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Full text of "English and shorthand dictionary, based on the original work of Sir Isaac Pitman, with lists of proper names, grammalogues and contractions, and an analytical introduction on the formation of shorthand outlines"



i 



PITMAN'S 

ENGUSH&SHOKfflAi 
DICTIONARY 






CENTENAR-V FJ: 



tt^ammBf'it^iio mm aia'tMatummMitmuiiiwitMttuuittTMimirmui t umr h 



j^lo^i ^>«> 



ENGLISH AND SHORTHAND 
DICTIONARY 



Ex Libris 

C. K. OGDEN" 

PITMAN'S 

ENGLISH AND SHORTHAND 
DICTIONARY 

BASED ON THE ORIGINAL WORK OF 
SIR ISAAC PITMAN 

WITH . LISTS OF PROPER NAMES, 
GRAMMALOGUES AND CONTRACTIONS, 
AND AN ANALYTICAL INTRODUCTION 
ON THE FORMATION OF SHORTHAND 
OUTLINES 

THE DEFINITIONS BY 

ARTHUR REYNOLDS, M.A., Oxon. 

CENTENARY EDITION 




^ 



LONDON 

SIR ISAAC PITMAN & SONS, LTD., t AMEN CORNER, E.C.4 

BATH: PHONETIC INSTITUTE 

MELBOURNE: THE RIALTO, COLLINS STREET 

NEW YORK: 2 WEST 45TH STREET 



TORONTO, CANADA 
The Commercial Text Book Co. 

OR 

The Copp, Clark Co., Ltd. 



Printed by Sir Isaac Pitman 

& Sons, Ltd., London, Bath, 

Melbourne and New York 



Re-f UNIVEP.r^^TY OF CALTFOR 

^ SANTA BARBARA 

'^'"^ PREFACE. 

IN response to a demand often expressed by users of the 
Shorthand Dictionary, it was decided to add to the words 
it contained their ordinary meanings, with occasional notes 
concerning their origins. It was, in fact, impossible to resist 
the argument that it is vastly more convenient to use one book 
of reference than to have to use two, and accordingly the task 
of making the dictionary complete and self-contained was 
attempted, and has, it is hoped, been accompUshed to the 
edification of those who may refer to it. 

In order to keep the volume within reasonable hmits, a great 
degree of economy had to be practised. Words have a tendency, 
the result of their handling sometimes by ordinary folk and 
sometimes by writers, to pass from their primary and obvious 
meanings to metaphorical senses. Only in a large and compre- 
hensive dictionary would it be possible to follow every word 
into a variety of usages, and here this has been done sparingly; 
for, given one or two of its meanings, anyone meeting a word 
in a connection different from its natural setting would at once 
perceive that metaphor had been at work upon it, and be able 
to see how it had acquired this further meaning. 

It is very tempting klso to trace words to their earliest dis- 
coverable source, but again that process would result in extending 
the bulk as well as the scope of the present book. Its purpose is 
to furnish the writer of shorthand with a ready means of finding 
the common and regular signification of each word the shorthand 
outline of which he requires to learn. What such a student 
needs for his purpose is the immediate and obvious rather than 
the recondite. 

Into the making of an English Dictionary Dr. Johnson intro- 
duced a delightful feature, the illustration of the meanings and 
usages of words by means of literary passages in which they occur. 
In a particular context, and especially when placed there by one 
of the makers of literature, a word is invested with a new life and 
power, and it needs the quotation for the lexicographer adequately " 
to convey the acquired meaning. To attempt this here was 
also out of the question, and the modest rdle assumed confines 
the /ambition of this Dictionary within the Umit of a desire to 
explain simply and usefully the words of the vocabulary. 

Subject, therefore, to these restrictions, the work is submitted 
to the pubUc of shorthand writers and students, in the hope 
and with the intention that it may be a real help to them. 

A. R. 



Digitized by tine Internet Arcliive 

in 2007 witli funding from 

IVIicrosoft Corporation 



littp://www.arcliive.org/details/englislisliortliandOOpitmiala 



CONTENTS. 



PREFACE ...... 

INTRODUCTION ..... 

INDEX TO INTRODUCTION . 
KEY TO ABBREVIATIONS USED 
SHORTHAND OUTLINES AND DEFINITIONS 
PROPER NAMES ..... 

GRAMMALOGUES, ALPHABETICAL LIST OF 
CONTRACTIONS, ALPHABETICAL LIST OF 



PAGE 
V 

ix 

xl 

xlvii 

1 

741 

778 

781 



Vii 



INTRODUCTION. 

THE object of the present work is to furnish standard forms for 
the words of the EngUsh language, written in accordance with the 
rules of Pitman's Shorthand (Centenary Edition). Every writer of 
the system is aware that the use of the many regularized abbreviating 
devices which results in brief and facile outUnes being obtained for the 
great majority of words without the help of any arbitrary abbrevia- 
tion, also involves, in many instances, a choice between two or more 
possible forms, and the Shorthand Dictionary provides those out- 
lines which experience has shown can be recommended for general 
adoption. Hence the importance and utility of the work as a book of 
reference for teachers, students, and practitioners. 

A considerable number of words have been added, including some new 
words ; while, on the other hand, many words now obsolete have 
been excluded. 

Every effort has been made to render the present edition of the 
Dictionary reliable and consistent in regard to pronunciation and the 
selection of the shorthand forms. There will, no doubt, be differences 
of opinion with regard to the outlines for certain words, since a form 
which is the most convenient to one writer is not invariably so to 
another writer. It is strongly recommended, however, that the 
closest possible adherence to Dictionary outlines be observed, since 
they have been decided upon as the result of experience and the most 
careful thought. No outline, therefore, should be rejected in favour 
of another until an attempt has been made to ascertain whether there 
is not some special reason for its adoption. It is obvious that uni- 
formity of outline is especially helpful in the case of writers who have 
to read or transcribe each other's notes. 



Changes as regards Pronunciation. 

With respect to pronunciation, this has been carefully checked 
throughout, A New English Dictionary, edited by Sir James A. H. 
Murray, LL.D., being taken as the authority in practically all cases, 
so far as that work is available. 

The principal changes, so far as vowel-sounds are concerned, consist 
of the substitution of — 

(a) ah for d in such words as bar, harm, embark. 

There are, of course, many words in which the vowel a before r has 

ix 



X INTRODUCTION 

a short sound; e.g., ' \; \ globular, \: n pillar. Compare 
[/'■ tarry (adjective) with l^' tarry (verb). 

(b) aw for ah in such words as tawnt, launch, saunter. 

(c) u for 6 when occurring medially in unaccented syllables ; e.g., 
in custom, mason, I^ondon, monopoly, gallop. 

A long vowel tends to become short when it is unaccented, and in 
some words, such as proclaim, biograph, the vowels o and u are 
practically indistinguishable. In others, however, e.g., flotation, 
nobility, the vowel is unmistakably o although unaccented. 

(d) e for a in such words as accurate, breakage, palace, chieftam, 
i.e., whenever the former represents the true pronunciation. 

Here again, the long vowel tends to become short when it is 

unaccented. Compare r lace with n/ palace. In some cases, 
however, including all verbs ending in -ate, the vowel a is long, 

although it may be unaccented. Compare <v^ moderate (adjective) 

with 1^ moderate (verb). 

(e) i for a in ^^i marriage, ■. — ^1 carriage, etc. 

(/) t for I in words ending in -ization, e.g., realization, capitalization. 

Preference is also given in the New English Dictionary to the 
pronunciation in in some further adjectives ending in -ine which were 
previously vocalized with i, e.g., Florentine, although generally both 
pronunciations are given. In most adjectives ending in -He, however, 
preference is given to t, although in these also both pronunciations 
are generally given. 

(g) wah for waw in French words containing oi, e.g., patois, boudoir. 

(A) The stroke g is written instead of k wherever the former represents 

the true pronunciation, as in ~| exist. 



Note. — In such words as ranch, French, inch, punch, with regard 
to which authorities differ, ch, which is believed to represent the 
more usual pronunciation, is retained. 

The pronunciation of French and other foreign words hcis been 
shown with greater precision than hitherto. 



SimplUications as regards Vocalization which do not involve the 
Alteration of any Rule in the Text-books. 

(1) Diphthong u between two Strokes. — The diphthong it 
when occurring between two strokes is now treated in the same 
way as a third-place vowel ; i.e., it is always written before 

the second of the two strokes ; thus, i (' Hercules, ( culinary, 

accurate. 

(2) Vocalization in Derivative Words. — A vowel in a derivative 



INTRODUCTION. Xl 

word, whether occurring in a (grammatical) prefix or suffix, such as 
re-, pre-, -able, -ance, or in the portion representing the root word, 
follows the ordinary rules as regards the stroke to which it is to be 
placed, and if it is immediately followed hy another vowel, a diphone 

is used ; thus, \ . prefigure, ^ measurable, ^i-^—'^^^unaccented, 

/ re-examine. 

Note.— This does not apply to Compound Words, or to words like 
A singer, /^\ wringer. 

(3) Third-place Vowel occurring on same side of Stroke 
AS shun Hook. — Any vowel- (or diphthongal-) sign other than a dot 

vowel is placed outside final shun hook ; thus Y\ delusion, \S fusion, 

/ Vo^ alleviation (but \^> vision). All third place signs are written 

inside medial shuyi hook ; thus, i_^ educational. 

(4) Vocalization of ng. — Outlines containing stroke ng, when used 
in the representation of the suffix -ing are now vocalized in the 
ordinary way, whether the vowel is a third-place vowel or otherwise ; 

thus, r laying, ^ — .^ gnawing. 

Changes Consequent upon Alteration of Text-book Rules. 

The principal changes arising from the simplification of existing 
rules and the introduction of new rules in the text-books are as 
follows — 

A. As regards Vocalization — 

(1) Second-place short vowels occurring between two strokes are 
now placed after the first stroke in the same way as second-place long 

vowels ; thus, r mental. 

(2) The diphthong l is always written in the first-place, and the 
diphthong ow in the third-place ; thus, V— time, v._p ounce, except 
in a few cases when joined, as in -— v nigh, — J^w ignite, tf owl ; 
also in words like /'\^ radii and 7'^ Ohio. 

(3) The diphthong u is now joined finally after — , — , ^-v, 
/^. or f (up), as /"^ rescue, \—^ argue, ^— > mew, /^ imbue, 
V/ value. 

(4) The form of the diphthong oi has 43een slightly modified, thus, 
■^ instead of "^ , in order to differentiate this sign from those of the 

series, now known as " diphones," which always represent two 
separately -sounded vowels. 

(5) The sign l has been discarded, except as the logogram for 
why ; hence the outlines <^ wife, <^ wide, c( white. 



Xll INTRODUCTION 

(6) " Triphones " (formed by the addition of a small tick to the 
diphthong-sign) are now used to represent a diphthong followed by 
any short vowel ; thus, V dial, ^ royal, y trowel, Y~ dual. 

Note. — A triphone takes the position of its diphthong. 

(7) The small shun hook after a circle is not vocalized when a second- 
place vowel precedes, a third-place vowel now being written outside 
the hook ; thus, <j' cessation, t decision. 

(8) The small circle used to represent a vowel occurring between 
the two consonants expressed by a hooked form of the pr, pi series 
is now, except in a few instances, written after the double consonant ; 
thus, Ut^ atmosphere : and when the vowel B occurs between the 
two consonants represented by the hooked form, it is not expressed 
even if it is accented ; thus, l^--^_p terminus. 

(9) joined to downward / in the proper names /^ William, 

L-^ Wilkins, etc., is now taken to represent wi. 

(10) The signs of the ah-i series, now known as " diphones," are used 
to represent any two consecutive vowels, without regard to accentua- 
tion ; thus, w real, / ' " reality, ''^sr-v* museum, c^ — ^.^-—^ cranium, 
Kj folio, /^ re-echo. 

B. As r^ards Outlines — ■ 

(1) In writing n s m the circle s is now placed inside the m in the 
following cases — 

(a) In DERIVATIVES and compounds from words in which the circle 
is written inside the m ; e.g., vLo— y unseemly, vix<j~> unsummoned, 
L_y-^ tinsmith (compare ^-^t^^ newsmonger) ; also in the word 
■ v_jcj— -~_^ insomnia. 

(6) In words containing the syllable -some, e.g., y-<s~^ noisome, 
N-oN handsome. 

Note. — It will be found that, with only two or three exceptions, e.g., 
' — -J^-j mincemeat, Norseman, and «5+j>cs nursemaid, the form 

^—er-N is used for n s m and the form n,.j>-n for n z m, most of the 
examples of the latter being words ending in -ism, e.g., O?-^ communism, 
^v.^,jt-v galvanism. 

(2) \ is now used, instead of n^, as under — 



INTRODUCTION xlfi 

(a) When not joined to another stroke, if there is no preceding 
vowel, as A flow, \ fleece, ^ flat, ^ flaunt, ^^\ Flanders. 

(b) In derivatives and compounds from the words referred to in 
(a), provided a convenient outline is so obtained, as V fleecer, 
'\^ flaunting, ^-\^ flyer, \] fluttered, ^ flatly. 

(c) Before — — ^-^ ^^ -^^ / as in Y flake, \_ flog, 

^--^ flame, \/ flurry, \ Fletcher. 

Note. — Subject to the above, preference is still given to the 
" left " form V_ ; thus, n-i^-^ flicker, ^ flavour, ^ flail, V_y flesh, 
V. flabby. 

(3) Shr is now written upward when following /, v, n or ng, as in 
S^y fissure, /: S=/ lavisher, \^j<y extinguisher. 

(4) Stroke n-s is used in all cases for final -nee or -nse (= ms) after 
a curve ; thus, vb silence, /-vf. ambulance. 

(5) A few words ending in -uation in which there would be some 
difficulty in writing separate sh hooked for n are now written with the 

shun hook (the diphthong and vowel being omitted) ; e.g. , \^ punctuation, 
fluctuation. 

(6) The forms ) and ) are used only in such words as )• Hesse, 

y hazy, in which the s or « is followed by a final vowel ; hiss, haze, 
haziness, hasten, hasty, etc., are, therefore, written with upward stroke 

h; thus, d^' <f^ /~^ /^ erf 

(7) The use of tick h before / is discontinued ; hence <y) heather, 
a-l^ hitherto. 

(8) Initial r is written downward before m or mp ; thus, ^r^. remit, 
remittance, V-s romp. 

(9) Upward / is used instead of the downward in such words as 

K trial, y" dual, r toivel, the diphthong and vowel now being 
represented by one sign. See No. A (6) above. 

(10) A stroke having a finally-joined diphthong may be halved for 
t or d : thus, ^ proud, Va bout. 

Note. — This nile does not hold good where it is necessary to have 
a distinction, as in V Bude, but >| Bute. Par. 141 (c) in the 
Instructor should be borne in mind in this connection. 



XlV INTRODUCTION 

(11) In addition to the words \ : picture, bv,..j_^ adventure, 

etc., in which -ture was previously expressed by doubling, other 
common words ending in -ture axe now written with double-length 
strokes, provided the resulting outlines are not such as would be con- 
fused with those of words ending in -tor : thus l. structure, 

\ fracture, ^~_^ nature. 

(12) F, sh, m and n may now be doubled to express the addition of 
tr, dr or thr without any restriction, except in proper names ; thus, 

^* — fodder, — '\ shudder, < — x madder, ^ -j kneader. 

{V3) A straight stroke may now be doubled to add tr or dr when it 
has an initial circle, as in >. sceptre, scatter, or a finally- 

joined diphthong, as in \ prouder, | tutor. 

(14) rf-v and s^ may be doubled to express the addition of -r ; 
thus, ^ slumberer, f lingerer. 

(15) Stroke <^ is now used whenever convenient in words begin- 
ning with the sound of « ; thus, <^ ^ Europe, oXi utilize, 

^ ' eulogy, 6^ unique. 

(16) The sign ^ is used in words beginning with wor- followed 
by m, i.e., in v— > warm, \^ warmth, etc, 

(17) Stroke ^ is used instead of dot -ing after — , — , /» 
v_ . v_ and ^ ; thus, ^-r> — .^ making, I . . digging, ^'X^ raging, 
C V»_> laughing, ^i v^ solving, v"^"^ halting. 

(18) Disjoined I is used to represent the termination -lousness 
as well as -lessness : thus, \/i perilousness, h/° sedulousness. 

(19) Disjoined / is used to represent the terminations -logical 
and -logically : thus, '1-7-^/ etymological-ly , \ — ^_^/ terminological. 

(20) The disjoined circle used to represent the suffix -self is dis- 
continued, and oneself is now included in the list of Contractions. 

(21) With reference to paragraph 188 (1) of the Instructor, n is now 
omitted — 

(a) In words ending in -gency (except 0\ agency) ; thus, 

pungency : and 



INTRODUCTION XV 

(b) In a further few words ending in -nger ; viz., \^ harbinger, 

~~K exchanger, / ginger, in addition to those given in the Lists of 
Contractions (U danger, \ stranger, ^ passenger and / messenger). 

Other Changes* Outlines Harmonized. 

With respect to other alterations in outlines, many groups of more 
or less similar words have been considered with a view to their being 
treated uniformly so far as is practicable, and various changes have 
been necessary in order to bring the outlines of such words into 
harmony. The following classes of words are mentioned for the purpose 
of furnishing an explanation of some of the changes referred to, and at 
the same time showing the general practice which has been followed 
in each class of words. 

S, Z (Circle and Stroke). 

(1) Words ending in -nese and -nize, most of which are Derivatives, 
are written with stroke n and circle s (z) whenever convenient ; thus, 

/ Japanese, -.^r-y^' v Americanize, a-<Lp humanize. 

(2) Words ending in -nism are written with v^j>-^ unless a better 
outline is obtained by writing hook n and X^ The latter is found 
to be the more convenient form after \ \ — [but not <= — or 
( J — ^^ o^ ^—^ I \ Examples : \/.L_>-^ Puritanism, 
^ •LiSr~~^ religionism : but <^lr Utopianism, ^^Anglicanism, 
\— 3 paganism. .|_^ 

(3) Words ending in -ess. All words (feminines) ending in -ess 
cannot conveniently be treated uniformly, but the following shows 
the practice which has been followed — 

(a) In words ending with the syllable -ess, stroke s is used if neces- 
sary for the purpose of distinguishing the feminine singular from the 
masculine plural when no other means of distinction is available ; 

thus, ^ poetess, {\ poets), \ heiress ( d heirs). 



ip) With regard to those words ending in -eress, -oress, -dess, -n(t)ess 
or -fess in which alternative methods of distinction are available, 

stroke s is used after //111 <= — — r^a -= ^* or / ; thus, 



\\ archeress, '/manageress, k tutoress, [-murderess, ^^=-=-\ 



mcaress. 



INTRODUCTION 



1—3 deaconess, ) countess, ^ championess, k chiefess : but in other 

7 y IV '/ /vN 

cases the circle is written, e.g., ^~^ viscountess, C, giantess. 
/vv ' lioness, NA^ baroness, /y^ mayoress. 

(c) In words ending in -ress immediately preceded by a consonant, 
the final s sound is always represented by the circle ; thus, t actress, 
t^h waitress. 

(4) Words ending in -zoon are written with stroke z : thus, 
^.epizoon, V -c)^ polyzoon (plural \/ ./'' polyzoa) ; but adjectives 
ending in -zoic have the circle ; thus, V paleozoic, \_ protozoic. 

(5) Derivatives from words with outlines containing stroke s. 
(See also paragraph 70 (a) of the Instructor and No. (2) below.) 

Derivatives formed by adding a suffix beginning with a vowel to a 
primitive word ending with s or ^ and a vowel retain stroke s or z ; 
thus, <^ cosier, ' 1 lazier, X/^ pursuance, [ Sadducean, 
\ Puseytsm, I g^ laziest, \ busiest. 

Compare — (a) Secondary derivatives, such as \ spiciest, d sauciest, 
c— 6 glossier, the primitives of which axe written with circle s ; and 

{p) Derivatives in which the suffix does not commence with a vowel ; 
e.g.. \tj> drowsiness, ^ , ensued, \^ busily. 

S (Stroke and Circle) ; ST ([ and Loop). 

(1) Initial s or st followed by a diphone is written as follows — 

(a) With stroke s or f in derivatives such as 1 sower, 1 seer, 
[!: stayer, r stowage. ^ 

(6) With the circle or loop in other words, such as ''x sahib, 
9^ stance, ci^f. sienna, =^ stoic, <^ Styrian. 

Initial s or st followed by a triphone is written with stroke s or f ; 
thus, ]_^ Siam, ) suet, [jr Stuart, L steward, y~ Stowell. 

(2) While words ending in -ous preceded by a diphthong are written 
with stroke s in accordance with paragraph 70 (d) of the Instructor, 
their derivatives ending in -uously, -uousness and -uosity are generally 

written with the circle ; thus \_fi strenuously, v/^ ] voluptuousness, 
n. K Kfi 



1 



impetuosity. 



INTRODUCTION 



The following, however, are cases in which the stroke is retained for 
the purpose of distinction — ^^ pioiisly, (^joyously, / joyousness, 

ingenuously, fi^ ingenuousness, l^^ tenuously, 

tenuousness, J sinuosity. 
(2a) In other words containing s, z or st preceded by a triphone 
or by a diphone, the circle or loop is used ; e.g., >o bias, x. biased, 
V^ quiesce, '^^—f. acquiesce, Q_p Genoese, <?* essayist, h^ truest, l)^ deist, 
C Judaism, j^ statuesque. The following are exceptions to this — 

\ prowess, r dais, ) chaos, ^~^ newest, {^-^ next). 
M ') 

(3) Words ending in -astic or -istic are written as follows — 

(a) With st loop after t, d, j or / ; thus, '^(ST" artistic, BT"' deisiic, 
it- logistic, ( elastic. 

(6) With I in other cases ; thus, t>«' theistic, r^' sophistic. 

(4) I is retained in derivatives from words with outlines con- 
taining I , except the monosyllabic past tenses *( stayed, J stewed, etc. ; 
thus, R stowage, b" dustiness, </ majestic. 

ST (Loop and ) ST). 

Words ending in -nest, -nist ; -jest, -vest, -vist ; -test, -tist, -dest, 
etc., are written with the st loop unless a distinctly better outline 

is obtained by means of the stroke ; thus, - — ^ keenest, e— O greenest, 

\ — ^ organist, \ briefest, \ bravest, V,_- faintest, ^-^^ fondest, 

y b artist, but y plainest, w toughest, V kindest, ) hardest. 

SST ( 9 . } AND P ). 

Words ending in -cest, -cist and -sest are generally written with 
^ ; thus, ^--s fiercest, X ^ publicist ; but } is more convenient 

after -^-^ n or ^-^ r, as in ^ S nicest, ,></•<). empiricist ; and \ is 
used in s^ biblicist. Y is also used in verbs ending in -sist, e.g., 
Xs subsist, p desist. 
•— (I7«) 



Xviii INTRODUCTION 

SS, SZ (Large Circle, ) ) and j). 

(1) Words ending in -sis and -sus axe written with the large circle ; 
thus, Ng basis, ° Q narcissus. 

(2) Words ending with the sound of sSs or zes, or with s - — sepa- 
rated by a diphthong or a diphone (including words ending in -cess, 
-cize and -size), are generally written with ^ or j ; thus, V access, 

\ capsize, i^ gaseous ; but after (, > v^_^ or .^^, J aftords a 
better joining, e.g., ' L Gothicize, \_^ princess, ^^^J. recess, 
-^d exorcize. The common words olD success, ^tt exercise and 

^ emphasize, are, however, written with the large circle. 

(3) Words ending in -cism are generally written with the large 
circle ; thus, ^:^--i fanaticism, . i Gallicism ; but after \ th, > n 

or -^ r J-^ gives more convenient and distinctive outlines ; thus, 
( Gothicism, J~^ cynicism, C ' -dh^ laconicism, _u^^ exorcism, 
""^ K-<)^ Doricism. 

Hooked Stroke and Separate R or L. 

(1) Words ending in -metry and -metric are written with separate r 
whenever practicable ; thus, 1^4/ geometry, v-v/^ barometric, 
but V,^ planimetry. 

(2) Words ending in -able or -ible are generally written with the 

hooked stroke N ; thus, '^. obtainable, ^ measurable. The 

separate strokes N/ , however, are used when a better outline is 
thus obtained ; e.g. — 

(a) After — o> _d> •-—!>> ^ or after a circle following a "right " 
curve (but not after Vo or vd ) ; thus, "\j excusable, 

^"^-vjQ^ invincible, ^^^^t/ reversible, ^^ ^ forcible (but 

Va feasitfle). 



INTRODUCTION 



(6) After |\ or / ; thus, ov^ contestable, J digestible. 

(c) After >> I or a dovmstroke hooked for v : thus, 
Si^ explainable, a< discernible, ^\/^ provable. 

(d) After a half-length stroke hooked for n ; thus, \^^ accountable, 
C >< lamentable. 

{e) After a shun hook ; thus, x/^ actionable (but •t-._:2\ men- 

tionable) . 

(3) Words ending in -tal or -dal preceded by --^ r axe written 
with separate I : thus, %^K parietal, V/Zf spheroidal. Coni- 
pare the verbs <\ rattle, ^ \ riddle. A number of words ending in 
-tal preceded by n are also written with separate / ; e.g., y^ mental, 
<iCi horizontal. Compare the verb 1 mantle. 

(4) Words ending in -/u/ and -jully are written with separate / in 
cases where a distinction between the adjective and the adverb can 
easily be shown by means of the downward and the upward / respec- 
tively ; e.g., after — , — , ^ — ■, >w, upward / or a straight upstroke ; 

thus, V_ wakeful, \/ wakefully, y manful, n V lawful. 



^ 



sorrowful. In other words, including verbs, fl and vl occurring after 
the strokes mentioned above are represented by the hooked forms 
\ > ; thus, ' 1 scuffle, Z"*"^ A level, /\r ^ upheaval. 

(5) Words ending in -ively preceded by '^~o, "-t or ■ are written 
with ) ; thus, A. massively, yt \ delusively. 

(6) Words beginning with unr-, enr-, unl-, enl-. Words formed by 
a prefix from words beginning with r or / retain the separate r or / ; 

thus, vj/^ unrest, -~i,y^^^^ unreasoning, vj_X unleavened. 

6. enlist. 

(7) Words ending in -ary, -ery, -ory, etc., are treated as follows — 

(a) The hooked strokes are used when they give a more easily written 
outline than the sej^arate r: thus, k drapery. x^~^ rookery, 

treasury. 

(b) The hooked strokes are retained in adjectives derived from 

words written with a final hooked stroke, such as k tottery, £ \ silvery, 

i '• 

*>- savoury. 



) 



JtX INTRODUCTION 

•p 

(c) In other cases the separate r or / is written ; thus, statutory, 

VI' /• "1^' 

]/ notary. 

(8) Derivatives ending in -ally and -alize from words written 
with a final hooked stroke retain the hooked form ; thus, *^ brutally, 
%, brutalize, r'' locally. 

(9) Derivatives from words written with hooked forms of the 
•pr, pi series are generally also written with the hooked forms if practic- 
able, even if the r or / is no longer in the same syllable as the preceding 

consonant ; thus, J , tippler, *^-<> trampling, J" doubly. Compare 

such words as .V^^ seedling, \~ (^~^ duckling, which are not so 
derived. 

(10) In Compound Words, when the second part of the compound 
begins with r or I, that r or / is not combined with the last letter 

of the first part ; hence, T y^ typewriter, T typewritten, 

\_/'' » bricklayer, v_, — >' necklace. 

(11) In the case of verbs the hooked forms are generally preferred 
so as to enable past tenses to be written on the same principle ; thus, 

I* bridle, \ bridled (compare ''^ bridal), * | model, ' ^ modelled. 

Duplicate Forms. — Cases where Joined to Another Stroke. 

(1) In Derivatives and Compounds from words written with 

^ ^ V. 1. etc., the form of fr, ft, vr or vl used in the primitive 
should, when convenient, also be used in the derivative or compound, 
without regard to the practice adopted in other words ; thus, 

\_p freeness (compare 'V.^p furnace), ^--~. offerer (compare 
\^ friar), ^\^ flyer (compare ^--^ flower), \N\ hop-fly (compare 

<^^^ hopeful). 
Subject to the above: — 

(2) The " left " curves v_ V. are used if more convenient for 
joining than the " right " curves, as in J ~ tougher, '\j leverage, 

V. effervesce, °^s survivor. V. froth, v, usufruct, ^~v^ friable. 



N- freckle, ^^^ — frank. 



France. 



INTRODUCTION ^^d 

(3) In other cases the " right " curves \ A are generally used, 
as V' verbose, \ — ■■ Africa, j fresh, V-^ frame. 

(4) As regards thr and THr, ( ( are used initally when preceded 
by a vowel (i.e., as when standing alone) ; thus, V> Atherston, 
\f Atherley, \^ otherwise. 

(5) In other cases the " right " curves / / are used, as / thread, 
) thrive, \J thrash, J throttle, K tether, X zither, \ Arthur. 

(6) Preference is given to the " left " curves V_ v. ; thus, 
V. flabby, Vq flask, V_y flash, ^^ baffle, ^A shovel, 

V_ muffle. 

(7) The " left " curve (. is used initially, and the " right " curve 
) after ' another stroke; thus, S athletic, \/\ Ethelred, v\ Bethel, 

CT^ bismuthal. 

N (Stroke and Hook). 

(1) Words ending in -nian are generally written with the hook for 
the final n, even in the case of derivatives from words with outlines 
ending with hook n ; thus, .IVj. Etonian, -^--J C^ Hamiltonian, but 
note ^^ Gladstonian, TL* Augustinian, t>_i» Athenian, 

(2) Words ending in -n nt are generally written with hook n finally ; 
thus, V anent, 2S> assonant, lai? dissonant. Final -n nt preceded by 
p, stroke / or v, or m is, however, written with stroke nt finally ; thus, 
\y pennant, Ji, tenant, V4>J> convenient, I— ^^.j^-' dominant, as are also 
the words 'slys^ consonant and jaj.^^ sonant. 

(3) Words ending in -t n or -d n are generally written with the 
hook for the final « ; thus, ^ fatten, (/.]■ wheaten, p abandon. 

(4) The final n is, however, represented by the stroke in the following 
cases — 

(a) Words ending in -rt n or -; st n, e.g.,\/<-^ Spartan, f~>''^~> martin, 

ff-^ congestion. Compare \<J puritan, \^" baritone. 



INTRODUCTION 



(6) Most words ending in -ntine, e.g., "t turpentine, and also — 

(c) The words ^^.j-^ fountain, ^,^1^ mountain, ^-^ plantain, 
\J> pontoon, and '^;^^ bounden. 

N Preceded by Two Vowel-Sounds. 

Stroke n is used — (a) After a Triphone consisting of « and a vowel ; 

thus, c>-^ genuine, {j^ constituent, \/lsf pursuant. Compare /V\ lion, 

^ client, >) compliance, ^ fcMoyawcy, in which the « is preceded by 
other triphones. 1 

(fe) After two separate vowel-signs ; thus, Ljj triune. 

(c) In the words V-vn pioneer, L> giawi, '^^_-, buoyant, <f heroine, 

^^ ruin, and several words ending in fluent, e.g., V^^ fluent. 



mellifluent. Compare other words in which n occurs after a 
diphone, e.g., =2= crayon, —^ cayenne, i^J^ hygiene. 

Medial N. 

(1) In the absence of any special reason to the contrary, stioke n 
is used between p, b, t, d, ch or / and full-length t ox d ; thus, 
\^y|^ pantaloon, vJl bountiful, L_^yo tantalize, lL-i>- dental, 

'li^.. legendary. 

(2) But the hook is used between the same strokes and half-length 
t or d, unless the n is followed by a vowel ; thus, ^ painted, 

J daunted, J enchanted, J jointed, but ^-r:] penitent, 
"^•'^O, originated. 

(3) Hook n is used between --^ r and ^--' n in such words as 
v^ ■ barrenness, <^ • modernness, but stroke n is more convenient 

between o^ sf or c^ w and -^-^ « ; thus, 0/ sereneness, 

(T^ ' oneness. SimiUarly -^^^ roundness, but c/'^'''^ windiness. 

(4) Stroke n is generally retained in derivatives from words 
written with the stroke, other than those ending in -ic or -cy ; 
thus, ^v^^ funnier, Vik^ puniness ; but ^ >=— ^ euphonic, 
^o Vi" subservieru^y. 



INTRODUCTION yrfH 

Medial NS. 

(5) Stroke « is used medially before s or f, unless the hook is 
clearly more convenient; thus, </• r Wednesday, c/^^^ wainscot, 

A^^jy^ caravansary, but ./^^~^ ransom, A lonesome, ^^ Ironside. 

(6) Two hooks together are generally avoided ; hence v-^ plunger, 

A I ranger. They are, however, allowed in the words 1- kindred, 
/ manger, and one or two uncommon words, as well as certain 
compound words. 

(7) In Compound words hook n is often retained medially, even 
where it would be avoided in other words ; e.g., 'V-^ open-mouthed, 

Y--> penman, ^r>-^ mainmast, X n/ rainproof, ^t-r earthenware. 

F, V (Hook and Stroke). 

(1) Words ending in -tive (other than those which are contracted) 
are generally written with \, ; thus, y^\ receptive, 'k. inventive. 
Exceptions to the above are '' ^ captive, ^ plaintive, and such 
words as H- attentive and J digestive. 

(2) The stroke is used for / or t; occurring between p ox b (without 
an initial attachment) and t ov d ; thus, \, pivot, ^^^ buffet. After 

N or N , however, the hook is more convenient ; thus, \ private, 
N brevity. 

(3) Hook / or « is used between t, d or ch and t or dia derivatives 
as well as other words ; thus, ^\i sanctified, u Cheviot. Note — - 
L defied, \^ edified, L deified, for distinction. 

The Aspirate. 

(1) Tick h attached to half-length stroke st, is used in the following 
words — )X' history, V^ histrionic, l^htistings, \j? Hastings. 

(2) Downward h is used in a few cases to create a clear distinction 
of outline, as /^ heritor ( ■h'^a inheritor), /L^ heritable 



INTRODUCTION 



(3-*^^ inheritable), or to provide a more easily written form, as 

«r heritage. 

(3) Words beginning with hetero- axe written with ^ except 
before — ^-^ or 1 , when | is more convenient ; thus 

?>X_4. heterogeneous, XI n heterodox ; but "I ^ heterogamous, 

•l^.yVo heteromorphous, Y^l. heterology. 

(4) Compound words ending in -house are written as under — 
(a) With <r if convenient for joining, i.e., after />, 6, /, d, f or a 

straight upstroke ; thus, tyP chop-house, ^\j club-house, 
\i gate-house, vj^ coffee-house, c^i^ warehouse, <£f hothouse. 

, (6) With / after k, g, m or I ; thus, l_j) workhouse, (^ l^ loghouse, 
^£^ summer-house, CZ^ alehouse. 

(c) With stroke s when neither cT^ nor / will join well, i.e., 
after s, sA, n, ng, # circle or a hook ; also after ch, in which case 
stroke s is particularly facile ; thus, .jj alms-house, } ice-house, 
Y wash-house, \ pigeon-house, / coach-house. 

Upward and Downward R and L. 

(1) Words beginning with st {vowel) r followed by stroke n 
have upward r ; thus, .</ ' consternation, <^c\j sternutation, 
^^~X^^^' Stornoway. 

(2) Final r is written upward (among other cases) after kr, gr or Ik ; 



thus, c — ^ cn'cr, c:; — grower, (^ luckier : but downward after 5* 

or fk : thus, o N| obscure, V — fakir. 

(3) Final r in compounds, as in other words, is written 
upward after two downstrokes ; thus, I r, f> tax-gatherer, 
<^« shooting-star. 

(4) In words ending in -rest, -rist, -lest or -list the r or / is written 
upward or downward as when followed by a final vowel ; thus, 
Ny/^ barest, \^ fairest, \f fullest, 4 annalist. 



INTRODUCTION 



(5) Medial r is nearly always written downward before m : thus, 

\ barium, 'X-t emporium, ^—^ forum. After th, however, 
it is written upward ; thus, U<^ theorem. 

(6) Medial r is also written downward in most derivatives from 
words written with downward r ; thus, J declarable, /Si powerful. 



-^^''"' barely, ^^ h furrier, ^y maturely : but in words ending 
in -rial, -ral or -rhal upward r is used ; thus, »T^ armorial, 
/-jrvf mayoral, \/\ catarrhal. 

(7) Final' / after \ \ or t~ is written as after a ; thus, 

^jrr egotistical, (- methodistical, (*fl; / logistical. 

(8) L occurring finally, or with only a circle or loop following, is 
written downward after a half-length or double-length stroke if a more 
convenient outline is so obtained ; thus, '5^. completely, ^Z" shiftless, 
^v vividly, y^ wildly. \ — -^ pectoral. 

(9) Final / is written downward in compounds of words written 
with upward / if the upward form would be quite inconvenient for 

joining, as in ./ sand-eel, O train-oil, but the upward form is 

retained if at all practicable, as in \J port-hole, L i stock-list. 

(10) Medial I is written upward in > " biliousness and 
^ ' superciliousness, but downward in words ending in -lescence or 
-lescent ; e.g., y- opalescence, ^ coalescent. It is also written upward 

before <s~n whenever practicable ; thus, / realism, /-^^/ 
imperialism, but /-^ sensationalism, J^ naturalism. 

Upward and Downward SH. 

(1) Final sh is written downward after t or st : thus. ' j latish, 
I coquettish, 1 moustache. Exception — > „ brutish. 

(2) Final sh s is written upward after t, but downward after st; 
thus, ^-^ — j .„ fictitious, but '¥ superstitious. 



XXvl INTRODUCTION 

(3) The words \y mopish and " \y tnobbish are written with 
upward sh on the same principle as V/ brush. 

(4) Final sh after I is written downward, except in verbs in which 
the / is preceded by another consonant ; thus, ^ J milifiu, ^l J palish, 
(•_J lash, but \/' polish, C slash. 

(5) Final sh s is written downward after I ; thus r^\ delicious, 
btj' silicious. 

Compound Consonants. 

(1) Wl and whl in derivatives. 

(a) The compound consonant u or C is retained in the deriva- 
tives (past tenses, etc.), o I wailed, 'C^ I wallowed, (j \ wheeled, etc. 
(fc) Primitive words containing the consonants wld are written 

with t-^^ ; thus, o^ wild, <y^ weld, c/^ weald : although in some 
derivatives from these words the compound consonant is again 

employed, e.g., mC wilder, vo t wildest, L welded, u d wealden. 

(2) iff. The compound consonant A is not used after ; / ; hence 
cellarer. 




(3) Kw and mp, mb in Compound words. A consonant at the 
end of the first part of a compound word is not combined with a 
consonant beginning the second part ; hence b^V_^ silk-worm, 
dumb-bell, l'-^ tomboy. An exception to this is the word 

lukewarm. 
Halving Principle. 

(1) A stroke is not halved when a better outline is obtained bj 
means of the full t or d; thus, Ql . flotilla, r7 indulge, \^ integer 

{^^ interior. 

(2) Words ending in -tatory, -datory, -ditary, etc., are treated as 
follows — 

(a) In the case of the termination -tatory the last / is generally 
written in full ; thus, XF rotatory, ~\, excitatory, b j saltatory 



INTRODUCTION XXVii 

(6) When the termination is -datory, the halving principle is generally 
applied; thus, d^ hereditary, ^C consolidatory . 

(3) Words ending in -lively following stroke t or tr are written with 
full t : thus, vl authoritatively, n illustratively. 



(4) Words ending in -ctary, -ctory, -catory, -gatory, -ctarian, etc., 

are generally written with full / ; thus, t_i directory, 1 Tractarian. 

A better outline, however, is obtained by halving in such words as 



secretary, ,q-~rr mxgratory. 

(5) Words ending in -taceous, -titious and -dacious are written with 
full t or d ; thus, |x cretaceous, L*-< mendacious. 

(6) The more common words ending in -pid are written with half- 
length p : thus, l^ tepid, ^— ^ insipid ; but 

(7) Words ending in -pade, -ped, -pede or -pod are generally written 
with full d ; thus, i_^^^ escapade, \ centipede, l^ tripod. 

(8) Words ending in k (vowel) d are generally written with full d; 
thus, V-j arcade, ' \ naked, L — decoyed ; but half-length k is 

used in a few words of more than two syllables, e.g., \/ barricade, 
V cavalcade, and in the word /''^ rescued. 

(9) Words ending in ^ (vowel) /, however, are generally written 
with half-length g ; thus, V Mg<ite, L target, ^^r nugget (but 

' I iMg'Of, for distinction). 

(10) Stroke < or i is retained when convenient in the following 
classes of derivatives, viz. — 

(a) Words derived, either directly or indirectly, from primitive words 
with outlines containing stroke t or d and not more than one other 
stroke consonant ; e.g., ^ pitiful, > becloud, S:^:}. overrate. 



; e.g., J pitiful, > 



The following are exceptional — V beautify, \n beautiful, 
/^"^ written, ^^-^ writing. 

(6) Certain secondary derivatives from primary derivatives wTitten 
with stroke t or d, in which the stroke is retained for the purpose of 



INTRODUCTION 



distinction ; e.g., <^Vj> weightiness, \js greediness, ) >; heartily, 
nv Y 

^ flightiness. 

(c) In words ending in -tieth, in order to prevent the possibility of 
confusion between ^^^^ seventieth and ^^-^-i seventh, ^v fiftieth 
and ^x_^ fifth, etc, / / 

(11) In COMPOUNDS of words with outlines ending in stroke < or d 
that t ot d is generally expressed by halving ; thus, X^j" copyright, 

^ — sjr backbite, K ice-boat, ~^^ cow-hide, ~Tf- go-ahead, NX^ brush- 
wood. Stroke t or d is, however, retained after one half-length stroke, 
as in ^ tit-bit, \ catboat, and also in a few other cases in which 
the full t or d gives a more distinct outline, e.g., /^ A rosewood, 
r\ jolly-boat. 

(12) In COMPOUNDS of words commencing with t or d, that t or d 
is not expressed by halving ; thus, U-, time-table, ^ grave- 



digger, ' ^1 quarter-deck. Exceptions — cr-i^ sometimes and 
N>^ beforetime. 

(13) Final // is written downward after v_i> ; thus, ^^ insult, 
* ^ cancellate, <o^ Hunslet. 

(14) With regard to final rd. the forms ^^veered, \ persevered, 

etc., are adopted because, although not strictly in accordance with 
the rule, they are quite distinct and more convenient than the 
possible alternatives v/'. ^., etc. On the other hand, in such 
words as geared, __^ is a better form than ^, wliidi latter would 
become indistinct in practice. 

(15) The upward r is only used finally for Id in words ending in 
■led Sitter \ \ ) or T. e.g., ^— y- furled, "^ frilled, j-" thrilled, 

\r belittled, and in the word r-^ scheduled; it is also used medially in 
<->^ mildly and -^-^^^^ mildness. In other cases the separate / I 
is written if r is not convenient ; thus, f\ assailed, ^ I muzzled, 
tf^ • household. 



INTRODUCTION XXix 

Doubling Principle. 

(1) The doubling principle is not applied in words ending in- lateral 
and -literal, double-length / being used only in words in which it 

occurs finally and in words derived from these ; thus, C r laten 
(compare C latterly), \/' ' pluriliteral, X t poulterer 

(compare ^ slaughterer), ri. liturgy (compare (^ ' lighterage). 

(2) When the vowel in the termination tor is sounded distinctly, 
as in the legal terms '^ grantor, VjjT vendor, r— "^^^ guarantor, 
the doubling principle is not applied. 

(3) The doubling principle is applied in a few cases although there 
is a strongly-sounded vowel between t and r : e.g., ^ — < material, 
Vi^' — '■ enteric, \t__;_^ — ; dysenteric, L^^^ tartaric. 

(4) The doubling principle is also applied in the following cases, 
notwithstanding that there is no vowel between the t or d and the r — 



(a) Several words containing central, centri- or -centric, e.g., 7 central, 
■(j_^_^ — = concentric, -^-"^^-i-x^ — '■ eccentric, \- r> centrifugal. 

(b) i theatrical, 6 cylindric. 

(5) Words ending in -erate or -orate, although derived from words 
written with a double-length stroke, are written by means of the halving 
principle (i.e., in the same way as past tenses such as "^ centred) ; 
thus, i—^. directorate, y^'' stadtholderate. 

(6) The doubling principle is not applied when tr is preceded by a 
diphthong and a long vowel ; thus, t_/i extenuator, n— i punctuator. 
Compare x^ proprietor, ^\ radiator. '\ 

(7) Joining of Strokes of Unequal Length. Paragraph 14(5 of the 
Instructor applies to double-length as well as hail-length strokes. 
Double-length n, however, is sufficiently distinct after t or downward / / 
thus, L detonator, C. > alienator. 

(8) Double-length I is written upward", except after ng, ns or sk ; 
thus, Vy filter, \i\ beholder, __/ gilder, but '/^ ringleader. 
Y insulter, "F' scolder, { f helter-skelter. 



XXX INTRODUCTION 

(9) Double-length strokes may be used in such compound words 



as the following — ^~v backbiter, L — ^ — chaff-cutter, ^ muzzle- 
loader. \ 

Vocalization of Double Consonants. 

(1) Medial r preceded by a strongly-sounded vowel is generally 
represented by separate r unless a hooked form is necessary in order 

to avoid an awkward or a too lengthy outline ; thus /-''^ ulterior, 
^ internal, '^\/f fraternal. 

(2) Words ending in -torial are generally written with separate r, 
but the hooked form is used in a few cases to avoid an awkward or 
a very lengthy outUne ; thus, I y- tutorial, [^ equatorial, 

q—\,y piscatorial, but /^\/y' reportorial, \_n <. spectatorial , 



•v 



dictatorial. 



(3) Words ending in -tarium, -torium, etc., are generally written with 
the hooked tr; thus, ' l^-,^ cometarium, <r^'t-~i moratorium, 

y auditorium. 

(4) Words ending in -chord are written with half-length kr ; thus, 
Ij. tetrachord, o-^-^ monochord. 

(5) Words ending in -jorm are written with the hooked form, ^ 
or \ , after | I / v / ^ ^~^ ^~^ or / ; thus, A. i stalacti- 

form, v^ spongiform, J aciform, \t>v curvi/orm, 

V— ^s. vermiform. In other cases separate r is used ; thus, 

napiform, ^p-n. cuneiform, yr^^^^ metalliform, 

variform. 

(6) The following words ending in -culate or -gulate are wiitten with 
half-length hi ox gl, f— c_n calculate, t^-" speculate, </' gesticulate, 

/ J^„ reticulate, •/'^ articulate, c/^ circulate, ^-^/^ matriculate, 
.;y-<^n coagulate, /^ regulate. 




INTRODUCTION XXXi 

(7) The prefix for- is represented by V. or, when this is inconvenient, 
by ^ ; thus, Vo.!. forsake, "X? / forbear, but ^-r-i forget. This does 
not apply to the prefix fore-, which should be written with separate 
r (downward in preference) when convenient ; thus ^-~^ forecast, 

\/ ' forenoon, ^-^ foresight (compare V^ ferocity) ; otherwise the 



hooked form is used ; thus, V^ foretell, <Jf foreshorten, ^*~z^ forewarn. 

J' 
(8) Compound words endinp in -bird and -board are written with 

the half-length br whenever convenient ; thus, r jailbird, 

mocking-bird, \ — fx blackboard, vC switchboard. But note 

keyboard, and \j pasteboard. 



Abbreviated W and Joined WAW. 

The abbreviated form of the consonant w is conveniently retained 
in a few compounds of " woman," e.g., 4,^ needlewoman, ^Z} char- 
woman : but J' as a joined diphthong is not retained medially as 
part of an outline ; hence /^^ rainwater, 'V soda-water, jL churchwarden. 

Suffixes. 

(1) With reference to -ing, the stroke is quite convenient after 
(/ or J ; thus, v^ chaining, -l^ enjoining. Stroke ng is also used 
after I , although it does not give a very convenient joining, as the 
dot might be mistaken for a vowel-sign ; thus, oXi utilizing, 

/^ releasing. 

(2) When adding -ing, the outline of the original word is almost 
invariably left unaltered ; thus, Vv fancying, d^ freezing, 

'^-r-o. cleansing, V failing, V. piercing, ^- shelling, ^\ rating. 

Exceptions to this are O losing, O- lacing, etc., (_^ ailing, 
^ coalescing, S- convalescing, and /">->■ writing. 

(3) When the outline of the present tense ends with a joined diph- 
thong, the latter is not retained if stroke ^^ can be joined ; thus, 
/ renewing, \/\j^ pursuing, \^ bowing. 



XXXii INTRODUCTION 

(4) -ality, -ility, -arity, etc., are expressed by means of a disjoined 
stroke in the great majority of cases, including practically all of the 
large number of words ending in -bility. The words which are written 
in full include — 

{a) Words ending in -ally, -iality, or -iorily, if the full outline is 

quite convenient ; thus, \_^ penalty, fi. cordiality, \y^l partiality, 

\iz, veniality, ^-^ j5| inferiority. 

(b) Words in which the full outline is particularly facile, especially 
after a half-length stroke; e.g., "^ [ fertility, 'yl, austerity, 
<~^.\. maturity, S:— ; verticality, c^ personality. 

(c) Words in which the -ality, etc., is preceded by only one stroke 
or by s or shun ; thus, ^:'^'^ " hilarity, ^* J. facility, s^'iJ.l nationality. 

{d} In a few cases for the purpose of distinction ; e.g., </\ juniority 

(^/^ geniality), (^° j. locality (' — legality), ^ /l disparity 
( b\ disability) . 

(e) \o compatibility, V .1. accessibility and a lew other 

miscellaneous words. 

(5) -ment is represented by ■^ after -,-^ -^ Vo or ^~_p, or a hook 
to which the full form .tt. cannot conveniently be jonied ; thus, 
•ci_^-^ consignment, ^» preferment, ^<.c^ effacement, v^o^ commence- 
ment, ^^ enchantment, X>- pavement. When ^^ can be made 
convenient, it is often written in preference to the contracted form ; 
thus, y^^" discernment, /Vn rescindment, |^ amendment. 

(6) The sufl&x .^ may be joined when occurring after full-length 
^-^ r, - — n or s-^ ng, also, when convenient, after a hook (the preced- 
ing part of the outline remaining unaltered) ; thus. <iiJ>v censorship, 

\^ companionship, ^ friendship, X^ relationship. -Ship is 
written in full after I /, as in V/V fellowship; also in j heirship. 

(7) Disjoined ^ may be used in compound and other words in 
which -ship is not grammatically a suffix ; thus, j> battleship, 
'^As midshipman, ^ lightship. 



INTRODUCTION XXXiil 

(8) -fulness is represented by the disjoined suffix v^ except in 
j-v delightfulness, a^ doubtfulness and \n beautifulness. 
^-v^ ^-v^ ^-^^ 

Grammalogues. 

(1) Derivatives and compounds from grammalogues are written 
by retaining the logograrri (unvocalized) in the outline whenever a 

convenient and legible form is so obtained ; thus c_^^^ golden, 

St.... thankless, L deliverer, U . advantageous, 4 would-be, 
^ twofold. ' 

\ 

(2) In DERIVATIVES and compounds of " eye the logogram is 

not abbreviated ; hence \if eyelet, y/ J eyelid. 

Contractions. 

Derivatives and compounds from contracted words are written 
by retaining the original contraction in the outline whenever a con- 
venient and legible form is so obtained ; thus, J^ disorganize, 
B— < distinguishable, A thank-off mng. 

Derivative Words. 

The derivation of words must be regarded as one of a number of 
considerations affecting the choice of outlines, but wliile in the outlines 
of many derivatives the outline of the primitive word, or some par- 
ticular feature of it, is retained, there are, on the other hand, many 
cases in which derivatives are written in accordance with the ordinary 
rules and principles of the system, without regard to derivation ; e.g., 

V--, remove, ^""^ remover ; \| bitter, \ embitter ; l hawk, 

<j^ hawker ; f ail, fC^ ailment ; ^ royal, ^ royalist. 

Words described as " derivatives " are taken to include any words 
that are apparently derived from other English words. 

In the above notes, attention is dra^vn by means of capitals to the 
treatment of certain classes of derivative and compound words. 



Derivatives Anticipated. 

In certain cases, including some verbs previously mentioned, 
words are written in a particular way so that tlieir outlines may agree 

with those of derivatives formed from them, e.g., <^ wanton, 

*\ / waiuoniy ; ' Jj— ' clandestine, ^^j^ clandestinely; 



XXXIV INTRODUCTION 

: \ captive, '"A captivate ; "| exist, ~J existence : j sister, 
1 sisterly ; ^ scientific, Cy scientifically. 

Compound Words. 

A number of classes of compound words have already been dealt 
with in connection with the various principles involved. With regard 
to cases in which the outlines of the primary words will not join con 
veniently, they are written disjoined if a better outline is not obtainable 
by altering one or both of them so as to admit of joining. 

Disjoining. 

(1) Disjoining is not resorted to if a better outline can other- 
wise be obtained ; thus, I — . tactics, (" I locate, \^ densely, 

y^ / rearrange, but i*;^ steadfast, ^^-^^ySk mentionable, (j^ deaf-mute, 
\) spendthrift. 

(2) Three straight strokes that would not make an angle are not 
joined together : hence \ --r picture-gallery. 

(3) Outlines in which one at least of three strokes is a curve are 
generally allowable although there is no angle ; thus, X. papacy, 
' 3N_ clockwork ; but the combination / \ is avoided. I 

(4) Sometimes an angle is shown in order to make a joining allowable ; 
thus, y escheat, ^k Hebraized. 

(5) More than two successive downstrokes are avoided in such 
words as L top-boots, /IC red-tapism, ^ \| quarter-deck. 

Compare \ copy-book, .L seed-time, U^^ tea-dealer, in which 

there are only two downstrokes. 

Outlines and Vowels. 

Outlines, as a rule, are not varied in order to permit of a vowel- 
sign being placed exactly in its proper place ; thus, fa^ legislation, 
/^ ceaseless, l J ingeniously, \s>j^ appropriately, ^^_/- meanwhile. 



In a few cases, however, in which an outline that can be more 
accurately vocalized is a better one from a practical point of view, it 

is adopted, e.g., Ja doubtless, -^x unsoiled. 



INTRODUCTION 



Special Outlines. 



It will be recognised that there are many pairs or groups of words 
which, from their meaning, are liable to clash, and every precaution 
is necessary in such Ccises to avoid the risk of confusion. In a great 
majority of cases the application of the ordinary rules of the system 
affords adequate means of distinction, but in a comparatively few of 

these pairs of words, such as V^ favoured, ^-=>. favourite ; 1 Austra- 
lian, vly-^ Australasian, which otherwise would be written with 

the same or a very similar form, a special outline is adopted for one of 
them in order to provide a clear distinction. Again, in a few instances, 

such as ^ affidavit, "y oxyhydrogen, L-^ tartaric, 'ijyf sincerely, 

it has been found advisable, in order to secure the most con- 
venient outline, to adopt a form which is not capable of being fully 
vocalized, or which is not written in accordance with the usual practice. 
A list of these special outlines, in addition to those contained in the 
list of Distinguishing Outlines in the Instructor, is given below. It 
should be borne in mind that such outUnes, except in the case of some 
derivatives from the words in question, must not necessarily be 
regarded as models for the formation of other outlines. 




List of 


Special Outlines 






^^■ 


candlestick 


K 


descriptions 


^^ 


captive 


K 


desert 


~n' 


chaos 


V 


despotism 


X> 


coalescing 


^ 


diffract 


•^ 


conclude 


h 


discern 


w^ 


consonant 


L^ 


dogmatism 


'\ 


convalescing 


^■ 


doubtless 




dais 


k 


downright 


^ 


declaration 




edification 


^ 


delightful 


H 


enlighten 



INTRODUCTION 




Ai^-v 



^ 



><. 



V-^ 



> 



introduction xxxvu 

Proper Names. 

In connection with these the pronunciation has -been checked from 
the Century Cyclopedia of Proper Names, the Standard Dictionary 
and other sources ; and a number of peculiarly pronounced and other 
names have been added. It should be remembered that proper 
names have frequently more than one accepted pronunciation. In 
some instances there is a local and also an " outside " pronunciation, 
and in the case of foreign names some have an anglicized pronunciation 
while others are given a native pronunciation only. From the short- 
hand point of view some proper names require special consideration, 
and the following observations will serve to indicate the practice 
which has been adopted in various groups of words — 

(1) When the nses circle is used, the vowel is understood to be S : 
it is therefore necessary to write stroke n and the ses circle when 
another vowel occurs, as in ' / Albigenses, ^C \i^ Waldenses. 

(2) Proper names ending in -ley preceded by the sound of k are 
generally written with the hooked letter ; thus, \ Brockley, 
^ Hinckley. 

(3) Words ending in -shire are generally written with the hooked 
letter shr (downward or upward as in other words) ; thus, \ Ayrshire, 

N/LjSi/ Aberdeenshire. 

(4) Words ending in -ford are generally written with the haJf-Iength 
hooked letter ( <l or ^ ) ; thus, ^"^ Catford, '~^ Oxford. The 
separate v,^ however is used after ^-^ ^.i^ etc., as in ^"V^ Swinford, 

K. Cinderford. 

(5) The hooked letter ^ is used for the terminations -boro, -burgh, 
-bury, when it is more convenient than the separate b-r, including 
cases in which it occurs after t, d, m, ms, I, Is : thus, L/ Attleborough, 

v->c>^ Flamborough, ^""W. Bloomsbury, r ^ Tilbury, 

'/^- Halsbury. 

(6) Proper names ending in -ton or -don are treated in the same 
way as other words having those terminations (see page xxi) ; thus, 

^T~v/vi/ Merton, \^Ts.y^--^ Pemberton, ^^ Clifton, p Bandon. 

J- J- 



XXXVIU INTRODUCTION 

(7) Words ending in -field are generally written with ^ , but after 
I ox I hook / is used ; thus, \~ Duffield, but 'J. Lichfield, 

L Sedgfield. 

(8) In the majority of words ending in -ham the h issilent, e.g., 
^^-— ^ Clapham, )^-^ Seaham, J ^_^ Ashburnham, Totten- 
ham, \h^ Rotherham. Doubtful cases include names of more 
than two syllables ending in -ingkam, such as Birmingham, Nottingham, 
but in these cases the aspirate is inserted. There are also a number 
of names ending in -sham or -tham in which custom has sanctioned 
the sound of sh and th respectively, e.g., \ Horsham, v_^. Evesham, 
n6 C-— . Waltham, ^-y- Bentham, though in others the s or / sound is 

retained, e.g., I Topsham, f Cheetham, .i-^ Greatham. 



(9) The h in the termination -hurst is generally represented by the 
dot ; thus, (^"yw Lyndhurst, y,/^-^^"'^ Billingshurst. In a few instances, 
however, it is disregarded in order to obtain a more convenient outline, 

e.g., \».?^ Pankhurst, \/' Parkhursf 

(10) After k the terminations -wall, -well, are most conveniently 

written with of'; thus c z^ Kirkwall. > — ^^ Bakewell. After 

upward I, however, (^ is sufficiently convenient ; as y^ Holywell. 

(11) When the vowel in the termination -ville is sounded distinctly, 
the separate / is written if convenient ; thus, V Sackville, 

^<. Granville, but rv^ Nashville. 

(1 2) The termination -gate is written with full t : thus, 
v^. Vr-i Bishopsgate, i__i_, Deansgate, ^^ Cripplegate. 

(13) -wood, however, is generally written with half-length w : thus, 
J/^ Attwood, — ..je^v Kingswood. Exception, ^' A Hey wood, to 

distinguish from <i<^ Hayward. 



(14) Words having the termination -worth are written with c^ ^'^ 
thus, }y^\ Saddleworth, \\\ Nailsworth : or when necessary 
to avoid an awkward or too lengthy outline, with '^ vocalized 
with wu : thus, c;:^^^''^^ Wandsworth, ^VA Wordsworth. 



INTRODUCTION XXxiX 

(15) In words ending in -ing, the dot is used after \ or c^^ or 
after r following another stroke ; thus, \ Epping, <<\. Wapping, 
\ Spalding, W>' Twining. In other cases stroke ^ is written ; 
thus, Tooting, \^^ Kettering, /^ij> Hutchings, \^ Harding, 
•^j) Jennings, >/ Behring. 

(16) In proper names p is not omitted when it occurs between m 
and t or m ajid sh : e.g., ^ Hampstead ( ^^ Hamstead), 

Y Ampthill, ' J Compton, /-^ Assumption, y Hampshire. 



(17) Proper names having their origin in words which are gramma- 
logues are generally written in accordance with the original outlines, 
but the logogram may be vocalized ; thus P Child, 2^ Short, 
^\ Wordsworth, 1 Seaforth, i— a* Seaman (compare ^ Seymour), 
A. Highbury. ( 

(18) In several place names such as ^~ Kingston-on-Thames, 
>L Strat ford-on- Avon, ^^ ^ Bur ton-on- Trent, J"* Clacton-on- 
Sea, aQ. Southend-on-Sea the preposition may be omitted. 

(19) The following are so written in order to obtain an easy or dis- 
tinct outline — of\ Sural, r^ Shetland, \. Thetford, Dudley, 

/ Jedburgh, ^ Ushant, {^j^ London, - — -^J Carruthers, V Sutherland, 
>» <^ Young. 

Distinguishing Outlines. 

The following distinguishing outlines should be noted — ^ Francis, 

X^ Frances ; J Tenby, l_^ Denbigh ; ^--S,_^ Dunbar, 
X-^y Edinburgh: I Didsbury, Jq. /. Dewsbury ; >] Bute, 

V Bude : l Symonds, c7a> Symons ; '/T^ Wyndham, 

(A^ Wenham ; ^ Cobbett, ' \ Cobb : ^{. Hindley, ^ Huntley ; 
<^ Wales, C Wells ; O Mather, '^ Modder ; (i^\ Heywood, 
^ Hay war d : <:iy Yardley, 'V Ardleigh ; Wilmot, 
^ William. 



INDEX TO INTRODUCTION. 



Abbreviated w and Joined 

waw, xiv, xxxi 
A- pirate, The, xiii, xxiii 

Centenary Changes : — 
Pronunciation, ix-x 
Rules, xi-xv 
Vocalization, ix-x; 
Century Cyclopedia of Pro- 
per Names, xxxvii 
Circle and Stroke s, s, xv 
Compound Corisonants.xxvi 
Cf^mptjund Words, xii, xiii, 
XX, xxiii, xxiv, xxv, xxvi, 
xxviii, xxxi, xxxii, xxxiii, 
xxxiv 
Contractions, xiv, xv, xxxiii 

Derivative Words, x, xii, 
xiii, XV, xvi, xvii, xx, xxi, 
xxii, xxiii, xxv, xxvi, 
xxvii, xxxiii 

Derivatives anticipated, 
xxxiii 

n phones, xii 

Disjoining, xxxiv 

Distinguishing Outlines for 
Proper Names, xxxix 



A. Subjects. 

Doubling Principle, xiv, 

XXiX 

Duplicate Forms, xii, xx 

English Dictionary, A Nei3>, 
ix, X 

F, V [book and stroke], 
xxiii 

Grammalogues, xxxiii 

Halving I'rinciple, xiii, xxvi 
Hooked Strokes and Sepa- 
rate f or /, xviii 

List of Special Outlines, 

XXXV 

Medial N, xiv, xxii 
Medial N S, xiii, xxiii 

N S M, xii 

N preceded by two vowel- 
sounds, xxii 
N [stroke and hook], xxi 

Outlines and Vowels, xxxiv 

Primitive Words, xxvi, 

xxviii 
Proper Names, xxxvii 



Shr, xiii 
Shun, xii 
Special Outlines, xxxv 

SS, SZ [Large Circle, / / 

and d J, xviii 

SST 1°), ^and f J, xvii 

Sr L I and Loop J, xvi 
ST [Loop and ) ], xvii 
Standard Dictionary, xxxvii 
Stroke and Circle, S, xvi 
Stroke ng, xiv 
Stroke y, xiv 
Suffixes, xiv, xxxi 
S, Z [Circle and Stroke], xv 

Triphones, xii 

Upward and Downward r 

and /, xiii, xxiv 
Upward and Downward sh, 

xxv 

Vocalization of Double Con- 
sonants, xii, XXX 



abandon, xxi 
Aberdeenshire, xxxvii 
access, xx 
accessibility, xxxii 
accountable, xix 
accrued, xxxv 
accurate, x 
aciform, xxx 
acquiesce, xvii 
actionable, xix 
actress, xvi 
advantageous, xxxiii 
adventure, xiv 
affidavit, xxxv 
Africa, xxi 
agency, xiv 
ail, xxxiii 
ailing, xxxi 
ailment, xxxiii 
airship, xxxii 
AlbigcDses, xxxvii 



B. niustrative Words. 

alehouse, xxiv 
alienator, xxix 
alleviation, xi 
alliance, xxxv 
allowance, xxxv 
al rns-house, xxiv 
ambulance, xiii 
amendment, xxxii 
Americanize, xv 
Ampthill, xxxix 
annalist, xxiv 
anent, xxi 
Anglicanism, xv 
antithesis, xxxv 
appropriately, xxxiv 
arcade, xxvii 
archeress, xv 
Ardleigh, xxxix 
argue, xi 
armorial, xxv 
Arthur, xxi 
articulate, xxx 



artist, xvii 
artistic, xvii 
Ashbumhani, xxxviii 
assailed, xxviii 
assonant, xxi 
assuredly, xxxv 
astigmatism, xxxv 
Athenian, xxi 
Athcrley, xxi 
Atherston, xxi 
athletic, xxi 
atmosphere, xii 
attentive, xxiii 
Attleborough, xxxvii 
Attwood, xxxviii 
auditorium, xxx 
Augiistinian, xxi 
austerity, xxxii 
Australasian, xxxv 
Australian, xxxv 
authoritatively, xxvii 
Ayrshire, xxxvii 



INDEX TO INTRODUCTION 



XU 



B 

backbite, xxviii 
backbiter, xx'x 
baffle, xxi 
Bokewell, xxxviii 
Baodoii, xxxvii 
bar, ix 
barely, xxv 
barest, xxiv 
barium, xxv 
barometric, xviii 
baroness, xvi 
barrenness, xxii 
barricade, xxvii 
basis, xviii 
battleship, xxxii 
beautiful, xxvii, xxxv 
beautifulness, xxxiii 
beautifv, xxvii 
becloucf, xxvii 
beforetime, xxviii 
beholder, xxix 
Behring, xxxix 
belittled, xxviii 
Bentham, xxxviii 
Bethel, xxi 
bias, xvii 
biased, xvii 
biblicist, xvii 
biliousness, xxv 
Billingthurst, xxxix 
biograph, x 
Birmingham, xxxix 
bismuthal, xxi 
Bishopsgate, xxxviii 
bitter, xxxiii 
blackboard, xxxi 
Bloomsbury, xxxvii 
bolting, xiv 
boudoir, ix 
bounden, xxii 
bountiful, xxii 
bout, xiii 
bowing, xxxi 
bravado, xxxv 
bravest, xviii 
breakage, x 
brevity, xxiii 
bricklayer, xx 
bridal, xx 
bridle, xx 
bridled, xx 
briefest, xvii 
Brockley, xxxvii 
brush, xxvi 
brushwood, xxviii 
brutalize, xx 
brutally, xx 
brutish, xxv 
Bude, xiii, xxxix 
boSet, xxiii 
buoyant, xxxv 
Burton-on-Trent, xxxix 
Bute, ix, xxxix 
buoyancy, xxii 
buoyant, xxii, xxxv 



busiest, xvi 
busily, xvi 



calculate, xxx 
cancellate, xxviii 
candlestick, xxxv 
capitalization, x 
capsize, xviii 
captivate, xxxiv 
captive, xxiii, xxxiv, xxxv 
caravansary, xxiii 
carriage, x 
Carruthers, xxxix 
catarrhal, xxv 
catboat, xxviii 
Catford, xxxvii 
cavalcade, xxvii 
cayenne, xxii 
ceaseless, xxxiv 
cellarer, xxvi 
censorship, xxxii 
centipede, xxvii 
central, xxix 
centred, xxix 
centrifugal, xxix 
cessation, xii 
chafi-cutter, xxx 
chaining, xxxi 
championess, xvi 
chaos, x*li, xxxv 
charwoman, xxxi 
Cheetham, xxxviii 
Cheviot, xxiii 
chiefess, xvi 
chieftain, x 
Child, xxxix 
chop-house, xxiv 
churchwarden, xxxi 
Cinderford, xxxvii 
circulate, xxx 
Clacton-on-Sea, xxxix 
clandestine, xxxiii 
clandestinely, xxxiii 
Clapham, xxxviii 
cleansing, xxxi 
client, xxii 
Clifton, xxxvii 
clockwork, xxxiv 
club-house, xxiv 
coach-house, xxiv 
coagulate, xxx 
coalescent, xxv 
coalescing, xxxi, xxxv 
Cobb, xxxix 
Cobbett, xxxix 
coffee-house, xxiv 
cometarium, xxx 
commencement, xxxii 
communism, xii 
companionship, xxxii 
compatibility, xxxii 
completely, xxv 
compliance, xxii 
Compton, xxxix 



concentric, xxix 
conclude, xxxv 
congestion, xxi 
consignment, xxxii 
consolidatory, xxvii 
consonant, xxi, xxxv 
consternation, xxiv 
constituent, xxii 
contestable, xix 
convalescing, xxxi, xxxv 
convenient, xxi 
copy-book, xxxiv 
copjright, xxviii 
coquettish, xxv 
cordiality, xxxii 
cosier, xvi 
countess, xvi 
cow-hide, xxviii 
cranium, xii 
crayon, xxii 
cretaceous, xxvii 
crier, xxiv 
Cripplegate, xxxviii 
culinary, x 
cuneiform, xxx 
curviform, xxx 
custom, X 
cylindric, xxix 
cynicism, xviii 



dais, xvii, xxxv 
danger, xv 
daunted, xxii 
deaconess, xvi 
deaf-mute, xxxiv 
Deansgate, xxxviii 
decision, xii 
declarable, xxv 
declaration, xxxv 
decoyed, xxvii 
defied, xxiii 
deified, xxiii 
deist, xvi 
deistic, xvi 
delicious, xxvi 
delightful, xxxv 
delightfulness, xxxiii 
deliverer, xxxiii 
delusion, xi 
delusively, xix 
Denbigh, xxxix 
dental, xxii 
densely, xxxiv 
descriptions, xxxv 
desert, xxxv 
desist, xvii 
despotism, xxxv 
detonator, xxix 
Dewsbury, xxxix 
dial, xii 

dictatorial, xxx 
Didsbury, xxxix 
difiract, xxxv 
digestible, xix 



xlii 



INDEX TO INTRODUCTION 



digestive, zxiii 
digging, xiv 
directorate, xxix 
directory, xxvii 
disability, xxxii 
discern, xxxv 
discernible, xix 
discernment, xxxii 
disorganize, xxiii 
disparity, xxxii 
dissonant, xxi 
distinguishable, xxxiii 
dogmatism, xxxv 
dominant, xxi 
Doricism, xviii 
doubly, XX 
doubtfulness, xxxiii 
doubtless, xxxiv, xxxv 
downright, xxxv 
drapery, xix 
drowsiness, xvi 
dual, xii, xiii 
duckling, XX 
Dudley, xxxix 
Dufl5eld, xxxviii 
diimb-bell, xxvi 
Dunbar, xxxix 
dustiness, xvii 
dysenteric, xxix 



earthenware, xxiii 
eccentric, xxix 
edification, xxxv 
edified, xxiii 
Edinburgh, xxxix 
educational, xi 
efiacement, xxxii 
effervesce, xx 
egotistical, xxv 
elastic, xvii 
embark, ix 
embitter, xxxiii 
emphasize, xviii 
empiricist, xvii 
emporium, xxv 
enchanted, xxii 
enchantment, xxxii 
enjoining, xxxi 
enlighten, xxxv 
enlist, xix 
enliven, xxxvi 
ensued, xvi 
enteric, xxix 
epizoon, xvi 
Epping, xxxix 
equatorial, xxx 
erudite, xxxvi 
escapade, xxvii 
escheat, xxxiv 
essayist, xvii 
Ethelred, xxi 
Etonian, xxi 
etymological-ly, xiv 
euphonic, xxii 



eulogy, xiv 
Europe, xiv 
Evesham, xxxviii 
examine, x 
excentric, xxix 
exchanger, xv 
excitatory, xxvi 
excusable, xviii 
exercise, xviii 
exist, X, xxxiv 
existence, xxxiv 
exorcism, xviii 
exorcize, xviii 
explainable, xix 
explode, xxxvi 
extenuator, xxix 
extinguisher, jciii 
eyelet, xxxiii 
eyelid, xxxiii 



facility, xxxii 
failing, xxxi 
faintest, xvii 
fairest, xxiv 
fakir, xxiv 
fanaticism, xviii 
fancying, xxxi 
fatten, xxi 
favoured, xxxv 
favourite, xxxv 
feasible, xviii 
fellowship, xxxii 
ferocity, xxxi 
fertility, xxxii 
fictitious, xxv 
fiercest, xvii 
fifth, xxviii 
fiftieth, xxviii 
filter, xxix 
fissure, xiii 
flabby, xiii, xxi 
flail, xiii 
flake, xlii 

Flamborough, xxxvii 
flame, xiii 
flaimelette, xxxvi 
Flanders, xiii 
flash, xxi 
flask, xxi 
fiat, xiii 
flatly, xiii 
flaunt, xiii 
flaunting, xiii 
flavour, xiii 
fleece, Jtlii 
fleecer, xiii 
flesh, xiii 
Fletcher, xiii 
flicker, xiii 
flightiness, xxviii 
flog, xiii 
Florentine, x 
flotation, x 
flotilla, xxvi 



flow, xiii 
flower, XX 
fluctuation, xiii 
fluent, xxii, xxxvi 
flurry, xiii 
fluttered, xiii 
flyer, xiii, xx 
fodder, xiv 
folio, xii 
fondest, xvii 
forbear, xxxi 
forcible, xviii 
forecast, xxxi 
forenoon, xxxi 
foreshorten, xxxi 
foresight, xxxi 
foretell, xxxi 
forewarn, xxxi 
forget, xxxi 
forsake, xxxi 
forum, xxv 
foundation, xxxvi 
fountain, xxii 
fracture, xiv 
frame, xxi 
France, xx 
Frances, xxxix 
Francis, xxxix 
frank, xx 
fraternal, xxx 
freckle, xx 
freeness, xx 
freezing, xxxi 
French, x 
fresh, xxi 
friable, xx 
friar, XX 

friendship, xxxii 
frigate, xxvii 
frilled, xxviii 
froth, XX 
fullest, xxiv 
funnier, xxii 
furled, xxviii 
furnace, xx 
furniture, xxxvi 
furrier, xxv 
fusion, xi 
futile, xxxvi 



Gallicism, xviii 
gallop, X 
galvanism, xii 
gaseous, xviii 
gate-house, xxiv 
geared, xxviii 
geniality, xxxii 
Genoese, xvii 
genuine, xxii 
geometry, xviii 
gesticulate, xxx 
giant, xxii 
giantess, xvi 
gilder, xxix ' 



INDEX TO INTRODUCTION 



xliii 



gnger, xv 
ladstonian, xxii 
globular, x 
glossier, xvi 
gnawing, xi 
go-ahead, xxviii 
golden, xxxiii 
Gothicism, xviii 
Gothicize, xviii 

grantor, xxix 
ranville, xxxviii 
grave-digger, xxviii 
Greatham, xxxviii 
greediness, xxviii 
greenest, xvii 
grower, xxiv 
guarantor, xxix 



H 

Halsbury, xxxvii 
Hamiltonian, xxi 
Hampshire, xxxix 
Hampstead, xxxix 
Hamstead, xxxix 
handsome, xii 
harbinger, xv 
hardest, xvii 
Harding, xxxix 
harm, ix 
hasten, xiii 
Hastings, xxiii 
hasty, xiii 
hawk, xxxiii 
hawker, xxxiii 
Hayward, xxxviii, xxxix 
haze, xiii. 
haziness, xiii 
hazy, xiii 
heartily, xxviii 
heather, xiii 
Hebraized, xxxiv 
heiress, xv 
heirs, xv 
heirship, xxxii 
helter-skelter, xxix 
Herciiles, x 
hereditary, xxvii 
heritable, xxiii, xxxvi 
heritage, xxiv, xxxvi 
heritor, xxiii, xxxvi 
heroine, xxii 
Hesse, xiii 
heterodox, xxiv 
heterogamus, xxiv 
heterogeneous, xxiv 
heterology, xxiv 
heteromorphous, xxiv 
Heywood, xxxviii, xxxix 
Highbury, xxxix 
hilarity, xxxii 
Hinckley, xxxvii 
Hindley, xxxix 
hiss, xiii 

history, xxiii, xxxvi 
histrionic, xxiii, xxxvi 



hitherto, xiii 
Holywell, xxxviii 
hopeful, XX 
hop-fly, XX 
horizontal, xix 
Horsham, xxxviii 
hothouse, xxiv 
household, xxviii 
humanize, xv 
hundred, xxxvi 
Hunslet, xxviii 
Himtley, xxxix 
hustings, xxiii, xxxvi 
Hutchings, xxxix 
hygiene, xxii 
hyoid, xxxvi 



ice-boat, xxviii 
ice-house, xxiv 
ignite, xi 
ignominy, xxxvi 
illness, xxxvi 
illustratively, xxvii 
imbue, xi 

imperceptible, xxxvi 
imperialism, xxv 
impetuosity, xvi 
inch, X 

indebted, xxxvi 
indigence, xxxvi 
indulge, xxvi 
inferiority, xxxii 
ingeniously, xxxiv 
ingeimously, xvii, xxxvi 
ingenuousness, xvii 
ingot, xxvii, xxxvi 
inheritable, xxiv 
inheritor, xxiii 
insipid, xxvii 
insomnia, xii 
insult, xxviii 
insulter, xxix 
integer, xxvi 
interior, xxvi 
internal, xxx 
intromission, xxxvi 
inventive, xxiii 
invincible, xviii 
Ironside, xxiii 
issued, xxxvi 



Jacobitism, xxxvi 
ailbird, xxxi 
Japanese, xv 
Jedburgh, xxxix 
Jennings, xxxix 
jointed, xxii 
jolly-boat, xxviii 
joyously, xvii 
joyousness, xvii 
Judaism, xvii 



junior, xxxvi 
juniority, xxxii 



keenest, xvii 
Kettering, xxxix 
key-board, xxxi 
kindest, xvii 
kindred, xxiii 

Kingston-on-Thames,xxxix 
Kingswood, xxxviii 
Kirkwall, xxxviii 
kneader, xiv 



lace, X 
lacing, xxxi 
laconicism, xviii 
lamentable, xix 
lash, xxvi 
lateral, xxix 
latterly, xxix 
latish, XXV 
laughing, xiv 
launch, x 
lavisher, xiii 
lawful, xix 
laying, xi 
lazier, xvi 
laziest, xvi 
legality, xxxii 
legendary, xxii 
legislation, xxxiv 
level, xix 
leverage, xx 
Lichfield, xxviii 
lighterage, xxix 
lightship, xxxii 
lingerer, xiv 
lion, xxii 
lioness, xvi 
liturgy, xxix 
locality, xxxii, xxxvi 
locally, XX 
locate, xxxiv 
loghouse, xxiv 
logistic, xvii 
logistical, XXV 
London, x, xxxix 
lonesome, xxiii 
losing, xxxi 
luckier, xxiv 
lukewarm, xxvi, xxxvi 
Lyndhurst, xxxviii 



madder, xiv 
mainmast, xxiii 
majestic, xvii 
making, xiv 



zliv 



INDEX TO INTRODUCTION 



manager, xxiii 
manageress, xv 
manful, xix 
manhilly, xix 
manger, xxiii 
mantle, xix 
marital, xxxvi 
marriage, x 
martin, xxi 
mason, x 
massively, xix 
material, xxix, xxxvi 
Mather, xxxix 
matriculate, xxx 
maturely, xxv 
maturity, xxxii 
mayoral , xxv 
mayoress, xvi 
meanwhile, xxxiv 
measiuable, xi, xvlii 
mellifluent, xxii 
mendacious, xxvii 
mental, xi, xix 
mentionable, xix, xxxiv 
merchandise, xxxvi 
Merton, xxxvii 
messenger, xv 
metalliiorm, xxx 
metbodistical, xxv 
mew, xi 

midshipraaji, xxxii 
migratory, xxvii 
mildly, xxviii 
mildness, xxviii 
militia, xxvi 
mincemeat, xii 
mobbish, xxvi 
mocking-bird, xxx! 
Modder, xxxix 
model, XX 
modelled, xx 
moderate, x 
modemness, xxii 
monochord, xxx 
monopoly, x 
moodily, xxxvi 
mopish, xxvi 
moral, xxxvi 
moratorium, xxx 
mountain, xxii 
moustache, xxv 
Mrs., xxxvii 
muffle, xxi 
murderess, xv 
museum, xii 
muzzled, xxviii 
muzzle-loader, xxix 



Nailsworth, xxxviii 
naked, xxvii 
napiform, xxx 
narcissus, xviii 
Nashville, xxxviii 
nationality, xxxii 



naturalism, xxv 
nature, xiv 
necessarily, xxxvi 
necklace, xx 
needful, xxxvi 
needlewoman, xxxi 
newest, xvii, .xxxvi 
newsmonger, xii 
next, xvii 
nicest, xvii 
nigh, xii 
nobility, x 
noisome, xii 
Norseman, xii 
notary, xx 
Nottingham, xxxviii 
nugget, xxvii 
nursemaid, xii 



obscure, xxiv 
obtainable, xviii 
offerer, xx 
Ohio, xi 

omniscient, xxxvi 
oneness, xxii 
oneself, xiv 
opalescence, xxv 
open-mouthed, xxiii 
orator, xxxvi 
ordinal, xxxvi 
organist, xvii 
originated, xxii 
ornament, xxxvi 
ornamental, xxxvi 
otherwise, xxi 
oimce, xi 
outrider, xxxvi 
overrate, xxvii 
owl, xi 

Oxford, xxxvii 
oxyhydrogen, xxxv, xxxvi 



paganism, xv 
painted, xxii 
palace, x 
paleozoic, xvi 
palish, xxvi 
Pankhurst, xxxviii 
pantaloon, xxii 
papacy, xxxiv 
parietal, xix 
Parkhurst, xxxviii 
partiality, xxxii 
passenger, xv 
paste-board, xxxi 
patois, X 

patriotism, xxxvi 
pavement, xxxii 
pectoral, xxv 
Pemberton, xxxvii 



penalty, xxxii 
penitent, xxii 
penman, xxiii 
pennant, xxi 
perilousness, xiv 
persevered, xxviii 
personality, xxxii 
picture, xiv 
picture-gallery, xxxiv 
piercing, xxxi 
pigeon-house, xxiv 
pillar, X 
pioneer, xxii 
piously, xvii, xxxvi 
piscatorial, xxx 
pitiful, xxvii 
pivot, xxiii 
plainest, xvii 
plaintive, xxiii 
planimetry, xviii 
plantain, xxii 
plunger, xxiii 
plurilateral, xxix 
poetess, XV 
poets, XV 
polish, xxvi 
poljfzoa, xvi 
polyzoon, xvi 
pontoon, xxii 
port-hole, xxv 
poulterer, xxix 
powerful, xxv 
preciseness, xxxvi 
preferment, xxxii 
prefigure, xi 
princess, xviii 
private, xxiii 
proclaim, x 
proprietor, xxix 
Protestant, xxxvi 
protestation, xxxvi 
protozoic, xvi 
proud, xiii 
prouder, xiv 
provable, xix 
prowess, xvii, xxxvi 
publicist, xvii 
punch, X 
pimctuation, xiii 
punctuator, xxix 
pungency, xiv 
puniness, xxii 
Puritanism, xv 
pursuance, xvi 
pursuant, xxii 
pursuing, xxxi 
Puseyism, xvi 



qualify, xxxvi 
quality, xxxvi 
quarter-deck, xxviii, xxxiv 
queer, xxxvi 
queerly, xxxvi 
quiesce, xvii 



INDEX TO INTRODUCTION 



xlv 



B 

radiator, xxix 
radii, xi 
raging, xiv 
rainproof, xxiii 
rainwater, xxxi 
ranch, X 
ranger, xxiii 
ransom, xxiii 
rating, xxxi 
rattle, xix 
real, xii 
realism, xxv 
reality, xii 
realization, x 
rearrange, xxxiv 
receptive, xxiii 
recess, xviii 
red-tapism, xxxiv 
re-«cho, xii 
re-examine, xi 
regulate, xxx 
relationship, xxxli 
releasing, xxxi 
religionism, xv 
remit, xiii 
remittance, xiii 
remove, xxxii 
remover, xxxii 
renewing, xxxi 
reportorial, xxx 
rescindment, xxxii 
rescue, xi 
rescued, xxvii 
reticulate, xxx 
reversible xviii 
rtieumatism, xxxvi 
riddle, xix 
ringer, xi 
ringleader, xxix 
romp, xiii 
rookery, xix 
rosewood, xxviii, xxxvi 
rotatorv, xxvi 
Rothernam, xxxviii 
roundness, xxii 
royal, xii, xxxiii 
royalist, xxxiii 
ruin, xxii, xxxvi 
niin-ed, xxxvi 



B 

Sackville, xxxviii 
Saddleworth, xxxviii 
Sadducean, xvi 
sahib, xvi 
saltatory, xxvi 
sanctified, xxiii 
sand-eel,- xxv 
sauciest, xvi 
saunter, x 
savoury, xix 
scatter, xiv 
scepticism, xxxvi 



sceptre, xiv 
scheduled, xxviii 
scientific, xxxiv 
scientifically, xxxiv 
scolder, xxix 
scuffle, xix 
Seaforth, xxxix 
Seaham, xxxviii 
Seamau, xxxix 
stance, xvi 
secretary, xxvii 
Sedgfleld, xxxviii 
sedulotisness, xiv 
seedling, xx 
seed-time, xxxiv 
seer, xvi 

sensationalism, xxv 
sereneness, xxii 
seventh, xxviii 
seventieth, xxviii 
Seymour, xxxix 
shelling, xxxi 
Shetland, xxxix 
shiftless, xxv 
shooting-star, xxiv 
Short, xxxix 
shovel, xxi 
shudder, xiv 
Siam, xvi 
sienna, xvi 
silence, xiii 
siliceous, xxvi 
silk-worm, xxvi 
silvery, xix 
sincerely, xxxv, xxxvi 
singer, xi 
sinuosity, xvii 
sister, xxxiv 
sisterly, xxxiv 
slash, xxvi 
slaughterer, xxix 
slumberer, xiv 
soda-water, xxxi 
solicitor, xxxvi 
solving, xiv 

'sometimes, xxviii, xxxvi 
sonant, xxi, xxxvi 
sophistic, xvii 
sorrowful, xix 
Southend-on-Sca, xxxix 
sower, xvi 
Spalding, xxxix 
Spartan, xxi 
spectatorial, xxx 
speculate, xxx 
spendthrift, xxxiv 
spheroidal, xix 
spiciest, xvi 
spongiform, xxx 
stadtbolderate, xxix 
stalactiforni, xxx 
start, xxxvii 
statuesque, xvii 
statutory, xx 
stayed, xvii 
stayer, xvi 
steadfast, xxxiv 



sternutation, xxiv 
steward, xvi 
stewed, xvii 
stock-list, xxv 
stoic, xvi 
Stomoway, xxiv 
stowage, xvi, xvii 
Stowell, xvi 
stranger, xv 

Stratford-on-Avon, xxxix 
strenuously, xvi 
structure, xiv 
Stuart, xvi 
Styrian, xvi 
subdivide, xxxvi 
subserviency, xxii 
subsist, xvii 
subvert, xxxvi 
success, xviu 
suet, xvi 

summer-house, xxiv 
superciliousness, xxv 
superstitious, xxv 
Surat, xxxix 
survivor, xx 
Sutherland, xxxix 
swerved, xxxvi 
Swinford, xxxvii 
switchboard, xxxi 
Symonds, xxxix 
Symons, xxxix 



tactics, XXXIV 
tantalize, xxii 
target, xxvii 
tarry, adj. Siv.,x 
tartaric, xxix, xxxv 
taunt, X 

tax-gatherer, xxiv 
tea-dealer, xxxiv 
tenant, xxi 
Tenby, xxxix 
tenuously, xvii 
tenuousness, xvii 
tepid, xxvii 
terminological, xiv 
terminus, xii 
tether, xxi 
tetrachord, xxx 
thankless, xxxiii 
thank -ofieriiig, xxxiii 
theatrical, xxix 
theistic, xvii 
theorem, xxv 
Thetford, xxxix 
thrash, xxi 
thread, xxi 
thrilled, xxviii 
thrive, xxi 
throttle, xxi 
Tilbury, xxxvii 
time, xi 

time-table, xxviii 
tinsmith, xii 



xlvi 



INDEX TO INTRODUCTION 



tippler, XX 
tit-bit, xxviii 
tomboy, xxvi 
Tooting, xxxix 
top-boots, xxxiv 
Topsham, xxxviii 
totally, xxxvi 
Tottenham, xxxviii 
tottery, xix 
tougher, xx 
toughest, xvii 
towel, xiii 
tractarian, xxvii 
train-oil, xxv 
trampling, xx 
transept, xxxvi 
treasury, xix 
trial, xiii 
tripod, xxvii 
triune, xxii 
trowel, xii 
truest, xvii 
tiu'pentine, xxii 
tutor, xiv 
tutoress, xv 
tutorial, xxx 
twofold, xxxiii 
Twining, xxxix 
typewriter, xx 
typewritten, xx 



tilterior, xxx 
unaccented, xi 
unique, xiv 
unleavened, xix 
unlikely, xxxvi 
unluckily, xxxvi 
unreasoning, xix 
unrest, xix 
unseemly, xii 
unsoiled, xxxiv, xxxvi 
unsummoned, xii 



upheaval, xix 
ursiform, xxxvi 
Ushant, xxxix 
usufruct, XX 
utilize, xiv 
utilizing, xxxi 
Utopianism, xv 



value, xi 
variform, xxx 
veered, xxviii 
vendor, xxix 
veiiiality, xxxii 
verbal, xxxvi 
verbose, xxi 
veritable, xxxvi 
vermiform, xxx 
verticality, xxxii 
vicaress, xv 
viscountess, xvi 
virile, xiv, xxxvi 
vision, xi 
vitiated, xxxvi 
vitiation, xxxvi 
vividly, xxv 
voluptuousness, xvi 



W 

wailed, xxvi 
wainscot, xxiii 
waitress, xvi 
wakeful, xix 
wakefully, xix 
Waldenses, xxxvii 
Wales, xxxix 
wallowed, xxvi 
Waltham, xxxviii 
Wandsworth, xxxviii 
wanton, xxxiii 
wantonly, xxxiii 



Wapping, xxxix 
warehouse, xxiv 
warm, xiv 
warmth, xiv 
Welsh-house, xxiv 
weald, xxvi 
wealden, xxvi 
Wednesday, xxiii • 
weightiness, xxviii 
weld, xxvi 
welded, xxvi 
Wells, xxxix 
Wenham, xxxix 
wheaten, xxi 
wheeled, xxvi 
white, xi 
why, xi 
wide, xi 
wife, xi 
wild, xxvi 
wilder, xxvi 
wildest, xxvi 
wildly, xxv 
Wilkins, xii 
William, xii, xxxix 
Wilmot, xxxix 
windiness, xxii 
Wordsworth, xxxviii, xxxix 
workhouse, xxiv 
would-be, xxxiii 
writing, xxvii, xxxi 
written, xxvii 
Wyndham, xxxix 



Yardley, xxxix 
Young, xxxix 



zither, xxi 



KEY TO ABBREVIATIONS USED IN THIS 
DICTIONARY. 



abbrev. 


abbreviation 


Lat. 


. . Latin 


adj. 


adjective 


leg. 


. legal 


adv. 


adverb 


Ut. 


literally 


Amer. 


American 






anat. 


. anatomical 


med. 


medical 


archit. 


architectural 


mus. 


. musical 


art. 


. article 






astr. 


astronomical 


n. 
naut. 


. noun 
nautical 


bel. 


. belonging 


obs. 


. obsolete 


biol. 


biological 


orig. 


originally 


chem. 


chemical 


pars. 


personal 


coUoq. 
comp. 


. colloquial 
comparative 


pert, 
phr. 
pi. 
p.p. 


pertaining 
phrase 
plural 
. past participle 


conj. 


. conjunction 


def. 


. definite 


prep, 
pres. 


preposition 
present 






pret. 


preterite 


esp. 


. especially 


pron. 


. pronoun 






pr.p. 


. present participle 


fig. 


. figuratively 


p.t. 


. past tense 


Fr. 


. French 










rel. 


relating to; 


Gr. 


. Greek 




relative 






Scot. 


. Scottish 


her. 


. heraldic 


sing. 


singular 






super. 


superlative 


impers. 


. impersonal 






indef. 


. indefinite 


usu. 


. usually 


inter] . 


interjection 






interrog. 


interrogative 


v.i. 


. verb intransitive 


i.q. 


same as 


v. reflex. 


. verb reflexive 


Ital. . 


. Italian 


v.t. 


verb transitive 




NO! 


'ES. 





(a) All grammalogues and contractions are printed in italic; also 
any portions of derivative or compound words for which logograms or 
contractions are retained. 

(6) Only logograms and contractions (and their derivatives when 
the primitive forms are retained) occupying a first or a third position 
have their positions shown by a dotted line. 

(c) Capitals are employed initially only where such is the ordinary 
usage, as in the case of proper names and terms. In botanical, 
zoological, and similar scientific terms, the names of genera are 
capitahzed; with species bearing the same name a capital would not, 
of course, be used. For example. Ranunculus, the genus; but 
ranunculus, a plant of this genus. 

xlvii 



Pitman s 
English and Shorthand Dictionary 



\ 






A, inief. art. or adj. 
(an before vowel or 
mute h), one, any, 

Aaron'ic, \ adj. pert. 
. Aaron'ical/ to Aaron. 

aback', adv., behind, 
at the back. Phr. 
taken aback = sur- 
prised. 

ab'acns, n., now used 
only in architecture 
= the top portion 
of a pillar. For- 
merly used for arith- 
metical calcula- 
tions, and consisted 
of beads or balls 
running on wires, 
and set in frame. 

Abad'don, »., the 
Destroying Angel; 
the bottomless pit. 

abaff, prep, and adv., 
astern, or towards 
the stern of a ship. 

aban'don, v.t., to give 
up, forsake, leave. 

abandoned, pp., 
abandon; adj., 
shameless, pro- 
fligate. 

abandonee', n., one to 
whom something is 
relinquished. 

aban'doner, n., one 
who abandons. 

abandoning, pr.p., 
abandon. 

abaa'donment n., 
the act of abandon- 
ing; shamelessness. 

abarticnla'tion, n., a 
dislocation. 

abas e', v.t., to lower, 
clegrade, humiliate. 

abased', p.p., abase. 

abase'ment, n., the 
act of lowering or 
humiliating; the 
state of humiliation. 
. abash', v.<., to put to 
confusion or shame. 



I 



\ abashed', p.p., abash. 



pr.p.. 



, the 
being 



\^ 



% 



^ 



\ 



v^ 



\ 



1 



\ 






abash'ing, 
abash. 

abash'ment, 
state of 
abashed. 

aba's ing, pr.p., abase. 

abate', v.t. and «., to 
diminish, decrease. 

aba'ted, p.p., abate. 

abate'meni, n., the 
act of abating, state 
of being abated, 
reduction of amount 
or quantity. 

iiba'ting, pr.p., abate. 

ab'atis, n., a military 
obstruction of felled 
trees. 

ab'atised, adj., having 
an abatis. 

abattoir', n., a slaugh- 
ter-house (Fr.). 

abb, n., a weaving 
term - yarn of warp. 

Ab'ba, n., Semitic 
word = father. 

ab'baoy, n., office of 
an abbot, an abbot's 
jurisdiction. 

abba'tial, j pert, to 
adj. ( an abbot 

abbat'ical, (or ab- 
adj. ' bey. 

ab'bi, 1. , French word 
for abbot; unbene- 
ficed priests often 
have the title given 
them as a dignified 
appellation. 
'ib'bess, n., the lady 
head of an abbey. 
/ ab'bey, n., a religions 
house under the 
rule of an abbot. 

ab'bot, n., the supe- 
rior of an abbey. 
Also abbot. 
^ abbre'viate, v.t., to 
shorten. 

abbre'viated, ^.^., ab- 
breviate. 



""5 



V 



abbre'viating, pr.p., 
abbreviate. 

abbievia'tion, n., the 
act of shortening: 
the abbreviated 
state; a shortened 
formula, as B.A. 
for Bachelor of Arts. 

abbre' viator, n., one 
who abbreviates; 
the drafter of eccle- 
siastical briefs at 
the Vatican. 

abbie'viatory. adj., 
shortening. 

abbie'viatore, n., the 
sign marking a 
contraction; also an 
abridgment. 

Ab'derite. n., an in- 
habitant of Abdera, 
a place noted for 
stupidity ; a stupid 
person. 

ab'dicant, adj., abdi- 
cating, also n., one 
who abdicates. 

ab'dicate, v.t., to re- 
sign, renounce. 

ab'dicated, p.p., ab- 
dicate. 

ab'dicating, pr.p., ab- 
dicate. 

abdication, n., the 
act of abdicating. 

ab'dicative, adj., dis- 
posed to abdicate. 

ab'dicator, n., one 
who abdicates. 

ab'ditory, »., a place 
to hide things in. 

abdo'men, n., the 
belly, the receptacle 
of the viscera. 

abdom'inal. adj., bel. 
to the abdomen. 

abdominos'copy, n., 
surgical examina- 
t ion of the abdomen. 

abdom'inoos, adj. , rel. 
to th» abdomen; 
gross. 



I— (i7a) 



abduce 






V 






V 



^ 



^ 

\ 



N 



abdace', v.t., to draw 
away or aside. 

abduced', p.p., ab- 
duce. 

abdu'cing, pr.p., ab- 

, duce. 

abduct', v.t., to carry 
off forcibly or by 
stealth. 

abducted, p.p., ab- 
duct. 

abducVing, pr.p. , ab- 
duct. 

abduction, n., the 
act of abducting. 

abduct' 01, «., one 
who abducts. 

abeam', adv., at right 
angles to the keel. 

Abeceda'rian, adj., 
rel. to the A.B.C., 
also n., one who 
learns or teaches 
the A.B.C. 

abed', adv., in bed. 

abele', "., white pop- 
lar. 

Abel'iaii, adj., of or 
pert, to Abel, the 
Norwegian mathe- 
matician; also n., a 
member of the sect 
of Abelites or Abel- 
ians. 

A'belite, «., a mem- 
ber of the ancient 
African sect of fol- 
lowers of Abel. 

aber'iancy, n., a 
straying from truth. 

aber'rant, adj., stray- 
ing from truth. 

aberration, n., the 
act of straying from 
truth; mental con- 
fusion; deviation 
from type (biol.); an 
optical defect in a 
lens or mirror; the 
seeming displace- 
ment of a heavenly 
body {astron.). 

abef, v.t., to aid, 
encourage, help in 
some action, fre- 
quently in mis- 
deed. (The phrase 
in such a context 
is " to aid and 
abet.") 

abet'ted, p.p., abet. 

abet' ting, pr.p., abet. 

abetter, abet' tor, »., 
one who abets. 

abey'ance, n., sus- 
pension, the state 
of suspension or of 
being held over. 

abey'ant, adj., hold- 
ing over. 



V 
V 



abhor', v.t., to hate, 
abominate, shudder 
at. 
' abhorred', p.p., abhor. 

abbor'rence, n., hat- 
red with loathing. 

abhor'rent, adj., re- 
i pulsive, hateful. 

abhor'rer, «., one who 
abhors. 

abhorring, pr.p., ab- 
hor. 

A'bib, n., a Jewish 
month. 

abi'dance, n., an 
abidmg. 

abide', v.i., to stay, 
remain, dwell. 

abi'der, n., one who 
abides. 

abi'ding, pr.p., abide. 

abi'dingiy> adv., per- 
manently, con- 
tinually. 

ab'ies, «., the fir-tree, 
a memt>er of the 
pine-family. 

Ab'igail, n., the Bible 
name of a woman 
attendant; hence, 
by transference, de- 
noting any lady's 
maid. 

abil'ity, n. , the state of 
being able; capacity. 

abintest'ate, adj. and 
n., inheriting from 
(or the inheritor of) 
an intestate person. 

abiogen'esii, n., spon- 
taneous generation. 

tb'Ject, adj., Runk to 
a low state, grovel- 
ling, mean; alto n. 
(but rare), a mean 
fellow. 

alxlMr, v.t., to 
degrade. 

abjec'tion, n., the 
state of one who is 
abject , or cast down. 

ab'ject^, adv., mean- 
ly, in a grovelling 
manner. 

ab'jectneas, n., mean- 
ness, a grovelling 
attitude. 

aUudica'tiOD, n., 
judicial rejection. 

abjtira'tioa. n., a 
solemn denial or 
repudiation of some 
doctrine oroplnion. 

abja'rstory, adj., of 
the nature of an 
abjuration. 

abjore', v.t., to make 
a solemn denial or 
repudiation of some 
doctrine or opinion. 



V^ 



va. 



c^ 



N 



\- 



\n 



abolished 



V abjured', p.p. , abjure. 
/\, / abjur'er, »., one who 
-* ^ abjures. 

\ , . abjur'ing, pr.p., ab- 

//^-^ jure. 
\/ 1^ ablacta'tion, n., the 
act of weaning. 

abla'tion, n., the act 
of carrying off or 
removing. 

ab'Iative, adj., tend- 
ing to remove or 
separate. As a n. 
the ablative is the 
gramimatical name 
for the case denot- 
ing separation. 

ablaze', adv., on fire. 

able, adj., having 
power, means, or 
capacity. 

a'ble-bodied, adj., in 
a physically fit con- 
^__^ dition. 
V~n ableg'ate, «., a papal 
envoy, bearer to 
new cardinals of 
their insignia. 

ab'lnent, ai/;., cleans- 
ing, purifying; n., 
that which cleanses. 

abln'tion, n., the act 
of cleansing. In 
ecclesiastical usage, 
the washing of the 
chalice and paten 
after Mass. 

abln'tionary, adj., 
pert, to ablution. 

a'bly, adv., in an able 
manner, with abil- 
ity. 

abnegate,!'.'., to give 
up, renounce. 

ab'negated. p.p., ab- 
negate. 

ab'negating, pr.p., 
abnegate. 

abnega'tion, n., the 
act of abnegating. 

abnor'mal, adj., con- 
trary to rule, un- 
usual. 
%_,_^ abnor'mity, n., the 
1 state or quality of 
the abnormal; an 
irregularity. 

aboard', adv., on 
board, on a vessel. 

abode', n., a place of 
abiding or dwelling; 
the act of abiding. 

abol'ish, v.t., to des- 
troy, put an end 
<^-^ to. 

V aborishable,ati;'.,that 

which can be abol- 

' A ished. 

>( abol'ished, p.p. abol- 

ish. 




X 



abolisber 






V 






aboriataer, n., one 

who abolishes. 
abol'ishine, pr.p. 

abolish. 

abolishment, n., the 
act or state of 
alxjlishing. 

aboli'tion, n., i.q. 
abolishment. 

aboli'tionism, n., the 
anti-slavery doc- 
trine or principle, 

aboli'Uonist, n., one 
who opposes sla- 
very. 

abom'inable, adj., 
detestable, hateful. 

abominate, v.t., to 
detest, abhor. 

abom'inated, p.p., 
abominate. 

abomina'tion, n., 
loathing; something 
detestable. 

aboriginal, adj., in- 
digenous; n., a pri- 
mitive native. 

aborigines, n., the 
original natives. 

abortion, n., a birth- 
miscarriage; the 
procuring of a mis- 
carriage. 

abortive, *dj., pre- 
mature, ineffectual. 

abor'tively, adv., in- 
effectually. 

abor'tiveness, n., the 
state of being abor- 
tive. 

aboimd', v.*', to be in 
a state of plenty; to 
be in great quantity 
or numbers. 

abomid'ed, p.p., 
abound. 

abotmd'ing, pr.p., 
abound. 

about', adv., around; 
nearly; prep . , 
around, concerning. 

above, adv., over, 
higher up; Prep., 
over, beyond, in 
excess of. 

afro velioard, luiv.and 
adj., without con- 
cealment, open. 

abracadabra, »■, a 
cabalistic word used 
as a charm. 

abrade', v.t., to wear 
or scrape off. 

abrad'ed, p.p., 
abrade. 

abrading, p' p., 
abrade. 

Abrabam'io, adj., rel. 
to Abraham the 
patriarch. 



\> 



1 



t 



^ A'brabamite. n., a 

A. follower of the 

Gnostic preacher, 

, ^ Abraham. 

^bra'sion, n., the act 
or operation of 
abrading, wearing, 
or rubbing off. 

\)/ abra'sive, adj., tend- 
, ing to abrasion; 
useful for abrading 
y purposes. 
"v abreast', adv., on a 
level with, in line 
with. 
\ abridge',*./., to short- 
/_ eii, epitomize. 

X ' abridged', p .p •, 
' ' abridge. 

abridg'ing, pr.p., 

abridge. 
abridg'ment, n., the 
act or state of 
abridging; an epi- 
, / tome. 
Nc X abroach', adv., on 
/ tap, broached. 

< '■, abroad'r adv., out- 
side one's home or 
fatherland; in 
foreign parts. 
ab'rogate, v.t., to can- 
cel, annul, repeal. 
abrogated, p.p., ab- 
rogate. 
ab'rogating, pr.p., 

abrogate. 
abroga'tion, n., the 
act of abrogating; 
repeal of a law. 
abmpt', adj., broken 
off short, precipi- 
tous, sudden, rude, 
abmp'tion, n., a sud- 
den separation. 
abrnpt'ly, adv., steep- 
ly, suddenly.rudely. 
N/f^^ abrapt'nes8,n., steep- 
ness, rudeness. 
ab'soess, »., a sore, 

tumour. 
abscind',!;./., to sever, 

cut off. 
absds'sion, n., the 
act of severance. 
Y> \ abscond', v.i., to 
' make off, flee into 
retirement. 
abscond' ed, p.p., abs- 
cond. 
^fbscond'er, »., one 
' ,, who absconds. 

\>^ >«bscond'inc, Pr.p., 

■ abscond. 
X^ ab'sence, «., the state 
of being away or 
. absent ; lack. 
"N^ X ab'sent, adj., away; 
not present; in- 
attentive. 



x^ 

"x= 



\ 



V 



>5 



absonant 

\^' absent', v.t., to with- 
draw (oneself). 

\i_^ absent'ed, p.p., ab- 
sent. 

S' absentee', n., one who 
absents himself or is 
away; non-resident. 
\,_^ absentee'ism, »., the 
^""3=-^ practice of not re- 
siding on one's 
estate. 
absenting, pr.p., ab- 
sent. 
ab'sently, adv., in an 

absent manner. 
ab'sinth, »., a liqueur 
made from worm- 
wood and brandy. 
absin'tbian, adj., rel. 
to absinth. 
\_^^ absin'ttiiate, v.t., to 
^^* make bitter with 
wormwood. 
absin'thiated, p.p., 

ab:>iaiiiiale. 

\»^ absin'thin, n., the 
^, bitter quality in 
absinth. 

Hab'sintbism, n., the 
state induced by 
indulgence in ab- 
sinth. 

V> .absolute, adj., free, 
independent; un- 
limited; perfect; 
y^ despotic. 

^r< < absolutely, adv., per- 
fectly, quite; des- 

. potically. 

v^-* ab'solnteness, n., the 
quality of being 
> absolute. 

V^ absola'tion, »., the 
act of loosing or 

. y_ absolving from sin. 

Y-J^ absolutism, n., the 
state or condition 
of the absolute; des- 

. y_ potic rule. 

V,l absolutist, n., one 
who advocates des- 

.. V' potic rule. 

in absol'utory, adj., able 
to absolve; loosing 
from sin. 
absol'Tatory, adj., 
capable of absolv- 

» ^ absolve', v.t., to re- 
lease from sin, to 
. - pardon. 

Y absolved', p.p., sb- 
V^ solve. 
» ' absolv'er, M.,one who 
» -, absolves. 

^ ^--^,/ absolv'ing, pr.p., 
. absolv.e. 

N:? ab'sonant, adj., dis- 
cordant; unreason- 
able. 



y\ 



absorb 



V 



absorb', v.t., to draw 
ill through the 
mouth, to swallow; 
to engross. 
absorbabirity, n., the 
coud.tion of being 
absorbable. 

absorb'able, a<i;., cap- 
able of absorption. 

absorbed', p.p., ab- 
sorb. 

absorb'ent, adj., ab- 
sorbing; also n., a 
substance capable 
of absorbing. 

absorb'ing, pr.p., ab- 
sorb; adj., engros- 
sing. 

absorp'tion, n., the 
act of absorbing; 
mental preoccupa- 
tion. 

absorp'tive, adj., cap- 
able of absorbing. 

abstain', v.t., to keep 
aloof from, to re- 
frain. 

abstained', p.p., ab- 
stain. 

abstain'er, n., one 
who abstains, par- 
ticularly from al- 
cohol. 

abstAin'ing, pr.p., 
abstain. 

abste'mions, adj., 
moderate in the use 
of drink. 

abste'mionsly, adv., 
with moderation in 
regard to drink. 

abste'mionsness, n., 
the habit of moder- 
ation in regard to 
drink. 

absten'tion, n., the 
act of abstaining. 

absterge', v.t., to 
cleanse by wiping. 

absterged', p.p., ab- 
sterge. 

abster'gent, adj., 
cleansing; also n., 
that which cleanses. 

abster'ging, pr.p., 
absterge. 

absterse', adj., wiped 
clean. 

abster'sion, n., the 
act of wiping clean. 

abster'sive, adj., of 
cleansing property. 

ab'stinenoe, n., the 
act or state of 
abstaining. 

ab'stinent, adj., not 
self-indulgent. 

«b'8tinently, adv., in 
^ a manner not self- 
indulgent. 



V 
V 



abstract', v.t., to draw 
away, to remove, to 
epitomize. 

ab'stract, adj., apart 
from matter (which 
is concrete); also n., 
an epitome or sum- 
mary. 

abstract' ed, p.p., ab- 
stract; also adj., 
absent-minded. 

abstracf ediy, adv., in 
an absent-minded 
way. 

abstract' edness, n., a 
mentally absent 
state. 

abstract'er, n., one 
wlio abstracts. 

abstracting, pr.p., 
abstract. 

abstrac'Hon,n.,the 
act of abstracting; 
the state of being 
abstracted; mental 
concentration. 

abstrac'tive, adj., 
capable of attract- 
ing. 

ab'stractly, adv., in an 
abstract manner. 

ab'stractness, n., the 
quality of being 
abstract. 

abstruse', adj., hid- 
den, profound, hard 
to comprehend. 

abstrose'ly, adv., in 
an abstruse way. 

abstruse'ness, n., the 
quality of the 
abstruse. 

absurd', adj., irra- 
tional, ridiculous. 

absord'ity, n., the 
absurd state, an 
absurd thing. 

absurd'ly, adv., in an 
absurd way. 

absord'ness, n., the 
absurd state. 

abundance, n., 

plenty. 

abun'dant, adj., plen- 
tiful. 

abon'dantly, adv., 
plentifully, richljr. 

abuse', v.t., to ill- 
treat, to violate, to 
insult, to misuse. 
abuse', n., ill-treat- 
ment, insult, mis' 
use. 
abused', p.p., abuse. 

abu'ser, »., one who 

abuses. 
abu'Bfaig,/>r.^., abuse, 
abu'sive, adj., of the 
nature of abuse, in- 
sulting. 



^ 



V 



1 






~l^ 



acaras 

^ ^ abu'sively, adv., in an 
^^ insulting way. 

abn'siveness, n., the 

abusive tendency. 

abut', v.t., to make to 

touch at the side or 

\eiid; v.i., to adjoin. 
abutment, n., the act 
of abutting; that 
which is abutted 
upon or abuts. 
abuttal, n., the rela- 
tion of abutting; 
abutment. 
abut' ted, p.p., abut, 
abut' ting, pr.p., abut. 
abysm', n., an abyss, 

gulf, vast depth. 
abys'mal, adj., pro- 
found, of vast 
depth. 
abyss', M.,t.^. abysm. 
Abyssin'ian, adj. , 
native to Abyssinia. 
aca'cia, »., a shrub so 
named; (one kind 
yields gum arable). 
Aca'cian, n., a fol- 
lower of Acacius, 
Bishop of Caesarea 
in the 4th cent. 
acade'mian, n., a 
member of an Aca- 
demy; a disciple of 
. Plato. 
^V--^ academ'ic, adj., bel. 
or rel. to a Univer- 
sity; bel. to the 
Platonic School. 
academ'ical, adj., i.q. 

academic. 
Academic'ian, n., a 
member of an 
Academy. 
Acad'emist, n., an 
academic philoso- 
pher. 
acad'emy, n., a place 
of higher learning; 
a University; the 
School of Plato. 
Aca'dian, adj., bel. 
to Acadia, or Nova 
Scotia. 
Acale'pbae, n. pi., 
marinestingingzoo- 
phytes (sea-nettles 
and the like). 
acan'tha, »., a plant's 
prickle; a fish's fin; 
a spinous growth. 
acantha'ceons, adj., 

prickly. 
acan'thme, adj., rel. 
to the acanthus; n., 
the acanthus-leaf 
ornament {archit.). 
acar'diac, adj., not 

having a heart. 
ao'arus, n., a mite. 



"1. 



^^ 



acatalectie 



-11 






acataleo'tio, a4/., not 
catalectic, i.e., not 
lacking in metre. 

acatalepsy, n., epil- 
epsy. 

acatalep'tio, ai)-, in a 
state of acatalepsy. 

acan'lous, ad,\., with- 
out a stem. 

Acca'dian, n., the 
language of ancient 
Babylon. 

accede', v.>., to agree 
to. 

aooe'd ei,p.p., accede. 

acoe'dinc, pr.p., ac- 
ceile. 

acceleiate, v.t. and t., 
to quicken, hasten. 

accererated, p.p., ac- 
celerate. 

accereiating, pr.p., 
accelerate. 

acceleration, n., 
quickening of speed. 

accel'erative, adj., 
causing accelera- 
tion. 

aocererator ped'al, »■ , 
a pedal which quick- 
ens the speed of a 
motor. 

accereratory, adj., 
causing accelera- 
tion, 

accend'ible, adj., in- 
flammable. 

accen'sion, n., the 
act of lighting altar 
candles. 

ao'cent, n., stress of 
voice; printed or 
written sign on a 
syllable or letter or 
musical notej pecu- 
liar distinction of 
speech or pronun- 
ciation. 

•ocenf, v.t., to lay 
stress in speech or 
music. 

accent'ed. p.p., 

accent. 

accenf ing, pr. p., 
accent. 

accenf or, »., a bird 
genus so named; a 
leading singer. 

accentual, adj., rel. 
lo accent. 

accentuate, «.<., to 
mark with an 
accent; to give 
prominence to. 

accenf nated. p.p., 
accentuate. 

aocenf Dating, pr.p., 
accentuate. 

accentna'tion, n., the 
act of accentuating. 



— ^. 

A 

-Vi 






-1 



aocepf t v.<.,totakeor 
receive; to approve; 
to agree to pay. 

acceptability, »., the 
quality of being 
acceptable. 

acceptable, adj., able 
to be accepted; 
agreeable; welcome. 

accepfableness, n., 
the state of being 
acceptable. 

acceptance, n., the 
act of accepting; a 
state of acceptabil- 
ity; a bill of ex- 
change; agreement 
to meet a bill. 

accepta'tion, n., the 
state of being accep- 
ted; meaning, sense. 

accept'ed, />./>., accept 

accept' er, »., one who 
accepts. 

accepting, pr.p., ac- 
cept. 

accep'tion, n., fa- 
vouritism. 

•ccepf or, n., one who 
accepts; one who 
has given his accep- 
tance on a draft. 

ao'cess, »., approach 
or means of ap- 
proach ; increase ; 
attack (of disease). 

ac'cessary, *dj., aid- 
ing, contributing to; 
n., an accomplice. 

aocessibil'ity, n., the 
state or quality of 
being approached. 

acces'sible, adj., easy 
to be approached. 

acces'sibly, adv.} in 
an accessible way. 

acces'sion, n., ap- 
proach; the act of 
acceding; increase; 
a coming to the 
throne. 

aoces'sional, adj., rel. 
to an accession. 

aooes'sive, adj., tend- 
ing to accession. 

accesso'rial, adj., rel. 
to an accessory. 

ao'cessory, adj., i.q. 
accessary; »., some- 
thing additional. 

aodaocatn'ra, n., a 
grace note struck 
with another note 
but instantly re- 
leased, while the 
other continues to 
sound. 

ao'cidence, »., the 
rudimentary part of 
grammar. 



-P 



%. 



-\ 



aceommodaUng 



ao'cident, u., a chance 
occurrence; a mis- 
hap. 

accidental, o^;., hap- 
pening by chance; 
fortuitous; n., a 
musical sharp or 
flat not belonging 
to the key. 

accidental!^, adv., by 
accident. 

ao'cidie, n., loss of 
interest; ennui. 

aocip'ient, n., re- 
ceiver. 

aocip'iter. n., the 
hawk; also name 
for birds of prey. 

accip'itrine, adj., like 
the hawk. 

acclaim', v.t., to wel- 
come or approve 
with shouting; n., 
loud approval. 

acclama'tion, n., loud 
applause. 

aoclam'atory, adj., 
expressing loud ap- 
plause. 

aocli'mate, v.t., to 
accustom to cli- 
mate. 

accli'mated, p.p., ac- 
climate. 

aocli'mating, pr. p., 
acclimate. 

acclima'tion, n., the 
act of acclimating. 

acclimatim'tion. n., 
the act of adapting 
to climate. 

aodi'matize, v.t., to 
adapt to climate. 

accli'matized, p.p., 
acclimatize. 

accli'matizing, pr.p., 
acclimaf.ze. 

accli'matnre, n., the 
act of habituating 
to climate. 

acollv'ity, n., an up- 
ward slope; hill. 

aocli'Tons, adj., ris- 
ing, sloping up- 
wards. 

accolade', n., the 
stroke with the 
sword in conferring 
knighthood; the 
brace that couples 
musical staves to- 
gether. 

•ooom'modate. v.t., 
to do a service or 
convenience; to fit, 
adapt. 

aocom'modated. p.p., 
accommodate. 

aocom'modating, 
pr.p. accommodate. 



accommodation 



accasativc 



"~b 



\^ 



"> 



1 



1 






acconunoda'tion, n., 

a favour, conveni- 
ence; hospitality, 
room. 

Bccom'modative, adj., 
willing to accom- 
modate. 

accom'modator, »., 
one who accom- 
modates. 

accom'panied, p.p., 
accoiifpany. 

accom'panier, n., one 
who accompanies. 

accom'paniment, ft., 
something that 
accompanies. In 
music, an instru- 
mental support to 
the voice or other 
instruments. 

accom'panist, n., one 
who plays the 
musical accompani- 
ment. 

accom'pany, v.t., to 
go with. Musically, 
to play the accom- 
paniment. 

accom'panying, p.p., 
accompany. 

accom'pUce, n., a 
partner in crime. 

acGom'plish, v.t., to 
perform, finish. 

accom'plishable, adj., 
able to be per- 
formed. 

accom'pUshed, p.p., 
accomplish; also 
adj., = skilful, pro- 
ficient. 

accom'pUsher, n., one 
who accomplishes. 

accom plishing, pr.p., 
accomplish. 

accom' plishment, n., 
the act or state of 
accomplishing; an 
elegant acquire- 
ment. 

accord, «., agree- 
ment, consent, har- 
mony; ».<., to grant; 
».»., agree. 

aocord'ance, n. .agree- 
ment, harmony. 

accord'anoy, n., i.q. 
accordance. 

Bocoid'ant, adj., in a 
state of agreement. 

accord' antly, *io., 
agreeably. 

accord'ed, p.p., ac- 
cord. 

accord'er, n., one who 
accords. 

according, pr.p., 
accord. (Helps to 
form prepositional 






It, 



^ 



— ^ 

-1\ 



phrase, " according 
to.") 

accord'ingly, adv., in 
agreement. In spe- 
cial sense = there- 
fore. 

accord'ion, n., a reed 
instrument, so 

called. 

accost', n., to greet, 
address in words. 

accost' able, adj., able 
to be accosted. 

accost'ed, p.p., ac- 
cost. 

aocost'ing, pr.p., ac- 
cost. 

accon'chement, n., 
bringing to bed 
(Ft.); confinement. 

accondieoi', n., a 
man midwife. 

accoacheuBC', n., a 
midwife. 

account', n., sum, 
bill; description; v.t. 
and «., to esteem, 
reckon. 

accoontabil'lty, n., 
the state of being ac- 
countable; liability 
to be called to 
account. 

accoimt'able. adj., 
able to account, 
responsible. 

acconnt'ableness, n., 
the state of being 
accountable. 

accotmt'ant, n., one 
who proves or keeps 
accounts. 

accoonfantship, n., 
the art or function 
of an accountant. 

accoont'-book, n., a 
book in which ac- 
counts are entered. 

account' ed, p.p., ac- 
count. 

acoonnt'ing, pr.p., 
account. 

acconp'le, v.t., to join 
one thing to an- 
other. 

acoonp'led, p.p., ac- 
couplo. 

acconp'ling, pr.p., ac- 
couple. 

acoou'tre, ».<., to 
clothe, equip. 

accou'tied. p.p., ac- 
coutre. 

accon'tiementa, n., 
military equipment. 

aoooa'trinK. pr.p., 
accoutre. 

aocred'it, v.t., to re- 
commend, author- 
ize. 



■—.-^ 



^i 



^. 



accred'ited, p.p., ac- 
credit. 

accres'cence, n., a 
growth, addition. 

aocres'cent, adj., 
growing, being add- 
ed. 

aocre'tion, n., a 
growth, addition. 

accre'tive, adj., tend- 
ing to growth. 

accroachment, n., 
usurpation. 

aoorae', «.«., to in- 
crease, be added. 

accrued', />./>., accrue. 

accm'ing, pr.p., ac- 
crue. 

accnba'tion, n., the 
act of reclining. 

accom'bent, adj., re- 
clining at table. 

aocn'mnlate, v.t. and 
«., to pile up, amass, 
grow. 

accu'mnlated, p.p., 
accumulate. 

accu'molating, pr.p., 
accumulate. 

accimiala'tion, n., the 
act of accumulat- 
ing; a piled up mass. 

accn'mnlatiTe, adj., 
lending to accumu- 
late. 

accn'molatively, adv., 
increasingly, in 

piles. 

aocn'molator, n., one 
who accumulates; a 
power-storing ap- 
paratus. 

ac'coraoy, m., the 
state or faculty of 
being accurate. 

ao'corate, adj., care- 
ful, exact. 

ao'cnrately. adv., 
carefully, precisely. 

ac'corateness, n., the 
state of being ac- 
curate. 

acooise', v.t., to in- 
voke curses against. 

aocnrsed', ) p.p., ac- 

accors'ed, I curse. 

accnrs'ing, pr.p., ac- 
curse. 

accu'sable, adj., able 
to be accused. 

accn'sant, adj., ac- 
cusing; «., an ac- 
cuser. 

accusa'tion, n., a 
charge, indictment. 

aocn'satiTe, adj., 
bringing a charge. 
In grammar, the 
name for the objec- 
tive case. 



accusatively 



1 
^^. 



-ru 



i 
\ 



acoD'satiTely, adv., in ! 
the manner of an 
accusation. 

SOOU'satoiy, adj., in- 
criminating, accus- 
ing. 

accuse' ,v.<., to charge, 
mdict. 

accosed', p-p., accuse. 

aoous'er. n., one who 
brings a charge. 

accns'ing, pr.p., ac- 
cuse. 

aocns'tom, v.t., to 
habituate. 

accns'tomarily, adv., 
habitually, in wont- 
ed manner 

aocos'tomary, adj., 
habitual, wonted. 

accns'tomed. p.p., 
accustom. 

accos'toming, pr.p., 
accustom. 

ace, n., a single pip on 
playing-card;aunit. 

ace'dia, n., see ac- 
cidie. 

Aceldama, n., the 
field of blood. 

acen'tiio, adj., with- 
out a centre. 

Aceph'ala, n., bi- 
valves; headless 
molluscs. 

aceph'alotu, adj., 
headless. 

a'cer, n., the maple- 
tree. 

ac'erate, adj., needle- 
pointed. 

acerbate, v.t., to em- 
bitter, exasperate. 

aceib'i^, n., bitter 
quality, bitterness. 

ac'eiose, adj., needle- 
shaped. 

a'cervate, adj., mas- 
sed or heaped to- 
gether. 

aces'cence, n., a sour- 
ing. 

aces'cency, n., the 
quality or state of 
turning sour. 

aces' cent, adj., turn- 
ing sour. 

aceta'rioos, adj., used 
in salad. 

acet'ary, n., the sour 
pulp in a pear, etc. 

ac'etate, v.a., salt of 
acetic acid. 

ac'etated, adj., com- 
bined with acetic 
acid. 

ace' tic, adj., of the 
nature of vinegar. 

acet'ified, p.p., acet- 
ify. 



^ 



L 



V 



Kr 



k^ 



^A, 



acet'Uy, v.t., to turn 
into vinegar; «.«'., to 
become sour. 

acet'ifying, pr-p; 
acetify. 

acetom'etei, n., an in- 
strument for ascer- 
taining the strength 
of acetic acid. 

ao'etone, n., an in- 
flammable liquid, 
sharp-tasted. 

ac'eiose', adj., pro- 
ducing or rel. to 
vinegar. 

acetos'ity, n., acidity. 

ac'etoQS, adj., i.q. 
acetose. 

ace' turn, n., vinegar 
(Lot.). 

acet'ylene, n. and 
adj., a colourless 
inflammable gas, so 
named, 

Ache'an, adj., bel. to 
Achea (a tribal dis- 
trict of ancient 
Greece). 

Acbai'an, adj., bel. to 
the Achaioi, i.q. 
Achean. 

ache, n. and v.i., 
pain; to be painful. 

ached, p.p., ache. 

A'oheron, n., a fabled 
river in Hades. 

achiev'able, adj., able 
, to be achieved. 

.achieve', v.^, to ac- 
complish by cour- 
age or skill or per- 
severance; to finish 
successfully. 

achieved', p.p., 

achieve. 

achieve'ment, n., 
somethingachieved. 

achiev'er, n., one who' 
achieves. 

achiev'ing, pr-p-, 
achieve. 

ach'ing, pr.p., ache. 

a'chOT, n., a variety 
of eczema. 

aohiomat'ic, adj., col- 
ourless; forming im- 
ages without their 
prismatic colouring. 

achro'matism, n., the 
achromatic state or 
quality. 

acbro'matize, v.t., to 
make achromatic. 

acic'tllar, adj., sharp- 
pointed. 

acio'nlate, adj., bear- 
ing prickles or bris- 
tles. 

aoic'nlifonn, a<i;., 
needle-shaped. 



acorned 



ac'id, n. and adj., 

sour, tart, 
acidiferoos, adj., 

acid-yielding. 
acidifica'tion, n., the 
act of converting to 
acid. 
acid'ifled, p.p., acid- 
ify. 
acid'ifter, »., one who 

acidifies. 
acid'ify, v.t. and t., to 
make or become 
acid. 
acid'ifying, pr.p., 

acidify. 
acidim'eter, n., an 
apparatus for test- 
ing the strength of 
an acid. 
acid'ity, n., the acid 

quality, sourness. 
acid'olae, n., cold 
acid mineral water- 
springs. 
acid'nlate, v.t., to 

make acfd. 
acid'olated, ^./>.,acid- 

ulate 
acid'olating, Pr.p., 

acidulate. 
acidula'tion, n., the 

act of acidulating. 
acid' vilova,adj. ,sl igh t- 

ly acid. 
a'ciform, adj., needle- 
shaped. 
\ ackaowl'edge, v.t., 
\ to own, admit. 
\ackaowl'edged, 
i p.p., acknowledge. 
J ackaowl'edgvt, n., 
I one who acknowl- 
edges. 
ackaowl'edging, 
pr.p., acknowledge. 
ackjiowfedgment, 
n., the act of ac- 
knowledging; re- 
turn of a favour. 
— '-> ' ac'me, n., highest 
point (a Gr. word). 
• — ^^. ac'ne, n., an erup- 
tion; maggot-pim- 
ple. 

j acock', adv., cocked. 

j_/7 ykooYogy, n., thera- 
T^peutics, the science 
of remedies. 
-r^ ac'olyte, n., the at- 
tendant on a priest. 
^T^^ ac'uiite, n., the plant 
monk's-hood, or 
wolf's-bane. 
atMm'itine, adj. , of the 
y, quality of aconite, 
r*-/ a'corn. n., the fruit 

of the oaji. 
r*-^ a'comed, adj., aoocn- 
bearing. 



aeotyledon 



actively 



A 









acotyle'don, n., a 

plant not having 
seed-lobes. 

acotyle'donoos, mdj., 
destitute of cotyle- 
dons (or seed-lobes). 

aoou'ohy, n., the Sur- 
inam rat. 

aeons' tic, adj., rel. to 
hearing. 

aoonst'ical, adj., rel. 
to hearing. 

aoqoaiat', v.t., to 
make known, to 
make oneself famil- 
iar with. 

aoQnaint'ance, n., the 
state of being ac- 
quainted; a person 
known, but not in- 
timately. 

acquaint' anceship, n., 
i.q. acquaintance. 

aoqnaint'ed, p.p., ac- 
quaint; informed 
about. 

aoaoaiot'ing, pr.p., 
acquaint. 

aoqoesf , »., property 
acquired otherwise 
than by inheritance. 

acqoiesce', v.i., to 
take passively, sub- 
mit to. 

aoqniesced', p.p., ac- 
quiesce. . 

aoqoies'oaice, n., the 
state or act of 
acquiescing. 

acQoies'oent, »dj., 
ready to acquiesce 
or submit. 

aoqniea'dng, pr.p., 
acquiesce. 

aoqaiiabil'ity, n., the 
state of being ac- 
quirable. 

aeqoir'able, adj., able 
to be acquired. 

aoqnire'. v./., to ob- 
tain, attain, gain 
possession. 

acqnired', p.p., ac- 
quire. 

acaoire'ment, n., the 
act or state of 
acquiring; a thing 
acquired. 

aoaoir'er, n., one who 
acquires. 

aoqnir'ing, pr.p., ac- 
quire. 

aoQoisi'tlon, n., the 
act of acquiring; a 
valuable gain. 

aoqois'itive, a4; . , of an 
acquiring tendency. 

aoqtus'itiTely, adv.,iD. 
an acquisitive man- 
ner. 



n. 



acqais'ltiveness, n., 

the acquiring tend- 
ency. 

acquit', v./., to free or 
clear, exculpate; re- 
flexively, to bear 
oneself. 

acqoit'ment, n., the 
act of acquitting. 

acquit' taU »., the act 
or state of acquit- 
ting. 

acquit' tance, n., dis- 
charge, release. 

acquitted, p.p., ac- 
quit. 

acquit' ting, pr.p., ac- 
quit. 

Ao'rasy, n., intem- 
perance personified. 

a'cre, n., a measure of 
surface, a field. 

a'creage, n., the ex- 
tent in acres. 

a'oied, adj., possess- 
ing or containing 
acres. 

ac'rid, adj., sharp, 
pungent, corrosive. 

arafid'ity, »., the acrid 
state or quality. 

ac'ridness, »., the 
acrid quality. 

aciimo'nious, adj., 
full of bitterness, 
spiteful. 

acrimo'niously, adv., 
in an acrimonious 
way. 

aorimo'nionsness, n., 
the acrimonious 
quality. 

ao'rimony, w., bitter- 
ness, spitefulness. 

acrit'ical, adj., with- 
out a crisis. 

acroat'ic, adj. rel. to 
esoteric teaching. 

ac'robat, »., a gym- 
nast — rope dancer, 
tumbler, and the 
like. 

Acrocerau'nian, adj., 
bel. to Acrocerau- 
nia, a Grecian 
promontory. 

ac'rogen, n., an or- 
ganism that grows 
at the apex only. 

aciog'enous, adj., 
growing at the 
apex. 

acrog'raphy. n., the 
process of making a 
relief printing-block 

ao'rolitb. n., a figiire 
with a head made of 
stone. 

Acrop'olis, n., a city 
stronghold {Gr.). 



'^ 



rt. 






n. 



^ 



'^ 



ao'rospire, v.t., to ger- 
miiiaie; n., the first 
sprout. 

ao'iospired, p.p., ac- 
rospire. 

across', prep, and 
adv., athwart, to 
the opposite side, 
over. 

acros'tic, n. and adj., 
a composition, in 
which certain let- 
ters, usually the 
first in a line, 
make words. 

aoros'tically, adv., 
acrostic-wise. 

acrote'ria, n. pi., or- 
naments above a 
building or pedi- 
ment. 

act, n., a thing done 
or performed; the 
doing of a thing; a 
Parliamentary mea- 
sure made law; a 
main division of a 
drama; v.t. and »., 
to perform, do, 
play. 

act'ed, p.p., act. 

Ao'tiaa, adj., bel. to 
Actium (a promon- 
tory of ancient 
Greece). 

aofing, />f.^., act;n., 
an actor's business. 

actin'ic, adj., rel. to 
rays. 

actin'ilonn, adj., ra- 
diated. 

ac'tinism, h., radia- 
tion; the property 
of radiant energy. 

actin'ograph, n., a 
ray-recording in- 
strument. 

actinol'ogy, n., the 
science or study of 
rays. 

aotinom'eter, »., in- 
strument for mea- 
suring rays. 

ao'tioD, n., the state 
of doing or acting; 
the thing done; law- 
suit. 

ao'tionable,a<;;. , 1 iable 
to an action or law- 
suit. 

ac'tionary, tt. , a stock- 
holder. 

ao'tionist, n., i.q. ac- 
tionary. 

ac'tionless, adj. .with- 
out action. 

ao'tive, adj., full of 
action, lively. 

ao'tively, adv., in an 
active way. 



activity 



J- 

A 

y 



1: 



■^ 



-^ 



~M 






1/ 



activ'ity, n., the ac- 
tive state. 

act' or, «., one who 
acts; a player 
(dram.). 

aot'ress, »«., a woman 
who acts. 

actual, ad]., real, 
existing. 

BCtuarity,u.,the state 
of being actual. 

actualize, v.(., to 
make real. 

act'oally, adv., really, 
111 fact. 

actua'rial, ad\., rel. 
lo an actuary. 

actua'riaDy, ado., by 
actuarial methods. 

act' nary, «., a regis- 
trar; one skilled in 
insurance business, 
rates of mortality, 
etc. 

act'uate, v.f., to move, 
influence. 

act'uated, p.p., act- 
uate. 

actuating, pr.p., act- 
uate. 

actoa'tion, n., the 
state of being act- 
uated. 

acu'leate, adj., armed 
with a sting. 

acn'leated, ad)., i.q. 
aculeate. 

acn'men, n., sharp- 
ness, wit, sagacity. 

acu'minate, adj., ta- 
pering. 

acu'minated, i.q. acu- 
minate. 

acomina'tion, n., the 
ending in a point. 

aca'minotis, adj., 
p-Mnted. 

acapress'nre, «., stop- 
ping bleeduig by 
means of a sutiu'e. 

acnpnnctnra'tion, n., 
the act of pricking 
with a needle. 

acnpnnct'ure, n., 
pricking with a 
needle. 

sate', adj., pointed, 
sharp; shrill. 

acate'ly, luiv., sharply, 
clcverlv. 

acnte'ness. n., the 
state or qualilv 
being of acute. 

adac'tyl. adj., having 
neither fingers nor 
toes. 

ad'age, n., a common 
or old saying. 

ada'gio, adj. and adv., 
in slow (mus.) time; 



\ — 

\ . 
\ 



K 

K 



n., a slow move- 
ment so named. 

ad'amant, n., a hard 
stone; the diamond. 

adamante'an, adj., 
like adamant; hard- 
hearted. 

adaman'tine, adj., of 
adamant; hard- 
hearted. 

Adam'ic, adj., rel. to 
.Vdain. 

Ad'amite, n., human, 
sprung from Adam. 

Adamit'ic, adj., ret. 
to Adam. 

Ad'am's-ap'ple, n., 
the ball in the front 
of a man's throat. 

adapt', tr.<., to fit, 
make suitable, alter. 

adaptability, n., the 
power to be adapt- 
ed. 

adapt' able, adj., able 
to be adapted. 

adapt' ableness, n. , the 
adaptable capacity. 

adapta'tion, n., tlie 
act of adapting; a 
thing adapted. 

adapted, p.p., adapt. 

adapt'ei, n., one who 
adapts. 

adapt' ing, ^r./). .adapt 

adapt' ive, adj., cap- 
' able of adapting. 

add, v.t., to put one 
thing to another; to 
say something more. 

adden'da, n., things 
to be added. 

adden'dum, n., a 
thing to be added. 

ad'der, n., a poison- 
ous reptile; one who 
adds. 

addibil'ity, n., fitness 
I'l be added. 

ad dible, adj., capable 
of addition. 

addict'. v.t., to give 
over to. 

addic' ted, />./>., addict, 
gi^nerally in sense of 
prone to, given up 
to. 

addict'edness, n., the 
state of addicted. 

addicting, pr.p., ad- 
dict. 

addic'tion, »., the act 
of addicting one- 
self. 

addictive, adj., in- 
clined to addict. 

ail' ding, pr.p., add. 

addit'ament, n., an 
addition. 

addi'tion, n., the act 






r^ 



adenoid 



of adding; a thing 
added. 

addi'tionaU adj., ad- 
ded. 

ad'dle, v.t., to mud- 
dle, u.i., become ad- 
dled. 

ad' died, p.p., addle 
rotten, confused. 

ad'dle-head'ed, adj. 
withconfused brain 

addle-pa' ted, adj., 
i.q. addle-headed. 

ad'dling, pr.p., addle 
also ad]., confusing. 

address', v.t., to speak 
to; to direct some- 
thing to; to prepare 
to strike (a golf 
ball); n., a con- 
gratulatory speech 
or letter; a public 
lecture or discourse; 
skilftUness; man- 
ners; direction. 

addressed', p.p., ad- 

' dress. 

addressee', n., one to 
whom a thing is 
addressed. 

a3dres8'er, «., one 
who addresses. 

address'ing, pr.p., 
address. 

adduce', ».<., to bring 
I'lrward or cite. 

adduced', p.p., ad- 
duce. 

alda'cent, adj., draw- 
ing together. 

addn'cer, n., one who 
adduces. 

adda'cible, adj., able 
to be adduced. 

aidn'oing, pr.p., ad- 
duce. 

addact', v.t., to dra-.v 
towards the axis of 
a limb or body. 

addnc'tion, n., the 
act of adducting, as 
of muscles. 

addnc'tive, a<ij., with 
power to adduct. 

adduc'tor, n., an ad- 
ducting muscle. 

ad'eling, n., one of 
princely descent. 

adel'opode, adj., hav- 
ing concealed feet. 

adel'phia, «., brother- 
hood, or group of 
stamens. 

ademption, n., the 
act of depriving. 

adeuog'raphy, «., des- 
criptive anatomy of 
the glands. 

ad'enoid, adj., glandi- 
> form, glandular. 



lA— (172) 



adenological 




Bdenolc^ical, adj., 
rel. to the study of 
the glands. 

adenoVog?, n., the 
study of the glands. 

adeno'ma, n., a glan- 
dular kind of tu- 
mour. 

ad'enose, adj., glan- 
duiar. 

adenot'oniy, »., the 
cutting '>f a gland. 

ad'enoos, adj., glan- 
dular. 

ad'eps, n., fat (Lat.). 

adept', adj., skilled, 
export; «., an ex- 
pert person. 

ad'equacy, n., the 
state of being ade- 
quate. 

ad'eqtiate, adj., equal 
to, compotent, suffi- 
cient. 

ad'eqnately, adv., in 
an adequate man- 
ner or degree. 

ad'eqnateness, n., the 
state of being ade- 
_ quate. 

adhere', v.i., to stick 
to, cling to, support. 

adhered', p.p., adhere. 

adher'ence, »., the 
act of adhering. 

adher'ency, n., the 
tendency to adhere. 

adher'ent, adj., stick- 
ing to; n., a sup- 
porter. 

adber'ently, aifv., in a 
clinging or closely 
joined way. 

adher'er, n. , one who 
supports or clings. 

adber'mg, pr.p., ad- 
here. 

adhe'sion, n., the act 
or quality of adher- 
ing; a thing that 
adheres. 

adhe'give, adj., stick- 
ing, attached. 

adbe'sively, adv., with 
adhesion. 

adhe'siveness, "., the 

- tendency to adhere. 

adhib'it, v.t., to let 
in; to attach; to use. 

adhib'ited, p.p., ad- 
hibit. 

adhibi'tion, n., the 
act of adhibiting. 

adiaph'orons, adj., 
opaque. 

adien', a Fr. phrase, 
i Dieu = farewell, 
used either as inter- 
jection or as noun. 

adipoc'erate, v.t., to 



10 



convert into adi- 
pocere. 

ad'ipocere, n., a light 
fatty substance. 

ad'ipose, oilj. and n., 
fat. 

adipo'sity, n., a ten- 
dency to fat. 

ad'ipsy, n., absence 
of thirst. 

ad'it, «., approach, 
entrance. 

adja'cence, »., the 
state of being near. 

adja'cency, n., neigh- 
bourhofid . 

adja'cent, adj., situa- 
ted near. 

adja'cently, adv., con- 
tiguously. 

adject', "-'■, to join. 

adject'ed,/>.p., adject. 

adject ing, pr.p., ad- 
ject. 

iljec'tion, n., the act 
of adjecting. 

adjecti'val, adj., of 
the nature of an 
adjective. 
Z_^ ad'jective, »., the 
U grammatical term 
for words denoting 
qualities or des- 
. cribing nouns. 

L-. ad'lectively, adv., in 
rJ the manner of ad- 

jectives. 

adjoin', v.t., to lie 
near, to be joined to. 

adjoined', p-P-i ^d' 
join. 

adjoin'ing, pr.p., ad- 
join; adj., next to, 
^ / contiguous. 
^ /adjonm', v.t. and »., 
I to put off to another 
time; to leave off. 

adjoDmed', p.p., ad- 
journ. 

adjoom'ing. pr.p., 
adjourn. 

adjourn' ment, n., the 
act of adjourning, 

adjudge', v.t., to de- 
cide judicially. 

adjudged', p.p., ad- 
judgL'. 

adjudging, pr.p., 
adjudge. 

adjn'dintte, v.t., to 
sit or decide as a 
judge. 

adju'dicated, p.p., 
adjudicate. 

adjn'dicating, pr.p., 
adjudicate. 

adjndioa'tion, n., the 
act of adjudicating. 

adjn'dicator, n., one 
who adjudicates. 









r 



C 



/ 



/. 



t 



M 






fv 



/■ 
I 



J 

I 

L 

L 
h 



administer 



alja'dicature, n., i.q. 
adjudication. 

ad'juuct, ft., some- 
thmg added. 

adjunction, n., the 
act of joining; a 
thing joined. 

adjunc'tive, adj., 
tending to join. 

adjunc'tively, adv., in 
an adjunctive way. 

adjimct'ly, adv., as 
something added. 

adjura'tion, n., a 
solemn appeal; a 
solemn oath; the 
act of adjuring. 

adjn'ratory, adj., of 
the nature of au 
adjuration. 

adjure', v.t., to make 
a solemn charge or 
appeal. 

adjured', p.p., ad- 
jure. 

adjnr'er, n., one who 
adjures. 

adjnr'ing, pr.p., ad- 
jure. 

adjust', v.t., to fit, 
make exact, settle. 

adjusfable, adj., able 
to be adjusted. 

adjusfed, p.p., ad- 
just. 

adjnsf er, n., one who 
adjusts. 

adjusting, pr.p., ad- 
just. 

adjust'ive, adj., cap- 
able of adjusting. 

sdjnst'ment, n., the 
act or state of 
adjusting; a regula- 
ting means, as in a 
watch; asettlement. 

ad'jntancy, n., the 
office or rank of 
adjutant. 

ad'jutant, n., an offi- 
cer who helps the 
commandingofficer. 

ad'jutant - gen'eral, 
n., the principal 
assistant to the com- 
mander of an army. 

adjn'tor, n., a helper, 
assistant (Lai.) 

adjn'trix, «., fem. of 
adjutor. 

ad'jnvant, adj. , assist- 
ing. 

admeas'ure, v.t., to 
apportion. 

admeas'urement, n., 
the act or state of 
admeasuring. 

admin'ister, v.t., to 
perform, execute; 
help. 



administered 



11 



adulate 






1'^ 



1 j administered, p.p., 

' administer. 

administe'rial, adj., 
rel. to administra- 
tion. 

admin' istering, pr.p., 
admit\isier. 

admin' istrable, adj., 
able to be admiu- 
istered. 

h' adntin' Istrate, v.l., 
j to conduct, man- 
age, govern. 
admlnlstra' tloa,n. 
the act of governing; 
the government. 
admia'Istratlve, 
adj., capable of 
administering. 
UO' admlnlstra tor, n., 
, one who administers. 
I_^ ad m I n'Istra'tor- 
y \ ship, n., the fuiic- 
i tion of administer- 
ing- 
L_,_j admialstra'trlx, 
»., fern, of admin- 
istrator. 
I /. admirabirity, n., fit- 
ness to be admired. 
I^^V^admirable, adj., wor- 
thy to be admired, 
ad'miral, n., the com- 
mander of a fleet, 
ad'miialsbip, n., skill 
in commanding a 
fleet. 
Ad'miralty, n., the 
supreme authority 
in the navy; the 
governing board, 
admira'tion, n., won- 
der, regard. 
admire', v.t., to won- 
der at, esteem, 
admired', p.p., ad- 
mire. 
admir'er, n., one who 

admires. 
admit' ing, pr.p., ad- 
mire. 
admii'ingly, adv., like 

one wlio admires, 
admissibil'ity, n., the 

bfiiig admissible. 

admis'sible, adj., able 

to be admitted or 

permitted or con- 

• ccived. 
[_ \1 admis'sion, «., the 

T act of letting in or 
j admitting; conces- 
I sion. 

^y ! admis'sory, adj., giv- 
ing admission. 

t^ i admif , v.t., to let in; 

• acknowledge, con- 
] cetle. 

L ; admit'table, ai^;.,aUe 
\ to be admitted. 






u 



V 



It- 



U. 



■^ 









W 









li 



admif tance, n., per- 
mission to enter. 
admitted, p.p., ad- 
nut. 
admit' tei, n., one who 
admits. 
l^ ; admit' ting, pr.p., ad- 
•j — mit. 

l_ 4 admix', v.t., to mix 

together. 
l-^.^ adnuxed', p.p., ad- 

UliX. 

I y admiz'tion, n., the 

I act or state of ad- 
mixing. 
L^ admixture, n., the 
1 act of admixing; an 
assembly of mixed 
things. 
\ admon'isb. v.t., to 
^ warn, reprove. 
|_^^^ admon'isbed. p.p., 
' admonish. 

t__^ admon'isher, n., one 
who admonishes. 
admon'ishing, pr.p., 

admonish. 
admoni'tion, n., the 
act of admonishing; 
warning. 
admon'itor, n., one 
who admonishes. 
l-^_^, . admon'itory, adj. rel. 
' y^ to admonition; 
warning. 
admortization, n., 

i.q. amortization. 
adnas'cence, n., ad- 
hesion, growing on 
to. 
ad'nate. adj., grown 
together. 
|_,_^^Nadnom'inal. adj., ad- 
^ ' jectival. 

ado', n., stir, trouble, 

fuss. 
ado'be. »., sim-dried 
brick; adj., made of 
sun-dried firick. 
cence, n., state 

., -,_, ^ owing up. 

J- adoles'cency, n., pe- 
(\ riod of growing up. 

^^ J adoles'cent. adj., in 

the growing-up 

stage. 
Adonai', n., a Hebrew 

name for God. 
Adone'an. adj., i.q. 

Adonic. 
Adon'io, adj. rel. to 

Adonis. 
•don'is, n., a beauty, 

a dandy. (The 

original Adonis was 

beloved by Venus.) 
adopf , v.t., to take to 

oneself, to choose; 

to take as one's 

own child. 



"y, sun-ar 
J^adoles'c 



i 



b 

c 



ll. 



c\ 



N 



\i 



1^ 









T-. 



I 



1 

j. 



u 



adopf ed. p.p., adopt. 

adopt' er, n., one who 
adopts. 

adopt'ing, pr.p. ,aido^t 

odop tion, n., the act 
of adopting. 

adop'tionist, n., one 
who believes that 
Our Lord is only 
God's adopted Son. 

odop'tive, aiij., rel. to 
auoplioii. 

ador'able, adj., fit to 
be adored. 

ador'ableDess, »., 
adorable state ; fit- 
ness to be adored. 

adora'tion, n., the 
act of adoring. 

adore', v.t., to wor- 
ship; love exceed- 
ingly. 

adored', p.p., adore. 

adoi'er. »., one who 
adores. 

ador'ing, pr.p., adore. 

adoringly, adv., in an 
ailoriiig way. 

adorn', v.t., to beau- 
tily, decorate. 

adorned', p.p., adorn. 

adorn' er, »., one who 
adcirns. 

adom'ing, pr.p., ad- 
orn. 

adom'ment. n., act 
of adorning; an em- 
bellishment. 

adoscnla'tion, n., im- 
pregnation of flow- 
ers or ova. 

adown', adv. and 
prep., down; down 
along. 

adrift', adv., driven 
by stream or wind. 

aJnp', adv., in a 
dripping state. 

adroga'tion, »., adop- 
tion. 

adroit', adj., skilful, 
nimble. 

adioit'Iy, adv., in 
adroit manner. 

adroit'ness. n., the 
adroit state or fac- 
ility. 

aSiif,aiij., thirsty. 

adsdti'tions, adj., ad- 
ditional, unessen- 
tial. 

adsciti'tionsly, adv., 
in an adscilitious 
way. 

ad'script. adj., writ- 
ten later; n., a serf 
attached to the soil. 

ad'nlate. v.t., to be- 
stow fulsome flat- 
tery on. 



adulation 



K 



adnla'tion, n., ful- 
some flattery. 
ad'nlatoi, n., oue who 

adulates. 

ad'ulatory, adj., ful- 
soaiely flattering. 

adult', n., one grown 
up; ad/., grown up, 
of full age. 

alol'teiant, ad]., ad- 
ulterating; n., a 
person or thing that 
adulterates. 

adulterate, v.i., to 
corrupt, make im- 
pure. 

adul'terated, p.p., ad- 

ulltT.iie. 

adulterating, pr.p., 
adulterate. 

adoltera'tion, n., the 
act or effect of 
adulterating. 

adol'terator, n., one 
who adulterates. 

adol'terer, n., one 
who commits adul- 
tery. 

aiul'teress, n., fem. 
of adulterer. 

adulterous, ad]., rel. 
to adultery. 

adnl'teronsly, adx., in 
the manner of an 
adulterer. 

adul'tery, n., the act 
of breaking the 
marriage vows. 

adolt'ness, n., matur- 
ity, the state of 
being grown up. 

admn'bra, n., the 
penumbra of an 
eclipse of the 
moon. 

adom'brant, ad]., in 
outline, faintly 

shadowing. 

Bd'ombrate, v.t., to 
sketch in outline, 
to typify. 

ad'nmbrated, />.^. , ad- 
umbrate. 

ad'nmbratiiig, pr.p., 
adumbrate. 

adambra'tion, n., the 
act of adumbrating; 
a faint sketch. 

aduncate. ai]., 

houkra. 

adunc'ous, ai]., 
hooked. 

adust', ad]., burnt, 
dried up; adv., in 
the dust. 

advance', v.t. and %., 
to put forward, 
move forward, give 
beforehand, in- 
crease (price). 



u 

i 

t 

A. 

U 
I. 

b. 



12 



advance', n., the act 

ol advancing, pro- 
gress; payment in 
advance. 

advanced', p.p., ad- 
vance. 

advance'ment, n., the 
act or state of ad- 
vancing; promo- 
tion, furtherance. 

advan'cer, n., one 
who advances. 

advan'cing, pf.p., ad- 
vance. 

advan'cive, adj., pro- 
moting advance. 

advan'tage,n.,gdL\n, 
profit, superiority; 
v.t., to be of service 
to, to benefit. 

advantaged, p.p., ad- 
vantage. 

advania'geoxi!,. adj. 
profitable, useful. 

a d V a a t a' K eonsAy, 
adv., with profit or 
advantage. 

advanta' geoxissM9S, 

n., the state of be- 
nig advantageous. 

advaat'agiag, pr.p. 
advantage. 

advene', «.»., to come 
lo, arrive; to be 
added. 

adve'nient, adj., ad- 
ditional. 

ad'vent, n., coming, 
arrival ; the four 
weeks before Christ- 
mas. 

adventi'tions, adj. ,ad- 
ditional, casual. 

adventi'tiously, adv., 
additionally, casu- 
ally. 

adventi'tiousness, n., 
the quality of being 
casual. 

advent'ual, adj., rel. 
to Advent. 

adven'ture, n., a haz- 
ardous enterprise, a 
risk; v.t. and »., to 
embark on an 
enterprise. 

adven'tuied, p.p., ad- 
venture. 

adven'torer, n., one 
who adventures; a 
trickster. 

adven'turesome, adj., 

prone lo adventlU"i'. 

adven'turess, «., fem. 

ot adventurer. 
adven' taring, pr.p., 

adventure. 
adventurous, adj., 

bold, ready to take 

ri?ks. 



1 — -^■ 



advised 



adven'turously, adv., 

daringly. 
adven' tnrousness, »., 

boldness, daring. 

ad' verb, n., a word 
that qualifies verbs, 
adjectives, or ad- 
verbs. 

adverb'ial, adj., rel. 
to an adverb. 

adverbially, adv., hi 
the manner of an 
adverb. 

ad'versary, n., op- 
ponent, enemy. 

adver'sative, adj. ,con- 

y trary, antithetical. 

\ ad' verse, adj., op- 

ix)sed, contrary to. 

ad'versely, adv., in a 
contrary or hostile 
way. 

ad'verseness,.n., the 
adverse state. 

adver'sity, n., bad 
lortime, misfortune, 
misery. 

advert', v.i. and «., to 
tiun, direct ; to refer 
to. 

advert'ed. p.p., ad- 
vert. 

advert' ence, «., at- 
tention. 

advert'ency, «., the 
attentive stale. 

advert' ent, ad] , at- 
1 tentive. 

^ advert'eatly,a<iu., at- 
tentively. 

advert'iag, pr.p., ad- 
vert. 

advertise, v.i., to 
proclaim publicly, 
make knowu. 

advertised, p.p., 
advertise. 
^ aiJver'tiiement,n., 
*-- publication, notice. 
J ad'vertiser, n., one 
^>^ who advertises. 
J ''^ aif vert /sing, pr.p., 
»-. advertise. 

K, advice', n., counsel, 



h 



I 



u 






-\ 






warning 

advisabil'ity, n., the 
state of being ad- 
visable. 

advis'able, adj., able 
to be recommended ; 
wise, prudent. 

advis'ableness, n., i.q. 
advisability. 

advis'ably, adv., wise- 
ly, ui a way to be 
approved. 

advise', v.t., to give 
notice; to warn; to 
inform. 

advised', p.p., advise. 



advisedly 



13 



a Sectioned 



V 



L 



L 






advis'edly, adv., upon 
consideration, with 
all care. 

adviser, n., one who 
advises. 

advise' ment, n., con- 
sultation, delibera- 
tion. 

advising, pr.p., ad- 

V1:>1-. 

advis'ory, adj., with 
powrr to advise. 

ad'vocaoy, «., the act 
of advocating. 

ad'vocate, n., the 
pleader of a cause; 
v.t., to plead, urge, 
support. 

advocated, p.p., ad- 
vocate. 

ad'vocatesbip, n., the 
oftice of advocate. 

advocating, pr-p., 
advocate. 

advocation, n., the 
act of transferring a 
law-case to another 
court (Scottish); ap- 
peal. 

advow'ee, n. , a patron 
holding an advow- 
son. 

advow'son, n., the 
right of presenta- 
tion to a benefice. 

adynam'ia, n., loss of 
pliysical strength. 

adynam'io, adj., rel. 
to adynamia; un- 
affected by force. 

ad'ytom, n., inner 
shrine; recess (La/.). 

adze, n., an axe-lilie 
to-jl. 

ae'dile, n., a Roman 
magistrate entrus- 
ted with the care 
of public building";, 
markets, games and 
so forth. A\iO e'dile. 

Aege'an, adj., rel. to 
the Archipelago. 

aegis, n., the pro- 
tecting shield of 
Zeus. 

aegro'tat, n., a cer- 
tificate of sickness. 

Aene'id, n., Virgil's 
poem on Aeneas. 

Aeo'Uan, adj., bel. 
to Aeolia. 

ae'on, »., an age, 
greatlengthof time. 

a'erate, v.t., to im- 
pregnate with air. 

a'erated, p.p., aerate. 

aerating, pr.p., aer- 
ate. 

aera'tion, n., the pro- 
cess of aerating. 



^ 






ae'rial, adj., of the 
air; high up. 

a'erie, n., a bird of 
prey's nest. 

aeriflca'tion, n., the 
pr<x;ess or state of 
aerifying. 

a'eriiled, p.p., aerify. 

a'erify, v.t., to fill 
with air. 

a'erodiome, «., a fly- 
ing-maclune course. 

aerodynamics, n., the 
science of the laws 
of motion of gases. 

aerog'raphy, n., des- 
cription of the at- 
mosphere. 

a'erolite, n., a me- 
teoric stone. 

a'erolitb, n., i.g. aero- 
lite. 

aerolif io, adj., rel. to 
aerolites. 

aerolog'ical, adj., rel. 
to aerology. 

aerol'ogist, u., a stu- 
dent of aerology. 

aerology, n., the 
science of the at- 
mosphere. 

a'eromancy, n. divi- 
nation of the sky. 

aerom'eter, n., an 
apparatus for dis- 
covering the ten- 
sion of air. 

aeromet'ric, adj., rel. 
to aerometry. 

aerom'etry, n., the 
science of weighing 
and measuring air 
and gases. 

aeronaut, n., a sky- 
sailor. 

aeronau'tic, adj., rel. 
to sky-sailing. 

aeronan'tics, n., the 
art and science of 
sky-sailing. 

a'eropbyte, »., an air- 
plant, such as the 
orchid, that grows 
in the air. 

a'eroplane, n., a heav- 
ier than air flying- 
machine, with one 
or more planes or 
fixed surfaces. 

a'eroplanist, n., one 
who flies in an 
aeroplane. 

aeros'copy, n., ob- 
servation of atmos- 
pheric phenomena. 

aerostat, n., an air 
balloon. 

aerostatics, n., the 
statical science of 
air; ballooning. 



5 

I 

si 

S 
\ 



aerosta'tkn, n., bal- 
looning. 

a'ery, adj., high in 
air; spiritual. 

Aescola' pian, act; . , rel . 
to Aesculapius. 

Aescula'pius, »., the 
Roman god of heal- 
ing. 

aestbefic, adj., bel. 
to good taste or 
fine perception {see 
esthetic). 

aesthet'ical, adj., i.g. 
aesthetic. 

afar', adv., at a dis- 
tance, far off. 

a!eard', adj., afraid, 
frightened. 

atlabil'ity, n., the 
quality of affable. 

affable, adj., ready 
to be spoken to, 
gracious. 

af'fableness, n., the 
quality of affable. 

affably, adv., gra- 
ciously, agreeably. . 

affair', n., a thing, 
matter, business, 
military engage- 
ment. 

affecf, v.t., to in- 
fluence, act upon; 
to assume, adopt, 
pretend. 

affectation, »., an 
assumed pose, a 
pretence. 
^aSect'ed, pp.., afject; 
also adj., showing 
affectation. 

affect' edly, adv., in an 
affected way. 

affect' edness, n., i.q., 
affectation. 

afleotibil'ity, n., an 
affectible condi- 
tion. 

aflect'ible, adj., cap- 
able of being affec- 
ted. 

affecting, pr.p., af- 
fect. 

affect'ingly, adv., 
touchingly. 

affection, n., love, 
tender feeling, fond- 
ness for; disease. 

•Seo'tional, adj., rel. 
to affections. 

affeo'tionate, adj., 
loving, fond. 

affec'tionately, adv., 
lovingly, fondly. 

aflec'tionateness, n., 
the quality of affec- 
tionate. 

afleo'tioned, adj., dis- 
posed. 



aOective 



H 






^• 



\ 



V.S 






s. 



aSec'tive, adj., emo- 
tional; with power 
to affect. 

affectively, adv., in 
an affective way. 

afiB'ance, n., promise, 
pledge, trust ; v.t. , to 
plight faith, to be- 
troth. 

affl'anced, p.p., affi- 
ance; adj., be- 
trothed. 

affl'ancei, n., one 
who affiances. 

affi'ancing, pr.p., affi- 
ance. 

afBohe', n., a notice 
(Fr.). 

affida'vit, n., a sworn 
written statement. 

affied', adj., affianced. 

affiliate, v.<., to adopt 
a child; to fix a 
child's parentage; 
to associate. 

affiliated, p.p., affil- 
iate. 

affll'iatiJig,^r.^., affil- 
iate. 

affllia'tion, n., the act 
of affiliating. 

af'iliutge, n., refining. 

aifin'ity, n., near rel- 
ationship; resem- 
blance of nature; 
attraction {chem.). 

afiBnn', v.t. and t., to 
state confidently; to 
say yes. 

aflSm'able, adj., able 
to be affirmed. 

affirm' ably, adv. , in an 
affirmable manner. 

afiOnn'ance, n., rati- 
fication. 

afflnn'ant, n., one 
who affirms. 

afflrma'tion, n., the 
act of affirming; a 
positive statement. 

afflrm'atiTe, adj., as- 
serting; saying yes. 

affirm' atively, adv., in 
an affirmative way. 

affirmed', p.p. , affirm. 

affirm' er, n., one who 
affirms. 

affirm'ing, pr.p., af- 
firm. 

af&x'. v./., to fix, to 
join. 

al'flx,n., an addition; 
a syllable or syl- 
lables added at the 
end of a word. 

affixed', p.p., affix. 

affiz'ing, pr.p., affix. 

affix' tare, n., the act 
of affixing; that 
which is affixed. 






■^ 






14 



affla'ted, adj., in- 
spired. 

afBa'tion. n., inspira- 
tion. 

affla'tns, »., breath 
of wind; inspiration. 

afflict', v.t., to cause 
pain or grief to. 

afflict'ed, p.p., affiict. 

afflict'er, n., one who 
afflicts. 

affiiot'ing,^r.^. .afflict 

affiic'tion, n., dis- 
tress, grief, oppres- 
sion. 

afflicfive, «dj., caus- 
ing affliction. 

affluence, n., abun- 
dance, wealth. 

affiaenoy, n., an 
affluent state. 

al'flnent, adj., abun- 
dantly wealthy. 

afflox, n., a flowing 
towards; a con- 
course. • 

aSord', v./., to bestow, 
to yield; to be able 
to spend. 

afford'ed, p.p., afford. 

afford'ing,^r.^. .afford 

afforest, v.t., to turn 
into a forest by 
planting. 

aSoresta'tion, n., the 
act of afforesting. 

aflran'chise, v.i., to 
liberate. 

affran'cbisement, n., 
the act of liberating. 

affray', n., an alarm- 
ing or noisy fight; 
v.t., to alarm. 

affreight', v.t., to 
charter a trading 
vessel. 

aflrighf, n., terror, 
dread; v.t., to cause 
terror. 

affrigbt'ed, p.p., af- 
fright. 

affrigbt'er, n., one 
who affrights. 

affright'ing, pr.p., 
affright. 

aflront', n., an insult; 
v.t., to insult. 

affront'ed, p.p., af- 
front. 

affront'ing, pr.p., 
affront. 

aflronfive, adj., ready 
to insult. 

affnse', v., to pour 
(water) on. 

aflnsed', p.p., affuse. 

afftu'iiig.^f.^. affuse 

affa'dcm, n., the 
pouring on (of 
water). 



\ 



s 



after-damp 

Afghan, n., a native 
of Afghanistan. 

afield', adv., to a 
distance, far. 

afire', adv., on fire. 

afloat', adv., floating, 
sailing. 

afoot', adv., on foot. 

alore^ adv., formerly, 
before. 

a! ore'f oing, adj. .pre- 
vious, preceding. 

tdoTe'baad, adv. , 
previously, in antici- 
pation. 

a!<xre'mentioned, adj., 
! previously spoken 
of. 

afore'named, adj., 
previously named. 

afore' said, adj., pre- 
viously said or men- 
tioned. 

afore'thonght, adv. 
and adj., with pre- 
meditation. 

afore'time, adv., in 
former times. 

a fortio'ri, I-tU. phr. 
= from a stronger 
cause = much more 
therefore. 

alool', adv., running 
foul. 

afraid', adj., fright- 
ened. 

afresh', adv., over 
again. 

Afric, adj., bel. to 
Africa. 

African, adj., i.q. 
Afric. 

Africtmder, n., a 
white man born 
(of Dutch paren- 
tage) in Africa. 

afrit, n., an evil 
spirit, demon. 

afroot', adv. and prep, 
in front (of). 

aft', adv., behind, in 
the stern of a ship; 
also adj. 

aft'er, adv., conj. and 
prep., behind; later; 
later than; accord- 
ing to. 

aft'er-ages, n., futur- 
ity, the coming 
times. 

aft'er-birth, n., the 
placenta. 

aft'er-clap, n., an un- 
expected blow.when 
one has dropped 
one's guard. 

aft'er-orop, n.. a later 
crop. 

aft'er-damp, n., choke 
damp (in a mine). 



aUer-guard 



v 



n 



■n 



s 



c 



za'et-guard, n., the 

sailors stationed ab- 
aft ttie maiumasl. 

ait'er-matb, n., a 
second crop. 

aft'er-inosr, adj. and 
a<iv., latest, last. 

afternoon', n., the 
period between mid- 
day and night. 

ait'ei-pains, n., the 
pains aflcc child- 
birth. 

after-piece, n., a 
sequel; a farce suc- 
ceeding a play. 

aft'er-tbooght, n., 
later reflection. 

aft'erward, adv., later 
in time. 

aft'erwards, adv., i.q. 
afterward. 

aft'er-wit, n., belated 
wisdom; wisdom 
after the event. 

a'gs, n., a Turkish 
gentleman or mag- 
istrate. 

again', adv., once 
more. 

against', prep., oppo- 
site, in opposition to 

agal'ma, n., an im- 
pression on a seal. 

ag'amist, n., one op- 
posed to marriage. 

ag'amous, adj., unfit 
to marry; produced 
without sexual 
union. 

ag'apae, n., pi. of 
agape. 

ag'ape, n., a love 
feast. 

agape', adv., gaping, 
in astonishment. 

Agapem'one, n., the 
abode of Love. 

ag'aric, n., a fungus 
or mushroom. 

aga^'t adv., gasping; 
adj., eager for. 

ag'ate, n., a precious 
stone so named. 

aga'Ve, n., an Ameri- 
can plant so named. 

agaze', adv., in a 
gazing attitude. 

agazed', adj., astoun- 
ded. 

age, n., a time- 
period; the length 
of a life; o.t'., to 
grow old. 

a'ged, adj., old. 

a'gedly, adv., like an 
old person. 

a'geing, pr.p., age. 

a'gency, «., the func- 
tion of an agent. 



I? 



u 



agen'da, n., things to 
be done or con- 
sidered. 

a'gent, «., one who 
acts; an interme- 
diary. 

aggera'tion, n., a 
heaping up. 

agglomerate, v.i. and 
«., to gather into a 
mass, collect; n., a 
heap. 

agglom'erated, p.p., 
agglomerate. 

agglomerating, pr.p. , 
agglomerate. 

agglomeration, n., 
the act of agglom- 
erating. 

aggln'tinant, adj., ten- 
ding to aggluthiate. 

agglutinate, v.t. and 
»., to join (as if with 
glue). 

agglutinated, p.p., 
agglutinate. 

aggln'tinating, pr.p., 
agglutinate. 

agglntina'tion, n., the 
process of agglu- 
tinating. 

aggln'tinative, adj., 
tending to agglu- 
tination. 

aggrandize, v.t., to 
increase; exalt. 

aggrandized, p.p., 
aggrandize. 

aggrand'izement, n., 
increase, exaltation. 

ag'grandizer, n., one 
who aggrandizes. 

aggrandimng, pr.p., 
aggrandize. 

aggravate, v.i., to 
make heavier or 
more serious; (less 
correctly) to annoy. 

aggravated, p.p., ag- 
gravate. 

aggravating, pr.p., 
aggravate. 

aggrava'tion, n., the 
making worse or 
more serious. 

ag'gregate, adj., tak- 
en together; n., a 
total ;«./., to collect. 

ag'gregated, p.p., ag- 
gregate. 

ag' gregately, (xii;. , col- 
lectively. 

ag'gregating, pr.p., 
aggregate. 

aggregation, n., the 
act of aggregating. 

aggregative, adj., 
tending to aggre- 
gate. 

aggress', v.t., to as- 



r 

n 

L 



(. 



agitatiDg 



sault; open a quar- 
rel; invade another 
man's rights. 

aggressed', p.p., ag- 
gress. 

aggress'ing, pr.p., ag- 
gress. 

aggres'sion, n., an 
unprovoked assault; 
an encroachment. 

aggress'ive, adj., as- 
saulting, encroach- 
ing. 

aggress'iveness, n., a 
tendency to bo ag- 
gressive. 

aggress' or, n. , one who 
begins a quarrel, 
who invades an- 
other man's rights. 

aggriev'ance, n., of- 
fence. 

aggrieva', v.t., to of- 
fend, to give cause 
for complaint. 

aggrieved', p.p., ag- 
grieve. 

aggriev'ing, pr.p., 
aggrieve. 

aggronp', v.l., to ar- 
range in a group. 

aggronped', p.p., ag- 
group. 

aggroup'ing, pr.p., 
aggroup. 

aghast', adj. and adv., 
wonder-struck and 
terrified. 

ag'ile, adj., nimble, 
active. 

ag'ileness, n., i.g., 
agility. 

agil'ity, n., nimble- 
ness, activity. 

ag'io, n., exchange 
premium; allow- 
ance on worn coin. 

ag'iotage, n., broker- 
age. 

agist', v.t., to look 
after cattle for hire; 
to assess for public 
purposes. 

agist'ment, n., the 
contract with an 
agistor; the agis- 
tor's profit; an as- 
sessment. 

agist'or, n., one who 
takes care of cattle 
for hire. 

ag'itable, adj., able 
to be agitated. 

agitate, v.t., to set 
in motion; perturb; 
excite. 

agitated, p.p., agi- 
tate. 

ag'itating, pr.p., agi- 
tate. 



agitation 




16 




air-cells 


i 


agitation, n., an 


_y 


ag'ora, «., a market- 


iS^ 


aheap', adv., piled up, 


agitated state; dis- 


-3. 


place, market (Gr.). 


aiiem', interj., ex- 




turbance; public 


agou'ti, n., a rodem, 




pressing hesitation 


. 


movement. 


^^^ 


with ihree hind toes. 


T 


or incredulity. 




ag'itative, adj., caus- 


agiaph'ia, »., loss of 


ahoy', inter j., a sail- 


\ ■/ 


ing agitation. 


y- 


power to write. 




or's challenge of 


( 


ag'itator, n., one who 


ir-r^ 


agra'rian, adj., rel. to 


■y 


another ship. 




excites the public. 




the land; n., a 


ahull', adv., lying al- 


^ . 


a'glet, n., the metal 




supporter of agra- 




most broadside to 




sheath at the end of 


^\. 


rianism. 




wind and sea. 




a lace; a bullion 


agia'iianism, »., the 


•1 


aid', n., help, assist- 




ornament on a uni- 




doctrine of equal 




ance; »./., to help, 




form; a particular 


/>-*' 


distribution of land. 


•J 


assist. 




kind of stay-lace 


r-r^ 


agra'rianize, n., to 


aid'ance, n., i.q., aid. 




(round and while). 




divide the land 


■c 


aid'ed, p.p., aid. 


J>7 


aglow', adv., glowmg. 




equally. 


aide'-de-camp, »., a 


agmatol'ogy, »., the 


c — : 


agree', v.i., to con- 




general officer's as- 


____^ 


study ot tractures. 




sent, be of one mind 


•1 


sistant. 


1 


ag'nail, « , a whit- 




with. 


aid'ei, n., one who 




low, a corn, mis- 


<~:\ 


agreeabil'ity, n., be- 


■^1^ 


aids. 




shapen finger-end. 


'^ 


ing agreeable. 


aid'fnl, adj., helping. 


_, 


ag'nate, adj., related 


agree'able, adj., plea- 


aiding, pr.p., aid. 




on the paternal side; 


. 


sant, consenting. 


aid'less, adj., with- 




akin; collaterally 


^N-.j' 


agree'ableness, n., 




out help or aid. 




related. 


^ 


pleasantness. 


n"^ 


ai'glet, see aglet. 


__^^_i 


agnatic, adj., rel. to 


agree'ably, adv., plea- 


ai'gret, n., a heron 




male descent. 




santly; in accord- 


n 


or egret. 


_^_p 


agnation, n., rela- 




ance with. 


ai'grette, n., an orna- 




tionship through 


iP! 


agreed', p.p., agree. 




ment of feathers or 




male descent. 


= >^ 


agree'ing, pr.p. ,agree. 




jewels worn on the 


;_^_p 


agni'tion, n., acknow- 


J -^- 


agree'ment, «., con- 


r 


head-dress. 




ledgment. 




sent, a formal docu- 


ai'gnille, n., a sharp 


— ^—.'^ 


agnomen, n., an ad- 


^iL 


ment of consent. 




mountain peak; a 


— ~P 


ditional name. 


agres'tic, adj., rel. to 


■r 


drUl. 


^_; 


agnos'tic, n. and adj., 




tlie country. 


aiUw.*., tobeill. 




refusuig to believe 


< — r , .; 


ag'ricnltor, n., one 


•c' 


ailed, p.p., ail. 


-^ 


in the unknowable. 




who cultivates the 


td\'iag,pr.p., M\;adj., 


agnosticism, n., the 




land. 


■c 


in a sick state. 




state of the agnos- 


■"....Trr! 


agrlcut tural, adj.. 


ail'ment. n., an ill- 




tic. 




rel. to agriculture. 




ness. 




ago, ado., in time 




ag'riculture, n.. 


y^ 


aim, n., a striving to 




past. 




land cultivation. 




hit a mark; a thing 




agog', adv., in an 


!\r^rf? 


agricuftarist, n.. 




aimed at; direction; 




excited, eager state. 




one engaged in 




intention; v.i., to 


-T-S^ 


ago'ing, adv., in 




agriculture. 




strive to hit a 




movement. 


j -T^'^^ 


agrimony, n., the 




mark; v.t., to point; 


, 


agone', adj., past. 


^ 


plant agrimonia. 




direct. 


J_ 


agonic, adj., without 


agriol'ogy. n., the 


A 


aimed, p.^., aim. 




an angle. 




study of uncivilized 


y^^^^ 


aim'ing, pr.p., aim. 


i__^ 


ag'onist, n., one who 




peoples. 


--=-/ 


aim'less, adj., with- 




agonizes or con- 


agroBtog'raphy, n.. 




out aim or inten- 


-n 


tends. 
agonis'tes, n., one 


the description of 
grasses. 


^ 


tion. 
aim'lessly, adv., in an 


-^-L 


who strives. 


agrostol'ogy, n., the 




aimless way. 


agonistic adj., striv- 




study of sr asses. 


^ 


ain't, a vulgar phrase 


_. 


ing, agonizing. 


n 


agioond', adv., fixed 




= am I not? is he, 


^^3 . 


agonia tical, adj., i.q. 




to a sea or river 




she, it not; are we, 




agonistic. 




bottom. 


■^ 


you, they not ? 


___, 


ag'onize, v.i. and (., 


-^ 


ague, »., a feverish 


air, n., the atmos- 




to endure anguish; 




shivering complaint. 




phere; a person's 




to distress. 


j^ 


a'gned, adj., suffering 




bearing; a melody; 


i_v_^ 


ag'onized, p.p., ag- 


t7 


from ague. 




».*., to expose to the 




onize. 


a'gnish, adj., inclined 




air, to dry, to dis- 




, ag'onizing, pr.p., ag- 




to ague, shivering. 


\ 


play boastfully. 




onize. 


..'_. 


ab,interj. ,expressing 


air'-bed, n., an in- 


r 


agonizingly, adv., in 


r 


pain or surprise. 




flated bed. 




a distressing man- 


aha', interj., express- 


air'-brake, n., a brake 




ner. 


A 


ing glee. 


actuated by air. 


*___^ 


ag'ony, n., extreme 


ahead', ado., in ad- 


air'-cells, n., cells 




pain, anguish. 




vance, beyond. 




containing air. 



air-craft 



"V 



V 






L 



A 






ail'-cistt, n. , flying in 
the air; the flying 
service or industry; 
flying machines col- 
lectively. 

aired, p.p., air. 

air-gas. n., the gas 
made by mixing air 
with petroleum va- 
pour. 

ail'-gtm, n., a gim in 
which the force is 
air. 

ail'-hole, n. , an open- 
ing to admit air. 

air'Uy, adv., lightly, 
gaily. 

air'mess, n., spright- 
liness, breeziness. 

aii'mg, pr.p., air; n., 
a walk or drive in 
the air. 

ail' less, adj., without 
air. 

aii'-pomp, n., a pump 
for forcing out air. 

ail'-shaft, n., a ven- 
tilating shaft. 

air'ship, n., a dirig- 
ible balloon. 

ail'-tigbt, adj., ex- 
cluding the air. 

ail'y> adj., having 
plenty of air; light, 
sprightly. 

aisle, n., a division in 
a building flanking 
the central division. 

ait, n., a little island 
in a river. 

ajar', adv., slightly 
opened. 

aj'atage, »., a tub for 
discharging liquid. 

akim'tx), adv., with 
hands on hips and 
the elbows pointed 
outweirds. 

aMn', adj., rel. by 
blood-oflilsenature. 

al'abaster, n., a semi- 
transparent stone 
so named; adj., 
made of alabaster. 

alack', inter j., ex- 
pressing grief. 

alack'-a-^ay, inter- 
jectional phrase, ex- 
pressing grief. 

alac'rity, n., speed, 
alertness, smartness 

A la mode', adv., in 
the fashion; n., a 
thin silk material. 

A la mort', adv., to 
the death. 

a'lar, adj., winged. 

alarm', n., sudden 
fear; sense of com- 
ing danger; an alar- 









17 



um; vX, to cause 
sudden fright; to 
call to arms. 

alarmed', p.p., alarm. 

alarm'ing, pr.p., al- 
arm; adj., startling, 
disquieting. 

alarm'ingly, adv., 
startlingly. 

alarm' ist, n., one who 
without reason 
causes alarm. 

alar'om, n., a clock- 
work contrivance 
for waking people 
up. 

a'lary, adj., rel. to 
wings; wing-like. 

alas', inter j., expres- 
sing sorrow. 

a'late, adj., winged. 

alb, n., a long, close- 
fitting white robe 
so named. 

Alba'nian, adj., bel. 
to Albania. 

alba'ta, «., a white 
alloy of nickel, rinc, 
and copper. 

albatross, n., a great 
sea-bird so named; 
a German type of 
aeroplane. 

albe'it, conj., al- 
though, even grant- 
ing that. 

albm'cent, adj., grow- 
ing white. 

Al'bin, n., an old 
name for Scotland. 

albi'ness, n., fem. of 
albino. 

albinism, n., the phy- 
sical character of 
the Albino. 

albi'no, n., a man or 
beast having white 
hair and skin, and 
pink eyes; a plant 
deficient in colour- 
ing matter. 

albi'noism, n., i.g. 
albinism. 

albngin'eoas, adj., rel. 
to the white of the 
eye. 

albn'go, n., an eye 
disease affecting the 
cornea. 

al'btmi, n., a book of 
blank pages. 

alba'men, »., the 
white of an egg; 
nutritive matter 
found in a seed. 

albn'min, n., any 
substance composed 
like or resembling 
albumen ; a pro- 
teid. 



aldehyde 



/\/^ 



C^ 






f 



£ 



<r- 






albn'miniM, v.t., to 

apply to paper an 
albuminous solution 

albuminized, p.p., 
albuminize. 

albn'minoid, adj., re- 
sembling albumen. 

albnminn'ria, n., the 
presence of albu- 
men in the urine. 

albuminu'ric, adj. ,rel. 
to albuminuria. 

albuminous, adj., 
with the quality 
of albumin. 

albur'nimi, n., a 
tree's sap-wood. 

alcade', n., a Span- 
ish, Portuguese, or 
Moorish Governor. 

Alca'ic, adj., in the 
metre of Alcaeus. 

al'cazar, *>., a Spanish 
or Moorish palace. 

alchem'ic, adj., rel. 
to alchemy. 

alchem'ical, i.q. al- 
chemic. 

al' chemist, n., one 
who practises al- 
chemy. 

alchemis'tic, adj., rel. 
to an alchemist. 

al'chemy, «., the spu- 
rious art of turning 
base metals into 
gold. 

al'cohol, n., a pure 
spirit so named. 

al'coholate, n. , a com- 
pound having al- 
cohol as its acid 
radical. 

alcohorio.a<2;., rel. to 
alcohol. 

alcoholiza'tion,n. , the 
act of alcoholizing. 

al'coholize, v.t., to 
produce an alco- 
holic effect. 

alcoholom'eter, n., an 
instrument for test- 
ing the alcoholic 
strength of liquors. 

Al'coran, n., the sa- 
cred book of the 
Mohammedan reli- 
gion. 

Alcoran'io, adj., rel. 
to the Alcoran. 

Alcoran'ist, n., one 
who studies the 
Alcoran. 

id'oove, n., a recess. 

Aldeb'aran, n., one of 
the Hyades group 
of stars. 

al'dehyde, n., a vol- 
atile liquid derived 
from alcohol. 



alder 

r 



.r 

■r 



^ 



r 



n: 



"i 



4 



al'der, »., a tree 
so named, 

al'derman,«., a muni- 
cipal dignitary so 
named. 

alderman' ic, ad]., re- 
sembling, or bel. to, 
an alderman. 

Al'dine, oAj., bel. to 
Aldus Manutius.the 
Venetian i6th cent, 
printer. 

ale, «., an intoxicat- 
ing malt liquor, 
brewed with hops; 
beer. 

aleak', adv., having 
sprung a leak. 

al'eatory, adj., rel. 
to dicing and gam- 
bling. 

aloc'tryomancy, n., 
divination by means 
of cocks. 

alee', adv., on or to- 
wards the lee side. 

a lejfar, n., malt 
vinegar. 

ale'hoof, n., ground- 
ivy. 

ale'hoose, »., a place 
where ale is sold. 

alem'bic, n., a dis- 
tilling vessel. 

alezn'broth, n., a mix- 
ture used in al- 
chemy. 

alert', adj., on the 
watch, spry. 

alert 'ness, n., the 
quality of the alert. 

alette', n , a small 
wing in a building; 
a side of a pier. 

alea'romancy, n., di- 
vination by means 
of flour. 

aleorom'eter, n., an 
instrument for test- 
ing the properties 
of flour. 

Aleu'tian, adj., rel. to 
the Aleuts, who live 
in the Aleutian is- 
lands of Alaska. 

alen'tic, adj., i.q. 
Aleutian. 

ale'wiie, n., a woman- 
seller of ale; an 
American herring- 
like fiih. 

Alezan'diian, adj., 
bel. to Alexander 
or Alexandria. 

Alexan'drine, adj., 
bel. to Alexandria; 
«., a twelve-sylla- 
bled iambic verse. 

aleziphar'nuc, adj., 
antidotal. 






.r^ 



G 

I 

o 
•d 



18 



aUres'co, an Italian 
phrase = in the 
fresh air. 

Al'ga, n., a species 
of sea-weed and 
water-weed. 

al'gal, adj., pert, to 
alga. 

al'gebra, «., the 
method of calculat- 
ing by means of 
letters, signs, and 
figures. 

algebra'ic, adj., bel. 
to algebra. 

algebraical, adj., i.q. 
algebraic. 

al'gebraist, n., one 
skilled in algebra. 

Algerine', adj., bel. 
to Algiers. 

Al'gol, n., the vari- 
able star Beta om 
Perseus. 

al'gor, n., chilliness. 

al'gorisin, «., Arabic 
numeration; arith- 
metic. 

al'giun, n., a Biblical 
tree, sandal-wood. 

Alham'bra, n., the fa- 
mous Moorish pal- 
ace at Granada. 

a'lias, adv., at an- 
other time; n., a 
false name. 

al'ibi, adv., in another 
place; «., the being 
in another place 
(Leg.). ^. ^ . 

a ben, ad]., foreign, 
strange; n., a for- 
eigner, stranger. 

alienabil'ity, n. , capa- 
city to be alienated. 

alienable, adj., able 
to be alienated. 

alienage,*!., the state 
of being an alien. 

a'lienate, v.^, to make 
over to another; to 
appropriate; to es- 
trange. 

a'lienated, ^.^.,alien- 
ate. 

alienating, pr.p., 
alienate. 

aliena'tion, n., the 
act or state of 
alienating. 

a'lienator, n., one 
who alienates. 

alienee', n., one to 
whom a property is 
transferred. 

a'lienism, »., the 
state of being an 
alien; the treat- 
ment of mental de- 
rangement. 



n 



c 

c 

c 

(^ — -y 



•o 

h 

Cr 
CtK 



alkalilying 



aliferoa8,a<<;.winged. 

al'iform, adj., wing- 
shaped. 

alight', v.i., to de- 
scend, light down, 
dismount; adv., on 
fire. 

aligbt'ed, p.p., alight. 

alighting, pr.p., 
alight. 

align', I v.t., to ar- 

aline', I range in line. 

align' ment, n., the 
act or state of 
aligning. 

alike', adj., resem- 
bling, like; adv.,m9. 
similar way.eqiially. 

ariment, n., nourish- 
ment, support. 

aliment'al, adj., rel. 
to aliment. 

aliment'ary, adj., rel. 
to aliment, giving 
nourishment. 

alimenta'tion, n., the 
giving of aliment. 

aUment'iveness, n., a 
liking for food and 
drink. 

alimo'nioos, adj., nu- 
tritious. 

arimony, n., support, 
a living allowance. 

al'iped, adj., wing- 
footed. 

al'iqoant, adj., form- 
ing a fractional part 
of a number. 

al'iqnot, adj., con- 
tained so many 
times in a whole; 
n., an aliquot part. 

a'lisb, adj., resem- 
bling ale. 

alive', adj., living, 
alert. 

aliz'arine, n., a coal 
product, used for 
red-dyeing. 

arkahest, n., the uni- 
versal solvent in 
alchemy. 

alkales'cengy, n., ten- 
dency to become 
alksdine. 

alkales'cent, adj., be- 
coming alkaline. 

al'kali, n., a chemical 
substance of a neu- 
tralizing nature. 

al'kaliflable, adj., able 
to be alkalified. 

al'kalifled. p.p., al- 
kalify. 

al'kalily, v.i., to 
change into an al- 
kali. 

al'kalilying, pr.p., 
alkalify. 



alkaligenous 



c/i. 



A- 



Cr' 



V 



a: 






n 



r- 



1 

rl 



klkalig'enoiu, adj., 

producing alkali. 

alkalim'eter, n., an 
apparatus lor ascer- 
taiuiiig tlie percent- 
age of alkali in a 
solution. 

alkalimet'ric, adj.,Te\. 
to alkalimetry. 

alkalimet'iical, adj., 
i.q. alkaliinetric. 

Blkalim'etry, n., the 
process of discover- 
ing the percentage 
of alkali in a solution 

al'kaline, adj., rel. to 
alkali. 

alkalm'it7i "■> the 
state of being al- 
kaline. 

alkaliza'tion, n., the 
act or state of 
alkalizing. 

al'kalize, v.t., to turn 
into alkali. 

al'kalused, p.p., al- 
kalize. 

alkalizing, pr.p., al- 
kalize. 

al'kaloid, n., a chemi- 
cal substance with 
properties like those 
of alkali. 

al'kanet, n., the name 
of a plant producing 
red dye. 

Al'koian, *«« Alcoran. 

all, adj., the entire 
number; the whole. 

Al'lah, n., the Mo- 
hammedan (Arabic) 
name for God. 

al'lanite, n., a min- 
eral so named. 

allanto'io, adj., rel. to 
the allantois. 

allan'toid, adj., like 
an allantois. 

allan'tois, n., a mem- 
branous appendage 
like a sac. 

allay', v.t., to lighten, 
make quiet, alle- 
viate. 

allayed', p.p., allay. 

allay' ing, pr.p., allay. 

alledge', allege', v.t., 
to assert, make a 
statement. 

alledge'able, allege'- 
able, adj., able to 
be alleged. 

alledged', alleged', 
p.p., allege. 

alledg'ei, alleg'ei, n., 
one who alleges. 

alledg'ing, aUeg'lng, 
pr.p., allege. 

allega'tion, n., the act 
of alleging a charge. 



r ' 



a 



19 



aUe'giance, n. , plight- 
ed loyalty. 

allegor'ic, adj., in the 
manner of allegory. 

aUegor'ical, adj., t.9. 
allegoric. 

allegor'ically, adv., iu 
an alltgoncal .man- 
ner or sense. 

al'legorist, «., a writer 
of allegory. 

al'legoriae, v.t., to 
make into allegory. 

al'legorized, p.p., al- 
legorize. 

al'legorizer, n., one 
who allegorizes. 

al'legoiizing, pr.p. , 
allegorize. 

allegory, »., a figur- 
ative story. 

allegret'to, adj., in 
fairly quick time 
(slower than alle- 
gro); n., a move- 
ment in fairly quick 
time. 

allegris'simo, adj., in 
very fast time; n., a 
movement in very 
fast time. 

alle'gio, adj., in fast 
time; n., a fast 
movement. 

allela'ia,tn/«r/. , praise 
the Lord {Heb.). 

allemande', n., a mu- 
sical movement in 
early suites; a slow 
dance of German 
origin. 

alleMate, v.t., to 

lighten, assuage. 

alle'viated, p.p., alle- 
viate. 

alle'viating, pr.p., al- 
leviate. 

aUevia'Uon, n., the 
act of alleviating. 

alle'viative.arf;. .tend- 
ing to alleviate. 

alle' viator, n., one 
who alleviates. 

al'ley, n., a narrow 
passage. 

All Fools' Day, n., 
April I. 

aU-ionrs', adv., on all 
four legs, or on 
hands and knees. 

all-hail', inter j., ex- 
pressing greeting. 

All-Hal'lows, n., the 
feast of All Hallows 
or Saints, Nov. x. 

allia'ceons, adj., like 
or bel. to garlic. 

alli'anoe, n., union 
by treaty. 

alUed', p.p., ally. 



.^1 
4 



1 

A 



allopathist 



allies', n. pi., those 
who are closely or 
solemnly uniteid. 

alligation, n., the act 
of binding. 

al'ligator, «., the cro- 
codile of America. 

allit'erate, v.t., to 
make alliterative; 
adj., alliterating in 
character. 

alliterated, p.p., alli- 
terate. 

allit'erating, pr.p., 
alliterate. 

allitera'tion, n., repe- 
tition of a letter 
in a succession of 
words. 

alliterative, a<;/.,with 
a tendency to allit- 
eration. 

allit'eratively, adv., 
in an alliterative 
way. 

al'liom, n., garlic; the 
name of a large class 
of liliaceae. 

allocate, v.t., to as- 
sign a place or 
portion to. 

al'located, p.p., allo- 
cate. 

al'locating, pr.p., al- 
locate. 

alloca'tion, n., the 
act of allocating. 

alloca'tnr,n.,a judge's 
allowance of an 
order of costs. 

al'lochroite, n., a 
species of garnet, 
so named from its 
changing colour un- 
der the blowpipe. 

alloon'tion, n., a 
spoken address. 

allo'dial, adj., rel. to 
absolute ownership. 

allo'diiun, n., estate 

• held in fee simple. 

al'lograph, n., a deed 
drawn by some one 
who is not a party 
to it. 

allonge', v.i., to 
luuge; n., a lunge; 
a paper slip at- 
tached to a Dill of 
exchange, enabling 
the addition of fur- 
ther endorsements. 

allopath'io, adj., rel. 
to allopathy. 

allopath'ically, adv., 
on allopathic prin- 
ciples or methods. 

allop'athist, n., one 
who practises allo- 
pathy. 



allopathy 



20 



altar-cloth 



^ 



a 



x\ 



^'•b 






allop'athy, n., the 

medical system 
which employs 

counter remedies, 
as distinguished 
from homoeopalliv 

allot', v.t., to give as 
a portion or lot, to 
apportion. 

allot'ment, n., an 
allotted portion. 

allot'ropy, n., varia- 
tion in physical 
properties. 

allot'ted, p.p., allot. 

allotting, ^r.^., allot. 

allow', v.t., to permit; 
to concede or admit. 

allow'able, adj., able 
to be allowed. 

allow'ableness, n., 
state of the allow- 
able. 

allow'ably, adv., in a 
way that can be 
allowed. 

allow'ance, n., per- 
mission, privilege; 
a grant; v.t., to give 
a grant to. 

allow'anced, p.p., al- 
lowance. 

allow'ancing, pr.p., 
allowance. 

allowed', p.p., allow. 

allow'ing, pr.p. allow. 

alloy', n., a mixture 
of metals; v.t., to 
spoil by mixture of 
base with good. 

alloy'age, n., the act 
of alloying. 

alloyed', p.p., alloy. 

alloy'ing, pr.p., alloy. 

All Saints' Day, see 
AU Hallows. 

alt-seeing, arf;., see- 
ing all things. 

All Souls' Day, n., 
Nov. 2, when the 
faithful departed 
are commemorated. 

all'spice, «., the pep- 
per-plant berry of 
Jamaica. 

allade',v.t., to refer to. 

allod'ed, p.p., allude. 

allad'ing, pr.p., al- 
lude. 

allnre', v.t., to entice, 
draw on. 

allured', p.p., allure. 

aUnre'ment, n., the 

act of alluring. 
allnr'ei, »., one who 

allures. 
alloi'ing, pr.p. allure, 
allai'ingly, adv., in an 
alluring way. 






-^ 



allusion, n., refer- 
ence to, hmt at. 

allu'sive, adj., mak- 
ing reference. 

allu'sively, adv., in an 
allusive way. 

alln'siveuess, »., th< 
quality of being 
allusive. 

allu'sory, i.q. allusive. 

allu'vial, adj., rel. to 
ailuviuiii. 

alln'vion, n., the act 
of depositing soil. 

allu'yiam, n., soil 
deposited by sea 
or river. 

«//-wise', »., omni- 
scient. 

ally*, n., a person or 
state joined to an- 
other by compact; 
a close friend; v.t., 
to attach, bind. 

ally'ing, pr.p., ally. 

Ai'magest, n., the 
treatise of Pliny on 
astronomy ; any 
learned treatise. 

al'ma ma'tei, n.,one's 
university or col- 
lege. 

al'manao, n., a year's 
kalendar. 

armandine, adj., rel. 
to the almandite. 

al'mandite, n., a 
species of garnet. 

a/migbt'iness, n.,the 
state of being al- 
mighty. 

a/might 'y, adj. , oinii i- 
potent; n., the Al- 
mighty, i.e., God. 

a'Imond, n., the nut 
of the almond-tree. 

al'moner, n., a distri- 
butor of alms. 

al'moniy, n., the 
place where alms 
are distribirted. 

ai'most, adv., near- 
ly, all but. 

alms, n., a charitable 
gift. 

alms'-hotise, n., a 
house where poor 
persons are lodged. 

al'mnce, n.,see amess. 

al'mng, n., see algum. 

al'oe, n., a bitter 

tropical plant. 
aloet'io, adj., rel. to 

the aloe. 
aloet'ical, adj., i.q. 

aloetic. 
aloft', adv., up above, 

on high. 
alogot'iopby, «., ir- 
regular nutrition. 



(L 

r. 



alone', adj. and ode., 

solitary, solitarily, 
by oneself. 
along', adv., in line, 
in company with; 
prep., from end to 
end or through a 
part of; forward. 
along'side, adv. and 
prep., side by side 
with. 
aloof, adv., at a dis- 
tance, apart, aside. 
aloofness, n., a dis- 
tant, stand-ofi man- 
ner. 
alope'cia, »., a form 

of baldness. 
aloud', adv., so as to 

be heard. 
alp, n., a mountain 

{lit., snow-top). 
alpao'a, n., a Peru- 
vian goat; the ma- 
terial made from 
its hair. 
alp'enstock, n., a 
mountaineer's staff, 
al'pha, n., the Greek 

A. 
al'pbabet, h., all the 
letters of a lan- 
guage arranged in 
order. 
alptaabeta'iian, n.,the 
learner or maker of 
an alphabet. 
alphabetic, adj., in 
the order of the 
alphabet. 
alphabet'ical,'!'^;- >rel. 

to the alphabet. 
al'phus, n., a form of 

leprosy. 
Alp'ine, adj., bel. to 

the Alps. 
«/read'y, a(fv.,by this 

time. 
Alsa'tia, «., Alsace; 
also the name given 
to the VVhitefriars 
in London, a fam- 
ous sanctuary. 
Alsa'tian, adj., rel. to 

Alsana. 
al'sike, n., a sort of 

clover. 
al'so, adv., in addi- 
tion, as well. 
Alta'ic, adj., bel. to 
the Altaic moun- 
tains. 
al'tar, n., the stone or 

table of sacrifice. 
altarage, n., the en- 
dowments of an 
altar. 
al' tar-cloth, »., the 
cloth with which an 
altar is vested. 



altar-piece 






-^^ 






/^ 



/I 
/to 

V/1 



L 



al' tar-piece, n., a 

picture behind an 
altar. 

al'tet, v.t., to change, 
make different; v.i., 
to become difierent. 

alteiabil'ity. n., the 
alterable state. 

al'terable, adj., able 
to b(.- altered. 

al'teiableness, n., a 
tendency to change. 

al'terably, adv., with 
change. 

al'terant,a<i;'. .change- 
producing; n., a 
substance that mod- 
ifies a colour. 

altera'tioii,n. ,change, 
variation. 

al'terative.n., a medi- 
cine which alters the 
bodily functions. 

altercate, v.i., to dis- 
pute. 

al'tercating, pr.p., al- 
tercate. 

altercation, n., a dis- 
pute, wrangle. 

altered, p.p., alter. 

altering, pr.p., alter. 

al'tem, adj., with op- 
posite parts alter- 
nating. 

artemate, v.t. and «., 
lo make alternate; 
to be alternate; to 
change. 

altem'ate, adj., occur- 
ring one after the 
other in turn. 

al'temated, p.p., al- 
ternate. 

altem'ately, adv., in 
succesiiou. 

al'temating, pr.p., 
alternate. 

altema'tion, n., the 
act of alternating. 

alter'native, n. and 
adj., a choice be- 
tween one and an- 
other. 

altera'atively, adv., 
one way or another. 

Althae'a, n., the 
marsh-mallow and 
other plants. 

although', conj., 
admitted, granted 
that; notwithstand- 
ing that. 

altim'eter, n., an in- 
strument for meas- 
uring vertical angu- 
lar elevation. 

altim'etry, n., the 
science of measur- 
ing vertical angular 
elevation. 



a 
\/^- 



A, 



21 



altis'onant, adj., high- 
sounding. 

al'titude, »., height. 

al'to, adj., high-pitch- 
eU (of a male voice); 
n., the alto part, an 
alto singer or instru- 
ment, as the viola. 

allogeth'er, ado., 
entirely, wholly. 

alto-relievo, adj., in 
high relief; n., a 
carving in high 
relief. 

alto-rilie'TO, i.i- alto- 
rdievo. 

al'tmism, n., doing 
something for an- 
other's sake. 

al'tmist, n., one who 
professes altruism. 

altrois'tic, adj., rel. 
to altruism. 

aln'del, «., a pear- 
shaped glass vessel 
used in condensing. 

arum, n., a chem- 
ical compound so 
named. 

alu'mina, n., alu- 
mmum oxide. 

aln'minate, v.t., to 
blend with a salt of 
aluminum. 

aluminif'eroQS, adj., 
producing alum, al- 
uminum, or alumin. 

alu'minite, n. , a white 
hydrous aluminum 
sulphate. 

alnmin'ium, n., a 
whitish metallic ele- 
ment so named. 
Also aluminum. 

alu'minous, adj., rel. 
to aluminium, alu- 
mina, or alum. 

aromish, adj., some- 
what resembling 
alum. 

alum'nus, n., one who 
has been brought 
up in a college or a 
place of learning. 

al'veary, »., a bee- 
hive. 

alveolar, adj., rel. to 
alveoli. 

al'veolary, adj., i.g. 
alveolar. 

al'veolate, adj., full 
of cavities. 

al'veoli, n., small cav- 
ities. 

al'veolos, n., a small 
cavity. 

al'vine, adj., rel. to 
the belly. 

mfway \adv., at all 

a f ways] times. 



n. 



-^^ 



o 



amaurotic 



am, v.t., pr.t., 1st 
pers. of to be. 

am'adon, n., a kind 
of tinder produced 
from fungi. 

a'mab, »., a child's 
nmse (Indian). 

amain', adv., with 
full strength. 

amargam, n., an 
alloy of a metal 
with mercury. 

amafgamate, v.t., 
to mix up together. 

aatai'gama tei,p.p. , 
amalgamate. 

a mal' gam a ting, 
^r.^., amalgamate. 

amalgama'tioa, 
n., the act of amal- 
gamating; a com- 
pound. 

amanuen'sis, n., a 
writing secretary. 

am'aranth, n., the 
plant Love-lies- 
bleeding; a flower 
said in poetry never 
to fade. 

amaranth'ine, adj., 
rel. to amaranth. 

amaranth'us, n., also 
amarantus, which 
gives its name to 
the Amarantaceae 
{Bot.). 

Amaryl'lis, n. ,aGreek 
rustic nymph's 

name; a bulbous 
plant of South 
Africa. 

amass', v.t., to pile 
together. 

amassed', p.p. ,amass. 

amass'ing, p>'-p; 
amass. 

amass' ment, n., the 
act or state of 
amassing. 

am'atenr, »., one who 
merely for love, not 
for a livelihood, 
pursues a study or 
art. 

am'atenrish, adj., un- 
skilled, unprofes- 
sional. 

amaten'risbly, adv., 
in an unskilled 
way. 

am'ative, adj., sex- 
ually loving. 

am'ativeness, n., the 
amative state. 

am'atory, adj., of a 
loving tendency. 

amaoro'sis, n., blind- 
ness. 

amanro'tio, adj., rel. 
to amaurosis. 



amaze 



Americanism 












amaEe', v.t., to as- 
tonish; stagger with 
surprise. 

amazed', p.p., arnaze. 

amazement, m., a 
state of astonish- 
ment. 

amazing, pr.p., a- 
mare; adj., aston- 
ishing. 

amaz'ingly, adv., in 
an astonishing way. 

Am'azon, n., one of 
the race of women- 
warriors; the river 
of that name. 

Amazo'nian, adj., rel. 
to the Amazons; 
bold, mannish. 

am'bage, n., a cir- 
cumlocution. 

ambas'sador, n., a 
representative, usu- 
ally of a sovereign 
or state. 

ambas'sadiess, n., 
feni. of ambassador. 

am'ber, n., a yellow, 
resinous substance, 
fossilized. 

am'bergrls, n., a frag- 
rant substance ob- 
tained from the 
sperm whale. 

ambidex'ter, adj., us- 
ing both hands as 
right hands. 

ambidexter'ity, n., the 
power to use both 
hands equally well. 

ambidex'trons, adj., 
i.q. ambidexter. 

ambidez'trously, adv., 
in an ambide.xtrous 
way. 

ambient, *dj., going 
about, surrounding. 

unbigu'ity, n., double 
meaning, uncer- 
tainty. 

ambig'noos, idj., of 
double meaning, 
uncertam. 

ambig'nonsly, ude., 
equivocally. 

ambigaoosnegs, n., a 
tendency to be ani- 
bifiuous. 

am'bit, »., bounds, 
scope. 

ambi'tion, n., aiming 
at hi^h things. 

ambi'tions, adj., in- 
clined to ambition. 

ambi'tionsly, adv., in 
an ambitious way. 

am'ble.v.t., to go at a 
slow pace; n., the 
walk of certain 
quadrupeds. 






A 






o 

r 



o 



am'bled, p.p., amble. 

am'bler, n., one who 
ambles. 

am'bling,^r.^. ,amble. 

amblyo'pia, n., dim- 
ness of vision. 

am'bo, adj., both to- 
gether; (Lai.), n., a 
pulpit for the read- 
mg of the epistle or 
the gospel. 

ambro'sia. n., a di- 
vine drink or fra- 
grance; a weed so 
named. 

ambro'sial, adj., rel. 
to ambrosia. 

Ambro'sian, adj., rel. 
to St. Ambrose. 

am'biotype, «., a pho- 
tographic negative 
which, being thin, 
gave the effect of a 
positive. 

am'bry, n., a cup- 
board, locker. Also 
aumbry. 

am'bukuice, n., a 
vehicle for convey- 
ing the sick or 
wounded. 

am'bolant, adj. , walk- 
ing. 

ambula'tion, n., the 
act of walking. 

am'bnlatoiy, ai/.,rel. 
to walking; n., a 
processional path 
round the altar of a 
church, or in a 
cloister. 

am'boiy, n. , a tumour 
atfecting cattle and 
horses; a disease in 
turnips and some 
other plants. 

ambuscade', n., the 
act of hiding; or a 
place of hiding, for 
the purpose of a 
secret attack; the 
men in hiding; v.t., 
to attack from an 
ambush. 

ambusca'ded, p.p., 
ambilscade. 

ambosca'ding, pr.p., 
ambuscade. 

am'bnsb, n. and v.t., 
i.q. ambuscade. 

am'busbed, p.p., am- 
bush. 

am'bnshing, pr.p., 
ambush. 

am'bnshment, n., i.q. 
ambush. 

ameer', amii', n., a 
Moh ammedan ruler ; 
the ruler of Afghan- 
istan. 



t 



"M 



ame'lioiate, v.t. and 
»., to make better, 
improve. 

ame lioiated, p.p., 
ameliorate. 

ame'lioiattng, pr.p., 
ameliorate. 

amelioia'tion, n., the 
act or state of 
ameliorating. 

ame'liorative, adj., 
tending to ame- 
liorate. 

ame'Iioiator, n., one 
who ameliorates. 

amen', inter j., so be 
it; the ending of an 
oath or a prayer. 

amenability, n., the 
amenable quality. 

ame'nable, adj., sub- 
missive, adapting 
oneself to others' 
rule. 

amend', v.t. and •., 
to improve. 

amend'able, adj., cap- 
able of amending. 

amend'ed, p.p., 

amend. 

amend'er, n., one 
who amends. 

amend'ing, pr.p., 
amend. 

amend'ment, n., the 
act of amending; an 
alternative proposal 

amends', n. pi., satis- 
faction for a wrong 
done. 

amen'ity, n., pleas- 
antness, agreeable- 
tiess. 

ament', n., a catkin. 

amenta'ceoos, adj., 
ri!5embling the cat- 
kin. 

amen'tia, n., the state 
of being out of 
one's mind. 

amenf um, «., a cat- 
kin; see ament. 

amerce', v.t., to pun- 
ish with a fine. 

amerce' able,a<i;., able 
or tit to be amerced. 

amerced'. p.p., 

amerce. 

amerce'ment, m., the 
act (if amercuig. 

amerc'er, n., one wlio 
amerces. 

amero'ing, pr.p., 
amerce. 

Amer'ican, ai;'. , bel., 
or native, to Amer- 
ica. 

Amer'icanism, n., 
something peculiar 
to Americans. 



Americanize 



23 



ample 



n. 
1 



^ 



V 



Amer'icanize, v./. and 
•., to change to 
American. 

amess', n., a hood 
with long ends in 
front, the mark of 
ecclesiastical rank; 
worn in choir. Also 
written almuc*. It 
must not be con- 
fused with the 
amice. 

am'ethyBt, »., a gem 
of a violet blue 
colour; a kind of 
quartz. 

unethyst'ine, adj., of, 
or like to, an am- 
ethyst. 

Amhar'ic, n., the 
court language of 
Abyssinia. 

amiability, n., lov- 
ableness, good- 
heartedness. 

a'miable, adj., lov- 
able, good-hearted. 

a'miableness, n., the 
lovable quality. 

a'miably, adv., in a 
lovable way. 

amian'thns, n., a 
species of asbestos. 

amicability, n., an 
amicable tendency. 

am'icable, adj., of a 
friendly character. 
- am'icabloness. n., 
friendliness. 

am'ice, n., any kind 
of clothing or hood- 
ed mantle; the linen 
collar, with oma- 
men t al border , worn 
by the priest and 
ministers at the 
Mass. 

amid', prep., in the 
midst of, surround- 
cd by. 

am'idiiie, n., a chemi- 
cal compound so 
named; a solution 
of starch in hot 
water. 

amid'ships, adv., in 
the middle of a 
ship. 

amidst', prep., i.q. 
am 111. 

amiss', adv., wrongly, 
in error, lacking. 

am'ity, n., friendsliip. 

ammo'nia, n., a 
strong-smelling gas, 
much used in the 
arts and in medi- 
cine. 
' ammo'niac, adj., ret. 
to ammonia. 



--f 



'~\ 



^^-ri 






ammcmi'acal, adj., 
i.q. ammonia. 

am'monite, n., a fos- 
sil shell-fish so 
named. 

ammunition, n., 
means of defence, 
war material. 

amnesia, n., loss of 
memory. 

anme'sic, adj., losing 
the memory. 

am'nesty, n., the act 
of overlooking an 
offence; pardon. 

am'nion, n., a mem- 
branous sac found 
in embryos. 

anmiot'ic, adj., re), 
to an amnion. 

amoe'ba, »., a class 
of Protozoans so 
named. 

Amo'mimi, n., an 
aromatic herb of 
the ginger family. 

amoni", prep., in the 
midst of, together 
with. 

amongst', prep., i.q. 
amone;. 

Amontilla'do, n., a 
variety of sherry. 

am'orist, n., one with 
a propensity for 
amours. 

amoro'so, adj. and 
adv., in a tender 
way (mui.). 

am'oions, adj., ex- 
cessively loving. 

am'oTonsly, adv., in 
an amorous way. 

am'oronsness, n., an 
amorous tendency. 

amor'phism, n., the 
state of beiug am- 
orphous. 

amoi'phoos, adj., 
shapeless, without 
form. 

amortisa'tion, »., the 
act of conveying 
property to a cor- 
poration with per- 
petual succession ; 
reduction of a debt 
by means of a 
sinking fund. 

amor' tin, v.t., to 
effect an amortiza- 
tion of. 

amor'tizement, n., 
i.q. amortization; 
the finishing off on 
the top of an archi- 
tectural member. 

amotmt', n., sum, 
total; v.i., to equal 
in total. 



^ 






-~A 



X. 



V 



amoont'ed, p.p., 

amount. 

amoimt'ing, pr.p., 
amount. 

amour', »., a love 
adventure. 

amptee', w., the unit 
of electric current. 

am'persand, n., the 
sign &. 

am'plii, a prefix = 
around, about. 

Amphibia, n., crea- 
tures that can live 
both on land and 
in water. 

amphib'ian, adj., of 
the naiiu'e of am- 
phibia. 

amphib'ious, adj., i.q. 
amphibian. 

amphib'ioQsly, adv. , 
in the manner of 
amphibia. 

amphib'ioQsness, n., 
the quality of being 
amphibious. 

amphibol'ogy, n. , am- 
biguity of expres- 
sion. 

amphib'oloos, adj., 
equivocal; spread- 
ing on both sides. 

amphibrach, n., a 
metrical foot con- 
taining three sylla- 
bles, of which the 
middle one is long 
and the others are 
short. 

Amphictyon'lc, adj., 
bel. to an amphic- 
tyony. 

Amphio'tyons, »., 
delegates to the Am- 
p'.iictyonic councU. 

Amphic'tyony, n., an 
ancient Greek as- 
sociation for mutual 
defence. 

amphisbaa'na, »., a 
fabled snake with a 
Iipad at either end. 

amphitbe'atre, am- 
phitbe'ater, n., a 
theatre with seats 
all round. 

amphitheat'ric, adj., 
in the form of an 
amphitheatre. 

amphitheat rica],a<i/. , 
i.q. amphitheatric. 

amphora, »., a two- 
handled jarof earth- 
enware. 

am'pboral, adj., rel. 
to an amphora. 

am'ple, adj., full, 
abundant, large, 
spacious. 



ampleness 



A 









.-^n 



ampleness, n., the 

condition of ample. 

ampliflca'tion, n., an 
enlarging. 

am'plified, P-P-, am- 
pliiy. 

am'plifler, n., one 
who amplifies. 

am'plify, v.t., to en- 
large; to add to a 
previous statement. 

am'plifying, pr.p., 
amplify. 

am'plitude.n. , extent, 
largeness. 

am'ply, adv., abund- 
antly, largely. 

ampal'la, n., a flask 
(Lot.). 

am'putate, v.t., to cut 
ofi (a limb). 

sm'patated, p.p., am- 
putate. 

am'patating, pr.p., 
amputate. 

amputation, n., the 
operation of cutting 
off. 

amock', adv., in a 
frenzied way, used 
in the phrase " to 
run amuck," or 
" amok." 

am'nlet, n., a charm 
consisting of a jewel 
or ornament. 

amns'able, adj., able 
to be amused. 

amuse', v.t., to en- 
tertain, delight. 

amused', p.p., amuse. 

amuse' menl, n., di- 
version, pleasure. 

amns'er, «., one who 

a[ini>i'S. 

amus'ing, pr.p., a- 
muse ; adj. diverting. 

amus'ingly, adv., in 
an amusing way. 

amus'ive, adj., tend- 
ing to amusement. 

amyg'dalate, ». a 
salt of amygdalic 
acid; an emulsion 
of almonds; adj., 
rel. to almonds. 

amyg'daline,ai;'. ,bcl. 
to almonds, or the 
tonsils. 

amyg'daloid, adj., al- 
mond-shaped. 

am'yl, n., starch, fine 
flour. 

amyla'ceous, adj., 
starchy. 

am'ylin, n., starch- 
cellulose. 

am'jrss, see amess. 

an, art. indef.; o 
before consonant. 



^^^ 



n-. 



"7 



24 



an'a, n., collected 

sayings; usually 
suffix, as Eliana. 

Anabap'tism, n., re- 
baptizing. 

Anabap'tist, n., one 
who re-baptizes a 
person already bap- 
tized. An A. is now 
called a Baptist. 

Anabaptist' ic, adj., 
rel. to Anabaptist 
teaching. 

anab'olism, «., a bio- 
logical term des- 
cribing " the up- 
building, construc- 
tive, synthetic pro- 
cesses " in the mak- 
ing of a cell. 

anacamp'tic, adj., re- 
flecting. 

anacathai'tic, adj., 
purging upwards. 

anach'ronism, n., an 
error in point of 
time. 

tnactaronis'tic, adj. , 
involving an error 
of time. 

anaclas'tic, adj., rel. 
to refraction. 

anacolu'thon, n. , a 
mixture of syntac- 
tical constructions 
in a sentence. 

anacon'da, n., a large 
S. American water- 
snake. 

Anacreon'tic, adj., 
bel. to, or like, the 
poet Anacreon. 

au'adem, n., a band, 
fillet, garland. 

anae'mia,n., a blood- 
less condition. 

anaem'ic, adj., suffer- 
ing from anaemia. 

anaestbe'sia, n., a 
slate of insensibil- 
ity to pain. 

anaesthet'ic, adj. and 
«., producing in- 
sonsibility. 

anaglyph, n., orna- 
ment in relief. 

anaglyph'ic, adj., rel. 
lo anaglyph. 

anaglyp'tic, adj., i.q. 
aiiaglyphic. 

ana^o'sis, n., recog- 
nition. 

an'agogy, «., mysti- 
cal interpretation. 

anagram, n., a re- 
arrangement of the 
letters of a word 
to make a new 
word. 

anagrammat'ic, adj.. 



aaalyziug 









7; 



7 



7 

T 

T 

T' 
X 



rel. 



n., t.q. 



of the nature of an 

anasr.Tm. 

anagTammat'ical,afi;. 
i.q. anagramniatic. 

anagraci'matize, v.t., 
to makj an ana- 
gram out of a word. 

an'agrapb, n., a 
recipe. 

a'nal, adj. 
the anus, 

analec'ta, 
analects. 

analec'tic, udj., com- 
posed of selections. 

an'alects, n. pi., selec- 
tions, gleanings. 

analem'ma, »., a scale 
for finding the sun's 
declination on a 
given day; a surgi- 
cal support. 

an'alepsy, n., a form 
of epilepsy. 

analog'ical. adj., of 
the nature of an 
analogy. 

anal'ogist, n. , one who 
draws analogies. 

anal'ogiBe, ».»., to 
draw analogies. 

Bnal'ogized, p.p., an- 
alogize. 

Bnal'ogizing, pr.p., 
analogize. 

anal'ogous, adj. , bear- 
ing a likeness or 
analogy to. 

anal'ogously, adv., in 
an analogous way. 

an'alogue, n., some- 
thing that corre- 
sponds with an- 
other. 

anal'ogy, n., a corre- 
spondence or like- 
ness of one thing 
to another. 

anal'ysis, n., the pro- 
cess of analyzing. 

an'alyst, n., one who 
analyzes. 

analytic, adj., 
to analysis. 

analyt'ical, adj. 
analytic. 

an'alyzable, adj., cap- 
able of analysis. 

analyza'tion, n., the 
act of analyzing. 

an'alyze, v.t., to sep- 
arate into parts or 
elements; to trace a 
thing to the source. 

an'alyzed, p.p., an- 
alyze. 

an'alyzer, «., one who 
analyzes. 

an'aljrzing, pr.p., an- 
alyze. 



bel. 



i.g. 



anamorphosis 



25 



androgynous 






•^- 






^ 



anamor'phoBis, n., a 

distortion. 

ana'nas, n., the pine- 
apple. 

an8n'droiis,arf7.,with- 
out stamens, a des- 
cription of female 
plants. 

an'apaest, an'apest, 
n., a metrical foot, 
two short syllables 
before a long one. 

anapaes'tio, anapes'- 
tic, udj., rel. to an 
anapest. 

anapb'ora, »., the 
portion of the lit- 
urgy of the Eastern 
Church which cor- 
responds to the can- 
on of the Western 
Church. 

anarch'ic, adj., tend- 
ing to, or in a state 
of, anarchy. 

anarob'ical, adj., i.q. 
anarchic. 

an'archism, n., the 
state of, or tending 
to, anarchy. 

an'aichist, n., one 
who teaches the 
overthrow of all 
government. 

anarchy, »., a state 
of lawlessness. 

anar'throns, adj., 
without the use of 
the article attached 
to a noun; without 
joints. 

aoasar'ca, »., a drop- 
sical condition of 
the cellular tissue; 
a somewhat similar 
affection of plants 
in wet weather. 

anasat'oons, adj. .sub- 
ject to anasarca. 

anas' tasis, n., resur- 
rection, recovery. 

anastatic, adj., in 
relief. 

anas' tomose, v.t., to 
join by nuning 
together. 

anas' tropbe, n., in- 
version. 

anath'ema, n., a 
solemn curse; the 
person or thing 
cursed. 

anathemat'ical, adj., 
rel. to anathema. 

anath'ematisni, m., 
the pronouncing of 
anathemas. 

anathematiza'tion,n. , 
the act of anathe- 
matizing. 












•nath'ematize, v.t., to 
pronounce an ana- 
thema on. 

anath'ematized, p.p., 
anathematize. 

anatb'ematizer, n., 
one who anathema- 
tizes. 

anatb'ematizing,/>f.^. 
anathematize. 

anatif'erotis, adj., 
geese-prjducing. 

anatom'ic, adj., rel. 
to anatomy. 

anatom'ical, adj., i.q. 
anatomic. 

anat'omist, n., one 
who studies or 
practises anatomy. 

anatomization, n., 
dissection. 

anat'omize, v.t., to 
practise anatomy; 
to cut into parts. 

anat'omized, pp., 
anatomize. 

anat'omizing. pr.p., 
anatomize. 

anat'omy. n., the 
study or art of 
cutting a body to 
examine its struc- 
ture; the structural 
arrangement of a 
body. 

anatrep'tio, adj., up- 
setting, refuting. 

an'cestor, n. , one of an 
earlier generation, 
a forefather. 

ancesto'rial, adj., rel. 
to ancestors. 

ances'tral, adj., bei. 
to forefathers. 

an'oestress, »., fem. 
of ancestor. 

ao'oestry, n., the line 
of one's ancestors. 

anch'or, »., the hook 
that holds a ship 
firm by gripping the 
water's bottom ; 
also v.i. and /., to 
come, or to bring 
a ship, to rest. 

ancb'orable, adj. , able 
to be anchored. 

anob'orage, m., a 
place where a vessel 
may be anchored or 
lie at anchor. 

ancb'oied, p.p., an- 
chor. 

ancb'oress, n., fem. 
of anchoret or an- 
chorite. 

•ncb'oret, n., one 
who retires from 
the world and often 
chooses to live in a 



^^ 



'^■ 






1 

1 



perpetually enclosed 
chamber attached 
to a church. 

ancboiet'ic, adj., rel. 
to an anchoret. 

ancboret'ical, adj., 
i.q. anchoretic. 

ancb'oring, pr.p., an- 
chor. 

ancb'orite, n., i.q. 
anchoret. 

ancbo'vy, n., a small 
fish, tound in the 
Mediterranean. 

an'cbylose, V.'. and i., 
to stiffen. 

anchylo'sis, »., the 
stiffening of a 
joint. 

an'cient, adj., bel. to 
long-past time; of 
great age; n., a 
very old man; in 
old English, an en- 
sign. 

an'ciently, adv., in 
ancient times. 

an'ciently, n., the 
people of old time. 

an'cillary, adj., serv- 
ing (like a hand- 
maid), and so help- 
ing. 

ancip'ital,<z<^;- > double 
headed, two edged. 

ancip'itons, adj., i.q. 
aiicipital. 

an'con, n., a bracket, 
a quoin. 

aad, conj., express- 
ing addition. 

andan'te, adj., in 
moderately slow 
(musical) time; n., 
a movement in 
moderately slow 
time. 

andanti'no, adj., not 
quite so slow as 
andante. (Properly, 
however, it means 
slower than an- 
dante.) 

Ande'an, adj., bel. to 
the Andes. 

andiron, n., a fire- 
dog or iron bar 
supporting a log on 
a hearth. 

andianat'omy, ». , dis- 
section of the (male) 
body. 

•ndrog'ynal, adj., 
hermaphrodite. 

andios'ynism, »., the 
change in plants 
from dioecious to 
monoecious. 

■odrog'ynoaa, adj., 
hermaphrodite. 



android 



26 



animadvertins 



J 
-j- 



<-W? 



M 



1 



^" 



^-/7 



an'droid, a4}., like 
human ; n., an auto- 
maton. 

andioid'al, ad], and 
n., «.^. android. 

an'dron, «., the men's 
quarters iii a Greek 
house. 

an'ecdotal, adj., rel. 
to anecdote. 

an'ecdote, n., a short 
tale or story. 

anecdotic, adj., with 
a tendency to anec- 
dote. 

anecdot'ical, adj., i.q. 
anecdotic. 

an'ecdotist, n., one 
who tells anecdotes. 

ane'mia, n., a blood- 
less condition. Also 
anaemia. 

tnemog'iaphy, n. , the 
recording of the 
wind's velocity. 

anemorogy, n., the 
study or science of 
winds. 

anemom'etei, n., a 
weather-gauge. 

anemom'etry, n., the 
art or science of 
gauging the winds. 

anem'one, n., the 
wind-flower. 

anem'oscope, n., an 
apparatus indicat- 
ing the force and 
direction of the 
wind. 

anent', pf^P-, to- 
wards, concerning. 

an'eroid, adj., with- 
out liquid (the baro- 
metric pressure be- 
ing measured with- 
out the use of a 
fluid). 

anestbe'sia, n., a state 
of insensibility. 

an'eorism, n., a con- 
dition caused by 
the swelling of an 
artery. 

anew', adv., afresh, 
over again. 

anfract'oons, adj., 
winding. 

an'gel, n., a heavenly 
messenger; an old 
coin so named. 

angerio, adj., like or 
rel. to the angels. 

angerica, n., an aro- 
matic plant, used 
in medicine and 
sweets. 

angerical, adj., i.q. 
angelic. 

angelol'ogy, n., the 






"1. 



study of angel min- 
istry. 

an'gelot, n., the name 
of a coin and a 
musical instrument. 

an'gelna, «., the de- 
votion so named, 
including the Ave 
Maria, recited 
morning, noon, and 
night. The bell 
rung for this devo- 
tion is often called 
the Angelus. 

an'ger, n., wrath, 
fury; v.t., to pro- 
voke to wrath. 

an'geied, p.p., anger. 

angering, pr.p., an- 
ger. 

an'gina, n., quinsy; 
an intense pain. 
(The accent is 
rightly on the first 
syllable.) 

angiocarp'ous, adj., 
with fruit covered 
by an envelope. 

angiog'iapliy, n., a 
description of the 
vascular system. 

angiorogy, n., the 
study of the vascu- 
lar system and lym- 
phatics. 

angiot'omy, n., the 
dissection of the 
vascular system. 

an'i^e, n., a figure 
resulting from the 
inclination of one 
straight line to an- 
other; the inclina- 
tion of two lines 
to one another; also 
a fishing hook, rod, 
and line; v.i., to fish 
with rod and line. 
. an'gled, p.p., angle. 

an'gler, n., one who 
angles. 

An'glican, adj., ol the 
English type. 
. An'glicanism, n., the 
method and spirit 
of the English 
Chxirch. 

An'gUc6, adv. {Lai.), 
in the English way 
or language. 

An'glicism, n., a pe- 
culiarity of English 
speech and idioms. 

an'gliciie, v.t.,io con- 
vert into English. 

an'glicized, p.p., an- 
glicize. 

an'glidzing, pr.p., 
anglicize. 

an'gling, pr.p., angle; 



^- 



^r 



n., the fisherman's 
pursuit. 

An'glomania, n., a 
craze for imitating 
English ways. 

An'glo-Saz'on, adj. 
and n., bel. to the 
fused races of An- 
gles and Saxons. 

ango'la, n., the wool 
of the Angora goat. 

an'gor, n., extreme 
distress. 

angora, n., a fine 
kind of wool; a 
breed of cats. 

an'grily, adv., in an 
angry way. 

an'gry, adj., Aowing 
or feeling wrath or 
passion. 

angoil'lilonn. adj., 
like an eel in form. 

angoin'eal, adj., rel. 
to snakes. 

an'gnish, n., acute 
pain or distress, 
physical or mental. 

an'gnished, adj., feel- 
ing anguish. 

an'gnishing, adj., 
causing anguish. 
I rn'gnlar, adj., point- 
ed, corner- wise. 

angnlar'ity, n., an 
angular quality or 
character. 

an'gularly, adv., cor- 
ner-wise, pointedly. 

an'gulated, adj., hav- 
ing angles. 

anhela'tion, n., a 
panting. 

anhy'drons, adj., wa- 
terless. 

an'il, n., an indigo 
plant found in the 
\V. Indies. 

an'ile, adj., old- 
womanish. 

an'iline, n., a coal-tar 
product , from which 
certain dyes are 
made. 

anility, n., old age 
in woman. 

an'ima, n., a breath, 
spirit. 

animadver'sioa, n., 
consideration, re- 
flexion, adverse 
comment. 

animadvert', v.i., to 
make comment on. 

animadvert'ed, p.p., 
animadvert. 

animadTert'er, n., one 
who animadverts. 

animadverfing, pr.p., 
animadv^t. 



animal 



^^-/1 



'^ 



'n 



^n. 



'^ 



an'imal, itdj., having 
life and will to 
move; brutal; rel. 
to animals; n., a 
living creature; a 
brute; a carnal per- 
son. 

animal'cula, n., pi. of 
aniinalculura. 

animarcular, adj., 
like or bel. to an 
animalcula. 

animaronle, n., i.q. 
animalcula. 

animarotiline, ndj. , of 
the nature of ani- 
malcules. 

animaroulist,* n., a 
student of animal- 
cules. 

animaroolnm, n., a 
diminutive animal. 

an'imalism, »-, the 
condition of animal 
being; sensuality. 

animarity, n. , the 
quality of animals. 

animaliza'tion, n. , the 
act of animalizing. 

an'imalize, v.t., tO| 
turn into animals; 
to brutalize; to add 
an animal quality 
to anything. 

animalised, p.p., an- 
iinalize. 

animal' iidng, pr.p., 
animalize. 

an'imate, v.t., to 
quicken, give life 
or spirit to; adj., 
having life. 

an'imated, p.p.. an- 
imate; also adj., 
lively, brisk. 

an'imating, pr.p., an- 
imate; also adj., 
inspiriting. 

an'iinatiiigly, adv., in 
an inspiriting way. 

anima'tion, n., life, 
vigour, briskness. 

an'imative, a4/., caus- 
ing animation. 

an'imism, n., the be- 
lief in the existence 
of a spiritual world 
apart from matter; 
the tendency to 
endow the material 
world and material 
objects with a soul. 

an'imist, m., a be- 
liever in animism. 

animos'ity, n., resent- 
ment, anger. 

an'imos, n., adverse 
feeling. 

an'ioQ, n., the name 
given by Faraday 



^ 

^ 






Y 



^ 
^ 



•^^ 



27 



to the electrical 
component " which 
went up against the 
current." 

an'ise, n., an aro- 
matic plant. 

aniseed, n., the seed 
of anise. 

an'isette,n.,a cordial 
made from aniseed. 

an'ker, n., a Dutch 
wine measure. 

an'kle, n., the part 
between the foot 
and the leg. 

an'kle-bone, n., the 
joint of the ankle. 

an'kled, adj., having 
ankles. 

an'klet, n., an orna- 
mental ring for the 
ankle. 

an'na, n., a small 
Indian coin, i-i6th 
of a rupee. 

an'nalist, »., one who 
writes or compiles 
annals. 

an'nalize, v.t., to com- 
pile annals. 

an'nals, n. , the record 
of yearly events. 

an'nats (Lot. anna- 
tes), n., the first- 
fruits of a benefice, 
formerly payable 
to the Pope, later 
to Queen Anne's 
Bounty. 

anneal', v.t., to tem- 
per with furnace- 
heat. 

annealed', p.p., an- 
neal. 

anneal'ing, pr.p., an- 
neal. 

annel' idan, adj. ,rel . to 
Annelida (».«., earth- 
worms and similar 
water-worms). 

annex', v.t., to join or 
add; n., something 
(usu. a building) 
joined on. 

annex'able, adj., able 
to be annexed. 

annexa'tion, n., the 
act of annexing; 
, appropriation. 

annexa'tiotiist, fi.,one 
who advocates an- 
nexation. 

annexe', n., i.q. an- 
nex. 

annexed', p.p., annex. 

annex'ing, pr.p., an- 
nex. 

anni'hilable, adj., 
able to be anni- 
hUated. 



•^ 



VI- 

n 

Vl- 

Mi 

I 






annuitant 



anni'hilate, v.t., to 
reduce to nothing, 
destroy entirely. 

annihilated, p.p., 
annihilate. 

annihilating, pr.p., 
annihilate. 

annihilation. n., 
complete destruc- 
tion. 

anni'hilatoi, n., one 
who annihilates. 

annivei'sary, n., a 
yearly commemo- 
ration. 

an'no Dom'ini, Lot. 
phrase = in the 
year of Our Lord. 

an'no mnn'di, Lat. 
phrase = in the 
year of the world. 

an'notate, v.t., to 
make notes or com- 
ments on. 

an'notated, p.p., an- 
notate. 

an'notating, pr.p., 
annotate. 

annota'tion, n., the 
act of making notes 
on; a note made. 

an'notatoT, n., one 
who annotates. 

an'notatory, adj., hav- 
ing annotation. 

annot'tO, n., a yellow- 
ish-red dye. 

annoimoe', v.t., to 
make publicly 
known. 

annonnced', p.p., an- 
nounce. 

annoonc'ement, n., a 
thing announced; 
the act of announ- 
cing. 

annotino'er, n., one 
who announces. 

annoono'ing, pr.p., 
announce. 

annoy", v.t., to vex, 
uritate. 

annoy'ance, n., that 
which annoys; the 
act of atmoying. 

annoyed' ,p.^. , annoy. 

annoy'er, n., one who 
annoys. 

annoy'ing, pr.p., an- 
noy. 

an'nnal, adj., yearly, 
happening year by 
year; n., a plant 
that lives only for 
one year. 

an'nnally, adv., year 
by year. 

anna'itant, n., one 
who receives an 
annuity. 



annuity 



Y 



X 



'J^ 
'::? 






^' 



annn'ity, n., a yearly 
payment of money. 

annal', v.t., to cancel, 
make null and void. 

an'nolar, adj., ring- 
like. 

an'nolate, adj., hav- 
ing rings, ringed. 

an'nalatod, adj., i.q. 
annulate. 

annola'tion, n., the 
act of state of being 
ringed; ring forma- 
tion. 

an'nolet, n., a little 
ring. In heraldry 
it denotes a fifth 
son. 

azmalled', p.p., annul. 

annal'ling, pr.p., an- 
nul. 

annnl'ment, n., the 
act of annulling. 

Annalo'sa, »., a class 
of animals under 
which arthropods 
and the higher 
worms are grouped. 

an'nnlose, adj., 

ringed; rel. to the 
Annulosa. 

aa'nalas, n., a ring. 

anna'merate, v.t., to 
add in. 

anna'merated, p.p., 
annumerate. 

annn'merating, pr.p., 
annumerate. 

annnmera'tioD, n. ,tbe 
process of annu- 
merating. 

annnn'oiate. v.t., to 
proclaim, publish 
tidings. 

annan'ciated, p.p., 
annunciate. 

annon'ciating, pr.p., 
annunciate. 

annmicia'tion, n., the 
act of announc- 
ing. The feast of 
the Annunciation of 
Our Lady commem- 
orates the angel's 
announcement of 
Our Lord's coming 
birth. 

annan'ciatory, adj., 
bringing an an- 
nouncement. 

■n'ode, »., the point 
where the electric 
current enters. 

•a'odyne, »., some- 
thing that eases 
pain. 

anoint', v.t., to smear 
with oil or oint- 
ment; to administer 
the chrism. 



•^ 



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.^ 



^^^ 



'-]' 



1 



2S 



anoint'ed, p.p., an- 
oint. 

anoint'er, n., one 
who anoints. 

anoint'ing, pr.p., 
anoint. 

anointment, n., the 
act of anointing. 

anom'alism, n., an 
irregular tendency. 

anom'alist, n., one 
who commits irreg- 
ularities. 

anomalist'io, adj., 
tending to irregu- 
larity. 

anomalist'ical, adj., 
i.q. anomalistic. 

anom'alOQS, adj., ir- 
regular .exceptional. 

anom'aloosly, adv., 
irregularly. 

anom'aly, n., an ir- 
regularity; excep- 
tional proceeding. 

anon', adv., imme- 
diately. 

anonym'ity, »., going 
without a name. 

anon'ymons, adj.f 
dropping one's 
name, nameless. 

anon'ymonsly, adv., 
without a name. 

anon'ymoosness, n., 
the act or state of 
anonymity. 

anorex'ia, n., want of 
appetite. 

anos'mia, n., inodor- 
ousness. 

anoth'er, adj., some 
person or thing else; 
one added. 

anot'ta, see annotto. 

an'serated, adj., with 
terminations cleft 
and ornamented 
with birds' or rep- 
tiles' heads, etc. 

an'serine, adj., rel. to 
a goose; silly. 

an'swer, v.t., to make 
reply; to suit; to be 
a success. 

an'swerable, a<^;'.,held 
to account. 

an'swered, p.p., an- 
swer. 

an'swerer, n., one 
who answers. 

an'swering, pr.p., an- 
swer. 

ant, n., a tiny insect 
= an emmet. 

an'ta, »., a pilaster 
corresponding to 
one opposite. 

antao'io, adj., oorreo 
live of acidity. 



antelope 



aatag'onism, n., 

the act or state of 
opposing. 
^^^^ aatag^oalst,n.,nno 
who strives against 
or opposes. 
":^^ antagoalst' Ic.adj., 
opposing. 
<.>T-,--» antt^onize, v.t., to 
resist, struggle 
against, neutralize. 
o-7v^ antag'anized, p.p., 

antagonize. 
>7v-«^ antag'onizing, pr.p., 
^^yj antagonize. 

' /_: antal'gic, adj., pain- 
relieving. 
LJ.' antal'kali, n., a sub- 
stance that counter- 
acts alkali. 
''"N Antarc'tic, adj., the 
or L opposite to the Arc- 

-^1 tic; rel. to the South 

Pole. 
\_ antarthrit'io. adj., 
curing or relieving 
(_^ arthritis. 

k— : antasthmat'ic, adj., 
„ relieving asthma. 

.1 ant'-«ater, n., a four- 
footed animal that 
;_^ devours ants. 

'~\ antecede', v.t., to go 
;_^ .1 before. 

~~1 anteced'ed,^./>., ante- 
cede. 
anteced'ence, n., the 
act of going before, 
anteced'ent, adj., go- 
ing before ; n. , some- 
thing that has gone 
before; in plur. = 
past conduct. 
"^ anteced'ently, adv., 
' ^ previously. 

anteoed'ing, pr.p., 

antecede. 
anteoes'sor, n., one 
who has anteceded. 
an'techamber, n., a 
room leading into 
another. 
an'te-chapel, n., the 
part of a chapel 
outside the screen. 
an'tedate, v.t., to an- 
ticipate the proper 
date, 
an'tedated, p.p., ante- 
date. 
an'tedating, pr.p., an- 
tedate. 
antedilu'vial, adj., 
before the flood. 
^Ws. antedilu'vian,£u/;.,«.?. 
' antediluvial ; n. , one 
who lived before 
the flood. 
^~V^ an'telope, »., a small 
kind of deer. 



^ 



1 






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iry 



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antemeridian 



29 



antipathic 






'^^ 

'^^ 
■^ 



^ 



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7 



antemerid'iao, adj., 

before mid-day. 

aiteman'dane, adj., 
before tlie world's 
iiiaking. 

antema'rsi, tdj., be- 
fore tfie wall or 
walls. 

anteni'cene, adj., be- 
fore the Council of 
Nicaea, a.d. 325. 

anten'na, n., a feeler 
or horn of a crus- 
tacean or an insect. 

anten'nae, n., pi. of 
antenna. 

antennp'tial, adj., be- 
fore marriage. 

ante-pas'chal, adj., 
before Easter. 

an'tepast, n., food 
before a meal. 

antepenalt', n., the 
last syllable but 
two. 

antepennlt'imate, adj. 
preceding the last 
but one. 

antepilep'tio, adj., 
rel. to the treat- 
ment of epilepsy. 

ante'rior, adj., pre- 
ceding, earlier in 
date. 

atiterior'ity, adj., pre- 
cedence in date. 

anteriorly, adv., 
earlier. 

an'te-room. n., an 
outer room leading 
mto another. 

ai'them, n., a solemn 
piece of vocal music 
for solo or chorus. 
It is the English 
Church form of the 
motet. 

aa'tber, n., the part 
of a flower's stamen 
containing the pol- 
len. 

aa'tberoid, adv., like 
an anther. 

ant'-hill, n., the 
mound raised by 
ants. 

anthorofrr, n., a sel- 
ection of choice 
literary passages. 

anthracite, »., a 
smokeless kind of 
coal. 

antbrad'tic, adj., rel. 
to anthracite. 

an'thrax, n., a car- 
buncle; an infec- 
tious disease among 
sheep and cattle, 
and communicable 
to man. 



n- 



\:-yV. 






anthiopog'rapby, n., 

the description of 
the human race, 
anthropoid, adj., re- 
sembling thehuman. 

anthroporogist, n., a 
student of anthro- 
pology. 

anthropol'oKy, »., the 
study of humanity 
as a branch of 
natural science. 

anthropomor'phism, 
n., likening divine 
things to human. 

anthropomor'phist.n. 
one who likens the 
divine to the human. 

anthropomor'ph ize, 
v.i., to liken the 
divine to thehuman. 

anthropomor'phoas, 
adj., in human 
shape. 

anthropop'athy, n., 
the attribution of 
human passions to 
the Deity. 

anthropoph'agi, n., 
cannibals. 

anthropoph'agoas, 
adj., cannibalistic. 

anthropophagy, n., 
cannibalism. 

an'ti-, a Greek prefix 

= against, opposite 
to, instead of. 

antihil'ions, adj., cor- 
rective of bile. 

an' tic, adj., odd, 
quaint; n., a buf- 
foon; a merry caper. 

An'tichrist, n., the 
rival to Christ. 

antichrist'ian, adj., 
hostile to Christi' 
anity; rel. to Anti' 
Christ. 

antio'ipant, n., one 
who anticipates. 

antio'ipate, v.t., to act 
in advance; to fore- 
stall; to foresee. 

antic'ipated. p.p., an- 
ticipate. 

anticipating, pr.p., 
anticipate. 

anticipa'tion, n., the 
act of anticipat- 
ing. 

antic'tpative, adj., 
anticipating. 

anticipator, n., one 
who anticipates. 

anticipatory, adj., 
forestalling. In ad- 
vance. 

antioU'maz, n., a 
drop from a pre- 
vious ascent; bathos. 



T 

4- 






antioli'nal, adj., bent 
with the convex 
side upward. 

anticyclone, n., the 
opposite of a cy- 
clone. (High pres- 
sure is at the centre, 
and the wind cur- 
rents sweep out- 
wards.) 

an'tidotal, adj., of 
the nature of an 
antidote. 

an'tidote, n., a rem- 
edy for poison or 
other trouble. 

antidot'ical, adj., rel. 
to antidotes. 

antifeb'rile, adj., 
fever-arresting. 

antifed'eral, adj., op- 
posed to federalism. 

antiied'eralism, adj., 
a movement op- 
posed to federalism. 

antilog'arithm, »., a 
number that corre- 
sponds to a given 
logarithm. 

antil'ogy, n., contra- 
diction, inconsist- 
ency. 

antimacas'sar, n., a 
protection against 
soiling. 

antimonarcb'ical, adj. 
opposed to mon- 
archy. 

antimo'nial, adj., rel. 
to antimony. 

antimo'niate, adj., 
having antunony in 
it. 

antimo'nioos, adj., 
rel. to antimony. 

an'timony, n., a met- 
allic element used 
in medicine, the 
arts, and alloys. 

Antino'mian, adj., 
opposed to law. The 
word is applied to 
those sectaries who 
hold that, in virtue 
of their belief, they 
are subject to no 
moral law. 

Antino'mianism, n., 
the theory or prin- 
ciples of Antino- 
mians. 

antin'omy, n., a vio- 
lation of law. 

antipa'pal, adj., op- 
posed to the papacy. 

Antipatbet'ic, adj., 
repugnant, dislik- 
ing. 

antipatb'ic, adj., in a 
state of antipathy. 



antipathy 






X 



"^ 



antip'athy, n., a feel- 
ing of repugnance, 
dislike. 

antiphlogistic, adj., 
preventive of in- 
flammation. 

an'tipbon, n., the 
passage sung or 
recited before and 
after psalms, can- 
ticles, and other 
portions of the 
Church's ritual. 

antipb'onal, adj., 
smgiiig or reciting 
in alternate verses 
or passages; n., a 
collection of anti- 
phons. 

antiph'ony, n., alter- 
nate or responsory 
singing. 

antiph'iasis, t%., the 
use of a word in a 
sense contrary to 
its proper meaning. 

antip'odal, adj., rcl. 
to the antipodes. 

an'tipode, adj., the 
opposite. 

antipode'an, adj., in 
or of the Antipodes. 

Antip'odes, »., coun- 
tries exactly on the 
opposite side of the 
globe; any extreme 
contrast. 

antipyiet'io, adj., re- 
lieving fever. 

antipy'lin, n., a pre- 
paration derived 
from coal tar, used 
in relief of fever. 

antiqua'rian, adj. , rel. 
to antiquity; often 
incorrectly used as 
a noun ioranliquary. 

antiqna'rianism, adj., 
a fondness for anti- 
quarian research. 

an'tiqoary, n., one 
who studies ancient 
things. 

an'tiqoate v.t., to, 
make out-of-date; 
abolish. 

an'tiqaated, p.p., an- 
tiquate; adj., old- 
fashioned, out-of- 
date. 

an'tiqaatinK. pr-p., 
ant'iquate. 

antiqua'tion, »., the 
act of antiquating. 

antique', adj., old, 
old-fashioned; n., a 
specimen of old 
work, a curiosity. 

•atique'ly, adv., in an 
old-fashioned way. 






\ 



\ 

r 



30 



antiqne'ness, n., age, 

old-world style. 

antiquities, n., relics 
of ancient times. 

antiq'uity, n., the 
olden days. 

antirhemnat'ic, adj., 
relieving rheumat- 
ism. 

antiscorbn'tic, adj., 
remedial in cases 
of scurvy. 

antisciipt'ural, adj., 
contrary to Holy 
Scripture. 

antiseptic, adj., re- 
sisting or arresting 
putrefaction; n., a 
substance with anti- 
septic properties. 

antislav'ery, n., a 
movement opposed 
to slavery. 

antiso'cial, adj., op- 
posed to the in- 
terests of society. 

antispasmod'ic, adj., 
spasm-relieving. 

antis'tasis, n., a rhe- 
torical argument 
that an act is justi- 
fied on the ground 
that its omission 
would have led to 
something worse. 

antis'tiophe, n., the 
lyrical passages that 
alternate with the 
strophe of a Greek 
chorus. 

antistropb'ic, adj. rel. 
to antistrophe. 

antitb'eses, »., pi. of 
antithesis. 

antitb'esis. n., op- 
position, contrast. 

autithet'io, fulj:, op- 
posed to, in con- 
trast with. 

antitbet'ical, adj., i.q. 
antithetic. 

antitoz'in. n., a sub- 
stance that coun- 
teracts poison. The 
person affected is 
inoculated with it. 

antitrjnita'rian, adj., 
opposed to belief in 
the Holy Trinity. 

an'Utype, n., that 
which is represen- 
ted by a type, e.g., 
the Cross is the anti- 
type to the Brazen 
Serpent in the Wil- 
derness. 

antityp'ical, adj., cor- 
responding to the 
type. [horn. 

ant'ler, n., a stag's 



apaee 

r anflered, adj., hav- 
^ ing antlers. 

Y' ant'Iike, adj., resem- 
, bling an ant. 

"'T^ antonoma'sia, n., the 
' substitution of 

names. 
^^^^_^ antonym, «., a word 
' " of opposite mean- 
ing. 
^->^ Anu'bis, w., the 
Egyptian dog-head- 
ed Deity. 
a'nus, n., the human 
* posterior. 

^S^ an'vil, «., a black- 
smith's hammering- 
block. 
Sf anzi'ety, n., care, un- 
easiness, strong de- 
sire. 
^ anx'ious, adj., care- 
^ worn, uneasy, desi- 
rous. 
'"^ anx'iously, adv., in an 

anxious way. 
"^^ anz'iousness, n., a 
"^ state of anxiety. 
^^ any, adj. , some (one 

' or more). 

'~\ Aii'ybody, pfon., 

I some individual. 

—^ aaVbow, adv. , in any 
way. 
an' y one, pron., any- 
body. 
an'ytblttg, pron., 

some thing. 
aii'ywbere, adv., in 
„ any place. 
.Tr^ a/i'j'wise.flrft'.jinany 

way. 
._f Anz'ac, adj. and n., 
a word coined dur- 
ing the Great War, 
and formed, like 
Cabal, out of initial 
letters, which re- 
present Australian 
and New Zealand 
Army Corps. 
.j^ Ao'nian, adj., bel, to 
Aonia. Mt. Helicon 
in Aonia was sacred 
to the Muses. 
"^ a'orist, adj. and n., 
indefinite; «.g., the 
aorist tense relates 
to no particular 
time. 
~J\. aoris'tic, adj., bel. to 
1 . the aorist. 
y\ aoi'ta, n., the main 
artery, leading from 
the left side of the 
heart. 

naorti'tis, n., inflam- 
mation of the aorta. 
No apace', adv., quickly, 
at a faster rdte. 



Apache 



> 
^ 

S 



V 






VI. 



^ 



vy^ 



■vj? 



X 



Apa'che, n., a hooli- 

R.iii {Fr.). 

apago'gd, »., proof by 
slMwing the absurd- 
ity of the opposite. 

ap'anage, n., a per- 
quibile; orig., pro- 
vision for mainten- 
ance of younger 
members of a 
family. 

apart', adv., separ- 
ately, at a distance 
from each other. 

apart'ment, n., a 
room in a house. 

apathet'ic, adj., list- 
less, indifferent. 

apathet'ical, adj., i.q. 
apathetic. 

ap'athist, n., one of 
an apathetic ten- 
dency. 

ap'athy, n., indiffer- 
ence, listlessness. 

ap'atite, n., a sub- 
stance once used as 
a gem. 

ape, n., one of the 
monkey tribe; v.t., 
to imitate, copy. 

apeak', adv., on the 
pt-ak or summit of 
a flagstaS. 

aped, p.p., ape. 

apel'loos, adj., not 
skinned over, un- 
cicatrized. 

Ap'enniiie, adj., the 
name of a mountain 
range in Italy. 

apep'sia, n., inability 
to digest. 

ape'rient, adi., open- 
ing, laxative; n., a 
laxative medicine. 

aper'itive, adj., hav- 
ing aperient pro- 
perties. 

ap'ertnre, n., an 
opening. 

a'pez, n., top, sum- 
mit. 

apha'sia, n., loss of 
speech. 

aphe'lion, n., the 
point most distant 
from the sun. Its 
opposite is the peri- 
helion. 

apher'esis, n., the 
elision of an un- 
accented syllable. 
Also aphaeresis. 

aph'ides, n., pi. of 
aphis. 

a'phis, n., the green- 
fly. 

apblogis'tic, ad;', .non- 
inflammatory. 






^ 



^ 



\ 



31 



apho'nia, n., sound- 

lessness. 

aph'orism, n., a short 
saying; a maxim. 

aph'orist, n., an ut- 
terer of aphorisms. 

aphorist'ic, adj., in 
tlie manner of an 
aphorism. 

aphorist'ical, adj., i.q. 
aphoristic. 

af h'orize, v. >. , to utter 
aphorisms. 

apb'rite, n., the foam- 
spar. 

aph'thae, n., small 
ulcerous vesicles, 
seen in the com- 
plaint called milk- 
thrush. 

aph' thong, n., a non- 
sounded letter or 
syllable of a word. 

apia'rian, adj., rel. to 
bees. 

a'piarist, n., a bee- 
keeper. 

a'piary, n., a bee- 
house. 

ap'ices, n., pi. of 
apex. 

apic'olated, adj., 
Dointed, peaked. 

a'picoltnie, n., bee- 
keeping. 

apieoe', adv., in 
shares. 

a'phg, pr.p., ape. 

a'pis, n., a bee ILat.). 

apish, adj., ape-like, 
Imitative. 

a pishly, adv., in an 
ape-like manner. 

a'pishness, n., an 
apish habit. 

aplastic, adj., not 
easily moulded. 

aplomb', adj. and 
adv., perpendicular; 
»., cool self-posses- 
sion. 

apoc'alypse, n., a 
revelation. 

apocalyptic, adj., rel. 
to or resembling 
apocalypse. 

apocalyp'tical, adj., 
■ i.q. apticalyptic. 

apocarpous, adj., 
with separate car- 
pels. 

apoc'opate, v.t., to 
perform apocope; to 
cut off or shorten. 

apoc'opd, n., a cut- 
ting off or elision of 
a final syllable or 
letter. 

apocnu'tio, adj., as- 
tringent. 






</7 



\ 



apoplectical 



Apoc'iypha, n., the 

name given to the 
Deutero - canonical 
books of the Bible. 

apoc'ryphal, adj., rel. 
to the Apocrypha; 
of uncertain au- 
thority. 

a'podal, adj., not hav- 
ing ventral fins. 

a'pode, adj., without 
feet. 

apod'osis, n., the 
clause answering to 
an »/-clause in syn- 
tax. 

ap'ogee, n., the point 
in the moon's orbit 
most distant from 
the earth. 

ap'ograph, n., an 
exact transcript. 

Apol'lo, n., a Greek 
and Roman deity, 
patron of music; 
worshipped as the 
sun-god, Phoebus 
Apollo. 

Apoll'yon, n., the 
great Power of 
Darkness. 

apoI«set'ic, adj., con- 
veying an apology, 
making a defence. 

apologeticaU adj., i.q. 
apologetic. 

apologet'ics, n., rea- 
soning in defence 
(of Christianity). 

apol'ogist, n., one 
who makes an apol- 
ogy or defence. 

apol'ogize, v.*-, to 
make an apology. 

apologized, p.p., 
apologize. 

apol'ogizer, n., one 
who makes an apol- 
ogy. 

apol'ogiziiig, pr.p., 
apologize. 

ap'ologue, n., a fable 
with a moral. 

apol'Ogy, n., a de- 
fence; an expression 
of regret; a make- 
shift. 

ap'qphthegm, n., a 
brief saying; a 
maxim. 

apoph'yge, n., a hol- 
low curve at the 
base or top of a 
column. 

apoplec'tic adj., rel. 
to apoplexy; n., a 
sufferer from apo- 
plexy. 

apoplec'ticaUiui/., 1.9. 
apoplectic. , 



apoplexy 



s 



V 



V? 









ap'oplexy, n., a stroke 
caused by brain 
affection. 

apos'tasy, n., a falling 
away from, revolt 
against, one's re- 
ligion. 

apos'tate, n., one who 
apostatizes. 

apostat'ical, adj., ten- 
ding to apostasy. 

apos'tatize, v.t., to 
revolt against one's 
former faith. 

apos'tatized, p.p., 
apostatize. 

apos'tatizmg, pr.p., 
apostatize. 

a posterio'ri. Lot. 
phrase «= arguing 
from effect to cause. 

apos'til, v.t., to anno- 
tate marginally; n., 
a marginal note. 

Spos'tle, n., one who 
is commissioned, 
esp. one of the 
Twelve Apostles; a 
leader in a move- 
meat or cause. 

apos'tleship, n., an 
apostle's office. 

ftfos'tolate, n., the 
order of apostles; 
an apostle's func- 
tion. 

apostolic, adj., rel. 
to apostles. 

apostolical, adj., i.q. 
apostolic. 

apostolic'ity, n., the 
apostolic character. 

apos'tiopbe, n., an 
aside address to 
some person or 
thing; a typograph- 
ical mark of posses- 
sion. 

apostropb'ic, adj., rel. 
to apcjstrophe. 

apos'trophize, v.i., to 
address with an 
apostrophe. 

apos'tiophized, p.p., 
apostrophize. 

apo8'trophizing,/>r./>. , 
apostrophize. 

apothecary, »., a 
storer of medicinal 
drugs; formerly an 
irregular practi- 
tioner in medicine. 

ap'othegm, »., i.q. 
apophthegm. 

apothegmat'io, adj., 
of the nature of 
apothf>?m. 

apotheo'sis, n., deifi- 
cation, making into 
a god. 



V 



s 

V 



\r 



v\ 



\ 



32 



apotheo'size, v.t., to 

deify. 

apot'omy, apo'tome, 

n.,a major semi tone 

appal', v.t., to terrify, 

dismay. 
Appalacli' ian, adj., 
bel. to the Appa- 
lachian mountains. 
. appalled', p.p., appal. 

appalling, pr.p., ap- 
pal; adj., frightful. 

appall'ingly, adv., in 
an appalling way. 

appanage, n., a 
dependency. 

appara'ta& n., appli- 
ances for doing 
work. 

appai'el, n., clothing; 
embroidered work 
on alb and amice; 
r./., to clothe. 

appar'elled, p.p., ap- 
parel; adj., orna- 
mented with appar- 
els. 

appar'elling, pr.p., 
apparel. 

appa'ient, adj., vis- 
ible, manifest.seem- 
ing. 

appa'iently, adv., 
clearly, seemingly. 

apparition, n., the 
act of appearing; 
something that ap- 
pears, a ghost. 

appar'itor, n., an offi- 
cer in a law court; 
a church beadle. 

appeal', v.i., to call 
upon; to carry a 
case to a superior 
court; «., reference 
to a superior court, 
a call for aid. 

appeal'able, adj., able 
to be pleaded before 
a higher court. 

appealed', p.p., ap- 
peal. 

appeal'er, n., one who 
appeals. 

appealing, pr.p., ap- 
peal; adj., com- 
pelling interest. 

appear', v.i., to be- 
come visible; to 
seem. 

appear'ance, n., a 
showing, becoming 
visible; a seeming; 
outward aspect. 

appeared', p.p., ap- 
pear. 

appear'er, n., one 
who appears. • 

appear'ing, pr.p., 
appear. 



X 

V 
■V 

VI 

f 



H 



\ 



x* 



appertaining 

appeasable, adj., abu 
to be appeased. 

appeas'ableness, n., 
an appeasable state 
or temper. 

appease', v.<., to calm, 
allay. 

appeased', p.p., ap- 
pease. 

appease'ment, »., the 
act of appeasing. 

appeas'er, n., one 
who appeases. 

appeasing, pr.p., ap- 
pease. 

appel'lant, n., one 
who appeals. 

appel'late, adj., pos- 
sessing appeal juris- 
diction. 

appellation, n., a 
name. 

appel'lative, adj., rel. 
to appeal; n., a 
nickname, title. 

appel'latively, adv. , by 
way of an appeal. 

appel'latory, adj., con- 
veying an appeal. 

appellee', «., the per- 
son against whom 
an appeal is lodged. 

appel'lor, n., i.q. ap- 
pellant. 

append', v.t., to hang 
to, fix to, add. 

append'age, n., some- 
thing appended. 

append'ant, n., i.q. 
appendage; adj., 
joined to, added. 

appended, p.p., ap- 
pend. 

append'ing, pr.p., ap- 
pend. 

appen'dices, pi. of 
appendix. 

appendici'tis, n., dis- 
ease of the vermi- 
form appendix to 
the great intestine. 

appen'dix, n., addi- 
tional matter at the 
end of a book; a 
part of the great 
intestine so named. 

appen'dixes, pi. of 
appendix. 

apperception, n., self- 
consciousness; the 
faculty of the mind 
to be conscious of 
perceiving. 

appertain', v.t., to 
belong to, to be 
relat^ to. 

appertained', p.p., 
appertam. 

appertain'ing. pr.p. , 
appertain. 



appertain ment 



33 



apprentice 



^ 



1- 



> 

V 

\ 

1 



V 



sppeitain'ment, m., 
the slate o£ apper- 
taining. 

ap'petence, «., strong 
desire, appetite, 
tendency. 

ap'petency, n., i.g. 
app.'teiico. 

ap'petent, adj., crav- 
ing; lllipilUlVC. 

ap'petite, n., desire 
(chiefly for food). 

ap'petitive. adj., pro- 
ducing appetite. 

ap'petiie, v.i., to ex- 
cite appetite in a 
person. 

ap'petizer, »., some- 
thing that pro- 
motes appetite. 

ap'petizing.ofi;. ,stim- 
uiating the appe- 
tite; tempting. 

Ap'pian, adj., named 
Irom Appius, as the 
Appian Way. 

applaud', v.t., to clap 
the hands at, to 
approve. 

appland'ed, p.p., ap- 
piaud. 

applaod'er, n., one 
who applauds. 

applauding, pr.p., 
applaud. 

applause', n., the act 
of applauding, open 
praise. 

applau'sive, adj., ex- 
pressing applause. 

ap'ple, n., the fruit 
so named; the pupil 
of an eye. 

ap'ple-tiee, »•, 3 tree 
bearing apples. 

appli'ance, n., some- 
thing applied. 

appli'ancy, n., the 
habit of applying, 
adaptability. 

appUcabitity, n., 
ability to bcapplied, 
fitness. 

ap'pUcable, adj., 
able to be applied, 
fit. 

ap'plicableness, n. , 
suitability, fitness 
to be applied. 

ap'plicanoy, n., the 
state of applying. 

applicant, n., one 
who applies for 
some gift or posi- 
tion. 

applioa'tion, »., the 

act of applying; 
steady industry; the 
moral of a story or 
discourse. 



H 



V 



1> 



X 



ap'pIicatiTe, »dj., rcl. 
to application; able 
lo be applied. 

ap'plicatory, adj., fit 
for application. 

appJied', p.p. .apply. 

appli'er, n., one who 
applies. 

app]iiiu6'> n., some- 
thiug laid on. 

apply', v.t. ai'd i., to 
put one thing to 
another, to exert; 
to request; to con- 
cern, be related to. 

applying, pr.p., ap- 
ply. 

appoggiatn'ra, n., an 
ornamental note in 
music, taking its 
time out of a prin- 
cipal note. 

appoint', v.t., to fix; 
confer ofiice; settle. 

appoint'ed, p.p., ap- 
point. 

appointee', n., a per- 
son appointed. 

appoint'ei, n., one 
who appoints. 

appointing, pr.p. 
appoint. 

appoint' meat, n., 
the act of appoint- 
ing; anofficeorpost; 
an engagement. 

appoint' meati, pi. 
of appointment = 
equipments. 
Apollina'iian, adj., 
rel. to Apollinarius; 
e.g., the ApoUina- 
rian heresy. 

apportion, v.t., to 
assign portions or 
parts. 

appor'tioned, p.p., 
apportion. 

appor'tioner, n., one 
who apportions. 

appor'tioning, pr.p. , 
apportion. 

apportionment, ». , 
the act of appor- 
tioning. 

appos'er, n., one who 
apposes. 

ap'posite, adj. , fitting, 
to the point. 

ap'posite^, adv., fit- 
tingly, to the point. 

ap'positeness, n., ap- 
plicability, the state 
of being to the 
point. 

apposi'tion, n., the 
act of placing side 
by side. In gram- 
mar, apposition is 
the juxtaposition of 



\ 



two nouns or equiv- 
alents in the same 
case, the latter ex- 
plaining the former, 
as Victoria Regina. 
appos'ltive, adj., rel. 

to app.jsition. 
apprais'al, n., the act 

of appraising. 
appraise', v.t., to take 
the value of, to 
price. 
appraised', p.p., ap- 
praise. 
appraise'ment, n., the 

act of appraising. 
apprais'er, »., a valu- 
er, one who ap- 
praises. 
apprais'ing, pr.p., 

appraise. 
appre'ciable, adj., 
able to be appre- 
ciated. 
appre'ciably, adv., 
sensibly, in a way 
to be felt. 
appre'ciate, v.t. and t. , 
to set a value on; to 
esteem highly; to 
incrtase in value. 
appreciated, p.p. , 

appreciate. 
appre'ciating, pr.p., 
/,. iipprcciate. 
■ \^ apprecia'tion, «., the 
act of valuing, re- 
cognition of value; 
rise in price, a cri- 
tique. 
appre'ciative, adj., 
showing apprecia- 
tion. 
\Jiy'' appre'ciatory,ai;'.,«.j. 

appreciative. 
\^ apprehend', v.t., to 
1 seize, to arrest; to 
understand; to an- 
licipate with fear. 
Vi^ apprehend'ed, p.p., 
apprehend. 
\j» apprehend'er, n., one 
' who apprehends. 
apprehending, pr.p., 

apprehend. 
apprehen'sible, adj., 
able to be appre- 
. hended. 

\^ apprehen'sion, n., 

nervous fear. 
Vi. apprehen'sive, adj., 

V nervously fearful. 
Vj. ^ apprehen'svely, adv., 
^V in an apprehensive 
way. 
\j> appr^an'8iTene8s,n., 
^^-r" an apprehensive 
state. 
appren'tioe, n., a 
young person 



•No 

•N. 






M 



-^ 



•h 



»-ii7*) 



apprenticed 



A. 



1 



■X, 



^ 



learning a trade or 
profession; v.t., to 
bind a youth to an 
employer. 

appren'ticed, p-p-, 
apprentice. 

appien'tioeship, n., 
the state o{ an 
apprentice: the 

period of being an 
apprentice. 

appren'ticing, pr.p-, 
apprentice. 

apprise', apprize', v.t. , 
to give notice of, 
inform. 

apprised', p.p., ap- 
prise. 

appris'er, n., one who 
apprises. 

appds'ing, pr.p., ap- 
prise. 

approach', v.t. and >., 
to come near to, 
make advances; n., 
a coming near, path 
to. 

approach'able, adj., 
able to be ap- 
proached, affable. 

approached'. p.p., 
approach. 

approach'er, n., one 
who approaches. 

approaching, pr.p., 
approach. 

approach'ment, n., 
the act of ap- 
proaching. 

ap'probate. v.t., to 
approve, sanction. 

ap'probated, p.p., ap- 
probate. 

ap'probating, pr.p., 
approbate. 

approba'tion, n., ap- 
proval, sanction. 

ap'probative, ad]., 
approving, sanc- 
tioning. 

ap'probatiTely, adv., 
in an approving 
way. 

ap'probatiTeness, n., 
a state of approv- 
ing. 

ap'probatory, adj. , i.g. 
approbative. 

appro'priable, adj., 
able to be appro- 
priated. 

appro'priate, v.t., to 
make one's own; to 
set aside; adj., fit- 
ting, suitable. 

appro'priated, p.p., 
appropriate. 

appro'priately. adv., 
in an appropriate 
way. 









^vv^ 



V 



34 



appro'priateness, n., 
fitness, suitability. 

appro' priating, pr.p., 
appropriate. 

appropria'tion,M., the 
act of appropriat- 
ing. 

appro'priatiTe, adj., 
given to appro- 
priating. 

appro'priator, n., one 
who appropriates. 

approv'able, adj., 
worthy to be ap- 
proved. 

approv'al, n., appro- 
bation, sanction. 

approve, v.t., to 
think well of, sanc- 
tion. 

approved', p.p., ap- 
prove. 

approve'ment. n., the 
act of approving. 

approv'er, n., one 
who approves. 

approT'ing, pr.p., ap- 
prove. 

approv'ingly, adv., in 
an approving way. 

approx'imate, v.t., to 
approach, come 
near to. 

approx'imate. adj., 
coming very near 
to, almost correct. 

approx'imated. p.p., 
approximate. 

approximately, adv., 
nearly, closely. 

approximating, pr.p., 
approximate. 

approxima' tion, n. , 
the act of approx- 
imating; a calcula- 
tion or statement 
almost exact. 

approx'imative, adj., 
coming close to, 
approaching. 

appni'. »., support 
(Fr.). 

appul'sion, n., the act 
of striking against. 

appor'tenance, n., 
that which per- 
tains or belongs. 

appnr' tenant, adj., 
bel., pert. to. 

a'prioot. «., a fruit of 
the plum kind. 

A'pril, «., the fourth 
month of the year. 

A'pril-fool, n., one 
who is made a fool 
of on All Fools' 
Day, April i. 

a prio'ri, Lai. phrase 
=" from something 
antecedent; ».«.,rea- 



aqnatint 



'H 



X 



> 



Ns 



\ 






soning from cause 
to effect. 

a'pron, n., an outside 
garment protecting 
the front of the 
body. 

a'proned, adj., wear- 
ing an apron. 

apropos', French 

phrase = to the 
purpose. 

apse, n., the roimd 
or multilateral end 
of a chancel, aisle, 
or chapel. 

ap'sidal, adj., rel. to 
an apse; in shape 
like an apse. 

ap'sides. pi. of apsis. 

ap'sis. n., a point in 
an eccentric orbit 
furthest from or 
nearest to the cen- 
tre of attraction; 
an apse. 

apt. adj., fit, ap- 
posite, liable to, 
well qualified. 

ap'tera, «., wingless 
creatures. 

ap'teral, adj., bel. to 
aptera. 

ap'teroos, adj., wing- 
less. 

ap'teryx, «., a bird 
with rudimentary 
wings. 

apt'itode. n., fitness, 
quickness, capacity 
for. 

apfly, adv., fitly, ap- 
propriately. 

apt'ness, n., a capac- 
ity for doing things, 
appropriateness. 

ap'tote, adj., not hav- 
mg case-endings. 

a'qna,M., water (La/.). 

aanafor'tis, n., nitric 
acid. 

aaoarelle', a<^'.,water- 
colour. 

aqna'rial, adj., rel. to 
water. 

aqoa'rian, adj., living 
in water. 
. aQoa'rinm, n., a re- 
ceptacle for water 
animals or plants. 

Aqnarios. n., the 
water carrier — one 
of the signs of the 
Zodiac. 

aanat'io, adj., rel. 
to, living in, water. 

aq'natint, n. , a special 
kind of engraving; 
an engraving print- 
ed from an aquatint 
plate. 



aqua vHae 



^ 
H 



\ 

V 



%/ 



V 

\^ 

V 



a'ana vi'tae, n. , strong 
water, especially 
brandy, eau it vie. 

a'qneduct,«., a chan- 
nel for conveying 
water. 

a'iineoiu,a47. ,watery , 
ot water. 

a'qaeousness, w., a 
watery state. 

a'qaiUne, adj., eagle- 
like; hooked like an 
eagle's beak. 

a'qodlon, n., the N.E. 
wind. 

Ar'ab, n., a native of 
Arabia. 

aiabesane'. n., orna- 
mentation or carv- 
ing in the Moorish 
style. 

arabewiiied'. adj., in 
the arabesque style. 

Ara'bian, adj., bel. to 
Arabia. 

Ar'aUc adj., i.q. Ara- 
bian; n., the lan- 
guage of Persia. 

ar^able, adj. , fit for the 
plough and tilling. 

Aiaob'nida, n., in- 
sects of the spider 
tribe. 

aiach'noid. adj., spi- 
der-like. 

araohnorogy, n., the 
study of spider- 
natiire. 

ar'agonite. n., a cal- 
cium carbonate. 

Aiams'iO, adj. and n., 
the name of an 
ancient language of 
Syria. 

Aiame'ail, adj., bel. 
to Aram (Mesopo- 
tamia) or Aramaea. 

ara'tion, n., plough- 
ing, tilling. 

ai'baUBt, n., a mUi- 
tary engine so 
named; a crossbow. 

ar'balister, n., the 
man behind the 
arbalist. 

ai'biter. »., a judge 
or umpire. 

afbltrable, adj., able 
to go to arbitration. 

arblt'rament, n., 
decision, umpire's 
verdict. 

at'bltrartly, adv., ol 
one's own will, des- 
potically. 

ar'bltrariaesi, n. , an 
arbitrary temper. 

arbitrary, adj., 
acting on one's own 
will or decision. 






5^ 



N 



35 



ar' bit rate, v.*., to 

decide between dis- 
putants. 

ar'bltratti,p.p.,:xi- 
bitrate. 

at' bitraiiat, pr.p., 
arbitrate. 

arbltra'tloa,n.,the 
act of arbitrating. 

ar' bitrator, n., one 
who arbitrates. 

ar'bitiatrix, n., fern, 
of arbitrator. 

aT'bitiess,n., fem. of 
arbiter. 

aibo'reotu, adj., bel. 
to trees. 

arboiea'oence, n., the 
growth of trees. 

aibore'tum, n., a col- 
lection of trees for 
scientific study. 

ar'borioaltore, n., 
scientific tree-cul- 
ture. 

aiboricolt'nrist, n., 
one engaged in ar- 
boriculture. 

ar'boiifoim, adj., 
tree-like. 

ar'boiist, n., one who 
cultivates trees. 

aiboriza'tion, n., an 
appearance like a 
tree. 

ar'borons, adj., rel. to 
trees. 

ar'booz, ar'bor, n., a 
tree-shaded bower. 

ar'botued, adj., re- 
cessed with arbours. 

ar'bnsole, »., a tuft. 

arba'tean, adj., bel. 
to the arbutus. 

ar'batns, n., the wild 
strawberry. 

aio> M., a curve, a 
part of the peri- 
phery of a circle or 
other curve. 

arcade', n., an arched 
structure; the range 
of arches in a 
church or other 
building; an arched 
passage with shops 
on either side. 

arcad'ed, adj., in the 
form of an arcade. 

Aica'dian, adj., na- 
tive to Arcadia; 
rustic, simple, pas- 
toral. 

aica'na, n., secrets, 
mysteries. 

atoa'nnin, n. , a secret ; 
something hidden. 

arch, n., a structural 
curve over an open- 
ing, or on the face 






> 



archer 



of a wall; adj., sly, 
roguish;w./.,toform 
into an arch. 
arch-,ar'chi-, a prefix 

denoting eminence, 
as archbishop. 
aichaeolog'io, adj., 

i.q. arcliat'<j|ogical. 

aicbaeolog'ical, adj., 
rel. to archaeology. 

arohaeol'ogist, n., one 
who studies archae- 
ology. 

aichaeorogy, n., the 
studyof antiquities. 

archa'io, adj., bel. to 
the remote past, 
obsolete. 

ar'ohaisin, n., an 
antiquated usage or 
expression. 

aichan'gel, n., an 
angel of the highest 
rank. 

arcbangel'lo. adj., 
bel. or rel. to an 
archangel. 

arcbblsb'op, n., a 
bishop who rules a 
province. 

arcbblsb'opTia, n., 
the of&ce or rule of 
an archbishop. 

aicbdea'con, n., a 
chief deacon; the 
bishop's diocesan 
deputy. 

aichdea'conry, n., an 
archdeacon's dig- 
nity or office. 

aiobdea'conship, n., 
an archdeacon's 
service. 

arcbdi'ooese. n., a 
term erroneously 
applied to an arch- 
bishop's diocese. It 
is unknown in the 
English Church, 

aichdrn'id, n., the 
chief of the Order 
of Druids. 

archdn'cal, adj., bel. 
to an archduke. 

archdoch'ess, »., the 
fem. of archduke. 

aichdnch'y, n., an 
archduke's terri- 
tory. 

arobdoke', n., a duke 
of the highest rank. 

arcbdnke'dom, n., an 
archduke's office or 
territorial jurisdic- 
tion. 

arched, adj., covered 
witli or forming an 
arch; p.p. arch. 

aich'er, »., one who 
shoots with a bow. 



areheress 



.7 



■■> 



•^. 



•^. 



aioh'eTeBS,n., fem.of 

archer. 

arch'ery, n., the sport 
of shooting with a 
bow. 

ai'chetypal, adj., rel. 
to an archetype. 

archetype, «., the 
original on which a 
type is modelled. 

archflend', n., the 
chief among the 
fiends, Satan. 

arch'ical, adj., gov- 
ernmental; original. 

archidiao'onal, adj., 
pert, to an arcli- 
deacon. 

archiepis'copacy, n., 
an archbishop's 
incumbency. 

archiepis' copal, adj., 
pert, to an arch- 
bishop. 

ar'cbi], «., a lichen 
so named. 

Archilo'chian, adj., 
rel. to Archilochus, 
an ancient Greek 
satirical poet, in- 
ventor of the iam- 
bus. 

archiman'diite, n., 
the title wf a Greek 
priest of the higher 
rank, ruler oi a 
large monastery or 
of several smaller 
ones. 

Aichime'dean, adj., 
rel. to Archimedes, 
the famous mathe- 
matician of antiq- 
uity. 

arch'ing, adj., curv- 
ing; pr.p. arch. 

archipel'ago, n., a 
group of sea islands, 
esp. the islands in 
the Aegean Sea. 

architect, n. ,a mas- 
ter-builder, one who 
designs buildings. 
ai^chltective, adj., 
rel. to architecture; 
constructive. 
architecton'ic adj., 
pert, to architec- 
ture: constructive. 
architeoton'ics, n. , the 
architectural sci- 
ence. 
architectural, adj. 
rel. to architecture. 
ur^cbltecture, n., 
the art or work of 
an architect. 
ar'chitrave, n., a prin- 
cipal beam, being 
the part of the 



% 






36 



entablature which 
rests on the capitals 
of the columns. 

archi'val, adj., rel. to 
archives. 

archives, n. pi., an- 
cient public records. 

ar'chivist, n., a stu- 
dent of archives. 

ar'chivolt, n., the 
under surface of an 
arch. 

arcb'ly, »dv., slyly, 
roguishly. 

arch'ness, n., slyness, 
roguishness. 

ar'chon, n., a magis- 
trate, ruler (Gr.). 

archpres'byter, «>., a 
presbyter of the 
h gher rank. 

archpres'bytery, n., 
tiie office of an 
archpresbyter. 

archpriest', n., the 
line anciently given 
to the leading priest 
in a diocese. Some- 
times, as at Hac- 
combe in Devon, it 
was given to the 
head of a com- 
munity. The rector 
of Haccombe re- 
tains the title. 

arch' way, «., a pas- 
sage through an 
arch. 

arch' wise, adv., in the 
lorm of an arch. 

ar'coeraph. n., a de- 
vice for drawing 
circles without strik- 
ing from a centre. 

arcta'tion, n., con- 
striction, constipa- 
tion. 

Arc' tic, adj., rel. to 
the Arctic or North 
Pole. 

Arctn'nu, n., the 
Great Bear con- 
stellation. 

ar'ooate, adj., arched 
in structure. 

arcna'tion, n., the 
arch formation. 

ar'dency, n., fervent 
emotion, ardour. 

ar'dent, adj., heated, 
impetuous, zealous. 

ar'dently, adv., in an 
ardent way. 

ar'dour, ar'dor, n., 
heat, passion, zeal. 

ar'dnous, adj., steep, 
difficult. 

ar'dnonsly, adv., lab- 
oriously, with diffi- 
cultv. 



/ 



■X. 



■^ 






%. 

.^ 



argent 



ai'daonsness, n. , diffi- 
culty. 

are, the pi. of the 
present tense of the 
copulative verb to 

*'• 
a'rea, n., surface 

measurement; a 

SI ace enclosed; the 

sunk space round 

a building; e.xtent, 

r.Tigc. 

Ar'eca, n., a kind of 
tropical palm. 

arefac'tion, n., with- 
ering. 

ar'efy, v.t., to wither 
up, dry up. 

are'na, n., the open 
space of a Roman 
amphitheatre; a 
place or scene of 
contest. 

arena'ceoos, adj., 
sandy. 

arena'tion, n., the 
use of hot sand. 

arenose', adj., sandy. 

are'ola, n., a small 
space in the marking 
on insects' wings, 
veins of leaves, etc. 

are'olate, adj., mark- 
ed with areolae. 

areola' tion, n., the 
act or state of being 
marked ■mthareolae. 

areom'eter, n., a sur- 
face measuring in- 
strument. 

areomet'ric, adj., rel. 
to surface measure- 
ment. 

areomet'rical, adj. , 
i.q. areometric. 

areom'etry, «., the 
science of surface- 
measurement. 

Areop' agist, n., i.q. 
Areopagite. 

Areop'agite, n., a 
member of the 
Areopagus. 

Areop'agns, n., the 
Hill of Ares in 
Athens, on which 
the most ancient of 
the Courts was held. 
Called Mars' Hill in 
the Acts of the 
Apostles. 

ar'gal, conj., a cor- 
ruption of ergo = 
therefore. Used in 
Shakespeare. 

ar'gand, adj., bci. to 
Argand's method of 
lighting. 

ar'Kent, n. and adj., 
silver, silvery. 



argeatal 









.% 






ugent'al, ai]. silvery. 

argent'ic, adj., rel. to 
silver. 

argentif'eroas, »di., 
silver-producing. 

ar'Kentine, adj., sil- 
very; »., a white 
metal so named. 

Ai'Kentine, ai]., rel. 
to Argentina; n., a 
native of A. 

ai'gil, n., white clay. 

argilla'ceoos. adj., of 
white clay. 

aigillileions, adj., 
producing white 
clay. 

argil'loas, adj., con- 
taining, or consist- 
ing of, white clay. 

Az'^ve, adj., native 
of Argos. 

ar'gol, n., the ^rape- 
juice deposit in fer- 
mentation. 

u'gon, n., an inert 
gas in the atmos- 
phere. 

Argonant, m., a sailor 
on the mythical 
ship Ar^o. 

Aigonaat'io, adj., rel. 
to the Argonauts. 

argosy, »., a richly- 
laden merchant ves- 
sel. 

ai'got, n., the French 
name for slang. 

ai'guable, adj., cap- 
ableof being argued. 

ar'gne, v.t. and >., to 
discuss, to try to 
prove; to show. 

ar'gaed, p.p., argue. 

ar'guer, n., one who 
argues. 

arguing, ^r.^., argue. 

argument, n., a de- 
bate, discussion, 
attempt to prove; 
suininarized pur- 
port ol a book or 
speech. 

argomentaUon. n., a 

dispute. 
argomen'tative, adj., 

rel. to argument; 

fond'Of disputing. 
arKamen'taUvaly,<xJv. 

in an argumenta- 
tive way. 
argumen' tativenesB, 

n., a fondness for 

disputing. 
ar'gas, n., an E. 

Indian phi^asant. 
Ar'gua, n., a Greek 

mythological being, 

having a hundred 

eyes. 



/ 

A 

1 

■/i 






37 



a'lia, M., a melody, 
song, air. 

A'rian, adj., rel. to 
Arius, the heretical 
leader opposed by 
St. Athanasius. 

A' danism, n., the 
profession ot Arian 
teaching. 

ai'id, adj., dry, 
parched, waste. 

arid'ity, n., a state of 
dryness. 

ar'idness, n., i.q. 
aridity. 

A'ries, n., the Ram, 
one of the signs of 
the Zodiac. 

ariet'ta, n., a short 
aria or melody. 

aright', adv., rightly, 
correctly. 

ai'il, n., a secondary 
covering of a seed. 

arise', ».»., to spring 
forth, to ascend, to 
leave one's bed. 

aris'en, p.p., arise. 

aris'ing, pr.p., arise. 

ar'istarch, n., a critic 
lilie Aristarchus. 

aristarch'ian, ad].,re\. 
to Aristarchus. 

mristoc'racy, n., 
government by the 
best cit zens ; the 
aristocrats as a class 
or body. 

ar'istoorat, n., a 
member of the aris- 
tocracy; a person 
with pride of birth. 

aristocrat' ic, ad]., 
like an aristocrat. 

aristoorat'ical, adj., 
i.q. aristocratic. 

Aristotelian, adj. , 
belouguig lo Aris- 
totle, the Greek 
philosopher. 

Aristote'Uo, adj., i.q. 
Aristotelian. 

ai'ithmancy, n., dl- 
Wnuig by means of 
numbers. 

arithmetic n., the 
science of numbers. 

arithmetical, adj., 
rel. to arithmetic. 

arithmeli'cian, n. , one 
who practises arith- 
metic. 

ark, n., chest, box, 
(Noah's Ark was a 
large floating ves- 
sel); a place of 
refuge. 

arm, n., a limb of 
the body, an inlet 
of the sea; a weap- 



•"V-^ 



armourer 



on; v., to furnish 
with weapons, equip 
for war. 

aima'da, n., a fleet of 
armed ships. 

armadillo, n., a four- 
footed creature, 
small, having a 
homy shell. 

ar'mament, n., an 
armed force; the 
coUecied munitions 
of war; defence. 

ar'matore, n., defen- 
sive armour; part of 
an electrical ma- 
chine. 

tam'-cbair, n., a 
chair with support- 
ing arms. 

armed, p.p., arm; 
adj., having arms. 

Arme'nian, adj., na- 
tive to, bel. to, 
.Armenia. 

arm'tnl, n., a gather- 
ing of things to fill 
the arms. 

aim'hole, »., a hole 
to ifi the arm 
through. 

ar'miger, n., the Lat. 
name for our Es- 
quire; a person en- 
titled to wear arms. 

armig'eroas, adj., en- 
titled to wear arms 
(heraldic). 

armil'la, n., a brace- 
let, ring. 

annil'lary, adj., rel. 
to an armilla. 

arm'iag, pr.p., arm. 

Armin'ian, aiij., rel. 
to Armiiuus, a i6th 
cent. Dutch anti- 
Calvinist teacher. 

Armin'ianism. n., 
teaching of the 
school of Arminius. 

armip'otenca, n., arm- 
ed superiority. 

armip'otent, adj., su- 
perior in arms. 

arm'istice, »., a tem- 
porary suspension 
of hostilities. 

arm'leaa, adj., with- 
out arms. 

arm'let, n., a badge 
or ornament worn 
round the arm. 

ar'moor, ar'mor. n., 
defensive arms worn 
on the body, or 
used in the plating 
of a man-of-war. 

armourer, ar'morer, 
n., one who makes 
armour. 



armorial 



-V/ 



-VA 






•"v. 



% 



'X-. 






anno'tial, adj., rel. 
to heraldic arms. 

Armoilo, adj., rel. to 
Armories. 

Annoi'ican, n., i.q. 
Armoric. 

ar'monrist, »., an 
heraldic expert. 

ar'moiu-pla'ted, adj., 
covered with defen- 
sive plates (a nau- 
tical term). 

ar'moniy, ar'mory, n. 
a place for the 
making or the keep- 
ing of arms. 

arm'pit, n., the hol- 
low under the arms. 

aims, pi. of arm. 

arm's' - length, a 
phrase, " at arm's- 
length " >» at a 
distance as long as 
one's arm. 

ai'my, n., an armed 
body of men; a 
large number. 

ar'nica, n., a medi- 
cinal herb so named, 
useful for bruises. 

arnot'to, n., an Amer- 
ican tree resembling 
the Indian plum. 

aroint', v.t. (generally 
found in tha im- 
perative), to re- 
move, get out of 
the way. 

aro'ma, n., a fragrant 
smell or taste; meta- 
phorically, an in- 
tangible quality. 

aromat'io, adj., pos- 
sessing aroma. 

aromat'ical, adj., i.q. 

aromatic. 

aro'matize, v.t., to 
season, perfume. 

aro'matizer, «., some- 
thing that gives 
aroma. 

aro'matons, adj., i.q. 
aromatic. 

arose', ^.(., arise. 

aronnd , adv. and 
prep., all about, 
round. 

aronse', v.t., to stir 
up, awaken. 

aronsed', p.p., arouse. 

arons'ing, pr.p., a- 
rouse. 

arpeg'gio,n. ,the harp- 
like striking of the 
notes of a chord 
separately. 

ar'pent, n., a former 
French land mea- 
sure >=> an acre. 

araoebnsade'. n., a 



'^• 
X, 

x. 
7 






38 



volley from arque- 
buses. 

ar'aoebnse, ar'anebos 
n., an old fire-arm, 
supported on a rest. 

arqnebnsier', n., one 
who fires an arque- 
bus. 

ar'rack, n., a heady 
liquor distilled from 
rice and other 
plants. 

ar'ragcmite, »., see 
aragonlte. 

arraign', v.t., to in- 
dict before a judge. 

arraigned', p.p., ar- 
raign. 

arraign'er, n., one 
who arraigns. 

anaign'ing, pr.p., ar- 
raign. 

arraign'ment, n., a 
legal indictment. 

arrange', v.t., to place 
in order, settle. 

arranged', p.p., ar- 
range. 

arrang'ement, n., the 
act of arranging; an 
agreed plan; a musi- 
cal setting. 

arrang'er, »., one 
who arranges. 

arrang'ing, pr.p., 
arrange. 

arrant, adj., thor- 
ough, downright. 

ar'ranUy, adv., in a 
downright way. 

ar'raa, «., tapestry 
(derived from Arras 
in France). 

array', n., order (as 
battle array), dress; 
v.t., to vest, dress. 

arrayed', p.p., array. 

array'er, n., one who 
arrays. 

array'ing, pr.p. array. 

arrear', n., position in 
the rear. 

orrear'age, n., the 
amount m arrear. 

arrears', n., an un- 
paid debt. 

arrest', v.t., to seize, 
to attract (the 
mind or attention); 
n., a seizure by 
legal warrant, a 
stopping. 

arrest'od, p.p., arrest. 

arrest' er.arrest'or, n., 
one who arrests. 

arrest'ing, pr.p., ar- 
rest. 

arrest'ment, n., the 
act of arresting. 

ar'ris, n., a ridge, as 



arsis 



that between the 
channels of a Doric 
pillar. 

arri'val, n., a coming, 
act of arriving. 

arrive', v,i., to come, 
to reach a place. 

arrived', p.p., arrive. 

arriv'ing, pr.p. arrive. 

ar'roganoe, »., over- 
bearing pride. 

ar'roganoy, m., i.q. 
arrogance. 

ar'rogant. adj., over- 
bearingly proud, ex- 
acting. 

ar'rogantly, adv., in 
an arrogant way. 

ar'rogate, v.t., to 
claim unduly or in 
excess. 

ar'rogated, p.p., ar- 
rogate. 

ai'rogating, Pr.p., 
arrogate. 

arroga'tion, n., the 
act of arrogating. 

arrondiss'ement, n., a 
French territorial 
division so named. 

ano'sion, n., des- 
truction by biting. 

ar'row, n., a sharp- 
pom ted missile, shot 
from a bow. 

ar'row-head, w., an 
arrow's pointed end. 

ar'rowroot, n., a 
starchy plant {Mar- 
anta arundinacea), 
very nutritious. 

ar'row-shaped, adj., 
shaped like an ar- 
row. 

ar'rowy, adj., like an 
arrow. 

ar'senal, n., a mann- 
factory or store of 
war munitions. 

arsen'iate, n., an 
arsenic acid salt. 

ar'senio, n., a metal, 
a strong poison. 

arsen'ical, adj., con- 
taining or rel. to 
arsenic. 

arsen'icate, v.t., to 
charge with arsenic. 

arsen'ioated, p.p., 
arsenicate. 

arse'nioos, adj., pert, 
to arsenic. 

ar'senite, n., an ar- 
senious acid salt. 

ar'sis, n., the stress 
of the voice where 
the accent comes; 
the conductor's 
beat at the begin- 
ning of a bar. 



■T8on 



-/^ 



.A, 






■^ 



ar'son, »., the act of 
wilfully setting on 
Are. 

art, n., skill, knowl- 
edge, cunning. 

arte rial, aii., bcl. to 
the arteries. 

arterializa'tion, n., 
the changing of 
venous into arterial 
blood. 

arte'riidize, v.t., to 
change venous into 
arterial blood. 

arte'rialized, p.p., ar- 
terialize. 

arte'rializing, pr.p., 
arterial ize. 

arteriol'ogy, n., the 
study of the ar- 
teries. 

arteriot'omy, n., the 
act of cutting ar- 
teries. 

ai'teiy, n., a blood- 
vessel leading direct 
from the heart. 

arte'sian, adj., very 
deeply boredl (Ar- 
tesian wells were 
first made in Artois.) 

art'fol, adj., cunning, 
designing. 

art'fnUy, ck^v., cun- 
ningly. 

art'folnesa, »., cun- 
ning. 

arilirit'io, adj., rel. to 
arthritis. 

arthri'tis, n., inflam- 
mation of a joint. 

ai'tiohoke, n., an ed- 
ible vegetable so 
named. 

ar'tiole, n., a separate 
part, a member, a 
thingor commodity, 
an agreed doctrine, 
a treaty-clause; a 
piece of literary 
work; v.t., to bind 
by indenture. 

ai' tided, p.p., article. 

ar'tioling, pr.p., ar- 
ticle. 

artio'alar, adj., rel. to 
a joint or articula- 
tion. 

artic'alarly, adv., in 
an articulate way; 
in detail. 

artlonla'ta, n., crea- 
tures with segmen- 
ted bodies. 

artic'tilate, adj., join- 
ted; clear, distinct. 

artio'olate, v.t., to 
speak distinctly. 

artio'olated, p.p., ar- 
ticulate. 



-^ 



•A. 
•A 
-A. 



4 



^ 



artio'olately, adv., 
with distinct utter- 
ance. 

artic'alatiiig, pr.p., 
articulate. 

artionla'tion, n., a 
joint {awu.y, clear 
utterance. 

art'ifice, n., contri- 
vance, cunning 
device. 

aitU'icei, n., one who 
practises an art, a 
workman. 

artifl'cial, adj., made 
bv art, unreal. 

artiflcial'ity, »., arti- 
ficial or unnatural 
character. 

artiflcial'ness, n., i.q. 
artificiality. 

aitil'lerist, »»., an ex- 
pert in artillery. 

artil'lery, n., origin- 
ally the equipment 
of bow and arrows; 
now guns and can- 
nons; also the men 
who use them. 

artil'leryman, n., a 
man in the artillery 
force. 

ai'tisan, n., one who 
practises a trade. 

art'ist, n., one who 
practises a fine art. 

artiste', n., the Fr. 
equivalent of artist, 
for which it is ab- 
surdly substituted 
in the case of 
public singers and 
actors. 

artist'io, adj., rel. to 
art and artists. 

artist'ical, adj., i.q. 
artistic. 

artist'ically, adv., in 
an artistic way. 

art'less, adj., simple, 
natural. 

art'lessly, adt<., sim- 
ply, naturally. 

aiflessnesB, n., a 
simple state or 
character. 

Aninde'lian, adj., bel. 
to Arundel. 

arondif'eroas, adj., 
reed-producing. 

arus'pice, n., a sooth- 
sayer, diviner. 

arns'picy, »., divining 
by means of the 
entrails of sacrificed 
beasts. 

Ar'yao, adj. and n., 
an Aryan is one who 
beloiigs to the great 
Indo -European 



i 



\ 



), 

> 



j>>j^' 



I 



asceticism 



tamily, for whom 
this name has been 
invented. 

as,n., a Roman coin 
and weight. 

as, adv., and conj., 
denoting similarity 
or cause. 

asafoet'ida, n., an 
extract from the 
Ferula and other 
strong-smelling bit- 
ter plants. 

asbes'tine, adj., made 
of or rel. toasbestos. 

asbes'tos, »., a fire- 
proof substance. 

as'caris, »., a round 
worm. 

ascend', v.t. and /., to 
go up, mount. 

ascend'able, adj., able 
to be ascended. 

ascend'ant, n., a state 
of upward advance; 
predominance. 

ascend'ent, adj., 
mounting upward. 

ascend'ed, p.p., as- 
cend. 

ascend'ency, n., a 
position of suprem- 
acy. 

ascmd'er, n., one who 
ascends. 

ascend'ing, pr.p., 
ascend. 

aseen'sion, n., the act 
of ascending. 

Aseen'sion Day, n., 
the Day (otherwise 
Holy Thursday) of 
Our Lord's Ascen- 
sion. 

ascen'sional. adj., rel. 
to ascension. 

ascent', n., a rising, 
climbing, degree of 
acclivity. 

ascertain , v.t., to find 
out for certain. 

asoertain'able, adj., 
capable of being 
ascertained. 

ascertained', p.p., as- 
certain. 

ascertain'er, n., one 
who ascertains. 

ascertain'ing, pr.p., 
ascertain. 

ascertain'ment, n., 
the act of ascer- 
taining. 

ascet'io, adj., practis- 
ing severe self-de- 
nial; n., one who 
lives the ascetic life. 

ascet'icism, n., the 
practice or life of 
an ascetic. 



aseititiouB 



h 

i 
J 

y 



< 






asciti'tions, adj., ad- 
ditional, supple- 
mental (also written 
adscititious). 

ascrib'able, adj., able 
to be ascribed. 

aacribe', v.t., to im- 
pute or attribute. 

ascribed', p.p., as- 
cribe. 

ascrib'ing, pr.p., as- 
cribe. 

ascrip'tion, n., the 
act of ascribing. 

asep'sis, «., absence 
of putrefaction. 

asep'tic, adj., not de- 
caying or putrefy- 
ing. 

asez'nal, ai/., sexless. 

ash, n., the tree so 
named; burnt re- 
mains. 

ashamed', adj., filled 
with shame. 

ash' en, adi., bel. to 
or resembling the 
ash or ashes. 

ash'eiy, n., an ash- 
bin. 

ash'-hole, »., a hole 
where ashes are 
thrown. 

ash'lar, «., hewn or 
squared stone. 

ash'laring, n., the 
wooden plaster- 
studs between the 
floor and the rafters 
of a garret; ashlar 
stone- work. 

ashore', adv., on 
shore. 

ash'-pan, n., a pan 
for ashes. 

ash'pit, n., a pit 
where ashes are 
flung. 

Ash Wed'nesday. n., 
the first day of 
Lent, when ashes 
are sprinkled on 
penitents' heads. 

ash'y, adj., pale, ash- 
like in colour. 

A'sian, adj., bel. to 
Asia. 

Asiat'ic. adj., i.q. 
Asian. 

Asiat'icism, n., an 
Asiatic peculiarity. 

aside', adv., on one 
side, apart; n., a re- 
mark spoken aside. 

as'inine, adj., rel. to 
f)r resembling an 
ass. 

asit'ia, »., loss of 

appetite; lack of 
food. 



L. 



l 
1.. 



u 



I 



V 



40 



ask, v.f., to question, 
beg. 

askance', adv., side- 
ways; with a sus- 
picious look. 

askant', adv., i.q. ask- 
ance. 

asked, p.p., ask. 

askew', adv., ob- 
liquely. 

ask'ing, pr.p., ask. 

aslant', adv., sloping, 
slanting. 

asleep', adv., in a 
state of sleep. 

aslope', adv., sloping. 

Asmone'an, adj., the 
name of a great 
Jewish family. 

aso'matoos, adj., 
without body. 

asp, n., a venomous 
snake. 

aspar'agine, adj., rel. 
to asparagus. 

asparagus, »., a 
much relished vege- 
table. 

as'pect,«., sight, look, 
position, prospect. 

as'pen, n., a kind of 
poplar that shivers. 

as'perate, v.t., to 
make harsh, make 
uneven. 

as'perated, p.p., as- 
perate. 

as'perating, pr.p., as- 
perate. 

aspera'tion, n., the 
act or state of 
harshness, making 
uneven. 

asper'ges, n., the 
sprinkling with holy 
water. Its name is 
derived from the 
opening words of 
the ceremotiy — As- 
perges me, Thou 
shalt sprinkle me. 

aspergii'lnm, »., the 
hoi y water sprink! or. 

aspergil'los, n., a fun- 
gus. 

asper'ity, n., rough- 
ness, harshness. 

asperm'ons, n., not 
seeding. 

asperse', v.t., to ac- 
cuse injuriously, to 
slander. 

aspersed', p.p., as- 
perse. 

aspers'er, n., one who 
asprrscs. 

ospers'ing, pr.p., as- 

p<T-«^. 

asper'sion, n., a slan- 
der. 



.^^ 



t 



b 



K 

V 

t 






as8 



anMrs'ive, adj., slan- 
derous. 

aspersc'riom, n., s 
holy water vessel. 

aspers'ory, n., i.q. 
aspersfjrium. 

as'phalt, n., a specie: 
of pitch. 

asphal'tic, adj., rel. 
to asphalt. 

asphal'tnm, n., Lat. 
name of a'^phalt. 

as'phodel, n., a plant 
so named; the " fab- 
ulous asphodel " of 
Hades in Greek 
poetry. 

asphyx'ia, »»., suffo- 
cation, temporary 
stoppage of breath- 
ing. 

asphyx'iate, v.t., to 
produce asphyxia. 

asphyxiated, p.p., 
asphyxiate. 

asphyxiating, pr.p., 
asphyxiate: adj., 
causing asphyxia. 

asphyx'y, n., i.q. 
asphyxia. 

as'pic, n., a savoury 
jelly. 

aspi'rant, n., one who 
aspires. 

as'pirate, v.t., to pro- 
nounce with a 
heavy breath; n., 
the sounded letter 
h. 

as'pirated, p.p., as- 
pirate. 

as'pirating, pr.p., as- 
pirate. 

aspira'tion, n., the 
act ol aspiring; 
strong desire. 

as'pirator. «., an in- 
strument for draw- 
ing in gas or air, 
also for drawing ofl 
fluid from abscesses, 
etc. 

aspi'ratory, adj., rel. 
to aspiration. 

aspire', v.*., to desire 
strongly, to strive 
after. 

aspired', p.p., aspire. 

aspir'er, »., one who 
aspires. 

aspir'ing, pr.p., as- 
pire; also adj., am- 
bitious. 

asini'ingly, adv., am- 
bitiously. 

asquint', adv., with 
a squint. 

ass, n., the quadru- 
ped otherwise called 
the donkey. 



assagai 



41 



associational 



r 






V 






M. 



as'sagai, »., a Kaffir 
spear. 

assa'i, adv., a musical 
term = very. 

assail', v./., to attack. 

assailable, adj., open 
to attack. 

assailant, n., one 
who attacks. 

assailed', p.p., assail. 

assail' ei, n., i.j. as- 
sailant. 

assail'ing, pr.p., as- 
sail. 

assas'sin, »■, a secret 
murderer. 

assassinate, v./., to 
murder secretly. 

assassinated, p.p., 
assassinate. 

assassinating, pr.p., 
assassinate. 

assassination, n., the 
act of assassinating. 

assas'sinator, »., i.q- 
assassin, 

assault', v.<., to attack 
with violence; »., 
an attack. 

assay', v.t., to try, 
test; «., trial, test. 

assayed', p.p., assay. 

assay' ei, n., one who 
assays. 

assay'ing, pr.p. .assay. 

assem'blage, n., a 
gathering together. 

assem'ble, v.t. and «., 
to call or gather 
together; to meet 
together. 

assem'bled, pp., as- 
semble. 

assem'bler, n., one 
who assembles. 

assem'bling, pr.p., as- 
semble. 

assembly, n., a meet- 
ing together. 

assent', v.i., to agree 
to, approve ; n., 
agreement, ap- 
proval, 

assent'ed, ^.^., assent. 

assen'tei, n., one who 
assents. 

assen'tient, adj., giv- 
ing approval. 

assent 'ing, pr.p., as* 
sent. 

asseif , v.t., to affirm, 
state positively. 

assert'ed, p.p., assert. 

asserting, pr.p., as- 
sert. 

assei'tion, n., a posi- 
tive alfirmalion. 

assert'ive, adj., mak- 
ing strong affirma- 
tion. 



) 
V 

X 

h 

I 
] 

■n 

b 



u^ 



L 
h 



p.p., 

pr.p., 



asseit'ivoly, adv., in 
an assertive way. 

assert'or, »., one who 
asserts. 

assertory, adj., rel. 
to assertion; affirm- 
ative. 

assess', v.t., to fix a 
value. 

assess'able, adj., li- 
able to assessment. 

assessed', p.p., asses>. 

assess'ing, pr.p., as- 
sess, 

assess'ment, »., val>i- 
ation for rating ■<z 
taxing purposes 

assess'or, n., one wbi* 
assesses. 

aa'sets, «•, property 
set against one's 
debts. 

assev'erate, v.t., to 
assert strongly. 

assev'erated, 
asseverate. 

asseverating, 
asseverate. 

assevera'tion, n., a 
strong assertion. 

as'sident, adj., usu- 
ally present with; 
in constant attend- 
ance on, 

assidn'ity, r., steady 
diligence, 

assid'aotu, jti^/., stead- 
ily diligent. 

assid'aoosly, adv., 
with untiring dili- 
gence. 

assid'aoQsness, n., i.g. 
assiduity, 

assign', v.t., to allot, 
make over to. 

assign'able, adj., able 
to be assigned. 

assignat', ». In the 
French Revolution 
assignals, or pro- 
missory notes, were 
issued on the secur- 
ity of the confiscated 
Church properly. 

assignation, n., an 
agreed meeting. 

assigned', p.p., as- 
sign. 

assignee', n., one to 
whom something is 
assigned. 

assign'er, n., one who 
assigns. 

assign'ing, pr.p., as- 
sign. 

assign' ment, n., a 
deed of transfer, the 
act of assigning. 

assignor', n., the 
party who assigns. 









bf 



assigns', «. pi., per- 
sons to whom pio- 
perty is transferred. 

assim'ilable, adj., 
able to be assim- 
ilated. 

assim'ilate, v.t., to 
makelike; loabsorb. 

assim'ilated. p.p., 
assimi;ato. 

assimilating, pr.p., 
assimilate. 

assimila'tion. «., the 
act of assunilaiing. 

assim'ilative, adj., 
capable of .issiin- 
ilating. 

assim'ilatory, adj., 
tending to assim- 
ilation. 

assist', v.<. and (., to 
help; to be present 
at a ceremony. 

assist'ance, »., help, 
aid; presence at a 
ceremony. 

assist'ant, »., one 
who assists, a liclpcr. 

assist'ed, p.p., assist. 

assist'ing, pr.p., as- 
sist. 

assize', n., a court of 
justice, with judge 
and jury; v.t., to fix 
price, weight and 
measure by au- 
thority. 

assized', p.p., assize. 

assize'ment, n., the 
act of assizing. 

assiz'er, n., one who 
assizes; one of a 
grand jury. 

assiz'es, n., pi. of 

assize. 

assiz'or. n., i.q. as- 
sizer. 

associabil'ity, »., the 
character of being 
associable. 

asso'ciable, adj., cap- 
able of being asso- 
ciated. 

asso'date, v.t. and i., 
to join to oneself, or 
to be in company 
with; n., one who 
is associated; adj., 
connected. 

asso'ciated, p.p., as- 
sociate. 

asso'ciating, pr.p., 
associate. 

association, n., the 
act of joining; a 
body of assocKiled 
members. 

assoda'tiooal. adj., 
rel, to an associa- 
tion. 



aA— (i7ai 



associative 



•.b 

^ 

A, 



asso'ciative, (wi;., ten- 
ding to association. 

assoil'zie, v.t., to give 
absolution (o6$.)- 

as'sonance, n., corre- 
spondence in sounds 
— consonants or 
vowels; any sort of 
correspondence. 

as'sonant, adj., mak- 
ing assonance. 

assort', v.t., to ar- 
range in kinds, class- 
ify; v.i., to agree, 
fall in with. 

assort'ed, Z).^., assort. 

assort'ei, « , one who 
assorts. 

assort'ing, pr.p., as- 
sort. 

assortment, n., an 
assorted portion. 

assuage', v.t. and i., 
to abatn; subside. 

assuaged', p.p., as- 
suage. 

assuagement, n., the 
.let o( allaying. 

assnag'er, n., one who 
assuages. 

assuaging, pr.p., as- 
suage. 

assua'sive, adj., tend- 
ing to assuage. 

assume', v.<., to take 
upon oneself; to 
accept without 

proof. 

assumed', p.p., as- 
sume. 

assum'er, »., one who 
assumes. 

assum'ing, pr.p., as- 
sume. 

assum'ingly, adv., in 
an assuming way. 

assump'sit, »., an un- 
sealed agreement; 
an action at law 
ret. to such an 
agreement. 

assump'tion, n., the 
act of assuming: the 
taking for granted. 

assump'tive, adj., in- 
clined to assume. 

assump'ttvely, adv., 
in an assumptive 
way. 

assurance, n., confi- 
dence; excessive 
confidence; a con- 
fident statement; 
life-security. 

assure', v.t., to make 
secure: to affirm 
with certainty; to 
take out a policy 



i 

.^ assured', p.p., assure. 



i 
k 

L 
) 






42 



assur'edly, adv., cer- 
tainly, without 
doubt. 

assur'edness, n., a 
roiifident state of 
mind. 

assnr'er, n., one who 
assures. 

assur'ing, pr.p., as- 
sure; adj., confi- 
dence-inspiring. 

assur'ingly, adv., in 
an assuring way. 

Assyr'ian, adj., bel. 
to Assyria. 

Astar'te, «., the Syro- 
Phoenician moon- 
goddess, also known 
as Ashtoreth. 

astat'ic, adj., in equi- 
librium; not tending 
to move in either 
direction. 

as'ter, n., a plant 
with star-shaped 
flora. 

aste'ria, n., a sapphire 
cut star-wise. 

aste'riated, adj., radi- 
ating like a star. 

as'terisk, n., a star-- 
shaped mark of 
reference. 

as'terism, n., a clus- 
ter of three stars, 
marking a passage 
in a book. 

astern', adv., on the 
stern; i.e., to the 
rear of a vessel. 

as'teroid, adj., star- 
like, lilce an aster. 

asteroid'al, adj., i.q. 
asteroid. 

asthen'ia, »., loss of 
power. 

asthen'ic, adj., suffer- 
ing from loss of 
power. 

asthenol'ogy, »., the 
study of asthenia. 

asth'ma, n., a disease 
in which the patient 
breathes with diffi- 
culty. 

asthmat'ic, adj., sufi- 
ering from asthma, 
rel. to asthma. 

astbmat'ical, adj., i.g. 
asthmatic. 

astigmat'ic, adj., rcl. 
to astigmatism. 

astigmatism, n., a 
focal disorder of 
the sight. 

astir', adv., on the 
move. 

aston'ied. adj., dis- 
mayed, astounded 
(obs.). 



astrologize 

^. astoa'lsb, v. I. ,to&n 
with amazement, to 
cause excessive sur- 
prise. 
.Irrrr. astoa'Isbed, p.p., 
astonish. 
.~>r:. astoa' Isbtag, pr.p., 

astonish. 
.frrr>7r. astoa'Isbmgly.adv., 
surprisingly, amaz- 
, ingly. 

.Srf. astOB'tsbmeat,n., 
surprise, amaze- 
ment. 
1i astotmd', v.t., to 
, ^ amaze. 
M astound'ed, p.p., as- 
tound. 
■\^ ;. astound'in«, pr.p. , as- 
^""^ tound. 

1 astrad'dle, adv., in 
J straddling fashion. 
)/*~l as'tragal, n., a con- 
vex (architectural) 
moulding. 
\, as'tral, adj., rel. to 
r .. the stars; starry. 
1 astray', adv., out of 

Lr the path. 
astrict', v.t., to bind; 
limit. 
1 astrict'ed, p.p., as- 
l_, trict. 
1 astric'tion,n., theact 
L_ 3 or state of astrict- 
., ipg. 

\ astricfing, pr.p., as- 
. U«> trict. 

\ astrio'tiTe, adj., with 

I—; .. power to astrict. 

t \. astride', adv. and 

prep., with one foot 

only on either side 

Lof something, 
astrin'gency, n., the 
- quality of binding. 
\ < asirin'gent,ai;.,biiid- 
<-f I ing, contracting; n., 
.. a binding medicine. 

\- astrog'rapby, «., star- 
•\ «— >. mapping. 
\' as'troid, n., a star 
exceeding 5 points 
magnitude. 
as'troite, n., an an- 
cient name for the 
., sapphire. 

L.. as'trolabe, n., an ap- 
r r\ paratus for finding 
the altitude of 

W stars. 
astroroger, n., one 
who professes as- 
.. trology. 

h^ astrolog'ic, adj., rel. 
.V Kt-; to astrology. 
\, astrolog'ical, adj., i.g. 
'J ^ astrologic. 

Vjy. astrol'ogize, v.i., to 
''< profess astrology. 



astrology 



W 



I 
I 
I- 



V 

•I. 

K 



astrorocy, n., the 

preteaded art of 
foretelling the fu- 
ture by the stars. 

astion'omer, n., one 
who practises as- 
tronomy. 

astionom'ic, adj., rel. 
to astronomy. 

astiouom'ical, adj., 
1.9. astronomic. 

astion'omy, n., the 
science of the heav- 
enly bodies. 

as'troscope, n., a cel- 
estial globe; a cel- 
estial telescope. 

a3trat^ adv., in strut- 
ting fashion. 

astute', adj., shrewd, 
cunning. 

astute'ly.aiv. ,shrewd- 
ly, cunningly. 

astnte'ness, n.shrewd- 
ness, cunning. 

ason'der, adv., apart, 
ni separate pieces. 

as/lom, «., any place 
of refuge; a shelter 
for poor or afiUcted 
persons. 

asymmet'ric, adj., 
lacking symmetry. 

asymmet'rical, adj., 
i.q. asymmetric. 

asym'metry, n., want 
of symmetry or 
proportion. 

as'ymptote, n., a 
straight line which 
au ever-approach- 
ing curve never 
reaches. 

Ht, prep., denoting 
station or position. 

at'abal, n., a Moorish 
name for a kettle- 
drum. 

at'avism, n., a rever- 
sion to ancestral 
type. 

atax'ia, n., disorder, 
loss of muscular 
control. 

nte, p.t., eat. 

A'tS, n., retribution 
(Gr.). 

atelier', »., a work- 
shop studio ( Ft.). 

atbaramoos, adj., 
without thalami. 

Athana'sian, (Ki;. , bel. 
to Athanasms. 

a'theisnij x. ,thedcnial 
of Goers existence. 

a'tbeist, »., a pro- 
fessor of atheism. 

atheist'io, adj., rel. to 
atheists and athe- 
ism. 



u 

L 

Ik 

I 
> 

m. 
r 



K 



43 



atheist'ical. adj., i.q, 
atheistic. 

atb'eling, adj., of 
princely family 
(06s.). 

athenae'um, »., ori?. 
the temple of Ath- 
ene, now any insti- 
tution for the pro- 
motion of culture. 

Athe'nian, adj., bel. 
to Athens. 

athint', adj., in a 
thirsty state. 

ath'lete, »., one who 
is trained with mus- 
cular exercise. 

athlet'ic, adj., strong, 
exercised; rel. to 
athletes. 

at-home, adv. phrase 
= in one's own 
house- familiar with. 

athwart', adv. and 
prep., across. 

atilt', adv., in tilting 
fashion. 

Atlante'an, adj., rel. 
to Atlas. 

atlan'tes, n., figures 
of men supporting, 
like caryatides, a 
superstructure. 

AtJan'tiC, adj. and n., 
the name of one of 
the Oceans. 

Aflas, at'las. n., a 
mountain in Asia; 
the mythological 
giant who bore the 
world on his should- 
ers; a book of maps. 

atmorogy, n., the 
study of vapour. 

atmom'eter, n., a 
vapour - measuring 
instrument. 

afmosphere. »., the 
earth's air-envelope. 

atmospher'ic. adj.,te\. 
to the atmosphere. 

atmospherical, adj., 
i.q. atmospheric. 

atdl', n., a ring- 
shaped coral island, 
with a lagoon inside 
it. 

at'om, n., an indivis- 
ible particle of mat- 
ter; any very small 
thing. 

atom'io, adj., rel. to 
atoms. 

atom'ical. adj., i.q. 
atomic. 

at'omism, n., the at- 
omic theory; belief 
in that theory. 

at'omist, it., one who 
holds with atomism. 



V7 

J- 



V 



r 



J 



I 



attaching 



at'omize, v.t., to re- 
duce to atoms; to 
convert into spray. 

atomorogy, n., the 
study of atoms. 

aton'able, adj., able 
to be atoned for. 

atone', v.i., to make 
satisfaction for, 

atoned', p.p., atone. 

atoae'meat, n., 
satisfaction, recon- 
ciliation. 

aton'er, n., one who 
atones; 

aton'io, adj., wanting 
tone; unaccented. 

aton'ing, pr.p., atone. 

at'ony, n., want of 
tone. 

atop', adv., on the 
top. 

atrabila'rian, adj., 
i.q. atrabilious. 

atrabilious, adj., suf- 
fering from black 
bile, depressed, mel- 
ancholy. 

atramenta'ceoas,a</;. , 
inky. 

atrament'al, adj., rel. 
to ink. 

atramenta'rions, adj., 
inky. 

atrament'ons, adj., 
inky. 

atrip', adv., trip- 
pingly. 

a'triom, n., the cen- 
tral hall of a bouse 
iUt.). 

atro'ciooB, adj., sav- 
age, brutal. 

atio'ciously, adv., 
savagely, brutally. 

atro'ciousness, »., 
savage character. 

atroc'ity, »., a brutal 
act; brutality. 

at'rophied, adj., wast- 
ing through lack of 
nourishment. 

at'rophy, n., a wast- 
ing away; v.t., to 
cause wasting; v.i., 
to waste away. 

at'ropine, »., an alka- 
loid contained in 
deadly nightshade. 

attach', v.t., to bind, 

fasten; to seize un- 
der warrant. 

attach'able, adj., able 
to b'j attached. 

atta'chi, n., one at- 
tached to a legation. 

attached', p.p., at- 
tach. 

attaoh'ing, pr.p., at- 
tach. 



attachment 



44 



attuned 



X- 
■J- 



l^ 



1 



attach'ment, n,, a 

fastening; close tie 
of affection; legal 
seizure. 

attack', v.t., to as- 
sault; n., an assault. 

attack'able, adj., li- 
able to attack. 

attacked', p.p., at- 
tack. 

attack' er, n., one who 
attacks. 

attack'ing, pr.p., at- 
tack. 

attaJB', v.t. and >., to 
reach, arrive at. 

attainabil'ity, n., the 
being able to be 
attained. 

attain'able, adj., able 
to be attained. 

attain'ableness, n.,i.q. 
attainability. 

attaind'er. n., for- 
feiture of civil 
rights. 

attained', p.p., attain . 

attain'ing, pr.p., at- 
tain. 

attala' ment,n., 3.ci 
of attaining, some- 
thing attained; in- 
tellectual gift. 

attaint', v.t., to im- 
pose attainder up- 
on; n., act of at- 
tainting. 

attaint'ed, p.p., at- 
tamt. 

attainting, prp-, 
attaint. 

attaint'ment, n., act 
of attainting. 

attaint'nre, »., dis- 
honouring imputa- 
tion; attainder. 

at'tar, n.. Oriental 
word for perfume 
made from flowers. 

attem'per, v.t., to 
modify, adapt. 

attem'pered, pp-, at- 
temper. 

attem'pering, pr.p., 
attemper. 

attempt, v.t. and i., 
to try, endeavour; 
«., an endeavour. 

attempt'able.a^f;. ,able 
to be attempted. 

attempt'ed, p.p., at- 
tempt. 

attempt' er, n., one 
who attempts. 

attempting, pr.p., 
attempt. 

attend', v.i. and t., to 
wait on, wait for; 
to be present; to 
pay attention to. 









■I. ^ 
I 



attend'ance, n., the 
act of attending; 
persons present. 

attend' ant, n., one 
who looks after per- 
sons or things. 

attend'ed, P4>., at- 
tend. 

attend'ing, pr.p., at- 
tend. 

attenf , n., attention. 

atten'tion, n., the 
giving heed. 

atten'tive, adj., giv- 
mg heed. 

atten'tively, «du.,with 
attention. 

atten'tiveness, n., the 
character of being 
attentive. 

atten'nant, adj., mak- 
ing thin. 

attoa'aate, v.t., to 
make tliin. 

atten'nated, p.p., at- 
tenuate. 

atten'uating, pr.p., 
attenuate. 

attenna'tion, »., the 
act of making thin; 
thinness. 

attesf, v.t., to bear 
witness to. 

attosta'tion, n., the 
act of attesting. 

attest' ed, p.p., attest. 

attest'er, attest'or, n., 
one who attests. 

attest'ing, pr.p., at- 
test. 

At' tic, adj., bel. to 
Attica in Greece. 

at' tic, »., a room in 
the roof of a house; 
a low storey above 
the entablature. 

At'ticism, «., the us- 
age of Attica or the 
Athenians. 

At'tioize, v.t. and >., 
to make Attic, to 
become .\ttic. 

At'ticized, p.p., at- 
ticize. 

At'ticizing, pr.p., at- 
ticize. 

attire', v.t., to dress, 
array; n., dress, 
clothes. 

attired', p.p., attire. 

attir'er, n., one who 
attires. 

attiring, pr.p., attire. 

at'titnde, n., posture; 
state of mind. 

attitn'dinal, adj., rel. 
to attitude. 

attitu'dinize, v.i., to 
postiu'e, to assume 
false airs. 



ii-U 



\ 
\ 

1 

ts 









\ 



\ 






attitu'diniaed, p.p., 
attitudinize. 

attitu'dinizing, pr.p., 
attitudinize. 

attol'lent, adj., eleva- 
ting. 

attor'ney, n., the legal 
agent for another. 

Attor'ney-(7«a'eraA, 
n., the highest legal 
adviser of theCrown. 

attor'neysbip, n., the 
office or function 
of an attorney. 

attract', v.t., to draw, 
allure, charm. 

attractabil'ity, n., the 
state of being sub- 
ject to attraction. 

attract'able, adj. . sub- 
ject to attraction. 

attract'ed, p.p., at- 
tract. 

attract'ing, pr.p., at- 
tract. 

attract'ingly, adv., in 
an attracting way. 

attrac'tion, »., the 
act of attracting; 
charm; the unseen 
force in Nature 
drawing particles to 
each other. 

attract'ive, adj., able 
to attract; charm- 
ing. 

attract'ively, adv., 
charmingly. 

attract'iveness, n., a 
power to charm. 

at'trataent, <t<2;., draw- 
ing to. 

attrib'atable, adj., 
able to be attrib- 
uted. 

at'tribnte, n., some- 
thing attributed; a 
quality or property. 

attrib'nte, v.t., to im- 
pute, ascribe. 

attributed, p.p., at- 
tribute. 

attrib'nting, pr.p., 
attribute. 

attribn'ticn. n., the 
act of attributing. 

attrib'atiTe, adj., rcl. 
to an attribute; ex- 
pressing an attrib- 
vite; assigned to; «., 
an adjective. 

attrib'atively, adv. , 
as an attribute. 

attrite', adj., worn 
down. 

attri'tion, n., wearing 
down by rubbing. 

attone', v.i., to make 
in tune. 

attnned', p.p., attune. 



attuning 



ir 



^ 



1-, 



1,. 



attrm'ing, pr.p., at- 
tune. 

atypical, «<i/., ac- 
quired by specializ- 
ation; not according 
to type. 

aubin', n., a kind of 
canter {Fr.). 

aa'bnm, adj., reddish 
brown in colour. 

aoc'tioii, n., a public 
sale, where the 
prices are raised by 
the bidders; a de- 
velopment of the 
game of bridge. 

anctioneei', »., one 
who sells by auc- 
tion. 

aacti(meer'iiis> "^i-, 
rel. to auctioneers; 
»., an auctioneer's 
profession. 

aDda'dooB, adj., bold, 
daring, impudent. 

aoda'oioiuly, tutv., 
daringly, impu- 
dently. 

aoda'cioomesa. n., 
impudence. 

audac'ity, n., daring, 
impudence. 

aodibil'ity, n., ability 
to be heard. 

aa'dible, adj., able to 
be heard. 

aa'dibleneH; n., i.q. 
audibility. 

aa'dibly. »dv., in a 
way that can be 
heard. 

aa'dienoe, n., hear- 
ing; collected bear- 
ers. 

andiom'eter, n., an 
apparatus for test- 
ing the power of 
hearing. 

au'diiihone, n., an 
instrument for con- 
veying sound 
through the teeth. 

an'dlt, n., au official 
inspection of ac- 
counts; V.I., to hold 
an official examina- 
tion of accounts. 

aa'dited, p.p., audit. 

aa'diting. Pr.p., 

audit. 

aodi'tioo, »., the 
sense of hearing; 
listening. 

aa'dltor, n., a hearer; 
one who conducts 
an audit. 

andito'rinm, n., the 
part of a building 
occupied by the 
audience. 






r 



^v 



n 



._^ 



45 



aa'ditory, n., a body 

of hearers; au audi- 
torium. 

au lait, adjectival 
phrase •= versed in; 
mstructed (Ft.). 

Aoge'an, ad]., rel. to 
Augeas, a mythical 
king whose stables 
Hercules cleansed. 

an'ger, n., a boring 
instrument. 

an' get, n., a priming- 
tube so named. 

augbt, n., anything. 

au'gite, n., another 
name for pyroxene. 

ang'ment, »., the ad- 
dition to, or length- 
ening of, an imtial 
syllable. 

angment', v.t., to in- 
crease, make larger. 

aagment'able, adj., 
able to be aug- 
mented. 

angmenta'tion, n., 
the act of augment- 
ing; increase. 

augmenfative. adj., 
tending to increase. 

angment'ed. p.p., 
augment. 

aogment'er, n., one 
who augments. 

aagment'ing, pr.p., 
augment. 

au'goi, n., a Roman 
soothsayer who di- 
vined by the flight 
of birds; »./. and »., 
to practise augury; 
to foretell. 

aagtml, adj., bel. 
to an augtir. 

aa'guied, p.p., au- 
gur. 

aa' goring, pr.p., au- 
giu:. 

augnnhip, n., the 
office of an augur. 

aa'gniy, n., the art 
of an augur; an 
omen. 

An'gtist, n., the 8th 
month of the year, 
named from the 
Emperor Augustus. 

angnst', adj., grand, 
venerable. 

angtist'ly, adv., in an 
august manner. 

Aogxu'tan, adj., rel. 
to Augustus. 

Augns'tiiu, n., the 
saintly bishop of 
Hippo; also his 
later namesake, the 
Apostle of the Eng- 
lish. 



I 



-1. 
'V 



^ 






aurist 



Angostin'ians, n. pi., 
those who follow 
the rule of the 
Order named after 
St. .\ugustine. 

augost'ness, n.,state- 
liiiess, majesty. 

atlk. Ft., an aquatic 
bird so named. 

aula'rian, adj., bel. 
to a haJl. 

au'lic, adj., rel. to a 
cuurt, as the Aulic 
Ojuncil. 

aont, n., a female 
relative (a mother's 
or father's sister). 

annt'ie, »., the child- 
ish name for aunt. 

au'ia, n., a breeze, 
air, subtle emana- 
tion. 

an'ral, adj., rel. to 
the ear. 

aa'ially, adv. , through 
the ear. 

aa'rated, adj., eared. 

an'ieale, adj., golden, 
gilded. 

aare'lia, n., a chry- 
salis. 

auie'lian, adj., in the 
chrysalis state. 

aore'ola, n., a halo; 
the Sim's corona. 

aa'ieole, n., a halo or 
circlet of light. 

au'ric, adj., contain- 
ing gold. 

aa'riole, n., the pro- 
jecting body of an 
ear; one of the 
heart's cavities. 

aa'ricled, adj., having 
auricles. 

aaric'ola, n., the Al- 
pine primrose; a 
little appendage, 
ear-shaped = au- 
ricle. 

anric'olai. adj., rel. 
to the ear or hear- 
ing; spoken into the 
ear, as in Con- 
fession. 

auric'olariy, adv., 
privately. 

aario'alato, adj., hav- 
ing auricles. 

aario'nlated, adj., i.q. 
atiriculate. 

auril'eroas, a<f;., gold- 
producing. 

an'rifonn, adj., ear- 
shaped. 

anrig'raphy, n., gold- 
engraving. 

aa'r^ n., one who 
treats ear com- 
plaints. 



aurochs 



V 

-v4 



'^. 



V 



L 



"W 



an'iocbs, adj., the 
bison or wild ox 
of Europe. 

anro'ra, «., the dawn. 

aoro'ra borealis, n., 
the northern lights. 

anio'ral, adj., rel. to 
the dawn. 

an'rnm, n., gold 
{Lot.). 

anscnlta'Uon, n., 
hearing through a 
stethoscope. 

aos'cnltator, n., one 
who examines a 
patient with a steth- 
oscope. 

aascolt'ative, 0<2;'., 
i.q., auscultatory. 

anscol'tatory, adj., 
rel. to auscultation. 

aa'spicate, v.t., to in- 
voke good luck on. 

an'splcated./).^., aus- 
picate. 

au'spicating, pr.p., 
auspicate. 

aa'spioe, n., omen. 

an'spices, n. pi., influ- 
ence, protection. 

auspicious, ad)., 
lucky, of goodomen. 

ausnf clously,adv., 
ludcily, with good 
omen. 

anspi'cionsness, n., a 
state of good omen. 

anstere', adj., severe, 
stern, harsh. 

aostere'ly, adv., se- 
verely, sternly, 
harshly. 

austerity, n., sever- 
ity, sternness, harsh- 
ness, [ern. 

ans'tral, adj., south- 

Aostrala'sian, adj., 
bel. to Australasia. 

Anstia'lian. adj., bel. 
to Australia. 

Aua'trian, adj., pert, 
to Austria and the 
Austrlans. 

aos'tromanoy, n., div- 
ination by means 
of the wind. 

anthen'tic, adj., true, 
real, actual. 

anthen'tical, adj., i.q. 
authentic. 

aathen'ticate, v.t., to 
verify, prove to be 
real. 

autben'ticated, p.p., 

authenticate. 

aathen'ticatins, pr.p., 
authenticate. 

anthentica'tion, n., 
the act of authen- 
ticating. 



V 

"01. 

V 
V 
V 

V- 



S 

1 



46 



antbentic'ity, n., 

truth, reality. 

author, «., a be- 
ginner, creator, 
writer.' 

au'thoress, n.,fem. of 
author. 

aatbor'itatiTe, adj., 
having authority. 

authoritatively, adv., 
as having authority. 

anthor'itaaveness, n., 
the character of 
having authority or 
sanction. 

authority, n., power, 
right; a recognized 
expert; in pi. = the 
powers that be. 

an'thorizable, adj., 
able to be au- 
thorized. 

aatboriza'tion, n. , the 
granting of author- 
ity or sanction. 

an'tborize. v.t., to 
give authority to, 
to sanction. 

aa'tborized, p.p., au- 
thorize. 

an'tborizing. pr.p., 
authorize. 

an'tborsbip, n., the 
writing of a book 
or article. 

antobiog'rapher, n., 
one who writes his 
own biography or 
life. 

antobiographlc, adj., 
rel. to autobiog- 
raphy. 

aatobiographlcal, adj 
i.q. autobiographic. 

aatobios'raphy, n., a 
biography of one- 
self by oneself. 

aat'ooar, n., an auto- 
mobile vehicle. 

antooh'tbon, n., a 
native of the soil. 

antoch'tbonons, adj., 
native, indigenous. 

autoc'raoy, n., gov- 
ernment by an ab- 
solute monarch. 

an'tocrat, n., one who 
rules absolutely. 

autocratic, adj., rul- 
ing absolutely. 

autocratical. adj.,<.g. 
autocratic. 

an'to-da-Ii,n., phrase 
= an act of faith. 

autog'enomi, adj. ,self- 
producing. 

an'tograpb, n., writ- 
ing in one's own 



hand. 
antographlo. 



adj.. 



\ 



i 



availed 



written in one's 
own hand. 

autographlcal, adj., 
i.q. autographic. 

antog'raphy, »., writ- 
ing in one's own 
hand. 

antom'ata, n., pi. of 
automaton. 

au'tomath, n., a self- 
taught person. 

automatic, adj., self- 
moving, self-acting. 

automatical, adj., i.q. 
automatic. 

automatically, adv., 
mechanically. 

autom'atism, n., the 
principle of self- 
action. 

autom'aton, n., a self- 
moving, self-acting 
instrument. 

automobile', adj., 
self-moving; n., a 
carriage actuated 
by its own motive 
power. 

an'tomotor. n., a self- 
moving engine. 

autonomic, adj., i.q. 
autonomous. 

auton'omize, v.t., to 
make autonomous. 

anton'omons, adj., 
obeying one's own 
laws,self-governuig. 

auton'omy, n., self- 
government, inde- 
pendence. 

autop'sia, n., per- 
sonal examination 
(of a dead body). 

antop'sy, n., i.q. au- 
topsia. 

autotype, n., a fac- 
simile; a photo- 
graphic print in 
monochrome in a 
carbon pigment. 

au'tnmn, n., the third 
of the seasons. 

autnm'nal, adj., of 
the autumn. 

anzil'iaheB, n., assist- 
ant troops, not 
forming part of the 
re^nilar forces. 

auxil'iary, adj., help- 
ing: n., a helper. 

avau, v.i., to profit, 
be of use, to serve 
a purpose. 

availability, n., abil- 
ity to be used. 

avail'able, adj., able 
to be used. 

avail'ableneBS, n., i.q. 
availability. 

availed, p.p., avail. 



availing 



47 



V 

s 



X 



.V 



c- 






KnU'ing, pr.p., avail. 

av'alanohe, n., a 
great fall of snow 
in mountains. 

av'arice, «., grend for 
gain. 

avari'cioaa, adj., 
greedy for gain. 

avari'ciously, adv., 
greedily. 

avan'cionsaess, n., an 
av.aricious temper. 

avast', inter j., stop ! 

avatar', n., a descent; 
incarnation. 

avannt', interj. =» 
stand ! keep off ! 

a'ye, an exclamation 
= Hail ! »., the 
act of devotion so 
named. 

A've Hari'a, phrasc= 
Hail Mary ! the 
salutation to Our 
Lady. 

avenge', v.t., to exact 
satisfaction for a 
wrong. 

avenged', P-p., 

avenge. 

aveng'er, »., one who 
avenges. 

aveng'ing, pr-P-, 

avenge. 

av'ens, »., a plant so 
named, bel. to the 
Rosaceae. 

av'entail, n., an air- 
hole, ventail. 

av'enne, »., an ap- 
proach or passage, 
esp. through trees. 

aver', v.t., to state 
firmly. 

av'eiage, »■, a mean 
or middle; a general 
estimate; adj., con- 
forming to a general 
estimate; v.t. and »., 
to get or conform 
to a general esti- 
mate. 

av'araged, p.p., av- 
erage. 

av'eraging. pr.p., av- 
era,<i;e. 

aver'ment, n., a posi- 
tive statement. 

averred',/).^., aver. 

aver'ring, pr.p., aver. 

averse', adj., turned 
away from; dis- 
inclined, unfavour- 
able to. 

averse'ly, adv., dis- 
approvingly. 

aversion, n., strong 
dislike. 

avert', v.t., to turn 
aside; to ward off. 









^ 



V 



avert'ed, p.p., avert. 

avert'er, »., one who 
averts. 

avert'ible, adj., able 
to be averted. 

avert'ing,^r./>. , avert. 

a'viajy, «., a collec- 
tion ot birds; large 
cage. 

avia'tion, n., the art 
and science of aerial 
flight. 

a' viator, n., one who 
practises aviation. 

avid, adj., greedy, 
very desirous. 

avid'ions, adj., i.q. 
avid. 

avid'ity, n., greedi- 
ness, eagerness. 

a'vion, «., the earliest 
type of heavier- 
Ihan-air machine. 

avoca'tion, «., strict- 
ly, the word means 
a recreation, a call- 
ing away from busi- 
ness. Nowadays it 
is used as the equiv- 
alent of vocation = 
employment. 

avocative, adj., call- 
ing one aside. 

av'ocet, »., a wader- 
bird so named; also 
a humming-bird. 

avoid', v.t., to get 
away from, escape. 

avoid'able, adj., that 
ran be avoided. 

avoid'ably, adv., in 
an avoidable way. 

avoid'ance, n., the 
act of avoiding. 

avoid'ed, pp., avoid. 

avoid' er, n., one who 
avoids. 

avoid'ing,^r.^. ,avoid. 

avoirdnpois', n. and 
adj., a standard of 
weight, reckoning 
i6 oz. to the lb. 

av'o8et,n.,<.9.avocet. 

avosefta, n., i.g. 
avocet. 

avonch', v.i., to 
affirm strongly. 

avonohed', 'P-P-, 
avouch. 

avoncb'er, «., one 
who avouches. 

avonch'ing, pr.p., 
avouch. 

avonch'ment, n., a 
strong affirmation. 

avow', v.t., to state 
openly, confess. 

avow'able, adj., able 
to be avowed. 

avow'al, tt., the act of 



S 
^ 









•^^ 

vT" 
^ 






aweless 



avowing, an admis- 
sion. 

avowed', p.p., avow. 

avow'edly, adv., ad- 
mittedly, openly. 

avowee', n., a patron 
possessing an ad- 
vowson. 

avow'er, n., one who 
avows. 

avow'ing, pr. p., ayow, 

avow'ry, n., a law 
term for the ac- 
knowledgment of 
having taken the 
goods. 

avnlse', v.t., to tear 
off. 

avnl'don, n., the act 
of reading. 

avnn'colar, adj., rel. 
to an uncle. 

await', v.t., to wait 
for, expect. 

await'ed, p.p., await. 

await' ing,pr.^., await. 

awake', v.t. and i., to 
rouse from sleep, to 
rise from sleep; adj., 
not asleep, alert. 

awaked', p.p., awake. 

awaken, v.t., to 
rouse from sleep. 

awa'kened, p.p., 

awaken. 

awakening, pr.p., 
awaken; »., the act 
or effect of awaken- 
ing. 

awa'king, pr.p., 

awake. 

award', v.t., to make 
over, adjudge; n., a 
final judgment. 

award'ed, ^./>. , award . 

award'er, n., one who 
awards. 

award'ing, pr.p., 
award. 

aware', adj., know- 
ing, on the look out. 

awash', adv. and 
adj., just covered 
by the waves. 

away", adv., at a 
distance, to a dis- 
tance, off. 

awe, n., reverential 
fear; v.t., to strike 
awe into. 

a-weath'er. adv., to- 
wards the windy 
side. 

awed, p.p., awe. 

a-wei{^', adv., said 
when the anchor 
just clears the bot- 
tom. 

awe'less, adj., with- 
out awe. 






awe'some, adj., i.q. 
awful. 

awe'-struck, adj. , 
struck with awe. 

aw'ful, ad]., produc- 
ing awe, terrible. 

aw'fully, adv., ter- 
ribly. 

aw'ftUness, n., ter- 
r.fyiiig character. 

awhile', adv., for a 
time. 

awhirl', adv., in a 
whirling state. 

aw'ing, pr.p., awe. 

awkward, oii/., clum- 
sy, embarrassing. 

awk'wardly, adv., 
clumsily. 

awk'wardness, n., 
clumsiness, diffi- 
culty. 

awl, «., a cobbler's 
tool for piercing. 

awn, n., the beard 
of wheat. 

awn'ing, n., a cover 
for shelter. 

awoke', p.t. awake. 

awry', adv., twisted 
aside. 

axe, n., a tool for 
cutting timber. 

axe'-head, »., the 
iron head of an 
axe. 

az'ial, adj., rel. to an 
axis. 

azif'erous, adj., bear- 
ing an axis. 



48 



ax'ilorm, adj., like an 
axis. 

■ — C ax'il, «., the angle at 
the junction of the 
upper side of a 
lateral member with 
the stem. 

•_v^ ax'ile, adj., rel. to an 

axis. 
•_^ axil'la, »., the arm- 
pit. 

■—4\ ax'illar, adj., i.q. axil- 
lary; n., one of the 
under feathers of a 
bird where the wing 
y" j>ins the body. 

■ f ax'illary, adj., rel. to 
an axil or axilla. 

. t^.^ ax'inite, n., a mineral 
so named. 

j_— ^* ax'iom, n., a univer- 
sally agreed prin- 
ciple or proposition. 

. „ , axiomat'ic, adj., uni- 
versally agreed up- 
on, unarguable. 

. ^ axiomat'ical, adj., i.q. 

~~'^~' axiomatic. 
,_Q ax'is, n., a straight 
line on which a 
body revolves; the 
stem of a plant. 
. /■" ax'le, n., the pin 
roimd which a 
wheel turns. 
■ /\ .ax'Ie-box, n., the 
metal lining of a 
hub. 
i-Y- az'led, od;. , having an 
axle. 



azymous 






"2 



i 



ax'Ie-tree, n., i.q. 

axle. 

ay, inter j., = yes. 

a'yah, n., a Hindu 
female nurse. 

aye, adv., always, 
for ever. 

aza'Iea, n., a flower- 
ing shrub so named. 

az'imnth, n., an arc 
of the horizon in- 
tercepted between 
the meridian and 
another vertical 
c rcle. 

azimutbal, adj., rel. 
to an azimuth. 

azo'ic, adj., without 
organic life. 

az'ote, n., an older 
name for nitrogen. 

az'oth, n., the al- 
chemist's name for 
mercury. 

azot'ic, adj., nitro- 
genous. 

Az'lec, n., one of the 
Aztec peofjle. 

az'ore, adj., sky- 
blue; n., the blue 
sky. 

az'orine, n., an anil- 
ine colour, deep 
blue. 

az'ygOUS, adj., un- 
paired. 

a/'ymite, n., a user 
of unleavened bread. 

az'ymons, adj., rel. 
to unleavened bread. 



\ 

\ 
\ 



^. 



baa, inter j. and n., 
the cry of a sheep. 

Ba'al, n., a Canaan- 
itish deity, supposed 
to represent the sun. 

bab'ble, v.t. and (., to 
talk indistinctly or 
idly, to murmur; n., 
idle talk. 

babbled, p.p., bab- 
ble. 

bab'blement, n., bab- 
ble. 

bab'blei, «., one who 
babbles, a teller of 
secrets. 

bab'bling, pr.p., bab- 
ble. 

babe, n., an infant, 
young child of 
cither sex. 

Ba'bel, n., the city 
where the confusion 
of tongues took 
place; a confused 
mixture of sounds; 
disorder. 

ba'bery, n., tawdry 
finery. 

ba'boo, ba'bn, n., 
Hindu word = 
master. 

baboon', n., a large 
species of ape or 
monkey. 

ba'by, n., a babe. 

babyhood, n., the 
state of being a 
baby; infancy. 

ba'byidi, adj., child- 
ish. 

Babylo'nian, »dj., bel. 
to Babylon or Ba- 
bel. 

Babylo'nish, adj., 
Babylonian. 

baccalau'reate, n. , the 
degree of Bachelor 
of Arts, etc. 

baccara', baccarat', 
ft., a game of cards. 

bac'cata, adj., bear- 
ing berries; like a 
berry. 

bac'chanal, adj., i.q. 
bacchanalian; n., a 
votary of Bacchus, 
a drunken reveller. 

bacchana'lian. adj., 
riotous, character- 
ized by intemperate 
drinking. 






^ 



^-K 



v 



bao'chant, »., a priest 
of Bacchus. 

bac'obante, n., a 
pr i es tcss of Bacchus, 
a female b.icchanal. 

bac'cbic, adi., rel. to 
Bacchus, drunken. 

Bac'chos, n., the 
classical god of 
wine. 

baccif'eroos, adj., pro- 
ducing berries. 

bacciv'orons, adj., 
feeding on berries. 

bacb'elor, n., an un- 
married man; a uni- 
versity man who 
has taken his &rst 
degree. 

bach'elorhood, n., the 
state or period of 
being a bachelor. 

bacil'C "■> P'- °' 
bacillus. 

bacU'los, n., a micro- 
scopic organism, the 
source of disease, a 
bacterium. 

back, n., the hinder 
part; adv., toward a 
former place, state, 
or condition; adj., 
lying in the rear; 

, v.t., to support; to 
endorse; to move 
backward; v.i., to 
move or gjo back. 

back'bar, n., a bar to 
support the back. 

backbite, v.t., to 
slander an absent 
person. 

back'biter, n., one 
who backbites. 

backbiting, Pr.p., 
backbite; n., secret 
calutmiy. 

back'board, n., a 
board used to give 
erectness to the 
spine. 

back'bone, n., the 
spine; fig., decision 
of character. 

back'door, n., a door 
at the back of a 
building. 

backed, p.p., back; 
adj., having a 
back. 

back'er, »., one who 
backs; one who bets 



s 



in favour of a par- 
ticular party in a 
contest. 

back'fire, v.i., to ex- 
plode prematurely; 
n., the act of back- 
firing. 

back'flred, p.^., back- 
fire. 

back'flting, pr.p., 
backfire. 

backgam'mon, »., a 
game for two play- 
ed on a prepared 
board with pieces 
or men and dice. 

back'groond, n., the 
part of a picture re- 
presented as far- 
thest from the spec- 
tator; a state of 
being out of view. 

back'handed, adj., 
with the hand 
turned backward; 
oblique ; sloping 
back; unfair. 

back'lumder, n., an 
indirect blow. 

back'house, n., an 
outbuilding behind 
a house. 

back'ing, pr.p., back; 
(I., supj)ort. 

back'lssb, n., the 
motion that has 
been missed be- 
tween working parts 
of an automobile. 

back'side, n., the 
back part of any- 
thing. 

back'aight, n., the 
rear sight of a gun, 
rifle, etc. 

back'slide, v.t., to fall 
away from religion 
or morality. 

back'slider, n., one 
who backslides. 

backsliding, n., fall- 
ing away from faith 
or practice. 

back'stain, n., stairs 
in the back part of 
a house; adj., secret 
and unfair, under- 
hand. 

back'stay. n., a long 
rope from the top 
of a mast back- 
wards to the sidr of 



backsword 



50 



baking 









V 



a ship helping to 
support the mast. 

back'swcrd, »., a 
singlestick. 

baok'ward, adv. and 
(ul;., toward the 
back; in a contrary 
manner or direction. 

back'wardly, adv., un- 
willingly. 

back'wardness, n., 
the state of being 
backward. 

back' wards, adv., 
backward. 

back' wash, n., the 
movement of a re- 
tiring wave. 

baok'watei, n., water 
turned back in its 
course by an ob- 
struction; ».»., to 
reverse the rowing. 

back'wooda, n. pi. 
(U.S. A. and Can- 
ada), forest dis- 
tricts remote from 
the more thickly 
settled parts. 

baok'woodsman, n., 
inhabitant of the 
backwoods. 

back'yaid, «., an en- 
closure in the rear 
of a house. 

ba'oon, n., swine's 
flesh pickled and 
dried. 

Baco'nian, adj., pert, 
to Bacon, his phil- 
osophy and theo- 
ries ; «., esp. one 
who believes that 
Bacon was the 
author of the works 
of Shakespeare. 

bacte'ria, n., pi. of 
bacterium. 

bacte'ria], adj., rel. 
to bacteria. 

baote'rion, adj., i.q. 
bacterial. 

bacteriol'ogy. n., the 
science rel. to bac- 
teria. 

bacte'rinm, n., a min- 
ute organism found 
in organic matter, 
diseased animal tis- 
sues, etc. 

bad, adj., the oppo- 
site of good; want- 
ing good qualities, 
physical or moral. 

bade, p.t., bid. 

badge, n., a mark or 
token worn to show 
connexion between 
the wearer and 
some other person. 



S 



V 



V 



u 



V 



occupation, or con- 
dition. 

badg'er, n., a small 
mammal of noc- 
turnal habits, car- 
nivorous, and living 
in a burrow; v.t., to 
worry or annoy. 

badg'ered, p.p., badg- 
er. 

badg'ering, pr-p., 
badger. 

badi'geon, n., a mix- 
ture of plaster and 
other substances 
used to fill up small 
holes in joiners' 
work. 

bad'inage, n., playful 
talk; chaff. 

bad'ly, adv., in a bad 
manner, unskilfully. 

bad'nunton, n., a 
game like lawn- 
tennis, but played 
with shuttlecocks; a 
kind of claret-cup. 

bad'ness, n., the state 
of being bad. 

baffle, v.t., to elude 
or defeat. 

baffled, p.p., baflSe. 

baffler, n., one who 
baffles. 

baffling, pr.p., baffle; 
adj., baulking. 

bag, »., a sack; v.t., 
to put into a bag; 
».»., to swell or 
hang like a bag. 

bagatelle', n., a trifle; 
a game played with 
a cue and balls on a 
board having nine 
holes at one end. 

bag'gage, n., luggage; 
the necessaries of 
an army. 

bagged, p.p., bag. 

bag'ging, pr.p., bag; 
»i., the cloth or 
other materials for 
bags. 

bag'gy, adj., pugy; 
looking like a bag. 

bag' man, n., a com- 
mercial traveller 
(slang). 

bagn'io, n., a bath; a 
brothel. 

bag'pipo, n., a musi- 
cal wmdmstrument, 
consisting of a lea- 
ther bag which re- 
ceives air from the 
mouth or a bellows, 
and of pipes into 
which the air is 
driven by the per- 
former's elbow. 



V 



NT 

vv 



v^. 



bag'piper, ». , one who 
plays on a bag- 
pipe. 

bail, n., a little stick 
placed on the 
stumps at cricket, 
legal security; v.t., 
to free from water 
with a bucket or the 
like; to liberate 
from imprisonment 
on security. 

bail'able, adj. , admit- 
ting of bail. 

bailed, p.p., bail. 

bailee', n., a person 
to whom goods are 
entrusted. 

bail'er, n., one who, 
or that which, bails. 

bai'lie, n., a Scottish 
alderman. 

b&i'liS, n., a subor- 
dinate civil officer; 
an under-steward 
on an estate. 

bail'ing, pr.p., bail. 

bai'liwick, n., the 
precincts within 
which a bailiff has 
authority. 

bail'ment, n., the act 
of bailing an ac- 
cused person. 

bail' or, n., one who 
delivers goods or 
money to another 
in trust. 

bairn, n., a child. 

bait, v.t., to feed a 
beast when travel- 
ling; to lure fish or 
other animals; to 
harass by dogs; n., a 
lure to catch fish. 

bait'ed, p.p., bait. 

bait'ing. pr.p., bait. 

baize, n., a coarse 
woollen stuff with 
a long nap. 

bake, v.t., to dry and 
harden by heat; to 
prepare in an oven. 

baked, p.p., bake. 

bake'boose, n., a 
building for baking. 

bake'meat, n., meat 
cooked in an oven; 
a rocat-pie. 

bak'er, n., one who 
bakes. 

Bak'erloo, n., a 
" portmanteau " 
word, the name of 
the railway line 
between Baker St. 
and VVaterUx). 

bak'ery, n., a bake- 
house. 

bak'ing, pr.p., bake. 



baksheesh 



>s 






> 

V 



bak'sheesb.n., a gra- 
tuity ot money (an 
Eastern term). 

bal'ance, n., an in- 
strument for ascer- 
taining tlie weight 
of a body; surplus — 
the difference of 
two sums; the part 
of a clock that 
regulates the beats; 
v.t., to weigh; to 
examine a mer- 
chant's books by 
summation; vA., to 
be equal on both 
sides of an account. 

bafaaced, p.p., 
balance. 

barancer, n.,one who, 
or that which, bal- 
ances. 

bafaace • sheet, n. , a 
statement of assets 
and liabilities. 

baf aaciii%, pr.p. , 
balance. 

ba'las ra'by, n., a 
species of ruby. 

balata, n., a gtim 
resembling rubber, 
and used for insula- 
ting purposes and 
as a substitute for 
shoe-leather. 

bal'conied, adj., hav- 
ing balconies. 

balcony, n., a pro- 
jecting gallery in a 
theatre: a project- 
ing platform, with a 
balustrade, on the 
outsideof a building. 

bald, adi; without, or 
with little, hair; 
unadorned. 

bal'dachin, «., a can- 
opy; also baldachino 
midbaudequin (orig. 
the canopy was of 
cloth from Bald- 
acca, i.e. Bagdad). 

bal'derdasb, »., non- 
sense. 

bald'head, n., a man 
bald on the head. 

bald'ly, adv., meanly, 
inelegantly. 

bald'ness, n., the 
state of being bald. 

bal'dric, n., a broad 
belt worn diagon- 
ally across the body. 

bale, n., a bundle of 
goods; calamity; 
v.t., to bail (water). 

Balearic, adj., pert, 
to a Spanish group 
of islands in the 
Mediterranean. 






^C^ 
v^ 



v 






^ 






51 



baled, p.p., bale. 

bale'-flie, n., an alarm 
fire. 

bale'fnl, adj., perni- 
cious, calamitous. 

bale'fnlly, adv., in a 
baleful manner. 

bale'tolness, n., the 
state of being bale- 
ful. 

bal'ing, pr.p., bale. 

balise', »., a land- 
mark or sea-beacon. 

balk, n., a thick 
beam; a disappoint- 
ment; v.t., to bar 
the way of. Also 
baulh. 

balked, p.p., balk. 

balk'ing, pfp-, balk. 

ball, n. , a round body ; 
a bullet; v.t. and i., 
to form into a ball. 

bal'lad, n., a short 
narrative poem. 

bal'lad-mon'ger, n., a 
dealer in ballads, an 
inferior poet. 

bal'last, n., heavy 
matter carried in a 
ship which has no 
cargo; material be- 
tween the rails of a 
railway; v.t., to 
steady. 

bal'lasted, p.p., bal- 
last. 

bal'Uuting, n., mate- 
rials for ballast; 
pr.p., ballast. 

ball'-cock, n., an 
automatic stop- 
cock consisting of a 
hollow sphere float- 
ing on the surface 
of a liquid and 
attached to a lever 
connected with the 
cock. 

balled, p.p., ball. 

bal'let, n., an clab- 
oratedance in which 
several persons take 
part, the action con- 
veying a story. 

bal'let, n., a littleball. 

ball'ing, pr.p., ball. 

ballis'ta, n., an an- 
cient niilitary engine 
for throwing heavy 
missiles; a s<wt of 
catapult; pi., bal- 
listae. 

ballis'ter, n., a cross- 
bow. 

ballis'tic adj., pert. 
to the ballista. 

baUis'tias, n., the sci- 
ence rel. to pro- 
jectiles. 






V 



V7' 



bamboo 



ballis'tite, n., a very 

high explosive. 

balloon', n., a large 
hollow sphere, esp. 
a large bag filled 
with a light gas, 
capable of rising in 
the air. 

balloon'ing, n., the 
art of managing 
balloons. 

balloon'ist, n., one 
who ascends in a 
balloon. 

bal'lot, n., a ball or 
paper by which one 
votes secretly; the 
system of voting in 
this way; a lottery: 
v.i., to vote secretly. 

bal'lot-boz, n., a box 
for receiving bal- 
lots. 

bal'loted, p.p., bal- 
lot. 

barioting, pr.p., bal- 
lot. 

ball'-room, n., a large 
room for dancing. 

balm, n., a fragrant 
ointment; anything 
that soothes pain. 

balm'ily, ado., in a 
balmy manner. 

balm'iness, n., the 
quality of being 
balmy. 

balm'y, adj., fra- 
grant; soothing; re- 
fresiiing. 

bal'neal, adj., pert, 
to a bath. 

bal'nun, n., an aro- 
matic, resinous sub- 
stance flowing from 
certain plants, and 
used in medicine. 

balsam'ic, adj., hav- 
ing the qualities of 
balsam. 

balsamicaU adj., bal- 
samic. 

balsamif'erons, adj., 
producing balsam. 

Hal' tic, adj., pert, to 
the Baltic Sea. 

baI'Dster. n., a small 
column used for 
balustrades. 

bal'natered, adj., hav- 
ing balusters. 

balustrade', n., a row 
of balusters joined 
by a rail. 

bambi'no, n. a baby; 
a figure of the In- 
fant Jesus. 

bamboo', n., a tropi- 
cal grass with largo, 
jointed stems. 



bamboozle 



/ 



\ 



b^ 



bamlxra'zle. v.t., to 
impose upon, de- 
ceive. 

bamboo'zled, p.p., 
bamboozle. 

bamboo'zling, pr.p., 
bamboozle. 

ban, n., a prohibi- 
tion; a curse; v.t., to 
put under a curse; 
proscribe. 

ban'al, adj., common- 
place, NTilgar. 

banal'ity, n., that 
which is banal. 

bana'na, n., a herba- 
ceous plant akin to 
the plantain, bear- 
ing soft, luscious 
fruit. 

ban'co, n., a standard 
of money in which 
some banks keep 
their accounts; a 
seat or bench of 
justice. 

band, n., a connec- 
tion; a narrow strip; 
a company of men, 
esp. soldiers; a body 
of instrumental mu- 
sicians; vJ. and «'., 
to associate for some 
common purpose. 

band'age, n., a roller 
used m binding up 
wounds; v.t., to put 
a bandage on. 

band'aged, />.p., band- 
age. 

band'kging. pr.p-, 
bandage. 

bandan'na, n., an 
i ndian silk hand- 
kerchief. 

bandbox, n., a light 
box of pasteboard 
for containing bon- 
nets, etc. 

band'ean, n., a ribbon 
for the forehead. 

band'ed, p.p., band. 

band'elet, n., a small 
band or fillet. 

ban'der, n., one band- 
ed with others. 

ban'derole, n., a little 
flag; a military 
weapon; a trumpet. 

ban'dicoot, n., a large 
Indian rat eaten by 
coolies. 

band'ied, p.p., bandy. 

banding, pr.p., band. 

ban'dit, m., a robber, 
an outlaw. 

bandit' ti, n., pi. of 
bandit. 

ban'dog, n., a large, 
fierce dog, a mas- 



V or Nj, 

s 



s^ 

>- 



\ 



V 



?. 



V 



52 



tiff, usually kept 
chained. 

bandoleer'.bandoliei', 
n., a shoulder-belt 
for cartridges. 

bandore', n., a string- 
ed musical instru- 
ment, a sort of lyre. 

band'roU, n., a ban- 
derole. 

bands'man, n., a 
player in a band. 

band-stimd, n., an 
open-air platform 
for a band of 
musicians. 

ban'dy, n., a sort of 
hockey-stick; the 
game played with 
these sticks and a 
ball; v.t., to toss to 
and fro. 

ban'dying, pr.p., 
bandy. 

ban'dy-leg, n., a bent 
or crooked leg. 

band'y-legged, adj., 
liaving bent legs. 

bane, n., any cause 
of destruction ; 
deadly poison. 

bane'fnJ, adj., des- 
tructive, poisonous. 

bane'fnlly, adv., in a 
baneful way. 

bane'folness, n., the 
quality of being 
baneful. 

bang, v.t., to beat; to 
make a loud noise; 
H., a loud noise, a 
heavy blow. 

banged, p.p., bang. 

bang'ing, pr.p., bang. 

ban'gle, n., an orna- 
mental ring for 
wrist or ankle. 

bangne, i.q. bhang. 

ban'ish, v.t., to drive 
away, to exile. 

ban'i^ed, p.p., ban- 
ish. 

ban'isher, n., one who 
banishes. 

ban'isbing, pr.p., 
banish. 

ban'ishment, n., exile; 
the act of banishing. 

ban'ister, n., a balus- 
ter, an upright in a 
stair-rail. 

ban' jo, n., a musical 
instrument with six 
strings, a body like 
a tambourine, and 
a neck like a guitar. 

bank, n., a mound; 
any acclivity; an 
establishment that 
trades in money; 



V 



V 



banqueted 



v.i. ,to enclose with a 
bank, to put money 
in a bank; to turn 
quickly (an aircraft 
term). 

bank'bill, n., a bill of 
exchange payable 
to order and nego- 
tiable. 

bank'book, n., a book 
in which debits and 
credits are entered 
by the officials of 
a bank. 

banked, p.p., bank. 

bank'er, »., one who 
keeps a bank. 

bank'ing, n., the busi- 
ness of a banker; 
making a turn with 
an aeroplane, inner 
side downwards; 
pr.p., bank. 

bank'-note, n., a pro- 

. missory note pay- 
able on demand, 
issued by a bank. 

bank'nipt, n., a per- 
son declared by 
legal authority to 
be unable to pay 
his debts. 

ba nkrupt cy, n . , the 
state of being a 
bankrupt. 

bank'rnpted, adj., de- 
clared bankrupt. 

bank'-stock, n., a 
share or shares in 
the capital of a 
bank. 

banned, p.p., ban. 

ban'nei, n., a large 
square flag bearing 
heraldic devices. 

ban'nered, adj., hav- 
ing a banner. 

ban'neret, n., a 
knight intermediate 
in rank between a 
baron and a knight 
bachelor, raised to 
this rank for brav- 
ery in the field. 

ban'nerol, n., a little 
flag, a banderole. 

ban'ning, pr.p., ban. 

ban'nock, n., {Scot.), 
an unleavened cake 
made of meal and 
baked on an iron 
plate over a fire. 

banns, n. pi., a pro- 
clamation in church 
of an intended mar- 
riage. 

ban'qnet, n., a feast; 
v.t. and >., to feast. 

ban'qneted, p.p., ban- 
quet. 



banqueter 



53 



bareheaded 






\ 



\ 



V 



V 



ban'qaeter, n., one 

who banquets. 

ban'qoeting, prp., 
banquet. 

banquette', n., a little 
raised bank inside 
the parapet of a 
fortification; the 
raised footway of a 
bridge. 

bans, n., pi. of ban. 

ban'shee, n., a female 
fairy whose appear- 
ance foretells a 
death (Irish). 

ban'stickle, n., a 
stickleback. 

ban'tam,n.,adiniinu- 
tive domestic fowl 
of great courage. 

ban'ter, v./., to make 
fuu of, to attack 
with jests; n., hum- 
orous raillery, chaff. 

ban'tered, p.p., ban- 
ter. 

ban'terer, n., one who 
banters. 

bantering, Pr-p., 
banter. 

bant'Ung, »., an in- 
fant (contemptu- 
ous). 

ban'yati, »■, a kind 
of Indian fig tree 
whose branches 
send down shoots 
which take root 
and become trunks. 

ba'obab, n., a large 
African tree bearing 
a pulpy fruit called 
monkey-bread. 

bap'tism, n., im- 
mersion; the Sacra- 
ment of entrance 
into the Catholic 
Church. 

baptismal, adj., pert, 
to baptism. 

Bap'tist, n. , one who 
baptizes, esp. St. 
John, the 'forerun- 
ner of Our Lord; a 
member of the Bap- 
tist sect. 

baptistery, n., a 
building or portion 
of a building where 
baptism is admin- 
istered. 

baptis'tic, adj., rel. to 
baptism. 

bapti'zable, adj., cap- 
able of being bap- 
tized. 

baptize', v.t., to ad- 
minister the sacra- 
ment of baptism to; 
to christen. 



\ 



s 



v^ 






vv 



baptlxettfp.p., bap- 
tize. 

bapti'zer, n., one who 
baptizes. 

baptfzioi, pr-P-, 
baptize. 

bar, n., a pole; an 
obstruction; a bank 
of sand, etc., at the 
mouth of a river; 
the place in court 
where prisoners are 
placed; the profes- 
sion of barrister; 
the enclosed place 
in a tayerii where 
liquor is served; in 
music, a vertical 
line on the staff; 
v.i., to fasten with 
a bar, to hinder, to 
exclude. 

barb, n., the sharp 
point projecting 
backwards of an 
arrow, fish hook, 
etc.; a Barbary 
horse; v.t., to fur- 
nish with barbs, as 
an arrow. 

bar'bacan, n., a 
watch-tower; an 
advanced work be- 
fore the gate of a 
walled town or 
castle. 

Barba'dian, adj., bcl. 
to Barbados; n., 
an inhabitant of 
Barbados. 

barba'rian, n., an un- 
civilized person; a 
brutal man. 

barbai'ic, adj., sav- 
age, wild; ornate, 
but not in good 
taste. 

bar'barism, n., an 
outrage; any of- 
fence against good 
taste; any form of 
speech contrary to 
correct idiom. 

barbar'ity, n., savage- 
ness, ferocity. 

bar'barize, v.t., to be- 
come barbarous; ».<. 
to make barbarous. 

barbarized, p.p., bar- 
barize. 

bar'barizing, pr-p., 
barbarize. 

barbarous, adj., un- 
civilized, ignorant; 
cruel, brutal. 

barbarously, adv., in 
a barbarous man- 
ner. 

bar'baronsness, n., 
barbarity. 



VA- 

w^ 
vv 




w 
v\ 

v^ 
v^ 



bar1»te, adj., beard- 
ed. 

bar'becne, n., a large 
animal roasted 

whole; v.t., to cook 
whole by roasting. 

barbecued, ^.^., bar- 
becue. 

bar'becning, pr.p., 
barbecue. 

barbed, adj., fur- 
nished with barbs; 
p.p., barb. 

bar'bel, »., a fresh- 
water fish with four 
beard-like append- 
ages on its upper 
jaw. 

bar'bellate, adj., hav- 
ingshort, stiff hairs, 
often barbed. 

bar'ber, «., one whose 
occupation it is to 
shave the beard. 

bai'berry, n., a shrub 
bearing small acid 
berries, common in 
hedges. 

bar'bet, n. , a dog with 
curly hair, a poodle. 

barbette', n., a plat- 
form in a fortifica- 
tion or on a ship of 
war, from which a 
cannon may be fired 
over the parapet 
instead of through 
an embrasure. 

bar'bican, n., a bar- 
bacan. 

bar'bnle, n., a small 
barb; a little beard. 

bat'carole, n., a 
Venetian boat-song. 

bard, »., a poet, esp. 
a Celtic poet or 
singer. 

bard'ic, adj., pert, to 
bards. 

bard'ism, n., bardic 
lore. 

bare, adj., naked, 
empty, much worn; 
v.t., to strip naked. 

bare'bone, adj., very 
lean. 

bared, p.p., bare. 

bare'faced, adj., im- 
pudent. 

bare'iacedness, n., ef- 
frontery .impudence. 

bare'foot, adj., with 
bare feet. 

bare'tooted, adj., 
barefoot. 

bartee', n., a thin, 
gauze-like fabric. 

bue'headed, adj.. 
having the heaa 
uncovered. 



barely 



V^ 



V 



M- 



V-^ 



bare'Iy, adv., nakedly, 
without decoration; 
scarcely. 

bare'ness, n., the 
state of being bare. 

bar'gain, n., an 
agreement; the 

thing stipulated for; 
something bought 
ot sold cheap; v.i., 
to mak« an agree- 
ment. 

bar'gamed, p.p., bar- 
gain. 

bargainee', n., the 
party who receives 
the property bar- 
gained for. 

bax' gainer, n., one 
who bargains. 

bar'gainiog, pr.p., 
bargain. 

barge, n., a boat used 
ceremonially; a flat- 
bottomed boat for 
carrying goods. 

barge'man, n., a man 
who manages a 
barge. 

baril'la, n., an impure 
soda got by burning 
certain plants, esp. 
sea-weeds. 

baring, pr.p., bare. 

bar'-iron, n., iron 
smelted from the 
ore in long rods. 

bar'itone. adj., be- 
tween tenor and 
bass; n., a baritone 
voice or singer. 

ba'riom, n., a metal. 

bark, n., the outer 
rind of a tree, shrub, 
etc.; a barque; the 
cry of a dog; v.t., to 
peel; v.i., to cry like 
a dog. 

barked, p.p., bark. 

bar'keeper, n., a ser- 
ver at a tavern bar. 

bark'er, n., one who 
barks; a pistol 
(slang). 

bark'ery, n., a tan- 
house. 

bark'ing, pr.p., bark. 

bark'y, adj., having 
the qualities of bark. 

bar'ley, »., a kind of 
grain. 

bar'ley-brotb, n., 
broth containing 
barley. 

bar'ley-com, n., a 
grain of barley; a 
measure equal to a 
third of an inch; a 
rifle foresight. 

bar'ley-meal,n., meal 



V 



v^ 



54 



made by crushing 
barley. 

barm, n., yeast. 

bar'maid, n., a 
woman who serves 
in .a tavern. 

Bar'meoide, adj., un- 
real, illusory. 

barm'y, adj., contain- 
ing barm; frothy. 

bam, n., a covered 
building to contain 
farm produce. 

bar'naole, n., a 
stalked sea shell- 
fish, often found 
attached to ships' 
bottoms; a species 
of goose. 

bar'ograph, n., a re- 
cording barometer. 

bar'olite, n., a kind 
of barytes. 

barom'eter, »., an in- 
strument for meas- 
uring the weight or 
pressure of the at- 
mosphere. 

baromefrio, adj., 
pert, to the barom- 
eter. 

baromet'rical, adj.. 
i.q. barometric. 

barom'etry, »., the 
science underlying 
the use of the 
barometer. 

bar' on, n., a peer 
holding the lowest 
rank in the heredi- 
tary peerage. 

bar'onage, »., the 
whole body of bar- 
ons; the dignity of 
baron. 

bar'oness, n., a bar- 
on's lady. 

bar'onet, n., one hold- 
ing hereditary rank 
below a baron, but 
not a peer, mere- 
ly an hereditary 
knight. 

bar'onetage, n., the 
whole body of bar- 
onets. 

bar'onetcy, »., the 
title and dignity of 
a baronet. 

baro'nial, adj., pert, 
to a baron. 

bar'ony, n., the title 
or I.onour of a 
baron; in Ireland, a 
territorial division 
corresponding to 
the hundred. 

bar'oscope, n., an in- 
strument for fore- 
casting weather. 



v^ 



barrel-organ 



VJ"^^— baro8cop'ic,a<{;.,pert. 
J -^ to a baroscope. 

V>^"\_, baroscop'ical,<»<i/.,».?. 
baroscopic. 

barouche , n., a four- 
wheeled carriage 

. with a falling top. 

\/ bargne, «., a three- 
masted sailing ves- 
sel, the two forward 
masts square-rig- 
ged, the mizzcn 
mast rigged fore- 
< /-r^— 1 3^d-aft. 
V^ J. bar'quentine, «., a 
three-masted sail- 
ing vessel, the fore- 
mast square-rigged, 
the main and miz- 
zen masts rigged 
fore-and-aft. 

bar'racan, n., a kind 
of camlet. 

bar'rack, n., a house 
for soldiers. 

barracoon', n., a ne- 
gro barrack, a slave 
depAt. 

bar'rage, n., the for- 
mation of an artifi- 
cial bar on a river 
or water course, to 
increase the depth 
of water; bar thus 
formed, esp. on the 
Nile; curtain fire. 

bar'ras, n., a kind of 
resin; galipot. 

bar'rator, «., an en- 
courager of litiga- 
tion; the master or 
any of the crew of a 
ship who commits 
barratry. 

bar'ratroos, ot^;., tain- 
ted with barratry. 

bar'ratry, «>., fraud 
by the master of a 
ship who injures the 
owners, freighters, 
or insurers, as by 

I sinking, deserting, 
or running away 
with the ship; en- 
couragement of law- 
suits and quarrels. 

baried, p.p. , bar; adj. , 
marked with thick 
lines. 

bar'rel, »., a cask; a 
hollow cylinder or 
tube. 

bar'relage, »., accom- 
modation for bar- 
rels. 

barrelled, adj., hav- 
ing a barrel or 
barrels. 

bar'rel-organ, n., a 
musical instrument 



V^ 



v/ 






VL- 
VI. 



V 






v% 



barren 



w 






VI' 
VI. 

V- 



in which a barrel 
furnished with pegs 
opens valves as it 
turns and admits 
air to a set of pipes. 

bar'ren, «<//., not fer- 
tile; unproductive. 

barrenness, n., the 
state of being bar- 
ren. 

barricade', n., a tem- 
porary fortification 
made ot trees, 
earth, etc.; «./., to 
stop up by a barri- 
cade. 

barricad'ed, p.p., bar- 
ricade. 

barricading, pr.p., 
barricade. 

bar'riei, n., an ob- 
struction, an ob- 
stacle. 

bai'ring, pr.p., bar; 
prep., excepting. 

bar'rister, n., a lawyer 
who acts as an 
advocate. 

bai'row, «., a pre- 
historic sepulchral 
mound; a wheel- 
barrow. 

bai'-shot, n. a double 
shot consisting of 
two round-shot uni- 
ted by a bar. 

bar'ter, v.t., to ex- 
change one com- 
modity for another 
and not for money; 
n., the act of ex- 
changing. 

bar'tered, p.p., barter. 

bar'terer, «., one who 
barters. 

bar'tering, pr.p., bar- 
ter. 

bartizan', n., a turret 
for archers. 

bar' ton, n., a de- 
mesne; a farmyard. 

baiy'ta, n., oxide of 
barium. 

baiy'tes, «., baryta, 
or its siilpliate 
(heavy-spar). 

baryt'ic, adj., con- 
taining baryta. 

bar'ytone, adi., bari- 
tone. 

bary'tom, n., barium. 

ba'sal, ad)., pert, to a 
base. 

basalf, n., a black 
igneous nxk. 

basalt'io, ady, pert, 
to basalt. 

basalt'iform, aii., in 
the form of basalt; 
columnar. 



Vv 



V 
V 

V 

v^ 

< 

VV-' 



V 



^ 



v^ 



Y^ 



V. 



55 



basalt'ine, ad]., i.q. 
basaltic. 

bas'anite, n., touch- 
stone. 

bas% adj., worthless, 
low, mean; «., the 
bottom of anything; 
a military dep6t; 
v.t., to lay the 
foundation of. 

base'ball, n., a ball- 
game like rounders. 

base'bom, adj., of 
illegitimate birth. 

based, p.p., base. 

base'less, adj., with- 
out foundations. 

base'Iy, ado., in a 
base manner. 

base'ment, »., the 
lowest story of a 
building. 

base'ness, n., mean- 
ness, vileness. 

bashaw', n., a pasha. 

basb'ful, adj., modest 
10 excess; shy. 

bash'fnlly, ad«., in a 
bashful manner. 

bash' fulness, n., ex- 
cessive modesty; 
shyness. 

bash'i-bazook', n., an 
irregular Turkish 
soldier. 

ba'sic, adj., rel. to a 
base. 

bas'ifled. p.p., basify. 

bas'ifler, n., that 
which basifies. 

bas'Uy, v.t., to con- 
vert into a chemical 
base. 

bas'ilying, pr.p., ba- 
sify. 

bas'il, n., the slope at 
the edge of a cut- 
ting tool, a bezel; 
an aromatic pot- 
herb. 

bae'ilar, adj., basal. 

bas'ilary, adj., basal. 

basil'ic, o^h, royal; 
kingly. 

basil'ica, n., a Roman 
public hall; a church 
with a similar plan. 

basil'ical, adj., pert, 
to a basilica. 

basil'icon, n., an oint- 
ment made of wax, 
pilch, and resin. 

bas'ilisk, n., a fabu- 
lous creature, a ser- 
pent or cockatrice. 

ba'sin, n., a round 
shallow vessel; a 
tract of cotmtry, 
drained by a river. 

ba'sing, pr.p., base. 



>fe 



v^ 



s. 

V 
No. 

X, 

A- 
\ 



basted 



ba'sia, »., a base, a 
foundation. 

bask, v.t.^ to lie in 
warmth or at ease. 

basked, p.p., bask. 

bas'ket, »., a vessel 
made of plaited 
twigs.rushes, osiers, 
etc. 

bask'ing, pr.p., bask. 

Basque, n., the lan- 
guage of the Bis- 
cayans, French and 
Spanish; adj., pert, 
to this language or 
people 

bas-relief, n., a sculp- 
ture in low relief. 

bass, n., a mat made 
of bast; a hassock; a 
sea-fish like a perch ; 
a kind of bitter pale 
ale. 

bass (in music), n., 
the lowest part or 
male voice; adj., 
pert, to this part. 

bas'set, n., a game at 
cards; a miner's 
term for an out- 
cropping stratum; 
«.«., to crop out. 

bas'seted. p.p., bas- 
set. 

bas'seting, pr.p., bas- 
set. 

bassinet, -ette, n., 
a cradle or per- 
ambulator. 

bassoon', n., a bass 
wind instrument. 

bassoon'ist, n., a bas- 
soon player. 

bass'-viol, n., a 
violoncello. 

bass'wood. n., the 
American liine-tre<-. 

bast, n., fibrous inner 
bark of the lime and 
other trees. 

bas'tard, »., an illegi- 
timate child; adj., 
spurious, not genu- 
ine. 

bas'tardize, p.<., to 
prove to be a bas- 
tard. 

bas'taidiaed. p.p. , bas- 
tardize. 

bas'tardizing, pr.p., 
bastardize. 

bas' tardy, n., the 
state of being a 
bastard. 

baste, v.t., to cudgel; 
to drip fat upon 
roasting meat; to 
sew slightly with 
long stitches. 

baifed. p.p., baste. 



bastile 



V 



v 









bastile', bastille', n., 

a fortress, esp. the 
state prison in Paris 
destroyed in 1789. 

bastina'do, n., pun- 
ishment in Moham- 
medan countries by 
beating the soles of 
the feet with a rod; 
v.t., to inflict this 
punishment. 

bastina'doed, p.p., 
bastinado. 

bast'ing, pr.p., baste; 
«., the long, loose 
stitches which fas- 
ten pieces of a gar- 
ment together dur- 
ing the making. 

bast 'ion, n., a mound 
standing out from 
the angle of a forti- 
fication. 

bast'ioned, adj., hav- 
ing bastions. 

bas'yie, n., a non-acid 
constituent of a 
compound. 

bat, n., a club used 
in the game of 
cricket and similar 
games; a winged 
mammal of noctur- 
nal habits; ».»., to 
play with a bat at 
cricket. 

Bata'vian, adj., pert, 
to Holland, or to 
Batavia in Java; n., 
a Dutchman or in- 
habitant of Bata- 
via. 

batch, n., a quantity 
of bread baked at 
one time; a number 
of individuals or 
articles similar to 
each other. 

bate, v.i. and /., to 
lessen. 

bateaa', n., a light, 
broad flat-bottomed 
Canadian boat; the 
pontoon of a float- 
ing bridge. 

ba'ted, p.p., bate. 

bath, n., a vessel in 
which the body is 
washed; a Hebrew 
liquid measure; 

Knights of the Bath, 
a British order of 
knighthood. 

bathe, ».«., to im- 
merse in a bath; 
v.i., to take a bath. 

bathed, p.p., batho. 

bath'er, n., one who 
bathes. 

bathing, pr.p-, bathe. 



\ 

V 

V 

\ 



56 



bath'os, n., a ludi- 
crous descent from 
the elevated to the 
mean in literary 
composition; an an- 
ti-climax. 

bath'-room, n., a 
room for bathing in. 

bat'ing, pr.p., bate; 
prep., excepting. 

batiste', n., a kind of 
cambric. 

bat'Iet, n., a small 
bat for beating lin- 
en in the wash. 

baf man, n., a man in 
charge of the cook- 
mg utensils of a 
company ot soldiers. 

bat'on, n., a trunch- 
eon; a conductor's 
rod; in heraldry, a 
diminutive of the 
band sinister, 
couped. 

Batia'chia, n. pi., a 
group of amphibi- 
ous animals, includ- 
ing frogs and toads. 

batn'chian, adj. , per t . 
to the Batrachia; 
n., one of them. 

bat'rachite, n., a fos- 
silized frog. 

bat'rachoid, adj., re- 
sembling a frog. 

Batiachomyom'achy, 
»., a Greek travesty 
of the Iliad; the 
battle between the 
frogs and the mice. 

bats'man, n., a crick- 
eter using the bat. 

bat'ta, n., an extra 
allowance made to 
British officers in 
India. 

battal'ia, n. pi., an 
old plural of bat- 
talion. 

battarion,tM., a body 
of infantry of about 
1,000 men, forming 
one division of a 
regiment. 

battal'ioned. adj., 
formed into bat- 
talions. 

bat' ted, p.p., bat. 

bat'teler, battler, n., 
an undergraduate 
who gets his battels 
free. 

bat'tels, n., food or- 
dered from the but- 
tery at an Oxford 
college. 

bat' ten, v./., to fatten; 
to fasten with bat- 
tens; v.i., to grow 






s 



■s 
\ 

X 

V 

\ 
\ 



bauble 



fat, to gorge; n., a 
long slip of wood. 

bat'tened, p.p., bat- 
ten. 

baf tening, pr.p., bat- 
ten. 

bat'tei, «., a bats- 
man; a mixture of 
flour, eggs, etc., 
beaten with some 
liquid into a paste; 
v.t., to beat with 
successive blows. 

bat'tered, p.p., batter. 

bat'terei, «., one who 
batters. 

bat'tering, pr.p., bat- 
ter. 

bat'tering-ram, n., an 
engine of war used 
to beat down walls. 

bat'teiy, n. , a number 
of guns placed near 
one another; a para- 
pet, etc., to cover 
guns and gunners; 
an electric current- 
generator; personal 
assault. 

bat'ting, pr.p., bat. 

bat'tish, adj., like a 
bat. 

bat' tie, n., a great 
combat ;t>.»., to fight. 

bat' tie-array, n., the 
arrangement of an 
army ready to give 
battle. 

bat'tle-axe, n., an axe 
used as a weapon. 

bat' tied, p.p., battle; 
adj., furnished with 
battlements. 

battledore, n., a 
racket used to strike 
a ball or shuttle- 
cock. 

battle-field, n., the 
scene of a battle. 

bat'tlement, n., an 
indented parapet. 

bat'tlemented, adj., 
having battlements. 

bat' tier, »., one who 
battles. 

bat'tleship, n.,alarge 
ship of war. 

bat'tUng, pr.p., bat- 
tle. 

battel' Ogy, n., bab- 
bling; a needless 
repetition of words. 

battue', n., the shoot- 
ing of driven game. 

banbee', «., a half- 
penny {Scot.). 

bau'ble, n., a short 
stick bearing a 
fool's- head; a showy 
trifle. 



baulk 



\ 






■1 






baulk, su balk. 

Bava'rian, ad)., pert, 
to Bavaria; w., an 
inhabitant of Bav- 
aria. 

ba'vill, n., a faggot of 
brushwood. 

bawbee', ite baubee. 

bawd, n., a brothel- 
keeper; a pander. 

bawd'ily, adv., in a 
bawdy maniter. 

bawd'y, adj., lewd; 
obscene; unchaste. 

bawl, v.t. and %., to 
shout; n., a vehe- 
ment cry. 

bawled, p.p., bawl. 

bawl'er, »., one who 
bawls. 

bawling, n., loud 
shouting; ^^-p., 

bawl. 

bawn, n., an enclo- 
sure with mud walls 
(for cattle). 

bay, '>-, an expanse 
of water between 
two headlands; the 
laurcI-trec; the bark 
of a dog; a recess; a 
space between col- 
umns or buttresses, 
or projecting be- 
yond the wall line, 
as a window; a./, 
and «., to b.-irk; adj., 
of a reddish chest- 
nut colour. 

bay 'aid, n., a bay 
horse. 

bay 'berry, n., the 
wax-myrtle and its 
fruit. 

bayed, p.p., bay; adj., 
having a bay or 
bays. 

baying, pr.p., bay. 

bay'onet, »., a short 
sword to fix on the 
muzzle of a rifle; 
V.I., to stab with a 
bayonet. 

ba/oneted, p.p., bay- 
onet. 

bay'oneting, p'p., 
liayonet. 

bay' 00. n., a channel 
proceeding from a 
lake ( American). 

bay'-salt, n., salt ob- 
tained by evaporat- 
ing sea-waler. 

bay' -tree, «., a kind 

of laurel. 

bay'-window, n., a 

wuulnw (orni:ng a 
recess m a room, 
often polygonal in 
plan. 



\ 



> 



V 



V . 



> 






57 



bazaar', bazar", n., an 

Oriental street-mar- 
ket; a charity sale 
of miscellaneous 
articles. 

bdeU'inm, n., an Ara- 
bian aromatic gum- 
resin. 

be, v.i., to exist; to 
become; to remain. 
(It forms a connec- 
tion between the 
subject and predi- 
cate of a sentence; 
it also helps to 
form the compound 
tenses of other 
verbs.) 

beaoh, n., the strand; 
part of the shore 
washed by the tide; 
v.t., to run (a vessel) 
on to the beach. 

beached, p.p., beach. 

beacb'ing, pr.p., 
beach. 

beach'y, adj., having 
a beach. 

bea'oon, n., an object, 
light, or signal used 
as a warning; v.i., 
to serve as a beacon. 

bea'oonage, n., money 
paid to maintain a 
beacon. 

bea'ooned, adj., hav- 
ing a beacon; p.p., 
beacon. 

bea'coning, pr.p., 
beacon. 

bead, n., a little per- 
forated ball of srold, 
glass, etc., strung 
with others on a 
thread; any small 
globular body; v.t., 
to adorn with beads; 
v.i., to form into 
beads. 

bead'ing, n., a small 
round moulding in 
architect lu-e or join- 
wy; pr.p., bead. 

bead'le, n., a sub- 
ordinate officer of a 
court, church, or 
parish. 

bead'-roU, n., a list 
of persons for whose 
souls prayers arc 
requested; a cata- 
logue. 

beads'-man, n., one 
whose employment 
is to pray for an- 
other; a recipient of 
alms. 

bea'gle, n., a small 
hound kept to hunt 
hares. 






\ 
\ 

V 



\ 



bearing 



beak, n., the bill of 
a bird. 

beaked, adj., having a 
beak; beak-shaped. 

beak'er, »., a large 
drinking cup or 
glass. 

beam, n., a long 
straight piece of 
wood; a collection 
of parallel rays of 
light; v.i., to emit 
rays of light; to 
show affection, 
satisfaction, etc. 

beamed, p.p., beam. 

beam'ing, ^r . ^. , beam. 

beam'less, adj., emit- 
ting no rays of light. 

beam'y, adj., heavy, 
massive; radiant. 

bean, n., the seed of 
a leguminous plant; 
the plant itself. 

bean-feast, n., a holi- 
day spent in merry- 
making. 

bear, v.t., to support; 
to convey; to bring 
forth; n., a large 
carnivorous. Bat- 
footed animal; a 
rude or uncouth 
man; a speculator 
on the Stock Ex- 
change who tries 
to bring down the 
price of stock so 
as to be able to 
buy cheaply. 

bear'able, adj., able 
to be borne. 

bear'-baiting, n., the 
sport of baiting 
bears with dogs. 

beard, »., the hair on 
the face; v.t., to 
defy. 

beard' ed, adj., having 
a beard; p.p., 
beard. 

bearding, pr.p., 

beard. 

beard'less, adj., with- 
out a beard. 

beard'lessness, n., the 
state of being with- 
out a beard. 

bear'er, n., one who 
bears. 

bear-garden, n., a 
place where bears 
are kept for sport; 
any place of dis- 
order. 

bear'ing, pr.p., boar; 
»., denieanotu-, 

mien; in an auto- 
mobile it is the 
support in which a 



bearish 



\^ 






*-b — '■ 



.^ 






revolving part ro- 
tates. 

bear'ista, adj., resem- 
bling a bear; rude; 
surly. 

bear'like, adj.; like a 
bear. 

beai's'-foot, n., a 
kind of hell'jbore. 

bear's'-greftse. n., a 
pomade for tlie 
hair. 

bear'sUn, n., the 
dressed fur of a 
bear. 

beast, n., any four- 
footed animal; a 
brutal or disgusting 
person. 

beast'Iineaa, n., bm- 
talitv; filthiness. 

beasfbr, a<2/., like a 
beast. 

beat, vJ., to strike; to 
overcome; n., a 
stroke or blow; the 
round of a police- 
man. 

beaten, p.p., beat; 
«<//., made smooth 
by beating or tread- 
ing. 

beat'er, n., one who 
beats. 

beatific, adj., im- 
parting bliss. 

beatifical, adj., bea- 
tific. 

beatifica'tion, n., bles- 
sedness; an act of 
the Pope by which 
he declares a persoti 
beatified but not 
canonized. 

beat'ifled. p.p., beat- 
ify. 

beat'ify, v.t., to make 
blessed. 

beat'ifying, pr.p., 
beatify. 

beating, pr.p., beat; 
n., a defeat. 

beat'itnde, n., con- 
summate bliss; one 
of Our Lord's eight 
declarations of bles- 
sedness. 

bean, n., a fop; a 
sweetheart. 

beabdde'al, n., high- 
est type of excel- 
lence. 

bean-monde', n., the 
fashionable world. 

beaa'teons, aii;. , beau- 
tiful. 

beao'teonaljr, adv., in 
a beautiful manner. 

beafD'teonsneis, n., 
beauty. 



^ 



\ 



x 
s 



V 



> 

> 
> 



58 



beau'tifled, p.p. , beau- 
tify. 

beaa'tifier, n., one 
who beautifies. 

bean'tiiol, adj., high- 
ly pleasing to the 
eye, the ear, or the 
mind. 

bean'tifnlneas, n., 
beauty. 

beau'ti^, v.t., to ren- 
der beautiful. 

beaa'tifying, pr.p., 
beautfiy. 

bean'ty, n., an assem- 
blage of perfections 
whereby an object 
is made pleasing to 
the eye; a beautiful 
woman or thing. 

bean't7-8pot,n. .some- 
thing that heigh- 
tens beauty by con- 
trast; a patch on 
the face to do this. 

beanz, n., pi. of beau. 

bea'vei, n., a quadru- 
ped about 2 ft. long, 
haunting rivers and 
lakes, valuable for 
its fur; the fur it- 
self; the vizor of a 
helmet. 

bea'vered, adj., hav- 
ing a beaver or 
vizor. 

bebee'rine, n., the 
active principle of 
the bark of the 
bd>e«ru, a kind of 
laurel foimd in 
British Guiana. 

becaJm', v.t., to ren- 
der calm; to reduce 
(a ship) to motion- 
lessness. 

bedimed', p.p., be- 
calm. 

beoalm'ing, pr.p., be- 
calm. 

becaiiie',/>.^, become. 

bscause', conj., by 
reason that. 

beooafl'co, n., a bird 
like the nightingale; 
the garden warbler. 

becbaooe', v.t. and t., 
to happen to; to 
happen. 

becbaoiced', p.p., be- 
chance. 

beohan'oing, pr.p., 
bechance. 

bechaim', v.t., to 
charm. 

bdohe'-de-mer, n., the 
trepang, a sea-slug 
eaten by the Chinese. 

beck, »., a brook; a 
nod intended as a 



i 



\ 



bedded 



signal; v.t., to call 
by a nod. 

becked, p.p., beck. 

beck'et, n., in ships a 
contrivance for fast- 
ening loose rojjes. 

beck'ing, pr.p., to 
beck. 

beck' on, v.t., to make 
a sign with the hand 
or finger. 

beck'oned, p.p., beck- 
on. 

beck'oning, pr.p., 
beckon. 

becloud', v.t., to cover 
with clouds; to ren- 
der obscure. 

beclond'ed, p.p., be- 
cloud. 

beclond'ing, pr.p., be- 
cloud. 

become, v.t., to pass 
from one state to 
another; v.t., to suit. 

becom'iaz, pr.p., be- 
come; oa;., suitable. 

fteooxn'ingly, adv., in 
a becomiag manner. 

Aecom'ingness, n., 
smtability. 

bed, »., that on 
which one sleeps; a 
plot of ground in a 
garden; that on 
which anything 
rests; a layer; v.t., 
to place in a bed; 
to plant. 

bedab'ble, v.t., to wet; 
to sprinkle. 

bedabbled, p.p., be- 
dabble. 

bedabbling, pr.p., be- 
dabble. 

bedaik'en, o.t., to 
make dark. 

bedash,' v.t., to be- 
spatter. 

bedaub', v.t., to smear 
with anything thick 
or slimy. 

bedaubed', p.p., be- 
daub. 

bedaub ing, pr.p., be- 
daub. 

bedaf'zle, v.t., to 
blind by excess of 
light. 

bed'-cAa/r, n. , a ch air 
with a movable 
back which can be 
lowered so as to 
form a bed. 

bed' chamber, n., a 
bedrofim. 

bed'-olothes, n. pi., 
blankets, coverlets, 
etc. 

bed'ded, p.p., bed. 



bedding 






> 



>^ 






bed'din^, n., a bed 

aiid Its furniture; 
pr.p., bed. 

bedeck^, v.t.,to adorn . 

bedecked', p.p., be- 
deck. 

bedeck'ing, pr.p., be- 
deck. 

bed'egnai, n., a 
spongy excrescence 
found on roses, pro- 
duced by insects. 

be'deL be'dell, n., a 
beadle in a univer- 
sity or law-court. 

bedeVil, v.t., to tor- 
ment, as by evil 
spirits. 

bedev'med, p.p., be- 
devil. 

bedev'illinK, pr.p., 
bedevil. 

bedew', v.t., to moist- 
en as with dew. 

bedewed', p.p., be- 
dew. 

bedew'jng, pr.p., be- 
dew. 

bad'fellow, n., one 
who occupies the 
same bed with an- 
other. 

bed'-hangings, ft. pi, 
curtains hung about 
a bed. 

bedight', v.t., to dress 
gaily, p.p. bedight. 

bedim', v.t., to tnake 
dim; to obscure. 

bedi'aen, v.t , to deck 
in a tawdry manner. 

bed'lam, n., a mad- 
house (orig., Beth- 
lehem Hospital). 

bed'lamite, n., a mad- 
man. 

bed'maker, »., a 
woman-servant who 
has the care of 
college rooms. 

bed' mate, n., a bed- 
fellow. 

Bed'ooin, n., a no- 
madic Arab. 

bed'-plate, n., the 
foundation plate of 
an engme. 

bed'-post, n., one of 
the comer pillars of 
a bed. 

bed'^nilt, »., a cov- 
erlet or counter- 
pane. 

bedng'de, *.(., to 
soil by dragging 
through mud. 

bed'rid, adj., long 
confined to bed. 

bed'ridden, adj., bed- 
rid. 



V 

1. 






> 



I 



V 

vv 



&9 



bed'room, n., a sleep- 
ing room. 

bed'side, adj., beside 
a bed; n., the space 
adjoining a bed. 

bed'stead, n., the 
framework of a bed. 

bed'straw, n., a plant 
growing wild in 
Britain, bearing yel- 
low or white flowers. 

bod' tick, n., stout 
linen or cotton 
forming a bag to 
hold the packing 
of a bed. 

bed' time, m., the hour 
for bed. 

bee, n., an insect, one 
species of which is 
kept in hives for its 
wax and honey. 

bee'bee, n., a lady 
( Hindustani). 

bee'bread, «., the pol- 
len of flowers col- 
lected by bees as 
food for their young. 

beech, n., a large, 
smooth-barked tree 
yielding a hard tim- 
ber. 

beech'en, adj., bel. 
to the beech, 

beech'-nnt, n., a nut 
or fruit of the 
beech. 

beef, n., the flesh of 
an ox. 

beefeater, n., a yeo- 
man of the guard. 

beefsteak, n., a slice 
of beef for broiling. 

bee'hive, n., a box 
used as a habita- 
tion for l>ecs. 

bw' bouse, H., a 
house to contain 
bee-hives; an apiary. 

beele, n., an Indian 
tree akin to the 
quince. 

bee'-liae, n., the di- 
rect path between 
two places. 

Beel'Eebab.n., a Phil- 
istine god (O.T.); 
the prince of devils 
(N.T.). 

bee'-master, n., one 
who keeps bees. 

been, p.p., be. 

beer, m., a fermented 
alcoholic drink 
made from malted 
barley. 

beer'-lMurel, n., a 
barrel to contain 
beer. 

beei'-bonse, n., a 









befriending 



house where malt 
liquors are sold. 

beei'-shop, »., a shop 
where beer is sold. 

beest'io^ n., the 
first milk given by 
a cow after calving. 

bees'-waz, m., wax 
secreted by bees. 

beet, n., a plant with 
a thick, fleshy root, 
the red beet used as 
a kitchen vegetable, 
the white to pro- 
duce sugar. 

beet'le, n., an insect 
with four wings, 
the front pair being 
homy; a wooden 
mallet; v.t., to over- 
hang. 

beet'le-brow, »., a 
prominent brow. 

beet'led, p.p., beetle. 

beet'iing, adj., over- 
hanging (said of 
cliffs, etc.); pr.p., 
beetle. 

beet'-ioot, n., the 
root of a beet; the 
plant itself. 

beeves, m. pi., oxen. 

befall', v.t., to happen 
to; t>.»., to come to 
pass. 

befal'Ien,^.^., befall. 

befal'lins, pr.p., lie- 
fall. 

befell'. p.t., befaU. 

baflt. v.t., to be 
suitable to. 

beflt'ted. p.p., befit. 

beflt'ting, pr.p., befit. 

befog', v.t., to in- 
volve in fog; to 
confuse. 

befogged', ^.^., l>efog. 

befogg'ing, pr.p., be- 
fog. 

befool', iv<- , to delude. 

befooled', p.p., be- 
fool. 

befool'ing, pr.p., be- 
fool. 

before', prep., in front 
of; adv., previously; 
corij., rather than; 
sooner than the 
time when. 

betoieliand, adv., in 
advance. 

betore'time, adv., for- 
merly. 

betonf. v.<., tosoil. 

befriend', v./., to act 
as a frit'nd to. 

befriend'ed, p.p., be- 
friend. 

befriend'iiig, pr.p., 
befriend. 



befringe 



V 



N_ 



V- 



^ 



^ 



\_;' 



befringe', v.t., to sup- 
ply with a fringe. 

bee f ./. and «., to ask 
for earnestly; to 
solicit alms; to as- 
sume. 

began, p.t., begin. 

beget', v.t., to pro- 
create; to produce. 

beget'ter, n., one who 
begets; a father. 

beget'ting, pr.p., be- 
get. 

beg' gar, «., one who 
begs; v.t., to reduce 
to beggary. 

beg'gared, p.p., beg- 
gar. 

bftK'garing, pr.p., beg- 
gar. 

beg'garliness, n., 
meanness. 

beg'garly, adj., like a 
beggar. 

beg'gary, n., the state 
of a beggar. 

begged, p.p., beg. 

begging, pr.p., beg. 

begin', v.t. and <., to 
originate. 

begin'ner, n., one who 
begins; a tiro. 

begin'ning, n., origin; 
commencement; 
pr.p. begin. 

begird', v.t., to sur- 
round with a girdle. 

begird'ing, pr.p., be- 
g'tfl. 

begirf, p.p., begird. 

begone', inter j., go 
away ! 

bego'nia, »., a beauti- 
ful tropical plant. 

begof, p.t., beget. 

begot'ten, p.p., be- 
get. 

begTiine',t>./., to make 
grimy. 

begrimed', p.p., be- 
grime. 

beaming, pr.p., be- 
grime. 

begrudge', v.t., to 
envy someone the 
possession of. 

begmdged', p.p., be- 
grudge. 

begmdg'ing, pr.p., 
begrudge. 

begnile', v.t., to 
deceive ; to while 
away (time). 

begniled'. p.p., be- 
guile. 

begnile'ment, n., the 
act or effect of be- 
guiling. 

begnil'er, n., one who 
beguiles. 






V 



60 



begoil'ing, pr.p., be- 
guile. 

be'gom, n., an Indian 
lady of high rank; 
a princess. 

begun', *.^., begin. 

behalf, n., interest; 
support; defence. 

tebave', v.i. and refl., 
to conduct oneself. 

behaved', p.p., be- 
have. 

beha'Ting, pr.p., be- 
have. 

behaviour, behaT'ior, 
n., manner of be- 
having. 

behead', v.t., to de- 
capitate. 

behead'ed. p.p., be- 
head. 

behead'ing, pr.p., be- 
head. 

beheld', p.p., behold. 

be'hemoth, n., a Bib- 
lical monster; per- 
haps the hippo- 
potamus. 

behesf, »., a com- 
mand. 

behind', prep, and 
adv., at the back 
of; later. 

behind'hand, adv., 
insufficiently ad- 
vanced; adj., tardy. 

behold', v.t. and «., to 
look at with atten- 
tion; inter j., fix your 
attention on. 

bebold'en, adj. , bound 
in gratitude. 

behold' er, »., a spec- 
tator. 

behold'ing, pr.p., be- 
hold. 

behoof, n., advan- 
tage; benefit. 

behoove', behove', v.t. 
irnpera., to be fit, 
meet, or necessary 
for. 

behooved', i.q. be- 
hoved. 

behoved', p.t., be- 
hove. 

be'ipg, pr.p., be; n., 
existence; a living 
creature, usually 
human. 

belabour, belabor, 
v.t., to beat soundly. 

bela'bonied, p.p., be- 
labour. 

bela'booring, pr.p., 
belabour. 

belate', v.t., to make 
too late. 

belat'ed, p.p., belate; 
adj., having lin- 



belittling 



gered till late; be- 
nighted. 
N/** belay', v.t., to make 
fast by winding 
round something. 
Vn belayed', p.p., belay. 
Vr*^ belay'ing, pr.p., be- 
lay. 
V7 beldi, v.i., to eject 
wind from the 
stomach; n., the 
act of belching. 
V^ belched, p.p., belch. 
V7 beloh'ing,^r./>., belch; 
»., the act of eject- 
ing wind from the 
stomach. 
\^X-~~ berdam,berdame,n., 
^_: an ugly old woman. 
V^ belea'guer, v.t., to 
blockade with an 
• army. 
\r belea'guered, p.p., 
•^ . beleaguer. 
'V'^^ belea'guering, pr.p., 

^_^^ beleaguer. 
N/^'"! belem'nite, n., a dart- 
shaped fossil shel^ 
found in the chalk. 
V^. bel'Iry, »., a beil- 

tower; campanile. 
VX Bel'gian, n., an in- 
habitant of Belgium; 
adj., pert, to Bel- 
gium. 
VZ_- Bel'giC, adj., Belgian; 
j/-^ pert, to the Belgae. 
N^ Be'lial, «., wicked- 
ness; a wicked per- 
son; Satan. 
N^ belie', v.t., to show to 
be false; to calum- 
niate. 
\Cl belied', pp., belie. 
.\... 6e/je/', «., an assent 
of the mind to the 
truth of a declared 
fact without per- 
sonal knowledge of 
it; a creed. 

\Ae//ev'able, adj., 
credible. 
• S... believe', v.l.ntid I.. to 
^ be firmly ptrsuaded 

of the truth of any- 
thing. 
* believed', p.p., be- 
^ lieve. 

%^ believ'er, »., one who 

^ believes. 
jt beiiev'ing, pr.p., be- 
X lieve. 

Vbeliev'ingly. adv., in a 
^. believing manner. 
V^ beUt'tle, v.t., to dis- 
parage. 
V^ beUt'Ued, p.p., be- 

^•^^ little. 
V/ belit'thng, pr.p., be- 
little. 



bell 



\r bell, n., a metallic 
vessel which gives a 
clear, musical sound 
on being struck: 
any bell-shaped 
thing; v.t., to put a 
bell on. 
b^lladca'na, »., a 
poisonous medicinal 
British plant. 
bell'-bird, n., a South 
American bird; also 
an Australian bird 
of a different species. 
belle, n. , a lady of dis- 
tinguished beauty, 
balles-let'tres, n. pi., 

elegant literature. 

bell'-Iounder, n., a 

,f maker of bells. 

N/''^ bell'-foimdiy, n., a 

^i^^ bell-caster's works. 

N/"^ bell'-hanger, n., one 

who fixes up bells 

in houses. 

N/^ bel'licose, adj., war- 
like; pugnacious. 
bel'Ued, p.p., belly; 
-^ adj., protuberant, 
v-f bellig'erency, n., war- 
1. fare. 
V^- bellig'eront, n., one 
engaged in fighting; 
ad)., carrying on 
war. 
_ bell' man, n., a public 
. ^.*/^ crier with a bell. 
>< bell'-metal, «., an 

alloy of cf)pper and 
tin used in making 
bells. 
bel'Iow, «.»., to roar; 
to make a loud, 
hollow noise like a 
bull; n., a loud 
outcry. 
bellowed, p.p., bel- 
low. 
bel'lower, n., one who 
V/-W bellows. 
V' bel'lowing. pr.p., bel- 
low; n., the act or 
the sound itself. 
bellows, «., sing, or 
pi., an instrument 
for making a strong 
> current of air. 
VV bell'poll, n., a bell- 
rope or wire and its 
^^"^ attachment. 
>( bell'ringer, n., one 

jv wlio rings bells. 
> '/ bell-wether, n., a 
shi-ep that leads the 
aock, having a bell 
on his neck. 
bel'ly, n., that part 
of the body below 
tbe thorax or chest; 
a protuberance, 









VI 



v^ 



V<1 



v 



V 



\n 



v> 



61 



generally hollow; 
v.i., to swell out. 

belly-band, n., a 
band round the 
belly of a horse. 

bel'Iyfol, n., as much 
as satisfies the appe- 
tite. 

bel'lying, pr.p., belly. 

belong', v.i., to be the 
property of; to per- 
tain to. 

belonged', p.p., be- 
long. 

belong'ing, pr.p., be- 
long. 

belove'. v.t., to love. 

beloveo', P-P., belove. 

belov'ed, adj., greatly 
loved. 

below', prep, and 
adv., under. 

bolt, n., a girdle; a 
band, esp. one 
rouud two wheels 
transferring motion 
from one to the 
other; w.<., to fasten 
or surround with a 
belt. 

Bel'taae, n., an an- 
cient Celtic festival 
in which bonfires on 
hills were lighted. 

bel'ted, adj., wearing 
a belt; p.p., belt. 

belt'ing, n., the mate- 
rials of which belts 
for machinery are 
made; pr.p., belt. 

bel'vedere, n., a sum- 
mer-house on a 
knoll; a look-out 
turret. 

bely'ing, pr.p., belie. 

bemire', v.t., to soil 
with mud or mire. 

bemiied', p.p., be- 
mire. 

bemit'ing, pr.p., be- 
mire. 

bemoan', v.t., to la- 
ment. 

bemoaned', p.p., be- 
moan. 

bemoan'er, n., one 
who bemoans. 

bemoan'ing, n., lam- 
entation; pr.p., be- 
moan. 

bemme', v.t., to mud- 
dle or stupefy, as 
with liquor. 

bemused', p.p., be- 
muse. 

bemos'ing, pr.p., be- 
muse. 

ben, n., a mountain- 
peak {Scot.). 

bench, w., a long seat; 



^ 



V 

V 



V,. 



benefice 



a table on which 
carpenters, etc., do 
their work; a judge's 
seat, the judges, 
their court. 

benoh'er, n., a senior 
barrister in an inn 
of court who is a 
governor of the 
society. 

bend, v.t., to curve or 
make crooked; v.i., 
to deviate from the 
straight or the per- 
pendicular; n., a 
curve; one of the 
ordinaries in her- 
aldry. 

bend' able, adf., capa- 
ble of being bent. 

bend'ed, p.p., bend. 

bend'er, m., one who 
bends. 

bend'ing, pr.p., bend; 
»., the act. 

bend'let, n., a dim- 
inutive of a bend 
in heraldry. 

b.-nd'y, adj., divided 
luto an even num- 
ber of bends of a 
shield in heraldry. 

beneath', prep, and 
adx., below; mider. 

Ben' edict, n., a mar- 
ried man, esp. one 
who has been long 
a bachelor. 

Benedio'tine, adj. , rel . 
to St. Eienedict's 
rule; n., a monk of 
the Order of St. 
Benedict; a kind of 
liqueur. 

benediction, n., a 
blessing; a solemn 
invocation of hap- 
piness. 

benedio'tiTe, adj., i.q. 
benedictory. 

benedic'toiy, adj., 
giving a blessing. 

Benedic'tns, n., the 
song of Zacharias in 
St. Luke i.; also the 
liturgical passage 
forming the end- 
ing of the Sancftts. 

ben'eiaction, n., 'a 
charitable donation. 

benefactor, n., one 
wlio confers a bene- 
fit. 

ben'eiactress, n., fern, 
of benefactor. 

ben'etlce, »>., an eccle- 
siastical endowment 
providing lor the 
maintenance of di- 
vine service. 



beneficed 









ben'eflced, adj., pos- 
sessed of a benefice. 

beneficence, n., ac- 
tive charity. 

beneficent, adj., per- 
forming acts of 
charity. 

beneficently, adv., in 
a beneficent manner. 

benefl'oial, adj., ad- 
vantageous. 

benefl'cially, adv., in 
a beneficial manner. 

benefl'ciaiy, n., one 
who is in the receipt 
of benefits or profits. 

ben'eflt, n., an ad- 
vantage or profit; 
»./., to do good to; 
v.i., to gain ad- 
vantage. 

ben'efited, p.p., ben- 
efit. ' [efit. 

ben'eflting.^r.^., ben- 
zene v'o/e/ice, n . , 
charitableness; a 
euphemism for a tax 
illegally exacted. 

beney'oleat, adj., 
charitable. 

beaev'oleatly,adv. , 
in a benevolent 
manner. 

Bengalese', adj., pert, 
to Bengad. 

Bengali, »., the lan- 
guage of Bengal; a 
native of Bengal. 

benighf , v.t., to over- 
take with night. 

benighfed, p.p., be- 
night; adj., morally 
dark, ignorant. 

benight'ing, pr.p., be- 
night. 

benign', adj., kind; 
gracious; not severe. 

benls^aant, adj., 
gracious, kind. 

benlg'aaatly, adv., 
in a benignant man- 
ner. 

benls^alty, n., gra- 
ciousness; kindness 
of superiors, 

benign'ly. adv., in a 
benign manner. 

ben'ison, n., a bene- 
diction. 

ben'net, n., the yel- 
low avens. 

bent, n., a natural 
tendency; a wiry 
grass; p.p., bend. 

boith'al, adj., pert, 
to depth. 

benumb', v.t., to de- 
prive of sensation. 

banombed', p.p., be- 
numb. 




pr.p. 



n., t.q. 
v.t., to 






62 



bennmb'ing, 

benumb. 

ben'zena, n., a sol- 
vent for grease pre- 
pared from coal-tar. 

ben'zine, n., i.q. ben- 
zene. 

benzo'ic, adj., ob- 
tained frombenzoin. 

benzo'in, n., gum- 
benjamin, obtained 
from the fragrant 
resin of a tree of 
Sumatra, used in 
incense, cosmetics, 
etc. 

ben'zol, n., i.q. ben- 
zene. 

ben'zoUne, 
benzene. 

bequeath', 
leave by will. 

bequeathed', p.p., be- 
queath. 

bequeath'er, n., one 
who bequeaths. 

beqneath'ing, pr.p., 
bequeath. 

bequest', n., a legacy; 
the act of be*- 
queathing. 

berate', v.t., to scold. 

berat'ed, p.p., berate. 

berat'ing.^r .^.berate. 

bei'berine, n., a yel- 
low dye obtained 
from the root of the 
barberry tree. 

Bere'an, adj., bel. to 
Beroea. 

bereave', v.t., to de- 
prive of something 
prized. 

bereaved', p.p., be- 
reave. 

bereave'ment, n., de- 
privation, esp. loss 
by death. 

bereav'ing, pr.p., be- 
reave. 

bereft', p.p., bereave. 

ber'gamot, n., a kind 
of pear; a fragrant 
oil or perfume pre- 
pared from lime 
fruit; a coarse tap- 
estry. 

ber'gander, n., a wild 
duck. 

berg'mote, »., a Der- 
byshire miners' 
court for settling 
disputes, 

ber'iberi, n., an 
Indian disease. 

Ber'nardJne, n., a 
Cistercian monk. 

Bernese', adj., pert, 
to Berne; »., a 
citizen of Berne. 



V~ 
M 



V. 

> 
> 



> 
> 

> 



besmear 



ber'ried, adj., having 
berries. 

ber'ry, n., a small 
pulpy fruit. 

ber'serker, n.,a Scan- 
dinavian warrior; a 
person of extreme 
violence. 

berth, n., a station in 
which a ship can lie; 
a small room in a 
ship; an appoint- 
ment or situation; 
v.t., to assign a 
ship's anchorage. 

berthed', p.p., berth. 

berth'ing, pr.p-, 

berth. 

Ber'thon-boat, n., a 
collapsible boat. 

ber";!, n., a kind of 
inferior emerald. 

ber'ylline, adj., like a 
beryl; bluish-green. 

beseech', v.^, to en- 
treat. 

beseech'er, »., one 
who beseeches. 

beseeoh'ing, Prp., be- 
seech; adj., entreat- 
ing. 

beseech'ingfy, adv.,ia 
a,"beseechmg man- 
ner. 

beseem', v.t., to be 
worthy of. 

beseemed', p.p., be- 
seem. 

beseem'ing, adj., be- 
coming; fit; worthy 
of; pr.p., beseem. 

beseem'ingly, adv., in 
a beseeming man- 
ner. 

besef , v.t., to hem in; 
to press hard upon. 

b<»eTtblg, adj., hab- 
itually assailing. 

beshrew'iV.t., to wish 
a curse to ; to exe- 
crate mildly. 

beside', prep., at the 
side of; in compari- 
son with. 

besides', prep., in 
addition to; otfo., 
moreover. 

besiege', v.t., to sur- 
round with armed 
forces so as to 
compel to surrender; 
to harass. 

besieged', P-P., be- 
siege. 

besieg'er, n., one who 
besieges. 

besieg'ing, Pr.p., be- 
siege. 

besmaar', v.t., to 
smear all over. 



besmeared 



63 



bewailer 



V 

>i 

V 
V 



besmeared', p.p., be- 
smear. 

besmeai'mg. pr.p., 
besmear. 

be'som, n., a broom; 
a brush of twigs. 

besot', v.t., to stupefy 
with drink. 

besot'ted, p.p., besot. 

besot'ting, p'-P-> be- 
sot. 

besongbt', p.p., be- 
seech. 

bespang'le, v.t., to 
ad(jrn with spangles. 

bespang'led, p.p., be- 
spangle. 

bespang'liug, pr.p., 
bespangU". 

bespat' ter, v.t., to soil 
by spattering. 

bespat tered, p.p., be- 
spatter. 

bespattering, pr.p. 
bespatter. 

bespeak", v.t., to order 
beforehand; to be- 
token; n. (among 
actors), a benefit 
performance. 

bespeak'er, »., one 
who bespeaks. 

bsspeak'iag, pr.p., be- 
speak. 

bespoke', p.t., be- 
speak. 

bespok'en, p.p.. be- 
speak. 

bespiead', v.<. , to form 
a coating over. 

besprin'kle, vJ., to 
sprinkle over. 

besprin'kled, p.p., be- 
sprinkle. 

besprin'kling, pr.p., 
besprinkling. 

Bes'semer, adj., des- 
criptive of steel 
made by Sir Henry 
Bessemer's process. 

best, adj., good in the 
highest degree; v.t., 
to surpass, over- 
come. 

bes'tial, adj., brutal; 
brutish. 

bestial'ity, n., bea.st- 
liness; the quality 
of a beast. 

best'ialize, v f., to re- 
duce to the condi- 
tion of a beast. 

bestir', v.t. and reft., 
to put into brisk 
action. 

bestirred', p.p., be- 
stir. 

bestir'ring, pr.p., be- 
stir. 

bestow', v.t., to con- 



V 
V 

V 



\ 

\ 
\ 



fer; to impart; to 
stow away. 

bestow'al, n., the act 
of bestowing. 

bestowed', p.p., be- 
stow. 

bestow'er, n., one 
who bestows. 

bestow'ing. pr.p., be- 
stow. 

bestrad'dle, v.t., to 
bestride. 

bestrew', v.<. , to strew. 

bestrewed', p.p., be- 
strew. 

bestrew'ing, pr.p., be- 
strew. 

bestrid', p.p. , bestride. 

bestrid'den, p.p., be- 
stride. 

bestride', v.t., to stand 
or sit with the legs 
on each side of. 

bestrid'ing, pr.p., be- 
stride. 

bet, v.t., to wager. 

betake', v.t. reft., to 
repair; to resort. 

betak'en, p.p., be- 
take. 

be'tel, »., a kind of 
pepper, chewed in 
Malaysia. 

beth'el, n., a Dissent- 
ing place of wor- 
ship. 

betb&k', v.t. reft., to 
call or recall to 
mind. 

betliink'iiig, pr.p., be- 
think. 

bethongbt', p.p., be- 
think. 

betide', v./., to happen 
to; v.i., to happen. 

beti'ded, p.p., betide. 

beti'diog, pr.p., be- 
tide. 

betimes', adv., season- 
ably; at an early 
hour. 

beto'ken, v.t., to serve 
as a token of; to 
foreshadow. 

beto'kened. p.p., be- 
token. 

beto'kening, pr.p., 
betoken. 

bet'ony, n., a British 
plant once used in 
medicine and dye- 
ing. 

betook', p.t. of be- 
take. 

betray^, v.t., to be un- 
faithful to. 

betra/al, n., the act 
of betrsiying. 

betrayed', p.p., be- 
tray. 



V 
\ 
\ 

> 

i 






1 






V 

\ 

V 



betrs/er. n., one who 
betrays. 

betray'mg, pr.p., be- 
tray. 

betray'ment, n., i.g. 
betrayal. 

betroth', v.t., to con- 
tract with a view to 
marriage. 

betrotta'ld, n., the act 
of betrothing. 

betrothed', p.p., be- 
troth. 

betroth'ing, pr.p., be- 
troth. 

bet'ted. p.p., bet. 

bet' ter, adj., good in 
a higher degree; 
adv., in a more ex- 
cellent manner; v.t., 
to improve; n., a 
superior. 

bet' tered, p.p., better. 

bet'tering, pr.p., bet- 
ter. 

bet'terment, n., im- 
provement. 

bet'ters, n. pi., su- 
periors. 

bet'ting,^r./>., bet; n., 
the act of wagering. 

bet'ty, M., a short 
jemmy; a Florence 
flask. 

between', prep, and 
adv., in the space or 
interval separating 
two things or 
groups. 

betwixt', prep., be- 
tween. 

bev'el, n., the inclina- 
tion of two surfaces 
of a solid body to 
one another; v.t., to 
cut to a bevel. 

bev'eUed. bev'eled, 
p.p. bevel; adj., 
having a bevel. 

bev'elling, bev'eling, 

pr.p., bevel. 

bev'eUwheels, n., 
machinery in which 
the shafts of two 
wheels that work on 
each other form an 
angle. 

bev'erage, n., a drink. 

bev'y, n., a flock of 
birds; a company of 
ladies. 

bewail', v.t., to la- 
ment. 

bewail'able, adj., 
worthy of being 
bewailed. 

bewailed', p.p., be- 
wail. 

bewail'er. m., one who 
bewails. 



bewailing 



V 

V 
V 






o 



bewail'ing, n., lamen- 
tation; pr.p., be- 
wail. 

bewaie'.p.t., to guard 
against; to be sus- 
picious of. 

bewil'der, v.t., to 
puzzle, to confuse. 

bewil'dered, p.p., be- 
wilder. 

bjwil'dering, pr.p., 
bewilder. 

bawil'dennent, n., 
state of being be- 
wildered. 

bewitch', v.t., to sub- 
ject to the influence 
of witchcraft; to 
charm. 

bewitched', p.p., be- 
witch. 

bewitch'er, »., one 
who bewitches. 

bewitch'ery, «., fas- 
cination; charm, 

bewitch'ing, adj., 
having power to 
bewitch; pr.p., be- 
witch. 

bewitch'ment, n., i.q. 
bewitchery. 

bewray', v.t., to be- 
tray. 

bey, n., a Turkish 
governor. 

beyoad, prep, and 
adv., on the farther 
side of. 

bei'el, n., that part 
of a finger ring 
which holds the 
stone; the groove in 
which the glass of 
a watch is set. 

beziqoe', n., a card 
game. 

be'zoat, n., intestinal 
c<jucretions of cer- 
tain animals, for- 
merly believed to 
be antidotes to 
poison. 

bezoai'dic, adj., com- 
pounded with be- 
zoar. 

bhang, n., a narcotic 
prepared from In- 
dian hemp. 

bian'galar, adj., hav- 
ing two angles. 

U'as, n., a weight let 
into a bowl which 
deflects it from run- 
ning straight; pre- 
p<.>ssession; v.t., to 
prejudice. 

bi'assed. p.p., bias. 

bi'assing, pr.p., bias. 

biax'ial, adj., having 
two axes. 



vr 



v^ 



64 



bib, v.t., to tipple; to 
drink frequently ; 
«., a chin-cloth wurn 
by a child to pro- 
tect its clothes. 

biba'ciooa, adj., ad- 
dicted to drinking. 

bibac'ity, n., fondness 
for drinking. 

bib'ber, n., a tippler. 

bib'itory, adj., tip- 
piiiig. 

Bi'ble, »., the book of 
the Sacred Scrip- 
tures. 

Bib'lical, adj., ptrt. 
to the Bible. 

Bib'Iicist, »., one 
skilled in knowledge 
of the Bible. 

bibhos'iapher, n. , one 
versed in biblio- 
graphy. 

bibliograph'ic, adj., 
pert. to biblio- 
graphy. 

bibliograph'ical, adj., 
i.q. bibliographic. 

bibliog'raplur, n., a 
history of the dif- 
ferent editions of a 
book; a list of 
works on a given 
subject. 

bibliol'atry, «., exces- 
sive reverence for 
any book. 

bibliolog'ical, adj. , rcl . 
to bibliology. 

bibliol'ogy, n., Bib- 
lical literature. 

bib'liomancy, n., div- 
ination by mean? of 
a bixik, esp. the 
Bible. 

biblioma'nia, n., a 
passion for collect- 
ing old and rare 
books. 

biblioma'niac, *>., one 
affected by biblio- 
mania. 

bibliomani'acal, adj., 
pert, lobibliomatna. 

bibliom'anist, n., i.q. 
bibliomaniac. 

bib'Iiophile, n., a 
lover of books. 

bibliopho'bia, n., a 
dislike of books. 

bib'UopoIe, n., a 
bookseller. 

bibliop'olism. 
bookselling. 

bibliop'olist, n., 
bbliopole. 

bibliothe'ca, n., a 

, library (Lot.). 

bib'olods, adj., ad- 
dicted to drinkmg 



V. 



i.q. 



^ 



"<« 



^ 



%^ 



^ 



bidding 



bical'carate, a<2/., hav- 
ing two spurs. 

bicap'solai, adj., hav- 
ing two capsules. 

bicarbonate, n., a 
carbonate having 
two equivalents of 
carbon dioxide to 
one of a base. 

bice, n., a blue or 
green colour used 
by painters. 

bicen'tenary, n., two 
hundred years; the 
two-hundredth an- 
niversary. 

biceph'alons, adj., 
having two heads. 

bi'ceps, n., a muscle 
of the arm or thigh, 
having two heads or 
origins. 

bicbro'mate, n., a salt 
with two parts of 
chromic acid to one 
of the other in- 
gredients. 

bicip'ital, adj., two- 
headed; pert, to the 
biceps. 

bicip'itoos, adj., i.q. 
bicipital. 

bick'er, v.i., to quar- 
rel; n., a quarrel, 
brawl; flash; por- 
ringer. 

bick'ered,^.^., bicker. 

bick'erer, «., one who 
bickers. 

bick'ering, pr.p., 
bicker; n., quarrel- 
ling. 

bicon'jngate, adj., in 
pairs; placed side 
by side. 

bi'com, adj., having 
two horns. 

bicom'ons, adj., i.q. 
bicorn. 

bicor'poral, adj., 
double-b'idied. 

bicra'ral, adj., having 
two legs. 

bicns'pid, adj., two- 
fangcd. 

bi'oycle, n., a light 
two-wheeled con- 
veyance propelled 
by the rider. 

bi'cyclist, n., a bi- 
cycle rider. 

bid, f ./., to command; 
to pray; to offer a? 
a price at an auc- 
tion ; «. , an offer of a 
price at an auction. 

bidden, p.p., bid. 

bid'der, n., one who 
bids. 

bid'ding, pr.p., bid. 



bide 



^^^ 



V 









bide, v.i., to remain 
in a place; v.t., to 
wait for. 

bid'ed, p.p., bide. 

bidet', «., a soldier's 
baggage horse; a 
sort of small port- 
able bath; a com- 
mode. 

biding, Pr.p., bide. 

bien'nial, adj., hap- 
pening once in two 
years. 

bien'nially, adv., once 
in two years. 

bier, «., a frame for 
conveying a corpse 
to the grave. 

bila'rioos, adj., dou- 
ble; two-fold. 

biferoos, adj., bear- 
ing twice a year. 

biffin, n., a. cooking- 
apple. 

bi'fld, adj., cleft; 
forked. 

bif'idate, adj.,i.q.hi6<i. 

bifidated, >■?. bifid. 

bitioroos, a4j., beat- 
nig two flowers. 

bi'lold, adj., two- fold; 
double 

bilo'liate. adj., hav- 
ing two leaves. 

bi'Iorato, adj., having 
two perforations. 

bif'orine, «., a two- 
dcKired cell on the 
leaves of certain 
plants. 

bi'torm, adj., double- 
bodied; having two 
shapes. 

bi' formed, adj., i.q. 
bilorm. 

bifurcate, v.i., to 
f'lik; adj., forked. 

bifurcated, p.p., bi- 
fmcato. 

bifurcating, pr.p., bi- 
tiircate. 

bifurcation, n., a 
forking. 

bifnr'cous, adj., i.q. 
bifurcate. 

big, adj., great; preg- 
nant; full. 

big'amist, n. , one who 
has committed big- 
amy. 

big'amy, «.,the crime 
or state of having 
more than one hus- 
band or wife at the 
same time. 

big'arreau, big'aroon, 
n., a white-heart 
cherry. 

bigen'tiial, adj., rel. 
to two tribes. 



viz 

V7 



66 



big'gin, M., a child's 
cap; a night-cap; a 

coif. 
bight, n., a bay, a 

loop. 

bigness, n., the state 
of being big. 

Bigno'nia, n., a beau- 
tiful clinibingshrub. 

big'ot, n., a person 
blindly attached to 
any opinion or 
creed. 

big'oted, adj., having 
the character of a 
bigot. 

big'otry, n., unrea- 
soiimg zeal; intoler- 
ance. 

US' wig, n., a person 
of importance. 

bijou', adj., some- 
thing small and 
pretty. 

bijou'try, n., jewel- 
lery; trinkets. 

bi'jngate, adj., hav- 
ing two pairs of 
leaJSets. 

bi'jngons, adj., i.q. 
bijugate. 

bila'biate, adj., hav- 
ing two lips; applied 
to the corolla of a 
flower. 

bilam'ellate, adj., 
formed of two 
plates. 

bilam'ellated, adj., i.q. 
bilamellate. 

bil'ander, n., a two- 
masted Dutch canal 
boat. 

bilat'eral, adj., two- 
sided. 

bil'berry, n., the 
whortletMjrry. 

bil'bo, n., a sword. 

bilboes, n. pi., a bar 
with shackles for 
the feet. 

bile, n., a yellow 
bitter liquid separa- 
ted from the blood 
by the liver; ill- 
nature. 

bile'-duot, n., the 
tube conducting 
the bile. 

bilge, n., the floor of a 
ship's Iwttom; v.i., 
to spring a leak in 
the bilge. 

bilged, p.p., bilge. 

bilge'water, n., water 
lying in a ship's 
bottom. 

bilging, pr.p., bilge. 

biliary, adj., pert, to 
bUe. 



V-'^ 



v> 

V 

V 



bUobed 



bilin'gnal. adj., ex- 
pressed in two lan- 
guages. 

bilin'guist, n., one 
who speaks two 
languages. 

bil'ious, adj., suffer- 
ing from excess of 
bile. 

biliousness, n., the 
state of being bili- 
ous. 

bilit'eral, adj., con- 
sisting of twoletters. 

bilk, v.t., to decamp 
without paying. 

bilked, p.p., bilk. 

bilking, pfp., bilk. 

bill, »., the beak of 
a fowl; a prun- 
ing instrument; a 
note of charges 
with amount due; 
an advertisement 
sheet; an order to 
pay; a parliament- 
ary proposal; v.i., 
to join bills, as 
doves do. 

bill'book, n., a book 
in which bills of 
e.xchange, etc., are 
noted. 

billed, p.p., bill. 

bil'let, »., a note in 
writing; a soldier's 
lodging; v.t., to 
lodge a soldier in a 
private house. 

billet-doux', n., a 
love-letter. 

billeted, p.p., biUet. 

bil'leting, pr.p. , billet. 

bill'hook, »., a small 
hatchet with a hook. 

bill'iard-room, n., a 
room with a billiard 
table. 

bill'iards, n., a game 
played on a table 
with balls and cues. 

billing, pr.p., bill. 

bil'lingiigate, n., foul 
language. 

bil'lion, n., a million 
millions. 

bil'lot, »., bullion in 
bar or mass. 

bU'loW, n., a great 
wave; v.i., to sw<ill. 

bil'lowy, adj., swel- 
lingintolarge waves. 

bill-poster, n., t.;. 
bill-sticker. 

biil'-sticker, n., one 
who posts placards 
m public places. 

bilo'bate, adj., divi- 
ded into two lobes, 

bi'lobed, i.q. bilobatc. 



S— («7a) 



bilocular 









S-^^ 



biloo'alar, (k//., divi- 
ded into two cells. 

bil'tong, n., strips of 
dried lean meat. 

bimac'ulatc, tidj., 
marked with two 
spots. 

bim'ana, «. pi., ani- 
mals having two 
hands. 

bi'mane, n., one of 
the bimana. 

bim'anons, adj., hav- 
ing two hands. 

bime'dial, adj., ap- 
plied to lines which 
can only be 
summed in powers, 
being otherwise in- 
comn:\ensiirabIe. 

bimes' trial, adj., con- 
tinuing two months. 

bimetallism, bimet - 
alism, n., a system 
of currency recog- 
nizing coins of two 
metals as legal ten- 
der to .any amount. 

bimonth'ly, adj. and 
adv., occurring 

every two months. 

bin, n., a sub-division 
of a wine-cellar for 
bottles; a recep- 
tacle, as dust-bin, 
etc. 

bi'nary, adj., com- 
posed of two parts. 

bi'nate, adj., growing 
in pairs. 

bind, v.t., to fasten, 
esp. with anything 
flexible; to join to- 
gether; to restrain. 

bind'er, «., one who 
binds, esp. books, 
sheaves, etc. 

bind'ery, n., a book- 
binding workshop. 

bind'ing, «.,thecover, 
etc., of a book; 
pr.p,, bind. 

bmd'weed, n., the 
convolvulus. 

binerv'ate, adj., two- 
nerved. 

bin'nade. n., the 
ship's compass-box 
near the helm. 

bin'ocle, n., a field- 
glass; a telescope 
with two tubes, one 
for each eye. 

binoo'olar, adj., hav- 
ing two eyes; suited 
for the use of both 
eyes at once; n., a 
bmocle. 

binoo'olate, adj., hav- 
ing two eyes. 



N,- 



bino'mial, n. and 

adj., having two 
algebraic terms. 

binom'inal, adj., hav- 
ing two names. 

binom'inous, <Ki/., t.g. 
binommal. 

bi'nons, adj., i.q., 
binate. 

bioc'eUate, adj., 

marked with two 
eye-like spots. 

biodynam'ics, n., the 
; doctrine of vital 
energy. 

biogenesis, n., the 
doctrine that life 
can spring only 
from living organ- 
isms. 

bi'ogiapb, n., a kind 
of cinematograph. 

biog'iapher, n., one 
who writes a bio- 
graphy. 

biogiaph'ic, adj., pert, 
to biography. 

biographical, adj., i.q. 
biographic. 

biog'raphy, n., a life 
history. 

biolog'ical, adj., pert, 
to biology. 

biorogy, n., the sci- 
ence that treats of 
the lives of animals 
and plants. 

biolyt'ic, adj., rel. to 
the destruction of 
life. 

biom'etry, n., calcula- 
tion of expectation 
of life. 

bi'oplasm, n., germ- 
inal matter. 

bi'otazy, n., the scien- 
tific classification of 
animals and plants. 

bip'arous, adj., bear- 
ing twins. 

biput'ible, adj., cap- 
able of being divi- 
ded into two. 

bipart'ient, adj., bear- 
ing twins. 

bipart'ile, adj., i.q. 
bipartible. 

bipartite, adj., hav- 
ing two correspond- 
ing parts. 

biparti'tion, m., the 
act of making bi- 
partite. 

bipec'tinate, tui/., hav- 
ing two toothed 
margins. 

bi'ped, n., an animal 
having two feet. 

bi'pedal, adj., having 
two feet. 



V- 






\4- 



bireme 



Upel'tate, adj., cover- 
ed with a shell like 
a double shield. 

bipen'nate, adj., hav- 
ing two wings. 

bipen'nated, adj., i.q. 
bipcnnate. 

bipet'alons, adj., hav- 
ing two petals. 

bipin'nate, adj., dou- 
bly lobed. 

bi'plane, n., an aero- 
plane with an upper 
and a lower plane 
or carrying surface. 

bipo'Iar, adj., doubly 
polar. 

bipolar'ity, »., bipolar 
quality. 

bi'pont, adj., rel. to 
books printed at 
Deuxponts (Bipon- 
tium or Zwei- 
briicken). 

bipont'ine, i.q. bipont. 

bipnnct'oal, adj., hav- 
ing two points. 

bianadrate, n., the 
squareof the square; 
the fourth power. 

biqoint'ile, n., an as- 
tronomical term ap- 
plied to the relative 
positions of two 
planets separated 
by 144 degrees. 

bira'diate, adj., hav- 
ing two rays. 

bira'moQs, adj., con- 
sistmg of two 
branches. 

birch. «., a graceful 
tree with small 
leaves and whitish 
bark; an instrument 
of punishment; v.t., 
to punish with the 
birch rod. 
V' birched, p.p., bkch. 



U 

V 






birch'en, adj., con- 
sisting of birch. 
birch'ing, pr.p. birch. 
bird, n., a feathered 
winged animal pro- 
ducing young from 
eggs. 
bird'-cage, «., a cage 

for a song-bird. 
bird'catcher, »., one 
, who catches birds. 
\y<— bird'-like, adj., re- 

" sembling a bird. 
\y'-^" bird'-lime,H., a sticky 
' substance for en- 

^ tangling birds. 
Nj* bird's'-eye, «., a 
species of primrose; 
. a kind of tobacco. 

V^^ bi'reme, n., a Greek 
'•'^' or Roman vessel 



%» 



^ 



biretta 



with two tiers of 
oars. 

biret'ta, n., a square 
cap worn by eccle- 
siastics. 

biros' trate, adj., hav- 
ing a double beals. 

biros' trated, adj., i.q. 
biros trate. 

birthf n., the process 
ofbeing born; lin- 
eage; origin. 

birtb'day, n., the day 
on which anyone 
is born, or its 
anniversary. 

birth'-mark, n., a 
congenital mark. 

birtb'place. «., the 
place of one's birth. 

birtb'rigbt, n.,aright 
to which a person is 
entitled by birth. 

Biscay'an, itdj., pert, 
to Biscay in Spain. 

bia'cotin, »., a con- 
fection made of 
flour, sugar, eggs, 
and marmalade. 

bis'cnit, n., a hard, 
dry, flat kind of 
bread that will 
keep; unglazcd 

porcelain after the 
first baking. 

bisect', v.t., to cut 
into two parts; esp. 
into two equal 
parts. 

bisect'ed, p.p., bisect. 

bisect'ing, pr.p., bi- 
sect. 

bisec'tion, n., the act 
of bisecting. 

biseg'ment, n., one of 
the pans of a bi- 
sectwl line. 

bise'rial, adj., ar- 
ranged in two series 
or rows. 

bisei'nte, adj., hav- 
ing serrate serra- 
tures. 

bise'tose, adj., having 
two bristles. 

bise'toas, i.g. bisetose. 

bisex'nal, adj., of 
both sexes. 

bisb'op, n., a member 
of the highest order 
of the Christian 
ministry; a piece in 
the game of chess. 
\J^\^' bjsh'opric «., the 
dignity of a bishop. 

\ bisk, n., soup made 

of several sorts of 
meat. 

bis'mutta. n., a yel- 
lowish metal used 



VI- ■ 

v^ 

V( 

n 



V 



fc 

V 






^r, 









67 



in making printers' 
type. 

bis'mothal, adj., com- 
posed of bismuth. 

bi'son, n., a wild 
American ox. 

bisqae, n., unglazed 
white porcelam; a 
point conceded to 
a tennis-player 
which he can claim 
when he chooses. 

bissex'tile, adj., pert. 
to leap-year. 

bistip'nJed, adj., hav- 
mg two stipules. 

bis' tort, n., a plant 
with twisted roots; 
snakeweed or ad- 
der's-wort. 

bis'tonry, n., a surgi- 
cal instrument. 

bis'tre, bis'ter, »., a 
brown pigment. 

bis ol' cats, adj. , cloven 
footed. 

bisol'phate, n., a me- 
tallic salt of sul- 
phuric acid in which 
one-half the hydro- 
gen remains. 

bisol'pbmet, »., a 
sulphide with two 
atoms of sulphur in 
the molecule. 

bit, p.t. and p.p., 
bite; «., a small 
piece; a boring tool; 
the metal part of a 
horse's bridle. 

Utch, n., the female 
of canine animals, 
as the dog, fox, 
wolf. 

bite, v.t., to cut or 
crush with the 
teeth; n., a wound 
made by biting; a 
mouthful. 

bit'er, «., one who 
bites. 

bitem'ate, adj., dou- 
bly ternate. 

bit'ing. pr.p., bite; 
adj., sharp, sar- 
castic. 

bitt, n., « frame 
fastened to the deck 
of a vessel on which 
to secure cables; 
v.t., to put round 
the bitts. 

bitted, adj., having 
bitts; p.p., bitt. 

bit'ten, p.p., bite. 

bit'ter, adj., acrid; 
keen; reproachful; 
sarcastic. 

bit'terish, adj., rather 
bitter. 



v=?- 



black 



Ut'terly, adv., in a 

bitter manner. 

bit'tem, >i., a wading- 
bird of the heron 
family. 

bit'terness, n., the 
quality of being 
bitter. 

bit'ters, n. pi. , a liquor 
used as a stomachic, 
made of bitter 
herbs. 

bit'tersweet, n., the 
woody nightshade. 

bit'terweed, n., yel- 
low gentian. 

bit'ting, pr.p., bitt. 

bitts, n. pi. , short bi- 
iurcated posts used 
for securing a 
ship's cable. 

bitn'men, n., a min- 
eral resin. 

bitn'minate, v.^, to 
impregnate with bi- 
tumen. 

bitn'minated, p.p. bi- 
tuminate. 

bita'minating, pr.p. , 
bituminate. 

bita'minize, v.t., i.g. 
bituminate. 

bita'minoas. ad) . 
contaimng bitumen. 

bi'valve, n., a shell- 
fish with two hinged 
valves. 

bivalv'oos, adj., i.g. 
bivalvular. 

bivalv'ular, adj., hav- 
ing two valves. 

bivault'ed, adj., hav- 
ing two arches. 

biven'tral. adj., hav- 
ing two bellies. 

biv'ioos, adj., leading 
two ways. 

biv'ouac, «., an open- 
air encampment of 
soldiers without 
tents; v.i., to en- 
camp in bivouac. 

biv'ouacked, p.p., 
bivouac. 

biT'ooacking, pr.p., 
bivouac. 

biweek'Iy, adj., oc- 
curring every two 
wetks. 

bizarre', adj., odd, 
fantastic. 

blab, v.t., to let out 
secrets. 

blabbed, p.p., blab. 

blab'ber, »., one who 
blabs. 

blabbing, />r.^., blab. 
, black, adj., of the 
darkest colour; v.t., 
to bl.icken. 



blackamoor 



68 



blasphemoasly 



^ 






p.p., 

pr.p.. 



^ 






s 



V 



^ 



tr" 



black'amooi, n., a 

negro. 

black'ait, n., magic. 

blackball, v.i., to 
exclude or reject by 
vote. 

black'balled, 
blackball. 

black'baUing, 
blackball. 

black'beetle, n., a 
cockroach. 

blackberry, n., the 
berry of the bram- 
ble. 

black'bird, n., a song- 
bird of the thrush 
family with black 
plumage. 

blackboard, n., a 
board used for in- 
struction to receive 
drawing or writing 
in chalk. 

black'-book, n., a 
record of oflences 
and punishments. 

black'-cap, n., a bird 
of the warbler 
family. 

blaok'-cattle, n., oxen 
reared for slaugh- 
ter, no matter what 
their colour may be. 

black'-death, n., an 
Eastern plague 

which first visited 
England in the 14th 
century. 

blacked, p.p., black. 

black'en, v.(., to make 
black. 

blackened, 
blacken. 

black'ener, 
slanderer. 

black'ening, 
blackeii. 

blaok'-eyed, adj. , hav- 
ing eyes with black 
or very dark irises. 

blaok'flsh, n., a small 
whale. 

blMk' guard, n., a 
fellow of low char- 
acter; v.t., to use 
abusive 1 an guage to. 

black'x-i/an/ism, n., 
the conduct of a 
blackguard. 

black'ing, n., a black 
polish for leather. 

blaok'ish, adj., rather 
black. 

blaok'-Iead, n. , graph- 
ite; plumbago; v.t., 
to polish with 
blacklead. 

black'leg, n., a cheat. 

black'letter, n., the 



PP; 



pr.p.. 



1_ 



Vvl 



N 






Old English or 
Gothic type used in 
early printed books. 

black'ly, adv., in a 
black manner. 

blackmail, n., extor- 
tion by intimida- 
tion; v.t., to levy 
blackmail on. 

black'ness, n., the 
state of being black. 

Black' Rod, n., the 
usher of the Order 
of the Garter; the 
usher of the Lords 
in Parliament. 

black'smith, n., an 
iron-smith. 

blackthorn, n., the 
sloe; a cudgel. 

blad'der, n., a thin 
membranous bag in 
the body of an 
animal containing 
the tirine, the gall, 
etc.; any similar 
vesicle. 

blade, «., the cutting 
part of an instru- 
ment; aleaf of grass; 
the broad part of an 
oar; a rollicking 
fellow. 

blade'-bone, n., the 
shoulder-blade, the 
scapula. 

blad'ed, adj., having 
a blade. 

blain, n., a blister. 

blame, v.t., to censure 
or reproach; n., im- 
putation of a fault. 

blame'able, adj., de- 
serving of blame. 

blamed, p.p., blame. 

blame'lul,n<i;., faulty; 
meriting blame. 

blameless, adj. .with- 
out fault. 

blame'lessnesB, n. ,the 
state of being 
blameless. 

blam'er, «., one who 
blames. 

blame'worthy, adj., 
culpable. 

bhun'inK. pr.p., 

blame. 

blanch, v.t. and i., to 
whiten. 

blanched,^.^., blanch. 

blanchim'eter, n., an 
instrument for 

measuring bleach- 
ing power. 

blanch'ing, prp., 
blanch. 

blancmange', n., a 
kind of white jelly- 
like pudding. 



■I. 



^^. 



bland, adj., mild; 
gentle; suave. 

blandiroqoence, n., 
dattering speech. 

bland'ish, v.t. and t., 
to caress or flatter; 
to render alluring. 

blandished, p.p., 
blandish. 

bland'isher, n., a 
flatterer. 

blandishing, pr.p., 
blandish. 

bland'ishment, n., 
artful caresses; caj- 
olery; endearment. 

bland'ness, n., the 
state of being 
bland. 

blank, adj., white; 
empty; vacant; n., 
an empty paper; an 
empty space on a 
paper; any void. 

blanket, n., a soft, 
thick, woollen cloth 
used as a bed- 
covering. 

blank'et(^ adj., cov- 
ered with a blanket. 

blanketing, n., mate- 
rial of which blank- 
ets are made. 

blank'ness, n., the 
state of being blank. 

blare, v.t., to make a 
loud trumpet-like 
noise; v.t., to pro- 
claim loudly; n., a 
loud noise. 

blared, p.p., blare. 

blaring, pr.p., blare; 
adj., harsh, loud. 

blar'ney, n., gross 
flattery; deceitful 
talk;!).*., to humbug 
with talk. 

blarneyed, p.p., 
blarney. 
' blar'neying, prp-, 
blarney; «., the act 
of blarneying. 

blas6, adj., sated with 
pleasure. 

blaspheme', v.t., to 
speak impiously of; 
v.i., to utter blas- 
phemy. 

blasphemed', p.p., 
blaspheme. 

blaspbe'mer, n., one 
who blasphemes. 

blasphe'ming, P'.p-> 
. blaspheme. 

blas'phemous, adj., 
impiously irrev- 
erent towards God. 

blas'pbemonsly, adv., 
in a blasphemous 
manner. 



blasphemy 






\ 



s 



> 



s 



V 

V 



V. 



blas'phemy, n., gross- 
ly irreverent or 
outrageous lan- 
guage. 

blast, n., a gust of 
wind; the sound of 
blowing a wind- 
instrument;a blight; 
a violent explosion; 
v.t., to injure by a 
blast or blight; to 
split by an ex- 
plosion. 

blast'ed, p.p., blast. 

blaste'ma, »., the 
axis of growth of an 
embryo plant. 

blast'er, m., one who 
bliists. 

blast'-fnrnaoe, n., a 
smeltiiig-furnace. 

blasting, pT.p., blast; 
n., the operation of 
blasting. 

blastooar'pons, adj., 
having the germ 
beginning to grow 
inside the fruit. 

blas'toderm, n., the 
outside of the em- 
bryo in its earliest 
condition. 

blasfpipe, n., the 
pipe of a locomo- 
tive which carries 
the waste steam up 
the chimney. 

bla'tant, adj., noisy. 

blat'ter. v.i., to make 
a senseless noise. 

blay, n., a fish. 

blue, n., a flame, a 
bursting out; a 
white spot on a 
hone's forehead; a 
white spot on a tree 
made by removuig 
the bark; v.i., to 
flame; v.t., to pro- 
claim; to make 
marks on trees to 
indicate a path. 

biased, pp., blaze. 

blaz'ing, pf.p., blaze. 

bla'son, n., a heraldic 
figure; v.t., to de- 
scribe armorial bear- 
ings; to adorn; to 
procLiim. 

bla'ioned, p.p., bla- 
zon. 

bla'soner, n., one 
who blazons; a 
herald; a scandal- 
monger. 

bla'ioning, pr.p., bla- 
zon. 

bla'soniy, n., the art 
of describing coats- 
of-arms. 



v 






s 

b 



S 



V 



V, 



V 



69 



bleach, v.<., to whiten. 
bleached, p.p., bleach. 
bleaoh'er, n., one who 

bleaches. 
bleach'ery, n., an 

establishment where 

cloth is bleached. 
bleaoh'ing, n., the act 

or art of making 

textile fabrics white; 

pr.p., bleach, 
bleak, (U2/., cold; chill; 

dreary. 
bleak'ish, adj., rather 

bleak. 
bleak'Iy, adv., in a 

bleak manner. 
bleak'neaa, n., the 

state of being 

bleak, 
blear, adj., sore (of 

the eyes); v.t., to 

make sore so that 

the sight is dimmed. 
bleai'-eyed, adj. , sore- 
eyed; dim-sighted. 
bleat, v.i., to utter 

the cry of a sheep; 

n., the cry of a 

sheep. 
bleat'ed, p.p., bleat. 
bleat'ei, n., one who 

bleats. 
bleat'ing, n., the cry 

of a sheep; pr.p., 

bleat. 
bleb, n., a blister, 
bled, /)./>., bleed. 
bleed, v.t., to lose 

blood; v.t., to take 

blood from, 
bleed' ing, n., the 

operation of letting 

blood. 
blem'ish, v.t., to im- 

Sair or sully; m., a 
efect. 
blem'ished, p.p., 

blemish. 
blem'lshlnK, pr.p., 

blemish. 
blench, v.i., to shrink; 

tu flinch. 
blenched, />.p. , blench . 
blench'inig, pr.p., 

blench. 
blend, v.t., to mingle; 

v.<., to be mixed; n., 

a mixture. 
blende, n., an ore of 

zinc. 
blend'ed. p.p., blend, 
blend'er, n., one who 

blends. 
blend'ing.^r.^. .blend . 
blen'ny. »., a small 

fish found among 

rocks. 
blent, adj., another 

form of blended. 









i 



1 






blinding 



Ues'-bok, «., a white- 
faced South African 
antelope. 

bless, v.t., to invoke 
or bestow happi- 
ness on: to glorify 
for benefits received. 

blessed, p.p., bless. 

blessed, adj., fa- 
voured with bless- 
ings; sacred; holy. 

bless' edly, adv., in a 
blessed manner. 

bless' edness, n., hap- 
piness; God's favour. 

bless'er, n., one who 
blesses. 

Uen'ing, »., the act 
of one who blesses; 
any good thing fall- 
ing to one's lot; 
pr.p., bless. 

blest, adj., another 
form of blessed. 

blet, n., over-ripeness 
in fruit. 

blet'onism, n., the 
faculty of water 
divination. 

blet'onist, n., a water 
diviner. 

blew, p.t., blow. 

blight, n., something 
that nii>s or des- 
troys plants; v.t., to 
blast; to frustrate. 

bligbt'ed, adj., smit- 
ten with blight; 
blasted;/)./)., blight. 

blighting, adj., des- 
troying; pr.p., 
blight. 

blight' ingly, adv., in a 
blighting manner. 

blind, adj., without 
sight; closed at one 
end; v.t., to make 
blind; n., some- 
thing to hinder 
sight or to keep out 
light; the cover of a 
window; a pretext; 
a covert design. 

bUnd'ed, p.p., blind. 

blind'er, n., one who 
blinds; a horse's 
blinker. 

blind'fold, adj., hav- 
ing the eyes band- 
aged; v.t., to cover 
the eyes with a 
bandage. 

blind'foMed, adj., i.q. 
blindfold; p.p., 
blindfold. 

blind' folding, pr.p., 
blindfold. 

blinding, adj., mak- 
ing blind; dazzling; 
pr.p., blind. 



blindly 









blind'ly, adv., without 
sight or understand- 
ing; in a reckless 
manner. 

blind'man's-bnfl, n., 
a child's game. 

blind'ness, n., the 
state of being blind. 

blind'-side, n., a 
weakness of charac- 
ter which allows 
one to be taken 
advantage of. 

blink, v.t., to wink; to 
glimmer; ».<., to 
shut one's eyes to; 
to evade purposely; 
n., a glance of the 
eye; a glimmer. 

blink'ard, n., one who 
blinks. 

blinked, p.p., blink. 

blink'ei, n., one who 
blinks; a leather 
flap placed on either 
side of a horse's 
head to prevent him 
from seeing side- 
ways or backwards. 

blink'ing, pr.p., blink. 

bliss, n., supreme 
happiness. 

bliss'fal, ad]., full of 
bliss. 

bliss'fnlness, n., ex- 
treme happiness. 

blis'tei, n., a thin 
vesicle on the skin 
containing watery 
matter; ».<., to raise 
a blister on; v.i., to 
become blistered. 

blis'tered. p.p., blis- 
ter. 

blis'tering, ad)., caus- 
ing blisters; pr.p., 
blister. 

blis'tery, ai]., full of 
blisters. 

blithe, adj., gay; joy- 
ful; merry. 

blithe'fol, i.q. blithe. 

blitbe'ly, ado., in a 
blithe manner. 

blithe'some, adj., full 
of gaiety; cheerful. 

blithe'someness, n., 
gaiety. 

bUz'zard, ••., a driv 
ing storm of sleet 
and snnw. 

bloftt, v.t., to make 
swollen; v.i., to be- 
come swollen. 

bloat'ed, adj., swol- 
len; unduly large; 
p.p., bloat. 

bloat'ednesL n.. the 
state 01 being 
bloated. 



:tC 






70 



bloat' er, n., a smoke- 
dried herring. 

bloat'ing, pr.p., bloat. 

blob'ber, n.,i.q. blub- 
ber. 

blob'bei-lipped, adj., 
having thick lips. 

block, n., a solid mass 
usually shaped with 
flat sides; an ob- 
struction; a casing 
containing pulleys; 
a portion of a city 
enclosed by streets; 
a piece of wood or 
metal on which an 
engraving is cut; 
v.t., to obstruct; to 
stop the ball with 
the bat at cricket. 

blockade', n., the pre- 
vention of ingress 
to a place by sur- 
rounding it with 
ships or troops; v.i., 
to shut a place up 
in this way. 

blockad'ed, p. p., 
blockade. 

blockad'ing, pr.p., 
blockade. 

block'-book, n., a 
' book printed from 
movable wooden 
blocks. 

blocked, p.p., block. 

block'head. n., a 
stupid fellow. 

Uock'honse, n., a 
sort of fort. 
, block'ing, ^r .^.,block. 

block'isb, adj. , stupid. 

block'-Un, n., tin cast 
into ingots. 

blond, blonde, adj., of 
fair complexion. 

blood, n., the fluid in 
the arteries and 
veins of the body; 
consanguinity; v.t., 
to bleed: to give a 
taste of Wood. 

blood'ed, p.p., blood. 

blood'-gnilUness, n., 
murder. 

blood'-heat, n., the 
temperature of the 
human blood in 
health. 

bloodhound, n., a 
large dog of acute 
powers of scent. 

blood'Uy, adv., in a 
bloody manner. 

blood'ineo, »., mur- 
derousness. 

blood'ing, pr.p. ,blood. 

blood'less, a4/. .empty 
of blood; without 
shedding blood. 



^1 



I 



% 

^ 

^ 









v^ 



blot 



blood'-red, adj., as 
red as blood. 

blood'-relation, n., 
one related by 
blood. 

blood'root, n., the 
tormentil. 

blood'shed, n., slaugh- 
ter. 

bloodshot, adj., red 
and with congested 
veins (said of the 
eyes). 

blood'stained, adj., 
stained with blood. 

blood'sncker, n., any 
animal that sucks 
blood; an extor- 
tioner. 

blood'thiisty, adj., 
desirous to shed 
blood. 

blood'-vessel, n., a 
vein or artery. 

blood' woii. «., the 
bloody-veined dock. 

blood'y, adj., pert, to 
blood; bloodstained; 
cruel. 

bloom, n., a blossom; 
fullness of life and 
vigour; a glow or 
flush-- the delicate 
powdery coating of 
certain fruits; v.t., 
to put forth flowers; 
to show the beauty 
of youth. 

bloom'aiy, n., the 
first forge in which 
iron is smelted. 

bloomed, p.p., bloom. 

bloom'er, n., a cos- 
tume for women 
including loose trou- 
sers; pi., the trous- 
ers alone. 

bloom'ery, n., i.q. 
bloomary. 

bloom'ing, adj., glow- 
ing as with youth 
and health; pr.p., 
bloom. 

bloom'ingly, adv., in 
a blooming manner. 

bloom'y, adj., full of 
bloom. 

bios' som, n., the flow- 
er of a plant; v.t., 
to put forth blos- 
soms. 

bloe'somed, adj., in 
bloom; p.p., blos- 
som. 

b'.os'soming, pr.p., 
blossom. 

blot, n., a spot or 
stain; v.t., to stain: 
to dry by means of 
blotting-paper, etc. 



blotch 






"k 



I- 



^ 



^ 



V 



V 

V 

>-'^' 



V 
V 



blotch, n., an irregu- 
lar spot; v.t., to 
mark with blotches. 

blote, v.t., to cure 
herrings. 

blotted, p.p., blot. 

blot'ter, n., one who 
or that which blots. 

blot' ting, pr.p., blot. 

blouse, n., a light, 
loose upper g'ar- 
ment worn by work- 
men and children; a 
loose, outer bodice 
worn by women. 

blow, v.t'., to make a 
current of air; to 
blossom; v.t., to 
drive a current of 
ail upon or into; n. , 
a stroke with the 
hand or a weapon; 
a calamity. 

blow'ei, n., one who 
or that which blows. 

blow'ing, pr.p., blow. 

blown, p.p., blow. 

blow'-pipe, n., an in- 
strument to pro- 
duce intense heat; a 
tube through which 
savages blow poi- 
soned darts. 

blow'-valve, n., a 
snifting valve. 

blowzed, ttdj., fat and 
ruddy. 

blowz'y, i.g. blowzed. 

blnb'ber, n., the fat of 
whales; v.t., to weep 
so as to disfigure 
the face. 

blub'bered, p.p. , blub- 
ber. 

blnb'bering, pr.p., 
blubber. 

Bliich'er, n., a strong 
leather half-boot or 
high shoe. 

blud'geon, »., a short 
stick with a heavy 
end used as a 
weapon; v.t., to 
strike with a blud- 
geon. 

blue, adj. , sky-colour- 
ed; n., the colour of 
clear sky or deep 
sea; v.t., to make 
blue. 

blne'-beU, n., the wild 
hyacinth or the 
hare-bell. 

blue'beny, n., a plant 
or shrub of the 
heath kind, bearing 
edible blue berries. 
blue'-biid, n., the 
blue robin (U.S.A.). 
blue'book, n., a 



V 
V 



\ 



S 

^ 

^ 



J 



i 



r 



71 



British Government 
otficial report. 

blne'bottle, n., a fly 
with a large blue 
belly. 

blue'-light, n., a com- 
position burning 
with a brilliant blue 
light, used as a 
flare. 

blue'ness, n., the 
quality of being 
blue. 

blues, n. pi., hypo- 
chondria; dejection. 

blue'-stocking, n , a 
literary lady; a fe- 
male pedant. 

bine'-stone, n., sul- 
phate of copper. 

blu'ey. adj., rather 
blue. 

blnfl, adj., broad and 
full; frank and good- 
humoured; n., a 
high bank with a 
steep front; bold 
words or acts meant 
to daunt an oppon- 
ent; v.t., to deceive 
with bluff. 

bluffed, p.p., bluff. 

bluff 'ing, pr.p., bluff. 

blufi'ness, n., frank- 
ness; good-humour. 

blnfty, adj., having 
bold, projecting 
banks. 

bln'ish, adj., blue in a 
slight degree. 

bln'ishly, adv., in a 
bluish manner. 

blnn'der, v.t., to make 
a gross mistake; to 
stumble; n., a stu- 
pid mistake. 

blnn'derbuss. n., a 
short gun or long 

Eistol with a wide 
arrel. 

blun'dered, p.p., 
blunder. 

blun'derer, n., one 
who blund -IS. 

blnn'derhettd. »., a 
stupid fellow. 

blun'deiing. pr.p., 
blunder. 

blunt, adj., dull, not 
sharp; having a 
thick edge or point; 
unceremonious; v.t., 
to impair the keen- 
ness of. 

blunf ed, p.p., blunt. 

blunt'ing, ^r.^., blunt, 

blunt'ish, adj., rather 
blunt. 

blunt'ly, adv., in a 
blunt manner. 



Vi 

V 



\' 

NT 



X 

^ 






\ 



boarding 



blunt'ness, n., the 
state of being blunt. 

blur, n., a blot; a 
confused appear- 
ance; v.t., to render 
indistinct. 

binired, p.p., blur. 

blnr'riiig, pr.p., blur. 

blurt, v.t., to utter 
suddenly. 

blurt'ed. p.p., blurt. 

blurt'ing, pr.p., bltirt. 

blush, v.t., to redden 
in the cheeks; n., 
the act of blush- 
ing. 

blushed, p.p., blush. 

bln8h'ing,^r./».,blush; 
adj., exhibiting 
blushes. 

blush'ingly, adv. , with 
blushes. 

blus'ter, v.t., to roar; 
to bully. 

blus'tered, p.p., blus- 
ter. 

blus'terer, »., one 
who blusters. 

blus'tering, adj., 
noisy; swaggering; 
pr.p., bluster. 

blos'terons, blus'- 
trons, adj., noisy; 
tempestuous. 

bo, inter j., a cry used 
to startle. 

bo'a, n., a very large 
species of serpents; 
a lady's neck-wrap. 

bo'apconstric'tor, n., 
one of the largest 
serpents, often 30 
ft. long. 

Boaner'ges, n., a 
vociferous preacher. 

boar, n., a male 

pig- 
board, n., a piece of 
timber sawed thin 
and of considerable 
length and breadth 
compared with the 
thickness; daily 
food; v.t., to go on 
to a vessel; to 
supply with board; 
v.t., to live as a 
boarder. 

board' able, adj., cap- 
able of being board- 
ed (as a ship). 

board'ed. pp., board. 

board' er, n., one who 
boards a ship in 
action; one who has 
his daily food for 
payment at an- 
other's table. 

board'ing, pr.p., 
board. 



boarding-house 



72 



boiling-point 



"^ 






\ 



\S 



boaid'ing-hoose, n., 

a house where board 
and lodging is pro- 
vided. 

board' ing-scAoo/> n., 
a school in which 
the pupils are 
boarded. 

board'-wases, n., 
wages allowed to 
servants in lieu of 
victuals. 

boar'ish, cUL]., pert, 
to a boar; swinish; 
brutal. 

boast, o.t., to speak in 
high praise of one- 
self or one's belong- 
ings; n., a state- 
ment expressing 
vanity or pride. 

boast'ed, p.p., boast. 

boast'er, n., one who 
boasts. 

boast'fnl, adj., ad- 
dicted to boasting. 

boast'folness, n., the 
state of being boast- 
ful. 

boasf folly, adv., in a 
boastful way. 

boasf ing, pr.p. ,boast ; 
n., the habit of 
being boastful. 

boasf ingly, ado., in a 
boasting manner. 

boat, n., a small 
vessel usually pro- 
pelled by rowmg; 
v.i., to row or sail. 

boat'able, adj., fit to 
sail or row a boat 
on. 

boafbiU, n., a South 
Aini^rica:! bird. 

boat'bnildei, n., a 
man who builds 
boats. 

boat'ed, p.p., boat. 

boat'hook, »., an iron 
hook for pulling or 
pushing a boat. 

boat'ing, n., rowing 
or sailing; pr.p., 
boat. 

boat'man, n., a man 
who manages a boat . 

boat'Bwain, n., a 
ship's officer who 
summons the crew 
to their duty. 

bob, M., any small 
round object at the 
end of a string, 
chain, etc.; v.t., to 
move jerkily; v.i., 
to drop a curtsey. 

bobbed, p.p., bob. 

bob'bin, n., a small 
drum of wood on 



V 
V 



<r^ 



\ 



^ 



\ 



which thread is 
wound. 

bob'binet, n., a 
machine-made cot- 
ton net. 

bob'bing, pr.p., bob. 

bob'olink, n., the rice- 
bird of North 
America. 

bob'stay, n., a rope 
or chain attached 
to the bowsprit. 

bob'tail, n., a short 
tail; the rabble. 

bob' tailed, adj., hav- 
ing a tail cut short. 

boc'asin, n., a wool- 
len stuff or cala- 
manco. 

Bocbe, H., a name 
invented for the 
Germans by the 
French in the Great 
War. 

bock'ing, n., a coarse 
woollen fabric used 
as a floor-cloth. 

bock'Iand, n., a 
species of land- 
tenure. 

bode, v.t., to be omin- 
ous; v.t., to portend; 
p.p., bide. 

bod'ed, p.p., bode. 

bode'ga, n., a wine 
shop; a shop. 

bod'ice, n., the body 
part of a woman's 
dress. 

bodied, ctdj., having 
a body; p.p., body. 

bodiless, adj., having 
no material form; 
incorporeal. 

bod'ily, adj., concern- 
ing the body; adv., 
completelv. 

bod'iog, adj., omin- 
ous; pr.p., bode. 

bod'kin, n., a blunt 
needle for drawing 
cord through a slot ; 
a hair-pin. 

Bodlei'an, adj., rel. 
to Bodley, esp. de- 
scribing the great 
university li&ary 
at Oxford; n., the 
library itself. 

bod'y, n., any entity; 
a human being; a 
corporation; siib- 
stance;strength;».». 
to invest with a 
body. 

bod'y-clothes, n. pi., 
attire, dress. 

bod'y- j'uan/, n., a 
band of life-guards. 

bod'ying, pr.p., body. 






"^r 






bod'y-pol'itic, «., the 

whole body of citi- 
zens. 

Boeo'tian, adj., pert, 
to Boeotia; stupid. 

Boer, n., a Dutch 
farmer or other 
colonist in South 
Africa. 

bo'fors, »., a type of 
naval gun. 

bog, n., a quagmire 
or morass; v.t., to 
overwhelm in mire. 

bo'gey, n., i.q. bogy; 
also a fixed score- 
value for the boles 
on a golf course. 

bogged, p.p., bog. 

bog'gle, v.i., to hesi- 
tate; to shilly-shally. 

bog'gled, p.p., boggle. 

bog'gler, n., a waver- 
er; an inconstant 
person. 

bog'gling, pr.p., bog- 
gle. 

bog'gy, adj., marshy; 
miry. 

bo'gie, n., a four- 
wheeled truck sup- 
porting the front or 
hind part of a wag- 
on or locomotive. 

bog'-land, «., marshy 
land. 

bo'gns, adj., spurious; 
counterfeit. 

bo'gy, n., a hob- 
goblin; a wicked 
spirit. 

bob, inter j., i.q. bo. 

bobea', n., an inferior 
black tea. 

Bohe'mian, n., a per- 
son, esp. an artist 
who despises con- 
ventionalities; adj., 
pert, to Bohemia. 

boil, v.i., to bubble by 
the action of beat; 
to be violently agi- 
tated; v.t., to sub- 
ject to the action of 
heat in a liquid; n., 
an inflamed, sup- 
purating tumour. 

boiled, p.p., boil. 

boil'er, n., a vessel 
in which water is 
boiled or steam 
generated, 

bail'e>plate, n., iron 
plate for making 
boilers of engines. 

boil'ery, n., a place 
for boifmg. 

boiling, pr.p., boil, 

boiling-point, n., the 
temperature at 



boisterous 



V 






which a liquid 
changes into a gas 
and vice versd. 

bois'terons, adj., vio- 
lent; stormy; tur- 
bulent. 

bois'teronsly. adv., in 
a boisterous man- 
ner. 

bo'Iar, adj., clayey. 

bold, adj., daring; 
executed with cour- 
age; impudent; con- 
spicuous. 

bolder, adj., eomp, 
of bold. 

boldest, adj., tuper. 
of bold. 

bold'ly, adn., in a bold 
manner. 

bold'ness, n., the 
state or quality of 
being lx)ld. 

bole, n., a tree-stem; 
a kind of yellow or 
brown earth con- 
taining iron oxide. 

bole'ro, n., a Spanish 
dance. 

boU, n., a Scottish 
dry measure con- 
taining about six 
bushels. 

bol'lard, n., a post or 
stanchion on a 
wharf or quay. 

Bologaese', adj., pert, 
to Bologna. 

Bolo'gnian, »., an 
inhabitant of Bol- 
ogna; adj., i.q. Bol- 
ognese. 

bol ster, n., a kind of 
long under-pillow; 
v.t., to support un- 
worthily. 

bol'stered. p.p., bol- 
ster. 

bolstering, pr.p., bol- 
ster. 

bolt, n., an arrow; a 
stream of lightning; 
a stout metallic pin 
for fastening ob- 

iects together; a 
»ar; v.t., to fasten 

with a bolt; to 

swallow hurriedly; 

to sift; v.i., to start 

and run ofi. 
bolted, p.p., bolt, 
bolt'er, n., a horse 

given to bolting; a 

sieve. 
bolt'ing, pr.p., bolt, 
bolt'ing-clolh, N., 

sieve cloth. 
bo'loa, n., a round 

mass of medicinal 

matter to he swal 






x-<< 



v^ 



73 



lowed at a gulp, 
larger and softer 
than a pill. 

bomb, n., a destruc- 
tive projectile, hol- 
low and filled with 
explosives; v.t., to 
throw bombs at. 

bom'bard, n., a short, 
wide- mouthed can- 
non. 

bombard', v.t., to at- 
tack with bomtw. 

bombarded, p.p., 
bombard. 

bombardier', n., a 
soldier who throws 
bombs; a non-com- 
missioned artillery 
officer. 

bombard'ing, pr.p., 
bombard. 

bombard'ment, »., 
the act of bombard- 
ing. 

bombasine', n., a 
fabric partly wors- 
ted and partly silk 
or cotton, 

bom'bast, n., high- 
sounding words. 

bombast'ic. adj. , high- 
sounding; turgid. 

bombaMtte', n., a 
thin woollen cloth. 

bombazine', n., i.q. 
bombasine. 

bombed, p.p-, bomb. 

bombing, pr-P-, 

bomb. 

bomb'-prool, »dj., 
secure against the 
action of bombs. 

bomb'-shelL n., a 
split'rical bomb. 

bom'byx, «., a silk- 
worm. 

bon-accord', n., good- 
will [Scot.). 

bona fide, adj. and 
adv., HI good faith. 

bona fides, n., good 
faith; honesty of 
purpose (LiU.). 

bonan'sa, n., a rich 
mine; an unex- 
pected prize. 

Bonapart'ean, adj., 
rel. to lionaparte. 

Bo'napartism, n., 
support of the Bo- 
naparte family in 
their claim to the 
French throne. 

Bo'napartist, n., one 
who supp<jrts the 
Bonapartes. 

bona'sos, n., the 
European bison; 
the aurochs. 



bonneted 



\ 



> 



S^ 






••«■ 



V, 



boaaa'su, 

bonasus. 

bon'-bon, m., a sugar- 
pljum. 

bond, n., anything 
that binds; the state 
of being bonded. 

bond'age, n., sla- 
very. 

bond ed, adj., applied 
to a licensed ware- 
house in which 
goods liable to gov- 
ernment duties are 
stored. 

bond'holder, n., one 
who holds a bond 
or binding deed. 

bond'ing, adj., pert, 
to a bonder. 

bond'maid, m., a fe- 
male slave. 

bond' man, n., a slave. 

boatf servuat, n., a 
slave. 

bonds' man, n., i.q. 
bondman. 

bond' woman, m., a 
woman slave. 

bone, n., one of the 
pieces of which the 
skeleton of an ani- 
mal is composed; 
v.t., to take the 
bones out of; to put 
whalebone into. 

boned, p.p., bone. 

bone'lace, n., a linen 
lace. 

bone'set, v.i., to set 
broken bones. 

bone'setter, n., one 
who sets broken or 
dislocated bones. 

bone'setting, n., the 
art of setting bones. 

boae'ahaker, n., an 
obsolete or defec- 
tive bicycle. 

bon'&re, n., a fire 
made to express 
public joy. 

bonhomie', n., good 
humour. 

Bon'iface, n., a sleek, 
jolly innkeeper. 

bon'ing, pr.p., lK>ne. 

bon mot, n., a wit- 
ticism (Ft.). 

bonne' bonohe, n., a 
titbit (Fr.). 

boo'net, n., a cover- 
ing for the head: 
one for the top of 
anything; v.t., to 
force the hat over 
the eyes of. 

bonneted, adj., wear- 
ing a boimet; p.p., 
Ixinnet. 



»A— (172) 



bonnetting 



s 

V 



V 






pr.p.. 



vV 



bon'netting, 

bonnet. 

bon'nily, adv., in a 
bonny manner. 

bon'ny, «<//., hand- 
some; pretty; fine. 

bo'nos, n., an extra 
payment made out 
of profits. 

bon'y, adj., having 
prominent bones. 

bonze, n., a Buddhist 
monk. 

boo, inter j., a rude 
expression of con- 
tempt; n., a hoot; 
v.t., to insult with 
booing; ti.t., to hoot. 

boo'by, «., a stupid 
fellow; a bird of the 
pelican family. 

boo'dle, n., money; 
profit (Amer. slang). 

book, n., a number of 
sheets of paper 
stitched together 
and bound in a 
cover; v.t., to regis- 
ter in a book; to 
buy a ticket for a 
journey. 

book'-account, n., a 
statement of debts. 

book'binder, «., one 
who binds books. 

book'bindery. n., a 
place where books 
are bound. 

book'binding, n., the 
artofbindingbooks. 

book'case, n., a case 
of shelves for hold- 
ing books. 

book'debt, n., a debt 
against a person in 
an account-book. 

booked, p.p., book. 

book'ing, pr.p., book. 

book'ish, adj., stu- 
dious; better ac- 
quainted with books 
than with the world. 

book'ishness, n. .fond- 
ness for study. 

book'-keeper, n., one 
who keeps accounts. 

book'-keeping, n., the 
art of keeping ac- 
counts. 

book' - knowledge, 
>!., knowledge de- 
rived from Ixioks. 

book'land, n., i.q. 
bockland. 

book'Iet, n., a little 
book. 

book'-maker, n., a 
maker of books; a 
betting-man who 
wagers on the defeat 



\^' 



^ 

N 



74 



of a specified horse; 

a layer of odds as 

- opposed to a backer. 

book'mark, n., a slip 
or strip to put be- 
tween the leaves of 
a book to mark a 
place. 

book'post, n., the 
system of convey- 
ing books, etc., by 
post at a cheaper 
rate. 

bjok'rack, n., a rack 
tor books. I 

book' seller, n., one 
whose occupation is 
to sell books. 

book'selling, n., the | 
business of selling ; 
books. I 

book'shelf, n., a shelf 
to hold books. 

book'stall, n., a stall 
holding books of- 
fered tor sale. 

book'store, n. , a book- 
shop. 

book'wonn, n., a 

• worm or mite that 

eats holes in books; 

an over-studious 

person. 

boom, M., a long pole 
on which the bot- 
tom parts of sails 
are extended; a 
beam across a river 
which prevents 

ships from entering; 
a deep, hollow noise; 
».»., to advertise; to 
I nake a hollow noise. 

boomed, p.p., boom; 
having a boom. 
' boom'erang, n., an 
Australian missile 
which rettirns to 
the thrower if it 
misses its mark. 

boom'iiig,^r./'. .boom. 

boon, n., a favour. 

boor, n., a rustic; an 
ill-mannered person. 

boor'ish, adj., awk- 
ward in manners. 

boor'ishly, *du., in a 
boorish manner. 

boose, v.t., i.q. booze. 

boos'er, n.,i.q. boozer. 

boos'y,a<i;.,t.9. boozy. 

boot, n., a covering 
for the foot and 
part of the leg; 
profit; v.t., to avail 
(irriptrs.). 

boot'ed, adj., wearing 
boots; pr.p., boot. 

bootee', n., a child's 
knitted boot. 



1 
x< 






v1. 



bore 



booth, n., a tem- 
porary house or 
shed in a fair- or 
market. 

boot'ikin, n., a child's 
legging. 

boot'jack, n., an in- 
strument for draw- 
ing off boots. 

boot'less, adj., un- 
profitable; unavail- 
ing. 

boot'lessly, adv., in a 
bootless manner. 

boot'-tree, n., a con- 
trivance to stretch 
and keep in shape 
a boot. 

boot'y, n., plunder. 

booze, v.i., to drink 
heavily. 

boozed, p.p., booze. 

booz'er, n., a heavy 
drinker. 

booz'ing, pr.p.,hooze. 

booz'y, adj., fud- 
dled. 

bopeep', n., a game 
among children. 

borac'ic, adj., pro- 
duced from borax. 

bor'age, n., a plant 
formerly infused in 
hot drinks, akin to 
the forget-me-not. 

bo'rate, n., a salt 
formed from boracic 
acid and a base. 

bo'rax, n., a crystal- 
line compound of 
soda and boracic 
acid. 

bor'der, «., the outer 
edge of anything; 
v.i., to have the 
edge adjoining. 

bor'dered, p.p., bor- 
der. 

bor'derer, «., one who 
dwells on or near 
the border of a 
country. 

bor'dering, pr.p., bor- 
der. 

bor'der-land, n.. latid 
forming a border or 
frontier. 

boi'dore, n., in heral- 
dry, the border of a 
shield. 

bare, v.i., to pene- 
trate by piercing; 
to weary by in- 
sufferable dulness; 
n., the hole made 
by boring; the cav- 
ity of a tube; a dull 
person; a sudden 
tidal wave in a 
river; p.t., bear. 



boreal 



, No 



No 

> 



bo'real,ix2/. ,northera. 

Bo'reas, n., the North 
Wind. 

bore'cole, »., a haidy 
winter cabbage. 

bored, P-p., bore. 

bore'dom, n., the 
state of being bored. 

bor'er, n., one who, 
or that which, bores. 

bo'lic, adj., i.q. bor- 
acic. 

bo'rinK, Pr-P; bore; 
adj., tedious, weari- 
some. 

bom, p.p., bear (to 
bring forth). 

borne, p.p., bear (to 
carry'). 

bo' ion, n., the char- 
acteristic element 
contained in borax. 

bor'otlgb, n., a cor- 
porate town. 

bor'row, v.t., to ob- 
tain on loan. 

borrowed, p.p., bor- 
row. 

bor'rower, n., one 
who borrows. 

bor'iowing, Prp., 
borrow. 

Bor'stal system, n., a 
method of reclaim- 
ing senior boy crim- 
inals. 

bos, »., an ox {Lot.), 

bos'oage, n., sylvan 
foliage. 

bosh, »., nonsense. 

bosk'et, n., a grove; a 
shrubbery. 

bosk'y, adj., covered 
withthickets;bushy. 

bos'om, n., the hu- 
man breast; adj., 
dear; v.t., to em- 
brace, embosom. 

bos'omed,^.^. ,bosom . 

bos'oming, pr.p., 
bosom. 

boss, n., a knob, pro- 
tuberance; a mas- 
ter; v.t., to order 
peremptorily. 

boe'sage, n., rustic 
work made of rough 
stones in building. 

bossed, p.p., boss- 
adj., ornamented 
with bosses. 

boss'ing, pr.p., boss. 

bos'sy, adj., i.q. 
bossed. 

Bos'well, n., any 
biographer. 

bot, n., the maggot 
of a gadfly. 

botanic adj., rel. to 
plants or botany. 



t 



> 

^1 



S 



S 



\ 



X 



} 
>. 



V 






75 



botanical, adj., i.q. 
botanic. 

bot'anist, n., one 
skilled in botany. 

bot'aoize, t.t'., to 
study plants. 

botanized, p.p., bot- 
anize. 

bot'anizing, pr.p., 
botanize. 

bot'any, n., the sci- 
ence which treats of 
the vegetable king- 
dom. 

botar'go, n., the salt- 
ed roes of the mul- 
let or tunny. 

botch, v.t., to mend or 
patch clumsily; n., 
a swelling or blotch 
on the skin. 

botched, p.p., botch. 

botch'ei, n., a clumsy 
workman at mend- 
ing. 

botch'ery, n., clumsy 
workmanship. 

botch'ing,^r./).,botch. 

botch'y, adj., marked 
with botches. 

bote, n., compensa- 
fion (legal). 

oot'-fly, n., a fly that 
produces bots. 

both, adj., pron., adv. 
and conj., the one 
and the other; the 
pair. 

both'er, v.t., to annoy; 
n., a trouble. 

botb'ered,^.^. .bother. 

both'eiing, pr-p-, 
bother. 

both'ie, both'y, n., 
a building used 
as a lodging by 
workpeople (Scot.). 

Both'nian, adj., rel. 
to Bothnia. 

Both'nic, adj., i.q. 
Bothnian. 

bot'ryoid, a4;., shaped 
like a bunch of 
grapes. 

botryoid'al, adj., i.q. 
botryoid. 

bot'ryolite, n., a vari- 
ety of datolite. 

bots, botts, n. pi., the 
maggots of gadflies, 
causing a cattle 
disease. 

boftine, »., a half- 
boot; a surgical 
boot. 

bot'tle, n., a narrow- 
aiouthea hollow 
vessel for contain- 
ing liquids; v.t., to 
put into bottles. 



.1* 



\ 






V 



d 



^ 



V 



^ 



n/^ 



%. 



bound 



bot' tied, p.p., bottle. 

bot'tling.^r/)., bottle. 

bot'tom, n., the low- 
est part of anything; 
the seat; the base; 
adj., lowest; v.t., tn 
furnish with a bot- 
tom; reach the bot- 
tom of. 

bot'tomed, adj., hav- 
ing a bottom; p.p., 
bottom. 

bot'toming, pr.p-, 
bottom. 

bottomless, adj., 
fathomless. 

bot'tomry, n., the act 
of borrowing mone\ 
by mortgaging or 
pledging a ship. 

booche, v.t., to drill a 
new mouth in a 
spiked gun. 

boudoir', n., a small 
private room be- 
longing to a lady. 

bough, n., a large 
branch of a tree. 

bought, p.p., buy. 

bott'gie, n., a wax 
taper; a surgical 
instrument for 

opening obstructed 
narrow passages. 

bonil'U, n., meat 

• stewed with vege- 
tables, [soup. 

bouil'lon, n., broth, 

boul'der, »., a water- 
worn, rounded 
stone, larger than 
a pebble; an ice- 
worn rock of large 
size found in clays 
and gravels of the 
Drift formation. 

boal'evard, n., a wide 
street shaded with 
trees; properly, a 
walk on the bul- 
warks or ramparts 
of a town. 

bounce, v.i., to make 
a sudden leap; to 
boast; v.t., to drive 
suddenly and vio- 
lently against any- 
thing; n., a heavy 
blow; boasting. 

bounced,/).^, .bounce. 

bonno'ei, n., one that 
bounces; a braggart. 

bonno'ing, adj., vig- 
orous; stout; pr.p., 
bounce. 

bonnc'ingly, adv., in a 
bouncing manner. 

bound, n., a limit; a 
liap;t;.<., to circum- 
Mribc;».«. , to spring; 



boundary 



H 



> 



a<i;'., prepared; des- 
tined; restrained; 
p.p., bind. 

boond'ary, ft., a 
limit. 

bonnd'ed, adj., lim- 
ited; />.^., bound. 

bonnd'en, adj., obli- 
gatory. 

bonnd'er, n., one who 
or that which 
bounds; a preten- 
tious, vulgar fellow. 

bound'ing, pr.p., 
bound. 

boaud'less,a<//., illim- 
itable; infinite. 

bonnd'lessly, adv., in 
unlimited degree. 

bonnd'lessness, n. , 

the state of being 
boundless. 

boon'teons, adj., gen- 
erous. 

bovin'teonsly, adv., 
liberally. 

boun'teoiisness, n., 
the quality of being 
bounteous. 

bonn'tifal.iu/;., muni- 
ficent. 

boun'tifulness, n., the 
quality of being 
bountiful. 

botm'ty, n., generos- 
ity; a favour; a 
premium. 

bouquet', n., a bunch 
of flowers; an agree- 
able aroma. 

Bour'bouism, n., sup- 
port of the claims of 
the Bourbon family 
to the French 
throne. 

Bonr'bonist, n., a 
French royalist. 

boni'geois. n., a citi- 
zen, a man of mid- 
dle rank; adj., med- 
iocre in taste or 
maimers. 

bourgeois', n., small 
printing type, be- 
tween brevier and 
long primer. 

bonigeois'ie, ft., the 
middle class. 

boni'geon, v.i. and n., 
i.q. burgeon. 

bourn, bourne, n., a 
limit; a brook. 

bourse, n., an ex- 
change where mer- 
chants meet to 
transact business. 

boustropbe'don, n., 
writing running in 
lines alternately 
from left to right 






\, 






v^ 



.V, 



V 



76 



and from right to 
left. 

bout, ft., a set-to; a 
contest; a debauch. 

bouts-rimes', ft. pi., 
words that rhyme 
given as the ends ot 
lines of a stanza, 
the other parts to 
be filled in as an in- 
tellectual exercise. 

bo'vine, adj., pert, to 
oxen. 

Bo'vril, ft., a patent 
preparation of beef 
essences. 

bow, ft., part of a 
violin; a weapon; a 
looped knot; an 
arch or curve. 

bow, ft., the front 
part of a ship; v.t., 
to make to bend ;t;. t. , 
to bend the body. 

bowd'lerize, v.t., to 
alter a text by 
cutting out impro- 
prieties. 

bowd'Ierized, p.p., 
bou'.Iienze. 

bowdlerizing, pr.p., 
bowJicrize. 

bowed, ^.p., bow. 

bow'els, ft. pi., the 
intestines; compas- 
sion. 

bow'er, ft., one who 
bows; one of two 
anchors at the bow 
of a ship; a boudoir; 
an arbour. 

bow'ery, adj., having 
bowers, arboured; 
a district of New 
York of evil repu- 
tation. 

bow'ie-knife, n., a 
strong knife used as 
a weapon in the 
United States. 

bow'ing, pr.p., bow. 

bow'knot, ft., a slip- 
knot. 

bowl, ft., a hollow 
vessel, almost hemi- 
spherical; the hol- 
low part of any- 
thing, as of a spoon 
or tobacco-pipe; a 
ball of wood used 
in a lawn game; v.^, 
to deliver the ball 
at cricket; to roll a 
bowl. 

bowled, p.p., bowl. 

bow'-leg, ft., a crook- 
ed leg. 

bow'-legged, adj., 
having crooked or 
bandy legs. 



boycotting 



sr^ 



^ 



V 






bowl'er, ft., one who 
plays at bowls; at 
cricket, the player 
who delivers or 
serves the ball to 
the batsman. 

bow'line, ft., a rope 
attached to a square 
sail and fastened so 
as to stretch the 
sail tight forward 
towards the bow. 

bowl'ing, pr.p., bowl. 

bowling-green, ft., a 
level lawn for bowl- 
ing. 

bow'man, ft., an 
archer. 

bowse, v.i., to ptill or 
haul hard. 

bow'sprit, ft., the 
large spar project- 
ing over the bow of 
a vessel. 

bow'-string, ft., the 
string that bends a 
bow; a string used 
by Turkish execu- 
tioners for stran- 
gling. 

bow'-window, ft., a 
projecting window 
whose plan is a 
segment of a circle. 

bow'-wow.tft/er;., the 
bark of a dog; ti.t'., 
to bark. 

box, ft., an evergreen 
shrub with hard 
wood; a case; a 
small room for spec- 
tators in a theatre; 
a shelter; the driv- 
er's seat on a car- 
riage; a small house 
for sportsmen; v.t., 
to enclose, as in a 
box; to fight with 
the fists. 

boxed, p.p., box. 

box'er, n., a pugilist. 

box'ing, pr.p., box. 

box'-tree, ft., a hard- 
timbered, evergreen 
shrub. 

box' -wood, ft., the 
fine, hard-grained 
timber of the box- 
tree. 

boy, ft., a male child; 
a youth; a comrade. 

boy'an, ft., a zig-zag 
trench in fortifica- 
tion. 

boy'oott, t;.<. , to ostra- 
cize; ft., ostracism. 

boy'cotted, p.p., boy- 
cott. 



boy'cotting, 

boycott. 



pr.p., 



boyhood 



I 






^ 



V 






boy'bood. n.,the state 
of being a boy. 

boyish, adj., pert, to 
a boy; itninature. 

boy'ishly, adv., in a 
boyisli iiianiicr. 

boyishness, n., the 
quality of being 
Ixiyish. 

boy 's'-play,n. , child's 
play; anything easy 
to accomplish. 

brac'cate, adj., feath- 
ered as to the feet. 

brace, n., that which 
liolds two or more 
things tight to- 
gether; a couple; 
v.t., to tie closely; 
to strengthen. 

braced, p.p., brace. 

brace'let, n., an orna- 
ment for the wrist. 

bracer, n., a guard 
for the wrist. 

brachial, adj., bel. 
to the arm. 

brach'iate, adj., Iiay- 
ing branches in 
pairs, each pair at 
right angles to the 
next. 

braoh'iopod, n., a 
marine mollusc with 
breathing append- 
ages on either side 
of its mouth. 

brachyg'rapher, n., a 
shorthand writer. 

biachyg'raphy, n., 
shorthand; stenog- 
raphy. 

brachyrogy. «., con- 
ciseness of expres- 
sion. 

bra'cing, adj., in- 
vigorating; pr.p., 
brace. 

bracken, n., (ern. 

braok'et, m., a short 
support projecting 
from a vertical sur- 
face; a gas-pipe pro- 
jecting from a wall; 
one of two marks 
used by printers to 
enclose an inter- 
polation, etc.; v.t., 
to furnish with a 
bracket- to enclose 
within brackets. 

brack'eted. p.p., 
bracket. 

brack'eting, pr.p., 
bracket. 

brack'iBb, adj. , rather 
salt. 

brack'ishness, n., the 
quality of being 
brackish. 



H 
'^, 



^ 



V 






77 



bnot, n., a modified 
leaf on the peduncle 
near the flower. 

brae' tea, n. (Lot.), a 
thin plate of metal. 

bract'eate, adj., fur- 
nished with brac- 
teae. 

brad, n., a small - 
headed nail used 
esp. by bootmakers. 

bradawl, n., au awl 
to make holes for 
brads. 

brad'ypod, »., a sloth. 

brag, v.t-, to boast; n., 
a game at cards. 

braggado'cio, n., a 
braggart; empty 
boasting. 

brag'gait, n., a boast- 
er. 

bragged, p.p., brag. 

brag'ger, n., one who 
brags. 

bragging, ^r^., brag. 

Brah'ma, n., a Hindu 
god; the Creator. 

Brah'man, n., a mem- 
ber of the Hindu 
sacred caste, noted 
for minute religious 
observances. 

Brahmin, n., i.q. 
Brahman. 
- Brahmin' ical, adj., 
pert, to the Brah- 
mins. 

braid, v.t., to plait; to 
intertwine; n., 4 
narrow plaited 

band. 

braided, p.p., braid. 

braid'ing, »., trim- 
ming made of braid; 
pr.p., braid. 

brail, n., a rope 
attached to a fore- 
and-aft sail; v.t., to 
haul in by means of 
the brails. 

Braille, n., a system 
of reading for the 
blind by means of 
raised letters. 

brain, n., the soft, 
greyish matter con- 
tained in the skull; 
the understanding; 
v.t., to beat out the 
brains of. 

brainedL adj., fur- 
nished with brains; 
p.p., Vrain. 

braining, />r.^. , brain. 

brain'less, adj., with- 
out understanding; 
silly. 

brain'pan, n., the 
skull. 









brandish 



braise, v.t. to stew 
with vegetables. 

brake, n., a thicket; 
an appliance to stop 
motion by friction; 
a heavy vehicle for 
bnaking m young 
hoi SOS to harness; a 
wagonette. 

brake'man, n., a man 
whoso business it is 
to attend to the 
brakes of a railway 
tram. 

brakes'man, n., i.q. 
brakeman. 

brak'y, adj., full 
of brambles and 
shrubs. 

bram'ble, «., a prickly 
shrub; a blackberry. 

bram'bling, n., a 
British finch, larger 
than the chaffinch. 

bram'bly, adj., full of 
brambles. 

bran, »., the husk of 
gram. 

branch, n., a bough; 
an offshoot; a sub- 
division or depart- 
ment; v.t., to send 
out branches; to 
diverge. 

branched, ^.^. branch. 

bran'chial, adj., rel. 
to the branchiae or 
pii;^ of fishes. 

branch'ing, pr.p., 
branch. 

branch'iopod, »., a 
crustacean whose 
gills are on the 
fieet, as in the 
water-fleas. 

branch'less,a(i;.,wilh- 
oiit branches. 

branch'y, adj., hav- 
ing wide-spreading 
branches. 

brand, n., a sword; a 
piece of burning or 
partly burnt wood; 
a mark made by 
burning or other- 
wise to denote own- 
ership, etc.; a trade- 
mark; a mark of in- 
fan\y; v.t., to mark; 
to stigmatize as 
infamous. 

brand'ed, p.p., brand. 

brand'er, n., one who 
brands. 

bran'died, adj., fla- 
voured with brandy. 

branding, pr.p., 

brand. 

brandish, v.t., to 
wave; to flourish. 



brandished 



No 



^ 

N*-^ 



bran'dished, p.p., 
brandish. 

bran'dishing, pr.p., 
brandish. 

brand'ling, n., the 
parr; a young sal- 
mon. 

biand'-new, adj., ab- 
solutely new. 

brandy, n., a spiritu- 
ous liquor distilled 
from wine. 

bian'gle, n., a squab- 
ble; «.»., to wrangle. 

bian'gled, p.p., bran- 
gle. 

bran'glei, n. , a squab- 
bler. 

bran'gling, pr.p., 
brangle. 

bian'lin, n., a small 
red worm used as 
bait. 

bian'ny, adj., resem- 
bling or consisting 
of bran. 

brant, adj., i.q. brent. 

brash, n., a confused 
heap of fragments 
of broken rocks or 
of boughs of trees. 

brass, n., an alloy of 
copper and zinc; a 
monumental plate; 
impudence. 

bias'sard, n., an arm- 
let. 

bras'sart,"., «.?. bras- 
sard. 

brass'-band, »., a 
company of musi- 
cians who perform 
on instruments of 
brass. 

brasse, n., a spotted 
fish resembling a 
perch. 

brass'ey, «., a wooden 
golf club protected 
at the bottom by a 
brass plate. 

brass'ineaa, n., the 
stateot beingbrassy. 

brass'y, adj., resem- 
bling or composed 
of brass. 

biat, n., a child; an 
apron [Prov.). 

brava'do, n., a boast. 

brave, adj., courage- 
ous; n., a daring 
person; a North 
American Indian 
warrior; ».<., to defy. 

braved, p.p., brave. 

brave'ly, adv., in a 
brave manner. 

brave'nesa, »., the 
quality of being 
brave. 



V 















> 



78 



brav'er, n., one who 
braves; comp. of 
brave. 

brav'ery, n., courage; 
splendour. 

brav'est, adj., tuper. 
of brave. 

brav'ing, *r.^., brave. 

bra'vo, inter j., well 
done I n., a hired 
assassin. 

bravn'ra, adj. (in 
music), florid, elab- 
orate. 

brawl, «., a noisy 
quarrel; ».«., to 
quarrel noisily. 

brawled, p.p., brawl. 

brawl' er, »., one who 
brawls. 

brawl'ing, adj., quar- 
relsome; pr.p., 
brawl. 

brawn, n., pig's cheek 
and ox feet, boiled 
and pickled, and 
pressed into a 
shape; muscular 
strength. 

brawn'y, adj., having 
large, strong mus- 
cles. 

brax'y, »., a disease 
of sheep. 

bray, v.t., to poimd or 
grind small; ».»., to 
utter the cry of an 
ass; n., the roar of 
an ass. 

brayed, p.p., bray. 

bray'er, n., one that 
brays like an ass. 

bray'ing, pr.p., bray. 

braze, v.t., to solder 
with a hard alloy 
of brass and zinc; 
to cover or om ament 
with brass. 

brand, p.p., braze. 

bra'zen, adj., made 
of brass; impudent. 

brazen-faced, adj., 
impudent. 

bra'zenness, n., bras- 
siness; impudence. 

bra'zier, n., an open 
pan for burning 
wood or coal. 

brazil', n., a very 
heavy red tropical 
wood used in dye- 
ing; a republic of 
South America. 

Brazil'lan, adj., pert. 
to Brazil. 

brazing, pr.p., braze. 

breach, n., the viola- 
tion of a pledge; a i 
gap, esp. m fortifi- j 
cations; a quarrel; ; 



> 



■v- 



\ 



■V- 



V-.. 



bream 



v.t., to make a 
breach in. 

breaching, pr.p., 
breach. 

bread, n., flour mois- 
tened, fermented, 
and baked into a 
food. 

bread'-com, n., corn 
or grain of which 
bread is made. 

bread'fmit, n., the 
fruit of a tree in 
Polynesia, used as 
a substitute for 
bread. 

bread'stnfl, n., a col- 
lective name for all 
kinds of grain and 
flour out of which 
bread is made. 

breadth, »., extent 
trom side to side; 
width. 

bread' winner, n., one 
whose labour sup- 
ports a family. 

break, v.t., to divide 
by force; to train to 
obedience; to cash- 
ier or reduce in 
rank; to violate; 
v.i., to become bro- 
ken ; to become 
bankrupt ; n., a 
breach ; a brake. 

break'able, adj., cap- 
able of being broken . 

break'age, n., the act 
of breaking; allow- 
ance for accidental 
breaking. 

break'-down, n., an 
overthrow; a fail- 
ure; a lively, noisy 
dance. 

break'er, »., one who 
breaks; a wave 
broken into foam 
near the shore; a 
small, flat water- 
cask. 

break'fast, »., the 
first meal of the 
day; ».»., to eat 
breakfast. 

break'iasted, p.p., 
breaktast. 

break'Iasting, pr.p., 
breakfast. 

break'ing, pr.p.hztik. 

break'man, n., i.q. 
brakeman. 

breakwater, n., a 
structure protect- 
ing a harbour by 
breaking the force 
of the waves. 

bream, n., a fresh- 
water fish of the 



breamed 












carp family; also 
a spiny sea-perch; 
v.t., to clean aship"; 
bottom by 6re. 

breamed, p.p. .bream 

bream'ing, pr. p. 
bream. 

breast, «., the fore 
part of the body 
between the neck 
and the belly; the 
seat of the affec- 
tions and emotions; 
v.t., to meet in front 
boldly; to oppose 
with the breast. 

breast'ed, adj., hav- 
ing a breast; p.p., 
breast. 

breast'fast, n., a cable 
used to fasten the 
midship part of a 
boat to a wharf. 

breast'ing, Prp-. 
breast. 

breast'knot, n., a knot 
of ribbon worn on 
the breast. 

breast'pin, n., a fast- 
ening or ornament 
worn on the breast. 

breast'plate, n., de- 
fensive armour cov- 
ering the breast. 

breast' wheel, »., a 
water-wheel which 
delivers the water 
about half-way be- 
tween the top and 
the bottom. 

breasfwork, n., a 
breast-high parapet. 

breath, n., the air 
inhaled and ex- 
haled during respi- 
ration; air in gentle 
motion. 

teeatti'able, adj., cap- 
able of being 
brr.Tthcd. 

breathe, t.i., to take 
breath; to be alive; 
v.t., to inhale; to 
utter. 

breathed,/>.^.breathe. 

breath'er, n., a sharp 
spoil of exercise. 

breath ing, n., respi- 
ration; in grammar, 
an aspirate; pr.p., 
breathe. 

breathless, adj., out 
of bro.-ith. 

brec'cia, n., a rock 
made of angular 
fragments united 
by a cement. 

bred, p.p., breed 

breech, n., the hinder 
end of anything 



> 

V 












79 



esp. of a cannon; 
»./., to put into 
breeches; to flog; to 
fasten with a breech- 
ing. 

breeched, adj. , having 
a breechor breeches; 
p.p., breech. 

breeoh'es, n. pi., a 
garment worn by 
men to cover their 
hip<: and thighs. 

breeching, n., a 
strong rope to mini- 
mize the recoil of a 
gun; the part of 
harness round a 
horse's breech; 

pr.p., breech. 

breechloader, n., a 
firearm loaded at 
the breech instead 
of the muzzle. 

breecb'loading, adj., 
loaded at the 
breech. 

breed, v.t., to produce; 
to bring up or rear; 
v.t., to bear a child; 
n., progeny from 
the same stock. 

breed' er, n., one who 
breeds young; one 
who takes care to 
raise a particular 
breed of animal, 

breed'mg, n., the act 
of producing young, 
of rearing live stock; 
upbringmg; deport- 
ment; good man- 
ners; pr.p., breed. 

breeze, n., a light 
wind; a horse-fly. 

breez'y, adj., fanned 
with light winds. 

Bre'hOD, »., an an- 
cient Irish judge. 

brent, adj., applied to 
a small wild goose 
which breeds in the 
north. 

bret, n., a kind of 
brill or turbot. 

breth'ren, n., pi. of 
brother. 

bret'tice, «., a par- 
tition in mining 
shafts to assist ven- 
tilation; a fence put 
round dangerous 
machinery. 

breve, n., in music, a 
note four minims in 
length. 

teevet, adj., of tem- 
porary rank; n., a 
patent or warrant; 
an honorary rank 
in the array; t;.*., to 



\ 



brie-&-brac 



confer brevet rank 
upon. 

brev'eted,p.p.,brevet. 

brev'eting, pr. p., 
brevet. 

bre'viary, n., a ser- 
vice book, contain- 
ing the daily offices 
of the Church. 

brevier', n., aprinting 
type between bour- 
geois and minion. 

brev'iped, adj., hav- 
ing short legs. 

brevipen'nate, adj. , 
having short wings. 

brev'ity, n., shortness; 
conciseness; fewness 
of words. 

brew, v.t., to prepare 
by steeping, boil- 
ing, and fermenta- 
tion; to mingle; to 
contrive; n., the 
mixture formed by 
brewing. 

brew'age, n., a mixed 
drink. 

brewed, p.p., brew. 

brew'er, n., one who 
brews. 

brew'ery, n., a place 
where brewing is 
carried on. 

brew'Aouse, n., a 
house in which beer 
is brewed. 

brew'ing, pr.p., brew; 
«., the process of 
making twer, etc.; 
the quantity brewed 
at one time. 

brew'is, n., i.q. brew- 
house. 

brew'ster, n., one who 
brews; a brewer, 
esp. a female brewer. 

bri'ar, n., i.q. brier. 

Bria'rean, adj., pert, 
to Briareus, a giant 
with a hundred 
hands. 

bribe, n., a gift be- 
stowed to corrupt 
the conduct; v.t., to 
gain over by a 
bribe; ».»., to prac- 
tise bribery. 

bribed, p.p., bribe. 

brib'er, n., one who 
bribes. 

brib'ery, «., the act of 
givnig or receiving 
a bribe. 

brib'ing, pr.p., bribe. 

bric'-4-brac «., arti- 
cles havii^g interest 
or value because of 
their rarity, anti- 
quity, etc. 



briek 



\-. 



u 



l</^ 

•<*. 






•> 



X 



brick, n., a kind of 
artificial stone made 
by burning moist- 
ened and moulded 
clay; adj., made of 
brick; v.t., to cover 
with brick. 

brick'bat, n., a frag- 
ineiit of a brick. 

brick'-kiln, n., a fur- 
nace in which bricks 
are burned. 

briok'layer, m., one 
who builds with 
bricks. 

briok'makei, n., a 
maker of bricks. 

brick' work, n., mas- 
onry made of bricks. 

briok'yaid, n., a yard 
in which bricks are 
stored for sale. 

bri'dal, n. , a marriage. 

bride, n., a woman 
newly married or 
about to be married. 

biide'cake, n., the 
cake made for the 
guests at a wedding. 

bride'chambei, n., a 
nuptial apartment. 

bride'gioom, n., a 
man newly married 
or about to be 
married. 

bride'leas, »dj., with- 
out a bride. 

bride'maid, n., a girl 
or woman who at- 
tends the bride at 
a wedding. 

bride'nuui, n., i.q. 
bridesman. 

biides'maid, »., i.q. 
bridesmaid. 

brides' man, **., a man 
who attends the 
bridegroom and 
bride at their mar- 
riage; a groomsman. 

bride' well, n., a prison 
for disorderly per- 
sons. 

bridge, n., a structure 
rais^ over a river 
or other depression 
to provide a suit- 
able passage; a game 
at cards resembling 
whist- v.t., to build 
a bridge over. 

bridged, p.p., bridge. 

bridg'ing, pr. p., 
bridge. 

bri'dle, M., head- 
harness for a horse; 
a restraint; v.t., to 
restrain; ».»., to toss 
the head, express- 
ing indignation. 






\ ■ 









% 



X 



80 



bri'dled, p.p., bridle. 

bri'dler, «., one who 
bridles. 

bri dling, ^f.^., bridle. 

bridoon', «., a light 
snaffie with a dis- 
tinct rein. 

brief, adj., short; n., a 
summary of a case- 
at-law ; a Papal 
letter; a circular 
appeal. 

briefer, »., a solicitor 
who hands a brief 
to counsel; adj., 

■ comp. of brief. 

briefest, adj., super. 
of brief. 

briefless, adj., having 
received no briefs. 

briefly, adv., con- 
cisely. 

briefness, »., con- 
ciseness. 

bri'er, n., a prickly 
shrub, esp. the wild 
rose. 

bri'ered, adj., set with 
briers. 

bri'ery, adj., full of 
briers; thorny. 

brig, n., a square- 
rigged, two-masted 
vessel. 

brigade', n., a number 
of battalions of 
troops. 

brigadier', »., the 
general command- 
ing a brigade. 

brig'and, n., a robber, 
esp. one of those 
who live in bands in 
mountains. 

brig'andage. n., rob- 
bery by brigands. 

brig'andiae, n., i.g. 
brigantine. 

brig'antine, n., a two- 
masted sailing ves- 
sel resembling a 
brig. 

bright, adj., shining; 
rlever; cheerful. 

bright'en, v.t., to 
make bright or 
brighter: v.i., to 
grow bright or 
brighter. 

brightened, p. p., 
brighten. 

brigbt'ening, pr.p., 
brighten. 

bright'-eyed, adj., 
Iiaving bright eyes. 

bright'ly, adv., in a 
bright manner. 

bright'ness, n., the 
stateotbeipgbright. 

Bright's' disease', n.. 



> 



bristly 

a dangerous disease 
of the kidneys. 

brigoe, n. (Fr.), a 
cabal; a secret con- 
trivance. 

brill, n., a flat-fish. 

brilliance, n., great 
brightness; splen- 
dour. 

bril'Uancy, n., i.g. 
brilliance. 

bril'liant, adj., spark- 
ling ; glittering ; 
shining; n., a fine- 
cut diamond. 

brii'liantly, adv., in a 
brilliant manner. 

brim, n., a margin; a 
rim; v.t., to fill full; 
v.i., to be full to 
overflowing. 

brim'ful. adj., ftill to 

the top. 

brim'less, adj., hav- 
ing no brim. 

brimmed, p.p., brim. 

brim'mer, n., a glass 
fnll to the brim. 

brim'ming, adj., full 
to the top; pr.p., 
brim. 

brim'stone, n., sul- 
phur. 

brind'ed, i.g. brindled. 

brind'led, adj., grey 
or tawny streaked 
with darker colour. 

brine, n., salt-water. 

brine'pan, n., a pit in 
which salt is formed 
by the evaporation 
of brine. 

bring, v.t., to fetch; to 
convey from a dis- 
tant to a nearer 
place. 

bring'er, n., one who 
brings. 

bring'ing, pr.p.,brmg. 

brin'ish, adj., rather 
salt. 

brink, n., the edge of 
a steep place. 

brin'y, adj., consist- 
ing of brine. 

brisk, adj., lively; 
nimble; quick. 

brisk' et, n., the breast 
>>f an animal. 

brisk'ly, adv., in a 
brisk manner. 

brisk'ness, n., the 
state of being brisk. 

bristle. «., a stiff 
hair; v.i., to stand 
on end like bristles. 

bris'tled, p.p., bristle. 

bristling, pr.p., bris- 
tle. 

bris'tly, adj., thick 



Britannie 



81 



brotherhood 



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.'h 






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set with hairs like 
bristles. 

Britan'nio, adj., pert. 
to Uritain. 

Brit'isb, adj., pert, to 
Great Brilain;some- 
tiines applied speci- 
fically to the ancieat 
Celtic itihabitaiits. 

Briton, n., a member 
<'f the British race. 

brittle, adj., easily 
broken; fragile. 

brit Ueaess, n., fra- 

^■'lUV. 

britz'ka, n., an open 
carriage with a fold- 
ini; top. 

broach, n., a spit; a 
spire; v.t., to open 
for the first time. 

broached, P-P-, 

bro.ich. 

broaoh'er, n., one 
who broaches, opens 
or utters. 

broach'ing, pr. p., 
broach. 

broad, adj., having 
extent from side to 
side; wide. 

broad-arrow, n., a 
stamp resembling 
the head of an ar- 
row marking gov- 
ernment property. 

broad-awake, adj., 
wide-awake. 

broad'-aze, n., a 
woodman's axe. 

broad'cast, adj.,eBec- 
ted by casting the 
seed with the hand 
in sowing; adv., far 
and wide. 

broad'olotb, n., a fine 
woollen cloth. 

broad'en,v.<., to make 
broad or broader. 

broad' ened, p.p., 
broaden. 

broadening, pr.p., 
bioiulen. 

broad'iah, adj., rather 

bmad. 

broad'ly, oiiv., widely; 
rninpr(!hensively. 

broad'ne88,n.breadth. 

broad'side, n., a sim- 
ultaneous discharge 
of all the gims on 
one side of a ship; 
a sheet of paper 
printed on one side 
only, usually with 
popular matter. 

broad'sword, n., a 
sword with a broad 
blade and sharp 
edge, formerly the 



national weapon of 
^ the Highlanders. 

\ Brobdingna'gian,a<i;., 
^ rel. to the land of 

>-*>rj the Brobdingnags 
* in Gulliver's Travels; 
gigantic. 
^^ brocade', n., silk stuff 
- ^ I richly embroidered. 
^^-|. brocad'ed, adj. , work- 
ed into a brocade; 
^ ^ dressed in brocade. 
^-j-A broo'ooli, n., a cab- 
bage resembling a 
cauliflower. 
y brocbore', n., a 
•^ pamphlet. 

^ > — brock, n., a badger. 
v^ brock'et, n., a red 
- deer two years old. 

-Jn— brog, n., a bradawl. 
V-, bro'gan, w., a brogue. 
^^ brogue, »., a shoe of 
rough hide; dialec- 
^ tical peculiarity. 
>i broid'ei, v.t., to adorn 
^ with needlework. 

A) broid'ered, p.p., broi- 
<^ der. 

^ broid'ering, pr-p., 
„ - '^^ broider. 
V broil, «., a noisy 

quarrel; v.t., to cook 
over a fire on a 
gridironj v.i., to 
sweat with heat, 
broil, 
one who 
„ -^ broils; 
■ ^ broirincpr.^., broil, 
broke, p.t., break, 
broken, p.p., break; 

adj., interrupted, 
bro'kenly, adv., in a 
broken manner. 
X_^ bro'kenness, »., the 
state of being bro- 

>| — bro'ker, n., an agent 
who buys or sells 
on commission. 

>-y brokerage, n., a 
' broker's commis- 

sion. 

V-^ bro'ma, n., a form of 
prepared cocoa, 
bro mol, n., a colour- 
less, oily liquid ob- 
tained by the action 
of bromine on al- 
cohol, 
bro'nutte. n., a salt of 

bromic acid, 
bromatoroffy, m., the 
science of alimen- 
tation. 

\n bromide, «., a com- 
pound of bromine 
and another ele- 
ment. 



^ sweat with 
\/^ broiled, ^^, 
> > broiler, n., o 



\_ 



X/^ 






V, 



7 



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1 



X 






7 



^ 

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bro'mine, m., a dark- 
reddish liquid ele- 
ment of strong 
odour. 

bron'chia, n. pL, the 
air-tubes leading to 
the lungs. 

bronchial, adj., pert. 
to the l)ronchia. 

bronchi'Us, »., inflam- 
mation of the lining 
membrane of the 
bronchi or bronchia. 

bron'cbus, n., one of 
the two bronchia. 

bronze, n., an alloy 
of copper, tin, and 
sometimes zinc; v.i., 
to make to look like 
bronze; to brown; 
v.t., to turn brown. 

bronzed, p.p., bronze. 

bronzing, pf-P-t 
bronze. 

brooch, M.. an orna- 
mental clasp. 

bropd, n., ofispring; 
v.t., to sit on eggs, 
as a hen; to dwell 
continuously on 
something with the 
mind. 

brooded, p.p.. brood. 

brood' ing, adj., pon- 
dering ; thinking 
deeply;/)f.p., brood. 

brood'y, adj., describ- 
ing a sitting hen. 

brook, n., a small 
stream of water; 
v.t., to endure. 

brooked, p.p., brook. 

brook'ing, prp-, 

brook. 

brook'let, »., a little 
brook. 

broom, n., a shrub 
with yellow flowers 
growing on heaths; 
long-handled brush. 

broom'stiok, n., the 
handle of a broom. 

broom'y, adj., full of 
broom. 

brose, n., a kind of 
Scotch broth or 
porridge. 

ferotb, »., liquor in 
which meat has 
been boiled, usually 
with certain vege- 
tables. 

brotb'eL n., a house 
of ill-iame. 

broth' et, n., the son 
of the same parents; 
a fellow-creature. 

broth'erhpod, n., an 
association of men 
for any purpose. 



brother-in-law 



82 



baekskin 






V 



•s 



Y 

V .1 



•v 






'No' 



'V 



brotb'er-in-law, n., 

the brother of one's 
husband or wife; a 
sister's husband. 

broth' erliness, n., the 
quality of being 
brotherly. 

brotb'eily, adj., such 
as is natural for 
brothers. 

broagh'am, n., a one- 
horse closed car- 
riage. 

broaght, p.p., bring. 

brow, »., the ridge 
over the eye; the 
forehead; the upper 
portion of a slope. 

brow'beat, v.t., to 
bully. 

brow'beaten, p.p., 
browbeat. 

brow'beating, pr.p., 
browbeat. 

brown, adj., a dark 
colour inclining to 
red; »./., to make 
brown; ».»., to turn 
brown. 

browned, p.p., brown. 

brown'ie, n., a kind 
of fairy. 

brown'ing, n., a pre- 
paration of burnt 
sugar, etc., for col- 
ouring dishes; pr.p., 
brown. 

brown'iBli,<>4;'., rather 
brown. 

brown' stnd'y, n., a 
reverie. 

browse, browze, v.t. 
and t., to graze. 

browsed, p.p., browse . 

brows'er, n., one who 
browses. 

brows'ing, pr. p., 
browse. 

bra' in, n., a name 
given to the bear. 

braise, v.t., to injure 
by a blow without 
laceration; n., a 
contusion. 

bmised, p.p., bruise. 

brais'er, n., one that 
bruises; a pugilist. 

brais'ing,/)/'.^. .bruise. 

brnit, n., a rumour; 
v.t., to noise abroad. 

brnit' ed, p.p., bruit. 

broit'ing, Pr.p., 

bruit. 

bni'mal, adj., bel. to 
the winter. 

bmnette', n. , a woman 
of dark complexion. 

brimt, n., the heat or 
utmost violence of 
an onset. 



Ny 



\ 



brash, n., an instru- 
ment made of bris- 
tles used for various 
purposes; a thicket 
of small trees and 
shrubs; the tail of a 
fox; a skirmish; v.t., 
to rub as with a 
brush. 

brashed, p.p., brush. 

brash' er, n., one who 
, brushes. 

brash'ing,^f.^.,brush. 

brasb'wood, »., small 
trees forming a cop- 
pice. 

brosh'y, adj., rough; 
shaggy. 

brasque, adj., abrupt 
in manner. 

brosqae'ness, n., an 
abrupt manner. 

bras'qaerie, «., brus- 
queness; a blunt 
expression. 

Bms'sela spronts', ». 
pi., a variety of 
cabbage consisting 
of little clusters of 
leaves for mingsmall 
heads. 

bra'tal, adj., savage; 
cruel. 

bratal'ity, n., gross 
cruelty. 

bra'talize, v.t., to de- 
grade to the level 
of a brute. 

brn'talised, p.p., bru- 
talize. 

bra'tahzing, pr.p., 
brutalize. 

bra' tally, adv., in a 
brutal manner. 

brate, n., a beast; a 
savage in disposi- 
tion or manners. 

bra' tilled, p.p., bru- 
tify. 

brn'tify, v.t., to make 
a person a brute. 

bra'ttfyjiig, Pr.p., bru- 

tify. 
, bra'tish, adj., resem- 
bling a brute. 

brn'tidily, adv., in a 
I brutish manner. 

bra'tishness, n., the 
state of being 
brutish. 

bryol'Dgy, n., the 
science of mosses. 

bry'ony, n., one of 
two British climb- 
ing plants, one 
called whiU, the 
other black. 

bab'ble, n., a small 
vesicle of fluid con- 
taining air; v.i., to 



V 



rise in bubbles; v.t., 
to cause to bubble. 

babbled, />.^., bubble. 

bubbling, pr.p., 

bubble. 

bab'bly, adj., full of 
bubbles. 

bo'bo, H., an in- 
flammatory tumour 
in the groin or 
armpit. 

babon'ic, adj., char- 
acterized by buboes. 

bnc'cal, adj., pert, to 
the cheek. 

bnccaneer', n., a pi- 
rate, esp. an English 
or French pirate in 
the Spanish Main. 

baccaneer'ing, n., 
piracy. 

boc'cinal, adj., trum- 
pet-like. 
■ baccina'tor, n., a 
muscle in the cheek 
used in blowing a 
wind instrument. 

bocen'taur, n., the 
Doge's state-barge 
at Venice; a myth- 
ical monster, half 
man and half ox. 

ba'ceros, n., a horn- 
bill ; a perching bird. 

bock, n., the male of 
various animals; a 
fop; bleaching-lye; 
v.t., to wash in 
bleaching-lye; v.i., 
to shy, to jib (of a 
horse). 

backed, ^.^., buck. 

baok'et, n., a vessel, 
now usu. of metal, 
for holding water; 
v.i., to spurt (slang). 

back'etfol, n., as 
much as a bucket 
will hold. 

baok'ing, pr.p., buck. 

bock'ish, adj., fop- 
pish. 

bno'kle, n., an instru- 
ment, consisting of 
a rim, chape, and 
tongue, for fasten- 
ing; v.t., to fasten 
with a buckle ; v.t. 
and ». , to crumple in. 

bao'kled, p.p., buckle. 

back'ler, n., a kind 
of shield. 

back'ling, pr.p., 
buckle. 

back' ram, n. , acoarse, 
stiff linen cloth. 

bock'skin, n., a soft 
yellowish or greyish 
leather, made of 
sheepskin. 



backthorn 



:) 



\ 






^ 
N 



\ 

\ 



bnok'tboin, »■, a 

spiny British shrub 
of various species. 

back' wheat, n., a 
herbaceous plant 
bearing small tri- 
angular seeds which 
are a valuable food. 

bUOOlio, adj., pas- 
toral; f»., a pastoral 
poem. 

bacol'ical,*-?- bucolic. 

bud, n., the early 
form of leaves or 
flowers before they 
expand; v.i., to pro- 
duce buds; v.t., to 
graft with a leaf- 
bud instead of a 
shoot . 

budded, p.p., bud. 

Bad'dbism, n., the 
chief religion of 
Asia. 

Bod'dhist, »., a wor- 
shipper of Buddha. 

bod'ding, pr.p., bud. 

bod'dle, n., a square 
frame used in wash- 
ing metallic ore. 

Bnde'-light, n., a 
brilliant light ob- 
tained by forcing 
oxygen into a coal 
or oil -gas flame. 

badge, v.t., to move 
away. 

bodged, ^•^■, budge. 

bads' er, "•> one who 
moves away. 

bodg'et, n., a little 
sack; a stock (of 
news, etc.); the 
Chancellor of the 
Exchequer's annual 
statement. 

badg'iiig,^f .^^ ,budge. 

bod'let, n., a little 
bud springing from 
another bud. 

boil, n., a soft kind of 
leather; a light yel- 
low colour. 

buffalo, n., a large 
Oriental draught- 
ox; the bison of 
North America. 

bof'fel, n., a small 
duck. 

buffer, n., anything 
to deaden the im- 
pact between two 
bodies; a fellow 
(familiar and rather 
contemptuous). 

buffet, n., a side- 
board; a refresh- 
ment room; a blow; 
v.t., to beat. 

buffeted, ^^, buffet. 



V 



■ N 



V 

vx 

VN 

vx 



83 



buf feter, n., one who 

buffets. 

buffeting, pr.p., buf- 
fet; n., the act of 
buffeting. 

buffo, n., an operatic 
comic singer. 

buffoon', «., a jester. 

bufioon'ery, «., ridic- 
ulous prank*;. 

buffooning, «., i.q. 
buffof)nery. 

boffy, adj., buff- 
oloured. 

bug, n., an insect of 
various kinds; esp. 
the domestic bug. 

bng'bear, n., some- 
thing that causes 
terror. 

bog'gy, adj., abound- 
ing with bugs; n., a 
light one-horse car- 
riage. 

bu'gle, »., a hunting 
horn; a military 
musical brass wind 
instrument; a long 
black bead. 

bu'glei, n., one who 
plays a bugle. 

bn'gloss, n., a weed 
with purple flowers. 

buhl, n., inlaid orna- 
mentation of gold, 
mother - of - pearl, 
etc. 

buhl'-work, n., cab- 
inet work inlaid 
with buhl. 

buhr'-stone, n., stone 
used for millstones. 

build, v.t., to con- 
struct. 

build'ed. p.p., build; 
used poetically. 

build'er, n., one who 
builds. 

bullif lag,n.,the&ct 
of one who builds; 
the thing built; 
pr.p., build. 

bnil^ adj., shaped; 
p.p., build. 

bulb, n., the rounded 
part of an onion or 
similar plant; any 
protuberance re- 
sembling a bulb. 

bulbed, adj., having 
a bulb. 

bolbiferous, adj., 
producing bulbs. 

bulb' let, n., a bulb 
which separates 
from the stem of a 
plant. 

bnlb'otia, adj., resem- 
bling a bulb in 
shape. 



\r 
vL 

V 

vi 



V 



\<~^ 



V' 



bull's-eye 



bol'bnl, n., a night- 
ingale (Persian). 

bnlb'ale, n., a small 
or immature bulb. 

bulge, v.i., to swell 
out; a swelling out. 

bulged, p.p., bulge. 

balg'itig, pr.p., bulge. 

buU'mia, , n., vora- 
cious appetite. 

bulk, n., size; the 
main mass; v.i., to 
swell. 

bulked, p.p., bulk. 

bolk'heaid, n., a par- 
tition in a ship. 

bolk'iness, n., the 
quality of being 
bulky. 

bolk'ing, pr.p., bulk. 

bulk'y, n., large. 

ball, n., a male ox; on 
the stock exchange, 
one who works for a 
rise in the price of 
stock; a papal edict ; 
a ludicrous incon- 
sistency in lan- 
guage; adj., male. 

bnl'la, n., a leaden 
seal. 

bul'lace, n. , adamson- 
like plum. 

bull' dog, n., a mus- 
cular, courageous, 
determined species 
of dog. 

bul'let, N., a pro- 
jectile, usually lead- 
en, to be discharged 
from small-arms. 

bul'letin, n., an offi- 
cial report. 

bol'let-pTool, adj., 
able to resist bullets. 

bnll'-flght, n., a com- 
bat between armed 
men and bulls. 

bnll'flnch, n., a Brit- 
ish song-bird. 

boll'frog, n., a large 
American frog with 
a loud bass voice. 

bnl'lied, p.p., bully. 

bul'lion, n., uncoined 
gold or silver; a kind 
of heavy silk and 
metallic fringe. 

bul'lionist, n., one 
who advocates an 
exclusive metallic 
currency. 

bol'look, H., a young 
bull; an ox. 

bull's-eye, n., a cir- 
cular opening in a 
building; a small 
lantern with a cir- 
cular lens; the cen- 
tre of a target, and 



bully 



V^ 






the shot that hits it; 
a kind of sweet. 

bully, n., an arrogant 
doiiiiiieeriiig lellow; 
v.t. and »., to act as 
a bully towards. 

bul'lying, pr. p., buMy. 

bui'rosb, n., a large 
rush that grows in 
marshes. 

bnlse, n., in the East 
Indies, a bag for 
\'aluables. 

bol'waik, n., a ram- 
part; a kind of wall 
round the deck of a 
ship. 

bom, n., a humniuig 
soutid; the podex; 
v.i., to boom. 

bumbail'iff, n., an 
f uiidcr-bailiff who 
serves writs for 
debt. 

bumble-bee, n., a 
. large kind of bee. 

bum'boat, n., a boat 
for carrying pro- 
visions to a ship. 

bom'kio, n., a short 
boom or spar. 

bump, v.t., to strike; 
v.i., to come into 
collision; n., a pro- 
tuberance; a shock 
from a collision. 

bumped, p.p., bump. 

bmnp'ei, n., a glass 
filled to the brim. 

bump'ing, pr. p.hump. 

bump'kiu, n., an awk- 
ward, rustic lout; 
i.g. biimkin. 

bomp'tioas, adj., 
offensively self- 
assertive. 

bump'tiously, adv., in 
a bumptious way. 

bump'tioosness, n., 
the quality of being 
bumptious. 

btm, n., a little puffed 
cake; a chignon. 

buucb, n., a cluster; 
a protuberance; v.t., 
to make into a 
bunch; v.i., to clus- 
ter. 

bunched, p.p., bunch. 

bunch'iness. n., the 
state of being 
bunchy. 

bunch'ing, pr-p., 
bunch. 

buncb'y, adj., grow- 
ing in a bunch. 

bau'combe, n., i.g. 
bunkum. 

bun'dle, n., a pack- 
age; v./., to fasten 



V 



1 

VI 



84 



into a rather shape- 
less package. 

bundled, p.p., bun- 
dle. 

bua'dling, pr.p., bun- 
dle. 

buug, n., a large cork; 
V.I., to close up. 

buii'galow, n., a low 
verandahed house, 
cr>nnmin in India. 

buiig'-hole, »., the 
hole in a cask 
through which it is 

eiiod. 

bua'gle, v.t. and <., to 
perform ineffici- 
ently. 

bun'gled, ^.^., bungle. 

bun'gler, n., an un- 
skilful performer. 

bua'gling, adj., clum- 
sv; pr.p., bungle. 

bua'glingly, adv., 
clumsily. 

buu'ion, n., an in- 
flammatory swell- 
ing of the joint of 
the great toe. 

bunk, n., a sleeping- 
berth. 

buuk'ei, n., a large 
bin. 

bunkum, n., talkhig 
for talking's sake. 

bun'ny, n. , a pet name 
for a rabbit. 

bnnt, n., the belly of 
a sail; v.i., to swell 
out. 

bunt'ine, n., a thin 
woollen stufl out 
of which flags are 
made. 

buat'ing, n., a bird 
akin to the finch; 
i.q. buntine. 

buoy, »., a float used 
for various pur- 
poses; v.t., to keep 
afloat. 

buoy'anoy, n., the 
quality of being 
buoyant. 

buoyant, adj., float- 
ing; light; cheerful. 

buoy'antly, adv., in a 
buoyant manner. 

buoyed, p.p., buoy. 

bur, n., i.q. burr. 

burbot, »., an Eng- 
lish fresh-water cod, 
eel-shaped and 

bearded. 

bui'den, n., a load; 
the refrain of a 
song; v.t., to load; 
to oppress. 

burdened, p.p., bur- 
den. 



burgoo 



Prp; 



VC 



vn. 



vn. 



V 



x^ 



NaJ^ bur'dening, 

. burden. 

\'^l„tf^ burdensome, adj., 
" \/1_^ heavy; grievous to 
be biiriie. 

^'I^A^ebuT'densomeuei^ t., 
"'vyi ' oppressivtB aS; 
s.-/^^~^ heaviness, 
v'l — bur'dock, «., a large, 
rough-leaved, com- 
posite, perennial 
weed, 
bureau', «., a writing- 
table with drawers; 
a business office; a 
public department; 
a chest of drawers. 
bureau'ciacy, n., the 
system of centraliz- 
ing government, 
esp. when carried 
,£T-| to excess. 
V^ L bureaucrat'ic, adj., 
y^ . rel. to bureaucracy. 
Na bureaucrat'ical, adj., 
t.q. bureaucratic. 
bureau'ctatist, n., a 
supporter of bu- 
reaucracy, 
burette', n., a grad- 
uated pipette with 
a stop-cock. 
burg, n., a borough. 
"^^ burgage, »., a sys- 
' tern of land tenure. 

^ burgee', »., a small 
» pennant. 
A^ bur'geon, «., a bud; 
- "'' v.i., to sprout. 
•^, bur' geoned, ^.^. , bur- 
geon. 
bnr'Keoning, pr.p. , 

burgeon. 
burgess, n., a citizen 
or a parliamentary 
representative of a 
borough. 
burgh, n., a corporate 
town; a borough. 
^<i — buigh'er, «., an in- 
habitant of a burgh; 
a freeman. 
% barg'lai, n., a noc- 

"\ turnal housebreaker 
% />- burgla'rious, a<i/., 

* ^ pert, to burglary, 
^^/j burglariously, <Kiti., 

* with intent to com- 
mit burglary. 

burglary, n., the 
crime of nocturnal 
housebreaking. 
bnrg'mote, n., a bor- 
ough court held 
thrice yearly. 
X_;^ burgomaster, »., a 
' ' Dutch, Flemish, or 
German mayor. 
"< burgoo', »., a kind of 

' oatmeal porridge. 



"? 



% 



\A 



^^- 



burgravo 



^^ 






> 






<v^ 






bnr'graTe, n., an her- 
editary governor of 
a castle or town. 

Bui'gundy, n., a kind 
of wine. 

bnr'ial, »., interment. 

bnr'ial-place, n., a 
place of burial. 

bor'ied, p.p., bury. 

bui'ier, n., one who 
buries. 

ba'rin, «., an en- 
graver's style or 
needle; a graver. 

burke, v.t., to smoth- 
er; to shelve. 

burked, p.p., burke. 

bnrk'er, «„ one who 
burks. 

burk'ing, pr.^.,burke. 

bnil, n., a small lump 
in thread or cloth; 
v.t., to finish cloth 
by picking out 
burls. 

burled, p.p., burl. 

bUTl'er, n., one who 
picks burls out of 
cloth in finishing. 

burlesque', n., a 
dramatic or literary 
extravaganza; a 
travesty; a carica- 
ttirc; adj., ludicrous 
because of contrast 
between subject and 
manner of treat- 
ment; v.t., to turn 
into a burlesque. 

burlesqued', p.p., btu:- 
lesque. 

burlesqn'ing, pr.p., 
burlesque. 

burlet'ta, n., a musi- 
cal farce. 

bur'liness, n., the 
quality of being 
burly. 

btir'ly, n., great in 
bndily size. 

Burmese', adj., pert. 
to Biirmah. 

bum, v.t., to consume 
or injur" by fire; 
».»., to flame; «., an 
injury caused by 
fire; a rivulet. 

bum'able, adj., cap- 
able ot being 
burned. 

burned, p.p., bum. 

bum'er, w., one who 
burns; the jet-piece 
of a lamp. 

bnm'ing, adj., flam- 
ing; causing ardour; 
pr.p., burn. 

bnr'nish, v.t., to pol- 
ish and make shin- 
ing. 






^ 

v.-^ 



S 



.V 



vr 



\x 



V 



\ 



V 



86 



bnr'nished, p.p., bur- 
nish. 

bur'nisber, n., one 
wh'j or that which 
burnishes. 

bnr'nisbing, Pr.p., 
burnish. 

burnous', n., a white 
woollen hood and 
mantle worn by 
Arabs. 

burnt, p.p., burn. 

bumt'-offering, n., a 
sacrifice or atone- 
ment for sin burnt 
on an altar. 

burr, «., the rough, 
prickly covering ot 
certain seeds; the 
burdock; a guttural 
pronunciation of 
the sound r. 

bnr'ral, n., %.q. burrel. 

bnr'reU «., the red- 
butter pear. 

bur'rock, n., a little 
weir or dam in a 
river. 

bnr'row, »., a hole in 
the ground in which 
certain animals shel- 
ter; v.t., to make a 
burrow or timnel in 
the ground. 

bnr'rowed, p.p., bur- 
row. 

bur'rowing, pr.p; 
burrow. 

bur'ry, ad]., covered 
with burrs. 

bur'sar, «., the treas- 
urer of a college or 
monastery; a stu- 
dent to whom a 
bursary is paid. 

bur'sary, n., a schol- 
arship or exhibition 
(usually Scottish); 
the treasury of a 
college or monas- 
tery. 

burst, v.i., to explode; 
v.t., to break by 
violence; n., a sud- 
den explosion; p.p., 
burst. 

bnrst'er, h., one who 
or that which 
bursts. 

bnrst'ing, n., the act 
of exploding; pr.p., 
burst. [den. 

bur'then, n., i.q. bur- 

bur'ton, »., a small 
tackle with two 
pulleys used in 
ships. 

bnr'y, v.t., to cover 
with earth; to hide. 

bnr'ying, pr.p., bury. 






^ 



V 









bustle 



bur'ying-ground, n., 

a cemetery. 

bus, 'bus, n., an 
abbreviation of 
omnibus, a street 
carriage. 

bus'by, n., a military 
fur head-dress. 

bush, n., a shrub with 
branches; a district 
overgrown with 
shrubs; a hard lin- 
ing let into the 
axle-socket of a 
carriage; v.i., to 
form a bush. 

bushed, p.p., bush. 

bush'el, n., a dry 
meastire of eight 
gallons. 

biub'iness, n., the 
quality of being 
bushy. 

bnsb'ing, ^r.^., bush. 

bush' man, n., a 
woodsman. 

busb'ranger, n., a 
robber in the bush 
cotmtry. 

bnsb'y, culj., like a 
bush. 

bus'ied, p.p., busy. 

bus'ier, adj., comp. of 
busy. 

busiest, adj., super. 
of busy. 

bns'ily, adu. , in a busy 
manner. 

bus'iness, n., employ- 
ment ; concern ; 
aflfair. 

bus' iness-like, adj. , 
showing aptitude 
for affairs. 

bnsk, n., a support or 
stifiening in a wo- 
man's stays. 

btu'ket, »., a shrub- 
bery. 

bns'ldn, n., a high 
boot worn by an- 
cient tragic actors. 

bns'kined, adj., wear- 
ing buskins; pert, 
to tragedy. 

boss, n., a kiss; a 
small vessel used in 
herring-fishing; v.t., 
to kiss.- 

bust, n., the figure 
down to jtist below 
the shoulders; the 
chest. 

bns'tard, n., a large 
bird. 

bus'tle, v.i., to be 
active and stirring; 
n., activity with 
noise and agitatioa; 
a pad worn by 



bustled 






•> 



> 









ladies below the 
waist behind. 

bns'tled, p.p., bus- 
tle. 

bus'tlei, n., an active, 
stirring person. 

bns'tling, adj., busy; 
stirring; pr.p., 
bustle. 

bus'y, adj., employed 
with constant atten- 
tion; v.t., to make 
or keep busy. 

bos'ybody, n., one 
who ofi&ciously con- 
cerns himself with 
the affairs of others. 

bns'ying, pr.p., busy. 

but, adv., prep., and 
conj., except, un- 
less; only; on the 
contrary; however. 

batoh'ei, «., one who 
kills beasts for food; 
one who slays bar- 
barously; v.t., to 
kill for food or lust 
of slaughter. 

batch' ered, p.p., but- 
cher. 

batcb'ering. pr.p., 
butcher. 

bntoh'erly, oi;., mur- 
derous. 

batch'ery> **■, the 
business of slaugh- 
tering; barbarous 
and ex tensive blood- 
shed. 

but'lei, n., a domestic 
servant who takes 
charge of the wines, 
plate, etc.; a head 
man-servant. 

but'leisge, »., an 
ancient duty paid 
on imported wine. 

but'lership, n., the 
office of a butler. 

but'lery, «., a butler's 
pantry. 

bnt'ment, n., a but- 
tress of an arch. 

butti n., the larger 
end of a thing; a 
large cask; the ob- 
ject of aim or 
attack; a push with 
the head; v.^ and «'., 
to strike with the 
head. 

bntt'ed, p.p., butt. 

bntt'-end. n.. the 
thicker end o( any- 
thing. 

but'ter, n., an animal 
that butts; an oily 
substance obtained 
from cream or milk 
by churning; v.l., to 






^ 



\^ 



h 



> 



'^- 



\ 



\ 



\ 









8« 



smear with butter; 
to flatter grossly. 

bnt'tercap, n., a yel- 
low flower; the ran- 
unculus. 

but'tered,/).^. , butter. 

but'ter^, «., a diur- 
nal lepidopterous 
insect with four 
coloured wings. 

but'terine, n., an arti- 
ficial butter made 
from animal fat, 
yolks of eggs, etc., 
churned with milk. 

bat'teiing, pr.p., but- 
ter. 

but'termilk, n., the 
milk that remains 
after the butter is 
separated from it. 

bnt'ter-tootb, n., a 
broad fore-tooth. 

but'tery, n., a. store- 
room for wines, pro- 
visions, etc.; adj., 
resembling butter. 

bntt'-hinge, n., a door 
hinge. 

bnt'ting, pr.p., butt. 

but'tock,n. , the rump. 

bat'ton, n., a small 
round fastener for 
clothing; the disc at 
the end of a fencing 
foil; v.t., to fasten 
with buttons. 

but' toned, p.p., but- 
ton. 

bat'tonhole, n., the 
hole or loop in 
which a button is 
fastened; a flower 
in a buttonhole; w.<. , 
to make button- 
holes in; to detain. 

bnt'toning, pr.p., but- 
ton. 

but'tress, n., a pro- 
j acting support of 
masonry built on 
to a waJI; any sup- 
port or prop; v.t., 
to prop. 

bnt'tressed, p.p., but- 
tress. 

bnt'tressing, pr.p., 

bnuress. 

butts, n. pi., the end 
<>t a rifle range 
where the targets 
are placed. 

bat'ty, n., a man who 
raises coal by con- 
tract at a stated 
price per ton, em- 
ploying others to do 
the work. 

batyia'ceoos, aJ/., re- 
sembling butter. 






>h 






\ 



■^■ 






by-name 



bntyi'ic, adj., derived 
from butter. 

bat'yrin, n., a fat 
contained in milk 
which gives butter 
its peculiar flavour. 

bQz'eoos, adj., pert, 
to the box-tree. 

bnx'ina, n., an alka- 
loid obtained from 
the box-tree. 

bux'ine, n. , t.^.buzina 

buz'om, adj., pliant; 
jolly; plump. 

bnz'omly, adv., in a 
buxom manner. 

bnx'omneBS, n., the 
quality of being 
buxom. 

buy, v.t., to acquire 
by paying a price 
to the seller. 

buy'et, n., one who 
buys. 

buy'iag, prp., buy. 

btizz, v.t., to make a 
low hissing sound; 
v.t., to whisper; «., a 
low whispering hum 

boz'zard, n., a large 
bird of the falcon 
family. 

buzzed, p.p., buzz. 

boz'zei, n., one who 
buzzes; one who 
tells tales secretly. 

boz'zing, pr.p., buzz. 

bnz'zingly, adv., with 
a low, humming 
sound. 

by, prep., near ; 
through; adv., near; 
aside. 

by and by. adv., in 
the near future. 

bye, n., a thing not 
directly aimed at; a 
run at cricket not 
due to a stroke of 
the bat. 

Ay-eleo'tion, n., an 
election while Par- 
liament is sitting, 
caused by death or 
resignation of the 
previous member. 

Ay'-end, ♦»., secret 
purpose or advan- 
tage. 

fry'gone, adj., past. 

6y'-lane, n., a side- 
lane. 

Ay'-Iaw, n. , a local or 
private law; a law 
made by an incor- 
porated body for 
the management of 
its own affairs. 

Ay '-name, n., a nick- 
name. 



by-path 



.\.... by' 

/ sei 



path, n., a path 
secondary to a main 
road. 

6y' -prod' not, n., a 
secondary pro- 
duct. 

bys'sine, adj. , of silky 
or flax-like appear- 
ance. 



v.. 



87 



by'staaittt, n., an on- 
looker. 

fty'-street, n., a street 
secondary to a main 
street. 

by the by', adv., by 
way of digression. 

by way, •»., a by- 
path. 



Byzantine 






by' word, n., a com- 
mon saying; a pro- 
V'-rb; a name for 
T' proach. 

Byz2ntian, adj., pert. 
lo Byzantium. 

Byzantine, adj., i.q. 
Byzantiau. 



^^ 



'-V^ 



'-% 



^ 



Ca'aba, n., the great 
Mecca shrine; also 
Kaaba. 

cab, n., a vehicle so 
named; the shelter 
for an engine driver; 
a J ewish measure 
of capacity. 

cabal', n., a plotting 
combination, secret 
intrigue; v.i., to 
plot. 

cab'ala, n., esoteric 
Rabbinism; inner 
teaching. 

oab'alism. n., occult 
doctrine. 

cab'alist, n., one who 
practises cabalism. 

cabalis'tic, ndi., rel. 
to cabala. 

cabal'ler, n., one who 
joins a cabal. 

cab'alline, adj., rel. 
to horses. 

cab'aret, n., a tavern 
{Fr.h 

cab'bage, n., the vege- 
table so named; the 
head of a palm-tree; 
».<., to appropriate 
(a slang word). 

cab'bala, n., i.q. 
cabala. 

ca'ber, n., a spar of 
wood, flung in a 
Highland game. 

oab'in, n., a hut, 
small cottage or 
room; a room in a 
ship; v.t., to confine 
in close quarters. 

oab'in-boy, n., a boy 
servant on board 
ship. 

oab'ined, p.p., cabin. 

cab'laet, n., a small 
room; a receptacle 
for articles of vertu; 
the select body of 
Ministers. 

oa'ble, n., a large and 
strongchain or rope; 
a submarine tele- 
graph line; v.t., to 
transmit a message 
by cable. 

oa'bled. p.p., cable. 

oa'blegram, n., a ca- 
ble message. 

ca'bling, pr.p., ca- 
ble. 



r-r-^ 



eab'man, »., the 
driver of a cab. 

cabob', v.t., to make 
into a cabob; n., 
roast savoury meat. 

oabocbon', n., a pre- 
cious stone polished 
without facets. 

caboose', n., a ship's 
galley; a goods- 
train guard's van. 

cabriolet', n., a cov- 
ered carriage (cab is 
the abbreviated 
form). 

oaca'o, n., a tropical 
American and West 
Indian tree from the 
seed of which cocoa 
is prepared. 

cach'alot, n., the 
sperm whale. 

cache, n., a hiding- 
place. 

ca'chet, n., a seal, 
impress. 

caohex'ia. n., poor 
health, bad con- 
dition. 

oachez'y, n., i.q. ca- 
chexia. 

caohinnn'tion, n., 
laughter. 

caoh'olong, n., a pearl 
opal. 

oacbon', n., an aro- 
matic breath-sweet- 
ening pill. 

oaciqoe', n., a tribal 
chief (W. Indian 
and S. American). 

cack'le, v.i., to make 
the sound of a hen 
or goose; to prattle. 

cack'led. p.p., cackle. 

caok'ler, n., one who 
cackles. 

cack'Unc pr. p., 
cackle. 

caoochym'io, adj., 
suffering from cac- 
ochymy. 

cao'ochymy, n., a 
disordered condi- 
tion of bodily fluids. 

eacoe'thes, n., a bad 
prop Msity (Gr.). 

oacog'raphy, n., bad 
writing. 

oaool'ogy, n., faulty 
pronunciation or 
use of words. 



n 



1 



1 
1 

—V 

n 



-7 
n 



X 



cacophon'io, adj., dis- 
cordant, ill-souiid- 
ing. 

oacoph'onons, adj., 
i.q. cacoplionic. 

cacoph'ony, «., dis- 
cordant noise. 

caota'ceons, adj., rel. 
to or resembling the 
cactus. 

cac'tus, n., a flower- 
ing spiny and fleshy 
plant so named. 

cad, n., a low, mean 
fellow; an omnibus 
conductor. 

cadaver'ic, adj., pert, 
to a cadaver or 
carcass. 

cadav'erous. adj., 
corpse-like. 

cadav'eronsly, adv. , in 
a cadaverous way. 

cadav'eroosness, n., a 
cadaverous state. 

cad'die, n., one who 
carries for a golf 
player. 

cad'dis, fi. , the cadd i s- 
fly larva. 

oad'dy, n., a domestic 
box for holding tea. 

cade, n., a cask of 
capacity to hold 
500 herrings or 
r,ooo sprats. 

oa'dence, n., the fall 
of the voice in 
speaking or read- 
ing; the close of a 
musical sentence. 

Ca'dency, «., the pre- 
cedence of younger 
members and bran- 
ches of a great 
family. 

caden'za, n., an im- 
provised or pre- 
pared addition be- 
fore the close of a 
musical movement. 

cadet', n., a younger 
son; a young mili- 
tary student. 

cadge, v.i., to beg, 
sponge. 

cadged, p.p., cadge. 

cadg'er, «., one who 
cadges. 

cadg'ing,/)f.^., cadge. 

ca'di, n., a Mohanr>- 
medan judge. 



eadillac 






-1 
Ho 



y 



^- 



X> 



oadil'lae, n., a large 
kind of pear. 

CBdme'an, adj., pert, 
to Cadmus of 
Thebes; Theban. 

oad'mia, n., a zinc 
ointment. 

oad'mium, »., a met- 
allic element so 
named, 

c&die, n., a regi- 
mental staff. 

oada'cean, adj., rel. 
to the caduceus. 

oada'cens, n., Mer- 
cury's winged staff. 

oada'oons, adj., drop- 
ping before ripened. 

cae'cal, adj., rel. to 
the caecum. 

oae'oam, n., a sort of 
pouch, closed at one 
end and attached to 
the great intestine. 

Oa'en-stone, »., a 
soft stone from 
Caen. 

Cae'sarism, n., abso- 
lute rule. 

oaesa'ia, n., a break 
in a metrical foot, 
making a pause in 
the verse. 

oaI6, n., a co£Fee- 
house, restaurant. 

oafle'ic, adj., rel. to 

coffee. 

caffeine, n., a coffee- 
extract. 

Oaf'fre, n., a native 
of a S. African 
tribe so named. 

caftan, n., a Turkish 
under-garment. 

cage, v.t. , to confinein 
a cage, to keep with- 
in narrow limits; 
«., an enclosure for 
birds or beasts; a 
contrivance for 
lowering and raising 
miners. 

caged, p.p., cage. 

cag'ing, p'P; cage. 

ca'hier, n., loose 
sheets of paper col- 
lected; a commit- 
tee's report. 

oalqne', n., a light 
Turkish skifl. 

cairn, n., a monu- 
ment composed of 
piled stones. 

cairngorm', n., a 
species of rock- 
crystal. 

caisson, n., an am- 
munition chest; a 
box for explosives 
in blasting; a casing 



■n. 



^^ 



89 



for building under 
water. 

cai'tiff, adj., vile, des- 
picable; n., a vile 
fellow. 

cajole', v.t., to 
wheedle, flatter. 

cajoled', p.p., cajole. 

cajole'ment, n., the 
act of cajoling. 

oajo'ler, n., one who 
cajoles. 

oajo'lery, n., i.g. 
cajolement. 

cajo'ling, ^r.^.,cajole. 

cake, v.t., to make 
into a cake; ».♦., to 
harden; n., a large 
or small mass of 
dough , sweetened , 
and either plain or 
containing various 
ingredients; a hard- 
ened mass. 

oaked, p.p., cake. 

cak'ing, ^r.^.,cake. 

oal'abash, n., the 
fruit of a tropical 
tree, used for con- 
taining liquids. 

Cala'brian, adj., pert, 
to Calabria. 

oalaman'oo, n., a 
woollen material, 
brocaded or check- 
ered. 

oal'amar, n., i.q. cal- 
amary. 

cal'amary, «., a cut- 
tle-fish. 

oalamiferons. adj., 
reedy. 

cal' amine, n., sl zinc 
silicate. 

cal'amite, n., a species 
of tremolite. 

oalam'itons, adj., 
bringing calamity. 

calam'itonsly, adv., 
in a calamitous 
way. 

calam'ltonsneas, n., 
the qiiality of cal- 
amity. 

oalam'i^, n., disas- 
ter, misfortune. 

oal'amns, n., a cane- 
bearing palm; the 
sweet-flag. 

calash', n., a low- 
wheeled, hooded 
vehicle; a woman's 
hood. 

oaroar, n., a spvii or 
a spur-like figure; a 
calcinating oven in 
glass-works, 

ci^'reoDl, 04/., rel. 
to limestone. 

oahta'reoonMi, «., 






s-4. 






ealelacient 



the calcareous qual- 
ity. 

cal'ceated, adj., wear- 
ing shoes. 

calceolaria, n. pi., a 
botanical genus; 
popularly known as 
slipperworts. 

caroily, v.i., to form 
lime. 

calcin'able, adj., able 
to be calcined. 

calcina'tion, n., the 
process of calcining. 

eal'cinatory, adj., 
tending to calcina- 
tion. 

oal'dne, vJ., to make 
friable by the appli- 
cation of heat; v.i., 
to become friable. 

oal'cined, p.p., cal- 
cine. 

cal'oining, pr.p., cal- 
cine. 

oal'cinm, »., a met- 
allic element so 
named. 

calcog'raphy, ° n., 
drawing with pas- 
tels or chalks. 

cal'onlable. adj., able 
to be calculated. 

ClU'cnlary, n., concre- 
tions in fruit pulp. 

oal'cnlate, v.t., to rec- 
kon arithmetically; 
to estimate, plan, 
design. 

oal'cmated, ^.^..cal- 
culate. 

oarcnlating, pr-P., 
calculate; adj., de- 
signing. 

oalonla'Uon. n., the 
process of calculat- 
mg; an arithmetical 
reckoning. 

cal'onlative, adj., rel. 
to calculation. 

cal'onlator, n., one 
who calculates; a 
calculating ma- 
chine. 

eal'cnlatory, adj., rel. 
to calculation. 

oarcnloos. adj., grit- 
ty. 

cal'cnlns, n., a stony 
growth in the body; 
a method of calcu- 
lating by means of 
symbols. 

oal'dron, n., a large 
kettle. 

Caledo'nian, adj.,be\. 
to Caledonia. 

oalela'dent, adj., pro- 
ducing warmth or 
beat. 



calefaction 



9U 



calnmniousness 



^"^^ 






•"^^ 



^ 



r^\ 



calefac'tion, n., the 

process of produc- 
ing warmth. 

calefac'toryi o<27-> 
warmth-producing ; 
n., a chamber in a 
monastery where a 
fire is allowed; a 
chafing-dish or hot 
water sphere. 

cal'endai, v./., to put 
into a calendar, to 
index; »., a system 
of reckoning years, 
months, and days; 
an official list. 

careiider,ti.f., to press 
in order to produce 
a glossy surface; 
n., a paper-making 
machine giving a 
glossy surface; a 
Turkish dervish. 

cal'endered, p.p., cal- 
ender. 

oal'enderer, n., one 
who calenders. 

calendering, pr.p., 
calender. 

cat'ends, n., the Latin 
name for the first 
day of the month. 
Also Kalends. 

carentnie, n., a de- 
lirious fever; hal- 
lucination. 

cales'cence, n., the 
process of growing 
warm. 

call, n., a cow's off- 
spring; the back of 
the leg below the 
knee. 

oaU's'-foot, n., the 
wake-robin. 

calves'-loot, ^i-, 
made from the feet 
of a calf. 

csl'ibiate. «.<., to 
mark on a ther- 
mometer degrees 
of temperature. 

oalibra'tion, n., the 
process of calibrat- 
ing. 

cal'ibie, cal'iber, »., 
the bore of a tube; 
the size of bore; 
standard of ability. 

cal'ioo, n., cotton 
cloth, whether plain 
or printed on one 
side; tuij., made of 
calico. 

ca'lif, »., i.q. caliph. 

caligiaph'ic, adj., rel. 
to caligraphy. 

calig'raphy. n., good 
penmanship. Also 
Calligraphy. 



_y^ 



r-/^ 

^^' 
^t^ 






cal'ipash, n. , the green 
gelatinous part of a 
turtle's flesh. 

calipee', «., the yel- 
low gelatinous part 
of a turtle's flesh. 

cal'ipei, n., an in- 
strument for meas- 
uring diameters. 

oal'ipb, n., a Moham- 
medan ruler. 

cariphate, n., the 
office, and tenure of 
office, of a caliph. 

calisay'a, n., a species 
of Peruvian bark. 

calisthen'ics, callis- 
tben'ics, n. pi., eas- 
ier gymnastic exer- 
cises, promoting 
gracefulness of 

body. 

ca'liz, «., a cavity in 
the shape of a 
cup. 

calk, caolk, v.t., to 
plug with oakum or 
other soft substance 
or to close up the 
seams of a ship by 
hammering ; trace 
on transfer paper. 

calked, p.p., calk. 

calk'er, n., one who 
calks. 

calk'ing, pr.p., calk. 

can, v.t., to summon, 
arouse, proclaim, 
deem or style; i/.t., 
pay a short visit; 
»., a cry, a demand, 
a vocation, a short 
visit. 

called, p.p., call. 

call'ei, n., one who 
calls. 

calligraph'ic, adj., i.g. 
caligraphic. 

caUiK'ntpby, n., i.g. 
caligraphy. 

caltiaz, pr.p., call. 

CaUi'ope, n., the chief 
of the Muses, pat- 
roness of epic 
poetry; a humming 
bird so named. 

callos'ity, n., a thick- 
ening of the skin; 
the state of being 
hardened. 

cal'lons, adj., hard- 
ened, insensible, 
indifferent. 

oal'lously, adv., in a 
callous way. 

cal'lonsness, n., in- 
sensibility, indif- 
ference. 

cal'low. adj., un- 
fledged. 




z 



cal'los, n., a hardened 
part, a callosity. 

calm, v.t., to tran- 
quillize, soothe; ».»'., 
to become tranquil; 
»., a state of 
smoothness or tran- 
quillity; adj., quiet, 
still, serene. 

calmed, p.p., calm. 

calm'er, »., one who 
calms. 

calm'ing, pr.p., calm. 

calm'ly, adv., with 
calmness. 

calm'ness, »., a state 
of calm. 

cal'omel, n.,the purg- 
ative drug so 
named. 

calores'cence, «., gen- 
eration of heat by 
reflection through 
a body partially 
transparent. 

caloi'ic, n., heat. 

calorific, adj., heat- 
producing, heat- 
carrying. 

caloriflca'tion, n., the 
causing of heat. 

calorimeter, n., a 
heat-measuring ap- 
paratus. 

calotte', n., a skull- 
cap, or other close- 
fitting cap. 

cal'otype, «., a photo- 
graph produced by 
a now antiquated 
process. 

calom'ba, n., a bitter 
vegetable tonic so 
named. 

cal'nmet, n., the long 
reed-stenmied pipe 
of the N. American 
Indians. 

calom'niate, v.t., to 
defame, slander. 

calom'niated, p.p., 
calumniate. 

calum'niating, pr.p., 
calumniate. 

calomnia'tion, n., the 
act of calumniat- 
ing. 

calom'niator, n., one 
who calumniates. 

calom'niatory, adj., 
defamatory, slan- 
derous. 

calom'nioos, adj., i.g. 
calumniatory. 

calom'njously, adv., 
slanderously. 

calnm'nioosness, n., 
a habit of slander- 
ing; the quality of 
being slanderous. 



ealamny 



*-W 



cal'uinny, n., a slan- 
dcToui report or 
charge. 
Car vary, n., the place 
of Our Lord's Cruci- 
fixion; an open-air 
erection represent- 
ing the Crucifixion. 

_j. calve, v.t., to give 
birth to a calf; to 
throw off a part of 
an iceberg. 
calved, p.p., calve. 

P-> calves, n., pi. uf calf. 

, j-^ calv'ing. pr.p., calve. 

*^ Cafvlalsm, H., the 
principles taught by 
John Calviu; the 
Calvinistic system. 
V.^_j, Cal'vinist, n., a fol- 
lower of Calvin. 

V. Calvinistic, adj., rel. 
i_ to Calviu or Cal- 

, vinism. 

Vj Calvinis'tical, adj., 
•L^ i.q. Calvinistic. 

^ ° calx, «., the residuum 
after calcination; 
chalk, lime: glass 
fragments for re- 
melting. 
4.^ oal'ydne, *dj., rel. to 
_ . a calyx. 

-f oal'ycle, n., a supple- 
c menlary calyx. 

-> oa'lyz, «., the outer 

wrappingofaflower, 
composed of the 
sepals. 

-^— ^ cam, «., a revolving 
piece of machinery, 
giving a recipro- 
cating motion. 

— «~^ cam'ber, n., a slight 
convexity; a liar- 
bour (obs.); v.t., to 
curve slightly up- 
wards. 

— ^ cam'bered,^.^., cam- 
ber. 

.^^^ cam'berlns, pr.p., 
f camber. 

.^--v' cam'biaU n., rel. in 
commercial ex- 

change, or to cam- 
bium. 

_^^^ oam'bist, «., an ex- 
pert 10 exchange 
values; a book 
which shows the 
moneys, weights, 
and measures of 
foreign countries, 
with their equiv- 
alents. 
cain1>iatry, n., the 
theory of commer- 
cial exchange. 
cam'binm, n., the 
organic sotirce of 



-^. 



91 



new tissues in cer- 
tain plants; prop- 
erty exchange. 

oamboose', n., i.g. 
caboose. 

Cambrian, adj., rel. 
to Cambria, or 
Wales. 
. cam'bric, n., a fine 
white linen; also a 
cotton fabric made 
to look like linen. 

came, p.t. come. 

cam'el, n., the well- 
known beast of bur- 
den, native to Ara- 
bia and Bactria. 

oamel'lia, n., the 
flower named after 
G. J. Kamel. 

cameropard, n., an- 
other name for the 
giraffe. 

oam'eo, n., a stone or 
shell so cut as to 
throw one layer 
into relief in one 
colour, the rest 
forming a back- 
ground in a differ- 
ent colour. 

cam'era, n., the 
photographic box 
in which the image 
is received- a room, 
esp. a judge's pri- 
vate chamber. 

cameralis'tio, adj., 
pert, to high finance. 

cam'erate, adj., par- 
titioned into rooms. 

cam'erated. adj., i.q. 
camerate. 

camera' Uon, n., par- 
tition into rooms; a 
vaulting. 

Oamero'nian, adi., 
pert, to the teach- 
ing of Richard Cam- 
eron; n., a follower 
of Cameron. 

Cam'isaid, n., a 
smock wearer, the 
nickname of the 
French Calvinists 
at the time of the 
revocation of the 
Edict of Nantes. 

oam'isole, n. , a Jacket , 
woman's wrapper. 

oam'let, h., a mate- 
rial nude from 
camel's hair. 

cam'omile, n., a bit- 
ter aromatic plant, 
much tts«d in medi- 
cine. 

Camot'ra, h., an 
Italian secret or- 
ganixation. 



-^ 



Cananites 



camp, vJ. and i., 
to encamp; m., an 
encampment, a 
place of encamp-* 
ment. 

campaign', n., a series 
or a period of mili- 
tary operations; any 
organized course of 
action. 

oampaign'er, n., one 
engaged in a cam- 
paign. 

campani'le, n., a bell- 
tower, belfry. 

campanology, n., the 
science of bell-con- 
struction and bell- 
ringing. 

oampan'nla, n., one 
of the bell-worts, as 
the Canterbury bell. 

camped, p.p., camp. 

cam'phene, n., oil of 
turpeiuine. 

cam'phine, n., i.q. 
camphene. 

cam'pbosen. n., t.^. 
cymene. 

cam'phor, n., a medi- 
cinal resinous com- 
pound. 

cam'phorate, 
impregnated 
camphor. 

cam'phorated, 
i.q., camphorate. 

camp'ing,^r.^. ,camp. 

cam'pion, n., a mem- 
ber of the pink 
family (Bot.). 

cam'shalt. n., the 
shaft on which the 
cams are mounted. 

caa, a defective verb 
used as an auxiliary 
=• to be able; v.t., 
to preserve in cans. 

can, n., a vessel, 
usually of metal. 

Oa'naanite, n., an in- 
habitant ot Canaan. 

Oa'naanitish, adj., 
bel. to Canaan. 

Oana'dian, adj., bel. 
to Canada. 

canaille', n., the vul- 
gar,therabble(Fr.). 

canal', n., an arti- 
ficial watercourse; a 
channel, a groove. 

oanalic'nlata, adj., 
having canaliculi, 
i.e., small ducts. 

canaliza'tion, n., con- 
version into a canal. 

ca'nalise, v.t., to con- 
vert into a canal. 

Ca'nanitaa, n., a sect 
of Jewish zealots. 



adj., 
with 

adj.. 



eanard 



canard', n., a made- 
up sensational 
statement; a liter- 
ary hoax (Fr.). 

cana'ry, n., a bird 
found in the Canary 
Islands. 

can'oeU v.t., to annul, 
cut out. 

can'cellate, adj., hav- 
ing a lattice-like 
appearance. 

oan'cellated, »dj., i.q. 
cancellate. 

oanoella'tion, n., a 
lattice-like network. 

can'celled, p.p., can- 
cel. 

can'oelUnK, pr.p., can- 
cel. 

can'oei, n., a malig- 
nant growth so 
named. 

can'ceiate, v.t., to 
become cancerous. 

canceia'tion, n., a 
cancerous state. 

oan'cerons, adj., of 
the nature of cancer. 

oan'oeronsly, adv., in 
, a cancerous manner. 

oan'oeionsness, n., a 
tendency to cancer. 

oan'oiilonn, adj., 
crab-like. 

oan'orine, adj., rel. to 
crabs. 

oan'orinite, n., a sili- 
cate so named. 

oandela'bra, n., pi. 
of candelabrum. 

oandela'bram, n., a 
branched candle- 
stick. 

oan'dent, adj., glow- 
ing, at white heat. 

oan^d, adj., fair, 
frank. 

can'didate, n., an 
applicant for an 
omce; one seeking 
Holy Orders, Con- 
firmation, and the 
like. 

oan'didatore, n., a 
candidate's applica- 
tion. 

oan'didly, adv., in a 
candid way. 

oan'didness, n., a 
frank altitude. 

oan'died, p.p., candy; 
adj., made into 
candy, frosted. 

oan'dle, n., a stick of 
wax or other pre- 
paration, with a 
central wick. 

Can'dlemas. n., the 
Feast of the Puri- 



92 



fication of Our Lady 
(Feb. a), celebrated 
with the display of 
many candles. 

can'dlestiok, n., a 
stand to hold a 
candle. 

can'donr. can'doi, n., 
fairness, frankness. 

can'dy, v.t., to turn 
into sugar crystals; 
to frost preserved 
fruits with sugar; 
n., a confection of 
sugar. 

can'dying, pr-p., 
candy. 

can'dytnft, «., a plant 
of the mustard fam- 
ily. 

cane, v.t., to strike 
with a cane; n., a 
species of reed or 
grass; a walking- 
stick. 

cane'-brake, n., land 
covered with grow- 
ing canes. 

caned, p.p., cane. 

oangue, oang, n., a 
wooden yoke, used 
as a Chinese instru- 
ment of torture or 
punishment. 

canic'nlar, adj., rel. 
to the dog-star. 

oan'ine, adj., rel. to a 
dog; ft., a canine 
tooth. 

oa'ning, pr.p., cane; 
n., the act of caning. 

oan'istei, n., a box 
or case of metal. 

can'ker, «.<-, to eat 
away, corrode; v.i., 
to be infected with 
canker; n., an eat- 
ing and spreading 
ulcer. 

cankered, p.p., can- 
ker. 

oan'kering, pr.p., 
canker. 

can' kerons, adj. ,of t he 
nature of canker. 

oan'ker-worm, n., a 
destructive kind of 
caterpillar. 

can'kery, adj., affect- 
ed with canker; 
cross, crabby. 

oan'nel-coal, n., a 
coal that burns very 
brightly. 

can'nibal, n. , one who 
eats human flesh. 
. oan'nibalism, n., a 
cannibal's state of 
life; the eating of 
human flesh. 



canonicals 



can'nikin, n., a little 
can. 

can'non, n., a large 
gun; a smooth horse 
bit; a stroke at 
billiards ; v.t., to 
glance off; to re- 
bound from another 
object. 

cannonade', n., a sus- 
tained attack with 
cannon; v.t., to 
make an attack 
with cannon. 

cannoua'ded. p.p., 
cannonade. 

oannona'ding, pr.p., 
cannonade. 

cannoneer', cannon- 
ier', «., a man who 
serves a cannon. 
' can'non-proof, adj., 
impenetrable to 
cannon-shot. 

can'non-shot, n., a 
cannon-ball; the 
shooting of cannon; 
the range of a 
gun. 

caa'aot, a phrase, 
the negative of can. 

can'nola, m., a sur- 
gical tube for con- 
veying away pus. 

can'nular, adj., hol- 
low, tubular. 

can'ny, adj., gentle, 
cautious, sagacious. 

canoe', n., a boat 
propelled by the 
paadle. 

can'on. n., a rule or 
standard; a member 
of a Collegiate or 
Cathedral Chapter; 
the more solemn 
part of the Mass; 
the Church's stand- 
ard of selection in 
regard to the Sacred 
Scriptures. 

can'on, »t., a deep 
ravine. 

can'oness, n., a 
woman of rank in a 
conventual Chapter. 

oanon'lo, adj., rel. to 

canons. 
^oanon'ical. adj., i.a. 
canonic; in accord- 
ance with rule. (The 
Canonical Scrip- 
tures are those 
which the Church 
has accepted.) 
^oanon'ioals, n.pl., the 
vestments or habits 
prescribed by the 
canons for the 
clergy. 



canonist 



->^ 



^V^ 






can'onist, n., an ex- 
pert in canon law. 

canoniza'tion, n., the 
act or state of 
canonizing. 

oan'onixe. v.t., to 
raise to the rank 
of a saint in the 
Kalendar. 

can'onised, p.p., can- 
onize. 

can'onidng, pr.p., 
canonize. 

can'oniy, n., the 
office and dignity of 
a canon. 

can'opied, adj., hav- 
ing a canopy over. 

oan'opy, v.t., to cover 
with a canopy; n., 
an overhead cover- 
ing. 

cano'lOOS, »di., tune- 
ful, melodious. 

canst, v., a defective 
auxiliary verb, sec- 
ond person singu- 
lar. 

cant, v.t., to tip up, to 
bevel ;».«., to tilt; to 
whine like a beggar; 
«., an inclination to 
one side; hypocriti- 
cal talk. 

can't, v., an abbre- 
viation for cannot. 

Can'tab, »., a Canta- 
brigian (or Cam- 
bridge man). 

cantab'ile, fd}., 

smoothly flowing; 
n., a smooth-flowing 
style in music. 

Canta'brian, ad)., 
p)ert. to Cantabria. 

Cantabrigian, adj., 
pert, to Cambridge. 

can'taliver, n., i.g. 
cantilever. 

can'talonp, n., a vari- 
ety of melon. 

cantan'kerons, »dj., 
q uarrelsome.crusty , 
contrary. 

canta'ta, »., the mus- 
ical setting of a 
poem or a drama. 

canta tion. »., incan- 
tation. 

cantatri'ce, »., a 
woman vocalist. 

oant'ed, p.p., cant. 

canteen', m., a sol- 
dier's drinking- 
flask; a military 
stores for food. 

can'tel, n., i.q. cantle. 

oan'ter, v.t., to ride a 
horse at a canter; 
v.i., to move at a 



lA 



-^ 



canter; »., a gentle 
gallop. 

can'teied, p.p., canter. 

can'teiinc. pr.p., 
canter. 

canthar'ides, n. pi., 
Spanish fly. 

oanthar'idin, n., a 
compound extract- 
ed from Spanish fly 
and other insects. 

oan'tiole, n., a prose 
song, such as Mag- 
nificat. 

oan'tUate, «.«., to 

chant. 

oantila'tion, n., chant- 
ing. 

oan'tilever, n., a long 
bracket supporting 
a bridge roadway, a 
balcony, or other 
heavy structure. 

cant'ing, pr.p., cant; 
adj., leaning; hypo- 
critical. 

can' tie, »■, a hunch 
of cheese or bread; 
the backbone of a 
saddle. 

can'to, n., a division 
in a long poem. 

can'to ier'mo, n., the 
. plain song melody 
as distinguished 
from the faux bour- 
don. 

can' ton, v.t., to divide 
into districts; n., a 
division of a 
country. 

can' tonal, adj., rel. 
to cantons. 

can'toned, p.p., can- 
ton. 

Can'tonese, adj., rel. 
to Canton. 

can'toning, pr.p., can- 
ion. 

canton'ment, n., a 
military station, 
either temporary or 
permanent. 

can' trip, n., incanta- 
tion, frolic. 

can'vas, adj. , made of 
canvas; n., a coarse 
cloth from which 
sails are made, 
or on which pic- 
tures are painted. 

oan'vass, v.t., to ex- 
amine closely; to 
solicit votes. 

can'vassed, p.p., can- 
vass. 

can'vasser, n., one 
who canvasses. 

oan'Tassing, pr.p., 
canvass. 



"^\ 






'-V*' 



-^ 



caper 

ea'ny, adj., full of 
canes. 

oan'yon, n., a deep 
ravine. Also caHon. 

canao'ne, n., a Pro- 
vengal type of mad- 
rigal. 

canaonet', n., a short 
song; a light opera- 
tic air. 

oaoat'choacn., india- 
rubber. 

caoat'chondn, m., oil 
of caoutchouc. 

cap, v./., to put a 
cap or cover on; to 
put a finishing 
touch to; to surpass; 
to salute; n., a 
head covering; the 
top; aujrtbing like 
a cap. 

capabil'ity, n., skill, 
ability to do things. 

capable, adj., skil- 
ful, able. 

ca'pableness. n., i.q. 
cap.ibility. 

oa'pably, adv., skil- 
fully, ably. 

capa'dons, adj., 

roomy, wide, able 
to hold much. 

capa'cionsly, adv., in 
a capacious way. 

capa'oioasnesB, n., 
the state of being 
capacious. 

capao'itate, v./., to 
qualify, render ca- 
pable. 

capao'itated, 
capacitate. 

capac'itating, 
capacitate. 

capao'ity. n., 

content; ability, 
skill ; function or 
relation. 

cap-d-pie', adv., from 
head to foot. 

capai'ison, v./., to 
cover with hous- 
ings; «., horse-trap- 
pings. 

capar'isoned, p.p., ca- 
parison. 

capai'isoning, pr.p., 
caparison. 

cape, »., a headland; a 
short circular cloak. 

cap'elet, oap'ellet, n., 
a swelling on a 
horse's hock. 

ca'per, v.t., to dance, 
leap about- n., a 
frisky antic : a 
shrub with pungent 
flower-buds used 
for flavouring. 



PP-. 
pr.p., 
cubic 



capercailzie 

""^rO capercail'zie, n., a 

large kind of grouse. 

.-^-^ ca'pered, p.p., caper. 

"^\ capering, pr.p., ca- 

per. 

\.' ca'pias, n., a writ 
authorizing the seiz- 
ure of a person or 
-^ goods. 
VS/ capilla'ceoTU, adj., 
^_^^ hair-like. 
'"A/'A capillaire',».,asyrup, 
once made from the 
maidenhair fern. 
\/^ capiUai'ity, n., capil- 
^/ lary attraction. 
' V^ cap'illary, ttdj., re!, to 
the hair, hair-like; 
«., a minute blood- 
vessel uniting the 
veins and arteries. 
'^vAr capil'liform, adj., in 
>~^ the form of hair. 
r-V' capital, adj., chief, 
at the head, rel. to 
the death penalty; 
«., the head of a 
column; the chief 
city in a State; 
stock, money. 
— ^ cap'italist, »., one 
who possesses and 
employs capital. 
: — v; capitaliza'tion, n. , the 
process of convert- 
ing into capital. 
^ — vf capitalize, v.t., to 
convert into capital. 
: — .jf cap'italized, p.p., 
capitalize. 
: — vf^ capitalizing, pr.p., 
capitalize. 
• \ cap'itate, adj., head- 
'• shaped; having a 
bead. 
'■ \ capita'tion, «•, a 
(^ grant made by 
heads. 
; — v^ Cap'itol, H., the tem- 
ple of Jupiter in 
Rome, called the 
Capitolium; the 
building at Wash- 
ington in which the 
U.S.Congress meets. 
Cap'itoline, adj., rel. 

to the Capitolium. 
capit'olar, adj., pert, 
to a monastic or 
cathedral Chapter: 
«., a collection of 
laws. 
oapit'olarly, adv., in 

chapter form, 
oapit'olarr, adj. and 

n., i.q. capitular, 
capit'ulate, v.i., to 
surrender on terms. 
; ./Ti capit'olated,/).^., cap- 
itulate. 






94 



capitulating, pr.p., 

capitulate. 

capitula'tion, n., the 
act of capitulating. 

capit'alator, n., one 
who capitulates. 

capit'olom, n., a little 
head; a chapter. 

capi'vi, n., a S. 
American balsam = 
copaiba. 

cap'lin, n., the part 
of a flail handle 
through which the 
thongs pass. 

cap'nomor, n., a com- 
pound distilled from 
wood-tars. 

ca'pon, n., a young 
cock fattened for 
table. 

capote', »., a cloak or 
coat with a hood; 
the hood of a 
vehicle. 

capped, p.p., cap. 

cap'per, »., one who 
caps. 

cap'ping, pr.p., cap. 

caprice', n., a whim, 
sudden change of 
mind. 

capii'cions, adj., sub- 
ject to whims. 

capri'cioaaly, adv., in 
a capricious way. 

capri'cioosness, n., 
the state of being 
subject to sudden 
changes of mind. 

Cap'ricom, n., the 
tenth of the signs 
of the Zodiac. 
' Oap'ricomns, n., the 
Latin name for Cap- 
ricorn •" homed 
like a goat. 

capriflca'tion, n., arti- 
ficial tertilization of 
the fig or date. 

oap'riforni, adj. , 
shaped like a goat. 
. cap'iine. adj., goat- 
lUce. 

cap'riole, n., a leap, 
esp. of a trained 
horse. 

cap'dcnm, n., the 
plant from which 
Cayenne pepper 
comes. 

capsize', v.t. and t., 
to overturn. 

capsized', p.p., cap- 
size. 

capsi'zing, pr.p., cap- 
size. 

cap'stan, n., an up- 
right drum used in 
raising an anchor 



'^i:^ 



^^ 



-y 



':i 



capolet 



and other heavy 
weights. 

cap'snlar, adj., rel. to 
or resembling a cap- 
sule. 

cap'solary, adj., i.q. 
capsular. 

cap'sole, n., a plant's 
seed-vessel; a gela- 
tinous bag contain- 
ing medicine. 

cap' tain, «., a head 
officer; commander 
of a ship, a com- 
pany of troops, a 
team or club; head 
boy of a school. 

oap'taincy, »., cap- 
tain'srank or tenure 
of office. 

cap'talastiit, n., a 
captaincy; skill as 
a captain. 

cap'tion, n., a title in 
a legal document; a 
chapter or section 
heading; an arrest. 

CSp'tious, adj., mak- 
ing frivolous or vex- 
atious objections. 

oap'tiotisly, adv., in a 
captious way. 

cap'tioosness, n., a 
tendency to be cap- 
tious. 

cap'tivate, v.t., to 
make captive; to 
charm. 

eap'tivated. p.p., cap- 
tivate. 

cap'tivating, pr.p., 
c.iptivate. 

capUva'tion, n., the 
act of captivating; 
state of being cap- 
tivated. 

cap'tive, adj., taken 
prisoner; held in 
captivity or bond- 
age; «., a prisoner. 

captiT'ity, n., the 
state of a captive. 

cap'tor, M., one who 
takes captive. 

cap'tnie, n., the act 
of capturing; v.t., to 
catch by force, 
arrest. 

oap'tored, p.p., cap- 
ture, [ture. 

cap'tnring, pr.p., cap- 

Cap'nchio, n., a monk 
of the Franciscan 
Order distinguished 
by his capuche or 
cowl. 

cap'nlet, »., a peasant 
woman's headgear 
worn in the S. of 
France. 



car 



^.^ 



.^ 






oar, n., a generic 

name for many 
kinds of vehicles. 

carabineer', »., a 
soldier armed with 
a carbine. Also car- 
bineer. 

car'acal, n., a species 
of Asiatic or African 
lynx. 

car'ack, n., a large 
armed Spanish or 
Portuguese trading 
vessel. 

cai'acole, n., a quick 
half-turn made by 
a horseman; v.i., to 
make sudden turns 
with horses. 

oar'acoly, »., an alloy 
of gold, silver, and 
copper. 

carafe', n., a water- 
bottle. 

car'amel, n., burnt 
sugar for colouring; 
a forpi of sweet- 
meat. 

car'at, n., a unit of 
weight (= 4 grains) 
for precious stones; 
the one twenty- 
fourth part of gold 
purity. 

caravan, n., an Ori- 
ental company of 
travellers for trade 
or other purposes; a 
house on wheels. 

caravaneei', n., one 
' who uses a caravan. 

ca'ravannei, n., i.q. 
caravaneer. 

oaravan'sary, n., i.q. 
caravanserai. 

caravan'serai, n., an 
enclosed shelter for 
caravans; an inn. 

car'avel, n., a small 
ship, formerly used 
in Spain and Por- 
tugal. 

car'away, n., a plant 
the seeds of which 
are used for flavour- 
ing. 

oar'bine, »., a short 
rifle, used chiefly by 
cavalry. 

ceurbineer', n., a sol- 
dier using a carbine. 

oarboric, adj., pro- 
duced from coal or 
coal-tar; n., the 
product itself. 

car'bolue, v.t., to 
charge with car- 
bolic. 

car'bolized, p.p., car- 
bolize. 



pr.p., 



"% 




• \ 



^^ 



^ 



n 



95 



oar'bolizing, 

carbolize. 

car'bon, »., pure char- 
coal. 

carbona'ceoTU, adj., 

producing carbon. 

Carbona'ri, n. pi., 
members of an Ita- 
lian secret society. 

carbonate, n., a car- 
bonic acid salt; adj., 
charged with car- 
bonic. 

carbon'io, adj., pro- 
duced from carbon. 

carboniferous, adj., 
yieldmg coal or 
carbon. 

carbonin'tlon, n. , the 
process of convert- 
ing into coal or 
carbon. 

oar'bonise, «.<., to 
reduce to carbon. 

cai'bonized, p.p., 
carbonize. 

car'bonizinK, pr.p., 
carbonize. 

car'boy, «., a large 
bottle, enclosed in 
wicker-work, for 
carrying acids. 

carbuncle, n., a pre- 
cious stone of a 
deep red colour; an 
ulcer so named. 

car'boncled. adj. , 
set with carbun- 
cles. 

carbnn'cnlar, adj., of 
the nature of a 
carbuncle. 

car'boret, v.t., to im- 
pregnate with car- 
bon; n. , a compound 
of carbon; carbide. 

car'bnietted,-ted,^.^. , 
carburet. 

car ourector, -tei, n., 
an apparatus for 
carburetting. 

car'bnrize, v.t., i.q. 
carburet. 

car'cajon, n., the 
wolverine. 

car'caiut,n., a jewel- 
led Cham or neck- 
lace. 

carcass, car'case, n., 
a dead body; a 
framework. 

carcinol'ogy, n., the 
study of crustace- 
ans. 

carcino'ma, n., a can- 
cer. 

carcinom'atons, adj., 
cancerous. 

card, v.t., to comb 
wool or flax; n., a 






^ 



careen 



piece of pasteboard, 
intended for written 
or printed matter. 

car'damine, n., a per- 
ennial plant of the 
mustard family, 

cai'damom,n. , an aro- 
matic East Indian 
and Chinese plant. 

card'board, n., thick 
card; adj., made of 
cardboard. 

card'-oase, n., a case 
containing calling- 
cards. 

card'ed, p.p., card. 

card'er, n., one who 
cards. 

car'diac, adj., rel. to 
the heart; n., a 
cordial. 

cardi'acal. adj., i.q. 
cardiac. 

cardiag'raphy, n., the 
process of recording 
the strength of the 
heart's movements. 

cardial' gia, »., heart- 
burn. 

cardial'Ky, n., i.q. 
cardial gia. 

car'dinaL adj., prin- 
cipal (lit., that on 
which something 
hinges); of a red 
colour: n., a mem- 
ber of the Sacred 
College at Rome. 
At St. Paul's Cathe- 
dral, London, two 
of the Minor Canons 
are called Cardinals. 

car'dinalate, n., the 
body of Cardinals, 
the rank of a car- 
dinal, a cardinal's 
tenure of oflSce. 

card'ing, pr.p., card. 

cardiag'raphy, n., i.q. 
cardiagraphy. 

car'dioid, n., a heart- 
shaped curve. 

cardlorogy, n., the 
science of the heart 
and of the heart's 
anatomy. 

oardi'tis, n., inflam- 
mation of the heart. 

cardoon', »., a peren- 
nial aster. 

care, v.i., to have 
regard; to be will- 
ing; n., a state of 
anxiety, solicitude; 
charge; the object 
of one's care. 

cmred. p.p., care. 

careen, v.t., to over- 
turn a ship for the 
purpose of repairs. 



careenage 



-^^ 



—/^ 



.^ 



.^ 



.-A' 



^ 



etc.; «.t., to heel 
over. 

caieen'age. »., the 
fee for careening; a 
place for careeniug 
purposes. 

careened', p.p., ca- 
reen. 

careen'ing, pr.p., ca- 
reen. 

careei', n., a voca- 
tion, profession. 

care'ful, it(J7.t full of 
care; conscientious 
in action; prudent. 

care'lolly, aio., with 
care. 

care'fulness, m., the 
habit or state of 
taking care. 

care'less, a<i/.. not 
taking care, indiff- 
erent; free from 
care. 

car« 'lessly, adu., in a 
careless way. 

c«r«' le88neas, h., the 
habit or state of not 
caring. 

caress', v.t., to fondle, 
stroke, pet; «., an 
embrace, a fondling. 

caressed', /).^., caress. 

oaress'ing, pr.p., ca- 
ress. 

caress'ingly, adv., in 
a caressing way. 

oar'et, n., a printer's 
or writer's mark of 
omission. 

care'iaker, n., one 
who looks after a 
building or house. 

care' worn, «<i;. , worn 
out with care. 

car'go, n., a ship's 
lading. 

car' goose, n., the 
crested grebe. 

Car'ib, n., one of 
an almost extinct 
American race, the 
Caribs, inhabiting 
the islands of the 
Caribbean Sea. 

Oaribbe'an, adj., rel. 
to the Caribs and to 
the sea containing 
their islands. 

Car'ibee,n.,«.?.Carib. 

caribou', «., the rein- 
deer of N. America. 

car'icatnre, n., a like- 
ness purposely dis- 
torted or exagger- 
ated; ».<., to repre- 
sent in a ridiculous 
way. 

ear'ioatared, p.p., 
caricature. 



'^ 



96 



oar'icatoriiig. pr.p., 

caricature. 

car'icatorist, n., one 
who caricatures. 

car icons, adj., fig- 
shaped. 

caries, n., decay of 
teeth or bone. 

Car'illon, n., a peal or 
chime of bells, acted 
upon by a perform- 
er or by mechanism. 

cari'na, »., a keel. 

car'inate, ni]., keeled, 
keel-shaped. 

car'inated. *d,i., i.q. 
carinate. 

caring, pr.p., c«re. 

car'iole, n., a light 
one-horse vehicle. 

cariosity, n., a ca- 
rious state. 

ca'rions, adj., rotten, 
decaying. 

cark, V.I., to oppress 
with care; n., anxi- 
ety, worry. 

cark'ing, pr.p., cark; 
adj., worrying. 

car'line, adj., rel. to 
th« Carlina; n., a 
plant of the Carlina 
family; the short 
timber that joins 
the deck beams of a 
ship. 

carl'ing, n., the dish 
of fried peas, once 
peculiar to Carling 
Sunday. 

Carlovin'gian, adj., 
rel. to the dynasty 
of Charlemagne; n., 
a member of the 
family of C. 

car'man, n., the dri- 
ver of a car or cart. 

Car'melite, m., a 
member of the 
Order of Friars of 
Our Lady of Moimt 
Carmel, known as 
the White Friars. 

oar'minate, v.i., to 
emit internal wind. 

car'minatiTe, adj., 
relieving flatulence. 

oar'mine, n., a deep 
red colour made 
from cochineal. 

car'nage, n., great 
slaughter, butchery. 

car'naJ, adj., rel. to 
the flesh, fleshly, 
sensual. 

caraarity. m., a sen- 
sual tendency or 
state. 

car'nalize, v.t., to 
make sensual. 



'~^ 




^-^. 



r-J 



^y^ 



carp 



car'nally, a4v., in a 

carnal way. 

car'nal-mind'ed, adj., 
disposed to sen- 
suality. 

cama'tion, n., flesh- 
tint; the flowering 
plant so named. 

came'lian, n., a red 
stone, much used 
for seals. 

car'neont. «<{/., fleshy. 

car'ney, n., a mouth 
disease in horses. 

camiflca'tion, n., a 
morbid conversion 
of tissue into flesh- 
like consistency. 

car'nifled, p.p. car- 
nify. 

car'nify, v.t., to con- 
vert into flesh; v.i., 
to suffer carnifica- 
tion. 

car'nifying, pr.p. , car- 
nify. 

car'nival, n., the feast 
that precedes the 
Lenten fast; any 
sort of revel. 

camiv'ora,n.^^, flesh- 
eating creatures. 

camiT'oroos, adj., 
flesh-eating. 

camoe'ity, n., flesh- 
iness. 

ear'notis, adj., fleshy. 

car'ob, n. , the tree so 
named, bel. to the 
bean order. 

oar'ol, v.t., to sing 
cheerfully, warble; 
n., a joyous song, 
esp. the joyous 
songs of Christmas, 
Epiphany, and 

Easter. 

car'olled, -led, p.p., 
carol. 

car'olUng, -ling, pr.p., 
carol. 

carot'id, adj., rel. to 
the carotids; n., one 
of the great neck- 
arteries. 

caron'sal, n., a revel, 
drinking bout. 

caroose', V. >. , to revel , 
hold a drinking- 
bout. 

caronsed', p.p., ca- 
rouse. 

carons'et, n., one 
who carouses. 

carons'ing, pr.p., ca- 
rouse. 

carp, v.i., to cavil, 
criticize censori- 
ously; «., a fresh- 
waterfish so named. 



carpal 






_/<1. 



ear'pol, adj., rel. to 
the wrist. 

Carpa'tbian, €dj.,hr\. 
to the Carpathian 
chain of moutitaitis. 

carped, p.p., carp. 

oar' pel, n., a simple 
pistil or seed-vessel. 

ear'pellary, adj., re- 
sembling a carpel. 

car'penter, o »., to do 
carpentry; n., a 
worker in timber 
for all manner of 
uses. 

oai'pentry, n., a car- 
penter's craft. 

carp'er, n., a caviller. 

oar pet, v.t., to cover 
with a carpet; n., a 
woven floor-cover- 
ing (formerly, a 
table cover). 

oar'peted,^./>. .carpet. 

oar'peting, p'-P-' car- 
pet; also n., carpet 
material, carpet 
goods; the act of 
carpeting. 

carping. P''P < carp- 

car'polite, »., iruit 
fossiliztd. 

oarporogist, n., a stu- 
dent of carpology. 

carpol'ogy, n., the 
study of fruits. 

car'pns, n., the wrist. 

car'raway, n., tee 
caraway. 

car' rel, n., a recess in 
a cloister for a desk. 

car'riage, n., the act 
of carrying; cost of 
freight; a vehicle; 
bearing.demeanour ; 
athingc3urried(ofrs.). 

carried, p.p., carry. 

oar'rier, n., one who 
carries; something 
that carries; one 
whose business it is 
to convey goods, 
parcels, etc.; part 
of a machine-gun. 

car'rion, n., dead and 
putrefying flesh; 
any loathsome ob- 
ject. 

oanonade', n. , a short 
naval gun with 
large bore. 

car'rot, n., the edible 
vegetable so named. 

car'roty, adj., like a 
carrot, reddish-yel- 
low. 

car'ry, v.t., to convey, 
bear; capture (a 
fort); involve, im- 
ply; hold up; to 









n- 
n. 

Hoi. 



97 



act as a bearer of 
anything; n., port- 
age; the range of a 
gun or missile. 

car'rying,/>r.^., carry. 

cart, w./., tocarry I'l a 
cart, to convey; «., 
a vehicle tor carry- 
ing loads. 

CArt'age, M., the car- 
rying in a cart; cost 
of carrying. 

carte, n., a card, bill 
of fare; a term in 
fencing to denote a 
particular position. 

carte-blanche', n. , f ull 
permission to act as 
one pleases. 

carfed, p.p., cart. 

carte-de-visite', n., a 
visiting card ; a small 
mounted photo- 
graph. 

oar'tel, n., a written 
agreement for the 
interchange of pris- 
oners; a written 
challenge. 

oart'er, n., one who 
drives a cart. 

Carte'sian, adj., rel. 
to Descartes and 
his philosophy. 

Carte'sianism, n., the 
philosophical sys- 
tem of Descartes. 

Carthagiii'iaii, adj., 
rel. to Carthage or 
the Carthaginians. 

car'tbainin, n., a red 
dye. 

cdrt'-borse, n., a 
horse that draws a 
cart. 

Cartba'sian, adj.j rel. 
to the Carthusians; 
«., a monk of the 
Order of St. Bruno. 

cartilage, »«., gristle. 

cartilaginous, adj., 
gristly. 

cart'iag, pr.p., cart. 

Cdrt'-load, n., the 
contents of a cart. 

outog'rapber, n., a 
map-maker. 

eartoigraph'io, adj., 
rel. to cartography. 

cartog'raphy, »., the 
art of map-making. 

oar'ton, n., a light 
cardboard box. 

oartooo'. n., a large 
sketch for a picture; 
a picture represent- 
ing, often comically, 
topical subjects. 

oartoon'ist, n., a 
drawer of cartoons. 



D 
r^ 



-^ 



^^ 



^. 



ease 



oartonohe', »., a car- 
tridge box; an in- 
scribed tablet. 

cartridge, n., a case 
in which is held the 
charge of a firearm. 

oar'tojary, n., a regis- 
ter of charters and 
other records. 

cart' way, n., a road 
fit for carting pur- 
poses. 

CArr'wbeel, n., the 
wheel of a cart; a 
summersault. 

cart 'wright, n., one 
who makes or re- 
pairs carts. 

oar'ocate, n., a mea- 
sure of plough land; 
it varied from 80 
to 120 acres. 

carnn'cle, n., a bird's 
wattles; the fleshy 
growth in the inner 
corner of the eye. 

carnn'colar, adj., of 
the nature of a 
caruncle. 

caroncnlate, adj., 
having caruncles. 

caran'colated. adj., 
i.q. ciiruiiculate. 

carve, v.t., to cut, to 
fashion. 

carved, p.p., carve. 

car'vel, n. , s«<caravel. 

carv'er, n., one who 
carves. 

carv'ing, pr.p., carve; 
also n., the art or 
act of carving; a 
piece ot carved 
work. 

car'yate, n., i.q. car- 
yatid. 

caryat'ic, adj., rel. to 
caryatids. 

caryat'id, »., a female 
figure supporting 
(instead of a pillar) 
an entablature. 

caryatides, n., pi. of 
caryatid. 

oas'oabel, n., the loop 
at the breech of a 
cannon. 

cascade', n., a water- 
fall. 

cascal'ho, n., a Braz- 
ilian name for de- 
tritus. 

oas'cara, n., bark. 

oaacaril'la, n., dimin. 
of cascara — an aro- 
matic bark, useful 
as a tonic. 

case, n., a covering, 
sheath, book cover; 
something that 



4— (17a) 



cased 






7 



1 



^ 



1. 



7 



happens; a con- 
dition; anyone un- 
der medical treat- 
ment; a law-suit; a 
grammatical name 
for the various rela- 
tions of a noun; v.t., 
to enclose, cover. 

cased, p.p., case. 

case'barden, v.t., to 
harden (iron) by 
making the surface 
into steel. 

case'hardened, p.p., 
caseharden. 

case'haidening, pr.p., 
caseharden; also n., 
the act or state of 
casehardening. 

oa'seic, adj., rel. to 
cheese or casein. 

oa'sein, n., milk curd. 

case'-^fe, n., a 
knife enclosed in a 
case or sheath. 

oase'mate. *>., a 
vaulted chamber in 
a fort; an armoured 
gun station in a ship. 

case'mated, adj., hav- 
ing casemates. 

oase'ment, n., a 
hinged window, 
opening like a door. 

case'mented, adj., 
having casements. 

ca'seons, adj., like 
cheese. 

casern', n., a barrack. 

case-shot, n., shrap- 
nel or canister shot. 

cash, v.t., to change 
mto money; n., 
money of all kinds; 
a Chinese coin so 
named. 

cash'-accoont, n., a 
book-keeping re- 
cord of money 
received and paid. 

cash '-book, n., the 
book recording re- 
ceipts and paymen ts 
of cash. 

cash'-boy, «., a boy 
who carries the cash 
from the counter to 
the cashier's desk 
and back again. 

cashed, p.p., cash. 

cashew', »., a nut- 
bearing tree {see 
cachou). 

cash'-girl, n., fem. of 
cash-boy. 

ouhier', n., one who 
looks after the 
money in a shop or 
bank; v.t., to dis- 
miss with ignominy. 



7 



■"7 






-^ 



cashiered', p.p., cash- 
ier. 

cashier'ing, pr.p., 
cashier. 

oash'ing, pr.p., cash. 

cash' keeper, »., a 
cashier. 

casb'mere, n., a fine 
fabric made from 
the wool of a Cash- 
mere goat. 

casboo', n., iu cate- 
chu. 

ca'sing, n. , a coverin g , 
frauung; pr.p., case. 

casi'no, n., a building 
for public enter- 
tainments. 

cask, v.t., to place in 
a cask; n., a round, 
hooped vessel. 

cas'ket, n., a small 
box; a jewel-case; 
a cof&n. 

casqne, n., a helmet. 

cassa'da, n., i.g. 
cassava. 

Cassan'dra, n., the 
Trojan prmcess, 
whose prophecies 
went unheeded. 

cas'sareep, n., a con- 
diment made from 
cassava. 

cassa'tion. »., rever- 
sal of a judicial 
sentence. 

cassa'va, n. , the pi ant 
from which tapioca 
is derived. 

oass'erole, n., a stew- 
pan. 

cas'sia, n., the plant 
from which senna 
is obtained. 

cas'simere, n., see 
cashmere. 

cassit'erite, n., a tin 
dioxide. 

cas'sock, »t., an eccle- 
siastical habit, close 
fitting and long, 

oas'socked, a<2/., wear- 
ing a cassock. 

oas'sowary, n., a large 
ostrich-like bird. 

oast, v.t., to throw, 
throw off, deposit; 
mould; reckon, cal- 
culate; n., the act 
of throwing; the 
length of a throw; 
a squint; a type; a 
mould; the assign- 
ment of dramatis 
personae. 

Casta'Iian, adj., rel. 
to Castalia, the 
spring sacred to 
the Muses. 



^ 



r-p. 






r-^ 



castor-oil 



cas'tanets, n. pi., two 
wooden or ivory 
clappers, fastened 
to a dancer's thumb 
and rattled. 

cast'away, n., a per- 
son or ship that has 
been abandoned. 

caste, n., hereditary 
class; class distinc- 
tion. 

cas'tellan, n., one in 
charge of a castle. 

cas'teUany, «., a cas- 
tellan's jurisdiction. 

cas'tellated, adj., bat- 
tlemented like a 
castle. 

cas'ter, n., one who 
casts; also i.g., cas- 
tor. 

cas'tigate, v.t., to 
chastize, criticize, 
emend. 

cas'tigated, p.p., cas- 
tigate. 

cas'tigating, pr.p., 
castigate. 

castiga'tion, »., the 
act of castigating. 

cas'tigator, n., one 
who castigates. 

cas'tigatory, adj., rel. 
to castigation. 

Castil'ian, adj., bet. 
to Castile; «., a 
native of Castile. 

casting, pr.p., cast; 
n., the act or result 
of casting. 

cast'ing-net, n., a net 
which is flung out 
and drawn back. 

oast'ing-vote, n., the 
chairman's extra 
vote when the sides 
are equal. 

cast'-iron, «., iron 
that has been melt- 
ed; adj., made of or 
like to cast-iron. 

cas'tle, v.t., to fortify; 
to exchange the 
places of the king 
and the castle at 
chess; «., a fortress. 

cas'tled, p.p., castle; 
also adj., having a 
castle on it. 

cas'tling, pr.p.,cait\t. 

cas'tor, n., a beaver; 
a tall hat; a utensil 
for sprinkling {e.g., 
a pepper castor); a 
small wheel for fur- 
niture legs; a sub- 
stance secreted by 
the beaver. 

cas' tor-oil, n., a vege- 
table purgative. 



eastrametation 



99 



eateehetieal 



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eastnuneta'tioc. n., 

the act or method 
of measuring a 
camp. 

castrate, v.l., to 
emasculate. 

castrated, p.p., cas- 
trate. 

cas'trating, pr.p., cas- 
trate. • 

castration, n., the 
act or process of 
castrating. 

cas'trel, n. , s« kestrel . 

cas'nal, <idj., acciden- 
tal, happening by 
chance; unmethod- 
ical and careless; n., 
a tramp. 

oas'aalty, »■, a serious 
accident; loss 
through death or 
wounds. 

cas'oist, «., one who 
studies casuistry. 

casnis'tic, adj., rel. 
to casuistry. 

casms'tical, adj., i.q. 
casuistic. 

cas'uistiy, m., in 
moral science the 
study of cases of 
conscience; over- 
subtlety; sophistry. 

cat, v.t., to haul up; 
n., the familiar ani- 
mal so named. 

cataVolism, n., (lit., 
a casting down); the 
change of proto- 
plasm into other 
substainces. 

catacbre'sis, n., amis- 
use of metaphors. 

catachres'tic, adj., of 
the nature of cata- 
chresis. 

cat'aolysm, n . , a flood , 
deluge; any great 
upheaval. 

cataclys'mie, adj. , re) . 
to cataclysms or 
to the cataclysmic 
theory. 

cataclys'inist, n., one 
who supports a par- 
ticular view about 
cataclysms. 

cat'acomb, «•., a sub- 
terranean cave- 
tomb. 

catacous'tics. n., the 
theory of reflected 
sound. 

oatadiop'trio, adj., rel. 
to the reflection or 
refraction ol light. 

cat'alalqoe, n., a tem- 
porary canopy over 
a corpse or coffin. 



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Cfttagmat'io, adj., rel. 
to a fracture. 

Cafalan, adj., bel. 
to Catalonia. 

cataleo'tic, adj., lack- 
ing metrical com- 
pleteness. 

oat'alepsis, n., i.q. 
catalepsy. 

cat'alepsy, n., a nerv- 
ous afiection; the 
patient loses con- 
sciousness, and his 
limbs become rigid, 
remaining where 
anyone fixes them. 

cataleptic, adj., reLor 
subject to catalepsy. 

catallac'tics, n., the 
theory of commer- 
cial exchange. 

catalogue, v.t., to 
make or to include 
in a list; n., a list or 
detailed enumera- 
tion. 

cafalogaed, pp., 
catalogue. 

cat'aloKuing, pr.p., 
catalogue. 

Catalo'Dian, ad)., bel. 
to Catalonia. 

Cat'alpa, n., a genus 
of trees so named. 

oatal'ysis, »., a chem- 
ical process in 
which a stable 
agent changes a 
compound. 

catalyt'ic, adj., rel. to 
catalysis. 

catamaran', n., a 
surf-boat or raft. 

catame'nia, n. pi., 
the menses. 

catame'nial, adj., rel. 
to catamenia. 

cat'amonnt. n., the 
panther. 

catapet'alons, adj., 
with petals at the 
base of a group of 
stamens. 

cat'aphraot, n., plate 
or scale armour. 

oat'aplasm, n., a 
poultice. 

cat'apolt, n., origin- 
ally a Roman en- 
gine for discharging 
heavy missiles; a 
modern toy. 

catapolt'ic, adj., rel. 
to a catapult. 

cat'aract, »., a great 
waterfall, or rush of 
water; a disease of 
the eye. 

catanc'tons, adj., 
cataract-like. 



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eatarrb'. w., an afiec- 
tion of the mucous 
membrane; a cold 
in the head. 

catanh'aL adj. , of the 
nature of catarrh. 

catas'tasis, n., the 
part in a Greek 
drama that next 
precedes the catas- 
trophe. 

catas'trophe, n., in a 
drama = the de- 
nouement or final 
conclusion; a disas- 
trous ending, a 
calamity. 

catastroph'ic, adj., of 
the nature of catas- 
trophe. 

catbird, n., the N. 
American mocking- 
thrush. 

cat'boat, n., a single- 
masted sailing boat. 

cat' call, n., a derisive 
outcry; v.i., to raise 
this cry. 

catch, v./., to lay 
hold of, seize; grasp 
meaning ; hear 

sound; overtake; «., 
anything that is 
caught; the act of 
catching; an im- 
pediment; a kind of 
musical form; a 
fastening. 

catch' er, n., one who 
catches. 

catch'fly, n., a plant 
so named from its 
glutinous stem. 

catcb'ing, ^r.^., catch 

catoh'ment, n., drain- 
age. 

catoh'penny, adj., 
worthless; n., a 
worthless article 
made only to sell. 

oateh'pole, n., an in- 
strument of medie- 
val warfare for un- 
horsing an oppwn- 
ent. 

catch'ap, n., see cat- 
sup. 

catch' wortf, n., a 
word or phrase de- 
signed to arrest the 
popular fancy; the 
first word of a page 
repeated at the foot 
of the preceding 
page. 

catechet'ic, adj., of 
the nature of a 
catechism. 

eataobefioal, adj., i.q. 
catechetic. 



eateehism 






-1 



cat'echism, n., in- 
struction by ques- 
tion and answer. 

cat'echist, n., one 
who catechizes; a 
teacher of cate- 
chumens. 

catechist'ic, adj., rel. 
to catechizing. 

catechiza'tion, n., the 
act of catechizing. 

cat'ectaize, v.t., to 
teach by question 
and answer. 

cat'echized, p.p., cat- 
echize. 

cat'ecbizer, n., one 
who catechizes. 

cat'echizing, prp-, 
catechize. 

cat'echn, n., an 
astringent extract. 

catecbn'men, n., a 
person under in- 
struction in the 
rudiments of the 
Catholic Faith. 
' catechtunen'ic, adj., 
in the relation of a 
catechumen. 
, oatechnman'ioal, adj., 
i.q. catechumenic. 

categoremat'ic, adj., 
said of terms which 
are complete in 
themselves. 

categor'ical, adi., 
positive, unequivo- 
cal. 

cat'egorize, v.t., to 
classify. 

oat'egory, n., a class; 
general heading or 
grouping. 

cate'na, n., a chain, 
series. 

catenarian, adj., rel. 
to a catenary. 

cate'nary, n., a 
mathematical curve 
so named; tuLj., rel. 
toor likeacatenary. 

cat'enate, vX, to form 
into a chain or 
series. 

catenated, p.p., cat- 
enate. 

catenation, n., the 
act of catenating. 

ca'ter. v.i., to provide 
food; minister to 
any taste or desire. 

ca'teran, n., a High- 
land name for a 
freebooter. 
1 catered. p./>., cater. 

ca'terer, n., one who 
caters. 

ca'teress, n., fern, of 
caterer. 






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100 



ea'tering, pr.p., ca- 
ter. 

cat'erpillar, n. , a grub; 
the larva of some 
insects. 

cat'erwaol, v.i., to 
make the cry of a 
cat; to raise any 
hideous cry. 

cates, n. pL, eatables; 
dainty meats. 

cat' fish, n., a fish so 
named from the 
purring sound it 
makes when caught. 

cat'gat, n., strong 
cord made from 
animals' intestines. 

Catb'ari, adj., a name 
corresponding to 
the Puritans. 

catharsis, n., purg- 
ing. 

cathar'tic, adj., purg- 
ing, purifying. 

oathar'tical, adj., i.q. 
cathartic. 

cat-head, «., the pro- 
jecting piece of tim- 
ber or iron from 
which a ship's 
anchor hangs. 

cathed'ra, »., the 
Greek name for any 
seat; hence, the 
bishop's seat, stool, 
or throne. 

oathe'dral adj., con- 
taining a cathedra 
or bishop's seat; n., 
a church in which 
the bishop has his 
seat. 

'catheret'io. adj., de- 
structive; erosive; 
»., a caustic. 

cath'eter, «., a surgi- 
cal instrument for 
insertion into pass- 
ages. 

ca&'ode, n., the neg- 
ative pole or elec- 
trode of an elec- 
trical battery. 

cathod'ic adj., rel. to 
a cathode. 

Catb'oUc, adj., uni- 
versal. The Catholic 
Faith is so called 
not because it em- 
braces all beliefs, 
but because the one 
belief is offered to 
the whole world 
without distinction 
of race. By a per- 
version of language 
a man who denies 
the Catholic Faith 
is often described 



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n. 







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eaucas 



as Catholic or Cath- 
olic-minded because 
he regards dogmatic 
belief as illiberal. 

Catfaolicism, n., thp 
system and doc- 
trines of the Catho- 
lic Church. 

catholic'itr. "•> the 
Catholic character. 
It is sometimes per- 
versely used in the 
sense of breadth, 
liberality. 

Catholicize, v.t., to 
make Catholic. 

cathol'icon, n., a 
universal remedy; 
a comprehensive 
book. 

Catilina'rian, adj., rel. 
to Catiline. 

cat'ion, n., Faraday's 
name for the ele- 
ment which in elec- 
trolysis makes its 
appearance at the 
cathode. 

catkin, n., the spikes 
of flowers on the 
willow and other 
trees. 

cat'-like, adj., like a 
cat. 

cat'ling, n., a kitten; 
a surgical knife so 
named. 

catmint, n., a kind 
of mint of which 
cats aie fond. 

cat'-nip, n., i.q. cat- 
mint. 

Cato'nian, adj., rel. 
to Cato. 

cat-o'-nine'-tails, ».. 
an obsolete instru- 
ment of punish- 
ment. It consisted 
of nine knotted 
cords attached to a 
handle. 

catoptric, adj., re- 
flecting. 

oat's'-paw. n., anyone 
made to do another's 
dirty work. 

cat'snp, n., a liquid 
aromatic condi- 
ment. 

cat' tie, »., domesti- 
cateid live stock, 
particularly bovine. 

oat'tlenshow, n., an 
exhibition of cattle. 

Cauca'sian, adj., rel. 
to the Caucasus 
region. 

caa'cns, «., a private 
association of poli- 
tical partisans. 



caudal 



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oan'dal, adj., rel. to 
the tail. 

cau'date, adj., tailed. 

oau'da ted, a<i7. , tailed. 

caa'dle, n., a warm 
concoction of wine, 
spices, etc., for a 
sick person. 

eant, n., a basket in 
which fish are kept 
under water. 

caught, p.p., catch. 

caul, n., a fold of the 
peritoneum; a mem- 
branoiis covering of 
some infants' heads 
at child-birth; a 
hair-net. 

caol'dron, n., a large 
boiler or kettle. 

caoles'oent, adj., hav- 
ing a stem. 

can'UoIe, n., a little 
stem. 

caa'licoloos, adj., liv- 
ing on stalks. 

caal'ionle. n., i.q. 
caulicle. 

oaalifeTons, »di., 
having a stem. 

oan'Uflower, n., a 
cabbage with edible 
flowers. [like. 

oaa'lUonn, a(2;.,stem- 

oaa'Une, adj., grow- 
ing on a stalk; the 
colouring matter in 
red cabbage. 

oaolk, v.t., to make 
watertight (w< calk). 

cana'al, «<</., rel. to 
cause. 

eanaarity.N., the rel- 
ation of cause and 
effect. 

mnn'tion. n., i.q. 
causality; the act of 
causing. 

MOS'ktiva, tulj., pro- 
ducing effect from 
cause. 

oaus'atiTely, *dv., io 
a causative way. 

oaosa, n., an original 
source, reason, mo- 
tive; a suit at law; 
a movement or prin- 
ciple; v.t., to pro- 
duce an edect; com- 
pel. 

oatued, p.p., cause. 

oaiue'less, adj., with- 
out any just cause. 

oatue'lessly, adv., in a 
causeless way. 

oatue'lessness, n., an 
unreasonable con- 
dition or state. 

Otiu'er, n., one who 
causes. 



J ^ 

T 

n 






101 



cans'erie, n., a chat, 
conversation (Fr.). 

caosetue', n., a seat 
for two people to 
chat on (Fr.). 

causa' way, n., a 
raised path. 

causey, n., i.q. cause- 
way. 

cau'seyed, adj., hav- 
ing a causeway. 

catisid'ical, adj., rel. 
to advocacy. 

caus'ing, pf.p., cause. 

caus'tio, adj., burn- 
ing; sarcastic; n., a 
burning substance. 

caustic'i^, n., the 
quality of being 
caustic. 

cau'tel, n., caution; in 
ecclesiastical lan- 
guage, a precaution 
against defects or 
irregularities in say- 
ing Mass. 

can'ter, n. , a burning- 
iron. 

oan'terant, adj., of 
the character of a 
cautery. 

cauteriza'tion, n., the 
act of using a 
cautery, 

oau'terize, v.t., to 
burn with a cautery. 

cau'teriied, p.p., cau- 
terize. 

can'teriztng. Pr-P., 
cauterize. 

csn'tery, «., burning 
with an acid or a 
hot iron; a searing 
iron or other agent. 

oan'tion, v.t., to ad- 
monish, warn; n., 
prudence, consider- 
ation, advice, ad- 
monition. 

caa'tioutfy, ad)., of 
the nature of warn- 
ing. 

oaa'Uoned, p.p., cau- 
tion. 

oau'tioner, n., one 
who camions. 

can'tioninx, pr.p., 
caution. 

cautious, ad]., wary, 
discreet. 

can'tionsly, adv., 
warily, discreetly. 

cau'tiousneau n., a 
wary, discreet char- 
acteristic. 

cavalcade', n., a train 
of horsemen. 

cavalier', n., an 
armed horseman; a 
lady's escort; a 



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eawed 



Royalist; adj., tike 
a cavalier, gay, off- 
hand; arrogant, 
abrupt. 

oavaliefly, adv., in 
free and easy, 
haughty fashion. 

cav'alry, n., horse 
soldiers; adj., rel. 
to cavalry. 

cavass', n., a Turkish 
military guard. 

cavati'na, n., a short 
aria without a re- 
peat. 

cave, v.t., to fall in, 
collapse; n., a hol- 
low subterranean 
place. 

ca'veat, m., a legal 
process in delay of 
proceedings. (It 
means " let him 
beware.") 

ca'veator, n., one who 
files a caveat. 

caved, adj., hollowed; 
p.p., cave. 

cav'em, v.t., to ex- 
cavate; enclose in a 
cavern ; n. , an under- 
ground cave; any 
cavity. 

cav'erned, p.p., cav- 
ern. 

cav'ernous, adj., like 
a cavern; caverned. 

cavet'to, n. , a grooved 
moulding. 

caviar', caviare', n., 
sttirgeon-roe pre- 
pared as a relish. 

cav'icom, adj., with 
hollow horns. 

oav'il, v.t., to find 
needless fault, to be 
captious; n., a cap- 
tious objection, 
needless criticism. 

eav'illed, -led, p.p., 
cavil. 

cav'iller. -ler, n., one 
who cavils. 

cav'iUing, -ling, pr.p., 
cavil. 

cavilUngly. -lingly, 
adv., in a captious 
way. 

caving, pr.p., cave. 

cav'ity, n., a hollow. 

ca'vy, n., a burrow- 
ing rodent, such as 
the guinea pig. 

caw, v.t'., to make a 
sound like that of 
the crow, rook, jack- 
daw, or raven; n., 
the cry of those 
birds 



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i}m\n'irn'Y 07 cau 



cawing 



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a 

n 



caw'ing, pf.p., caw. 

oawk, v.t. and n., i.q. 
caw. 

cax'on, n., a chest. 

Cayeime', n., a town 
in French Guiana; 
a hot, red pepper, 
nam^ from that 
place. 

cay'man, »., an 
American alligator. 

caziqae', n., te* ca- 
cique. 

oease, v.*. and t., to 
stop, desist, come 
to an end, bring to 
an end; n., end, 
pause. 

ceased, p.p., cease. 

cease'Iess, adj., with- 
out cease. 

oease'lessly, adv., in 
a ceaseless way. 

ceas'ing, pf.p., cease. 

ce'oity, n., blindness. 

ce'dar, n., a large 
tree of the pine and 
fir order; adj., made 
of cedar wood, 

Ce'dared, adj., cedar- 
covered. 

ce'dam, adj., made 
of cedar. 

cede, v.t., to give up, 
resign. 

ce'ded, p.p., cede. 

ce'der, n., one who 
cedes. 

cediria,n., the sign (,) 
beneath the letter c, 
softening it before 
a, o, u, 

ce'ding, pr.p., cede. 

ce'drat, ce'drate, n., 
the citron. 

ce'diin, ce'diine, n., 
the active principle 
of the cedron, a very 
bitter fruit. 

oeil, v.t., to cover 
with ceiling. 

ceiled, p.p., ceil. 

eeirinK,^r.^.,ceil;n., 
the roof of a room. 

oeradon, n., sea- 
green. 

celandine, n., the 
swallow-wort, a 
kind of poppy. 

celatare, n., the art 
of chasing and en- 
graving. 

celebrant, »., one 
who celebrates; the 
officiating priest or 
bishop at the Mass. 

cerebrate, v.t., to 
make famous; to 
observe with cere- 
monies; to com- 



i—' 
r 



n 



102 



memorate; to offi- 
ciate at the Mass. 

cerebrated, p.p., cele- 
brate; adj., famous. 

cerebrating, pr.p., 
celebrate. 

celebra'tion, n., the 
act of celebrating; 
the offering of the 
Holy Mysteries in 
the Mass. 

cerebrator, n., one 
who celebrates. 

celeb'rity, n., the 
state of being cel- 
ebrated; a famous 
parsonage. 

celer'iao, n., turnip- 
rooted celery. 

celer'ity, n., speed, 
rapidity. 

cel'ery, «., the edible 
plant so named. 

celes'tial. adj., bel. 
or rel. to the sky or 
heavens. 

ce'liao, adj., rel. to 
the abdomen. 

celibacy, n., the un- 
married state; bach- 
elorhood. 

cel'ibate, n., an un- 
married person ; 
adj., not married; 
abstaining from 
marriage. 

oelidog'raphy, n., the 
study or descrip- 
tion of the sun's 
spots. 

cell, n., a small room 
(in a monastery or 
a prison); a cavity; 
a little mass of 
protoplasm en- 

closed in a sac; a 
division of an elec- 
tric battery. 

oel'lar, »., an under- 
ground chamber for 
storage. 

cel'larace, n., a sys- 
tem or series of 
cellars; the capacity 
of a cellar; charge 
for storing. 

cel'Iarer, n., a monk 
in charge of the 
monastic cellar. - 

eel'laret, n., a cabinet 
for holding wine or 
spirit decanters. 

oeUed, adj., contain- 
ing cells. 

'cellist, «., abbrevia- 
tion of violoncellist, 
one who plays the 
violoncello, 

'cello, n., short for 
violoncello. 



cenotaph 






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5. 



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^- 



cel'lnlar, adj., in cell 
formation. 

cel'lnlated, adj., 

formed into cells. 

oel'lnle, n., a little 
cell. 

cellnlif'erons, adj., 
producing cellules. 

cel'lnloid, n., a sub- 
stance composed of 
camphor and gun- 
cotton. 

cel'Inlose, adj., full of 
little cells; made of 
cellulose; «., a white 
compound much 
used in the arts. 

Cel'sias, n., a ther- 
mometrical scale, 
named after the 
Swedish astrono- 
mer, Anders Cel- 
sius. 

Celt, «>., a member of 
the Celtic race; a 
pre-historic stone, 
axe-like implement. 

Celtibe'rian, adj., 
pert, to the Celti- 
beri, a mixed people 
partly Celts, partly 
Iberians (Basques). 

Celt'ic, adj., bel. to 
the Celts. 

Celt'icism, »., some- 
thing characteristic 
of a Celt. 

Celt'ish, adj., Celtic, 

cement', v.(., to join, 
unite closely; n., a 
substance making 
thmgs adhere; a 
kind of mortar; 
(metaphorically) a 
bond of union. 

cementa'tioa, n., the 
process of cement- 
ing. 

cement'atory. adj., 
rel. to cement. 

cement'ed, p.p., ce- 
ment. 

cement'er, n., one 
who cements. 

cement'ing, pr.p., 
cement. 

cementi'tioas, ad)., 
tending to cement. 

oem'etery,n., a grave- 
yard, burial-ground. 

cen'obite, n., one who 
lives the common 
life, a monk, nun. 

cenobit'ical. adj., rel. 
to a cenobite. 

cenog'amy, »., com- 
munity of wives or 
husbands. 

cen'otapb. n., a tomb 
not containing the 



cense 



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3 



r 



body of a person 
commemorated. 

cense, v./., to offer 
incense to; to per- 
fume. 

censed, p.p., cense. 

cen'ser, n., the vessel 
in which incense is 
burned. 

cens'ing, pr.p., cense. 

cen'sor, n., an ancient 
Roman official who 
looked after taxa- 
tion and superin- 
tended the public 
morals; an official 
examiner ot books, 
plays, etc. ; one who 
criticizes with a 
moral purpose; v./., 
to reject after exam- 
ination. 

cen'sored, p.p., cen- 
sor. 

censo'rial. adj., rel. 
to a censor. 

cen'soring, pr.p., cen- 
sor. 

censo'riODS, mtj., ad- 
versely critical. 

censo'rioosly, adv., in 
a censorious way. 

censo'iioosness, n., 
the habit of criti- 
cizing. 

oen'sonbip. n., the 
office of a censor; 
tenure of his office. 

oen'snal, adj., rel. to 
the census. 

cen'sorable, adj., fit 
to be censured. 

cen'suie, v.t., to 
blame, reprove. 

cen'sored, p.p., cen- 
sure. 

cen'sniei, »., one who 
censures. 

cen'soring, pr.p. , cen- 
sure. 

cen'sns, n., a num- 
bering of the people 
(in Roman times 
the census mcluded 
a survey of pro- 
perty). 

cent, n., a hundred; 
the hundredth part 
of a dollar. 

cent'age, n., i.q. per- 
centage. 

cen'tal, n., a weight 
of too lb. 

centaur, n., a fabled 
creature, half man, 
half horse. 

oen'tanry, n., a plant 
of the gentian 
family. 

centena'riui. n., a 



^i/^ 



m. 



1U3 



person aged a hun- 
dred; adj., rel. to a 
hundred years. 

oen'tenary, n., the 
hundredth anniver- 
sary. 

centan'nisl, adj., rel. 
to a period of a 
hundred years. 

oen'ter, see centre. 

cen'tering, pr.p., cen- 
ter. 

centes'imal, adj., 
hundredth; n., a 
hundredth part. 

centesima'tion, n., 
the act of taking 
one in every 
hundred. 

centifo'Uoas, adj., 
hundred-leaved. 

cen'tigrade, adj., of a 
hundred degrees. 

cen'tigranune, »., a 
hundredth of a 
gram. 

cen'tilitre, -ter, n., a 
hundredth of a 
litre. 

centime', n., a 
hundredth of a 
franc. 

cen'timetre, -ter, n., 
a hundredth of a 
metre. 

cen'tipede, n., a crea- 
ture with a hundred 
{i.e., very many) 
leet. 

cen'to, n., a selection, 
patchwork. 

oen'tral, adj., rel. to, 
or placed at, the 
centre. 

central'ity, n., the 
state or relation of 
the central. 

centraliza'tion. n., 
the drawing to a 
centre; concentra- 
tion of authority or 
administration in a 
single body or office. 

oen'traUze, v.^, to 
draw to a centre; to 
concentrate author- 
ity or administra- 
tion. 

cen'traliEed. p.p., 
centralize. 

oen'tralizing, pr.p., 
centralize. 

oen'tre, v.t., to fix on 
a centre, place at 
the centre; ».»., to 
be at the centre; «., 
the middle point of 
a circle; a point to 
which things con- 
verge. 



'^V^ 



-V- 



cerate 



cen'tre-bit,n., a bor- 
ing tool with a 
centre point. 

cen'tred, p.p., centre. 

cen'trio, adj., central. 

cen'trical, adj., i.q. 
centric. 

centrio'ity, rt., the 
centric relation. 

centril'ngal, oti/., fly- 
ing off from the 
centre; radiating. 

cen'tring, pr.p., cen- 
tre. 

centrip'etal, adj., 
tending towards the 
centre. 

centum' vir, n., a 
Roman judge so 
named. (The cen- 
tumviri numbered 
105, and were pre- 
sided over by a 
praetor.) 

centum' Tirate, n., the 
Ixxly of centumvirs; 
the office, and ten- 
ure of office, ot the 
centumvirs. 

oen' tuple, adj., a 
hundred-fold; v.t., 
to increase a hun- 
dred-fold. 

oenta'rial, adj., rel. 
to a century. 

centn'rion, n., a 
Roman military 
officer, command- 
ing a hundred foot 
soldiers. 

cen'tory, n., a period 
of 100 years; a hun- 
dred in number; a 
Roman political 
division according 
to property. 

ceorl, n., a freeman 
{see churl). 

cephalal'gic, adj., rel. 
to headache; n., a 
remedy for head- 
ache. 

ceph'alalgy, n., head- 
ache. 

cepbaric, adj., rel. to 
the head. 

ceph'alopod, adj., rel. 
to the Cephalopods, 
molluscs with a 
subcentral head. 

ceph'alons, adj., hav- 
ing a head. 

cera'ceons, adj., wax- 
en. 

ceram'ic, adj., rel. to 
pottery. 

cer'asite, n., a fossil 
resembling a cherry. 

ce'rate, adj., having 



cerated 






the 
the 






ce' rated, adj., coated 
with wax. 

oer'atin, n. , the essen- 
tial element in the 
composition of 

horny tissue. 

Cerbe'iean, •dj., rel. 
to Cerberus, the 
watch-dog of Hades. 

cere, v.t., to cover 
with wax or cere- 
cloth; «., wax; the 
waxy membrane on 
a bird's beak. 

ce'real, adj., rel. to 
Ceres; rel. to corn. 

oereberiom, n., the 
lower and back por- 
tion of the head. 

cer'ebral, adj., rel. to 
the brain. 

ceiebra'tion, n., 
action of brain 

cerebroin. n., 
brain. 

cere'cloth, n., a 
waxed cloth. 

cere'ment, n. , a wrap- 
ping, esp. one cov- 
ered with wax. 

oeremo'nial, adj., rel. 
to ceremony; n., 
order of ceremonies; 
a book of cere- 
monies. 

ceremo'Dialism, n., a 
fondness for cere- 
monial practices. 

oeiemo'nions, adj., 
formal. 

ceremo'niotuly, adv., 
in a ceremonious 
way. 

oer'emony, n., the 
formal acts illus- 
trating a rite or 
other observance; a 
way of showing 
respect or civility; 
regard for etiquette. 

ce'reoos, adj., waxen. 

ce'rio, adj., rel. to 
wax. 

ce'rin, n., a com- 
pound obtained 
from cork. 

oei'ipb, n., the little 
stroke projecting 
from the main 
strokes of a letter. 

cerise', adj., cherry- 
coloured; n., the 
cherry colour. 

oe'rite, n., a cerium 
silicate. 

ce'riam, n., a rare 
metal of a steel- 
g^ey colour. 

oeme, v.t., to sur- 
round; n., a circle. 



•n 



^^ 



t. 












\ 



104 



cerotr'raphy, n., writ- 
ing on wax. 

ce'romancy, n., div- 
ination by means of 
wax. 

oeroplas'tic, adj. , 
modelled in wax ; 
rel. to wax mould- 
ing. 

cer'tain, adj., sure, 
unquestionable; 
confident, con- 

vinced; appointed; 
one or some. 

cer'tainly, adv., truly, 
assuredly, inevit- 
ably. 

eer'tainty, n., the 
state or fact of 
bemg certain. 

cer'tes, adv., cer- 
tainly (obs.). 

certificate, v.t., to 
give a certificate to; 
n., a testimonial to 
character or pro- 
ficiency. 

certiiloa'tion, n., the 
act of certifying; 
guarantee. 

oer'tifled, p.p., cer- 
tify. 

cer'tiflei, n., one who 
certifies. 

oer'tily, v.t., to guar- 
antee, make evi- 
dent, testify. 

cer'tifyinK, Pr.p., 
certify. 

certiora'ri, n., a writ 
from a higher court 
requirmg the re- 
cords from a lower 
court. 

cei'titude, m., assured 
belief; certainty. 

cerulean, adj., of a 
sky-blue colour. 

oera'men, n., the wax 
in the ears. 

ce'mse, »., white 
lead; v.t., to paint 
with ceruse, a cos- 
metic made from 
white lead. 

ce'rosed, P-P-, ceruse. 

cervical, adj., rel. to 
the neck. 

cer'vine, adj., rel. to 
deer. 

Cesa'rean, adj., rel. 
to Caesar. 

ces'pitom, (Mi;., turfy. 

cess,. v./., to assess, 
tax; v.t., to surren- 
der; n., rate, tax. 

cessa'tion, n., a leav- 
ing off. 

ces'ser, n., ceasing to 
perform some duty. 






A 



V 



I- 



y 






J 



.L 
1 






t 



ehafled 



ces'sion, n., yielding 
up, surrender. 

ces'sionary, adj., giv- 
ing up, surrender- 
ing. 

ces'sor, n., i.g. cesser. 

cess' pool, n., a cov- 
ered well to receive 
the solid contents of 
a drain. 

Oest, »., i.q. cestus. 

cestui, n., an old 
French expression 
= he; the man who. 

oes'tus, n., a girdle; 
a pugilist's fist- 
guard {Lot.). 

cesu'ra, n. , a break or 
pause in a metrical 
foot. This break 
occurs at various 
points in a verse. 

cesn'ral, adj., rel. to, 
of the nature of, 
cesura. 

Ceta'cea, n. pl., mar- 
ine animals, like the 
whale, the dolphin, 
etc. 

ceta'cean, adj., rel. to 
the cetacea; n., one 
of these creatures. 

ceta'ceous, adj., i.g. 
cetacean. 

ce'tic, adj., rel. to the 
whale. 

ce'tin, n., a fatty 
compound contain- 
ing spermacetti. 

oe'tine, n., i-g. cetin. 

cetol'ogy, n. , the study 
ol cetaceans. 

Chab'lis, n., a French 
white wine from 
Chablis. 

chad, n., otherwise 
the shad, a young 
sea-bream. 

chafe, v.t., to rub 
sore, to gall; to 
annoy; to restore 
warmth; v.i., to be 
hot with anger, to 
fume. 

chafed, p.p., chafe. 

cha'fer, n., one who 
chafes; also a com- 
mon name for the 
cockchafer. 

oha'tery, n., a forge 
for the making of 
iron bars. 

obail, v.t., to teaze, 
make fun of; n., the 
husk of grain; cut 
strawor hay; banter. 

chaif'-OQtter, n., a 
machine for cutting 
chaff. 

chaffed, p.p., chaff. 



chaffer 



J- 



^ 

% 



b 



ehaMer, v.i., to bar- 
gain, haggle; n., 
bargaini:ig. 

chaf iered. p.p., chaf- 
fer. 

charierer, n., one 
who chaffers. 

chafferinK, pr.p., 
chaffer. 

chaffinch, n., a small 
British song-bird. 

chaffy, adj., like 
chaff, covered with 
chaff; disposed to 
banter. 

cha'flng, />f.^., chafe; 
n., impatience, irri- 
tation. 

cha'flng-dish. n., a 
receptacle of live 
coals for heating 
purposes. 

chagreen', n., see 
shagreen. 

chagrin', v.t. to vex, 
mortify; »., disap- 
pointment; morti- 
fication. 

chagrined', p.p., cha- 
grin. 

chain, v.i., to fasten 
with a chain, to 
fasten securely; to 
measure with a 
chain; n., a series 
of links for the 
purpose of binding; 
bond, slavery; a 
connected series; a 
measuring line. 

chained, p.p., chain. 

chain'ing, ^r.p.,chain. 

chain'-ptunp, n., a 
pump with an end- 
less chain to which 
buckets are at- 
tached. 

chain'-shot, n., can- 
nod balls chained 
together. 

chabi'-stitcb, n., a 
loop-stitch. 

cbair, v.t., to place in 
a chair; carry in a 
chair; n., a single 
seat; an official seat; 
a sedan-chair. 

chaired, p.p., chair. 

c Aa/r'ing, pr.p. chair. 

cAd/j-'man, n., the 
president of any 
assembly or com- 
pany for whom a 
special chair is re- 
served; a sedan- 
chair bearer. 

cAa/r'manship, n., 
the function, or term 
of office, of a chair- 
man. 



J. 



^. 



. r 






105 



ebaiM, n., a two- 
wheeled light car- 
riage. 

ohalcedon'ic, adj.,re\. 
to, or resembling, 
the chalcedony. 

chateed'ony, n., a 
precious stone of 
the quartz kind. 

chalcog'rapher. n., 
one who engraves 
on copper. 

chalcog'raphy, »., 
copper engraving. 

Chalda'ic, adj., pert. 
to the Chaldees. 

Cbal'daism, n., some- 
thing characteris- 
tically Chaldean. 

Chalde'an, adj., bel. 
to Chaldea. 

Chaldee', adj., Chal- 
dean; n., a Chal- 
dean. 

ohal'dron, n., a coal 
and coke measure, 
of varying capacity 
according te coun- 

cha'let, n., a Swiss 
moimtain dwelling; 
any small country 
house built in 
imitation. 

ctaal'ice, n., a cup or 
bowl; pre-eminently 
the Eucharistic cup. 

cbal'iced, adj., cup- 
like. 

chalk, v.i., to mark 
with chalk; to treat 
with chalk; n.,a50ft, 
white limestone. 

chalked, p.p., chalk. 

chalk'ineas. n. , chalk y 
nature. 

ohalk'inc pi'P-, 
chalk. 

chalk'-pit, n., a pit 
from which chalk 
is extracted. 

chalk'-stone, n., a 
chalky formation in 
the body. 

ehalk'y, adj., like 
chalk, rel. to, or 
made of, chalk. 

ebal'I«>ge,i'.<.,tocall 
out to combat, 
defy; demand proof; 
take exception to. 

chal'lengeable, adj., 
able to be chal- 
lenged. 

chal'lenged. p.p., 
challenge. 

chal'lenger, »., one 
who challenges. 

chal'Ienging, pr.p., 
challenge. 



^ 



1>-^J^ 



A/l 



A^ 



champing 



cfcalyb'eate, adj., im- 
pregnated with iron. 

Cham, n., a Tartar or 
Mogul chief. 

chamade', n., the 
trumpet or drum 
appeal for a par- 
ley. 

cham1)er, v.i., to fur- 
nish with chambers; 
v.i., to act wan- 
tonly; n., a room; 
an assembly. 

cham'bered, adj., 
provided with, or 
divided into, cham- 
bers; p.p., chamber. 

cham'ber-leUow. »., 
one who shares 
chambers. 

cham'bering, pr.p., 
chamber; n., wan- 
ton behaviour. 

cham'berlain, m., an 
officer in a royal or 
great household, 
who has charge of 
the chambers and 
the ceremonial. 

cham'bermaid, n., a 
domestic servant in 
charge of the cham- 
bers. 

chame'leon, n., a 
kind of lizard, pos- 
sessed of the power 
to change colour. 

cham'Ier, v.t., to 
groove, bevel; n., a 
groove, bevel. 

cham'Iered. p.p., 
chamfer. 

cham'fering. pr.p., 
chamfer. 

cham'ois, n., a species 
of momitain goat; a 
soft leather. 

cham'omile, n., set 
camomile. 

champ, v.t. and «., to 
gnash, crunch; n., 
the act of champ- 
ing. 

champagne', n., a 
sparkling wine from 
the Champagne dis- 
trict of France. 

oham'paign, adj., 
open country, un- 
enclosed; n., a plain , 
open country. 

champed,^. ^. , champ. 

cham'perty, n., a 
bargain between 
two litigants, tu 
carry on a suit and 
share in the prop- 
erty. 

champ'ing, Pr.p., 
champ. ' 



4*-(«7») 



champion 



106 



chapter-hoDse 






4- 









cham'pion, v.<., to 
act as a champion 
for, to defend a 
cause; n., a de- 
fender. 

championed, p.p., 
champion. 

cham'pione88,n., fem. 
of champion. 

cham'pioxiing, pr.p., 
champion. 

Cham' pionship, n. , 
the act of a cham- 
pion. 

chance, v.t. and %., to 
take the risk of; to 
happen by chance; 
»., that which hap- 
pens unexpectedly; 
an opportunity; a 
possibility. 

chanced, p.p., chance. 

chan'cel, »., the east- 
ern section of a 
church. 

chan'cellery, «., the 
office of a chan- 
cellor; a court; a 
department of a 
legation. 

chancellor, n., an 
official who keeps 
the Great Seal; the 
head of a univer- 
sity; a cathedral 
dignitary so named; 
a diocesan judge. 

chan'cellorship, n., 
the office, and ten- 
ure of office, of a 
chancellor. 

chan'ceiy, »., a court 
of equity, now one 
of the divisions of 
the High Court. 

chancing, pr.p., 
chance. 

chan'ore, »., an ulcer. 

chan'oroos, tii)., ul- 
cerous. 

chandelier', n., a 
branched, sus- 

pended frame for 
holding candles. 

chand'Ier, n., a maker 
of and dealer in 
candles; a general 
dealer. 

chandlery, n., a 
chandler's shop; a 
chandler's goods. 

ohan'frin, n., the 
forehead of a horse. 

change, v.t. and %., to 
alter, make or be- 
come different; to 
exchange; n., al- 
teration, exchange; 
smaller money for 
larger. 









/ 



/ 



^ 






changeability, n., a 

tendency to change. 
change'able, euii., 

prone to change, 
change'ableness, n., 

i.q. changeability. 
chiuige'ably, adv., in 

a changeable way. 
changed, ^.^..change. 
change'fnl, »di., full 

of changes. 

changeless, adj., un- 
changing. 

change' ling, n., a 
substituted child. 

cban'ger, n., one who 
changes, esp. money. 

chan'ging, Pr.p., 
change. 

chan'neU v.t., to di- 
vide with channels; 
to groove; n., tlie 
bed of a stream; a 
strait, estuary; a 
means or passage; 
line of action. 

chan'nelled, p.p., 
channel; ai/., hav- 
ing channels; chan- 
nel-like. 

chan'nelling, pt.p., 
chaiHiel, 

chan'son. n., a song 
or ballad (Vr.). 

chansonette', n., a 
short ballad (/•>.). 

chant, v.t. and >., to 
sing; celebrate with 
praise; n., a melody 
to which psalms 
and other non- 
metrical words are 
sung. 

chant'ed, pp., chant. 

chant' er, n., one who 
chants, a singer, a 
precentor; the fin- 
ger-pipe on a bag- 
pipe. 

ehant'ey, »»., a 
rhythmical song 
suag by sailors when 
at work. 

chanticleer, n., a 
cock. 

chant'ing, pr.p., 
cliant. 

chant ress, n., fem. 
ot chanter. 

Chant'ry, n , an en- 
dowment of a priest 
or priests to say 
mass for the soul of 
a foimder or bene- 
factor. Sometimes, 
but not quite cor- 
rectly, the name is 
used for the chapel 
in which an en- 
dowed altar stood. 



"n 



< 



<■ 

< 



oha'os, n., a formless 
and disordered 

state; utter con- 
fusion. 

chaofic, adj., like 
chaos, in utter con- 
fusion. 

chap, v.t. and «., to 
split, crack; n., a 
split or crack in 
the skin; any fissure; 
a boy; a dealer; a 
jaw. 

chape, n., the tip of 
a scabbard; the 
part of a rein that 
goes into the buckle. 

cbiipeaa', n., a hat 
{Fr.). 

chap'el, n., a small 
church or part of a 
church; a Dissent- 
ing place of wor- 
ship; the collective 
journeymen in a 
printing office. 

chap'elry, n., a dis- 
trict m the jurisdic- 
tion of a chapel. 

ciiap'eron, v.t., to 
attend as a chap- 
eron; n., one who 
attends upon a lady. 

chap'eronage, n., the 
act or state of 
chaperoning. 

chap'fallen, adj., with 
drooping jaw, de- 
jected. 

chap'iter, n., a 
piilar capital. 

chap'lain, n., a priest 
attached to a chapel , 
the forces, a ship, 
an institution, or 
company. 

chap'laincy, n., a 
chaplain's office or 
tenure of office. 

chap'lainship, n., i.g. 
chaplaincy. 

Chap'let,n., a garland 
tor the head; a part 
of a rosary. 

Chap'man, n., a deal- 
er in small wares. 

Chapped, p.p., chap. 

chap'py, n., a little 
chap. 

chaps, n., pi. of 
chap. 

ohap'ter, »., a chief 
division of a book; 
the collective name 
for the clergy of a 
cathedral or colle- 
giate church; a local 
branch of a society. 

ohap'ter-/ioifs«, n., 
the building in 



ehaptrel 

which a chapter 
assembles. 

Vchap'tiel. M., ao im- 
post. 
, ohai, v.t., to scorch; 

^ v.i., to do house- 

hold chores; n., an 
odd job; a salmon- 
like fish. 
/\^ char'-A-bano, «., a 
^ large car with trans- 
v«vse seats. 

-... cbai'acter, w.t., to 

impress, engrave; 
to characterize; n., 
a distinctive quality 
or set of qualities; a 
letter of the alpha- 
bet, reputation. 

■: ."^ characterlst' Ic, 

adj., distmctive, 

peculiarly marking; 

«., a distinctive 

^ mark or quality. 

-....."...... characterlst' IcaiOs, 

adv., m a character- 
istic way. 
w i . cbaracterizA'VLoa, 

z ?. n., the act or effect 

of characterizing; 
description. 

'. .? cbar'acterim, v.t., 

to make distinguish- 
able; to describe. 

' ■" cbar'act eria,tA,p.p. , 

characterize. 

"• — cbar'acterisaag, 

/ f° ^r.p., characterize. 

- cbar'acterless, adj., 

without character, 
not distinctive. 
/I charade', n., a riddle, 
word-puzzle; a play 
consisting of a word- 
j, puzzle. 

i-f-i cbar'ooal. «., charred 
wood; a drawing- 
pencil made of char- 
coal dust; a drawing 
,, in charcoal. 
4 chaid, n., the white 
leaves or stalks of 
. certain plants. 
... C^ chare, iee char. 
f^ ' charge, v.t., to im- 
pose, lay upon; com- 
mand; fill; accuse; 
debit, fix a price 
for; attack; n., 
something imposed 
or put on; a com- 
mand; accusation; 
demand of a price; 
/y attack. 

^\ chargeabil'ity. n., a 
,y. chargeable state. 
^/ charge'abie, adj. , abl e 
/O. to be charged. 
^ ohaiKe'ably, adv., ex- 
^ pensively. 






i 



ly/ 



r- 



i 

^ 



107 



charged, />./>. charge. 

oharg6 d 'affaires', n., 
a diplomatic official 
in charge of aSairs, 
in place, or during 
the absence, of an 
ambassador. 

cbar'ger, n., one who 
charges; a war- 
horse; a large dish ; a 
case for the charge 
of a machine gun. 

charg'ing, Pr.p., 
charge. 

cba'ri^, adv., in a 
chary way. 

oha'riness, n., a state 
of being chary. 

char'iot, n., a two- 
wheeled carriage, 
used in war and 
races; a state car- 
riage. 

charioteer', n., the 
driver of a chariot. 

char'ism, n., a grace 
or power bestowed 
by the Holy Ghost. 

oharismat'ic. adj., of 
the nature of a 
spiritual gift. 

char'itable, adj., apt 
at bestowing char- 
ity. 

obar'itableness, n., a 
charitable temper. 

char'ity, n., love, esp. 
to one's neighbour; 
lenity of judgment. 

chariva'ri, n., a wild 
sort of serenade 
with a medley of 
noises. 

cbar'latan, »., an im- 
postor, quack. 

cbarlatan'ic, adj., 
resembling a char- 
latan. 

char'latanlsm, n,, the 
act or state of a 
charlatan. 

ohar'latanry. n., i.g. 
charlatanism. 

Char'iie, »., a night- 
watchman {obs.). 

char'lock, n., the wild 
mustard. 

obann, v.t., to en- 
chant, cast a spell 
on, delight; »., at- 
tractiveness, fasci- 
nation, spell. 

oharmed. p.p., charm. 

charm' er. n., one who 
charms. 

charm'ing, p.p., 
charm; adj., ae- 
lightful. 

chum'ingly. adv., 
delightfully. 









n- 

^ 



"A 



Chartrenx 



cbar'nel. adj., rel. to 
a corpse, ghastly; 
n., a charnel-house. 

ohar'nel-honse, n., a 
mortuary, a de- 
pository for bones. 

char'pie, n., lint. 

char'poy, »., a Hindu 
bed. 

charred, p.p., char. 

char'ring. pr.p., char. 

char'ry, adj., like 
charcoal. 

chart, v.t., to lay out 
on a chart; »., a 
map of land, sea, 
or sky; a tabular 
sheet. 

char'ta. n., a parch- 
ment, writing. 

charta'ceous. adj., 
like paper. 

char'ter, v.t., to hire, 
engage; n., a grant 
of titles, privileges, 
etc. 

cbar'terage. n., char- 
ges for chartering 
ships. 

ohar'tered. p.p., char- 
ter; adj., authorized 
by charter. 

char'terer, «., one 
who charters. 

Cbar'terbouse, n., a 
Carthusian monas- 
tery; the name is 
the English equiva- 
lent of Chartreuse. 

chartering. pr.p., 
charter. 

charter-party. n., 
agreement for hir- 
ing a ship or a part 
of a ship. 

ohar'tism. n., the 
principles of char- 
tists. 

cbar'tist, n., an 
advocate of the so- 
called People's 
Charter. 

cbartog'rapher, n., 
one who draws 
charts or maps. 

ohartoc'raphy. n., the 
art and practice of 
map-drawing. 

chartom'eter. n., an 
instrument for mea- 
suring distances on 
maps. 

Char teeose, n., a 
Carthusian monas- 
tery; a liqueur dis- 
tilled at La Grande 
Chartreuse in 
Grenoble. 

Char'trenz. n., a 
Charterhouse. 



ehartnlary 



108 



cheek-tooth 



< 



\ 



6 



< 



< 






U 



C 



f 



'f 



char'tolary, n., a 

record of property 
of a religious com- 
munity. 

char' woman, n., a 
woman who ctiares, 
or does chores. 

cha'ry, adj., careful, 
cautious. 

chas'able. chase'able, 
adj., able to be 
chased. 

Chase, v.l., to bunt, 
pursue, drive off ; 
ornament metal by 
indenting; n., hunt- i 
ing, pursuit; the 
part of a gun next 
to, and in front of, 
the trunnions. 

chased, p.p., chase. 

cbas'er, n., one who 
chases. 

chas'ing, pr.p., chase. 

chasm, n., a gap in 
the earth's surface; 
any great breach 
or severance. 

chasse'pot, n., the 
French needle-gun, 
now out of date. 

chasseni', n., a 
French light-armed 
soldier. 

chas'sis, n., the lower 
frame of a motor- 
car; a type of gun- 
carriage. 

chaste, adj., pure, 
clean, refined. 

chaste'ly, adv., in a 
chaste way. 

ohast'en, v.t., to puri- 
fy, punish. 

ofajkst'ened, p.p., 
chasten. 

ohast'ener, n., one 
who chastens. 

chastening, pr.p., 
chasten; n., punish- 
ment. 

chastise', v.f., to 
punish. 

chastised', />./>., chas- 
tise. 

chas'tisement, n., 
punishment. 

chastis'er, n., one 
who chastises. 

chastis'ing, p.p., chas- 
tise. 

ohas'tity, n., the qual- 
ity of being chaste. 

chas'able, n., the 
vestment of the 
celebrant at Mass. 

chat, v.t'., to talk 
informally, gossip; 
n., informal talk, 
gossip. 



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t 



oh&tean', n., a French 
castle. 

chat'elaine, n., the 
lady of a castle; a 
lady's chain to 
which are attached 
a variety of trin- 
kets, keys, etc. 

chat'ellany, n., the 
lordship of a castle- 
owner. 

chat'ted, pp., chat. 

chat'tel, n., a mov- 
able article of pro- 
perty. 

chat'ter, v.t., to 
prattle, talk use- 
lessly; shiver with 
cold (said of the 
teeth). 

chat'terboz, n., a gar- 
rulous person. 

chaf tered, p.p., chat- 
ter. 

charterer, «., one 
who chatters. 

chat'tering, pr.p., 
chatter. 

chatting, pr.p. chat. 

Chat'ty, adj., agree- 
ably talkative, gos- 
siping. 

Ctiat'wood, n., twigs 
lor burning. 

Chaocer'ian, adj.,Te\. 
to, or resembling, 
Chaucer. 

Chau'cerism, n., a 
Chaucerian idiom 
or peculiarity. 

chanffenr, n., a 
motor-car driver. 

Chan'tauana, n., a 
mutual improve- 
ment union (A mer.). 

ohan'Tinism, n., the 
principles of a chau- 
vinist. 

chan'vinist, n., on« 
who says " My 
country, right or 
wrong " and des- 
pises every foreign 
country. 

cheap, adj., of low 
price, of little value, 
common, poor. 

cheap'en, v.t., to make 
cheap, lower the 
value; v.i., to fall in 
price. 

cheap'ened, p.p., 
cheapen. 

cheap'ener, n. , one 
who cheapens. 

oheap'ening, pr.p., 
cheapen. 

cheaply, adv., at a 
cheap rate. 

cheap'ness, n., the 



Z_ 






J^ 






state or quality of 
being cheap. 

cheat, v.t., to deceive, 
defraud , mislead; n. , 
a fraudulent per- 
son, an act of 
cheating. 

cheat'able, ai;., liable 
to be cheated. 

cbeat'ed, p.p., cheat. 

cheat'er, n., one who 
cheats. 

cheating, pr.p. ,cheat ; 
«., the act or prac- 
tice of a cheat. 

check, v./., to bring to 
a sudden stop; mod- 
erate; to verify by 
examination; to 
threaten a king in 
chess; n., a sudden 
stoppage;something 
that stops; the 
American equiva- 
lent of English 
cheque; a crossed 
pattern in weaving; 
an identifying tick- 
et or disc. 

check'-book, n., i.q. 
cheque-book. 

checked, p.p., check. 

cbeck'er, »., one who 
checks; v./., to mark 
with a cross pat- 
tern; to fill with 
changes of fortune. 

check'er-board, n., %ee 
chequer-board. 

check'ercd, p.p., 
checker; adj., full 
of vicissitudes. 

check'ering, pr.p., 
checker. 

check'eis, n., t.^. 
chequers. 

check'er-work, n. , 
work on a check- 
ered pattern. 

check'ing, pr.p., 
check. 

check'mate, v.t., to 
beat at chess; to 
thwart, overcome; 
«., defeat, thwart- 
ing. 

cbeck'mated, p.p., 
checkmate. 

cb3ck'niating, pr.p., 
checkmate. 

chee'-chee, n., an 
Eurasian; an Eura- 
sian's speech. 

cheek, v.t., to treat 
impudently; n., the 
lower part of the 
side-face; impu- 
dence (ilart^. 

cheek'-tooth. n., a 
molar. 



cheer 



_;_.. 



-6 
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A— 



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cbeer, v.i., to put 
heart into, inspirit, 
applaud; «., a cry 
of applause, good 
entertainment, ex- 
pression of coun- 
tenance. 

cheered, p. p., cheer. 

cheer M, n., one 
who cheers. 

cAee/ful. adj., 

hearty, gay. 

cAeer falness, n., 
the state of being 
cheerful. 

cheer'ilj, adv. , 

brightly, gaily. 

cAeer iness, n., the 
state of being 
cheery. 

cheer'ing. pr.p., 
cheer; adj., encour- 
aging; n., applause. 

cAeer'ingly, adv., 
encouragingly. 

cAeer'less. adj. , 

gloomy, depressing. 

cheer'y, adj., bright, 
gay. 

cheese, n., the curd 
of milk compacted 
and dried. 

cheese-cake, n., a 
sweet made of curd, 
sugar, and butter. 

cheese'-cntter. n., an 
instrument for cut- 
ting cheese. 

cheese '-monger, n., a 
dealer in cheeses. 

cheese-press, n., a 
press used in mak- 
ing cheeses. 

chee'sy, adj., like 
cheese, or contain- 
ing cheese. 

chee'tah, n., a kind 
of leopard used in 
hunting. 

chel, n., the head or 
chief; a head cook. 

chef-d'oeuvre', n., a 
masterpiece. 

Cheirop'tera, n., bats. 

cheirop'terous, adj., 
having wings like 
hands. 

chem'ic, v.t., to apply 
chloride of lime; «., 
chloride of lime; an 
alchemist. 

ehem'ical, a<2/., rel. to 
chemistry; n., a 
chemical substance. 

chemise', n., a 
woman's under- 
garment, a shift. 

chemisette', n., an 
under-lxKlice of 
feminine wear. 



i 






A 






109 



ohem'ist, »., one who 
is practised in chem- 
istry. 

chemistry, "., the 
science dealing with 
the composition of 
matter. 

chenille', n., a velvety 
cord of various 
materials. 

cheque, »., an order 
on a bank for pay- 
ment of a named 
sum. 

cheqne'-book, n., a 
book containing 
cheques and coun- 
terfoils. 

chea'ner-board,n. ,the 
board with which 
chequerswas played. 

chequer, v.t., i.q. 
checker. 

cheq'ners, n. pi., a 
game once played 
with a board mark- 
ed out with little 
squares. 

cher'ish, v.t., to treat 
with affection; re- 
tain in the memory. 

oher'isbed, ^./>., cher- 
ish. 

cher'isher, n., one 
who cherishes. 

cber'ishing, pt-p-, 
cherish. 

cheroot', n., a form 
of cigar. 

cher'ry, n., the fruit 
of the cherry tree; 
adj., cherry-col- 
oured. 

Chersonese, »., the 
famous peninsula 
so named; any pen- 
insula. 

chert, w., hornstone. 

cher'ty, adj., consist- 
ing of or like chert. 

cher'ub, n., an angel 
ranking next below 
a seraph; a beauti- 
ful child. 

chera'bic, adj., cher- 
ub-like. 

cher'nbim, n., pi. of 
cherub. 

cher'Til, «., a pot- 
herb so named. 

chess, n., the game 
so named. 

chess'-board, »., the 
board on which 
chess is played; it 
has 64 squares. 

chess'man, n., one of 
the pieces used on 
a chess-board. 

chest, n., a box; the 






4. 



^ 



chickpea 



capacity of a chest; 
the thorax. 

chested, adj., having 
a chest. 

chest'nut, ohes'nnt, 
«., the nut of the 
castanea- the tree 
so namea; a reddish 
brown; a horse of 
chestnut colour; a 
venerable jest or 
story; adj.,oi chest- 
nut colour. 

cheral'-Klass, n., a 
tall, swinging mir- 
ror. 

chevalier', n., a 
knight, horseman. 

chevatu'-de-irise', n., 
a spiked fence. 

chevron, n., an 
heraldic term; the 
V-shaped badge of 
a non-commissioned 
officer. 

chev'ronal, n., a nar- 
row chevTon. 

chew, v.t., to masti- 
cate, crush with the 
teeth. 

chewed, pp., chew. 

chew'ing, pr.p., chew. 

ChiaJlt'i, n., a red 
Italian wine. 

chiarosou'ro, n., light 
and shade in paint- 
ing; adj., rel. to 
light and shade. 

chib'bal, n., the stone 
leek; i.q. cibol. 

chibouk', chi'bouque, 
n., a Turkish pipe. 

chic, adj., in the 
mode, stylish; n., 
stylishness, smart- 
ness. 

chicane', n., sophis- 
try, a cunning way 
of biding the truth; 
the holding of no 
trumps at cards. 

chicanery, n., the 
employment of chi- 
cane. 

ohiob, adj., niggardly. 

chioh'ling, n., i.q. 
chickling. 

chick, »., a young 
bird. 

ohiok'abiddy, n., a 
term of endearment 
for a child. 

ehiok'en, n. , the chick 
of a domestic fowl. 

diiek'en-poz, »., an 
eruptive childish 
disorder. 

ohiok'ling, n., a small 
chick. 

ohick'pea, n., pulse. 



ehickweed 



A. 









..^.. 



•<4 



chick' weed, n., a wild 
flower so named. 

Chic'ory, «., a peren- 
nial which, when 
roasted, is mixed 
with coffee. 

chid, p-i., chide. 

chid'den, p.p., chide. 

chide, v.t., to re- 
prove. 

chid'er, n., one who 
chides. 

chid'ing, pr.p., chide. 

chief, adj., principal, 
foremost; n., a 
leader. 

cliiefess, n., fem. of 
chief. 

clliefly, adv., prin- 
cipally, first. 

chief tain, n. , a leader, 
head of a clan. 

chiel'tainsbip, n., the 
office or rank of 
chieftain. 

chiel, n., a youth. 

cliield, n., i.q. chiel. 

Chifion, n., a gauzy 
fabric. 

ohiflanier', n., a rag- 
collector; a kind of 
sideboard. 

ohi'gnon, n., a mode 
of dressing the back 
hair over a pad. 

chil'blain, v.t., to 
cause chilblains; n., 
a sore produced by 
cold. 

ohil'blained, adj., suf- 
fering from chil- 
blains. 

child t n., a son or 
daughter, the hu- 
man young; a per- 
son under age. 

Cblltf-hti. n., the 
time and place of 
delivery of a child. 

cA//(/'-biith, n., i.g. 
child-bed. 

ohilde, n., a son, not 
yet knighted, of a 
great house. 

Chil'dermas, n., the 
Feast of Holy 
Innocents, Dec. 28. 

cblld'-'booi, n., the 
childish p«riod of 
life. 

cblltfiBb, adj., like 
achild, puerile, silly. 

cblld'Uhiy, o^o., like 
a child, sillily. 

cA/Zc/'ishness, n., 
puerility. 

cbltttless, adj., with- 
out a child. 

cblld'Wu, adj., like 
a child, innocent. 



/^ 



"X 



A 



110 



cbllttWag, n., a 

little child. 

cblfdren, n., pi. of 
child. 

chil'iad, n., a group 
of 1,000; a thousand 
years. 

chil'iBgon, n., a 
thousand- sided 
figure. 

cliiriarch, n., a 
commander of a 
thousand men, 

chil'iasm, n,, the doc- 
trine rel. to Our 
l/)rd's reign on 
earth for a thous- 
and years. 

chill, v.t., to make 
cold; discourage; 
harden by cooling; 
adj., feeling cold, 
discouraging; n., a 
feeling of sudden 
cold; discourage- 
ment. 

chilled, p.p., chill. 

chil'li, «., dried cap- 
sicum-pod. 

chil'Unesi, n., the 
sensation or cause 
of chill. 

ohil'Uns, pr.p., chill; 
adj., depressing. 

chil'ly, adj., i.q. chill. 

Chi'Iopod, adj., hav- 
ing 1,000 feet. 

Chil'tern Han'dreds, 
«., Crown lauds in 
Bucks, the stew- 
ardship of which, 
being a Crown ap- 
pointment, vacates 
the holder's seat in 
Parliament. 

chime, v.t. and i., to 
make music with 
bells, to accord; n., 
the sound of chim- 
in g bells; the 
chimed bells col- 
lectively; harmony. 

chimed, p.p., chime. 

chim'er, »., a person 
or apparatus that 
chimes. 

chime'ra, n., a 
strange creation of 
the fancy. 

chimere', n., a sort 
of cope with arm- 
holes, and worn 
over academic and 
canonical habits. 

chimerical, adj., fan- 
tastic, impossible. 

chim'ing,^r.^., chime. 

cliim'ney, n., a smoke 
vent, the tube of a 
lamp. 



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6. 



ehip 



chim'ney-board, »., a 

fire-board. 

chim'ney-pieoe, n., 
the outer frame of 
a chimney-opening. 

chim'ney-pot, »., a 
tubular added top 
to a chimney; a tall 
silk hat (coUoq.). 

chim'ney-sweep, n., 
one who sweeps 
chimneys. 

chim'panzee, m., an 
anthropoid ape 

from the W. Indies. 

chin, »., the face 
below the lips. 

chin'a, adj., made of 
china; n., a fine 
porcelain. 

ohi'na-as'tei, n., the 
aster of China. 

chi'na-clay, adj., a 
fine kind of clay. 

chin'capin, n., an 
American shrub, 
bearing edible nuts. 

chinchil'la, n., a 
small furry rodent; 
the fur of the chin- 
chilla; adj., made of 
chinchilla. 

chin'-coDgh, n., the 
whooping-cough . 

chine, v.t., to cut 
through the back- 
bone; v.i., to fissure; 
n.,ananimarsback- 
bone; a cliff fissure. 

chined, adj., having a 
chine; p.p., chine. 

Chinese', adj., bel. to 
China; n., a China- 
man. 

chink, v.t. and <*., to 
rattle with a metal- 
lic sound: «., the 
sound of rattled 
money; money 

(slang); a narrow 
opening. 

chhiked, p.p., chink. 

chinking, pr.p.chink. 

chink'y, adj., having 
chinks. 

chiimed, adj., having 
a chin. 

chinse, v.t., to stop a 
ship's seams with 
oakum. 

chintz, adj., of chintz 
material; «., a 
glazed cotton cloth. 

cUp, v.t., to cut into 
little pieces; v.i., to 
fly into little pieces; 
n., a little piece of 
wood or stone, etc.; 
a kind of straw; 
adj., made of chip. 



chipped 



./^ 






ohipped, p.p., chip. 

Chippendale, adi., in 
the style iiiventi'cl 
by Chippendale; «., 
a piece of Chippen- 
dale furniture. 

ohip'per, adj., pert, 
smart ( Anur.). 

chip'ping, pr.p., ch p. 

Chip'py, adj., having 
chips, dry. 

chir'agia, n., gout in 
the hand. 

obi'rograph, adj., a 
piece of handwrit- 
ing, a deed. 

ohirog'nomy, n., 
judging character 
from the hand, 

obirog'Tapher, n., an 
engrosser. 

ohirograph'io, adj. , 
written by the hand. 

olurog'raphist, n., an 
expert in hand- 
writing, a copyist. 

ohirog'Taphy, n., 
handwriting. 

chirolog'ical, adj., rel. 
to chirology. 

ohirol'ogy, n., thi art 
of sign-speech; the 
study of the hand. 

cbi'romancy, n. , 

palmistry. 

ohiroman'tic, adj. ,rel. 
to palmistry. , 

ohiron'omy, n., ges- 
ticulation. 

chi'ioplast, n., an 
apparatus for mak- 
ing the fingers sup- 
ple. 

chirop'odist, n., one 
who doctors the 
feet and hands. 

chiros'cvhy, n. , pal m- 
istry. 

chirp, v.i., to make 
the short, shrill 
sound of a bird; n., 
a bird's short, shrill 
note. 

chirped, p.p., chirp. 

chirp' er, n., one who 
chirps. 

Ohirp'ing, pr.p., chirp. 

ohir'mp, v.i., i.q. 
chirp. 

chir'mped, p.p., chir- 
rup. 

ohirmping, pr.p., 
chirrup. 

chis'eU »./., to carve, 
cut with a chisel: n. , 
a bevel -edged tool 
used for cutting 
wood, stone, or iron. 

ohiselled, -led, p.p., 
chisel; adj., finely 



/-A 



i 



111 



outlined; edged 
with a chisel. 

chis'eller, -ler, «., one 
who chisels. 

Chiselling, -ling, pr.p. 
chisel. 

chiselly, «i;., gritty, 
Kravelly. 

Chis'len, n., a month 
in the Jewish Kal- 
endar. 

chit, «.<., to remove 
sprouts; «., a sprout, 
a child. 

Chif-Chat, n., pratt- 
ling talk, gossip. 

Chit'in, n., the horny 
substance of certain 
beetles' shells. 

Chi'ton, n., a Greek 
slave's tunic. 

ohit'teilings, n., a 
pig's small intes- 
tines. 

Cbit'ty, ad]., with 
sprouts, piinnled. 

cbiT'alric, ady , rel. 
to chivalry. 

chir'aboos, adj., rel. 
to chivalry; gallant, 
courteous. 

chiy'aliy, »•, the 
system ol knight- 
hood; gallant be- 
haviotir; courtesy. 

chive, n., a gatJen 
herb allied to the 
leek or onion; a 
piece cut off. 

chlo'ral, n., an oily 
liquid used to pro- 
mote sleep. 

chlo'rate, n., a chloric 
acid salt. 

chlo'ric, adj., rel. to 
chlorine. 

oblo'rid, chlo'ride, n., 
chlorine compound- 
ed with some other 
element. 

chlo'ridate, v.t., to 
combine with a 
chlorid. 

chlo'rine, n., a chem- 
ical gaseous ele- 
ment. 

Chlo'rite, n., a com- 
mon appellation of 
sevoral greenstones. 

ehlorit'io, adj., con- 
taming chlorite. 

chlo'ro^ne, n., an 
anodyne so named. 

chlo'roform, »., an 
. anaesthetic so 

named; 0./., to treat 
a patient with chlo- 
roform. 
, cbloTom'eter, n., an 
instrument for mea- 



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choke-Iuli 



suring the degree of 
chlorine. 

ohloiom'etry, m., the 
process of using a 
chloronieter. 

chlo'rophyl. ohlo'ro- 
phyll, n., the gretn 
colouring matter in 
plants. 

chloro'sis, n., a dis- 
ease affpcting girls 
at puberty, and 
marked by a green- 
ish pallor. 

chlo'rons, adj., com- 
bined with chlorine. 

chock, v.^, to fasten 
with a chock; n., a 
block or wedge of 
wood, to plug a hole 
or prevent some- 
thing from slipping. 

chock'-full,ad;., quite 
full. 

chocolate, adj., of a 
dark reddish brown 
colour; n., a pre- 
paration from the 
cacao plant. 

choice, adj., worthy 
to be chosen, select, 
precious; n., the act 
or power of choos- 
ing, a thing chosen, 
determination. 

choi'cer. adj., comp. 
of choice. 

choi'cest, adj., super. 
of choice. 

choir, v.i., to sing in 
chorus; n., a com- 
pany of singers; the 
part of a church 
occupied by the 
singers. 

choir'-organ, n., the 

, part of an organ 
containing soft 

stops for light ac- 
companiment. (For- 
merly called chair- 
organ.) 

choke, V.I., to stop 
the breath, throttle, 
block up; v.i., to be 
suffocated, become 
stopped up; n., the 
inner part of the 
artichoke. 

ohoke'-bore, n. , a gun- 
bore narrowed at 
the muzzle. 

choked, <>.^., choke. 

choke'-damp, n., the 
poisonous carbonic 
acid gas often found 
in mines, wells, and 
quarries. 

choke'-tall, adj. , quite 
full, chock-full. 



choker 



112 



Christmas-box 



A. 



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^ 






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c 



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chok'er, n., one who 
chokes; a crushing 
rejoinder; a large 
cravat. 

chOk'ing,<>r./>. ,choke. 

cllok'y,aii/. , 1 1 ke chok- 
ing, suffocating. 

chol'er, n., anger, 
passion. 

cholera, n., a 
dangerous epidemic 
disease. 

choleraic, adj., rel. 
to cholera. 

cholera morbus, n., 
i.q. cholera. 

choreric »d]., pas- 
sionate, hasty-tem- 
pered. 

chondritis, n., in- 
flammation of car- 
tilage. 

chondrom'eter, n., a 
grain-weighing ap- 
paratus. 

choose, v./., to make 
a choice; to select; 
to have a prefer- 
ence for. 

choos'er, «., one who 
chooses. 

choosing, pfp-, 
choose. 

chop, v.t., to cut into 
pieces; to bargain 
over; v.i. , to shift or 
change suddenly; 
n., a small piece 
cut off; a jaw, chap. 

ehov'-house, n., a 
restaurant. 

cho'pin, n., an earth- 
enware drinking- 
vessel; a liquid mea- 
sure. 

chopine'. n., a high 
clog. 

chopped, p.p., chop. 

Chop'per, n., one who 
chops, a chopping 
instrument. 

chop'ping,^r.^. , chop. 

chops, n. pi., the 
cheeks or chaps. 

cbop'sUcks, n. pi., 
thin wooden or 
ivory sticks used by 
the Chinese at 
meals. 

chorag'ic, adi., be- 
longing to a chora- 
gus. 

ohora'gns, n., the 
leader or furnisher 
of a chorus. 

cho'ral, ad)., rel. to 
a choir or chorus; «. 
a harmonized hymn 
tune of German 
type. 



-T^. 









,/ 



cho'rale, n., «.?. 
choral. 

cho'ralist, n., one who 
makes or sings 
chorals. 

chord, n., the string 
of a musical instru- 
ment; a combina- 
tion of musical 
notes; a straight 
line joining the ends 
of an arc or apse; 
v.t., to string; v.i., 
to accord. 

chord'ed, p.p., chord. 

chord'ing, pr.p.choid. 

chore, n., a small 
domestic job. 

chore'a, n. , a nervous 
twitching, St. Vi- 
tus's dance. 

choree', »., a trochee. 

choriam'bic, adj., rel. 
to a choriambus. 

choriam'bns, n., a 
metrical foot of 
four syllables, viz., 
a trochee followed 
by an iambus. 

cho'rion, n., an 
enveloping mem- 
brane of the fetus. 

cho'rist, n., a singer 
in a chorus. 

chor'ister, n., a mem- 
ber of a choir. 

chorog'rapher, n., a 
surveyor. 

chorograph'io, adj., 
rel. to surveys. 

chorog'raphy, «., the 
art or practice of 
regional surveying. 

eho'roid, adj., resem- 
bling the chorion. 

cbo'nu, v.t., to sing 
the chorus of, to 
celebrate in con- 
cert; n., a choir of 
singers; united song. 

chorossed, p.p., cho- 
rus. 

cho'mssing, pr.p. , 
chorus. 

chose, p.t., choose. 

chos'en, p.p., choose. 

Chongh, n., a kind of 
jackdaw. 

chouse, v.t., to swin- 
dle; n., a swindle. 

chonsed, ^.^. , chouse. 

chow'-cbow, adj., 
mixed up, miscel- 
laneous; n., a mix- 
ture of food; a breed 
ot dogs. 

chow'der, n., a mixed 
dish; a p'cnic. 

chrematis'tics, n., 
political economy, 



^ 






the science of the 
distribution of 

wealth. 

chrestom'athy, m., a 
collection of useful 
extracts. 

chrism, n., the con- 
secrated oil used in 
various Sacraments 
of the Church, and 
at the Sovereign's 
Consecration. 

chris'mal, n., a vessel 
containing chrism. 

Chris' matory, adj.;[e\. 
to chrism or unc- 
tion; M., a case to 
carry the chrism 
vessels. 

ohris'om, n., a bap- 
tismal robe. 

chris'om-child, n., a 
child dying in its 
first month was 
buried in its chris- 
om. 

Christ, n., the An- 
ointed One, the 
Messiah. 

Christ'-cross, n., a 
mark or cross. 

Chris' ten, v.t., to bap- 
tize, admit to the 
Christian family. 

CliriB'tendom, n., all 
Christian countries 
collectively, all 

Christian people. 

ohris'tmed, pp., 
christen. 

Chris' tening, prp., 
christen ; n. ,the bap- 
tismal ceremony. 

Cbrls'tlaa, adj. , rel . 
to Christ's follow- 
ers; n., one of the 
baptized, a follower 
ot Christ. 

Cbrlstiaa' Ity, n., 
the practice or doc- 
trines of the Chris- 
tian faith; ecclesias- 
tical jurisdiction. 

Christianiza'tion, n., 
the act or state of 
Christianizing. 

Christ'ianiae. v.t., to 
convert to Chris- 
tianity. 

Christ'ianized, pp.. 
Christianize. 

Christ'iaai/inK, pr.p., 
Christianize. 

Christ'ianly, adv., in a 
Christian way. 

Christ'mas, n., the 
season of Our 
Lord's Birthday. 

Christ'mas-box, »., a 
Christmas gift. 



Cbristmas-day 



113 



eharching 






Chtist'iiuui-day', n., 

the Feast of Our 
Lord's Birthday, 
Dec. 25. 

Cbristorogy, n., the 
study of the attri- 
butes and person of 
Christ. 

ohro'mate, n., a chro- 
mic acid salt. 

obiomatic adj., rel. 
to colour; proceed- 
ing by semitones; «. 
a note modified by 
an accidental. 

chromatics, n., pi. 
of chromatic; the 
science of colour. 

chromatog'raphy, »., 
a work on colour. 

chromatorogy, n.,the 
scientific study of 
colour. 

chromatom'eter, n., 
a colour-measuring 
scale. 

chrome, n., a yellow 
pigment. 

chro'mic, adj., rel. to 

chromium. 
' ohro'minm, ». , a 
whitish metallic 
element so named. 

ohro'mograph, n., a 
gelatme pad for 
multiplying writ- 
ing. 

chrranoUth'oKraph,n. , 
a colour -prmted 
lithograph. 

chromolitbog'raphT, 
n., the art of mak- 
ing chromolitho- 
graphs. 

ohro'mosphere, n., a 
layer of glowing 
hydrogen through 
which the light of 
the sun has to pass. 

chronic, adj., lasting 
for a long time; 
firmly established. 

chion'icle, v.t., to 
record in order of 
time; »., a record 
of events in order 
of time. 

chron'ioled, p.p. , 

chronicle. 
> chronicler, n., one 
who chronicles. 

Chronicles, »•., one 
of the books of the 
Old Testament. 

chronicling, pr.p., 

chronicle. 
' chron'ogram, n., an 
inscription in which 
a date can be read 
by the numeral 



letters iM. D. V. 
and the like) con- 
tained in the words. 
■■ chronogrammat'ic. 
adj., in the style of 
a chronogram. 

chron'ograph, n., an 
accurate stop- 

watch; an instru- 
ment determining 
the muzzle velocity 
of a shot. 
i chronog'rapher, n., a 
chronicler; a chron- 
ologist. 
, chronog'raphT. n., 
the inquiry into 
dates and past his- 
tory. 

chronoroger, m., one 
versed in the study 
of dates and events. 

chronologic, adj., in 
order of time. 

chronolog'ical, -ly, 
adj. and adv., in 
order of time. 

chronorogist. n., one 
who studies dates 
and events. 

chronology, n., the 
study of events and 
dates. 

chronometer, n., a 
specially accurate 
timekeeper. 

chronomet'rio. adj., 
rel. to the chronom- 
eter. 

chronom'etry, »., 
t i me- measurement . 

chron'qpher, n., an 
electric apparatus 
for transmitting 
time-indications. 
, ohron'oscope, n., an 
inslruiucnt for as- 
certaining precise 
length of minute 
intervals of time. 

chrys'alid, adj., like 
a chrysalis. 

chrys'iJis. «., a but- 
terfly or moth in 
the grub state. 
. chrysan'themnm, n., 
the common name 
for a variety of 
flower of the aster 
type; the flower so 
named. 

ohrysog'raphy, n., 
illuminating in gold. 

chrys'olite. »., a yel- 
low topaz. 

chrysol'ogy, n., the 
science of weajtb. 

ohry'soprase. n., i.g. 
chrysoprasus. 

chrysop'rasna. n., a 



i 



f 

A. 

/ 



Ll 



precious stone of 
apple-green colour. 

chrys'otype. w., a 
photographic proof 
in which gold chlo- 
rid is used. 

chab. n., a little river 
fish so named. 

chabbed, adj., i.q. 
chubby. 

chnb'by. adj., plump, 
round. 

chack. v.t., to throw, 
tip up, to call by 
clucking; n., an up- 
ward pat, a throw, 
• part (of a lathe) 
for holding in 
position. 

chucked, p.p., chuck. 

chucking. pr.p., 

chuck. 

chuckle, v.t., to 
laugh to oneself. 

chuck'led, p.p., 

chuckle. 

chuckling. pr.p., 
chuckle. 

chuddar, n., an 
Indian fine wool 
shawl. 

chufi, adj., churlish; 
chubby. 

cbul'fily. adv., churl- 
ishly. 

chuf'flness. n., surli- 
ness. 

chof ly. adj., chubby. 

chum, v.t., to share 
rooms with: n., 
a chamber-fellow, 
close friend. 

chump. v.<. , to munch: 
n., a smaJI block of 
wood; the thick end 
of a joint. 

chn'nam. v.t., to plas- 
ter with chunam; 
ft., a plaster of lime 
and sea sand. 

chunk, n., a short, 
thick piece. 

chimk'y, adj., like a 
chimk, in a small 
piece. 

church, v.t., to say 
the Office for the 
churching of women 
over a woman re- 
turning thanks for 
a safe delivery; n., 
a building for 
church worship; the 
whole collection of 
Catholic Ctiristians: 
a local assembly of 
Catholic Christians. 

churched, ^.^.church. 

church'iiig, pf-p., 
church; «., the 



eharchman 



4 



I 



l^ 



1^ 



L 



thanksg:iving after 
childbirth. 

ohnich'man, n., a 
member of the 
church; an ecclesi- 
astic. 

church' manship, n., 
the status of a 
churchman. 

ohorch'-iate, n., a 
rate levied for the 
maintenance of the 
church. 

churchward' en, n. , an 
officer who has the 
charge of a church 
and its properly. 

church' yard, n., the 
area in which a 
church stands. 

churl, n., a rude 
rustic, a clown. 

churl'ish. adj., like a 
churl, ill-bred. 

chnrl'ishly, adv., 
rudely. 

chnrriabness, n., 
rudeness, ill-breed- 
ing. 

chum, v.t., to stir 
cream into butter; 
n., a vessel in wh.ch 
butter is produced 
by agitating cream. 

Chum^, p.p., churn. 

chnm'ing, pr.p., 
churn. 

chute, »., a rapid 
fall in a river; an 
inclined trough. 

ohnt'ney, n., a 
mixed Indian con- 
diment. 

chyla'ceons, adj., of 
like nature with 
chyle. 

chyle, n., a milky 
fluid in the in- 
testine. 

chylilac'tive, adj., re). 
■ to chylification. 

chylif'erous, adj. , 
chyle-carrying. 
, chyllflca'tion, »., the 
formation of chyle. 

chyrouB, adj., rel. to 
chyle. 

chyme, n., the pulp 
in the stomach re- 
sulting from the 
first act of digestion. 
, ohyniiflca'tioii,f>.,the 
formation of chyme. 

chym'ify, v.t. and i., 
to turn into chyme. 

ciba'riou8,a<</. ,ed i bie . 

ciVol, «., the shallot. 

dbo'rinm, n., a large 
covered cup used 
for the distribution 



n 

f 
•1 

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r\ 






p 



c 



CO. 



^ 



114 



of the Host; a 
tabemacle-like re- 
ceptacle for a pyx; 
a canopy over an 
Altar. 

cica'da, n., the har- 
vest-fly, cricket, 
locust. 

oic'atrice, n., the 
scar of a healed 
wotmd. 

cicatris'ive, ai;., tend- 
ing to form a cica- 
trix. 

Cica'trix, «., i.q. cica- 
trice {Lai.). 

cicatriza'tion, n., the 
forming of a c.ca- 
trix. 

cic'atrize, v.«.,to form 
a cicatrix. 

cic'atrized, p.p., cic- 
atrize. 

oic'atrizing, Pfp-, 
cicatrize. 

Bic'ely, n., a species 
of parsley. 

cicero'ne, n., a guide 
to the sights of a 
place. 

Cicero'nian. adj., in 
the style of Cicero. 

cichoria'ceous, adj. , 
rel. to chicory. 

Cid, n., a leader, 
chief. 

ci'der, n., a drink 
from pressed apple 
juice. 

ci'derist, m., a judge 
or maker of cider. 

ci-devant', adj., pre- 
vious, former. 

cierge, »., a wax 
taper. 

dgu', n., a roll of 
tobacco leaves for 
smoking. 

cigarette', n., tobacco 
rolled in paper, a 
diminutive cigar. 

cil'ia, n. pi., the hair- 
like growth on cells. 

ciliary, adj., rel. to 
the eyelashes or to 
cilia. 

dl'iate, adj., having 
cilia. 

cU'iated, adj., i.q. 
ciliate. 

oil'ice, n., a hair-shirt. 

Cili'dan, adj., bel. 
to Cilicia. 

cili'dons, adj., made 
of hair. 

cil'ilorm, adj., like 
cilia. 

cil'iograde, adj. , mov- 
ing by means of 
cilia. 



einq 






M 



cil'iom, N., the sing, 
of cilia. 

ci'ma, set cyma. 

Cim'bric, adj., rel. to 
the Cimbri (or 
Cymri); Welsh. 

Cimine'rian, adj., rel. 
to the Cimmerii; 
profoundly dark. 

oim'olite, n., an alu- 
minum silicate. 

cinch, v.t., to get a 
grip on, to compel; 
n., a broad saddle- 
girth. 
, cinoho'ns, n. , the 
name of the tree 
from which quinine 
is produced. 
: cincho'nio, adj., rel. 

to cinchona. 
> cin'chonine, n., an 
alkaloid so named, 

cincture, v.t., to 
girdle, surround; n., 
a girdle, anything 
that encircles. 

cinct'ured, p. ^., cinct- 
ure. 

cin'der. n., the 
refuse of burnt coal. 

cin'derous, adj., like 
a cinder. 

cin'dery, adj., like, or 
alxiunding in, cin- 
ders. 
, cinelac'tion, n., re- 
duction to cinders. 

Cine'ma, n., an ap- 
paratus for showing 
pictures in motion. 
• cinemat'ograph, n., a 
moving p.cture. 

cinera'ceous, ad)., 
'' ashy-coloured. 

cinera'ria, n., the 
family name for a 
variety of shrubs. 

cin'erary, adj., rel. 
to ashes, holding 
ashes. 

cinera'tion, n., reduc- 
tion to ashes. 

cine'rious, adj., ashy- 
grey. 

Cingalese', adj., rel. 
to the Cingalese or 
Ceylon. 

dn'nabar, n., ver- 
milion. 

oin'nabarine, ii<2;.,like 
cinnabar. 

oin'namon, n., the 
spicy inner bark of 
the cinnamon tree. 

cixmamon'ic, adj., 
consisting of cin- 
namon. 

dnq, cinque, adj., 
five. 



einque-foil 



115 



eircamscribing 



^ 



V 



.^ 



dnqae'-loU, adj., hav- 
iug cinque-foils; n., 
a five-cusped archi- 
tectural ornament. 

Cinque' Ports, n., five 
English! sea-ports 
charged with the 
defence of therealm. 

oi'pher, v.t., to cal- 
culate arithmetic- 
ally; v.i., to con- 
tinue sounding (said 
of an organ-pipf); 
H., the figure 0, the 
sign of rero; any- 
thing unimportant; 
a cryptic way of 
writing. 

ciphered, p.p., ci- 
pher. 

oi'pberinK, pr.p., ci- 
pher. 

oip'olin, n., an 
Italian marble. 

Circas'sian, adj., bel. 
to Circassia; n., a 
native of C. 

Circe'tn, adj., rel. to 
Circe; bewitching. 

Ciroen'fdan, adj., rel. 
to the (Roman) 
circus. 

oir'oinal, adj., circled 
back, coiled back 
on itself. 

dr'oinate, adj., coiled 
inward. 

cir'ole, v.t. and «., to 
move circularly; to 
encircle; n., a round 
figure, a ring, an as- 
semblage of people 
sharing the same 
ideas or being of 
the same rank. 

cir'cled, p.p., circle. 

cir'det, n., a little 
circle. 

cir'oling, pr.p., circle. 

circuit, n., a going 
round; extent of 
circumference; a de- 
fined district; the 
passage of an elec- 
tric cun-ent; t;.»., to 
circulate. 

cir'onited. p.p., cir- 
cuit. 

cir'otdting, pr.p., cir- 
cuit. 

oircu'itoiu, adj., 
roundabout. 

ciron'itously, adv., in 
a roundabout way. 

circa'ity, n., round- 
about method. 

cir'colable, adj., able 
to be circulated. 

dr'oalar, adj., round; 
of the nature of a 



.-^. 



o^- 



o^'^- 






circle; m., a notice 
sent round. 

cir'cnlarism, n., the 
circular theory of 
the universe. 

circnlar'ity, n., the 
character of being 
circular. 

cir'caiarize, v.t., to 
address a circular 
notice to; to make 
circular. 

oir'colarly, adv., in a 
circular way. 

cir'onlate, v.t., to send 
round, to spread 
about: v.t., to be 
spread about, to go 
round. 

circulated, p.p., cir- 
culate. 

circulating, p.p., cir- 
culate. 

circula'tion, n., the 
act of circulating; 
something circu- 
lated. 

cir'culatire, adj. , 
causing circulation. 

dr'colatory, adj., rel. 
to circulation. 

oircomam'bient adj., 
surrounding. 

circumcise, v.t., to 
perform, circum- 
cision on. 

cir'cnmcised, p.p., cir- 
cumcise. 

cir'cnmoiser, n., one 
who circumcises, 

cir'cnmeising, pr.p., 
circumcise. 

circumci'sion, n., the 
act of circumcising. 

cir'cnmdnct, v.t., to 
lead round. 

drcum'Ierence, n., 
the boundary line 
of a circle; the dis- 
tance round. 

circumleren'tial, adj. , 
in, or rel. to, the 
circumference. 

circum'Ierentor, n., 
an instrument for 
measuring circum- 
ferences. 

cir'cmnflect, v.t., to 
bend round. 

cii'cnmflex, v.t., to 
accent with the 
circumflex; n., an 
accent mark, com- 
bined of the acute 
and the grave. 

eircnmflex'ion, n., the 
act of circumflex- 



o^'^^ drcnm'flaent, adj., 

flowing round. 
"^^ circumfluous, adj., 

i.q. circumfluent. 
"^Ki circumluse', v.t., to 
pour or spread 
round, to surround. 

circomfused', p.p., 
circumfuse. 

ciroumfn'sile, adj., 
able to be circum- 
fused. 

circumln'sioii, n., the 
act of circumfu$ing. 

drcumgjr'rata, v.i., to 
revolve. 
•y> ciicumgyra'tion, «., 
the act of revolv- 
ing. 

oiroumja'cence, n., 
the relation of lying 
around. 
«^ circiuija'cent, adj., 
lymg around, close- 
ly bordering. 

oircumlocn'tion, n. , 
a ro'indabout way 
of speaking; a re- 
dundant phrase. 
»^C~}y- circnmloc'ntory, adj. , 
redundant, round- 
about. 

oiroiumiav'igable,<><;/. 
able to be sailed 
round. 






-L> 



^r^-' 



y" 



y- 



y 



y- 



mg. 
circum'floanoe, n., a 
flowing round. 



■~\^ circumnav'igate, v.t., 
, I to sail round. 
~V_y:j oircummiv'igated,^./>. 
, circumnavigate. 

"A__i ciicnmnav'igatuig. 
* ! pr.p., circumnavi- 
gate. 
circnmnavifa'tioii, n., 
the act of sailing 
., round. 

•^ "A^ droumnav'igator, »., 
I one who circum- 
y navigates. 

* \C\ drcumpo'lar, ady, 

->i round the pole, 

•"^b ciioimirota'tion, n., 
the act of revolving 
^^y. on an axis. 
'^'^v'' dicomro'tary. adj., 
revolving on an 
^ axis. 

^'k.. ciroomro'tatory. 'x';-. 

.- i.q. circumrotary. 

VX circimiscrib'able, adj. , 

^ able to be circum- 

^ scribed. 

" ^N circumaoribe', v.t., to 

confin e within 

. boundaries, tolimit. 

* "^ circumscribed', p.p., 
y^ TV Circumscribe. 

' ciroumscrib'er, n.,onr 
.- who circumscribes. 

'^^^^^dronmsorib'ing.^r./'., 
circumscribe. 



yx 



circumgcription 



116 



ci?Uize 









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y^ 






^i 



»^ 



y\ 






<A 



•> 



o>1 






dronmsorip'tioii, n., 

the act of circum- 
scribing; stateof be- 
ing circumscribed. 

circomscrip'tiTe, adj., 
tending to circum- 
scribe. 

cir'camspect, a<2;., 
wary, discreet. 

circumspec'tion, »., 
wariness, discre- 
tion, vigilance. 

circomspeo'tive, ad]. , 
watchtul. 

cii'cmnspectly, adv., 
warily, discreetly. 

cii'oamspectness. n., 
the habit ot being 
circumspect. 

cir cumataace.v.t. , 
to place in particu- 
lar circumstances; 
M., an incident; an 
event; attendant 
condition. 

cir'cumstaaced, 
p.p., circumstance. 

circum stan'tlal, 
adj., containing tull 
details; matter of 
fact. 

oiiciunstantiarity, n., 
the circumstantial 
character. 

dicomstan'tiate, v.t., 
to confirm with 
facts or details. 

ciicnmstan'tiated, 
p.p., circumstan- 
tiate. 

cironmstan'tiating, 
pr.p., circumstan- 
tiate. 

circnmval'late, v.t., to 
make a trench 
round, to fortify. 

ciicnmvalla'tion, n., 
the act of circura- 
vallating; a ram- 
part and trench. 

ciroomTenf, v.i., to 
outwit, get the bet- 
ter of. 

dicomvent'ed, p.p., 
circumvent. 

circumventing, pr.p., 
circumvent. 

circum ven' tion, n . , 
the act of circum- 
venting. 

ciroumTen'tiTe, adj., 
able to circumvent. 

circnmToIa'tion, n., 
the act of flying 
round. 

circom'Tolnte, v.t., 
to wrap round. 

circnmToIn' tion, n . , 
the act of wrapping 
round. 



oK' 



c/\^ 



J? 




J. 



J. 



rL 

f 
J- 

I 



circnmTolTe', v.i., to 
roll round. 

cir'cns, «., a circular- 
ended race-course; 
hippodrome; a row 
of houses forming a 
circle or part of a 
circle. 

cirrho'sis, »., a mor- 
bid condition of 
tissue. 

cirrif'erons, oi;'., hav- 
ing cirri. 

cir'riform, adj., like 
a cirrus. 

cirrig'erons, adj., car- 
rying cirri. 

cir'riped, adj., having 
cirrus-like feet. 

cirro-cn'mulus, n., a 
pile of small clouds, 
part cirrus, part 
cumulus. 

cir'rose, adj., having 
cirri. 

cirro-stra'tus, n., a 
mass of clouds ter- 
minating in cirri. 

cir'rns, n., a cloud- 
shape resembling a 
wisp of hair; a 
tendril. 

cir'socele, n., vari- 
cocele. 

cisal'pine, adj., on 

' this (the Roman) 
side of the Alps. 

cisatlan'tic, adj., on 
this side of the 
Atlantic. 

cismon'tane, adj., on 
this side of the 
mountains. 

cis'soid, adj., within 
two intersecting 
curves; n., a variety 
of curve so named. 

cist, n., a chest, box. 

Oister'dan, adj., bel. 
to the Cistercian 
Order; n. , a C.monk. 

els' tern, n., a recep- 
tacle for holding 
liquid. 

cis'nc, see cystic. 

cit, n., a Hindu name 
for the Universal 
Spirit; colloquial 
for a city man. 

ci'table, adj., able to 
be cited. 

oit'adel, n., a fortress 
within or defend- 
ing a city. 

citation, n., the act 
of citing, or quot- 
ing; a quotation; a 
summons. 

ci'tatory, adj., of the 
nature of a citation. 






a- 
,1 

.U 

Y 
1 



S 
\ 



"1^ 



cite, v.t., to call, 
quote, summon. 

ci'ted, p.p., cite. 

ci'ter, «., one who 
cites. 

cith'ara, n. , the Greek 
lyre. 

citb'er, n., a zither. 

cit'iiied, adj., having 
city airs. 

cit'igrade, adj., fast- 
running. 

ci'ting, pr.p., cite. 

cit'izen, «., the dwel- 
ler in a city or 
country. 

clfizenship, n., the 
status of a citizen. 

citrate, »., citric acid 
salt. 

cit'rene, n., a volatile 
oil so named. 

Cit'ric, adj., consist- 
ing of fruit of the 
citron. 

cit'ril, »., a little bird 
so named. 

cit'rine, adj., lemon- 
colouied. 

cit'ron, n., the fruit 
of the citron tree. 

rat'y, «. , a community 
of citizens; a place 
where citizens live. 

Civ'et, «., a perfume 
so named; the civet- 
cat; a stew. 

civ'et-cat, n., i.q. 
civet. 

civ'ic, adj., rel. to a 
city or citizenship. 

ci'vica, »., the study 
oi civil government. 

oiv'il, adj., rel. to a 
city or state; polite, 
well-mannered. 

civ'il engineer', »., an 
engineer of roads, 
bridges, etc., for 
civil (not military) 
purposes. 

civil'ian, n., one en- 
gaged in civil (not 
military) occupa- 
tions; an Indian 
Civil Servant. 

civil'ity, «., good 
manners, courteous 
treatment. 

civ'ilizable, adj., cap- 
able of civiliza- 
tion. 

civiliza'tion, n., the 
state of being civil- 
ized; the act of 
civilizing. 

civ'ilize, v.t., to bring 
under refining and 
progressive influ- 
ences. 



civilized 






c^^ 



oiv'ilized. P.p., civ- 
ilize. 

dv'ilizer, n., one who 
civilizes. 

dv'ilizing, pr.p., civ- 
ilize; adj., refining, 
progressive. 

civ'illy, »., court- 
eously; in rel. to 
the Stats. 

civ'ism, n., the 
profession of devo- 
tion to the com- 
munity. 

clab'ber. v.i., to 
curdle. 

clack, v.i., to rattle, 
babble; n., a sudden 
noise, rattle, i*at- 
tle. 

clacked, p.p., clack. 

clack'er, n., any- 
thing that clacks. 

clack'ing. pt .p. ,clack. 

clad, p.p., clothe. 

claim, v.t., to assert a 
right; to affirm; «., 
an assertion of a 
right; anything 
claimed. 

claim'able, adj., able 
to be claimed. 

claim' ant. n., one 
who claims. 

claimed, p.p., claim. 

claim'ing, P'P-, 

claim. 

olair-aa'dience, n., 
the alleged power 
ot abnormal bear- 
ing. 

clair-aa'dient, adj., 
able to hear ab- 
normally. 

olair-obscnie', tee 

chiaroscuro. 
< clairvoy'ance, n., the 
alleged power of 
seeing absent per- 
sons and objects. 

clairvoy'ant, n., one 
who pretends to 
clairvoyance. 

clam, n., a bivalve 
shell-fish; v.t., to 
starve. 

cla'mant, adj., loud, 
urgent. 

clam'ber, p. t. , to cl imb 
with the hands and 
feet; «., the act of 
clambering. 

clambered, 
clamber. 

clambering, 
clamber. 

clammed, p.p., clam. 

ciam'ming, pf.p-, 
clam. 

clam'miness. 



pp., 
pr.p.. 



^3^ 



^-% 



117 



state or feeling of 

damp cold, 
clam'my, adj., damp, 

cold and sticky. 
clam'or,clam'oiir,v.t. , 

to raise an outcry; 

n., an outcry, voci- 
feration. 
clamored, dam'- 

oured,^.^. .clamour. 

V clam'orer, clam'- 

OOier, n., one who 

clamours. 
;■ cliuu'oring, clam' oar- 
. ing, /»■.?., clamour. 

V clam'otons, adj., 

making an outcry, 

vociferous. 
clamp, v.t., to fasten 

tight, to secure; n., 

a stiff fastening; the 

name of a variety 

of tools. 
damped, p.p., clamp. 
^ olamp'ing, pr.p., 

clamp. 

— clan, n., a tribe. 

' clandes'tine, adj., 

secret, underhand. 
i dandes'tinely. adv., 

secretly. 
. clang, v.i., to make a 

ringing noise; n., a 

ringing metallic 

sound. 
clanged, p.p., clang. 
^ clang'ing,pr.^., clang, 
clan'gor, dan'gonr, 

n.,a clanking sound. 
I clan'gorous, adj., 

noisily sounding. 

— clank, v.t., to make 

something clank; 
v.t., to resound; 
n., a metallic sort 
of sound. 

— clanked, p.p., clank, 
w clank'ing,/>r.]&., clank. 
' clan'nisb, adj., rel. to 

a clan; exclusive; 
united by preju- 
dice. 

^'dan'nislily, adv., in 
clannish fashion. 
dan'ahip, n., the 
rights of a member 
of a clan. 
dans'man, «., a 
member of a clan. 

^ dap, v.t. and t., to 
strike together; to 
strike suddenly; to 
applaud; H., a sud- 
den, sharp noise. 

^ clap'board, v.t., to 
protect with a clap- 
board; n., a weather 
board. 

^ clapped, p.p., clap, 
dap' per, n., anything 




-_/^- 



^^ 



class 



that claps; a bell's 
tongue. 

clap'per-claw, v.t., to 
scratch and slap; n., 
a back-scratcher. 

clap' ping, pr.p., clap. 

clap' trap, n., balder- 
dash, cheap talk. 

claque, n., a hired 
body of supporters 
in a theatre. 

claqneoi', n., a hired 
applauder. 

darabel'la, n., a 
sweet, sott-voiced 
organ-stop. 

Clar'enceux, Clar'- 
endeoz, n., the 
higher of the two 
provincial Kings-of- 
Arms. His prov- 
ince is South of the 
Trent. 

clar'endon, n., a 
heavy-faced print- 
ing type. 

dar'et, adj., claret- 
coloured; n., a light 
red French wine. 

dariflca'tion, n., the 
processof clarifying. 

olar'ifled, p.^., clarify. 

clar'lfler, »., any- 
thing that clarifies. 

clar'ify, v.t., to make 
clear, to purify. 

clarifying, pr.p., clar- 
ify. 

dar'inet, n., a keyed 
wind instrument so 
named. 

clarion, adj., like a 
clarion; n., a form 
of trumpet. 

clarionef, »., i.f. 
clarinet. 

dash, v.t., to strike 
together; v.i., to 
collide; n., a noise 
of things strikmg 
together. 

clashed, p.p., clash. 

clashing, pr.p. , clash. 

clasp, v.t., to embrace, 
fasten close; »., an 
embrace, a fasten- 
ing. 

clasped, p.p., clasp. 

clasp' er, »., anything 
that clasps. 

clasp'iog, pr.p., clasp. 

clasp'-kidfe, n., a 
knife, of which the 
blade shuts into the 
handle. 

class, v.t., to group 
together, to rank; 
a<i;.,rel. to class dis- 
tinction; H., a rank, 
group, division. 



classable 



*-\^ 






n 









obttg'able. adj., able 

to be clas!>ed. 
classed, p.p., class. 

das' sic, adj., of the 
first rank, esp. in 
literature; rel. to 
the Greek or Latin 
classics; n., a stand- 
ard work or author. 

classical, adj., i.q. 
classic. 

classical'it;, n., the 
classic uature or 
quality. 

clas'sicism, n., the 
style of the classics; 
an idiom of the 
classics. 

clas'sicist, n., one 
who favours or 
studies the ancient 
classical styles. 

classiflca'tion, n., the 
act of classifying; a 
classified system. 

clas'sifled, p.p., clas- 
sify. 

classifier, n., one 
who classifies. 

clas'sily,t>.<., to group 
in classes. 

olas'silying, pr.p., 
classify. 

class'lng. pr.p. , class. 

clas'sis, n., a class. 

class' man, n., a 
member of a class; 
one who obtains 
university honours. 

class'mate. n., a 
fellow-member of a 
class. 

clat'ter, v./. and i., to 
rattle; to prate; «., 
a confused noise, 
prattle. 

clat'tered, p.p., clat- 
ter. 

clat'terer, n. , one who 
clatters. 

clat'tering, pr.p. , clat- 
ter. 

clause, n., a sentence 
or part of a sen- 
tence; an article in 
a contract or will. 

clans' tral, adj., rel. to 
a cloister, secluded. 

clan'snlar, adj., con- 
taining clauses. 

ola'Tate. adj., club- 
like. 

cla'vated, adj., i.q. 
clavate. 
, clave, p.t., cleave. 

clav'iary, see clavier, 

dav'ichord, m., an 
early stringed in- 
strument with a 
keyboard. 




^' 



X 



118 



clav'icle, m., the col- 
lar-boue. 

clavic'nlar, adj., rel. 
to the collar bone. 

Clav'ier, n., a key- 
board. 

clav'iform, adj., club- 
shaped. 

clavig^erous,«<i7. .key- 
bearing. 

Cla'ris, n., a key; a 
clue. 

claw, v.t., to seize, 
tear, scratch; «., a 
booked nail, the 
head of a hammer. 

clawed, p.p., claw. 

claw'ing, pr.p., claw. 

clay, v.t., to cover 
with clay; «., stiff, 
damp soil. 

clayed, p.p., clay. 

olay'ey, adj., like 
clay, abounding in 
clay. 

cla/ing, pr.p., clay. 

clay'ish, adj., slightly 
clayey. 

clay'more, n., a High- 
lander's two-edged 
sword. 

clead'ing, »., a wood- 
en lining. 

clean, v.t., to purify, 
cleanse; adj., puri- 
fied, free from dirt, 
smooth, morally 
pure; adv., wholly, 
quite. 

cleaned, p.p., clean 

dean'er, n., anything 
that cleans; adj., 
comp. of clean. 

Cleanest, a<i/., super. 
of clean. 

dean'ing, pr.p. ,c\esm. 

clean'lily, adv., in a 
cleanly way. 

clean'liness, n., the 
cleanly quality or 
habit. 

clean'^, adj., habitu- 
ally clean. 

olean'ly, adv., in a 
clean way. 

dean'ness, n., the 
state of beuig clean. 

cleanse, v.t., to make 
clean, to remove 
defilement. 

cleansed,p.p. .cleanse. 

deans'er, n., any- 
thing that cleanses. 

deans ible, adj., able 
to be cleansed. 

deans'ing. pr.p., 
cleanse; n., the act 
of cleansing. 

dear, v.t., to make 
bright; to free from 






1 



y 



^ 



element 



blame, to remove; 
to gain over and 
above cost: v.i., to 
become brighter; 
ad]., bright, pel- 
lucid, unobstructed, 
net, plainly mani- 
fest; n., a clear 
space. 

clear'age, n., a 
clearmg. 

clear'ance, n., the act 
of setting free; a 
cleared space. 

cleared, p.p., clear. 

clear' er, n., anything 
that clears; adj. , 
comp. of clear. 

dearest, fij., super. 
of clear. 

olear'ing, pr.p., clear; 
n., a cleared space; 
the settlement of 
bank balances. 

dear'ing-hoose, n. , an 
of&ce where bank- 
ers' balances are 
adjusted. 

dear'ly, adv., plainly, 
evidently. 

dear'ness, n., the 
state or quality of 
being clear. 

clear'-sighted, adj., 
having clear vision. 

cleat, v.t., to supply 
with a cleat; n., a 
strip nailed across 
something to pre- 
vent slipping. 

deav'able, adj., able 
to be cleft. 

cleav'age, n., the act 
of cleaving, a cleft. 

cleave, v.t., to split, 
divide; v.t., to cling 
to. 

cleaved, p.p., cleave. 

deav'er, n., one who 
cleaves, a chop- 
per. 

deaVing, Pr.p., 

cleave. 

dedge, n., clay. 

dedg'y, adj., clayey. 

deek, n., a golf club 
with an iron head. 

del, n., a piusical 
sign to indicate 
pitch. 

cleft, p.p., cleave; n., 
a fissure. 

cleg, «., a horse-fly. 

clem'atis, n., a climb- 
ing plant so named. 

clem'ency, n., the 
quality of gentle- 
ness, compassion. 

dem'ent, adj., gentle, 
compassionate. 



Clementine 



'^ 



'D. 



Clem'entiiM, »d)., 
bel. to St. Clement. 

clench, v.t., to grasp, 
to double up, to 
brace, 

clenched, p.p. .clench. 

Olen'cher, n., any- 
thing that clenches. 

clen'ohing, pr.p., 
clench. 

dep'sydra, n., a 
Greek water-dock. 

oleie'story, n., the i 
upper range of win- 
dows in a church. 

oler'gy, n., the collec- 
tive name for clergy- 
men as a body; the 
clerical status. 

oler'syman, n., a 
member of the 
clergy. 

der'ic, n., a clerk or 
clergyman. 

oler'ioal, ad)., rei. to 
the clergy; rel. to a 
clerk or writer. 

clerk, n., a cleric; a 
writer in an office; 
a scholar. 

derk'ly, adj., schol- 
arly; rel. to a clerk. 

clerkship, n., a 
clerk's office or 
function. 

ole'romancy, n., div- 
ination by lots. 

clev'er, tdj., skilful, 
capable. 

oleT'erly, a4»., in a 
clever way. 

olev'emen, n., the 
quality of being 
clever. 

clev'is, n., an iron 
loop round a plough 
beam. 

clew, v.t., to roll up; 
n., a ball of thread; 
a guide to a mys- 
tery; the lower cor- 
ner of a sail. 

cUchi, n., an electro- 
type or stereotype 
plate. 

click, v.(., to make to 
click; v.i., to give 
forth a click; n., 
short, sharp sound, 
non-metalUc. 

clicked, p.p., click. 

click' er, n., anything 
that clicks; a fore- 
man shoemaker. 

dick'et, n., a latch. 

dick'ing, pr.p., dick. 

oli'ent, n., a depend- 
ent, a customer, one 
who consults a law- 
yer. 



^ 

&/ 




'=^ 



lid 



clientage, n., a num- 
ber of clients. 

clientele', »., a body 
of clients, followers, 
etc. 

dill, n., a high steep 
rock. 

dift, n., iee cleft. 

dimiac'teric, adj., rel. 
to a climax; u., a 
critical period in 
life. 

cli'mate, n., local 
atmospheric con- 
ditions. 

climatic, »dj., rel. to 
climate. 

dimat'ical, adi., i.q. 
climatic. 

oli'matize, v.t., to ac- 
custom to a climate. 

dimatog'raphy, n., a 
description of cli- 
mate. 

dimatorogist, n., an 
expert in climate. 

clinwtorogy, *>., the 
study of climatic 
conditions. 

di'max, n., an as- 
cending scale. In 
modern usage it 
means incorrectly 
the highest point, 
acme. 

climb, v.t., to ascend, 
mount. 

dimb'able, oii/., able 
to be climbed. 

climbed, p.p., climb. 

climb' er, n., one who 
climbs. 

climb'ing, Pf-P-, 
climb. 

clime, n., a region, 
climate. 

clinch, v.t., to grasp, 
fasten tightly, set 
the teeth, settle; »., 
a clinched bolt; a 
particular knot in 
a rope. 

clinched, p.p., clinch. 

dinch'er, n., a settler. 

clinch'ing, ffp-, 
clinch. 

ding, v.i., to hold on 
to, adhere to. 

I cUng'er, ». , one who 
clings. 

, cUng'ing. ^.^., cling. 

dins' (tone, adj., de- 
scriptive ot a peach 
of which the pulp 
adheres to tbestone. 

ding'y,<xJ;. , adhesive. 

olin'ic, adj., Tv\. to a 
bed; n., a pa.ient in 
bed; bedside teach- 
ing. 



eloehe 



»■?. 



^=^^0^ 



olin'ical, adj., 
clinic. 

dink, v.t., to produce 
a tinkling sound; 
v.i., to tinkle; n., a 
sound as of metal 
on metal. 

clinked, p.p., clink. 

clink'er, n., one who 
clinks; a slag; v.t., 
to form dinkers. 

dink'ered,^.^., dink- 
er. 

clink'ing, pr.p., clink. 

clinoceph'aly, n., a 
flattening of the 
cranium. 

cli'noid, adj., like a 
bed. 

clinom'eter, n., an 
instrument for mea- 
suring angles ot 
elevation and de- 
pression. 

clinomet'ric. adj., rel. 
to a clinometer. 

clinomet'rical, adj., 
i.q. clinometric. 

olin'qoant, adj., tin- 
selled. 

dip, v.t., to cut off, 
crop, shear; to em- 
brace; M., the act or 
result of clipping: a 
device for holding 
things fast; the 
holder for the 
charge of a maga- 
zine rifle. 

clipped, p.p., clip. 

clip'per, H., one who 
dips; an instru- 
ment for clipping; a 
fast sailing ship. 

clip'ping, ^r.^., clip. 

clique, n., a small 
closely-united party. 

di'qaidl, adj., ex- 
clusive, clannish. 

di'qnism, n., an ex- 
clusive tendency. 

dish-ma-daver, n., 
gossip (Scot.). 

diT'ers, »•. pi., grass- 
tufts. 

doa'ca, n., a sewer 
(Lot.). 

doa'cal,a<i;'.,rel. toa 
sewer. 

cloak, v.t., to cover 
with a cloak, hide; 
n., a loose outer 

Sarment; an excuse, 
isguise. 
cloaked, p.p., cloak, 
cloak ing, pr.^.,cloak. 
clob ber, v.t., to patch 
up; n., a Diack 
paste. 
cloche, n. , a bell-glast. 



elocher 



^ 



n 



?-i 



n 






olo'cher, n., a bel- 
fry (Ff.h 
dock, n., a timc- 
measuriiig instru- 
ment; an ornament 
on a stocking. 
dock' -maker, n., a 

maker of clocks. 
Clook'-work, adj. , reg- 
ular, accurate; n., a 
clock's mechanism. 
clod, v.t., to pelt with 
clods; to make clods 
of; v.i., to form into 
clods; n., a lump of 
earth or turf; a 
bumpkin. 
clodded, p.p., clod. 
clod'ding, pr.p., clod. 
olod'dy, ad]., full of 

clods. 
dod' -hopper, n., a 

rustic, yokel. 
olod'-hopping, adj. , 

loutish. 
dod'pate, n., a block- 
head. 
dod'pated, adj., stu- 
pid. 
clod'poU, n., a stupid 

fellow. 
doS, n., a small 
deduction of weight. 
dog, !>.(., to choke up, 
impede; v.i., to be- 
come clogged; n., an 
impediment; a shoe 
with a wooden sole. 
clogged, p.p., clog. 
clog'giness, »., a 
tendency to clog. 
. clog'gillg, pr.p., clog. 
dog'gy, adj., apt to 

clog. 
doisonni', n., a kind 

of enamel ware. 
clois'ter, v.i., to en- 
close in a monas- 
tery; n., a covered 
walk, partly or 
wholly enclosed; a 
monastery. 
doii'tered, p.p., clois- 
ter, 
dois'terer, n., one 
Vho lives in a 
cloister. 
clois'tering, pr.p. , 

cloister. 
cloia'tral, adj., rel. to 

a cloister. 
don'io, adj., rel. to 

spasm. 
close, V.I., to shut up; 
to fill up; v.t., to 
come near, come 
together. 
dose, adj., near, at- 
tentive, confined, 
stifling, stingy; n.. 



^ 

^ 






^# 



"i— I- 



%-s 



120 



an enclosure; an 
end; adv., fast shut 
up, nearly, near, 
close'-bodied, adj. , 

close-fittmg. 
closed, p.p., close, 
close'ly, adv., in a 
close way, atten- 
tively, compactly. 
close' ness, n., the 
state of being close; 
proximity; stingi- 
ness. 
clo'ser, adj.,comp. of 

close. 
clos'est, adj., super. 

of close. 

clos'et, n., a closed 

chamber, a private 

room; v.t., to shut 

in a closet. 

clos'eted, p.p., closet. 

clos'eting, pr.p., 

closet. 
clos'ing, pr.p., close, 
clo'sure, v.t., to put 
the closure on; «., 
the sudden ending 
of a debate, 
dot, v.<., to make into 
clots; ».«., to become 
clotted; n., a thick 
coagulated mass of 
liquid matter, 
olot'-bnr, «., the 

cockle-bur. 
cloth, n., woven 

material. 

dothe, v.t., to cover 

with a garment, 

invest. 

clothed, p.p., clothe. 

clothes, n. pi., dress, 

garments. 
dothes'-basket, «., a 
basket containing 
clothes. 
clothes'-horse, n., a 
rail to hang clothes 
on. 
clothes' -line, n., a line 
to hang clothes on. 
cloth'ier, »., a seller 
or maker of clothes. 
cloth'ing,/>r./>. ,clothe; 

n., garments. 
clot' ted, p.p., clot, 
^clotting, ^f.^., clot, 
olot'ty, adj., full of 

clots. 
doud, v.i., to darken, 
overshadow; n., va- 
pour floating in the 
air; a dimmed 
effect; a soft wrap 
for the head. 
dood'-capt, cloud'- 
capped, 04/., having 
clouds OD the sum- 
mit. 



-r^- 
%. 

'n^^ 
^ 



^ 




^ 



^^v 



club-room 



cloud' ed, p.p., cloud. 
dood'ily, n., in a 

cloudy way. 
dond'iness, n., the 
state of being 
cloudy. 
cloud'ing, ^r.p., cloud, 
cioud'less, adj., with- 
out a cloud. 
clood'y, adj. , covered 
with clouds, lower- 
ing, not clear. 
cloagh, »., a sluice; 

a ravine. 
clout, v.t., to patch; 
to cuff; n., a piece 
of cloth, a rag; a 
blow. 
clout'ed,^.^., clout, 
clout'ing, ^f .p., clout. 
clout' -nail, n. , a short 
nail used by cob- 
blers, 
clove, p.t. of cleave; 
n., a spice from the 
bud of the clove tree. 
Clo'ven, p.p., cleave; 

adj., divided. 
clo'ven-looted, adj., 
having the foot 
divided, 
clo'ver, n., a trefoil 
plant, used as fod- 
der, 
do'vered, adj., plant- 
ed with clover. 
clown, n., a rustic, 

boor, buffoon. 
down'ish, adj., like 

a clown 
clown' ishly, adv., in a 

clown-like way. 
clown'ishnesa, «., the 
quality of a clown. 
cloy, v.t., to fill to 

excess. 
cloyed, pp., cloy, 
cloy'ing, pr.p., cloy. 
club, v.t., to strike 
with a club; to use 
as a club; to con- 
tribute; n., a heavy 
stick; an associa- 
tion. 
clubbable, adj. .socia- 
ble. 
clubbed, p.p., club, 
club'bist, n. , one who 

favours clubs. 
clnb'-footed, adj., 
having deformed 
feet. 
clnb'-Aouse, n., a 
house in which a 
club meets. 
clnb'-law, n., rule by 

violence. 
clnb'-room, n., a 
room for a club's 
meetings. 



elack 






'7 

'-n 



"T7 



^ 



77 



■vi 



? 



elaok, v.i., to make 
the sound of a heii; 
n., the sound made 
by a hen. 

clocked, p. ^., cluck. 

clock'ing, pr.p., cluck. 

Oloe, n., a guide, a 
means to solving a 
problem. 

clom'ber, n., a vari- 
ety of spaniel. 

Olomp, v.i., to group; 
v.t., to tramp; n., a 
cluster, mass, a 
thick boot-sole. 

clom'sily, adv., in a 
clumsy way. 

clom'sineas. n., the 
quality of being 
clumsy. 

clam'sy. adj., awk- 
ward, unwieldy. 

oloncb, adj., stumpy; 
n., indurated clay. 

dang, p.p., cling. 

da'niao, adj., rel. to 
the Cluniac Order; 
n. , a monk of Cluny . 

olas'tor.v.t., to gather 
into clusters; v.t., to 
grow in clusters, 
form into clusters; 
n., a bunch, group. 

olns'tered, p.p., clus- 
ter. 

clos'tering, pr.p., 
cluster. 

clns'tery, »dj., hav- 
ing clusters. 

Clntoh, v.i., to grasp; 
n., grasp, seizure; a 
mechanical device 
for putting parts 
into or out of 
action; a batch of 
eggs before laying. 

olniobed, p.p. ,c\mch. 

clatoh'ingi pfp-, 
clutch. 

dnt'ter, v.^, to dis- 
order; v.t., make a 
noise; n., a heap of 
confusion. [ter. 

dut'tered, p.p., ciut- 

dnftering, Prp-, 
clutter. 

dyg'mio, adj., rel. to 
a deluge. 

dyi'tai, »., ao enema. 

coaob, v.i., to travel 
by coach; to work 
under a tutor; v.t., 
to tutor; n., a large 
carriage, a railway 
carriage, a tutc». 

coach-hone, n., a 
carnage horse. 

coach'-honM, n., a 
building where a 
carriage is kept. 



^ 



"^ 



121 



coMh'man, n., the 
driver ot a carriage. 

CO-ao'tioil, n., joint 
action. 

coac'tive, adj., acting 
conjointly. 

coadlost', v.i., to ac- 
commodate mutu- 
ally. 

coad'jntant, «<{;., co- 
operating. 

ooadjn'tor, n., an 
assistant, colleague. 

ooadja'trix, »., fem. 
of coadjutor. 

ooadven'tare, v.i., to 
share in an adven- 
ture; n., an adven- 
ture in company. 

coag'olable, adj., able 
to coagulate. 

coag' olant, adj . , cau s- 
iiig coagulation; n., 
something that 

causes coagulation. 

coag'alate, v.t., to 
curdle, thicken; v.i., 
to become curdled. 

coag'alated, p.p., 
coagulate. 

coagdlating, pr.p., 
coagulate. 

ooagnla'tion, n., the 
act or state of 
coagulating. 

eoag'ttlaUTe, adj., 
tending to coagu- 
late. 

COSg'lllator, n., some- 
thing that causes 
coagulation. 

coag'alatory, adj., i.f. 
coagulative. 

coKK'uloiii, n., a 
coagulant. 

CO'-aid, n., mutual 
or joint help. 

coal, V.I., to furnish 
with coal; v.i., to 
take in coal; n., a 
black mineral used 
for fuel. 

coal' -field, n., a coal- 
bearing district. 

coaled, p.p., coal. 

coalesce', v.i., to grow 
together, combine. 

coalesced', pp., co- 
alesce. 

coalescence, n., the 
act or state of 
coalescing. 

coales'cent, adj., 
growing together. 

coaleso'fng, Prp., 
coalesce. 

coal'ing. pr.p., coal. 

coali'tion, n., the act 
of combining; a 
union of parties. 



-^ 






w 

T 



coating 



oooli'tionist, adj., rel. 
to coalition. 

co-ally', n., a joint 
ally. 

oool'-mine, n., a mine 
from which coal is 
hewn. 

coal'-pit, n., a pit 
from which coal is 
drawn. 

coal'y, adj., like, or 
containing, coal. 

eoam'ing, %u comb- 
ing. 

coapta'tion, n., the 
fitting together of 
parts (ot a broken 
bone). 

coarc'tate, adj., 

pressed together. 

coaiota'tion, n., stric- 
ture, contraction. 

coarse, adj., rough, 
of poor quality, tm- 
refined. 

coarsely, adv., in a 
coarse way. 

coarse'ness, n., the 
quality of being 
coarse. 

coara'er, adj., comp. 
of coarse. 

coars' est, «<<;., tuper. 
of coarse. 

coast, v.i., to travel or 
sail along; to bi- 
cycle downhill with- 
out pedalling; n., 
border, edge of land 
by the sea. 

coa^'ed, p.p., coast. 

coas'ter, »., a vessel 
sailing from port to 
port on the same 
coast. 

coast'-f u<n/, n., the 
guard stationed 
along the coast. 

Ooast'lng, pr.p., coast: 
n., the sport of 
bicycling downhill 
without using the 
pedals. 

coast'-Iine, n., the 
line showing on a 
map th3 coast of a 
country. 

coasfwise, adv. and 
o^ii., along thecoast. 

coat, v.i., to apply a 
coating to; to covnr 
with a coat; n., in 
outer covering; • 
layer. 

coat'ed, p.p., coat. 

coatee', n., a sho^t 
coat. 

coafing, n., an outer 
layer; material for 
a coat; pr.p., coat. 



coax 



"^VL 



^1^ 



coax, v.t., to wheedle, 
persuade by cares- 
ses. 

coaxed, p.p., coax. 

coax'er, n., one who 
coaxes. 

coax'ing, pr.p , coax; 
adj., wheedling, 
fondling; n., the act 
of one who coaxes. 

coax'ingly, adv., in a 
coaxing way. 

cob, v.t., to beat; n., 
a roundish hump; a 
small sturdy horse, 
a bead of wheat; a 
blow on the but- 
tocks; a breakwater. 

CO'balt, n., a mineral 
so named; a pig- 
ment made from 
the same. 

cobalt'ic. adj., rel. to 
cobalt. 

cobbing, adj., vul- 
garly ostentatious; 
n., copper-impreg- 
nated rubble. 

oob'ble, v.t., to patch 
up; to lay cobble- 
stones on; n., a 
variety of fishing- 
boat; a large round 
paving-stone. 

cob'bled, p.p., cobble. 

oob'bler, n., one who 
cobbles, a shoe- 
mender; a summer 
beverage so named. 

cob'ble-stone, n., a 
cobble for paving. 

cob'bling, pr.p., cob- 
ble. 

cob'by, adj., head- 
strong, ardent. 

OoVdenism. n., the 
doctrine of Cobden, 
i.e.. Free Trade. 

Oob'denite. w., a Free 
Trader. 

oob'nut, M., a variety 
of hazel-nut. 

cob'ra, n., an Indian 
snake, exceedingly 
venomous. 

cob' web, v.t., to cover 
with a cobweb; n., 
a spider's web. 

cob' webbed, adj., cov- 
ered with cobwebs. 

C0'ca,n. , the dried leaf 
of a Peruvian shrub. 

co'caine, n., an anaes- 
thetic, produced 
from the coca plant. 

oo'cainism, n., the 
effect of cocaine 
poisoning. 

ooc'oalos, n., a 
tropical plant bear- 



^ 



^-n- 



"^ 



122 



ing berries of a nar- 
cotic character. 

COC'cyz, n., the lower 
end of the spine. 

coch'ineaU »., a 
bright red dye, 
made from coch- 
ineal insects dried. 

cocb'lea, n., one of 
the ear passages. 
\ coch'lear, adj., like a 
spoon; «., the com- 
munion-spoon of 
the Greek Church. 

cochleai'ilonn. adj., 
spoon-shaped. 

coch'leate, (u2;., spiral 
like a snail-shell. 

cock, v.t., to set up on 
one side; to raise 
the hammer of a 
gun; n., a male 
bird; a hay-pile; a 
jaunty tip. 

cockade', n., a knot 
of ribbons or other 
badge attached to 
a cap or hat. 

cocka'ded, adj., dec- 
orated with a cock- 
ade. 

Cockaigne', n., an 
imaginary country; 
London, the home 
of cockneys. 

cockatoo', n., a 
variety of parrot. 

cock'atiice, n., a 
fabulous snake-like 
creature, hatched 
from a cock's egg. 

cock'bill, v.t., to hang 
(an anchor) from 
the cathead; to 
raise the sign of 
mourning (naui.). 

cook'boat, n., a little 
rowing boat. 

cock'ohafer, m., a 
winged beetle. 

cock'-crow, n., the 
early morning. 
. cock'-crowing, n., i.g. 
cock-crow. 

cocked, ^.^., cock. 

cock'er, n., a breed of 
spaniels; v.t., to 
pamper, indulge. 

cock'erel, n., a young 
cock. 

cock'et, n., a seal of 
the custom house. 

cock'-eyed, adj., 
squinting. 

oook'-flgb^n., afight 
between cocks. 

oock'-bone, n., a 
hobby horse; any- 
thing across which 
a child can straddle. 




>=^ 



n 

r-T 
a. 



code 



cock' ing, pr.p., cock. 

cock'le, n., a weed 
growing amid corn; 
a bivalve so named; 
v.t., to wrinkle. 

cock'led, p.p., cockle. 

cockling, pr.p., 

cockle. 

cock'ling, see cock- 
erel. 

cock'-loft, n., a loft 
next to the roof. 

COCk'ney, n., a Lon- 
doner. 

cook'neyfled, p.p., 
cockneyfy. 

cock'neyfy, v.t., to 
change to a Lon- 
doner. 

cock'neyism, n., the 
London manner 
and idiom. 

COCk'pit, n., a ring 
for cock-fights. 

cock'roach, n., a 
black beetle. 

coclra'comb, se* cox- 
comb. 

cock'spanow, n., a 
male sparrow. 

cock'spor, n., a spur 
on a cock's legs. 

oock'swain, see cox- 
swain. 

OOCk'tail, n., an 
American iced drink. 

co'co, co'coa, n., the 
palm tree; the seeds 
of the cacao tree. 

co'coa-nib, n., the 
roasted cacao seeds. 

oo'co-nut, n., the 
fruit of the coco- 
palm. 

cocoon', »., an en- 
velope spun by 
caterpillars. 

eoeosm'eiy, n., a place 
where sUk is spun. 

ooc'tion, n., the 
process of boiling. 

cod, »., a well-known 
edible fish. 

oo'da, n., an addi- 
tional ending to a 
piece of music; the 
finale of a fugue or 
sonata. 

cod'dle, v.t., to 
pamper; n., one 
that is pampered. 

cod'dled, p.p., cod- 
dle. 

cod'dling, pr.p. , cod- 
dle. 

code, n., a body of 
law; a system of 
signs for conveying 
messages briefly or 
in cipher. 



eodeine 






Tr- 



1- 



"^^ 




co'deine, n., an al- 
kaloid so named. 

OO'dex, n., an uncial 
MS. 

cod'flah, H., a cod. 

codg'er, n., an eccen- 
tric old person. 

cod'icil, n., a later 
cote modifying or 
explaining a wUl. 

codicil'laiy, adj., rel. 
to a codicil. 

codiflca'tion, n., the 
systematizing of 
laws already in ex- 
istence. 

codified, p.p., codify. 

ood'ifler, n., one who 
codifies. 

ood'ily, v.t., to reduce 
existing enact- 
ments to a code. 

codifying, pr.p., co- 
dify. 

codil'la, n., part of 
the flax or hemp. 

codille', n., a term 
used in the game 
of ombre. 

COd'ling, »., a young 
cod; acooking apple. 

CO'don, n., a bill; the 
mouth of a trumpet. 

ooednca'tion, n., the 
education of both 
sexes together. 

co-eiB'ciency, »., 
combined efficiency. 

coeffl'cient, adj., co- 
operative, WOTking 
with another; n., a 
number placed com- 
monly before an- 
other to multiply 
it. 

ooe'liac, adj., rel. to 
the abdomen. 

coemp tion, n., an old 
form of marriage by 
mutual purchase. 

coenof'uny, n., com- 
munity of wives 
ar.d husbands. 

coequal, ad/., joint- 
ly equal. 

ooeqoal'itr, »., the 
state of being co- 
equal. 

coeioe', v.t., to com- 
pel, force. 

coerced', P-p-, coerce. 

coer'cible, adj., able 
to be coerced. 

eoer'dbleness, n., the 
state of being co- 
ercible. 

coerc'tng, pr.p., co- 
erce. 

ooer'doii, n., the act 
of coercing. 



123 



coer'cive, adj., pro- 
ducing coercion. 

coessen'tial, »di • , 
having the same 
essence. 

coessential'ity, n., the 
quality or state of 
being coessential. 

coetei'nal, 04/., equal- 
ly eternal. 

coeter'nity, »., equal 
eternity. 

coe'val, <uLj., of the 
same generation, 
contemporary. 

coexist', v.i., to exist 
together. 

coexisted, p.p., co- 
exist. 

coexistence, n., the 
state or fact of co- 
existing. 

coexist'ent, adj., co- 
existing. 

coexisting, pr.p., co- 
exist. 

coextend', v.i., to be 
equally extensive. 

coextend'ed, p.p., co- 
extend. 

coextend'ing, pr.p., 
coextend. 

coexten'gion, ft., the 
act or state of 
coextending. 

coexten'sive, adj., co- 
: extending. 

coffee, n., the seeds 
of the cofiee plant; 
the beverage made 
from them. 

cof'!ee-Aous«, n., a 
place of refresh- 
ment selling coffee. 

coffee-pot, n., a pot 
from which cofiee is 
served. 

coffer, v.t., to shut in 
a chest; to sink 
panels in a ceiling; 
M., a chest; a sunk 
panel. 

coffer-dun, n., a 
temporary dam. 

coffered, p.p., coffer; 
adj., having cofiers. 

cofferer, n., a treas- 
urer. 

coffin, v.t., to place 
in a coffin; n., a 
chest to bold a 
dead body. 

coffined, p.p., coffin. 

cog, v.t., to supply 
with cogs; to load 
(dice); to cheat; n., 
a tooth on a wheel's 
surface; a project- 
ing catch; a trick; a 
small fishing vessel. 



7 



1 



T 



I 



cog-wheel 



co'gency, n., the state 
or quality of the 
cogent. 

co'gent, adj., com- 
pelling, convincing. 

co'gent^, adv., in a 
cogent way. 

cogged, adj., having 
cogs; p.p., cog. 

cog'ger, n., one who 
builds mine-props. 

cog'ging, pr.p., cog. 

cog'itable, adj., able 
to be cogitated. 

cog'itate, v.t., to think 
over; v.i., to reflect, 
meditate. 

cog'itated, p.p., cog- 
itate. 

cog'itating, pr.p., cog- 
itate. 

cogita'tioD, M., the 
act or state of 
cogitating. 

cog'itative, adj. , given 
to reflecting. 

co'gnac, »., fine 
French brandy. 

cog'nate. adj., of the 
same family orkind; 
allied. 

cog'natenesB, »., the 
' quality of being 
cognate. 

oogna'tion, n., family 
relationship. 

cogni'tion, n., clear 
apprehension ,know- 
ledge. 

cog'nitive. adj., rel. 
to cognition. 

cog'nizable, adj., able 
to be apprehended. 

COg'niiance, n., know- 
ledge, recognition; 
a heraldic badge. 

COg'niauit, adj., per- 
ceiving, taking no- 
tice. 

COg'nise, v.t., to per- 
ceive, recognize. 

COg'niziBd, p.p., cog- 
nize. 

cognizee', n., one 
accepting the ac- 
knowledgment of a 
fine of lands. 

cog'niiing, pr.p., cog- 
nize. 

cog'niior, n., one ac- 
knowledging a fine 
of lands. 

cogno'man, n., a tiur- 
* name, nickname. 

cognom'inal, adj.,Tti\. 
' to a cognomen; of 
the same name. 

COg'-wheel, n., a cog- 
ged or toothed 
wheel. 



cohabit 









CohaVit, v.t., to live 
together as married. 

cohabitant, n., one 
who lives in the 
same place with 
another. 

cohabita'tion, n., the 
act or state of 
cohabiting. 

cohab'ited, p.p., co- 
habit. 

cohab'iter, n., i.q. 
cohabitant. 

cohab'iting, prp., 
cohabit. 

coheir', n., a joint 
heir. 

coheii'ess, n., fem. of 
coheir. 

cohere', ».«., to stick- 
together. 

cohered', />.^., cohere. 

coher'ence, n. , the 
act or state of 
cohering. 

OOher'ency. n., a tend- 
ency to cohere; con- 
sistency. 

coher'ent, <idi., stick- 
ing together; logic- 
ally consistent. 

coher'ently, adv. , in a 
coherent way. 

coher'ing, pr.p., co- 
here. 

cohesibil'ity, n., the 
state of being co- 
hesible. 

cohe'sible, adj., able 
to cohere. 

cohe'sion, n., the act 
or state of coher- 
ing. 

cohe'sive, adj., with 
the power of coher- 
ing. 

cohe'siveness, n., the 
state of being cohe- 
sive. 

CObib'it, v.t., to re- 
strain. 

oohibi'tion. n., the 
act or effect of 
cohibiting. 

eo'hobate, v.t., to re- 
distil. 

CO'hort. n., the tenth 
part of a Roman 
legion. 

coif, n., a form of 
head-gear, particu- 
larly as worn by 
serjeants-at-law. 

coifed, tdj., wearing 
a coif. 

coiffeur, n., a hair- 
dresser. 

coif fore, n., head- 
dressing; a mode of 
dressing the hair. 



^^ 



^f>f 



"X. 




-^ 



124 



coign, coigne,n.,acor- 

ner; corner-stone. 

coil, n., a rope gath- 
ered into a ring; a 
stir, noise; an elec- 
trical apparatus so 
named; v.i. and <., 
to wind round. 

coiled, p.p., coil. 

coil'ing, pr.p., coll. 

coin, n., stamped 
money; v.t., to 
stamp metal as 
money; to invent. 

coin'age, n., the pro- 
cess of stamping 
money; the money 
stamped; invention, 

coincide', v.i., to 
occur simultaneous- 
ly; to agree exactly; 
to lie on the same 
line or point. 

coincid'ed, p.p., coin- 
cide. 

coin'cidence, n., the 
act of coinciding; a 
simultaneous occur- 
rence. 

coin'cident, adj., sim- 
ultaneously occur- 
ring. 

coin'cidently, adv. , 
simultaneously. 

coinciding, pr.p., 
coincide. 

coindica'tion, n., a 
supplementary in- 
dication. 

coined, p.p., coin. 

coin'er, n., one who 
makes coins, esp. 
spurious ones. 

co-inhab'itant, n., a 
fellow-dweller. 

coin'ing, pr.p., coin. 

coir, n., cocoa-nut 
fibre. 

coit, n., see quoit. 

coi'tion, n., copula- 
tion, conjunction. 

cojn'ror, n., a fellow- 
juryman. 

coke, »., coal residue 
after the withdraw- 
al of the gas; v.t., to 
turn into coke. 

coked, p.p., coke. 

co'ker-nnt, n., the 
popular form of the 
name cocoa-nut. 

ook'ing, pr.p., coke. 

col'ander, n., a do- 
mestic strainer. 

col'chictun, n., mead- 
ow saffron. 

col'cotliar, n., an iron 
peroxide. 

cold, adj., without 
heat; passionless; of 



^ 

^ 

^ 









collapsible 



a bluish tone; n., 
absence of heat; the 
sensation of chill; 
a catarrh. 

co/ff -blooded, adj., 
having blood of a 
low temperature ; 
cruel. 

cold'er, adj., comp. 
of cold. 

cold'est, adj., super. 
of cold. 

cold'beaxtei. adj., 
without natural 
affection, cruel. 

cold'iab, adj., some- 
what cold. 

cold'lj, adv., in a 
cold way. 

cold'neaa, n., the 
state of being cold; 
indifference. 

cole, n., a general 
name for cabbage- 
plants. 

coleop'tera, «. pi., in- 
sects with sheathed 
wings; beetles. 

coleop'terist, n. , a col- 
lector of coleoptera. 

coleop'terons, adj., 
having sheathed 
wings. 

cole'seed, n., rape- 
seed. 

col'et, n., an acolyte. 

cole'wori "-i young 
cabbage. 

col'io, n., vicdent 
pain of the bowels; 
adj., rel. to the 
bowels. 

col'ioky, adj., rel. to 
colic. 

col'in, n., a variety of 
quail. 

Colise'om, n., the 
great Flavian am- 
phitheatre in Rome. 
Also Colosseum. 

coUab'orate, v.t., to 
join with someone 
in a piece of work. 

oollab'oiated. p.p., 
collaborate. 

collab'orating, pr.p., 
collaborate. 

collabora'tion, n., the 
act of collaborating. 

collab' orator, n., one 
who collaborates. 

collapse', v.i., to fall 
down, break down, 
fail; n., a break- 
down, falling down; 
failure. 

collapsed', p.p., col- 
lapse. 

colla^ibla, «(;., col- 
lapsing. 



collapsing 



zA- 



.y^ 



-j\ 



r^ 



ooUaps'ing, pr.p., col- 
lapse. 

col'lar. »■( somethinc 
worn round tlip 
neck; v.t., to seize 
by the neck. 

col'lared, p-P^, collar. 

collaret, collarette', 
n., a fichu. 

col'laring, pr.p., col- 
lar. 

collat'able, adi-, able 
to be collated. 

collate'. ».'., to com- 
pare a text or texts 
critically; to pre- 
sent to a benefice 
(said of a bishop 
exercising patron- 
age). 

collat'ed./>./>.,collate. 

collaferat od;., side 
by side; subsidiary; 
not in direct de- 
scent. 

collat'eralnen, n., the 
state of being col- 
lateral. 

CoUat'ing, pr.p., col- 
late. 

colla'tion, n., the act 
of collating; a light 
repast. 

coUa'tive, adi., pert, 
to collation. 

coUa'toT, w., one who 
collates. 

ool'leagae, n., an as- 
sociate in office, em- 
ployment or under- 
taking. 

ool'lectj n., a short 
liturgical prayer. 

collect', v.<., to gather 
together, assemble; 
v.i., to assemble 
together. 

collect'able, ad)., able 
to be collected. 

collecta'nea, n. pi., 
selected passages 
from books. 

collecta'neons, cd)., 
selected. 

oollect'ed, pp., col- 
lect; also ail., self- 
possessed. 

eollect'edly, a<&.,with 
self-possession. 

collect' edness, n., a 
self-possessed atti- 
tude. 

coUect'ible, adj., able 
to be collected. 

oolleet'ing, pr.p., col- 
lect. 

collec'tion, n., the act 
or state of collect- 
ing; a number of 
thugs collected to- 



'n. 



-X\ 



125 



gether; a crowd; 
the gathering of 
alms; a college ex- 
amination. 

collect'ive, ad)., taken 
as a whole or in 
bulk. 

coUecfively, adv., al- 
together. 

collect'iveness, n. , the 
state of being col- 
lective. 

collectivism, n., the 
political theory of 
collective owner- 
ship by the State. 

colleot'or, n. , one who 
collects. 

oollect'orate. n., a 
collector's district. 

collect' orship, n., the 
office ol a collector. 

col'leen. n., a girl 
(Irish). 

ool'lege, n., a society, 
community; its 
hall or house of 
residence. 

colla'gial, adj., rel. to 
a college. 

coUe'gian, «., the 
member of a college. 

coUe'giate, adj., rel. 
to a college; corpor- 
ately established. 

collet, «. , the part of 
a ring in which the 
stone is set. 

collide', v.t., to strike 
up against. 

colii'ded, p.p., collide. 

coUi'dinK, pr.p., col- 
lide. 

col'lie, n., a sheep- 
dog. 

col'lier, n , one who 
hews coal; a coaling 
vessel. 

col'liery, n., a coal 
mine. 

coriigate,ti.<., to fast- 
en together. 

coUigaaoii, n., the 
act of fastening 
together. 

corUmate, vi., to 
make parallel. 

collima'tion, n., the 
act of collimating. 

coUiiiea'tion, n., the 
act or state of 
bringing into line. 

coUiq'natiTe, adi., 
marked by exces- 
sive ptirging. 

CoUi'sioo, n., the act 
of colliding, con- 
cussion. 

ool'locata, v.t., to 
place or arrange. 



-/n 



_AI. 






colonial 



ool'located, p.p., col- 
locate. 

col'locating, pr.p., 
collocate. 

colloca'tion, n. , the 
act or state of col- 
locating. 

colloca'tioii, n., the 
act of making a 
colloquy. 

collo'dion, n., soluble 
gun-cotton treated 
with ether. 

coUo'dionize, v.t., to 
prepare collodion. 

col'loid, adj., glue- 
like; n., a glue-like 
substance. 

col'lop, n., a slice (of 
meat). 

collo'qnial, adj., in 
the ordinary style 
of speech; rel. to 
conversation. 

coUo'anialism, n., a 
colloquial expres- 
sion. 

col'loqoist, n., one 
who engages in a 
colloquy. 

eol'loqiiy, n., a con- 
versation, 

col'lotype, n., a pho- 
tograph produced 
on gelatine; the 
collotype process; 
v.t., to reproduce in 
coUotvpe. 

Golltide', v.i., to be a 
partner to a collu- 
sion. 

oolla'ded. p.p., col- 
lude. 

colla'der, n. , one who 
colludes. 

colla'ding, pr.p., col- 
lude. 

ooUn'sioD, M., a secret 
agreement to de- 
ceive. 

OOlln'siTe, adj., fraud- 
ulently agreed, de- 
ceitful. 

coUa'dTely, «it'.,with 
collusion. 

col'ly, see collie, 

col'ocyntli, n., a 
purgative medicine. 

colooyn'thin, adj. , rel. 
to colocynth. 

co'lon, IX., the large 
intestine; a punc- 
tuation mark (:). 

col'onel, M., the head 
of a regiment. 

coroneloy. n-, a 
colonel's rank and 
office. 

GOlo'nia], adj., rel, to 
a colony. 



colonist 



-y^ 



-e 



coronist, n., a settler 
in a colony. 

colomsa'tion m., the 
act or effect of 
colonizing. 

ooloniza'tionist, n. , 
an advocate of col- 
onizing. 

coronize, v.t., to form 
into a colony. 

colonized, p.p., col- 
onize. 

colonizing, pr.p., 
colonize. 

colonnade', n., a row 
ot columns. 

col'ony, n., a settle- 
ment. 

corophon, n., a de- 
vice to mjirk the 
end of a book. 

col'opbony, n., a dark 
resin produced from 
turpentine. 

col'or, col' OUT, v.t., to 
tint, impart colour 
to; v.i., to show 
colour; n., tint, 
tinge, dye; a pre- 
text; a flag. 

col'orable, coroni- 
able, adj., plausible, 
resembling. 

col'orableness, col'- 
ooiableness, n., the 
quality of being 
colourable. 

col'orably, col'oni- 
ably, adv., in a 
colourable way. 

colora'tion, «. , the act 
orstateof colouring. 

coroiatuie, n., col- 
our m music. 

ool'ored, col'onred, 
p.p., colour. 

colorific, adj., pro- 
ducing colour. 

col'onng, colouring, 
pr.p., colour; «., the 
act or art of apply- 
ing colour; the 
colour applied. 

cororist,coi'oiirist, n. , 
an artist skilled in 
colouring. 

col'orless, coroorless, 
adj., without colour, 
paie, white. 

colos'sal, adj., gigan- 
tic, huge. 

Colosse'om, n., the 
great amphitheatre 
of Rome (also spelt 
Coliseum). 

Colos'gian, adj., pert, 
to Colosse. 

Coloi'siu, n., the 
gigantic statue at 
Rhodes. 



^ 






-^-Hr 



126 



col'portage, n., the 

distribution of 

books, tracts, etc. 

corporteor, n., one 
who distributes 
books, tracts, etc. 

colt, n. , a young male 
horse; an untrained 
youth; v.t., to 
punish with a colt 
or rope's end. 

colt'isb, adj., like a 
colt, untamed. 

colt'er, «« coulter. 

colts'foot, n., a medi- 
cinal plant. 

OOl'llber, n. , a serpent 
(Lai.). 

ool'abrine, adj., rel. 
to serpents. 

colnm'ba,<t. , a pigeon; 
dove. 

oolomba'riom, n., a 
pigeon-house; dove- 
cot; a set of niches 
for cinerary urns. 

cormubary, n., i.q. 
columbarium. 

Colnm'bian, adj. ,pert . 
to Columbus, Col- 
umbia, or the U.S. 

OOlnm'biC, adj., pert, 
to columbium. 

cornmbine, »., a 
female pantomime 
dancer; a perennial 
plant. 

coInm'Uam, n., a 
dark grey metallic 
element. 

columel'la, n., a cen- 
tral column. 

COl'nmn, n., a cylin- 
drical pillar; a large 
body of troops, a 
vertical row of fig- 
ures; a division of 
a page. 

colom'nar, adj., rel. 
to columns. 

col'iunned, adj., hav- 
ing columns. 

colmnnia'tion, n., the 
arrangement of col- 
umns. 

colore', n., the name 
of the two great 
circles in the celes- 
tial sphere. 

col'sa-oil, n., oil from 
the seeds of a cer- 
tain cabbage. 

co'ma, n., complete 
insensibility. 

co'mate, »., hairy; 
written co-mate it 
means companion. 

co'matose, adj., in a 
stupor, insensible. 

comb, v.t., to arrange 



comedian 



the hair with a 
comb; n., an instru- 
ment tor adjusting 
the hair; a cock's 
crest. 

com'bat, v.t., to fight 
against; n., a fight, 
contest. 

com'batable, adj. ,able 
to be combated. 

combatant, n., one 
who combats. 

combated, p.p., com- 
bat. 

com'bater, n., i.q. 
combatant. 

combating, pr.p., 
combat. 

com'bative, adj., pug- 
nacious, fond of 
fighting. 

com'bativeness, n. , 
pugnacity. 

combed, p.p. , comb. 

comber, n., anything 
that combs; a roll- 
ing breaker. 

combin'able, adj. , 
able to be combined . 

combina'tion, n., the 
act or effect of 
combining; a union. 

combine', v.t. , to join 
or associate to- 
gether; v.t., to unite, 
agree; n., a secret 
association for the 
purpose ot fraud. 

combined', p.p., com- 
bine. 

combi'ner, n., one 
who combines. 

combing, pr.p. ,comb. 

combin'ing, pr.p., 
combine. 

comb'less, adj., lack- 
ing a comb. 

combust', aij;., burnt. 

combustibility, n., 
the state or quality 
of being combust- 
ible. 

combus'tible, adj., in- 
flammable; n., any- 
thing inflammable. 

combos' tibleness, n., 
i.q. combustibility. 

combus'tion, »., the 
act of burning; the 
condition of being 
burnt. 

combos' tive, adj., in- 
flammatory. 

come, v.i., to draw 
near, arrive, hap- 
pen;t;.<., to play the 
part of. 

come'dian, n., a wri- 
ter or player of 
comedies. 



eom§dieiuie 



127 



eommensuration 



13 







comMienne', n., a 
comedy actress. 

comediei'ta, n., a 
short comedy. 

come'-down, n., a 
fall, drop. 

com'edy, n., a comic 
drama. 

oome'lier, adj., comp. 
of comely. 

come'liest, adj., super. 
oi comely. 

oome'lily, adv., in a 
comely way. 

comeliness, n., 

beauty, grace. 

come'ly, adj., beauti- 
ful, graceful. 

com'er, n., one who 
comes. 

comes' tible, adj., eat- 
able; n., an article 
of food. 

com'et, n. , a heavenly 
body w.ih a lumin- 
ous trail. 

cometa'rinm, n., an 
instrument to mea- 
sure a comet's mo- 
tion. 

com'etary, adj., rel. 
to a comet. 

comet'ic, adj., i.q. 
cometary. 

eometoK'raphy. n., 
the study of comets. 

oom'flt, n., a dry 
sweetmeat. 

com'fltare, n., i^. 
comfit. 

COm'Iort,t;.<. ,tocheer, 
warm, solace; n., 
solace, support, 
warmth. 

com'lortable, adj., 
imparting comfort, 
in a state of ease. 

oom'fortableness, n., 
the quality of giv- 
ing comfort. 

oom'forted, ^.^., com- 
fort. 

com'fnter, n., one 
who, anything that, 
comforts; a neck- 
wrap. 

com'forting, pr.p., 
comfort. 

comfortless. adj., 
without comfort, 
dreary. 

com'frey, n., a hairy 
plant. 

comic, adj., ludi- 
crous, exciting 
mirth. 

oom'ical, adj., t.g. 
comic. 

comical'itr, n., ludi- 
crousness, funniness 



v- 



n--- 



L 
k 



com'ically, adv., in a 
comical way. 
p com icaJness, n., i.q. 
comicality. 

coming, pr.p. .come; 
n., an arrival. 

com'ity, n., courtesy, 
civility. 

com' ma, »., a punc- 
tuation mark (,). In 
music a very small 
interval. 

command', v.l., to 
order, lead; n., an 
order; superior 

position, advantage; 
the charge of a 
naval or military 
force. 

commandant', n., an 
officer in command 
of a garrison. 

oommand'atory, adj., 
mandatory. 

commanded, p.p., 
command. 

commandeer', v.t., to 
seize under military 
taw. 

commandeered', p.p., 
commandeer. 

commandeer'ing, 
pr.p., commandeer. 

command'er, n., one 
who commands; a 
naval officer so 
named. 

command'ery, n., a 
commander's office 
or sphere of juris- 
diction; the rank of 
a Knight Com- 
mander; the name 
of a branch house 
of the Knights 
Templars. 

command'ing. prp., 
command; adj., in a 
position of superior- 
ity, authoritative. 

command'ingly, adv., 
in a commanding 
way. 

command' ment, tt., a 
command, precept, 
law. 

comman'do, »■ , a bur- 
gher military force. 

commat'ic.oi/. , terse, 
concise. 

com' matism, n. , terse- 
ness, conciseness. 

commeas'nrable, adj., 
commensurate. 

commem'orable, adj., 
worthy of com- 
memoration. 

commem' orate, v.<. , 
to celebrate the 
memory of. 



.^T^- 



.^rv4- 



.^fVl^ 



X 

X 

"n-. 



^ 

•^ 



.J^ 



commem' orated, p.p. , 
commemorate. 

commem' orating, 
pr.p., commemor- 
ate. 

commemora'tion, n., 
the act of commem- 
orating. 

commem' orative.adf. 
celebrating the 

memory of. 

commem'orator, t., 
one who commem- 
orates. 

commem'oratory.A^/. 
i.q. commemora- 
tive. 

commence', v.t. and 
i., to begin. 

commenced', p.p., 
commence. 

commence' ment, »., 
a beginning; a uni- 
versity ceremony of 
granting degrees. 

commencing, pr.p., 
commence. 

commend', v.t., to 
name for approval, 
recommend, entrust 

commendable, adj. , 
worthy to be com- 
mended. 

commend'ably, adv. , 
in a commendable 
way. 

commen'dam, »., a 
trust. Ecclesias- 
tical livings have 
been sometimes 
held " in commen- 
dam," on trust until 
a permanent ap- 
pointment is made. 

commenda'tion, n., 
the act of com- 
mending; approval. 

commend'atory. adj., 
laudatory, approv- 
ing. 

commend' ed, pp., 
commend. 

commend'ing, pr.p., 
commend. 

commen' sal, adj., 
sharing the same 
table. 

commensarabil'ity,*!. , 
the quality of being 
commensurable. 

commen' snrable, adj. , 
reducible to the 
same measure. 

oommen'snrate, adj., 
equal, proportion- 
ate. 

commensnra'tioii, »., 
the act of reducing 
to a common mea- 
sure. 



comment 



128 



common law 



"1/ 






com'ment, v.t., to 

remark on, make 

notes on; n., an 

annotation, explan- 
ation. 
com'mentary, n., an 

exposition. 
com'mentate, v.i., to 

write expository 

notes. 
comraenta'tion, n., 

the act of com- 
menting. 
com'mentatoT, »., an 

expositor, annota- 

tor. 
com'mented, p.p., 

comment. 
com'menter, n., one 

who comments. 
com'menting, pr.p. , 

comment. 
commenti'tions, adj., 

of the nature of a 

commentary. 
com'merce, n., trade, 

dealing, intercoiirse; 

v.i., to have mler- 

coiirse. 
commer'clal, adj.. 

rel. to trade and 

commerce. 
conunet'cialism, n., 

commercial ways, 

the commercial 

spirit. 
commei'cialize, v.i., 

to make commer- 
cial. 
com m er'cia lly, adv. 

in the way of trade. 
commina'tion, n., a 

denouncement of 

sins and offences. 
corn'minatory, adj. , 

condemnatory. 
commin'gle, v.t. and 

»., to mingle lo- 

gpther. 
commingled, pp. , 

commingle. 
commin'gling, pr.p., 

commingle. 
com' minute, v.t., to 

grind small, pul- 
verize; adj., ground 

small. 
com'minnted, p.p., 

comminute. 
comminuting, pr.p., 

comminute. 
comminn'tion, n., the 

act or state of 

comminuting. 
commis'erate, v.t., to 

pity, compassionate 
commis'eiated, p.p., 

commiserate. 
eommis'erating,^./>. , 

commiserate. 






commisera'tion, n., 
the act of com- 
miserating. 

commis'eratiTe, adj., 
pitiful, compassion-. 

' ate. 

conunis'erator. n. ,one 
who commiserates. 

commissa'rial, adj., 
rel. to commissary. 

commissa'riat, n., the 
provisioning depart- 
ment of an army. 

com'missary, n,, a 
person charged with 
a commission, a 
delegate; an ord- 
nance officer with 
honorary combat- 
ant rank. 

com'missary - gea' • 
eral, n., the head 
of thecommissariat. 

commis'sion, v.t., to 
charge, entrust, 
authorize; »., a 
charge, trust; the 
act ol commission- 
ing; a warrant; 
an appointment in 
the navy or the 
army; a body of 
commissioned per- 
sons. 

commissionaire', n. , 
a military pension- 
er engaged as a 
messenger. 

commis'sioned, p.p., 
commission. 

commis'sioner, **., a 
member of a com- 
mission. 

commis'sionershipin. , 
the office of a com- 
missioner. 

commis'sioning.^r.^., 
commission. 

com'missure, "., a 
seam, point of 
union. 

commit', v.i., to en- 
trust, consign, per- 
petrate, send to 
gaol or trial. 

commit'ment, n., i.q. 
committal; engage- 
ment, pledge. 

commit' tal, n., the 
act of comtnitting. 

commit'ted, pp., 
commit. 

commit' tee, n., a 
body of person?; 
dealing with a par- 
ticular business. 

committee', n., a per- 
son appointed to 
the guardianship of 
another's property. 



-K 



^ 



■^^ 



commit' ter, n., one 

who commits. 

commit' ting, pr.p. , 
commit. 

commit' tor, n., one 
who commits. 

commix', v.t. and »., 
to intermingle. 

commixed', p.p., 
commix. 

commix'ing, pr.p., 
commix. 

commix' tion, m., the 
act or result of 
commixing. 

commix' tnre, n., i.q. 
commix tion. 

com'modate, n., a 
form of loan, free of 
charge on return of 
loan undamaged. 

commode', n., a piece 
of furniture. 

commodious, adj. , 
roomy, convenient, 
useful. 

commo'dionsly, adv., 
in a commodious 
way. 

commo'diooanets, n., 
the quality of being 
commodious. i 

commod'ity, »., some- ! 
thing of use, an i 
article of commerce; j 
in pi., goods, wares. 

com'modore, n., the 
commander of a 
naval squadron. 

oom'mon, adj., be- 
longing to two or 
more persons; vul- 
gar; n., an open 
space that is com- 
mon property. 

com'monable, adj. , 
having common 
pasturage rights. 

commonage, n., pas 
turage rights. 

commonalty, n., the 
collective people. 

com'mon conn'cil, 
n., the municipa, 
body. 

com'moner, adj. . 
comp. of common ; 
n., anyone not a 
peer; a M.P.; one 
who has joint rights 
in common lands; 
academically one 
who is admitted to 
commons but is not 
on the foundation. 

com'monest, adj., 
super, of common. 

common law, n., 
English unwritten 
law. 



eommonly 



^ 



^ 



•^1 






eom'm<MiIy« of^v-. gen- 
erally, usually, m 
common. 

com'monness, n., the 
quality of being 
common. 

oom'monplace, adj., 
ordinary; »., an 
obvious saying; 
anything ordin- 
ary. 

com'monplsce- book, 
1 n., a book ol notes 
for ready refer- 
ence. 

com' mom, n., the 
name for food in 
the Oxford colleges; 
the common people 
of England; the 
House of Com- 
mons. 

com'mon seium, adj., 
marked by ordinary 
good sense; n., 
sound sense, judg- 
ment. 

com'monweal, n., the 
well-being of the 
community; the 
commonwealth. 

oom'monwealtb, »., 
the body politic; in 
the Cromwellian 
usurpation it meant 
a republic. 

eom'inonuioya n. , 
residence. 

commo'tioo, *>■, tu- 
mult, disturbance. 

oom'mnnaU adi., rel. 
to a commune. 

com'mtinikliM, v.t., 
to make into a 
commune. 

com'mnne, n., a 
self-governing com- 
munity. 

oonunniw', v.t., to 
hold intercourse. 

communed'. p.p., 
commune. 

commonioabil'ity, n., 
the state of being 
communicable. 

commn'nicaUe. »d)., 
able to be com- 
municated. 

comjntm'ioant, adj., 
communicating; n., 
one who communi- 
cates in the Holy 
Eucharist. 

oommun'ioate, v.t., to 
impart, reveal; v.t., 
to share; to receive 
th6 Blessed Sacra- 
ment. 

commtm'ieated, p.p., 
communicate. 



n 



J 



\_ 



129 



oomman'ioatinK,^r./>. 

communicate. 

oommnnica'tiai, n. , 
the act of com- 
municating; means 
of getting from 
place to place; news. 

oommnn'icatiTe, adj., 
fond of imparting 
information. 

commnn'ioator, n., 
anything that com- 
municates. 

commmi'icatory,ai/. , 
imparting mforma- 
tion. 

oomma'ninK, pr.p., 
commune. 

oommnn'ion, n., in- 
tercourse, fellow- 
ship, a religious 
body, the reception 
of the Blessed 
Sacrament. 

com' monism, n., 
socialism. 

com'mnnist, n., an 
upholder of social- 
istic opinions. 

commimis'tic adj., 
rel. to commun- 
ism. 

oommn'nity, n., shar- 
ing; a common soci- 
ety; a religious cor- 
poration. 

eom'munize, v.t., to 
make public prop- 
erty. 

commnUtbil'itjr, n., 
the quality of being 
commutable. 

comma'taUe, adj., 
able to be com- 
muted. 

commnta'tion, n. , the 
act of commuting; 
exchange. 

commn'tatiTe, adj., 
rel. to commuta- 
tion. 

oom'mntator, »., con- 
trivance for altering 
the course of an 
electrical current. 

commute', v.t., to 
exchange, buy off 
an obligation. 

commu'ted, p.p., 
commute. 

comma' ter, n., one 
who commutes. 

commn'tinK, pr.p., 
commute. 

compact', v.<., to pack 
tight, press close; 
adj., pressed close, 
solid. 

oom'pMt, n., an 
agreement. 



\y- 



V 












comparison 



compaot'ed, p.p., 

compact. 

compact'edly, ado., 
compactly. 

compact'ing, pr.p., 
compact. 

compaction, n., the 
state of being com- 
pacted. 

compact'Iy, adv., 
closely, solidly. 

comp.ict'ness, n., the 
quality of being 
compact. 

oompa' KM, N. , a struc- 
ture of united parts; 
a joint {Lat.). 

compag'inate, v.i., to 
knit together. 

compagina'tion, m., 
the state of being 
compaginated. 

eompan'ion, v.t., to 
acco mpan y ; adj. , 
attendant; n., an 
associate, comrade; 
the shelter over the 
ship's ladder. 

oompan'ionable, adj., 
sociable, agreeable. 

compan'ionless, n., 
without a compan- 
ion. 

compan'ionship, n., 
the society ol a 
comrade. 

com'pany, v.i., to 
associate with; n., 
an assembly, soci- 
ety, fellowship, a 
trading firm, a 
crew, part of a regi- 
ment. 

oom'paiable, adj., 
ableto becompared. 

compar'ative, adj., 
judged or measured 
by comparison: not 
positive; «., the 
comparative degree. 

compar'atiTely. adv., 
by comparison; not 
positively. 

compare', v.t., to esti- 
mate one thing by 
reference to an- 
other; to examine; 
to form the degrees 
of comparison; n., 
comparison. 

compared', p.p., com- 
pau-e. 

oompar'er, n., one 
who compares. 

compar'lng, pr.p., 
compare. 

comparison, n., the 
act of comparing; a 
comparative esti- 
mate. 



5— («7a) 



compart 



130 






\ 



•^ 



•t 



V 

V 



compart', v.^, to sub- 
divide. 

compart'ed,^./». .com- 
part. 

compart'ing, pr.p., 
compart. 

compartment, n., a 
sub-division; a rail- 
way carriage; a 
panel. 

oom'pass, v.t., to 
achieve, effect, en- 
circle; «., a circuit; 
enclosed space; a 
magnetic instru- 
ment determining 
the n6rth; in pi., 
instruments for 
drawing and divid- 
ing circles. 

com'passable, adj., 
able to be com- 
passed. 

com'passed, p.p., 
compass. 

com'passes, pi. com- 
pass. 

com'passing, pr.p. , 
compass. 

compas'sion, n., pity, 
sympathy. 

compas'sionate, adj., 
pititul,sy[npathetic. 

compas'sionate, v.t., 
to feel pity for. 

compas'sionated,/>./>. , 
compassionate. 

compassionately ,adv. 
with compassion. 

compas'sionateness, 
n., the quality of 
being compassion- 
ate. 

compas'sionating, 
pr.p., compassion- 
ate. 

compatibility, n., the 
quality of being 
compatible. 

compatible, ai/., con- 
sistent with, suit- 
able. 

compatibleness, n. , 
i.q., compatibility. 

compat'ibly, arfu. .con- 
sistently, agreeably. 

compat'riot, n.. a 
fellow-countryman. 

compat'riotism, n., 
the quality of 
fellow-countryman- 
ship. 

compel', v.t., to force, 
drive. 

compel'lable, adj. , 
able to be com- 
pelled. 

compella'tion, n., the 
act of addressing; a 
form of address. 



H 









\! 



\ 



'W^ 



compelled', p.p., com- 
pel. 

compel'ler, «., any- 
thing that compels. 

compel'ling, pr.p., 
compel. 

com'pend, n., an 
abridgment. 

compen'dions, adj., 
summarized, ab- 
ridged. 

compen'diously, adv., 
succinctly. 

compen'diousness, n., 
the quality of being 
compendious. 

compen'diom, n., an 
abridgment, sum- 
mary. 

com'pensate, v.t., to 
remunerate, make 
amends for; v.i., to 
make co mpcasat ion . 

com'pensated, p.p., 
compensate. 

com'pensating, pr.p., 
compensate. 

compensation, n., 
recompense, a set- 
off. 

compen'sative, adj., 
bringing recom- 
pense. 

compen'satory, adj., 
t.q., compensative. 

compete', v.i., to con- 
tend in rivalry. 

compel' ed, p.p., com- 
pete. 

com'petence, n., abil- 
ity, sufficiency. 

com'petency, n., i.g. 
competence. 

com'petent, n.. suffi- 
cient, qualified. 

com'petently, adv., in 
a competent way. 

competing, pr.p., 
compete. 

competition, n., the 
act of competing, 
rivalry. 

compet'itive, adj., rel. 
to competition. 

competitor, «., one 
who competes. 

compila'tion, n., the 
act or result of 
compiling. 

compile', v.t. , to bring 
together materials. 

compiled', p.p., com- 
pile. 

compi'ler, n. , one who 
compiles. 

compiling, pr.p., 
comp le. 

complacence, «., civ- 
ility, affableness. 
self-satisfaction. 



\ 









?• 



eomplexioned 



compla'cency, n., i.q. 

complacence. 

compla'cent, adj., 
civil, affable. 

compla'ceutly, adv. . 
in a complacent way. 

complain', v.i., to 
murmur, grumble, 
lament. 

complain'ant, »., a 
plaintiff. 

complained', p.p., 
complain. 

complain' er, n., one 
who complains. 

eomplain'ing, pr.p., 
complain. 

complaint', n., accus- 
ation, lament; ail- 
ment. 

complais'ance, n., 
courtesy. 

complais'ant, adj., 
courteous, agree- 
able. 

complais'antly, adv., 
in a complaisant 
way. 

com'plement, v.t., to 
complete a number 
or quantity; n., the 
completion of a 
quantity or number. 

complemen'tal, adj. , 
i.q. complementary. 

complemen'tary, adj. , 
completing a quan- 
tity or number. 

complete', «.<., toper- 
feet, finish; adj., 
perfected, finished. 

completed, p.p., com- 
plete. 

complete'ly, adv., en- 
tirely, wholly. 

complete'ness, n. , the 
quality or state of 
being complete. 

complet'ing, pr.p., 
complete. 

comple'tion, n., the 
act or result of 
completing. 

comple'tive, adj., 
tending to com- 
pletion. 

comple'tory, adj., i.q. 
completive. 

com'plex, adj., not 
simple, of many 
parts. 

complez'ion, n., col- 
our of the skin, 
aspect. 

complex'ional, adj., 
rel. to the com- 
plexion. 

complex'ioned, adj. , 
having a complex- 
ion. , 



eomplexity 



■^ 



\,. 






eomplez'ity, n., the 

state or quality of 
being complex. 

oom'plexness, n., i.q. 
complexity. 

complex' 08, n., the 
large muscle in the 
nock. 

compU'able, ad/., i.q. 
compliant. 

CompU'ance, n., an 
act ot yielding; ac- 
quiescence. 

compli'ant, adj., 
ready to yield or 
acquiesce. 

compli'antly, adv., in 
a compliant way. 

com'plicaoy, n., the 
state of being com- 
plicated. 

complicate, v.t., to 
involve, entangle; 
adj., intricate. 

complicated, p.p., 
complicate. 

com'plicatiiig, pr-P-, 
complicate. 

comphca'tion, n., the 
act or result of 
complicating. 

complic'ity, n., the 
being an accom- 
plice. 

complied', p.p., com- 
ply. 

compli'er, n., one 
who complies. 

com'pliment, v.t., to 
praise, flatter; n., 
praise, flattery. 

compliment' al, adj., 
i.q. complimentary. 

compliment'ary, adj., 
flattering. 

com'plimenter, n. ,one 
who pays compli- 
ments. 

com'plbi, com'pline, 
n., the last day 
office of the Church. 

com' plot, v.i., to join 
in a plot; n., a joint 
plot. 

oomplot'ted, pp., 

complot. 

complot'ter, n., one 
who complots. 

complot' ting, pr.p., 
complot. 

Complaten'sian, adj., 
pert, to Coraplutum 
(in Spain) and the 
Polyglot Bible pub- 
lished there. 

comply', v.t., to yield, 
acquiesce. 

comply' ing, pr.p., 
comply. 

com'po, n., a sort of 



1. 



V 



131 



concrete; a material 
used in prmting. 

compo'nent, adj., 
forming a part; n., 
an ingredient. 

comport', v.t., to con- 
duct, bear oneself; 
v.i., to agree with. 

comport' ed, p.p., com- 
port. 

comport'ing, pr.p., 
comport. 

compose', v.t., to put 
together, to write, 
to quiet, to arrange 
type. 

composed', p.p., com- 
pose; adj., calm, 
self-possessed. 

compo'sedly, adv., 
calmly. 

compo'sedness. n., 
calmness, self-pos- 
session. 

compo'ser, n., one 
who composes a 
book or a piece of 
music. 

compo'sing, Pr.p., 
compose. 

com'posite, «<i/., com- 
pound, made up of 
parts. 

composi'tion, n., the 
act or result of com- 
posing; an agree- 
ment, esp. for the 
acceptance by one's 
creditors of a 
smaller amount 
than the debt. 

oompos'itive, adj., 
compound. 

compos' itor, »., a 
type-setter. 

com'post, n., a land- 
tertilizing mix- 

ture. 

compo'sore, »•, calm- 
ness, sedateness. 

compota'tion, »-, 
drinking m com- 
pany. 

com'pote, n., stewed 
fruit. 

compound', v.t., to 
mix together; to 
settle; to con- 
done; v.i., to come 
to terms. 

oom'ponnd, n., a mix- 
ture; the grounds ot 
an Indian house; 
adj., containing a 
mixture. 

eompomid'able, adj., 
able to be com- 
pounded. 

compoond'ed, p.p., 
compound. 



\ 
\ 

! \ 



comprised 



compoond'er, n., one 

who compounds. 

compounding, pr.p., 
compound. 

compreca'tion, n., a 
sharing in prayer; 
praying together. 

comprehend', v.t., to 
comprise; to under- 
stand. 

comprehend' ed, p.p., 
comprehend. 

comprebend'er, »., 
one who compre- 
hends. 

comprehend'ing, pr.p, 
comprehend. 

comprehensibil'ity.n- , 
the state or quality 
of being compre- 
hensible. 

comprehen'sible, adj., 
able to be compre- 
hended. 

comprehen'sibly, adv. , 
in a comprehensible 
way. 

comprehen'sion, »., 
the act or state of 
comprehending. 

comprehen'sive, adj., 
embracing, lull. 

comprehen'sively.aiiv. 
in a comprehensive 
way. 

compreben'siveness, 
n., the quality of be- 
ing comprehensive. 

compress', v.t., to 
press together. 

com'press, n., a sur- 
gical pad. 

compressed', p.p., 
compress. 

compressibility, »., 
the quality of being 
compressible. 

compress'ible, adj., 
able to be com- 
pressed. 

compress'iblenesB, n., 
i.q. compressibility. 

compress'ing, pr.p., 
compress. 

compres'sion, n., the 
act or restilt of 
compressing. 

compressive, adj., 
compressing. 

compress' or, n., any- 
thing that com- 
presses. 

compress'nre, n., t.q. 
compression. 

comprisaU »., the 
act of comprising. 

comprise', v.t., to con- 
tain, include. 

comprised', p.p., com- 
prise. 



comprising 



V 
v 



■'"^ 



r^ 






eompris'ing, pr.p., 

comprise. 

com'promise, v.t., to 
involve in risk; to 
settle by mutual 
concessions; v.i., to 
makeacompromise; 
M., a settlement by 
mutual concessions. 

com'promised, p.p., 
compromise. 

com'promiser, n., one 
who compromises. 

com'piomising, pr.p., 
compromise. 

compromit', v.t., to 
imperil, compro- 
mise. 

compromit'ted, p.p., 
compromit. 

compiomit'tinK, pr.p. 
compromit. 

oompt'ogiaph, n., a 
machine for adding 
up figures. 

oompt'oir, n., a count- 
ing-house, factory. 

comptom'etei, n., an 
adding machine. 

oomptrorier, w., an 
examiner of public 
accounts. Also 

spelt controller. 

compol'satory, adj., 
forcible. 

eompol'sion, n., the 
act of compelling, 
force. 

oompol'siTe, adj., 
compelling. 

compul'sively, adv. , 
with compulsiou. 

compal'siveness, n., 
the quality of being 
compulsive. 

compol'sorily, adv., 
by compulsion. 

oompol'sory, adj., 
using compulsion, 
obligatory. 

compuno'tion, n., re- 
morse, contrition. 

compono'tiooa, adj., 
feeling compunc- 
tion. 

compoiga'ticm. n., 
joint testimony to 
clear an accused 
person. 

oom'pnrgator, »., one 
who testifies with 
others to clear an 
accused person. 

compn' table, adj., 
able to be com- 
puted. 

compnta'tion, n., an 
estimate, reckonmg. 

compnte', v.t., to esti- 
mate, reckon. 



\ 



./I 

i. 



L 



132 



compn' ted, p.p., com- 
pute. 

compn' tei, n., one 
who computes. 

compn'ting, pr.p 
compute. 

com'rade, n., a com 
pan ion. 

Com'tist, ». , a follower 
of Comte, a positiv' 
ist; adj., rel. to 
Comte and the posi' 
tive philosophy. 

con, v.t., to peruse 
study; prep., short 
for Lat. contra 
against; Italian 
word = with. 

cona'tion, n., endeav 
our. 

cona'tive, adj., en 
deavouring. 

cona'tns, n., an 
attempt {Lai.). 

cotiax'ial, adj., hav- 
ing the same axis. 

concam'erate, v.t., to 
divide into cham- 
bers. 

concat'enate. v.t., to 
link together. 

concatenated, p.p., 
coiicatenalc. 

concatenating, pr.p., 
concatenate. 

concatenation, n. , 
the act of concaten- 
ating; a series. 

con'cave, adj. , with a 
curved hollow. 

con'caved, adj., i.q. 
concave. 

con'cavely, adv., in a 
concave way. 

oon'caTeness, n., the 
quality or state of 
being concave. 

concaT'ity, n., i.q., 
concaveness. 

conceal', v.t., to hide, 
cover. 

conceal'able, adj., 
able to be con- 
cealed. 

concealed', p.p., con- 
ceal. 

conceal'er, n., one 
who conceals. 

conceal'ing. pr.p., 
conceal. 

eonceal'ment, n., the 
act of concealing; a 
hiding-place. 

concede', v.t., to 
grant, give up. 

conce'ded, p.p., con- 
cede. 

conce'ding, pr.p., 
concede. 

conceit', n., a notion; 






^ 
w 






coneeptacle 



a quaint idea; van- 
ity. 

conceit'ed, adj., vain. 

conceit'edly, adv., in 
a vain way. 

conceit'edness, n. , the 
quality of being 
conceited. 

conceiT'able, adj., 
able to be con- 
ceived. 

conceiv'ableness, ft., 
the quality of being 
conceivable 

conceive', v.t., to 
thmk, understand, 
form in the mind 
or in the womb; 
v.i., to think; to 
become pregnant. 

conceived', p.p., con- 
ceive. 

conceiv'er, «., one 
who conceives. 

conceiv'ing, pr.p., 
conceive. 

concent', n., song in 
harmony. 

con'centrate, v.t., to 
bring to a common 
centre; to apply 
fixedly; to condense; 
v.t., to fix all one's 
attention. 

con'centrated. p.p., 
concentrate. 

con'centrating, pr.p., 
concentrate. 

concentia'tion, n., the 
act or quality of 
being concentrated. 

concen'trative, adj. . 
fixing (the mind) on 
one object. 

concen'trativeneas, » . , 
the quality of be- 
ing concentrative. 

con'centrator, n., an 
apparatus for sep- 
arating ore; an ar- 
rangement for nar- 
rowing the muzzle 
of a shot-gun. 

conoen'tre, conoen'- 
ter, v.t. and >., to 
bring, or come, to 
the same centre. 

conoen' trie, adj. , hav- 
ing a common cen- 
tre. 

concen'trioal, adj., i.q. 
concentric. 

conoentric'ity, n., thf 
quality of being 
concentric. 

OOn'cept, n., an ab- 
stract conception. 

concep'tacle, n., thai 
which contains; a 
follicle. 



conception 



\ 



\ 









.A 



I 



oancep'tion, n., the 

act of conceiving in 
the womb or in the 
mind- an idea. 

oonoep tive, adj., cap- 
able of conception. 

conoem', v.t., to re- 
late to, to interest, 
to perturb; n., busi- 
ness, solicitude. 

concerned', p.p., con- 
cern. 

ooncem'edly, tidv., 
anxiously. 

conoexn'ins. Pr.p., 
concern; prep., with 
reference to. 

ooiicem'ment, n., 
solicitude, business. 

concert', v.t., to ar- 
range in association 
with someone. 

con'ceit, n., a musical 
entertainment; con- 
cord; union. 

conoertan'te, n., an 
orchestralpiecewith 
solo instruments. 

concetf ed, p.p., con- 
cert. 

conceiti'nA, n., a reed 
instrument. 

conoeit'ine, pr.p., 
concert. 

ooncer'to, n. , a music- 
al work for orches- 
tra and solo instru- 
ment or instru- 
ments. 

con'cert-pitoh, n., the 
standard musical 
pitch for concerts. 

conces'sioD. »., the 
act of conceding; 
some thing conceded; 
territorial and other 
rights conceded by 
a government to a 
foreigner. 

conces'sionary, »dj., 
rel. to concession. 

conces'sionist, n., one 
who favours con- 
cession. 

conces'dve, adj., con- 
ceding. 

oonces'sory, adj., i.g. 
concessive. 

conch, n., a sea-shell. 

con'cba, n. , the outer 
ear. 
\ Conohif'en,n.^/.,the 
class name of bi- 
, valve molluscs. 
k conchiTeroas, adj., 
pert, to the Con- 
chifera. 

con'dute, n., a fossil 
shell. 

oon'choid.iii/. ,curved 



y 



133 



like a shell; n., a 
curve like a shell. 

c<Hichoi'dal, adj., i.q. 
conchoid. 

c(BioholoK'ical. adj., 
rel. to conchology. 

conchol'oKist, n., a 
student of con- 
chology. 

conchol'oKy. n., the 
science of molluscs 
and shells. 
. conohom'eter, n., an 
instrument for 

measuring shells. 

concierge', n. , a door- 
keeper {.Ft.). 

concll'iate, v.<., to win 
over; reconcile. 

concil'iated, p.p., con- 
ciliate. 

conoil'iating, Pr.p., 
conciliate. 

concilia' tioi, *>., the 
act of conciliating. 

concil'iator, n., one 
who conciliates. 

oonoil'iatory. t^]., 
tending to concilia- 
tion. 

concin'nity, n., agree- 
ableness,. elegance. 

concise', o^;'., terse, 
brief. 

conoise'ly, »dv., terse- 
ly, briefly. 

oondse'ness, n. , terse- 
ness, brevity. 

conoi'sion, n., a cut- 
ting; abbreviation. 

coa'c^ve, n., a pri- 
vate assembly. 

conclude', v.t., to 
close, end; to infer; 
settle. 

conoln'ded. p.p., con- 
clude. 

oandnd'er, »■, one 
who concludes. 

conclnd'ing. pt.p; 
conclude. 

conoln'sion, n., the 
act of ending; an 
end; an inference. 

OOQCln'siTe, adj. , final , 
decisive. 

conda'siTely, ado., 
decisively. 
p conda'siveneu, n., 
the quality of being 
conclusive. 

condu'sny, adj., i.g. 
conclusive. 

concoct', V.I., to mix 
with ingredients; 
to plot. 
■ ooDooct'ed, ^.^., con- 
coct. 

COOOOCt'et. n., one 
who concocts. 



•nr 



--V 



.r 






concubinage 



oonooct'ing. Pr.p., 

concoct. 

concoc'tion, n., the 
act or result of 
concocting. 
concoc'tive, adj., pert. 
to concocting. 

conoom'itance, n. , the 
state of being con- 
comitant. 

concom'itant, adj., 
associated with, fol- 
lowing, attendant; 
n., an attendant 
circumstance. 

Oon'cord,n. .harmony, 
agreement. 

concoid'a^e, n., an 
agreement; a dic- 
tionary of words 
and passages with 
reference marks. 

concord'ant, adj., 
agreeablei to, in 
harmony. 

ooncord'antly, adv., 
agreeably, harmoni- 
ously. 

coocoTd'at, n., a for- 
mal agreement be- 
tween the Holy 
See and a secular 
power. 

con'cooise, n., an 
arrival together, a 
gathering, crowd. 

conoies'cence, n., a 
growing together. 

concres'cible, n., able 
to grow together. 

concrete, v./. , to solid- 
ify; adj., solid; not 
abstract; n., a mass 
of lime, sand, etc. 

concre'ted, p.p., con- 
crete; adj., laid 
down with concrete. 

con'cretely, n., not 
abstractly. 

oon'oretenesL n., the 
quality of being 
concrete. 

concre'tinib Pf-p., 
concrete. 

concre'tion, n., the 
act of concreting; a 
solidified mass. 

concre'tional, adj. ,rel. 
to concretion. 

concre'tionary, adj., 
marked by concre- 
tions. 

concre'tive, tui;. .tend- 
ing to concretion. 

concre'tor, m., an 
apparatus for solid- 
ifying cane-juice. 

concn'binage, n., co- 
habitation without 
marriage. 



eoncttbinary 



•nr 



u 

K 






concu'binary, ad}.,Tel. 
to concubinage. 

oon'cnbine, n., an un- 
married woman co- 
habitmg with a 
mail. 

concn'piscence, n . , 
carnal appetite. 

concn'piscent, adj . , 
having carnal ap- 
petite. 

oonoor', ».»., to agree 
with, coincide. 

concurred', p.p., con- 
cur. 

concar'rence, n., the 
act or result of 
concurring. 

concor'rent. adj., co- 
incident, simultan- 
eous, acting in con- 
junction; n., a con- 
tributory cause. 

•oncurrently, »dv., 
simultaneously , 
jointly. 

concur'ring, pr.p., 
concur. 

concns'sion, n., a. 
shock, result of 
shock. 

Concus'siTe, adi., 
causing concussion. 

condemn', v.t., to 
find guilty, censure. 

condem'nable, adj., 
worthy of condem- 
nation. 

condenuis'tion, n., 
the act of condemn- 
ing, censure. 

oondem'natory, adj., 
expressing condem- 
nation. 

condemned', p.p., 
condemn. 

condemn' er, m., one 
who condemns. 

condemn' ing, Pr.p., 
condemn. 

ccmdensabil'ity, n., 
the state or quality 
of being condens- 
able. 

condens'able, adj., 
able to be con- 
densed. 

condens'ate, v.t., to 
compres<;. 

condens'ated, p.p., 
condensate. 

condens'ating, pr.p., 

condensate. 

condensa'tion, n., the 
act or result of con- 
densing. 

condens'ative, adj., 
producing condens- 
ation. 

condense', v.t., to 






I 






i- 



134 



compress; ».»'., to 
become dense. 

condensed', p.p., con- 
dense. 

condens'er, n., an ap- 
paratus for condens- 
ing gases; a storer 
of electricity; a con- 
ceiitratmg lens. 

condens'ing, pr.p., 
condense. 

condescend', v.<., to 
come down, stoop, 
deign. 

condescend'ed, p.p., 
condescend. 

condescend'ing, pr.p. 
condescend. 

condescendingly, adv. 
with condescension. 

condescen'sion, ». ,the 
act or state of con- 
descending. 

condign', adj., thor- 
oughly deserved. 

condlgn'ly, adv., de- 
servedly. 

condign'ness, n., the 
quality of being 
condign. 

con'diment, n., a sea- 
• soning. 

condi'tion, v.t., to 
stipulate, to im- 
pose limitations; n., 
a stipulation, limit- 
ing circumstance, 
state, etc. 

condi'tional, adj., de- 
pending on condi- 
tions. 

condi'tionally, adx., 
with limitations. 

condi'tioned. p.p., 
condition. 

condi'tioning, pr.p., 
condition. 

condo'latory, adj., 
conveying condo- 
lence. 

condole', «.»., to 
express sympathy 
with one in dis- 
tress. 

condoled', p.p., con- 
dole. 

condole'ment, n., i.q. 
condolence. 

condo'lence, n., the 
act of condoling. 

condo'ler, n. , one who 
condoles. 

C(Hido'Iing, pr.p., con- 
dole. 

condona'tion, n., the 
act of condoning. 

condone', v.t., to par- 
don, overlook. 

condoned', p.p., con- 
done. 



I. 

u 

1 



T 

ki 



coney 



condon'ing, pr.p., 

condone. 

con'dor, n., the great 
vult ure of the Andes. 

condottie're, n., an 
Italian mercenary 
soldier. 

conduce', «.«., to pro- 
mote an end, con- 
tribute to. 

conduced', p.p., con- 
duce. 

condocibirity, n., the 
quality of being 
conducible. 

condu'cible, adj., 
tending to promote, 
contributory. 

condu'cing, pr.p. ,con- 
duce. 

conducive, adj., i.q. 
conducible. 

conduct', «./., to 
lead, direct; behave; 
transmit. 

Ccm'duct, n., behav- 
iour, management, 
right of passage. 

conduct'ed, p.p., con- 
duct. 

condnctibil'ity, n., the 
quality of being 
conductible. 

conduct'ible, adj. ,able 
to be conducted. 

conducting, pr.p., 
conduct. 

conduc'tion, n., trans- 
mission by a con- 
ductor. 

conductive, adj., 
conducting. 

condnctiv'ity, n., the 
quality of being 
conductive. 

conduct'or, n., any- 
thing that conducts; 
a guide, guard on 
an onmibus; a trans- 
mitting medium. 

eomdnct'ress, n., fem. 
of conductor. 

con'doit, n., a water- 
pipe, canal for bring- 
ing water. 

condu'plicate, adj., 
doubled together. 

con'dyle, n., the 
round end of a 
bone. 

con'dyloid, adj., like, 
or rel. to, a condyle. 

cone, n., a solid body 
shaped like a sugar- 
loaf; the fruit of 
certain trees, as the 
pine. 

cones, n., a fine 
flour. 

co'ney, n., a rabbit. 



conlabulate 



135 



confluent 



.V 
V 



s 

S 

S 



oonfab'olate, v.t'., to 
chat together. 

confab'nlated, p.p., 
confabulate. 

confabulating, pr.p., 
confabulate. 

coufabnla'tion, n., a 
chat. 

confection, n., a 
sweet; something 
compounded with 
sugar; a dainty crea- 
tion in millinery. 

confectionary, adj., 
rel. to confections. 

confec'tioner, n., one 
who makes and 
sells sweets. 

confeo'tioneiy, »., 
sweetmeats, cakes, 
etc. 

confed'eracy, n., a 
league of any de- 
scription. 

confederate, v.t. and 
t., to unite in a 
league. 

conled'erate. adj., 
united m a league; 
n., a member of a 
confederation; an 
accomplice. 

confed'erated. p.p., 
confederate. 

confed'erating, pr.p., 
confederate. 

conf edera'tion, n. , the 
act of confederat- 
ing; a league; an 
association of once 
independent states. 

confed'erative, adj., 
leading to confed- 
eration. 

confer', v.t., to be- 
stow; v.i., to con- 
sult with; hold con- 
versation. 

con'ference, n., the 
act of conferring; a 
gathering for dis- 
cussion; a lecture. 

conferred', p.p., con- 
fer. 

confer'rer, n., one 
who confers. 

confer'ring, pr.p., 
confer. 

confess', v.t., to own , 
admit; to hear con- 
fession; to make 
confession. 

confess'ant, n., one 
who confesses. 

confessed', p.p., con- 
fess. 

confes'sedly, adv., ad- 
mit tc<ily. 

confessing, pr.p., 
confess. 









s. 
s 



■<i. 



confes'sion, n., the 
act of confessing; 
an avowal. 

conies' sional, adj. , 
rel. to confession; 
n., the place where 
confessions are 

heard; the system 
of confession. 

confes'sionary, adj., 
rel. to confession. 

confess'or. n., one 
who confesses; one 
who avows his faith 
at the risk of life; 
a priest who hears 
confessions. 

confet'ti, «. pl., com- 
fits; pellets. 

confidant', confid- 
ante', «., the sharer 
of one's secrets. 

confide', v.t., to en- 
trust; v.i., to repose 
trust in. 

ccmfl'ded, p.p., con- 
fide. 

con'fldence, n., a feel- 
ingot trust ; reliance . 

confident, orf;., trust- 
ful, reliant. 

conflden'tial, adj^ 
worthy of trust; 
said or done in 
confidence or secret. 

con'fidently, adv., 
with confidence. 

confi'der, «., one who 
confides. 

confl'ding, pr.p., con- 
fide. 

conflg'nrate, v.t., to 
shape, fashion. 

configurated, p.p., 
configurate. 

configurating, pr.p., 
configurate. 

configora'tion, »., 
outward shape; re- 
lative position. 

conflg'nre, v.t., to 
shape according to 
a pattern. 

conflg'ared. p.p., con- 
fignre. 

confi'nable, adj., able 
to be confined. 

confine', v.t., to place 
withinlimits;to im- 
prison. In the pas- 
sive, to be brought 
to child-bed. 

con' fine, »., a fron- 
tier. 

confined', p.p., con- 
fine. 

confine'ment, n., the 
act of confining; the 
state of being con- 
fined; child-bed. 



^ 



^ 



confi'ner, n., one who 
confines. 

confl'ning, pr.p., con- 
fine. 

confirm', v.t., to 
strengthen, support, 
ratify; to adminis- 
ter the Sacrament 
of Confirmation. 

conflrm'able, adj., 
able to be con- 
firmed. 

CiHifirma'tion, n., the 
act of confirming; a 
further proof; the 
Sacrament of Con- 
firmation. 

oonfirm'ative, adj., 
attesting. 

confirm'atively, adv., 
in a confirmative 
way. 

conflrm'atory, adj., 
i.q. confirmative. 

confirmed', p.p., con- 
firm. 

confirm'edly, adv., 
with con&rmation. 

confirmee', n., a per- 
son confirmed or to 
whom something is 
confirmed. 

infirm' er, n., one 
who confiims. 

oonfirm'ing, pr.p., 
confirm. 

confiscable, adj. , able 
to be confiscated. 

confiscate, v.t., to 
appropriate to the 
public treasury. 

con'fiscated, />./>., con- 
fiscate. 

con'fiscating, pr.p., 
confiscate. 

confisca'tion, n., the 
act or result of 
confiscating. 

ooa41scator, n., one 
who confiscates. 

confiscatory, adj., in 
the nature of con- 
fiscation. 

conflagra'tion, m., a 
fire on a groat scale. 

conflict', v.t., to fight, 
to be inconsistent 
with. 

conflict «•> a fight. 

conflict'ed, p.p., con- 
flict. 

conflict'ing. Pr.p., 
conflict. 

conflict'ive, adj., con- 
flicting. 

coa'finenoe, n., a 
meeting; the junc- 
tion of two streams. 

COa'floent, adj., flow- 
ing to the same 



conflux 



136 



congregational 



•^^ 









point; n., a tribu- 
tary stream. 

OOn'flox, n. , the 
junction of streams; 
a meeting. 

oonform', v.t., to 
make alike, adapt; 
v.«., to comply with. 

conformabil'ity, n., 
the state or quality 
of being conform- 
able. 

conlorm'able, adj., 
compliant, corre- 
sponding. 

conform' ably . adv., 
correspondingly, 
compliantly. 

conforma'tion, n., 
structure. 

oonfonned', p.p., con- 
form. 

confonn'ing, pr.p., 
■ conform. 

confoim'ist, n., one 
who conforms. 

conlorm'ily, n., com- 
pliance, resem- 
blance. 

conloond'. v.t., to 
mix toge t h er, 
amaze, confuse. 

confound'ed. p.p., 
confound. 

confound' er, n., one 
who confounds. 

confound' ing, pr.p., 
confound. 

contrater'nity, n., a 
brotherhood. 

confrere', n., a col- 
league, associate. 

confront', v./. , to face , 
oppose. 

confront'ed, p.p., con- 
front. 

confront' er, n., one 
who confronts. 

confronfing, Pr.p., 
confront. 

Confu'cian, adj., rel. 
to Confucius and 
his philosophy. 

oonfa8e',v.<., to blend, 
jumble together, 
perplex, muddle. 

confused', pp., con 
fuse. 

confu'sedly, adv., in a 
confused way, 

confu'sedness. n., the 
state of being con- 
fused. 

contu'sing, pr.p., con- 
fuse. 

oonfu'sion, m. , the act 
of confusing; tu- 
mult, disorder. 

confn'sional, adj. , rel. 
to confusion. 



X 

'v. 

J 

L 
h 

L 






oonfu' table, adj., able 
to be confuted. 

confuta'tion, n., the 
act or result of 
confuting. 

confute', v.t., to con- 
vict of error. 

confa'ted, p.p., con- 
fute. 

oonfu' ter, n., one who 
confutes. 

confu'ting, pr.p. , con- 
fute. 

cong6 n., a bow; 
leave-taking; per- 
mission. 

congeal', v.t. and «'., 
to freeze, harden. 

congeal'able, adj., 
able to be con- 
gealed. 

congealed', p.p., con- 
geal. 

congeal'ing, Pr.p., 
congeal. 

congeal'ment, n., the 
act or effect of con- 
gealing. , 

con' gee, «., boiled 
rice, rice-water. 

congela'tion, n., the 
act ot congealing. 

con'gener, n., one of 
the same stock. 

congener'ic, adj., of 
the same stock. 

conge'nial, adj., of 
the same nature, 
agreeable. 

congeniality, »., the 
quality of being 
congenial. 

conge'nialness, n., i.g 
congeniality. 

congen'ital, adj., ex- 
isting at or from 
birth. 

con'ger, n., a sea-eel. 

conger-eel', n., i.g. 
conger. 

conge'ries, n., a mass 
of particles. 

ccmgest', v.t., to accu- 
mulate. 

congest'ed, p.p., con- 
gest; adj., crowded 
up; with an undue 
accumulation of 
blood. 

oongest'ible, adj., able 
to be congested. 

congestion, «., over- 
crowding, stoppage; 
undue accumula- 
tion of blood. 

congest'ive, adj., 
causing congestion. 

con'globate, adj., 
spherical. 

congloba'tion, n., the 



■1. 



act or eflfect of 
making spherical. 
conglob'ulate, adj. , 
made spherical. 
^""^^ oonglom'erate, adj., 
gathered into a 
round mass; n., a 
rock consisting of 
rounded and water- 
worn stones; v.t. , 
and t'., to gather 
/|. into a round mass. 
■1—'^^' oonglom'erated, p.p., 

conglomerate. 
■f-''^-''^ conglom'erating,/)f .^. 

o conglomerate. 
^""^^ conglomeration, «., 
the act or effect of 
conglomerating; a 
mixture. 
conglu'tinant, adj., 
■^ cementing together. 

-Lyq conglu'tinate, v.t., to 
' cement together; 
to form into a 
•«— 1 single mass. 

-U,. congla'tinated. p.p., 
•«— I * coiiglutinate. 

-L^ co3gln'tinating,/>r.^. , 
•«— , ! conglutinate. 
-Lp conglutina'tion, n. , 
the act or effect of 
■«— I conglutinating. 

-Lj, oonglu'tinative, adj., 
''■ causing conglutina- 
tion. 
,— ^-T" Con' go, «., the region 

so called. 

r— >^-^ con'gou, «., a species 

of black China tea. 

•r^ congrat'ulant, adj. 

i.g. congratulatory. 

congrat'i^te, v.t., to 

felicitate, wish joy 

to. 

oongrat'ulated, p.p., 

congratulate. 
congrat'ulating.^r.^. , 

congratulate. 
congratulation, n., 
the act of congratu- 
lating. 
oongrat'nlator, n. , 
one who congratu- 
lates. 
congrat'nlatory, adj., 
expressing congrat- 
ulation. 
con'gregate, v.l., to 
bring together: v.i., 
to meet together. 
con'gregated. p.p., 

congregate. 
con'gregating, pr.p., 

congregate. 
oongrega'tion, n., the 
act ofcongregating; 
an assembly. 
congrega'tiona], adj., 
rel. to congregation. 



■r^ 



•/■ 



•^ 



•^ 



r 



Congregationalism 



137 



connoted 



.J 






-«--^' 



Coogrega' tb:m!i8iii, 

«., the Congrega- 
tional system. 

Congrega'tionalist, n. , 
one who adheres to 
Congregationalism. 

oon'gress, n., a meet- 
ing, a legislative 
assembly. 

congies'sional, adj., 
rel. to congress. 

congres'sionist, n., 
one who supports a 
congress. 

con'greve, n., a 
rocket. 

con'grnence, »., the 
state or quality of 
being congruent. 

coa'graent, adj., ac- 
cordant, suited. 

congra'ity. »., fitness, 
agreement. 

con'gruoos, adj., i.q. 
congruent. 

con'graonsly. adu., 
agreeably, in ac- 
cordance. 

con'giuoosness, n., 
i.q. congruity. 

con'ic, adj., cone- 
shaped, rel. to a 
cone. 

con'ical, adj., i.q. 
conic. 

con'ioidly, adv., in the 
form of a cone. 

con'io seo'tiom, n., 
the department of 
mathematics rel. to 
ellipses, parabolas 
and hyperbolas. 

con'ifer, n., a cone- 
bearing plant. 

ConiTeiae, n., the 
family of conifers. 

conU'eioQs, adj., 
cone-bearing. 

co'niform, adj., cone- 
shaped. 

conjee' tnrable, adj., 
able to be con- 
jectured. 

conjee' tnral, adj., 
dubious; guessed. 

conjec'tnre, v.t., to 
guess, surmise; «., 
a guess, surmise. 

conjeo'ttued, p.p., 
conjecture. 

conjee' torer, n., one 
who conjectures. 

conjee' taring. pf-P-, 
conjecture. 

conjoin', v.t., to join 
together. 

conjoined', p.p., con- 
join. 

conjoin'ing, pr.p., 
conjoin. 



u 

If 






u 



"i 



i 



L 






conjoint', adj., united 
in combination. 

eonjoint'ly, adv., to- 
gether. 

c<Hijoint'ness, n., the 
state of being con- 
joint. 

con'jngal. adj., rel. 
to marriage. 

conjngal'ity, n., the 
state of marriage. 

conjugate, v.t., to 
join; to inflect a 
verb; adj., of kin- 
dred meaning. 

eiHi'jagated, p.^. .con- 
jugate. 

con'jngating, pr.p., 
conjugate. 

eonjnga'tion, n., 
union; the inflec- 
tion of a verb. 

conjuga'tional, adj., 
rel. to conjugation. 

Conjonct'iOii;. .united, 
in association. 

oonjonc'tion, n., the 
act or result of con- 
joining; a part of 
speech denoting a 
word that connects 
words and sentences 

conjono'tional, adj., 
rel. toaconjunction. 

conjunct!' T8. n., the 
mucous membrane 
within the eyelid. 

conjune'tive, adj., 
uniting; connecteid; 
n., the grammatical 
mood so named. 

eonjone'tlTely, adv., 
in union. 

conjune'tnre, n., a 
point of time at 
which various cir- 
cumstances or 
causes meet. 

oonjnn'ticm, n., the 
act of conjuring; an 
incantation. 

con'juie, V.*., to prac- 
tise a conjurer's 
arts. 

conjuie', v.t., to bind 
by an oath; to 
exhort solemnly. 

con'jarad, p.p., con'- 
jure. 

conjoied', p.p., con- 
jure'. 

eon' jnrei, n. , one who 
does tricks of sleight 
of hand. 

conjni'er, n., one who 
conjures'. 

conjuring, pr.p., 
con'jure. 

conjnr'inR, pr.p., con- 
jure'. 



^ 



n. 



ccmjnr'or, n., one 
who takes oath in 
company. 

oonnas'cent, a<2;., hav- 
ing a common 
origin. 

con'nate, adj., united 
in the same body. 

connafuial, adj., 
sharing the same 
nature. 

connat'uralize, v.t., to 
make of similar 
nature. 

connect', v.t., to join, 
bind. 

connect'ed, p.p., con- 
nect: adj., coherent. 

connect'edly, adv., in 
a connected way. 

oonnect'ing, pr.p., 
connect. 

connee'tion, n., the 
act or result of con- 
necting; a relation 
by marriage; inter- 
course; association; 
a religious body. 

connect'ive. adj. , con- 
necting; n., that 
which connects. 

connect'ively, adv., in 
a connective way. 

connect'or, n., that 
which connects. 

conned, p.p., con. 

con'ner, n., one who 
cons. 

connez'ion, n., i.g. 
connection. 

con'ning, pr.p., con; 
n., the act of direct- 
ing a steersman. 

con'ning-tower, n., 
the pilot-house in 
an armoured ship. 

eonni'vance, n., as- 
sumed ignorance of 
a plot- winking at 
a fault. 

connive', v.t., to wink 
at; to share secretly 
in a plot. 

connived', p.p., con- 
nive. 

conni'ver, n., one 
who connives. 

conni'ving, pr.p., con- 
nive. 

connoisseur', n., an 
expert judjge in the 
fine arts. 

connotation, n., the 
implication of qual- 
ities. 

connote', v.t., to im- 
ply qualities or at- 
tributes. 

conno'ted. p.p., con- 
note. 



3 A— (17a) 



eonnoting 



~^ 



J. 



oonno'ting, pr.p. , con- 
note. 

cozmu'biaU adj., rel. 
to married life. 

connubial'itr, n., the 
connubial state. 

connumera'tion, n. , 
the act of number- 
ing together. 

Co'noid, adj. , cone- 
like; «., anythmg 
cone-like. 



adj., 
adj., 



conoi'dal, 

conoid. 

conoi'dic, 
conoid. 
' co'noscope, n., an in- 
strument for exam- 
ining crystals. 

con'qnei, v.t.,to over- 
come; v.i., to win a 
victory. 

con'qaerable, adj. , 
able to be con- 
quered. 

con'qaered, p.p., con- 
quer. 

con'qoeriiiK, pr.p., 
conquer. 

con'qaeror. «., one 
who conquers. 

con' quest, n., the act 
of conquering; vic- 
tory. 

oonsanguin'eal, adj., 
i.q. consanguineous. 

oonsanguin'eous. adj., 
related in blood. 

consangnin'ity, n. , re- 
lationship in blood. 

CO&'science, n., sense 
of right and wrong. 

conscien'tioos. adi., 
having a conscience; 
scrupulous. 

consoien' tiously, n. , 
scrupulously, ex- 
actly. 

consoien'tioumess, n. , 
the quality of being 
conscientious. 

eon'sdonable, adj., in 
accordance with 
conscience; reason- 
able. 

oon'scions, adj., 
aware; in possession 
of one's faculties. 

oon'sciously, adv., 
with full knowledge. 

(Mw'scioasness. n.,the 
state or quality of 
being conscious. 

oonsoript'. v.t., to en- 
roll for military ser- 
vice. 

conscript, adj., en- 
listed; n., one en- 
listed by conscrip- 
tion. 



■'~\^ 









138 



conscription, n., the 
act ot conscripting; 
compulsory service 

con'secrate. v.t., to 
set apart for a 
sacred purpose; adj. , 
set apart. 

con'secrated, p.p., 
consecrate. 

consecrating, pr.p., 
consecrate. 

consecra'tion, n., the 
act of consecrat- 
ing. 

con'secrator, n., one 
who consecrates. 

consec'taiy, adj., log- 
ically following; «., 
a corollary. 

consecu'tion, n., con- 
sequence. 

consec'utive, adj. , 
following m order. 

consec'ntively. adv. , 
in a consecutive 
way. 

consec'utiveness, n., 
the state or quality 
of being consecu- 
tive. 

consen'soal. adj., rel. 
to agreement of 
opinion. 

consen'sns, n., an 
agreement of opin- 
ion, 

consent', v.t., to be of 
one mind; to com- 
ply; «., acquies- 
cence, concurrence. 

consenta'neoos, adj., 
accordant. 

consent'ed, p.p., con- 
sent. 

consent' er, n., one 
who consents. 

consen'tient, adj., 
agreeing in opinion. 

ccnsent'ing, pr.p., 
consent. 

con'seqnence, n., a 
result, effect; im- 
portance. 

con' sequent, adj., 
resulting, following. 

conseqaen'tial, adj., 
following as a con- 
sequence; self-im- 
portant. 

conseqnen'tially, adv., 
in a consequential 
way. 

con'seqnently, adv., 
naturally, as a con- 
sequence. 

conserr'able, adj., 
able to be con- 
served. 

conserv'ancy, n., pre- 
servation. 



.1 



ir- 






>L^ 



consignment 



conserva'tion, n., the 

act of preserving. 

conserr'atism, n. , the 
political principle 
of preservmg what 
is good in old in- 
stitutions. 

Conserr'atiTe, n., one 
who professes Con- 
servatism. 

conservative, adj., 
preserving; politic- 
ally opposed to vio- 
lent change. 

conserv'atively, adv., 
in a conservative 
mood. 

conserv'atoire, n., a 
music-teaching in- 
stitution. 

conserv'atory, n., a 
greenhouse. 

conserve', v.;., to 
save, preserve. 

conserved', p.p., con- 
serve. 

conserving, pr.p., 
conserve. 

consid'er, v.t., to 
think over, delib- 
erate, deem. 

consid'erable, adj., 
worthy of consider- 
ation; valuable; 
more than a little. 

oonsid'erably, adv., 
more tlian a little. 

consid'erate, adj., 
thoughtful for 

others. 

consid'erately, adv. , 
with thought for 
others. 

oonsid'erateness, n. , 
the state or quality 
of being consider- 
ate. 

considera'tion, m., de- 
liberation; respect 
for a person's 
claims; a quid pro 
quo. 

consid'ered, p.p., con- 
sider. 

consid'erer, n., one 
who considers. 

considering, pr.p., 
consider. 

consign', v.t., to en- 
trust; hand over. 

consigned', p.p., con- 
sign. 

consignee', n., one 
to whom anything 
is consigned. 

consign'er, n., one 
who consigns. 

consigning, pr.p., 
consign. 

consign'ment, n., the 



consignor 



> 

■ay- 

/ 

r 
r 

n 

<\> 



act of consigning; 
goods consigned. 

oonsi^oi', n., «.?. 
consigner. 

Oonsist', v.i., to be 
composed of; to co- 
exist; to agree. 

oonsist'ed, p.p., con- 
sist. 

consist' eiiC6, »., de- 
gree of density; 
agreement. 

oonsist'eaoy, n-, •■?■ 
consistence; con- 
formity with. 

oonsist'eiit, a<2;'.,solid; 
in conformity with; 
firm in principle. 

consist'ently, <x'v. , 
conformably. 

consist'ing, prp., 
consist. 

consisto'rial, ad)., rel. 
to a consistory. 

oonsis'tory, n., an 
assembly; the meet- 
ing of Cardinals; the 
court of a diocesan 
bishop. 

conso'ciate, v.t., to 
take into one's so- 
ciety: t».»., to be in 
company. 

oonso'ciated, p.p., 
coiisociate. 

oonso'ciatinc pt.p., 
coiisociate. 

oonsocia tion, n., the 
act of coiisociating. 

consol'able, adj., will- 
ing to be consoled. 

consola'tion, n., com- 
fort, alleviation of 
sorrow. 

consolatory. <idj., 
offtring consola- 
tion, comforting. 

console', »./., to com- 
fort, cheer. 

con'sole, n., an orna- 
mental bracket ug- 
der a cornice. 

consoled', p.p., con- 
sole. 

conso'ler, n., one who 
consoles. 

consol'idate. v.t., to 
make solid, com- 
bine; w.i., to become 
solid. 

consolidated, p.p., 
consolidate. 

oonsolidating, pr.p., 
consolidate. 

consolida'tion, n., the 
act or result of 
consolidating. 

oonsol'idator, n., any- 
thing that consoli- 
dates. 






"%! -\ 






s 

^ — »_» 



\ 



139 



consol'idatory, ai)., 
tending to consoli- 
date. 

censoring, pr.p., con- 
sole. 

con'sols, n. pi., con- 
solidated stocks in 
the British National 
Debt. 

oonsommi', n., clear 
soup. 

con'sonance, n., con- 
cord, harmony. 

con'sonancy, n., i.q. 
consonance. 

con'sonant, adj., in 
harmony, accord- 
ant; n., a letter 
which is sounded 
with a vowel. 

consonan'tal, oi/., rel. 
to consonants. 

con'sonantly, »dv., 
agreeably, harmo- 
niously. 

con'sonous, a<i;'., i.q. 
consonant. 

consort', v.(., to join 
company with. 

con'sort, n., a wife or 
husband; an attend- 
ant ship. 

oonsort'ed. p.p., con- 
sort. 

consort'ing, pr.p., 
consort. 

conspec'tos, n., a 
general view, an 
abstract. 

conspic'uous, id)., 
plainly seen, emi- 
nent. 

consinc'nonslr, adv., 
visibly, eminent- 
ly. 

conspic'oonsness, n., 
the state or quality 
of being conspicu- 
ous. 

oonspir'acy, n., a 
combined plot. 

conspira'tion, n., the 
act of conspiring. 

conspii'ator, n., one 
who joins a con- 
spiracy. 

conapirs', v.*., to join 
in a conspiracy. 

conspired', p.p., con- 
spire. 

conspii'er, n., one 
who conspires. 

conspiring, Pr.p., 
conspire. 

ctn'stable, n., a high 
official (as Con- 
stable of the Tower); 
a peace-officer. 

oonstab'olary, n., the 
police force. 



r 






\ 



L 
J 



J- 



L 



constitntiTely 



oon'staiwy, n., firm- 
ness, stability. 

con'stant, adj., firm, 
unvarymg; n., an 
invariable quantity 
of force. 

constantly, adv., reg- 
ularly, without 
variation. 

con'stellate, v.t., to 
arrange in constel- 
lations; to cover 
with constellations. 

constella'tion, n., a 
group of fixed stars. 

constema'tion, n., 
alarm, amazement. 

con'stipate, v.t., to 
bind, to make cos- 
tive. 

con'itipated, p.p., 
constipate; adj., 
costive. 

con'stipating, pr.p., 
constipate. 

constipa'tion, n., cos- 
tiveness. 

constit'nency, n., a 
body of electors; an 
electoral division. 

constit'nent, adj., ele- 
mental, essential ; 
n., a member of a 
constituency. 

con'stitnte, v.t., to 
form, compose; to 
appoint, establish. 

con'stitated, p.p., 
constitute. 

con'stitnting, pr.p., 
constitute. 

constitn'tion, n., the 
act of constituting; 
that which is con- 
stituted; the funda- 
mental laws of a 
nation; bodily con- 
dition. 

cottstltu'tlottal, 
adj., lel. to the con- 
stitution ; funda- 
mental; n., a walk 
for exercise. 

coastltu'tlonal' 
ism, M., loyalty to 
the constitution. 

constitu'tionalist, n., 
an upholder of the 
constitution. 

coastltu'tloaaUy, 
adv., in accordance 
with the constitu- 
tion. 

constitu'tionist, n., 
i.q. constitutional- 
ist. 

constitutive, adj., es- 
sential, component. 

con'stitntively, adv. , 
essentially. 



constitutor 



140 



contain 



K 



h 









4 



Oon'stitntoT, n., that 
which constitutes. 

constrain', v.t., to 
compel, coerce. 

constrain' able, adj., 
able to be con- 
strained. 

constrained', p.p., 
constrain. 

constrain'er, n., one 
who constrains. 

constrain'ing, pr.p., 
constrain. 

constraint', n., the 
act or effect of con- 
straining; confine- 
ment. 

constrict', v.t., to nar- 
row, cramp. 

constrict'ed, p.p., con- 
strict. 

constricting, pr.p., 
constrict. 

constriction, n., the 
act or effect of 
constricting. 

sonstricfive. adj., 
cramping, binding. 

constrict'or, »., that 
which constricts; 
the boa-constrictor. 

oonstringe', v.t., to 
contract, bind. 

constringed', p.p., 
constringe. 

constringent, adj., 
binding, contract- 
ing. 

constrin'ging, pr.p., 
constringe. 

construct', v.t., to put 
together, build, 
compose. 

constnict'ed, p.p., 
construct. 

constmct'er, n., cue 
who constructs. 

constructing, pr.p., 
construct. 

construc'tion, n., the 
act or result of 
constructing; an in- 
terpretation ; the 
syntactical form- 
ation of a sentence. 

construc'tional, adj., 
rel. to construction. 

construc'tionist, n. , 
one skilled in con- 
structing. 

construct'ive, adj. , 
with capacity for 
constructing; in- 
ferred. 

construcfively, adv., 
in a constructive 
way. 

construct'ivenesi, n., 
capacity for con- 
structing. 






% 









construct'or, n., one 

who constructs. 

con'strue, v.t., to in- 
terpret, translate. 

con'strued, p.p., con- 
strue. 

con'struing, pr.p., 
construe. 

consubstan'tial, adj., 
uf one substance or 
nature with. 

consnbstantial'ity, n., 
the quality of being 
consubstantial. 

ccnsnbstan'tiate, v.t., 
to form into one 
substance with. 

consubstan'tiated, 
p.p., consubstanti- 
ate. 

consnbstan'tiating, 
pr.p., consubstan- 
tiate. 

consnbstantia'tion, n., 
the process by 
which, according to 
the Lutherans, the 
Body and Blood of 
Christ are consub- 
stantiated with the 
elements of Bread 
and Wine. 

con'suetude, n., cus- 
tom; intercourse. 

consuetu'dinal, adj., 
customary. 

consuetu'dbiary, adj., 
i.q. consuetudinal. 

con'sul, n., a chief 
magistrate at Rome; 
the representative 
of a foreign State in 
another country, to 
look after the com- 
mercial interests 
and protect the sub- 
jects of his nation. 

consulage, n., the 
period of a consul's 
service. 

con'sular, adj., rel. to 
a consul. 

con'sulate, n., the 
office of a consul; a 
consul's official 
home. 

con'sulship, n. , the 
office of a Roman 
consul. 

consult', v.t., to seek 
advice from, to de- 
liberate with; re- 
gard. 

consult'ant, n., one 
who is consulted. 

consultation, n., the 
act of consulting; 
the deliberation of 
two or more persons 
together. 






V- 



f^ 

^ 









L 



X 



consultative, adj., 

deliberative. 

consul'tatory, adj., 
i.q. consultative. 

consult'ed, p.p., con- 
suit. 

consult'er, n., one 
who consults. 

consulting, pr.p., 
consult. 

consumable. adj., 
able to be con- 
sumed. 

consume', v.t., to des- 
troy, devour; v.t., 
to waste away. 

consumed', p.p., con- 
sume. 

consu'mer, n., one 
who consumes. 

consu'ming, pr.p., 
consume. 

con'snmmate, v.t., to 
accomplisn, com- 
plete. 

consum'mate, adj. , 
complete. 

con'summated, p.p., 
consummate. 

consimi'mately, adv., 
completely, utterly. 

con'summating,pr.^. , 
consummate. 

consumma'tion, n., 
the act or result of 
consummat i n g ; 
completion. 

con'summator, «., 
one who consum- 
mates. 

consump'tion, n., the 
act of consuming; 
decline. 

consump'tive, adj. , 
causing consump- 
tion; suffering from 
phthisis. 

consump'tiTely, adv., 
in a consumptive 
way. 

consump'tiveness, n., 
the tendency to 
phthisis. 

con' tact, »., close 
touch, close union. 

conta'gion, »., dis- 
ease conveyed by 
contact. 

conta'gious, adj., con- 
veyed by contact. 

confafi'gionsly, adv.. In 
a contagious way. 

conta'gionsness, n., 
the state of being 
contagious. 

contain', v.t., to hold 
within' it, to hold 
up, keep within 
bounds; v.i., to live 
continently. 






Si 



Si 



containable 



kooatain'able, adj., 
able to be con- 
tained. 
> contained', p.p., con- 
tain. 
contain'er, n., that 

which contains. 
containing. pr.p. , 
contain. 
U>_i o«Hitam'inabIe, adj., 
able to be con- 
taminated. 
contam'inate, v.t., to 
j. pollute, defile. 

t--Vi- contaminated, p.p., 
contaminate. 
oontam'inating, pr.p., 
. coiUamiiinto. 
l~~^ contamination, «., 
• pollution. 

L—^ contam'inatiTe, adj., 
:. " polluting. 

;^^ contan'go, «. , a St nrk 

Exchange term for 
the premium wh ch 
a buyer pays to the 
broker for deferring 
settlement. 

contemn', v.t., to 

scorn, despise. 
contemned', p.p., 
I contemn. 

^tl^ contem'ner, n., one 
j who contemns. 

t— >«> contemn'ing, pr.p., 
contemn. 
con' template, v.'., to 
consider with at- 
tention, to think 
about, to intend. 
contemplated, p.p., 

contemplate. 
contemplating, pr.p. , 

contemplate. 
contempla'tion, n., 
meditation, inten- 
tion. 
contem'platiTe, adj., 
given to meditat- 
ing. 
contem'platiTely,<i<jt'. , 

thoughtfully. 
contem'plativeness, 
n. , the state of bemg 
contemplative. 
con'templator, n., one 

j ,^~^ who contemplates. 

tr^^^" contempora'neons, 

aiij., existing at the 
] /^-fr* same time with. 
t-J^^^ contempora'neona- 

ness, n., coincidence 
in time. 
contem'porary. adj. 
and »., (one) of the 
same age or time. 
contempt', n., scorn, 
• disregard. 

■^ oontempt'ible, adj., 
> worthyofcontempt. 



141 



eontinnoas 






K. 






K 



I 







o 



i>^ 






I- 
I- 



coatempt'iUy. adv., 
in a contemptible 
way. 

contemp'tnons, adj., 
scornful, disdainful. 

contemp'taously,(«&'. , 
with contempt. 

contemp'tnoosness, 
«., the state of be- 
ing contemptuous. 

contend', v.i., to dis- 
pute, strive; affirm. 

contended, p.p., con- 
tend. 

oontend'er, n., one 
who contends. 

contending, pr.p., 
contend. 

content', v.t., to grati- 
fy; <wi/., satisfied; n., 
what is contained; 
contented state. 

content'ed, p.p., con- 
tent; adj., satisfied. 

content'edly, adv., In 
a contented way. 

content'edness, n. , the 
state of being con- 
tented. 

contenting, pr.p., 
content. 

contention, n., strife, 
argument. 

contentious, adj., 
leading to conten- 
tion, quarrelsome. 

ooaten'tiously, adv., 
in a contentious 
way. 

conten' tioosness, n ■ , 
the state or qualit y 
of being conten- 
tious. 

coateat' meat, n., 
contented state. 

contents', »., pi. of 
content. 

center' minable. adj., 
able to be made 
conterminous. 

oonter'minooa, adj., 
bordering upon, 
contiguous. 

contest', v.<. and i., to 
dispute, litigate. 

con' test, n., a fight, 
struggle. 

contestable, adj., de- 
batable. 

oontest'ant, n., one 
who contests. 

oontesta'tico, n., dis- 
putation .emulation. 

contest'ed, p.p., con- 
test. 

contesting, pr.p., 
contest. 

oon'tezt, »., the whole 
from which a pass- 
age Is quoted. 



.4- 



u 



U 

h 

U 

4) 



context'aal,<Ki/., rel. 

to context. 

contez'toral, adj., rel. 
to contexture. 

contez'tnre, »., struc- 
ture. 

contigu'ity, »., actual 
contact, close prox- 
imity. 

contig'nons, adj., 
closely adjacent. 

contig'nonsUr, adv., 
adjacently. 

coa'tinence, n., self- 
restraint, chastity. 

con'tinenoy, n., t.q. 
continence. 

con'tinent, adj . , 
chaste; ft., the 
largest geographical 
division of land. 

continen'tal, adj., rel. 
to a continent. 

con'tinently, adv., 
chastely. 

contin'gence, n., i.q. 
contingency. 

coatin' gency, n., 
chance, what may 
happen. 

ConUn'genl, adj., ac- 
cidental, condition- 
al; n., something 
depending on 
chance; a body of 
troops. 

oontin' gently, n., con- 
ditionally. 

oontin'oable, adj., 
able to be con- 
tinued. 

Contin'nal, adj., con- 
tinuing, lasting. 

contin'oally, adv. , 
lastingly. 

contin' nance, n. , per- 
manence, duration. 

oontin'nant, adj. , con- 
tinuing. 

continna'tion, n., the 
act or state of con- 
tinuing; that which 
is continued. 

contin'uatiTe, adj., 
continuing. 

contin'nator, n., one 
who continues. 

oontin' tie, v.t., to 
carry on; v.i., to 
persist, abide. 

contin'oed. p.p., con- 
tinue. 

contin'ner, m., one 
who continues. 

contin' Ding, pr.p., 
continue. 

continn'ity, n., the 
state of being con- 
tinuous. 

cintin'uotis, adj., 



eontinnously 



i 

t 

t 



t 



uninterrupted.with- 
out a break. 

contin'nously, adv., 
uninterruptedly. 

contort', v.t., to twist. 

contort'ed, p.p., con- 
tort. 

contorting, prp., 
contort. 

contor'tion. n. , a 
twisting, writhing. 

contor'tioniit, n., a 
variety of acrobat. 

con' torn. v.t., to 
draw an outline; n., 
outline. 

con'tra, prep., against 
(Lai.). 

contraband, adj., 
illegal, prohibited. 

contnct', v.t., to 
draw together, to 
narrow, to shorten; 
».»., to become 
shorter, to make an 
agreement. 

con' tract, »., an 
agreement. 

oontraofable, adj., 
able to be con- 
tracted. 

oontract'ed, p.p. , con- 
tract. 

contract'edly, n., in a 
contracted way. 

contract' edness, n., 
the state of being 
contracted. 

contractibility, n. , 
the state or quality 
of being contract- 
ible. 

contract'ible, adj., 
able to be con- 
tracted. 

contracf ile. adj., hav- 
ing the power of 
contraction. 

contractil'ity. n., the 
state or quality of 
being contractile. 

oontiact'ing, pr.p., 
contract. 

oontiao'tion, n., the 
act or result of 
contracting; abbre- 
viation. 

contiacfor, n., one 
who makes a con- 
tract. 

contraot'nal, adj., of 
the nature of con- 
tract. 

eontrao'tnre, n., 
chronic shortening 
or stiffening. 

con'tra-dance, n., a 
country-dance in 
which the partners 
face one another. 



1:, 



H 



I. 
I 



n- 






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x^ 

U 



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\ 



142 



contradict', v.t., to 
gainsay, say the 
opposite to. 

contradict'ed, p.p. , 
contradict. 

contradict'ing, pr.p., 
contradict. 

contradic'tion, n., the 
act of contradict- 
ing; denial. 

contradic'tions, adj., 
apt to contradict. 

contradict'iTe, adj., 
i.g. contradictious. 

contradict'orily, adv., 
in a contradictory 
way. 

contradict'ory, adj., 
saying the opposi te , 
giving the lie to, 
inconsistent ynth. 

contradistinct', adj. , 
distinguished by 
opposite qualities. 

contradistinction, n. , 
distinguishing by 
opposite qualities. 

contradistin'giiish,v./. 
to distinguish by 
opposite qualities. 

contradistin'gnished, 
p.p., contradistin- 
guish. I 

contradistin'gnishing, 
pr.p., contradistin- | 
guish. 

contral'to, n., the 
voice part between i 
soprano and tenor; i 
a contralto singer. ! 

contrapnn'tist, n., a 
person skilled in 
counterpoint. 

con'traries, n. pi., 
opposi tes. 

contrari'ety, n., op- 
position, disagree- 
ment. 

oon'tiarily, n., in a 
contrary direction. 

con'trarinesa, n., ig. 
contrariety. 

oon'tiariwise, adv. , 
on the contrary, | 
conversely. ; 

con'trary, adj., op- ' 
posed, in an oppo- j 
site direction; per- i 
verse; n., some- | 
thing the opposite i 
to others. 

contrasf , v.(., to place | 
in opi>ositiOD or i 
contrast. 1 

con'tiast, «., opposi- 1 
tion, dissimilitude, j 

contrast'ed, p.p., con- '. 
trast. I 

oontrast'ing pr.p.,' 
contrast. 



u 



I 



I 



i 

X 



L 
x^ 

y 

K 



controller 



contraTalla'tioi, m., 

a military defence- 
work made by the 
besiegers of a town. 

contravene', v.t., to 
transgress, to op- 
pose. 

contravened', p.p., 
contravene. 

contrave'ner, n., one 
who contravenes. 

contrave'ning, pr.p., 
contravene. 

contraven'tion, n., 
the act of contra- 
vening. 

con'tre-danse, n., see 
contra-dance. 

con'tretemps, n., a 
mishap, a hitch. 

contrib'nte, v.t., to 
give to a common 
object or stock; v.i., 
to lend support. 

contrib'nted, p.p., 
contribute. 

contrib'nting, pr.p., 
contribute. 

contribn'tion, »., the 
act of contributing; 
a share; a subscrip- 
tion; a writing in a 
review or paper. 

oontrib'ntive, adj., 
contributing. 

oontrib'ntor, n., one 
who contributes. 

contrib'ntory, adj., i.g. 
contributive. 

con' trite, adj., re- 
pentant, sorry. 

con'tritebr, adv., peni- 
tently. 

contri'tion, n., peni- 
tence, sorrow. 

contri'vable, a<<7.,able 
to be contrived. 

contri'vance, »., the 
act of contriving; a 
device, apparatus. 

contrive', v.t., to de- 
vise, plan out, effect. 

contrived', p.p., con- 
trive. 

contri'vei, «., one 
who contrives. 

contri'ving, pr.p., 
contrive. 

control', v.t. , to check, 
guide, govern; «., 
restraint, superin- 
tendence. 

control'lable, adj., 
subject to control. 

controlled', p.p., con- 
trol. 

control'ler, n., one 
who controls; a de- 
vice regulating an 
electric motor's 



eontroUenhip 



I 



I 



l 



% 



L 

I 



^ 



I 



speed; a public 
official of accounts. 
Also comptroller. 

contTol'lersliip, n., the 
office of a controller. 

ooatrorUnK. pr.p-, 
control. 

controrment, n., the 
effect of controlling. 

controver' slat, adj. 
rel. to controversy; 
disputatious. 

coatroTer'sialist, n., 
one who engages in 
controversy. 

coa'troversy, n., 
disputation. 

controTeit", v.t., to 
oppose a statement; 
to refute. 

controvert'ed, p.p., 
controvert. 

controvertible, adj., 
refutable. 

controverting, pr.p., 
controvert. 

contmna'cions, adj., 
perversely wilful, 
disobedient. 

contama'cionsly,<ufo. , 
in a contumacious 
way. 

coatania'cioasness, 
n., the state of be- 
ing contumacious. 

coD'tonuusy, «., wil- 
fulness, disobedi- 
ence to law. 

contome'liona, adj., 
contemptuously in- 
solent. 

con' tamely, «., arro- 
gant abuse. 

contuse', v.t., to 
crush, bruise. 

contused', p.p., con- 
tuse. 

contn'sins, pr.p., 
contuse. 

contn'sion, n., a 
bruise, the act of 
bruising. 

conon'dram, n., a 
riddle. 

oonvalefloe', v.i., to 
recover from sick- 
ness. 

oaovaleaced', p.p., 
convalesce. 

convalea'cenoe, n. , the 
state of recovering 
one's health. 

convales'cenoy, n., i.q. 
convalescence. 

oonvalei'oent, adj. 
rel. to convales- 
cence; recovering 
health. 

oonvmles'cing, pr.p., 
convalesce. 



^ 

^ 









148 



convec'tion, n., trans- 
mission; diffusion. 

conveo'tive, adj. , con- 
veying. 

oonve'nable, adu, ca- 
pable of being con- 
vened. 

convene', v./., to sum- 
mon together; v.i., 
to come together. 

convened', p.p., con- 
vene. 

conve'ner, n., one 
who convenes. 

conve'nienoe, n., fit- 
ness, accommoda- 
tion. 

coDve'niency, n., i.g. 
convenience. 

conve'nient, adj., fit, 
suitable, giving ac- 
commodation. 

conve'niently, adv., in 
a convenient way. 

conve'ning, pr.p., 
convene . 

con' vent, «., a com- 
munity of religious, 
male or female; a 
nunnery or a mon- 
astery. 

conven'ticle, »., an 
irregular or schis- 
matic assembly. 

eonven'ticler. »., a 
frequenter of con- 
venticles. 

conven'tion, n., an 
assembly, a con- 
tract; common 
usage. 

conven'tional, adj., 
rel. to convention; 
ordinary. 

oonven'tionalism, n., 
the tendency to be 
conventional. 

conven'tionalist, n., 
one who is con- 
ventional. 

oonventional'ity, n., 
the state or quality 
of being conven- 
tional; artificiality. 

coaven'tionist, n. , one 
who makes a con- 
vention. 

conven'tnal, adj., rel. 
or bel. to a con- 
vent. 

converge', v.i., to in- 
cline towards the 
same point. 

converged', p.p., con- 
verge. 

conver'gence, n. , 
tendency to the 
same point. 

conver'genoy, n., i.g. 
convergence. 



L 

L 

L 

y 



V 






eonvexed 



OOOVer'gent. adj., in- 
clining to the same 
point. 

conver'ging, pr.p., 
converge. 

convers'able, adj. , 
fond of conversing. 

convers'ableness, n. , 
the state or quality 
of being convers- 
able. 

con'versanoe, n., fa- 
miliarity with. 

con'versant, adj., 
familiar with, thor- 
oughly informed 
about. 

oonversa'tion,.n. ,talk, 
discourse; habit of 
life. 

converss'tional, adj., 
colloquial. 

conversa'tionist, n., a 
good talker. 

convers'ative, adj., 
social. 

oonversado'ne, n., a 
meeting for friendly 
talk. 

convene', v.i. , to talk , 
join in conversa- 
tion. 

con' verse, adj., op- 
posite; n., talk. 

conversed', p.p., con- 
verse. 

con'versely, adv., 
from the opposite 
point of view. 

convers'ible, adj., i.q. 
convertible. 

convers'ing. pr.p., 
converse. 

cdnver'sion, n., the 
act or result of 
converting. 

oonvers'ive, ik2;., lead- 
ing to conversion. 

convert', ».<., to 
change, transmute; 
bring over to a 
change of belief or 
opinion: to apply to 
some use. 

con' vert, n., one who 
is converted. 

convert'ed, p.p., con- 
vert. 

convert'er, n., one 
who converts. 

convertibil'ity, n., the 
state or quality of 
being convertible. 

ooDverf ible, adj., able 
to be converted. 

coa'vex,a(iy. .rounded , 
swelling spheric- 
ally. 

con' vexed, adj., i.q. 
convex. 



couTexity 



144 



coopering 






convex'ity, m., the 

quality or state of 
being convex. 

con'Texly, n., in a 
convex way. 

convex'o - con'cave, 
adj., convex on one 
side, concave on the 
other. 

conyey', v.t., to carry; 
impart, transfer 
(property). 

convejr'able, adj., able 
to be conveyed. 

convey'ance, «., the 
act of conveying; a 
deed of transfer; a 
vehicle. 

convey'ancer, n., one 
who negotiates the 
transfer of property. 

conTe/ancing, n. , the 
profession of a con- 
veyancer. 

conveyed', p.p., con- 
vey. 

convey'er, n., any- 
thing that conveys. 

convey'ing, pr.p., 
convey. 

convict', v.t., to prove 
guilty. 

con'vict, «., one 
undergoing sen- 
tence. 

convict'ed, p.p., con- 
vict. 

convict'ing, pr.p., 
convict. 

convic'tion, n., the 
act of convicting; 
the state of being 
convicted; a firm 
belief. • 

convict'ive, a<i;. .tend- 
ing to conviction. 

convince'.v./. ,to bripg 
over to one's side 
by argument; per- 
suade. 

convinced', p.p., con- 
vince. 

convince'ment, n., 
the state of being 
convinced. 

convin'cer, n., one 
who convinces. 

convin'dble, adj., 
open to convic- 
tion. 
' oonvin'oing, pr.p., 
convince; adj., per- 
suasive. 

convin'dnKly, adv., 
persuasively. 

oonviv'ial, adj., socia- 
ble, fond of good 
fellowship. 

oonviv'ialist, n., a 
convivial person. 



^^ 






convivial'ity, n., 

good fellowship. 
con'vocate, v.t., to 

call together. 
con'vocated, p.p., 

convocate. 
con'vocating, pr.p., 

convocate. 
convoca'tion, n., the 
act of convocating; 
the assembly of the 
English clergy, and 
of certain univer- 
sities. 
convoca'tional, adj., 
rel. to convocation. 
convoke', v.t., to 

summon together. 
convoked', p.p., con- 
voke. 
convoking, pr.p., 

convoke. 
con'voInte,ai;'., twist- 
ed. 
convoluted, adj., i.q. 

convolute. 
convolution, n., a 
._ twisting. 

Vyv convolve', v.t., to roll 
• _ together. 

\u^ convolved', p.p., con- 
•_ volve. 

V/V^ convolv'ing, pr.p., 
• j;, convolve. 

v/w^convol'vnlns, n., the 
twining plant so 
named. 
convoy', v.t., to pro- 
tect while travelling 
by land or sea. 
con'voy, n., an escort. 
convoyed', p.p., con- 
voy. 
convoy'ing, pr.p., 

convoy. 
convulse', v.t., to 

shake violently. 
convulsed', p.p., con- 
vulse. 
V convuls'ing, pr.p., 
(^ convulse. 

convul'sion, n., vio- 
lent agitation; a 
sort of fit. 
convni'sionary, adj., 
causing convulsion . 
convuls'ive, adj. , vio- 
k ■ lently agitated. 
S y convuls'ively, adv., 
Q with violent agita- 
■ tion. 
-,-,_,. cony, co'ney, n., a 
rabbit. 

J COO, v.i., to produce 

the note of a pigeon; 
to speak wooingly; 
n., the sound a 
— I pigeon makes. 
J cooed, p.p., coo. 
— ^ coo'ing, pr.p., coo. 



C 



C 



■^ 






^ 



^ 



^- 



_^. 



^ 



■^'-Vi* 



super. 



adj., 
calcu- 



porter 
, cool. 



cook, v.t., to heat 
prepared food. 

cooked, p.p., cook. 

cook'ery, »., the art 
and practice of 
cooking. 

cook'ing, pr.p., cook; 
n., i.g. cookery. 

COOk'y, n., aflat cake. 

cool, v.t., to reduce 
temperature; make 
cool; v.i., to become 
cool; adj., slightly 
cold, calm, calculat- 
ing; n., a state of 
moderate tempera- 
ture. 

cooled, p.p., cool. 

cool'er, adj. , comp. of 
cool; «., a cooling 
receptacle. 

cool'est, adj., 
of cool. 

cool'-beaded, 
deliberate, 
lating. 

coo'lie, n., a 
in India. 

cool'ing, pr.p 

cool'isll, adj., some- 
what cool. 

cool'ly, adv., in a 
cool way. 

cool'ness, n., the 
state of being cool. 

coom, n., an old 
measure of capa- 
city = 4 bushels. 

coon, n., a cunning 
person. 

coop, V.I., to cage, pen 
up; n., a cage, pen. 

cooped, p.p., coop. 

COOp'er, n., one who 
makes barrels; a 
malt liquor so 
named; a North Sea 
refreshment - selUng 
vessel. 

coop'erage, n., a 
cooper's trade; pay- 
ment for coopers' 
work. 

CO-op'erant, adj., co- 
operating. 

co-op'erate, v.i., to 
work together. 

co-op' eiated, p.p., co- 
operate. 

co-op'erating, pr.p., 
co-opetate. 

co-operation, n., the 
act of co-operating. 

co-op' erative, adi., 
associated, working 
in combination. 

co-op' erator, «., one 
who co-operates. 

coop'ering, n., a 
cooper's business. 



eoopery 






-^. 









oocmenr. n., a 

cooper's trade. 

co-opt', v.t., to elect 
on to a committee 
(said of the existing 
members). 

co-op' tate, v.t., i.q. 
co-opt. 

co-op'tion. n., the act 
or result of co-opt- 
ing. 

co-or'dinance, n., 
joint regulation. 

co-or'dinate, v.t., to 
range or class to- 
gether; adj., of the 
same order or class. 

co-or'dinate, n., an 
equal in rank; one 
of the geometrical 
elements defining 
the position of a 
point. 

co-OT'dinately,a<iv. , of 
the same order. 

co-or'dinateness, n. , 
the state or quality 
of being co-ordinate 

co-ordina'tion, n. , the 
act or result of co- 
ordinating. 

coot, n., a British 
aquatic bird. 

copai'ba, n., a S. 
American drug. 

copai'vic, ad]., rel. to 
copaiba. 

CO'pal, n., a resinous 
transparent sub- 
stance used in var- 
nishes. 

copar'cenary. »■. an 
estate held by co- 
heirs. 

copai'cener, n., a 
joint holder of an 
estate. 

copart'ner, n., a joint 
partner. 

copart'nership, n.,the 
state of a copartner. 

copart'nery, »., i.q. 
copartnership. 

copas'torate, n., a 
joint pastorate. 

cope, v.t., to strive, j 
contend success- 
fully; v.t., to add a 
coping to; w., an 
ecclesiastical and 
academical hooded 
mantle. 

co'peck, n., a Rus- 
sian copper coin, 
equal to an English 
halfpenny. 

coped, p.p., cope; 
ad;., wearing a cope. 

Coper'nican, adj., rel. 
• to Copernicus and 



"^ 
^ 



r-N 



145 



the Copernican 
system. 

cope'-stone, n., i.q. 
coping-stone. 

cop'iable, aij., able 
to be copied. 

copied, p.p., copy. 

COp'ier, «., one who 
copies. 

OO'ping, pr.p., cope; 
«., the topmost 
course of a wall. 

oo'ping-stone, n., the 
topmost course, or 
a stone in the top- 
most course, of a 
wall. 

co'pions, ad]., abun- 
dant, plentiful. 

co'pioudy, adv., 
abundantly. 

co'piousness, n., the 
state of being 
copious. 

copi'vi. «., i.q. co- 
paiba. 

cop'per, v.t., to over- 
lay with copper; n., 
a ductile metal of 
reddish colour; a 
copper coin; a 
boiler. 

cop'peias, n., green 
vitriol. 

cop'pered, p.p., cop- 
per. 

copper-faced, ad)., 
p-^. faced with copper. 

-| cot'perhead, n., a 
poisonous N. Amer- 
ican snake. 

cop'pering, pr.^., cop- 
per. 

cop'perish, «<;., like 
copper. 

cop'perize, v.t., to 
treat like copper. 

cop'perized, p.p. , cop- 
per ize. 

oop'perizing, pr.p., 
copperize. 

cop'perplate, «2/., 
printed on copper- 
plate; n., a plate of 
copper for engrav- 
ing or etching. 
cop'persmith, n., a 

worker in copper. 
cop'pery, adj., i.q. 

copperish. 
cop'pice, n., a wood 
^ of low trees. 

"I \^ co-pres'ence, «., pres- 
ence together. 
■""^ cop'rolite, n., petri- 

fied dung. 
' v.l coprolith. n., \.q. 

cx)prolite. 
f~vT_,coprobt'io, ad/., rel. 
to coprolite. 



eoquetting 



T-V 



^ 



r-\ 



coproph'asoofl, adj., 
dung eating. 

copse, H., i.q, cop- 
pice. 

cops'y, ad)., covered 
with copses; copse- 
like. 

Copt, n., one of the 
original Egyptian 
stock. 

Cop' tic, ad)., bel. to 
the Copts. 

cop'nla, n., the word 
expressing the rela- 
tion of predicate to 
subject. 

cop'iUate, v.%., to 
unite; have inter- 
course with. 

cop'olated, p.p., cop- 
ulate. 

copulating, pr.p., 
copulate. 

copula' tion, n., sexual 
intercourse. 

cop'olative, adj. . hav- 
ing the effect of 
joining; rel. to cop- 
ulation. 

cop'olatively, adv., 
with the effect of 
joining. 

cop'y, v.t., to imitate, 
reproduce exactly, 
transcribe; «., an 
exact reproduction, 
transcription; one 
of a set of volumes; 
writing to be re- 
produced. 

cop'y-book, n. , a book 
containing writing 
to be imitated. 

cop'ygraph, n., the 
duplication of MSS. 
or drawings. 

cop'yhold, n., holding 
of land on the 
strength of a copy 
of court roll. 

cop'ying, pr.p., copy. 

copying-press, »., a 
press for multiply- 
ing copies. 

cop'yist, n., one who 
transcribes, or imi- 
tates. 

cop'yrigbt, n., the 
exclusive publish- 
ing rights. 

coqnet', v.%., to flirt, 
trifle. 

co'qaetry, n., the arts 
of a coquette. 

coquette', »., a wo- 
man who coquets. 

coquet' ted, p.p., co- 
quet. 

ooquet'ting, pt.p., co- 
quet. 



eoqnettish 









coqoet'tish, adj., giv- 
en to coquetry. 

coanet'tisb^t adv., in 
a coquettish way. 

cot'acle, »., a wicker 
leather-covered 
boat. 

oor'acoid, aij., like a 
crow's beak; rel. to 
the C. bone; n., a 
hook-like formation 

oor'a], arf/., consisting 
of coral; n., a hard 
structure in the sea 
composed of the 
skeletons of zoo- 
phytes; a child's 
coral toy. 

coralla'ceons, <t<i;., 

I made of coral. 

corallif'eroas, adj. 
coral-producing. 

ooral'liform, adj. , 
branching like coral. 

coi'alline, adj., of, or 
like, coral; n. , a dye. 

cor'allite, »., fossil- 
ized coral. 

coralloid'al, adj., like 
coral. 

oor'ban. »., an o£Fer- 
ing. 

coi'beil, cor'bel, n., a 
little basket used in 
siege work. 

eor'tel, »., a projec- 
tion or bracket. 

eoid, v.t., to fasten- 
n., a string, a wood 
measure. 

cord'age, n., a mass 
or collection of 
ropes. 

eor'date, adj., heart- 
shaped. 

COld'ed, adj., having 
cords; p.p., cord. 

ootdelier', n., a 
Franciscan {Fr.). 

eordelle', n., a tassel. 

cor'dial, adj., hearty, 
genial; n., an in- 
vigorating medicine 
or liqueur. 

cordial ity, n., cordial 
manner, geniality. 

cor'dially, adv., geni- 
ally, heartily. 

cor'diform, adj., 
heart-shaped. 

cordille'ra, n., a 
mountain-chain. 

Oord'ing, n., a ribbed 
surface; pr.p., cord. 

OOr'dite. n., smoke- 
less powder. 

oor'doo, »., a ribbon, 
a line. 

oor'don-blen, n., the 
top of a profession. 






"'^ 



_^- 






146 



eor'doran, n., Span- 
ish leather. 
cor'dnroy, adj., made 
of corduroy; n., a 
ribbed material of 
cotton or fustian; 
v.t., to make a 
corduroy road. 

oord'wainer, n., a 
leather-worker, 
shoe-maker. 

core, v.t., to extract 
the core from; «., 
the heart or inmost 
part. 

cored, adj., having a 
core; p.p. core. 

co-re'gent, n., a 
joint regent or ruler. 

co-ielig'ionist, n., a 
professor of the 
same religion. 

coreop'sis, n., a genus 
of composite plants 
so named. 

co-respondent. »., a 
joint respondent. 

corf, «., a coal-heav- 
ing basket. 

coria'ceoiu, adj., lea- 
thery. 

corian'der, n., a seed- 
bearing plant so 
named. 

co'ring, pr.p., core. 

Corin'thjan, adj., bel. 
to Corinth. 

cork, adj., made of 
cork; n., the outer 
part of a cork-tree's 
bark; a stopper; w./. , 
to stop with a cork. 

cork'age, »., an inn- 
keeper's charge on 
wine belonging to 
guests. 

corked, adj., stopped 
with a cork; tasting 
of the cork; p.p., 
cork. 

cork'ing, pr.p., cork. 

oork'gcrew,n.,acork- 
extractor. 

cork' tree, n., the tree 
from which cork is 
stripped. 

oork'y, adj., of, or 
like, cork. 

OOr'morant, n., a fish- 
eating bird so 
named; a greedy 
person. 

com, v.t., to cure or 
preserve; n., grain 
of several varieties; 
a horny growth on 
the foot or toe. 

com'-chandler, n., a 
retailer of corn. 

com'-cob, n., the 



'-r. 



eorn-laws 



spike on the ear of 
maize, 
com'-cockle, n. , a 
weed that grows in 
corn. 
com'-crake, n., the 

land-rail. 
cor'nea, n., the horny 
membrane of the 
eyeball. 
corned, adj., pre- 
served, cinred. 
cor'nel, n., a wild 

sort of cherry, 
come'lian, adj., made 
of cornelian; n., a 
.sort of chalcedony, 
t — ~-<v cor'neons, a<2y., horny. 
t-^_^ cor'ner, v.t., to drive 
into a comer or 
difficulty; to set up 
a monopoly; n., an 
angle, a recess, a 
monopolizing ring. 
tr-^ cor'nered, p.p., cor- 
ner; adj., having 
corners. [iier. 

~<^_^^^ cor'nering, pr.p., cor- 
»^-<^. cor'ner-stone, «., the 

'' principal stone, 
t — V COr'net, n. , a trumpet- 
like instrument; a 
junior cavalry 
officer. 
*'~^. oor'net-A-pis'ton, »., 
J a cornet on which 
the notes are pro- 
duced by pistons. 
cor'netcy, n. , the rank 

of a cornet. 
com'fleU, n., a held 

for corn. 
com'floor, n., fine 
meal from Indian 
ev, corn. 
_y~'^ \ com'flower, n., a wild 
' ** plant so named. 

(^ j>. COr'nice, n , a pro- 
jection from the top 
of a wall or range of 
columns; overhang- 
ing snow. 

^ oor'nicle, «., the 

honey-duct of a 
plant louse. 
comic' olate, adj., 

having horns, 
cor'nilonn, oti/. , hor n - 

shaped. 
Com'ing, n., meat- 
curing; pr.p., corn. 
Cor'nisb, adj., pert. 

to Cornwall. 
cor'nist, n., a player 

on the cornet. 
com'-land, » , corn- 
growing land, 
com'-laws, «./>/., I a ws 
rel. to import and 
export of com. 





eorno 



147 



corrigibleness 






^lAt 



,r~P 






oor'no, n., a horn, 
oomo'pean, »., a 

musical instrument; 
an organ stop so 
named. 

oom'-plaster, n., a 
plaster for relieving 
corns. 

oomoco'pia, «•., the 
horn of plenty. 

cornate', adj. , homed . 

comu'ted, adj . , 
horned. 

Oorn'y, adj., horny; 
corn-producing. 

COC'ody, n., i.q. cor- 
rody. 

eororis, n., a flower's 
inner envelope. 

ooroUa'ceotu, adj., 
like a corolla. 

oorol'larr, «., a fur- 
ther inference. 

COTOllate, adj., hav- 
ing a corolla. 

cor'oUated, adj., i.q. 
coroUate. 

COTO'ns, n., a crown; 
a halo. 

COr'ODaOh, »., a dirge. 

cor'oiial, adj., rel. to 
the corona; n., a 
garland. 

cor'onary, adj., rel. 
to a crown; encir- 
cling. 

oor'onated, adj., hav- 
ing a corona. 

oorona'tion, n., the 
ceremony of crown- 
ing. 

cor' oner, n., a Crown 
officer who holds 
inquests. 

oor'onet, n., a little 
or lesser crown. 

oot'oneted, adj., hav- 
ing a coronet. 

ooro'niform, adj., 
crown -shaped. 

oor'oiioid, adj., 
crown-like. 

ooro'nQle, n., the 
tuft of a seed. 

oot'poral, adj., pert, 
to the body; »., a 
white linen cloth 
used at the altar; a 
non - commissioned 
officer so named. 

eotporal'ity, »., the 
state of being cor- 
poral {i.e., unspiri- 
tual). 

Oor'portUy, adv., 
bodily. 

eor'ponlship, n., the 
office of corporal. 

eor'ponte, adj., col- 
lective. 



^-^ 



^-K^. 



-vn. 



.-V 




oor'poratenetB, n., 
the state of being 
united in a body. 

corpora' tion, n., an 
authorized body, 
with powers to act 
as a single unit; 
(steng) a pot-belly. 

corporative, adj., 
corporate. 

cor'porator, n., a 
member, or co- 
founder, of a cor- 
poration. 

corpo'real, adj., hav- 
ing a body. 

oorporeal'ity, n., the 
state of being cor- 
poreal. 

corpo'really, *dv., in 
bodily torm. 

corpo'realness, n., i.q. 
corporeality. 

corpore'ity. n., physi- 
cal existence. 

corposant, n., the 
fireball seen on 
ships' masts in 
stormy weather. 

corps, n., a body, a 
company. 

corpse, n., a dead 
body. 

oor'pnlence, n., ex- 
cessive stoutness. 

cor'pnlency, n., t.q. 
corpulence. 

cor'polent, adj., ex- 
cessively stout. 

cor'pns, n., a body; a 
whole. 

cor'pnscle, »., a dim- 
inutive body, par- 
ticle. 

corpos'cnlar, adj., 
consisting of cor- 
puscles. 

oorposcnla'rian, adj., 
rel. to corpascles. 

corral', n., an enclo- 
sure for cattle, or 
for capturing wild 
elephants; v.t., to 
enclose in a corral. 

corralled', p.p., cor- 
ral. 

OOrral'linK, Pr.p., cor- 
ral. 

correct', v.t., to put 
right, punish; adj., 
strictly accurate, 
right, proper. 

corrected, p.p., cor- 
rect. 

oorreofible, adj., able 
to be corrected. 

correot'ing, pr.p., cor- 
rect. 

oorrec'tion, n., the 
process of correct- 



.^ 



t-r-^ 



^ 






ing, the amending 
of an error, punish- 
ment. 

correo'tional, adj., 
with a correcting 
purpose. 

correot'ive, adj. , tend- 
ing to correction; 
n., an antidote. 

correct'ly,arft'.rightly, 
properly.accurately. 

correot'ness, n., the 
state or habit of 
being correct. 

correct'or, n., one 
who corrects. 

oor'relate, v./. , to brin g 
into reciprocal rela- 
tion; adj., correla- 
ted. 

cor'related, p.p., cor- 
relate. 

cor'relating,^f .^. ,cor- 
relate. 

correla'tion, n., the 
state of reciprocal 
relatioti. 

correl'ative, adj. , reci- 
procally relative; H., 
the antecedent to a 
relative pronoun. 

COTrel'atively, adv., in 
reciprocal relation. 

correl'ativeness, n. , 
the state or quality 
of reciprocal rela- 
tion. 

correspond', v.t., to 
answer, agree, be 
equal to; to write 
letters to. 

oorrespond'ed, p.p., 
correspond. 

correspond'enoe, n., 
the act of corre- 
sponding; agree- 
ment; epistolary in- 
tercourse. 

conraspoBd'ent, adj., 
equal, in agreement; 
»., one who corre- 
sponds. 

oorrespond'ing, pr.p., 
correspond. 

oor'ridor, n., an open 
gallery or passage. 

corrigen'da, n., pi. of 
corrigendum. 

corrigendam, m., a 
point to be cor- 
rected. 

corrigibil'ity, n., the 
state of being cor- 
rigible. 

oor'rUlible, adj., cap- 
able of reform or 
correction. 

cw'rigibleness, n., a 
willingness to be 
corrected. 



corroborant 



148 



cosmologist 






coirob'orant, adj., 
verifying, confirm- 
ing. 

corroborate, v.i., to 
confirm, verify, es- 
tablish. 

corrob' orated, p.p., 
corroborate. 

corrob'orating, pr.p., 
corroborate. 

corrobora'tion, n., the 
act of corrobora- 
ting; a verification. 

corrob'orative, adj., 
confirming.support- 
ing. 

corrob'oratory, adj., 
i.q. corroborative. 

corroboree', n., an 
Australasian native 
war-dance. 

corrode', v.l., to eat 
away, rust; v.i., to 
rust. 

corro'ded, p.p., cor- 
rode. 

corro'dible, adj., li- 
able to corrosion. 

corro'ding, pr.p., 
corrode. 

oor'rody, n., a found- 
er's right of sub- 
sistence in his own 
monastery; provi- 
sion. 

corro'sible, adj., i.q. 
corrodible. 

corro'sibleness, n., 
the state of being 
corrosible. 

corro'sion, n., the 
process of corrod- 
ing. 

corro'sive, adj., tend- 
ing to corrode. 

ootro'sively, adv., in 
a corrosive way. 

corro'siTeness, n., the 
corrosive power. 

cor'rugant, adj., 
wrinkling. 

oor'mgate, v.t., to 
wruikle, or make 
folds in. 

oor'rngated, p.p., cor- 
rugate. 

cor'nigatinK, pr.p., 
corrugate. 

cormga'tion, n., the 
act of corrugating; 
a wrinkle. 

cor'nigator, n., some- 
thing that corru- 
gates. 

corrupt', v.t., to make 
putrescent; to taint, 
spoil, make impure, 
deprave; v.i., to 
become impure; 
adj., tainted, de- 






"A. 



pravcd, full of 
errors. 

cormpt'ed, p.p., cat- 
rupt. 

corrupt'er, n., one 
who corrupts. 

corruptibil'ity, n., the 
state of being cor- 
ruptible. 

cormpt'ible, adj., able 
to be corrupted; 
tending to decav. 

corrnpt'ibleness, n., 
the state of being 
corruptible. 

corrupt'ibly, adv., in a 
corruptible way. 

corrupt'ing, pr.p., 
corrupt. 

cormp'tion, n., the 
process of corrupt- 
ing; decay; dissolu- 
tion. 

cormpt'iTe, adj., with 
a corrupting ten- 
dency. 

oormpt'ly, adv., 
wrongly, in error, 
depravedly. 

cormpt'ness, n., the 
state or quality of 
being corrupt. 

cor'sage, n., a bodice. 

cor'sair, n., a pirate. 

corse, n., a dead 
body. 

corse'let, n., light ar- 
mour for the body. 

oor'set, n., a body 
support, stays. 

Cor'sican, adj., pert, 
to Corsica. 

cors'ned, n., a piece 
of bread used as 
the test of guilt or 
innocence. 

cort^e', n., a train, 
procession. 

Cor'tes, ft., the Parlia- 
ment of Spain or 
Portugal. 

cor'tex, n., bark. 

cor'tical, adj., of, or 
like, bark; external. 

oor'ticate, adj., cov- 
ered with bark. 

oor'ticated, adj., i.q. 
corticate. 

corticif'erons, ad)., 
bearing bark. 

conm'dam, n., a hard 
mineral so named. 

coras'cant, adj., glit- 
tering, sparkling. 

cor'oscate. v.i., to 
sparkle, glitter. 

cor'nscated, p.p., 
coruscate. 

cor'nscating, pr.p., 
coruscate. 




r-^r^ 



corusca'tion, »., a 

flash, sparkle. 

C0rv6e', n., the forced 
labour of feudalism. 

corvette', «., a sloop. 

cor' vine, adj., like, or 
pert, to, a crow. 

cor'vus, »., a crow. 

Cor'ybant, «., a priest 
of Cybele. 

Coryban'tic, adj., rel. 
to the Corybants; 
wild, frenzied. 

coryphae'os, n., the 
leader of a Greek 
dramatic chorus. 

coryphee', n., a ballet 
dancer. 

cor'yphene, n., a 
dolphin. 

coryphe'os, n., i.q., 
coryphaeus. 

cory'za, n., a cold in 
the head. 

cose'cant, n. , a trigo- 
nometrical function. 

COSh'er, v.i. to pam- 
per; v.i., to cheat. 

CO'sily, adv., in cosy 
fashion. 

co'sine, n., the sine 
of a complement of 
an angle or arc. 

cosmet'ic, adj., adorn- 
ing; heightening 
beauty; n., a dye or 
wash for adornment. 

COS'mic, adj., rel. to 
the cosmos or kos- 
mos. 

cos'mical, adj., i.q. 
cosmic. 

oos'mically, adv., in 
the manner of the 
cosmos. 

cosmog'onal, adj. , 
rel. to cosmogony. 

cosmog'ooist, n., a 
student of cosmog- 
onies. 

cosmog'ony, n. , a 
work on the origin 
of the cosmos. 

cosmog'rapher, n., a 
student of cosmog- 
raphy. 

cosmograph'ic, adj., 
rel. to cosmography. 

cosmography, n., the 
science of the cos- 
mos. 

cos'molabe, n., an 
astrolabe. 

cosmoratry, n., wor- 
ship of the cosmos. 

cosmolog'ical, adj., 
rel. to cosmology. 

cosmol'ogist, n., a 
student of cosmol- 
ogy. 



cosmology 






r-<C» 



i-f 



^T- 



nr 



'"w 






oOBmorocy, n., the 

study of the origin 
of the cosmos. 

cosmoplas'tic, adj., 
rel. to the structure 
of the cosmos. 

cosmoporitan, adj., 
claiming the citizen- 
ship of the world; 
n., a citizen of the 
world. 

oosmoporitanism. n., 
the claim to be a 
citizen of the world. 

ooBmop'olite, n., i.q. 
cosmopolitan. 

cosmora'ma, n., a 
realistic representa- 
tion of parts of the 
world. 

cosmoiam'io, adj., of 
the nature of cos- 
morama. 

OOs'mos, n., order; 
the universe, world; 
the system of 
worlds. 

Cos'sack, n., a South 
Russian horseman; 
adj., rel. to the 
Cossacks. 

cos'set, v.t., to pet up, 
cocker; «., a pet 
lamb; a comforting 
drink. 

cost, v.t., to be valued 
at; to inflict; n., an 
amount to be paid, 
charge. 

cost'al, adj., rel. to 
the ribs. 

cos'tard, n., a variety 
of apple. 

COS'tate, adj., ribbed. 

cos' tated,aii/., ribbed. 

cost'-book, n., a list 
of partners in a 
mine. 

cos'tennonger. n., a 
hawker of apples, 
also of other eat- 
able things. 

cost'ing, pr.p., cost. 

cos'tive, od/., con- 
stipated. 

cos'tively, adv., in a 
costive way. 

cos tiveness, n., con- 
stipation. 

cost'liness, »., high 
price. 

oost'ly, adj., costing 
much, high-priced. 

cost'mary. »«., a fra- 
grant plant so 
named. 

cos'toine, v.t. , to put 
into costume; «., 
dress, mode of 
dress. 






n 

7 

Hi.. 

A 



"7 



149 



Goetn'mer, n., one 
who makes or pro- 
vides costumes. 

costn'mier, n., i.q. 
costumer (Fr.). 

oo'sy, adj. , snug, com- 
fortable; »., a cover 
to a teapot. 

cot, n., a cottage; 
child's bed. 

cotan'gent, n., the 
tangent of the com- 
plement of an angle 
or arc. 

cote, n., a hut, sheep- 
fold. 

cotempora'neons, see 
contemporaneous. 

cotem'porary. see 
contemporary. 

CO'terie, n., a com- 
pany, a party. 

co-ter'nunoos, ^ee 
conterminous. 

oothorn'ate, adj., 
wearing cothurni or 
buskins; pert, to 
tragedy. 

cothor'ntis, n., a 
buskm, worn by 
Greek tragic actors; 
tragedy. 

cotillion, «., a var- 
iety of dance or 
dance-music; a 

black and white 
stuff. 

co-trostee', «., a joint 
trustee. 

Cots' wold, «., the 
name of a Glouces- 
tershire range of 
hiUs. 

cofta, n. , a truncated 
surplice. 

cot'tage, n., a little 
house. 

cot'tagei, n., the oc- 
cupant of a cottage, 
a rustic. 

cot' tar, cot'ter. n., 
i.q. cottager. 

cot'tier.n., I.q. cottar. 

cot' ton, adj., made of 
cotton; n., a white 
material. 

cot' ton-gin, n., a 
machine for cleans- 
ing cotton. 

eot'tony, adj., cotton- 
like. 

cotyle'don, n., a seed 
lobe. 

cotyled'onoos, adj., 
like a cotyledon. 

cotyl'ifonn, a4;., cup- 
shaped. 

cot'yioid, adj., like a 
cup. 

couch, v.t., to hide; 



77 



-^ 



'\r 



coanted 



express in terms; to 
operate for catar- 
act; v.i., to lie down. 

conoh'ant, ai;., lying, 
crouching (her.). 

C0ach6', adj., partly 
lying (her.). 

couched, p.p., couch. 

couch' er, n., one who 
couches. 

coocb'-grass, n., a 
species of rapidly 
growing grass. 

ooncb'ing, pr.p., 
couch; n., an opera- 
tion for cataract. 

coa'gar, n., a panther. 

coogh, v.t., to expel 
air from the lungs 
with violence; n., a 
violent expulsion of 
air from the lungs. 

coughed, p.p., cough. 

congh'ei, «., one who 
coughs. 

cough'ing, pr.p., 
cough. 

could, P.t. of can. 

coulisse , n., a port- 
cullis; a side-scene 
of a stage. 

con'loir, n., a steep 
gorge. 

oonl'ter, n., a plough- 
share. 

coun'cil, n., a con- 
lerence, assembly 
of councillors. 

conn'cU-board, n.,the 
table at which coun- 
cillors meet. 

oonn'cillor, conn'cil- 
or, »., a member of 
a council. 

coun'seU v.t., to give 
advice to; n., ad- 
vice, deliberation; a 
barrister. 

coon'selled. conn'- 
seled, p.p., counsel. 

cotm'seUing, conn'- 
seling, pr.p., coun- 
sel. 

conn'sellor, conn'sel- 
or, n., one who 
gives counsel. 

coun'sellorship,coaa'- 
seloTship, n., a 
counsellor's office 
or fimction. 

count, v.t., to reckon 
up, to esteem; f.i., 
to rely upon; n., 
reckoning; a par- 
ticular charge; the 
title of a grade of 
nobility. 

eount'able, adj., able 
to be counted. 

oount'ed, p.p., count. 



countenance 



160 



eoantryman 



'n. 



X 



~^i 



oonn'tenanoe, v.t., to 
approve, support; 
n., the face, appear- 
ance, support. 

ooon'tenaiiced, p.p., 
countenance. 

conn'tenanoer, n.,one 
who countenances. 

conn'tenancinK, pr.p. , 
countenance. 

Coont'er, adj., ad- 
verse, contrary; v.t., 
to parry, oppose; n. , 
one who counts; 
part of a horse's 
breast; part of a 
ship's stern; a shop 
table. 

counteract', v.t., to 
defeat, neutralize. 

ooonterac'ted, p.p., 
counteract. 

counteracting, pr.p., 
counteract. 

counterac'tioQ, n.,the 
act of counteract- 
ing. 

connteiact'ive, adj., 
tending to counter- 
act. 

counleract'ively. adv., 
with counteracting 
efiect. 

counter - attrao'tion, 
n., attraction in an 
opposite direction. 

ootmterAa/'dJice.v.f. 
to weigh against. 

counter Aa/'/iace<f, 
p.p., counterbalance 

counter iba/jtncing, 
pr.p., counterbal- 
ance. 

count'erbrace, v./., to 
brace in opposite 
directions; n., a de- 
vice to relieve the 
stress on a main- 
brace. 

connt'ercharge, v.t., 
to charge in opposi- 
tion; n., an oppos- 
ing charge. 

connt'ercharm, n., a 
charm against a 
charm. 

countercheck, n., a 
check in opposition. 

count' erclaim, n., a 
claim against a 
claim. 

coont'erfeit. v.t., to 
feign, to imitate, 
forge; adj., spuri- 
ous, feigned; n., an 
imitation, forgery. 

cotmt'erfeited. p.p., 
counterfeit. 

coont'erfeiter, »., one 
who counterfeits. 



^yi 



connt'erleiting, pr.p., 
counterfeit. 

connt'erloil, n., the 
part of a document 
or cheque retained 
by the drawer. 

wjmi'vtguardf n., 
a guard agamst a 
guard. 

connt'er-ir'ritant, n., 
a plaster or other 
irritant to relieve 
pain in one part by 
causing it in an- 
other; adj., produc- 
ing counter-irrita- 
tion. 

count'er-jumper, n. , 
a shop assistant. 

coontermand', v.t., to 
cancel an order; n., 
the cancelling of an 
order. 

countermand'ed, p./>. , 
countermand. 

conntermand'ing, 
pr.p., countermand. 

cotmt'ermarch, n., a 
march back. 

coant'ermark, v.t., to 
put a countermark 
on; n., an additional 
mark. 

coimt'ermine, v.t., to 
engineer a counter- 
mine; n., a mine 
against a mine. 

connt'er>motion, n., a 
motion in opposi- 
tion. 

count'ermnre, n., a 
strengthening wall. 

counterpane, n., a 
bed -cover. 

counterpart, n., a 
duplicate. 

counter-plea, n., a 
plea in opposition. 

count'erplot, v.t'., to 
meet a plot with a 
plot; «., a plot 
against a plot. 

coont'erplotted, p.p., 
counterplot. 

coont'erpiottiug, pr.p. 
counterplot. 

ooont'erpoint, n., a 
branch of musical 
science so named. 

counterpoise, v.t., to 
balance ; n., bal- 
ance. 

counterpoised, p.p., 
couiitt'rp<iisp. 

counterpoising, pr.p., 
counterpoise. 

counterscarp, n., the 
slope of a ditch 
opposite to the 
scarp. 



y^ 



countersign, v.t., to 
put an authenticat- 
ing additional sig- 
nature; n., an addi- 
tional signature; a 
sign corresponding 
to a sign. 

connt'ersigned. p.p., 
countersign. 

count'ersigning, pr.p., 
countersign. 

ooont'ersink, v.t., to 
prepare a bed for 
the head of a screw 
or bolt. 

connt'er-stroke, n., a 
stroke against a 
stroke. 

count'er-tenor. n., the 
voice part above 
the tenor. 

countervail', v.t., to 
counterbalance, 
compensate. 

countervailed', p.p., 
coimtervail. 

countervailing, pr.p. , 
countervail. 

conntervalla'tion, n., 
the act of opposing 
with a rampart; the 
rampart itself. 

count'erview, n., a 
contrary view. 

count'erweigh, v.t., to 
balance. 

count'erweighed, p.p., 
counterweigh. 

cotmt'erweighing, 
pr.p., counterweigh. 

count' erweight, n., a 
balance. 

count'erwork, n., a 
work agamst a 
work. 

connt'ess. n., fem. of 
earl or count. 

cotmt'ing. pr.p., 

count. 

coimt'ing-house, n., a 
department of an 
office in which the 
accounts are kept. 

COtmt'less, adj., in- 
numerable. 

count'rifled. adi., 
rustic; p.p., count- 
rify. 

count'ii^. v.t., to 
make rustic. 

count'rilying. pr.p., 
countrify. 

country. «., a region, 
the rustic districts, 
a native land. 

cotmt'ry-dance, n., a 
contre-danse. 

countryman, n., a 
native of a country; 
a rustic. 



country-seat 






ooont'ry-aekt. n., a 

house or estate in 
the country. 

coDnt'7. M., a local 
division for political 
or administrative 
purposes. 

count'y-conrt, »., a 
court for small debt 
cases; v.t., to sue. 

coop, n., a sudden 
stroke. 

coup de eiAce'. n., a 
final stroke (Ft.). 

coap de main', n., a 
sudden exercise of 
force (Fr.). 

coop d'itat'. n., a 
political sudden ex- 
ercise of force (Fr.). 

COUpi', n., the front 
part of a stage- 
coach; the end of a 
railway carriage; a 
four-wheeled car- 
riage for two {Fr.). 

conpee', »., the salute 
in a dance {Fr.). 

conp'er, n., a lever 
on a loom. 

coap'Ie, v.t., to link, 
join; v.i., to be 
joined; n., a pair, 
two of the same 
kind, a man and 
his wife. 

coap'led, p.p. , couple. 

coup'ler, n., one who 
couples, a thing 
that couples; an 
apparatus on an 
organ for linking 
keyboards together. 

OOUp'let, n., two 
successive lines of 
poetry. 

coap'ling, pf-P-, 
couple; n., links. 

coa'pon, n., a cer- 
tificate; a ticket. 

COOr'age, n., bravery, 
fortitude. 

coon'geoos, adj. , 
brave, spirited. 

coora'geously, adv. , 
bravely. 

conrageoasnen, n., 
courageous char- 
acler. 

coor'ant, adj., run- 
ning {lur.). 

ooui'bash, n., a whip 
made of hippopota- 
mus hide. 

COUz'ier, «., a messen- 
ger; an attendant. 

ooone, v.t., to chase 
with greyhounds; n. , 
a race, a racing- 
track; direction, line 



::? 







-^ 



*> 



151 



of movement, a 
stage in a meal; a 
range of masonry. 

cooraed, p.p., course. 

coois'er, n., one who 
courses; a swift 
horse. 

coDis'ing, pr.p., 

course; n., chasmg 
hares. 

coort, v.t., to solicit, 
flatter, pay devo- 
tion to; n., an in- 
closed space, a 
palace, a king's 
household; a place 
of justice, tbejudge. 

oonit'-chaplain, n., 
the chaplain of a 
sovereign. 

oonrt'ed, p.p., court. 

coort'eoDs. adt., po- 
lite, considerate. 

coort' eonsly, adv., 
politely. 

couit'eonsness, n., 
the exercise of cour- 
tesy. 

coort'er, »., one who 
courts. 

coort'esaa, n., a 
prostitute. 

coorfesy, «., polite- 
ness, considerate- 
ness, civility. 

ooari'-baadf n., an 
old style of official 
handwriting. 

cooit'-boDse, n., a 
building in which a 
court is held. 

couifiei, n., one who 
is attached to a 
court; a person of 
courtly manners ; 
one who seeks fa- 
vours. 

oonrt'-lands. n., the 
land of a lord of the 
manor. 

conif-leet, n., an old 
court of record. 

conrt'Iineo, n., the 
habit of courtesy. 

conrt'ly, adj., court- 
eous, refined. 

ooort-mar'tial, n., a 
naval or military 
court of discipline. 

coort'-plaster, n., a 
superior sticking- 
plaster. 

court'ihip, n., the act 
or period of court- 
ing. 

ooart'-rard, n., an 
enclosure to a house. 

COOS'in, n., an uncle's 
or aunt's son or 
daughter. 






-'^ 




eoTetouB 



cons'in get'inaii. n., a 

first-cousin. 

coat'ean, »., a knife 
{Fr.). 

ooavade'. «., a primi- 
tive practice of put- 
ting to bed the 
father of a newly 
born infant and 
conveying to him 
sympathetic felici- 
tations. 

cove, v.t., to arch; n., 
a creek; a quiet 
corner; a hollowed 
moulding. 

cov'eaaat, v.i., to 
make a covenant; 
n., a written agree- 
ment; a common 
pledge. 

cov'enanted, p.p., 
covenant; adj., 

under agreement. 

oovenantee'. n., one 
with whom a con- 
tract is made. 

coT'enantei, cov'en- 
antor, n., one who 
makes an agree- 
ment. 

cov'eaaating, pr.p. , 
covenant. 

oov'er, V.I., to lay 
something over, to 
hide; n., something 
spread over; a shel- 
ter; a covert; fur- 
nished place for 
each guest at table. 

cov'eied, p.p., cover. 

cov'erer, n., one who 
covers. 

COT'ering, pr.p., cov- 
er; n., something 
that covers. 

ooT'erlet, »., a bed- 
quilt. 

COV'ert, adj., con- 
cealed, secret, un- 
derhand; protected; 
n. , a shelter ,thicket , 
the hiding-place of 
wild animals. [ly. 

oov'ertly, adv., secret- 

coT'ertnra, »., shelter; 
the protected state 
of amarried woman. 

COT'et, v.t., to desire 
what is not one's 
own. 

cov'etable, adj., able 
to be coveted. 

oov'eted, p.p., covet. 

ooT'eter, n., one who 
covets. 

ooT'eting. pr.p. ,covet. 

cov'etoos, adj., ar- 
dently desirous, 
avaricious. 



coTetoasly 



^ 



_yt. 



~1 



cov'etoasly, adv., in a 
covetous way. 

eov'etoosness, n., the 
habit of coveting. 

COV'ey, «. , a brood of 
birds, particularly 
partridges. 

OOT'in, n., collusion 
in a fraud. 

CO'ving, pr.p., cove; 
n., the projection of 
a higher over a 
lower storey. 

cov'iiions, adj., fraud- 
tilent. 

COW, v.t., to quell 
with fear; n., the 
female ox. 

OOW'an, n., an un- 
apprenticed work- 
man. 

OOw'aTd, n. , one who 
lacks courage, a 
poltroon. 

cow'ardice, n., the 
act or state of a 
coward. 

oow'aidliness, n., i.q. 
cowardice. 

oow'aidly, ad]-, with- 
out courage, fearful. 

COW'boy, n., a boy in 
charge of cows; a 
ranchman. 

cow'-cali, ». , a female 
calf. 

cow'catcher, n., an 
apparatus in front 
of a locomotive for 
clearing away ob- 
structions. 

cowed, p.p., cow. 

cow'er, v.t., to shud- 
der, crouch down in 
fear. 

oow'ered, p.p., cower. 

cow'ering, Pr.p., 
cower. 

cow'gate, n., the 
right to pasture 
cattle. 

cow'hage, n., a ver- 
mifuge. 

cow'heel, n., gelatine 
made from a cow's 
foot. 

cow'herd, n., one who 
has charge of cows. 

cow'-bide, n., leather 
made of cow's skin ; 
a whip made of 
hide; ad]., made of 
cow-hide. 
J cow'ing, pr.p. , cow. 

cowl, n., a monk's 
hooded robe; a re- 
volving top to a 
chimney pot. 

cowled, ad]., wearing 
a cowl. 



-f^ 



^ 



152 



co-work'er, n., a 
colleague, collabo- 
rator. 

COW'-pox, n., a dis- 
ease affecting a 
cow's udders. 

cowrie, cow'ry, n., 
shell money. 

COW'slip, n., a yellow 
flower so named. 
"Coz'comb, n., a con- 
ceited fellow. 
^ cozcomb'ioU, cox- 
com'ical, adj., con- 
ceited, foppish. 
" coz'combry. n., the 
act or nature of a 
coxcomb. 
'COZ'swain, n., one 
, who steers a boat. 

coy, «<{;., bashful, 
demure. 

coy'ish, adj., play- 
fully demure. 

COy'ly, adv., demure- 
ly, modestly. 

coy'ness, n., demure- 
ness. 

CO/ote, n., the 
prairie wolf. 
, coz'en, v.t., to cheat. 

cozenage, n., cheat- 
ing, trickery. 
^ coz'ened, p.p., cozen. 

coz'ener, n. , one who 
cozens. 
; coz'eiiing, pr.p., coz- 
en. 
' co'zily, see cosily. 

co'zy, see cosy. 
, crab, v.t., to catch 
crabs; to beat; to 
irritate; »., a crus- 
tacean so named. 

crab'-apple, n., a 
small, very sour 
kind of apple. 

crablwd, p.p., crab; 
adj., sour, morose, 
difficult to read. 

ciablMdly, adv., 
morosely. 

orab'bedness. n., 
morosity. 

crabbing, pr.p., crab. 

crab'by, ^j., morose. 

crab' stick, «., a cud- 
gel; a morose fellow. 

crab-tree, «., a tree 
growingcrab apples. 

crab'-yaws, n. pi., 
ulcers on the sole. 

onudc, v.t., to make a 
fissure in, break 
open; ».«., to split 
open; «., a fissure, 
fracture, a shawp 
sound (as of a 
whip, etc.), a 
friendly chat. 



^ 



X> 



^ 



^. 



eram 



orack'-brained, adj. , 
silly. 

cracked, p.p., crack; 
adj., broken, im- 
perfect; out of one's 
mind. 

crack'er, n., anything 
that cracks; a vari- 
ety of biscuit; a 
firework. 

crack'ing,^r.^. ,crack . 

crack'le, v.t. , to make 
a slight explosion; 
v.t., to cover with 
cracks; n., a crack- 
ing sound repeated. 

orack'led, p.p., crac- 
kle. 

crackling, pr.p., 
crackle; n., a con- 
tinued sound of 
slight explosion; the 
rind of roast pig. 

crack'nel, n., a 
variety of biscuit. 

cracks'man, n., a 
burglar. 

cra'dle, v.t., to put 
into a cradle; to 
bring up; n., a 
babe's bed; native 
place; a timber- 
frame for launching 
vessels; a gold- 
washing apparatus. 

cra'dled, p.p. , cradle. 

cra'dling, pr.p., cra- 
dle. 

craft, n., skill of 
hand, cunning. 

craft'ily, adv., cun- 
ningly. 

craft'iness, n., the 
act or quality of 
being crafty. 

crafts' man, n., a 
skilled worker, a 
member of a trade. 

craft'y, adj., cun- 
ning. 

crag, n., a steep, 
rough rock. 

crag'ged, adj., having 
crags. 

crag'giness, n., the 
quality of a crag. 

crag'gy, n., precipi- 
tous, rugged. 

cragsman, "., an 
expert crag-climber. 

crake, n., the corn- 
crake. 

cram, v.t., to stuff, 
fill to overflowing, 
get up for examina- 
tion, tell falsehood 
to; n., the act of 
crammmg, a false- 
hood, getting up an 
examination. 



erambo 



v_^ 



/' 



omn'bo, n., a family 
game of rhyming. 

onunmed, p.p., cram. 

oram'mer, n., one 
who crams, esp. in 
preparing pupils for 
an examination. 

oram'ming, Pr-p-, 
cram. 

cramp, v.t. , to confine, 
narrow; cause a 
muscular spasm; n., 
a muscular spasm; a 
tool so named. 

. onunped, p.p. , cramp. 

oramp'-flsb, n., the 
torpedo. 

oramp'ing, P^-P; 
cramp. 

cramp'-iron, n., a 
piece of iron, bent 
at the ends, to hold 
anything in place. 

oram'pon, n., a piece 
of iron fastened to a 
climber's shoes. 

crampoon', n., a 
weight-lifting appa- 
ratus. 

cra'nage. n., the right 
or cost of loading or 
unloading. 

cian'berry, n., a vari- 
ety of whortleberry. 

orane, v.*., to stretch; 
n., a tall bird so 
named; a weight- 
lifting machine. 

cranes' bill, «., a vari- 
ety of geranium. 

cra'nial, adj., rel. to 
the skull. 

craniocr'nomy, n., the 
science of skulls. 

craniological, adj.t 
rel. to craniology. 

craniol'oKist. n., an 
expert in skulls. 

craniorocy, n. , the 
study of skulls. 

oraniom'eter, n., a 
skull-meas u rin g 
instrument. 

craniomet'rical, adj., 
rel. to craniometry. 

oraniom'etry, n., the 
scientific measure- 
ment of skulls. 

cranios'copy, n., the 
scientific study of 
skull formation. 

cra'ninm, n., the 
skull. 

crank, adj. , easily 
overturned; n., a 
turn; an instru- 
ment for turning an 
axis; a monomaniac. 

erank'le, v.t. and •'., 
to bend. 



'^ 



rp 



158 



crank'led, p.p., cran- 

kle. 
orank'linK, pr.p., 

crankle. 

orank'y, adi., shaky, 
loose, crotchety. 

oran'nied,a<^7. ,chink y . 

cran'ny, n., a chink. 

crape, v.t., to cover 
with crape; n., a 
thin gauzy mate- 
rial. 

Crap'nlence, n., sick- 
ness after adebauch. 

crap'nlent, ad;., 

„ drunken. 
^"V^ crap'ulous, adj., i.q. 

crapulent. 
crash, v.l., to dash; 
v.t., to make a loud 
noise; n., a loud 
alarming noise; 
coarse linen. 
rT7 crashed, p.p., crash. 
^^Jj, crashing, ^r.^. .crash. 
c^ Cra'sis, «., the forma- 
tion of a long vowel 
or diphthong from 
two vowels, 
c— e crass, adj., coarse, 

stupid, 
r^ crass'itnde, n., stu- 
pidity. 
cratch. »., a crib, a 

rack. 
cratch'ei, n., a swell- 
ing on a horse's 
pastern or beneath 
the hoof, 
crate, n., a hamper, 

packing-frame. 
cra'ter, n., the hollow 

of a volcano. 
crater'iform, adj. . 
, , cup-shaped. 
T~^ craunch, v.t. and »., 
i.q. crunch. 
I — -r orannched, p.p., 

craunch. 
r^^ craanch'ing, pr.p., 

craunch. 
«— X. Cravaf, «., a neck- 
tie. 
._» crave, v.t., to beg 
humbly, yearn for. 
^ craved, p.p., crave. 
°''\^ era' ven, adj. , coward- 
ly, dastardly. 
■T^ ora'ver, «., one who 
craves. 
,_^. cra'ving, pr.p., crave. 
''V^^ cra'vingly. adv., with 
if great yearning. 
-_ craw, n. , a bird's crop. 
r~V 7 craw'-flsh, *ee cray- 
. fish. 
--f crawl, W.I., to creep, 
' movewithdifficulty; 

n., a slow, difficult 
walk. 



creating 






2V 




-^ 



V 



crawled, ^.^., crawl. 

crawl'er, n., anything 
that crawls. 

crawring,pr.p. ,crjwl. 

ora/flsh, n., a fresh- 
water crustacean so 
named. (A corrup- 
tion of the French 
crevice.) 

cray'on, adj., drawn 
in chalks; n., a 
drawing chalk; a 
drawing in chalks; 
a carbon point. 

cray'onist, n., an 
artist in chalks. 

erase, v.i., to lose 
one's senses; v.t., to 
drive out of one's 
wits; n., a besetting 
whim, obsession; a 
crack. 

crazed, p.p., craze, 

cra'zily, adv., in crazy 
fashion. 

cra'ziness, »., a crazy 
condition. 

ora'zing, pr.p., craze. 

cra'ay, adj., de- 
mented; unsafe. 

creak, v.i., to make a 
sound of grating; n. , 
a grating noise. 

creaked, p.p., creak. 

creak'ing,/>f.^.,creak. 

cream, v.t., to skim; 
v.i., to form cream; 
n., the oily element 
of milk; the choicest 
part. 

oream'-cheesa, n., 
cheese made from 
cream. 

creamed, p.p., cream. 

cream' ery, n., a shop 
where cream and 
butter are sold. 

cream'ing, pr.p., 
cream. 

cxnm'y, n., yielding 
cream; cream-like. 

crease, v.t. and •'., to 
wrinkle; n., a wrin- 
kle; a line defining 
the batsman's and 
the bowler's posi- 
tion. 

creased, p.p., crease. 

creas'er. n., anything 
that creases. 

creas'ing, Pr.p., 
crease. 

crea'taUe, adj., able 
to be created. 

create', v.t., to bring 
into being, make, 
originate, appoint. 

orea'ted, p.p., create. 

creating, pr. p., 
create. 



creation 






"In 



"I, 



^ 



^ 



n. 



T 



r 



ciea'tion, n., the act 
of creating; all 
created things; a 
masterpiece; an ele- 
vation to rank. 

ciea'tive, adj., with 
the faculty of creat- 
ing. 

crea'tiveness, n., the 
taculty of creating. 

crea'toi, n., one who 
creates. 

ciea'tnral, adp, rel. 
to creatures. 

crea'tnre, n., a crea- 
ted being; the tool 
of another. 

crdche, n., a public 
nursery. 

cre'dence, »., belief; a 
side sanctuary table. 

creden'da, »., pi. of 
credendum. 

oieden'dam, »., an 
article for belief. 

cre'dent, adj., be- 
lieving. 

creden'tial, n., a testi- 
monial, proof of 
identity and status. 

credibil'ity, n., the 
state of being cred- 
ible. 

cred'ible, ai^;'., worthy 
of belief. 

cred'ibleness, »., i.g. 
credibility. 

cred'ibly, adv., be- 
lievably. 

cred'it, v.t., to believe, 
trust; acknowledge 
as owing; n., belief; 
honour; permission 
to defer payment. 

cred'itable, ad/., with 
honour. 

oied'itably, adv., to 
one's honoiu'. 

ored'ited, p.p., credit. 

cred'iting, ^r.p.credit. 

ored'itoi, «., one to 
whom a debt is due. 

credu'lity, n., the 
state of being credu- 
lous. 

Oied'olons, adj., be- 
lieving anything 
that is said. 

cred'ulously, adv., 
with crerlulity. 

cred'ulousness, n., i.g. 
credulity. 

creed, n., an accepted 
belief; articles of 
faith. 

creek, n., a small 
inlet of the sea. 

creel, »., a fishing- 
basket; V.I., to place 
in a creel. 



-^ 



^^ 



154 



creep, v.t., to crawl; 
move painfully; 
grow along the 
ground. 

creep' er, n., anything 
that creeps; a cling- 
ing plant. 

creep'ing, pr. p., creep. 

creep'ingly, adv., in a 
creeping way. 

creese, n., a Malayan 
knife. 

cremate', v.t., to burn 
a corpse. 

crema'ted, p.p., cre- 
mate. 

crema'ting, pr.p.,cie- 
mate. 

crema'tion, n., the 
act of cremating. 

cremato'riom, n., a 
place lor cremation. 

Cremo'na, «., a city 
in Italy; a violin by 
one ot the great 
Cremona makers. 

ore'nate, adj., with 
notches. 

cre'nated, adj., i.g. 
crenate. 

cren'ature, n., a 
notching. 

cren'ellate, cren' elate, 
v.t., to embattle; 
to decorate with in- 
dented mouldings. 

cren'ellated, crenel- 
ated,/). />. ,crenellate. 

cren'ellating, pr.p., 
crenellate. 

crenella'tion, cren- 
ela'tion, «., decora- 
tion with indented 
mouldings. 

crenelle', n., an em- 
brasure of a battle- 
ment. 

cren'elled, oren'eled, 
adj., i.g. crenellated. 

cren'ulate, adj., 

notched. 

cre'ole, adj., rel. to 
Creoles; n., a half- 
caste. 

creo'lian, adj., rel. to 
Creoles. 

cre'osote, n., an anti- 
septic product of 
wood-tar. 

cre'pance, n. , a wound 
in a horse's hind leg 
produced by the 
other leg striking 
against it. 

crep'itant, adj., mak- 
ing a cracking or 
grinding sound. 

crep'itate, v.i., to 
make a cracking or 
grinding sound. 



cribbage 



-t 



-7 



T 



"> 



crep'itated, p.p., crep- 
itate. 

crep'itating, pr.p., 
crepitate. 

crepita'tion, n., the 
act or sound of crep- 
itating. 

crep'on, n., a crape- 
like stuff. 

crept, p.p., creep. 
\ crepuscular, adj., 
dim; twilight. 

crepus'cule, n., twi- 
light. 

crepus'culous, adj., 
i.g. crepuscular. 

crescen'do,n. , a grow- 
ing volume of 
sound; adv., with 
increasing volume. 

cres'cent, adj., grow- 
ing; n., a new moon; 
a moon-shaped em- 
blem, the Moslem 
Empire. 

cress, n., the name 
for a variety of 
cruciferous plants. 

cres'set, n., a beacon- 
light; a stand for 
the light. 

crest, v.t., to top, sur- 
mount; n., a top, 
ridge, plume; the 
emblem svirmount- 
ing a helmet. 

crest' ed, p.p., crest; 
adj., having a v'-rest. 

crest'tallen, adj., de- 
pressed. 

cresting, n., a sur- 
mounting orna- 
ment; pr.p., crest. 

creta'ceous, adj., 
chalky. 

Cre'tayo, adj., bel. to 
Crete. 

cre'tin, n., one suffer- 
ing from cretinism. 

cre'tinism, n., a dis- 
ease producing de- 
formity and idiocy. 

cretonne', n., a print- 
ed cotton fabric. 

crevasse', n. , an open- 
ing in a glacier. 

orev'et. n., a. pot for 
melting gold. 

crev'ice, n., a fissure. 

crew, p.t., crow; «., 
the men of a ship 
or boat. 

crew'el, ». , a material 
used for fancy work. 

crib, v.t., to confine; 
to appropriate; n., 
a manger; a child's 
bed; a translation. 

crib'bage, «., a card 
game. 



j 



cribbed 



^^V 



'"-i 




.-^ 



oribbed, p.p., crib. 

cribbing, pr.p., crib. 

orib'ble,v.'., toriddle; 
«., a riddle; coarse 
meal. 

crib'bled, p.p., crib- 
ble; adj., dotted or 
punctured. 

crib'bling, pr.p., crib- 
ble. 

crib'rifonn, adj., like 
a sieve. 

crick, v.t., to twist ; »«. , 
a muscular twisting 
of the neck. 

crick'et, n., the game 
so named; the in- 
sect so named. 

cricketer, n., one 
who plays cricket. 

cri'coid, adj., like a 
ring. 

cried, p.p., cry. 

cri'er, n., one who 
cries; an official 
who proclaims pub- 
licly. 

crime, n., an ofience. 

Crim'inal, n., one 
guilty of crime. 

criminality, n., the 
state or quality of a 
criminal. 

criminally, ado., in a 
criminal way. 

criminate, v.t., to 
accuse, incrimin- 
ate. 

crim'inated, 
criminate. 

crim'inating, 
criminate. 

crimina'tion, n., the 
act of criminating. 

crim'inative, adj., 
tending to crim- 
inate. 

crim'inatory. adj., 
i.q. criminative. 

criminorogy, n., the 
study ot crime and 
criminals. 

crimp, v.t., to make 
wavy; to contract; 
enlist by foul means; 
n., one who crimps 
soldiers or sailors; 
the keeper of a low 
class of seamen's 
lodgings. 

crimped, p.p., crimp. 

crimp'ing, pr.p. , 

crimp. 
I crimp'ing-iron, n., an 
instrument for 

crimping. 

crim'ple, v.t., to 
crimp; n., a wrinkle. 

crim'pled, p.p., crim- 
ple. 



PP-, 
pr.p.. 



pr.p.. 



pp., 
pr.p.. 



"~^-iy? 







155 



crim'pling, 

crimple. 

crim'son, v.t., to stain 
crimson; v.i., to 
blush; adj., the col- 
our of crimson; n., 
a deep red. 

crim'soned, 
crimson. 

crim'soning, 
crimson. 

cri'nal, adj., rel. to 
hair. 

cri'nate, adj., having 
hairs. 

cri'natory, adj., rel. 
to hair. 

cringe, v.t., to bend 
down servilely; «., 
servile self-abase- 
ment. 

cringed, p.p., cringe. 

crin'ger, n., one who 
cringes. • 

crin'ging, pr.p.cringe. 

crin'gingly, adv., in a 
cringing way. 

crin'gle, «., a loop. 

crinicnl' total, adj., 
concerning the cul- 
tivation of hair. 

crinig'eroiu, adj., 
hairy. 

cri'nite, adj., hairy. 

crin'kle, v.t. and «., to 
wrinkle; n., a wrin- 
kle. 

crin'kled. p.p., crm- 
kle. 

crin'kling, Pr.p., 

crinkle. 

crin'kom - oran'knm, 
n., a zig-zag. 

crin'oid, «., a stone- 
lily. 

crinoi'dal, adj., rel. 
to a crinoid. 

crin'oline, n., a hoop 
skirt. 

crip'ple, v.t., to maim, 
hamper; n., one 
who is crippled. 

crip'pled, p.p., crip- 
ple. 

crip'pling, pr.p., 
cripple. 

Cri'sis, n., a turning- 
point, extremity of 
danger. 

crisp, v.t., to make 
wavy; adj., wavy, 
brittle, bright. 

cri8'pated,a<i;. ,curl ed . 

crispied, p.p., crisp. 

crisp'er, n., anything 
that crisps. 

Cris'pin, n., the pa- 
tron saint of shoe- 
makers. 

Crisp'ing, pr.p., crisp. 



-AT 



=A. 






^^ 






^ 



? 



crock 



crisp'ly, adv., in a 
crisp way. 

crisp'ness, n., the 
crisp state or qual- 
ity. 

crisp'y, adj., some- 
what crisp. 

criss-cross, adj., 
backwards and for- 
wards; »., an inter- 
section. 

oris'tate, adj. , crested. 

cris'tated, adj., crest- 
ed. 

crite'ria, n., pi. of 
criterion. 

crite'rion, n., a test, 
proof. 

crit'ic, n., a critical 
person. 

critical, adj., exact; 
judging; censorious; 
at a crisis. 

critically, adv., in a 
critical way. 

crit'icalness, n., the 
critical habit or 
quality. 

criticism, n., judg- 
ment, censure. 

criticize, v.t., to pass 
judgment on; to 
review; to censure. 

critidzed, p.p., crit- 
icize. 

crit'icizer, n., one 
who criticizes. 

criticizing, pr.p., crit- 
icize. 

critiQue', n., a review 
of literary or artis- 
tic work. 

criz'zle, v.«., to be- 
come wrinkled. 

croak, v.i., to make a 
hoarse noise; to 
grumble; n., a 
hoarse noise or cry. 

croaked, p.p., croak. 

croak'er, n., one who 
croaks; a grumbler. 

croak'ing, pr.p., 

croak. 

Cro'at, «., a native 
of Croatia. 

Croatian, adj., pert, 
to Croatia. 

croche, n., the top of 
an antler. 

cro'chet, v.t., to work 
at crochet; n., work 
wiyi a crochet hook. 

cro'cBeted, p.p., cro- 
chet. 

crocheting, pr.p., 
crochet. 

crock, v.t., to overlay 
with soot; n., an 
earthenware pot ; 
soot on a pot. 



eroekery 




crook'ery, n., earth- 
enware. 

crook'et, n., a pro- 
jecting ornament on 
spires and canopy 
work. 

croo'odile. n., a large 
amphibian. 

crocodilian, adj., rel. 
to the crocodile. 

CIO'COS, n., a spring 
flower so named. 

croft, n., a small field 
enclosure; a small 
farm holding; V.I., 
to bleach. 
.oroft'er, n., a small 
farmer in the High- 
lands of Scotland. 

croft'ing, pr.p., croft. 

crois'ant, adj., cres- 
cent. 

crom'lech, n., a pre- 
historic stone circle. 

cromor'na, n., an 
organ reed-stop. 

Cromwellisn, adj. , 
rel. to Cromwell. 

crone, n., an old 
woman. 

cro'ny, **-, a very 
intimate friend. 

crook, v.t., to bend; 
v.t., to be bent; n., a 
staff with a bent 
end; a sharper. 

crooked, p.p., crook. 

erook'ed, adj., not 
straight; unprin- 
cipl^. 

orook'edly, a4v., in a 
crooked way. 

crook'edness, n., the 
crooked state or 
quality. 

erook'ing,^r.^.,crook. 

crop, v.t., to cut close, 
reap; lay under 
crops; w.»., to sprout, 
appearsuddenly; »., 
the result of crop- 
ping; a bird's craw; 
close cut of hair; 
a hunting-whip. 

cropped, p.p., crop. 

cr(v'per, »., a crop- 
ping implement; 
one who crops; a 
bad fall (ilang). 
T~\ crop'pins.pf.^.,crop. 
I J. cro'Qoet, v.t., to pun- 
ish ap opponent's 
ball; n., the game 
so named. 
t~^ orore, n., a sum of 
Indian money = 
,. loo lakhs. 
,^ cro'sier, cro'iier, «., 
' a bishop's staff or 

crook. 



r-\ 



rA' 



156 



^ cro'siered, adj., hav- 
ing a crosier, 
c—^ cros'let,n., a crucible. 
i— o cross, v.t., to place 
' across; pass over; 

mark crosswise;hin- 
der; n., an upright 
line crossed by an- 
other at right angles; 
the Christian em- 
blem of Salvation; 
a great trial; a 
cross-breed. 
^ n- _, cross'-action, n., a 
' counter-suit. 

'"'^ CTOss'-armed, n. , with 

crossed arms. 
?~^ cro8s'-bar. v.t., to 
^ draw a bar across; 
n., a bar. 
r-Sr oross'-barred, p.p., 

' cross-bar. 
"r"V oross'-bearer, n., th^ 
• /^ bearer of a cross. 
r"V^ cross'bill, »., a bird 
with a cruciform 
bill. 
•r~V cross'bow, n., an old 

cross-shaped bow. 
<^— (i. cross'-breed, n., an 
' animal of mixed 

breed. 
^ n^ croes'-ont, v.t., to 
intersect. 
<-= crossed, p.p., cross. 
'...7.7^'. cross - exatnlna'- 
Hon, n., the exami- 
nation of a witness 
on behalf of the 
opposing party. 
t1^. cross-exam' lae, 

v.t., to examine a 
witness on behalf of 
the opposing party. 
r...?T. eross-exam'laed, 
p.p., cross-examine. 
'TfTT.' cross • exam'lning, 
pr./>., cross-examine 
r^f cross'-eyed, adj., 
squinting. 
oross'-grained, adj., 
' with irregular grain; 

of difficult temper. 
T~:f eroes'-head, n., a 
beam crossing the 
top. 
n. oro«s'inf,^r.^., cross; 
' n., the act of cross- 

ing; a way over; a 

thwarting. 

^. I cro6s'-legged,n.,with 
'^ the legs crossed. 

f cross'let, see croslet. 
' /'• cross'ly, adv., in a 
' cross way. 

.i_r croBs'ness, n., the 
I cross quality; bad 

temper. 
r-<</\ croBs'-purpose, n., a 
contrary purpose. 



erowding 






n. 



,^- 



^ 



^7 



^ 



:^ 






cross'-qnestion, v.t., 
i.q. cross-examine. 

oross'-road, n. , a road 
meeting or crossing 
another. 

cross'-tie, n. ,a sleeper. 

cross'-tree, n., the 
short projections on 
a mast. 

cross'ways, n., a 
meeting-place of 
several roads. 

cross' wise, adv., 

across; like a cross. 

crotch, n., a hook. 

crotched,ai^;. ,hooked . 

orotcta'et. n., a hook- 
shaped musical 

note; afoolish whim. 

crotcb'eted, adj., con- 
sisting of crotchets. 

crotoh'ety, adj., pos- 
sessed by whims; 
odd. 

cro'ton, M., the E. 
Indian plant so 
named. 

croton'ic, adj., rel. to 
croton. 

oro'ton-oil, n., the oil 
from the seeds of 
croton. 

oronch, v.t., to bend 
down, stoop. 

cronched,p./>. ,crouch. 

crooch'inc pr.p., 
crouch. 

croup, n., an affec-- 
tion of the trachea 
and larynx. 

croupade', n., a 
horse'sleap in which 
the hind legs are 
drawn up. 

oron'pier, n., the man 
who handles the 
money at a gaming- 
table. 

crow, v.t., to make 
the sound of a cock; 
to exult over; «., 
the sound of a cock ; 
the bird so named. 

crow'bar, n., an iron 
lever. 

crowd, v.t., to press 
together; to op- 
press with numbers; 
v.t., to assemble in 
great numbers; n., 
a gathering of peo- 
ple or things; a 
Welsh stringed 

musical instrument. 

crowd'ed, p.p., crowd. 

crowd'er, n. , one who 
crowds; a player on 
a crowd. 

orowd'ing, Prp., 
crowd. 



crowdy 



157 



Crutched Friars 



-a. 



.C^ 



"^ 



-T<' 






^tC- 



--'^>-^ 
-^^ 



-^ 



crowd'y, n., thick 
gruel. 

crowed, ^.^., crow. 

crow'foot, see crow's- 
foot. 

crow'ing, Pr.p. , crow. 

crown, v.t., to place a 
crown on; to sur- 
mount; to complete; 
n., a king's head- 
covering; royal 
power; a wreath; 
summit; a five- 
shilling piece; one 
of the sizes of 
paper and books. 

crowned, p.p., crown. 

crown'er, «., one who 
crowns; see also 
coroner. 

crown'-ghun, n., best 
window glass. 

crown'ing, pr. p., 
crown; adj., com- 
pleting; supreme. 

orown'-kwyer, n. , 
the Crown's legal 
adviser. 

crown'less, adj., with- 
out a crown. 

crown'-poBt. »., a 
king-post. 

CTOwn'prinoe, n., the 
heir apparent. 

crown'-wheel, n., a 
variety of cog-wheel . 

crowV-Ioot, n., the 
ranunculus; n., a 
wrinkling of the 
skin beneath the 
eyes. 

crowV-nest, n., a 
look-out on a mast. 

cro'zier, see crosier. 

CTO'ziered, see cro- 
siered. 

cm'cisl, adj., rel. to a 
crux or cross; trans- 
verse; severe. 

cm'date, adj., cross- 
shaped. 

cm'cible. n., a melt- 
mg-pot. 

craciferons, adj., 
with petals ar- 
ranged m the form 
of a cross. 

cm'cifled, p.p., cru- 
cify. 

em'cifler, n., one who 
crucifies. 

cm'cifix, n., a cross 
with Our Lord's 
figure on it. 

crucifix' ion. n., the 
act of crucifying; 
terrible suffering. 

cra'cilorm, adj., 
cross-shaped. 

cm'oily, v.t., to fasten 




to a cross; to tor- 
ture; to subdue. 

cm'cifying. pr.p. 
crucify. 

erode, <id)., raw, 
coarse, uncultured. 

omde'ly, adv., in a 
crude way. 

omde'ness, n., the 
crude quality. 

cm'dity, n., i.q. 
crudeness. 

cra'el, adj., pitiless, 
fond of inflicting 
pain, severe. 

em'el^, adv., in a 
cruel way. 

cra'elty, n., a cruel 
act. 

cm'et, n., a small 
vial. 

cruise, v.t., to sail 
about; »., a voyage. 

cmised, p.p., cruise. 

cmis'er, n., a war 
vessel of high speed. 

cmis'ing, pr.p. ,criiise . 

cmmb, v.t., to spread 
crumbs on; n., a 
small fragment. 

crumb'-cloth, n., a 
cloth to protect 
against crumbs. 

crumb' ing, pr.p., 
crumb. 

crum'ble, v.t., to 
break up into 
crumbs; to shatter 
to pieces; v.i., go 
to pieces. 

crum'bled, p.p., 

crumble. 

cmrn'Ming, pr.p., 
crumble. 

crum'my, adj., full of 
crumbs; soft. 

crump, adj., crisp. 

cram' pet. »., a vari- 
ety of tea-cake. 

crum'ple, v.t., to 
rumple, sque«e in- 
to folds; v.i., to 
become crumpled. 

crflm'pled, p.p. .crum- 
ple. 

crtim'pUnc, pr.p.. 
Crumple. 

emnoh, v.t., to crush 
with the teeth; v.i., 
to make a crunch- 
ing noise; n., the 
act of crunching. 

cnmohed, P-p., 

crunch. 

crunob'ins, pr.p., 
crunch. 

erup'per, n., a horse's 
buttocks; the leath- 
er loop passed un- 
der a horse's tail. 



%. 



'V 



-^ 



^ 



7 



-\ 



em'ral, adj., rel. to 
the thigh. 

crusade', n., an ex- 
pedition ol Crusa- 
ders; any vigorous 
concerted action; 
v.t., to go on a 
crusade. 

cmsa'der, n., a 
soldier luder the 
emblem of the 
Cross fighting for 
the recovery of the 
Holy Land. 

crusa'ding, pr.p., cru- 
sade. 

oruse, M., a vessel, a 
dish. 

crush, v.t., to press, 
break, put down; 
v.t., to go out of 
shape or into a 
smaller space; n., a 
press, crowd. 

crushed, p.p., crush. 

crush'er, n., anything 
that crushes; a con- 
clusive argument. 

crush'inc pr.p., 
crush. 

crust, v.t., to overlay 
with crust; v.t., to 
form a crust; w., a 
hard outer layer or 
surface. 

Crusta'cea, n. pi., the 
generic name of 
shell-fish. 

crusta'cean, adj., rel. 
to the Crustacea; 
n., one of the C. 

crustaceorogy, n. , the 
study of Crustacea. 

crusta'ceotu, adj., 
shell-covered. 

crusta'ceousness, n., 
the quality or state 
of being crusta- 
ceous. 

crusta'ted, adj., shell- 
covered. 

crosta'tion, adj., the 
act of forming a 
crust. 

crust'ed, adj., having 
a crust; p.f., cnist. 

emst'ily, adv., in a 
crusty way. 

omst'iness, »., surli- 
ness. 

cmst'ing, pr.p., crust. 

crust'y, adj., crust- 
like, surly. 

crutch, n., a support 
for lameness; part 
of a ladv's saddle. 

crutched, adj., hav- 
ing a crutch. 

Crutched Fri'ars, n., 
members of an 



crux 






Order wearing a 
cross on their habits. 

CTOZ, n., a cross; a 
trial; the crucial 
point. 

cty, v.t., to call out, 
proclaim; v.i., to 
utter a cry, to 
exclaim, to weep; 
n., a loud utterance, 
an attack of weep- 
ing, a party watch- 
word, the noise of 
a pack of hounds on 
the chase. 

cry'ing, pr.p., cry. 

crypt, n., an under- 
ground vault. 

crypt'ic, adj., dark, 
mysterious. 

crypt'ical, adj., i.q. 
cryptic. 

cryp'togam, n., one 
of the cryptog- 
amous plants. 

Cryptogs'niia, »., a 
name lor flowerless 
plants. 

cryptogam'ic, adj. , 
rel. to cryptogamia. 

cryptog' amist, n., a 
student ot crypto- 
gams. 

cryptog'amons, adj., 
pert, to the crypto- 
gams. 

cryptog'amy, n., the 
cryptogaraous state. 

cryp'togram, n., writ- 
ing in cipher. 

cryp'tograph, »., a 
piece of writing in 
cipher. 

cryptog'rapher, n., 
one who writes in 
cipher. 

cryptograph'ic, adj., 
rel. to cryptography. 

cryptograph'ical, adj., 
i.q. cryptographic. 

cryptog'rapby, «., the 
art of writing in 
cipher. 

crys'tal, adj., made of 
crystal; transpar- 
ent; n., a definitely 
shaped piece of 
inorganic matter; 
very clear glass. 

crys'talline, adj., like 
crystal, transparent. 

crys'tallite, n., a 
spurious crystal 
formation. 

crys'tallizable, adj. , 
able to be crys- 
tallized. 

orystalliza'tioD, n., 
the act or state of 
crystallizing. 



<^-^ 






H 



"7 






:r 



158 



crys'tallize, v.t., to 
turn into crystal; to 
give a permanent 
definite shape to; 
v.i., to become crys- 
tal; to take definite 
shape. 

crys'tollized, p.p., 
crystallize. 

crys'talliziiig, pr.p., 
crystallize. 

crystallog'rapher, n., 
an expert in the 
science of crystals. 

crystallograph'ic,a(2;. , 
rel. to crystallog- 
raphy. 

crystaUog'raphy, «., 
the science of crys- 
tal structure. 

crys'talloid, adj., like 
a crystal; «., a 
protein crystal. 

crystallol'ogy, n., the 
science of crystals. 

crys'tallotype, n., a 
picture taken on 
glass or some trans- 
parent material. 

cto'noid, adj., having 
combs; n., a fish 
with comb-like 

scales. 

cub, v.t., to produce 
cubs; n., the young 
of a fox or other 
wild beast. 

cn'bagef *>•• the act of 
estimating cubic 
content; n., the 
measure ot cubic 
content. 

Ca'ban, adj., pert, to 
Cuba. 

caba'tion, n., the act 
or period of lying. 

cn'batore, n., the 
cubic content; the 
process of ascer- 
taining the cubic 
content. 

cubbed, p.p., cub. 

cabbing, pr.p., cub; 
adj., pert, to the 
chase of young 
foxes. 

cnb'by-hole, »., a 
snug biding place. 

cube, n., a solid body 
with six equal square 
faces; the multiple 
of the square of a 
quantity by the 
quantity itself; v.i., 
to raise to the 
power of a cube. 

cu'beb, n., Java 
pepper. 

en'tac, adj., rel. to a 
cube. 




-1 



~1 






cuffed 



calricle, n., a bed- 
room. 

ca'biform, adj., cube- 
shaped. 

ca'bit, n., a measure 
roughly correspond- 
ing to the length 
of the forearm. 

ca'bital, adj., rel. to 
the cubit. 

cn'boid, adj., cube- 
like. 

cnboi'dal, adj., i.g. 
cuboid. 

cock'ing-stool, n., a 
chair in which 
scolds were ducked 
under water. 

cnck'old, v.t., to se- 
duce a man's wife; 
n., a man whose 
wife is an adulteress. 

CUCk'oo, n., the bird 
so named. 

cu'cullate, adj. , hood- 
ed, hood-shaped. 

cn'cnllated, adj., i.q. 
cucullate. 

ca'cnmber, n., the 
creeping plant so 
named. 

cucur'bit, n., a gen- 
eric name for pump- 
kins, melons, etc.; a 
goujrd-shaped vessel 

cod, n., food returned 
from a ruminant's 
first stomach. 

cad'bear, »., a dye 
made from a cud- 
bear lichen. 

cnd'dle, v.t., to clasp 
closely ; v.i., to 
snuggle up; n., an 
embrace. 

cnd'dled, ^.^. , cuddle. 

cnd'dliig, pr.p., cud- 
dle. 

oud'dy, «., a ship's 
galley. 

cndg'el, v.t., to strike 
with a cudgel; n., a 
short, thick stick. 

cudg'elled, cudgeled, 
p.p., cudgel. 

cudg'ellei, n. , one 
who cudgels. 

codg'elling, pr.p., 
cudgel. 

cnd'weed, n., a plant 
so named. 

one, n., a tail; the 
end words of an 
actor's part; a hint; 
a stick for driving a 
billiard ball. 

cuff, v.t., to slap; n., 
a blow with the 
hand; a wrist-band. 

cuffed, p.p., cuS. 



C'ufic 



■ y 




<=-i-N. 

\ 



Cnfio, adj., pert, to 
the old Arabic writ- 
ten character. 

cuff'ing, pr.p., cuff. 

cuirass', n., a breast- 
plate. 

cuirassier', n., a 
horse soldier wear- 
ing a cuirass. 

onish, n., i.q. cuissc. 

coisine', n. , a kitchen ; 
cookery. 

CQJsse, n., armour for 
the thigh. 

Col'dee, n., an early 
Order of religious. 

cnl-de-sao', n., a pas- 
sage with one out- 
let. 

culic'ilorm, adj., 
shaped like a gnat. 

cn'linaiy, adj., pert, 
to the kitchen. 

cnll, v.t., to pick out, 
gather. 

called, p.p., cull. 

oal'lender, n., i.q. col- 
ander. 

cnll'ing, pr.p., cull. 

cnl'lion, n. , an orchid; 
a low person. 

Onl'lis, n., a roof- 
gutter; a groove; 
see coulisse. 

cnl'ly, v.t., to trick; 
n., a dupe. 

Ctllm, n. , agr ass-stem ; 
poor kind of an- 
thracite. 

cnlmif'erons, (idj., 
having stems. 

col'minant, adj., cul- 
minating. 

col'minate, v.i., to 
reach the highest 
point. 

col'minated, p.p. , cul- 
minate. 

col'minating, pr.p. , 
culminate. 

colmina'tion, n., the 
act of culminating; 
the highest point 
attained. 

cnlpabil'ity, n., the 
state or quality of 
being culpable. 

col'pable, arf;'., blame- 
worthy, guilty. 

cnl'pableness, n., i.q. 
culpability. 

cnl'pably, adv., in a 
culpable way. 

cnl'prit, n., a guilty 
person. 

colt, n., a system of 
worship; a particu- 
lar devotion. 

col'tiTable, adj., able 
to be cultivated. 



X 

X 
X 

X 



^^w- 



159 



cal'tivatable, adj., i.q. 
cultivable. 

cnl'tiTate, v./., to 
bring under cultiva- 
tion; to seek the 
society of. 

cal'tivated, p.p., cul- 
tivate. 

cnl'tivating, Pr.p., 
cultivate. 

cultivation, n., the 
act of cultivating; 
a cultivated state; 
refinement. 

cnl'tivator, n., any- 
thing that culti- 
vates. 

cnl'trate, adj., like a 
knife. 

col'trated, adj., made 
like a knife. 

col' triform, adj., 
knife-like. 

COl'taral, adj., tend- 
ing or pert, to 
culture. 

cnl'tnre, »., tillage; in- 
tellectual improve- 
ment; the growing 
of bacteria. 

cnl'tored, adj., cul- 
tivated, refined. 

cnl'tns, n., a system 
of worship; cult. 

COl'ver, n., a wood- 
pigeon. 

COl'Terin, n., an ob- 
solete type of can- 
non. 

col' vert, n., a sub- 
terranean drain. 

cnm'bent, adj., reclin- 
ing. 

cnm'ber, v.t., to op- 
press, burden. 

cnm'bered, p.p., cum- 
ber. 

cmn'berer, n., one 
who cumbers. 

cnm'bering, pr.p. , 
cumber. 

combersome, adj. , 
troublesome, em- 
, barrassing. 

' cnm'bersomely, adv., 
in a cumbersome 
way. 

> com bersomeness, n., 

the state or quality 
of being cumber- 
some. 

Com'brian, n., pert. 
to Cumbria. 

combroos, adj., 
troublesome, heavy. 
' com'broosly, adv., in 
a cumbrous way. 

> cmn'broosnesB, n. , 

the state or quality 
of being cumbrous. 



cupidity 



pp., 

pr.p., 
(., the 



"^ 



^\ 



com'in, cnm'min, n., 

an aromatic plant 
so named. 

com'merbnnd, h., a 
sash, waistband. 

cn'mulate, v.t., to 
pile up. 

ca'malated, 
cumulate. 

cn'molating, 
cumulate. 

cnmnla'tion, 
act of cHmulating. 

ca' molati ve, adj. , 
increasing by addi- 
tion. 

ca'molose, adj., com- 
pfj<((l of cumuli. 

cnmnlo-cirro-stra'tns, 
»., a composite 
cloud - formation, 
consisting of cumu- 
lus and cirro-stra- 
tus. 

cumolo-stra'ttis, n., a 
cloud half cumulus, 
half stratus. 

cn'mnlos, n., a pile; a 
mass of round wool- 
ly clouds. 

ca'neal, adj., rcl. to a 
wedge. 

cn'neate, adj., wedge- 
like. 

on'neated, adj., i.q. 
cuncate. 

oaneiiorm, n., the 
ancient wedge- 

shaped Assyrian 
and Persian script. 

con'ning, adj., sly, 
underhand, design- 
ing; n., skill, crafti- 
ness. 

can'ningly, adv., in a 
cunning way. 

can'ningness, n. , cun- 
ning conduct. 

cup, V.t., to bleed by 
cupping; n., a vessel 
for drinking; any- 
thing shaped like a 
cup; a vessel used 
in surgical bleeding. 

cnp'bearer, n., one 
who hands round a 
cup. 

cup'board, n., a shut* 
up closet. 

CU'pel, n., a refining 
vessel. 

cnpella'tion, n., the 
act of refining. 

cup'ful, n., the quan- 
tity contained in a 
cup. 

Cn'pid, n., the Roman 
god of love. 

onpid'ity, adj., covet- 
ousness. 



cupola 



-^ 



-v^' 



_?). 



-/)- 



-J\.. 



ca'pola, n., a small 
domicallantern sur- 
mounting a build- 
ing; a roof hemi- 
spherical or nearly 
so; a domical shot- 
proof ship's turret. 

capped, p.p., cup. 

cnp'per, n., one who 
cups. 

cup'ping, ^>'7>.,cup. 

cap'ping-glass, n., a 
glass used in bleed- 
ing patients. 

ca'preons, adj., cop- 
pery. 

capiiferons, adj., 
yielding copper. 

ca'prite, n., red cop- 
per oxide. 

on'pule, n., a small 
cup. 

cnpnlil'eroiu, adj., 
producing small 
cups. 

OUT, «., a mongrel; a 
surly fellow. 

onrabil'ity, n., a 
curable state. 

cor'able. adj., able 
to be cured. 

cnr'ableness, n., i.q. 
curability. 

coracao', coracoa', n. , 
a liqueur flavoured 
with orange-pe«l. 

OU'iacy, «., a curate's 
office or sphere of 
work. 

coia'ie, n., a South 
American poison 
used for smearing 
arrows. 

ctrn'rize, v.t., to 
smear with curare. 

cnras'sow. n., a S. 
American bird so 
named. 

cn'rate, n., one w th 
a cure of souls; the 
parish priest. 

cnr'atiTe, adj., of 
curing effect. 

eora'tor, »., an officer 
in charge of a 
gallery or museum. 

onib, v.t., to restrain, 
hold; n., anything 
that checks; a bit. 

cnrbecU p.p., curb. 

cnrb'ing, pr.p., curb. 

ooib'-roof, n., a roof 
with two sets of 
rafters. 

cnrb'stone, su kerb- 
stone. 

cmcn'Uo, »., a weevil. 

OOld, v.t., to make 
into ctird; v.i., to 
form curd; n., the 



n 



_^. 



~y^ 



160 



separated solid part 
. of milk. 

-T-/\ cord'ed, p.p., curd. 
__/l^ card'iness, n., the 
state or quality of 
curd. 
cnr'dJe, v.t., to make 
into curd; v.i., to 
become curd. 

X- cnr'dled, p.p., curdle. 
cni'dling, pr.p., cur- 
dle. 

cnid'y, adj., curd- 
Like, curding. 

cme, v.t., to heal, 
remedy, preserve; 
to salt; n., healing; 
spiritual charge; a 
benefice. 

curt, »., a French 
parish priest. 

cured, p.p., cure. 

cnre'less, ai?., past 
healing; without a 
cure. 

cni'er, «., one who 
cures. 

cnrette', n., a surgical 
instrument so 

named. 

enr'few, n., an old 
edict for the ex- 
tinction of house 
fires at a fixed hour; 
the bell rung at 
curfew time. 

on'ria, «., an assem- 
bly, a senate-house; 
the papal court. 

ca'ritd, adj., rel. to a 
curia. 

cni'ing, pr.p., cure. 

ca'rio, »., a curiosity, 
bric-4-brac. 

cnrios'ity, n., the act 
or character of the 
curious. 

curio'so, «., a person 
skilled in an art or 
the arts. 

cn'rions, adj. , inquisi- 
tive, exact, strange. 

cn'riously, adv., in a 
curious way. 

cn'rioosness. n., the 
character of the 
curious. 

CHll, v.t., to twist, 
bend; v.i., to move 
spirally; become 
curled; piay at curl- 
ing. 
*T ^-^ coiled, p.p., curl. 
c+/ > cnrl'er, n., one who 
curls; a player at 
curling. 

cnr'lew, m., the bird 
so named. 

cniricoe, ft., any 
queer, twisted thing. 



-J 






-rA. 






c-t-fl '** 



enrsoriness 



cnr'liness, n., a tend- 
ency to curl. 

earring, pr.p., curl; 
»., the game so 
named played on 
ice. 

carry, adj., in curls; 
full of curls. 

cnrmodK'eon, n., a 
stingy fellow. 

car'rant, n., a small 
dried grape; the 
shrub and fruit so 
named. 

car'rency, n., circula- 
tion; the monetary 
system. 

current, adj., run- 
ning; of the present 
time; common; w., 
a flow, a stream, 
the set of a stream. 

car'rently, adx., com- 
monly, in the gen- 
eral opinion. 

oar'ricle, n., an old- 
fashioned two- 
wheeled , two-horsed 
vehicle. 

cnrhc'nla, «., pi. of 
curriculum. 
V carric'olam, n., a 
prescribed course of 
studies. 

cor'ried, p.p., curry. 

car'rier, n., a leather- 
dresser. 

cnr'rish, adj., cur- 
like. 

ear'ry, v.t., to dress 

tanned leather, to 

clean a horse, to 

flavour with curry, 

. to flatter. 

carry-comb, v.t., to 
groom a horse; «., 
a comb for groom- 
ing horses. 

cor'iying, pr.p. curry. 

carse, v.t., to invoke 
evil against, to im- 
precate; v.i., to use 
bad language; n., 
an imprecation 

against; a cause of 
trouble. 
-, oarsed, p.p., curse. 

con'edneas, »., the 
state of being 
cursed. 
^ ems'ing, pr.p., curse. 

cor'sitor, »., once a 
clerk of the Chan- 
cery Court. 

cnr'siTe, arf;'. .running. 

cnr'sorily, adv., in a 
cursory way. 

cor'sorinen, m., the 
quality of being 
cursory. 



cursory 



161 









oar'sory, ad;., super- 
ficial. 

ourt, orf/., short, 
abrupt. 

curtail', v.t., to shor- 
ten at the end; 
reduce. 

curtailed', p.p., cur- 
tail. 

cnrtail'er, »., one who 
curtails. 

curtailing, pr.p., cin-- 
lail. 

curtail'ment, «., the 
act or effect of 
curtailing. 

our'tain, v.t., to en- 
close with a curtain ; 
«., a screen; a castle 
wall between the 
towers. 

curtained, p.p., cur- 
tain. 

cur'taining, pr.p., 
curtain. 

cnr'tate, adj., short- 
ened. 

cnrta'tion, n., the 
ditterence between 
the curtate and the 
real distance of a 
planet Irom the sun 
fir the earth. 

curtilage, «., thr 
ground immediately 
coimected with a 
house. 

curt'ly, adv., in a 
curt way. 

ctirt'ness, n., the act 
or state of being 
curt. 

curt'sy, «.«., to drop a 
curtsy; «., a respect- 
tul dropping of the 
knees by women. 

CU'rule, ad)., magis- 
terial. 

curv'ate, ad]-, curved. 

cnrv'ated, ad)., i.g. 
curvate. 

curva'tion, n., the 
act of curving. 

cnrv'atore, n., the act 
of bending; a bent 
state. 

curve, v.t., to bend; 
v.i., to move in a 
curve; n., a bent 
line, a bend. 

carved, p.p., curve. 

cur'vet, v.i., to 
prance; n., a horse's 
prance. 

curveted, p.p., cur- 
vet. 

eur'veting, pr.p., cur- 
vet. 






^ 






1 



■^ 



onr'vilorm, 

curved. 



adj. , 






cnrvilin'eal, a<i/. , hav- 
ing curved lines. 

curvilin'ear, adj., i.g. 
curvilineal. 

curv'ing, ^f.^., curve. 

curv'ity, n., the state 
of being curved. 

cnsh'at, n., a ring- 
dove. 

cush'ion, v.t., to put 
on a cushion, to fur- 
nish with cushions; 
v.i., to go off the 
cushion at billiards; 
n., a sort of pillow; 
the elaistic padding 
round a billiard 
table. 

cush'ioned, p.p., 
cushion. 

cush'ioniag, pr.p., 
cushion. 

casb'iony, adj., cush- 
ion-like, comfort- 
able. 

cusp, n., a sharp 
point; an architec- 
tural spear-shaped 
ornament. 

cusped, adj., having 
cusps. 

cus'pid, n., a canine 
tooth. 

cus'pidal, adj., rel. to, 
of the nature of, a 
cusp. 

cus'pidated, adj., 
sharpened to a cusp. 

cus'taid, n., a con- 
fection of milk, 
eggs, sugar, and 
other things. 

custo'dial, adj., rel. 
to custody. 

custodian, n., one 
who has custody. 

ens' tody, n., guard, 
confinement, care, 
charge. 

cns'tom, H., what is 
usual; habit, wont; 
purchasing. 

cus'tomable, adj., 
liable to dpty. 

customarily, adv., in 
a customary way. 

cns'tomary, adj., 
usual, wonted. 

cus'tomed, adj., ac- 
customed. 

cns'tomer, n., a 
buyer; a person with 
some peculiarity. 

cua'tom-bonie, n., 
the place where 
customs duties are 
collected. 

cns'toms, n. pi., taxes 
on goods imported 

, or exported. 



-n- 



.7]... 



-^ 



i 



cat-water 



ens' too, n., a guard- 
ian, warden ; a mark 
at the end of a 
musical line show- 
ing the first note 
on the following 
line. 

cut, v.t., to cleave, 
divide, make an 
incision; to refuse 
to recognize; put a 
spin on a ball; to 
hit a ball to the 
right ; n. , an incision , 
gash; a stroke at 
cricket; a ditch; 
style; an engraving; 
a direct way; a spin 
on a ball; a snub. 

cuta'neons, adj., rel. 
to the skin. 

cute, a<2;'., sharp, cun- 
ning. 

cuto'ness, n., the 
quality of being 
cute. 

cn'ticle, n., the outer 
skin. 

cntic'nlar, adj., rel. 
to the cuticle. 

cu'tis, n., the skin. 

cut'lass, n., a short, 
heavy sort of sword, 
slightly curved. 

cnt'ler, n., one who 
makes or sells cut- 
lery. 

ont'lery, »., a cutler's 
trade; cutting im- 
plements. 

cnt'let, »., a slice of 
meat or fish for 
broiling. 

eat' -out. n., a switch 
to cut off an electric 
circuit. 

out'pnise, n., one who 
steals purses. 

cafter, n., anything 
that cuts; a small 
single-masted ves- 
sel; a small steamer 
used in the reveane 
service. 

cutthroat, n., tn 
assassin. 

cutting, pr.p., cut; 
adj., sharp-edged; 
»., the act of cut- 
ting; an extract, a 
clipping. 

cnt'tle-fl^ ft., the 
marine creatine so 
named. 

cnt'ty, adj., short; «., 
a short thing, as a 
pipe, etc. 

cnt'-water, »., the 
front part of a ship 
or boat. 



6— (172) 



cyanate 



162 



Czech 



t 
t 



n 



cy'anate, n., a cyanic 

acid salt. 

cyau'ic, adi., rel. to 
blue or to cyanogen. 

cy'anid, n., a com- 
pound formed with 
cyanogen. 

cyanide, n., i.g. cy- 
anid. 

cyan'ogm, n., a gas 
compounded of car- 
bon and nitrogen. 

eyanom'eter, n., an 
apparatus for mea- 
suring the intensity 
of blue. 

cyan'oiet, n., i.q. cy- 
an id. 

cyanu'ric, adj., pert, 
to cyanogen and 
urea. 

cyc'lamen, n., a bulb- 
ous flowering plant 
so named. 

cy'de, v.i., to move 
inacycle; tobicycle; 
n., a recurring peri- 
od; a series; a 
bicycle or motor- 
cycle. 

cy'cled, ^.^•, cycle. 

C.vc'lic, <tdj., moving 
in a fixed order, 
recurring in cycles; 
bel. to the epic 
cycle. 

cyclical, adj., i.q. 
cyclic. 

cy'cUng, pr.p., cycle; 
n. the act of cyclmg. 

cy'clist, «., a bicyc- 
list or motor-cyclist. 

cy'dograph, «., an 
apparatus for draw- 
ing arcs. 

cycloid, adj., like a 
circle; approaching 
the circular. 

cydoi'dal, adj., i.g. 
cycloid. 

cyclom'eter, n., an 
instrument that re- 
cords a wheel's ro- 
tations. 

cyclom'etry, n., the 
art of measuring 
circles. 

cy'clone, n., a storm 
moving in a circle. 

oyclope'an, adj., rel. 



'^. 



T 






.«-: — ^- 



to the Cyclopes; 
gigantic. 

oyclope'dia, n., a dic- 
tionary of general 
knowledge, or of a 
special subject. 

cyclope'dic, adj., like 
a cyclopedia. 

cyclope'dical, adj., i.g. 
cyclopedic. 

cyclop'ic, adj., i.q. 
Cyclopean. 

Cy'clops, n., one of 
the Cyclopes, fabu- 
lous one-eyed giants 

cygnet, n., a young 
swan. 

cyl'inder, »., a solid, 
roll-like figure; a 
hollow cylinder-like 
vessel. 

cylin'diic, adj., pert, 
to a cylinder. 

cylin'drical, ad]., i.q. 
cylindric. 

cylin'driJorm, adj., 
shaped like a cylin- 
der. 

cyl'indroid, adj., like 
a cylinder. 

cylindrometric, adj., 
pert, to the mea- 
suring of cylinders. 

cy'ma, n., a curved 
moulding. 

cym'bal, n., one of a 
pair of brass plates 
clashed together for 
musical purposes. 

cyme, »., a form of 
inflorescence. 

cy'mene. n., an oily 
liquid compound 
obtained by dis- 
tillation of camphor 
with phosphoric 
anhydrid. 

cy'mose, adj., of the 
nature of a cyme. 

Oym'ric, adj., rel. to 
the Cymri or Welsh. 

Cjman'che, n., in- 
flammation of the 
throat. 

cynan'thropy, n., the 
mental delusion of 
a man who believes 
himself to be a dog. 

cyn'ic, adj., rel. to 
Dlogene* and the 



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Cynics; n., a sneer- 
ing, captious per- 
son. 

cyn'ical, adj., sneer- 
ing, captious. 

cyn'icism, n., the act 
or character of a 
cynic. 

cyn'osnie, n., the 
Little Bear constel- 
lation; a centre of 
attraction. 

oy'press, n., a large, 
dark evergreen. 

Cyp'rian, adj., pert, 
to Cyprus and 
Venus. 

cyp'rine, adj., pert. 
to the cypress. 

Cyp'riote, «., a native 
of Cyprus. 

Cyrena'io, adj., pert, 
to Cyrene. 

Cyre'nian, adj., i.g. 
Cyrenaic. 

cyriolog'ic, adj., rel. 
tohieroglyphics and 
capital letters. 

cyst, n., a sac of 
morbid matter in 
an animal body. 

oyst'io, adj., rel. to 
cysts. 

cysti'tis, n., inflam- 
mation of the blad- 
der. 

cys'tocele, n., a form 
of hernia. 

cystotomy, n., an 
operation for cyst. 

Cythere'an, adj., con- 
nected with Cyth- 
era, and with Cyth- 
erea or Aphrodite 
(Venus). 

Car, n., the title of 
the Emperor of 
Russia and the 
King of Bulgaria. 

Osar'mritch, n., a 
Czar's heir appa- 
rent. 

Czarev'na, n., the 
Czarevitch's con- 
sort. 

Czari'na, n., the 
Russian Empress. 

Cnoh, n., the name 
of the Bohemian 
Slavs. 



^ 






^ 



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dab, v.t., to strike 
gently, or with some- 
thing soft or moist; 
to deface; n., a 
gentle blow; a piece 
of something soft. 

dabbed, ^./>., dab. 

dabbing, pr.p., dab. 

dab'ble, v.t. and %., to 
wet by dips or 
strokes; to work, 
but not in earnest. 

dabbled, ^.f., dabble. 

dab'bler, n., one who 
liabbles. [ble. 

dab'blins, pr.p., dab- 

dab'chick, n., a small 
swimming bird. 

dab'ster, n., an, adept; 
a proficient. 

dace, n., a small 
river fish. 

daohs'himd, n., a 
badger dog; small, 
short-legged, and 
long-bodied. 

Da'cian, adj., rel. to 
Dacia. 

daooit', n., an East 
Indian brigand. 

dactyl, n., in poetry 
a foot containing 
one long and two 
short syllables : — 
(— ^ ^). 

dao'tylai, adj., pert, 
to a finger, toe, or 
claw; dactylic. 

dactyl ic adj., con- 
sisting of dactyls. 

dactylog'iaphy, n., 
type- writing. 

dactyIorogy,«. .finger- 
language used by 
deaf mutes. 

dad, n.. a childish 
name for father. 

dad'dy, n., a longer 
form of dad. 

da'do, n., the lower 
part ot a wall whan 
ornamented differ- 
ently from the rest. 

dae'dal, adj., ingeni- 
ous; intricate. 

Daed'alus, n., the 
builder of the Cre- 
tan Labyrinth. 

daft, v./., to put off. 

dariodil. n., a kind 
of lily. 

dalt, adj., crazy. 



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dag'ger, »., a short 
sword for stabbing. 

dag'gle, v.t. and «., to 
draggle. 

Da'gon, n., the Phil- 
istine god. 

dagner'rean, adj., rel. 
to Daguerre or the 
daguerreotype. 

daguerre'otype, n., an 
early kind of photo- 
graph. 

dahabee'yah, n., a 
Nile passenger-boat. 

dah'lia, n., a flower- 
ing plant so named. 

dai'iy, adx. and adj., 
day by day. 

dain'tily, ada., in a 
dainty manner. 

dain'tiness, n., fine- 
ness of taste. I 

dain'ty.ad;. .delicious; i 
fastidious; elegant; 
trim; n., some- 
thing pleasant to 
the taste. ■ 

dai'ry, n., a place for i 
selling milk and 
making butter and 
cheese. ■ 

dai'rymaid, n.. a fe- 
male servant doing 
dairy work. 

da'is, n., the raised 
end of a hall. 

dais'ied, adj. , adorned 
with daisies. 

dai'sy, n., a small 
white flower with a 
yellow centre. 

dak, n., a relay of 
letter carriers, etc.; 
the post. 

dale, n., a hollow 
between hills. 

dall, n., a slab of 
marble. 

dalliance, n., trifling; 
giving and receiv- 
ing caresses. 

danied.^.p., dally. 

dal'lier, n., one who 
dallies. 

dal'ly, v.t., to put off 
by doing little or 
nothing; to trifle. 

dalmat'ic, n., the 
deacon's Mass vest- 
ment, worn also by 
a bishop under the 
chanuble. 









1-^ 



Dalto'nian, n., one 
suffering from col- 
our-blindness. 

dal'tonism, n., colour- 
blindness. 

dam, n.. a bank to 
keep back water; a 
mother of four- 
footed animals; v.t., 
to confine water by 
a bank. 

dam'age, n., barm; 
loss; v.t., to injure. 

dam'ageable. adj., 
capable of being 
damaged. [age. 

dam'aged, p.p., dam- 

dam'aging, pr.p., 
damage; adj., in- 
jurious. 

diun'ascene, n.. a 
damson; v.t., i.q. 
damaskeen. 

dam'ask, n., cloth 
with woven figures 
on it; adj., of a deep 
rose colour; v.t., to 
variegate. 

damasked, p.p. .dam- 
ask. 

damaskeen', v.t., to 
ornament metals 
with inlaid gold or 
silver. 

damaskeened', p.p., 
damaskeen. 

dam'assin, n.. dam- 
ask with gold and 
silver flowers woven 
in. 

dame, »., a lady; a 
knight's or baron- 
et's wife. 

dammed, p.p., dam. 

dam'ming.^r.^.. dam. 

damn, v.t., to give 
over to everlasting 
punishment; to con- 
demn. 

damoabil'ity, n., the 
quality of being 
damnable. 

dam'nable, adj., odi- 
ous; detestable. 

dam'nableness, n., 
the state of being 
damnable. 

dam'nably, adv., in a 
damnable manner. 

danina'tion, »., pun- 
ishment of the 
wicked. 



damuatory 

v—^y. damnatory, adj., 
^ condemnatory. 
l-> damned, adj., detest- 
able; p.p., damn. 
U-— ^» dam'nifled.^.^., dam- 
nify. 
dam'nify, v.t., to 

cause l(jss to. 
dam'nifying, pr.p., 
damnify. 
U;^^ dam'ning, /)./>., damn; 
adj., convicti'ig. 
damp, n., slight wet- 
ness; noxious gas in 
a coal-mine; adj., 
feeling wet; v.t., to 
make slightly wet; 
to depress. 
damped, p.p., damp, 
damp'en,!'.^, to make 

damp. 
damp'ened, p.p., 

dampen. 
damp'ening, pr-P- , 

dampen. 
damp'er, n., a plate 
in a chimney to 
regulate draught; a 
means of reducing 
sound in a musical 
instrument. 
damp'ing, pr.^.damp; 

adj., depressing. 
damp'ish, adj., rather 

damp. 
dampness, n., slight 
.. wetness. 

I— t dam'sel, «., a girl. 
V-^ dam'son, n., a kind 
.. of plum. 
J dan, «., an old title= 
master. 
J dance, «.«., to move 

on foot to music; 
M., a movement in 
time with music. 
J danced, p.p., dance. 
t_p>^ dan'cer, n., one who 
dances. 
J dan'cing,/?r.^., dance; 
n., the act of danc- 
ing. 
dan'delion, n., a herb 
with a yellow flower. 
dan'der, n., temper; 

a feeling of anger. 
dan'dify, v.t., to dress 

out like a dandy, 
dandified, p.p., dan- 
dify. 
dan'dle, v.t., to toss 
, up and down gently. 
r dandled, ^.^., dandle. 

•^ r. dan'dler, «., one who 
.1/ dandles. 
\ dandling, pr.p., dan- 

,. l-> <"<■• 

l» _ dan'druff , w ., scurf on 
v .. the scalp. 

dan'dy, n., a fop. 









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164 



dan'dyish, adj., like 
a dandy. 

dan'dyism, n., fop- 
pishness. 

Dane, n., a native of 
Denmark. 

Dane'geld, n., the 
Danish exaction on 
our Saxon kings. 

Daae'gelt, n., i.q. 

Daaegeld. 

dane'wort, «., dwarf 

elder. 
dan' get, n., a state 

in which harm may 

happen. 
dan'gerous, adj., 

bringing or involv- 
ing danger. 
daa' fferoualy, adv. , 

in a dangerous 

manner. 
(/an'j-eroasness, n., 

the state of being 

dangerous. 
dan'gle, v.t. and i'., to 

hang loosely. 
dan'gled, />./>., dangle, 
dan'gler, «., one who 

hangsabout women. 
dan'gUng, pr.p., dan- 
gle. 
Da'nish, adj., pert, to 

Denmark. 
dank, adj., damp. 
daosense', n., a fe- 
male stage-dancer. 
Dann'bian, adj., rel. 

to the R. Danube. 
dap, v.t., to let bait 

fall gently into the 

water. 
Dapb'ne, n., laurel, 
dap'per, adj., little 

and active; smart in 

dress. 
dap'perling, n., a little 

fellow; a dwarf. 
dap'ple, v.t., to mark 

with spots; adj., 

spotted. 
dap'pled, p.p., dap- 
ple; a<i/. .variegated. 
dap'pling, pr.p., dap- 
ple. 
dar, n., the European 

black tern. 
dare, »■<■, to be bold 

enough; ».<., to defy; 

to challenge; n., a 

dace, 
dared, p.p., dare, 
dar'er, n., one who 

dares. 
dar'ic, n., a Persian 

gold or silver coin. 
du'ing, adj. , bold ; n. , 

courage; pr.p., dare. 
daringly, adv., in a 

daring manner. 



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dashing 



dark, adj., wanting 
light; «., want of 
light. 

dark'en, v.t., to make 
dark; v. ., to grow 
dark. 

dark'ened, p.p., dark- 
en. 

dark'ener, n., one 
who, or that which, 
darkens. 

dark'ening, pr.p., 
darken. 

dark'er, adj., comp. 
of dark. 

dark'est, adj., super, 
of dark. 

dark'-eyed, adj., hav- 
ing dark eyes. 

dark'iEh, adj., dusky. 

dark'ling, adv., in the 
dark; adj., black-; 
looking; groping. 

dark'Iy, adv., in a 
dark manner. 

dark'ness, n., the 
state of being dark. 

dark'some, adj., 
dark. 

dar'ling, n., one much 
beloved. 

dam, v.t., to mend a 
hole m cloth; n., a 
place darned. 

darned, p.p., darn. 

dar'neU «., a troubk- 
some weed in corn. 

dam'er, n., one who 
darns. 

dam'ing, pr.p., darn; 
n., the act of darn- 
ing. 

dart, n., a pointed 
hand-missile; a sud- 
den spring; v.t., to 
throw suddenly; 
».»., to shoot out. 

darted, p.p., dart. 

dart'er, n., one who 
darts; a tropical 
swimming bird. 

dart'ing, pr.p., dart. 

Dar'winism, n., the 
biological doctrines 
of Charles Darwin. 

dash, v.t., to strike 
strongly against; v.i. 
to rush; n., a quick, 
heavy blow; a sud- 
den rush; a mark 
( — ) in printing. 

dash-board, n., a 
mud-catching board. 

dashed, p.p., dash. 

dash'er, »«., one who, 
or that which, 
dashes. 

dashing, adj., showy; 
impetuous ; pr.p.f 
dash. 



dastard 



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das' tard, n. , a coward . 

daa'tardliness, n., 
cowardliness. 

das'tordly, adj., cow- 
ardly. 

das' tardy, n., mean 
tiniorousness. 

da'ta, n. pL, facts 
given from which 
others may be in- 
ferred. 

datable, date'able, 
adj., capable of 
being dated. 

Data'ria, n., an office 
m the papal couit. 

da'taiy, n., an officer 
having charge of 
the Dataria. 

date, »., the fruit of 
a kind of palm; a 
fi.xed point of time; 
v.t., to note the 
time of. 

da' ted, p.p., date. 

dateless, adj., un- 
dated; of extreme 
antiquity; eternal. 

da' ting, pr.p., date. 

da'tive, ttdj., describ- 
ing one of the cases 
of a noun; n., the 
dative case. 

da'tom, n., sing, of 
data. 

data'ra, n., a strong 
narcotic plant. 

datu'rin, data'rine. 
«., atropin. 

daub, n., a coarse 
painting; v./., to 
smear with some- 
thing soft. 

daubed, p.p., daub. 

daub'er, n., one who 
daubs; an indifler- 
ent painter. 

danb'ing, pr.p., daub. 

daab'y, adj., slimy; 
viscous. 

daogh'ter, n., a fe- 
male child. 

daogh'teily. adj., du- 
tiful; becoming a 
daughter. 

daunt, v.t., to intimi- 
date. 

daont'ed, p.p., daunt. 

daonf er, n., one who 
daunts. 

dannt'ing, pr.p., 
daunt. 

dannt'Iess, adi., fear- 

l.-^s. 

daout'lessly, adv., in 
a bold, fearless 
manner. 

daont'lessness, »., 
fearlessness. 

dau'phin, n., the 



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French Heir Appar- 
ent. 

dau'ptainess, »., the 
dauphin's wife. 

dav'enpoit, n., a 
small writing-table. 

dav'it, »., one of the 
two wooden or iron 
arms for hoisting or 
lowering a boat. 

da'vy, n., a safety 
lamp. 

daw, n., a bird of the 
crow kind. 

daw'dle, v.t., to waste 
time; to saunter. 

daw'dled, p.p., daw- 
dle. 

daw'dlei, n., a waster 
of time. 

daw'dling, pr.p., daw- 
dle; n., the act or 
habit of dawdling. 

dawn, n., the break 
of day; ».»., to begin 
to show light. 

dawned, p.p., dawn. 

dawn'ing, n., the 
growing light in the 
morning ; pr.p., 
dawn. 

day, »., a period of 
24 hours; the time 
of light between 
sunrise and sunset. 

day'book, n., a book 
recording daily sales 
and purchases. 

da/break, »., the 
beginning of the 
dawn. 

day'-dream, n., a 
reverie. 

day'-labotuei, n., a 
worker for a daily 
wage. 

day'ligbt, n., the light 
of the day; natural 
light. 

day'spring, n., the 
dawn. 

day'-star, n., the star 
that remains visible 
some time after 
dawn. 

da/ tune, «., the time 
of daylight. 

day'-work, n., work 
for a day's wage. 

daze, V.I., to make 
stupid. 

dazed, p.p., daze. 

da'zing, pr.p., daze. 

daz'zle, v.t., to dim 
the eyes by too 
strong light. 

daz'eled, p.p., dazzle. 

daz'zling, pr.p., daz- 
zle; adj., excessively 
brilliaiit. 






I 

b- 






deafening 



dea'con, n., a mem- 
ber of the third 
order of the clergy; 
a Presbyterian sec- 
ular office-bearer. 

dea'coness, «., a fe- 
male deacon, but 
not in Holy Orders. 

dea'conry, n., the 
office of a deacon. 

dead, adj., without 
life; n., stillest time; 
pi., those who are 
dead; adv., com- 
pletely. 

dead' en, v.t., to take 
away feeling; to 
soften. 

dead'ened, p.p. , dead- 
en. 

dead'ening, pr.p., 
deaden; adj., de- 
pressing. 

dead'eye, n., a block 
pierced with three 
holes used on ships. 

dead'bead, n., one 
who is admitted 
free to a theatre, etc. 

dead'heat, n., a race 
in which the com- 
petitors finish ex- 
actly side by side. 

dead'-letter, n., a law 
no longer enforced; 
a letter returned 
by the P.O. 

dead'lier, adj., comp. 
of deadly. 

deadliest, super, of 
deadly. 

dead'lift, n., a direct 
lift of a dead- 
weight; an extreme 
emergency. 

dead'Iight, n., a shut- 
ter over a cabin 
window. 

dead'liness, n., the 
quality of being 
deadly. 

dead'look, n., a com- 
plete standstill. 

dead'ly, adj., causing 
death. 

dead-march, n., a 
funeral march. 

dead'ness, n., lifeless- 
ness. 

dead'-weigfat, n., an 
oppressive burden. 

deaf, adj., unable to 
hear. 

deafen, v.i., to make 
deaf. 

deafened, p.p., deaf- 
en. 

deafening, pr.p., 
deafen; adj., ex- 
tremely loud. 



deal-mate 



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deaf-mute, n., a deaf 

and dumb person. 

deafness, «., want of 
hearing. 

deal, n., a division; a 
thin cutting of 
wood; v.t., to give 
out in parts; to 
carry on business; 
to distribute cards. 

dosd'er, n., one who 
deals; a trader. 

deal'ing, pr.p., deal; 
n., conduct; inter- 
course of business. 

dealt, p.p., deal. 

dean, n., the chief 
dignitary in a cath- 
edral or collegiate 
church; the disci- 
plinary ofi5cial of a 
college; the presi- 
dent of an aca- 
demic faculty. 

dean'ery, n., the 
charge of a dean; 
also his house; the 
area of a rural 
dean's authority. 

dear, adj., greatly 
beloved; costly. 

dear'et, adj., comp. 
of dear. 

dear'e&i, adj., super. 
of dear. 

dea/ly, adv., with 
great love; at a high 
price. 

dear'nesa, n., high 
price; preciousness. 

dearth, n., scarcity. 

dear'y, dear'ie, n., a 
word of endear- 
ment. 

dea'sil, n., motion 
from east to west, 
as of the sun (Scot.). 

death, n., loss of life. 

death'-bed, n., the 
bed on which one 
dies. 

death'less, adj., that 
cannot die. 

death'Iike, adj., i.q. 
deathly. 

death'ly, adj., resem- 
bling death. 

deatb'-rate, n., the 
proportion of deaths 
in a specified area. 

death 's'-head, n., a 
human skull. 

death'-warrant, n., an 
order for execution. 

d6b&c'Ie, n., a con- 
fused rout; a sud- 
den breaking up of 
ice in a river (Fr.). 

debar', v.t., to shut 
out; to hinder. 












166 



debark', v.t. and >., to 
land from a ship. 

debarka'tion, »., the 
act ot landing. 

debarked', p.p., de- 
bark. 

debark'ing, pr.p., de- 
bark. 

debarred', p.p., debar. 

debarring, pr.p., de- 
bar. 

debase', v.t., to make 
of less value. 

debased', p.p., de- 
base. 

dobase'ment, »., the 
act of debasing. 

deba'ser, n., one who 
debases. 

deba'sing, pr.p., de- 
base. 

deba' table, adj., that 
can be debated. 

debate', n., a con- 
tention in words; 
v.t., to discuss. 

deba' ted, p.p. , debate. 

deba'ter, n., one who 
debates. 

deba' ting, pr.p., de- 
bate. 

debauch', v.t., to lead 
away from virtue; 
«., a course of in- 
temperance or im- 
purity. 

debauched', p.p., de- 
bauch; a</;., vitiated 
in morals. 

debauchee', n., a per- 
son given over to 
intemperance. 

debanch'er, n., one 
who debauches. 

debauoh'ery, n., sin- 
ful indulgence. 

debanch'ing, pr.p., 
debauch. 

deben'ture, n., a doc- 
ument charging 
property with the 
repayment of a 
loan. 

deben'tuied, adj., 
secured by deben- 
ture. 

debil'itate, v.t., to 
make weak. 

debil'itated, p.p., de- 
bilitate. 

debil'itating, adj., 
tending to weaken; 
pr.p., debilitate. 

debilita'tiom. n., the 
act of weakening. 

debil'ity, n., bodily 
weakness. 

deb'it, n., something 
recorded as owed; 
v.t., to mark as due. 



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deeamping 



deb'ited. p.p., debit. 

deb'iting, pr.^., debit. 

debonair', adj., ac- 
complished; well- 
bred; courteous; 
affable. 

deboodi', v.t., to 
emerge into open 
ground. 

debris', n., broken 
pieces of anything. 

debt, »., what one 
owes. 

debt'less, adj., free 
of debt. 

debt' or, n., one who 
owes. 

dibut', n., a first 
appearance. 

d6'butant, n. , one who 
makes his d^but. 

d6'butante, n., fem. 
of debutant. 

deo'achord, n., a 
Greek ten-stringed 
musical instrument. 

dec'adal, adj., pert, 
to, or consisting of, 
tens. 

dec'ade,dec'ad, n.,ten 
years; any group of 
ten. 

dec'adence, n., a 
growing worse. 

dec'adenoy, n., i.q. 
decadence. 

dec'agon, n., a plane 
figure with ten sides. 

deo'agram, n., a 
weight of ten 
grammes. 

Decagyn'ia, n. pi., 
plants having ten 
pistils. 

decag'ynous, adj., 
having ten pistils. 

decahe'dral, adj., 
having ten plane 
faces. 

decahedron, *•., a 
solid figure with ten 
faces. 

decalitre, dec'aliter, 
n., a French mea- 
sure of capacity. 

Deo'aloKue. n., the 
Ten Command- 
ments. 

Decam'eron, n., Boc- 
caccio's famous col- 
lection of tales. 

dec'ametre, dec'a- 
meter, n., a French 
measure of length. 

decamp', v.i., to go 
away secretly. 

decamped', p.p., de- 
camp. 

decamp'ing, pr.p., de- 
camp. 



decampment 



uS 



decampment, n., a 
marching oS. 

deoa'nal, (tdj., rel. to 
a dean. 

Decan'dria, n. pi., 
plants having ten 
stamens. 

decan'drian, adj., 
having ten stamens. 

decan'^os, adj., i.q. 
decandrian. 

decan'gular, adj., 
having ten angles. 

deoa'ni, n., iU., the 
Dean's side of the 
choir (a direction in 
ecclesiastical music) 

decant', v.t., to pour 
from one vessel to 
another. 

decanted, p.p., de- 
cant. 

decanfer, n., a glass 
bottle for wine or 
spirits. 

decant'ing, pr.p., de- 
cant. 

decaphyrions, adj., 
having ten leaves. 

decap'itate, v.i., to 
behead. 

decap'itated, p.p., de- 
capitate. 

decapitating, pr.p., 
decapitate. 

deoapita'tion, »., the 
act of t>eheading. 

dec' apod, n., a crus- 
tacean with ten 
feet (crab, etc.). 

decap'odons, adj., 
having ten feet. 

decarbonate, v.i., to 
deprive of carlxjii 
dioxide. 

decai'bonated, p.p., 
decarbonate. 

decar'bosating, pr.p., 
decarbonate. 

decarboniza'tion, n., 
the act ot decar- 
bonizing. 

decar'bonize, v.t., to 
deprive of carbon. 

decarbonized, p.p., 
decarbonize. 

decarboniziag, pr.p., 
decarbonize. 

dec'astich, »., a ten- 
line [Kiem. 

dec'astyle, n., a por- 
tico (if ten columns. 

decasyllab'ic, adj., 
having ten syllables. 

decay", v.t'., to waste 
away; »., a growing 
weak; witherirg. 

decayed', p.p., decay. 

decaying, pr.p., de- 
cay. 



L 



r 



^^ 









167 



decease', n., death; 

v.i., to die. 

deceased', p.p., dc- 
cea'ie. 

deceasing, pr.p., de- 
cease. 

deceit', n., misrepre- 
sentation; trickery. 

deceit'fnl, adj., ad- 
dicted to deceit. 

deceit'fulness, n., 
tendency to deceive. 

deceit' less, adj., free 
of deceit. 

deoeiv'able, adj., 
liable to be de- 
ceived. 

deceive', v.t., to mis- 
lead; to practise 
deceit on; to dis- 
appoint. 

deceived', p.p., de- 
ceive. 

deceiv'er, n., one who 
deceives. 

deceiving, pr.p., de- 
ceive. 

December, n., the 
last month of the 
year. (When the 
year's reckoning be- 
gan in March, the 
name December, t.«. 
tenth month, was 
appropriate.) 

decem'fid, adj., div- 
ided into ten parts. 

decern' vir, n., one of 
ten magistrates in 
ancient Rome. 

decern' viral, adj.. 
pert, to the decem- 
virs. 

decern' virate, n., the 
decemvirs collec- 
tively. 

de'oency, n., pro- 
priety, delicacy, be- 
coininfiness. 

decen'nary, n., a 
period of ten years; 
adj., pert, to a ten 
year period. 

decen'nial, adj., hap- 
pening every ten 
years. 

decen'oitui, n., i.q. 
decennary. 

de'cent, adj., acting 
in a proper way; 
becoming. 

de'cently, adv., in a 
decent manner. 

decen'tralize, f.'., to 
distribute what has 
l)een centralized. 

decen'tralized, p.p., 
decentralize. 

daoen'tralizing, pr.p., 
decentralize. 






v^-'-l 



] 



i 



<fev 

\ 



deciphered 



deception, n., the 
act of deceiving. 

decep'tive, adj., tend- 
ing to deceive. 

deoep'tively, adv., in 
a manner todeceive. 

decep'tiveneqs, n., 
tendency todeceive. 

decern', v.i. and t., 
to pass judgment 
{Scots law). 

deci'dable, adj., able 
to be decided. 

decide', v.t., to deter- 
mine; u.».,to resolve. 

deci'ded, adj., with 
one's mind made 
up; unmistakable; 
p.p., decide. 

deci'dedly, adv., in a 
decided way; cer- 
tainly. 

deci'der, n., one who 

decides. 

deci'ding, pr.p., de- 
cide. 

decid'nons, aii/., shed- 
ding leaves period- 
ically. 

decid'noosness, n., 
the quality of being 
deciduous. 

decigram, n., a 
French weight. 

deo'ilitre, dec'iliter,n., 
a French measure 
of capacity. 

decil'liou, n., a num- 
ber consisting of i 
followed by si.\ty 
ciphers. 

decil'lionth, n., one 
of a deciilion equal 
parts. 

deo'imal, adj., count- 
ed by tens; n., 
a fraction having 
some power of lo 
as denominator. 

dec'imalize, v.t., to 
turn into a decimal. 

dec'imate. v.t., to kill 
every tenth man. 

dec'imated, p.p., dec- 
imate. 

decimating, pr.p., 
decimate. 

decima'tion, n., the 
act of decimating. 

dec'imetre, dec'i- 
meter, n., a Fremti 
measure of length. 

deci'pher, v.t., to read 
a cipher: to solve a 
difficulty in writing. 

deci'pherable, adj., 
able to be deci- 
phered. 

deciphered, p.p., de> 
cipher. 



decipherer 



168 



decorticated 



t 

^ 



L 



K 



deci'pheier, »., one 

who deciphers. 

deci'phering, pr.p., 
decipher. 

deci'sion, n., deter- 
mination; a judg- 
ment. 

deci'sive, adj., ending 
dispute; quick in 
deciding. 

deci'sively. adv., in a 
decisive manner. 

deci'sjveness, n., the 
quality of being 
decisive. 

deck, v.t., to cover; 
to adorn; n., the 
upper platform of 
a ship ; pack of 
cards. 

decked, itdj., adorned; 
lurnished with a 
deck; p.p., deck. 

deck'er, n., a vessel 
with a deck or 
decks; one who 
decks. 

deck'ing, pr.p., deck. 

declaim', v.t. and t., 
to make a set 
speech. 

declaimed', p.p., de- 
claim. 

declaim' er, n., one 
who speaks for 
effect. 

declaim'ing, Pr.p., 
declaim. 

declama'tioil, n., im- 
passioned speech; 
the art of declaim- 
ing. 

declam'atory, adj., 
rel. to declamation. 

declar'aUe, adj., able 
to be declared. 

declara'tion, n., the 
act of declaring. 

declarative, adj., 
making declaration. 

declar'atively, adv., 
in a declarative 
manner. 

declai'atory, adj., 
distinctly expres- 
sive of opinions. 

declare', v.t., to af- 
firm; to state fully. 

declared', p.p., de- 
clare. 

declar'er, n., one who 
declares. 

dechur'ing, pr.p., de- 
clare. 

deolen'sion, n., a 
falling off; deterio- 
ration; case-inflec- 
tion; a noun-class. 

decli'nable, adj., hav- 
ing case mflections. 



i-^ 



J— 









declina'tion, n., de- 
viation; one of the 
co-ordinates of a 
heavenly body; the 
deviation of the 
magnetic needle 
from the true north. 

dec'linator, n., an in- 
strument for ob- 
serving declination. 

decli'natory, adj. , 
characterized by 
declining. 

decline', v.i., to sink 
or stoop to a lower 
level; to decay; v.t., 
to refuse; to inflect 
so as to form the 
oblique cases; n., a 
deterioration; con- 
sumption. 

declined', p.p., de- 
cline. 

decli'ner, n., one who 
declines. 

decli'aing, pr.p., de- 
cline. 

declinom'eter, n., an 
instrument for 

measuring the de- 
clination of the 
magnetic needle. 

decli'noos, adj. , bend- 
ing downwards (ap- 
plied to stamens of 
a flower). 

decliv'ity, «., a slope 
downward. 

decli'vons, adj., slop- 
ing downward. 

decoct', v.t., to pre- 
pare by boiling. 

decoct'ed. p.p., de- 
coct. 

decoct'ible, adj., able 
to be boiled. 

decoct'ing, pr.p., de- 
coct. 

decoc'tion, n., the 
water in which a 
substance has been 
boiled; the act of 
boiling. 

deooc'tiTe, adj., hav- 
ing a tendency to 
decoct. 

decol'late, v.t., to be- 
head. 

decol'lated, adj., be- 
headed; truncated; 
p.p., decollate. 

decol'lating, pr.p.,de- 
collate. 

decolla'tion, n., the 
act of beheading. 

OcoUeW, adj., hav- 
ing the neck ex- 
posed (Fr.). 

decol'orant, n. , a sub- 
stance that bleaches. 









'•V 



decoloration, n., re- 
moval of colour. 

decor orize, v.t., i.q. 
decolour. 

decororized, p.p., de- 
colorize. 

decor orizing, pr.p., 
decolorize. 

decol'oni, decol'or, 
v.t., to deprive of 
colour; to bleach. 

decol' oared, p.p., de- 
colour. 

decol'oiiring, pr.p., 
decolour. 

decompo'sable, adj. , 
able to be decom- 
posed. 

decompose', v.t., to 
resolve into original 
elements; v.i., to 
decay. 

decomposed', p.p. , de- 
compose. 

decompo'sing, pr.p., 
decompose. 

decom'posite, ad^., 
compounded a 

second time. 

decomposi'tion, n., 
analysis; disinte- 
gration; decay. 

decompoimd', adj., 
i.q. decomposite; 
v.t. to compound 
with things al- 
ready compounded. 

decomipoand'ed, p.p., 
decompound. 

decompotmd'ing,/>r./>. 
decompound. 

decon'secrate, v.t., to 
unconsecrate; to 
secularise. 

dec' orate, v.t., to 
adorn. 

dec'orated, p.p., dec- 
orate. 

dec'orating, pr.p., 
decorate. 

decora' tion, n., orna- 
mentation; a badge 
of honour. 

dec'orative, adj., 
adorning. 

dec'orativeness, n., 
quality of being 
decorative. 

dec' orator, n., one 
who decorates. 

deco'rons, adj., seem- 
ly; befitting. 

deco'roosly, adv., in a 
becoming manner. 

deco'roosness, n. , pro- 
priety of behaviour. 

decorticate, v.t., to 
strip the bark from. 

deeor'ticated, p.p., 
decorticate. 



deeorticatins 



169 



deep-seated 






L 






Hi 



decortioatiog, prp-, 

decorticate. 

decortication, n., the 
act of decorticating. 

deoo'rum, n. , decency 
ot beliaviour. 

decoy', n., a lure; a 
snare; u./., to entrap 
by deceit. 

decoy-duck, n. , a 
duck used to en- 
snare other ducks; 
v.t., to entice, 
ensnare. 

decoyed', p.p., decoy. 

decoying, pr.p., de- 
coy. 

decrease', v.t. and t., 
to diminish; n., 
gradual diminution. 

decreased', p.p., de- 
crease. 

decreas'ing, pr.p., de- 
crease. 

decreas'ingly, adv., by 
diniinistung. 

decree', n., an edict; 
a judicial decision; 
V.I., to determine 
judicially or legis- 
latively. 

decreed', p.p., decree. 

decre'er, «., one who 
decrees. 

decreeing, pr.p., de- 
cree. 

decrement, «. , the 
small quantity by 
which a variable 
becomes less and 
less. 

decrepit, adj., weak- 
ened with age. 

decrepitate, v.t., to 
crackle when roast- 
ing. 

decrepitated, p.p. , de- 
crepitate. 

decrep'itating, pr.p., 
decrepitate. 

deorepita'tion, n., the 
act of flying asunder 
with a crackling 
noise when strongly 
heated. 

decrep'itnde, n., the 
state of being de- 
crepit. 

deores'oent, adj., de- 
creasing. 

decre'taU n., a papal 
letter settling a 
point of ecclesias- 
tical law. 

decre'tist, n., one who 
is skilled in know- 
ledge of decretals 
or common law. 

decretive, adj., pert, 
to a decree. 












Lp 






I- 



decre'tory, adj., es- 
tablished by a de- 
cree. 

decri'al, n., the act of 
decrying. 

decried', p.p., decry. 

d<M:rasta'tion, n., the 
removal of a crust. 

dtory", V.I., to dis- 
credit by fault- 
finding. 

decry'ing, pr.p., de- 
cry. 

decnm'bence, n., the 
state of being de- 
cumbent. 

decom'bency, n., i.q. 
decuriibence. 

decumbent, adj., re- 
clining; prostrate. 

deo'aple, adj., ten- 
fold; n., a number 
ten times repeated; 
v.t., to multiply by 

lO. 

dec'upled, p.p., dec- 
uple. 

decupling, pr.p., 
decuple. 

decn'rion, n., a Ro- 
man officer over 
ten soldiers. 

decur'rent, adj., the 
base extended down- 
wards along the 
stem {Bot.). 

decur'sive, adj., run- 
ning down; Recur- 
rent. 

decurve', v.t., to make 
to curve downward. 

deourved', p.p., de- 
curve. 

decurv'ing, pr.p., de- 
curve. 

decus'sate, v.t., to in- 
tersect in a cross- 
wise manner; adj., 
i.q. decussatetl. 

deoos'sated. adj., 
crossed; p.p., de- 
cussate. 

decus'sating, pr.p., 
decussate. 

decuasa'tion, n., the 
act of crossing at 
right angles. 

deons'satively, adv., 
crosswise. 

de'daU adj., %.q. dae- 
dal. 

deda'lian, adj., i.q. 
daedal. 

ded'alous, adj., hav- 
ing a margin with 
intricate windings 
(Bot.). 

dedicate, v.t., to set 
apart, devote; in- 
scribe to somelx>dy. 



M. 



u- 



^• 



u.- 



ti 






ded'icated, p.p., ded- 
icate. 

dedicating, pr.p., 
dedicate. 

dedica'tion, n., de- 
votion; setting 
apart; use; an ad- 
dress prefixed to a 
book. 

ded'icator, n., one 
who dedicates. 

ded'icatory, ai;., serv- 
ing as a dedication. 

deduce', v.t., to infer; 
trace descent of. 

deduced',/).^, .deduce. 

deduce'ment, n., de- 
duction. 

deducibil'ity, »., the 
quaaty ot being 
deducible. 

dedu'cible, adj., able 
to be deduced. 

deduo'ing, pr.p., de- 
duce. 

deduct', v.t., to sub- 
tract. 

deduct'ed, p.p., de- 
duct. 

deduct'ing, pr.p., de- 
duct. 

deduction, n., au in- 
ference from gene- 
ral to particular; a 
subtraction. 

dednct'ive, adj., de- 
ducible; rel. to de- 
duction. 

deed, »., an act; a 
legal contract or 
agreement. 

deed'iess, adj., in- 
active. 

deem, v.l., to believe; 
to judge; ».»., to 
suppose. 

deemed, p.p., deem. 

deem'ing, ^r.^.,deem. 

deem'ster, n., one of 
two Manx justices. 

deep, ixi/., descending 
far downward; n., 
the open sea. 

deep'en, v.t., to make 
deep or deeper; v.%., 
to become deeper. 

deepened, p.p., 

deepen. 

deep'eninc prp., 
deepen. 

deeper, adj., comp. 
of deep. 

deep'est, adj., super. 
of deep. 

deep'ly. adv., far be- 
low the surface; 
profoundly. 

deep'ness, n., depth. 

deep'-seated, adj., 
deep down. 



6a— (173) 



deer 

L 






deer, n., a ruminant 
quadruped wilh 
branching horns. 

deei'-stalker, n., one 
who stalks deer. 

deface', v.l., to dis- 
ligure. 

defaced', adj., in- 
jured on the surface. 

deface'ment, n., in- 
jury to the surface. 

defa'cer, «., one who 
defaces. 

defacing, pr.p., de- 
face. 

de fac'to, phrase = 
actual (Lat.). 

defarcate,".*., to mis- 
appropriate money. 

defalcated, p.p., de- 
falcate. 

defal'cating. pr.p., 
defalcate. 

defalca'tion, n., a 
fraudulent defici- 
ency in money mat- 
ters. 

de'falcator, n., an 
embezzler. 

defama'tion, n., slan- 
der; calumny. 

defam'atory, adj. , 
slanderous; calum- 
nious. 

defame', v.t., to slan- 
der; to libel. 

defamed', p.p., de- 
fame. 

defa'mer, n., a slan- 
derer. 

defa'ming, pr.p., de- 
fame. 

default', n , an omis- 
sion of a duty; v.t., 
to neglect an en- 
gagement. 

defaolt'ed, p.p., de- 
fault. 

default' er, n., one 
who makes default. 

defaulting, pr.p., de- 
fault. 

defea'sance, n. , a ren- 
deringtiiill and void. 

defea'sible, adj., able 
to be annulled. 

defea'sibleness, »., 
the state of being 
defeasible. 

defeat', n., a frustra- 
tion; an overthrow; 
v.t., to overcome; to 
resist with success. 

defeat' ed, p.p., de- 
feat. 

defeat'ing, pr.p., de- 
feat. 

defecate, v.f., to 
purge of extraneous 
matter. 



^ 



u 






H 



170 



defecated, p.p., defe- 
cate. 

defecating, p''.p., 
detecate. 

defeca'tion, n., the 
act of clarifying. 

defecator, n., one 
who or that which 
defecates. 

defect', n., a fault; 
something lacking; 
a shortcoming. 

delect'ible, adj., de- 
hcient. 

defec'tion, n., aban- 
donment; apostasy. 

detect' ive, adj., im- 
perfect. 

defect'ively, adv., im- 
perfectly. 

defect'iveness, n., 
faultiness. 

defence', «., the act 
of defending; a pro- 
tection; a vindica- 
tion. 

defenced', adj., pro- 
vided with a de- 
fence. 

defence'Iess, adj., 
without defence. 

defence'lessness, n., 
the state of being 
defenceless. 

defend', v.l., to pro- 
ti-ct against attack. 

defend'able, a<2;., able 
to be defended. 

defendant, n., one 
who opposes a 
charge or com- 
plaint. 

defend'ed, p.p., de- 
fend. 

defend'er, n. , a cham- 
pion; an advocate. 

defmd'ing, pr.p., de- 
fend. 

defeosibil'ity. n., the 
quality of being 
defensible. 

defen'sible, adj., able 
to be defended. 

defen'sive, adj., serv- 
ing to defend. 

defen'dvely, adv., in a 
defensive manner; 
n., the state of be- 
ing on defence. 

defer', v.t., to post- 
pone; ».»., to yield 
toanother'sopinion. 

def erence.n. , respect ; 
courteous consider- 
ation. 

deferent, n., an im- 
aginary circle em- 
ployed by Ptolemy 
in his system of 
astronomy. 






H 



deflagrability 



deferen'tial, adj., ex- 
pressing deference. 

deferred', p.p., defer. 

deter'rer, «., one who 
defers. 

defer'ring, pr.p., de- 
fer. 

defeu'daliza, v.t., to 
deprive of feudal 
character. 

defi'ance, n., a chal- 
lenging to fight; 
opposition to au- 
thority. 

defi'ant, adj., inso- 
lent, bold, disobe- 
dient. 

deffciency, n. want ; 
somethmg less than 
is necessary. 

def I' dent, adj., 
wanting; iraperleci. 

defi'clently, adv. , in 
a defective manner. 

deficit, »., a defi- 
ciency (in money). 

defied', p.p., defy. 

defl'er, »., one who 
defies. 

defile', v.l., to make 
unclean; v.i., to 
march off in a line. 

de'flle, n., a long, 
narrow pass. 

defiled', p.p., defile. 

defile'ment, n., the 
effect of defiling. 

defl'ler, n., one who 
defiles. 

defiling, pr.p., defile. 

definable, adj., able 
to be defined. 

define', v.t., to deter- 
mine the limits or 
meaning of. 

defined', p.p., define. 

defi'ner, n., one who 
defines. 

defining, pr.p., de- 
fine. 

definite, adj., certain; 
precise. 

definitely, adv., in a 
definite manner. 

definiteness, »., the 
state or character 
of being definite. 

deflni'tion, n., a brief 
and exact descrip- 
tion of a thing by 
its properties; clear- 
ness of outline. 

defln'itive, adj., de- 
terminate; con- 
clusive. 

defin'itively, adv., 
conclusively; un- 
conditionally. 

defiagrabil'ity, n., 
combustibility. 



deflagrable 



i 



H 



i- 



i„ 



deflagrable, adj., 

combustible. 

deflagrate,".', and «., 
to burn rapidly. 

deflagrated, p.p., de- 
flagrate. < 

deflagrating, pr.p., 
deflagrate. 

deflagration, n., 
rapid combustion 
of a mixture. 

deflagrator. n., an 
electrical instru- 
ment for producing 
the combustion of 
metallic substances. 

deflate', v.t., to with- 
draw the air from. 

deflated, ^.p., deflate. 

deflating, pr.p., de- 
flate. 

deflect', v.t. and »., to 
turn from a straight 
hne. 

deflect'ed, p.p., de- 
fl.-ct. 

deflect'ing, pr.p., de- 
flect. 

deflection, deflexion, 

«., deviation. 

deflect' or, n., a dia- 
phragm in a lamp 
or stove by means 
of which air and 
gas are mingled and 
made to burn com- 
pletely. 

deflorate, adj., of 
plants, having shed 
their pollen on their 
flowers. 

defloration, n., rape. 

deflower', v.t., to vio- 
late; to ravish. 

deflowered', p.p., de- 
flower. 

deflower'er. n., one 
who deflowers. 

deflow'ering, pr.p., 
deflower. 

deflnx'ion, n., a ca- 
tarrhal discharge. 

defo'liated, adj., de- 
prived of leaves. 

defolia'tion, n., the 
fall of the leaf. 

defor'est, v.t., to re- 
mo ve the trees from . 

defor'ested, p.p., de- 
forest. 

defor'esting, ^r./)., de- 
forest. 

deforesta'tion, n., the 
act or practice of 
deforesting. 

deform', v.t., to dis- 
figure. 

deformed', adj., mis- 
shapen; p.p., de- 
form. 



^ 



^ 



t 



>=^ 



i 



171 



deform'er, »., one 

who deforms. 

deform'ing, pr.p., de- 
form. 

deformity, n., the 
state of being de- 
formed; any mis- 
shapen part of the 
body. 

defrand', v.<.,tocheat. 

defrauded, p.p., de- 
fraud. 

defraud'er, n., one 
who defrauds. 

defraod'ing, pr.p., de- 
fraud. 

defray', v.t., to dis- 
charge; settle. 

defrayed', p.p., de- 
fray. 

defray'er, n. , one who 
pays expenses. 

defray'ing, pr.p., de- 
tray. 

deft, adj., dexterous. 

deft'ly, adv., neatly; 
dexterously. 

deft'ness, n., dex- 
terity. 

defmict', adj., dead. 

defy', v.t., to chal- 
lenge; to set at 
nought. 

defying, pr.p., defy. 

degen'eracy, n., a 
state of deteriora- 
tion. 

degen'erate, adj., 
base; mean; having 
declined in natural 
or moral worth; n., 
a creature that has 
so declined. 

degen'erate, v.t., to 
become of a lower 
type, physically or 
morally. 

degen'erated, p.p., 
degenerate. 

degen'erately, adv., 
in a degenerate 
manner. 

degen'erateness, n. a 
degenerate state. 

degen'erating, pr.p., 
degenerate. 

degenera'tlott, n., 
i.q. degeneracy. 

degen'erative, adj., 
causing degenera- 
tion. 

degln'tinate, v./., to 
unglue. 

deglu'tinated, p.p., 
deglutinate. 

degln'tinating, pr.p., 
deglutinate. 

deglati'tion, n., the 
act or power of 
swallowing. 



1-: 



Si 



\r. 



C 






deistic 



degradation, n., de- 
basement; the act 
of degrading. 

degrade', v.t., to de- 
base; to reduce 
from a higher to a 
lower rank; v.i., to 
degenerate. 

degra'ded, adj., sunk 
to a vile state; p.p., 
degrade. 

degra'ding, adj., dis- 
honouring; pr.p., 
degrade. 

degra'dingly, adv., in 
adegrading manner. 

degree', «., rank; sta- 
tion; extent; the 
360th part of the 
circumference of. a 
circle; a division 
marked on a scien- 
tific instrument; a 
university title of 
distinction. 

dehisce', v.i., to open 
(as the seed-vessels 
of plants). 

dehis'cence, n., the 
opening or splitting 
of cert»iii organs in 
plants. 

debort'ativt), ai^/., dis- 
suasive. 

dehort'atory, adj., 
i.q. dehortative. 

de'icide, n., the act of 
putting Jesus Christ 
to death; «., one of 
Christ's murderers. 

deiflca'tion, n., the 
act of deifying. 

de'ifled, p.p., deify. 

de'ifler, »., one that 
deifies. 

de'iform, adj., of god- 
like form. 

de'i^, v.t., to make a 
god of. 

de'ifying, pr.p., de- 
ify. 

deign, v.i., to con- 
descend. 

deigned, p.p., deign. 

deign'ing, pr.p. .deign. 

deii, n., devil (Scot.). 

deipnos'ophist, n., a 
philosopher who 
cultivates learned 
conversation at 
meals. 

de'ism, n., the creed 
of a deist. 

de'ist, n., one who 
believes in a su- 
preme being but 
denies revealed re- 
ligion. 

deis'tic, adj., pert, to 
deism. 



deistical 



172 



delirium tremens 



M 



I 



L 



K 



L 



L 



i 






M 



L 

L 



^ 
V^'- 



deis'tical, adj., i.q. 

deistic. 

de'ity, n., divinity; 
Godhead; God; a 
fabulous god or 
goddess. 

deject', v./., to cast 
down; to dispirit. 

deject'ed. oui]., down- 
cast; sorrowful. 

deject'edly, adv., sad- 
ly; heavily. 

deject'edness, »., de- 
jection. 

deject'er, n., one who 
dejects. 

deject'ing, pr.p., de- 
ject. 

dejec'tion, n., lowness 
of spirits. 

deject 'ory, adj., pro- 
moting the action 
of the bowels. 

di'jenner, n., break- 
fast; luncheon. 

de ja're, adv. and adj. , 
by right; rightful 
{Lot.). 

delaine', n., a muslin 
made of cotton and 
wool, used chiefly 
as a printing cloth. 

delay', v.t., to retard; 
to hinder; v.i., to 
linger; n., a linger- 
ing or deferring. 

delayed', p.p., delay. 

delay'er, n., one who 
delays. 

delaying, pr.p., de- 
lay. 

de'le, v.t., blot out; 
erase;remove (La/.). 

delec'table, adj., high- 
ly pleasing. 

delecta'tion, n., a 
giving delight; de- 
light. 

delegate, «., a repre- 
sentative; a deputy; 
oii/., representative. 

delegate, v.t., to en- 
trust to another's 
care and manage- 
ment. 

del'egated, p.p., dele- 
gate. 

del'egating, pr-p-, 
delegate. 

delega'tion. n., ap- 
pointment to act as 
deputy; a person or 
body of persons de- 
puted to act for 
another or others. 

delete', v.t., to erase; 
to strike out with 
a pen or pencil. 

delete'rious, adj., 
noxious. 



\ 
h 

L 

ir 

Kb 
k 



dele'tion, n., the act 
of deleting; a pas- 
sage deleted. 

dell, n., glazed earth- 
enware dishes. 

De'lian, adj., rel. to 
Del OS or to Apollo. 

delib'erate, adj., care- 
fully considering 
probable consequen- 
ces; not hasty; slow. 

delib'erate, v.t., to 
ponder; to reflect. 

delib'erated, p.p., de- 
liberate. 

delib'erately, adv., in 
adeliberate manner. 

delib'erateneas, n., 
the state or quality 
of being deliberate. 

delib'erating, pr.p., 
deliberate. 

delibera'tion, n., care- 
ful consideration; 
discussion and ex- 
amination of pros, 
and cons. 

delib'erative, adj., 
pert, to delibera- 
tion. 

delib'eiator, n., one 
who deliberates. 

del'ible, adj., able to 
be deleted (more 
correctly spelt de- 
leble). 

del'icacy, n., the 
quality of being 
delicate. 

del'icate, adj. , dainty; 
easily injured; in 
weak health. 

del'icately, adv., dain- 
tily; tenderly. 

del'icateness, n., the 
state of being deli- 
cate. 

delicatesse', n., deli- 
cacy (Fr.). 

deli'cioos, adj., af- 
fording exquisite 
pleasure. 

deli'cioualy, ado., in a 
delicious manner. 

deli'cionsness, n., the 
quality of being 
delicious. 

deliga'tion, n., band- 
aging. 

delight', v.t., to please 
highly; v.i., to be 
greatly pleased; n., 
joy; thecauseof joy. 

delight'ed, adj., over- 
joyed; p.p., delight. 

delight'ful, adj., 
charming. 

delight'iobiess, n., 
the quality of being 
delightful. 



yc^n^ 



delighting, pr.p., de- 
light. 

deligtat'some, adj., i.q. 
delightful. 

delim'it, v.t., to fix 
boundaries of. 

delimitation, n., the 
fixing of boundaries. 

delim'ited, p.p., de- 
limit. 

delim'iting, pr.p., de- 
limit. 

delin'eament, n. , por- 
trayal either pic- 
torially or in words. 

delin'eate, v.t., to de- 
pict or describe. 

delin'eated, p.p., dc- 
lineati-. 

deUn'eating, pr.p. , de- 
lineate. 

delinea'tion, n., the 
process of delineat- 
ing. 

delin'eator, n., one 
who delineates. 

delin'eatory, adj., rcl. 
to delineation. 

delta' guency, n., a 
misdeed; failure in 
duty. 

delinquent, n., one 
who fails to per- 
form his duty. 

del'iqnate, v.i., to be 
dissolved; v.t., to 
melt. 

del'iquated, p.p., de- 
liquate. 

deriqoating, pr.p.,Ae- 
liquate. 

deliqna'tion, n., a 
melting. 

dehqaesce', v.i., to 
become liquid by 
absorbing moisture 
from the air. 

deliquesced', p.p.,dc- 
liquesce. 

deliqnes'cence, n., a 
gradual melting by 
absorption of mois- 
ture from the at- 
mosphere. 

deliqnes'cent, adj., 
liquefying in thi 
air. 

deliqnes'cing, pr.p., 
deliquesce. 

delir'ioas, adj., affect- 
ed with delirium. 

delir'ioQsly, adv., in a 

delirious manner. 
. delil'inm, n., a tem- 
porary disorder of 
the mind. 

delil'inm tre'mens, n. , 

, an affection of the 

' brain caused by 

Alcoholic excess. 



^ 



deliver 



f dellv'er, ».<., to res- 
cue; to liand over; to 
resign; to utter; to 
disburden of a child. 

<(fe//v'erable. adj., 
capable of being 
delivered. 
J* deliverance. H., re- 

lease; verdict; de- 
livered opinion. 
f delivered, p.p., de- 
liver. 
dellVent, »., one 
who delivers, 
j' dellv'eriBZ, pr.p., 

deliver. 
f delivery, n., a giv- 
ing up; utterance; 
manner of speak- 
ing; child-birth. 
V dell, n., a small 
. narrow valley. 
fer* ' ' Della-CTns'can, adj., 
pert, to the Aca- 
demia della Crusca 
in Florence; applied 
to a class of affected 
English writers. 
y\j Del'pluan, adj., rel. 
to Delphi; oracular. 
V'\_, Del'phic, adj., i.q. 
Delphian. 
Kl' del'ta, n., the fourth 
letter of the Greek 
alphabet; an allu- 
vial tract at the 
mouth of a river. 
r^ del'toid, tdj., trian- 
gular; in anatomy, 
applied to a muscle 
of the shoulder. 
KI delude', »./., to mis- 

'^ lead. 

K*" deln'ded, p.p., dc- 
^»— , lude. 

f delu'der, «., a de- 

ceiver. 
VJi ■ delu'ding, Pr.p., de- 

^^ lude. 
V^ del' age, n., a flood; 

v.t., to inundate. 
V^ deluged, p.p., del- 

YJ. del'nging, pr.p., del- 

^^ uge. 
J^, dela'sion, n., a mis- 
leading of the mind; 
a false belief. 
y\_^ delu'sive, («<i;.,decep- 

live. 
\'?\ delu'dvely, adv., in a 

y. delusive manner. 
yf deln'sory, adj., apt 

to deceive. 
y\^ delve, v.i. and t., to 
dig. 
. |;^ delved, p.p., delve. 
1^ delv'er, n., one who 

delves. 
►"V^ delv'ing, pr.p., delve. 




5 



•7- 



173 



demag'netize. v.t., to 
deprive of magnef ic 
influence. 

demag'netized, p.p., 
demagnetize. 

demag'netizing, pr.p. , 
demagnetize. 

demagog'ic, adj., rel. 
to a demagogue. 

dem'agogism. n., 
demagogic prin- 
ciples. 

demagogue, n., one 
who acquires in- 
fluence over the 
populJice by playing 
on their ignorance. 

demand', v.t., to ask; 
to claim; to necessi- 
tate; ».•., to inquire; 
«,, a request with 
authority. 

demand'able, adj., 
liable to demand. 

demuid'ant, n., a 
plaintiff; one who 
demands. 

demand'ed, p.p., de- 
mand. 

demand'er, n., one 
who demands. 

demand'ing, pr.p., 
duinaiid. 

de'marcate, v.t., to 
mark the bound- 
aries of. 

demaroa'tioD, »., the 
process of marking 
off boundaries; sep- 
aration. 

demean', v.t., to be- 
have. 

demeaned', p.p., de- 
mean. 

demean'ing, Pr.p., 
demean. 

demean' our.demean'- 
or, n., behaviour. 

dement'ed, adj., in- 
sane. 

deraen'tia, n., a form 
of insanity. 

demei'it, n., that 
which is blamable 
in moral conduct. 

demeised'. ad;., grow- 
ing under water. 

demer'sion, n., the 
act of plunging into 
a liquid. 

demesne', m., land 
adjacent to a manor 
house. 

dem'i, prefix, half. 

dem'igod, n., an in- 
ferior deity; one 
partly human, part- 
ly divine. 

dem'ijohn, n., a glass 
bottle with a large 



U/1 



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l-J\ 

h 






l^ 






demon 



body and small 
neck, enclosed in 
wicker-work. 

dem'ilone, n., an out- 
work in fortification 
protecting a bastion 

demi-monde, n., 
women of doubtful 
character living as 
ladies of position. 

dem'iqnaver, «., ».?. 
semiquaver. 

dem'irep, ti., a 
woman of doubtful 
chastity. 

demisabU'ity. n., cap- 
ability of being 
demised. 

demi'sable, adj., able 
to be demised. 

demise', »-, the death 
of a person of dis- 
tinction; the con- 
veyanceof an estate 
in law; ».<., to trans- 
fer, convey, or be- 
queath. 

demised', p.p., de- 
mise. 

dMn'isendftua'ver, n., 
the half of a semi- 
quaver. 

demi'sbig, pr.p., de- 
mise. 

demis'sion, n., a lay- 
ing down of office; 
resignation. 

demit', v.t., to resign. 

dem'itone, n., i.q. 
semitone. 

demo'bilize, v.t., to 
disband troops. 

democracy, n., 
government by the 
people; the popu- 
lace as rulers. 

dem'ocrat, «>., one 
who adheres to 
democracy. 

democrat'lc, adj., 
pert, to democracy. 

democrat'ical, adj., 
i.q. democratic. 

demo'graphy, n., sta- 
tistics, etc., rel. to 
population. 

demoiselle', n., a 
young lady. 

demol'isb, v.t., to 
destroy. 

demol'i^ed, p.p., 
demolish. 

demol'lsher, n., one 
who demolishes. 

demol'ishing, pr.p., 
demolish. 

demoli'tion, n., des- 
truction. 

da'moo, n., a malig- 
nant spirit. 



demonetization 



174 



denomination 






h 



lu/ 



demonetization, «., 
the act of de- 
monetizing. 

demon'etize, v.t., to 
deprive of standard 
value as money; 
to withdraw from 
circulation. 

demon'etized, p-P-, 
demonetize. 

demon' etizing, pr.p., 
demonetize. 

demo'niac, adj., in- 
fiuenced by demons; 
n., a human being 
possessed by a de- 
mon. 

demoni'acal, adj., i.q. 
demoniac. 

demon'ic, adj., rel. to 
a demon. 

de'monism, n., belief 
in demons. 

de'monist, «., a be- 
liever in demons. 

de'mooize, v.t., to 
render diabolical. 

de'monized, p.p., de- 
monize. 

de'monizing, pr.p., 
demonize. 

demonoratry, n. , 
devil-worship. 

demonorogy, n. , 
knowledge regard- 
ing evil spirits. 

demonstrabirit;, "i 
the state of being 
demonstrable. 

demon'strable, adj., 
capable of being 
demonstrated. 

dem' oastrate, v.t., 
to prove beyond 
doubt ; to make 
evident. 

dem'onstrated, t>.p., 
demonstrate. 

detn'oBstrat'vc^, 
pr.p., demonstrate. 

demottstra'tloB, n. , 
a logical proof; a 
manifestation; a 
military operation 
intended to deceive 
the enemy. 

demon'stratiTe, adj., 
proving by certain 
evidence; outward- 
ly expressive of the 
emotions; pointing 
out. 

demon'stratively.aiiii. , 
in a demonstrative 
manner. 

dem'onstiator, n. , one 
who demonstrates. 

demoralization, n., 
the act of demoral- 
izing; the state of 















s 



b 



being demoral- 

ized. 

demoi'alize, v.t., to 
corrupt the morals 
of; to deprive 
(troops) of courage 
and self-reliance. 

demor'alized, p.p. , 
demoralize. 

demor'alizing, pr.p., 
demoralize. 

de'mos, »., the com- 
mon people. 

Demosthen'ic, adj., 
resembling Demos- 
thenes; eloquent. 

demot'io, adj., popu- 
lar; said of the or- 
dinary alphabet of 
ancient Egypt. 

demoont'able, adj. , 
able to be taken to 
pieces for conveni- 
ence of transport. 

demp'ster, n., i.q. 
deemster. 

demnl'cent, adj., 
mollifying; n., a 
medicine which re- 
duces the effects of 
irritation. 

demol'sion, n., the 
act of soothing. 

demur', «.«'., to object 
hesitatingly; n., 
hesitation. 

demure', adj., affect- 
edly modest; con- 
sciously reserved. 

demure'^, adv., in a 
demure manner. 

demnre'ness, »., the 
state of being de- 
mure. 

demur'rage. n., time 
of detention of 
a vessel by the 
freighter beyond 
his agreement; cor- 
responding compen- 
sation. 

demurred', p.p., de- 
mur. 

demur'rer, n., one 
who demiu-s; in law, 
a stop at some point 
in the pleadings and 
dependence on that 
point for the de- 
cision of the cause. 

demurring, pr.p., de- 
mur. 

demy', «., a particu- 
lar size of paper, 
about 22 in. by ij\ 
In.; a scholar of 
Magdalen College, 
Oxford. 

den, n., a cave or 
pit used for shelter. 



fc 









U 



denar'cotize, v.t., to 
deprive of narcotine 

denar'cotized, p.p., 
denarcolize. 

denar'cotizing, pr.p., 
denarcotize. 

dena'rins, n., a Ro- 
man silver coin 
worth about 7jd. 

den'ary, adj., pro- 
ceeding by tens. 

dena'tionalize, v.t., 
to divest of national 
rights or character. 

dena'tionalized, p.p., 
denationalize. 

dena'tionalizing, pr.p. 
denationalize. 

den'driform, adj., 
shaped like a tree. 

den'^te, «., a min- 
eral on, or in, which 
are figures resem- 
bling trees or 
mosses, the result 
of crystallization. 

dendrit'ic, adj., tree- 
like. 

dendrit'ical, adj., i.q. 
dendritic. 

den'droid, oi^/., resem- 
bling a small tree 
or shrub. 

dendrol'ogist, n., one 
acquainted with 
dendrology. 

dendrol'ogy, n., the 
natural history of 
trees. 

den'gne, «., a W. 
Indian epidemic 
fever resembling 
scarlet fever with 
rheumatism. 

deni'able, adj., cap- 
able of beingdenied. 

deni'al, «., contradic- 
tion; disownment. 

denied', p.p., deny. 

deni'er, n., one who 
denies. 

den'igrate, v.t., to 
b.acken thoroughly. 

denization, n., the 
act of making one 
a denizen. 

den'izen, «>., an in- 
habitant; a natural- 
ized alien. 

denom'inate, v.t., to 
give a name to. 

denom'inated, p.p., 
denominate. 

denominating, pr.p., 
denominate. 

denomlaa' tion, n., 
a collection of indi- 
viduals called by 
the same name; a 
religious sect. 



denominational 



175 



department 



-P 






I --^ 

J 

La,* 

4r 



deaomlaa'tlonal, 

adj., pert, to par- 
ticular, esp. religi- 
ous, denominations. 

denom'inatiTe, adj., 
couterring a dis- 
tinct appellation. 

denom'inator, n., the 
number below the 
line in a vulgar 
fraction. 

deno' table, adj., that 
mav be denoted. 

denoia'tion, n., the 
act of denoting; 
what a word or 
sign denotes. 

denote', v.t., to be 
the name of; to 
indicate. 

deno' ted, ^.^. .denote. 

deno' ting, pr.p., de- 
note. 

dtaone'ment, n., the 
unravelling of a 
plot; the solution 
of a mystery; the 
issue of any course 
of conduct (Fr.). 

denoimoe', v.t., to 
accuse; terminate. 

denonnced', p.p., de- 
nounce. 

denoance'ment, n., 
i.q. denunciation. 

denonnc'ei, n. , one 
who denounces. 

denonnc'ing, pr.p., 
denounce. 

dense, adj., compact; 
thick; stupid. 

dense'ly, adv., com- 
pactly. 

dense'ness, n., den- 
sity; stupidity. 

den'ser,aa;., comp. of 
dense. 

den'sest, adj., super. 
of dense. 

den'sity, «., closeness 
o( constituent parts. 

dent, n., a depression 
made by a blow; v.t., 
to make a dent in. 

den'tal, adj., rel. to 
the teeth; n., a den- 
tal sound, as d, t, th. 

den'talize, v.t., to con- 
vert to a dental let- 
ter. 

den'tate,(t<';.,toothed. 

den'tated, adj., i.q. 
dent.ite. 

dentation, h., a 
toothed form. 

dent'ed, p.p.. dent. 

dentelle', n., lace. 

den'ticle, n.. a small 
tooth or projecting 
point. 



^ 

t 






denticulate, «<<;■> 
having small teeth. 

dentio'ulated, adj., 
i.q. denticulate. 

denticnla'tion, »., the 
state of being den- 
ticulate. 

den'tifonn, adj., 
tooth-like. 

den'tibice, n., a 
powder for cleaning 
the teeth. 

den' til, n., a little 
square block cut on 
a Greek cornice. 

dent'ing, pr.p., dent. 

den'tist, n., one who 
cleans, repairs, and 
supplies teeth. 

dentis'tic, adj., rel. to 
dentistry. 

den'tistiy, »., the pro- 
fession or art of a 
dentist. 

denti'tion, n., the 
cutting of teeth in 
infancy; the system 
of teeth peculiar to 
an animal. 

den'toid, adj., shaped 
like a tooth. 

den' tore, n., a 
dentist's name for 
one or more arti- 
ficial teeth. 

denu'date, adj., de- 
nuded; v.t., i.q. de- 
nude. 

denn'dated, adj., i.q. 
denudate; p.p., de- 
nudate. 

dennda'tion, n., the 
act of denuding. 

denn' dating, pr.p., 
denudate. 

denude', v.t., to make 
bare. 

denn'ded, p.p., de- 
nude. 

denn'ding, pr.p., de- 
nude. 

dennn'ciate, v.^, to 
denounce. 

denon'oiated, p.p., de- 
nunciate. 

dennn'ciating, pr.p., 
denunciate. 

dennnda'tion, n., a 
public menace or 
accusation. 

dennn'ciator, n., one 
who denounces. 

dennn'ciatory, adj. , 
implying denuncia- 
tion. 

deny', v.t., to declare 
not to be true; to 
refuse; ».»., to an- 
swer in the nega- 
tive. 



^ 
\ 



U- 






I 



)e 



I 

^ 



deny'ing, pr.p., deny. 

deobstmct', v.t., to 
remove obstructions 
from. 

deob'strnent, ad]., 
that opens the nat- 
ural ducts and pores 
of the body. 

deoc'nlate, v.t., to 
make blind. 

de'odand, n., a 
chattel which, hav- 
ing caused the death 
of a person, was 
formerly confiscated 
by the king and 
devoted to religious 
uses. 

deodar', n., the In- 
dian cedar tree. 

deodoriza'tion, n. , the 
act of deodorizing. 

deo'dorize, v.t., to de- 
prive of smell, esp. 
of obnoxious smell. 

deo'dorized, p.p., deo- 
dorize. 

deo'doiizei, n., a 
substance which 
destroys fetid efflu- 
via. 

deo'dorizing, pr.p., 
deodorize. 

deontol'ogy, n., the 
science of duty; 
ethics. 

deox'idate, v.t., to 
deprive of oxygen. 

fleox'idated. p.p., de- 
oxidate. 

deox'idating, pr.p., 
deoxidate. 

deozida'tion, n., the 
process of reducing 
an oxide. 

deox'idize, v.t. , i.q. 
deoxidate. 

deox'idized, p.p., de- 
oxidize. 

deoz'idizing, pr.p., 
deoxidize. 

deoz'ygenate, v.t., i.q. 
deoxidate. 

deox'ygenize, v./., i.q. 
deoxidate. 

depart', v.i., to go 
elsewhere. 

depart'ed. p.p., de- 
part; adj., gone; 
dead. 

deinrt'er, »., one who 
departs. 

depart'ing, pr.p., de- 
part. 

depart'ment. n., a 
separate branch of 
business, science, 
etc.; a division of 
territory, as in 
France. 



departmental 









department'al. adj., 
pert, to a deparl- 
ment. 

department'ally, adv., 
in or by means of 
departments. 

depar'toie, n., the 
act o£ departing; 
deviation from a 
custom or plan. 

depas'tnre,«./., to put 
out to graze. 

depaa'perate, «./., to 
impoverish. 

depaa'peiize, v.t., to 
free from pauper- 
ism. 

depend', v.i., to be 
sustained by being 
attached to some- 
thing above; to 
hang down; to be 
contingent (on); to 
rely (upon). 

depoid'able, adj., 
trustworthy. 

dependant, n., one 
who relies upon 
another for support. 

depood'ed, p.p., de- 
pend. 

depend' ence, n., the 
state of being de- 
pendent; confi- 
dence. 

depend' ency, n., a 
territory remote 
from the state to 
which it belongs, 
but subject to its 
government. 

depend'ent, adj., 
hanging down; at 
the disposal of; 
relying for support. 

depend'ently, adv., in 
a dependent man- 
ner. 

depend'ing, pr.p., de- 
pend. 

dephos'phorize, c^, 
to remove phos- 
phorus from. 

dephos'phorized, p.p., 
depliosphor:ze. 

dephosphorizing, 
pr.^. .dephosphorize. 

depict', v.t., to por- 
tray in colours or 
words; to describe. 

depict'ed, p.p., de- 
pict. 

depict'er, n., one who 
depicts. 

dopiot'ing. pr.p., de- 
pict. 

depio'ticm, «., the act 
of depicting. 

depio'tore, v.t., to 
depict; to picture. 



^^ 






K 



176 



depio'tured, p.p., de- 
picture. 

depic'toring, pr.p., 
depicture. 

dep'ilate, v.t., to strip 
of hair. 

dep'ilated, p.p., de- 
pilate. 

dep'ilating, pr.p., de- 
pilate. 

depila'tion, «., the 
removal of hair. 

depil'atoiy, «., a cos- 
metic used to re- 
move superfluous 
hairs. 

deplete', v.t., to ex- 
haust by draining 
away. 

deple'ted, p.p., de- 
plete. 

depleting, pr.p., de- 
plete. 

deple'tion, n., the act 
of depleting. 

deple'tory, adj., caus- 
ing depletion, 

deplorable, adj., 
lamentable; con- 
temptible. 

deplor'ableness, n. , 
the state of being 
deplorable. 

deplor'ably, adv., 
lamentably. 

deplora'tion, n., lam- 
entation. 

deplore', v.t., to grieve 
for. 

deplored', p.p., de- 
plore. 

deplor'er, n., one who 
deplores. 

deploring, pr.p., de- 
plore. 

deplor'ingly, adv., in 
a deploring manner. 

deplo/, v.t., fo ex- 
tend in a line of 
small depth; v.i., to 
form a more ex- 
tended front. 

deployed', p.p., de- 
ploy. 

deplo/ins, pr.p., de- 
ploy. 

deploy' ment, m., the 
act of deploying. 

deplume', v.^, to strip 
of feathers. 

depo'lahce, v.t., to 
deprive of polarity. 

depolarized, p.p., de- 
polarize. 

depo'larizing, pr.p., 
depolarize. 

depo'nent, cidj., lay- 
ing down; n., one 
who makes a de- 
position; a depo- 



V. 



\ 



\. 



\ 






V 



\ 



\ 



depository 



nent verb, i.e., 
verb passive in f'^- 
but active in tnean- 
Jug. 

depop'nlarize, v.t., ii 
make unpopular. 

depop'ulate, v.t., tn 
deprive of inhabit- 
ants. 

depop'olated, p.p., de- 
populate. 

depop'ulating, pr.p., 
depopulate. 

depopula'tion, n., the 
act of depopulating 

depop'olator, n., oA 
who depopulates. 

deport', t>./., to banish; 
reH., to behave. 

deporta'tion, n., ban- 
ishment. 

deport'ed, p.p., de- 
port. 

deport'ing, pr.p., de- 
port. 

deport'ment, n., de- 
meanour; conduct. 

depo' sable, adj., that 
may be deposed. 

depose', v.t., to re- 
move froni a throne 
or other high sta- 
tion; to bear witness 
in a court of law. 

deposed', ^./>., depose. 

depo'ser, »., one who 
deposes. 

deposing, pr.p., de- 
pose. 

depos'it, v.t., to lay 
down; to entrust; to 
put in a place for 
preservation; «., 
that which is laid 
down; a pledge; a 
sum of money 
lodged in a bank. 

depos'itary, n., a per- 
son holding a de- 
posit in trust. 

depos'ited, p.p., de- 
posit. 

depos'iting, pr.p., 
deposit. 

deposi'tion, n., the 
act of giving sworn 
evidence; the at- 
tested written tes- 
timony of a witness; 
the dethroning of a 
king; the act of 
depositing; some- 
thing deposited. 

depos'itor, n., one 
who makes a de- 
posit. 

depos'itory, n., a 
place where any- 
thing is lodged for 
preservation. 



depdt 



dep'At, n., a building 
where goods are 
stored; the head- 
quarters of a regi- 
ment; a railway- 
station {Amer.). 

deprava'tion, n., the 
act of corrupting; 
deterioration. 

deprave', vJ., to cor- 
rupt. 

depraved', adj., viti- 
ated; vicious; p.p., 
deprave. 

dcpra'ver, n., one 
who depraves. 

depra'ving, pr.p., de- 
prave. 

deprav'ity, «•. a state 
of corrupted morals; 
wickedness. 

dep'reoate, v.t., to 
argue earnestly 
against. 

deprecated, p.p., de- 
precate. 

dep'reoatiiig, pr.p., 
deprecate. 

dep'recatinsly, adv., 
in a deprecating 
manner. 

depreoa'tion, «., dis- 
approval. 

deprecative, adj., i.g. 
deprecatory. 

dep'recatory, adj., 
serving to deprecate 

depre' elate, v.t., to 
disparage; v.t., to 
fall m value. 

depredated, p.p., 
depreciate. 

depre' elating, pr.p., 
depreciate. 

deprecUi'tion, n., re- 
duction in value. 

depre'ciative, adj., i.g. 
aepreciatory. 

depre'ciator, »., one 
who depreciates. 

depre' eiatory, adj., 
tending to depre- 
ciate. 

dep'redate, v.t., to 
plunder. 

dep'redated, p.p., dep- 
redate. 

depredating, pr.p. , 
depredate. 

depreda'tion, n., a 
robbing. 

dep'redator, n., a 
spoiler; a robber. 

depred'atory. adj., 
consistmg in pillag- 
ing. 

depress', v.t., to press 
down; to lower; to 
make sad. 

depressed', p.p., de- 












V 



177 



press; adj., dispirit- 
ed; sad; flattened in 
shape. 

depress'ing, pr.p., de- 
press. 

depress'ingly, adv., in 
a depressing man- 
ner. 

depres'sion, n., the 
act of depressing; a 
hollow; dejection; a 
state of commercial 
dulness. 

depress'ive, ad;., tend- 
ing to depress. 

depressor, n., that 
which depresses. 

depri'vable. adj., able 
to be deprived. 

deprivation, n., the 
act ot depriving; a 
state of being de- 
prived; want; the 
taking of a prefer- 
ment from a clergy- 
man. 

deprive', v.t., to dis- 
possess. 

deprived', p.p., de- 
prive. 

depri'ver, »>. , one who 
deprives. 

depriving, pr.p., de- 
prive. 

depth, n., the distance 
from top to bottom, 
or from front to 
back, of a thing; 
profoundness; in- 
tensity. 

depth'less, adj., un- 
fathomable. 

depol'sion, »., a 
thrusting away. 

dep' urate, v.t., to 
purify; v.i., to turn 
pure. 

dep'orated, p.p., dep- 
urate. 

dep'orating, pr.p., 
depurate. 

depuration, n., the 
cleansing of a 
wound. 

dep'nrator, n., one 
who, or that which, 
depurates. 

depu'ratory, adj., 
purifying the blood. 

deputation, n., the 
person or persons 
deputed to transact 
business for another 
or others; the act of 
deputing. 

depute', v.t., to ap- 
point as a sub- 
stitute. 

depn'ted, p.p., de- 
pute. 






K 



derive 



depu'ting, pr.p., de- 
pute. 

dep'nty, n., a repre- 
sentative or sub- 
stitute. 

derail', v.t., to cause 
to leave the rails. 

derailed', p.p., derail. 

derail'ing, pr.p., de- 
rail. 

deraU'ment, n., the 
state of being de- 
railed. 

derange', v.t., to dis- 
order. 

derange'able, adj., 
able to be deranged. 

deranged', p.p., de- 
range. 

derange'ment. n., 
confusion; mental 
disorder. 

derang'ing, pr.p., de- 
range. 

der'elict, adj., aban- 
doned, esp. at sea; 
n., an article aban- 
doned by the owner, 
esp. a vessel at sea. 

derelic'tion, n., aban- 
donment. 

deride', v.t., to ridi- 
cule; to mock. 

deri'ded, p.p., deride. 

deri'der,n., a mocker. 

deriding, pr.p., de- 
ride. 

deri'dingly, adv., 
mockingly. 

deris'ible, adj. , ridicu- 

l0U.<:. 

deri'sion, »., mock- 
ery; scorn. 

deri'sive, adj., mock- 
ing. 

deri'sively, adv., with 
mockery. 

deri'siveness, n., the 
state of being deri- 
sive. 

deri'sory, adj., i.g. 
derisive. 

deri'vable, adj., cap- 
able of being de- 
rived. 

deriva'tion, n., the 
act of deriving; ety- 

. mology. 

deriva'tional, adj., 
rel. to derivation. 

derivative, adj., tak- 
en from something 
preceding. 

derivatively, adv., by 
derivation.- 

derive', v.t., to receive 
from a source; to 
trace the etymology 
of; v.i., to trace 
origin from. 



derived 



178 



desideratum 






V 

L 

bV7 

J, 



I—. 



derived', p.p., de- 
rive. 

deri'ver, «., one who 
derives. 

deii'Ting, pr.p., de- 
rive. 

derm, n., the true 
skin lying beneath 
the cuticle. 

der'mal, adj., pert, 
to, or consisting of, 
skm. 

dermat'io, adj., pert, 
to the skin. 

dennatog'raphy, n., 
i.q. dermography. 

der'matoid, adj. re- 
sembling skin. 

dennatol'ogy, n., the 
science of the skin 
and its diseases. 

der'mic, adj., rel. to 
llie skin. 

dermog'raphy, n., a 
scientific descrip- 
tion of the skin. 

der'moid, a(i;., resem- 
bling skin. 

deimofomy, n., dis- 
section of the skin. 

der'nier, adj., last 
(Fr.). 

dei'ogate, v.t., to dis- 
parage; v.i., to les- 
sen by taking away 
a part. 

der'ogated, p.p., der- 
ogate. 

dei'ogating, pr.p. 
derogate. 

derogation, n., dis- 
paragement. 

derog'atory, adj., les- 
sening the effect or 
value. 

der'rick, n., a kind of 
crane for lifting 
weights. 

der'ringer, «., a short- 
barrelled pistol of 
large calibre. 

der'vish, n., a 
Mohammedan friar 
or monk. 

des'cant, n., melody, 
song; a contrapun- 
tal ornamenting of 
a melody. 

descant', v.i., to dis- 
course freely; to 
add a part to a 
melody. 

descant'ed, p.p., des- 
cant. 

descant'er, n., one 
who descants. 

descanting, pr.p., 
descant. 

descend', v.i., to move 
downward; v.i., to 



u 



u 
K,. 



^^ 



t-. 






pass from the top 
to the bottom of. 

descend'ant, »., an 
individual proceed- 
ing from an ances- 
tor in any degree. 

descend'ed, p.p., de- 
scend. 

descend'ent, adj., de- 
scending. 

descend'er, n., one 
who descends. 

descendibili'ty, n., the 
quality of being 
descendible. 

descend'ible, adj., a.h\e 
to be passed down. 

descending, adj., 
moving downwards; 
pr.p., descend. 

descen'sion, n., de- 
scent; degradation. 

descen'sional, adj. , 
pert, to descension. 

descen'si7e, adj., 
tending downward. 

descenf, n., the act 
of descending; de- 
clivity; an invasion ; 
transmission by 
inheritance; lineage. 

descri'bable,«<i;. , able 
to be described. 

describe', v.i., to trace 
out; to depict in 
words. 

described', p.p., de- 
scribe. 

descri'ber, »., one 
who describes. 

desori'bing, pr.p., de- 
scribe. 

descried', ^.^. , descry. 

descri'er, n., one who 
descries. 

descrip' Hon, n.,the 
act of describing; 
delineation in words; 
variety or kind. 

descrip' tions, n., pi. 
of description. 

descrip' tire, adj. , con- 
taining description. 

descrip'tively, adv., in 
a descriptive man- 
ner. 

descry', v.t., to espy. 

descry'ing, pr.p., de- 
scry. 

des'ecrate, v.t., to 
profane. 

dcs'ecrated, p.p., des- 
ecrate. 

desecrating, pr.p., 
desecrate. 

desecration, «., pro- 
fanation. 

desert, adj., lying 
waste; uncultivated 
anduninhabited;n.. 



s 

J. 

J- 



a wilderness; a 
solitude; a vast 
sandy waste, al- 
most destitute of 
vegetation. 

desert', v.t., to aban- 
don; v.i., to quit a 
post or service with- 
out permission; n., 
reward or punish- 
ment merited. 

desert'ed, p.p., de- 
sert. 

desert' er. n., one who 
deserts, esp. a sol- 
dier or sailor. 

desert'ing, pr.p., de- 
sert. 

deser'tion, n., the act 
of deserting. 

desert'less, adj., un- 
deserving. 

deserve', v.i. and »., 
to merit. 

deserved', p.p., de- 
serve. 

deserv'edly, adv., 
justly. 

deserv'er, n., one who 
deserves. 

deserv'ing, adj., meri- 
torious; pr.p., de- 
serve. 

deserv'ingly, adv., 
meritoriously. 

deshabille', n., the 
state of not being 
fully or properly 
dressed. 

des'iccate, v.t., to ex- 
haust of moisture; 
v.i., to become dry. 

des'iccated, p.p., des- 
iccate. 

desiccating, pr.p., 
desiccate. 

desicca'tion, n., the 
act of making dry. 

des'iccative, adj., 
drying; n., an appli- 
cation 'hat dries a 
sore. 

des'iccator, n. , that 
which desiccates. 

desid'erate, v.t., to 
feel the want of; to 
desire. 

desid'erated, 
desiderate. 

desiderating, 
desiderate. 

desid'erative, 
expressing 
n., a verb formed 
from another and 
expressing a desire 
of doing what the 
primitive verb im- 
plies. 

desideratum. »., 



p.p., 
pr.p., 



adj., 
desire; 



design 



1^ 



something much 
wanted. 

design', v./. , to sketch ; 
to plan; to purpose; 
n., a sketch; a 
scheme; intention. 

design'able, adj., able 
t" be designed. 

des'ignate, v.t., to 
mark out by des- 
cription; to select 
for a purpose. 

designated, p.p., des- 
ignate. 

designating, pr.p., 
(it's;giiale. 

designa'tion, n., the 
act of designating; 
a distinctive appel- 
lation. 

des'ignator, n., one 
who designates. 

designed', p.p., de- 
sign. 

design'edly, adv., in- 
tentionally. 

design'er, n., one who 
designs. 

design'ing, »dj., art- 
ful; pr.p., design. 

design'less, adj., with- 
out uiliMition. 

desirability, n., the 
quality of being 
desirable. 

desirable, »di., 

worthy of desire. 

desir'ableness, n.,i.q. 
desirability. 

desire', v.t., to covet; 
to request; n., 
craving to obtain 
something; that 
which is desired. 

desired', p.p., desire. 

desir'er, n., one who 
desires. 

desiring, pr.p.,6es\ie. 

denr'oos, adj., wish- 
ful. 

desist', V.I., to dis- 
continue. 

dosist'ance, n., a ceas- 
ing to act. 

desisf ed, p.p., desist. 

desist'ing, pr.p., de- 
sist. 

desi'tion, n., an end 
or ending. 

desk, M., a kind of 
table for the use of 
writers and readers, 
often with a sloping 
upper surface. 

desmol'ogy, m., the 
anatomical study of 
smews and liga- 
ments. 

des'olate, »dj., un- 
inhabited; forlorn. 



V 



^ 



\ 









^ 



179 



des'olate, v.t., to lay 
waste; to ruin. 

des'olated, p.p., des- 
olate. 

des'olateness, n., a 
state of being des- 
olate. 

des'olating, />r./>., des- 
olate. 

desola'tion, n., ruin; 
melancholy. 

des'olator, n., one 
who desolates. 

despair', v.i., to give 
up hope; «., hope- 
lessness. 

despaired', p.p., des- 
pair. 

despair'ing, adj., 
prone to despair; 
pr.p., despair. 

despair ingly, adv., in 
adespairiiig manner. 

despatch', v.t., to 
seiiu; lo ha.-iien; to 
kill; n., dismissal; j 
speed; a letter on 
public business. 
Also dispatch. 

despatched', p.p., des- 
patch. 

despatch'ing, pr.p., 
despatch. 

despera'do, n., a 
desperate fellow; 
a reckless ruffian. 

des'perate, adj. be- 
yond hope; reckless. 

des'perately, adv., in 
a desperate manner. 

despera'tioD, n., the 
state of being des- 
perate. 

des'picable, adj., con- 
temptible. 

des'picableness, n., 
the quality of being 
despicable. 

des'picably, adv., vile- 
ly- 

despi'sable, adj., wor- 
thy of contempt. 

despise', v.t., to look 
down on; to scorn. 

despised', p.p., de- 
spise. 

despi'ser, *>., one who 
despises. 

despising, pr.p., de- 
spise. 

despite', n., extreme 
malice; contemptu- 
ous defiance; prep., 
notwithstanding. 

deapite'ial. adj., ma- 
lignant. 

despoil', v.t., to rob; 
to strip. 

despoiled', p.p., de- 
spoil. 



i 

J;- 

ii 

•c 

u 

'I 
I 



destiny 



despoil'er, n., a plun- 
derer. 

despoil'ing, pr.p., de- 
spoil. 

despoil'ment, n., i.g. 
despoliation. 

despolia'tion. n., the 
act of despoiling. 

despond', v.i., to feel 
dejected; to lose 
heart. 

despond'ed, p.p., de- 
spond. 

despond'ence, n., i.g. 
despondency. 

despond'ency, n., the 
state of being de- 
spondent. 

despondent, adj., 
sulking into dejec- 
tion. 

despond'ing, adj., i.g. 
despondent; pr.p., 
d.'spond. 

des'pot, n., an ab- 
solute monarch; a 
tyrant. 

despot'ic, adj., arbi- 
trarv; tyrannical. 

despot'ioal, adj., i.g. 
despotic. 

des'potism, »., auto- 
cracy; tyranny. 

des'potize, v.t., to act 
as a despot. 

des'pnmate, v.t. and 
»., to remove or 
ttirow off scum. 

des'pomated. p.p., 
despumate. 

des'pomating, pr.p., 
despumate. 

despoma'tion, n., the 
act of despumating. 

des'qoamatiB, v.i., to 
peel off. 

des'qnamated, p.p., 
desquamate. 

dea'qnamating, pr.p., 
desquamate. 

desqoama'tion, n., a 
scaling off. 

dessert', n., a course 
of sweetmeats and 
fruit at the end of a 
dinner. 

dessert'-spoonlnl, n., 
as much as fills a 
dessert-spoon. 

destina'Uon, n., the 
appointed end of a 
journey or voyage. 

das' tine, v.t., to fix 
unalterably; to 

doom. 

destined, p.p., des- 
tine, [line. 

destining, pr.p., des- 

des'tiny, n., fortune; 
doom; fate. 



destitate 



\y 



is' 






I 



dea'titnte, adj., de- 
void; 111 abject pov- 
erty. 

destitu'tion, n., a 
stale of utter want. 

destroy', v.l., to de- 
moiish; to put an 
end to. 

destroyed', p.p., de- 
stroy. 

destroy'ei, «., any- 
thing that destroys; 
a swift armed 
ship esp. designed 
against torpedo- 
boats. 

destroy^ing, pr.p., 
destroy. 

destrnctibil'ity, n. , 
the state ot being 
destructible. 

destrac'tible. adj., 
liable to destruc- 
tion. 

destruc'tloB,n., the 
act ot destroying; 
th« state oi being 
destroyed. 

destruc'tlve. adj., 
causing destruction. 

destrudtlvels, adv., 
in a destructive 
manner. 

destruc'tiveaota,n., 
a propensity to 
destroy. 

destruc'toT, n., a 
refuse-burner. 

desnda'tion, n., a 
profuse sweating. 

des'aetade, n., dis- 
con tinuance of prac- 
tice or custom. 

des'itltorily, a(fo. .with- 
out method. 

des'oltoriness, n., the 
character of being 
desultory. 

des'oltory, adj., ram- 
bling; inconstant; 
unmethodical. 

detach', v./., to sepa- 
rate. 

detached', adj., stand- 
ing apart. 

detach'ing, pr.p., de- 
tach. 

detach'ment, »., a 
state of being de- 
tached; troops tak- 
en from the main 
army for some 
special service. 

detail', v./., to recite 
the particulars of; 
to appoint to a 

' special duty; n., an 
individual fact; 
item; detatjiment. 

detailed', p.p.. detail; 



J- 



I 
I 



t 

I 



u 



I 



u 



I 



180 



ad]., exact; particu- 
lar. 

detail'ing, pr.p., de- 
tail. 

detain', v.t., to keep 
back; lo hold in 
custody. 

detain'der, n., a writ. 

detained', p.p., de- 
tain. 

detain'ei, n., one who 
detains; in law, a 
keeping what be- 
longs to another. 

detain'iiig. pr.p., de- 
tain. 

detect', v.t., to dis- 
cover. 

detect'able, adj., able 
to be detected. 

detect'ed. p.p., de- 
tect. 

detect'er, -or, «., one 
who, or that which, 
detects. 

detect'ing, pr.p., de- 
tect. 

detec'tioo, n., dis- 
covery. 

detec'tive, n., a police 
officer whose special 
duty it is to detect 
crimes and appre- 
hend crimin als ; adj. , 
pert, to detection. 

detent', »., a click or 
pawl in a clock, 
watch, or lock. 

deten'tion, n., the act 
of detaining; con- 
finement; delay. 

deter', v.t., to pre- 
vent. 

deterge', v.t., to 
cleanse (a sore). 

deterged', p.p., de- 
terge. 

deter' gent,<K2;.,cleans- 
ing; n., anything 
with cleansing 
power. 

deter' ging, pr.p., de- 
: terge. 

dete'riorate, v.i., to 
grow worse; »./., to 
make worse. 

dete'riorated, p.p., 
deteriorate. 

dete'riorating, pr.p., 
deteriorate. 

deteriora'tion, n., the 
process or state of 
growing worse. 

deter'ment, n., that 
which deters. 

determinable, adj., 
^ capable of being 
determined. 

determinant, adj., 
%.q. determinative; 



detinoe 



n., in mathematics, 
an algebraical ex- 
pression formed ac- 
cording to certain 
laws. 

deter'mlnate. adj., 
1 definite; conclusive. 
' deter' minately, ado., 
^ precisely; in a deter- 
minate manner. 

detenmna't:on, »., de- 
' cision; settled pur- 
pose; resoluteness. 

deter'minative, adj., 
I having power to 
''• direct to a definite 
end. 

deter' mine, v.t., to fix 
or establish; to 
cause to come to a 
conclusion; v.i., to 
resolve; to termin- 
ate. 

deter'mined, adj., 
resolute; p.p., de- 
termine. 

deter' minedly, adv., 
^ in a determined 
manner. 

deter' miner, n., one 
who determines. 

deter'mining. pr.p., 
determine. 

deter'minism, n., the 
philosophical denial 
of free will. 

deterred', p.p., deter. 

deter'rent. adj., de- 
terring; n. , that 
which deters. 

deter'rjng, pr.p., de- 
ter. 

deter'slon, n., the act 
of cleansing. 

deter'sive, adj., i.q. 
detergent. 

detest', v.t., to hate 
extremely. 

detestable, adj., very 
'>dious. 

detesta'tion, n., loath- 
ing. 

detest'ed. p.p., de- 
test. 

detesf er, n., one who 
detests. 

detesting, pr.p., de- 
test. 

dethrone', «.<., to de- 
pose. 

dethroned', p.p., de- 
throne. 

dethrone' ment, n., 
deposition. 

det]m>'ner, n., one 
who dethrones. 

dethro'ning. pr.p., 
dethrone. 

det'inne. n., a thing 
or person detained; 



detonate 



I, 



^' 



I 



I 



I 



L 



L 



I 






i 



K 



K 



an action for re- 
covery. 

det'onate, v.t. and >., 
to explode, or cause 
to explode. 

defoliated, p.p., de- 
tonate. 

det'onating, adj., ex- 
plosive; pr.p., de- 
tonate. 

detona'tion, n., an 
explosion. 

det'onator, n., a cap- 
sule filled with some 
fulminating sub- 
stance to fire a high 
explosive. 

detoniza'tion, »., the 
act of exploding. 

det'onize, v.t., i.q. 
detonate. 

det'oniised. p.p., det- 
onize. 

det'onizing. pr.p. , 
detonize. 

detor'&ion, n., a wrresi- 
111 g or perversion. 

detorf, t>.<. , to distort : 
to pervert. 

detoor', n., a round- 
about way (Fr.). 

detract', v.t., to take 
away from a whole; 
v.i., to take away 
reputation. 

detraot'ed, p.p., de- 
tract. 

dotract'imc, pr.p., de- 
tract. 

detnu3'Uon, n., mali- 
cious depreciation. 

detraot'ive, adj., hav- 
ing the power to 
take away. 

detract'or, n., one 
who detracts. 

detiact'ory, adj., de- 
preciatory. 

detrain', v.t., to re- 
move troops from a 
train; v.t., to alight. 

detrained', p.p. de- 
train. 

detrain'inc pr.p., de- 
train. 

defriment, n., harm. 

detrimen'tal, adj., in- 
jurious. 

detri'tal, adj., pert, 
to detritus. 

detri'tion, n., the 
wearing down or 
weathering of rocks. 

detri'tns, n., disin- 
tegrated materials 
of rocks. 

detrude', v.t., to 
thrust down. 

detmd'ed. p.p., de- 
trude. 



t 






1, 



L- 



181 



detmd'ing, pr.p., de- 
trude. 

detron'cate, v.t., to 
lop. 

detnm'cated. p.p., de- 
truncate. 

detrun' eating, pr.p., 
detruncate. 

detronca'tion, n., the 
act of detruncating. 

detm'sion, n., the act 
of detruding. 

deuce, «., a playing 
card or die with 
two spots; the devil. 

deaterog'amist. n., 
one who marries a 
second time. 

deuterog'amy, »., a 
second marriage; 
the marriage of a 
widow or widower. 

Deateron'omy. n., the 
fifth book of the 
Pentateuch, con- 
taining a second 
version of the Law. 

deaterop'athy, n., the 
sympathetic affec- 
tion of one part 
with another(Af «(i.). 

deatox'ide. »., di- 
oxide; binoxide. 

devapora'tion. n., the 
change of vapour 
into water. 

dev'astate. v.t., to 
ravage. 

devastated, p.p., dev- 
astate. 

dev'astating. pr.p., 
devastate. 

devasta'tion. »., 

havoc; desolation. 

deveFop. v.t., to im- 
fold gradually; v.i., 
to advance from 
stage to stage. 

dereroped. p.p., de- 
velop. 

devel'oper. n., one 
who, or that which, 
develops. 

developing, pr.p., de- 
velop. 

devel'opment, »., a 
gradual growth 

through progressive 
changes. 

devest', v.t., to di- 
vest; to alienate. 

deviate, v.i., to di- 
verge; to vary from 
uniform state. 

de'viated, p.p., de- 
viate. 

de'viating, pr.p., de- 
viate. 

devia'tion, n., a tam- 
ing aside. 



I 



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S^L* 



^ 



I 



devolve 



device', »., a design; 
d scheme; an orna- 
mental design; an 
emblem. 

dev'il, n., an evil 
spirit; the Evil One; 
a I awyer's, printer's, 
or author's assist- 
ant; v.t., to pepper 
excessivelyand grill; 
v.i., to work as devil 
for a printer, etc. 

devilish, adj., pert, 
to the devil; very 
evil. 

dev'ilishly, adv., in a 
devilish manner. 

dev'illed, deviled, 
p.p., devil. 

dev'illing, dev'iling, 
pr.p., devil. 

dev'ilry, n., wicked 
mischief. 

de'vions, adj., ram- 
bling; going astray; 
circuitous. 

de'vioosly, adv., in a 
devious manner. 

de'vioosness, »., the 
state of being de- 
vious. 

devi'sable, adj., able 
to be devised. 

devise', v.t., to in- 
vent or contrive; to 
bequeath; v.t., to 
form a scheme; n., 
a share of an estate 
bequeathed. 

devised', p.p., devise. 

devisee', *>., the (per- 
son to whom a 
devise b made. 

devi'ser. n., one who 
devises; a contriver. 

devi'sing, pr.p., de- 
vise. 

devi'sor, n., one who 
gives by will. 

devi'talize. v.t., to de- 
prive of vitality. 

devitriflca'tion, n.,the 
act of devitrifying. 

devit'riir. v.t., to de- 
prive of the charac- 
ter of glass. 

devo'calise. v.t., to 
make toneless. 

devoid', adj., not 
possessing. 

devoir', «., service or 
duty; respect due to 
another {Fr.). 

devola'tion, n., the 
act of devolving or 
transferring. 

devolve', v.t-. and t., 
to pass, or make to 
pass, from one per- 
son to another. 



devolved 



U 



b 



b 



lr\ 



devolved', />./>. , de- 
volve. 

devolv'ing, pr.p., de- 
volve. 

Devo'nian, ad)., pert, 
to Devonshire; rel. 
to the Old Red 
Sandstone. 

dev'onport, n. , a small 
writing-table fitted 
with drawers, etc. 

devote', v.t., to set 
apart; to consecrate; 
to direct the atten- 
tion entirely. 

devo'ted,arf;., zealous; 
p.p., devote. 

devo'tedness, n., the 
state of being de- 
voted. 

devotee', n., an en- 
thusiast; devout ad- 
herent; fanatic. 

devo'ter, n., one who 
devotes. 

devo'ting. pr.p., de- 
vote. 

devo'tion, n., ardent 
attachment; earn- 
estness; a religious 
exorcise. 

devo'tional, ai/., pert. 
lo devotion. 

devour', v.t., to eat 
up; to consume. 

devoured', p.p., de- 
vour. 

devonr'er, «., one 
wlio devours. 

devoor'ing, adh, con- 
suming; destroying; 
pr.p., devour. 

devout', ad)., pious; 
religious; earnest. 

devout'Iy, adv., in a 
devout manner. 

devoul'ness, n., the 
state of being de- 
vout. 

dew, n., condensed 
atmospheric vapour 
on bodies colder than 
their siuroundings. 

dewan', n., an Indian 
state treasurer. 

dew' drop, n., a drop 
of dew. 

dew'iness, n., a state 
of being dewy. 

dew'lap, n., a lold of 
skin hanging from 
the neck, asp. of 
cows. 

dew'-point, «., the 
temperature at 

which dew begins 
to form. 

dew'y, adj., partak- 
ing of the nature or 
appearance of dew. 



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182 



dez'ter, adj., situated 
on the right hand. 

dezter'ity, n., skill; 
experlness. 

dexterous, adj., skil- 
ful; adroit; expert. 

dex'terously, dez'- 
trously, adv., with 
dexterity. 

dez'tral, adj., right 
(as opposed to left). 

deztrai'ity, n., right- 
handedness. 

dez' trine, n., the 
gummy matter into 
which the interior 
of starch globules is 
convertible. 

dextrors'al, adj., ris- 
ing from left to right 
(as a climbing plant). 

dextrose, »., grape- 
sugar. 

dextrous, adj., i.g. 
dexterous. 

Dey, n., the title of 
tlie old governors 
of Algiers, Tunis, 
and Tripoli under 
the Sultan of Tur- 
key. 

dbo'bi, n., an Indian 
washerman. 

dho'ti, n., a Hindoo's 
loin-cloth. 

dtaow, n., an Arab 
vessel, 150-250 tons 
burden, usually 
one-masted. 

dhur'rie, n., an In- 
dian fringed cotton 
carpet. 

diabe'tes, n., a urin- 
ary disease. 

diabe'tic, adj., pert. 
to diabetes. 

dia'blerie, n., devilry; 
witchcraft. 

diabol'ic, adj., devil- 
ish; infernal; atro- 
cious. 

diabol'ical, adj., i.g. 
diabolic. 

diab'olism, n., posses- 
sion by the devil. 

diab'olo, n., a game of 
skill played with 
two sticks and a 
reel. 

diacaos'tic, adj., bcl. 
to a class of caustic 
curves formed by 
refraction. 

diach'ylon, n., a med- 
ical plaster made of 
olive oil and pow- 
dered litharge. 

diac'onal, adj., rel. to 
a deacon. 

diac'onate, n., the 



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^ 






1;^ 



in. 



dialling 



office or dignity of a 
deacon. 

diacous'tic, adj., bel. 
to the refraction of 
sound. 

diacrit'ic, adj., dis- 
thiguishing; dis- 
tinctive. 

diacrit'ical, adj., i.g. 
diacritic. 

di'adem, n., a crown; 
a coronet. 

diaer'esis, dier'esis, n. , 
separation of one 
syllable into two, 
the mark (") denot- 
ing this division. 

diagno'sis, n., the 
discrimination of 
diseases by their 
symptoms. 

diagnos'tic, adj., in- 
dicating the nature 
of a disease. 

diagonal, adj., from 
angle to angle; n., a 
straight line joining 
opposite corners of 
a figure. 

diag'onally, adv., in a 
diagonal direction. 

di'agram, n., an illus- 
trative outline 
drawing. 

diagrammat'io, adj. , 
pert, to a diagram. 

di'agraph, «., an in- 
strument which en- 
ables one to repro- 
duce objects before 
one without requir- 
ing skill in drawing, 
a kind of camera 
hicida. 

diagrapb'ic, adj., pert, 
to the diagraph. 

di'al, »., the face of a 
watch or other time- 
keeper; any similar 
face over which a 
pointer moves; v.t., 
to measure with a 
dial. 

di'alect, n., a local 
idiom differing from 
the standard speech. 

dialec'tic, adj., pert, 
to a dialect or to 
dialectics; n., rea- 
soning. 

dialec'tica], adj., i.g. 
dialectic. 

dialecti'cian, n., a 
reasoner; a logician. 

di'alist, n., a maker 
or user of dials. 

di'allage, n., a folia- 
ted minerail akin to 
augite. 

di'aUing, di'aling, n., 



dialogism 






t 



c. 






'^ 



cu. 



the art of coustruct- 
ing dials; the theory 
uf the sundial. 

dial'ogism, n., ob- 
lique narration ; dia- 
logue in the third 
person. 

diarogist, n., a writer 
of dialogue; a speak- 
er in a dialogue. 

dialogis'Uo, adj., hav- 
nig the form of a 
dialogue. 

dial'ogize, v.t., to dis- 
course in dialogue. 

di'alogue, n., a con- 
versation between 
two or niore per- 
sons, esp. in a stage- 
play. 

dial-plate, n., the 
plate 01 a dial. 

dial'ysis, n., the sep- 
aration of the crys- 
talloid from the 
colloid elements of 
a body; debility; a 
solution of con- 
tinuity. 

diamagnet'ic adj., 
shownig the pecu- 
liarity of pointing 
east and west under 
magnetic influence. 

diam'eter, n., a 
straightline through 
the centre of a 
body; thickness. 

diametral, adj., i.q. 
diametric. 

diamet'ric, adj., pert, 
to a diameter. 

diametrical, adj., i.q. 
diametric. 

di'amond, n., a very 
hard precious stone; 
a very small kind 
of printing type; a 
lozenge or rhom- 
bus. 

Dian'dria, n. pi., 
plants with two 
stamens. 

dian'drian, adj., hav- 
ing two stamens. 

Dian'thos, n., a genus 
of plants including 
the pink and carna- 
tion. 

diapa'son, n., an oc- 
tave; the compass 
of a voice or instru- 
ment; an organ 
stop. 

di'aper, n., a linen or 
cotton fabric with a 
figured pattern; v.t., 
to variegate with 
figures. 

di'aphane, »., a silk 



4 

I. 

P5- 






183 



fabric with trans- 
parent figures. 

diaphane'ity, n., the 
quality of being 
diaphanous. 

diaphanom'eter, n., 
an instrument for 
measuring the trans- 
parency ot the air. 

diapbanoos, adj., 
transparent; pel- 
lucid. 

diaphon'ic, adj., dia- 
coustic; rel. to 
sound-refraction. 

diaphore'sis, n., ex- 
cessive perspira- 
tion. 

diaphoret'ic, a<2/.,bav- 
uig the power to 
increase perspira- 
tion; »., a sudorific. 

di'aphrai^ n., the 
irudrifl; a partition. 

diaph'ysis, n., the 
suaf t of a long bone. 

dia'rian, adj., rel. to a 
diary. 

di'arist, n., one who 
keeps a diary. 

diarrhoea, diarrhe'a, 
H., an ailment ot 
the intestines; ex- 
cessive looseness of 
the bowels. 

diarrhoe'ic, adj., rel. 
to diarrhoea. 

diarrhoet'ic, adj. , pro- 
ducing diarrhoea. 

diarthro'sis, n., a 
joint capable of re- 
volving in all direc- 
tions, as the shoul- 
der-joint. 

di'ary, n. , a journal of 
daily transactions. 

diastase, n., a sub- 
stance in barley and 
oats after germina- 
tion, which turns 
starch into sugar at 
150° F. 

dias'tole, n., the dila- 
tation of the heart; 
the lengthening of a 
short syllable. 

di'astyle. n., an ar- 
rangement of col- 
umns in classical 
architecture in 

which intercolum- 
niation is equal to 
three diameters. 

Diates'saron, n., a 
harmony of the 
four gospels; an 
electuary or medi- 
cine containing four 
drugs; a musical 
interval. 



dickey 



1- 
I 



k 



h 






V- 

HA. 



u 
u 



diather'mal, adj., 
penetrable by heat. 

diather'manons, adj., 
letting radiant heat 
pass through. 

diath'esis, n., habit of 
body; predisposi- 
tion to certain dis- 
eases. 

Diatoma'ceae, n. pi., 
a family of minute 
unicellular algae, or 
primitive plant- 
forms. 

diaton'ic, adj., pert, 
to the major and 
minor scales in 
music. 

di'atribe, n., a long 
invective. 

dib, n., a small bone 
in a sheep's knee. 

dib'ble, n., a pointed 
tool used in garden- 
ing, v.t., to dig with 
a dibble. 

diVbled, p.p., dibble. 

dib'bler, n., one w^ho 
dibbles. 

dib'bling, pr.p., dib- 
ble. 

dib'stone, ». , a pebble 
used in a cliild's 
game (called dib- 
slotus). 

dice, n., pi. of die; 
v.i., to play with 
dice. 

dice '-bos, n., a box 
from which dice are 
thrown. 

diced, ^.p., dice. 

diceph'aloos, adj., 
havmg two heads. 

di'cer, n., a player 
at dice. 

dichot'omize, v.i., to 
become dichoto- 
mous. 

dichot'omoos, adj., 
regularly dividing 
by pairs from top 
to bottom. 

dichot'omy, n., dis- 
tribution of ideas 
by pairs; branching 
by continual fork- 
ing. 

dichromat'ic, 1x^7'., 
having two colours. 

di'dng, pr.p., dice; 
»., the practice or 
act of dicing. 

dick'ena, n., devil; 
deuce {slang). 

dick'er, n., ten hides 
or skins. 

dick'ey, dick'y, n., a 
false shirt-front; the 
driver's seat; a seat 



dicotyledon 









IT 



at the back of a 
carriage. 

dicotyle'don, n., a 
plant whose seeds 
contain a pair of 
seed-leaves. 

dicotjrled'onous, adj., 
having two seed- 
leaves. 

dictate', v.l., to deliv- 
er a command; to 
instruct to be writ- 
ten. 

dic'tate, n., a rule 
suggested to the 
mind. 

diota'ted, p.p., dic- 
tate. 

dicta' ting, pr.p., dic- 
tate. 

dicta'tion, n., the act 
of dictating. 

diota'tor, >«., one in- 
vested with abso- 
lute authority. 

dictato'iial, adj., 
over-bearing. 

dictatorship, n., the 
office of a dictator. 

dic'tion, «., choice of 
words; mode of ex- 
pression. 

dic'tioBary, «., a book 
which contains tfic 
words of a language- 
arranged alphabeti- 
cally, with mean- 
ings, etc., attached. 

dic'tum, n., an au- 
thoritative saying. 

did, p.t., do. 

didao'tio, idj., in- 
tended to instruct. 

didactical, adj., i.q. 
didactic. 

didac'tyl, adj., two- 
toed; n., a two-toed 
animal. 

didac'tylons, adj., 
two- toed or two- 
fingered. 

did'^e, v.t., to cheat; 
to dandle. 

did'dled, p.p., diddle. 

did'dling, pf.p., did- 
dle; n., cheating. 

didecahe'dral. adj. , 
having ten planes 
at either extremity. 

didst, p.t., 2iid pers. 
sing., do. 

did'jrmotis, adj., twin; 
growing double. 

dMyna'mian, adj., i.q. 
didynamous. 

di^'amons, adj., 
having four sta- 
mens in pairs, one 
pair longer than the 
other. 






I. 



A- 






184 



die, « ., to cease «o 
live; «., a small 
cube used in gam- 
ing; a square body; 
a stamp used m 
coining, etc. 

died, p.p., die. 

die'-hard, n., a brave 
man who fights to 
the death. 

die'-sinker, n., an 
engraver of dies for 
embossing. 

di'esis, n., a very 
small interval in 
music. 

di'et, «., regular food 
and drink; a legisla- 
tive session; a Ger- 
man or Austrian 
parliament; v.l., to 
prescribe a diet. 

di'etary, «., a system 
of diet. 

di'eted, p.p., diet. 

di'eter, n., one who 
prescribes rules for 
eating. 

dietet'ic, adj. , pert, to 
a regulated diet. 

dietet'ical, adj., i.q. 
dietetic. 

di'etine, n., a local 
assembly or diet. 

di'eting, pr.p., diet. 

differ, «.»., to be un- 
like; to be of an- 
other opinion; to 
quarrel. 

differed, p.p., differ. 

difference, n., dis- 
similarity; a dis- 
pute; the remainder 
after arithmetical 
subtraction; v.t., to 
cause a difference 
in; to discriminate. 

differenced, p.p., dif- 
ference. 

differeacing, pr.p., 
difference. 

differeat, adj., dis- 
tinct; separate; un- 
like. 

difleren'tia, n., the 
characteristic attri- 
bute of a species. 

difleren'tial, adj. , 
making a difference; 
discriminating; a 
mathematical epi- 
thet applied to the 
infinitesimal differ- 
ence between two 
values of a vari- 
able. 

diftereu'tiate, v.t., to 
distinguish by a 
difference; in mathe- 
matics, to obtain 






N 



dig 



the differential co- 
efficient of. 

differcn'tiated, p.p., 
differeniiuie. 

difteren'tiating, pr.p., 
differentiate. 

differentia' tion, n. , 
the act of differen- 
tiating. 

differently, adv., in 
a different manner. 

difficult, adj., not 
easy; hard to do or 
to understand. 

difficulty.n., hard- 
ness to be done; 
embarrassment ot 
affairs; a quarrel. 

diffidence, n., want 
of confidence; self- 
distrust. 

diffident, adj., not 
confident; bashful. 

dif'form, adj., irregu- 
lar in form; an- 
omalous. 

diffract', v.t., to bend 
from a straight line. 

diffracted, p.p., dif- 
fract. 

diffracting, pr.p., dif- 
fract. 

diilrac'tion, n., deflec- 
tion of light. 

diffuse', adj. , verbose; 
wanting in concise- 
ness; v.l., to send 
out in all directions. 

diffused', adj. , spread; 
dispersed; p.p., dif- 
fuse. 

diffuse'ly, adv., ex- 
tensively; with too 
many words. 

diifn'ser, n., one who, 
or that which, diffu- 
ses. 

diffusibil'ity, »., the 
quality of being 
diffusible. 

diffin'sible, adi., cap- 
able of being spread 
in all directions. 

diffu'ging, pr.p., dif- 
fuse. 

diffa'sion, n., a 
spreading abroad; 
propagation. 

diffu sive, <nf;., widely 
reaching. 

difiu'siveiy, adv., ex- 
tensively; widely. 

diffusiveness, n., the 
character of being 
diffusive. 

dig, v.t., to open and 
turn up with a 
spade; v.i., to work 
with a spade or 
similar implement. 



digamma 






i 



digamma, n., a lost 
Greek letter, prob- 
ably equivalent to 
V or /. 

digas'toic,a^7. .double- 
bellied. 

di'gest, n., a collec- 
tion of Roman laws, 
arranged by the 
Emperor Justiiiiaii; 
any similar collec- 
tion. 

digest', v.t. , to arrange 
methodically for 
study; to dissolve 
in the stomach. 

digest'ed, ^.^., digest. 

digest'et, n., one who 
arranges in order; 
that which assists 
the digestion of 
food; a vessel in 
which substances in 
water are exposed 
to great heat so as 
to extract their 
essences. 

ducestibirity, n., the 
quality of being 
digestible. 

digast'iWe, adj., cap- 
able of being di- 
gested. 

di^est'ing, pr.p., di- 

fl^s'ticm, »., the act 
of methodizing; the 
process which food 
undergoes in the 
stomach. 

digestive, adj., hav- 
ing the power to 
promote digestion; 
n., a stomachic. 

digged, ^.^., dig; more 
commonly, dug. 

digger, «., one who 
digs, esp. for gold. 

dig'ging, n., the act of 
digging; />r./)., dig. 

dig'gingS.n./)/., lodg- 
ings (slang). 

dig'it, »., a finger; 
any whole number 
less than ten. 

digital, adj., pert, to 
the fingers; n., a 
piano or organ key. 

digita'Iis, «., a genus 
of plants including 
the loxglove. 

dig'itate, adj. , branch- 
ed out into divisions 
like fingers. 

dig^itated, adj., i.q. 
digitate. 

digita'tion, n., divi- 
sion into finger-like 
processes. 

dig'itigTade, n., an 



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t 

L 






185 



animal that walks 
on its toes. 

di'glypit, «., a pro- 
jecting face with 
two channels sunk 
in it ( Arch.). 

dis'olhed, adj., 
stately in deport- 
ment; p.p., dignify. 

dignify, v.t., to in- 
vest with dignity 
or high rank; to 
honour. 

dlg'alfyiag, pr.p., 
dignify. 

dignitary, n., a per- 
son of exalted ratik 
or office. 

dig'aity, n., noble- 
ness of mind; an 
elevated office. 

di'graDh, n., a union 
of two letters signi- 
fying one so\md. 

digress', v.i., to wan- 
der from a theme. 

digressed', p.p., di- 
gress. 

digress'ing, pr.p., di- 
gress. 

digres'sion, n., a de- 
parture from a main 
subject. 

digres'sional, adj., 
consisting m digres- 
sion. 

digres'sive, adj., i.q. 
digressional. 

digyn'ian, adj., hav- 
ing two pistils. 

dig'ynoos, adj., i.q. 
digynian. 

dibe'dral, adj., having 
two plane faces, as 
a crystal. 

dibe'dral an'gle, »., 
the incljiation to 
each r itier of an 
aero-^lane's wings. 

dibe'droa, n., a figure 
with two planesides. 

dija'dicate, v.t., to 
judge; to adjudi- 
cate. 

dija'dicated, p.p., di- 
judicate. 

diju'dicating, pr.p., 
dijudicatc. 

dijndioa'tioii, n., the 
act of adjudicating. 

dike, n., a ditch; a 
mound; v.t., to sur- 
roimd with a dike; 
to secure by a bank. 

diked, p.p., dike. 

di king, pr.p., dike. 

dilac'erate, v.t., to 
rend asunder. 

dilao'erated, p.p., di- 
lacerate. 






K 

n 



r 



diU 



dilac'erating, pr.p., 
dilacerate. 

dilapidate, v.i., to 
fall to ruin; v.t., to 
allow buildings to 
become ruinous by 
neglect. 

dHap'idated, adj., 
in a ruinous state; 
p.p., dilapidate. 

diiap'idating, pr.p., 
dilapidate. 

dllapida'tion, «., 
the state of being 
dilapidated; in 

ecclesiastical law, 
the decay of a build- 
ing caused by the 
neglect of the in- 
cumbent. 

dilap'idator. n., one 
who dilapidates. 

dilatabil'ity, n., the 
quality of being 
dilatable. 

dila' table, adj., elas- 
tic; able to be 
dilated. 

dilata'tion, n., the 
act of expanding; 
the state of being 
distended. 

dilate', v.t. and >., to 
expand; distend; 
enlarge on. 

dila'ted,^.^., dilate. 

dila' ting, pr.p., dilate. 

dila'tion, n., i.q. di- 
latation. 

dil'atorily, adv., in a 
dilatory manner. 

dil'atoriness, n., tar- 
diness. 

dil'atory, adj., pro- 
crastinating, delay- 
ing. 

dilem'ma, n., a logi- 
cal argument which 
catches an adver- 
sary between two 
fatal alternatives; 
an awkward situa- 
tion. 

dilettan'te, »., an 
amateur; one who 
cultivates an art 
for amusement (pi. 
dilettanti). 

dilettan'ti^ n., the 
character of a 
dilettante. 

dil'igence, n., indus- 
try; a four-wheeled 
stage-coach. 

dil'igent, <Ki;., indus- 
trious; attentive. 

diligently, adv., in a 
diligent manner. 

dill, n., a European 
plant, the seeds of 



dUuent 






V>. 



\r' 



^tw. 



n 












which are used to 
cure flatulence. 

dil'uent, »., that 
which dilutes; a 
medicine to make 
the blood more fluid. 

dilate', v./., to weaken 
by mixing with 
water; adj., diluted. 

dila'ted, p.p., dilute. 

dilu'ter, »«., one who, 
that which, dilutes. 

dilu'ting, pf .p. .dilute. 

diln'tion, n., the act 
of diluting. 

dila'vial, cuLi., pert, 
to a deluge, esp. to 
the Noachian Del- 
uge. 

diln'Tian, ^i., i.q. 
diluvial. 

dilu'viom, n., a 
deluge; a deposit 
caused by the ex- 
traordinary action 
of water. 

dim, ad]., not seeing 
clearly; not clearly 
seen; obscure; v.l., 
to obscure. 

dime, n., an Ameri- 
can silver coin, the 
tenth of a dollar; 
ten cents; value 
about 5d. 

dimen'sion, n., exten- 
sion in a single 
direction. 

dim'eter, n., a verse 
of two measures. 

dimid'iate,a<2;.halved. 

dimin'ish, v.t. and i., 
lo lessen. 

dimin'ished, adi. , 
lessened in size or 
importance; p.p., 
diminish. 

dimin'ishiiiK, pf-p- , 
diminish. 

diminoea'do, adv. , 
diminishingly; n., a 
lessening in volume 
of sound. 

diminn'tion, n., the 
act of diminishing. 

dimin'ative, adj., 
smaller than the 
normal sixe; n., a 
word formed from 
another to express 
a little thing of the 
kind. 

dim'issory, adj., dis- 
missing to another 
jurisdiction. 

dka'ity, n., a stout 
cotton fabric. 

dim'ly, adv., in a dim 
manner. 

dimmed, p.p., dim. 









K 

K 

J. 



Lb 






1S6 



dim'ming, pr.p., dim. 

dim'mish, adj., some- 
what dim. 

dim'ness, n. , the state 
of being dim. 

dimor'pbism, n., the 
property of having 
two distinct forms, 
exhibited by some 
crystalline min- 
erals. 

dimoi'phoos, adj., 
exhibiting dimor- 
phism. 

dim'ple, n., a small 
depression, esp. on 
the face; v.i., to 
form dimples; v.t., 
to mark with 
dimples. 

dim'pled, adj. , having 
cheeks marked by 
dimples; p.p., dim- 
ple. 

dimpling, pr.p., dim- 
ple. 

dim'ply, »dj., full of 
dimples. 

din, n., a loud, long- 
continued noise; »./., 
to stun with noise. 

dine, v.i., to take 
dinner; v.t., to give 
a dinner to. 

dined, p.p., dine. 

di'ner, n., one who 
dines. 

ding, v.t., to dash. 

ding'-dong, n., the 
sound of bells; adv. , 
with alternating 
success. 

dinged, p.p., ding. 

dingey, din'ghy, n., a 
ship's small boat; a 
pleasure boat. 

din'giness, n., the 
state of being dingy. 

ding'ing, pr.p., ding. 

din'gle, n., a little 
wooded valley. 

din'go, n., a wild 
Australian dog. 

din'gy, adj., soiled; 
dirty white. 

di'ning, pr.p., dine. 

dining-room, n., a 
room to d.iie in. 

din'ner, »., the prin- 
cipal meal of the 
day. 

din'neiless, adj., hav- 
ing no dinner. 

din'ning, pr.p., din. 

dinothe'iiom, n., a 
gigantic extinct ele- 
phant. 

dint, n., the mark 
made by a blow; a 
dent; v.l., to dent. 



v 

\ 

■v 



,L. 



diploe 

dint'ed. p.p., dint. 

dioc'osan, adj., rel. 
to a diocese; n., a 
bishop as related to 
his own diocese; one 
in a diocese in rela- 
tion to the bishop. 

di'ocese, n., the ex- 
tent of a bishop's 
jurisdiction. 

Dioe'cia, n. pi., a 
genus of plants, 
some being male 
and some female. 

dioe'cian, adj., hav- 
ing individuals of 
either sex. 

diop'ter, n., an opti- 
cal instrument for 
taking altitudes. 

diop'tric, adj., pert, 
to dioptrics, that 
branch of optics 
which deals with 
refraction, esp. 

through lenses. 

diop'trical, adj., i.q. 
dioptric. 

diora'ma, n., a scenic 
spectacle produced 
by transmission and 
reflection of light. 

diora'mic, adj., pert. 
: to diorama. 

dioitho'sis, n., correc- 
tion of a deformity; 
critical revision of 
a text. 

diox'ide, »., an oxide 
containing two 

atoms of oxygen 
and one of another 
element. 

dip, v.t., to put into 
a fluid and with- 
draw; v.i., to sink; 
to slope; n., an 
immersion; inclina- 
tion; a rude kind of 
candle; a wash. 

dipet'aloos, adj., two- 
petalled. 

di'pbone, n. , a phono- 
graphic sign repre- 
senting two con- 
secutive vowels, 
which are sepa- 
rately pronounced. 

dipbon'ic, adj., rel. to 
a diphone. 

diphtbe'ria, n., a dis- 
ease of the throat. 

dipb' thong, n., a 
union of two vowels 
to form a single 
sound. 

dipbtbon'gal,a<i;. , bel. 
to a diphthong. 

dip'loe, n., the soft 
substance between 



diploma 



187 



disappearance 



i. 



^ 



k 






w 



V 






^ 

K^ 



1 






the plates of the 
skull. 

diploma, n., a writ- 
ten document con- 
ferring a privilege 
or honour. 

diplo'maoy, n., the 
art of conducting 
negotiations be- 
tween nations. 

diplomat, n., a diplo- 
niJiist. 

diplomatic adj., rel. 
to diplomacy; tact- 
ful. 

diplomatically, adv., 
in a diplomatic 
manner; artfully. 

diplo'matist, n., a 
person skilled In 
diplomacy. 

dipped, p.p., dip. 

dip'per, »., one who, 
or that which, dips; 
an American Bap- 
tist; a water-ousel. 

lip'ping, pr.p., dip. 

dips, pi. of dip (n.); 
3rd pers. sing. pres. 
of to dip. 

dipsomania, n., an 
uncontrollable ma- 
nia for drinking 
stimulants. 

Dip'tera, n. pi., the 
class of animals 
having two wings 
only. 

dip'teral, adj., having 
two wings. 

dip' tote, n., a noun 
with only two cases. 

dip'tycb, n., a carv- 
ing or painting on 
two folding tablets. 

diiadia'tion, n., the 
emission and difiu- 
sion of light. 

dire, adj., dreadful; 
dismal. 

direct', adj., straight; 
v.t., to point in a 
straight line; to 
order; to address a 
letter. 

direct'ed, p.p., direct. 

direct'ing. pr.^.,direct 

direo'tion, »., the act 
of durectiog; course; 
management; the 
address on a letter. 

direcfive, adj., hav- 
ing the power of 
directing. 

diroot'ly, adv., in a 
direct manner; im- 
mediately. 

direot'ness, n., the 
quality of being 
direct. 









"S 



Ixi 



iT 



K 



!>-.» 



[ 



dirocf or, n., one who 
directs, esp. a com- 
pany; a spiritual 
adviser. 

direct'orate, n., a 
body of directors. 

directo'rial, a J/. , pert . 
to a director. 

direct' ory, n., a txxik 
containing an alpha- 
betical list of per- 
sons, with certain 
particulars, such as 
their addresses. 

direct'ress, n., a 
woman who directs. 

directrix, n., a 
straight line of im- 
portance in the 
theory of conic sec- 
tions. 

dire'ful, adj.,i.q. dire. 

dire'tolness, n., the 
slate of being dire. 

dir'er, adj., comp. of 
dire. 

dir'est, adj., tuper. of 
dire. 

dirge, n., a song 
expressing mourn- 
ing. 

dirigible, adj., able 
to be directed; n., 
an airship capable 
of being steered. 

dirk, n., a dagger. 

dirt, n., any foul or 
filthy substance. 

dirtied, p.p., dirty. 

dirt'ier, adj., comp. of 
dirty. 

dirt'ieot, adj., tuper. 
of dirty. 

dirt'ily, adv., in a 
dirty manner. 

dirt'iness, n., foul- 
ness; nastiness. 

dirt'y, adj., not clean; 
impure; v.t., to de- 
file, to soil. 

dirt'yine, pr-P., dirty. 

Dis, »i., the god Pluto. 

disabil'ity, n., inca- 
pacity. 

disa'ble, v.t., to render 
incapable. 

disa'bled. p.p., dis- 
able. 

disa'bling, pr.p., dis- 
able. 

disabnse', v.t., to tm- 
dcceive. 

dlMibased', p.p., dis- 
abuse. 

disabus'ing, ^r.^., dis- 
abuse. 

diaadvaa'tage, n., 
injury; harm; dam- 
age; v.t. to affect 
injuriously. 



V 



V 



n 



Kr 



L 



O. 



Ky 



K^ 



disadvan'taged, p.p., 

disadvantage. 

diaat/vA a 'raffing, 
pr.p., disadvan- 
tage. 

Haadvaata'seoMa, 
adj., unfavourable 
to success. 

Xaadvaata'geom\j, 
adv., in a disadvan- 
tageous manner. 

disaflect', v.t., to 
make unfriendly. 

flisafiect'ed, adj., un- 
friendly, disloyal; 
p.p. disaffect. 

disafiect'ing, pr.p., 
disaffect. 

disaSeo'tion, n., alien- 
ation of affection. 

disaffirm', v.t., to 
repudiate. 

disafflrm'ance, n., 
denial. 

disaffirmed', p.p., dis- 
affirm. 

disafflrm'ing, pr.p., 
disaffirm. 

disaSor'est, v.t., to 
divest of forest laws. 

disaflor'ested, p.p., 
disafforest. 

disaSor'esting, pr.p., 
disafforest. 

disagree', v.i., to dif- 
ter; to quarrel. 

disagree'able, adj., 
unplcasing. 

disagree'ableness, n., 
the quality of being 
disagreeable. 

disagree'ably, adv., 
unpleasantly. 

disagreed', p.p., dis- 
agree. 

disagree'ing, pr.p., 
disagree. 

disagree'ment, n., 
difference; a quarrel. 

disallow', v.t., to re- 
fuse permission for; 
to reject. 

disallow'able, adj., 
not to be permitiod. 

disallow'ance, n. , pro- 
hibition. 

disallowed', p.p., dis- 
allow. 

disallowing, pr.p., 
disallow. 

disanntil', v.t., to can- 
cel. 

disannulled', ^.^. .dis- 
annul. 

disannulling, pr.p., 
disanuMJ. 

disappear', v.t., to 
vanish. 

disappear'anoe, n. , re- 
moval from sight. 



disappeared 



188 



discoloration 



i. 

\ 

V 
k'. 



■k 






disappeared', p.p., 
disappear. 

disappearing, pr.p., 
disappear. 

disappoint', v.'., to 
belie expectation. 

disappoint'ed, p.p., 
disappoint. 

disappoiat'ing. Pr.p., 
disappoint; adj., 
contrary to hope. 

disappoint' me nt, 
n., failure of expec- 
tation. 

disapproba'tion. n., 
disapproval; cen- 
sure. 

disap'probatory, adj., 
conveying disap- 
probation. 

disappro'priate, u.t. , 
to release trom indi- 
vidual ownersliip. 

disapprov'al, n., dis- 
approbation; dis- 
like. 

disapprove', v.l., to 
censure; «.«., to ex- 
press disapproval. 

disapproved', p.p., 
disapprove. 

disapprov'ing, pr.p., 
disapprove. 

disapprov'iogly, adi.. 
in a disapproving 
manner. 

disarm', v.t., to take 
the arms from; to 
render harmless. 

disann'ament, n., the 
act of disarming. 

disarmed', p.p., dis- 
arm. 

disarm'ing, pr.p., dis- 
arm. 

disarrange', v.t., to 
put out of order. 

disarranged', p.p., 
disarrange. 

disarrange'ment, n., 
disorder. 

disarrang'ing, pr.p., 
disarrange. 

disarray', v.t., to un- 
dress; to throw into 
disorder; n. , dis- 
order; confusion. 

disarrayed', p.p., dis- 
array. 

disarra/ing, pr.p., 
disarray. 

disas'ter, n., a great 
misfortune or cal- 
amity. 

disas'trona, adj., 
causing or accom- 
panied by disaster. 

dtsas'troosly, adv., in 
a disastrous man- 
ner. 



to. 



I 



k^ 



^ 



L disavow', v.t., to re- 
pudiate; to dis- 
own. 
disavow'al, n., denial; 
repudiation. 
j, disavowed', p.^., dis- 
avow. 
disavow'ing, pr.p-, 

disavow. 
disband', v.t. and i., 
to dismiss; to break 
up as a band of 
men. 
disband'ed, p.p., dis- 
band. 

JL disband'ing, pr.p., 
*-^ disband. 

disband' meni, n., the 

act of disbanding. 
disbelief, n., denial 

of belief. 
disbelieve', v.t., to 
hold not to be true; 
v.t., to refuse to 
believe. 
disbelieved', p.p., dis- 
believe. 
disbeliev'er, «., an 

unbeliever. 
disbelieving, pr.p., 

disbelieve. 
disbnr'den, v.t., to 
remove a burden 
from. 
A,^ disbor'dened. p.p., 
^^■^ disburden. 

disburdening, pr.p., 
disburden. 
Jj, o disburse', v.t., to e.x- 
^^ pend. 

disbursed', p.p., dis- 
burse. 

A, xp disburse'ment, »., a 
^■'^ sum paid out. 

disbnrs'er, n., one 
who disburses. 
JLa^ disbars'ing,^r./).,dis- 
biu'se. 
disc, n. , a flat circular 
plate. 
Jr-^ discard', v.t. and »., 
to throw out of the 
band cards not 
wanted in the game; 
to cast off. 
discarded, p.p., dis- 
card. 
Ji-^ discarding, ^r./)., dis- 
card. 
discern', v.t., to dis- 
criminate by the 
eye or intellect. 
i diacemed', pp., dis- 
cern. 
J^ discem'er, «. , a cl ear- 
^ sighteil observer. 
discem'ible, adj., able 
to be discerned. 
<L discem'ing, adj., 
^ sharp-sighted; acute 



^ 



^ 



V 



V' 



i- 



A-^ 



h 



Vt 






h 



y 



L 



of understanding; 
pr.p., discern. 

discern' ingly, adv., in 
a discerning man- 
ner. 

discem'ment, n., 
acuteness of judg- 
ment; penetration. 

discbarge' , v.t., to 
free from a burden; 
to fire off; to pay (a 
debt); to dismiss; 
n., release; dismis- 
sal; payment. 

discharged', p.p., 
discharge. 

dischar'ger, n., one 
who, or that which, 
discharges. 

discbarg' ing, pr.p., 
discharge. 

dis'ciiorm, adj., disc- 
shaped. 

disci'ple, n., a pupil; 
a follower. 

disci'pIesLip, n., the 
state of being a 
disciple. 

disciplina'rian, n. , one 
who enforces rigid 
discipline; a mar- 
tinet. 

dis'oiplinary. adj., 
promoting disci- 
pline. 

dis'cipUne, n., train- 
ing; correction; 
chastisement; v.t., 
to subject to disci- 
pline. 

disciplined, p.p., dis- 
cipline. 

dis'cipliiiing, pr.p., 
discipline. 

disclaim', v.l., to dis- 
avow. 

disclaimed', p.p., dis- 
claim. 

disclaim'er, n., one 
who disclaims; an 
act of disclaiming. 

disclaim'ing, pr.p., 
disclaim. 

disclose', v.t., to re- 
veal. 

disclosed', p.p., dis- 
close. 

disclo'ser, n. , one who 
discloses. 

disclo'sing, pr.p., dis- 
close. 

disclo'sure, n., the 
act of revealing; the 
thing revealed. 

dis'coid, adj., resem- 
bling a disc. 

discoi'dal, adj., i.g. 
discoid. 

discolora'tion. n., the 
act of discolouring. 



discolour 



\. 



s 



k 

w 



disool'onr, discoror, 

v.t., to stain; adj., 
differing in colour. 

discoroured, p.p. , dis- 
colour. 

discolonring, pr.p., 
discolour. 

discom'flt, v.i. ,to van- 
quish; to disconcert. 

discomfited, ^.^., dis- 
comfit. 

discom'flter, n., one 
who discomfits. 

discom'fltinK, pr.p., 
discomfit. 

discom'fiture, n., de- 
feat; disappoint- 
ment. 

discom'fort, n., ab- 
sence of comfort; 
disturbance of 

peace; v.t., to make 
unoasv. 

discom'Iorted, p.p., 
discomfort. 

discomforting, pr.p., 
discomfort. 

discommode', v.t., to 
put to inconveni- 
ence. 

discommo'ded, p.p., 
discommodR. 

discommo'ding, pr.p. , 
discommode; adj., 
inconvenient. 

discompose', v.i., to 
disturb; to vex. 

discomposed', p.p., 
discompo-o. 

discomposing, pr.p., 
discompose. 

discompo'snre, n., 
agitation of mind. 

disconcert', v.t., to 
frustrate; to con- 
fuse. 

disconcerted, pp. , 
disconcert. 

disconcerting, pr.p., 
disconcert; adj., up- 
setting. 

disconnect', v.'., to 
detach. 

disoonnect'ed, p.p. , 
disconnect. 

disconnect'ing, pr.p., 
aisoounec.l. 

disconnec'tion, n. , 

separation. 
discon'solate, adj. , 

hopeless; sad. 
discontent', »., dis- 
satisfaction. 
discontent'ed, adj., 

dissatisfied. 
discontent'edly. adv., 

in a discontented 

manner. 
discontenting, adj., 

causing discontent. 



^U3 



k 
V 

JSSL! P 






189 



i&acon tent' meat, 

n., discontent. 

discontin' nance, »., 
cessation. 

discontinoa tion. n. , 
i.g. discontinuancf. 

discontin'ne, v.t., to 
put an end to; V.i., 
to cease. 

discontin'ned, p.p., 
discontinue. 

discontin'ning, pr.p., 
discontinue. 

discontinn'ity, n., 
want of continuity. 

discontin'uoos, adj. , 
interrupted. 

dis'cord, «., disagree- 
ment; strife; a union 
of musical sounds 
disagreeable to the 
ear. 

discord', v.i., to be 
out of harmony or 
agreement. 

discord'ance, »., of- 
fence against har- 
mony. 

discord'ancy, n., i.q. 
discordance. 

discord'ant, adj., dis- 
agreeing; not har- 
monious. 

discos'tate, adj., hav- 
ing ribs diverging 
radiately. 

dis'coont, «. , a deduc- 
tion from a price or 
other sum of money 
to cover interest. 

discotmt', v.i., to de- 
duct discount from; 
to discredit. 

disconnt'able, adj. , 
capable of being 
discounted. 

discotmt'ed, p.p., dis- 
count. 

disconn'tenauce, v.t., 
to discourage by 
disapproval. 

disconn'tenanced,/).^. 
discountenance. 

discoon'tenancing, 
pr.p., discounten- 
ance. 

dis'coimter, n., one 
who discounts bills, 
etc. 

disconnt'ing, pr.p., 
discount. 

discourage, v.t., to 
dishearten; to dis- 
suade. 

discoor'aged, p.p. , 
discourago. 

disconr'agement, n., 
the act of dis- 
couraging; thai 
which discourages. 



^ 



discrepant 



disconr'ager, n., one 

who discourages. 

disconr'aging, adj., 
dishfarteiung; pr.p. 
discourage. 

discoorse', n. , con- 
versation; a treatise; 
a sermon; v.i., 
to communicate 
thoughts in a for- 
mal manner. 

disconrsed', p.p., dis- 
course. 

discours'er, n., one 
who discourses. 

discoursing, pr.p., 
discourse. 

discourteous, adj., 
uncivil. 

disconr'teonsly, adv. , 
uncivilly. 

discoor'tesy, n., want 
of courtesy. 

dis'cous, adj., disc- 
shaped. 

discov'er, v.t., to have 
the first sight of; to 
detect. 

discoT'erable, adj., 
able to be dis- 
covered. 

discovered, p.p., dis- 
cover. 

discov'erer, n., one 
who discovers. 

discov'ering, pr.p., 
discover. 

discov'ertnre, n., in 
law, release of a 
woman from the 
coverture of her 
husband. 

discov'ery, «., a find- 
ing out; a revealing; 
that which is dis- 
covered. 

discred'it, n., dis- 
repute; disbelief; 
v.t., to disbelieve. 

discred'itable, adj. , 
disgraceful. 

discred'ited, p.p., dis- 
credit. 

discred'iting, pr.p., 
discredit. 

discreet', aaj., pru- 
dent; cautious. 

discreet'ly, adv., pru- 
dently. 

discreet'ness, n., the 
quality of being dis- 
creet. 

discrep'anoe, n., i.q. 
discrepancy. 

discrep'anoy, n., in- 
consistency among 
facts. 

discrep'ant, adj., dif- 
fering; inconsis- 
tent. 



discrete 



190 



disenthrall 









discrete', adj., sepa- 
rate; distinct. 

discre'tion, «., dis- 
creetness; sound 
judgment; liberty 
of acting according 
to one's own judg- 
ment. 

discre'tional, adj., i.g. 
discretionary. 

discretionary, adj., 
left to one's own 
discretion. 

discre'tive, adj., de- 
noting separation 
or opposition. 

discrim'inate, adj. , 
fiaving the power 
of noting minute 
distinctions. 

discrim'inate, o.t., to 
distinguish by ob- 
serving difierences; 
to select; v.i., to 
note differences. 

discriminated, p.p., 
discriminate. 

discrim'inately, »dv., 
with minute dis- , 
tiiiction. j 

discrim'inating, adj.,\ 
able to make nice 
distinctions; pr.p., 
discriminate. 

discrimioa'tion, n., 
the faculty of dis- 
critniiiating. 

discrim'inative, adj., 
characteristic; dis- 
criminating, j 

discrim'inator, n. , one 
wlio discriminates. 

discriminatory, adj., 
i.g. discriininative. 

discrown', v.t., to de- 
prive of a crown. 

discrowned', ^.^., dis- 
crown. 

discrown'ing, pr.p., 
discrown. 

discur'sion, n., the 
act of ranging from 
thought to thought 
in discourse. 

discni'siTe, adj., pass- 
ing rapidly from 
one subject to an- 
other. 

discor'sively, adv., in 
a d iscursive manner. 

discor'sory, adj., 
argumentative. 

dis'ous, n., a kind of 
ancient quoit;adisc. 

discoss', v.t., to de- 
bate; to argue. 

discossed', p.p., dis- 
cuss. 

disonss'er, n., one who 
discusses. 



^ 



discos'sing, pr.p., dis- 
cuss. 

discus'sion, n., de- 
bate; the act of 
discussing. 

discuss'ive, adj., hav- 
ing the power to 
discuss. 

discu'tient, n., a 
m'^diciiie or appli- 
cation which dis- 
perses a tumour. 

disdain', v.<. , to scorn; 
n., haughtiness; 
contempt. 

disdained', p.p., dis- 
dain. 

disdain'lul, adj., con- 
temptuous; haugh- 
disdain'tnlly, adv., m 
disdainful manner, 

disdain'ing, pr.p. , dis- 
dain. 

disease', »., any mor- 
b.dstateof the body. 

diseased', adj., afiect- 
ed with disease. 

diseas'ing, adj., caus- 
ing discomfort. 
~ disembark', v.t. and 
t., to land. 

disembarked', p.p., 
, disembark. 

disembarka'tion, n. , 
the act of dis- 
embarking. 
' disembark'ing, pr.p., 
disembark. 

disembar'rass, v.t., to 
free from embar- 
rassment. 

disembar'rassed, p.p., 
disembarrass. 

disembar'rassing, 
pr.p., disembarrass. 

disembar'rassment, 
fi., the act of dis- 
embarrassing. 

disembod'ied, p.p., 
disembody. 

disembodiment, n., 
the act of disem- 
bodying. 

disembod'y, v.t., to 
disband (troops); to 
divest of the body. 

disembod'ying, pr.p., 
disemtxxiy. 

disembogae', v.t., to 
discharge water (as 
a stream) into the 
sea or a lake. 

disembow'el, v.t., to 
deprive of the vis- 
cera; to gut. 

disembow'elled, p.p., 
disembowel. 
' disembow'elling,^f .^. 
disembowel. 






V 



V 



k 

k. 
V 



disembroil', v.t., to 
extricate from con- 
fusion. 

disembroiled', p.p., 
disembroil. 

disembroiling, pr.p., 
disembroil. 

disena'ble, v.t., to 
disqualify. 

disena'bled, p.p., dis- 
enable. 

disena'bling, pr.p., 
disenable. 

disenchant', v.t., to 
free from fascina- 
tion or pleasing 
delusion. 

disendiant'ed, p.p., 
disenchant. 

disencbant'er, n., one 
who disenchants. 

disenchant'ing, pr.p., 
disenchant. 

disenchant'ment, n., 
the act of disen- 
chanting. 

disencom'ber, v.t., to 
free trom encum- 
brance. 

disenonm'bered, p.p., 
disencumber. 

diseacmn'bering.^f.p. 
disencumber. 

disencom'brance, n., 
deliverance from 
encumbrance. 

disendow', v.t., to rob 
or deprive of endow- 
ments. 

disendowed', p.p., dis- 
endow. 

disendow'ing, Pr.p., 
disendow. 

disendow'ment, n., 
the act of taking 
away an endow- 
ment. 

disenfran'chise, v.t., 
i.g. disfranchise. 

disengage', v.t., to 
disentangle; to free; 
to set free from an 
engagement. 

disengaged', adj., at 
leisure; not occu- 
pied; p.p., disen- 
gage. 

disengage'ment, n., 
the state of being 
disengaged. 

disengag'ing, pr.p., 
disengage. 

disentaa'gle, v.t., to 
unravel; to free 
from entanglements 

disentan'gled, p.p., 
disentangle. 

disentan'gling, pr.p., 
disentangle. 

disenthrall', v.t., to 



disenthralled 



191 



disintegrate 



L 
I 

X 



u 



rescue from slavery 
or oppression. 

disenthralled', p.p., 
disenthrail. 

disenthraUing, pr.p., 
disenthrall. 

iaestab'lish, v.t. , to 
cause to cease to be 
established. 

disestab'tis bed, 
p.p., disestablish. 

discs' « 67/ s /ring, 
pr.p., disestablish. 

disestab'Hsbm eat. 
It., the act of dis- 
establishing. 

disesteem', n., want 
of esteem; v.t., to 
dislike slightly. 

disesteemed', p.p., 
disesteem. 

disesteem ing, pr.p., 
disesteem. 

disIa'TOor, disfa'vor, 
n., slight displea- 
sure; a disobliging 
act; v.t., to with- 
draw favour from. 

disla'voored, p.p., dis- 
favour. 

diafavooring, pr.p., 
disfavour. 

disflgoia'tion, n., the 
act of disfiguring; 
disfigurement. 

disflg'aie, v.t., to in- 
jure the beauty of. 

diafig'nred. p.p., dis- 
figure. 

disflg'arement, n., 
di^guration; that 
which disfigures. 

disflg'oier, n., one 
who disfigures. 

disfiguring, pr.p., 
disfigure. 

disfran'ohise, v.t., to 
deprive of the rights 
of citizenship, esp. 
of the vote. 

dislran'chised, p.p., 
disfranchise. 

disfran'cbisement, n., 
the state of being 
disfranchised. 

disfran'chising, pr.p., 
disfranchise. 

disgorge', v.t., to 
vomit; to surrender. 

disgorged', p.p., dis- 
gorge. 

disgorge'ment, n., the 
act of disgorging. 

disgorg'ing, pr.p., dis- 
gorge. 

disgrace', n., dis- 
favour; shame; 
cause of shame; v.t., 
to put out of favour; 
to dishonour. 






V 



u-: 



disgraced', p.p., dis- 
grace. 

disgrace'inl. adj., 
shameful; infamous. 

disgrace'fnlly, adv., 
in a disgraceful 
manner. 

disgrac'ing, pr.p., 
disgrace. 

disguise', v.t., to con- 
ceal the ordinary 
appearance of; n. , 
a dress intended to 
conceal identity. 

disguised', p.p., dis- 
guise. 

disgoi'ser, n., one 
who disguises. 

disgni'sing, pr.p., dis- 
guise. 

disgust', n. , strong 
dislike; v.t., to stir 
up loathing in. 

disgiut'ed, p.p., dis- 
gust. 

disgnst'fnl, adj., ex- 
citing disgust. 

disgust'ing, pr.p., dis- 
gust; adj., loath- 
some; nasty. 

dish, n., a broad, 
open vessel for serv- 
ing food at table; 
v.t., to put in a 
dish; to ruin (slang). 

dishabille', n., i.q. 
deshabille. 

dish'-doth, n. , a cloth 
for washing dishes. 

disheart'en, v.t,, to 
discourage; to dis- 
pirit. 

disheart'ened, p.p., 
dishearten. 

disheart'ening, pr.p., 
dishearten. 

disheart'enment, m., 
discouragement. 

dished, p.p., dish. 

dishev'eUt*./., to allow 
(the hair) to hang 
negligently. 

dishev'elled. dishev'- 
eled, p.p., dishevel. 

disheveling, pr.p., 
dishevel. 

dish'ing, pr.p., dish. 

dishon'esi, adj., not 
honest. 

dishon'estly, adv. , 
fraudulently. 

dishon'esty, n., fraud; 
treachery. 

dishon'onr, dishon'or, 
n., want of honour; 
disgrace; v.t., to 
disgrace, treat with 
indignity; refuse to 
accept or pay (a 
cheque). 



n 












dishon'ourable, adj., 
disgraceful. 

dishon'oored, p.p., 
dishonour. 

dishon'oorer, n., one 
who dishonours. 

dishon' During, pr.p., 
dishonour. 

disilla'sion, n., dis- 
enchantment; v.t., 
to free from illusion. 

disillu'sioned, p.p., 
disillusion. 

disiUn'sioning, pr.p., 
disillusion. 

disinclina'tion, n. , un- 
willingness. 

disincline', v.t., to 
make unwilling. 

disinclined', p.p., dis- 
incline. 

disincli'ning, pr.p., 
disincline. 

disinoor'porate, v.t., 
to deprive of cor- 
porate powers. 

disincorporated, p.p., 
disincorptirate. 

disincorporating, 
/>f.^. disincorporate. 

disincorpora'tion, n., 
the act of disin- 
corporating. 

disinfect', v.l., to pu- 
rify from contagious 
matter. 

disinlect'ant, n., a 
substance that dis- 
infects. 

disinfeof ed, p.p., dis- 
intect. 

disinfect'ing, pr.p., 
disinfect. 

disinfec'tion, n., puri- 
fication from in- 
fecting matter. 

disingen'uons, adj., 
insincere. 

disingen'uously, adv., 
in a disingenuous 
manner. 

disingen'uotuness, n., 
insincerity. 

disinher'it, v.t., to 
deprive of the right 
to an inheritance. 

disinher'itance, n., 
the act of disin- 
heriting. 

disinber'ited, p.p., 
disinherit. 

disinheriting, pr.p., 
disinherit. 

disin'tegrable, adj., 
that can be dis- 
integrated. 

disin'tegrate, v.t., to 
reduce to frag- 
ments; v.i., to lose 
coherence. 



disintegrated 



192 



disparaging 



y 



A 



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disintegrated, ^./>., 
disintegrate. 

disin'tegratiag, pr.p., 
disintegrate. 

disintegration, n., 
the act of disin- 
tegrating. 

disinter', v.t., to take 
out of the earth. 

dlsln'terested, adj. 
unselfish; without 
personal motive. 

dtsla'terestedly, 
adv., in a disinter- 
ested manner. 

disla'terestedaess 
«., the state of being 
disinterested. 

disinter'ment, n., ex- 
humation. 

disinterred', p.p., dis- 
inter. 

disinter'ring, pr.p. , 
disinter. 

disjoin', v.t., to sepa- 
rate; w.t'., to part. 

disjoined', p.p., dis- 
join. 

disjoining, pr.p., dis- 
join. 

disjoint', «.<., to sepa- 
rate at the joints; to 
render incoherent. 

disjoint'ed, adj., inco- 
herent; out of order; 
p.p., disjoint. 

disjoint'ing, pr.p., 
disjoint. 

disjunct', adj., sepa- 
rated. 

disjunc'tion, «., dis- 
union; separation. 

disjoQot'ive, adj., 
tending to separate; 
marking opposition. 

disjunot'ive^, adv., in 
a disjunctive man- 
ner. 

disk, «., «.?• disc. 

dislike', «., antip- 
athy; aversion; v.t., 
to feel dislike to- 
wards. 

disliked', pp., dis- 
hki-. 

disliking, pr.p., dis- 
like. 

dis'locate, v.t., to dis- 
place; to put out 
of joint. 

dislocated, p.p., dis- 
locate. 

di.s'locating, pr.p., 
d slocate. 

dislocation, «., the 
act of dislocating 
or displacing. 

dislodge', v.i. , to drive 
from the place occu- 
pied. 



h 






9-^ — i]. 



dislodged', p.p., dis- 
lodge. 

dislodg'ing, pr.p., dis- 
lixige. 

dislodg'ment, n., the 
act of dislodging. 

disloy'al, adj., faith- 
less; treacherous. 

disloy'ally, adv., in a 
disloyal manner. 

disloy'alty, n., in- 
fidelity. 

dis'mal, adj., gloomy. 

dis'nmlly, adv., in a 
dismal manner. 

disman'tle, v.t., to 
strip of equipments. 

disman'tled, p.p., dis- 
mantle. 

disman'tling, pr.p., 
dismantle. 

dismast', v.t., to de- 
prive of masts. 

dismast'ed, p.p., dis- 
mast. 

dismasting, pr.p., 
dsmasl. 

dismay", v.i., to dis- 
courage; «., a com- 
plete loss of cour- 
age. 

dismayed', p.p., dis- 
may. 

dismaying, pr.p.,Ai%- 
may. 

disme, n., a tenth 
part; the number 
ten. 

dismem'ber, v.t., to 
divide limb from 
limb. 

dismem'bered, p.p., 
dismember. 

dismem'bering, pr.p., 
dismember. 

dismem'berment, n. , 
the act of dis- 
membering. 

dismiss', v.t., to send 
away. 

dismiss'al, n., dis- 
charge. 

dismiMed'. p.p., dis- 
miss. 

dismiss'ing, pr.p., 
dismiss. 

dismis'sion. «., the 
act of dismissing. 

dismiss'lve, adj., giv- 
ing dismission. 

dismiss'ory, adj. , 
granting permission 
to depart. 

dismonnt', v.i., to 
alight from a horse; 
v.t., to unhorse. 

dismount'ed, p.p., 
dismount. 

dismounting, pr.p., 
dismount. 



i 



'r 



V 









disobe'dience, »., neg- 
lect or refusal to 
obey. 

disobe'dient, ad;., 
guilty of disobedi 
ence. 

disobe'diently, adv. 
in a disobedient 
manner. 

disobey", v.t., to neg- 
lect or refuse to 
obey. 

disobeyed', p.p , dis- 
obey 

disobey'er. «., one 
who disobeys. 

disobe/ing, pr.p., dis- 
obey. 

disoblige', v.t., to 
offend by failing to 
oblige. 

disobliged', p.p., dis- 
oblige. 

disobU'ging, adj., un- 
accommodating; 
pr.p., disoblige. 

disor'der, n., want of 
order; confusion ; 
sickness; v.t., to 
throw into con- 
fusion. 

disor'dered, adj., ir- 
regular; deranged; 
p.p., disorder. 

disor'dering, pr.p. 
disorder. 

disor'derliness, n. 
the state of being 
disorderly. 

disor'derly, adj. 

marked by dis- 
order; unruly. 

iisorganlza'tlon, 
n., the state of be- 
ing disorganized. 

^organize, v.i., 
to throw into con- 
fusion. 

disorganized, p.p., 
disorganize. 

diaor'ganlzer, n., 
one who disorgan 
izes. 

disown', v.t. , to refuse 
to acknowledge. 

disowned', p.p., dis- 
own. 

disown'ing, pr.p., dis- 
own. 

dispar'age, v.t., to de- 
preciate. 

dispar'aged, p.p., dis- 
parage. 

dispar'agement, n., 
detraction; dis- 

honour. 

dispar'ager, «., one 
who disparages. 

disparaging pr.p., 
disparage. 



disparagingly 



198 



disproportionable 






V 



V 



K 



dupai'agii«ly, adv., 
in a manner to 
disparage. 

du'parat^ adj., dis- 
similar. 

dispar'ity, n., in- 
equality. 

dispark', v.t., to turn 
(parkland) to some 
other use. 

dispart', v.t., to sever; 
v.i., to open; n., the 
difference between 
half the diameter 
of base ring and the 
muzzle of a gun; a 
muzzle sight. 

disparted, p.p., dis- 
part. 

dispart'ing, pr.p., dis- 
part. 

dispas'sion, n., free- 
dom from passion; 
apathy. 

disjtaa'sionate, adj., 
unmoved by feel- 
ing:; impartial. 

dispatcli', v.<. and n., 
i.g. despatch. 

dispel', v.t., to dis- 
perse. 

dispelled', p.p., dis- 
pel. 

dispel'ling, pr.p., dis- 
pel. 

dispen'sable, a<i/.,able 
to be dispensed 
with. 

dispen'sary, n., a 
house in which med- 
icines are com- 
p-^unded; a place 
where medicines 
and medical advice 
are given graus. 

dispenaa'tion, n., the 
act of dispensing; a 

■^ystem of religion 
and morals; the 
setting free from 
an obligation. 

dispen'satory, adj. , 
having power to 
grant dispensations; 
n. ,a pharmacopoeia. 

dispenie', v.t., to dis- 
tribute; to admin- 
ister; to excuse from 
an obligation; to 
compound. 

dispensed', p.p., dis- 
pense. 

dispen'aer, n., one 
wlio dispenses. 

dispen'siixr, adj., 
granting dispensa- 
tion; n., the act or 
practice of dispens- 
mg; />f.^., dispense. 

dispeople, v./., to 






empty of inhabit- 
ants. 

dispeo'pled, p.p., dis- 
people. 

disper'moas, adj., 
two-seeded. 

disperse', v.t. and i., 
to scatter. 

dispersed', adj., scat- 
tered; p. p., disperse. 

dispars'er, n., one 
Wiio disperses. 

dispers'ing, pr.p., dis- 
perse. 

dispar'sion, n., the 
state of bemg scat- 
tered. 

dispersive, adj., tend- 
ing to scatter. 

dispir'it, v.t., to dis- 
hearten. 

dispir'ited, adj., de- 
pressed in spirits; 
p.p., dispirit. 

dupir'iting, pr.p., dis- 
pirit; adj., depress- 






c 



<. 



k- 



i 



', V.I., to re- 
move from its place. 

displaced', p.p., dis- 
place. 

displace'ment, n., re- 
moval; the quan- 
tity of water dis- 
placed by a floating 
body. 

displaxs'ing, pr.p., dis- 
place. 

displant', v.l., to 
piuck up what is 
planted. 

displant'ed. p.p., dis- 
piaiit. 

displant'iiig, pr.p., 
displant. 

display', v.t., to 
spread before the 
view; n., exhibition; 
ostentatious show. 

displayed', p.p., dis- 
play. 

displajr'er, n., one 
wao displays. 

displa/ing, pr.p., dis- 
play. 

displease', v.t., to 
offend somewhat; 
to make slightly 
angry. 

displeased', p.p., dis- 
please. 

displeas'er, »., one 
who displea^ics. 

displeasing, adj., dis- 
agreeable; pr.p., 
displease. 

displeas'ure, n., 
vexat ion ; annoyance 

displome', v.t., to 
strip of feathers. 



h 






kf displomed'. p.p., dis- 
I plume. 

i^ . dkplam'ins, pr.p., 
-^"^-^ displume. 

dispooe', v.t., in Scots 

law, to convey 

(property) to an- 

I other formally. 

<^ disponed', p.p., dis- 

I pone. 

if dispo'ner, h. , one who 

^ — dispones. 
iv . disponing, pr.p., dis- 
>^ pone. 

disporf, n., sport; 
pastime; v.t., to 
play; to sport. 
disport'ed. p.p., dis- 
port. 

J» . disporf ins, pr.p., dis- 
^■^^ port. 

dispo'sable, adj., free 
to be used when 
required. 
dispo'sal, M., arrange- 
ment; power of be- 
stowing; the act of 
selling or parting 
with. 
dispose', v.t., to ar- 
range; to incline; to 
apply to a par- 
ticular piirpo>se. 
disposed', adj., in- 
clined;minded;^.^., 
dispose. 
dispo'ser, n., one who 
disposes. 
JL dispo'sing, pr.p., dis- 

^%> pose. 

dispod'tion, n., man- 
ner of arrangement; 
natural constitution 
of mind; propensity. 
dispossess', v.t., to 
deprive of owner- 
ship or occupancy. 
dispossessed', p.p., 

dispossess. 
dispossess' ing, pr.p., 

dispossess. 
dispossession, n., the 
act of dispasses!>iiig. 
dispossess'or, n., one 

who dispossesses. 
dispraise', n., blame; 

v.t., lo censure. 
dispraised', p.p., dis- 
praise. 

I disprais'ing. pr.p., 

^^_;, dispraise. 

L disproof, n., a prov- 
^ ing to be false or 
erroneons. 
dispropor'tlon, n., 
want of proportion 
or symmetry; in- 
equality. 
dispropor'tianable, 
ad]., not havmg due 



V 



K 

V 



k 



S 



L 



h 



1 



k 



V 



k 



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7— (174 



disproportional 



194 



dissenter 



V 

6 



\- 



\ 



L 



proportion; un- 
equal; inadequate. 

dispropor'tional, adj., 
i.q. disproportion- 
able. 

dispropor tioaate, 
adj., i.q. dispropor- 
tionable. 

disprop oc'tloned, 
adj., wanting in 
symmetry. 

disproT'able, adj., 
capable of being 
disproved. 

disprov'al, n. , the act 
ot disproving. 

disprove', v.t., to 
prove to be talse 
or erroneous. 

disproved', p.p., dis- 
prove. 

disprov'er, n., one 
who disproves. 

disprov'ing, pr.p. , dis- 
prove. 

dis'putable, adj., con- 
trovertible. 

disputant, «., one 
who disputes or 
argues. 

disputation, n., the 
act of disputing; 
controversy. 

dispnta'tions, adi., 
inclined to dispute. 

dispute', v.i., to con- 
tend ill argument; 
to uTangle; v.t., to 
attempt to dis- 
prove; to call in 
question; to con- 
test; «., contro- 
versy; strife. 

dispu'ted, p.p., dis- 
pute. 

dispn'ter, n., one who 
disputes. 

dispu'ting, pf.p., dis- 
pute. 

disqualiflca'tion, n. , 
disability; that 

which disqualifies. 

disdual'ifled, p.^. , dis- 

qiialily. 

disqnal'ify, v.l., to 
incapacitate. 

disqualiSying, pr.p., 
disqualify. 

disqui'et, n., uneasi- 
ness; anxiety; v.t., 
to mal<e uneasy; to 
harass. 

disqui'eted, p.p., dis- 
quiet. 

disqui'etiug, adj., dis- 
turbing the mind; 
pr.p., disquiet. 

disqui' etude, n., want 
of tranquillity; dis- 
quiet. 



y^ 






^' 



L 



disquisition, n., a 
dissertation, essay, 
or treatise; an argu- 
mentative inquiry. 

disqnisi'tional, adj., 
pert, to a disquisi- 
tion. 

disregard', «., neglect; 
v.l., to pay no heed 
to. 

disregard' ed, p.p., 
disregard. 

disregard' iul. «<//. , 
neglectful. 

disregarding, pr.p., 
disregard. 

disrel'isb, «., distaste; 
v.t., to dislike the 
taste of. 

disrelished, p.p., dis- 
relish. , 

disrelishing, pr.p. , 
disrelish. 

disrepair', n., a state 
of requiring to be 
repaired. 

disrep'utable, adj., 
dishonourable; low. 

disrepute', n., loss or 
want of reputa- 
tion. 

dtsi espect'pti., v/ii\t 
ot respect; rude- 
ness. 

disrespect' tul, adj. , 
wanting in respec . 

di» respect 'fully. 
adv., in a disrespect- 
ful manner. 

disrobe', v.t. and t., 
to undress; to di- 
vest of a robe. 

disrobed', p.p., dis- 
robe. 

disro'ber, n., one who 
disrobes. 

disro'bing, pr.p., dis- 
robe. 

disruption, n., the 
act of bursting and 
separating. 

disrup'tive, adj. , 

causing or following 
disruption. 

disrup'ture, n., a 
rending asunder. 

a&satlstac'tion, n., 
discontent. 

diss ati 8 fac' to ry. 
adj., causing dis- 
satisfaction. 

dissatisfied, adj., dis- 
contented; p.p., dis- 
satisfy. 

dissat'isfy, v.t., to fail 
to satisfy; to render 
discontented. 

dissat'isijnng, pr.p., 
dissatisfy. 

dissect', v.l., to divide 



in. 

K 

i-3 



i 

i 
i 



i 



i 
K 



L, 



with a cutting 
instrument; to an- 
alyse. 

dissect'ed, p.p., dis- 1 
sect. 

dissect'ible, adj., cap- 
able of being d.s- 
sected. 

dissect'ing, adj., used 
in dissection; pr.p., 
dissect. 

dissec'tion, n., the 
act or art of dis- 
secting. 

dissect'or, n., one 
who dissects. 

disseize', disseise', v.t., 
to dispossess wrong- 
fully. 

disseized', p.p., dis- 
seize. 

disseizee', n. , one who 
is disseized. 

disseizin, n., the act 
of disseizing. 

disseizing, pr.p., dis- 
seize. 

disseiz'or, n., one who 
dispossesses an- 
other. 

dissemblance, n., 
concealment by 
false pretences. 

dissemble, v.i., to 
hide by false pre- 
tences; v.i., to put 
on an assumed 
manner. 

dissem'bied, p.p., dis 
semble. 

dissem'bler, n., one 
who dissembles. 

dissem'bling, pr.p., 
dissemble. 

dissem'inate, v.t., tr 
diffuse; to spread 
by dispersion. 

disseminated, p.p., 
disseminate. 

dissem'inating, pr.p., 
disseminate. 

dissemina'tion, n. , 
act o£ disseminat- 
ing. 

dissem'inator, n., one 
who disseinuiates. 

dissen'sion, n., strife, 
quarrel; breach of 
friendship. 

dissent', v.t., to dis- 
agree in opinion; «., 
difference of opin- 
ion; separation 
from the Church in 
England. 

dissented, p.p., dis- 
sent. 

dissent'er, n., one 
who dissents; a 
separatist. 



dissentient 



n 
J- 












dissen'tient, <id;., de- 
claring dissent; vot- 
ing dilTerently. 

dissent'ing, adj., dis- 
agrecitig in opinion; 
bel. to a body of 
dissenters; pr.p.,dis- 
sent. 

disserta'tion, n., a 
treatise; a formal 
discourse. 

disserve', v.t., to do 
an ill -service to. 

disserved', pr.p., dis- 
serve. 

disserv'ice, n., aa ill 
tiirii; an injury. 

disserv' iceabie, t^i- , 
injiu'lous. 

disserv'ing, pr.p., dis- 
serve. 

dissev'er, c<., to part 
in two; to separate. 

disseverance, n., the 
act of dissevering. 

dissevera'tion. n., i.q. 
disseverance. 

dissev'ered. p.p., dis- 
sever. 

dissev'erlng, pr.p., 
dissever. 

dis'sidenoe, n., dis- 
sent. 

dis'sident, adj., dis- 
senting; n., a dis- 
senter. 

dissil'ient, adj., burst- 
ing (as the dry pod 
of a plant). 

dIsalta'Uar, adj., 
unlike. 

dissimilar'ity, n., un- 
likeiiess. 

dissimila'Uon, n., the 
act of rendering 
dissimilar, esp. with 
reference to sounds 
in orthoepy. 

dissimilitude, n., un- 
likeness; want of 
resemblance 

dissim'ulate, v.i., to 
feign; to make pre- 
tence. 

dissim'tilated. p.p., 
dissimulate. 

disdrn'olating. pr.p., 
dissimulate. 

disHimnla'tion, »., 
concealment of fact; 
hypocrisy. 

dis'sipate. v.t., to scat- 
ter; to drive away; 
to waste; t;.»., to 
vanish. 

dis'sipated, adj., ex- 
travagant; disso- 
lute; p.p., dissipate. 

dis'sipating, pr.p., dis- 
sipate. 



195 

JL dissipa'tion, n., the 

^ act of dissipating, 

dissolute conduct. 

bv\ disso'ciable, tdj., 

incongruous; not 

reconcilable. 

h/y dissociate, v.t., to 

disunite; to part. 
b;t' disso'ciated, p.p., dis- 
sociate. 
^^f^> disso'ciating, pr.p., 

dissociate, 
b^* dissociation, n., dis- 
union; chemical 
decomposition. 
<rc dissolubility, «., the 
quality of being 
dissoluble. 
jr\^ dis'soluble, idj., sus- 
cepiible of decom- 
position. 
Jn dissolute, tulj., de- 
bauched; given to 
^ vice or profligacy. 
JY dissolutely, adv., in 
a dissolute man- 
ner. 
Jirv dis'solutaness, n., 
viciousuess; dissipa- 
tion. 
jf~) dissoIn'tioD, n., de- 
' composition; death; 
the putting an end 
to the existence of 
an assembly. 
^'"Vos. dissolvabil'ity, «., 
^ capability of being 
dissolved. 
^p-v dissolvable, aii;., able 

\ to be dissolved. 
jj'-\ dissolve', v.t. , to melt ; 
to liquefy; to de- 
stroy any connected 
system or body; 
v.i., to melt; to 
break up. 
y\, dissolved', p.p., dis- 
solve. 
jf-ii. dissolv'ent, n., any- 
thing that dissolves. 
yr^ dissolv'er, n., one 
who, or that which, 
dissolves. 
»t-i dissolv'iug, p»'.p.,dis- 
^"-^ solve. 

dis'sonance. »., dis- 
cord. 
dis'sonanoy. »., \.q. 

dissonance. 
dissonant, udj., harsh 
sounduig; incongru- 
ous. 
dis'snade, v.t., to ad- 
vise against; to ttirn 
from a purpose by 
argument. 
dissua'ded. p.p., dis- 
suade. 
dissna'der, n., one 
who dissuades. 



V. 












I 



V: 



b 
h 



t 



L 



distension 



dissna'ding, pr.p., dis- 
suade. 

dissoa'sion, n., ad- 
Vice in opposition 
to something. 

dissna'sive, adj., tend- 
ing to dissuade ; 
n., an argument 
against. 

dis'tafl. n., the staff 
to which a bunch of 
fljx is tied, and 
from which the 
thread is drawn to 
be spun. 

distain',t/./., to stain. 

distained', p.p., dis- 
tain. [tain. 

distain'ing, pr.p., dis- 

dis'tance, n., an in- 
terval of space or 
time; remoteness; 
v.t., to outstrip. 

dis'tanced. p.p., dis- 
tance. 

distancing, pr.p., dis- 
tance. 

dis'tant, adj., remote 
m place or time; not 
intimate. 

dis'tantly, adv., at a 
distance; with re- 
serve. 

distaste', n., disrelish; 
disinclination. 

distaste'Iul, adj., dis- 
agreeable. 

distem'per, n., a mal- 
ady; a disease of 
young dogs; a kind 
of painting used for 
scene-painting and 
the decoration of 
walls, etc.; tempera; 
V.I., to paiut in 
tempera. 

distem'peratore, »., 
confusion. 

distempered, ad)., 
diseased in body or 
mind. 

distem'pering. pr.p., 
distemper. 

distend', v.t., to swell; 
v.i., to become in- 
flated. 

distend'ed. p.p., dis- 
tend. 

distending, pr.p., dis- 
tend. 

dislensibil'ity. n., the 
Quality of being 
(distensible. 

disten'sible, adj., cap- 
able of being dis- 
tended. 

disten'sion, n., the 
act of distending; 
the stale of being 
distended. 



distensive 



k 



H 
% 

V-y. 



%.q. 



disten'sive, ad] 
distensible. 

dis'tich, «., a couplet. 

distil', distill', v.i., to 
yield in drops; to 
extract by distilla- 
tion. 

distil'lable, adi., fit 
for distillation. 

distil'late, n., a fluid 
distilled. 

distilla'tion, »., the 
operation of ex- 
tracting spirit from 
a substance by vol- 
atilization and con- 
densation. 

distil'latory, ad/., used 
iji distillation; n., a 
still. 

distiUed'.^^, distil. 

distil'let, n- , one 
whose occupation is 
to extract spirit by 
distillation. 
/■ distil'lery, «., the 
works where dis- 
tilling is carried on. 

distil'ling, ^r.^. ,d istil ; 
n., the act or busi- 
ness of distilling. 

distinct', adj., well- 
defined; different; 
obvious. 

distinc'tion, n., a dis- 
tinguishing quality; 
superiority; an hon- 
our of some kind. 

distinot'ive, adj., in- 
dicating difference. 

distmct'ively. adv., in 
a distinctive man- 
ner. 

distincfiveness, n., 
the quality of being 
distinctive. 

distinct'ly, aiv., clear- 
ly; obviously. 

distinct'ness, « . , clear- 
ness; precision. 

distln'gulsh, v.t.,to 
recognize the indi- 
viduality of; to 
mark out from 
others by some 
point of difference, 
to confer an honour 



K 



\.^^^^j' 



dlstit^galstMe. 

adj., capable of be- 

uig distinguished. 
distia'guisbed, 

adj., eminent; p.p., 

distinguish. 
distin'gnisher, »., one 

who, or that which, 

distinguishes. 
dlsHn'gulsbing, 

adi., characteristic; 

pr.p. distinguish. 



t,. 



L 



t. 



I 



ix 



t 



I. 






f 



i 



4 

I 



186 



distort', v.t., to twist 
out of natural shape. 

distcrt'ed, adj., 

shaped abnormally; 
misshapen; p.p., 
distort. 

distort'ing, pr.p., dis- 
tort. 

distoi'tion, »., a 
twisting out of 
natural shape or 
meaning. 

distort'ive, adj., caus- 
ing distortion. 

distract', v.t., to turn 
from any object; to 
perplex; to render 
insane. 

distract'ed, adj., per- 
plexed; crazy; p.p., 
distract. 

distract'ing, pr.p., 
distract. 

distrac'tion, n., con- 
fusion of mind; di- 
version. 

distract'ive, adj., 
causing perplexity. 

distrain', v.t., to seize 
for debt. 

distrain'able, adj. , 
liable to be dis- 
trained. 

distrained', p.p., dis- 
train. 

distiain'er, »., one 
who distrains. 

distrain'ing, pr.p., 
distrain. 

distrait', adj., absent- 
minded (Fr.). 

distraught', adj., dis- 
tracted. 

distress', n., anguish 
of mind or body; 
misery; seizure for 
debt; v.t., to make 
miserable. 

distressed', adj., suf- 
fering distress; p.p., 
distress. 

distress'fnl, adj., in- 
flicting or indicating 
distress. 

distress'ing, adj. , very 
afflicting; pr.p., 
distress. 

di8trib'atary,<t4/., i.q. 
distributive. 

distrib'ate, v.t., to 
divide among a 
number of recipi- 
ents. 

distrib'uted, p.p., dis- 
tribute. 

distrib'nter, n. , one 
who distributes; a 
device for distribut- 
ing electric current 
to the sparking 



c 



disunite 



plugs of a motor, or 
the compressed air 
of a self-starter to 

tthe cylinders. 
distrib'ating, pr.p., 
distribute. 
distribution, n., the 
act of separating 
into distinct parts. 
distrib'utive, adj., 
y serving todistribute. 
A ?| distrib'utor, n., i.q. 
I "J distributer. 
\^ J dis'trict, «., a region, 

tL locality, or quarter, 
distrin'gas, n., a writ 
.rf authorizing dis- 
traint. 
J. dis'trix, n., a disease 

1 s of the hair in which 

individual hairs 
split. 
J distrust', v.t., to have 
V no confidence in; 

to suspect; n., 
doubt; suspicion. 
distrusted, p.p., dis- 
trust. 
distrust'er, n., one 

who distrusts. 
distrust'ful, adj., sus- 
picious; wanting 
confidence. 
distrust'ing, pr.p., dis- 
trust. 
disturb', v.t., to agi- 
tate; to disquiet; to 
interfere with. 
distorb'ance, »., in- 
terruption of a set- 
tled state of things; 
confusion; a tumult. 
L disturbed', p.p., dis- 



4 
^ 



K 



turb. 



t^ disturb'er, n., one 
V^ who disturbs. 
L disturb'ing, pr.p., dis- 

pC^^_> tiu-b. 

i^ disul'phate, »., an 

ac;d salt of sul- 
, phuric acid. 

jJ-\j> disul'phuret. n., a 
binary compound 
of sulphur, with 
two atoms of sul- 

I phur in the molecule. 

f'~Ky^~^ disulphu'ric, adj., ap- 
plied to an acid 
containing two 

atoms of sulphur in 
each molecule. 
Ln, disun'ion, n., separa- 
^^ tion; dissension. 

jj^^^ distu'ionist, n., an 

^f^-*^^ advocate of dis- 
union. 

L disunite', v.<. , to sepa- 
rate; to set at 
variance; v.i., to 
fall asunder. 



disunited 



4 



-i 



7V. 

K 






i: 



•i-v 



L 

PL. 



disanit'ed. p.p., dis- 
unite. 

disOBi'ter, »., any- 
thing tiiat disjoins. 

disunit'in^, pr.p., dis- 
unite. 

disu'nity, n., want of 
unity. 

disa'sage, »., gradual 
cessation of use, 
custom, or practice. 

distua', »., cessation 
of use. 

disose', v.t., to cease 
to use. 

disQsed', p.p., disuse. 

disns'ing, pr.p., dis- 
use. 

diisyUab'ic, adj., con- 
sisting of two sylla- 
bles only. 

disyl'lable, n., a word 
of two syllables. 
.\lso disty liable. 

ditoh, n., a trench; 
«.»., to dig a ditch; 
drain by a ditch. 

ditched, p.p., ditch. 

ditch'er, n., one who 
digs ditches. 

ditcta'ing, ^r.^., ditch. 

ditcb'-water. «., water 
contained by a 
ditch; a simile for 
dulness. 

di'theism, n., the doc- 
trine of the exist- 
ence of good and 

. evil principles in 
nature ; Maniche- 
ism. 

di'theist, M., one who 
believes in ditheism. 

ditheis'tio, adj., rel. 
to ditheism. 

dithyramb, n., a 
Bacchic hymn; an 
irregular poem of 
impetuous charac- 
ter. 

dithyram'bic, n., t.^. 
dithyramb; adj., re- 
sembling a dithy- 
ramb; enthusiastic. 

di'tone, n., a musical 
interval measuring 
two tones. 

dit'tany, n., a plant 
of Southern Europe 
yielding a fragrant 
oil. 

dit'to, adj., same as 
aforesaid. 

dit'ty, n , a song; a 
little lyric poem. 

dinre'sis, n., an exces- 
sive flow of urine. 

dinrat'io, adj., tend- 
ing to excite the 
secretion of urine; 






t 



^ 



i 









197 



H., a medicine to 
stimulate the blad- 
der or kidneys. 

diai'nal, adj., pert, 
to the daytime; 
daily. 

divaga'tion, n., a di- 
gression. 

divan', n., an Oriental 
court of justice, 
council, or council- 
chamber ; a cush- 
ioned seat against 
the wall of a room; 
a caf6. 

divaricate, v.i. and i., 
to branch, esp. at 
an obtuse angle. 

divaricated, p.p., di- 
varicate. 

divaricating, pr.p., 
divaricate. 

divarica'tion, n., a 
forking. 

dive, v.t., to plunge 
into water head 
first; n., a plunge; 
the act of diving. 

dived, ^.^., dive. 

di'ver, n., one who 
dives; a marine 
swimming bird. 

diverge', v.*., to pro- 
ceed in different 
directions from the 
same point; to de- 
viate; to differ or 
vary. 

diverged', p.p., di- 
verge. 

divergence, »., the 
act of diverging, 

diver' gency, "., »■?• 
divergence. 

diver'gent, adj., di- 
verging, as lines 
separating from one 
another, proceeding 
from the same 
point. 

diver'ging, pr.p., di- 
verge. 

di'vers, adj., differ- 
ent; several. 

diverse', adj., unlike. 

divene'ly, adv., in 
different directions. 

diversiflca'tion, n.,the 
act of diversifying. 

diver'sifled, adj. , 
characterized by a 
variety of forms or 
objects; p.p., diver- 
sified. 

diver'siform, adj., of 
various forms. 

diver'sily, v.t., to give 
variety to. 

diver'sifying, pr.p., 
diversify. 






I 






t^ 



k-. 






diviner 



diTer'sioa, n., the act 

of diverting; amuse- 
ment; pastime; a 
feint to mislead an 
enemy. 

diver'sity, »., unlike- 
ness; variety. 

divert', v.t., to turn 
aside; to amuse. 

divert'ed, p.p., divert. 

divert'er, n., one who 
diverts. 

diveit'ing, pr.p., di- 
vert; adj., enter- 
taining. 

divert'ive, adj., amus- 
ing; interesting. 

divest', v.i. ,to deprive; 
to strip. 

divest' ed, ^. p., divest. 

divest'ing, pr.p., di- 
vest. 

divestiture, n., the 
deprivation or sur- 
render of rights, 
property, etc. 

divi'dable, ai/., capa- 
ble of division. 

divide', v.t., to part; 
to set at variance; 
v.i., to become sepa- 
rated; to open; to 
vote by the division 
of an assembly into 
two parts; n., a 
watershed. 

divi'ded, adj., sepa- 
rated; at variance; 
p.p., divide. 

div'idend, «., a num- 
ber to be divided; 
profit made by a 
company to be di- 
vided among the 
shareholders; the 
share of each share- 
holder. 

divi'der, n., one who, 
or th^ which, di- 
vides. ' 

divi'ding, pr.p., di- 
vide. 

divina'tion, n., the 
act of divining. 

div'ioator, «., a div- 
iner. 

divine', adj., rel. to 
God, or to a heath- 
en deity; godlike; 
holy; n., a priest; a 
theologian; v.t., to 
prognosticate; to 
guess; v.i., to prac- 
tise divination. 

divined', p.p., divine. 

divine'ly, adv., by the 
agency of God; in a 
supreme degree. 

divi'ner, n., a sooth- 
sayer; a guesser. 



diving 



198 



doesliiii 









1< 



di ving, n., the art of 
descending into 
water to perform 
some work at tlie 
bottom; pr.p., dive. 

di'ving-beU. «., an 
apparatus used in 
professional diving. 

diTi'ning, pr.p., di- 
vme. 

divill'ity, n. , godhead ; 
divine nature; God; 
a celestial being; 
sacredness; the 

science of theology. 

divisibirity, n., the 
quality of being 
divisible. 

divisible, adj., cap- 
able of division. 

divis'ibleness, n., i.q. 
divisibility. 

divi'sion, «., a par- 
tition; a distinct 
segment or portion; 
a certain portion of 
an organized whole, 
as of an army; vari- 
ance; one of the 
four fundamental 
rules of arithmetic. 

divi'sional, adj., bel. 
to division, or to a 
division or district. 

divi'sive, adj., tend- 
ing to divide. 

divi'sively, adv., in a 
divisive manner. 

divi'sor, «., the num- 
ber by which the 
dividend is divided. 

divorce', «. , sever- 
ance, sundering;»./., 
to separate. 

divorced', p.p., di- 
vorce. 

divoice'ment, n., i.q. 
divorce. 

divor'cer, «., one who 
dfvorces. 

divor'cible, adj. , liable 
to be divorced. 

divor'cing, pr.p., di- 
vorce. 

div'ot, n. , a sod or turf 
used in some places 
for roofing; the 
piece of turi a golf- 
player displaces. 

divulge', r. < . , to re vea 1 
what was a secret. 

divulged', p.p., di- 
vulge. 

divul'ger, n., one who 
divulges. 

divul'ging, pr.p., di- 
vulge. 

divol'sion, n., a rend- 
ing asunder; lacera- 
tion. 



C 

K^ 



t 

n 



S 



6 



1 



diz'en, v.l., to dress 
gaudily; to bedizen. 

d^'ziness, n., giddi- 
ness; vertigo. 

diz'zy, adj., giddy; 
heedless; causing 
giddiness. 

(/o, !;.<., and auxil., to 
effect; to cause to 
be; to cheat; to 
prepare. 

dob 'bin, n., sea gravel 
mixed with sand; 
an old horse. 

do'cent, adj., teach- 
ing. 

do'cile, adj. , teach- 
able; tractable. 

docil'ity, n., the state 
of being docile. 

doc'imasy, n., metal- 
lurgy; the art of 
assaying metals. 

docimas'tic adj., 
proving by experi- 
ments or tests; met- 
allurgic. 

docimal'ogy, »., a 
treatise on the art 
of testing. 

dock, n., a weed with 
broad leaves; the 
place where a pris- 
oner stands in 
court; an artificial 
basin for ships; v.t. , 
to bring into a 
dock; to shorten. 

dock'sge, «., charges 
for the use of docks. 

docked, p.p. dock. 

dock'et, n., a sum- 
mary; any small 
written paper; v.t., 
to mark the con- 
tents of a paper on 
the back. 

dock'eted, p.p., doc- 
ket. . 

docketing, pr.p., 
docket. 

dock'ing, pr.p., dock. 

dock'yard, n., an en- 
closure containing 
docks. 

doc' tor, n., a univer- 
sity graduate of the 
highest degree in 
any faculty; a 
physician; a teach- 
er; v.t., to treat 
medically; to falsify. 

doc'toral, adj., rel. to 
a doctor's degree. 

doctorate, «., the 
degree of doctor. 

doctored, p.p., 

doctor. 

doc'toriag, pr.p. , 
doctor. 












}' 



I 






doc' tress, n. , a woman 

physician. 
doctrlntiue' , n., a 

theorist who ignores 
practical considera- 
tions. 

doc' trlaaiUadj., pert. 
to doctrine. 

doc'tHae,n., a prin- 
ciple; a set of 
opinions or beliefs; 
esp. the truths of 
the gospel. 

doc'ument, n., an 
official or authori- 
tative paper con- 
taining instructions 
or proof; any writ- 
ten or printed paper. 

docnmen'tal, adj., i.q. 
documentary. 

documentary, adj., 
consisting of docu- 
ments. 

doc'umented, adj., il- 
lustrated with docu- 
mentary proofs. 

dod'der, n., a leafles<: 
parasitic plant. 

dod'dered, adj., over- 
grown with dodder. 

doddering. adj., 

feeble, imbecile. 

dodecagon, n., a 
regular polygon 
having twelve equal 
sides and angles. 

dodecagyn'ian, ad)., 
having twelve styles. 

dodecahe'dron, n., a 
solid having twelve 
equal faces, each a 
regular pentagon. 

dodecan'drian, adi., 
having twelve sta- 
mens. 

dodecan'drons, adj., 
i.q. dodecandrian. 

dodecasyl'lable, n., a 
word of twelve syl- 
lables. 

dodge, v.t., to start 
suddenly aside; v.t., 
to evade; to baffle; 
n., a trick. 

dodged, f./>., dodge. 

dodg'er, n., one who 
dodges. 

dodging, /)f.^., dodge. 

do'do, n., an extinct 
bird of Mauritius. 

doe, n., the female 
of a buck. 

do'et, n., one who 
does or performs. 

does, v.t. and auxil., 
3rd pers. sing. pres. 
of to do. 

doe'skin, n., the skin 
of a doe; a twilled 



doff 



S 



woollen cloth; adj.< 
made of doeskin. 

doff, v.t., to take off; 
v.i., to take off the 
hat. 

doffed, p.p., doff. 

doff iag, pr.p., doff. 

dog, n., ail animal, 
alcin to the wolf 
and fox, domestica- 
ted, and strongly 
attached to man; 
v.t., to follow 
closely. 
. dog' tony. »•! the 
hfcty o( the dog- 
wood. 

iog -cart, n., a two- 
soated gig, the rear 
occupants facing 
backwards. 

dog'-days, n. pi., the 
days from about 
July 3to August ii; 
days of great heat. 

doge, n., the chief 
magistrate of the 
old republics of 
Venice and Genoa. 

dog'-eared, adj., hav- 
ing the corners 
turned down and 
crumpled. 
I dog'-flsh, n., a kind 
of small shark. 

dogged, p.p., dog. 

dogged, adj., ob- 
stinate; sullen. 

dog'gedly, adv., in a 
dogged manner. 

dog'gedness. n., the 
quality vt being 



dog'ger, n., a Dutch 
two-masicd fishing 
boat. 

dog'geiel, adj., defec- 
tive in sense and 
rhythm; n., ex- 
tremely poor verses. 

dog'gish, adj., brutal; 
snappish. 

dog'ma. n., a doctrine 
received on author- 
ity. 

dogmat'io, adj., pert, 
to dogmas; dicta- 
torial. 

dotrmat'ical, adj., i.g. 
dogmatic. 

dogmat'icalness, n. , 
' the quality of being 
dogmatic. 

dogmat'ics, n. pi., 
doctrinal theology. 

dog'matism, n., arro- 
gant assertion. 

dog'inatist, n., one 
who is dogmatic. 

dog'matize. v.i., to 






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199 



assert authorita- 
tively. 

dog'matized, p.p., 
dogmatize. 

dog'matizer, n., one 
who dogmatizes. 

dogmatizing, pr.p., 
dogmatize. 

dog'-rose, n., the 
lintish wild rose. 

dog's'-ear, n., the 
corner of a leaf 
turned down by 
careless handling of 
a book; v.t., to turn 
down and disfigiire 
in this way. 

dog's'-eared. adj., 
with the corners 
crumpled. 

dog's'-meat, n., meat 
for, or only fit for, 
dogs. 

dog'-star, «., the star 
Sirius, of the first 
magnitude. 

dog' tooth, n., a can- 
me tooth; an orna- 
ment characteristic 
of Early English 
architecture. 

dog'-trot, n., a gentle 
trot. 

dog'-watch, n., a 
watch of two turns 
on board ship. 

dog'wood, 11. , a 
British hedgerow 
shrub; the cornel. 

dohl, n., a kind of 
pulse like dried 
pease. 

doi'Iy, «. , a small or- 
namental table-mat. 

(fo'ing, pr.p., do. 

(/o'ings, n. />/., things 
done; performances; 
conduct. 

doit, n., a small 
Dutch copper coin; 
the old Scottish 
penny; any small 
coin. 

dol'ce, adj. or adv., 
soft and sweet, in 
music. 

dordnuns, n. pi. , the 
equatorial belt of 
calms; low spirits. 

dole, n., a gratuity 
given in charity; 
grief; ».<., to deal 
out in small quan- 
tities. 

doled, p.p., dole. 

dole'fol, adj., mourn- 
ful. 

dole'falness, n., the 
state of being dole- 
ful. 






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domesticating 



dole'some, adj., dole- 
ful. 

dole'somely, adv. , 
dolefully. 

do'Iing, pr.p., dole. 

rfo -little, «., an idler. 

doll, n., a little image 
used as a plaything. 

dol'Iar, «., a silver 
coin of varying 
value; the U.S.A. 
dollar is worth about 
4S. 2d. 

dolly, »., a little doll. 

dor man, n., a kind of 
Turkish robe; a 
lady's wide jacket. 

dol'omite, n., a rock, 
composed of the 
carbonates of lime 
and magnesia. 

dolomit'ic, adj., of 
the nature of dol- 
omite. 

dolorif'ic, adj., caus- 
ing grief. 

dororons, adj., sor- 
rowful. 

dol'orously, adv., in a 
dolorous manner. 

do'lour, do'loT, n., 
sorrow. 

dol'phin. It., a nam" 
of several species of 
cetaceans; the 
grampus; a mooring 
buoy or poai. 

dolt, «., a blockhead. 

dolt'ish. adj., stup.d. 

dolt'ishness. n., stu- 
pidity. 

domain', n., a dom- 
inion; a landed 
estate; a demesne. 

dome, n., the hemi- 
spherical roof of a 
building; the round- 
ed top of any build- 
ing or chamber. 

domed, adj., provided 
with a dome. 

Domes'day, adj., rel. 
to the survey and 
census of William 
the Conqueror. 

domes' tio, adj., bel. 
to the home; tame; 
l>el. to one's own 
country; n., a 
household servant. 

domes' ticate, v.t., to 
make domestic; to 
tame; to reduce 
from a wild to 
a cultivated condi- 
tion. 

domes' ticated, p.p., 
domesticate. 

'domes'tioating, pr.p., 
domesticate. 



domeatlcation 



200 









domestica'tioii, n., 
the state of being 
domesticated. 

domesUo'ity. n., the 
state oi being do- 
mestic. 

dom'idle, n., a place 
of residence; a per- 
manent abode. 

dom'loUa, v.t., to es- 
tablish in a fixed 
residence. 

dom'idled, p.p., dom- 
icile. 

domiciriary. adj., rel. 
to a domicile. 

domioil'uite, v.t., i.q. 
domicile. 

domidl'iated, p.p. , 
domiciliate. 

domioil'iating, pr.p., 
domiciliate. 

domioJHa'tion. n., 
permanent resi- 
dence. 

dom'ioUiiig, pr.p., 
domicile. 

dom'ilUUlt, adj., pre- 
vailing; predomin- 
ant; n., the fifth 
tone of the diatonic 
scale. 

dom'inate, v./., to 
have power over; 
to govern. 

dom'inated. p.p., 
dominate. 

dominating, pr.p., 
dominate. 

domination, n., gov- 
ernment; tyranny. 

dom'inatiTe. itdi., 
governing; imperi- 
ous. 

dom'inatoT, n., one 
that dominates. 

domineer', v.t. and t. , 
to rule or com- 
mand insolently. 

domineered', p.p., 
domineer. 

domineer'ing, adj., 
overbearing; Pr.p., 
domineer. 

Domin'ioal, adj., rel. 
to Sunday or the 
Lord's Day; n., one 
of seven letters used 
in kalendars. 

Domin'ican, adj., rel. 
to St. Dominic or 
his religious Order 
of Preaichers; n., a 
member of this 
Order; a Black 
Friar. 

dom'inie, n., a Scot- 
tish schoolmaster. 

domin'ion. »., su- 
preme authority; 



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territory under a 
government; pi., an 
order of angels. 

dom'ino, n., a mas- 
querade dress; a 
half-mask; a dotted 
tablet used in a 
game. 

dom'inoes, n. pi., a 
game played with 
dotted oblong tab- 
lets. 

dom'inus, n., a lord 
or master; an owner. 

don, n., a Spanish 
title of courtesy; a 
university digni- 
tary; ».<., to put on. 

do'na, n., the fern, 
of don; a sweet- 
heart (slang). 

donate', v.<. and /., to 
give; to bestow. 

dona'ted, p.p., do- 
nate. 

dona'ting, pr.p., do- 
nate. 

dona'tion, n., a gra- 
tuity; a gift. 

Don'atism, n., the 
doctrines of Don- 
atus. 

Don'atist, n., a fol- 
lower ot Donatus. 

don'ative, n., a' gift; 
in law, a benefice 
bestowed by a pa- 
tron without the 
intervention of a 
bishop. 

done, p.p., do. 

donee', n., the recipi- 
ent of a grant or 
gift. 

don'jon, n., the prin- 
cipal tower of a 
castle; a keep. 

don'key, n., an ass. 

don'key-engine. n., a 
small subsidiary 
steam engine. 

don'na, n., a lady. 

donned, p.p., don. 

don'ning, pr.p., don. 

do'nor, «., a giver. 

doo'Ue, doo'ly, n., a 
palanquin. 

doom, n., final judg- 
ment; fate; ruin; 
v.t., to condemn. 

doomed, p.p., doom. 

doom'ing,^r.p.,doom. 

doomsday, n., the 
day of doom. 

door, n., a frame of 
wood or other mate- 
rial which closes an 
opening. 

door'-keeper. n., a 
porter. 



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door'-nail, n., the naii 
on which a door- 
knocker strikes. 

door'-step, n., the 
stone at a thresh- 
old. 

door' way, «., the 
entrance into a 
room or house. 

dop'per, n., an 
Anabaptist. 

dor, dorr, n., a British 
beetle. 

Dor'cas, adj., pert, to 
a society of ladies 
who make garments 
for the poor. 

do'ree, n., i.q. dorv 
(the fish). 

Do'rian, adj., pert, to 
the Dorians, a 
people of Ancient 
Greece. 

Dor'ic, adj., i.q. Do- 
rian; naming one of 
the ancient Greek 
orders of architec- 
ture; n., a rustic 
dialect. 

Oor'icisin, n., a pecu- 
liarity of the Doric 
dialect. 

dor'manoy, n., the 
state of being dor- 
mant. 

dor'mant, adj., sleep- 
ing; not in action; 
not claimed. 

dor'mer, n., a window 
in a roof. 

dor'mitive, «., a 
soporific; adj., tend- 
ing to cause sleep. 

dor'mitory, n., a 
building or room 
to sleep in. 

dor'monse, n., a small 
rodent, torpid in 
the winter. 

dor'my, adj., a golf 
term implying that 
a person is up by 
as many holes as 
remain to play. 

dor'sal, adj., rel. to 
the back. 

dor'sel, n., a pannier; 
a hanging of rich 
stuff at the back of 
a throne or altar. 

dor'som, »., a ridge; 
the back of an 
animal (Lot.). 

do'ry, n., a yellow 
European food-fish; 
a small boat. 

do'sage, n., the pro- 
cess of improving 
wine by additions 
of other substances. 



dose 



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V 



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<. 



dOM, n., the quantity 
oi medicine to be 
taken at one time; 
V.I., to physic. 

dosed, p.p., dose. 

do' sing, pr.p., dose. 

dos'sal, n., i.q. dorsel. 

dOBsiei', n., a collec- 
tion of all the 
papers rel. to some 
matter. 

dos'sil, n., a plug of 
lint for a wound. 

dost, v.t. and auxil., 
2nd pers. sing. pres. 
of to do. 

dot, n., a speck; a 
small spot; v.t., to 
mark With dots. 

do'tage, n., the child- 
ishness of old age. 

dotard, n., a man 
whose mind is en- 
feebled by age. 

dotation, n., the be- 
stowal of a dowry; 
endowment. 

dote, v.t., to be senile; 
to love to excess. 

doted, p.p., dote. 

do'tel, n., a dotard; 
silly fellow. 

do'ter, n., one who 
dotes. 

dotb, v.l. and auxil., 
3rd pers. sing. pres. 
of to do. 

do' ting, pr.p., dote. 

do'tingly, adv., with 
excess ve fondness. 

dot'tard, n., an old, 
decayi'd tree. 

dotted, p.p., dot. 

dot'ter, n., a device 
for elevating a 
naval gua in accord- 
ance with the ship's 
roll. 

dot'terel, n., a kind 
of plover. 

dot'tiuK, pr.p., dot. 

dooane', n., a custom- 
house {Fr.). 

doob'le, adj., two- 
fold; twice as much; 
deceitful; v.t., to 
make double; to 
pass round; n., a 
duplicate; a quick 
step in marching. 

donb'le - bar'relled, 
ad}., having two 
barrels. 

doab'Ied. ^.i>. .double. 

doab'le-deal'ing, n., 
duplicity; ad)., de- 
ceitful. 

donb'le-face, »., 
double dealing; 
hypocrisy. 



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801 



donb'le-laoed, adj., 

hypocritical. 

donb'Ieness, n., the 
state of being 
double. 

doub'let, n., a kind of 
waistcoat; one of 
two words really 
the same but difier- 
ing in form. 

doab'ling, Pr.p., 

double. 

doabloon', n., a 
Spanish coin worth 
about a guinea; a 
double pistole. 

doub'ly, adv., to twice 
the extent. 

doubt, v.t., to be un- 
certain; i;.<., to dis- 
trust; n., imcer- 
tainty of mind; want 
of belief; suspicion. 

doubtable, adj., liable 

• to be doubted. 

doubt'ed, p.p., doubt. 

doubt'er, »., one who 
doubts. 

doubt'fnl, adj., unde- 
termined; not cer- 
tain. 

doubt'Iully, adv., in a 
doubtful maimer. 

donbt'ialness. n., the 
state of bemg 
doubtful. 

doubt'ing. pr. p., 
doubt . 

doubt'ingly, udv., in a 
doubting manner. 

doubt'less, adv., un- 
questionably. 

douceur', »., a gra- 
tuity; a bribe. 

douche, n., a kind of 
bath in which a jet 
of water or vapour 
is directed upon 
some part of the 
body. 

dough, n., paste of 
bread. 

dongb'nnt, n., a small 
round cake made of 
flour, eggs, sugar, 
and milk, and 
cooked in lard. 

dough' til;, adv., with 
douglitiness. 

dough' tiness, n., brav- 
ery; valour. 

dougb'ty, ad}., vali- 
ant; noble. 

dougb'y. atlh, like 
dough; flabby and 
pale. 

douse, v.t., to plunge 
into water; to ex- 
tinguish. 

doused, p.p., douse. 



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down-hilJ 



dousing, pr.p. , douse. 

dove, n., a pigeon. 

dove'-cot, n., a house 
tor doves. 

dove'like, adj., like a 
dove; gentle. 

dovetail, n., a 
method of fastening 
boards at right 
angles; v.t. and t., to 
unite in this way; 
to fit exactly. 

dovetailed, p.p., 
dovetail. 

dovetailing, pr.p., 
dovetail. 

dow'able, adj., en- 
titled to dower. 

dowager, n., the 
widow of a person 
of rank whose heir 
has a wife. 

dow'dy, adj., ill- 
dressed. 

dow'dyish, adj., like 
a dowdy. 

dow'el, »., a wooden 
or iron pin used in 
fastening pieces of 
wcxxi, etc., edge- 
wise; v.t., to fasten 
with dowels. 

dow'elled, dow'eled, 
p.p., dowel. 

dow'elling, dow'eling, 
pr.p., dowel. 

dow'er, «., a wife's 
portion; a widow's 
third; v.t., to en- 
dow. 

dow'ered, />;>., dower. 

dow'erless, adi., with- 
out dower. 

dow'las, n., a coarse 
linen cloth. 

down, n., rising 
ground; a roundea, 
grassy hill; the soft 
covering of birds 
undei the feathers; 
prep, and adv., from 
a higher to a lower 
position. 

downcast, adj., cast 
downward; de- 

jected; n., the 
ventilating shaft 
down which aj 
passes into a mine. 

dowa'liJl, >!.. a fall- 
ing down; loss of 
fortune or fame; 
ruin. 

down'hanl, n., a rope 
to haul down a sail. 

downhearted, ad)., 
di'jecled. 

down '-bill, aJ/., slop- 
mc; downwards ; 
adv. , down a slope. 



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downiness 



202 



draper 



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downiness, n., the 

quality of being 
downy. 

down'pova, n., a 
continuous shower 
of rain. 

down'rlght, adj., 
plain; blunt; un- 
ceremonious; adv. , 
in plain terms; 
thoroughly. 

down'sitnns, n., the 
act of sitting down. 

down'staiis, adj., rel. 
to the lower part 
of a house; adv., be- 
low; down the stairs. 

down'stroke, n., a 
downward blow; the 
thick stroke of a 
letter. 

down'waid, adv. and 
adj., in a descend- 
mg course. 

down'y, adj., covered 
with down; sooth- 
ing. 

dow'ry, «., a wife's 
property at mar- 
riage. 

dowse, v.i., i.q. douse. 

doxology, n., a short 
hymn glorifying 
God. 

doz'y, n., a low word 
for sweetheart or 
mistress. 

doyen', n., a dean; 
the senior member 
of a body (Fr.). 

doze, v.i., to sleep 
lightly; n., a light 
sleep. 

doeed. p.p., doze. 

Ao^tHU n., a collec- 
tion of twelve, or 
about twelve, 
things or persons. 

do'zer, n., one who 
dozes. 

do'ziness, n., drowsi- 
ness. 

do'zing, pr.p., doze. 

do'zy, adj., sleepy. 

drab, n., a slut; a 
thick, dull-brown, 
woollen cloth; a 
dull-brown colour; 
adj., dull-brown. 

drab'ble, v.t., to drag- 
gle; to wet and 
dirty. 

drab'bled, p.p., drab- 
ble. 

diab'bling, pr.p., 
drabble. 

drachm, n., a dram; 
three scruples. 

draoh'ma, n. , a Greek 
coin and weight. 



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Dracon'ic, adj., rel. 
to Draco, the Ath- 
enian law-giver; ex- 
tremely severe. 

draS, «., refuse; hogs- 
wash. 

drafi'y, adj., consist- 
ing of draif; worth- 
less. 

draft, n., a body of 
men drawn from a 
larger body; an 
order for payment; 
a document in out- 
line; a sketch; v.t., 
to make a draft of. 

draft'ed, p.p., draft. 

draft'ing, pr.p., draft. 

Jrafts'man, n., i.q. 
draughtsman. 

drag, v.t., to pull; to 
draw along the 
ground; v.i., to Ije 
drawn along the 
ground; to proceed 
slowly; »., a kind 
of grapnel for re- 
covering articles 
lost m the water; 
an obstacle; a long, 
open carriage. 

dragged, p.-b., drag. 

drag'ging, pr.p., drag. 

draggle, v.t. and »., 
to wet and dirty by 
drawing along the 
ground. 

drax'gled, p.p., drag- 
gle. 

drag'gliog, pr.p., 
draggle. 

drag'-net, n., a 
fishing-net to be 
drawn along the 
botiom of a river 
or pond. 

drag' Oman, n., an m- 
terpreter, esp. one 
attached to an em- 
bassy or consulate 
in the East. 

drag'on, «., a fabu- 
lous monster, a sort 
of winged crocodile. 

dras'onet, n., a small 
fish; a little goby. 

drag' on-fly, n., a kind 
of large insect. 

drag'onish, adj., like 
a dragon. 

dragonnade', n., a 
Protestant persecu- 
tion under Louis 
XlV;t;.<.,tousethe 
military against 
citizens. 

dragoon', n., a cav- 
alry soldier; v.t., 
to compel by vio- 
lence. 



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drasooaed', p.p., 
dra(»ix)n. 

dragoon'ing, pr.p., 
di agoon. 

drain,!'./., to exhaust; 
(of a liquid) to. 
deprive by drawing 
off gradually; v.t., 
to flow off gradu- 
ally; n., a trench 
to convey water 
from wet land; con- 
tinuous outflow. 

drain'able, idj., cap- 
able of being 
'irained. 

drainage, n., a 
system of drains; 
the manner in which 
the waters of a 
country pass off by 
rivers. 

drained, p.p., drain. 

drain'er, n., one who, 
or that which, 
drains. 

drain'ing, pr.p., drain. 

drain'-trap, n., that 
which prevents foul 
air from escaping 
from drains. 

drake, n., a male 
duck. 

dram, «., the six- 
teenth part of an 
ounce avoirdupois; 
a drink of spirituoii > 
Uquor. 

dra'ma, n., a stage- 
play; theatrical 
composition and 
representation. 

dramat'io, adj., pert, 
to the drama; theat- 
rical. 

dramat'ical, adj., i.q. 
dramatic. 

dramat'ically, adv., in 
a dramatic manner. 

dram'atist, n., a play- 
wright. 

dram'atize, v.t., to 
make into a play. 

dramatized, p.p., 
dramatize. 

dram'atizing, pr.p., 
dramatize. 

dram'-drinker, »., a 
person addicted to 
alcohol. 

dram'-shop, n., a 
shop where spirits 
are sold in small 
quantities. 

drank, p.t., drink. 

drape, v.t., to cover 
with drapery. 

draped, p.p., drape. 

dra'per, «., a dealer 
in cloths. 



drapery 



dra'pery. «., the 

business of a draper; 
hangings. 

dra'ping, pr.p. , drape. 

dras'tic, adj., oower- 
ful; eflicdcious. 

diaoght, »., the act 
of drawing; the act 
of drinking; a 
drink; a drawing 
or sketch; the depth 
a laden ship sinks 
in water; a current 
of air; v.l., to sketch 
roughly. Mso draft. 

dran^t'-boaid, n., a 
checkered board 
for the game ot 
draughts. 

draught -engine, n., a 
mining engine used 
for pumping, etc. 

diaoc^t'-horse, n., a 
horse used for draw- 
ing vehicles. 

draaght'iness, »., the 
state of being 
draughty. 

draughts, n. pi., a 
game played with 
round pieces on a 
checkered board. 

draoghts'man, n. , one 
who draws designs 
and plans. 

dranght'y. adj., ex- 
posed to draughts. 

Dravid'ian, adj., pert, 
to a family of 
languages spoken m 
Southern India and 
Ceylon. 

draw, v.t., to pull; to 
lead; to form a pic- 
ture; to form a 
writing; n., a con- 
test in which both 
parties are equally 
successful. 

draw'back, n., a dis- 
advajitage; cus- 
toms duties repaid. 

draw'bridge, n., a 
bridge that may 
be drawn up or 
aside. 

drawee', n., the per- 
son on whom a bill 
of exchange is 
drawn. 

draw'er, »., one who 
draws; a sliding 
box in a table or 
other piece of furni- 
ture. 

draw'ers, n. pi., a 
garment to cover 
the lower part of 
the body and the 
legs. 






\ 



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203 



drawing, n., the act 

of one who draws; 
pictorial represen- 
tation; pr.p.,dticvi. 

draw'ing-master, n., 
one who teaches the 
art of drawuig. 

drawing-pen, n., a 
per> for drawing 
lines. 

draw'ing-room, n., a 
reception room. 

drawl, v.t., to speak 
with slow utterance. 

drawled, p.p.. drawl. 

drawl' er, n., one who 
drawls. 

drawling, Pr.p., 
drawl. 

drawn, p.p., draw. 

draw'-net. n., a net 
tor catching birds. 

dray, n., a low cart 
on heavy wheels. 

dray -cart , n. , a dray . 

dray'-horse, n., a 
horse used in a 
dray. 

dray'man, n., a dray 
driver or attendant. 

dread. »., great fear; 
adj., terrible; v.t. 
and •., to fear 
greatly. 

dread'ed, p.p., dread. 

dread'Iul, adj., ter- 
rible; »., a book 
about crimes, fright- 
ful accidents, etc. 

dread' folly, adv., in a 
manner to be 
dreaded. 

dread'fnlness, n., the 
quality ot being 
dreadful. 

dread'ing,^f./>.,dread. 

dread' less, adj., in- 
trepid. 

dread' lessness. n., 
fearlessness. 

dread'nooght, n., a 
thick rainproof 

cloth or garment; a 
very powerful 

armed ship. 

dream, n., the series 
of thoughts of a 
sleeping person ; v.i. , 
to have images in 
the mind when 
asleep; v.t., to see 
ill a dream. 

dreamed, p.p. , dream. 

dream'er, n., one who 
dreams; a visionary. 

dream'iness. n., the 
state of being 
dreamy. 

dream'ing, pr.p., 
dream. 






U. 



1. 






V 



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V 






dressed 



dream'ini;ly, ado., as 

ihougli (Ireaming. 

dream'les.s, adj., free 
from drt-ams. 

dreamt, p.p., dream. 

dreamy, adj., full of 
dreams; dream-like. 

drear, adj., gloomy 
with solitude. 

drear'ily, adv., dis- 
mally. 

drear'iness, n., the 
state of being 
dreary. 

drear'y, a<i;., dismal; 
oppressively mono- 
tonous. 

dredge, n., an appar- 
atus for clearing the 
bed of a channel; a 
drag-net; v.l., to use 
a dredge; to sprin- 
kle dour on roasting 
meat. 

dredged, p.p., dredge. 

dredg'er, n., one who, 
or that which, 
dredges. 

dredg'ing, pr.p., 
dredge. 

dredg'ing-box. m., a 
utensil for dredging 
flour. 

dreg'gy, adj., con- 
sisting of dregs; 
muddy. 

dregs, n. Pi., the 
sediment of liquors; 
lees;the most worth- 
less of human be- 
ings. 

drench, v.t., to wet 
thoroughly; to 

purge with a strong 
aperient medicine; 
n., a purgative for 
an animal. 

dfenched,^.^.,drench. 

dreacb'ing. pr. p., 
drench. 

Dres'den, n., a town 
01 Saxony; porce- 
lain made near 
there; adj., pert, to 
china majde near 
Dresden. 

dress, v.t., to put 
clothes on; to pre- 
pare, in a gener.ll 
sense; v.i., to clothe 
oneself; to arrange 
oneself in a line 
with others; «., gar- 
ments; a lady's 
gown, 
dress'eoat. »., a coat 
with narrow point- 
ed tails worn at 
evening ceremonies, 
dressed, p.p., dress. 



dresser 



204 



drossiness 



.1 



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dress'eri n., one who 

dres'^cs; a hospital 
attendant; a kind 
of sideboard afid 
low cupboard. 

dress'ing, n., an ap- 
plication to a wound; 
manure for land- 
preparation oi food 
lor cooking; a sauce 
or cream for a salad; 
pr.p., dress. 

dres'sing-case, n., a 
case ot loilct re- 
quisites. 

dres'sing-gown, «., a 
flowing coat worn 
to cover d^^habUle. 

dres'sing-room, n., an 
apartment in which 
one dresses oneseli. 

dres'sing-table, »., a 
toilet table. 

dress'maker, n., a 
maker of ladies' 
dresses. 

dres's'y, adj., wearing 
showy dress. 

drib'ble, v./., to let 
fall in drops; to 
work a football for- 
ward with the feet; 
v.(., to fail in a 
quick succession of 
drops; just to roll 
(into): n., a trickle. 

dribbled, p.p., drib- 
ble. 

dribbling, pr. p., dr\b- 
ble. 

drib'let, n., a small 
part doled out as 
one of a series. 

dried, p.p., dry. 

dri'er, adj., comp. of 
dry; n., one who 
dries. 

dri'est, adj., super, of 
dry. 

drift, n., a heap of 
matter driven to- 
gether by wind or 
water; tendency; in- 
tention; ».»., to be 
driven along by a 
current of water or 
air; adj., drifted by 
wind or water. 

drift'ed, p.p., drift. 

drift'ing. pr.p., drift. 

drill' wood, n., wood 
drifted by water. 

drill, v.t., to bore; to 
train by frequent 
repetition of exer- 
cises; n., a pointed 
instrument for bor- 
ing holes; the ex- 
ercises by which 
soldiers are trained. 



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drilled, p.p., drill. 

drilling, «., a coarse 
linen or cotton 
cloth; pr.p., drill. 

drill-plough, n., a 
plough tor sowing 
grain in drills or 
straight rows. 

drill'-sergeant, n., a 
sergeant who drills 
soldiers. 

dri'ly, adv., in a dry 
n;anner. 

drink, v.i., to swal- 
low liquor; to be an 
habitual drunkard; 
v.t., to imbibe; «., 
liquor. 

drink'able, adj., fit 
for drink; n., a 
liquor that may be 
drank. 

drink'er, n., one who 
drinks. 

drink ing, ^f./>., drink. 

drink-offering, «., a 
Jewish offering of 
wine. 

drip, v.t., to fall in 
drops; n., the fall. 

dripped, p.p., drip. 

drip' ping, n., the fat 
which falls from 
roasting meat; pr.p. 
drip. 

drip'ping-pan, n., a 
pan to catch drip- 
ping. 

drip'pings, n. pi., that 
which drips from 
anything. 

drive, v.t., to urge 
forward; v.i., to 
travel in a carriage; 
«., a road prepared 
for driving; a 
sweeping blow. 

driv'el, v.i., to slaver; 
to be foolish; «., 
silly, meaningless 
talk. 

driv'elled, driv'eled, 
p.p., drivel. 

driv'eller, n., one who 
drivels; a fool. 

driv'elling, P'-P-, 
drivel; n., drivel. 

driv'en, p.p., drive. 

dri'ver, «., one who, 
or that which, 
drives; a wooden 
golf-club. 

dri'vlng. pr.p., drive. 

dri'ving-uiaft, «., a 
shaft from a driving- 
wheel setting a 
machine in motion. 

driz'de, f.<., to rain 
in small drops; n., 
a fine rain. 



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)- 



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t. 



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X 



driz'zled, />./>., drizzle. 

driz'zling, pr.p., driz- 
zle. 

driz'zly, adj., shed- 
ding fine rain. 

droll, adj., laughable; 
n., a jester. 

droU'ery, »., comical- 

ness. 

drom'edary, n., the 
Arabian or single- 
huir.ped camel. 

drone, n., male of the 
honey-bee; an idler; 
a humming sound; 
a bag-pipe's bass 
note; v.i., to hum: 
v.t., to speak in a 
dull, monotonous 
manner. 

droned, p.p., drone. 

dro'ning, pr.p.,drone. 

dro'nis^ adj., lazy; 
sluggish. 

droop, v.t., to bond 
downward as from 
weakness; n., 
drooping p>osition. 

drooped, p.p., droop. 

droop'ing, pr.p.Acoo'p. 

droop' ingly, adv., ui 
a drooping manner. 

drop, n., a small 
portion of a liquid 
falling or about to 
fall; anything that 
hongs in the form; 
of a drop; v.t., to! 
let fall;ti.»., to fall. 

drop'let, n., a little 
drop. 

dropped, p.p., drop. 

dropping, pr.p., drop. 

drop'-scene, n., a 
scenic picture sus- 
pended by pulleys 
which falls in front 
of the other scenery 
in theatres. 

drop'sical, adj., dis- 
eased with, inclined 
to, or resembling 
dropsy. 

drop'sy, n., an un- 
natural collect ioa 
of water in any 
cavity or in the 
tissues of the body. 

drosh'ky, n., i.q. 
drosky. 

dros'ky. «., a light, 
four-wheeled car- 
riage used in Rus- 
sia. 

dross, n., waste or 
worthless matter; 
the refuse of metals. 

dross'iness, n., the 
quality of being 
drossy. 



drossy 



205 



dubitable 



dross'y, adj., worth- 
less; impure; pert, 
to dross. 

drought, n., want of 
rain; aridness. 

drought'y, adj., full 
of drought. 

drouth, n., drought; 
thirst. 

drove, n., a number 
of animals driven 
in a body; p.t., 
drive. 

dro'ver, «., one who 
drives cattle or 
sheep. 

drown, »./., to kill by 
immersion in water; 
v.i., to perish by 
suffocation in water. 

drowned, p.p-, drown. 

drowning, pi'-P-f 
drown. 

drowse, v.i., to sleep 
imperfectly; V.I., to 
make dull or stu- 
pid. 

drowsed, p.p., drowse . 

drow'sily, adv., in a 
drowsy manner. 

drow'sinoss, n., the 
state of being 
drowsy. 

drowsing, p^-P-, 
drowse. 

drow'sy, <'dj., sleepy; 
lulling. 

drub, v.t., to cudgel. 

drubbed, p.p., drub. 

dfub'bing.^r.^. ,drub; 
n., a sound beating. 

drudge, v.i., to work 
hard; n., one who 
works hard and 
without pleasure. 

drudged, p.p. , drudge . 

drudg'er, n., one who 
drudges; a task- 
master. 

dmdg'ery, f»., ignoble 
toil. 

drndg'ing, pr.p., 
drudge. 

drudgingly, adv., 
laboriously. 

drug, n., any sub- 
stance used in the 
preparation of medi- 
cines; an article of 
slow sale; v.t., to ad- 
minister narcotics 
to and to stupefy. 

drugged, p.p., drug. 

drtig'get, n., a wix)l- 
len cloth for cover- 
ing carpets or for 
use a^ a carpet. 

drugging, ^r.p., drug. 

druggist, n., one who 
deals m drugs. 



1^ 






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L 



dm'id. It., an ancient 
Celtic priest. 

drn'idess, n., a female 
druid. 

druid'ic, adj., pert, 
to the druids. 

dmid'ical, adj., i.q. 
druidic. 

dru'idism, n., the 
doctrines and rites 
of the druids. 

drum, n., an instru- 
ment of music in 
the form of a hollow 
cylinder with ends 
covered with vel- 
lum; anything of 
the shape of a drum; 
v.t., to beat a 
drum. 

drnm'head, n., the 
head of a drum. 

dmm'-major, n., the 
chief drummer of a 
regiment. 

drummed, p.p., drum. 

drom'mer, n., one 
who drums. 

drom'ming, pr.p., 
drum. 

drum'stick, n., the 
stick of a drum; 
the upper part ot 
the leg of a cooked 
bird. 

drank, adj., intoxi- 
cated by alcoholic 
liquor; p.p., drink. 

drunk' ud, »., one 
given to over-indul- 
gence in strong 
liquor. 

drunk' en, a(2;.,drtmk; 
proceeding from in- 
toxication. 

dnmk'enness, n., the 
state of being 
drunk; inebriety. 

drupe, n., stone fruit. 

Druse, n., one of a 
Syrian people and 
religious sect. 

druse, n., a cavity in 
a rock having its in- 
terior surface stud- 
ded with crystals. 

dry, adj., destitute 
of moisttire; un- 
interestmg; quietly 
sarcastic; v.t., to 
make dry; v.i., to 
grow dry. 

dnr'ad, n., a nymph 
of the woods. 

dry'asdust, adj., ex- 
tremely uninterest- 
ing. 

dry'-dock,n.,a grav- 
ing dock fromwhich 
the water is emptied 



I. 
I, 



1^ 



I. 






in order that a 
vessel may be re- 
paired. 

dry'er, n., one who, 
or that which, dries. 

dr/'goods, n. pi., 
cloths, etc. 

dry'ing, pr.p., dry. 

d^ly, adv., without 
moisture, affection, 
or interest; sarcasti- 
cally. Also drily. 

drjr'ness, »., the state 
or quality of being 
dry. 

dry'-nnrse, «. , a nurse 
who tends but does 
not suckle; v.t., to 
bruig up in this way. 

dry'-rot, «., a disease 
ot timber which 
reduces it to powder. 

dry'salter, n., a dealer 
in chemicals. 

dry'-shod, adv., with- 
out wetting the 
feet. 

dn'al, adj., twofold; 
n., the grammatical 
form used in some 
languages when two 
things are referred 
to. 

du'alism, n., the be- 
lief in two antag- 
onistic principles 
governing human 
life. 

du'alist, n., a believer 
in dualism. 

dual'ity, n., the state 
of being dual. 

dub, v.t., to strike 
with a sword and 
make a knight; to 
give a new name to; 
to rub (leather) 
with grease. 

du'bash, n., a native 
Indian interpeter 
or commissionaire. 

dubbed, p.p., dub. 

dub'ber, n., one who 
dubs. 

dub'bing, n., grease 
used for smoothing 
and rendering leath- 
er watertight; pr.p., 
dub. 

dnbi'ety, «., doubt- 
fulness. 

du'bions, adj., doubt- 
ful. 

dn'biously, adv., in a 
dubious manner. 

du'biousness, n., the 
state of l)eing du- 
bious. 

du'bitable, adj., liable 
to be doubted. 



dubitation 



\ 

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b. 



L 



I 
U 



dnbita'tion, n., the 
act ot doubting or 
hesitating. 

da'cal, oil., pert, to 
a diiice. 

dao'at, n., a gold or 
silver coin formerly 
used in many 
European countries. 

ducatoon', n., a silver 
coin once common 
on the Continent. 

dach'ess, n., the wife 
of a duke. 

duch'y, »., a duke- 
dom. 

dnck, n., a coarse 
cloth, usually white; 
a water-fowl ; a bend 
of the head; v.t., to 
dip in water and 
suddenly withdraw; 
». ». , to stoop ; to bo w. 

ducked, p.p., duck. 

duck'er, «., one who 
ducks; a bathing- 
pond. 

duck'ing, pr.p., duck. 

duck'luig, n., a young 
duck. 

duckweed, n., an 
aquatic plant that 
floats on the surface 
of still or gently 
running water. 

duct, n., a tube by 
which a fluid is 
conveyed. 

dnc'tile, adi-, capable 
of being drawn out 
into a thread. 

dnctil'ity, n., the qual- 
ity of being ductile. 

dud'dei, ».«., to shiv- 
er; to tremble. 

dude, n., a fop 
(Amer.). 

dndg'eon, »., resent- 
ment. 

due, a-dj., demanding 
payment or per- 
formance; n., a toll, 
tax, or tribute. 

dn'el, «., a single 
combat. 

dn'eller. du'eler, n., 
i.q. duellist. 

du'elling, dn'eling, n., 
the act or practice 
of engaging in duels. 

da'ellist, duelist, n., 
one who engages in 
duels. 

dnel'lo, M., a duel; the 
code of laws regu- 
lating duels. 

dnen'na, n., an elder- 
ly woman who takes 
charge cf a yoimger 
one. 



J- 



-i- 



206 



duet', n., a musical 
~i composition for two 

voices or instru- 
. ments. 
, duet' to, n., i.q. duet. 

r ~r duff, n., a stiff flour 
pudding boiled in a 
cloth. 
dnf'iel, «., frieze; a 
coarse woollen cloth. 
duf'fer, n., a stupid 
^ person; a cheat. 

L_ dug, n., the pap or 
nipple of an animal; 
p.p., dig. 
L_ dug'ont, »., a shelter 
J dug in the ground; 

a canoe hollowed 
out of a tree-trunk. 
I - duke, «., a nobleman 
of highest rank; a 
sovereign prince. 
I ^ duke'dom, «., the 
l^ territory or rank of 
a duke, 
l^ dul'cet, ad.\; melo- 
dious, 
i dul'cified, p.p., dul- 
^ cify. 

•L dul'dfy, f./. , to render 

V_ agreeable to the 

taste, 
i^ dul'cifying, ^r .^. , dul- 



dunging 



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k- 



IK 






dulcimer, «., a 
stringed musical 
instrument, played 
by being struck by 
two hammers. 

duli'a, «., veneration 
paid to saints or 
angels. 

dull, «i;., without 
life or spirit; cheer- 
less; dim; blunt; 
V.I., to make dull. 

dull' aid, »., a block- 
head. 

dulled, p.p., dull. 

dull'er, adi., comp. of 
dull. 

dnll'est, adj., super. 
of dull. 



b-^-^ ^ dull'ing, pr.p., dull. 
b^ dul'ly, adv., in a dull 



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lb 



maimer, 

dni'ness, n., the 
character of being 
dull. 

dulse, n., an edible 
sea-weed. 

dn'ly, adv., properly. 

dum'dnm, n., a soft- 
cored bullet. 

dumb, adj., unable to 
utter articulate 
sounds; silent. 

dumb'-beU, n., a piece 
of gymnastic ap- 
paratus consisting 



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b. 



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J- 



J- 

J- 

J- 
b 



of two balls with a 
short piece uniting 
them. 

dnmbfoujud', v.t., to 
strike dumb; to con- 
fuse. 

dumbfound' ed, p.p., 
dumbfound. 

dumbfoond'ing, pr.p., 
dumbfound. 

dumb'ly, adv., with- 
out speech. 

dnmb'ness, »■, the 
state otbeingdumb. 

dnmb'show, n., ges- 
ture without words. 

dnm'my, n., the ex- 
posed band at 
bridge; any sham 
object; a lay-figure; 
adj., fictitious. 

dump, v.t., to deposit 
carelessly; to sell 
cheaply in a foreign 
country owing to 
protection at home. 

dumped, p.p., dump. 

dump'iog, pr.p., 

dump. 

dump'ish, adj., mel- 
ancholy. 

dump' ling, n., a mass 
of boiled paste. 

dumps, H. pi., low 
spirits. 

dump'y, adj., short 
and thick. 

dun, adj., dull brown; 
V.I., to demand a 
debt in a pressing 
manner from; to 
importune; n., one 
who duns. 

dunce, »., an ignora- 
mus. 

dnn'dei, »., the dregs 
of sugar-cane juice 
used in distilling 
rum.- 

dune, n., a low sand- 
hill on the coast. 

dun'flsh, «., cured 
cod-fish. 

dimg, n., the excre- 
ment of animals; 
v.t., to manure with 
dung; v.t., to void 
excrement. 

dungaree', n. , a coarse 
blue calico used as 
a working dress by 
mechanics. 

dunged, p.p., dung. 

dun'geon, n., a deep, 
dark prison; a don- 
jon or keep. 

dung'hiU, «., a heap 
of dung; a mean 
abode. 

dung'ing, pr.p. , dung. 



liuiigy 



b 

U 



^ 






0- 



dting'y, adj., full of 
duug. 

dimg'-yard, n. , a yard 
in which dung is 
collected. 

dnniwas'sal, n., a 
cadet of a Highland 
family of rank. 

Dnn'lop, n., a cheese 
made at Dunlop in 
Ayrshire; a kind of 
rubber tire for a 
motor-car, etc. 

dnn'nage, «., mate- 
rial laid in the hold 
ot a ship to keep 
the cargo out of the 
bilge-water. 

dunned, p.p., dun. 

dun'ner, n., a debt- 
collector. 

dun'ning, pr.p., dun. 

dnn'nish, adj., some- 
what dun. 

du'o. n., a duet. 

duodecen'mal, adj., 
consisting of twelve 
years. 

daodec'inuki, adj., 
reckoning by 
twelves. 

daodeo'imo, adj. , con- 
sisting of twelve 
leaves to a sheet; 
n., a book made of 
sheets folded in this 
way. 

dnodec'aple, adj., con- 

sistinR of twelve. 

dnoden'ary, adj., rel. 
to the number 
twelve; increasing 
by twelves. 

duode'nnm, n., the 
first portion of the 
small intestine. 

dnoUt'eral, adj., con- 
sisting of two letters 
only. 

du'ologne, n., a dia- 
logue between two. 

da'pable,(i4;- .gullible. 

dupe, n., a person 
easily led astray by 
his credulity; v.i., to 
make a dupe of. 

duped, p.p., dupe. 

du'pery, «., the prac- 
tice ol duping. 

dtt'ping, pr.p., dupe. 

du'ple, adj., double. 

duplex, a(.';\ I twofold. 

du'plicate, n., a se- 
cond thing of the 
same kind; adj., 
double; expressing 
proportion between 
squares. 

du'plicate, v.l., to 
double. 



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V 



t 



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207 



da'plicated, p.p., du- 
plicate. 

duplicating, pr.p., 
duplicate. 

duplication, n., the 
act of doubling. 

duplicative, adj., 
having the quality 
of doubling. 

dn'plicator, »., one 
who, or that which, 
duplicates; a copy- 
ing machine. 

dn'plicature, n., a 
doubling; a fold. 

dnplic'ity, n., double- 
dealing; deceit. 

durabil'i^, n., the 
quality of being 
durable. 

du'rable, adj., not 
perishable. 

du'rableness, n., i.q. 
durability. 

du'ra ma'ter, n., the 
outer membrane of 
the brain. 

dn'rance, n., im- 
prisonment. 

dnra'tion, n., con- 
tinuance in time. 

dni'bar, n., an Indian 
state levee; an au- 
dience room in an 
Indian palace. 

dn'ress, n., restraint 
of liberty ; con- 
straint by threats. 

during, prep. , 
throughout the 

course of. 

durst, p.t., dare. 

dusk, adj., tending 
to darkness; n., twi- 
light. 

dusk'ily, adv., in a 
dusky manner. 

dnsk'iness, n., the 
stateof beingdusky. 

dusk'ish, adj., rather 
dusky. 

duskiness, n., the 
state ot being dusk- 
ish. 

dosk'Tf adj., dark- 
coloured;not bright. 

dust, n., fine dry par- 
ticles of matter; 
v.t., to free from 
dust. 

dnst'-cart, »., a cart 
for refuse. 

dnst'ed, p.p., dust. 

dost'er, n. , that which 
clears from dust. 

dost'-hole, n., a place 
for rubbish. 

dustiness, n., the 
state of being dusty. 

dost'ing, pr.p., dust. 



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dweller 



dnst'man, n., one 

whose business is to 
remove rubbish. 

dnst'-pan, n. , an uten- 
sil to hold dust 
swept up. 

dusfy, adj., covered 
with dust; dust- 
coloured. 

Dutch, adj., pert, to 
Holland. 

Dntob'man, n., a na- 
tive of Holland. 

dn'teous, adj., duti- 
ful; obedient. 

dn'teoosly, adu., in a 
duteous manner. 

du'teousness, n., the 
quality of being 
duteous. 

da'tiable, adj., sub- 
ject to the im- 
position of duty or 
customs. 

du'tifol, adj., per- 
forming one's duty. 

da'tiftiDy, adv., in a 
dutiful manner. 

dn'titnlness, n., the 
character of being 
dutiful. 

dn'ty, n., a moral 
obligation; a sum 
of money exacted 
by government in 
the course of trade. 

duum'vir, n., one of 
two Roman magis- 
trates who per- 
formed the same 
duties. 

duum'viral,<Ki;.,pert. 
to the duumviri. 

daum'Tiiate, n., the 
union of two men 
in the same office. 

dnx, n., the head of 
a class or school 
(Scot.). 

dwale, »., the deadly 
nightshade. 

dwul, n., a diminu- 
tive man or woman; 
anything much 

smaller than the 
ordinary size; v.t., 
to stunt; to cause to 
look small or in- 
significant. 

dwtucfed, p.p., dwarf. 

dwarfing, Pr.p., 
dwarf. 

dwarfish, adj., below 
the common size 
or height. 

dwell, v.t'., to live in 
a place. 

dwelled, p.p., dwell. 

dwell'er, n., an in- 
habitant. 



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dwell'ing, «., a place 
of residence; pr.p., 
dwell. 

dwell'ing-bonse, n., a 
house intended as a 
residence. 

dwell'ing-plaoe, n., a 
place of residence. 

dwelt, p.p., dwell. 

dwin'dle, v.t., to di- 
minish gradually. 

dwin'dled, adj., di- 
minished in size; 
p.p. dwindle. 

dwin'dlinK, pr.p., 
dwindle. 

Dy'ak, n., an aborig- 
inal inhabitant of 
Borneo. 

dye, v.t., to colour; 
n., a stain. 

dyed, p.p., dye. 

dye'-Aouse, n., a 
building in which 
dyeing is carried 
on. 

dye'ing, pr.p., dye. 

^'er, n., one who 
dyes cloth. 

dye-stnfl, n., mate- 
rials used in dyeing. 

dye-wood, n. , wood 
from which dye is 
extracted. 



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u 



dy'ing, adj., associ- 
ated with death; 
pr.p., die. 

dyke, «., ».?. dike. 

dynam'eter, n., an 
instrument for de- 
termining the mag- 
nifying power of 
telescopes. 

dynamet'rical, adj., 
pert, to a dy- 
nameter. 

dynam'io, adj., pert, 
to force as a moving 
agency. 

dynamical, adj., i.q. 
dynamic. 

dynam'ics, n. pi., the 
science which deals 
with the nature and 
action of force. 

dy'namite, n., an ex- 
plosive prepared 
from nitro-glycer- 
ine. 

dy'namo, n., an elec- 
tric machine in 
which current is 
produced by power. 

dynamom'eter, n., an 
instrument for 

measuring force. 

dyn'ast, n., a ruler; a 
prince. 



P 



dynast'io, adj., rel. 
to a dynasty. 

dyn'asty, n., a line 
of kings. 

dysenter'io, adj., pert, 
to dysentery. 

dys'entery, «., inflam- 
mation of the mu- 
cous membrane of 
the large intestine. 

dyspep'sia, n., indi- 
gestion. 

dyspep'sy, n., i.q. dys- 
pepsia. 

dyspep'tic, adj., af- 
flicted with dyspep- 
sia; n., a person so 
suffering. 

dyspep'ti(»l, adj., i.q. 
dyspeptic. 

dyspha'gia, n., diffi- 
culty of swallowing. 

dys'phony, n., diffi- 
, culty of speaking 
distinctly. 

dyspnoe'a, n., diffi- 
culty of breathing. 

dysthe'sia, n., a mor- 
bid feeling of dis- 
comfert. 

dysthet'ic, adj., pert, 
to dysthesia. 

dys'oiy, n., difficulty 
indischarging urine. 



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each, pfon., every 
one (separately). 

ea'ger. (wi;., keen, 
earnest; ardently 
desirous; «., s<« 
eagre. 

ea'serly, adv. , with 
eagerness. 

«l'gemeS3,n., a state 
of ardent desire. 

eagle, n., the large 
bird of prey so 
named. 

ea'gle-eyed, o<i;.,with 
the eyes of an eagle; 
keen-sighted. 

eaglet, n., a yoting 
eagle. 

ea'gre, n., a tidal 
wave. 

eal'donnan, n., the 
head of the assem- 
bly in Saxon times. 

eaT,v./., to plough; n., 
the organ of hear- 
ing; an car-like pro- 
jection; line percep- 
tion; a corn-spike. 

ear'-ache, n., internal 
pain of the ear; 
otalgia. 

ear'drnm, n., the 
tympanum. 

eared, p.p., ear; adf., 
havmg ears. 

earing, pr.P-, ear; n., 
the growth of an 
ear of corn; a small 
line for fastening 
{naut.). 

earl, n., the third 
highest rank of 
nobility. 

earl'dom, n., an earl's 
rank and territory. 

ear'Iess, adj., without 
ears. 

ear'Uei, adj., comp. of 
early. 

earliest, adj., super. 
of early. 

ear'Iiness, n., the 
state of being early. 

eai'ly, adj. and adv., 
near the beginning; 
in good time; be- 
times; before the 
time. 

ear' mark, v.t., to 
mark specially; n., 
an owner's mark on 
an animal; a mark 






A. 



ot identification or 
appropriation. 

earn, v.t., to gain by 
service; to merit. 

earned, p.p., eary. 

eam'er, n., one who 
earns. 

ear'nest, adj., serious, 
determined; n., seri- 
ousness, zeal; a 
pledge. 

ear'nestly, ad"., in 
earnest. 

ear'nest-money, n., 
money paid to bind 
a bargain. 

earnestness, n., the 
state of being ear- 
nest. 

eam'ing, pr.p., earn. 

eam'ingg, n. pi,, 
wages, payment for 
service. 

ear'-ring, n., a ring 
nung from the ear. 

earshot, n., a dis- 
laiice to which the 
hearing reaches. 

earth, n., the ground, 
the globe on which 
we live; soil; a 
burrowing animal's 
hole; v.t., to place 
in the earth, drive 
into the earth; 
mound up. 

earth'-bom, adj., of 
earthly burth. 

earthed, ^■^■, earth. 

earth' en, adj., mad» 
of earth. 

earth' enwaie, w., 
domestic utensils 
made of burnt clay. 

earth'liness, n., the 
state or quality of 
bivng earthly. 

earth'ling. n., a 
worldling. 

earth'ly, adj., bel. to 
earth, gross, carnal. 

earth'qnake, n., a dis- 
turbance of the 
earth's surface. 

earth' worm, m., the 
common worm. 

earth'y, adi., rel. to, 
or like, the earth; 
gross. 

ear'-tnunpet, n., an 
instrument enabling 
the deaf to hear. 



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ear-wax, »., ceru- 
men ; wax in the ear. 

ear' wig, n., the insect 
so named. 

ear'-witness, n., one 
who testifies what 
he has heard. 

ease, v.t., to lighten, 
make looser; n., 
freedom from pain 
or trouble; comfort, 
rest. 

eased, p.p., ease. 

ease'fnl, adj., full of 
ease. 

ea'seU n., a stand for 
a picture, portfolio, 
etc. 

ease'less, adj., with- 
out ease. 

ease'ment, n., a right 
apart from owner- 
ship of the soil: 
relief. 

eaa'ier, adj., comp. of 
easy. 

easiest, adj., super. 
of easy. 

eas'ily, adv. , wi th ease . 

eas'iness, n., the state 
of being easy. 

eas'ing. pr.p., ease. 

East, adj., bel. to the 
East; n., one of the 
cardinal points; an 
Eastern region. 

East'er, n., the great- 
est of the Christian 
Festivals, commem- 
orating Our Lord's 
Resurrection. 

Eas'terling, n., a na- 
tive of an Eastern 
country; formerly 
the English name 
for the Hanseatic 
traders. 

•ast'erly, adj., east- 
ward; coming from 
the East. 

east'em, adj., bel. to 
the East. 

east'ward. adv., to- 
ward the East. 

eas'y, adj., not diffi- 
cult, comfortable, 
free from pain or 
trouble; unaffected. 

tas'y-chair, n., an 
ar:n-cliair m.ide to 
be especially com- 
fortable. 



easy-going 



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e&s'y-sromg, adj., cas- 
ual, good-natured. 

eat, v.t., to consume 
with the teeth; to 
wear away; v.i., to 
take food; to taste. 

eat'able, adj., fit to 
eat; «., anything 
edible. 

eat'en, p.p., eat. 

eat'er, »., anything 
that eats. 

eat'ing, pr.p., eat; n., 
food. 

eat'ing-honse, n., a 
restaurant. 

eaa-de-CoIogne', «., a 
perfume of that 
name. 

eatl-de-vie',n.brandy. 

eaves, n. ^/., the over- 
hanging part of a 
roof. 

eaves'diop, v.i., to 
listerf secretly. 

eaves'dropper, n., one 
who listens secretly. 

ebb, v.i., to flow back, 
subside; decline; n., 
the back flow of the 
tide; decline. 

ebbed, p.p., ebb. 

ebb'ing, pr.p., ebb. 

ebb' tide, »., low tide. 

eb'on, adj., made of 
ebony; n., ebony. 

eb'onize, v.t., to make 
look like ebony. 

eb'ony, adj., made of 
ebony; n., a hard 
black wood. 

ebri'ety, n., a state of 
drunkenness. 

ebnl'liency. n., the 
state of being ebul- 
lient. 

ebnl'Iient, adj., bub- 
bling over, exces- 
sively enthusiastic. 

ebolli'tioii, n., the 
act of bubbling 
over; an outburst 
of enthusiasm. 

6caite', n., a card 
game so named, for 
two. 

eo'bole, n., a digres- 
sion. 

eccen'tric, adj., not 
in the centre: pecu- 
liar; n., a device for 
alternating circular 
with rectilinear 
motion; a queer per- 
son. 

ecoen'trieal, ad)., i.q. 
eccentric. 

eccentric'ity, n., the 
state or quality of 
being eccentric. 



~n 



210 



eccle'sia, n., an as- 
sembly; the Church. 

eccle'siaich, n., a 
Church ruler. 

Ecclesias'tes, n., the 
name of one of the 
canonical Scrip- 
turesai the Preacher . 

ecclesias'tic, adj., 
rel. to the Church ; n. , 
a Churchman {i.e., 
in the sense of a per- 
son in Holy Orders). 

ecclesiastical, adj. 
i.q. ecclesiastic. 

ecclesias'ticism, n. , 
devotion to the 
Church; the ecclesi- 
astical system. 

Ecclesias'ticus, n., 
one of the deutero- 
canonical Scrip- 
tures. 

ecclesiolog'ical, adj., 
rel. to ecclesiology. 

ecclesiol'ogist, n., a 
student of ecclesi- 
ology. 

ecclesiorogy, «., the 
study of church 
antiquities and 

church architecture. 

^oh'elon, n., an ar- 
rangement of troops 
in a succession of 
receding lines, each 
to the right or left 
of the first; v.t., to 
dispose in 6chelon; 
v.i., to take up a 
position in Echelon. 

ech'inate, adj., prick- 
ly, bristly. 

eohi'nns, n., the sea- 
urchin; hedgehog. 

ech'o, v.t., to reflect 
back (asound); «.»., 
to resound; n., a 
reflection of sound; 
an exact imitation. 

ech'oed, p.p., echo. 

ecb'oing, pr.p-, echo. 

ecbom'eter, n., an 
instrument for 

measuring sound- 
distance. 

eohom'etry, n., the 
art of measuring 
sound-distance. 

6clat', n., brilliant 
effect, applause, 
distinction. 

ecleo'tic, adj., select- 
ing, picking and 
choosing; n., one 
who is eclectic. 

eclec'tical, adj., i.q. 

eclectic. 
edec'ticism, n., the 

eclectic spirit; selec- 



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eczema 



tion from a variety 
of opinions. 

eclipse', v.t., to put 
under an eclipse; to 
obscure, throw into 
the shade; n., an 
obscuration of a 
heavenly body. 

eclipsed', ^.^., eclipse. 

eclipsing, pr.p., 

eclipse. 

eclip'tic, adj., rel. to 
eclipses, or to the 
ecliptic; n., the 
sun'sapparentpath. 

ec'logne, n., a simple, 
rustic poem. 

econom'ic, adj., pert, 
to economy. 

econom'ics, n. pi., the 
science of wealth in 
relation to the state 
and the people ; 
political economy. 

econom'ical, adj. , 
careful of expen- 
diture; also i.q. 
economic. 

econ'omist, «., a stu- 
dent of economics. 

econ'omize, v.t., in 
husband, use thrift- 
ily; v.i., to be 
thrifty. 

econ'omized, p.p., 
economize. 

econ'omiziiig, pr.p-, 
economize. 

econ'omy, n., domes- 
tic management , 
saving; adjustment 
of means to ends; a 
system of govern- 
ment. 

terskseor', n., a sur- 
gical instrument so 
named. 

6cru', adj., like un- 
bleached linen; n., 
coarse linen. 

ec'stasis, n., a trance. 

ec'stasy, n., a raptur- 
ous, exalted stale. 

ecstat'ic, adj., exalt- 
ed, rapturous, en- 
trancing. 

ecstat'ical. adj., i.q. 
ecstatic. 

ectio'sis, n., arrestive 
treatment {med.). 

e'cu, n., an ancient 
coin of varying 
value. 

ecnmen'ical, adj. , hi . 
to the whole world, 
general. Alsoo^tw- 
mentcal. 

ec'zema, n., an in- 
flamed state of the 
skin. 



eezematous 



211 



etierveseenee 









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S. 



L 



eozem'atous, adj., of 
the nature of 
eczema. 

eda'cions, adj., vora- 
cious, destructive. 

edao'ity, n., voracity, 
greediness. 

Ed'da, n., the name 
of either of the two 
series of ancient 
Icelandic books. 

ed'der,' v.t., to bind 
with edder; n., a 
hedge; the binding 
for a hedge. 

eddied, p.p., eddy. 

ed'dy, v.i., to whirl 
round and round; 
«., a whirling cur- 
rent. 

ed'dying, ^r.^., eddy. 

ed'elweiss, n., a small 
white Alpine flower. 

edem'atoos, adj., 
puffy, swollen. 

E'den, «., Paradise. 

edentate, adj., with- 
out teeth. 

eden'tated, adj., de- 
prived of teeth. 

edge, v.i., to put an 
c*Jge to; to incite; 
v.i., to sidle, come 
up slowly; n., the 
sharp side of a 
blade; a sharp bor- 
der; brink; fringe. 

edged, ^.^., edge. 

edge'less, adj., with- 
out an edge. 

edge'iail, n., a rail on 
the edge of which 
wheels run. 

edge'-tool, »■> a 
cutting-tool. 

edge'ways, adv., i.q. 
edgewise. 

edge' wise, adv., side- 
ways. 

edg'ing, n., border. 

ed'ible, adj., eatable. 

ed'ibleness, n., the 
quality of being 
edible. 

e'dict, n., a procla- 
mation by authority. 

ediflca'tioii, «., the 
act or effect of 
edifying. 

ed'ifice, >>., a build- 
ing, structure. 

ed'ifled, p.p., edify. 

ed'ify, v.t., to build 
up, instruct, im- 
>rove. 



J ^r.^., edify. 

e'dile, n., i.q. aedile. 

edit, v.t., to look 
after tlie publica- 
tion of a book: to 



V 



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1^ 



r 



prepare a book for 
publication. 

ed'ited, p.p., edit. 

ed'iting, pr.p., edit. 

edi'tion, n., the issue 
of a book to the 
public; the number 
of copies printed at 
one time. 

ed'itor, n., one who 
edits either a book 
or a newspaper, 
magazine, etc. 

edito'rial, adj., rel. to 
an editor. 

editorship, n. , the 
office of an editor. 

ed'itress, n., fem. of 
editor. 

ed'ocable. adj., ca- 
pable of education. 

ed'acate,".'., to train, 
develop the mind 
and cliaracter. 

ed'uoated, p.p., edu- 
cate. 

ed'acating,/>r.^.,edu- 
cate. 

edoca'tion, n., the 
process or effect of 
educating. 

educational, adj., rel. 
to education; in- 
structive. 

ednca'tionist, n., one 
who professes a 
knowledge of edu- 
cational principles. 

ed'ocator, n., one 
who educates. 

ednoe', v.t., to draw 
out; make an in- 
ference. 

educed', p.p., educe. 

edu'cible, adj., able 
to be educed. 

edn'cing, pr.p., educe. 

edac'tion, n., the act 
or result of educing. 

eduo'tor, n., anything 
that educes. 

ednl'coiant. adj., 
sweetening. 

ednl'corate, v.t., to 
sweeten by reduc- 
ing acidity. 

edal'corator, n., any- 
thing that edul- 
corates. 

eel, n., a snake-like 
fish so named. 

e'en, n. and adv., 
see even. 

ee'rie, ee'ry, adj., 
fear-inspiruig; caus- 
ing a feeling of 
loneliness. 

efface', v.t. , to destroy 
the face of, blot out, 
remove from notice. 



eflaoe'able, adj., able 
to be effaced. 

effaced', p.p., efface. 

eSace'nient, n., the 
act of effacing. 

eflta'cing, pr./». .efface. 

effect', v.t., bring to 
pass,accomplish; n., 
a result, accom- 
plishment. 

effect'ed,/>.^., effect. 

eilect'ible, adj., able 
to be effected. 

eflect'ing,^r./).,effcct. 

effect'ive, adj., effect- 
producing, success- 
ful. 

•Seot'iTely, adv., in 
an effective way. 

efieofiveness, n., the 
> quality of being 
effective. 

effect'or, n., that 
which effects. 

effects', n. pi., belong- 
ings, chattels. 

effec'toal, adj., pro- 
ducing intended 
effect. 

effeo'toally, adv., in 
an effectual way. 

effectuate, v.t., to 
accomplish. 

effec'tuated, p.p., 
effectuate. 

effec'tuatiiiK. pr.p., 
effectuate. 

eSectna'tioo, n., the 
act or result of 
effectuating. 

eSem'inacy, n., wom- 
anish character, un- 
manlines*. 

effem'inate, adj., 
woman-like, un- 
manly. 

effem'inate, v.t., to 
weaken, render 
womanly. 

efiem'inaHd, p.p., 
effeminate. 

effem'inately, adv., in 
an effeminate way. 

effem'inateness, n., 
, the quality of being 
effeminate. 

effem'inatinc pr.p., 
effeminate. 

ESeo'di, n. , a Turkish 
title, equivalent to 
Mr. 

efferent, adj., dis- 
charging. 

efferresoe', v.i., to 
bubble up, froth up. 

effenreaced', p.p., 
effervesce. 

efferves'cence, n., the 
act or process of 
effervc^cTic. 



effervescent 



212 



ejectment 






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W7 



eflerves'cent, adj., 
effervescing. 

effete', adj., worn out 
by age. 

efflca'cions, adj., able 
to produce intended 
resiilt. 

efHoa'oiously, adv., in 
an efhcacious way. 

efficaciousness, n., 
the state or quality 
of being efficacious. 

efftoacy, n., i.q. effi- 
caciousness. 

effi' ciency, n., the 
state or quality of 
being efficient. 

effi'cient, adj., able 
to produce intended 
effect; capable, vig- 
orous. 

etttcieatly, adv.,m. 
an efficient way. 

effig'ies, n., a figure, 
efhgy. 

effigy, n., a figure, 
image. 

eflSoresce'. v.i., to 
blossom forth, 

flower. 

effloresced', p.p., 
effloresce. 

efflores'cence, n., the 
state or period of 
efSorescing. 

efflores'cency, n., the 
state or quality of 
being efflorescent. 

efflores'oent, adj., 
blossoming forth, 
flowering. 

efflores'oing, pr.p., 
effloresce. 

ef'flaenee, n., a flow- 
ing out; that which 
flows out. 

effluent, a<i;., flowing 
out; n., an outlet, 
outflow. 

efflu'Tia, n., pi. of 
effluvium. 

efHu'vinm, n., an in- 
visible vapour, gen- 
erally from decay- 
ing matter. 

efflux, «., the act or 
process of outflow- 
ing. 

efflnx'ioii, n., a lapse; 
issue. 

effort, n., an exer- 
tion of strength, at- 
tempt, achievement. 

effortless, adj., with- 
out effort. 

eifront'ery, n., impu- 
dence, barefaced- 
ness. 

eftnl'gence, n., bright- 
ness, lustre. 



V 



-*_. 



•n. 



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n 



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•^ 



efful'gent, adj., shin- 
ing forth, splendid. 

effuse', v.t., to pour 
forth. 

effused', p.p., effuse. 

effusing, /ir.^., effuse. 

effu'sion, n., the act 
or result of effusing. 

eflu'sive, adj., ex- 
uberant in senti- 
ment; gushing. 

effu'sively, adv., in an 
effusive way. 

effu'siveness, n. , gush. 

eft, n., a newt. 

eges'tion, n., excre- 
tion. 

egg, v.t., to incite, 
goad on; n., the 

•rounded body con- 
taining the sub- 
stance of the crea- 
ture to be born 
from it. 

egged, p.p., egg. 

egg'ing, pr.p., egg. 

egg'-shell, n., the 
shell of the egg. 

e'gis, see aegis. 

eg^lantine, n., per- 
haps the sweet- 
briar or the honey- 
suckle. 

eg'oism, n., the self- 
regarding theory of 
morals. 

ego'ist, n., an up- 
holder of egoism. 

eg'otism, n., a fond- 
ness for saying "I"; 
self-praise. 

eg'otist, n., one who 
speaks chiefly about 
himself; self-centred 

egotis'tic, adj., self- 
centred, inordin- 
ately self -regarding. 

egotis'tical, adj., i.q. 
egotistic. 

eg'otize, v.i., to in- 
dulge in egotism. 

egre'gious, adj., re- 
markable, standing 
out of the crowd, 
(often used dispar- 
agingly). 

egre'gionsly, adv., in 
an egregious way. 

e'gress, n., an exit, 
going out. 

egres'sion, n., exit. 

eg'ret, n., a variety 
of heron; a tuft of 
heron's feathers. 

Esyp'tian, adj., rel. 
to Egypt. 

Egyptology, n., the 
study of Egyptian 
history and antiqui- 
ties 



1:- 



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L 



eb, inter j., what ! 

ei'oou, n., a sacred 
picture. Also icon. 

ei'der, n. , a large sea- 
duck. 

ei'der-down, n., thp 
breast feathers of 
the eider; a bed- 
quilt. 

eider-duck, n., i.q. 
eider. 

ei'dograph, n., an 
apparatus for copy- 
ing drawings. 

eight, adj., one of the 
cardinal numbers. 

eighteen', adj., one of 
the cardinal num- 
bers. 

eighteenth', adj., the 
ordinal of eighteen. 

eight'fold, adj. and 
adv., eight times 
repeated. 

eighth, adj., the or- 
dinal of eight. 

eighth'ly, adv., in the 
eighth place. 

eight'ieth, adj., the 
ordinal of eighty. 

eight'score, adj. and 
»., eight times 
twenty. 

eigbt'y, adj., a car- 
dinal number. 

eigne, adj., eldest, 
elder {Leg.). 

eire'nicon, n., an at- 
tempt (usually writ- 
ten) to bring about 
a reconciliation. 

Eistedd'fod, n., a 
Welsh bardic as- 
sembly. 

ei'ther, pron., one or 
the other of two; 
conj., in one of two 
cases. 

ejao'ulate, v.i!., to jerk 
out words; speak in 
short sentences. 

ejac'nlsted, />.^. , ejac- 
ulate. 

ejac'nlating, pr.p., 
ejaculate. 

ejacula'tion, n., the 
act of ejaculating; a 
short, sharp excla- 
mation. 

ejao'ulatory, adj., rel. 
to ejaculation. 

eject', v.t., to throw 
out, dismiss, banish. 

eject'ed, p.p., eject. 

eject'ing, pr.p., eject. 

ejec'tion, «., the act 
oi ejecting. 

eject'ment, n., re- 
moval (by law); dis- 
possession. 



ejector 









eject'or, n., one who 

ejects. 
eke, V.I., to make to 

suffice; atjv. .equally, 

also. 
eked, p.p., eke. 
e'king, ^r.^., eke. 
elab'orate, adj., made 

with much toil, 

highly finished. 
elab'orate, v.t., to 

work out with much 
pains; to add im- 
provements to. 

elab'orated, p.p., 
elaborate. 

elaborately, adv., in 
ail elaborate way. 

elaborating, pr.p., 
elaborate. 

elabora'tion. n., the 
act or process of 
elaborating. 

elab'orative, adj., 
tending to elabora- 
tion. 

elab'orator, n., one 
who elaborates. 

ela'in, »«., an oily 
liquid compound. 
Also olein. 

ilan, n., dash, ardotir 

e'land, n., a S. Afri- 
can antelope. 

elapse', v.t., to pass 
away; end. 

elapsed', ^.^., elapse. 

elaps'ing,^''-^- .elapse. 

elas'tic, adj., having 
the power of return- 
ing to the state 
from which it has 
been disturbed by 
pressure, pulling, or 
distortion; n., a 
strip or band of 
rubber. 

elas'tically, ado., in 
an elastic way. 

elastio'ity. «•> the 
elastic property. 

elate', v.t., to exalt, 
elevate, make proud. 

ela'ted, p.p., elate. 

elating, pr.p., elate. 

ela'tion, n., a state 
produced by elat- 
ing. 

el'bow, v.t., to push 
aside, jostle; n., the 
joint at the middle 
of the arm; any 
elbow-like bend. 

el'bow-cAA/r, n., a 
chair with rests for 
the elbow. 

el'bowed, p.p., elbow; 
also adj., elbow- 
shaped. 






^ 



cb 



\ 



213 



efbowing, pr.p., 

elbow. 
elbow-room, n., 

space to turn round 

in. 
el'der, adj., older; m., 

an old person; a 

functionary so 

named; the shrub 

so named. 
el'derberry, n., the 

fruit of the elder 

tree. 
eld'erly, adj., becom- 
ing old; rather aged, 
eld' est, adj., super, of 

elder. 
El Dora'do, n., a 

fabulous country 

rich in gold. 
elecampane', n., a 

variety of aster. 
elect', v.t., to choose, 
• select (by vote); 

adj., chosen; n., one 

chosen. 
elect'ed, p.p., elect, 
eleot'ing, pr.p., elect, 
eleo'tion, n., the act 

or result or occasion 

of electing. 
electioneer', v.t., to 

organize an elec- 
tion; n., one who 

organizes an elec- 
tion. 
electioneered', p.p., 

electioneer. 
electioneering, pr.p., 

electioneer. 
elec'tive, adj., pert. 

to election. 
eleot'or, n., one who 

has the right of 

electing. 
elect'oral, adj., bcl. 

to an elector or 

election. 
elect'orate, »., the 

collective body of 

electors. 
elec' tress, ♦»., fem. of 

elector. 
elec'tiic, adj., bel. 

to electricity; mag- 
netic. 
elec'tHcal, adj., i.q. 

electric. 
elec'trlcalXy, adv. by 

means of electricity. 
electrician, n., an 

expert in electrics, 
electrics, n. pi., the 

science of electricity 
electric' tty, n., an 

energy - producing 

agency in nature, 
eleo'triflable, adj., 

able to be electrified. 
electriflca'tion, n., the 



'^^ 



^w. 






electroplate 



iwocess or result of 
electrifying, 

elec' trifled, p.p., elec- 
trify. 

electrify, v.t., to 
charge with elec- 
tricity; amaze. 

electrifying, pr.p., 
electrify. 

elec'tro, «., electro- 
plate, an electro- 
type. 

eleo'trocnte, v.t., to 
execute by means 
of electricity. 

electrode, n., either 
of the poles or ter- 
minals of a galvanic 
battery or dynamo. 

electrolier', n., a hold- 
er of electric lamps. 

electrol'ogy, «., the 
science ol electric 
phenomena. 

electrol'ysis, n., de- 
composition by 
means of electricity. 

eleo'trolyte, n., a sub- 
stance decompos- 
able by electricity. 

elec'trolyzable, adj. , 
able to electrolyze. 

elec'trolyze, v.t., to 
decompose by 

means of electricity. 

elec'trolyzed, p.p. , 
electrolyze. 

elec'trolyzing, pr.p. , 
electrolyze. 

electro-magnet, n., a 
magnetized piece of 
soft metal. 

electro - magnetism, 
n., the science deal- 
ing with the de- 
velopment of mag- 
netism by electric 
currents. 

electrom'eter, n., an 
instrument for 

measuring the 

strength of an elec- 
tric current. 

•lectromo'tor, n., a 
machine applying 
electricity as a mo- 
tive power. 

eleotrop'athy, n., the 
treatment of dis- 
ease with electri- 
city. 

electroph'onis, n., an 
apparatus generat- 
ing statical elec- 
tricity by induction. 

electroplate, v.t., to 
cover with metal by 
means of electricity; 
H., a piece of ware 
so coated. 



electroplated 



^- 



a 
n 



^ 

C" 

c 



A 

Cv 
^ 



electroplated, P-p., 
electroplate. 

elec'troplating, pr.p., 
electroplate. 

elec'tioscope, n., an 
instrument detect- 
ing the presence of 
electricity. 

elec'trotypB, v.t., to 
make an electro- 
type of; H., a repro- 
duction in copper 
by means of elec- 
tricity. 

elec'trotyped, p.p., 
electrotype. 

elec'trotyper, n., a 
maker ol electro- 
types. 

elec'trotyping, pr.p., 
electrotype. 

elec'tram, «., amber. 

elec'tuary, n., a medi- 
cine prepared as a 
confection. 

eleemos'ynary, «i;., 
rel. to almsgiving; 
given from charity. 

el'egance, «., grace- 
fulness, daintiness. 

el'egancy, «., »•?• ele- 
gance. 

el'egant, adj., grace- 
ful, refined. 

el'egatitly, adv., with 
elegance. 

elegi'ac, adj., pert, to 
elegy and elegiacs; 
n., elegiac verse. 

elegi'acal, adj., t.q. 
elegiac. 

el'egist, »•., one who 
writes elegies. 

el'egy, n., a death- 
poem, funeral song. 

ereme, adj., hand- 
picked, choice 
(Turkish). 

erement, »., one of 
the simplest parts; 
an unanalysable 
substance; a first 
principle; an ingre- 
dient; a natural 
environment. 

elemen'tal, adj., rel. 
to the elements. 

elemen'tary, adj., 
primary, simple. 

erements, n., pi. of 
element; rudiments 
of learning; the 
matter (bread and 
wine) of the Sacra- 
ment of the Altar. 

el'emi, n., a general 
name for gumresins. 

elen'chas, «., a refut- 
ing argument. 

el'ephant, n., the 



Ad 



214 



huge quadruped so 
named. 
elephanti'asis, n. , a 
disease which makes 
the skin hard, 
rough and thick. 
elepban'tme, adj., rel. 
to or like an ele- 
phant. 
elephan'toid, adj., 

like an elephant. 
Eleusin'ian, adj., rel. 
to Eleusis and the 
Eleusinian mys- 
teries. 
el'evate, v.t., to raise 
up, exalt, improve, 
cheer; adj. .elevated. 
erevated, p.p., ele- 
vate; adj., exalted; 
intoxicated. 
el'evating, pr.p., ele- 
vate. 
eleva'tion, n., the act 
or result of elevat- 
ing. 
f^ erevatoT, «., any- 
v^.. thing that elevates; 
a lift; a limb-raising 
muscle; a horizontal 
plane, fore and aft, 
for steering an aero- 
plane upwards or 
downwards. 
elev'en, n., one more 
than ten. The com- 
plement of a cricket 
or Association foot- 
ball team. 
/\l, elev'enth, adj., the 
^^ ordinal of eleven. 
elf, n., a small spirit, 

fairy. 
elf' in, adj., pert, to 
elves; n., an elf, a 
playful child. 
'f\^ elf'ish, adj., like an 

elf. 
/A_7~^ eli'ishness, n., the 
state of being elfish. 
elic'it, V.I., to entice 

forth, to educe. 
elic'ited, p.p., elicit. 
/^ elic'iting.^r.^, elicit. 
■ elide', v.t., to strike 
out, erase, 
/fl eli'ded, p.p., elide. 
(\^ eli'ding. pr.p., elide. 
' /7 eligibil'ity, n., the 
N State of being elig- 
ible. 
Q el'igible, adj., worthy 
N of choice, desirable, 

qualified. 
elhn'inate, v.t., to 
cast out or aside; to 
obtain by separa- 
tion. 

CL^^. elim'inated, p.p., 
^»^' eliminate. 



A. 






n 
a 



a. 



^ 









o 



a 



z^- 



Elohim 



eliminating, pr.p., 

eliminate. 

elimina'tion, n., the 
act or eSect of 
eliminating. 

eli'qnate, v.t., to melt 
out. 

eli'quated, p.p., eli- 
quate. 

eli'quating, pr.p., eli- 
quate. 

eliqua'tion, n., the 
process or effect of 
eliquating. 

ell'sion, «., the act or 
result of eliding. 

61ite', adj., choice, 
select, the pick (Fr.). 

elix'il, n., a liquor 
brewed by alchem- 
ists for preserving 
life indefinitely, or 
for converting baser 
metals into gold. 

Elizabe'than, ad). , rel. 
to Queen Elizabeth 
and the Elizabethan 
period or architec- 
tural style. 

elk, «., the largest 
kind of deer. 

eU, n., an old cloth 
measure of varying 
lengths. 

ellipse', «., an oval- 
sliaped figure. 

ellip'sis, n., the leav- 
ing out of words 
needed for the com- 
pletion of the sense. 

ellip'tic, adj., rel. to 
or like an ellipse. 

ellip'tical, adj., i.g. 
elliptic. 

elliptic'ity. «., the 
state of being ellip- 
tic. 

ellip'toid, adj., like an 
ellipse. 

elm, n., the familiar 
tree so named. 

elm'en, adj., rel. to 
elms. 

elm'y, adj., covered 
with elms. 

elocu'tion, n., the art 
of speaking with 
correct and clear 
articulation. 

elocu'tionary, adj., 
rel. to elocution. 

elocn'tionist, «., one 
who professes elocu- 
tion. 

61oge', n., a panegyr- 
ic, encomium (Fr.). 

61'0gy, n., t.q. 61oge. 

El'ohim, n., an Old 
Testament name for 
God, the true God, 



elongate 






< 






in all the fullness of 

deity. 
elon'gate, v.t., to 

draw out, make 

longer. 
elon' gated, p.p., elon- 
gate. 
elongating, pr.p., 

elongate. 
elongation, n., the 

process or result of 

elongating. 
elope', v.%., to run 

away clandestinely. 
eloped', p.p., elope, 
eloping, pr.p., elope, 
elope'ment, n., the 

act of eloping. 
eloquenoe. n., the 

power of fine speech . 
el'oquent, adj., gifted 

with eloquence. 
el'oqaently, adv., in 

an eloquent way. 
else, adv., in addition, 

also, instead. 
else' where, adv., in 

some other place, 
elucidate, v.t., to 

make clear, explain, 
elucidated, p.p., elu- 
cidate. 
elucidating, pr.p., 

elucidate. 
elucida'tion, n., the 

act or result of elu- 
cidating. 
elucidative, adj., 

explanatory, throw- 
ing light on. 
eln'cidator, «-, one 

who elucidates. 
elucidatory, adj., i.q. 

elucidative. 
elude', v.t., to baffle, 

avoid by artifice. 
elu'ded, p.p., elude. 
elu'dible, adj., able 

to be eluded. 
ela'ding,/)r.p., elude, 
eln'sion, n., the act 

of eluding. 
eln'siTe, adj., bafBing, 

hard to grasp. 
ela'dTely, adv., in an 

elusive way. 
elu'tdveness, n., the 

quality of beuig 

elusive. 
elu'soriness, n., the 

quality of being 

elusory. 
eln'sOTy, adj., i.q. 

elusive, 
elves, n., pi. of elf. 
Elys'ian, adj., bel. to 

Elysium; delightful, 

blessed. 
Elys'inm, n., the 

blissful place of 



.^^ 



.? 



Zi 



? 



215 



the dead, the classic 
Paradise. 

El'zevir, adj., pert, to 
the Elzevirs, the 
famous 17th cent. 
Dutch publishers. 

em, n., a printer's 
unit of measure- 
ment. 

ema'ciate, v.t., to 
make thin, reduce 
to leanness; ».»., to 
become lean. 

ema'ciated, p.p., 
emaciate. 

ema'ciating, Pr.p-, 

■ emaciate. 

emacia'tioii, n., the 
state of being ema- 
ciated; extreme 
leanness. 

em'anant, adj., flow- 
ing from a source. 

em'anate, v.i., to flow 
from, proceed from. 

em'anated, pp., em- 
anate. 

em'anating, pr.p., 
emanate. 

emana'tion, n., the 
act of emanating; 
something that 

emanates. 

em'anative, adj., 
tending to emanate. 

enum'cipate, v.i., to 
set free from slav- 
ery or any oppres- 
sion or bad influ- 
ence. 

eman'dpated, p.p., 
emancipate. 

eman'cipating, pr.p., 
emancipate. 

emancipa'tion, n. , the 
act or result of 
emancipating. 

emancipa'tionist, n., 
a supporter of the 
emancipation of 
slaves. 

eman'dpator, »., 
. one who emanci- 
pates. 

emas'cnlate, v.t., to 
deprive of male 
strength; take out 
the vigour. 

emaa'ctdated, p.p., 
emasculate. 
' emas'cnlating, pr.p., 
emasculate. 

emascola'tion, n., the 
act of emasculating. 

embale', v.t., to make 
a bale of. 

embaled', p.p., cm- 
bale. 

•mbaTiiig, pr.p., em- 
bale. 



embayed 



^^ 






embalm', v.i., to pre- 
serve a corpse with 
spices and drugs. 

embalmed', p.p., em- 
balm. 

embalm'er, n., one 
who embalms. 

embalm'ing, pr.p., 
embalm. 

embank', v.t., to buUd 
a bank around or 
against. 

embanked', p.p., em- 
bank. 

embank'ing, pr.p., 
embank. 

embank'ment, n., the 
act or result of 
embanking. 

embarca tion, n., see 
embarkation. 

embar'go, v.t., to lay 
an embcU'go on; n., 
an order forbidding 
a ship to leave a 
port. 

embar'goed, p.p., em- 
bargo. 

embark', v.t., to place 
on board; v.t., to 
go on board; to 
begin an enterprise. 

embarkation, n., the 
act ot embarking. 

embarked', p.p., em- 
bark. 

embark'ing, 
embark. 

embar'rass, 
hamper, 
perplex. 

embar'rassed, 
embarrass. 

embar'rassing, pr.p., 
embarrass; ad]., 
awkward, trouble- 
some. 

embar'rassment, n., 
perturbation, per- 
plexity, money 
trouble. 

embas'sador, n., see 
ambassador. 

em'bassy, »., an 
ambassador's mis- 
sion; an ambassa- 
dor's residence and 
the officials. 

embat'tle, v.t., to 
draw up in battle 
array. 

embat'tled, p.p., em- 
battle; adj., having 
battlements. 

embat'Uing, pr.p., 
embattle. 

embay', v.t., to place 
in a bay. 

«mbayed', p.p., em- 
bay. 



pr.p.. 



v.t., to 
trouble. 



PP: 



embaying 



pr.p.. 



-^ 
X 







"V 



embaying, 

embay. 

embed', v.t., to lav in 
a bed. 

embed' dad, p.p., em- 
bed. 

embad'ding, pr.p., 
embed. 

embel'lisb, v.t., to 
adorn, beautify. 

embel'lished, p.p., 
einbelii>h. 

embel'lisher, n., one 
who (embellishes. 

embel'lishing, pr.p., 
embellish. 

embellishment, n. , 
the act or result ot 
embellishing; an 
ornament. 

em'ber, n. , a live coal ; 
a rcTiinant of a fire. 

em'ber-week, n., one 
of the tour seasons 
of the ecclesiastical 
year, set apart for 
fasting and prayer. 
Tliese are the times 
for admitting can- 
didates to Holy 
Orders. 

embez'zle, v.t., to 
steal something en- 
trusted to one's 
care. 

embez'zled, p.p., em- 
bezzle. 

embez'zlement, n., 
the act ot embez- 
zling. 

embez'zlei, n., one 
who embezzles. 

embsz'zling, pr.p-, 
emb'^zle. 

embit'ter, v.t., to im- 
part bitterness to; 
to intensify. 

embit'tered, p p., em- 
bitter. 

embit'tering, pr.p., 
embitter. 

emblaze', v.t., to em- 
bellish, blazon. 

emblazed', p.p., em- 
blaze. 

embia'zinK, pr.p., em- 
blaze. 

emblazon, v.t., to 
adorn with heraldic 
figures, or with 
bright colours. 

embia'zoned, p.p., 
emblazon. 

embla'zoner, n., one 
who emblazons. 

embla'zoniiig, pr.p., 
emblazon. 

embla'zonment, n., 
i.g. emblazonry. 

embla'zoniy, n., the 






n 



^^ 



r 




216 



act or art ot em- 
blazoning. 

em'blem, n., a type, 
fieure, symbol. 

emblemat'ic, aif;., 
typ cal, syn>bolical. 

emblomat'ical, aJ;., 
i.q. e.mbleinatic. 

emblematize, v.t., x.q. 
embiemize. 

em'biements, n. pi., 
profits on crops. 

em'blemize, v.t., to 
represent emblem- 
atically. 

embod'ied, p.p., em- 
Ixxly. 

embod'ier, n., that 
which embodies. 

embod'iment, n., the 
act or result of 
embodying; a com- 
plete representation 

embod'y, v.t., to form 
into a body; to give 
concrete expression 
to. 

embod'ying, pr.p., 
emb'>dy. 

embold'en, »./., to 
make t)old, en- 
courage, hearten. 

embold'ened, p.p., 
embolden. 

embold'ening, pr.p., 
embolden. 

embolism, »., the 
periodic intercala- 
tion of days or 
years; an obstruc- 
tion caused by a 
clot of blood. 

embolis'mal, adj., rel. 
to an embolism. 

embolis'mic, adj., i.q. 
embolismal. 

em'bolns, n., an in- 
sertion;a blood-clot. 

embonpoint', «4;., 
plump, well nour- 
ished; n., plump- 
ness. 

embor'det, vi., to 
furnish with a bor- 
der. 

embos'om, v.t., to re- 
ceive into the 
bosom; to embrace, 
envelop. 

embos'omed, p.p., 
embosom. 

embos'oming, pr.p. , 
embosom. 

emboss', v.t., to orna- 
ment with raised 
work. 

embossed', p.p., em- 
bos >. 

embossing, pr.p. , 
emboss. 



embroidery 



emboss' ment, n., the 

act or result of 
embossing. 

embow'el, v.t., to re- 
move the entrails 
of; to bury. 

embow'elled, embow'- 
eled, p.p., emb<jwel. 

embow'eller, embow'- 
eler, n., one who 
embowels. 

embow'elling, em- 
bow'eliag, pr.p., em- 
bowel. 

embow'ellment, em- 
bow'elment, n., the 
act or result of 
embowelling. 

embow'er, v.t., to 
cover with a bower, 
shelter with trees. 

embow'ered, p.p., 
embower. 

embow'ering, pr.p., 
embower. 

embrace', v./., to 
clasp with the arms; 
to adopt; to include; 
n., the act of em- 
bracing; a clasping 
in the arms. 

embraced', p.p., em- 
brace. 

embra'cer, »., any- 
thing that embraces 

embra'oery, «., tam- 
pering with a jury. 

embra'cing, pr.p., em- 
brace. 

embrasure, »., an 
opening in a wall, 
with its sides bevel- 
led, so that the 
opening widens in- 
wards; a loop-hole. 

em'brocate, v.t., to 
apply a liquid medi- 
cine to the body. 

em'brocated,p./>., em- 
brocate. 

em'brocating, pr.p., 
embrocate. 

embrocation, n., the 
act of embrocating; 
a liniment. 

embro'glio, n., ue 
imbroglio. 

embroid'er, v.t., to 
ornament with 

needlework designs; 
to variegate. 

embroid'ored. p.p., 
embroider. 

embroid'erer, «., one 
who embroiders. 

embroidering, pr.p., 
embroider. 

embroid'ery, n., the 
art or act of em- 
broidering; a piece 



embroil 









of embroidered 

work. 

embroil', v.t., to in- 
volve HI a quarrel. 

ambroiled', pp., em- 
broil. 

embroiring, P'p-, 
embroil. 

embroil'ment, n., the 
act or result of 
embroiling. 

em'bryo. n., a rudi- 
mentary form; the 
vitalized germ in 
the first stage ot 
development. 

embryog'raphy. n.,a 
treatise on embryos. 

embryoroKy, n., the 
study of embryos 
and the develop- 
ment of organisms. 

em'bryonate, a<i/., rel. 
to embryos. 

em'bryonated, adj., 
i.q. embryonate. 

emteyon'ic. *di., in 
the state of an 
embryo; rel. to an 
embryo. 

embryofic, ftdj., i.q. 
embryonic. 

embryofomy, m., the 
cutting or dissec- 
tion of a foetus. 

Bmeer', »., an Emir. 

emend', v.t., to cor- 
rect. 

emend'able, adj., able 
to be emended. 

emen'dals, n. pi., 
money reserved for 
emergencies. 

emenda'tion, m., the 
act or result of 
emending; correc- 
tion. 

em'endator, n., one 
who emends. 

emend'atory, itdj., 
correcting. 

emend'ed, p.p., 

emend. 

emending, prp., 
emend 

em'erald, adj., green 
likean emerald; n., a 
green gem or colour; 
a printing typa. 

emerge', v.t., to rise 
out of; come into 
view; result. 

emerged', p.p., 

emerge. 

emer'gence, »., the 
act of emerging. 

emer'gsacy, n., a 
sudden occurrence 
requiring instant 
action. 



A^i 



,^1 



217 



.-i-v^ emer'gent, (Ki/., emer- 
ging- 

-r-yf^ emerging, pr.p., 
emerge. 

,-4~v<l' emeriti, udj., pi. of 
emeritus. 

..^-yk emer'itiB, »dj., re- 
tired from office. 
emer'itos - proles'sor, 
n., an ex-professor. 
-/I em' erode, n. pi., hem- 
orrhoids. 
em'eroid, »., i.q. 

hemorrhoid. 
emersed', adj., stand- 
ing out of the water; 
protruding. 

^^v/' emer'sion. n., the act 
ot emerging. 

^r^^ em'ery, »., a hard 
mineral used in 
polishing. 
-^ em'esis, n., vomiting. 

.^^ ; emet'ic, adj., produc- 
ing vomiting; n., a 
medicinethat causes 
vomiting. 
Q. . emet'ical. adj., i.q. 

emetic. 
,->■ e'meo, e'mn, »., the 
Australian ostrich. 
^ tmeute', »., a riot, 
outbreak. 

^.^-^ em'igrant, adj., mi- 
grating; n. , one who 
emigrates. 
^^-^ em'igrate, v.t., to 
leave one's country 
in order to settle in 
another. 

-^-^li em'igrated. p.p., em- 
igrate. 

.-^<rw em'igrattog, pr.p., 
emigrate. 

,-,rT? emigra'tion, n., the 
act of emigrating. 

-■~^j-~w em'inenoe,n., height, 
distinction; a title 
bestowed on car- 

i,.^_;,^^ dinals. 

) em'ineney. »., i.q. 
eminence. 

,^-^_i^ em'inent, adj., tower- 
ing above, exalted, 

_i.^^ distinguished. 

^^^ em'inently, adv., 
markedly, conspicu- 

,j,^^ ously. 

"^^ limir', n., a Turkish 
or Arabic tribal 
ruler. 
em'issary, adj., rel. 
to a spy or an 
emissary; n., one 
sent on a mission, 
a spy. 
emla'sion, n., the act 
or result of emitting. 

"T^ emis'dye, adj., lead- 
ing to emission. 



empire 



-^■ 



^^ 






pp.. 

pr.P; 



■n:. 



em'issory, adj., i.q, 
emissive. 

emit', v.t., to send 
forth, put forth. 

emit'ted,p.p., emu 

emit'ting, pr.p., emit. 
, em' met, n., an ant. 

emolles'cenoe, n., the 
act or process of 
softening. 

emol'liate, v.t., to 
soften. 

emol'liated. 
emoUiate. 

emol'liating, 
emolliate. 

emorUent, adj., soft- 
ening in its effect; 
n., an emollient 
substance. 

emol'ament, n., pay, 
reward. 

emo'tion, it., mental 
excitement, deep 
feeling. 

emo'tiooal, adj., rel. 
to the emotions; 
excitable. 

emo'tionalism, n., a 
tendency to be emo- 
tional. 

emo'tive, adj., caus- 
ing emotion. 

empale', v.t., ttt im- 
pale. 

empaled', p.p., em- 
pale. 

empale'ment, n., the 
act of empaling. 

empa'ling, pr.p., em- 
pale. 

empan'el, v.t., se$ 
impanel. 

empan'elled, empan'- 
eled, p.p., empaufl. 

empan'elling, empan'- 
eUng, pr.p., em- 
panel. 

empark', se* impark. 

em'peror, n., the 
ruler of an empire. 

em'phasis, n., stress, 
intensity. 

em'phasiae, v.t., to 
lay stress on; call 
special attention to. 

em'phasized, p.p., 
emphasize. 

em'phasizing, pr.p., 
emphasize. 

emphat'io, adj., lay- 
ing stress, urgent. 

emphat'ical, adj., i.q. 
emphatic. 

emphat'ically, adv., 
with emphasis. 

em'pire, »., rule; the 
rule of an emperor; 
the territory of an 
empire; the nations 



empiric 






n. 

n. 

n. 



composing an im- 
perial whole. 

empii'ic, adj., rel. to 
experience; based 
on experience or 
mere observation. 

empir'ical, adj., i.q. 
empiric. 

empir'ioism, n., the 
empirical method 
and characteristics. 

empir'icist, n., one 
who professes em- 
piricism. 

emplas'tic, adj., ad- 
hesive; n., a glutin- 
ous adhesive sub- 
stance. 

employ', v.t., to en- 
gage in labour; «., 
the state of being 
employed. 

employed', p.p., em- 
ploy- 

employ'6, n., a male 
person employed. 

employ' 6e, n., a fe- 
male employed. 

employee', n., one of 
eithpr sex employed. 

employ'er, »., one 
who engages em- 
ployees. 

employ'ing, pr.p., 
employ. 

employ 'ment, n., the 
state of being em- 
ployed; the act of 
employing; an 

occupation. 

empoi'son, v.t., to 
poison, envenom. 

empo'rimn, ». , a large 
store. 

empow'er, v.t., to 
authorize, entrust 
with power. 

empow'ered, p.p.,tm- 
p iwer. 

empow'ering, p.rp., 
empower. 

em'press, n., the fem. 
of emperor. 

emp'Ued, ^.^., empty. 

emp'tier, n., any- 
thing that empties; 
ad]. , comp.oi empty. 

emp'tiest, adj., super. 
of empty. 

emp' tineas, n., the 
state of being 
empty. 

emp'ty, adj., contain- 
ing nothing; un- 
substantial; un- 
intelligent; vain. 

emp' tying, pr.p., 
eniply. 

emptyings, n. pi., 
lees. 



-^ 



.W^- 



.^l 



218 



empur'ple, v.t. , to 
stain with purple. 

empor'pled, p.p., em- 
purple. 

empurpling, prp-, 
empurple. 

empye'ma, n., sup- 
puration. 

empyr'eal, »dj. and 
«., i.q. empyrean. 

empyre'an, adj., pert, 
to the highest heav- 
en; n., the highest 
heaven. 
' empyieu'ma, n., the 
smell of burning 
organic matter. 
' empyreomat'ic, adj., 
rel. to erapyreuma. 

empyienmat'ical,a^; ■ , 
i.g. empyreumatic. 

e'mn, «., the Austra- 
lian ostrich. 

em'ulate, v.t., to vie 
with, to rival. 

em'nlated, p.p., em- 
ulate. 

em'ulating, pr.p., 
emulate. 

emola'tion, n., the 
act of emulating; 
rivalry. 

em'nlative. adj., in- 
clined to emulating. 

em'olator, n., one 
who emulates. 

tmxil'eeut,adj. .strain- 
ing out. 

em'nlons, adj., trying 
to surpass or equal. 

em'nlousness, n., the 
state or quality of 
being emulous. 

emol'sion, n., a liquid 
composed of oil 
and water. 

emul'sive, adj., pro- 
ducing emulsion. 

emonc'tory, adj., ex- 
cretory. 

ena'ble, v.t., to g vc 
power to; make able. 

ena'Ued. p.p., en- 
able. 
. ena'blinc, J>r.p., en- 
able. 

enact', v.t., to give 
Parliamentary sanc- 
tion to; to perform. 

enact'ed, p.p., en- 
act. 

enaot'ing, pr.p., en- 
act. 

enaot'lve, adj., enact- 
ing. 

enactment, n., the 
act or result of 
enacting; a statute. 

enaot'or, n., one who 
enacts. 



enceinte 



enam'el, v.t., to cover 
with enamel; n., a 
smooth glossy mate- 
rial for laying over 
surfaces; the hard 
coating of teeth. 

enam'elled, enam- 
eled, p.p., enamel. 

enamelling, enam'- 
eling, pr.p., enamel; 
n., a covering with 
enamel. 

enam ' eller, enam'eler, 
«., one who enamel •. 

enam'ooT, enam'or, 
v.t., to captivate, 
inspire with passion. 

enam'onied, pp., en- 
amour. 

enam'onring, pr.p., 
enamour. 

enanned',ii(j;'. , ar med . 

enarthro'sis, n. , a ball- 
and-socket joint 
formation. 

e'nate, n., a relative 
on the maternal 
side. 

encae'nia, ence nia, 
n. pi., z dedication 
festival. AtOxford, 
the encaenia are the 
yearly commemora- 
tion of founders 
and benefactors. 

encage', v.t., to con- 
fine in a cage. 

encaged', p.p., en- 
cage. 

encaging, pr.p., en- 
cage. 
" encamp', v.t., to place 
in a camp; v.t., to 
pitch a camp. 

encamped', p.p., en 
camp. 
- encamp'ing, pr.p. ,cu- 

camp. 
. encamp'ment, n., the 
act or place of en- 
camping. 

encan'this, n., a 
tumour in the eye. 

encar'pos, n., a fes- 
toon of fruit and 
flowers. 

encase', v.t., to put 
into a case. 

encased', ^.^., encase. 

encasing, pr.p., en- 
case. 

encans'tic, adj., hxirni 
in; n., encaustic 
work. 

encave', v.t., to shut 
into a cave. 

enceinte', adj., preg- 
nant; n., a sur- 
rounding wall, an 
enclosure. 



encephalic 



^X> 









encephalic, atf;., rel. 
to the encephalos. 

enceph'alon, n., the 
bram {Gr.). 

encepb'alos, n., i.g. 
eiicephaloii. 

enchain', v.t., to bind 
with a chain. 

enchained', p.p., en- 
chain. 

enchain'inc, pr.p. , en- 
chain. 

enchant', v./., to cast 
a spell on; to charm, 
delight. 

enchant'ed, p.p., en- 
chant. 

enchant'er, n., one 
who enchants. 

enchant in;;, pr.p. , en- 
chant; adj., charm- 
ing, delightful. 

enchant'inply, tdv., 
charmingly. 

enohant'ment, n., the 
act of enchanting; 
the state of being 
enchanted. 

enchant'ress, n., fern. 
ot enchanter. 

enchase', v.i., to en- 
close in a border; 
to set in ornamental \ 
work; to ornament 
with embossed 

work; to chase. 

enchased', p.p., en- 
chase. 

encha'sing, pr.p., en- 
chase. 

enchirid'ion, n., a 
small handbook. 

encho'riai. »di., bel. 
to a country, in- 
digenous. 

endi'cle. v.t., to 
surround. 

endi'cled, p.p., en- 
circle, [circle. 

encir'dinz, pr.p., cn- 

enclasp', v.t., to cm- 
brace. 

enchive', »., a piece 
of territory in a 
foreign country. 

enolit'ic, adj., un- 
accented and at- 
tached to the final 
syllable of a pre- 
ceding word; n., a 
particle so attached. 

endit'ical, adj., i.g. 
enclitic. 

enclose', v.t., to shut 
in, confine, frame. 
Also inclose. 

enclosed', p.p., en- 
close. 

endo'sinK, pr.p., en- 
close. 



--ri> 




V^ 



^^ 



219 



enclo'snie, n., the act 
of enclosing; a space 
enclosed. 

enco'miast, n., one 
who pronounces an 
encomium. 

encomias'tic, adj., 
laudatory. 

encomias'tical, adj., 
i.q. encomiastic. 

enco'mium, m., an 
eulogy, praise. 

encom'pass, v.t., tn 
encircle, surround. 

encom'passed, p.p., 
encompass. 

encom'passin^ pr.p., 
encompass. 

encore', *dv., again; 
v.t., to dema'iU a 
repetition of; «., a 
call for a repetition. 

encored', p.p., en- 
core. 

encor'ing, pr.p., en- 
core. 

enoonn'ter, v./., to 
meet, engage with, 
experience. 

encoon'tered, p.p., 
encounter. 

encoon'tering, pr.p., 
encounter. 

encoor'age. v.t., to 
cheer, hearten, in- 
cite. 

enconi'aged, p.p., en- 
courage. 

enconr'agement, n., 
the act of encourag- 
ing, the state of 
being encouraged. 

enconrager, r.., one 
who encourages. 

encoor'aging, pr.p., 
encourage; <wi/., 
promising success, 
favourable. 

encoor'agingly. adv., 
in an encouraging 
way. 

encroach', v.i., to 
trespass, invade. 

encroached', p.p., 
encroach. 

encroach'er, n., one 
who encroaches. . 

encroach'ing, pr.p., 
encroach. 

encroach'ment, n., 
the act or result of 
encroaching. 

encmsf. v./., iet in- 
crust. 

encnmlMr, v.t., to 
burden, hamper. 

enonm'bercd. p.p., 
encumber. 

encnin'bering, pr.p., 
encuml)er. 



^. 



~~1 



endemie 



encom'br.ince, n., a 

hindrance. 

encyc'lical, adj., put 
into gener.il circu- 
lation; n., a letter 
from the Holy See 
to the Roman Cath- 
olic world. 

encyclopae'dia, en- 
cyclope'dia. n., a 
dictionary of gen- 
ern] information. 

encyclopae'dian, en- 
cyclope'dian, adj., 
rel. to an encyclo- 
paedia. 

encyclopae'dio, en- 
cyclope'dic, adj., i.q. 
encyclopaedian. 

encyclopiu'dist, en- 
cyclope'dist, n., one 
who compiles an 
encyclopaedia ; a 
man of universal 
knowledge. 

encyst', v.t., to sur- 
round with a cyst; 
v.i., to be sur- 
rounded with a 
cyst. 

encyst'ed, p.p., en- 
cyst. 

encyst'ing. pr.p., en- 
cyst. 

end, v.t., to bring to 
an end, to termin- 
ate; v.i., to come to 
an end; n., the 
finish of anything, 
termination; object 
in view. 

tadau'gsr. v.t., to in- 
volve in danger. 

endan'gered, p.p., 
endanger. 

endangering, pr.p., 
endanger. 

endear", v.t., to make 
dear. 

endeared', p.p., en- 
dear. 

ondear'ing, pr.p., en- 
dear; adj., making 
dear. 

endear'ment. n., the 
act of endearing; 
afiection. 

endeav'onr, endeav'- 
or, v.t., to try, 
attempt; «., an at- 
tempt. 

endeav'onred, 
deav'ored, 
endeavour. 

endeav' oaring, 
deav'oring, 
endeavour. 

ended, p.p., end. 

endem'ic, adj., pecu- 
liar to a people or 



pp.. 



pr.p., 



endemieal 



220 



engineer 



~i^ 
^ 






•;:? 

^ 






country; n., a dis- 
ease constantly pre- 
vailing in a locality. 

endem'ical, adj., i.q. 
endemic. 

ender'mic, adj., 

through the skin. 

end'ing, pr.p., end. 

en'dive, n., a garden 
herb, used in salads. 

end'less, adj., without 
end. 

end'lessly, adv., with- 
out end. 

end'lessness, n., the 
state of being end- 
less. 

end'lonc adv., length- 
wise. 

en'dogen, n., a plant 
growing from with- 
in. 

endog'enoos, adj., 
growing from with- 
in. 

endorse', v.t., to write 
one's name on the 
back of; to confirm, 
approve. Also in- 
dorse. 

endorsed', p.p., en- 
dorse. 

endorse' ment, n., the 
act of endorsing, a 
signature, a con- 
firmation. 

endors'er, n., one 
who endorses. 

endors'ing, pr.p., en- 
dorse. 

en'dosperm, n., al- 
bumen in a seed. 

endos'mose, n., pas- 
sage inward of 
liquid through the 
pores of a septum. 

endow', v.l., to fur- 
nish with a dowry; 
to give money for 
an endowment; to 
enrich. 

endowed', p.p., en- 
dow. 

endow'er, n., one who 
endows. 

endow'inif, pr.p., en- 
dow. 

endow'ment, n., the 
act of endowing; 
money given for 
the permanent in- 
come of a founda- 
tion; talent, grace. 

EIndozo'a.n./)/., para- 
sites. 

endue', v.l., to clothe, 
vest, endow. 

endued', p.p., endue. 

endn'ing, pr.p., en- 
due. 









■^-. 



^"^A 



endor'able, adj., able 
to be endured. 

endor'ance, n. , the 
faculty ot enduring. 

endue', v.t., to bear, 
sustain; v.i., to last, 
continue. 

endured', p.p., en- 
dure. 

endur'ing, pr.p., en- 
dure. 

end' ways, adv., i.g. 
endwise. 

end' wise, adv., with 
the end first or 
uppermost. 

Ene'id, see Aeneid. 

en'ema, n., an injec- 
tion, clyster. 

en'en^, n., a foe, an 
unfriendly person 
or people. 

energet'ic, adj., full 
of energy, active. 

anerget'id&I, adj., i.q. 
energetic. 

en'ergize, v.t., to 
make active or 
forceful; v.i., to dis- 
play energy. 

en'ergized, p.p., ener- 
gize. 

en'ergizer, «., any- 
thing that energizes. 

ea'ergizing, pr.p., en- 
ergize. 

en'ergy, n., activity, 
force. 

en'ervate, v.t., to en- 
feeble; deprive of 
nerve or strensjth. 

en'ervated, p.p., ener- 
vate. 

enervating, pr.p., en- 
ervate. 

enerva'tion. n., the 
act or effect of 
enervating. 

enfee'ble, v.t., to re- 
duce to weakness. 

enfee'bled, p.p., en- 
feeble. 

enlea'blement, n., the 
act or result of 
enfeebling. 

enfee'bling, pr.p., en- 
feeble. 

enfeoff', v.t., to con- 
vey (lands), trans- 
fer. 

enleofled', p.p., en- 
feoff. 

enleoS'ing, pr.p., en- 
feoff. 

enfeoff' ment, n., the 
act of enfeoffing; 
the legal instrument 
of transference. 

enfilade', v.t., to rake 
with shot from the 



--Ac/I 



X. 



flank; n., a line; gun 
fire from the flank. 

enflla'ded, p.p., en- 
filade. 

enflla'ding, pr.p., en- 
filade. 

enfold', v.l., to wrap 
up, to clasp. 

enfold'ed, p.p., en- 
fold. 

enfolding, pr.p., en- 
fold. 

enforce', v.t., to com- 
pel, give force to, 
put into practice. 

enforce 'able, adj., 
able to be enforced. 

enforced', p.p., en- 
force. 

enforc'edly, adv., in 
an enforced way. 

enforce'ment, n., the 
act or result of 
enforcing. 

enfcno'er, »., one who 
enforces. 

enforc'ing, pr.p., en- 
force. 

enfnm'chise. v.t., to 
set free; to bestow 
the vote on. 

entran'chised, p.p., 
enfranchise. 

enfran'chisement, n., 
the act or result of 
enfranchising. 

enlran'ohising, pr.p., 
enfranchise. 

engage', v.t., to bind 
by promise; to em- 
ploy; to entangle; 
v.i., to promise, un- 
dertake; busy one- 
self; to join in a 
conflict. 

engaged', p.p., en- 
gage. 

engage'ment, n., an 
undertaking in 

words; a contract; 
a battle; a promise. 

enga'ging, p.p., en- 
gage; adj., pleasing, 
attractive. 

enga'gingly, adv., 
pleasingly, attrac- 
tively. 

engen'der, v.t., to 
beget, cause. 

engen'aared. p.p., en- 
gender. 

engen'derisg, pr.p., 
engender. 

en'gine. n., a power- 
producing machine; 
an instrument or 
device. 

engineer', v.l., to 
organize, manage, 
carry through; n., 



engineered 






^ 



one who makes, 
repairs, iiscs, or 
drives engines; one 
who practises the 
atrt and science of 
engineering. 

engineered', p.p., 
engineer. 

eagineer'ing, pr.p., 
engineer; n., the 
science and art of 
cotistruction. 

en'gineiy, n., engines 
collectively; the art 
of working engines. 

engird', v.l., to en- 
circle with a belt; 
siirround. 

engird'ed, p.p., en- 
g rd. 

engird'ing, pr.p., en- 
grd. 

engir'dle, v.t., to en- 
circle, put a girdle 
on. 

Ettg'Usb, adj., rel. 
to England and the 
English; n., the 
English language; 
English literature. 

Ettg'llsbman, n., a 
native of England; 
in a wider sense, a 
patriotic subject of 
the Crown of Eng- 
land. 

engorge', v./., to fill 
up, congest; to con- 
sume voraciously. 

engorged', p.p., en- 
gorge. 

engorge'ment, n., the 
act or result of en- 
gorging. 

•ngorg'ing, pr.p., en- 
gorge. 

engra!f,ii.<., to graft; 
to impress upon the 
mind. 

engraft'ed, p.p., en- 
graft. 

eagiatt'inc pr.p., en- 
graft. 

engrail', v.t., to in- 
dent. 

engrailed', p.p., en- 

• grail. 

engrail'ing, pr.p-, en- 
grail. 

engrail' ment, n., the 
arrangement of dots 
round a coin. 

engrain', tee ingrain. 

engrave', v.t., to cut 
a design or picture 
into metal or wood. 

engraTed't p.p., en- 
grave. 

engra'ver, n., one 
who engraves. 




^-^ 



221 



engraving, pr.p., en- 
grave; n., a picture 
produced from an 
engraved plate. 

engross', »./., to pre- 
occupy, completely 
occupy; to write in 
a large, clear hand. 

engrotoed', p.p., en- 
gross. 

engross' er, n., one 
who writes out 
documents in a 
large, clear hand. 

engross'ing, pr.p. , en- 
gross; n., the trans- 
cript of a docu- 
ment in a large 
band; adi., absorb- 
ing, enthralling. 

engross'ment, n., the 
act of engrossing; 
an engrossed docu- 
ment; mental ab- 
sorption. 

engnll', ».<., to over- 
whelm, completely 
swallow up. 

engulled',/>.^.,engulf. 

engulfing, pr-p., en- 
gulf. 

enhance'. v.t., to in- 
crease in value, 
heighten. 

enhanced', p.p., en- 
hance. 

enhance'ment, n., the 
act or result of 
enhancing. 

enhan'cing, Pr.p., 
enhance. 

enhannon'ic odj., 
with musical inter- 
vals smaller than a 
semitone. 

enharmonical, adj., 
i.q. enharmonic. 

enheart'en, v.t., to 
cheer up, inspirit. 

enig'ma. »., a riddle, 
word-puzzle. 

enigmatic, oi;., puzz- 
ling, obscure. 

eni^mat'ical, tdj., i.q. 
enigmatic. 

enig'matist, n., one 
who makes or solves 
enigmas. 

enig'matize. «■•■, to 
speak in enigmas. 

enjoin', v.t., to com- 
mand, lay a charge 
upon. 

enjoined', p.p., en- 
join. 

enjoining, pr.p., en- 
join. 

enjoy', v.^, to take 
pleasure in; to have 
possession of. 



^ 
^ 



±.. 

^■ 

T 









enneagon 



enjoy'able, adj., de- 
lightful, causing en- 
joyment. 

enjoyed', p.p., en- 
joy. 

enjoy'ing. pr.p., en- 
joy. 

enjoy'ment, n., the 
act or state of en- 
joying; delight. 

enkin'dle, v.t., to set 
fire to; to rouse. 

enkin'dled, p.p., en- 
kindle. 
; enkin'dling, pr.p., 
enkindle. 

eeJarge, v.t., to 
make larger, in- 
crease; to set at 
liberty, v.i., to ex- 
patiate at length; 
to exaggerate. 

enlarged', p.p., en- 
large. 

enlarge' meat, n., 
the act of enlarging; 
being set free. 

enlar'ger, n., one 
who enlarges. 

ealar'giag, pr.p., 
enlarge. 

enlight'en, r.<., to 
illuminate, ^ive 
light to; throw light 
on. 

enlight'ened, p.p., en- 
lighten. 

enlight'ener, n., one 
wlio enlightens. 

enlightening, pr.p., 
enlighten. 

eallgbt'eameat, 
n., the act or result 
of enlightening. 

enlist', V.I., to put on 
a list or roll, to 
recruit; to win to 
one's side; v.i., to 
join the colours. 

enlisted, p.p., en- 
li'it. 

enlist'ing, pr.p., en- 
list. 

enlist'ment, n., the 
act of enlisting. 

enli'ven, v.t., to put 
life into, add bri^t- 
ness to. 

enli'vened. p.p., en- 
liven. 

enli'vener, n., one 
who enlivens. 

enU'vening, pr.p., en- 
liven. 

enmesh', v.i., to en- 
tangle, snare. 

en'mity, n., hostility, 
unfriendliness. 

en'neagon, n. , a nine- 
sided figure. 



Enneandria 



222 



entanglement 



— -^ 



^^. 



V.W 



-^ 



Ennean'dria, n. />/., 
one of Linnaeus's 
grouping of plants. 
It contains flowers 
with nine stamens. 

enno'ble, v.c, to make 
noble, either moral- 
ly or in rank. 

enno'bled, p.p., en- 
noble. 

ennoblement, «., the 
act of ennobling; 
state of being en- 
nobled. 

enno'blinE, pr.p., en- 
noble. 

ennui', «., boredom, 
lassitude. 

enor'mity, n. , the 
state of bemg enor- 
mous; a monstrous 
offence. 

enor'mous, cuij., ex- 
cessively large, 
huge. 

enor'monsly, adi>., to 
an enormous degree. 

enoi'monimes!!, n., 
the quality of being 
enormous. 

enough', adj., suffi- 
cient. 

enonnce',v.<. ,to state, 
declare, enunciate. 

enounced', p.p., 

enounce. 

enoun'cing, pr.p., 
enounce. 

enquire', «.i., see in- 
quire. 

enrage', v.t., to put 
into a rage, iiiluri- 
ate. 

enraged', p.p., en- 
rage. 

enra'ging, pr.p., en- 
rage. 

enrap'hure, v./., to 
thrill with rapture. 

enrap'tnred, p.p., en- 
raptiu'e. 

enrap'tnring, pr.p., 
enrapture. 

enrav'isb. see ravish. 

enrav'ishment, see 
ravishment. 

enrich', v.t., to make 
wealthy; to add 
worth to; to orna- 
ment. 

enriched', p.p., en- 
rich. 

enrich'er, n., one vriio 
enriches. 

enriching, pr.p., en- 
rich. 

enrich'ment, n., the 
act or result of en- 
ricl|ing; ornamenta- 
tiori. 



■^^ 



-<s^ 



•v^ 

^ 

^.^>1» 



enrobe', v.i., to deck 
with a robe. 

enrobed', p.p., en- 
robe. 

enrobing, pr.p., en- 
robe. 

enrol', enroll', v.i., to 
place on a roll, 
enlist. 

enrolled', p.p., enrol. 

enroll'er, «., one who 
enrols. 

enrolling, pr.p., en- 
rol. 

enrol'ment, n., the 
act or result of en- 
roling. 

enroot', v.t., to cause 
to take root. 

enrooted, p.p., en- 
root. 

enroot'ing, pr.p., en- 
root. 

ens, n., an entity, an 
existing thing. 

ensam'ple, see ex- 
ample. 

ensan'guine, v.t., to 
stain with blood. 

ensconce', v.t., to 
hide with safety. 

ensconced', p.p., en- 
sconce. 

ensconcing, pr.p., 
ensconce. 

enseal', v.t., to seal 
up. 

ensealed', p.p., en- 
seal. 

enseam', v./., to scar; 
sew up. 

ensem'ble. n., the 
whole (Ft.). 

enshield', v.t., to 
cover with a shield. 

enshrine', v.t., to set 
in a shrine; to 
cherish with affec- 
tion. 

enshrined', p.p., en- 
shrine. 

enshrin'ing, pr.p,, en- 
shrine. 

enshroud', v.t., to 
wrap in a shroud, 
envelop. 

enshroud'ed, p.p., en- 
shroud. 

enshroud'ing, pr.p., 
enshroud. 

en'siform, arf/., sword- 
shaped. 

en'sign, n., a stand- 
ard, flag; a military 
officer who bore 
the flag of his 
regiment. 

en'signcr, n., the 
rank and office of 
an ensign. 



.^.^ 



^■^ 



7^ 



^"-v^^ 



en'silage, n., storage 
in a silo. 

enslave', v.t., to make 
aslaveof;captivate. 

enslaved', p.p., en- 
slave. 

ensla'ver, n. , one who 
enslaves. 

enslave'ment, n., the 
act or result of en- 
slaving. 

enslav'ing. pr.p., en- 
slave. 

ensnare', v.t., to en- 
trap, entangle. 

ensnared', p.p., en- 
snaie. 

ensaar'er, n., one who 
ensnares. 

ensnaring, pr.p., en- 
snare. 

ensphere', v.t., to 
place within a 
sphere. 

ensphered', p.p., en- 
sphere. 

enspher'ing, pr.p., 
ensphere. 

enstajnp', v.t., to 
stamp. 

enstamped', p.p., en- 
stamp. 

enstamp'ing. pr.p., 
enstamp. 

eosue', v.t. and «., to 
follow. 

ensued', p.p., ensue. 

ensu'ing, pr.p. , ensue. 

ensure', v.t., to make 
sure of, guarantee. 
Also insure. 

entablature, n., the 
topmost member (in 
a classical building) 
that rests upon the 
capitals of the pil- 
lars. 

entail', v.t., to settle 
in tail; to involve as 
a consequence; n., 
settlement of an 
estate upon 
named succession 
of inheritors. 

entailed', p.p., entail. 

entail'ing, pr.p-, en- 
tail. 

entailment, n., the 
act or result of 
entailing. 

enton'gle, v.i., to 
twist together, to 
involve. 

entan'gled, pr.p., en- 
tangle. 

entan'glement, »., the 
act or result of 
entangling; a mili- 
tary obstruction of 
barbed wire, etc. 



entangling 



~% 



entan'gUng, pr.p., en- 
tangle. 

en'ta^ n., a slight 
convexity io the 
shaft of a column; 
a spasm. 

entente', n., under- 
standiri!;, agree- 
meni (/■>.). 

en'tei, v.t. and i., to 
come into; to make 
a record of; to 
name for a contest. 

en'tered, p.p., enter. 

en terer, «., one who 
enters. 

enter' ic, adj., rel. to 
inteslmes;n., an en- 
teric infiamraation. 

enteri'tis, «., inflam- 
mation of the small 
intestine. 

en'tering, ^r.p., enter. 

enterol'ogy, «., the 
science ot the in- 
testines. 

en'terpiise, v.t., to 
attempt; n., bold 
attempt. 

en'terpiised, p.p., en- 
terprise. 

en'terpriser, «., one 
who IS enterprising. 

en'torpriiing, pr.p., 
enterprise; *;'/•, 
bold, adventurous. 

en'terprisingly, n., in 
an enterprising way. 

entertain', v.t., to 
receive hospitably; 
to admit to one's 
thoughts; to amuse. 

entertained', p.p., en- 
tertain. 

entertain' er, n., one 
who entertains. 

entertaining, pr.p., 
entertain ; tul)., 

amusing. 

entertain' meat. n. , 
the act or result of 
entertaining. 

enthrall', v.t., to cap- 
tivate, charm. 

enthralled', p.p., en- 
thrall. 

enthrall' ing, Pr.p., 
enthral. 

enthrone', v.t., to 
place on a throne. 

enthroned', p.p., en- 
throne. 

enthrone'ment, n., 
the act or result of 
enthroning. 

enthro'ning. pr.p., en- 
throne. 

enthroniza'tion, n., 
the ceremony of 
enthionlug. 



1 



7 



.T 



1. 



-n^ 



223 



entbu'slasm, n., a 

state or feeling of 
intense zeal or 
gratificat ion. 

entha'siast, n., one 
who shows himself 
enthusiastic. 

entbuslas'tic, adj., 
full of enthusiasm; 
very zealous. 

enthnsias'tical, adj., 
i.q. enthusiastic. 

eathuslas tlctXtj, 
adv., with enthu- 
siasm. 

entice', v.t., to allure, 
draw on. 

enticed', p.p., entice. 

entice'ment, n., the 
act of enticing; a 
snare. 

enti'cer, «., one who 
entices. 

enti'cing, pr.p., en- 
tice; ad/., attractive. 

enti'dngly, adv., at- 
tractively, allur- 
ingly. 

entire', adj., whole, 
complete. 

entire'ly, adv., wholly, 
completely. 

entire'ness. n., the 
quality of being 
entire. 

entire' ty, «., com- 
pleteness. 

enti'tle, v.<., to give a 
title or right to; to 
name. 

entitled, p.p., entitle. 

enti'tling, pr.p., en- 
title. 

en'tity, n., any in- 
dividual existing 
thmg; existence, 
essence. 

entomb', v./., to place 
in a tomb. 

entombed', p.p., en- 
tomb, [tomb. 

entomb'ing, pr.p., en- 

entomb'ment, n., the 
act or result of 
entombing. 

entom'ic, adj., rel. to 
insects. 

entom'ical, adj., t.q. 
entomic. 

en'tomoid, adj., in- 
sect-like. 

entomolog'ical, adj., 
rel. to entomology. 

entomol'ogist, n., one 
who studies ento- 
mology. 

entomoi'ogy, »., the 
branch of natural 
history that relates 
to insects. 



Hi? 



1 



entree 



entomoph'agotts, adj. , 
eaiing insects. 

enton'ic, adj., at high 
tension. 

entonrage', »., sur- 
roundmgs, follow- 
ers. 

Entozo'a, n. pi., m- 
ternal parasites. 

entozo'on, n., slug, 
of entozoa. 

entr'acte, n., the 
interval between 
the acts; the music 
played in that in- 
terval. 

en' trails, n. pi., intes- 
tines, bowels. 

entrain', v.t., to put 
into a train; v.t., to 
board a train. 

entrained', p.p., en- 
train. 

entrain'ing, pr.p., en- 
train. 

entram'meU s« tram- 
mel. 

entram'melled, en- 
trammeled, p.p., 
entraminel. 

entram'melling, en- 
tram'meling, pr.p., 
entrammcl. 

entrance', v.t., to 
throw into a trance, 
charm. 

en'trance, n., the act 
of entering, admis- 
sion, an opening 
into. 

entranced', p.p., en- 
trance. 

entrancing, pr.p., en- 
trance; od;'., charm- 
ing. 

en'trant, adj., enter- 
ing; »., a novice. 

entrap', v.t., to catch 
in a trap. 

entrvped', p.p., en- 
trap. 

entrap'ping, pr.p., 
entrap. 

entreaf, v.t., to im- 
plore, beseech. 

entreat'ed, p.p., en- 
treat. 

entreat'er, n., one 
who entreats. 

entreat'ing, ^r.^., en- 
treat. 

entreat'ingly, adv., 
pleadingly, beseech- 
ingly. 

entreat'r, n., an 
earnest request, 
prayer. 

entrie'. n., entrance, 
privilege of enter- 
ing; a Qkade dish. 



entremets 






4^- 



-^-<4 



entremets', n. pi. , the 
viands that follow 
the piicc de restsl- 
ance at a meal. 

entrench', v.t., to dig 
a trench; fortify 
with a trench; v.i., 
to encroach. 

entrenched', p.p., en- 
trench. 

entrench'ing, pr.p., 
entrench. 

entrench'ment, n., 
the act or result of 
eatrenching. 

en'trep6t, n., a ware- 
house; a trade-dis- 
tributing centre. 

entrepreneur', »., one 
who starts indus- 
trial schemes. 

en'tresol, n., a low 
storey between two 
higher ones; a mez- 
zanine. 

entrust', v.t., to put 
into the care of; 
to charge with. 

entrust'ed, p.p., en- 
trust. 

entrust'ing, pr.p , en- 
trust. 

en' try, «., the act of 
entering; the place 
of entering; the act 
of entering in a 
ledger, register, etc. 

entwine', v.t., to in- 
terlace, twine round 

entwined', p.p., en- 
twine. 

entwin'ing, pr.p., en- 
twine. 

entwist', v.t., to 
twist. 

enn'oleate, v.l., to 
extract; explain. 

enn'oleated, p.p., 
enucleate. 

enu'cleating, pr.p., 
enucleate. 

ennolea'tion, n., the 
act of enucleating; 
the extraction of a 
tumour. 

enu'merate, v.t., to 
reckon, count up, 
to mention sever- 
ally. 

•nn'meratod, p.p., 
enumerate. 

enn'merating, pr.p., 
enumerate. 

enumeration, n., the 
act oi enumerating; 
a list. 

enn'meratiTe, <tdj., 
enumerating. 

•numerator, n., one 
who enumerates. 



^ 



""V^. 



224 



enunciate, v.i., to 
utter, declare, pro- 
nounce ari iculately. 

enun'ciated, p.p., 
enunciate. 

ennn'ciating, pr.p., 
enimciate. 

enuncia'tion, n., the 
act of enunciating; 
clear articulation; 
the formal state- 
ment of a proposi- 
tion. 

ennn'ciative, adj., 
declaratory; rel. to 
enunciation. 

enun'ciatory, adj., i.q. 
enunciative. 

envel'op, v.t., to wrap 
round; surround. 

en'velope, «., a cover- 
ing; the cover of a 
letter. 

enveloped, p.p., en- 
velop. 
, enveloping, pr.p., en- 
velop. 

envel'opment, n., the 
act of enveloping; 
a covering. 

enven'om, v.t., to 
poison; put venom 
into. 

enven'omed, p.p., en- 
venom. 

enven'oming, pr.p., 
envenom. 

en' viable, adj., the 
object of envy. 

en'viably, adv., in a 
way to be envied. 

en' vied, p.p., envy. 

en'vier, «., one who 
envies. 

en'vious, adj., feeling 
envy, jealous. 

en'vionsjy, adv., with 
envy, jealously. 

envi'ron, v./., to sur- 
round. 

envi'roned, p.p., en- 
viron. 

envi'ronlnK, pr.p., en- 
viron. 

envi'ronment, n., 
siUTOundings; the 
external circum- 
stances condition- 
ing existence. 

environs, n. pi., sur- 
rounding neigh- 
bourhood, suburbs. 

en'voy, n., a special 
messenger. 

en'voyship, n., the 
office of an envoy. 

en'vy, v.t., to be 
jealous of another's 
good fortime; «., 
the feeling of jeal- 



epicarp 



S 



ousy of another's 
good position. 
; en'vying, pr.p., envy. 

enwrap', v.t., to wrap 
closely. 

enwreathe', v.t., i.q. 
wreathe. 

E'ooeno. adj., rel. to 
the Eocene period. 

Eo'lian, see Aeolian. 

e'on, iee aeon. 

Eozo'ic, adj., pert, 
to the Eozoic or 
Upper Archaean 
rocks. 

Eozo'on, n., a fora- 
miiiiferotis fossil. 

ep'act, n., the name 
for the additional 
days to those of the 
polar limar periods. 

ep'arch, «., a Greek 
or Russian ruler of 
an eparchy; a 
Russian metropoli- 
tan. 

ep'archy, n., a pro- 
vince. 

epanie'ment, »., a 
protective parapet. 

ep'aolet, n., a shoul- 
der-ornament. 

epen'Uieds, n., the 
addition of a syl- 
lable or a letter. 

ipergne', n., a fruit 
or flower stand. 

e'phah, n., a Hebrew 
measure of capac- 
itv. 

ephem'era, n. pi., the 
May-fly; a genus of 
short-lived insects. 

ephem'eral, tui/., last- 
ing for a day; short- 
lived. 

ephem'eris, n., a day 
by day calculation 
of the motions of 
the heavenly bodies. 

ephem'eron, n., a 
May-fly. 

Epbe'sian, adj., rel. 
t<i Ephesus and the 
Ephesians. 

eph'od, n., a linen 
vestment of the 
Jewish ceremonial. 

eph'or, n., one of the 
five magistrates of 
Sparta. 

ep'ic, ad)., rel. to 
heroic story; n., a 
poem on heroic 
stories. 

epican'thus,n.,afold 
of skin in the comer 
of the eye. 

ep'icarp, n., the outer 
layer of a pericarp. 



epicene 



H 



ep'ioene, adj., com- 
mon to both sexes. 
t epicra'ninjn, n. , the 
covering of the 
skull. 

Epicte'tian, adj., bel. 
to Epictetus. 

ep'icare, «., a person 
loml of good eating. 

Epicuxe'an, adj., rel. 
to Epicurus; fond 
of good things. 

Epicnreanism, n., 
the practices of the 
Epicureans. 

ep'iourism, n., the 
practices of aii ep- 
icure. 

ep'ioycle, »., a circle 
centred on the cir- 
cumference of ano- 
ther circle. 

epicy'cloid, n., a 
curve formed by a 
point in the circum- 
ference of a circle 
rolling on the ex- 
terior of another 
circle. 

epidemic, adj., 

spreading among 
the people; n., an 
outbreak of di>easc 
among the people. 

epidemical, adj., rel. 
to epidemics. 

epidermal, adj 
to epidermis. 

epider'mis, n., 
outer skin, 
scarf-skin. 

epigas'tric adj., pert. 
to the abdomen. 

epi^lot'tic, adj., pert. 
to the rp glottis. 

epiglottis, n., the 
cartilage at the 
tongue's root, part- 
1 y closing the larynx. 

ep'igiam, »., a terse, 
pithy saying; a 
short versa com- 
position, satirical, 
antithetic or com- 
plimentary. 

epignmmat'ic adj., 
rel. to or like an 
rpigram. 

epigrammat'ical, adj., 
i.q. fpi^amiiiatic. 

epigram'matist, n., a 
writer of epigrams. 

epigraph, n., an in- 
scripliou. 

epilepsy, n., the 
" falling sickness," 
a nervous disorder 
accompanied by 
convtilsive fits. 

epilep'tic, adj., rel. to 



rel. 



the 
the 



v_.. 



V-v 



> 



-V 






\ 



V 



225 



or suffering fironi 
epilepsy; n., one 
who suffers from 
epilepsy. 

epilogue, n., a speech 
at the end of a 
play; the conclusion 
of a discourse. 

EJpiph'any, n., the 
Least ot Our Lord's 
Manifestation, Jan. 
6. 

ep'iptayte, n., a para- 
sitical plant. 

opis'copacy, n., the 
principles or system 
of episcopal rule. 

epia' copal, adj., rel. 
to a bishop. 

episcopa'Han, adj., 
rel. to Episcopacy. 

episcopa' llanlsta, 
n., the doctrine of 
episcopal rule. 

episcopate, adj., a 
bishop's incum- 
bency of his office; 
the collective bish- 
ops. 

ep'isode, n., a sep- 
arate story or inci- 
dent ill a book or 
speech; any inci- 
dent. 

ep'isodiaU adj., of the 
natuieof an episode. 

ep'isperm, n. , a seed's 
outer covering. 

epis'tle, n. , a letter. 

epis'tolanr, adj., of 
the nature of a 
letter. 

epis'tolin, v.f., to 
write letters to. 

ep'istyle, n., an archi- 
trave. 

ep'itaph, »., an ui- 
script ion on a tomb: 
a composition in 
honour of a dead 
person. 

epitbala'mium, n., a 
wedding song. 

epitiie'linm, n., the 
coating of the in- 
ternal parts and 
organs of the body. 

ep'ittiet, n , a word, 
usu. an adj., de- 
scribmg some qual- 
ity of a person or 
thing. 

epithet'io, adj., of the 
nature of epithet. 

epit'ome, n., an ab- 
breviation, an ab- 
stract. 

epit'omist, n., one 
who makes an epit- 
on\e. 



V 



X 



1 



n' 



equalled 



epit'omize, v.l., to 
reduce to an epit- 
ome. 

epifomized. p.p., 
opitoniize. 

epit'omizer, n., one 
who epitomizes. 

epit'omiziiig, pr.p., 
epiiomize. 

ep'itrite, n., a metric 
foot containing one 
short and three 
long syllables vari- 
ously arranged. 

epizo'a, ». pi., exter- 
nal parasites. 

epizo'an, adj., rel, to 
epizoa. 

epizo'io, adj., i.q. 
opizoan. 

epizoot'ic, adj. , 

spreading among 
animals. 

ep'och, »., a fixed 
point in time; an 
era. 

ep'ochal, adj., rel. to 
an epoch. 

ep'ode, n., the third 
number of a lyric 
ode; a kind of ode 
in which a long 
verse is followed by 
a shorter one. 

epod'ic, adj., rel. to 
an epode. 

ep'onjrm, «., the sup- 
posed or actual 
founder of a city 
named after him. 

epon'ymous, adj., giv- 
ing a name to. 

epopee', n., an epic 
p<jem. 

eqnabil'ity, n., the 
quality of being 
equable. 

e'qnable, adj., of even 
temper, calm. 

equably, aiiv., in an 
equable way. 

equal, o.i., to make 
equal, be equal to. 

equafify, n., the 
state of being equal. 

equaliza.%<m, n., 
the act or effect of 
equalizing. 

e'qaaRxe, v.t,, to 
make equal. 

«'«(/ai!sed, p.p., 
equalize. 

e'quaRzet, n., a de- 
vice for giving late- 
ral stability to an 
aeroplane. 

e'qualitjag, pr.p., 
equalize. 

e' quailed, e'qualed, 
p.p., equal. 



•—(17a) 



equalling 



226 



erectile 






e'qualtiag, pr.p., 
equal. 

e'quallyt adv. , in the 
same degree. 

eqnan'gnlai, see 

equiangular. 

eqnaiiiiu'ity, n., even- 
ness of temper; 
calmness. 

equate', v.t., to form 
an equation with. 

equa'ted, ^.^. , equate. 

eqoa'ting, pfp-> 

equate. 

eqoa'tion, n., a pro- 
position indicating 
equality between 
two quantities. 

eaos'toi, n., an imag- 
inary line round the 
earth dividing it 
into two equal 
parts. 

eqnato'dal. <x2;-> rel. 
or bel. to the 
equator. 

ea'aerry. »., a court 
official under the 
Master of the Horse. 

eques'trian, adj., rel. 
to horsemanship. 

eqoes' trianism, n. , 

hor 5eiii;i[iship. 

equiaa' gnlar, ad)., 
having equal angles. 

eqnidis'tant, adj., at 
an equal distance. 

eqoilat'eral, adj., hav- 
ing equal sides. 

equili'biaie, v.t. and 
»., to balance 
equally. 

eqoili'liiated, p.p., 
equilibrate. 

eqoili'biating. pr-P., 
equilibrate. 

equilibration, n., the 
act of balancing; a 
state of equal bal- 
ance. 

eqnilib'rious. adj., in 
equilibrium. 

equU'ibrist, n., a 
balancer, or tight- 
rope walker. 

equilib'rity, n., the 

state of equilibrium. 

\ equiiib'riom, n. , equal 

balance, equipoise. 

e'qnine, idj., pert, to 
a horse. 

equinoc'tial, adj., bel. 
to the time; the 
equinox. 

e'quioox, n., one of 
the two periods 
when day and night 
are equal. 

equip', V.'., to fit out, 
furnish, arm. 



"\ 



"^. 



^~\ eq'nipage, n., equip- 
/ ments, train of at- 
c^^ tendants. 

^^Vj equip'mont, n., the 
state of being equip- 
ped; materials ior 
equipping; outfit. 

e'quipirise, >»., equal- 
ity of weight; per- 
fect balance. 

eqnipol'lence, n., 
equality of slcill or 
inJBuence. 

eqnipol'lency, n., i.q. 
equipollence. 

eqnipol'lent, adj., 
equally skilful or 
influential. 

eqnipon'deronce, w., 
the state of being 
equal m weight. 

equiponderant, adj., 
equal in weight. 

equipped', p.p., equip. 

equip'ping, pr.p., 
fquip. 

equis'onance, n., the 
concord of an 
octave. 

equis'onant, adj., 
soimding in con- 
cord of an octave. 

equitable, adj., just, 
fair. 

eq'uitably, adv., 

justly, fairly. 

eq'uitant, adj., on 
horseback; over- 
c- lapping. 

•b eqnita'tion, n. , the art 
r- of horsemanship. 

^. eq'uites, n. pi., the 
knights or members 
of the Roman eques- 
trian order. 

eq'tiity, n., fairness, 
impartiality. In the 
legal sense, it is the 
correction of what 
is defective in the 
broad statements of 
c-i. ^^ the law. 
VT^ eqniv'alence, n., the 
state of being equiv- 
r . alent. 

^L/^ equiv'alency, n., i.q. 
- ' '■ equivalence. 

eqniv'alent, adj., of 
equal value to; n., 
something of equal 
value. 

equiT'ooal, adj., hav- 
ing more than one 
meaning; question- 
able. 

eqniv'ooally, «<&>., in 
an equivocal way. 

eqniv'ocate, v.t., to 
use intentionally 
misleading words. 



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P-P;\ 

Pr.p.,\ 



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1 



3 






equiv'ocated. p.p., 

equivocate. 

equiv'ocating, pr.p., 
equivocate. 

equiyoca'tion, n., the 
act of equivficating; 
prevarication. 

eqniv'ocator, n., one 
wlio equivocates. 

i'qnlToque, n., an 
ambiguous expres- 
sion; a pun. 

equiT'OTOUS, adj., eat- 
ing horse-flesh. 

e'ra, n., a period of 
time. 

era'diate, «.<., to shed 
as rays; v.%., to 
radiate. 

eradia'tion, n., the 
act or effect of 
radiating. 

erad'icable, adj., able 
to be eradicated. 

erad'icate, v.t., to re- 
move by the roots; ■ 
destroy. 

erad'icated, 
eradicate. 

erad'icatins, 
eradicate. | 

eradica'tion, n., the' 
act or effect of erad- ; 
icating. | 

erad'icative, adj., 
utterly destructive. 

era'sable, adj., able 
to be erased. j 

erase', v.t., to rub orj 
cross out. 1 

erased', p.p., erase, j 

erase'ment, n., era- 
sure. 

eraser, n., anything 
that erases. 

era-'sing, pr.p., erase. 

eras'iou, n., the act 
of erasing, erasure. 

Eras' tilui, adj., rel. to 
Erastus and his 
teaching. 

Eras' tianism, n., the 
tenets of Erastus 
and his followers. 

era'snre, »., the act 
or effect of erasing; 
obliteration. 

ere, prep, and coitj., 
sooner than, before. 

Er'ebUS, «., an inter- 
mediate place of 
the dead. 

erect', v.t., to set up- 
right, to build; adj., 
upright. 

erect'able, adj., able 
to be erected. 

erect' ed, p.p., erect. 

erect'ile, adj., with 
power to erect. 



ereetUity 



ereoUl'ity. n., the 

quality or state of 
being erectile. 
erecf ing, pr.p., erect. 
erec'tion, n., the act 
or result of erect- 
ing; a building. 
ereot'ly, ado., straight 

upright. 
eieot'ness, n., the 
quality of being 
erect. 
ereot'or, n., anything 
. ^^ that erects. 
*yf ere'Iong, a<fo., shortly. 
er'emito, n., a hermit 
{lU., dweller in the 
desert). 
eremit'ic, adj., rel. 

to hermits. 
eremit'ioal, adj., i.q. 

eremitic. 
er'ethism. »., exces- 
sive excitability. 
erg, n., a unitary 
measure of energy. 
et'go, adv., therefore. 
Wgot, n., a fungus 
on rye; a growth 
on a horse's fetlock. 
L_ er'gotism, »., the 
'j^. growth of ergot; the 
effect of ergot as a 
medicine. 
Eri'ca, »., heath, 
eriom'eler, n., a 
. measuring appara- 
ttis used in the 
textile industry. 
er'mine, n., a small 
furry animal; its 
fur worn by kings, 
peers and Judges; 
adj., made of er- 
mine; ».<., to invest 
with the ermine, 
er'mined, p.p., er- 
mine. 
erode', v.t., to eat 

away. 
ero'ded, p.p., erode 
eio'dent, adj., pro- 
ducing erosion. 
Xl «xo'iiag,pr.p., erode 
' ero'sioii, n., the act 
or result of eroding. 
*i eto'sfve, adj., eatmg 
• V away, wearing 

away, 
eiofic, adj., pert, to 

love; passionate. 
erpetorogy. »« her- 

petology. 
err, ».»., to go astray, 
to do wrong, to 
make a mista^ke. 
er'rand, n., a journey 
on someone's busi- 
ness, a commission. 
er'rant, adj., roving. 



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V_fL_p 



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"Vi- 



227 



er'rantry, n., a knight 
crr.int's service. 

errata, n. pi., mis- 
takes. 

erratic, adj., roving, 
uncertain, irreguUir. 

errat'ioal. adj., t.q. 

erratic. 
erratically, adv., in 

an erratic way. 
erra'tum, «., smg. of 

errata. 
er'rhine, adj., causing 

sneezing, 
erred, p.p., err. 
erring, pr.p., err. 
erro'neons, adj., in 

error, mistaken. 
erro'neoosly, adv., 

incorrectly. 
erro'neonsness, n. , 
the slate or quality 
of t>cing erroneous. 
er'ror, »., a mistake, 
blunder, false be- 
lief. 
E!rse, adj., rel. to 
Ireland and the 
Irish; n., the native 
speech of Ireland. 
erst, adv., formerly, 

in the beginning, 
erst'while, adj., form- 
er; adv., formerly. 
embes'cence, »., a 
reddening, blushing. 
embes'cent, adj., red- 
dening, blushing. 
eroofate, v./., to 
belch forth; v.i., to 
belch. 
eructa'tion, n., the 

act of belching. 
et'odite, adj. , learned, 

cultivated, 
er'oditely, adv., in an 

erudite way. 
er'aditoness, n., the 
state of being ertl- 
dite. 
emdi'tion, n., learn- 
ing; scholarship. 
em'ginons, adj., rel. 

to verdigris. 

•rapt', v.t., to cause 

to burst forth; v.t., 

to burst forth. 

empfed, p.p., erupt. 

empt'ing, pr.p., 

erupt. 
erap'tion, n., the act 
or eflect ot eruptmg. 
erup'tive, adj., caus- 
ing eruption. 
erysipelas, n., a dis- 
ease usually in the 
face or head, at- 
tended with inflam- 
mation and fever, 
erysipol'aloas, adj.. 



escheated 



suffering from ery- 
sipelas. 

y\t^- erythe'ma, n., exces- 
sive redness; a skin 
disease attended by 
redness. 

L/1 escalade', v.t., to at- 
tack by means of 
ladders; n., an at- 
tack by means of 
ladders. 

i_/*^ escala'ded, p.p., es- 

■ calade. 

L/l_; escala'ding, pr.p., 
^— escalade. 

iv es'calate, «., a mov- 
ing staircase. 

^_/^ escai'lop, see scallop. 
L_/<^ escal'loped, adj., 
charged with scal- 
lops {Her.). 

) ^ escapade, »»., a frolic, 

r^ flight. 

)^ I escape', v.t., to get 
^N clear from', avoid; 
v.i., to get away 
safely; »., flight, 
deliverance. 
) ^ escaped', ^.^., escape. 
) ~^ escape'ment, n., a 
^Nv^ part of the works 
of a time- piece con- 
trolling the revolu- 
tions of a cogged 
wheel that is actu- 
ated by the pendu- 
lum. 
) escap'ing, p.p., es- 
^^v. cape. 
l_y^ escarp', v.t., to form a 
steep slope; n., the 
side of a ditch 
nearest to the ram- 
part. 
l^' escarped',/).^., escarp. 
L_/X. escarp'ing. pr.p., 

escarp. 

]_yv, esoarp'ment, «., a 

steep side of a rock, 

hill, or rampart. 

/ esohalof , see shallot. 

•\_1 es'ohar.n., a slough. 

]y<j \ eschatol'ogy, n., the 

department of 

theology that deals 

with the last things, 

death, judgment, 

etc. 



) eioheaf, v.t., to take 
'• over forfeited pro- 

perty; v.i., to revert 
by forfeiture or 
fail tire of heirs; n., 
the reversion by 
forfeiture or failtire 
of heirs. 
) esoheat'able, adj., 
c^ liable to escheat. 

) esoheat'ed, p.p, es- 
f cheat. 



escheating 



228 



estovers 



} 






)-J> 



K 

V 



eschaafing, pr.p., 

escheat. 

escheat'or, »., an 
official who super- 
intends escheating. 

eschew', v.t., to avoid. 

eschewed', p.p., es- 
chew. 

escbew'ing, pr.p., es- 
chew. 

Esco'iial, n., the 
royal palace near 
Madrid. Also writ- 
ten Escurial. 

es'coit, n., a guard of 
armed men, pro- 
tection; a guide, 
attendant. 

escort', w.<., to accom- 
p.^iiy tor protection. 

escort'ed, p.p., escort. 

escort'ing, pr.p., es- 
cort. 

escritoire', «., a writ- 
ing-desk. Also writ- 
ten icritoire. 

Escnla'pian, adj., rel. 
to Aesculapius; 
medical. Also writ- 
ten Aesculapian. 

es'cDlent, adj., eat- 
able, fit for food; 
«., anything eat- 
able. 

escDtch'eon, n., an 
heraldic shield; a 
plate round a key- 
hole. 

escatch'eoned, adj., 
furnished with an 
escutcheon. 

Es'kiino, see Esqui- 
mau. 

esopb'agos, n., the 
gullet, conveying 
food and drink 
into the stomach 
(properly written 
oesophagus). 

esoter'ic, adj., inner, 
secret, mysterious; 
n., a person initiat- 
ed in esoteric prin- 
ciples. 

esjiariei, n., a trellis 
on which trees are 
trained; «., a tree 
so trained. 

espar'to, n., a strong 

variety of grass. 
espe'cial, adj., spe- 
cial, particular, pre- 
eminent. 
espe' dally, adv., 
pre-eminently, par- 
ticularly. 
Esperanto, n., an 
invented universal 
language. 
espi'sJ, n., the act of 



V 

■I. 



V 



^ 



\ 



L. 



i 



spying, or keeping 
secret watch. 

espied', p.p., espy. 

es'pionage, n., the 
practice of a spy. 

esplanade', n., an 
open space for 
promenading; the 
level space between 
a citadel and a 
town. 

espon'sal, «<J/.,rel. to 
a betrothal or mar- 
riage; n., the act of 
espousing, betroth- 
al. 

espouse', v.<., to take 
as a spouse, to 
betroth; to adopt 
a cause. 

espoused', p.p., es- 
pouse. 

espous'er, m., one who 
espouses. 

espons'ing, pr.p., es- 
pouse. 

espy', v.t., to catch 
sight of. 

espying, pr.p., espv. 

Es'quimau, adj., the 
name of an indig- 
enous people in 
Arctic regions; n., 
one of the race. 

esquire', n. , a shield- 
bearer, of the rank 
next below a knight; 
a gentleman en- 
titled to arms. 

essa/, v.t., to at- 
tempt. 

es'say, n., an en- 
deavour; a short 
dissertation. 

essayed', p.p., essay. 

essay'er, n., one who 
essays. 

essay' ing, pr.p. ,essay. 

es'sayist, n., a writer 
of essays. 

es'sence, v.i., to per- 
fume; «., the true 
distinctive quality 
of anything; being 
in the abstract; a 
perfume. 

es'senced, p.p., es- 
sence. 

es^sencing, pr.p., es- 
sence. 

Essene', n., a member 
of a Jewish ascetic 
party. 

essen'tial, ndj., rel. to 
the essence; neces- 
sary; n., something 
necessary. 

essential'ity, n., the 
quality of being 
essential. 



-V 



K 



K 



I 



>•? 



V. 



•4. 



A 



\ 



L 



essen tially, »., neces' 

sarily. 

estab'Usb. v.t., to 
settle, make firm oi 
stable; to institute! 
to ratify; to prove, i 

estab'Hsbed, p.p.. 
establish. 

estab'lisher, n., any- 
thing that estab- 
lishes, j 

estab'nsbing, pr.pl 
establish. 1 

estab'tlsbmeat, n., 
the act of establish- 
ing; that which ij 
established; an in- 
stitution; a business 
or household. 

estafelte', n. ,a cour lor 

estate', »., condition, 
state, property. 

esteem', v.t., to value 
prize; n., favour- 
able opinion, re' 
spect. 

esteem'able, adi., t.q 
estimable. 

esteemed', p.p., rs 
teem. 

esteem'ing, pr.p.. e%- 
teem. 

esthetic, ad]. 
aesthetic. 

estimable, 
worthy oi 
or re?poct. 

es'timate, v.t., tc 
judge the \alue, 
height, weight, etc., 
of. 

es'timate, n., a valua- 
tion. 

es'timiated, p.p., fsti 
mate. 

es'timating, pr.p., es- 
timate. 

estima'tion, n., thi 
act or result ol 
estimating; rftr-em. 

es'timator, «., ont 

who makes an ^~ti- 

mate. 
est'ival, adj., r"\. Xr 

summer. Also writ- 
ten aestival. 
estiva'tion, n., tb( 

act of spending the 

summer; dormanc) 

in summer. 
estop', v.t., to bat 

prevent, dam. 
estopped', p.p., estop 
estop'pel, n., tow 

prohibition. 
e^p'ping, pr.p., e? 

top. 
esto'vers, n. pi. ,nec« 

saries allowed a 

such by law. 



estrade 



L 



estrade', m., a low 

platform. 

estrange', v.'., to 
make strange, alien- 
ate. 

estnuged', p.p., es- 
trange. 

estrange'ment, »., the 
act of estranging; 
the state of being 
estranged. 

estran'ging, pr.p., 
estrange. 

estrapade', n., a 
hcjrse's kicking. 

estray', n., an un- 
claimed horse or ox. 

estreat', v.t., to levy 
a fine under an 
estreat; n., a cor- 
rect copy of the 
record under which 
a fine is levied. 

estteat'ed, p.p., es- 
treat. 

estreat'ing, pr.p., es- 
treat. 

estrepe'ment, n., 
waste committed 
on another man's 
lands, as by a 
tenant on his land- 
lord's property. 

es'tnary, n., the wide, 
tidal mouth of a 
river. 

e8'taate,w.i.,toboil up. 

estoa'tion, n., the act 
of Ixjiling up. 

et cet'era, phrase = 
and the rest (Lai.). 

etch, v.t., to engrave 
with the use of a 
corrosive acid; to 
scratch lines with a 
sharp, needle-like 
instrument. 

etched, p.p., etch. 

etch'er, n., one who 
etches. 

•tcb'ing, pr.p., etch; 
n., the process of 
etching; a printed 
impression. 

eter'nal. adj., without 
beginning or end; 
everlasting. 

•ter'nally, adv., with- 
fmt end. 

eter'nlty. n., infinity 
bein? or existence. 

eter'nize, v.t., to make 
perpetual. 

eter'nized, p.p., eter- 
nize. 

eter'niiiiiK, Pr.p., 
eternize. 

ete'sian, adj., annual. 

eth'al, n., cetyl al- 
cohol. 









(s^. 



229 



e'tber, »., the clear 
sky; the impalpable, 
invisible medium 
that fills all space; 
a mobile, colourless 
fluid. 

ethe'reid, adj., rel. to 
the sky, light, airy. 

ethe'realize, v./., to 
make ethereal. 

ethe'realized, p.p., 
ethereal ize. 

ethe'realizing, pr.p., 
etherealize. 

e'theriform, adj., of 
~ like nature with 
ether. 

e'tberism, n., the 
effect of inhaling 
ether. 

etheriza'tion, n., the 
act or result of 
etherizing. 

e'therize, v.t., to bring 
under the influence 
of ether. 

e'therized, ^.^. , ether- 
ize. 

e'therizing, Pr.p., 
etherize. 

eth'ic, adj., i.q. eth- 
ical. 

eth'ical, adj., moral. 

eth'ically, adv., mor- 
ally. 

eth'iCS, n., the sci- 
ence of morals and 
duties. 

E'thiop, n., an Ethio- 
pian. 

Ethiopian, adj., rel. 
lo Ethiopia and the 
Ethiopians. 

Ethiop'ic, adj., i.q. 
Ethiopian. 

eth'moid, adj., sieve- 
like. 

ethmoi'dal, adj., i.g. 
ethmoid. 

eth'nacch, n., a 
national ruler; a 
viceroy. 

eth'nic, adj., rel. to 
race. 

eth'nioal, adj., i.g. 
ethnic. 

ethnog'npher, m., one 
who describes races 
and peoples. 

ethnogiaph'io, adj., 
rei. lo ethnography. 

ethnographical, adj., 
i.q. ethnographic. 

ethnog'Taphy, n., de- 
scription of races 
and peoples. 

ethnolog'ie, adj., rel. 
to ethnology. 

ethnolog'ical, adj., 
i.q. ethnologic. 



n 



•L 

u 



euchre 



ethnoI'Dgist. n., one 

who studies ethnol- 
ogy- 
etfanol'ogy, «., the 

science rel. to races 

and peoples. 
etholog'ic, adj., rel. 

to ethology. 
etholog'ical, adj., i.q. 

ethologic. 
ethol'ogist, «., one 

who studies ethol- 
ogy- 
ethol'ogy. »•> the 

science of human 

character. 
etiolate, v.t., to 

blanch; make sick- 

ly-lookmg; v.i., to 

become psde. 
ettol'ogy, n., the 

science of causes, 
et'iqnette, n., society 

formalities and 

rules. 
Etne'an, ai/., pert, to 

Etna. Also written 

Aetnean. 
Eto'nian, adj., pert. 

to Eton; n., a past 

or present Eton 

schoolboy. 
Etrns'can, adj., pert. 

to Etruria and the 

Etruscans, 
etui', n., a lady's case 

for carrying small 

useful articles. 
etymolog'ic. adj., rel. 

to etymology. 
etymolog'ical, adj., 

I.q. etymologic. 
etymoWically, adv., 

according lo ety- 
mology. 
etymol'ogiaL n. 

student of etyi 

ogy 



tymol- 



etymorogy. «., the 
science of word- 
growth and word- 
formation. 

et'ymon, n., the root 
form of a word. 

Eacalyp'tos, n., the 
gum-tree of Austra- 
lia. 

encalyp'tol, n., a 
liquid foimd in eu- 
calyptus oil. 

En'charist, n., the 
Mass or the Supper 
of the Lord; the 
Blessed Sacrament. 

eoohaiis'tic adj., bel. 
to the Eucharist. 

enoharis'tieal, adj., 
i.q. cucharistic. 

ea'ohre, n., a card- 
game so named. 



Eaelid 



^--v^ 



.^-'V--, 



^%_p 



Endid, n., the Alex- 
andrian geometer; 
the treatise wiiich he 
wrote on geometry. 

Eaclid'ian, adj., rel. 
to Euclid. 

eu'crasy, n., sound 
health. 

eodiom'etei. n., a 
vessel employed in 
the volumetric an- 
alysis of gases. 

eadiomet'ric, adj., rel. 
to eudiometry. 

endiom'etry, n., the 
use of the eudiom- 
eter. 

eogen'ic, *di., rel. to 
eugenics. 

Eogen'ios, n., the 
theorizing about 
the physical im- 
provement of the 
human race. 

eulogist, n., one who 
pronounces a eulogy. 

eologis'tio, adj., laud- 
atory. 

eolo'giiuiii M., a laud- 
ation. 

ea'logize, v.t., to 
praise highly. 

en'logized, p.p., eu- 
logize. 

ea'logizinK, pr.p., eu- 
logize. 

en'logy, n., a lauda- 
tion. 

en'nomy, »., law and 
order; a well- 
ordered constitu- 
tion. 

ea'nuch, n., the 
guardian of a 
harem. 

enpep'sia, n., good 
digestion. 

eapep'sy, «., <•«. eu- 
pepsia. 

enpep'Uo, adj., pro- 
moting a good diges- 
tion. 

ea'phemism, n., the 
use of an agreeable 
instead of an offen- 
sive expression. 

ea'phemut, n., one 
who uses euphem- 
ism. 

eaphemlst'ic adi., of 
the nature of eu- 
phemism. 

ea'phemize, v.t., to 
describe euphemis- 
tically; v.i., to speak 
euphemistically. 

enphon'icoi;'. .sound- 
ing pleasantly. 

eapho'nions, adj., i.q. 
euphonic 




>. 

.^-v- 

y^^ 



A' 
A, 



s 
s 



230 



ea'phonism, n., a 

concord of sweet 
sounds. 

eo'phony, n., pleasant 
sound; avoidance of 
harsh - sounding 
words in written 
or spoken words. 

ea'phiasy, «., eye- 
bright. 

en'phnism, n., affect- 
ed speech (in the 
manner of Lyly's 
Euplmei). 

en'phnist, n. , one who 
speaks affectedly. 

enphnis'tio, ad]., rel. 
to, or marked by, 
Euphuism. 

Enra'sian, ad]., rel. 
to Eurasia; (i.e., 
Europe and Asia 
combined); half- 
caste. 

eure'ka, «•., a Greek 
word = " I have 
found," the excla- 
mation of Archi- 
medes on making a 
scientific discovwy. 

enrhyth'my, n., har- 
mony, proportion. 

enri'poB, **., any arm 
of the sea like the 
original Euripus in 
Greece. 

Eoioc'lydo