(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Faculty bulletin / The Pennsylvania State College"

PENN STATE COLLECTION 




Old Main, 
Building 



LIBRARY OF 

THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 

PENN STATE COLLECTION 



PENN STATE COLLECTION 



> 



pennState 



UNIVERSITY 
LIBRARIES 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://archive.org/details/facultybulletinpO0penn 



THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 



FACULTY fiflia BULLETIN 




Published weekly on Tuesday during the College \S^/ contributions should be as brief as possible and reach 

year as a means of making official announcements ^£^ Walter F. Dantzscher, Doctor of Public Information, 

and presenting items of interest to the faculty. Afc ptcmbcr ZQ } i92 ^ ™ Main > not later than 10 ^ "* ^f' 



VOL. 19 

ENROLLMENT STATISTICS /JJD THE FUgSffiffTW LLAaa 



NO. 



Based on registration figures published on October 12, 1938, was 

compiled Wednesday, enrollment for 6,993. With late registration and 

the first semester this year will the registration of part-time stu- 

exceed last year's comparable fig- dents in Friday and Saturday classes, 

ures, William S. Hoffman, College registration this year will prob- 

registrar, has reported to Prcsi- ably exceed last year's figure." 
dent Hetzcl, The quality of the 

entering class has again improved The advance in the quality of 

over the high standards of other the entering class is indicated by 

years* the following comparisons: 

According to a late compila- Of 326 freshmen girls, 279 
tion, 5,879 students had filled in or 85.4 per cent were in the up- 
regi strati on forms on the campus per fifth of their secondary school 
during the official college regis- classes this ye-ar, as compared with 
tration period. To obtain a compar- 230 or 68,7 per cent last year, 
iison with the similar figure pub- 
lished in the Faculty .Bulletin/ ear- Of 1080 men students, 473 or 
ly last year, there must be added 43.8 per cent come from the upper 
the registration at Mont Alto, fifth of their secondary school 
which will total approximately 125, classes, as compared with 456 or 
the registration at the undergrad- 42.2 per cent of the 1081 entering 
uate centers, which last year total- a year ago, 
led 429, and 45 in practice teach- 
ing. This gives a total of 6,478. - These figures combine to pro- 
The comparable figure last year duce' a total of '752 students, or 
was 6,408. 53.5 per cent, Of superior calibre 

, as compared with 686, or 48,4 per 

"The total number of freshmen cent -in 1938. 
registered on Thursday and Friday 

was 1004 men and 337 women," Mr. "It is trite," Mr, Hoffman 
Hoffman stated. "The latter fig- remarks, "to say that this year's 
ures do not include freshmen in freshman class is the 'best ever,' 
forestry at Mont Alto, but do in- but in this instance statistics 
elude some few with advanced stand- prove it." 
ing. 

Freshman enrollment by Schools 

"The number registered for is as follows: 
the first semester last year as 

MW M V M | MW 

♦Agriculture 183 13 Liberal Arts 210 156 Engineering 274 4 Physical Ed. 26 20 
Ch~m % & Phys. 2 00 1 C J Mineral Ind. 82 Education 21 129 Totals 1004 337 



♦Not including Mont Alto registration. 



24.3376 



OF GENERAL INTEREST 



An 
lating t 
lege Lib 
9. The 
tures of 
their na 
can Russ 
played a 
library . 
from the 
both the 
hibit ed 
lobbies. 



exhibit of 

o Russia i 

rary from 

exhib it ion 

26 differ 

t ive sett i 

ian Inst it 

long the o 

Books an 

library c 

old and t 

in the fir 



p icture s 
s being h 
September 

include s 
e nt Ru s s i 
ng, lent 
ute. The 
ent er ais 
d magazin 
ollection 
he new Ru 
st and se 



and books re- 
eld by the Col- 
21 to October 
colored pic— 
an peoples in 
by the Ameri- 
se are d is- 
le of the 
e articles 
s relat ing t o 
ssia are ex— 
cond floor 



Individual members of the faculty 
who desire a copy of the P.S.C.A, Stu- 
dent Handbook should make their request 
to the Christian Association at once 
either by telephone or by note, 

* * * * * * 

The President's Office requests 
that those members of the faculty who 
received reappointments or modification 
of their agreements and have not returned 
one signed copy, please do so at once, 

* * * + * * 

Personnel Athletic Books for the 
first semester will go on sale at the 
Athletic Association ticket office, 107 
Old Main, beginning Monday, September 25, 
1939, Sale will continue until 12 noon 
on October 7, 1939, The price will be- 
$7 plus federal tax, 

* * * * * * 





Durin 


g t: 


the 


campus 


ha 


operat ions 


> 1 


our 


previous 


grass did 


not 


be a 


uty of 


the 


re s 


t ored, 


and 


it s 


place 


aga 


in ■ 


the nat 


ion 


stu 


dent an 


d e 


and 


staff 


is 


the 


good o 


f a 


the 


campus 


wa 



he past two years 
s been t orn up by 
isregard by some 
custom of protect 
seem important, 
grounds is rapid 
our campus will 
in as one of the 
, In this restor 
very member of th 
requested to coop 
11 by keeping str 
Iks except in tho 



, because 
■ building 
persons of 
ing the 

Now the 
ly being, 
soon take 
lo vclie st 
at ion every 
e- faculty 
erate for - 
ict ly ■ t o 
se areas 



which have been designated for recreation' 
or other special use. It should be taken 
for granted that no one will walk on 
newly seeded plots, but special attention 
is called to the unsight line s s which re- 
sults when persons cut across the grass, 
particularly at corners, 

** ** — R. D. Hetzel 

Individual members of the faculty, 
especially new members or members who 
have had changes in room assignments, 
who are not receiving copies of the 
Faculty Bulletin should report this fact 
to their department heads so that the 
proper addition or correction may be 
requested by the department head, who 
is responsible for preparing lists for 
the distribution of the Bulletin, 
* * * * * * 



Mem 
received 
Chapel S 
will be 
supply 1 
Chaplain 
Frizzell 
a note i 
II, Hume, 
Lingnan 
speaker 
been de s 
Day, ** 



bers of 
copies 
peaker s 
supplied 
asts if 

of thai 
, Divisi 
n the fa 

of the 
Univc r s i 
at chape 
ignat ed 



the facult 
of the Cal 
and would 
promptly a 
they will 
r desire, 
on of Spec 
culty exch 
Board of T 
ty, New Yo 
1 next Sun 
as Penn St 
* * 



y who have not 
endar of Sunday 
like t o have one 
s long as the 
not if y the 

♦Phone John II, 
ch, or drop 
ange. Dr. Edwar 
rustees of 
rkj will be the 
day, which has 
at e ' in China '. 



The annual fall get-together of the 
faculty of the School of Agriculture will 
be held on Saturday, September 30, at 
6;30 p, m,, in Old Main, Members planning 
to attend should inform the heads of 
their departments no later than noon of 
Thursday, September 28, 



The first event on the yearly sports 
calendar is the soccer game with Gettys- 
burg to be held at 2 p,rn» on Saturday, 
September 30, at New Beaver Field, 



COMMITTEE CONSIDERING SCHOLARSHIP APPLICATIONS 



The Committee on Academic Standards 
is planning for the annual awarding of 
the Louise Carnegie and John W, White 
Scholarships* In order to facilitate 
the consideration of each case, the 
Committee has prepared special applica- 
tion forms which may now be obtained at 
the office of Professor Jacob Tanger, 
committee chairman, 409 Old Main, All 
applications should be returned to that 
office on or before October 10, 

Students whose academic ratings 
fall in the first ten per cent of their 



class are eligible for consideration for 
these scholarships. However, as the 
number of applicants in recent years has 
been greatly in excess of the sixteen 
scholarships available, the selection 
has of necessity been practically limited 
to those with an academic rating not 
below the first twentieth of the class. 

In making the nominations for these 
several scholarships, the Committee on 
Academic Standards is assisted by a com- 
mittee of three undergraduates appointed 
by the Student Board, 
« * * » 



MEMBERSHIP OF COLLEGE SENATE 



The names listed below are those of members of the College Senate 
for the academic year 1939-40, Following the names of the individual 
members are letters indicating their- status in the College staff, the 
School' with which they are connected, and membership in Senate commit- 
tees. For instance, Professor Brunner is head of a department in the 
School of Agriculture and is a member of the Committee on Calendar. 
The symbols used for these several designations are a 



follows: 



For the first letter following the name: 



Department Head 
Dean's representative 
Elected member 



p 


Pre si dent 


H 


D 


Dean 


R 
E 



s 

A 
V 



Schools are indicated by the following abbreviations: 



Ag Agriculture 

CP Chemistry and Physics 

Ed Education MI 



En Engineering 
LA Liberal Arts 

Mineral Industries 



Substitute for 

Member of admini st rat ive staff 

Visit or 



PE physical Education 

G Graduate School 
MS Military Science 



Membership of Committees is indicated by the following list of abbreviations: 



AS Academic Standards Com 

Ad Admissions CS 

Ath Athletics M 

Cal Calendar PO 



Committee s 
Courses of Study 
Military Instruction 
Public Occasions 



Pub Publications 
SW Student Welfare 
N Not any 



The chairman of the committee is indicated by the use of the capital letter "C" 
following the abbreviation for the committee. Members of the Graduate School have 
following the letter "G" the School with which they are al30 affiliated in parentheses. 



Ambers on JD- — E— -Ed — N 
Anderson AK — E — Ag — N 
Bab cock MM — E — En — N 
Banner FC — H — LA: — SW 
Beede VA — H — Ag — Pub 
Bent ley FL — H — Ag — Ath.C 
Bernhard RK — H — En — N 
Bernreuter RG — E — Ed — CS 
Bischoff EC— E — PE — Pub 
Blasingame RU — H — Ag — N 
Bonine CA — H — MI — N 
Borland AA — H — Ag — Com 
Brady GA — E — iZX — N 
Broyles WA— E — Ag — N 
Brunner HS — H — Ag — Cal 
Bullinger CE — II — En — PO 
Callenbach EW — S (Knandel) 
Champlin CD — E — Ed — N 
Chandlee' GC — H — CP-Ad 
Cryder DS — E — CP — N 
Dantzscher WF — V — A — Pub 
Davis AF — R — PE — N 
Davis EC — E — PE — CS 
Davey WP — E — G (CP ) — N 
Denglar RE — II — LA — CS 
Dotterer RH— H — LA — N 
Drummond L — H — Ed— IT 
DuMont FM — II — LA— N 
Duncan DC — E — CP — Com 
Dusham EH — II — Ag — Ad 
Dut che r RA — H— Ag — C S 
Dye WS — II — LA — N 
Emery AR — H — MS — M 
Everett HA — II — En — SW 
F le t che r SW — D — Ag N 



Forbes EB-— II — Ag — N 
Galbraith RE — E — LA — N 
Gates T J — II — LA — M 
Gauge r AW — II — MI — M 
Graham R — E — Ed — SW 
Grant RW — H — LA — PO.C 
Green GR — H — Ed — N 
Haidt M~E — PE — Cal 
Ham WR — H — CP — M.C 
Hammond HP — D — En — AS 
Harris CL — E— En — M 
Ha s e k C W — II — LA— N 
Hechler FG — H — En— Pub. C 
He lme B — E — G ( En ) — N 
Hetzel RD — P 

Hoffman WS — A — Cal — Ad#C 
Hostetter SK — A 
Hurrell AS — II — Ed — N 
Eussey RA — S (Bullinger) 
Johnstone BE — H — En— Ad 
Kaulfuss JE — E— En — Ad 
K e it h T B — S — Ag- — N 
Keller EL — II — En — PO 
Keller JO— A 
Kelly JP — E — Ag — 1! 
Kern FD — D — G (Ag ) — CS 
Kin sloe CL — H-r-En — CS.C 
Knandel EC — II — Ag — N 
Lawther JD — E — PE— Ad 
Lewis WP — A — Pub 
Lininger FF — II— Ag — IT 
McD owe 1 1 MS — H — Ag — N 
McFarland DF — II — III — N 
Ma ck WB — II — Ag — S W . C 
Marquardt CE — A— —As 
Mart in AS — E — G ( LA ) — At h 



Mavis FT — II — En — N 
I lit che 11 DR — II — MI — N 
Moore BV — II — Ed — Com 
Mors e AO— A — C om — PO 
lie 1 s o n HW — E — MI — IT 
Noll CF — H-.-Ag — N 
ITorthrup HB — II — MI — Pub 
O'Brien JF — E — LA — IT 
Owens FW — II — LA — N 
Peters CC — II — Ed-- AS 
Pierce F W — II — LA 
P ir s on S J— II — MI — N 
Popp HW — R ( G ) — Ag — N 
Pugh DB — II — LA — N 
Ray CE-^-D— SW 
Ritenour JP — A — SIT 
Rowland CJ — E — LA — N 
Schott CP — D — PS— Ath 
Selsam JP — E— LA — -KT' 
Smith OF — E — CP — As 
St e idle E — D — MI — Ath 
Stavely EB — E — G(En)-*-N 
Stewart FC — E — En — N 
Stoddart CW — D — LA— N 
Struck FT— II — Ed — Ad 
Tanger J — II— LA — AS.C 
Taylor NW — II — MI — CS 
Trabue MR — D — Ed — M 
Warnock AR — D — SW 
Wat kin s R — V — A 
Werner CD— R — PE — M 
Wh it e HW — :; — c P — C S 
Whitmore FC — D — CP — N 
Williams EF — E — MI— N 
Wr i ght CC — E — MI — IT 

Wm. S. Hoffman 
Registrar 



CENTRAL FUND FOR RESEARCH 



Dr. S. W. Fletcher, 
Council on Research, annou 
College budget for the cu 
year includes an it en of 
nated as the "Central Fun 
This fund is administered 
on Research, It is to be 
to promote fundamental re 
out the College, funds fo 
applied research being mo 
able from other sources. 
that this fund shall be u 
port of creative studies 
sciences and the humaniti 
the natural sciences. Fo 
summary of the conditions 
use of the fund : 



chairman of the 
nces that the 
rrent fiscal 
$3000 desig- 
d for Research", 
by the Council 
used primarily 
search through— 
r the support of 
re readily avail- 
It is intended 
sed for the sup- 
in the social 
es as well as in 
llowing is a 
governing the 



Grant s — in— aid 

cal year, but may 
that may be allott 
determined by the 
after giving consi 
quests, including 
tinuance of the 16 
fiscal year. The 
general maintenanc 
used to employ a t 
for a member of th 
freedom from teach- 
part of a semester 
research in progre 



are made for one fis— 
be renewed. The sum 
ed to a project will be 
Council on Research 
deration to all re- 
requests for the con- 
grants made in the la: 
fund may be used for 
e ; it may also be 
emporary substitute 
e faculty who requires 
ing for a semester or 
in order to complete 
s s . 



■Applications for grant s — in— aid 
should be filed with the dean of the 
School* Application forms are available 
at his office. These call for informa— ** 

tion on the following points: objectives 

OF INTEREST TO FACULTY WIVES 



of the study; its probable importance; 
previous work and present outlook; pro- 
cedure or working plan; financial sup- 
port desired (itemized); other funds, 
if any, which contribute to the support 
of the project; the leaders and their 
qualifications; and an estimate of the 
time required to complete the project. 
Applications should be filed before 
October 1, 1939. 

The approval of the head of the 
department and of the dean is required 
before the proposed project is consid- 
ered by the Council on Research, 
Requisitions are drawn and bills approved 
by the chairman of the Council after 
their approval by the head of the depart- 
ment and the dean. The recipient of 
a grant-in— aid is requested to file with 
the dean and with the Council on Research, 
before April 1, 194©, a report 'on the pro- 
ject. 

In addition, the Council on Research 
also has a fund for the publication of 
The Pennsylvania State College Studies, 
These arc "monographs and other sub- 
stantial researches which are of such a 
nature that they do not find ready pub- 
lication in technical and professional 
journals", Members of the faculty who 
expect to complete such manuscripts during 
the current year will please advise their 
dean. 



Faculty members wishing women stu- 
dents to help in the home may call Miss 
Bell in the Office of the Dean of Women* 

* * * * * + 

Grapes, apples, and cider are avail- 
able at the cold storage at the College 
Fruit Farm, Open every day. Call 3769. 

* * * * * * 



The Department of Home Economics has 
an Easy ironer for sale. Since it is to 
be disposed of within the week, anyone 
interested is advised to call the Home 
Economics office as soon as possible. 
The iron is a 1939 model which has been 
used only since April, The price is $75, 



.... „-...— ^_ . . 



«JI -**»^ » *» -z^z a 



HSJINVHO'H SAaVlS SSI 



Supplement to The Faculty Bulletin of September 26, 1939 

OFFICIAL NOTICES FROM THE OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR 

The following students have been dropped from College under the 50 percent rule 
Significance of symbols: *Dropped for poor scholarship; **Dropped and reinstated. 



School of Agriculture 

Allen, Ray H. , AgEc 
Be erne r, Robert W, , DH 
Bollinger,. Ralph R., ABCh 
Conle'y, Philip H.', AH 
Dela'field, Robert E., AH. 
Frazier, Johnson M» f For 
Fuhrman, Exiger.e A,, 2yr Ag 
Gardner, Thomas L., DH 
Gollam, William E., DH 
Hamilton, Andrew W. , Hort 
Kirkhuff, JamesH., DH 
Leichliter, Franklin B., For 
Lockwood, Charles H», DH 
Lowry, Carl L.-,A 
MacDowell, Frederick M, ; 2yr Ag 
MacKay , . Malcolm M . , Z o o 1 
Martin, Harry' R., DH , . 
Mowry, Clarence L., AgEd 
Pepper, George R. •, DH 
Phelleps, Vincent F.', For 
Phillips, Dorsey 0., AgEng 
Pre'tka, Frank,- ABCh 
.Saul, William W. , AgEng 
Shea, George M, , A 
Sulcerj Henry Wi , Hort-, 
Tenzigolski, Joseph P., AgEd 
Thanpson, Hamilton S., For 
Wehr, Kermit K., DH 
White , Henry C., AH 
Tfhitenight, Eugene E., 2yr Ag 

Mont Alt o 



, 1 Ke own ; Walter J., 2yr For 
1 Lindsey, Thomas L., 2yr For 
1, Lisotto, John L., For 



Moran, Francis 



2yr For 



School of Chemistry and Phy s ins 



Cohen, Barbara A,, PM 
.Etter, Frederick W, , Sci 
Fry, John G., ChE 
Green, Paul W., ChE 
Harvey, Charles L», 
Marczak, Joseph L,, 
Roan, Harry, PM 
Ryan, John S • , Ch 
Salerno, George J., PM 



ChE 
ChE 



Tronzo, Louis 



<•» > 



ChE 



School of Education 



1 4 'Beikert, Ruth, Ed 

1 2 Bowman, Matilda, HEc 

,2' Clark, Betty J., HEc 

1 1 Eirich, Annette, HEc 

2 Fike, Louise I,, HE 



2 
1 

* 3 

* 1 
4 

* 1 

* 1 



He'seltine,- Lillian, HEc 
Keith, Kathryn, 
T.n !<-« Mary , HEc 

Robert A., IEd 



Keith, K at h'ryn , ME d 
Lake, Mary, HEc 
Martin, Robert A., IEd 
Nicholls, Margaret, HEc 
Wilkinson, Charles J., HE' 



3 
2 
2 

3 
3 
2 

1 
1 
2 

2 

3 

3 

1 

2 

3 

3 

2 

2 

2 

2 

2 

1 

2 

2 

2. 

1 

2 

2 

2 

2 

2 

2 

2 

3 

4 

2 

3. 

3 

2 

1 

2 

1 

2 

3 . 

1 

2. 

2 



School of Engineering 

Amend, G. F., CE 
Antonacoi, D. W. , ME 
Appleby, J. R., ME 
Bechtel, Alfred R. , IEng 
Benscoter, C. A., MEng 
Benton, S. 3., EE 
Bristow, W. C., CE 
Campbell, W. T., ME 
Davis, J. J«, MEng 
Dempler, Walter J., IEng 
Dilling, J. C, IEng 
Eckhardt , Boyden, IEng 
Entz, Eugene E., IEng 
Espy, G. H.', MEng 
Ewalt , Richard W. , IEng 
Halbig, G. 0., EE 
Hamer, J. E. , EE - 
Harman., Richard W, , ME 
Hauck, J. J.,' MEng 
Hech.t, Frederick L«, Jr.-, 
Herman, P. H,, CE 
Hoy, Harold L., IEng 
Kclleher, John E., EE 



Klunk, R. J, 



ME 



Krauser, C . , ME 
Lewis, Tv r al t e r .' H . , ME 
Long, James G., IE 
Maxwell, G. S., EE 
McLean, W. E. , ME 
Minney, J. W. , EE 
.Moss, B. D., LIE 
Qakes, J. G., CE 
Ohlsen, J. W. , HE 
Panlcratz, F. A., EE 
Parkinson, Harry, Jr, 
Pierce , J, W. , EE 



IE 



Reimer, G 



EE 



Rea, William J. , EE 
Rife, W.' A., CE 
Ryan, H. J., EE 
.Schall, W. D. , ME 
Scott , P. W. , EE 
.Smith, D. F., ME 
Whartenby, C. A,, 
. Wian, W. Hi, ME 
Wilson, P . B . , Jr., 
Wolff, J. M., ME 



ME 



ME 



School of the Liberal Arts 



Bardo, Will-iamA,, LD 
Bertiaux, Paul E., LD 
Bingaman, 'Clara W # , CF 
Blair, Alfred F., LD 
Bowman, Calvin S., LD 
Breene, William J., LD 
Broyles, Leo C», LD ' 
Carson, Henry A., LD 
Casselberry, Elizabeth D, , LD 
Cianni, Frederick L;, LD 
Cqmley, Betty H., LD 
Crist , Mary LI. , AL 



Davi i 



David 



LD 



Davis, Rodney L., LD 



Supplement to The Faculty Bulletin of September 26, 1939 

Page 2 
OFFICIAL NOTICES FROM THE OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR (continued) 



School of the Liberal Arts 
( O ont inued ) 

Evans, Vaughn U f , LD 
Fox, Roy P., LP ' 
Gans , Gene E . , LD 
Ganz, Joseph H., LD 
Gartland, Jame.s D. , LD 
Goss, William J., LD 
Grain, Theodore S.. , LD 
Green, Arnold T.. , LD 
Haas, Frederick, CF 
Harrier, Albert B., LD 
Harrison, George S», LD 
Herr, Joel C. , LD 
Hileman, Albert I.I. , LD 
Hindman, Margee J., LD 
Humphrey, Jean L., LD 
Humphreys, Helen ; J., LD 
Ihrig, Jean E. , LD 
Karhan, Joseph A. , LD 
Keller, Karl E., LD 
Kintner, Jane H . , LD 
Kless, Richard, LD 
Lavelle, James J., LD 
Lynch, David J., LD 
Marshall, William G., LD 
Maxwell, Alexander W. , LD 
Maxwell, Francis S., LD 
MazeroT, Paul B., LD 
McCloskey, Peter J., LD 
Meyer, Natalie I., LD 
Murphy, Francis C,, LD 
Oldstein, David S., LD 
Opperman, David Li, CF 
Parris, Howard A., LD 
Pfahl, William H., LD 
Powell, Ar ja Ti, LD 
Rossman, Zella, LD 
Salamanchuk, John E., LD 
Santmyers, Jack H., LD 



Schneier, Bernice K«, LD 
Smith, Marshall L», LD 
Specht, Frank E., LD 
Steciw, Stanley S, , LD 
Stevens, Elian ore M. , LD 
Trombi, Francis D., LD 
Williams, Lowell W. , LD 
Wolfe, John M. , LD 
Zwinggi, Robert C, LD 



School of Mineral Indust rie s 

1 Blotter, R. E., Met 
3 Clarke, H. H., Met 

2 Claudius, R. C, PNG 

* 2 Dennis, II . A., PNG 

* 2 Ertel, A. L., PNG 

* 2 Griffiths, V. S., Met 
2 Hotchkiss, R. H. , PNG 
2 Kinckiner, R. E., FT 

* 2 Morrow, P. R., Met 

* 1 Ritts, H. J., PNG 

2 Roelofs, R. F., Met 

* 1 Slicker, T. _M. , PNG 

School of Phy s ical Educat ion 

S Bachman, Paul 

** 2 Edgar, Raymond 



School of Physical Educat ion 
( cont inued") 

4 McAuliffe, Dorothy 
** 1 Rank, Elisabeth 

Transit ion Section 
2 Shovlin, John J,, Jr. 

* 3 Wilson, Edward C. 

Undergraduat e Cent ers 
SC Beadle, J, Robert 

* SC Berrang, ' Joseph A, 
HC Bolt on,' Thomas R. 
SC Brenneman, Philip R. 
FC Bushyeager, James 0. 
FC Chivers, John F. 
HC Connolly, Joseph B. 
FC Davidson, William B. 
HC Dctato, Anthony C. 

** DC Frederici," Dominic P. 
DC Gaylor, George W, 
DC Harris, Clarence F. 

* FC Hart , 'Paul R. 
HC Hayes, Paul R, 
SC Headman, John L» 
SC Hewitt, William E. 
DC Hackman, William C, 

** DC Hay, John A. 

* * FC Jackson, Adalyn M. 

** DC Joseph, Edward B», Jr. 

FC John, Fouad S. 

DC Keller, William L. 

* HC Keyser, Aaron G. 
HC Kinney, Robert M, 
HC Kushnerick, John A» 

* SC Maczees, William G. 
SC Mader, Robert F. 
SC McDonald, Ambrose, J, 
DC M cK e e , J e we 1 1 W . 
HC McWilliarns, Paul E # 
HC Morris, Stewart M. 

* DC I.Iorrow, Dorothy A. 
DC Ocshier, James E. 
SC O'Hara, Eugene A. 
DC Riffle', Robert A. 

* SC Sale sky, Edwin J. 
DC Stiteler, Stanley M. 
FC Wasilco, William A. 
DC Way, John W. , Jr, 
HC Williams, Thomas D. 

TRANSFERS 

The following students have been granted 
permission to transfer from two— year to four- 
year courses in the School of Agriculture: 

Burkhart , Francis, R. 

Duff, Charles J. 

Fulem, Charles 

Gayman, George G,, Jr. 

Heilman, William J. 

Tloltzer, Morris 

Kins, Carl M. , Jr. 

Martin, Frederick 

Price , Harold 

Tegeler, Lester 

Wm. S. Hoffman 
Registrar 



THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 



FACULTY 

Published weekly on Tuesday during the College 
year as a means of making official announcements 
and presenting items of interest to the faculty. All 

VOL. 19 




October 3, 1939 



BULLETIN 

contributions should be as brief as possible and reach 
Walter F. Dantzscher, Director of Public Information, 
105 Old Main, not later than 10 a.m. each Friday. 

NO. 



FACULTY MEMBERS INVITED TO PARTICIPATE AT DAD'S DAY 



The annual Dad' s Day program 
in which students, parents, and 
faculty members participate will 
be held this Saturday and Sunday, 
The program of entertainment is 
under the direction of the Associat- 
ion of Parents of Penn State, of 
which David B. Pugh is president. 

Activities are scheduled to 
begin with a meeting of the board 
of directors of the association at 
10 a«m« Saturday in the Little The- 
atre, followed by a general meeting 
of members at 10:45 a.m. At the 
general meeting greetings wi 11 be 
given by Jane Romig, president of 
the Women's Student Government Asso- 
ciation, and Howard C. McWilllams, 
president of the Penn State Student 
Body. An address will also be given 
by Dean Carl P. Schott of the School 
of Physical Education and Athletics. 

A soccer game with Lehigh Uni- 
versity at 1 p.m. on New Beaver 
Field will begin the sports program. 



The first football game, with 
Bucknell University, Is sched- 
uled to begin at Z p,m# The 
third event in the afternoon 
sports program is the cross coun- 
try meet with Manhatten to begin 
at 2:30. 

A smoker and entertainment 
for students and their dads, to 
which faculty members are also 
cordially invited, will be held 
in the Armory at 7 o'clock. 

The Penn State Players will 
present the farce "Squaring the 
Circle" at 8:30 p.m.* in Schwab 
Auditorium. All seats are re- 
served. Tickets may be purchased 
now at the Student Union office 
for »75 or .50. 

Special chapel services In 
the Auditorium at 11 a.m. Sunday 
will have Dr. Arthur C. Wickenden 
of Miami University, Oxford, Ohio, 
as the speaker. 



FINE ARTS EXHIBIT 



The opening exhibition of the 
Division of Fine Arts of the De- 
partment of Architecture is now 
hanging in the College Art Gallery, 
303 Main Engineering, and will re- 
main there through October 4, ac- 
cording to an announcement 'received 
from Professor J, B. Helme. 

The exhibition consists of a 
series of 52 carefully studied 



photographs of Williamsburg, re- 
cently restored to its former 
eighteenth century appearance, 
the photographs are the work of 
Mr, F, S, Lincoln, well-known 
New York photographer* 

The gallery is open dally 
from 3:30 a.m. until 0:30 p,m, 
except on Sunday. The public is 
cordially invited. 



OF GZ 



AL INTEREST 



Faculty athletic 
on sale at the Athlet 
ticket office in Old 
until noon, October 7 
for the Bucknell, Leh 
Pittsburgh games will 
the t ime of purchase, 
the West stands, has 
the faculty sale, 

* * * 

The Athletic Ass 
accepting orders for 
from home. prices fo 
$2.20; Syracuse, $2.2 
$2.28 an"d $3.42 (box) 



ticket books, now 
ic As sociat ion 
Main, will be sold 

Reserved seats 
igh, Maryland, and 
be distributed at 
Sect ion C , in 
been allotted for 



ociation is also 
all games away 
How: Cornell, 
0; Pennsylvania, 
; and Army, $3.30. 



The Home Economics cafeteria is serv- 
ing lunch dally from 11:45 a.m. to 12:30 
p.m. Senior students in institution admin- 
istration serve dinner -daily from 5:30 to 
6:15 p.m. Miss Jones in the cafeteria 
office will take reservations for parties 
and special dinners. 



Individual members of the faculty who 
desire a copy of the P.S.C.A. Student Hand- 
book are again reminded to make their re- 
quest to the Christian Association at once 
either by telephone or by note. 
* * * * * * 



OFFICIAL NOTICES FROIi: THE OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR 



The following persons were granted degree 
Post-Se s sion : 



as of September 1, 



the end of the 



Aaron, Helen B. — U.S. in Ed, 
Allison, Luther W. — M.A. 
Anderson, Martha C— B.A. in Ed, 
Bart low, Harry J. — M.Ed, 
Benna, Alfred H, — M*Ed. 
Booth, James F, — B.A* in C&F 



Bradley, Veronica Maria~B.S. 
Britten, Mary W* — B.S* in Ed, 
Brown, Ethel A,— B.A. in Ed, 
Chubb, Calvin, B.— M.S. 
Coxe, Charles — D.Ed. 
Fahringer, Wilber 0, — M.Ed, 
Francis, Walter W-, — B.S, in For* 
Freyberger, Ruth M, — M.Ed. 
Gleason, He il A. — B.S, in EE 
Goepfert, John L, — M,Ed, 
Green, Arnold S. — M.Ed, 
Holt, Alfred S. — M.Ed, 
Jack^ John D,-»-M,Ed. 
Eirk, George I!* — 3, A, ii 
•Eline, Heal L, — M.Ed. 



in Ed, 



Psy, 



Kozelsky, Florence D, — B.A, in Ed, 

Lindsey, Anna M, — M.Ed, 

Maneual, Raymond E, — M,A, 

Metro, Joseph P.— B.S. in H, and P,Ed, 

Moore, Clyde E, — M.Ed, 

M owr e y , R o g e r C . — M .Ed. 

Musser, Clarence Z» — M.Ed. 

Nicholson, Jacob E, — M.Ed. 

Pin n nM 'llli Vt r>+ ov» _T - _.«T ■" _ Vfl - 



— , 

Nicholson, . 

Onachilla, Victor J.- — M.Ed. 
Cutters on, Leslie A, -—M.Ed, 
R*, 



Leslie ^., — i. #JJ ^, 
Jr.— M.A. 



rage, Uiayton K*, Jr.— -M.A 
Peiffcr, David S, — M.Ed. 
Rimp, Mary G;-~B«S, in Ed. 
- Roddy, Russell S.' — M.Ed, 
SchrRpner. Tlrnn s t —hi . V. d . 



** ^ V - v^. j j * .. w ^ ut w -. J- >-' » J.-.'- . J.J «-t- « 

Schre iber, Erne st — M.Ed, 
Sommerville, Alan J, — B.A. 
St oner, Robert T. — M.Ed, 
Turner, B. Alf red— -M.Ed. 
U'oton. Lee. 0.— B.S. in C 



— B.A. in AL 



Turner, B. Alfred—-! 
Upton, Lee. 0.— B.S. ^ v 
Westerberg, Bror G. B. — M.Ed, 



in Cer,, 



'ithdrawa-ls 



1 Ailes, Robert - Cer. - Sept; 1? 
G Baron, Edward R. - Sept. 25 

2 Croweil, May A. - PEd - Sept, 22 



1 Glover, William W, - IndEd 



1 Korinis, William P. — LD — Sept. 13 
3 Lceper, John W. — AgEd — Sept, 22 
2. McCarrell, Jay W. - AgEd - Sept. 23 



:pt..27 1 Mayers, James W, - DH - Sept. 18 



1 Hardy, Joseph E. - ME - Sept. -26 ■•• 1 i'illikcn, Mason D. - LD - Sept. 25 
1 Haulik, Leo J, - EE - S.ept* 22 -.1 Weaver, George W. - AgEd - Sept. 19 

1 Kampe, Raymond L. - 2yr Ag - Sept.27 G Williams, Roger K. - Sept* 22" 

Changes of CI as sif icat ion 

Freed, Irwin - Jr. C&F instead of Soph, LD Earner, Paul S. - Grad. instead of Sp, 

&uinn, Franklin E. - Soph. LD instead of Fresh. LD 

Change in- Name 



Zerbey, Margaret 



should be Margaret- Zerbey Jones, in the Graduate School, 



Win, S. Hoffman 
Registrar 



CORRECTED MEMBERSHIP AND COMMITTEE LIST OF THE COLLEGE SENATE 

for the Current Academic Year 

Inadvertently the committee personnel was incorrectly given in the 
list of members of the College Senate published in the last issue of The 
Faculty Bulletin, Faculty members are therefore requested to discard 
the previously published list and to refer for accurate information only 
to the following listings. 

The letters following the names of the individuals indicate their status on the 
College staff, the School with which they are connected, and membership on Senate 
committees. The symbols used for these several designation are' as follows: 
For the first letter following" the name: 
P President. H Department Head S Substitute for 

D Dean R Dean's representative A Member of administrative staff 

E Elected member V Visitor 

Schools are indicated by the following abbreviations: 



Ag Agriculture En 

CP Chemistry and Physics LA 
Ed Education MI 



Engineering 
Liberal Arts 
Mineral Industries 



Membership of Committees 

AS Academic Standards 

Ad Admissions 

Ath Athletics 

Cal Calendar 



in indicated by the following list 

C om C omm it t e e s 

CR Repr. on Council on Research 

CS Courses of Study 

K Military Instruction 

PO Public Occasions 



PE Physical Education 


G Graduate School 


MS Mil it 


ary Science 


list of a 


bbreviat ions : 


Pub 


Publicat ions 


arch SW 


St \i dent Welfare 


N 


Lot any 


R 


Rep on Bd of 




Student Pub* 



'The chairman of the .committee is indicated by the use of the capital letter "C" 
following the abbreviation for the committee. Members of the Graduate School have 
following the letter "G" the School with which they are also affiliated in parentheses. 



Ambers on JD- — E — Ed — N 
Anderson AK— E — Ag — Cal 
Babcock MM— E — En — II . 
Banner EC — ^H — LA — R 
Beede VA — H— -ig — Pub 
B e nt 1 e y F L— R — A g- -At h . C 
Bernhard RE — II---En' — N 
Bernreuter RG — E— Ed — CS 
Bischoff EC— E— PE — PO 
Blasingame RU — H-;-Ag— N 
Bonine CA— rll — MI— Ad '. 
Borland AA — H — Ag — •Com 
Brady GA — E — MI — N ' 
Broyles WA — E — Ag — M 
Brunner HS — H — Ag — N 
Bullinger CE — H — En — PO 
Callenbach EW — s' (Knandel) 
Champlin CD — E — Ed—At h 
Chandlee GC — H — CP — Cal.C 
Cryder' DS — E — CP— Ad 
Dantzscher WF — V--A — Pub 
Davis AF — R — PE — }{ 
Davis EC — E — PE — CS 
Davey WP — E — G(CP) — N 
Dengler RE — H — LA — CS 
Dotterer RH — H — LA— N 
Drummond L--H— Ed — AS 
DuMont FM — H — LA— N 
Duncan DC — E — CP — Com 
Dusham EH — H — Ag — Ad 
Dutcher RA — H — Ag — CS 
Dye "WS — II — LA — N 
Emery AR — H — MS — M 
Everett HA — H — En — N 
Fletcher SW — D — Ag — N 



Forbes SB— H— Ag — N ' 
Galbraith RE — E — LA — SW 
Gates TJ — H — LA — M 
G auger AW — H — MI — M 
Graham R — E — Ed — SW 
Grant RW— H — LA — PO.C 
.Green GR — H — Ed — N 
Haidt M — E — PE — Cal 
Ham WR — II — CP — M.C 
.Hammond HP — D — En — AS 
Harris CL — E — En — M 
Hasek CW — H — LA — Com . 
Hechler FG — H — En — N 
He lme B — E — G (En )— Pub 
Hetzel RD — P 

Hoffman WS — A — Cal — Ad.C ' 
Hostetter SK— A 
Hurrell A3 — H — Ed — N 
Hussey RA — S (Bullinger) 
Johnstone BK — H — En — Ad 
Kaulfuss JE- — E— En — Com.C 
Keith TB — E — Ag — N 
Keller EL — H — En — N 
Keller JO — A — PO 
Kelly JP — E — Ag — N 
Kern FD — D — G (Ag ) — CS 
Kinsloe CL — H— En — CS.C 
Knandel HC — H — Ag — N 
Lawther JD — E—PE — Ad 
Lewis WP— — A— Pub 
Lininger FF — H — Ag — PO 
McDowell MS — H — Ag — N 
McF arland DF — H — MI — C om 
Mack WB — II — Ag — SW.C 
Marquardt CE — A — AS 
Mart In AE — E — G (LA )«— ath — CR 



■Mavis FT— II — En— IT 
Mitchell DR — H — MI — N 
Moore BV — H — Ed — Com 
Morse AO — A — PO 
Nelson HW— E — MI — N 
Noll CF — II — Ag — N 
Northrup HB — H — MI — Pub.C 
O r Brien JF — E — LA — N 
Owons FW — II — X LA — Ad 
"Peters CC — II — Ed — CR 
Pierce FW — H— LA — N 
■Pirson SJ— II — MI — N 
Popp "HI? — R(g) — Ag — N 
Pugh DB — II — LA — N 
Ray CE — D — SW 
Ritenour JP — A — SW 
Rowland CJ— E — LA — N 
Schott CP— D — PE — Com 
Selsam JP— E — LA — N 
Smith OF — E — CP — AS 
S t e i d 1 e E — D — MI — at h 
Stavely EB — E — G (En ) — SW 
Stewart FC — E — En — N 
Stoddart CW — D — LA — N 
Struck FT — H — Ed — Ad 
Tanger J — II — LA — AS.C 
Taylor NW — II — MI — CS 
Trabue MR — D — Ed — M 
Wa r n o ck AR — D — S W 
Wat kins RV — V — A 
Werner CD— R— PE — U 
Wh it e MW — E — C P— C S 
Wh it m o r e F C — D — C P — N 
Williams EF — E — MI — Cal 
Wright CC — E — MI — N 

Wm. S. Hoffman 
Registrar 



REGULATIONS FOR STAFF MEMBERS TAKING COURSES AND DEGREES 

On October 14, 1936, the Conn- Those staff members desiring 
cil of Administration adopted a to qualify for candidacy for ad- 
regulation "that members of the vanced degrees are informed of the 
staff be allowed privileges as to following regulations of the 
carrying courses, wi thout being Graduate Faculty: 
subject to the fees and regula- 
tion prescribed for students, , „ 1 ' No member of the teaching 

* statf above the rank of instructor m 

Under tnc lOllowing plan: this college may receive from the col- 
lege the Master's or the Doctor's de — 

1. The applicant's Dean or Admin- gree. This regulation docs not apply 
istrative officer act as scheduling to cases of candiates registered for 
officer. a particular degree on the date of 

adoption of this regulation (October 5, 

2. privilege be granted only when 1933), 
class enrollments permit, (Burden 

should be on the applicant to ascertain 2, An instructor or assistant, in 

this information.) order to fulfill the requirements for a 

Doctor's degree, must be registered during 

3. Arrangement be definite as to two semesters for at least half time gradu- 
whether work is taken as auditor or for a te work, with a corresponding reduction in 
credit. Registrar to keep the record. his services to the college. 

4. No fees other than laboratory 3, a technical degree may also 
fees, he granted to an engineer of approved 

practical experience, who is a grad— 

5. It should be understood that uate in engineering of another insti- 
staff members taking courses in this tut ion of equal standing, on completion 
manner are. not matriculated in any f at least three years of full tine 
School and that if later they are per- teaching or research work in engineering ' 
mitted to become candidates for a degree, i n a professorial rank in this institution, 
they are then subject to the regulations and upon presentation of an acceptable 

of the School in which they are regis- thesis and the fulfillment of all other 

tered and are not eligible for these requirements for technical degrees* 

special provisions. These provisions 

are for staff members only, and not ** ** *» 

for their families, who are subject to 

the fees and regulations prescribed for 

students, except for exemption from 

incidental fees." 

COLLEGE SENATE TO MEET 

There will be a meeting of the College Senate on Thursday, October 
5, at 4:10 p»m* in room 107 Main Engineering Building* 

Win, S. Hoffman 

Secretary of the College Senate 



Hawaii ?3©u 

imunnzo-* saqvid ssi 



THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 



FACULTY 

Published weekly on Tuesday during the College 
year as a means of making official announcements 
and presenting items of interest to the faculty. All 



VOL. 19 




October 10, 1939 



BULLETIN 

contributions should be as brief as possible and reach 
Walter F. Dantzscher, Director of Public Information, 
105 Old Main, not later than 10 a.m. each Friday. 

NO. 



ALUMNI DAY EVENTS 



A thousand np more alumni are 
expected to return this week-end 
to participate in Homecoming, ac- 
cording to Edward K..Hibshman, 
executive secretary of the Alumni 
Associ ation. 

A cordial invitation is ex- 
tended to members of the faculty 
to take part in the annual cider 
party which will be held this year 
in Old Main Sandwich Shop at 8:50 
p.m. Saturday evening. 

Members of the faculty and 
administrative staff are also in- 
vited to attend the alumni -student 
mass meeting to be held Friday 
evening, October 13, at 7:30 in 



Recreation Hall, From 8:00 to 
8:30 the program, including musi- 
cal numbers by the Glee Club, Blue 
Band, and Thespians, will be broad- 
cast nver Station KDFA, Pittsburgh. 

The sports program for the 
day includes the Penn State-Lehigh 
football game en New Beaver Field 
at 2:00 p.m. A soccer game at 1:00 
p.m. with Bucknell precedes the 
football game, and at 10:00 a.m. 
the freshman football team plays 
Pi ttsburgh. 

The chapel speaker on October 
15$ Alumni Sunday, will be Dr. 
Halford E. Luccock, of the Yale 
University Divinity School. 



BRUCE ROGERS EXHIBIT 



From October Z to 14 the 
Library will have on display in 
the first and second floor lob- 
bies the very unusual collection 
of books, pictures, sketches, en- 
gravings, title pages, and book 
plates illustrative of the work 
of Bruce Rogers who is character- 
ized by Mr. Daniel Up dyke, the 
famous Boston typographer, as 
"the most distinguished designer 
of books of our times." The ex- 
hibition comes to us from the 
American Institute of Graphic 
Arts and is being shown at a 
number of prominent libraries 
throughout the country. 

Bruce Rogers is not a printer 



but a designer of fine books, an 
artist. There are Included many 
evidences of his art work other 
than books, including a photograph 
of the wc<~>d carving which he made 
from the head of Joseph Conrad. 
There are also many lovely water- 
colors* The most beautiful book 
In the collection is the great 
Oxford Lectern Bible. 

Artists, book lovers, students, 
and others will enjoy this exhibit 
which members of the Library staff 
characterize as a foretaste of a 
notable series of exhibits which 
will be held with the increased 
facilities available when the new 
building is opened* 



MINUTES OF THE COLLEGE SENATE MEETING 



A meeting of the College Senate was 
held in Room 107 of the Main Engineering 
Building on Thursday, ♦Oct ober 5, 1939, at 
4:10 p,m,, with Dean Stoddart presiding. 
A list of the members present is on file 
in the office of the Registrar, 

Under the report of standing com it — 
tees Professor Kinsloe announced that 
although no changes would be permitted 
for the next issue of 'the catalogue the 
Committee on Courses of Study was meeting 
regularly and would consider changes in 
curricula and courses of study and that 
these changes could be effected even 
though they did not appear in the cata- 
logue . 

Dr. Chandlee presented a report of 
the Committee on Calendar as follows^ 
which was adopted: 

To the College Senate: 

Because of the proclamation of Pres- 
ident Roosevelt that Thanksgiving should 
be observed on Thursday, November 23, 
instead of Thurs day ,- November 30, the Sen- 
ate Committee on Calendar wishes to rec- 
ommend the following changes in the cal- 
endar for the current year: 

1939 
'Thanksgiving Recess begins 8 a.m., 
November 23, Thursday, 

Thanksgiving Recess ends 8 a.m., 
November 24, Friday. 

i 
1940 



2. That the scheduled final examina- 
tions for all lecture and recitation 
courses shall be used either for final 
examinations or for ether types of class- 
room work. - ■ ■ 



Examinations begin 8- a.m., January 
25, Thursday. 

Midyear Commencement 7:30 p.m., 
January 31, Wednesday, 

Fix '•■ Semester ends 11:50 a.m., 
February 1, Thursday. 

The changes proposed meet with the 
approval of- the Registrar and the Col- 
lege Scheduling Officer and confirm tc 
the wishes of the student body as pre- 
sented by Miss Shirm and Mr, Mo/Williams , 
student representatives. 

• ■ Miss- Marie Haidt 
W<# S. Hoffman 
E. F .• Williams 
G. C. Chandlee 

The recommendations submitted by the 
Committee on Calendar and Academic Stan- 
dards at the meeting 'of the Se'nat e in 
June concerning basic rules in the con- 
struction of a calendar were on motion 
adopted. These recommendations were as 
f ollrws : 

1, That a three— hour period be .made 
possible for final examinations for th.osj5 
departments that desire it * 



3, a. That the ca 
on Commencement occurrin 
following the first Satu 

b. That each s 
fifteen weeks of class w 
final examinations. 

c. That the fi 
periods shall be eight d 

d. That there 
vacation period between 
ceding the dates assigne 
for the second semester, 

e. That the Ea 
one full week in length. 



lendar be based 
g on the Monday 
rday in June . 
emester shall be 
ork exclusive of 

nal examination 
ays in length., 
be a three-day 
semesters, pre— 
d for registration 

ster vacation be 



Amendments to the Constitution as 
proposed by Dean Warnock as Chairman of 
the special committee at the meeting in 
June, and by Professor Kaulfuss, ■were 
adopted. These amendments change Article 
II, Section 1, of the By-Laws of the Sen- 
ate so that it reads as folliwo* 

Sect ion 1, 

The standing committees of the College 
Senate shall be the following: 

(a) Admission, one member from each of 
the undergraduate schools, and the Regis- 
trar, ex officio, 

fb ) Athletics, four members, 
^ c ) Student Welfare, five members, and 
the Dean of Men, and the Dean of Women, ex 
officiis, AND TWO STUDENT REPRESENTATIVES, 
ONE MAN AND ONE WOMAN, WHO SERVE IN AN 
ADVISORY CAPACITY WITHOUT VOTE, 

(d) Publications, four members, and 
the head of the Department of English Com- 
position, and the College Editor, ex 
officiis, - 

(e) Academic Standards, four members, 
and the College Examiner, ex officio, 

(f ) Courses of Study, on« member from 
each of the undergraduate schools, and the 
Dean of the Graduate. School, 

(g) Public Occasions, five members 
and such ex officin members as seem appro- 
priate to. the Committee on Committees, 
AND TWO STUDENT REPRESENTATIVES., ONE MAN 
AND ONE WOMAN, WHO SERVE IN AN ADVISORY 
CAPACITY .WITHOUT VOTE, 

(h). Military Instruction, one member 
from each of the undergraduate schools 
and the head, of t.he Department .of Military 
Science and Tactics,. eix officio, 

(i.) Committees,, one member from each 
of the undergraduate schools, 

(j) Calendar, five membars, AND TWO 
STUDENT REPRESENTATIVES, ONE MAN AND ONE 
WOMAN, WHO SERVE IN AN ADVISORY CAPACITY 
WITHOUT VOTE, 

(k) RULES, FOUR MEMBERS AND THE SECRE- 
TARY OF THE SENATE, EX OFFICIO. 



The new changes are indicated in cap- 
ital letters. 

Section 3 cf Article II cf the By— Laws 
was adopted as fellows: 



(k) RULES : — IT S 
THE COMMITTEE ON RULE 
MAKE RECOMMENDATIONS 
ING ALL PROPOSALS OF 
RULES, AND AMENDMENTS 
AND BY-LAWS; TO ADVIS 
FLICTS BETWEEN RULES; 
ADDITIONS AND CHANGES 
CODIFY AND PUBLISH TH 
T IME . 



HALL BE THE DUTY OF 
S TO CONSIDER AND 
TO THE SENATE REGARD- 
HEW RULES, CHANGES IN 

TO THE CONSTITUTION 
E THE SENATE OF CON- 
TO RECOMMEND NEEDED 
IN RULES; AND TO 
RULES FROM TIME TO 



In addition, the letters for the sub— 
sections of Section 3 were changed to 
agree with the letters for the sub-sections 
of Section 1. 



The 
Rules ma 
sede the 
On motio 
Committe 
to disch 
and to h 
Committe 
for the 
long per 
Committe 



sett in 
de this 

specia 
n of De 
e on Co 
arge th 
ave it s 
e on Ru 
S enat e 
iod of 
e on C o 



g up' of the C 
committee in 
1 Committee o 
an Warnock, a 
dif icat ion, t 
e Committee o 
duties taken 
les. Mr. Mor 
it s appreciat 
service durin 
dif icat ion ha 



ommittee on 
effect super— 

n Codification, 
member of the 

he Senate voted 

n Codification 
over by the 

se expressed 

ion for the 

g which the 

s labored* 



The special committee appointed at 
the May meeting of the Senate presented 
the following report j which was on motion 
adopted i 

At the meeting of the' Senate on May 
4, 1939, the following recommendation was 
adopted : 

r 

That the determination of the' dates 



for final presentation to the Senate of 
material for the 1941—42 and later cata- 
logues be referred to a committe con- 
sisting of the Chairman of the Committee 
on Courses of Study, the College Editor 
and the Registrar, for later report. 

Your Committee recommends that for the 
Complete Announcement of the Summer Sessions, 
including the next issue, recommendations 
for changes in courses be in the hands of 
the Committee on Courses of Sttidy by Octo- 
ber 15 of each year; that the committee 
present its recommendation at the November 
meeting for final action at the December 
meeting. This recommendation, if adopted, 
will operate to change the date at which 
final copy for the Complete Announcement 
of the Summer Sessions shall be submitted 
to the Director of Public Information^ in 
that it will change the date from December 
1 to the latest possible date on which the 
first Thursday in December could fall. 

Your Committee further recommends 
material for the General Catalogue and for 
the Graduate Catalogues, beginning with the 
catalogues for 1941—42, be in the hands 
of the Senate Committee not later than 
March 1 of each year^ and that the Commit- 
tee make its report to the Senate at the 
April meeting, for final action at the May 
meeting* This will make the material 
available to the College Editor somewhat 
earlier than the final date of June 1, as 
recommended by the special Committee, 

W. F» Dantzscher 
' ' Wm. S. Hoffman 

C, L, Kinsloe, Chairman 

Wn. S, Hoffman 
Secretary of the College Senate 



OFFICIAL NOTICES FROM 
THE OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR 



Withdrawals 

S Crissman, Hannah S., LA, Sept* 26 

2 Drury, Byron R., PH, Sept. 21 

2 Ellis, Dorothy C, PSd, Sept. 27 

1 Forrest, Oliver W., 2yr Ag, Sept, 28 

2 Fordyce, Denny, Jr., A, Sept, 27 

1 Garner, Anna M,, HE, Sept, 29 

S Hamer, Robert C., AgEd, Sept, 22 
S Heat on, Mildred, LA. Sept. 25 

2 Kerr, William A., PEd, Sept. 29 

1 Kleokner, Robert K., ME, Oct, 5 

2 Langendoen, John M,, CE, Sept, 29 

1 Manko, William, PEd, Sept, 28 

2 Marino, Louis H,, CE, Oct, 3 

3 Pellett, Howard E., Met, Sept. 29' 
S Rhoades, Emmett E., AgEd, Sept, 2C 
1 Roseta, Margaret A., LD, Sept, 20 
G Woodruff, Amy L,, Ed, Sept, 28 

Of the above, 3 withdrew because of 
illness, 6 because of financial difficul- 
ties, 2 to accept positions, 1' to return 
to undergraduate center, 3 because of 



personal reasons, 1 because of insuffi- 
cient mathematics to continue. 

Changes in Classification 



Couch, Edward G,, Jr. in AL should 
be changed to Sr. in AL. 

Goldstein, William D,, should be 
changed from Grad, to Special. 

McMaster, Rachel, should be changed 
from Special LA to Soph. LD. 

Wm. S, Hoffman 
Registrar 



OF INTEREST TO FACULTY WIVES 

The College meat shop is now open 
every Friday afternoon fr«m 1:15 to 5:00 
p.m. The sales room is located in the 
south side basement of the Stock Judging 
Pavilion. Orders may be telephoned to 
the animal husbandry office every Thurs- 
day , * * * * * * 



FEES FOR STAFF MEMBERS TARING COURSES 



The Executive Committee of 
the Board of Trustees approved 
on January ZQ , 1938, the following 
regulation as printed in the Fac- 
ulty Bulletin of October 18, 1938: 

"Full-time employees and their 
immediate families carrying a 
part-time schedule are exempt 
from the incidental fee and 
other specific fees, but pay a 
fee of $£,50 per semester plus 
practicum fees." 



This clarifies the notice 
appearing in last week's Faculty 
Bulletin with references to the 
regulations for staff member tak- 
ing courses and degrees as adopted 
by the Council of Administration 
on October 14, 1936. 

V. D. Bissey 
Head, Statistical Division 
Accounting Office 



OF GENERAL INTEREST 



The' librarian would appre- 
ciate it if faculty members 
wishing to dispose of old files 
of college publications v/ould get 
in "touch with the serials depart- 
ment before discarding them.. Many 
of 'the library's files ..ape incom- 
plete, with mi's sing, numbers not. . 
available -at the issuing offices. 
Advisers on student publications ■ 
should ask that four copies of 'each 
current issue be sent to the library 
immedl ately on. publi cation to assure 
preservati oh. ' , •. ■; 



An illustrated lecture on 
Chinese Porcelain will be given by 



Mr. Walter A. Wei don of Baltimore, 
in the Home Economics Auditorium, 
on Saturday, October 14,- -at 7:30 
p.m. The lecture will be illus- 
trated with several fine examples 
from the speaker's collection, a T .d 
some work of his own studio which 
has been exhibited in national 
shows* 

Mr, Wei don is an adviser to 
several museums. 

The lecture is sponsored by 
the American Ceramic Society. 
Faculty members and students are 
Invited. 



4***Wl 99a two 



U t M£b 



«3HKy«0*¥ SAQYlft SSIH 



THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 



FACULTY 

Published weekly on Tuesday during the College 
year as a means of making official announcements 
and presenting items of interest to the faculty. All 




VOL. 19 



October 17, 1939 



BULLETIN 

contributions should be as brief as possible and reach 
Walter F. Dantzscher, Director of Public Information, 
105 Old Main, not later than 10 a.m. each Friday. 

NO. 4 



PENNSYLVANIA COLLEGE PHYSICS TEACHERS TO MEET 



Every recognized college and 
university in Pennsylvania is ex- 
pected to be represented at the 
annual conference of Pennsylvania 
college physics teachers to be 
held here on Eriday and Saturday, 
October ZO and £1. 

The book and apparatus ex- 
hibits, which may be inspected in 
the old Physics Building from 3; 15 
p.m. to 5:00 p.m. on Friday, are 
called to the particular attention 
of the faculty. 

Members of the faculty are 
cordially invited to attend other 
events on Friday, which include a 
special program for visiting ladies 
(details of which may be secured at 
the ' registration desk) from 1:30' 



w 



R. Ham, 



p.m. to 5:00 p.m. Dr. w. n. nam, 
head of the Department of Physics, 
will be chairman of a meeting to be 



held from 1:30 p«m, to 3:15 p.m. in 
room 109, the old Physics Building. 
Dean Whitmore will give the address 
of welcome, and other talks will be 
given by physicists from the Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania, the Uni- 
versity of Pittsburgh, Swarthmore, 
Ursinus, and Albright Colleges. 

Evening events include a get- 
together from 6:00 p.m. to 6:15 
p.m. in the first floor lounge of 
Old Main, followed by 'a dinner 



from 6:15 to 7:45 p.m. 
Main Sandwich Shop. 



in the Old 



Dr. Charles F. Squire, of the 
Department of Physics of the Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania, will speak 
on the subject "Production and 
Measurement of Temperature Below 
One Degree Absolute" on Friday 
evening at 8:00 o* clock in the 
Home Economics Auditorium. 



EXHIBIT OF AMERICAN PAINTING 



The current exhibition, "Ameri- 
can Painting," in the College Art 
Gallery, room 303 Main Engineering, 
will hang until Saturday, October 
El, according to Professor J. Burn' 
Helme of the Division of Fine Arts, 
Department of Architecture. The 
gallery is open daily except Sun- 
day from 8:30 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. 
The public is cordially invited. 

This exhibition, comprised 
mainly of oils, includes the work 
of such prominent artists as Saul 
Berman; Bruce Mitchell; Sidney 



Laufman, winner of the Altman 
prize at this year f s National Acad- 
emy Exhibit in New York; Arnold 
Vv'iltz; Leon Kelly of Pennsylvania; 
June Groff, also of Pennsylvania; 
and others of equal importance. 

A significant cross-section 
of American art is presented in 
this group of 33 paintings, which 
includes 15 works by artists who 
were represented in "New Horizons 
in American Art," the display of 
the Work Projects Administration 
Art Program held at the Museum of 



Modern Art in New York City last 
year. 

All sections of the country 
are represented by the paintings. 
The landscapes illustrate a new 
vital emotion which was in danger 
of being lost during the period 
of worship of technique for its 
own sake* City, small town, and 
industrial scenes also interest 
the Project artists, but still life 
and figure painting receive very 
little attention. 

Exhibitions of this type, ac- 
cording to Professor Helme, are one in a hundred years, 



of the outstanding features of the 
Work Projects Administration Art 
Program. The Art Projects beyond 
providing employment for needy 
artists have produced art for thou- 
sands of American institutions and 
millions of our American people. 
The program has opened to the pub- 
lic new avenues for active commun- 
ity participation in the arts, and 
in the words of Lawrence Vail Cole- 
man, Director of the American Asso- 
ciation of Museums , as quoted by 
Professor Helme, "The Art Project 
is one of the most important things 
that has happened to American a.rt 



FACULTIES TO MEET 



The Graduate Faculty will meet will meet on Monday, October 23, at 



on Wednesday, October 25, at 4:00 
p.m* in 208 Buckhout Laboratory, 
according to an official notice 
received from Dean Frank D. Kern, 



4:10 p.m., in room 110 Home Economics 
Building, according to an official 
notice from Dean M» R. Trabue. Dean 
C. W. Stoddart will speak on the 
subject "Liberal Arts in a Land 



The School of Education faculty Grant College 



CHAPEL SPEAKER 



SPORTS CALENDAR 



The chapel speaker for Sunday 



October 22, 
Sutherland, 



wi 11 be Dr. 
Dean of Men 



Robert L. 
at Buck- 



nell University! 

ROOMS WANTED 

Any faculty members having 
rooms available for visiting pro- 
fessors who will attend the meet- 
ing of college physics teachers 
this Friday and Saturday, October 
20 and 21, will kindly notify 
Professor H» L. Yeagley, stating 
the number of people that can be 
accommodated and the price of the 
room. 



Sports events away from home 
this week-end include the football 
game with Cornell at Ithaca on 
Saturday, October 21; the junior 
varsity game with' Cornell junior 
varsity on Friday, October 20; and 
the freshmen soccer game at Syra- 
cuse on Saturday. 

The varsity soccer team will 
meet Carnegie Institute of Tech- 
nology at home on Friday, October 
20, at 3:00 p.m., and the freshmen 
football team will play Syracuse 
on New Beaver Field at 2:00 p.m. 
on Saturday. 



OFFICIAL NOTICES FROM THE OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR 
W i thd r a v/als 

3 Beemer, James Cage, Jr., A f Of the above four withdrew to 

Sept. 23 accept positions, two on account of 

1 Canonico, John L., For, finances, tv/o to take a trip, one 

Sept. 23 on account of father's death, one 

1 Garinger, Wilson R., DH, gave no reason, and one gave reason 

Oct. 2 as not interested. 
G Hench, Donald E. Ch, Sept. 29 

2 Jayne, V/m. M., LD, Oct. Z Changes in C lass if i c a t i on 

3 Laphar.i, Evelyn, Psy, Oct. Z 

Z Llewellyn, Woodrow G., LD, Bartha, Wra. A«, change from 

Sept, 26 sophomore in IEd f to freshman in 
G montagur, Walter V. r ., IviEd, IEd. 

Oct. 11 Turner, Barbara, change from 

Z O'Neill, Harold J*, LD, Oct. 7 Special to Graduate, 
Z Smith, Nellie L., LD, Sept. ZA 

Wrn« S. Hoffman 
Regl strar 



jCz-ciqii aSsix 



H3KKYHD'H SAGVIS SS 



THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 



FACULTY I 



Published weekly on Tuesday during the College 
year ?s a means of making official announcements 
and presenting items of interest to the faculty. All 




BULLETIN 

contributions should be as brief as possible and reach 
Walter F. Dantzscher, Director of Public Information, 
105 Old Main, not later than 10 a.m. each Friday. 



VOL. 19 



October 24, 1939 



NO. 



5 



CLEVELAND SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA ' TO APPEAR ON ARTISTS' COURSE 



An enlarge 
ted by Presiden 
has been consid 
of numbers to a 
coming Artists 1 
soon be in a po 
nouncements of 
series for the 
Carl E* Marquar 
committee, stat 



d committee, . appoin- 
t Hetzel last Spring, 
ering the selection 
ppear on the forth- 

Course and will 
sition to make an- 
the numbers on the 
present season, Dr* 
dt, chai rman of the 
es» 



The larger committee provides 
more adequate representation for 
the student body and gives repre- 
sentation to townspeople. The first 
number to be engaged is the Cleve- 
land Symphony Orchestra, which is 
scheduled to appear in State College 
Friday evening, March 29* It was 
necessary for the committee to en- 
ter Into contractual arrangements 
with the orchestra before the ap- 
pearance of the last number on last 
year's scries in order to be assumed 
that they would appear on the cam- 
pus for the forthcoming series* 

Accordingly, subscribers to 
last year's course were asked in 
expressing their preferences for 
numbers on this year's series to 
take the appearance of the Cleve- 
land organization for granted. Pop- 
ular- interest. in the number ran so 
high, however, that 115 subscribers 
voted the Cleveland Symphony as a 
personal choice. Symphony orches- 
tras have invariably polled the high- 
est number of votes for any type 
of number, 

"in booking the Cleveland Sym- 
phony, we are not only obtaining the 
services of a fine orchestral group, 



but are responding, as we have 
always attempted to do, to the 
expressed preferences of subscribers. 
There appeared to members of the 
committee to be unmistakable evi- 
dence of a growing preference for 
a new orchestral group and the 
Cleveland Symphony has not appeared 
on our series for six years," Dr. 
Marquardt .stated*, 

The Cleveland Symphony Orches- 
tra Is an older organization than 
the National Symphony which has 
appeared here for the last three 
cons-ecutive years* The National is 
in its ninth season this year. The 
Cleveland enters its twenty- second. 
It began its celebrated tours in 
its very first season* Now with 
continuing re-engagements, the num- 
ber of concerts played away from 
home totals 829, in 27 states, Cuba, 
and Canada. Among the concerts 
scheduled for the present tour is 
an appearance In Carnegie Hall in 
New York* Its present conductor 
is Dr. Artur Rodzinski* 

Members of the present commit- 
tee includes Professor H, S* Brun- 
ner, Miss Jessie Cameron, W. F* 
Dantzscher, Nell Fleming, Pro- • 
fessor R# ' W. Grant, Professor B. K. 
Johnstone, Dean Edward Steidle, 
W. K. Ulerich, and Professor W. L. 
Werner, as well as A# William 
Engel, Jr., editor of The Collegi- 
an; David Pergrin, president of 
the Senior class; Jane Romlg, presi- 
dent of the W# S* G» A#, and Frank 
Anderson, president of Interfra- 
ternity Council* 



AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY TO MEET 



The ninety-first meeting of the 
Central Pennsylvania Section of the 
American Chemical So'ciety will be' held 
in the Home Economics Auditorium on 
Friday, October 27, at 7:30 p.m. 

Dr. Bernard Lewis, physical chemist 
Explosive Division, U, S ', Bureau of 
Mines Experiment Station, Pittsburgh, 
will speak on the subject, "Flames and 
Explosions of Gases," 

Dr, Lewis received a B, S« degree 
at the Massachusetts Institute of Tech— 



and has done extensive research work on 
reaction kinetics, gaseous explosives, 
and flames, lie is an authority on the 
subject on which he is to speak, having 
written a hook on it which is one of 
the volumes of the Cambridge Series of 
Physical Chemistry i Ihe*talk will' be 
illustrated by slides. 

At 6 ;00 p,m, a dinner will be held 
in the Old Main Sandwich Shop to give 
members the opportunity of meeting and 
speaking with Dr, Lewis, Faculty members 
are requested to make reservations by 



°Logy, an M, S, degree at Harvard, and notifying Dr, S, T, Yuster, School 



. Ph,D, degree at Cambridge, He has 

been with the Explosives Division of 

the U, S, Bureau of Mines since 192 9 

* * 



of 



Mineral Industries, by -Thursday 
October 26, 



noon. 



ART EXHIBITS 



During October and November a group 
of 87 original etchings, lithography . 
wood-engravings, and aquat int s- will be 
on display in the exhibit room of the 
Central Library, 

Printed in ur.lim.it cd> unsigned cdi~ 
tions, the American Artists Group prints 
are in no way produced for the r.ionopol— 

■e published at a 
;e art lover, who 

the expensive 
s issued solelv a: 



istic collector, but arc 
low cost for the average 
before could not afford 
b 1 a ck— a n d— wh it e ex amp 1 e 
collectors 1 items. 



Among the contempd 
artists represented are 
Reginald Marsh, Raphael 
Gropper, Waldo Pierce, 
Marin, Adolf Dehn, Erne 
Tait, Mabel Dwight, Wan 
Kunioshi, Don Freeman, 
others noted for their 
American expression, 

* * 



rary American '■ 
: George Biddlc, 
Soyer, William 
Emil Ganso, John 
st Fiene, Agnes 
da Gag, Yasue 
Paul Cadmus,, and 
charact erist ically 



The display has been loaned by the 



The Division of Fine Arts of the 
Department of Architecture announces an 
exhibition of the work of a local painter, 
Mi so Lucie M, Manley, sponsored by the 
State College T/onen's Club, The exhibi- 
tion contains a large group of oil paint- 
ings by Miss Manley, who is a member of 
the club. 

The pictures will hang in the College 
Art Gallery, room 303 Main Engineering 
Building, which is open daily except Sun- 
day from 8:30 a.m. until 8:30 p,m. The 
show will be open to the general public 
commencing Tuesday morning, October 24, 
and will continue for two weeks until 
Saturday noon, November 4, -The public 
is cordially invite d« 



OF GENERAL INTEREST 



Members of the faculty who are not 
receiving copies of Co-Edition, the weekly 
women's student publication, and who de- 
sire to do bo, please notify Mary Fen— 
ninger at the Phi Mu House. 

* * * * * * .... 

The speaker at chapel on Sunday, 
October 29, will be D r » Raymon Kistler^ 
of the Central Presbyterian Church, 
Rochester, New York, ... 
'' * * * * * * 

Only two sports events will occur 
at home this week— end. They -are -the 
freshmen soccer gane with Cornell at 1:00 
p,m, Saturday, October 28; and the varsity 
soccer game with Syracuse at 2 :30 p.m. on 
the same afternoon, 

* * * * * * 

Members of the Graduate Faculty are 
again reminded of the meeting called hy 



Dean Kern for Wednesday, October 25, at 
4:00 p.m. in 208 Buckhout Laboratory, 
* * * * * * 

Copy for the St udent— Faculty Directory 
has gone to the printer, who promises to de- 
liver the directorips at State College with- 
in two weeks. 

This year's directory contains a • 
total of 8212 names. Of this .number 1330, 
which represents the most , comprehens ive 
listing of 'f acuity and, staff members ever 
att enpt ed, are in capital letters. Last 
year there was a total of 7923 names> of 
'which number 1228 represented members of 
the staff. The lines devot ed 'wholly to stu- 
dents, therefore, increase from 6695 last 
year to 6882 this year, 

Wm. S. Hoffman 
Registrar 



GRANTS-IK-AID OF RESEARCH 



At a meeting of the Council on Re- 
search held on October 16, 1939, the 
following grants-in-aid of research were 
made from the Central Fund for Research: 



12. C, W. Hasek, G. L. Leffler, and R, H, 
Waters* Econo, .ic growth and fluctuations 
in Pennsylvania correlated with those in 
the United States, $200. 



1. Mary L. Willard. Optical properties 
of drugs, dye intermediates and various 
allied crystalline organic compounds, 
$200. 

2, Arthur Rose, Calculations on the 
sharpness of separation in batch frac- 
tional dirjt illat ion $150* 

3» Clifford R, Adams, An objective test 
of personality character i ; st ics * $145, 

4', Bruce V, Moore, Identification and 
measurement of qualifications for suc- 
cessful foremen and supervisors in indus- 
try. $75, 

5. Charles C. Peters. An experiment 
with a pioneering high school curriculum. 
$115, 

6. Benjamin J, Lazan, Engineering 
mechanics. $100. 

7. P. H. Schweitzer* Porting of two- 
stroke Diesel engines* $2'00, 

S. Herbert Koepp— Baker. The physiology 
of certain aspects -of the articulatory 
process in the speech of human' adults, 
$125, 

9, John H, Ferguson, Survey of munici* 
pally owned electric companies' in Pennsyl- 
vania, $200, • ' 

10, H, F, Alderfer, An assessment manual 
for elected assessors of Pennsylvania, 
$200. 

11, F. J, Tschan. Medieval history — 
Bernward of Hildesheim and Adam of Bremen, 
$100. 



13, P, H. Wueller, Pennsylvania taxes, 
state and local, $100, 

14, H, H, Arnold, Old Spanish versifica- 
tion. $105. 

15, H, M, Davis, The system MgO - B ? qO 
$100. f J 

16, D. W. McGlashan,. Application of 
froth flotation methods to separ-ation of 
minerals, $100, 

17, Edward C „ Henry, Measurement of 
elect rophoret ic migration velocity of 
clay particles, $120, 

18, Arthur P. Honess. Etch figure inves- 
tigations with special reference to 
amphisymetry of crystals, $100* 

19, C. A. Bonine and P. D. Krynine. 
Influence of cementation of oil and gas 
reservoirs on migration and accumulation, 
$35. 

20, Paul D, Krynine. The origin and 
significance of Red Beds. $15 

21, W. M. Myers. A. P. Honess, P. D. 
Krynine* Origin and genetic relation- 
ships of the Silaceous oolites of Central 
Pennsylvania, $50, 

22, Frank M, Swart z* Fossil faunas of 
Silurian of Pennsylvania, $50. 

23, Elwood C» Davis and John D. Lawther. 
Relationships between personality changes 
in college freshmen and their participation 
in certain extracurricular activities, 
$200. 

S. Yi", Fletcher 
Chairman, Council on Research 



EXAMINATIONS TO BE HELD 



Dean Frank D, Kern announces the 
four following preliminary and qualify- 
ing examinations for the Ph.D. and D.Ed, 
degree s : 

Mr, Anthony C, Richter," preliminary 
examination, Ph.D., agricultural bio- 
chemistry, 10:00 a.m., Thursday, Oct, 26, 
213 Agriculture Building. 

Mr. J. W, Ford, qualifying examina- 



tion, Ph.D., physics, 9:30 a,m., Saturday, 
Oct, 28, 108 -physics Building, 

Mr. Claude A, Knight, qualifying 
examination, Ph.D., agricultural bio- 
chemistry, 10:00 a.m., Tuesday, Oct. 31, 
213 Agriculture Building, 

Miss Edna Bottorf, qualifying exam- 
ination, D.Ed., 2:00 to 5:00 p.m., Thurs- 
day, November 9, 20 Education Btiilding, 



FACULTY FINANCE CANVASS FOR CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 



Professor M, A. Farrell, Department 
of Bacteriology, is chairman of the 
annual finance canvass of the Penn State 
Christian Association, it was announced 
Thursday by Professor Marsh W. White, 
chairman of the Board of Directors. 

for the Schools of 
'■ulture, Professor 
Borland; Education, Professor Georg 
een; Engineering, Professor Fred C. 
Chemistry and Physics, Professor 



the C 
A. A. 
R. Gr 
St ewa 
0. F. 
Jabir 
A. P. 
f e s s o 



Division leaders 
olle.'e 



■L *.' j W 11 U 111 Jt k> U A V "-" 11 J. J. ., 1 J 

Smith; Liberal Arts, Professor 

Shibli; Mineral Industries, Dr 

Honess; Physical Education, Pro 

Robert A. Higgins; and for the 



Administration, Mr* W, J, Mills, More 
than 300 students and faculty members are 
taking part In this canvass. Over 600 
participate in activities each week of 
the school year. 

The canvass among faculty members 
will extend through November 3, while the 
student canvass will finish this Friday* 
Contributions from both students and 
faculty are used in the program services 
and activities budget. Overhead expenses 
are defrayed by contributions from alumni, 
parents, and friends, and by an appropria- 
tion from the College, 



OFFICIAL NOTICES- FROM THE OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR 



Withdrawals 



G ■ 


Barto, Robert W, , IEd, Oct, 7 




Blumenthal, Arthur J,, Ed, Sept, 3 


1 


Callista, James S., LD, Oct. 17 


r> - 


Cope, William' T*; PH, Oct.. 11 


h ■ 


Eastep, Chester S»> Ed, Sept * 2*5 • 




Etters, Eva Mae, LA, Oct, 16 


c 


Gunwaldsen, Ralph W, , CE, Sept. 25 


3 


Hankins, George D., LA, Oct. 17 




Hucker, Alfred, Ed, Sept. 30 


1 


Kribs, David A., ME, Oct. 18 - 


s 


McCcmbie, Helen Z., Ed, Sept, 30 ', 


2 


Paulhamus, Bruce -A. IEd, Oct. 17 


1 


Rittenhouse, Douglas W. , For, Oct. 


S 


Schaffer, Joseph H., Ed, Sept. 30 


1 


Sykes, John F., Met, Sept, 26 


G 


•Watkins, Florence V., LA, Oct, 13 




* * 



Of the foregoing 4 withdrew because 
"their course was discontinued by their 
instructor; 3 because of lack of finances; 
1. because of illnessj 1 to accept a posi- 
tion; 1 because of dissatisfaction; 6 for 
personal reasons. 

Change s in Classification 

Barbey, Carl Weller, LD— should be changed 

to freshman from sophomore. 
Ash, Richard L,, Mng— should be changed 

to freshman from sophomore, 
Gerhart, Robert P., LD—— should be changed 

to freshman from sophomore, 

Wm. S, Hoffman 
Registrar 



**«<LI1 **»!!« 



: £-4 «h <*-•* fe ~» 



¥3ilKYH0*H SAQV1S SSI 



THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 



FACULTY 

Published weekly on Tuesday during the College 
year as a means of making official announcements 
and presenting items of interest to the faculty. All 




VOL- 19 



October 31, 1939 



BULLETIN 

contributions should be as brief as possible and reach 
Walter F. Dantzscher, Director of Public Information, 
105 Old Main, not later than 10 a.m. each Friday. 

NO. 



DON COSSACK CHORUS TO OPEN ARTISTS' COURSE 



In response to demand ,for a 
choral number, always a popular 
feature on Artists 1 Course series/ ' 
the committee for this year's con- 
certs has engaged the Don Cossack 
Chorus for the opening performance 
Tuesday evening, December 12. Dur- 
ing the last 15 years the Don Cos- 
racks have traveled nearly a million 
miles in giving approximately 4-000 
concerts • Those who have heard 
them in one of their many concerts 
in this country have been impressed 
with their verve and color« 



The chorus 



comprised of 36 



men, giants 'in stature, who appear 
dressed In black tunics and shiny 
black boots, and stand erect In 
military obedience to commands 
from their leader. They sing with 
joy and abandon, in some songs 
whistling and dancing in accom- 
paniment to their music. Sonoro-us- 
basses plumb the bottom of the 
vocal register, balanced at the' 
other end by high and equally power- 
ful tenors. 

The Don Cossacks v/ill sing 
three groups in their concert here, 
the first being liturgical in 
character, the others composed main- 
ly of the folk songs of Russia. 
Characterizing the first group Is 
the "Cherubim Song," a perfect ex- 
ample of the 18th century hymn and 
corresponding with the ancient mel- 
ody preserved by the Simonov Con- 
vent. Outstanding in the latter 
two groups is Shvedoff's unique 
arrangement of Rachmaninoff's famed 
"Prelude in C Sharp Minor." 



Few choruses can match the 
exciting history of the Don Coo- 
sacks. Most of them officers in 
the defeated White Army under 
General Wr angel during the Russian 
Revolution, they were imprisoned 
at Tchelengir in 1921. They com- 
bat ted the misery of their exist- 
ence by gathering about the camp- 
fires at night and singing the 
songs of: their homeland--songs of 
the peasants, laborers, and sol- 
diers at work and at play, and 
liturgical music. of the Russian 
Church. One of- their number, a 
young lieutenant, had been a choir- 
master. Seeing' the possibilities 
in the rich natural voices of many 
of these men, he formed them into 
a group' that has remained vi r- 
tually intact to this day. 

"When the men were exiled to 
Bulgaria two years later, the 
chorus formed by Serge Jaroff be- 
came the choir of the St. Sofia 
Cathedral. It was a short time 
only before a shrewd manager de- 
tected their potentialities and 
encouraged them to present their 
first secular concert. 



Most of the Cossack people 
were either killed or dispersed 
when the Bolsheviks began their 
war against the old regime. The 
present troupe, with' its reper- 
toire of 130 numbers, is one of 
the few ramainlng agencies keep- 
ing the old culture alive. The 
members of the chorus, banned from 
Russia, are now studying to become 
citizens of the United States. 



SCHOLASTIC MORTALITY AS RELATED TO RANK IN HIGH SCHOOL CLASSES 



Admission to the Pennsylvania State 
College is based very largely on rank in 
secondary school graduating classes. That 
this' method "is justified seems to be 
indicated in the following paragraphs* 

In the supplement to the Faculty Bul- 
letin of September 26 , 1939 , the names of 
students who were dropped for poor scholar- 
ship at the- e-n-d -of the second semester of 
last year are listed. The Faculty Bulletin 
of March 7, 1939, contains the. names of 
students dropped at the end of the first" 
semester of the year 1938—39. The total 
number dismissed at the end of both semes- 
ters of the year is 368<, Four of these 



were two-year agriculture students and 
six were special students, leaving a 
total of 358 students who were candidates 
for baccalaureate degrees. 



to th 
let in 
stude 
at th 
In ea 
right 
in t'h 
is th 
the g 
top i 



The fo 
at wh i 

of Ma 
nt s d i 
e end 
ch sec 

repre 
e grou 
e numb 
roup i 
s the 



11 owing 
ch appea 
rch 14, 
smissed 
of each 

ion the 
sents th 
p indica 
er of st 
ndicat ed 
percent a 



distribution is similar 
red in the Facility Bui— 



193' 



and includes all 



for poor scholarship 
semester of last year. 

number to the lower 
e number of students 
ted. To the lower left 
udents dismissed from 
• The figure at the 
ge dismissed* 



Rank in Secondary S choo l Graduat ing Class 



First 
Fifth 



Second Third Fourth 

Fifth Fifth Fifth 



Fifth Not 

Fifth Ranked Total 



Fre shman 


2.3$ 
18 788 


7 . 1$ 

38 -539 


14,1$ 

.33 244. 


23.5$ 
28 , 119 


3 9 e 8$ 
31 80 


8$ 
4 50 


8.4$ 
152 . 1820 


S ophomore 


2.7$ 
19 716 


11,3$ 
57 503 


. ,8,2$ . . . 
12 .243 . 


. 16.5$ 
20 121 


16.5$ 
20 121 


8 , 7$ 
22 58 


8.4$ 
140 1664 


Junior 


" • 1 . 5$ 
9 606 


5.2$ 
21 403 


. 6.6$ 
12 182 


11$ 
8 73 


. .10,2$ 
4 37 


8.8$ 
3 34 


4.3$ 
57 1337 


Senior 


. 2/j 
1 541 


.6$ 
2 361 


+6$ 

1 194 


1„0$ 
1 104 


4.9$ . 
2 .. 41 


7.7$ 
2 26 


.7$ 
9 1267 


Total I 1.8$ 

i 47 2651 


6.5$ 

113 1860 


7*6$ 
66 363 


13.5$ 
57 417 


27.0$ 

59 218 
... 


8.3$ 
11 133 


nc-f 
O »(L/o 

358 6088 



The class of 1942 is made up of stu— graduated from high school in the first 

dents from the various fifths of their fifth of their class. Dismissals from 

high school classes as represented on the same class are shown on scale (2). 
scale (l)j 788, or 43.3$ of them having 

Scale 1 



Make— up of Freshman Class (1820) by Rank in High School Clas 



First Fifth 



„43_...3^ 1 .93j9 



Second Fifth 



?2jM 



cf. 




3rd Fifth 
244 



Scale 2 



Dismissals from Freshman Class (152) by Rank in High School Class 



1st Fifth 

1 is n.e 



Second Fifth 
38 25$ 



Not 
Ranfce d 



Third Fifth . 4th Fifth J Fifth Fifth 
33 . 21.6^128 18.3$} 31 . 20.-^ 13&I 



In the same way the next two scales 
show the makeup and dismissals for the 
total enrollment. It is interesting to 
note that f irst— f if thers, who make up 



43.3$ of the freshman class, furnish only 
11.8$ of the dismissals, Fifth-f if thers, 
on the other hand, make-up 4.4$ of the 
class and 20«4$ of the dismissals© 



Scale 3 



Make-up of Total Enrollment (6088) "by Rank in High School Class jjot 

fanked 



First Fifth 



2651 



Second Fifth 
43.5_ii J 1806 



_££*£* 



— 



3rd Fifth 
86 3 14,2 c /o 



4th 

417 |21 
6_,^i 



3.6 



12J2 



1st Fifth 
47 13.1^ 



Scale 4_ 
Total Dismissals (358) by Rank in High School Class 



lit 



Second Fifth 



Third Fift 
33 „7o 1 66 18,43 



Not 

Rank nd 



W 



'ourth Fifth 'Fifth Fifth 
57 1 5 c 9--/A 59-- 16 .5' 



11 
3.1 



In the Registrar's distribution of 
enrollment for the first semester 1938-39 
Table X summarizes the enrollment by rank 
in secondary school graduating classes 
and the average grade for each -group ex- 



Rank - 

1st , , . 
2nd. . . 
3rd, . . 
4th... 
5th . . . 
None . . 



Seniors 
No. Average 



541 



.361. . 
.194. . 
.104.. 
♦.41.. 
..26. . 



1.79, 



1.34. 
1.14. 



1.06. 

.86. 

1.67. 



Every year a chart showing the 
tribution of freshman averages is se 
each Pennsylvania high school which 
representatives in the freshman bias 
the year previous. On this chart ar 
placed the names and averages of the 
students from the high school to whi 
it is sent, A typical example is th 
for the Germaritown High School, Phil 
phia. There was one student .from th 
first fifth of his class; his averag 
2.61. Those from the second fifth h 
the following averages: 1,78^ 1.65 J 
1;55, l;40> U38* l*25j and 1.21. T 
from the third fifth had these avera 
IkOO, 498., ,56^ and .32. One of the 
students from the fourth fifth made 
average of 2.09, the highest made by 
student' admitted from that fifth las 
year. The other student had an aver 
of 1.00. These last two were admitt 
by examination. 

* * 



dis— 

nt to 
had 
s of 



oh 

at 

adel- 
e 

e was 
ad 

1*62> 
hose 
ges : 
two 
an 

ny 
t 

age 
ed 



cept freshmen. This table is here repro- 
duced in part. Note that in each case 
the first-fifth average is higher than the 
second—fifth, the second is higher than 
the third, etc, 



Juniors 
No, Average 



S ophemore s 
No, " Average 



,606. . 

,403.. 
,182. . 
,.73.. 
,.39.. 
■34 



1.66... .716 ...... 

1.21....503...... 

1 • 06 .... 2 4 3 ..... . 

7.-.O.2.. ..121 

,76 ... . 58 

.64.,... 23 



,1.55 

,1.01 

.82 

.6 9 

.59 

, .60 



It is interesting to note that all 
of the 17 students of the class , of 1943 
who are exempt from English Composition 
1 on the basis of the placement tests 
given during Freshman Week are ranked in 
the first fifth of a public high school 
graduating class. 

In June, 1939, 84 students of the 
class of 1939 were graduated with honors. 
Of this number 72 had been, graduated -.in 
the first fifth of their high school 
class, 7 in the second fifth, 1 in the 
fourth fifth, and 4 without rank. With 
one exception, all those who received 
special honors at the June, 1939, Com- 
mencement were first fifth high school 
student s , 



M, V. Brown 
Office of the Registrar 



PfU D. EXAMINATIONS 



Dean Frank D, Kern announces the following final examinations for the ' Ph.D. 
degree : . • 



Clifford R, Adams .' 

Major: -psychology 
Friday, Nov, 3, 2:00 p.m. 
13 Education Building 



Vincent Meunier , ■ 
Ma jor : chemistry 
Friday, Nov. 3, 2:30 p.m, 
105 Pond Laboratory 



OF GENERAL INTEREST 

The College Library invites the The local chapter of Phi Beta Kappa 

college conn-unity to Wednesday readings wishes to add to its roll the names of 
at 4:15 in the Upper Lounge, Old Main, all newcomers on the faculty or in the 
The eighth series will begin November 1 community who are members of the society, 
and will follow the general subject of Information should be sent to A, Pauline 
"Personalities," The speakers with their Locklin, secretary, in care of the De- 
subjects are as follows: partnent of English Literature and should 

include the following data: name (if a 
November married woman the maiden name also); 

college; year of graduation and of initi— 
1 Professor R, E, Galbraith, ationj position, if an employee of the 

"Robert Frost," College; local address, 

8 Professor R, T/, Tyson, ** ** ** 

"Constantin St anislavski," 
15 Professor Herbert Koepp— Baker , The chapel speaker for next Sunday, 

"Job," November 5, will be Dr. Moses Lovell, 

of the Central Congregational Church, 
Decembe r Brooklyn, 

* * * * * * 

6 Professor R, E, Dengler, 

"Robert Browning," Four sports events are scheduled for 

13 Mr, A, 0, Morse, this Saturday, November 4 f The football 

"Christmas Selections," ( game with Maryland will be held at 2:00 

** ** ** p,m,, preceded by the freshman game with 

The College Senate will meet Bucknell at 12:30. Both the varsity and 

Thursday, November 2, at 4:10 in room tl } e freshmen cross country meets will be- 

107, Main Engineering, This is official £ irL at 2 :30, 
notification from the secretary, 

** ** ** * * * * ** 

OFFICIAL NOTICES FROM THE OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR 

Withdrawals 

G Blackburn, Enos E,> Sept-, 30 ' G ETine, Harold W,, Ch, Oct, 6 

2 Bue.ll, Harold Ellsworth, FC, Sept, 21 2 Medlar, Charles E., PEd, Sept, 21 

2 Chianelli> Russell R., PEL), Oct. 2 1 Reighard, Samuel N,, DC, Oct, 2 

2 Eiseman, Mary Alice, HE, Oct, 13 . 1 Reynolds, Jack D», FC, Oct, 16 

2 Findley, Fred K., FC, Oct, 9 1 Riester, Edwin H,, SC, Oct. 18 

2 Fischer., Adelaide, HE, Sept. 15 •■ 1 Roth, Saul, LD, Oct. 16 

2 Gilbert, Martha L,, EC , Oct, 3 2 Ruth, Alfred L., FC, Sept. 25 

1 Havrilak, John, lEd, Sept. 23 2 Seybert, Doris E., HC , Oct, 9 

1 Hungerbukler, Leo, PEd, Oct, 10 2 Staruch, Stanley J,, Ch,.0ct. 25 

1 Jones, Bruce H,, Mng, Oct. 25 3 Urbansky, Edward 77., AL, Oct. 20 

Of the' above, four gave financial one was dissatisfied, one enrolled at an— 

lif ficu.lt ues as their reason for leaving, other institution, one gave lack of interest, 

three gave illness, two are working, one and one was unable to obtain desired courses. 

was unable to come at scheduled time, one Four cited no reason, 
gave a personal reason, one was married, 

Cha nge s in Cla s s if i cat ion 

Evans, Margaret Jane, from sophomore, Johnson, William Stanley, sophomore in 

HE, to freshman, HE. - ME to freshman in ME, 

Healy^ Ruth Stull, from sophomore in Williams, Harriet Augusta, from senior 

education to part-time junior, Ed. in Mid, to junior in MEd, 

Wm. S, Hoffman 
** ** ■ ** Registrar 

FACULTY MEETING 

The faculty of the School of the Liberal Arts will meet on Wednesday, November 1,, 
at 4:10 p.m., in 405 Old Main, according to an official announcement from the dean of 
the School, 



■ 



X3HMVH0-H SJKIV1& SSIH 



L 



THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 



FACULT 



Y 




Published weekly on Tuesday during the College 
year as a means of making official announcements 
and presenting items of interest to the faculty. All 

November 7, 1939 
VOL. 19 



BULLETIN 

contributions should be as brief as possible and reach 
Walter F. Dantzscher, Director of Public Information, 
105 Old Main, not later than 10 a.m. each Friday. 



NO. 



7 



V RITZ 



rKiu i\REISLER, CELEBRATED VIOLINIST, AND 
CORNELIA OTIS SKINNER ON ARTISTS COURSE 



With the engagement of Fritz 
Kreisler and Cornelia Otis Skinner, 
the program for the forthcoming 
Artists 1 Course has been completed, 
according to an announcement from 
Dr. Carl E# Marqtiardt, chairman* 
More money will be expended for tal* 
lent this year than ever before, 
although there will be but four 
numbers on the current course as 
compared to five or six in other 
years. 

"The opportunity to engage 
Fritz Kreisler cflme to the com- 
mittee as a complete and unexpect- 
ed surprise* . In other years the 
inclusion of so outstanding an ar- 
tist as Kreisler has been s<~> defin- 
itely beyond cur financial means 
that the committee spec! f i cal ly 
withheld his name ■ from the ballots 
on which past subscribers were ask-. 
ed to indicate their preferences 



for a forthcoming scries 



Dr. 



Marqtiardt stated. "Due to the un- 
settled situation abroad and the 
consequent curtailment of concert 
plans in Europe, it has been pos- 
sible to obtain the services of 
Fritz Kreisler on participation 
basis which has not heretofore 
been available." 

In selecting attractions for 
the current series, the committee 
was definitely of the opinion that 
the local audience would prefer to 
have four top-ranking numbers than 
five or six of lesser quality, Dr. 
Marquardt stated. Accordingly the 
committee has attempted to support 
the appearance of perhaps the world's 
most ceLebrated violinist, with 



thr.ee. other numbers, each of which 
would be outstanding in its field. 
In selecting Cornelia Otis Skinner, 
who has been described as "the great- 
est single attraction in the Ameri- 
can theatre," cognizance was taken 
of the fact that she was the most 
popular number on the ballots re- 
turned last spring. The commi'ttee 
has sought to engage her several 
times previously without success, 
usually because her itinerary was 
not , definite ..enough when it became 
necessary to make commitments* 

"When the committee considered 
the question as to whether -there 
should be five or six numbers at a 
higher price or four numbers at the 
same prices that have prevailed in 
other years* it was generally felt 
that the price range should remain 
the same," Dr. Marquardt stated, 
"it was believed that if the price • 
of the series was raised, the in- 
crease in price might work a defi- 
nite hardship on the student body 
and thus defeat the educational 
purposes of the course. According- 
ly prices will remain at $5, $4, 
and $3 per series ticket*";. 

The Kreisler number -will be 
the third In the series 'and is 
scheduled for Thurs'day evening, 
March 7. Cornelia Otis Skinner 
will appear in "The Loves of 
Charles II" as the second number 
on the evening of Tuesday, Jan- 



uary 



The first number will be 



the Don Cossack Chorus on Tuesday 
evening, December 12, and the fi- 
nal number will be the Cleveland 
Symphony Orchestra, on Friday 
evening, March 29. 



ENROLLMENT COMPARI SONS~~ 1938 and 1939 SUMMER SESSIONS 

Graduate Enrollment 1938 1939 Gain or Loss 

State College 

Alt oona 

First Nature Study Camp 

Second Nature Study Camp 

Int er-Se s s ion 

Post-Session 



Totals 
Attending two sessions' 
(deduct ) 
Attending three sessions 
( deduct twice ) , 

Net Graduate Summer -.. .. " 

Enrollme'nt 1038 1218 180 



902 


1067 


165 




24 


22 




2 





3 


3 














223 


288 


65 




175 


173 


• 


2 


1324 


1553 


229 




182 


199 


17 




52 


68 


16 





Undergraduat e Enrollment 

State College 

Alt nona 

First Nature Study Camp 

Second Nature Study Camj 

Int er-3e s s ion 

Post— Session 

Mine Survey Camp 

Forestry Camp 

Geology Camp 

Surveying Camp 

Totals ' 

Attending two sessions 
( deduct ) 
Attending three sessions 
(deduct twice ) 

Net Undergraduate Summer 2465 2264 201 

Enrollment 



1974 


1773 




2 01 


151 


146 




5 


27 ■ 


23 




4 


16 


15 




1 


226 


313 


37 




129 


122 




7 


2 


8 


6 




110 


105 




5 


35 


20 




15 


25 


16 




9 


2695 


2541 




• 154 


162 


187 


25 




34 


45 


11 





Total Summer Enrollment 3503 3482 21 



A study of total registration, with no ures fell* • This, is explained by the fol- 
duplicates removed, shows the following: lowing statement: student A attends' 

three sessions and counts as one individual. 
1938 193 9 Student B attends the intern-session only> 
C attends the six weeks session only, and 
Graduate Students 1324 1553 D attends the post-session o.nly. Credits 
Undergraduate Students 26 95 2541 earned and. fees paid by A are equal to 
. .. 4019 4094 those for B plus C plus Dj hut A counts 

as one individual, whereas B, C, and D 
If only those under direct supervision count as three, 
of the Summer Session Office are tabulated, 

omitting the various camps, except the That there wa s a gain in graduate 

Nature Study Camps, the above tabulation enrollment is self-evident, and this in 
totals: , spite of stricter entrance requirements. 

•'■ '■ 1938 1939 It is also, clear that there was a loss in 

undergraduate enrollment. Perhaps this 
3847 3945 * loss could be counteracted or prevented 

next summer by making more use of the 
In other words, in actual Summer summer session for those who are irr.egii.t_ar> 
Session registrations there was an increase either because of advanced standing or 
of 98, but since an increased number con— for failures incurred. 

tinued throughout the three sessions, or Wm. S. Hoffman 

attended two sessions, nei attendance fig- Registrar 



OF GENERAL INTEREST 



The American Association of 
University Professors will hold 
an open meeting in Old Main Sand- 
wich Shop at 8: 00 p.m. Wednesday, 
November 8, according to a notice 
received from Professor Joseph F, 
O'Brien, It will be preceded by 
a meeting of the ' executive com- 
mittee at 7; 30 p.m. The program 
is as follows; 

Report of the Treasurer-- 
Mr. J. T.' Law 

Report of the Forum Committee- 
Mr* R, H, Waters, Chairman 

Report of the Traffic Committee- — 
Mr, Rex Green, Chairman 



Notes en 



..U,P. News — 



Mr, L. A. Doggett and Mr. 
F« J. Tschan, Chapter Repre- 
sentatives on National Coun- 
cil and Committees* 
Suggestions on and discussion of 
chapter policy for the year 
from the floor* 



Members of the faculty and 
their wives are invited to see 
two old Berks County Pennsylvania 
German potters, Isaac and Thomas 
Stahl, of Bally, Pennsylvania, 
who will demonstrate . the throwing 
of vases and bowls on the potter's 
wheel at 7:30 p.m. Friday, Novem- 
ber 10, in the Home Economics 
Auditorium, Professor Nelson W# 
Taylor, who announces the demon- 
stration, says that the Stahl 
brothers are almost unique in 
Pennsylvania in carrying on the 
tradition of the old Pennsylvania 
German pottery, A short talk on 
the origins of the Pennsylvania 
Dutch handicrafts will also be 
given by Mr. Guy Re Inert of Read- 
ing* The show is sponsored by 
the Penn State Student Branch of 
the American Ceramic Society. 



'Professor R. W. Tyson's sub- 
ject for this week's Wednesday 
Reading program is "Constantin 
Stani slavskl ." This is the second 
of the series sponsored by the 
College Lihrary and held in the 



upper lounge of Old Main at 4:15 
p.m. Professor R» E» Dengler's 
topic for November 29 will be 
"Francis of Assisi» n Professor 
Mason Long's topic for December 
6 will be "Robert Browning, !I 



Dr. H. H» Nininger, president 
of the International Society for 
Research on Meteorites, Director 
of- the American Meteorite Labora- 
tory, Curator of Meteorites in the 
Colorado Museum of Natural History, 
and owner of the largest private 
collection of meteorites in the 
world, is to speak in the Home 
Economics Auditorium next Wednesday 
evening, November 8, at 7:30 p.m. 
under the sponsorship of Sigma 
Gamma Epsilon and the Mineral Indus- 
tries Society, All faculty members 
are invited* Dr. Nininger and 
those working under his direction 
have discovered mere than half of 
all the meteorites collected on 
our continent during the last ten 
years. 



By action of the College Senate, 
the College calendar provides a 
football Saturday half-holiday to 
be selected by the students. No- 
vember 11, the occasion of the var- 
sity game with the University of 
Pennsylvania, has been chosen. 
There will be no Chapel exercises 
on Sunday, November 12, 



The Penn State Club of New 
York has arranged with the New York 
Central Railroad for a special train 
.to the Penn State-Army game at West 
Point on Saturday, November 18. 
The schedule is as follows: 

Lv. West 42d Street Ferry 10:55 a.m. 
Lv. Weehawken (West Shore RR) 11:10 
Ar. West Point 12:20 p.m. 

Busses will transfer passengers to 
the Ml 11 tary Academy Parade Grounds 
upon arrival, 'The cadet parade and 
review will take place at 1:10 p.m. 
The kick-off will be at 2:00 p.m. 

(cont'd) 



OF GENERAL INTEREST (cont'd) 



Returning, the special will leave 
West Point three quarters of an 
hour after the end of the game, 
arriving in New York at approximate- 
ly 6:00 p.m. The round trip fare 
will he $1»45« Faculty members 
who wish to buy tickets are re- 
quested to send their remittance 
to William A. McQueen, Room 1214, 
466 Lexington Avenue, New York City. 
Tickets will be sent by return mail. 
Reservations will close November 14, 



The junior varsity soccer game ■ 
with Lock Haven Teachers College 
this Saturday will begin at Z: 00 p#m, 



The freshman cross country meet 
will begin at 2:30. 



An exhibit, in facsimile, of 
the works of the 16th century 
Flemish master, Peter Brueghel, 
will open Monday, November 6, in 
the College Art Gallery, 303 Main 
Engineering, and will remain open 
for three weeks, dai ly except 
Sunday, from 3:30 a.m. to 8:30 
p.m., according to an announcement 
received from Professor J* Burn 
Helmc, Division of Fine Arts, De- 
partment of Architecture. 



TRANSITION SECTION 



The following students are in the Transition Section for the first semester of 
the year 1939—40. All grades for these students should be sent to the office cf the 
Dean of Men. 



Alloy, Frank J. 
Anstadt, Robert E. 
Baldwin, Alfred 
Beale, Harry E. 
Bourgerie; Alexander L, 
Capazzo, William J. 
Cochran, Henry E. 
Conrad, Charles D. 
Culpepper, Walter S. 
delPapa, Nadir J, Jr. 
Ettelstein, Nathan 
Fletcher, Alvin E. 
Francis, Robert Ft 
Frketich, Leonard L* 
Geist, Sidney R., Jr. 
Gentzel, Perry H. 
Grazier, Frank E. 
Harman, Richard W. 
Eartnett, John D. 
* * 



Heath, William S. 
Hensel, Victor B. 
Hill, William S. 
Hiznay, Joseph M. , Jr. 
Hoblitzell, James J. 
Johnston, Argyle L. 
Krauser, Casimer 
Lewis, Walter M. 
Lut z , Theodore J., Jr. 
McClure, Frank L. 
Ma gee, Gordon W » 
Mat tick, Joseph F. 
Maxwell j G. Scctt 
Miller; William K« 
Mills, William W * , Jr* 
Newcomer, James C. 
Patton, Wallace K, 
Pierce, John W. 



Rader, Paul M. 
Rayrner, Robert E. 
Re illy, Richard W, 
Richwine, Francis K« 
Roelcfs, Robert F. 
Saunders, Robert W» 
Shekell, Edward, Jr, 
Slicker, Thomas M. 
Smith, Marshall Li 
Smith, Oscar T. 
Spryn, John 
Wagman, Marshall H* 
Wertz, Orvis L. 
Wiest, Lester A. 
Wiley > Richard W* 
Y/ilhelm, Irvin C* 
Young, John B. P. 
Zimmerman, Robert E» 



OFFICIAL NOTICES FROM THE OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR 



1 



I 

1 
1 


Murphy 

Read, 

Robert 

Salter 

Segal, 


1/ 


The 
t o att 


insuf f ici 
father; 1 



Withdravrals 

,. Patricia K., LD, Oct. 20 
Harry M., Jr., Ag, Oct. 28 
son, David, For, Oct. 16 
, Leon, PV, Sept. 20 
Nathaniel S., LD, Oct. 30 

following reasons were given: 
end another institution; 1, 
ent preparation; 1, illness of 
, marriage; 1, personal reason. 



Change s in Cla s s if icat ion 

Myron Brotrnan, from soph. LD t o jr., AL. 

I a nee Hat ion of Withdrawal 

Withdrawal of George D. Hankins, 
junior in LA, dated Oct. 17, 1939, has 
be^n cancelled and the student is allowed 
to continue in college. 

Wm. S. Huffman 
Registrar 



H3HKYHQ-H SAGV7S SSIH 



THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 



FACULTY 




Published weekly on Tuesday during the College 
year as a means of making official announcements 
and presenting items of interest to the faculty. All 

November 14, 1939 



BULLETIN 

contributions should be as brief as possible and reach 
Walter F. Dantzscher, Director of Public Information, 
105 Old Main, not later than 10 a.m. each Friday. 



V 



1! 



NO. 



8 



NEW YORK ALUMNI GROUP TO STAGE BIG PRE -GAME RALLY 



A rousing send-off for the 
varsity football team will be stag- 
ed at the Hotel Pennsylvania under 
the auspices of the Penn State Club 
of New York Friday evening at 8 
o'clock* All members of the staff 
who expect to attend the Army— Penn 
State game at West Point the fol- 
lowing day are cordially invited 
to attend. 



Among the entert 
tures promised is' the 
of Alexander Gray, ba 
Fred Waring and his P 
as well as a national 
chorus which, before 
of hostilities abroad 
uled to represent the 
in an international c 
The Penn State Blue B 
appear* 



alnment fea- 

appearance 
rltone, and 
enn sy 1 van 1 an s , 
ly known male 
the outbreak 
was sched- 
United States 
ompeti ti on, 
and also will 



The attention of staff members 



is again callad to the special 
train which will leave New York 
(West 42nd Street feyry) at 10:53 
a.m. Saturday, to arrive in West 
Point at IZiZO p.m. Buses will 
transfer passengers to the Military 
Academy parade grounds upon arri- 
val. The cadet parade and review 
will take place at 1:10 p.m. and 
the kick-off will be at 2:00 p.m. 
The round trip fare will be $1.45. 
Reservations may be made through 
William A, McQueen, Room 1-214, 
466 Lexington Avenue, New York City. 

Other athletic events on the 
calendar for the current week in- 
clude the freshman football game 
to be played with Army at West 
Point on Wednesday, the varsity 
soccer game with Temple in Phila- 
delphia ^n Saturday, and partici- 
pation in the 1CAAAA cross country 
meet in New York next Monday. 



FINE ARTS TO CONTINUE PROGRAM OF GALLERY TALKS 



To supplement Its program of 
current exhibitions, the Division 
of Fine Arts will again offer a se- 
ries of art lectures on topics sug- 
gested by its exhibits. The first 
of these entitled "Peter Bruegel: 
A Modern Old Master" will be deliver- 
ed by Mr. F. E. Hyslop, Jr., a mem- 
ber of the Fine Arts staff, this 
Wednesday evening at 7:30 p.m. Mr. 
Hyslop 1 s talk, which is descriptive 
of the current exhibition on Bruegel, 
will begin in room 107 Main Engineer- 
ing and will continue after the 
audience has moved upstairs to the 



gallery In 303 Main Engineering 
where 42 color facsimiles of the 
work of this sixteenth century 
Flemish master are hanging. 

The Division of Fine Arts of 
the Department of Architecture char- 
acterizes the present exhibition 
as one of Its most important ex- 
hibitions of the year. Bruegel is 
particularly popular with Penn 
State students* The exhibition will 
continue until November 25, The 
gallery is open dally except Sun- 
day from 8:30 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. 



OF GENERAL INTEREST 

The College Library will The Glee-Thespian swine 1 versron 
gladly receive back issues of of Gilbert and Sullivan 1 s ,! Pina- 
The Saturday Evening Pest to fore 1 ' which was so successfully 
be added to its now incomplete presented during houseparty week- 
unbound files* There appears end will again be given on Friday, 
to be a growing interest in November 24, and on Saturday, No- 
back issues of The Post, which vernber 25. The performances will 
the Library will be in a better begin promptly at 7 p.m. Tickets 
position to satisfy if its files priced at 50^ may be secured at 
are complete* Because of limit*- the Student Union'desk. There are 
ed funds for binding, and because no reserved seats* 
of the greater usefulness of -:;--;:- -::--::- ' -::--;:- 
other more scholarly publications, 

the Library has not found it pos- Professor Herbert Koepp-Baker 
sible to preserve issues of The will conduct the third of the cur- 
Post in permanent bindings, but rent series of Wednesday readings 
wi 1 1 nevertheless welcome gifts sponsored by. the College Library 
from members' of the staff with the in the Upper Lounge' of Old Main, 
understanding that issues already tomorrow, Wednesday, November 15. 
represented in its files may be His topic will.be "Job, 11 Profes- 
discarded. scr Robert E. Dengler wi 11 'conduct 
-::--«- -ihi- -::--::- the next reading on the second 

week following. His topic will 

"There will be a meeting, of the be "Francis of Assisi." 
faculty of the School of Agriculture -::-•;:- -::--;:- -::--:!- - 
and Experiment Stations Friday, 

November 24, at 4; 10 p.m. in room Dr. R. E. Tulloss, president 

109 Agriculture Building, accord- of Wittenberg College, Springfield^ 

ing to official notification from Ohio, will be the chapel speaker 

Dean S. W* Fletcher. next Sunday, November 19. 

CONCERNING ABSENCES OFFICIAL NOTICES FROM THE 

OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR 

The regulations enacted by the 
College Senate state thatj except Withdra wals 

In the cases of absences incurred 

on inspection trips, athletic team 2"CowdenJ Joseph A*,, AH> Oct* 23 

trips, and' other student organiza- G Grant, Richard W., Jr., MtisEd,0ct.9 

ti on 'trips, the instructor has fi- G Lewis, Edward H., IEd, Oct. 25 
nal authority in marking absences 

excused or unexcused. The state- Of the above, one withdrew be- 
ments Issued from my office concern- cause of illness, one to accept a 

Ing reasons for student absences position, and one because of lack 

are therefore of an informational of funds, 
nature only. They leave with In- 
structors the privilege and duty Wm. S. Hoffman 
of excusing or refusing to excuse Registrar 
the absences. 

A. R. Warnock 
Dean of Men 



OFFICIAL MINUTES OF THE COLLEGE SENATE 



A meeting of the College Senate 
was held in room 107 of the Main En- 



The Committee on Calendar, 
throuqh its chairman^ Dr. Ch and lee, 



gineering building on Thursday , Novem- presented its report, which con- 



her Z f 1939, at 4:10 p.m., with Pre- 
sident Hetzel presiding. A list of 
the members present is. on file in the 
office of the Registrar. . 

The minutes of the meeting of 
October 5, 1939, were read and ap- 
proved. 



oo 

A lette 

Fletcher inf 
Professor J. 
as acting he 
of Agronomy 
1 1 Iness and ' 
No.ll in the 
absence from 



r was read from Dean 
orming the Senate that 

W. White would serve 
ad of the Department 
during Dr. C. F. Nell*s 
would represent Dr. 
Senate during Dr. Nollys 

the campus. 



The acting secretary read a 
communication from Mr. H. C. McWIl* 
liams, Jr., in which the latter in- 
formed the Senate of the names of 
students that had been appointed 
by the All -Col lege 'Cabinet -to the 
Calendar Commi ttee, ' the Committee 
on Public Occasions, and the Stu- 
dent Welfare Committee of the Col- 
lege Senate, These students were 
to serve 'on these committees with- 
out vctei The names of three addi* 
tional students were listed in Mr* 
McWilllams* letter and these stu-» 
dents were to stand ready to give 
^ther committees of the College 
Senate .any information and counsel 
when matters affecting student In- 
terests v/er© under consideration. 
The names of all the students con- 
cerned In these appointments are 
on file in the office o.f the Regis- 
trar. 



sisted of the proposed calendar 
for the next academic year. Dr. 
Chandlec moved the adoption of 
the proposed calendar and it was 
adopted by unanimous vote of the 
Senate. A copy of the calendar 
is on file at the office of the 
Registrar. ' 

Professor G« R. Green re- 
quested unamimous consent of the 
Senate in order that action might 
be taken on the approval of the 
following courses In Nature Edu- 
cati on. : 

1) That Nat. Ed, 201e, 201h, 
202e, and ZOZh be changed from 
6 credits in three weeks to 3 
credits in three weeks. 

Z) That Nat. Ed. 411 e, 41 lh, 
41 2e, and 412h (each 3 credits 
in three' weeks), new courses, 
be approved. 

All of these courses had been act- 
ed upon favorably by the Commit- 
tee on Courses of Study. 

President Hetzel made a brief 
announcement to the effect that 
the Executive Committee of the 
Board of Trustees would probably 
have its meeting on November 24. 

In the absence of 'any further 
business, the meeting adjourned. 

* • * 

C. E. Marquardt 
Secretary Pro Tempore 



; : ; " 



H3HNVHO'H SAQV1S SSIH 



THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 



FACULTY 

Published weekly on Tuesday during the College 
year as a means of making official announcements 
and presenting items of interest to the faculty. All 



VOL. 19 




November 21, 193! 



BULLETIN 

contributions should be as brief as possible and reach 
Walter F. Dantzscher, Director of Public Information, 
105 Old Main, not later than 10 a.m. each Friday. 

NO. 



FINE ARTS HONORARY TO SPONSOR MOVIE REVIVAL OF "THE LAST LAUGH" 



"The Last Laugh/' directed by 
F. '7. Murnau with Emi 1 J armings in 
the lead, a distinguished silent 
motion picture of 1924, will be 
shown in Schwab Auditorium, start- 
ing at 8:50 Wednesday evening, 
November 29, according' to an an- 
nouncement received from Professor 
J. Burn Helme. The program is 
sponsored by Pi Gamma Alpha, honor- 
ary fine arts fraternity on the 
campus, as a contribution to a 
better understanding of the motion 
picture as an art form. Admission 
is free. Townspeople, faculty 
members, and students are cordially 
invi ted* 

Modern art is not confined to 
painting and sculpture, Professor 
Helme says. Superficially an 
ephemeral entertainment only, the 
motion picture in fact is a new 
medium of expression. As a sig- 
nificant reflection of contemporary 
aesthetics, modes, and manners, it 
has grown more and more important 
to society; Its influence is far- 
reaching. Believing that an exam- 
ination, however brief, of the 
history and the functions of this 
new art is a worth-while under- 
taking for a fine arts fraternity, 
Pi Gamma Alpha proposes to sponsor 
a series of programs from the Museum 
of Modern Art Film Library this 
coming winter. A start will be 
made with "The Last Laugh," a land- 
mark film in the development of the 
use of the camera. 



"The Last Laugh" constituted 
a revolution in the method of film 
making; it broke with the past in 
both technique and theory. Pre- 
viously, a discontinuous method 
of pictorial narration had been in 
general use. Films were composed 
after the photographic process had 
been completed, by joining together 
the various shots taken with a sta- 
tionary camera, which was shifted 
only between scenes. 

In "The Last Laugh" a new and 
continuous method of narration was 
used, for here appear prolonged 
stretches of uninterrupted and un- 
cut Images, in which the camera 
itself has moved to follow the 
progress of the action.' This film 
took final shape before, not after, 
the shooting and was played in sets 
specially constructed to permit 
continuous action and continuous 
photography, with the camera mount- 
ed on perambulating trucks or 
swinging cranes. It was actually 
the joint product of "four men: 
Murnau, the director; Freund, the 
cameraman; Mayer, the scenarist; 
and Jennings, the principal actor. 
Together they conceived and devel- 
oped it as a pictorial unit, work- 
ing with unusual freedom In a 
studio unparalleled anywhere at 
that time for its technical equip- 
ment and the ingenuity of its 
craftsmen. Faculty members are 
urged to see this history-making 
production on Wednesday, the 29th. 



OF GENERAL INTEREST 



An exhibit of the original pen 
and ink drawings made by T. H. Rob- 
inson, a celebrated English illus- 
trating artist,' for Thackeray's 
Henry Esmond will continue in the 
College Library during the week of 
November 20. 

The pictures' are well knownto 
most readers. "Although the fair 
Beatrix doesn't seem quite so fair 



to u: 



the announcement from the 



library states, "and the clothes 
worn by Henry Esmond and his friends 
appear very definitely ' masqueradish', 
the pictures do undoubtedly portray 
the ladies and gentlemen of Esmond's 
time very -well* If you enjoy fancy 
shoe-buckles, lace cuffs, wide 
skirts, and masses of curls (mascu- 
line as well as feminine), see the 
Robinson pictures." 



The faculty of the School of 
Engineering will me-et at 5: CO p»m» 
Tuesday, November 28, in room. 107 
Main Engineering Bui ldi ng, "accord- 
ing to, an official announcement 
from Dean Hammond. 



The kick-off for the foot- 
ball game with the University of 
Pittsburgh Saturday, November 25, 
will be at 2:00' p.m. 



The chapel speaker for this 
Sunday, November 26, will be Dr. 
Richard Niebuhr, .Yale University 
Divinity School. 



The Glee-Thespian version of 
"Pinafore" will '"swing "awe i'gh" in 
the Auditorium Friday,, 'November 24, 
and Saturday, November. 25,. promptly 
at 7:00 p.m. on both nights. There 
are no reserved seats.- Tickets 
priced at 50^ are on sale at the 
Student Union. 



The faculty of the School of 
Agriculture will hold a Christmas 
party in Old Main Sandwich Shop on 
Saturday, December 16, according 
to an announcement received from 
the Dean of the School. Tickets 
including dinner will he 752?. All 
staff members and' their wives are 
invited. #-«- *--»- -"--«- 



OFFICIAL NOTICES FROM THE OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR 



Withdrawal s 



ingtiam, Frank J., LD, Nov. 1!) 
ampbell, Frances Mi, Bot j[ Nov; 14 
ooley, Robert E., LD, FC, Oct. 17, 
ifferidai, James J*> DH, Not. "14 
ckenf'oth, Robert, CE, Novi 15 
agan, John D»> LA> HC j Oct ; 17 
rede'rick, Claire Ai, ABCh> Nov; 14 
lenn, Hazel F., AL, March 31 
ood, William B., Gh, Nov. 14 
arper, Lawrence M., CE, Nov. 13 
artman, karquein H., LA A Oct. 1 



Of 'the above 5 withdrew to accept 
positions, 6 because of illness, 3 
because of finances, 2 because of death 



1 


"B 


1 


"C 


1 


'C 


s 


D 


2 


E 


S 


*P 


G 


'F 


O 

w 


*G 


2 


'G 


2 


H 


S 


'H 



Hollen, Alvin L,, Ch> AG, Oct. 17 
Hutchison, Thomas H.. CE, Nov. 6 
James, Mary Eij LD, Septi 17 
Krenitsky, Joseph P., AL,..- Nov. 15 
Lyon, Tom PU , Cer> Oct; 17 
McLaughlin^ Charle s, AgE,&> Oct. 26 
MalacavageJ A. William/, LA j SC> Oct. 2 3 
Raf f ensperger, Miriam Jij HE, Novi 18 
Wagner, James E., Arch, Nov. 13 
White, Thomas S., LA, FC , Oct. 15 
Whuler, Jerome J,, EchE, Nov. 15 



in family, 3 because of lack of int.eres"k, 
1 to change curriculum, 1 because of 
scholarship, and 1 gave no reason.- 



Change s in Clas s if i cat ion -- . ; 

l»a-r<-.ly., .Tiimfts—frui. Sr, to Jr. in For, Le ise.nr ing, Lewis — -from Sr. to Jr. in For, 

!>s-wisj Clifford M» — from S.p. to Grad. in LA 

Wm. S. Hoffman 
Regis-tr-ar 



1939 


-4 






1939 


(As 


appr 


Sept 


. 14 


, Thur. 




Sept 


. 18- 


-19, Mon,'— 


Tu. 


Sept 


. 20 


, Wed. 




Sept 


. 20 


, We d . 




Sept 


. 22 


, Fri. 




Sept 


. 28- 


-2 9, Thur. 


-Fri. 


Oct . 


14, 


Sat . 




Nov. 


15, 


We d . 


M 


Nov. 


■23, 


Thur. (8 a 


.m. ) 


Nov. 


24, 


F'ri. 




Dec. 


20, 


We d . 









1940-41 


39) 




1940 ■ 




Sept , 


12, Thur. 


Sept 


.16-17, 


Mon ,-Tu. 




Sept. 


18, Wed. 




Sept « 


18, Wed. 




Sept . 


20, Fri. 


Sept 


. 26-27 


,Thur.-Fri. 




Oct . 


12, Sat. 


m. 


Nov. 


. 13, Wed. 


. 


Nov. 


20, We d . 




Nov. 


25, Mon, 




Dec. 


21, Sat. 



COLLEGE CALENDAR 

pproved by the College Senate, Nov. 2, 1939) 

Freshman Week begins 8 a.m. 
Registration, First Semester 
Freshman Week ends, 11:50 a.m. 
♦First Semester begins 1:10 p.m. 
Payment of Fees, Freshmen 
Payment of Fees, Upper Classes 
Alumni Homecoming Day 
Midsemestor Below— grade Reports 1:10 p. 
Thanksgiving Recess begins, 11:50 a.m 
Thanksgiving Recess end's, 8 a.m. 
Christmas Recess begins, 11:50 a.m. 

1940 ' 1941 

Jan. 3, Wed. (l;10 p.m.) Christmas Recess ends, 3 a.m, 

Jan, 3, Wed, Winter Courses in Agriculture begin 

Jan. 25, Thur, Examinations begin 8 a.m. 

■Jan. 31, Wed, Midyear Commencement 8:00 p.m. 

■Feb. 1, Thur., First Semester ends 11:50 a,m, 

Feb, 1, Thur. Midyear_ Recess begins 11:50 a.m, 

Feb. 5, Mon. Midyear Recess. ends 8 a.m. 

Feb. 5—6, Mon.— Tu, Registration, Second Semester 

Feb. 7, Wed, (8 a.m.) ■•/•■Second Semester begins 1:10 p.m. 

Feb. 15-16, Thur, -Fri. . Payment of Fees Feb. 

Feb. 28, Wed. Winter Courses in Agriculture end 11:50 a 

Apr, 9, Tu. Midsemester Below— grade Reports 1:10 p .m 

Mar, 20, Wed. Easter Recess begins 11:50 a.m. 

Mar, 27, Wed, Easter Recess ends 1:10 p.m. 

May 27, Mon, Examinations for Seniors begin 

May 31, Fri, Examinat ions for Lower Classes begin 8 a,m. 

May 30, Thur, Memorial Day Recess 

June S, Thur. ' Second Semester end's 5- p.m, 

June 7, Fri. Election of Trustees by Delegates 12 noon. 

June 8, Sat. * . Alumni Day 

Election of Trustees by Graduates closes 11 a 
Annual Meeting of Board of Trustees 2 p.m* 
June 9, Sun, Baccalaureate Day 

June 10, Mon* Commencement Day, Class Day 

June 11, Tu* Inter-Session Registration 8 a.m. 

Inter-Session begins 10 a.m. 
June 28^ Fri, Inter-Session ends 5:50 p.m. 

July 1, Mon*- Summer Session Registration 

July 2, Tu, Summer Session begins 8 a*m, 

July 4, Thur, Independence Day Recess 

Aug, 8, Thur. . . Summer Session Commencement 
Aug, 9, Fri. Summer Session end 5:50 p.m* 

Aug, 9, Fri, ; Entrance Examinations 

Aug-, 12, Mon. Post-Session Registration a.m. 

Aug. 12, Mon. . , Post— Session "begins 10 a.m, 
Aug, 30, Fri. . Post-Session ends 5:50 p.m, • > 

Sept, 12, Thur. . Freshman Week begins 8 a.m. - ■- - 
Sept,. 16-17, Mpn.-Tu, Registration, First Semester Sept. 
Sept. 18, Wed, , . Freshman Week ends 11:50 a.m. 
Sept, 18, Wed,, , First Semester begins 1:10 p.m. 

Sept, 20, Eri. ... Payment of Fees, Freshmen 
Sept, 26—27, Thur, -Fri, payment of Fees, Upper Classes Sept 



Jan, 6, 


Mon. 


Jan. 6, 


Mon, 


Jan. 20, 


Mon. 


Jan. 28, 


Tu. 


Jan. 2 9, 


We d . 


Jan, 29, 


We d . 


Feb. 3, 


Mon. 


Feb. 3-4, Mon 


.-Tu. 


Feb. 5, 


We d . 


13-14, Thur.- 


-Fri. 


m» Mar, 1, 


Sat , 


Apr. 2, 


We d . 


Apr. 9, 


We d , 


Apr, 16, 


Wed. 


May 22, 


rhur . 


May 26, 


Mon. 


May 30, 


Fri. 


June 5, 


rhur. 


June 6, 


Eri. 


June 7, 


Sat . 


m. 




June 8, 


Sun, 


June 9, 


Mon. 


June 10 


i Tuj 


June 27, 


Fri. 


June 30, 


Mon. 


July 1, 


Tu. 


July 4 t 


Fri. 


Aug. 7, ' 


"hur , 


Aug. 8, 


Fri. 


Aug. 8, 


Fri. 


Aug, 11, 


Mon. 


• Aug. 11, 


Mon, 


Aug. 29> 


Fri. 


Sept, 11, Thur, 


. 15—16, Mon 


,-Tu. 


« S e pt • 17, 


We d . 


Sept. 17, 


• We d . 


Sept . 19j 


Fri. 


25— 5Ki, .Thur,- 


-Fri, 



*First Semester: One football Saturday half holiday by student selection, 
'fSecond Semester: P , S «C ,A, , Convocat ion at 11 a.m., date to be selected by 
the President of the College, 



THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 



FACULTY 



Published weekly on Tuesday during the College 
year as a means of making official announcements 
and presenting items of interest to the faculty. All 




BULLETIN 

contributions should be as brief as possible and reach 
Walter F. Dantzscher, Director of Public Information, 
105 Old Main, not later than 10 a.m. each Friday. 



VOL. 19 



November Zd, 1939 



NO. 10 



ARTISTS 1 COURSE TICKETS TO GO ON SALE SATURDAY 



Seats for the current Artists' 
Course series will be placed on 
sale beginning Saturday mcrning, 
December Z 9 Dr. Carl E. Marquardt, 
chairman of the committee, stated 
today. The sale will continue Sat- 
urday afternoon and will resume 
Monday and Tuesday, morning and 
afternoon, December 4 and 5. The 
A. A, windows will open at 8 o'clock 
and charts showing the allocation 
of the seats in the various price 
brackets will be on display near 
the Student Union desk several 
days in advance of the sale. 



"As in other 
and f a c u 1 ty- 1 own s 
seats may appear 
a proxy to repres 
Marquardt stated, 
to improve the co 
sale, the commit t 
Saturday for the 
it is believed tn 
the majority of f 
and students with 
of attending clas 
again be priced a 
for the series an 
will again be res 
and faculty- towns 
dows will be aval 
appli cati ens. 



years, students 
people desiring 
in person or send 
ent them," Dr. 

"In an effort 
nditions of the 
ee has chosen 
first day, since 
at Saturday finds 
acuity members 
o u t the ne c e s s I ty 
ses. Seats will 
t $5, $4, and $3 
d alternate rows 
erved for students 
people. Two win- 
lable to handle 



"From 
rent serie 
wi de spread 
there appe 
tic recept 
gram than 
last seven 
and studen 
posed towa 
Krei sler, 



advance comment, the cur- 
s seems to be meeting with 

popular approval. Infect, 
ars to be a more enthusias- 
ion assured for this pre- 
fer any offered during the 

years. Faculty members 
ts alike seem heartily di s- 
rd the appearance of Fritz 
the Cleveland Symphony Or- 



chestra, Cornelia Otis Skinner, and 
the Don Cossack Chorus, Little un- 
favorable comment lias been heard 
about the wisdom of allocating un- 
precedented expend! tures for talent 
to four numbers instead of five or 
six as in other years* 

"In view of the apparent ac- 
ceptance of the numbers on the 
course and, also, of its desire to 
continue the Artists' Course as a 
community project, the committee 
has made no efforts to publicize 
the course outside of State College. 
Requests continue to reach the 
chairman and members of the commit- 
tee from outsiders who v/ould like 
to subscribe to the series, and the 
committee has found it necessary to 
discourage courteously but firmly 
all such expressions of interest. 



"Faculty membe 
asked to emphasize 
be derived by the s 
attendance at such 
The Committee is ea 
that the student bo 
share of the house, 
financial success o 
would undoubtedly b 
house were sold out 
the type of subscri 
of the committee wo 
the course as a sue 
dent body did not p 
the fullest possibl 



rs are again 
the benef i ts to 
tudent body from 
a concert series, 
rnestly desirous 
dy take up its 

While the 
f the course 
e assured if the 
, regardless of 
ber, the members 
uld not regard 
cess if the stu- 
articipate to 
e extent." 



The attention of all faculty 
members and townspersons is again 
directed to the brochure which de- 
scribes the course in detail. Any 
member cf the faculty who has not 
received a copy may obtain one at 
the Student Union desk. -::--::- *--"- 



OF GENERAL INTEREST 



The seventeenth annual exhibi- 
tion of the 50 outstanding books 
selected by the American Institute 
of Graphic Arts from almost 800 vol- 
umes representing over 100 differ- 
ent publishers is now on view. at 
the College Library. 

The purpose of the exhibition 
is "to exhibit annually current books 
of the highest artistic and techni- 
cal excellence to the end that they 
may stimulate and encourage other 
book manufacturers, thus helping to 
raise the general level of book pro- 
duction in this country. " 

An illustrated lecture on this 
exhibition will be given by Profes- 
sor J, Burn Helme in 107 Main Engi- 
neering at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, De- 
cember 6. The exhibit will be at 
the ' library from November 7.1 to 
December 11. -::--::- •:;--::- 

Dean Frank D. Kern announces for the 
Graduate School the following qualifying 
examinations for the PhilH degree: 

Ellsworth C. Dunkle, Agronomy, Tues- 
day, November 28,-2:00 pirn*, room 2 
Agriculture Building* 

T, S, Polansky, Bacteriology, Wednes- 
day, November 29, 9:00 ajm*, £01 Patterson 
Hall, 

* * * * * * 

A Model M— 8 Conlon Ironer, now on 
consignment in the Department of Home Eco- 
nomics, is for sale at a special price of 
$55. Anyone interested may call Miss 
Gephart in room 101 Home Economics build- 
ing for further information, 

* * * * * * 



The chapel speaker for next 
Sunday, December 3, will be Mr. ■ 
Henry E. King, Secretary for color- 
ed work among colleges for the nat- 
ional Y.M.C.A. Mr. king's subject 
will be "Derelict or Delivered?" 



The Penn State Christian Asso-H 
elation wishes to thank the' entire 
faculty and administrative staff for 
its generous support in the recent 
financial canvass. The pi edges made, 
by the members of the faculty and 
administration amount to slightly 
more than the goal which was set for 
this group. If anyone has not been 
visited and wishes to make a con- 
tribution or pledge for the work of 
the association during this year, 
he may do so by sending a note to 
the association at 304 Old Main. 



All faculty members interested in 
basketball are invited to register, with- 
out charge, for the third annual basket- 
ball clinic, to be conducted by the School 
of Physical Education and Athletics in 
co-operation with the Extension Services 
Saturday, December 2, 



ba 
ha 
10 
pr 
be 
4 : 
Wa 



During the 
11, wrestling, 
ve attracted a 
00, Two demon 
ogram for Satu 
tween Greensbu 
00 p,m. and th 
shjngton and J 
00 p.m. Glenn 
nning o eminent 
coach of a oh 



ru 
is 
port, Long Islan 



past several years, basket— 

and gymnastic clinics 
ttendances as high as 
stration games are on the 
rday : a high school game 
rg and Butler from 3:00 to 
e varsity game between 
efferson and Penn State at 

O'Donovan will supply 
rin the varsity game. He 
ampionship team at Free— 
d # ** ** ** 



OFFICIAL NOTICES FROM THE OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR 



Withdrawals 



G Ahlgren, Gilbert A., Bot, Nov, 21 
3 Bence, Robert B», Chea, Nov, 16 
3 Bigott, Luis A., DH, Nov, 15 



2 Hindman,. Hettie, LD, Oct, 24 

2 Kins, Carl M,, For, Nov, 27 

G Krupa, Joseph H., PEd, Nov. 20 



2 withdrew because of finances; 2 because of illness; 2 to secure positions 

Change of Classification 
Rose, Bernard— —from freshman in LD to SC 



Wm, S, Hoffman 
Registrar 



THE COMPARATIVE STANDING OF PENN STATE AND OTHER LEADING INSTITUTIONS 
AS REFLECTED BY ENROLLMENTS AND DEGREE.S CONFERRED 

.- >. . By William S. Hoffman, Qollege Registrar 

President, American Association of Collegiate Registrars 



Assq 

publ 

de.gr 

t ion 

t ica 

pre s 

Cine 

and 

it em 

his 

inst 

Regi 

sent 



For the 
giat ion .. 
ished a 
e.e.3 .canf 
s . For 
1 items 
ident Wa 
innat i, 
S ociety 
s for th 
paper do 
itut ions 
strars ' 

total f 



past 10 ye 
of .Collegia 
report on t 
erred by it 
cempar is ons 
no ether .re 
Iters, oft 
publishes e 
stat ist ics 
e current f 
es not incl 

a s doe s t h 
ass ociat ion 
igures for 



ars the American 
te Registrars, .has , 
he enrollments and 
s member inst it u— 
of these stat is — 
port is available* 
he University of 



he university 01 
ach fall in School 



J.J. -U ■_* -J- -t. J. * t » « " - 

concerning these 
irst semester, but. 
ude nearly so many 

report from the 
, and does not pre' 
any academic year. 



During October. the Registrars' report 
for 1938—39 was received. Six hundred 
and eightyrnine institutions of higher 
learning are included, representing 92,7 
per cent of the member institutions. Only 
one large institution, the College of the 
City of New York, appears on inspection 
by this office to be missing. The report 
lists data, .for the following types and 
numbers of institutions: 



though honorary degrees were granted to 
.only 97 per cent as large a group as in 
'1937-38.* ' 

The place of The Pennsylvania State 
,C,ollege ,i,n t th.ese 6-89 # report ing institu- 
tions is higher than during any preced- 
ing year, . A .tabulat ion ranking the 20 
largest institutions according to six 
.different he.ad.ings ^ql^ows. These six 
headings are; enrollment, September tc 
^une; .summer se s s ion ^ (1938 } enrollment; 
bachelor's degrees conferred; master's 
.degrees .conferred ; do ct qrat es conferred; 
and total degrees conferred. In these 
.divisions l^he Pennsylvania State College 
appears in the first 20 institutions four 
times. In .enrollment £ ^Septejnber to June, 
we occupy the 19th position, with only 
one other Pennsylvania institution, the 
University of Pennsylvania, in 14th po- 
sition, represented. In ..enrollment f«r 
the 1938 summer session we are in 18th 
place. No. other Pennsylvania institution 
occurs among the leading 20. 



Universit ie s . 174 

Liberal ..Art, s Colleges . ... 327 . 

teachers Colleges,... 82 

Junior Colleges •••• 70, 

Professional and Technical Schools... 36 

Total enrollment figures show an in- 
crease of 6.7 per cent over 1937-38. 
For men the increase is 6.1 per cent; for 
women, 7.7 per cent. This increase is 
slightly more than that reported a year 
ago,- T otal . degree s conferred increased 
9.4 per cent over the preceding year, al- 



For b 
we rank 13t 
vania repre 

.Pennsylvani 
total numbe 
Pennsylvani 
the leading 
sylvania, i 
sity of Pit 

( T,bje Pennsyl 
place. The 

, oqlumns ^of 
nifi*s the 
inst itut ion 



achelor's deg 
h with only o 
sentative, th 
a, in 15th pi 
r of degrees 
a institution 

20: the 'Univ 
n 12t h pos it i 
tsburgh, in 1 
vania State C 

subscript in 
the following 

comparat ive 

« tJ i * . . 



rees conferred 
ne other Pennsyl- 
e University of 
ace , In the 
conferred these 
s occur among 
crsity of Penn- 
on; the Univer— 
6th place ; and 
ollege, in 18th 

each of the 

tabulation sig— 
ranking of the 



Name 



Enrollment 
Sept .-June 
1938-1939 



1938 
S.S. 



1938-39 

Degrees Conferred 
Bachelor's Master's Ph.D.'s 



Total 



Boston Uniy, ,.,,,... , , , . , , .....,..56 3...,...73........ 

' ' '.. ' ' 14 18 

Brooklyn, College. ..,, ..13534 ,3519 .,, ,1232 . ,.....,,..... 

7 15- 14 

C^umbia.UrkiY,,, . . , , ,,,17456,,,., . ,11822 M , ,^446. . ,,,, . ,,,3355.. . . . .250. ...... .5065. . . 

3 1 10 12 1 

Cornell Univ ,, ........999 . ......13 ..14 93. .. 

, 2 7 19 

Duke Univ ......... ..3513., .......................... 95 

16 13 

George Wash. Univ. . , ........................ .410 * 

20 

Harvard Univ. 9310 ,1222., ....343 2483. . a 

16 , ' ' 4 1 8 

Hunter ..College. 9883 ........ 3505 .... 1644 .1667. .. 

15 17 9 ,, 17 

Indiana Univ.. . , .452. . . . 

18 >.. 

JohnHopkins Univ , ,,».138 

: . . 6 



OF . GENERAL . I NTF.RF.ST 



Name 



Enrollment 1938-1939 

Sept. -June 1933 Degrees Conferred 

1938-39 £.S, Bachelor's Master's Ph.D.'s 



Total 



Louisiana State Univ. .8550 3340..,, 

17 2 

MoGill Univ. .......... 



10 



149, 



Mass. Inst, of Tech 
New York Univ...... 



,66. 



20 



373 76 9010 2 821 16 04 .... 121 ....... . .4554. , 

1 2 2 .29 3 

Northwestern Univ 76 6 2, .4516 ...... 1439 957 2438., 

13 10 11 5 9 

Ohio State Univ ....... 1436 3 6054 ...... .1973 874,... 101 2953,. 

6 7 5 7 11 7 

Penna. State Col 72 92 3503 1310 16 08.. 

19 18 13 . 18 

Stanford Uu. iv • ♦ ,,125...... ......... 

8 

State Univ, of Iowa » « 495 .... ,91, ........ 1482 . . 

17 14 20 



Syracv.se Univ, .««...... 1082 



17 



Temple Univ, 



6 9 —' D L. , 



16 



14 



3419. 



Univ. of California. »»27551...*.. .4.0301 *..».. 415 9* 619... ...98, 4883.. 

2 4 1 12 12 2 

Univ, of Chicago 1246 3.. ..... 1*4484 .756... .173 1760.. 

8 11 10 4 
Univ, of Colo r ado... »»....».«. *.«.»»4277*4. *...»..*......».»•».».»• ,,...... 

12 

Univ. of 111 ..14648 33 97... ,...2541....... ..... .772 . . . ,106 . . .... 

5 14 . . .3 9 lfi 4 

Univ. of.. Mich '.12434 5771 1661.. . ...-. ......1427.,..,. . .90. 3192. , 

9 88 3 15 5 
Univ. of Minn 172 50 7 375 2155 379 88. 3122.. 

4 3 4 6 16 6 

Univ. of Missouri • 3338, , . ... ,1120 .«,... 

19 15 

Univ.- of Oklahoma ...,...*..»•* 1039. 

19 

Univ* of Penna.... , , i .10459* *-«- * I • ki i « ii i i i » * « 4 1051 776. . . . , »lSW.t 

j,4c .18 8 .12 

Univ* of Pitt sburgh.4 4 t .«» * 4 * 1 Vi . i<tiUtlUiUliliiU<<tMti *668» 4 . 4 4 4 ♦ • i * i » * . * .16954 4 

11 16 

Univ* of S, Calif .4,4*4726944 . .4. .«.6634,.. ...1114. 345 1696., 

20 "5 16 . • 15 15 

Univ, • £ Te«as 11444' .6 077,, 1385 616 ,. ,2 043.. 

12 6 12 13 11 

Univ.' of- ; /7ash-... . . ,-• *-. ,<12«2,7>l»,»,«,«,-» . ,.,-,42«3«8.,....,.,.,.»iLS.8.0... ,........•••...»•«•,.• ,1875, , 

1(5 13 7 ^ 13 

Univ. of. ¥-ls-,.-. . . . •.-,•...-12.104 •-.». . . . »47<5,7. . . .......L&01-.-. .... ,-..,42 5.,., . ,104 .2425. , 

11 6 19 3 



10 



Wayne- U.niv, • .»« »-•-. ..... » 11*072.. 



,76, 



13 



17 



enrolled. This means that 2,9 per cent 
»n,f. „t.he. ,coJ..le.ge s. and universities had 
matriculations representing 27,2 per cent 



One interesting item, in- addition, 
is t-h-at' >cf t.h-e- 3-6- .ia.s»t-i<t»\i»t.i.o.n.s« »lo»s»t.&d. .in 
the foregoing table, only three bear the 

flame- of College Br eolaLy.Bf. ^•cLLe.g-e,,. JLun-t.e.r . . -of. .t.h,e» ,na,t.j,Q.nal -total. F* ur hundred and 

ninety colleges conducted summer sessions: 
< .i?V .19.3.8,, wit.h. a tatal enrrllraent of 
106,463. This means that four per rent 
cf. .t.h.e. -summer, .s es sicn-s had an attendance 
representing 28.9 per cent of the national 1 
, .t.o.t.al» ..The. .co.nce.nt.r.ation of students in 
these larger institutions is shown in the 



College, and The Pennsylvania State Col- 
le-ge- 



In the 20 .unlve.r.s.i»ti,e.s. ."wsi-tJa the- ■ » . 

largest September-June enrollment there 
were, in .193 8-193.9. 9, t.o.t.a.1 .cwfi. 27.2. ,.431 
students. In the esitire country as 

■r-e-pr-escnt-ed by .the ,£,ig.ur.&& .f.ar. .6,89 .r.c-. , fallowing t ahulatian : 

porting institutions, a total of 1,000,490 






; , ...,■-' Table II 
Enrollment in the 20 Largest Institutions as Listed, in Table I 



Enrollment 



Peg rees Conferred 



Sept .—June 
National total 1,000,490 
Total, largest 20 272,431 
% of total 27.2 

fa of number of c.clleges2.9 



The total number of degrees con- 
ferred is not the sum of the bachelor's, 
master's, and doctor's, but includes as 
well professional and honorary degrees 
(of which latter there were 943). 



1938 












s.s. 


Bachelor ' s 


Ma s t e r ' s 


D 


oct or ' s 


Total 


368,302 


132,739 


32,101 




3721 


169,504 


106,46 3 


33,652 


17,967 




2580 


51,760 


28.9 


.25,3 


55.9 




69.3 


30.5 


4.0 




»■ 









in its proper order in the following 
tables which list the 10 leading insti- 
tutions by enrollment in the divisions 
indicated. Only those divisions in which 
The Pennsylvania , St'ate College appears 
among the first 10 are included,' 



The Pennsylvania State College appears 

AGRICULTURE 



Ag. and 'Mech, Col, of Texas 
University of Minnesota 
Ohio State University 
Cornell University 
University of California 



1,959 
1,358 
1,662 
1,616 

1,519 



Okla, Ag. and Mech. College 1,219 

Iowa State Col. of Ag. and Mech.Artsl, 083 
University of Missouri 1,054 

University of Illinois ,-■ 1,053 

THE PENNA, STATE COLLEGE ". 924 



CHEMISTRY 



University of California 
Baylor University 
THE PENNA, STATE COLLEGE 
University of Illinois 
University of Wisconsin 



University of California 

Oregon- St at e College 

New York State College of Forestry 

Syracuse' University 

THE PENNA. STATE COLLEGE 



525 University of Alabama 

524 Mass, Institute of Technology 

450 University of Pennsylvania 

2'92 Alabama Polytechnic Institute 

258 Holy Cross College 

FORESTRY 

' 630 ' University of Washington 

508 University of Idaho 

501 Iowa State Col. of'Ag. and Mech. Art 

465 Utah State Agriculture College 

453 Montana State University 

HOME ECONOMICS 



& Mech. Artsly520 



Iowa State Col. of A 

Mich, State' Col, of*Ag.-& Ap. Sci, 

Purdue University >. ' 

Kansas State* Col »•. of Agi & Ap, Sci, 

Okla, Ag, and Mech, College 



868 
8 06 
744 
699 



Oregon State College ' ■ 
University* of Illinois 
University of Wi scon sin 
University of Tennessee 
THE. PENNA, STATE COLLEGE 



MINERAL INDUSTRIES 



University of Utah 
University of California 
THE PENNA, STATE COLLEGE 
University cf Missouri 
Texas College of Mines 



458 
342 
298 
295 
279 



Mich. Col, 
Univer s ity 
Univers ity 
Univer s ity 
Univers ity 



of Mng, and Tech. 

of Pitt s burgh 

of Washingt on 

of Idaho 

of Wisconsin 



2 08 
2Q3 

194 
190 
151 



371 

3 08 
.8 08 
302 
287 



663 
599 

576 
534 



278 
215 

119 
115 
101 



A J. 13 J q 1 1 3 G x X ! l 



H3HNYH0-H 5AGV1& SSIi 



THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 



FACULTY 



Published weekly on Tuesday during the College 
year as a means of making official announcements 
and presenting items of interest to the faculty. All 




VOL. 19 



December 



1939 



ULLETIN 



contributions should be as brief as possible and reach 
Walter F. Dantzscher, Director of Public Information, 
105 Old Main, not later than 10 a.m. each Friday. 



NO. 



11 



LIBERAL ARTS LECTURE COMMITTEE ANNOUNCES PROGRAM FOR 1939-40 



The Liberal Arts Lecture Com* 
mi t tee announces the fcl lowing 
program for 1939-40: 

Dec, 5— -"The Old Regime in Vir- 
ginia; Social Life and Customs 
of the Old South," Way land F. 
Dunaway, Department of History* 

Jan. 16--"Aiieri cat s National De- 
fense," Col. Am Km Emery, De- 
partment of Military Science anc 
Tactics* 

Feb, 13 — "A Garland of Greek Flow* 
ers," Robert E. Denglcr, Depart- 
ment of Classical Languages. 

Mar. 5--"The Impact of Chemistry 



on the Modern World, 



Dean 



Frank C. Whitmore, School of 
Chemistry and Physics. 



Apr. 9— "The Free Press, a Champ- 
Ion of Democracy," Franklin C. 
Banner, Department of Journal- 
i sm. 

All these lectures are sched- 
uled to be held on Tuesday evenings 
from 7:30 to 6:30 In the Home Eco- 
nomics Auditorium. 

The first one, to be given 
this evening by Professor Dunaway, 
will point out certain popular 
misconceptions concerning the 
civilization that existed in Vir- 
ginia in ante-bellum times > par- 
ticularly the social life and 
customs of the era* 

The lecture will also eval- 
uate the contribution made by the 
old regime in Virginia to the 
national life and progress. 



DOUBLE EXHIBITION IN COLLEGE ART GALLERY 



The Division of Fine Arts of 
the Department of Architecture 
announces a double show in the 
College Gallery, starting Decem- 
ber 4 and continuing until Decem- 
ber 19. 

The first exhibition consists 
of a group of 1Z framed Gelatone 
facsimiles of contemporary American 
paintings, a recent gift to the 
College by the Carnegie Corporation 
of New York. American artists 
represented are Adolf Dehn, Leon 
Kroll, Luigl Lucioni, and Grant 
Wood. 



The second exhibition is cir- 
culated' by the American Federation 
of Arts, Washington, D. C. It con- 
sists of a series of 50 reproduc- 
tions in color of Pueblo Indian 
pottery. The examples come from 
various sites in the American 
Southwest, and reproduce specimens 
in the well-known collection of 
the Indian Arts Fund, Santa Fe, 

The College Gallery, located 
in room 303 Main Engineering, is 
open daily except Sunday from 8:30 
a.m. to 8:30 p.m." The public is 
cordially invited* 



OF GENERAL INTEREST 

For a number of years the ulty members and their families, 
showing of the Fifty Books, se- students, and townspeople are 
lected by the American Institute cordially invited, 

of Graphic .Arts for their excel- -»--"• -x--x- ■*-»- 

lence in typography, has been .'a ^ faculty of , the School 

feature of the exhibit program at of ^ gricuIture and Experiment 
the College Library, and in con- station will meet Friday, Decern- 
nection with the exhibition a pub- . ber 15 at 4jl0 p# m,' in' room 109 
lie meeting has been held with an Agriculture Building, according 
illustrated lec.ure on the books, to an - official announcement from 
generally by a member of the facul- o ean 5 ^ Fletcher 
ty of Fine Arts, Illustrated ' _,,„* ",_„.. * ••• _,,„,,_ 

slides arc shown pointing out the 

excellencies of title page, illus- The chapel speaker' for~ next 
trations, binding, and type, ..Sunday, December 10, will be Dr. 

Howard S. Wi Iklnson, -St., Thomas 

Professor J, Burn Helme will Episcopal Churchy • '//-ashing ton* 
give the illustrated talk tomorrow -«--"<■ ---"■' ' -"•-"- 
(Wednesday) evening at 7:30 P .m, The Co ii ege - senate ^ill- meet 

i n r °? m 107 Mam engineering. All in room 10? Main Engineering this 
^i Y„ !??!!" cordially, in- Thursday, December .7, . at. [*; 1.0 p.m., 

according to'an official notice 
from William S« Hoffman,- Secretary, 



J" yf 



.The varsity basketball team "'" CM "" 

will play Susquehanna tomorrow 

(Wednesday) evening in Recreation Professor Mason Long will 

Hall at 8:00 o.m, conduct the fifth' 'of the current 

jl.;;. %# .::-..;:- series of Wednesakay' readings in 

the "Upper Lounge .of. Old Main to- 

The German department will morrow, December 6, at 4:10 p.m. 

hold its annual Christmas sing His subject "wi 11^ be' "Robert 

in Schwab Audi tori urn on Wednesday, Browning." 
December 13, at 8>;15 p.m. Fac- J:~:H .. -::-:;- "" '• • -::--;:- 

OFFICIAL NOTICES FROM THE OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR 

' Wi thdrawal s • , . 

S Clark, Pauline A.-, FC, Hoy. 15 1 MCCurdy, Robert F>i* LDy -Nov. 24 

1 Evans, Kenneth I., FC, Nov, 6 S Marley, Rosemary; T#^ He, ' Nov. 8 

Z Kesser, Rhoda S,, ' LD, Nov* 10 Z Mi.dgette, Arthur L», ' C'h/ Nov. ZZ 

Z Kj.ns,'Carl M.,' For, Nov, 27 1 Seal Is, James. A,-, .He, .Nov. .17 

1 Lange^ Alfred J.,/ DC, Novi 17 S Speidel, Millicent E-., PE, Nov. 28 

1 Leonard, Leona L., AC, Oct. 31 Z Stafford, Robert' 'S,, AE, Nov. 15 

Of the above, four left be- school; one because of change in in- 
caus.e of finances; four because terest; one becau-se of poor scholar- 
of Illness, one to attend another ship; one gave nc "reason. 

Cancel led Wi thdra wa 1 . 

3 Krevitsky, Joseph P., AL 

• Change of CI as s i f i c a t i on 

.Russell, Vaughn C., from Special in CE to Part-time Soph, In CE. 
•Wiesner, Vivienne J., from Special to Part-time Junior In Ed, 



Wm, 'S, Hoffman 
Secretary 



COMPARATIVE 
ENROLLMENT 

STATISTICS First 3 em . First Sera . First Sem . Firs t Sern, 

"1529-30 1934-35 1932-39 1939-40 



% of Total 

Enrollment 4312 - 100 5040 - 100 6993 - 100 7200 - 100 

Bachelors.. 3968 - 92. 4520 - 89.7 6088 - 87.1 6245 - 87.2 

Men 3649 - 84.6 4040 - 80.1 5520 - 79.0 5457 - 75.7 

Women... . 663 - 15.3 1000 - 19*9 '1473 - 21.3 1743 - 24.2 

Bachelor Men 3369 - 78.2 3659 - 72.6 4318 - 68.9 4770 - 66.6 

Bachelor Women 599 - 13.9 861 - 17.1 1270 - 18.2 1475 - 20.4 

% of Bachelor's 

Bachelor Men 84*9 80.9 79.3 76.4 

Bachelor Women 15.1 19.1 20.4 23.6 

% of Total 

Agriculture.. 705 - 17.7 876 - 17.4 1360 - 19.5 1316.- 18.2 

Chemistry and Physics.... 412 - 10.5 599 - 11.9 683 - 9.8 644 - 9.0 

Education \ 697 - 16.3 ! 730 - 14.5 769 - 11.0 838 - 11.6 

Engineering.. ..." 1119 - 28,2' 834 - 16.5 1054 - 15.1 1233 - 17.1 

No LD LD fro shmen only 

Liberal Arts 941 - 23.7 1236 - 24.5 1496 - 21.4 1490 - 21.3 

Mineral Industries 181 - 4.5 199 - 3.9 296 - 4.2 306 - 4.2 

Physical Education - - 160 - 3.2 165 - 2.4 178 - 2.4 

Undergraduate Centers.... - 429 - 6.3 556 - 7.7 

Graduate.. 183 - 4.6 280 - 5.6 491 - 7.0 512 - 7.1 

Superintendent, Manager, fo of Bachelor's 

Foreman -' - 404 - 8.9 536 - 3.8 494 - 7.9 

Storekeepers, Merchants.. - - 420 - 9.3 445 - 7.3 492 - 7.8 

Farmers - - 323 - 7.2 432 - 7.1 453 - 7,2 

Salesmen, Commercial 

Travelers - - 150- 3.3 318 5.2 321 5.1 

Railroad Employees - - 158 - 3.5 219 3.6 222 3.5 

Engineers - *- 122 - 2.7 176 2.9 218 3.4 

Professore, -Teachers - - 171 - 3.8 220 3.6 208 3.3 

Laborers - - 140- 3.1 188 3.1 131 -2.8 

Miners* . - *• •. 124- 2.7 176 2;9 157 2.5 

Clerks.., * *..*..* . - - 105 - 2;3 147 t i4 126 2.0 

Physicians*. * . ) . • . • • i • • A • *" . ~ 128 ~ 2 * 8 u ~ ~ 

Contract orsj. . i ; - - 124 - 2.7 * 

% of Total 

Pennsylvania 4064 - 94,1 4727 - 93.9 6369 - 91.2 6510 - 90.5 

Non-Pennsylvania. 248 - 5,9 313 - 6.2 624 - 8.9 690 - 9.5 

% of Bachelor's 

: Presbyterian 920 - 23.18 ' '880 - 19.49 1111 - 18,25 1113 - 17.8 

Methodist 792 - 19.95 730 - 16.15 1012 - 16.72 1049 - 16.7 

Roman Catholic 465 - 11.71 614 - 13,60 900 - 14,69 936 - 15,0 

Lutheran 517 - 13,02 524 - 11..60 754 - 12.38 782 - 12.1 

Hebrew 170 - 4.28 291 - 6.44 504 - •. tB.,28 543 - 8.5 

Reformed ,. 265 - 6.67 283 - 6.27 311 - 5,..ll 307 - ' 4.9 

Protestant Episcopal...,. 224 - 5.64 274 - 6.07 • • 304 7 4.99 306 - 4.8 

Baptist 143 - 3.60 152 - 3.36 209 - 3.42 - 210 - 3.3 

Protestant 96 - 2,41 225 - 4.99 323 - 5.31 315 - 5.0 

No Preference 74 - 1.86 120 - 2.66 149 - 2.42 132 - 2.1 

% of Class 

Modal Age, 18 Freshmen... 475 - 37.5 590 - 40.0 816 - 44,9 933 - 52.2 

19 Sophomores. 420 - 37.2 489 - 40.0 631 - 37.9 778 - 43.1 

20 Juniors.... 308 - 34,6 386 - 39,4 559 - 41.8 480 - 37.8 

21 Seniors.... 236 - .34.5 319 - 38,0 462 - 36.4 525 - 41.5 

% ,of Bachelor's 

Advanced Standing - - 385 8.5 683 - 11.2 776 - 12.4 

Advanced Standing, Centers _ _ _ — 160 - 2.6 217 - 3.5 

Total _. - - - - 343 - 13.9 993 - 15.0 

% of Bachelor's 

Sons or Daughters of Alumni - - - - 332 - 5.5 350 - 5.6 



Freshmen, , 1264 

Sophomores. 1130 

Juniors... 890 

Seniors. 684 



of 



Bachel 


or • s 
















31.3 


1477 


- 


32.7 


' 1320 


- 29,9 


1901 


- 


30.5 


28.5 


1219 


- 


27.0 


1664 


- 27.2 


1808 


— 


29.0 


22.4 


982 


- 


21.8 


1337 


- 22.0 


1270 


— 


20.3 


17.2 


842 


- 


18.6 


1267 


- 20.3 


1266 


- 


20.3 



Wm« S, Hoffman 
Registrar 



H3?fKVaD*H SAGV1D SSI 



THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 



FACULTY 

Published weekly on Tuesday during the College 
year as a means of making official announcements 
and presenting items of interest to the faculty. All 



VOL. 19 




BULLETIN 

contributions should be as brief as possible and reach 
Walter F. Dantzscher, Director of Public Information, 
105 Old Main, not later than 10 a.m. each Friday. 



NO. 



December .12, 1939 



12 



PUBLICITY FOR 

CHRISTMAS PAPERS 



AP P L I CA T I ON S REQUE S TED FOR 
'NEW LIBRARY FACILITIES 



Members cf the faculty who 
plan to attend meetings of pro- 
fessional societies or participate 
at educational conferences during 
the Christmas holidays are asked 
to report this fact to their de- 
partment head at once. The head 
of the department is asked to keep. 
a record of this proposed partici- 
pation and to report the activities 
of members of his department to 
the Department of Public Informa- 
tion at his early convenience, as 
soon as he thinks his information 
is reasonably complete. 

In cases where papers are to 
be delivered, it will be helpful 
to the prestige of the College if 
advance copies or abstracts of the 
proposed addresses are sent to the 
Department of Public Information 
well In advance of the meetings. 
No publicity about the contents of 
the papers will be released for 
publication before their delivery, 
but It is essential for the de- 
partment to have the papers well 
in advance in order to assimilate 
their contents and organize the 
presentation of material for the 
press if it Is to appear at all. 

Faculty members who fear mis- 
quotation have the assurance of 
tiie College News Service that news 
stories about their papers will be 
submitted to them for approval be- 
fore they are released to press 
associations and newspapers if 
they so request in submitting the 
abstracts. 



The new central library build- 
ing contains 60 carrells in the 
stack, 12 on each of five floors. 
Each carrell includes a desk top 
on which to write, a chair, and a 
locked book shelf. It does not in* 
elude a door so that carrells not 
in use may be available to other 
faculty members and graduate stu- 
dents. Carrells and keys to the 
book shelves will be assigned to 
faculty members 'as far as possible 
In the order of preference ^n the 
semester basis when and if we move 
into the new building. Meanwhile, 
advanced applications for carrells 
are being received at the Central 
Library Circulation Desk, Appli- 
cants are requested to see Miss 
Stokes or Miss Knoll. 



There are also nine semin 
and studies on the third floor 
the library building of which 
four smallest are designed for 
faculty studies. These will b 
assigned, also on a semester b 
to faculty members who are eng 
in serious research projects c 
writing of bocks. Each' study 
eludes a table, a chair, and b 
shelves. Advanced application 
studies will be received at th 
office of the Librarian, Assi 
ments will be made when and if 
move into the new library bui 1 



ars 

of 
the 



asi s, 
aged 
r the 
In- 
ook 

for 
e 
gn- 

we 
di ng. 



Willard P, Lev/Is, Librarian 

A Christmas Musical Service by 
the College Choir will be given in 
chapel next Sunday, December 17, 



OF GENERAL INTEREST 



Sponsored by Fi Gamma Alpha, 
honorary fine arts fraternity 



there is 

11 i 
303 ! '3 



on display a new exhibi- 



tion in the 'College Art Gallery, 
ain Engineering, from Decern 
her 5 to 16. This is Pi Gamma 
Alpha *s annual alL-college show, 
open to any Penn State student 
who cares to su" 
graphic art. 



A demonstration and talk on 
the grading of canned and frozen 
foods will be presented by H, S. 
Slamp of the United States Depart- 
ment 'of Agriculture in room 100 
Horticulture Building, Thursday 
evening, December 14, at 7:00 p,m, 
Faculty members and their wives 



m'i t examples of are cordially invited. 



this yea 



/-.mono students represented 
r are Cicely M» DeSi Ivor, 
tern, J, \ee Thorne, Jean 



Da r Ion S 

Craighead, Hazel I* Shu.ll, Don 



Facul ty -members are again - 
reminded that tiic German depart- 
ment will hold its. annual Christmas 
sing in Schwab- Auditorium tomorrow, 



Dhitc, G 
Secri s t, 
exhibi ti 
double s 
simi les 
ducti ons 
A 1,1 thro 
rentlv u 



eorge A. Hay, Dorothee 

and Eugene Fickes. This 
on is in addi ti cn_ to . the 
ii owing of American fac- 
and Pueblo pottery repro~ 

announced last week. 
e shows will ri i n concur- 
ntii December 16. 



December 1. 



The gallery is open daily 
except Sunday from 8*30, a»m« to 
5:3,0 p.m. The -public is cordial- 
ly invited, -:;--::- -:;--::- 

The varsity basketball team will play 
Buclcnell in Recreation Hall this Satur- 
day, December 16, at 8:00 pirn. 



The Heme Economics department will 

welcome visitors Friday, December 15, 
from 3:0C to 5:00 p.m. in the Heme Eco- 
nomics building. Come specia.l features 
will be exhibited, including hone crafts, 
clothing, special Christmas decorations, 
and' inspection of the new hone kitchen. 
Tea will be served in room 204 from 3:00 



5:00 p.m. 



. Faculty members are invited to at- 
tend the Americanization ceremony in 
connection with the dedication of the 
new Elks Home tomorrow, December ' 13, 
at 8:00' p.m. The heme will be open for 
inspection from 7:00 to 8:00 p.m. 



Dean Frank D. Kern announces the 
following final examination for the 
D.Ed, degree : 

Russell K« Landis, Industrial Ed- 
ucation, Friday, December 15, 1:30 p.m. 
i'.nTQ 24 Education Building. 

* * * * * * 

The next issue of the Faculty Bul- 
letin -will b>- dated January 9, ** ** 



at 8:15 D*rn, 



The last of the Wednesday . 
Reading series presented by the 
College Library' wi 11 be' given to- 
morrow, Dec-ember 13, in. the Upper 
Lounge' of Old Main at 4:15 p.m. 
by Dr. A, 0. Morse. 'The subject 
will be "Christmas/from Dickens, 1 ' 



The Graduate Club will hold 'a Christ- 
mas party and election of officers Thurs- 
day, December 14, at 8:00 p*m, in the 
Sandwich Shop, Old Main.' All interested 
gra.duate students are urged to join the 
club an*d attend this meeting, 

* * * * * * 

In order to meet the unprecedented 
demand for Artists' Course tickets, the 
committee voted Friday to make available 
a limited amount of standing room a amis.— 
sinns and to provide seats in the second 
floor foyer of Schwab Auditorium to such 
possible patrons as may desire these ac — 
coram odat ions.. 

The price of admission to the first 
number, the Don p 03 sack' Chorus , which 
Trill appear n 
December 12 



here' this evening, Tuesday, 
., following' a concert in Phil- 
adelphia last evening, will be $1.25 for 
either type of admission. The two types 
of admission will not be interchangeable'. 



In the foyer, the committee announc- 
ed, it will be possible, to hear the mu- 
sical numbers while seated, but 'it will 
not be possible to see the artists..- Tic- 
kets for both types of accormnc/dat ion will 
be available in the lobby of the Audi- 
torium en the night of the concert before 
the concert. 



IINUTES OF TKE COLLEGE SENATE 



3- 



A meeting of the College Senate was 
held in room 107 Main Engineering at 4:10 

Thursday, December 7, with President 
el .presiding. A list of the members 
ent is on file in the Office of the 
strar , 



p.m. 
Hetz 



pre s 
Regi 



The secretary announced the member— 
ship in two committees, as appointed by 
the Pre silent : 

(1) The Committee on Rules, as nom- 
inated by the Committee on Committees and 
approved by the President; 

W. S. Dye, Jr., Chairman 

H. A. Everett W. S. Hoffman 

G, R. Green H. C. Knandel 

(2) The committee authorized by the 
Senate to study the organization of the 
Senate and the methods of choosing its 
members from the viewpoint of its influ- 
ence and usefulness as the principal 
legislative agency of the institution: 

A. E* Martin, Chairman 
E* C, Bischoff H* Landsberg 
Laura Drummond F, F. Lininger 
B; K. Johnstone M» W. White 



Under the reports o 
Committee on Admission r 
the entrance requirement 
ricula in the School of 
changed as follows: for 
chemistry, bacteriology, 
entomology, add one and 
algebra and a year of pi 
the curriculum in poultr 
one year of algebra* Si 
of the catalogue contain 
requirements is now at t 
committee recommends tha 
be effective for admissi 
1941. The report of the 
is on file in the Office 
was on motion approved. 



f committees the 
ecommended that 
s for four cur- 
Agriculture be 
agricultural bio-* 
and zoology and 
one— half years of 
ane geometry; for 
y husbandry, add 
nee the portion 
ing these entrance 
he printer's, the 
t these changes 
on in September, 
committee, which 
of the Registrar, 



The Commit 
presented its n 
White and Louis 
The following s 
mittee in makin 
senior class wa 
Pergrin, the cl 
class by Miss E 
sophomore class 
in addit ion to 
college preside 
Jr., and the ed 
A. W. Engel, T 
awards were : 



tee on Academic Standards 
ominations for the John W» 
e Carnegie scholarships, 
tu dents assisted the com— 
g its selections: the 
s represented by Mr i David 
ass president; the junior 
linor Weaver; and the 

by Mr, Gerald Doherty; 
these students, the all— 
nt , Mr. H, C. McWilliams, 
it or of the Collegian, Mr, 
hose receiving the various 



John W, Wh it e Scholarships 

Senior — Frank J. Fry 
Junior — Robert G. McCoy 
Sophomore — Mary A. Galletti 



Louise Carnegie Scholarships 

Seniors : Helen L, Camp 

Kenneth K, Klingensmith 

(2nd semester, 1939-40) 
Elmer D. Longfellow 
Betty C. Wagner 

(1st semester, 1939-40) 
Stanley A. Wyke s 

Juniors: Frank J, Brecher 
Ray H, Dutt 
Albert L, Myers on 
Leo Sommer 

S ophomore s i 

Robert W, Noll 
Karl H, Norris 
Stuart G, Rhode 
Murray L» Schwartz 

The Committee on Academic Standards 
presented a request for an exception to 
the residence rule in the case of Miss 
Mary Latherow, This recommendation, which 
would permit Miss Latherow to earn one 
college credit prior to the opening of 
College this year was not to be regarded 
as a precedent. The recommer.dat ion, which 
is on file in the Office of the Registrar, 
was on motion adopted. 

Professor Kinsloe, Chairman of the 
Committee on Courses of Study, presented 
a report which had previously been dis- 
tributed among the members of the Senate, 
The report was en motion adopted. 

Professor Kinsloe raised the question 
as to whether the practice of circular- 
izing the reports of the Committee on Cotir- 
ses of Study a week or more prior to any 
meeting date, as now permitted for the De- 
cember meeting, might not with propriety 
be extended to other months of the year. 
On motion of Dr. Dengler this suggestion 
of Professor Kinsloe' s was adopted. 

The President announced that he would 
appoint in the very near future a commit- 
tee en campus traffic and parking. The 
co-chairmen of this committee were to be 
Dean Warnock and Mr, Hostetter* The Pres- 
ident asked of the Senate its cooperation 
with and sympathetic aid for the committee, 

The President further announced that 
under date of December 16 there would be a 
special meeting of the Executive Committee 
of the Board of Trustees, at which time 
the docket would be restricted to the ques- 
tions surrounding the issuing of bonds by 
the special State Authority, require d to se- 
cure the equipment for the new buildings., 

Wm, S. Hoffman 
Secretary 



OFFICIAL NOTICES FROM THE OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR 

Wi thdrawal s 



(AC) 


1 




n 




a- 




1 


(HC) 


s 




4 


(FC) 


1 




1 


(HC) 


S 


(AC) 


4 




1 


(DC) 






1 




3 




4 



Boland, Herbert B., DH, Nov. 27 
Brockway, Elsie, LD, Nov. 29 
Conway, Carl G., IEd, Nov. 17 
Elsasser, Ina, LA, Nov. 8 
Ewalt, Richard W., IE, Nov, 28 
Gal I i van, Richard H., Eng, Nov # ', 
Griff Ing, Neil F», LD, Nov. 17 
Habel, Edna M., LA, Nov. 10 
Hoenstine, Ronald VI. , LD, Nov* 2' 
Jordan, Ann M., LD, Nov. 29 
Joseph, Edward B., Jr., LA, Nov* 
Natkin, David, Ch, Oct. 17 
Seff, Sidney, ChE, Dec. 5 
Zehner, Betty J., AL, Nov. 1 



Of the above 1 withdrew to ac« 
cept a position; 1 because of fi- 
nancial difficulties; 1 because of 
academic difficulties; 2 to be 



married; 1 because of lack, of in- 
terest; 2 to attend other schools 
3 .because of illness; 
personal reasons* 



because of 



Dropjped from CojUjsgjs JTor ' P oo r Scholarshpp 



o 

I 



Ev/a It, R i char d W • , ' I E 
Ganter, Walter J., EE 



The Registrar wishes to bring 
to. the attention of faculty mem- 
bers regulation 38 of the Regula- 
tions for Undergraduate Students, 
as fol lows, . which became effective 
December 7: 

A grade of WB incurred within 
the last six weeks of a semester 



2 Piatt, John T., Met 

3 wheeler, Jerome J., 



,cnE 



shall automatically be recorded 
as a minus two (-2) unless the 
Instructor reports a grade of 
minus one (-1). Such grades 
shall be recorded as WB(*-1) or 
WB(-2)« A grade of WB(~1) shall 
not entitle the student to be en- 
rolled in a dependent subject. 

Wm« S. Hoffman' 
Regi strar 



Aj.-ej.q_zn sSsiii 
HSPSKVttD'H SAGV1D SSI 



THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 



FACULTY 

Published weekly on Tuesday during the College 
year as a means oi making- official announcements 
and presenting items of interest to the faculty. All 

VOL. 19 




~-- : =ss^ / ' 



January 9, 1940 



•BULLETIN 

contributions should be as brief as possible and reach 
Walter F. Dantzscher, Director of Public Information, 
105 Old Main, not later than 10 a.m. each Friday. 

NO. 13 



PENN STATE PLACERS TO SELL SEASON TICKETS 



The P'enn State Players in cele- 
bration of their 20th anniversary 
season are, for the-' first .time in 
their history, offering season 
tickets for their next four produc- 
tions to be presented during the 
remainder of the school year. 

According to Frank S. Neus- 
baum, assistant professor of dra- 
matics, order blanks are now avail- 
able at the Student Union Desk, and , 
series tickets may be obtained at 
$2. for the four .productions* * 



Holders ©f season tickets 

< 

! ", ENGINEERING SCHOOL FACULTY DINNER 



will have the advantage of prefer- 
ential seating by advising Student 
Union of their choice at least one 
day before the general sale of 
ti ckets beg ins* : 

The titles and dates of this 
season's productions are: "The 
Chalk Circle"— January 19-20, a 
Chinese fantasy; "The -World We 
Live In" — March 15-1G, a comic 
satire of life, love, and war; 
"Our Town" — May 10-11, Pulitzer 
Prize winner of . 1938; and a popu- 
lar, comedy to be chosen--June 
4-5. 



An Engineering 'School . Faculty 
Dinner wi 1*1 be" held at the Univer- 
sity Club this Thursday evening, 
'January 11, at 6:45 p.m. This meet- 
ing is under the sponsorship of the 
Central Pennsylvania Section of the 
Ameri can " Society of Mechanical Engi- 
neers, The Pennsylvania State Col- 
lege Branch of the Society for the 
Promotion of Engineering Education, 
and the Program Committee of the 
School of Engineering. 

A turkey dinner v/i 1 1 be served 
at 85^ a plate. The dress will be 
informal and the party will be stag. 
No business will be transacted. The 
Engineering School Octette will sing. 
The speaker of the evening will be 
Mr. A. B. Karpov, consulting engi- 



neer of *Pi ttsburgh, whose subject 
will be "Engineering as a Branch 
of Modern Science."-- Mr. Karpov 
was formerly with the Aluminum 
Company of America and i s an ex- 
cellent speaker* 

Tickets will be sold in the 
various departments. Attendance 
at the dinner is limited to 140. 

This meeting is intended as a 
social gathering of the School of 
Engineering Faculty, and it is 
hoped that all members will attend. 
Faculties of the Schools of Chemis- 
try and Physics and Mineral Indus- 
tries, as well as the outside mem- 
bers of the sponsoring societies 
are also Invited to attend. 



AN ANALYSIS OF PRESIDENT WALTERS.' LATEST ENROLLMENT STATISTICS 

By William S. Hoffman, College Registrar 
President, American Association of Collegiate Re-gistrars 



For more than 20 years,Dr, Raymond 


The position 


Walters (now president of the University 


State College in t 


of Cincinnati) has published in School and 


first item studied 


Society registration statistics for the 


a first semester e 


first semester of each year in American 


occupy 15th place 


institutions of higher learning. The fig- 


versity of Fennsyl 


ures for the present semester appeared in 


with a plurality o 


the issue for December 16, Dr, Walters 


University of Pitt 


states that his data were gathered from re- 


with an enrollment 


ports of 648 institutions, perhaps the 


15 institutions in 


largest group ever included in his papers. 


are as follows : 


Full-time Rank 





of The Pennsylvania 
his grouping is the 

by the writer. With 
nrcllment of 7200, we 
nationally. The Uni— 
vania is in 14th place 
f 147 students. The 
sburgh is in 25th place 
of 6265. The leading 
resident enrollment 



Student s 



California. 26,004. 

Minnesota . . , . . . . 15,3 01. 

Columbia 14,211. 

Illinois. . . . . . . . 13,510. 

Ohio State 13,231. 

New York University . . 12,745. 

Michigan. , 12,098. 

Wisconsin . . . . . . . 11,268. 



.2 

.3 
.4 
.5 
.6 
.7 
.3 



Full-time 
Student s 

Univ. of Washington. . .10,129. 

Texas 9,872. 

College C. of New York. 8,548. 

Harvard. . 8,209, 

Louisiana. ,,.,••,« 7,813. 

Pennsylvania ...... 7,347, 

Pennsylvania State , . , 7,200, 



Rank 



. 9 
.10 
.11 
.12 
.13 
.14 
.15 



Ten years ago, in the academic year 
1929—30, the University of Pennsylvania 
was In 11th place with an enrollment of 
7117; the University of Pittsburgh was in 
17th place with 5646; and The Pennsylvania 
State College was in 32nd place with an 
enrollment of 4089* 

Five years ago, figures reported for 
the first semester of 1934- k 35 gave the 
University of Pennsylvania 13th place with 
6115; the University of Pittsburgh again 
in 17th place with 5723; while The Penn- 
sylvania State College had moved to 27th 
place with 4879. 



If part-time enrollment and other 
resident regi strat ions, such as summer 
session figures for the preceding summer 
session, are added and duplicates removed 
(as requested by Dr, Walters), The Pennsyl- 
vania State College has an enrollment of 
9284J which places the College in 23rd 
position* In this compilation the Univer- 
sity of Pennsylvania occupies 12th place 
and the University of Pittsburgh 15th. 

The 10 largest institutions 15 years 
ago, 10 years ago, 5 years ago, and for 
the current semester are, according to 
Dr. Walter's reports; 



15 ' Years Ago 



10 Years Ago 



Univ. of California 

13,276 
Columbia University 

11,530 
Univ. of Illinois 

9,353 
Univ. of Michigan 

8,906 
Univ. of Minnesota 

8,331 
Ohio State Univ. 

8,225. 
Univ. of Wisconsin 

7,531 
Univ-. of Pennsylvania Univ, of Wisconsin 

7>168 9,468 

Harvard- University Harvard University 

6,.584 8,377 

New York University Univ. of Washington 

5,843 7,258 

Dr, Walters reports an increase of 
2,7% in full-time student enrollment over 
the preceding year; for the Middle Atlan- 
tic states (New York, New Jersey, and Penn- 



Univ, of California 

17,242 
Columbia University 

14,952 
New York University 

12,419 
Univ. of Illinois 

12,413 
Univ* of Minnesota 

10,657 
Ohio State Univ, 

10,557 
Univ. of Michigan 
9,688 



_5 Years Ago 

Univ. of California 

18,892 
Columbia University 

13,819 
New York University 

12,347 
Univ. of Minnesota 

12,188 
Univ. of Illinois 

10,747 
Ohio State Univ. 

10,012 
Univ. of Michigan 

9,005 
Univ, of Wi scon sin 

8,053 
Coll. City of N, Y. 

3,030 
Harvard University 
7,671 



Today 

Univ, of California 

26,004 
Univ. of Minnesota 

15,301 
Columbia University 

14,211 
Univ. of Illinois 

13,510 
Ohio State Univ, 

13,231 
New York University 

12,745 
Univ. of Michigan 

12,098 
Univ, of Wisconsin 

11,268 
Univ. of Washington 

10,129 
Univ, of Texas 
9,872 



sylvania ) a loss of ,24%; for Pennsylvania 
a gain- of 3,08%; and for public universities, 
(55 in number including Penn State) a gain 
of 2,5%, The gain in enrollment for The 



ANALYSIS OF ENROLLMENT STATISTICS (cont'd) 



Pennsylvania State College, as derived 
from the last two first semester enroll- 
ment reports issued by this office is 
2.96$. 

Dr. Walters reports the change in 
freshman enrollment throughout the coun- 
try over last year's figures, as given by 
623 institutions, as follows; 

Liberal Arts - from 147,406 to 150,642 



Engineering 
Commerce 
Agriculture 
Teachers 



from 28,192 to 37,799 

from 23,485 to 23,574 

from 10,094 to 10,950 

from 30,118 to 31,572 



The total reported increase in 
freshman enrollment was 6,4?b with a 
total freshman registration for the year 
of 254,537 Freshman at The Pennsylvania 
State College increased from 1820 to 
1901, a gain of 91, or exactly 5^, 



OF GENERAL INTEREST 



Pi Gamma Alpha, fine arts fraternity, 
announces the showing of "Greed," the 
second in a series of three motion pic- 
tures, at-8;30 p.m. tomorrow, Wednesday, 
January 10, in Schwab Auditorium, 

Erich von Stroheim, who. has just re- 
turned to Hollywood, directed "Greed" in 



1924, He made it one of the most 
of all realistic films. 



drast ic 



Admission is free and the public is 
cordially invited to attend, 

* * * * * * 

Faculty members and graduate students 
who desire to purchase or rent academic 
costumes for the February Commencement 
should place their orders at once with 
C E. Myers, room 2A> Horticulture Build- 
ing, Rental orders may be placed by tele- 
phone. Persons in charge of graduate stu- 
dents please bring this to their attention, 

* * A * * * 

A limited amount of standing room for 
the performance of Cornelia Otis Skinner, 
who will appear this evening, Tuesday, 

* * * 



January 9, at 8:30 p m c as the second num- 
ber on the Artists' Course, will be sold 
at $1 50. 

* * * * * * 



The Graduate School Faculty will meet 
tomorrow, Wednesday, January 10, at 4:10 
p,m» in room 208 Buckhout Laboratory, ac- 
cording t o an official announcement from 
Dean Frank D» Kern, 

* * * * * * 

The next subject in the Liberal Arts 
Lecture Series will be "America's National 
Defense," to be discussed by Col, Ambrose 
R, Emery, department of military science 
and tactics, next Tuesday, January 16, at 
7:30 p,m, in the Home Economics Auditorium. 

* * * * * * 

The speaker for chapel next Sunday^ 
January 14> will be Dr.* Everett R, Clinchy, 
Director^ National Conference of Jews and 
Christians^ New York* 

* * * * * * 

The basketball game with Georgetown 
tomorrow evening will be played at 8 p.m, 
* * * 



MINUTES OF COLLEGE SENATE MEETING JANUARY 



^> 



1940 



A meeting of the College Senate was 
held in 107 Main Engineering Building on 
Thursday, January 4, 1940, at 4:10 p,m,, 
with President Eetzel presiding, A list 
of the members present is on file in the 
Office of the Registrar, Professor J, H, 
Frizzell represented Professor R, E, Gal— 
braith. 

The minutes of the meeting of Decem- 
ber 7, 1939, were read and approved. 

The President announced that the bond 
issue referred to at the December meeting 
of the Senate was .now ready for execution 
and that a schedule for movable equipment 
amounting to $200,000 would be advertised 
for bids in the very near future e Appar- 
ently the t otal 'equipment requirement for 
the new buildings would probably be pro- 
vided for by the bond issue. 



The President 



also 
* * 



announced that the 



contractor in charge of installing seats' 
in the new buildings was in soma diffi- 
culty, but that the College was doing all 
it could in order to make certain rooms 
available for the second semester. 

The President announced the arrival 
of the new Catalogue and congratulated 
those concerned with its publication. 

Professor Kinsloe presented the re- 
port of the Committee on Courses of Study, 
which had been sent to all members of th« 
Senate prior to the Christmas vacation. 
The report, with two slight corrections, 
was adopted. The corrected report is on 
file in the Office of the Registrar 

■ There being no further business the 
Senate adjourned c 

Y. r m, S. Hoffman 
Se cret ary 



CALENDAR CHANGES AND REVISED REGISTRATION PROCEDURES 

At the meeting of the College Senate changed the dates for events at the end 

on October 5 the calendar was changed on of the first semester hut has no effect 

account of the change made by President on the dates for the opening of the second 

Roosevelt for Thanksgiving Day. This semester. The calendar is as follovs: 

Examinations begin at 8 a.m., Jan. 25 — Thursday 

Grades for seniors due at Registrar's Office 8 a.m., Jan. 29 — Monday 

Midyear Commencement 7:30 p.m., Jan, 31 — Wednesday 

First semester ends 11:50 a.m., Feb. 1 — Thursday 

Second semester registration Feb. 5 and 6 — Monday, Tuesday 

Second semester begins 8 a.m., Feb, 7— —Wednesday 

In accordance with e stablished cust om tion Hall, students 'will be required to 
and in order to avoid congestion in Recrea— present themselves there as follows: 

AtoBor - Mon, 1 to 5 H to I — Mo n. 1 to 5 PtoR — Mon* 1 to 5 

Bos to Co - Tues. 1 to 5 J to K - Tues. 1 to 5 S to Sp - Tues* 1 to 5 

Cr to E - Mon. 10 to 12 L, Mc to Mar - Mon. 10 to 12 St to V - Mon. 10 to 12 

F to G - Tues. 8 t o 12 Mas to - Tues. 8 t o 12 W to Z - Tues. 8 to 12 

The above divisions are so arranged In the past, since there was no vaca— 

that a student registering for four con— tion period between s eue st er§, student s 

secutive second semesters will have regis— were permitted to exchange places in order 

tered on each of the four half days of the to obtain certain advantages as to dates 

registration period; for instance, a stu— of registration. This practice will not 

dent named Johnson would have registered be permitted this year, and all students 

Monday morning in 1937, Tuesday morning in who register late within the registration 

1938, Monday afternoon in 1939, and Tues- period will be assessed the late penalty 

day afternoon of this year. fee of $1, 

Wm» S» Hoffman 

OFFICIAL NOTICES FROM THE OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR 

Withdrawals 

1 Anders, Fanniebell J., PM> Dec; 2 4 Han, Frank H., Met, Nov. 15 

S Anthony> Edith R*, AL, Dec. 19 1 Himoff,. Robert A., LD, Nov. 2 

1 Balesberger, Thomas F.> For, Dec. 10 2 Irving, Frank M., Jr.,ChE, Dec. 9 

2 Block, Heinz, Ag> Nov. 2 G Keith, Ralph W., NEd, Dec. 12 

3 Cochran, Henry E., IS, Dec. 12 AC Xnouse, Samuel B,, Ch, Dec. 12' 
2 Drew, James E.. , ChE, Dec. 11 3 Lucas, Weir S.,, PM, Dec. 14 

1 Gates, Janet E., HE, Dec. 11 1 Olson, John W., ME, Dec. 8 

1 Gearhart, John W. , LD, Dec. 15 3 Raughley, Robert F., PM, Dec. 18 

2 Gerhard, William S., PEd, Oct, 27 3 Young, Nevin D,, For, Dec. 16 

2 Griffin, Howard L,, LD, Nov. 23 4 Zierdt, Eugene H., ME, Dec. 20 

Of the above, 4 withdrew- because of of interest, 1 to attend business college, 
poor scholarship, 5 because of illness, 1 to accept a position, 1 to study another 
1 because of finances, 2 because of lack vocation, 5 because of personal reasons. 

Wm. S. Hoffman 
Registrar 



i 
H3JINYHD-H SAQVID SSIW 



THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 



FACULTY- 



Published weekly on Tuesday during the College 
year as a means of making official announcements 



and presenting items of interest to the faculty. 

VOL. 19 




All 

J emu air 



BULLETIN 

contributions should be as brief as possible and reach 
Walter F. Dantzscher, Director of Public Information, 
105 Old Main, nqt later than 10 a.m. each Friday. 



IS, 1940 



NO. 



14 



JOINT. EXHIBITION OF PAINTING 



ELEANOR RUBIN AND ELBJ 



DAY I S 



- . From January 8 to 27 the Division of 
Fine Arts of the Department of Architecture 
is sponsoring an exhibition of work by two 
young artists, pupils of Hobson Pittman cf 
Philadelphia, in the College Art Gallery, 
303 Main Engineering, 



mond 
now 

lege 

stud 

Phil 

of t 

the 

tr ia 

two 

wit h 

phia 

The 



The- first 
Rubin,, f'o 
the wife c 
faculty ;m 
ied at the 
adelphi,a,. 
he Univers 
Pennsylva,n 
1 Art s in. 
.summers sh 
Hobson Pi 
paint er , 
Ponn sylvan 



of th 
rmerly 
f a Pe 
ember. 

Graph 
at 'the 
ity 'of 
1 a Mil s 
Phi lad 

has 
ttman, 
at the 
ia St a 



ese is Elea.n 
of Philadel 

nVi sylvania S 
Mrs, Rubin 

i'c Sketch CI 
Fine Arts C 

'Pennsylvani. 

eum School o 

el phia. For 

studied oil 
well— known 
summer sess 

te College, 



ore Dia 


- 


phia, 




tate Co 


1- 


has 




u«b in 




ol lege 




a, and 


at 


f Indus 


- 


tthe p3 


st 


paint'ir. 


g 


Bhilade 


i- 


ion* of 





This is Mrs. Rubin's first general 
exhibition. She is represented by 15 , 
works, which are said to show to good 



advantage her rich handling of color -and 
her. solid feeling for form and structure, 
Mrs, Rubin is interested in a variety of 
subject matter, from still lifes to fig- 
ure studies. 



The other exhibitor is 
born in Tyro 



from The Pen 
1937 with a 
E ducat ion, 
summers he h 
Hobson Pittm 
session, Mr 
to shew his 
his strongly 
His painting 
and the medi 
dynamic fash 



ne, Mr, Davis was 
n sylvania State Co 
Bachelor of Sole no 
For the past five 
as st tidied oil pai 
an at the Perm St a 
, Davis *'s canvases 
exuberant sense of 
developed feeling 
s are subjective i 
um is said to be h 
ion. 



bert Davis, 
graduat ed 

liege in 

e in Art 

con se cut ive 

nting with 

te summer 
are said 
color and 
fcr pattern, 

n character^ 

a n d 1 e d in 



The gallery is open daily except Sun- 
day from 8:30 a.m. to 8:30 p,m. The pub- 
lic is cordially invited. 



.oKAM 



EXHIBITS CARTOON DRAWINGS 



An exhib 
cartoon drawi 
College Libro. 
nary. These 
country's lea 
the New Yorker, Collier's, the Saturday 
Evening Post, 



it consisting of 25 original 
ngs is being held at the 
ry during the month of Jan- 
have appeared in many of the 
ding publications, including 



Among the artists included are Gar- 
rett Price, Charles Addams, Jay Irving, 
Frit z 'Wilkinsen, -Hof f , Chen Day, Schus, 
Lariar, Bandel Linn, and many others. In 
addition, some books and materials relat- 
ing to the history and drawing of cartoons 



and 



others , 
* * 



are on 
* * 



display, 



.COLONEL EMERY TO LECTURE THIS 



Colonel 
the second in 
Series this e 
in the Home E 
p,m. His sub 
National Defc 



Ambrose R, Emery will give 

the Liberal Arts Lecture 
vening (Tuesday, January 16) 
conomics Auditorium at 7:30 
j e ct will be " Ame rica's 
n s e , " 



Emery, son of a United States 
, will speak from a wide ex— 
in army life at various posts in 



C olonel 
Army officer 
perience 

the United States, Cuba, the Philippine 
Inlands, Hawaii, and China, He will dis- 
cuss the needs of our military forces, 
* * * * 



AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY TO MEET 



The 93rd meeting of the Central Penn- 
sylvania Section of the American Chemical 
Society will be held in the Home Economics 
Auditorium tomorrow, Wednesday, January 
17, at 7 ;30 p,m. 



Dr, Kc C, D, Hickman will speak en 
"Molecular Distillation of Natural Oils 
and Vitamins" and Trill show slides deal- 
ing with various phases of his work. 



Dr , Hickman received his training at 
the Rcyal College of Science in London 
and was Lecturer in Chemistry there* He 
has "been associated with the Eastman Kodak 
Company and List illation Products, Inc., 
since 1925. 



Memhers of the society who wish to 
attend the informal dinner for Dr . Hick- 
man tomorrow, V/ednesday, January 17, at 
the State College Plotel should send the 
reservation "blank by today noon. The 
price will "be 75^. 



CARBON COPIES WILL HELP 



The Department of Public Information 
would like to receive carbon copies of 
the prepared addresses faculty and. staff 
members are scheduled to make before any 
group or organization other than a regu- 
larly scheduled class, 

Within recent months many news items 
have been written and distributed which 
f ound their origin in the information 
contained in these prepared addresses, 
ohe message sometimes thus attaining a 
• irculation numerically a hundredfold 
greater than the audience before which . . 
it was originally delivered,, Some of. the 
articles have found circulation through 
the press associations. 

The publicity department would nat- 
urally like to have this material as far 
in advance of the date it is scheduled 
"o o be delivered as possible because 
resultant publicity is likely tc be 
greater if the release can be placed in 



the 
far 



the hands of editors at a time to coincide 
with the actual delivery. But papers re- 
ceived after delivery are not absolutely 
valueless for publicity purposes because 
they sometimes suggest possible topics not 
necessarily predicated upon the speech 
it self. 

It would be helpful also if individual 
members of the staff would endeavor to 'call 
to the attention of the Department of Pub- 
lic Information the publication of articles 
which they have written for scholarly and 
scientific publications. Some effort is 
now being made by the department to review 
all such material for news distribution, 
but the assignment is naturally broad and 
requires the periodical inspection of hun- 
dreds of likely publications to keep in 
touch with the scholarly production of all 
staff memberso Some effort is being made 
tc show each cooperating faculty member 
clippings of the material which originates 
with him. 



A LETTER TO FACULTY MEMBERS 



To Faculty Members: 

The Independent Party is seeking to 
establish on the campus an examinat ion 
file in which copies of all types of ex- 
aminations will be kept,, When the plan 
was discussed with the Council of Admin- 
istration, no objection was raised to 
rhe cooperation of any individual facul- 
ty member. 

You are probably aware of the fact 
that most fraternities have examination 
records in their houses, We feel that 
similar records should be available to 
all student s . 

We believe that such a file will 
assist the students in studying for the 



examinations and will serve 
for better work. 



, s a st imulus 



The file is to become part of the 
reference section of the College Library, 
You can help us materially in the following 
way: After each examination period, 
please send a copy of your questions to 
Miss Frear, Reference Librarian, Central 
Library, who has kindly agreed tc help 
us carry out the plan. 

If you have any suggestions or com- 
ments regarding the proposed filing sys- 



tem, I should appreciate discussing 
with j^ou. 



diem 



David Finkle, 
Chairman File Committee 
* * 



STAFP MEMBERS TO APPLY FOR FEE EXEMPTION 



Full— time employees on the staff of 
the College who desire exemption from in- 
cidental or part— time fees for themselves 
or members of their immediate families 
for cours.es they plan to schedule during 
the second 'semester are requested to make 
formal application for such exemption at 



the offices of the deans of their Schools 
or heads of their administrative depart- 
ments. Applications for exemption should 
be made immediately so that the student 
bills may include the item of fee exemp- 
tion, 

V, D, Bissey, Head 
'Statistical Division 
Accounting Office 
* * * * 



CANDIDATES FOR DEGREES AT MIDYEAR COMMENC 



:nt 



" Candidates for advanced degrees and 
bachelor degrees at the midyear commence- 
ment are listed below. In order that all 
records maybe complete, grades for those 
receiving degrees must be in the office 
of the Registrar not later than 8 ;00 a«m , 
Monday , January 29 . 



arra 
appe 



Special final examinations should be 
nged for any students whose names 
ar in this list if the regular exam- 



inations are scheduled later than a time 
which would make it possible to report 
grades as indicated above. The Registrar 
will appreciate it if instructors will 
bring grades to his office in person be- 
fore Monday morning, January 29, in or- 
der not to cause any possible delay by 
sending them through the faculty mail. 
Grade cards should be in an envelope 
plainly marked "Grades for Midyear Grad- 



plainly 
uat est" 



A eke man, Lenore M,, AL 



Allen, 
Anst ead 



Walter F., Ed 

Russell C., AgEd 



Aula, John G., AH 



Bacal, Charle: 



MEd 



Beale, Paul L«, Ed 
Bernstein, George, AL 
Bernstein. Herbert I,, 
JBeuck, William F., Gcol 
Bilcovitch, Daniel L., A] 
Black, James D., For 
Bland, Georg U., ME 
Bowe, Harold W., AL 
Boyd, Frank A., Jr., PNG 
Boy den, Robert B., 
Brake, Raymond C., 
Burrage, Robert W. 



PhD 



CF 
PEd 
, MEd 



Suras, Dwight J., EE 
£aldwell, Janes T., Jr., 



CF 



passidy, Benjamin T,, CF 
Nellie M., ABCh 



pat ena 
onnor 
owe n 
ox , 



Raymond E», IE 
, Henry P., AL 
Paul L., Jr., Sci 
;rone, Robert L., EchE 
Dailey, John Jos., Jr., 
Davidson, Sol, A., AL 
Davis, Florence, AL 
DeFalco, Ralph P., AL 
Dell-art j Charles J., CF 



A] 



ieWet , Jakobus 



o • t 



MS 



Doig, John R., Jr., MS 
Eisenberg, Alte R., J 
F a n a 1 e , Wm • D • , IE 

Foley, James E.> IE 
Forbes, Daniel 0., AL 
Forrester, Elizabeth L», 
Francis, Howard T., MS 

'ce, Anne R,, HE 
Fry, William J#, Phys 
Gager, Arthur H,, CF 
Saltans, Phillip M., AL 
Gall, Ernest W., AE 



Gardner, LeRcy B«, CF 
Garrett, Russell P., ABCh 
Goodley, Marian En, AL 
Greshko, John J., IE 
Haight, James H,, Ed 
Harris, Norman S 
Keisler, TJilliam T., IIEd 
Henry, Albert 1'., EE 
Hess,' George M;, MEd 
Hicks, Arthur J,, Jri, AgEc 



MEd 



Kicks* Norraa 



^ ., 



ME 



Hoffer, Eleanor H., AL 
Hoover, Norman K # , AgEd 
Hopwcod, William J., AL 
Hower, Justin J,, For 
Hughes, Donald P., ME 
Hunter, Raymond H., AL 
Hutchison, William H., DH 
Ifft, Bruce I., DH 
Jacobs, Randall, Jr., Geol 
Jamieson, Gilbert 



• > 



EE 



MS 



Jenkins, David M., Jr, 
Jennings, Emma S., HE 
Jerome, Angelo L,, EE 
Johanson, Clifford L., CF 
Jones, Scott R., EE 
Joseph, Barbara A., J 
Karbach, William IT., AL 
Keith, Ralph W., MS 
Klimctas, Alberta M., HE 
Korn, Carl A., Jr., ME 
Krawiec, Genevieve M., PEd 
Kroll, Raymond F., Jr., IE 
Konst ant inide s, George, CE 
Kudrikoff, Boris S., A 
Landis, Russell II., D.Ed 
Larus, John W,, For 
Lefever, Harold R,, EE 
Levin, Harvey, AL 
Linberg, Elmer F., AL 
Lininger, Fred T., AL 
McCandless, Jennings C, DH 
McConnell, Donald H., IE 
McCormick, Mary C., HE 
McCoy, William N,, ME 
McDonald,' Eugene T . , MEd 
McFarland, David F., Jr., MA 
Bot Mains, Floyd M,, AgEc 
Menoher, Omar C,, AgEd 
Miller, Bessie A., MA 
Miller, Dean F., CF 
Miller > Herbert S., ME 
Miller, Joseph R., MA 
Mintmier, Edward A., AgEd 
Moats > Irria M., AL 
Mueller, Charles L,, ME 



Pride, Richard E», Kort 
Procopic, Joseph F., CF 
Prytz, Bo, PhD 
Purinton, Helen J., MS 
Quinn, Beatrice M., HE 
R am 1 e r , E dwa r d . , MS 
Raup, John R«, Bact 
Re if snider, Horn C., MS 
Rh o a d s , Ph i 1 ip A . , ME 
Richman, Caul, AL 
Rickard, Rembrandt B., MA 



R i ck e r , Y, i 1 1 i am h . 



IS 



Rodzanskas, John F., For 
Rutman, Robert J,, ABCh 
Saxer, George P., AL 
Sayles, Charles E., For 



Schult: 



Le st er 



• Q -« f 
., CF 



AL 



Sevel, Mort on 
Shapiro, Marjorie F. 
Simmons, Robert W«, CCh 
Skoglund, Winthrop C., MS 
Slotter, John G., CCh 
Smith, Ralph F., For, 
Smith, Spencer C, NEd 
Snider, Philip M,, MEd 
Starer, Herman M. , For 
Stow, Richard W., MS 
Stubblebine, Warren, MS 
Supow, Irwin R # , AL 
Swope, Caroline L,, AL 
Tegge, Bruce R., MS 
Thomas, Albert E., A 
Thompson, Robert H., AL 
Turn, Ralph G., ABCh 
Ulrich, Harry R., DH 
Vlossak, Frank C., Jr., CF 
Wagner, Petty C., J 



Wagner, John D 



• / 



Met 



My e r : 



David 



AH 



Newinsy Willis R., CF 
Nickol, Gordon B., ABCh 
Organist, Walter E., Ed 
Owen, Georgia W*, HE 
Paquit^ Mire ill e, Ed 
Pearlman, Edwin A., CF 
Phillips, Marshall W, , IF. 
Place, Mary B., Psy 
* * 



Wangs gar d, Alton P., PhD 
Warnock, John P., Met 
Weeks, Charles B., MS 
Weitzner, Noemi 0«, Psy 
Wheeler, Wilson H,, For 
L'iebesiek, Karl W», AL 
Wohl, Bernard G«, PM 
Woleschok, Helen, Psy 
Wolfe, Frank B., Jr #> IE 
Wright, L u r e 1 1 a B . , MA 
Yanofsky, Herbert S*, CF 
Yenchko, John, SE 
Zerr.j Gordon K#, AL 
Zipkin, Is ad ore, MS 
Zuliok^ Liu R,» -ir-.^ i'or 



OF GENERAL I NT ERE 



The Penn State Players will present 
a Chinese drama, "The Circle of Chalk," 
this Friday and Saturday, January 19 and 
20, in Schwab Audit oriun, This produc- 
tion, the first of four t • "be presented 
in 1940, will be given in a manner adapt- 
ed to people of the western world. The 
announcement states that unusually rich 
and beautiful costumes and scenery are 
being especially designed and constructed 
on the campus. 



Faculty members and graduate students 
who desire to purchase or rent academic 
costumes for the February C ommencenen't . are 
again reminded to place their orders at 
once with C. E. Myers, room 2A> Horticul- 
ture Building. Rental orders may be 
placed by telephone. Persons in charge 
of graduate students arc requested to 
bring this to their attention. 

* * * * * * 

i Because the date fflr the next regu- 
lar meeting of the College Senate falls 
on February 1, when College is not. in 
session, the meeting will be postponed 
until 4:10 Thursday, February 6, accord- 
ing to an announcement received from 

president Hetzel* 

»* ** ** 

A duplicate bridge tournament will 
be held thirs evening, Tuesday, January 16> 
at 8 p.n* in Pi Gamma Alpha fraternity. 
Faculty members and their friends arc in- 
vited to participate. 



Dr. F. W. Went, professor of plant 
physiology at the California Institute 
cf Technology, will deliver a lecture be- 
fore the Sigma Xi chapter of Bucknell on 
"Regulation of plant Growth" this even- 
ing^ January 16, at 8 p.m. in Vaughn Hall, 
Lewisburg. Dr. Vent is an international 
authority on growth-promoting substances. 



An invitation has been 
and faculty members of 



ext ended to 
Penn State, 



student s 



* * 



F. G. Merkle, Sec. 
Penn State Chapter 



dar 



Seven events are on the sports calen- 
for this week : 



Varsity boxing with Western Maryland — 

•Tuesday, January 16, 7:00 p.m. 
Varsity basketball with Syracuse — 

Wednesday, January 17, 8;00 p.m. 
Varsity fencing with Temple — 

Saturday, January 20, 1:00 p.m. 
Freshman wrestling with Kercersburg — 

Saturday, January 20, 2 ;00 p.m. 
Freshman basketball with Wyoming Seminary — 

Saturday, January 20, 3:30 pirn* 
Varsity swimming with Wash, and Jeff»— — 

Saturday > January 20, 4:00 p.m* 
Varsity wrestling with Chicago — 

Saturday, January 20, 7:00 p*m, 

*, *» *• 

Dean Frank D* Kern announces the fol- 
lowing qualifying oral examination for the 
D.Ed* degree : 

Mr, John Shuman, education) Friday, 



January 19, 2 
ing. 



00 p, 



25 Education Build— 



The chapel speaker for this Sunday, ** ** *' 

January 21, will be Dr. E. P. Corson, 
President of Dickinson C ollege ,' Carli sle . 
< * * - ' * * ** 

OFFICIAL NOTICES FROM THE" OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR 

Withdrawal s 

1 McKown, Craig B., Met, Dec. 20 S Newmeyer, Jakie J., Ed, Sept. 25 

2 Masood Ruth, EH, Dec! 5 2 Oliver, James A., LD, Dec. 15 

HC Schmutzer, Elizabeth S., Sp, Nov, 11 



Of the above, 1 withdrew because of 
illness, 1 because, of illness of parent, 



1 to secure a position, 1 because of lack 
of interest, 1 because of personal reasons* 

Wm, S, Hoffman 
Registrar 




H3HNVHO "d SAGY1S SS 



THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 



FACULTY 




Published weekly on Tuesday during the College 
year as a means of making official announcements 
and presenting items of interest to the faculty. All 

January 23, 1940 
VOL. 19 



BULLETIN 

contributions should be as brief as possible and reach 
Walter F. Dantzscher, Director of Public Information, 
105 Old Main, not later than 10 a.m. each Fri, 

NO. 



STUDENTS' OWN LIBRARY CONTEST TO BE HELD 



so 

Li 
nu 
qu 
ie 
wo 
lc 



The College Libr 
ring the fifth Stud 
brary Contest. Thi 
al event in which s 
iring the best pers 
s receive two prize 



rth o: 



i ooks awarde 



ge Book Store and K 
Store* Final judgment 
the best selected col 



ary is sp.on~ 
ents 1 Twn 
s i s an an- 
tudents ac~ 
onal librar- 
s of $Z5 
d by the Col- 
eeler's Book 
is based on 
lection and 



the one with which the student is 
intimately acquainted* Neither 
the size nor the expense of the 
collection will influence this 
judgment. Book plates or marks of 
identification must appear in each 
volume. Faculty members are asked 
to remind the students to apply to 
the Librarian for information be- 
fore Apr i 1 1 . 



FACULTY ATHLETIC BOOKS TO GO ON SALE 



Faculty athletic books will 
go on sale at the Athletic Asso- 
ciation ticket office, 107 Old 
Main, beginning Monday, February 
5, and continuing through Thurs- 
day, February 15, First semester 
tickets will be honored at athletic 



events up to and including the 
basketball game with New York Uni- 
versity Wednesday, February 14, 
The price of second semester tick- 
ets will again be $7 plus a feder- 
al tax of .70 for single persons 
and $1,40 for married nersons. 



OFFICIAL NOTICES FROM THE OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR 

Wi thdrawal s 



1 Alders^n, Howard E., J, Jan, 10 
3 Barnhart, Harry P., HE, Nov. 27 

2 Beemer, Robert W., ■ DH, ' Dec. Z0 
1 Levinson, Doris K., Ch, DC, 

Jan. 5 

Of the above, 3 withdrew be- 
cause of Illness, 1 to accept a 
position, Z because of lack of 



Schuh, Francis R», LD, 
Steinberg, Raymond L., 



Thomas, David B., 
Warner, Myrta H», 



LD, 



Jan, 5 
FM, DC, 
Jan. 3 
Dec. 20 



LD, Dec. 20 



interest, 1 because of finances, 
and 1 because of personal reasons 



Correct! ons 



One omission and two typo- 
graphical errors occurred in the 
list of graduates published in the 
January lo Issue of the Faculty 
Bulletin. The omitted name Is: 



Etter, Sylvia Margaret, AL 

The other two names should be: 

Wagner, John C., Met 
Warnock, John F., AL 



OF GENERAL INTEREST 



Al 

to marc 
mi dyear 
be held 
nesday, 
Members 
cession 
of the 
rear co 
p.m. ]■; 
guard* 
en the 
permi ts 



1 faculty members are asked 
h in the procession o$ the 
Commencement exercises to 
in Schwab Auditorium Y.'ed- 
January 31, at 8:00 p#mj 
taking part in the pro- 
will meet in the balcony 
auditorium at the south 
rner not later than 7:45 
ats and coats will be under 
The faculty will be seated 
platform as far as space 

Wm. S. Hoffman 
Req i s trar 



Those faculty members and 
graduate students who have not as 
yet purchased or rented academic 
costumes for the February com- 
mencement are again requested to 
place their orders at once with 
C. E. Myers, room 2A horticulture 
Bui ldi no. 



Members of the facu 
administrative staff wi 1 
from the College within 
time memoranda informing 
the amount of salary rec 
each of them for the cal 
1939 # This information 
ed to be helpful in the 
of the federal income ta 
which each faculty and s 
must file if he receives 
more as a single person 
or more if married* The 
is required by law to pr 
duplicate of this inform, 
the Internal Revenue Off 



1 ty and 
1 receive 
a short 

them of 
eived by 
endar year 
Is i nt end- 
prep ar at ion 
x forms, 
taff member 

$1000 or 
or $2500 

Col lege 
ovide a 
ation to 
ice. 



Sigma Xi f the honorary re- 
search society, will sponsor a 
lecture entitled "Practical Appli- 
cations of Geophysical Research" 
by Dr. Helmut Landsberg, professor 
of geophysics* The lecture, which 
is open to all, will be given in 
107 Main Engineering Friday, Jan« 
uary 26, at 7:30 p.m. 



Full-time employees on the 
staff of the College who desire 
exemption from incidental or part- 
time fees for themselves or mem- 
bers of their immediate families 
for courses they plan to schedule 
during the second semester are 
again requested to make formal ap- 
plication for such exemption at 
the offices of the deans of their 
Schools or heads of their adminis- 
trative departments* Applications 
for exemption should be made imme- 
diately, so that the student bills 
may Include the item of fee exemp- 
ti en* 

V. D. Eissey, Head 
Statistical Division 

Accounting Office 



The faculty of the School •£.-; 
Agriculture and Experiment Station 
will meet this Friday, January 26, 
at 4:10 p*m. In room 109 Agricul- 
ture Building, according to an 
official announcement from Dean 
S* W* Fletcher. 



The faculty of the School of 
Education will meet Monday, Jan- 
uary 29, at 4:10 p«htl* in room 209 
Home Economics Building, according 
to an announcement from P. C. Weav- 
er, Administrative Assistant to the 
Dean. ■ Dean H, P# Hammond wi 1 1 
'speak on the subject "Engineering 
Education at The Pennsylvania State 
College." 



Two sports events will be 
held this Saturday, January 27. 
The varsity wrestling team will 
meet Syracuse at 3; 00 p.m., and 
the varsity boxing team will meet 
Toronto at 8:00 p.nu 



The chapel speaker this Sun« 
day, January 28, will be Father 
Vincent C. Donovan, 0. P., St. 
Mary's College', Notre Dame, Ind- 
iana.' -::--::- -X--::- -::--::- 



m 



£jlvj.ch t i aSsxiO; 



HHFCNVKD * H SAG V ID SSI 



THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 



FACULTY 

Published weekly on Tuesday during the College 
year as a means of making official announcements 
and presenting items of interest to the faculty. All 



VOL. 19 




BULLETIN 

contributions should be as brief as possible and reach 
Walter F. Dantzscher, Director of Public Information, 
105 Old Main, not later than 10 a.m. each Friday. 



January 30, 1940 



NO. 



16 



EARLY FILING OF FINAL GRADES NECESSARY TO 
SUCCESS OF NEW REGISTRATION PROCEDURE 



The chief value of the two- 
day period between semesters can 
be realized if all instructors co- 
operate with the Office of the 
Registrar by having their grades 
on file in the office at the ear- 
liest possible date. 

The Registrar's staff plans 
to work evenings, Saturday after- 
noon (February 3), and through 
Sunday in order to have available 
by Monday morning at 8 o'clock 
grade reports for students regis- 
tered during the first semester. 
The Department of Industrial Engi- 
neering is co-operating in the 
printing of these grade reports 
and will have them available for 
all students by 8 a.m. on Monday, 
February 5* 

The registration procedure 
has been changed for the second 
semester in that all students are 
first to call at the Office of the 
Registrar for grade reports. No 
adviser is permitted, according to 
a procedure approved by the members 
of the Council of Administration, 
to sign a schedule for an under- 
graduate unless he has first pre- 
sented his report for the first 
semester, which report should be 
retained by the adviser. This, of 
course, refers only to students in 



NO CHAPEL THIS SUNDAY 

There will be no chapel ser- 
-vice this Sunday, February 4, be- 
cause of midyear vacation. 



attendance during the first se- 
mester of the current year. Those 
admitted to the College at the 
opening of the second semester will 
have credentials indicating this 
fact. Students previously matricu- 
lated, but not in attendance during 
the first semester, should have a 
letter indicating the fact that 
they are entitled to return. 



In order 
plan a succes 
teaching staf 
turn in the i r 
earl i est date 
be placed in 
after noon Fr 
should be del 
the Office of 
all grades ar 
Saturday, Feb 
as described 
able for all 



to make the 
s, all member 
f are reque 

grades at th 
. Grades sho 
the faculty 
iday, Februar 
ivercd in per 

the Registra 
e on file 
ruary 3, grad 

above can be 
students . 



above 
s of the 
sted to 
e very 
uld not 

mai 1 
y Z, but 
son to 
r. If 
by noon 
e reports 



Note: Under the regulations of the 
College, grades are due at the Office of 
the Registrar within one week after the 
final meeting of a class ci* of the sched- 
uled final examination for the class, ex- 
cept that all grades are due at the Office 
of the Registrar hy the Wednesday follow- 
ing the close of the semester. Final ex- 
aminations at the time this rule was 
adopted ended on Saturday. This year 
they end at 10 a.m. on Thursday. 

Wm. S. Hoffman, Registrar 



VARSITY WRESTLING SATURDAY 

The varsity wrestling team 
will meet Princeton here this Sat- 
urday, February 3, at 8 p.m. 



PROFESSOR MATHER TO DELIVER COMMENCEMENT. ADDRESS 



Neark 



:00 students arc ex- 



pected to receive baccalaureate 
and advanced degrees at the mid- 
year commencement to be held ' to- 
morrow evening, Wednesday, Janu- 
ary 30, at 6 o'clock in Schwab 
Audito'rium. Professor Kirtley F. 
Mather, director of the Harvard 
University Summer School and pro- 
fessor of geology at Harvard will 
deliver the commencement address 
on "Intelligence and the Future 
of America." 

Profess' or Mather combines a 
serious interest in rocks and min- 
erals and in earthquakes and fos- 
sils with 'an active interest in 
the problems of modern civiliza- 
tion. He lias given special atten- 
tion to the trend of religious 



philosophy in this scientific age 
and to the development of modern 
educational policies, both with 
respect to. the ideals of the teach- 
er and the technique of such aids 
as motion pictures. He is one of 
the leaders in the task of popular- 
izing scientific knowledge and is 
much in demand for lectures and ad- 
dresses on topics in .the philo- 
sophical, religious, educational, 
and political spheres. 

All faculty members are again 
requested by Mr. Hoffman to march 
in the procession, which will meet 
in the balcony of the auditorium 
at the south rear corner not later 
than 7:45 p.m. The faculty will 
be seated on the platform, as far 
as space permits. 



MODERN ART LOAN EXHIBITION NOW OPEN 



ne Arts of 

+ o,- + 



The Divi s i on of 
the Department of Architecture an- 
nounces that its present exhibi- 
tion is one of the most important 
of the year. For three weeks, from 
Monday, January 2.9, until Saturday, 
February 17, there will be in the 
College Art Gallery, 303 Main Engi- 
neering, a loan exhibition of 40 
large prints from the Museum of 
Modern Art. These were especially 
assembled for the summer exhibi- 



tion in the Musi 
New York. 



:um of Modern Art, 



The second of 
Fine Arts lectures 
during the prog res 
tion. Miss Hartley Fletcher, 
the department staff, will give 



the group of 
will be g iven 
of the exhibi- 
of 
a 



gallery talk .about the print show 
Wednesday evening, February 14, at 
7:30 p.m. The gallery is open from 
8:30 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. 



CORRESPONDENCE WITH APPLICANTS FOR ADMISSION 



The Office of the Registrar 
from time to time is criticized 
for failing to know certain facts 
in connection with applicants for 
admission. Almost invariably on 
inquiry it is discovered that the 
applicant's first correspondence 
was with some other college office 
Undoubtedly when an applicant 
writes to any member of the staff 
In regard to admission that person 
is entitled to answer the letter, 



especially when it is remembered 
that in most instances the corres- 
pondence is of a personal nature. 
It should be apparent, however, 
that, in order that the office of 
admission may be Informed as to 
this personal interest, as well as 
to any other pertinent facts in 
connection with an applicant, a 
carbon copy of such correspondence 
should be sent to the Office of 
the Registrar, 



OF INTEREST TO FACULTY WIVES 



PH.D. EXAMINATION TO BE HELD 



Sales 
Shop will 
February 9 
from 1:15 
afternoon, 
be placed 



at the College Meat 
be resumed on Friday, 

The shop will be open 

to 5:00 every Friday 

Telephone orders may 

by calling the Animal 



Husbandry Office on Thursdays. 



Dean Frank D. Kern announces 
the following final examination 
for the Ph.D. degree: 

Mr. Bo Prytz, agricultural 
chemistry, Thursday, February 1, 
10 a.m., 212 Agriculture Building. 



OFFICIAL NOTICES FROM THE OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR 

Wi thdrawals 



2 Allison, Harry. R., For, Jan. 13 
S Baker, Eloise.W., AL, Jan. 18 

1 Bethel, Marie E., . HE, DC, Jan* 3 

2 Frey, Paul K. , ChE, Jan. 15 

Of the above, Z left because 
of personal rcas.ons, 1 because of 



i 1 lne 



1 because of death, 1 to 



1 Hicks, Frank J., ChE, Jan. 22. 

1 Klugh, Samuel A., ME, Jan. 22 

2 Oakes, Martha J., LD, Jan. 19 
2 Piepoii, Carl R. , ChE, Oct. 14 

enter another school, 1 because 
of dissatisfaction, 2 gave no 
reasons . 

Wm. S. Hoffman 
Registrar 



^3?INVaO-ii SAQV10 SSIW 



THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 



FACULTY 



Published weekly on Tuesday during the College 
year as a means of making official announcements 
and presenting items of interest to the faculty. All 




VOL. 19 



February 0, 1940 



BULLETIN 

contributions should be as brief as possible and reach 
Walter F. Dantzscher, Director of Public Information, 
105 Old Main, not later than 10 a.m. each Friday. 



NO. 



17 



FORTY LARGE FRINTS BY MODERN ARTISTS NOV/ ON EXHIBIT 



The exhibi t i 
L a r g e prints by M 
now in the Col leg 
wi 1 1 remai n on vi 
day, February 17, 
the Museum of Mod 
York, as a travel 
it is to be shown 
cities in the Uni 
Twenty-one of the 
qroup were shown 
\ Modern Art as par 
Anniversary exhib 
Our Time." 



on of "Forty 
odern Art i s ts" 
e Art Oal lery 
ew unt il Satur- 

Organized by 
ern Art, New 
1 ing exhi bi t i on, 

in var i ous 
ted States. 

pr ints in ihi s 
at the Museum of 
t of its Tenth 
ition, "Art in 



the 



(1) The great majority of 
-Tints are by many of the fore' 



As a 
this exhi 
winter g r 
w ill be a 
Fletcher 
Archi tect 
will be " 
Prints." 
the form 
demons tra 
Eng ineer i 
nana ina, 
14,~at 7: 



n a i d i n 
bi t i on th 
oup of Fi 
iven by M 
of the De 
ure staff 
Processes 
The lect 
of a gall 
t i on in r 
ng , where 
on V/ednes 
30 p.m. 



under s tand i ng 
c second of the 
ne Arts Lectures 
iss Hartley 
partment of 
* Her topic 

of Modern 
ure wi 1 i take 
ery talk and 
oom 303 Main 

the prints are 
day, February 



The vast field 
graphic art --drawing 
media, lithographs, 
woodcuts, color prin 
illustrations and po 
represented in the e 
40 prints which embr 
variety of media and 
and most of the ma jo 
view in modern art, 
-oy characteristic wo 
ffcs-s-or Helme's annou 
that the group as a 
chosen with two spec 
at ions in mind: 



of modern 
s in various 
etchings, 
ts, book 
s t e r s - - i s 
xh i bi t i on by 
ace a great 
techniques 
r points of 
represented 
rks. Pro- 
ne erne nt states 
wh o 1 e is 
ial ..cons-ider- 



most painters of the past 50 years, 
for it is usually true that the 
greatest prints of any period are 
by the greatest artists rather 
than by the men whose reputations 
depend primarily upon their prints, 
however technically perfect these 
mav be . 



(2) The 
ately chosen 
and bold char 
espec i al ly et 
small or so d 
that they are 
or portf ol i os 
are large eno 
to count posi 
the wall. Th 
can have for 
money an orig 
modern artist 
large enough 
the principal 



prints are deliber- 
for their large size 
acter. Fine prints, 
chings, are often so 
elicate in technique 

best seen in books 
. But these 40 prints 
ugh and strong enough 
tively as pictures on 
ey show that a person 
comparatively little 
inal work by a great 
--a work, moreover, 
in scale to count as 

picture in his home. 



Among the artists repres 
are: the Frenchmen Arp, Braq 
Cezanne, Derain, Gauguin, Leg 
Matisse, Redon, Renoir, Rouau 
Toulouse-Lautrec, Vlaminck, a 
Vuillardj the Spaniard Picass 
the Germans Kollwitz, Nolde, 
Max Ernst (who now lives in P 
and has become a leader of th 
Surrealists); the 'Swiss Klee, 
Russian Kandinsky; the Americ 
Bellows, Chariot, Dehn, Wanda 
Orosz, Feininger, "Pop" Hart, 
iyoshi, Pascin, Raphael Soyer 
Mary Cassatt (who spent most 
her life abroad); and the Mex 
Orozco and Siqueiros. 



e n t e d 
ue, 
er, 
It, 

nd 

oj 

and 

ar i s 

e 
the 

ans 
Gaa, 
Kim- 

, and 

of 

icans 



Oh OFFER, vL TWTEKE51 



Senate members are again re- 
minded of the meeting this Thurs- 
day, February 8, at 4:10 p.m., in 
room 107, Main Engineering. 



According to an announcement 
received from Mr. J. 0. Keller, 
the College will start a new class 
in First Aid on Friday, February 
16, under the instruction of Lorin 
Elder. The quota will be closed 
when there are 20 in the class. 
Eighteen men completed' the First 
Aid course of the first semester 
on January 26. Any department 
head* desi ring to have any of his 
staff members take the course is 
requested to' notify Mr. Elder. 



An announcement from Mr. C. W 
Smith, assistant in photography, 
School of Agriculture, states that 
a non-credit course in general 
photography will be given the sec- 
ond semester to upper classmen. 
No fee will be charged, but a per- 
sonal camera is required. Regis- 
tration will be held f r om " 3 to 
5 p.m. tomorrow, Wednesday, Feb- 
ruary 7, in room 306 Horticulture 
Building. Classes will be held 
from 3 to 5. p.m. on Thursdays. 



The American Association of 
University Professors will hold a 
business meeting in Old Main Sand- 
wich Shop this Thursday, February 
8, at 7:30 p.m. Reports of the 
membership and nominating commit- 
tees will be given. Officers for 
1940 will be elected, and other 
business will be transacted. In 
addition, an open discussion will 
be held. 



Faculty wives with library 
experience or training who may be 
available for part time service 
are invited to register at the 
Librarian's office* 



The third of the Liberal Arts 
Lecture Series will be given' next 
Tuesday, February 13, at 7:30 p.m. 
in the Home Economics Auditorium. 
Professor Robert E. Dengler of the 
Department of Classical Languages 
will speak on the subject "A Gar- 
land of Greek Flowers." 



The chapel speaker for next 
Sunday, February 11, will be Dr. 
Bliss Forbush, executive secretary, 
Baltimore Yearly Meetina of Friends. 



Sports events this week include 
the f o 1 lowing : 

Wednesday, February 7 

Freshman basketbal 1 --Carneg ie Tech. 

6 : 3 p.m. 
Virginia 
8:00 p.m. 



Vars i ty basketbal 1 --West 



Saturday, February 10 

Varsity f enc ing--Rutgers , 2 p.m. 
Varsity gymnast i cs--Temple, ' 2 p.m. 
Freshman gymnast i cs--Temple, 2, p.m. 



To Faculty Members: 

The Examination File Committee 
wants to thank all members of the 
faculty who have cooperated with 
them by sending copies of their 
examination questions to the 
library. We should like to ask 
those members of the faculty v/ho 
have not as yet done so to send 
their questions to Miss Frear, 
reference librarian, Plain Library, 

The number of question sheets 
sent in so far leads us to believe 
that the faculty, in general, are 
in accord with this project i We 
hope that you will continue to give 
the student body your support. 

David I, F inkle 
Chairman File Committee 



t Dr. F«, C. Whitmore, Dean of 
the School of Chemistry and Physics, 

an open 



will deliver a talk before 



meeting of Phi Lambda Upsilon this 
Thursday, February 6, at 7:30 p.m. 



in room 10, 
The subject 



Liberal Arts Building, 
of the talk will be 



Some Researches in Organic Clienus- 
try," a particularly fitting topic 
for Dean Whitmore, who is widely 
known' as an organic chemist. This 
lecture is one of a series being 
sponsored by Phi Lambda Upsilon, 
honorary chemical society, dealing 
vOth the research being carried on 
in various departments in the Col- 
1 e c c . 



The faculty of the School of 
Engineering will meet on next Mon- 



day, February 12., at 5 p,m. in 
room 107 Main Engineering, accord- 
ing to an 'official announcement 
from Dean 'H, P. Hammond, 



erday (Monday) 
nts who had been 
at 8 o' clock had 
ports, The coop- 
culty in sending 
and of the Depart- 
1 Engineering in 
, and of the mem- 
of the Registrar 
is greatly appreciated, 

V;m. S. Hoffman 
Registrar 



At G:30 ^e st 
morning all s tude 
standing in line 
received grade re 
eration of the fa 
in their grades, 
ment of Industrie, 
making the prints 
bers of tb.e staff 



OFFICIAL NOTICES FRCP THE OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR 



VPi thdrawal s 



FC 



1 

r 

i 

1 
1 
1 

o 
<. 

o 
<. 

1 

2 

1 

(C 
n 

o 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
2 



Beck, Paul R., ChS,' 
Bezilla, George J,, 
Carroll, E dwa r d A . , 
Cole, Livingston E,, 
D e g e r , Fr a nk S . , ME , 
Eucs, Robert A,, IE, 
Fa r r e 1 1 , J oh n P , , Pi: 
Prompter, Wayne W, , ' 
H o 1 1 i s t e r , Vincent, 
Kehler, Marjorie J,, 
McCoy, Robert R,, ME 
Nagy, Frank J., PD, 
Netter, Pi 1 1 i am S. , 
Ostcrman, Chester P. 
Rosenber, Martin, B., 
Seymour, Charles F,, 
Steinfeldt, Dorothy 
Sykes, James P,, PIP, 
W i tkowsk if A 1 g a r d Pi 
Yoder, Jesse Thomas > 



Feb. 3 

PI.', Jan. 30 



PM, Jc 


n. 3 





ChS, 


Feb. 




Jan.. 


30 




Jan. 


31 




, Jan. 


22 





ME, 'Feb. 1 
For, Jan, 19 

PD, Pec. 2 
, Jan, 31 
Jan, 22 
Cer, Jan. 30 
, ABCh, Jan, 9 

LD, Jan. 30 ■■■ 

LD, Jan. P9 
. , LD , J an ♦ 1 5 

Jan. 31 
,\LD, Jan. 30 

Jr., For, Feb. 



Of the above) P withdrew be' 
cause of illness, 6 because of 
I'-ack, of finances, 3 to transfer 
to other institutions, 1 because 



of dissatisfaction with schedule, 

1 to transfer to two-year course, 

2 because of scholarship, 4 for 
personal reasons, 1 nave no reasuiv 



n- 



mae in Name 



Hyac inth S 1mm on Pa d r a should, be changed to Harry S i n t o Zadra . 

V/m. S • PI o f f man , Registrar 



I 



jCi-eaq.il sSqiIO! 



.- ~_ tat /-» <^ I ui 



THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 



FACULTY 



Published weekly on Tuesday during the College 
year as a means of making official announcements 
and presenting items of interest to the faculty. All 




VOL. 19 



.February 1.3, 1940 



BULLETIN 

contributions should be as brief as possible and reach 
Walter F. Dantzscher, Director of Public Information, 
105 Old Main, not later than 10 a.m. each Friday. 

NO. 16 



SIGMA XI 

"PEKN STATE'S 



LECTURE SERIES ON THEUE 
C ONTB 1 31 ? T I CNS TC COUKOW.TdAUm " 



In token of its interest in 
the promotion of research, the 
local chapter of Sigma Xi, nation- 
al honorary scientific fraternity, 
will sponsor, the. first series of 
lectures intended to afford facul- 
ty members and students with an 
insight... into investigational ac- 
tivities at 'The " Pe nn sy i van! a "'-"$' tat q 
Z o 1 1 e c e . 



The seri 
around the th 
State in the 
nonwealth" an 
donday even in 
jochwab Audi to 
joperat i on of 
search. A sp 
(the seven und 
'■/ill summa'r i z 
i 1 c t i v i t i e s w i 
ire contribut 
the c i t i zens 
col loqui urn i s 
at 7:30 p.m. 



e s will 
erne "Re 
Service 
d w i 1 1 



o 



r i urn , 



Febr 



w 



th e C o u 
caker f 
e r g. r a d u 

e the i 
thin 1 i i 
i no to 
of the 
schedu 



be in 
search 

of th 
be con 
uary Z 
ith th 
nc i 1 o 
rom ea 
ate sc 
nvest i 
s scho 
the we 
state . 
led to 



tegrated 
at Penn 
e Corn- 
due ted 

6, in 
e co- 
n Re- 
ch of 
h o o 1 s 
gat i ona 1 
ol which 
1 f a r e of 
The 
bcoin 



The speakers 
W. Fletcher, Schoo 
Dean Frank C. Whit 
Ch em i s t ry a n d Fhy s 
C « C . Peters, dire 
School of Educatio 
G. Hechler, direct 
Experiment Station 
bert Poepp-Baker, 
Liberal Arts; Prof 
g e r , director, i " i n 
Experiment Station 
E. C. Davis, Schoo 
Education and At hi 



Introductory lectures are ex- 
pected to be followed by additional 
addresses at a later date which 
will develop more* fully some of the 
aspects of research in progress in 
the several schools. 

Faculty members are urged to 
attend and to call this unique 
opportunity to the attention of 
their students. 



comprise Dean S, ' 


1 of 


Acr i cu 1 ture j 


more , 


School Of 


i cs ; 


Professor 


ctor 


cf research, 


n; ' Professor F. 


or , E 


no i neer i ng 


; P r c 


f essor Her- 


Scliool of the 


essor 


A. W. Gau- 


eral 


Industries 


; and 


Professor 


1 of 


Phvs i cal 


c t i c s 


• 



LIBERAL 



LECTURE TO BE GIVEN THIS EVENING 



Dr, Robert E, Dengler, head 
of the Department of Classical 
Languages, will give the third 
lecture of the Liberal Arts Series 
pais evening, Tuesday, February 
13, at 7:30 p.m. in the Home Eco- 
nomics Auditorium. The title is 
"A Garland of Greek Flowers". 

Dr. Denoler will discuss the 



collection of poetry known as the 
Greek Anthology, giving "the his- 
tory of its development; the char- 
acteristics of its make-up; the 
literary, social, and cultural 
value of its contents. He states 
that the collection is of especial 
interest for "the curious and sur- 
prisingly contemporary qualities 
of human existence that it portrays," 



OF GENERAL INTEREST 



Dr. Kirby Page, nationally known 
author and lecturer, will be brought to 
the campus next Monday and Tuesday, Feb- 
ruary 2.9 and. 20, by the Penn , State 
Christian Association, Of especial in- 
terest to the faculty are two luncheon 
meetings at which Dr. 'Page will speak, 

-Dr'i Page is a popular lecturer and 
an authority in the fiel.d of social 
ethics and international relations. 

The luncheons will be at noon Febru- 
ary 19 and 20 in the Sandwich Shop. All 
faculty members wishing to attend should 
«i.,ke their reservations in the Christian 
association office, 304 Old Main, before 
5 p.m. Saturday, February 17, 

For the benefit of. those who cannot 
attend the luncheons, the talks will be — 
gin at 1 p.m. in 304 Old Main. 



Since February is "America Month", 
the February exhibit at the Main College 
Library, "America in Books", is devoted 
to the stories cf our states, and the bi- 
ographies of our great men— -books which 
are said to "truly embody the spirit of 
America . " 



• A few great Americ 
days fall in "America M 
Greeley, Roger Williams 
Thomas A. Edis'on, Cyrus 
E. Anthony, Elihu Root, 
'Henry Wadsworth Longfel 
Books about these leade 
thought, as well as the 
Project's state guides 
Hampshire, New Jersey, 
achusutts, Connecticut, 
combined with those dep 
phases of American life 
lads" and "The Story of 
1365-1377" to "A S out he 
South" and "American Ai 
1940", 

* * * * 



ans whose birth— 
onth" are Horace 
, Dwight Moody, 

McCormick, Susan 

Win slow Homer, 
low, and Mary Lyon, 
rs cf American 

Federal Writers' 
for New York, New 
Rhode Island, Mass— 

and Kentucky ■ are 
icting various 
, from "Maine Bal- 

Re const ruct ion, 
rner Discovers the 
r Ma il Catalog, 



SUMMARY OF TRANSFER OF STUDENTS FROM ONE CURRICULUM TO ANOTHER 



A distribution of the Change-of— 
"ourse petitions received ay the Regis— 
rar at the beginning of the present se— 
lester indicates that 152 students changed 
,'rom one School-to another. This distri— 





. Changed 




From To 


.GRICULTURE 




AgBioChem 


3 6 


AgEc 


1 1 


AgEd 


1 1 


AgEng 


1 


Bact. 


2 ' 1 


DH 


2 1 


For 


6 


Hort 


1 


Pre-Vet 


5 


Z&E 


2 


Total 


^3 TT 


HEMI3TRY AND PHYSICS' 




ChEng 


17 1 


Cb em 


9 1 


CcraChem 


1 1 


Ph] s 


1 


Pre— 'Med 


11 3 


Sci 


2 1 


Total- 


41 7 


DUCAT ION 




Ed 


Z ' ... 3 


HEc 


10 7 


IndSd 


3 


? C y 

• Total 


2 

12 15 



but ion does not include changes within a 
School, as in t'hc case of a student who 
changes from Electrical Engineering to 
Mechanical Engineering. 

Mary Virginia Brown 
Registrar's Office 



: 


Change 


d 




From 


To 


ENGINEERING 






Arch. 


3 




ArchEng 


1 




CE 


4 


1 


' EE 


2 


1 


IE 


8 


8 


ME ' 


7 


3 


T otal 


25 


13 


LIBERAL ARTS 






A&L 


2 


9 


C&F 




3 


LD 

T otal 


IS 
18 


65 
77 


MINERAL INDUSTRIES 






FT 


1 


1 


Geol 


1 




Met "■ 


1 


4 


PNG 

Tot al 


1 
4 


1 
6 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 2 

TRANSITION 2 7 

GRAND TOTAL 152 



23 
152 



OFFICIAL HOT ICES FROH THE OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR 



Wi thdrawal s 



Bretz, George L'., ChE, Feb, 7 
Cubberley, Sheldon, For, Feb. 6 
Ely, Maurice L,, A, Feb. 5 
Gendek, Leonard R., ChE, Feb. G 
Heath', William S., TS, Feb. 1 
Jeter, William B«, HE, Dee. 5' 
Knight, 'William J., LD, Feb. '5 

Of the above, 5 v/ithdrev; be- 
.ese of finances, 1 to attend 
icthcr school, 1 to accept a posi- 



Z 
Z 
1 



Levy, Henry I,, PL', Feb. Z 
Lindzey, Gardner E,, LD, Feb. 6 
Maiidlfeh. L. I.. Let. Feb. 1 



Lindzey, Gan 

Ma lid i cl'i , L . I . , Let, Feb. 
1/iller, Robert H., Ch, Feb. 3 
Sauer, Albert K,, HE, Feb. 3 

-Ed, Feb. 



Z Stephens, Lorcn C 
1 Wilkinson, Albert 



n C . , Agb< 



K., LD, Feb. 



Z 
6 



tion, 6 because of scholastic diffi 
culties, 1 for a personal reason. 



MINUTES OF THE COLLEGE SENATE MEETING FEBRUARY 



Wm. S. Hoffman 
Registrar 



1940 



A meeting of the College .Senate was 
lie Id February 9 at 4 p.m. in 107 Main 
Engineering, with Dean Stoddart presiding. 

The secretary announced that on roc— 
commendation of Dean Steidle Dr. A, P. 
Honess would be the representative of the 
Department of Geology during the second 
Berne ster inasmuch as Dr. Bonine would be 



pn sabbatical leave during the 
ne st er . 



second se- 



Dean Stoddart announced that Pro- 
fessor Fishburn would represent Professor 
]rant during the second semester, since 
rofessor Grant would be on sabbatical 
Leave . 

The Committee on Academic Standards 
presented a petition for an exception to 
;he residence rule for Miss Gertrude A. 
3arber. On motion the recommendation 
fas adopted. The original recommendation 
Ls on file in the Office of, the Registrar. 

The Committee on Courses of Study 
ecommended the approval of a new course, 
lome Economics 207, and reported an error 
for certain changes approved in the Jan— 



LOCAL ALUMNI TO LUNCH 



uary meeting for Speech Education 541. 
These changes should have been for Speech 
Education 540. On motion the recommenda- 
tion of the Committee was adopted. 

The secretary read a report for the 
Committee on Committees, naming Professor 
D, R. Mitchell on the Committee on Rules, 
to take the place of Professor Knandel, 
on leave of absence, and Professor Haul— 
fuss to take the place of Professor 
Grant, also on leave, as chairman of the 
Committee of Public Occasions. 



The secretary 
connection with the 
course in Library S 
at the December nee 
was not offered on 
a possible variatio 
governing credit by 
work. He read page 
tion of the Regulat 
graduate Students a 
tion as to wh ether 
in these regulation 
cussion the memoran 
the Committee on Ac 

Wm. 



read a memorandum in 

establishment of the 
cience 31, as approved 
ting. Since the work 
the campus, there was 
n of Senate regulations 
other than residence 
37 of the current edi— 
ions Affecting Under— 
nd brought up the ques— 
any change was necessary 
s. After a brief dis- 
duin wa s referred to 
ademic Standards, 



S, Hoffman, 



Se cret ary 



of the local alumni are ar— 
ke lunch together every Mon- 



A group 
peftging tot 

lay noon in the Alumni Mailing Room ad- 
joining the Sandwich Shop in Old Main. 
Ill alumni on the campus and in town are 
Invited to meet with them. 



The chapel speaker for this Sunday, 
'ebruary 18, will be Rabbi Milton Stein- 
berg, Park Avenue Synagogue, New York. 



SPORTS CALENDAR 

Wedne sday , February 14 

Freshman basket ball— Bucknell , 6:30 p.m. 
Varsity basketball — Nev; York U,, 8:00 p.m. 

Saturday , February 17 

Varsity swimming — Cornell, 2:00 p.m. 
F r e s hma n basketball — K iski, 2:30 p.m. 
Varsity wrestling — Michigan, 8;00 p.m. 



THE PENNSYLVANIA 

CTA T T QTT r Q 



STATE COLLEGE 
FOR TEE YEAR 1S3S 



SCHOOL OR DIVISION 



IL. • Ui 
LCYEES 



FATAL 
ACCIDENTS 



NO. OF 
LOST TINE 
ACCIDENTS 



DAYS 

LOST 



■ 



Agr 
Ena 
Din 
The 
Edu 
Che 
Phy 
Phy 
Ser 
The 



1 c u 
i ne 
e r a 

Li 
cat 

s • 

5 i c 
V i c 



it 

cr 
1 

be 
i o 
tr 

r r j 
al 
c 
tt 



ure 

i ng 
I lid 
ral 



y a 

. a 

PI 

D 1 V 

a rp / 



u s t r i e s 

Arts 

nd Physics 
nd Athletics 
ant Di vi s ichs 
i s i o n s 
Lion Inn 



54 5 

IIS 

64 

184 

E7 

SO 

. 44 

o; : 

■Eo 5 

"0 











1 






13 
1 



£ 


o 

2 

1 



217 

49 



7 

6045 

40 



TOTAL 



;7f 



:8 



6363 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION FACULTY TO LEET 



The faculty of the School of 
Education will meet next SEdnday, 
February 19, at 4; 10 p.m. in room 
209 Nome Economics building, ac- 
cording to an official notifica- 
tion from Dean N. R. Trabue. 



Dean Carl Schott, School of 
Physical Education and Athletics, 
will speak on the subject, "The 
Organisation oT the School of 
Physical Education and Athletics 
and the Ways in Which the School of 
Education Can Be of Service," 



GRADUATE CLUB TO HOLD VALENTINE PARTY 



All graduate student a are in- 
vited to a Va 1 en t i ne party to be 
held this Thursday, February 15, 



'at 8 p. mi in the first floor lounge 
of Old Main. 







THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 



FACULTY 

Published weekly on Tuesday during the College 
year as a means of making official announcements 
and presenting items of interest to the faculty. All 




VOL. 19 



February 20, 1940 



BULLETIN 

contributions should be as brief as possible and reach 
Walter F. Danlzscher, Director of Public Information, 
105 Old Main, not later than 10 A.M. each Friday. 

NO. 19 



ARTISTS' COURSE TO MAKE AVAILABLE 130 

ADDITIONAL SLATS FOR KREISLER CONCERT 



At the suggestion of the Kreis- 
ler management, the Artists' Course 
Committee is adopting an expedient 
used generally at performances of 
this noted violinist, Dr. Carl E. 
Marquardt, committee chairman, said 
today. 



The committee has 
sale of stage seats v/h 
accommodations aval lab 
ditional members of th 
student body, and town 
will be in addition to 
limited to 124 persons 
staoe seats and for st 
v» r ill be sold at a spec 
sale to be held Friday 
the A. A. windows in C 
Fritz Kreisler concert 
place Thursday evening 
The price for stage se 
ina room has been set 



approved the 
i ch wi 1 1 make 
le to 130" ad- 
e faculty, 
speople. These 

standing room 
. Tickets for 
anding room 
ial advance 
, March 1, at 
Id Main. The 

wi 1 1 take 
, March 7. 
ats or stand- 
at 



Through the adoption of this 
new procedure, the committee is 
hoping to dispel much of the disap- 
pointment occasioned by the early 
sellout of series tickets in Decem- 
ber. The Kreisler number has been 
regarded by many as the high mark 
among the attractions provided by 
the Artists' Course in recent years. 



<3- O 



as the 
Me i s 
t i on o 
i g i e s 
in mat 
der ch 
1 in be 
Ke app 
at the 
Vi enna 
though 
in his 



reisl 
worl 

said 
f the 
rare 1 
ur i ty 
i Id, 
g i nn i 
e a r e d 
age 
Cons 
an e 
case 



er i 
d' s 
to b 
the 

y fu 

. K 
h i s 
ng a 

in 
of s 
erva 
xcep 



s widely recognized 
greatest violinist. 
e a 1 i vino ref uta- 
ory that child prod- 
lfill their promise 
e was himself a won- 
interest in the vio- 
lmost with speech, 
concert in Vienna 
even and entered the 
tory the same year, 
tion had to be made 



CNR I ST IAN ASSOCIATION SPEAKER TO TELL 



"NOV; TO KI 



AMERICA OUT OF V/AR' 



As a climax to a series of 
public addresses which he will make 
locally on Monday and Tuesday, Dr. 
Kirby Page, religious leader and 
authority on world events, will de- 
liver an address on "Nov/ to Keep 
America Cut of War," In Schwab Audi- 
torium at 7:30 o'clock tonight, Tues- 
day, February 20. 

Dr. Page was one of the fea- 
tured speakers at the Religion-in- 
Life week held last year. He also 
has written many popular books and 



pamphlets. His latest pamphlet 
bears the same title as his lecture 
topic this evening. 

An opportunity for questions 
will be afforded following the lec- 
ture in Schwab Auditorium, Dr. 
Page has appeared on the campus 
under the sponsorship of the Penn 
State Christian Association. His 
schedule embraced various meetings 
with P.S.C.A. groups, but the lec- 
ture this evening is intended for 
the widest possible audience. 



OF GENERAL INTEREST 



A special conference for fac- 
ulty members, run:" inn concurrently 



i th the student conference 



ill 



be held at the annual mid-winter 
Student Christian Movement Focono 
Conference at Buck Hill Falls Inn, 



1 to 



accord inq to an an- 



nouncement from the Penn State 
Christian Association. 



hi 



<een planned to help clarify 



your thinking; to intensify the 
spiritual vigor and direction of 
your own lives, and of your work 
with students, 1 ' it continues. 

For further information see 
Ruth M'abee, Penn State Christian 
Assoc i at i on. 



The 



acuity discussion group 



w ill be led by Dr. Mo r gan Ode 11, 

professor of religion, Occidental 
College, Los Ang-eles.- Dr. Ode 11 
is now an exchange professor at 
Lafayette and an experienced lead- 
er of faculty groups in many sec- 
tions of the country. 



'The group will also sit in on 
the student conference program led 
by Dr. Harold Case, who was chapel 
speaker on January 7, and Miss 
Purici Lester, the "Jane Adrians of 
England", founder of Pingsley Hall. 

The announcement states tbat 
those f a c u 1 1 y me mb c r s wh o are c o n - 
cerned about the vitality of re- 
ligion on college campuses need 
more wisdom, insight, and resources 
than ever before. "This conference 



A duplicate bridge tournament 
will be lie Id at Fi Kappa Alpha this 
evening, Tuesday, February ZQ , at 
7:45 p.m. Faculty members and 
their friends are invited. 



Dr. Henry Crane, pastor of the 
Central Methodist Church, Detroit, 
wi 1 1 be the < 



.pel speaker for next 



- u n d ay , P e b r u a r y Z 5 • 



Two sport 
calendar for t 
box i no wi th M i ch i g a 

this Saturday, February 



the 



b e 1 d 

8 p.-m 



events are on 

s .week. The first, 

n State, wi 1 1 be 

ry ZA, at 

The second, gymnastics with 

T., will be held next Monday, 



February 26, at 4 p.m, 



■INFORMATION, PLEASE 



A tale that is yet to "be told In de- 
finitive terms seems to the editor cf The 
Faculty Bulletin to be the stcry of col- 
lege and university professors and admin- 
istrators who have made noteworthy a— 
enlevements in business, government, and 
the arts and professions beyond the 
sphere of the classroom and the campus. 

Does the general public view the 
college professor or administrator with 
less suspicion today than it did on the 
eve' cf Wilson's election to the White 
House? 

Has the general preoccupation cf the 
last decade with social, economic, and 
political problems changed the attitude 
of the public toward the scholar? 

Has his reputation been enhanced or 



has it suffered through participation in 
efforts to solve the most perplexing prob- 
lems of our day? 

For enlightenment in connection with 
a purely personal undertaking, the editor 
of The Bulletin would like to 'know what 
members cf the Penn State faculty believe 
on this issue. He would be pleased to 
have faculty members point out to him in- 
dividuals with at least some college or 
university teaching or administrative ex- 
perience whose ncn— academic achievements 
today may equal or excel their academic 
at t ainment s • 

For purposes of comparison, informa- 
tion about outstanding figures of other 
eras who qualify under this description 
would also be helpful. 



Dean Fletcher read the following, report for the information of the 
Council of Administration at its meeting Monday, February 12. It is re- 
printed here for the information of the staff. 

Wm. S. H of f man, ■ Secretary 
Council of Administration 



TRAINING AND RECRUITING COLLEGE GRADUATES 
FOR THE FEDERAL SERVICE 



Report of a Conference at Washington, D. C, 
February 3, 1940 
Between Representatives of 
The Pennsylvania State College, 
United States Civil Service Commission, 
and 
Several Departments of the Federal Government 



The Conference was concerned chiefly of specialization in certain aspects of 

with problems in the training and recruit— that field, are better able to adapt them— 

ing of college graduate s . f or the Junior selves to the requirements of the Federal 

professional Assistant classification. service than graduates of highly special- 

In this examination, the candidates are ized curricula. This is true even though 

rated as follows: the professional questions in the Civil 

Service examinations may be highly spec— 

1, General test (intelligence and apt i— ialized in character. It was suggested 

tilde).., 30 that it would be' advantageous to classify 

2. Professional que stdons .......... « 70 the questions in these examinations under 

Total 100 three instead of two heads, as follows: 

The Federal representatives reported 1, General test, 

that a much larger percentage cf the can— 2, General professional questions, 

didates fail in the general test than in 3, Specialized 'professional questions, 
the professional test, Th'ey agreed that 

the mcst serious deficiency of college. It was considered that at least equal 

graduates who take this examination is .. weight' should be given to the general pro — 

in their use of English, Government of— fessional questions 'as to the specialized 

ficials are called upon to make many professional questions, 

'technical reports; these should be well 

I organized, accurate, and concise. The The question was raised as to the 

following suggestions for improvement advantage of including in technical cur- 

jwere offered; s ricula courses on public administration. 

The representatives of the Federal agen— 

il. Strengthen -the required work in the cies agreed that one three— credit course 

I Writing of reports on technical 'subjects, in this field 'might be serviceable, but 

Both the Department of English Composi- that it would be undesirable to eliminate 

tion and the department in which the stu— basic subjects in order to make room for 

ident is specializing should appraise these such instruction. Acquaintance with the 

reports, i problems of public administration is best 

secured through experience or through 

J2, Request instructors in all subjects graduate study. Six universities now 

:to grade reports and examination papers offer curricula in public administration, 

'not only on subject matter but also on the The School of Public Affairs of the 

1a.se of English, American University, Washington, D.C., 

provides excellent in— service training 

,3, Devcte more time to exposition, Clar— for Federal employees in public adminis— 

fity of diction is more important, in this tration. More than 1400 Federal employees 

;reiation at least, than a large vocabulary are now registered in this School, The 

or a wide knowledge of English literature, instructors are drawn largely from the 

Federal service. 
|4, Endeavor to interest students in the 

'study of English by shewing them its value The present machinery for recruiting 

las a professional tool, college graduates for the Federal service 

is inadequate. It was pointed cut by the 

The Federal officers stressed the representatives of the College that the 

disadvantages of highly specialized cur— Federal Government is now at a disadvan— 

pri-oula. In general, they have found that tage in recruiting as compared with indus — 

graduates who have had broad training in tries since no assurance of employment 

ia technical field, with a limited amount can be given until after the students have 



graduat ed, 
for the Juni 
rank has tee 
register of 
teen complet 
ment s from t 
been made un 
because of d 
mental appro 
of the best 
positions in 
promptly, an 
ment service 



The Civil Service examination 
or Professional Assistant 
U held in February. The 
eligibles, however, has not 
ed until June, and appoint— 
he eligible list have not 
til after mid— summer, partly 

lay in passing the Dep_art — 
priation bills. Hence many 
qualified graduates accept 

industries • which can rccruil 
d so are lost to the Govern-. 



It was agreed that pre— examinat ion 

recruiting by the Federal Government, pri- 
marily to establish personal contacts with 
students, is desirable. These contacts 
should be with juniors as well as seniors. 
The Forest Service has done this for sev- 
eral years with satisfactory results. It 
also gives summer employment to a limited 
number of outstanding juniors and seniors. 
More recently the Soil Conservation Ser- 
vice has adopted similar procedure. It 
is probable that the policy of "student 
aid" will be adopted 'by other departments 
of the Federal Government, 

: The Civil '-Service Commission has 
recognized this weakness in its recruit- 
ing procedure. In co— operrat ion with the- 
personnel office of each major division • 
of the' Federal Government, it is now set- 
ting tip a centralized recruiting service. 
It is appointing a principal examiner in 
each broad field, as in agriculture, engi- 
neering, or economics. This officer will 
visit the colleges at least once a year 
to contact students, juniors as well as 
seniors, to acquaint them with the oppor- 
tunities in the Government service and, 
in - some cases, to arrange for temporary 
employment of students in the summer. It 
was agreed that recruiting should be done 
in the 'Second semester only, since it is 
likely to distract the attention of stu- 



dents from their studies. The Civil Ser- 
vice Commission also proposes to make 
available to the colleges, for public 
lectures, outstanding specialists in the 
Government service a 



e r a 1 
indus 
uat e s 
the f 
be be 
in t h 
ment s 
Commi 
inf or 
publi 



It wo s p 
G over nine 
tries f c 
, the in 
acuity a 
tter inf 
e Fedcrr. 
for ent 
ssion wi 
'nation t 
cat ions , 



ointed out th 
nt is to corap 
r the most nr 
t crest and co 
re essential, 
ormed on the 

I service and 
ering It, Th 

II endeavor t 
hrough person 



at if the Fed- 
ete with the 
omising grad— 
—operation of 

They should 
oppcrtunit ie s 
the require— 
e Civil Service 
o supply this 
al contacts and 



It was suggested that mutual advan- 
tage to the colleges and the Federal ser- 
vice might accrue' from student inspection 
trips to Washington. The Civil Service 
Commission, in co-operation with the de- 
partments of the Federal Government, would 
undertake to acquaint each group with the 
activities and opportunities in the Govern- 
ment service. Such inspection trips 
should.be taken by schools* 



Th 
a de s ir 
and wit 
conside 
and r e c 
Federal 
the sco 
ing for 
cio.t ion 
vers it i 
serve a 
s p e ct * 
confine 
It woul 
nat iona 
S o ciety 
©ducat i 
ope rat e 



e Civil Service 
e to co-operate 
h prof e s s ional 
rat ion of the p 
ruiting college 

service. It w 
p e of the Joint 

Government Ser 

of Land Grant 
es be broadened 
s ' an advisory c 

Thus far its a 
d t o" training f 
d be desirable, 
1 prof e s s ional 

for the Promot 
on, to appoint 

with the Civil 



Commission expres 

with the colleges 

groups In the furt 

roblem of training 

graduates for the 

as suggested that 

Committee on Trai 
vice of the Asso— 
Colleges and Uni— 

so that it may 
ommittee in this r 
ctivities have bee 
or extension work, 
also, for certain 
groups, such as th 
ion of Engineering 
committees to co- 
Service Commi ssio 



hei 



e— ■ 
n 



n. 



H» P, Hammond 

Edward St e idle 

S, W» Fletcher, Chairman 



LECTURES ON RESEARCH TO BE HELD NEXT MONDAY 

Members of the faculty are again A speaker from each of the 

reminded of the unusual opportunity seven undergraduate schools will 

to become acquainted with the broad summarise the investigational 

program of research that is going activities within his School which 

forward in each of the Schools by are' contributing to the welfare of 

attending the Sigma Xi lecture on the citizens of the state. 
"Re'scarch at Pcnn State in the Ser- 
vice of the Commonwealth," This co'l- These introductory lectures 

loouium, with the co-operation of are expected to be followed at a 

the Council on Research, will be later date by others which will dc- 

given in Schwab Auditorium next pict in more detail the activities 

Monday even inn, February 26, at 7:30 in each of the Schools in this 

o'clock, major field of College activity. 

OFFICIAL NOTICES FROM TNE OFFICE' OF THE REGISTRAR 

New Grade Re per t Procedure 

The Council of Administration Full details 01 this change wi 1 1 be 

at its meeting 'on Monday^ February printed in a later issue, but this 

12, voted unanimously to cliscon- advance information is given now 

tinuc the practice of having grade to prevent unnecessary work on the 

reports at the end of the semester part of those who prepare ' the 

mailed to the offices of the Deans Deans' lists early in the semester. 
in which the students arc enrolled. 

V/i thdrav/als 

2 Montgomery, Ri Bi> Geolj Feb* 1 4 Tronzo, Louis 0*, AL, Nov. 15 

2 Fitterman, Joseph A., Chem, Feb. 9 

1 withdrew 'because of illness, 1 because of finances, 1 gave no reason. 

Change of Classification 

Lenore Ostrosky should be a sophomore instead of a freshman in the 

curriculum in Science. 
Roy Ernest McDonald should be a sophomore in Lov/er Division instead of 

in the Pre-Medlcal curriculum.' 
Helen Henrietta Hayward should be changed from a freshman to a sophomore 
in Horticulture, 

; ■■ Wm, S. Hoffman 
Registrar 



THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 



FACULTY 



Published weekly on Tuesday during the College 
year as a means of making official announcements 
and presenting items of interest to the faculty. All 




February 27, 1940 



BULLETIN 

contributions should be as brief as possible and reach 
Walter F. Dantzscher, Director of Public Information, 
105 Old Main, not later than 10 A.M. each Friday. 



VOL. 19 



NO. 



URG 

Because o 
terest in the 
ler Thursday e 
E. Marquardt, 
chairman, urge 
ulty and stude 
in obtaining s 
to appear at t 
Friday morning 
trill open at 8 

"Already, 



ES FACULTY MEMBERS TO OBTAIN KREISLER TICKETS FRIDAY MORNING 

f the indie 
appearance 



ated advance in— 
of Fritz Kreis— 
ch 7, Dr. Carl 
urse Committee 
rs of the fac— 

are interested 
or standing room 
dows in Old Main 

The windows 



veiling, Mar 
Art ist s * Co 
d all membe 
nt body who 
tage seats 
he A.A. win 
, March 1. 
o'clock. 

" Dr , Marquardt stated, 
* * 



"several requests for tickets have been 
received from out of town, including one 
request for a large block of seats. In 
view of this demand and the desire of 
the comrittee to accommodate first of 
all the students and faculty, seats will 
not knowingly be sold to out of town 
patrons until Friday afternoon." 

Stage seats, numbering 130, and 
standing room, United to 124, will be 
sold at $2 per person* 



OF GENERAL INTEREST 



The 1940 Presidential campaign will 
be the topic for the first forum to be 
sponsored on the Penn State campus by an 
honorary fraternity. pi Gamma Mu, 
national social science fraternity, will 
hold the forum tomorrow, Wednesday, Feb- 
ruary 28, at 7:30 p.m. in the Home Eco- 
nomics Auditorium, Four student speakers 
will cover the main issues, and an open 
discussion will follow. Professor Arthur 
H« Reede, department of economics, will 
be chairman. The speakers will be Flor- 
ence Watkins, graduate; Morris Cohen, 
graduate; Leonard S. Schneider, junior; 
and Frank R. Zumbro, jr., senior, 

* * * * * * 

The Committee on Academic Standards 
is now giving consideration to applica- 
tions for John W, White Fellowships for 
graduate study for the year 1940—41, 

Three fellowships are awarded annu- 
ally to graduating seniors of the highest 
standing who possess in the opinion of 
the committee those qualities which will 
enable them to profit to the greatest ad- 
vantage by graduate study. The recipi- 
ents must spend the year in advanced study 
at the college or elsewhere under the 
direction of the President of the College, 



Application blanks may be obtained 
now in room 409 Old Main and should be 
returned by March 9, 

J, Tanger, Chairman 
Committee on Academic Standards 
* * * * * * 

The local chapter of the American 
Association of University Profcasors' 



met on Febru 
They were pi 
G, R. Green' 
is consideri 
and parking 
outgoing off 
dent ; E, C , 
J. F. O'Brie 
ovation, Th 
C, Davis, pr 
vice preside 
and Miss Mab 
* * 



ary 8 for 
eased to 1 
s commit te 
ng the pro 
areas on t 
ice re— H, 
Davis, vie 
n, secreta 
e new offi 
e sident ; V 
nt ; J* T* 
el E. Kirk 
* * 



business matters, 
earn from Professor 
e that the College 
blem of traffic 
he campus. The 
F, Alderfer, presi- 
e president; and 
ry— — were given an 
cers are : Elwood 
ernon R, Haber, 
, secretary; 
treasurer. 
* » 



Law 



The fourth lecture in the Liberal 
Arts Series will be given by Dean Frank 
C« Whitmore, School of Chemistry and 
Physics, next Tuesday evening, March 5, 
at 7:30 p.m. in the Home Economics Audi- 
torium. Dean Y.'hitmore's subject will be 
"The Impact of Chemistry on the Modern 
World." 

* * * * * * 

Professor John H, Frizzell, Chaplain 
of the College, will be the chapel speak- 
er next Sunday, Ma.rch 3. 

* * + * * * 

Sports events this week include the 
following ; 

Saturday , March 2 

P,I,A«A, swimming meet in the Glennland 
pool, beginning about 10 a.m, and con- 
tinuing in the afternoon. 
Freshman boxing with Cornell, 1 p.m. 
Varsity swimming with Syracuse, 2 p.m. 
Varsity boxing with Cornell, 3 p.m. 
Varsity basketball with Pitt, 8 p.m. 



OFFICIAL NOTICES FROM THE OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR 



The following students were dropped 
under the fifty per cent rule at the end 
of the first semester: (Significance of 



symbols: *dropped for poor scholarship, 
**dropped and reinstated, ***dropped un- 
der 6—6 rule ) 



School of Agriculture 



2 Baldi, Charles C, AH 2 

Sp Blichfeldt, Roger, A 3 

2 Cimino, John B., ABCh 2 

2 Cubberly, Sheldon, For 2 

2 **"sbenshade , Jacob Z., 2yr Ag 2 

2 Fowler, Arthur B., PV ' 1 

1 Frangella, John W. , ABCh 2 

1 Harlacher, Eugene W., ABCh 3 

2 Harter, Sherman H., 2yr Ag 2 
2 Holtzer, Maurice 0., F*or ■ 3 
2 Perlmutter, Irving M., ABCh 

Mont Alto 



Pettibon, LeVern A«, 2yr Ag 
Ricketts, Samuel E., AgEd 
Ross. George J.. For 



Ross, Ge orge J. 
Rupp, David M., For 
♦♦Schreiber, Harold R., AgEd 
**Schultz, Norman, 2yr Ag 
Taylor, John T», A 
Wherry, Calvin N # , Bact 
White, Betty M« , Bact 



vvnxxe, oe^T,y m» , u; 
**Wiand, Charles E,, 



ABCh 



Carlson, W. A«, 2yr For 

Oliver, Donald 'P., 2yr For 



Cole, Robert 



2yr For 



Craven, Frank N,, 2yr For 
Drennen, Alex A., For 
Gerson, Arthur D;," 2yr For 



1 Gruber, Albert C#, For 

1 Marshall, Gle.nn G., For 

1 Richards, Harold E„, For 

1. Wolff, Quentin R., For 

1 Yoimgblood, Edwin F», For 



Scho ol of Cb cmi st ry and Phy s ics 



1 


Arm s ■ 


1 


Beck 


2 


* *Be st 


1 


Bezi 


3 


Bret 


2 


Bute' 


1 


Carr 


1 


Cohe 


2 


Dolb 


4 


Doyl 


1 


Engl 


4 


Espy 


1 


Farr 



trong, Paul M. , PM 
, Paul R., ChE 
, Paul W., ChE 
11a, George J., PM 
z, George 'M. , ChE 
hko, T. J., ChE 
oil, Edward A., PM 
n, Martin B., PM 
in, D. D., ChE 
e, W. P., ChE 
ish, John D., ChE 
, R. H., Ch ' ' 
ell, Richard D., PM 



* *Greenawald. 



PM 



Jerome , 
A., ChE 
hur J., ChE 



Gregory, G. 
He pier, Art 
Hutchins, John A., Ch 
Knesel, Charles F., Ch 



Kohman, V, 
K o 1 i ck , C h ; 



. rle s 
maid 

.dney 



PM 
G t , 



Ch 
D., 
A., 
J., 



Kratzer, Do 
**Krengel, Si 

Levy, H. I. 
**Loeb, Barto 

Lodge, Robert T., ChE 
**Mahcney, J, F,, PM 



PM 
PM 
PM 



PM 



Miller, Robert H. , ChE 
Price, F, W., jr., ChE 
Proctor, Richard S., ChE 
Rigby, Vernon E., ChE 
**Sanz, Angel E., PM ' 



Shull, Emanuel G, 



Ch 



**Smith, Margaret V., PM 
**Snipas, Ben J., Ch 

Stethers, H. LeRoy, ChE 
Sweet, W. R„, ChE 
Watson, Claude J., ChE 
Williams, R, L., ChE 



School of Education 



2 Dresher, Mildred, HE S 
1 **Hartswick, Jean R», HE 2 



Hirsch, Robert L,, Ed 
Katz, Evalyn, HE 

School of Engineering 



1 **Norris, Anna G., HE 

2 St over, June M«, HE 



2 *Bartonj W. H*> IE ' 1 

3 *Black, J«' A.> ME 1 
1 Boyer, H K #> IE 3 
3 Dixon, Max D,, CE 2 

1 Eves, R. A., IE - 2 

2 *Fedorsak, J., EE 2 

3 **Gahagan, W. S., EE 2 
Sp**Gibson, -Norman J., ME 1 

4 *Hall, Richard G . , EE 2 

2 *Hartman, James F., ME 1 

3 *Henkel, Robert A., ME 1 
2 Hickey, Clarence R., ME -1 



Jones, Monroe, IE 1 

Klugh> Samuel Ai> ME 1 

Lawless, Robert M. , ME 1 

**Leerberg, J. W., IE 2 

♦Lerten, P., EE 2 

♦Lewis, William K., ME 2 

Lucas, J. R., EE 4 

McCracken, J, H,, ME 1 

McElwain, D. B., ME 2 

Magyar, W. A., EE 3 

**Marx, A. B», IE 1 

**Mazurie, Norman H,, IE 2 

4 



0» 

01 

**Pa 

*Ra 
Ro 

*Ro 

*Se 

**Sp 

Ta 

Tr 

Wa 

*Wa 
Zi 



Hearn, J, J,, ME 
son) J « W • , ME 
yeras^ H» 0., CE 



ab . W# H», 



IE 



w. 



llins, F, v.., 
yer, Kenneth 
ly, Roland E», 



CE 



L., 



exy, Koxana li», m 
roat, Kathryn J», 
^ V. M., EE 
Wo J., CE 
J. C,, AE 
IE 



ME 
ME 



IE 



bb, 

ask, 

Iker, 

lther, F. H., 

erdt , Eugene H., 



ME 



School of the Liberal Arts 



1 Berline, James H., LD 1 

2 ♦♦Bernstein, Helen-R., LD 4 



Besse, Paul H., LD 
Caldwell, . Jame s T«, 



CF 



2 Caplan, Helen E,, LD 

1 Claiborne, Nelson L«, LD 



( cont 'd 



1 **Daker, John 0., LD 

2 E linen, Richard L., LD 

3 **Farber, Donald E», CF 

4 **Feldman, Stanley, CF 

3 Higgins, Larry C., AL 
1 Knight, William J., LD 



"Jolenrha, Florian J,, LD 

LD 
LD 
LD 

Mailman, Albert J., AL 



McCloskey, Harry A., 
McKinney, Mat hew H., 
McNight, Frances E,, 



Petrella, John A 



• t 



LD 



3 Ratcliffe, George W,,C: 
1 Rcesel, Miriam M., LD 
3 Schuler, Robert E., CF 
1 St ear, Kenneth J,, LD 

1 **Swan, Albert Y. r . , LD 

2 Weber, Albert, LD 



School of Mineral Industries 



2 **Brachbill, C. S., Cer 3 David, A. D., PNG 
1 Costenbader, €', E., Met . 2 Landis., B. A., PNG 



1 **McVicker, R, J, , Met 

2 Mitchell, J. R., Geol 
1 **Myers, G, M,, Cer 



Soh ool of physical Educat ion and * Mi 1 e t i c s 



2 Kunkle, John B., PEd 



Overholts, Ben, PEd 



Transition Section 



2 Earman, Richard W. , TS 

3 Hiznay, Joseph Michael, jr. 



TS 



2 Slicker, Thomas Ivielvin, TS 

3 Smith, Oscar Theodore, TS 



Undergraduate Centers 



AC 


1 


SC 


1 


DC 


1 


HC 


1 


FC' 


* *2 


DC 


**2 


AC 


1 


IIC 


1 


FC 


T_ 


DC 


2 



Brubaker, Robert, LD 
Buchspics, John T., LD 
Crytser, Benjamin F., ME 
Dcisroth, Nancie J., 
Doorley, Richard B., 
Fransen, Carl A,, EE 
Gorman, Fred S., LD 
Halko, Jeannette E», . 
Hoyden, Jesse R., AgEd 
Hunter, Verne W., IE 



LD 

ME 

PM 



AC 1 

FC 1 

DC 1 

FC 1 

DC 1 
SC ***2 

HC 1 

DC **2 

FC S 

AC 1 



Jaap, Gerald D., EE 
Jenkins, MfCennedy A., 



PM 



Johnston, Robert B», AgEc 
McConnell, James E., PM 
Michael, George YI , , Ch 
0*Haray Eugene A,, LD 
Persico, Anthony G., PM 
Stewart, Frederick C, EE 
Sturge'o'n, Robert D,, LA 
Williams',' George W. , LD 
* * 



Withdr avals 



Adessa, Chester J,, ME, Feb, 12 
Bailey> Eva Myers, Ed, Feb. 15 
Burke, Harvey E., Hrt , Feb. 15 
Bevan, James A., CF, Feb. 14 
Boyer, Harry K., IE, Feb* 16 
Costenbader, C. E., Met, Feb, 7 
Crist',^ Mary E., Pt . Time Ed, Feb, 
Do lb in", Donald' D., PM, Feb. 12 
Dresher, Mildred A., HE, Feb, 6 
Espy, Ronald H., Ch, Feb. 7 
Fanus, ( Sheldon, TS,. Feb. 8 
Fox, Charles, LAroh> Feb. 5 
Harley, Robert Sij AE, Dec, 1 
Hepler', Arthur J*^ ChE> Feb* 8 



16 



Jack 



son, Doris E., Art Ed, Feb, 



Jewell, Robert R,, LD, Feb, 12 



Katz, Evalyn, T3> Feb* -20 
Koon, Telford W; , DH, Feb, 8 
Lerten, Paul, EE, Feb, 5 
Lucas, John'-R,, EE, Feb* 20 
Lewert, John F., ME, Feb, 7 
Miller, Jane E,, HE, Feb, 7 
Myers, Clyde V., PH, Feb, 8 
Rombra, Marvin' J,, PM, Feb. 16 
Royer, Kenneth L., ME, Feb. 17 • • 
Ruzicks, Paul, Met, Nov, 24 
Schreiber, Harold R*) AgEd, Feb. I 
Survis, Frimi F., LD, Feb, 16 
Taylor, Alexandra T., AL, Feb* 9 
Thompson) Carroll F«> AgEd, Feb*; : 
Walker, Jacob H., TS, Feb, 15 
Walther, Frederick H,, IE, Feb, 1 



,0f the above 10 withdrew on account 
)f scholastic record, 7 on account -of fi— . 



nances, 2 to go to 'work, 2 for personal 
reasons, 1 because of inability to > ■ 
schedule courses desired, 1 because of ■ 
interest in secretarial work, 1 because 
of inability to do student teaching and 
schedule required courses, 1 to enter 



another institution, 1 because advanced 
standing credits were ' riot 'accept able , 1 
because of an automobile accident, 1 on 



account of illness 



on 2,ccount of ill- 



ness of father, 1 because class was with- 
drawn by. instructor^ 1 because teaching 
duties were too heavy, and 1 gave no 
reas on. 



Beck, Evelyn F., from Sr„ to 
Foster, James N,, from Spec, 

White, F. 



Change s in Classification 



^pe-o, in HE , 
t o Graduate 
liar r 5 . , from 



Knapp, Jeane Louise,' from Fr,' to Soph. inH; 
Weinbrom, Benjamin, from Jr. to Sr. in CF 
Jr. to Sr , in AL 



Wm, S, Hoffman, Registrar 



**K«S 9*»XtQ0 






y3?INV¥0-H SACVID SSI 



THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 



FACULTY 

Published weekly on Tuesday during the College 
year as a means of making official announcements 
and presenting items of interest to the faculty. All 

VOL. 19 




larch 5, 1940 



BULLETIN 

contributions should be as brief as possible and reach 
Walter F. Dantzscher, Director of Public Information, 
105 Old Main, not later than 10 a.m. each Friday. 

NO. 21 



CLEVELAND ORCHESTRA ENGAGED TO GIVE MATINEE PERFORMANCE ON ARTISTS 1 COURSE 



For the first tine in the history ending at noon Saturday, March 16, Seats 
of the Artists' Course, a regularly sched— for the afternoon concert will be priced 



uled evening performance will be supple- 
mented by a special raatinee performance , 
Dr. Carl E. Marquardt, committee ^chairman, 
announced today* In arranging the after- 
noon performance, the committee had three 
purposes in mind, Dr. Marquardt stated: 

1. To experiment with the feasibil- 
ity of providing two performances of some 
or all of the numbers scheduled on the 
course, with the intent of benefiting in 
another year from this experience. 

2. To alleviate some of the disap- 
pointment which resulted from the early- 
sell-out of tickets for the present 
serie s • 

3. To respond to a request from the 
local Parent— Teachers Association that 
students in the local school system be 
given an opportunity to hear a symphony 
orche stra. . , 

A special ticket sale for the after- 
noon performance will take place for stu- 
dents, faculty, and townspeople, at the 
A. A. window.s.. in Old Main beginning at 8 
o'clock Wednesday morning, March 13, and 



at $1.25, excepting that students in the 
public schools will be admitted by tickets 
sold at 35f£ each within the school system. 
The Parent— Teachers Association is guaran- 
teeing half the costs of the extra per- 
formances. 

Tickets for parents and other adults 
desiring to accompany the children will 
be available at $1.25 at the High School 
office during the entire week of March 11. 
The afternoon and evening performances 
will be entirely different, so that music 
lovers may attend both with, profit. 

Individual seats for the afternoon 
performance will not be reserved, but in- 
dividual tickets must be purchased in ad- 
vance. The auditorium will be divided 
down the center, with half the seats al- 
located to college students and faculty 
members. and the other half to students in 
the public schools and their parents and 
friends. 

A limited amount of standing room for 
the evening concert will also be sold at 
$1.75 at the A.A. windows in Old Main at 
the time of the sale of afternoon seats. 
* * ** 



EXHIBITION OF OLD MASTER DRAWINGS NOW OPEN 



T 
Art Ga 
Old Ma 
fully 
famous 
world, 
are sk 
Tint or 
well a 
brandt 
is als 
studie 
ters , 



he March exh 
llery consis 
ster Drawing 
selected gro 
collect ions 
the Alberti 
etches by Ra 
etto, and ot 
s by Duerer, 
, and other 
o a small gr 
s by ninetee 
Including Da 



croix, Renoir, and 
drawings are in co 



ibition in th 
ts of 50 facs 
s. These are 
up from one o 

of drawings 
na in Vienna, 
phael, Michel 
her Italian n 

Vandyck, Rub 
northen maste 
oup of sketch 
nth century F 
umier, Ingres 

Degas. Many 
lor. 



e College 
imiles of 

a care— 
f the nodt 
in the 

Included 
angelo # 
asters, as 
ens, Rem— 
rs. There 
e s and 
rench mas— 

De la- 



the third and last 
gallery talks spons 
of Fine Arts of the 
tecture will be giv 
will talk about the 
March 12, at 7:30 p 
gin in room 107 Mai 
brief introduction, 
proceed to the gall 
the pictures in the 



of the winter group of 
ored by the Division 

Department of Archi— 
en. Professor Helme 

drawings on Tuesday, 

m. The talk will be- 
n Engineering, as a 

The group vrill then 
ery for discussion of 

exhibit ion. 



The exhibition opened Saturday, March 
2, and will continue until Monday, March 
of the 18. The gallery, 303 Main Engineering, is 
open from 8:30 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. daily ex- 
cept Sunday. The public is cordially in— 
During the progress of the exhibition vited. 

* * » * * * 



PRIESTLEY LECTURES TO BE GIVEN NEXT WEEK 

Dr, Oscar E« Harder, assistant di— copies of the lectures may be obtained at 
rector of Battelle Memorial Institute^ $1 per copy from o N, Breivikj, Department 
Columbus, Ohio^ will deliver the 14th. of Agricultural and Biological Chemistry, 
annual series of Priestley Lectures here 

next Monday to Friday^ March 11 to 15 in— Joseph Priestley's Northumberland 
elusive. The series will commemorate the home was purchased in 1919 by the alumni 
207th anniversary of the birth of Joseph of the Department of Chemistry, and a mil- 
Priestley, seum was built nearby. In order to assure 

continuous and permanent maintenance of 

This year the general theme will be this memorial, the property has now been 
"Physical Metallurgy in the Service of In— deeded to the College, 
dustryc" The titles of the individual 

lectures are; "Progress of Physical Metal— The Priestley Lectures were inaugur— 
luL'gy,." "Twenty Years of Metallurgy . of Ex- ated in 1926 "oy the faculty of the Bepart- 
haust Valve Steels," " I at ermet allic Com— ment of Chemistry, Since 1931 they have 
poinds and Their Importance in Industry," been sponsored by the lo'cal chapter of Phi 
''Metals and Alloys in Dentistry^," "Physi— Lambda Upsilon, national honorary chemical 
cal Metallurgy of Bearing Metals," fraternity, in co-operation with the De- 

partment of Chemistry, The lectures each 

The lectures will begin at 7 p m s year deal with the borderline between 
each evening in the Liberal Arts Auditor— physical chemistry and some other branch 
ium, 10 Liberal Arts, Complete duplicate of science» 

* * * * * # 

OF GENERAL INTEREST 

Faculty members are again reminded An International Tea will be held 

cf Dean Whitmore's lecture, "The Impact next Sunday afternoon, March 10^ from 2 
cf Chemistry on the Modern World," to be until 4 o'clock in the Hugh Beaver Room, 
given this evening^ Tuesday, March 5, at 304 Old Main, to provide an opportunity 
7 „-3'0 p,m» in the Home Economics Audit; or— for faculty members and students who are 
iunit, The talk will be addressed primar— interested to become acquainted with for— 
ily to the layman, rather than to the eign born and Americans who have lived 
chemist <> the announcement states, abroad. The tea will be entirely informal 

** ** ** and all faculty members and their families 

.are cordially invited. 

The Department of Music announces the 
annual series of free Sunday afternoon Mr, Andrew Szekely, '43, of Budapest, 

concerts as follows: March 10, College Hungary, is chairman of the committee in 
Symphony Orchestra; March 17, Engineer charge and will be assisted by M, Beryl 
Band; March 31, Phi Mu Alpha (women's in— Hindman, Sally Searle, Anita Rainselo, 
strumental honorary) and Louise Homer Club Olive Halar^ Betty Crilly, and Alberto 
(women's vocal) in joint concert; April 7, Roque<, 
Infantry Band; April 14 > Glee Club; April 

21j> College Symphony Orchestra; and April It would be appreciated if those who 
28, Blue Band, are planning to come would inform the 

** ** ** committee in care of the Christian Asso— 

.. . ciation Office either by postcard or by 

The Penn State Players will celebrate telephone, 
their 20th anniversary by presenting on ' ** ** ** 

March 15 and 16 "The World We Live In," by 

Josef and Karel Capek, This unusual play Intercollegiate boxing this week— end 
was originally called the "Insect Comedy," will follow this schedule: preliminaries, 
and was produced in all of the important Friday, March 8, at 8 p,m,; semi— finals, 
capitals of Europe during the 1920' s. Re— Saturday, March 9, at 2 p,m,; and finals, 
cent world events have again made its mix— Saturday, March 9, at 8 p,m. Seats are 
turc of comic and bitter satire timely, now on sale at the following prices: pre— 
The Players selected the show in the be— liminarie s, 550; semi— finals, 750; and 
lief that its broad comedy, refreshing finals $1,10, Only balcony seats will be 
viewpoint, and thrilling melodramatic se— reserved, 
quences will provide their 20th anniver— . 

sary audiences with the best entertainment The varsity basketball team will play 
of the season. Ticket reservations may be Temple tomorrow, March 6, at 8 p.m. They 
made at Student Union beginning Monday, will also play Carnegie Tech, next Monday, 
March 11, The mid— winter low price cf 500 March 11, at 8 p,n, 
.is still in force. - ** * * , * * 

* * * * * * 

The chapel speaker for next Sunday, 

The College Senate will meet this March 10, will be Dr, W, Emory Hart man, 
Thursday, March 7, at 4:10 p,m« in room pastor of the Allison Memorial Methodist 
107 Main Engineering, Church, Carlisle. 



■DISMISSALS FOR POOR SCHOLARSHIP 

During the past semester and inolud- largely on rank in the secondary school 

ing the end of the semester, a total of graduating class, it is cur practice to 

176 students were dropped for poor scholar- break this group into smaller groups, by 

ship. Their names, arranged by schools, class in college, and according to rank 

were printed in earlier editions of the in secondary school. This tabulation 

Bulletin, Since admissions are based so fellows; 

Rank in Secondary School (fifths) 



1st 



!nd 



3rd 



4 th 



5th 



"Not Ranked 



Total 



Freshmen 89c 



0.9 



Sophomore 816 

0.9 



Junior 618 

0.8 



Senior 



580 
0.2 



25 

460 
5.4 

18 
544 

. 3.3 

11 
378 ! 
2.9 



381 
0.8 



17 
265 

6.4 

16 

240 
6.7 

8 

172 
4.7 

3 

170 
1.8 



15 
159 
9.4 

6 
117 

5.1 



63 
3.2 



69 
1.4 



86 



33 



9.3 



59 



8.5 



4.8 



39 



6.1 



32 



18 



27 



75 
1901 
3.9 


53 
1808 
2.9 


27 

1270 
2.1 


8 
1266 

0.6 



Specials & 
2 Yr Ags 



13 



Total 



22 

2912 





59 


44 


25 


20 


1763 


847 


408 


205 


3.4 


5.2 


6.1 


9.7 



6 
110 



5.5 



176 
6245 
2.8 



In this tabulation, in each rec- 
tangle, beginning at the upper left, we- 
ll ave the number dismissed for poor 
scholarship; next, the number of students 
who ranked in a specific fifth of the 
secondary school graduating class; 'and 
last, the percentage of this group 
dropped. That is, for the freshman 
class, fcr those who had been graduated 
from secondary school in the second fifth 



of tneir class, 460 in number, 25, or 5.4^ 
cf the group were dropped. 

The class of- 1943 is made up of stu- 
dents from the various fifths cf their 
high school classes as represented on 
Scale (l); 898, or 47,3%" of them having 1 
graduated from high school in the first 
fifth cf their class. Dismissals from the 
same class are shown on Scale (2), 



. Scale 1 
Make— up of Fre-shman Class (1901) .by Rank in High School Class 



Not 
Ranked 



898 



First Fifth 



, i .Second Fifth .Third Fifth I 4th 5th 
'47. 3% | 460 24.2^|?65 13.9% h 59 8.4sgj33 



" Scale 2 
Dismissals • from Freshman Class (75) by Rani: in High School Class 



La l 5 l0.6|25 Second F ifth 33 ~ j ~ Third Fif th^ ^ 



Fourth Fifth 



4.5 1.7 

Not 
_Ranj£ed 



5th Fifth 

10.6;: 



r 



Scale 3 
Make-up cf Total Enrollment (6245) by Rank in High School Class 



1Z& 

Not 
O^ked 



2912 



First Fifth 



46.6: 



Second Fifth 
1763 28.2% 



3rd Fifth, 4th 
847 13 4? 406 6. 



BO 



Scale 4 
Total Dismissals (176) by Rank in High School Class 



xn.8 

Not 

,P.ap,ked 



1st Fifth, 
22 1 2.4% 59 



Second Fifth 



3 3 . 6% 



Third Fifth 
44 25.0% 



4th Fifth 
25 14.2; 



.?I!iIM?U 



3;A% 



Wm. S. Hoffman 
Regi strar 



AT THE COLLEGE LIBRARY 



The Amherst Camera Club Travelling 
Salon is now on exhibition in roon E of 
the College Library and will be there un- 
til March 12. This exhibition consists 
of 42 large photographs representing 16 
different subjects, all of which have been 
shown at various salons throughout Eastern 
United States since last September, Among 
then are several photographs by people who 
are well— known to State College faculty 
members and one by William Lachman of the 
class of 1938, 

i< * * * * * 



The Central Librar 
new method of keeping c 
McBee Eeysort cards are 
for the library call ca 
will no longer be used, 
cards provide. an econom 
cards accurately and ra 
card has round holes pu 
the edges of the card. 
t i cation or code has be 
".hereby slotting away t 
between the hole and th 
makes a notch. This no 
tion of them, establishes the desired 
classification just as a Yale— type key is 

* * 



y is installing a 
irculation records. 

being substituted 
rds, and book cards 
The McBee Eeysort 
ical way of sorting 
pidly. The Eeysort 
nched adjacent to 

A sorting classi— 
en worked out 
he part of the card 
e edge of the card 
tch, or a combina— 



notched along the edge to identify it with 
a particular lock. 

When the borrower wants a book, he 
fills out the McBee Eeysort card giving 
the call number, author, and brief title 
of the desired book. He also signs his 
name, address, and indicates his college 
status. The library assistant stamps the 
date due and slots the card to indicate 
the desired classification of the charge. 
Thus this one card, while filed by call 
number to indicate the record of the book, 
will at the same time^ through a process 
of sorting by a needle, indicate the date 
due or any other given information that 
may be desired. After all records have 
been changed to Eeysort cards, these will 
be employed not only to indicate over— due 
books, but also to provide statistics for 
.reading surveys. 

'. Borrowers are asked to co-operate 
with the library by filling out the McBee 
Eeysort, cards completely, legibly^ and ac- 
curately. Posters with specific direc- 
tions have been placed near the circula- 
tion desk at the Central Library, 



** 



PHEASANT SALE BEGINS SATURDAY 



Approximately 200 Ringnecked pheas- 
ants will be sold by the Poultry Depart- 
ment beginning this Saturday, March 9 f and 
continuing until the avo-ilable supply is 
exhausted. The market price will be ;50ji 
per pound for dressed weight. 



Orders must be in the hands of the 
Poultry Department not later than noon on 
the Friday preceding the Saturday morning 
on which the dressed birds will be avail- 
able in the Poultry Department office, 
106 Horticulture Building. 



OFFICIAL NOTICES FROM THE OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR 

Withdrawals 



2 Balak, Matty J., LD> Feb. 26 

S Cannon, Betty Jane Leed^ Feb. 27 

2 Davis, Florence S., LD, Feb. 26 

S Fleming, Mary I., LA, Feb; 20 



1 Hamaty, Simon, LD, Feb. 10 

S Haupt , Naomi A., Ed, Feb. 20 

4 Mitchell, James K,, For, Feb. 27 

1 Rcckman, Norma E., LD, Feb. 19 



Of the above, 2 withdrew because of finances^ and the remainder for personal reasons. 

Addit ional Student s Dropped at the End of the First Semester 

1 IE Harry G. Wolfe — reinstated by Dean 1 HE Helen L. Gilkey— reinstat ed on 
Warnock on eight weeks probation probation 

2 HE Alice L. Fritz— dropped under 50$ rule 

^ .' ■■' ■ Yfc, S. Hoffman 

' Registrar 

NOTE: 'PLACE OF SENATE NEET'ING THURSDAY IS CHANGED TO 10 L. A. 




aamtvHO-H saqyio ssih 



THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 



FACULTY 

Published weekly on Tuesday during the College 
year as a means of making official announcements 
and presenting items of interest to the faculty. All 



VOL. 19 




March 12, 1940 



BULLETIN 

contributions should be as brief as possible and reach 
Walter F. Dantzscher, Director of Public Information, 
105 Old Main, not later than 10 a.m. each Friday. 



NO. 



:z 



HOBBY FAIR TO BE HELD IN APRIL 



With the entry of several hobby ex- 
hibits from residents and members of the 
College faculty and student body, plans 
for the first annual Penn State Hobby 
Fair are rapidly taking form. The Fair 
will be held in the Armory on a week-end 
in the early part of April. The follow- 
ing groups are participating: Penn State 
Camera Club, Women's Recreational Asso- 
ciation, Student Recreation group of the 
School of Physical Education and Athlet- 



ics, Christian Association Seminar, and 
the faculty t 

Faculty members and townspeople who 
are interested in hobbies are urged to 
participate and should get in touch with 
Dr, James Shigley or Dr, Gerald Stout, 
Interested students should call Walter 
York, Alpha Ganna Rho, Jean Craighead or 
Connie Reddig, Grange Dormitory, 



GROUP HOSPITALISATION TO BE DISCUSSED AT CLUB MEETING 



Faculty members are invited to at- 
tend a meeting of the State College Co- 
operative Club to be held this Thursday, 
March 14, at 8 p,m., in 305 Old Main^ when 
group hospitalization will be discussed, 
Mr. Allen E. Wierman, assistant supervi- 



sor, Division of Correspondence Instruc- 
tion, Extension Services, will describe 
the first year's operation of the College 
hospitalization plan and will answer any 
questions on the subject. Various group 
plans elsewhere will also be summarized. 



OF GENERAL INTEREST 



Faculty members are again reminded 
of the gallery talk about the exhibit of 
Old Master drawings > to be given by Pro- 
fessor J, Burn Helme this evening, Tues- 
day, March 12, beginning at 7:30 p*m, in 
107 Main Engineering and continuing in 
the College Art Gallery. 

* * * * * * 

An Easter musical service will be 
giver: in chapel this Sunday, March 17, 
by the College Choir, 

* * * * * * 



Two sports events are on the calen- 
dar this week. The varsity fencing team 
will meet New York University Saturday, 
March 16, at 4 p,m. The P. I. A, A, wres- 



tling meet will be held Frida 
day, March 15 and 16. 



and Satur- 



The Penn State Players will present 
"The World We Live In" 'this Friday and 
Saturday, March 15 and 16. Tickets are 
now on sale at Student Union, The price 
is 50sz!. Further details were given in 
last week's Faculty Bulletin, 

* * * * * * 



Dr, Carl E. Marquardt will address 
the School of Education faculty at the 
regular meeting next Monday ; , March 18, in 
209 Home Economics building, Dr, Mar- 
quardt' s subject will be "The Problem of 
the Graduate and Undergraduate Transfer 
Student with Special Reference? to the 
School of Education," 

* * * * * * 

"Uses of Mathematics in Engineering" 
will be discussed by professors L, A, 
Doggett, H, I. Tarplay, and Mr, C. B, 
Holt at the meeting of the Mathematics 
Club tomorrow, Vfednesday, March 13, at 
7:30 p.m., room 4 North Liberal Arts, 
All who are interested are invited, 

* * * * ♦ * 

Mr, Oscar Harder will continue the 
Priestley Lectures this week each evening 
including Friday, at 7 p.m. in the Lib- 
eral Arts Auditorium. 

* * * * * * 

The concert this Sunday afternoon, 
March 17, will be given by the Engineer 
Band. 

* * * * * * 



MINUTES OF THE COLLEGE SENATE MEETING MARCH 7, 1940 



A meeting of the College Senate was 
held in 10 Liberal Arts Thursday, March 
l t at 4:10 p.m., with President Ketsel 
presiding, A list of the members present 
is on file in the Office of the Registrar, 

The minutes of the February 8 meet- 
ing were read and approved. 

The secretary read a recommendation 
from the Council of Administration, as 
follows : 



concluded that these courses did not meet 
the requirements for granting residence 
credit c 

"It was unaninously voted by the 
Committee to reaffirm the definitions of 
residence and extension instruction as 
then existing and to classify the courses 
referred to as extension courses " 

The Senate voted to accept the recom- 
mendation of the Committee * 



"The Council of Administration, 
which is charged with the administration 
of college regulations, is of the opin- 
ion that Senate Rules No, 58—64 inclu- 
sive, which have to do with vacation ab- 
sences, are not working sat isf act orily 
Me believe they should be reconsidered 
by a special committee authorized by the 
College Senate,, 

"We therefore recommend that such a 
special committee be appointed, its mem- 
bership to include both members of the 
Senate and instructors who are not mem- 
bers of the Senate, The committee should 
report its recommendations to the Senate," 

(Signed) H. P, Har-wond 
Frank D, hern 
A e R, Warnock 

The President ruled that this would 
be considered under the head of new busi- 
ness. 

The President announced that there 
would bo a meeting of the Executive Com- 
mittee of the Board of Trustees on Fri- 
day of this weeki 



Th 
was the 
a repor 
at ion 
the Reg 
Student 
1939-40 
the Alt 
list of 
instruc 
mendat i 
in Libr 
port, w 
the Reg 
re comme 



e C emmit 
only st 
t , Dr . 
from the 
ulat ions 
s, as me 
edit ion 
oona T Jnd 
those p 
tion is 
on dealt 
ary Sole 
hich is 
i st'rar , 
ndat ion : 



tee on Academic 
anding committee 
Sanger read two 

committee, one 

Affecting Under 
nt ione d on p, 37 

by inserting th 
orgraduate Cente 
laces at which r 
given. The seco 

with credit for 
nee 31 and 32, 
on file in the 
contained the fo 



St andards 

t o make 
re comme nd- 
changing 
graduate 

of the 
e name of 
r in the 
e s i d e nt 
n d r e c om— 

course s 
The re— 
ffice of 
Hewing 



"The Committee on Academic Standards 
carefully examined the description of the 
courses submitted t o it and the procedure 
to be followed in offering them, together 
with the College regulations governing 
residence and extension instruction and 



Under the head of new business the 
re cemmendat icn from the Council cf Admin- 
istration was, on notion, adopted. The 
Chair announced that the committee would 
be appointed in the near future. 

There was a "brief d.iscusLiion as to 
the place of meeting of the Senate, It 
was decided that beginning with the next 
meeting the Senate would meet in 121 
Liberal Arts buildingo 

The secretary pointed rut that under 
the Senate regulations the Senate was, 
when possible, to meet in a room suffi- 
ciently large to make it possible to have 
other members of the faculty visit the 
sessions. He announced, therefore, that 
unless there was objection the next meet- 
ing would be advertised in the Faculty 
Bulletin. and the faculty invited to at- 
tend. He also requested that at this 
next meeting Senators occupy the center 
section of seats and that side sections 
be reserved for visitorso 



The 
with the 
new buil 
opinion 
to an e a 
comme nda 
lat ions 
State Co 
the rece 
s e 1 o r s a 
dent gov 
leges, 
sy st em o 
f e ct , ha 
Trust ee s 



Pre si 

secu 
dings 
all p 
rly s 
tion 
as ex 
liege 
nt me 
nd th 
ernme 
He st 
f the 
d bee 



dent spok 
ring of e 

and stat 
roblems s 
olut ion, 
of the st 
isting at 
, mention 
e t i n g of 
e recent 
nt leader 
ated, als 

C ollege , 
n commend 



e in connection 
quipment for the 
ed that in his 
eemed to be moving 

He also spoke in 
udent— faculty re— 

The Pennsylvania 
ing in particular 
fraternity coun— 
convention of stu— 
s from other col— 
o, that the advisory 

although not per— 
ed by the Board of 



Dr, Peters suggested that visitors 
to the Senate be given the courtesy of 
the floor. This question was 



Br, Peters 

be given the court . 
the floor. This question was referred to 
the Committee on Rules for reoomnendation, 

After several announcements the Sen- 
ate adjourned, 

Yto. S. Hoffman 
Secretary 



OFFICIAL NOTICE FROM THE COLLEGE HEALTH SERVICE 

Please call to the attention of your To meet this requirement a letter 

students Senate Regulation No. 62 for must cone direct fron the parent _ or 

Undergraduat e Students which states: guardian to the Health Service before 

the student leaves schools A doexor's 

"A student desiring to extend his excuse rvust be brought back by the stu- 

vacation to obtain medical or dental ser- dent after the absence. This is filed 

vice, except in an emergency,, must be— with the Health Service, and the student 

fere doing so acquaint the Health Ser— presents to the instructor a wh ite of— 

vice with the intent, and must present ficial statement from the College Health 

to the Health Service a statement from Service, 

his parent or guardian that the request Joseph P, Ritenour, Director 

be granted a" College Health Service 

* * * a * ifc 

. OFFICIAL NOTICES FROM THE OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR 

W ithdraw als 

3 Haskell^ Richard Edward, EE, March 1 2 Wesley, Ruth Jane, Pact, March 5 
1 Madden, William Erret, EE, February 29 1 Wolfe, Harry G,, TS ? March 1 

Of the above, two withdrew because of lack of funds and two because of illness. 

Re in st at emen t 

Alice ,L e Fritz, a sophomore in the reinstated on probation for the current 
curriculum of Hone Economics, has been semester, 

Addit ional Dismi ssals 

The following students have been dropped for po.or scholarship: 

3 Ira R 8 Feuster, For 3 Vincent F, Phelleps, For 4 Herman M, Starer, For 

Wn- S, Hoffman 
Registrar 

* * * * * * 

IN TRANSITION SECTION 

The following students are in Transition Section for the second semester of the 
year 193 9-40: 

Mildred Eurget Ernestine Nixon Kathryn Jane Sproat 

i/tary Jane Cook Marion J, Roehrig Bernice M, Wetniller 

atherine Elizabeth Jones Margaret Virginia Smith 

_A11 below grades for these students should be sent to the Office of the Dean of 
fpnerio 

C- E e Ray 
Dean of Women 

* * * * * * 

PH.D. EXAMINATION TO BE HELD 



Dean Frank D, Kern announces the following qualifying examination for the Ph.D. 
aegrce ; 

Mr. Fred E. Armstrong 
Subject: agricultural education 
Time: 10 a.m., Monday, March 18 
Place: 107 Patterson Hall 
* * * * * * 



.*■'■ 



H3HNYHD-H SAQV7D SSIW 



THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 



FACULTY 

Published weekly on Tuesday during the College 
year as a means of making official announcements 
and presenting items of interest to the faculty. All 




'"^^^"' 



VOL. 19 



March Zl , 1940 



BULLETIN 

contributions should be as brief as possible and reach 
Walter F. Dantzscber, Director of Public Information, 
105 Old Main, not later than 10 a.m. each Friday. 



NO. 



23 



LIBERAL ARTS FACULTY TO HOLD DINNER 



The Liberal Arts- faculty will have 
its first "get together" dinner in six 
rears Monday, April 8, at. the Nittany 
Lion Inn c The affair will begin at 6:30 



Because the dinner has been designed 
primarily to enable faculty members to 



"become bett 
promises no 



>r acquainted, the committee 
lengthy entertainment, no 



fancy frills, no more than 
Only faculty members, admi 
office workers will be inv 

Ticket prices and inf 
cerning reservations will 
the campus mail soon, Eur 
may be obtained 
ing the dinner, 
Louis H# Bell« 



from the m 
Mr So C , Ho 



two sp 
nist rat 
it ed. 

rrmat ic 
be s e nt 

t h e r d e 
embers 
St e eke 



eaker s B 
or s , and 



n con- 
through 
tails 
arrang— 
r and 



EXHIBIT OF PENN 'STATE STUDENT ART TO EE HELD 



Scarab- archi 
and Pi Gamma Alpha 
fraternity, are sp 
hi bit ion in the Co 
This exhibition wi 
terest locally bee 
lection of work do 
dents in classes c 
sion of Fine Arts 
Architecture, The 
through the co-cpe 
Helen M Savard, M 



t e ctu 


, hon 


onsor 


liege 


11 be 


ause 


ne by 


onduc 


of th 


work 


rat io 


lis s F 


* * 



ral fraternity^ 
orary fine arts 
ing the April ex- 
Art Gallery, 
of particular in- 
it includes a se— 

penn State stun- 
ted by the Divi— 
e Department of 

is being chosen 
n of Professor 
lorence Handy, 



Miss Hartley Fletcher, and Trofessor An- 
drew Vu Case, Drawing in various media, 
water-color painting, costume design, and 
design in various media will be included 
in the show c 

The exhibition will open next Monday, 
April 1, and will continue for three weeks 
until Saturday,, April 20 L , The College Art 
Gallery, 303 Main Engineering, is open 
daily except Sunday from 3:30 a m, until 
8:30 p.m. The public is cordially invited, 
* * * * 



OF GENERAL INTEREST 



Dr» Harry A, Overstreet, philoso- 
pher, psychologist, and author, who will 
speak at chapel next Sunday morning. 
March 31, will also be the speaker at an 
All-College meeting Sunday evening at 8 
o s clock in Schwab Auditorium, sponsored 
by the Penn State Christian Association, 
His topic will be "How Can Philosophy 
and Religion Meet Tcday'd Needs?" 

Because no issue of the Collegian 
will appear before Sunday, an announce- 
ment in youi classes of the chapel and 
the evening meeting would be appreciated© 
* * * * * * 



Sigma Xi, national honorary research 
society, will hold its annual initiation 
banquet at the Nittany Lion Inn Wednesday, 
April 10, at 6 ;15 p„m. Members of the 
local chapter will be contacted by repre- 
sentatives. Others may obtain tickets cr 
reservations from Dr„ M, A, Farrell, 



treasurer, Division cf Bacteriology, 

* * * «■■ 



* * 



The concert this Sunday, March 31, 
will be given by Phi Mu Alpha, women's 
instrumental honorary fraternity, and 
the Louise Homer Club, women's vocal, 
* * * * * * 



Am 
t h 

" 'h 
hi: 
Re. 
be 
th 
le 



, president cf the 



will address 



Dr, S, C, Lind_ 
erican Chemical Society, 
e Central Pennsylvania Section this 
arsday, March 28^ at 7:30 p.m. His 
b.iect will be "Natural and Artificial 
1 icaot ivity ," The meeting will be 
Id in 121 Liberal Art s o It is open to 
e public, and all members of the Col— 
ge staff are invited to attend,, 
# V * * * * 



Faculty members are again reminded 
of the special matinee performance of 
the Cleveland Orchestra Friday afternoon, 
The programs of the matinee and evening 
performances will be entirely different. 
Seats for the afternoon are not reserved 
and may be purchased in the Auditorium 
before the concert starts at 3 o'clock. 
Price, $l c 25 each, 

* * * * * * 



COMPARATIVE LIST OF PENNSYLVANIA COLLEGES IN ORDER OF THEIR FOUNDING 

Compiled "by the Department of Public Information, The Pennsylvania State College 

(Sources of Information: World Almanac, 1940; individual catalogues of institutions; 
1937 edition of directory of American Universities and 'C ollege s ? published by the 
American Council on Education, Please note: Y.liere discrepancies exist In several 
publications as to the first date named in connection with 'any institution, this list 
accords that inst itution -the -benefit of the doubt by iderit if yirig "the earliest' date 
with it 9 This list is comprised of the fifty-seven colleges and universities ac- 
credited by the State- Department of Public Instruction. The fourteen State Teachers 
Colleges, which 'Tare not included in the list compiled by the State Department under 
the heading colleges and universities, are shown in a supplementary list at the end. 
T .-> provide a completely comparative summary we have indicated in the column showing 
the date for each institution St line" indicating whe're e'ac'h State Teachers' College 
should be inserted if they are to be regarded as units in' a' completely comparative 
t abulat ion, ) 

Name Lccati'on Date cf 



' " Founding 

University cf Pennsylvania •«, „ -. •*«'••• • Philadelphia ....,,.« 1740 

Moravian Seminary and College for- Women'. « . Bethlehem. .......«, 1742 

Washington and Jefferson College »«..«« Washington, Pa. ..•••• 1780 

Dickinson College. .,o., ••.«•«•* Carlisle ••••.••••• 1783 

Franklin and Marshall College,, • « 9 . • « . Lancaster. ....a.... 1787 

University of Pittsburgh . . Pittsburgh ••<>••••«. 1787 

Moravian College and Theological Seminary, . Bethlehem*, •..,.,,.. 1807 

Allegheny College. .«'••*»«»*•••• Meadville. , • , ••.••• 1815 

Pennsylvania Military « C ollege » *.,»».• Chester, .,••••«•«. 1821 

Philadelphia College ©f^Pharmacy and Science Philadelphia ,...,,.. 1821 

Lafayette College. »..*.. ■ • • • . • .. East on .....•••••• 1826 

St i Charles Seminary . e ».««i..;.. Orerbrookj Philadelphia. , , 1831 

Gettysburg College .«,.,.. }...,, Gettysburg ........ 1832 

Ilaverford College ......... Haverford* ..*.«*«.. i833 

Villanova College. ••»•«&•*..,«« Villanova. »•••,,,.. 1842 

Moore Institute — School -of Be s ign -for 'Women, Philadelphia ........ 1844 

St , Francis College, s «.< i i .<:.., . . Loretta. ... o ..... . 1845 

St. Vincent's College. ^ ......... . Latrobe. ... .,,...• 1846 

Bucknell University. .... ,,. Lewisburg, ......,,, 1846 

Muhlenburg College,.... Al lent own . . . . 1848 

Geneva College . . . « .... Beaver Falls ........ 1848 

T.aynesburg College •,<■« ,,,*«••.. Wayne sburg .....,.,, 1850 

St. Joseph's College ... .,*• Philadelphia ........ 1851 

Westminster College. •«, New Wilmington ....... 1852 

Beaver College ............... Jenkintown ......... 1853 

Lincoln University', .., ,,.*,...• Lincoln University ... s . a 1854 

Pennsylvania State College , ..,.,••• State College. ....... 1855 

Albright College ...... <,..•••.. Reading, ... ••••.«•• 1856 

Susquehanna University .,....,,,., Selinsgrove, ••••»•«• 1858 

Chestnut Hill College, ...» ,.,••••*. Chestnut Hill, Philadelphia. 1858 

La Salle College ...••••• Philadelphia • 1863 

Swarthmore College ............. Swart hmore ...«••••• 1864 

Lehigh University, ....->..,.».••. Bethlehem... •••••..• 1865 

Thiel College , Greenville •••• 1866 

Lebanon Valley College .,....,••», Annville .. •,.,,.•. 1866 

Cedar Crest College, ...,.,,«••»• Allentown, „-..•••••• 1868 

Wilson College ...... ....,,••. Chambersburg .«...,•• 1869 

Ursinus College. ..,,.. • • Ccllegeville • • 1869 

Pennsylvania College for Women «•••••• Pittsburgh ......... 1869 



(A) 



(B) 



:c) 



(i. 
j 



Juniata College, .... ,,,,. Huntingdon ......... 1876 

Grove City College Grove City ......... 1876 



Name 

Duquesne University c . . . . • 

Eryn Mawr College. » c • . » • • »••«•• 

Seton Hill College „ . . . c c 

Temple University. ...e«»***««*« 

University of Scranton ..&..,,.•••» 

Drexel Institute of Technology ...««.. 



Elizabetht own College, • • « • • 
Carnegie Institute of Technology 
Dropsie College. ...... . 

Marywood College , • 9 „ • • & 
Immaculat a College « . • • • • • 

Rosemont College *..ooa»4 
Misericordia College „ • . . . 
Villa Ma ria College. . . . • • . 

Mercyhurst College .i.e..* 
Mount Mercy, » # «•«•• o • • 

















Date of 




Locat ion 














F 


3imdi ng 




Pittsburgh . » 


m 


• 


e 


fa 


• 


4 


» . 


1878 




Bryn Mawr . . 


• 


a 


t 


9 


© 


• 


i . 


1880 




















1883 




Philadelphia . 


c 


9 


• 


© 


a 


• 


i • 


1884 


(L) 


Scrant on <. <, a 


• 


9 


• 


• 








» . 


1888 


(M) 


Philadelphia . 


t 


• 


© 


V 





c 


■ . 


1891 























(N) 


Elizabetht own. 


3 


• 


o 


o 


■ 





» j 


1899 




Pittsburgh e . 


J 


• 


• 


<s 





• 


» . 


1900 




Philadelphia 





S 


• 


w 


* 


• 


i , 


1907 




Scranton . . 





e 


6 




o 


* 


• 


1915 




Immaculat a . , 





o 


4 










1920 




Rosemont . . » 








9 




o 


• 


1 


1921 




Dallas ..co 


© 


tt 


e 







o 


» # 


1924 




Villa Ma r i a . . 


• 


3 


• 




* 


• 


» 9 


1925 




Erie . • a « 


A 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• e 


1926 




Pittsburgh , a 


It 















1929 





STATE TEACHERS COLLEGES 



West Chester, 

Cheyney a c 

Millersvillc 

Bloomsburg . 

Mansfield , 

Edinboro, » 

Kutztown. « 

HJ California. 

ill Lock Haven. 

( J J Indiana „ .. 

K) Shippensburg 

Ll Clarion . . , 

M) Slippery Rock . , 

\NJ East Stroudsburg'. 



West Chester 
Cheyney. . . - . . 
Millersville 
Bloomsburg •. 
Ma n s f i e 1 d--. 
Edinboro . 
Kutztown ■. 
Calif'or-nia 
Lock Haven 
Inddana-. •. 
Shippensburg 
Cla«rion. ». ■. 
Slippery Rock 
East Stroudsburg 



..»••• B » 

• •«'..».« 

• «...... 

........ 

. . 3 » • » • « 
.£«'. r..« 

« . u . C « . C 

« •» o . • • -e • 

^r? „ o ■• • . e 



1812 
1842 
1854 
1856 
1857 
1859 
1860 
1865 
1870 
1871 
1873 
1887 
1889 
1893 



IN TRANSITION SECTION 



The following men students' are in 
the Transition Sect'io'n for 'the 'se'co'nd 
semester of the year J 1939-40 o All grades 



for these -students* should -be sent to the 
Office of -the Dean of Men. An * indi- 
cates that' the- student withdrew. 



Anstadt, Robert Ellwqod 
Baggs, Andrew Robert 
Baldi, Charles. C ». 
Best, Paul Wharton, . 
Bordo, Louis John . 
Broida, Donald -Y-a-le 
Cohen, Martin Bernard 
delPapa, Nadir Jose 
Eckenroth , 
Eichholtz 



Robert t , 
Philip Warren 
Ely, Jerald Edgar 
Everitt, Orville Clinton 
*Fanus, Sheldon Herbert 
Francis, Robert Frederick 
Friedman., Morris Samuel 
Fritz, John William 
Frketich, Leonard L«, 
Greenwald, Jerome Bernard 



.Henkel, ^Robert Albert 
Hill, William S. 
Krengel, Sidney Jay 
Lewis, Walter Morgan 
Lqckwood, Charles H« 
Loeb, Barton G c 
Lucas, Weir Smith 
Mahoney, John Francis 
^Mather, David James 
^McElhinney, James" 
Moore, Douglas B» 
Morrow, Paul Rtissell 
Niederhauser, Albert" 
Patton, Wallace Keys 
Peirce, Harry G# 

Earl Robert 
Howard Edward 



^Raymer, 



Re in , 

Rexach, Hans 

Richards, Luther Warren 



Richwine, Francis Host 
Rife, Wilbur Allison 
Rula, Adam Anthony 
Sanz, Angel E# 
Sch'all, Wayne Dee 
Schwartz, Bernard 
Shekell, Edward 
Silan, John 

Slupeckej Joseph Edwin 
SnxpsLs^ Ben Joseph 
St em, 'Morris 
Trybala, Edmund Richard 
Vogel, Richard Royer 
Wagman, Marshal Howard 
♦Walker, Ja6ob Howard 
'♦Walther, Frederick H, 
'♦Wolfe, Harry 'George 
Young, John B. Packer 



P.I.A.A. GYMNASTICS TO BE EELD THIS WEEKEND 

Frid ay . March _29 10:30—11:00 — Making Gymnastics Safer, a 
P,M, demonstration by Eugene Vvettstcne, gym— 

8 :00-9 :00— "Flip Flops," an instructive nastic coach, The Pennsylvania State 
and entertaining movie on elementary College . 

and advanced tumbling,, Also movies of 11:00 — 11 :30— Lecture— Demonstrat ion on 
rope olimbingo Little Theatre,, Old Parallel Bars Technique, by George 
Main. "Wheeler, present National A A C L T Ail- 

Around Champion and 1936 Olympic Star,, 

Saturda Vg M arch 3 12:00 — Luncheon, informal meeting, Sand— 
A .M„ vrich Shop, Old Main, 

9:20-9:30 — Address of Welcome by C. Law- 
rence Walsh o P.M. 

9:30-3.0:00 — -Lecture-Demonstration of In- 1 :30~-2 :66— Registration and ■warm-up* 

dian Club Swinging, by Harris B. Winne^ 2;00 — -4 :00— Pennsylvania Int erscholast ic 
physical director, Sewickley High Athletic Association Gymnastic Champion— 

Schoolo ships, 

10 : 00-10 •: 30 — Discussion on Philadelphia 4:00- — Presentation of Awards by C. Lav- 
High School Gymnastic Frcgram,by Dr« rence Walsh, Chairman of P c I,A,i» Gym- 
Leopold F. Zvarg, physical director^ nastic Committee^ 
Germant own High School,, 

* * :- * * <-- 

OFFICIAL NOTICES FROM THE OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR 

The Registrar finds that he does not Extra copies of any edition, either in 

have a printed copy of the Constitution mimeographed form or in printed form, dated 

of the College Senate for 1932, He would prior to 1930 might also be sent since the 

appreciate receiving from any member of supply of these earlier numbers is quite 

the faculty an extra copy of this issue. limited. 

* * * * * * 

All instructors are requested to should be placed thereon;, In this con- 
send to the Office of the Registrar the . nection please note rules '36 and 38 of 
class cards for all students who with- the Regulations Affecting Undergraduate 
draw from college or who drop a subject. Students. It is suggested that the card 
Notice of tnese are being mailed by the sent out by Mr* Bissey be used by the in- 
Statistical Office to the instructor con— structor to report to the Office of the 
cerned each week. Before mailing cards Dean of the School in which the student 
please note that a grade of WA or WB is enrolled the grade of WA or WB . 

Wit h dr awals 

1 Cecley, Robert E., LD, FC, Feb„ 20 S Hunter, Helen IC, , Ed, Mar, 11 

2 Eigenrauch, Lawrence A s , PEd, Feb, 14 2 Kelly, V,"m, T., DH, Feb u 8 

1 Deily, Richard B., Met, Feb. 15 S McDonnell, Eleanor R a , AL, Mar, 8 

Fisher, Harvey J., DH, Feb. 27 G . Sutton, Robert OV, Ch, Mar, 19 

1 Flynn, Bernard F,, LD, Feb. 1 4 Swan, Albert W.r jr« ? LD,-, Mar. 13 

1 Fox, Donald E., Geol, FC, Mar, 11 2 Terrizzi, Charles C , „ CE ? Mar. 11 
G Goodley, Marian E., History, Mar. 9 4 Wharrey, Lester W,, AE, Mar, 1 

3 Graham, Richard B., CF, Feb. 27 2 Wiesheirer^ John M, ? 2'yr Ag, Feb. 24 

Add it ional Dismis sals 

2 Brown, Yfm L., ME, dropped for poor 2 Sidler, Frank V,, AgEc, dropped and 
scholarship. reinstated. 

Change of Class if ica t ion 

Raymer, Earl R», from special to scpho— Foresman, Robert A,, jr c > from special in 
more in Transition. Agriculture to junior in Dairy Husbandry, 

Win, S, Hoffman, 
Registrar 






fit Ji 



«3HiiVH0-li SAGV1D S 



S 



THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 



FACULTY 

Published weekly on Tuesday during the College 
year as a means of making official announcements 
and presenting items of interest to the faculty. All 

VOL. 19 




April 2, 1940 



BULLETIN 

contributions should be as brief as possible and reach 
Walter F. Dantzscher, Director of Public Information, 
105 Old Main, not later than 10 a.m. each Friday. 



NO. 



2 4 



OF GENERAL INTEREST 



Professor Franklin C. Banner, 
head of the Department of Journal- 
ism, will give the fifth and last 
lecture of the Liberal Arts Series 
next Tuesday, April 9, at 7:30 p.m, 
in the Home Economics Auditorium. 
Professor Banner's subject will be 



"The 
mocracy. 



1' ree 

it 



Press, a Champion of De- 



The College Senate will meet 
this Thursday, "Apr i 1 4, at 4:10 
p.m., in room 10 Liberal Arts. 



The concert this Sunday after- 
noon, April 7, will be given by 



the Infantry Band 



The lacrosse team will meet 
Hobart this Saturday > April 6, at 
2 i 30 p.m. 



Liberal Arts faculty members 
and their wives and husbands will 
attend a dinner at the Nittany 
Lion Inn next Monday night, April 
8, at 6:30 o'clock. It"will be 
the group's first get together in 
six years. Members of the office 
force will also be invited. The 
speaker will be Don Rose, Phila- 
delphia newspaper man and author 
of the column appearing in the Pub- 
lic Ledger under the name "Stuff 
and Nonsense." Tickets cost $1 
each and must be reserved by re- 
turning application blanks to Mr* 
L* H* Bell, 310 Old Main, by this 
Thursday, April 4, at 3 p.m. 



Dr. Justin Nixon, of Roches- 
ter, New York, will be the chapel 
speaker next Sunday, April 7, Dr. 
Nixon will replace Dr« Albert W« 
Beaven, who is unable to be here. 



OFFICIAL NOTICES FROM THE OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR 

Wi thdrawal s 

S Graybi 1 1 , David I,, I Ed, Feb, 17 
3 McC o rm i c k , Ma r t h a E . , ABCh , Mar. 6 



Of the above, one withdrew be- ble to his purpose, and one because 
cause his credits were not applica- of lack, of finances and illness. 

Change of Classification 

George B. Moser, changed from two-year Agriculture to four-year 
PJairy Husbandry. 

Wn. S. Hoffman 
Reo i s trar 



v REQUIREMENTS FOR ELIGIBILITY TO PHI BETA KAPPA 

(The editor of the Faculty Bulletin has been requested by official ac- 
tion of the local chapter of Phi Beta Kappa to publish this statement.) 



The following are some of the 
conditions which must have been 
fulfilled by a graduating senior 
in order to be eligible for Phi 
Beta Kappa. 

1. Residence in The Pennsyl- 
vania State College of at least 
two years with an average grade on 
work done in this College of at 
least 2,5. 

Z, The work shall have been 
liberal in character. This is in- 
terpreted to mean that at least SO 
per cent of the student's credits 
shall have been in art, bacteriol- 
ogy, botany, chemistry, drama,' 
economics, English, entomology, 
French, geography, geology, German, 
Greek, history, Italian, Latin, 
mathematics, mineralogy, music, 
philosophy, physics, physical sci- 
ence, political science, psychol- 
ogy, sociology, social science, 
Spanish, speech, or zoology, (Even 



within these field 



s, however, cer< 



tain specific courses may be treat 
ed by the Chapter as non-liberal; 



l o be regarded as liberal, 



si 



ib- 



jects must be taught and studied 
from the point of view of knowl- 
edge and appreciation rather than 
from that of vocation or immediate 
appl icat i on, ) 

3, There must be evidence of 
a fairly wide range of interest. 
This is safeguarded by the provi- 
sion that the student must have 



had at least 



credits each from 



six of the following eight subject 
matter groups: 



eluding bacteriology, biological 
science, biological and physiolog- 
ical 

°gy. 



chemistry, botany, and zool- 



{Z) Physical sciences, * in- 
cluding chemistry, geography, ge- 
ology, mineralogy, physical sci- 
ence, and physics. 

(3) Social studies, includ- 
ing economics, history, political' 
science, social science, and so- 
ciol ogy. 



°gy< 



(4) Philosophy and psycho 1- 



(5) Mathematics. 



(6) 
erature * 



Ino lish lanouace and lit- 



(1) 



(7) Foreign languages. 

( 6 ) Ar t s , i nc 1 ud 1 ng art, 
drama, and music. 

Fulfillment of these condi- 
tions In no sense obligates the 
Chapter to elect a student to mem- 
bership in Phi Beta Kappa, Not 
more than 10 per cent of those ex- 
pected, to receive liberal bache- 
lor's degrees may be elected, and 
more than 50 per cent of all e- 
lected must be from the School of 
the Liberal Arts, It should be 
made clear also that elections are 
by secret ballot, and that in cast- 
ing their votes the members of the 
Chapter reserve the right to take 
into account character as well as 
scholarsh i p. 



Bioloaical sciences, in- 



BOCKLET S AVA I LABLE 



A limited number of booklets on the Pennsylvania Turnpike from 
Harrisburg to Pittsburgh are now available in the Department of Public 
Inf orrnat i on. 



i - t& 



H3?lNVH0'ii SAQVIS SSIK 



THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 



FACULTY 

Published weekly on Tuesday during the College 
year as a means of making official announcements 
and presenting items of interest to the faculty. All 

VOL. 19 




April 9, 1S40 



BULLETIN 



contributions should be as brief as possible and reach 
Walter F. Dantzscher, Director of Public Information, 
105 Old Main, not later than 10 a.m. each Friday. 

NO£5 



RESERVED SEATS FCR LECTURE BY SENATOR NYE 
TO GO ON SALE BEGINNING THURSDAY MORNING 



In an endeavor to help to re- 
alize the oft-expressed desire of 
students and faculty members to 
hear more persons of national prom- 
inence, the local chapter of Phi 
Beta Kappa has underwri tten the ex- 
penses in connection with the local 
appearance of U. S. Senator Gerald 
P. Nye, Dr. Ray H. Dotterer, presi- 
dent of the chapter, has announced. 

Senator Nye, who has been de- 
scribed by Oswald Garrison Villard 
as "one of the most valuable mem- 
bers of the Senate," will appear in 
Schwab Auditorium next Monday eve- 
ning, April 15, at 8:15 o'clock. 
All seats will be reserved. The 
price of admission is 35^. The 
ticket sale will take place at the 
A. A. windows in Old Main bee in- 
ning Thursday morning at 6 a.m. 
and will continue Thursday and Fri- 
day from 8 a.m. to noon and from 
1:30 to 5 p.m., as well as Saturday 
morning beginning at 8 a.m. 

If seats remain, they will 
continue to be sold Monday morning 
and afternoon during the same hours 
and just before the lecture in the 
lobby of Schwab Auditorium. 



Senator Nye has been so fre- 
tly in the news that a recital 
is connections seems superflu- 
ous topic will be "Can We 

Ame r i c a Cu. t of W ar?" He is 
d especially for his policy of 
ationism and his insistence on 
ures intended to preserve 
c t ne v t r a 1 i ty , He is n ow s e r - 

his third term in the Senate, 



quen 


of h 


cms . 


Keep 


note 


isol 


me a s 


SLl 1 


vmg 



which he joined in November, 1925, 
when he was appointed by Governor 
Sorlie to fill the vacancy caused 
by the death of the late Senator 
Edwin F. Ladd. Early this year 
he was appointed to the position 
which the late Senator Borah oc- 
cupied on the Senate Committee on 
Foreign Relations. 



A newspaper editor 
lisher by profession, nr 
senator's fame has come 
the result of tv. : o specia 
1 a 1 i nve s t i g a t i on s wh i ch 
headed. Most recent of 
been the special cornmitt 
ti gating munitions. A f 
ago Oswald Garrison Vi 1 1 
scribed this undertaking 
tri Luting as much to the 
welfare as any other und 
in Wash i no ton in the las 



and pub- 

ch of the 

about as 

1 Senator- 
he has 

these has 

ee inves- 

ew years 

ard de- 
as con- 
pub 1 i c 

ertaking 

t 25 years. 



Nye was 
Senate commit 
out the Conti 
pany during t 
lowing the Ha 
Th i s i nve s t i g 
i ng of Sine la 
Robert Stewar 
Standard Oi 1 
the recovery 
for the rover 
vat i on of oil 
dreds of mill 



also chairman of the 
tee which ferreted 
nental Trading Com- 
he oil scandals fol- 
r d i ng a dm i n i s t r a t i o n . 
ation led to the jail- 
ir, the removal of 
t as president of the 
Company of Indiana, 
of millions in taxes 
nment, and the preser- 
resources worth hun- 
ions of dollars. 



Politically Nye is described 
"always a liberal and a pro- 



as 



gress i ve 



but never one to let 



his Republicanism "keep him from 
being independent," 



TWO LOTION FT 



TO BE GIVEN THIS WEEK 



Faculty members, their wives 
and friends are invited to attend 
two motion pictures which will be 
presented this week. 

The first, "Little Caesar," 
with Edward 0. Robinson, will be 
shown in Schwab Auditorium this 
Thursday, April 11, at 8:30 p.m. 
It is the third and last Fuse urn 
of Modern Art Film Library movie 
being brought to the campus by Fi 
Gamma Alpha, honorary fine arts 
fraternity. Described as "an his- 
toric talkie of 1930," it is some- 
what briefer than either of the 
previous programs. 



This 



"Grand I 1 1 us i on, " 
107 Main 

12, 



The second, 

shown in room 

this Friday, 

ten-reel sound 
and 



Apr i I 



wi 1 1 be 
Eng ineer ing 

at 7 : 30 p.m. 

film,' with Trench dialogue ; 
superimposed English titles, 
sponsored by Phi Delta Kappa, pro- 
fessional fraternity in Education.' 
It was awarded first prize by the 

Mat i nna 1 T5 r> a r 1 rl a c tho "T-i^ct film 



i s 



It was awarded first prize 
National Board as the "best filn 



of 1938 from any country" and by 
the New York Film Critics' Circle 
as the "best foreign film of that 
year , " 

"Little Caesar" represents an 
era when gangster films boasted 
that ''every event shown in this 
film is based on an actual occur- 
rence" and that "all characters 
are portraits of actual persons, 
living or dead." In contrast, in 
the present era films of American 
life are preceded by the caution 
that "events and persons depicted 
herein are purely fictitious." In 
the former period, Darryl Zanuck 
was said to have determined his 
production schedule on the basis 
of newspaper headline content. 

"Grand Illusion" presents a 
moving plea for peace in a tense 
drama depicting the life of some 
French army officers in a German 
prison camp. The cast' includes 
Jean Gab in, Dita Farlo, Eric Von 
Stroheim, Dalio, and Pierre Fresnay, 



LIBRARY TO HOLD STUDENT HOBBY EXHIBIT 



An exhibit of hobbies of Fenn 
State students is being held at 
the Central Library until April 12. 
This exhibit is sponsored by the 
Student Library Committee, mater- 
ial being collected and arranged 
by Marjorie Harwick, '41 > a member 
of the committee. 

The exhibit includes manu- 
script and descriptive material of 
the book "Hawks in the Hand" by 
Frank and John Craighead, '39; old 



and rare penny banks collected by 
Martha Pease, '43; hand carved fur- 
niture, Constance Reddig, '43; min- 
iature animals, Marjorie McFarland, 
'43; chip carving, Anne Borton, 
'42; snapshots, Beth Howe, '40, and 
D.. L. Backenstose, '36; Mexican 
articles, Muriel Eng e Ike, '41; 
dolls and oddities from' Panama^ 
Haiti, China, and India, Norma 
St ill we 11, '41; ship pictures, 
Barbara Miller, '41; poetry, a 
member of the junior class. 



A.S.M.E. TO, PRESENT DR. ABBOTT 



Dr. Ernest J. Abbott, presi- 
dent of the Physicists' Research ■ 
Company of Ann Arbor, Michigan, 
will give a lecture and demonstra- 

Thursda^ 

in room 



tion this 
7:30 p.m. 
neering , 



', Apr i 1 11, at 
107 Main Enqi- 



The subject will be "Quiet- 



ing Machinery with the Aid of Sound 
Measurements," The talk, which is 
sponsored by the Central Pennsyl- 
vania Section of the American Soci- 
ety of Mechanical Engineers, is 
said to deal with familiar things 
from- quite new angles and to be of 
wide interest. Everyone interested 
in the control of noise is invited. 



OF GENERAL INTEREST 



Faculty members are again re- 
minded of Professor Banner's lec- 



tur< 



on 



'The Free Tress, 



of Democracy," to be given 
evening, Tuesday, April 9/ 
p.m. in the Home Economics 
t o r i urn . 



Champ 1 on 
thi s 
at 7:30 
Audi - 



Faculty members and their 
families, as well as students, 
are invited to attend the annual 
P.5.C.A. dinner, which will be 
held next Monday, April 15, at 
5:30 p.m. in the Old Main Sand- 
wich Shop. 

After a brief business meet- 
ing, Dr. Francis F, Miller, Di- 
rector of the Council on Foreign 
Relations, New York, will speak 
on "America's Share in Building 
World Co-operation," Reservations 
for the dinner may be made at the 
P.S.C.A. office. 



Dr. Miller will also be 
chapel speaker this Sunday, , 
14. 



the 
/pr i 1 



The baseball team will have 
three games at home this week: 
Western Maryland tomorrow^ Wednes- 
day, April 10, at 4 p.uu; West 
| Virginia Friday, April 12, at 4 
P«m«; and West Virginia again 
Saturday, April 13, at 2:30 p.m. 



Dr. C. G. Rcssby, assistant 
chief of the United States Weather 
Bureau, will give, a lecture on 
"Recent Studies of Northern Hemi- 
sphere Weather" next Tuesday, April 
16, at 4:10 p.m. in room 121 Min- 
eral Industries. The lecture is 
sponsored by the Mi neral og ic.al 
Seminar of Central Pennsylvania. 
The public is cordially invited. 



There will be a special meet- 
ing of the faculty of the School 
of ' Agriculture this Thursday, April 



11, at 4:10 p.m. in 
cu 1 ture Bui lding. 



room 10 



o 



An r i - 



A discussion of standards of 
teaching will be the problem be- 
fore the meeting of the A.A.U.P.. 
Wednesday, April 17, at 7:30 p.m. 
in the Old Main Sandwich Shop. 
Dr.. R. 'G. Be rnre uter will be in 
charqe . 



There will be a meeting of 
Phi Beta Kappa for the election 
of new members this Thursday, 
April 11, at '4; 10 p.m. in room 
418 Old Main. 



'The concert this Sunday after- 
noon^ April 14, will be given by 
the Glee Club. 



OFFICIAL NOTICES FROM THE OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR 



Sp 
1 
3 

1 

G 
G 
1 

1 
1 



,7 i thdrawal s 
Ash, Harold GiJ CLV> March 29 



Cal 1 i s ta, JOmes 



LD, March 14 



Catlin, Edward H»,ChE, April 1 
Doolittle, Charles, 'ME, March 20 
Miller, Bessie, Soc, Ap'ri'l '1 ' 
Ne s s , W i 1 1 i am H . , ME , Apr i 1 4 
O'Tousa, Joseph E., ME, April 2 ' 
Stover, Arthur M., 2yr Ag, March 14 
Taylor, Rachel Hi, HEc, March 19 



Of the above> 3 withdrew be- 
cause of illness, 1 because of 
finances, 1 to accept a position, 



1 because of insubordination, 1 
because' of death, and 2 gave' n'o 
reasons i 

Wm. S* Hoffman 
Rectis trar 



S37INVHD ' ¥ SAO V ID SSIl 



THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 



FACULTY 



Published weekly on Tuesday during the College 
year as a means of making official announcements 
and presenting items of interest to the faculty. All 




VOL. 19 



April 16, 1940 



BULLETIN 

contributions should be as brief as possible and reach 
Walter F. Dantzscher, Director of Public Information, 
105 Old Main, not later than 10 a.m. each Friday. 



NO. 



26 



OF GENERAL INTEREST 



The faculty of the School of Engi- 
neering will meet in r'-om 110 New Elec- 
trical Engineering Building this Friday, 
April 19, at 5 p<,m , according to an of- 
ficial announcement from Dean Hammond. 
* * * * * * 



"Can 


Valid?" i 


meeting t 


p m»- in x 


various p 


uated by 


chologica 


Doct or s B 


A report 


will also 


Green. I 


report on 


vey of fa 


talizatio 


is open i 



Teacher Ra 
s the s u b j e 
his Wednesd 
he Old Main 
lans will b 
Dr. R. G. B 
1 Clinic in 
, V . Moore 
^n the camp 

be given b 
n add it ion, 

the return 
culty opini 
n for depen 
all who a 

* * * 



t ing S cal 
ct for th 
ay, April 

Sandwich 
e analyze 
e rnreut er 

co— opera 
and C. 0. 
us traffi 
y Prof e s s 

Dr. E. C 
s of the 
en regard 
dents. T 
re intere 



es Be Made 
e A„A.UoP. 

17, at 7:30 

Shop. The 
d and eval- 

of the Psy- 
t icn with 

Williams • 
c problems 
or George R. 
. Davis will 
recent sur— 
ing hospi— 
he meeting 
st e d . 
* * 



The annual dinner of the local Cor— 
lell alumni and students will be held at 
;he University Club this Thursday, April 
_8, at 6:30 p.m. These interested are 
equested to secure tickets fr^m J. S, 
obb, B. R.. Gardner, or Miss Ruth E. Gra— 
a,m; or tc telephone reservations to pro — 
escrr H» C. Knandel's office by tomorrow 
Wednesday) noon, April 17. 



Dr. Sherwood E 
author, lecturer, a 
affairs will be the 
State Christian Ass 
and Tuesday, April 
address a. public me 
torium at 7:30 p.m. 
"America's Stake in 
Other meetings will 
Anyone who would li 
personally may make 
so by calling the C 



ddy, world tr 

nd student of 

guest of the 

ociat ion next 

22 and 23. H 

eting in Schw 

Monday on th 

Europe ' s Pea 

be announced 

ke t t meet Dr 

arrangement s 

hristian As so 



aveler, 

foreign 

Penn 

Monday 
e will 
ab Audi— 
e t opic 
ce." 

lat er • 
, Eddy 

to do 
ciat ion . 



Dr, Robert W. Searle, of the Greater 
New York Federation of Churches, will be 
the speaker at chapel this Sunday, April 
21, 



Madam Maria Tolstoy, granddaughter 
of Count Leo Tolstoy, will speak this 
Wednesday, April 17, at 8 p«m in room 
10 Liberal Arts on "Czechoslovakia Since 
Munich," Madam Tolstoy will give a first 
hand account of conditions in central 
Europe in the former Czecho— SI ovak repub- 
lic. The lecture is open to the public. 
It is given in the interests of the 
Czecho— Slovak Red Cross, and a silver 
offering will be taken. 

* * * * * » 

The Fraternity Counselors Associa- 
tion will hold a meeting at 8 p.m. today, 
Tuesday, April 16, at Tau Kappa Epsilon, 
Garner Street and East Prospect Avenue. 
The committee will present a tentative 
draft of the Freshman Booklet, Election of 
officers for 1940—41 will also be held. 

* * * * * * 

The School of Education faculty will 
meet in room 209 Home Economics Building 
next Monday, April 22, at 4:10 p.m., ac- 
cording tc an announcement from Dean Tra— 
bue. Dean Frank D. Kern will speak on 
"The Development of a Graduate School," 

* * * * * * 

Faculty members are again reminded 
of the lecture to be given today, Tuesday, 
April 16, in room 121 Mineral Industries. 
Dr. C. G, Rossby, assistant chief of the 
United States Weather Bureau, will speak 
on "Recent Studies of Northern Hemisphere 
Weather." The time of the lecture will 
be 3:10 p.m. instead of 4;10 p.m., as 
originally announced. 

* * * * * * 

A foreign money order, No, 5026, is- 
sued in New South Wales, cleared through 
some department of the College by way of 
New York January 27, 1940, The local 
postal authorities will appreciate the 
clearance of this item without any further 
delay. 



The concert this Sunday afternoon, 
April 21, will be given by the College 
Symphony Orchestra, 



OF GENERAL INTEREST (cont'd) 



Sports events this week include the 
following: Wednesday, April 17, the base- 
ball team will play Syracuse at 4 p.m., 
and the lacrosse team will meet Swarthmore 
at 4 p c m»j Saturday, April 20, the base- 
ball team will play Navy at 2:30 p.m., 
the lacrosse team will meet Cornell at 
2:30 p,m», and the golf team will meet 
Pittsburgh at 2 p.m. 

* * * * * * 



The Department of Home Economics has 
two articles for sale. The first is a 
Westinghcuse Electric waffle baker, which 
has been used for two years. The orig- 
inal price was $9,95; it is to be sold 
for $3,39, The second is a We st inghouse 
Electric toaster, which has also been in 
use for two years The original price was 
$5.95; it will be sold for $l e 88. 
* * * * * * 



FACULTY MEMBERS CONTRIBUTE TO 42 PUBLICATIONS 



In order to keep in touch with the 
contributions of Penn State staff members 
to scholarly publications, a member of 
the Department of Public Information 
checks over such periodicals at regular 
intervals. The purpose is to give more 
adequate publicity to research. 

Agricultural Education Magazine 

American Dyestuff Reporter 

American Journal of Sociology 

American Miller 

American Mineralogist 

American Speech 

Automobile Engineer 

Bulletin' of the American Association of 

Petroleum Geologists 
Bulletin of the American Meteorological 

Society 
Bulletin of the Torrey Botanical Club 
Heating and Ventilating 
Ice Cream Trade Journal 
Industrial and Engineering Chemistry 
Inter— State Milk Producers' Review 
Journal of Agricultural Research 
Journal of the American Ceramic Society 
Journal of the American Chemical Society 
Journal of the American Society of 

Agronomy 
Journal of Applied Physics 
Journal of the Association of Official 

Agricultural Chemists, 



In the past seven months, articles 
by staff members have appeared in the fol- 
lowing 42 publications. Since this list 
may be incomplete, faculty members are 
asked to call ether articles to the atten- 
tion of Miss Margaret H. Buyers, Depart- 
ment of Public Information, 

Journal of Chemical Physics 

Journal of Dairy Science 

Journal of Economic Entomology 

Journal of Educational Psychology 

Journal of Educational Sociology 

Journal of Engineering Education 

Journal 'of Forestry 

Journal of Health and Physical Education 

Journal of Heredity 

Journal of Nutrition 

Journal of Physical Chemistry 

Milk Dealer 

Mycologia 

National Petroleum News 

Oil Vfeekly 

Physical Review 

Poultry Science 

Plant Physiology 

Quarterly Journal 

Research Quarterly 

Health, Physical 

t ion 
School and Society 
Science 



of Speech 
of the Journal 



of 



Education, and Recrea- 



OFFICIAL NOTICES FROM THE OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR 
Withdrawals 



2 Davis, William A., jr, EE^ April 5 
1 Lewis, James YI » > PM> AC > March 4 



Brachbill, C, S,> Cer, April 9 
Brisling Neal A., Ed> March 15 

Of the above) 3 withdrew because of illness and 1 because of peer scholarship, 

: ■ .-, ■ Change s in Classification 



^C ) Beatty, Martha E, — should be Special LA instead of Sophomore LD 
,FC | Campbell, James R, — should be Part-Time Freshman, instead of Special 
t FC ) Crow, Philip B„ — should be Part— Time Sophomore, instead of Special 
HC 1 Ferlino, Jack D. — should be Part-Time Freshman, instead of Special 
DC ) Griffith, Besse Mae — should be Part— Time Freshman, instead of Special 
Harvey, David A, — should be Sophomore LD, instead of Freshman LD 
Rosenberg, Marjery J. — should be Junior Ed, instead of Sophomore LD 



The Registrar wishes to call to the 
attention of instructors regulation 38 
of the Regulations Affecting Undergrad- 
uate Student s : 

"A grade of WB incurred within the 
last six weeks of a semester shall auto- 
matically be recorded as a minus two (—2 



unless the instructor reports a grade of 
minus one (—1), Such grades shall be 
recorded as WB(-l) or WB(-2). A grade 
of WB{— l) shall not entitle the student 
to be enrolled in a dependent subject. 
The date for the last six weeks begins 
April 25." 

Wm« S. Hoffman 
Registrar 



PROCEDURES INVOLVED TJHEN GRADES ARE MO LONGER 
REPORTED TO THE DEANS ' .O.EF.ICES 

Adopted by the Council of Administration, April 8, 1940 

In a recent issue of the Faculty sary to set up in connection with .this 
Bulletin notice was given to the effect action would be printed, -an an early issue.. 
that instructors would not be required The following procedures wq,re adopted at 
to send grade "reports to the offices of a recent meeting and are* .printed here for 
the several Deans beginning with the end the information of the staff. Perhaps 
of the nresent semester. It was also the most important item is the last re corn- 
pointed' out that the additional proce- mendation, having to do with failing grades 
dures or regulations, it would be neces- at the end of the semester. 



It em 



Present Practice Recommended New Pra ct ice 



Registration Dean's office receives a No change 

copy of the schedule card 

Drop-Add. Dean's office receives a No change 

Yv'ithdrawal from College copy of the action 

Grade reports due to Registrar receives grade card Instructor should send to 

drop-adds or marked in accordance with rules the student's Dean the 

withdrawal from 36, 38, and the following ac- card of notification of 

College tion of the Senate: "In those "drop" cr "withdrawal" 

exceptional cases where a stu- marking it in accordance 
dent is permitted to drop a with rules 36, 38, etc. 

subject after the first two 
weeks of a semester for reasons 
not due to poor scholarship, 
the School in which he is en- 
rolled may authorize the drop- 
ping 'without penalty,' in which 
case the instructor teaching the 
subject shall not report a grade 
WB. If the instructor by mis- 
take reports a grade TTB, the 
Registrar shall disregard the 
report ." 

Credit by examination Grades are reported to the Registrar's Office will 

Credit by extension Registrar send duplicate prints of 

Credit by correspondence t he ' student ' s record to 

Corrections to the record the Dean's office*' 

Intelligence test scores These are now reported to No change 

Deans' offices, as well as to 
the Registrar 

Below grades Sent now only to the Deans 1 No change 

office s 

Exemption from ROTC, Letters are at present sent Such notices should also 
Physical Education, to the Registrar be sent to the office of 

English Comp. 1 . . "the student's Dean 

Grade reports Grade reports are sent in No change 

Regular Sessions .duplicate to the office of 

Summer Sessions the Dean v .... 

Summer Practicum 

To speed up the consideration of these grade reports it is suggested that 

those who should be dropped for poor the instructors give the reason for the 

scholarship, instructors shall continue failure on their reports. All grades, 

to mail to the office of the student's including failures, are of course to be 

Dean all failing grades at the end of reported promptly to the Office of the 

each semester. In addition to sending Registrar. 

Vim. S. Hoffman 



MINUTES 0? THE COLLEGE SENATE MEETING 



A meeting of the College Senate was 
held in room 10 Liberal Arts .Building on 
Thursday, April 4, 1940, at 4:10 p.m., 
with President Hetzel presiding. A list 
of the members present is on file in the 
Office of the Registrar. 

The minutes of the meeting of March 
7, 1940, were read and approved. 

The secretary brought to the atten- 
tion of the Senate the fact that Thanks- 
giving Day had been set for different 
dates by the Governor and by the Presi- 
dent. The Chair referred the question 
of the observance of Thanksgiving by the 



C olle; 



the Committee on Calendar. 



The Committee on Academic Standards 
presented the following list of nomina- 
tions for Highest College Honors, which 
had been approved by the President and 
wure on motion ratified by the Senate* 

John . W. T ,7hite Medal and Prize 

Sylvia Levinthal Bernstein 

John _K, Whit e Fellowships 

Marianne Caroline Hessemer 
George Esler Inskeep 
John Joseph Trent in 

Alt ernate 

Sara Eleanor Hileman 

Evan Pugh Scholars 

Seniors " 

Mary Elizabeth 'Hatt on 
Le on , Melvin Kne$z ,, 

Elmer David Longfellow 
Calvin Deane McCarthy 
Mart in Sites Veris 

Juniors 

Gerald Brownell Bready 

Louis Nelson Grafinger 

Albert Leon Myers on 

Norman Racusin 

Herman Smith 

Leo Sommer 

John Chamberlain Williams 



The Committee on Courses 
presented a report which was, 



of Study 
in a c c c r &— 



ance with Senate procedure, tabled for 
consideration at the next meeting of the 
Senate . 



; nt e d 



The Committee on Rules presei 
the following report, which was tabled 
for consideration at the next meeting of 
the Senat e : 



The Committee on Rules suggests 
the following amendment to rule 46; 
After the word "rule" add the words 
"and of rule 96." The amended rule 
would read, therefore, "In the appli- 
cation of the preceding rule, and of 
rule 96, a subject dropped from a 
student's schedule during the semes- 
ter with a grade of WB shall be 
counted as a failure," 

The Committee also suggests that 
after rule 96, which has to do with 
eligibility for athletic contests, the 
words "see rule 
in parentheses. 



46" shall be appended 



The Committee recommends that 
there be added to Section 4, Article 
of the By— Laws of the Senate a new 



item : 
t ions 



[g) Comments and recommenda- 
'or the good of the College." 



It is also recommended that Sec- 
tion 1 of Article 4 of the By-Laws 
of the Senate be amended by adding to 
the section the following words: "In 
announcing any meeting of the College 



Senate, the chairman may invite 



attendance of vi 
eral faculty." 



itors from the 



the 
gen- 



It 


is furth 


a new se 


ction ma 


Art icie 


5 of the 


"On invitation o 


■(g) (By- 


Laws, Se 


order of 


bus ine s 


emmendat 


ions for 


lege,' t 


he privi 


be e xt e n 


ded to v 


the general facu 


pre sent 


Sect ion 


t i o h 6 ; 


and that 


6 be changed to 



er recommended that 
rked 5 be added to 

By— Laws to read: 
f the chair, under 
c. 4, Art . 5 ) of the 
s, 'Comments and Tee- 
the good of the Col- 
lege of the floor may 
i siting members of 
lty"j and that the 
5 be changed to See- 
the present Section 
Section 7 of Article 



o . 



Dr. Tanger announced that Scholarship 
Day would be observed Sunday, May 12, in 
connection with the celebration of Mother's 
Day. 

Wm. S. Hoffman 
Se cret ary 



.: 



m 



:33INVHO«a SAQVID ssirc 



THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 



FACULTY 

Published weekly on Tuesday during the College 
year as a means of making official announcements 
and presenting items of interest to the faculty. All 




VOL. 19 



April 23, 1940 



BULLETIN 

contributions should be as brief as possible and reach 
Walter F. Dantzscher, Director of Public Information, 
105 Old Main, not later than 10 a.m. each Friday. 

NO._ 



SECOND ANNUAL ALL -COLLEGE CIRCUS TO BE HELD THIS SATURDAY 



The second annual All-College 
Circus, sponsored by the School of 
Physical Education and Athletics, 
will be held in Recreation Hall 
this Saturday, April 27, at 8 p.m. 
Reserved seats at 35<zf will be sold 
at the Student Union office until 
5 p.m. Saturday. Over two-thirds 
of these have already been bought. 
General admission tickets may be 
obtained at the door for Z5d» 

Special music for this dis- 
play of talent will be furnished 
by the clown band master, Frank 
Gullo, and his .group. Background 
music for the acts will come from 
the string ensemble directed by 
IVrs. James F. Wis den. 

Not until the night of the 
circus will spectators discover 
the identity of the queen and her 
two attendants > who were selected 
by the movie star, Dick Powell. 

Featured acts of the circus 
will be quite similar to those of 
the best traveling performances. 
Some of the outstanding displays 
include: a perch-pole act, in 
which one man supports another who 
is doing tricks 25 feet above him 
on the top of a pole; a swinging 
trapeze act without a net; an at- 
tempt to break the world's champion 



muscle-grind record, which is now 
held by Bob Clow of Illinois, with 
88 successive revolutions; acrobats 
on the bounding table; rope spin- 
ning; adagio dancing; an iron jaw 
act, in which the performer is sup- 
ported only by his teeth; and others. 

Clowns of all sizes and shapes 
will give the show added zest. Bus- 
by Butterf inger, the Circus public- 
ity man, will be present in person 
to give the affair a good start. 

Fraternities whose acts have 
been judged suitable will compete 
for the trophy, which is to be a- 
warded to the group giving the best 
act. Those fraternities entered 
are: Beta Sigma Rho and Pi Kappa 
Alpha, both of which plan to pre- 
sent a take-off on some current 
affairs; Delta Sigma Phi, with' pole 
balancing; and Phi Delta Theta> 
wi th "the big shot" act. 

The goal is to make this year's 
circus better than last year's, 
which included 300 actors and at- 
tracted more than 4,000 spectators. 
The purpose of the circus is to 
meet the needs of those who have 
talent and who would otherwise not 
be able to display their abilities. 
It is a climax to the indoor recre- 
ational program. 



CHAPEL SPEAKER 



SUNDAY CONCERT 



Dr. W. Taliaferro Thompson, 
of the Union Theological Seminary, 
Richmond, will be the speaker at 
chapel this Sunday, April 28. 



The concert thi: 
noon, April 28, wi 1 1 
the Blue Band. This 
of the series. 



Sunday after' 
be given by 
is the last 



NINTH ANNUAL PETROLEUM AND NATURAL GAS CONFERENCE TO BE HELD THIS WEEK 



The ninth annual Petroleum and Nat- 
ural Gas Conference, conducted by the 
School of Mineral Industries, •will be 
held this Friday and Saturday, April 26 
and 27, at the Nittany Lion Inn. 



The Petroleum Sessio 
in the Peacock Room from 
Friday, The chairman wil 
Bauer, e_ditor of Prodiicer 
fessor Lachlan Gilchrist, 
department of the Univers 
will speak on "Recent Ele 
netic Geophysical Investi 
Surface and in Drill Hole 
and Other Mineral Fields* 
Chittick, manager of the 
technical sales departmen 
Oil Company, Chicago, als 
His subject will be "On S 
Products in the Refining 
discussion will follow. 



n will be held 
2 to 5 p .m, on 
1 be Mr. G. G. 
s Monthly. Pro- 
of the physics 
ity of Toronto, 
ctrical and Ma le- 
gations on the 
s in Gas, Oil, 
" Mr. M. B. 
specialty and 
t of the Pure 
o will speaks 
pecial and By- 
Industry t " A 



A tea for visiting ladies will be 
held in the Lounge from 3:30 to 5 p.m., 
and an informal dinner will be held at 
7 p. in. The price of the latter is $1.25, 



Tickets should be secured at registration. 
An entertainment by the Three Stooges will 
follow the dinner. 

At the Natural Gas Session from 9 a.m. 
to noon Saturday, the cc— chairmen will be 
Mr. D, S, Keenan, president of the Carne- 
gie Natural Gas Company, and Mr, J, P. 
O'Donnell, oil editor of the Oil City Der- 
rick. ' Professor C. R. Fettke, cf the de- 
partment of geology, Carnegie Institute 
of Technology, will speak on "Sub-surface 
Studies in Connection with Recent Deep Oil 
and Gas Sand Exploration in Pennsylvania." 
Discussion will be led by Professor R, E, 
Sherrill, head of the oil and gas produc- 
tion department, University of Pittsburgh. 
Mr. F. W, Laverty, chief of the technical 
service department, Clark Brothers Company, 
Inc., Olean, New York, will speak on "Ret- 
rograde Condensation and Its Possible Ap- 
plication in the Eastern Gas Production 
Pract ice •" 

At 10 a.m. visiting ladies will be 
conducted on an inspection of the Mineral 
Industries museum and a tour of the campus. 
* * * » 



REGISTRATION FOR SUMMER CAMP AND SUMMER PRACT ICUM 



Registration for summer camp and and 17, 

Ftimmer practicum courses for undergrad— Surveyi 

'aates will take place Thursday and Fri— ready p 

day, May 2 and 3, at the Office of the have be 

Registrar, This special period has been tion fo 

appointed to keep registration for these 2 and 3 

courses separate from second semester camp an 

w'ork and to enable departments to make made at 

preparation for this work. Courses in May 10. 

the above category include: Agronomy 14, quested 

Dairy Husbandry 17, Forestry camp, Geol- tion of 

ogy 70 and 72, Home Economics 315, Hort — in the 
iculture 17, Landscape Architecture 16 



Mining 60, 
ng 48. Cour 
laced on se 
en disregard 
r these cour 
. Payment o 
d summer pra 

the Office 
Heads of d 

to bring th 

the sttident 
above course 



Poultry H'as 
ses of this 
cond semest 
ed, so that 
ses is n e c e 
f fees for 
cticum cour 
of the Burs 
epartment S 
is matter t 
s who plan 
s. 



bandry 9, 

nature al- 
er schedules 

registra- 
ssary May 
the summer 
ses wi 11 be 
ar Friday, 
are re- 
o the at ten— 
to enroll 



FACULTY MEMBERS CO-OPERATE TO INCREASE PUBLICATION LIST 



Additional information from faculty 
members indicates that staff members have 
contributed articles to at least 57 schol- 
arly publications since the beginning of 
the present academic year. The list In 
the last issue of The Faculty Bulletin is 
now supplemented by the following 15 pub- 
lications. Faculty, members who. have had 
articles published during the last seven 



months are again requested to bring the 
name of the publication and date of pub- 
lication to the attention of Miss Mar- 
garet H. Buyers in the Department of Pub- 
lic Information. Such information will 
enable that department to publicize more 
effectively the research program of the 
institution. The 'following list should 
be appended to last week's list. 



Accounting Review 
American Literature 
Dickinson Law Review 
Educational Record 
Forest Leaves 
Harvard Business Review 

* * 



Hispanic Review 

Journal of the American 
Association of Colle- 
giate Registrars 

Journal of Mammalogy 

Journal of Marketing 
* * 



Journal of Wildlife Manage- 
ment 
Mechanical Engineering 
Pennsylvania Game News 
Phyt opathology 
Wilson Bulletin 
* * 



AID FOR FRATERNITY COUNSELORS 



The Fraternity Counselor's Associa- 
tion announces that Mr. Martin B. Chit- 
tick, vocational advisory director of the 
Alpha Tau Omega fraternity, will be in 
State College t -is Friday evening, April 



26. Mr. Chittick will discuss the work 
he is doing in his fraternity with anyone 
interested in attending a meeting to be 
held at the A.T.O. house, beginning at 
8 p.m. 
* * * * 



OF GENERAL INTEREST 



Copies- of the rating scales 
for college instructors, to be 
filled. out by students, are avail- 
able to any faculty members who 
wish to use them in their own 
classes. This is the blank pre- 
pared by Dr. Robert G. Bernreuter, 
which was discussed' at the A.A.U.P. 
meeting on April 17. The rating 
scales may be obtained In any quan- 
tity, free, from room 3 Burr owes 
.Building, in exchange for the mime- 
"ograph paper. Two sheets are re- 
quired for each scale. 



discussion will begin promptly 
and stop at the end of one hour. 



• A meeting of the Graduate 
School faculty will be'held in 
200 Buckhout Laboratory next Tues> 
day, April 30, at 4:10 p.m., ac- 
cording to an official announce- 
ment from Dean Frank D. Kern. 



The Graduate Club will meet 
this Friday, April 26, at 8 p.m. 
in the Grange Dormitory playroom, 



There will be a meeting of 
the faculty of the School of Agri- 
culture in room 109 Agriculture 
Bu i 1 d i ng this Fr i day, , Apr i 1 26 , 
at 4:10 p.m., according to an of- 
ficial announcement received from 
Dean S . W . Fie t che r . 



Faculty members are again re- 
minded of the Forum hour with Dr. 
Sherwood' Eddy this afternoon, 
April 23, at 4:10 p.m. in room 
316 Central Liberal Arts. This 
is an opportunity for faculty mem- 
bers to ask Dr. Eddy questions 
about his views on the world sit- 
uation and the dangers of the 
(United States becoming involved. 
Dr. C. D, Champlin, chairman of 
the Forum, has announced that the 



Sports events this week in- 
clude the following* 

Tuesday , Apr i 1 23 

Baseball with Temple, 4 p.m. 

Wednesday , Apr i 1 24 

Golf with 'Wash, and Jeff., 2 p.m. 
Lacrosse with Swarthmore, 3 p.m. 
Tennis with Gettysburg, 4 p.m. 
Freshman tennis, Gettysburg J. V. , 

4 p.m. 

Saturday , pr i 1 Zl 

Golf with Army, 2 p.m. 

Lacrosse with Maryland, 2:30 p.m. 



OFFICIAL NOTICES FROM THE OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR 



Withdrawals 



Boland, William J., EE, HC, April 9 
Chuhran, Gilbert J., Ch, March 18 
Crawford, Margaret M. , LD, April 3 
Goldstein, Edward B., S, April 16 
Manifold, Dean, Ed, April 4 



Of the above, 3 withdrew because of 
illness, 2 to accept positions, 1 to be 



1 Marx, Albert B., IE, AC, April 8 

2 Robb, Harry D., ME, April 11 

3 Serankes, Marion, Ed, April 13 

1 Switzer, Marjorie J., HE, April ! 



married, 1 because of scholarship, 1 be- 
cause admission was cancelled, 1 gave no 
reason. 



(SC 
(HC 
(HC 



Change s of Class if icat ion 

Lawson, Vincent J. — should be Part— Time Sophomore instead of Special, 

Marino, Louis H. — should be Part— Time Sophomore instead of Special. 

Marley, Rosemary T. — should be Part— Time Freshman instead of Special, 

Metter, William S. — should be Part— Time Sophomore in Ceramics instead of Special. 

Tischer, Dorothy S. — should be Part— Time Junior in Education instead of Special, 

Wm» S« Hoffman 
Registrar 



THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 



FACULTY 

Published weekly on Tuesday during the College 
year as a means of making official announcements 
and presenting items of interest to the faculty. All 

VOL. 19 




"^''^-w/// 



April 30, 1940 



BULLETIN 

contributions should be as brief as possible and reach 
Walter F. Dantzscher, Director of Public Information, 
105 Old Main, not later than 10 a.m. each Friday. 

NO. 2 8 



A.A.U.P. INVITES ALL STAFF MEMBERS 
TO DINNER HONORING TRUSTEES 



In order to further t rust ee— faculty 
relationships;, the local chapter of the 
American Association of University Pro- 
fessors is sponsoring a dinner at 7 p t n, 
Friday, May 10, in the Nittany Lion Inn, 



Dr. Elwood C. Davis, president of 
the A.AoU.P., will extend greetings in 
behalf of the Association, and it is ex- 
pected that at least one of the trustees 
will speak. 



Honored guests will be the College 

trustees and their wives u All members of 
the faculty, whether members of the A A, 
U.P. or not, and their wives, as well as 
deans, other administrative officials, 
and their wives, are invited. 

According to Professor F. Theodore 
Struck, general chairman, the affair will 
be informal* The tentative program lists 
Dr« Asa E. Martin as tcastmaster and Pro- 
fessor Hummel Fishburn in charge of the 
Musical pro gram i, 



The sale of tickets will be in charge 
ofesscr Louis H, Bell, of the Depart— 
of Journalism. His committee, in— 
ng a representative of each school, 
be announced at a later date. Those 
ing tickets may secure them from Pro— 
r Bell, any member of his committee, 
the Student Union, Old Main, this 
The price of each ticket will be 



All reservations must be made by next 
Tuesday, May 7 e 



of 


Pr 


me 


nt 


cl 


udi 


wi 


11 


de s ir 


f e s s o 


or 


at 


we 


ek. 


$1 


25 



ANNUAL ALL-COLLEGE EXTEMPORANEOUS SPEAKING CONTEST 
TO BE HELD THIS THURSDAY 



An outgrowth of the more t 
year— old Junior Oratorical Cont 
the Sophomore Extemporaneous Sp 
Contest of later years, the Ann 
College Extemporaneous Speaking 
open to all undergraduates, is 
for this Thursday , evening, May 
Liberal Arts, at 7:30. Two pri 
offered for first and second pi 
Pennsylvania State College Priz 
and the Forensic Council Prize 



ban 50- Topics 

est j and may not incl 
eaking nations, are 
ual All- with Profess 
Contest, office in th 
announced ing, between 
2, in 121 
zes are 
ace : The 
e of $50 
of $25. 



ent 
a t 

cho 

nin 

cli 

ent 

be 

the 

eve 



This evening, April 30, at 7:30, the 
rants will speak for five minutes on 
opic of current interest which they 

e at a preliminary meeting last eve — 

o They will be grouped into six 
mination sections, meeting at differ— 

assigned rooms, and one person will 
chosen from each group to compete for 

two prizes in the finals Thursday 
ning. 



t on or row, We 
the finals a 
ten minutes 
livered with 
debating squ 
test., as are 
except prise 
debate squad 
bate topics 
selected the 



for the 
ude thos 

t o be s 
or Clayt 
e Engl is 

the h o u 
dne sday , 
re to be 
in lengt 
out note, 
ads are 

all pre 

winners 
s , h owe v 
in the f 
ref or » 



final contest 
e used in the 
elected in co 
on H, Schug, 
h Composition 
rs of 10 a«m« 
May 1. Spee 
between eigh 
h^ and are to 
s e Members o 
eligible for 
vious contest 
„ Members of 
er, may not u 
Inals should 



, wh i ch 

elimi— 
nf erence 
in his 
build- 
to noon 
dies for 
t and 

be de — 
f the 
the con- 
ants 
the 
se de — 
they be 



Arrangements for the contest are in 
charge of a committee of the Division of 
Speech composed of Clayton H. Schug, 
chairman^ Mrs. Harriet D. Nesbitt, Ray- 
mond Tyson, and Dennis Weaver. 



COLLEGE LIBRARY TO DIVIDE IIS CATALOG 



Librarians and card catalog users 
have long regarded t.he increasing com- 
plexity cf the dictionary cat a lag -with 
dismay,, In spite of every effort to 
simplify the filing rules, the arrange" 
ment of cards still is complicated due 
to the filing together cf various types 
of entries "beginning with the same or a 
similar word. One suggestion for sim- 
plifying the catalog proposes two divi- 
sions; an author and title catalog and 
a subject catalog,, Among the lihraries 
•which have tried this scheme are those 
of the University of California at Berks* 
ley and the Central State Teachers Col- 
lege at Stevens Point, Wisconsin, 

Some cf the advantages of the di- 
vided catalog are that it will simplify 
the filing; that it will produce a com- 
pact subject catalog, bringing related 
subjects more closely together; and that 
persons using the catalog from a subject 
approach will not hold up those wanting 
to look up a single author or title. 

Recently The Pennsylvania State 
College Library staff voted to try this 
experiment. So that' the physical sepa- 



ration can be made before the library is 
moved into the new building, it was de- 
cided to start on Hay 1 to separate the 
authors and titles and subjects within 
each catalog tray. Blue giiide cards, one 
reading "Authors and Titles" and one read- 
ing "Subjects", will be inserted in each 
tray as it. is dividedo It is hoped that 
the division can be cor. plet ed' before sum- 
mer school begins, and that it can be ac- 
complished with a minimum of inconvenience 
to faculty and students. Tie catalog 
trays will be available to, the public at 
all times during the process of division. 
If at any time anyone has difficulty in 
locating material in the divided trays, 
the catalogers and other staff members 
will be only too glad to assist. 

Since it will take several months 
to make the necessary adjustments, it 
will be some time before the divided cata- 
log can function properly and "before it 
can be given a fair trial, "We do not 
expect the arrangement to solve all the 
problems arising in locating material," 
the announcement states, "but we do hope 
that it will solve some of them and that' 
you will find it easier to' use'," 

* * 



REGISTRATION FOR SUMMER CAMP -AND SUMMER PRACTICUM 



Registration for summer camp and 
summer practicum courses for undergrad- 
uates will take place Thursday and Fri- 
day, May 2 and 3, at the Office of the 
Registrar. This special period has been 
appointed to keep registration for these 
courses separate from second semester 
Aork and to enable departments to make 
preparation for this work. Courses in 
the above category include: Agronomy 14, 
Dairy Husbandry 17, Forestry camp, Geol- 
ogy 70 and 72, Rome Economics 315, Hor- 
ticulture 17, Landscape Architecture 16 



and 17, Mining 60, Poultry Husbandry 9,' 
Surveying 48, Courses of this nature al- 
ready placed on second semester schedules 
have been disregarded, so that registra- 
tion for these courses is necessary May 
2 and 3. Payment cf fees for the summer 
camp and summer practicum courses will be 
made at the Office cf the Bursar Friday, 
May 10 Heads of departments are again re- 
quested to bring this matter to the atten- 
tion of the students who plan to enroll 
in the above courses* 



ADDITIONAL PUBLICATIONS" CONTAINING ARTICLES BY FACULTY MEMBERS 



During the past week faculty mem- 
bers have turned in the names of 13 ad- 
ditional publications to which they have 
contributed during the past seven months^ 
bringing the total so far .to 70, The 
following list includes some magazines 
in which creative literary work has ap- 
peared. Newspaper contributions are, of 
course, excluded; and April magazines 

Agricultural Engineering 

American Anthropologist 

Econcmetrica 

Ice Cream Field 

Journal of Engineering Drawing 

Journal of Political Economy 

Junior College Journal 



have not yet been checkedo In view of 
the number "of responses from faculty 
members since the request was first made 
two weeks -ago., it seems probable that 
the list may be still incomplete. If so, 
kindly send additional Information about 
such contributions to Miss Margaret H, 
Buyers, Department of Public Information, 
105 Old Main, 

Modern Language Journal 

New Republic 

New York Historical Society Quarterly 

Bullet in 
New Yorker 
Partisan Review 
Yale Review 
* » * * 



OF GENERAL INTEREST 



The Franklin Institute of Philadel- 
phia is sending a truck-load of demon- 
stration equipment and two demonstrators 
t o put on their "Traveling Air Show" at 
Schwab Auditorium this Wednesday, May 1, 
at 7:30 p.m. 

The purpose of the exhibit is to 
present in popular form the underlying 
principles of aerodynamics; what makes 
an airplane fly, etc e The exhibit and 
demonstration has been arranged by the 
local section of the American Society of ■ 
Mechanical Engineers, of which Professor 
F. C. Stewart is chairman, and other cam- 
pus groups. There will be no admission 
charge. Faculty members, students, and 
townspeople are invited. 

* * * * * * 

"Ideas for Gardening," the exhibit 
now being held at the Main Library, in- 
cludes colored illustrations of plants 
and flowers and helpful hints on flower 
growing and arranging „ The exhibit will 
continue until May 10 „ 

* * * * * * 

The College Library is glad to an- 
nounce the result of the fifth Students 1 
Own Library Contest. The examining com- 
mittee, consisting of Professors Pauline 
Locklin and J. Burn Heine and the Librar- 
ian, W. Po, Lewis, have awarded the prizes 
of $25 worth of new books each to Charles 
Hand ova, '40, of 111 South Allen Street > 
and John Currier, '42, of 503 East Foster 
Avenue. The two prizes were donated by 
Peeler's Book Store and the College Book 
Store. Mr, Handova's books have been 



displayed in Heeler's window, and Mr a 
Currier's have been displayed in the Col- 
lege Book Store's window,, 

* * * * * * 

The Coller'e Senate will meet this 
Thursday, May 2, in room 121 Liberal Arts; 
at 4:10 p ru, according to an announce- 
ment received from William- S Hoffman, 
secret ary a 

* * * * * * 

Members of the Graduate School fac- 
ulty are again reminded of the meeting 
to be held today, Tuesday, April 30, at 
4:10 p m in room 208 Buckhout Labora- 
tory,, This is an official announcement 
from Dean Frank D, Kern, 

* * * * * * 

The chapel speaker for this Sunday, 
May 5, will be Br » Allan K, Chalmers of 
the Broadway Tabernacle Church, New York. 

* * * * * * 

Sports events this week include the 
following : 

Wedne sday , May 1 

Golf with West Virginia at 2 p o m 
Baseball with Dickinson at 4 p„n. 
Tennis with Bucknell at 4 p.m<, 



iaturday , May 4 



at 2 
p.m. 



P.m. 



Freshman golf with Cornell 
Track with Ohio State at 2 
Freshman baseball with Mercersburg at 
Freshman lacrosse with Cornell at 4 p 
+ * * * * * 



4 p.m. 
m. 



OFFICIAL NOTICES FROM THE OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR 

Withdrawals 

DC Alexander, Joyce L,, Ed, April 17 1 Holmes, John E 09 LD, April 19 
3 Bortner, Ivan A., HE, April 23 1 Rogus, Paul R., EE^, April 9 

2 Forsyth, William R., jr*, ME, March 9 -S Zeigler, Betty A., AL, March 29 

Of the above, 1 withdrew to take a of funds, 1 because of poor scholarship, 
position, 1 because of illness of father, and 1 to be married. 
1 because of illness, 1 because of lack 

Dropped for Poor Sch olar ship • 

Paul R. Rogus, freshman in Electrical Engineering, was dropped from the College 
for poor scholarship on April 23i 

Change s in Classification 

Lamm, Amandon Lee— from Special to Senior in AgEd 
Ogrydziak, John E<>— -from Jr. in Ed. to Soph, in LD 

Change of Name 

Esther Bower Lockhart, Graduate in Home Economics, has changed her name on the 
College records to Esther Weight nan Bower 



Wn S. Hoffman 
Registrar 



&HM4U1 3S53 "^ 






H3HKYH0 



* H SAQV1D SSI 



THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 



FACULTY 

Published weekly on Tuesday during the College 
year as a means of making official announcements 
and presenting items of interest to the faculty. All 




BULLETIN 

contributions should be as brief as possible and reach 
Walter F. Dantzscher, Director of Public Information, 
105 Old Main, not later than 10 a.m. each Friday. 



VOL. 19 



May 7, 1940 



NO. 29 



PENN STATE COLLEGIAN TO BECOME A DAILY 



The newly elected senior managing 
board of the Penn State Collegian has re- 
quested that the faculty and administra- 
tive staff of the College be informed 
through the Faculty Bulletin of the pro- 
posed change in the Collegian from a 
semi-weekly to a daily. 

So that staff members will have full 
knowledge of the background and the pro- 
posed administrative and business setup 
of the Daily Collegian, the Faculty Bul- 
letin is printing the following communi- 
cation received from the 1940-41 editor 
and business manager of the new enter— 
pri se , 

"The Penn State Collegian will be- 
come a five— day— a— week, morning daily 
paper next September pending authoriza- 
tion of the incorporation charter by dis- 
trict courts. 

"With a daily paper the staff of the 
Collegian can naturally increase its ser- 
vice to the College community. If plans 
materialize the Collegian will be a non- 
profit corporation, with a board of di- 
rectors composed of members of the facul- 
ty and administrative officers. A grad- 
uate adviser will be selected to serve as 
a co— ordinator between the undergraduate 
managing board and the Board of Directors. 

"Under the proposed 1940-41 budget, 
$1,000 has been cut from the 'salaries to 
staff* item in the 1939-40 budget, in 
spite of the fact that the daily paper 
will entail additional work and responsi- 
bility on the part of the staff. 

"In the future any additional income 
over the amount anticipated from adver- 
tising and circulation revenue will 'go 
back into the paper,' A sinking fund 
will be established, and new equipment 
will be purchased. As in the past the 
accounting will be directed through the 
Student Union office, and the books 
audited annually by official College audi- 



tors. It is our earnest desire that the 
Collegian will show normal mechanical and 
editorial advancement each year under this 
plan. 



"I 
wi 11 of 
news co 
providi 
portuni 
newswor 
with sp 
s t ru c t i 
Sub scri 
past wi 
ing the 



t i s 
f er a 
1 iimns 
ng tb 
ty to 
thy i 
ace f 
ons t 
p t i o n 
th th 
same 



hoped 
solut 
of th 

e f acu 
secur 

tern 

or 

o the 

s will 

e year 
excep 



the 



that the Daily Collegian 
ion to the overcrowded 
e semi-weekly' paper, 
Ity with, additional op— 
e the publication of 
and the administration 

release of timely in— 
faculty and student body. 

be solicited as in the 
ly rate of $2,50 remain— 
t for mail subscriptions. 



"The incorporators 
will be: Professor Fran 
head of the Department o 
Russell E. Clark, Colleg 
Donald W. Davis, of the 
Journalism; C. Russell L 
ness manager of the Coll 
Fleming, graduate treasu 
activities} Professor Br 
of the Department of Jou 
Riley, of the Department 
tion; and Arthur R. Warn 



of the new venture 

klin C. Banner, 

f Journalism; 

e Bursar; Professor 

Department of 

ck, 1939-40 busi- 

egian; Neil M, 

rer of student 

aton P., Gardner, 

rnalism; Hugh R, 

of Public Informa- 
ock, Dean of Men. 



"The above group will serve as a tem- 
porary Board of Directors until the court: 
approve the charter. At that time the 
Directors will be named, including five 
student members, among these to be the 
editor, the business manager, and the 
woman's editor of the Collegian; and ap- 
proximately nine members of the faculty 
and administrative staff of the College, 

"The senior managing board of the 
Collegian earnestly solicits the support 
of the faculty in this enterprise which 
will give The Pennsylvania State College 
a student daily paper commensurate with 
its size and prestige In the academic 
world," 

Adam A. Smyser Lawrence S. Driever 
Editor Business Manager 



MINUTES OF THB SENATE MEETING OF MAY 2 



.940 



President Hetzel presided at the Sen- 
ate meeting Thursday afternoon, May 2. 
The following senators were elected for 
the academic year 1940-41: ' School of Ag- 
riculture, M. A Farrellj Jo E, Nicholas, 
H. A. Wahl, E I. Vvilde; School cf Chem- 
istry and Physics, B „ S. Cryder, D. C. 
Duncan, 0. F, Smith, M. W, White; School 
of Education, Miss Jean Amberson, Miss 
Phyllis Spraguc, Carroll D. Champlin, 
C. 0. Williams; School of Engineering, 
M # M. Babcock, C. L. Harris, J. E. Kaul- 
fuss, F, C, Stewart; School cf the Liber- 
al Arts, T, D a Bowman, P. R, Baugherty, 
I B M. Sheffer, G. J. Wurfl; School of 
Mineral Industries, W, M, Fuchs, D. C» 
Jones, J. A Taylor, E fc J t Teichert; 
School of Physical Education and Athlet- 
ics, E. C, Davis, E „ C. Bischoff, Miss 
Marie Haidt, J, D. Lawtherj Graduate 
School, A. E, Martin^ H. M» Davis, L c A. 
Doggett, J, B. Helme, Senators who will 
represent deans who are department heads 
are: H» W. Popp for Dean Kern, Ivalclare 
S, Rowland for Dean Schott. 

An exception to the residence rule 
was granted on the recommendation of the 
Committee on Academic Standards for Miss 
Eileen Hatfield. 

A report from the Committee on Cour- 
ses of Study presented at the April meet- 
ing and .a new report containing new ma- 
terial and corrections to the April re- 
port were presented by the chairman, Pro- 
fessor Kinsloe, The Registrar pointed 
out that new courses included in Engi- 
neering curricula for the sophomores, 
juniors, and seniors were not sett up in 
the report as new courses, nor are the 
descriptions on file in his office. After 
considerable discussion the motion to 
adopt the two reports as presented by Pro- 
fessor Kinsloe was withdrawn and a motion 
to approve the two reports, with the ex- 
ception of the upper three years in the 
School of Engineering^ was adopted. Pro- 
fessor Kinsloe announced that the de- 
scription for tne new courses would be 
presented at the June meeting of the Sen- 
ate at which time action could also be 
taken for the three upper years of the 
curricula in the School of Engineering. 
These rep.orts are on file in the Office 
of the Registrar. 

Dr. Dye, chairman of the Committee 
on Rules, presented a report recommending 
changes in the regulations for undergrad- 
uate students insofar as they refer to 
absences before and after vacations. The 
report contained th <s fallowing recommenda- 
tions: 

A. That the following regulations be sub- 
stituted for those now numbered 58 to 64 
inclusive in the Regulati ons for Under- * 
Graduate Students edition of 1939—40: 



58. All students are expected to attend 
to their assigned work until the beginning 
of scheduled vacation periods and to re- 
port promptly at the end of such periods. 
A student who is absent from a scheduled 
class during the 48 bourn preceding or 
succeeding the Thanksgiving, Christmas, 

or Easter vacation shall incur a special 
fee of $5. 

59. In the application of the foregoing 
rule, inspection trips scheduled just be- 
fore or just after vacations shall be con- 
sidered as regular classes, 

60 • No instructor has the right to dis- 
miss any student before the end of the 
class hour during this 48— hour period, ex- 
cept that he may follow his established 
practice^ if there be such, of permitting 
students to leave the class upon. the com- 
pletion of the assigned work for the class 
period. 

61. It shall be the duty of each instruc- 
tor to report, on special blanks, all ab- 
sences from his classes during the 43— hour 
period just before or/and just after the 
Thanksgiving, Christmas, and Easter vaca- 
tions to the Accounting Division of the 
College. All students who are reported 
absent will be assessed the $5 fee. 

62, Appeals from the application of the 
special fee must be submitted promptly in 
writing, accompanied by sufficient evi- 
dence, to a special committee composed of 
th« Bursar, the Director of the College 
Health Service, the Dean of Men, and the 
Dean cf Women. 

63. The committee named in section 62 is 
hereby empowered to establish or to change, 
from time to time) administrative practices 
for carrying these provision into effect 

so that the operation of the system may be 
■impartial, effective^ and just. 

B. After "these regulations shall have been 
adopted by the Senate, the Committee rec- 
ommends that the Senate request that the 
Board of Trustees be asked to approve the 
following statement; 

64, All money collected from the applica- 
tion of rules 58 to 63 inclusive shall be 
placed in the Student Loan Fund. 

C, In order that the Senate may be in- 
formed from time to time of the efficacy 
of the rules now proposed, it is further 
recommended by your committee that a spec- 
ial committee of the faculty be appointed : 
whose duty it shall be to observe and ap- 
praise the workings of the system and re- 
port its findings to the Senate. 

In accordance with Senate procedures 
the recommendations were tabled for con- 



si deration at the meeting in June, 

A special committee appointed by the 
President to study the organization of 
the Senate presented, through its chair- 



man , 



the following 



iport 



During the pro; sent school year your 



committee 



held three meetings 



at 



which 'it has given careful consideration 
to various proposals presented to it by 
members of the faculty and to the results 
of the questionnaire which it sent to a 
representative group of colleges and uni- 
versities. Despite comparatively little" 
open criticism of the efficiency of the 
Senate your committee finds an undercur- 
rent of discontent arising largely from 
three sources; first, the undemocratic 
basis of representation in the Senate; 
second, the almost total absence of dis- 
cussion of questions of educational pol- 
icy on the floor of the Senate; and third ; 
the lack of any other body, such as a 
General Faculty, where the opinions of 
individual faculty members can find ex- 
pression, 



ate h 

mini s 

d e p a r 

sever 

membe 

by vi 

so ha 

t ion 

P r o v o 

spiri 

over, 

tioii 

undel 

ings 

tunit 

tens 

lower 



As constituted at present, the Gen- 
ial 104 members, of whom 28 are ad- 
;trative officers, 44 are heads of 
tments, and 32 are elected by the 
al faculties. Thus 72 of the 104 
rs hold their seats in the Senate 
rtue of administrative positions and 
ve indefinite tenure* This situa— 
is obviously undemocratic and is not 
cative of an alert, progressive 
t in the faculty as a whole « liore — 
many, including a considerable por~ 



itself, feel that the 



of the Senat < 

iberative character of the proceed— 
of the Senate and the lack of oppor— 
y for discussion of educational mat- 
in any other official body tend to 
the morale of the faculty. 



After a careful cons 
these and other minor cri 
study of the organization 
versities, your committee 
the questions involved go 
cific powers vested in it 
it is of the opinion that 
tion of the legislative m 
institution involves more 
and should be presented t 
ulty for discussion in an 
called for that purpose, 
therefore, recommends tl: 
be requested to call a me 
ulty early next fall for 
of views on the legislati 
The Pennsylvania State Co 
more, it suggests that as 
cussion the following pro 
others be presented for c 
without endorsement; 



i d e r a t i on of 
ticisms and a 
in other uni— 
believes that 
beyond the spe — 
„ Furthermore, 

this whole ques- 
achinery of the 

than the Senate 
o the entire fac- 
open meeting 
Your committee, 
at the President 
eting of the fac- 
a full exchange 
ve machinery of 
liege. Further— 
a basis of dis- 
posals among 
onsideration 



1. The substitution for the present Sen- 
ate of a General Faculty composed of all 
member's of the staff of professorial rank, 



2, The establishment of two bodies: a 
General Faculty to meet at stated inter- 
vals to discuss matters of policy; and a 
snail admi:ii s tra tive group known as an 
Administrative Council or a Senate with 
a somewhat smaller and more democratic 
organization than that of the present 
Senate » 

3 e The reorganization of the Senate by 
making one or more of the following 
changes in its composition and procedure: 



(a) 
from 

(D) 

b e r s . 

(c) 

Senat 
basis 
ever y 

(a) * 

excep 
t r a t i 
basis 

(*) 

membe 
ye ar s 

stand 
membe 
or no 



Deduce the number of representatives 
the administrative staff „ 



Increase the number 



elective men- 



Select the elective members of the 
e on a proportional representative 
, as for example on senator for 

10 members of the faculty. 
Select all members of the Senate,, 
t the 28 members from the Adminis— 
on, on a proportional representative 
a 

Increase the tenure of the elective 
rs of the Senate from one to three 

o 

Throw open the membership of all 
ing committees of the Senate to all 



th- 



s t a f f . wh e t h e r senat o r s 



re 

ia 
on 

P° 
pi- 
th 
ic 

of 

og 
in 



.lie recommendation of the committee 
iting the President to call a spec— 



ting 



the 



acuity next fall wa ; 



adopted. Attached to the re- 



I 
que s 
1 me- 
mo tion 

rt were mimeographed sheets showing the 
esent representation of the Senat 
r z p o 
e Un 

Vi 



and 



rro 

the 

raph 

the 



rt of a Committee of the Faculty of 
iversity of Washington on Democrat— 
cedure in the Faculty. The report 
committee, together with the mime — 



ed sheets referred to, is 
Office of the Registrar,. 



on file 



recei 

from 
of th 
Hay 1 
dated 
on tli 
mem.be 
Miner 

Oil ± b 

membe 



The Secretary announced that he had 
ved from Dean Steidle an excerpt 
the minutes of the faculty meeting 
e School of Mineral Industries for 
, 193 9, together with a statement 

April 20, 1940, a committee report 
e method of choosing the elective 
rs of the Senate for the School of 
al Industries, It was moved that 
report be mimeographed and sent to 
rs of the Senate. 



Under the head of old business the 
report of the Committee on Rules, as pre- 
sented at the April meeting of the Senate, 
was on motion adopted,, The report of the 
committee is printed on the fourth page 
of the issue of the Faculty Bulletin for 
April 16, 1940. 

Under the head of new business Dean 
Kern presented certain regulations as 
recommenda tions to the Senate by the 
Graduate School faculty. The recommenda- 
tions are as follows: 



(l) That the following requirement — 

"Residence requirements may be met 
by 24 credits earned in two semesters, or 



in one seme ster 
Sessions, or in 
s i c n s " 



and 12 we 
24 weeks 



eks in Summer 
in Summer Ses- 



he amended to read as follows: 

"Residence requirements may he met 
hy 30 credits earned in two semesters, or 
in one semester and 15 weeks in Summer 
Sessions, or in 30 vre±s in Summer Se s- 
s ions." 

(2) That the provision that six credits 
earned in another approved institution, 
or in the extension classes of The Penn- 
sylvania State College, may be offered in 
partial fulfillment of the credit require- 
ments be changed to three credits. The 
amended regulation would read as follows: 

"Candidates presenting credits earned 
in other approved institutions, or in ex- 
tension classes of The Pennsylvania State 
College, may thus secure advanced standing 
up to three credits provided they complete 
the work for the degreee in two semesters, 
one semester and 12 vreeks in Summer Ses- 
sions, or in 27 weeks in Summer Sessions, 
The credits must have the approval of the 
Examiner, must fit into the program of the 
student, and must come within the period 



allowed for candidacy," ' | ; 

Revisions are to be effective for 
students admitted after publication in the | 
next Announcement of the Graduate School 
(1941-42) and the next Summer Session An- 
noucement (1941), It is understood that 
the former regulation is operative for 
students previously registered who have 
six credits previously earned. 

In accordance with Senate regulations! 
this recommendation, which is on file in 
the Office of the Registrar, was tabled 
for consideration at the June meeting of 
the Senate, 

Dr, Tanger, chairman of the Committee 
on Academic Standards, presented the fol- 
lowing recommendation : 

It is recommended to the College Sen- 
ate that the same minimum requirements for 
a second bachelor's degree be enforced as 
are required for the first bachelor's de- 
gree at The Pennsylvania State College, 
and that the period of residence for the 
two bachelor's degrees may not run concur- 
rently. 

This action was' referred to the Com- 
mittee on Rules and will be considered by 
the Senate at the June meeting, 

Wm, S. Hoffman 
Secretary 



ATTENTION OF FACULTY MEMBERS IS CALLED TO NEW ADMISSION REdUIREMENTS 



The attention of members of the fac- 
ulty and especially that of the depart- 
ment heads is called to the fact that 
admission requirements for students who 
transfer to us from other institutions 
have been changed since March, 1940, Al- 
though a few students were admitted in 
recent years with one unremoved failure, 
in view of their otherwise good scholas- 
tic record, applicants from now on, who 
have attended other institutions and wish 
to transfer here, are not eligible for 
admission if there is a' single unremoved 



condition or failure in their record or 
if they are en scholastic probation at 
another institution,. All questions re- 
garding the admission of advanced stand- 
ing students should continue to be re- 
ferred to the College Examiner as in the 
past. However, it was felt that members 
of the faculty might desire the above 
information so that they could suggest 
to the applicants who write to them that 
it would be inadvisable to apply for ad- 
mission unless their scholastic records 
were entirely satisfactory,, 



OFFICIAL NOTICES FROM TEE OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR 

Withdrawals 



2 Bush, Paul E., ChE, April 24 
2 Culver, John L,, Met, April 16 
1 Cousins, Roy L., IE, April 30 

Of the above 2 left because of poor 
scholarship, 1 because of insufficient 



3 Kazmicrski, Anthony S., ME, April 9 

1 Laughlin, Harold K,, AC, April 22 

Schultz, Norman S., 1st year, April 30 

interest in college, 1 for financial rea- 
sons, 1 to accept employment, 1 had no 
reasons , 



Additional Dismissal 



1 Brachbill, Charles S,. Cer dropped for poor scholarship 

Wm. S. Hoffman 
Red"i strar 



OF GENERAL INTEREST 

The deadline for reservations to the The Dairy Exposition -will be held in 

faculty-trustee dinner at the Nittany the Stock Judging Pavilion this Saturday 

Lion Inn this Friday evening, May 10, has afternoon, May ll e A special invitation 

been advanced two days, according to Pro- is extended to members of the faculty and 

fessor F e Theodore Struck, general chair- their families, 

man of the affair. Members of the facul- ** ** ** 
ty 'and administrative officials may obtain 

tickets for the dinner, which is sponsored Miss Clair Danker, president of the 

by the local chapter of the American Asso- Penn State chapter of Delta Sigma Rho, 

ciation of University Professors, until would like all faculty and staff members 

May 9, of the College who are members of that 

organization to notify her of their mem- 
Tickets, which are priced at $1.25, bership (phone 4303) as soon as possible, 
are available at the Student Union, Old ** ** ** 
Main, according to Professor Louis H, 

Bell, in charge of the ticket sale, They Dean Frank D, Kern announces the fol— 
may also be obtained from the following lowing final examinations for the doctor- 
members of the faculty: ate: 

William C. Bramble, Department of Forestry Mr, Ralph Woodard Reuse, D.Ed degree, 

Julia G, Brill r Department of English Thursday, May 9, at 2 p.m. in room 13 

Composition Education Building a 

Henry L, Yeagley, Department of Physics 

Eugen C. Bischoff, School of Physical Mr, Harold W, Weigel, Ph.D, degree in 

Education and Athletics German, Thursday, May 9, at 1:30 p m, in 

Francis E, Hyslop, Department of Archi- room 407 Old Main, 

tecture ** ** ** 

Carroll D, Champlin, Department of Educa- 
tion and Psychology Sports events this week include the 

Louis H. Bell, Department of Journalism following: 

The dinner, which has been planned Vfedne sday , May _8 
to further trustee— faculty relationships, 

will be informal. Members of the faculty Freshman tennis with Gettysburg J . V . 4 p e m, 
and' staff, whether they are members of 

the A.A.U.P. or not, and their wives are Friday , May 10 
invited, 

** ** ** Tennis with Susquehanna, 4 p.m. 

Members of the faculty and graduate Saturday ,, Ma y 11 
students who wish to rent or purchase 

academic costumes for June Commencement Freshman track with Cornell, 2 p,n„ 

may place their orders with G „ J. Stout, Freshman baseball with Cornell, 2:30 p. in, 

room 2 Horticulture, Rental orders may Lacrosse with Lehigh^ 4 p m 

be placed by phone £ Early ordering will * * ** ** 
avoid unnecessary expense or delays. Mr. 

Stout is the successor of Dr. C. E u Myers, Faculty members have turned in the 

who formerly handled orders for academic names of three additional magazines to 

costumes, which they have contributed: the Journal 

of Negro History, the Scottish Geographi- 

Dr, Myers has given all profits from cal Magazine, and the American Midland 

the enterprise either to the local Chris- Naturalist, This brings the total to 73 
tian Association or to a student loan 
fund, 

** ** ** * * # * * * 

Mother's Day services and Scholar- Dr. Henry H, Tweedy, of the Yale Uni- 

ship Day exercises will be held this Sun- versify Divinity School, will be the speaker 

day, May 12, at 10:30 a.m, in Recreation in chapel this Sunday, May 12, Mother's Day 
Hall. 

** ** ** ** * * * * 

SCHOOL OF EDUCATION FACULTY TO MEET ■ 

The School of Education faculty will Hawaiian Islands" and Mr. Rafael Burgos- 
meet in 209 Home Economics Monday, May Maoias will discuss "Education in Puerto 
13, at 4:10 p.m. Professor Fred E, Arm- Rico." 
strong will speak on "Education in the 



4 
:3S GLADYS R. C RANKER 



)1 1 ege Library 



THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 



FACULTY 



Published weekly on Tuesday during the College 
year as a means of making official announcements 
and presenting items of interest to the faculty. All 

VOL. 19 




ay 14, 1940 



BULLETIN 

contributions should be as brief as possible and reach 
Walter F. Dantzscher, Director of Public Information, 
105 Old Main, not later than 10 a.m. each Friday. 

NO. 30 



DOCKING DIP? j'CULTIES TO KEEP ARTISTS' COURSE FROM TWO-NIGHT EXPERIMENT 



Despite efforts to book num- 
bers for the 1940-41 Artists' 
Course months before they have 
been booked for any previous se- 
ries, the Ar t i s t s '• Ceur s c Oommi t - 



finding it impossible to 



tee is 

schedule attractions of the reeui- 
site outstanding calibre for tv;o 
successive evenings. 

In making this announcement, 
jr. Carl E, karquardt, committee 
chairman, indicated that such at- 
tractions as Rachmaninoff and the 
E o s t o n S ymph o ny O r c h c s t r a v/erc al- 
ready booked up early in April for 
the full season next year and were 
unavailable for even a single per- 
formance . 



''Because of the unavailabil- 
o f o u t s t a n d i n o n umb c r s on a 



i ty 

two -n i gh t s ' ba sis," Dr . f ".ar qua r d t 
stated, "the committee has found 
it necessary to abandon this plan 
for the next series. If we arc to 
put it into effect for the year 
f o 1 1 owi no , it s c ems 1 i ke 1 y that we 
shall have to plan and book oar 
series two years in advance- in or- 
der to obtain really outstanding 
talent. 

11 In reaching the decision to 
abandon the plan to have the course 
on consecutive evenings, the com- 
mittee has f e 1 1 t h at it w o u 1 d b e 
more acceptable to present and po- 
tential subscribers to have top- 
notch attractions for one night 
rather than inferior numbers for 
two or more nights. 

"Our inability to double our 



sea t i ng capac i ty at thi s t i me i s 
as much a disappointment to mem- 
bers of the committee as it will 
be to many of our present sub- 
scribers. Y.'e thought we had in 
the two nights' plan a practical 
solution to the elimination of 
congestion at the ticket windows 
and a means of alleviating the dis- 
appointment that has" followed an 
early sellout in recent years. 

"As a result, we shall again 
be faced with the necessity of a- 
dapting the circumstances of our 
sponsorship to our continually in- 
creasing patronage, but wc arc hop- 
ing to increase our capacity by 
approximately 140 by the use of 
stage scats as suggested by the 
Krcisler management on this year's 
course • " 



and 
wi th 
on n 
met 
for 
ing 
type 
to s 
it i 



The newly appoint 
its sub-committee 

the final sclecti 
ext year's course 
a number of times. 
the next scries is 



.p< 



In order t 



of attractions wh 
ubscribers en last 
s vcrv likely that 



'or talent will have t 



o d CO 

entru 
or. of 
have 
The 
rapi 
o obt 
i ch a 
year 
the 
o be 



mm i 1 1 e c 
s ted 

numbers 
al ready 

program 
dly tak- 
a i n the 
ppcaled 
' s ecu r se 
budget 
increased. 



'Thi 



"wi 1 1 
i acre 



said Dr. karouardt, 



se in the 
for next year ' s 



:ry probably entail a slight 



price o: 
ser i es • 



■ ts 



The present committee includes 
the following representatives of 
faculty and town, the appointment 
of student members having been 



delayed until the outcome of the 
student elections: Miss Jessie 
Cameron, Messrs, K. 



F. Pantzscher, 



. Brunner, 
P. Davey, 



Hummel Fishbnrn, N. M. Fleming, 
B. K. Johnstone, A. 0. Morse, Ed- 
ward Steidle, W. K. Ulerich, and 
V. L. Werner. 



ORIGINAL ETCHINGS BY REMBRANDT AIID HIS CONTEMPORARIES TO BE EXHIBITED 



A grou 
ings by the 
artist, Rem 
poraries, t 
at the Coll 
of the most 
son. These 
from the co 
quired by W 
This is the 
travel ino e 



p of 48 original etch- 

17th century Dutch 
brandt, and his cent em- 
he current exhibition 
ege Art Gallery, is one 
important of the sea- 
have been borrowed 
llection recently ac- 
es ley an University. 

first showing of the 
xhi bi t i on. 



There are 12 etchings by Rem- 
brandt himself, including the fa- 
mous sel f-portrai t "Drawing at a 
Window" and "The Raising of Laza- 



rus," together with some rare land- 
scapes. Other artists represented 
are Rubens, VanDyck, Ruisdael, Ri- 
bera (three rare prints), Paul Pot- 
ter, etc. 

The Division of Fine Arts is 
proud of this opportunity to show 
so many original works of art to 
the State College audience. 

The exhibition will be open 
daily except Sunday from 8:30 a.m. 
to 8:50 p.m. in 303 Main Engineer- 
ing, until next Tuesday, May 21, 
The public is cordially invited. 



Y OBSERVES 500th PRINTING ANNIVERSARY 



• The 500th anniversary of the 
art of printing from movable 'type 
is now on display at the Main Li-" 
brary. Rare old volumes 'published 
in Pennsylvania, Fenn State mater- 
ial, and qua i nt pamph lets as we 1 1 
as books from local presses are 
shown in' the cases.' Among rare 
books from local presses are Ben- 
jamin Franklin's General Magazine 
and Historical Chronicle, T)er 
Hoch-Deutsch Amer icani sche Calen- 
dar for 1759 and the Zionitischer 
Weyrauchs Hiigel printed by Chris- 
topher Saur at Germantown, and 
Der Blutigc Schau-Platz, oder 



M&rtyrer-Spiegel , one of the most 
important and interesting books 
from the Ephrata press. 

Also included are facsimiles 
of the Bay Psalm Bool:, the Guten-' 
berg Bible, Indian Treaties printed 
by Franklin from 1736 to 1762, and 
the Stuttgart Psalter. 

Of special interest to those 
connected with the College are ear- 
ly reports, catalogues, and records 
of The Pennsylvania State College 
when it was known as The Farmers 
High School 4 



OFFICIAL NOTICES FROM THE OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR 

Wi thdrawals 



S Broderick, John J., IndEd, May 7 

Claypoole, Harold PI,, 1st year, March 20 

3 Megargee, Thomas 0., PEd, April 10 

3 Snyder, Charles P., EE, April '26 

2 Stark, Richard D., CF, April 15 



Of the above, three withdrew 
on account of illness,' one to ac- 



cept a job, and 
poor health. 



one on account of 

Wm. S. Hoffman 
Reg istrar 



NOTICE TO ALL MEMBERS OF THE TEACHING STAFF 

The Senate, at 'its meeting of in the Faculty Bulletin edition of 

October 5, 1939, approved certain the minutes on October 10, 1949, 
recommendations concerning final 

examinations and the calendar. In accordance with the above 

Included in these recommendations action the College Scheduling Offi- 

v/as the following: cer, L'r. Uatkins, scheduled final 

examination periods for all lecture 

FINAL EXAMINATION PERIODS FOR and recitation courses without 

ALL LECTURE AND RECITATION COURSES calling upon department heads for 

SHALL BE USED EITHER FOR FINAL EX- a list of those subjects in which 

AMI NAT IONS OR FOR OTHER TYPES' OF they might prefer to have given 

CLASSROOM WORK. examinations. 

This regulation was approved This notice is published under 
at the meeting in June, 1939, and, the direction of the Council of Ad- 
as indicated above, was adopted ministration as a result of a motion 
October 5, 1339. It was printed adopted at a meeting Monday, Lay 5. 



r. PT'TfT 



uL INTEREST 



Dr. Pauline Beery Mack will Dean Frank. D. Kern announces 

speak on ''Evaluating Nutritional the following final examinations 

Status in Human Beings" at 8 p.m. for the Ph.D. degree: 
th i s Fr i day , May 17, in r o cm 1 Z 1 

Liberal Arts. This is the first Mr. Anthony C. Richer, a^ri- 
of a series of annual popular lee- cultural biochemistry, room 212 
tures sponsored by Iota Sigma Pi, Agricultural Building, Z p.m. to- 
national women's chemistry honor- day, Tuesday, Lay 14. 
ary, Faculty members and their 

friends are invited, Mr. Sydney Archer, chemistry, 

-x--;i- -:';-!!- -:;--::-• 105 Fond Laboratory, 9:30 a.m. to- 
morrow, Wednesday, May 15. 

Miss Helen Loui se* Rei dy, blind 
lyric soprano, will give a concert Mr. R. B. Greenburg, chemis- 

this Thursday, May IS, at 3 p.m. try, 105 Fond Laboratory, 3 p.m. 

in Schwab Auditorium under the aus- next Monday, Lay 20. 
pices of the All-College Cabinet, 

for the benefit of the student Mri Raymond Ei Culbertson, 

loan fund. Miss Reidy- is a grad- hort i cul ture> room 2D Horticulture 

uate of the Elmira school of music Building, Z p.m. next Tuesday, I, 'ay 

and has received favorable comment 21, 

from a large number of discrimi- -::•-::- -"--"- -::--::- 

nating music critics* 

The chapel speaker for next 

Tickets for the concert will Sunday, May 19, will be Rabbi Ler- 

be on sale at Student Union until ris S. Lazaron of Baltimore. 
5 p.m. on the day of the perform- . .. -::--:;- -a::- -::--:;- 

ance. Admission is 50^, There 

will be no reserved seats. ■ v - Two events arc on the sports 

'■'-'■'- -5c-" -::--::- • calendar for this week: 

Faculty members have turned ■■ Saturday , May 18 

in the names cf three more period- • ■ 

icals containing their work: In- Track with Syracuse at Z p.m. 
dus trial Arts and Vocational Edu- 
cation, South Carolina Education, Monday, May 2C 
and Zeitschrift der Instrumenten- 
kunde. This makes the total 76. Tennis with Syracuse at 4 p.m. 



-.- i 



*3HN¥H0-H SAQV1S S S I M 



THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 



FACULTY 

Published weekly on Tuesday during the College 
year as a means of making official announcements 
and presenting items of interest to the faculty. All 

VOL. 19 




May 21, 1940 



BULLETIN 

contributions should be as brief as possible and reach 
Walter F. Dantzscher, Director of Public Information, 
105 Old Main, not later than 10 a.m. each Friday. 



NO. 



31 



NEW LIMITS TO BE PLACED ON ARTISTS' COURSE TICKET SALE 



In view of the inabili 
book high quality numbers o 
year's Artists' Course for 
consecutive nights and thus 
lievc the disappointment an 
gestion that resulted durin 
current year when the cours 
out within four hours, the 
Course Committee at its mee 
last week again considered 
whole matter of the ticket 
and v/ays and means of elimi 
practices which have kept s 
students and faculty member 
obtaining seats. 



ty to 

n next 
two 

re- 
el con- 
g the 
e sold 
Art i sts' 
t ing 
the 
sale 
nat ing 
one 
s from 



After a discussion of methods 
of selling seats in which many 
members of the committee partici- 
pated, it was finally decided that 
there was no way of handling the 
ticket sale which would be less 
objectionable than the plan used 
last year. The committee was con- 
scious of the criticism which had 
been levelled at this method of 
sals, but several spokesmen point- 
sd out that after much public par- 
ticipation in the discussion of 
alternatives, no satisfactory and 
practicable solution had been 
found. The need for such a solu- 
n will be even more pressing 



ti o 

next season, the committee appeared 

to 

now 



to have even more popular appeal 
than those on last year's course. 

Considering this expected in- 
creased demand, the committee 
adopted a regulation limiting the 
number of seats which might be 
bought by any faculty member or 
his proxy to four. At the sugges- 
tion of the student members of the 
committee, and to assure the stu- 
dent body of the greatest possible 
opportunity to purchase tickets 
within the seats allocated to them, 
students have been restricted to a 
maximum of two seats. The abuse 
of the privilege of buying six tick' 
ets is believed to have placed stu- 
dent seats in the hands of out-of- 
towners at the expense of other mem- 
bers of the study body. 



believe, because the numbers 
under consideration arelikelv 



Pres 

six stude 
tec this 
than the 
fore. Th 
no Id Laic 
W. B. Bar 
seni or c 1 
pres i dent 
Smyser, e 
W. R. Her 
I.M.A.; a 
of the I 



ident Hetzel has 
nt members to the 
spring. This is 
students have eve 
e' student members 
h, all -Col lege pr 
tholomew, preside 
ass; Elinor L. We 
of the W.S.G.A.; 
di tor' of The Col 1 
rmann, president 
nd H. E. Wagner, 
F .C • 



appointed 

commi t- 
two more 
r had be- 
are: Ar- 
es ident ; 
n t of the 
aver, 

Adam' 
eg ian; 
of the 
pres i dent 



MAY 29 FINAL DATE FOR ORDERING ACADEMIC COSTUMES 



The final date for faculty 
and graduate students to place 
purchase or rental orders for aca- 
demic costumes for June Commence- 



2°> 



ment will be Wednesday, May 
Rental orders may be placed by 
telephoning G. J. Stout, Horti- 
culture Bu i 1 d i nq • 



OF GENERAL INTEREST 



There will be a joint meeting 
of the Mathematics Club and members 
of the Department of Physics this 
Thursday, May 23, at 7:30 p.m. in 
room 5 Liberal Arts; The subject 
for discussion will be "The Teach- 
ing of Mathematics and Physics 
Courses . " 



be put into effect for the coming 
final examination week, because 
neither space nor filing cabinets 
are available in the present li- 
brary setup. However, the file 
will be made available shortly af- 
ter the Library moves into its new 
quarters • 



The faculty of the School of 
Ag r i c u 1 1 u r e wi 1 1 me e t F r i d ay , M ay 
31, at 4:10 p.m." in room 109 Agri- 
culture Building, according to an 
official announcement from Dean 
S . w" . Fletcher, 



Dean Frank D. Kern announces 
the following final examinations 

for the doctorate: 



I hope that those of you who 
have sent copies of former final 
examinations will arrange to send 
a copy of the coming final examina- 
tions, and that those of you who 
have not will do so after examina- 
tion week is over. They should be 
addressed to Miss Frear, Reference 
Librarian, Lain Library, who has 
kindly consented to collect them 
until such time as they can be 
made avai lable . 



Mr, Raymond E. Culbertson, 
Ph.D. in horticulture, 2 p.m. to- 
day, Tuesday, May 21, in room 2D 
Horticulture Building. 

Mr. Carl S. Miner, Ph.D. in 
chemistry, 3 p.m. tomorrow, Wed- 
nesday, May 22, in 105 Pond Labor' 
atory. 



David F inkle, Chairman 
Examination File Committee 



The chapel speaker for this 
Sunday, May 26, will be Dr. Frank 
King don, president of the Univer- 
sity of Newark, 



Miss Edna A. Bottorf, D.Ed., 
2 p.m. this Thursday, May 23, in 
room 20 Education Building. 

Mr. John L. Barnhart, Ph.D. 
in dairy husbandry, 9 a.m. this 
Saturday, May 25, in room 202 
Dai ry Bui lding . 



Sports events this week in- 
clude the following: 

Wednesday , May 22 

Baseball with Susquehanna, 4 p.m. 
Freshman baseball vi'th Mont Alto, 

4 p.m. 



Mr, S. C. Schuman, Ph.D. in 
chemistry, 3 p.m. next Tuesday, 
May 28, in 105 Pond Laboratory. 



T o Facu 1 ty Member s : 

I should again like to thank 
those of you who have co-operated 
in the organization of the 'examina- 
tion file. Up to this t i me 21 de - 



'riday, May 24 



partments' have contributed 
aminati ons. 



10? 



e x ■ 



P. I. A. A. golf, 1 p.m. 

Saturday , May Z5 

P . I i A i A j golf, 9 a , m i 

P. I. A. A. track, 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. 

Freshman baseball with Wyoming 

Seminary, 12:30 p.m. 
Freshman lacrosse with Penn, 2 p.m. 
Dual track meet with Navy, 2 p.m. 
Baseball with Muhlenberg, 3 p.m. 



It is unfortunate that the 
plan of allowing students to re- 
view theses examinations will not 



There will be two more issues 
of The Faculty Bulletin this year. 



HENRY VARNUM POOR EXHIBITION OPENS TOMORROW 



Through the courtesy of Mr. 
>nry Varnum Poor and his .dealer, 
e Rehn Gallery of New 'York, the 
Allege Art Gallery .is enabled to 
iow a special exhibition of" Or . 
)or's work during the next 10 
ivs . 

The exhibition is sponsored 
the Division of Fine Ar t s of 
le Department of Architecture and 
11 consist of a section devoted 

preliminary studies in pencil 

id color fcr the Penn State mural 

>w in progress, including some of 



MOVIE ON THE MAKING OF A 

A ruction picture entitled 
'he Technique of Fresco fainting'' 

being civen everv evening this 
e] 
le 



;, Gay 20 to 25 inclusive, in 
basement "auditor i urn' 1 ' of the 



[liege Book Store, 129 West Reav- 
Avemie. Miss Hartley Fletcher, 
struct or in fine arts, will make 
:planatory comments durinc the 
inning oi the film, which is to 

shown twice nightly, at 7:30 
d 8 p.m. 

Produced by the WPA, the film 
rtrays each stage in the evclu- 
on of a fresco; ingredients of 
c plaster and paints, the first 
tctches and their transfer to 
ale cartoons, tracing, perfora- 
on, powdering the outline' on 
e wall, mixing the pastor, its 
)p 1 i ca t i on to the wa 11, the ar - 
t painting the picture day by 



Mr. Poor's Pennsylvania sketches 
made in the autumn of 1939. An- 
other section will consist of 
various pictures by Mr ♦•Poor, done 
during the past several years. 

The exhibition will begin to- 
morrow, Wednesday, Gay 22, and will 
continue through Saturday, June 1. 

The Gallery, room 303 Main 
Engineering, will be open daily ex- 
cept Sunday from 8:30 a.m. until 
6:30 p.m. The public is cordially 
invited. 



FRESCO TO BE SHOWN THIS WEEK 



j f 



md the completed mural in 
f i lm was made 
Evander Ch I 1 ds 

dur ing 



da 

technicolor. The 

in the 1 i brary of 

High School, New York City, 

a WPA art project. 



The film, sponsored by the 
College Book Store, is presented 
for the purpose of enlightening 
those who have gathered- dai ly to 
watch the progress Henry Varnum 
Foor is rnak i ng on h i s mur a 1 i n 01 d • 
Main. It is expected that through 
it many details of Mr. Poor's work 
which the spectator cannot see 
wi 1 1 be explai ned. 

Winning entries in the stu- 
dent water-color ' contest will be 
on display during the showing of 
the picture. Judges for this con- 
test were Henrv Varnum Poor, H. E. 



Dickson, and Mr 1 



leanore - Rubin. 



OFFICIAL NOTICES FROM THE OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR 

Wi thdrawals 

2 Cohen, James David, DH, April 9 
4 Crispin, David, Arch, May 11 

.Of the above, one withdrew because of scholastic difficulties, 
cause' of illness, and the other 

Wm, S. Hoffman 
Recistrar 



KISS QLADYS P. .CRANE ER 
College Library 



s. 



THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 



FACULTY 

Published weekly on Tuesday during the College 
year as a means of making official announcements 
and presenting items of interest to the faculty. All 

VOL. 19 




ly 28, 1940 



BULLETIN 

contributions should be as brief as possible and reach 
Walter F. Dantzscher, Director of Public Information, 
105 Old Main, not later than 10 a.m. each Friday. 

NO. 32 



1200 LIKELY TO GRADUATE; COUP'iBNCEMENT PROCEDURES ANNOUNCED 



Nearly 1200 persons will 
probably receive degrees at the 
June Commencement, according to 
figures released by Y/illiam S. 
Hoffman, registrar* The number 
of June graduates has been stead- 
ily increasing from year to year, 



Mr. Hoffman points out. Last 

year 1157 degrees were granted 

in June, a number which 

in excess of the number 

the previous June. Figures for 

last year and approximate figures 

for this year compare as follows: 



was 100 

granted 



June, 12 



June, 1940 



Bachelor of Arts . * * • 331 

Bachelor of Science . » . 723 

Total Bachelor Degrees ...*.. 1054 

Master of Arts. . . . . . . . • . . 15 

Master of Education * » . . ~ZZ 

Master of Science • . » • • 49 

Technical Degree of Electrical Engineer . . 6 

Technical Degree of Industrial Engineer . . 

Doctor of Education 4 

Doctor of Philosophy __7 

Total Advanced Degrees ...... 103 

TOTAL ...'.' 1157 



. 337 

. 1076 

24 

21 

. 62 



1 

3 

• Je2 

. 131 
. 12 07 



According to Professor C 
Bui linger, College marshal, b 
laureate exercises will be he 
this year in the same manner 
last year, as a chapel 



ervic 
in Re 



. E. 

acca- 

Id 

as 

e at 

crca^ 

be 

Mad. 
ch , 



11 a.m. Sunday, June i 
tion Hall. The speaker will 
Dr. George A. Buttrick of the 
ison Avenue Fresbyterian Chur 
New York. 

Professor Bui linger also 
announces the following Commence- 
ment procedures: 



.culty who 



Members of the f 
will march in the academic pro- 
cession on Commencement Day will 

assemble at the Water Tower at 
10:10 a.m. Monday, June 10. The 



procession will move about 10:30. 

Graduates of the various 
schools will assemble with their 
marshals on New Beaver Field at 
the designated sections. Members 
of the faculty receiving advanced 
degrees will assemble with other 
graduate students in section N. 

In case of rain the faculty 
will meet under the balcony on 
the first floor, south side of 
Recreation Hall. Under these cir- 
cumstances there will be no academ- 
ic procession of graduates* Instead 
they will assemble at the place 
designated by their school banner 
and in accordance with instructions 
which have been given them. 



CF GENERAL INTEREST 

Faculty members are again re- Mr. Bridges,. A. Turner, pre- 

minded that tomorrow, Wednesday, liminary examination, D.Ed, in 

Fay 29, is the final date to place industrial education, 1:30 p.m. 

purchase or rental orders for aca- Friday, May 31, in room 12 Educa- 

demic costum.es for the June Com- tion Building. 

mencement. Rental orders may be -;:--:;- -I:--:;- -:;--::- 

placed by phoning G. J. Stout, 
Horticulture Building, Only one sports event is on 

-"-•«- -::-* ■■■ ------ the calendar for this week: base- 

ball with Bucknell today, Tuesday, 

Members of the faculty of the May 28 , at 4 p.m. 
School of Agriculture are again -::--::- -;k:- -::--::- 

reminded of their meeting at 4:10 

p.m. this Friday, Fay 31, in room There will be no chapel ser- 

109 Agriculture Building. This is an vice next Sunday, June 2.. 
official announcement from Dean -::--::- •*-:;- -::--::- 

S. W. Fletcher. 

-::--:;- -*-"- -::--"- There will be only one more 

issue of The Faculty Bulletin, 

Dean Frank D. Kern announces -:;--"- -::--;:- -::--;:- 

the following examinations for the 

doctorate: The School and College Depart 

ment'of the Hotel Biltmore, New 

Mr, J. Wi Fredericks, final York, announces a special school 

examination, D.Ed,, 2 p.m. to- and college rate which will be in 

morrow, Wednesday, May 29, in effect throughout the calendar 

room 305 Old Main. year 1940.' A single room with 

bath is S3; a double room with 

Mr. W. A. Mosher, final ex- bath is .$5, These special rates, 

amination, Ph.D. in chemistry, available only to college students 

10 a.m. tomorrow, Wednesday, May and staff members, are half the 

29, in 105 Pond Laboratory. normal tariff* 

OFFICIAL NOTICES FROM THE OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR 

Change in Classification 

Shallcross, Winifred B. --should be changed from LA Special to part' 
time senior in journalism. 

Win. S, Hoffman 
Reqistrar 



H3HNViID*JJ SAQV1S SS 



THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 



FACULTY 

Published weekly on Tuesday during the College 
year as a means of making official announcements 
and presenting items of interest to the faculty. All 

VOL. 19 




June 4, 1940 



BULLETIN 

contributions should be as brief as possible and reach 
Walter F. Dantzscher, Director of Public Information, 
105 Old Main, not later than 10 a.m. each Friday. 

NO. 33 



TICKETS FOR COMMENCEMENT REQUIRED ONLY IN EVENT OF RAIN 



Commencement exercises will 
be held at New Beaver Field ex- 
cepting in the case of inclement 
weather j in which event they will 
be held in Recreation Hall, Fro- 
fessor Julius Kaulfuss, acting 
chairman of the Senate Committee 
on Public Occasions, announces. 
If weather necessitates holding 
the exercises in Recreation Hall, 
tickets of admission will be re- 
quired for seats until 10:15 a.m., 
after which whatever seats remain 
will be made available to the gen- 
eral public. 

No tickets of admission are 
available for members of the fac- 
ulty, their families, or friends.- 
Faculty members must march in the 
academic procession in order to 
secure admission to Recreation 
Hall. 

To provide against the con- 
tingency of inclement weather, 
three tickets will be allotted 
and will be distributed to each 
senior and graduate student. With 
the space required for the faculty 
and graduating seniors and ad- 
vanced students, this is expected 
to exhaust the capacity of the 
Hall. 

Professor C. E, Bui linger, 

College marshal, wishes to repeat 



his announcement of the following 
Commencement procedures: 

Members of the faculty who 
■will - march in the academic pro- 
cession on Commencement Day xv ill 
assemble at the Water Tower at 
10:10 a.m. Monday, June 10. The 
procession will move about 10:30* 

Graduates of the various 
schools will assemble with their 
marshals on New Beaver Field at 
the • designated sections. Members 
of the faculty receiving advanced 
degrees will assemble with other 
graduate students in section N* 

In case of rain the faculty 

will meet under the balcony on the 
first floor, south side of Recre- 
ation Hall. Under these circum- 
stances there will be no academic 
procession of graduates. Instead 
they will assemble at the place 
designated by their school banner 
and in accordance with instructions 
which have been given them. 

Baccalaureate exercises will 
be held this year in the same man- 
ner as last year, as a chapel ser- 
vice at 11 a.m. Sunday, June 9, in 
Recreation Hall. The speaker will 
be Dr. George A. Buttrick of the 
Madison Avenue Presbyterian Church, 
New York. 



LIBRARY EXHIBIT TO CONTINUE THROUGH COMMENCEMENT 



The exhibit now being held 
at the College Library to cele- 
brate the 500th anniversary of 



the printing of the first book 
will continue through Commence- 
ment. 



SENATE BREAKFAST TO BE HELD SUNDAY; FACULTY MEMBERS 

INVITED TO ATTEND SENATE MEETING 



The annual Senate Breakfast 
will be held at 6; 45 a.m. this 
Sunday, June 9, at the Nittany 
Lion Inn. Members of the Board 
of Trustees have been invited to 
attend. Tickets at 5Qd will be 
on sale at the Senate meeting 
this week. 

In accordance with action 
adopted at the May meeting of the 



College Senate, the chairman of 
the Senate, President Hetzelj. in- 
vites faculty members to be pres- 
ent at its meeting this Thursday, 
June 6, at 4:10 p.m. in room 121 
Liberal Arts. Senators will oc- 
cupy center seats. Visitors are 
requested to take seats in the two 
side sections. This will be the 
last meeting of the Senate for the 
current academic year. 



GRADES FCR GRADUATING SENIORS DUE TOMORROW 



All grades for graduating 
sniors are due at the Registrar's 
office tomorrow, Wednesday, June 
5, at 5 p.m. 

If grades are in the office 
at the time designated, it is not 
necessary for the recorders to 
call for grades to complete rec- 
ords where grade points are in- 
sufficient and enables the office 
to give final corrections to the 
printer of the Commencement pro- 
gram in time to meet our contract. 

Last year, thanks to the co- 
operation of all instructors, 
grade sheets for all seniors who 
were graduating were ready for 
distribution before Commencement 
Day. It Is our hope to do the 



same thing this year. 

Senior grades not reported 
by 5 p.m. Wednesday will be con- 
sidered as passing. 

Other Grades 

All grades are due at the 
office of the Registrar one' week 
after the final meeting of a class 
for which no final examination is 
scheduled, or one' week after the 
final examination, except that all 
grades are due at the office of the 
Registrar not later than the Wed- 
nesday following the clos'e 'of the 
final examination period.'' 

Wm, S. Hoffman 
Req is trar 



EMPLOYEES TO APPLY FOR SPECIAL SUM1V 



f.V] 



.SI ON FEES 



Full-time employees of the 
College or members of their imme- 
diate families who desire to ap- 
ply for the special staff fee of 
$5 for Inter-Session or Post- 
Session courses or $7 for Main 
Summer Session courses are re- 
quested to make formal application 
immediately at the offices of the 



deans of their schools or heads of 
their administrative departments. 
Applications should state the spe- 
cific sessions in which courses 
will be scheduled, 

V. D. Bissey 
Statistical Division 
Accounting Office 



PENN STATE PLAYERS TO PRESENT "WHAT A LIFE" 



The Penn State Players will 
present "What a Life" this Friday 
and Saturday, June 7 and 8, in 
Schwab Auditorium* Performances 



will begin at 8:30 p.m. Friday and 
at 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Tickets 
for reserved seats at 50^ are now 
on sale at Student Union. 



FACULTY MEMBERS INVITED TO ATTEND ALUMNI LUNCHEON 

invitation is ex- 12:30 p.m. this Saturday, June 8. 
tended to faculty members by the Tickets may be purchased in ad- 
Alumni Association to attend the vance at the office of the Alumni 
annual Alumni Luncheon to be held Association, 104 Old Main, 'at 75<zf 
this year in Recreation Hall at each. 

#•& *fr# -;;--::- 

COMMENCEMENT F ROORAM 

1940 
(Eastern Standard Time) 



.!-»__• J _ . 



Supplement to The Faculty Eulletin of June 4, 1940 

EMERGENCY NOTICE 

Because of the need for additional trained air personnel, the 
Federal Government has asked the College to duplicate the ground school 
instruction made available to 30 students during the winter session. In 
view of the present emergency, the College will undertake responsibility 
for the training of 30 additional students under the Civil Aeronautics 
Authority program. Actual flight instruction will again be given at the 
State College Airport. 

No further issues of The Collegian or of The Faculty Bulletin are 
available to publicize this program, so faculty members are requested 
to make announcements to this effect at the remaining examinations which 
they may be supervising. 

Students should be informed that further information about the pro- 
ject and application blanks may be obtained from Professor H. A. Everett, 
Director of the Civilian Pilot Training Program at the College, in the 
Department of Mechanical Engineering. The instructional program will 
extend from June 15 to September 15. 



Campus 



Monday , June 10- - Commencement Day 



10:00 a.m. Commencement Procession forms at New Beaver Field 

10:30 a.m. Commencement Excrci scs--New Beaver Field (In case of rain, 

Recreation Building, admission by ticket only until 10:15 a.m. 

Thereafter remaining seats, if any, available to the general 

public . ) 



-::-Alumni Registration, all day--01d Main 



SENATE BREAKFAST TO BE HELD SUNDAY* FACULTY 
INVITED TO ATTEND SENATE MEETING 



MEMBERS 



The annual 
wi 11 be held at 
Sunday, June 9, 



Senate Breakfa: 
6:45 a.m. this 
at the Nittany 



t 



Lion Inn. Members of the Board 
of Trustees have been invited to 
attend. Tickets at 50jzf will be 
on sale at the Senate meeting 
this week. 

In accordance with action 
adopted at the May meeting of the 



College Senate, the chairman of 
the Senate, President Hetrol, in- 
vites faculty members to be pres- 
ent at its meeting this Thursday, 
June 5, at 4:10 p.m. in room 121 
Liberal Arts. Senators will oc- 
cupy center seats. Visitors are 
requested to take seats in the two 
side sections. This will be the 
last meeting of the Senate for the 
current academic year. 



^a i n 
re- 



Session courses or $7 for 
Summer Session courses are 
quested to make formal application 
immediately at the offices of the 



w 

< 

PS 

p 

0£ 



a 



CO 


t^* 




>- 


jQ 




Q 


•<-i 




< 


.J 




► 4 






o 


hj) 




CO 


o 


1 


w 


i—i 


, 




r-t 
O 


i 


0& 


o 


;i 



wiii ue scneauiea. 



V. D. Bissey 
Statistical Division 
Accounting Office 



it.it. 



PENN STATE PLAYERS TO PRESENT "WHAT A LIFE 1 



The Penn State Players will 
present "What a Life" this' Friday 
and Saturday, June 7 and 8, in 
Schwab Auditorium, Performances 



will begin at 8:30 p.m. Friday and 
at 7:30 p.m. Saturday. Tickets 
for reserved seats at 50szf are now 
on sale at Student Union. 



FACULTY MEMBERS INVITED TO ATTEND ALUMNI LUNCHEON 

A cordial invitation is ex- 1£;30 p.m. this Saturday, June 8. 
tended to faculty members by the Tickets may be purchased in ad- 
Alumni Association to attend the vance at the office of the Alumni 
annual Alumni Luncheon to be held Association, 104 Old Main, 'at 75^ 
this year in Recreation Hall at each. 

-;;--;:- •&■•;;- ■>(--;:- 

C OMMENC EMENT F ROGRAM 

1940 
(Eastern Standard Time) 

-" -Fr i day , June 1. 

12:00 noon Trustee Election by De legates--The Nittany Lion 
8; 30 p.m. "What a Li f e"--Audi tor ium, by Fcnn State Players 
9:30 p.m. Fraternity Dances 

-" -Saturday , June 8 -- Alumni - Day 

8:30 a.m. Alumni Golf Tournament 

9:00 a.m. ) 

to 12:00 ) Campus Tour--Busses leave from rear of Odd Main 
noon ) 

10:00 a.m. Annual Meeting --Alumni Council--121 New Liberal Arts Building 

11:00 a.m. Election of Alumni Trustees Closes 

12:30 p.m. Alumni Luncheon--Recrea t i on Building 

2:30 p.m. Meeting of the Board of Trustees 

2:30 p.m. Basebal 1 --University of Pittsburgh 

3:00 to ) Miss Ray, assisted by members of her staff, hostesses of the 

5:00 p.m.) dormitories, and the State College Alumnae Club will be at 
home to Alumnae--Frances Atherton Flail 

6:00 p.m. Class Reunion Dinners 

6:00 p.m. -Dinner--Non-Reuni on Classes--Sandwich Shop, Old Main 

7:30 p.m. u \7hat a Li f e"--Audi tor ium, by Fenn State Flayers 

9:30 p.m. Fraternity Dances 

Sunday , June 9-- Bacca laureate Day 

8:45 a.m. Senate Breakf ast--The Nittany Lion 

9:00 a.m. Alumnae Breakf as t-~Sandwich Shop 
11:00 a.m. Baccalaureate Service> Dedicated to the Class of 1890 Cele- 
brating the 50th Anniversary--Recreati on Bui ldi ng--Dr , 
George A. Buttrick, Madison Avenue Presbyterian Church, New 
York 

6:00 p.m. Senior Class Day Exercises and Blue Band Concert--Front 
Campus 

Monday , June 10- - Commencement Day 

10:00 a.m. Commencement Procession forms at New Beaver Field 

10:30 a.m. Commencement Excrci scs--New Beaver Field (In case of rain, 

Recreation Building-, admission by ticket only until 10:15 a.m. 

Thereafter remaining seats, if any, available to the general 

pub Li c • ) 



-"■Alumni Registration, all day--01d Main 



OF GENERAL INTEREST 

The faculty of the School of June 6, in ZOZ Dairy Building. 
Engineering will meet at 10 a.m. 

Monday, June 17, in room 107 Main Mr. Arthur W, Ayers, psychol- 

Engineering, according to an of- ogy> 9 a.m. this Saturday, June 8, 

ficial announcement from Dean in 13 Education Building. 

H. P. Hammond. ## -*-"- -»-# 

Two sports events are on the 
Dean Frank D. Kern announces calendar for this week; baseball 
the following qualifying examina- with Illinois V, r es leyan" thi s Thurs- 
tions for the Ph.D. degree: day, June 6, at 4 p.m.; and base- 

ball with the University of Pitts- 
Mr. Harry A. Keener, dairy burgh this Saturday, June 6, at 
husbandry, 9:30 a.m. this Thursday, 2:30 p.m. 

OFFICIAL NOTICES FROM ' THE OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR 

4 ; Wi thdrawal s 

1 John, Frank T., Z&E, May 25 

1 Thi erne, Roinhold W., CE, May 4 

1 Wheeler, Thomas W., 2yr For, May ZZ 

Of the above 1 "wi thdrew be- lack of finances, and 1 to accept 
cause of illness, 1 because of a position. 

Change in Classification 

Helen A* Sevel--should be changed from freshman in Home Economics 
to freshman in Lower Division. 

Change of Name 

Alfred J. Posteraro--shoul d be changed to Alfred J. Post (senior 
in ceramics ) . 

Wm. S. Hoffman 
Reg i strar 



. . ..-_. 



H3HNVU3-H SAQVTS S S I St 



THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 



FACULTY 

Published weekly on Tuesday during the College 
year as a means of making official announcements 
and presenting items of interest to the faculty. All 




BULLETIN 

contributions should be as brief as possible and reach 
Walter F. Dantzscher, Director of Public Information, 
105 Old Main, not later than 10 a.m. each Friday. 



VOL. 20 



September 24, 1940 



NO. 1 



RESEARCH ACTIVITIES TO RECEIVE INCREASED 
EMPHASIS IN COLLEGE PUBLICITY PROGRAM 



Of all the con 
tions that have tee 
of The Pennsylvania 
the last six years, 
most news publicity 
the joint annual me 
psychological and -s 
These sessions were 
during the week of 
it is still too ear 
plete report -on the 
material emanating 
if indeed such a re 
it is definitely kn 
about them carried 
from the Canadian b 
possibly beyond. 



ferenoe 

n held o 

State C 

the one 

undoubt 

etings o 

peech as 

held on 

Sept embe 

ly to re 

publica 

from the 

port wex 

own that 

from coa 

order to 



and conven— 
n the campus 
ollege during 

productive of 
edly has been 
f the five 
so ciat ions • 

the campus 
r 2. While 
nder a com— 
tion of news 

e meetings, 
■e possible, 

news stories 
st to coast, 

Mexico, and 



Much of this publicity resulted from 
the dispatches filed by staff correspon- 
dents sent to the institution by the 
leading wire services and metropolitan 
newspapers. Among those present to re- 
port the developments of the meetings 



were Howard 



Blakeslee. science editor 



of the Associated Press; Marjorie Van de 
Water of Science Service; Hugh O'Connor, 
staff correspondent of the New York Times; 
Thomas R. Henry, science editor of the 
Washington, D. C,, Star; Robert P. Potter, 
science editor of the American Weekly; 
and H. Rcgosin, member of the American 
Psychological Association and correspon- 
dent for Newsweek, The United Press and 
the International News Service relied for 
their coverage on the College news ser- 
vice which, at times, had as many as five 
members of its staff covering sessions 
simultane ously. 

Through day to day contacts with 
these press representatives and through 
informal conferences many valuable sug- 
gestions for enhancing the efficacy of 
the College research publicity program 
have been brought to light. Throughout 
these conversations the emphasis by the 
professional newspaper men and women has 
been upon the need for greater co-opera- 
tion between individual members of the 
staff and the College news service. 



Th 


pre s sed 


with th 


ity sub 


on Arra 


logical 


Pr of e s s 


and o t h 


commit t 


the tec 


read at 


for t h e 


gave th 


ment of 


Several 


na d e t h 


meeting 


that fo 


barring 


ical So 



e members o 

themselve s 

e arrangerae 

— commit t ee 

ngements fo 

A s s o c i a t i o 

or Edward B 

er members 

ee who stoo 

hnical phas 

these meet 

co— operat i 

e press, bo 

Public Inf 

individual 

e comment t 

had been h 

r any scien 

only po s si 

c i e t y . 



f the worki 
•as uniform 
nt s made by 
of the Loca 
r the Ameri 
n . They co 
, Van Ormer 
of his publ 
d r c a dy t o 
es of the 3 
ings, and we 
on the psyc 
th through 
ormation an 
press repr 
hat publici 
an died as c 
tific organ 
bly the Arae 



ng press e::- 
ly pleased 

the public- 
1 Committee 
can Psycho— 
ngratulat ed 
, chairman, 
icity sub- 
interpret 
00 papers 
re grateful 
hologist s 
the Depart — 
d directly, 
c sent at ive s 
ty for this 
apably as 
izat ion, 
rican Chen— 



The reason for mentioning these 
press reactions at this point is to 
stress the statement made privately by 
several members of the working press tc 
members of the College news service and 
by Mr. Blakeslee at an informal dinner 
tendered him by members of the publicity 
committee of the local chapter of Sigma 
Xi, which, at the suggestion of the ad- 
ministration, has been concerning itself 
with ways of obtaining more adequate pub- 
licity for research projects. At this 
dinner Blakeslee was asked by members of 
the scientific honorary society to make 
suggestions whereby the scientific a— 
enlevements of the College could be given 
more publicity, primarily through news- 
papers. He was questioned by Pr , Roy D. 
Anthony, past president of the local 
chapter and a member of the publicity 
committee, in the absence of Dr. William 
L. Henning, chairman. 

In a frank discussion among members 
of the society, the College publicity 
director and Mr . Blakeslee, who represents 
the most extensive news gathering organiz- 
ation in the country, Blakeslee stated 
that in his experience an institution 
secured the most desirable publicity 



for its research when, from the president 
down to the youngest assistant, the value 
of such publicity to the institution as a 
whole and to each individual researcher 
is thoroughly appreciated. Under such 
conditions full co-operation between fac- 
ulty members and the news service of the 
institution follows as a matter of course, 



le 
wh 
f o 

pa- 
ne 
s c 
in 
ne 
w i 
pe 
ex 
of 



In h 
e det ai 
ich a s 
re it s 
pers. 
w s in t 
lent if i 

a way 
ws paper 
th spot 
ning in 
pe ct ing 

ment io 



is response t 

led the intri 

cientific sto 

ees the light 

"Science," sa 

he ordinary s 

c achievement 

comprehensibl 

reader if th 

development s 

Europe." He 

too much in 

n. 



o questions, Blakes 


cate steps through 


ry must proceed be — 


of day in some pa- 


id Blakeslee, "is n 


ense. Accounts of 


s must be presented 


e to the average 


ey are to compete 


such as are hap— 


cautioned against 


terms of frequency 



ot 



"If Penn State produces 
eight 'big national' stories 
will be achieving a normal e 
he added, "Look at Harvard, 
break one big national story 
Nevertheless, he went on, th 
ries will never be uncovered 
bers of the faculty take the 
service into their confidenc 
to it the facts so that they 
veyed by the news service to 
editors of the press associa 
those on metropolitan papers 



six or 

a year, it 
xpe ct at ion, " 
They don't 

a month," 
e "big" sto- 

unless rnern— 

College news 
e and impart 

may be con— 

the science 
tions and to 



Concretely, these are seven sugges- 
tions made by Mr, Blakeslee and othar 
attending science editors for publicizing 
the scientific activities of the insti- 
tution: 

1, That all papers and reports 
either published or given as speeches be 
sent to the Department of Public Informa- 
tion as a matter of routine, in the form 
of carbon copies, mineographed copies, 

or reprints. Speeches should be sent in 
advance. Among colleges using this sys- 
tem are Michigan and Cornell, 

2, That someone be appointed in the 
various departments to co-operate with 
the Department of Public Information in 
suggesting research that is suitable for 
publicity purposes and in interpreting 
that work whenever necessary, 

3, That theses or dissertations 
which have general news interest be 
called to the attention of the Department 
of Public Information bv the advisers of 



such projects at an early date, 

4, That copies of whatever speeches 
seem newsworthy bjs sent by the Department 
of Public Information to science editors, 
and to editors of papers in the city 
where the speech is being given, and 'that 
the speaker have several copies with him 
to supply to reporters at siich meetings, 

5, That scientific material pro- 
vided for publicity purposes lay emphasis 
on the meaning of the research, 

6, That the Department of Public 
Information be placed on the mailing list 
of scientific societies, 

7, That commercial sponsors of re- 
search projects be convinced that a news 
item sent out from the College is worth 
far more than their own advertising. 

In the light of these observations, 
the Department of Public Information for 
the present academic year proposes to 
place a renewed and possibly enlarged 
emphasis upon the news of scientific and 
research activities. Members cf the 
staff will be called upon more frequently 
to co-operate in the news publicity pro- 
gram, A photo record of the research 
activities in all the major departments 
is projected to familiarize members of 
our own staff with what is taking place 
on our own campus in other departments. 
Through the co-operation of the College 
Library, which has approved the plan in 
general principle, occasional photogra- 
phic exhibits are planned, supported. by _ 
descriptive captions in which emphasis 
is laid upon informational aspects of the 
phot ographs , 

Members of the faculty are again re- 
minded that three members of the staff 
of the Department of Public Information 
concern themselves wholly or in part with 
the gathering and writing of news mater- 
ial: Miss Margaret H, Buyers, whose pri- 
mary responsibility is to keep in touch 
with the research program; Richard V, Wall, 
general news assistant; and Walter F, 
Dantzscher, director. 

The enclosed article by Waldemar 
Kaempffert, science editor of the New 
York Tines, reprinted by permission of 
"The Quill," is still another message of 
possible interest to faculty members who 
are becoming increasingly aware of the 
public relations responsibilities of the 
scientist , 
* * * * 



A NOTICE FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS 



A course in Scientific French will 
be offered this semester on Monday eve- 
nings from 7 to 9 in '304 Liberal A r t s • 



Those interested please see Mr, Bench, 
302 Liberal Arts, or attend the first 
meeting next Monday, September 23, 
* * * * 



Without Discounting Advances Made, This Writer Finds 

Science Reporting Still 
In a Primitive Stage 



By WALDEMAR KAEMPFFERT 

Science Editor, the New York Times 



**NY community gets precisely the kind 
of newspapers that it can digest. The 
faults of journalism are the faults of our 
culture. 

If 90 per cent of a city's inhabitants are 
more interested in horse races, divorce 
scandals, crime, gossip, than in electrical 
engineering or atomic physics, then it is 
of horse races, divorce scandals, crime, 
and gossip that they will read. 

According to Frederick Adams Wood, 
who used to lecture on human heredity 
at M. I. T., only two per cent of any popu- 
lation supplies leaders in law, engineer- 
ing, commerce, and politics. It is no sta- 
tistical accident that the foremost news- 
paper of the United States should have a 
daily circulation of 375,000, which is about 
two per cent of the literate in the metro- 
politan region. There are cultural strata 
in every community; there are news- 
papers for each stratum. By their news- 
papers may communities be judged. 

1 T is the function of a newspaper to pub- 
lish news. A truism? Yes, but it needs re- 
stating. Publishers of newspapers some- 
times forget it. Hence, the reliance on 
comic strips and columnists to win and 
hold readers. It is easy to find comic 



strips and publish witty columns. But 
news? It is hard to gather, hard to ap- 
praise, hard to present for the many. It 
must be judged both quantitatively and 
qualitatively. For news must be abun- 
dant, varied, and accurate. 

But what is news? Anything that satis- 
fies human curiosity. The editors will 
agree on the news value of King George's 
death, the racial policies of the Nazis, 
Mussolini's activities in Ethiopia, the kid- 
naping of a millionaire, the decision of 
the Supreme Court on the constitutional- 
ity of the National Recovery Act, the 
assassination of a Balkan king in Mar- 
seilles, the outcome of a prize fight for 
the heavy-weight championship of the 
world. 

But the cosmic rays or the neutron? 
Only in recent years have they begun to 
realize that the discoveries made in scien- 
tific laboratories, the new advances in 
engineering are news — great news, per- 
haps the greatest news of our time. Some 
20 years ago there were only five so-called 
science editors in the country. Now there 
are five times that number. The numeri- 
cal increase is an omen. 

Despite this growth of the news interest 
in science there is still much inadequate 



J. HERE is no beat more potentially productive of significant 
and at the same time absorbing stories than the science beat. 
Yet, for reasons outlined in the accompanying article by Walde- 
mar Kaempffert, science editor of the New York Times and one 
of the country's best known science writers, many such stories 
either are untouched or do not receive wide popular reading. 

For 30 years, Mr. Kaempffert has been popularizing science 
and engineering. He was editor of the Scientific American for 
18 years and of Popular Science Monthly for five years. He was 
the first director of the Museum of Science and Industry in Chi- 
cago and laid out the plan now being followed in developing 
that institution. 

He is the author of "The New Art of Flying," one of the earlier 
books on aviation, also of "A History of Astronomy," "A Popular 
History of American Invention," "Science Today and Tomor- 
row," recently published, and of numerous popular articles on 
science, engineering and industry which have appeared in the 
leading periodicals of the United States, England. France and 
Germany. He writes all the editorials on science and engineer- 
ing which appear in the New York Times and conducts for that 
paper the weekly science department which is used by many 
schools. 




Waldemar Kaempffert 



reporting of the discoveries made by great 
physicists and biologists. The reasons are 
two. One is the tradition that a good re- 
porter can write on anything from the 
collision of two trains to the transmuta- 
tion of matter. The other is that "human 
interest" comes before everything. 

Both of these tenets are repugnant to 
every scientist, apart from the manner of 
presentation. He wants facts. He insists 
that a man must know what he is writing 
about. "Human interest" entertains him, 
as it does every normal being. But in 
science, especially in physics, humanity 
counts for nothing. Every first-class as- 
tronomer prays nightly: "Please God. do 
not let us discover evidence of intelligent 
life on Mars." Life, especially human life, 
is a nuisance in the exact sciences. If 
there were intelligent beings on Mars — 
super-engineers who can dig canals as the 
late Prof. Percival Lowell postulated — 
the door would be opened wide for specu- 
lation. 

Only the editors of the great metropoli- 
tan dailies have learned to accept this 
view. Hence, the insistence on factual re- 
porting by specialists. As a result we hear 
less of the mythical "wizards" of the labo- 
ratory and more about the meaning of dis- 
coveries in the onward sweep of culture 
and of society. Neutrons, electrons, pro- 
tons, atomic numbers and masses, the 
expanding universe — they are the prin- 
cipals in exciting articles that sometimes 
"make" the front page. 

/\LL this is part of the journalistic trend 
toward specialization. Despite the best 
efforts of newspapers to avoid the depart- 
mentalization of their journals the spe- 
cialists will not be denied. Financial edi- 
tors, sports writers, dramatic critics, book 
reviewers, commentators on motion-pic- 
ture plays, music writers, automobile 



THE QUILL for April. 1940 



editors, art critics, society columnists — 
their number is already legion. 

There are still brilliant reporters who 
write on politics and football with equal 
facility. But the day of the universal 
genius is definitely over on the great 
dailies. This applies to editorial writers 
as well as to reporters. A reporter is sup- 
posed to state only the facts. But the edi- 
torial writer expresses opinions. He is a 
critic. And as a critic, he of all men must 
know the facts, and he of all journalists 
must be a specialist. 

The universities may well claim some 
of the credit for the higher standards now 
set by popular scientific journalism. 
There was a time when a physicist or a 
biologist regarded himself as an Egyptian 
high priest. "This is my temple," he said 
in effect to the reporter who crossed the 
threshold of the laboratory, "do not defile 
it with your presence." He would rarely 
stoop to write a popular article even for a 
monthly magazine. 

There is less of that aloofness now. The 
professor willingly gives a little lecture 
over the telephone on astrophysics in re- 
sponse to a request for information, es- 
pecially when he is assured that he will 
not be quoted. From the press bureaus 
of the great universities come well-pre- 
pared, simply worded statements that 
make the science reporter's task easier. If 
he has a literary conscience, if he takes 
any pride in his own work, he will not 
copy a "hand out" word for word. It is 
a foundation on which a specialist can 
build without distorting the facts and yet 
impart a flavor of his own. 

OO it is with the great corporations. 
Some of the finest scientific work of our 
time is done in their laboratories. They, 
too, are creators of news. Their publicity 
departments know it, conducted as they 
are by ex-newspaper men; and so it hap- 
pens that the corporation press agent 
often sends out announcements about 
new vapor lamps, developments in tele- 
vision, remarkable plastic compounds — 
announcements as important as those 
that come from the universities. 

Unfortunately, the corporation bally- 
hooers are under constant pressure from 
sales promotion departments. Hence, a 
slightly improved sad iron is acclaimed as 
fervently as if it ranked with the inven- 
tion of the telephone. The newspapers 
find no difficulty in sifting mere adver- 
tising from scientific news. Because 
they have no such eye for the main 
chance and because they are under pro- 
fession control (so far as approval of their 
utterances is concerned) the university 
publicity men fare better. 

There is also Science Service, a non- 
profit-making agency which was founded 
by the late E. W. Scripps, himself a news- 
paper owner, to disseminate the news of 
the laboratory and the observatory. It 
does its work well and is especially useful 
to the small-town papers. But the large 
dailies rely more on their own staffs of 
specialists. 

Then comes the Associated Press, which 
has of late years, paid more and more 
attention to science and technology. Its 



staff is still so small that it does not pre- 
tend to cover thoroughly the vast field of 
science from mathematical physics to 
genetics. It misses more good science 
news than it transmits over its wires. 
Moreover, it is hampered by the neces- 
sity of dealing with 1,200 newspapers 
ranging from the best to the worst, from 
the largest to the smallest. How fortunate 
are the science writers of the New York 
dailies in comparison! They can discuss 
Einstein ian mass-energy equivalents, the 
transmutation of bismuth into radium E 
in terms of atomic numbers and masses 
and soar into what is at least the strato- 
sphere if not the heaven of scientific 
journalism. 

Lastly, there are the scientifi and en- 
gineering conventions at which important 
papers are read. Usually a press bureau 
sees to it that abstracts are handed out 
and the papers themselves made available 
if need be. Even a technically untrained 
reporter can go far with the aid thus lent. 
He may fail to see the significance of 
some paper because of a forbidding tech- 
nical title, but there is no excuse for in- 
accuracy on his part. 

JL ET, despite all these facilities, science 
reporting is still in a primitive stage. 
The men are for the part technically 
untrained. They must cover too wide 
a field. To leap from the Jeans-Edding- 
ton hypothesis of the annihilation of 
matter in stars to anthropology — breathes 
there the man who can do it and not start 
in his sleep, wondering for what' error 
he will be reproved by some captious 
writer of letters to the editor? 

The day is coming — and it is not so 
very distant — when at least two pages 
will be devoted every day to science and 
technology in a first-class newspaper. 
There will be a demand for technically 
trained specialists. Instead of one or two 
men, the scientific reportorial staff will 
comprise a dozen, each a Ph.D. perhaps, 
each certainly a graduate of a technical 
school or of a university where he has 
specialized in some science. 

But a new public is also needed. The 
one we have is appallingly ignorant of 
even the elements of science, despite the 
homespun knowledge it has acquired of 
household electric circuits, automobiles, 
and cameras. The reporters and the edi- 
tors must now rack their brains for sim- 
iles, word pictures, analogues. 

How is relativity to be explained to 
readers who cannot think in terms of any- 
thing but Euclidian space? How are the 
tenets of wave mechanics to be driven 
home? How can the discovery of the 
positron be linked with Dirac's mathe- 
matical prediction of its existence by 
methods still so recondite that only a 
few experts in the field of higher mathe- 
matics understand them? 

X HE science writer is not equipped by 
training or knowledge (with perhaps 
three exceptions on all the papers in the 
country) to understand the mathematical 
argument. And if he were, his public 
would fail him. He finds himself in the 
position of a man who is asked to explain 



a new symphony in words. It cannot be 
done. There is nothing for it but to sum- 
mon the orchestra and play the score — 
nothing for it but to print the equations. 
Like music, mathematics is a language in 
itself. 

And yet, such are the strange turns of 
journalistic fate, that equations some- 
times are printed. When, for example, 
Einstein's first attempt at a unitary field 
theory became known the whole mathe- 
matical argument, symbols and all, was 
cabled across the Atlantic for publication 
in New York. It required an expert at the 
transmitting end to reduce the equations 
to a form that could be transmitted and 
another at the receiving end to relate 
them properly to one another in the final 
"copy." 

Yet not 20 readers out of the hundreds 
of thousands who saw the theory thus 
scientifically expounded could under- 
stand what appeared. Here is "news in- 
terest" pushed to the extreme. When rel- 
ativity was first discussed in any paper — 
13 years after the special theory had be- 
come familiar to every good mathematical 
physicist, be it noted — the baffled reporter 
could do little more than write of a mys- 
terious revolution that had occurred in 
human thinking. Time-space? Fourth di- 
mensions? Light from a star bent aside 
by the sun on its way to the earth? No 
wonder he was staggered. 

Since the advent of Einstein he has had 
much harder things to worry about — the 
puzzles of nuclear physics, for example, 
the theories of de Broglie, Schroedinger, 
and Heisenberg. He becomes aware not 
only of his own deficiencies but of those 
of his readers, too. 

X HE difficulties of popularizing physics 
will never be overcome. But it is some- 
things that newspaper editors and report- 
ers are beginning to realize that a de- 
scription of Einstein as a bright-eyed, 
absent-minded man with white fuzzy hair, 
who smokes an English pipe and talks on 
pacifism now and then is not an elucida- 
tion of relativity. What shall be done in 
the absence of a mathematically educated 
public? Dwell on the philosophic conse- 
quences. It is what Russell, Jeans, Ed- 
dington, Reichenbach, de Sitter, and 
others have done to explain the new sys- 
tems of mathematical lcgi. There is no 
other formula. 

But this in turn brings us back to the 
public. And the public, in this case means 
not the devourers of the "he-and-she" 
stories of the tabloids but the college 
graduates, the engineers, the business 
men, the educated class. Yes, even the 
scientists. For what does the geneticist 
know of quantum theory? Or the bota- 
nist of astrophysics? Or the engineer of 
biology? 

It is evident that we face here a prob- 
lem in education. The newspapers are 
helpless. They are not free of all re- 
sponsibility; for they, too, educate in their 
way. It is to the high schools, the univer- 
sities that we must look for a new type 
of newspaper reader, the type that can 
[Concluded on page 8] 

THE QUILL for April, 1940 



Science 



[Concluded jrom page 4\ 

understand good science reporting and 
sound editorial comment on science. 

Must the whole world, then, receive an 
education in physics, chemistry, biology, 
and geology if science is to be more ef- 
fectively treated in the press? Hardly. It 
is not the business of the English depart- 
ment of a college to turn out poets and 
dramatists or of the history department to 
make historians of students. English, his- 
tory, economics are taught as cultural sub- 
jects. So should it be with science, some 
effort at correlating philosophy with 
physics, chemistry, and biology, some 
revelation of the manner in which the 
human mind has progressed in its think- 
ing about matter, trees, stars, the winds, 
the universe and life since the day when 
the first primitive savage saw the sun rise 
out of the east and plunge into the ocean 
on the western horizon. 

There are old cries to be answered — 
cries that have been wrung from human 
throats ever since there were brains and 
voices. 

What does it all mean? Why am I here? 
They are the same old questions. More 
and more is it the business of science to 
answer them. And in answering it must 
of necessity become philosophical. 

Give us college and university gradu- 
ates with this broad philosophic outlook 
and we shall have more and more science 
in the newspapers and better presenta- 
tion. Can't you see the headlines on the 
front page, if the universities would only 
forget that science is not made for 
scientists alone? 

THE QUILL for April, 1940 



Reproduced in 
The Faculty Bulletin of 
The Pennsylvania State College 

by permission 
of 



THE QUILL 

A MAGAZINE FOR WRITERS. EDITORS AND PUBLISHERS 
Founded 1912 




volume xxvni 



APRIL, 1940 



NUMBER 4 



The Quill, a monthly magazine devoted to journalism, is owned and published by 
Sigma Delta Chi, professional journalistic fraternity, which was founded at DePauw 
University, April 17. 1909. 



George F. Pierrot 

World Adventure Lectures 

Detroit, Mich. 

Mitchell V. Charnley 

University of Minnesota 



RALPH L. PETERS, Editor 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

Lee A White 
The Detroit News 



Frank W. McDonough 
Better Homes & Gardens 



Verne Minge 
The Detroit News 



Donald D. Hoover 

Bozell & Jacobs, Inc. 

Omaha, Nebr. 

Vernon McKenzie William A. Rutledge III 

University of Washington 2746 Hampden Court, Chicago, 111. 

James C. Kiper, 3usiness Manager 

PUBLICATION BOARD 

George A. Brandenburg Elmo Scott Watson 

Chicago Editor, Editor & Publisher Editor, The Publishers' Auxiliary 

Ralph L. Peters 
Roto Editor, The Detroit News 



OF GENERAL INTEREST 

Claude R. Wickard, U. S. Secretary Individual members of the faculty 

of Agriculture, will speak in Schwab Aud- who desire a copy of the F.S.C.A. Student 

itorium this evening, Tuesday, September Handbook should make their requests tc 

24, at 7 p.m., on the subject "The Place the Christian Association at once, either 

of Agriculture in the national Defense by telephones cr through the faculty mail, 
Frogram." Music will be provided by the ** ** ** 

sophomore band. Faculty members and 
townspeople are invited. Faculty members wishing to enroll 

** ** ** for membership in the N,E.A, and P.S.E.A, 

may obtain blanks in room 106 Durrowes 

Attention cf faculty members is Building. All subscriptions should be in 

called to the fact that there will be a that office not later than next Monday, 

special registration date in State Col- September 30, 

lego on which voters may register or ** ** ** 

change their registration from one pre- 
cinct to another in order to qualify tc The first sports event of this se— 

vote on November 5. The date will be master will tc the soccer game with Get- 

this Friday, September 27, at the Fire tysburg this Saturday, September 24, at 

Hall, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. and from 7 2 p.m. 

p. in, to 10 p.m. Any registered voter ** ** ** 

who failed to vote within the past two 

years must re-register at this time. For The chapel speaker for this Sunday, 

further information call W, K, Ulerich at September 29, will be Dr. William W, Cad- 

the Centre Daily Times office, bury, Superintendent of the Canton Hospi- 

** ** ** tal, Canton, China, This trill be Penn • 

State-in-China Day, 

Personnel Athletic Books fcr the ** ** ** 

first semester will go on sale at the 

Athletic Association ticket office, 107 Faculty members wishing women stu— 

Old Main, beginning Monday, September 30. dents to help in the home may call Miss 

The sale will continue until noon October Bell in the office of the Dean of Women, 
5, The price will again be $7 plus fed— ** ** ** 

eral tax, 

** ** ** Individual members of the faculty 

who are not receiving copies of the Fac— 

Application blanks fcr the John W. ulty Bulletin should report this fact to 

White and Louise Carnegie scholarships their department head so that the proper 

are available to interested students at addition or correction may be requested 

room 112 Pond Laboratory, This informa— by him, 

tion must be completed and in the hands ** ** ** 

of the committee by this Friday, Septem- 
ber 27, according to an announcement from A prise of $2500 is offered by Rey- 

0, F. Smith, chairman, nal and Hitchcock for the best non— fiction 

** ** ** book— length manuscript to be submitted in 

complete form before September 1, 1941, 

The President's office requests that by a member of an American college or 

those members of the faculty who received university staff, 
reappointments or modifications of their 
agreements and have not returned one While the publishers are seeking a 



signed copy should please do so at once, book for the general reader, not a text — 

** ** ** book, they emphasize that they do not -de- 

sire "popularization" in anything but the 

The Penn State Players offer as the best sense. Although the author should 

first production of the year Clare Booth's write as for his intellectual peers, he 

'Margin for Error," The play is a melo- should avoid technicalities that would be 

iramatic comedy and a successful satire understood only by colleagues in his own 

:rhich had an extended shewing in New York field. Examples of the kind of book de — 

Sity, It will be given on Saturday, Oc- sired are : The Rise of American Civili - 

tober 5, at 8:30 p.m. in Schwab Auditorium, zation , The Epic of America , The Nature 

Tickets for this production are available of the Physical 77orl(l , Mathemat ics : 

at Student Union at $.75. Season tickets the Million , Public Opinion , The Human 

are also being sold there for $2. Body , and Ma i n :urrents in American 



* * * * * * 



Thought 



The faculty of the School of Agri- Preferably the book should be be- 

culture will meet this Friday, September tween 80,000 and 125,000 words. Judges 

27, at 4:10 p.m,, in room 109 Agriculture will include Henry Seidel Canby and Carl 

Building, according to an official an- Van Doren, The purpose is to stimulate 

nouncement from Dean S. W. Fletcher, creative writing by faculty members, 
* * * * * * * * ** * * 



CENTRAL FUND FOR RESEARCH 



Dr. S» W, Fletcher, chairman of the 
Council on Research, announces that the 
College "budget for the current fiscal 
year includes an item of $3500 designated 
as the "Central Fund for Research." This 
fund is administered by the Council on 
Research, It is to he used primarily to 
promote fundamental research throughout 
the College, funds for the support of ap- 
plied research being more readily avail- 
able from other sources. It is intended 
that this fund shall he used for the sup- 
port of creative studies in the social 
sciences as "well as in the natural sci- 
ences. Following is a summary of the 
conditions governing the use of the fund: 



Grant 
e a 1 ir ear 
that may b 
be d e t e rm i 
after givi 
quests, in 
tinuance o 
the last f 
used for g 
special ap 
equipment . 
a temporar 
the fa cult 
teaching f 
mester in 
progre s s . 



s— in— aid are made for one fis — 
but may be renewed. The sum 
e allotted to a project will 
ned by the Council on Research 
ng consideration to all re— 
eluding requests for the con— 
f any of the 23 grants made in 
iscal year. The fund may be 
eneral maintenance and for 
paratus, but not for general 

It may also be used to employ 
y substitute for a member of 
y who requires freedom from 
or a semester or part of a se- 
order to complete research in 



at hi 
t ion 
of th 
previ 
cedur 
d c s i r 
which 
pro je 
cat io 
quire 
Gat io 
1940. 



s office. 
on the f o 
e study; 
ous work 
e or work 
ed (itemi 
contribu 
ot j the 1 
lis; and a 
d to comp 
ns should 



Th 


ese call for 


inf orma— 


How 


ing point s : 


object ive s 


it s 


probable importance; 


and 


present outlook; pro- 


ing 


plan; financial support 


zed j 


; other funds 


, if any, 


te t 


o the support 


of the 


eaders and their 


qualif i- 


n e s 


timate of the 


time re — 


let e 


the pro je ct . 


Appli- 


be 


filed before 


October 1, 



The approval of the head of the de- 
partment and of the dean is required be— _ 
fore the proposed project is considered by 
the Council on Research. Requisitions are 
drawn and bills approved by the chairman 
of the Council after their approval by 
the head of the department and the dean. 
The recipient of a grant-in— aid is re- 
quested to file with the dean and with 
the .Council on Research before April 1, 
1941, a report on the project. 



Applications for grant s— in— aid 
should be filed with the dean of the 
School. Application forms are available 



fu 
Pe 
Th 
ti 
tu 
ti 
na 
la 
ex 
in 
th 



j. 
nd o 
nnsy 
e se 
al r 
re t 
on i 
Is." 
at y 
pect 
g th 
c ir 



he Council o 
f $500 for t 
Ivania State 
are "monogra 
e searches wh 
hat they do 
n technical 

Three mono 

ear. Member 

to complete 

e current yc 

dean. 



n Research 
he publica 

College S 
phs and ot 
ich are of 
not find r 
and profes 
graphs wer 
s of the f 

sx;ch manu 
ar will pi 



also ha s a 
tion of The 
tudies. 
her substan- 

such a na— 
eady publics 
sional jour- 
e published 
acuity who 
scripts dur- 
ease advise 



COLLEGE LIBRARY NOW HOLDING EXHIBIT 



An exhibit of Book Illustration is 
now being presented in the exhibit cases 
of the new Central Library, With the. 
purpose of showing as many as possible 
of the various methods used by artists 
in creating original art work and repro- 
ducing it for illustrations in books, the 
exhibit is being sent out under the aus- 
pices of the American Institute of Gra- 
phic Art s . 



are divided into three 
on pink backgrounds, in 



The items 
groups : those 
which the artist has made the printing 



surface, including etching; 

* * 



lithographs, 



and woodcuts; those on gray backgrounds, 
in which the artist's work has been re- 
produced phot omechanically by processes 
such as offset and gravure ; those on blue 
backgrounds, in which the artist and the 
mechanic * have worked together. 

Among the well— known artists repre- 
sented are Henry Varnum Poor, Crant Wood, 
Rockwell Lent, Reginald Marsh, John Sloan, 
and Edward A. Wilson. 

The exhibit, which is being sent to 
leading libraries in the country, will 
continue here until Friday, September 27, 



DOUBLE EXHIBIT AT COLLEGE ART GALLERY 



The present exhibit at the College 
Art Gallery, 303 Main Engineering, in- 
cludes 26 photographs of Mexican life, 

* * 



12 watercolors, and 19 prints. The 
exhibit will close next Monday, Sep- 
tember 30. 
* * * * 



\M- 






H3?JKVH0*U SAGVI& SSI H 



THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 



. .FACULTY 

Published weekly on Tuesday during the College 
year as a means of making official announcements 
and presenting items of interest to the faculty. All 




ULLETIN 



contributions should be as brief as possible and reach 
Walter F. Dantzscher, Director of Public Information, 
105 Old Main, not later than 10 a.m. each Friday. 



VOL. 20 



October 1, 1940 



NO. 



FACULTY MEMBERS INVITED TO PARTICIPATE AT DAP 



DA-j 



The annual. Dai's Day program In 
which students, parents, and faculty" 
members participate will be held this 
Saturday and Sunday, October 5 and 6. 
The program is under the direction of 



Association of Pa: 



of Pe-nn Stati 



of which David P. Pugh is president. 



Tw o thousand 
according to Ivlr . 
first feature 
be the opening 
with Bucknel" 
Field. 



are expected, 
ugh's estimate. The 
of. the entertainment will 
football game to be play 
on New Beaver 



a 



"dads' 
hi 

f 2 p.m. 



After 



game, a J 
* * 



4 :45 r ,m. 



en in— 
eet in' t 
; ert ainmen H 
. be hold 



members of the Association hav 

vited to attend a "b: 

in room 121 LIT* era! Arts. 

by various student groups 

in the evening. 

In addition, the 
will offer their first 
current season, "Margin for Error," 



enn otate Players 
production of the 



Schwab Auditorium a J 
evening. Tickets a - 
Student Union, 



8:3° p.m. Saturday 



are on s a . 



Dr. Frank 
University cf 
ial chapel services Sunday 
* * * * 



Kingdon, president 
ewark, wil. sneak 



sp oak a 
a 



;f the 
: spen- 

.m • 



:he 



.1 



mrollment la; 



( .< 



year 



the middle of October was .72 GO; th: 
year, as cf September 26, the enrol 



_me r.' 



is 705P, according' 



"o o 



the figures 



William Si Hoffman, registrar. The en- 
rollment on the campus last year was 
6517; this year it is 6481, Enrollment 
at five undergraduat e centers last year 
totaled 556; this year enrollment at the 
four undergraduate centers is 4S9. The 
enrollment at Mont 'Alto of 160 is approx- 
imately 20 more than the number enrolled 
there last year. 

* * * * * * 

The College 3 e nate will meet this 



Thursday, October 



at 4 : x p , m , 



m room 



121 Libera]. Arts, according to an an- 
nouncement from William S, Hoffman, Sec- 
retary. Mr. Hoffman has been instructed 
by the president to invite all members 



of the fa en 
quest them 
the row, 
* * 



ty to be present, and to : 
o take seats at the sides 



The Liberal Ar _ 



'acuity wi! 



rn.fi et 



tomorrow, Wednesday, October 2, at 
p.m. in room 121 Liberal Arts, according 
to an official announcement from Dean 
Stoddart's office. 



Oswald . Garrison Yillard will' speak 
on the subject "Is Our Way of Life Doomed 
or Can Wo Avoid Fascism?" in Schwab Audi- 



~r -xr -n TP r j T-i C2 ."n 
-Li"! * jjKl O jl 

torium this 



Dhur sdav 



Octob' 



3, ,a- 



p.m, 
P.S.I 



His talk is sponsored by the 
,A, The public is invited. 



i a 

c o 
da 
wi 
31 
pr 
si 
He- 
el 
ti 
an 
of 
fa 
in 
dr 



At the suggestion 
culty^ the Daily Col 
1 um n for f a cu 1 1 y n o t 
ily calendar, Notic 
11 be received at th 
3 Old Main, until 6 
eceding publication. 
ty a similar column 
w s is used t c a nn oun 
assroom, special ass 
ons, cancellations o 
d like material. Ad 

the Daily Collegian 
culty members for th 

n ew s gathering and 
ive . 

* * * * 



of members of the 
leg Ian will run a 
ices as part of its 
e s for this c o lumn 
e Collegian office 
p.m. on the day 

At Yale Univer— 
in the Yale Daily 
ce change s of 
ignments, examina- 
f class periods, 
am Smyser, editor 
, wishes to thank 
eir co— operation 
in the subscription 



'he Coll 



e g e Me a t Ma r k e " 



.coat- 



the basement on the south side o: 



;h 



;tock Taviiion, will be cpen for business 



October 4 from 1:30 



5 o.m. and each 



Or 



semester excepting vacation periods, 

ders may be placed by telephone at the 
Animal Husbandry office between the hour's 
of 9 a.m. to 12 nccn and 1:30 to 5 p.m. 
Thursdays, Patrons are reminded that 
these meat sales constitute the practice 
work of students taking the meats courses 
* * * * * * 



MINUTES OF THE COLLEGE SENATE MEETING OF JUNE 



1940 



At the meeting of the Senate on June 
, 1940, President Hetzel presided. 



tee 
ae 

Ruth 



commendat icn of the Commit— 

c Standards, exemptions tc 
^„n„„ , „~„ ^„^+„i *„,, Miss 



On the re 
^n Academic 
the residence rules v.ere grant 
Ruth E. Smith and Mr. Jacoh K. 



on Academic , 

rules v.ere granted for M 
oh K. Herman. 



The Senate voted tc permit the Com- 



mittee on Academic Standards to act with 
power on the cases of such students at- 
tending the slimmer session which might be 
referred to the Committee during the sum- 
mer t 

Appointments to the Senate committees 
for the academic year 1940-41 were ap- 
proved as follows: 



A cademic Standar d s 

. T , Smith, C h a i r ma n 

Mi s s L . Drummo nd 

R. H. Dotterer 

II. P. Hammond 

C. E. Marquardt 

Calendar 

J. T anger, Chairman 

Miss Marie Haidt 

R U. Blasingame 

T-7. S. Hoffman 

No W. Taylor 

Student s 
Miss N. P. Still-well 
J. H. Hihtard 

Military Instruct ion 
W. R. Ham, Chairman 
Mrs. I. S. II owl and 
T . D. Bowman 
A. R. Emery 
A. W, Gauger 
C. L. Harris 
II. C. Hnandel 
M. R. Trabue 



A dm issicns 

W. S, Hoffman, Chairman 

M. M. Babccck 

H« S, Brunner 

D. S »■ Cryder 

P. R. Daugherty 

J. D. Law t her 

S. J, Pirson 

C « 0. Williams 

Ccmmitt ee s 

D, C. Duncan, Chairman 
Mi s s P. K, Sprague 
M. A. Farrell 

C. W. Hasek 

D. F. McFarland 
F. C, Stewart 
C. P. Schott 



Rule s 
W . S . Dy e , jr., I 
K. A. Everett 
G. R. Green 
F. W. Owens 

Board of Student 
Banner 



Public Peer, siens 

Eaulfuss, Chairman 
Bi setoff 

Bullinger 

Grant 

Hibshman 

Heller 

lininger 

Morse 



J. 

E. C. 

C. E. 

R. M. 

J. 

F. 



0. 
F. 



Jhairman- 



Pub ligations 



A. 0. 

Students 
Miss F. E. Hohn 
F. R. Fiynn 



Athletics 

F. L. Be^tley, Chairman 

C, D. Champ 1 in 

A. E, Martin 
E, Steidle 

Ccur s e 's cf Study 

C. L. Xinslce^ Chairman 

E. C. Davis 
R. Eo Dengler 
R. A. Dutcher 

F. D. Kern 

D. R. Mitchell 

B. V. Moore 
M. W « White 

P ublications 

H e 3, Northrupj Chairman 

Y. A. Beede 

¥. F. Dantzscher 

J-. o . Ja bob 

J. B. Helme 
W. P. Lewis 

Student Welfare 
W. B. Mack, Chairman 
Mi s s J . D . Amb e r s o n 
Miss C. E. Ray 

E. C. Bischoff 

C . A . Bcnine 



£« 

J. 

A. 



II. Dusham 
P. Ritenour 
R, War nock 
Student s 



C 



Mi s s 
H. E 



Council en Research 



3. Black 
Wagner 



A. E 
C. C, 



dar , 
to t 
date 
givi 
a .m. 
3 a . 



Mart in 
Peter s 

On motion of the Committee on Calen— 

the Thanksgiving recess was changed 
he date set by the Governor from the 

set by President Roosevelt. Thanks— 
ng recess, therefore, begins at 11:50 

November 27, Wednesday; and ends at 



m, 



December 2, Monday 



The Senate voted to -approve' cert air- 
regulations concerning absences before 
and after vacations. These- regulations, 
as adopted, became Rules 58 to 63 of the 
Regulations Affecting Undergraduate Stu- 
dents, 1940-41 edition (Copies of the 
regulations are available for all faculty 
members at the Office of the Registrar). 

The following recommendation from 
the Graduate School was adopted: 

"Candidates presenting credits earned 



in other approved 'institutions, or in ex- 
tension classes of The Pennsylvania State 
College, may thus secure advanced stand- 
ing up to three credits provided they com- 
plete the work" for the degree in two se- 
mesters, one semester and 12 weeks in sum- 
mer sessions, r>r in 27 weeks in summer 
sessions. The credits must have the ap- 
proval of the Examiner, must fit into the 
program of the student, and must come wit] 
in the period allowed for candidacy." 

The S e nate adopted a re— wording of a 
rule in the Regulations Affecting Under- 
graduate Students 1939-40 by addinga 

t 

"In the cases of those students who 
desire tc earn a second Bachelor's degree, 
regulation No. 79 applies and the periods 
of residence for the first and for the sec 
ond degree may net be taken concurrently," 



P- 



ile 79e 



Wm. S. Hoffman, Secretary 



OFFICIAL NOTICES FROM THE OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR 



At the end of the second semester 
of the past academic year, and during the 
summer, 217 students were dropped for • 
poor scholarship. Their names are listed 
below. Those names preceded by an aster- 



isk were dropped for poor scholarship. 
Those preceded by two asterisks were 
dropped and reinstated. Where no aster- 
isk is printed, the student was dropped 
under the fifty per cent rule. 



School of Agric ulture 



School of Education (cont'd 



1 
1 
1 
*2 
*A 
1 

* *4 

1 

1 

1 

*3 

*0 

* *3 

1 

*4 

2 
2 

1 
1 
1 
3 



**1 
2 
3 
2 
1 

**3 
3 



2 

S 

S 

*2 

*3 

•4 

*2 

*1 

*3 

*2 

*1 

2 

2 

* 3 
*2 
*i 

* 3 
.*1 

1 
. *3 
*2 
•1 
*2 
♦2 
•1 
*3 
♦1 



Aker, Wm. G., Hrt 

Anstine, John B., ABCh 

Gaenzle, Frank D., For ■ 

Gerber, Samuel J., p-H 

Hauser, Jean P., L.Arch 

Ickes, Samuel J., Pre-Vet 

Jeffrey, Robt. G., ZiE 

Kenamond, Levris V., AgEd 

Kerlin, Wm. II., PH 

Eipp, Wilhelmina, ABCh 

Litch, Milton B., jr., ABCh 

MacDowsll, Frederic M.,- jr., 2yrAg 

Mowry, Geo. R., AgEng 

Prophet, Willis J., For. 

Reish, Rcbt. H., Hrt 

Rizi, Robert P., 2yrAg 

Rumbaugh, Frank H., DH 

Schwartz, Leonard II., Pre— Vet 

Shea, George M., 2yrAg 

Sidler, Frank V., AgEc 

Talley, Wallace R., For 

Thompson, Harry M. , Agron 

Willenbecher, Muriel I., ABCh 

Schc ol of Chemi s try and Fhy sic s 

Back, David N., ,ChE 
Clauser, Grace V.,-Ch 



Hartman, Paul G 



jr 



• > 



Johnson, Dale II., ChE 
Juda, Albert, Ch 
Mitch, Frank A., ChE ■ 
Sheen, Milton R., jr.. 



PM 



Sci 



Scho ol of Education 

Bates, Wm. E., IndEd 
Beyer, Mary S., Ed 
Broderick, John J., IndEd 
Cleaver, Anna C., HE 
Clinger, Mary E., HE 
Conway, Thomas, MusEd 
Fritz, Alice L., HE 
Gilkey, Helen L., HE 
Gillette, Margaret L., HE 
Graham, Eleanor W. , HE 
Hartswick, Jean- R., HE 
Hollister, Vincent, HE 
Jones, Thelma J,, HE 
Eammerer, David S., Ed 
La Porta, Mary A., HE 
Marshall, Sara J., HE 
Martini, Mary, HE 
Morris, Anna G., HE 
Park, Robert E., HE 
Piec, Roman, Ed 
Sellers, Mar jorie, HE 
Shifman, Paul, HE 
Sieber, Claire 0., HE 
Staver, Sara, HE 
Vought, Dorothy H., HE 
Ward, Gerald, Ed 
Warner, Robert E., HE 



; 2 Weiss, Arlene E,, HE 
4 Wright, Paul D., IndEd 
'1 Yerkes, Wilma M. , HE 



1 
2 

*2 

*4 
2 
2 

*2 
2 
S 
3 
2 
2 
3 

*4 
3 
2 

*4 
2 

*4 
2 

*2 
3 
3 

*2 
2 
3 
3 

*2 

*1 

*2 

*2 
2 

*2 
3 

*3 
3 
2 

*2 
4 
1 



•1 

*2 

*2 
*2 

*2 
2 
*2 
*2 
*1 
*2 
*3 
*1 
2 



Scho ol' of Engineering 



J. W., 



IEng 
ME 



Breish, . 
Brugler, R. B., 
Chris tman, A. R., EE 
Crispen, David, Arch 
Dempler, W. J., IEng 
*•«*-- c. A., ME 

A. E., IEng 
ME 



Fagan, 
Fletcher, . 
Geisler, W. S., 
Gib'son, N. J., LIE 
Godon, W. W., IEng 
nT-<»enlee, W. A., ME 
W. A., Me 

3d, LIE 
C . . Mi 



Gree 

Grun, 

ir ar + m rr 

nai u, j. . ivi. , 
Hart-well, T. o., . 

Hitchcock, J. W., IEng 
Reverter, W, E., ME 
Jackson, P. R., ME 
Eemledy, F.R., ME 
Eintner, R. S., EE 
Eulp, R.A., I/IE 
L e e rb e r g , J . W. , IE ng 
Martin,' C. L., ME 
Mauk, D. S., EE 
Mayer, XI. G., IEng 
Meyer, W. E., LIE 
Mowry, G. R.,' jr., ME 
Nippes, A. S., ME 
Nye, G. C., Arch ■ ■ 
Payeras, Henry, CE 
Phillips, M. A,, Arch 
Pcrras, George D., '^ 
fiuinn, M. B., ME 
Reilly, Richard W, 
Renner, K. , ME 
Richards, D. L,, ME 
Rit tenhouse, T. L,, IEng 
Shields, M. F., ME 
We bster,"F, E . , EE 
Weigard, J. L., ME 

T P IT- 



Arch 



Young 



IEng' 



School of the Liberal Arts 



Ad an s 



W"m. A., jr 



• t 



LD 



Arnott, John M. , LD 
Ball, Robt. ¥., LD 
Bardo, Wm. A,, LD 
Beeman, Thomas H., LD 
Bernstein, Helen R,, LD 
Bernstein, Myron, LD 
Calhoun, Isabel C., LD 
Catlin, Edward Y., LD 
Daker, John 0., LD 
Dice, Ruth V., LD 



Dilworth, Robt. W., 
Dodies, Norman, LD 



AL 
Dowler., Pre s sly R., LD 



School of the Liberal Ar" 



cont'd 



Transition Section 



*3 
*2 
*2 
2 
*2 
*2 
*2 
*2 
3 

* *2 
*S 
*1 
*1 
*3 
*3 
2 
*2 

**3 
*2 
*1 



*3 

2 

2 

*1 

*1 

* ] 

*2 

*3 

*2 

*1 

c 

4 

2 

*2 



Egan, Frederick J., CF 
Elinen, Richard, LD 
Erwin ; Clarence E., LD 
Evans, Margaret J., HE 
Freudiger, John, LD 
Gartland, James B., LD 
Goss, Martha, LD 
Harvey, David A., HE 
Hubler, John W«, Jour 
Huehnergarth, Richard J,, LD 
Humphreys, Helen J., LA 
Krantz, Dorothy J., LD 



Lei 



John Michael, LD 



Levy, Richard, OF 
Lewis, John L., 3d, CF 
Lowden, Frances M. , LD 
Lower, Isabel V,, LD 
McKelvy, James Sj, AL 
Maeser, R o b t . E . , 4th, LD 
Marcus, Joseph, LD 
Marple, Lewis, LD 
Maxwel] , Alexander W., LD 
Maxwell, Frances S,, LD 
Megaha;:, Eugene J., LD 
Filler, Glenn E., LD ■ 
Morris, Joseph E., LD 
Murfit, Wallace G., jr., LD 
Murphy, Francis C., LD- 



*1 Mussinj 



Beatrice 



Olsen, Arnold. M 



* .' 



LD 



Parsons, Llewellyn S., 
Fenman, John W», LD 
Reagan, William F,, LD 
Phody, Paul C., LD 
Rossi, Frederick M, - LD 



LD 
CF 



Schoenbrun, Helen J, 
Shapiro, Edward, LD 
Shick, Meade IT., CF 
Steciw, Stanley S., 
Tobias, Roma F., LD 
Trombl, Francis 1 . , 
Turk, Robert L. , 
Wharton, William'? 
Wolfe, John M ", LD 



LD 



:v 



LD 
LD 
LD 



School of Mineral ludu strie s 

2 Beerbower, R. C», Mng 

2 Bodendorfer, Ao E«, Mng 
■3 CI aud iu s , R, C ? , Mng 

3 . Eck, C , . J» , Lie t 



**1 Hart son, 



' c , PNG 



**2 Toothman, G. W., Mng 

Schc ol of Physical Education 
2 Earl, Anne Harriet, PEd 



2 Jones, Catherine E., T 

2 Lucas, Weir S., T 

3 del Papa, Nadir Jose, jr., T 



»DC 
*SC 

*AC 
* SC 
*HC 
*FC 
*HC 

* *DC 
*AC 
*DC 
*AC 

AC 
*SC 
*FC 

*sc 
*sc 

♦DC 
*DC 
*_DC 

*"sc 

*DC 
*FC 
*DC 
*SC 
*HC 
*HC 

*sc 

*HC 

**DC 
*SC 
*HC 
*DC 
*SC 

**SC 
♦HC 
*DC 
*DC 
*AC 
*AC 
•DC 

**DC 
*DC 
*FC 

**DC 

*sc 

* *DC 
»HC 

**HC 
*DC 



Undergrs duate Center s 

Beatty, Martha E. 
Caroll, Thomas J, 
Cassidy, George J, 
Chesko, J. William 
Cotter, Eugene M. 
Crow, Philip B, 
Davidheiser, Joseph L # 
Earhart, Earl F. 
Furrer, Eugene E. 
Gardiner, Donald S. 
Garthcff, Guy H. 
Goldstein, Darriel H, 
Haig, Andrew P. 
Ha 11am, Claude K. 
Hampton, Robert B. 
He pier, Lenwood G. 
Hessltine, Lillian M. 
Hout, Eleanor J. 
Humes, John R', 
Hreshko, William 
Jones, Betty J. 
Jordan, Robert, jr. 
Salberer, Nancy J. 
Kissinger, Robert W. 
Kransteuber, Warren G. 
Lamont, James P., jr. 
Lcskin, John E 8 
Lockwood, Samuel A. 
Loucks, William V. 
Lucas, George J., jr. 
Lucia, Michael C. 
Mage©, Merritt G., jr. 
Mantell, Leonard N, 
Mills, Jame-s L. 
Monahan, John W. 
Mo nroe, W i 1 1 i am E . 
O'Mara, James W. 
Peterson, Marian M. 
Policastro, Josep 1 ' A. 
R c s s , Jo h n A . 
Schoenrn~n, Harry R. 
Stewart, Fred C<, 
Th omp son, Jame s E a 
Thompson, Ruth K. 
Ufberg, Saul H, 
Wedge, Charles A., 
Yenchko, Stephen 
Yensel, Richard F. 
Yoke, William F. 



.ir, 






Wm. S. 
Regi strar 



■Io:c fman 



* * 




imixdvi saqvis ssm 



THE PEN 




PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 



Published weekly on Tuesday during the College 
year as a means of making official announcements 
and presenting items of interest to the faculty. All 




VOL. 20 



October 8, 1910 



BULLETIN 

contributions should be as brief as possible and reach 
Walter F. Dantzscher, Director of Public Information, 
105 Old Main, not later than 10 a.m. each Friday. 

NO. ' - 



PEP RALLY THIS FRIDAY TO DE BROADCAST 



All members of the faculty 
and staff are invited to attend 
the., annual student-alumni football 
pep- rally which will be broadcast 
from Recreation Hall by Station 
KDKA of Pittsburgh this Friday, 
..October 11, from 8 to 8:30 p.m. 
The. ha 1 f -hour program will consist 
of 01 ee Club, Flue Band, and var- 
iety numbers, and short' informal 
interviews with Coach Bob Higgins, 
West Virginia Coach Bill Kern, and 
football captain Leon Gajecki. A 
specialty act on the order of the 
"information, Please 1 ' program has 
been written for the three Daily 
Collegian campus beauty queens. 
Since the program will be ampli- 
fied over the public address sys- 
tem, those In Recreation Hall will 
cet- the full benefit of the show 



designed primarily for the radio 
aud I ence . 



Actua 
wi 11 get u 
dents and 
that time 
War ing ' s C 
Time progr 
ing wi 11 d 
song, and 
in Recreat 
KDKA of fie 
rehearsal 
the aud i en 
ing. 



lly Friday night's rally 
rider way at 6:45, Stu- 
a 1 umn I will 'gather at 
to hear alumnus Fred' 
hesterfield P 1 e a s ur e 
am at 7 o'clock. War - 
edicate a new Pcnn State 
this will be amplified 
ion Hall, At 7:30 p.m. 
ials will hold a timing 
for the broadcast, using 
ce for singing and cheer- 



Immediately following the 
rally the Dally Collegian will 
hold its annual subscription dance 



ALUVNI DAY EVENTS 



'■ Approximately 2000 alumni are 
expected to return this' week-end 
for Homecoming, according to Ed- 
ward K, Hibshman, executive secre- 
tary of the Alumni Association. 

Faculty members, as well as 
alumni and seniors, are cordially 
invited to attend the cider party 
to be held in' the Armory at 8:30 
p. Hi. Saturday, October IF. 

The sports program for the 
clay includes the West Virglnia- 



Penn State football game at Z p.m. 
on Hew Beaver Field, a soccer game 
with Western Vary land at 1 p.m., 
the junior varsity football game 
with Cornell at 1 p.m., the fresh- 
man football game with Bucknell 
at 10 a.m., and the cross country 
meet with Michigan State at 3 p.m. 

The chape P speaker October 
15, .alumni Sunday, will be Dr. 
Robert W. Searle, of the Greater 
New York Federation of Churches, 
New York City. 



EXHIBIT OF SELF-PORTRAITURE THROUGH THE AGES NOT/ 

Koko schka , 



The story of the way artists have 
seen themselves in paint, sculpture, and 
other mediums from the time of the Phar- 
oahs to the present day is the theme of 
an educational exhibition, " Self -Portrai- 
ture through the Ages," which opens to- 
day, Tuesday, October 8, and will contin- 
ue through October 23 in the College Art 
Gallery, 303 Main Engineering, Prepared 
by the Division of Education of the Phila- 
delphia Museum of Art, the exhibition con- 
sists of 54 photographic enlargements of 
the world's greatest masterpieces of 
self— portraiture. 

A new method of making ideas in art 
stimulating and meaningful to the average 
...an has been employed in this exhibition, 
according to the announcement of Pro — 
lessor J.' Burn Helme. The story is de- 
veloped chronologically beginning with 
the self-portrait of Ni-ankh Ptah, an 
Egyptian artist of 2650 P. C,, and con- 
cluding with self-portraits of such 20th 
century artists of international reputa- 
tion as Matisse, Edvard Munch, Paula 
Moder sohn-Be cker , Max Beckmann, Oskar 



<iT COLLEGE ART GALLERY 
Modigliani, and Picasso. 



Early Christian times and the self- 
effacing midieval era are both represented 
by a single self-portrait. The 400 years 



beginning with the 15th century 
tists began to mirror 
quently in their art, 
to the end of the 19th 



, when ar — 
themselves more ire — 
and continuing up 
century are repre- 



sented by 40 self-portraits. Most of the 
famous names in art since the Gothic age 
are included. Some of these are Memling, 
Purer, the older Brueghel, Titian, Tin- 



toretto, El Greco, Velasquez, Goya, Corot 
Degas, and Cezanne. Five of the 64 known 
self —portrait s of Rembrandt form an im- 
portant section of the exhibition. The 
photographic reproductions of the por- 
traits are accompanied by brief word de- 
scriptions which explain the works of art 
and interpret their significance in sim- 
ple • language easily understood by the 
layman. 

The gallery is open daily except 
Sunday from 8:30 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. The 
public is cordially invited. 



MINUT' 



OF THE COLLEGE SENATE MEETING OF OCTOBER 3, 1940 



A meeting of the College Senate was 
held in room 121 Liberal Arts Thursday, 
October 3, 1940, at 4:10 p.m., with 
President Hetzel presiding. A list of 
'.he members present is on file in the 
o f f i c e of the Registrar. 

The secretary announced, changes in 
membership as follows: Dr. Farrell, an 
elected member from the School of Agri- 
culture, to become a senator as head of 
che department of bacteriology; Dr. Tan— 
ger to become a member as head of the 
aewly created department of political 
science ; Dr. Martin to become a member 
as head of the department of history; 
Professor Frizzell as head of the newly 
created department of speech; Dr. L, M. 
.'ones to replace Dr. E. C. Davis in the 
School of Physical Education and Athlet- 
ics; Dr , W, C. Bramble as an elected mem*- 
bsr from the School of Agriculture in 
place of Dr. Farrell, 

The pre sident. made certain announce- 
ments in connection with enrollment, reg— ' 
istration for military service, equipment 
the new buildings, and the budget for 



! or 



the next biennium. 



A recommendation from the Committee 
on Academic Standards for an exception to 



the residence rules for Miss Gertrude 
Regan was, on motion, adopted, 

Dr i Tanger presented a report for 
the Committee on Calendar -presenting the 
Calendar for the academic year 1941—42. 
The report of the Committee was adopted. 
('The calendar is printed elsewhere in 
this issue of the Faculty Bulletin.) 

The secretary read the following 
statement from Dean Fletcher: "Dean Dick 
and Dr. Shigley are in agreement in rec- 
ommending that students who take the 
three year pre—veterinary curriculum at 
The Pennsylvania State College and then 
transfer to the School of Veterinary 



Medicine of the University 



Pennsyl- 



vania, be eligible to receive the bach- 
elor's degree from this institution en 
the satisfactory completion of the sec- 
ond year at the University of Pennsyl- 
vania rather than the first year as at 
present. This, I understand, is in keep- 
ing with the policy followed at other 
institutions." The president referred 
the recommendation to the Committee on 
Academic Standards. 

The Senate then adjourned, 

V/m. S. Hoffman, Secretary 



LATEST ENROLLMENT STATISTICS 



Campus . . 
Mont Alt o . 
Centers. . 



This Year 



6535 

158 
417 



Last Year 



6517 
127 
556 



Total 



7110 



7200 



OF GENERAL INTEREST 

By authority of the Centre County tions as a medium of social contact be- 

Commissioners, a committee of registrar:; tween members of, the various Schools, 

taken from the College staff will regis- ** ** ** 

ter all undergraduate and graduate stu- _ _ , , , . , . ' 

, , „ : .f , .„ ° , ri . , faculty members who have not received 

dents of draft age next Wednesday, October „ * n . , . _, -. r , . 

u.ci-uo w± e j , copy ox the Calendar of Chapel Speakers 

16, in the Armory. Faculty and staff mem- _, li n x --in ■, i • i • ~ 

, ' .,, . ., J * n- •+ ' . ln „ .• + ^ for the Current year will be supplied 11 
bers within the age limits will register ' . .,. . . ^ l - , . 

7 f, . , , tt- ^ n they will telephone Mass taller, depart- 
ed their regular polling places. J . _ ' 

„, ,, ** ment of specen, 

* * * * + * 

A national broadcast to answer spe- 
cific questions of students and faculty Individual members of the faculty 

members regarding the Selective Service who desire a copy of the P.S.C.A. Student 

Act and potential military training will Handbook should make their request to the 

be given this evening, Tuesday, October Christian Association at once, either by 

3, from 10:15 to 10:30 p.m. over a net- telephone or through the faculty nail, 
rorl: of the Columbia Broadcasting Company. 

Questions will be asked by Dr. Harry The cafeteria located on the ground 
Noodburn Chase, chancellor of Hew York floor in the Home Economics Building 
University, and Dr. C. C. Williams, pres- opened for business last Monday, September 
ident of Lehigh University. They will 30# Luncheon is served daily from 11:45 
be answered by Lt . Col. Lewis B. Hershey, to X2 :30. All foods served in this cafe- 
executive officer at the national Selec- teria are prepared by students registered 
tive Service Headquarters, Washington, in auantity Cookery classes, 
and Dr o Frederick Osborn, chairman of the * * ** ** 
Advisory Committee on selective Service, 

Washington. The broadcast is sponsored The depar t me nt of forestry has avail- 
by the American Council on Education, able a ii n i te d quantity of fireplace wood 

from the College Farm woodlands for de— 

A collection of textiles, bows and livery in October and November. Some may 

arrows, primitive musical instruments, be delivered also at a later date. This 

and various other articles from the Ilui— wood is mostly oak, with some cherry, ma— 

chol Indians of Mexico and the Quiche pl ( -, and a small percentage of pine. It 

Indians of central Guatemala are on dis- will be sold at the standard length of 

play in two of the glass cases on the two feet. Orders will be taken, however , 

third floor of the Mineral Industries for other lengths if received in time. 

Building. Dr. Henry J „ Bruman, instruc- The price for a load delivered is $4. If 

tor in geography, who collected these wood can be unloaded in the driveway, a 

items, has promised most of them to the discount of 30<z5 is allowed, A load is 

Field Museum, Chicago; therefore they the equivalent of one— half cord or, when 

will be exhibited locally for only a few cut in two-foot lengths, a stacked pile 

weeks, four feet high and eight feet long. Or— 

** ** ** ders will be taken by letter or telephone 

The Pennsylvania State College Grad- at the department of forestry.^ 
uate Club will have its opening meeting 

at the Sandwich Shop, Old Main, this , , , x, 

Thursday, October 10, at 3 p.m. Graduate /'V^T' W \° holl J ht a ^usnel of 

students, faculty members, and secretar- Ho « 1 Mcintosh apples from the College 

ies are invited. New students especially orchard last Thursday October 3, about 

are urged to attend, since the club func- 10 a ' r -'°> 1S requested to call Professor 

F» N« Fagan, department of horticulture. 

OFFICIAL NOTICES FROM THE OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR 
T ransfers from the Two— Year Course in Agriculture to a Four— Year Course in Agriculture 

James Miles Hall, AgEc George VanlCennen, For Eermit L, Witmer, AgEd 

Changes in Classification 

j Lindsey E. Bierer — should be Fr, in Mechanical Engineering. 
! Joseph John Bushek — change from Fr» to Soph, in Phys. Ed 

Simon G. Hamaty — change from Soph, in Lower Division to Fr, in Lower Division, 
j Mae D, Lethbridge — change from Sp. in Min, Ind. to part-time Jr, in Geol, 

James Claude Lewis — change from Soph, in Lower Division to Sr, in Arts and Letters, 
i Curtis C, Wallace— —change from Sr. to Jr, in Science, 

; Change of Name ; Walter Randall Hurwitz to Walter Randall 

Bernard Anthony Kowaleski to Bernard Anthony Koval- 



The registration of William Gilvert Marshall was cancelled Sept, 19, 1940, 

Wm, S, Hoffman, Regi 



strar 



1940-41 




1940 




Sept . 


12, 


Thuri 


Sept . 


16- 


17, Mon.-Tu. 


Sept , 


18, 


We d . 


Sept. 


18, 


Fe i • 


Sept. 


20, 


Fri. 


Sept. 


26- 


27, Thur.-i'r 


Oct. 


*.12, 


Sat, 


Nov. 


13, 


Fe d , 


Nov, 


27, 


Fe d , 


Dec. 


o 

<- 1 


Lion. 


Dec. 


21, 


Sat. 



COLLEGE CALENDAR 



Freshman Week begins 8 a.ri. 
Registration, First Senester 
Freshman Week ends, 11:50 a,n, 
♦First Senester begins 1:10 p.n 



1941-42 
1941 



Sept 



Payne nt 



Fre shi.ien 



payment cf Fees, Upper Classes Sept, 
Alumni Hone coning Day 
Ltidsenester Be low-grade Reports 1:10 p»n, 

, 11 :50 a.n. 
ends, 8 a,n, 
Christnas Recess begins, 11:50 a.n. 



Thanksgiving Recess begin 
Thanksgiving Recess 



Sept o 

15-16 

Sept , 

Sept , 

Sept, 

25-26 

Oct , 

Nov. 

Nov, 

Dec, 

Dec, 



1941 



11, 
, Ho 
17, 
17, 
19, 

11, 

12, 
26, 

1, 

20, 

1942 



Thur . 
n.-Tu. 

Fe d , 

Fed. 

Fri, 
.ur ,-Fri, 

Sax , 

Fed. 

Fed. 

lion. 

Sat, 



i 



Jan. 


6, 


lion. 


Jan. 


6 , 


lion. 


Jan. 


20, 


I 'on. 


Jan. 


28, 


Tu, 


J an. 


29, 


Fe d . 


Jan. 


29, 


Fed, 


F e b , 


- f 


Hon. 


F e b • 


3-4, 


I.k> n . — Tu 


F e b , 


5, 


Fe d . 


F e b , 


13-1. 


4, Tliur. 


Mar . 


1, 


Sat. 


.j^pr » 


2', 


Fe d . 


Apr . 


9, 


Fe d e 


Apr. 


16, 


Fe d . 


Kay 


•27, 


Tu , 


May 


30, 


F r i . 


June 


^ f 


Thur . 


June 


6, 


Fri. 


June 


7- 


Sat, 



June 


8, 


Sun « 


June 


9, 


Lion, 


June 


10, 


Tu. 


June 


27, 


Fri. 


June 


30, 


Lion. 


July 


1, 


Tu . 


July 


A 


Fri. 


Aug. 


7, 


Thur . 


Aug, 


8, 


Fri. 


Aug. 


8, 


Fri. 


Aug. 


11, 


Hon, 


Aug. 


11, 


lion. 


Aug. 


29, 


Fri, 


Sept . 


■11, 


Thur. 


Sept . 


15- 


L6, Hon 


Sept . 


17, 


Fe d . 


S e p t • 


17, 


Fe d . 


S e pt . 


19, 


Fri. 


Sept . 




?6, Thu 



Christnas Recess ends, 3 a.n. 

Finter Courses in Agriculture begin 

Examinations begin 8 a.n. 

Midyear C onuenceuent 8 p.n. 

First Senester ends 11:50 a,n, 

Midyear Recess begins 11:50 a.n. 

Midyear Recess. ends 8 a.n, 

. Registration, Second Senester 

**Second Senester begins 1:10 p.n. 
—Fri. Payne nt of Fees 

Finter Courses in Agriculture end 11:50 e 
Midsenester Below— grade Reports 1:10 p.r 
Easter Recess begins 11:50 a.n, 
Easter Recess ends 1:10 p.n. 
E xan i n a t i o r> s be g i n 8a, n . 
Me n o r i a 1 Day Recess 
Second Senester ends 5 p.n. 
Election of Trustees by Delegates 12 nt 
Alunni Day 

Election of Trustees by Graduates closes 
Annual lie e ting of Board of Trustees 2 
Baccalaureate Day 
Conner, cement Day, Class Day 
Inter— So s s ion Registration 8 a.n, 
Int er— Se s si on begins 10 a.n, 
Inter-Session ends 5:50 p,n, 
Sunner Session registration 
Sunner Session begins 8 a.n. 
Independence Day Recess 
Sunner Session Connencenent 
Sunner Session ends 5:50 p.n. 
Entrance Examinations 
Post-Session Registration 8 a.n, 
Post-Session begins 10 a.n. 
Post— Session ends 5:50 p.n. 
Freshman Feeic begins 8 a,n, 
,— Tu. Registration, First Semester 

Freshman Feek ends 11:50 a.n. 
First Senester begins 1:10 p.n. 

Payment of Fees, Freshnen 
Payment of Fees, Upper Classes 



,-i-ri 



Jan. 


5, 


, Mo n . 


Jan, 


5 


, Lion. 


Jan. 


19' 


, I ion. 


Jan. 


27] 


, Tu * 


Jan. 


23* 


, Fed, 


Jan. 


23, 


, Fed, 


Feb. 




, Mon, 


Feb. 2-3 


} J 


m.-Tu._. 
, Fed. 


Feb. 


— r 


Feb, 12-13, ' 


Jhur ,-Fri. 


, m . Feb, 


20 


c 'i + 


• Apr. 


1 


, Med. 


Apr . 


1 


, V/ed. 


Apr. 


8 


, Fed. 


May 


26 


, Tu. 


May 


30 


, Sat. 


June 


4 


, Thur. 


on June 


5] 


, Fri, 


June 


6 t 


, Sat. ; 


11 a.m. 






p . n . 






June 


7 


, Sun. 


June 


a' 


, Lion. i 


June 


o 

J 1 


, Tu . 


June 


26 


, Fri. 


June 


2 9* 


, Mon. 


June 


30 ' 


, Tu . 


July 


A 


, Sat . 


Au g . 


e' 


, Thur . 


Aug. 


i 


, Fri. 


Aug. 


7 , 


, Fri. 


Aug. 


10* 


, LIo n . 


Aug. 


10 


, Mon. 


Aug, 


23' 


, Fri. 


Sept, 


10 ' 


, Thur . 


Sept. 14- 


15,' 


Moni— Tu, 


S e pt . 


16 


, Fed, 


. Sept , 


16* 


, Fed, 


Sept . 


18] 


, Fri, 


Sept.' 24- 


25, 


Thur ,-Fri, 



♦First Senester: 
♦♦Second Senester 
President t 



;tball Saturday half holiday by student selection, 

n at 11 a.n,, date to be selected by the 



One 

P.S.C.A. ConvocatM 
the College, 






THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 



, FACULTY 

Published weekly on Tuesday during the College 
year as a means of making official announcements 
and presenting items of interest to the faculty. All 




VOL. 20 



October 15, 



I BULLETIN 



contributions should be as brief as possible and reach 
Walter F. Dantzscher, Director of Public Information, 
105 Old Main, not later than 10 a.m. each Friday. 

i NO. 4 



PENNSYLVANIA COLLEGE PHYSICS TEACHERS TO MEET 



clu 

cal 

col 

van 

the 

leg 

her 

£5 

off 



V 

:iin 

ch 
leg 
ia 

Pe 
e- P 
e F 
and 
Ice 



very teacher of physics, in- 
g chemical physics and physi- 
emistry, in every recognized 
e and university in Pennsyi- 
has been invited to attend 
nnsylvania Conference of Col- 
hysics Teachers to be held 
ri day 'and Saturday, October 
26. The group' has neither 
rs nor dues. 



M embers of t h e f a c u 1 1 y are 
invited to inspect ' the booh and 
apparatus exhibits from 3 to 5 
pirn, on Friday in the old Physics 
Building, and to attend other 
events of the conference. 

Dr. W. R. Ham., head of the De- 
partment of Fhysics, will be chair- 
man of the meeting to be held from 
1:30 to 3 on Friday afternoon, dur- 
ing which Dean Whitmore will give 
an address of welcome and papers 
will be presentee by physicists 
from Ur sinus, the University of 
Pennsylvania, St. Vincent College, 
Allegheny Col lege, • Carneg i e Insti- 
tute of Technology, and the Uni- 
ve r s i ty of Pitt s b ur g h . 

Evening events include a get- 
together in the second floor lounoe 
of Old Main from 6 to 6:15 p.m.; 



ets pi); a lecture on "The Role of 
Physics in Dentistry' by Dr. Arthur 
P. r ^able, Darby professor of oper- 
ative dentistry at the University 
of Pennsylvania, to be given in the 
lecture room of the "new Physics 
Building; and a cider party after 
the Lecture in the Sandwich Shop. 



In addition, there will be a 
student . meet i ng under the auspices 
of the Fenn State chapter of Sigma 
Pi Sdgma, physics honor society. 
This Will be featured by a sympo- 
sium on "Physics from the Standpoint 
of the Bre-Medical Student," to be 
held »in room IIP of the new Physics 
Building from 3 to 4:30 p.m. 

There will also be special en- 
tertainment for visiting ladies, 
details of which may be secured at 
the registration desk in the old 
Phys I c s ' Bu i 1 d i no • 



the annual dinner 
Chop from 6:15 to 



in the Sandwich 
7:45 p.m. (Tick- 



The Saturday morning sympo- 
sium will center about the theme 
of physics in medicine. All pre- 
medical students are urged to at- 
tend. Talks will be given by rep- 
resentatives of Temple University, 
University of Pennsylvania, and 
University of Pittsburgh medical 
schools, and by a representative 
of the Central Scientific Company 
of Chicago. 



The 
Sunday, « 
Kenrv W, 



CHAPEL SPEAKER 

speaker in chapel next 
)ctober CO, will be Dr. 



A. Hanson 



resident of 



Gettysburg College. 



AGRICULTURE FACULTY TO MEET 

The School of Agriculture fac- 
ulty will meet this Friday, October 
18, at 4:10 p.m. in 109 Agriculture 
Dean S. W. Fletcher announces. 



2 



SCHOLASTIC MORTALITY AS RELATED 
Second Semester 1939- 

In the Faculty Bulletin cf March 5, 
1940, dismissals for poor scholarship dur- 
ing the first semester 1939—40 'were ana- 
lyzed and tabulated according to rank in 
the high school class. On October 1 the 
Faculty Bulletin published a. list of stu- 



TO RA 


NK IN HIGH SCHOOL CLASSES 


4 an 


d Summer 1940 




dent 


s dropped for 


poor scholar 


end 


of the second 


semester 193 


duri 


ng the summer 


of 1940. In 


ing 


tabulation the latter grou 


down 


into smaller 


groups by cl 


lege 


and by rank in secondary 



ship at the 
9-40 and 

the foil ow- 
p is broken 
ass in col— 
s chc ol : 



Rank in 3 econdar y S ch ool Graduat ing Class 



First 
Fifth 



SecoiK 
Fifth 



Third 
Fifth 



Fourth 
Fifth 



Fif th 
F i f t h 



Mot 
Ranked 



Total 



Senior 



Junior 



3 ophomore 



580 



0.51 



618 



0.4 9 



I 16 



J16 



i . yo 



.11 
'reshman 895 



i.2; 



;si 



0.7 9 



10 



378 



2.64 



33 



544 



6.06 



12 



460 



2,61 



170 



1.18 



17; 



3.49 



11 



240 



4.! 



265 



7.55 



69 



1.45 



10 



63 

15,87 



13 



117 

11.11 



21 



15 9 

13.20 



39 



.56 



21 



14,23 



15.26 



16 



86 



10.61 



!7 



3.70 



18 



5.55 



6.2 5 




Special j 

a n d 
Two— Year 



34 



59 



39 



32 



'otal 



;12 

i.: 



1763 



7 



3.35 



84 7 
4.60 



JL 



408 

11.2! 



:os 



110 



15.6 



6.36 i 3. 



Beg inn 

rectangle i 
ber dismiss 
the number 
specific f - i 
uating clas 
this group 
senior clas 
uated from 
first fifth 
cent , were 

Admi s s 
fifths of t 
represented 



ing 


at 


n t 


he 


ed 


f or 


of 


stu 


fth 


of 


s; 


and 


dr o 


ppe 


s > 


of 


their 


of 


th 


dro 


ppe 


ions t 


he 


sec 


on 


Sc 



the upper left of each 
table, we have the miDi- 

poor scholarship; next 
dents who ranked in the 

the high school grad— 

last the percentage of 
d. That is, for the 
the 580 who were grad— 
secondary school in the 
e class 3, or .51 per 
d. 

o the class of 1943 by 
ondary school class are 
ale 1, Eight hundred 



ana ni 
gradua 
Di smis 
'on Sea 
S event 
■the fr 
fifths 
23.5 p 
fifths 
dismi s 
and 71 
fifths 
in the 
t otal 



nety eight 
ted in the 
sals from 
le 2.. The 
y one and 
e s hma'n c 1 a 

of their 
er cent we 
; whereas 
sed were i 
.2 per cen 
. A simil 

m a k e — u p a 
enrollment 



, or 47.3 per 

first fifth o 
the same class 
contrast is s 
five tenths pe 
ss were in the 
class in high 
re in the lowe 
28.8 per cent 
n the upper tw 
t In the lower 
ar contrast is 
nd dismissals 



Scale 1 
Make-up of Freshman Class (1901 ) by Rank in High School Clas 



cent, were 
f the class. 

are shown 
t-rik-a ng , 
r cent of 

upper two 
school and 
r three 
of those 
o fifths 

three 

apparent 
from the 



Not 
Ranked 



'irst Fifth 



898 



Second Fifth 
47.3^ j 46 24.2^ 



Third Fifth j 4th 
265 13.9^1 159 8.4 



5th 
86 



4.5 1.7 



o ca 
Dismissals from Freshman Clas's ( 



le 2 

80) by Rank in High School Class 



1st Fifth 
j II 13.8^ 



Second Fifth 
12 ' 15. 0%' 



Third Fifth Fourth Fifth 
2 2 5 . 0$ Rl 



26.2^ 



"j" 'Fifth Fifth 
j 16 2 . Q% 



Scale 3 
Make-up of Total Enrollment (6245) by Rank in High School Class 



Not 
Ranked 



First Fifth 



2912 



46.6% 



Second Fifth 
1763 28, 



1 3rd Fifth 
?847 13.6%' 



4th 
408 



5th 
12 



3 Id 



Total Dismissal 



Scale 4 
217) by Rank in High School Clas 



6.5 3.3 1, 

Not 
Ranked 



First Fifth 



Second Fifth { Third Fifth Fourth Fifth I Fifth Fifth 
59 2 7.1^ ! 39 1 8.0£ | 46 21 . 2 % j 32 14. 7^' 



1.3% 



M, V. Brown, Office of the Registrar 



MEMBERSHIP AIID COMMITTEE LIST OF THE C OLLEGE : SENATE 
For the Academic Year 1940-41 



Members of the College Senate for 
the academic year 1940—41 are listed be- 
low. The letters following the names of 
the individuals indicate their status on 

for the first letter following the name 



the College staff, the School with which 

they are connected, and membership on 
Senate committees. The symbols used for 
these designations are as follows: 



P President 
B Bean 



H Bepartment Head 

R Bean's representative 

E E 1 e ct e d' memb e r 



S Substitute for 

A Member of administrative staff 

V ■ Visitor 



Schools are indicated by the following abbreviations 

Ag Agriculture En Engineering 

CP Chemistry and Physics LA Liberal Arts 

Ed "Education ' -MI Mineral-Industries 



PE Physical Education 

G Graduate School 
MS Mi 1 it a'ry S ci'e nee 



Membership of Committees is indicated by the following list of abbreviations: 



AS Academic Standards 

Ad Admissions 

Ath Athletics 

Cal Calendar 

Com Committees 



CR Repr. on Council on Research Pub Publications 



CS Courses of Study 

■M Military Instruction 

N Not any" 

PO Public Occasions 



R Rep, on Bd, of 
Student Pub. 
Ru Rules 
SW Student Welfare 



The chairman of a committee is indi- 
cated by the use of the capital letter 
"C" following the abbreviation for the 
committee. Elected members from the 



Graduate School have, in parentheses, 
following the letter "G", the abbrevia- 
tion "for the School with which they are 



, 1 : 



'iliat e d. 



Amb'erson JB— E — Ed — SW 
B a b c o ck MM — E — E n — A d 
Banner FC — H — LA — R 
Beede VA — H — Ag — Pub 
Bent ley EL — H — Ag — Ath.C 
Bernhard RK — H — En — N 
Pischoff EC — E — PE — PO — SW 
Blasingame RU — H — Ag — Cal ' 
Bonine CA — H — MI — SW 
Borland AA — H — Ag — II 
B owma n T B — E — LA — M 
Bramble WC — E — Ag — N 
Broyle s WA — K — Ag* — N 
Brunner HS- — H — On leave 
Bui linger CE — H — En — PO 
Champlin CB — E — Ed — Ath 
Chandlee GC — II — CP — N 
Cryde'r' B3 — E — CP— Ad 
Da nt Z'scher WF — Y— -Pub 
Laugher ty PR — E — LA — Ad 
Bavi s JIM — E — G ( MI ) — N 
Bengler RE — II — LA — CS 
B o g g e 1 1 LA — E — G ( E n ) — N 
r ' o 1 1 e r er . RR — K — LA — AS 
Qrummpnd L — H — Ed — AS 
BuMcnt FM — H — LA — II 
Duncan BC — E- — CP — Com.C 
Du s h am E H— II — A g — S W 
Butcher RA — H — A g — C 3 
Bye WS — II — LA — Ru.C 
Emery: AR — H — MS--M 
Everett HA— -K — En--Ru 
Far r e-11 MA — -H— Ag — C om, 
Fletcher S W--D — -A g — N 
F orbe s EB — H — Ag — N 
Fuchs WM — E — MI— N 



Gates TJ — H — LA — Pub 
G au g e r AW — II — MI — N 
Grant' RW — H — LA — PO 
Green GR— H — E d— Ru 
Haidt M — E — PE— Cal 
Ham WR — II— C P ; — M . C 
Hamm o n d HP — B — E n- — AS 
Harris CL — E — En- — M 
Ha s e k CW—-H — LA — C om 
Hechler FG — II — En— N 
He lme JB--E— G ( En ) — Pub 
Hetzel RP — P — N 
H o f f ma n WS — A — A d . C — C a 1 
Hostetter SK — A — N 
Rowland IS — R — PIC— M 
Hurrell AS — H — Ed — N 

Johnstone BE — H — En~H 

Jones BC — E- — MI — N 
Jones LM — R— PE— CS 
Kaulfuss JE — E — En— PO.C 
Keller EL — H — En — IT 
Heller JO — A — PO 
Kern FB — B — G (Ag ) — CS 
Kin sloe CB— H — En— CS-.C 
Knandel HC — H — Ag — M 
Lawther JD— E— PE — Ad •■ 
Lewis WP — A — Pub 
Lininger FF — II — Ag — PO ■ 
McBowell MS — II — Ag — IT 
McFarland BF — II — MI — Com 
Mack' BB— H— Ed— IT' 
Mack WB--H — Ag — SW.C - 
Marquardt CE— A — AS 
Mart in AS — E — G ( BA ) — Ath — CR 
Mavis FT— H* — En— -N 



Mitchell DR — H— MI — CS 
Mo or e BV — IT — E d — CS 
Mo rse A — A — p 
Nicholas JE — E — Ag — IT 
Noll CE — H--Ag — N 
Northrup KB— H — MI — Pub ,C 
Owen s F W — H — LA — Ru 
Peters C C — II — E d — CR 
Pierce FT J- — H — LA— N 
Pirson 3 J — H- — MI — A d 
P o p p HI I — R '(G) — A g — N 
Pugh BB — II — LA — N 
Ray CE— *-D — SW 
Ritsnour JP — A — SW 
Schott CP — D — PE — Com 
Sheffer IM — E — LA — N 
.Smith OF — E — CP.— AS.C 
Sprague P — E — Ed — Com 
St e idle E — B — Mi — Ath 
Stewart EC — E — En — Com 
S t o d d a r t C } I — B — LA — N 
S t r u ck F I — H — E d — N 
Tanger J — IT — LA — Cal.C 
Taylor JA — E — MI — N ' 
Taylor NW--H — MI — Cal 
Teichert 'EJ — E — MI— N 
Tr abue MR — 3 — E d — M 
Wahl HA — E — Ag — IT 
Warno ck AR — B — SW 
Wa t ki n s . RV — -V — A— N 
Wh i t e MW — E — C P«*-C S 
Whitmore FC — B — CP — IT 
Wi 1 d e E I — E — A g — N 
Williams C — S— Ed — Ad 
Wurfl GJ — E — LA — IT 



Wm, S-« Hoffman, Secretary 



PH.D. EXAMINATION TO BE GIVEN 



SPORTS CALENDAR 



Dean Frank R, Kern announces tlie 
following preliminary examination for 
the Ph.D. degree: Mr, Samuel Zerfoss.j 



major, ceramics; minor, cnemi; 



T 



and 



mineralogy; today, Tuesday, October 15 



room 210 Mineral Industries. 
* * * * 



Sports events this Saturday, Octo- 
ber 19, include the following: freshman 
soccer with Syracuse at 1 p.m., freshman 
football with Colgate at 2 p.m., and 
varsity soccer with Bucknell at 3 p.m. 



OFFICIAL NOTICES FROM THE OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR 

Change s in Cla s sif icat ion 

Thomas C, Culp — Junior to Sophomore in Industrial Engineering 
Edward Charles Martin — Sophomore to Freshman in Lower Division 

Chang) in Name 

Victor William Ficre to William. Victor Fiore 

Withdrawals 



2 


Adkins, William M. , Sept. 9, LD 


3 


Bender, Esther M. , Sept. 20, HE 


1 


Beranek, Andrew J., Sept. 18, Mng 


1 


Bcssard, Harlan G., Sept. 24, LD 


1 


Brown, Donal E., Sept.' 20, LD 


3 


Claudius, R. C,, jr., Sept. 19, Mng 


U 


Davis, Robert, Sept. 25, IndEd 


2 


Fallon, Jack S«, Sept. 25, LD 


2 


Gibbons, Harold D., S e pt. 19, LD 


1 


Gordon, Marvin Jack, Sept. 18, LD 


3 


Eildabrand, Theodore J,, Sept. 18, A 


1 


Hat o ski, Harry S.^ Sept. 19, PEd 


1 


Lowans, Warren H., Sept. 27, ME 


G ' 


McAuliffe, Herbert D., Oct. 1, Bact 


-i 


McGeehan, Betty I., Sept. 23, LD 


1 


McGuire, Robert G., No Date, IE 


2 


May, William A., Sept. 24, TS 


g 


Meahl, Robert P., Sept. 23, Hrt 





Miller, Daun R., Sept* 13, Ag 


1 


Morgan, Richard V., Sept. 25, PEd 



2 
3 
S. 

s 

1 

3 
1 
G 

1 
1 
2 

o 

G 
1 

1 

]. 

4" 

1 

1 



i-o s s , IvI 
Navran, 
Parnell 
Feterna 
Pound, 
Remcho , 
R o s s y , 
Pummel, 
S a ch s , 
S cannel 
Smith, 
Spyker, 
Umpleby 
Van Ing 
Vogini, 
Wa 1 1 a c e 
Weaver , 



Tl 



f ° e 



Pt 



Leslie, Se 

Rebecca H 

n, Edna F., 

Doris J . , S 

Karl, Sept 
Doris M., S 
, Paul K., S 
Theron E., 
1, Gerald, 
Gale L , , Se 

, J c seph G 
en, Warren 



. 13, A 
pt. 21, For 
'., Sept. 23 

Sept . 18 , 
ept , 24, LD 
. 18 . C 



, LA 
, AL 



ept , 25 



ept. 17, PEd 



' f 
19. 



'hys 
ept. 19, AgEd 
Sept. 13, Met 
pt. 18, CF 
opt, 2 3 



LA 



John 



i,i,, 



Robert J . 



Elmer A«, 
Werner, Robert E., 
Williams, William 



, Sept.' 30, PNG 
D., Sept. 25, AgE 
ept . 14, LD 
^ Sept, 27, PEd 
Sept* 27, ABCh 
Sept, 14, ChE 
E,,"Sept. 23, LD 



Of the above 6 withdrew because of 
illness, 6 to go to work) 6 transferred 
to another school, 1 for poor scholarship, 
9 for financial reasons, 2 for sickness 



.t home, 3 for conflict in scheduling, 1 



for overcrowded cla.ss 



for marriage, 
for no reason. 



2 for dissatisfaction, 

Wm, S. Hoffman, Registrar 



^Jisjqiq 9 2 H Q 



XSI'IKVKC ' U SAG VIS SSIifi 



THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 



FACULTY 

Published weekly on Tuesday during the College 
year as a means of making official announcements 
and presenting items of interest to the faculty. All 




VOL. 20 



October 



BULLETIN 

contributions should be as brief as possible and reach 
Walter F. Dantzscher, Director of Public Information, 
105 Old Main, not later than 10 a.m. each Friday. 



1940 



NO. 



5 



PAUL ROBESON, CELEBRATED AMERICAN BASS-BARITONE, 
SIGNED AS OPENING NUMBER ON ARTISTS' COURSE 



Seeking to provide a program this 
year which would rival or excel last 
year's series, the current Artists' 
Course will begin with a concert by Paul 
Robeson, noted American bas s— bar it one , 
Pr « Carl E. Marquardt, committee chair- 
man, announced today. Robeson, 'whose 
rendition of " 01 ' Man River" and Negro 
spirituals over the radio and on the 
stage and screen has won him world—wide 
acclaim, will appear in State College on 
Monday evening, December 9. 

The return of Paul Robeson to the 
concert stage is described as the big 
news of the current music season. After 
four triumphant years in Europe, he re- 
cently began a cr o s s— country tour in 
America with an initial concert at his 
alma mater, Rutgers. It was no mere geo- 
graphical convenience that started his 
tour at New Brunswick, his manager said, 
because it was at Rutgers that he won his 
Phi Beta kappa key in his junior year and 
was hailed as the greatest defensive end 
that ever trod the gridiron. 

At Carnegie Hall, where he gave his 
first concert on October 6, every avail- 
able space was packed with standees, in- 
cluding the rear of the boxes and the 
rear of the orchestra and the balconies. 
Pew artists before the American public 
have received the moving reception which 
was tendered to Robeson. It was several 
minutes before the concert could begin. 



Paul Robes 
He completed a 
Columbia after 
At the time of 
in a play in a 
ing Eugene 0'Ne 
kacgowan, produ 
scenic director 
audience. Thej'- 
with the young 
O'Neill went ba 
to appear in hi 
son laughed at 
sist ed and f ina 
try the part . 
soon found hims 



on meant to be a lawyer, 
three-year law course at 
graduating from Rutgers, 
his graduation he appeared 
nearby Y.Li.C.A, The ris — 
ill, playwright, Kenneth 
cer, and Robert E. Jones, 
, happened to be in the 
were vividly impressed 



;e rfro 



talent, and Mr, 



ckstage and asked Robeson 
s "Emperor Jones." Robe— 
the idea, but O'Neill in— 
lly persuaded Robeson to 
To his a str onishment , he 
elf taking the final 
* * 



curtain to a wildly applauding, cheering 
audience, the first of many he was to know 
in his exciting career. His phenomenal 
success lay not. alone in his dramatic 
gifts but in the marvelous quality of 
his speaking voice. 



He had alwa 
had never occurr 
concert stage un 
give a recital o 
New York; The e 
resonant bass— ba 
the throng that 
For his next con 
in a s n ow storm, 
sold out . Soon 
and sensational! 
ce s se s dr if t e d b 
Berlin, Vienna, 



ys loved to sing, but it 
ed to him to consider the 
til he was irduced to 
f Negro spirituals in 
motional splendor of his 
ritone held spellbound 
had come to hear him. 
cert, a long line waited 
only to find the house 
after, he went abroad, 
'eports of musical sue— 
ack from London, Paris, 
Prague, and Budapest. 



in the na- 
was now a 



His ret ur n t o Ame r i ca wa s 
ture of a triumphal entry. He 
world— famed singer, and his own native 
land was waiting to acclaim him. From 
coast to coast he toured, thrilling the 
ear and the soul with compas s ionat e beau- 
ty, truth, and spirituality of the Negro 
folk music through the medium of his 
great voice. 

Back to Europe agai 
cert tours and a career in motion pi 
tures, topped by the film version of 



or long 



peror Jone; 



Robeson remainei 



^y 



on— 


c— 


" Em 


for 


ns 


nd 


g. 


s s e d 


s a y , 



four years during which time America 
missed his concerts and the rhythm a 
emot ion— charge d beauty of his singin 
Not to have heard Robeson sing "Deep 
River" and "water Boy" is to have mi 
an exalted experience, music lovers 



His return to this country this year 
was signalized by one of the most excit- 
ing radio adventures of the season, the 
first performance of Earl Robinson's folk- 
oratorio "Ballad for Americans," a work 
whose freshness of spirit and novelty of 
style is said to have opened up an en- 
tirely new concept of American music. 
It was introduced at the premiere of the 
Columbia Broadcasting System's new "Pur- 
suit of Happiness" program, 
* * * 



STAFF TAKES STEPS TO FACILITATE PUBLICITY 
FOR RESEARCH* MEMBERS CITE SPECIFIC GAIN£ 



That the efforts of the Sigma Xi 
Committee on Publicity for Research and 
the endeavor of the Department of Public 
Information to stimulate a greater inter- 
est on the part of members of the staff 
in publicity for research projects are 
already bearing fruit is witnessed by 
several major developments of the past 
few- weeks : 



associated with Johns Hopkins University; 
a research chemist in Florida; the Miami 
Chamber of Comma r ce ; . an interested indi- 
vidual who at this writing has not been 
more specifically identified; and the 
Biochemical Foundation of the Franklin 
Institute, Philadelphia, 

Dr. West lake made this statement: 



1. The Department of Education and 
Psychology, signalizing the success of 
his efforts to interpret psychology to 
the lay public, has designated Professor 
Fdward B. van Orrner as a permanent point 
of contact between the Department of Edu- 
cation and Psychology and the Department 
of Public , Information and local publica- 
tions, 

2. The Division of Sociology has 
commissioned. Prof ess or Duane V. Ramsey 
to perform a like mission for sociology* 

Meanwhile comments testifying to 
the specific value of publicity for re- 
search projects have continued to be re- 
ceived from individual members of the 
staff. 

. Due in part to Professor van Orrner 's 
efforts, a news story concerned with the 
background of a book on statistics by Dr. 
C. C. Peters, director of educational re- 
search, and Walter R. VanVoorhis was dis- 
tributed to Sunday papers of October 13, 
It was published in brief form on the 
educational -pages of Sunday's New York 
T ime s . 

"The very first day after it ap— • 
peared I received 12 letters inquiring 
about the book and its publisher," Dr. 
Peters told the publicity department. 

Further testimony of the value of 
news publicity in the establishment of 
new and valuable professional contacts 
is found in the experience and comments 
of two other members of the staff, Pro- 
fessor Helmut Landsberg of the School of 
Mineral Industries and Dr. Harold 'Test- 
lake of the Department of Speech, 



Dr» La ndsb erg's exp 
of the release of a news 
the discovery of a new m 
ing ultra— violet light, 
widely published and bro 
and contacts from the fo 
Department of the Genera 
pany; the Titanium Divis 
tional Lead Company; the 
sion of the Air Corps; t 
Sine Company of Pennsylv 
can Association for the 
Science; the Burton Manu 
of Chicago; the Atlas El 
Company of Chicago; a sp 
heliotherapy; a former c 



erience grows out 
story announcing 
ethod of measur— 

This story '.fas 
ugh.t inquiries 
llowing: the Lamp 
1 Electric Com— 
ion of the Na— 

Materiel Divi- 
ne New Jersey 
ania; the Ameri— 
Advancement of 
facturing Company 
e ctr ic .Device s 
eciaiist in 
o lie ague now 



"The publicity given last year t'o my 
work with deaf children made some very 
valuable contacts for me. The articles 
brought 'letter's which put me in touch 
with people who had worked on the same 
problems or related problems, and as a 
result. I had the benefit of their exper- 
ience on the subject. Letters also came 
from schools for the deaf, as well as 
from people who were merely interested 
in the hearing problem. Probably I could 
have made these contacts in no other way,' 

Latest of the major scientific sto- 
ries released was a story dealing with 
the research work of Dr. Pauline Beery 
Mack, which summarized her findings on 
individual case studies among families of 
various' income status as relating the 
month of birth to the development of the 
skeletal frame. 



This 
partment 
suit at ion 
Howard W. 
the Assoc 



papers, O 
papers, 
yet compl 
that the 
major pap 
geographi 
York to S 
Fort L 7 or 
shown exc 
doubtedly 
the retur 



story was o 

of Public In 
with Mrs. IP 
Blake slee , 
iat ed Pre s s , 
appeared in 
ctober 3, an 
ctober 4, I 
e t e , but a p 
item >» r as pri 
ers in 13 st 
c distributi 
an Francisco 
th. The 'tot 
eeds 4,300,0 
b e amp 1 i f I e 
n s are all a 



ffered by th 

f o rma t i o n , i 

.ok, exclusi 

science edit 

was accepte 
Thursday eve 
d Friday nor 
he returns a 
art ial repor 
nted in at 1 
ates and tha 
on ranged fr 

and from Bo 
al circulati 
00, which wi 
d still furt 
s semble d. 



e De- 
n con— 
ve ly t o 
or of 
d by 
ning 
ning 
re not 
t s h ow s 
east 26 
t it s 
om Hew 
st on to 
on so far 
11 un- 
her when 



As a matter of fact, clippings from 
a number of these papers (not included in 
the totals shown above) were sent to Mrs* 
Mack by friends located in various parts 
of the country, Mr s . Mack's independent 
survey indicated that two Harrisburg 
papers used the story, one paper in Hew 
York, one in St. Louis, one in Minneapo- 
lis, one in Berkeley, and two in Tulsa, 
Oklahoma. "They were all sent in by 
friends except one, which I saw myself," 
she said. Before the publicity depart- 
ment was in a' position to report publica- 
tion in 26 papers, Mrs. Mack observed 
that the story is "having at least some- 
what good coverage." 

It appears evident that the interest 
of the faculty can be more readily en- 
listed through the recital of specific 



instances of advantages gained through 
the release of ne"W5 material. For that 
reason The Faculty Bulletin will continue 
to publish, from week to week as space 
permit s, additional reports on success— 

* * 



ful news stories, particular ly of the 
scientific type, and will attempt to out- 
line ' other methods whereby news of this 
kind may be brought closer to publica- 
tion, 
< * * 



MOTION PICTURE TO BE PRESENTED THIS EVENING 



A motion picture 
ting the painting of 
preliminary sketch to 
ture, will be shown t 
day, October 22, at 7 
Main Engineering. Th 
"Waynan Adams Paint in 
is shown under the au 
Alpha, honorary fine 

Mr, Y/ayman Adams 
demonstrations in per 
professional art grou 
day criticisms freque 
portrait class in Eli 



in color, demonstra— 
a portrait, from a 

the finished pic— 
his evening, Tues — 
:30 p.m. in room 107 
e film is entitled 
g a Portrait," and 
spices of Pi Gamma 
arts fraternity, 

has given similar 
sons before important 
ps and in the Thurs- 
ntly given to his 
zabethtown, New York, 



It is to be noted that the film is in 
full color, which makes a more satisfac- 
tory demonstration of a painting technique 
than would be possible with black and 
white. 



"The sponsors of the film, the I 
Grumbacher color laboratories in 



are to be congratulated for their w 
ingness to make the production in c 
said Professor J, Burn Helme in his 
nounoement , 

The public is cordially invite- 
attend the showing of the film, 
< * * 



w York, 

ill- 

olor," 

an— 



i to 



EXHIBIT OF BOOKPLATES NOW AT COLLEGE LIBRARY 



A collection of bookplates, loaned 
:by the Southern Printmakcrs Society of 
tit • Airy, Georgia, is now being exhibited 
at the College Library, It will continue 
until October 31, 

Among the out standing ■ plat e s in the 
collection are those of colleges and uni- 
versities all over the United States, 
Harvard, Dartmouth, Brown, Yale, the Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania, Vassar, and Rad- 
oliffe are but a few of those included. 
Plates of the Gamma Tau chapter of the 
Sigma Nu fraternity at the University 'of 
Minnesota and of the Beta Eta chr.pter of 
Delta Tau Delta are also shown. 

There are over 100 plates covering 
a wide range of the coat of arms type, 
from the extremely modest to the very 
ornate. This has always been a very 
popular style of plate for designating 
b o o k own e r s h i p , 

Public libraries are well repre- 
sented by their plates, Birmingham, San 
Francisco, New Haven, Detroit, and Boston 



are some of the cities whose lib: 
are represented in the exhibit. 



iris s 



t h e o u t s t a n < I i n g m e t li o d s of 

liiustration is that of the wo.od— 
Of the 34 beautiful wood — z 
h nv- . four have been drmp n 



One of 
plate illustration is 



cu t , 

this s h ow , 

Lankes, one of the renowned artists i 

this field. 



in 



-cut s 
done by J, J 



The collect ion is not without its 
famous names. Ten of the bookplates be- 
lonE? to statemen and writers such as 



IToodrow Wilson, Burton Holme 
Harte, and Newton D, Baker, 



Bret 



The most fascinating plates in the 
collection are those that carry out the. 
owner'' s name in the design, Charles Na- 
gel's plate shows three dwarfs hammering 
a large nail, above which is the motto, 
"Der Nagel halt fest," James Noel Ney's 
plate has a coat cf arms made of a Christ- 
mas tree with two keys crossed behind.it. 
That of Albert Gardner Cone Is made up 
of a border of pine cones which encircle 
an evergreen tree. 



ENGINEERING FACULTY URGED TO ATTEND S ,P ,E ,E . MEETING 



Faculty members of the School of 
Engineering are urged to attend the sixth 
annual meeting of the Allegheny section 
of the Society for the Promotion of Engi- 
neering Education to be held at Carnegie 
Tech this Friday and Saturday, October 25 
and 25, Saturday has been selected as 
the annual football holiday. 

Since Penn State is inviting the Al- 
legheny section to our campus on November 
14 and 15, 1941, it is especially impor- 
tant that the College, have- a good repre- 

* * 



sentation at this year's meeting. 

The program is said to be unusual; 
the speakers have an excellent reputation 
in their various fields; and every topic 
is of personal interest to those associa- 
ted with engineering college instruction. 

Faculty members who need transporta- 
tion are requested to notify Professor 
F, C, Stewart, Mechanical Engineering Lab- 
oratory, or professor Albert P, Powell, 
108 Electrical Engineering, 
* * * * 



OF GENERAL INTEREST 



The C 
class this 
afternoon, 
class will 
for a peri 
meeting wi 
room of th 
ing. The 
to take th 
at once ei 
Supervis or 
Elder of t 
partment , 
to 2 memb 
* * 



ollege employees' first aid 




fall will begin this Friday- 


inf 


October 25, at 3 p.m. This 


tra 


hold two— hour periods weekly 


oft 


od of 10 weeks. The place of 


sma 


11 be the Grounds and Buildings 


has 


e Central Liberal Arts Build- 


yea 


names of the persons wishing 


the 


is course should be submitted 


pai 


ther to Mr, R, Y. Sigworth, 


Wor 


of Utilities, or to Mr, Lor in 




he Grounds and Building De- 




fer the class will be limited 




er s . 


tob 



Paul Morit: 



rho 



has just returned 
from a year of travel in West China as 
the "student ambassador" of the Student 
Christian Movement, will speak in the 
Heme Economics Auditorium tomorrow eve- 
ning, Wednesday, October 23, at 8 p.m., 
on the subject "Will China Survive?" 



Mr. Moritz obtained his first— hand 
ormation on conditions in China by 
veling, sometimes by rail but more 
en by bus (frequently an open truck), 
11 boat, rickshaw, and on foot. He 

come back to the United States for a 
r of college visits in all sections of 

country to help both with relief can— 
gns and with interpretation of the 
Id's Student Christian Federation. 

* * 



The chapel speaker this Sunday, Oc- 
tober 27, will be Dr. Charles Love Durham, 
Department of Classics, Cornell Univer— 
s ity . 

* * * * * * 

Two sports events will be held this 
Saturday, October 26: the varsity and 
the freshman cross country meets with 
Syracuse, both at 2 p.m. 

* * * * * * 



■■?■ 
i 



S3HNYH0-* SA<2VIS SSIW 



THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 



. FACULTY 

Published weekly on Tuesday during the College 
year as a means of making official announcements 
and presenting items of interest to the faculty. All 




BULLETIN 

contributions should be as brief as possible and reach 
Walter F. Dantzscher, Director of Public Information, 
105 Old Main, not later than 10 a.m. each Friday. 



VOL. 20 



a 



.u 



PER 2©, 1940 



NO. 



PUBLICITY FOR PSYCHOLOGICAL MEETINGS LIKELY TO SET 
AN ALL-TIME HIGH; PITTSBURGH PRESS ASiCS FOR PICTURE LAYOUTS 



The likelihoo 
the five psycholog 
tions on the oampu 
State College duri 
September would se 
for the volume of 
for the College se 
an effort was "'made 
covering these mee 
tearsheets and cli 
Department of Publ 
for this issue of 



d that the meetings of 
ical and speech assooia- 
s of The Pennsylvania 
hg the first week of 
t an' all— time record 
newspaper publicity 
emed assured today as 

to' compile a report 
tings on the basis of 
ppings received by the 
ic Information in time 
The Faculty Bulletin. 



was mentioned, but the publicity depart- 
ment is hoping to prepare layouts in such 
numbers that this series will run each 
Sunday for twenty or thirty consecutive 
weeks . 





Although 


the Colleg 


reau 


had been 


instructed 


not 


to submit 


clippings 


oirc 


ulations under 50,00 


Pennsylvania , 


or in c it i 


100, 


000 popuh 


tion, the 


the 


publicity 


department 


stories released during 


ber 


1 and just 


before t h 


s e s s 


ions will 


probably e 


(f if 


ty mi Hi or 


) in total 



On the basis 
distribution as am 
different circulat 
probable that stor 
scientific meeting 
in issues of paper 
billed circulation 
100,000,000. The 
of all daily newsp 
States (approximat 
39,670,682. A rep 
results in hand w i 
publication in the 
Faculty Bulletin, 



e ' s clipping bu- 
' not to clip and 
f r om papers w i t h 
0, excepting in 
es with less than 
exhibits now in 

indicate that the 
the week of Septcm- 
e opening of these 
xceed 50,000,000 

circulati on, 



of known circulation 
org newspapers of 
ion groups, it is very 
ies released during these 
s will have circulated. 
s having a total cc in- 
between 85,000,000 and 
total daily circulation 
apers in the United 
cly 1800 or 1900) is 
ort on the verified 
11 be completed for 
next issue of The 



Spec ime n layouts 
nod by the publicity d 
mission to The Press, 
begins, It is likely t 
to interest" ether' edit 
a pictorial record - of 
the College. The publ 
therefore find it' nece 
few weeks to call upon 
of the College to ; co-o 
of pictures which have 
in principle . • - 



are now being 
epartment for 

Once such a s 
hat it will be 
ors in the sta 
the a ct ivit ies 
icity departme 
ssary within t 

various depar 
p e r a t e in the 

alreadv met a 



plan- 
sub— 
erie s 

easier 
t e in 

of 
nt will 
h e next 
tment s 
taking 
ppr oval 



Sugge st ions' a s t 'o topics which may be 
treated in these- layouts will he grateful- 
ly received. Our photographs will natural- 
ly stand greater chance of acceptance if 
we try to conceive these pictures from the 
point of view of the reader for whom they 
are planned. A number of obvious sugges- 
tions have already been rejected in prin- 
ciple simply because they have been over- 
done. Faculty members who are not acquaint- 
ed with the Press may rest assured that 
their interests are in good hands in deal- 
ing with the Press. Those particularly in- 
terested are likely to find the layout 
in last Sunday's roto section on the 
Pennsylvania School for the Blind especi- 
ally interesting. The Press dees not 
encourage' sensational distortion in photo- 
graph or in text, but it finds it neces- 



sary, 



course, to think in nontechnical 



In its more intensive efforts to 
publicize research on the campus, the 
College has just received an invitation 
from The Pittsburgh press to prepare for 
the consideration of the editors of that 
paper pictorial layouts representing in- 
teresting activities of various types. The 
request included specific suggestions to 
include pictorial narratives having to 
do with research and a promise was made 
to use the layouts, if acceptable, week 
after "week as long as they seemed inter- 
esting. No specific number of layouts 



terms in appealing to the readership of 
its roto section. 

To study the problem of publiciz- 
ing the School of the Liberal Arts more 
effectively, Dean Charles U, Stoddart 
last week appointed a committee consist- 
ing of Professor Jacob Tanger and Pro- 
fessor Franklin C. Banner. They have al- 
ready met with members of the news staff 
and will probably report to the faculty 
of the School of the Liberal Arts at 
an early date . 



CLEVELAND SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA TO APPEAR ON ARTISTS' COURSE AGAIN 

The Cleveland Symphony Orchestra will The Cleveland Orchestra is 

again appear on the Artists' Course pro- fortunate in "being one of the few 
gram this year, Dr , Carl E, Marquardt, com— symphony orchestras to oira the hall 

mittee chairman, announced today. The in which it plays. Severance Hall, a 

orchestra will appear on Monday evening, building of great beauty and exceptional 

March' 17, 1941. The. Course this year will acoustics, represents an investment of 

begin 'with the appearance of Paul Robeson, nearly $3,000,000. An orchestra that 

noted. Negro bass baritone, as announced owns its own hall is not only secure 

last week, en December 9, in planning its activities several sea- 
sons ahead; it is also free to arrange 

The Cleveland Orchestra needs no ex- its concert and rehearsal schedules 

tended introduction to Pennsylvania State at its own convenience and is not obli- 

College audiences, at least not to those ged to rehearse in strange halls where 

who have welcomed it several times in the it does not play its concerts. Such 

past with undiminished interest, Pr , Mar- a practice, forced upon many orchestras, 

quardt pointed out. can rarely produce entirely satisfactory 

results, Dr. Rodzinski points out. 

In fact, one of the remarkable fea- 
tures of the Cleveland Orchestra is the The hall was a gift of the 

number of times it has been requested to noted philanthropist, John Long Sever— 

give repeat performances in the same lo— ance. In the vestibule leading to 

calities. This, according to Dr. Artur the foyer is a marble tablet bearing 

Rodzinski, is the testimony of excellence these words of Plato: "Music is a moral 

of which it is proudest. law. It gives a soul to the universe, 

flight to the imagination, a charm to 

It has appeared more than 70 times gaiety, and life to everything. It is 

in Oberlin, Ohio, where Oberlin College the essence of order and leads to all 

is the frequent sponsor, and more than 30 that is good, just, and beautiful." 
times in Columbus and in Pittsburgh, 

Toledo, Youngstcwn, Akron and New York Rodzinski came to America in 

have each heard the orchestra more than 1926 and has oeen an American citizen 

20 times and it has appeared almost as since 1933. He spent three years with 

often in Dayton, Chic, and in Hamilton, Stokowski in Philadelphia, where his 

Ontario. versatile talents were engaged in many 

fields. He was director of the Curtis 

Throughout the past 22 seasons of Institute's orchestra and operatic 

its existence the orchestra has sought departments, and tool: an active part 

continually to enhance its standards in the development of the Philadelphia 

and to broaden its horizons, Noted for Grand Opera Company. During this per— 

the breadth and distinction of its re— iod he appeo.red as guest conductor of 

pertory, it has played a total of 856 four other American orchestras: the 

concerts in 25 states, Canada, and Hew York symphony, the Detroit Sym— 

Cuba. In this, its 23rd year, it Trill phony, the Rochester Philharmonic, and 

present 32 concerts in 12 states. the Los Angeles Philharmonic. In 1929 

he accepted the invitation of the Los 

Dr. Artur Rodzinski is now begin- Angeles Philharmonic to become its 

ning his eighth year as conductor of regular leader, and he held this post 

the organization, which owes much of until 1933, when the Musical Arts 

its recent success to his breadth of Association of Cleveland engaged him 

musical knowledge and appreciation, his to direct the Cleveland Orchestra. His 

skillful mastery of detail and his stim— seven seasons with the Cleveland bave 

ulating leadership of the 82 virtuosos been characterized by distinguished 

in the organization. achievement* 

* * * * * * 

A.A.U.P. AND PHI DETA HAPPA TO MEET THIS WEEK 

The local chapter of the American The local chapter of Phi Beta Lappa 
Association of University Professors will will meet this Thursday, October 31, at 
hold an open meeting In Old Main Sandwich 4:10 p.m. in room 19 Liberal Arts, The 
Shop today, Tuesday, October 29, at 7:30 chapter wishes to add to its roll the 
p.m., according to an announcement from names of all newcomers on the faculty or 
Professor J, T, Law, secretary. The pro- in the community who are members of the 
gram will Include the results of the society. Information should be sent to 
questionnaire on hospitalization, a re— Miss Vera L, Moyer, secretary, the Col- 
port of the Committee on Instructional lege Library, and should include the fol- 
Problems, comment's on the Faculty Uelfare lowing data: name (if a married woman, 
Committee, and an interpretation of the the maiden name also); college; year of 
effect of the Hatch Act upon faculty in— graduation and of initiation; position, 
fluenoe in borough government, to be pre— if an employee of The Pennsylvania State 
sented by Mr, Russell E. Clark, bursar. College; local address. 
A business meeting will also be held. 



OF GENERAL INTEREST 



Arthur R. War nock, Dean of lien, and 
Miss Charlotte Ray, Dean of Women, '.fish 
to announce that the College considers a 
desire to go home to vote to be a legit- 
imate reason for excusing a student from 
class work missed,, Instructors should 
therefore grant such excuses without 
prejudice to the student's standing* 
* * * * * * 

Congressman James E, Van Zandt will 
speak at the Armistice Day Memorial Serv- 
ice to he held in Schwab Auditorium at 
11 a,m„ Monday, November 11, The meeting 
will be sponsored by the Penn State Chris- 
tion Association in co-operation with the 
State College Citizens Committee, the All- 
College Cabinet, the Student Religious 
Workers Council, and the Inter-Church 
Fellowships Classes are to be dismissed 
at 11 o'clock, according to action taken 
by the Council of Administration on Mon- 
day, October 21 „ The program will also 
Include an organ prelude, a period of 
worship, and probably at least one musi- 
cal selection. A student representative 
•will preside, and a representative from 
the Citizens Committee will introduce 
the speaker. 

* * * * * * 

The first of a series of forums 
sponsored by the Forum Committee of the 
Penn State Christian Association 'will be 
held this Thursday, October 31, at 7:30 
p=m» in the Home Economics Auditorium, 
The topic will be "Should the United 
States Form a Permanent Union with the 
British Commonwealth of Nations?" Pro- 



Pennsylvania Historical Commission at 
Harrisburg, will speak on the affirmative; 
Professor John H. Ferguson on the nega- 
tive. Professor A. H,.Reede will give an 
economic analysis of the question, Rob- 
ert Dean Baird will act as chairman. 
* * * * * # 

The College Library will hold its 
ninth series of Wednesday Readings this 
year in room 402 (reached by elevator) of 
the Central Library, beginning November 
6 at 4:15 p.m. Speakers are as follows: 
Miss Pauline Locklin, November 6; I.Irs, 
Carroll D. Champlin, November 13; Mrs, 
Robert ¥, Stone, November 20; Mrs. Har- 
riet D. Nesbitt, December 4; Hiss Matilda 
Bentley, December 11; and Mrs, Henry S, 
Brunner, December 18. 



Graduate students desiring a course 
in elementary German in preparation for 
the Ph.D. reading test should immediately 
consult Mr, Harold W. Weigel, 225 Liberal 
Art s * 



Dr. Justin ¥„ Nixon, of the Colgate- 
Rochester Divinity School, Rochester, New 
York;, will be the chapel speaker this 
Sunday, November 3. 

* * * * * * 



Sports events this Saturday ,. Novem- 
ber 2, include football with South Caro- 
lina at 2 p.m. and freshman football 
with Cornell at 12:30 p.m. 

* * * * * + 



GRANTS-IN-AID OF RESEARCH 



At a meeting of the Council on Re- 
search held on October 14, 1940, the fol- 
lowing grants-in-aid of research were 
made from the Central Fund for Research: 

lo Richard B. Dow. Strength of Metals 
at High Pressures. $100. 

2 ; D. II. Rank. Infra red absorption 
cands of organic molecules. $150. 



J> K. Simons. Electrolysis in 
liquid hydrogen fluoride. $150. 

H e L, Yeagley. A new technique for 
::pe otro — chemical analysis, $150. 

5,. Arthur Rose. Effect of holdup on 
sharpness of separation in batch frac- 
tional distillation. $150. 

6 6 Michael R. Cannon, The relationship 
between viscosity and molecular struc- 
ture. $150. 

7 U Clifford R. Adams. The validation 
of an objective test of personality 
characteristics. $175. 



Oo C. R. Carpenter. The social be- 
havior of primates ( liacac a mula tta ). $200. 

9. Benjamin J, Lazan, Dynamic charac- 
teristics of materials. $150* 

10. H. F. Alderfer. A survey of the 
Minor Judiciary in Pennsylvania. $200. 

11 o Joseph F. 0'Brien o Experimental 
studies of the relative effectiveness 
of discussion and reflection as stimuli 



for persuasive speech composition. 



:50. 



12, K. Koepp-Baker. The physiological 
factors in the syllable,, $150. 

13. F. J. Tschan. Medieval History: 
Bernward of Hildesheim. $125. 

14. Joseph Jay Rubin. Theories of 
Prose Style. $150. 

15, E« C. Henry. The effect of various 
anions on the viscosity of clay suspen- 
sions. $100 o 



4 



16. H. M, Davis. The System, MgO-B 2 3 , 
$75. 



20. C, R. Austin. Dilatation studies. 
$100. 



17. D. W. LcGlashan. A fundamental 
study for the application of froth flo- 
tation methods to separation of minerals. 
$100. 

18. C. H. Sarnans. Effect of alloying 
elements on recry stallizat ion of cold 
worked pure iron. $150, 



19. M, C. Fetzer, Creep Propertie 
Cast Iron, $100. 



of 



21. H. Neuberger. Studies of the geo- 
logical basement complex in Centre Coun- 
ty. $150. 

22, Ivalclare Ilowland, Correlations be- 
tween the physical fitness index an$ re- 
sponses to mental acuity and skill tests 
and responses to nutritional tests. 
$200. 

S 9 W« Fletcher 
Chairman, Council on Research 



1 
S 

G 
G 
1 
1 
1 
1 
3 
1 



OFFICIAL NOTICES FROM THE OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR 

Withdrawals 



1 Ashworth, Earle G., For, Sept. 
*G Birch, Jack W., Ed, Feb. 8 

Brimmer, Daniel, For, Sept. 28 

Oct. 2 



28 



t r 

t L . , LA , 

T7> T„ 3 P J 



iiurney, iiarriei; jj., .ua, uct, c 
Carl, Kenneth E., IndEd, Sept. 27 
Coyne, Floyd P., Econ, Oct. 8 
DeGaetano, Robert M # , LD, Sept. 18 



DeGaetano, nuucio m . , ujj, jc_ 
Demarest, Merritt, LD, Sept. 27 
Denkin, Phyllis, LD, Oct. 16 

For, Sept. 



rest, lverrxtt , l.i 
..-in, Phyllis, LD, 
Diamond, Speros G., I 
Dresher, Beatrice, AL, Oct, 11 
Fiorletti, Victor J., For, Sept. 27 
r,nf-fn-r+. William, For, Sept. 26 



2 
2 
2 
G 
1 

O 

vJ 

1 
1 
3 

2 
**0 
2 
1 




Jones, Philip R., EE, Oct. 8 
Jones, Walter J., LD, Oct. 4 
Lukachek, Albert J., LD, Sep- 
McGuire, Thomas F., PEd, Oct 



14 



Mateer, Charles E., IndEd, Oct. 4 
I.ioersch, George W. , Ch, Oct. 16 
Price, Thomas E., PEd, Oct. 16 
Rand, Elizabeth . H. , LA, Oct. 2 
Reed, James B., For, Sept, 20 
Robinson, John N • , ME , Sept. 25 
Rydesky, Regina B., HE, Sept. 25 
Shaal, David W, , Ag, Sept, 27 
Stoudt, Robert F,, ABCh, Oct. 4 
Stover, Arthur M, , Ag, Jan. 21 
Stuokey, Robert B,, EE, Oct, 14 
Thomas, Marie D,, LD, Sept, 22 
Thompson, Paul H,, Ag, Sept. 18 
Weaver, Ruth Li., LA, Oct, 16 



Withdrew second semester 1939—40 
Withdrew first semester 1939-40 



Of the above 3 withdrew becau.se of 
homesickness, 2 because of other duties, 
4 to transfer to other schools, 1 because 
of unavoidable circumstances, 3 to go to 



work, 6 for no reason, 1 because of ill- 
ness at home, 1 to get married, 3 because 
of dissatisfaction, 7 because of finan- 
cial dif f icultue s , 5 because of illness. 



Change of Classification 



William Stanley Johnson — change from jr. in ME to soph, in LIE 



Reinstatement 



William C 



been reinstated in 



Gilbert Marshall, jr., has 
ed in the School of Liberal 



Arts as a junior for the first semester 
1940-41, 



Wn. 



Hoffman, Registrar 



rivj-Ol 



tl ® S3 \' 



,, - • >i S X G V 



19 Si 



THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 



FACULTY 



Published weekly on Tuesday during the College 
year as a means of making official announcements 
arid presenting items of interest to the faculty. M\ 




November 5, 



VOL. 20 



BULLETIN 

contributions should be as brief as possible and reach 
Walter F. Dantzscher, Director of Public Information, 
105 Old Main, not later than 10 a.m. each Friday. 

1940 7 

NO. 



METROPOLITAN OPERA CONTRALTO TO APPEAR ON ARTISTS' COURSE 



Anna 
Opera con 
the Art is 
17, 1941, 

M i s s Ka s k 

4-3 contes 
voices in 
poll tan r 
tract for 
regular w 
her re war 
her perfo 
"Cavalier- 
pheus and 
snr ina 'se 



Kaskas, M 
t r a 1 1 o , w i 
ts' Course 
Just fou 
as won fir 
tants chps 

the first 
adio audit 

leading r 
inter oper 
d for the 
rmances in 
la Rustica 



etropol i tan 
1 1 appear on 

program Apr i 1 
r years ago 
st place among 
en from. 700 

of the Metro- 
ions, A ccn- 
oles in the 
a season was 
excel lence Of 

"Rigoletto,"" 



na 



and 



Or- 



Euridice during. the 



ason 



Two years ago, in addition' 
to her Metropol i tan appearances, 
she. sang with a number of famous 
symphony orchestras, winning the 
praise net only of critics' but 
also of Serge Koussevi t sky, the - 
famous . conductor of the Boston 
Symphony. 

"She has a marvelous voice 
and great musical intelligence," 
Dr. Koussevitsky said "She sing 
with warmth and with authority. 
Miss Kaskas knows how' to produce 
tones with her throat, but she ha: 
music in her head, too." 



The Conn 
began the stu 
prominent mus 
contributed % 
to Europe to 
lected a 1 i tt 
in Lithuania, 
parents, the 
her financial 
ther musical 
year -old girl 
der Ferdinand 



ecticut-born c 
dy of music at 
ic lover who h 
500 toward sen 
study; her cho 
le more. Afte 

the homeland 
government the 

assistance fo 
training; and 

elected to st 

Per car a at Mi- 



ontral to 

15. A 
eard her 
ding her 
1 r co 1 - 
r a year 
of her 
re gave 
r f ur- 
the 18- 
udy un- 
lan. 



On e- y e ar later M i s s Kaskas 
made her debut in Favia, At the 
end of the ''second year she returned 
to America^ where she became solo- 
ist at the Catholic Cathedral in 
Hartford, a -position which she held 
for the next four years. Meanwhile 
she studied with' Enrico Rosatl, 
teacher" of Gigli, Lauri-Volpi, and 
Rosa. Tentonr . 

With a voice range of two and 
a third octaves, from low F sharp 
to a B flat top, Miss Kaskas has 
a pleasing appearance and person- 
ality as well as a beautiful tonal 
quality. Critics acclaim her charm 
as well 'as her voice and musical 
abi 1 i ty. 



CLASSES TO BE DISMISSED FOR ARMISTICE DAY SERVICE 



Faculty members are reminded 
that classes are to be dismissed 
at' 11 a,m next Monday, November 
11, in order to permit students to 
attend the Armistice Day Memorial 
Service to be held in Schwab Audi- 
torium at that hour. This action 



was taken by the Council of Admin- 
istration at a recent meeting,, 

The Honorable James E„ Van 
Zandt, Congressman from the ZZvd. 
district in Pennsylvania, will 
give the address. 



MODERATELY FRICED PAINTINGS NOW ON EXHIBIT; GALLERY TALK TO BE GIVEN 



An exhibition of original oil 
paintings of moderate size and 
price is now being held in the 
College'Art Gallery, 303 Main Engi- 
neering, 'and will continue until" 
Saturday, November 23. This care- 
fully selected group by various 
young American painters was chosen 
by Howard Devree, art critic of 
the New York Times, for the Amer- 
ican Federation of Arts. The pic- 
tures were laoned by a number of 
well known New York dealers' gal- 
leries, including Kraushaar, 
Walker, Downtown, Macbeth, Mid- 
town, ACA, and Fludson Walker, 

' In connection with the exhi- 
bit, Miss Hartley Fletcher, in- 
structor in fine arts and an ar- 
tist in oil and other media, will 
give' a gallery talk Wednesday eve- 
ning, November 13, at 7:30 p.m. 
This will be the first of the 
group of fine arts lectures for 
the winter season. 

The paintings include works 



by academic and modernist artists." 
There are landscapes, figure pieces, 
portraits, still-lifes, and indus- 
trial subjects; there are paintings 
by elder artists and by painters 
who have never had one-man shows. 



"Within 
itation, they 
emplify the s 
tiveneness of 
revealed in p 
right, ought 
of American h 
ment states, 
planations ne 
They speak fo 
are for sale 
on the labels 



a price and si 

are presented 

oundness and a 

American pain 

ictures which, 

to hang on the 

omes," the ann 

"No apologies 

ed be made for 

r themselves. 

at prices indi 



ze li in- 
to ex- 
trac- 
ting as 

by 

wal 1 s 
ounce - 

or ex- 

them. 

They 
cated 



State College people will be 
especially interested in the small 
oil by Lee Townsend of the Summer 
Session staff. The public is cor- 
dially invited to attend both the 
lecture and the exhibit. The gal- 
lery is open daily except Sunday 
from 8:30 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. 



EXHIBITION OF WOOD CARVINGS FROM OBERAMMERGAU 
NOW ON VIEW IN COLLEGE LIBRARY 



A collection of small wood 
carvings from the Bavarian village 
of Oberammergau is now on view in 
the College Library and will re- 
main there until November 25. 

The collection of about 61 
objects consists of several groups, 
the most notable being the Christ- 
mas Creche and the copy of the 
Regensberger Madonna, the original 
of which has been transferred to 
the Munich National Museum, 

' "The carving, 'The Last Sup- 
per,' executed in most minute de- 
tail and encased in a shrine, il- 
lustrates the delicacy and feeling 
the artist has in working this 
medium," the announcement states,' 
"Although the inhabitants of Ober- 



ammergau are" renowned for their 
dramatization of the Passion Flay 
and their wood " carvings, the lat- 
ter are usually associated with 
religious subjects! in the minds of 
.the general public. However, the 
little figures of children and 
animals give evidence of their 
skill also. Such carvings as the 
does. ..the horses,, the colts, and 
the barnyard group gathered around 
the watering trough express the 
artists' love of simple beauty and 
reflect their peaceful surround- 
ings ." 

The exhbition Is circulated 
by Blanche A. Byerly of Westport, 
Connecticut, and will be on tour 
for the rest of the season in var- 
ious parts of the country. 



OF GENERAL INTEREST 



The College Senate will meet 
this Thursday/ November 7, at 4; 10 
p.m. in room 121 Liberal Arts, ac- 
cording to an announcement from 
William S. Hoffman, secretary. 



The Graduate Club will have 
a, social meeting this Thursday, 
November 7, at 8 p.m„ in the Sand- 
wich Shop. All graduate students 
and members of the staff are cor- 
dially invited,, 



Miss Pauline Locklin will 
give the first of the series of 
Wednesday readings in room 402 of 
i.he College Library tomorrow, Wed- 
nesday, November 6, at 4:15 p t m 3 
The reading next Wednesday, Novem- 
ber 13, will be given by Mrs. Car- 
rol 1 D. Champ 1 in. 



The Division of Fine Arts 
calls attention to a lecture by 
the famous artist, Mr« John Sloan 



who has been represented in the 
College collection of pictures for 
many years by his "Rocky Landscape, 
Gloucester." Mr. Sloan will speak 
in the Teachers College Auditorium 
at Lock Haven Friday evening, No- 
vember 15, at 8:15 p.m. His ad- 
dress will be illustrated by repro- 
ductions of his paintings. Both 
the address and an exhibition of 
pic tares, ' including some Sloan 
originals, will be open to the pub- 
lic. Admission to the lecture is 
25j2 The State College public is 
cordially invited to attend. 



Dr. Bernard Clausen, of the 
First Baptist Church in Pittsburgh, 
will be the chapel speaker this 
Sunday, November 10 



Sports events this Saturday, 
November 9, include soccer with 
Army at 1 p.m. and squad "B" foot' 
ball with Pittsburgh at Z p.m. 



IN TRANSITION SECTION 



The following students are 
in transition section for the 
first semester of the year 1940- 
1941 a Instructors are requested 
to send all semester grades for 



these women students to the office 
of the Dean of Women and all se- 
mester grades for these men stu- 
dents to the office of the Dean of 
Men. 



Women Student's 



Kalar, Clive 
Ostrosky, Lenore 



Allen, Robert Lowrie 
barton, Richard Paul 
Beemer, Robert Wallace 
Best, Paul Wharton 
Bordo, Louis John 
Brugler, Robert Bottum 
Butchko, Thomas Joseph 
Christian, James Alvin 
Cimino, John Barton 
Cohen, Martin Bernard 
Colgan, Robert Joseph, 
Bavies, Warren Lewis 
delPapa, Nadir Jose, jr, 
Bimeo, Victor Vincent 
Kly> jefa],d Edgar 
Pagan, John Be Wan 



jr 



Smith,. Virginia 
Stone, Genevra 

Men Students 



Frketic'h, Leonard L 
Gouriey, John Maurice 
Jimeson, William Car don 
Eratzer, Bonald Arthur 
Lenox, William Clarence 
Maclay, Charles Francis 
Mahoney, John Francis 
Martin, Christian B , jr„ 
Mastandrea, Nick 
Mayer, S h e r w i n 
Mayer, William George, jr e 
Me e nan, Thomas Patrick, jr, 
Meyer, Warren ICappes 
Mitchell, Jo seph' 'Robert 
Peirce ; Harry Gilbert 
Pieo, Roman Nick 
* * 



Wetmiller, Bernice M, 



Fiepoli, Carl Robert 
Pierce, John William 
Piatt, J. Thomas 
Richards, Luther Warren 
Salerno, George Joseph 
Sanz, Angel E. 
Shields, Michael Franklin 
Shull, Emanuel Gates, jr. 
Stambaugh, Bean Robert 
Surkalo, Michael Ivan 
Toothman, George Wayne 
Walker, J. Howard 
Wilmer, Benjamin Oscar 
Wolfe, H 9 Michael, 3rd 



Yoder. Rufus 



lyne 



LIBERAL 



ANNOUNCED 



The Liberal Arts Lecture Com- 
mittee has announced its program 
for "1940-1941. The lectures are 
to be given on Thursday evenings 
from 7:30 to 8:30 in room 10 Lib-'" 
eral Arts. The course, now in its 
31st year, presents' contributions 
of general interest, not only by 
the faculty of the School of the 
Liberal Arts, but by staff members 
of other divisions and of other 
institutions as well. 

The following are the numbers 



for this vear 



N o ve mb e r 14, Ame 



lean Plural Painting, Harold E, 
Dickson, Department of Architec- 
ture; December 12, Unemployment in 



Pennsylvania, Louis Reed Tripp, 
Department ' of Economics, Lehigh 
Un i ve r s i t y ; J anuary 16, Ax i s Ac - 
tivities in Latin America, William 
H. Gray, ■ Department of history; 
February ZQ , American Radio, Ray- 
mond V/i Tyson, Department of 
Speech; March 20, Non-Human Primate 
Behavior and Its " Significance for 
the " Understanding of" Human Behav- 
ior, C« R. Carpenter, Department 
of Education and Psychology. 

The committee this year is 
composed 'of Joseph F. O'Brien, 
chairman; Thomas D. Bowman; Arthur 
H. Reede; J. Paul Selsam; and 
Philip A. Shelley. 



OFFICIAL NOTICES FROM THE OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR 

Withdrawals 



S Cohen, Henrietta, LD, AC, Sept. 20 

2 Devlin, C. James, EE, Oct. 22 

2 Keinsling, Mary Ida, LD, Oct, 3 

S Miller, Myra B., LA, Oct. 23 

1 Mitchell, Julia H;, S, AC, Sept. 26 

The following reasons were given for 
the withdrawals: courses not being of- 
fered, to obtain employment, death of 
father, lack of time, nervous breakdown, 



1 Morris, Clifford T., DII, DC, Sept. 27 

S Myers, Bessie H., LA, Sept, 20 

1 Ritter, Arleen M,, PM, SC, Oct, 8 

1 Walters, Leonard M, , S, Oct. 22 

1 Williams, Mildred E., HE, SC, Oct. 8 

financial difficulty, no reason, personal 
reason, unable to carry work. Miss 
Heinsling withdrew from the campus but 
re— regi stered at a center. 



Withdrawal Cancelled 



I he withdrawal for Robert J. Wallace, a freshman in Phys. Ed,, should be cancelled. 

Change in Clas s if icat ion 

Richard Montgomery should be changed fr-om Graduate to Special in Zoology, 

Wm , S , H o f f ma n 
Registrar 






^atJjqtq 3S©xi^0 



, H3 ?IK V HO • U S A G Y 1 D SSIM 



THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 



FACULTY 



Published weekly <m Tuesday during the College 
vrai a* * means of making official announcements 
and presenting items of interest to the faculty. AU 




ULLETIN 



contribution* should be as brief as* possible am) reach 
Walter F. Dantzscher, Director of Public Information 
105 Old Main, not later than 10 a.m. each Friday 



VOL. 20 



November IZ , 1940 



NO. 8 



JASCHA HEIFETZ TO APPEAR ON ARTISTS' COURS3 



Jascha Heifetz, world-famous' 
violinist who has traveled more 
than 1,350,000 miles to, give Con- 
certs' to audiences all over the 
world," will appear on this, year's 
Artists '' Course progTam February 
11, 1941, Dr. Carl EV Marquardt, 
committee chairman, announced to- 
day. The announcement of the 
Heufetz appearance completes the 
program for the current series. 
The Heifetz concert will provide 
an opportuni ty 'f or local subscrib- 
ers to compare his technique with 
Kreisler's. Both of them have 
been called the world's greatest 
violinists. 

"I have never known a musi- 
cian with more artistic integrity," 
Deems Taylor has said of Heifetz. 
"He has reached the point, I think, 
that every great artist, creative 
or interpretative, must reach; the 
point where he has achieved such 
mastery of his craft that he knows 
he will never completely master it. 
He plays the violin so well that 
he knows what a lesser artist will 
never know; how good violin play- 
ing might be . . , and . . .he is still 
learning to play. He has only one 
rival, one violinist whom he is 
trying to beat: Jascha Heifetz." 

Members of the State College 
audience who saw the violinist in 
Samuel Goldwyn's production "They 
Shall Have Music" when it appeared 
here last winter will be interest- 
ed to know that Heifetz's decision 
t© appear in it was based on his 
belief that motion pictures are a 



logical medium for the introduc- 
tion cf gfcod hnusi c to countless 
new auHienc.es. .> Educators voted 
the film. the. greatest single con- 
tribution to- an appreciation of 



qood music that''h; 



thus far been 



made by motion pictures, and the 
critics agreed, 

I Born in 1001, Heifetz began 
to study violin at the age of 
three. He made his public concert 
debut at seven, playing the Men- 
delssohn Concerto. Shortly after- 
wards he gave a recital in P'etro- 
grad and a concert with the sym- 
phony orchestra in Odessa. At 10 
he launched his career in Berlin 
by making his first major appear- 
ance with the Berlin Philharmonic 
Orchestra, substituting for the 
scheduled performer on only 24 
hours notice. He played the 
Tschaikovsky Concerto, which he 
had never before given in public, 
with such success that he was en- 
gaged to play in other concerts in 
Leipzig and Vienna, 

At the age of 16 he made his 
American debut at Carnegie Hall, 
playing so brilliantly that he was 
hailed by critics as the greatest 
talent of his generation. Since 
then he has made four world con- 
cert tours. Today he is acclaimed 
for his perfection of technique, 
his purity of style, and his beau- 
ty of tone. 

Other numbers on this year's 
program include Paul Robeson, Anna 
Kaskas, and the Cleveland Symphony, 



m 



INSTRUCT I CITS FOR REPORTING VACATION ABS3 



The Thanksgiving Vacation period 
d.es the first opprrtunity to test 
ew regulations concerning ahsences 
e and after racation periods. These 
at ions (Regulations for Undergrad- 



proTi 
the n 
hef or 
r e gu 1 

uato Students, 50-63) provide for a re- 
port 
; lass 
hef or 
has a 



from every instructor who may have 
es scheduled in the 48 hour periods 
e and after each vacation whether he 
ny absentees or not, 



The blank on which the instructor 
may report all the absentees from all of 
his classes held during those 48 hour 
periods is being sent to each instructor 



with this issue of the Faculty Bulletin. 
It is expected that every member of the 
instructional force will co-operate in 
trying out the efficacy of the regula- 
tions. 

Attention is called to the discrep- 
ancy between the date shown in the cata- 
logue for Thanksgiving vacation and the 
correct date. The vacation is to extend 
from 11:50 a.m, Wednesday, November 27, 
to 8 a.m, Monday, December 2, 

R, D. Hctzel 



AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING BUILDING TO BE DEDICATED 



The new Agricultural Engineering vice pr 

Building will be dedicated from 1 to 2 ager of 

p.m. this Thursday, November 14, in room at Alto 

1C3, The dedication is being held in Pennsyl 

connection with the annual meeting of the Slectri 

Pennsylvania Farm Equipment Dealers' Fright, 

Association, Faculty members are cor— a farm 

dially invited to attend, and Imp 

R. U. B 

Dean S, W. Fletcher will preside. c f agri 

Speakers and their subjects are as fol- opment 

lows: J. ?. r . Cooper, president of the Penn St 

Pennsylvania Tractor and Implement Club dent of 

and manager of the Karri sburg branch the Aiae 

house of the International Harvester Com— gineeri 

pany, "Farm Mechanization"'; Wi II* Wade, the agr 



esident and assistant g 
the Pennsylvania Ediso 
ona and past president 
vania Electric Associat 
float ion in Pennsylvani 
publisher of the Eastc 
machinery trade paper, 
lenient Industry Co— oper 
lasingamc, head of the 
cultural engineering, •." 
of Agricultural Engine e 
ate"; and A, S. Marburg 
the Penn State student 
rican Society of Agricu 
ng, who will speak In b 
icultural engineering s 
* * 



eneral man— 
n Company 
of the 
ion, "Rural 
a"; Grant 
rn Dealer, 
"College . 
a t i o n " ; 
department 
The Devel— 
ring at 
er, pre si- 
branch cf 
Itural En— 
ehalf of 
tude nt s » 



NEW FORESTRY BUILDING OPEN FOR INSPECTION 



The new Forestry Building will be 
cpen for the inspection of students, fac- 
ulty, and townspeople next Monday after-' 
noon, November 18, from 3 to 5, at which 
time an open house is planned, Professor 
Victor A. Beede announced today. 

Among the activities to be seen at 
that time are the laboratories in wood 

* * 



technology and In silvics, and a minia- 
ture demonstration of forest fire- 
fighting procedures. The Pennsylvania 
Cooperative Wildlife Conservation Unit 
under the direction of Dr. Logan J. Ben- 
nett will also exhibit its collections 
of birds and mammals. Other exhibits 
will show the work of 'students and the 
distribution of alumni of the department, 
* * * 



'ORIGINAL RENOIR NOW ON EXHIBIT 



Through 'the courtesy of the owners, 
Mr, and Mrs, Roger E, Ritter of Shingle- 
town, the College is able to show for a 
brief time .an original painting by Pierre 
Auguste Renoir, 1841-1919, distinguished 
French impressionist painter. The oil 
painting, "The Card Player," is now in 
the College Art Gallery, 303 Plain Engi- 



neering, and will remain there. until 
Saturday neon, November 23, • 

This is the first 'tine that the 
College has been able to show such an 
important painting by such a well— known 
master. The public is cordially in- 
vited. 



GALLERY TALE ON ART EXHIBITION TO BE GIVEN TOMORROW 



Miss Hartley Fletcher, instructor in 
fine arts, will give a gallery talk on 
the current exhibition in the College Art 
Gallery tomorrow, Wednesday, November 13, 
at 7:30 p.m. The public is cordially In- 
vited to attend the lecture, which is the 



the series of fine art 



the winter season •■ 1940— 41, 



lecture s 
The 'ex- 



first 

for 

hibition consists of original American 
oil paintings of moderate size and price 
It will be shown until November 23, 



PROFESSOR DICKSON TO GIVE FIRST LIBERAL' ARTS LECTURE 



Professor Harold E, Dickson, asso- 
ciate professor of fine arts, will give 
the first of the Liberal Arts Lecture 
series this Thursday, November 14, from 
7:30 to 8:30 p.m. in room 10 Liberal 
Arts. The lecture, "American Mural 
Painting," will deal chiefly with the 
notable developments in that field within 
the last twd decade s 'whi ch have seen the 
emergence of a new school of American 



muralists, Works by the Mexican fresco 
painters, Diego Rivera and J. 'C , Orozco, 
as well as by modern American artists 
su-ch as Thomas Ben-ton, Boardman Robinson, 
George Biddle, Reginald Marsh, and others 
will be described and illustrated with 
lantern slides. Particular notice will 
be given to the work of Henry Varnum Poor 
and to his Land— Grant Fresco completed 
last June in the lobby of Old Main. 
* * , * * 



LIBRARY EXHIBITING RARE AND VALUABLE NEWSPAPERS AND DOCUMENTS 



The Central Library is presenting 
until Novmeber 25 an unusual selection 
from its collection of newspapers, docu- 
ments, and manuscripts. 

Included are facsimiles of the 
Ma s s a chu setts Spy for 1775 and 1776 which 
give an insight into the thoughts of the 
colonists at that time; the 1776 paper 
includes the Declaration of Independence 
and news of the war with the British. 
There are also several counterfeit copies 
of the famous Ulster Co unt y Gasett e for 
January 4, 1G00, which contain news of 
the death and burial of George Washing- 
ton. Only one genuine copy of this paper 
is known to be extant. 



Early land deeds of Centre County, 
Bucks County, and Lancaster- County are of 



special interest, as are certificates of 
membership in the Quakers, a certificate 
of honorable discharge made out to a Rev- 
olutionary soldier, and an 18th century 
marriage license from Philadelphia, 

Accounts of the assassination of 
President Lincoln are given in copies of 
the New Y or k Time S | and Harper ' s Weekly 
for 186 5". 

Another very interesting item is a 
genuine copy of the V icksburg Daily Citi - 
zen dated June 27, 1863, and printed on 



wall paper.. .This was during the siege cf 
Vicksburg by General Grant and his army 
and is one of the very few copies extant. 
Many other items of interest are included 
in this showing. 



OF GENERAL INTEREST 



"Pneumonia and the Common Cold" will 
be discussed by Dr , Paul Havens of Jef- 
ferson Medical College tomorrow, Wednes- 
day, November' 13, at 8 pirn, in Schwab 
Auditorium. This is the first of a ser- 
ies of health talks to be given this 
year on preventive medicine. 



during the Thanksgiving and Christmas 
vacations when it will be open from 9 
a.m, to 5 p.m. and closed on Sundays and 
holidays . A formal open hoiise to which 
all will be welcome will be held later 
when the new furniture and eauipment have 
arrived and are in use. 



A series of T own 
held on Sunday evenin 
Hillel Foundation, 13 
The meetings are held 
for the discussion of 
national issues. The 
day, November 17, is 
and the Fifth Column, 
M. Nelson McGeary, in 
oal science; C, C. Pe 
educational research; 
College scheduling of 
period will follow th 
ulty members, student 
are cordially invited 
* * * 



Meetings are being 
gs at 7^:30 at the 
3 W, Beaver Ave, 
as an open forum 
national and inter- 
subject this Sun-* 
"Civil Liberties 
" The speakers are 
structor in politi— 
ters, director of 

and Ray Y. Watkins-, 
ficer. A question ■ 
e speeches. Fac— 
s, and townspeople 



The faculty of the School of the 
Liberal Arts will meet tomorrow, Wednes- 
day, November 13, at 4:10 p»m. in room 
121 Liberal Arts, according to an of- 
ficial announcement from Dean Stoddart, 



Dean Frank D. Kern announces the 
following examination for the Ph.D. de- 
gree: Mrs. Isabella W. White, November 
22, 2 p.m., room 108 Burrowes Building; 
major, psychology; minors, home economics 
and education. 

* * * * * * 

Mrs. Carroll D. Champlin will give 
the Wednesday Reading in room 402 of 



Faculty members, students, and t.wns- the College Library' tomorrow, November 
people interested in seeing the new Li- 
brary in operation are cordially invited 
at any time. The building will be open . 
from 8 a,m, to 10 p.m. on weekdays and 
from 2 p.m. to 10 p.m. on Sundays except 



13, at 4:15 p.m. Mr s . Robert W , Stone 
will -.give the reading next Wednesday, - 
November 20, 

* * * * * * 



4 



CHAPEL SPEAKER 

The speaker in chapel this Sunday, 
November 17, will he Dr. Miles Krunbine, 
of Plymouth Church, Shaker Heights, 
Cleveland. Ohio, 



SPORTS EVENTS 

Sports events this week include the 
junior varsity soccer game with Lock 
Haven State Teachers College this Friday, 
November 15, at 4 p.m.; and the football 
game with New York University this Satur- 



day, November 16 



at 2 
* * 



p,m, 



OFFICIAL NOTICES FROM THE OFFICE OF TEE REGISTRAR 

Change s in Classif icat ion 

S, Edward Gardner— —change from sophomore to two— year forestry 

Leo Paul Roan— change from sophomore to freshman in electrical engineering 

Barbara R, Thiele— change from- junior to senior in arts and letters 

- .. ■ . «, 

Withdrawals 



2 Bacon, Robert William, LD, Oct, 14 

2 Clark, Rollin Vaughan, A, Oct, 30 
S Clifford, Joseph C,, MI, Nov, 5 

3 Fletcher, Nancy J,, AL, Oct, 29 

3 Hannum, Kenneth Albert, ME*, Oct, 29 

2 Kulp, Marie Louise, PEd, Nov, 4 

1 Miller, E, Curtis, LD,'Nov, 4 

The following reasons were given for 
withdrawal: 2, conditions at hone; 1, ' 
did not pay fees; 2, to go to work; 4, 



Miller, Edwin' William, ME, Oct, 16 
O'Tjusa, Joseph Edward, ME, Nov, 4 
Rake straw, J, Harry, PEd, Sept, 19 
Reed, Adam V,, PEd, Sept, 19 
Savitch, S'aul, LD, pet, 24 
Wolf," John E., PEd, Oct. 15 



financial ^difficulties ; 1$ personal; 1, 
to have an operation; 1, illness of 
father; 1, no reason, 

Wm, S, Hoffman 
Regi strar 




*3affYH0-¥ SAQV13 SSIW 



THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 



- FACULTY 

Published weekly on Tuesday during the College 
year as a means of making official announcements 
and presenting items of interest to the faculty. All 




VOL. 20 



November 19, 1940 



BULLETIN 

contributions' should be as brief as possible and reach 
Walter F. Dantzscher, Director of Public Information. 
105 Old Main, not later than 10 a.m. each Friday. 

NO. o 



ARTISTS' COURSE TO RESTRICT TICKETS TO TOTAL OF THREE TO AN IWDI7IDUA 



In an effort to correct the abuses 
which were noted in the Artists' Course 
ticket sale last 'year, the Committee has 
voted to restrict the sale of seats to a 
maximum of three per individual, Dr , Carl 
E, Marquardt, chairman, announced today. 
The purpose of the new regulation is to 
prevent tickets from going outside the 
college community while hundreds of stu- 
dents find it impossible to obtain seats 
for the course. The new plan also looks 
toward a more equitable distribution 
among those who have waited long hours 
to obtain their seats* 

"In recent years the concern of the 
Artists' Course has been not so much to 
sell tickets," the chairman stated, "as 
to see that they are sold to the persons 
for whom they are primarily intended; 
namely, the student body of the College, 
the faculty and staff,' and the residents 
of the town. Throughout the history of 
the course the effort has been made to 
make the course essentially a community 
project. The committee is glad to accom- 
modate persons other than those mentioned 
above after the needs of this primary, 
clientele have been taken care of." 

Dr , Marquardt also stated that the 
committee voted this year to use a writ- 
ten proxy, to be presented by students 
serving for faculty or staff members or 
townsper sons, so that there would be some 
greater assurance that the early sales 
would be restricted to members of the 
college community. The proxy form, which 
is made a part of the new brochures to be 
distributed this week, provides a space for 
indicating for whom the tickets are being 
purchased. Separate proxy forms will 
also be available at the Student Union. 
The ticket window has been instructed by 
the committee to refuse to .sell seats to 



individuals believed not to be faculty 
members or townsper sons, on the day re- 
served for that type of sale, if a writ- 
ten proxy for whom they are purchased is 
not presented. This form requires the 
signature of the person named,, 

A further regulation designed to 
guarantee a maximum sale to students and 
faculty— townsper sons on. the days of their 
respective sales prevents a student ser- 
ving as a proxy for a faculty member from 
buying seats for students on the day of 
the faculty sale. The day of the stiident 
sale will be Wednesday, December 4, The 
faculty sale will be Thursday, December 
5, Alternate .rows will again be reserved 
for students and faculty— townspersons and 
130 additional seats are this year being 
made available through the use of stage 
seats, A ticket entitling the holder to 
a stage seat for the three sola numbers 
will provide for a seat in the foyer for 
the performance of the orchestra. Seats 
will be priced at $5,50, $4,50, and $3,50 
per series of four numbers. 

"The committee is not unconscious of 
the inconveniences imposed by the present 
method of selling tickets," Dr. Marquardt 
stated. "The whole "matter has again re- 
ceived thorough discussion, and -where 
methods prdmising improvements have been 
suggested they have been speedily adopted. 
As yet no method has been suggested which 
promises to eliminate the early formation 
of lines of subscribers to the course 
without raising other equally troublesome 
problems. But the committee itself feels 
that other subscribers should be made 
aware of the fact that it adopts no leg- 
islation and no regulations which are not 
also binding on its members, many of whom 
give long hours in a sincere attempt to 
make the course successful," 
* * * * 



PICTORIAL SERIES TO START SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 24 



The first of three specimen pictor- 
ial narratives prepared by the College 
publicity department for The Pittsburgh 
Press roto section will appear Sunday, No- 
vember 24* Credit for suggesting this 
layout belongs to Professor Franklin P, 
Ferguson of the Agricultural Publications 
staff. This layout announces to the lay— 



nfan for the first time the successful com- 
pletion of breeding experiments on turkeys 
weighing between 8 and 12 pounds, a stream- 
lined fowl for which 75 per cent of Ameri- 
can housewives have been asking. Because 
of its timeliness, it will be published 
somewhat in advance of the series in which 
the Press will tell "the story of the college, 1 



FACULTIES TO MEET THIS WSSK 



j > 



Tuesd 



The Graduate 
meet toda 
p,m, in 
cording 
Dean Fr 



culture 
22, at 



room 208 
to an off 
ank D, Ker 
* * 

e faculty 
will meet 

4:10 PiQ, 



Sen 

ay, 

Buck 
icia 
n. 

of t 

thi 

in r 

CER 



ool faculty will 
November 19, at 4:10 
hout Laboratory, ac— 
1 announcement from 

* * * * 

he School of Agri- 
s Friday, November 
oom 109 Agriculture 

TIFICAIION OF FENN3Y 
OR ADMISSION TO THE 



Building, according to 
nouncement from Dean S, 
* * * * 



an 



official an- 
, Fletcher. 
* * 



The faculty of the School of Engi- 
neering will meet next Tuesday, November 
26, at 5 p.m. in room 107 Main Engineer- 
ing Building, according to an official 
announcement from Dean H, P, Hammond. 

LVANIA SECONDARY SCHOOLS 
PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 



AH 

cat ion 
in the 
schools 
s choo Is 
during 
than 85 
schools 
of the 



by v. r illiam S • 

cording to the Pennsylvania Edu- 
Directory for 1939-1940 there are 
state more than 900 public high 
and over 200 private secondary 
• Freshmen have been admitted, 
the past four years, fron more 
different Pennsylvania secondary 
, with just a few more than half 
schools represented. 



rriv; 



iloffman, Registrar 

trar, requested for the first time on any 
college application blank this now uni- 
versally requested item. 

Records from an individual school 
are reduced to index numbers, A typical 
index number for next year's admission 
is that for the West York High School. 
It is : 



The certification privilege Is ex- 
tended to a Pennsylvania secondary school 
on the basis of the record made by its 
graduates, as freshmen, during the four . 
years preceding the admission of an in- 
coming class* On this basis exactly 50 
public high schools, one vocational high 
school, and nine private schools have 
lost the certification privilege for 
their entire graduating class. Thirty- 
four schools may have the applicant who 
ranks in the upper fifth of his class 
admitted on certificate provided he re- 
ceives the special recommendation of the 
principal. Two hundred and fourteen 
schools have the upper fifth applicant 
automatically eligible by certification. 
Thirty— seven schools have the upper fifth 
certified and the second fifth eligible 
for certification provided those so 
ranked receive the special recommendation 
of the principal. Exceptional schools 
are those certified for the entire grad- 
uating class, or for the upper four 
fifths. One public high school, one 
vocational high school, and two private 
schools have certification extending 
over their entire graduating classes. 
Six public high schools and. one private 
school are certified for the upper four 
fifths of the graduating class. 

All these certifications are for 
« one year .only, and all secondary schools 
represented in the last four freshman 
classes are at this time receiving let- 
ters indicating just what their certifi- 
cation privilege fcr next summer will bo. 

< Certification is based on a compar— 
'ison of rank in a high school graduating 
class and rank in the freshman class. 
Rank in the secondary school graduating 
class was first requested by The Pennsyl- 
vania State College when Professor A. H, 
Espenshade, early in his career as regis— 



14 357XX 
5/63311 

14 represents the number of freshmen ad- 
mitted during the past four years (not 
including the present freshmen; their 
records are of course not as yet avail- 
able), 5 represents the number of fresh- 
men admitted last year. 63311 represents 
the number of freshmen admitted from each 
fifth of the high school graduating class. 
There were 5 in the first fifth of their 
class, 3 in the second fifth, 3 in the 
third fifth, 1 in the fourth fifth, and 
1 in the fifth fifth — a total of 14, 



35 
were gr 
their c 
the thi 
that th 
ond fif 
average 
man cla 
'in the 
on the 
our fre 
graduat 
class r 
f r e s hma 
graduat 
ola'ss r 
fre shma 



7XX i 
aduat 
las s 
r (1 te 
e 3 w 
th of 
, in 
ss; t 
third 
avera 
s hma n 
e d in 
anked 
n cla 
ed in 
anked 
n cla 



ndicat e 

e d In t 
ranked, 
nth of. 
ho were 

the ir 
the fif 
hat the 

fifth 
ge , in 

class; 

the fo 

in the 
s s ; and 

the fi 

in the 
ss • 



s th 
he f 

on 
the 

gra 
cla s 
th t 

3 w 
of t 
the 

tha 
urth 

ten 

tha 
fth 

ten 



at t 
i r ■ s t 
the 
f re s 
duat 
s ra 
enth 
h o w 
heir 
seve 
t th 
fif 
th t 
t th 
fift 
th t 



he 6 who 

fifth of 
average, in 
hman class ; 
cd in the se 
nked, on the 
of our fres 
re graduate 
class ranke 
nth tenth of 
e 1 who was 
t h of his 
enth of our 
e one who wa 
h of his 
enth of our 



h- 
d 

a, 



Since those who were ranked in the 
upper two fifths of their class made an 
average rank in -the freshman class better 
than the seventh tenth, at which point 
the average drops below plus, one, the 
certification privilege is extended to 
the high school next summer for this 
portion of -the graduat ing class. 



certification privi— 



A tabulation of 
leges for those high schools represented 
in the last four freshman classes follows: 



Certification 



Entire class certified 



Public H igh 
Schools 



Vocational 




Private 
S chools 



Upper four fifths 
certified 

Upper three fifths 
certified, fourth 
fifth on principal's 
r e c omm endation 



Upper three fifths 
certified 



39 



Upper two fifths 
certified, third 
fifth on principal's 
r'ecommendat a on 



20 



Upper two fifths 
cert if led • 



358 



25 



47 



Upper fifth certified, 
second fifth, on 
principal's re com— 
mendat ion 

Upper fifth certified 

Hone certified, upper 
fifth on principal's 
re oonmendat ion 

'"None certified 



Totals 
* * 



34 

176 

25 

50 

721 



3 
7 

7 

1 

44 




31 

2 

9 

101 



OP GENERAL INTEREST 



Mrs, Robert W. Stone will give the 
Wednesday Reading tomorrow, November 20, 
at 4:15 in room 402 of the College Li- 
brary i Mr si Harriet D. Nesbitt will give 
the next "reading December 4, 

* * * * * * 

"National Defense : What Are We De- 
fending? From i'VTiom?" will be the subject 
for discussion at the Hillel Foundation, 
133 W. Beaver Ave,, in the Town Meeting 
this- Sunday, November 24, at 7:30 p.m. 
Speakers include Major Francis J, Heraty, 
Durgess W. F, Leitzell, and Professor 
A. H. Reede, Since this is an open forum 
for the discussion of national and inter- 
national issues, a question period will 
follow the speeches. Faculty members, 
students, and t ownspe ople are cordially 
invited. 

* * * * * * 

Paul Popenoe, D.Sc., social biolo- 
gist and director of the Institute on 
■Family Relations at Los Angeles, will 
speak this Wednesday and Tlmrsday eve- 
nings, November 20 and 21, at 8:15 p.m. 
in Schwab Auditorium under the auspices 
of the P.S.C.A. Wednesday his subject 



will be "When Is One Ready to Marry?" and 

Thursday he will speak on "'That Makes a 
Successful Marriage?" At 4:10 p.m* on 
Thursday, November 21, Dr. Popenoe will 
speak to faculty members on "The Changing 
Family in the Changing World" in room 10 
Liberal Arts Building. 

* * . * * * * 

The chapel speaker this Sunday, No- 
vember 24, will be Dr. George F.. Finnie, 
Calvary Baptist Church, Norristown. 

* * * *• * * 

. The soccer team will play Temple 
this Saturday, November 23, at 2 p.m. 

* * * * * * 

The telephone number of William 
Clark Bramble, associate pr-ofessor of 
forestry, should be 2064 instead of 4062 
as listed in the current directory. 



Because of 'the Thanksgiving holiday 
there will be no Faculty Bulletin next 
week, November 26. The next issue will 
be December 3,. 

* * * * * * 



MINUTES OF THE SENAT! 



TING 0? 



tm^A r, rm 



A nee ting 1 of the 
4 held in room 121 L 
Thursday, ■ 



w 
o 
of f ice 



of the 



College Senate vrs 
b e r a 1 Ar t s Bu i 1 d i ng 

4:10 p,m # 

A list 

present is on file in the 

registrar , 



aexa in room x^x uioeraj. i-j-ts cu. 
Thursday, November 7, 1940, at 4 
frith President I-Ietzel presiding, 
of the members present is on file 



The secretary announced the appoint- 
ment of Dr. Lloyd •!, Jones to the Senate 
Committee on' Courses of Study to take the 
place of Dr, E, C • Davis, who resigned. 

The secretary also read the follow- 
ing communication from President Hetzcl 
as secretary of the Board of Trustees: ' 

The following action was taken at 
the meeting of the Executive Committee 
of the Board of Trustees on September 27, 
on the recommendation of the College Sen- 
ate: 

"It' was moved, seconded, and carried 
to disapprove, with regret,' the recommen- 
dation of the College Senate tha-t all 
monies collected from students who are 
subject to a fine of $5 for absence dur- 
ing the 40— hour period preceding or sue-, 
ceeding the Thanksgiving, Christmas, .or 



Easter vacations -b< 
dent loan fund*" 



credited to the 



; t u • 



The president announced the plan for 
helping students and faculty in making 
out the draft questionnaire and read the 



announcement concerning it, which is to 
be sent from his office. The communica- 
tion is or. file in the office of the 
registrar. 

Dean Kern requested the co-operation 
cf heads cf departments in making out a 
survey for the American Council on Educa- 
tion, 

' For the Committee on Rules Dr, Dye 
reported that the next Faculty Bulletin 
would contain a form for reporting stu- 
. dent absences before and after vacation 
and urged that all members of the faculty 
be requested to make out this report even 



if no students are 



sent , 



For the Committee on Courses of 
Study Professor ^ in sloe presented a re- 
port, which is to lie on the table until 
the next meeting. 

The secretary read a letter from Mr, 
Morse requesting that the date of the 
football half-holiday be decided in time 
to appear in the College calendar. Cer- 
tain difficulties arise if this date is 
not decided until the last minute. The 
letter was referred to the Committee on 
Calendar* 

The Senate then adjourned. 



C, W, Stoddart 
Secretary, pro tempore 



OFFICIAL NOTICES FROM THE OFFICE OF THE 



IGISTRAR 



■'Withdrawals 



1 Carpeneto, Louis J,, LD, Nov, 6 

2 Graves, Daniel M, , LIE, Nov, 12 

1 £ ing, Robert P., PhyEd, Nov, 7 

2 Musacchio, Alfred J",, LD, Oct, 10 

The following reasons were given for 
leaving: 2 for financial reasons, 1 to 
change schools, 1 because of illness, 1 



1 States, William J,, LD f Nov* 5 

S Twining, Wilmer-A,, Ch, ^ov, 7 

2 Wagman, Marshall H,, LD, Nov, 7 



for personal reasons, 1 to return to 
work, and 1 lost interest. 



Change in Class if 1 cat, ion 
William A, Lockett, changed from junior to sophomore in architecture 

Official Notice 



Rule 44 of the Regulations for Un- 
dergraduate Students states that "when a 
student drops a portion of his schedule 
during the last six weeks of a semester, 



WB 



are useo. in 



grades of iVB(-l) or 

computing averages," This rule becomes 

effective for the current semester for 

subjects dropped on or after December 9 

1940, 

Urn, S, Hoffman, Registrar 



HaKKVHO'tf SAdYlD SSIW 



THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 



• FACULTY 

Published weekly on Tuesday during the College 
year a* a means of making official announcements 
and presenting items of interest to the faculty. All 




VOL, 20 



December 3, 1940 



BULLETIN 

contributions should be as brief as possible and reach 
Walter F. Dantzscher, Director of Public Information, 
105 Old Main, not later than 10 A.M. each Friday. 

NO. 10 



FACULTY SALE- -FOR ARTISTS' COURSE BEGINS THURSDAY; 
STUDENT PROXIES MUST HAVE WRITTEN AUTHORIZATION 



Artists' Course series tick- 
ets for members of the faculty and 
staff and for townspersons will go 
on sale Thursday morning, Dr, Carl 
El Marquardt, committee chairman,' 
reminded faculty members this"" 
morninq. Students will. have had 
an opportunity to buy seats in 
their part of- the house the day 
before. If any 's'eats remain in 
the student'' sect'ion, which seems 
un likely 1 n, v i e w„ o f last yea r ' s 
experience, these, too, will be 
made available to members of the 
faculty and staff at the Thursday 
safe. The* ticket windows in Old 
Main will, open at 8 a.m.. and the 
sale will continue until noon, un- 



le: 



the house is sold out before 



that time. If s'eats remain, the 
sale' will continue .In the after- 
noon, from 1:30 to 5 p.m.- A con- 
tinuance of the sale on Friday J s R 
predicated on the availability of 
tickets at the completion of 
Thursday's sales. .'■ ■■ 

Dr. Marquardt again called 
attention to the fact that faculty... 
and staff members and townspersons 
may use students as proxies, but 

pointed out that any one student 

would not be eligibleto buy more'' ' 
than three seats. No student 
seats will be sold to students on 
the day of the faculty sale. To 
obtain such seats, students must 
appear at the windows on the day 
of the student sale. Also, Dr. 
Marquardt reminded, it will be 
necessary this year for the fac- 
ulty member or towns per son de- 
siring seats through a student 



to fill in and sign a proxy form 
such as is found on the next to the 
last page of the brochure describ- 
ing the course or such as is en- 
closed with this issue of The Fac- 
ulty Bulletin. To protect patrons 
of the course insofar as it is 
able, the c6mmfttee has authorized 
H. R. Gilbert., who/wi'll be in 
charge of. the sale, t© withhold 
t i eke ts '. from - any student who con- 
tends he is buying them for a fac- 
ulty member or town spears on but who 
does not present the form indicat- 
ing, that they ^have authorized him 
to serve as .their pro'xy, ■- 

In summary, Dr. Marquardt 
pointed out- that the course this 
year would consist of four numbers: 

1 ) Paul Robeson 

...,£:.) Jascha Heifetz 

3) Cleveland Orchestra 

4 ). Anna Kaskas 

and that' tickets would-be priced 
at $5.50, $4.50, and $3.50. He 
stated, further, that the capacity 
of the Auditorium is being enlarged 
by 130 seats through the addition 
"of' stage seats for the three solo 
number's. Holders of stage seats 
for these three numbers will be en- 
titled to seats in the foyer for 
the performance of the orchestra. 

The first number on the course 
will be given Monday evening, De- 
cember 9, at which time Paul Rebe- 
ls 
avai lable 



.on will appear. It is unlikely 



that seats will be 
single numbers • 



for 



THE HIGH SCHOOL GRADE REPORT USED BY THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 

by William S, Hoffman 



Grade reports, in the usual sense, 
are not sent to the high schools from 
which students in the College have teen 
admitted. An objective chart, showing 
the relative position of a freshman in 
his class as compared with all others 
similarly ranked when graduated by the 
high schools, is mailed to those schools 
w*ho.se . graduate s are members of the fresh- 
man class . . . 



schoo 

repor 

their 

after 

port 

three 

the f 

cipal 

spite 

grade 

end o 



The assumpt 
Is are inte 
t s from the 

graduat e s . 

sending th 
(EnglComp, 

years, no 
ourth year, 
s wr o t e let 

of this se 

reports we 
f the fifth 



ion s 

re st e 

coll 

W it 
e tra 
3, et 
repor 

Thr 

t sr s 

eming 

re ag 

year 



eems to 
d in re 
eges att 
h this 
dit iona 
c. ) for 
ts were 
ee high 
of inqu 

lack o 
a in rnai 

and t h 



be that high 
ceiving grade 
ended by 
in mind, and 
1 grade re — 
a period of 
mailed for 
school prln- 
iry. In 
f interest, 
led at the 
ereaf t er , 



A facsimile of the grade report re- 
cently mailed to Coudersport High School 
is an insert in this issue of the Bulle- 
tin, The chart, prepared each year for 
a period of over a decade, was originally 
printed in black ink, but for the past 
three years, at the suggestion of presi- 
dent Harper of Wyomissing Polytechnic 
Institute, ha s ^been ■ printed in red. The 
•use of red ink on the graph makes the 
names inserted upon it much more easily • 
seen. 

The chart is essentially of three 
parts: a grade scale, at the left; a 
t e nths— of— the— clas s scale, at the right; 
and a graph of average grade distribu- 
tions "for each fifth of. the high school 
graduating classes, with the Widths of 
the several rectangles proportionate to 
the size of the group. This makes the 
rectangle for the distribution of aver- 
ages for those ranked in the first fifth 
of their graduating class, 836 in number, 
just about twice as wide as that for 
those ranking in the second fifth, of 
■ ' ■- * * 



whom there were 415, . . 

Each rectangle is divided into four 
parts, indicating, beginning from the top, 
the upper quarter of the group, the sec- 
ond quarter, third, and fourth. Arrows 
indicate the top and bottom five individ- 
uals. To me it is interesting to note 
that the spread of average for the bottom 
five individuals, who had been ranked in 
the top fifth of their high school grad- 
uating class, is greater than the spread 
of either of the middle quarters. 

In sending a report to a 'high school, 
the names of freshmen from that school 
are inserted opposite the point on the 
grade scale where their averages would 
place them. 



from 

rank 

ing 

Welt 

of a 

ond 

quar 

high 

clas 

but 

m ore 

rank 

the 



L 

Co 

ed 

cla 

sch 

11 

qua 

t er 

sc 

s n 

a IS 

th 

ed, 

fir 



ast 
ude 

in 
s s , 
ar 

fir 
rt e 
• 

hoo 
ot 
o d 
a n 

at 
st 



year 
r sport 
the up 
Of t 

e r a nk 
st fif 
r, and 
Karhan 
1 in t 
only d 
id bet 
half o 

high 
fifth 



there 

High 

p e r f 

h is g 

d in 

ther s 

Lyma 

, who 

he se 

id be 

tcr t 

f the 

schoo 

of -th 



were f 

School 
ifth of 
roup, C 

t he up 
, Haupt 
n i n t h 

was ra 
c o n d f i 
tter th. 
h a n con 

ent ire 
1 gradu 
eir cla 



our freshmen 
who had been 
the graduat— 

arpenter and 

per quarter 
in the sec- 

e fourth 

nked by the 

fth of the 

an Lyman, 

s iderably 
group who 

a t i o n , in 

s s , 



I know of only one other college 
which sends out such an objective report. 
The University of Pittsburgh plots a nor- 
mal curve of averages for all those 
freshmen who were ranked in the upper, 
•two fifths of their high school graduat- 
ing olarsses. Names ar,e inserted at the 
appropriate points, hut there is no way 
of seeing i'n which fifth of his class, a 
student had been ranked by his high 
school. In this respect. I believe my 
.grade report to be better, but'the Pitts- 
burgh graph is better in that it repre- 
sents much more clearly the distribution 
of averages than does mine, 

K * * . ■ ' 



COLLEGE LIBRARY EXHIBITING TEXTBOOKS 



An* exhibition of "Sixty Textbooks 
of 1940" sponsored by t he ..American Insti- 
tute of Graphic Arts, is being displayed 
in the College Library until this Satur- 
day, December 7, 

The jury^which selected the text- 
books from a total of 278 submitted by 
60 publisher s ,. was comprised of Dr, W, B. 
Featherst one, professor of education at 
Teachers College, Columbia University; 
John Benbow, director of the manufactur- 
ing department of Longmans, Green and Co,; 
and Arthur Williams, production manager 
of Little, Brown, and Co, They chose the 



books from the point of view of the cover 
material, choice of paper and type, legi- 
bility and attractiveness of the page, 
typographic design throughout, the book's 
fitness to present its ideas successfully, 
and the success with which the designer 
met the problems of manufacture. 

Selected for physical format rather 
than literary content, the books range 
from an elementary song book to advanced, 
college chemistry. They are interide'd to 
show- "art'istic and technical excellence" 
and to raise the general level of text- 
book production in this- country. 



.00 







3.00 



Z!0 



y/*vpj , /y 



1£5_ 



MEDIAN 



1.19 



-:/ 



urn an 



RE 



FIRST FIFTH 
836 



-63 







271 



254 



fcarA^n A/A 



SA 



121 



M 



.78 



2ND. FIFTH 
415 



--48 



THE LOCATION OF THE UPPER AND LOWER FIVE IN EACH FIFTH 

IS INDICATED BY AN ARROWHEAD THE SHADED AREA 

INDICATES THE MIDDLE 50 PER CENT 



- 2.71 



.22 



Stfk 



.83 



M 




"48 

3RD FIFTH 
237 



±Q5_ 



- 



£J^ 



/ 



■ M / 

/ 
/ 



21 



4TH. 
140 



«li00 



1.73 



* 



CM 
CVJ 
II 



Q 

UJ 

Z 
< 



.5Q 



< 

Z 

6 1 

X 

7 £ 

l_ 

8 </i 



u 



KT 



560 

5TH 
70 



10 



=£3J 



3=90-100 

GRADES 2=80-89 

I =70-79 



DISTRIBUTION OF FRESHMAN AVERAGES 
CLASS OF 1943— N = 1720 

THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 
OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR 

0=60-69 
-1=45-59 
-2=0-44 



t&t/cfer'S/oor-/ f-J- 5". 



DOUBLE CHRISTMAS EXHIBITION IN THE COLLEGE ART GALLERY 



I. Original American Print s 



A specially chosen collection of *30 
original etchings and lithographs on loan 
from the Associated American Artists of 
New York is now being exhibited by the 
division of fine arts and Pi Gamma Alpha, 
honorary fine arts fraternity. The exhi- 
bit Will' continue through December 14, 

It includes the works of Peggy Ba- 
con, Thomas Benton, Aaron Bohrod, 'Alexan- 
der Brook, John Costigan, John Stetfart 
Curry, Adolf Dehn, Ernest Fiene, Eniil 
Ganso, William Gropper, Doris Lee, Luigi 
Lucioni, Boardman Robinson', and Raphael 
S oyer ,- 



These wo 
lished in the 
'American Arti 
years ago by 
attempt to in 
in the owners 
exhibition is 
program and o 
throughout th 
have particip 
extent of all 
sold at the p 
their plan to 
dividuals and 
works of livi 



rks were all rece 
program of the A 



st 



which was cr 



24 American art is 
crease nationwide 
hip of fine origi 
part of it s educ 
ne of, a series se 
e United States, 
ated in the progr 
owing these origi 
rice of $5 each, 
stimulate owners 
public collectio 
ng men. 



ntly pub- 
s s ociat ed 
eated fire 
ts in an 

intere st 
nals. The 
ational 
nt on tour 

The artists 
am to the 
nals to be 
as part of 
hip by in- 
ns of the 



II , Pennsylvania Academy Student Work 



The second exhibition consists of ; 
group of 37 oil paintings and 19 black 
and whites by students of the Pennsyl- 
vania Academy of the Fine Arts, These 
Were made in competition for the Cressoi 
Memorial Scholarships and other prizes 
during the year 1940. 

The Pennsylvania Academy of the Fi 
Arts was officially established in 1305 
It was the first such school establishe 
in the United States of America'* 

"The solutions to the various prob- 
lems which confront the student will be 



ne 
d 



interesting to 
leaflet says, 
true Academy i 
individual app 
portraiture, 1 
life painting, 
lent studies o 
this small but 
reach far into 
art." 

Both exhi 
cept Sunday fr 
in the College 
neering, until 



the visitor," the Academy 
"The character of the 
s expressed in the various 
roaches to the problems of 
ife, composition, and still 

as well as their equiva— 
n paper. The import of 
significant show may well 
the future of American 



bitions are open daily ex— 
om 8:30 a.m. to 8:30 p.rru 
Art Gallery,. 303 Main Engi- 
noon Saturday, December 14. 



OF GENERAL INTEREST 



The Penn State Players will present 
"Family Portrait," their second produc- 
tion of the year, this Friday and Satur- 
day, December 6 and 7, at 8:30 p.m. in 
Schwab Auditorium, Critics have called 
the play "a simple, eloquent, and rever- 
ent picture of the family of Jesus." 
Tickets are on sale for 50?* at the Stu- 
dent Union desk. All seats are reserved. 

* * * * * * 

"Tuberculosis and Its Prevention" 
will be the subject of a talk to be given 
tomorrow, Wednesday, December 4, at 8 
p.m. in Schwa'b Auditorium by Charles R. 
Reynolds, M.D., Major-General U.S.A^, 
retired, and director of the Pennsylvania 
Bureau of Tuberculosis Control, The new 
sound film "Tuberculosis, Its Diagnosis, 
Treatment, and Control" will also be 
shown. This is the second in the series 

of Health Talks this year. 

* * * * * * 

Miss Ruth Wanger, regional vice- 
president of the American Federation of 
Teachers-, will speak on the subject 
"America's Schools in the Present World 
Crisis" next Tuesday, December 10, at.- 
8:15 p.m. in room 10 Liberal Arts. The 
speech is sponsored by the State College 
Teachers Association. 

* * * * * * 



The College Senate will meet this 
Thursday, December 5, at 4:10 p.m. in 
121 Liberal Arts, William S. Hoffman, 
secretary, announces. 



"What S 
Youth?" will 
December 8, 
Meeting to b 
the Hillel F 
Speakers wil 
director of 
the state of 
War nock ; and 
president of 
Faculty memb 
people are c 
* * 





News stories 


ab 


out 


b.ree 


ding of a 


tur 


key 


wei 


and 


12 pounds, 


wh 


ich 


wer 


Pitt 


sburgh Press 


a s 


a pi 


and 


printed by 


th 


em, 


wer 


nationally by 


the 


Associ 


wider interest 


in 


th 


5 to 


dent 


, it was o 


f f e r e d 


to 


lee, 


science e 


dit 


or, 


wh p 


evening papers 


th 


e day b 


ally 


. appointed 


Th 


ank 


sgiv 




* * 




* 


* 



** 



hould Government Do for 

be discussed this Sunday, 
at 7:30 p.m. in the Town 
e held in the auditorium of 
oundation, 133 W. Beaver Ave, 
1 include Dr. Levi N. Gresh, 
the Student Work Program for 
Pennsylvania; Dean A. R, 
Robert N« Baker, '41, vice- 
the All-College Cabinet, 
ers, students, and towns— 
ordially invited. 

* * * * 



the successful 
ghing between 8 
e offered to. the 
ctorial feature 
e also circulated 
ated Press. When 
pic became evi— 
Howard W, Blake s- 

released it to 
efore the nation— 
ing- Day, 



Mrs. Harriet D. Nesbitt will give Library is exhibiting will remain on dis- ■ 

the Wednesday Reading tomorrow, December play until this Saturday, December 7. 

4, at 4:13 p.m. in room 402, College Li- Among the items are . early land deeds and 

brary. Miss Matilda Bentley will give facsimiles of the Massachusetts Spy , 

the reading next Wednesday, December 11, There is also a copy of the Vicksburg 

** ** ** Daily Citizen for June 27, 1863, printed 

on wallpaper. 

The American Association of Univer— ** ** ** 

sity Professors will hold an open meeting 

next Wednesday, December 11, at 7:30 p,m 9 Dr, Raymon M, Kistler, president of 

in the Sandwich Shop, The proposed ex— Beaver College at Jenkintown, will be the 

tension of group insurance for hospitali- chapel speaker this Sunday, December 8, 
sation and surgical benefits to cover de— ** ** ** 

pendents of members of the College staff 

will be discussed by Professors A, E, ..'. The only sports event this week will 
Wierman and W, E, Butt of the insurance be the varsity basketball game with Wash- 
oomrcittee. Election of officers will be ington and Jefferson this Saturday, De- 
held and a resolution to petition against cember 7, at 7 p,m, 

the Hatch Political Activities Act will ** ** ** 

be presented, 

** ** ** The telephone number of Dr, Robert G, 

Bernreuter should be 3114 instead of 3774 

The collection of newspapers, docu— as listed in the current directory, 
ments, and manuscripts which the College ** ** ** 

OFFICIAL NOTICES FROM THE OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR 

Withdrawal 

0" Adams, Frank R,, Ag, Nov. 16' 2 Jayne, William ■ M, , EE, Nov, 20 ' 

2 Allen, John R., LD, Nov, 16 1 Lee, Kenneth B,, PM, Nov, 16 

4 Ambrose, Albert A., C«F, Oct, 24 G Mcauown, Andrew B,, Hist, Sept, 28 

2 Bennett, James W , PV, Nov, ,15 . 2 Harsh, Mary E,, ID, Nov, 18 

Bittel., George L e , Ag, Nov, 1 G Martin, Eli M, , AgEc, Nov, 7 

2 Bradley, Manson J„^ Met, Nov, 15 G Morrison, Oliver, . Hist , Sept, 26 

2 Confehr, Kenneth M. . LD, Oct,, 15 1 Ott, William P,, ChE, Nov, 12 

1 Decker, George J c r LD; Hov c 8 2 Pure, Abraham J,, Bact, Nov, , 18 

2 Delozier, Jay L & , EE, Nov*' IS , 2 Ruskin, Leonard L,, *LP, Nov, 13 

3 Dennis, Harry A,, Me b v Novf 16 1 Scholato, Edward P., PM, Novi 7 

2 G'erber, Edward G 9f EchE, llovl 13 3 Sullivan, Theodore G,, AH, Nov, 1 
2 Gilbert, Harold R.^'.LD, Nov. 13 1 Suskinj Leonard N;> For, Oct! 27 

1 Herbster, Edward S,, LD, Nov, 6 1 Torres, Hector, PM, Oct, 22 

The reasons given for withdrawing arship, l„to go into Army, 1 because of 
are: 1 to enter winter short course, 6 . conditions at home, 2 because of illness, 
for financial reasons, 1 for personal 1 because of scholastic difficulties, 1 
reasons, 1 to attend another school, 7 gave no reas' - on, 1 was unable to attend 
to ^go to work, 2 dropped for poor schol~ classes', and 1 was not interested, 

» ■ 
Change s in Classif icat ion 

Grayce A ft Lange should be changed from sophomore in HoEc to freshman in HoEc, 

Edgar D, Leibensperger should be changed from graduate to special. 

Robert R, Logan should be changed from junior in C&F to senior in C&F, 

Pauline A, Lowe should be changed from special in LA to part-time senior In A&L, 

Reinstatement ■ ■ 

i i 

Rollin Vaughn Clark was reinstated as> a sophomore in agronomy as of November 11, 1940^ 

Dropped for Po or Scholarship . 

.Manson J, Bradley, sophomore in metallurgy 

Paul F, Murphy, sophomore in ceramics 

« t- 

Wm, S, Hoffman, Registrar 



m 






*3*NV*0-S SACV1S SSIS 



THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 



FACULTY 



Published weekly on Tuesday during the College 
year as a means of making official announcements 
and presenting items of interest to the faculty. All 




VOL. 20 



BULLETIN • 

contributions should be as brief as possible and reach 
Walter F. Dantzscher, Director of Public Information, 
105 Old Main, not later than 10 A.M. each Friday. 



December 10, 1940 



NO. 11 



SECOND 'LIBERAL ARTS LECTURE TO BE GIVEN THIS THURSDAY 



The second of the Liberal Arts lec- 
ture series for this year, "Unemployment 
in Pennsylvania," will be given this 
Thursday, December 12, from 7 ;30 .to 8:30 
p.m, in room' 10 Liberal Arts* 



Mr. Louis Ree 
ment of economics 
will be the speake 
employed by the Jo 
Commission of the 
study the nature o 
sylvania. The res 
tion will be used 
prepare new unempl 
legislation. 



d Tripp of the depart- 
at Lehigh University 
r,, Mr, Tripp has been 
int State Government 
State Legislature to 
f unemployment in Penn- 
ults of his investiga^- 
by the Commission to 
oyment compensation 



The lecturer will discuss the causes 
of unemployment, its nature, and its 
problems, as well as the bearing of con- 
temporary economic trends on this subject. 
He will explore the special nature of 
Pennsylvania unemployment and relate it 
to the industrial character of this, state. 

Mr. Tripp will also discuss the 
forms of social amelioration possible in 
Pennsylvania, public assistance in this 
state and its relationship to unemploy- 
ment compensation, the workings of the 
employment offices, and future possibil- 
ities of' the social machinery in alleviat- 
ing the lot of the unemplbyed. 
►• * *. 



COURSE CHANGES 'WHICH DO NOT REQUIRE SENATE APPROVAL 



S'enate approval is not required, for 
the change of an instructor in a graduate 
or undergraduate course, providing the 
course has been previously approved by 
the Senate, according to Professor 
Charles L. Kinsloe, chairman of the Sen- 
ate Committee on Courses of Study.': 

He was prompted to make this state- 
ment because of the relatively large num- 
ber of request's that have been coming to 
the attention of his committee to approve 
such recommendations. 

The change of an instructor's nam* 
in catalogue material is regarded as .an 
editorial change, as is'a shifting of the 



course from one semester to the other in 
the course description materia"! prepared 
for College publications. 

Department he a ds,^ however , are urged 
to exercise caution in switching courses 
from one semester to the other when these 
courses are list'ed as required in certain 
of the curricula. 

Under a new regulation adopted by the 
Council of Administration on December 2, 
•1940, the closing date for th« inclusion 
of material in the first semester time- 
table will.be the. secqnd Monday in March 
and for inclusion in the second semester 
timetable the second .Monday in October, 
* * * * 



COLLEGE ART GALLERY EXHIBITS 



An exhibition 
ings is now on disp 
Gallery, 303 Main E 
sists of a series o 
proofs of the wood., 
for the new edition 
_a Country Church Ya 
This is a current C 
of Harper Brothers 
proofs are loaned t 
of Mr, A. W. Rushmo 
office. 



of Lankes wood engrav— 
lay in the College Art 
ngineering. It con—, 
f 30 signed artist »s 
cut s by J. J. Lankes 
of Elegy Written in 
rd by Thomas Gray, 
hristmas publication 
of New York. The 
hrough the courtesy 
re of their New York 



LANKES BOOK ILLUSTRATIONS 

In the opinion of many critics Mr. 
Lankes is America's leading wood engraver 
at the 1 present time. "Certain it is that 
his prints for- the Elegy have been done, 
with imagination as well as with great 
technical skill," the announcement says. 

The gallery is open daily except 
Sunday from 8:30 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. The 
exhibition will remain until this Satur- 
day noon, December 14. The public is 
cordially invited. 
* * * 



GRADING IN HIGH SCHOOL AND COLLEGE 
.by William S, Hoffman 



The index numbers computed by the 
registrar each year for the secondary 
schools of the state are essentially a 
comparison of grades in secondary school 
with those made during the freshman class 
■in college. There are almost as many 
grading systems as there are schools, or 
even departments, and comparison here is 
therefore limited to that of rank in 
c 1 a s s.. 

The .computation of an index number 
comparison of rank. Referring to 
index number of a typical school we 



is 
th« 

have 



22 2370X 
5/86,521 

This comparison is in the figures 2378X, 
which actually say what is given in the 
following tabulation: 

Rank in Rank in 

H«S, Freshman Class 
(fifths) (tenths) 



2 

3 

7 

8 

10 



Schools sending 10 to 19 students to 
the College during this same period num- 
bered 107 • Rational indexes are found 
for 65 or 60,7 per cent of the group. 
If we compare only first fifthers, .sec- 
ond fifthers, and all who ranked lower, 
81 or 75,7 per cent are rational. 



the 

cent 

ere a 

and 

send 

peri 

clas 

that 

rate 

that 

sif i 

engi 

that 

of t 



This wou 
size of t 
age of no 
se materi 
has not b 
ing just 
od, and f 
s, number 

these tw 
d by thre 

they can 
e d as mu 3 
neering, 

in 72 ca 
he total. 



Id seem to 
he group d 
n-rat ional 
ally, Thi 
een so in 
two studen 
rom differ 
ed 96, If 
o individu 
e full cal 

enter cur 
ic educati 
it is amaz 
ses, or ex 

we have r 



indicate th 
ecreased the 

indexes wou 
s is not the 
the past , S 
ts during th 
ent fifths o 

one remembe 
als could be 
endar years, 
ricula as di 
on and chemi 
ing to disco 
actly 75 per 
at ional numb 



at as 
per- 

ld in- 
case 

chools 

is 

f the 

rs 
sepa— 
and 

ver- 

cal .. 

ver 
cent 

ers# 



An index with numbers arranged ae 
was the above (2378X) I call rational, 
simply because each fifth of the class 
has maintained its same relative position 
in college, A non-rational index number 
is one where the positions of all or of 
some are reversed/ as in 238X7 or X7842, 

How often are these index numbers 
rational? Or, in other. words, how often 
do the faculty at Penn State place their 
freshmen in the same relative order as 
they were placed en the basis of their 
secondary school record? 

In answering these questions I have 

considered three groups of schools: those 

schools sending 20 or more students during 
the past four years; those sending 10 to 

19; and those sending just two, but in 

different fifths of their secondary school 
graduating class, 

A total of 71 schools sent us, dur- 
ing the four years preceding the admission 
of the present freshman class, 20 or more 
students, 49 or 69 per cent have ra- 
tional numbers. If we indicate rank in 
the freshman class in fifths instead of 
in tenths, 59 or 83,5 per cent are ra- 
tional for each fifth of the high' school 
class. If we compare only first fifthers, 
second fifthers, and all who rank lower, 
65 or 91,5 per cent are rational, 

* * • * 



This^method of computation makes no 
comparison of grades as such, and an in- 
dex number reading 12345 is as rational 
as one reading 6789X, The first high 
school is sending a group much superior 
to that from the second, but the second 
predicted the relative position of its 
graduates just as ' accurately ' as did the 
first, " *. 

A typical example follows. Miss 
B*C,B, entered the curriculum in home 
economics in 1938, She was ranked in the 
first fifth of her graduating class by 
the B*T« High School in June> 1938; at 
the end of the freshman year had an aver- 
age of 1,00; and ranked in the seventh 
tenth of her class* Tiro years earlier 
J.W.V,, who was r'anked in"' the fourth 
fifth of his graduating class in the same 
high school^, entered the forestry curri- 
culum at Mont Alto, At the end of his 
freshman year he ranked in the tenth 
tenth of his class. Instructors in two 
widely different faculty groups, with n» 
possible previous knowledge of the other 
student's record, ranked these two stu- 
dents in the same order as did their high 
school faculty. Certainly neither stu- 
dent was outstanding, but relative posi- 
tions remained unchanged, When this ocr- 
curs three times out of four, year after 
year, it seems to those charged with the 
admission of freshmen that there is. some- 
thing in grades and grading, that grades 
are apparently .properly used, to place 
students in their proper positions within 
a class or series of classes, and that 
those charged with the instruction of 
high' school and college students are 
doing a genuinely conscientious * job. 



OF GENERAL INTEREST 



The following letter is published 
at the request of President Hetzel: 

Dear President Hetzel: 



The School of Agriculture faculty 



Inf or 
C ommitt ee 
to believe 
being hand 
conditions 
ma 1 nu t r i t i 
eye sight , 
disorders, 
instructor 
en the loo 
port them 
agencies o 



nation coming to the Senate 
on Student Welfare leads it 

that some of our students are 
icapped in their studies by 
growing out of bad health, 
on and undernourishment, faulty 
and various kinds of nervous 

The committee suggests that 
s and advisers be asked to be 
kout for such cases and to re — 
promptly to central service 
f the College. 

Yours respectfully, 



A. R. Warnock, Secretary 
S e nate Committee on Student Welfare 

* * * * * * 

Miss Ruth Wanger, regional vice 
■president of the American Federation of 
Teachers, will speak on "America's Schools 
in the Present World Crisis" today, Tues- 
day, December 10, at 8:15 p.m. in room 
10 Liberal Arts. 

* * * * * * 



;his Friday, December 1; 

in room 109 Agriculture Build— 



will meet 
4:10 p.m. 

ing, according to an official announce- 
ment 



from Dean 
* * 



W. Fletcher, 
* * 



The 
Town Mec 
will be 
Changing 
Kenneth 
Rabbi Be 
f oundat i 
meet ing 
Foundat i 
It is op 
and town 



sub j 
ting 
"Does 
?" S 

D . Ku 
n jami 
on, w 
begin 
on au 
en to 
spe op 



e ct of t 
this Sun 

Our E c o 
peaker s 
t chinson 
n Kahn, 
ill be t 
s at 7:3 
dit orium 

student 
le. 



he Hillel Foundation 
day, December 15, 
nomic System Need 
include Professors 

and Charles Wyand. 
director of the 
he moderator. The... 
p.m. in the Hillel 
, 13 3 W, Beaver Ave* 
s, faculty members, 



J, J. Dreese, Lemont, has lent a 
copy of "Recipts and Expenditures of 
Pennsylvania," published in 1802, to the 
College Library for an indefinite period^ 
The pamphlet contains the last will and 
testament of Moses Thompson and a copy 
of a tax assessment statement of James 
P. McFarland, Boalsburg, June 14, 1856. 
These will be exhibited in the lobby 
ca s e s . 

* * * * * * 



The American Association of Univer- 
sity Professors will hold an open meeting 
tomorrow, Wednesday, December 11, at 7:30 
p.m. in the Sandwich Shop. After the 
business meeting, the proposed extension 
of group insurance for hospitalization 
and surgical benefits to cover dependents 
of members of the College staff will be 
di s cussed. 

• * * * * , * * 

The second in a series of P,S.C,A, 
forums will be held tomorrow, Wednesday, 
December 11, at 7:30 p«nu in the Home- ■ 
Economics Auditorium* The subject "Is 
Pan— Americanism Practical?" will be dis- 
cussed by Dr. A, H. Reede, assistant pro- 
fessor of economics, and Dr. William Gray, 
instructor in Lat in— American history, 

* * * * * * 

Miss Matilda Bentley will give the 
Wednesday Reading tomorrow, December 11, 
at 4:15 p*m» in room 402 of. the College 
Library, Mrs* Henry S. Brunner will give 
the reading next .Wednesday, December 18, 

* * * * * * 

The Graduate Club will hold their 
Christmas party this Friday, December 13, 
at 8 p.m. in the Sandwich Shop. 



The Liberal Arts faculty will meet 
tomorrow, Wednesday, December 11, at 4:10 
p.m. in room 121 Liberal Arts, according 
to an official announcement from Dean 
Charles W. Stoddart, 

* * * * * * 



Dean Frank D. Kern announces the 
following preliminary examination for 
the Ph*D, degree: Mr, Lane Mitchell; 
major) ceramics; minor, mineralogy; 201 
Mineral Industries Building; T/ednesday, 
December 18, at 2 p»m, 

* * * + * * 

A Christmas musical service by the 
Col-lege Choir will be given in chapel 
next Sunday, December 15. 

* * * * * * 

The basketball team will play Col- 
gate this Saturday, December 14, at 8 p.m. 

* * * * * * 

Faculty members who plan to present 
papers before professional meetings dur- 
ing the Christmas holidays are requested 
to send advance copies or abstracts to 
the department of public information as 
soon as convenient, 

* * * * * * 



F a cu 1 1 y me mb e r s 
to go hone for the h 
vantage of round tri 
fares by purchasing 
ticket, A one— way t 
should be purchased 
special ticket may t 
any tine between Dec 
16 for return to the 
et will be good for 
between February 15 
Easter or spring vac 
15 and June 30 at th 



or students who plan 
olidays nay take ad— 
p reduced railroad 
a "College Special" 
icket from the College 
in going' hone. The 
hen be obtained at 
ember 25 and January 

College, This tick— 
a trip home any day 
and April 15 for the 
ation or between May 
c close of school, 

* * * * 



MINUTES OF THE COLLEGE SENATE 



4 A meeting of the C 
held in room 121 Libera 
on Thursday, December 5 
p.m., with President He 

The minutes of the 
were read and approved. 

The Secretary read 
tion of the Senate, the 
from the Council meet in 
ber 2, 1940: "On motio 
that the closing date f 
of material in the firs 
table would be the seco 
and for inclusion in a 
timetable would be the 
October, " 



ollege Senate was 
1 Arts Building 
, 1940, at 4:10 
tzel presiding* 

previous meeting 

, for the informa— 

following minute 
g of Monday, Decem- 
n, Council voted 
or the inclusion . 
t semester timeT 
nd Monday in March 
second semester 
second Monday in 



The Committee on Academic Standards 
presented a report which was read by the 
Secretary. This report requests an ex- 
ception for Mrs, -Nellie T, Hogue, to the 
rule limiting the number of. credits to be 
secured by extension, in one semester and 
was, on motion, adopted. 

The acting chairman of the Committ.ee . 
on Academic Standards,' Dr.- C.# >£• Mar— 
quardt, presented a recommendation for 
the reconsideration of the case of Miss ,.., , 
Gertrude Regan .and recommending ' an ex- 
ception to the residence rule, in her be—.., 
half. This recommendation was, on mo- 
tion, adopt ed, .. : 

The Secretary presented the candi- 
date s _f or ' the John W* White and Louise 
Carnegie Scholarships, These awards had 
been previously "approved "by the President 
and were, on motion, approved by the Sen- 
ate. 

The recommendations of the Committee 
on Academic Standards are on file in the 
office of the. Registrar. 

Professor Kinsloe, chairman of .the' 
Committee on Courses of' Study, moved the 
adoption of the report of the, committee 
as presented on November 7, 1940. The 

• ■ OFFICIAL NOTICES FROM THE 



MEETING, DECEMBER 5, 1940 

Senate so voted. 

Professor Kinsloe presented a new 
report which contained, beginning near 
the top of page 21 of the report, a rec- 
ommendation for two engineering defense 
programs and asked for unanimous consent 
for the immediate consideration of this 
part of the report. There being no objec- 
tion, this part of _ the report, beginning 
near the top of page 21 and continuing 
on pages 22 and 23, was adopted unanimous- 
ly. The remainder of the report was 
placed on the table for consideration at 
the January meeting of the Senate, The 
entire report is on file in the office 
of the Registrar, 

On motion of Professor Kinsloe, the 
Extension Division was voted permission 
to add to course • numbers giyen in Engi- 
neering Defense Training and letters . . 
"e.d.t," (Engineering' Defense Training) 
without referring such subjects, all 
already in existence, to the Senate 'in 
each individual case. 

The President brought to the atten- 
tion, of the Senate that, in the November 
report of the Committee on Courses of 
■Study just approved a total of 68 new 
courses— carrying a maximum of 22 8 cred- 
its— ^-werc approved, whereas at the same 
time 16 course s— carrying a maximum total 
of 40 credits — were dropped. This means 
that the College will have a net gain of 
52 new cour se s, carrying a total of 190 
credits, with no assurance that the Col- 
lege is financially able to extend its 
program at this time. The President 
pointed; out that some type of financial 
a's.sura.noe. is necessary in order that 
such extension of programs be made 
possible, ' 

The_ pre sident pointed out that.this 

wag the last meeting for the year 1940 

,and wished the members of the Senate a 

happy holiday period, whereupon the Sen—" ' 

ate adjourned, T(T _ TT „__ 

W, S, Iioffman, Sec, 

OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR 



Withdrawals 



G Bell, Sarah E., Ed, Sept, "28 ' ". • 

1 Blair, Robert R., LD, Nov. 27..'.' 

1 Dodds,'Dean M. , Cer, Nov, ; - 2 

2 Reddig, Constance M, , LArch, Nov, 23 

The following reasons were given:"' 
4, poor healthj 1, to go to work; 1, 



2 Rennsr, 'Winifred, LD, Nov. 27 

3 Rogers, *Mary Jane, AL, Nov, 25 
2 '."Watto, Paul, EE,, Nov. 21 

personal reasons; 1, no reason. 



Dropped for Poor Scholarship 

E, L, Kemmlcr, sophomore in electrical engineering 
Wm, G. .Hueston, sophomore 'in mechanical/ engineering 



Win, S.' 'Hoffman Registrar 






«3WKVH3-.a SAav-I* SSIW 



THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 



FACULTY 



Published weekly on Tuesday during the College 
year as a means of making official announcements 
and presenting items of interest to the faculty. All 




ULLETIN 



contributions should be as brief as possible and reach 
Walter F. Dantzscher, Director of Public Information, 
105 Old Main, not later than 10 a.m. each Friday. 



VOL. 20 



December 17, 1940 



NO 



12 



COMMITTEE ASKS THAT STUDENTS BE CAUTIONED ON VACATION PENALTIES 



The committee charged with adminis- 
tering the vacation absence regulations 
requests that the following statement be 
read in all classes at some time during 
the week before the Christmas vacation: 

"Under the new regulations instruc- 
tors must report all absences that occur 
during the 48-hour period before and af- 
ter the Thanksgiving, Christmas, and... 
Easter vacations* Absentees will be 
assessed the penalty unless they have 



been exempted from 
cation to the ccmmi 
the vacation. The 
ing applications fo 
vacation will be Sa 
11» Students who 1 
vacations or return 
only for emergency 
are absent during t 
still in the commun 
tions for exemption 
that they had not e 



it upon written appli- 


ttee submi 


tted 


after 


final date 


for 


re ceiv— 


11 owing the 


Chr i stmas 


turday noon^ J 


anuary' 


eave early 


for 


their 


late will 


be 


exempted 


reasons. 


stud 


ents who 


he 48-hour 


period while 


i t y must f 


ile 


applica- 


with evid 


snce 


to show 


xt ended th 


e ir 


vacat ions," 



PUBLICITY FOR CHRIS IMAS PAPERS 



Members o 
attend meeting 
or participate 
during the Chr 
to report this 
head at once, 
asked to keep 
part icipat ion 
ties of member 
Department of 
early convenie 
his informatio 



In cases where papers are to be de- 
livered, it will be helpful to the pres- 
tige of the College if advance copies or 
abstracts of the proposed addresses are 
sent to the Department of Public Informa— 



f th 


e faculty wh 


r plan to 


s of 


prof e s siona 


1 societies 


at 


educat ional 


conference s 


istmas holidays 


are asked 


fac 


t to their d 


epartment 


The 


department 


head is 


a record of this 


propo sed 


and 


to report th 


e act ivi— 


s cf 


his department to the 


Publ 


ic Information at his 


nee , 


as soon as 


he thinks 


n is 


reasonably 


complet e • 



tion well in advance cf the meetings. No 
publicity about the contents of the papers 
will be released for publication before 
their delivery, but it is essential for 
the department to have the papers well in 
advance in order to assimilate their con- 
tents and. organize the presentation of 
material for the press if it is to appear 
at all. 

Faculty members who fear misquotation 
have the assurance of the College News 
Service that news stories about their pa- 
pers will be submitted' to them for ap- 
proval, if time permits, before they 'are 
released to press associations and news- 
papers if they so request in submitting 
the abstracts. 



A MESSAGE FROM PRESIDENT AND MRS. HETZEL 



To the Faculty and Staff: 

This year it seems to Mrs. Hetzel 
and me to be more appropriate to extend 
our holiday greetings to the faculty and 
staff more simply than in the past, and 
through a medium which enables us to put 
into words the thought that is foremost 
in our minds. We take this opportunity, 



therefore, to extend to you cordial 
greetings of the season and to express 
the heartfelt hope that before another 
Christmas has come and gone the real 
spirit of the season will have come once 
more to the whole world. 

Sincerely, 

President and Mrs. R. D. Hetzel 



CIRCULAR, 137, LAND GRANT COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES 
by William S, Hoffman 



Th 
again h 
ment an 
Grant c 
ently t 
annual 
to make 
inst itu 
. eluded 
mere th 
for ins 
the sta 
Inst it ti 



e U. 
as p 
d fi 
olle 
heir 
repo 

to 
tion 
in t 
an o 
tanc 
te o 
t e o 



S, Office o 
ublished st 
nance s v rega 
tfe s and ,uni 
data are .t 
rt_ all t cpl,l 
the Office, 
s for wh ( ite 
he report b. 
ne inst itut 
e , Ma s s a chu 
ollege and 
f Techno log 



1, University 



5, University of 



f Education once 


at ist ics 
rding the 


on enroll— 
Land -> >■ • 


ver sit ie s 

aken from 


e Appa*r— • 
the ■» • • 


eges are 
of Educat 


requested- 
ion. All- 


student s 
Some sta 


are in— • ■ 
tes have • 


ion reporting; as v , 
setts, with both 
the Massachusetts 
y included* 


f ornia- . 
e sota , , 
nois , « 
ity, , , 
onsin, . 


, .24,096 
. ,15,096 
. ,12,785 
, ,12,660 
, .10,539 



The top five institutions and The 
Pennsylvania State College are listed in 
the following table, on the basis of en— 



1. 



2,' 



4*' 



5. 



Penn 
State 



Undergr 
Graduat 
Spe cial 
Men 
U, of 
Cal, 
17,376 

U. °t . 
Minn, 
11,244 
U. of 
111. 
10,796 
Ohio 
State 
'10,459 
U, of 
Wis, 

8,234 
10th 

5,478 



acluat e , 
e, and 
Student s 
Women 
U, of 
Cal, 
11,475 
U, of 
Minn, 

6,282 . 
Ohio, 
State 

3,951 
U. of 
Wis, 

3,715 
U. of 
111. . 

3,665 
12th 

1,815 



Under 
Stu 

Men 
U, of 
Cal, 
14,319 
U, of 
111, 

9,490 
U, of 
Minn, 

9,395 
Ohio 
State . 

■9,113 
U. of 
Wi s • . 

7,121 
9th 

4,867 



graduate 
dent s 
Women 
U. of 
Cal, 

9,777 
U. of 
Minn, 
5.701 
Ohio . 
Stat e 

3,547 
U. of 
. Wi s , 
3,418 
U, of 
111* 
3,295 
14th 
.1,501 



There is a total of 52 institutions listed 
in the report. 

■ • No 'single figures" indicating total., 
•resident enrollment are given in the re- 
port-, -and the following table was made by 
adding- enrollment "by s'ex, under the head- 
ing ''Total Undergraduate's, * excluding du- 
plicates,' 1. The table shows the position 
of The Pennsylvania State College, in re- 
lation to other Land Grant institutions, 
for the past academic year: 



6, Louisiana State University . ,7,539 

7, Purdue University, • • . • , ,6,748 

8, University of Nebraska . « • ,6,611 

9, Michigan State College • , . ,6,529 
10, Pennsylvania State College » ,6,368 

rollment for the academic year 1939—1940, 

as reported by the Office of Education: 



Number first 




( 


time in any.. 


Summer 


College 


Se ssion 


Men 


Wome n 


Men 


Women 


U, of 


U..P,f 


U, of 


U, of. 


Cal, 


Cal, 


Minn. 


Cal, 


2,967 


2,552; . 


3,512 


4,733 


Ohio 


U. of 


U> of. 


U. of.. 


Stat e 


Minn, 


" Cal, 


Minn. 


2,425 


1,241 


3,420 


3,503 


U, of. 


Ohio 


Ohio, 


Oh i , 


Mini* , 


State' 


State 


State 


2,214 


1,005 


3,350 t 


2,449 


U. of 


U. of 


Penn 


U. of 


111, ' 


Wis, 


Stat e 


Wi s , 


2,009 


897 


2,317 


2,372 


Purdue 


Okla, 


U. of 


U,. of. 


Univ, 


A&M 


111. 


Puerto Rico 


1,753 


749 


2/314 


1,623 


' '9th 


14th 


4th 


6th 


1,402 


437 


2,317 


1,6.16 



The total number of undergraduate, 
graduate, and special students enrolled 
in these institutions for the academic 
year 1939-1940 was : men, 184,218; and 
women, 74,962 — a total of 259,180, 



Bachelor's degrees conferred, .during the. 
year numbered: , men, 28,099; and women^. 
12,242 — a total of 40,341, A tabulation 
of degrees conferred by the five leading 
institutions and Penn State follows: 



First Degrees 
Men Women 



U. of Cal, 

1,834 
U, pf Minn, 

895 .. 
U. of 111, 

814 
0. State U, 

673 
U, of Wis, 

614 
10th 

359 



1. 


U, 


, of Cal, 
2,730 


2. 


u 


. of 'in, 

2,100' 


3, 


u 


, of Minn, 
1,724 


4. 





, State U, 
1,511 


5« 


u 


• of Wis, 

1,347 


Penn 


6th 


St; 


ite 


957 



Master's 



U, of 111, 

652 
0, State U,'' 

532 
U. of Cal," 

503 
U. of Wis, 

480 
U, of Minn, 

35? 

7th 

314 



Doctor ' s 


u. 


of Wis, 




160 


Cornell U, 




131 


u. 


of 'ill. 




130 


u. 


of Cal. 




129 


0, 


State U, 




111 




8th 




62 



Enrollment and bachelor's degrees 
conferred in come of the areas covered 
"by The Pennsylvania State College are 



Agriculture . . • • . 
Architecture. . . . * 
Commerce and Business 
Engineering 



enumerated. The positions held by the 
College in their several fields using the 
names appearing in the report follow: 



Degrees Conferred 



Enrollment 



9th with 160 20th with 506 

9th with 6 11th with 30 

9th with 130 ..... 22nd with 238 

9th with 255 ..... 12th with 1344 



Home Economics 4 ,•••.•••••••*• 13th with 1«02 

Journalism, •••••••■•••••••• 6th with 52 

Teachers College. ............. 7th with 239 



13th with 532 
4th with 99 
9th with 677 



OF GENERAL INTEREST 



at 7 p.m. Faculty 
and townspeople are 



The annual German Christmas sing is 
to be held in Schwab Auditorium today, 
Tue sday, »Dacember 17, 
member a, • students, 
cordially invited, 

* * , * * * * 

The annu 
sponsored by 
Music and the 
ciation will 

Iviain at 8:30 
19. A collec 
benefit of th 
and Mrs. Hetz 
following the 
worship servi 
in the Hugh B 



al Christma 
the College 

Penn State 
be held on 
p.m. this T 
tion will b 
e World Stu 
el's Fund f 

carol sing 
ce will be 
carer Rpbm. 
1 * * 



s carol sing 

's Department of 

Christian Asso— 
the steps of Old 
hursday, December 
e taken for the 
dent Service Fund 
or Emergencies. 

the Christmas 
held at 9 :15 p im. 



The Department o'f Agricultural and 
Biological Chemistr'y will bs open for in- 
spection by faculty 'member s , students, 
and townspeople on Friday, January 10, 
from 3 to 5, p .m,. It will be possible to 
observe instruction and research activi- 
ties as th,ey are normally conducted,^ Ex- 
hibits and ..demonstrations of, interest to 
the public b,ave been arranged, and guides 
will be available, ' • 

* * * * * * 

I/Irs. Henry S. Brunner will give the 
V/cinesday Reading tomorrow, December 18, 
at 4:15 p.m. in room 402 of the Library. 
. * * * * . * * 

There will b'e no chapel service 



until January 12. 



The basketball team will play Sus- 
quehanna ' tomorrow, Wednesday, December 
18 , at 8' p.m. . 

*•+ , » * * * 

* * i 

Dean Fr«an«k D. Hern announces the 4 
following examinations for the Ph,D, de- 
gree : 

Mr, L. A. Peacock; qualifying exam- 
ination; major, English literature; today, 
Tuesday, December 17, at 2 p,m>j room 205 
Liberal Art s i 

Mr; Joseph Naghski; final examina— 
tionj" ma jor> .bacteriology J minor, agri- 
cultural biochemistry/ Friday, December 



20 



1 :30 



p.m.; 



"room 201 Patterson Hall, 



Mr, Jerome W,, Sprauer ; final examin- 
ation; major, chemistry; minor, physics; 
second minor,, chemical engineering; Sat- 



urday, De-cember 21, at 
Porfd Laboratory, 



>0 a,m-, : .105 



Mr. James L. Dizikes; preliminary 
examination; ma j or ,' ^ dairy husbandry; 
minftr, agricultural "biochemistry ; Satur- 
,dS,y, December 21, at * 9 a,m.;' roomn202 
Dairy Building. 



This will be the last is.sue of the 

V F a'culty Bulletin until after the Christmas 
vacation. 

* * * * * * 



OFFICIAL NOTICES FROM THE OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR 

Withdrawals 



1 Moxley, Warren Westly/ EchE, N,ov, 25 S Reinwand, Jule Irene, LA, Nov. 1 
t, o Snyder, Marion Elizabeth, LA, Nov, 1 



> The following reasons were given 
for withdrawing: one withdrew be cause 



of "a speech , defect j two because classes 
interfered with full-tine positions. 

Wm. S, Hoffman 
* ' . Registrar 



LIBRARY OFFERS SEVERAL EXHIBITS 



An exhibit of steel plant pastels by 
the well known artist Frank Hartley An- 
derson is now on display at the Library, 
This exhibition will continue until Jan- 
uary 5» Mr. Anderson's pastele were done 
in the steel mills at night. Pastel was 
selected in preference to any wet color 
medium for that reason, Operat ions on 
molten iron and steel, none lasting for 
more than 10 minutes at a time, must be 
worked on rapidly and must be waited, for 
until, they happen again, the Library's 
announcement explains. Five months' time 
wont into 18 pictures. 



beraburg in 1851 and the other published 
in New Berlin in 1838, These are placed 
in the exhibit oases in the lobby, 

J, J, Dreese, Lemont, has lent to 
the Library for an indefinite period a 
copy of "Receipts and Expenditures of 
Pennsylvania" published in 1802, a pam- 
phlet containing the last will and testa- 
ment of Moses Thompson, and a copy of a 
tax assessment statement of James Pi. 
McFarland, Boalsburg, June 14, 1856, 
These are being exhibited also in the 
lobby cases. 



Mr, Anderson, who lives in Atlanta, 
had not only the years of experience 
gained through working in many mediums, 
Int. months of experiment in actually mak— 
1-ng the colors which he worked out for 
himself. He made his own Colors, he 
says, because "commercial pastels are 
not colorful enough for the subject," 

The Library also' announces that Hi as 
Grace Bittner, of the Leitzell Building, 
through the kindness of Harry Leitzell, 
has l'ent the Library for exhibition for 
an indefinite period', two early Pennsyl- 
vania imprints, one published in Cham*- 



The Engineering Reading Room, 110 
Main Engineering, is sponsoring a plas- 
tics display which will continue to De- 
cember 20, This display covers magazine 
artioles, bulletins, books, and samples of 
plastics in process, A complete exhibit 
of "Vinylite" resins manuf actured by the 
Car"bide and Carbon. Chemicals Corporation, 
from powdered form to complete pro'duct, 
showing .-many applications, also is on 
display. Other items include . several 
samples of "Beetle" products manufactured 
by the American Cyanamid Company, .and 
R8hm and Haas plastic material, especial- 
ly "Plexiglas" and' "Cry staline," 



"POVERTY BALL" TO AID- NEEDY STUDENTS 



The attention of faculty members is 
directed to the '"Poverty Ball" to be held 
this Thursday evening, December 19, in 
Recreation Hall from 9 to 12, following 
the Christmas carol service on the steps 
of Old Main, The ball is being sponsored 
by the undergraduate "hat" societies, 
■Admission will be $1 and a can of food, 



The profits from the ball will be turned 
over to Mrs, Hetzel's Fund for Emergen- 
cies, and the food will be distributed to 
needy families in the community through 

'the committee of which Mr 
is chairman* 

■pe ople , 
attend. 



S« Hirby 
Faculty members, towns- 



and students are invited to 



INF 0R1 AT I ON 'PLEASE PROGRAM TO BE HELD JANUARY 12 



Alpha Lambda Delta*,: freshman women's 
honorary, is sponsoring its second "In—, 
formation, Please" program, Sunday, Jan- 
uary 12, at 3 p,m, in room 121 Liberal. 
Arts, The board of exper.ts will be com- 
posed of five faculty members: Warren 
B. Hack, Joseph J. Rubin,, Kinsley R. 
Smith, Charles S, Wyand, and Hummel Fish- 
burn. Robert E, Galbraith, associate 
professor of English composition, will 
preside, * 

Any student may, on the back of any 



of his bluebooks that have been graded „ ' 
"3", submit a question by turning it in 
to the Student Union desk before Thursday, 
January 9, For any question that .stumps 
the experts, the' sponsors will pay $2,50* 
About 30 queat.ions of a general nature 
will be selected. These should be accom- 
panied by 'the correct answers. 

Faculty members are requested to an— 
'nop.ee the program to their classes, 

Ha?.el E. Gassmann 
President' of Alpha Lambda Delta 



■A J- "£ J n 



"Mv«- a SAQV1S SSIS 



THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 



•FACULTY 



Puhli«h«?d weekly on Tuesday during the College 
yeai a- a means of making official announcements 
and presenting items oi interest to the faculty. All 




VOL, 20 



January 7, 1941 



U-LLETIN 



contributions should be as brief a* pnnsible and reach 
Walter F, Dantzacher, Director of Public Information 
105 Old Main, not later than 10 a.m. eaclj Friday. 

• . NO. 13 



A YEAR'S REPORT ON OUT-OF-STATE PUBLICITY 



If it is true that research as an 
activity deserves greater recognition in 
the College publicity program, it_is*also 
true that the same sort of scientific 
analysis should be applied to the public- 
ity program on a continuing basis. This 
need was first realized some five or six 
years ago and an effort was then made to 
amass objective data about limited por- 
tions of the area to be studied as early 
as 1935. Since, however, activities of 
this type are not 'sd obviously and imme- 
diately productive as energies expended 
in finding, writing, and 'Circulating, news 
and feature stories arid photographs, it 
has not been possible until recently to 
put this part of the activities of the 
Department of Public Information on any 
basi's that would even approach the '-exac- 
titude of "a 'scholar attempting to study 
phenomena in a restricted area," * 

One of the difficulties, to begin 
with, is the multiplicity of publications 
themselves. An individual faculty member 
or administrator frequently tends to 
evaluate the worth of a college publicity 
program on the 'basis of 'his personal 
reading experience with one, two, or 
three newspaper's* While' "it is cdnceded 
that these may be among 'the most impor- 
tant objectives in any publicity effort, 
it is also 'a fact that Arty single publi- 
cation, or any two or thre'e publications, 
form but a small part o'f the whole pro- . 
gram. Neve'rthele ssy 'in December^ 1939, 
the Department of Public Information em- 
barked on its first rigorous 1 attempt to 
study the efficacy of at least part of 
its program. A report on the findings in 
Pennsylvania is still in progress. 
Through the services of a clipping bureau 
which specializes in college publicity, 
it is now possible to report on the find- 
ings for one year in media published out- 
side of Pennsylvania.' 

For budgetary reasons, the clipping 
bureau was instructed to clip only from 
newspapers with more than 50,000 circula- 
tion. There are approximately 150 news- 
papers of this size in the United States, 
although the number of daily newspapers 
of all sizes totals 1900, To eliminate 



mere 

burea 

per so 

membe 

tions 

liste 

insti 

or ot 

which 

line o 



inc 
u wa 
nal 
r s r 
; no 
d Pe 
tuti 
her 

a PP 



idental mentions," the clipping 
n further instructed not to clip 
items about students or faculty 
eturning from week— ends or vaca— 
t to clip items which simply 
nn State among a number of other 
ons; and not to clip agricultural 
extension items excepting those 
eared under a State College date— 



From experience on certain specific 
stories, it is evident that while the clip- 
ping bureail is 'doing 'a ' sat isf act ory job, 
it has not 'been able to collect all items 
for which it "has 'authorization. Neverthe- 
less, after" Ruling 'out sports publicity 
(which could'ndt be studied '-at this time), 
after eliminating dll references to the 
unfortunate" Rachel Taylor case, and after 
restricting int Srder a§*above described, 
the report shows that news about College 
activities appeared in one year in 196 
publications^ mostly daily papers^ pub 1 - 
lished outside of Pennsylvania, The 196 
•figure- includes also a few national maga- 
zines such as Time and Newsweek and, ob- 
viously, a smSll proportion of newspapers 
below 50,000 dirculat ion . Clipping's from 
these were not returned beoause they did 
not reach us in sufficient numbers to be. 
objectionable. The one— time circulation 
of these publications is* 24,748;754, The 
total number of clippings received from 
out-of-state papers 'for ' one year was 1039, 
It would make 1 an interesting parler game, 
if time permitted, to multiply the circu- 
lation of each publication by the fre- 
quency of the appearance of Penn State 
news in that publication, but even brief 
inspection reveals that the total would 
•be- astronomical in proportions. The 196 
publications were published in 29 states., 
and 71 cities. Despite its size, the 
24,748,754 figure is conservative because 
l) it is incomplete; 2) because, when 
clippings have been received from both 
daily and Sunday editions of the same pa- 
per, it uses daily circulation figures, 
which are generally considerably below 
the Sunday figures. 

The 20 out— of— state papers which 
( cont * d on page 4 ) 



THE PLACE OF THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE ACCORDING TO THE 1939-40 ENROLLMENTS 



by William S«- Hoffman 



The repor 
tion of Colleg 
ment in Americ 
f or. the academ 
my ,.de sk on De c 
memher institu 
bership of 790 
ment of 1,.012, 
these same col 
ment of 981,91 
grees "were con 
group of colle 
the previous y 
eluded in the 
in 1938-1939 t 



t of the American Associa— 
iate Registrars on enroll— 
an and Canadian colleges 
ic year 1939-1940 reached 
ember 16, This year 681 
tions, out of a total mem— 
, report a combined enroll- 
826* One year earlier 
leges reported an enroll— 
1. A total of 178,339 de- 
ferred in 1939-40 by this 
ges, a gain of 8,350 over 
ear. Honorary degrees, in- 
above, increased from 945 
o 1,006 in 1939-^1940, 



Institutions included in the report 
are as follows : 

Universities • •*»•<•• 173. 
Liberal Arts Colleges* • • 329 
Teachers Colleges, » • • * 76 
Junior Colleges, *•>«« 63 
Professional and Technical 

Schools, * ,, , . , • • , 40, 



The position of The Pennsylvania State 
College in any tabulation of this type is 
always of interest to the writer,. Espe- 
cially true has this become recently when 
different reports pLace the College in 
entirely different positions on what seems 
to be similar bases. 



ident Raymond Walters 's annual 
enrollments is published each 
in School and Society for the 
ear. The report for 1940-1941 
e* P£nns.yLva»nLa .State College in 
t.ioji,. oji the .basis .of total resi- 
st ime. enr.ol.lm,en.t ,. September to 
s,t ye,ar., -in r.eporting for the 
-J. 940., .President Walters 's report 
e.. College, in 15th position, The 
e«s .t o.ge.t her. with their enroll-r 
shown in the following table^ 
n in this table is the place Penn 
d at the end of the year, to— 
th the enrollments of those col— 
se student bo-dies were larger 





Pre s 


repor 


t on 


Deceit 


ber 


current y 


places Th 


18th 


po si 


dent 


full 


June , 


La 


year 


1939 


place 


d th 


15 cc 


lleg 


ment s 


are 


Also 


show 


Stat e 


hel 


gether wi 


lege s 


who 


than 


our 


As soc 


iati 



own 



as reported by the American 



on of Collegiate Registrars* 



TABLE 



Enrollment 1939-1940 

President Walters *s Report Rank 

■-._.,.... Students 

full time 



December 16, 1939 

California ....... 26,004 1 - 

Minnesota, »•••••* 15,301 2 - 

C c lumb ia ,,,,,,, , 14,211 3 - 

Illinois . . * 13,510 4 - 

Ohio State University, , 13,231 5 - 

New York University, , , 12,745 6 - 

6,618 

Michigan ,,,...., 12,098 7 - 

Wisconsin* ••*■•-*» 11,268 .. 8 — 

University of ITashington 10,129 9 - 

6,011 

Texas, ,,,..,.,. 9,872 10 - 

5,277 

The College of the City 8,548 11 - 

of New York * 7,000 

Harvard University , , * 8,209 12 — 

Louisiana . State University 7,813- 13 — 

6,075 

University of Pennsylvania 7,347 14 

The Penna, State College 7,200 15 - 

6,767 

1,661 - 

The total number of. (decrees conferred 
by the 681 reporting institutions was 
178,339, If fron^this we deduct !he 
honorary degree s ,' 1606, we have 177,333* 
degrees conferred on students enrolled in 
the institutions. This is 17,7 per cent 



American Association of 
Colleg.iate Registrars Report 

Enrollment of Collegiate grade 
for the- academic year 
November, 1940 



2 


28,856 




3 


17,526 




4 


16,511 




5 


14,461 




6 


14,410 




1 


, 36,126 




7 


13,656 . 


• • 


8 


13,011- 




3.0 


11,949 




9 


12,162 




11 


11,677 * 


• • 


12 


11,627 




13 


10,576 , 


.• » 


14 


10,561 




15 


10,249 . 


• * 


16 


9,013 




17 


8,427 




18 


7,659 , 
no report 


• • 


21 


7,473 




19 


7,549 , 


* • 


20 


7,538 . 


• • 



Brooklyn College 

Chicago University 
Wayne University 
Hunter College 

Northwestern Unir» 



Purdue University 
George Yfashington U» 



of the total enrollment reported, 
1,012,826, The 21 largest institutions 
report ,an enrollment of 281,017, and 
granted 53,297 degrees, exclusive of 
any honorary degrees conferred. This is _ 
18., 9-. per cent of the reported enrollment. 



The Pennsylvania State College granted 
1670 degrees, or 22,6 per cent of the 
enrollment of 7473, A fallacy in this 
comparison is the omission of summer 
session students in enrollment figures, 
but the inclusion of all those receiving ' 
degre.es during the year. 

According to the American Associa- 
tion of Collegiate Registrars' report, 
the position of The Pennsylvania State 
College on the "basis of various enroll- 
ment factors is ■ as- .fallows- :•-...,.■«■, -, 

lien enrolled . . » . • • « • • • » 17th 

Women enrolled 1 . 4oth 

Total enrollment «-«.......» 21st 

Bachelors degree s . conferred. '• . . . 15th" 
Masters degrees conferred. . . *■■ . .21st 

Doctorates" conferred ....... 24th 

Total degrees conferred. ..... 16th 

One outstanding feature" of The Penn- 
sylvania State College is not given in 
the report, but can be made by reference 
to the latest census report. No other 
college or university included -iii the 
list of 'the 21 largest institutions is 
located in a community so nearly com- 
pletely academic. The smallest center 
reported as the home of any college or 
university larger that The Pennsylvania 
State College is Lafayette, Indiana, where 
Purdue University is locate dy -which, ac- 
cording -to- the 1940 -census, has a popula- 
tion of 28,901, In fact, if the 50 larg- 
est institutions are considered, only two 
others are located in t'owns approximating 

* * 



the population of State College, They, 
and their enrollment, rank, and the popu- 
lation of the town in which they are lo- 
cated are as f o 1 1 ovr s : 

Enroll— Popn— 

Institution ment .Rank Address lation 



Penn State 7473 
Texas 'A&M' 6 395 
Oregon State 5053 



21st State 6.300/ 

>* Co-lie ge 
36th College 1500 

6 tat ion 
42nd Corvallis 7575 



Land Grant colleges, as liste 
Circular 187 of the United States 
of Education, have an' enrollment a 
ported to the American Association 
legiate Registrars of 256,585, or 
cent of the total for the nation, 
same colleges granted 37,889 bache 
degrees, or 27, 2 per cent* of the t 
The total numter- of degrees confer 
the Land Grant ■ college s was 47,961 
26,8 per cent* of the total degrees 
178,339, conferred by all reportin 
tutions. In "other wor d-s ,' the- Land 
colleges are doing somewhat over o 
fourth of the total work of higher 
tion in the nation. 



d in 


Office 


s ro- 


of Col- 


25,6 per 


These 


lors 


otal. 


red by 


, or 


f 



g msti- 

Grant 
ne 

educa — 



The concentration of students in New 
York City is almost appalling. In New 
York City and ; Brooklyn. ,16 .institutions 
with a combined enrollment of 103,639 are 
doing slight ly over one tenth (10,2 per 
cent) of the nation's task in higher 
education, 
* # , i * * 



'©F GENERAL INTEREST 



The College Senate will meet v this 
Thursday, January 9, at 4:10 p.m* in 
room 121 Liberal Arts^ according to an 
official announcement from William. S» 
Hoffman, Secretary, ' ' . 



Mr 
Divi sio 
nel, U, 
Washing 
cultura 
tunitie 
Graduat 
January 
culture 
will be 



. Samuel S 

n of Train 

,S» Depart 

ton> Di C, 

1 students 

s in the F 

es in Agri 

10, at 4 : 

' Building, 

■welcome , 



. Board 
ing, Of 
ment of 
, will' 

on the 
ederal ' 
culture 
10 p.m, 

Stude 
Dean Fl 

* * 



Chief of 
fice'of P6 

Agr icultil 
address th 

sub je ct ' '' 
Government 
>" this Fr 
, room'109 
trfc's of any 
etcher &nn 
* * '* ' * 



the 
r son- 
re, 

e agri — 
Oppor- 

f or 
iday, 

Agri- 

school 
.(5unce s • 



Faculty members are" reminded* that 
the Department of Agricultural and Bio- 
logical Chemistry will 1 be open for in- 
spection at its new headquarters in Frear ' 
Laborat orie s' thi*B Friday, January 10, 
from 3 to ,5 p,m». Instruction, research 
activities as' they are normally conducted, 
exhibit s ,' and demonstrations may be ob— * 
served. Guides will be available. 
* * * * * * 



, The Agricultural ' Engineering ■ open 
house will be held Thursday af-t e?n<5on, 
January 16, from 3 to 5 p.m. Everyone is 
cordially invited to*visit the Agricul- 
tural Engineering Building on that date 
or at any other* time ," ' * ' ' ' 

** .. ', ■* •*.**'• ■ ,*■ 

The third' of the Liberal Arts lec- 
"ture series will be' given Thursday), Jan- 
uary 16, from'7":30 to 8:30 p.m. in room 
10 _ Liberal Art si William H, Gray of the 
Department of 'History will speak on "Axis 
Activities in, Latin America-*" 

♦ t> ' *t * i * * 

4 

Dean Frank' D. Kern announces the 
following oral examinations for candidates 
for the doctorate: 

Mr, Howard K. J.ohnst on, preliminary 
• examination, D,Ed,j major,, dairy husband- 
ry; minor , , agricultural biochemistry; Mon- 
day, January 13, 2:30 p.m,; room 202.' DaiVy 
Building;, 

Mr, Char-les H, Goodman^ Ph.Dj; major, 
psychology; Tuesday, January 14, 9 a.m, to 
12 noon; room 108 Burrowes Building, 



Mr. Bernath Phillips, Ph.D.; major, 
4 health and physical education; minor, 

education; Wednesday, January 15, 2 p.m.; 
room 109 Burrowes Building. 

Mr. Roger E. Williams, Ph.D.; major, 
psychology) Thursday, January 16, 2 to 5 
p.m.; room 108 Burrowes Building. 
* * * * * * 



Dim Park 
will be the 



Dr. Harold C. Case of 
Methodist Church, Scranton^ 
chapel speaker this Sunday, January. 12,. 

* * * * * * 

Sports events this Saturday, January 
11, include swimming with Carnegie Tech. 
at 2 p.m. and wrestling with Maryland at 
7 p.m. 

* * * * * * 

Faculty members are again reminded 



of the "Information, Please" program, 
sponsored by Alpha Lambda Delta, freshman 
women's honorary, to.be held this Sunday, 
January 12, at 3 p.m. in room 121 Liberal 
Arts. The board of experts will consist... 
of five faculty members: Warren B. Mack, 
Joseph J. Rubin, Kinsley R, Smith, Charles 
S. Wyand, and Hummel Fishburn. Robert E, 
Galbraitn, associate professor of English 
composition, will preside. Any student 
may, on the back of any of his bluebooks ., 
that have been graded "3", submit a ques- 
tion by turning it in to the Student Union 
desk before this Thursday, January 9. The 
sponsors will pay $2.50 for any question 
that stumps the experts. About 30 ques- 
tions of a general nature will be select- 
ed. All questions should be accompanied 
by the correct answers. Faculty members 
are requested to announce the program to 
their classes, if they have not already 
done so. 



A YEAR'S REPORT ON OUT-OF-STATE PUBLICITY 
■ ( cont * d ' f rom page l) 



carried most frequent references to the 
College under the conditions above de- , 
scribed and the frequency of reference are: 

*New York Times »««,«••-«• §1 ' 

"New York, Herald-Tribune . • ... * 23 

New York World-Telegram. .... 22 

New York Evening Sun •••*.. 20 . 

Youngstown^ 0,, Vindicator . , . 20 . ■ 

New York Evening Post. ,'*•'• ■ 19 

Rochester Democrat & Chronicle , 19 

Indianapolis, Ind«, Star , • t e 19 

* * * * 



Brooklyn Daily Eagle . . . . • 
0,, Plain Dealer, , 

0., Post 

. , Journal, . , , , 
11. Y., Times-Union, 
i ly New s . . . . • . 



Cleveland,. 
C ihcinnat i, 
Flint, Mich 
Roche st er , 
New York Da 
Louisville', 
Minneapolis 
Minneapolis' 
Newark, 1 IT,- 
Newark, N* 
Buffalo) N* 



Ky 



• > 



Courier— Journa 



Star— Journal , , 

Times-Tribune, , 

J,," Evening News, 

J , > Star-Ledger , 

Y*, Evening News 



18 
18 
17 
17 

15 
14 
14 
14 
14 
13 
13 
13 



OFFICIAL NOTICES FROM THE OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR 
Withdrawals 



Alexander, Mary E,, LD, Nov* 25 
Barratt, Mary V., HoEc, Nov. 27 
Br eon, Ruth I,, LD, Dec, 2 
Cadgene, Narcisse, Ed, 
Carroll, W. L,, LD, Nov. 20 
Cavanaugh, John M,, LA, SC, Nov. 
Higgins, L. C«, A&L, Nov. 19 
Himoff', Robert' A., ME, Dec, 13 
Huesto.n, .William G., ME, Nov. 26 



20 



K The following reasons were given for 
the withdrawals: £ive because of illness, 
one because of illness at home, one for. 



3 Kemmlery Earle L., EE, Nov. 27 

2 Moon, Clinton D,, ME, Dec, 16 

1 Medimyer,,, John. J., LD, Nov, 20 

1 Oi'kin, Dorothy M. , LD, De«c, 12 

2 ' Sauter, Charles A., ME, Dec, 18 

S S eiders, Harold B., LD, SC, Nov, 20 

1 Slack, Harold E,, ME, Nov, 3 

2 Stafford, Robert S., LD, Dec, 6 

2 Williams, Beatrice B,, LD, Nov, 19 

lack of interest, two gave no reason, five 
*for poor scholarship, two for financial 
reasons, one to go to work, one died. 



Change of Name 



From: Leonard Thomas Olszewski 



To: Leonard Thomas Olshefski 

• ■:. .Wm. S, Hoffman, Registrar 



' 



m 



H3?<NVHD'H SAQV1D SSII 



THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 



'ACULTY 



Published ..weekly on Tnefiday during the College 
vw a » a mean* of making official announcements 
and presenting item* of interest to the faculty. All 




"January 



vol.. 20 



1941 



BULLETIN 

contributions should b~ as brief a* possible and reach- 
Walter F. Dantzscher, Director of Public Inforraaiio.. 
105 Old Main, not later than 10 a..m. each Fnda\ 

14 
NO. 



THIRD LIBERAL -ARTS LECTURE TO BE GIVEN THURSDAY 



"Axis Activities in Latin America" 
-will "be the subject of t-he third Liberal 
Arts lecture to be given by Dr, William 
H, Gray, instructor in Latin American 
history, this 'Thursday,. January 16-, at 
'7:30 p,m, in room 10 Liberal Arts, 

The lectu-re will include brief men- 
tion of the migrations and influence of 
Germany and Italy prior to 1933, What is 
publicly -known- of the purpose, agencies, 
and methods-, of Nazi-s -and Fascists in the 
Americas "south of the Rio Grande will be 
discussed. Other phases of the totali- 
tarian threat, such as Japanese competi- 
tion and S'panish Phalanx propaganda, will 
be described, 

Ciuestions which, will be considered 
include: What has been the success of 



these activities? What will be the fu- 
ture of democracy in Latin America? What 
is the significance to the United States 
of the infiltration into that area of 
German economic, political, and cultural 
ideas-? 



In 

among s 
College 
Gr-ay to 
has S'tu 
and the 
in Puer 
also tr 
area , 
Diploma 
Novembe 
Hist or i 



creased interest in Latin America 

tudents in the Pennsylvania State 
was responsible for bringing Dr, 
t-he College staff last fall. He 

died at Trinity University, Texas, 
University of Chicago^ as- well as 

to Rico and Venezuela, He has 



DISTRIBUTION OF VARSITY ATHLETES IN THE VARIOUS • CURRICULA 

by Ridge Riley 



Contrary to the general belief, par- 
ticipants in the varsity intercollegiate 
athletic program of the College are fair- 
ly evenly distributed throughout the 
seven academic divisions and the 45 cur- 
ricula , 

This survey includes 202 athletes 
engaged in the 17 intercollegiate sports 
recognized by the student Athletic Asso- 
ciation, Major letter winners during the 
calendar year of 1940 were used in the 
report, writh the exception of ice hockey 
and skiing. In these activities the cur- 
rent squads were included since ice hock- 
ey and skiing were not recognized as 
"official sports" until the spring of 
last year. 

It is interesting to note that 34 of 
the 45 curricula are represented by at 
least one varsity athlete. Liberal Arts 
(including Lower Division) with 57 leads 
the list, followed by Engineering and 
Physical Education, each with 38, There 



are 3? athletes from Agriculture, 

The smallest number are found. in the 
School of Education, but this is under- 
standable because of' 'the percentage of 
women students in this School, Another 
contributing factor would be that the 
majority of male athletes desiring to 
teach would naturally enroll in Physical 
Educat ion. 

Not including those enrolled in 
physical education (38), the majority of 
Penn State's athletes are studying com- 
merce and finance (25), mechanical engi- 
neering (20), and forestry (17), 

Captains of six sports are engineer- 
ing students (four mechanical engineers), 
and six are liberal arts students (five 
from commerce and finance). 

Baseball and ice hockey are the only 
sports of the 17 which list representa- 
tives from all seven academic divisions. 



AGRICULTURE (33) 
Agr, Biochemistry 
Agr, Economics. • 
Agr. Education. . 
Agr.' Engineering". 
Agronomy, . . . . 
Dairy Husbandry . 
Forestry. • . . . 
Horticulture, . . 
Poultry Husbandry 
Pre— Veterinary . . 



CHEMISTRY AND PHYSICS 
Chemical Engineering 
Chemistry • • • • • 
Commercial ,Ckemi stry 
Pre -Medical .... 

EDUCATION (10) 

Education , . . . • 
Home Economics. . * 
Industrial Education 
Mu sic Edu cation . . 
Nature Education. . 



H 

H 
d 










1 



C 



H 
>> H 



15) 



-p 

o 

o 
1 



1* 

4 1 

0' 







d 

fit 

-p 
11 
M 



10 





n 




10 

10 
10 



S3 

O 

a 



d 

u 



H 
• H 

oi 



to 
C 

•H 
H 

-P 



5* 1 









Oil 

IOC 

10 



Oil 







•H 

o 
P-. 






o 

o 

H 



to 



to 

i 

•H 



H 







H 


W 




d 


W 


w 


,0 


O 


•H 


<d 


k 


fl 


w 


o 


fl 


d 


d 


(D 


m 


»-^ 


EH 



1* 1 

1 c 











1 











1 





1 











o 





6 



6 

n 






o 
d 

EH 



2 

o 6 







a! 
-p 
o 



. 2 

. 1 
. 1 

■ 1 

. 3 

■ 4 

■17 

■ 1 
• 2 

■ 1 



•11 
- 2 






ENGINEERING (38)' 

Civil Engineering . . . 

Electrical Engineering. 

Industrial Engineering. 

Mechanical Engineering. 1 

Sanitary Engineering, . 

LIBERAL ARTS (57 ) 

Arts and Letters. . , . '0 

Commerce and Finance, . 2 

Journalism. ...... 

Lower Division. . . , . 

MINERAL INDUSTRIES (ll) . 

Ceramics, . . . . . . . 

Fuel Technology . . . . 1 

Metallurgy, ...... 1 

Mining Engineering. . . 

Petroleum and Nat. Gas. 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION (38) .14 2 
Totals 21 14 



1 
5 1 0.0 
1* ,0 
2* 5* 1 




4*000111 
2* 0030110 
000000 
00 11-021 



00000001 
00000000 
O'-D 
00100000 

- .0 -l 

1 2 3* 3* 1 

5 8 ' 9 13 14 10 11 14 









i* i.' 

o o 



2 12^00 

2*1*5*0 2*4 

10 11 

4 112 2 1 





o o ' i* o o 6 o 

o i i i i o i 





1 3 2 '1 5 

5 16 14 16 7 7 18 



- 1 
•12 

■ 4 
•20 

■ 1 



•12 
•25 

- 3 

-17 



1 
2" 
6 

1 



■38 



:o2 



*Team Captain ' h „ t0 ...„„, 

JANUARY EXHIBITION IN THE COLLEGE ART GALLERY CANCELLED 



The Department of Architecture re- 
grets tc announce that its January exhi- 
bition in the College Art Gallery, "The 
Development of Landscape Fainting," has 
had to be cancelled. The exhibition was 
being shipped by boat from New Orleans to 
New York, Word has just been received 



that the boat sank en route. Because of 
the short time remaining in the first se- 
mester A there will be no replacement show 
in the Gallery cLu 1 *! 1 ^ January, However, 
the Gallery will reopen for the second se- 
mester early in February with an exhibi- 
tion of original Japanese prints. 



CANDIDATES FOR DEGREES AT MIDYEAR COMMENCEMENT 



Candidates for advanced degrees >and 
baohelqr degree? at the. midyear commence-? 
mext are fisted .below, , In order that -.all 
reo»rds may be, complete^ grades for those 
reoeiving degreqs must be in the office ** 
ft the Registrar , not later than 12 .neon 
Saturday, January 2.^4 

Special final examinations should be 
arranged for any students •whose name-s- ap- 
pear in this list, if the regular examina- 



tions are scheduled later than A time 
which would make it possible" t<3 report 
grades as indicated 'above » Thd Registrar 
will 'appreciate i*t if instructors will 
•bring ' grade s to his Office in pe'rson be«* 
for*. Saturday morning^ January 25, in or- 
der not to cause a ay* po'ssi'ble delay by 
sending them through 'the faculty m'ail. 
Grade cards should bo in an envelope 
plainly marked "Grades' for Midyear Grad«» 
uat es »"' 



Alcprttj Joseph N«, IE 
Allison, Mary E,, HEc 



A.pt, Albert C f , ZE 



AgEd 



PH 
CF 



Iwsxin. Alferd H,, 

air, Edna M,, Ed 
Bitting, William A,, 
Blaakman, Norman E,, 
B«gar, William D,, Ed 
Breuninger, Louise. E,, PEd 
Briggle, Charles M., Ed 
Brotmar,, Myron M # , AL 
Burton, Clare J,,«AL 






CF 



" a 1 dwell, James 
lftU| Charles, CF 
barter, Lera L,, Ed 
]asimir, Charles, Ed 
Hilary, D Robert, Ed 
]orbin, Maxwell H,, PEd 
Crawford, Ronald F ? , Png 
3ont, Bette E,, HEc 
Dugan, Walter J., ME 
Dufclap, Laura J,, HEc 
Sder, Ruby G., Al 

E f# AgEc 
S 



Slwocd, Glenn 



!spy, Ronald H,, 
Pay, John G», I" 
'irth, William E,, ME 
[it a a Clair F,, lEd 
|i«ef, David J«, Ch 
Fletcher, Harriet L,, 



Ed 



p »rd, William B 



f * 



PEd 
AL 



'reedma», Harris, 
'reeman, Alice, AL 
Puchs, William R,, ME 
3armen, A^na J,, AL 
Setrost, Ralph L # , IE 
3ittelsoa. George, Ed 
pld. Julian F., AL 
!riffii, George F,, Ed 
Gulden, Francis V,, Hrt 
la&au, Rob«rt C,. AL 
larvey, Charles L., CF 
lausman, Sidney, J 
Javsl, Joseph F«, For 
,ieath, Virginia C., Psy 
lecht, Gertrude H., AL 
lerman, Charles R,, DH 
lindmaa, William P f , AL 
loiland, Glen* E., For 
fackson, Doris E«, Ed 
r*a*ston, Don C,. AL 
Callina, Margaret A,, PM 
Carhan, Lillian E,, HEc 
Cexdall, John T,, AL 
Cing, Carl S • t AL 
£ing. Harriet, AL 
iorlishin, Theodore G«, AL 
Cronherg, Eugene M*, Psy 



Kunz, Alvin*. £, ,» For 
Leisenring^ Lewis 5,, For 
Le s ser,- Robert B«, Png 
Longwell, Caroline E», 



Ed 



Apfelbaum, Marti"* D», ABCh 
Appleby, Kathleen 0», Speech 
Auker, Palmer L,, ABCh 
Banks, Mary E # , Ed 



McCarraher, Phyllis M., AL Beale, Robert's,, Ch 



McClrskey,. Cyril I,, CF 
McClure, Leland B», Cer 
McKelvy, James S,, AL 
McKenzie, Vindetta B,, 
Madway, Ralph Ki, PM 
Martin^ Frederick, DH 
Meyers, Arthur K», Ed 
Michaelson, Michael C, 



Ed 



Miller, Frederick P., 
Miller, John R,, AL 



, ABCh 
AgEd 



AL 

Ed 
AL 



Moul, Kenneth R,, 
Mowrey, Ellen L,, 
Newton, Esther B,, 
Northeimer, Evan S«, 
Orkin, David Li,, CF 
Patterson, Thomas G . w 
Pearson, Ronald C,, For 
Pfeiffer, William R,, S 
Plapinger, Mildred R,, J 



AL 



Pretka, 
Ransom, 



Frank, ABCh 
Eda I,, Ed 



Reder, Geraldine Y,, 



AL 



AL 



Roller, H, M,, For 
Rcush, William P,, ME 
Runk, Stanley E,, AgEd 
Russell, John M # , EE 
Ruttenberg, Robert L,, AL 
Sacks, Jacob, AL 
Schall, Wayne D,, CF 
Silverstein, Philip R,, 
Simmers, Charles D», S 
Singer, Zeena, AL 
Smith, Richard R,, Ch 
Smith, William J,, CF 
Stanisky, Isabel M,, HEc 
Swan, Joyce F,, J 
Thacker, Harry B,, EE 
Tisch»r, Dorothy S», Ed 
Turk, Robert L,, CF 



Wagner, 
Walt er s 



Harry E,, AL 
Robert C,, AL 
., Ed 



Watters, Mary F 
Tfeinbrom, Benjamin, CF 
West, Annabel H,, Ed 
White, Frances H,, AL 
Whitman, Frank E,, ME 
Winpkur, Rosine A,, AL 
Yarjjell, Clara H,, MusEd 

ADVANCED DEGREES 

Abbott, Richard A,, PolSci 
Alcorn, Robert L,, ME 



Benner, Dorothy' M,, Ed 
Blackburn, Ehos'E,, Ed 
Biews ',' Edward 0,, Bet 
Bl^ck, Seymour S,, ABCh 
Borow # Henry^.Psy _'• 
Boyadis, A,'T,, Fr 
Brewik, oi N,, ABCh 
Brown, E, - D # , SLlt 
Brumbaugh, Irene, ELit 



Buch, John W 



• ? 



Mng 



Calhoun, John C,, Png 



Caveny, Charles C » , IEd 
Caywood, P, G 9 , Hist 
ComCh Cobb, Tfilliam E, 



Coblentz, Irving, 



Cohen, M 



Ed 
Psy. 



»# 



Econ 



Clemens, George B,, Fr 
Copeland, Otis L,., A 
Corbett, P, Ll«, Car 
Cosb^", Jghn.N.j Ch 

Coughlin, R, M«, Ed 
Crumbling, Mary H,, Speech 
Cummings, G, H«^ ChE 
Darrah, Lawrence B», AgEc 
DeMarino, D, A,, PEd 
Doherty, Margaret I,, Psy 
Donohue, Dorothy W,, Psy 
Dougherty, G „ Wj, Psy 
Eaton, S, 
Eoonomos . 
Elzey, 
Eyler, 



ff 

E,, IEd 

,, J, J # , PEd - 

Herman R,, ELit 
Blanche A,, Lat 



Faylrr, H, 0,,..Econ 
Foehr, Edward G,, ChE 
Granlun, Walter S, ( 
Grundy, Walton E», 
Guisser, Lloyd E,, 



Ed 
Bact» 

Ed 



Haimovicz, Joseph P,, Ch 
Hanawalt , David K,, Ed 
Harris..,' Herbert-. P, , , ChE 
Heefner, G, C,, Ed 



Heisler, William 



Nat Ed 



, -1 J. J. JU J. CiiiJ ^ , , 

Hiller, Donald S,, PolSci 
Hirt, John 0,, Psy 
Hogg, Calvin H., Phys 



Hone s s , Frank C 



•» 



LArch 



Heworth, Ruth, HEc 

Hunt, Ugrmbetm H,, Psy 

Janssen, Hans 

Jarrett , 

Keating, 

Keith, Ralph W., NatEd 

Kees«y., Richard E.j PEd 



Ecoa 
H, M # , Math 
Thomas J», Ed 



Knight, Mellen A., Ger 
Kuhn, T. M. , For 
Laubach, Frances V,, El/it 
Laubscher, Florence M, , Elit 
Leetoh, George N«, Psy 
Li, Lai -Yung, Hort 
Lingenf elter , L. L«, ELit 
Linn, Henrietta C „ , Ger 
Liveezey, J, P«, Ed 
McCoy, Eugene M. , Ed 
»McAfee> Wm», Hist 
Mackenzie, Kenneth D», ME 
Mackenzie, Lucille E., ELit 
Magill, Frank, Ed 
Ma'sters, Robert E., Hist 
Mattil, K. P., ABCh 
Mays, Ella J,, Ed 
Mehring, P, A. , Ed ' . 
Menaker, M. H., ABCh 
Messerly, DoYothy P»,'Src 
Miller, Joseph' R», S c.o . 
Miller, Leo L., Ed 
Moats, Irma M., Poi§ci 
Montgomery, Nevin, Ed 



Murphy, Alice E «, , HEc. 
Myers, Leroy, PolSci 
Naghski, Joseph, Bact 
Nell, R 9 B», Ed 



Studholme, A« T«, Zool 



Swenson, Helen J 



i , 



PEd 



Norris, R. T, 



For 



Ed 



Swingle, E, E„, PEd 
Tatman, M, E., Met 
Telfair, David, Phys 
Thomas, A, P., ME 
Todd, R. C., Hist 
Turner, Bridges A,, IEd 



h: 



Olson, Virginia L«, 

Parsons, G, W., PEd 

Prlansky, Theo. S«, Bact 

Powers, Elizabeth E., ELit Underwood, Joseph C , , ABCh 

Randall, Pearl A,, Soc. 

Rawhouser, Anna, ELit 

Reindel, W, H», Ed 

Ricker, Wm« H«, CE 

Rodger s, John Q/J , Econ 

Rogers, Mildred M,, ELit 

Russell, A* S^ Ch 

Schneider,,. M,, Boon 

Shaffer, Je.r.ome-, Psy 

Shick, C.harle's-;. NatEd 

Sinco^ Madeline, Dram 

Sollen'berger , Orville F„, 

Sprauor, J,.W., Ch 

Stauffer, William K,,'Ed 

Stoudt, ^enry J,, Hist 



Wain, James A., IEd 
Weaver, D, A„, Speech 
Weeks, C, B , Agro 
Whitlock, Gaylord,P,, ABC 
V/iegand, Walter H., Arch, 
Wilkins, John P., Ch ( ;. 
Williams, Paul H., Ch 
Wisemin, W„ J,, Fng • 
Witt, Mary 7,,,,, Fr V , 
Wright, Mabel C,, E-Lit . 
Yingling^ P, A., Ed 



Ed Yoder, J. P 



9 f 



Soc 



Zurine, G, D., Pc.lSci 

Wm. *S. Hoffman, *,* 
Registrar * 



\ * 



** 






\ k 



\ > 



\ " 



', 






NOBEL PRIZE WINNER TO LECTURE ON PHOTOSYNTHESIS 



Sigma Xi, national honorary research 
society, co- operating with the School of 
Agriculture, is bringing to the campus Dr. 
James Franck, noted physical chemist, to 
lecture upon the subject "Fundamentals of 
Photosynthesis," The lecture will be 
given in room 121 Liberal Arts on Friday, 
January 24, at 8 p.m. It will be open to 
all., • 

Dr. Franck made outstanding contri- 
butions in the relationship of physical 
chemistry in biological processes. His 
work in the field of sensitized photo- 
chemical reactions won for him the Nobel 
prize for physics in 1926, Dr. Franck 



did research work with the eminent photo- 
chemist, Emil Warburg, at the University 
of Berlin and was later associated with 
Dr , Fritz Ilaber, famous as the inventor 
of the Hater process for fixing atmos- 
pheric nitrogen, Dr, Franck served at 
Johns Hopkins as professor of physical 
chemistry from 1934 to 1938 and is now in 
charge of co-operative research at the 
University of Chiqag,o wherein the univer- 
sity surgeons, chemists.^ physicists, and 
physiologists will undertake to determine 
the normal process of cell growth. These 
investigators believe that a large class 
of diseases, particularly .cancer, will be 



traced to abnormal 



cell .f unct 
* * 



.onmg, 



REPORT OF PENN STATE- STUDENTS IN 



IDICAL COLLEGES 



The Registrar has received from Dr, 
Fred C. Zapffe, secretary of the Associa- 
tion of American Medical Colleges, the 
following report on the rank of 44 Penn- 
sylvania State College students who were 
registered as freshmen in 10 different 
medical schools last year! Out of the to- 
tal of 44, 24 had been graduated in the 
upper half of their class and 20 in the 
lower half* Seven students who were grad- 
uated in the first tenth of their class 
by the Pennsylvania State College were 
enrolled in Jefferson^ Yale ^ and Pennsyl- 
vania; and without exception they are all 
located in the first third of the fresh- 



man class in medicine. Of those graduated 
in the first half,. 15 ,ar.e .in the first 
third of their class at .medical college, 
6 in the second third,, and 2 in the third 
third. One additional student has passed 
all of his work but was not ranked by his 
medical school* No .conditions or failures 
were reported .for ,aay .of this group of 24, 
Of the 20 stuclents who had been graduated 
in the lower half of their class by the 
College, 3 wer.e ,lQcated, at the end of the 
freshman year in medicine > in the upper 
third) 7 in the middle third) and 10 in 
the lower thir„d. Eight of the 20 are con- 
ditioned in one or more subjects. 



STATE SCHOLARSHIPS 



Quoted from Pennsylvania Public Education Bulletin, October, 1940 



"■On the basis of a competitive exam- 
ination administered by the Department of 
Public Instruction, the Commonwealth pro- 
vides for the distribution of 80 scholar- 
ships annually to resident graduates of 
Pennsylvania high schools. 



the 



"One scholarship is awarded to the 
. attaining the highest rating in_t" 
ntest in each county except Philadel- 
ia, Allegheny, and Luzerne where one 
i-,^i c vc'Kt -r, no =™-arded j_ n each senatorial 



j- T 

scholarship is 
district 



"Each scholarship may be used only in 
an accredited .college in Pennsylvania and 
amounts to $'100 per year for four consecu- 
tive years providing the pupil maintains a 
satisfactory standing in the college," 

Those freshmen attending The Pennsyl- 
vania State Colleg,e who .earned state 
scholarships are: Ira Bell, Gerald Eno, 
Gordon Fiske, Shirley Fletcher, Sanford 
Hotchkiss, Charles Martin, George I.Iosch, 
Betty Pielemeier, Marian Powers, Elizabeth 
Senft, James Ziegler, 



Nm, 



Hoffman, Registrar 



NOTICES CONCERNING MIDYEAR COMMENCEMENT 



Midyear Commencement will be held on 
Tuesday evening, January 28, at 8 p,m,, 
according to an announcement from C, E, 
Bullinger^, College Marshal, Members of 
the faculty taking part in the academic 
procession will meet in the balcony of 
Schwab Auditorium at the south rear cor- 
ner not later than 7:45 p,m. Hats and 
coats will be under guard. The faculty 
will be seated on the platform as far as 



space permits. 

* * * * * * 

.Graduate students and faculty members 
who wish to rent or purchase academic cos- 
tumes for the Midyear Commencement should 
do so at once, according to an announce- 
ment from G. J, Stout, Rental orders may 
be placed by telephoning the Vegetable 
Gardening office, 

* * * * * * 



4 



OF GENERAL INTEREST 

A special meeting of the faculty of include llrs, W f A. Broyles, Professor 

the School of Agriculture -will he held Robert Stone, and Dean Edward Steidle. 

this Friday, January 17, at 4:10 p,m,, in ** ** ** 
room 109 Agriculture Building, according 

to an official announcement from Dean The Reverend Herbert King, assistant 

S. W. Fletcher. Dean Cornelius Betten secretary of the Y.M.C.A., New York, will 

of Cornell University will discuss prob- be the chapel speaker this Sunday, Jan- 

lems of student guidance and placement, uary 19, 

Members of the faculty of other Schools ** ** ** 
cf the College are invited tc hear Dean 

Betten, who has had wide experience in Two sports events are on the calendar 

this field, for this week: basketball with Syracuse 

** ** ** tomorrow, Wednesday, at 8 p,m,; and swim- 
ming with Washington and Jefferson this 

Dr. D, W. Bronk, of the Cornell Uni- Saturday, January 18, at 2 p,m, 
versity Medical College of New York City, ** ** ** 
will be the speaker at this year's Priest- 
ley lecture series. The series, which is Dean Frank D. Kern announces the fol— 
sponsored by Phi Lambda Upsilon, will be lowing examinations for the doctorate:, 
held from March 3 to 7 in room 119 New 

Physics Building, The topic and time of Mr, Stanley J, Pawelek, qualifying 

the meetings will be announced later, examination, D,Ed»; major, industrial edu— 

** ** ** cation; minor, education; room 206 Bur— 

rowes Building; this Friday, January 17, 

"Aid to Britain— "That Kind and How at 1:30 p,m # 
Much?" will be the subject cf the Town 

Meeting at the Hillel Foundation, 133 W, , Mr, Herbert H, Johnson, jr., final 

Beaver Ave,, this Sunday, January 19, at oral examination, Ph,D,; major, chemistry; 

7:30 p.m. Faculty members and townspeo- minor, agricultural biochemistry; 105 Pond 

pie are invited to attend this open fcrum Laboratory; this Saturday, January 18, at 

for the discussion of national and inter- a a,m, 

national issues. Speakers this Sunday ** ** ** 

OFFICIAL NOTICES FROM THE OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR 

' . Withdrawals 

2 Griel, John Brubaker, Ch, Dec, 21 4 Sacks, Jacob, A&L, Dec, 21 

3 Hicks, Charles Kimball, ABCh, Deo, 21 4 Smith, Lloyd George, Agro, Dec, 20 
1 Johnson, Lewis Homer, Z&E, Dec, 21 2 Walton, Thomas Jones, DH, Dec, 20 

3 Mattick, Joseph Francis, DH, Oct, 28 3 Whiting, Raymond Russell, AH, Dec, 21 
G Naghski, Joseph, Bact, Jan, 6 

The following reasons were j 
withdrawal: one to join the U,3 
cue to join the Canadian Royal Air Force, 



The following reasons were given for one because of illness, two for financial 
withdrawal: one to join the U.S. Army, reasons, four to accept positions, 

Wei, 3, Hoffman, Registrar 



CORRECTION ON DATE FOR GRADES OF MIDYEAR GRADUATES 



iD , 



The Registrar wishes to announce office is Friday, January 24, at 5 p ,1 
that the date for instructors to have instead cf Saturday as announced above the 
the grades of midyear graduates in his list of graduates on the insert. 



* * * * 



■ 



aaanTHO'n sagvid ssiw 



THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 



FACULTY 

Published weekly on Tuesday during the College 
veat si- a means of making official announcements 
and presenting items of interest to the faculty. All 

VOL. 20 




BULLETIN 

contributions should be as brief as possible and reach 
Walter F. Dantzscher, Director of Public Information 
105 Old Main, not later than 10 a.m. each Friday. 



NO. 



January 21, 1941 



15 



REDUCED RATES IN EFFECT FOR ARTISTE 



COURSE TICKETS 



Reduced rates will be in effect for 
series tickets for the three remaining 
numbers of the Artists' Course, Dr. Carl 
E* Marquardt, committee chairman, has an- 
nounced. Tickets priced at $5,50 before 
the Robeson concert will now be sold at 
$3,90, while those which were formerly 
$4.50 will-, be sold at $3.40. 

Sale of tickets at the latter price 
will be held during the week which begins 
Monday, February 3. However, seats which 
hare not been sold for the three— perform- 
ance series will be made available on 
Thursday, February 6, for individual per- 
formances. Prices of these will be $2,25 
each for Jascha Heifetz and the Cleveland 
Orchestra and $1,25 for Anna Kaskas, "to- 
taling $5.75 for the three numbers in- 
stead of $3.90 and $3.40 for the series. 
Interested patrons are therefore urged to 
purchase their tickets at the Athletic 
Association ticket windows February 3, "4, 
and 5 before the individual sale begins, 

* * 



"It seems probable that out— of— town 
buyers will request a la,rge number of 
single seat tickets," Dr, Marquardt ex— • 
plained, "However, no such requests will 
be filled before February 6 so that stu- 
dents, faculty members, and townspeople 
may be given preference," 

Almost as many seats have been sold 
this year as for any preceding series, he 
pointed out. The difference corresponds 
almost exactly to the number of seats 
added by providing stage accommodations. 

"A larger amount of money has been 
budgeted for the course this year than in 
any previous year," he added, "and prac- 
tically all of this was used for talent. 
Nevertheless, the course is in no danger 
of running a deficit." 

Attention is called to the fact that 
the majority of the 150 remaining seats 
are excellent stage locations. 



NOTICE CONCERNING MIDYEAR COMMENCEMENT 



Professor Bullinger, College Mar- 
shal,, wishes to call attention to the 
fact that Midyear Commencement will be 
held next Tuesday evening, January 28, 
at 8 p.m. Members of the faculty who 
are taking part in the academic proces- 



sion will meet in the balcony of Schwab 
Auditorium at the south rear corner not 
later than 7:45 p.m. Hats and coats-Will 
be under guard. The faculty will be 
seated on the platform as far as space 



LIBRARY HOLDING HAMLIN GARLAND EXHIBIT 



The Library is exhibiting, until 
January 30, part -of the Hamlin Garland 
collection which was loaned to Miami Uni- 
versity, Oxford, Ohio, by that famous 
American author before his death in 
March, 1940. 

The collection consists of original 
manuscripts, original letters, and other 
kinds of literary mementos of Mr, Gar— 
land's life, work, and friendship. How- 
ells, Twain, Crane, Henry James, Riley, 
Field, and many others are represented. 
Of interest are photographs and letters 
from George Bernard Shaw. 



Hamlin Garland wrote on of the Mid - 
dle Border .in 1917 and in 1921 was award- 
ed the Pulitzer prize for his Daughter of 
the Middle Border , He was a prolific, 
writer, and one of the few novelists who 
in the nineties depicted American life 
without romantic glamour. He was noted 
for his kindness to young authors, par- 
ticularly Stephen Crane. 

Books by Hamlin Garland which are in- 
cluded in the exhibit are: C rumbling Idols^ 
The Mystery of the Buried Crosses , _A Lit - 
tle Norsk , Prairie Songs , The Spirit of 
Sweet Vfat er , The I rail of the Gold-Seekers, 



NOTICE CONCERNING INCOME TAX 



The following notice is published 
verbatim, by request, for the convenience 
of State College taxpayers. 

General Notice 



The Revenue Act of 1940 has made im- 
portant changes with respect to the lia- 
bility of individuals for the filing of 
income tax returns. Individuals under 
the following circumstances are required 
to file returns covering the calendar 
year 1940 : 

Single individuals, or married individ- 
uals not living with husband or wife, 
having a GROSS INCOME of $800 or more. 

Married individuals living together 
having a combined GROSS INCOME of 
$2,000 or more. 

The net income is no longer to be 
used in determining the liability for the 
filing of a Federal income tax return. 
The liability of a citizen or resident of 
the United States to file a return is de- 
pendent upon his status as a married or 
single person, and the amount of his 
GROSS INCOME, Therefore, every citizen 
or. resident of the United States will be 
required to file a return for the taxable 
year 1940 if his GROSS INCOME in 1940, 
regardless ' of the amount of his net in- 
come, comes within the amount specified 
above for his particular status, A re- 
turn must be filed even though, by reason 
of allowable deductions from gross income 
and of allowable credits against net in- 
come, it develops that no tax is due, 

Forml040A should be used for GROSS 
INCOME of not more than$5 > 000 derived 
from salaries) wages) interest, dividends, 
and - annuit ie si For 1040 should be used 
for GROSS INCOME from salaries, wages> 
interest, divide nds> and annuities of 
mor° than $5^000; or if any part of your 
income is derived from other than sala- 
ries, wages, interest, dividends, or an- 
nuities, Forml040 should be used regard- 
less of the amount of your income. While 
returns must be filed on or before March 
15, 1941, with the collector of internal 
revenue for the district in which you re- 
side, it is urged that they be filed as 
soon as possible after January 1, 

If in doubt as to your liability for 
the filing of a return and if your em- • 

* * 



ployer has no blank return forms availa- 
ble, make request of the collector of in- 
ternal revenue for the district in which 
you reside, or of any deputy collector 
stationed in your vicinity, for the 1940 
individual income tax return and the 
printed instructions accompanying the 
form. 

Failure of individuals , under the 
circumstance s out line d above , to file re - 
turns will sub ject them to- the impo sit ion 
of the penalt ie s pre s cr ibed by law . 

Notice for State College Taxpayers 

For convenience of those who are re- 
quired by law to file Federal Income Tax 
Returns, a Deputy C-ollector of Internal 
Revenue will be at : 

Post Office Building, State College, Pa, 
on January 27th and 28th, 

February 17th and 18th, and 
March 6th, 7th, and 8th > 1941 

to assist taxpayers in preparing their re- 
turns, NO CHARGE WILL BE MADE FOR THIS 
SERVICE, 

The matter of filing your Income Tax 
Return should be given immediate attention, 
in order to avoid penalty and interest, 

, 1* ,You p are required to file a return 
if your gross, income is $800 or over and 
you are § ingle , or married and not living 
with husband or wife for any part of the 
taxable year, 

2; Married and living with husband 
or wife for the entire taxable year. If 
each has income and their combined gross 
income is . $2000 or over , they must each 
make a return or file a joint return. 

If only one has income and his gross 
income is $2000 or over, only that one is 
required to make a return* 

WHEN AND WHERE TO FILE THE RETURN 

Your return for the calendar year 
1940 mus*t be filed not later than Mar oh 
15th, 1941, with the Collector of Internal 
Revenue for the district in which you re- 
side cr have your principal place of 
bu s ine s s , 

John M, Boob, Deputy Collector 
Internal Revenue Service 

Bellefonte, Pa, 
* * * 



NOBEL PRIZE WINNER TO LECTURE THIS FRIDAY 



Faculty members are reminded of the 
lecture, "Fundamentals of Photosynthesis.," 
to be given by Dr. James Franck, Nobel 
prize winner and noted physical chemist, 
this Friday, January 24, at 8 p,m, in 
room 121 Liberal Arts, 



Because of Dr. Franck's varied back- 
ground, his lecture will interest faculty 
members in various fields. The talk is 
sponsored by Sigma Xi, national honorary 
research society, in co-operation with 
the School of Agriculture-, 



DISTRIBUTION OF RESIDENT ENROLLMENT 



& 



"W 



PVBO\S 



Willi *m SPORT 
' 2<5 



H AZL(£ TOAJ 



STATE COLLET * + 

© £SlO Po-CT5V»l.Lg 



ALTOONA c ^ 



JohwstoujM ^z 



A. ^ / jx-aciict? Je&cher / 



(AONiT ALTO 



7 



c 



\ 



_y 



Resident enrollment as cf October 
12,. 1940, totaled 7250. In addition, two 
seniors in Home Economics are taking work 
at the Merrill— palmer School in Detroit, 

State College ..... 6510 

Mont Alto . 4 . 158 

Altrona Undergraduate Center. ... 156 

DuBois Undergraduate Center ...» 139 

Ha z let on Undergraduate C e nter . . , 112 



and t\. r c seniors in the pre— Veterinary cur- 
riculum are enrolled at the University of 
Pennsylvania, The' 7260 arc actually tak- 
ing their work at the following points:., 

Schuylkill Undergraduate Center . . 123 

Johnstown (practice teachers) ... 22 

Williamsport (practice teachers), . 26 

Other points (practice teachers). , 14 

Total 7269 



MINUTES OF THE SENATE MEETING 



JANUARY 9 



941 



A meeting of the College Senate was 
held in rcom 121 Liberal Arts on Thurs- 
day^ January 9, 1941^ at 4:10 p.m,, with 
Dean Stoddart presiding. A list cf the 
members present is on file in the office 
cf the Registrar, 

The minute's of the previous meeting 
were read and approved. 



The Secretary read a recommendation 
from the Committee on Academic Standards 
for an exception to the residence rule 
for Miss Earriei? King, The recommenda- 
tion, which was on. motion adopted, is on 
file in the office cf the Registrar, 

Professor Kaul'fuss, for the Commit- 
tee on Public Occasions, announced that 
the Midyear Commencement would be held on 
January 28, 1941, 

The Committee on Committees announced 
the appointment of Dr , Cliandlee tc serve 
on the Committee on Academic Standards 
dur'ing the absence of Dean 0. E, Smith 
and the. appointment of Dr , C. E, Marquardt 



as chairman of the committee during Dean 
Smith's absence. This recommendation, 
which had the approval of the President j, 
was adopted. 



Under the 
ne_.ss the report 
e. s of Sturdy, as 
o,f these '■ mi nu t c 
sideratj.cn, An 
removing' from p 
elect ives Art -1 
stituting of el 
items. It wa s 
partment ,coucer 
dditional lea d 
ted by., the c 
on motion, 



a 
cep 
wa s ,, 



heading of 
of the Co 
ref'erre d 
s , wa s b r o 
amendment 
age 2 of t 
and Art 5 
e ct ive ere 
pointed on 
n e d c c u 1 d 
, The ame 
emmittee a 
adopted. 



unfinished busi- 
mmittee on Pours- 
to on p a£ e 373 
ught up for con- 
was presented 
he report the ■_ 
9 and the sub — 
dit s for the se 
t that the de— 
not carry this 
ndment was ac— 
nd the report 



Under the heading of new business, 
Dean Hammond read a report recommending 
that Mr. Charles E. Denney, a former mem- 
ber of the Class of 1900, be awarded the 
degre-e- of Bachelor of Science in Mechani- 
cal Engineering at the June Commencement 
as ^cf the Class of 1900, and that in ad- 
dition thp .degree o'f Mechanical Engineer 



4 "be conferred upon Mr, Denney. The recom- 
mendation had the approval of the faculty 
of the School of Engineering and the Com- 
mittee on Academic Standards and is on 
file in the office of the Registrar. The 
recommendation was adopted without a dis- 
senting vote. 



The report of the Committee on Cour- 
ses of Study contained a recommendation for 
the establishment of a new curriculum, 
"Hotel Administration," This recommenda- 
tion and the recommendation concerning 
Mr, Denney will be forwarded to the Board 

OF GENERAL INTEREST 



of Trustees for their consideration. 

Dean Trabue asked unanimous consent 
for the consideration of two new courses 
needed for the summer session of 1941, 
There being no objection, the Senate con- 
sidered the approval of Industrial Educa- 
tion 376 and 393 and voted approval of 
these courses for the summer session of 
1941 only. 



The Senate then adjourned. 

TJm, S. Hoffman, Secretary 



As was previously announced, grades 
for those graduating at Midyear must be 
in the office of the Registrar by this 
Friday, January 24, at 5 p.m. Grades for 
all students are due at the office of the 
Registrar by 5 p.m. Wednesday, January 
29. Instructors are urged to bring 
grades to the Registrar's of fice at the 
earliest possible date and not to permit 
the slight delay that would be" caused by 
sending them 'through the faculty mail, 

* * ' * * * * 

Full— time employees on the staff of 
the College who desire exemption from 
incidental or part-time fees for them- 
selves or members of their families for 
courses they plan to schedule during the 
second semester are again requested to 
make formal application for such exemp- 
tion at the offices of the deans of their 
Schools or heads of .their administrative 
departments. Applications for exemption 
should be made imme diat e ly , so that the 
student bills may, include the item of 
fee exemption, 

V, D. Bissey, Head, Statistical Division 
Accounting Office 
•* * . , * * * * 

The All— College Recreation Committee 
has decided that Recreation Hall shall be 
open for faculty and student recreation 
each Sunday afternoon from 2 to 5, 

* * * * * * 



the e 
uary 

that 
file , 
all', s 
those 
c o p i e 
force 
copy 
Mi s s 
super 
plan 
dent s 
stu.de 



The fact t 
xaminat ion 
9, to Wedn 
there is a 
At pre se 
ub je ct s , 

of you wh 
s of past 
s with t h o 
of,, the pre 
Frear, ref 
vising the 
is to give 

t.he same 
nt s have , 



hat over 

file fr 
esday, J 

def init 
nt it is 
The co mm 
o have n 
e xaminat 
s e wh o h 
sent fin 
ere nee 1 

file , 

the non 
opportun 



350 stu 
om Thurs 
anuary 1 
e nee d f 
not com 
ttee ho 
ot contr 
ions wil 
ave and 
al exami 
ibrar ian 
The purp 
— f rat ern 
ity that 



dents used 
day, Jan- 
5 , s h ow s 
or this 
plete for 
pes that 
ibut e d 
1 join 
send a 
nation to 
, wh o is 
o se of the _ 

ty stu — 

fraternity 



* * 
Dean Frank 
'following preli 
the D.Ed, degre 



David I. F inkle, Chairman 
Examination- File Committee 
* * * * 

D. Kern announces the 
minary examination for 
e : 



t ion ; 
rowe s 
2 p.m 



Mr. F. Clark Skellyj major, eduga- 
minor, psychology; room 109 Bui — 
Building; Saturday, February 8; at 



* * 

service this 



bunda 



Satur 
only 



* * * * 
There will be no chapel 
y, January 26. 

* * * * * » 

Boxing with 7estern Maryland 'thi s 
day, January 25 , at 8 p,m, is the 
sports event scheduled for this week, 

* * * * * * 



OFFICIAL NOTICES FROM THE OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR 

V, r ithdrawals 



4 Brotman, Myron, AL, Dec, 5 

1 Feoney, Alice Elizabeth, Jan. 10 

2 Fleming, Edward L., PM, Dec.2o' 

1 Giombetti, James F,, LD, Nov. 15 

2 Godshall, Harry Edwin, ME, Jan, 14 

• The following reasons, were -given for 
withdrawing; 1 gave no reason, lgave 
personal reasons, 1 was in wrong curricu- 
lum, 2 vrent to other colleges, 1 because 



2 Good, William B., Ch, Jan, 8 

2 Johnson, Albert S,, Hrt , Deo, 21 

2 Jones, Oliver C,, AH, Dec, 21 

Kahn, Cecile B,, Ag, Be-.c, 21 

1 Schloss, Margaret', LD, Dec, 21 

of illness, 1 to go to work, 1 because of 
lack of interest, 1 because of eye trouble, 
and 1 because of illness at hone, 

• Wra, S, Hoffman, Registrar 






Jd'B.zqT'l 3231X00 
H3HHVS0 '* SAGY1J) SSI M 



THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 



FACULTY 

Published weekly on Tuesday during the College 
year as a means of making official announcements 
and presenting items of interest to the faculty. All 

January 
VOL. 20 




ULLETIN 



contributions should be as brief as possible and reach 
Walter F. Dantzscher, Director of Public Information, 
105 Old Main, not later than 10 a.m. each Friday. 

16 
NO. 



FIGURES DON'T LI! 



by William S. Hoffman 



In writing this 
tried to act as I f r 
when I try to find o 
school or ' department 
years ago, by referr 
tions of that time, 
that I was trying to 
1965, the enrollment 
of Engineering at Th 
State College in 193 
the same year the en 
rollment for five'ot 
tive Institutions, I 
fig ur e s in four d iff 
tativc reports. The 



brief paper I 
equently do, 
ut how large a 
was some E5 
ing to publ I ca- 
So imagining 
find out, in 
of the School 
c Pennsylvania 
9-1940, and for 
gineering en- 
her representa- 

looked up the 
erent author! - 
y are: 



1. Statistics of registration 
in Amer ican'Universi ties and Col- 
leges, 1939, by Dr. Raymond Walters, 
In School and Society, December 16, 

1939. (Dr. Walters' s reports are 
published at the opening of an aca- 
demic year and give first semester 
figures, ) 

Z, Engineering enrollments, 
1939-1940, published in the Journal 
of Engineering Education, January, 

1940, (Since these figures are 
published In January, 1940, for the 
academic year 1939-1940, they, too, 
must show first semester enroll- 
ments . ) 



3, Circular 187--Prel i mi nary 

report--Land' Grant Colleges and ' 
Universities, year ended June 30, 
1940, undated but received at my 
office November 15, 1340. (Appar- 
ently the figures are for the en- 
tire academic year.) 

4. Eleventh Annual Report, 
Enrollments In and Degrees Con- 
ferred by LTembef " Ihsti tutions for 
the Year 1939-1940. (Journal of 
the American Association of Col- 
legiate Registrars, November, 1940. 
Figures are for the entire aca- 
clemi c year . ) 

The enrollment figures under 
the heading of Engineering' in each 
of these four publications, and 
which include in no instance an 
explanation of what "engineering" 
covers, are as follows* In only 
one instance was there any foot- 
note to the figures as given. 
This footnote is repeated in the 
table , 



NOTE: The reference to the 
publication concerned is by the 
same number by which they arc 
listed above. 



source 

J. 

2 
3 
4 



Engineering Enrollments 1939-1940 
,tate Col. U. of Gal. Cornell U. U, of 111. U. of Minn. 



Penn. 



U. e: 



not listed 
1614 
1321 
1305 



2700 
2016 
1574 
1778 



1236 

1240 
not listed 
1269 



2327 

2349 
1852 

1866 



2256 

2112 

*2438 





1445 

1447 
1538 
1424 



•Entire enrollment in Institute of Technology included 

(cont »d ) 



At this point it is natural the Scho 

to suggest that I refer to the- Included 

catalogues of the institutions-; Architcc 

listed above in order to get ex- tracted, 
act data. All that I can ..say to - added th 

this is: Have you ever tried to Engineer 

find enrollment data in a college total of 

catalogue? be jask'ed 

Engineer 

Here is how I justify an en- courses 

rollment of 1305 as 1 reported to Industri 

the Registrars' Association, Ac- question 

cording .to the most recent cata- than wou 

logue which gives enrollment fig- part to 
ures for 193 9*- 1940, there were in 



o 1 of Enc i ne e r i ng 1 042 . 

in this group were 30 in 
ture which have been sub- 

and to this group were 
ose enrolled in Chemical 
Ing,'" 293, which gives the 

1305, The guest ions might 
: li o w about Ag ri' cultural 
ing and the engineering 
in the School of Mineral 
es?" The asking of the 
, however, is much easier 
Id be an attempt on my 
reply. 



GRADES TO BE TURNED IK TOMORROW 



gra 

i s t 

mor 

Stu 

req 

or-; 

the 

The. 

nee 

for 

ope 



It is imperative that all 
be in the hands of the Rec- 



ce 

rar.not later than 5 p.m., to 

re 

de 



;w, 



V! 



ednesday, January 



nts will not be permitted to 
ister unless, they receive a 
de report from the office of 
Registrar on February 3 or 4, 
Department of Industrial Engi- 
ri.ng makes the grade reports 

the Registrar, but the full co^ 
ration of all instructors is 



nee 


essary in order th 


at 


be 


recorded and 


f acs i 


mi 


Adv 


isers and sc 


hedul i 


ng 


are 


reminded th 


at they 


the 


grade repor 


t subn 


it 


s tu 


dent as the! 


r vouc 


he 


pe r 


nitted to sc 


hedule 


♦ 


not 


scheduled t 


he fir 


st 


sho 


uld. have a 1 


e 1 1 c r 


of 


or 


readmi ss i on 


from a 


r 


college officer 


* 






. Ill • o • 


Hof frr 


an 



grades may 
les printed. 

of f i ccrs 
should keep 

t e d by th e 

r ' f or being 

Students 

semester 

admi ss i on 

espohs ib-le 

, Registrar 



AGRICULTURE AND ENGINEERING FACULTIES TO MEET 



of t 

Agri 

109 

day, 

cord 

ment 

Foil 

b u s i 

meth 

Ha 1 1 

memb 



The regular January meeting 
he faculty of the School of 
culture will be held in room 
Ag riculture' Bui 1 ding thi s Fr i - 

January 31, at 4:10 p.m., ac- 
. ing to an official announce- 

from Dean S. W. Fletcher. 
owinci the regular order of 



E. W. Callenbach, 
warren D. Mack, F 



L. Henninq 



H 



n 



Triebold" 8 



S f 



The faculty 
Engineering w i 1 1 
Ma i n Enq i n e e r i nq ' 



ness, there will be a teaching- day, February 10 
od panel discussion, with 

in charge and the 
ers participating: 



• r . cording to an < 
f oil ow i ng ment from Dea n 
A. L. Beam, -x~* 



•p -r 



G. Merkle, and 



of the School of 
meet in room 107 
Bui 1 di ng on Idon- 

a t 5 p . m . , a c - 
icial announce - 

F. Hammond. 



EMPLOYEES TO APPLY FOR FEE EXEMPTION 



Full-time employees on the 
staff of the College who desire 
exemption from incidental or part- 
time fees for themselves or mem- 
bers of their f am i 1 i e s for course s 
they plan to schedule during the 
Second semester are again re- 
quested to make formal application 
for such exemption at the offices 



of the deans of their Schools or 
heads of their administrative de- 
partments. Applications for ex- 
emption should be made immediately, 
so that the student bills may in- 
clude the item of fee exemption, 

V. D. Blsscy, Head 
Statistical Division 

Accounting Office 



OF GENERAL INTEREST 



In the 75 years before new 
Old Main was occupied, the College 
had granted a total of 12,224 de- 
grees. Since that time, in the 10 
years from October, 1930, through 
June, 1940, it has granted 12,679 
degrees. The total number of de- 
grees granted throughout its his- 
tory is therefore 24,903. 



As tronomi ca 1 Measurement: 



wi 11 



be given this semester. It vas 
inadvertently omitted from the 
timetable . 



There will be no chapel serv- 
ice this Sunday, February 2. 



Professor Henry L, Yeagley 
announces that Physics 290, The 
Making of Telescope Mirrors and 



The only sports 'event sched- 
uled for this week is oymnastics 



with Navy thi 
1 , at 2 p.m. 



> a t u r d a y , P e b r u a r y 



OFFICIAL NOTICES PROM THE OFFICE OF THE REG I STL 



Y/i th draws Is 



2' Chubb, Margaret J., LD f Jan. 6 

2 D i eh 1, : Robert M., LD,-Jan. 8 

1 Feeney, • Albert W., ME, Jan. 15 

1 Goodman, ' Fred L,, LD, Jan. IS 

1 Hamacher, Lawrence, ME, Jan. 14 

The following reasons were 
given for withdrawing: 2 because 
of illness, 2 to go to business 
school, 1 because of poor scholar- 



Hosier, Men 5., LD, Dec. 20 
Hricik, .Elbert J., For', Jan. 7 
Hunter, George 'R., ME, Jan', 
McDevi 1 1 , Henry S . , 



For 



Dec. 19 



Paul P., ;, 



■ > 



Jan, 8 



ship, 1 to enlist in the Canadian 
Air Corps, 2 to go to work, 1 be- 
cause of lack of interest, 1 be- 
cause of poor eyesight, 



Change of Name 
Fred Richard Nale, jr., changed to Fred Richard Nail 



Wm. S. Hoffman 
Reg i strar 



Katheririe C Dwyre 
College Library 



THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 



FACULTY 

Published weekly on Tuesday during the College 
year as a means of making official announcements 
and presenting items of interest to the faculty. All 




VOL. 20 



ULLETIN 



contributions should be as brief as possible and reach 
Walter F. Dantzscher, Director of Public Information, 
105 Old Main, not later than 10 a.m. each Friday. 



rebruarv 



1941 



NO. 



17 



NYA ADMINISTRATION TO MAKE MOVIE 



Beginning some 
the middle of Februa 
National Youth A d m i n 
delegate its staff p 
make a mov i n.g p i c t ur 
interesting and char 
tivities of the NYA 
College. The Col leg 
in preference to cth 
throughout the state 
was felt that the va 
of the program here 
Lain advantages that 
a va ilable else v/h ere. 



time during 
ry, the State 
istration will 
hotographer to 
e of the more 
acteristic a c - 
program at the 
e was chosen, 
er ins t : tut i ons 
, because i t 
riety and scone 
afforded cer- 
we re not 



The moving 
in color, and s 
possibly a r unn 
will be "dubbed 
according to pr 
organ i zat i on of 
continuity is i 
Department of F 
Members of this 
doubtedly will 
to call upon me 
ulty and admin i 
further cc-oper 



pic 


ture 


wi 1 1 be 


ound 


ef f 


ects and 


inq 


comm 


entarv 


in" 


aft 


erwards, 


esen 


t pi 


ans, The 


the 


pre 


1 i mi nary 


n the ha 


n d s of the 


ubl i 


c In 


format ion. 


dep 


artment un- 


find 


it 


necessary 


mb e r 


s of 


the fac- 


stra 


t i ve 


staff for 


at i on 





IOTO 



RIES TO BEGIN NEXT SUNDAY 



gin 

t i ve 
tell 

next 
r i es 
r „ i on 
spre 
subs 
unt i 
inte 



Th 
the 

se 
ing 

Su 



, w 
ad" 
e q u 
1 fi 
res 



e Pittsburgh Press v/ill be- 

publication of a c ons e cu- 
ries of rotogravure pages 
the story of the College 
nday, February £. The se- 
ccording to advance inforrna- 
ill lead off with a "double 

and will be continued in 
cnt weeks by a page a week 



the subj 
t." 



:ct has lost its 



The plans of the Department 



of Publ 
the pro 
of 30 s 
with po 
ser i es . 
kind to 
lege we 
ser i es 
gravure 
uni que . 
of any 
to call 
at tent i 



ic Information call for 
duct ion of a minimum number 
eries of picture stories, 



such 



ti- 



ll] s 
col- 



ssibly as many as 5 
An opportunit y o f 

tell the story of 
ek by week through picture 
in a metropolitan roto- 

section is believed to be 
Faculty members knowing 
similar series are invited 

it to Mr. Dantzscher' s 
on. 







ART I 


STS' COU 


ISE S 


NU.Ev 




Series tick 


et s r 


ernaining f 


or the 


last 


three numbers on 


the 


Ar t i s t s ' C 


o u r s e 


went 


on 


sale yesterday nor 


ning at 8 


a ,.m 3 


The 


sal 


e will continue at 


the A.oA, 


ticket 


win- 


dov* 


s in Old Llain 


tod a 


-j (Tuesday 


) a n d 


to- 


■ nor 


row, Beginning Th 


ursday, if 


scat s 


re— 


"na 1 


n, tickets for incl 


xvidual na 


jab e r s 


may 


b e 


purchased, as 


well 


as series 


t icke 


ts. 




The prices 


set on series t 


icket s 


are 


is 


follows: $3. 


90 for tickets 


ori ginally 


pri 


->ccl at £5.50 


with 

* * 


the Paul R 


o b e son 


* 



UES TICKETS NOW ON SALE 



number; $3,40 for series tickets origin- 
ally priced at $4,50, The windows will 
remain open from 8 a.m. to 12 and from 
1:30 to 5 p t Q„ each day of the sale. 

The first of the three remaining 
concerts will be held on Tuesday, Feb- 
ruary lly At this time Jascha Heifetz, 
one of the world ' s greatest violinists, 
will play,. He will be followed on March 
17 Dy the Cleveland Orchestra and on 
A.pril 17 by Anna Kaskas, 
* * * 



CORRELATION BETWEEN HIGH SCHOOL AND COLLEGE RANK 



by Ma r y V i r g i n i a Br own 
Office of the Registrar 



Few colleges send more objec- 
tive information to parents of 
students, high school principals, 
and to the faculty than does the 
Registrar's office of this Col- 
lege, Seldom, however, have we 
given out information reduced to 
a correlation factor.. This latter 
fact was caused very largely by 
the difficulty the Registrar en- 
countered in trying to explain to 
parents or even to a high school 
principal just what a correlation 
factor means* However, this year 
for the first time, correlations 
of high school and college rank 
have been made which show very 
gratifying results. 

A study of the records of the 
graduates of 12 representative 
Pennsylvania high schools who en- 
tered The Pennsylvania State Col- 
lege as freshmen during the period 
1928-1935 reveals very interesting 
relationships between rank in high 
school graduating class and rank 
in college. Since the work in- 
volved in analyzing records of' all 
students admitted as freshmen dur- 
ing this period would be tremen- 
dous, these 12 schools were chosen 
on the basis of geographical and 
numerical representation. In this 
eight-year period a total of 12S0 
students started as freshmen at 
The Pennsylvania State College 
after graduation by the following' 
high schools; Allentown, Altoona, 
Scranton Central, Hazleton, New 
Castle, Oil City, Peabody (Pitts-' 
burgh ) , ' w I 1 1 i am Penn' ( Har r i sburg ) , 
Reading, State College, West , 
Philadelphia, and Wi 1 1 iamsport « 

In computing correlations ' be- . 



in 



tween high school rank and rank 
college, the former is based on 
division by fifths of the class ' 
and the latter on tenths of the 
class. A correlation factor of 
,64 was found between high school 
rank and rank at the end of the 
first year of college, and of ,60 
between high school rank and rank 
at the end of the college career. 
The correlation factor between 
rank at the end of the freshman 
year and rank at the end of the 
college career for these 1290 stu- 
dents is #88 6 



certification privilege 



The 
based on index numbers for Pennsyl- 
vania high schools has been ex- 
plained in' an article' by William 
S, Hoffman, Registrar, in the Fac-' 



u 1 1 v Bulletin of N o vemb e r 1 



1940, 



Vol. 20, 



WO, 



o 



The averaoe rank 



of students from a given fifth of 
a given high school is, in a meas- 
un 



a prediction of the success 



of subsequent 
high school . 
considered it 
index numbers 
A correlation 
found in comp 
ber rank with 



students from that 
Of the 1290 records 
was possible to make 
for 768 students, 
factor of .63 was 
ring the index num- 
the actual rank of 
these 768 students at the end of 
their first year in colleqe. 



Since these correlation fac- 
tors have been found to be re la- ' 
tively high for this sort of data, 
they further bear out the fact that 
high school rank, is an excellent 
predictive index of college rank. 
(See the Faculty Bulletin, Decem- 
ber 10, 1940,. Vol ,' 20, No. 11, 
"Grading in High School and Col- 
lege," b}^ W 1 1 1 i am 5 • Hoffman . ) 



OFFICIAL NOTICE FRCP; THE OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR 
Ghana e of Class i fi cat i on 



Ned Kelly should be registered as a part-time junior in physics 
instead of a special in physics, 

Wm c S. Hoffman, Registrar 






, v '-.>'- 



OF GENERAL INTEREST 



The College Senate will meet 
this Thursday, February 6, at 4:10 
p.m., in room 121 Sparks building 
(which is the new official name 
for the Liberal Arts building), 
according to an announcement from 
William S. Hoffman, Secretary. 



Personnel athletic books for 
the second semester will be on 
sale at the Athletic' Association 
ticket office, 107 Old Main, dur- 
ing' the week beginning next Mon- 
day, February 10, The price 'Will 
again be $7 plus federal tax. 



The Department of Home Eco- 
nomics announces the opening of 
''The Maple Room," where evening 
meals will be served four nights 
a week beginning Monday, February 
17, and continuing each Monday to" 
Thursday inclusive. Serving' hours 
will be from 5:15 to 6:30 p«.mo 
The Maple Room will also be avail- 
able at noon upon special reserva- 
tion. Call Mrs. Katherine Claws on 
at the Institution Administration 
office in the Home Economics build- 
ing for additional information 
about the room and its facilities. 



daily except Sunday, 



The Li 
during Febr 
of the work 
photographe 
ing from st 
1 i f e to see 
i ty in the 
have been s 
ternati onal 
York, San F 
and -Ottawa, 



brary is 
uary 1 t 

of the 
r s with 
ill life 
n e s of e 
Soviet U 
hown in 

photogr 
ranci sco 

Canada, 



exhi bi t ing 
o 16 examples 
leading Soviet 
subjects rang- 

and animal 
veryday activ- 
nion. These 
salons of in- 
aphy in New ' 
, Des Moines, 



"Labor and Defense" will be 
the subject of the Town Meeting at 
the Hillel Foundation this Sunday 
evening, February 9. Speakers" wi 1 1 
be Mr. Thomas V. Bowen, president 
of the Blair County Centre Labor 
Union; Professor Clarence E. Bui-' 
linger, head of the Department of 
Industrial Eng ineering; ' and Pro- 
fessor Harney Y, T . Stover, associate 
professor of economics in extension. 
The forum will be held in the aud- 
itorium of the. Hillel- Foundation, 
133 W, .Beaver Ave.,. at 7:30 p.m. 
All faculty members, students, and 
townspeople are invited. 



The. Reverend A. J. Muste, di- 
The Home Economics Cafeteria rector of the Labor Temple, New 
will begin serving' again on Monday, York City, will be the chapel 
February 17. Serving hours will speaker this Sunday, February S, 
be from 11:45 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. -::•-::- -::--::- -"---:- 



SPORTS CALENDAR 



Sports events this week include the 
following : 

Wednesday, February 5 

6:00 p.m. Freshman "boxing with Syracuse 
7:00 p.m. Varsity boxing with Syracuse 
8:00 p.m. Basketball with West Virginia 



3 :00 p.m. 

2 :00 p.m. 

3 :30 p.m. 

3 :30. p.m. 
8 tOO p.m. 



* * 



Saturday, February 8 

Swimming with Tempi* 
Freshman basketball with Wyo- 
ming Seminary 
Fencing with Navy 
Freshman wrestling with Lehigh 
Varsity wrestling with Lehigh 
* * 



28th MIDYEAR COMMENCEMENT 



t Degrees conferred 
v . Bachelors 99 
Ma s t e r s 21 



Doct or s 11 
Total 131 



Degrees conferred in first 27 midyear 
6ommen cement s : > 

Bachelors 1779 Doctors 38 
Masters 2 96 Total 2113.. 



Degrees conferrred to date at midyear com- 
mencement s : 

Bachelors .1878 Doctors 49 
317 



. Ma s t e r s 



Total 2244 



Degrees conferred in first 28 years of 
the life of the College: 
Total 144 



iCaEjqt'x 9 28IIOo 



* : - 



^3?!NYH0 ' H 5AGY75 SSi 



n 



THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 



FACULTY 

Published weekly on Tuesday during the College 
year as a means of making official announcements 
and presenting items of interest to the faculty. All 




VOL. 20 



'ebruary 11, 1S41 



1 BULLETIN 



contributions should be as brief as possible and reach 
Walter F. Dantzscher, Director of Public Information, 
105 Old Main, not later than 10 a.m. each Friday. 

NO. 18 



LIBERAL ARTS FACULTY LINKER TG BE HELD NEXT MONDAY 



1 O 



ulty dinner v. 

day, February 17, 



Lion Inn 

or wives, 



their husbands 

are invited. 



Ni ttany 
their h 
employees 

Cy Hunger... 
f the Pittsburgh Po 
ill be the pr inc i p 



Liberal Arts fac< 
" "on- 
the 
.„ e r s , 
and office 



This year -a mjciai j-\. 

•rill be held next Mon- 

r in „ + n ,-. ~, 



it 7 p.m. in 
Faculty members, 

c and r\ ~T "P i r- o 



ford, famed cartoon- 
of the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, 

al speaker. 



wi 



Reservations must be made by 

February 13, 
_ ~ 1 . . 1 j 1 



4 p.m. this Thursday, 
Tickets are 01. Checks should be 
G. H, Stecker, 213 



ent to Firs. 
Sparks 



building (the new name for' 

to Louis H. Bell, 

"'"i sh- 



or 



O^Ul no U U J. J. u 

Liberal Arts, 

310 Old Fain, The committee wi 
es to have the name of every per- 
son for whom a reservation is 
made* 



PRESIDENT HETZEL TO ADDRESS A.A.U. 



AND A.A.U.W. 



President Hetzel will address 
a joint meeting of A.A.U. P. and 
A.A.U.V/, this Thursday, February 
13, at 7:45 p.m. in the Home Eco- 
nomics auditorium. His subject 
will be "Faculty Responsibility 



for Student Welfare-." Husbands 

and wives of members, as well as 
faculty friends, are. invited. A 
reception and refreshments wi 1 1 
follow the speech. . 



CO-OPERATION ON GRADE REPORTS IS APPRECIATED 



"Crypto 
trar ? s of f i ce 
the end of ex 
is the job of 
record final 
d e n t s - - a p p r ox 
sand separate 
print grade r 
sheets on whi 
records are k 
last exams we 
nesday. On M 
week all thos 
ready to be h 
starting thei 
req i strat ion. 



runs a co 
as a s i d 
ams each 

his o f f i 
grades fo 
imateiy f 
entr i es- 
eports fr 
ch these 
ept. Thi 
re . held o 
onday mor 
e grade r 
anded out 
r second 
Orchids 



liege regis- 
eline. At 
semester it 
ce staff to 
r 6500 stu- 
i f ty thou- 
-and to 
cm the 1 i nen 
6500 student 
s year the 
n last Wed- 
ning of this 
eports we r e 

to students 
semester 



;ay we 



The above' is quoted from th© 
Daily Half Colyum as published in 
the Centre Daily Times on Wednes- 
day, February 5. 

The Registrar wishes to point 
out that grades cannot be recorded 
until they have been received in 
his office-, and therefore he takes 
this opportunity of distributing 
the orchids handed him by A.R-.W. 
to those staff members who did ma-ke 
recording possible by getting in 
their grades in record time, 

Wm. S. Hoffman, Registrar 



FEWER CONFLICT ENANI NAT IONS 



] FORT ED 





At the 


end of 


the s e c o 


nd 


seme st 


or, 


1939- 


40, there were 


1466 st 


udent s wh 


o had 


ccnf 1 


ict exa 


minat io 


n So In 


the 


cour s 


e s in 


which 


t he se 


conflict s ' were 


sche dule d 


there 


were 


16,451 


student 


s enroll 


ed 








For the 


first 


s e me s t e r 


f 1940-41 




1102 


oonf li o 


t s were 


sche dul 


ed 


in courses 


i n wh 


ich 12, 


972 stu 


dents were 


enroll 


ed, 


This 


re duct ion wa s 


the re su 


It 


cf clo 


ser 


CO—Op 


e r a t i o n 


between the heads 
* * 


of de 


part — 



ments and the College Scheduling Officer,, 
A new card for reporting, examinat ion data 
was used, and approximately 70 per cent cf 
the cards were completely filled out This" 
reduction in conflict examinations was 
worth the effort; and if the cards are com- 
pletely filled out for this semester, there 
is no reason why the number of conflict 
examinations cannot be greatly reduced,, 

Ray V e Wat kins 
College Scheduling Officer 



OF GENERAL INTEREST 



There will be a special meeting of 
the faculty of the School of Agriculture 
this Thursday., February 13 ; at 4:10 p m 0j - 
in room 109 Agriculture building, with a 
teaching-method panel discussion in charge 
of W F« Hall and the following members 



Beam, 



Wo B, Mack 



C a 1 1 e n- 
F «, G „ 



participating: A a 

bach, W L e Henning, n„ 

Merkle, and H« 0„ Triebold, This is an 

official announcement from Dean S a W, 

Flet cher o 

* * * * * * 

"Social Diseases" is the subject of 
a talk to be given by Dr „ A. F. Doyle 
in Schwab Auditorium tomorrow, Wednesday, 
February 12, at 8:15 p t m, In addition, 
a sound film entitled "With These Weapons" 

will be presentedo 

* * * + * * 

Single admissions to the Jascha 



bxngxe admissions 
Heifets number tonight a 
$2,25 eacho Tickets may 
the A»A„ windows in 

lar business hours and' before the 
in the lobby of the audit or rum 



e available at 
be purchased at 
Old I.Iain during regu— 
concert 



Although more series 
this year than ever before 
tickets are also available at the rate 
$3 90 for tickets originally priced at 



seat s were sold 
, good series 



of 



$5<>50 and $3 o 40 for those originally priced 
at S4 o 50« Single admissions for the final 
two numbers, the Cleveland Orchestra en 
March 17 and Anna ha ska s en April 17, will 
be priced at 02 o 25 and $1 25 respectively 
With admissions to the I-Ieifetz number 



2 o 2 5 s the 



likewise priced at 
tage is obviously in favor 
* * * * 



of 



price advan- 
the serieSo 
* * 



The fourth Liberal Arts lecture of 
the current series will be given Thursday. 
February 20, at 7:30 p m in room 10 
Sparks building (the new name for Liberal 
Arts)* Raymond W, Tyson of the depart- 



ment of speech i 
" Ame r i ca n Radio 
* * 



ill speak on the subject 



Dr Q Halford E y Luccock of the Yale 



University Divinity 



chanel 



speaker thi: 
* * 



School will be the 
Sunday, February 16 e 



Three sports events are on the cal- 
endar for this week: basketball with 
Carnegie Tech, tomorrow, Wednesday, Feb- 
ruary 12, at 8 p,n ; swimming with Pitts- 
burgh Saturday, February 15, at 2 p a moJ 
and gymnastics with Chicago Saturday, 
February 15, also at 2 p a m 

* * * * * * 



'0 HOLD POPULAR 



INDUlvI CN ARTISTS' COURSE TICKET PLANS 



The pro's and con's 



various type 



of ticket sale procedures will be brought 
to the attention of subscribers to the 
Artists' Course and they will be asked 
this evening during the intermission of 
the Heifetz number to list in order of 
their preferences the six basic methods 
which seem to offer relief from the in- 
conveniences of present selling methods. 

It, The use of some system of pref- 
erential selection, a method in which the 
allocation of seats is left largely to 
chance „ 

2. The possible use of Recreation 
building, 

3 The Davey plan, which provides 
for an advance sale by mail in the spring, 



supplementing the present plan 

line or the 



cpu i r e s 
proxy. 



standing : 



which re- 
use of a 



4, The Tobias plan, which discour- 
ages early line formation by dividing sub- 
scribers into two lines, employing 'or der — 
takers in the lobby, one of whom starts at 
the beginning of Line I, the other at the 
end of Line II, a short time before the 
windows are scheduled to open e 

5 The plan which has been in effect 
for the last several years, with the dis- 
tribution of priority numbers which was 
used for the first time this fall, 

6 W A modification of the present 
plan designed to expedite the movement of 
the line at the ticket windows* 



PREFERENTIAL DRAWING PLAN 



Advantage s 



Dig a d v a ntage s 



1, The use of this system would dispense 
with the early— forming lines, which have 
been a source of growing dissatisfaction, 

2, Under this plan, tickets could possi- 
bly he purchased by, mail r and applications 
numbered to correspond to numbers to be 
drawn to establish priority in much the 
same manner as the selective service act 
operatedo 

3, The idea is flexible enough so that 
other means of employing preferential 
drawing could be used without mailed 
applicat ions o 



1# Subscribers would be in no position 
to determine just -.That seats they would 
receive, 

2 a To insure the success of the course, 
it would be necessary to stipulate that 
all ticket allocations would have to be 



final, whether or not the 



ts a partic- 



ular subscriber received were entirely 
satisfactory or not 

3, This system eliminates the flexibility 
in going from one price class to another, 



which is a feature 
proxy type of .sale 



of the personal or 



2. THE USE OF RECREATION BUILDING 



Advantage s 



Di sac 1 vantage s 



1, There would be sufficient room for 
all applicants. 

2 e With sufficient seats available, the 
need for a ticket sale line would be 
eliminate d, 

3« The number of seats that could be 
purchased by any one person would proba- 
bly not have to be restricted,, 

4, There would be no necessity for dis- 
couraging out-of-town sales, 



l c The acoustics of Recreation building- 
are not satisfactory for a concert series 

2. There would be a lessening of the 
"appearance— in-per son" value which, after 



the principal advantage in hearing 



all. 

an artist in person, rather than on a 
phonograph or radio o The distance of the 
audience from the artist and the inability 
to hear the artists' performance except 
through amplifiers would take away much 
that one is willing to pay for in a small 
audit orium, 

3. Seats in Recreation building would be 
less comfortable for the longer . perform- 
ances of the Artists' Cctirse than these 
in the Auditorium, 

4* Without costly investments for a cur- 
tained stage and other stage accessories, 
Recreation building would lack equipment 
to build up an adequate concert hall at — 
mo sphere , 



THE DAVEY "OPTIONAL ADVANCE SALE" PLAN 



Advantage s 

1. Patrons could purchase seats in an 
advance sale to be held in April or May, 
Since the advance ■ sub script ions would 
probably occupy only a small part of the 
house, purchasers would be assured of good 
seats without having to stand in line, 

2, The number of tickets at an advance 
sale would probably not have to be re- 
stricted, 

3« The present " stand— in— line " system 
with the proxy feature would still be a — 
vaiiable : to purchasers who preferred to. 
buy their seats in the fall. It would be 
possible to continue the use of priority 
numbers in the fall to save potential sub- 
scribers or their proxies as much time as 
possible. 



Disadvantage s 

1, Those purchasing tickets at the ad- 
vance sale in the spring would not know 
what numbers would appear on the course 
in the fall, 

2, Since seniors would have been grad- 
uated by fall and freshmen not admitted at 
the time of the advance sale in the spring, 
the advance sale privilege, so far as the 
student body is concerned, would be limited 
largely to the present sophomore and jun- 
ior clas s c 

3 Participation in the advance sa.le 
would require an investment in tickets 
eight months before they would be used 



4. 



UdE TOBIAS "ORDER-TAKING" PLAN 



This plan, suggest 
Milton Symphony Or 
parts, right and 1 
the windows, the o 
e d with a seating 
subscribers on his 
taker will begin a 
Those in each line 
ginning or the end 
minutes before the 
blank indicating t 
chart. The subscr 
his tickets with m 
could be numbered, 
starting point cou 



ed by Professor Ar 
chestra. Briefly, 
eft. Four persons 
ther two as order- 
chart so that he c 
line , Tc discour 
t the beginning of 
will not know whe 
of that line unti 
wind ow s open. E a 
he seats which the 
iber presents this 
inimum delay. To 

The selection of 
Id be decided by f 



thur L, Tobias, 
it calls for a 
handle the sale 
takers in the lo 
an cross off his 
age the early fc 
one line, the c 
ther they will g 
1 the order-take 
ch order-taker h 
subscriber has 
blank with his 
assure maintenan 
the beginning c 
lipping a coin, 



has wo 
divi s i 
, two 
bby. 

chart 
rmat ic 
t her a 
ain pr 
r gets 
ands e 
sele ct 
che ck 
ce of 
r the 
etc . 



rke 
on 
of 
The 
ea 
n o 

X J. 

b U 

i cr 
in 
ach 
ed 
at 
pes 
end 



d suco 
of the 
them s 

order 
ch sea 
i the 
he end 
ity by 
to ope 

succe 
after 
the wi 
it ion 

of th 



e s sf ully 

hou se i 

tat ione d 

-taker i 

t s e le ct 

lines, o 

of the 

being a 

ration, 

ssive su 

ref er enc 

ndew and 

in line , 

e line a 



for the 
nt o two 

behind 
s provid- 
ed by the 
ne order- 
other line, 
t the b e - 
15 or 20 
b s cr iber a 
e to his 

r ece ive s 

the blanks 
s the 



.dvant age s 

1. It eliminates the incentive for form- 
ing in line early since later comers in 
one line have as 'good a chance to get* 
satisfactory seats as early comers in the 
other line, 

2. Persons in line still ha.ve an oppor- 
tunity to select in person the specific 
seats which they regard as' most satis— 
fact ory . 

3. This plan will expedite the movement 
of the lines at the ticket windows* 



Disadvantages 

1. -Though satisfactory at Hilton, it may 
create new problems in maintaining order : 
in the line in which the order— taking 
will begin 'fr*om the en<I; i.e. some of the - 
early corners in that li-ne may be resentful 
of losing the precedence which their early 
arrival has given them and may try tc im- 
prove their positions, 

2.' A person coining ' early will not heou a— ■ 
sarily receive preferential treatment on 
that account . 

3. It may take more than a year under this 
plan for the public to realize that no 
great gain results from forming in line 
early, since chance determines which end 
cf the lines will be served first* 



-5. THE PRESENT PLAN (USING PRIORITY NUMBERS) 



Advantage s 

1. An opportunity to select at the time 
of purchase spc cif i c * seat s satisfactory 
to the purchaser. 



Pi s a dvant ages ■ ■• 

1. The forming of an early line cannot 
be eliminated. 

2, It is necessary to employ a proxy if 
one docs net want tc stand in line himself. 



2. The desirability cf the seats secured 
depends on the initiative of the individ- 
ual subscriber rather than en the element 3. Possible disappointment that may re- 
ef chance, suit for those who have stood in line if 

the course is oversold, 

3, widest possible choice in selection 

of seats Irrespective cf price range, 4. Possible interference with class at- 
tendance because of the necessity of 
waiting in line. 

6. PRESENT PLAN i/TTH A FEATURE DESIGNED T-0 LAKE THE LINE MOVE MORE RAPIDLY 



It has been suggested that many would prefer to see the line meve mere rapidly even 
at the expense of selecting specific seats. Under this plan the individual would 
accept the seats handed to him within a particular price bracket just as he would in 
applying at the box offices o'f metropolitan theatres. 



Advantage . 

1, It would enable the lines to move 
more rapidly once the ticket sale got 
under way. 



Pi sadvantage 

1, It would eliminate the possibility of 
selecting specific locations which seem 
to each individual subscriber tc be the 
most desirable. 






THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 



FACULTY 



Published weekly on Tuesday during the College 
year as a means of making official announcements 
and presenting items of interest lo the faculty. All 




BULLETIN. 

contributions should be as brief as possible and reach 
Walter F. Dantzscher, Director of Public Information, 
105 Old Main, not later than 10 a.m. each Friday. 



VOL. 20 



February 18, 194-1 



NO. 



19 



FOURTH LIBERAL ARTS LECTURE TO BE 'HELD THIS -THURSDAY 



The fourth lecture in the 
current Liberal Arts series will 
be given by Raymond W. Tyson of 
the department of speech this 
Thursday, February 20, at 7:30 
p.m. in room 10 Sparks building 
(the new name for Liberal Arts). 



Mr . Tyson' s 



It A 



me n- 



lecture, 

can Radio," will contain a brief 
survey of the growth of radio in 
this country, with especial refer- 
ence to its educational, cultural, 
and social influences. It will 
also include a discussion of ad- 
vertising in the American system 
of broadcasting, self -regulat ion 



the Code of the 
on of Eroad- 
t h a t radio will 
of a national 
American radio 



with reference to 

National Associat 

casters, the part 

play in the event 

emergency or war, 

contrasted with that of other 

parts of the world, and radio as 

an instrument of democracy. 

r.'r . Tyson studied educational 
radio at the University of Wiscon- 
sin, worked with several of the 
broadcasting stations in Cleveland 
and with the state station of Wis- 
consin at Madison, and has con- 
tributed to several publications 
on various aspects of radio. 



AMERICAN CHEMICAL 



CIETY TC SPONSOR LECTURI 



''Micro-chemical Methods in 
Toxicology 1 ' will be the subject 
of an illustrated lecture hy Pro- 
fessor A. O. Get tier of New' York 
University, to be he Id' tomorrow, 
Wednesday, February 19, at 7:30 
p.m. in 119 New Physics building. 
Dr. Oettler is internationally 
known for his work in the applica- 
tion of chemical and toxi col og i cal 
methods to crime detection. 



V/h i 1 e Dr. Gettler's address 
will be made in the language and 
f rem the v i ewp o i nt of a scientist, 
much wi 11 be i nc 1 ucied wh i ch wi 1 1 
be of popular interest. His ap- 
pearance here is being sponsored 
by the Central Pennsylvania branch 
of the American Chemical Society. 
Faculty members, students, and 
townspeople are cordially invited 
to attend. 



SECRETARY OF STUDENT CHRISTIAN FEDERATION TO SPEAK TONIGHT 



Robert Uackie, general secre- 
tary of the Student Christian Fed- 
eration, who Is now located in 
Canada, will speak in the Home 
Economics audi tori urn' thi s evening, 
Tuesday, February 18, in connec- 



Fund and British War Relief Drive 
Mr. Mackie, former secretary of 
the British Student Christian 
Movement, came to America from 
France in August, He has also 
spent two vears with Chinese stu- 



i on with the World Student Service dents. 



COMMITTEE 1J OV7 CONSIDERING APPLICATIONS FOR JOHN 



, r HITE FELL OT/3 HIPS 



The Committee on Academic Standards 
is now giving consideration to applica- 
tions for John "7. T .7hite fellowships for 
graduate study for the year 1941—42, ac- 
cording to an announcement from Dr. C, E. 
Marquardt, acting chairman of the com- 
mittee. 

Three fellowships are awarded an- 
nually to graduating seniors of the high- 
est standing who possess, in the opinion 



of the committee, those qualities which 
will enable them to profit to the great- 
est advantage by graduate study. The re- 
spend the year in advanced 
College or elsewhere under 
of the President of the 



cipients must 
study at this 
the direction 
College . 



Application blanks may be obta.ined 
now in room 103 Old Main, and should be 
returned by March 1. 
* * ♦ * 



TWO-WEEK PERIOD FOR DROP-ADDS ENDS TOMORROW 



The two-week period for Drop— Adds 
will end tomorrow, Wednesday, February 
19, at 5 p.m. After that time the fol— 
lowing rule goes into effect: 

"In the case of subjects dropped 
from a student's schedule by his Dean or 



two 



scheduling officer after the end of 
weeks, the instructor, upon receipt of 
the Drop notice, shall indicate on the 
class card, before returning it to the 
Registrar, that at the time the 'student 
withdrew from the class the grade was 



above passing (WA ) or below passing (WB). 

"In those exceptional cases where a 
student is permitted to drop a subject 
after the first two weeks of a semester, 
for reasons not due to poor scholarship^ 
the School in which he is enrolled may 
authorize the dropping 'without penalty,' 
in which case the instructor teaching 
the subject shall not report a grade 
(WB). If the instructor by mistake re- 
ports a grade (WB), the Registrar shall 
disregard the re-port." 



NAVY TO RECRUIT ENGINEERING STUDENTS FRIDAY 



Rear Admiral H. E. Yarnell, U.S.N., 
recently in command of the Asiatic squad- 
ron, will visit the College this Friday, 
February 21, with the purpose of re- 
cruiting graduate students, seniors, and 
juniors in all divisions of engineering 
work for service in the Navy Department 
following graduation. An address will be 
delivered by Admiral Yarnell at 4:10 p.m. 
in room 121 Sparks building (the new name 
for Liberal Arts), to which all students 
in the above— merit ione d classes and divi- 
sions of work are invited. Beginning at 
3 p.m. and continuing until the hour of 
the lecture and from 5 to 6 p.m. members 
of the Admiral's party will be available 
for interviews with students concerning 
cpportunit ie s in engineering in the sev- 
eral divisions of the Navy. 



Commissions as ensigns will be of- 
fered to seniors and graduate students 
who are found physically fit immediately 
upon graduation in June. Not more than 
20 per cent of the graduating class will 
be permitted to apply; this limitation 
does not apply to graduate students. 
Provisional appointments will also be 
offered to juniors, which will continue 
until graduation in 1942, when commis- 
sions will be offered to those who then 
qualify, 

A committee of College officers rep- 
resenting the various departments is be- 
ing invited to act as a board or commit- 
tee to advise the Navy Department concern- 
ing students best qualified for engi- 
neering service in the Navy. 



PROFESSOR HELME TO TALK ON ART GALLERY EXHIBITION TOMORROW 



Professor J. Burn Eelme will give a 
talk on the current exhibition of 25 Jap- 
anese prints tomorrow, Wednesday, Febru- 
ary 19, at 7:30 p.m. in the College Art 
Gallery, 303 Main Engineering, The pub- 
lic is cordially invited. This is the 
second gallery. talk of the winter series. 

The exhibition of print's, which will 
continue until the end of the month, is 
circulated by the American Federation of 
Arts, It consists of 25 examples, in- 
cluding some well-known ones, ranging 
from primitives through the classic per- 
iod to such romanticists as Hiroshige, 
The whole history of the art of Japanese 



wood block printing in color, roughly 
from 1650 to 1850, is shown in these 25 
prints. Among the artists represented 
are Harunobu, Utamaro, Sharaku, Hokusai, 
and Hiroshige, "The prints will have 
particular appeal for people interested 
in design and in the theatre," Professor 
Eelme 's announcement states. The exam- 
ples in the exhibition are modern fac- 
similes and are for sale at prices rang- 
ing from six tc ten dollars. 

The recently redecorated gallery 
will be open from 8:30 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. 
Monday through Friday. It closes at 
noon on Saturday, 



LIBRARY EXHIBITING OLD PENNSYLVANIA BANK NOTES 

John A, Musoalus, of Bridgeport, "An Index of State Bank Notes that Illus- 
Pennsylvania, has loaned to the Library trate Presidents," "The Views of Towns, 
his collection of old Pennsylvania state Cities, ' Falls, and Buildings Illustrated 
hank notes. The collection is now being on' 1300-1866 Ban!: Paper Money," and' "Pan- 
exhibited. Mr, Musoalus is the author of ous paintings Reproduced on Paper Money 
numerous books on bank notes, including of State Banks, 1800—1866." 

* * + * * * 

OF GENERAL INTEREST 

The Graduate School faculty will "There is really no limit whatsoever 

meet next Tuesday, February 25, at 4 .to the eligible subjects," the new an— 
p.m. in room 208 Buckhout Laboratory, nouncement states, "except that fiction 
according to an official announcement is barred: biography, autobiography, 
from Bean Frank D. Kern, history, economics, politics— the whole 

** ** ** range of the .social sciences — any of the 

natural sciences, along with literature 
The person who corresponded with the and the fine arts. The only limitation.. 
Banco Mercantil del Rio de la Plata, Mon- is the treatment, which must be suffi— 
tcvideo, Uruguay, on January 9, may have ciently non-technical to be understand— 
the reply by calling the President's able and interesting to the intelligent 
office. lay reader. And of course the manuscript 

** ** ** must be a unified, full-length book, not 

a collection of essays or papers, or 
Apples are still available at the separate studies." 
Fruit Farm Cold Storage, and an effort is 

being made to keep the road open by the Manuscripts when submitted should 

use of snow plows* Baldwin, Stayman, be identified with the name of the au— 
Rome Beauty, and Golden Delicious are thor and the institution, with which he is 
available. The salesroom is open Wednes- associated. Judges will be Henry Seidel 
day and Friday afternoons only, Canby, Carl Van Doren, and Dr , William 

* * * * * * A. Neils on. 

* * * * * * 

Dean Frank D, Kern announces the 
following preliminary examination- for the Ten sports events are on the calen- 

Ph.D. degree: Harold J. Miller; major, dar for this week; 
botany; minor, agricultural biochemistry; 

room 204 Buckhcut Laboratory; Wednesday, Wednesday, February 19 

February 26, at 3 p,'m, 

** ** ** ' 6:30 p.m. Freshman basketball with ?>uck- 

nell 

Father Vincent C. Donovan, O.P., di- 8:00 p.m. Basketball with Georgetown 
rector of the Catholic Thought Associa- 
tion, New York City, will be the chapel Saturday, February 22 
speaker this Sunday, February 23. 

** ** ** 1:00 p.m. Freshman basketball with Sus- 

quehanna 

Reynal and Hitchcock, Inc., who of— 2:00 p.m. Fencing with Pennsylvania 

fer a $2500 prize for the best non-fiction 2:00 p.m. Freshman swimming with Cornell 

book— length manuscript submitted before 2:00 p.m. Swimming with Rtitgers 

September 1, 1941, by a member of an Am- 2:00 p.m. Gymnastics with Minnesota 

erican college or university staff, have 4:00 p.m. Freshman wrestling with Cornell 

revised their announcement to give more 7:00 p.m. Boxing with Army 

specific information on the subject mat— 8:00 p.m. Wrestling with Cornell 
ter desired, .. ** *.* ** 

MINUTES OF THE COLLEGE SENATE MEETING OF FEBRUARY 6, 1941 

A meeting of the College Senate was menda.tion from the Committee on Academic 
held in room 121 Sparks building (the new Standards for an exception to the re si- 
name for Liberal Arts) on Thxirsday, Feb— dence rule for Mrs, Nellis T, Hogue, The 
ruary 6, 1941, at 4:10 p.m., with Dean recommendation, which is on file in the 
Stoddart. presiding. A list of the mem— office of the Registrar, was adopted, 
bers present is on file in the office of 

the Registrar, Professor Kinsloe presented a report 

from the Committee on Courses of Study, 

The minutes of the meeting of Jan-,,. Beginning at the middle of page 4 and 
uary 9, 1941, were read and approved. continuing through pages 5 and 6 of the 

report, there were listed new engineering 

Dr. C. E. Ivlarquardt read a recom— defense training courses. This portion 



of the report received immediate atten- Mr, W, P, Lewis, the College Lib-rar- ■ 

tion and was, on motion, adopted by unan- ian, announced that the new Library would 

incus consent. The remainder of the re— be dedicated on Saturday, March 15, 1941, _ 

port, pages 2, 3, and part of page 4, was at 2 p,m», and that Dr. Fred Lewis Pattee 

placed on the table for consideration at in all probability will be present for the 

the next meeting. The entire report is dedication, 

on file in the office of the Registrar, Wm, S ^ Hoffman, Secretary 

* * 

OF THE REGISTRAR 



* * * * * * 





OFFICIAL NOTICES FROM THE OFFICE 




Withdrawals 


1 

1 


Coran, Robert G,, Chen, Jan, 30 2 McC 
Jacobs, Jerome R,, PM, Jan, 10 2 Mai 



latchey, Edward L,, Bact^ Dec, 21 
loney, Harry A,, ME, Dec, 20 

The following reasons were given for transfer to another school, 1 because of 
withdrawing: 1 for lack of funds, 1 to injury to leg, and 1 gave no reason. 

Change of Classification 

Galen Bailey from freshman to sophomore in physical education 

Margaret Dillard from special to sophomore in home economics 

Robert Dunsmore from sophomore to freshman in Lower Division 

Joseph Gavenonis from junior in education to sophomore in Lower Division 

Jean Matthes from junior in education to sophomore in Lower Division 

William Ritzel from junior in education to sophomore in Lower Division 

Melvin H, Wainer from sophomore to freshman in dairy husbandry 

Ernest E, Watkins from sophomore to junior in Liberal Arts 

James F, Williams from junior to senior in physical education 

Change of Name 



Change Solomon Bralow to Saul Philip Bralow, jr, 
Change Leroy M, Feigenbaum to Leroy M, King 



Wm. S, Hoffman 
Registrar 



H3HJ8VKD-S SAdV-IlD SSiH 



THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 



FACULTY 



Published weekly' on Tuesday during the College 
year as a means of making official announcements 
and presenting items of interest to the faculty. All 




BULLETIN 

contributions should be as brief as possible and reach 
Walter F. Dantzscher, Director of Public Information, 
105 Old Main, not later than 10 a.m. each Friday. 



VOL. 20 



February 25, 1941 



NO. 20 



PR I-J ST LEY LECTURES TO BE HELD NEXT' WEEK 1 



Dr. Detlev W, Bronk, professor of 
physiology and chairman of the Department 
of Physiology and Biophysics at Cornell 
University Medical College, New York 
City, will deliver the 15th annual scries 
of Priestley lectures here next Monday to 
Friday, March 3 to 7 inclusive. This se- 
ries will commemorate the 208th anniver- 
sary of the birth of Joseph Priestley. 



"The 

Act io 

le ctu 

Signi 

"Phys 

in Ne 

Excit 

gans, 

Synap 

trol 



This 

Physi 

n." 

res a 

f ican 
ical 
rve C 
at ion 

II u,j, h 

tic A 
of th 



year the general theme will be 
cal and Chemical Basis of Nerve 
The titles of the individual 
re: "The Biological and Social 
ce of the Nervous System," 
Structure and Chemical Events 
ells," "Physical and Chemical 

of the Nerve through S e nse Or- 
e Physico-chemical Nature of 
ction," and "The Nervous Con— 
e Organism." 



The lectures will begin at 7 p.m. 



each evening in room 119 New Physi/cs 
building. Complete duplicate copies of 
the lectures may be obtained at $1 per 
copy from Mr, Warren Stubblebine, Textile 
Chemistry building. 

Joseph Priestley's Northumberland 
home war, purchased in 1919 by the alumni 
of the Department of Chemistry, and a mu- 
seum was built nearby. In order to as- 
sure continuous and permanent maintenance 
of this memorial, the property has now 
been deeded to the College. 

The Priestley lectures were inaugu- 
rated in 1926 by the faculty of the De- 
partment of Chemistry, Since 1931 they, 
have been sponsored by the local chapter 
of Phi Lambda Upsilon, national honorary 
chemical fraternity, in co-operation with 
the department. The lectures each year 
deal with the borderline between physical 
chemistry and another branch of science. 
* * * 



OPEN MEETING OF A.A.U.P. TO BE HELD TOMORROW 



The American Association of Univer- 
sity Prof e snors will hold an open meeting 
tomorrovr, Wednesday, February 26, at 7:30 
p.m. in room 119 New Physics building. 
Group hospitalisation insurance for de- 
pendents of members of the College staff 
will be discussed. A report on the prog- 
ress of the questionnaires to date will 
be given by Dr. W. E, Butt and A, E, 



Wierman* Clue st ions from the floor will 
be answered. 

The problem of parking on the campus 
will also be discussed by Professor George 
R, Greent Comments from the floor will 
be welcomed. In addition, Professor J, Ti 
Law will give a report on the national 
convention of A,A,U*P* 



LE0TURE ON NUTRITIONAL PROBLEMS OF THE TROPICS TO BE GIVEN FRIDAY 



Dr, George R, Cowgill, professor of 
physiological chemistry and nutrition at 
Yale University, will deliver an illus- 
trated lecture on "Nutrition in Tropical 
America; Studies of Jungle Villages in 
Panama" this Friday, February 28, at 7:30 
p.m, in room 121 Sparks building, 

Dr , Cowgill has made special re- 
searches on the nutrition of inhabitants 
of jungle villages in relation to their 

* * 



health and resistance to tropical dis- 
eases. The lecturer is in charge of 
nutritional investigations at Yale, He 
is also editor of the Journal of Nutri- 
tion, a member of the Council on Foods 
of the American Medical Association, and 
a member of many other professional or— 
ganizati ons , 

The lecture is sponsored jointly by 
Sigma Xi and the School of Agriculture, 
t * * 



FIRST MEETING ON "WORLD RECONSTRUCTION" TO BE HELD TOMORROW 



The first of a series of meetings, 
sponsored "by the Fenn State Christian 
Association, on th<s topic "World Recon- 
struction" will be held tomorrow, Wednes- 



day, February 26, at 8 p, 



.171, 



in the Home 



Economics auditorium. Dr. John P. Selsam, 
associate professor of history, will speak 
on the subject "Is Permanent Peace Possi- 
ble?" The question will be open' for dis- 
cussion at the completion of the talk. 



COURSE IN FIRST AID AND CARE OF THE INJURED BEGINS MONDAY 



A' course in 
the injured will 
3, and. continue 
Known as the Ins 
it is sponsored 
Education. and At 
Health. Seryice, 
Service, in co-o 
can Nat ipnal,. Red 
are invite d . t o , e 
wh o n cw h o 1 d .. t h e 
dard Certificate 
sons qualified.t 
will le^,d to the 
structor's Certi 
fee is charge d, 
given. 



first aid and care of 
begin next Monday, March 
to Friday^ March 14, 
tructor's Training . Gour se , 
by the School of Physical 
hletics, the College ■>. 
and the Central Extension 
peration with the,.Ameri- 
Cross. Faculty members 
nroll. Open to persons 
American Red Cross Stan— 
and to other mature per— 
o.do the 'work, the course, 

American Red Cross -In— 
ficate for First Aid, No 
and no college credit is 



Thirty clock hours of instruction 
will be offered, and classes will meet 
from 7 to ,10 p,m, Monday through Friday . 
in room, 316 .Sparks building, Lecture.s-, 
demonstrations, and practice in emergency 



treatment, bandaging, transportation of 
the injured, artificial respiration, and 
ether similar sub je ct s' will be covered. 



Instructors will be 
cur, director of the Col 
ice; Mr.'Lcren Elder of ' 
chapter of the American 
Jack Hulme, instructor i 
tion'; and Mr, Robert G. 
representative of the Am 
Those who complete the c 
fully will be given an o 
■struct others who enroll 
Training Course which -op 



'Dri J, P. Riten- 
lege Health Serv- 
the State College 
Red Cro ss j Mr . 
n physical educa — 
Zubrod, field 
erican Red Cross, 
ourse success — 
pportunity to in— 

'in the Student's 
ens March 17, 



d in .enrolling 

and 



Any person intereste 
n the first course should communicate 
with the School of Phy 

'or with Dr 1 . u , r , 
f the All-College 
rir st Aia, Blanks are 1 now 
.registration in advance, 

* * . . 



Athletics 'or wit„ 

chairman 'of the All— College Committee on 
■ First Aid, B~ 



h Dr 1 . J. P. Ritenour, 
chairman of the All— College Committee , 

available for 



OF GENERAL. INTEREST 



Through the local chapter of the* . ■ 
American. .Association of University. Pro- 
fessors and Mr, ,S • K, Hostetter it has 
been arranged that faculty members may - 
file income- tax returns today, Tuesday, w 
February ,25, in room 305 Old Main,.,. 

, , * * , * * ,,**.. 

The ..Graduate School faculty w.i.ll • 
meet t,p.day,, Tuesday^ February 25, at 4. 
p.ra, in r,o,om .208 Buckhout Laboratory., ac- 
cording t.o' a,n official announcement -from 

Dean Frar\k Di. Kerni ■ • 

* *. * * * * , 



presented before a New York audience in 
1925i Mr, Lawrence E, Tucker, instructor 
in dramatics, has' rewritten the 'play for 
a Pennsylvania State College audience. 
S-.pecialty numbers will be given between 
the acts. ' Tickets will be on sale at 
Student Union next week at 50^ each, 
* * * * * * 

V 

Dr , Arthur C. ^ickenden, director 
of religious activities at Miami- Univer- 
sity, Oxford, Ohio^'wili' be' the chapel 
•.speaker this Sunday, Mar^ch 2. 



The School of Agriculture faculty- • 
will meet for the transaction of business, 
this Thursday, February 27, at 4:10 p„m, . 
in room 10.9 Agriculture building, .accord— » 
ing to. an ..official announcement from Dean 
S, W, Fletcher. .. There will al.so b,e. a . ., 
special meeting o-f this faculty this Fri- 
day, February. 2a,, at 4:10 p.m. in the 
same r.o-om«. President Hetzel plans to be. 
present at, .the. latter meeting to discus-s* 
with the st.acff .various aspects of the • », 
policies and program of the College, ., •• ■ -. 
,* * * * * * , . . 

. » r . 

The Benn .State Players will presen-fc" 
"The Street-s of New York" Friday and Sat- 
urday, March 7 and 8. The play wa-s- writ- 
ten as a melodrama of the 1860's and wa-s 



Six sports events' are scheduled for 
this week : • < «. 



8 :00 



7 aOO 

8 :00 



3 :30 

7 :O0 

8 :00 



Tuesday, February 25 

p.m. Basketball", with Mexico 

Thursday, February 27 - 

p.m. Wrestling with Michigan 
p.m. Basketball--' with Muhlenberg 

Saturday, Mar'ch 1 

p.m. Boxing with- Wi sconsin 
p.m. Wre st ling' with Army 
p.m. Basketball with Pittsburgh 
* * *.*. ' > - .» * 



STUDENTS DROPPED AT THE END OF THE FIRST SEMESTER 



At the , end of the first semester 
1940-41, 166. students were dropped for 
poor scholarship and under the fifty per 
cent rule. Their names are listed below. 
Those names preceded by an asterisk were 



dropped and reinstated. These preceded 
by two asterisks were dropped for poor 
scholarship. Where no asterisk is print- 
ed, the. student was dropped under the 
fifty per cent rule. 



School of Agriculture 

2 Atkins, Patricia, Pact 

1 Coryea, Jos, I., APCh 

2 Dai ley, Warren F,, For 

Ihlnti. R n h +. . ]_ . For 

For 



1 Dunn, Robt 

1 Eardley, Wm. J,, d 

2 Fly, Stanley M., Fcr 
Gillespie, Robt,, Foi 
Gordon, Fred M,, Ag 

' :r 
'APCh 



Gordon, Fred M,, Ag 

1 Guthrie, Jacob N,, A 
1 Haberchak, Michael, Fo3 
1 Harlacher, Eugene, APC1 

Hinkley, Harry 77., Ag 

1 Horvath, Chas,, Pact 

Kauffman, John R,, Ag 

1 Kessler, John D,, For 

1 McCarthy, Daniel L,, DH 
1 Millard, W, Scott, For 
1 Page, George S», Pact 
1 Phillips, Norman C,, For 
1 Ranck, Paul A,, Fcr 
1 Rankin, Warren M.., For 
1 Rathgeb, John F., . DH 
1 Smith, Charles P., DH 

Speyer, Moreland, Ag 

1 Stephan, John F,, For 
1 Trumbore, Jchn H«, For 
1 Whitehead, Charles, For 

1 Wilson, John, AH 

2 Wimmer, Warren R,, For 

School of Chemistry 
and Physics 

1 Arie, Pen, PM 

2 Avery, Lawrence P., ChE 

2 Barwin, Clarence J,, ChE 
1 Bickel, Robt. W., Ch 
1 Black, Chas. 0., Jr., PM 
1 Bosch, Frank X,, PM 

1 Braunegg, Carl R,, ChE 

2 Burdick, Samuel, Jr., ChE 
*1 Burkhard, Rita J., PM 

1 Ebersold, 77m. R,, Ch 

3 Eisenhuth, Harry A,, Ch 

2 Irvin, Donald E,, Sci 

3 Kent, Frederick EA, ChE 



*3 Krainik, Edward B,, CCh 

2 Erantz, John I., ChE 

3 Kudelko, Michael, ChE 

*1 Ledebur, Glenn, Jr., PM 
3 Lip sky, Henry I., Ch 
1 Mar old, Vincent J., Ch 
1 Meissonier, Henry J., PM 

1 Melt cher, Ira W., ChE 

*2 Moore, Clarence, Jr., Ch 

2 Mullaney, John P., Ch 

2 Pianka, Stanley J«, ChE 
*1 Price, Edward 



Ch 



3 Raughley, Robt. F., Ch 
2 Ricker, Robt. J., Ch 
1 Romano, Michael A., PM 
1 Roshay, Frank, ChE 
*2 Simpson, ' Norman £., ChE 



Schcol of Chemistry and 
Physic s ( cent j d ) 

1 Sloan, Robt, W. , ChE 

*2 Spahr, Nance L., PM 

1 Steel, Joseph .W., ChE 

1 Sullivan, James R., ChE 

*3 Wagner, James B., Ch 

*1 Weller, Elaine H., PM 

School of Education 

3 Alt emus, Ada, Ed 
*1 McCloskey, John L,, lEd 
*3 Magill, Marian, Hp.Ec 

1 Mertens, Mary G., HoEc 

School of Engineering 

2 Barbera, F. J,, CE 
**2 Beattie, C. H., ME 
**2 Bertram, A. T., ME 

1 Bishop, D. H., IS 
* *4 Caput o, W. G., EE 

*2 Chmielevski., S. J., IE- 

3 Ciccarelli, W. E., ME 

2 Davis, J. P., EE 

**2 Derrick, L. J., Jr., ME 

*3 Eisiminger, R. E*, ME 

1 Garofalo, Silvio, EE 

1 Gin din, E., LIE 

2 Gcdshall, H. E.y ME 
1 Green, J. R., IE 



School of Engineering 

[cent 1 d 

2 Straitiff, D. F., ME 

1 Sweet, R. L., ME 

*2 Terrizzi, C. C., ME 

1 Thomas, R. J,, ME 

1 Thompson, J. 77., EE 
■ 1 Vasilich, T. E., IE 
*2 Walter, R. K., EE 

S Ward, N. W., Arch 

2 Weaver, J. A,, ME 
**2 Weisbrod, R. M., ME 
**3 Wian, W. H., IE 

1 Zegarski, R. A., EE 

chool cf the Liberal Arts 



i., LD 

LD 



* *2 Greenwood, J* 



'•> 



IE 



IE 



ME 
ME 



f - - f — 

3 Greenwood, T, H.^ Jr., 

*.*3 Hall, J. J., ME , 

*2 Hand, A. 3., Jr., 

* *2 Hartswick, J. A., 

1 Hemphill, 77, A,, M_ 

**2 Hueston, 77. G., ME 

1 Hummel, R. E., IE 

**2 Johnson, Sten, ME 

1 Jones, John 77., IE 

3 Hreider, P* J., ME 

* *2 Krzywiokij J. P., M 

1 Licata, J. F., EE 

2 Loftus, 77. H«, ME 
*2 Long, C. P., EE 

1 McClellan, S. A., Jr., ME 1 Bessan, 

**3 McWilliams, 0. R., ME 



1 Ayre s, J . Li, 

1 Atwell, H. L, 

4 Elotzer, John 77., CF 

*1 Candy, G. E., LD 

1 Chervak, E. I., LD 

1 Clark, 77m. E., LD 

1 Farver, H. E«, LD 

2 Flock, Charles F., LD 
*1 Gi'bbs, Ailene M., LD 

2 Ham i 1 1 o n , 77m . R . ^ LD 

1 Hoy, Helen J., LD 

1 Knight, 77m. J., LD 

2 Law sen, V . J . , LD 

2 Ludwig, Chas. F., LD 

2 Musmanno^ S« A,, LD 

3 O'Brien, John^ Jr., LD 
2 Reichenbach, J. 77,, LD 
1 Ro senf eld, . M« Id., LD 
1 Scholl, 77* A., LD 
1 Singhouse, C, T., LD 

1 Snyder, P. N,, LD 

2 Steinmeyer, L. 77., LD 



4 Sucher, E. C, AL 

2 Tomlinson, R. 77,, LD 

2 Wescoat, Bill G., LD 

School of Mineral Industries 



2 Morn. C 
77, 



D., Jr . , 
3 Owen, W. H., IE 
1 Paes, P. F«, EE 
1 Patterson, R. S., 
2 .Rhodes , E. M., CE 



ME 



EE 



. 1 .Richey, J , B , 
! Roan, L. P., ] 



IE 



1 Robling, P., ME 

1 Ryan, J. B., ME 

**3 .Schneider, C. L., ME 
3 .Shutt, 77. E., IE 
.2 .Silver, S. R,, CE 

2 S ny de r , G . M . , Jr . , ' ME 
*1 Solornui. , D. A,, Arch 

2 Staub, II. E., ME 



1 Austin, R. C, Met 

3 Awdakimow, E, 77., Met 

G, 77., Met 

1 Deily,'R. P., Gecl 

3 Geddes,- P. E., PNG 

1 Heinemann, J. 77., Cer 

3 Jonesj A. L,, Met • 

1 Kane, J. H., -PNG 

1 Mere, J. A., Cer 

1 Newton, R. A., PNG 

3 Simpson, 77. 77., Met 

1 Smith, J. D., Mng 

2 Starr, A, P., Cer 

enters 
*0 Calderon, Raul, Ag, SC 
77m. S. Hoffman, Registrar 



OFFICIAL NOTICES FROM THE OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR 

Withdrawals 



1 Balega, John L;, ME, Feb* 4 

1 Barraclough, Harold, FT, Feb, 10 

2 Bertram, Alan I*, ME, Feb. 10 

1 Bessan, Theodore W,, Met, Feb, 3 

1 Bosch, Frank X,, PM, Feb, 3 

2 Bur dick, Samuel L,, Chi, Feb, 6 

2 Butterwick, James F,, DH, Feb, 5 

1 Chervak, Edward T., LD, Feb, 7 

2 Comly, Margaret R,, HoEc, Feb, 6 
S Corbin, Maxwell H», PEd, Feb, 6 

3 Davies, Paul L«, LArch, Feb, 11 

4 DeVore, Betty J,, HoEc, Dec, 5 
1 Dietterick, Dea A,, PM, Feb, 3 

1 Eberhart, Frank E., DH, Jan. 22 

3 Freyermuth, Russell D,, EE, Feb. 14 

2 Gorman, James F,, For, Feb, 5 

3 Holligan, Donald W,, For, Feb, 5 

3 Holligan, Yolanda K,, HoEc, Feb, 6 

The following reasons vrere given for 
withdrawal: 10 for financial reasons, 
3 because of illness, 11 were dropped for 
failures, 2 gave no reason, 1 because 



Knight, William J,, LD, Feb, 12 
Lange, Alfred J,, Ag, Feb, 5 
Ligo, Jack E,, Arch, Feb, 14 
London, Heal E,, AgEd, Jan, 31 
Mar old., Vincent J,, Ch, Feb, 6 
Means, Herbert 2,, ME, Feb, 8 
Me It cher, Ira W,, ChE, Feb, 6 
Motz, William R,, LD, Feb. 14 
Mowery, Asa G,, DH, Jan, 31 

Newill, Domer S., PM, Feb, 7 
Notareschi, Don Joseph, ChE, Feb. 3 
Page, George Stevens, HoEc, Feb. 7 
Sclan, Marvin M,, PM, 
Staub, Herman E,, ME, 
Steinbacher, John R,, 
Sullivan, William J., 
Weisbrod, Robert M,, 



Feb, 
Feb, 11 



LD, 



^eb, 7 



EE, SC, Dec 



Ze-garski, Ralph A 



• > 



ME, Feb, 4 
b. 4 



s e 



course is not offered, 2 to enter C,A,A 
training, 1 to go to national Guard Cam; 
1 to repeat work, 1 to go to another 
school, 2 to go to work, 2 for personal 
reasons. 



Change of Classification 

Change Joseph Bushek from freshman to sophomore in physical education. 
Change Jerald E, Ely from sophomore to junior in industrial education, 

Wm* S* Hoffman, Registrar 



I 



£ 4 ¥ «x q^ i ij sSsxioq 



■ 



U2VIUVUD ' V SAdVlD SSift 



THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 



FACULTY 

Published weekly on Tuesday during the College 
year as a means of making official announcements 
and presenting items of interest to the faculty. All 

VOL. 20 




March 4, 1941 



BULLETIN 

contributions should be as brief as possible and reach 
Waller F. Dantzscber, Director of Public Information, 
105 Old Main, not later than 10 a.m. each Friday. 

NO. 21 



MRS. HETZEL'S FUND FOR 



:rgencies aids 51 students 



During its first year of op- 
eration, Mrs. Hetzel's Fund for 
Emergencies was' used by 51 stu- 
dents.- However, the members of 
the committee are concerned lest 
some students in need have not 
known that the Emergency Commit- 
tee is functioning. 



For example, 
men students -have 
with clothes whehe 
shown. Therefore 
knowing of student 
clothing are reque 
these students let 
known at the of fie 
State Christian As 
Dean of Men, or th 
Any of these three 
also be glad to kn 
ing aval lable for 
dents. 



both men and wo- 
been furnished 
ver the need was 
faculty members 
s in need of 
sted to have 

the ir 'needs be 
es of the ' Fenn 
sociation, the 
e Dean of women* 

offices will 
ow of any cloth- 
transfer to stu-« 



Students who are experiencing 
a temporary financial emergency 



should be directed to Mr-. R. E. 
Clark, treasurer of the Fund, 

During the year which ended 
February 24, 194-1, a total of 
§62.2, 86 was contributed to the 
Fund by various organizations'.' 
Personal gifts-' totaled $308.03, 
which brought receipts from all 
sources to $930.89. 

By February 24,. 54 loans had 
been made to 51 students for a 
total of $394*26. Repayments 
amounted to '$318.26; unpaid loans 
totaled $76. Of the latter only 
one is past due. The cash on 
hand thus was $854*89, 

Loans have been used for the 
following emergencies; doctor 
bill, eye glasses, food, fare 
home $ commencement expense, job 
interview, material for clothes, 
personal items, room rent, medi- 
cal examination, and books* 



PROFESSOR STEVENSON TO SPEAK ABOUT FRANCE THIS EVENING 



Professor Donald D.- Steven- 
forestry research, will dis- 
" France After August, 1940" 
evening, Tuesday, March 4, 
p.m. in room 121 Sparks 
building 4 He will describe his 
experiences and will include some 



son, 
cuss 
this 
at 7 



observations on Southern France. 
Professor Stevenson spent the 
months from' August, 1940, to Feb- 
ruary, 1941, in reconstruction 
work in France with the American 
Friends Service Committee, under 
whose auspices he is presented. 



ATTENTION IS CALLED TO TIME OF PRIESTLEY LECTURES 



The attention of faculty mem- 
bers is called to the fact that 
the Priestley lectures this eve- 
ning, Wednesday, and Friday will 



begin at 7:30 instead of 7 p.m.. as 
announced in last week's Faculty 
Bulletin, Thursday's lecture will 
be given at 6:30 p.m. 



AMERICAN ARCHITECT TO LECTURE THIS THURSDAY 



t 

Antonin Raymond, architect of New . 
York City and New Hope, Pennsylvania, 
will give the third of the winter g«roup 
of Fine Arts lectures this Thursday, 
March 6, at 7:30 p.m. in room 110 Elec- 
trical Engineering building. His subjec 
will be "What Is a Modern Home?" Mr, 
Raymond comes to the campus under the 
auspices of the Department of Architec- 
ture and Scarab Fraternity. 

In 1920 the lecturer went to Japan 
with Frank Lloyd Wright tc work on the 
Imperial Hotel, Tokyo, Shortly there- 
after he began private practice in that 
■country and remained there for 15 years. 
About 1935 he returned to the United 
States, where he has been practicing 
steadily ever since. He is recognized 
as one cf America's leading exponents of 
a style of architecture in keeping with 
modern living. 



Co incident ally with Mr, Raymond's 
visit to the campus there will be an ex- 
hibition of his work during the first 
half of Mar-ch in the College Art Gallery, 
303 Main Engineering. The exhibition has 
been especially arranged for presentation 
at Penn State by one of Mr. Raymond's 
associates, Mr, Earl H, Strunk, an alum- 
nus cf the College, class of 193 9. Mr . 
Raymond will spend a few days on the cam- 
pus and will be available for informal 
discussion with students of the Depart- 
ment of Architecture, 

After the lecture Thursday, those 
who are interested will adjourn to the 
gallery, where Mr, Raymond will discuss 
his work and answer questions. The pub- 
lic is cordially invited to the lecture 
and the exhibition. The gallery will be 
open from 8:30 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. Monday 
through Friday, closing at noon Saturday, 



SSCOiTD DISCUSSION OF "WORLD RECONSTRUCTION" TO BE HELD THURSDAY 



The second in the series of discus- 
sions en world reconstruction entitled 
"After War — What?" will present Professor 
Charles S, Wyand, assistant professor of 
economics, in the Home Economics audi- 
torium this Thursday, March 6, at 8 p.m. 
Professor Wyand 's talk will be on "Eco- 
nomic Barriers to World Peace," and he 
will include a discussion of suggestions 
for overcoming such barriers. 



This series is being sponsored by 
the Penn State Christian Association, and 
other 1 topics which will be discussed on 
subsequent dates will be: social and 
psychological changes necessary for world 
peace, political structures proposed for 
world' organization, the function of edu- 
cation in establishing and maintaining 
world order, and the role of religion in 
world peace. 



LIBRARY TO BE DEDICATED MARCH 15 



The dedication of the new Library 
building will be held in the reserve book 
room at 2 p.m. Saturday, March 15, with 
President Ketzel presiding. 

Highlights of the program will be 
the presentation of the Pattee Library of 
American Literature and an address, "The 
Library in -the Land-Grant College or' 



University," by Phineas L. Windsor, di- 
rector emeritus of the Library and Li- 
brary School at the University cf Illi- 
nois 4 

An open house will be held follow- 
ing the ceremonies. All members of the 
faculty and interested persons are cor- 
dially invited to attend. 



lNK NOTE EXHIBIT CONTINUES UNTIL LARCH 



The bank note collection lent to the 
Library by Mr* John A, Muscalus cf Bridge- 
port, Pennsylvania^ will be on exhibit at 
the Library until Thursday, March 13 i The 
notes represent a good crass— sect ion of 
paper mousy issued by American banks, bus- 
iness houses, and cities., Some of ■ the 



notes are the only ones known to be in ex- 
istence, and therefore it is difficult to 
place a value on them* Others are re- 
deemable, since their banks are still in 
existence* Fractional notes (l0(^, 12-g-^, 
etc.) were issued during periods of finan- 
cial distress when coins were scarce. 



PHI BETA KAPPA TO MEET TOMORROW 



ONE SPORTS EVENT THIS WEEK 



The local chapter of Phi Beta Kappa 
will meet tomorrow, Wednesday, March 5, 
at 4:10 p.m. in room 318 Old Main, 
* * * * * * 



The only sports event this week will 
be fencing with Lehigh at 2 p.m. this 
Saturday, March 8, 



OF GENERAL INTEREST 

3 

The College Senate will meet this The Reverend W, 17, Van Kirk, seore- 
Ihursday, March 6, at 4:10 p.m., in room tary of the Federal Council of the Church— 
121 Sparks building, according to an of— es of Christ in America, New York City, 
fic'ial announcement from William S, hoff— will be the speaker, in chapel this Sun- 
man, secretary, day, March 9, 



* * 



DISMISSAL FOR POOR SCHOLARSHIP . 

Each semester the Registrar reports special student, leaving 193 students "who 

to the faculty through the Faculty Bui— were candidates for the bachelor's degree, 

letin the names of students dropped from in the following table these 193 students 

college for poor scholarship and under the are distributed according to class and 

fifty per cent rule. The names of those rank in high school graduating class. In 

so dropped at the end of the first sem.es— explanation of the table, of the 95 fresh- 

ter of the current year appeared in the men dropped, 16 were. in the first fifth 

Faculty Bulletin of February 25, Of a of their graduating class. This number 

total of 201 students dropped during and is 1 , 8/ of a total of 876 first fifth 

at the end of the semester, seven were freshmen enrolled last fall, 
two— year agriculture students and one a 

Seniors Juniors Sophomores 

7 13 
First 6 02 6 85 86 3 

Fifth 1,0/ 1.5/ 

2 8 20 
' Second 361 371 478 

..Fifth .6/ 2.2/ 4.2/ 

1 7 15 
Third 153 147 263 

Fifth , .7/ 4.8/ 5.7/ 

3 11 

Fourth 47 59 142 

Fifth 5.1/ 7.8/ 

9 

Fifth 18 24 83 

Fifth 10.8/ 

CO 2 

- ' Not 13 28 3 3 

Ranked ■ 6.1/ 

3 2 5 70 
Total 1194 1314 ie62 

, 3<fo 1 , 9/ 3 , 8/ 

The percentage of dismissals for the years, by rank in high school graduating 
first semester of each of the past four class, appears in the following table. 

Rank in High School 

Not 
Year 1/5 2/5 3/5 4/5 5/5 Ranked Tot.al 

3.8/ 7.1/ 6.3/ .3.2/ 2.2/ 

2.7/ 6.2/ 10.0/ 4.5/ 2.2/ 

5.2/ 6.1/ 9.7/ 5.5/ 2.5/ 

3.9/ 8.5/ 10.3/ 2.0/ 3.0/ 



Fre shmen 


T 


o t a 1 


16 

876 
1.8/ 


36 


3026 

1.2/ 


3 3 

518 
6.4/ 


63 


L728 

3.6/ 


9 

263 
3.4/ 


32 


826 
3.9/ 


22 . 
176 
12.5/ 


36 


424 
8 . 5/ 


15 

107 
14.0/ 


24 


232 
10 . 3/o 




25 


2 


99. 
2.0/ 


95 

196 5 

4.3/ 


193 


5335 



1937-38 


„9°< 

-'/O 


2 . \°/o 


1938-39 


A"' 
.-HyO 


2.4/ 


1939-40 


• C5/0 


3.4/ 


•1940-41 


J- . C/o 


3.6/ 


Four— Year 






Total 


.9/ 


2 . 9/ 



3.9/ 7.0/ 9.1/ 4.0/ 2.6/ 

Mary "Virginia Brown 
Office of the Registrar 



4 



OFFICIAL NOTICES FROM THE OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR 

Withdrawals 



S Anstead, Russell C,, AgEd, Feb. 

G Cairns, Elinor, PEd, Feb. 11 

Dor-wart, Albert L # , Ag, Feb. 5 

1 Fenicchia, William J., Ch, Feb. 

2 Fly, Stanley M., LD, Feb. 19 

3 Hall, Jack J., ME, Feb. 3 



19 



2 Johnson, Sten, ME , Feb. 3 

3 Johnston, Argyle L., lEd, Feb. 20 

The following reasons were given for 
withdrawing : 4 to gc to work, 1 because 
of illness, 6 because of poor scholar— 

Change of 



Korbich, Leon 
Kunz, Alvin E . 



10 



'., CS, Feb. 
i, axviH ^ • , Feb, 21 
Marsilio, Joseph V», PM, Feb. 14 
Phillips, Cecile (Mrs.), Ed, Feb. 17 
Sucher, Edward C., J, Feb. 5 
Towers, Curtis L,, Tor, Feb, 8 
'^enrich, Helen L,, (Mrs,), Ed, Feb, 



17 



ship, 2 because of financial difficul- 
ties, 1 to leave State College, 1 gave 
no reason. 

Curriculum 



Change Eugene W. Lederer from junior in music education to junior in education. 
Additional Students Dropped Under the Fifty Per Cent Rule 



The following names should be added 
to the list of those who were dropped un- 
der the" fifty per cent rule at the end of 



-Undergraduate Centers 



►Bonner, Miles B., HC , PM 
Brady, Joseph H,, AC, LD 
Breuninger, Elizabeth W., DC, 
Canberg, William G., AC, LD 
Delozier, Jay L,, AC, EE 
Diilman, Wilbsrt M., DC, LD 
'.. Irney, Lawrence, DC, Met 
Fuj rer, Eugene E»> AG, LD 

'• Danders, David E., DC, PNG 
i-oucks, William, DC, AgEd 

-': ..oBurney, Elizabeth A,, AC, 
Mu.lhollen, Sarah E. , AC, PM 
Crner, Mar fin Van, AC, IEd 

■Fool, Daniel H., AC, Cer 
"Khoad'es, Karl A,, SC, LD 



LD 



Bact 



■/ell 



i 



George G., 
herry, Raymond R., 
; oiida, Emil J., HC , PM 



C. LD 



HC. Geol 



The notice appearing in the February 
2S> issue .of the Faculty Bulletin, drop- 
ping John W, Blotzer, a senior in C&F, 



the first semester 1940-41. Those names 
preceded by an aster isle were reinstated 
for the second semester. 

Centers (cont'd) 



2 Sukowski, Daniel, HC , LD 
1 *Vespa, Amelia C., AC, LD 
1 Wagner, Marion L., HC , LD 
Wagner, Robert Ci', HC, LD 



*Watkins, Thomas R., AC, PNG 
Weidley, John E., AC, S • 

School of the Liberal Arts 



3 * O'Brien, John F., Jr., CF 

1 *3choll, William A., LD 

School of Physical Education 

2 Cresswell, Robert W,, PEd 
1 Eppright, William, PEd 

1 Xraynack, Joseph L,, PEd 

2 Worthley, Florence, PEd 

under the fifty per cent ,rule^ should be 
cancelled, 

Wmi S. Hoffman, Registrar 



■■■,.-. ustj^js 



H3HMYH0** SAavii ssm 



THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 



FACULTY 

Published weekly on Tuesday during the College 
year as a means of making official announcements 
and presenting items of interest to the faculty. All 

VOL. 20 




^arch 11, 1941 



BULLETIN 

contributions should be as brief as possible and reach 
Walter F. Dantzscher, Director of Public Information, 
105 Old Main, not later than 10 a.m. each Friday. 



NO 



zz 



ENGINEERING OPEN HOUSE TO BE HELD THIS SATURDAY 



The annual Engineering Open House 
will be held this Saturday, March 15, 
from 2 to 10 p.m., according to an an- 
nouncement from Dean II. P, Hammond. On 
this occasion the new Electrical Engi- 
neering building will also be open for 
the first time, in full operating condi- 
tion, for inspection by members of the 
faculty, who are cordially invited to 
visit the building. 

Since the Library is to be dedicated 
on the same day, and since the dedication 



ceremonies are scheduled from 2 to 3:30 
p.m., it is hoped that members of the 
faculty will visit the Electrical Engi- 
neering building at some time during the 
afternoon or evening after the Library 
dedication and inspection. Special 
groups of ushers will be on hand to es- 
cort visitors through the building. 

It is suggested that faculty members 
call at Professor Einsloe's office, 105 



Electrical Engineering, where guide 
be stationed. 
* * * * ' 



will 



rRE ON "CAKOUFLAGE" T BE GIVEN NEXT TUESDAY - 



A lecture on "Camouflage" by Captain 
Peter Rodyenko will be given next Tues- 
day, March 18, at 7:30 p.m. in room 121 
Sparks building. 

Captain Rodyenko, camouflage reserve 
officer for the first Army maneuvers at 
Piatt sburg, has been engaged in camou- 
flage research for the past 16 years and 
is consultant to the War Department Engi- 
neering Board. He is also consulted by 
the British and Canadian army on camou- 
flage problems. He is the author of many 

* * 



articles on the subject in military jour- 
nals as well as cf the four— page article 
•■on camouflage recently published in Life 
magazine. Captain Rodyenko has a large 
number of kedachrome slides which he will 
use to illustrate his lecture on this 
phase of defense. - 

The lecture^ sponsored by the Land- 
scape Architectural Club in collaboration 
with the Society of American Military 
Engineers, is open to all who may be in- 
terested. 
* * * * 



NATIONAL COLLEGIATE. BOXING TOURNAMENT TO BE HELD MARCH 27-29 



The National Collegiate Boxing Tour- 
nament will be held here Thursday, Fri- 
day, and Saturday, 'March 27, 28, and 29, 
The ticket sale will start at 8 a.m. 
Monday, March 24, at the Athletic Asso- 
ciation ticket windows in Old Main. Gen- 
eral admission tickets will be sold at 
the same time in order to facilitate the 
handling of crowds at Recreation building, 



General admission for the prelimi 
naries on March 27 at 2:30 and 8 p 
be 55<fi including tax. Bleachers f 
semi-finals en March 2 8 at 8 p.m 



75(z! including tax. 

1 including ta 



Reserved, seats 

balcony will be $1,10 in 

•Bleachers for the finals on March 

p.m, will be 85^ including tax. R 

balcony seats will be $1.10* 
it * * * 



•m, will 
or the 
w ill be 
on the 



29 at 8 
e serve d 



THIRD DISCUSSION ON "WORLD RECONSTRUCTION" TO BE HELD TH 



EVENING 



The third discussion on "World Re- 
construction" sponsored by the P.S.C.A. 
will be held this evening, Tuesday, March 
11, at 8:15 p.m. in the Home Economics 
auditorium. The subject of the entire 
series is "After War — What?" This dis- 
cussion will be on "Psychological and 

* * 



Social Adjustments for World Peace." . Par- 
ticipants will be Dr , C, R, Adams, in- 
structor in education and psychology; Dr , 
C, R, Carpenter, associate professor of 
psychology; and Dr , S, W. Russell, in- 
structor in sociology. Abstracts of pre- 
vious discussions are available. 
* * * * 



ADVISORY- COMMITTEE ESTABLISH! 



TO AID CONSCIENTIOUS OBJECTORS 



An advisory committee for students 
who have conscientious objections to mil- 
itary training has been established by 
the Student Religious Workers' Council, 
according to Miss lone Sikes, president. 
Persons on the committee have been se- 
lected because they believe in the need 
for sympathy and justice in the cases of 



conscientious objectors and have resources 

for counseling. Members of the committee 
include Rabbi Benjamin Eahn, Dr » John Fer- 
guson, Mr, A. 0. Morse, Rev. C. Gail Ncr- 
ris, and Mr. D. N, Linegar. Any member 
of this committee is available for coun- 
seling at any time upon appointment. 



OF GENERAL INTEREST 



The local chapter of A.A.U.W, will 
meet this Thursday, March 13, at 7:45 
p.m. in room 110 Heme Economics building. 
The subject for the panel discussion will 
be "It's Your Problem, Too," Colonel 
Ardery, E, L. Keller, and B* R. Gardner 
will participate, 

* * * * * » 



Behavior; Its Significance for the Under- 
standing of Human Behavior." 

* * * * * * 

The chapel speaker this Sunday, March 
16, will be Dr. Louis H. Evans, of the 
Third Presbyterian Church, Pittsburgh, 

* * * * * * 



Dr 4 Ci R, Carpenter, of the Depart- 
ment of Education and Psychology, will 
give the fifth Liberal Arts lecture of 
the current series Thursday, March 20, 
at 7:30 p.m, in room 10 Sparks building. 
His subject will be "Non-Human Primate 



The College Co— op Society wishes to 
purchase living-room furniture. If fac- 
ulty members have such furniture which 
they care to sell, they are requested to 
notify the society, located at 244 East 
Nit t any Avenue, 



UNDERGRADUATE ENROLLMENT IN PENNSYLVANIA COLLEGES 



From time to tine the Faculty Bulle- 
tin has published studies concerning the 
position of The Pennsylvania State Col- 
lege, according to size, among the educa- 
tional institutions of the country. 
These figures are invariably based on 
total enrollment. That The Pennsylvania 
State College has one of the larger col- 
leges insofar as enrollment of candidates 

Temple University 12,520 

The University of Pennsylvania 16,894 



for the bachelor's degree is concerned is 
frequently overlooked. In Pennsylvania 
three institutions report residence en- 
rollment in excess of that for The Penn- 
sylvania State College, For instance, in 
1939-1940 the following total residence 
enrollments are reported, according to 
figures published in the catalogues of 
the institutions concerned: 



The University of Pittsburgh 
The Pennsylvania State College 



12,920 
10,066 



for which figures were not available. One 
indication of the size of the undergrad- 
uate student body may be had by looking 
at the size of the freshman class. This 
year, according to letters received from 
the officers of admission of five Penn- 
sylvania institutions, the following 
freshman enrollments were reported: 



This, insofar as total enrollment is con- 
cerned, places The Pennsylvania State 
College in fourth position in the state. 

In all attempts to discover the num- 
ber of candidates for the bachelor's de- 
gree for these four institutions, we have 
invariably found at least one institution 

Name of the Institution 

Carnegie Institute of Technology 

Lehigh University 

Temple University 

The University of Pennsylvania 

The University of Pittsburgh 

The Pennsylvania State College 

Freshman enrollments at the Univer- 
sity of Pennsylvania and Temple Univer- 
sity combined or at the University of 
Pittsburgh and the Carnegie Institute of 
Technology combined are less than the 
total freshman enrollment at The Pennsyl- 
vania State College. Another indication 
of undergraduate enrollment is the number 

Temple University 650 The University of Pittsburgh 994; Penn State 1316 

Wm. S, Hoffman, Registrar 



Main Campus 

653 

450 

900 
1042 
1100 
16 61 



Junior College 



160 
304 



Total 

65 3 

450 

900 

1042 

1260 

1965 



of bachelor's degrees conferred. Although 
figures are not available for all of the 
four larger institutions they are avail- 
able for three. According to the figures 
published in the Journal of the American 
Association of Collegiate Registrars, 
bachelors* degrees conferred for the past 
academic year were as follows: 



TABULATION OF STUDENTS ♦. ANSWERS TO GlUESTIONS CONCERNING THEIR 
RETURNING TO COLLEGE FOR THE FIRST SEMESTER 1941-42 



3 



SENIOR 



JUNIOR 



;OPEOi.:ORE 



F RES K.IAN 



Yes No . Un.de c Yes No Undec Yes No Undec Yes No Undec 



Tota.l 



AGRICULTURE " " . ' 

ABCh 2 8 4 2 3 

AgEc" 6 1 8 

AgEd 1 31 5 42 

AgEng 14 1 11 

Agro 2 9 1 13 

AH 1 10 2 10 

Bact 15 1 7 
; Bot 1 

DH 3' 24 1 27 

For 2 60 8 55 

Hart 2 7 1 15 

LArc'h. 15 1 12 

PH ' 1 16 8 

PV* • 2 
ZE 11 

TOTAL 17 187 26 234 



12 



1 
11 



27 




1 


12 






44 




2 


10 




1 


15 




1 


9 






6 


1 




1 






33 




1 


61 


1 


7 


9 




2 


3 






4 






20 


2 




3 






2 57 


4 


15 



27 

12 

28 

g 

15 
11 
12 
2 
23 

13 
2 

8 
13 

a 
O 

183 



95 
40 

156 
39 
57 
44 
35 
4 

120 

199 
49 
25 
39 
40 
14 

956 



CHEMISTRY- AND PHYSICS 



Chem 


1 


16 


5 


ChEng 


1 


31 


6 


ComChem 


1 


14 


3 


Phys 


1 


6 




Pre Med 




20 


4 


Sci 


1 


3 


3 


TOTAL 


5 


90 


21 


EDUCATION 








Ed- ' 


10 


52 


19 


HE 


5 


66 


14 


IndEd 


2 


16 


2 


MusEd 


1 


10 


2 


Nat Ed 




1 




Psy 


1 


8 


1 


TOTAL 


19 


153 


38 



17 




3 


49 




1 


8 


1 




3 






28 


2 


1 


12 




1 


117 


3 


6 



98 


3 


9 


134 




6 


16 


3 


1 


15 






6 






9 




1 


278 


6 


17 



25 




2 


65 




2 


1 






4 






34 


4 


1 


3 






132 


4 


5 



115 

14 



129 



44 




2 


89 


3 


2 


9 






28 


1 


1 


2 






172 


4 


5 



115 

249 
28 
23 

124 
25 

564 









191 


127 




5 


483 


12 


1 


1 


70 

28 

7 

20 


139 


3 


6 


799 



ENGINEERING 



AE 

Arch 

CE 

EE 

EChE 

IE 

ME 

SE 

TOTAL 





8 


2 


1 


5 


1 


3 


9 


4 


3 


39 
2 


11 


c 


23 


11 




50 


15 



9 136 



44 



4 




2 


6 






14 




1 


58 


2 


2 


3 






44 


4 


A 


73 


1 


5 


02 


7 


14 



g 


1 




19 


1 


3 


46 


1 


4 


7 






51 


2 


1 


91 


2 


4 



228 



12 



7 






4 




1 


33 




4 


50 


1 


6 


2 




1 


33 




1 


119 


2 


4 


248 


3 


17 



28 

28 

91 

223 

15 
176 
366 

927 



LIBERAL ARTS 



AL 


8 


110 


27 


CF 


13 


88 


17 


Jour 


2 


29 


.19 


LD 








TOTAL 


23 


227 


54 


MINERAL INDUSTRIES 




Cer 




4 


1 


FT " 




6 




Geol 




1 


2 


Met 


1 


27 


3 


Mng 


1 


6 




PNG 




10 


2 


TOTAL 


2 


54 


8 



126 


6 


9 


104 


2 


10 


38 




3 



8 


1 


9 


1 


2 




34 


1 


11 




10 




74 


3 



22 



460 14 
460 .14 



16 
16 



378 
378 



286 

234 

82 

900 

1502 



16 




1 


20 






51 


8 




1 


16 






41 


4 






6 






15 


30 


1 




36 


1 


4 


138 


16 




1 


17 




2 


54 


12 






15 






49 


86 


1 


3 


110 


1 


6 


348 



SENIOR 



JUNIOR 



i OP H Oil ORE 



FRESHMAN 



Yes No Undec Yes No Undec Yes No Undec Yes No Undec Total 
PEYS IC AL EDUCAT I ON 

3 42 2 3 57 4 187 

1 16 3 2 17 2 48 



PhysEd 2 


30 


5 


39 




TRANSITION 


1 




5 


1 


GRAND TOTAL 










77 


878 


196 


1217 


40 



74 1350 38 64 
YES NO UNDEC 



1304 22 71 



5331 



SPECIAL 


55 31 


36 




GRADUATES 


235 162 


88 




TITO-YEAR 


77 42 


9 


TOTAL STUDENTS 




* * 




* * 



122 
485 
128 

6066 



OFFICIAL NOTICES FROM THE OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR ■ 



Withdrawals 



2 Beattie, Charles H., LIE, Feh. 3 

2 Bowman, Calvin 3., LD, Deo, 21 

2 Burkhart, Francis R,, , For, Jan, 28 

2 Bushek, Joseph J „ , PEd, Feb. 17 

1 Cohn, Gloria R'. , LD, Jan. 22 

1 Hard castle, Henry H., IE, Feb. 5 

2 Hood, Everett L , LD, Dec. 20 

2 Krzywioki, John P., ME, Feb. 3 

Lippincctt, l ',m, F», Ag, Jan 29 

The following reasons were given for 
withdrawing: 2 because of scholastic 



McClatchey, Edward L,, Baa 
Magill, Marian G., KoEc, : 
Mayne , Jack A., For, Feb, 



Fact, Dec 



c i.iayne, jacK a., xor, a e d . ca 

1 Newton, R. A., PNG, Feb. 5 

3 01 she f ski, Leonard I., Ed, Feb. 2 

1 Patterson, Roswell 3., EE., Jan. 2 

2 Sykes, James L,, LD, Feb. 14 



eb. 21 
18 

Feb. 23 



21 



-J w ju u .la -^ a. v"? ai- ju • j_:^wj.a.<r.i.a.\.L _l # • £j U i x'OU 

1 Patterson, Roswell 3., EE., Jan 

2 Sykes, James L., LD, Feb. 14 
2 witmer., Calvin M. , LD, March 1 



diffi< 



because of automobile ac- 



cident, 4 because of financial difficul— 

Notice of Drop and Reinstatement 



ties, 2 to go to another school, 2 be- 
cause of ill health, 2 because of per- 
sonal reasons, 1 on the advice of his 
dean, 2 to go to* work, 1 gave no reason, 



Harry A. Maloney, sophomore in me- 
chanical engineering, was dropped from 
the School of Engineering under the fifty 



per cent rule at the end of the first se- 
mester. He has been reinstated in the 
Transition Section for the second semester. 



Change of Classification 

Change Ralph R, Cupelli from junior in Liberal Arts to sophomore in Lower Division, 
Change John R, Dewender from sophomore in' ceramics to freshman in ceramics. 
Change Margaret Hollis from junior in education to sophomore in Lower Division, 

?fffi. S. Hoffman, Registrar 
* * * * * * 



CLEVELAND ORCHESTRA TIC LETS STILL AVAILABLE 



A limited number of single seats for 
the Cleveland Orchestra concert next Mon— 

* * 



day, March 17, are still available at 
$2,25 each. 



• ] 






H3HNVH0*S SAdYlS SSIW 



THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 



FACULTY 

weekly on Tuesday during the College 
means of making official announcements 




Published 
year as a 
and presenting items of interest to the faculty. All 

V0L 20 March 18, 194-1 



BULLETIN 

contributions should be as brief as possible and reach 
Walter F. Dantzscher, Director of Public Information, 
105 Old Main, not later than 10 a.m. each Friday. 



NO 



23 



FOURTH DISCUSSION ON WORLD RECONSTRUCTION TO BR HELD TONIGHT 



The fourth discussion on 
"World Reconstruction," sponsored" 
by the P.S.C.A. , ' wi 1 1 be held this 
evening, Tuesday, March 18, at 
8s 15 p.m. in the Home Economics 
auditorium. The subject, "Basis 
for a Constructive Peace," will' be 
discussed by Dr. Ernst W. Meyer, 
former first secretary of the 
German Embassy in Washington. 

Dr. Meyer, born in German 
Silesia, studied lav/ and economics 
at the Universities of Breslau and 
Strassburg and received the degree 
of Doctor of Lav/ and Economics in 



1914 



H( 



"ought through the World 



War on both eastern and western 
fronts. After' a brief period" of 
practicing law, he began his "ca- 
reer in the diplomatic service. 



As representative of the Ger- 
man Foreign Office, lie served as 
legation counsellor in Athens and 



Eelg 

Cent 

and 

Berl 

1926 

un t i 

ret a 

Wash 

of f e 

his 

dipl 

coul 

fore 

the 



aveled throughout 

Turkey, Egypt, 
st. Recalled to 
he spent the years from" 
From that date 



rade and tr 
ral Europe, 
the Near Ea 



n 



-1931' there 



1 May, 1937, he was first sec- 



ry of the G 
ington. On 
red, on his 
resignation 
omatic serv 
d not agree 
i gn or dome 
Third Reich 



crman Embassy in 
May 1, 1937*, he 
own initiative, 
from the German 

ice because he 
with either the 

st ic pol ici es of 



the 
lect 
t i on 
and 
will 
in e 
and 
fore 
d i t i 



D 
fa 
ur 

in 

d 

st 

9 i 
es 

on 



r, Meyer is now a member of ' 
culty of Bucknell University, 
ing on international ' re la-' 

modern state phi losof hies, 
ternational economics. He 
Iscuss the work to be done 
ablishing a lasting peace 
ve his analysis of the 

that are shaping the con- 
s of the problem. 



SECOND ANNUAL MARIE CURIE LECTURE TO BE GIVEN TOMORROW 



Dr; Louise Kellcy of Gouchcr 
College, Baltimore, will deliver 
the second annual Marie Curie lec- 
ture tomorrow, Wednesday, March 
19, at 8 p.m. in' room 119 New 
Physics building. Her subject 
v/ill be "A Chemist at Large." 

The Mar'ie Curie lectures wore 
inaugurated in May, 1940, by Pal- 
ladium chapter of Iota Sigma Pi, 
national honor society for women 
in chemistry, as a memorial to 



Madam Curie, an honorary member of 
the society. These semi -popular 
lectures arc to be given each year 
by some outstanding woman chemist. 

Dr. Kclley, professor of chem- 
istry at Gouchcr College, is the 
co-author- of a textbook on organic 
chemistry, with G. Albert Hill. 
In addition, she is assistant edi- 
tor of Chemi cal _ and of the 
Journal of Rhys ical Chemi stry . 



FIFTH LIBERAL ARTS LECTURE TO BE GIVEN THURSDAY 



The fifth Liberal Arts lec- 
ture of the current series will ' 
be given this Thursday, March "20, 
at 7:30 p.m. in room 10 Sparks 
building, when Dr. C. R. Carpenter 
will discuss "Non-Human Primate 
Behavior; Its Significance for the 
Understanding of Human Behavior," 
Dr. Carpenter has studied the 



gibbon, smallest of the anthropoid 
apes, in Si am, where he was in 
charge of the Behavior Research 
Division of the Asiatic Primate 
Expedition, and more recently in 
Puerto Rico. In all, he has been 
investigating the behavior of 
apes and monkeys for nearly 10 
years . 



OF GENERAL INTEREST 



Copies of the complete notes 
of the Priestley lectures on "The 
Physical and Chemical Basis of 
Nerve Action" are available at 
50^ each from Warren Stubblebine, 
104 Textile Chemistry building* 
The lectures were delivered March 
3 to 7 by Dr. Detlev W, Bronk of 
Cornell University Medical Col- 
lege, New York, 



Faculty members are reminded 
that tickets for the National Col- 
legiate Boxing Tournament will go 
on sale next Monday, March 24, at 
8 a.m. in the' Athletic Association 
ticket office, Old Main, General 
admission tickets will be sold at 
the same time. 

General admi ssi on' f or the 
preliminaries Thursday, March 27, 



will b 

ers for the semi 



55(z( including tax. 



Blcach- 



■finals Friday, 



March 28, will be 75^ J balcony re- 
served scats, $1.10. Bleachers 
for the finals Saturday, March 29, 
will bc'85(zfj reserved seats on the 

balcony,, SI, 10. 



Faculty members who are in- ' 
terested'in seeing student' boners, 
blunders, and wit published' in 
P o r t f o 1 i o arc requested to turn 
In their contributions to. Student 
Union as soon as possible. 



Dr. Bliss Forbush, executive 
secretary of the Baltimore Yearly 
Meeting of Friends, will be the 
chapel speaker this Sunday, March 
23 . 



NEW LIBRARY REGULATION IN 



PL 



CT 



Owing to increased restric- 
tions on the part cf lending li- 
braries the following regulation 
was placed in effect at the Penn- 
sylvania State College Library on 
January 1, 1941, relative to bor- 
rowing books from other libraries; 

Interlibrary loans for the 
use of graduate students and fac- 
ulty members must be used in the 
Library building or in the depart- 
ment library which serves the 
School with which the borrower 
is connected. This ruling is in 



accord with the practice pre- 
scribed by many individual lending 
libraries and within the code of 
interlibrary loan practice set up 
by the American Library Associa- 
tion, As one library states, 
"When a library sends books on 
interlibrary loan, it is expected 
that they shall be used where they 
will be immediately ava liable for 
return, if needed by the lending 
library. They should be at all 
times under the direct supervision 
of the borrowing library." 



58 STUDENTS IN TRANSITION SECTION 



The following students arc in 
the Transition Section for the 
second semester of the year 1940- 
1941, Avll grades for the men stu- 
dents, including mid-semester 



below grades, should be sent to 
the office of the Dean of Lien. 
Grades for the v/omen students 
should be sent to the. office of 
the Dean of V/omen • 



Men 



Best, Paul Wharton 
Bordo, " Louis John 
Brandt, John Henry, Jr. 
Bull, Wi 1 1 iam Meredith 

Butchko, Thomas Joseph 
Candy, Ouyer Edward 
Chmielevski, Stanley Joseph 
Cimino, John Barton 
Colgan, Robert Joseph, Jr. 
Devlin, Christopher James 
Dimidio, Daniel 
Framm, Harold . 
Frketich, Leonard Lawrence 
Hand, Arthur Sturdevant, Jr. 
Hart, Thomas Menees, III 
Holden, Thomas Pollard, Jr. 
Ho r ow i 1 2 , S eymo ur I r v i ng ' 
Horvath, Charles Franklin 

Hovanec, Albert Louis 

Kabul ish, Robert Edwin 
Kane, Joseph Harvey 
Kilker, James Daniel 
Kratzer, Donald Arthur 
Ledebur, Glenn A.lvin,' Jr. 
Leidy, David Louis 



Lenox, William Clarence 
Lewi s, Julian Ira 
Maderick, Michael George 
Maloney, Harry Augustus, Jr. 
Mastandrea, Nick 
McCloskey, John Leo 
McConnell, Thomas Patterson 
McFadden, Charles Augustine 
Meehan, Thomas Patrick, Jr. 
Moore, Clarence Philip, Jr. 
Murfit, Wallace Gi Iky son, Jr. 

"Myers, Harry Calhoun 
Pifer,'Earl George 
Que r ry, - Merle Vernon" 

' Ran ieri ,' Nicholas Peter 
Richards, Luther Warren 
Solomon, David Arnold 
Surkalo, ' Michael Ivan 
Terrizzi, Charles Carmello 
Thomas, John Brown 
Walker, Hugh James" 
'Waschler, Albert Louis 
W i an, ' Wi 1 1 iam Harrison , 
Wolfe/ Hiram Michael, III 



omen 



Rita Burkhard 
Phyllis Daily 
Olive Kalar 



Ernestine Nixon 
Lenore Ostroski 
Nance Spahr 



June Steinfurth 
Genevra Stone 
Elaine We Her 



4 







H3HKVH0*H 5AQV7D SSIN 



THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 



FACULTY 

Published weekly on Tuesday during the College 
year as a means of making official announcements 
and presenting items of interest to the faculty. All 

VOL. 20 




<^2^'" 



;arcn 



1941 



BULLETIN 

contributions should be as brief as possible and reach 
Walter F. Dantzscher, Director of Public Information, 
105 Old Main, not later than 10 a.m. each Friday. 

24 
NO. 



COURSE IN PHYSICAL : 

The School of Physical Educa- 
tion and Athletics will offer a. 
seven-week "Course in Physical ' 
Fitness" beginning next Tuesday, 
April 1, and continuing until 
Friday, May 23. 

The purpose of the course is 
to improve the physical fitness of 
students and others who may be 
drafted, so that their first army 
training may be less difficult. 

The course will include' a 
thorough medical examination, 
games and recreation, body build- 
ing and calisthenics, boxing and 
wrest 1 ing, ' hiking, camping, mili- 
tary drillji first aid lectures, 
and lectures in the care of mili- 
tary equipment. Army handbooks 
v/ill be used as guides. 



ITNESS 


TO 


BE OF 


FERED 




Stu 


dents 


, f ac 


towns 


.people i 


n t e r e 


ing are 


reque 


sted 


Student 


Un i on 


at a 


next 


Tuesday, 


Apr i 


of cl 


ass 


es wi 


11 be 


sui t 


the 


v; i s h 


es of 


However, 


the 


cl ass 


evenings 


each 


week 


will 


be 


made 


for t 


free 


loc 


k e r s 


and t 


ti on 


bui 


1 ding 


will 


everj 


r one 


in the gr 



ulty members, or 
sted in enrol 1- 
to reg i ster at 
ny time before 
1 1. The time 
arranged to 
the group. 
will meet three 
. No charge 
he course, and 
owe Is in Re crea- 
te provided for 
oup. 



The committee in charge is 
composed of Glenn Thiel, chairman; 
Eugen Bischoffj Charles Speidelj 
and Dr. Lloyd M* Jones. Lieuten- 
ant Prosser represents the Depart- 
ment' of Military "Science and Tac- 
tics, which is co-operating in the 



project* 



P.S.C.A, TO HOLD ANNEAL DINNER 



:ting 



The annual dinner meeting of 
the Penn State Christian Associa- 
tion 'v/ill be held next Monday eve- 
ning, March 31, from 5:30 to 8 
p.m. in the Sandwich Shop. Dr. 
Frederick 3. Igler, director of 
Baptist Student Work and secretary 
of the University of Pennsylvania 



Christian A.ssoci at i on, will he the 
speaker. Persons unable to attend 
the dinner may come at 6:45 p.m. 
to participate in the meeting and 
to hear Dr. Igler speak. Tickets 
for the dinner are 50^ and may be 
secured at the Christian Associa- 
tion office, 304 Old Main. 



FACULTIES TO MEET 



The faculty of the School of 
the Liberal Arts will meet today, 
Tuesday, March 25, at 4:10 p.m. in 
room 121 Sparks building, accord- 
ing to an of f i cial ' .announce merit 
from Dean Stoddart. 



The faculty of the School of' 
Agriculture will meet this Friday, 
March 28, at 4:10 p.m* in room 109 
Agriculture building, according to 
an official announcement from Dean 
Fletcher, 



BENEFIT MOVIE FOR GREEK V7AR RELIEF TO EE HELD FRIDAY 

A benefit movie for Greek War benefit performance. This is a 
Relief will be held this .Friday, national effort of the motion pic- 
March 28, at 11:30 p.m. ""'Admission ture industry to raise one million 
will be 40jz?, and all money wi 1 1 'Abe dollars for Greek relief. Dr. 
used for relief. Theatre employ- R. E. Dertgler, local chairman, 
ees are donating their services, calls attention to the fact that 
and the company is providing the tickets will be available at the 
picture. No tax is required cna end of the week at the Cathaum. 

-:;--;:- -;:--"- ' -;;--;;- 

GROUP HOSPITALIZATION FOR DEPENDENTS DEFEATED 

The plan for extending the submitted to faculty and staff 

benefits of group hospitalization members, 360 did not count either 

to dependents, which was proposed way; 255 were in favor of the 

by the American Association of plan; a total of 231 were opposed 

University Professors, has been to it for one reason or another, 

defeated, according to an announce- This was very far short of the 75 

merit from Professor J. T. Law. Of per cent required for adoption of 

the returns from the questionnaire the project. 



OF GENERAL INTEREST 

Dr. Roswell F, Barnes, as so- sports event ...on the calendar this 

ciate secretary of the Federal week. The preliminaries will be 

Council of Churches of' Christ in held Thursday, March 27, at 2:30 

America, New York City, will be and S p.m., price 55^; the semi- 

the chapel speaker this Sunday, finals Friday) March 28, at 8 p.m., 

March 30. 75^ and $1.10; the finals Satur- 

-:;--"- -X--X- -::--;;- day, March 29, at 8 p.m., 85iz? and 

$1.10, All tickets are now on 

The National Collegiate sale at the A. A. ticket office. 
Boxing Tournament is the only -;:--::- ■ -::--!:- -"--:;- 

MINUTES OP THE PARCH SENATE MEETING 

A meeting of the College Sen- presented, 
ate was held in room 121 Sparks 

building Thursday > March o, at 'Under the head of old busi- 

4:10 p. mi, with President Hetzel ness, the report of the Committee 

presiding* A list of the members on Courses of Study was, on mc- 

present is on file in the office tion, adopted, after an amendment 

of the Registrar. presented by Colonel Ardery had 

been approved. 

The minutes of the February 
meeting were read and approved. After several announcements, 



No committee reports were 



the Senate then adjourned. 

Wm. S. Hoffman, Secretary 



OFFICIAL NOTICES FROM THE OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR 

.'/' i their awa 1 s 

Z Brown, Ensign J., Pre-Vetj Feb. 5 

Z Englebaugh, Louis C, IEd, Feb. £8' 

1 Erlichman, Ruth, LD, DC, Feb. 10 

Z Fussemegger, 'Merrill E . , ME, Mar. 17 

1 Garof alo, ' Si lvi o, EE,.Feb. 3 

S Kersavage, M. P., FT, Mar. 12 

Z Mignoni, Frank' E. ,' Chem, Mar. 19 

Z Schwen, Wm. A., ME, 'Mar. 6 

G Studholme, Allan T., Zool, Mar. 18 

3 Taylor, Alfred B., Jour, Feb. 19 

The following reasons were illness of wife, 1 to accept posi- 

given for withdrawing: Z for poor tion, 1 because of death in the 

scholarship, Z because of finan- family, 1 because of operation, 1 

cial difficulties, 1 because of" was dissatisfied, 1 gave no reason. 

Change of Classification 

Change Ruth M. Clyde from special in LA. to part-time senior in A&L. 
Change Robert I. Dixon from sophomore in LD to junior 'in A&L. 
Change Norwood H. Ewe 1 1 from sophomore to junior in PEd. 
Change F cigar F. McClintcck from junior in A&L to sophomore In LD. 

Additional Students Drooped under the Fifty P e r Cent Rule at the End of 

the First Semester 1040" 4l 

1 Feeney, A. Whitney, ME 1 Jones, Edward E., AgEng 

1 Hamacher, Lawrence L., ME 1 Ryan, 'Paul F., ME' 

1 Hunter, George R., ME 1 Woods, Charles T., AgEng 

Students Reinstated ig^ the Second Semester 1040-41 

1 Kane," Joseph H. (reinstated in Transition Section) 

1 Wagner, Robert C. (reinstated in Hazleton Undergraduate Center) 

Wm. S. Hoffman 
Rcc 1 strar 



ISS GLADYS R. CHANCER 



College Library 



THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 



FACULTY 

Published weekly on Tuesday during the College 
year a* a means of making official announcements 
and presenting items of interest to the faculty. All 

VOL. 20 




April 1, 1941 



BULLETIN 

contributions should be as brief as possible and reach 
Walter F. Dantzscher, Director of Public Information. 
105 Old Main, not biter than 10 a.m. each Friday. 



NO. 



25 



TRAVEL FILM TO RE SHOWN THIS AFTERNOON 



A color-sound film of 1200 
feet, entitled "The Radiant Rock- 
ies and Alaska," will be shown 
this afternoon at 4 p.m,, in room 
10 Sparks building B The film 
deals with the summer attractions 
of the Banff-Lake Louise region 
of the Canadian Rockies and a jour- 
ney by a Canadian Pacific "Prin- 
cess" steamer from Vancouver to 



Alaska, thence up the Yukon River, 

The Alaska sequence takes the 
spectator to the Land of the Mid- 
night Sun via the famous shel- 
tered Inside Passage, v/i th shots 
of the principal points touched at 
en route and a close-up of Taku 
Glacier, one of the highlights of 
the entire voyage. 



OVER 50 NOW REGISTERED FOR PHYSICAL FITNESS COURSE 



Over 50 persons have already 
registered for the physical fit- 
ness course offered by the School 
of Physical Education and Athlet- 
ics in co-operation with the De- 
partment of Military Science and 
Tactics, according to Glenn Thiel, 
chairman of the committee 

Persons who desire to regis- 
ter and have not already done so 
may still enroll at Student Union, 
In response to inquiries from fac- 
ulty members who are over the age 
for selective service, Mr , Thiel 
wishes to announce that these 



people arc also welcome to take 
the course if they pass their 
physical examination. 

No charge is made for the in- 
struction, and free lockers and 
towels are provided. 

Originally designed to im- 
prove the physical fitness of stu- 
dents and others eligible for the 
draft, the work includes games, 
body building, boxihg, wrestling, 
hiking, military drill, first aid 
lectures, and lectures on the care 
of military equipment. 



COLLEGE ACQUIRES NEW SCULPTURE 



The Division of Fine Arts of 
the Department of Architecture an- 
nounces the acquisition of "Frie- 
del," a sculptured bust by the 
P h i 1 a d e 3. p h 5 a s c 1 1 1 p t ■■■ ess, F i n g a. 1 
Rosenqui s t« The bust is on dis- 
play in the Architectural Library, 
301 Main Engineering „ 



Miss Rosenquist is now having 
an exhibition of her work at the 
Contemporary Arts Gallery in New 
York City , a c c c r- d ,i a g to the an- 
nouncement from Professor J e 3urn 
Helme. The College sculpture was 
acquired through the Pennsylvania 
Art Project. 



FIFTH MEETING ON WORLD RECONSTRUCTION TO BE HELD THURSDAY 



The fifth meeting of the 
"Aft e r War - -Wh at?" series on Wo rid 
Reconstruction, sponsored by the' 
Fenn State . Chri sti an Association," 
will be held in the Home ' ■Economics 
auditorium this Thursday, April 3, 
at 8:15 p.m. 



The 'speakers who will open 
the discussion on the subject in- 
clude Dr. C. D. Champlin and Dr. 
C. C. Peters of the Department of 
Education and Psychology, and A* - 
Druckman, assistant professor of 
phi losophy, ■ , 



P.S.C.A. SPONSORS DISCUSSION GROUPS THI 



V/l 



;k 



The Rev. Roy McCorkel, secre- 
tary' of the Inter-Seminary Move- 
ment, is on the campus this week 
and will meet with various groups 
connected with the College as well 
as with church groups. Personal 
interviews with students and fac- 
ulty members are also being sched- 
uled. 

Subjects which he will pre- 
sent in discussion groups to be 
held in room 304 Old Main I.nclude 
u ' v he Relation of Relioion and 



Democracy," "International Rela- 
tions," "Economic Order," "Is 
.There a Purpose in Life," "Effec- 
tive Ways , of Working for Peace," 
"In What .Way Can the Church Serve 
_Bcst," and "Religion and Labor." 

,The Rgv. McCorkel is a grad- 
uate of Wqoster College and Yale 

University. He taught at Ewing 
.Christian College in Allahabad, 

India, In 19.33-1934; and has trav- 
eled extensively in the" United 
.States, India, and Europe* 



OF GENERAL INTEREST 



The College Senate will meet 
this Thursday, April 3, at 4:10 
p.m. in 121 Sparks building, ac- 
cording to an official announce- 
ment f rom'V/i 1 1 1 am S. Hoffman, 
secretary. 



Members of Phi Beta Kappa 
should" make reservations for the 
April '3rd banquet not later than 
today, Tuesday, April 1, with 



Lewi 



105 Old Main. 



The following, action was 
taken' at the meeting of .the Coun-' 
cil~of Administration on March 24, 
1941': The Council voted that 
there shall be no solicitation of 
any College staff member during 
College hours for a purpose not 
connected with the College, by any 
agencies, without the permission 
of the President's office. 

Wm. S. Hoffman, Secretary 
Council of Administration 



The Thespians will present 
their annual spring show-, "The 
Jointz. Jumpin'," this Friday and 
Saturday, April 4 and 5, at 7 p.m. 
in Schwab Auditorium,, Tickets are 
now on sale at Student Union, The 
price is 50^ for the Friday per- 
formance and 75jz? for the Saturday 
performance. 



An Easter musical service by 
the Col lege' Choir will be given 
this Sunday, April 6, 



No sports events are sched- 
uled' for this week. 



THREE EXAMINATIONS FOR DOCTORATE ANNOUNCED 



Dean Frank D, Kern announces 
the following preliminary examin- 
ations for candidates for 'the' 
doctor ' s degree : 

Miss Edith LaVerne Strong; 
major, education; minor, psychol- 
ogy; Tuesday, April 8, 9 a.m. to 
12 noon; 108 Burrowes building. 



Mr. A. Sterl Art ley; major, 
education; next Tuesday, April 8, 
Z to 5 p.m.; room 108 Burrowes 
bui 1 ding . 

"" Mr, Irving Coblentz; major, 
psychology; Friday, April 25, 
2 to 5 p.m.; room 108 Burrowes 
bui 1 ding . 



OFFICIAL NOTICES FROM THE OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR 

Wi thdrawal s 



3 
2 
S 
1 
2 
2 
1 
3 
3 
3 
3 
G 



Betts, Kenneth H., Mng, Mar. 20 
Campana, John Paul, EE, Feb. 7 
Eisenman, Austin W., EE, Mar. 2( 
Harrold, Paul, LD, Mar. 24 
Holben, Wilmer P., Jr., ME, U 

Cer, Nov. 



Murphy, P. F.,. Jr 
Poorman, Willis M., IndEd, Mar. 
Ramp," Charles 'Henry, Psy, Mar. 
Schneider, Carl L., ME, Feb. 3 
Vogel, Richard, CF, Feb. 10 
Watkins, Harold P., CF, Feb. 7 
Wesesky, Hannah T., Ed, Feb. 10 



ar. 18 
19, 1940 
18 
19 



The follov/ing reasons were 
given for withdrawing: 1 for per- 
sonal reasons, 3 because of finan- 
cial difficulties, 2 for poor 
scholarship, 2 to go to work, 1 



to transfer to another college, 1 
because of health,. .1 had regis- 
tration cancel fed, and T was un- 
able to attend this session. 



Change of Classification 

William Lloyd Barr changed from special to graduate* 

Wm. S. Hoffman 
Fiegi strap 

EXHIBITION OF NEWSPAPER TYPOGRAPHY NOW AT LIBRARY 



The American Institute of 
Graphic Arts is sponsoring the F. 
Way land Aye r Exh i b i t i on of News- 
paper Typography which is 'being 
held at the Library April A to 12. 

This show includes the Ayer 
award which Is made each year' for 
typographical merit- and which, in 
1940, 'was given to the New York 
Times; and honorable mentions, in- 
cluding the Philadelphia Inquirer, 
the Christian Science Lion i tor, and 
the New York Herald Tribune; as 



well as an historical review from 
a handwritten Peking Gazette of 
the 10th century; the Renaissance 
news letter; news ' pamphlets, semi- 
weekli-es, weeklies and dailies, to 
newspapers of the present day. 

There arc papers from' foreign 
countries—China, Scotland, South 
Africa, Spain, Germany, Sweden, 
France, New Zealand, and Greece -- 
many of them published in the war- 
ring capitals and therefore con- 
taining conflicting viewpoints. 



PI GAMMA MU STUDENT FORUM TO 3E HELD TOMORROW 



Pi Gamma Mil, honorary social 
science fraternity, will sponsor 
an open student forum discussion 
on the subject "is Pan-Americanism 
Feasible?" tomorrow, Wednesday, 
April Z, at 7:30 p . m , in room 110 
Electrical Engineering building. 

Five students, ' three of whom" 
are Latin-Americans, will partici- 
pate in the discussion. They are: 



Charles L. Albright, Pittsburgh; 
Norma Still we 11, Canal Zone; Al- 
berto Roque y Prima, Cuba; Jorga 
Tristani y de Cardenas, Puerto 



. ico; and Mark 



.ichard: 



III, 



Philadelphia, who will preside. 

Faculty members are requested 

to call the forum to the attention 

of their students and to invite 
them to attend. 







THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 



FACULTY 

Published weekly on Tuesday during the College 
year as a means of making official announcements 
and presenting items of interest to the faculty. All 

* April lb, 1941 

VOL. 20 




BULLETIN 

contributions should be as brief as possible and reach 
Walter F. Dantzscher, Director of Public Information, 
105 Old Main, not later than 10 a.m. each Friday. 

NO. 



AN EDITOR LOOKS AT COLLEGE PUBLICITY" 



By William K» Ulerich 
Editor and Associate Publisher, The Centre Daily, Times 

(The following article is intended as a sequel to the series of arti- 
cles on publicity "which were run in The Faculty Bulletin earlier this 
academic year. It was delayed because of Mr * Ulerich's preoccupation 
with other matters. The invitation was extended to Mr, Ulerich because 
as the editor and associate publisher of our local community paper 
an- alumnus of the College, and as a working member of the craft, 
i) 
f] 

expressing his point of view,) 



an- alumnus of the College, and as a working member of the craft, he is 

in an especially advantageous position to look at the publicity problem 

from three angles. He was assured that he would have complete freedom 
in expressing his point of view,) 



As I see the publicity picture at 
Penn State, there are two distinct divi- 
sions , 

In one are the scientific releases, 
the "big, national" stories Mr, Howard 
Blakeslee, AP science editor, so ably 
discussed 
time ago. 



in The Faculty Bulletin some 



In the other are the myriad run— of— 
the— mine stories appearing principally 
in the State papers. 

Both serve their purpose. The first 
maintains the prestige of the College in 
scientific and academic circles. The 
second keeps Penn State before the peo- 
ple of Pennsylvania, a function vitally 
important for an institution so depend- 
ent en popular goodwill. 

In his seven suggestions, Mr, Blakes- 
lee left nothing to be desired in explain- 
ing the procedure necessary to obtain and 
present a big, scientific "break" to the 
public. Anything I might write would 
simply echo his words. 

In the other fields, however, I ven- 
ture a few ideas: 

Unless it is a story especially re- 
quested by the newspaper— and they are 
few— the stories mailed from the College 
news service must make their way in com- 
petition with countless other news re- 
leases sent from other schools, govern- 
ment agencies, and private sources. They 
are usually placed on the city editor's 
desk. Unfortunate as it may seem, unless 



the editor decrees otherwise, the news 
story may be wast e— basket ed then and 
there. However, College releases have ; 
lot better chance to survive this pre- 
liminary weeding cut because an editor 
knows he will find in such releases lit- 
tle that should really be in the adver- 
tising columns. 



If the e 
and the relea 
judge what he 
simple : Fill 
to be worth t 
theorist may 
give his read 
them, the tru 
the reader wh 
and that alon 
other sensati 
Incidentally, 
the metropoli 
reader is le s 
College, We 
is similar he 
was an exampl 



nvelope is actually opened 
ses glanced at, how does he 
sees there? The answer is 
it interest enough readers 
he space? Although your 
say that the editor should 
ers what they need to broaden 
th is that the editor gives 
at the reader wants. That — 
e- — is why crime news and 
onal subjects get page one, 

that does not apply only to 
tan areas where the average 
s educated than in State 
find that the reading taste 
re at home. The Taylor case 
e , 



The problem, then, stated simply is 
how to send out stories which editors 
will judge interesting to their readers. 
And it is a difficult one for the College 
publicity department. Items of extreme 
scientific interest, unless dressed up 
with adjectives, live verbs, and ether 
journalistic trimmings, will leave your., 
editor cold. Then again, some simple 
little feature story will crack page one 
in all the dailies. 

For instance, I recall that some 
years ago, the old chestnut about its 



being sc hot in State College that a Now the courses in Spanish would 

fried e^^ was cocked en the sidewalk was have "been introduced anyhow, the engi — 
page one all over the country. The rat— neers always make an inspection tour, 
tlesnake that broadcast ever the College and soil studies are routine work, hut 
radio station was very acceptable copy, with the aura of national defense about 

them, their chances for publication 

Granted that fried eggs and rattle- would be better. 
snakes, although good copy, do not par- 
ticularly enhance the College's reputa— An important point for College staff 
ticn as an educational institution, what members to know is how to judge whether 
may be done to get a good press? the man— in—the— street (in whom your edi- 
tor is interested) will like your par— 

The simplest way, of course, is to ticular story. In the first place, be — 
know your key men on the paper and in cause the story interests ycu, you are 
that way be sure your story will be given already prejudiced. The best suggestion 
a break for friendship's sake, or at I have is to tell the story to someone 
least that the friend will tell you how entirely removed from your particular 
to shape it up to make it suitable. It's field — perhaps to your next— door neigh- 
too bad stories are often "planted" that bor who is in a different school or de- 
way. I don't justify it; I state it as rartment. If he shows interest, it's 
a fact. probably worth continuing. If he's not 

particularly interested, your stcry may 

This method is too much to ask of a be a dud. But in any case, you should 
publicity department. The other is to give the, item, to the publicity depart- 
ure ss up" the stcry so. that it has wide— ment and rely on their judgment. If you 
spread public appeal, ask advice of someone on Ag Hill regard- 

ing ycur lawn, you'll accept it, Like- 
Right now, any story on which ycu wise you should accept Publicity's state- 
can hang the national defense tag will ment that ycur story is or is not news, 
stand a good chance of making the papers, and continue to send in information with- 
out getting insulted when ycur pet story 

For instance, stories could be doesn't make The New York Times, 

played up in this manner: 

Brevity, too, is valuable* A short 

National defense has inspired some three— paragraph item will often make the 
new Spanish courses tc enable future press association wires or page one. in 
graduates tc get jobs in South America many dailies where a larger story wculd 
working for hemisphere solidarity, get nowhere. The reader tires after 

about three paragraphs, and it's best 

National defense methods were exam— not tc bore him. Your editor keeps that 
ined by a group. of engineers en a tour in mind. Besides^ a short stcry fits 
of factories, t page one make— up in most papers better 

than a long one. The long ones usually 

National defense has been furthered end up inside on the filler pages cr 
by studies in soil productivity at the more often in the wa st eba sket . 
College. 

LEAVES OF ABSENCE FOR MILITARY SERVICE 

At its meeting on March 28, 1^41, not to exceed one year, with the expecta- 

the Executive Committee of the Board of tirn of renewing the leave from year to 

Trustees adopted the following statement year for the duration of their military 

of policy regarding the tenure of members service. Interim replacements will be of 

of the faculty called tc duty in the mil— a temporary nature only. Subject to the 

itary service of the United States: provisions of paragraph II, it is the in- 
tention of the College that each faculty 

"I, No one can foresee the extent member upon his return from military serv- 

of the emergency and its effect upon the ice shall have the tenure of the unex— .. 

program and finances of the College, How— pired portion of the term for which he 

ever,' The Pennsylvania State College will was appointed, as if no leave of absence 

do all in its power to safeguard the posi- ha.d interrupted that term, 
tions of members of the facility who may be 

called to duty in the military, service cf "II. Should the extent and effect 

the United States, in order that their cf the . emergency be such as to require a 

positions may be available to them at the reduction in the faculty either during or 

end of their periods of service. after the emergency, this reduction will 

be made on the basis that would have been 

"Accordingly, leave cf absence will used had no member cf the faculty been 

be granted to such persons for a period absent on military service," 
* * * * * * 



CAMPUS PHOTOSTAT SERVICE INAUGURATED 



With the completion of the instal- 
lation of the photostat equipment in 
the new Library, the administration of 
the College announces the availability 
of photostat service on the campus. 
Actual operation of the photostat serv- 
ices is scheduled to begin today, Wed- 
nesday, April 16, 

The photostat is a machine for 
quickly producing photographic copies 
of all hinds of documents, commercial 
papers, maps, drawings, blueprints — in 
fact, of anything drawn, written, or 
printed,, The subject matter is photo- 
graphed directly from the original copy 
onto a specially sensitized paper held 
in the machine. No glass plate or film 
negative is used to produce copies of 
the original. The initial photostat 
copy of the original is a negative. 
print 1 that is, white letters en a black 
background — a reversal of the original, 
-^ positive pr int , an exact facsimile of 
the original, can be produced by making 



a photostat copy of the negative print. 
If material is wanted for reference work 
only, negative prints are usually quite 
satisfactory. Illustrations in color do 
not reproduce as clearly as those in 
black' and white, A decided advantage of 
the photostat machine is .the fact that, 
either or both reductions and enlarge- 
ments of original copy can be produced. 
The College photostat machine can pro- 
duce a print up to 18 by 24 inches in 
one operation. Preparation of photo- 
static copy larger than 18 by 24 inches 
involves the preparation of copies of 
sections of the original; these sec- 
tions, in turn, can then be matched and 
mounted on any type of material with 
cement or transparent adhesive tissue,, 

The photostat services will be op- 
erated on a non-profit cost basis » 
Charges for photostat services will 
be ma.de in accordance with the follow- 
ing sche dule : 



Schedule f Charges for Phot 3 t at Service , Th e P ennsylvania Stato College 

Prices Per Copy According To Size of. Print 
8i x 11 11 x 14 14 x 18 18 x 24 



Negative print 

Positive print (in addition to 
cost of negative) 

Additional positives — ~oer print 

Additional negatives from same 
copy as the first, or from 
same publication and in same 
size as first negative, per print 

Charge for wrapping and postage 
for mailing outside orders 

For example, a charge of 40^ will 
be made for a positive photostat print 
8-g- by 11 inches. If this same order 
called for four positives rather than 
one, the charge would amount to 65^„, 
Special price quotations will be ren- 
dered for prints larger than 18 by 24 
inches and for orders calling for large 
quantities of prints. 

Mr. Fred E Kelly, part-time in- 
structor in visual education, room 10 
Burr owes building, will be in direct 
charge of photostat services. All in- 
quiries in regard to special prices or 
such other information as is not con- 
tained herein should be addressed to 
Mr, Kelly. 

College departments desiring work 



,20 
o 20 

,15 
,15 

,15 



.20 
.20 

.15 



c35 
,35 

,30 
a 30 

,20 



done sh 
t ion to 
spe cif i 
copies 
tive or 
any add 
Fcllowi 
t ions a 
office 
or igina 
are 1 
the req 
rect to 
is in t 
s i t i o n 
and por 



ould make out the usu 
Audio— Visual Aids, i 
c sizes required, the 
of each size, and whe 
negative or both, toj 
itional remarks deeme 
ng the usual procedur 
re to be forwarded to 
and thence to Mr, Kel 
1 material from which 
be prepared may be at 
ui sit ion or may be fc 
Mr, Kelly, If origi 
he Library, specify 
the author, title, pa 
tions cf the page to 



,45 
.45 

.40 
.40 



.20 



al re qui si — 
ncluding 

number of 
ther pesi— 
gether with 
d necessary, 
e, requisi- 

Mr , Lcman ' s 
ly The 

phot st at s 
t ached to 
rwarded di- 
nal material 
n the requi- 
re number, 
be . copiedo 



It is suggested that those depart- 
ments making regular use of this serv- 
ice issue a standing order for a period 



of three months, under the regulations 
contained in the circular letter from 
the Purchasing Agent, issued under date 
of August 19, 193 9. 

Every effort will be made to ex- 
pedite the completion and delivery of 
all orders. 

All responsibility for questions 
of copyright that may arise in photo- 
stating and for use made of the copies 
is assumed by the purchaser. The fol- 
lowing are a few of several types of 
governmental materials which may not be 



copied photographically: obligations, 
or securities of the U, S, Government, 
including bonds, treasury notes, etc.; 
certificates of citizenship; passports; 
immigration papers. Mimeographed copies 
of regulations and statements of policy 
in regard to photocopying rights will 
be made available in the near future. 
These can be secured from Mr, Kelly's 
office, room 10 Burrowes building. 

Samples of various sises of photo- 
stat prints in both negative and posi- 
tive form are available in Mr, Kelly's 
office for inspection by the faculty. 



DEFENSE THEME DEVELOPED FOR COLLEGE CIRCUS 



"Perm State on Parade 



the 



hird 



annual All— College Circus, will be given 
in Recreation building Saturday, April 26, 
at 8 p.m. With a red, white, and blue 
color scheme as the background, the Cir- 
cus will represent the contribution of the 
College to the national defense program. 



To avoid a last-minute rush, 2500 
reserve seats at 50(2 will go on sale at 
Student Union this Saturday, April 19 a 
Out— of— town mail orders will be accepted, 
General admission tickets, also at 50$zf, 
will be sold at the doors en the night 
of the performance. 



ANNUAL ALL-COLLEGE EXTEMPORANEOUS SPEAKING CONTEST TO BE HELD NEXT WEEK 



Faculty members are requested to an- 
nounce to their students the annual all- 
College extemporaneous speaking contest 
to be held next week. 



An cut 
year— old ju 
sophomore e 
of later ye 
open to all 
next Thursd 
room 121 3 p 
offered for 
Pennsylvani 
and the For 



growth 
nior or 
xt empor 
ar s , t h 

u n d e r g 
ay, Apr 
arks bu 

first 
a u t a t> e 
ensic C 



of the 
at erica 
aneous 
e all-C 
r a du a t e 
il 24, 
il ding, 
and sec 
Cclleg 
ouncil 



more 

1 co 
spea 
clle 
s , w 
at 7 
Tw 
ond 
e pr 
priz 



than fi 

ntest an 
king con 
ge conte 
ill be h 
:30 p.m. 
r prizes 
place — I 
i z e of $ 
e of $ 2 5 



fty- 

-1 the 

test 

st, 

eld 
in 
are 

he 

50 



A prelim 
interested wi 
interest and 
elimination s 
room 121 Spar 
April 21. To 
provided at t 
entrant s ' own 
committee in 
set earlier t 
who desires t 
and still a 1 1 
or the women 1 



Inary meetin 

11 select a 
be assigned 
ections, wil 
ks building 
pics may be 
he meeting o 
choosing, i 
charge. The 
o allow ampl 
o enter the 
end the Anna 
s debate wit 
* * 



g, at which all 
topic of current 
to one of six 
1 be held in 
at 7 p.m. Monday, 
chosen from lists 
r may be of the 
f approved by the 

hour has been 
e time for a ny.cn a 
contest to do so 

Kaskas concert 
h Cornell. 

* * 



Tuesday evening, April 22, at 7:30, 
the entrants will speak for five minutes 
on the topic chosen the evening previous. 
They will have been grouped intc sections, 
meeting in different assigned rooms, and 
one person will be chosen from each group 
to speak in the finals Thursday night. 



To 
may n^t 
t i o n s , 
with Mr 
f ice , 3 
10 a.m. 
23 . Sp 
between 
and are 
Members 



b: 



for 



contest 
bers of 
not use 
le ct ed 



pics for the final c 
include those used 

are to be selected i 

s, Harriet D. Nesbit 

11 Sparks building, 
or 1 and 3 pom Wed 

eeches for the final 
ight and ten minut 
to be delivered wit 
of the debating squ 
the contest, as are 

ants except prize wi 
the debating squads 
debate topics shoul 

for the finals. 



ontest, which 
in the elimina- 
n conference 
t in her of — 
between 8 and 
nes day, April 
s are to be 
es in length 
hcut notes, 
ads are eligi— 

all previous 
nner s . Mem— 
, however, may 
d they be s e — 



Arrangements for the contest are in 
charge of a committee of the Department 
of Speech, composed of Mrs. Harriet D. 
Hesbitt, chairman; Harold P. Zelkc; 
George P. Rice; and Eddie G. Couch. 



OF GENERAL INTEREST 



Members of Phi Lappa Phi from other 
colleges who are now on the campus but 
who have not been contacted by the local 
chapter are requested to send their names 
to the local secretary, Miss Mary Willard, 
101 Pcnd Laboratory, 

* * * * * * 

The School of Engineering faculty 
will meet Wednesday, April 23, at 5:10 
p.m., in room 107 Main Engineering, ac- 
cording to an official announcement from 

Dean H. P. Hammond. 

* * * * * * 

The Agricultural Student Council in- 
vites all faculty members to attend the 
"Ag Frolic" to be held in Recreation 
building this Saturday, April 19. Danc- 
ing will begin at 9 p.m. and continue 
until 12. 

* * * * * * 

The Department of Home Economics has 
at present a Conlon Ircner, received on 
consignment from the manufacturer and ur.ed 



in the department since April, 1940, which 
the company has asked them to offer for 
sale. The price is $55, Additional in- 
formation may be obtained from Miss Ruth 
Bonde, Home Management effice. 

* * * * * * 

Dean Frank D. Kern announces the 
following oral examinations for the loo- 
ter a t e : 

Mr. Richard Tcrrence Parsons; pre- 
liminary examination for the D.Ed, de- 
gree; -major, education; Friday, May 2, 
2 to 5 p.m.; room 108 Burrowes building.' 

Miss Pearl E. Hoagland, candidate 
for the Ph.D. degree; major, psychology; 
minor, education; Thursday, May 8, 2 to 
5 p.m.; room 103 Burrowes building. 



Dr. Paul Scherer, of the Lutheran 
Church of the Holy Trinity, New York 
City, will be the chapel speaker this 
Sunday, April 20. 



4 



AGRICULTURAL LIBRARY EXHIBIT OF INTEREST TO GARDENERS 

Miss Anne Wiggle sworth has assembled tural Library. These will be en display 

an exhibition of garden books and unusual for several weeks, and all gardeners are 

plant and seed catalogues at the Agricul— invited to come and see them. 

* * * * * * 

SPORTS CALENDAR 

Three sports events are scheduled Baseball with Gettysburg at 2:30 p.m. 
here fcr this Saturday, April 19. They Tennis with Army at 2 p.m. 
include: Golf with Amy at 2 p m. 

* * * * * * 

OFFICIAL NOTICES FROM THE OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR 

Withdrawals 

4 Bambrick, John G., AL, Mar c 8 1 Kasperko, John R», ME, Mar. 31 

1 Bates, William F , Mng, Apr. 9 1 O'Brien, William T», Jr., Mar. 24 

1 Behney, Harry Martin, Jr., ME, Mar. 12 1 Raiken, Benjamin J., PEd, Apr 7 

1 Dalton, Phyllis Harriet, HoEc, Feb. 25 1 Travis, George, For, Mar, 18 

1 Farver, Harold E., LD, Feb. 7 2 Updegraff, Gail T., PEd, Dec. 18 

4 Hagerty, Catherine L., HoEc, Mar. 22 3 Watkins, Ernest E., AL, Mar. 4 

The following reasons were given for cent rule, 1 was dissatisfied, 2 were 

withdrawing: 3 because of illness, 1 be— drafted, 2 because of scholastic diffi— 

cause of insufficient funds, 1 to go to culties, and 1 gave no reason, 
work, 1 was dropped under the fifty per 

Reinstatement 



Mr. Leonard N. Mantell, a sophomore stated in the College as of the first 
in Agronomy at the Schuylkill Undergrad— semester 1940-41, 
uate Center, has been official ly rein— 

Mid-Term Drops for Poor Scholarship 

1 Gibbs, Ailene M e> LD 3 O'Brien, John Francis, C&F 

Wm. S 9 Hoffman 
Registrar 






■ - = ■ «L i - ** ** 

H3HNVH0'a SAGV-ID SSIM 



THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 



FACULTY 

Published weekly on Tuesday during the College 
year as a means of making official announcements 
and presenting items of interest to the faculty. All 

VOL. 20 




BULLETIN 

contributions should be as brief as possible and reach 
Walter F. Dantzscher, Director of Public Information, 
105 Old Main, not later than 10 a.m. each Friday. 



April ZZ, 1941 



NO. 



Zl 



THIRD ANNUAL ALL-COLLEGE CIRCUS TO BE HELD THIS SATURDAY 



"Penn State on Parade," 
annual Fenn State circus, wi 
in Recreation building this 
April 26, at 8 p.m. Reserve 
ets are now on sale at Stude 
50ff« Over 1000 have already 
and from all indications the 
vrill he sold before Saturday- 
admission tickets will go on 
reation building at 6 p.m. t 
the show. The price for the 
504 for adults and 2<5$ for c 



the third 
11 be held 
Saturday, 
d seat tiok- 
nt TTnion for 

been sold, 

remainder 
, General 

sale at Hec- 
he night of 
s e will be 
hildren. 



Although the circus starts at 8 
p.m., the string ensemble, the circus 
band, and the clowns will begin to enter- 
tain at 7:30, 

As a climax to the year's athletic 
and recreational program, the circus was 
originated in the spring of 1939. It is 
sponsored by the School of Physical Edu- 
cation and Athletics as an answer to a 



desire for an entertainment which is fun 
for the performers as well as the spec- 
tators. 

The circus is not merely vaudeville, 
nor is it just an exhibition of athletic 
prowess and comedy, Penn State's display 
includes the usual circus band, clowns, 
and comedy; but in addition it presents a 
finer type of entertainment, such as the 
background music of the string ensemble, 
singing, dancing, and. acrobatics. 



t it le 
from 
stand 
a r e p 
man a 
be in 
Grima 
for h 
cle c 



This year's' theme is patriotic. The 
, "Penn State on Parade," is derived 
the grand finale in which the out- 
ing representatives of each activity 
resented. As guest artists BobHoff— 
nd his weight-lifting champions will 
troduced. Among these is Mr; John 
k, who was acclaimed "Mr, America" 
is physique this past year. His mus- 



ontrol act is a special feature. 



POPULAR LECTURE ON 
DEMONSTRATION OF 



THE ARTIFICIAL CREATION OF SPEECH AND 
THE "VODER" TO BE GIVEN NEXT MONDAY 



A popular lecture on the artificial 
creation of speech and a demonstrat iun of 
the Voder will be given in Schwab Audi- 
torium next Monday, April 28, at 8 p,m,, 
by Dr, J a 0, Perrine, assistant vice 
president of the American Telephone and 
Telegraph Company, New York City, The 
lecture is sponsored by the local chapter 
of the American Institute of Electrical 
Engineers, Sigma Pi Sigma, and Sigma Xi, 

In his talk, Dr , Perrine will dis- 
cuss the character of sounds and their 
basic elements, their analysis and syn- 
thesis, and the electrical means for cre- 
ating speech-like sounds. He will ex- 
plain how the Voder creates electrically 
the two kinds of sounds which are char- 
acteristic of speech — the unvoiced con- 
sonant sounds like "s" and "h" and the 
vowel sounds of the vocal cords— and 
show how the operator, by manipulating 
the keys and pedals, shapes these basic 
sounds into almost any desired combina- 
tion. Just as color is really a com- 
posite of various hues, so vowel and con- 
sonant sounds are made up of various 
patterns of audible tones. 



Designed in Bell Tel 
ries, the Voder is an ele 
ment corresponding to the 
mechanism both in its pro 
and in the completeness o 
thereof. It is built ent 
for its keys, of apparatu 
day telephone service, T 
onstratior, a young woman 
play the Voder from a con 
that of an old-fashioned 
enunciate letters of the 



ephone Laborato— 
ctrical ar range - 

human speech 
duct ion of speech 
f it s control 
irely, except 
s used in every 
n Monday's dem— 

operator will 
sole similar to 
organ. She will 
a 1 p h a b e t , num- 
bers from one to ten, and various multiple 

;rument will be 
prof undo voice, 
shaky voice ef 
an old man, and to laugh and to sing. 



syllable words. The 
made to sneak in a b; 



inst: 
s s o 



high— pitched voice, the 



The Voder was developed in its pres- 
ent form after over 100 years of effort 
to reproduce speech. It is a step in se- 
rious telephone research, which may lead 
to a number of practical uses. For exam- 
ple, it is hoped that out of studies of 
this kind facilities may be provided for 
carrying more telephone conversations 
over existing lines without interference 
of one with any other. 



FINAL I 


EST INC ON W 


GRID R 


For the final me 


eting in th 


e ser i 


of discussions on the 


theme "Aft 


c r War 


What?" the Fenn State 


Chr ist ian 


A s s o c i 


tion is presenting' Dr 


. W, Emory 


Ear t ma 


minister of the Allis 


on Memorial 


lie the 


ist Church of Carl i si 


e and forme 


rly 


Wesley Foundation pas 


tor of St, 


Paul ' s 


Church of State Co'lle 


g'e. The theme of 


his discussion will b 


e "The Role 


of 


Religion and Religiou 


s Institutions in 


World Reorganization. 


" He will 


speak 



LIBRARY NOW HOLDING 



EC 01IS TRUC TION TO BE HELD TONIGHT 

es this evening, Tuesday, April 22, at 8:15 
— • p,m», in the Home Economics auditorium, 

n, A number of speakers in the series 

d— have indicated that the political organi- 
zation, the sociological structure, and 
the economic order would need the contri- 
bution of religion if any or all were to 
succeed, Dr „ Hartman will close the se- 
ries with an analysis of the contribution 
of religion to the world's future, 

XHIBITION ON BOOL-COMPOSITION 



The Library is exhibiting from now 
until May 1 a collection of books de- 
signed, set in type, and printed by Helen 
Gentry, originator of the Holiday House 
press, which, since 1935, has issued fine 



books of old and new writings, 
some commercial printing. 



as well 



The exhibit shows various stages in 



the making of a book— composition, layout, 
illustration, binding, etc., in addition 
to seme miscellaneous pieces, such as 
press announcements, men's clothing ad- 
vertisements, stationery, grocery sale 
broadsides, and nursery rhymes. 

The exhibit is sponsored by the 
American Institute of Graphic Arts, 



It may be expec 
budget for the next 
elude an item design 
Fund for Research'," 
i s t e r e d by the Counc 
to be used primarily 
tal research through 
for the support of a 
more readily availab 
It is intended that 
used for the support 
in the social scienc 
as well as the natur 



GRANTS-IN-AID 


OF RESEARCH 


ted that the College 


Applications for grant s-in— aid 


fiscal year will in— 


should be filed with the dean of the 


ated as the "Central 


School, Application forms are available 


This fund is admin— 


at his office. These call for informa- 


il on Research, It is 


tion on the following point's: objectives 


to promote fundanien— 


of the study; its probable importance; 


out the College , funds 


previous work and present outlook; pro- 


pplied research being 


cedure or working plan; financial support 


le from other sources. 


desired (itemized); other funds, if any, 


this fund shall be 


which contribute to the support of the 


of creative studies 


project; the leaders and their qualifica- 


es and the humanities 


tions; and an estimate of the time re- 


al s cience s , 


quired to complete the project. Applica- 




tions should be filed before May 10, 1941, 



Grants-in-aid are mad 
cal year. The sum th£ 
to a project will be determ 
Council on Research after g 
eration to all requests, in 
quests for the continuance 
24 grants made in the prese 
year. The fund may be used 
maintenance and for special 
but not for general equipme 
also be used to employ a te 
stitute for a member of the 
requires freedom from teach 
mester or part of a semeste 
complete research in protfre 



for one f is- 
b e allotted 



ined by the 
iving cons id— 
cluding re- 
of any of the 
nt fiscal 
for general 
apparatu s , 
nt , It may 
rnporary sub- 
faculty who 
ing for a se- 
r in order to 
s • 



The approval of the head of the de- 
partment and the dean is required before 
the proposed project is considered by the 
Council on Research, Requisitions are 
drawn and bills approved by the chairman 
of the Council after their approval by the 
head of the department and the clean. The 
recipient of a grant-in-aid is requested 
to file with the dean and with the Coun- 
cil on Research, near the close of the 
fiscal year, a report on the project. 



Chairman . 



, W, Fletcher 
Council on Research 



REGISTRATION FOR SUMMER CAMP AND SUMMER PRACTICUM 



Registration for summer camp and 
summer practicum courses for undergrad- 
uates will take place on Thursday and 
Friday, May 1 and 2, at the office of the 
Registrar, This special period has been 
appointed to keep registration for these 
courses separate from second semester 
work and. to enable departments to make 
preparation for this works Courses in 
this category include Agronomy 14, Civil 
Engineering 13, Dairy Husbandry 17, Earth 
Science 



summer camp, Forestry camp 



Home 



Economics 315, Hotel Administration summer 
practicum, Horticulture 17, Landscape Ar- 
chitecture 16 and 17, Mining 60, Poultry 
Husbandry 9, Regjistrat ion for these 
courses is necessary on May 1 and 2 to se- 
cure proper enrollment. Payment of fees 
for the summer camp and summer practicum 
courses will be made at the office of the 
Bursar on Tuesday, May 20, Heads of de- 
partments are requested to bring this mat- 
ter to the attention o'f all students who 
plan to enroll in the above courses. 



MINUTES OF THE COLLEGE SENATE MEETING OE APRIL 3. 1941 



A meeting of the College Senate was 
held in room 121 Sparks building Thursday, 
April 3, 1941, at 4:10 p.m., with Presi- 
dent Hetzel presiding, A list of the 
members present is on file in the office 
of the Registrar. 

The minutes of the meeting of March 
6, 1941, were read and approved. 

Under the reports of standing com- 
mittees, Dr* Marquardt, acting chairman 
of .the Committee on Academic Standards, 
presented a list of those nominated for 
certain scholarships and awards This 
report, which is on file in the office of 
the Registrar, had received approval of 
the president and was, on motion, adopted. 

Dr Marquardt also recommended that 
the name. of the Fayette Undergraduate Cen- 
ter, closed June 30, 1940, he removed from 
the list of Centers approved by the Senate 
as Centers of resident instruction e This 
recommendation, which is on file in the 
office of the Registrar, was adopted,, 

Dr, larger, as chairman of the Com- 
mittee on Calendar, announced that the 
All-College Cabinet selected Saturday, 
October 18, for the football half-holiday 
for the first semester of 1941-1942 e 
This report is on file in the office of 
the Registrar. 

Dr. Dye, chairman of the Committee 
on Rules, presented a recommendation af- 
fecting rules 88 and 91 of the Regula- 
tions Affecting Undergraduate Students, 
This report follows : 

The Committee on Rules proposes 
the following ■ clarifications of the 

Undergraduate Student Regulations 
numbers 88 and 91: 

1» In rule 88, which concerns 
student automobiles, it is proposed 
to substitute the words, "the Campus 
Patrol, Department of Grounds and 
Buildings, room 320, Old Main," for 
the words "the designated College 
authority." Then the regulation will 
read "A student who desires to keep 
or operate an automobile," etc*, 
"shall obtain a student automobile 
permit from the Campus Patrol, De- 
partment of Grounds and Buildings, 
room 32 0, Old Main " The committee 
proposes further to print in an ap- 
pendix to the regulations booklet 
the rules adopted by the Department 
of Grounds and Buildings. 

2, Since the regulations con- 
cerning the use of rooms in College 
buildings, like the regulation of 
campus traffic, is a purely adminis- 
trative matter, yoiir committee pro- 
poses that the rule 91 be amended 
by substituting in the first sentence 



of the paragraph the words "the admin- 
istrative regulations printed in the 

appendix: to these Regulations, p. " 

for the words "the permission of the 
custodian of the building." This 
would make the first sentence read 
"Authorized meetings may be heJd in 
the rooms of College buildings sub- 
ject to the administrative regula- 
tions printed in the appendix to 
these Regulations, p. ." These regu- 
lations have been furnished the com- 
mittee by the Department of Grounds 
and Buildings. 

This report, which is on file in the 
office of the Registrar, was tabled for 
consideration by the Senate at the next 
meeting „ 



D 
mitt ee 
operat 
sence s 
C ommit 
repeal 
sent f 
t i o n a 
being 
able d 
of the 
motion 
This r 
the Re 
Senate 
to a p p 
a t i o n 
before 
at the 
p o s s i b 
pr ovem 



r r 



io 
b 
te 
ed 
or 
t 

vo 

i s 

r 

> 

e P 

gi 

v 
oi 
of 
a 
U 
le 
en 



Dye also presented for the Com- 
n Rules a five— page report on the 
n of rules 58 to 64 governing ab- 
efor<j and after vacations. The 
e re commended that these rules be 
. Dr , Dye asked unanimous oon- 

oonsiderat ion of the recommenda— 
this time. Unanimous consent 
ted, there wa s a rather consider— 
cuss ion of the recommendation and 
eport with the result that, on 
the rocoEnendation was defeated, 
ort is on file in the office of 
strar On motion, however, the 
oted that the Chair be authorized 
nt a committee to study the opcr— 

the rules governing attendance 
nd after vacations and to report 
ay meeting of the Senate any 

revisions or suggestions f'or im— 
b of the operation of the rules. 



The Committee on Courses of Study, 
through its chairman, Professor Kinsloe, 
presented a report which is on file in the 
office of .the Registrar. This report was 
tabled for consideration at the next meet- 
ing of the Senate. 

The Secretary read a recommendation 
for the" Executive Committee of the School 
of Engineering as follows: 



Any examination authorized a 
cial examination to remove a 
tion in a subject where t he- 
has not been repeated (by tu 
or otherwise) may be graded 
e r than a and this shall b 
final grade for the course, 
ported grade should be accom 
by the letters "Sp.Ex," indi 
that it is the result of a s 
examinat ion 3 



This report, which is on file in the 
office of the Registrar, was referred to 
the Committee on Academic Standards, 

The Senate then adjourned. 

Urn , S , Hof f ma n , S e cr e t ary 



s a s p e 


c o n d i - 


cour se 


t o r i n g 


no high 


e the 


The re 


p a n i e d 


cat ing 


dc cial 



OF GENERAL INTEREST 



The faculty of the School of Agri- 
culture will meet this Friday, April 25, 
at 4:10 p.m., in room 109 Agriculture 
building, according to an official an- 
nouncement from Dean S. W, Fletcher, 
* * * * * * 

Faculty members are reminded of the 
all— College extemporaneous speaking con- 
test finals to he held this Thursday, 
April 24, at 7:30 p.m., in room 121 
Sparks buildingc Judges will be Dean 
Frank D„ Kern, Dean Arthur R, War nock, 
and Dean Charles W« Stoddart, 



The Little International Livestock 
Show will he held this Saturday, April 
26, at 1 p.m in the Stock Judging 
Pavilion, 

* * * * * * 

- , Dean Frank D„ hern announces the 
following final examination for the 
Ph, Do degree : 



agricultural biochemistry; inn nor, chemis- 
try; room 209 Frear Laboratory; Saturday, 
April 26, at 9 a,m, 

* * * * * * 

Rabbi Morris S. Lazaron, of the Bal- 
timore Hebrew Congregation, will be the 
chapel speaker this Sunday, April 27," 

* * * * * * 

Sports events this week include the 
following : 

Wednesda y^ A pri l 23 

4:00 p,m. Baseball with Susquehanna 
4:00 p,m. Tennis with Bucknell 

Friday, A pr il 2 5 

4:00 p,m. Tennis with Lehigh 

Saturday, A p ril 26 

2:00 p.m. Tennis with Pittsburgh 
2:30 p.m. Baseball with Syracuse, 

* * * * * * 



Mr , Orville Neil Breivik; major, 

OFFICIAL NOTICES FROM THE OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR 

Withdrawals 



Shipman, William Stevens, Ag, April 9 

Reasons for withdrawing: one gave 
personal reasons; the other withdrew to 



1 Thomas, John Brown, PM, April 16 
enlist in the U. S. Navy, 



Cancellation of Mid-Term Drop 
1 Gibbs, Ailene Marie, LD 
Official Notice 



A grade of WB incurred within the- ■ 
last six weeks of a semester shall auto- 
matically be recorded as a minus two (-2 
unless the instructor reports a grade of 
minus one (-l). Such grades shall be 



recorded as WB(-l) or WB(-2). A grade of 
WB(— l) shall not entitle the student to 
be enrolled in a dependent subject. The 
last six weeks of the semester begins on 
this Friday, April 25, at 8 a, in, 

Wm. S, Hoffman 
Registrar 



44«aqii 9S&XX0Q 
nKKV«9 •■» SAdV-IS SSIH 



THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 



FACULTY 




Published weekly on Tuesday during the College 
year as a means of making official announcements 
and presenting items of interest to the faculty. All , y 1 QA 1 

VOL. 20 



BULLETIN 

contributions should be as brief as possible and reach 
Walter F. Dantzscher, Director of Public Information, 
105 Old Main, not later than 10 A.M. each Friday. 

28 
NO. 



PRINTS BEING EXHIBITED IN COLLEGE ART GALLERY; 
FINAL GALLERY TALK TO BE GIVEN TOMORROW 



The post-Ea 
sponsored by the 
Arts, Department 
cons i s ts of a gr 
prints in variou 
century French a 
part of the prin 
Wesleyan Univers 
artists represen 
Millet, Daumier, 
Rodin, Degas, Ce 
Cassatt of Pitts 
a lifetime paint 



ster exhibition 
Division of Fine 
of Architecture, 
oup of 40 original 
s media by 19th 
rtists. They are 
t collection of 
i ty. Among the 
ted are Manet, 

Meryon, Delacroix, 
zanne, and Mary 
burgh, who spent 
ing in Par i s . 



The final gallery talk of the 
winter group will be given about 



this exhibition tomorrow, Wednes- 
day, April 30, at 7:30 p.m. in the 
College Art Gallery, 303 Main En- 
gineering. The speaker v/i 1 1 be 
Mr. Francis E. Nyslop, Jr., who 
teaches the College's course in 
the History and Appreciation of 
Prints. His subject will be 
"French Prints." 

The public is cordially in- 
vited to see the exhibition and to 
hear the lecture. The gallery v/i 11 
be open from 8:30 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. 
Monday through Friday until May Z, 
It closes at noon Saturday. 



STUDENT MORTALITY AT THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 



by Mary Virginia Brown 
Office of the Reqistrar 



When a student is admitted to 
The Pennsylvania State College, it 
is assumed that he anticipates re- 
ceiving his degree from the Col- 
lege at the end of the appropriate 
four years. However, everybody 
knows that many students do not 
graduate, and that many of those 
who do get their bachelor's de- 
grees do not get them at the end 
of the four-year period following 
matriculation. Because of the 
careful selective processes in- 
volved in the admission of stu- 
dents to The Pennsylvania State 
College, we quite logically enjoy 
a much lower student mortality 
than is found in many other insti- 
tut i ons . 



During the 
1316 students r 
degrees from Th 
State Col leoe : 
the 193Q Post-S 
Main Summer Ses 
135 at the end 
ter in January, 
the traditional 
Of this number 
ly admitted as 
men either on t 
Alto, or at an 
ter; and 27 9 we 
vanced standing 



past academic year 
eceived bachelor's 
e Pennsylvania 

14 at the end of 
ess ion: 113 at the 
si on Commencement; 
of the first semes- 

1940; and 1054 at 

June Commencement. 
103 7 were original- 
new college fresh- 
he campus, at Mont 
undergraduate cen- 
re admitted with ad- 

from other colleges, 



It might be assumed that the 
members of the class of 1940 en- 
tered college in September, 1936. 



However, an analysis of the 
of the 1316 students who re 
bachelor's degrees reveals 
esting facts about the mort 
of the class of 1940. In S 
ber, 1936,, 1394 students re 
tered at The Pennsylvania S 
College as freshmen, either 
campus at State College, at 
Alto, or at an undergraduat 
ter, with no previous colle 
Of this group 818 graduated 
years later, at some time d 
the academic year 1939-40. 
is 58.7 per cent of those w 



records 
ceived 

inter- 
a 1 i ty 
eptem- 
gis- 
tate 

on the 

Mont 
e cen- 
ge work. 

four 
ur i no 

This 
ho en- 



burnme 
Sunme 
First 
Summe 
Sumrne 
First 
Summe 
Summe 
Summe 
First 
Summe 
First 
Summe 
First 
Summe 
First 
Summe 



r Se s 
r Se s 

Seme 
r Se s 
r Ses 

Seme 
r Ses 
r Ses 
r Ses 

Seme 
r Ses 

Seme 
r Ses 

Seme 
r Ses 

Seme 
r Se s 



sion 
sion 
ster 
sion 
sion. 
ster 
sion 
sion 
sion 
ster 
sion 
ster 
sion 
ster 
sion 
ster 
sion 



1913 
1920 

1919-20 
1922 
1924 

1924-25 
1927 
1928 
1929 

1929-30 
1930 

1930-31 
1931 

1931-32 
1932 

1932-33 
1933 



The United States Department 
of Education recently published a 
study of College Student Mortality 
(Bulletin 1937, No* 11) in which 
admissions to and graduates from 
the class of 1935 at 25 institu- 
tions were analyzed. This study 
indicated that The Pennsylvania 
State College graduated 56.0 per 



tered in September, 1936, and the 
highest percentage graduated by 
The Pennsylvania State College, so 
far as records in the Registrar's 
office show. Many of those who 
did not graduate, 576 in all, or 
41.3 per cent of the entering 
group, may perhaps turn up for de- 
grees later, either here or else- 
where. In this connection-, it is 
interesting to note the variety of 
dates on which members of last 
year's graduating class originally 
matriculated at The Pennsylvania 
State College. 



First s 
Summer 
First S 
Second 
Summer 
First S 
Second 
Summer 
First S 
Se cond 
Summer 
First S 
Se cond 
Summer 
First S 
Second 
First S 



erne s 
Se s s 
eme s 
Seme 
Se s s 
erne s 
Seme 
Se s s 
ernes 
Seme 
Se ss 
eme s 
Seme 
Se s s 
eme s 
Seme 
eme s 



ter 

ion 

ter 

ster 

ion 

ter 

ster 

ion 

ter 

ster 

ion 

ter 

ster 

ion 

ter 

ster 

ter 



1933-34 
- 1934 
1934-35 
1934-35 

1935 
1935-36 
1935-36 

1936 
1936-37 
1936-37 

1937 
1937-38 
1937-38 

193 8 
1938-39 
1938-39 
1939-40 



7 
5 

28 
3 

17 

133 

5 

10 
845 

24 

5 

100 

9 

9 

66 
1 
5 



cent of the students of the class 
of 1935 at the end of the four- 
year period following their .ad- 
mission in September, 1931. This 
is the' second highest percentage 
printed in the, report, the highest 
being that of Rutgers University 
which graduated 57.8 per cent in 
the appropriate year. 



REGISTRATION FOR SUMMER CAMP AND SUMMER PRACTICUM 



Registration for summer camp 
and summer practicum courses for 
undergraduates will take place on 
Thursday and Friday, May 1 and 2, 
at the office of the Registrar. 
This special period has been ap- 
pointed to - keep reg i s trat i on for 
these courses separate from second 
semester work and to enable de- 
partments to make preparation for 
this work. Courses in this cate- 
gory include Agronomy 14, Civil 
Engineering 13, Dairy Husbandry 17, 
Earth Science summer camp, Forestry 
camps, Home Economics 315, Hotel 



Administration' summer practicum, 
Horticulture 17, Landscape Archi- 
tecture 16 and' 17, Mining 60, Poul- 
try Husbandry 9. Registration for 
these courses is necessary on Play 
1 and 2 to secure proper enroll- 
ment. Payment of fees for the 
summer camp and summer practicum 
courses will be made at the office 
of the Bursar on Tuesday, May 20. 
Heads of departments are requested 
to bring this matter to the atten- 
tion of all students who plan to 
enroll in the above courses. 



OF GENERAL INTEREST 



The Collcae Senate will meet 
this Thursday, May 1, at 4:10 p.m. 
in room 121 Sparks building, ac- 
cording to an official announce- 
ment from William S. Hoffman, sec- 
retary. 



The faculty of the School of 
Agriculture will hold a special 
meeting this Friday, May 2, at 
4:10 p.m. in room 109 Agriculture 
buildino, according to an official 
announcement from Dean S. W. 
Fletcher . 



Phi Kappa Phi, honorary fra- 
ternity, villi hold its initiation 
banquet next Tuesday, May 6, at 7 
p.m. in the University Club. Dean 
Whit mo re will speak on the subject 
"What Can We Do?" Tickets will be 
$1, and reservations should be 
made with Professor H. I. Tarpley, 
102 Electrical Engineering. 



Dean Frank D, Kern announces'' 
the following examinations for the-' 
Ph.D. degree: 

Mr. Francisco C. Urge 11;' ma- 
jor, industrial education; minor)' 
education; room 305' Burrowes build- 
ing; this Friday, May *2/ at 9'' a'.m* 

Mr. Is ado re Zipkin; major, 

OFFICIAL NOTICES FROM THI 



agricultural biochemistry; minor, 
chemistry; room 209 Frear Laborato- 
ry* next Tuesday, May 6, at 2 p.m. 



Dr. Moses Lovell, of tbe Cen- 
tral' Congregational Church, 'Brook- 
lyn, will be the chapel speaker 
this Sunday, May 4. 



Nine sports events are sched- 
uled for this week: 

Tuesday, Apri 1 - 29 

4:00 p.m. Baseball with George' 
Wash ing ton 

Wednesday, Apri-1 30 

4:00 p.m. Lacrosse with Syracuse 
4:00 p^m. Tennis with Gettysburg 
4:00 p.m. Freshman baseball with. 
Kiski 

Thursday, May 1 

1 *L~— 

4:00 p.m. ' Baseball' with Dickinson 

Saturday, May 3 

'2:00 p.m. Track with Pittsburgh 
'2:00 p.rm Freshman laorosse with 

Pennsy' lvah'i a 
'2:30 p.m. Baseball with Western 
■ : ' Maryland 
4:00 pirn. Lacrosse with Lehigh 

OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR 



Wi thdrawa Is' 



4 Averman, E*dmond J,, Ed, April 13 

2 Colton, GLenn Harold, For, April 8 

1 Hinkle, Raymond Robert, CE, April 9'' 

2 Kehler, Marjorie- J., <LD, March 28 

G Miller, Frederick Paul, AgEc, April IS 



The following reasons were 
given for withdrawing: '2 because 
of illness, 1 to teach school, 1 



because of financial reasons, and 
1 to enter- military service, 

Wm". S. Hoffman 
Reg.i strar 



4 



LADYS R. CRASHER 



MISS ftl- 

CoUese IIWW 






^ii2i 



THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 



FACULTY 

Published weekly on Tuesday during the College 
year as a means of making official announcements 
and presenting items of interest to the faculty. AU 

VOL. 20 




May 6, 1941 



BULLETIN 

contributions should be as brief as possible and reach 
Walter F. Dantzscher, Director of Public Information, 
105 Old Main, not later than 10 a.m. each Friday. 

NO. 



FACULTY MEMBERS CONTRIBUTE TO AT LEAST 47 PERIODICALS 



During the seven-month period 
extending from September, 1940, to 
March, 1941, inclusive, records of 
the Department of Public Informa- 
tion show that faculty members 
have contributed a minimum 'of 115 
articles to at least 47 scholarly 
periodicals. Since it is ^impossi- 
ble to check all such publications 
in- the Library and various .reading 
rooms in other buildings, it is 
altogether likely that this record 
is incomplete. Such a list was 
published last year in The Faculty 
Bulletin and later supplemented by 



American Anthropolo 
American Historical 
American Journal, .of 
Amer i can M-i 1 ler 
Automobile Engineer 
Bulled: in of the Ame 

Soci ety 
Bulletin of the Ame 

log i cal Soc i ety 
Bulletin of the Geo 

of America 
E'duca t i on 
Educational Adminis 

Super vi s ion 
The Forum of Phi Et 
H i s pan i c -Ame r i c an H 

vi cw 
Ice Cream Field 
Ice Cream Trade Jou 
Industrial and Engi 

i s try 
Inter-State Mi Ik Ft 
Journal of the Acou 

of America 
Journal of the Amer 

Soc i ety 
Journal of the Amer 

Agronomy 



gist 
Revi ew 
Ma t h e ma t i c s 



rican Ceramic 
r.ican Meteoro- 
logical Society 

tration and 

a Sigma 
istorical Rc- 

rnal 

ncering Chem- 

oducers' Review 
stical Society 

ican Chemical 

ican Society of 



reports sent in by individual fac- 
ulty members. The record is kept 
for the. purpose of obtaining in- 
formation which may contribute to 
publicity for research activities. 

The 47 magazines' in which the 
articles appeared arc listed below. 
Faculty member § who have contrib- 
uted to periodicals other than 
these are requested to send the 
name of 'the article, the name of 
the publication, and the date of 
issue to Miss Margaret Buyers, De- 
partment of Public Information. 

Journal of the American Statisti- 
cal Assoc i at ion 
Journal of Biological Chemistry 
Journal of Chemical'. -Education 
Journal of Chemical Physics 
Journal of Dairy Science 
Journal of Educational Sociology 
Journal of Home Economics 
Journa 1 of Markc t i ng 
Journal of Nutrition 
Journal of Wildlife Management 
Junior College Journal 
Mechanical Engineering 
Mi Ik Dealer 
Mi Ik Plant Monthly 
Modern Language Journal 
Mycol op i a 

Oil and Gas Journal 
Oi 1 Weekly 

Pennsylvania Game News 
Pennsylvania History 
Pennsylvania School Journal 
Physical Review 
Quarterly Journal of Speech 
Revi ew of Scientific Instruments 
School and Society 
Sc i ence 

Social Studies 
Soi 1 Sc iencc 



SPRING SALE OF ARTISTS' COURSE TICKETS TO BE HELD WAY 14 AND 15 



The preliminary sale of 1941- 
1942 Artists' Course tickets for 
faculty members will be held Wed- 
nesday, May 14, Dr. Carl E Mar- 
quardt, chairman of the committee, 
announced today. Ticket windows 
will be open from 8 a.m. to 12 and 
from 1:30 to 5 p.m. The student 
sale will be held Thursday, May 15, 
at the same hours. 

The spring sale was arranged 
in accordance with the Davey plan, 
which received the largest number 
of votes in the recent ballot on 
ticket sale methods. 

Prices of the tickets will be 
the same: $5.50, $4.50, and $3.50, 
Half of the seats will again be 
reserved for students and half for 
faculty members and townspeople. 
If students fail to take advantage 
of the spring sale, their section 
of the* auditorium will be reserved 
until the main sale in the fall. 

The only number at present 
selected is the Rochester Philhar- 
monic Orchestra, which received 
twice as many votes as the other 



two symphony orchestras combined 
as well as the greatest number of 
votes in the Artists' Course bal- 
lot. 

The quota of tickets that may 
be purchased by one person has 
been raised from three to four, in 
order to accommodate two couples 
who may wish to sit together. 
Tickets must again be purchased 
in person or by authorized proxy, 
and cash or a check must be pre- 
sented. The sale is final, and 
no money can be refunded. 

The main sale wi.ll be held in 
the fall as usual. At 4 p,m. on 
the day preceding this sale, pri- 
ority numbers will be distributed 
to prospective purchasers. Since 
only numbers will be distributed 
on that day, the line can be 
cleared very rapidly. Purchasers 
will then be instructed at what 
hour to report on the following 
day for the selection and obtain- 
ing of tickets. This procedure, 
the committee hopes, will elim- 
inate the all-night -lines formed 
in preceding years. 



MEETING ON "WORLD RECONSTRUCTION" TO BE HELD THURSDAY 



The final meeting in the se- 
ries of discussions on the theme 
"After War--What?" which was orig- 
inally scheduled for April ZZ will 
be held this Thursday, May 8, at 
8:15 p.m. in the Home Economics 
auditorium. Dr. W. Emory Hartman, 
minister of the Allison Memorial 
Methodist Church of Carlisle and 
former Wesley Foundation pastor of 
St, Paul's Church, State College, 
will speak on "The Role of Reli- 
gion and Religious Institutions in 
World Reorganization." 



Several speakers in the se- 
ries have indicated that the po- 
litical organization^ sociological 
structure^ and the economic order 
would need the contribution of re- 
ligion if any or all were to suc- 
ceed. Dr. Hartman will therefore 
analyze the contribution of reli- 
gion to the world future. Members 
of- the committee planning the se- 
ries include Charles Clemson, Al 
Kaplan, Clermont Powell, Galen 
Alexander, Clayton Allen, Clarence 
Stevens, Dorothy Stevens, and Jean 
Hershberger. 



MOTHER'S DAY SERVICES TO BE HELD SUNDAY 

Mother's Day services and the Dr. Albert W. Beaven, presi- 

scholarship day program will be dent of the Colgate-Rochester 

held this Sunday, May 11, at 10:30 Divinity School, Rochester, will 

a.m. in Recreation building. be the speaker. 



HOME ECONOMICS DEMONSTRATIONS TO BE GIVEN THIS MONTH 



Faculty members and townspeople are 
cordially invited to attend the demon- 
strations to be given by Home Economics 
seniors during May. All demonstrations 



will be given in room 105 Heme Economics 
building except the Mother's Day program, 
which will be given in the Home Economics 
auditorium. The schedule is as follows: 



May 6 9:00 a.m. Springtime Emergency Meals 
10:00 a.m. A Business Girl Entertains 



May 8 11:30 a.m. Playlet showing, the preparation of a pot-luck picnic as -it would 
to 12:30 p.m. have been done in an old-fashioned kitchen and as it would be 
done in a modern one. 

May 10 9:00 a.m. Mother's Day Program, including Table Setting, Flower Arrange^ 
to 11:00 a.m. merits, Refreshments, and Wearing Apparel 



May 13 
May 15 
May 16 



9:00 a.m. Tips on Tray Service 

10:00 a.m. Foods for Garden Parties 

9:00 a.m. Adventures with Yeast Rolls 

10:00 a.m. Springtime Desserts 

9:00 a.m. Time— and Temper-Saving Meals 

10:00 a.m. Handicrafts for the Home 



May 19 9:00 a.m. There Is Pep in the Package 

9:40 a.m. Summertime Meat Dishes 

10:15 a.m. Lawn Party Refreshments • 

May 20 11 :00 a.m, 



Marketing of. Meats and Fresh Garden Foods 



May 21 2:00 p.m. Community Nutrition 'Program 

3:00 p.m. Farm Security Work as Food for Thought 



May 22 11 -.00 a.m. 



Salads, Salad Dressing Variations, and New Sandwiches and Salad 
Accompaniment s 



May 23 9:00 a.m. Let Your Refrigerator Do It 
9:40 a.m. Tempting Hot Weather Dishes 
10:15 a.m. New Floral Arrangements 

GRADES FOR SENIORS DUE JUNE 3 



Classes for the second semester will 



end at 5 



begin at 8 
June 5. 



p.m. 



,ay 



Examinations will 



a.m. May 27 and end at 5 p.m. 



Grades for graduating seniors must 



be in t h e 



'istrar's office at 5 



p.m* 



June 3. All senior grades not reported 
at this time will be considered as pass—' 
ing grades. Grades for all other stu- 
dents are due in the office of the Ren'is- 



trar one week after the date of the final 
examination in that course. If no final 
examination has been given, the grades 
should be reported within one week after 
the last meeting of t.he class, except 
that all grades are due by noon of the 
We-dnesday following' the- close of the se- 
mester. The second semester officially 
ends at 5 p.m. June 5, 1941. 

Wm. S'« Hoffman, Registrar 



FACULTY MEMBERS REQUESTED TO CONTRIBUTE TO EXAMINATION FILE 



The jurisdiction of the examination 
file has been removed from campus poli- 
tics and placed in the hands of the Stu- 
dent Library Committee. This action was 
taken by the All-College Cabinet'- which 
officially recognized the examination 
file as a worthwhile student project. 



The Student Library Committee hopes 
that since the project has received this 
recognition members of the faculty will 
oo- 
t 
that those who have not as yet sent 



o— operate more actively in the crganisa- 
ion of the file. They therefore ask 



copies of their examinations to Miss 
Frear in the reference' room of the Li- 
brary-will do so before May 12. At that 
time a list of all examinations on file 
will be published in the Collegian. 

Although this file is available to 
students at all times, it will be main- 
tained 



from 
June 



in rooms 5 and 6 of the Library 
to 10 p.m. daily from May 17 to 
inclu sire . 

David I. F inkle, Chairman 
Examination File Committee 
';Student Library Committee 



OF GEITERAL INTEREST 



The faculty of the School of the 
Liberal Arts will meet tomorrow, Wednes- 
day, May 7, at 4:10 p.m. in rocm 121 
Sparks building, according to an of- 
ficial announcement from Dean Stoddart, 

* * * * * * 

The Graduate School faculty will 
meet next Tuesday, May 13, at 4:10 pun* 
in room 208 Buckhout Laboratory, ac- 
cording to an official announcement 
from Dean Frank D« Kern, 

* * * * * * 

The American Association of Uni- 
versity Women will hold a banquet in the 
State College Hotel this Thursday, May 8, 
at 7 p.m. 



A meeting of the Penn State Chris- 
tian Association Board of Directors will 
be held at the P.S.C.A, Cabin this Fri- 
day evening, May 9, The group will leave 
from the back of Old Main at 5:30 p.m. 
for stipper at the cabin. Following this 
the regular business meeting will be held. 



Faculty members or townspeople who 
are interested in securing the services 
of a co— ed for summer session or next 
fall are requested to call Ruth Zang in 
the office of the Dean of Women. 
* * * * * * 

Nine sports events are scheduled for 
this week. They are as follows: 

Wednesday, May 7 

4 tOO p.m. Freshman baseball with Mer- 
cer s burg 

Friday, May 9 

2:00 p.m. Golf with Georgetown 

Saturday, May 10 

Golf with Princeton 
Lacrosse with Pennsylvania 
Tennis with Cornell 
Gclf with Pennsylvania 
Freshman tennis with Cornell 
Freshman baseball with Syra— 
cu se 
2:30 p.m. Freshman golf with Cornell 



9:00 


a.m. 


2 :00 


p.m. 


2 :00 


p.m. 


2 :00 


p.m. 


2 :00 


p.m. 


2 :30 


p.m. 



OFFICIAL NOTICES FROM THE OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR 



Withdrawals 



Russell R # ', For, April 22 



Bartholomew, Russell R # ', For, Apri 
Dietrick, Charles R., MS, AC, Feb. 
Haman, Harry G., AE, DC, Mai' ch 3 
Laratonda, Joseph J., LD, AC, Marc 
London, Carl B«, Ch, April 1 
McFadgen, Robert N., ChEng, April 16 



h 26 



O'Brien, John F., C&F, April 9 
Pennock) Mary E., PM, AC, March 2 7 
Porter, Harold L., PEd, April 28 
Preston, Robert E., LD, April 23 
Wiley, William D», ME, SC, March 10 



The following reasons were given for 
withdrawing: 4 to go to work, 1 because 
of poor scholarship, 1 to go into the 



Army, 1 was net interested, 1 for finan- 
cial reasons, 1 because of illness, 1 for 
personal reasons, and 1 gave no reason. 



Change of Classification 

Max Rudolph Trembour should be two-year Agriculture instead of sophomore in Forestry, 

Wm. S. Hoffman 
Registrar 



■H , 



£*z?a(n*x 9S©xtoo 
H3HKYH0*H SAaVlS SSIH 



THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 



FACULTY 

Published weekly on Tuesday during the College 
year as a means of making official announcements 
and presenting items of interest to the faculty. All 

VOL. 20 




May 13, 1941 



T 



BULLETIN 



contributions should be as brief as possible and reach 
Walter F. Dantzscher, Director of Public Information, 
105 Old Main, not later than 10 a.m. each Friday. 



NO. 



30 



SPRING SALE OF ARTISTS' COURSE TICKETS BEGINS TOMORROW 



The spring sale of Artists' 
Course tickets, to be held tomor- 
row and Thursday, May 14 and 15, 
will be restricted to those "two 
days, Dr. Carl E. Marquardt, com- 
mittee chairman, announced today. 





The sa 


le f 


or faculty 


members 


and 


townspeople 


will 


be he 


Id to- 


morrow and 


the 


studen 


t sal 


e Thurs- 


day 


from 8 


a.m. 


to 12 


noon 


and 


from 1:30 t 


o 5 


p.m. a 


t the 


Athlet- 


ic Associ at 


i on 


t i eke t 


wi nd 


ow s i n 


Old 


Ma i n . 


One 


purchaser may buy a 


maximum of 


four 


t icke 


ts . 


After 


the 


c lose o 


f th 


e sale 


Thursday, no 


more 


t icket 


s wi 


1 1 be 


sold 


unt i 1 


the 


ma i n s a 


le in the 


fall . 





The Rochester Philharmonic 
Orchestra, with Jose Iturbi con- 
ducting, has been engaged as one 
of next season's numbers, in re- 
sponse to popular preference as ; 
shown on the Artists' Course bal- 
lot. 

Prices are the same as last 
year's: $5.50, $4.50, and $3.50. 
Tickets will not be distributed 
at the spring sale, but receipts 
will be given to purchasers for 
the particular seats selected. 
These seats cannot be exchanged 
at a later date, nor can money be 
refunded after the sale has been 
made • 



EXHIBITION OF WESTERN WATERCOLORISTS NOV/ BEING HELD 



An especially arranged exhi- 
bition of water colors is now be- 
ing sponsored by the Division of 
Fine Arts of the Department of 
Archi tecture . 

The exhibit consists of 49 
examples of original water-color 
paintings by such well-known Amer- 
icans as John Steuart Curry, Adolf 
Dehn, Doris Lee, Frank Mechau, 
Barse Miller, Henry Poor, Boardman 



Robinson, and Paul Sample. It is 
being circulated by the American 
Federation of Arts and will be 
open to the public in the College 
Art Gallery, 303 Main Engineering, 
from now until this Friday, May 
16, inc lus i ve . 

The gallery v/i 1 1 be open from 
8:30 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. daily. The 
public is cordially invited. 



FINAL MILITARY EXERCISES TO BE HELD MAY 21 



In accordance with Council 
action, the final military exer- 
cises are scheduled for the after- 
noon of Wednesday, May 21, from 3 
to 5 p.m. Students enrolled for 
R..O.T.C. who have classes at these 
hours are, by action, excused. 



If May 21, on account of inclement 
weather, is not used for this pur- 
pose, the alternate date is Fri- 
day, May 23. 

Wm. S. Hoffman, Secretary 
Council of Administration 



FACULTY MEMBERS CONTRIBUTE TO 11 ADDITIONAL PERIODICALS 



Faculty members have sent in 
the names of 11 additional period- 
icals to which they have, contrib- 
uted articles during the period 
from September, 1940, to March, 

Bulletin of the American Physical 
Soc i e ty 

Comparative Psychology Monographs 

Journal of the American Associa- 
tion of Collegiate Registrars 

Journal of Engineering Education 

Journal of Negro History 



1941, inclusive. This brings the 
total to' 126 articles in* 58 publi- 
cations. Additional contributions 
should be sent to the .Department 
of Public Information; 

Philosophy of Science 
Proceedings of the Institute of 

Radio Engineers 
Proceedings of the Pennsylvania 

Academy of Science' 
School Activities 
Social Forces 
West Virginia School Journal 



OF GENERAL INTEREST 



Faculty members and graduate 
students who wish to rent or pur- 
chase academic costumes for the 
June Commencement may do so at 
once by telephoning G. J. S'tout, 
Vegetable Gardening office, Horti- 
cul ture bui 1 di ng . 



for a candidate for the Ph.D. de- 
gree: 

Mr. Thomas Patrick Carney; 
major, 'chemistry; room 105 Pond 
'Laboratory; Tuesday, May 27, at 
8 a.m. 

it^L i'-l'- ."„"- 



.The American Associ 
University Professors wi 
important business meeti 
hour this Thursday, May 
7 to 8 p.m. in room 5 of 
brary, according to an a 
ment from J. T. Law, sec 
•The business will includ 
preparation of a letter 
dent Hetzel relative to 
the value of Penn State 
strument for protecting 
This will be the last me 
the year. 



ation of 
11 hold an 
ng for one 
15, from 
the Li- 
nnounce- 
re tary. 
e the 
to Presi- 
increas ing 
as • an in- 
democracy. 
eting of 



The Graduate School faculty 
will meet today, Tuesday, May 13, 
at 4:10 p.m. in room 208 Buckhout 
Laboratory, according to an offi- 
cial announcement from Dean Frank 
D." Kern. 



Dean Frank D. Kern announces 
the following final examination 



Dr. Henry H. Tweedy, of the 
Yale University Divinity School, 
will be the chapel speaker this 
Sunday, May 18. 



Five sports events are sched- 
uled for this week. 

Wednesday, May 14 

4:00 p.m. Freshman baseball with 
Colgate 

Friday, May 16 

4:00 p.m. Baseball with Muhlen- 
berg 
4:00 p.m. Tennis with Franklin 
• and Marsha 1 1 

Saturday, May 17 

12:30 p.m. Freshman baseball with 
Bucknell 
2:30 p.m. Baseball with Temple 



AGRICULTURAL-HOME ECONOMICS PICNIC TO BE HELD SATURDAY 



The Agricultural-Home Eco- be held 
nomics student-faculty picnic wi 1 1 May 17, 



on Ag Hi'll this Saturday, 
from 2 to 5:30 p.m. 



MINUTES OF THE COLLEGE SENATE MEETING OF MAY 1, 1941 



A meeting of the College Senate was 
held in room 121 Sparks building - Thurs- 
day, May 1, 1941, at 4:10 p.m., frith Dean 
Stoddart presiding, A list of the mem- 



bers present is 
the Registrar, 



on 



file in the office of 



The minutes of the April meeting 
were read and approved. 

The Secretary announced that he had 
received the names of elected members for 
the academic year 1941-1942, from the 
several Schools, with one or two excep- 
tions. The complete list of newly elect- 
ed members is to be printed in an early 
issue of the Faculty Bulletin, These 
lists are on file in the office of the 
Registrar, 

Dr, Marquardt, acting chairman of 
the Committe'e on Academic Standards, pre- 
sented a report in two parts. The report 
informed the Senate that Mr, Winston G, 
Donr'.lds.'on, a recipient of the John.W, 
White Fellowship, had resigned the Fel- 
lowship and that Mr, Ray H* Dutt , alter— . 
Hate, had been appointed to it* The Com- 
mittee announced two additional alter— ' 
nates, Mr, George P, Cressman as first 
alternate and Miss Mary E 8 Baker as sec- 
ond alt ernate ,. who will ( f ill any vacan- 
cies that may occur in the . Fellowships 
These recommendations^ which are on file 
in the office of the Registrar, had the 
approval of the _Pre sident •and were,, on 
mocion, adopted, 

., The Committee on Academic Standards 
also presented the recommendation made 
by the Executive Committee of the School 
of Engineering which was presented at the 
Apr^l meeting of the Senate and'recom- 
me ided favorable action on the part of 
tho Senate, The recornmendat ion reads as 
fellows j . ' 

Any examination authorized as a spe- 
cial examination to remove a condition 
in a subject where the course has not 
been repeated may be- graded no higher 
than a 0, and this shall be the final 
grade ..for the course The reported 
grade should be accompanied by .the 
letters "Sp,ExJ" indica'cing that it is 
the result of a special examination. 

The recornmendat ion was, on motion, 
adopted. 

Professor Kinsloe, as chairman of 
the Committee on Courses of Study, pre— 
rented a report which, in accordance with 
Senate procedure, was tabled for consid- 
eration at the June meeting. The report 
of the Committee on Courses of Study, as 
presented at' the April meeting of the 
Senate, wag, pn motion, adopted. 

On motion, the Senate voted that the 



Committee on Courses of Study be permitted 
to act with power on Engineering Defense 
courses that might require action during 
the summer months, beginning with the day 
following the date of this meeting and to 
continue until the Senate convenes in the 
fall. No courses carrying College credit 
are included in this proposal. 

The special committee, appointed to 
study the operation of the rules govern- 
ing attendance before and after vacations, 
presented a report. The committee unani- 
mously came to the conclusion that no 
change in the rules (58 to 63) should be 
made. The report contained two recornmen- 
dat ions : 

1, That two teaching members of the 
faculty, not department heads, be added 
to the administrative committee on va- 
cation absences. 



This recommendation was tabled for 
consideration at the June meeting and re- 
ferred, in the interim, to the Committee 
on Rules, * ' 



2, That the Senate Committee on Calen- 
dar be requested to study the desira- 
bility of scheduling vacations to be- 
gin, as far as possible, on Saturday 
noon and to end on Monday morning. 

This recornmendat ion was automatically 
referred to the Committee on Calendar for 
consideration. The report, which is on 
file in the office of the Registrar, was, 
on motion, adopted. 

The report of the Committee on Rules, 
as presented at the April meeting- of the 
Senate and referred to on page 381 of 
these minutes, was considered. Recommen- 
dation No, 1 reads as f ollows i 

In Rule 88, which concerns student au- 
tomobiles, it is proposed to substitute 
the words "the Campus Patrol, Depart- 
ment of Grounds and Buildings, room 
320 Old Main" for the words "the desig- 
nated College authority," Then the 
regulation will read "A student- who 
desires to keep or operate an automo- 
bile," etc., "shall obtain a student 
automobile permit from the Campus Pa- 
trol, Department of Grounds and Build- 
ings, room 320 Old Main," The C-ommit- . 
tee proposes further to print in an 
appendix to the Regulations booklet 
the rules adopted by t he _Department 
of Grounds and Buildings, 

This recornmendat ion was, on motion, 
adopted, professor Kinsloe suggested an 
amendment to recommendation No, 2, which 
was accepted by the Committee on Rules, 
The amende-d recornmendat ion reads as fol- 
lows : 



Authorized meetings may be held in. 
rooms of College "buildings subject 
to administrative regulations on file 
in the central booking office, room 
320 Old Main, It is expected that 
meetings "will generally be held in 
Old Main, but meetings may be held 
in classroom buildings, provided 
that the meeting is sponsored by a 



department of the College* 

The recommendation, as amended, was 
adopted. 

The Senate then adjourned, 

Wm, S, Hoffman 
Secretary 



OFFICIAL NOTICE FROM THE OFFICE OF TEE REGISTRAR 

Withdrawal 
S Ro.driguez, Julie, HoEc, April 8 
The reason given for withdrawing was illness. 



Wm, S, Hoffman 
Registrar 






H3HNVH0*a S'AdV-lD S S 1 n 



THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 



FACULTY 

Published weekly on Tuesday during the College 
year as a means of making official announcements 
and presenting items of interest to the faculty. All 

VOL. 20 




May 20, 1941 



BULLETIN 

contributions should be as brief as possible and reach 
Walter F. Dantzscher, Director of Public Information, 
105 Old Main, not later than 10 a.m. each Friday. 

NO.31 



FACULTY MEMBERS CONTRIBUTE TO 9 ADDITIONAL PERIODICALS 



During the past week faculty 
members have sent in the names of 
9 additional periodicals to which 
they contributed during the seven- 
month period from September, 1940, 
to March, 1941, inclusive. This 

Annals of Mathematical Statistics 
Canadian Journal of Optometry 
Childhood Education 
Journal of Veterinary Medicine 
Metals Technology 



brings the total to 67. The addi- 
tional names are listed below. 
Others which may be sent in during 
the coming week will be published 
in the next issue of the Faculty 
Bui let in. 

Opt ome trie Weekly 
Pennsylvania Optometrist 
Teachers College Journal, Tcrre 

Haute, Indiana 
Visual Digest 



Or GENERAL INTEREST 



The faculty of the School of 
Agriculture will meet this Friday, 
May 23, at 4:10 p.m. in room 109 
Agriculture building, according to 
an official announcement from Dean 
S. W. Fletcher. 



Faculty members and graduate 
students who wish to rent or pur- 
chase academic costumes for the 
June Commencement may do so at 
once by telephoning G. J. Stout, 
Vegetable Gardening office, Horti- 
culture bui ldi ng . 



Dr. Don Frank Fenn, of the 
Church of Saint Michaels and All 
Angels, Baltimore, will be the 
chapel speaker this Sunday, Play 25. 



Dean Frank D. Kern announces 
six final examinations for the 
Ph.D. degree: 

Mr. Harry A. Keener; major, 
dairy husbandry; minor, agricul- 
tural biochemistry; room 202 



Dairy building; this Friday, May 
23, at 1:30 p.m. 

Mr. Ernest George Stern; 
major, architectural engineering; 
minor, mechanics; room 104 Main 
Engineering building; this Friday 



May 



9 1 

/CO 



at 



p.m. 



Mr. Lai -Yung Li; major, hor- 
ticulture; room 102 Horticulture 
building; this Saturday, May 24, 
from 8 a.m. to 12 noon. 

Mr. Allen Carl Werner; major, 
chemistry; room 105 Pond Labora- 



y > 



tory; next Monday, May 
1:30 p.m. 



:6, at 



Mr. David Irwin Randall; ma- 
jor, chemistry; room 105 Pond 
Laboratory; next Tuesday, May 27, 
at 10 a.m. 

Mr. Jacob Osborn Ashcraft, 
Jr.; major, chemistry; minor, ag- 
ricultural biochemistry; room 105 
Pond Laboratory; next Tuesday, May 
27, at 1:30 p.m. 



SURVEY OF CONFLICT EXAMINATIONS 



by Ray V, Watkins 
College Scheduling Officer 



The College Scheduling Officer has 
been striving to reduce the number of 
conflict examinations. The following 
table shows a decrease in those sched\.iled 
for the second semester of 1941 over 
those scheduled for the second semester 



of 1940. If the examination cards sent 
out by the College Scheduling Officer are 
completely filled out by instructors, the 
number of conflict examinations may be 
even further reduced. 



SECOND SEMESTER 193 9-1940 



SECOND SEMESTER 1940-1941 



COURSE 


Number 


Number 


Per Cent 


Number 


Number 


Per Cent 




Enrolled 


Conflict 


Conflict 


Enrolled 


Conflict 


Conflict 


ABCh 








226 


14 


5.2 


AgEo 


187 


12 


6.4 


272 


32 


11.8 


AgEng 


198 


23 


11.6 


57 


6 


10.5 


Agro 


212 


19 


9.0 


91 


2 


2*2 


AH 


63 


8 


12.7 


83 


8 


9.6 


Art 


200 


33 


16.5 


120 


11 


9.2 


Bact 


243 


25 


10*3 


243 


22 


9*1 


Bot 


530 


59 


11*1 


436 


16 


3;7 


ChE 


225 


5 


2*2 








Chem 


756 


44 


5.8 


183 


6 


3.3 


Com 


1064 


71 


6.7 


1282 


94 


7.3 


DH 


295 


5 


1.7 








Dram 








42 


5 


11.9 


Econ 


241 


25 


10.4 


724 


66 


9.1 


Ed 


473 


53 


11.2 


370 


30 


8.1 


EE 


37 


4 


11.0 


258 


10 


3.9 


EComp 


538 


31 


5.8 


446 


43 


9.6 


ELit 


818 


89 


10.9 


890 


112 


12.6 


EngLaw 


119 


4 


3.4 


100 


4 


4.0 


For 


412 


70 


17.0 


315 


38 


12.1 


Fr 


281 


52 


18.5 


99 


2 


2.0 


FT 


104 


10 


17.3 








Geol,Geog 


162 


16 


9.9 


224 


25 


11.2 


Ger 


397 


46 


11.6 


2 70 


10 


3.7 


HE 


406 


45 


11.1 


385 


75 


19.5 


Hist 


84 9 


90 


10.6 


660 


43 


6.5 


Hort 


182 


29 


15.9 


131 


10 


7.6 


Hyd 


188 


13 


6.9 


177 


8 


4.5 


IE 


283 


20 


7;i 


159 


15 


9.4 


Jour 


170 


10 


10.6 


353 


48 


13.4 


Math 


1189 


44 


3.7 


388 


34 


8.8 


Mchs 


63 


3 


4.6 


237 


11 


4.6 


ME 


180 


9 


5.0 


173 


4 


2.3 


Met 


32 


3 


9.4 








Mu s 








297 


28 


9.4 


Phil 


246 


36 


14.6 


234 


23 


9.8 


PH 


35 


5 


14.3 


34 


3 


8.8 


PhysSci 


271 


6 


2.2 


487 


24 


4.9 


PEd 


1339 


44 


3.3 


890 


34 


3.8 


Phys 


219 


12 


5.5 


580 


23 


3.3 


PolSci 


516 


36 


7.0 


373 


39 


10.5 


Psy 


781 


73 


9.3 


797 


46 


5.8 


S oc 


6 96 


70 


10.1 


751 


99 


13.2 


Sp 


213 


53 


24.9 


172 


14 


8.1 


Spec ch 


3 92 


45 


11.5 


20 


5 


25.0 


Zool 


486 


75 


15.4 


519 


25 


4.8 


TOTALS 















16291 



1441 



8.8 



14661 



1167 



8.0 



3 



SPORTS CALENDAR 



Three sports events are on 
the calendar for this week: 

W ednesday, May Zl 



Saturday, Fay 24 



1:30 p.m. Track with Michigan 
State 



4:00 p.m. Freshman baseball with 2:00 p.m. Tennis with Muhlenberg 
Font Alto 

OFFICIAL NOTICES FROM THE OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR 

Wi thdrawa 1 s 

4 Kerr, Helen S., A&L, March 21 Z Lieb, Shirley, LD, May 12 

2 Newton, Richard R., PNG, April 4 

All three withdrew because of illness. 

Change of Classification 

i i m i i - i - ■■■!.- -it 

Robert Pi Saalbach changed from special to graduate. 

Wm. S. Hoffman 
Rea i strar 



6 a 12 j q i *J 9 s 9 1 1 9 
USBKVHO'H SAQV1S ,SS1M 



THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 



FACULTY 



Published weekly on Tuesday during the College 
year as a means of making official announcements 
and presenting items of interest to the faculty. All 




VOL. 20 



May 27, 1941 



BULLETIN 

contributions should be as brief as possible and reach 
Walter F. Dantzscher, Director of Public Information, 
105 Old Main, not later than 10 a.m. each Friday. 

NO. 



NEW COMMENCEMENT FROCE 
DEGREES GIVEN BY THE 

A new procedure will be tried 
the June Commencement , according 
an announcement from Professor 
E. Dull inner, College Marshall 



DURE 5 ANNOUNCED; TOTAL 
COLLEGE EXCEED 25,000 



at 

to 
C* 

When the dean of a_ Schoo 1 r i ses to 
p r c 5 e n t the graduates from hi s 
School , t. h e members of the f acul ty 
of that School shou 1 d rise a ncl 
stand with him unt i 1 the degrees 
have been conferred. 



Members of the faculty who 
will march in the academic pro- 
cession on Commencement Day will 
assemble at the Water Tower at 
10:10 a.m.. Monday, June 9. The 
procession will move about 10: SO. 

Graduates of the various 
Schools will assemble with their 
marshals on New Beaver baseball 
field at the designated sections. 
Members of the faculty receiving 
advanced degrees will assemble 
with other graduate student , at 
section N. 

In case of rain the faculty 
Will meet, under the balcony on the 
first floor, south side of Recre- 
ation building. Under these cir- 
cumstances there will be no aca- 
demic procession of graduates. 
Instead they will assemble at the 
place designated by their School 
banner and in accordance with in- 
structions given them. 

Baccalaureate exercises will 
be held as a chapel service at 11 
a.m. Sunday, June 8, in Recreation 
building. The speaker will be Dr. 
Joseph R. Sizoo, of the Collegiate 
Church of St. Nicholas, New York. 



Faculty members and graduate 
students are again reminded that 
they can rent or purchase academic 
costumes by telephoning G; J. 
Stout) Vegetable Gardening office, 
Horticulture building. 

Including the Mid- Year Com- 
mencement this year, a total of 
25,296 degrees have been awarded 
by The Pennsylvania State College, 
according to figures released by 
William S. Hoffman, Registrar, 
The number to be graduated this 
June will be somewhat in excess of 
the number graduated last June 
(1,157) and will therefore bring 
the total well over 2 6,000. 

The total number of degrees 
that have been conferred at the 17 
Ma i n 5 umme r Session C ommc nc e me n t s 
is 3121; at the 8 Post-Session Com- 
mencements, 224; at the 27 Mid- 
Year Commencements, 2250; and at 
the 80 June Commencements, 10,693, 

The total number of bachelors' 
degrees conferred to date is 
21,615; masters' degrees, 2617; 
technical degrees, 327; and doc- 
tors' degrees, 247. These latter 
figures are as of the academic 
year ending June 30, 1940. The 
total number of men receiving de- 
grees up to that time is 20,487; 
the total number of v/omen is 4319. 

At the Commencement to be 
held on June 9, 194.1, the probable 
number of degrees to be conferred 
is as follows: Bachelor of Arts, 
316; Bachelor of Science, 734; and 
advanced degrees, 129. 



COMMENCEMENT PROGRAM 

June, 1941 
(Daylight Saving Time) 

-i:-F r i day, June o 

1 : OC p.m. Trustee Election by De 1 egates--The Nittany Lion 

&:30 p.m. "Goodbye Again" --Schwab Auditorium, by Renn State Players 

9:30 p.m. Fraternity Dances 

-: :- Saturday, June 7--Alumni Day 

8:30 a.m. Alumni Golf Tournament 

9:00 to ) Campus Tour--Busses leave from rear of Old Main. 
12:00 noon) - - 

10:00 a.m. Annual Meet i ng- -Alumni Council--121 Sparks Building 

11:00 a.m. Election of Alumni Trustees Closes 

12:30 p.m. Alumni Luncheon- — Racreati on Building 

2;30 p.m. Meeting of the Board of Trustees 

3:00 p.m. Basebal 1- -University of Pittsburgh 

3:30 to ) Miss Ray, assisted by members of her staff and members of 

5:00 p.m.) the State College Alumnae Club will be at home to alumnae- 
Frances Atherton Hall 

6:00 p.m. Class Reunion Dinners 

6:00 p.m. Dinner- -Nonreuni on Classes--Sandwich Shop, Old Main 

7:30 p.m. "Goodbye Again"-~Schwab Auditorium, by Penn State Players 

9:30 p.m. Fraternity Dances 

Sunday, June 8--Bacca laureate Day 

8:45 a. mi Senate Breakfast—The Nittany Lion 
9:00 a.m. Alumni Breakfast —Sandwich Shop, Old Main 
11:00 a. m* Baccalaureate Service, Dedicated to the Clasr of 1891 Geife- 

brating the 50th Anniversary—Recreation Bui 1 ding— Dr . 

Joseph R. Sizoo, The Collegiate Church of St. Nicholas, 

New York City 
6:00 p.m. Senior Class Day Exercises and Blue Band. Concert--Front 

Campus . . . 

Monday, June 9--Commcncemcnt Day 

10:00 a.m. Commencement Procession Forms at New Beaver Field 
10:30 a.m. Commencement Exerc i ses--New Beaver Field (In case of rain, 
Recreation Building, admission by ticket only) 

-"Alumni Registration, all day—Old Main 

*\ *\ %wv" "\ *\ 

EXHIBIT OF FOREIGN PROPAGANDA NOV-/ AT LIBRARY 

An exhibit of foreign propa- "chamber of commerce." All per- 

ganda is now on display at the Li- sons interested in examining the 

brary. Such material, received displayed material more closely 

frequently and free of charge, is should ask for similar pamphlets 

distributed by such agencies as at the periodical desk. This ex- 

the British and German "libraries hibit will be on display until 

of information" and the Japan this Friday, May 30. 



OF GENERAL INTEREST 



The name of one additional 
periodical to which a faculty 
member has contributed during the 
present academic year was turned 
in this week. It is the s imple- 
ment to Electrical Engineering 
Transactions. This brings the 
seven-month total to 63. April 
and May contributions are not 
included in this total. 



Dean Frank D. Kern announces 
the following final examinations 
for the Ph.D. degree: 



Mr. Frederick Dewey Bennett; 
major, physics; minor, chemistry; 
tomorrow, Wednesday, May 26, at 1 
p.m.: room 115 New Phys i c s . 



Four sports events are on the 
calendar for t. h is week: 



Tue sday, May 2 7 

4:00 p.m. Baseball with 
Univers i ty 

Friday, May 30 



Buckne 1 1 



Mr. Theodore Stephen Po lan- 
sky; major, bacteriology; minor, 
agricultural biochemistry: today, 
Tuesday, May 27, at 9 aim.; room 
201 Fat tor son Fall . 

Mr . David Telfair; ma j or , 
physics; minor, chemistry.; today, 
Tuesday, May 27, at 1 p.m.; room 
110 New Physics building. 



12:30 p.m. Freshman baseball with 
Wyoming Seminary 
2:30 p.m. Baseball with Fong 
Island University 

Saturday, May 31 

2:30 p. in* Baseball with- Long 
Island University 



OFFICIAL NOTICES FROM THE OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR 

V/i thdrawal s 

1 Ettcrs, Elmer Orin, IndEd, May 15 

4 Huehnergarth, R. J., C&F, April 28 

McEvoy, Leo Thomas, For, Jan. 20 

1 Ralston, Hugh G., LD, May 19 



The following reasons were 
given for withdrawing: 1 because 
of illness, 1 had too heavy a 



schedule, 2 left to accept posi 
t i ons . 

Urn. S. Hoffman 
Rcoistrar 



4 



MISS GLADYS R.C RANKER 

College Llbrai*^ 



THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 



FACULTY 

Published weekly on Tuesday during the College 
year as a means of making official announcements 
and presenting items of interest to the facidty. All 

VOL. 20 




June 3, 1941 



BULLETIN 

contributions should lie as brief as possible and reach 
Walter F. Dantzscher, Director of Public Information, 
105 Old Main, not later than 10 a.m. each Friday. 



NO. 



TICKETS FOR COMMENCEMENT REQUIRED ONLY IN CASE OF RAIN- 
ANNOUNCEMENT OF NEVv COMMENCEMENT PROCEDURES REPEATED 



Commencement exorcises will 
be held at New Beaver field next 
Monday, June 9, except in case of 
rain, in which event, they will be 
held in Recreation building. If 
the latter is necessary, tickets 
of admission will be required for 
seats until 10:15 a.m., after 
which whatever seats remain will 
be made ai/ailable to the general 
pub lie. 



No tickets of admi 
available for members o 
ulty, their families or 
Faculty members must ma 
academic procession in 
secure admission to Rec 
building. Three ticket 
allotted and distribute 
senior and graduate stu 
the space required for 
graduating seniors, and 
students, this is expec 
haust the capacity of t 



ssion are 
f the fac- 

f r i ends . 
rch in the 
order to 
rcat i on 
s will be 
d to each 
dent. With 
the faculty, 

advanced 
ted to ex- 
he bui Id inq. 



Professor C. E. Bui linger, 
College Marshal, wishes to repeat 
his announcement of the following 
Commencement procedures : 

When the dean of a_ Schoo 1 
r i ses to present the graduates 
from hi s School , the members of 
the f acul ty of that School should 
r i s e and stand wi th him unt i 1 the 
degrees have been conferred . 

Members of the faculty who 
will march in the academic pro- 
cession on Commencement day will 
assemble at the Water Tower at 
10:10 a.m. Monday, June 9. The 



procession will move about 10:30. 

Graduates of the various 
Schools will assemble with their 
marshals on New Beaver baseball 
field at the designated sections. 
Members of the faculty receiving 
advanced degrees will assemble 
with other graduate students at 
sect 5 on N. 

In case of rain the faculty 
will meet under the balcony on the 
first floor, south side of Recrea- 
tion building. Under these cir- 
cumstances there will be no aca- 
demic procession of graduates. 
Instead they will assemble at the 
place designated by their School 
banner and in accordance with in- 
structions given them. 

Whether the exercises are 



held outdoors or indoor' 



there 



w i 1 1 be _a recess i ona 1 for the f ac - 
ul tv only . 

Baccalaureate services will 
be held as a chapel service at 
11 a.m. next Sunday, June 8, in 
Recreation building. The speaker 
will be the Reverend Dr. Joseph R. 
Si zoo, pastor of the Collegiate 
Church of St. Nicholas, New York. 
His subject will be "Unashamed and 
Unafraid," Born in the Nether- 
lands, Dr. Sizoo was educated at 
Hope College, New Brunswick Theo- 
logical Seminary, and Columbia 
University. He is the author of 
several books on religious sub- 
jects and books on Abraham Lincoln 
and William Jennings Bryan. 



LOCAL U.S.O. COMMITTEE BESPEAKS 

IN BRINGING ENTERTAINMENT TO f 



FACULTY SUPPORT 
IEN IN SERVICE 



An intensive week's drive to 
solicit a financial contribution 
from all members of campus and 
town will be conducted beginning 
tomorrow by the local committee of 
the United Service Organizations 
for National Defense, Inc., em- 
ploying the women's auxiliaries of 
the American Legion and the Veter- 
ans of Foreign Wars. The solici- 
tation will be made at the indi- 
vidual's home. The U.S.O. is a 
co-ordinated agency comprised of 
the Young Men's Christian Associa- 
tions, National Catholic Community 
Service , ..Sal vati on Army, Young 
Women's Christian Association, 
Jewish Welfare Board, and National 
Travelers Aid Association. The 
national goal is $10,765,000. 

The money raised in this 
drive will be used to provide rec- 
reation and-entertainment and to 
bolster in other ways the morale 
of 1,500,000 men in uniform and 
2,000,000 others engaged in vital 
defense, industries. The federal 



government will. provide the build- 
ings to serve the participating, ,. 
organizations, but the program pro- 
vided by the U.S.O. wi 11 consist 
of leisure-time activities con- 
ducted when the service men are 
off duty and are keen to get away 
from bounds. Therefore the fed- 
eral government itself cannot ef- 
fectively finance the activities' 
program. 

The U.S.O. plans to set up 
339 service clubs, adjacent to 
camps, naval stations, and defense 
industries throughout the United 
States and its overseas bases, so 
that the influence and comfort of 
the American home communi ty 'may be 
brought to those who have been 
separated from their homes to 
serve their country. 

Claude G. Aikcns is chairman 
of the local committee and Walter 
J. Mills, executive accountant of 
the College, treasurer. Receipts 
will be provided to all solicitors 



PENN STATE- IN-CHINA COMMITTEE REQUESTS INFORMATION FROM DONORS 



The Perm State-in-China com- 
mittee has received a check for 
$1 which was unsigned. The check 
is drawn on the First- National 
Bank and is No, 65, dated May 22, 
1941. If the contributor will get 
in touch with one of the secre- 
taries in 304 Old Main, the check 
will be returned for signature. 



In addition, several . cash 

contributions of $1 have also been 
received by the committee without 
any designation as to the donor. 
The committee does not object to 
anonymous contributions but. wishes 
to give credit for these receipts 
whenever it is possible to do so. 



FACULTY MEMBERS INVITED TO ATTEND ALUMNI LUNCHEON 



A cordial invitation is ex- 
tended to faculty members by the 
Alumni Association to attend the 
annual Alumni Luncheon to be. held 
this year in Recreation building 



at 12:30 p.m. this Saturday, June 
7. Tickets may be purchased in 
advance at the office of the Alum- 
ni Association, 104 Old Main, at 
75iz? each. 



SENATE BREAKFAST TO BE HELD SUNDAY 



The annual Senate Breakfast 
v/i 1 1 be held at 8:45 a.m. this 
Sunday, June 8, at the Nittany 
Lion Inn. Members of the Board 



of Trustees have been invited to 
attend. Tickets at 50sz? will be 
on sale at the Senate meeting 
this Thursday, June 5, 



GRADES FOR GRADUATING SENIORS DUE TODAY 



All grades for graduating 
seniors arc due at the Registrar's 
office today, Tuesday, June 3, at 
5 p.m. 

If grades are in the office 
at the time designated, it is not 
necessary for the recorders to 
call for grades to complete rec- 
ords where grade points arc in- 
sufficient and enables the office 
to give final corrections to the 
printer of the Commencement pro- 
gram in time to meet our contract. 

Last year, thanks to the co- 
operation of all instructors, 
grade sheets for all seniors who 
were graduating were ready for 
distribution before Commencement 
day. It is our hope to do the 



same thing this year. 

Senior grades not reported by 
5 p.m. today, Tuesday, will be 
considered as passing. 

Other Grades 

All grades are due at the 
office of the Registrar one week 
after the final meeting of a class 
for which no final examination is 
scheduled, or one week after the 
final examination, except that all 
grades are due at the office of 
the Registrar not later than the 
Wednesday following the close' of 
the final examination period. 

Wm. S. Hoffman 
Rcgi s trar 



EMPLOYEES TO APPLY FOR SPECIAL SUMMER SESSION FEES 



Colle 
diatc 
ule c 
are r 
plica 
ti on 
f i ce 
or he 
depa r 
state 
es wi 



Ful 1- 
ge or 

f ami 
o u r s e 
eques 
t ion 
from 
of th 
ads o 
tment 

the 
11 be 



time empl 
members 
lies who 
s in the 
ted to ma 
immedi ate 
general f 
c deans p 
f their a 
s. Appli 
scs s ions 
schedule 



ovees of the 
of their imme- 
plan to sched- 
summer sessions 
ke formal ap- 
ly for cxemp- 
ees at the of- 
f thei r Schools 
dmini s t rati ve 
cations should 
in which cours- 
d. The special 



staff fee is $5 for Inter-Session 
and Post-Session and $7 for Main 
Summer Session. .This fee does not 
apply to charges for the Band, Or- 
chestra^ and Chorus School. All 
summer session students arc charged 
a Health Service fee of 75^ for 
Inter-Session and Post-Session and 
$1.50 for Main Summer Session. 

V. D. Bissey 
Statistical Division 
Accounting 0ffi.ee 



OF GENERAL INTEREST 



The College Senate will meet 
this Thursday, June 5, at 4:10 
p.m., in room 121 Sparks building, 
according to an offici.al announce- 
ment from William S. Hoffman, Sec- 
retary. 



The faculty of the School of 
Engineering will meet on Tuesday, 
June 17, at 10 a.m., in room 107 
Main Engineering, according to an 
official announcement from Dean 
H. P. Hammond. 



The only sports event sched- 
uled for this week is baseball 
with Pittsburgh at 3 p.m. this 
Saturday, June 7. 



The name of one additional 
periodical to which a faculty mem- 
ber contributed during the current 
year was turned in this week. The 
magazine was Agricultural Educa- 
tion. This brings the total of 
known publications containing the 
work of staff members to 69. 



OFFICIAL NOTICES FROM THE OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR 

Wi thd raw a I s 

4 Brotman, Myron, A&L, Feb. 15 

1 He in, Harold J., LD, SC, March 20 

Z Mills, James L., PNG, DC, April 17 

The following reasons were automobile accident, and 1 was not 
given for withdrawing: 1 because fitted for college work. 
of eye trouble, 1 because of an 

Wm. S. Hoffman 
Req i strar 



& 3 FT M V H ' H S A C V 1 G SSI 71 




- 

■ 



• I 



PENN STATE COLLECTION