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Full text of "Faculty bulletin / The Pennsylvania State College"

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PENN STATE COLLECTION 




Old Main 
Building 
1859 



LIBRARY OF 

THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIVERSITY 

FINN S1ATE COLLECTION 



PENN STATE COLLECTION 



pennState 



UkBBJ 

UNIVERSITY 
LIBRARIES 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://archive.org/details/facultybulletinpv3637penn 



THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 



FACULTY 



Published weekly on Tuesday during the College 
year as a means of making official announcements 
and presenting items of interest to the faculty. All 



VOL. 




BULLETIN 



contributions should be as brief as possible and 
reach Louis H. Bell. Director of Public Information, 
313 Old Main, not later than 10 a. m. each Friday. 



36 



September 27, 1948 



NO. 



McCQMB NAMED LIBRARIAN; OTHER CHANGES ANNOUNCED 



Ralph W # McComb, associate librarian 
since January 1, 1947, has been named 
college librarian, succeeding Wlllard P. 
Lewi So 

An increasing measure of ill health 
prompted Lewis to shed the responsibili- 
ties of this office and accept the asso- 
ciate librarian's position with a leave 
of absence for one year P He had served 
as librarian since 1931» 

Other appointments announced during 
the summer months include: Dr. Ralph 0, 
Gallington, associate professor of indus- 
trial arts education at Eastern Illinois 
State College, professor of industrial 
arts education, effective September 1; 
Dr , Kendon R. Smith, assistant professor 
of psychology at Prinoeton University, 
associate professor of psychology^ effec- 
tive September 1; Dr. Harold L* 31ack 7 
assistant professor of mathematics at 
Michigan State College, associate profes- 
sor of engineering research in the Ord- 
nance Research Laboratory, effective 
August 1. 

George M. Duslnberre, of University 
of Delaware, associate professor of 
mechanical engineering, effective Septem- 
ber 1; Wayne H, Wilson, land planning 
consultant with FHA, associate professor 
of landscape horticulture, effective 
September 1. 

Dr. Hugh M p Davison, with division 
of school administration, FSA, professor 
of educational research, effective Septem- 
ber 1; Dr. Thomas C« Kavanagh, instructor 
in civil engineering, New York University, 
associate professor of civil engineering, 
^effective September 1; Dr. David C. White, 
U.S. Department of Agriculture, nrofessor 
of pomology, September lj Arthur L« Har- 
nett, Jr., of University of Florida, pro- 
fessor of physical education and ath- 



letics, effective September 1, and Dr« 
Douglas W.E. Axford, of Cortlands Funda- 
mental Research Institute- Maidenhead, 
England, research associate in physics, 
effective Ootober 1» 

Edward Abrarnson, assistant professor 
of sociology, was named research asso- 
ciate in instructional film researoh» 

Resignations acoepted during the 
summer months included those of Dr. John 
R„ Low, Jr 3 , professor and chief of the 
division of metallurgy, effective Septem- 
ber 15; Dr » Willis E* Pratt, professor 
and head of the department of eduoation, 
effective June 30; Dr, Doris E. Ekstrom, 
associate professor of home economics' 
education, effective June 30; Merrill D. 
Hart, associate professor of engineering 
research in Ordnance Research Laboratory, 
effective July 26; and Dr. Merlin T. 
Henderson, associate professor of agronomy, 
effective August 15 • 

Leaves approved by the Trustees in- 
clude: JbL E. McCord, professor of agri- 
cultural extension in charge of corres- 
pondence courses, six months, effective 
October 10; John W. Bratzler, associate 
professor of animal nutrition, one year, 
effeotive October 1; J,K« Stern, profes- 
sor of agricultural cooperation, one year, 
effective September 16; P.S, Crossman, 
agricultural extension representative, 
six months, effective August 1; CoCr 
McDowell, agricultural extension repre- 
sentative, six months, effeotive Novem- 
ber 1, 

James F» Keim, associate profes- 
sor of agricultural extension, was re- 
called to serve with the Department of 
the Army in Germany and was granted a 
leaveo He will assist in the organiza- 
tion of an agricultural extension program 
in Germany* 



MORE THAN 1000 QUALIFY FOR ADVANCED DEGREES IN PAST YEAR 



More than 1000 men and women quali- 
fied for advanced degrees during the 
year from June 1947 to June 1943. 

Among the 1008 degrees conferred 



were: doctor of education, 51; doctor 
of philosophy, 90; master of arts, 110; 
master of education, 345; master of 
science, 397; master of forestry, 2; and 
technical degrees, 13. 

PENN STAT^ COLLECTION 



7 FACULTY PROMOTIONS ANNOUNCED 



Promotions for seven faculty menters, 
all effective July 1, have 'been announced 
by James Milholland, aoting president of 
the College* 

They are: Charles D* Werner, asso- 
ciate professor to professor of physical 
education; Dr* Lester P, Guest, assistant 
professor to associate professor of psy- 
chology; Donald Ross, assistant professor 
to associate professor of engineering re- 



search in the Ordnance Research Labora- 
tory; Dr« Richard C» Raymond, assistant 
professor to associate professor of physics-, 

Clifford A, Nelson, assistant pro- 
fessor to associate professor of econo- 
mics in arts and science extension; Dr, 
Robert W. Lindsay, assistant professor to 
associate professor of metallurgy; and 
James F. Keim, assistant professor to 
associate professor of agricultural exten- 
sion. 



TRUSTEES AUTHORIZE BEGINNING OF WORK ON MEN'S DORMITORIES 



Trustees have authorized officers of 
the College to arrange for excavation and 
the building of the foundations for men's 
dormitories on West Campus, Bids are due 
on Thursday. 

The dormitories, which will house 
12 00 men, will join the West Dormitories ■ 
Irvin, Jordan, and Watts Halls, Even- 
tually, the College plans facilities for 
feeding the 1500 men who will live in the 
area. 

On East Campus, Simmons Hall was 
opened to 534 women students on Thursday 
afternoon. McElwain Hall, which will 
house 509 women, will be completed before 
the opening of the second semester, 

S-^eel work has started on the Plant 
Industries Building and steel for the 



Mineral Sciences Building is expected to 
start arriving this week. 

The first floor slabs for Willard 
Hall have been laid. The building is 
of reinforced concrete. 

Brickwork on the Foods Building is 
about one-fourth completed and excavation 
fcr the Water Tunnel for the Ordnance Re- 
search Laboratory is completed* 

A new entrance to New Beaver Field 
is under construction and ticket booths 
will be ready for use on Saturday. Work 
on laying a new main trunk storm sewer 
from the area of Recreation Building to 
the Thompson Dam is underway. The sewer 
was planned to care for campus needs, 
not only for the present, but for many 
years in the future. 



COMPLETE CONTRACTS WITH INDUSTRIES, ORGANIZATIONS FOR RESEARCH WORK 



Agreements with private industries 
and organizations which provide grants 
totalling $76,350 were approved by the 
College reoe'ntly*. 

In the School of Chemistry and Phy- 
sics, an agreement with the Standard Oil 
Development Co, for the continuation of 
research for one year, beginning July 1, 
1948, under a maximum grant of $42,000 
has been renewed, 

In the School of Agriculture, grants 
totalling $16,500 for conducting research 
in artificial breeding have been approved. 
They are from the following Artificial 
Breeding Co-operatives: Western Pennsyl- 
vania, $7500; Nepa, $5000; Southeastern 
Pennsylvania, $3000; and First Pennsyl- 
vania, $1000, The grants will supplement 
appropriations made by the State Legis- 
lature for this work, 

"THE COLLEGE," MAGAZINE FOR ALL 
"The College," a magazine for all 
staff members of the College, will make 
its initial, appearance this week. 

Published by the College through the 
Department of Public Information, the 
monthly publication will help to acquaint 
staff members with the College, its per- 



A research fellowship in the School 
of Agriculture ,• effective July 1, for a 
three— year period, has been established 
under a grant of $6,000 from the U.S. 
Golf Association Green Section, 

The Co-operative Grange League Fed- 
eration Exchange, Inc. has also made a 
grant of $1500 for a research fellowship 
for the improvement of Ladino clover. 

In the School of Engineering, a 
grant of $8,000 was increased to $9,500 
in the renewal of an agreement with the 
Texas Co. The funds will be used for re- 
search on lubricant and cqmbustion 
phenomena . 

An agreement also was completed with 
Eastman Kodak Co, which provides a $750 
fellowship for work leading to a master of 
science degree in electrical engineering, 

EMPLOYEES, TO APPEAR THIS WEEK 
sonnel, and its functions. 

The magazine will be mailed to the 
homes of all full-time employees. Any 
staff member who fails to receive his 
copy should send his name and home ad- 
dress to Public Information (Ext, 184). 



PERSONNEL CHANGES" 



Following personnel charog-e-s , 
July 30, 1948, are an-iKMHlo^d, Te 
appointee s • 

Raymond E» Graber, Jr. 
Leon T. Piekarski 
William M. Waohter 
Guy Woods 
John H, Dawson 
John R. S human 
George R ■> Waggoner 
Nelson A, Brigham 
Paul We Keller 
Edward W. Ph E 'i" n 
Alt a L* Hummel 
Joseph M, Sta iner 
Ellis Sprague 
Georgia Halstead 
Robert L« Sproat 
Katherine James 
Norman B, Thompson 
Jack L. Durall 
George R, Ewing 
E» Wallace McMullen 
Marion J., Whallon 
C.P. Bastuscheck 
Richard E. Coburn 
Willis A, Budlong 
Eva L 5 Culbreth 
Edwin R Freeman 
Leonard G» Yearick 
Betty J» Middle sworth 
Ralph Richardson 
James R. Ziegler 
Louise B. Hartzell 
Ralph W. Yerger 
Seymour Schwimmer 
T. Dean Lower 
Richard S * Kolakoski 
Nancy J. Sherriff 
Rosemary Geynet 
"Violet Fidel 
Hilda L„ James 
John R. Barnes 
Paul J LaMorgia 
Coleman C« Bender 
Gustave W. Moessen 
Frances M, Weymer 
Andrew Rostosky, Jr. 
Jack R, Mentzer 
Edward J, 01 ow in ski 
Victor A» Szebehely 
Donald E« Nulk 
Jess W» Or en III 
Vernon L. Dutton 
James L 6 Bachman 
William Eo Downey 
Paul A. Marshall 
Donald S, Shriver 
lyan S. Kolarik 
Robert B. Hunter 
Wesley N» Wagner 
Roger Mo Harrington 
George F. Castore 
Donald V7« Brethurick 
Ii'ma L, Swank 
H. Robert Dursch 
Marjory A.. Helsel 



approved during the period June 5, 1948 to 
lefchone extension numbers are listed for new 

Re signat ions ; 

Assistant Professor - Ordnance Research Lab. 
Assistant Professor - Ordnance Re sear ch ' Lab . 
Assistant Professor - Civil Engineering 



Assistant Professor 
Assistant Professor 
Assistant Professor 
Assistant Professor 
Assistant Professor 
Instructor — Speech 
Instructor 
Instruct or 
Instructor 
Instructor 
Instructor 



Mu sic 
Civil Engineering 
Central Extension 
English Literature 
Central Extension 



- Central Extension 

- Home Economics 

- Undergraduate Centers 

- Philosophy 

- Home Economics Education 
Instructor - Metallurgy 

Instructor — Physical Education & Athletics 
Instructor - Economics 
Instructor - Economics 

Instructor — Physical Education & Athletics 
Instructor — Undergraduate Centers 
Instructor - Physical Education & Athletics 
Instructor — Undergraduate Centers 
Instructor - Undergraduate Centers 
Instructor — Undergraduate Centers 
Instructor - Undergraduate Centers 
Instructor - Undergraduate Centers 
Instructor - Agronomy 
Instructor — Undergraduate Centers 
Instructor — Speech 
Instructor — Mathematics 
Instructor - Undergraduate Centers 
Instructor - Undergraduate Centers 
Instructor - Undergraduate Centers 
Instructor - Undergraduate Centers 
Instructor —■ - Romance Languages 
Instructor - Central Extension 
Instructor - Undergraduate Centers 
Instructor - Undergraduate Centers 
Instructor - Undergraduate Centers 

Instructor - Animal Nutrition 

Instructor — Romance Languages 

Instructor — Speech ,' 

Instructor — Chemistry 

Instructor - Home Economics 

Research Assistant - Mining Engineering 

Research Assistant — Ordnance Research Laboratory 

Research Assistant - Engineering Experiment Station 

Research Assistant - Engineering Experiment Station 

Research Assistant - Metallurgy 

Research Assistant - Engineering Experiment Station 

Research Assistant — Engineering Experiment Station 

- Ceramics 

- Chemistry 

- Ceramics 

- Chemistry 

- Chemistry 

Chief Appraiser - Veterans Guidance Center 

Appraiser - Veterans Guidance Center 

Assistant Agr icultural Extension Representative 

Assistant - Psychology 

District Representative - Central Extension 

Assistant Cataloger - Library 

Assistant — Undergraduate Centers 

Assistant - Undergraduate Centers 



Research Assistant 

Research Assistant 

Research Assistant 

Research Assistant 

Research Assistant 



Jaoque A. Hogg 
Harriet Mayers 
Virginia M» Rayback 
Virginia M, Hartman 
Clara Mabry 
Mary Bonhannon 
Elsie MoClure 
Edith Anderson 
Grace H. Wright 
Ann Sholes 
Mary M, Finlon 
Mary Ann Peterson 
Jean Hamill 
Helen M» Grossett 
W„ Ruth Fergus 
Joan We is 
Mary Frances Rose 
Kathleen Noel 
Mary R„ Probst 
Dorothy Jung 
Edwin Crist 
Jean S. Benner 
Mary Jo Reed 
Agnes Finlon 
Eleanor M. ^orley 
Regina Piotrowski 
Marjorie Emery 
L Jane Meyers 
Barbara C # Win slow 
Isabel Snyder 
Marion L. Law 
Samuel M n VanTries 
Helen C. Anderson 
Helen A, Neff 
Ruth E r Marindoe 
Barbara R. Pease 
Robert E 3 Brower 
Lorin Elder 
Daniel McCoy 
Lula A Pater son 
Homer Krape 
James W«, Bishop 
Fred W. Hart sock 
Kay K, Hutchinson 
Hogan J. Markle 
Violet C «. Croyle 
Charles Osman 
Martha N # Tressler 
Nance S. Seiple 
Verner H. Condon 
Barbara L, Wenrich 
Lloyd A Spearly 
Marjorie C, Smith 
Esther Luse 
Marie Ellzey 
Frank Kershaw 
Harry R» Mathias 
Arveda B, Gibson 
Harriet M. Zettle 



Assistant — Physics (Mont Alto) 

Assistant — Extension Library 

Assistant — English Literature 

Secretary — President's Office 

Secretary - Dean's Office — Education 

Secretary — Physical Education & Athletics 

Secretary — Accounting 

Secretary — Psychology 

Secretary — Undergraduate Centers 

Secretary - Industrial Education 

Secretary — Engineering Experiment Station 

Secretary — Ellen II, Richards Institute 

Secretary — Psychology 

Secretary — Personnel Relations 

Secretary — Liberal Arts 

Secretary — Central Extension 

Secretary — C e ntral Extension 

Secretary — Political Science 

Secretary — Chemistry 

Secretary — Liberal Arts 

Secretary — Undergraduate Centers 

Stenographer — Mont Alto 

Stenographer — Alumni Office 

Stenographer — Central Extension 

Stenographer — Agricultural Extension 

Stenographer — Alumni Office 

Stenographer — Undergraduate Centers 

Stenographer — Agricultural Education 

Stenographer — Undergraduate Centers 

Stenographer — Undergraduate Centers 

Clerk — Education 

Clerk- - physical Plant 

Clerk — Central Extension 

Clerk — Agricultural Economics & Rural Sociology 

Clerk — Agricultural Economics & Rural S 0c i o i o gy 

Clerk — Agricultural Economics & Rural Sociology 

Electrician — Ordnance Research Laboratory 

Supervisor — Physical Plant 

Cook — Pollock Circle Dining Hall 

Supervisor — Dormitories & Dining Commons 

Technician - Petroleum Refining Laboratory 

Laborer — Dairy Husbandry 

Patrolman — Physical Plant 

Assistant Editor - Alumni Office 

Janitor — Physical plant 

Seamstress & Post Office Clerk — Dormitories 

Technician - Bacteriology 

Telephone .Operator — Physical Plant 

Nurse — College Health Service 

Property Clerk — Psychology 

Accounting Clerk — Undergraduate Centers 

Stock Clerk — Central Extension 

Receptionist - Naval ROTC 

Clerical Assistant — Library 

Mail Clerk — Registrar's Office 

Janitor — Central Extension 

Laboratory Assistant - Mont Alto 

Nurse — College Health S e rvice 

Nurse — College Health Service 



130 Coy N. Shellito 

151M 0. Dudley Duncan 

272 Julia M. Haber 

338J Albert A e Laplante, Jr, 

43 Ralph E„ Armington 

280 Clarence S. B r yner 

58M Melvin W. Isenberg 

130 Raymond D, Kennedy 



Appo intment s ; 

Assistant Professor - Central Extension 

Assistant Professor — Sociology & Rural Sociology 

B ot a ny 

Entomology Extnesion 

Electrical Engineering 

Instructor — Agronomy 

Instructor — Architectural Engineering 

Instructor - Central Extension 



I3f> Virgil E* Neilly 
irt J?{TM Charles E. Medlar 
137 Frances P. Finlon 
X37 Thomas F, Irvine, Jr, 
371J Herbert A. MoXin^s-try 
Francis C * Vannoy 
Dean Asquith 
303 Barry S« Brinsmaid 
47J Robert M, Eastman 
151J Neal Riemer 
15 1J Ruth C» S'ilva 
264J Kenneth H, Maddy 
42 Vernon Leroy Duttcn 
216M John J. Schanz 
142 Laurence J. Rosan 
91 Ruth E. Leonard 
148 John A. Novo 

Lois I, Neifert 
184 William F, Ackerman 
Betty Y. Knepshield 
Patricia E» Hoagland 
Nettie F, Seely 
John V. Robertson, Jr. 
Alan T, Wade 
Jeanne B. Haxton 
Jane A. Bachore 
Sara L. Krone 
Lillian B. Larrabee 
Esther R, Felby 
Flo F. Segner 
Elizabeth Glattfelder 
Marian J . Shaffer 
Nancy Gillespie 
Catherine Berkstre s ser 
Virginia Cramer 
Blanche S , Barr 
Boris Latshaw 
Agnes H. Allison 
Beatrice Palaskey 
J. Arlene Was sell 
Lois A-. Griffith 
Hope S^ Allison 
Evelyn F * Roman 
Patricia A. Yearick 
Laura E« Scheirer 
Elizabeth P. Shawley 
Jeanne C. Lawless 

Regina piotrowskl 
Ma rie D, Hilhert 
Doreen M* Power 3 
Velma C. Boal 
Jane Rhine smith 
Virginia L» Sapienza 
Jo Ann Davison 
Laura W, Peters 
Ruth E. Marindoe 
Grace Harpster 
Helen A. Strand 



177 

390 

53J 

398 

130 

40 

398 

192 

181 

144 

270 

375 

2 92 

295 

344 

395 

268J 

263J 

396 

130 

130 

262 

56J 

64M 

371J 

253J 

262 

2 03 
252 
220 
16 3 
126 
220 
177 
177 
177 

354 
265J 



Isabel 



l.lu s s e r 



Florence Lam'bour 
Marjorie Morgan 
Colleen A. Ross 
L« Janut Rishel 
Julia Fi Levis 
Patricia A. Smeltzer 
S. Elizabeth Yoder 
Patricia L, D i e h 1 _ 
James G. Chiorazzi 
Rut h J . Kat z 
Henry W. Nor1>hrup 



Instructor 
tnstructor 
[instructor 
Instructor 
Instructor 
Instruct or 



instructor - Central Extension 

Instjru-otor - Physical Education & Athletics 

Research Assistant - Ordnance Research Laboratory 

R^^d-arch Assistant - Ordnance Research Laboratory 

Re' search Assistant - Ceramics 

Assistant Home Eoonomios Ext-6-rt*4oTi--vKepresentat ire 

Assistant Professor - Entomology 

Assistant professor - Music 

Industrial Engineering 
^instructor - Political Science 
instructor - Political Science 

Animal Nutrition 

Civil Engineering 

Mineral Economics 
Instructor - Philosophy 

Instructor - physical Education & Athletics 
Instructor — History 
Instructor - Undergraduate Centers 
News Assistant - public Information 
Home Economics Extension Representative 
Assistant Home Economics Extension Representative 
Assistant Home Economics Extension Representative 
Assistant Agricultural Extension Representative 
Assistant Agricultural Extension Representative 
Assistant Home Economics Extension Representative 
Assistant Home Economics Extension Representative 
psychometrist - Veterans Guidance Center 
Cataloged - Library 

Secretary - Dean's Office - Education 
Secretary - Engineering Experiment Station 
S e c.retary - psychology 
Secretary — Central Extension 

tary - Bean's Office - Engineering 

— Psychology 

- A lumn i Office 

— Athletic Association 

- Engineering Extension 

- English Literature 

— Agricultural Education 
Stenographer - Mineral Industries 
Stenographer - Agricultural Experiment Station 
Stenographer - Forestry 

Stenographer - Registrar's Office 
Stenographer - Industrial Education 
Stenographer - Agricultural Extension 

Kort i culture 

Industrial Education 

Alumni Office 

Central Extension 

Central Extension 

Ag. Economics & Rural Sociology 
Stenographer - Agricultural & Biological Chemistry 
Stenographer - Agricultural & Biological Chemistry 
Stenographer - Mineral Technology 
Clerk - Agricultural Extension 
Clerk - Agricultural Economics 
Clerk — Agricultural Economics 
Clerk - Agricultural Economics 
Clerk Agricultural Economics 
Clerk - Accounting 
Clerk-typist - Naval ROTC 
Clerk-typist - Personnel Relations 
Clerk-typist — Accounting 
Clerical Assistant - Library 
Clerical Assistant — Chemistry Library 
Clerical Assistant - Library 
Clerical Assistant - Library 
Draftsman — Physical Plant 
Technician - Animal Husbandry 
Technicial Laborer — Agronomy 



Seer 

S e cretary 
Secretary 
Se cretary 
Se cretary 
Secretary 
Secretary 



Stenographer 
St enographer 
St enographer 
S tenographer 
St enographer 
Stenographer 



& Rural Sociology 
& Rural Sociology 
& Rural Sociology 
& Rural Sociology 



327J 
192" 



177 
6 7J 
344 
348 
236 
13 
220 
247 
137 
137 
137 
100 

18 

20 

310 

220 

220 

137 

192 

220 

220 

389 
352 
220 

220 
203 
220 
137 
137 
220 
137 

124J 

280 
137 
137 
130 
130 

354 
96 



Thomaii N 6 Harttrcriok 
Clyde Arac e rn a n 
Hogan J. Markle 
Laura Craig 
La-wren co W, Albright 
William 3. Breon 
Francis L. Smith 
Consuelo G. Myers 
Carolyn K» Price 
Elizabeth C t Weber 
Freda Fryer 
Maude Williams 
Gerald Hutchinson 
Marion L, Law 
Evelyn I, M nsell 
Kathleen S. Noel 
Mary Ann Peterson 
Anne L. Piatt 
Margaret Frantz 
Betty L Baldini 
Shirley R. Blau 
Reita Mae Somers 
Gladys J » Kocher 
"Ralph Peters 
Robert E. Beam 
Margaret M„ Berry 
Winifred Neyhart 
Frances J. Mitchell 
Sue Corey 

Marguerite L. Austin 
Marian J « Evan s 
Claire Me couch 
Elaine Ross 
Harriet E. Stitzer 
Barbara R» Pease 
Freida M. Spicer 
Donald T. Laird 
Hayden L« Schofield 
Do Lester Forcey 
Francis J, Boyle 
Earl G-s Johnston 
Donald P. Benner 
Sterling E, Sell 
Russell Walker 
Rosemary Geynet 
Russell S. Weaver 
John P, Wierman 
C. Reynold Ammerman 
Frank G, Kenney 
Nina G. Pomroy 
Mildred C off man 
Ma ry Durban 
Jean Grenoble 



Laboratory 
Laboratory 



Elizabeth H. Ammerman 
Mary V, Manning 
Garnet E« Weaver 
Flossie Boyer 
John S „ We aver 
Gladys L, Verdier 
Stella Mo Carbaugh 
Emanuel G n Snowberger 
Henry Janzen 
R.B. Wagner 
Tohn R, Re its 
Elaine Windrich 
E«E, Musoblitz 
Ft-atvciS M» Boldea-eff 



Locksmith - Physical Plant 

patrolman - Physical Plant 

Stock Clerk - Chemistry 

Managing Editor - Alumni Office 

Janitor - Physical Plant 

Janitor - Physical Plant 

Janitor - Physical Plant 

Library Assistant — Library 

Technician - Agricultural & Biological Chemistry 

Filing Clerk - Registrar's Office 

Recorder - Registrar's Office 

Recorder - Registrar's Office 

Stock Clerk - Central Extension 

Secretary - Accounting 

Secretary - Chemical Engineering 

Secretary - Ordnance Research Laboratory 

Secretary - Ordnance Research 

Secretary - Ordnance Research 

Secretary — Home Economics 

Secretary - Education 

Secretary - Education 

Secretary - Dean of Women's Office 

Stenographer - Physical Plant 

Clerk - Accounting 

Clerk - Accounting 

Clerk — Ordnance Research Laboratory 

Clerk - Alumni Office 

Clerk - Accounting 

Clerk — Accounting 

Clerk - Bursar's Office 

Clerk - Education 

Clerk - Bursar's Office 

Clerk - Accounting 

Clerk - Accounting 

Clerk ~ Agricultural Economics & Rural Sociology 

Clerk - Accounting 

Assistant -" Ordnance Research Laboratory 

Assistant — Ordnance Research Laboratory 

Accountant — Accounting 

Assistant - Ordnance Research Laboratory 

District Dairy Agent - Agricultural Extension 

Carpenter - Dormitories 

Technical Laborer - Horticulture 

Technical Laborer - Agronomy 

Assistant - Ordnance Research Laboratory 

Janitor - Ordnance Research Laboratory 

Janitor ~ Central Extension 

Janitor - Central Extension 

Inventory Clerk - Accounting 

Bookkeeper - Physical Plant 

Cook - Hospital 

Cook - Hospital 

Assistant to Supervisor - Pollock Circle 

Leaves of Absence s 

Technician - Chemistry & Physics 
Clerk - Agricultural Extension 
1st Cook - Mont Alto 
Kitchen Helper - Dormitories 
Kitchen Helper - M nt Alto 
Pantry Helper - Mont Alto 
Pantry Helper - Mont Alto 
Utility Man - Mont Alto 
Assistant Professor - Political 
Assistant Professor - Chemistry 
Assistant Professor - Ord» Res. 
Instructor — Political Science 
Instructor - Physics 
Publications Production Manager- 
Public Information 





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OF GENERAL INTEREST 



i 



SENATE: The College S e nate will meet at 
4:10 p.m. Thursday, October 7, in Room 
121> Sparks Building* 

* * * 

ENGINEERING: Faculty of the School of 
Engineering will meet in Room 110, Elec- 
trical Engineering Building, at 5 o'clock 
on Friday afternoon. 

* * » 

COURSES OF STUDY: The Senate Courses of 
Study Committee will meet at 10:30 a.m. 
on Thursday in Room 207, Engineering "C", 

* ♦ » 

CHAPEL: Penn State-in-China Day will "be 
observed at chapel services at 11 o'clock 
Sunday morning. Dr. T.Z, Koo, inter- 
national secretary for the World Student 
Christian Federation, Princeton, N.J., 
will be the speaker. 

* * * 

SPORTS: Football — Bucknell at Penn State, 
2 p.m. Saturday. 

* * * 

DEATHS: Deaths announced during the sum- 
mer included those of: Furman H. Gyger, 
Sr e , trustee, in an accident on his farm 
near Kimberton, on June 17; Merritt M. 
Harris, professor emeritus of English 
composition, at Plattsburg, N.Y., on 
August 8; and Dr. Samuel I. Bechdel, pro- 
fessor emeritus of dairy husbandry, at 
Blair Memorial Hospital, Huntingdon, on 

September 13. 

* * * 

REVISE ROTC : According to a revision of 
the ROTC senior program announced by 
Gen. Jacob L. Devers, chief, Army Field 
Forces, the number of hours of instruc- 
tion in the tactics and techniques of a 
particular branch of service will be 
increased. 

* * * 

GET DIPLOMAS: Dr. Bruce V, Moore, pro- 
fessor and head of the department of 
psychology and Dr. Clifford R„ Adams f 
associate professor of psychology, have 
aeen awarded diplomas by the American 
Boa^d of Examiners in professional psy- 
chology, Dr, Moore's diploma is in in- 
dustrial psychology and Dr ,. Adams' is in 
clinical psychology-. Dr „ Robert Go Bern- 
reuter, professor of psychology, also 
holds a diploma in clinical psychology *> 

* * * 

PRESENT PAPERS; Five papers, prepared 
by Dr * Joseph H. Simons, director of the 
Fluorine Laboratories at the College, and 
associates, were presented at the recent 
meetings of the American Chemical Society 
in Portland, Ore. Dr. Thomas J. Brice, 
instructor in chemistry, presented the 
paper s . 

* * ♦ 

AT CONFERENCE: Dr 3 Eugene T. McDonald, 
director of the Speech and Hearing Clinic, 
will serve as chairman of the speech 
correction session while Dr. Harold E. 
Nelson, assistant professor of speech, 
will be in charge of the session on radio 



activities at the annual Pennsylvania 
Speech Association convention in Harris- 
burg on Friday and Saturday, Joseph F. 
O'Brien, professor of public 3peaking, is 
executive secretary of the Association. 

* ♦ * 

CONVENTION HERE: The American Psychologi- 
cal Association will hold its 1950 meet- 
ing at Penn State during the first week 
of September, Dr. Bruce V. Moore, profes- 
sor and head of the department of psy- 
chology, has been advised in answer to a 
bid for the convention. 

* * » 

OPENING ASSEMBLY: Dr. Robert E. Dengler, 
professor and head of the department of 
classical languages, was guest speaker 
for the opening convocation at the Mont 
Alto branch of the Pennsylvania State 
Forest School on Saturday morning. Col, 
Ben-H» Chastaine, professor of military 
science and tactics, Capt. William T. 
McGarry, professor of naval science, and 
Victor Beede, professor and head of the 
department of forestry, represented their 
departments at the convocation. 

* * » 

RETURN FROM ALASKA: Dr. E. Willard Miller 
and Dr. George F, Deasy, associate pro- 
fessors of geography, have returned from 
a month's field trip to Alaska where they 
observed environmental factors, such as 
vegetation and ground conditions, particu- 
larly on the transportation routes of the 
Territory. 



TRUSTEE: A.W, Stewart, chief recorder 
the Registrar's Office, has been named 
to the Board of Trustees of Gettysburg 
Theological Seminary, 

» * * 

ON ORIENTATION STAFF: 
associate professor of 
during the summer as a 
Orientation staff for 



m 



Dr« Kent Forester, 
history, served 
member of the Ship 
student exchange 



project sponsored jointly by the American 
Friends Service Committee and the U.S. 
Department of State. He sailed from New 
York to Le Havre and returned via South— 
ampt on, 

* * # 

STUDENT HANDBOOK: The 1948-49 Student 
Handbook is ready for distribution to 
faculty. Copies may be obtained by call- 
ing the Christian Association (ext. 194), 

* * * 

AUTHORS: Dr. Hans Neuberger, professor 
and chief of the division of meteorology, 
and Cdr. F, Briscoe Stephens, instructor 
in meteorology, are authors of the book, 
"Weather and Man," published recently by 
Prentice-Hall, Inc 

* * * 

MURALS; Art students of Viktor L wenfeld, 
professor of art education, have completed 
a series of murals during the summer 
months. In Engineering "E", murals 
decorate the walls of the Navy ROTC ro _ 
ception room. Other murals were painted 
in the Temporary Classroom Building. 



FACULTY LUNCHEON CLUB TO RESUME WEEKLY SESSIONS ON OCTOBER 4 
The Faculty Luncheon Club will resume Language of the Pennsylvania Germans," 



weekly sessions next Monday noon, October 
4, at the Hotel State College, 

Dr. Albert F. Buffington, associate 
professor of German, will sp-eak on "The 



All faculty, and especially new 
members of the faculty, are invited to 
attend the weekly sessions. 



ANNUAL REPORT OF SENATE COURSES OF STUDY COMMITTEE, 1947-1948 



The Courses of Study Committee 
herewith presents its annual report. 



Name of School 



The Committee has considered curri- 
culum and course changes to the following 
extent t 



Curricular 
Change s 



New 
Courses 



Old Course 
Changes 



Old Course 
Drop s 



Agriculture 

Chemistry & Physics 

Education 

Engine ering 

The Liberal Arts 

Mineral Industries 

Physical Education & Athletics 

Mi 1 i t a ry 



5 
12 

15 

13 

7 

2 

1 



The most important curricular change 
this year was the increase of the Curri- 
cula in Architecture and Architectural 
Engineering to five year curricula. 

The Committee has had constant dif- 
ficulty with courses in Art since such 
courses are given in three departments 
In two schools. It believes that some 
coordination other than that which the 
Committee can give should be introduced 
such as the creation of a Division or 
School of Art or Arts, 

The Committee has noted from time 
to time the submission of an increasing 
number of graduate courses stipulating a 
large number of credits. It feels that 
this reflects an increasing tendency to 



33 

32 
35 
62 

91 

12 

3 

2 



46 
32 
63 
79 
92. 
14 
2 
12 



18 

14 
65 
20 
41 
1 
3 



increase the amount of credit for research 
work in graduate programs to the exclusion 
of reduction of work given as class work. 
The Committee seriously questions whether 
this is good practice and recommends that 
the Graduate School make some study of 
the problem. 

Last year, authorization was given 
by the Senate to the Department of Public 
Information to reduce course descriptions 
to 50 words. Your Committee's experience 
in reading course descriptions is that 
they could well be reduced to a maximum 
of 20 words, or even less; but that more 
might be permitted if absolutely necessary 
and so recommends, 

C.E, Bullinger, Chairman 
Courses of Study Committee 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE SENATE COMMITTEE ON COMMITTEES, 1947-1948 



During the year, five vacancies on 
various committees were provided for by 
recommendation for new appointments. The 

committer recommended and presjdf.ut, Mil— 
holland apprvvfi-l +.)>» rvunbeivohip of Sea- 



ate Standing Committees for the year 
194R-1949. (Printed in Faculty Bulletin 
for June 7, 1948). 

B.V, Moore, Chairman 
Committee on Committee: 






THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 



FACULTY 



Published weekly on Tuesday during the College 
year as a means of making official announcements 
and presenting items of interest to the faculty. All 




VOL. 36 



BULLETIN 



contributions should be as brief as possible and 
reach Louis H. Bell, Director of Public Information. 
313 Old Main, not later than 10 a. m. each Friday. 



October 4, 1948 



NO. 



Z 



NEW HOSPITALIZATION INSURANCE PLAN WITH GREATER BENEFITS ANNOUNCED 



A new hospitalization insur- 
ance plan for all regular full-time 
College employees would provide in- 
creased allowances for surgical and 
confinement costs and also would 
cover dependents. (Husbands of 
v/omen employees would not be con- 
sidered dependents.) 

Under the old plan, which has 
been in effect since 1939, only 
the employee himself was covered 
and the entire cost of membership 
was borne by him. Under the new 
plan, up to 40 per cent of the 
gross cost of the premium will be 
assumed by the College, making 



the employee. 

Among other benefits to be 
received is coverage of many more 
types of operations than were 
previously given. 

The new plan will go into ef- 
fect when 75 per cent of the eligi- 
ble employees have signed for It, 
During this month, meetings of em- 
ployees will be held on the cam- 
pus to explain the plan in detail. 

Employees who arc- members of 
the present plan will continue to 
receive benefits under it until 
the new plan goes into effect. 



possible an extremely low rate to 

INCOMPLETE REGISTRATION FIGURES ESTABLISH NEW RECORDS 
Although registration figures 5600 mark, 
are still incomplete, a new cam- 
pus enrollment record and a new 
record for veterans was establish- 
ed this semester. 



Previous enrollment records 
were established last year with 
8400 students, including 5362 
veterans . 



Campus enrollment on Friday 
had passed 9475 and the number of 
veterans on campus had passed the 

CHANGE IN FEES AFFECTS ST^FF 
■ Staff members enrolled as 
special or graduate students are 
affected by the change in the fee 
structure that became effective 
this Fall, 



A complete report on regis- 
tration will appear in a later 
issue of the Faculty Bulletin. 

MEMBERS ENROLLED AS STUDENTS 
time fee of $7, but will be 
charged the general fixed fee of 
$Z per credit. 

In the past, the charge to 
staff members had been $2,50, re- 
gardless of the number of credits 
carried. 



The staff member will be 
exempt from the incidental part- 

SWIMMING PERIOD ARRANGED FOR COLLEGE EMPLOYEES 



A recreation swim period has 
been arranged at the Glennland 
pool for all faculty, their wives 
or husbands, and for other Col- 
lege employees . 

Beginning on Monday night, 
October 11, the pool will be ava i 1 - 



from 7 to 



o ' c loci 



Towe is 



able 

will be provided but suits cannot 

be rented, 

Tickets may be purchased at 
the Office of thc^. Bursar , 110 Old 
Main, at $1,80, which! ncl udes 



,30 tax. 



STATE 



the 

XECTION 



OF GENERAL INTEREST 



SENATE: The College Senate will meet at 
4:10 p.m. on Thursday in Room 121, Sparks 

Building. 

* • * 

ENGINEERING FACULTY: The postponed meet- 
ing of the faculty of the School of Engi- 
neering will be held at 5 p.m. on Friday, 
October 8, in Room 110, Electrical Engi- 
neering Building. 

* * * 

ACADEMIC STANDARDS: The Senate Commit- 
tee on Academic Standards will meet at 9 
o'clock on Wednesday morning in Room 304, 
Old Main. 

* * * 

CHAPEL: Rev. James H. Robinson, Church 
of the Master, New York, N,Y., will 
speak at chapel services at 11 o'clock 

on Sunday morning. 

c * * 

SPORTS: Soccer, Bucknell at State Col- 
lege, Saturday at 2 p.m. 

* * * 

LUNCHEON CLUB: Samuel P. Bayard, assis- 
tant professor of English composition, 
will address the Faculty Luncheon Club on 
Monday noon on "The Irish and Welsh 
Harper's Tunes." 

* * * 

GRADUATE EXAMINATION: Graduate R e cord 
Examinations will be given on Monday and 
Tuesday, October 25 and 26. Registration 
deadline is noon on Thursday, October 7. 
Applications should be made to Dr. A.R. 
Grove, 210 Buckhout Laboratory, between 
9 a.m. and 12 noon and 2 and 5 p.m. 

* * * 

FOOD SERVICE: Food service of the divi- 
sion of institution and hotel adminis- 
tration has been resumed at the Home 
Economics Building. Cafeteria service 
is available Monday through Friday from 
11:45 to 12:30 o'clock while tea room 
service in the Maple Room is available 
from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m., Monday through 
Thursday . 

* * * 

HUSBANDS NOT DEPENDENTS: Husbands are 
not considered dependents under the new 
hospitalization plan and therefore the 
husband of a woman employed by the Col- 
lege would not be covered by College 
hospitalization insurance as indicated in 
the October issue of "The College." 

* * * 

COLLOQUIUM: Dr. John J. Gibbons, Jr., 
associate professor of physics, will dis- 
cuss "On the Theory of Waves of Finite 
Amplitude" at the first physics collo- 
quium to be held in Room 117, Osmond 
Laboratory at 4:25 p.m. on Tuesday. 

* * * 

ADULT FOOD CLASS : A class in foods 
preparation, open to interested women in 
the community, will begin at 7:30 p.m. on 
Tuesday, October 12, in the Home Economics 
Building. Women interested in enrolling 
for either the advanced or elementary 
group should call Mrs. David Cowell 
(telephone 3324) for details and infor- 



mation on registering, 

* * * 

LANGUAGE READING TEST: The foreign 
language reading examinations required of 
candidates for advanced degrees will be 
given on November 1 from 7 to 9 p.m. in 
Room 316, Sparks Building. All candi- 
dates should register before Saturday for 
French and Spanish in Room 300, Sparks 
Building, and for German in Room 229, 
Sparks Building. 

* * * 

TRAIN SCHEDULE CHANGE: Train travelers 
coming to State College from New York, 
Washington, Philadelphia, and Harrisburg 
may now reach Lewistown at 12:48 p.m. 
daily on the westbound "Metropolitan" of 
the Pennsylvania Railroad, The train is 
not listed on current schedules but is 
being stopped at the request of Guy G. 
Mills, of the State College Commerce 
Club, and James Milholland, acting presi- 
dent of the College „ 

* * • 

PRESENTS PAPER: Dr. Frank M. Swart z, 
professor and chief of the division of 
geology, will present a paper on "Late 
Ordovician and Silurian Facies, Condi- 
tions of Deposition, and Paleogeography 
in the North Central Appalachians" at the 
meeting of the American Association of 
Petroleum Geologists in Pittsburgh this 
week. He also will serve as field trip 
leader for a three— day geological excur- 
sion through Pennsylvania and New Y rk. 

* * * 

AT CONVENTION: Members of the department 
of speech who participated in the annual 
convention of the Pennsylvania Speech 
Association at Harrisburg last week were: 
Joseph F. O'Brien, Harold J. O'Brien, 
Harriet D. Nesbitt, Eugene T. McDonald, 
C. Cordelia Brong, Harold E. Nelson, and 
Clayton H. Schug. 

* * * 

PRESENTS PAPERS: Dr. CD. Dahle, profes- 
sor of dairy manufacture, presented three 
papers before the University of Minnesota 
Dairy Conference recently. 

» * * 

STUDIES RESEARCH PROGRAM: Dr e Jean Warren, 
head of the division of home economics at 
the University of California, is studying 
the research program in housing conducted 
in the department of home economics here. 
Much of the work was done by Gladys Was— 
mut h in co-operation with the Bureau of 
Home Economics and Human Nutrition, U.S. 
Department of Agriculture. 

* * * 

DAIRY JUDGING: Penn State's dairy judging 
team placed 8th among the 12 colleges and 
universities competing at the Eastern 
States Exposition in Springfield, Mass. 
recently. The team will enter the national 
competition at Waterloo, la. this week. 

* * * 

MEDICAL COLLEGE TEST: The Association of 
American Medical Colleges is giving the 
Medical College Admission T e st on Saturday, 



October 30, from 9 
2 p.m. to 5 p.m. 
1949 freshmen clas 
cine are expected 
the Medical Colleg 
auxiliary evidence 
medical study. Ap 
must register befo 
October 14, betwee 
and 2 p.m. and 5 p 
hout Laboratory. 

CLINIC : The clini 
and Bank Credit in 
held here on Thurs 



a.m. to 12 noon and 
All applicants to the 
s in colleges of medi- 
to present results on 
e Admission T e st as 

of preparation for 
plicants for the test 
re noon on Thursday, 
n 9 a.m. and 12 noon 
.m. in Room 210, Buck- 



c on Farm Management 
Agriculture will be 
day and Friday. Ses- 



sions will be held in Room 105, White Hall, 

* * * 

PRESENTS LECTURE: Viktor Lowenfeld, pro- 
fessor of art education, recently presen- 
ted a lecture on "Art and Society — A 
Dilemma" at the forum of the Society of 
Modern Artists in Gloucester, Mass, 

* * * 

RETURNS FROM TOUR: Dr. Will M. Myers, 
cf the U.S. Regional Pasture R e search 
Laboratory, recently returned from a two- 
month tour of all midwestern agricultural 
experiment stations. He discussed forage 
crop research with staff members of the 
various experiment station units. 



JLWTAL REPORT OF THE SENATE COMMITTEE ON RULES 1947-1948 



During- the current academic year the 
S e nate Committee on Rules has held three 
formal meetings, each with 100$ attendance. 

At the first meeting of the year the 
committee reaffirmed the principle of its 
predecessors: that action to be consider- 
ed by this committee must have been re- 
ferred to it through regular S e nate chan- 
nels, i.e. by action taken on the floor 
of that body. 

The normal work of the committee has 
thus been carried out in the phrasing, 
harmonizing, and returning to the Senate 
for action of rules or sections of rules, 
whether revised or new, referred to the 
Committee by the Senate, 



re taken toward a codifica- 
xisting Re gulations for 
Students, each member of 
of five members having 
dy an assigned one-fifth of 

Even if time had been 
-fever, for this task - on 
he individuals as well as on 
he committee in its entirety 
not as becomes increasingly 



plain, have been a satisfactory job. 
What is needed, and this the committee as 
a wnoie unanimously recommends, is the 
release of some qualified individual, 
from other academic or administrative 
duties, for at least a semester, in order 
that time and opportunity may he provided 
to interview all bodies, departments, in- 
dividuals, or other units, directly or 
indirectly concerned with the various 
regulations. This person, acting with the 
Committee on Rules, should then proceed 
to a codification of The Regulations for 



Undergraduate Student s , in such 



W 







Steps we: 


t 


ion 


of the e 


u 


rid e 


..-gra duate 


t 


commit tee 


t 


ake 


~i for stu 


■fc 


he 


booklet. 


a 


vai 


".able , ho" 


4- 
t 


he 


part of t! 


t 


he 


part of t! 


- 


th 


is could 



that in that document not only the words 
cf one rule will be in agreement with 
those of another, but that the whole as 
well as its parts will express the real 
functions and actual regulations of the 
College. 

The Secretary of the College S e nate 
and the present chairman of the Committee 
on Rules are now engaged in incorporating 
the changes made by the Senate in 1947-48 
and will edit the 1948-49 copy cf The 
Regulations for Undergraduate Students 
during the summer of 1948 for publication 
in the early fall. 

Robert E. Dengler, Chairman 
■ Senate Committee on Rules 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE SENATE COMMITTEE ON SCHOLARSHIPS AND AWARDS, 1947-1948 



The Committee held six meetings dur- 
ing the year. 

Two meetings were devoted to the 
making of an inventory of all the scholar- 
ships currently in effect. This was done 
at the request of Miss Margaret Buyers 
with reference to copy for the General 
College Bulletin. As a result, the copy 
has been re-organized and the scholar- 
ships classified by Schools, 

One meeting was called at the request 
of Acting President Milholland to consider 



plans for an All-Campus Scholarship Day, 

The other meetings were devoted to 
the applications for scholarships during 
the school., year 1947-1948. Two groups 
of awards were made. (Printed in Faculty 
Bulletin February 16,. 1948. and May 17, 
1948). 

In addition, the Committee held 
personal interviews, of ten minutes each, 
with 59 applicants for scholarships, 

CO. William s , . Cha itiin n 

Committee on Scholarships and Awards 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE SENATE COMMITTEE ON ADMISSIONS, 194 7-194H 



The Committee on Admissions reports 
that no me c h jugs were held during the 
academic year and blisv-t n,> actions were 



taken, 



M.M, Bab cock, Chairman 
Committee on Admissions, 



HRNN STATE COLLECTION 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE SENATE COMMITTEE ON ACADEMIC STANDARDS 1947-48 



The Committee held 40 meetings in 
disposing of its business, which fell un- 
der two headings as follows: 

Student Cases 



One hundred and fifty-five student 
cases were reviewed, 41 of which were 
petitions for the waiving of various 
Senate regulations, Of these 18 were 
approved (9 by the Committee under power 
granted by the S e nate, 9 by direct Sen- 
ate action). Denied, 23, 

Of the 155 cases reviewed, 144 were 
recommendations for reinstatement after 
dismissal for scholarship deficiencies, 
handled under the new Senate procedure* 
Approved, 66; denied, 40; returned, as 
for one reason and another not under the 
jurisdiction of the Committee, 8, 

Senate Policy 

Recommendations were made to the 
Senate in connection with the following: 

1 - Authority for the Committee to 
act with power on student cases when the 



College is not in session, (Senate, 
Oct. 2, 1947) 

2 - Defining the restrictions of 
probation. (S e nate, Dec, 4, 1947) 

3 - Extending the conditions under 
which courses may be taken by corres- 
pondence, (Senate, Feb. 12, 1948) 

4 - Operation of the Fifty Percent 
rule, and of the Probation rule in the 
Summer S e ssions. (Senate, Feb. 12, 1948) 

5 - Termination date for granting of 
credits for military service. (S e nate, 
Feb. 12, 1948) 

6 — Credit by examination for Ed, 
439 Safety Education in the Public 
Schools. (Senate, J u ne 3, 1948) 

7 - A grade point average as a basis 
for College action in cases of scholarship 
deficiency, .5 for dismissal, .65 for 
probation, (Senate, June 3, 194.8) 

Victor A. Beede, Chairman 

Senate Committee on Academic Standards 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE SENATE COMMITTEE ON MILITARY INSTRUCTION - 1947-48 



The Committee on Military Instruc- 
tion held one meeting this year for the 
purpose of drafting an amendment to 
Paragraph 86, S e ction "C" of the Rsgula- 
tion for Undergraduate Students, The 
change, which was approved by the Senate 



at its December, 1947 meeting, was re- 
quired as a result of the installation 
of R.O.T.C, in some Undergraduate Centers, 

Nelson McGeary 
Chairman, Committee en 

Military Instruction 



OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS FROM THE REGISTRAR'S OFFICE 



Withdrawal s : 



3 Cohen, D a vid, LD, Sept. 24 3 

5 Kandrat, R»bert James, Chem,, Sept,29 3 

3 O'Conner, William Henry, Hort, Sept. 30 3 



Stalter, Edward Paul, ME, Sept. 25 
Perkins, Jack Charles, PEd, Sept. 28 
V e lloso, Henrique Rubem Costa, CE. 
Sept. 29 



leave 



Reasons for Wit hdrawal : Illness, 1; transfer to other college, 1; military 
cancelled, 1; undecided about curriculum, 1; personal 2, 

ANNUAL REPORT OF THE SENATE COMMITTEE ON PUBLIC OCCASIONS, 1947-1948 

During the past year the Committee arranged for the following publio occasions 

Summer Sessions Commencement, Saturday, August 9, 1947 in Schwab Auditorium 
Summer S e ssions Commencement, Friday, September 19, 1947 in Schwab Auditorium 
1st Semester Commencement, Saturday, January 31, 1948 in Recreation Building 
2nd Semester Commencement, Monday, June 7, 1948 in Recreation Building 

Re spectfully submitted: 

The Committee on Public Occasions 

R.M, Conger, Chairman 

ANNUAL REPORT OF THE SENATE COMMITTEE ON PUBLICATIONS, 1947-1948 



During the academic year, 1947-48, 
no matters were referred to the S e nate 
Committee on Publications, and no meet- 



ing of the Committee was called, 

Warren B. Mack, Chairman 
Committee on Publications 



m 



■ . THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 
COUNCIL ON RESEARCH 

SUMMARY OF REPORTS ON PROJECTS SPONSORED BY 
GRANTS-IN-AID FROM THE CENTRAL FUND FOR RESEARCH 
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1948 



SCHOOL OF CHEMISTRY AND PHYSICS 



1, A« Witt Hutchison , Rare Earths as Oxidation Catalysts. 

Apparatus and methods hare been devised for the study of catalytic oxida- 
tion reactions, using oxides of praseodymium and neodymium as catalysts. Fifty-one 
complete runs have been conducted to date with encouraging results, 

6. Wheeler P. Davey . (in 'cooperation with B.V. Moore, M.R,, Trabue, George F* 

Castore )♦ 

A Study of Screening Tests for Prospective Physicists and 
Chemical Engineers. 

Standardization and validation of, a selection and screening battery have 
been completed for students who wish to enter the fields of Chemistry and Physics. 

7. John M« Schempf . 6-Chloro-5-nit rot oluene-3-sulf onic acid as a Reagent for 

Potas sium. 

Spectrographic studies on the potassium salt color complex showed maximum 
absorption at 410-420 m.u. Aqueous solutions of the colorless potassium salt showed 
maximum absorption at 315 m.u. Beer-Lambert equations are obeyed up to concentra- 
tions of 15—20 ppm. of potassium. 

8. Henry L, Yeagley . Physical Basis of Bird Navigation. 

Pigeons are being trained preparatory to a study of new experimental 
flights which will be followed by observation planes, in order to test the Electro- 
magnet ic-Coriolis bird navigation theory. 

SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 



2, C.R. Carpenter , (in cooperation with Hollis Farnum). 

Human Factors in a Regional Development. 

Data have been obtained relative to patterns of attitudes and opinions of 
( the prpulatlon of the Jackson Hole Region with reference to the establishment of a 
Wildlife Park, The data will be used in planning public information and tourist 
traffic programs, 

9, Jame s Gemmell , Research Techniques in Business Education. 

A detailed rutline of a proposed research guide, for research workers in 
the field of business education, has been prepared, 

10. Willis E. Pratt (in cooperation with Donald G, McGarey). 

Techniques of Curriculum Building. ; 

A study of 329 curriculum development projects has led to the compilation 
of a comprehensive master list of techniques and procedures. A list of the charac- 
teristics of good curriculum development was compiled. These will be used in prepai — 
ing a study guide for seoondary schools, 

11* A»W« VanderMeer , Survey of Use of Non-Textbook Materials in Pennsylvania 

Secondary Schools, 

Data have been collected, treated statistically, and the final report has 
been prepared. 



12, William S „ Vincent , Analysis of Administrative Problems in Pennsylvania School 

Systems, 

Manuscript is completed for a book entitled "Tools for Teaching" and a 
film entitled "Teachers at Work" has been made. Preliminary work has been done in 
outlining a study of a public relations program, 

13. William S. Vincent , The Adsquacy of Laboratory Work in the Training of School 

Administrators. 

A student internship program has been devised in order to study the 
adequacy of laboratory work in the training of school administrators. 

SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING 



14. Leonard A. Doggett . Susquehanna Valley Improvement. 

Manuscript for a Bulletin, entitled "Susquehanna Valley Improvements," 
is being submitted for publication. 

■*■->• S^ .K, Hoffman and Design of Engine Indicator System. 
J *C .. Montgomery . 

A high speed engine indicator, utilizing a magnetic pickup plug and 
oscilloscope, has been devised which is useful in the study of engine performance. 

16. C.C. Hsiao . Experimental Stress Analysis. 

Average residual stress of rolled aluminum bars was studied, using SR-4 
strain gauges. 

17. Joseph Marin (in cooperation with V.L, Dutton). 

Combined Plastic Stre s s— Strain Relations for Metals. 

Fourteen combined stress experiments have been completed and data are 
being computed. 

18. Philip K. Roo s . Comparison of Fatigue Data. 

Experimental equipment has been perfected and pilot specimens have been 
run indicating that all tests are now feasible. 

20, W.M. Waohter . Shaver Creek HydrolCgic Study, 

Observations have been made on precipitation, stream flow, evaporation 
and other factors necessary for a study of the relation between rainfall and runoff. 

21, A.H, Waynick , Literature Survey and Preparation of Paper on the Physios of 

the Ionosphere, 

A survey of the literature has been made and manuscript is being prepared 
for publioation 

22, A.H. Zerban , Research in Periodic Heat Flow. 

Experimental equipment has been assembled and tests have been made of 
brass rod with surface polished and coated with lampblack. The method of determining 
thermal conductivity through measurements of velocity of propagation of a temperature 
wave has yielded good results with brass rod 'and the method should be applicable to 
other materials, 

38, Paul F. Norton . Thomas Jefferson and the Arts, 

Data have been collected relating to Thomas Jefferson's connections with 
art, artists and architects. This includes considerable unpublished material which 
is being prepared for future publication. 



SCHOOL OF THE LIBERAL ARTS 



3. Frank B» Freidel , Franklin D. Roosevelt: Assistant Secretary of the Navy, 
1 "■* " ' .' ' i 

Collection of materials has been completed and the first draft of the 
final manuscript has teen started, 

Janze n . Government and Politics in the USSR, 

Source materials have been microfilmed and periodicals in the Library of 
Congress have been abstracted with the view of publishing the manuscript in book form* 

5, Frederick B, Marbufr ♦ History of the Washington Press Corps, 

Library researches have .been' completed and the first of a series of 
articles has been accepted for publication in the Journalism Quarterly, 

23, Helen Adolf , Studies in the Grail Legend, 

A study has been made of the use and translation of "Zwivel" as used in 
Wolfram's Parzival, Interpretations of its various meanings have been made and 
manuscript is being submitted for publication, 

24, Paul R, Beall , The Forensio Oratory of William Maxwell Evarts, 

The study has been completed and' has led to discoveries of basic speech 

methods, with particular reference to techniques in direct and cross examinations, 

which can be applied to the solution of present day problems, A publisher is being 
sought , 

25, Albert F» Buffington . The Languages and Culture of the Pennsylvania Germans, 

Work has been continued in an attempt to determine the underlying causes 
for the astonishing array of differences in Pennsylvania German dialect in different 
geographical areas of Pennsylvania, 

26, Robert J, Clements , A Study of Michelangelo's Aesthetics, 

Material has been collected which sheds light on Michelangelo's theory 
of art, A portion of the work has been submitted for publication by the Boston 
Public Library and, eventually, the complete study will appear in book form, 

27, Franklin H. C^fk , A Trend Study of Small Electric Power Companies, 

Compilation of data for 1942 and 1945 has been completed and one bulletin 
(No, 32), "Achievements of the Electric Power Companies During the War," has been 
published, 

28, Haskell B, Curry , Foundations of Mathematics, 

Four papers have been completed during the year, in addition to the publi- 
cation of a number of reviews, A paper entitled "Languages and Formal Systems" was 
presented at the International Congress of philosophy in August 1948, 

30, Kent Forster , Biography in Modern Japanese History, 

Data have been collected on the diplomatic and political activities of 
Prince It o Hirobumi. 

31, Philip S, Klein , Life of James Buchanan, 

About eight hundred letters of John W, Forney to James Buchanan have been 
transcribed from microfilm, 

32, M, Nel s on McGeary , Government and the Liquor Business. 

A monograph dealing with the history, organization and operation of the 
Pennsylvania Liquor Conhrol Board will be published by the Pennsylvania Book Service, 



33. Louis F. Peck . Matthew Gregory Lewis (1775-1818). 

Literature searches have been made, largely at Harvard University, rela- 
tive to the life of Lewis and to the sources of his work. 

34, Herbert Steiner , The Poems of Hofmannsthal . 

Research has led to a better knowledge of the chronology of Hofmannsthal ' s 
poems. This will lead, eventually, to a rearrangement of poems when the new edition 
of the Volume of P ems is published. 

SCHOOL OF MINERAL INDUSTRIES 



35. S.C. Sun and The Physical Aspects of Coal Flotation* 
D.R. Mitchell . 

Flotation studies using a newly developed "f rothimeter" have led to a 
new conception (the multi-bubble hypothesis) regarding the flotability of coal and 
similar materials, 

36. S.C. Sun . The Electrostatic Separation of Minerals, 

A distribution analyzer was used in connection with an electrostatic 
separator in studying ten minerals and some synthetic mixtures. The method estab- 
lished the fundamental mechanism of mineral behavior in an electrostatic field, 

SCHOOL OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND ATHLETICS 

37. Lloyd M. J ones . Vocational Guidance in Health Education, Physical Education 

and Recreation, 

Eight hundred questionnaires have been received from eleven colleges and 
interviews have been held with vocational counselors at ten high schools. When the 
data are tabnl^ted, an outline will be prepared for a planned program af improved 
guidance for the use of vocational counselors. 



SJ8* 0< J 8T.I0f.IBJr 



THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 



FACULTY 



Published weekly on Tuesday during the College 
year as a means of making official announcements 
and presenting items of interest to the faculty. All 




BULLETIN 



contributions should be as brief as possible and 
reach Louis H. Bell, Director of Public Information, 
313 Old Main, not later than 10 a. m. each Friday. 



VOL. 



36 



October 11, 1948 



NO. 



DR. C.E. MARQUARDT TO RETIRE; OTHER CHANGES ANNOUNCED 



Dr. Carl E. Marquardt, College 
Examiner and professor of romance philo- 
logy, will retire on February 28 with 
emeritus rank. 

Joining the faculty in 1909 as an 
instructor in. German, Dr. Marquardt in 
1919 was named associate professor of 
French. He became the first College 
Examiner in 1920, a part-time job at 
that time, and in 1923 was named profes- 
sor of romance philology. 

The Executive Committee of the 
Board of Trustees at their recent meet- 
ing also approved the appointment of 
Dr. Alfred L. Bortree, who has served on 
the Michigan State College faculty for 
the past nine years, as professor of 
veterinary science, effective October 1» 

Five other appointments, all effec- 
tive September 1, were announced. They 
are: Rohas Garciduenas, Jose, since 
1947 director of the Department of In- 
formation for the Mexico Foreign Service, 



visiting professor of romance languages; 
Dr. Raoul C. Mitchell, who has been doing 
consulting work in Idaho, visiting pro- 
fessor of geology; Dr. Rebekah Gibbons, 
professor of home economics at the Uni- 
versity of Nebraska, professor of home 
economics (part-time). Dr. Gibbons was 
an instructor in chemistry at Penn State 
from 1918 to 1921. 

Dr. Eva D. Wilson, professor of home 
economics at Ohio State University, pro- 
fessor of home economics (part-time); 
and Dr» Ruth R. Honey, assistant profes- 
sor of home economics at Cornell Univer- 
sity> associate professor of home econo- 
mics. 

Promotions approved by the Trustees 
include those of Floyd A. Hummell, from 
research assistant to assistant, profes- 
sor of ceramics, and Nettie P. S e ely, 
from assistant home economics extension 
representative to home economics exten- 
sion representative* 



PROGRAM FOR COMMUNITY FORUM ANNOUNCED; TICKETS ON SALE 



The program for the 1948-49 State 
College Community Forum Series has been 
announced and will include five numbers » 

Fairfield Osborn, president of the 
New York Zoological Sooiety and presi- 
dent of the Conservation Foundation, will 
open the series on N vember 4 when he 
discusses "Our Plundered Planet. " 

Dr • 0. Spurgenn English, head of 
the department of psychiatry at Temple 
University Medical School, will speak on 
December 2 on "The Kinsey Report," 

Quinsy H we, news analyst, will 
talk on "The Soviet-American Future" on 
January 10 and Hanson Baldwin, military 
editor of the New York Times will speak 



on February 15 on "Security in the 
At omic Age . " 

The series closes on April 21 with 
Ellis Arnall, former governor of Georgia 
speaking on "The South Today." 

Tickets for the series are priced 
at $3, which includes the federal tax. 
Tickets may be bought now at the Student 
Union office or from representatives of 
the 19 sponsoring organizations. On 
October 28, the general admission 
tickets --may bo exohanged'at the Stu(*»nt 
Union office for reserved seat 
ticket s. 

Single admission will be $1^ which 
includes the tax. 



tffcNN STATE C< ILLECTi 



ALL FULL-TIME EMPLOYEES REQUESTED TO ATTEND MEETINGS ON HOSPITAL EXPENSE INSURANCE 



College officials have again urged 
all regular full-time employees to at- 
tend one of the meetings at which the 
new hospital expense insurance plan will 
he explained. 

The meetings have been arranged to 
enable all employees to have an oppor- 



tunity to gain complete information abput 
the plan. They sign for the plan at the 
meet ing . 

The new plan, which provides in- 
creased benefits and also benefits for de- 
pendents of employees, will become effec- 
tive as soon as 75 per cent of the em- 
ployees sign for the plan. 



OF GENERAL INTEREST 



CHAPEL: Dr. D. Elton Trucblood, head of 
the department of philosophy, Earlham 
College, Richmond, Ind . , will speak at 
chapel services on Sunday morning, 

* * a 

CHEMISTRY AND PHYSICS: Faculty of the 
School of Chemistry and Physics will meet 
at 5 p.m. Wednesday, in Room 119, Os — 
mend Laboratory. 



SPORTS: Saturday at 2 p .n 
West Virginia vs Penn State. 



, football, 



LUNCHEON CLUB: Dr. Werner F. S tried- 
Ieck, assistant professor of German, will 
speak at the Faculty Luncheon Club o» 
Monday noon, October 18. His subject 

will be: "No Man's Land Europe, Summer 

of 1048." 

* * • 

PHILOSOPHY SEMINAR: The philosophy 
Seminar will meet at 7:30 p.m. Monday, 
October 18, in Room 5, Central Library. 
Dr. H.B. Curry, professor of mathematics, 
will review his impressions of the 10th 
International Congress of Philosophy 
which he attended in Amsterdam, Holland 
last summer. 

* * i> 

AAUW: The American Association of Uni- 
versity Women will meet at 8 p.m. on 
Wednesday at the State College High 
School library. It will be a social 
meeting for the purpose of getting ac- 
quainted . 

... 

PLANT BREEDING SEMINAR: J.R. Watson, 
research fellow in agronomy, will discuss 
"St, at i St ica-1 Predict ions of Genetical 
Effects of the Various Systems of Mating" 
at the Plant Breeding Seminar in Rr>om 211, 
Agriculture Building at 4 p.m. Monday, 
October 18. 

* * * 

TRUSTEES RE-APPOINTED: Gov. James H. 
Duff has announced the re— appoint ment of 
Howard J. Lamade, of Williamsport , and 
Frank R, Dentin, nf Pittsburgh, to the 
Board of Trustees of the College. 

* * ■!■ 

CORRECTION: In the Regulations for 
Undergraduate Students, 1948-49, Rul<* 88c 
on page 31, the word "sophomore" should 
be changed to "freshman." 



COLLOQUIUM: Br« John A. Sauer, professor 
and head of the department of engineering 
mechanics, will speak at the physics 
colloquium at 4:25 p.m. Tuesday in Room 
117, Osmond Laboratory, His subject is: 
"Adiabatic Demagnetization Phenomena at 
Low Temperatures," 

* • • 

DEVELOP GALLSTONE DETECTOR: A gallstone 
detsctcr which has been successfully used 
at the University of Pennsylvania hospital 
Philadelphia, has been developed in the 
Ordnance Research Laboratory. The work 
was done by E.G. Thurston under the di- 
rection of Dr. Erio A. Walker* 

* » » 

BOOK PUBLISHED: A revised edition of the 
textbook, "Crop Management and Soil Con- 
servation" by Dr. Lyman E. Jackson, dean 
of the Sohool of Agriculture, and Joseph F 
Cox, retired director of the Midwest Agri- 
cultural Foundation, has been published by 
John Wiley & Sons, Inc., New York, N.Y. 
» , » 

ADVANCED COOKING CLASS: There are vacan- 
cies for three more adults in the advanced 
class in foods preparation. Women who 
have had considerable experience in cook— J 
ing or who have taken courses of this type 
are eligible. They may register by tele- 
phoning Mrs. David Cowell, (3324), the 
instructor. The first class xrill meet at 
7:30 o'clock Tuesday night in Room 188, 
Home Economics Building, 

* * * 

SPEAKS: Viktor Lowenfeld, professor of 
art education, addressed the Maryland 
State Teachers Association in Baltimore on 
Friday. His subject was, "Education Througl 
Art ." 

* , » 

SPEAKS: Dr. Hasel Hatcher, professor of 
home economics education, addressed a 
joint session of the Southeastern District 
cf the Pennsylvania Home Economics Asso- 
ciation and the Philadelphia Home Econom- 
"i'o-a Association in Philadelphia on Satur- 
day. Her subject was: "Evaluating Evalua- 
t ion." 

* * • 

AT SYMPOSIUM: Paul F, Norton, assistant 
professor of fine arts, will attend a sym- 
posium on Mediaeval Architecture to be held 
by the department of fine arts at Oo-erlin 
College, Oberlin, 0. this week- end. 



SPEAK: Dr. Ellen D, Kelly, assistant 
professor of physical education and 
athletics, spoke on "Preventive and Re- 
medial Techniques" at the meeting of 
the Central District, Pennsylvania State 
Education Association, in Lock Haven 
Friday, Dr. Helen R» LeBaron, assistant 
director of home economics, spoke on 
"Planning the H memaking Program of To- 
day" and Dr. William U, Snyder, asso- 
ciate professor of psychology, spoke on 
"The Teacher's Contribution to Pupil 



Mental Health." 

* * * 

BOOK PUBLISHED: Covering the most re- 
cent developments in the science of 
pest control chemicals, the second 
edition of "Chemistry of Insecticides, 
Fungicides, and Herbicides" by Dr. Donald 
E.H, Frear, professor of agricultural 
and biological chemistry, has been pub- 
lished by the Van N strand Co. 



MINUTES OF THE SENATE MEETING OF OCTOBER 7, 1948 



The College Senate met at 4:10 p.m. 
on October 7, 1948 in 121 Sparks Build- 
ing, Dean F.D, Kern presiding. The list 
of members present is en file in the Of- 
fice of the Registrar. The minutes of 
the last meeting were not read ainoe 
they had been printed in the Faculty 
Bulletin for June 7, 1948. 

The acting secretary, Dean R.M. 
Gerhardt, read letters as follows; 

From F.F. Lininger that M,A. Far- 
rell, Assistant Director of the Agricul- 
tural Experiment Station, would serve 
in the Senate in his place during his 



six months' sabbatical 
July 1, 194! 



leave, beginning 



From Eric A. Walker that F.T. Hall, 
Jr. would replace him at the Senate meet- 
ing today. 

From Dean Euwema that William H. 
Powers has been appointed as the Director 
of Arts and Science Extension to replace 
D.B. Pugh'and would, therefore, take his 
seat in the College S e nate. 

From Mr. A.O. Morse, Acting Secre- 
tary of the Board of Trustees, stating 
that the Board of Trustees had approved 
the recommendation of the College Senate 
that the degree of Fuels Engineer bo 
added to the list of technical degrees 
conferred by the College. 



These letters are on 
fice of the Registrar. 



file in the Of- 



Victor Beede, Chairman of the Com- 
mittee on Academic Standards, made a 
statement that his committee had acted 
with power on 51 petitions for rein- 
statement during the summer: 4 had 
been approved, and 11 denied. 

C.E. Bullinger, Chairman of the 
Committee on. Courses of Study, reported 
that a mimeographed letter had been sent 
to all senators outlining the "Standard 
Praohioes" for the committee, A copy of 
this letter is on file in the Office of 
the Registrar; 



Prof, Bullinger presented a report for 
the Courses of Study Committee which is 
on file in the Office of the Registrar 
and which, in accordance with S e nate 
regulations, will lie on the table for 
one month. 

E,W, Calle-nbach, Chairman of the 
Committee on Calendar, stated that in ac- 
cordance with Senate action on April 1 
the coming Election Day would not be a 
College holiday but that printed excuse 
forms would be available at the Student 
Union Desk after October 29 for students 
who desired to be absent in order to go 
home to vote. These excuses are to be 
signed by the judge of elections, and to 
be presented by the student to the indi- 
vidual instructors. 

Prof. Callenbach presented three al- 
ternatives for a College Calendar for 
1949-1950 to be studied by the Senate. 
These are to lie on the table for one 
month and are on file in the Office of 
the Registrar. 

Under the heading of old business, 
the recommendations of the Courses of 
Study Committee in their annual report to 
the S e nate were discussed. 

Item 1. The creation of a Division 
or School of Art or Arts. 

Item 2. The Graduate School study of 
the amount of credit to be given for 
re search. 

Item 3. The course descriptions for 
the general College catalog to be cut to 
twenty words or less. 

The following actions have been taken 
on the above recommendations: 

Item 1 has been referred to the Ad- 
ministration. 

Item 2 "has been referred to the 
Graduate School 'for study. 

Item 3 was discussed on the floor of 
the S e nate. 



PE'NN STATE ^tjjsctiq^ 



R.E. Dengler moved and T.J. Gates 
seconded the motion that "descriptions for 
catalog material be kept at twenty words 
or less." The motion oarried. It was 
stated that it was not necessary for 
shortened descriptions of old oourses to 
be acted upon by the Courses of Study 
Committee but that such descriptions 
should be on the official card in Mr. 
Watkins' office. 

Prof. Werner stated a committee had 
been appointed to study and prepare a re- 
vision of the Academic Service reports 
but that there was no report at this 
meet ing. 

The acting secretary read a letter 
from Mr. A.O. M rse, dated August 9, 1948, 
and his attached letter from the Presi- 
dent of the College Physical Education 
Association, dated August 1, 1948 and 
signed by Lloyd Jones with reference to 
Credit for Military Training in Physical 
Education and Hygiene. It is on file in 
the Office of the Registrar. Prof. 
Jones stated that a committee from the 
Senate Committees on Military Science 
and Student Welfare were studying this 



letter. 

Prof* Beede for the Committee on 
Academic Standards, recommended that the 
following line be incorporated in Rule 56 
of the Regulations for Undergraduate Stu- 
dents, edition 1948-49. 

Any student reinstated by the Com- 
mittee shall be on probation for the en- 
suing seme ster. 

The recommendation will lie on the 
table for one month. 

The complete report of the Senate 
Committee on Academic Standards in on 
file in the Office of the Regis- 
trar. 

After an infernal discussion 
on the question "When and how does . 
a student get off probation" the Sen- 
ate adjourned. 



Royal M. Gerhardt 
Secretary pro tern 



REPORT OF THE SENATE COMMITTEE ON CALENDAR, 1947-48 



The Committee on Calendar has pre- 
pared and submitted for approval an ex- 
tension of the College Calendar covering 
the period - September 28, 1948 to Sep- 
tember 26, 1949. It was, approved on 
November 6. 

The Committee, on request of the 
Council of Administration, also gave 
consideration to the designation of 
National Election Day, November 2, 1948, 
as a student holiday. After thorough 
consideration of the problem, the Com- 
mittee reported a unanimous recommenda- 
tion that Election Day be not designated 
a general student holiday but that stu- 
dents presenting adequate evidence of 
eligibility to vote be excused from 
missed classes without penalty; further- 
more, that faculty members whose legal 
voting residenoe is not in the State 
College area be granted the privilege 
of absenting themselves from classes pro- 



vided adequate substitute instruction is 
provided. 

Finally, the Committee voted to 
recommend to its successor in 1948—49 
"that consideration be given to the elimi- 
nation of some period of summer instruc- 
tion so that each regular semester may 
meet the requirement of 16 weeks of in- 
struction, not including registration, 
and that this 16-week period shall pro- 
vide a minimum of 15 class hours of in- 
struction per credit for all class sec- 
tions; furthermore, that consideration be 
given to allowing one day in a semester 
for First Phase registration and one other 
day between the ending of semester classes 
and the beginning of final examinations," 

Respectfully submitted, 



E.W. Callenbach, Chairman 
Senate Committee on Calendar 



OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS FROM THE OFFICE OF THE DEAN OF ADMISSIONS 

Withdrawals : 



3 
3 
8 
3 



Coll, James Joseph, Jr., CE, Oct. 1 
Cota, Rita Holly, Bact., Sept. 26 
Derr, Jack T., Ed, Oct. 7 
Ervin, Donald C., LD, Oct. 4 
Hilger, John W., LD, Oct. 1 
Kaithern, Robert W. , CF, Oot . 1 
Kelso, Edward Grover, EE, Oct. 1 

Reasons for W1+- h drawal : Per s one 



5 Lorah, Gladys M, , AL, Oct. 4 

Sp Neupauer, Lucille Millicent, AL,Sept.2# 

3 Oleynik, Stanley, CF , Oct. 4 

Sp Pickering, Alice Romaine, AL, Sept. 28 

3 Serro, Louis Mike, PEd, Oct. 2 

3 Wahl, Anne Amelia, Ed, Sept. 29 



Reasons for Wl+.h drawal : Personal, 3; health, 2; finances, 2; transfer to another 
college, 2; aoofipt a position, 1; low grades, 1; dissatisfied, 1; not qualified for 

cur ri on Inn # 1, 

Change of Name ? 

From Wyllian Knapp King to Wyllian K. King Yockey (7th semester AE ) 



Pro ject 
Number • 



10 



IX 



12 



Pro je ot 

Leader 

Hutchison, A. Witt 
Oakword, Thomas S, 
Sohempf , John M» 

Webb, Wayne 

Gemmell, James 
Gemmell, James 
Smith, William M. 

Smith, William M. 

Lemmon, Don C » 
Norton, Paul F, 



THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 
COUNCIL ON RESEARCH 

GRANTS-IN-AID FROM THE CENTRAL FUND FOR RESEARCH 
APPROVED FOR THE FISCAL YEAR 
July 1, 1948 to June 30, 1949 

SCHOOL OF CHEMISTRY AND FHYSICS 



• Title 

Rare Earths as Oxidation 
Catalyst s 

Cleavage of Beta-Benzil- 
monoxime 

6 Chloro-5-nitrot oluene- 
3-sulfonic acid as a 
Reagent for Potassium 

Compressibility of Pure 
Hydrocarbons 

SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 

Economic Concepts of Youth, 
Ages 16-19 

Research in Business 
Educati on 

Attitudes and Beliefs of 
Prof e-ssional Home Economics 
Workers about Child Develop- 
ment and Family Relationships 

■ Criteria of Mate S e lectir. n 
of 2000 Young People 

SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING 



Vibration Loosening of 
Threaded Connections 

..Thomas Jefferson, and the 
Art s 



Amount 
Approved 

$ 250.00 



200.00 



100.00 



200.00 



300.00 



300.00 



200.00 



200.00 



200.00 



300.00 



13 
14 
15 

16 



Rocs, Philip K. 
Roseoe, Edwin S« 
Smith, Charles J. 

Zerban, A.H, 
Bayard, Samuel P» 
Freund, Ernest H. 



Fatigue Stresses in Wo«d 

Plastic Working of Metals 

Shaver Creek Hydrolog.io 
Study 

Thermodynamic Properties 
of Silicone Fluids 



SCHOOL OF THE LIBERAL ARTS 



A Folklore Survey of a 
Section of We stern Pennsyl- 
vania, Including Jefferson 
County 

Historical and Analytical 
Research on the Ideas of 
Value in Western Civilization 



100.00 
200.00 
225.00 

300.00 
1?0.00 
180.00 



17 



Adolf, Helen 



Studies in the Grail Legend 



200,00 



18 Auerbach, Erich Levels cf Style in Modern $ 200.00 

Lyric Poetry, Especially 
French 

19 Bernard, Jessie Prediction of Success on 300,00 
Clark, Robert • Parole 

20 Clements, Robert J. A Study of Michelangelo's 200.0.0 

Ae sthet ios 

21 Curry, Haskell B. Foundations of Mathematics 250,0© 

22 Dahmus, Joseph H, The Prosecution of John . 135i00 

Wyclyf 

23 Forster, Kent Biography in Modern Japanese 200,00 

Hist ory 

24 Harris, Brice Patronage and the Profession 300.00 

of Letters in England, 1640- 
1710 

25 Keyes, Scott Recent Growth cf American 300.00 

Housing Market Areas 

26 McGeary, Nelson Government and the Liquor 45.00 

Bu sine ss 

27 Scott, Dorothy B, Aesthetics of Drama and 300.00 

the Theatre 

28 Steiner, Herbert Hrfma nnst hal ' s "Pompilia" 200.00 

29 Zelko, Harold F. Speech Training in Industry 150.00 

SCHOOL OF MINERAL INDUSTRIES 

30 Bates, Thomas F, Electron Microscope Studies 300.00 

of the Clay Minerals 

31 Sun, Shiou-Chuan The Mechanism of Chemical' 300. OQ 

Coating on Mineral Surfaces 

SCHOOL OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND ATHLETICS 



32 ' Davis, Arthur F. The Present Practices of 215,00 

Teaching Health Education 
in the High Schools of 
Penn sylvan ia 

33 , Masley, Jshn W. Construction of a Test to 150.00 

Measure Attitudes Toward 
Physical Ecuation Activities 



SJSttOcT SlJOf JB$ 



THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 



FACULTY 



The Bulletin is published weekly during the College 
year as a means of making official announcements 
and presenting items of interest to the faculty. All 




VOL. 36 



BULLETIN 



contributions should be as brief as possible and 
reach Louis H. Bell, Director of Public Information. 
313 Old Main, not later than 10 a. m. each Friday. 



October 13, 1948 



NO. 



COLLEGE TO WITHHOLD STATE COLLEGE BOROUGH AND SCHOOL DISTRICT TAX 



The Collage will -withhold the Stato 
College VhO-rough and school district 
taxes from earnings of salaried employe:! 
residing in the borough and from salaried 
employes who work full time for the 
College* • 

The action applies also with respeot 
to the ordinances of College, Ferguson, 
Harris, and Patton tow&ships. 

The College will report the names 
and addresses of its employes from whom 
taxes are withheld and will remit to the 
borough each month the gross amount of 
all taxes withheld. 

While withholding by the Colleges 
will be effective from August 1, 1048, 
the complete system will not be operative 
until after January 1, 1940 because of 
the complexity of the system and the ex- 
tensive ohanges required' to put the plan 
into operation. 



All saiivried employes of the College 
who receive no taxable earnings as de- 
fined in the ordinances other than that 
paid to them by the College need net file 
estimates of earnings tax, or pay tax dne 
on October 15, However, all salaried 
employes who receive taxable earnings, 
in addition to those paid by the College, 
must file a return of such earnings. 

The College will first start with- 
holding on February 1, 1949, on the 
following basis s 

Out of January earnings, 1 per cent 
will be withheld, plus half of the total 
withholding for the overdue months. On 
March 1, 1 per cent will be withheld from 
February earnings, plus the second half 
of the total for the overdue months. 
After the back, taxes b.ave been paid, 
the withholding will amount to the agreed 
1 per- cent a month* 



RECORD ENROLLMENT ESTABLISHED WITH 9601 STUDENTS ON CAMPUS 



A record enrollment was established 
•with the registration of 9801 students 
on the campus. The previous high for 
student enrollment was reached last Fall 
with 8400 students. 

In addition to the students on the 
main, campus, 713 sophomores are regis- 
tered at four centers as follows: 



Altoona, 226; DuB<">is, 162; Hazleton, 167; 
and Schuylkill (at Pottsville), 158. 

Figures on enrollment, tabulated by 
semester and curriculum, are -published 
in this issue of the Faculty Bulletin. 
A report on freshman enrollment will be 
published in a later i(*sue» 



TfORE ON NEW MEN'S DORMITORIES BEGINS 



The contract for clearing the site 
and excavating for the foundations for 
new men's dormitories and a dining hall 
en West Campus was let to M,W. Schreffler, 
of Pleasant ,,pap , Work has already been 
started and it is expected the excavating 



will be completed within three months. 

The new dormitories, which will 
house 1200 men, will consist of three 
major units. The dining hall will have 
facilities for feeding 1500 men. 



DRAWINGS, WATER COLORS BY ELEANORE RUBIN COMPOSE LIBRARY EXHIBIT 



Mpre than 40 drawings and water 
colors by Eleanore Rubin, all depioting 
views of life in Centre Ccunty, compose 
an exhibit at the College Library. It 
will continue until the end of the month. 

Characteristic ,landBcap#8 and de- 



lightfully interpreted animals and ve&pla 

show familiar aspects cf csuntry life*. 

The drawings are executed with a light 

touoh in soft, luminous tones, cr in 

orisp, expressive lines. Several cf the 

water colors aohieve a rich, decorative 

e f f e ct . ^>'N STATE COLI ECTIOS 



NEW TRAFFIC AND PARKING REGULATIONS ANNOUNCED 



One-way traffic, including bumper- 
to— bumper parking on Pollock Road, and 
enlargement or construction of four other 
areas, will add an estimated 237 parking 
spaces to the present campus capacity. 

The enlargement of the area north of 
Osmond Laboratory, which will accommodate 
an additional 70 cars, will be completed 
this week. Work on the other areas will 
f o 1 1 ow * 

One-way traffic and parking on 
Pollock Road, from Burrowes Road to Short- 
lidge Road, will become effective on ".'--" 
November 1. Parking will be permissible 
on the north side of the road only and 
traffic will move from west to east. 
This plan will accommodate an estimated 
100 cars. 




Other new areas will be constructed 
north of Patterson Hall in Curtin Road 
and northwest of the Horticulture Build- 
ing, also on Curtin Ro&d. The Patterson 
Hall area will then accommodate 83 cars 
instead of the present capacity of 15, 
while the other area will add about .29 
new stalls. 



It was emphasized that no illegal 
parking will be tolerated, and also that 
within a few weeks the parking area west 
of Sparks Building weuld be closed pre- 
paratory to the start of work en new men's 
dermitrries. Closing of this area will 
eliminate 85 spaces. 



A new approach to Old 
is expected to be built in 
It will include an incoming 
west cf the present entranc 
to the east. The present d 
replaced by a grass panel, 
parking stalls for the use 
will be available in the dr 
interior courts will be clo 
except service vehicles. 



Main building 
the Spring, 

drive to the 
e and an exit 
rive will be 

Twelve new 
of visitors 
ives and the 
sed t o all 



In announcing the plans, George Vf„ 
Ebert , director of the Physical Plant, 
renewed his appeal for clearance of ser- 
vice drives. He said the problem has- 
become so serious that deliveries cf 
parcel post, express, and other supplies 
have been delayed for days because of the 
inability of service vehicles to gain 
aocess to campus buildings, 

Ebert also pointed out that parking 
on Curtin Road, north side only, will 
continue to be permitted and that cars may 
be parked on the west side of Shortlidge 
Road and Burrowes Read, 



J.L. KRALL APPOINTED TO BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



J,L. Krall, of Cat as an qua , ha s been 
appointed to the Board of Trustees by 
James Milholland, president of the Board, 
tc fill the unexpired term of Furman H, 



Gyger, Sr., of Kimberton, deceased, 

Krall was first appointed to the 
Board en July 12, 1S44 and in June, 1945, 
was eleoted for a three— year term. 



OF GENERAL INTEREST 



LIBERAL ARTS FACULTY: Faculty of the 
School of the Liberal Arts will meet at 
4:10 p.m. Tuesday, October 26, in Room 
121, Sparks Building, 

* * * 

CHAPEL: Rev. William E. Kroll '17, of 
the Arlington Ave, Presbyterian Church, 
East Orange, N,J., will speak at the 
chapel service at 11 o'clock Sunday morn- 
ing, 

* * * 

HOME SPORTS i Saturday, aooo&T, 
Penn State vs Marylar.d, 10 a.m.; foot- 
ball, Penn State vs Michigan State, 2 p.m.; 
and cress-country, Penn State vs Michigan 
State, during football game, 

* * * 

LUNCHEON CLUB: Dr, Seth W« Russell, 
professor of sociology and assistant 
dean, School of the Liberal Apt s , will ad- 
dress the Faculty T„jnohecn Club on Monday 
noon, October 25, on "Happy Shores on 
Por-HugnX — 19-10." 



HOSPITAL EXPENSE' INSURANCE: Anyone who 
has not signed up for the new hospital 
expense insurance plan, can do so by 
filling out an application card and send- 
ing it to Security Benefits Division, 
208 Old Main. Cards are available at 
offices of deans and department heads. 

• * + 

RESERVE RESEARCH GROUP: The 2101st 
Organized Reserve Research and Development 
sub group will meet at 7:30 p,m. on 'Wed- 
nesday in the office of the unit instruc- 
tor, Department of the Army, 616 W« Col- 
lege Ave, All personnel who have made 
application to join this group and other 
interested reserve officer personnel are 
requested to attend. Organization of the 
group and questions pertaining t© its 
functions will be discussed, 

» * * 
READING EXAMINATION: The reading examina- 
tions in foreign languages required ?i 
candidates for advanced decrees, will be 



-given on Monday, November 1, between 7 
and 9 p.m. in Room 316, Sparks Building. 

* * * 

'PLANT BREEDING SEMINAR* Lei Paangj-fei, 
research assistant in horticulture, 
■will discuss "The Back Cross Method of 
Plant Breeding" at the Plant Breeding 
S e minar in Room 211, Agriculture Build- 
ing, on Monday^ October 25, at 4 p.m. 

» * * 

SWIMMING : Recreational swimming sessions 
are held at the Glennland Pool for fac- 
ulty and wives, offic t e staff ar v d college 
employes every Monday from 7 to 9 p.m. 
Tickets may be obtained at the Bursar's 
Office for $l,80 a 

* * * 

COLLOQUIUM: Dr. Karl K„ Darrow, of the 
Bell Telephone Laboratories and Columbia 
University and secretary of the American 
Physical Society will speak o» "Magnetic 
Ressnance" at the Physics Colloquium in 
Room 117, Osiraond Laboratory, at 4:25 p.m. 
on Tue sday * 

* * * 

HORT SHOW: The annual Horticulture Show, 
dedicated to Frank N, Fagan who retired 
on September 30 as professor emeritus of 
pomology, will be held in the Stock 
Judging Pavilion this week-end. The show 
will open Friday and be open ^11 day 
Saturday and Sunday. There will be ex- 
hibits in lands cane horticulture, home 
economics, pomology, vegetable gardening^, 
forestry,, dendrology, agronomy, and 
floriculture and ornamental horticulture. 

* * * 

COMBINED ARTS: The first meeting of the 
Combined Arts group will be held in the 
Hone Economics Living Center at 7 o'clock 
on Sunday night,- All interested in 
participating in planning the year's pro- 
gram are urged to attend. The steering 



committee, cf the group will meet at 9 a.m, 
Friday in Room 207B, Burrowes Building. 



SIGMA XI : 
longing t 
o f t he Si 
with the 
t icipat e 
see the s 
Osmond La 

ELECTED: 
prof e ssor 
pre sident 
As sociat i 
Harri sbur 



New members of the faculty be- 
o other chapters of the Society 
gma Xi are invited to affiliate 
Penn State chapter and to par-* 
in its activities. They should 
ecretary, Henry W, Knerr, 215 
borat ory . 

+ * * 

Clayton H. Schug, associate 
of speech, was elected vice- 
of the Pennsylvania Speech 
on at the annual convention in 



SPEAKS: Dr. Lloyd M. Jones, professor of 
physical education, addressed the southern 
district convention of the Pennsylvania 
State Education Association in Chambers- 
burg on Friday, He spoke on "The 
Challenge tc Educational Leadership/ 

* * * 

SPEAKS; Dr. Franklin B. Krauss, profes- 
sor of Latin, addressed the classical 
division of the Western Pennsylvania 
Education Conference at Pittsburgh en 
Friday. His subject was: "The Challenge 
to Latin Teachers," 

» * * 
PAPER PUBLISHED: A paper by Dr. F r ank M, 
Swartz, pr.'fnssor of paleontology, was 
published in the August issue of the 
Bulletin of the American Association of 
Petroleum G e oiogists s It is titled, 
"Trenton and Sub-Trenton Outcrop Areas in 
New York, Pennsylvania, and Maryland e " 



SPEA.KS 



w 



'.M. Smith, Jr. 



a s soci at e 



professor cf home economics, last Friday 
discussed "Human Relations in the Class- 
room" before the southern district of the 
Pennsylvania State Education Association 
meeting in Chamber sburg. 



OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS FROM THE OFFICE OF THE DEAN OF ADMISSIONS 

Withdrawals : 



8 

3 

3 

S P 

3 

7 



Carpenter, Rodger W., AgEd, Oct. 5 
Cooper-, Florence E., Psy, Oct, 11 
D'Auria, Mario V.. ChE, Oct. 13 
DeLauter^ Lettie K., Ed ; Oct. 8 
Hetrick, Patricia A., LD, Oct. 7 
Jones, J, Wayne, AL, Oct. Q 



3 Long, Shirley A., LD, Oct. 7 

6 Peck, Luther D., AgEd, Oct « 6 

3 Phillips, Robert S., WU, Oct, 8 

Gr Sheurer, George H., ABCh, Oct. 9 

3 Sheffer', Da-le E., PV, Oct „ 6 



Reasons for Withdrawal: 111 health, 2; personal, 5; recalled to duty. with 
Air Corps, 1; to enter another c-llege, 2; lack of finances, 1. 

Change of Name ^ 
Jocleha Gilbert Mar&jLey +.» .T,->oleta Gilbert Markley Kyle 



PENN STATE COLLECTION 



ANNUAL REPORT CF THE REPRESENTATIVE ON COUNCIL OF RESEARCH, 1947-1948 



Tho Council for Research meets ap- "• 
proximately once a month to discharge its 
four major duties. 

The first is the dispensation of 
s*>me $7,500 allotted to it for the pro- 
motion of research throughout the Cullege, 
Applications are received from any fac- 
ulty member for funds from the Council. 
In general it is expected the funds will 
be spent for small supplies, equipment 
and services, without which a useful 
piece of research could not be completed. 
It is rarely used for faculty salaries. 
The allotments are, in general, limited 
to $300, and no two allotments are made 
to any one persan simultaneously. As can 
be expected the requests for fund3 ex- 
ceeds' the funds available. The procedure 
followed by the Council is to have the 
entire body discuss the proposals and 
gradually cull them until a number, 
within the allowable funds, can be filled. 
This procedure has been followed for a 
number of years, and this year the process 
was continued without an important change. 

A second function of the Council is 
to publish the booklet, "Publications and 
Research," About seven hundred copies 
are prepared which are sent to all mem- 
bers of the staff and te certain other 
interested parties. This has been ac- 
complished this year in the usual manner, 

A third function is the preparation 
of an annual report entitled, "Research 
In Progress." This requires the compila- 
tion of all active and projected research 
for the entire institution. It is com- 
piled by schools and published only in 
mimeographsdf *rm. Only about thirty- 
five copies are prepared, which go to all 
the Deans, Directors of Research, to the 
President's Office and to the various 
College libraries. This is an onerous 
task which is accomplished without addi- 
tional cost t* the Council on Research 
since it is done entirely by the Office 
of the Chairman of the Council, 

The fourth function of the Council 
is that of reviewing possible patent 
applications and reporting through the 
College administration to the Pennsylvania 
Research Corporation whether or not a 
patent application should be filed. The 
work in performing this latter function 
has not been great until the current year, 



but rnnfthtly 1 there hae been a < considerable 
increase in the patent aotivity by the 
College staff. This has required a rather 
large amount of the Council Members' time 
during the current year, but now that 
rules have been set up and the method for 
making approval has been codified, it is 
expected, in the future, thi* will pro- 
ceed without incident, 



Some considerations in this ma 
are as follows; If the Research Co 
tion applies for a patent, the Corp 
underwrites all expenses so incurre 
any profits accrue to the Corporati 
The government, if it supports the 
search, as it does in some cases, d 
only a uon-divi 3 ible , non-a s signabl 
royalty free license to manufacture 
problems in making the decision to 
or not are many, but the situation 
has been clarified because the crmm 
no longer has to decide whether or 
idea is patentable but leaves t he d 
entirely to the Patent Council* Th 
avoids all questions or prior publi 
or prior use* 



tter 

rpora— 

orat ion 

d and 

*n« 

re- 

emands 

, The 

patent 

lately 

ittee 

not an 

ecisicn 

is 

cation 



The que st io 
been bothersome, 
f ie d by a letter 
dent of the Rese 
Milholland, Acti 
lege, which stat 
of importance is 
return to the Re 
the Council, thr 
.has only to ask 
bility of the Co 
money back?" If 
recommendation i 
apply for a pate 
"no", the idea i 
other interested 
fication the Cou 
applications has 
smoother line. 



n of public interest has 
but this has been clari- 
frrta Mr. Deike, Pre si- 
arch Corporation, to Mr, 
ng President of the Col- 
es that the only question 

one of probable financial 
search Corporation. Thus 
ough its patent committees, 
"Is ther* a good possi- 
rporatifrn getting its 
the answer is "yes.", the 
s that the Corporation 
nt , If the answer is 
s then abandoned to any 

party. With this clari- 
ncil's work on the patent 
proceeded along a 



The Council, through its commit- 
tees, during the past year has considered 
29 applications and has recommended 
to the Research Corporation for patent, 
leaving 18 to be ■ patented by the 
sponsor, the inventor or t n> be aban- 
doned. 

Eric A. Walker, Director 
Council on Research 



ALUMNI HOMECOMING PROGRAM OPENS FRIDAY NOON 



The Fall Homecoming program will 
open with registration in Recreation 
BvL-U-ding at noon Friday, 

Saturday events include a golf 
tournament in the morning; soccer at 
10 a.rm; l^n^h^e <->n in R<=<.-*.-<=at.ir>n Fu Aiding; 
football at 2 p.n,; Thespian Sh.w at 



7 p.m.; cider party in Recreation Build- 
ing at 8 p.m., followed by a dance at 9 
p,m» State College alumnae will oe 
hostesses for the cider party. 

The Executive Board will meet Friday 
night and the Alumni Ccuxicil meets at 1" 
a,m. Saturday in Rccm 1?1, Sparks Build- 
ing. 



_ 



ENROLLMENT BY CURRICULA 1st SEMESTER 1948-1949 
2 Sem 3 Sem 4 Sen 5 __S_em 6 S e m 7 Sen 8 Se m 





M 


W 


M 


W 


M 


W 


M 


W 


M 


W 


M 


W 


M 


W 


M 


• If 


T 


AGRICULTURE 


































APCh 


mm 


„, 


14 


3 


3 


_ 


7 


2 


1 


_ 


6 


2 


8 


2 


3.9 


9 


48 


Ag Ec 


- 


— 


28 


- 


4 


- 


41 


- 


7 


- 


18 


- 


14 


- 


112 


- 


112 


Ag Ed 


- 


— 


48 


- 


11 


- 


4.6 


1 


20 


- 


22 


- 


18 


- 


165 


1 


166 


Ag Eng 


- 


— 


33 


.— 


4 


- 


15 


- 


3 


- 


13 


- 


2 


- 


70 


- 


70 


Agro 


- 


- 


26 


- 


- 


1 


36 


- 


8 


- 


6 


- 


5 


- 


81 


1 


82 


AH 


- 


- 


20 


1 


4 


- 


32 


1 


5 


- 


13 


5 


8 


1 


82 


8 


90 


Bact 


.. - 


— 


18 


2 


1 


-1 


9 


5 


2 


— 


4 


4 


6 


1 


40 


13 


53 


Bot 


- 


— 


2 


1 


- 


- 


4 


- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


8 


1 


9 


DH 


- 


- 


64 


- 


7 


- 


45 


- 


8 


- 


47 


- 


11 


— 


182 


- 


182 


For 


- 


- 


81 


- 


9 


- 


93 


- 


10 


- 


41 


- 


29 


— 


263 


. - 


263 


Hort 


- 


- 


54 


3 


5 


- 


54 


4 


10 


- 


23 


2 


7 


- 


153 


9 


162 


PH 


- 


- 


9 


- 


1 


- 


7 


- 


1 


- 


4 


- 


4 


- 


26 


- 


26 


PV 


- 


- 


32 


- 


1 


- 


21 


- 


3 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


57 


- 


57 


ZE 


- 


- 


7 


- 


- 


- 


10 


2 


2 


- 


- 


1 


- 


3 


19 


6 


25 


MT 


— 


— 


— 


16 


- 


2 


- 


8 


- 


- 


- 


6 


- 


- 


— 


32 


32 


WU 


- 


— 





- 


- 


- 


12 


- 


- 


- 


4 


- 


1 


- 


26 


- 


26 


Total 


- 


— 


445 


26 


50 


4 


432 


23 


81 


- 


201 


20 


114 


7 


1323 


80 


1403 


CHEMISTRY 


AND 


PHYSICS 






























ChE 


^ 


^ 


92 


1 


2 


1 


105 


wm 


10 


_ „ 


68 


_ . 


5 


_ 


283 


2 


205 


Chem 


m 


— 


36 


11 


7 


— 


36 


1 


-. 


- 


22 


4 


1 


- 


102 


22 


124 


Phys 


— 


- 


12 


2 


5 


- 


37 


- 


5 


~ 


17 


1 


7 


1 


83 


4 


87 


PM 


- 


- 


66 


8 


9 


— 


72 


2 


9 


- 


46 


1 


4 


— 


206 


11 


217 


Soi 


— 


— 


5 


3 


1 


1 


10 


8 


15 


2 


14 


6 


7 


3 


52 


23 


75 


CCh 


— 


— 


1 


- 


1 


- 


4 


— 


1 


— 


19 


— 


. 1 


— 


27 


- 


27 


Total 


- 


- 


212 


25 


25 


2 


265 


17 


40 


2 


186 


12 


25 


4 


753 


62 


815 


EDUCATION 
















, 




















Ed 


_ 


_ 


44 


106 


29 


7 


93 


83 


19 


16 


54 


93 


24 


26 


263 


331 


594 


IA 


— 


— 


13 


— 


6 


— 


16 


— 


1 


— 


4 


— 


2 


— 


42 


- 


42 


MEd 


— 


- 


10 


1 


2 


— 


8 


8 


1 


— 


7 


4 


4 


2 


32 


21 


53 


Psy 


- 


- 


25 


19 


39 


5 


64 


22 


16 


2 


23 


27 


8 


3 


175 


78 


253 


VIEd 


_ 


— 


1 


- 


2 


- 


2 


- 


3 


- 


6 


— 


- 


•m 


14 


- 


14 


Total 


- 


- 


93 


132 


78 


12 


183 


113 


40 


18 


94 


124 


38 


31 


526 


430 


956 


HOME ECONOMICS 


( 


effect ive 


Jan . 


1, 


1949) 


i 




















HEc 


_ 


_ 


_ 


106 


_ 


5 


_ 


57 


_ 


4 


_ 


94 


_ 


18 


_ 


2 94 


2 94 


HA 


- 


- 


42 


2 


3 


- 


36 


2 


8 


— 


22 


— 


6 


— 


117 


4 


121 


Total 


- 


— 


42 


108 


3 


5 


36 


69 


8 


4 


22 


94 


6 


18 


117 


298 


415 


ENGINEERING 












' 






















Aroh 


_ 


_. 


27 


_ 


_ 


_ 


19 


9m 


1 


_ 


10 


mm 


— 


_ 


57 


_ 


57 


AE 


- 


— 


10 


- 


4 


— 


18 


2 


2 


- 


23 


1 


1 


— 


58 


3 


61 


CE 


- 


- 


82 


- 


17 


- 


88 


— 


19 


— 


41 


— 


22 


- 


269 


— 


269 


EE 


- 


— 


137 


- 


32 


- 


189 


- 


42 


— 


93 


- 


43 


- 


536 


- 


536 


IE 


- 


- 


57 


- 


9 


- 


114 


- 


46 


— 


82 


— 


58 


- 


366 


- 


366 


ME 


- 


- 


145 


- 


44 


- 


141 


- 


32 


— 


77 


— 


51 


— 


490 


- 


490 


SE 


- 


- 


4 


- 


- 


- 


4 


— 


2 


— 


— 


— 


1 


- 


11 


- 


11 


Aero 


- 


- 


30 


- 


5 


- 


40 


- 


11 


- 


28 


1 


11 


- 


125 


1 


126 


Total 


- 


- 


492 


- 


111 


- 


613 


2 


155 


- 


354 


2 


187 


- 


1912 


4 


1916 


THE LIBERAL ARTS 
































AL 


— 


— 


_ 


— , 


_ 


_ 


187 


14 9 


47 


13 


129 


91 


60 


38 


423" 


291 


714 


CF 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


— 


258 


22 


65 


1 


170 


11 


95 


6 


588 


4 


628 


Jour 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


67 


21 


8 


4 


34 


20 


16 


7 


125 


52 


177 


AC 


— 


— 


— 


— 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


1 


_ 


_ 


_ 


1 


1 


LAC 




































LD 


4 


— 


461 


180 


191 


26 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


656 


2 06 


86 Z 


Total 


4 


- 


461 


180 


191 


26 


512 


192 


120 


18 


333 


123 


171 


51 


1792 


590 


2382 



MINERAL INDUSTRIES 



Cer 




mm 


mm 


25 


1 


2 


FT 




-■ 


- 


-6 


- 


2 


Geog 




- 


- 


2 


- 


- 


GM 




- 


— 


8 


1 


4 


GG 




- 


- 


4 


- 


1 


Met 




- 


- 


27 


- 


1 


Mrgy 




- 


- 


5 


- 


2 


MEo 




— 


— 


5 


— 


- 


MPE 




- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


MEng 




- 


- 


25 


- 


4 


PNG 




- 


- 


20 


- 


2 


Total 




- 


- 


127 


2 


18 


PHYSICAL 


EDUC 


AT ION 


28 




PEd 




_ 


_ 


46 


5 


HEd 














Reo 




- 


- 


2 


1 


1 


Total 




— 


— 


48 


29 


6 


TRANSITION 
















- 


- 


9 


- 


9 


Total 




4 


_ 


1929 


502 


491 



20 

■8 

4 

9 

3 

34 

12 



17 
22 

137 



57 18 



3 
60 



1 

19 



2 

1 

1 

4 

3 
6 

20 



17 
6 
1 

12 
1 

28 
3 
5 

10 
11 
94 



-" 48 22 



2 

r 

4 

8 

31 



10 



68 


1 


69 


23 


1 


24 


12 


2 


14 


41 


1 


42 


13 


— 


13 


90 


- 


90 


23 


1 


24 


24 


- 


24 


1 


- 


1 


63 


- 


63 


69 


- 


69 


427 


6 


433 



172 



7 3 
55 25 



1 
11 



16 

188 



72 244 



6 22 

78 266 



13 1 2 -' - -" 34 - 34 

51 2251 436 473 43 1341 400 583 116 7072,15.48 8620 



Candidates for Bachelors Degree 
Grad « Student s 
Special Students 
Two-Year Ag« 

Grand Total 



7072 


1548 


8620 


828 


174 


1002 


- 63 


107 


170 


8 


1 


9 



7971 1830 0801 



OS 



> 



o 
s 

*-* o 

3 



THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 



FACULTY 



The Bulletin is published weekly during~the College 
year as a means of making official announcements 
arid presenting items of interest to the faculty. All 




VOL. 36 



BULLETIN 



contributions should be as brief as possible and 
reach Louis H. Bell. Director of Public Information, 
313 Old Main, not later than 10 a. m. each Friday. 



October 25, 1948 



NO. 5 



TWO ADDITIONAL PARKING AREAS OPENED; NEW TRAFFIC PLAN BEGINS MONDAY 



Two new parking areas, with accomo- 
dations for 100 cars, were opened last 
week north of Osmond Laboratory and north 
of the Horticulture Building. Work is 
underway on another area north of Patter- 
son Hall, It will provide space for 
83 cars. 



Effective next Monday, November 1, 
one-way traffic on Pollock Road becomes 
effective. All traffic will move from 
west to east. This system will provide 
space for bumper-to -bumper parking for 
100 cars. 



ARTISTS' COURSE TICKETS GO ON SALE NOVEMBER 9 AND 10 



Sale of series tickets for 1 the 
Artists* Course will be held N vember 9 
for students and November 10 for faculty 
and townspeople, ( 

The program this year features 
Christopher Lynch on December 9; Vladimir 
Horowitz on January 6} and Helen Traubel 
on February 28, 



After the November sale, remaining 
tickets will be made -available to out-of- 
town persons. 

Seats are priced at $8.70 and $7.50, 
If single admission tickets are sold, 
they will be priced at $4,50 for the 
first and third numbers and-$5 for Horo- 
wit z. 



FACULTY REQUESTED'. TO CALL COMMUNITY FORUM SERIES TO ATTENTION OF STUDENTS 



The State College Community Forum, 
consisting of 19 campus and town organi- 
zations, was founded originally to pro- 
vide timely le oture— di scu s sion sessirns 
for students, not excluding faculty and 
t ownspeople , 

Hugh G. Pyle, chairman for the Fnrun, 
has therefore requested faculty to call 
to the attention of their students the 



Forum series. 

Season tickets are on sale this week 
at the Student Union Office in Old Main 
and at the Commerce Club on West College 
Avenue, On Thursday, these general ad- 
mission tickets may be exchanged at the 
Student Union Office for researved 
seat t icket s , 



MINERAL INDUSTRIES EXHIBIT FEATURES BIRTHSTONES 



Birthstones are the subject of an 
exhibit in the Mineral Industries rotunda. 



A summary of the history of the 
stones, dating back to ancient times, 
introduces the exhibit and explains the 
origin of popular belief regarding the 
st one s , 

45 STATES REPRESENTED IN ENROLLMENT 



The exhibit of birthstones, in 
natural crystal forms, and finished gems, 
is in addition to the permanent gem 
exhibit in the main corridor of the 
building, where more than 600 gems and 
gem materials are on display. 



Forty-five states are represented 
in the current 'enrollment, according to 

W.S. Hoffman, ( D e an of Admissions', •'. 

Limited to five per 'cent of the total 



student body, the out— of -state .enrollment 
includes students from every state ex- 
cept Arizona, Nevada, and North 
Dakota e 



TEN)': SI 



FIVE FACULTY MEMBERS AWARDED CITATIONS 



Citations, in recognition of work 
done during World War II, were presented 
to five faculty members on Tuesday after- 
noon. 

Dr, Eric A. Walker, director of the 
Ordnance Research Laboratory and profes- 
sor and head of the department of electri- 
cal engineering and Dr. Marsh W, White^ 
professor of physics, received Presiden- 
tial Certificates of Merit • 

The War-Navy Certificate of Apprecia- 



tion was presented to Dr , Albert K. Kurtz, 
professor of psychology; Dr, Elburt F, 
Osborn, professor of geochemistry and 
head of the department of earth sciences; 
and posthumously to Dr. Frank C, Whitnore, 
the late dean of the School of Chemistry 
and Physics. 

Presentations were made by Brig, 
Gen. Edward J. McGaw, of Carlisle 
Barracks; Brig* Gen. Donald F, Sta'ce, of 
Middletown Air Materiel Area; and Admiral 
John Ball, rf Naval Supply Depot at 
Mechan icsburg. 



PLAGOJE DEDICATED BY MONT ALTO-PENN STATE FORESTRY ALUMNI 



A plaque, .bearing the names of 52 
graduates and former students in the de- 
partment of forestry who gave their 
lives in World War I and II, was dedi- 
cated Saturday morning. 



The plaque, which was procured by 
the Mont Alto-Penn State alumni, will be 
mounted in the lobby of the Forestry 
Building, 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE SENATE COMMITTEE ON ATHLETICS 1947-1948 



The personnel of this 
J«H. Olewine, N.R. Sparks, 
and F.L, Bentley, Chairman, 
was originally approved as 
after being elected Alumni 
Athletic Advisory Board, re 
the Senate Committee. M.A. 
approved but before he had 
to function his position wa 
he was no longer a member o 
M.N. McGeary was then appro 
Senate. 



C ommit tee is 
M.N. McGeary, 

B.M, Hermann 
a member, but 
member of the 
signed from 

Farrell was 
an opportunity 
s changed and 
f the S e nate, 
ved by the 



Your Committee has held seven 
regular and one special meetings during 
the year, and most of the members have 
attended four meetings of the Athletic 
Advisory Board. 

Several intercollegiate sports were 
suspended during the war years but all 
of these except Ice. Hockey have been re- 
newed. At the present time, there are a 
total of sixteen intercollegiate sports. 

All intercollegiate schedules are 
checked and approved by the Committee be- 
fore contracts are completed. Most 
scholarship eligibles are checked through 
the office of the chairman; during the 
year, 1184 candidates for the various 
teams have been checked. Excuses for 
trips are also issued through this office. 

Members of the Committee are als? 
members of the Athletic Advisory Board* 
Each member is assigned to one or more of 
the regular and special committees of 
this Board, 

The success of most of the teams, 
as well as of many individual athletes, 
has brought numerous requests for their 



participation in contests not on the 
regular schedule. It i s the policy of 
the Committee to approve only such re- 
quests as seem to have special merit. 
Since this is Olympic try— out year, the 
Committee has been more liberal in grant- 
ing permission for individual competition 
than usual, Perm State has a possibility 
of furnishing four or five members of 
Olympic teams; two of' these have been 
sele ct ed . 

The Eastern College Athletic Con- 
ference wa s organized in December, 1946, 
Penn State is a charter member. At 
present, about sixty colleges and univer- 
sities of the New England and Middle 
Atlantic States are members, The unit of 
membership in this organization is the 
College itself. 

The principal object is to have a 
single standard for all member colleges 
in the large Eastern distriot . It has 
set up, for the first time in the history 
of Eastern collegiate athletics, a single 
set of exacting eligibility rules which 
can be supported and followed by all 
institutions in the area. 

To conform with this code, the Col- 
lege needs to change several of its 
present methods of handling intercollegiate 
athletics. As noted above, the college 
is the unit of membership itself, and all 
matters pertaining to intercollegiate 
athletics and athletes must be handled 
by the institution. The Athletic Advisory 
Board has a special committee working on 
recommendations for the College Board of 
Trustees so that our methods will confdrm 
to the E.C.A.C. code. 



The Chairman and his staff wish to 
express their appreciation to the Regis- 
trar, the College Examiner, and their 
staffs for their excellent cp-ope.rat.ion 
in checking scholarship and transfers,, 
This has been a tremendous task during . 
the past year. The new probat ion- rule 
makes checking eligibilities between - 
Seme st ers rather difficult, and in many 
ways, unsatisfactory because of the time 
required to determine ( probat ions • For 
example, these"were not finally checked 
for two weeks after the second semester 
started, and in some cases members of 
team3 had already competed in two con- 
tests. Fortunately, no athletes who had 
competed were on probation in this case, 
but it could be embarrassing if some ■ 
were found ineligible after competing in 
one or more contests. 

The Dean of the School of Physical 



Education and Athletics, the Graduate 
Manager of Athletics, the coaches, and 
their staffs have assisted the Committee 
in every way possible » 

All rules and regulations that were 
modified during the war period, including 
the freshman and transfer rule, have been 
reinstated. In addition, .some regula- 
tions have'been changed- to meet the re- 
quirements of the N.C.A.A. and E.C.A.C. 

It is suggested that the incoming 
S e nate Committee on Athletics prepare a 
brief set of regulation^, which are not 
now a part of the rules and- regulati ons 
of the College Senate, to be presented 
to the Senate for approval and to be 
printed in the regular rules and regula- 
tions of the College Senate,, 



F«L, Bentley, Chairman 



OF GENERAL INTEREST 



AGRICULTURE FACULTY: The faculty of the 
School of Agriculture will meet at 4:20 
p»m, Friday in Room 109, Agriculture 
Building * 

* • * 

LIBERAL ARTS FACULTY: Faculty of the 
School of the Liberal. Arts will meet at 
4:10 p.m. Tuesday in Room 121, iSparks 
Buiidinjg. 

* * * 

LUNCHEON CLUB^: Dr, Haskell B. Curry > 
professir of mathematics., will speak on 
"A Visit to the Netherlands" at the 
Faculty Luncheon Club meeting on' Monday, 
November 1, 

* * * 

SOCCER: Colgate will play Penn State in 
soccer on Beaver Field at 4 p.m. on 
Friday, 

* * * 

COURSES OF STUDY: The Courses of Study 
Committee will meet at 10:30 a.m. on 
Thursday in Room 207, Engineering "C", 

* * * 

CHAPEL: Rabbi Joshua Tracht enburg, of 
Temple Covenant of Peace, Eas w toji, will 
speak at chapel services on Sunday porning 

* * * 

AAUp : John B. Butler, supervisor of 
Security Benefit r Division, will discuss 
faculty retirement, insurance, and com- 
pensation at the American Association of 
University Professor's meeting on Thurs- 
day night. The meeting, which will be 
open to all faculty members, will., be held 
at 7:30 p.m. in Room 110, Electrical 
Engineering Building* , 

* * * 

READING EXAMINATION: The reading- examina- 
tion in foreign languages required of 
candidates for advanced degrees, will be 
given between 7 and 9 p.m. on M nday, , , 
November 1, in Room 316, Sparks Building, 

* » * 



PLANT BREEDING SEMINAR: Gordon Hanson, 
research fellow in agronomy, will speak 
on "Convergent Improvement as a Method 
of Plant Breeding" at the Plant Breeding 
S e minar in Room 211, Agriculture Building, 

* » * 

CREAMERY SALESROOM: The College Creamery 
salesroom will be open on Sundays from 9 
a.m* to '1 p,m,' No retail sale s, will be 
made from the Shipping Room hereafter, 
* * * * 

CENTRE COUNTY' ENGINEERS : The first Fall 
meeting of the Centre County Engineers 
will be held at Snow Shoe on Thursday, 
The program includes stripping operations 
at Mo shannon Airport at 4 p.m.; visit to 



Hall Brother's Silk Mill at 5 



p ,m, 



din- 



ner at Presbyterian Church at 6:15 p.m.; 
and a visit to J.H. France Refractory Co., 
Clarence, at 7 ;45 p.m, 
* * * * 

REPLY TO LETTER AWAITS WRITER: The fac- 
ulty member who wrote to Alfred Holt <x 
Co., Liverpool, England, about % re serva-, 
tions to So- oh. Africa and Australia, may 
pick up the answer to his query at the 
♦ Office of the President, 2 03 Old Main. 

* * * 

TICKETS: Members of . Phi Beta Kappa' are' 
requested to purchase their Community 
Forum tickets at 112 Old Main, office of 
Dr. C.E. Marquardt, chapter representative 

on the Forun. 

* * * 

ON AIR: The Central P«*insylvan ia chapter 
of the American Chemical Society has re- 
sumed its weekly broadcasts en develop- 
ments in the field of chemistry. The 
program may be heard each Thursday at 8:30 
p.m.. over" Radio Station WMAJ , 

* * * 

AIEE-IRE: E.G. Thurston, research assis- 
tant in the Ordnance Research Laboratory, 
will discuss the new acoustical devioe for 



PHNK 1 STATE COLLECT] &* 



locating gallstones and Dr, V.M, Albers 
will talk on "The Co-operation of the 
Scientific and Medical Fields" at the 
AIEE-IRE meeting Tuesday night at 7:30 
o'clock in Room 219, Electrical Engi- 
neering Building, 

* * * 

ELECTED: Dr, Hubert W, Frings, asso- 
ciate professor of entomology, has been 
elected to membership in the American 
Society' of Humtin Genetics. 

• * o 

ELECTED: Dr. Harold J. Read, acting 
chief of the division of metallurgy, has 
been seleoted by the Electrochemical 
Society to serve as chairman of its 
publication Committee and as a member of 
the Board of Directors of the Society. 

» * * 

TO SPEAK: Dr. Winona L. M rgan, pro- 
fessor of home economics, addressed the 
western distriot conference on the 
Pennsylvania State Education Association, 
Home Economics section, in Indiana on 
Friday. Her subjeot was: "New Emphases 



in Human Relations." 

SPEAKS: Dr. Douglass S. Mead and Thomas 
D. Bowman, both of the department of 
English literature, addressed the County 
People's University of Huntingdon on 
Friday. Their , subje ct was; "Our Liter- 
ary Heritage: Chauoer and Shakespeare." 

* * * 

AT CONFERENCE: Dr. Mary L. Dodds, pro- 
fessor of home economics, is attending a 
conference on the study of food intake 
this week. It is held in Washington. 

** » 

JUDGING TEAM: Penn State »s meat judging 
team placed 13th in the intercollegiate 
competition in Kansas City last week, 

* 0* 

AT MEETING: Ina Padgett and Gilma M # 
Olson, both of the department of home 
economios, attended the national meeting 
of the American Dietetic Association in 
Boston last week-» 

• *« 



OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS FROM THE OFFICE OF THE DEAN OF ADMISSIONS 



Wit hdrawals : 



5 Dorman, James Regis, EE, Sept. 1 
Gr Fuoss, Leonard Lee, Jr., Econ.,0 



ian, James Regis, EE, .sept. 10 
s, Leonard Lee, Jr., Econ.,0ct,16 
n, John Patrick, EE, Sept. 3 
Keller, Merle Hunter, Phys, Oct. 19 
Patterson, Milton Woods, Hort, Oct. 4 
Schock, Carl Raymond, EE, Oct. 21 

O ~.n r. « v, « -P^iw. ']Ul,J.«.., n 1 . rn„ „ 4- 



Gree 

Kelle 

Patte 



5 Shannon, Harry E., Jour, Oct a 9 

Sp Smiley, Caroline M. , Ed, Oct, 14 

3 Weil, Hildegarde M., ABCh, Oct. 15 

3 Weller, Burton Lee, IE, Oct, 18 

Sp Wilson, Marylou, Ed, Oct, 18 

Sp Zech, Helen M., AL, Oct, 7 



Reasons for Withdrawal : To accept employment, 3; illness, 2; financial, 2; 
personal, 3; indecision, 1; change curriculum next semester, 1, 

Change of Name : 

By court order, the following person has made a legal change in name: 

From Joseph A, Lesniewski to Joseph A. Lane 

COLLEGE CALENDAR 1948-49 



Nov. 20, Sat, 

Nov, 24, Wed 1 . 

Nov. 29, Mon. 

Dec, 18, Sat, 

Jan* 3, Mon, 

Jan, 21, Fri, 

Jan ,22, Sat « 

Jan. 31, Mon. 

Feb. 4-5, Fri, & Sat 

Feb • 7, Mon, 

Feb, 27, Sat, 

April 2, Sat, 

April 14, Thurs, 

April 20, Wed. 

May 21, Sat, 

May 30, Mon. 
June 1, Wed, 
June 5, Sun, 
June 6, Mon, 



8 a,m. 

Semester .Graduation Exercises, 



Mid-Semester below grade reportfi due. 
Thanksgiving Reoess begins 11:50 a,m. 
Thanksgiving Recess ends 8 a.m. 
Christmas Recess begins 11:50 a.m, 

Christmas Recess ends 8 a.m.; Short Courses in Agriculture begin, 
First S e mester classes end 5 p e m. 
First S e mester examinations begin 
First Semester ends 5 p.m.; First 
, Second Semester registration. 
Second S e mester classes begin. 
Short Courses in Agriculture end. 
Mid— Semester below grade reports due. 
Spring Recess begins 11:50 a,m. 
Spring Recess ends 8 a,m. 

Second Semester classes end 11:50 a,m,j Second Semester examina- 
tions begin 1:20 p,m. 
Memorial Day Recess 
Second Semester ends 5 p.m. 
Baccalaureate Day, Clas3 Day, 
Commencement Day, 



Football-Saturday — Half holiday by student selection — Nov, 6, 1948 



PERSONNEL CHANGES 

The following personn-el changes are announced for the period July 31, 1948 to 
tefoober 1, 1948. 



James Fitzpatrick 
William W, Reeder 
Robert A. McCall 
Maynard G, Gleason 
Robert Co Baker 
Isadore Rudnick 
James P. Stewart 
William F ,. Ackerman 
Velma L 6 Clark 
Marianne E. Keye s 
Edward C. Breinig 
George J. Szasz 
Suzanne Davison 
George A» Maag 
Margaret E Langhaar 
Robert E. Wineland 
Robert P. Hunter 
James E. Cox 
J. Ross Heverly 
Vit o DiVincenzo 
James 0, Reynolds 
Lawrence T. Blaney 
Fernand P. de Percin 
Homer B» Metzger 
Alexander C, Beaumariage 
Kenneth C» Schubel 
Mabel M, Stoner 
Charles H, Parmer 
Henry H„ Gray 
Dorothy Cornell 
Charles L, Meloy 
Norman St . John 
Walter R. Berg 
Kenneth M. Barclay 
F . Clifton Wagner 
George H c Rowe, III 
Florence G» Fralin 
Robert L, Hess 
Jack E. Darr 
Cecil A. Deutschle 
Charles R. Barr 
Theodore W, Sproull 
Louis Colteryahn 
Harry Schwartzbart 
Thelma E. Heller 
Marguerite Grymko 
Zalman S. Altschuler 
Paul D. Kostenbader 
Keith E. Lorentzen 
William T, Nelson, Jr. 
Glenn E. Miller 
William J. Jones 
Ernest deM. Berkaw, Jr. 
William C. Westberg 
John F« Taylor 
Anne Rockey Confer 
Flora— May Sagui 
Emmeline M„ Mehlman 
Mary M, Burkhardt 
Max-/— Frances Muse hi 3 +. z 
Patricia A. Costing 
Doris L, Beokley 
Claianiip, V. Johnson 
Doris J, St owe 



Assistant Professor - Central Extension 
Assistant Professor - Rural Sociology 
Assistant Professor - Rural Sociology Extension 
Assistant professor - Engineering Extension 
Assistant Professor - Poultry Husbandry Extension 
Assistant Professor - Physics 
Assistant Professor - Central Extension 
Assistant Professor — Agricultural Engineering 

Home Economics Extension 

Home Economics 



Prof e s sor 
Prof e s sor 



Assistant 

As si st ant 

Instructor - Central Extension 

Instructor - Chemistry 

Instructor - Textile Chemistry 

Instructor - Central Extension 

Instructor - Central Extension 

Instructor - Agricultural Engineering 

Instructor - Agricultural Engineering 

Instructor - Mechanical Engineering 

Instructor - Physic3 

Instructor — Romance Languages 

Instructor - Central Extension 

Instructor - Horticulture 

Instructor — Meteorology 

Instructor — Agricultural Economics 

Instructor — Central Extension 

Instructor - Economics 

Instructor - Home Economics 

Instructor — Central Extension 

Instructor — Mineralogy 

Instructor - Central Extension 

Research Assistant - Ceramics 

Research Assistant - Agricultural Economics 

Research Assistant - Oriuance Research Laboratory 

Research Assistant - Fuel Technology 

Research Assistant - Metallurgy 

Research Assistant - Metallurgy 

Research Assistant - Home Economics 

Research Assistant - Ceramics 

Research Assistant - Engineering Experiment Station 

Research Assistant - Engineering Experiment Station 

Research Assistant - Petroleum & Natural Gas Eng. 

Research Assistant - Metallurgy 

Research Assistant - Metallurgy 

Research Assistant - Metallurgy 

Research Assistant — Home Economics 

Research Assistant — Metallurgy 

Research Assistant - Mineralogy 

Research Assistant - Petroleum Refining Laboratory 

Research Assistant - Chemistry 

Research Assistant - Chemistry 

Agricultural Extension Representative 

Vocational Appraiser - Harrisburg Guidance Center 

Assistant Director - College Placement 

Vocational Appraiser — Veterans Guidance Center 

Supervisor - Credit Class Centers 

Home Economics Extension Representative' 

Home Economics Extension Representative 

Home Economics Extension Repre sent at ive" 

Assistant Home Economics Extension Representative 

Supervisor - Personnel Relations 

Assistant Circulation Librarian - College Library 

Serials Assistant - College Library 

Senior P sychometri st - Veterans Counseling Service 

Assistant Editor — Central Extension 



Hftle-n C» Dnrall 

Laura J* Benner 
Mar«y J« -Buoi.nger 
Betty Ii* Blazer 
Dorothy Hainley 
Florence C, Meeker 
Pauline K. Goden 
Ethel P. Shepherd 
Phyllis J. Smethers 
Lucette Sanders 
A. Louise Ccrl 
Betty M. DiMaria 
Augusta L, Petron 
Martha E. Jamison 
Emily Shank Myers 
June Kuhn 

Catherine Berkstressor 
Mary K, Miller 
Lois Bardon 
Betty Lane Baldini 
Carolyn Ann Glahn 
Ethel Owens 
Loretta Showers 
Dorothy Wallace 
Betty Jeanne Daugherty 
Phyllis M» Kaiser 
Marian A. Ciperson 
Doris G. Brown 
Emily McCormick 
Ruth J. Christian 
Alicia II. Fagans 
Helen H, Waite 
Ruby J. Rostosky 
June G. Cramer 
Amelia L, Schoch 
Nan T, Murphy 
Margaret T, Frantz 
Irene Jean Cornell 
Althea M. Townsend, 
Harry S . Houtz 
Paul C, Luts 
Robert J. Cassidy 
James T, Metzler 
Donald R, Bobb 
Floyd 0. Rnss 
Herbert W. Alter 
Robert L» Mas den 
John M» Marshall 
George T, Blakeslee 
Robert B. Boyden 
Donald T „ Laird 
Hayden L Schofield 
Francis J „ Boyle 
Aileen M. Holz 
Basra 'in C» Loiter 
Ecgar v7« P>rr 
Janes H'# "tpift? ' i 
i.n dr nw W , ?>"h ',. t « c i d e 
Ruth B„ 5pir.p.r 
Fl^inr. C&nn 
Z^nrcth L» Ghnn^r 
S&ra X, Sfi^n 
Harry A* Fogle # Jr. 
ill 3. ce lie y s t n k 
E lw i n R * Or t ~> n ,. J r v 
EdfJax E * ^ Gearhart 
Evelyn 3 ohTrar •■ 
Eddie R« Farto ; :s 

J/jAdA-lyn C* Sh-aokXetto 
tfjois r,u.-.Ulf> Smith- 



Secretary — psychology 

Secretary - Ordnance Research Laboratory 
Secretary - Ordnance Research Laboratory"'" 
Secretary - Ordnance Research Laboratory 
Secretary - Central Extension 
Secretary - Ordnance Research Laboratory 
Secretary - Engineering Extension 
Secretary - Business Administration 
Secretary - Ordnance Research Laboratory 
Secretary - Ordnance Research Laboratory 
Secretary - Ordnance Research Laboratory 
Secretary - Central Extension 
Secretary - Sociology 

Secretary - Dean's Office - Education 
Secretary - Botany 
Secretary - Liberal Arts 
Secretary - Psychology 
Secretary - General Administration 
Secretary - Home Economics 
Secretary - Psychology 
Secretary - Central Extension 
Secretary - Dining Commons 

Stenographer - Agricultural Extension •■- •>■' 

Stenographer - Central Extension • '• 

Stenographer - Agricultural Extension 
Stenographer - Arts & Sciences Extension 
Stenographer - Agricultural Economics & Rural Sociol, 
Stenographer - Agricultural Extension 
Stenographer - Mineral Technology * 

Stenographer -r. Earth Sciences 
Stenographer -. Central Extension 
Stenographer - Speech 
Clerk — Bookkeeping 

Clerk - Ordnance Research Laboratory 
Clerk - Ordnance Research Laboratory 
Clerk - Agricultural Economics & Rural Sociology 
Clerk-Secretary — Home Economics 
Clerk-Typist - Central Extension 
Clerk-Typist - Central Extension 
Janitor — Physical Plant 
Janitor - Dormitories 
Janitor - Dormitories 
Janitor — Dormitories 
Janitor - Dormitories 
Janitor - Fhysical Plant 
Janitor - Physical Plant 
Janitor — Physical plant 
Janitor - Physical Plant 
Engineer - Physical Plant 
Accountant - General Administration 
Assistant - Ordnance Research Laboratory 
Assistant - Ordnance Research Laboratory 
Assistant - Ordnance Research Laboratory 
Dietitian - Dining Commons 
Machinist - Mineral Technology 
Creamery Employee - Dairy Husbandry 
Technical Laborer - Dairy Husbandry 
Painter - Physical Plant 
Cook - Dining Commons 
Technician - Bacteriology 
Equipment Operator — PIrysical plant 
Technician - Chemistry 
Creamery Employee - Dairy Husbandry 
Technician - Mineral Technology 
Laboratory Assistant - Zoology & Entomology 
■Laborer - Physical Plant 
Cook - Dining Commons 
Operator - Physical Plant 

Typist - Purchasing Agent's Office ' ' 

Laboratory Assistant - Zoology & Entomology 



Gilbert R. White man 

Dean A. Braucht 

William F. Best 

John F ,- Loesoh 

Mary Ann Bishop 

Gertrude Casey 

Mary Miller 

Ethel Adams 

Mavis Roman 

Josephine Janu szkiewioz 

Sheldon Baird 

Theodore Smith 

Margaret Grebe 

Vivian Zong 

Sarah Rudy '.< 

Gladys Bex-winger 

June Gray 

Rose Isnler 

Catherine Struble 

Patricia L Biehl .. 

Jeanne Koch 

Mary Dugan 

Osoar Struble 

Harrison Whitehill 

Eva Hunt 

Mary Shipley 

Donna Moore 

Appointments t 

James P. Stewart 
Raymond H, Hollis 
James E, Lordeman, Jr. 
Bertram Kessel 
Carlton E. Hunter 
Walter M. Weber 
Leonard Y. Shakt 
Enid L. Bever 
Louis W, Balmer 
Arthur G. Shields 
William J. Horean 
Gordon W. Couchman 
Joseph A. Perkins, Jr. 
Harold U. Crouse 
J . Mitchell Morse 
Thomas H. Turnbull 
.Frederic W. Borges 
Albert F. Lopez 
Carl E. Maukonen 
Ida E. Ficker 
David Thurbon 
Platon Gottlund 
Irvin H. Kochel 
Richard S. Kolakoski 
Charles B. Haentze 
Paul J . LaMorgia 
Jacque A. Hogg 
Louise Grossman 
Charles Ridenour 
Edward J. Tracey, Jr. 
John V. Zuckerman 
Frank E. Shuster . 
Wayne E. Boop 
John N, Hoffman 
Alice E. Warne 
Quincy J. Lowman' 
Dean S. Chaapel 
Bannett L, Black, .]Tr, 
Charles A. DeFazio' . 
Rowan F. Crawford 
Paul E. Benner 



Fireman - Physical Plant 

Laborer -• Physical Plant 

Laborer - Physical Plant 

Laborer - Physical Plant 

Laboratory Assistant - Mineral Technology 

Accounting Clerk — Central Extension 

Dining Commons Employee 

Dining Commons Employee 

Laboratory Assistant — Mineral Technology 

Nurse - College Health Service 

Recorder - Registrar 

Kitchen Porter - Dining Commons 

Dining Commons Employee 

Dining Commons Employee 

Dining Commons Employee 

Dining Commons Employee 

Dining' Commons Employee 

Dining Commons Employee 

Dining Commons Employee 

Clerical Assistant - College Library 

Soda Fountain Clerk - Student Union 

Cook - College Health Service 

Dining Commons Employee 

Dining Commons Employee 

Dining Commons Employee 

Dining Commons Employee 

Nurse — College .Health Service 



Assistant Professor - Arts & Science Extension Ex 

Assistant ^rofessor — Ordnance Research Lab« 

Assistant Professor — Liberal Arts 

Assistant Professor — Physical Education & Ath. 

Instructor — Industrial Engineering 

Instructor — Central Extension 

Instructor — Central Extension 

Instructor — Central Extension 

Instructor — Central Extension 

Instructor — Central Extension 

Instructor — Central Extension 

Instructor — Central Extension 

Instructor — Central Extension 

Instructor - Central Extension 

Instructor ■ ■— Central Extension 

Instructor — Central Extension 

Instructor - Central Extension 

Instructor - Electrical Engineering 

Instructor — Central Extension 

Instructor — Central Extension 

Instructor — Central Extension 

Instructor — Central Extension 

Instructor — Central Extension 

Instructor — Central Extension 

Instructor — Central Extension 

Instructor - Central Extension 

Instructor — Central Extension 

Instructor — Central Extension 

Instructor — Physical Education & Athletics 

Research Assistant — Ord, Res. Lab. 

Research Assistant - Psychology 

Research Assistant — Ord. Res. Lab, 

Research Assistant - Ord. Res. Lab. 

Research Assistant - Mining Engineering 

Research Assistant - Bureau of Business Research* 

Research Assistant - Petroleum & Natural Gas Eng. 

Research Assistant — Inst, of Local G6vernment 

Research Assistant - Engineering Experiment Station 

Research Assistant - Chemistry 

Assistant — College Placement Service 

Assistant - Bursar's Office 



,,130 
137 
146J 
94J 
48M 
130 
130 
130 
130 
130 
130 
130 
130 
13 n 
130 
130 
130 
43 
130 
130 
130 
130 
130 
130 
130 
130 
130 
130 
84J 
137 
18 
137 
137 
360 

146M 

376J 
147 
55J 

320M 
128 
352 



Riohard D. Heck, Jr. 
Patricia A, Cotting 
Robert W« Drick 
Mary Fleming 
Lorin J. Elder 
Thomas R. Osborne 

William H, Earhart 
Edwin Earl Honey 
Paul E e Shields 
Voclav Mares 
Oscar Haac 
Alma McDougall 
Muriel E. Starr 
Jack H. Vincent 
Carl Volz 
Elwood F. Olver 
Jarae s K« Magor 
Robert M, p ckrass 
Harold B. White, Jr, 
Robert E. Short 
Peter B. Pfahl 
John S . Perry 
William M, Burke 
Lowell G. No o nan 
Harold R. Wakefield 
Andrew J, Pepper 
Elbert B, Reynolds 
John A. Fox 
Lester Eidemiller 
Ila H. Gehman 
Charles L. Hosier 
J» Glenn Hawthorne 
M. . Olive Chapman 
Paul R. Baird' 
Raymond C» Murphy 
George P. Barron, Jr, 
Edward J, Organ 
Robert W. Reed 
James W« Beach 
Charles D. Miller 
Abraham A» Goodman 
Charles W. Huff 
Edward C. Grose 
William J| Lucian 
Martin Alperin 
Richard W, Wonn 
Isable Melendez 
Ja ne S t au s 
Louis J, Morocco 
Charles E. Savige 
•Ruth L, Eister 
William T. Butz 
William Counts 
Betty Jane Rock 
Frederick W, Gray 
Delia S. Short 
■Ray T, Fortunato 
William Archer, Jr. 
Malcolm S, Taylor 
Roy F. Snyder 
. Donald H. Baldwin 
TDora C. Terbizan 
Geraldine Wallaoe 



Auditor - Central Extension 

General Librarian - Central Extension 

Assistant Agriou ltural;; Ext ension Representative 

Assistant' Speci-alist - Central Extension :■■ 

Supervisor — Personnel Relations 

Assistant. Agricultural Extension Represent at ive 

Assistant' Professor - Ceramics r . 

Assistant Professor - Plant Pathology Ext » 

Assistant Professor - Electrical Engineering 

Assistant Professor - Economics , 

Assistant Profe.ssor - Romance Languages 

Assistant Professor - Home Economios 

Assistant Professor- - Home Economics '. ; ; 

Assistant Professor ■•— Economics 

Instructor - Electrical Engineering " 

Instructor - Agricultural Engineering : ■ 

Instructor - Industrial Engineering 

Instructor - Journalism 

Instructor - Rural Sociology Extension 

Instructor - Civil Engineering 

Instructor - Horticulture 

Instructor - Agricultural Engineering 

Instructor - English Literature 

Instructor - Political Science 

Instructor - Agricultural Engineering 

Instructor - Engineering Mechanics 

Instructor - Mechanical Engineering 

Instructor - Aeronautical Engineering 

Instructor — Philosophy 

Instructor - Psychology 

Instructor - Meteorology 

Instructor - Agricultural Economics 

Instructor -'Chemistry 

Instructor - Economics • 

Instructor - Engineering Mechanics 

Instructor -'Animal Nutrition 

Instructor ~ Mathematics 

Instructor - Central Extension 

Instructor - Central Extension 

Instructor - English Composition 

Instructor — ' History 

Instructor - Mathematics 

Instructor - Animal Nutrition 

Instructor -English 

Instructor -'Central Extension • 

Instructor -'Mathematics 

Instructor -Romance Languages 

Instructor - Central Extension 

Instructor - Economics 

Instructor - Mathematics 

Instructor -"Political Science 

Research Assistant - Agricultural Economics 
Research Assistant - Ceramics 

Research Assistant - Chemistry 
Research Assistant - Chemistry 
Assistant Hone Economics Extension Rep. 
Supervisor - Personnel Relations 
Assistant Agricultural Extension Rep. 
Assistant Agricultural Extension Rep. 
Assistant Agricultural Extension Rep. 
Assistant Agricultural Extension Rep. 
•Assistant Editor - Central Extension 
Assistant - Bacteriology 



130 • 
130 

130 
126 

37IJ 

338M 

43 

118 

153 

104 

103J 

145J 
43 
298 
47M 
385 

336J 
58 J 

285J 
298 
144 
151 
298 
50J 

167J 
166 

142M 
398 

377J 
262 

249M 

146J 
55J 

264J 

142J 

130 

'130 

145 

148 

142J 

264J 

144 

13 

142J 

153 

130 

146J 

142J 

151 

203 

218M 

242M 

253M 

58J 

125 



13^ 
276 






THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 



FACULTY 



The Bulletin is published weekly during the College 
year as a means of making official announcements 
and presenting items of interest to the faculty. All 




BULLETIN 



contributions should be as brief as possible and 
reach Louis H. Bell. Director of Public Information, 
313 Old Main, not later than 10 a. m. each Friday. 



VOL. 36 



November 1, 1948 



NO. 6 



FAIRFIELD OSBORN TO OPEN COMMUNITY FORUM SERIES THURSDAY NIGHT 



Fairfield Osborn, an outstand- 
ing authority on the earth's re- 
sources, will open the Community 
Forum Series in Schwab Auditorium 
at 8 o'clock on Thursday night. 
His subject will be: "Our Plunder- 
ed Planet." 

Tickets for the five numbers 
of the series are available at the 
Student Union Office,, Old Main, 
for $3. 

A naturalist by profession, 
Osborn is president of the New 



York Zoological Society; president 
of the Conservation Foundation; a 
member of Secretary Krug's Ad- 
visory Committee on Conservation; 
and a member of the American Com- 
mittee of the International Council 
of Museums. 



Osborn will be introduced 

Carpenter, professor 
Fol iowi ng the 



by Dr. C.R. 

of psychology. 

talk, comments will be made by 

Dr. H.R. Albrecht, professor of 

agronomy, and by Dr. W.M, Myers 

associate professor of mineral 

economi cs « 



TICKETS FOR ARTISTS' COURSE GO ON SALE NOVEMBER 9 AND 10 



Tickets for the Artists' 
Course Series will go on sale for 
students on Tuesday, November 9, 
and for faculty and townspeople on 
Wednesday, November 10. They will 
be sold at the Student Union Of- 
fice in Old Main. 

Prices for the tickets are 
$8.70 and $7.50. If any seats are 
available for individual admis- 



sions, which Dr. C.E. Marquardt, 
chairman, says seems unlikely, 
tickets for the numbers will 
range between $4.50 and $5« 

The Artists' Course Series 
includes Christopher Lynch,'' 
Irish tenor, December 9; Vladimir 
Ho r ow i t z , pianist, J. a nu a r y 6 ; 
and Helen Traubel, famous soprano, 
February 28. 



ONE-WAY TRAFFIC ON POLLOCK ROAD 



One-way traffic, west to east 
between Burr owes Road and Short- 
lidge Road, became effective this 
week. 

The plan will make possible 
tfiac parking of about 100 cars 
along the north curb of Pollock 



Road. 

Faculty and others have been 
requested to discontinue stopping 
along the south curb of the road 
since this will impede the flow 
of traffic, and in the case of 
large trucks, will halt traffic. 



^ENN STATE COLLECTION 






SUMMARY OF ENROLLMENT FOR 1ST SEMESTER, 1948-49 

1st Semester Freshmen 

Agricul- Chem- Educa- Engi- Liberal Mineral Physical Totals 

ture Phy s t ion neering Art s Industrie s Education 

Bloomsburg 10 1 20 - 38 

California 33 4 27 53 52 1 

Clarion 38 14 5 47 19 8 

E. Stroudsburg 13 20 5 30 21 3 

Edinboro 46 59 18 49 43 29 

Indiana 3 1 - — 7 - 

Kutztown 36 '«• 15 100 47 

Lock Haven 13—31 - 36 - 

Mansfield 18 31 25 14 6 

Kiiloravilla 11 - 41 3? 54 

SLJopensburg 5 13 1 1 

Slippery Rock 12 - 8 29 21 

Che/r.ey - - — — — — 

Total 238 131 198 347 353 48 69 1384 



Gannon 


2 


4 


2 


1 


6 


7 


Ke •/:;■:. one 


10 


2 


12 


23 


25 


1 


Ly coming 


13 


33 


16 


46 


27 


4 


S \. c 5 ranci s 


2 


- 


— 


- 


- 


— 


York 


15 


15 


8 


36 


19 


9 


Total 


42 


54 


38 


106 


77 


21 


Alt oona 


38 


41 


31 


71 


78 


16 


Boh rend (Erie ) 


22 


20 


28 


31 


44 


3 


BuBois 


16 


22 


18 


42 


51 


7 


Harrisburg 


32 


21 


37 


58 


87 


2 


Hazlet on 


21 


47 


38 . 


43 


55 


4 


Schuylkill 
(Pott sville ) 


10 


43 


40 


50 


72 


4 














Swart hmore' 


69 


101 


60 


92 


171 


9 



4 


73 


25- 


195 


4 


135 


1 


93 


8 


252 


- 


11 


2 


200 


12 


92 


3 


97 


5 


150 


- 


11 


4 


74 


1 


1 



- 


22 


m* 


73 


- 


139 


«• 


2 


3 


105 


3 


341 


1 


276 


4 


152 


4 


16 


9 


246 


4 


212 


7 


226 



18 520 

Total 208 295 ' 252 387 558 45 47 1792 



Mont Alto 12 


14 


3 


37 


8 


6 


- 


188 


Bradford 
(Credit Class 
Center ) 


7 


5 


13 


30 


2 


- 


57 


State College 8 
(Credit Class 
Cent er ) 


4 


10 


13 


23 


— 


1 


59 


1st Semester 
Grand Total 616 

2d, 3d, 4th 
Sern. at Ctrs 2 9 


505 
79 


506 
157 


903 1049 
Other Student s 

178 319 


122 
18 


120 
17 


♦ 3821 
797 


Undergraduate s 
Cn Campus" 1403 


815 


1371 


1916 


23 82 


433 


266 


8586 


School 

Totals 2048 


1399 


2034 


2997 


3750 


573 


403 


13,204 


Grad v # Sp . , 
2-Yro Ag., 
Transit ion 














1,215 


GRAND TOTAL 














** 14,419 



* Total let Semester Men, 3130; Women, 691. ** Grand Total Men, ll,839;W*,men, 2580, 



130 Peggy L 8 Skipp 

220 Lois Leininger 

130 George F, Wooner 

130 Phillip R,Crosby 

13 Arthur' F. Harnish 

130 Edward E. Daugherty 

130 John R. Baker 

Harry E» Sager 
Harry C e Musser 
Edward M. Ashton, Sr, 
David A« Hemphill 
Merle R. Rishell 
Richard L. Confer 
Gladys M, Woods 
Bertha J. Bloom 
Emma C » Bloom 
Boyd S-fconer 
Jacob Lohr " 
Harold Hazel 
Harvey Grenoble 
Abram Gra s smyer 
Gene Aunan 
June Adams 
Elizabeth Young 
Josephine Williams 
• Ida Sunday 
Blanche Smoyer 
Thelraa Simpson 
Beverly J» Scott 
Evelyn Orwick 
Carrie Miller 
Geneva MoMonigal 
Martha Xeeler 
Myrtle Irvin 
June Inhoof 
Edna Heeman 
Margaret Hastings 
Bessie Hassinger 
Betty Harpster 
Dewella' Haines 
Nellie Faust 
Mary Dyke 
Mary Dugan ■ 
Alice Coslo 
M, Evelyn Cain 
Thelma Brown 
Eva Mae Bloom 
Margaret M, Tanoe 
Elizabeth Persing 
Dorothy Svenson 
Ruth M, Klier 
Helen M. Gust in 
Grace Beresparis 
184 Henry Francis Goeken 

130 Francis Leo Bliley ' 

John Heverly 
137 William G. Wilkinson 

295 William Carl Keller 

43 Kenneth H. Walters 

130 Harriet M, Ohle 

47M Harry S, H utz 

Prisoilla D, Meckley 

Rut h May s 

68 Elwin R. Orton, Jr, 

63 Harold Harold E. Boyd 

68 Ethel M, Vonada 

137 Charles E. Peokham 

295 Leroy A, Stanbrough 

Albert Hart sock 
Frances Warner 
Foster Rinka 



Clerk-Typist - Central Extension 
Clerk-Typist -'Property Control 



Janitor - 
Janitor - 
Janitor - 
Janit or - 
Janitor - 
Janitor — 
Jan it or - 
Janitor - 
Janitor - 
Janitor - 
Janitor - 
Janitre ss 
Janitre ss 
Janitre s s 



Central Extension 
Central Extension 
Central Extension 
Central 1 Extension 
Central Extension 
Dormit or ie s 
Dormit drie s 
Dormit orie s 
Dormit oTie s 
Dormit orie s 
Physical Plant 

- Dormitories 

- Dormit orie s 

- Dormit orie s 
Dining Commons Employee 
Dining Commons Employee 
Dining Commons Employee 
Dining Commons Employee 
Dining Commons Employee 
Dining Commons "Employee 
Dining Commons Employee 
Dining Commons Employee 
Dining Commons Employee 
Dining Commons Employee 
Dining Commons Employee 
Dining Commons Employee 
Dining Commons Employee 

■Dining Commons. Employee 
Dining Commons Employee 
Dining C onmons -Employee 
Dining Commons Employee 
Dining Commons -Employee 
Dining . Commons -Employe e 
Dining Commons Employee 
Dining Commons Employee 
Dining Commons Employee 
Dining Commons Employee 
Dining Commons Employee 
Dining Commons Employee 
Dining Commons Employee 
Dining Commons Employee 
Dining Commons Employee 
Dining Commons Employee 
Dining Commons Employee 
Dining Commons Employee 
Dietitian — . Dining Commons 
Dietitian - Dining Commons 
Dietitian -.-Dining Commons 
Dietitian -..Dining Commons 
Dietitian -.Dining Commons 
Dietitian - Dining Commons 
Supervisor - Public Information 
Caretaker - Central , Ext en sion 
Assistant Cook.- Dining Commons * 
Machinist - Ordnance Research Laboratory 
Ranger - Forestry 

Mechanic - Electrical Engineering 
Cafeteria Director - Central Extension 
Mechanic - Industrial Engineering 
Housekeeper.- Dormitories 
Housekeeper - Dormitories 

Laboratory Assistant - Zoology & Entomology 
Laboratory Assistant - Zoology & Entomology 
Laboratory Assistant - Zoology & Entomology 
Technician - Ordnance Research Laboratory 
Laborer - Forestry 
Kitchen Assistant - Dining Commons 

- Dining Commons 

- Dining Commons 

WMN STATE O ' 



Kitchen Assistant 
Kitchen Assistant 



Appointment s ; 

130 Ruth B, Bair 

356 Dorothy L, Maddy 

251 j e an S, Sherrill 

220 Bernioe V, Mohn 

2 72 Mary Ann Kun 

151 Rosalie A. Miller 

18 Betty B «, Forry 

398 Ruth L» Kramer 

130 Emily H, McCormick 

130 Beatrice M, Kepple 

220 Nancy A. Fowler 

106 Dorothea L, Brown 

142J Mildred Zelinski 

149 Marjorie Emery 

338M Alberta S. Tatters 

143 Dorothy M. Wallaoe 

130 Linda R. Grubb 

2 80 Helen Hesser 

266J Leda F» Broheck 

281J Dawn Frances Brandow 

^30 Rosemary C o Nagle 

■344 Earbara K Winslow 

120 Henry S c Illingsworth 

2f,2 Harriet Ruth Thai 1 

130 Phyllis M» Kaiser 

130 Shirley A, Brennan 

130 Winifred C, Caruso 

126 Ma'ry Louise Glessner 

130 Ka-thleen Hart er 
Ralph R, Ziegler 
Robert H. Billett 
John J. Lohr 
Dean A« Fetzer 
William G Thompson 

220 Niles L, Keesler 

273 Lawrence Re Tate 

276M Harry Lewis Smith 

2* r 5M M# Phyllis Sigel 

17 7 Elizabeth Riker 

295 Edgar William Cauffman 

305 Jean T, Hoke 

96 Margaret E. Oyler 

96- Edith A. Roeder 

96' Gene S, Fogelsanger 

96- Beatrice A, Wagner 

95 Veronica Crockett 

137 Geraldine M„ Scheibl 

146J Nellie Petrosky 

130 Jeanne M. MoBeath 

Isabel Craig 

137 Helen M„ Friese 

137 Nancy C» Spangler 

137 Margaret J, McClure 

130 Luella M. Ripka 

77M Mozelle M# Aiken 

13 Miriam E. Wolf 

130 Eileen R. Derick 

18 Helen Hayes 

18 Vera C. Shultz 

130 Marion T. Brennecke 

392 Irene Harrod 

394 Margaret Ball 

121J Homer R» Krape 

220 Teresta J« Dreibelis 

389 Marian J* Evans 

137 Jeanne R, Shaffer 

231 Edith R. Kllroy 

130 Irene J„ Cornell 

126 Marylou Wilson 



Secretary - Central Extension 

Secretary - Business Administration ■ 

Seoretary - Ellen H. Richards- Institute 

Secretary - Accounting Administration 

Secretary - Botany 

Secretary - Political Science 

Secretary - Psychology 

Secretary - Psychology 

S e cretary - Central Extension 

Secretary - Central Extension 

Secretary - General Administration 

Secretary - H me Economics 

Secretary - Mathematics 

Secretary - Speech 

Stenographer - Agricultural Extension 

Stenographer - Arts & Scienoes Extension 

Stenographer - Central Extension 

Stenographer - Agronomy 

Stenographer - Agricultural Extension 

Stenographer - Ccolcgy 

Stenographer - Central Extension 

Stenographer - Registrar 

Clerk - Physicsl Plant 

Clerk - Agricultural Economios & Rural Sociole 

Clerk-Typist - Central Extension 

Clerk-Typist 

Clerk-Typist 

Clerk-Typi st 

Clerk-Typist 

Janitor 

Janitor 

Jan it or 

Jan it or 

Janitor 



Central Extension 
Central Extension 
Personnel Relations 
Central Extension 

Physicsl Plant 

Physical Plant 

Physical Plant 

Physical Plant 

Central Extension 
Accountant - General Administration 
Creamery Employee - Dairy Husbandry 
Technician - Bacteriology 

Laboratory Assistant - Zoology & Entomology 
Clerical Assistant - College Library 
Laboratory Assistant - Forestry 
Soda Fountain Clerk - Student Union 
Nurse - College Health Service 
Nurse - College Health Service 
Nurse - College Health Service 
Nurse - College Health Service * 
Nurse - College Health Service 
Secretary - Ordnance Researoh Laboratory 
Secretary - Economics 
Secretary - Central Extension 
Secretary - Dining Commons 
Secretary - Ordnance Research Laboratory 
Secretary - Ordnance Research Laboratory 
Secretary - Ordnance Research Laboratory 
Secretary - Central' Extension 
Secretary - Military Science & Taxtios 
Secretary - Central Extension 
Secretary - Central Extension 
Seoretary - Psychology 
Secretary - Psychology 
Stenographer - Central Extension 
Stenographer - Education Extension . 
Stenographer - Dean's Office - Education 
Clerk - Purchasing Agent's Office 
Clerk - Accounting 

Clerk - Dean : s Office - Education 
Clerk - Ordnance Research Laboratory 
Clerk-Typist - College Placement 
Clerk-Typist - Central Extension 
Clerk-Typist - Personnel Relations 



Frederick P3.etcb.er 

Bertha Rider 

Alfred Brodbeck 
130 Ivory Foster Jacob 
336J Lois L, Smith 
295 Ellis E. Dearmitt 
13 Florence Mary Yannes 
13 Margaret M. Nelson 
130 Leota E Ba.ir 
130 Janice Painter 

Mahlon Strayer 

Harry Mart in 
130 Jo Ann George 
130 J, Leonard Simon 
220 Martha J, Crawford 
130 Charles S. Karnas 
350 Kathleen P. Scalera 
8 Maybell M. Spencer 

6' Verna Bink 

7 Lois Hoffman Rice 

305 Marjorie 0. Mackey 
130 Kathryn J. Neff 
305 Elisabeth F. Kauffman 
344 Elizabeth C, Weber 

Leave s p f Absence ; 

Edna S, Isenberg 
Alice M, Murray 
Mary E, Hawthorne 
Helen H, Webb 
Helen F« Story 
May Alice Eminhizer 
Dixie Cris swell 
Claudia Moore 



Kitchen Assistant - Dining Commons 

Kitchen Assistant — Dining Commons 

Kitchen Assistant - Dining Commons 

Housekeeper - Central Extension 

Laboratory Assistant - Zoology & Entomology 

Laborer - Forestry 

Nurse - Central .Extension 

Nurse - Central Extension 

Nurse - Central Extension 

Nurse - Central Extension 

Utility Man — Dining Commons 

Utility Man - Dining Commons 

Receptionist - Central Extension 

Custodian - Central Extension 

Key Punch Operator — Accounting 

Assistant Custodian - Central Extension 

Typist - Purohasing Agent's Office 

Hostess — Dormitories 

Hostess - Dormitories 

Hostess - Dormitories 

Supervisor - Student Union 

Typist - Central .Extension 

Soda Fountain Clerk - Student Union 

Filing Clerk - College Examiner's Office 



Assistant Professor - Central Ex. 
Assistant Professor - Home Ec. Ext. 
Instructor - Central Ex. 
Instructor — Physics 
Instructor — Mathematics 
Stenographer - Ag . Ex. ' 

Telephone Operator - Physical Plant 



7-1-48 to 6-30-49 
8-1-48 to 10-31-48 
7-1-48 to 6-30-49 
7-1-48 to 6-3 0-49 
7-1-48 to 6-3 0-49 
9-1-48 to 3-1-49 
5-16-48 to 2-16-4 9 



Clerical Assistant - College Library 7-17-48 to 8-16-41 

ANNUAL REPORT TO THE SENATE OF THE REPRESENTATIVE FOR STUDENT PUBLICATIONS 1947-1948 

Editorial and financial improvements 
are apparent in the College student pub- 
lications for the academic year 1947-48, 

The Collegian, changing from four 
issues to five issues a week and in- 
creasing its number of eight-page edi- 
tions, was thus able to improve con- 
siderably its campus coverage of news in 
quality, quantity and immediacy* 

Its financial receipts were con- 
siderably strengthened by both local and 
national advertising incomes. These and 
classified advertising Increased t.he 
total income from this source nearly 40 
per cent over last year, and provided a 
substantial contribution to the sinking 
fund to take care of future contingencies. 



Despite the ever mounting costs of 
printing, engraving, materials, and 
supplies, Collegian, Inc., is on a sound 
financial footing. Because of this, it 
may well provide an even more effective 
communication service for the campus dur- 
ing the coming year. 

Our comic magazine, Froth, still 
relies on the occasional questionable 
story for its particular brand of humor <> 



Its contents, however, has undergone a 
fairly thorough scrubbing behind the ears 
over the past dozen years, with the re- 
sult that only , o ccasionally now are 
particular persons offended by its stories. 

Receipts were up about 30 per cent 
over those of last year, with the bulk of 
the extra income from local advertising. 
The actual balance of receipts Jver ex- 
penditures was, nevertheless, down nearly 
50 per cent over that of last year. Al- 
though the editorial advisory setup is 
excellent, more > could be done to improve 
the business organization and efficiency 
in both the advertising and circulation 
departments of Froth. 

LaVie has been subjected this year 
to a thorough overhauling and reorganiza- 
tion, a corporation being formed with a 
board selected from representatives of 
administration, teaching, and student 
grcups. It is hoped that the change will 
step up staff efficiency and campus 
interest in the publication. Although its 
income is from subscription only, the year- 
book has managed to keep in the black and 
to add, from time to time, to a substan- 
tial sinking fund. 



The Penn State Engineer should be 
complimented especially upon its worth- 
while special articles, its art work, and 
format. The local advertising rose near- 
ly 100 per cent oyer. that of- last year, 
evidence of an enthusiastic and co- 
operative staff, Praotioally all of this 
increased revenue was poured back into 
the magazine's production to enlarge and 
improve it. That staff members and stu- 
dents of the School of Engineering are 
appreciative of the work being done on 
the Engineer is indicated by a continuing 
increase in circulation. 

It is hoped that at least one of the 
School of Agriculture's publications, 
Breeze or The F a rmer, which have been 
discontinued because of financial diffi- 
culties, will be renewed in the Fall,, 

Critique, the feature magazine, can 
at least be complimented en its recent 
issues by a decided improvement in "typo- 
graphy and makeup. It is still, however, 
waging quite a struggle for circulation 
and advertising income. The new staff 
can be depended upon for a more success- 
ful magazine during the coming year. 

Your representative feels that the 
Board of Trustees' acceptance of the Sen- 
ior Class gift of $5500 for a student- 
press was a step in the right direction. 
It would, of course,, be impossible for 
many years for all student publications 



to be printed on the campus a Elaborate ■ 
engraving departments and a variety of 
expensive presses would doubtless run the 
printing costs too high for the limited . 
amount of work contemplated. 



However, t he 
Collegian and one 
of simple makeup 
out long delay if 
would approve the 
t ion to plan t he 
could be obtained 
bonds that would 
fits, or by contr 
publishers of wor 
longer need. Spa 
most difficult pr 
would not have to 
yond sclut ion. 



printing of the Daily 
or two of the magazines 
could be undertaken wit li- 
the administration 
creation of a corpora- 
project. Equipment 
either by floating 
be retired from the pro— 
ibutions of interested 
n equipment they no 
ce , of course, is the 
oblem, but because it 
be large it is not be- 



Greater impetus wou 
whole matter if the admi 
include plans in its exp 
for a building that. will 
offices and newsroom Spa 
campus publications, for 
and for laboratory facil 

Hundreds of youngst 
interested in this ever 
communications, either b 
to enter it as a career, 
see its intimate and s ig 
tions with every other s 
the Pennsylvania State C 
Franklin Banner, 
Student Publicat 



Id be given the 
nistration would 
ansion program 

provide adequate 
ce for each of the 

a student press, 
itie s » 

ers are deeply 
growing field of 
e 'cause they plan 

.or because they 
nificant connec- 
tudy offered at 
cllege* 

Re pre sent at ive 
ions . 



FLAGS TO FORECAST WEATHER 



To make weather information avail- 
able to more people, the division of 
meteorology is displaying weather signal 
flags from the Mineral Industries Building, 

The code: red - warmer; blue - 
colder; white - fair; yellow - cloudy; 
blue and white checkers - rain or snow; 
and red and blue checkers - 3trong winds. 



Combinations o f t he flags are used 
to give a more complete description of 
the expected weather, that is, a white 
flag over a red flag would indicate 
fair and warmer weather. Flags flown 
before noon predict weather for the re- 
mainder of the day. Flags flown in the 
afternoon apply to weather for the fol- 
lowing day« 



OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS FROM THE OFFICE OF THE DEAN OF ADMISSIONS 

Withdrawals : 



3 Grabowski, Anthony R,, LD, Oct. 25' Gr 

3 Hurley, William Patrick, CE, Oct. 25 7 

7 James, Richard Lowell, EE, Oct, 25 3 



Stitzer, H ward, PEd«, Sept, 3 
Lease, -Vernon Glenn, H rt . Oct. 20 
Sushereba, Tony Eugene, EE, Oct,, 25 



Reasons for W it hdrawal : Accident, 1; health, 1; illness at home 
not prepared for cm.rriculiini, 1; desired "to become a missionary, 1, 



, 1; finance, 1; 






ma 



CF GENERAL INTEREST 



SENATE: The College Senate. will meet at 
4:10 p.m. on Thursday in Room 121, Sparks" 
Building. 



Dr. 



William G» Mather, 
will 



prof e ssor 
chapel 



CHAPEL: 

of rural sociology, will speak at 
services on Sunday morning. 

• » * 

LUNCHEON CLUB: Dr. Herbert Steiner, 
associate professor of German, will speak 
on "Life with Corona" at the Faculty 
Luncheon Club meeting on Monday, November 
8. 



HOME SPORTS : 
Syracuse at 2 



* * * 
Saturday, soccer with 
p.m. j Friday* cross- 



country with Manhattan at 4 p«ra. 



HALF-HOLIDAY; In accordance with action 
by the College Senate and the All-College 
Cabinet, classes will be suspended on 
Saturday morning for the annual football 
half -holiday , 

* * * ' 

PUBLIC SPEAKING COURSE: A special pub- 
lic speaking course will be offered by 
the Extension S e rvices beginning Thursday 
with Dr. Paul R. Beall, associate pro- 
fessor of speech, in charge. Classes 
will meet Thursday, 7 to 10 p.m., in 
Room 125, Sparks Building, Purpose of 
the course is to provide practice and 
criticism in the problems of delivering 
speeches. Registration will be held from 

7 to 9 p«m«. on Monday and Tuesday in 
Room If Sparks Building* 

* » * 

PLANT BREEDING SEMINAR: Niel Wright, 
research fellow in agronomy, will speak 
on "Measures of Combining Ability and 
Predictions" at the Plant Breeding 
S e minar at 4 p.m. on Monday, November 8, 
in Room 211, Agriculture Building. 

* * * 

FACULTY WOMEN'S CLUB: "Old Timers," the 
Newcomers Alumnae, and the Newcomers' 
invite anyone interested in forming a 
faculty women's club to attend an open 
meeting in Room 121, Sparks Building, at 

8 p.m. Monday, November 8. 

* * » 

ASM: Dr. D,L, McBr 
intendent, Open He a 
Bethlehem Steel Co* 
will address the Pe 
the American Societ 
monthly meeting at 

the Miner 

His subje 



of Dr» Arthur Rose, associate professor 
of chemical engineering. 

* * * 

ELECTED: Dr. S,K» Stevens, former mem- 
ber of the history department, was 
elected president of the Pennsylvania 
Historical Association for a three-year 
term, Dr. J, Paul S e lsam, first vice- 
president, and Dr. Philip S. Klein was 
re-elected secretary at recent meetings 
held in Erie* Others attending the meet- 
ings were Dr. Ira V, Brown, Dr . James E, 
Gillespie, Dr, William H, Gray, and Dr, 
Way land F. Dunaway, 

* * » 

PRESIDES: Dr. M.A, F a rrell, acting 
director of the Pennsylvania Agricultural 
Experiment Station, presided last week 
for two technical committee meetings in 
New Y rk« The meetings were on the North- 
eastern Forage Crops Project and the 
Northeastern Weed Control Project,. 

* * * 

CONTINUE AWARDS: The Interstate Adver- 
tising Manager's Association, meeting 
here last week-end, voted to continue for 
the 8th year the cash awards made to stu- 
dents in advertising. 

* • * 

CONFERENCE: Feed dealers and feed mixers 
of five states met here last week for the 
first animal nutrition conference. 

• * • 

SPEAKS: Dr. Joseph G, Rayback, assistant 
professor of American history, addressed 
the annual meeting of the Pennsylvania 
Society of the Sons of the American 

Revolution held on the campus last week* 

The subject was "Labor and the American 
Revolut ion, " 

* • » 

'SPEAKS: Carol. 0» Dossin, professor of 
poultry husbancu'y extension, will address 
the New Jersey State Poultry Association 

.in Asbury Park, N.J. on Thursday on 
"Efficient Poultry Production." Last 
week he addressed the Virginia State 
Poultry Federation on "Summer Egg Pro- 
duct ion." 

* * * 

PRESENT PAPERS: Dr. Orrin Frink, Jr., 
Dr. Isador M. Sheffer, and Dr. Haskell B. 



ber 9, in 



Gallery. 
Making. 



ide, assistant super- Curry, all of the department of mathe- 
rth Departme 
(Cambria PI 
nn State oha 
y for Metals 
8 p ,m . Tue sd 
al Industrie 
ct wi 11 b e : 



.ant ) , 
.pter of 

at it s 
Lay , Novem— 
a Art 

"Steel 



matics, will present papers before the 
meetings of the Mathematical Association 
of America, Allegheny Mountain Section, in 
Pittsburgh on Saturday, Other members of 
the department who will attend the meet- 



ings are Dr. 



Owens, Dr, Teresa Cohen, 



RESEARCH GRANT: A 
been made to the Co 
Corporation, New Yo 
of research in the 
tion. The project 



grant of $3, 
liege by the 
rk, for cant 
theory of di 
is under the 



500 has 
R e search 

inuat ion 

st illa- 
d ir e ct ion 



Dr, Evan Johnson, Jr., Dr. Harry L, Krall, 
Walter 0, Gordon, L, Tremaine Dunlap, 
Dr, Helen B, Owens, Dr. Walter J. Harring- 
ton, T)r, Aline H. Frink, Winton H, 
Laubaoh, Robert -I< Foots, and Stephao J, 
Bilo 8 



■■■■■i 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE SENATE COMMITTEE ON STUDENT WELFARE, 1947-1948 



The following 
Committee for the p 
Miss J,G, Brill, Mi 
Tietz, H.p. Griffit 
O'Brien, Dr. H.R. G 
"Weston, S,W, Russe 
of the Committee an 
served as Secretary 
of the Committee we 
dents: W.F. Agnew, 
fraternity Council, 
All-College Preside 
Romig, President of 



persons served on this 
ast year: E.C. Bishoff, 
ss W,L« Morgan, H,M» 
h, Mr s , Jo seph F . 
lenn, Dean Pearl 0, 
11 served as Chairman 
d Dean A.R« War nock 
. Additional members 
re the following stu- 
representing Inter- 
Thomas J, Lannen, 
nt and Suzanna R, 
W.S.G.A 



Fallowing is a brief statement of the 
of f icial -act ions taken by t he Committ ee • 

The Secretary reported that authority 
had been granted for the installation of 
a chapter of Alpha Epsilon Pi in accord- 
ance with an earlier - act ion of the Commit- 
tee, and that the ohapter was installed 
Sunday, December 7, 1947, 

A petition from a group of students 
asking permission to be recognized as a 
student organization with the name of 
Penn State Dendrologic Society was granted. 

A petition from the officers of 12 
campus Hat Societies for recognition of a 
Hat Societies Council under the pro- 
visions of a constitution submitted was 
granted • 

At a meeting held March 9, 1948, the 
Committee unanimously agreed that it would 
not be in the best interest of the College 
at the present time for the Committee to 
authorize a departure from the established 
'policy with regard to student political 
party and political action organizations. 



The Committee therefore took no 
action which would modify the decision 
made on December 10, 1947, in the' case 
the petition of a YPCA group for full 
recognition as a oampus organisation. 



of 



The Committee granted recognition to 
a' group of girls to become a chapter of 
"Chimes" under the conditions of the 
constitution filed with their petition. 



The Committees granted the request 
of Alpha Phi Alpha fraternity for recog- 
nition in accordance with its constitu- 
tion and plan as filed with the Committee. 



gave 
prop 
occa 

It w 
t he s 
cell 
f rat 
t ion 
Dean 
f avo 
Inte 
made 
for 



At a meet 

considera 
erly housi 
sions of a 
as voted t 
e occasion 
ege year *i 
emit ie s w 
s fixed by 

of Men. 
rable inte 
rf rat emit 

a ■ survey 
import s,.. 



lng in March the Committee 
tion to the problem of 
ng girl imports on the 
11-College dance week-ends, 
o permit mixed "housing on 
s during the rest of the 
n the case of those 
hich could meet the cendi- 
t he Dean of Women and the 
The Committee noted with 
rest the fact that an • 
y Council Committee had 
of guest rooms available 




By a telephone vote made by the 
Secretary the following petitions were 
granted : 

Official recognition of an honorary 
Hotel Administration society to be called 
Sigma Eta Alpha was granted in accordance 
with the ■ co nst itut ion and by-laws filed 
with the Committee. 

The Ellen H. Richards Club request 
wa s granted to become the Alpha Kappa 
Chapter of the honorary— prof e s sional 
fraternity of Phi Upsilon Oniicron. 
Their constitution and by-laws are filed 
with the Committee. 

Official recognition wa s granted to 
a group to become a local social frater- 
nity, to be known as Sigma Alpha, in 
accordance with their constitution. 

The request of the Int erf rat ernity 
Council for a charter for its publication, 
the IFC Newsletter, was granted, 

Seth W. Russell, Chairman 
Committee on Student Welfare 



VETERAN 'ENROLLMENT SETS NEW RECORD 



Veteran enrollment on the campus 
has established^, new re-cord with 5597 
ex-servicemen enrolled. This is an 
increase of. 235 over last year's en- 
rollment « 

Sixty— three -of the veterans are 
women, while 462 of the total ex- - ; 
Servicemen are gx-adn&te students, • 
Thirty per cent of the veterans en-"" 
rolled are members of the senior 



class. 

Enrollment by schools follows: 
Agriculture, 940; Chemistry and Physics, 
461; Education, 483; Engineering, 1496; 
the Liberal Arts, 1189; Mineral Indus- 
tries, 329; Physical Education and Ath- 
letics, IPC; Graduate School, 462; 
Transition Section, 27; Special Students, 
24; and Two-Year Agriculture students, 
6, 



THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 



FACULTY 



The Bulletin is published weekly during the College 
year as a means of making official announcements 
and presenting items of interest, to the faculty. All 




BULLETIN 



contributions should be as. brief as possible and 
reach Louis H. Bell. Director of Public Information. 
313 Old Main, not later than 10 a. m. each Friday. 



VOL. 



36 



November 8. 194! 



NO. 



ARTISTS' COURSE TICKET SALE CN TUESDAY, WEDNESDAY 



The ticket sale for* the Artists* 
Course series opens Tuesday for students 
and Wednesday for faculty and towns- 
people. They will he sold at Student 
Union Office, Old Main, starting at B 
o'clock each morning. 



The 



Prices are $8,70 and $7,50. 
series will bring to the campus 
Christopher Lynch, Irish "tenor, Deoember 
9; Vladimir Horowitz, pianist, January 6j 
and Helen Traubel, soprano, February. 28. 



FACULTY PLAY ACTIVE PART IN LAND-GRANT MEETINGS 



Faculty members are playing an 
active part in the 62d annual convention 
of the Association of Land-Grant Col- 
leges and Universities in Washington, D.C. 
this week. 

Dr. Lyman E, Jackson, dean of the 
School of Agriculture, has been designa- 
ted official representative of the Col- 
lege, He will address three of the asso- 
ciation's four divisions and-also is 
serving as chairman of a special commit- 
tee appointed to,study the report of the 
President's Commission on Higher Education, 



Dr. B 
of t he Lib 
chairman o 
Science s , 
the School 
the agricu 
mental Res 
Instructio 
assistant 
man of the 
which meet 



en Euwema, dean 
eral Art s, ■;!■&. pr 
f the Division o 
Dr. H.K. Wilson 
of. Agriculture, 
ltural division 
ponsibi lit ie s in 



of t 

e sid 

f Ar 

i vi 

wil 

on " 

ft.gr, 

E.L, Keller, ex 

sion 

ensi 



in Central Exten 
engineering ext 
s on Wednc sday. 



he School 
i ng as 
t s a nd 
ce-dean of 
1 address 
Cur Funda- 
icu«ltural 
ecut ive 
, is chair- 
on section 



Dr. H.P. Hammond, dean of the School 
of Engineering, Dr. Eric A, Walker, 
director of the '"rdnance Research Labora- 
tory, and Dr. Fred G» Hechler, director 
of the Engineering Experiment Station, 
will represent the School of Engineering 
in several sessions, Dr« S e th W, Russell, 
assistant dean of the School of the 
Liberal Arts, also" is attending. 

Dr. Frank D. Kern, dean, of tho 
Graduate School, represents that School 
while the department of home economics is 
represented by Dr. Grace M, Henderson, 
director, and Dr.. Helen R. LeBaron and 
Delpha E. Wie sendanger , assistant direc- 
tors.' 

Dr. Fred F. Lininger, director of 
the Agricultural Experiment Station is 
back frnm China, but still on leave, and 
will attend several of the sessions but 
Dr. M,A. Farrell, acting director, will 
represent the Experiment Station in re- 
search discussions, J.M, Fry* director 
of Agricultural Extension Services, will 
represent that group. 



NEW HOSPITAL EXPENSE PLAN NOW EFFECTIVE 



The new hospital expense 'plan became 
effective on November 1, 1948, so that 
for those who have signed for the plan, 
the insurance now is in effect. A 
certificate and identification card will 
be issued in the near future,' 

The first deduction for the new plan 
will be made from the November salary 
oh e ck , 

Coverage under the old plan termi- 
nated as of October 31, except for cer- 
tain extended insurance , including nine 



months coverage for maternity benefits, 
A distribution of the dividend earned 
during the period July 1, 1947 to Ootober 
31, 1948, will be made in the near future. 

Employees who have not signed for 
the plan, may sign on or before December 
1 and will have coverage for themi* 
selves qnd eligible dependents as 
of the date of the signature on the 
sard* Otherwise, late enrollment 
penalties, Auoh ae possible medical 
examinations, delayed benefits for de- 
pendents and delayed maternity benefits 
for employees, will apply. 



•hnstatp 



^ueerroiv 



MINUTES OF THE SENATE MEETING OF NOVEMBER 4, 1948 



The College S e nate met at 4:10 p.m. 
on November 4, 1948 in 121 Sparks Build- 
ing, D e an M.R. Trabue presiding. The 
list of members present is on file in the 
Office of the Registrar. The minutes of 
the last meeting were not read since they 
had been published in the Faculty Bulle- 
tin for October 11, 1948. Dr. R.E, 
De-ngler oalled attention to the faot that 
in' the minutes as printed in t he Faculty 
Bulletin a correction should be made. 
He referred to the item dealing with a 
proposal that course descriptions in the 
general catalog should be, kept at twenty 
words or less. It was pointed out by 
Dr. Dcngler that this statement was more 
restrictive than he had intended it 
should be when he had made the original 
motion. However, he had been informed 
that the necessary correction had been' 
made in the official minutes as they 
appear in the files of the Secretary of 
the College S e nate# 

The acting seoretary read letters 
as follows under the heading of communi- 
cations from college officers : — 

Dr. Lloyd Jones, of the School of 
Physical Education, stated that Dr , 
Harnett would, serve in his place at the 
November meeting of the College S e nate,» 

Dr. Eric At Walker, -head of the 
department of electrical engineering, 
likewise informed the secretary of the 
Senate that Prof. F.T".. Hall, Jr. would 
replace him at the meeting of the Col- 
lege S e nate- on November 4, 1948. 

Dr. R.L. Weber informed the secre- 
tary of the College Senate that. Prof . 
Wayne W e bb would attend the November 
meeting of the Senate in his place. 

These letters are on file in the 
Office of the Registrar. 

Under the reports of standing com- 
mittees, Prof. Victor A. Beede, Chairman 
of the Committee on Academic Standards, 
reported that the committee was recom- 
mending to the Senate that it grant an 
extension of time from September 1, 1948 
to January 1, 1949 for the purpose of 
granting credit by examination in Educa- 
tion 439 (Safety Edu cat ion ) provided the 
requirements of the original reepmmenda— ^ 
tion were met. The original recommenda- 
tion had been approved by the College 
Senate under date of June 3, 1948. 

•Prof. Beede, likewise, recommended 
on behalf of the committee that Mrs. 
Martha Whit e * St evens , a senior in the 
Mineral Economics curriculum, be per- 
mitted to schedule six credits by corres- 
pondence in Cpinrierce 41 and "Geography 26 



in order to enable her to meet the re- 
quirements for her bachelor's degree in 
one more semester. She is not in 
attendance at the present time. By 
taking these six correspondence credits 
and carrying 23 credit s in her final 
semester by attending the College, either 
in the Spring of 1949 or t he Fall of 1949, 
her purpose could be accomplished. By 
unanimous vote of the College Senate, the 
reoommendation of the Committee on Aca- 
demic Standards in regard to this case 
was approved. 

Prof. Beede on behalf of the com- 
mittee likewise presented the case of 
Charles A. Brouse, Mr. Brouse, a student 
in the State College Credit Class Center, 
has completed all but six credits for 
sophomore standing required for admission 
to. the campus. He is at present enrolled 
in Drawing 1 (Engineering Drawing) and 
needs Math 7 (Analytic Geometry) which 
is not given at the Credit Center this. 
semester. However, Math 7 is available 
through the Correspondence Division and 
Mr, Brouse requested permission to take 
this course by correspondence while in 
residence at the Center. The Committee 
on Aoademic Standards recommended that the 
request be granted. The College Senate, 
by unanimous vote, approved th» recom- 
mendation as presented by Prof. Beede* 
The report of the Committee on' Academio 
Standards is on file in the Office of 
the Registrar. 

Prof. C.E. Bullinger, Chairman of 
the Committee on Courses of Study, pre- 
sented the November report of his commit- 
tee. In accordance with College S e hate 
regulations the report was laid on the 
table for one month-'. The report of the 
Committee on Courses of Study is on file 
in the Office of the Registrar* 

Prof, E.C. Callenbach, Chairman of 
the College Calendar Committee, presented 
a revised report for his committee. This 
report, likewise, in accordance with Col- 
lege Senate regulations, was placed on 
the table for one month. This report is 
on file in the Office of the Registrar, 

Prof. Wn. Werner, as chairman of a 
special committee, presented a detailed 
statement for his committee as an Academic 
Service report. This report of the com- 
mittee, which is on file in the Office of 
the Registrar, likewise was laid on the 
table for one month. 

Under unfinished business an item 
was taken up which had been presented by 
Prof, Beede on behalf of the Committee 
on Academic Standards at the 'October 
meeting of the College Senate. The 
October motion of Prof. Beede recommended 



that the following line be incorporated 
in Rule 56 of the Regulations for Under-* 
graduate Students, edition 1948-1949:- , 

Any student reinstated by the Com- 
mittee shall be on probation for the en- 
suing semester; 

On motion of P.rof„ Beede, duly 
seconded, th« College Senate voted unani- 
mous approval of this recommendation.. 

Prof, Bullinger moved that his re- 
port of the Committee on Courses of Study 
for October 'be adopted with the deletion 
of two courses in Physics (Physics X920 
and Physics X921) as they had been . • 
listed: in the original report. Prof, 
Bullinger 's motion to adopt the Ootober 
report with the deletions mentioned wa s 
passed by unanimous vote of the College 
Senate, 

Under new business, the chairman of 
the meeting, Dean M,R„ Trabue, called 
for a preliminary discussion,' if the mem- 



bers of the. College Senate so desired, 
of the College oalendar report as pre- 
sented by Profi Callenbach and of the 
Aoademic Service report as presented by 
Prof, Wm, Werner, This discussion was 
entered into by Professors Weaver, 
Callenbach, Werner, Selsam, Bradford, 
Sauer, Whisler, Reede, Bullinger, and 
several others. In view of the fact that 
the items covered by these two reports 
constituted new business no action could 
be taken on them at this meeting. The 
discussion merely related to the clarifi- 
cation of certain sections of the report 
and also drew attention to certain changes 
in our present procedure which might be 
involved if the reports as presented 
were adopted. 

In the absence of any further new 
business, the College Senate adjourned. 



CoEo Marquardt 
Secretary pro tern 



OF GENERAL INTEREST 



CHAPEL; Dr , Lynn Harold Hough, dean 
emeritus of Drew Seminary, New York, N,Y,, 
will speak at ohapel services at 11 
o ' clock* ■' 

« • « 

LUNCHEON CLUB: Joe B e denk, of the foot- 
ball coaching staff, will" address the 
Faculty Luncheon Club on Monday' on "Pre- 
paring a Football Team for a Game," 

* * * 

SPORTS; Football, Temple, at 2 p.m. 
Saturday , 

» » * 

AAUW: Dr. J, Paul S e lsam, head of the 
department of history, will address the 
meeting of the American Association of 
University Women at 8 o'clock on Thurs- 
day night in the State College High 
School Library, His subject will be; 
"Student Invasion of Europe, 1947-48." 

« * * 

ASM: Dr , D.L, McBride, assistant super- 
intendent, Open Rearth Department, 
Bethlehem Steel Co., will address the 
Penn State chapter of the American 
Society for Metals at .8 p.m. on Tuesday 
in the Mineral Industries Art Gallery, 
Dr, McBride will speak on "Steel Making," 

* * * 

SEMINAR: The Philosophy Seminar will 
meet at 4:15 p.m. Tuesday, November 16, 
in Room 5-, Central Library, Dr , L.J, 
Rosan, instructor in philosophy, will 
discuss "A Platonic Solution to the 
Problems of Universals and Classes and 
Its Mystical Implications," 

• * * 

FAMOUS FILMS: "The Golem," famous 
silent film of 1920, illustrating the 
expressionist io influence of post-war 
German cinema, will be shown at 7 o'clock 
on Wednesday night in Room 121, Sparks 



Building, The film is a part of the 
Dramatics 61 course, but there will be 
extra seats for interested faculty, 

» * * 

DRAWING EXHIBIT: Drawings by students 
in architecture compose an exhibit on 
the third floor of Main Engineering 
Building, 

* * * 

PLAYERS,: The Penn State Players will 
present "Skin of Oar Teeth" in Schwab 
Auditorium at 8 p.m. on Thursday, Friday, 
and Saturday nights. Tickets, priced at 
60 cents for Thursday night and $1 for 
the other nights, are on sale at Student 
Union Office. "Ten Nights in a Barroom" 
will open on Friday and Saturday nights 
at Ce-ntre Stage and continue each Friday 
and Saturday night, except for holidays, 
for the remainder of the s.emester. 
Tickets, priced at $1,25, are on sale a^; 
Student Union Office, Advance reserva- 
tions may be made by calling the Dramatics 
Office, ext , 362, 

* * * 

COLLOQUIUM; Dr. Richard G. Stoner, 
assistant professor of physics, will dis- 
ouss "On the Propagation of Shock Waves" 
at the Physics Colloquium to be held at 
4:25 p.m. Tuesday in Room 117, Osmond 
Laborat ory a 

* * * 
ENROLLMENT IN BOTANY 406 : Scheduling 
officers are advised that it is necessary 
to sohedule some students for lectures 
only (2 credits) in Botany 406, Plant 
Physiology, Laboratory facilities accom- 
modate only an enrollment of 48 students. 
Some groups of students will find the 
lectures adequate, and may omit the 
praoticum, 

* ♦ * 



UNN $T>rr 6j 



SPECIAL HOTEL RATES'. Special hotel rates 
for faculty, staff, and students are 
available at Hotel Manhattan Towers, 
Broadway and 76th St., New York, N,Y» 
Requests, made on College stationery, 
should he addressed direct to the hotel* 

* » o 

ENGAGEMENT CALENDAR! The 1949 Penn 

State Engagement Calendar is on sale 

at Student Union Office, Old Main, for $1, 

• * * 

TEA: An invitation has been extended to 
the faculty of the School of the Liberal 
Arts and their husbands or. wives to 
attend an informal tea to be held in the 
northeast lounge of Atherton Hall from 3 
to 5 p.m. on Sunday* Mrs, Ben Euwema, 
Mrs, Brice Harris, Mrs Walter Coutu, 
and Mrs, Robert Dengler will, pour, 

• * * 

ATTEND CONFERENCE; Five members of the 
Library staff attended the 48th annual 
conference of the Pennsylvania Library 
Association in Pittsburgh recently. 
They were Ralph W, -McComb, Mildred 
Ailman, Evelyn Ilensel, Eisa Lisle, and 
Margaret Spangler, McComb is a member 
of the Committee on Standards and Certi- 
fication while Mrs, Spangler was elected 
secretary of the College and University 
Section of the Association and was 
appointed chairman of the committee on 
recruiting librarians, 

* ♦ * 

HOME MAKING CLASS: Additional students 
will be enrolled in. the weekly home- 
making class taught from 7:30 to 9:30 
each Thursday night at the State College 
high school* Instruction in planning 
and preparing low cost meals is offered. 
Persons interested in enrolling should 
call extension 106, 



Town Meetings sponsored by Hillel Founda- 
tion, will open at 8 p,m« Sunday at 133 
W, Beaver Ave. Subject is: "The 81st 
Congress and Civil Rights Issues," The 
forum is open to the public. 

• » * 

SPEAKS: Dr, Robert E Dengler, head of 
the department of classical languages, 
was the principal speaker at the recent 
banquet meeting of the Pennsylvania 
Society of the Sons of the American 
Revolution, His subject was: "An Old 
Greek Looks at a Divided Worlds" 

» » * 

A paper prepared by 
of the Watson Project 
staff, was published in the October 
issue of "Proceedings of the Institute 
of Radio Engineers," 

» * * 



PAPER PUBLISHED: 
Peter G, Sulzer, 



PARENT' 
raising 
a serie 
held ea 
at the 
public 

SPEAKS ; 
the Sch 
address 
lu n ch e o 
Indu str 
burgh, 
vision. 

ATTENDS 
College 
of the 
of the 
tion in 
mit tee 
t he pu b 
De cimal 



S PROBLEMS : 

children wi 
s of informa 
ch Tuesday n 
State Colleg 
is invited t 

Dr , George 
ool 'of Chemi 
ed the Rober 
n of the Mel 
ial R e search 
on Tuesday, 



Parent's problems in 
11 be the subject of 
1 discussions to be 
ight at 7:30 o'clock 
e High School* The 
o attend, 
* * * 

L, Haller, dean of 
stry and Physics, 
t Kennedy Duncan 
Ion Institute of 
, University of Pitts- 
He spoke on "Tele- 



TOWN MEETING 



The :9th annual series of 



MEETING: Evelyn Hensel, of the 

Library staff, attended a meeting 
Decimal Classification Committee 
Lake Placid Club Education Founda- 

New York on Thursday, The corn- 
acts in an advisory capacity to 
lishers and editors of the Dewey 

Cla ssif icat ion, 
* * * 



OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS FROM THE OFFICE OF THE "EAN OF ADMISSIONS 



Withdrawals 



3 Caine, Edwin J , , LD, Oct. 21 5 

Sp Carlson, Dona Jean, LA, Oct, 23 4 

3 Chadwick, Harold H., PM, Oct. 27 5 

Sp Dilley, Anne Marie, LA, Oct. 26 Sp 

Erb, Richard I,, ME, Oct. 29' 8 

Ewaldsen, Harold, AgEg., Oct. 25 5 

Goldberg, Morton P., H rt, Oct, 28 3 

Herman, William Jr „ , CE, Oct. 3 5 

Holtzman, Donald S,, CF, Oct. 29 4 

Lehr, Robert Philip, Arch, Oct. 30 4 

Maloy, Raymond T Jr., Met, Oct, 26 



Mari, Albert Joseph, CE, Oct, 28 
Moberg, Harry M, , LD, Oct, 25 
Murrav, Mary M,, AL, S e pt, 29 
Pineda, Eduardo Castillo, PNG, Oct ,7 
Rosen, Richard I<, CF , Oct, 6 
Schnavely, Harry Anthony,. ME, Oct, 25 
Strickler, Dorothy Jean, LD, Oct, 26 
Ulicny, Paul Thomas, CE, Oct, 29 
Vannan, William P., LD, Oct, 29 
Wilt, Margaret Jane, Ed, Oct, 30 



Reasons for Withdrawal: Illness, 6; personal, 5; illness in family, 2; not 
prepared for curriculum, 4j financial, lj to accept employment, 1; to be married, 1; 
and transfer to another college, 1, 



SJ*M1 wW* 



saeatod 



,xao 






THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 



FACULTY 



The Bulletin is published weekly during the College 
year as a means of making official announcements 
and presenting items of interest to the faculty. All 




VOL. 



BULLETIN 



contributions should be as brief as possible and 
reach Louis H. Bell, Director of Public Information, 
313 Old Main, not later than 10 a. m. each Friday. 



36 



November 15, 



NO. 



ARTISTS COURSE TICKETS STILL AVAILABLE 



Tickets for the Artists' 
Course Series are still available 
and may be purchased i'n Room 112, 
1 d Ma in, or by w r i t i n g to Dr . 
Carl E. Marquardt, Chairman of 
the Artists Course Committee, 112 
Old Main. 



Tickets are priced at $8.70 
and $7.50, which includes tax. 
The program includes Christopher 
Lynch, Irish tenor, December 9; 
Vladimir Horowitz, pianist, Janu- 
ary 6; and Helen Traubel, soprano, 
February 28. 



NEW TELEPHONE DIRECTORY PUBLISHED 



A new directory of campus 
telephones has been published and 
a copy is included with the Fac- 
ulty Bulletin this week. 

If additional copies arc de- 
sired, requests should be made to 



the Department of Publ ic Informa- 
tion, 3 13 Old Main. 

The telephone directory will 
be included in the 1948-49 Stu- 
dent-Faculty Directory which is 
expected to go on sale after the 
Thanksgiving holidays. 



PHI BETA KAPPA PLANS FOUNDER'S DAY DINNER DECEMBER 6 



The Lambda of Pennsylvania 
chapter of Phi Beta Kappa is 
planning its annual Founder's Day 
dinner on December 6. 

Members of Phi Beta Kappa in 
this vicinity who are not already 



affiliated with this chapter 
urged to send their names to 
president, Dr. A.J. Currier, 
Walker Laboratory or to the 
secretary, Dr. Teresa Cohen, 
213 Sparks Building 1 . ■■ 



are 
the 
106 



LIBRARY EXHIBIT MARKS ANNIVERSARY OF WOMEN'S RIGHTS CONVENTION 



The American Association of 
University Women is sponsoring an 
exhibit in the College Library 
this month to recognize the cen- 
tennial of the first woman's 
rights convention held in Seneca 
Falls in 1848. 

Banners and stickers used In 



the campaign to get votes for 
women are included in the exhibit. 
The display cases' in the main 
lobby contain books, programs, 
and pictures of such famous 
pioneers in the w ome n ' s r i gh t s 
movement as Carrie Chapman Catt, 
Mary Lyon, Frances Willar,d, Emma 
Willard, Elizabeth Stanton, and 
others. 



PENM- SfrATE COLLECTION 



SPECIAL MEETING OF SENATE CALLED FOR THURSDAY AFTERNOON 



The College calendar for 1949-50 and 
1950—51 will be adopted at the December 
meeting of the Senate. The Senate Commit- 
tee on Calendar is of the opinion that 
the members of the Senate are not fully 
acquainted with the many factors, some 
conflicting, which should be considered 
in adopting a calendar and that there 
may not be time to give adequate atten- 
tion to these at the regular December 
meeting. ^"he Committee has proposed a 
special meeting at which the calendar 
will be the only order of business. 

President Milholland has, therefore, 
called a special meeting of the Senate 



for 4sl5 p.m. Thursday, November 18, in 
Room 121, Sparks ^uilding, 

A calendar cannot legally be adop-r— 
ted at that time but the meeting will be 
devoted to the formulation of a calendar 
policy for the guidance of the Committee 
on Calendar „ 

The Committee on Calendar is sending 
to each member of the Senate a list of 
questions to be considered at the spec- 
ial meeting. The Committee hopes that 
all those who are interested in improving 
the calendar will attend the special 
meeting prepared to take part in the 
discussion. 



SHORTLIDGE ROAD BETWEEN POLLOCK AND CURTIN ROADS TEMPORARILY CLOSED 



Shortlidge Road, between Pollock and 
Curtin Roads, will be closed for several 
days this week while a storm sewer and air 
and gas lines are laid. 



Service drives to the Infirmary, 

LIBRARY HOURS FOR THANKSGIVING ANNOUNCED 



Nurses' Home, and the Temporary Union 
Building may be entered via Pollock 
Road and Shortlidge Road while the For- 
estry parking area must be entered via 
Curtin Road and Shortlidge Road* 



The following hours will be observed 
by the Central Library during the Thanks- 
giving recess, Ralph W. McComb, librarian, 
has announced. 

Wednesday, November 24, 7:50 a.m. 



to 5 p.m,; Thursday, November 25, 
closed; Friday, November 26 and 
Saturday, November 27, 9 o«m, to 
5 p,m.j and Sunday, November 29^ 
closed* 



OF GENERAL INTEREST 



CHAPEL j rt ev. G eor g e C. Anderson, rec- 
tor, Trinity Church, Swart hmore, will 
speak at chapel services at 11 o'clock 
on Sunday morning, 

* » » 

PHYSICS COLLOauiUM: Dr. Marsh White, 
professor of physics, will speak on 
"The Utilization of Physicists during 
Peace and War" at the Physics Collo- 
quium to be held at 4:25 p.m. in Room 
117, Osmond Laboratory, 

* * * 

AGRICULTURE CONVOCATION: State Sec- 
retary of Agriculture M iles Horst will 
be one of the speakers for the School 
of Agriculture convocation t o be held 
at 7:30 p,m, on Tuesday, November 30, 
in Room 121, Sparks Building, 

* » * 

MEETING: W, I, Runals, of the F ire stone 
Tire and Rubber Co., u kron, 0,, will 
conduct a group meeting at 5 p 9 m. on 
Monday, November 29, in Room 110, 
Electrical Engineering 3 u ilding. He 
will talk on "And Nov/ What?" and show 
the film, "The Building of a Tire." All 
interested faculty members are invited 
to attend. 



PSI CHI: Charles R, Elliott, assist- 
ant professor of psychology and clini- 
cal speech, will address an open meet- 
ing of Psi Chi, psychology recognition 
society, at R o'clock on Tuesday night 
at the illel Foundation center, 133 
W. Beaver Ave. He will discuss "An 
Experimental Investigation of Learning 
by Auditory Stimulation during Sleep," 
A business meeting will be held at 
7 :30 p.m 

* * * 

SEMINAR: Clarence S, Bryner, research 
fellow in agronomy, will speak at the 
Plant ^reeding Seminar t o be held in 
Room 211, Agriculture B uilding, at 4 
p,m. on Monday, November 22. His sub- 
ject will be j "Inheritance of Com- 
bining Ability," 

* * * 

SPEAKS: Dr. Ellen J . Kelly, assistant 
professor of physical education and 
athletics, on Monday addressed a group 
of Philadelphia public school teachers 
on "Organization of Individual and 
Remedial Physical Eduoation Programs." 

* * * 



/ceoff / Butkttn - Ztyfrtf t>Wr 



DEPARTMENT 

Corrected to C 



Ixt No 



220 
344 
166J 
54M 
66M 
260 
61 
269J 
267 
262 
335J 
>70M 
298 
292 
339 
337 
J64M 
29 3 J 
203 
29 3M 
292 
339 
292 
280 
336J 
192 
192 
66J 
261 
26 4 J 
26 5 J 
65J 
45 
58M 
45 
76 
73 
79M 
78 
74 
77M 
77J 
79J 
75M 
75J 
143 
250J 
181 



Accounting 

Admissions 

Aeronautical Engineering 

Aeronautical Engineering Staff D 

Aeronautical Engineering Staff E 

Agriculture, Dean 

Agr & Bio Chemistry 

Agr Corres Instruction 

Agr Economics 

Agr Econ Staff 

Agr Econ Extension 

Agr Education 

Agr Engineering 

Agr Exp Sta 

Agr Extension 

Agr Extension Staff 

Agr Library 

Agr Mailing Room 

Agr Marketing 

Agr Publications 

Agr Research 

Agr Vice Dean— Extension 

Agr Vice Dean— Research 

Agronomy 

Agronomy Extension 
Alumni Association 
Alumni Mailing Room 

Analytical Service— Frear 
Animal Husbandry 

Animal Nutrition 

Animal Pathology 

Animal Production-Frear 

Architecture 

Architectural Engineering 

Arch Reading Room 

Army Commandant Office 

Army Engineer Office 

Army Gun Room— Armory 

Army Property— McAllister 

Army Reading Room 

Army Records Office 

Army ROTC Instructors 

Army Signal Corps 

Army Supply Officer 

Army Supply Room 

Arts & Science Extension 

Astronomy Lab 

Athletic Association 



276 

291 

26 5M 

172 

288J 

171 

67J 

62 

272 

338M 

352 

46M 

356 



B 

Bacteriology 

Barberry Eradication 

Bee Laboratory 

Beecher House 

Beef Cattle Barn 

Benedict House 

Bio-Chemistry Research 

Bio-Physical Chemistry 

Botany 

Botany Extension 

Bursar 

Business Research, Bureau of 

Business & Finance, Asst to Pres in Charge a 



89J Caddy House 

197 Campus Patrol 

130 Central Extension 

371 J Ceramics 

240 Chemistry & Physics, Dean 
242J Chemistry Library 

241 Chemistry 

314 Chem Engineering 

248 Chem Labs-Director 



Ext No 

288M Sheep Barn 

289M Sheep Herdsman, Residence 

20 5 J Short Wave Field Station 

151M Sociology 

257M Sound Lab-Physics 

153 Spanish 

149 Speech 

152 Speech and Hearing Clinic 

19J State Power Plants Survey 

289J Stock Judging Pavilion 

327J Stock Room— Chemistry 

327M Stock Room-Chem Eng 

63J Stock Room— Frear 

250J Stock Room— Physics 

89M Stock Room-Recreation Bldg 

1 2 1 J Stock Room— Service Building 

31 J Store Room— Atherton 

3 Store Room— Simmons 

231 Student Employment 

211 J Student Resident Adv, Nittany 

21 1M Student Resident Adv, Pollock 

182 Student Union 

391 Summer Sessions 

257J Supersonics 

199 Supervisor, Dining Halls 



84J Team Physician 

119M Temp Class Room, Drafting 

1 18M Temp Class Room, Education 

119J Temp Class Room, Engineering 

118J Temp Class Room, Lib Arts 

305 Temporary Union Bldg 

87J Tennis Courts 

251 Textile Chemistry 

56J Thermal Plant 

1 22J Tool Room-Service Bldg 

88M Towel Room— Recreation Bldg 

124 Trailer Camp Caretaker 

356 Treasurer 

93J Typewriter Repair Shop 

U 

53M Ultra High Frequency Lab 

143 Undergraduate Centers 



28 7M Vegetable Cellar 

26 8 J Vegetable Gardening 

72 Veterans Advisement 

220 Veterans Affairs, Coordinator of 

233 Veterans, Fac Counselor of 

286M Veterinary Hospital 



W 

205M Warehouse, Salvage 

87M Water Tower 

60 Westinghouse, Geo, Professorship 

9 1 White Hall 

29 4 J Wild Life 

29 4M Wild Life Museum 

9 1 Women's Phys Ed Staff 

92 Women's Rec Assn 
47M Wood Shop-Eng B 



68 Zoology and Entomology 

69 J Zoology Staff- 1 12 Frear 

69M Zoology Staff-311 Frear 



O 

al 



sor 

i- 

ted 



try 




1 

urse 
ite 



gEJtt* 



Si -Al£ 



cou£ c 



; i0 K 



vice— president —sale s , Jones ana baugniin 
Steel Corp., will address the Central 
Pennsylvania chapter, Sooiety for the 
Advancement of Management , at a dinner 
meeting at the V. P. W. Home, Belle- 
fonte, at 6:30 o'clock on Thursday. 



and Wesley L. Nyborg, of the department 
of physics, attended the meetings of the 
Acoustical Society of America in Cleve- 
land last week. Dr. Walker is chairman 
of the membership committee and a member 
of the council to arrange for dates for 



PEHK 



5XAS£° -' 



■^■B^Hl 



SPECIAL MEETING OF SENATE CALLED FOR THURSDAY AFTERNOON 



The College calendar 
1950-51 will be adopted at 
meeting of the Senate. Th 
tee on Calendar is of the 
the members of the Senate 
acquainted with the many f 
conflicting, which should 
in adopting a calendar and 
may not be time to give ad 
tion to these at the regul 
meeting. ^he Committee ha 
special meeting at which t 
will be the only order of 



for 1949-50 and 
the December 
e Senate Commit- 
opinion that 
are not fully 
actors, some 
be considered 

that there 
equate atten— 
ar December 
s pr opo sed a 
he calendar 
business » 



President Milholland has, therefore, 
called a special meeting of the Senate 



for 4:15 p.m. Thursday, November 18, in 
Room 121, Sparks ^uilding. 

A calendar cannot legally be adopt- 
ted at that time but the meeting will be 
devoted to the formulation of a calendar 
policy for the guidance of the Committee 
on Calendar . 

The Committee on Calendar is sending 
to each member of the Senate a list of 
questions to be considered at the spec- 
ial meeting. The Committee hopes that 
all those who are interested in improving 
the calendar will attend the special 
meeting prepared to take part in the 
discussion* 



SHORTLIDGE ROAD BETWEEN POLLOCK AND CURTIN ROADS TEMPORARILY CLOSED 



Shortlidge Road, between Pollock and 
Curtin Roads, will be closed for several 
days this week while a storm sewer and air 
and gas lines are laid. 



Service drives to the Infirmary, 

LIBRARY HOURS FOR THANKSGIVING ANNOUNCED 



Nurses' Home, and the Temporary Union 
Building may be entered via Pollock 
Road and Shortlidge Road while the For- 
estry parking area must be entered via 
Curtin Road and Shortlidge Roade 



The 



following hours will be observed to 5 p. m »} Thursday, November 25, 

ntral Library during the Thanks- closed; Friday, November 26 and 

cess, Ralph W. McComb, librarian, Saturday, November 27, 9 a.m. to 

noed * 5 p.m.; and Sunday, November 29^ 



by the Central u i Drar y uurmg (j 
giving recess, Ralph W, McComb, 
has announced. 

Wednesday, November 24, 7:50 a.m. 



OF GENERAL INTEREST 



CHAPEL: R ev. G eorge C. Anderson, rec- 
tor, Trinity Church, Swarthmore, will 
speak at chapel services at 11 o'clock 
on Sunday morning, 

* * » 

PHYSICS COLLOQUIUM: Dr. Marsh White, 
professor of physics, will speak on 
"The Utilization of Physicists during 
Peace and War" at the Physics Collo- 
quium to be held at 4 ;25 p.m. in Room 
117, Osmond Laboratory. 

* * * 

AGRICULTURE CONVOCATION: State Sec- 
retary of Agriculture M iles Horst will 
be one of the speakers for the School 
of Agriculture convocation t o be held 
at 7:30 p.m. on Tuesday, November 30, 
in Room 121, Sparks Building, 

* * * 

MEETING: W, T. Runals, of the F ire stone 
Tire and Rubber Co., u kron, 0„, will 
conduct a group meeting at 5 p.m. on 
Monday, November 29, in Room 110, 
Electrical Engineering Building. He 
will talk on "And Now W na t? n and show 
the film, "The Building of a Tire." All 
interested faculty members are invited 
to attend. 



PSI CHI: Charles R. Elliott, assist- 
ant professor of psychology and clini- 
cal speech, will address an open meet- 
ing of Psi Chi, psychology recognition 
society, at R o'clock on Tuesday night 
at the illel Foundation center, 133 
W. Beaver Ave. He will discuss "An 
Experimental Investigation of Learning 
by Auditory Stimulation during Sleep," 
A business meeting will be held at 
7:30 p.m«, 

* • * 

SEMINAR: Clarence S. Bryner, research 
fellow in agronomy, will speak at the 
Plant ^reeding Seminar to be held in 
Room 211, Agriculture B uilding, at 4 
p.m. on Monday, November 22, His sub- 
ject will be j "Inheritance of Com- 
bining Ability." 

* * * 

SPEAKS: Dr. Ellen J . Kelly, assistant 
professor of physical education and 
athletics, on Monday addressed a group 
of Philadelphia public school teachers 
on "Organization of Individual and 
Remedial Physical Education Programs," 



DEPARTMENT TELEPHONES 

Corrected to October 15, 1948 



Ext No 



220 Accounting 

344 Admissions 

1 66 J Aeronautical Engineering 

54M Aeronautical Engineering Staff D 

166M Aeronautical Engineering Staff E 

260 Agriculture, Dean 

61 Agr & Bio Chemistry 

269J Agr Corres Instruction 

267 Agr Economics 

262 Agr Econ Staff 

335J Agr Econ Extension 

270M Agr Education 

298 Agr Engineering 

292 Agr Exp Sta 

339 Agr Extension 

337 Agr Extension Staff 

264M Agr Library 

293J Agt Mailing Room 

20S Agr Marketing 

293M Agr Publications 

292 Agr Research 

339 Agr Vice Dean— Extension 

292 Agr Vice Dean— Research 

280 Agronomy 

J36J Agronomy Extension 

192 Alumni Association 

[92 Alumni Mailing Room 

66J Analytical Service— Frear 

26 1 Animal Husbandry 
264J Animal Nutrition 
265J Animal Pathology 

65J Animal Production— Frear 

45 Aichitecture 

58M Architectural Engineering 

45 Arch Reading Room 

76 Army Commandant Office 

73 Army Engineer Office 

79M Army Gun Room— Armory 

78 Army Property— McAllister 

74 Army Reading Room 
77M Army Records Office 

77J Army ROTC Instructors 

79J Army Signal Corps 

75M Army Supply Officer 

75J Army Supply Room 

143 Arts & Science Extension 

250J Astronomy Lab 

181 Athletic Association 



B 



276 Bacteriology 

291 Barberry Eradication 

2fa 5 M Bee Laboratory 

172 Beecher House 

288J Beef Cattle Barn 

171 Benedict House 

67J Bio-Chemistry Research 

62 Bio-Physical Chemistry 

272 Botany 

338M Botany Extension 

352 Bursar 

146M Business Research, Bureau of 

356 Business & Finance, Asst to Pres in Charge of 



371 



241 



Ext No 

322M 

242M 

326J 

3 29 J 

194 

42 

165J 

52J 

52M 

144 

110J 

373M 

214J 

344 

380 

210M 

317 

220 

130 

273 

244 



Caddy House 

Campus Patrol 

Central Extension 

Ceramics 

Chemistry & Physics, Dean 

Chemistry Library 

Chemistry 
314 Chem Engineering 
*48 Chem Labs— Director 



Chem Lecture Preparation 

Chem Low Temperature Laboratory 

Chem Low Temperature Office 

Chem Staff-3 1 1 Osmond 

Christian Association 

Civil Engineering 

Civil Engineering Staff— 213 Main Eng 

Civil Engineering Staff-208 Eng A 

Civil Engineering Staff— 103 Eng A 

Classical Languages 

Clothing Home Econ 

Coal Processing 

Coal Technology 

College Examiner 

Collegian 

Combustion Engineering Lab 

Computer Lab— Osmond 

Coordinator of Veterans Affairs 

Correspondence Instruction 

Creamery 

Crystal Structure— Osmond 



286J Dairy Barn 

274 Dairy Husbandry 

278 Dairy Husbandry Extension 
277J Dairy Manufacturing 

27 5M Dairy Nutrition 

290 Dairy Physiology 

279 Dairy Production 

27 5 J Dairy Production Research 

187 Dean of Men, Office 

174 Dean of Men, Residence 

20 Dean of Women, Office 

22 Dean of Women, Residence 

28 Dean of Women, Asst, Res, McAllister 

1 Dean of Women, Asst, Simmons 
56M Diesel Engineering Laboratory 

30 Dining Commons— Atherton 

27 Dining Commons— McAllister 

2 Dining Commons— Simmons 
190 Dispensary 

350 Dorms & Dining Commons, Director 

29 Dormitories, Atherton, Office 
38M Dormitories, Irvin, Counselor 

38J Dormitories, Irvin, Supv 

39 Dormitories, Jordan, Counselor 

209J Dormitories, Nittany, Caretaker 

210 Dormitories, Nittany, Heating Plant 

209M Dormitories, Nittany, Mailing Room 

21 lj Dormitories, Nittany, Res Adviser 

208J Dormitories, Pollock Circle, Acct 

208M Dormitories, Pollock Circle, Caretaker 

207 Dormitories, Pollock Circle, Mgr 

21 1M Dormitories, Pollock Circle, Res Adviser 

4 Dormitories, Simmons, Office 

37 Dormitories, Watts, Counselor 

362 Dramatics 



E 

368 Earth Sciences 

146 J Economics 

390 Education, Dean 

393 Education Department 

397 Education Staff 

392 Education Extension 

43 Electrical Engineering 

53J Electrical Eng-Rm 104-Watson Proj 

245 Electrical Measurements— Physics 

93M Electric Repair Shop 

321M Electro Magnetic Lab 

15 Electronics 

40 Engineering, Dean * 

40 Engineering, Asst Dean 

57M Eng Drawing-Eng B 

48J Eng Drawing— Eng C 



5 1 Engineering Experiment Station 

70M Engineering Exp Station Res Assts 

14 Engineering Exp Station— Instrument Shop 

19M Engineering Exp Station— Tech Services 

1 30 Engineering Extension 

57J Engineering Library 

55J Engineering Mechanics 

55M Engineering Mechanics Lab 

50J Engineering Mech Staff-200 Eng A 

50M Engineering Mech Staff-212 Eng A 

145 English Composition 

144 English Literature 

68 Entomology 

338J Entomology Extension 

1 39 Extension, Asst to Pres in Charge of 



107M Family Relations Research— Home Econ 

335M Farm Management Extension 

226 Fee Assessor 

176 Film Library 

1 8 Film Research, Psychology 

59M Fine Arts-Eng F 

59J Fine Arts, History of— Main Eng 

66M Fish Culture 

28 5 J Floriculture 

320M Fluorine Lab 

320J Fluorine Research Office 

103M Foods-107 Home Econ 

105M Foods-202A Home Econ 

108M Foods Stewardess— Home Econ 

88J Football Coaches 

295 Forestry 

330 Forestry Extension 

266 Four-H Club 

153 French 

382 Froth 

366J Fuel Technology 

216J Fuel Technology Research 



219M Geography 

218J Geology 

218M Geology Research 

219J Geophysics 

150 German 

367 Glass Science 

90 Glennland Pool 

89 J Golf Shop 

180 Graduate Manager of Athletics 

271 Graduate School, Dean 

63M Graduate Students— Frear 

165M Grease Laboratory— Eng E 

268M Greenhouse— Horticulture 

1 25M Greenhouse— Research 



H 

190 Health Service, Director, Office 

175 Health Service, Director, Res 

99J Health Service, Supt, Res 

170 Hillcrest Cottage 

1 48 History 

100 Home Economics 

106 Home Economics Education 

334 Home Economics Extension 

109 Home Economics Reading Room 

108 J Home Economics Receiving Room 

103J Home Management 

1 10M Home Related Arts 

28 3 J Horticulture 

33 Hostess— Atherton N W 
35 Hostess— Atherton S W 
32 Hostess— Atherton N E 

34 Hostess— Atherton S E 

24 Hostess— Grange East 

25 Hostess— Grange West 

26 Hostess— McAllister 

5 Hostess— Simmons East 

6 Hostess— Simmons East Center 

7 Hostess— Simmons West Center 



Ext No 

8 Hostess— Simmons South 

23 Hostess— Woman's Building 

104 Hotel and Institutional Administration 

58J Hydraulics Laboratory 



269M Industrial Arts Shop 

396 Industrial Education 

47J Industrial Engineering 

48M Industrial Engineering Staff 

70J Industrial Reference Division 

96 Infirmary 

130 Informal Instruction 

333 Insectory 

384 Instrumental Music 



^y/(r Bufktt'n -^>(o/^/]/. tSfifr 



385 Journalism 



12 Landscape Construction 

28 3M Landscape Hort 

125 J Landscape Maintenance Depot 

196 La Vie 

140 Liberal Arts, Dean 

141 Liberal Arts, Asst Dean 

162 Liberal Arts, Vocational Counselor 

177 Library, Central 

147 Local Government, Institute of 

141 Lower Division, Adm Head of 

121M Lumber Shed 



M 

389 Mailing Room— Burrowes Bldg 

122M Maintenance Office— Service Bldg 

142J Mathematics 

49 Mechanical Engineering 

46 Mechanical Engineering Lab 

167J Mech Eng Staff-209 Main Eng 

167M Mech Eng Staff-211 Main Eng 

54J Mech Eng Staff-Eng D 

379J Metallurgy 

37 1M Metallurgy Research 

377 Meteorology 

67M Micro Bio Chemistry— Frear 

324J Microscopy Laboratory 

370 Mineral Industries, Dean 

373J Mineral Economics 

369 Mineral Engineering 

375 Min Ind Experiment Station 

374 Min Ind Extension 

378M Min Ind Instrument Shop 

217M Min Ind Library 

378J Min Ind Receiving Room 

2 1 7 J Mineralogy 

369 Mineral Preparation 

372 Mineral Technology 

216M Mining 

123J Multigraph (Printing Service) 

383 Music & Music Education 

N 

399 Nature Education 

163 Navy Commanding Officer 
161 Navy Executive Officer 

164 Navy Security Watch— Armory 
160 Navy Store Room 

107J Nursery School 

99M Nurses Home 

105J Nutrition— Home Econ 

64J Nutrition and Vitamins Lab 



250M Observatory 

184 Office Services 
28 4M Olericulture 



Ext No 

137 
325J 
253M 
318 
28 2J 



Ordnance Research Lab 
Organic Chemistry 
Organic Chemistry Research 
Organic Chemistry Research, Ofc 
Ornamental Horticulture 



220 Payroll Department 

194 Penn State Christian Assn 

359 Penn State Club 

183 Penn State Engineer 
126 Personnel Relations 

214M Petrography 

376M Petroleum and Natural Gas 

376J Petroleum Production 

376M Petroleum Production Lab 

168 Petroleum Refining Lab 

142M Philosophy 

28 2M Photographer, Agr 

85 Phys Ed & Athl-Dean 

86M Phys Ed & Athl-213 Rec Bldg 

86J Phys Ed & Athl-214 Rec Bldg 

84M Phys Ed & Athl-301 Rec Bldg 

94 Phys Ed & Athl-Irvin 

354 Physical Plant, Dept of 

310 Physical Plant Ext 
249M Physical Science-Chem 

255 Physics 

321 J Physics High Pressure Lab 

258M Physics Reading Room 

258J Physics Shop 

256J Physics Staff-Room 107 

256M Physics Staff-Room 108 

322J Physics— Sub Basement 

1 28 Placement Service, College 

65M Plant and Insecticide Chem 

62 Plant and Soil Chem 

363 Players— Loft, Auditorium 

1 5 1 J Political Science 

311 Pollock Union Bldg 
243M Pond Lab-Room 19 or 203 

323J Pond Lab-Room 119 

323M Pond Lab-Room 307 

246 Pond Lab-Room 204 

24 3J Pond Lab-Room 219 

285M Poultry Husbandry 

336M Poultry Husbandry Extension 

64M Poultry Nutrition— Frear Lab 

287J Poultry Plant 

120 Power Plant 

252 Pre-Med Student Adviser 

340 President, Office 

173 President, Residence 

220 Property Control 

395 Psychology 

388 Psychology Staff 

398 Psycho-Educ Clinic 

184 Public Information 
350 Purchasing Agent 



I23M Radio Experimental Station 

387 Reading Clinic 

236 Recorders 

394 Records and Placement— Ed uc 

344 Registrar 

348 Registrar Extension Records 

235 Registrar Veterans Affairs 

228 Research Coordinator 

340 Resident Instruction, Asst to 
Pres in Charge of 

251 Richards, Ellen H, Institute 

20 5R Riding Stable 

153 Romance Languages 



205M Salvage Warehouse 

58J Sanitary Engineering Lab 

347 Scheduling Office 

36 Sewing Room— Atherton 

Sewing Room— Simmons 



Ext No 

28 8 M Sheep Barn 

289M Sheep Herdsman, Residence 

20 5 J Short Wave Field Station 

1 5 1 M Sociology 

257M Sound Lab— Physics 

153 Spanish 

149 Speech 

152 Speech and Hearing Clinic 

19J State Power Plants Survey 

289J Stock Judging Pavilion 

3 27 J Stock Room— Chemistry 

327M Stock Room— Chem Eng 

63J Stock Room— Frear 

250J Stock Room-Physics 

89M Stock Room-Recreation Bldg 

121 J Stock Room— Service Building 

31J Store Room— Atherton 

3 Store Room— Simmons 

231 Student Employment 

2UJ Student Resident Adv, Nittany 

21 IM Student Resident Adv, Pollock 

182 Student Union 

39 1 Summer Sessions 

257J Supcrsonics 

199 Supervisor, Dining Halls 



84/ Team Physician 

1 19M Temp Class Room, Drafting 

1 18M Temp Class Room, Education 

1 19J Temp Class Room, Engineering 

1 18J Temp Class Room, Lib Arts 

305 Temporary Union Bldg 

87J Tennis Courts 

25 1 Textile Chemistry 

56J Thermal Plant 

122J Tool Room-Service Bldg 

88M Towel Room— Recreation Bldg 

1 24 Trailer Camp Caretaker 

356 Treasurer 

93J Typewriter Repair Shop 



U 

53M Ultra High Frequency Lab 
143 Undergraduate Centers 



V 



287M Vegetable Cellar 

268J Vegetable Gardening 

72 Veterans Advisement 

220 Veterans Affairs, Coordinator of 

233 Veterans, Fac Counselor of 

286M Veterinary Hospital 

W 

20 5 M Warehouse, Salvage 

87M Water Tower 

60 Wcstinghouse, Geo, Professorship 

91 White Hall 

29 4 J Wild Life 

294M Wild Life Museum 

9 1 Women's Phys Ed Staff 

92 Women's Rec Assn 
47M Wood Shop-Eng B 



68 
69J 
69M 



Zoology and Entomology 
Zoology Staff- 1 12 Frear 
Zoology Staff-3 11 Frear 



p&NN 



STATU 



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and 



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CHAP 
tor, 
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on S 

PHYS 

prof 
"The 
Peac 
quiii 
117, 

AGRI 
ret a: 
be o 
of A 
at 7 
in R 

MEET 
Tire 

cond' 
Mond: 

will talk on "And Now w hat?" and show on "Organization of Individual and 

the film, "The Building of a Tire." All Remedial Physical Education Programs." 
interested faculty members are invited * • * 

to attend* 



SPEAKS: Dp. D, V. Josephson, professor 
and head of the department of dairy 
husbandry, was guest speaker for the 
meeting of the Centre County Goat Soc- 
iety held here Saturday night* 

* * » 

AT SESSIONS: Lydia Tarrant, professor 
of home economics extension, represented 
t hat , department at meetings of the 
National Association of Land-Grant 
Colleges and Universities in Washing- 
ton, B, C. last week, Paul L, Edinger 
and Harold R. McCulloch, both assis- 
tant directors and professors of 
agricultural extension, were official 
representatives to the meetings of 
Epsilon igma Phi, honorary extension 
fraternity, held in connection with the 
Land— Grant sessions, 

* * * 

ARTICLE PUBLISHED: Dr. Joseph G. Ray- 
back, assistant professor of history, 
is author of an article published in 
the Journal of Southern History, It 
is titled, "The Presidential Ambitions 
of John C. Calhoun, 1844-1848." 

• * * 

FORM SOCIETY: Students in chemical engi- 
neering have formed the Chemical Engi- 
neering Society, Through a program of 
faculty— student mixers, field trips, 
plant motion pictures, and talks by^ 
men in industry, the society expects 
to help students better prepare them- 
selves for their profession. 



AT CONVENTION: Dr. Henry 
Glenn- Z, Stevens, both of 
of agricultural education, 
ing the 20t h % anniver sar y c 
the National Future Farmer 
at Kansas Gj_ty, Mo, Dr. B 
will direct the national F 
Stevens represents the col 
t er« 

* * * 

NOTICE TO ADVISORS: Physical S c i enGe 
7 and 8 will be offered during the 2d 
semester, 1948-49, 



S . Brunner and 
the department 

are .attend — 
onvent ion of 
s of America 
runner again 
FA Band while 
legiate chap — 



REAPPOINTED: 
of electrica 
reappointed 
Procedure fo 
istics of Ga 
the Illumina 

BOOK PUBLISH 
logue of Ins 
by Dr. D. E, 
agricultural 
has been pub 
published in 



D. L. Markle, 
1 engineering, h 
to the Committee 
r Illumination C 
seous Discharge 
ting Engineering 
* + * 

ED: Volume II o 

ecticides and Fu 

H. Frear, profe, 

and biological 

lished. Volume 

December, 1947# 



profe ssor 
a s been 

on Testing 
haract er— 
Lamps of , 

Societ y. 

f a "Cata- 
ng.icide s" , 
ssor ,of 
chemistry, 
I was 



SAM: Hubert Johnson, assistant to the 
vice— president -sale s , Jones and Laughlin 
Steel Corp., will address the Central 
Pennsylvania chapter, Sooiety for the 
Advancement of Management , at a dinner 
meeting at the V. F. W. Home, Belle- 
fonte, at 6:30 o'clock on Thursday, 



His subject will be: "Economic Aspects 
of Mandatory FOB Mill Prices," Edward 

. Baldwin, George We st inghou se Pro- 
fessor of Production Engineering, is 
president of the chapter, 
* * * 

IN NEW POSITION:' Robert H . Rumler, who 
served nine years as county agricultural 
agent in Lycoming oounty, has been 
appointed assistant executive secre- 
tary of the Hoist e in-^rie sian Asso- 
ciation of America, 



PRESENT PAPERS : Two 
of the Watson Project 
department of electri 
under the direction o 
Walker, were presente 
joint meeting of the 
Scientifique Internat 
Institute of Radio En 
ington, D. C, A. H, 
a paper on "Predictin 
Frequency from Long L 
and J. ^. Kelso prese 
"An Approximate Solut 
lem of Path and Absor 
Wave in a Deviating I 
J . E . Ha ck e , Jr. a s s i 
the paper. 



papers by members 

Staff of the 
cal engineering, 
f Dr. Eric A, 
d at the recent 
Union Radio 
ionale and the 
gineers in Wash— 
Benner presented 
g Maximum Usable 
istance Scatter" 
nt ed a paper ' on 
ion of the Prob— 
ption of a Radio 
onosphere Layer," 
sted in-preparing 



ATTENDS CONVENTION: Dr. F r anklin B. 
Krauss, professor of Latin, wi'll attend 
the ninth national convention of Phi 
Eta Signa, national freshman honorary 
fraternity, at the University of Ala- 
bama, November 19 and 20. Dr. Krauss 
was the associate faculty adviser of 
the local chapter from 1934—38 and has 
been faculty adviser since 1938 B 
* * * 

APPOINTED: Dr. N„ B, Guerrant, professor 
of agricultural and biological chemistry, 
and John E. Nicholas, professor of agri- 
cultural engineering, have been appointed 
to the Committee on Food Industries 
Awards by the Institute of Food Tech- 
nologists. The committee will select 
the food concern of the nation making 
the greatest contribution to the industry 
during th'e past three years, 
» * * 

CANCER REFRESHER COURSE: More than 100 
Pennsylvania high school educators will 
attend a three— day Cancer Refresher Course 
on Thursday, Friday and Saturday in White 
Hall. The sessions will be open to in- 
terested faculty members, A. F, Davis, 
professor of physical education and 
director of the course, explains, 
* * * 

ATTEND MEETINGS: Dr. Eric A. Walker, 
and Dr.. C. II.. Tindal, both of the Ord- 
nance R e search Laboratory, and Dr» 
Harold K. Schilling, Clayton II. Allen, 
and Wesley L. Nyborg, of the department 
of physics, attended the meetings of the 
Acoustical Society of America in Cleve- 
land last week. Dr. Walker is chairman 
of the membership committee and a member 
of the council to arrange for dates for 



^KSlATtO- -- 






the convention* Nyborg presented a 
paper on "Spectra of Ultrasonic Edge 
Tones." 

* * » 

HOLSTEIN HERD HONORED: For the fourth 
year, the College herd of purebred Hol«» 
stein dairy cattle has been awarded the 
Progressive Breeders Certificate by the 



Holstein— Frie sian Association - of America, 

* * * 
DAIRY PRODUCTS JUDGING: Penn s tate's 
Dairy, Products Judging team placed 
ninth in the Intercollegiate competi- 
tion in Atlantic City, Twenty-six teams 
participated. The teams stood third in 
milk and fifth in ice cream judging,, 



MEN STUDENTS IN TRANSITION SECTION 

The following men students are in the Transition Section for the 1948 Fall Semester* 
All below grades at the end of eight weeks should be sent to the Office of the 

Dean of Men a 



Aldinger , Glenn Raymond 
Alt, Ronald Reynolds 
Appel, Norman 
Bernstein, Murray 
Ferresford, John Francis 
Berty, John James 
Bleecker, Harry John 
Bonadio, Joseph N. 
Brady, Robert Ralph 
Bridi, Richard V. 
Campbell, John 
Candy, ^uyer E. 
Christmas, James M« 
Clark, William E . 
Conrad, Lewis Henry 
Coolick, Philip M, 
Cronin, Richard E, 
Dalrymple, Robert W, 
Davis, Jesse Bruce 
LuBois, ^obert H« 
Bukovic, James G« 
Dunlap, James Cowan 
Dunn, Donald Adams 
Echard, George D, 
Engle, George W, 



Fanelli, D e o Harry 
Fleming, George R« 
Good, Clarence Edgar 
Gruskin, George A. 
Helm, William Robert 
Horner, James Henry 
Johnson, Aif re <} L, 
Jourdet , Burton M. 
Kehs, James Leidy 
Knorr, George J. 
Eozich, George "^ohn 
Krusen, J. C, 
Laher, Richard L. 
Lambert, Kenneth W. 
Lenox, William C. 
Lewis, Charles * . 
Lingle, ^llan W. 
Logue, John Francis 
Long, Merle Edwin 
Lord, n exf ord Dunbar 
Martin, Richard C. 
Martorana, Robert F. 
MoLaughlan, Russell T., 
Migdon, George 
Nolan, William Joseph 



Olshansky, George S, 
Orrell, David Gordon 
Phillips, Gifford B. 
Phillips, William H. 
Potter, Elliott David 
Riffner, William James 
Ruff, Edward S» 
Salada, Isaac Jason • 
Sattler, LeRoy Melvin 
Sheehan, Jerome Charles 
Simpson, Robert John 
Smith, Richard Henry 
Sparks, Howard Curtis 
Suda, Emil John 
Swigart, Ned Clair 
Turley, Mitchell Reed 
Uhl, Alan 

Walters, Arthur Howard 
'Wat son, Jack 
Wicks, Har old 
Wingenroth, Vernon C„ 
Wirtz, Arthur Frederic 
Witmer, ^obert John 
Wozniak, Martin Thomas 
Ziminsky, ^dward William 



OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS FROM THE OFFICE OF THE DEAN OF ADMISSIONS 



Withdrawals 



Alt miller, John Leckie, For, Oct. 9 

Brenckman, Phyllis I,, LD, Nov. 5 

Ca s sidy .• Robert W., EE, Nov. 4 

Craig, R obert Warren, ME, Nov. 9 

D e Haven, John Louis, For, ^ t « 9 
Gr Fleming, ^arah Bernice, Econ, Nov. 8 
1 Good, Charles Edwin, ME, Oct. 14 

3 Hartnett, Edward R., PM, Nov. 8 

4 Heil, Robert Wendell, EE, Nov. 8 

8 MoCanna, Francis Owens, AgEd, o t . 27 
1 Neely, Byron Henry, For, Sept • 29 

5 • Nelson, Harold W., ME, Nov. 9 

Gr Puschak, Theodore Basil, ABC , Nov. 9 
1 Schoeller, Walter Henry, For, Oct. 1 
1 W a lker, Edward Richard, CF, Oct. 14 

Reasons for Withdrawal: To accept employment, 3; personal reasons, 4; dissatisfied 
with curriculum, 3j illness at home, 2; financial, 2; transfer to another college, 1« 

OFFICIAL CHANGE OF NAME 



From John Dosakoskie to John Eoss 
From Hazel Ja 



"iWrftft^'TWffcitf 



Helt Blair (by marriage) 



asuzojQ Stqqv 



THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 



FACULTY 



The Bulletin is published weekly during the College 
year as a means of making official announcements 
and presenting items of interest to the faculty. All 




VOL. 



BULLETIN 



contributions should be as brief as possible and 
reach Louis H. Bell, Director of Public Information, 
313 Old Main, not later than 10 a. m. each Friday. 



36 



November 22 , 1948 



NO. 



THANKSGIVING RECESS TO BEGIN AT 11:50 A.M. WEDNESDAY 



Classes will be suspended from 
1 1 ; 50 a.m. Wednesday until 8 a.m. 
Monday, for the Thanksgiving re- 
cess • 

College offices will be 
closed on Thursday in observance 
of the holiday. 



The Library has announced the 
following hours for the Thanks- 
giving recess; Wednesday, Novem- 
ber 24, 7:50 a.m. to 5 p.m.; 
Thursday, November 25, closed; 
Friday, November 26 and Saturday, 
November 27, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.; and 
Sunday, November 28, closed. 



■LIBRARY REQUESTS MATERIAL FOR PELT' STATE COLLECTION 



The College Library requests 
that each School or person re- 
sponsible for issuing printed or 
mimeographed material send three 
copies to the Perm State Collec- 
tion, College Library. 

All items of possible his- 
torical significance, such as 



statements of policies, programs 
of events, conferences , 'banquets , 

etc., pictures and publications 
of Penn State are solicited. 

Autographed copies of indi- - 
vidual books and reprints by fac- 
ulty members or others connected 
with the College also are desired 



"WATER TUNNEL" SUBJECT FOR SOCIETY OF THE S1.GMA XI -LECTURE 



The Water Tunnel, now under 
cons tructi on- by the Ordnance Re- 
search Laboratory, will be the 
subject for the Society of the 
Sigma Xi lecture to be held at 
7:30 p.m. Thursday, December 2, in 
Room 119, Osmond Laboratory. 



Dr. R. Burton Power, profes- 
sor of engineering research in the 
Ordnance Research Laboratory, will 
discuss the general construction 
features while Dr. James M. Robert- 
son, associate professor of civil 
engineering, will talk on model 
tests and functional uses. 



DR. JOSEPH B. WOLFFE TO SPEAK ON TUESDAY NIGHT 



Dr. Joseph B. Wolff e, Phila- 
delphia specialist in internal 
medicine and a member of the fac- 
ulty at Temple University Hospital 
and Medical ■ School, will speak at 
7:30 p.m. Tuesday in Room 10, 
Sparks Bui lding, on : "The Heart of 
the Athlete." 

The meeting, which is open to 
the public, is sponsored by the 



School of Physical Education and 
Athletics, Phi Epsilon Kappa, pro- 
fessional physical education 
fraternity for men, and the Centre- 
County branch of the Pennsylvania 
Association of Health, Physical .. 
Education, and Recreation. Dr. 
Carl P. Schott, dean of the School 
of Physical Education and Athletics, 
will introduce Dr. Wo Iff e. 



PENN STATE COLLECTION 



AAUP TO MEET TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 30 



Three important items of business 
■will be discussed at the meeting cf the 
American Association of University Pro- 
fessors to be held at 7:30 p.m., Tuesday, 
November 30, in Room 110, Electrical 
Engineering Building « 

The program includes the election 
of a vice-president for 1949 and a 
treasurer for 1949-52; report and action 



on the Faculty-Trustee Relations commit- 
tee; and an open meeting to collect sug- 
gestions for improving scheduling and 
registration procedure. Ray V. Watkins, 
scheduling officer, will be present to 
explain reasons for certain procedures 
that may be questioned. 

All members of the faculty are in- 
vited to the session. 



OF GENERAL INTEREST 



EDUCATION FACULTY: The School of Educa- 
tion faculty will meet at 4 p.m. on Mon- 
day, December 6, in Room 14, Home 
Economics Building. 

* * * 

LUNCHEON CLUB: Amos E. Neyhart, adminis- 
trative head, Institute of Public Safety, 
will discuss the activities of the 
Institute of Public Safety at the Faculty 
Luncheon Club meeting on Monday, Novem- 
ber 29. 

* * * 

PHYSICS COLLOQUIUM: Dr. Woldetnar Weyl, 
professor of glass technology, will 
speak at the Physics Colloquium at 4:25 
p.m. Tuesday, November 23, in Room 117, 
Osmond Laboratory. His subject is "Glass 
as Dielectrics." 

* * » 

GROUP MEETING: W.T. Runals, of the 
Firestone Tire and Rubber Co., Akron, 0., 
will conduct a group meeting at 5 p.m. 
on Monday, November 29, in Room 110, 
Electrical Engineering Building. He will 
talk on "And Now What?" and show the 
film, "The Building of a Tire." The 
meeting is open to all interested fac- 
ulty members. 

* * * 

ATTEND MEETINGS: Dr. Franklin B. Krauss, 
professor of Latin, will attend the 62d 
annual convention of the Middle States 
Association of Colleges and Secondary 
Schools and the Fall meetings of the 
Classical Association of the Atlantic 
States at Atlantic City, N.J. on Friday 
and Saturday, He has been secretary- 
treasurer of the Classical Association 
since 1943. 

* * * 

ELECTED: David C. Sprague, professor of 
agricultural engineering, has been 
elected chairman of the Pennsylvania sec- 
tion, American Society of Agricultural 
Engineers, Elwood F. Olver, instructor 
in agricultural engineering, was named 
Secretary— trea surer , 

* * * 

APPOINTED: Dr. S«W. Fletcher, dean 
emeritus of the School of Agriculture, 
has been named by Governor James H. 
Duff to the State Planning Board, 

* » * 

CALENDAR ON SALE: Members of the fac- 
ulty and etaff are informed by the 



Alumni Association that the 1949 Penn 
State Engagement Calendar, with 55 new 
campus views, can be secured at the 
Student Union Office or local book 
stores. The price is $1. 

» * * 

CHOSEN: Dr. G e orge F, Johnson, profes- 
sor of agricultural extension, has been 
selected by the Photographic Society 
of America as visual education chairman 
of its motion picture division. 

» * # 

STAMP EXHIBIT: Postage stamps of inter- 
est to soience students will be exhibited 
at frequent intervals on a bulletin 
board in Osmond Laboratory lobby. The 
exhibits are prepared by Frank T, Dietz, 
instructor in physics, 

* * * 

S PEAKS : Viktor Lowenfeld, professor of 
art education, recently spoke on a 
symposium at the 10th annual Pennsyl- 
vania Art Conference in Kutztown. 

* * • 

ATTEND MEETING: Dr. Donald S. Cryder, 
Dr. Michael R. Cannon, and Dr. Arthur 
Rose, all of the department of chemical 
engineering, attended the national meet- 
ing of the American Institute of Chemical 
Engineers in New York recently. Dr. 
Cryder also attended the Chemical Engi- 
neering Achievement Award dinner, 

* * * 

CO-AUTHOR: G.M, Dusinberre, associate 
professor of mechanical engineering, is 
co-author of an article describing a new 
method for calculating heat loss from 
cylindrical tanks with thick insulation. 
The article appears in the November issue 
of "Transactions of the American Society 
of Mechanical Engineers," 

* * * 

ATTENDS CONFERENCE: Dr. Hans Neuberger, 
professor and chief of the division of 
meteorology, attended a recent conference 
of the Armed Forces National Research 
Council Vision Committee at the University 
of Texas in Austin. He participated in an 
inspection of the Navy's visibility field 
research project, which is under the di- 
rection of Dr. Howard Coleman, formerly 
of the department of physics here, 

INTER-LIB RART LOANS : Due to congestion in 
the mails, xnter— Library Loans will be 
suspended from December 4 to 29. 



MINUTES OF THE SENATE MEETING OF NOVEMBER 18, 1948 



A special meeting of the College Sen- 
ate, having been called by President 
Milholland, was held at 4:15 p.m. on 
Thursday, November 18, 1948 in Room 121 
Sparks Building. When Mr. Morse rose to 
preside he was greeted with a round of 
applause in recognition of his recovery 
from his recent operation. The list of 
members present is on file in the Office 
of the Registrar, 

Mr. Morse said it was quite important 
that a College Calendar be adopted at the 
December meeting of the Senate and since 
the committee did not understand what 
were the Senate wishes, this meeting was 
called to show the committee the majority 
opinions of the Senate on various items 
prepared by Professor Callenbach, Chair- 
man of the Calendar Committee. Mr. Morse 
suggested that the questions be taken up 
in order and that discussion be limited 
to a single question. Mr, Morse also 
pointed out that the calendar committee 
is not bound to follow any votes taken at 
this meeting since certain items might be 
mutually contradictory and therefore, im- 
possible of fulfillment. 

Item 1. NECESSITY FOR AN ORIENTA- 
TION PROGRAM AND SHORTEST TIME REQUIRED 
IF ONE IS NECESSARY? Mr. Morse suggested 
that orientation be the same as presented. 
Dr. Gauger moved that orientation be cut 
to three days. The motion vras seconded. 
The Registrar explained the various pro- 
cedures of orientation week and stated 
that the physical examinations necessary 
before a student attends classes is a 
determining factor in the length of the 
period. Dean Warnock asked that three 
days before upper classmen registration 
be allowed for orientation. The concensus 
of opinion of the Senate was that three 
days in addition to upper classmen regis- 
tration be devoted to the orientation 
program. The motion carried. 

Item 2. MEETING REQUIREMENT OF 
MINIMUM DAYS PER SEMESTER VERSUS EQUALIZED 
SECTION SCHEDULES TO MEET A CLASS HOURS 
PER SEMESTER STIPULATION? Dean Hoffman 
stated that a, letter from the North Cen- 
tral Association listed 172 days as a 
minimum school year, 86 days a semester, 
including registration and final examina- 
tions. Prof, Callenbach said 88 days 
exclusive of registration and examina- 
tions had been set up by a Post-W a r Plan- 
ning Committee, Prof, Rhodes moved that 
the Calendar Committee attempt to arrange 
for fifteen weeks of each half day per 
semester exclusive of examinations. The 
motion was seconded. Dr. Weaver stated 
that he had attended a meeting last week 
in which he was informed that in some 
institutions they equalize the number of 
meetings by holding additional meetings 
of certain classes rather than extending 



the total number of meetings of the ses- 
sions missed for holidays. The S e nate 
voted to adopt Prof. Rhodes' motion. 

Item 3, LENGTH OF TIME BETWEEN LAST 
DAY OF FIRST SEMESTER EXAMINATIONS AND 
REGISTRATION FOR SECOND SEMESTER? It was 
suggested that only failures be reported 
immediately, not all grades. Dr. Sauer 
moved that not more than four working days 
be permitted between the end of the se- 
mester and registration. Prof, Werner 
suggested that all grades be posted, and 
all failing grades be sent directly to 
the Dean, Dr , Dengler amended the motion 
by adding "at least." Dr, Sauer did not 
accept the amendment, The S e nate voted 
adversely on Dr , Sauer's motion. Prof, 
Callenbach moved that a minimum of two 
days and a maximum of six days be allowed 
between the end of the semester and regis- 
tration. The motion was seconded and the 
Senate so voted. 

Item 4. MOST SATISFACTORY DATE (SUCH 
AS THIRD WEEK IN SEPTEMBER) FOR BEGINNING 
OF FIRST SEMESTER? The Senate made no 
comment on this item. 

Item 5. MCST SATISFACTORY' DATE (SUCH 
AS SECOND 'WEEK IN JUNE) FOR ENDING OF 
SECOND SEMESTER. The S e nate made no 
comment on this item. 

Item 6, LENGTH OF THANKSGIVING 
VACATION? It was moved and seconded that 
vacation ought to begin on Wednesday and 
close on the following Monday, leaving 
the question of the closing hour to the 
committee on calendar to decide, dependent 
on their action on Item 2, The Senate 
so voted. 

Item 7. REASONABLENESS OF A FOOTBALL 
HALF HOLIDAY ( IF ALLOWED, HOW ABOUT MAKING 
IT APPLY TO ALL COLLEGE PERSONNEL)? The 
Senate made no comment on this item. 

Item 8. LENGTH OF CHRISTMAS VACATION 
AND MINIMUM TIME BETWEEN LAST CLASS BEFORE 
DECEMBER 25 AND BETWEEN JANUARY 1 AND FIRST 
CLASS THEREAFTER? It was moved by Dr, 
Dengler and seconded that students not be 
required to travel on New Year's Day. The 
motion carried. It vras' moved by Dr. Moore 
and seconded that the vacation include a 
minimum of two week days before Christmas, 
The motion was adopted© 

Item 9. EASTER VACATION VERSUS A 
STANDARD (FOR TIME) SPRING VACATION AND 
FOR LENGTH OF EITHER VACATION PERIOD? It 
was moved by Dr „ Dengler and seconded that 
we retain the Easter vacation. This motion 
was adopted with the understanding that 
the length of the Easter vacation be left 
to the Calendar Committee, 

Item 10. IF SEC ON!" SEMESTER EXAMINA- 



L 



".<" 



| 



■■■ 



TIONS END ON A MONDAY OR TUESDAY, SHOULD 
SUMMER INSTRUCTION (OF WHATEVER KIND 
SELECTED) START BEFORE GRADUATION ANF. 
ALUMNI CLASS REUNIONS ARE -OVER? On 
motion of Dean Weston it was- voted that 
summer instruction should not start be- 
fore final examinations are over, 

Item 11. SHALL MEMORIAL DAY AND 
INDEPENDENCE DAY HOLIDAYS BE LIMITED TO 
ONE DAY REGARDLESS OF WHEN THEY FALL 
(FOR EXAMPLE, ON FRIDAY) ANI TO NO 
VACATION 'WHEN "THEY FALL ON SUNDAY? On 
motion of Dr. Dengler it was" voted that 
Memorial Day be limited to one day and 
that no additional holidaj/ be allowed 
when Memorial Day fall on Sunday. On 
motion of Lr » Dengler it was. voted that 
the Independence Day holiday be limited ; 
to one day, but that when Independence, 
Day falls on Sunday the College observe 
Monday as the legal holiday. 

Item 12. WHAT KIN! OF SUMMER PRO- 
GRAM WILL BE OF GREATEST SERVICE TO, OR 
INTERFERE LEAST WITH: 

(a) STUDENTS Q-N CAMPUS FQR FIRST 
AND SECOND SEMESTER ONLY? 

(b) VETERAN^? 

(c) TEACHERS IN SERVICE? 

(d) GRADUATE STUDENTS NOT TEACHERS 
IN SERVICE 

(e) CONFERENCES ASSOCIATE 1 " WITH 
PROFESSIONAL AN]~ LEARNED 



GROUPS UTILISING COLLEGE 
FACILITIES ANr PERSONNEL 
THROUGHOUT THE' SUMMER? 



After a c 
the Senate vot 
that beginning 
a twe lve-w,eek 
be limited by 
taken at this 
wa s accepted b 
regardle ss of 
twelve— week se 
certain course 
ment s be permi 
sessions withi 
period . 



onsideraticn discussion 
ed on motion of Dr. Moore 
in 1950 the-College hold 
summer session which would 
other actions already 
meeting. An amendment 
y Dr. Moore to state that 
any revisions made in the 
ssion in order to offer 
s that the Science Depart- 
tted to give two six— week 
n the above twelve -week 



SOCIETIES 



AGRICULTURAL AND 



INDUSTRIAL GROUPS, AN" OTHER 



Item 13. ARE EIGHT DAYS NEEDED FOR 
FINAL EXAMINATIONS? Mr. Watkins, 
Scheduling Officer, said it was impossi- 
ble to shorten the examination period and 
take care of the conflicts. It was 
moved and seconded that we continue eight 
days for examinations. The motion 
carried. 

Item 14, TIME PROVISION FOR FIRST 
SEMESTER GRADUATION? The question was 
•withdrawn ^y Prof. Callenbach, Chairman 
of the Calendar Committee. 

Mr. Morse then asked for a motion to 
the effect that the above actions be re- 
ferred to the Committee on Calendar to be 
used by them as a guide in the preparation 
of the calendar which the committee would 
present at the meeting of the Senate on 
December 2. Such a motion was made and 
adopted. The meeting ad j ourned at 6 :10 p.m . 

Wm, S. Hoffman 
Seoret ary 



OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS FROM THE OFFICE OF THE DEAN OF ADMISSIONS 

Withdrawal s • 



3 Friedman, Morton Benjamin, PEd, Sept. 28 -3 Sutjak, Joseph F. Jr., Agro, Nov, 9 
6 Koster, Harvey B « , CF, Oct. 1 ' 3 Wood, Merle Edward, ChE, Nov. 12- 

3 McDermott, John William-, EE, Oct. 13 3 Wunderle, Francis M, CE, Nov, 9 

Reasons fo r .Withdrawal : Personal, 3j ill health, 2; inadequate preparation 
for curriculum, 1, 

WOMEN IN TRANSITION SECTION LISTED 

The following women students are in the Transition S e otion for the 1548 Fall 
Semester, All below grades at the end of eight weeks should be sent to the Office 
of the De a n of Women . 



Campo, Edith Theresa 
Eshmont, Reg^na 
Lamari , f/uoie E. 



Marcus, Marilyn Renee 
Totenbier, Rosalie 






ai 



THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 



FACULTY 



The Bulletin is published weekly during the College 
year as a means of making official announcements 
and presenting items of interest to the faculty. All 




BULLETIN 



contributions should be as brief as possible and 
reach Louis H. Bell, Director of Public Information, 
313 Old Main, not later than 10 a. m. each Friday. 



VOL. 



36 



November 29, 194f 



NO. 



10 



DR. 0. SPURGE ON ENGLISH TO SPEAK HERE THURSDAY NIGHT 



An analytical discussion of the 
"Kinsey Report" will "be presented in 
Schwab Auditorium at 8 o'clock on 
Thursday night as the second event ' of 
the 1948-49 Community Forum series* 

The speaker will be Dr. 0. Spurgeon 

English, head of the department of 

psychiatry at Temple University Medical 
School and Hospital. 

Dr„ English is expected to give a 
very complete abstract of the contents 



of the Kinsey Report and to discuss 
also the question, "Are Our Moral 
St andards . Changing?" He will be 
introduced by Dr. Clifford R. Adams, 
associate professor of psychology* 

Seasons tickets for the remaining 
numbers of the Forum Series are avail- 
able for $2.50 at the Student Union 
Office. "Single tickets are priced at 
$1.00 and also may be bought at 
Student Union Office. 



FIRST PHASE REGISTRATION TO BE COMPLETED PRIOR TO DECEMBER 11 



First phase registration for the 
second semester, 1948-49, should be 
completed not later than De cember .. 11 . 

Time Tables are expected to arrive 
this week at the Office of the Scheduling 
Officer, and each Sohool is requested 
arrange their -own schedules as tc when 
students meet with advisers. 

Advisers are requested to sign the 



schedule cards that have already been 
supplied to the Dean's Offices, Only one 
copy of the form is required for regis- 
trat ion. 

'Class lists prepared by the College 
Scheduling Officer must be ready early 
in January so that departments can make 
adjustments before final phase regis- 
tration on February 4-5, 



LIST OF COURSES PROPOSED FOR 1949 SUMMER SESSIONS DISTRIBUTED 



To assist students in planning their 
schedules for the second semester, 
1948-49, the Summer Sessions Office is 
distributing a list of courses to be 
offered during the 1949 Summer Sessions. 

While the list is subject to change, 
it is pointed out that students planning 
tc take work next summer can determine 
from the list whether or not certain re- 



quired courses are proposed for the Summer 
Session, and if not, can schedule them 
forthe second semester* ' : 

The list will be distributed to 
faculty members receiving the Faculty 
Bulletin. Students and others desiring a 
copy of the list should call at the Summer 
Sessions Office, Burrowes Building. 



1173 UNDERGRADUATE TRANSFERS, 317 NEW GRADUATE STUDENTS ADMITTED 



A total of 1173 undergraduates and 
317 graduate students were admitted to" 
the College at the beginning of the 
current semester, Dr , C,E, Marquardt , 
College Examiner, has reported. 

The undergraduates included 839 men 
and 334 women and came from 269 different 
colleges and universities. More than 
4000 applicants for transfer were refused 
because of lack of room. 

Of the 317 graduate students, 296 



were regular students, candidates for de- 
grees, while 21 were general graduate stu- 
dents. Forty-eight of the students al- 
readyhold master's degrees. 

Seventy-seven of t h.e students admit- 
ted are Penn State graduates while the re- 
maining 219 of the regular students held 
bachelcr's degrees from 137 other colleges. 

Dr. Marquardt points out that the 296 
students selected their graduate majors 
among 57 different fields. He also stated 
that, as in the case of the undergraduates, 
hundred of students were refused admission 
because of lack of room. 



STUDY OF CLASSROOM FACILITIES ON CAMPUS 

Following is a survey of classroom facilities on the campus which was prepared 
by the College Scheduling Officer: 

Ag riculture 

Number of Seats 

Building Number of Rooms With Tablet Arms 

Agriculture 3 348 

Agricultural Education 1 30 

Agricultural Engineering 3 185 

Buckhout Laboratory 2 93 

Dairy and Creamery 2 126 

Fc-restry 5 246 

Frear Laboratories 4 182 

Horticulture 3 . 319 

Patterson Hall __1 45 

Total 24 1,574 

Enrollment in School of Agriculture October 6, 1948 1,415 

Chemistry and Physics 

Walker Laboratory 3 .16 8 

Osmond Laboratory , 10 514 

Textile Chemistry Laboratory __2 ^ 70 

Total ■ 15 752 

Enrollment in School of Chemistry and Physics October 6, 1948 815 

Educat ion 

Burrowes 1 40 

Home Economics . 3 ■ 126 

Total "4" 166 

Enrollment in School of Education October 6, 1948 1,343 

Engineering 

Electrical Engineering 11 723 

Engineering "A" 7 432 

Engineering "B" 1 28 

Engineering "C" . 2 93 

Engineering "D" 3 119 

Engineering "E" 1 . 42 

Main Engineering 11 429 

Total 36 1,866 

Enrollment in School of Engineering October 6, 1948 1,918 

The Liberal Arts 

Carnegie Hall 5 270 

Sparks 36 2,254 

Total 41 27554 

Enrollment in School of the Liberal Arts October 6, 1948 2,397 

Mineral Industries 

Mineral Industries 3 133 

Enrollment in School of Mineral Industries October 6, 1948 425 



Physica l Education 



Irvin Hall 

Mary Beaver White Recreation Hall 

Total 



4 

4 
-8 



Enrollment £n School, of Physical Education October 6, 1948 267 



150 
453 

«-**—< — 

T03 



Library 

Old Main 

Temporary Classroom Building 



2 

6 

25 



73 

279 

1,062 



DR. M.R. FENSKE TO SPEAK AT PHI BETA KAPFA FOUNDER'S DAY BANQUET 



Dr. M.R, Fenske, director of the 
Petroleum Refining Laboratory, will speak 
at the Phi Beta Kappa Founder's Day Ban- 
quet to be held at 6:30 p.tru on Monday, 
December 6, at the Nittany Lion Inn» 



Dr. Fenske "will speak on "Some 
Social and Economic Aspects of petroleum." 
A business meeting will be held following 
the banquet . 



OF GENERAL INTEREST 



SENATE: The Collage Senate will meet at 
4.10 p.m. on Thursday in Room 121, Sparks 
Building, 

* * * 

ENGINEERING FACULTY: The faculty of the 
School of Engineering will meet at 5:10 
p.m. on Wednesday in Room 110, Electrical 
Engineering Building, 

* * * 

EDUCATION FACULTY: The School of Educa- 
tion faculty will meet at 4 p.m. on Mon- 
day, December 6, in t he Living Center of 
the Home Economics Building. 

* * * 

CHAPEL: Dr. Hobart D. McKeehan, of the 
Abbey Church, Huntingdon, will speak at 
chapel services on Sunday morning, 

* * * 

LUNCHEON CLUB: Dr. Stuart A- Mahuran., 
associate professor of journalism, will 
entertain the Faculty Lunoheon Club with 
a program of magic on Monday noon, Decem- 
ber 6, „ ,» 

CRGAN RECITAL: George Ceiga, assistant 
professor of music, will present the 
second of a series of organ recitals at 
4 o'clo-ck on Sunday afternoon in Schwab 
Auditorium. Rebecca J. Griffin, soprano 
and a senior in music education, will 
appear en the program with him in a 
group of selections, 

* * » 

MIDNIGHT SERVICE: The Chapel Choir will 
present its first Midnight Service in 
Schwab Auditorium from 11 p.m. to 12 
o'clock on Saturday, December 11, Be- 
sides the traditional Christmas selec- 
tions, the program will include the Bach 
Cantata, "For Unto Us A Child Is Born." 
The same program will be repeated at the 
Chapel Hour on Sunday, December 12, 

* » * 

RECEPTION: The Library Staff Association 
has ext-eu&ed invitations to the faculty 
and their husbands and wives through the 
heads of department s to attend an open 



house and informal reception for Mr. and 
Mrs* Ralph W, McComb to be held in the 
Central Library from 7 to 9 p.m. on 
Saturday. Mr. McComb recently was ap- 
pointed College Librarian, 

* * * 

AAUP : Suggestions for improving sched- 
uling and registration procedures will be 
discussed at the open meeting of the 
American Association of University Pro- 
fessors in Room 110, Electrical Engineer- 
ing Building at 7:30 o'clock Tuesday night 
The entire faculty is invited. Other 
items on the program include the election 
of a vice-president for 1949 and a 
treasurer for 1949—52. The report of the 
Faculty-Trustees Relations committee also 
will be heard and action taken, 

* * * 

COURSES OF STUDY: The Courses of Study 
Committee will meet at 10 o'clock on 
Thursday morning, December 16, in Room 
207, Engineering "C". 

* * • 

SIGMA XI: Dr. R, Burton Power, professor 
of engineering research in the Ordnance 
Research Laboratory, and Dr. James M. 
Robertson, associate professor of civil 
engineering, will discuss the Ordnance 
Research Laboratory water tunnel at the 
Sigma Xi meeting at 7:30 o v clcck on Thurs- 
day night in Room 119, Osmond Laboratory, 

* • * 

TOWN MEETINGS: The third of the series 
of Town Meetings sponsored hy the Hillel 
Foundation will be held at 8 p.m. Sunday 
at the Hillel Auditorium, 133 W« Beaver 
Ave. The subject will be: "H w Can We 
Learn to Live Together?" Speakers will 
be Rabbi Manning H, Bleich, of Lewistownj 
Dr. George M. Lott , psychiatrist with the 
College Health Service; and Dr • J. Paul 
Selsam, professor of Euro.pean history. 
The public is invoted. 

* • * 

APPLE SALES: Beginning on December 1, 



the apple sales room at the Fruit Farm 
Cold Storage will be open only in the 
afternoon from 1 to 5:30 p.m. 

* * * 

BAZAAR: The three State College chapters 
of Beta Sigma Phi, international sorority 
for younger business and professional 
women, will sponsor a Christmas Bazaar 
from 2 to 4:30 p.m. on Saturday in the 
lower room of the Corner Room. Handmade 
gifts and baked goods will be on sale. 
Proceeds will be used to aid the Cancer 
Clinic at the University of Colorado and 
in community projects, 

* * * 



COLLCaiJIUM: Dr. Vernon W, Myers, assis- 
tant professor of physics, will speak in 
"Cross-over Transitions in Gamma Ray 
Spectra" at the Physics Colloquium to be 
held in Room 117, Osmond Laboratory, at 
4:25 pjn. on Tuesday, 

* * * 

INTER-LIBRARY LOANS: The College Library 
announces that due to congestion in the 
mails, Inter-library Loans will be sus- 
pended from December 4 to December 29. 



FILM CLASSIC : The fa 
"Potemkin," directed 
stein, will be shown 
Dramatics 61 course, 
Wednesday night. Int 
members are invited. 



mous Russian film, 
by Sergei Elsen- 
as a part of the 
at 7 o'clock en 
erested faculty 



ELECTED: 
fuel tech 
t he Centr 
can Chemi 
Other off 
ler, assi 
vice— chai 
a s si st ant 
biologica 
A.H, Holt 
chemistry 
of the Ca 
D.C., dis 
exchange 
of the se 



Dr. C.R. Ki 
nology, was 
al Pennsylva 
cal Society, 
icers named 
stant profes 
rman; Dr. Pa 

professor o 
1 chemistry, 
zinger, asso 
, treasurer, 
rnegie Insti 
cussed his r 
in bone at t 
ct ion. 



nney, professor of 
elected chairman of 
nia section, Ame r i - 

on 'Wednesday night, 
are Dr. R.W. Schiess- 
sor of chemistry, 
ul M« Alt house, 
f agricultural and 

secretary; and Dr, 
ciate professor of 

Dr. Hugh H. Darby, 
tut e of Washington, 
esearch on calcium 
he recent meeting 



SPEAKS: Dr. Paul R, Beall, associate 
professor of speech, addressed the « 
Allegheny-Kiski Valley Foremen's Club in 
Mew Kensington recently*, He spoke on 
"Better Human Relations." 

* * * 

'HOLIDAY DINNER: A Holiday Dinner will be 
served by students in hotel and institu- 
tion administration in the Maple Room on 
Wednesday and Thursday night, December 8 
and 9. Roast turkey or baked ham with 
all of the holiday trimmings will be 
features. Reservations, which can be 
made by calling extension 104. will be 
required , 

* * * 

PUBLISHED: An article published in the 
April, 1943,* issue of Q.ST, entitled, "An 
Oscillator for the 1215 Mc, Band" by 
Peter G. Sulzer, research assistant in 
the Engineering Experiment Station, and 
Charles R, Ammerman, instructor in 
electrical engineering, was translated 
into Spanish and published in the Argen- 
tine magazine, "Revista Telegrafica 
Elect ronica . " 

* * # 

TO SPEAK: Dr. Harold K, Schilling, pro- 
fessor and head of the department of 
physics, will speak on "Adventure in 
Ultrasonics" at a joint meeting of the 
Franklin Institute and the Physics Club 
of Philadelphia in Philadelphia on Wed- 
nesday, 

* * * 

ATTEND MEETINGS: Three members of the 
department of home economics attended 
the week— end meetings of the National 
Council on Family Relations in Chicago, 
They were Delpha Wle sendanger , Mrs* 
Marion S. MoDowell, • and Dr , William M. 
Smith, Jr, 

» * * 

PRESENTS PAPER: Dr, R.W. Swift and Dr. 
Alex Black, of the department of animal 
nutrition, are co-authors of a paper 
presented last week to the American Oil 
Chemists' Society in New York, The paper, 
titled, "Fats in Relation to Caloric 
Efficiency," was presented by Dr. Black, 



OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS FROM THE OFFICE OF THE DEAN OF ADMISSIONS 

Withdrawals : 



3 Appleman, Loy We Her, MEd, N v. 15 3 

6 Behnken, Jack, EE, Nov. 17 3 

6 Bell, Alan M., Met, Nov, 19 Gr 
5 Boyd, Robert Lester, Ed, Nov. 13 3 

7 Crouser, Claude Thayer, EE, Nov. 20 5 
1 Downing, Richard Norman, For, Nov, 13 5 
3 Humphreys, Gladys Elinor, PEd, Nov. 17 1 
5 Lake, Stanley A., AL, Nov. 16 3 
5 Louis, Maryjane N», S ci , Nov. 16 

Reasons for Withdrawal: Personal, 4; poor 
OTJcvriovilAj.nij 2; lack of interest, 2; inadequate 
listed in Navy, 1; to be married, 1. 



McCullough, David L.Jr,, ABCh, Oct ,29 
Martorana,- Robert Frank, TS, Oct. 28 
Metz, Sara Helen, HEc, Nov, 16 
O'Brien, Richard William, PM, Nov. 16 
Reagan, Thomas Francis, EE, Nov. 17 

Nov. 17 
Nov. 10 



neagan, ± nomas Francis, ju ju _, 
Solomon, Howard Owen, VIEd., 
Tibbott, J hn Russell, For, 
Weaver, Walter Harvey, ChE, Nov, 16 



health, 4; financial, 2; change of 
preparation for curriculum, 1; en- 






THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 



JT Jt\ v*» U JLi 1 I 



The Bulletin is published weekly during the College 
Tear ai a means of - making official announcements 
and presenting items of interest to the faculty. All 




VOL. 



36 



Jt> U Xj JLj Jti 1 1 IN 



contributions should be as brief as possible and 
reach Louis H. Bell. Director of Public Information. 
313 Old Main, not later than 10 a. m. each Friday. 



December 6, 1948 



NO. 11 



CHRISTOPHER LYNCH TO OPEN ARTISTS' COURSE SERIES THURSDAY NIGHT 



Christopher Lynoh, Irish tenor, will 
open the Artists' Course series at 8 
o'clock on Thursday night in Schwab 
Audit orium. 

Series tickets priced at $7,50 and 
;$8.70, may be purchased in Room 112, 



Old Main, and on Thursday, single 
tickets for the Lynch concert, priced 
at $4.50 each, may be purchased thsre 
until 5 p.m. From 7 to 8 p.m. on 
Thursday, the single tickets will be 
on sal<=> at the Student Union Office, 
Old Main. 



STUDENT-FACULTY DIRECTORY PUBLISHED 



The 1948-49 Student-Faculty Direc- 
tory has been published and distribution 
has been made to campus offices. 

As deliveries are made, the Direc~ 
tory is placed on sale for students and 



for faculty members desiring additional 
copies. Priced at 25 cents, the book may 
be purchased at the Office of the Recorder, 
109 Old Main, or at Keeler's Book Store 
or the Athletic Store. 



CHAPEL CHOIR TO PRESENT CHORAL SERVICE SATURDAY NIGHT f SUNDAY MORNING 



The Chapel Choir will present its 
first Midnight Service at 11 o'clock on 
Saturday night. 

Besides the traditional Christmas 
selections, the musical program will in- 
clude the Bach Cantata, For Unto Us A 
Child Is Born." 



The same program will be repeated 
at the 11 o'clock chapel hour on Sunday 
morning , 

The choir is under the direction of 
Willa W, Taylor, associate professor if 
music education, and George E, Ceiga, 
assistant professor of music, will aocom- 
pany the choir at the organ* 



LIBRARY HOURS DURING CHRISTMAS RECESS ANNOUNCED 



The following hours will be observed 
by the Central Library during the Christ- 
mas holiday s : 

Saturday, December 18, 7:50 a,m. to 
5 p.m. | Sunday, Deoember 19, closed; 
Monday, December 20 through Thursday, 



December 23, 9 a.m. to 5 p»m«; Friday, 
December 24 through Sunday, December 25, 
closed; Monday, December 27 through Fri- 
day, December 31, 9 a,m, to 5 p.m.; and 
Saturday, January 1 and Sunday, January 2, 
clo sed. 



"FIFTY BOOKS OF THE YEAR" IN LIBRARY EXHIBIT 



The 28th annual exhibition of the 
"Fifty Books of the Year" is now on dis- 
play at the College Library and will con- 
tinue until December 27. 

The exhibition represents a selec- 
tion of outstanding work in American book 
design and production during 1947 and 
was selected by a jury from over 700 
titles submitted in response to the 
Iiis-hit ate • s Call for Books, 



Books of many different types are' 
represented. In- choosing the "Fifty 
Books" the jury considered covers, choice 
of paper and type, use of color and 
illustrations, register and impression, 
design, artistic conception and cohesion, 
fitness for the book's intended use, and 
the designer's success in meeting problems 
of manufacture and those presented by the 
book's editorial content, 



.■ 






SIGMA PI SIGMA TO RECEIVE DP, HENRY A. BARTON, PHYSICIST 



Dr. Henry A. Barton, director of the 
American Institute of Physics, will be 
received as an honorary member into the 
Penn State chapter of Sigma Pi Sigma, 
physics honor sooiety, at a dinner Tues- 
day nighto 



At 4:20 p.m. Tuesday, Dr. Barton 
will discuss the organization and work of 
the American Institute of Physics at the 
Physics Colloquium in Room 117 ^ Osmond 
Laboratory , 



MINUTES OF THE SENATE MEETING OF DECEMBER 2, 1948 



The College S e nate met at 4:10 p.m. 
on December 2, 1948 in Room 121 Sparks 
Building, Mr. A.C. Morse presidingi The 
list of members present is on file in the 
Office of the Registrar, The minutes of 
the special meeting were not read since 
they had been published in the Faculty 
Bulletin for November 22, 1948. 

Under the heading of reports from 
standing committees, Prof. Beede, chairman 
cf the Committee on Academic Standards, 
read the following memorandum of an ac - 
tion taken by the committee,*: 

It was voted that the Committee 
should go on record before the S e nate as 
favoring such action by the College as 
would guarantee a minimum of 15 weeks of 
actual instruction in each semester of 
the academic year, not only to maintain 
high academic standards but also in order 
that The Pennsylvania State College may 
not suffer invalidation by the accredi- 
ting agencies. 

This statement required no action 
but is included herewith in the record* 
The report of the committee is on file in 
the Office of the Registrar. 

Pr^f, E.W. Callenbach, chairman rf 
the Committee on Calendar, presented a 
report in the nature of an amendment to 
the report as presented at the November 4 
meeting of the Senate, The amendment in- 
cluded the calendar, amendments to the 
By-Laws of the Senate to become effective 
at the opening of the academic year 
1949-1950 as follows: 

a. Change Article II, Section 1 ( j ) 
on page 7 of the 1948-49 edition to in- 
clude the College Scheduling Officer and 
Director of Summer Sessions as ex • fi"3tvi-o 
members of the Senate Committee on 
Calendar. 

b. Change Article II, Section 3 (j) 
on page 9 of the 1948-49 edition to read 
"March meeting" instead of "December meet- 
ing." 

and the following statement : 

Effective with adoption of this re- 
port, extensions of the College Calendar 
eaoh Spring shall be such that two 
aoademic years and three summer sessions 



are "on schedule" as of any June l c 

Prof, Callenbach also read a letter 
from the Editor of the daily Collegian in 
connection with a request for a holiday 
on the date of national elections. The 
report of the committee, as presented on 
November 4, was removed from the table and 
Prof f Callenbaoh's motion for the adoption 
of the amendment was seconded and adopted. 
The Senate then voted to adopt the entire 
report of the Committee on Calendar as 
amended, it being noted that this included 
the adoption of two changes in the By- 
Laws of the Senate, The complete report 
of the Committee on Calendar is on file in 
the Office of the Registrar. The arcSnded 
calendar as adopted follows these minutes, 
(Editor's Note: Copy of the calendar is 
published in an enclosure with this issue 
of the Faculty Bulletin) 

Mr. Morse then spoke a word of ap- 
preciation of the great amount of work 
done by the committee in the preparatian 
of this calendar and for the Senate's 
co-operation as evidenced by attendance 
at the special meeting on November 18, 

Prof, Wm. Werner, chairman of the 
Special Committee on the revision of the 
Academic Servioe Report, presented an 
amendment to the report as submitted at 
the meeting of the S e nate on November 4, 
The report was removed from the table and 
a motion to adopt the report was made and 
adopted. After some discussion, an amend- 
ment t o t he amendment eliminating the 
following words from the amendment was 
pre sent e d . 

(2) Add on page 1 of proposed form: 
"Filling out this form is optional with 
faculty members, though it will serve the 
hest interest of the staff and the College 
if all forms are filled out and are avail- 
able for reference. 

The amendment to the amendment pre- 
vailed. The Senate then voted on the 
amendment as presented by Prof. Werner 
which in turn was adopted. The entire re- 
port as amended was then voted upon and 
adopted. Prof. Werner asked that the com- 
mittee be not discharged in order that it 
might continue with the preparation of the 
actual printed form whioh might involve 
slight changes in phrasing and would cer- 
tainly involve changes in spacing. The 



Chair agreed to continue the committee « 
The report of the Special Committee on 
Academic S e rvice Reports is on file in 
the Offioe of the Registrar, 

Under the heading of old business 
Prof, C.E. Bullinger, chairman of the 
Committee on Courses of Study, moved that 



the report of his committee as submitted 
at the November 4 meeting be removed 
from the table and adopted. The motion 
prevailed after which the S s nate Adjour- 
ned* 

Win, S, Hoffman 
Secretary 



OF GENERAL INTEREST 



LIBERAL ARTS FACULTY: Faculty of the 
School of the Liberal Arts will meet at 
4:10 p.m. on Thursday in Room 121, 
Spark3 Building, '. 

* * + 

COURSES OF STUDY COMMITTEE: The Senate . 
Courses of Study Committee will meet on 
Thursday, December 16, at 10 a.m. In 
Room 207, Engineering "C". 

* * * 

COLLOQUIUM: Lawrence Perez and Louis 
Berger, both of the department of civil 
engineering, will speak on "Applications 
of Aerial photography to Engineering 
Problems" at the Engineering Colloquium 
tc be held at 4:15 p.m. Thursday in Room 
1, Main Engineering Building. 

* * * 

PHILOSOPHY SEMINAR: L.L. Eidemiller, 
instructor in philosophy, will discuss 
"Psychoanalysis and Humane Value" at the 
Philosophy Seminar at 3:30 p.m. Tuesday, 
December 14, in Room 5, Central Library. 

* * ♦ 

LUNCHEON CLUB: A program of Christmas 
music has been arranged for the Faculty 
Luncheon Club meeting on Monday, Decem- 
ber 13* 

* » * 

BENEFIT: Mark Y/einbaurn, editor of a 
Russian language newspaper in New Y rk 
who made secret arrangement for Anna 
Kasinkina, Russian schoolteacher, to 
escape from Soviet control, will speak 
at 8 p„m, on Wednesday, December 15, in 
Schwab Auditorium. His subject will be: 
"Are the People Behind the Soviet Regime?" 
Tickets are available for a donation at 
Room 132 Sparks Building. Proceeds will 
be contributed to a fund to establish 
the Orthodox Greek Catholic church for 
Penn State students and faculty members, 

* * * 

CIVIL SERVICE EXAMS: Faculty members are 
requested to bring to the attention of 
all seniors the announemment of the U.S. 
Civil Service Commission examinations 
for the positions of Junior Professional 
Assistants and Junior Management Assis- 
tants, Application must be made before 
December 21, Students graduating in 1949 
will not have another opportunity to take 
the examinations. Detailed information 
is available at the College Placement 
Service, 2 04 Old Main, 

» * * 

TOWN MEETING: Final session in the cur- 
renh series of Town Meetings sponsored by 
the Hillfil Fo-virLd.at-j.on.-wi.il be held at 



133 W. Beaver Ave, at 8 o'clock on Sunday 
night. Subject will be: "What Is the 
Russian Challenge --How Can We Meet 



It V 



Russian Challenge— —How . 
Speakers are Dr. Walter Coutu, professor 
of sociology; Vaclav Mares, assistant 
professor of economics; and.Dr, A,G, 

associate professor of European 



Pundt , a 



history. Rabbi Benjamin Kahn, lecturer 
in Hebrew, will serve as moderator, 

* * * 

TO BE INITIATED: Elon Borton, of New 
York, president of the Advertising Federa- 
tion of America, will be initiated as a 
professional member of the Penn State 
chapter of Alpha Delta Sigma, professional 
advertising fraternity, on Sunday night, 
C.L. Fountain, advertising director of 
the Lancaster (Pa.) Newspapers and head 
of the advertising division of the Pennsyl- 
vania Newspaper Publishers' Association 
and 13 undergraduates also will be initia- 
ted, 

» * * 

HONORED: William S, Hoffman, Dean of Ad- 
missions and Registrar, was among three 
retiring registrars honored last week at 
the meeting of the Middle States Associa- 
tion of Collegiate Registrars. He will 
retire February 28, 

+ * * 

TO SPEAK: Dr. Paul D. Krynine, professor 
of petrology and chief of the division of 
mineralogy, will address the New York 
Academy of Sciences on Monday on "The 
Origin of Red Rocks," Dr. T.F. Bates, 
assistant professor of mineralogy, will 
address the Academy on January 3, on 
"Geologic Research with the Electron 
Micro s cope . " 

* * * 

ELECTED: Ruth E. Graham, professor of 
home economics, was elected for a two— year 
term as secretary of the main planning com- 
mittee at the Conference of Eastern Col- 
lege Clothing Teachers in New Y rk,.N.Y, 
last xveek. She also was requested to 
compile and prepare the mimeographed re- 
port of the recent conference, 

* * * 

VISIT COLLEGE: M.C. Gerson, head of the 
electromagnetic section of the Geophysical 
Research Division, U.S. Air Force, Cam*- 
bridge, Mass., accompanied by Dr, W» 
Pfister, now en his staff, visited the 
College recently. Dr. A.H. Way nick and 
Ernest Axman, both of the department of 
electrical engineering, conducted the 
visitors on a tour of the Watson projects. 



WITTS MEDAL: Dr# G e orge F. Johnson, pro- 
fessor of agricultural extension, was 
named a silver medal winner by the 
Chicago Color Canera Club for his color 
picture showing a snow scene at a farm 
entrance near Pine Grove Mills. Last 
Wednesday, Dr. Johnson addressed the 
Chicago Club on "Adventures in Rural 

Color Photography. 

* * * 

ALL COUNTIES REPRESENTED: All of 
Pennsylvania's 67 counties are repre- 
sented in this year's enrollment of 
9800 students. 

* * * 

SLIDES EXHIBITED: Four color slides 
taken by Robert S. Beese, assistant in 
agricultural photography, have been 
accepted for international exhibits. 
Two. slides, "Old Main Winter" and 
"Chicken Inspector" were accepted by 
the 17th International Color Slide 
exhibit in Minneapolis. Two other 
slides were shown in the recent Chicago 
exhibit. One of the slides, "Golden 
Years of Life," received honorable 

ment ion . 

* * * 

ON STAFF: Dr. A.J.G. Maw, professor of 
poultry husbandry, served on the staff 
for the annual P ultry Breeders school 
held recently at the University of 
Ma s s a chu sett s . 

» + * 

PRESENTS PAPER: Harold A, Everett, 
professor emeritus of mechanical engi- 
neering, presented a -paper on Wednesday 
before the Society of Mechanical Engi- 
neers in New Y rk, It was titled, 
"Construction of a Temperature Entrophy 
Diagram for Air and Its Application to 
Explosive Combination Studies," 



campus were Dr. Paul Ferrero, director 
of research, and Dr , Michel Fourez, his 
assistant, of the Societe Carbochimique f 
at Tertre, Belgium. They are studying 
methods of producing coal products and 
while here-met with members of the School 
of Chemistry and Physics, including the 
Petroleum Refining Laboratory, 

* * * 

TURKEY JUDGE; Harry H. Kauffman, profes- 
sor of poultry husbandry extension, 
judged the Far West Turkey Show at Tur— 
lock, California, last week. He also will 
attend the Roseburg Turkey Show in Oregon 
on December 7, 

* * * 

ON COMMITTEE: Dr. John 0, Almquist, as- 
sociate professor of dairy husbandry, 
served on a nutrition sub-committee of the 
Northeastern Regional Research project 
on dairy cattle breeding. The committee 
met recently at Cornell University, 

* + * 

GIVE TALKS: F.J. Dean, professor of 
dairy manufacture, recently gave two 
talks to Dairy Short Course Manufacturing 
students at the University of Georgia, 
He also conducted a "Milk duality Clinic" 
for Georgia distributors, 

* * * 

TEACHER EXAMINATIONS: Application for 
participation in the National Teachers 
Examinations must be submitted by January 
22, The examinations will be administered 
on February 19 and 26, Additional infor- 
mation is available in Room 109, Burrowes 
Building, 

* * * 

INTER-LIBRARY LOANS: Due to conge s- 
tlen in the mails, I n t er- Library 
Loans will be suspended from December 
4 to 29. 



VISITORS 



Two recent visitors to the 



OFFICIAL ANNOJNCEMENTS FROM THE OFFICE OF THE DEAN OF ADMISSIONS 

Wit hdrawal s : 



Adams, George Thomas, AgEg, Nov, 30 
Bleecker, Harry John, TS , Dec, 1 
Bluhm, Henry, PNG, Nov. 23 
Hummel, Merrit Jacib, Phys, D e c. 1 
Lawson, Lynn Francis, ME, Dec, 1 
Leiter, Emerson Challes, ME, Dec. 1 
McGill, Thomas Charles, ME, Nov. 5 
McMaster , 'Orin M. , PNG, Dec. 1 



4 

Sp 

3 

4 

3 

4 

4 



Madenfcrt, James Lee, MEd, Oct. 27 
Madill, Thomas J seph, PEd, N©v« 22 
Paul, Thomas Jr., LD , Dec, 1 
Robertson, W. Laird, LD, Nov. 11 
Schaeffer, Ellwood Edward, Psy, Nov. 30 
Widdoss, Lorraine Nathalie, Bact, No v. 24 
Wiseman, Howard Fleming, For, Dec. 2 



Reasons for Withdrawal: Financial, 4; personal, 3; illness, 2; to attend other 
schools, 2; to accept another position, 1; poor scholarship, lj return to Army, 1; 
not satisfied with curriculum, 1, 

Official charge of name 

Fa^ora Wan>-pe.i Pauline Chang" to Wan-pei Chang Tsu — by marriage. 

(The abave person is enrelled as a graduate student ) 



COLLEGE CALENDAR 



September 21, .1949 to August 31, 1951 



1949 
Sept. 21, Wed, 
Sept, 26-27, Moru&Tues, 
Sept, 28, Wed., . 
Nov, 22, Tues, 
Nov, 23, Wed. 
Nov, 28, Mon, 
Dec, 20, Tues. . 

1950 



Jan., 


4, 


Wed, 




Jan, 


4, 


Wed, 




Jan, 


28, 


Sat, 




Jan . 


30, 


Mon. 




Feb. 


7, 


Tues , 




Feb. 


7, 


Tues . 




Feb. 


10- 


11, Fri 


,&Sat 


Feb. 


13, 


Mon. 




Feb. 


28, 


Tues, 





April 4, Tues, 
Apr i 1: 11, Tues , 
April 13, Thurs. 
May 30, Tues. 
June 1, Thurs. 



June 


2, Fr i . 


June 


10, Sat. 


June 


11, Sun. 


June 


12, Mon. 


June 


,13., Tues, 


June 


13, Tues. 


June 


30, Fri. 


July 


4, Tues. 


July 


5, Wed. 


July 


6, Thurs. 


July 


22, Sat, 


July 


(C /C • O C* L ^ 


July 


24, Mon. 



Aug, 11, Fri, 

Aug. 12, Sat, 

Aug, 14, Mon, 

Aug. 14, Mon. 

Sept, 2, Sat. 

Sept, 2, Sat. 
-"--'s-First Semester 
selection. 



First Semester 1949-50 
Orientation Week begins 
First Semester registration 
•"--"-First Semester classes begin 8 a.m. 
Mid-Semester below grade reports due' 
Thanksgiving Recess begins 11;50 a.m 
Thanksgiving Recess ends 8 a.m. 
Christmas Recess begins 5 p.m. 



Christmas Recess ends 1:10 p.m. 

Short Courses in Agriculture begin 1:10 p.m. 

First Semester classes end 5 p.m. 

First Semester examinations begin 8 a.m. 

First Semester ends 5 p.m. 

First Semester Graduateon Exercises 

Second Semester 1949-50 
Second Semester registration 
Second Semester classes begin 
Short Courses in Agriculture end 
Spring Recess begins 5 p.m. 
Spring Recess ends 8 a.m. 
Mid-Semester below grade reports due 
Memorial Day Recess 
Second Semester classes end 5 p.m. 
Second Semester examinations begin 8 a.m. 
Second Semester ends 5 p.m. 
Baccalaureate Day, Class Day 
Commencement Day 

Summer Program 1950 
Registration for Inter-Session and First 

6-weeks Science Session in a.m. 
Inter-Session and First 6-weeks Science 

Session classes begin 1:20 p.m. 
Inter-Session ends 5:50 p.m. 
Independence Day Recess 
Registration for Main Summer Session 
Main Summer Session classes begin 8 a.m. 
First 6-weeks Science Session ends 5:50 p.m. 
Registration for Second 6-weeks Science Session 
Second 6-weeks Science Session classes begin 

8 a.m. 
Main Summer Session ends 5:50 p.m. 
Main Summer Session Graduation Exercises 
Registration for 3-weeks Post-Session in a.m. 
3-weeks Post-Session classes begin 1:20 p.m. 
Second 6-weeks Science Session and 3-weeks 

Post-Seasion ends 5:50 p.m. 
Second Summer Program Graduation Exercises 
One football Saturday half holiday by student 



1950 
Sept. 13, Wed. 
Sept. 18-19, Mon.&Tucs 
Sept. 20, Wed. 
Nov. 14, Tues. 
Nov, 29, Wed. 
Dec, 4, Mon, 
Dec. 19, Tues, 

1951 



Jan, 3, Wed. 
Jan. 3, We d 
Jan, 18, Thurs. 
Jan. 19, Frio 
Jan. 27, Sat. 
Jan, 27 , Sat, 

Feb,, 6-7, Tues.&Wed. 
Feb* 8, Thurs, 
Feb, 27, Tues. 
Ma r * 21, Wed* 
Mar. 28, Wed. 
April 10, Tues. 
May 29, Tues, 
May 30, Wed, 
May 31, Thurs, 
June 8, Fri. 
June 10, Sun. 
June 11, Mon. 



June 12, Tues 
June 12, Tues 
June 29, Fri, 
July 2 , Mo n , 
July 3, Tues 



July 4, Wed. 



Aug • 
Aug, 
Aug, 
Aug. 
Aug, 



10, 

11, 
13, 

13, 

31, 



Fri • 

Sato 
Mon. 
Mon, 
Fri • 



First Semester 1950-51 
Orientation Week begins 
First Semester registration 
:-First Semester classes begin 8 a.m. 
Mid-Semester below grade reports due 
Thanksgiving Recess begins 1 1 s 50 a.m. 
Thanksgiving Recess ends 8 a.m. 
Christmas Recess begins 5 p.m. 



Christmas Recess ends 1:10 p.iru 

Short Courses in Agriculture begin Is 10 p.m. 

First Semester classes end 5 p.m. 

First Semester examinations begin 8 a.m. 

First Semester ends 5 p.m. 

First Semester Graduation Exercises 

Second Semester 1950-51 
Second Semester registration 
Second Semester classes begin 
Short Courses in Agriculture end 
Spring Recess begins 5 p.m. 
Spring Recess ends 8 a.m. 
Mid-Semester below grade reports due 
Second Semester classes end 5 p.m. 
Memorial Day Recess 

Second Semester examinations begin 8 a.m. 
Second Semester ends 5 p.m. 
Baccalaureate Day, Class Day 
Commencement Day 

S umm e r Program 1951 
Registration for Intcr-Scssi on ijn a.m. 
Inter-Session classes begin 1:20 p.m. 
Inter-Session ends 

Registration for Main Summer Session 
Main Summer Session classes begin 8 a.m. 
Independence Day Recess 
Main Summer Session ends 5:50 p.m. 
Main Summer Session Graduation Exercises 
Registration for Post-Session in a m* 
Post-Session classes begin 1:20 p.m. 
Post-Session ends 5:50 p.m. 



-)R:-First Semester — One football Saturday half holiday by student 
selccti on. 






THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 

FACULTY MmI BULLETIN 




The Bulletin is published weekly during the College 
year as a means of making official announcements 
and presenting items of interest to the faculty. All 



contributions should be as brief as possible and 
reach Louis H. Bell, Director of Public Information, 
313 Old Main, not later than 10 a. m. each Friday. 



VOL. 36 



December '13, 1948 



NO. .12 








TO & llj " 



- 






DR. C.O. WILLIAMS NAMED ASSISTANT DEAN OF ADMISSIONS AND COLLEGE EXAMINER 



Dr. CO, Williams, professor of 
education and director of education ex- 
tension, has been named Assistant Dean 
of Admission and Cellege Examiner, effec- 
tive March 1, 

The Executive Committee of the Bo?~d 
of Trustees on December 3 also named 
Dr. Carl E. Marquardt, College Examiner, 
Assistant Dean of Admissions and Cellege 
Examiner, effective December 1, He will 
retire on February 28, 

Retirements of Dr. Earle I. Wilde, 
professor of ornamental horticulture^ 
effective December 31, and of L.A. 
Doggett, professor cf electrical engi- 
neering, effective January 31, were ap- 
proved. Dr. Wilde has been on the fac- 
ulty since 1912 and Doggett since 1923* 
Both will retire with emeritus rank* 

The appointment of Dr. Ward M. 
Sharp, biologist and ecologist with the 
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, as pro- 
fessor of wildlife management, also was 
approved, effective October 1»_ 

Resignations approved include thos° 
of Joseph E. Spagnuolo,' associate profe " — 
sor of architectural engineering, ef- 
fective January 31; Dr.- Sylvain J* Pir — 
son, professor of 'geophysics and chief rf 
the division of geophysics : an d geochemis- 
try, effective December 31; Dr. Donald W#. 
McKinstry, associate professor of bac- 
teriology, effective November 15; Harold' 
Kopel, associate specialist in motion 
picture production, effective November 30: 
and Dr. Leon W# Camp, associate profes- 
sor cf engineering research in the Ord- 
nance Research Laboratory* 

Promotions approved included those 
of Dr. W.R, Mills, from assistant pro- 
fessor to associate professsr of plant •• 
pathology; Dr. Robert R, Murphy, from 
assooiate professor to professor of . ; 
,poultry husbandry; and Pauline G. Hoke, 
from assistant home economics extension ' 
representative to home economics exten- 
sion representative. : ; 

Dr. H,A. Wahl, associate professor 
of botany, was granted a leave of ab- 
sence for 6 months beginning February 1 
to carry on a co-operative project with 
the University of Pennsylvania on the 



flora of Pennsylvania. 

Sabbatical leaves we 
K.J, DeJ^hasz, professor 
research, November 1 tr F 
Donald W, Davis, prof esso 
and John E. Nicholas, pro 
cultural engineering, bot 
ter, 1948-49; Franklin C. 
sor and head of the depar 
lism, and A. 3, Cloetingh, 
dramatics, both for 1st s 
and Catherine Holland, ho 
extension representative, 
July 31, 



re approved for 
cf engineering 
ebruary 28; 
r of journalism, 
fessor of agri- 
h for 2d seme s-r- r 

Banner, profes— 
tment of journa- 

professor of 
erne st er, 1949-50; 
me economics 

February 1 t o 



The Trustees also accepted a gift 
of 50- shares of General Motors common 
stock, valued at more than $3,000 # which 
will be added to the principal of the 
Ethel and Bayard Kunkle Loan Fund. 

The gift was made by Bayard D. Kun- 
kle, class of 1907, who is a member of 
the' Board of Directors of the General 
Motors Corp. and vice-president and group 
executive in charge of .overseas and 
Canadian operations for the corporation. 
The fund. was established in 1946 and the 
principal, prior to his latest gift of 
50 shares, amounted to $22,670. Loans 
fr<->m the fund are available to married 
veterans meeting certain requirements. 

An agreement with the Dow Corning 
Corporation provides a..grant of $8,000 
for research on organo silicons while a 
grant of $4,000 from Sharpe and Dohme Co. 
provides for a fellowship for research on 
the microbiological synthesis of Vitamin 
3?12* Dr. Leo Sommer, assistant professor 
cf chemistry, will direct the organosili- 
con work while Dr. John C. Garey, asso- 
ciate professor of bacter iology^ will 
supervise the '■other project, 
'. . «An agree'ment with the Autcr^tive 
Safety* Foundation for the continuation of 
the Motor Vehicle Fleiet Supervisor Training 
pr.ogran' was renewed. _ i'he contraot provides 
for a grant. of $10,000 from the Foundation 
and additional grants from other organisa- 
tions, whici will be submitted for approval 
a3 received. The w^rk is conducted by the 
Institute of Public Safety.' " r - 

Two -.contracts with The Texas Co. also 
wore renaw«d for one year. They provide 
for research in the School of Engineering 
on grease lubrication and cutting oil. 



CHRISTMAS CATiOh'SIWG TO BE HELD THURSDAY NIGHT 



The annual Christmas carol sing will 
be held on the front steps of Old Main 
at 8 o'clock on Thur.s.day night. 



Words for the 
ted on a screen. 



carols will be projec- 
Special music, in- 



cluding a. brass quartet, will be pro- 



vided by students in music. 

The traditional sing is sponsored 
by the P-enn State Christian Association, 
the department of music, and the depart- 
ment of the .physical plant. 



DR. .GRACE -M*- -HENDERSON NAMED -DE. 



SCHOOL OF HOME ECONOMICS 



Dr » Grace M^ Henderson, director ef 
.home' economics since 1946 , has be 'en named 
dean of the School of Home Economics, 
.The appointment is effective on January 
1, the date of the establishment of the 
new School, 



The Board of 
the appointment of 
as assistant dean 
Economics in charg 
tion and professor 
relationships; and 
ger, as assistant 
Home Economics in 
vices and of the b 
professor of home 



Trustees also approved 

Dr. Helen R. LeBaron 
of .the School of Home 
e of resident instruo— 
of home -community 
Delpha E. Wiesendan- 
dean of the School of 
charge of field ser- 
uilding, and associate . 
management and housingo 



Departments and their heads are: 



Child Development and Family Relation- 
ships, Dr. Winona L. Morgan; Clothing 
and Textiles, Ruth E. Graham; Foods and 
Nutrition, Elisabeth W„W, Dye; Home 
Management, Housing, and Art, Miss 
Wle sendanger , acting head; Home Economics 
Education, Dr. Jean D, Amberson; and 
Hotel -and Institution Administration, 
Eother~A, Atkinson. Dr. Mary L. Dodds 
■will serve as acting head of the depart- 
ment of foods and nutrition while Mrs. 
Dye is on leave • 

Divisions and their heads are: 
Heme Art, Amy G. Gardner.; Home— Communit y 
Relationships, Dr. LeBaron; Home Manage- 
ment, Family Economics, .Housing, and 
Home Equipment, Miss Wie sendanger ; and 
Commercial Consumer Services, Mary Brown 
■ AUgood. 



CHRISTMAS RECESS BEGINS ON SATURDAY 



Christmas recess will begin at 11 j50 
a.m., Saturday and continue until 8 a ,m c 
en Monday, January 3 e 

Administrative offices at the Col- 
lege will close at 5 p.m. Wednesday, ■ 
Beoeraber "22 end open on, Tuesday mourning, 
December 28, They alao will be closed 
on January 1 for New Year's Day, 




Sunday, 



GERMAN CHRIS TMAS SING AT 7' P.M. TUESDAY 



The 19th annual G e rman Christmas 
sing, sponsored by the department of 
German, will be held at 7 p.m. Tuesday 
in Schwab Audit or ium e 

The audience will 'sing the carols, 
n D du frohliche, o du 'seelige," "O, .„ 
Tannenbaum, Tannenbaum," and "Stille 
Nacht, heilige Nacht." 

Dr. Albert F, Buffington, asso- 
ciate professor of Germa'n, will give, a 
talk, ''The -Visit of the" Bel snickel."". .'. 



The organ prelude and postlude will 
be played by G e orge Eo.Ceiga, assistant 
professor of music, while vocal, solos and 
a duet will be';, sung by Jacqueline Heckert 
and Maynard Hill, accompanied by Paul 
Margolf . ' Alan Buechner, accompanied by 
■C'lyde Shive, will' play a violin solo. 

George J, Wurfl, professor emeritus 
of German and founder of v the annual pro- 
gram, will conduct the sing. He will 
read a Biblical account of the Nativity, 



, ^ * 



ONLY STUDENTS ADMITTED TO -INDOOR SPORTS EVENTS 



For the second straight year, only 
students will be admitted to Recreation 
Building for indoor sports events during 
the coming w inter. 

The Athletic Advisory Board re- 
affirmed its policy of a year ago o'n the 
grounds that the student enrollment is 
larger than it wa s a year ago and there 
has been nochange in the capacity of 

SUGGEST INVITING A FOREIGN 
Faculty, and staff members whe would 
like to invite a foreign student to- 
share their Christmas dinner, are asked 
to call Mrs, Margery Yougel at the 
Christian Association (ext. 194) or any 
of the following f a an It y— student commit— 



Recreation Building. Campus enrollment 
e-x*ceeds 9800 while the building holds 
'only 600*0 spectators. 

The only exception to this rule will 
be on Saturday night when faculty, staff 
members, and townspeople will be admitted 
with aut • charge to the Penn State — Washing" 
'ton and Jefferson basketball game which 
begins at 8 p.m. 

STUDENT FOR. CHRISTMAS DINNER 

tee members arranging the invitations: 
Dr. William H. Gray, co-chairman; 
'De'an Frank D <. Kern, Dr. Anna 0. Stephens, 
Charles A. Oerkvitz, co-chairman; John 
Kochalka, Jr.; and William H e Schminkey# 



_ 



BEAVER FIELD SEATING CAPACITY TO BE INCREASED' 



Beaver Field seating oapac : :y 
•will he more than doubled by new ocr- 
struction expected to "be completed 1c- 
fore the 1949 season. 




st 

72 . 

West stands at the 

seating capacity will be increased from 

14,77*; to 28,O0«. Temporary staa&s 



at the south end can accommodate 2,000 
more people* 

A new, double-decked, all— steel 
press box in which will be included all 
the newest features for newspaper, 
radio, and photographic c-everage of heme 
football games, will be built to the rear 
of the West Stands, Removal ef the 
present press box will free 250 top row 
mid-field seats. 



OF GENERAL INTEREST 



SENATE: Tho College Senate will meet 
at 4:10 p.m. nn Thursday, January 6 , i\i 
Ronm 121, Sparks Building, 

* • • 

COURSES OF STUDY COMMITTEE'S The Senate 
bourses of Study Committee will mset at 
10 a.m, Thursday in Room 207, Engineer- 
ing "C". 

* » * 

AGRICULTURE FACULTY: The faculty ■ «. the 
School of Agriculture will meet at *-, : 1 j 
?,m, Friday in Room 109, Agriru ltur<; 
Building, 

* • * 
WOMEN'S CLUB: The newly-organized 
Faculty Women's Club will meet at H p,m, 
Tuesday in Room 316, Sparks Building* 
Officers will be elected, 

e « » 

AIEE-IRE: The Centre Ceuaty aecticr wf 
the AIEE-IRE will meet at 7*i30 p.m. 
Tuesday in Rocra 219, Electrical Eng noer- 
ing Building, H,H, Henliwe, Rerret-ry 
*f the American. Institute ©f Electrical 
Engineers, will apeak ou "Organizat : e n of 
&n Engineering Seeiety," Dr. Eric A* 
Ts-lker, head of the department of 
electrical engineering and director of 
the Ordnance Research LaVo'ratory, will 
discuss "A Polar Vector Indicator," 

* * • 

•U.UW: Foreign students will be guests 
?f the American Association of Un.iver*' 
?ity Women at 8 o'clock on Thursday 
night at the State College high school. 
Eight foreign students will participate 
in a panel discussion, comparing their 
preconceived impressions of the United 
States with their present impressions* 
pr, Kent Fe.rster, associate professor of 
"rXntcry, will >e moderator* 

* * • 

±SM: J, p. Gill* chief metallurgist-* 
V^aadium-Alloys Steel Co., Latrobe* will 
Speak on "New Developments in T©*1 
Steels" befere the Penn State *hapter *f 
t'he American Society for Metals at f 
P*clock on Tuesday night. The meetizg 
will be held in the Mineral Industries 
Art Oallery and is open, to the public* 
Gill, a past-president of the Society, is 
wi.d«vl.y— V"ii»-wri as an author and lecturer in 
the field of -WcO and spcni^il steels. 



CAPS AND GOWNS j Graduate -students who 
are candidates for degrees at the January 
31 Commencement Exercises, should order 
raps, gowns, and hnrds at the Athletic 
Store before January 10, 

• * » 

PHILOSOPHY SEMINAR: The Philosophy 
Seminar will meet at 3:30 p,m. Tuesday in 
R*om 5, Central Library, L,L, Eidemiller, 
instructor ir. philosophy, will diseuss 
"Psychoanalysis and Human Value." 

• * * 

WcRLD FEDERALIST MEETING: Julia L. 
Maietta, who was the Democratic candidate 
fir Congress from the 23d district, will 
r.-ldre ss the World Federalist meeting at 
3 h 'clock on Thursday night at the Hillel 
Foundation Auditorium, Her subject will 
be "A Congressional Candidate Looks at 
World C-evernment," 

• * * 

FAMOUS FILMS; Greta Garbe's version ef 
Eugene O'Neill's play, "Anna Christie," 
will h? presented at 7 o'clock Wednesday 
iight in Room 121, Sparks F-eilding as a 
part of the Dramatics 61 course* Seats 
also are available for interested faculty 
or staff members, 

• ♦• 

CENTER STAGEi The Player's production of 
"Ten Nights in a' Barre-em" at Center Stage 
will continue through January, Faculty 
groups may buy out Friday houses f*r the 
wr "k-ends of January 7 and 8, 14 and 15, 
and 21 and 22* 

• • • 

NEW' HONORARY : A rhapter of Keramos, 
national honorary and professional cera- 
mics fraternity, was installed here. 
Members initiated into the chapter include 
R.W. Rowland, trustee of the College, 
honorary; Dr. E'dward S+eidle, dean of the 
Scheel of Miaeral Industries, Dr, E.C, 
Henry, chief of the division of ceramics, 
and Dr. W.H. Earhart , assistant professor 
of ceramics, faculty members} and 18 
student s * 

• * • 

PUBLISHES BOOK: "Scavenging of Two-Stroke 
fycle Diesel Engines," a book by Dr. Paul 
H, Schweitzer, professor of engineering 
re sp arch, new is on the cress of the 
Macmillar. Co,, New Y r rk ," N,Y, 



PERSONNEL CHANGES 



The following personnel changes, approved during the period October 2 to 
December 3> are announced. Telephone extension numbers are listed for new appointees 



Re signat ions ; 

Victor Gilpin 
Richard F, W a tt 
John P# Herring 
Frank P Defina 
Howard M, J nes 
Stephen T« Rollins 
Helen Dossenbach 
Herman L, Fink 
Franklin M, Cunlap 
Myron T, Kozary 
John R« Reitz 
E* Richard Booser 
George E. Cuff 
Joseph B» Simpson 
Robert T. Grazier 
Curtis C, Norbeck 
Mary T# Pickering 
Dorothy Bo Jones 
Grace C. Pharr 
Franklin W. Hoy 
Martin L, Ziegler 
Helen Ke Coore 
Marjorie Frey 
Shirley A. Moss 
Sylvia F, Wotdward 
Barbara T e nant 
Jeanne Morgan 
Elizabeth Dj Reeher 
Caroline M* Smiley 
Margaret K» Culbertson 
Kathryn Ketterer 
Theresa Dunst 
H'*pe Go Allison 
Alice Louise Dry 
Rut h II » McC 1 e e st e r 
Beverly D» Long 
Jane Rhine smith 
Mary Jane Shore 
Phyllis J» Henshaw 
Harriet Stitzer 
Phyllis M, Kaiser 
Kathryn A» Beringer 
Ethel Corl Strouse 
Lois Leininger 
Jane s F , Crater 
Melvin T« McMahon 
Chalmers D. McMahon 
Francis L* Smith 
William G« Thompson 
Jacob Lohr 
Edna Heeraan 
Julia Bonchack 
Phyllis Frazier 
Bessie Hassinger 
Dorothy Wagner 
Earle C« Pace 
Irvin Zaleski 
Kenneth W, Lambert 
Elmer Etters 
Gerald 0» Newman 
Merrill E» H user 
John M, Marshall 
James C » Bonson 
Harry Do Gill 



Instructor - Chemistry 

Instructor - Forestry 

Instructor - Petroleum Refining Laboratory 

Instructor — Central Extension 

Instructor - Central Extension 

Instructor — Physical Education & -Athletics 

Instructor - German 

Research Assistant — Chemistry 

Research Assistant — Fuel Technology 

Research Assistant - Geophysics 

Research Assistant - Ordnanoe Research Laboratory 

Research Assistant -Petroleum Refining Laboratory 

Researoh Assistant - Engineering Experiment Station 

Assisbant Administrative Head - Central Extension 

Serials Librarian - Central Library 

Assistant Agricultural Extension Representative 

Home Economics Extension Representative 

Home Economics Extension Representative 

Home Economics Extension Representative 

Assistant - Motion Picture Research 

Assistant - Psychology 

Secretary - Dean's Office - Engineering 

Secretary - D e an of Women's Office 

Secretary — Ordnance Research Laboratory 

Secretary - Physics 

Secretary — Physical Education & Athletics 

Secretary - Education 

Secretary - Romance Languages 

Secretary — Engineering 

Secretary - Chemistry 

Secretary - Central Extension 

Stenographer — physical Education & Athletics 

Stenographer - Forestry 

Stenographer - Central Extension 

Stenographer - Dormitories 

Stenographer - Mineral Industries 

Stenographer - Agricultural & Biological Chemistry 

Clerk - Ordnance Research Laboratory 

Clerk - Agricultural Extension 

Clerk - Bookkeeping 

Clerk-Typist - Central Extension 

Clerk-Typist - Ce'ntral Extension 

Clerk "-Typist - Registrar & Scheduling Office \ 

Clerk-Typist - Property Control 

Janitor - Dormitories '.','.' 

Janitor — Physical Plant 

Janitor - Physical Plant .. ; . 

Janitor - Physical Plant ... 

Janitor - Central Extension 

Dining Commons .Employee 

Dining Commons Employee 

Dining Commons Employee 

Dining Commons Employee 

Dining Commons Employee 

Dining Commons Employee 

Assistant - Ordnance Research Laboratory 

Head. Waiter - Nittany Lion Inn 

Assistant - Ordnance Research Laboratory 

Machinist - Engineering Experiment Station 

Mechanic -Ordnance Research Laboratory' 

Laborer - Dairy Husbandry 

Technical Laborer - Dairy Husbandry 

Technical Laborer - Dairy Husbandry 

Electrician - Physical Plant 



Clarence L» Stoner 
David Gilliland, Jr * 
Harold E. Boyd 
Charlotte S, Lawther 
Maurice Dv Breen 
Paul E.' Pressler : 
Linda D. Koch 
Rubin Waite 
Chester J, Stambrough 
Barbara K. Hartswick 
Lillian Edmonds 
Elizabeth F. Kaufman 
Harriet Jean Lashinsky 
Emily Zimmerman 

Appointment s : 

277J Stuart Pattnn 

Floyd Gahman 

130 Ellis W. Roberts 

Wesley R« Burns 

130 Thomas ■ E, Campbell 

130 . George W. Bierley 

130 Paul R, Hoffman 

283J John E. Linde, Jr. 

2B3J William C. Kennard 

130 John V. Wildeman 

130 Sprague F. Snively 

130 Chester R. Corsen. 

130 Em'il B„ Dandar 

130 Howard W, Crenziger 

130 Waldemar A* Scheyer 

146J J. Robert Wilson 

54J Perry M# Smith 

54J James L. Everett, III 

130 Eugene H«P, Mondeau 

130 Ronald C. Ho skins on 

130 Irene. .Berg 

130 William M. . Benson 

130 Marvin Demp ■, 

130 Albert R.Erskine •' 

130 Herman Belferman *, 

130 James F. Penney 

68 Amy M«J. Kerstetter 

130 Burton S. Ri'tter 

371J Webster Capps 

219J John C. Cook 

32 OM Penn F. Spitzer, 

Mary E. Fallraer 

George W» Gorsline 

130 Jeanne S e McShea 

146J David D. Mercer 

130 Frederick M # Oldach 

2 95 Orvel A. Schmidt 

144 Marshall Waingrow 

Wilber W, Ward 

130 Gilbert H, Ward 

130 Hayden C. Oliver 

130 Carl W. Bordas 

118J Lester Goldberg 

130 Mervin H# Reines 

130 Mary Bell Barrett 

130 Ruth Botdorf 

130 Robert E. Miller 

130 Marvel E # Tanricer 

Henry H« Baierl, Jr» 

JL30 Luther W. Slifer, Jr, 

130 Florence G. Freilioh 

130 William C, Wolfgang 

130 Robert W. Kisstii^e-r 

107>T .T^-an ]N*uJ.kx-cra 



Laborer - Dairy Husbandry 

Creamery Employee - Dairy Husbandry 

Laboratory Assistant - Zoology & Entomology 

Assistant - Ordnance Research Laboratory 

Operator -"Physical Plant 

Operator - Physical Plant 

Key Punch Operator - Tabulating 

Machine Operator - Peoperty Control 

Laborer - Physical Plant 

Recorder - Registrar's Office 

Clerical Assistant - Library 

Clerk-Soda Fountain - Student Union 

Nurse - College Health Service 

Nurse - College Health Servioe 



Assistant Professor - Dairy Husbandry 
Assistant Professor - Eduoat ion 
Assistant Professor - Central Extension 
Instructor - Engineering Extension 

- Central Extension 

- Central Extension.' 

- Central Extension 

- Pomology 

- Pomology 

- Central Extension 



•Instructcr 
Instructor 
Instructor 
Instructor 
Instructor 
Instructor 
Instructor 
Inst ructqr 
Instructor 
Instruct or 
Instructor 
Instructor 
Instructor 
Instruct or 
In st ruct or 
Instruct or 
Instructor 
Instruct or 
Instruct or 
Instruct or 
Instructor 
Instructor 
Instructor 



C e nt r a 1 Ext e n s i o n 
Central Extension 
Central Extension 
Central Extension 
Central Extension 
Economies' 

Mechanical Engineering 
Mechanical Engineering 
Central Extension 
Central Extension 
Central Extension 
Central Extension 
.Central Extension 
Ext ension 
Ext ension 
Ext ension 



Central 
Central 
Central 
Zoology 
C e nt r a 1 



Instructor - Central Extension . 

Research Assistant — Ceramics 

Research Assistant - Geophysics 

Research Assistant - Chemistry 

Assistant to Dean of Women 

Assistant Agricultural Extension Representative 

Librarian - Central Extension .. * 

Assistant Professor - Economics 

Assistant Professor *- Central Extension 

Instructor - Forestry 

Instructor - English Literature 

Instructor - Forestry 

Instructor - Central Extension 

Instructor - Central Extension 

Instructor — Central Extension 

Instructor - Economics 

Instructor - Central Extension 

Instructor — Central Extension • 

Instructor - Central Extension 

Instructor - Central Extension 

Instructor - Central Extension 

Instructor — Physical Education & Athletios 

Instructor - Central Extension 

Instructor - Central Extension 

Instructor - Central Extension 

Instructor - Central Extension 

Instructor - Home Economics 



251 

251 

371J 

371J 

244 

253M 

251 

168 
168 
130 
130 
130 
130 
130 
137 
27 

* 

130 

137 

268J 

04 

220 

269J 

352 

176 

220 

184 

184 

187 



2 
2 
2 

2 
2 

137 
137 
137 
137 
137 
53J 
13fi 

137 
56M 
137 
137 

46 
130 

137 

312 

137 

210J 

2 

220 



George S.VJham, Jr. 
Raymond E» Kourtz 
Clifford F t Hooker 
W c Clayton Ornaby 
Donald E, Netzley 
George G, Eoke 
Eulalia C. Ruth 
Suzanne Lawrence 
Richard H. Criswell 
Norman E, Shirk 
Joseph N. Johnson 
Thomas P. Kiser 
Everett L, Sutter 
Mary P. Kane 

Dorothy Price Page 
Mary L e Rodgere 
Helen S, Horton 
Gloria She llenberger 
Anne M. Decker 
Betty Lou Williams 
Marjorie V» Gresham 
Claire M. Resig 
Jean Cleland 
Rae S , Leo s 
Margaret Jean Swope 
Helen E, Wins low 
Arlene K, Ammerman 
Janet Thompson 
Mary K, Miller 
Jane Boglon 
Lu c i 1 1 Law son 
Elwood Musser 
Elizabeth Young 
Ruth Snyder 
Julia Bonchack 
Phyllis Frazier 
Dorothy Wagner 
James E, Frye 
Betty J* Whippo 
Mary A, Sunday 
Pearl R. Stanton 
Ellen E, Slavin 
Hazel E« Shawley 
Margaret E. Deoker 
Hazel Keen 

Catherine E, Struble 
June E» Gray 
Rose C, Ishler 
Ethel A, Adams 
Ralph T. McRae 
Nelson F. Wheeler 
Robert P. Lehr, 
Leonard R. Miller 
Edna T. Cannard 
Chester R. Unde'rhil'l 
Paul B, Connelly 
LeGrand Watkins' 
Samuel P, Robinson 
Robert Breon 
Stanley C. Wells 
Charles W, Meyers 
William Haas 
Jame s M, Sager' 
Hugh John Gallagher 
Mary Lou Murphy 
Rupert S. Koski 
Paul A. Saupp 
Allen M. Smit h 
Forest J •. Dry 
C yru s Hu nt er 
Robert E. Ruhl 



Research Assistant 
Research Assistant 
Researcn Assistant 
Research Assistant 
Research Assistant 
Research Assistant 
Research Assistant 
Research Assistant 



- Textile Chemistry 

- Textile Chemistry 

- Ceramics 

- Ceramics 

- Physics 

- Chemistry 

- Textile Chemistry 

- Metallurgy 

Research Assistant - Petroleum Refining Lab« 

Research Assistant - Petroleum Refining Lab» 

Appraiser - Central Extension 

District Representative - Central Extension 

Appraiser - Central Extension 

Junior psych->metr ist - Central Extension 

Secretary — Central Extension 

Secretary - Ordnance Research Laboratory 

Secretary — Dining Commons 

Secretary - Dining Commons 

Secretary — Central Extension 

Stenographer - College Placement Service 

Stenographer - Ordnance Research Laboratory 

Stenographer - Agricultural Extension 

Stenographer - Physical Education & Athletics 

Clerk — Accounting 

Clerk - Agricultural Extension 

Clerk - Bursar's Office 

Clerk-Stenographer — Audio Visual Aids Library 

Clerk-I/pist - Tabulating 

Clerk-T'ypist - Public Information 

Clerk-Tvpist - Public Informat ion 

Clerk-Typir.t - Dean of Men's Office 

Dining Commons Employee 

Dining Commons Employee 

Dining Commons Employee 

Dining Commons Employee 

Dining Commons Employee 

Dining Commons Employee 

Janitor - Physical Plant 

Janitress - Dormitories 

Janitress - Dormitories 

Janitress - Dormitories 

Janitross - Dormitories 

Janitress - Dormitories 

Janitress - Dormitories 

Dining Room Employee-Dining Commons 

Dinin* Room Employee-Dining Commons 

Dining Room Employee-Dining Commons 

Dining Room Employee-Dining Commons 

Dining Room Employee-Dining Commons 

Draftsman - Ordnance Research Laboratory 

Draftsman — Ordnance Research Laboratory 

Draftsman — Ordnance Research Laboratory 

Draftsman — Ordnance Research Laboratory 

Draftsman - Ordnance Research Laboratory 

Technioiah - Engineering Experiment Station 

Dining Commrns Manager - Central Extension 

©ook - Dining Commons 

Machinist - Ordnance Research Laboratory 

Machinist - Engineering Experiment Station 

Assistant - Ordnance Research Laboratory 

Mechanic — Ordnance Research Laboratory 

Assistant Cook - Dining Commons 

Mechanic - Mechanical Engineering 

Custodian - Central Extension 

Dietitian - Dining Commons 

Technician - Ordnance Research Laboratory 

Clerk-Insrc ct or - physical plant 

Ordnance Research Laboratory 

Electrician - physical Plant 

Third Cook - Dining Commons 

Maohine Operator - Accounting 



! 



137 
273 

265J 

30 

310 

130 

130 

2 05M 



38J 
177 

2 
2 

2 
2 

2 

4 

4 

137 

137 

2 

2 

2 

2 

2 

31J 

2 

236 

236 

205R 

12 2 M 

122M 



40 

04J 

130 

255 

151M 

19J 

326 

60 

387 

153 

32 0J 

91 

13» 

2 95 
252 
14 
66J 
262 
220 

3 91 
100 
347 
130 
130 
220 
13 O 



William L« Tarbert 

Paul Do Weaver 
Helen H« Harlan 
Ernest Noel 
Catherine J • Fisher 
Alice L« Leah 
Mary L, Young 
Earl M. Houok 
Earl F. Best 
James Kuste.nb order 
Mabel L. Bleioh 
Grace Strand 
Richard Wirtz 
Jo seph A* Ce s sna 
Lee R, Sprankle 
Clara M» Lynch 
Vivian E« Zong 
Mary E* Miller 
Fern E, Muschlitz 
Ruth R. Neff 
Betty V. Gesser 
Jacqueline D. Hunt 
Sarah A, Rudy 
M. Marie Ashton 
Gertrude M, Moffet 
Elizabeth B. Skeath 
Ella W« Bowers 
Evelyn Sohwer 
Elizabeth Zeller 
Emily Sellers 
Alice Pickering 
Ward Manning 
Philip L. Bryan 
Harry L. Johnson 
Dolores T. Leahy 
Ruth A* Engle 
Ruth E# Marburger 
Ann Meyer 
Esther McCulloch 
Maybelle R« Buok 
Louise C. Spiker 
Doris J, Peters 
Margaret Has si 
Mary L. Munro 
Elizabeth M, Reeher 
Mary M. Gray 
Louise G, Williams 
Mary Hyrniewich 
Norma M. St owe 
Vivian K, Fleming 
Jane Gilliland 
Joan C» Cottrell 
Frances N, Sowk* 
Dolores T. Hutchison 
Delores Ann Houser 
Gloria Slonaker 
Miriam B. Wise 
Rebecca Strouse 
Margaret A» Mahoney 
Patricia Adams 
Miriam Fox 
Mary Jane Merrell 
Martha N 4 Tressler 
Erma J, Lordeman 
Betty Jo Wintermut.fr 
Martha Horner 
Sheila A. Segner 
Nancy # Stoudt 
John M, Marshall 
James C» Bonson 



Technician - Ordnance Research Laboratory 

Creamecy 'Employee - Dairy Husbandry 

Technicians- Animal Husbandry 

Truck Driver ■- Dining Commons ■• ,;; - ' ,' ! 

Engineering Aid - Physical Plant ' \ 

Head Cook -*. Central Extension 

Cook-Housekeeper - Central Extension 

Warehouse Assistant - Property Control 

Mechanic - Physical Plant 

Utility Man - Dining Commons 

Seamstress & Postal Clerk - Dormitories 

Clerical Assistant - College' Library 

Laborer — Animal Husbandry 

Dining Commons Employee 

Utility Man - Dining Commons 

Cafeteria Woman - Dining Commons 

Head Pantry Woman - Dining Commons . - 

Head Salad Woman - Dining Commons 

Postal Clerk-Receptionist - Dormitories 

Postal Clerk-Receptionist - Dormitories 

Technician - Ordnance Research Laboratory 

Technician - Ordnance Research Laboratory 

Dining Commons Employee 

Dining Commons Employee 

Dining Commons Employee 

Dining Commons Employee 

Dining Commons Employee 

Dining Commons Employee 

Dining Commons Employee 

Recorder-Clark - Registrar's Office 

Recorder-Clerk - Registrar's Office ' , 

Groom - Physical Education & Athletics 

Carpenter - Physical Plant 

Carpenter - Physical Plant 

Nurse - College Health Service 

Hostess - Mont Alto 

Secretary - Dean's Office-Engineering 

Physical Education & Athletics 

Central Extension 

Physics 

Sociology 

Engineering Experiment Station 

Chemistry 

Engineering 

Education 

Romance Languages 

Chemistry , 

Physical Education & Athletios 
Central Extension 
Forestry 

Chemistry & Physics 
Dean's Office-Liberal Arts 
Agricultural & Bio, Chemistry 
& Rur « S o c • 



Secretary 

Secretary 

Secretary 

Secretary 

Se cretary 

Secretary 

Se cretary 

Secretary 

Secretary 

Secretary 

Stenographer 

Stenographer 

Ste nographer 

Stenographer 

Stenographer 

Stenographer 



Clerk - Agricultural Economics 

Clerk - Bookkeeping 

Clerk-Stenographer - Dean's Office-Education 

Clerk— Secretary — Home Economics 



Clerk-Typist 
Clerk-Typist 
Clerk-Typist 
Clerk -Typist 
Clerk— Typist 
Telephone Operator 
Telephone Operator 
Telephone Operator 
Telephone Operator 



Dean -'of Admission's 
Central Extension; 
Central Extension 
Property Control 
Central Extension 

Physical Plant 
Physical Plant 
Physical Plant 
Physical Plant 
Physical Plant- 
Physical Plant 



Office 



Telephone Operator 

Telephone Operator 

Technical Laborer - Dairy Husbandry 

Technical Laborer - Dairy Husbandry 



122M 

220 

273 

220 

236 

130 
220 
96 ,, 
13 

305 

96 

96 



Earl K» Wian 

Clark h'i> Tice 

Janes M » W i 1 s o n • 

Clyde L. Heverly 

Ruth Erb 

Paul Reed ' 

Meredith Bishop'' 

Harry M. Corrnap 

David C. Gilliland,Jr, 

'June- Bloom 

Patricia S. Shatzer 

Evelyn E. Pilla 

■Ruth V. Crust 

Bart MoEwen 

Addie Bart 

Gloria J,* Steye'rs 

Evelyn Sinclair 

Mar'jorie E. CTo hover 



LAborar - D^iry. Husbandry 

Dairy Farm ''Employee - Dairy Husbandry 

Dairy Farm Employee - Dairy Husbandry 

Palr'cr - Physical Plant 

Machine Operator - Tabulating 

Creamery Employee -..Dairy Husbandry . 

Laborer - Dairy Husbandry 

Machine Operator - Property Control 

Janitor - priysical Plant 

Recorder - Registrar's Office 

Accounting Clerk - Central Extension. 

]£ey Punch Operator. - Tabulating 

Cook - College Health Service 

Janitor — Central Extension 

Night Matron - Dormitories • 

Cle'rk - Soda Fountain - Student Union 

Nurse ~ College Health Service 

Nurse - College Health Service 



Leaves of Absence: 
r* ' " » ■ 

Arthur T. Thompson 
Melvin M, Levine 
Ellen M. Tiffany 
Berry B. Lethbridge ,, 
William H. Peake 
Mary Dennis 
Abbie Cromer 
Grace L. Hall 



Assistant Proiessor - Ord. Rbb, Lab. 
Instructor - Central Extension 
Instructor - Central Extension 
Instructor - Economics 
Research Assistant - Ord. Res, Lab. 
Telephone Operat P*;- -. Phy sical Plant 
Curator - College Tj ri>r '£¥y ; ' '' 
Hostess - Dormitories 



10-21-48 to 6-30-49) 
7-1-48 to 6-30-49 ) 
9-1-48 to 6-30-4S) 
9-1-48 to 6-30-49) 
10-16-48 to 6-30-49) 
'11-1-48 - Indefinite) 
10-1-48 to 6-30-49) 
10-1-48 to 11-30-48 ) 



SCHOLARSHIPS TO BE AWARDED FOR 1948-1949 



Applications for scholarships are 
now being received by the- S e nate Com- 
mittee on Scholarships and Awards. ■ The 
following scholarships are available 

•ohis year: 

. • f 

THE JOHN W. WHITE SCHOLARSHIPS — 
Established through gifts of James S. 
White of the Class of 1882, in memory 
of his father, the Reverend John^W. 
Whit e . 



Three wards, one each to a senior; 
a junior, and a sophomore on the basis 
of scholarship, financial condition, and 
need; $100 each, 

THE LOUISE CARNEGIE SCHOLARSHIPS — 
Established by the late Andrew Carnegie 
in memory of his wife. 

Twelve awards, four to seniors, four 
to juniors, four to sophomores, on the 
basis of scholarship, financial oonditaau, 
and need, $75 eaoh, 

THE CLASS OF 1922 MEMORIAL SCHOLAR- 
SHIPS — Established fr«m the income of a 
fund provided by the Class of 1922. 

A number of awards to students in the 
upper three classes, on the basis of 
scholarship, character, and participation 
in ext,ra-ciirritrnlar cultural pursuits .i 
such as debating, di-umatics, literature, 
and music. 



THE HELEN WOOD MORRIS SCHOLARSHIPS — 
Established by Lloyd M, Morris of the 
Class of 1919 in memory of his wife.' 

Two awards, one each to a junior and 
a sophomore, on the basis of financial 
condition, need, character, and scholar- 
ship attained during the sophomore and 
the freshman year respectively, $50 each. 

VANCE C. McCORMIGK SCHOLARSHIPS — 
Established from a fund bequeathed to the 
College by the Honorable Vance C. McCor- 
mick . 

A number of awards to be available 
to needy and meritorious students to ob- 
tain an education at the Pennsylvania 
State Co lie ge . 

LIEUTENANT HARRY EDWARD WAGNER 
SCHOLARSHIPS — Established by Mrs. Maude B. 
Wagner in memory of her son, Harry Edward 
Wagner, a graduate of the Class of 1941, 
iflin was killed in action in World War II. 

Awards are aval lable to men students 
in the three upper classes who have dis- 
played exceptional ability as students and 
promise of leadership and who are in need 
of financial help. 



1920 CLASS 
lished from the 
by the Class of 



SCHOLARSHIP AWARDS — Eatab- 
income of a fund provided 
1920. 



Five awards to students in the upper 



: 



two classes on the basis of scholarship, 
f ellowship , character, Americanism, and 
needj $100 each, 

APPLICATION FORMS for these scholar- 
ships may be obtained in Ro»m 221 Miner:.- 1 . 1 
Industries Building, The closing date 
for filing applications will be. Tuesday, 
January 4» 

A student may secure additional informa- 
tion from the Committee member represen- 
ting his school. 

Other available scholarships, 
fellowships, and awards are: 

C»F. Barclay 

Julia K, Hogg Testimonial 

Judge Benjamin F, Keller Memorial 

Klopp Prize 

McAllister 



Alan Nutt Memorial 

Charles Lathrop Pack Foundation 

Forestry Prize 
President's Prize 
Rehab Club Memorial 
George T. Rogers Memorial 
Elizabeth Stuart Shattuck Memorial 
Harold B. Shattuck Memorial 
State Federation of Penna, Women 
Ellen M« Stuart Memorial 
John W. Stuart Memorial 

SENATE COMMITTEE ON SCHOLARSHIPS AND AWARDS 

Agriculture — <■ R.A. Dutcher, 110 Frear 
Chem, and Phys, — H,K, Schilling, 101 

New Physics 
Education — C„0, Williams, 106 Burr owes 
Engineering — L.S. Rhodes, 208 Eng. "A" 
Liberal Arts — Seth Russell, 132 Sparks 
Mineral Industries — E,F„ Osborn, Chair- 
man, 222 Mineral Industries 
Physical Education — J„D« Lawther, 301 
Recreation Hall 



OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS FROM THE OFFICE OF THE DEAN OF ADMISSIONS AND REGISTRAR 

WITHDRAWALS { 



3 Aber, Elizabeth May, HEc, Dec, 5 

5 Berkebile, Marlin John, EE, Dec. 3 

3 Cash, Ralph, Bact, Nov, 29 

Gr Eisner, Vivienne, Psy, Dec, 7 



Hahn, Harold Douglas, IE, Dec, 6 
Sp Martin, Violet N,,AL, Dec* 6 

Gr Steffens, Dorothy R, /»?, 1 

1 Whitekettle, Loy Andrew, For, Nov, 17 



Reasons for Withdrawal: Illness, 2; injured in acoJdeut, 1; illness and death 
in family, 1; financial, 1; undecided about curriculum, 1; enlist in U^S. Air Force, 
lj lack of time to study, 1, 

OFFICIAL CHANGE OF NAME (by marriage ) 

From Jeannette Gall t-o Jeannette Gall Jenkins^ Grad» 

From Selma Lamport tc Selma Lampert Smith, Psy, 

From Do Anuette 3Lir«y to L, Annette Shirey McHugh, Ed* 



SJ3*0<J STJCfJBft 



THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 



FACULTY 



The Bulletin is published weekly during the College 
year as a means of making official announcements 
and presenting items of interest to the faculty. All 




VOL. 36 



BULLETIN 



contributions should be as brief as possible and 
reach Louis H. Bell, Director of Public Information, 
313 Old Main, not later than 10 a. m. each Friday. 



January 3, 1949 



N0.13 



SPECIAL SALE OF ARTISTS' COURSE TICKETS' ON' WEDNESDAY 



A special sale of tickets for 
the final two numbers of the 
Artists' Course series will be 
held from 8 a,m, to 5 p.m. Wed- 
nesday at the Student Union Of- 
fice, Old Main. 

Tickets for the concerts of 
Vladimir Horowitz op. Thursday and 
Helen Traubel on February 28 will 
be sold for $6.60. 

"This special price will mean 
a saving of almost $3 for some 



very excellent seats," Dr. C.E. 
Marquardt, chairman of the com- 
mittee, explained. 

Tickets priced at $5.40 for 
the two concerts also will be 
available. Single prices are $5 
for the Horowitz concert and 
$4.50 for Miss .. Traubel. 

Horowitz, famous pianist, will 
appear at 8 p.m. Thursday in 
Schwab Auditorium as the second 
number on the current series. 



PAYROLL PROCEDURE CHANGED; CHECKS ON JANUARY 10 INSTEAD OF JANUARY 5 



Dean and administrative offi- 
cers have been advised by letter 
of the new payroll procedure which 
became effective January 1. They 
are requested to inform all em- 
ployees concerned of the five-day 
adjustment period in changing to 
the hew plan. 

Pay checks covering services 
rendered between December 16 and 
31 inclusive will be issued on 



January 10 instead of January 5. 
Pay checks covering services 
rendered between January 1 and 15 
inclusive will be issued on Janu- 
ary 25. After that, wage payroll 
checks will be issued on the" 10th 
arid 25th of each month. 

The greatly increased pay- 
roll, it was explained, has neces- 
sitated a longer period of time 
for processing and preparing the 
checks . 



NEW PROCEDURE FOR ROUTING ACCIDENT REPORTS 



A new procedure for routing 
accident reports has been announced. 

In the past, the department 
in which the accident occurred 
sent five copies of the accident 
report form to the Office of the 



four copies 



Purchasing Agent. 

In the futur< 
of the accident report form should 
be prepared and sent to the Safety 
Division, Personnel Relations, 
423 Old Main. 



t&fm $t&££ COLLECTION 



HAZ1ETCN CENTER TO HAVE NEW CAMPUS 



Through the combination of a gift of 
Eokley B. Markle, and a purchase hy the 
Hazleton Educational Council, the 66-acre 
Markle estate on the crest of Conynghan 
Mountain will soon become the new campus 
for the Penn State center in Hazleton. 



The new campus includes the 32-room 
Markle mansion, a five-room cottage, 
seven-car garage, and several large 
green houses* Alterations will he made 
to convert the buildings into classrooms 
and laboratories. 



BOOKS DONATED HERE ARRIVE AT LING NAN UNIVERSITY 



Mora, than 4,000 student and faculty 
donated books for the library of Lingnan 
University, Canton, China, have arrived 
there, Richard E. Pride, of the Lingnan 
faculty, reported. 

The books were donated here last 
June, were inspected and sorted by ex- 
change students here, and packed and 



shipped by Summer Sessions students in 
agricultural education, 

A collection of 10,000 agricultural 
bulletins from the collection of Frank 
D, Gardner, professor emeritus of 
agronomy, also was received at Ling- 
nan, 



HOWELL NAMED CHIEF, DIVISION OF GEOCHEMISTRY AND GEOPHYSICS 



Benjamin F, Howell, Jr , has been 
named associate professor of geophysics 
and chief of the division of geochemistry 
and geophysics, effective July 1, 1949, 
He succeeds Dr, S.J, Pirson, who resigned 
to accept a position with Standolin Oil 
Co . , Tulsa , Ckla, 



Howell is a graduate of Princeton 
University and received his master of 
science degree from California Institute 
of Technology. He will receive his doc- 
tor of philosophy degree there in June, 
He is associated with the United Geo- 
physical Co. 



OF GENERAL INTEREST 



SENATE: The College Senate will meet at 
4:10 p.m. Thursday in Room 121, Sparks 
Building * 

* * * 

CHAPEL: Dr, Paul Paine, general secretary 
of the Board of Christian Education of 
the Presbyterian Church, and USA delegate 
to the World Council of Churches at 
Amsterdam, will speak at chapel services 
at 11 a,m. Sunday e 

* * * 

LUNCHEON CLUB: Dr. Eugene T. McDonald, 
associate professor of speech and speech 
education and director of the Speech and 
Hearing Clinic, will address the Faculty 
Luncheon Club on Monday, January 10. 
will discuss the work of the Clinic, 



He 



CAPS AND GOWNS: Graduate students who 
are candidates for degrees on January 31 
should order caps, gowns and hoods at 
the Athletic Store before January 10, 

* * * 

AAUP : "The Salary Situation" will be 
discussed at the meeting of the American 
Association of University Professors in 
Room 110, Electrical Engineering Build- 
ing, at 7:30 p.m. on Wednesday, January 12. 

* * ♦ 
COLLOQUIUM: Dr , C.L, Christ, of the 
American Cyanamid Co,, will speak at the 
Physics Colloquium to be held at 4:25 p.m. 
Tuesday in Room 117, Osmond Laboratory. 
His subject will be; "Calculation *.f 
Electron Densities and Structure Factors 
in Crystal S'bruoture Analysis," 

* * * 



HILLEL PROGRAM: Ruth Rubin, expert on 
Jewish folk songs, will conduct a recital 
of Yiddish and Palestinian folk songs at 
8 p.m. Sunday at the Hillel Fovindation, 
133 W, Beaver Ave, The program also will 
mark the opening of an exhibit of original 
paintings by 33 Jewish artists. The pub- 
lic is invited, 

* * * 

FAMOUS FILMS: The talking picture, 
"Captains Courageous," with Spencer Tracy, 
Lionel Barrymore , and Freddie Bartholomew, 
will be presented at 7 p.m. Wednesday in 
Room 121 Sparks Building. This is the 
last of the current series of films from 
the Museum of Modern Art which are being 
shown as a part of the Dramatics 61 
course. Seats are available for interes- 
ted faculty members. 

* * * 

PLAYERS SHOWS: Tickets for "All My Sons" 
to be presented by the Penn State Players 
in Schwab Auditorium on January 13, 14 
and 15, will go on sale on Monday, Janu- 
ary 10, at Student Union Office, "Ten 
Nights in a Barroom" will continue its 
run at Center Stage through January, 
playing on Friday and Saturday nights e 
Friday houses may be bought out by fac- 
ulty groups* 

* * * 

RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS: The Committee on 
Radioisotopes has prepared a leaflet for 
research workers and administrative 
personnel on the campus, outlining condi- 
tions surrounding the use of radioactive 
materials obtained from the Atomic Energy 



Connis sion B Copies are 
office of Dr c Richard C, 
ciate professor of phyni 
of the Commit tee p 12 Os 

* * * 

AT CONVENTION: Henry 3, 
tant professor of Englis 
attended the American Bu 
Asspciation convention i 
last week* He Is easter 
of the group and is on t 
rectorSo He also is cha 
"bership committee' and at 
participated in a panel 
cerning the current prob 
business writing courses 
univer sitie s, a 

* * * 

DEATH ANNOUNCED; Announcement has teen 
made of the death of Dr Thomas Co 
Blaisdellp 81, dean of the School of the 
Liberal Arts from 1915 to 1920, He died 



available at the 

Raymond j asso- 
cs and chairman 
nond Laboratory 

Young ; a ss is— 
h composition, 
sines s Writing 
n St o Louis j Mo« 

n vice-president 
he board of di — 
irman of the mem- 

the convention 
discussion con— 
lens of teaching 

in colleges and 



at Sanford, Fla, on 



December 
* * * 



Hi 



PRESENTS PAPER 



Dr 



Lloyd M-) Jones 



professor of physical education y pre-- 
sented a paper on "The Roots of Physical 
Education" at the 52 d annual convention 
of the College Physical Education Asso- 
ciation in Chicago last week« Re is 
president of the association, 

* * * 

AT CONVENTION: J.R. Ha swell, extension 
agricultural engineer, and AoW. Clyde, 
professor of agricultural engineering, 
attended the recent annual meeting of 
the American Society of , Agricultural 
Engineers In Chicago, In a disoussion 
on land drainage, Ha swell told of tile 
installations in Pennsylvania with the 
use of traction ditchers, 

* * * 

REPORT P 
the Liqu 
Pennsylv 
M« Nelso 
of the d 
has been 
lisher s, 
page boo 
ment pub 
on the 1 



UELISHED:' "Pe 
or Business," 
ania Liquor Co 
n McGeary, pro 
epartment of p 
published by 
inc., State C 



k 



'.n Institut 



ELECTED: 
of plant 
elected 
Assoc iat 
Pitt sbur 
Dr. W.R, 
plant pa 
"Result s 
Varietie 



licati on, is a 

iquor business 

* * 

Dr n llie D 

pathology ext 

national presi 

ion of America 

gh convention, 

Mills, assist 

thology, prese 

of Tito -Year T 



nn sylvan ia and 
a study of the 
ntrol Board by Dr • 
fessor and head 
olitical science, 
Penns Valley Pub- 
oil ege. The 76- 
e of Local Govern- 
detailed report 
in Pennsylvania, 

Burke, professor 
ension, has been 
dent of the Potato 
• At the recent 

Dr, Burke and 
ant professor of 
nt e d a report on 
e sts with Potato 



H ANNIVERSARY: The Central 
ania S e cti on of the American 

Society marked its 25th anni— 
at a dinner meeting on December 
lowing a banquet at the Nittany 
, the group heard charter men— 



MARK 25T 

pennsylv 

Chemical 

ver sary 

15c Eol 

Lion Inn^ 

ber Dr, David F, McFarland, professor 



emeritus of metallurgy, review the found- 
ing of the section in 1923 

* * * 

The death of Mrs Grace 
wife of Dr,, John M 
of the College from 
been announced at 
was one of the founders 



DE.fi Til ANNOUNCED? 
See-ly Thomas, 78 ? 
Thomas, president 
1921 to 1925, has 
Mendon, vt o ■ She 



of Alpha Chi sorority which later affilia- 
ted with Kappa L>,ppa Ganna sorority, 

* * * 

ATTEND MEETINGS i Twenty-nine faculty 
members attended the 63d annaal meeting 
of the Modern Language Association of 
America in New York, N, : ,Y.-. last week.. Dr. 
Robert J p Clements, proie^sor and head 
of the department of romance languages, 
served as chairman of the French Litera- 
ture of the 16th century section and as 
secretary of the Mediaeval and Renais- 
sance Italian section while Dr a H„H« 
Arnold^ professor of romance languages, 
gave a report on "Study of Rhythmic 
Patterns in Old Spanish Poet rye 8 Rojas 
Garciduenas Jose ? visiting professor of 
romance languages,, led a group discussion 
on "La vecacion relig::,osa de Sor Juana 
Ine s de la Cruz ; " Others attending were 
Dr Cortland Eyer- Nicholas M a Brent in, 
Oscar A« Haac, Erich Auerbach, Richard N» 
Krough, and Lois M« Ilyslop, of the de- 
partment of romance languages; Dr, Philip 
A.. Shelley, Dr , Albert F« Buff ington, Dr, 
Herbert Steiner, Dr„ Helen Adolf, Dr<> 
Dagobert de Levie^ Dr Werner F.> Stried- 
ieck >v and Nora E D Wittman, all of the 
department of German; Dr, John S» Bowman 
and Dr„. Louis F Peck, both of the de- 
partment of English composition; and Dr, 
Brice Harris, Dr<, Douglass S, Mead, Dana 
K, Merrill, William L B Werner- Dr, Mason 
Long, Chauncey 0, Ridenour, Dr , A« Bruce 
Sutherland, Ro.bert V. Bauer, Gerhard G 
Friedrich,, Marshall Waingrow, and Arthur 
0, Lewis, Jr., all of the department of 
English literature, 

* * * 

WORK DESCRIBED: Re search' work conducted 
in the Fluorine Laboratories here under 
the direction of Dr, Joseph H< 
described in an article, titled, "New 
Materials Won't Wear Cut," in the January 
issue of Popular Science magazine, 

» * * 

DIRECTORY PUBLISHED: Names of more than 
1,060 graduates and former students of 
the department of dairy husbandry are 
listed in the Penn State Dairy Alumni 
Directory recently published,, The book 
is dedicated to Andrew Ac Borland, pro- 
fessor emeritus of dairy husbandry and 
head of the department until his retire- 
ment on June 30, 1948, 

* * * 

PHI BETA KAPPA: Lambda of Pennsylvania 

chapter of Phi Beta Kappa has named the 

following officers; Dr Robert E, Dengler ; 

president; Dr, Terc 

Dr, Thomas F, Bate: 

J, Currier, Dr, Helen R, LeBaron, and 



Simons, is 



sa Cohen, secretary; 

« treasurer; Dr© Arnold 



%&&* ST* 



Dr, William Uj Snyder, members of the 
executive committee • 

* * * 

SPEAKS: Dr. Lloyd M, Jones ; professor 
of physical education, spoke en "After 
Graduation, What Taen?" before the stu- 
dent section of the 27th annual conven- 
tion of the Pennsylvania State Associa- 
tion for Health, Physical Education, and 
Recreation in Philadelphia recently, 

* * * 

PRESENT PAPERS: Dr, William C. Bramble, 
professor of forestry^ and Dr. P.F. 
English, professor of wildlife manage- 
ment^ presented a paper on "The Forest 
„Graj,'.U: " u - ublem Created by Deer in 
Easier u Forests" before the Society of 
Am 31 3 can Foresters meeting in Boston 
recently, 

* * * 

ATTEND MEETING: Dr. Franklin 3. Eraus 6> 
professor of Latin, attended the annual 
meeting of the American Philological 
Association and the Archaeological Insti- 
tute of America at St. Louis, Mo, last 
week, 

* • * 



PRESENT PAPERS : Five of the technical 
reports presented at the recent sessions 
of the American Society of Animal Produc- 
tion, were presented by faculty members 
here, Dr. AvL e Bortree joined Michigan 
scientists in presenting a paper on 
"Types and numbers of micro-organisms in 
the rumen contents of cattle fed natural 
and semi— synthetic rations." J W, Bratz- 
ler, J,R. Barnes, and Dr. R«W» Swift, 
reported on "Effect of Thiouracil on the 
Metabolism of Rats" while J,L«> Gobble,, 
' Dr , RcC. Miller, and F#L, Bent ley reported 
on "Pasture for Swine*" Dr. William L. 
Henning and Glenn R. Kean reported on ex- 
periments on production of hothouse 
lambs and P.T. Ziegler and James A» 
Christian spoke on factors influencing 
the quality of frozen storage meat. 

* * * 

PLANS CURRICULUM: Dr. William M. Lepley, 
associate professor of psychology and a 
lieutenant colonel in the Air Force Re- 
serve spent three days recently at the 
Air University, Maxwell Field, Ala, 
helping to prepare the curriculum for the 
Air Force Academy. 



OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS FROM THE OFFICE OF THE DEAN OF ADMISSIONS AND REGISTRAR 

Withdrawals : 



4 
1 
3 
3 
5 
3 
3 

Gr 
3 



Airhart, J hn Joseph, EE, Dec. 
Amsleij Robert Harry, For, Dec, 
Berkheimer, Russell C, PV, Dec. 
Cook, Elmer Paul, Hort , Dec, 9 



10 
4 



Corl, Richard Evan, ME,, Dec, 14 
DeLeo, Joseph D,, Ming, Dec, 9 
Glenn, Donald Malcolm, PM, Dec, 11 
Gulbrandson, Robert Allen, Geol, Nov, 1 3 
Garrison, William P., PEd, Dec, 16 



Gr. 

6 

4 

3 

Sp 

5 

1 



Jelen, Barbara Lu, Engo Lit, Dec, 8 
Ke!lly, Joseph -A., AL, Nov, 30 
King, Harvey C% 9 LD, Dec, 7 
McKenzie, James Milton, Ag.Ed, Dec. 
Moore, Betty Margaret, Ag, Nov. 18 
Polerie, Ralph Vita, CE, Dec. 13 
Shirey, Robert Louis, For, Nov* 24 

Williamson, James Hall, LD , Dec, 7 
Yates, Leo Francis, DH, Dec. ' 



Reasons f.or Withdrawal: Personal, 4; financial, 4; illness, 2; inadequate 
preparation for curriculum^ 1; low grades, lj to change to short course, 1; to 
dental school, 1; to enlist in Air Force, 1; to accept employment, 2; lack of 

Hi+.prpsh. 1. 



12 



ent er 



interest j 1, 



CANDIDATES FOR BACHELOR DEGREES AT COl-MENCEMENT EXERCISES ON JANUARY 31, 1040 



Following is a list cf candidates for bachelor degrees at Commencement Exer- 
cises on January 31, 1949. Grades for graduating seniors are- due in the Recorder *s 
Office, 109 Old Main, before 8 a«m, on Thursday, January 27, 1945, 

SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURE 
, . BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 



A g r i'wltuj'-al i a nd Bio lc g^icaJ L Chemist ry_ 



Dornthy Emily Bell 
Robert Conrad Bens.ing 
Robert Andrew Hollic 
Lawrence Joseph Kuhnu 



Michael Adamovich 
John Albert Coh.ee 
Glenn Daniels Guiser 
Bernard Wayne Kelly 
James Peter King 



Ernest Evan Brown 
Neil Burton Gingrich 
Norman Hay Gnage»y 
Charles Meridia Huffma-n 
Frank Roy Lerew, J r <» 



Joseph Edward Kunetz 
Patricia Anne Ludorf 
Ri"hard Leigh Mullan 
Jespph Geerge Slakas 

Agric u ltural Economics 

Arnold Krafft 
Donald Stanley Kuryloski 
John Edward Long, III 
Robert Arthur Lunn 
Merrill Ler*y Mordan 

Agr i c ultur al Educatio n 

Robert John Loughry 
Gene Miller Love 
Donald James Mc-Keeby 
Robert Daniel Muzzi 
Gecrge William Myers 



James Richard Storay 
Robert Joseph Suhadclnik 
George Milton Werkheiser 



John Magner ^'owers 
Eugene Stewart Soliday 
William Hamilton Walker 
Walter Ellis Wheelook 



Carl Frederic Nagel 
Hilbert Anthony N*el 
Opcar Leo Padon 
William Alfred Robinson 
Clifford Alexander Snyder 
Albert John Vigilante 



John Graham McCleary 



John Henry Baker 
Joseph Schultz Bo.ard 



A gricultural Engi nee ring 

Earl MoCord Sherwood 



■Agronomy 



William Trotter 
William Charles' 



Dible g Jr» 
Gerhar-fc 



Donald Edwin Longeneeker 



Archie Orville. Auerbach 
Warren -Spaff ord Conrad 
Vernon Lee Cowoll 



Bohdan Russell Choman 
George T. Dimop<»ull3E 
Anthony Joseph Girardi 



Animal Husbandry 

Rc-^er't William Dysart 
John Irwin Gearhart 
Mary Morgan Goodwin 

Bactgriolcx' V ' 

Lenore B, Jasewicz 
S-tanlcy A, Katz 



' Botany . 
Norton Little Marshall 



Thomas B. King 
Robert Leo Smith 



Paul Francis Smith 
Joseph Peter Usaavage 



Robert Arthur Hpgg 
Bra ai 11a May Hoke 
Frank William Huron 
Fred Miller IrwiR - 



Samuel Wilbur Anthony 
Henry Joseph Boccella 
Richard Hc-ime s Boynton 
Robert Charles Burkholder 
Richard Allen Clark 



Dairy Husbandry 

John J, Latshaw 
Nicholas- Samuel Matt is©- 
Clyde William Mayer 
Richard .Menier Myers 

G^ant Davis ■ 
Thomas Turner 3D be r hard 
Leon John Enright 
John F.rarklin Ewers 
John Helson Graff 



Frank Howard Rumba ugh 

Alan Thomas 

Frar,ois. Charles Turner- 



William Garrett Haag 
Russell Davis Harrar, Jr. 
Richard Bertram llersiine 
Ray William Howell 
David Bruce Hunter 



-2~ 



SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURE (oon'd) 
Fore stry (con ' d ) 



Francis Xavier Kennedy 
Harry Robert Krear 
Alvin George Leidel 
Ray Clifford Martz, Jr« 
Franz Frederick Menninghaus 
Frank Walter Mohoney 



Orange Lynford Mulhollen 
Rowland karringe-r Orum 
Grant Edward Powell 
John Shapoczka 
Braden Melton Souders 
Jerome Peter Swanson 

Hort iculture 



Robert Douglas Fleming, III 
Samuel James Greenlee 
Francis M, R. Isenberg 



June J. Pallis 



Roland Barnes Driscoll 
Robert Duwayne Foor 



Samuel Ephraim Firestone 
Clayton Brooks Hill, Jr. 



William Aaron Beyer 
Daniel Rooney Curran 
Thelma Ruth Hobaugh 
Herman Ashur Latt 



Leo Francis Mansor 



Lawrence W. Linvill 
Bernard Leonard Pollack 
Dale William Rennoll 

Medical Technology 
Catherine Ann Perry 

Poultry Husbandry 
Orvis Ray Gulich, Jr» 

7/ood Utilization 

Andrea Roosevelt Caccavo 

SCHOOL OF CHEMISTRY AND PHYSICS 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

Chemical Engineering 

Paul Lambert Leemhuis 

Chemistry 

Richard Jo seph. Thompson 

Commercial Chemistry ; 

Edward Louis Trabold 

Physics 

John Philip McKelvey 
Gershon Meckler 
James Henry Neyhart 

Pre-Medical Curriculum 
Philip Andrew Miller 
Science 



Karl Gustaf Thompson 
George Rath Tiers 
Curtis Clifford Truver 
Robert Glenn Wingard 
John Weber Wyld 



Bronislaw Soloway 
Leonard Harlan Weinstein 



Marie D» Rymshaw 



Howard F» S-fcruble, Jr. 



Thomas Edward Salisbury 



Richard Blount Shepard 
Russell Benedict Wad dell 
Florian Bernard Yanoski 



Ralph Donald Schumack 



Manuel Kraus 

John Daniel Layser, Jr, 

Harriet May Oyler 



Gaetano Thomas Passananti David Leroy Wright 
Joseph Clarence Wasilewski Thomas Allen Wright 



Paul Gecoge Andrews 
Theodore Robert Bechtol 
Richard Harry Book 
Anne Marie Condrin 
Martha Ann Con ley 
Helen Lillian Finder 
Albert Thomas. G a len 
Leo Francis Gusmerotti 
Donald Savoy Harris 



Norman Wilbur Boehm 
Sara Ellen Dougherty 



Anna Mae Auchenbach 
Clare S. Coleman 
Anna Katherine Courtney 
Grace Ann DiGiorgio 
Shirley Lynnor Goldich 
James E, Hawkins, III 



John Milton Ant o lick 
Russell Francis Ginther 



Rebecca Jeanne Griffin 
Mary Ann Master 



Theodore Hertzal Blau 
Frederick Henry Fuller 
Isadore Mark Goldhirsh 
Beverly Joy Grossmann 



Paul Henry Schalles 



-3- - 

SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 
BACHELOR OF ARTS 
Educat ion 



George Michael Holanchock 
Constance Ruth Levy 
Domenic Anthony Lockwood 
Lois P. Metzler 
John James Hedimyer 
William McKay Page ,111 
Richard Joseph Phelan 
Gloria LaVerne Rodgers 
Clarence Edward Rudy 

Psychology 

Selma L, L, Smith 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

Educat ion 

Elizabeth R, W, Jacobus 
^ichard Jame s Long 
Alice Elizabeth Miller 
Gladdy Lou Miller 
Charles Frederick Pyatt 
Sally Gammons Schleyer 

Industrial Arts 



Harold Charles Smith 
Henry Louis Sosinski 

Music Education 

Francis Anthony Rettzo 
John Herbert Sloan 

Psychol ogy n 

Joseph Johns 

Joseph Albert Murnin 

Marjorie Ann Riley 

Vocational Industrial Education 



Sylvia Schenfeld 

G er a 1 d i ne Ma y T h cma s 

Edward Joseph Tylden 

Betty L. Vanderbeck 

Richard Sitman VanScoyoc 

Louise Way 

Arthur James Welch 

Wesley Wielgclasky 



Edward Joseph Wiertal 



Mark Edwin S e tzer 

Gladys .Singer 

He le n Tyr iw 

Sally E. H. VanPelt 

James Blaine Walker 

Patricia Mae Woods 



*John Davis Vincent 



Eugene William Sprague 
Frederick Franklin Swingle 



Robert Rambo Saylor 
Lawrence Richard Shambach 
Louis Allan Wa lker 



Robert Cecil Thomas 



Leonard Angel o Ascani, Jr 
Robert W e Her Burkhart 
Edward Thomas Davie s 
Richard Wet.zel Hartswick 



SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING 
E AC HE L OR OF ' S C IE NC E 

Aeronautical Engineering 

George William Hogue, Jr< 
William Paul Hughes 
Wo 1 den Magann 

Architectural Engineering 
Lawrence Earl Klepper 



Franklin George Richardson 
Charles Edward Swingle 
James Moreland Trego 



Deceased 



■"»4 • 



Robert Mitchell Anderson 
Azael Barrera 
Samuel L. Bur dick, Jr» 
Donald Albert Carlson 
W a lter Johnson D e Jaiffe 
George Kurt D e ssauer 
Michael Fatula 



Walter Haning Allwoerden 
Melvin Eugene Annett 
Richard Nugent Balthaser 
Bruno Bonini 
Hylton Roller Brown, Jr, 
Iriest Joseph Cappello 

iohard Chapin Clark 
John Glenn Cunningham 
Joseph DeMott 
John James Egan 
G e orge Fisher Gardner 
Leo Ira Gettlin 
Louis Charles Goodfarb 
Milton Ernest Gross 



John Stratton Becker 
Richard Alan Bernhard 
Robert Carl Boedecker 
~rthur Elbertis Boyd 
Norman Dann 

Howard James Dingle, Jr, 
Guy Ellis Eckman, Jr» 
Karl Hermann Eisele 
Robert William Ellis 
Kenneth Kay Emerson 
Harry 7/infield Fillman 
William Jan Fortune 
Howard William Grebs, Jr* 
Alan Richard Greenwald 
Arthur Raymond Griffith 
Charles James Griswold, Jr. 
Paul Julius Guhl 
Richard Douglas Guild 
Warren Douglas Hale 
John Abram Hauptman 



Norman Alterman 
James Dunford -ppel 
Andrew Her brand Bakken, J r < 
Russell Arthur Berger 
George Fillmore Bierman 
Herbert Bernard Bierman 
Jack Jordan Biery 
John O'Hara Black 
Sanford Smith Bowlus 
John Foster Byrom 
R ichard Joseph Calvert 
William Bernard Cassidy 
Roy Hartman Cook 
Franklin Edgar Crissy, IJI 
Frank Thomas P.i August ine 
Jules Dresner- 
Adam Samuel Dumot 



SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING (oon'd) 

Civil Engineering 

George A. Ferguson, II 
John Roy Flack 
James Samuel Fluke 
James P. Griffiths, Jr, 
Joseph John Harchar 
Kenneth Hunter 
Richard Roe McClain 

Electrical Engineering 

Robert Jack Kelso 
Edward Joseph Leonard 
Emrys P. Lewis, Jr» 
William Elmer Long 
Willard Charles Lutz, Jr. 
Leo Paul McGuire 
Thomas Edward Mai son 
Bruce Curtis Moen 
William Jerome Mulligan 
Kenneth Irvin Myers 
Maxwell Oliver Paley 
Richard F, Pearson 
John Pelick, Jr# 
John Pirow 

Industrial Engineering 

Arthur Jami s H C p i e r 
Richard Earl Howe 
Wilbur Ernest Hudson 
Arthur Boris Jenkins 
Richard Paul Kahn 
Emil Stephen Kapcar 
Chester Vincent Krainik 
^ichard Joseph Kucel 
Robert William Lauer 
Tulio John Lazarin 
Howard Bruce Lee 
John Albert Love 
Frank Henry M c Cowan, Jr. 
Travis E. McDaniel, Jr* 
James Francis McGrath 
Robert F. Mcl n tyre 
William Henry Marshall 
Donald Guy Martin 
John Edward Muhs 
Donald Leroy Myers 

Mechanical Engineering 

Warren Robert F e tterolf 
Harold Gabin 
James Lewis Hatch 
Donald Robert Herb 
Jam^s Reese Herzog 
John -*hlq.uist Irwin 
John Cadwallader Jones 
George Gregory Karian 
Charles William Knisely 
William R. Krone nwetter 
Wilbur Russel Laird, Jr, 
Charles Thomas Luddy 
Donald Scott Magargee 
Jerome 0. Markowitz 
John Fordyce Martin 
Gregory Edward Mazza 

Sanitary Engineering 
Donald Middour Keagy 



Richard Lee McCombs 
H e nry Anthony McD e rmott 
Robert Miller McKillip 
Leo Joseph Noker, Jr, 
Fred Michener Pollock 
Jesse Pershing Smith 
George Alvin Stout 



Marvin Herbert Pressman 
Richard Marlowe Reed 
William Jerome Rich 
Leon Rothberg 
George Schulz 
Norman John Shires 
Robert Edmond Skipper 
Harry George Starrett 
Marvin Lewis Thall 
Paul -unthony Tornavacca 
Edward Walter Urbansky 
Ralph Wagner, Jr, 
Eugene Samuel Wheeler 
Joseph Zaslow 



Creston F. Ottemiller, Jr, 
Bru;e Gordon Parker 
Andrew Patrick 
Alexander Petrowski 
Benjamin Albert Raphael 
Donald George Redmond 
James Louis Heeder 
Curtin Spencer Roop 
Arthur Yetter Shambach 
James Curtis Short 
William Marcher Simpson 
Francis Thomas Smith. 
J?, ck Edmund Smith 
Joseph Harold Vought 
Joseph Lins Weber 
Melvin Frederick Weiss, Jr« 
LeV e rn Blake Yochim 
Morris Ziswasser 



H e nry Carlton Meier 
George Willard Metger, Jr, 
Richard L er oy Miller 
Herbert Dewey Nash, Jr, 
Robert P. O e lschlager 
Charles Parigian 
Henry David -Phillips 

Jesse Leon Piatt 

Ross D, Pillsbury, Jr, 

John Piskorski 

James Raymond Qualters 
ohn Paul Schoening 

Carl Arnold Schwanbeck 

Frederick E, Snyder 

Dale Emerson Woomert 

Norman Pepper Wynn, Jr, 

Samuel Amos Young 



Jane Louise Anthony 
Rita Cecilia Apt or 
Phyllis Claire Artelt 
Dorothy Jean Coffman 
Lois Mae Edel stein 
Jeanne Esterman 
Lois Jean Hague 



Donald Eugene Book 
Daniel Arthur Botkiss 
Joseph Arthur Daniels 



—5"« 

SCHOOL OF HOME ECONOMICS 
BACHELOR OE SCIENCE 

Home Economics 

Marjorie Ann Hemphill 
Geroldine F, Hindenach 
Carolyn Miller Hocking 
Margaret Isabel Houston 
Beatrice Bush Kaufman 
Martha Jane Leitze'll 

Hotel Administration 



Barbara Jane MoCleary 
Alice Hamilton M. ^ing 
Georgia Anne Miller 
Angeline Mingoia 
Beatrice D, Silverstone 
Helen Ha in White 



Roy Samuel McClenaghan, Jr, Richard Waldo W e bber 



SCHOOL OF THE LIBERAL ARTS 
BACHELOR OF ARTS 



Ar t s 



Letters 



Charles Joseph Baish, Jr. 
S-,rah Ann B a liner 
Birdie Love Berman 
Fred Cordes Bliss 
Jean Moyer Book 
Man son J. Bradley, Jr. 
Phyllis May Budd 
Hugh P. Callahan, Jr. 
Frank W. Campbell, Jr • 
John Lj_ n v,rood Cashman 
Yar Gregory Chomicky 
Benjamin T. Chrzanoski 
Pauline Christine Ciaffoni 
Frederick Michael Ciletti 
Howard Stanley Cchen 
William Bernard Coleman 
Thomas Joseph Condon 
Janet Vivian Cox 
Sonia Coyne 
Rose Theresa Di Main 
Cornelia Hannah Dreifus 
Harry Clifford Dunham 
George L. Earnshaw, Jr. 
Vernon Wurster Ellzey 
Julian Lee Eliasoph 
Marjorie Suzanne Fisher 
Jane Elizabeth Fouracre 
Ernest Friday 
Martin B. Friedman 
Shirley Rhea Gettlin 
Henry William Glass 
Horace Sluman Glover 
Larry Paul Goldsmith 



Edwin Hugh Abernethy 
James Arthur Anderson 
Charles VanDresser Ashnrst 
Barbara June Atkins 
D»nald Bany 
Marg-ret May Bopp 
Joseph VanKirk Borland 
Thomas Coutts Botsford 
Lenard Allen Brenner 
Ross Blair Brode 



Edna I. R. Griffiths 
Nancy Romig Harrison 
Paul Mansfield Harrison 
Alice Eya He cht 
Paul Dillon Howard 
Stanley David Jacobs 
Linda Mae Jacobson 
James Dorrance Johnson 
Margaret Frankel Kahn 
Melvin Donald, Eat in sky 
Barbara Anne Keefer 
William Light ^el ler 
Eleanor Ann Kelly 
Melba Ruth Kleinberger 
Maria T. Klosterman 
Martha Ann Koons 
Ru t h S e lma Krafts ow 
Janet Lucille Kurtz 
Robert Henry Lindy 
Andrew Joseph Lock 
Janet Elisabeth Long 
Robert J, Lowery, Jr. 
David A. Magaziner, Jr. 
Esther Anne Maginnis 
Rosemary C. Moloney 
Ellen Louise Miller 
Richard Francis Morgan 
Robert Praul Murray 
Nicholas Napora 
Robert Erwin Nein 
Charles Henry Ness 
Alexander Cranovsky 

Connerce & Finanoe_ 

Kenneth Clinton Brooks 
Edgar Byron Brouse 
Rosalie Hannah Caplan 
Frank K e lly Chaplin 
Edmund Joseph Che His 
Harry Walt er Compton, Jr. 
Thomas Ellis Cooper 
John William Dillman 
Robert G. Edgerton, III 
James Robert Etters 



Seymour William Perlman 
Diva Diana Petrucci 
Marilyn Pomerene 
Alan Maxwell Pottasch 
Bengt Alver Pulls 
John Olen Riggs 
Barbara J. Rodemeyer 
Patricia Ruth Rodli 
Bernardo Rodriguez 
Louis William Rose 
Elliot Rosengarten 
Merle Sidney Sachnoff 
Jerry Philip Sapienza 
William Harry Schiele 
Richard LaMar S chic gel 
Glenn Elmer S c hultz 
Richard Ira Shafritz 
Malcolm Shapiro 
Kat herine Jane Solomon 
Charles W, St audenme ier f Jr # 
Sally-Lou Sternau 
Leonard Sugarman 
Ruth E r e ndig Summers 
Ivan Bell Thompson 
Martin Richard Veater 
Jay Lawr e n c e 1 7a ke f i e 1 d 
Richard Allen Weil 
Margaretta J. Winturine 
Sylvia Elaine Wilson 
Metro Woleschok 
William Francis Wood 
Joyce Elisabeth brighter 



Ferdinand E. Fidati 
Joseph Robertson Folge: 
Abraham Freund 
Henry Fried land 
Louis Gauthey, Jr. 
Herbert David Gedrich 
Harold Gittlen 
Leonard Ray Glenn, j r# 
Ernest McVey G codling 
Edward F, Haldeman 
Edward Signor Hanford 






SCHOOL OF THE LIBERAL ARTS (con'd 



Robert William Harbison 
Henry Owen Heckert 
Manuel Donald Herbert 
G e orge Byrnes Hite 
John Hendel Hogan . 

Robert Evans Hoyer 
Blair Griffith Kusted 
Raymond Jansen 
Dorothy G e nc Jenks 
Robert William Kaithern 
John '.."alter Klein 
John Joseph Kramer 
John Robert Kupetz 
Mi c ha e 1 Ku zna 
Oscar &, Lashley, Jr» 
Richard Drexel Leach 
C a rrcll Harold Leppo 
Leonard Eugene Lcvine 
Melvin Levine 
Jerome Murray Lj.be nson 
William Penn Loomis, Jr< 
Harry Wright McKee, III 
James D ean Magargee 



Richard Wendell Balentiie 
Betty Ruth Bodell 
Robert Michael Brezovio 
Lawrence James Casey, Jr« 
Sarajane M, Churashore 
Wayne Clayton DeArment 
Rita Florence I' e inberg 
Joan Loretta Fox 



Robert Samuel Cruikshank 



Emma Elizabeth Cutler 
William Turk Gilland 



Paul Malley 
Francis Joseph Martin 
Robert Tyler Martin 
Calvin Bivins Meyer 
Donald Frederick Meyer 
Wallace Gene Minich 
John W e aver Mitchell 
Paul Bay M u lhollen 
John William Orr 
William Per bet sky 
Michael Henry Pikus 
W i 1 1 i am ■ s hau b Piper 
Ma& Po Ian sky 
John W. Pouch 
Albert Grant Purchase 
Irwin Bernard Raffel 
Paul Linn Reish 
Robert Vincent Rex 
Jack Edward Riclrrdson 
Richard Erwin Rosen 
Albert N. Rosenblatt 
Dean Rich rd Fvotz 
Jay Donald Schlussel 

Journalism 

William Howard Frazier 
George Edward Kline 
Walter McLain Leuzinger 
Robert FloyT LeVine 
Joseph Henry Ma day 
Ralph Orville Pearson 
Elliot Shapiro 
Joseph Shulman 

SCHOOL OF MINERAL INDUSTRIES 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

Ceramics 

Joseph John Kovalich 

Fuel Technology 

.Russell Cole Fie gal 

Geography 

James Francis Hamilton 

Geolggy and Mineralogy 

Harold G lenn May 
Roy Park Stamm 



Paul Franklin Schweitzer 
Dean Edward Sholl 
Edward Lester Silverberg 
Harvey Edward Silverston 
George C, °mith, Jr e 
Gerald Ely Smith 
Gladys Worden Smith 
William John Sohonage 
Milton David Stemler 
James Russell Stine 
Luther Scott Stover, Jf» 
Bruce Lawrence Summers 
William Stobo Taylor 
Robert Wilford Thomas 
Blair Banto T r essler 
Rich?, rd Henry Trumbore 
Robert E ? ; Tscherfinger 
Frank Donald Welker 
Richard Stephen W e rner 
Richard Brandt Willis 
Robert Downs Wilson, Jr, 
Joseph 0. Wint er steen, Jr. 
James Lindsay Workman 



Gwen Harvey Spann 
Edward Arthur 1'aggert 
Audrey Marie Thompson 
Beverly Jean Witherow 
S e lma Zasofsky 
Ma r s ha 1 1 A . Z im me rma n 



Eric Rolf Rude 



Maurice Louis To si 
David John W e igle 



Alvi n J ay UavmD.ii 



Ge ophysics and Geochemistry 

G e orge Vernon Keller 
Mete or o logy 
Mary Jane Boyd 
Mineral Economics 
John G e orge Dellolacono 






Byron Ma the 1 .: Emery 
Allen Daniel Gray, Jr # 



SCHOOL OF MINERAL- INDUSTRIES (con'd) 
Mineral Preparation 
Leslie Udell Anderson 
Mining Engineering 
Charles D a lburg Iloyt 



John Paul Weir 



Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering 



John William Bisbing, J r » 
John Blair Caldwell, Jr« 
William Charles Ireland 



Charles G e crge Judge, Jr« 
Thompson Re id 



Judson Donald- Sweet 
William Robert w aag 



SCHOOL OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND ATHLETICS 

BACHELOR, OF SCIENCE 



Grant Hillary Dixon 
Sherrie F a y Fogg 
Glenn Ulysses Ilanna 
Jane s William Matthews 



James Saxe Kline 



Physical Education 

Wallace Stuart Merchant 
Jeanne Marie Parrish 
Joseph John Pasda 
^dward Anthony Sulkowski 



Willard Disston Tease 
Robert Derk Weitzel 
Robert John Williams 



Recreat ion 



Dorothy Nell Whitney 



CANDIDATES FOR ADVANCED DEGREES AT COMMENCEMENT EXERCISES CN JANUARY 31, 1949 

Following is a list of candidates for advanced degrees at Commencement Exer- 
cises on January 31, 1949. Grades for these students are due in the Recorder's 
iff ice, 109 Old Main, before 8 a,m» on Thursday, January 27, 1949, and also must be 
reported before that time to the Dean of the Graduate School on special forms that 
will be provided by the Dean's office* 



Patrick Joseph Boner 
Shirley Jane Gauker ^eppell 



Irvin Harrison Bietz 
George Woodrow Bradford 
Mel hart Daniel Che lo sky 
Robert Corrigan 
Sidney Alfred Culbertson 
Joe Alfred Errigo 



MASTER OF ARTS 

Nancy Koplin Jack 
Joseph Allen J ame s 

MASTER OF EDUCATION 

Dean Stanley Hart man 
Stanley Good Keisey 
Wilma Kathleen Kelly 
Samuel Willier Kurtz 
Freda A. Phillips 



Dwight Leroy Ling 



Martin Luther Scott 
Dorothy Cunningham Waite 
Ralph Whitebread 
Joseph Henry Wolfe 
Mar k B . Wo Igemut h 



Carolyn Y. Graham Aull 
Robert Blaine Barefoot 
John Andrew Bauscher 
Arthur Shuman Beward 
Richard Egbert Black 
James Norton Brennan 
James Packford Bressler 
Arthur Donald Brickman 
Violet Irene Brughelli 
Joseph Sanson Bryner 
Doris Lippincatt Bye 
Cesar Adolf o C a lderon 
Webster Capps 



MASTER OF SCIENCE 

Ruth Mathilde Connor 
Robert Lee Cowan 
William Rotzcll Davey 
John Paul Devlin 
Joseph J. Eisenhuth 
Bert Howard Garcia, J r # 
Walter Freeman Gard 
Robert Georg e Geir 
Mildred C. Ilarriman 
Jesse Glenn Hawthorne 
Paul Musser Heberling 
Joseph John Hromadik 
Merril Jameson Humbert 



Melvin William Isenberg 
Marvin William Kahn 
Harry Albert Kahn 
Albert Sydney Kaplan 
Martin Jay Krakauer 
Jack Celeig Landy 
Nada Ledinko 
John Witt Lewis 
Harry Franklin Longwell 
Harry Montgomery Luhrs 
Lawrence John McGrael, Jr. 
Murry Carpenter McJunkin 
Jean Edna MaGuire 



-8- 



MASTER CF SCIENCE (oon'd) 



\ 



Hung Xee Miao 
George Harold Millnan 
Albert Samuel Mowery 
D e lrnar Knisley Myers 
Stanley Leo Nale 
Charles S, Nevin 
Mary B^igid G'Hara 
Nicholas A. Petrick 
Romulo Q-uintero 
John Moses Rakusin 
Allan MacDonald Heece 
Howard William Riok 
Joseph Robert Riden 



Charles Henry Riden our 
John William Roberts 
Norma Ruth Robinson 
Lawrence S. Rothstein 
Delia Mar tin, Roy 
A'D e lbert Peilett Samson 
Javier . S a nohez 
Harvey Edward Shaffer 
Joseph S, Shelly 
Thomas Carl Simmons 
James Stanley Sims, Jr» 
William H e nry Smith 
Elwood Gilbert Stetler 



Kenneth James Stodden 
Peter Gustav Sulzer 
Marjory Beth Stout 
Everett Lee Sutter 
Clarence Mo s Sykes 
John Moore Tome 
Wan-pei P. Chang Tsu 
Joseph Uhring 
Frank Irvin Varva 
William W, Wance 
Duncan F. Woodward 
Chen— Kun Wu 
Leonard G, Yeariok 



MECI-IANICAL ENGINEER 

Emilie Hartwig Brio 
DOCTOR CF EDUCATION 



Clayton Hamilton Allen 
Donald LeRoy Bailey 
Malcolm Douglas Beals 
Carl W. Bonhorst 
Earl Richard Bocser 
Marial Louise Boyar 
Robert James Day 
Jack Richard Gold 



Harvey A. Andruss 

D CTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 

Gershon Morton Goldberg 
Saul Isserow 
John Morris Kelso 
Merle Monroe Krider 
Robert Lawrence McLaughlin 
Samuel Barakat Maloof 
Nelson Samuel Marans 
Stanley Donald Melville 



Joseph William Nemec 
Edward Walter Pietrusza 
Sol Meyer Roshal 
Herbert C» Rothenberg 
James William Shigley 
William D, Smiley 
Phelps Trix 
John A, VanHorn 



q«o on M Hai v U a % 



THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 

BULLETIN 



FACULTY 



The Bulletin is published weekly during the College 
year as a means of making official announcements 
and presenting items of interest to the faculty. All 




VOL. 



36 



contributions should be as brief as possible and 
reach Louis H. Bell, Director of Public Information. 
313 Old Main, not later than 10 a. m. each Friday. 



NO. 



January 10, 1949 



14 



SALARY SCHEDULE FOR ACADEMIC STAFF ANNOUNCED 



A formal salary schedule for the 
academic staff, effective January 1, has 
been adopted by the Board of Trustees* 
At the sane tine, a detailed policy was 
established covering employment qualifi- 
cations by academic rank, and a procedure 



for promoting academic (teaching and re- 
search) personnel in rani: and/or salary. 

Details of the plan are announced in 
the January issue of "The College," 
mailed this week to all College employees, 



FEE EXEMPTION FOR 2D SEMESTER, 1948-49 



of h 

priv 

for 

memb 

in t 

trat 

that 

can 

no 1 



In 
is d 
ileg 
the 
er s 
he o 
ive 

the 
c o rip 
ater 



order for a staff member or any 
ependents t o be granted the 
e of exemption from certain fees 
2d semester, 1948-49, the staff 
hould make application immediately 
ffice of his dean or adminis- 
officer. This should be done so 

dean or administrative officer 
lete the list for fee exemption 

than Thursday, January 20, 



The name of the State Teachers Col- 
lege or credit center should be indicated 
beneath the name of the applicant for ex- 
emption, in instances where the student 
has been assigned to that institution by 
this College* 

If the staff member completes these 
arrangements by Tuesday, January 18, he 
can be assured of receiving the fee 
exemption promptly© 



MINUTES CF THE SENATE MEETING OF JANUARY 6, 1949 



The College Senate met at 4:10 p.n, 
on January 6, 1949, in Room 121 Sparks 
Building, Mr* A„0„ Morse presiding. The 
list of members present is on file in the 
Office of the Registrar, The minutes of 
the last meeting were not read since they 
had been published in the Faculty Bulle- 
tin for December 6? 1948, 

Mr, Hoffman as the officer of the 
College responsible for the recording of 
grades read a memorandum which he planned 
to read to the Council of Administration 
at its meeting on Monday, January 10, 
The memorandum pointed out that his of- 
fice was sure that it was impossible for 
the members of the staff to enforce regu- 
lations 59, 60, and 61 of the Regulations 
Affecting Undergraduate Students, edition 
1948-49, in sufficient time to have them 
effective before a second semester was 
under way for a period of only two weeks, 
Dr, Dengler pointed out that if any 
changes were t o be made in these regula- 
tions it would be a function of the Sen- 
ate rather than the Council of Adminis- 
tration, Mr, Hoffman, therefore, moved 
that rules 59, 60, and 61 be effective at 
the end of an academic year rather than 
at the end of a semester. After some 
discussion Professor Sparks pointed out 
that in his opinion these regulations were 



to become effective in September 1948 
with the admission of the freshman class 
for that class but not for the entire 
institution. An inspection of the minu- 
tes of the meeting of May 6, 1948, indi- 
cated that such was the case and that 
Regulations Affecting Undergraduate Stu- 
dents, edition 1948-49, was in error at 
the bottom of page 23» 

The statement "Rules 59, 60, and 61 
are effective beginning September, 1948, 
including members of the freshman class" 
should be changed to read: "Rules 59, 
60, and 61 will become operative with the 
olass entering in the Fall of 1948„" No 
action, therefore, was necessary on the 
motion as presented by the Registrar© 

The secretary read a communication 
from the Secretary of the Council of 
Administration recommending that regis- 
tration for the Spring semester begin on 
February 3 at 8 a m. instead of February 
4 because of athletic events scheduled 
for February 5 throughout the afternoon 
and evening of that day. The Senate so 

V0t0d ° PENN STATE O 

The secretary read a communication 
from Dean Henderson of the newly created 
School of Home Economics announcing 



Senators as elected by the School: For 
the remainder of the academic year 1943- 
49. Mary Brown Allgood, Ina Padgett , and 
Margaret E. Riegel, and for a terra ending 
at the end of the academic year 1949-50, 
Amy G. Gardner, Helen R» LeBaron, and 
William M» Smith, Jr. Dean Henderson 
also pointed out that in addition to her- 
self the following are automatically mem- 
bers of the Senate. Jean D. Amberson, 
Esther A. Atkinson, Winona L. Morgan, 
Delpha E. Wie sendanger , Mary L, Dodds, 
and Ruth E. Graham. 



A lette 
changes in s 
of Education 
the" School o 
Dr. 'Winona L 
LeBaron, the 
Bixby and Dr 
letter also 
Dr>. P.C. We a 
Dr. Willis E 
Dr. Weaver w 
ber of the S 
elected to t 



r from Dean Tr 
enate members 
. caused' by-the 
f Home Economi 
« Morgan and D 
School electe 
. Robert G. Be 
announced the 
ver to take th 
« Pratt who ha 
as, however , a 
enate and Dr, 
ake the place 



abue announced 
in the School 

sett ing up of 
cs, To replace 
r. Helen 
d Dr. Paul 
rnreut er. The 
appointment of 
e place of 
s resigned, 
n elected mem- 
Lepley has been 
of Dr. Weaver. 



• A letter from Dean Steidle of the 
School of Mineral. Industries announced the 
election of Dr. Phyllis R, Griess tr re- 
place Dr. John R. Low, Jr. for the balance 
of the academic year . 1948-49, 



The above communications ; 
in the Office of the Registrar 



.re on file 



Under the heading of reports of 
standing committees, the . Commit te'e on 
Academic Standards recommended';, an ex- 
ception to the rule prohibiting corres- 
pondence study on the part of regularly 
enrolled students for Mr. William Rager 
and an exception 1 t he credit by exami- 
nation rule in the case of. Mr. Clayton B n 
Hill. .Both of these recommendations are '- 
on file in the Office of the Registrar 
and they were, on mot ioh rf " adopt ed« 

The Committ ee ■ on Committee s , recog- 
nizing the establishment of the School of 
Home Economics, announced the following 
additions to £snate cemmittees: 

Admissions — Ruth E, Graham 
Courses of Study — Helen R. LeBaron 
Military Instruction — Esther A, 

At k i n s o n 
Committees — Margaret E. Riegel 
Scholarship and Awards — Mary Brown 

Allgood 
Academic Standards — R.G. Bemr<.uii.e.r 



Committees that the By- 
Committee on Academic S 
consist of "seven membe 
Examiner." Believing t 
was intended to have a 
from each undergraduate 
it should have a repres 
school, the Committee o 
mends to the S e nate tha 
tion 1 (e), be amended 



Laws specify the 
tandards shall 
rs and the College 
hat this committee 
repre sentat i-ve 

school and that 
entative from each 
n Committees^ recom- 
t Article II, See- 
to read : 



(e ) Academic Standards, one member 
from each of the schools, including the 
Graduate School, 

This recommendation wa s> placed on 
the table for consideration at the next 
meeting of the Senate. The report of the 
Committee on Committees is on file in 
the Office of the Registrar, 

Professor Bui linger, Chairman of the 
Committee on Courses of Study, presented 
a report which will lie on the table for 
one month. The report of this committee 
is on file in the Office of the Registrar, 

Mr. Louis A. Richardson, Chairman of 
the Committee on Public Occasions, pre- 
sented a report announcing the order of 
the ceremonies for the Commencement on 
January 31. The report which is on file 
in the Office of the Registrar was recei- 
ved, 

■Mr.- Morse pointed out that all mem- 
bers of the Senate were expected to at- 
tend the. various Commencement Exercises 
of the College, according to act Lpn . take n 
by the. Senate at its meeting o'n April 
10, 1947. 

Dr. C.O. Williams stated that the 
.next me.et.ing of the Senate would normally 
be held when registration was in progress. 
On motion the S e nate voted to postpone < 
the meeting one week and to meet on Eeb— 



uary 10, at 4 
Build ing. 



10 p.m. in Room 121 Sparks 



Professor Werner' asked whether any 
progress. had been made in the appointment 
of a person to make a complete codifica — 
'tion of, the regulations of the College as 
recommended in the annual report of the 
Committee on' Rules, Mr, Morse announced^ 
that no such appointment had been made 
largely on account of the difficulty in 
finding ^a suitable per son £ o take ever 
the Vork, or one that could be snared : 
frora the work for which he is now 
scheduled. ■■ 



These recommendations, which ■ha.d 
been previously approved by President 
MiXholland,' were received 'and accepted. 
The Commait+_e<? on Coomittees further 
stated that : 

It was noted by the Committee on 



After a brief discussion the Se,nate' 
ad j ourned • 

Wm, "S. 'Hoffman 
■ Secretary 



OF GENERAL INTEREST 



GRADUATE FACULTY: The Graduate faculty 
will meet at 4 p.m. on Tuesday, January 
18, in Room 208, Buckhout Laboratory « 

* * * 

CHAPEL: Rev* Enre Kovacs, lecturer and 
writer on religious and social issues^ 
Program Associates, Inc., Utica, NoY.j, 
will speak at chapel services on Sunday 
morning. 

* * » 

COURSES OF STUDY: The regular meeting of 
the Senate Courses of Study Committee 
will be held at 10 a.m. on Thursday, 
January 20, in Room 207, Engineering "C"» 

* * * 

LUNCHEON CLUB: Frank S. Neusbaum, ad- 
ministrative head, Motion Picture and 
Recording Studio, will discuss the work 
of the studio at the Faculty Luncheon 
Club meeting on Monday noon, January 17. 

* * * 

AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY: Members of 
the Central Pennsylvania section, Ameri- 
can Chemical Society, will meet at 7:30 
p.m. Tuesday, January 18, in Room 119, 
Osmond Laboratory. H.D. Hartough, of the 
research laboratories, Socony -Vacuum Oil 
Co., will discuss the "Chemistry of 
Thiophene and Its Derivatives," 

* * * 

AAUP : The meeting of the American Asso- 
ciation of University Professors, 
scheduled for 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, Janu- 
ary 12, will be held in Room 219, 
Electrical Engineering Building, instead 
of in Room 110 Electrical Engineering 
Building, as previously announced*) De- 
velopments in faculty salaries and their 
relationship to living costs will be 
considered in a discussion led by William 
L* Werner, professor of American litera- 
ture and 'chairman of the Committee on 
Faculty Salaries and Tenure. 

* * * 

AAUW: "Problems Our Schools Must Meet" 
will be the subject of a panel discus- 
sion to be held at the meeting of the 
Amrican Association of University '.."omen 
at 8 p.m. Thursday in the State College 
high school library. Speakers will in- 
clude Mrs. John J, Gibbons, chairman of 
the AAUW Education Committee', Dr« M.R. 
Trabue, dean of the School of Education, 
and Dr. Jessie Bernard, associate profes- 
sor of sociology, 

* * * 

LECTURE: E. Baldwin Smith, chairman cf 
the department of art and archaeology at 
Princeton University, will deliver a 
public lecture at 8 p.m. Wedne sday in 
Room 110, Electrical Engineering Build- 
ing. His subject will be: "Ancient 
versus Modern Concepts of Architecture*" 
The le-obure is sponsureJ by the depart- 
ment of architecture* 

* * * 

COLLOQUIUM: Dr. W.F.G. Swann, of the 
Bartol Research Foundation, and former 



president of the American physical 
Society, will speak on "The Primary Cosmic 
Radiation" at the Physics Colloquium at 
4:25 p.m. Tuesday in Room 117, Osmond 
Laboratory* - 

* * * 

LECTURE DISPLAY: The Hillel Foundation 
invites the public to a lecture-display 
on Palestine antiquities by Paul I 
Ilton, journalist and archeologist , at 
8 p.m. Sunday. An exhibit of original 
paintings by Jewish artists will continue 
until the end of this week -at the Hillel 
Foundation. 

* * * 

ASM: L,L, Ferrell, director of metallurgy 
for the Crucible Steel Company of America, 
will be the guest speaker at the monthly 
meeting of the Penn State chapter of the 
American Society for Metals at 8 p.m. 
Tuesday in theMineral Industries Art 
Gallery, 

* * * 

PI GAMMA; MU: Pi Gamma Mu, honorary- 
social science fraternity, has announced 
a series of five open meetings on the 
status, methods, and achievements of the 
social sciences. The first, dealing 
with sociology, will be held at 8 p.m. 
Wednesday in Atherton Hall 

* * * 

TALK ON CLOTHING: Marian P. Fraser, assis- 
tant professor of home economics, will 
present a talk on clothing at the First 
Methodist church at 8 p.m.^ Tuesday. The 
talk, titled, "Makeovers for Women and 
Children," is sponsored by the State 
College Women's Club. 

* * * 

WORLD FEDERALISTS: The State College 
chapter of the United World Federalists 
will hold its regular meeting at 8 o'clock 
on Thursday in Room 304, Old Main Building, 
Dr., Alfred G, Pundt, associate professor 
of European history, will speak on "An 
Historian Looks at World Government." 
The meeting is open to all interested^ 

* * * 

SEMINAR: Dr. Ray H, Dotterer, professor 
emeritus of philosophy, will discuss 
Plato's geometrical explanation of the 
four elements at the Philosophy Seminar 
to be held in Room 6, Central Library, at 
3:30 p.m. Tuesday, January 18 

* * * 

TEACHER EX;j.IS : Applicants for the 10th 
annual National Teacher Examinations 
should file their applications in Room 
109, Burrowes Building, before January 22, 
The examinations will be offered on Febru- 
ary 19 and February 26 , 

* * » 

TALK ON FLOOR COVERING: John V. Sneallie, 
of the Mohawk Carpet Mills, Inc., will 
speak on floor coverings at 9 a.m., 10 a»m«, 
and 8 p.m. on Tuesday in Room 228, Home 
Economics Building. Interested persons 
are invited to the talks. 



. 



ATTEND MEETINGS: Seven members of the 
Speech and Hearing Clinic staff at the 
College attended the meetings of the" 
American Speech and Hearing Association 
in Washington, D,C, recently. They were 
Dr, C, Cordelia Brong, Charles Elliot*, 
Margaret Raabe., Dorothy Brandow, Wilna 
Grove, Arden Monson, and Dr» Eugene T„ 
McDonald, Dr, McDonald also presented a 
pap(ccr on "Store Clerk Reactions to 
Stuttering," and was elected for a three- 
year tern to the executive council of 
the Association and named assistant 
editor of the Journal of Speech and 
Hearing Disorders,, 

* * * 

SPEAKS: Dr. s, Willard Miller, associate 
professor and chief of the divi-sion of 
ga ography, spoke at the recent meeting of 
the American Geographers held at the 
University of Wisconsin,, His subject 
was "Strip Mining— *A Problem of Land 
Utilization in Western Pennsylvania „ " 
At the same meetings, Dr. George F« Dea"sy, 
associate professor of geography, was 
elected to the council of the American 
Association of Geographers and Dr. Miller 
was appointed to the nominations commit- 
tee. Dr. Phyllis R, Griess, instructor 
in geography, also 



tt ended the sessions, 
* * * 



ATTEND MEETINGS: Victor Bee 
and head of the department o 
attended the council of fore 
executives preceeding' the na 
ings of the Society of Amcri 
in Boston recently, Other m 
department attending the* nat 
ings were Dr. W,C, Bramble', 
rey, M.K. Goddard, W,T, Near 
Worley, O.A. Schmidt, and E, 
lain. Dr. Bramble presented 
"The Forest Grazing Problem 
Deer in Eastern Forests," of 
is co-author with Dr. P.F, E 
fessor of wildlife manageme'n 
presented a report as chairm 
Society's committee on Civil 



d e , professor 
f forestry, 
stry school 
ti onal meet — 
can Foresters 
embers of the 
ional meet — 
M,¥, Humph- ' 
n, D.P. •' 
B. Chamber- 

a pape r on 
Created by 

which he 
nglish, pro- 
t„ Beede 
an for the 

Service •> 



SPEAK: Dr, Kinsley R, Smith, professor 
of psychology, spoke on "Adjustments of 
Personality Conflicts in Industry" at 
the meeting of the Central Pennsylvania 
chapter of the Society for the 'Advance- 
ment of Management in Bellefonte on' 
Thursday, - • 

* * * 

SPEAKS: Dr • Herbert Steiner, associate 
professor of German, presented a paper 
on "Rudolf Borchardt, 1877-1945" at the 
63d annual meeting of the Modern Language 
Association of America in New York re- 
cently, Thomas D, Bowman, associate 
professor of English literature, was 
among the faculty members attending the 
meet ings, 

» , * 
ARTICLE PUBLISHED: "Early Washington 
Correspondents: Some Neglected Pioneers,' 
is- the title of an article by Frederick 
B, Marbut, associate professor of journa- 
lism, which was published in the December 
issue of the Journalism Quarterly, 

* * * 

ATTEND CONVENTION: A.C, Cloetingh, Rcberi 
D, Reifsnyder, Dorothy B. Scott, Warren S, 
Snith, and Kelly Y e aton, all of the divi- 
sion of dramatics', attended the national 
convention of the American Educational 
Theatre Association held recently in 
Washington D.C, Cloetingh served on the 
committee for college dramatic curriculum! 

* * * 

PUBLISHES POEMS:" .Gerhard G. Friedrich, 
instructor in English literature, has 
published a series of poems in recent 
issues of Books Abroad, The Christian 
Century, The Educational Forum, Nature 
Magazine, and Poet Lore, The collection 
included two translations from 
Emerson and Goethe into German 
English respectively, - 

* * * 

SECOND PRIZE: Carl R. Kohler, 



ana 



m 



junior 

architecture,, won second place in the 
Tile Council of America contest conducted 
by the Beaux-Arts Institute of Design. 



OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS FROM THE OFFICE 0? THE REGISTRAR AND DEAN OF ADMISSIONS 

Wit hdrawals : 

3 Varner, Robert Clyde, CE, Jan. 5- 

\ 3 Weigand, Robert Walter, PM, Jan. 3 

3 Witmer, Philip Eugene, ME, Jan. 4 

3 Zerby, Harry Nevin, LIE,' Jan, 4 

Reasons for Wit hdrawal : Dissatisfied with curriculum, 3; injured in accident, 1; 
.illjieaSj . "L; . financ i a.1, .1 ; poor scholarship, 1; personal, 1; and change of curr iculun,l» 







THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 



C D 



FACULTY 



The Bulletin is published weekly during Ihe College 
year as a means of making official announcements 
and presenting items of interest to the faculty. All 




BULLETIN 



contributions should be as brief as possible and 
reach Louis H. Bell, Director of Public Information, 
313 Old Main, not later than 10 a. m. each Friday. 



VOL. 36 



January 17, 1949 



NO. 15 



MAJ. GEN. WILLIAM H. HARRIS ON ' NAMED COMMENCEMENT SPEAKER 



Maj, Gen, William H # Harrison, 
USA-Ret,, director of procurement for the 
Army S e rvice Forces during World War II 
and now president of International Tele- 
phone and Telegraph Co,, will he the 
speaker for the Commencement Exercises on 
January 31. 

The Commencement Exercises will be 
held at 2:30 p,m,* in Recreation Building© 

Faculty "members, and especially 
members of the "College" Senate, are re- 
minded of action by the College Senate on 
April 10, 1947, when it was stated that 
"attendance of Commencement exercises in 
academic costume should be considered a 
responsibility of each member of the Col- 
lege Senate, " ■ •' 

The Senate also -stated that this 
responsibility belongs not only to mem- 
bers of the Senate, but to the entire in- 
structional staff, and that such atten- 
dance is as much a duty and responsibility 
of individual members of the Faculty as 



are their other services to the College 



O.oca s 

that 

cept e 

ity o 

gradu 

that 

ing.j 

invit 

f easi 

repre 

(o). 

arran 

part i 

t ime c 



The Senate Committee on Public 
ions at that time also recommended 
attendance at Commencement be ac- 
d as an "administrative responsibil— 
f the Dean of the several Under- 
ate Schools, It suggests however, 
consideration.be given to the follow- 

(a )j, AH staff, members should be 
ed to attend, (b). In so far as is 
ble, there be present at least one 
sentative from each department,, 

Some equitable plan of rotation be 
ged to provide an" opportunity for' 
cipation by all over a period of 



C.E. Bullinger, College marshal, 
has announced that faculty attending 
the Commencement will assemble under, 
the balcony to the south side of 
Recreation Building at 2:10 p.m. The 
procession, will move promptly at 
2 :25 p»m« 



BACCALAUREATE SERVICE FOR GRADUATING SENIORS TO BE HELD SUNDAY MORNING 



Mid-Year Baccalaureate Services will 
be held at 11 o'clock on' Sunday morning, 
January 23, in Schwab Auditorium, 

Dr,- Paul L Thompson, president of 
Kalamazoo College, Kalamazoo, Mich,, 
will be the guest speaker. Special 
music will be presented by the Chapel 
Choir under the direction of Willa Taylor 
with George- Ceiga at the organ, James T# 



Smith, acting chaplain, will officiate. 

One of the- leading educational and 
religious leaders of the Baptist churoh, 
Dr, Thompson shares his busy executive 
life with the lecture platform and as a 
contributor to numerous religious maga- 
zines. 

No academic dress is required for 
the Baccalaureate S e rvice, 



CAMPUS "MARCH OF DIMES" DRIVE TO AID INFANTILE PARALYSIS FIGHT 



The campus drive to aid the' "March 
of Dimes" of the National Foundation 
for. Infantile Paralysis, 'which began on 
January 14, will continue until Janu- 
ary 2.4 • " ' 

Dr, Arthur L, Harnett, professor of 
physical education, is general chairman 
of the campus project, sponsored with 
the approval of the President's Office, 
by students majoring in health education. 



Dr, Evan Johns 
mathematics, i 
other employee 

Faculty 
requested to c 
re spe ct ive dep 
where March of 
Vided for that 
donations may 
nett , 11 Irvin 
Sparks Bui Id in 



on, Jr,, professor of 

s in charge of faculty and 

's contributions, 

nd other employees are 
ontribute through their 
artments and buildings 
Dimes coin boxes are pro- 
purpose. Checks or other 
be sent direct to Dr • Kar- 
Hall, or Dr, Johnson, 208 



gg tffcj 



S1ATE COLLECTION 



&UINCY HOWE TO SPEAK ON TUESDAY NIGHT 



Q.uincy Howe , CBS news analyst, lec- 
turer, traveler, and author, will speak 
at 8 o'clock on Tuesday night in Schwab 
Auditorium on "The S oviet-Araer ican Future i' 

His talk is the third in the State 
College Community Forum series* 

Born in Boston, Mass., Howe is a 
graduate of Harvard University, He ser- 
ved as editor of "Living Age" and in 



1939 became a news commentator for Sta~ 
t ion W&XR, New York. He has been with 
the Columbia Broadcasting System since 
1942. 

Howe is author of "World Diary," 
"England Expects Every American To Do 
His Duty," "Blood Is Cheaper Than Water," 
and "The News and How To Understand It." 

Tickets, priced at $1, are available 
at Student Union Office. 



GALBRAITH NAMED FACULTY COUNSELOR OF FOREIGN STUDENTS 



Robert E. Galbraith, faculty counse- 
lor of veterans, has also been named 
faculty counselor of foreign students, 

„ Jame's Milho'lland, acting president 
of the College, in announcing the appoint- 
ment, said that the action was taken to 
carry out the recommendation of one of 
the faculty committees appointed to con- 
sider post— war problems* 

.His duties will be to assist and 
coordinate existing agencies, officers 
of the College, and members of the fac- 
ulty, in their service, to, foreign stu- 
dents, and to advise foreign students on 
personal problems. 



Recognizing that many members of the 
faculty have taken an active interest in 
foreign students it was expla'ined that 
there is no intention of having the Fac- 
ulty Counselor of Foreign Students super- 
sede them. 

Galbraith will be assisted in the 
work by an advisory committee consisting 
of the following faculty members: N.M. 
Brentin, Dr. H C S. Brunner, Dr, A.J, 
Currier, Dr« II. M t . Davis/l M-, Gerhardt , Dr. 
W.H. Gray, Wixlian Jeffrey, D e an F.D. 
Kern, Dr.. Helen R. LeBaron, E.B. Stavely, 
D e ^n A.R. Warn.ock, Dr. B.C. Weaver, Dr. 
C.O. Williams, and Dean Pearl 0. Weston. 



DR. DAEL L. WOLFLE TO PRESENT SIGMA XI LECTURE FRIDAY NIGHT 



Dr. Dael L # Wolfle, executive sec- 
retary of the American Psychological - 
Association and secretary' of the Inter- 
Society Council, the advisory group for 
the proposed National Science Foundation 
Bill, will present the Sigma Xi lecture 
at 8 p ,m. 'Friday, 

The lecture, titled "A National'' ' 



Science Foundation," will be held in 

Room 119, Osmond Laboratory, and will be 
open to the public. 

Dr. Wolfle will discuss the history 

of proposals and the present status of 
the bill to establish a National Science 
Foundat ion. 



OF GENERAL INTEREST 



GRADUATE FACULTY: The Graduate faculty 
will meet at 4 p.nyi on Tuesday in Room 
208, Buckhout Laboratory. 

* « * 

REGISTRATION: At the meeting of the 
College Senate on January 6, it' wa s voted 
to change registration days from Febru- 
ary 4 and 5 to February 3/4, and 5, A 
heavy athletic schedule on February 5 
will necessitate the use of Recreation 
Building on that date, ; 

* * * 

AGRICULTURE FACULTY; The faculty. of the 
School of Agriculture will meet at 4:10 
p.m. on Friday, January 28, in Room 109, 
Agriculture Building. 

* * * 

COURSES OF STUDY COMMITTEE:'" The regular 
meeting of the Senate " Course s of Study 
Committee will be held at 10 a.m. on ,' . 
Thursday in Room 207, Engineering "C". 



MEDICAL COLLEGE TESTS: The Association 
of American Medical Colleges is giving 
the Medical College Admission tests on 
Monday, February 7. Applicants should 
^register not later than Tuesday, between 
9 and 12 and 2 and 5 o'clock in Room 210, 
Buckhout Laboratory , " 

* * * o '-. 

GRADUATE RECORD EXAM: The next Graduate 
Recor d- Ex^^inat ibn will be given on Feb- 
ruary 7 and 8. Applicants should register 
before January 20 between' 9 and 12 and 2 
and 5 o'clock in Room 210, Buckhout Lab— - 
oratory . '. -. '' * 

* * * * j ; 

COLLOQUIUM.: 'Dr. C.R, Carpenter, proces- 
sor of psychology, Trill speak at the Phy— ' 
sics Colloquium at 4:25 p.m. Tuesday in 
Room 117, Osmond Laboratory. He will dis- 
cuss: "What' A Psychologist Thinks a Col- 
lege Teacher of physics Should Know About 
Psychology ." ■..'■•', 



TYPISTS NEEDED: The College Library 
would like to have the names of persons 
who type theses or dissertations in 
order to compile a list to "be made avail- 
able to graduate students. Persons wish- 
ing to register should call the Librar- 
ian's Office (Ext, 177). 

* * * 

McELWAIN HALL: Construction on McElwain 
Hall, second unit of the new women's 
dormitories on East Campus, is progress- 
ing steadily but the building will not 
be opened for use during the second 
semester as had been planned. The dormi- 
tory will open next fall. 

* * * 

SPEECH HOUR. The Penn State Speech Hour 
will be heard regularly on M nday nights 
from 9 to 9:30 o'clock over Station WMAJ • 

* * * 

PRESENT PAPERS : Two papers will be 
presented in Room 110, Electrical Engi- 
neering Building, at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday 
at the meeting of the Centre County Sub- 
section, American Institute of Electri- 
cal Engineers, Institute of Radio Engi- 
neers, and the American Society of 
Mechanical Engineers, G.M. Dusinberre, 
associate professor of mechanical engi- 
neering, will discuss "Gas Turbine Ap- 
plications" while Roland E. Mueser, 
assistant professor of engineering re- 
search, will speak on "Jet Propulsion," 

* * * 

PI GAMMA ML: The local chapter of Pi 
Gamma Mu, social science honor society^ 
will hold its initiation and dinner at 
the AHencrest at 7 p.m, on Wednesday, 
Dr. Walter Coutu, president of the 
chapter, will give the address. Members 
of Pi Gamma Mu from other chapters or 
former members of the Penn State chapter 
are requested to make themselves known to 
the secretary, Mrs. Janet McLaughlin, 
202 Central Library (Ext. 177). 

* * * 

ASM: L,L. Ferrall, director of metal- 



lurgy for the Crucible Steel Company of 
America, will be guest speaker at the 
monthly meeting of the Penn State chapter, 
American Society for Metals, at 8 p „m, 
Tuesday at the Mineral Industries Art 
Gallery, He will discuss "Supersonic 
Testing." 

* * * 

CHEMICAL SOCIETY: Members of the Central 
Pennsylvania section of the American 
Chemical Society will meet at 7:30 p<,n, 
Tuesday in Room 119, Osmond Laboratory, 
H,D. Hartough, of the Research Labora- 
tories of the S o co ny— Vacuum Oil Co., will 
discuss "Chemistry of Thiophene and Its 
Deri vat ive s 9 " 

* * * 

ELECTED: Dr. Hans Neuberger, professor 
and chief of the division of meteorology, 
has been elected to the utilization com- 
mittee of the coal- division of the Ameri- 
can Institute of Mining and Metallurgi- 
cal Engineers' 
pollut ion. 



subcommittee on atmospheric 



The Faculty 
a Valentine 
on February 14 



F AC U LT Y W OME N ' S C LU B : 
Women's Club will hold 
Day party at 7:30 p.m. 
in Frances At he rt on Hall, Those 
desiring t o be charter members are 
requested to pay their dues to Helen 
L. Hechler, 107 Sparks Building, be- 
fore February 1„ 

* * * 

ATTEND CONFERENCE: The Penn State Chris- 
tian Association was represented at the 
recent United Student Christian Council 
Conference in Lawrence, Kans, by two 
student delegates — John K chalka, Jr., 
and Jo Ann N # Esterly, 

SEMINAR: Dr. Paul Doty, of Harvard 
University, will speak at the Chemistry 
S e minar a't 7:3 p.m. Wednesday in Room 
119 Osmond Laboratory. His subject will 
be: Investigations of Micromolecule s 
and Their Reactions by the Scattering 
of Light," The seminar will be 
all interested. 



)e open to 



COLLEGE CALENDAR 
Jan, 21, Friday - First semester classes end at 5 p.m. 
Jan, 22, Saturday - First semester examinations begin at 8 a.m, 
Jan. 31, Monday — First semester ends at 5 p.m, 

Jan, 31, Monday - First semester Commencement Exercises, 2:30 p.m, 
Feb, 3, 4, 5 — Second semester registration. 
Feb, 7, Monday - Second semester classes begin at 8 a.m. 



$tem SJATE «OLLECTlON 



CONFLICT EXAMINATION SCHEDULE 



ABCh 35 Jan 24 3:30 209 FL 

Ag Ed lv Jan 27 8 304 BL 

Ag Eng 4 Jan 1 26 3:30 304 BL 

Ag Eng 7 Jan 26 10:20 105 Ag Eng 

Ag Eng 406 Jan 26 8 2 06 Ag Eng , 

A H 21 Jan 22 8 304 BL 

Art 55 Jan 24 1:20 101 M Eng 

Bact 414 Jan 24 8 304 BL 

Bot 1 Jan 27 10:20 304 BL 

Bot 10 Jan 22 3:30 304 BL 

Bot 27 Jan 28 10:20-208 BL 

Cer 201 Jan 27 3:30 206 Ag Eng 

Cer 415 Jan 26 10:20 304 BL 

C E 61 Jan 25 10:20 106 M Eng 

C E 444 Jan 22 l.:2 106 M Eng 

Ch Eng 1 Jan 25 8 200 Ch Eng 

Chem 3 Jan 29 8 304 BL 

Chem 30 Jan 24 8 10 Sparks 

Chem 32 Jan 28 8 104 Osmond 

Chem 34 Jan 27 10:20 104 Osmond 

Chem 40 Jan 24 8 104 Osmond 

Chem'44 Jan 25 8 109 Osmond 

Comp Lit 1 Jan 22 10:20 11 Sparks 

C om 5 Jan 26 8 12 Sparks 

Cnm 15 Jan 25 7 12 Sparks 

Com 20 Jan 25 8 12 Sparks r 

Com 21 Jan 24 1:20 11 Sparks 

Com 25 Jan 22 8 11 Sparks 

Com 30 Jan 25 10:20 105 For 

Com 31 Jan 22 8 6 Sparks 

Com 41 Jan 24 7 8 Sparks 

Com 47 Jan 25 3:30 13 Sparks 

Com 60 Jan 27 8 11 Sparks 

Com 90 Jan 22 3:30 13 Sparks 

DH 1 Jan 24 3:30 211 Dairy 

Econ 1 Jan 28 8 1 Sparks 

Ecnn 14 Jan 24 1:20 13 Sparks 

Eoon 15 Jan 28 8 11 Sparks 

Econ 16 Jan 27 10:20 11 Sparks 

Eoon 18 Jan 25 3:30 11 Sparks 

Econ 65 Jan 24 7 105 Ch Eng 

Ed 1 Jan 25 3 :30 204 BB 

Ed 51 Jan 29 8 204 BB 

EE 1 Jan 28 3 :30 2 00 EE 

EE 4 Jan 25 8 3 EE 

EE 8 Jan 26 R 3 EE 

EE 9 Jan 25 8 200 EE 

EE 12 Jan 26 1:2 207 EE 

E Lit 4 Jan 28 8 7 Sparks 

E Lit 20 Jan 22 3:30 7 Sparks 

E Lit 25 Jan 28 8 6 Sparks 

E Lit 26 Jan 25 7 11 Sparks 

E Lit 71 Jan 25 3:30 5 Sparks 

Ger 3 Jan 25 8 11 Sparks 

Geog 15 Jan 24 3:30 105 M I 

Geol 20 Jan 27 8 105 M I 

Geol 31 Jan 24 10:20 105 M I 

Greek 25 Jan 24 10;20 11 Sparks 



H Ed 244 Jan 27 3:30 12 I H" 

H Ec 12 Jan 25 8 118 H Ec 

H Ec 14 Jan 26 3:30 14 H Ec 

H Ec 15 Jan 26 10:20 224 H Ec 

H Ec 18 Jan 25 3:30 118 H Ec 

H Ec 109 Jan 24 3:30 118 H Ec 

H Ec 213 Jan 26 8 118 H Ec 

II Ec 220 Jan 29 10:20 118 H Ec 

Hist 18' Jan 22 1:20 14 Sparks 

Hist 19 Jan 26 8 13 Sparks 

Hist 20 Jan 25 10:20 12 Sparks 

Hist 21 Jan 26 1:20 105 Sparks 

Ind Ed 101 Jan 26 8 204 BB 

IE 205 Jan 24 10;20 210 Eng C 

I E 315 Jan 24 3:30 209 Eng C 

I E 327 Jan 27 1:20 202 Eng B 

I E 404 Jan 25 8 202 Eng B 

I E 409 Jan 27 8 208 Eng C 

J our ni Jan 27 1:20 111 CH 

Journ 15 Jan 27 1:20 100 CH 

Journ 40 Jan 27 8 100 CH 

Journ 43 Jan 24 8 100 CH 

Journ 4 8 Jan 26 8 100 CH 

Math 7 Jan 26 11 Sparks 10:20 

Math 10 Jan 26 1:20 11 Sparks 

Math 11 Jan 26 3:30 5 Sparks 

Math 75 Jan 27 1:20 11 Sparks 

Math 431 Jan 25 8 13 Sparks 

M E 6 Jan 24 8 201 Eng D 

M E 105 Jan 25 3:30 105 M Eng 

M E Des 6 Jan 28 10:20 202 Eng D 

Mchs 14 Jan 25 102 Eng A 3:30 

Met 59 Jan 25 3:30 105 M I 

Met 411 Jan 24 8 104 M I 

Meteor 300 Jan 27 10:2 225 M I 

Min 31 Jan 27 3:30 105 M I 

Min 46 Jan 24 8 105 M I 

Mus 5 Jan 24 8 111 CH 

Phil 1 Jan 24 8 1 Sparks 

Phil 2 Jan 28 3:30 1 Sparks 

Phys Sci 1 Jan 25 10:20 104 Osmond 

Pol Sci 4 Jan 31 8 4 Sparks 

Pol Sci 419 Jan 25 10:20 1 Sparks 

PH 1 Jan 28 3:30 204 Hort 

Psy" 2 Jan 22 10:20 209 BB 

psy 3 Jan 2 9 8 2 06 BB 

Psy 17 Jan 26 7 204 BB 

Psy 412 Jan 27 8 204 BB 

Phys 26 9 Jan 27 8 104 Osmond 

Phys 306 Jan 24 8 113 Osmond 

Phys 403 Jan 25 1:20 113 Osmond 

Phys 411 Jan 26 8 113 Osmond 

Phys 467 Jan 28 8 113 Osmond 

Soc 60 Jan 24 10:20 6 Sparks 

Soc 403a Jan 22 3:30 11 Sparks 

Soc 409 Jan 25 1:20 4 Sparks 

Zool 41 Jan 24 7 209 FL 



OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS FROM THE OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR AND DEAN OF ADMISSIONS 

Withdrawals : 



5 Dantsker, Judith L«, AL, Jan. 7 3 Pigula, David, EE, Jan. 10 

4 Hoffman, James Robert, 2-yr Ag, Dec, 10 5 Sutherland, Charles K , CF, Nov. 23 



Reasons for Withdrawal: Financial, 2; to be married, 1; accident and illness, 1 # 



THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 

SPRING SEMESTER 1949 

REGISTRATION 

Thursday, February 3 3 a.m. to 12M 8th and 7th Semester students 

Thursday, February 3 1:10 to 5 p.m. 6th Semester students 

Friday, February 4 8 a.m. to 12M 5th and 4th semester students 

Friday, February 4 1:10 to 5 p.m. Graduate s-S pecial-New students 

'Saturday, February 5 8 a.m. to 12!vl To complete registration 

Students who do not register according to this schedule will be considered late and 
will be assessed late fee. No students will be registered ahead of scheduled time. 

UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 

Report to your Adviser. 

If a student does not know his Adviser he should report to the Head of the 
Department in which he is enrolled or to the office of the Dean of his school, 

A student for whom First Phase Registration has been completed will receive a 
schedule from his Adviser. He then reports with the schedule directly to the 
Recreation Building to complete registration. 

Any student who has NOT COMPLETED FIRST PHASE REGISTRATION will first receive a 
schedule card signed by an adviser or the Dean of the school in which he is enrolled 
and then : 

A, Report to the Board of Control in the Armory and receive approval for each 
course scheduled, 

B, When approval has been received for each course on the signed schedule, report 
to College Scheduling Officer to have schedule stamped, 

C, Report to Recreation Building to complete registration. 

D, Any student who desires to change his schedule before completing registration 

at Recreation Building must secure a special change of schedule form from his adviser. 
This form is presented to the Board of Control for processing and initialing. Stu- 
dent will report to a member of the Board of Control for each subject listed on the 
change of schedule form. After each course has been initialed report to College 
Scheduling Officer to have form stamped. Then report to Recreation Building to com- 
plete registration. When a student changes his schedule before completing registra- 
tion at Recreation Building, he must record on the official registration form the 
revised scheduled only. 

GRADUATE STUDENTS 

Graduate student must have schedule signed by his Adviser and Dean of Graduate School, 
Graduate students may register until February 12, 1949 without paying late regis- 
tration fee, 

SPECIAL STUDENTS 

Employees of the College 

Schedule must be signed by the Dean or A^minA? tra-fcive Officer 1 in the school or 
department in which the student is employed-. 

Employee then reports to poaa*<i of Control, and then to Recreation Building to 
complete registration. 

Students not employees of th<= College; 

Schedule must be signed by Mr, A#W. Stewart,, Chief Recorder, 109 Old Main. 
Students rep-os-t to Bca.i-d of Control, and then to Recreation Building to complete 
regJ-F'tratioH. 

( over ) 



TRANSITION STUDENTS 

AlX men report- to Dean A.R» Warnock, 111 Old Main* 

All women report to Dean Pearl 0. Weston, 105 Old Main, 

ANNOUNCEMENTS 

ALL VETERANS must register in "basement Carnegie Building, immediately after comple- 
ting registration in the Recreation Building. 

Classes will assemble according to the Time Table for the first time Monday at 8 a # m, 

After Saturday, February 5, registration hours will be announced by the respective 
offices. A fee of FIVE DOLLARS will be charged for registration beginning M nday, 
February 7, 1949, 

On Friday February 25, go tc the Recreation Building and pay your fees. Be sure to 
get your itemized receipted bill # 

The office rf the Bursar in the Recreation Building will be open from 9:00 a,m, to 
4 p.m. continuously. 

Official copies of the Time Table may be seen at all advisers offices, and may be 
purchased by students at the office of the College Scheduling Officer, in the 
Arnory, 



Abbie Cromer 
Central Library 



THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 



FACULTY 



The Bulletin is published weekly during the College 
year as a means of making official announcements 
and presenting items of interest to the faculty. All 




VOL. 



36 



LLETIN 



eotfiiributions should be as brief as possible and 
reach Louis H. Bell, Director of Public Information, 
313 Old Main, not later than 10 a. m. each Friday. 



January 24, 1949 



NO. 



16 



803 STUDENTS CANDIDATES FOR DEGREES AT COMMENCEMENT MONDAY AFTERNOON 



Eight hundred and three sen- 
iors and graduate students are 
candidates for degrees at the mid- 
year Commencement Exercises to be 
held in Recreation Building at 
2:30 p.m. on Monday, January 31, 

Maj. Gen. William H, Harrison, 
president of International Tele- 
phone and Telegraph Co. and during 



the war, director 
Corps Procurement 



of the Signal 
and Distribution 



Service, will address the graduates. 

Of the 692 candidates for 
bachelor degrees, 578 are men and 
114 women. Ninety- five men and 16 
women will receive advanced de- 
grees . 

Candidates for bachelor de- 
grees, according to Schools, are; 
Agriculture, 123; Chemistry and 



Phys Ics 



■ducation, 70; Engi 



neering, 183; Home Economics, 25; 
the Liberal Arts, 217; M i ne r a 1 
Industries, 32; and Physical Edu- 
cation and Athletics, 15. 

Advanced degrees to be con- 
ferred are: master of arts, 2; 
master of education, 16; master 



of science 



doc tor of educa- 



tion, 2; doctor of philosophy, 16 
engineer of mines, 1; and mechani- 
cal engineer, 1, 

Among the undergraduates are 
473 veterans while 57 of the can- 
didates for advanced degrees are 
veterans . 

Faculty attending the Com- 
mencement Exercises will assemble 
under the balcony on the south 
side of Recreation Building at 
2:10 p.m. The procession will 
move promptly at 2:25 p.m. 



PROCEDURES FOR CHANGING SCHEDULE BEFORE AND AFTER FIRST PHASE REGISTRATION 



All changes made in sched- 
ules that have been processed 
through Fi rs t Phas Registration 
must be made on a new form which 
has been sent to Advisers, 

All changes made in sched- 
ules that have been processed 
through Final P h ase Registration 
(in Recreation Building) must be 
made on the old form, Drop-Add, ' 
which is divided into three parts. 
The co forms will not be accepted 



by the College Scheduling Officer 
before February- 7. 

All changes in schedules 
must be processed through the 
Board of Control. When the Board 
is not assembled in the Armory, 
students must have each course 
on the schedule or change of 
schedule signed by the head of 
the department in which each 
course is taught. 



(gfeisN STAT E COLl.EC 



SCHOOL OF HOWE ECONOMICS PLANS SPECIAL PROGRAM FOR FEBRUARY 8, 9, AND 10 



Hundreds of Pennsylvania home- 
makers and home economists arc ex- 
pected to visit the campus on Feb- 
ruary 8 to 10 to attend the inaug- 
uration program marking the estab- 
lishment of the School of Home 
Economics , 

Dr. Lee Vincent, dean of the 
College of Home Economics at Cor- 
nell University, will be the 
principal speaker at the opening 
convocation in Schwab Auditorium 
at 4; 10 p.m. on February 8. 

Two former directors of home 
economics, Edith P. Chacc, v/ho 
headed the department from 1918 
until her retirement in 1937 and 
Dr. Laura W, Drummond, who was 
director of home economics from 
1938 to 1945, will participate in 



the program. 

A series of talks and demon- 
strations in all phases of the 
work conducted by the School of 
Home Economics will continue from 
9 a.m. to 9 p.m. on February 9 
and 10. Many special exhibits 
also have been arranged. 

Committee chairman making 
arrangements for the program are: 
Dr. Winona L. Morgan, general 
chairman; Dr. Ruth R. Honey, open 
house; Gladys Wasmuth, exhibits 
and t ou rs ; Ma ri on S . McDowe 11, 
guest list; Marian P. Fraser, 
housing; Dr. Helen R. LeBaron, 
convocation; Mary Brown ..11 good, 
reception; and Dr. W.M. Smith, 
Jr . , publ ici ty . 



LIBRARY HOURS FOR BETWEEN-SEMESTERS PERIOD /ENOUNCED 



The Central Library will 
observe the following hours be- 
tween semesters: 



Sunday, January 31, Z to 5 

OF GENERAL INTEREST 



p .m • ; Monday, Janue. ry 31, 7:50 
a.m. to 5 p.m.; Tuesday, February 
1 through Saturday, February 5, 
9 a„m, to 5 p.m ? ; and Sunday, 
February 6, Z p.m. to 5 p.m. 



SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURE: There will 
be a meeting of the faculty of 
the School of Agriculture at 4:10 
p.m. on Friday in Room 109, 
Agriculture Building, 



SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING: The fac- 
ulty of the School .of Engineering 
v/i 1 1 meet at 5:10 p.m. on Tues- 
day, February 15, in Room 110, 
Electrical Engineering Building, 

LUNCHEON CLUB: C.J. Rowland, 
professor of economics, will ad- 
dress the Faculty Luncheon Club 
on Monday, January 31. He will 
speak on principal changes in 
CIk? income tnv InW. 



COLLOQUIUM: Dr. Leo Nedelsky, 
associate professor of physics 
and a member of the Board of 
Examiners at the University of 
Chicago, will speak at the 
Physics Colloquium at 4:25 p.m. 
Tuesday in Room 117, Osmond Lab- 
oratory. His subject will be: 
"Testing in Terms of Specific 
Objectives in Physics Teaching," 

S PEAK I NG OUT -OF - TOWN ? Faculty 
and staff members v/ho are speak- 
ing in cities where there are 
Penn State alumni Clubs and who 
would be interested in visiting 
with the clubs while there are 
requested to call Ridge Riley, 
executive secretary of the Alumni 



Association (Ext. 192) as soon as 
arrangements for the talk are 
comple ted . 

CHORAL SOCIETY: Faculty and staff 
members or graduate students who 
would be interested in singing 
with the State College Choral 
Society are invited to attend 
rehearsals held each Monday night 
at 7; 30 o'clock in the third 
floor room of the Wesley Founda- 
tion Building at St. Paul's 
Methodist* church. New members 
will be accepted until February. 
The group, under the direction of 
Mrs. Duane Ramsey, is rehearsing 
Bach's B minor Mass and next 
December plans to sing Bach's 
Christmas Oratorio, Dr. R.B« 
Power, professor of engineering 
research, is president of the 
group. 

AT MEETING: Dr. Alfred H. Griess, 
physician in the College Health 
Service, represented the Health 
Service at the annual meeting of 
the American Student Health Asso- 
ciation in San Francisco recently. 
He served on the Committee on 
Admi ni s trat ion. 



LANGUAGE EXAMS : Foreign language 
reading examinations required of 
candidates for advanced degrees 
will be given on March 7 from 7 
to 9:00 p.m. in Room 316 Sparks 



Building. All candidates should 
register before February 7, for 
French and Spanish in 300 Sparks 
Building, and for German in ZZ9 
Sparks . 

ATTEND MEETINGS: Paul H. Margolf, 
professor of poultry husbandry, 
attended meetings in Chicago last 
week in connection with the new 
"Chicken of Tomorrow" contest. 
He is working with the national 
committee for sponsoring produc- 
tion of superior me a t type 
chickens . 



TO ATTEND MEETING: Dr. James J. 
Gemmc 1 1 , associate professor of 
economics and business education, 
will attend the me e t i n g s of the 
National Association of Business 
Teacher Training Institutions, 

NAMED TO STAFF: Patricia M. Woods 
and George L. Earnshaw, Jr., both 
candidates for degrees on January 
31, have be e n name d assistant 
secretaries in the Christian 
Association for the second semes- 
ter. Ma r j o r i e ^ 1 1 c n , asso- 
ciate secretary, and Earnshaw, 
will attend the Student Chris- 
tian Movement Staff conference 
at Pend lc Hill, Wa 1 1 i ngf o r d , 
on Thursday and Friday. 



REGISTRATION SCHEDULE 

Thursday, February 3, 6 a.m. to noon--Reg i s t ra t ion of 7th and 8th 

semester students. 
Thursday, February 3, 1:10 to 5 p.m. --Reg i s trat ion of Sth semester 

students. 
Friday, February 4, 8 a.m. to noon-~Rcg is trat ion of 5th and 4th semes- 

te r students . 
Friday, February 4, 1:10 to 5 p.m.-- Registration of graduate, special 

and new students. 
Saturday, February 5, 8 a.m. to noon--Comple te registration. 
Monday, February 7, 8 a.m. --Second semester classes begin. 

OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS FROM THE OFFICE OF THE DEAN TF ADMISSIONS AND REGISTRAR 

Withdrawal s ; 

Gr AmLandos, James John, Pram, Jan. 8 5 Saunders, Patricia R,, AL, Oct, 3 

6 Bauer, Harry H, PNG, Dec. 8 5 Schmerin, John. S., EE, Jan, 17 

1 Carpenter, Joseph Mason, For., Jan. 6 Sp Sprang, L. Ronald, LA, Nov. 15 

Sp Gido, John Paul, LA, Deo, IS Sp Zelinski, Mildred M. , AL llev* 15 

3 Olinger, F. Ralph, LD, Jan. 5 -.•...- 

Reasons for Withdrawal: Illness, 4; illness in family, .2; lack of tine... 1; to 
Secure employment, 1; and personal, 1, 



?ENN STATE COLLECTION 



A/bbie Cromer 
Central Library 



d. ■ i- 



THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 



FACULTY 



The Bulletin is published weekly during the College 
year as a means of making official announcements 
and presenting items of interest to the faculty. All 




BULLETIN 



contributions should be as brief as possible and 
reach Louis H. Bell, Director of Public Information, 
313 Old Main, not later Ihes!. 10 a, m. each Friday. 



VOL. 



36 



February *7, 1949 



NO,. 



APPROPRIATIONS, TOTALLING $18,386,000 REQUESTED FOR COLLEGE BY GOVERNOR DUFF 



Appropr iat ion s ,, totalling 
$18,386,000 were recommended for the 
College to the Pennsylvania Legislature 
last week by Governor James H. Duff. 

In the Governor's budget, a total 
of $10,386 ,000 was requested for the 
College for the bienniun, 1949-51. Of 
this amount, $9,826,000 was requested 
for general maintenance, while the 



remaining $56 0,000 was earmarked for 
special projects. 

The Governor also included a recom- 
mendation for an appropriation of 
$8,000,000 for construction work at the 
College in a General State Authority 
program he proposed to the Pennsylvania 
Legislature . 



FACULTY, STUDENTS, TOWNSPEOPLE INVITED TO HOME ECONOMICS PROGRAM THIS WEEK 



The formal inauguration program for 
the new School of Heme Economics will 
'open with a convocation at 4:10 p.m. 
Tuesday in Schwab Auditorium and continue 
with demonstrations, lectures, and 
exhibits in the Hs-sje Economics Building 
on Wednesday and Thursday, 

The program will be open to 'all 
members of the faculty and students as 
well as townspeople. The School extends 
an earnest invitation to the campus and 
the community to attend the convocation 
and the full program on Wednesday and. 
Thursday* 

The program for the convocation will 
include the' Charge to the School of Home 
Economics by James Milholland, acting 
president of the College, followed by 
the Response by Dr. Grace M. Henderson, 
dean of the School, and Cynthia Doan and 
David Browne, students in the School of 
Home Economics. * " ' 



Dr. Elizabeth Lee Vincent, dean of 
the College of Home Economics at Cornell 
University, will speak on "The Contribu- 
tion of H me Economics in the Education of 
Today's Citizens," 

The program Wednesday will open at 
9 a,m, and continue until 10 p.m. in the 
Home Economics Building. On Thursday the 
program will continue from 9 a.m. to 4 
p.m. Demonstrations, lectures, and 
exhibits in all departments and divisions 
of the School will be presented. 

From 3 to 4 p.m. on Wednesday and 
Thursday, Simmons Hall will be open to 
visitors while Hillcrest, Beecher, and 
Benedict Home Management Houses will be 
open from 10 a.m. to 12 a..m, and 2 to 4 
p.m. on Wednesday and Thursday and 
from 7 to 8 p.m. on Wednesday. 

Dr. Winona L# Morgan is general 
chairman of the program. 



OFFICE SERVICES DIVISION ESTABLISHED 



The establishment 



of an Office Ser- 
vices Division as a division of the De- 
partment of Public Information was 
announced today. The division, of which 
Henry F. Goeken is supervisor, will be 
located in Room 308, Old Main. The 
telephone extension is 183M. 

Services offered include* typing, 
stencil cutting, mnne graphing, assenr*- 



bling, folding, and mailing, A meflsenger 
is available tc pick up and deliver work. 

College agencies requesting work 
may furnish their own typed stencils 
or other materials or have them supplied 
by Office Services Division. All 
charges are made on ,a ,cost basis. The 
division is now open for business. 



ffciNiN 



biAiu C. LixCTlON 



DR. G.C. GHANDL1E TO RETIRE MARCH 31 j OTHER CHANGES APPROVED BY TRUSTEES 

Dr. Grover C« Chandlee, professor Promotions approved included those 

and head of the department of chemistry ^ of Dr. Arnold J, Currier, Dr. A» Witt 

will retire March 31 as professor Hutchison, and Dr, Mary L. Willard, all 

emeritus of chemistry. He has served on associate professors of chemistry, to 

the faculty for 42 years. the rank of professor of chemistry. 

All are effective February 1. Dr, Joseph 

Dr, Chandlee's position will be J. Lowden, associate professor of educa— 

filled by Dr , W» Conrad Fernelius, pro- tion, was promoted to professor of educa- 

fessor and chairman of the department of cation, and Margaret A. Neuber, assistant, 

chemistry at Syracuse University. His professor of elementary education, was 

appointment had been previously announced. named associate professor of elementary 

education, effective February 1, Lavonia 

The Board of Trustees at their Janu- Ililbert, instructor in clothing extension, 
ary 21 meeting also approved the retire- has been promoted to assistant professor 
ment, effective February 28, of F.S. of clothing extension, effective Januaryl, 
Bucher, agricultural extension represen- 
tative in Lancaster county. Bucher ser— Harry S. Sloat, assistant agricul- 
ved in that capacity since 1913 and has tural extension representative in Lan- 
had the longest service of any of the caster county, was promoted to the newly- 
agricultural extension representatives, created rank of associate agricultural 
He served on the faculty of the depart- extension representative, 
ment of agronomy for a year prior to his 

appointment in extension. The Board accepted the resignation 

of Jose Rojas Garciduenas, visiting pro — 

Dr. Charles D. Cox, assistant pro- fessor of romance languages, effective 

fessor of bacteriology at the Medical January 31, 
College of Virginia, has been appointed 

associate professor of bacteriology, Leaves of absence were approved for 

effective February 1. He received his C.E. Bullinger, professor of industrial 

bachelor's, master's, and doctor of engineering, June 15 to September 14 and 

philosophy degrees at the University of June 15, 1950 to September 14, 1950, to 

Illinois and served on the staff there write a textbook; Dr. M.W, White, profes- 

and as a bacteriologist in the U.S. Army sor of physics, for second semester for 

prior to going to the Medical College travel; Ina Padgett, professor of foods 

of Virginia, and nutrition, for the first semester, 

1949-50, for travel and visits to other 

Chester R. Underhill, commercial institutions interested in nutrition; and 

and supervisory engineer with RCA, Camden, Dr. C.S. Anderson, professor of agricul- 

N.J., nas been named administrative tural education, for six months beginning 

assistant of the Watson Laboratories in February 1, for study and writing, 
the Engineering Experiment Station, ef- 
fective January 1. A graduate of Ebor Leaves also were approved fcr 
College in Switzerland, Underbill has - . , 

I. ■, .,„ j x i 4. 4-t, n t t ^ ~.p +v„ C,A, Anderson, associate professor 
taken graduate work at the College of the " . ** , * •. . ~ 

.,, °, T v , TT ,„„ ,„-, ,„z,„ A „,.- of industrial engineering, fcr 

City of New Ynrk. He has had broad ex— _,_ , . , , -, _ ., *-'*, . 

y . . ,.-,.. ■, graduate study for the academic year 

perience m radio production work, , J 

beginning September 1, and Dr. Ernest A. 

The trustees also approved the ap- Lachner, associate professor of 

p ointment of Dr. Daniel M. Lonberger, of fisherie8 biology from February 1 to ' 
State College, as dentist with the Col- . e " / . .... ... J 

lege Health Service, effective January 15. September 15 to serve as a research 

He received his bachelor of science and associate with the Division of Fishes, 

doctor of dental surgery degrees from the u#Sb National Museum, 
University of Pittsburgh, 

TRAFFIC REGULATIONS FOR POLLOCK ROAD CHANGED 

Traffic regulations for Pollock tate construction work and keep con- 
Road have been changed to permit two- struction traffic on the campus at a 
way traffic on Pollock Road between minimum. 
Willard Hall (new classroom building) 

and Burrowes Road, Pollock Road, from Willard Hall to 

Shortlidge Road, will continue t o be a 

No parking will be permitted in this one-way street, with traffic travelling 

area between 8:30 a.m. and 5:30 p.m. west -fco east. Parking also will be per- 
mitted along the north curb of this sec- 

The change has been made to facili- t i on of Po iiock Road. 



TRUSTEES APPROVE CONTRACTS PROVIDING FOR SPECIAL GRANTS 



Grants, providing for research) 
fellowships, and special training pro- 
grams., have been received by the College 
under agreements approved "by the Board 
of Trustees* 

A grant of $17,600 received from 
the Koppers Co., I n c. will provide 
for research in electrostatic precipi- 
tation of liquids and solids from the 
atmosphere. Work will be conducted 
under the supervision of Dr. Eric A* 
Walker in the Engineering Experiment 
Stat ion. 

A grant of $1800 from the Gayton 
Co., Youngstown, 0.., establishes a 
fellowship for research in engineering* 

A feed ingredient hedging study 
will be conducted in the department 
of agricultural economics and rural 
sociology under a $4500 grant made by 
the Production and Marketing Adminis- 
tration of the U.S. Department of Agri- 
culture » 

A grant of $6^000 from the National 
Association of Automotive Insurance 
Companies, Chicago, 111., and of 
$2500 from the American Trucking Asso- 



ciation, Washington, D.C,, will assist 
in carrying on the program of Motor 
Vehicle Fleet Supervisor Training 
in the Institute of Public Safety, 
Central Extension* 

An agreement also was completed 
with The Markel Service, Inc., Rich- 
mond, Va., for providing the full- 
time services of one man whose salary 
and travel . expense s are estimated at 
$10,000, He is Dennis A* Weaver, who 
will be affiliated with the Institute 
of Public Safety. 

A grant of $7500 from the Pennsyl- 
vania Grade Crude Oil Association for 
the continuation of research in the 
Petroleum Refining Laboratory also 
was approved. 

Two other renewed agreements pro- 
vide for the continuation of a fellow- 
ship in chemical engineering under a 
grant from the Shell Fellowship Com- 
mittee and the continuation of the 
Natural Gas Fellowship in the School of 
Mineral Industries under an $1800 
grant from the Pennsylvania Natural 
Gas Men's Association 



OF GENERAL INTEREST . 



The College S e nate will meet 
in Room. 121 , 



SENATE 

Qn Thursday at 4:10 p,m, 

Sparks Buildingo 

* ♦ • 

ENGINEERING FACULTY: The faculty of 
the School of Engineering will meet at 
5:10 p.m. on Tuesday, February 15, in 
Room 110, Electrical Engineering Building. 

* * * 

LUNCHEON CLUB: Dr. R. Wallace Brewster, 
professor of polit ioal'' science, will 
address the Faculty Luncheon Club on 
Monday, February 14. His subject will be 
"A' University and Its Faculty." 

* * * 

AAUP : The American Association of Uni- 
versity Professors will meet at 7:30 
p,m. on Wednesday in Room 110, Electrical 
Engineering Building. The subject will 
be: "Faculty Service in a National 
Emergency." 

» * * 
CONCERT: The first of a series of Sun- 
day concerts will be held at 4 p.m. Sun- 
day in Schwab Auditorium. It will be a 
recital with George E. Ceiga, organist, 
and Barbara Thomas, violinist* . 

* * * 

DEBATE: To mark the 50th anniversary of 
debating at Penn State and the 20th 
anniversary of Joseph F. O'Brien as 
coach, the penn State debating team will 
meet the U.S. Naval Academy at 8 p.m. 
on Friday in Room 121, Sparks Building* 



The proposition will be: Resolved, that 
the federal government should adopt a. 
policy of equalizing educational oppor- 
tunities in tax— supported schools by 
means of annual grants, Dr, Seth W, 
Russell, assistant dean, School of the 
Liberal Arts, will serve as chairman. 
Debaters are Richard K. Hill and David M, ' 
Barron. 

* * * 

PLACEMENT TEST: The general placement 
test will be given by the department of 
romance languages in Room 110, Electrical 
Engineering Building, at 7 o'clock on 
Tuesday night. The tests are intended 
for those who took French and Spanish at 
the high school level, who studied French 
and Spanish at other colleges, or these who 
have not studied French and Spanish re- 
cently and desire guidance and rating at 
the appropriate level in a language class 
he r e * 

* * * 

AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY: "Relation- 
ship of Enz yme sto Life" will be dis- 
cussed at the meeting of the Arte r.i can 
Chemical Society at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, 
February ,16, in Room 1-19, Osmond Labora- 
tory. Speaker will be D r . James B. Sum- 
ner, director of the laboratory of enzyme 
chemistry, Cornell University, 

* * * 

VISIT CAMPUS: Jim Bristol, of the Ameri- 
can Friends S e rvice committee ■will visit 






the canpus on February 7-9 
opportunities for sunnier s 
by the Connittee, He will 
o'clock' on Tuesday and Wed 
in Roon 3 04, Old Main... Fr 
through -Saturday , Charles 
Fellowship cf Reconciliati 
on the canpus in the inter 
action. Both rne n are avai 
personal interviews or cla 
pointments through the Chr 
ciation (Ext. 194). 



to explain 
ervice offered 

speak at 7:30 
nesday night 
on Thursday 
Walker of the 
on xv ill be 
ests of peace 
lable for 
s sroon ap- 
istian Asso- 



AAUW: Mrs. Henry R. Christ nan, of 
ITyonissing , chairnan of the radio con- 
nittee of the General Federation of 
Women's Clubs, will address the meeting 
of the American Association of Univer- 
sity Wonen at the State College High 
School library at 8 p.n. Thursday. Her 
subject will be: "Radio Reflects the 
Society in Which It Operates." 

* * * 

WELFARE FUND: Only faculty members who 
live on' campus will be solicited on the 
campus during- the Welfare Fund Drive, 
Dr. Agnes R, McElwee, associate profes- 
sor of English composition and drive 
chairman, said, today, 

*.* * 

ELECTED: Faculty members elected to 
the Steering Committee of- the Faculty 
Luncheon Club for the second semester 
are Maurice S, Gjesdahl, professor of 
mechanical engineering; Dr. Haskell B» 
Curry, professor of mathematics; Dr » 
Robert. L. Weber, associate professor of 
physics; Nora E. Wittman, instructor in 
German; and E v elyn M, Hensel, assistant' 
librarian. 

* * * 

UNITED WORLD FEDERALISTS : The State 
College chapter, United World Federalists, 
.will meet in the Episcopal parish House 
at 8 p.m. Thursday, Judge Ivan Walker, 
of Centre county, will speak on "A 
Jurist Looks at World Government." 

* » 

ATTEND MEETING: Dr. J.G. Aston, Dr. 
Arthur Rose, and Dr. R.W. Schiessler 
all of the 
sics, atte 



School of Chemistry and Phy- 
nded the Meet ing-i.n-Miniature 



of the Philadelphia section, American 
Chemical Society, in Philadelphia re- 
cently,.- Dr. Aston spoke on "Recent 
Contributions: to Chemistry from Investi- 
gations at Low Temperature" while Dr. 
Schie.ssler discussed "The Effect of 
Chemical Structure on the Physical 
Properties of Higher Hydrocarbons." 

* * * 

ON TRIP: Donald W. Davis, professor of 
journalism, will leave Tuesday on a 
nation-wide trip that will take him to 
more than 3 of the country's colleges 
and universities as national president 
of Alpha Delta Sigma, professional ad- 
vertising fraternity. He also will 
study curricula organization and teaching 
methods in journalism schools. and as 
president of -Collegian, Inc., will ob- 
serve new developments' in the field of' 
campus publications, 

* * jH 

SPEAKS: Paul H. Margolf, professor 'of 
poultry husbandry, recently participated 
in the annual Farm and Hone W e ek program 
of the Kentucky Extension Service at 
Lexington and also presented two talks 
at the 5th annual Midwest Turkey Trot at 
•Marshall, Ind. 

* * * 

TO SPEAK: Dr. John 0. Almquist, associate 
professor of dairy husbandry, will be 
guest s.peaker at the state-wide S.elective 
Breeding program at Worcester, Mass, on 
February 8. 



VISITS UNIVERSITIES: Dr. 
Snyder, associate profess 
recently visited 'the Univ 
Georgia School of Techno I 
University to discuss stu 

procedure s . 

* * * 



ATTEND 'MEETINGS : Dr, Eri 
Tarpley, and William B. S 
the department of electri 
a'nd John E. Coolidge, ass 
of engineering research, 
tended the winter general 
American Institute of Ele 
in New Y rk. Dr • Walker 
on '.'polar Vector Indicate 
scribed work conducted by 
nick, P. G. Sulzer, and Dr. 



William U, 
or. of psychology,, 
ersity of Georgia, 
°£y t an< 3- Emory 
dent counseling 

c A. Walker, II. I. 
hepperd, all of 
cal engineering, 
istant professor 
last week at- 

meeting of the 
ctrical Engineers 
presented a pa '.^.t 
rs" which de 



Dr. A.M. Way 
Wa lker « 



OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS FROM THE OFFICE OF THE DEAN OF 'ADMISSIONS AND REGISTRAR 
' - >' - Withdrawals : 



Allen, Harold Russell, ChE, Nov. 20 
Bacchettay Vincent , ME, Feb. 1 
Bonsch, Donald Phillip, PV, Jan. 31 
Campitell, Joseph Louis, Ed, Jan. 31 
Dalson, John Charles, LD, Jan. 31 
Ilatkevich, Francis Joseph, EE, Feb. 1 
Krampholz, Harold Walter, IE, -Jan. 29 
McDowell, Donald E. , MEng., Dec, 1 

Reasons for withdrawal: Personal, 8; 
married, 1; business reasons, 1; to enlist 
college, 1. 



4 McMut-ray, Joseph Walter, ME, Jan. 7 
1 Merkel, Charles Bernard, For, Jan, 6 
7 Murphy, 1yd ia Nyce., Ed., Jan. 29 

5 Selignan, S, George, CF', Nov. 20 
5 Stettler, Elizabeth, HEc, Jan. 29 
S *' Stringer, W. Joseph J r », PH, Jan, 
3 Torrance, Nancy Mae, Ed, Jan. 28 
5 Winghaman, Paul Miller, ME, Feb* '. 

illness, 2; poor scholarship, 2; to be 
in Air Corps, 1; transfer to another 



31 



Of f_icial_ Chan ge o f Na me by Marriag e 



Betty Jb-an Ritchie to Bc*tty Ritchie Miller 



Elizabeth M, Klenk to Elizabeth Klenk 
Marx 



PERSONNEL CHANGES 



Following personnel changes, approved during the period December 4, 1948 to 
January 21, 1949, are announced. Telephone extension numbers are listed with the 
names of new appointees: 



Re s ignat ioas : 

John A, Bauscher, Jr. 
Irving Pincus 
Nancy B. Ellis 
Suzanne Lawrence 
Mildred I, Yearick 
Pauline S, Williman 
Helen Gcphart 
Elizabeth Baker 
Joyce Dannenbrink 
Charlotte Ives 
Julia Baish 
Kathryn Carleton 
Flo F, Segner 
Ann B« Musser 
Elizabeth S. Wissinger 
Ann L, Piatt 
Anetta N. Wilson 
Carolyn L. Wells 
Johanna Gillmore 
Betty Lou Williams 
Lois Anne Griffith 
Grace Griffiths 
Dorothy K. Lutz 
Rita Slavin 
Linda R, Grubb 
Virginia L, Sapiens a 
Miriam C. Zimmerman 
Elizabeth M, DiBattista 
Emigene B, Fulton 
Harriet Ruth Thall 
Lena B. Willis 
Ralph T. McRae 
Thomas W. Bedea 
Melvin C« Aikey 
Kenneth W. Walters 
Harriet M. Ohle 
Albert L. Fetzer 
Kenneth Rutherford 
Roy B. Henry 
George W. Troutwein 
Helen V. Miller 
Marjcrie M, Morgan 

An p ointment s ~ ; 

280 Henry R. Fortmann 

242M Max Met lay 

130 Robert C. Haseltine 

Thomas W . Minku s 

13 James L. Wolf 

376M John W, Bisbing 

376M Paul T. Kinney 

215M Mary Ann Bishop 

215M Lorayne Tarr 

126 Dona Thorns 

230 Howard L. Carnahan 

110J Tat iana Levcowich 

130 Robert E. McCord 

130 John H.E. Slater 

142.T Hazel Gassman Hart 

13 Henry L. Miller 

Merrill L, Mordan 



Research Assistant - Metallurgy 

Research Assistant - Fuel Technology 

Research Assistant - Engineering Experiment Station 

Research Assistant - Metallurgy 

Home Economics Extension Representative 

Home Economics Extension Representative 



Secretary 
Seoretary 
Secretary 
Secretary 
Secretary 
Secretary 



ory 



and Rural Sociology 
and Rural Sociology 



Home Economics 

Ordnance Research Labora- 

President's Office 

Central Extension 

Summer S e ssions 

Motion Picture Studio 
Secretary - Engineering Experiment Station 
Secretary - Ordnance Research Laboratory 
Seoretary - Ordnance Research Laboratory 
Secretary - Ordnance Research Laboratory 
Secretary - Ordnance R e search Laboratory 
Stenographer - Mineral Industries Extension 
Stenographer - Personnel Relations 
Stenographer - College Placement 
Stenographer - Agricultural Experiment Station 
Stenographer - Mineral Engineering 
Stenographer - Central Extension 

Stenographer - Physical Education and Athletics 
Stenographer - Central Extension 

Stenographer - Agricultural and Biological Chemistry 
Clerk - Accounting 

Clerk — Agricultural Economics and Rural Sociology 
Clerk - Accounting 
Clerk - Agricultural Economics 
Clerk - Agricultural Economics 
Detailer Draftsman - Ordnance Research Laboratory 
Machinist - Ordnance Research Laboratory 
Mechanic - Engineering Experiment Station 
Electronics Technician - Electrical Engineering 
Cook - Central Extension 
Laborer - Poultry Husbandry 

Golf Shop Assistant - Physical Education an<] Athletics 
Maintenance Helper - Physical p J a tit 
Laborer - Physical Plant 

Clerk-typist - D e an of Ad m i ss icn's Office 
Clerk-typist - Naval Science 



Assistant Professor - Agronomy 

Instructor - Chemistry 

Instructor - Central Extension 

Instructor - Politioal Science 

Instructor - Central Extension 

Research Assistant - Petroleum 

Research Assistant - Petroleum 

Research Assistant - Metallurgy 

Research Assistant -- Metallurgy 

Personnel Assistant - Personnel Relations 

Assistant Professor - Agronomy 

Assistant Professor - M me Economics 

Instructor - Engineering Extension 

Instructor - Central Extension 

Instructor - Mathematics 

Associate Specialist - Motion Picture Studio 

Assistant Agriculture Extension Representative 



Natural Gas Engineering 

'. Natural Gas Engineering 



HMMH 



1 



137 Anetta W. Wilson Secretary - Ordnance Research Laboratory 

137 , Johanna Gillmore Secretary - Ordnance Research Laboratory 

137 Betty Lou Williams Secretary - Ordnance Research Laboratory 

137 Jane M« Ronning Secretary - Ordnance Research Laboratory 

107M Norma B. Vogel Secretary - Home Economics 

147 Ruth J. Hagerty Stenographer - Institute of Local Government 

137 Jean K. Harrison Stenographer - Ordnance Research Laboratory 

18 Kathryn Swingle Stenographer - Education (instructional Film Research) 

322M Helen Gephart Clerk - Ellen H. Richards Institute 

262 Mary Lou DeGrave Clerk - Agricultural Economics and Rural Sociology 

203 Beryl N. Hamburg ^ Clerk - Agricultural Economics and Rural Sociology 

262 Eleanor T. S iepiet owskl clerk - Agricultural Economics and Rural Sociology 

Eugene K, Barto Janitor - Nittany Dormitories 

David Henderson Janitor - Nittany Dormitories 

Merlin F. Shively Janitor - Nittany Dormitories 

Howard E. Sagar Janitor - Pollock Circle Dormitories 

Merel F. Frantz Janitor - Physical plant 

J. Stewart Kurtz Carpenter - physical plant 

John W. Weber, Jr. Painter - Physical Plant 

215M David W. Pease Laboratory Assistant - Metallurgy 

Bill C. Trostle Maintenance Helper - Physical Plant 

John 0. Corl Maintenance Helper - Physical Plant 

Arthur St oner Farm Employee - Agriculture 

Isaac F. Garner _ Farm Employee - Agriculture 

53J Garnet B. Younkxn Computress - Engineering Experiment Station 

207 Constance Benarick Clerk-typist - Pollock Circle Dormitories 

210M Wayne R. Ramish Laboratory Assistant - Mineral Technology 

137 Deronde A. Weeks Re lief -Re cept ioni st - Ordnance Research Laboratory 

130 Helen M, Adam Secretary - Central Extension 
130 Marjorie M. Bloomfield Secretary - Motion Picture Studio 

53J Abbey Feinberg Secretary - Engineering Experiment Station 

130 Mary F. Ahearn Secretary - Central Extension 

130 Kathryn B. Dunkil Secretary - Central Extension 

130 Ruth Dona r Secretary - Central Extension 

588 Gwendolyn E. Cochran Stenographer - Personnel Relations 

376J Jeanne F. Perkins Stenographer - Mineral Engineering 

152 Jo Ann L. Barron Stenographer - Speech 

262 Eunice L. Robbins Clerk - Agricultural Economics and Rural Sociology 

285M Jean B. Hackman Clerk - Poultry Husbandry 

262 Shirley Thomas Clerk - Agricultural Economics and Rural Sociology 

43 Malcolm K, Echley Electronics Technician - Electrical Engineering 

Joseph W» Elliot Dairy Farm Employee - Dairy Husbandly 

130 Florence C, Ryan Cook _ Central Extension 

Re id C. Sprague Laboratory Assistant - Zoology and Entomology 

Paul W. Weagley Janitor - Physical Plant 

391 Mary C. Cain Clerk-Stenographer - Summer Sessions 

Frederick B. Fowler Kitchen-man'- Mont Alto 

177 Phoebe Cronister Book cleaner - College Library 

128 Shirley A. Smith Clerk-typist - College Placement 

96 Inez E. Meyers Nurse - College Health Service 

Leaves of Absence: 



1-4-49 to 
Glenn R, Moltrup Assistant Professor - Ordnance Research Laboratory 6-30-49 
Ethyl Ri Grady Home Economics Extension Representative 12-1-48 to 12-31-48 
Oliva Armstrong Clerk - Ordnance Research Laboratory 12-1-48 to 12-31-43 
Francis W. Cooper Technical Laborer - Physical Plant 11-30-48 to 12-31-48 
Robert W. Hamilton Carpenter - Physical Plant 1-1-49 to 3-31-49 



W J » I q q y 



THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 



C. 2. 



FACULTY 



The Bulletin is published weekly during the College 
year as a means of making official announcements 
and presenting items of interest to the faculty. All 




BULLETIN 



contributions should be as brief as possible and 
reach Louis H, Bell, Director of Public Information, 
313 Old Main, not later than 10 a. m. each Friday. 



VOL. 36 



February 14, 1949 



NO. 18 



DR. S.K. HORNBECK TO PRESENT COMMUNITY FORUM LECTURE TUESDAY NIGHT 



Dr. Stanley K. Hornbeck, recently 
retired ambassador to the Netherlands and 
an outstanding educator, will replace 
Hanson Baldwin, military analyst on the 
Community Forum program. He will speak 
at 8 p.m, Tuesday in Schwab Auditorium. 

Dr. Hornbeck, whose recent exper- 
ience with the Dutch should throw new 
light on current developments in the 



Far East, will speak on "China and the 
United States." 

Dr. Fred F. Lininger, vice-dean 
and director of the Agricultural Experi- 
ment Station, who recently returned from 
China, will introduce Dr. Hornbeck. 
Tickets, priced at $1, will be on sale 
at Student Union Office until 8 o'clock 
on Tuesday night. 



SIGMA XI RECEIVING REQUESTS FOR GRANTS-IN-AID FOR RESEARCH 



Applications are now being received 
by Sigma Xi, national science frater- 
nity, for grants-in-aid for research 
for 1949. 

Dr. Henry W. K n err, local secretary, 
explains that awards ranging from $50 to 
$500 are made annually in the natural 
sciences without limitations to any 
particular field or working place. They 



may be used for purchasing apparatus, 
hiring assistants, defraying publica- 
tion costs, and similar expenses. 

Applications must reach the national 
office before April 1 and blanks for 
submitting applications may be ob- 
tained from Dr. Knerr in Room 218, 
Osmond Laboratory., 



COLLEGE PUBLICATIONS COMPRISE LIBRARY EXHIBIT 



College publications, designed by 
Frances M, Boldereff, publications 
production manager in the Department 
of Public Information, comprise an ex- 
hibit in the foyer of the College Library, 



The collection, which includes 
catalogs, posters, programs, research 
reports, and many other publications 
issued by the College, will continue 
until the end of the month. 



LIBRARY ACQUIRES BOOK COLLECTION OF ROBERT MILLS BEACH 



The library of Robert Mills Beach, 
who was a resident of Bellefonte at the 
time of his death in 1930, has been 
acquired by the College Library. 

For many years after 1912, Beach 
Served as preceptor of German and French 
at the Bellefonte Academy and built up 



a fine personal library, particularly in 
Latin and Greek classics, but including 
also works in more modern European 
literature and some works in theology. 

The collection includes about 1800 
volumes, and portions of it may be put 
on exhibition later in the year. 



ALEXANDER ARCHIPENKO, NOTED SCULPTOR, WILL SPEAK ON WEDNESDAY NIGHT 



Alexander Archipenko, noted sculptor, 
will deliver an illustrated lecture at 
8 p.m. Wednesday in Room 110, Electrical 
Engineering Building, under the sponsor- 
ship of the department of architecture. 
It will be open to the public. 



Archipenko, who is director of the 
Archipenko Art School, New Y rk, N.Y., 
will lecture on "Creat ivene s s as a cos- 
mical phenomenon manifested through 
every living creature and crystallized ir. 
forms of art and inventions." 



*£M^ STATE COI I 



MINUTES OF THE SENATE MEETING OF FEBRUARY 10, 1949 



The College Senate net at 4:10 p.m. 
on February 10, 1949, in Room 121 Sparks 
Building, Mr. A.O* Morse presiding. The 
list of members present is on file in the 
Office of the Registrar. The minutes of 
the last meeting "were not read since they 
had beer, published in the Faculty Bulletin 
for January 10, 1949. 

Under the heading of communications 
from college officers the secretary read 
a letter from Prof, John E. Nicholas 
stating that Prof. A»W» Clyde would be 
his substitute during the second semes- 
ter of the present academic year. The 
secretary also read a letter from Prof,, 
Eric A. Walker indicating that Prof, F.I, 
Hall, Jr« would be his representative at 
the meeting of this date e 

The secretary then asked permission 
of the Chair to make a statement since he 
■was acting as secretary for the last 
time prior to his ret irement ■ on March 1, 
1949. The secretary then pointed out 
that when he joined-the faculty in 1911 
the regulations affecting undergraduate 
students were printed in a 22 page book- 
let and included only 38 rules and that 
these 38 rules included two regarding 
chapel attendance which, of course, are 
no longer in effect. He pointed out 
that the edition for the current year 
was printed in smaller type^ filled 44 
pages, and included 127 rules. In 1911 
four rules explained the grading system 
of the College. In 1948-49 six rules are 
required to explain how a subject dropped 
during a semester should be graded, and 
these six regulations referred to such 
periods as the first two weeks of a semes- 
ter, the period after the first two weeks 
of a semester, the last six weeks, and 
the last three weeks of a semester. Four 
rules are at present required for com- 
puting averages and three separate and 
distinct averages are required in the 
consideration of certain student cases. 



The secretary questioned i 
complex regulations were neces 
pecially when we remember that 
the regulations were enforced 
Registrar, the Academic Beans, 
Office of the president, where 
present time many of these reg 
are put into effect by Recorde 
Office of the Registrar and ar 
dates rather arbitrarily place 
add" forms by advisers. The s 
pointed out that these regulat 
the administration a considera 
of embarrassment and, that in 
to the regulations, the action 
the various schools, and their 
uniformity, caused additional 
merit. It has actually happene 
dents in the same fraternity w 
the sane record received great 



f such 
sary c?- 

in 1911 
by t he 

and the 
as at the 
u la t ions 
r s in t he 
e based on 
d on "drop— 
ecretary 
ions caused 
ble amount 
addit ion 
s taken by 

lack of 
embarra s s— 
d that stu— 
ith exactly 
ly dis- 



similar treatment. This can easily be 
seen when it is noted that some schools 
take school action only at the end of 
the year, whereas others take action at 
mid-semester and between semesters. The 
secretary stated that, in his opinion, 
the college regulations are now so severe 
that the several schools could with 
propriety abandon their codes except 
where they help in the advising of stu- 
dent s. 



The secretary also pointe 
entirely different treatment w 
Penn State freshmen under the 
regulations. Under regulation 
current edition of the regulat 
rule is to be applied at the e 
freshman year for a student at 
Penn State Center, whereas a s 
a similar record in attendance 
the cooperating colleges will 
to transfer to the campus sine 
case, the rule will not apply 
mid-point of the sophomore yea 



d out that 
s given the 

pr e s e nt 
59 of the 

ions t he 

nd of the 

tending a 

tudent with 
at one of 

be permitted 

e, in his 

until the 

r . 



m w 

in t 

mitt 

rule 

in t 

dent 

e sea 

cess 

wher 

the r 

ject 

agai 

seer 

ma ny 

shou 

agai 

on f 

him 

ing 



Mr. H off nan p 
hichrule he ha 
hat he had bee 
ee on Academic 

was formulate 



he case 



,11 



who remains i 
pe act ion unde 
fully repeats 
eas if he chan 
eby doe s no t h 
, the failing 
nst him. In t 
etary stated t 

cases a stude 
Id have a seco 
n from scratch 
ailures previo 
back except so 
is affected. 



ointed out that rule 61, 
d had a personal hand, 
n present with the Corn- 
Standards when the 
d, will not work fairly 

students since a stu— 
n a curriculum can 
r the rule if he suc- 
a subject failed, 
ge s his curriculum, and 
ave to repeat the sub- 
grade will be held 
h i s co nne ct io n t he 
hat he felt that in 
nt with a low average 
nd chance to start 
, with no average based 
usly incurred to hold 
far as his class stand— 
(under rule 51 ) 



The secretary then spoke of his 
appreciation of the splendid cooperation 
he had had during the years lie has served 
the College as Registrar pointing out that 
grade reports are turned in more promptly 
at The Pennsylvania State College than at 
most of the colleges with which he is 
familiar. He also pointed cut the ex- 
cellent cooperation given his office by 
the Department of Industrial Engineering 
in the preparation of grade reports and 
by the Department of the Physical Plant 
in the conducting of commencements and the 
distribution of diplomas. The secretary, 
as Dean of Admissions, also pointed out 
that the amount of pressure brought upon 
him by the various coaches of the athletic 
teams of the College wa s practically • . 
negligible and that he was, therefore, 
the envy of his fellow registrars from 
coa st to coast , 



The secretary then expressed his best 
wishes for the future success of the Col- 
lege and of the members of the S e nate and 
hoped that the members of the Senate 
would enjoy their retirement as much as 
he hoped to enjoy his own. 

In accordance with a request .from the 
Chair the statements made by the secre- 
tary are included in the.se minutes. 

Under the heading of reports of 
standing committees, Prof, Beode, as 
chairman of the Committee on Academic 
Standards, presented the cases of five 
students* The first, Frank E. Ea-uerle 
who had never attained the- status of a 
junior in any college requested permis- 
sion to take an examination in Ed., 439 
(Teaching Traffic Safety and Automobile 
Operation). In view of the fact that 
Mr, Bauerle has been teaching in Pennsyl- 
vania High Schools since 1933 the Senate, 
on recommendation of the committee, voted 
to approve the request fr 

Charles B, Gural was admitted by the 



Office of the College Examiner as a 
junior in the fall of 1948. Mir, Gural 
entered the Altoona Center apparently 
in good faith and only after the semester 
was long underway was the error discover- 
ed. On recommendation of the committee 
the S e nate voted to permit Mr. Gural to 
receive credit for the work of a fifth 
semester earned at the Altoona Center, 

Three students, Mr, Michael Burda, 
Mrs, Margaret S, James, and Mr, Leonel J, 
Garcia requested exceptions to the resi- 
dence rule required of seniors. On recor> 
mendation of the committee the Senate 
voted to approve theJe exceptions. The 
report of the committee is on file in 
the Office ofthe Registrar. 

Prof, Bullinger, chairman of 
the Committee on Courses of Study, 
presented a. report for the committee 
which will remain on the table 
for consideration at the next meeting 
of the Senate, 

(continued next week) 



LIBERAL ARTS LECTURE SERIES TO OPEN FEBRUARY 24 



Dr. Robert T. Oliver, of Washington, 
D.C, manager of the Washington Bureau, 
Korean Pacific Press, will open the 1949 
Liberal Arts lecture series at 8 p.n, 
on Thursday, February 24, He will speak 



on "Between Peace and War in North Asis 



will 



Other lectures in the series, which 
be open to the public with no ad- 



mission charge will be announced . later , 



PRESIDENT APPOINTS ALL-COLLEGE ADVISORY COMMITTEE ON RECREATION 



An All-College Advisory ' Committee on 
•Recreation, headed by Ray M, Conger, of 
the School of Physical Education and 
Athletics, has been ' appo int e d by James 
Milholland, acting president •• 

"An expanded program of recreation 
for our larger student body" was described 
as the primary purpose of the committee, 
the creation of which was proposed to the 
Administration by Dr. Carl P. Schott, 
dean of the School of Physical Education 
and Athletics, 

The new committee is intended to serve 
as "clearing house" for existing recrea- 
tional activities, as consultant and ad- 



visor on new - a cti vit ie s , to promote the 
establishment of new recreational groups, 
and to help other agencies expedite some 
of their worthwhile projects, such as the 
rebuilding of The Mountain Lodge,* 

Members of the committee follow: 

Miss Ellamae Jackson, Dan DeMarino, 
D e an H.K. Wilson, Professors L.A. Richard- 
son, R,E. Galbraith, H,L, Yeagley, Hummel 
Fishburn, Thomas Bates, Amy Gardner, 
Marie Haidt, Miss Marjorie Allen, George 
Donovan, Dr . H.R. Glenn, Walter Trainer, 
Wilner S. Kenworthy, and a representative 
from All-College Cabinet. 



APPLICATIONS BEING RECEIVED FOR TICKETS TO BOXING ' INTERCOLLE G IATES 



Applications fortickets to -the boxing 
intercollegiate s in Recreation Building 
March 11-12, are now being accepted at 
the Athletic Office. Reserved seats for 
the three sessions are priced at -.$1,20 for 
Friday night, $1.20 for Saturday after- 



noon| and $2,40 for Saturday night* 
A Special series ticket for all three 
sessions is priced at $4-, Sale of 
general admission tiokets, priced at 90 
cents 'for eaoh session, will not open, 
uj:t il March 'I* ' , 






££NXn STATE COLLECTION 



OF GENERAL INTEREST 



ENGINEERING FACULTY: The faculty of the 
School of Engineering will neet at 5:10 
p.m. on Tuesday in Roon 110, Electrical 

Engineering Building. 

* * * 

LUNCHEON CLUB: Mrs. Paul Moser, a leader 
in civic and religious work, will speak 
at the Faculty Luncheon Club on Monday, 
February 21. Mrs, Moser spent 6 weeks 
"behind the Iron Curtain" and has travel- 
led widely in China, Sian, and the 
Philippine Islands. 

* * * 

CHAPEL: Dr. Fred G. Holloway, dean of 
Drew Seminary, Madison, N.J., will speak 
at chapel ' service s on Sunday morning. 

* * * 

FRUIT SALES ROOM: The fruit sales room 
at the fruit farm cold storage will 
close for the season at 5:30 p.m. on 
Saturday . 



AMERICAN CHEMICAL S 
Sumner, director of 
Enzyme Chemistry, C 
will address the Ce 
Section, Ame r i ca n C 
7:30 p.m. on Wednes 
Osmond Laboratory 
"Relationship of En 

.MINERAL INDUSTRIES 
hours will be obser 
Industries Library 
day, 8 a.m. to 10 p 
to 12 noon, 1 p.m. 
day, 2 p.m. to 5 p 
p.m. The extension 
being made in compl 
made by faculty and 



OCIETY: Dr. James B. 

the Laboratory of 
ornell University, 
ntral Pennsylvania 
hemical Society, at 
day in Room 119, 

His subject 'Brill be: 
zyme s to Life. " 

* * * 

LIBRARY: Following 
ved by the Mineral 

Monday through Fri — 
.n. ; Saturday, 8 a.n* 
to 5 p.m.; and Sun- 
m . and 7 p.m. to 10 

of library hours is 
iance with requests 

student s. 

* * * 



HOMEMAKING CLASSES: First session of a 
class in Advanced Meal Preparation will 
be held, from 7 to 8:30 p.m. on Tuesday 
in Room -106, Home Economics Building. 
Interested persons should call Mrs. David 
C owe 11, instructor for the class, at 
3324. At 7 p.m. on Thursday at the State 
College high school library, classes in 
clothing construction, refinishing furni- 
ture, child study, and a course for 
brides will be organized. Interested 



persons should attend this first session, 

* » * 

SAM: William Gomberg, director, manage- 
ment engineering department of the Inter- 
national Ladies' Garment Workers, AFL, 
will address an open meeting of the stu- 
dent chapter, Society for the Advancement 
of Management, at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday in 
Roon 121, Sparks Building. His subject 
will be: "Labor and the Industrial. Engi- 
neer Relationship." 

* * * 

FIVE O'CLOCK THEATRE: "The Professor and 
the Burglar," an original one-acit play by 
Arthur W a rd, student, will be presented 
at 5 p.m. Tuesday in the Little Theatre, 
Old Main. The public is invited. There 
is no admission, 

* * * 

RELIGION-IN-LIFE WEEK: Faculty members 
desiring to become patrons for the 
Religion-in-Lif e Week (February 20-24) 
are requested to send their contributions 
to Paul E» Benner, treasurer, Bursar's 
Office . 



INAUGURA 
persons 
the inau 
Economic 
trant s w 
Uruguay, 
vers it y 



HON PROGRAM: More than 1000 
registered for the program marking 
guration of the School of Home 
s last week. Among the regis- 
as May Hoerner, of Montevido, 

and Avice Bowbyes, of the Uni— 
of Otago Dunedin, New Zealand. 
* * * 

LASSES: Two classes in elemen- 
ing will convene for the first 



TYPING C 

tary t'yp 

tine Tuesday night in Room 9, Sparks 

Building 

6 :30 to 

8 to 9:3 

Tue sday s 

They are 



Elementary (1) will neet from 
p.m. and elementary (2) from 

p . m , 



i p.m. Classes will continue on 
and Thursday nights for 11 weeks, 
offered by the Extension Services, 



* * * 

SPEAKS: Dr. W.M. Smith, associate profes- 
sor of fanily relationships, will speak 
at the PTA Forum in Erie on T\iesday night. 
His topic will be: "The Adolescent: His 
Emotional Development." On Tuesday after- 
noon he will address students at the 



Behrend Center of Penn State on 
Ready for Marriage?" 



Who Is 



'OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS FROM THE OFFICE OF THE DEAN OF ADMISSIONS AND REGISTRAR 

Withdrawals : 



4 Abbey, Ruth E., Ed, F e b. 5 

4 Allen, Edward E., ME, Feb. 9 

Gr Auerbach, Archie Orville, AH, Feb. 8 

4 Barrett, Walter Elner, Jr.., EE, Feb. 7 

3 Beck, Joseph Logue, IE, Dec. 18 

5 Berger, Willi's Leon, ME, Feb. 1 

4 Farabee, Elbin Jordan, AgEd, Feb. 7 
7 Jewett, Mark Creighton, ME, Feb. 1 

5 Kilker, Janes Aloys ius, 'ME, Feb. 8 



Gr Levine, Melvin M. , phys,, Sept. 30 
5 Luddy, Frederick Joseph, CE, Feb. 3 
McIIugh, Annette S., Ed, Feb. 10 
Meehan, Kenneth Charles, Jr., AE, Jan. 31 
Paul, Donald H., LD, Feb. 10 
Rigling, Walter Samuel, ME, Feb. 4 
Smith, Janes Beyer, ME, Feb. 1 
Sorenson, Sorena Ellen, ABCh, Jan. 31 
Withrow, Morgan Flack, EE, Feb. 3 



REASONS FOR WITHDRAWAL: Personal, 5; poor health, 3; to transfer, 3; scholastic 



difficulties, 3; bad eyes, 1; illness at hone, 1; 
of finances,^ wqn T B.Z*tt30 



to enter nurses' training, 1; lack 



JL9MQJLQ »T*t«lY 



THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 



1 




The Bulletin, is published weekly during She College 
year as a means of making official announcements 
and presenting items of interest to the faculty. AH 



L L E T I 



contributions should he as brief as possible and 
reach Louis H. Bell, Director of Public Information, 
313 Old Main, not later than 10 a. m. each Friday. 



VOL. 



36 



February 21, 1949 



NO. 19 



HELEN TRAUBEL TO CLOSE ARTISTS COURSE SERIES ON MONDAY NIGHT, FEBRUARY 23 



Helen Tr.aubel, famous stprano of the 
Metropolitan Opera, will close the 
Artists Course Series with a concert in 
Schwab Auditorium at 8 o'clock on Monday- 
night, February 28, 



available and may be purchased at the 
Student Union Office. 

Miss Traubel, especially noted for 
her excellent performances in the diffi- 
cult Wagnerian operas, is a native of 
St, Louis, Mo, 



Tickets, priced at $4,50, are still 
RELIGION-IN-LIFE WEEK INCLUDES FACULTY LUNCHEON, SEMINARS, WORSHIP SERVICES 



The annual Religion-in-Lif e Week,, 
sponsored by the College and community 
church groups, is being held this week. 

International relations, war and 
peace and the problems they pose for 
Christians, and race relations, are in- 
cluded among the subjects to be discussed. 

At 12:10 p.m. Wednesday, a Religion- 
in-Life Luncheon to which all faculty 
members are invited, will be held at 
St, Paul's Methodist church. A panel of 
visiting speakers will discuss "The 
Effect of Social Changes on Religious 
Values," Reservations should be made by 
calling 2163 before Tuesday noon, 

A detailed program of events is 
available at the Christian Association 
Office, 304 Old Main. 



Among the spakers for the 
are Dr, Howard H, Brinton, dire 
Pendle Hill Graduate School for 
and Social Study in Wallingford 
E, Winston, director of Luthera 
Work in Greater New Y rk; Rev. 
Houser, co-secretary of the Rac 
Industrial Department of the Fe 
of Reconciliation and Executive 
ef CORE) Dr. Ira D. Reid, profe 
sociology at Haverford College; 



program 
ctor f 

Religious 
; Mildred 
nS-fcudent 
George M, 
ial — 
How ship 

Secretary 
sscr of 

Mrs. Paul 



Moser, first chairman of the National 
Council of Women's Organizations of the 
Presbyterian Church of USA; Ray C, Downs, 
director of the Division of Youth Work 
for the Presbyterian Board of Foreign 
Missions. 

Rev, sward Elbert, Eastern student 
secretary, National Lutheran Council; 
Rabbi Samuel Volkman, Madison Ave. 
Temple, Scranton; Rev, Parker Burroughs, 
director of student work, West Virginia 
Baptist Church; Rev, Bruce Gideon, 
Methodist student pastor of State College 
Dr. William M, S m ith ,' associate professor 
of family relationships here; Dr, L.M. 
Hoffman, Williamsport surgeon. 



Alfred Jackson, assistant district 
attorney, Lycoming County; Rev. Charles 
Schwantes, director of student work, 
Evangelical and Reformed church; Helene 
K. M sier, director, National Student 
YMCA in Middle Atlantic Region; Dr. 
Richard M, Sutton* noted physicist; Mrs, 
Francis Steele, and Barbara Dixon, both 
workers with Inter— Varsity Fellowship. 

Faculty 'desiring to aid in the 
support of the program are requested 
to mail their checks to Paul E. Benner, 
Bursar's Office, who is treasurer- of 
Religion-in-Lif e Week. 



W. 



DR. B.M. DUGGAN TO ADDRESS SIGMA XI OPEN MEETING THURSDAY NIGHT 



Dr, B.M, Duggan, of the Lederle 
Laboratories division, American Cyanamid 
Co., will speak at 7:30 p.m. Thursday in 
Room 119, Osmond Laboratory. The meet- 
ing, sponsored by Society of the Sigma 
Xi, will be open to the public. 



Dr. Duggan will discuss recent ad- 
vances in anti-biotics with special 
emphasis on aureomycin. He will be 
introduced by Dr. Robert W. Stone, profes-» 
s or and head of the department of 
bacteriology. 



PENN STATE COLLECTION 



MINUTES OF THE SENATE MEETING OF FEBRUARY 10, 1949 
(continued from last week) 



Prof. E,,F. Osborn, chairman of the 
Committee on Scholarships and Awards 
presented a list of candidates for 
Scholarships and Awards which had pre- 
viously been approved by the Acting 
President of the College. The report was 
read by the secretary and on motion was 
approved by the Senate. The report is on 
file in the Office of the Registrar, 
The recipients of the various awards are: 

JOHN W, WHITE SCHOLARSHIPS ($100.00) 

Gerhard, Robert Charles '50 of Palm GM 
Intorre, Rose '51, of Ma sent own HEc 
Williams, Theodore Joseph '49, of 
Blairsville ChE 

LOUISE CARNEGIE SCHOLARSHIPS ($75.00) 

Blostein, Sonia Marie '49 of Athens AC 
Bonney, Jack '50, of Wattsburg Ed 
Ely, Roland Price, Jr. '.51, of Kennett 

Square AL 
Eshleman, Robert Jacobs, Jr. '50, of 

Bloomsburg Hort 
Gillespie, Roberta Ann '50, of Erie ZE 
Kraft, John Christian '51, of Schwenks— 

ville GM 
Rosenberg, Jack Noah '50, rf Philadelphia 

PM 
Schechter, Ruth '51, of State College AL 
Sellers, Betty Anne '51, of Somerset AL 
Shaffer, Marlen G. *50, of New Castle AL 
Udis, B e rnard '49, of Philadelphia AL 
Ungerleider, Benjamin Robert '51, «f 

Carbondale IE 

CLASS OF 1922 MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIPS 

Alderson, Marian. Elizabeth '50, of 
■ • Pittsburgh $75.00 HEc 
Austin, Shirley Lorraine '50, of Peck— 

ville $50.00 Jour 
Bissell, Margaret Jean '50, of New 

Ken-sing ton $75.00 HEc 
Bloomquist, Lois Marie '49, of W a rren » 

$6 7.49 Jour , - J 

DeGolia, Janet Claire '50, of Phila— 

' delphia $75.00 HEc 
Drozdiak, Louise Gloria '50, of Shamokin 

$75 HEc 
Eshleman, Annabelle '50, of Bloomsburg 

$75.00 Hort 
Herting, David Clair '50, of Pottstown 

$75.00 Chem 
Learn, Ila May f 51, of Commodore $50,00 

HEc 
Levitsky, Florence There se 

ton $75.00 HEc 
Reese, Carolyn Josephine '49 

burg $75.00 Ed 



'51, of Pitts- 
of Ebens— 



XQ.20 GLASS SCHOLARSHIP AWARDS ($100.00) 

Deeda, Mary Frances '50, of Altoona AL 
D e rmott, Robert V. <50, of Philadelphia pM 
Gu&ll<sb s jAxvilj-a r 50, of S-tate College AFCh 



LaBar, Jean Marie '49, of Bangor Ed 
Wenner, Robert Bruce '49, of Hazleton AL 

HELEN WOOD MORRIS SCHOLARSHIPS ($50. 00) 

Knauss, Joyce S ,A. '50, of Emmaus PM 
Palmer, John Francis '51, of Ridley Park 
AL 

vance c. Mccormick scholarship 

Zekauskas, Ann Barbara '50, of Kingston 
$118.47 HEc 

LIEUTENANT HARRY EDWARD WAGNER SCHOLAR- 
SHIP 

Nakonechny, Michael '40, of Garfield, N.J, 
$155.70 EE 

Under the heading of old business 
Dr. Moore, chairman of the Committee en 
Committees, requested that the recommenda- 
tion for an amendment to the By-Laws as 
presented at the meeting of January 6, 
and printed in the Faculty Bulletin for 
January 10, be referred back to the com- 
mittee for further study since the commit- 
tee had received certain suggestions in 
connection with the proposed amendment. 
The Senate SO voted. 

Prof, Bullinger, chairman of the Com- 
mittee on Courses of Study, asked that the 
report of the committee as presented in 
the January meeting be removed from the 
table for consideration and asked permis- 
sion to delete the following words from 
the description of Ed, 574, page 2 of 
the report : 

"Statistical procedures and their 
mathematical bases; with considera- 
tion of". 

The report of the committee, with 
the correction as requested by Prof, 
Bullinger, wa s on motion adopted. 

Under the heading of new business 
Dr, Dengler suggested that some method 
should be devised whereby members of the 
faculty could be made more familiar with 
the regulations of the College especially 
those not in the booklet prepared for 
undergraduate students. An example' cited 
by Dr. Dengler wa s that many new members 
of the faculty did not know that the 
office of the College Examiner is the sole 
office which has to do with granting 
credit for work taken elsewhere. 

Dean Haller presented the new head 
of the department of chemistry, Dr. W,C, 
Fernelius . 

Dr. F,B, Krauss then made the follow- 
ing motion of commendation: 

The College Senate expresses to its 
retiring Secretary, D e an William S, 



' t 



Huffman, its deep appreciation of 
and gratitude for his very great 
services to the S e nate over a long 
period of years, and it wishes him 
many years of health and abundant 
happiness in his well earned emeri- 
tus status « 

The Senate by a rising vote so voted. 

Dr. C*E, Marquardt then announced 
that he was retiring on the same date as 
is the secretary by pointing out that he 
would be busy up to the last minute in 



that Miss Helen Traubel would be tb.9 
artist at the Concert on the evening of 
February 20, the day preceding his re- 
tirement, and that a. few tickets were 
still available for this concert. The 
Chair then stated thai; Br, Marquardt was 
simply indicating once more that he was 
doing his full duty up to the very last 
moment and doing it very successfully. 

The S e nate then adjourned, 

Wm. S. Hoffman 
Secretary 



DEVELOPMENT OF MUSIC WITHIN RELIGIOUS FJSITHS .FEATURES PROGRAM TUESDAY NIGHT 



How music developed within the var- 
ious religious faiths will be told 
through music in a novel program at 7:30 
o'clock Tu e s d a y n ig ht « 

Dr, Henry S, Brunner, faculty chair- 
man and T» Clayton Allen, student chair- 
man, have obtained the co-operation of 
the Chapel Choir, directed by Willa W # 
Taylor; the Hillel Foundation group, led 
by Rabbi Benjamin Kahn; and the male 



choir of Cur La dy of Victory church, 
directed by A.U, Case, to present examples 
of sacred music of all types and faiths* 

William Hyme s , student, will sing 
several Negro spirituals and George E, 
Ceiga, organist, will illustrate some of 
the instrumental religious music* 

The program, open to the public, is 
a part of the Religion— in— Life Week. 



OF GENERAL INTEREST- 



SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURE: The faculty of 
the School of Agriculture will meet at 
4:10 p.m. Friday in Room 109, Agriculture 
Building, 

» * * 

COURSES OF STUDY COMMITTEE: The Senate 
Courses of Study Committee will meet 
from 9 to 11 a.m,, instead of 10 a,m, to 
12 noon as previously announced, on Wed- 
nesday in Room 207, Engineering "C n , 

* * * 

CHAPEL: Rev. Harry B. Taylor, of the 
First Presbyterian Church, Syracuse, 
N.Y, , will speak at chapel services on 
Sunday morning, 

* * * 

LUNCHEON CLUB: A musical program by 
members of the department of ma themat ics 
will be presented at the Faculty Luncheon 
Club meeting on Monday, February 28, 
Dr e Teresa Cohen will play the vi alin; 
Dr, Thomas C. Bentm, the piano; and Edmund 
H. Umberger, the clarinet, 

* * * 

SUNDAY RECITAL: George E. C^iga, assis- 
tant professor of music, will present an 
organ recital at 4 p.m. Sunday in Schwab 
Auditorium. He will be assisted by 
Maynard L, Hill, tenor, who is a student 
in metallurgy, 

* • A 

FOOD SERVICE OPENS : The H me Economics 
foods service has opened for the semester. 
The cafeteria and Maple Room will be open 
daily, Monday through Friday, from 11:45 
a»m. to 12:30 p.m. Tea room service will 
be available in the Maple T?.'.>m Monday 
through Timvcday £a~om 5-t3 p,m, to 
8:30 p .m. 



COLLOQUIUM: Dr, Richard M, Sutton, 
professor of physics, IlaVerford College, 
and past-president, American Association 
of Physics Teachers, will speak at the 
Physics Colloquium at 4:25 p.m. Tuesday 
in Room 117, Osmond Laboratory, His sub- 
ject will be: "The Art of Lecture Demon- 
stration in Physics," 

* * * 

READING EXAMINATION: The Reading examina- 
tions in foreign languages required of 
candidates for advanced degrees, will be 
given on. Monday, March 7 between 7 and 9 
p.m. in Room 316, Sparks Building, 

4 * * 

ARTICLE PUBLISHED: "Should You Have An 
Arena Stage?" is the subject of an 
article by Kelly Yeaton, assistant profes- 
sor of dramatics, in the January issue of 
Player's Magazine, Center State also is 
mentioned and a picture cf a scene from 
"Hotel Universe" is included in the March 
issue of Theatre Arts, 



FAMI 

nor e 

f ami 

for 

Scho 

meet 

p#m. 

bala 

sons 

by < 

fox 



LY MEALS C 

skill in 
ly meals a 
a non-cred 
ol of Home 
weekly on 
to pre par 
need, low 

should re 
ailing Mrs 
the course 



OURSE: Per 
planning an 
re invited 
it cour se o 

Economic s . 

Thursday f 
e and serve 
cost meal, 
gistcr notl 
• David Cow 

(3324). 



sons desiring 

d preparing 

to register n 

ffered by the 

The group w 

rom 5:30 to 3 

a simple, we 

Interested p 

ater than Tue 



ow 



ill 
:30 
11- 
er- 
sday 
11. instructor 



PAPER PUBLISHED: A paper, "Self Con- 
fidence Through Creative Work, " by 
Viktor L^wenfeld, professor of art educa- 
tion, has been published in the January 



PENN STATE COLLECTION 



i»3ue of "Progressive Education." The 
article deals with the influence of art 
education on personality adjustment s , 

* * * 

SPEAKS; Robert B, Donaldson, professor 
of agricultural economics extension, 
last week addressed the annual meeting 
of the National League of Wholesale 
Fresh Fruit and Vegetable distributors 
in Pittsburgh. His theme was "Your Best 
Foot Forward" and he emphasized the need 
for more educational work in the market- 
ing of fresh fruits and vegetables, 

* * * 

AUTHOR: Oscar F. Spencer, professor and 
supervisor of petroleum and natural gas 
extension, is co-author of "Natural Gas 
Engineering, Volume III." The book was 
revised in collaboration with M.M. 
Stephens, former supervisor of petrnleum 
and natural gas extension. 

* * * 

PUBLISHES TEXT: A text, titled, "Course 
Making in Industrial Education" by John E, 



Friese, professor of industrial 'art s 
education, has been published by the 
Manual Arts Press, Peoria, 111, 

* * * 

SPEAKS: Carl 0, Dossin, professor of 
poultry husbandry extension, spoke on 
"Hatching Egg Production" at the recent 
annual meeting of the Connecticut Poultry 
Association in Hartford, 

* * * 

SPEAHS : "Bigger and Better Corn Crops" 
"was the title of an address presented 
by Dr. L.L. Huber, professor of agronomy 
at the recent annual Farmers' W e ck pro- 
gram at Rutgers University, 

* * * 

HOOD LOST: An academic hood was lost fol- 
lowing the mid-year Commencement exercises. 
It is believed that the hood was dropped 
somewhere between Recreation Building and 
Osmond Laboratory, Anyone who may have 
found this hood is requested to call 
extension 259M, 

* * * 



OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS FROM THE OFFICE OF THE DEAN OF ADMISSIONS AND REGISTRAR 

Withdrawal s : 



7 Dombrswski, Stanley, CF,-Feb, 7 

4 Gracey, James, LD, Feb, 10 

4 Hanamirian, Arsen, LD, Feb, 4 

4 Herman, Patricia Ann, LD, Feb, 5 

5 Higgins, William Joseph, ME, Feb. 3 



Sp Rice, Raymond R., PNG, Feb. 7 

5 Shultz, Raymond Lewis, EE, Feb, 

5 Weil, Hildegarde, MT, F e b« 7 

5 Whitman, J«hn B., FT, Feb, 9 



Reasons f«r withdrawal: To transfer, 2; personal, 2; illness, 2; undecided 
about curriculum, 1; scholastic difficulties, lj and financial problems, 1, 

Change of Name : 



From Thomas Cornish Hrill (of Harrisburg Center) 
To Thomas Cornish Cooke 



ENROLLMENT BY CURRICULA. 2nd SEMESTER 1549 

2 Sem 3 Sem 4 Sem 5 Sem 6 Sem 7 | ,. Se rn 8 Sem 

M ' M U W M W M W M W M "17 M W M 

AGRICULTURE 

ABCh 

Ag Ec 

Ag Ed 

Ag Eng 

Agro 

AH 

Bact 

Bot 

DH 

For 

Hort 

PH 

PV 

ZE 

MT 

WU 9 - 1 - 12 

Total 3 9 10 2 435 28 39 - 421 29 90 

CHEMISTRY AND PHYSICS 



- 


— 


1 


- 


15 


4 


2 


1 


- 


1 


- 


29 


- 


5 


- 


— 


1 


— 


49 


- 


5 


1 


- 


1 


- 


27 


- 


2 


1 


- 


1 


- 


26 


1 


- 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


20 


1 


4 


- 


2 


1 


- 


16 


1 


2 


- 


- 


- 


— 


2 


- 


1 


— 


- 


- 


— 


66 


— 


5 


- 


- 


— 


— 


83 


— 


6 


— 


— 


2 


- 


54 


3 


2 


- 


- 


2 


— 


37 


- 


4 


— 


2 


- 


- 


1 


1 


- 


— 


2 


- 


- 


— 


5 


— 


- 


3 


- 


2 


1 


12 


_ 


— 


— 


— 


— 


9 


— 


1 


3 


9 


10 


2 


435 


28 


39 



8 


3 


1 


48 


~ 


9 


45 


1 


20 


17 


- 


3 


33 


— 


7 


30 


1 


4 


11 


4 


2 


4 


- 


1 


45 


- 


6 


91 


- 


17 


53 


2 


6 


24 


- 


4 


_ 


11 


_ 


- 


7 


— 



6 


2 


33 


9 


42 


17 


— 


110 


- 


110 


32 


— 


152 


1 


153 


12 


— 


63 


- 


63 


10 


— 


73 


1 


79 


15 


5 


73 


7 


80 


3 


4 


35 


11 


46 


— 


— 


8 


— 


8 


43 


— 


165 


1 


166 


36 


- 


233 


- 


233 


23 


2 


14 


7 


147 


3 


— 


74 


- 


74 


— 


— 


1 


4 


5 


- 


1 


— 


19 


19 


— 


6 


1 


30 


31 


4 


- 


26 


— 


26 


04 


20 


1192 


90 


1282 



ChE - 4 - 66 

Chem 1 3 - 32 4 

Phys - 17 

PM 4 1 - 48 6 

Sci - - 5 - 

CCh - 1 2 3 

Total 5 8 1 170 13 



6 


- 


96 


— 


4 


- 


67 


— 


243 


— 


243 


3 


— 


25 


1 


— 


— 


18 


4 


81 


10 


91 


6 


— 


35 


- 


4 


- 


17 


- 


79 


— 


79 


9 


- 


54 


1 


4 


1 


44 


1 


16 


13 


173 


1 


1 


13 


7 


7 


2 


16 


5 


42 


15 


57 


3 


~ 


7 


3 


4 


- 


22 


2 


38 


9 


47 


8 


1 


230 


12 


23 


3 


184 


12 


643 


47 


690 



EDUCATION 



Ed 




IA 


— 


MEd 


— 


Psy 


— 


VlEd 


— 


Total 




HOME E 


C GNOMICS 


HEc 




HA 


— 


Total 


- 


ENGINEERING 



22 



60 


115 


16 


18 


— 


7 


12 


8 


1 


39 


34 


15 


1 


- 


4 


130 


157 


43 



99 


81 


24 


18 


42 


90 


243 


335 


578 


18 


- 


3 


- 


10 


- 


57 


- 


57 


7 


9 


2 


- 


7 


5 


29 


22 


51 


65 


24 


17 


1 


27 


2fr 


165 


89 


254 


7 


- 


1 


6 


8 


- 


22 


6 


28 


196 


114 


47 


25 


94 


121 


516 


452 


96 8 



10 2 115 7 1 74 13 2 90 4 301 305 

21 119 5 124 



- 


2 


- 115 


- 


7 


1 


74 


1 


2 


- 


44 3 


6 


- 


33 


2 


13 


2 


2 


44 118 


6 


7 


34 


76 


14 



23 90 123 306 429 



Arch - - --24- «. «. 20 - 2- 8 

AE 1 - - - 18 - - - 24 - - - 25 

CE 1 1 - 77 - 19 - 83 - 17 - 41 

EE 3 155 41 164 - 45 - 88 

IE 7 - 59 - 22 120 40 

ME 2 149 40 122 - 32 - 92 

SE ____6-l-5~l-76 

Aero -- __28- 4-30- 9-28 

Total 2 - 13 - 516 - 127 - 568 - 146 - 358 

THE LIBE RAL ART S, 

AL 50 11 

CF - - 

J our — — — 

AC - 

LAC - 

LD 2 22 37 5 487 165 - - - 526 192 71? 

Total 2 22 37 5 487 165 151 19 490 175 149 29 360 125 1676 540 2216 



54 


- 


54 


68 


1 


69 


239 


— 


239 


4 96 


- 


4 96 


248 


1 


249 


437 


- 


437 


89 


- 


89 


99 


— 


99 


730 


2 


1732 



- 


- 


50 


- 


- 


92 


— 


— 


9 


487 


165 




487 


16 5 


151 



150 


133 


55 


25 


138 


93 


3 93 


262 


655 


268 


22 


79 


1 


190 


11 


629 


42 


671 


72 


20 


15 


3 


32 


20 


128 


43 


17'- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


— 


1 


^ 



mmaammmttmml m m mmmt 



MINERAL INDUSTRIES 



Cer 






_ 


_ 




27 


_ 


5 


_ 


20 


J|L 


4 


mm 


16 


. mn 


72 


_ 


72 


FT 




- 


~ 


- 


- 


6 


- 


2 


1 


9 


- 


2 


- 


5 


- 


24 


1 


25 


GePg 




». 


- 


~ 


- 


6 


- 


- 


~ 


5 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


11 


- 


11 


GM 




— 


— 


- 


~ 


10 


1 


2 


— 


10 


- 


5 


1 


9 


— 


35 


2 


38 


GG 




— 


- 


- 


- 


5 


— 


— 


— 


3 


- 


1 


- 


1 


- 


10 


— 


10 


Met 




m. 


— 


1 


- 


28 


— 


- 


— 


33 


- 


- 


- 


26 


— 


88 


— 


88 


Mrgy 






































MEo 




_ 


— 


— 


— 


2 


— 


— 


— 


5 


- 


3 


- 


8 


- 


18 


— 


18 


MPE 






































MEng 




_ 


— 


— 


— 


13 


— 


1 


- 


16 


— 


8 


— 


8 


— 


51 


— 


51 


PNG 




~ 


- 


1 


- 


26 


- 


3 


- 


37 


- 


5 


- 


14 


— 


86 


- 


86 


Total 




- 


- 


2 


- 


128 


1 


13 


1 


138 


- 


28 


1 


87 


- 


3 96 


3 


399 


PHYSICAL 


EDUC1 


5.TI0N 
































PEd 




_ 


_ 


,_ 


_ 


42 


28 


5 


_ 


53 


15 


12 


_ 


42 


17 


154 


60 


214 


HEd 




~ 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


— 


— 


1 


1 


1 


- 


1 


3 


4 


5 


9 


R.eo 




- 


- 


- 


— 


2 


1 


2 


— 


4 


1 


1 


— 


7 


3 


16 


5 


21 


Total 




- 


- 


- 


- 


45 


30 


7 


- 


58 


17 


14 


- 


50 


23 


174 


70 


244 


TRANSITION 








































- 


- 


1 


- 


38 


2 


6 


- 


11 


1 


2 


- 


3 


- 


61 


3 


64 


Total 




7 


71 


79 


11 


1993 


514 


420 


37 


2146 


424 


503 


63 


1364 


3 92 


6511 


3533 


8024 



Candidates for Bachelors Degree 65111513 8024 

Grad. Students go2 184 1086 

Special Students 82 103 185 

Two -Year i\g» 5-5 

Grand Total 7500 1800 9300 



A JL & 2 q I <3 I^J^UOQ 

j.9mcj.$ ©TQ.CJ.V 






THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 

BULLETIN 



FACULTY 



The Bulletin is published weekly during the Colleg® 
war as a means of making official announcements 
and presenting items of interest to the faculty. All 




contributions should be as brief as possible and 
reach Louis H. Bell, Director of Public Information, 
313 Old Main, not later than 10 a. m. each Friday. 



VOL. 



36 



February 28, 1949 



NO. 



20 



DR. CLEMENTS TO OPEN 17TH SERIES OF LIBRARY READINGS 



Dr. Robert H. Clements, pro- 
fessor and head of the department 
of romance languages, will open 
the 17th series of Wednesday- 
Readings in Room 105, Central 
Library, at 4:15 o'clock on Wed- 
nesday afternoon. The series will 
be devoted to drama. 

Dr. Clements will read from 
the play, "Red Gloves," and from 
other plays of Jean Paul Sartre. 
"Red Gloves," starring Charles 
Boyer, is currently playing on 
Broadway, 

The other numbers in the 17th 



series w i 
the plays 
Frank Neu 
head, Mot 
ing Studi 
N.M. Bren 
of romanc 
Dr. Phili 
and head 
German; a 
Robert Re 
fessor of 



11 include 
of Eugene 
sbaum, admi 
ion Picture 
o ; Ti rso de 
tin, assist 
e languages 
p A. Shel le 
of the depa 
nd Tennesse 
if sne ider , 
dramatics , 



readings from 


O'Neill by 


nistrative 


and Record- 


Molina, by 


ant professor 


; Goethe, by 


y, professor 


rtment of 


e Wi 1 1 iams , by 


assistant pro- 



Students, faculty, and 
townspeople are invited to attend 
the readings. 



BOXING TOURNAMENT TICKETS GO ON SALE WEDNESDAY 



Both reserved seat and 
general admission tickets to the 
Intercollegiate Boxing Association 
title tournament will go on sale 
Wednesday at the ticket windows of 
the Athletic Association, first 
floor, Old Main. The bouts will 
be held in Recreation Building 
Friday and Saturday, March 11 and 
12. 



entitling the purchaser to a re- 
served seat at all three sessions 
may be purchased for $4,00. 

General admission tickets, 
priced at 90 cents for each ses- 
sion, will entitle the holder to a 
seat in the bleachers on the 
first floor of Recreation Build- 
ing. 



Reserved seat tickets are 
ed at $1.20 for Friday night 
tt 1.20 for Saturday afternoon 



pric 

and 

sessions, and $2 

Satu 



►40 for the finals 
A series ticket 



The A. A. ticket 
be open daily from 8 
noon, and again from 
4:30 p.m. 



windows wi 1 1 
a.m. until 
1:30 to 



rday night. 

LOCAL TALENT TO PRESENT MUSICALE SUNDAY AFTERNOON 



wi 1 1 


Lion 


the 


As so 


bene 


whic 



A musicale by local talent 
be presented at the Nittany 
Inn at 3:30 p.m. Sunday under 
sponsorship of the American 
ciation of University Women, 

Proceeds will be used for the 
fit of the fellowship fund 
h provides national and inter- 



national fellowships for graduate 
s tudy. 

Co-chairman of arrangements 
are Mrs. Franklin Cook and Mrs, 
T.S. Oakwood. 

Tickets, priced at 75 cents, 
may be purchased from committee mem- 
bers or at the Inn. 



FENN STATE COLLECTION 



■ 



OLD MAIN DIRECTORY 

Locations of many administrative offices in Old Main Building have 
been changed. New locations and telephone extens i ens arc listed below. 

B asement 
Room No. " Off ice Telephone 

Receiving Room ■ -West Service Area 

4 -Accounting Divi s ion--Fee Assessor 226 

5 --Accounting Divis ion--Mul t i 1 i th 220 

6,7,8 Accounting Divis ion--Main Entrance ZZO 

6A Accounting Divi si on--B i 1 1 ing ZZO 

6B- Accounting Divis ion--Bookkceping ZZO 

6C-— --Accounting Divis ion--Bookkeeping North East ZZO 

6D Accounting Divis ion--Bookkeeping North West ZZO 

6E- Accounting Division—Auditors and Conference 220 

6F Accounting Divis i on--Chief Accountant 220 

7 Accounting Divis ion--Tabulat i ng 220 

8 Accounting Divi s ion--Centra 1 Filipg 220 

9 Accounting Divis i on--Test Scoring 220 

Second Floor 

209 Personnel Relations 588 

209- , Accounting Division, Research Co-ordination 220 

209 — « • Accounting Division, Budget Accountant . 220 

Third Floor 

301 Accounting Division—Property Inventory 582 

302 Accounting Division—Auditing 581 

305-- Accounting Divis i on— Aud iti ng 580 

309,315 -Public Information, Office Services Division 183M 

318 -Physical Plant, Plant Extension Division 310 

321— Physical Plant, Engineering and Drafting; 310 

Key Depository 

Fourth Floor 

411 _-_ — Penn State Club and Philotes 

413 Naval Cost Accountant 232 

415- -U.S'. Navy, Officer in charge of Construe- City 

tion 4901 

Ext, 6d 

OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS FROM THE OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR AND DEAN OF ADMISSIONS 

Withdrawals ; 

A J^lewioz, Carl- Edward, EE, Feb. 17 4 Wachtel, Barbara, HE, Feb, 8 
6 Idonir, Kenneth, CE, Feb. 17 

Reasons for Withdrawal: Personal, 2; to be married 1. 

' Change of Status 
The provisional admission of Edward Faber, which wa s cancelled, is now valid. 



95— 
96— 
117— 
126 — 
206J- 
206M- 
211 J- 
211M- 
364-- 
376J- 
376M- 
493-- 
494 — 
495-- 



NEW CAMPUS TELEPHONE NUMBERS AND CHANGES 

Intramural Sports 

Dental Clinic 

Psychology Extension, Old Zoology Building 

Employment Office 

Salvage Warehouse 

Res., K.G. Houck, Salvage Warehouseman 

Resident Advisor, Nittany Dormitories 

Resident Advisor, Pollock Circle Dormitories 

Criti que 

Petroleum Production Office 

South Penn Research Laboratory 

Office, School of Engineering 

Dean, School of Engineering 

Assistant Dean, School of Engineering 



OF GENERAL INTEREST 



SENATE? The College Senate will 
meet at 4:10 p.m. Thursday in Room 
121, Sparks Building., 

CHAPEL: Dr. Carl Lund-Quist, ex- 
ecutive secretary, National Luther- 
an Council, Division of Public Re- 
lations, New York, N.Y., will 
speak at chapel services at 11 
o'clock on Sunday morning, 

LUNCHEON CLUB; Harold Fishbein, 
who has served with the American 
Military Government in Europe, 
will speak at the Faculty Luncheon 
Club on Monday, March 7. His sub- 
ject will be; "The Berlin Crisis." 

PHYSICS COLLOQUIUM: A.O. Morse, 
assistant to the President in 
charge of resident instruction, 
will speak at the Physics Colloqui- 
um to be held at 4:10 p.m. Tuesday 
in Room 117, Osmond Laboratory, 
His subject will be: "General 
Education, Its Meaning and Signi- 
f icance ." 



READING EXAMINATION: The reading 
examinations in foreign languages 
required for candidates for ad- 
vanced degrees will be given on 
Monday, March 7, from 7 to' 9 p.m. 
in Room 316, Sparks Building. 



SWIMMING: Recreational swimming 
for faculty, wives, and employees 
will be held at Glennland Pool 
every Monday from 7 to 9 p.m. 
Tickets may be bought at the Bur- 
sar's Office for $1,80 per semes- 



ter . 
pool 



Towels are provided at the 



MOTORS FOR SALE: The College 
Creamery has a number of motors 
from fractional horsepower up to 
10 horsepower for sale. There 
also is one large ice crusher 
wi th a motor , 



FIVE O'CLOCK THEATRE: This 
week's p ro d uc t i o n for F i ve 
O'Clock Theatre v/ill be 
"St, Levy's," written by Henry 
W. Glass, It is a farce and 
running time is 20 minutes. It 
will be presented at 5 p.m. 
Tuesday in the Little Theatre, 
Old Main. There will be no ad- 
mission charge. 



CHORAL SOCIETY: Faculty, staff 
members, and graduate students 
interested in singing with the 
State Col lege . Choral Society are 
invited to attend the rehearsals 
held at 7:30 o'clock each Monday 
night in t he third floor room of 
the Wesley Foundation Building 
at St. Paul's Methodist Church. 
The group, under the direction 
of Mrs. Duane Ramsey, is rehear- 
sing Bach's B minor Mass and 
next December plans to sing 
Bach's Christmas Oratorio. Dr. 
R.B, Rower, professor of engi- 
neering research, is president 
of the group. 



ABROAD: Dr. Eric 



Wa 1 ke r 



director of the Ordnance Research 



■xi otats ^n T ' E ~'~" 1 B 



Laboratory, has just returned from 
a short trip abroad where he con- 
ferred v/ith British scientists 
and Navy officers concerning the 
establishment of joint Anglo- 
American research and development 
stations. He was accompanied by 
Sir Charles Wright, of the British 
Scientific Commission; Admiral 
CM. Bolster, of the Office of 
Naval Research; and J,S. Coleman, 
of the National Research Council, 
While abroad, they were met by 
Sir William Tennant and Captain 
McCoy of the British Atlantic 
Naval Forces to consider the prob- 
lem of sites, personnel, and 
methods of operation. With the 
present shortage of scientists, it 
is considered essential that dupli- 
cation of effort be avoided and 
joint operations is considered the 
best way to do this. 



CONFERENCE: More than 75 county 
superintendents of schools and 
their assistants are meeting on 
the campus this week to discuss 
the future role of county super- 
intendents in Pennsylvania, Meet- 
ings are held at the Nittany Lion 
Inn. 



ATTEND CONFERENCE: Five faculty 
and staff members attended the 
conference on Current Trends in 
Industrial psychology at the Uni- 
versity of Pittsburgh recently. 
They were Dr. B .V. Moore, profes- 
sor and head of the department of 
psychology; Dr. Knisley R. Smith, 
professor of psychology; Dr. Al- 
bert K. Kurtz, professor of psy- 
chology; Dr. Lester P. Guest, as- 
sociate professor of psychology; 
and W.F. Hittinger, of the Person- 
nel Service Division of Central 
Extens ion. 



ATTENDS MEETING: C.A. Eder, asso- 
ciate professor of civil engineer- 
ing, recently attended the annual 
meeting of the American Concrete 
Institute in New York, N.Y. 



HONORED: Th 
and Home Eco 
tral ExtensI 
ne r at the P 
6 p.m. on S a- 
honor Dr. Ro 
professor of 
i s t i n c ommu 
wh o will d e s 
in Japan, F 
we 1 c orne . P r 
For reservat 



e Schools of Education 
nomics as well as Ccn- 
on -wi 1 1 sponsor a din- 
resbyterian Church at 
turday, March 19, to 
se Cologne, associate 

education and special- 
nity adult education," 
cribe her recent work 
acuity and wives are 
ice, $1„60 per plate. 
ions , cal 1 ext. 387 . 



SPEAKS: Dr. R. Adams Dutcher, pro- 
fessor and head of the department 
of agricultural and biological 
chemistry, addressed the Pcnn State 
Club of Philadelphia in Philadel- 
phia on Friday. He discussed 
"Research." 

ATTENDS MEETINGS: Dr. T.C. Kavan- 
agh, associate, professor of civil 
engineering, recently attended the 
annual meeting of the Column Re- 
search Council of the Engineering 
Foundation as well as the meeting 
of the American Concrete Institute 
in New York . 



HONORED: W C S. Hoffman, dean of 
admissions and registrar, and Dr. 
Carl E, Marquardt, assistant dean 
of admissions and College examiner, 
'who retired on Monday, were honored, 
recently at a luncheon by the 
Council of. Admini s trati on„ 



ATTENDS MEETING: Dr. H.K. Wilson, 
director of resident instruction 
for the School of Agriculture, 
last week attended the meeting of 
directors of resident instruction 
from Land-Grant Colleges and Uni- 
versities of northeastern states 
in New York. The new comprehen- 
sive education plan was the sub- 
ject for discussion. 

ARTICLE PUBLISHED:" An article, 
"Mr. Ne i 1 1 and Phys iocracy,'' by 
Dr . John A, Mourant, associate 
professor of philosophy, was pub- 
lished in the January issue of 
Journal of the History of Ideas, 
The article deals w;tn the Phvsio- 
cratic Conception oi Natural Law. 



j£ a ■£• J q t ^ x S - 1 3- - © 
jocojq 3TC L qv 



THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 




The Bulletin is published weekly during She College 
year as a means of making official announcements 
and presenting items of interest to the faculty. Ail 



VOL. 36 



ULLETIN 



contributions should be as brief as possible and 
reach Louis H. Bell. Director of Public Information, 
313 Old Main, not later than 10 a. m. each Friday. 



March 7, 1949 



NO. 21 



MINUTES OF THE SENATE MEETING OF MARCH 3, 1949 



The College Senate met at 4:10 p.m. 
on March 3, 1949, in Room 121 Sparks 
Building, Mr. A*Q, Morse presiding. The 
list of members present is on file in 
the Office of the Registrar, The minu- 
tes of the last meeting were not read 
since they had been published in the 
Faculty Bulletins for February 14 and 
21, 1949. 

The Acting Secretary read letters, 
as follows^, under the heading of com- 
munications from College Officers: 



Dr. Lloyd Jones, of the School of 

ysical Education and Athletics, stated 

at Dr » Harnett would serve in his 

ice at the March meeting of the Col— 



Phy 

that 

place 

lege Senates 



Dr. Helen LeBaron, Assistant Dean 
of the School of Home Economics, like- 
wise informed the secretary of the Sen- 
ate that Dr. Hatcher would replace her 
at the meeting of the College Senate^, 
March 3, 194 9. 

These letters are on file in the 
Office of the Registrar. 

Under the reports of standing com- 
mittees, Prof. Victor A. Beede, Chairman 
of the Committee on Academic Standards, 
reported that the committee was recom- 
mending that Miss Eloise B. Cohlberg be 
permitted to take six credits at Temple 
University this summer in order to meet 
requirements for her degree in February, 
1950, By unanimous vote of the College 
S e nate, the recommendation of the Com- 
mittee on Academic Standards in regard 
to this case was approved. 

Prof. Beede on behalf of the com- 
mittee, likewise, presented the case of 
Betty L, Levitt. The Committee on 
Academic Standards recommended that Miss 
Levitt be permitted to take six credits 
at T e mple University this summer in 
order to meet the requirements for her 
degree in February, 1950. By unr imous 
vote of the College Senate, the recom- 
mendation of the Committee on Academio 
Standards in regard to this case was 
approved. The report of the Committee 



on Academic Standards is 
Office of the Registrar «> 



on file in the 



Dr. BoV. Moore recommended the fol- 
lowing change in the by— lav/ s specifying 
the membership of the Committee on 
Academic Standards* 



Th 
mends a 
the mem 
Academi 
standin 
repre se 
graduat 
cat ions 
members 
n ow e i g 
committ 
Article 
t o read 



e Committe 
change in 
bership of 
c Standard 
g committe 
ntation fr 
e schools, 

for this 
hip to sev 
ht undergr 
ee recomme 



e on Committ 

the by— laws 

the Committ 

s . S ince ot 

es of the Se 

on each of t 

and since t 

committee li 



a du a t e s ch o o 
nds to the S 
II, Section 1 (e ) be 



ees recom— 

specifying 
ee on 

her similar 
nate have 
he under- 
lie specifi— 
nit the 
there are 
Is, the 
enate that 
amended 



(e ) Academic Standards, one member 
from each of the undergraduate schools. 

This report was placed on the table 
for one month. It is on file in the 
Office of the Registrar. 

Prof, C.E. Bui linger, Chairman of 
the Committee on Courses of Study, 
reported that the March report was tem- 
porarily held up, but would be In the 
mail next week. 

Prof, L uis A. Richardson, Chairman 
of the Committee on Public Occasions, 
made the following recommendations: 

1. That the top honors listed below 
be awarded at the Commencement ceremony: 

a. John W« White Medal. 

b. John W« White Fellowship • 

c. Evan Pugh Medals. 

d. President Sparks Medal (if won 
by a graduating senior,) 

2. That those graduating with a 
scholastic average of 2.4 or better be 
listed in the program and be asked to 
stand, in place, and be mentioned with 

ttiMN STATE COLLECTION 



appropriate remarks by the President* 

By unanimous vote of the College 
Senate the recommendation of the Committee 
on Public Occasions was accepted. 

Under the heading of old business, 
Professor Bullinger, Chairman of the 
Courses of Study Committee, made the fol— , 
lowing changes in the February report: 

Hort • 518. "Drop lecture hours" 
should be included in the changes on 
page 2, 

Ind. Ed. 580 - "To be dropped for 
extension" should be deleted on page 5. 

Professor Bullinger's motion to 
accept these changes w a s unanimously 
approved by the S e nate. 

Professor Bullinger reported that 
course and curriculum changes be sent 
to him before April 27, 1949. 

Under the heading of new business, 
Mr. Morse raised the question of the 
Registrar of the College acting as 
Secretary of the College Senate. Dean 
R.M, Gerhardt, the new Registrar and 
Dean of Admissions, gave the Senate an 



opportunity to change the by-laws which 
state that the Registrar of the College 
act as Secretary of the Ccllege Senate* 
Motion was duly made and seconded that 
Dean Gerhardt continue as Secretary of 
the Senate. Motion was unanimously pas sed. 

Prof. William Werner raised the 
question of the accuracy of the Old Main 
clock, Mr. Morse stated that he would 
report this matter to the proper authori- 
ties. Prof. Werner moved that the Coun- 
cil of Administration consider the possi- 
bility of installing a system of bells 
for classrooms and laboratories. This 
motion was lost. 

Dr. R.E. Dengler brought up the 
subject of prizes and departmental 
awards and if these should be included 
in the Commencement Program. This 
matter was referred to the Committee 
on Public Occasions. 

In the absence of further new 
business of the College, Senate ad- 
journed. 



R.E. Dengler 
Secretary jjro tern. 



"ISOTOPES AS TRACERS IN SCIENCE" IS SUBJECT OF SIGMA XI LECTURE 



Dr. Paul C. Aebersold, chairman of 
the Isotope Division of the Atomic Energy 
Commission will discuss "Isotopes as 
Tracers in Science" at 7:30 p.m. Monday, 
March 14, in Room 121, Sparks Building, 

The lecture, sponsored by the 
Society of the Sigma Xi, will be open 
to the public, 

Dr» Aebersold, who received his 
doctor of philosophy degree at the 



University of California, was associated 
with the radiation laboratory there for 
several years before joining the Atomic 
Energy Commission staff. His xvork in 
nuclear physics and bio-physics includes 
research on neutron 'radiation, biological 
effects of radiation, and radiation 
therapy of cancer. 

His lecture will be a general survey 
of the use of isotopic tracers, popularly 
known as tagged atoms. 



FRANK S . NEUSBAUM TO PRESENT LIBRARY READING WEDNESDAY 



Frank S. Neusbaum, administrative 
head, Motion Picture and Recording 
Studio, and professor of dramatics, will 
present the second in the series of 
Library Readings at 4:15 p.m. Wednesday, 



The reading, which will be open to 
the public, will be held in Room 105, 
Central Library, 

Neusbaum will read from the plays of 
Eugene O'Neill. 



POSTER-MAKING SERVICE AVAILABLE ON CAMPUS 



The .Office Services Division 
announces that it is now equipped to make 
embossed posters for all agencies of the 
College. This service is in addition 
to those already announced — typing, mimeo- 
graphing and duplicating, assembly and 
mailing. 

With its Embosograph poster-making 
machine, Office Services can prepare 
posters, naneplatflS (for desk and door), 
direction signs, legends, announcements 



md similar cards. 



those limits, cards of 
sions may be nade. 



Maximum poster size 
wit] 
ny dimen— 



, a II u , 

. lmo st i 



There is a choice of ten colors and 
a type choice ranging in size from one- 
quarter inch to three inches. Posters 
are produced on a cost basis and 48— hour 
service is provided. For further infor- 
mation, call Office Services Division, 
Ext. 183-M, 



LARS' MARNUS, DANISH ARCHITECT, TO SPEAK .HERE WE DUES DAY EIGHT 



Lars Marnus, noted Danish architect 
and educator, will speak on "Cont enporary 
Architecture in the Scandinavian Coun- 
tries" at '8 o'clock on. Wednesday night in 
Room 110, Electrical Engineering Building, 

His talk, which is sponsored by the 
department of architecture and will be 
open to the public, will be illustrated 
with slide s« 



In connection with the talk, an 
exhibit of 400 photographs will be shown 
on the third floor, Main Engineering 
Building, all day on Wednesday, 

Marnus studied architecture in the 
Royal Academy of Copenhagen, and later in 
England, France, and the United States, 
This is his third lecture tour in this" 
country , 



OF GENERAL INTEREST 



CHAPEL: Dr. Frank £. Gaebelein, head- 
master of Stony Brook School, Stony 
Brook, L,Ia,N,Y», will speak at chapel 
services at 11 c'clook on Sunday morning, 

* * * 

LUNCHEON CLUB:' Ralph W, McComb, college 
librarian, will address the Faculty 

Luncheon Club on Monday noon, March 14 * 

* * * 

AAUP : Graduate studies and research 
will be discussed at the meeting of the 
American Association of University Pro- 
fessors to be held in Room 219, Electri- 
cal Engineering Building, at 7:30 p e m, 
Wedne sday night . A selected panel will 
lay before the chapter for debate by the 
entire group some of the problems of ad- 
mission requirements, scholarship stand- 
ards, and research facilities which must 
be considered in improving the level of 
graduate study at the College. 

* * * 

COLLOQUIUM: Dr. Wayne Webb, associate 
professor of physics, will speak at the 
Physics Colloquium in Room 117, Osmond 
Laboratory, at 4:25 p.m. Tuesday, March Q 4 
His subject will be "Recent Developments 
in Magnetism," 

* » * 

EMPLOYEE BENEFITS: Retirement, group 
life insurance, and the group hospital 
expense .plan .for College employees will 
be discussed .at a meeting in Room 304,, 
Old Main, at 3:30 p.m. Thursday, Ques- 
tions concerning the plans will be 
answered and new employees, as well as 
others with questions, are urged to at- 
tend the meeting, 

* * * 

BOXING: Reserved seat and general ad- 
mission tickets are still available for 
the Intercollegiate Boxing Association 
championships in Recreation Building on 
Friday and Saturday, They may be pur- 
chased daily at the Athletic Association 
ticket window, first floor, Old Main, 
Tournament sessions will be held at 7 p,m, 
Friday, and at 2 p.m. and 7 p,m. Satui — 
day., A series ticket entitles the holder 
to a reserved seat at all three sessions 
for a cost of $4. Individual sessions 
are $1.20 each for the first two ses- 
sions, $2.40 for the finals* General ad- 
mission tickets sell for 90 cents per 
session, 

* * * 



CONCERT: A recital will be presented at 
4 p.m. Sunday in Schwab Auditorium by 
George E. Ceiga, organist, William Lynes, 
baritone, and Raymond Robinson, organist, 

* * * 

ASM: Dr. R.S, Buck, of Dow Chemical Co., 
Midland Mich,, will address a meeting of 
the Penn State chapter, American Society 
for Metals, at 8 p.m. Tuesday in the 
Mineral Industries Art Gallery. He will 
discuss the effects of alloying elements 
on the properties of magnesium and the 
fundamental aspeots of alloy behaviour, 

* * * 

PSI CHI: Dr. C.R. Carpenter, professor 
of psychology, will serve as moderator 
for a panel discussion of "The Place of 
Ethics in Science" to be held by Psi Chi, 
psychology recognition society, at 7:45 
p.m, Tuesday at the Hillel Foundation, 
At 7:15 p.m. a business meeting will be 
held while a coffee hour will follow the 
pane 1. 

* * * 

DEMONSTRATION: Three member s of the de- 
partment of civil engineering presented a 
hydraulics demonstration before the New 
Jersey section, American Water Works Asso- 
ciation, in Newark, N.J. recently. They 
were Robert E. Stiemke, R, Rupert Kuntz, 
and C , Fred Abel, 

* * * 

SPEAKS; H»W, T, n nan,' purchasing agent, 
spoke on "Dormitory Design,' Equipment, 
and Finances" at the Louisiana-Mississippi 
Regional meeting of the National Associa- 
tion of Educational* Buyers in Alexandria, 
La. last week. Earlier, Loman, who is 
national treasurer of the group, attended 
the association's planning me'et ing in 
New York, N.Y.' as a member of the execu- 
tive committee, and represented the organi- 
zation at the Texas regiona'l meeting at 
Dallas, Tex. 

* * * 

SPEAKS: Dr* W, Cor.ard F e rnelius, professor 
and head of the department of chemistry t 
recently addressed the Chicago section, 
American Chemical Society, on "Structure 
of Coordination Compounds " 

* * * 

HEADS CONCERT: Hummel Fishburn, professor 
and head of the department of music and 
music education, will have charge of the 
program of the Eastern Music Educators 
Conference in session in Baltimore this 



i 



T^ 



7rr>ek, Other faon.lt y ne taker 9 on the pro- 
gran include Janes W. Dunlop, Frank Gullo^ 
Barry S. Brinsmaid, all of the depart- 
nents of nusic and music education; and 
Dr. CO, Williams, assistant dean of ad— 
nissionsand College examiner. Other 
faculty nenbcrs attending are Br, Frances 
M, Andrews, Wills W. Taylor, G# William 
Henninger, and Elizabeth D. Reynolds*, 

* * * 

RADIO PROGRAM: Beginning March -14, Dr« 
Dagobert de Levie , assistant professor 
Of German, will present a radio 'program 
over Station WMA J , State College, each 
Monday, Wednesday, and Friday night from 
8:55 to 9 p.m. The program, conducted 
in German, will consist of news on Ger- 
many as well as a discussion of current 
topics concerning Germany, 

* * * 

REAPPOINTED: Joseph F, O'Brien, profes- 
sor of public speaking, ha.s been reappoin- 



ted to the regional committee to oe.Ie<3t 
debate teama which will participate in 
the National. Inter-collagiate Debate 
Tournament at the U,S , , Military Academy 
on April 21-23, 

* * * 

TO SPEAK: Marion S, McDowell, associate 
professor of family relationships, will 
present two talks at B e thany College, 
Bethany, W, Va , on Wednesday and Thursday. 
Addressing women students, she will dis- 
cuss "What Do You Bring to Marriage?" 
and at a convocation of al 1 . student s , 
she will speak on "Who Is Ready for 
Marriage ?" 

* * * 

SPEAKS: Dr, John 0, Alnquist, associate 
professor of dairy husbandry, reported 
on "Progress in Artificial Breeding in 
Pennsylvania" at the annual meeting of 
the Ontario Artificial Breeders Associa- 
tion at Canandaigua, N,Y # recently. 



FIRST "POST CARD" BOOKS FOR MICRO READER RECEIVED 



The first sets of Micro cards for 
use with the new Micro Library Reader 
have arrived. 

They include copies of Bell's "British 
Theatre," Dibdin* 8 "London Theatre," 
and "A Select Collection of Old English 
Plays" by Dodsley, 

Micro cards are the size of a 3 x 5 
inch index card, and in addition to the 
usual bibliographic material found on 
index cards, the text of the. book is - 
printed. As nany as 100 pages -can be 
printed on a single card. 

The Micro Library R e ader is used to 
read the micro print on the card. The 
machine is simpler to operate than the 
microfilm machines now in use in the * 



library and the cards are not as easily 
damaged as the film. It is also ex- 
pected that they will be cheaper. 

The Micro cards are not expected 
to replace books, but will make avail- 
able nany works now out of print, or 
rare, which are very important for 
research, but possibly are not widely 
used . 

The cards also will effect great 
savings in space and equipment, since 
one card file will house the equivalent 
of nany shelves of books j in tine, since 
they already will be catalogued; and 
in cost, since the cost of the cards 



is expected to be but 
wh at the books cost. 



fraction of 



OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS "FROM THE OFFICE OF THE DEAN OF ADMISSIONS AND- REGISTRAR 

WITHDRAWALS 



Arnold, Howard G,, Met, Feb. 10 

irris, AgEd, Feb*- 
Ciplet, Florence, AL, Feb, 1 
Cooper, Ray Calvin, Ed., Feb, 26 
Cover, Richard E,, LD, Feb. 19 ■ 
Fry'e , ''Jarie Alna, AL, Feb. 2 3 
Gar lire, Wilbur Neale, OhE,Feb, 26 



Gr '.Brazziel, William I 

6 

6 

4 

6 

3 

6 

4 

3 

4 

5 



Harris, Nancy 



.L. Feb. 25 



Haugh, Hubert Hammond', AgEc,, Feb, 
Hwa, Chen Yuan-Shi, CE," Feb.. 1 
Horsford, George S., Jr., LD , F e b, 
Lalli, Joseph Anthony, CE, Jan. 31 



21 
19 



2 Lee, Delores June, HEc, Feb. 9 
7 "McAdans, Richard H,, HA, Feb, 22 

4 Mendenhall, NanCy " Louise , Ed, Feb, 25 

5 Moretz, Donald E,, CF , Feb, 18 

Gr Oliver, Jean Elizabeth, Ed., Oct. 8 
4* Pry, Gilbert H.; Met, Feb. 28 

3 Richmond, Thomas Francis, Agro, Jan. 7 
Gr Rosen, Samuel, Bact., Feb. 23 

4 Snucker, Edward F., AgEg, Feb. 9 

4 Tagliaferi, Julius David, AgEd., Mar. 2 

5 Thomson, Robert Don, PNG, Feb, 23 



REASONS FOR WITHDRAWAL 
college , 2 ; 
be ■ marrie d, 



Per sonal 



; ii 

death of father, 1; illness in 
1; and no aptitude for techniea 



lness, 6; financial, 2; to attend another 
family, 1; to accept a position, 1; to 
1 work, 1. 



MAP EXHIBIT AT LIBRARY CONTINUES THROUGH MARCH 



An exhibitibn of naps, mainly those 
produced by the various service- of the 
United States during World* War II, will 
be on display in the lobby of the Central 
Library during the month of March. 



■Topographic maps of the United States 
and interesting' historical maps are 
among the many included in the exhibit. 



SOURCES OF GRADUATE FELLOWSHIPS AND SCHOLARSHIPS FOR 1946-1949 

The following list of sources of Graduate Fellowships and Scholarships has ken 
prepared by the Research Policy Committee of Sigma Xi*,' All interested applicants are 
urged to write immediately to the sponsoring agency as some of the Fellowships have 
a deadline date for application of March 15th, Any persons having additional infor- 
mation which might be added to this list are requested to phone or send it to Profes- 
sor W.M. Lepley, 203 Burr owes Building. 

THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE SOURCES 



Sponsoring Agency 

Graduate School & 
Department s 


Address 

Department 
Offices 


Yearly 
St ipend 

$1000 

< 


Field 
Study 

Any 


of 


Special 
Condit ion s 


ONR Instructional 
Film Research Project 

Ordnance Research 
Laborat ory 


370 Burrowes 
Burr owes Road 


$1000- 
$2400 

$1200- 
$1800 


Varie s 

. Eng 'g or 
Physics' 


Pre- or 
Po st— .doc- 
t oral 


GENERAL 


INSTITUTIONAL, 


INDUSTRIAL & FEDERAL SOURCES 





Amer. Assn. of 1634 Eye St. NW $1500 -^ n y Women only 

University Women Washington 6, EC • * 

Amer, Home 620 Mills Bldg. $600 Home Women only 

Economics Assn. Washington 6, DC Economics ' 

Amer. Institute 114 E. 40th St. $1400 Architecture 

of Architects New York, N.Y. 

Amer, Petroleum 50 W. 50th St. Varies Chemistry Selected 

Institute New York, N.Y. Schools 

Amer, Society of 33 W. 39th St. $1000- Hydraulics — — 

Civil Engineers New Y rk, N.Y, $2000 

Brookhaven National Brookhaven, L.I, Varies Physical — — 

Lab. N,Y. Sciences 

J.T. Baker Prof. J.H, Yoe $1000 Applied 

Chemical Co, Univ, of Va , Chemistry 

Charlottesville, Va, 

Charles Coffin General Elec, Co. Varies Electricity — 

Foundation Schenectady, N.Y, Physics 

Physical Chemistry 

Eleotro-Chemicetl 3000 Broadway $1000 Chem, Eng, 

Society New York, N,Y. 

Guggenheim Memorial 551 5th Ave, $2500 Any Arts & post -doc- 
Foundation New Y rk, N.Y, Varies Sciences toral 

W.K. Kellogg Founda- Battle Creek Varies Medicine — 

tion Michigan International 

Education 
Lalor Foundation Wilmington, Varies Chemistry Post-doc- 
Delaware Allied Sciences toral 

National Research 2101 Constitution Varies Sciences 

Council Ave,, Washington, 

D.C. 

Rhodes Scholarship American Hdqs, .^400 ^V Study at 

Swart hmo re College 1 c Oxford 
Swart hmore, Pa. 



Sponsoring i-gency 

Rockefeller 
Foundat ion 



Social Science 
Research Council 

Standard Brands 



Tau Beta Pi 



U # S. Public Health 
Service 

U.S. State Dept. 



Address_ 

49 W, 49th St . 
New York, N„Y. 



230 Park Ave* 
New York 17, N.Y*. 

5 95 Madison Ave* 
New York, N.Y. 



Univ. of Mich. 
Ann Arbor, Mich. 

Surgeon General 
Washington 14, DC 

Div. of Cultural 
Relat ions 
'Washington, DC 



West inghouse Elec,E. , Pittsburgh, Pa, 
& Mfg. Co. 



Zellers, Ltd. 



Montreal, Quebec 
Canada 



Yearly 
St ipend 

Varie s 



$1800- 
$2500 

Varie s 



$650 



Varie s 



Varie s 



Field of 
Study 



Special 
Condit ions 



Natural Sciences Post- 



Social 

Medicine 

Social 
Science s 

Food & Nutri- 
tional Studies 



Engineering 



doctoral 



Pre— doctoral 
Post— do-ot oral 

10 Selected 
ITtii-verBi— 
tie 3 

Tau Beta Pi 
Members only 



Int ernat ional 
Relat ionsj also 
Foreign study under 
Fulbright Bill 



Ztuita, International 59 E, YanBuj-cn St, 

0'2iii--ago , 111. 



$3300 


Physical 


Po st— doc 




Science s 


t"T*al 


$1000 


Any 


Canadian 
student s 
only 


$500 


Aeronaut ical 


Women 




Engineering 


only 






c- z 



THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 



FACULTY 



The Bulletin is published weekly during the College 
year as a means of m aking official announcements 
and presenting items of interest to the faculty. All 




ULLETIN 



contributions should he as brie? at possible and 
reach Louis H. Bell. Director of Public Information. 
313 Old Main, not later than 10 «, m. each Friday. 



VOL. 36 



March 14, 1949 



NO. ZZ 



N.M. BRENT IN TO PRESENT LIBRARY READING WEDNESDAY 



NoM'h * Brent in, assistant pro- 
fessor of romance languages, will 
discuss the plays of Tirso de 
Molina at the third in the series 
of Wednesday Library Readings at 
4s 15 p.m. Wednesday in Room 105, 
Central Library. 

Tirso de Molina, a 17th 
century priest, whose real name 
was Gabriel Tellez, ranks as one 
of the foremost dramatists of 
Spain, He is said to have written 
more than 400 plays but only about 
80 are in existence today* He is 
perhaps best known as the creator 



of the legendary character, 
Don Juaru The legend, once re- 
duced to writing, became imme- 
diately popular and has been 
treated in one form or another 
by dramatists and others all over 
Europe. 

The ultimate origin of 
Mozart's opera "Don Giovanni" is 
Tirso de Molina's play* n El Burla- 
dor de Sevilla y Combidano de 
Pietra," 

The reading will be open to 
the public* 



PENN STATE TO MEET CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY IN INTERNATIONAL DEBATE 



The 15th International stu- 
dent debate will be held at 7 p.m. 
Monday, March 21, in Schwab 

Auditorium, when Penn State and 
Cambridge University debate the 
question, "Resolved, that the 
world would have been much happier 
had not the American Revolutionists 
left the British Empire." 

Richard K. Hill, of Butler, 



and Duncan Macrae, representing 
Cambridge, will take the affirma- 
tive, while John Fedako, of Marlin, 
and Percy Cradock, of Cambridge, 
will take the negative. 

The debate will be open to 
the public'and there will be no 
charge for admission. Following 
the debate, an audience sway of 
opinion ballot will be taken. 



£76 UNDERGRADUATES ADMITTED AS TRANSFER STUDENTS THIS SEMESTER 



A total of 276 undergraduates 
were admitted to the College as 
transfer students for the second 
semester, according to Dr. C.O. 
Williams, Assistant Dean of Ad- 
missions and College Examiner. 

Of this number, 252 trans- 



ferred as full-time resident stu- 
dents while 24 were part-time 
resident students, the report 
also revealed that 203 men and 73 
women were among the students ad- 
mitted and that 230 were admitted 
to the main campus here while 46 
were admitted to centers. 



OF 



GENERAL 



CHAPEL: Dr. Warren Hastings, Na- 
tional City Christian Church, 
Washington, D . C . , will speak at 
chapel exercises in Schwab Audi- 
torium at 11 a.m. Sunday. 



AGRICULTURE: Faculty of the 
School of Agriculture will meet at 
4:10 p.m. Friday in Room 109, Agri- 
culture Building. 



LUNCHEON CLUB: H.R. Kinley, tabu- 
lating coordinator in the account- 
ing office, will explain the use 
of IBM machines on the campus at 
the Faculty Luncheon Club meeting 
on Monday noon, March 21, 

PLAYERS: Tickets for the Players 
production of "Dark of the Moon" 
are on sale at Student Union Of- 
fice. The play will be presented 
on Thursday, Friday and Saturday 
nights at 8 o'clock. Tickets are 
priced at" 75fzf for Thursday and $1 
for each Friday and Saturday night. 



CHEMICAL SOCIETY: Dr. W. Conard 
Fernelius, professor and head of 
the department of chemistry, will 
address the meeting of the Central 
Pennsylvania section, American 
Chemical Society, to be held at 
7:30 p.m. on Thursday in Room 119, 
Osmond Laboratory,, His subject 
will be: "The Structure of Co- 
ordination Compounds." 

PHYSICS COLLOQUIUM: Dr. Ray 
Pepinsky, professor of physica at 
Alabama Polytechnic Institute, 
will speak at the Physics Collo- 
quium at 4:25 p.m. Tuesday in 
Room 117, Osmond Laboratory. His 
subject will be: "New Methods in 
X-ray Ana lys i s . " 



FIVE O'CLOCK THEATRE: "A Family 
Story," a one-act comedy by Edward 
L. Breining, will be presented at 
5 o'clock Tuesday afternoon in the 
Little Theatre, Old Main. There 
will be no admission charge, 



INTEREST 

University, will speak on IfShc 
Inner Light and the Future of 
Civilization" at 8 p.m. Sunday in 
Room 121, Sparks Building. The 
lecture is sponsored by the Chris- 
tian Association and the State 
College Friends Meeting, 



JAZZ FORUM: The Ohio State Univer- 
s i ty of American Music Workshop is 
sponsoring a group of 25 students 
under the title of OSU Jazz Forum. 
The group will appear in Schwab 
Auditorium at 8 p.m. Wednesday, 
March 23, Tickets, priced at 75^, 
will go on sale at the Student 
Union Office on Monday afternoon. 

YMCA RECRUITING: Six secretaries 
of the YMCA will be here March 24 
for a recruiting conference. Sen- 
iors interested in any phase of 
YMCA work should attend a dinner 
at St. Paul's Methodist church at 
6 p.m. Interviews will follow 
the dinner. 



STATE GOVERNMENT JOBS: Commission- 
er Ruth Glenn Pennell of the State 
Civil Service Commission v/ill dis- 
cuss opportunities with the State 
Government at a meeting at 7 p.m. 
Tuesday in Room 119, Osmond Lab- 
oratory. Faculty and interested 
students arc invited to attend. 
Faculty are requested to inform 
interested students of the meeting, 



AIEE-IRE 
director 
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LECTURE: Dr. Home 11 N. Hart, 
professor of sociology at Duke 



RU S S I AN -AME RI C, JN RE LAT I ONS : Th e 
first of a series of programs on 
Russian-American relations will 



be held at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday in 
Room 304, Old Main. Dr. J. Paul 
Selsam, professor of European 
history, will speak on the histori- 
cal background of present-day 
Russia. The Penn State Christian 
ASsociat ion" wi 1 1 sponsor the series, 



TO SPEAK: Dr. James J. Gemme 1 1 , 
associate professor of economics 
and business education, will be 
the principal speaker at a meeting 
of the Akron Business Teachers 
Association in Akron, 0. on Thurs- 
day, His subject will be: "Status 
and Current Trends in General 
Business Education." 

SIGMA DELTA EPS1L0N: Dr. Mary L, 
Dodds, professor of .home economics, 
will address the annual initiation 
banquet of Sigma Delta Epsilon to 
be held at the Nittany Lion Inn at 
6 p.m. Monday, Her subject will 
be: "The Human as an Experimental 
Subject ." 

APPOINTED: Paul H. Seitzinger, 
assistant specialist in motion 
picture production, has been named 
to a sub-committee of the Society 
of Motion Picture Engineer's com- 
mittee on 16-millimeter and 8- 
milli meter motion pictures. 



DINNER: The Schools of Education 
and Home Economics and Central 
Extension are sponsoring dinner 
at the Presbyterian Church at 6 
p.m. Saturday to honor Dr. Rose 
Cologne, associate professor of 
education. She will describe her 
recent work in Japan, Faculty 
and wives are welcome and rcserva. 
tions may be made bv calling Ext # 
387, Price is $>1.60 per plate. 



ELECTED: Dr. Marsh W. White, pro- 
fessor of physics, has been re- 
elected vice-president of the 
National association of College 
Honor Societies, 

REVIEWS RESEARCH: Pennsylvania's 
progress in turf research was re- 



viewed recently by H,B, Musscr, 
professor of agronomy, at the 
state-wide Turf Conference held at 
Ithaca, N.Y, At the same meetings, 
Dr. Henry W, Thurston, Jr., pro- 
fessor of plant pathology, spoke 
on control of turf diseases. 



TO PRESENT PAPER-: Dr. Joseph Marin, 
professor of engineering mechanics, 
will present a paper at a symposium 
on plasticity to be held at Brown 
University on April 4 to 6, It is 
sponsored by the Bureau of Ships 
and the Office of Naval Research, 
He v/i 1 1 describe new testing 
machines developed in the labora- 
tories he re. 



ATTENDS 
Ze lko, 
lie spe 
conf ere 
of Trai 
0, rece 
nat i ona 
needs i 
fere nee 
speech 
mee t ing 



CONFERENCE: Harold P. 
associate professor of pub- 
aking, attended the annual 
nee of the /oner i can Society 
ning Directors in Cleveland, 
ntly. He is conducting a 
1 survey of speech training 
n industry and at the con- 
served as consultant on 
training in a sectional 
on this subject , 



TO SPEAK: Dr. Frederick G. Mcrkle, 
professor of soil technology, has 
been invited to address the 31st 
annual convention of the National 
Lime association at Hot Springs, 
Va, the first week in May. He 
will address the research section. 



AT MEETINGS: Dr. Ward M, Sharp 
and Dr. P.F. English, professors 
of wildlife management, recently 
attended the meetings of wildlife 
unit leaders and the North American 
Wildlife Conferences in Washincton, 
D.C, 

COURSE CANCELLED: The short course 
for dairy herdsmen, scheduled for 
this week, has been cancelled be- 
cause too few students scheduled 
the course at the advance regis- 
tration. 






OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS FROM THE OFFICE. OF. THE DEAN OF ADMISSIONS 

Withdrawals : 



5 Brown j Jesse Ednond, PM, Feb. '28 

4 Ceiga, Edward Ge or ge, Chen, March 7 

6 .Cohen, Thelna, AL, Feb. 25 

4 Hefkin, Ruth Haymes, CF, March 3 

4 Huff nan, Homer, LD, March 2 



6 Lanan, Lucy E, AL, March 3 

4 Rinker, Marshall E,, Mrgy, F e b.l4 

6 Sargent, Johnson W», Mrgy, March 10 

6 Stephenson, Kay G.,CF, F e b. 11 

4 Weisberg, Constance, AL, Feb. 8 



REASONS FOR WITHDRAWAL: Illness, 3; illness in family, 2; personal, 2; diffi- 
culty in curriculum, 1; scholastic difficulties, 1; to enlist in armed forces, 1. 

Name Changed by Marriage 

From Jeanne Eunice Davenport to Jeanne Davenport" Sykes. 




THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 



FACULTY 



The Bulletin is published weekly during the College 
year as a means of making official announcements 
and presenting items of interest to the faculty. All 




TT I T F T T 

U L L L I I 



contributions should be as brief as possible and 
reach Louis H. Bell, Director of Public Information, 
313 Old Main, not later ;'han 10 a. m. each Friday. 



VOL. 



March 21, 1949 



NO. 23 



■noitmean 



GENERAL CONTRACT LET FOR NEW MEN'S DORMITORIES 



The general contract for the con- 
struction of men's dormitories on West 
Campus has been awarded to Henry E. 
Baton, Inc., of Philadelphia,, 

The project will consist of three 
units and is expected to be ready for 
occupancy by the Fall of 1950. The over- 
all cost approximates $6,000,000, 



When the new units are completed, 
there will be dormitory accommodations in 
the area for more than 1630 men. The new 
units have a capacity of 1343, 

Plans are being drawn for a Dining 
Hall to be built in the area. It will 
join one of the new dormitory units and 
will face Burrowes Road, opposite the 
Alpha Zeta fraternity. 



DR. PHILIP 



SHELLEY TO PR] 



]NT LIBRARY READING 



Dr, Philip A. Shelley, professor 
and head of' the department of German, will 
read from Goethe's Faust at the fourth in 
the series of Wednesday Readings at 4:15 
p.m. Wednesday, March 23, in Room 105, ■ 
Central Library, 



This year marks the 200th anniversary 
of Goethe's birth which will be widely 
celebrated. In addition to Dr, Shelley's 
reading, the Library's observance of the 
bicentennial will include an exhibit later 
in the year , 



VETERAN ENROLLMENT TOTALS 5348 



Veteran enrollment for the present 
semester totals 5348, Although, in 
actual figures, the enrollment is 249 
below that of the first semester, the 
veteran registration continues to be 57 
per cent of the total enrollment. 

Among the 5343 veterans enrolled 
are 5301 men students and 47 women stu- 
dents. Undergraduate veterans number 
4766, There are 546 graduate students, 
33 special students, and 3 two— year 



student s , 

There are 1550 seniors, 2101 juniors, 
and 1115 sophomores. Undergraduate en- 
*rollment by schools follows: Agriculture, 
850; Chemistry and Physics, 403; Educa- 
tion, 423; Home Economics, 97; Engineer- 
ing, 1340; the Liberal Arts, 1177; Min- 
eral Industries, 304; and Physical 
Education and Athletics, 13 2, There 
are 40 veterans in Transition Sec- 
tion, 



EXHIBIT OF COLOR REPRODUCTIONS ON TUESDAY 



An extensive exhibit of color re- 
productions will be held from-9 a.m. to 
9 p.m. Tuesday, March 22, in Room 220, 
Home Economics Building. 

The exhibit, conducted by Conde 
Kennedy, representing the Raymond and 



Raymond Galleries, New York, will in- 
clude many paintings and drawings after 
old and modern masters. It is spon- 
sored by the divisions of fine arts 
and related arts and reproductions 
exhibited will be available for sale, 



COLOR PRINTS OF 1 AMERICAN ARTISTS COMPOSE EXHIBIT 



A collection of color prints by 
well-known American artists is now on 

display in the 3d floor corridor of the 
Main Engineering Building, 

The work of 18 artists make up the 



brought to the campus by 
' architecture and may 
h 26, Among the artists 
an. c Leon Kroll, Joseph Hirsch, 
Thomas Benton, Adolf Dehn, Millard Sheets, 
and Grant Wocd, 

P£NN ST,/TE COLLECT!. 



show which was 

the department of 

be seen until March 26, 

represented are 



OF GENERAL INTEREST 



CHAPEL: Rev. John Paul Jones, of the 
Federated Church, Jhswagiac, Mich., will 
speak at chapel service on Sunday morning, 

Ma r ch 2 7 * 

* * * 

COURSES OF STUDY COMMITTEE: The S e nate 
Courses of Study Committee will meet at 
9 a.m. on Wednesday, March 3 0, in Room 
207, Engineering "C", 

* * * 

COLLOaUIUM: George H. Millman, graduate 
assistant in physics, will speak on "The 
Absorption of Microwaves in Gases" at 
the Physics Colloquium on Tuesday, March 
22, in Room 117, Osmond Laboratory, 

* * * 

LUNCHEON CLUE: Dr. R.C. Raymond, asso- 
ciate professor of physics, will speak 
on H M del Railroading" at the meeting 
of the Faculty Luncheon Club on Monday^ 
March 28 a 

* * * 

PART-TIME WORK: Students are available 
for part-time work such as ga Alening, 
houseclean ing , window washing, manual 
labor, typing, baby-sitting, drafting, 
and various other jobs involving tech- 
nical skills. Faculty having employment 
needs are requested to call the Student 
Employment Office, Ext « 231. 

* # * 

CONCERT: George E. Ceiga, organist, 
assisted by Paul Margolf, senior in 
music education, will present an organ 
recital in Schwab Auditorium at 4 p.m. 
on Sunday, March 27. 

* * * 

JAZZ FORUM: The Ohio State University 
of -American Music .Workshop is sponsoring 
a group of 25 students under the title 
OSU Jazz Forum. The group will appear 
in Schwab Auditorium at 8 p.m. Wednes- 
day, March 23. Tickets, priced at 75^, 
are now on sale at the Student Union 
Office. 

* * * 

LECTURE: Dean Howard M. LeSourd, dean 
of the School of Public Relations at 
Boston University, will deliver a public 
lecture on "A Christian Looks at Pales- 
tine" at the Hillel Foundation, 133 W« 
Beaver Ave*, at 6 p*m. Sunday, March 27. 
The meeting is open to the public, 

* * * 

FIVE O'CLOCK THEATRE: "The West End 
Express," an experimental fantasy by 
Timothy D. Hayes, will be presented at 
5 p.m. Tuesday, March 22, in the Little 
Theatre, Old Main. 

* * * 

APPOINTED: Walter A. Kearney, super- 
vising principal of the Bellefonte School 
District, has been appointed associate 
professor of education, effective March 16. 

* * * 

FAMOUS FILMS: The Dramatics 61 movie 
series will begin on Wednesday, March 23, 
with the Museum of Modern Art program.. 
"The Development of Narrative." One of 



the five films will be shown in Room 119, 
Osmond Laboratory, at 7 p.m. each Wednes- 
day, during the coming weeks* Included 
are "Intolerance ," "The Last Laugh," 
"Potemkin," "Duck Soup," and "The City," 
Faculty and staff are welcome up to the 
capacity of the auditorium. 

* * * 

NEW PLAY: The Players will present their 
first new full-length play when "This 
Side of Bedlam" opens at Centre Stage 
on Friday night, March 25. The author, 
Warren S. Smith, assistant professor of 
dramatics, wrote the play with Centre 
Stage in mind. It is a comedy with ser- 
ious overtones, written around the theme 
of intolerance in a sm A .ll town and its 
relationship to integrity and responsi- 
bility in teaching. 

* * * 

SIGMA XI: Dr. Arnold Gesell, of the 
Child Vision Research Department, Yale 
University, will deliver the Sigma Xi 
lecture in Room 110, Electrical Engineer- 
ing Building, at 8 p.m. on Wednesday, 
March 30„ 

* * * 

PENN STATE NIGHT: Penn State Night, a 
program sponsored annually by the Penn- 
sylvania Ceramics Association and the 
Philadelphia section, American Ceramic 
Society, will be held in Philadelphia 
Thursday night, March 24* Dr. E.C. 
Henry, chief of the division of ceramics, 
will discuss ceramics activities at the 
College; Dr , J ,C . Griffiths, assistant 
professor of petrography, will discuss 
mineralogical investigation of ceramic 
raw materials, and Dr. F,R. Mat son, 
professor of ceramics, will report on 
early uses of glass for standards of 
weight and volume. Dr. Henry is managing 
director of the Pennsylvania Ceramics 
Association while R*G, Ehman, assistant 
professor of ceramics, and J.R. Coxey, 
assistant professor and supervisor of 
ceramics extension, are secretary and 
treasurer respectively. 

* * * 

EXCHANGE FELLOW: Dr. Simone Dormal, an 
international exchange fellow from Bel- 
gium, has arrived on the campus for six 
months of study and research on the 
chemistry of insecticides and fungicides. 
Her work is being done under the direc- 
tion of Dr. D.S.H. Frear, professor of 
agricultural and biological chemistry* 

* * * 

ATTEND CONVENTION: Nine faculty members 
of the School of Engineering, attended 
the annual convention of the Institute 
of Radio Engineers in New York, H.Y, 
They were Dr, Eric A. Walker, Francis T» 
Hall, Jr., Ernest Axman, David Van Meter, 
Charles R, Ammerman, Wilson R* Smith, 
Dr. Arthur H, Waynick, J, William Miller, 
and Peter G. Sulzer, 

* * * 



ATTENDS CONVENTION: Viktor Lowenfeld, 
professor of art education, attended the 
convention of the National Committee on 
Art Education in New Y rk, N,Y* on Friday 
and Saturday, He is a oouncil member of 
the committee and assisted in arranging 

the program* 

* * * 

FOREIGN VISITOR: Dr , Luis Macias, of the 
agricultural college faculty at the Uni- 
versity of Mexico, inspeoted facilities 
and studied methods in the co-operative 
•wildlife research and teaching programs 

here last week. 

* * » 

AT MEETING: Thirty-one students in 
electrioal engineering, accompanied by 
A. P. Powell, associate professor of 
electrical engineering, attended the 
student branch conference of the Pitts- 
burgh section, American Institute of 
Electrical Engineers, in Pittsburgh 
recently, A dinner meeting held in con- 
nection with the conference was attended 
by Dr, Eric A. Walker, Ralph E, Arming- 
ton, and Robert J»E, Hemmen, all of the 
School of Engineering* 

* * * 

AT CONFERENCE: Four members of the 
Speech and Hearing Clinic staff are 
attending the meetings of the American 
Academy of Cleft Palate Prosthesis in 
Columbus, 0, on Monday and Tuesday, 
March 21 and 22, They are Dr. Eugene T* 
McDonald, Dr, C. Cordelia Brong, Margaret 
C, Raabe, and Charles R. Elliott, Dr, 
McDonald will participate as a member of 
a diagnostic clinical team, composed of 
a surgeon, dentist, and speech correc- 
tionist. The team will examine children 
with cleft palates and make recommenda- 
tions for their treatment. The Clinic 
also is sponsoring an exhibit to illus- 
trate the rehabilitation program developed 
for persons with cleft palate* 

* * ♦ 

MARIE CURIE LECTURE: The annual Marie 
Curie Lecture, sponsored by Iota Sigma 
Pi, women 1 s chemistry honor society, will 
be presented this year by Mrs* Evelyn 
Chostner Marboe, assistant professor of 
glass technology, at 8 p.m. on Tuesday, 
April 5, in Room 119, Osmond Laboratory* 
She will speak *n "Gas Evolution from 
Supersaturated Liquids*" The public 
is invited. 

* * * 



PRIESTLEY LECTURES: The 23d in the ser- 
ies of annual Priestley lectures will 
be presented by Dr. L.F, Audrieth, of 
the University of Illinois, on April 25 
to 29. The subject for the series will 
be: "Acids, Bases, and Non-Aqueous Sys- 
tems «" 

* * » 

TO PRESENT PAPER: Dr. Franklin B. Krauss, 
professor of Latin, will present a paper, 
"The Classics and the Case for Rhetoric" 
in a four-speaker review of the topic, 
"Speech and the Enterprise of Learning" 
before the Eastern Public Speaking Con- 
ference in New York on April 9* 

* * * 

TO INSTALL CHAPTER: Dr, Marsh W. White, 
professor of physics, and national execu- 
tive secretary of Sigma Pi Sigma, national 
physical honor society, will be the 
principal visiting officer to assist in 
the installation of the Clemson College 
chapter at Clemson, S,C, on Friday, 

* * * 

DEATH; Thomas I, Mairs, 77, professor 
emeritus in charge of correspondence 
courses in agriculture, died at his 
State College home on Wednesday morning* 
He had served on the faculty since 1901 
and had retired in 1941. 

* * * 

SALUTE TO PENN STATE: Fred Waring and 
His pennsylvanians will salute Penn State 
in their program over the National Broad- 
casting Company network at 10 a.m. on 
Wednesday, March 30, Attending the pro- 
gram will be the Penn State Glee Club, 
which will leave the campus on Monday, 
March 28, on a one— week tour* They will 
sing in Scranton, New York, Allent own, 
Kutztown, Trenton, and Philadelphia, The 
tour ends with a concert in Schwab Audi- 
torium on Sunday afternoon, April 3, 

* « * 

SPRING WEEK: Students are planning a 
Spring Week celebration which will begin 
next Tuesday, March 29, and continue 
through Sunday, April 3* Included on 
the program is a Faculty Talent Show, 
scheduled for Sohwab Auditorium on Tuesday 
night. The program is sponsored by 
Interf rat ernity Council and by Froth, 
humor magazine, which is marking its 40th 
anniver sary* 



OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS FROM THE OFFICE OF THE DEAN OF ADMISSIONS 

Withdrawals : 



4 Benninghoff, John M, , Met, Maroh 12 4 

4 Browne, Donald E., LD, Feb. 7 6 

4 Fitzgerald, William K,, GM, March 3 7 

3 Glass, Harry John, PM, Fab, 16 



Glessner, Joseph, LD, Feb* 7 
Shaw, William Edward, EE, March 14 
Van Keuren, William G., AL, Feb. 2 



Reasons for Withdrawals 
go t o Alaska , 1, 



Illness, 2; personal, 2; poor scholarship, 2; to 



FENN STATE COLLECTION 



STUDENTS IN TRANSITION SECTION 

The following students are in the Transition Section for the current semester. 
All below grades, at the end of the eight weeks, should he -sent to the Office of the 
Dean of Men for men students and the Office, of the Dean of Women, for women students. 

Women • ■ . ■".".'' '.' . . ' . 



Bayer, Nancy 
Eshmoirt, Regina C a 
Hof fman, Suzanne 
McCormick, Nancy J 



May, Harriet C, 
Rose, Laura Jo 
Ruby, Helen E. 
Sachs, Jean H. 



Sukoff, Georgiaria 
Tptenbier, Rosalie 
Zack, Gloria .T, 



Me n 

Adelman, Andrew 
Allan, George Laird" 
•Allen, .Lawrence 
Andrews, John 
Ba'ily, Richard Downing 
Barrho., Jerry Walter 
Eerty, John James 
Blocher, Thomas J, 
Bogan, Robert William ■ 
Bonebreak, Richard Lamont 
Brady, Robert -Ralph 
Bucher, Carl H. 
Burchill, Clinton LaRoy 
'Bu'rkhart, William Eugene 
Candy, Guyer Edward 
Caputo, Ant hony • J o seph 



Gochno'iir, Robert Lee 
Gold, Alfred 
Goldstein, Lawrence J t 
Grasty, Andrew 
Green ," 'Severn T»: 
Grifferty, Thoma s "Francis 
Guller, Albert William 
Hagerty, .Kenneth William 
Hanobeck, Robert 
Hazlett, John Marlin 
Heller*, Stanley -" 
Henderson, William 17a tt 
Hess, A, Clifford ) , 
Horning, Luther B « 
Hunt, William Francis 
Jarvis, Charles Steinert 



Ciccarelli, Dominic - Jo seph Johnson, Robert Wesley 



Clark, Clair EoJfman 
Clark, Jesse P. Ill 
Coll, James Joseph 
Collif lower, William E. 
Crandall, John Richard 
Culbertson, Bradley Jean 
Culver', Harry Wayne ■ 
Daghir, Geerge Louis 
Damon, John Price 
Daniels, William Irvin 
D'ARdenne, John Richard 
DeBrandt, Charles Dana 
Dunlap, James Cowan- 
Dunn, Dona id Adams 
Dur ant ,- Raymond Martial 
Dzelsky, Edward J, 
Edmunds, McKinley Hoff 
Engle , George William 
Ernst , Edwin G • 
Evans, Richard Ralston 
Ewing,' Stanley Williams 
Falicia, Edward Walter 
Fine, Robert We S ley 
Fisher, H.E. 
Foster, Joseph Milton 
Frey, John P. 
Fricker, Fred Harvey 
Gardner, Richard E» 
Gehrett, Charles. William 
Gilbert, William Edward 
Gildea, Richard Charles 



Jones, Ben C. 
Kehs, . James Leidy 
Kerste.ter, Amnion W. ' 
Ko'tlensky, John J „ 
Kowalczyk, .-Jo seph > 
Kozich, George John 
Kraft, Henry C. - 
Kulp, John Willis 
Lambert, Kenneth W. 
Larimer, Thomas R, 
Lasher, Ronald Henry 
Latterner, Donald I, 
Lebo is , Gaston 
Leisawitz, Sheldon M» 
Light, Harvey Frederick 
Lingle, Allan Willard 
Lukas, T.E.' 
Maslan, Edward L. 
"Mason, David Hayes 
Ma strago st ino , Louis S, 
McClellan, W.L. ■ 
Merryman', Roberij John 
•Miller, George H, 
Monks, John Louis 
Moore, Charles T. 
Moore, Richard Eugene 
Mouery, William James 
Myers, George Sanderson 
Naler, Geoffrey Hudson 
Percy, Wayne Wesley 
Pies singer,, Paul 



Poet, 'Emanuel Mac, 
Ponti ng,' Harry Thompson 
Rach,-- Frank Albert 
Rapp, Fester Junior 
Ream/ J seph Michael 
Robbins, Walter E» 
Roderer, Theod-ore Francis 
Rubino,^ Michael Joseph 
Ruff, Edward S+eelman 
Ryan, Robert Blair 
Scheffey, Paul- Lincoln- 
Schoenberger , Richard Harvey 
Schwa lb, Jacob 
Semago',' William Theodore 
Sheehan, Thomas Francis 
Shelly, George Robert 
Shenk, George Samuel 
Shivery ,- George Burton 
Simpson, J a ck P . •■ 
Simpson, Robert Lee 
Snyder, Mervin Arnold 
Stabile, Anthony 
Stewart, Henry Wright 
St one , John M. ' 
Swart z, Robert Lewis 
Sweeney, Edward James 
Szot, Michael Andrew- 
Thomas, E dwa r d R , 
Tdmaine, Vincent James 
Townsend, Stanley W, 
Twiford, Ralph 
Uhl, Alan 
Ulicny, Paul T # 
Vogel , William Leader 
Wagner, Charles Howard 
Walters, Arthur Howard 
•W e is, Paul D, 
'Wells, Stanley Clarence 
White, William Chaplin 
Wicks, Harold 
Williams, Charles Edwin 
Williams, Char le s ■ Ken neth 
Wilson/ Graf ius Calvert 
Wit sell, William Allen 
Wy lie, Henry J, 
Yanavage , Ray Joseph 
Young, George Leighton 



O 

CD 

"J 
>-» 

c 

& 

2 



a- 



THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 



FACULTY 



The Bulletin is published weekly during the College 
year as a means of making official announcements 
and presenting items of interest to the faculty. All 




VOL. 



36 



ULLETIN 



contributions should be as brief as possible and 
reach Louis H. Bell. Director of Public Information, 
313 Old Main, not later than 10 a, m. each Friday. 



Mar oh 28. 194 9 



NOj 4 



FRED WARING AMD HIS PENNSYLVANIANS TO SALUTE PENN STATE AT 10 A.M. WEDNESDAY 



Fred Waring and His Pennsy Iranians 
will salute Perm State in a coast-to- 
coast broadcast over the NBC network 
at 10 o'clock on Wednesday morning, 
March 30. 

The program will be broadcast by 
Radio Station WMAJ # State College, 



The Penn State Glee Club, on tour 
this week, will be guests of Fred W a ring 
for the broadcast. 

Waring, a former student at the Col- 
lege, is a member of the Board of Trus- 
tees, 



ROBERT REIFSNEIDER TO PRESENT FINAL LIBRARY READING WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON 



Robert Reifsneider, assistant pro- 
fessor of dramatics, will present the 
fifth and final reading of the Wednesday 
Afternoon series at the College Library 
at 4:15 p.m. Wednesday, March 30, 

Reifsneider has chosen three plays 
by Tennessee Williams. They are 



"Glass Menagerie," which played "for 
more than 500 performances on Broadway 
in 1946—47; "Summer and Smoke," which 
played on Broadway from October 6, 194£ 
to January 1, 1949j and the Pulitzer 
prize-winning play, "A Streetcar Named 
Desire," which opened in New York on 
December 3, 1947, and is still playing, 



DR. ARNOLD GESELL TO PRESENT SIGMA XI LECTURE WEDNESDAY NIGHT 



. .Dr. Arnold Gesell, of Yale Univer- 
sity School of Medicine, 1949 National 
Sigma Xi lecturer, will speak at "8 p,m, 
Wednesday, March. 30, in Room 110, Elec- 
trical Engineering Building, 

Speaking on "Human Infancy and the 



Ontogenesis of Behaviour," Dp* Gesell 
will trace the development of the basic 
patterns of human behaviour. 

The lecture, which will be open to 
the public, will be illustrated with 
slides and motion pictures. 



EXHIBIT IN MINERAL INDUSTRIES BUILDING COMMEMORATES 1849 GOLD RUSH 



In commemoration of the 1849 gold 
rush to California, Howard K, Lucas," 
curator of the Mineral Industries Mu- 
seum, has prepared a special exhibit 
which can be seen in the rotunda of the 
Mineral Industries Building. 

A short history of the discovery 
and its far— reaching effects is ex- 
plained in appropriate form. Specimens 
consist of various grades of ore having 
assay values from $10 a ton to $10,000 
a ton. Several extremely rich speoimens 



are included. 

Gold dust, nuggets, rare crystal- 
lized gold and antique jewelry items made 
of raw gold are on display. 

Gold coins, dating back to 1853, are 
featured through the courtesy of Mr, and 
Mrs, Robert M, Gruver, 

The exhibit is open from 9 a.m, to 
5 p.m. Monday through Friday and from 
9 a.m. to noon on Saturday, 



f£NN STATE COLLECTION 



STUDENTS TO MARK SPRING WEEK WITH PROGRAM BEGINNING TUESDAY 



Spring Week will be observed on the 
campus beginning Tuesday, March 29, and 
continuing through Sunday, April 3, 

Highlights of the program will in- 
clude a Faculty Talent Show in Schwab 
Auditorium at 8 p.m. Tuesday, Tickets 
are on sale at Student Union Office for 
50 cents, plus tax* 



From 2 to 10 p.m. Thursday, the 
Spring Carnival will be held on South 
Allen Street, On Friday night, the 
Interf rat emit y Council-Panhellenic 
Council Ball will be held and the Spring 
Queen will be crowned. 

4 

The men's Glee Club concert at 3 _; . 
p.m. Sunday in S G b.wab Auditorium concludes, 
the program. 



OF GENERAL INTEREST 



LUNCHEON CLUB:: Ralph W. McComb, College 
librarian, will address the Faculty Lunch- 
eon Club on Monday noon, April 4, 

* * * 

COURSES OF STUDY COMMITTEE: The Senate 
Courses of Study committee will meet on 
Wednesday, March 30, at 9 a.u. in Room 
207, Engineering "C". 

* * * 

PHYSICS COLLOQUIUM: Dr. Robert G. B e rn- 
reuter, professor of psychology and di— 
rector of the Psychology Clinic, will 
speak at the physics Colloquian in Room 
117, Osmond Laboratory, at 4:25 p.n, Tues- 
day, March 29. His subject will be: 
"What Should a Professor of phyeloB Know 
About Student Advising?" 

* * * 

GLEE CLUB CONCERT: The Glee Club will 
conclude their tour with a concert at 3:30 
p.m. Sunday, April 3, in Schwab Auditorium. 

. * * 

STATISTICS SEMINAR: Dr. Evan Johnson, 
professor of mathematics, will speak on 
"Sequential Analysis" at the Statistics 
Seminar of the S c hool of Agriculture to 
be held in Room 210, Forestry Building, 
at 7 tl5 poa.on. Tnoeday, March 29, Faculty 
members au u ^ a, da ate students are invited. 

* * » 

AAUP : The American Association of Univer- 
sity Professors will meet at 7:30 p.n, on 
Wednesday, April 6, in Room 219, Electrical 
Engineering Building. "Faculty Efficiency" 
will be the subject for discussion. 

* * * 

MUSICALE: The third in a series of clas- 
sical musicales will be presented at the 
Simmons Hall Music Lounge at 7:15 p.m. 
Thursday, March 31, The program will in- 
clude Scarlatti Sonatas — Horowitz; 
Wagner: Prelude and Liebestod from "Tristan 
and Isolde" — Furtwangler and Berlin Phil- 
harmonic Orchestra; Dvorak; Concerto in B 
minor for 'Cello and Orchestra — Casals, 
with Szell and the Czech Philharmonic 
Orche stra. 

* * * 

LANGUAGE RECORDINGS: The Audio-Visual 
Aids Library announces that records for 
instruction in French, G e rman, ' Italian, 
Portuguese and Spanish are available at 
the Reserve Book Room Desk, Central Li- 
brary. Players are in the Newspaper Room, 



Recordings and transcription on a number 
of subjects are available at the Audio- 
visual Aids Library, Room 7, and are 
listed in the new catalog, 

* *•* 

CHAPEL: D rs Raymon M. Kistler, pres- 
ident, Beaver College, Jenkintown, will 
speak at Chapel Services at 11 a.m. 
Sunday, April 3, in Schwab Auditorium. 

COMBINED ARTS GROUP: An important meet- 
ing of the Combined Arts Group will be 
held in the Living Center of the Home 
Economics Building at 4 p.m. on Sunday, 
April 3. All concerned are requested 
t o attend, 

FIVE O'CLOCK THEATRE: "Mom's That Way," 
a one-act play by June Wiley, senior in 
arts, and letters, will be presented in 
the Little Theatre, Old Main, at 5 o'clocl 

on Tuesday, March 29, 

* ♦ * 

LECTURE: The Penn State Christian Associ* 
ation announces the second in its series 
of Russian-American Relations to be pre- 
sented at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, March 30 # 
in Room 304, Old Main, when Dr. John A. 
DeNovo, instructor in history, speaks on 
*U. S. Foreign policy in Relation to 

Russia." 

* * * 

ATTENDS MEETING: Dr. T. S, Oakwood, 
associate professor of organic chemistry, 
recently attended the national meeting 
of the American Association of Petroleum 
Geologists in St. Louis, Mo. 

* * » 

ELECTED: Dr. Eugene T. McDonald, direc- 
tor of the Speech and Hearing Clinic, 
has been elected to a three-year term on 
the executive committee of the American 
Association of Cleft Palate Rehabilitation, 

* » » 

INSPECTS DEPARTMENT: Dr. W. Conard 
Fernelius, professor and head of the 
department of chemistry in behalf cf the 
committee on professional training of th-e 
American Chemical Society, recently in- 
spected the department of chprnistry^t 
the University of South Carolina. 

* * * 
DEATH: Warren G. C. Thompson, associate 
professor of mechanical engineering, died 



Tuesday, March 22, at the age of 64. He 
had served on the faculty since 1920. 

* * * 

SPEAKS: Dr. C. D. D a hle, professor of 
dairy manufacture, recently addressed 
conferences of dairy manufacturers at 
Washington State College, Pullman, Wash., 
and at the Utah Agricultural College, 

Logan, Utah. 

* * * 

ATTENDS MEETING: Dr» Frank M. Swartz, 
chief of the division of geology, attend- 
ed meetings of the American Association 
of Petroleum Geologists in St. Louis, Mo. 
recently. H e participated in a symposium 
on "Control of Petroleum Accumulat ion by 
Sedimentary Facies," contributing a paper 
on "Facies Background of Appalachian 
Accumulation." 

* * * 

SYMPOSIUM: Dr. D. S. C r yder, professor 
and head of the department of chemical 
engineering, attended a symposium on 
Chemical Engineering Operations and Equip- 
ment Cost in Columbus, 0. recently. 

* * * 

ATTENDS TOURNAMENT: Joseph F. O'Brien, 
professor of public speaking and a member 
of the Middle Atlantic Regional Debate 
Tournament Committee, assisted in the 
supervision of this event at Temple 
University, Philadelphia, on Friday and 
Saturday, Four teams were chosen to 



represent the region at the national 
tournament to be held at W e st Point in 
April. Richard C. Shultz and David M. 
Barron represented the College. 

* * » 

SPEAKER: Dr. L. L. Huber, professor of 
agronomy, wa s a guest speaker at Ohio 
State University's annual Farm and Hone 
Week last week. He spoke on "Factors 
Influencing Corn Production." 

* *# 

WINS NATIONAL HONORS: Penn State's 
Flower Judging Team, coached by P e ter 
Bo Pfahl, instructor in floriculture, 
won the national intercollegiate contests 
in St. Louis, Mo. recently. It is the 
first such trophy ever won by a Penn 
State student team. 

* * * 

ATTENDS MEETING: D r » W Conard F e rnel- 
ius, professor and head of the depart- 
ment of chemistry, recently attended a 
meeting of the Panel on Inorganic 
Chemistry of the Office of Naval Research 
in Washington, D. C. 

* * * 

SHORT COURSE CHANGED: Dates for the 
short course in Dairy Bacteriology have 
been changed from June to August 15—31. 
State examinations for licenses will 
be held September 1—3. 



CORNERSTONE CEREMONIES FOR THREE BUILDINGS HELD 



Cornerstones for three buildings on 
the campus were placed on Friday after- 
noon with James Milholland, acting pres- 
ident of the College and president of the 
Board of Trustees presiding. 

J. Eric Linde, of Crefield, member 
of the Board of Trustees, Dr. Lyman E. 
Jackson, dean of the School of Agri- 
culture, Dr. Warren B« Mack, head of the 
department of horticulture, and Dr. 
Herbert R. Albrecht, head of the depart- 
ment of agronomy, participated in the 
ceremonies for the Plant Industries 
Building. 

At Willard Hall, Mrs. Henrietta N. 



Willard, of State College, widow of 
Joseph M. Willard for whom the building 
has been named, laid the stone. Admiral 
W. W. Behrens, deputy secretary in the 
State Department of Property and Supplies, 
spoke . 

In addition to President Milholland, 
Dr. Edward Steidle, dean of the School 
of Mineral Industries, spoke at the 
ceremonies at the Mineral Sciences 
Building. Edgar C. Weichel, of Scranton, 
a member of the Board of Trustees, read a 
speech prepared by J. B. Morrow, pres- 
ident of Bituminous Coal Research, Inc., 
who was unable to attend the ceremonies. 



TREE SPRAYING TO BEGIN ON CAMPUS ON TUESDAY MORNING 



Beginning Tuesday, March 29^ trees 
on campus will be sprayed for aphid 
scale and other soft body insects. 

Walter W# Trainer, supervisor of 
landscape construction and maintenance 
has this advice for persons who get the 



spray on their clothes or automobiles: 
If the spray, which looks like milk, is 
allowed to dry on clothes, it will 
evaporate and will not harm the clothes; 
if on a car, it should be allowed to dry 
after which it can be easily wiped from 
the finish. 



OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS FROM THE OFFICE OF THE DEAN OF ADMISSIONS AND REGISTRAR 

Withdrawals : 



Hazzard, Ralph Clifford, Ed t Feb. 10 
Kotlensky, J hn J., ME, Feb. 12 
Stamn, Roy P., Geol, Mar. 22 



3 Collins, Gertrude McCombie, HEc, Mar .24 6 
6 Davie s, Nancy A., AL, Mar. 15 5 

Gr Davis, William Sylvester, HA, Mar. 12 Gr 
8 Grotzinger, Hudson F,, EE, Mar 11 

Reasons for Withdrawal: Financial, lj illness, 2} personal, 1; death in family, 
Ij to accept position, 1; husband leaving College, 1. 

PENN STATE COLLECTION 



CLARK NAMED DIRECTOR OF HOUSING; MISS BAKER DIRECTOR OF FOOD SERVICE? HOGAN BURSAR 

Russell E» Clark, bursar since 1936, quarters operated by the College on the 

■has been named to the newly-created post main campus, branch campuses, and exten- 

cf director of housing, while Mildred A. sion centers-, will come under Clark'g 

Baker, who came here- in 1948 as supervisor jurisdiction. His office also will allot 

of dining halls and foods buyer, has been College— operat ed living quarters to ' 

elevated to the new position cf director.. alumni, guests, and delegates to campus 

of food service, conventions. ' . 

The'- Execut ive Committee of the Board Miss Baker will be responsible for 
of Trustees on Friday also approved the .the operat ion ' of ..men ' s and women's din- 
appointment of David C» Hogan, Jr., ing halls, and any other dining hall- 
accountant, as bursar, succeeding Clark* facilities operated by the College on 

the main campus, branch campuses, or 

The changes are effective immed- extension centers. She also-will super- 
iately,. vise and advise in the management of 

coffee shops, snack bars, or any such 

Men and women* s dormit or ie s , family food service facilities which may here— 
residence units, and any other housing after be operated by the College* 

3 NEW DEPARTMENT HEADS APPOINTED; 7 FACULTY MEMBERS RETIRE; -OTHER CHANGES 

Appointment of three new department . professor of botany, with 40 years ser— 
heads and the retirement of seven faculty vice; Dr. Roy D, Anthony, professor of 
members, including, two department heads, pomology, with 30 years service; Thomas 
were approved by the Executive Committee W, Mason, professor of analytical chem— 
of the Board of Trustees on Friday night. 'istry, with 38 years of service; and 

David L, Markle, professor of electrical 

The new department heads are Dr « Seth engineering, with 39 years of service* 
W« Russell, sociology; Dr» Orrin Frink, Mason's retirement is effective August 
Jr., mathematics; and Dr , John A* Mourant, 7, while those of Dr. Hill, Dr# Anthony, 
philosophy. All are effective July 1. and Markle are effective June 30. 

Dr, Carl W, Hasek, professor and Helen B » Owens, assistant professor 

head cf the department of economics, will of rsnthemat ics , who has been on the 

retire with emeritus rank on July 6 while faculty since 1941, will retire June 30. 
Dr ». F. W« "Owens, professor and head of the 

department of mathematics, will retire New appointments include: Dr. John 

with emoritus rank on June 30. Dr. Hasek ' -G, S C eley, who- has been on the faculty at 

has served on the faculty since 1914 and Cornell University for the past four 
has been he'^.d of the department since 1930, years, as professor of floriculture, 

Dr. Owens joined the faculty in 1915 and effective July 1. 
has headed the department since 1926. 

Jay W, Fredrickson, of the University 

Dr» Russell joined the sociology of Utah, associate professor of metallurgy 

staff in 1937, became assistant dean of and chief at the division d'f metallurgy, 

the School of the Liberal Arts in 1946,, effe-ctive June 16 • 
and last July was named acting* head of 

the department of sociology. He will con- Douglas F» Oliver, head of the dec— 

tinue to serve as assistant dean. Dr. trical laboratory and design engineer 

Frink- ha" been on the faculty since 1928 with Packard Motor Co., Aircraft Division, 

while Dr. Mourant joined the philosophy Toledo, 0., associate professor of engi— 

staff in 1946, His appointment, in accoi — -neering research i'n the Ordnance Research 

ance with a policy of rotation, is for a Laboratory, effective March 1. 
three-year period. Dr# phillip c# Newm an, associate 

professor of economics, effective Feb— 
. ■ Other faculty members who will re- ruary x He had - been at the. City College 
tire wiLb. frooritus rank are Dr , J. B« Hill, c f New York, 






^ 



THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 

FACULTY IMsl BULLETIN 




The Bulletin it published weekly during the College 
year as a means of making official announcements 
and presenting items of interest to the faculty. All 



contributions should be as brief as possible and 
reach Louis H. Bell. Director of Public Eniormaiien, 
313 Old Main, not later Shan 10 a, m. each Friday. 



VOL. 



36 



April 4, 1949 



HO. 



25 



CHANGES LIBERALIZE HOSPITAL INSURANCE PLAN 



Two changes liberalizing the new hos- 
pital insurance plan for all full-time 
employees became effective on April 1, 

One is an increase in allowances 
for additional hospital charges cov- 
ering such items as X-rays, drugs and 
medical ' supplie s , and clinical labora- 
tory fees. The other extends to all 
eligible employees who retire on or 
after April 1, 1949 the privilege of 
continuing their participation after 
retirement. 

Prior to April 1, $65 was allow- 
ed per confinement for the hospital 
charges over and above room and board, 
surgical fees, and nurses' and physi- 
cians I fee s» 

Under the new plan, $130 will be 
allowed for confinement cases of full- 



time employees and their dependents, 
except that for dependents' maternity 
cases, the old allowance of $65 will 
cont inue . 

The new benefit s . will be at no 
additional cost to the employee, the 
College bearing the extra cost. 



Bene 
April 1 w 
before r 
from thos 
Total con 
limited t 
surgical 
per year, 
allowed u 
member wh 
after ret 
monthly c 
an active 



fits for those ret 
ho were members of 
etirement will dif 
e of other members 
finement time per 
o 31 days, and all 
charges will be li 
Additional charg 
p to $130 per year 
o elects to contin 
irement will make 
ontributions that 
era; loyee * 



iring , after 

the plan 
fer slightly 

of the plan, 
year will be 
owances for 
mited to $200 
e s will be 
, A staff 
ue this plan 
the same 
he made as 



KENWORTHY NAMED ASSISTANT TO THE PRESIDENT, SUCCEEDS WARNOCK AS DEAN OF MEN 



The position of Assistant to the 
President in charge of Student Affairs 
was created by the Executive Committee 
of the Board of Trustees and Wilmer E» 
Kenworthy ,ex-;f ut i.r-, sroroir.?'y to the Pres< 
ident, was named to the new post, ne 
also was appointed Dean of Men, succeed- 
ing Arthur R* Warnock, who will retire 
with emeritus rank August 31, 

The new appointments are effective 
on September 1, 

In addition to his functions as Dean 
of Men, Kenworthy will assist the Pres- 
ident in the administration of student 
affairs other than instruction and busi- 



ness relations, and will be responsible 
to him for such offices as Dean of Wom- 
en, Counsellor of Veterans, Counsellor 
of Foreign Students, Placement Service, 
Health Service, Associated Student Ao-» 
tivities and Student Union, and Chaplain, 

Kenworthy came to the College in 
1937 when he joined the staff of the late 
President Ralph D, Hetzel as executive 
secretary to the President, 

Dean War nock came to Penn State in 
1919 as the first Dean of Men at the 
College, He had previously served as 
assistant dean of men and on the faculty 
at the University of Illinois, 



CHAPEL CHOIR TO PRESENT SPECIAL EASTER SERVICES ON SUNDAY 



The Chapel Choir, under the dir- 
ection of Mrs, Willa W. T a ylor, will 
present Cherubini's Mass in C Minor at 
the L e nten Worship Service on Sunday, 
April 10, in Schwab Auditorium, 



The first presentation will be at 
the regular chapel hour, 11 o'clock, 
while the second presentation will be 
made at 8:15 p.m. 



ff£NN STATE COLLECTION 



ROTC DEPARTMENT TO MARK ARMY DAY WITH PROGRAM TUESDAY AFTERNOON 



Army Day, April 6, will be marked on 
the campus with a special program arranged 
by the department of military science and 
tactics for Tuesday afternoon, April 5, 

At 3:15 p.m., the ROTC band will 
present a concert in Schwab Auditorium* 
It will be open to the public and will 
also be broadcast over Station WMAJ. 

Following the concert, there will be 
a parade through the State College busi- 



ness districts, followed by a formal re- 
treat parade on front campus, 

Col« Ben-H. C^astaine, professor of 
military sc'ence and tactics, will pre- 
sent to the representative of the College 
in behalf of the Commanding General, 
Second Army, a Certificate of Proficien- 
cy. Ten cad:;t 3 will receive awards as 
Distinguished Military Students and two 
will receive special service awards. 



GRANTS RECEIVED FOR CONTINUATION OF RESEARCH PROGRAMS, 2 FELLOWSHIPS 



Agreements providing grants total- 
ling $37,500 for research and $2450 for 
two fellowships have been renewed by the 
College » 

An agreement with the South Penn Oil 
Company provides for continuation of re- 
search in the School of Mineral Industries 
under a grant of $20,000 while an agree- 
ment with the Penn Grade Crude Oil Associ- 
ation provides $17,500 for research in the 



School of Mineral Industries. 

A graduate fellowship in Petroleum 
Engineering will be continued under a 
grant of $1250 by the Standard Oil Com- 
pany of California while In the School 
of Chemistry and Physics, the Allied 
Chemical and Dye Corporation has pro- 
vided a grant of $1200 for continuation 
of their fellowship In chemistry* 



FIVE FACULTY MEMBERS GRANTED LEAVES OF ABSENCE 



ed 



Five faculty members have been grant- 
leaves of absence. 



I 



hey a 



sor and he a 
nautical en 
January 31, 
professor o 
seme st cr , 1 
fessor of p 
ber 31, 194 
of entomolo 
January 31, 
economics e 
Somerset Co 
1950. 



re Dr » David J, Peery, profes- 
d of the department of aero- 
gineering, February 1, 1950 to 

1951; Dr. William H. Gray, 
f Latin American history, first 
949~50j Milton T , Lewis, pro- 
lant breeding, July 1 to Decem- 
9; John 0. Pepper, professor 
gy extension, August 1 to 

1950; and Eliza Corbin, home 
xtension representative in 
unty, October 1 to March 31, 



Retirements of two College employees 
also have been announoed. They are R, A. 
Kerstetter, laboratory mechanician in 
the School of Engineering, who has been 
with the College seven years, and J. H* 
Robinson, department of the physical 
plant, who has been employed for 15 years 
by the College. Kerstetter will retire 
June 30 and Robinson on May 8. 

The transfer of Dr. Arthur H". Way- 
nick, from professor of engineering re- 
search in the Ordnance Research Labo- 
ratory to professor of electrical engi- 
neering, also was announced. 



POULTRY BREEDING HOUSE TO BE CONSTRUCTED 



A poultry breeding house will be 
constructed on the campus north of the 
present poultry brooder house. 

The building will be of one story 
and will be 24 ft, x 152 ft,, and will 
be constructed of light prefabricated 
steel frame, with asphalt shingle roof, 



cemesto board exterior, and a concrete 
floor. 

The, interior will consist of poultry 
pens, with a feeding alley through the 
center of the Building. There will be 
automatic waterers in the pens and pro- 
vision is made for limited heating. 



OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS FROM THE OFFICE OF THE DEAN OF ADMISSIONS AND REGISTRAR 



Withdrawals 



8 -Golding,", Robert Edward, IA, Feb. 15 
7 Lowe, Louise, AL, March 25 

4 -Maag, Kenneth, MEc, March 30 

5 Ostwind, Lois S., Ed,, Feb» 10 



8 Binkman, Charles J h, AL, March 12 

6 Clark, John T,, PNG, March 30 

5 Collins, Byron Charles, ME, April 1 

8 Decker, 'Allen B., CF, March 16 

8 Dillon, Phillip John,AgEd, March 29 

Reasons for Withdrawals: Personal, 3; illness, 2; financial, 1; to enter Army, 
1* to accept position, 1; and to transfer to another college, 1, 

Cha ng e Of Classification : 

Samuel H. W e inei* from sophomore in physics to junior in physics, 5th semester.. 



OF GENERAL INTEREST 



SENATE: The College S e nate will meet at 
4:10 p.m. on Thursday, j^-pril 7, in Room 
121, Sparks Building. 

* * * 

LUNCHEON CLUB: D r . M.» R. Fenske, dir- 
ector of the Petroleum Refining Labora- 
tory and professor of chemical engineering, 
will speak on "The Gasoline Situation" 
at the meeting of the Faoulty Luncheon 
Club on Monday, April 11, 

* + * 

GRADUATE FACULTY: There will be a meet- 
ing of the Graduate S c hool faculty in 
Room 208, Buckhout ' Laboratory , at 4 p.m. 
on Tuesday, April 12, 

* * * 

AAUP : The American Association of Uni- 
versity Professors will meet at 7:30 
p.m. Wednesday, April 6, in Room 219, 
Electrical Engineering Building. Subject 
for discussion will be: "Faculty Effi- 
ciency .* 

» # * 

COLLOQUIUM: Prof.. R. B, Lindsay, of 
Brown University, will speak on "Ultra- 
sonics at Brown University" at the physics 
Colloquium in Room 117, Osmond Laboratory, 
at 4:25 p.m. Tuesday, April 5, 

* * * 

MARIE CURIE LECTURE: Mrs. Evelyn Chost- 
ner Marboe, assistant professor of glass 
technology, will present the annual 
Marie Curie lecture at 8 p.m. or Tues* 
day, April 5, in Room 119, Osmond Labora- 
tory, The lecture, titled, "Gas Evolution 
from Supersaturated Liquids," is sponsored 
by Iota Sigma Pi, women's chemistry honor 
society, 

* * * 

DELTA SIGMA PI: Jean Taul Elkann, of 
New York, general manager of the Inter- 
national Division of the Titan M e tal Man- 
ufacturing Co,, will speak on"European 
Reaction to the Marshall Plan" at 8 p,m # 
Tuesday, April 5, in Room 121, Sparks 
Building* The meeting, sponsored by 
Delta Sigma pi, professional business 
fraternity, is open to the public, 

* * » 

GRADUATE RECORD EXAMINATION: Graduate 
Record Examinations will be given on May 
2 and 3* Applicants should register at 
210 Buckhout Laboratory, between 9 and 
12 o'clock and 2 and 5 o'clock, prior to 
noon on April 14, 

* • •> 

JEWISH PASSOVER : The most important holy 
day in the Jewish Passover ceremonies 
this year will begin at 6 o'clock on 
Wednesday evening, April 13, In accord- 
ance with College practice, students of 
the Jewish faith should be granted excuses 
by instructors for any classes missed on 
Wedncsvlay afternoon, April 13, and Thurs- 
day ".fiKMpjiljagjApril 14, This is the 24- 
hour period preceding the Spring recess 
for, all^ student s , 

* * * 

FIVE O'CLOCK THEATRE: "Some Other Time," 
by Manuel D, Herbert, senior in commerce 
and finance, will be presented in the 



Little Theatre at 5 o'clock on Tuesday 
afternoon, April 5. A play, "For Old 
Time's. Sake," written by Herbert last 
year, has been published by the Samuel 
French Co, 

* * * 

ENGINEERING FACULTY: Faculty of the 
School of Engineering will meet at 5:10 
p.m. on Thursday, April 21, in Room 110, 
Electrical Engineering Building, 

* * # 

'LECTURE ON EDUCATION: Dean John Wahl- 
quist,of the College of Education, Uni- 
versity of Utah, will speak at 7:30 p.m. 
on Wednesday, April 6, in Room 121, 
Sparks Building, His subject will be: 
"The Future of Progressive Education," 

* * * 

TO SPEAK: D r « Harold E. Dickson, pro- 
fessor of fine arts, will Speak on 
"Architecture of Eastern Pennsylvania" 
at a meeting of the Historical Society p 
of Berks County in Reading on Friday, 
April 8, 

* * * 

SPEAKS: Dr. A* H. Holtzinger, associate 
professor of chemistry, recently spoke 
on "Opportunities in Chemistry" over 
Radio Station WPAM, Pottsville, 

* * * 

ATTEND CONVENTION: Esther A, Atkinson, 
Marguerite E, Horn, and G» Alna MoDougall 
all of the department of hotel and insti- 
tution administration, attended the C e n«» 
tral Pennsylvania Dietetics Association 
meeting in Ilarrisburg recently. 

* * * 

ETA KAPPA NU: Twenty-two electrical 
engineering students recently were ini- 
tiated into Eta Kappa Nu, electrical 
engineering honor society. Wilmer E, 
Kenworthy, executive secretary to the 
President of the College, spoke at the 
banquet that followed the initiation, 

E. B, Stavely, assistant dean of the 
School of Engineering, presented the 
Eta Kappa Nu sophomore prize to William 

F, Markley. 

* * * 

TO ATTEND CONVENTION: T e n members of 
the department of speech will attend the 
Eastern Public Speaking Conference in 
New York Thursday through Saturday. 
Joseph F. O'Brien, who is a member of 
the executive committee, Harold P* Zelko, 
Kolle G, DcBoer, Dr, C m Cordelia Brong, 
and Dr, Paul R, Beall, will participate 
in the conference, Others attending ar? 
William W, Hamilton, Melville Hopkins, pr, 
Harold E» Nelson, Harriett D, Nesbitt, 
and Mildred B. W e rtz# 

* * * 

SEMINAR: Dr. Milton C, Nahm, professor 
of philosophy at Bryn Mawr College, will 
discuss "public Art and Private Art" at 
7:30 p.m. Monday, April 11, in Room 5, 
Central Library. 

* » * 

EDUCATION SPRING MEETING: The department 
of education through its Student— Faou-lty 
Acquaintance Committee is sponsoring a 

- 



rpiMixi > i ,< 



' ' '' 



Spring Meeting in Room 121, Sparks 
Building, from 7 to 9 p.n, on Tuesday,, 
April 12, It will be open to all stu- 
dents and faculty in the department of 
e ducat ion, 

* * » 

ON RADIO: Dr # Dagobert de Levie, assist- 
ant professor of German, conducts a 
program each Sunday afternoon at 4:45 
p.m. over Radio Station WRTA, Altocna. 
The program, conducted in German, is 
designed to teach the language to radio 
li stener s . 

* * * 

SPEAKS : Violet Brughelli, instructor 
in hotel and institution administration, 
recently spoke to high school students 
in Stroudsburg on "Opportunities in 
Hotel and Institution Administration," 

* * * 

AT UNESCO MEETINGS: Arthur C, Clnetingh, 
professor of dramatics, and Dr, Hazel M« 
Hatcher, professor of home economics 
education, attended the second national 
conference of UNESCO in Cleveland, 0, 



3,ast week, Cloetingh represented the 
theatre section of Pennsylvania while 
Dr. Hatcher was a representative of the 
American Home Economics Association,* 

* * * 

ATTENDS CONFERENCE: Mrs. Marion S, 
McDowell, associate professor of family 
relationships, is attending the 12th 
annual Groves conference on Conservation 
of Marriage and the Family in Chapel 
Hill, N, C, this week, 

* * * 

CONFERENCE HERE: The annual Pest Con- 
trol Operators conference will be held 
here April 14-16, Dr. Hubert W« Frings, 
associate professor of entomology, has 
arranged the program, 

* * * 

COMBINED ARTS GROUP: Tho Combined Arts 
Group will meet in the Home Economic 
Living Center at 4:30 o'clock on Sun- 
day afternoon, April 10, 



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THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 



FACULTY 



The Bulletin is published weekly during the College 
year as a means oi making official announcements 
and presenting items oi interest to the faculty. All 




ULLETI 



contribution* should be as brief as possible and 
reach Louis H. Bell. Director of Public Information, 
313 Old Main, not later than 10 a ■ m. each Friday. 



VOL. 



36 



April 11, 1949 



NO. 2 6 



SPRING RECESS TO BEGIN THURSDAY NOON; LIBRARY HOUR-S ANNOUNCED 



^he Spring Recess will begin at 
11:50 a,m, Thursday, April 14, and con- 
tinue until 8 a,m, on Wednesday, April 20, 

Because of the Jewish Passover cer- 
emonies, students of the Jewish faith 
have been authorized to be absent from 
classes on Wednesday afternoon and Thurs- 



day morning, 

"he Central Library will observe 
the following hours. during the Spring 
recess period: Thursday, 7:50 a»m, to 
5 p«ra,; Friday and Saturday, 9 a.m. to 
5 p,m,j S un( jay, closed; Monday and 
Tuesday, 9 a,m, to 5 p»m« 



ELLIS ARNALL TO SPEAK APRIL 21 IN COMMUNITY FORUM SERIES 



Ellis Arnall, former governor of 
Georgia, will close the 1948-49 commu- 
nity Forum Series on Thursday night, 
April '21, when he speaks in Schwab Audi- 
torium at 8 p.m, on "The South Today," 

Elected governor of Georgia at the 
age of 36, Arnall was one of the young- 
est mentb ever hold the positon of gover* 



nor. He also' has,, served as attorney 
general nf Georgia, In 1942, he was 
named one of ten outstanding young 
men. 

Arnall is a graduate of Mercer 
Un'ive'r sit y, Macon, G a ., University of 
the South, and University of Georgia, 



PRIESTLTf SERIES TO BE HELD APRIL 25 TO 29 



Dr, L, F, Audrieth, professor of 
inorganic chemistry at the University 
of Illinois, will present the 23rd in 
the series of Priestley lectures, be- 
ginning on Monday, April 25, and con- 
tinuing through April 29, 

The subject for the series will be 



"Acids, Bases, and Non— Aqueous Systems," 
Dr #' Audrieth -will open the series on 
April 25 with a lecture on "The Histor- 
ical Development of the Acid— Base Con- 
cept and Its Philosophical Aspects," It 
will be held at 7:30 p.m, in Room 119, 
Osmond Laboratory, 



PAN. AMERICAN DAY OBSERVED ON CAMPUS 



The College is marking Pan Ameri- 
can Day, April 14, with a special pro- 
gram of motion pictures, broadcasts, and 
social e vent s . 

Flags nf the 21 American Republics 
will be displayed on front campus this 
week, Monday through Thursday, 

A Pan American Day dance will bo 
held from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m, on Tuesday 
night, April 12, following the History 
Round Table at 7 p.m, B oth will be held 



at the Temporary Union Building, 

Ihe Pan A m er ican .movie .program 
includes the film, "La Re ina del Tropico" 
at the Nittany Theatre on Monday and 
Tuesday night while WMAJ, State College, 
will broadca st "Centre County Looks at 
Latin America" at 7:45 p»m, Tuesday and 
"Rotary Club Forum on Latin America" at 
7:45 p.m. Thursday, 

Faculty are invited to attend and 
.participate in the various activities. 



DR. FARRINGTON DANIELS TO SPEAK ON APRIL 20 



Dr, Farrington Daniels, professor 
of chemistry at the University of Wis- 
consin, will speak on "Atomic and Sol- 
ar Eriergy" at 7:30 p.m, on Wednesday, 
April 20, in Room 119, Osmond Laboratory, 

The lecture is s-nnnanr-pl "hv t.hi= 



American Chemical Society, Central 
Pennsylvania S ec -ti on# 

Dr, D a niels has been at the Uni- 
versity of Wisconsin for 28 years and 
during World War II was connected with 

thp l.fa. n V> n +. +. n n Pv n n p r->.+. "P nr> j.±t. n m t r». En»V rfv 



MINUTES OF THE SENATE MEETING OF APRIL 7, 1949 



The College Senate met at 4:10 p.m. 
rn April 7, 1949, in Room 121 Sparks Build- 
ing, Mr. A* 0, Morse presiding. Mr, 
Morse presented the neophyte secretary 
of the College Senate, Dean R. M, Gerhardt-. 
The list of members present is nn file 
in the Office of the Registrar, The 
minutes of the last meeting were not read 
since they had "been published in the Fac- 
ulty Bulletin for March 7, 1949. 

The secretary read the following 
communicat ions : 

A letter from R. M, Gerhardt express- 
ing his appreciation to the College Sen- 
ate for their vote of confidence. 

A letter from E, W. Callenbach stat- 
ing that Dr. A, J. G. Maw would represent 
him at the April meeting of the Senate, 

A letter from Dean Stavely, of the 
School of Engineering, asking that atten- 
to rules 45 and 51 of the Regulations 
Affecting Undergraduate Students, edition 
1948-1949, be called, to the attention of 
the teaching staff, through the medium 
of the Faculty Bulletin. The secretary 
stated that the last six weeks period of 
the present semester would begin on April 
20 at 8 a.m. 

A letter from Vice-Dean H. K. Wilson 
stated that the entrance requirements of 
the School of Agriculture had been changed 
and approved by the School faculty. This 
change will be referred to the Committee 
on Admissions. 

A letter from R. V. Watkins, College 
Scheduling Officer, pertained to the 
dropping and adding of courses at a late 
date, and suggested that students be 
warned against this practice before the 
First Phase Registration for the Fall 
Seme st er . 

These letters are on file in the 
Office of the Registrar. 



the reports of standing eom- 
rof, Victor A. Beede for the 
on Academic Standards reported 
ommittee recommended that Miss 
tein be granted permission to 
redits this surrmer at We strain— 





Under 


mittees ? P 


Committee 


that 


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and the Se 



ge, New Wilmingt on, Pa,, which 
e her to be graduated from The 
ia State College in January 

recommendation was seconded 
nat e so vote d. 



Prof. Beede on behalf of the com- 
mittee, likewise, presented the petition 
of Rev. Charles L. Rumrae 1 to carry two 
credits (Ed, 424, Visual Ed.) in addition 
to the number allowed by the College to 
people employed on a full— time basis. 
The Senate, on \-eoommendat ion of the com- 
mittee, voted to approve the request. 



The report of the committee is on file 
in the Office of the Registrar. 

Prof. C. E. Bullinger, chairman of 
the Committee on Courses of Study, pre- 
sented the first section of the April 
report and stated that a second section 
would be issued in a short time* The 
report of the committee which i s on 
file in the Office of the Registrar will 
lie on the table for one month. 

Under unfinished business, the 
report of the Committee on Committees 
was removed f r on the table and Dr. B. V. 
Moore moved that the report be accepted. 
The report had to do with Article II, 
Section 1 (e) of the Constitution and 
By-Laws, edition 1948— 49, which reads: 

Academic Standards, seven members, 
and the College Examiner, ex officio. 

The report recommends that Section 
1 (e ) be amended to read: 

Academic Standards, one member from 
each of the undergraduate Schools, 

Prof, Beede stated that the new 
wording excludes the College Examiner 
from the committee and felt that it was 
an unfortunate omission. He therefore 
moved that the words "College Examiner" 
be included in the amended recommen- 
dation. There was a second to the mo- 
tion. Upon vote of the College S en ate, 
the motion was lost. 

Dr, Bernreuter raised the question 
of including a member from the Graduate 
School on the Academic Standards Com- 
mittee and Prof, Brice Harris stated 
that at the next meeting of the Graduate 
School Faculty this matter would be dis- 
cussed. The recommendation of the Com- 
mittee on Committees was passed by the 
Senate . 

Prof. Bullinger, chairman of the 
Committee on Courses of Study, asked 
that the report of his committee as 
presented in the March meeting be re- 
moved from the table for consideration 
and asked th"t it be adopted. By unani- 



mous vote of the College 
port was adopted. 



Senate the re— 



The Chair reported on two items of 
old business. The first, a request from 
the Rules Committee that a person be 
appointed to codify the Senate Regula- 
tions affecting Undergraduate Students 
and other regulations. Mr, Morse an- 
nounced that Prof. Sheldon C. Tanner 
had been appointed to this task and 
would begin the work as soon as pps-sSble , 
codifying all regulations affecting 
students, including Trustee regulations, 
Senate regulations, School regulations, 
anJ any c>the" n.gpno.x&B thai- affect stu* 



dsnt s. 

The second item of old business was 
relative to Old Main Clock. Mr, Morse 
announced that new zie onanism for the 
clock had been ordered and that in due 
tir.ie he hoped the clc'ck would be in 
perfect working order. 

Under new bus'iness there was a gen- 
eral discission on the grading of stu- 
dents dropping courses between the first 
two weeks and the last six weeks of a 
semester. Prof. Benton na'de a motion 
that students be not allowed to drop a 
course after the first three weeks, A 
mo t i o n w a s made to refer this na 1 1 e r to 
the Rules Committee* -he motion to re- 
fer the no t i o n was lost. 

Prof. Benton* 3 motion was declared 



n ew legislation and will, therefore, 
lie on the table for one month, 

Mr* Morse announced that the Bor- 
ough of State College would observe 
Daylight Saving Tine -beginning -Apr il 
24 and ending September 25, 1949 and 
asked if the College wished to cooperate 
Upon motion of Mr, Rhodes, duly second- 
ed, the Senate -so voted. 

The Senate adjourned at 5:20 p.m. 



R, M« Gerhardt 
Secretary 



COLLEGE LIBRARY EXHIBITS GREJ.T BCOKS 



The College Library is exhibiting 
this month illustrations and other ma- 
terial connected with "Great Writers of 
the Western World," a new comparative 
literature course. 

The course, offered for the first 
time last fall, is taught co-operatively 
by 17 different teachers in the S c hool 
of the Liberal Arts,' 



down to such modern artists a 

nd Chirico, One section 



S e rt , 
Dali, Grosz, . 
of the show includes modern versions 
f r, las sin tales . such as Jnvne's 

and 



"Ulysses," Mann's "Dr* Faustus, 
Robinson Jeffers' version of "Medea." 
^heap reprints for college students are 
shown, as well as juvenile versions, 
comic books, Sunday newspaper supplements 
and movie and musical treatments. 



The exhibit tells well-known stories 
from Homer and Vergil down to the novels 
of Thomas Mann and Proust in our own 
country. 

Reproductions of famous works of 
art are used wherever possible, ranging 
from' Greek sculpture and later painting 



The aim of the exhibition is to 
show the use of visual aids in concoc- 
tion with the study of great literary 
works, Most of the material is the 
property of W, L» Werner,, professor of 
American literature, who is in charge 
of t he cour se , 



PROCEDURE FOR SUMMER SESSION REGISTRATION ANNOUNCED 



The College Scheduling Office has 
announced the following procedure for 
Summer Session registration: 

1, Student reports to advisor to 
secure signed application schedule, 

2, Separate' application must be 
made for each session, 

3* Signed applications should be 
delivered to the College Scheduling 
Office . 



5, Applications for Summer Sessions 
will be received at the College Sched- 
uling Office during the month of April, 

6, Courses will be closed when the 
maximum number of students have been 
accepted for any given co\irse, 

7, Applications will be processed 
in the order received at the College 
Scheduling Office, 



4, Notice of acceptance will be 
mailed to student by the Summer Sessions 



The three sessions offered during 
the summer are Inter—Session, June 7 to 
24; Main Session, June 27 to ai ugust 6; 
and Post-Sessions, August 8 to 26 and 
August 8 to September 17, 

WEATHER FLAGS ARE CHANGED 



The division of meteorology has Cloudy — Bed, white, and blue; Stormy -* 

announced that weather flags, flown ■ f.rora Red and blue checkered flag; Fai'' — 

the 'Mineral Jntustrioc Building, have White; Colder — Blue; W?.jrvpj? — Red; 

been chantfe-ft* p-.v>oi r».i hi t ixn — ■ Blire r»-n. : . white checkered 

/lag/' 

The following signals are now used; 



gbtfrt STATE COLLECTION 



OF GENERAL INTEREST 



GRADUATE FACULTY: There will be a meet- 
ing of the Graduate School faculty in 
Room 208, B uc khout Laboratory, at 4 p.m,, 

Tuesday, April 12. 

* * * 

ENGINEERING FACULTY: There will be a 
meeting of the faculty of the School of 
Engineering at 5:10 p t ra. on Thursday, 
April 21, in Room 110, Electrical Engi- 
neering Building. 

* * * 

CHAPEL: Because of the Spring recess, 
there will be no chapel service on Sun- 
day, April 17. On April ?.4, Dr. Gillian 
J. Faulkner, dean of the School of 
Religion, F isk University, Nashville, 
Tenn., will speak. 

* * * 

SPORTS: Saturday, April 23, lacrosse, 
2 p.m., Loyola; baseball, 2:30 p.m., 

Western Maryland. 

* * * 

POLITICAL SCIENCE PANEL: Faculty members 
of the department of political science 
will present a panel discussion on "Meth— 
odsand Trends in Political Science" at 
7:30 p.m. Tuesday, April 12, in the 
lounge of Simmons Hall. The panel is 
one of a Series sponsored by Pi Gamma 
Mu and is open to the public. Partici- 
pants will be Dr e R, W, Brewster, Neal 
Riemer, Dr c Ruth C, Silva, Dr a M. Nelson 
MoGeary, and Drc Larry Leonard, 

* * # 

STATISTICS SEMINAR: Dr • Evan Johnson, 
professor of mathematics*, will speak 
on "Sequential Analysis" at the Statis- 
tics S e minar of the School of Agriculture 
in Room 210, Forestry Building, at 7:15 
p.m. Tuesday, April 12 » 



AAUW: Alice Parker Tallmai 



state 



president of the American Association of 
University Women, will speak at the AAUW 
dinner at 6:30 p.ra, Wednesday, April 20, 
at the Nittany Lion Inn., Mrs. Tallmadge 
is head of the department of Classics 
and assistant professor of Greek and 
Latin at Cedar Crest College. 

* * * 

LUNCHEON CLUB: The Faculty Luncheon Club 
will not meet on Monday, April 18, but 
on Monday, April 25, will hear Dr » 
George M. Lott , Psychiatrist, College 

Health Service. 

* * * 

DRIVING THRU WINDCREST : The Windcrest 

Borough Council has launched a "Drive 
Safely" campaign in the Windcrest area, 
Residents living in Eastview Terrace 
and others who drive through Winders St 
are requested to observe the 10 MPH speed 
limit. It is pointed out that a greater 
speed endangers the lives of the 400 
children, as well as other residents of 
the community, 

» * * 

NAVAL RESEARCH UNIT: Reserve personnel 
interested in joining a Volunteer w " val 
Research, unit in State College are in- 
vited to attend n rie-e.ti.ng at 7 :45 p.m. on 



Tuesday, April 12, in Room 107, Main 
Engineering Building, Men and women 
affiliated with the Naval, Marine Corps, 
and Coast Guard Reserve are eligible. 
Cdr, J, H, Graham, USNR, of the New 
York offices of the Office of Naval 
Research, will disucss the procedure 
and answer questions, 

* * * 

COLLOauiUM: Dr , W„ Conard F e rnelius, 
professor and head of the department 
of chemistry, will speak on "Physical 
Properties of Liquid Ammonia Solutions" 
at 4:25 p.m. Tuesday, April 12, in Room 
117, Osmond Laboratory, 

* * * 

GRADUATE RECORD EXAMINATIONS: Graduate 
Record Examinations will be given on 
May 2 and 3. Applicants should register 
at Room 210, Buckhout Laboratory before 
noon on Thursday, April 14, 



ral Song," 
rank X • 
etters, will 



FIVE O'CLOCK THEATRE: "Fune 
a one— act play in verse by F 
Fatsie, junior in arts and 1 
be presented in the Little Theatre at 
5 p.r.i, on Tuesday, April 12, 

* * * 

A total 



VETERAN ENROLLMENT 
veterans of w rld War II hav 
rolled at the College to da t 
number ranged from 2 in the 
semester of 1944 to 5536 dur 
semester, 1943-49, 

* * * 

EDUCATION SPRING MEETING: T 
of education through its Stu 
Acquaintance Committee, will 
Spring meeting in Room 121, 
Building, from 7 to 9 p.m. o 
Anril 12, 



of 10,851 
e been en— 
e , 1 he 
Spring 
ing the 1st 



he department 
dent -Faculty 

sponsor a 
Spark s 
n Tuesday, 



SIMMONS SERIES: Dr. Brice Harris, pro- 
fessor and head of the department of 
English literature, will present the 
first lecture of the Simmons Series at 
4:15 p.ri, Monday, April 25, in Room 121 
Sparks Building, He will speak on 
"Milton for Moderns." 

* * * 

NO BULLETIN NEXT WEEK: Because of the 
Spring recess, there will be no Faculty 
Bulletin published next week. The next 
issue will appear the week of April 25, 

* * * 



NOTICES FROM DEAN OF ADMISSIONS: 

lowing withdrawals are announced 
8 Andre, Paul Edward,, AgEd, Feb. 



4 Antal, William Louis. EE 



ipr, 



Frl- 

12 
6 



'owerSj, Yvonne Lee, Ed, Apr. 4 



5 Simon, George, EI 



At 



>r« 4 

Reasons for Withdrawals Personal, 2y 
illness, 1; dissatisfied with currien Inn 
chosen , l a 

The following change of name is 
announced: From Theodore Mark 
Swiatkowski to Theodore Mark Swain, 

* * * 



PERSONNEL CHANGES 



Following pers 
March 25, 1949, are 
appo int ee s % 



onnel changes, approved during the period, January 
announced. Telephone extension numbers are listed 



ary 22, -1949 to 



for new 



53J 
130 
326 
145 
385 
379 
278 

43 



Resignat ion s ; 

Henry G m Bobertz 
Henry Newburgh 
Ellis W* Roberts 
Eugene F» Von Arx 
Robert V # Higdon 
A» Roberts Leisner 
George K, Campbell 
Bavid J» Kachik 
William W, Kinsley 

( William W,' Co oner 
John W^ Nelson 

^Harvey E, Shaffer 
Frank T, Dietz 
Clifford P, Bastuscheck 
Marian Bressler 
J. Glenn Hawthorne 

Virgil E, Neilly 
Marion P, Poorbaugh 
Donald D, Smith 
Robert W # Kissinger 
Guy Ervin, Jr, 
Donald C. Kimmel 

William T, Butz 

Kermit M, Bird 

Robert E, Lowrie 
Martin Felsenthal 
Delia M. Roy 
Meredith Robinson 
Lillian W # Ashenfelter 
Peggie 17. Mullan 
Helen M, S.nyder 
Janet McLaughlin 

Appo intment s ; 

John E, Coolidge^, Jr, 
Fred K, Hoehler, Jr, 
George L, Kington 
A, Roberts Leisner 
Richard 0, Byers 
William H, Smith 
John H, Wheeler 
Thomas T, Jackson 



52J Richard 0., Praeger 
130 Edward A, Q-uade 
43 Joseph L» Goodman 
43 Sheldon A, Kohn 
43 George Spanos 
87J Edward A, Sulkowski 
57 Tormod Forland 
Walter L, Ross 
Rustum Roy 

William H. Gordon, Jr 
John B, Mason 
William J, Hepfi'i^pr 
'-■j/ James H, Pi*obuS 
37J.1 Delia Martin Roy 
137 Robea-fc E, Skipper 

56J Richard J, Calvert 
219J George V. K e ller 



357 
51 
368 
137 
137 
137 
137 



Instructor 
Instructor 
Instructor 
Instructor 



Assistant Professor — Central Extension 

Assistant Professor — Ordnance Research Laboratory 

Assistant Professor - Education 

Assistant Professor - Ordnance Research Laboratory 

Assistant Professor - Electrical Engineering 

Assistant Professor — Mont Alto 

Instructor — Agricultural Extension 

Instructor —Mining Engineering 

Instructor — Mechanical Engineering 

Instructor - Petroleum Refining 

Inetructor ~ Central Extension 

Instructor - Dairy Husbandry 

Instructor - Physics 

Instructor - Physics 

Instructor - Central Extension 

Instructor — Agricultural Economics and Rural 

S ociology 

Central Extension 

Home Economics 

Central Extension 

Central Extension 
Research Assistant — Ceramics 
Research Assistant - Agricultural Economics and 

Rural Sociology 
Research Assistant — Agricultural Economics and 

. Rural Sociology 
Research Assistant — Agricultural Economics and 

Rural Sociology 
Research Assistant — Mineral Technology 
Research Assistant - Petroleum and Natural Gas Engr, 
Research Assistant — Mineralogy 

Research Assistant — Institute of Local Government 
Research. Assistant - Ellen H, Richards Institute' 
Psychometrist - Central Extenstion 
Home Economics Extension Representative 
Assistant Reference Librarian - College Libra*ry 



Assistant Professor — Engineering Experiment Station 

Assistant Professor - Central Extension 

Assistant Professor - Chemistry 

Assistant Professor - English Composition 

Instructor - Journalism 

Instructor - Metallurgy 

Instructor — Agricultural Extension 

Instructor — Electrical Engineering 

Instructor — Civil Engineering 

Instructor - Central Extension 

Instructor - Electrical Engineering 

Instructor — Electrical Engineering 

Instructor — Electrical Engineering 

Instructor — Physical Education and Athletics 

Research Assistant — Ceramics 

Research Assistant — Engineering Experiment Statist 



Research Assistant 
Research Assistant 
Research Assistant 
Rj= search Assistant 
Research Assistant 
Research Assistant 
Research Assistant 



Mineralogy 

Ox*dnance Research Laboratory 

Ordnance Research Laboratory 

Ordnance Research Laboratory 

Ordnance Research Laboratory 

Mineralogy 

Ordnance Research laboratory 

Research Assistant — Engineering Experiment Station 

Research Assistant — Earth Sciences 



53J Chester R. Underhill 
70M Heinerich A. Steiger 

176 Thurston M. Reeves 
130 Eugene M* Fulraer 
280 Leonard G. Yearick 
347 Harry A. Sperber 

Clarence E, Craver 
311 James S, Kline 
588 Ruth A, Aiken 
265J Ruth J, Katz 
3 97 Franklin A. Miller 
153 Ramon Xirau 
290 Harvey E, Shaffer 
13 William G. Jackson 
262 George X, Campbell 
130 Virgil E. Neilly 
334 Mary Kathryn Ris singer 

J. Norton Brennan 
130 Stanley S» Beers 
130 Harold L» Dillenbeck 

54J Robert L. Streeter 
130 Walter L, Ferree 

Martin Light 
203 Clarence E. Trotter 

142 J Winton H, Laubach 
203 Norman St, John 

373M Harold J, Donald 

373M Karl F, Ockert 

371J John J, Dorsey 

16 8 John A. St e lima ok 
Marjorie H, Wilson 
Geraldine F, Hindenach 
Mary A n n Mu s s e r 

177 Ellen M, T iffany 

Leaves of Absence 



Admin, Ass't, - Engineering Experiment Station 

Research Associate - Engineering Experiment Station 

Assistant Supervisor - Audio-Visual Aids 

Assistant Specialist - Central Extension 

Assistant Agricultural Extension Representative 

Assistant Scheduling Officer — Admissions Office 

Assistant Agricultural Extension Representative 

Assistant - Physical Education and Athletics 

Personnel Assistant — Personnel Relations 

Assistant - Animal Pathology Research 

Assistant Professor - Education 

Assistant Professor — Romance Languages 

Instructor - Dairy Husbandry 

Instructor ~ Central Extension 

Instructor — Agricultural Extension 

instructor — Engineering Extension 

Instructor - Home Economics Extension 

Instructor — Mont Alto 

Instructor - Central Extension 

Instructor - Central Extension 

Instructor - Engineering 

Instructor - Central Extension 

instructor - Mont Alto 

Instructor — Agricultural Economics and Rural 

S ociology 
Instructor — Mathematics 
Research Assistant - Agricultural Economics ond 

Rural Sociology 
Research Assistant - Mineral Technology 
Research Assistant — Mineral Technology 
Research Assistant — Ceramics 
Research Assistant — Petroleum Refining 
Assistant Home Economics Extension Representative 
Assistant Home Economics Extension Representative 
Assistant Home Economics Extension Representative 
Cataloger — College Library 



Alio© M, Murray 

Emma PI, Eastman 
Grace L, Kelley 
Nelle M # Stasukinas 



Assistant Professor — Home Economicn Extension 2-1—49 to 

7-31-49 
Instructor - Home Management Extension 4-1-49 to 4-30-49 
Home Economics Extension Representative 5-1—49 to 5—31-49 
Home Economics Extension Representative 1-1-49 to 6-30-49 



AJL-QJLWI I"!2-n^90 



sjs&oj ©tjorj^H 



Ci 



THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 



FACULTY 



The Bulletin is published weekly during the College 
year as a means of making official announcements 
and presenting items of interest to the faculty. All 




BULLETIN 



contributions should be as briei as possible and 
reach Louis VL Bell, Director of Public Information, 
313 Old Main, not later ihan 10 a, m. each Friday. 



VOL. 



36 



April 25, 1949 



NO. 



27 



DR. L. F. AUDRIETH TO PRESENT PRIESTLEY LECTURE SERIES THIS WEEK 



Dr. L. F. Audrieth, professor of in— 
organic chemistry at the University of 
Illinois, will present the 23rd in the 
series of annual Priestley lectures in 
Room 119, Osmond Laboratory, this week, 

A native of-Vienna, Austria, Dr, 
Audrieth received his bachelor of i<cience 
degree from Colgate University and his 
doctorate from Cornell University. He 
has been on the faculty at the University 
of Illinois since 1928, 

Subject for the series this year will 
be: "Acids, Bases, and Non— Aqueous Sys- 
tems," 

Dr, W, Conard Fernelius, professor 
and head of the department of chemistry, 
will be chairman for the meeting at 7:30 



p.m. Monday, while Dr, R, Adams Dutcher, 
professor and head of the department of 
agricultural and biological chemistry, 
will preside at the lecture at 7:30 p.m. 
Tue sday . 

Dr. D, S. Cryder, professor and head 
of the department of chemical engineering 
will preside for the session beginning at 
7:30 p.m. Wednesday, while on Thursday 
night, the lecture will begin at 7:30 
p.m. with Dr. W, A, Weyl, professor of 
glass technology and head of the depart- 
ment of mineral technology, as chairman, 

Dr, George L, Haller, dean of the 
School of Chemistry and Physics, will 
preside at the final lecture at 5:30 p,m, 
on Friday night. 



DR. JOHN M. ANDERSON TO PRESENT LIBERAL ARTS LECTURE WEDNESDAY NIGHT 



Dr, John M, Anderson associate pro- 
fessor and acting head of the department 
of philosophy, will present the second 
in the series of Liberal Arts lectures 
at 8 o»olock on Wednesday night, -kpril 
27, in Room 10, Sparks Building, 

His subject will be: "The Human 
Spirit and the Challenge of Science." 



Dr. Anderson received his bachelor 
of arts and master of arts degrees at 
the University of Illinois and his doctor 
of philosophy degree at the University 
of California at Berkeley, He joined -the 
faculty here in 1946 after serving at 
the University of California and the 
University of Minnesota, 



"GOVERNMENT MEDICINE" SUBJECT FOR DEBATE TUESDAY NIGHT 



The question of "Government Medi- 
cine" will be debated in a round table 
discussion at 7:30 p.m. T ue sday, April 
26, in Room 10, S pQ r.ks Building, 

A, H, Reede, professor of economics, 
will support the case for government 
medicine while Leo W. Brown, representing 
the Pennsylvania State Medical Society, 
will take the negative of the question. 




ident of the society, will serve as 
moderator , 



COLLEGE MARKS TREES ON CAMPUS 



A program to mark the most promi- 
nent and unusual trees on the campus 
was started this month and 408 trees, 
representing 129 species, have already 
been labeled. 



The trees are marked with aluminum 
labels, measuring 2x5 inches and lifting 
the common name and the botanical name 
of the tree, 

&ENN STATE COLLECTION 



OF GENERAL INTEREST 



LAST SIX WEEKS: The last six weeks of the 
current semester "began at 8 a.m. on 
April 20, This date is important in the 
application of rules 45 and 51 of the 
Regulations for Undergraduate Students, 
edition 1948-49. 

* * * 

SPORTS: Wednesday, April 27, 2 p.m., 
golf, B ucknell. Friday, April 29, 4 p.m., 
baseball, Georgetown, Saturday, April 30, 
2 p.m., lacrosse, Navy; golf, Colgate; 
tennis, Colgate; 2:30 p.m., baseball, 
Georgetown, Monday, May 2, 2 p.m., golf, 

Gettysburg . 

* * * 

CONCERT: Phi Mu Alpha, professional music 
fraternity, will present a concert at 
3:30 p.m. Sunday, May 1, in S c hwab Audi- 
torium „ 

* * * 

CHAPEL: Herbert Harrison, minister, 
lecturer, and philosopher, will speak at 
Chapel Services in Schwab Auditorium at 
11 a,m, Sunday, May 1, H e also will 
address a union meeting of State College 
churches Sunday evening, a high school 
assembly Monday morning, and a joint ses- 
sion of the Rotary, Kiwanis, and Lions 
Clubs on Monday night. His talks will be 
in keeping with the Youth Week observances, 



DEATH: Dr. Will Grant Chamber 
emeritus of the School of Edu 
died at his State College hom 
day, April 16, after a long 
He was 81, 

» * * 

PROMOTED: Virgil R Miller, a 
professor of military science 
has been promoted from lieute 
to colonel and John. E. Stewart 
professor of military science 
for air, has been promoted fr 
lieutenant colonel, 
# * * 

NEW EDITION: A new edition of 
"Creative and Mental Growth" 
Lowenfeld, professor of art e 
is now being published. More 
colleges and universities hav 
the book as a text. 



s, dean 
cation, 
e on Satur- 
illne ss , 



s s ist ant 

and tactics 
nant colonel 
, assistant 

and tactics 
o m &a j o r to 



the book, 
by Viktor 
ducat ion, 

than 6 
e adopted 



COURSES OF STUDY C 
Courses of Study c 
9 a ,m, on Wednesda 
207, Engineering " 

LUNCHEON CLUB: Dr. 
of anatomy and phy 
"Butterflies" at t 
Club meeting on Mo 

CAPS AND GOWNS : Ca 
degrees may place 
gowns at the Athle 
25 and May 5, 



OMMITTEE: The Senate 
omrnittee will meet at 
y, April 27, in Room 

C". 

* * * 

H. M, Tietz, professor 
siology, will speak on 
he Faculty Luncheon 
nday, May 2, 

• * » 

ndidatea for advanced 
orders for caps and 
tic Store between April 



RESEARCH PROJECT: Four 
work together on a res 
study biological and p 
of high intensity soun 
being conducted under 
completed with the A er 
of the Wright— Patter so 
Dr. Harold K. Schillin 
physics, is coordinato 
while departments" and 
charge are : bacteriol 
Reid; physics, Dr. W e s 
psychology, Dr. C, R, 
zoology and entomology 
Frings. 



departments will 
er.rch project to 
sycho logical effect: 
d. The work is 
a contract recently 
o— Medical Laborator; 
n Air Force Base, 
g, professor of 
r for the projects 
ne n in ir.ee d ia t o 
°gy* ^ r • James J, 
ley L. Nyborg; 
Carpenter; and 
Dr.. Hubert W» 



DIALS FOR SCALES: Departments with Hanson 
Scales No, 1509 and 1515 may requisition 
replacement dials showing postal rates 
which went into effect on January 1 from 
General Stock. They are priced at ,77 
each, 

* * * 

"INVEST YOUR SUMMER" : A special meeting 
for students interested in summer pro- 
jects will be held at 7:30 p.m. on Tues- 
day, April 26, in Room 304, Old Main. 
James Bristol., of the American Friends 
Service Committee, will speak at the 
meetings and five students will relate 
their experiences on summer projects. 
The Christian Association has also ar- 
ranged exhibits along this line and re- 
quests faculty members to encourage stu- 
dents to invest opportunities for summer 

project s , 

* * * 

NEW PARKING AREA: Another new parking area 
with accommodations for 83 automobiles 
is Hearing completion north of Patterson 
Hall, 

* * * 



ON UN COMMITTEE: Dr. N, B, G uerran t, 
professor of agricultural and biological 
chemistry, has been invited to serve as 
a member of a committee on vitamin 
standards of the United Nations World 
Health Organization, He left New York 
by plane Monday, April 25, to begin de- 
liberations in London on Tuesday, -"-pri! 
26. 

* * + 

RECREATION: More than 350 leaders in 
recreation in Pennsylvania will attend 
the 2d annual Pennsylvania Recreation 
Conference here on Thursday and Friday, 
April 28-29, The conference is sponsored 
by the Pennsylvania Recreation Society 
and the School of Physcial Education and 
Athletics and the Extension Services of 
the College. Fred M, Coombs, associate 
professor of physical education, is chair- 
man for the conference. Faculty and 
students are invited to attend sessions 
and may obtain copies of the program 
through the chairman, 

* * * 

PRESENT PAPERS: Dr, Hans Netrberger, pro- 
fessor and chief of the. division cf 
meteorology, presented a paper before 
the symposium on meteorological measure- 
ments, and "ussel C. ^uhf, a senior in 
meteorology, presented a paper before 
the symposium on short range forecasting 
at the Joint Meeting of the American 
Meteorological Society and the American 



Geophysical Union in Washington, D. C, |jit orvlew service* Staff members of the 

last week. School of Mineral industries who have 

*** prepared papers to be presented are T, F* 
ATTEND MEETINGS: Six members of the depart- Bates , Guy Erwin, Jr., E, F, Osborn, T. 

ment of psychology participated in the Forland, W„ A, Weyl, R, M« Gruver, F, A. 

20th annualmeetings of th. Eastern Psy- Hummel, Gordon Johnson, Guy Rindone, 
chological Association at Springfield, Delia M, Roy and Rustum Roy, 
Mass. recently. ^hey were Dr. C» R« .*♦ 

Carpenter, Philip Ash, Nathan Jaspen, Dr. BOOK PUBLISHED: Harold P* Zelko, associate 
A, W# VanderMeer , Jeanette Sprecher Walter, professor of public speaking, has col— 

and Henry R. Brenner. All reported on laborated in the writing of a text, 
work done under the Instructional Film "Communicative Speech," published by 

Research project. Others attending were the Dryden Press, New York. W or king with 
Martha 0, Fry, Dr. Albert K. Kurtz, Sol Zelko were Robert T, Oliver, formerly of 

M, Roshal, and Jean M, Goldstein, Syracuse University; and Dallas C, Oickey ; 

*** of the University of Florida, 
SPEAKS: Dr. W, Conard Fernelius , professor *** 

and head of the department of chemistry, ATTEND MEETINGS: Dr* R, V, Boucher, Dr, 

spoke o - i "Structure of Coordinated Com*- N, B, Guerrant, Dr, R, Adams Dutcher, 

pounds" at Canis'ius College, Buffalo, Dr, R, C, Miller, and Leonard W. Aurand, 

N, Y. recently. all of the department of agricultural 

*** and biological chemistry, attended meet— 

BECOMES NATIONAL FRATERNITY: Sigma Alpha ings of the American Institute of 

Eta, speech and hearing society organized Nutrition at Detroit, Mich, last week, 

here in 1947, has become a national organ- Dr. Guerrant, Dr, Miller, and Aurand 
ization with 20 chapters. ™he organization presented papers, 
meeting was held in New York recently and •** 

Penn State war. chosen site for the nat ional SPEAK : Three Penn State men addressed 

office. Dr. C, Cordelia Brong, assistant meetings of three professional and 

professor of clinical speech, was named scientific earth sciences societies in 

executive secretary. Washington, D, C, recently, Dr, E, F, 

*♦* Osborn, head of the department of earth 
CHAIRMAN: Dr. Grace M, Henderson, dean sciences, addressed the Petrologist s ' 
of the School of Home Economics, re- Club, D r , Woldemar W e yl, head of the de- 
cently served as chairman of a conference partment of mineral technology, addressed 
of Home Economics Administrators of the the Geological Society of Washington, 
12 Northeastern States, ^he conference and Dr, Paul D^ Krynine, chief of the 
was held in New York. division of miner-logy, addressed the 

**+ Pick and Hammer Club« 
BOOK PUBLISHED: "Business Organization *** 

and Management," by Dr, James Gemmell, TO PRESENT PAPER: Dr, David II, Rank, pro- 

asscciate professor of business education, fessor of physics, has been invited to 

has been published by McGraw-Hill Book present a paper before the meeting of 

Co., New York, the American Physical Society in Washing— 

*♦* ton, D, C. on April 28-30, H e also will 

VISIT YALE: Dr, William M, Lepley, Br, present a paper at the Symposium on 

Kendon R, Smith, and Dr, Joseph H, Gross- Molecular Structure in Columbus, 0,in June, 
light, all of the department of psychology,. ***• 

recently visited the Institute of Human SPEAKS: Victor Beede, professor and head 

Relations at Yale University to study of the department of forestry, recently 

facilities and procedures there, discussed careers in forestry at the 13th 

»** annual Vocations Conference at the William 

ATTEND MEETINGS: Dr, S e th W« Russell, Penn Senior high school in York, 
Dr , Samuel W, Blizzard, Jr., Dr, 0, **• 

Dudley Duncan, and Dr, Jessie Bernard, FINALISTS; Four of the seven finalists 

all of the department of sociology, chosen in the competition for the John 

participated in the program for the 19th Stewartson Memorial Fellowship are Penn 

annual meeting of the Eastern Sociology State students in architecture. They are 

Society in New York over the week— end. Frank P. Graham, Jr., W, Bruce Sloan, Jr,, 

Others from the department who attended Paul A, Waterman, and William H, Sippel, Jr, 
were Dr , Robert E, Clark, ^larence W, *** 

Anderson, and Edward Abramson. TO TV RITE CHAPTER: Dr. Hans Neuberger, 

*** chief of the division of meteorology, 

CERAMIC MEETINGS: The 51st annual meeting has been invited to write the obopter on 

of the American Ceramic Society is being General Meteorological Optics for the 

held this week in Cincinnati, 0, Dr. E» C. Compendium of Meteorology, It will be 

Henry, chief of the division of ceramics, published under the direction of the 

as chairman of the Whitewares Division, American Meteorological Society and under 

will preside at all meetings of that the sponsorship of the United *tates &iv 

division. He also is vice— pre s ident of Force, 

the Ceramics Educational Council, Roy G, ♦•* 

Ehman, assistant professor of ceramics, PRESENTS PAPER: Dr. T, C # Kavanaugh, 

is in charge of a student employment associate professor of civil engineering, 

pfiMN STATE OOLLBGTIOS 



presented a paper at the Spring meeting 
of the American Society of Civil Engineers 
in Oklahoma City, Okla. last week, 

* * * 

ATTEND MEETING: G. Alma McDougall, Esther 
A. Atkinson, and Marguerite E» Horn, all 
of the department of hotel and institution 
administration, will attend the Pennsyl- 
vania Dietetics Association meetings in 
Reading on Thursday and Friday. Miss 
Atkinson is a member of the executive 
board. 

* * * 

PAINTING STOLEN: An oil painting, valued 

at $l.,000jWas stolen Thursday evening 

from the lounge in Old Main. The painting, ing Employees" at 8 p„n» Wednesday, April 

titled "Portrait Study," was presented 27, in Room 121, Sparks Building. ?he 

to the College by the artist, the late meeting is open to the public and is 

William J. Glackens, of Philadelphia. It sponsored by D e lta Signa Pi, national 

depictp a young lady buttoning her glove. professional business fraternity. 

* * * 



The canvas was cut from the frame. 

* * * 

CONCERT: Choral clubs of the University 
of Pittsburgh and of the Mont Alto 
branch of the Pennsylvania State Forest 
School will present a joint concert at 
the Chanbersburg high school, Chambers— 
burg, at 8 p.m. on ^atxirday, April 30. 
H«. N. Jarrett, instructor in mathematics 
at Mont Alto, conducts the Mont Alto 
singers. 

* ♦ * 

DELTA SIGMA PI: J. E. Harkless, direc- 
tor of public relations of G» C, Murphy 
Co., will speak on "Selecting and Train— 



OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS FROM THE OFFICE OF THE DEAN OF ADMISSIONS 

Withdrawals : 



6 Focht, Herbert 0., ME, April 7 

6 Jones, Warren T., Mng,.Feb. 5 

4 Zoelle, Clifford R., LD, Feb. 3 

4 Miller, George R., ME, April 12 

4 Mironoff, L e on, ZE, Feb. 27 



4 Nyholm, Sidney A., AgEd # April 20 

5 Palowitch, Eugene R., ME, April 11 
2 Rowland, Roger W. , M e t, April 14 

4 Thomas, Theodore H., Phys, April 9 



Reasons for withdrawals: Illness, 2; personal 2j dropped for poor scholarship 2; 
financial difficulties 1; illness at home 1; to change ourriciilum, 1, 



PERSONNEL CHANGES 



Following personnel changes, approved during the period, January 22, 1949 to 
April IP,»1949j, are announced. Telephone extension numbers are listed for new 
appo intee s : 



Resignat ions ; 

Gladys T # Hosterman 
Beryl T, Mordan 
Evelyn C, Bland 
Ruth R. Bair 
Jeanne E» Baldwin 
Florence E. Hammer 
Dorothy P « Page 
Ruth E, Fleming 
Elizabeth Getz 
Mary M. Gray 
Melba M, Kaufmann 
Dorothea M* Kerstetter 
Eileen D, S wa rtz 
Mildred Zelinski 
Wilna B e Kesler 
Lillian Millman 
Dolores Hess Brode 
Mary A*. Eminhizer 
Ruth E, McDaniel 
Anna M. Fleck 
Ardna J, Nix 
Sarah F, Lafferty 
Kathryn Swingle 
Rita M. Frask 
Shirley A, Brennan 
Jeannette A, Krista 
Patricia Adams 
Mary K# Miller 
Wilbur L. Spicer 
John Whippo 
Elmer Swanger 
Luther 0. Walker 
Nevin H. Crater 
Henry W, Demler 
Gerald L. Eberly 
Joseph W. Elliot 
Clarence F« Ciemow 
Alice Bright 
Paul Reed 
Kenneth Frazier 
G e orge B« Romer, Jr, 
Laura W # Craig 
Earl F. Best 
Angelo Martella 
Jo Ann George 
John W, Krumrine 
Peter C, McKenzie 
C, Albert Smith 
Harry R. Strouse 
Charles S # Karnas 
Rachael Segner 
Helen W # Johnston 
Eleanore G, Wells 
Frederick B« Fowler 
Erma I, Lordeman 
S, Elizabeth Yoder 
Marjorie J, Dillman 
Arrah Wanna McCombs 
Barbara E» Schumacher 
Sheila Ann Segner 
Oliva B, Armstrong 
June Murphy 
Caryl Lutz 
Edith Roeder 
C la r a Ma e McG a rv e y 



Secretary — School of Agriculture 

Secretary - Ordnance Research Laboratory 

Secretary - Veterans Counseling S erv ice 

Secretary —Central Extension 

Secretary — Ordnanoe Research Laboratory 

Secretary — Ordnance Research Laboratory 

Secretary — Central Extension 

Secretary - Dean of Admissions Office 

Secretary - Pa, Co-op. Wildlife Research Unit 

Secretary — Romance Languages 

Secretary - Central Extension 

Secretary — Central Extension 

Secretary - Central Extension 

Secretary — Mathematics 

Stenographer - Dairy Husbandry 

Stenographer - Education 

Stenographer — Agricultural Extension 

Stenographer - Agricultural Extension 

Stenographer —Agricultural Extension 

Stenographer — Agricultural Extension 

Stenographer — Earth Sciences 

Stenographer «• Economics 

Stenographer - Education (Motion Picture ) 

Clerk-typist — Central Extension 

Clerk-typist — Central Extension 

Clerk— typist — Physical plant 

Clerk-typist - Central Extension 

Clerk— typist — Public Information 

Janitor - Dormitories 

Janitor - Dormitories 

Janitor - Dormitories 

Janitor — Physical Plant 

Janitor — Dormitories 

Assistant - Ordnance Research Laboratory 

Draftsman - Ordnance Research Laboratory 

Dairy Farm Employee - Dairy Husbandry 

Inventory Clerk — Accounting 

Draftsman - Physical Plant 

Creamery Employee — Dairy Husbandry 

Laborer - Poultry Husbandry 

Laboratory Technician — Chemistry 

Editor — Alumni Association 

Office Machine Repairman — Physical Plant 

Mailcarrier — Service and Supply 

Receptionist — Central Extension 

Maintenance Helper - Physical plant 

Maintenance Helper - Physical Plant 

Maintenance Helper - physical plant 

Maintenance Helper - Physical Plant 

Assistant Custodian - McKeesport Building Operation 

Telephone Operator - Physical Plant 

Chief Booker - Audio Visual Aids Library 

Laboratory Assistant — Mineral Technology 

Kitchenman — Mont Alto 

Telephone Operator - Physical plant 

PBX Operator — College Library 

Typist — Central Extension 

Relief Receptionist — Ordnance Research Laboratory 

Clerk-Supervisor - Student Union Building 

Telephone Operator — Physical Plant 

Clerk - Ordnance Research Laboratory 

Recorder — Dean of Admissions and Registrar 

Typist - Central Extension 

Staff Nurse - College Health Service 

Nurse - College Health Service 



Ruth .Tylden 
Edyth Smith 
Margaret E „ Becker 
Margaret A» Mahoney 
Harriet Burney 
Ruth n c Spr.rber 
Marilyn Goldberg 
Jean T„ Hoke 
Jane Ann Korrnan 
Helen M, Snyder 
Jean S, ?falker 
Msrjorie H. Wilsen 
Hope N» Buchenhorst 
Irene G« Hughes 

James Kustenbcrder 

Violet N, Martin 

At Irene Valmont 

Deronde A, Winne 

Lois Bailey 

Blanche S. Barr 

Robert H. Billett 

Sue H» Cprey 

Dixie J 4 Crisirell 

Ann L. Hammond' 

Harry A. Hoy 

Ottis MoClarren 

Marjorie M« Penfield 

Eleanor E, Siepietowski 

Dorothy M« Wallace 

Lawrence Tate 

J a rne s T » Smith 

Rose E , Ru d y 

Joan We i s 

Barbara K. Winslow 

Ann E. Christmas 

Appoint rne nt s t 

220 Dolores Warrington 
137 Mary G, Fries 
137 Greta IC. Kugler 
199 Betty 0, Yonker 
34 7 Ruth Kurpjuwait 
356 Eva S, Mecartney 
137 Mona A, Mires 
18 Gloria Jean Hunter 
18 Betty Jenkins 
322M Helen A, Gephart 
354 Kathryn W, Breon 
2 07 Miriam L, Murray 
126 Helen J» Patterson 
371M Patricia A # Adams 
101 Essie Lin sky 
183M Elizabeth M, Stambaugh 
183M Marybelle Huet 

Wilson M. Ghaner 

John B. Derstine 

Fred W. Klinefelter 

Frank J« Snavcly 

Rexford T, Woods 

George L. Fink 

Chalmers D. McMahon 

Melvin T, McMahon 
137 Luther D, Shope 

Nevin H. Crater 

James F, Weaver 

W. W« Herman 

William W. Henninger 

Merl W, Fink 

Clarence E. Long 

Junior H» Meyer 

Elwood H. Horner 



Nurse - College Health Service 

Kitchen Helper — Dining Commons 

Janitress — Women's Dormitories 

Clerk typist -'Central Extension 

Secretary — Accounting Administration 

S^oret cry — Ordnance Research Laboratory 

Clerk —recorder - Dean of Admissions and Registrar 

Soda Dispenser — Student Union Building 

Stenographer — Dean of xldmissions and Registrar 

Extension Representative — Agricultural Extension 

Ass 't« - Extension Representative —Agricultural Ext* 

AssH. Extension Representative — Agricultural Ext. 

Receptionist — Ordnance Research Laboratory 

Stenographer — Agricultural Soonomics and Rural 

Sociology. 
Utility Man - Nittany Dining Hall 
Clerk- - Associated Student Activities 
Clerk— typist . — Public Information 

Relief —receptionist — Ordnance Research Laboratory 
Stenographer — Education 
Secretary - Athletic Association 
Janitor — physical Plant 
Clerk — Bookkeeping 
Operator — Physical Plant 
Stenographer — Central Extension 
Fireman - Physical plant 
Dairy Farm Employee - Dairy Husbandry 
Secretary — Central Extension 

Clerk — Agricultural Economics and Rural Sociology 
Stenographer — Arts and Science Extension 
Creamery Employee — Dairy Husbandry* 
Creamery Employee - Dairy Husbandry- 
Janitress— McAllister Hall 
Stenographer — Admissions 
Stenographer — Admissions 
Clerk— supervisor - Student Union Building 



Secretary — Accounting 

Secretary — Ordnance Research Laboratoi-y 

Secretary - Ordnance Research Laboratory 

Secretary — Dining Commons 

Stenographer - Dean of Admissions Office 

Clerk - Business Administration 

Clerk - Ordnance Research Laboratory 

Cler^ — Education (Motion picture) 

Clerk - Education (Motion picture) 

Statistical Recorder - Ellen H. Richards Institute 

Clerk-typist - Physical plant 

Clerk— typist — Dormitories 

Clerk —typist — Personnel Relations 

Clerk-typist ~ Mineral Technology- 

Clerk-stenographer - Home Economics 

Clerk— typist — Office Services Division 

Clerk-typist — Office Services Division 

Janitor — Dormitories 

Janitor - Physical plant 

Janitor —Physical plant 

Janitor — Fhysical Plant 

Janitor - Physical Plant 

Janitor — Physical Plant 

Janitor — Physical plant 

Janitor 

Janitor 

Janitor 

Janitor 

Janitor 



Physical plant 

Ordnance Research Laboratory 

Dormit orie s 

Health Service 

Dormitor ie s 
Mechanic — Physical Plant 
Mechanic — Physical plant 
Mechanic - Physical Plant 
Mechanic ~ Physical plant 
Mechanic — Physical plant 



Stanley J. Myers 
Elmer Swanger 

51 MacDonald Heebner, Jr. 
137 Harry F, Wegener 

18 John B, C ann on, Jr. 
137 James R, Duffy 
227 William F. Christ of fers 
580 John W, Dillman 
137 Richard C, Claudius 
13 7 Earl A. Weaver 
100 Margaret Corwin 

Russell M. Evey 
354 William B. Cassidy 
258J Robert S, Slegal 
137 Joseph D. Hicks 
53 J Victor Emanuel Leuter 

Earl R, H e ckman 

Jacob W. Fry 
258J Paul S„ Ream 

Ruth M. Spicer 
130 Mary J« Garison 
258J Fred R* Myers 
'53J Garnet B, Younkin 

Emma A. E. Benson 

Geraldine E, Snyder 

Charles Sprankle 

Warren E. Taylor 
137 Marian K. Hager 
183M Robert P. Hunsinger 
18 Gloria B. Kahn 
18 Betty M. Mohnkern 
96 Marie H. Whit a ore 

Harold J. Reisinger 
294J Norma Bossart 
130 Joanne M, Bigler 
142J Ruby E, Bonadio 
153 Mildred M* Montgomery 
130 Kathryn Dunkel 
279 Carol R, Rossman 
261 Freda J. Erb 
293 Evelyn Brungart 
374 Barbara L, Jelen 
146J Bernice H« Smith 
368 Regina piotrowski 

61 Mary Herzog 
344 Elizabeth A, Eckley 

176 Nanette D. Craig 
354 Helen M, Simco 
161 Fred Krebs 

13 Alice M. Cole 

130 Betty Spock 

Scott A. Shawver 
Luther 0, Walker 
Charles W # Jordan 
Frances M, Kowalski 
Joseph W. Elliott 
Charles 0. Wilson 

177 Nina J. Blake slee 
177 Elise Fishbein 
168 Alice Bright 

John Barr, Jr. 
273 James P # Smith 
192 Mary E. Swart z 

Karl II. Smith 
130 Ruth I, McCulloch 
181 Catherine 0. Ferguson 
130 Charles L. Koch 
236 Joan Wakefield 
305J Ann E* Christmas 
13 Mary K # Miller 

96 Helen G. Baney 

96 Hazel B, Donald 



Mechanic - Physical Plant 

Mechanic — Physical Plant 

Accountant - Engineering Experiment Station 

Designer - Ordnance Research Laboratory 

Project Engineer. - Education (Motion Picture) 

Design Draftsman - Ordnance Research Laboratory 

Accountant — General Administration 

Accountant — General Administration 

Detailer Draftsman - Ordnance Research Laboratory 

Millwright - Ordnance Research Laboratory 

Student Records Clerk and Office Manager - Home 

Economic s 
Carpenter - Physical Plant 
Utility Engineer - physical Plant 
Machinist - Physics 

Coil Shop Ass*t. - Ordnance Research Laboratory 
Electronics Technician - Engineering Exp» Station 
Electrician — Physical Plant 
Assistant Cook — Dining Commons 
Machinist - Physics 
Fourth Cook — Dining Commons 
Nurse - Central Extension 
Machinist - Physics 

Computress - Engineering Experiment Station 
Janitress — ormitories 
Janitress - ^ormitories 

ishroom Man — Dining Commons 
Utility Man - Dining Commons 

Electronics Technician - Ordnance Research Lab* 
Assistant - Office S erv i es Division 
Statistical Clerk - Education (Motion Picture) 
Statistical Clerk — Education (Motion Picture) 
Dental Technician - College Health Service 
Carpenter — Physical plant 

Secretary - Pa, Co-cp . Wildlife Research Unit 
Secretary — Central Extension 
Secretary — Mathematics 
Secretary — Romance Languages 
Secretary — Central Extension 
Stenographer — B a iry Husbandry 
Stenographer — Agricultural Extension 
Stenographer — Agriculture 

Stenographer - Mineral Industries Extension 
Stenographer — Economics 
Stenographer — Earth Sciences 

Stenographer — Agricultural and Biological Chemistry 
Clerk-typist — Admissions Office 
Clerk— typist - Audio— Visual Aids 
Clerk— typist - Physical Plant 
Clerk— typist - Naval Science 
Clerk-typist - Central Extension 
Clerk -typist — Central Extension 
Janitor - Physical plant 
Janitor - physical plant 
Janitor - Physical plant 

Assistant Food Supervisor — Dining Commons 
Dairy Farm Employee — Dairy Husbandry 
Dairy Farm Employee - Dairy Husbandry 
Library Clerical Assistant I — College Library 
Library Ci er j_ ca l Assistant I - College Library 
Draftsman — Chemistry 
patrolman — Physical plant 
Creamery Employee — Dairy Husbandry 
Managing Editor - Alumni Association 
Laborer - Mont Alto 

Accounting Clerk - Central Extension 
Accounting Clerk — Athletic Association 
Custodian — Central Extension 
Clark - Admissions Office 

Clerk— Supervisor— Student Union Building 
Typist — Central Extension 
Nurse — College Hospital 
Nurse »• College Hpepital 



255 Janet V. Cox 
137 DeEtta R. Emig 
220 Anna Mae Kustanbauder 
305J Anna Jane Mater 
89J Earl E # B al, Jr. 

Alfred Brodbeck 

Roy W, Clouser 
181 Virginia Fox 
130 Mae L. Rash 
130 Norma Jane T >/e inheimer 
266J Dorothy L. Blowers 
262 Oliva Corty 

262 Irene Szadziewicz 



Jack C m Smith 
Charles Truitt 
Dorothea Bauer 
Mary R« Dawson 
Edwin M, Grove 
Elvira M, Meyer 
Ruby A, New son 
Brown W« Norris 
Marian L, Orcutt 
Ray H, Zeigler 

305J Mary Lou Lightner 

130 Reggy Farmer 

Jacqueline M, Frye 
Alene L % Kinzer 
June S # Hanna 
Virginia F, Johnson 

277J Richard E. Pearce 

2 73 Thomas F. Roush 



287J 

397 

344 

354 
137 

130 



130 
130 
143 
226 



Stenographer — Chemistry and Physics 

Clerk f Ordnance Research Laboratory 

Clerk - General Administration 

Soda Dispenser — Student Union Building 

Golf Shop Assistant — Physical Education 

Storeroom Man — Nittany Dining Hall 

Farm Employee — Agriculture 

Secretary — Athletic Association 

Clerk— typist — Central Extension 

Receptionist — Central Extension 

Stenographer — Agricultural Extension 

Stenographer — Agricultural Economics and Rural 

Sociology 
Stenographer — Agricultural Economics and Rural 

Sociology 
Maintenance Helper - Forestry and Physical Plant 
Poultry Farm Employee - Poultry Husbandry 
Stenographer — Education 
Clerk - Admissions 
Inspector - Physical Plant 
Clerk-typist - Physical Plant 
Secretary — Ordnance Research Laboratory 
Janitor — Physical Plant 
Secretary — Central Extension 
Janitor — Physical Plant 

Soda Dispenser — ^Student Union Building 
Stenographer — Central Extension 
Receptionist — Central Extension 
Stenographer — Central Extension 
Stenographer — -^rt s and Science Extension 
Clerk — Accounting (Fee Assessor) 
Creamery Employee — Dairy Husbandry 
Creamery Employee — ■'-'airy Husbandry 



Leaves of Absence: 



Josephine E, Knack 
Margee Bodle 
Ira C. C or x 
Mary B. Glenn 
James Foust 
Robert D, Smith 
Leota B„ Griswold 
Alfred Brodbeck 
Marie M. Ashton 
Roxie M„ Durik]fi'h»>vgpr 
Nina G, pomroy 
Emma H« Eastman 
Margaret Gauger 
Ethel Bright 
John E, Bubb 



Stenographer - Agricultural Extension 

Clerk-typist - Admissions Office 

Janitor — Physical plant 

Janitress — Physical plant 

Laborer - Agronomy 

Laborer — Forestry 

Nurse - Central Extension 

Stores Clerk — Dining Commons 

Linen Woman — Dining Commons 

Dining Commons Employee — Dining Commons 

Bookkeeper — Physical plant 

Instructor — Agriculture 

Librarian — Engineering 

Staff Secretary — Library 

Janitor — Physical plant 



1-22-49 to 2-12-4< 

2-28-49 to 3-31-4' 
2-1-4 9 to 3-7-49 
2-1-4 9 to 3-1-49 
12-31-48 indefini" 
12-1-48 indefinit 
2-1-49 to 6-30-49 
1-14-49 indefinitf 
2-2-49 indefinite 
3—1-49 indefinite 
2-28-49 indefinite 
4-1—49 to 4~30-4 9 
4-1-49 to 4-3 0-4 9 
4-1-49 to 4-3 0-4 9 
4-1—49 indefinite 



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THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 



FACULTY 



The bulletin is published weekly during" the College 
year as a means of making official announcements 
and presenting items of interest to th<s -faculty. All 




ULLETI 



contributions should he as brief as possible and 
reach Louis H. Bell, Director of Public Information. 
313 Old Main, not later than 10 s. m. each Friday. 



VOL. 



35 



May 



2, 1949 



NO. 



28 



COMBINED ARTS GROUP TO HOLD FESTIVAL MAY 4 TO 10 



The second annual Combined Arts 
Festival will open on Wednesday, May 4, 
and continue through May 18. 

The program will include presenta- 
tions in the fields of music, dance, 
fine arts, art education, hone art, 
dramatics, architecture, motion picture, 
landscape horticulture, and oral inter- 
pretation of literature. 

Dramatics productions, recitals, 
concerts, and the Pennsylvania Inter- 
collegiate Reading festival have been 
included in the two-week program. Fac- 
ulty and students also will have an 
opportunity , to watch Henry Varnun Poor 
as he continues work on the mural in 
Old Main. . 

The Combined Arts Exhibit, embracing 
work in architecture, painting, murals, 
sculpture, dance, music, scene design, 
landscape horticulture, and home art, 
will open in the Temporary Union Build- 
ing on Saturday, May 7, and continue 
through May 16. 

Other campus exhibits will include 
"Prints of Modern European Artists" 
which will continue in Simmons Hall 
until May 18; student architectural 
drawings on the 3d floor of Main Engi- 
neering Building; Combined Arts in the 
foyer of the College Library; Scene 
design and photographs from productions 
in the Green Room, Schwab Auditorium; 
student murals and sculpture done in 
art education in the temporary classroom 



building; and student work in Hone Art 
in the Home D^onomlcs Building* 

The program for this week includes: 
Wednesday, May 4, 2 p.m., Narrative 
Poem, 304 Sparks Building; 7 p.m., films, 
including "The City," 119 Osmond Lab- 
oratory; 8. p.m., Short Story, 14 H ne 
Econonics Building; and also 8 p.m., 
Modern Dance Recital, White Hall. 

Thursday, May 5, 9 a.m., Group of 
Sonnets, 304 Sparks Building; 10:30 a.m., 
Group of Lyrics, 304 Sparks Building; 
1:30 p.m., Drama, 3 04 Old Main; 8 p.m., 
Modern Dance Recital, White Hall; 8 p.m., 
Penn State Players, "J hn Loves Mary," 
Schwab Auditorium, 

Friday, May 6,8 p.m,, penn State 
Players, "John Loves Mary" in Schwab 
Auditorium and "Thi.s Side of Bedlam" at 
Centre Stage. 

Saturday, May 7, 8 p.m., Modern 
Dance Recital-, White Hall; 8 p.m., 
Penn State Players, "John Loves Mary" 
in Schwab Auditorium and "This Side nf 
Bedlam," Centre Stage, 

Sunday, May 8, 3;3 p.m.', College 
Symphony, Schwab Auditorium, 

Monday, May 9, 7 p.m., Three One — 
Act Plays, Studio production, Little 
Theatre . 



COUNCIL OF ADMINISTRATION MINUTES REGARDING SUMMER SESSION SCHEDULES 



The following is quoted from the 
minutes of the Council of Administra- 
tion meeting on April 25, 1949: 

"It wa s moved, seconded, and carried 
that it was the sentiment of the Council 
fcjiat the load which students are per- 



mitted to carry in the Sumner Sg.ssions 
should not exceed one credit for , 
each week of residence, except that in 
the Main Summer S e ssion they be permitted 
to take up to seven credits without 
special permission of the lean concerned," 



P£NN STATE COLLECTION 



PENNSYLVANIA INTERCOLLEGIATE POETRY REAPING FESTIVAL HERE 



More than 30 Pennsylvania, college 
students will participate in the first 
annual Pennsylvania Intercollegiate 
poetry Reading festival here on "Wednes- 
day and Thursday, May 4 and 5. 

Delegates will be welcomed at 1:30 
p*m. Wednesday by Joseph F, O'Brien, 
professor of speech, and at a banquet on 
Wednesday night, will hear Dr, Br ice 
Harris, professor and head of the depart- 
ment of English literature* Marjorie J.„ 
Opel, junior in education, will be 
t oastmistre s s , 



Sessions and penn State participants 
are: Wednesday, 2 p.m., Narrative Poem, 
Edward L. Breining, 304 Sparks Building; 
and 8 p.m., Short Story,, Theodore R« 
Mann, 14 Hone Economics Building; Thurs- 
day, 9 a.m., Sonnets, Edward H© Armsby, 
304 Sparks Building; 10:30 a.m., Lyrics, 
Gladdy Lou Miller, 304 Sparks Building; 
and 1:30 p.m., Prama, Francine B, Toll, 
304 Old Main, 

Sessions are open to interested 
faculty and students. 



SCHOOL OF CHEMISTRY AND PHYSICS TO HOLD OPEN HOUSE SATURDAY, MAY 7 



Chemistry, physics, and biology 
laboratories will be open to the public 
as the School of Chemistry and physics 
holds its Open House program from 2 to 
5:30 p.m. on Saturday, May 7. 

Guided tours will give visitors a 
chance to see some of the research work 
underway in the School, 



Chemistry lab 
special programs i 
Organic Laboratory 
see research proje 
dents in progress; 
low temperature ex 
stances such as li 
liquid air will be 
analysis, showing 
small quantities o 
copy, showing exhi 
scope; and under gr 
try, Qualitative A 
Analysis, Physical 
cal Engineering La 
typical undergradu 
be illustrated and 
displayed. 



oratories planning 
nclude the Graduate 
, where visitors will 
ct s by Graduate Stu— 

Cryogenics, where 
periments with sub- 
quid hydrogen and 

conducted; Micro- 
experiments with very 
f materials; Micros- 
bits under the micro- 
aduate Organic Chemis- 
nalysis, Chiantitat ive 

Chemistry, and Chemi- 
boratories, where 
ate experiments will 

equipment will be 



The biology work will include Agri- 
cultural Biochemistry, showing student 
experiments; Histology, showing slides 
of human and animal tissues; Anatomy, 
with specimens of human and animal body 
parts on display; and Invertebrate 
Zoology, which includes displays of the 
lower forms of animals. 

In physics, typical experiments by 
undergraduate students on mechanics, 



heat, light, s 
be demonstrate 
equipment used 
faculty will b 
of electronics 
miser o scope ; X 
waves; high pr 
radio -act ivity 
as to interest 
physici st • 



ound, and electricity will 
d» R e searoh experiments and 

"by graduate students and 
e demonstrated in the fields 

and magnetism; electron 
-Ray; acoustics; shock 
essure; spectroscopy; and 
. All will be conducted so 

the layman as well a s t he 



The work in astronomy also will 
be dedicated with the observatory and 
astronomy equipment open for the pub- 
lic's inspection. 



MOTHER'S LAY PROGRAM PLANNED FOR THIS WEEK-END 



Parents of hundreds of students on 
the campus will visit the College this 
week-end to participate in the annual 
Mother's Day events. 

One of the highlights of the pro- 
gram vrill be the ofowning of the May 
Cueen at the traditional May Day festivi- 
ties at 4:30 p.m. Saturday on Holmes 
Field, Lillian C« Skraban, of Bethlehem, 
a senior in medical technology, has been 
named May Q.ueen, 

Prior to the May Day program, women 
students will hold teas in all dormi- 



tories for the mothers while a full 
sports program has also been planned for 
the campus guests. 

Students will hold the annual Corona- 
tion Ball at 9 p.m. Friday in White Hall, 

The Sunday program includes chapel 
services in Schwab Auditorium at 11 a,m, 
and a concer 4 ' by the College Symphony in 
Schwab Auditorium at 3:30 p,m. The 
chapel speaker will be Dr, Howard Scharfs, 
of Shady side Presbyterian Church, Pitts- 
burgh, 



RECENT PRINTS OF PAINTINGS BY EUROPEAN ARTISTS ON EXHIBITION 



An exhibition of 16 recent prints 
of paintings by nodern European artists 
is now on display in the lobby of Simmons 
Hall fron 9 a,n. to 9 p.m. It will con- 
tinue until May 18 • 



Such artists as Picasso, Braque, 
Leger, and Roualt are represented. The 
color prints are of extraordinary 
strength and brillance and are of the 
sane size as the originals. 



ECONOMICS AS A SCIENCE AND PROFESSION SUBJECT FOR PANEL DISCUSSION 



Economics as a science and profes- 
sion will be the subject for the final 
panel of the series sponsored by Pi Gamma 
Mu, social science recognition society, 
at 7:30 p.n. Tuesday, May 3, in Atherton 



Hall. 

Participants will be Br, Carl W. 
Hasek, D a vid II, McKinley, Arthur H» 
Reede, and Br, R, Hadley Waters, all of 
the department of economics. 



A, II. SCHULTZ TO PRESENT SIGMA. XI LECTURE THURSDAY NIGHT 



A,H. Schultz, professor of physical' 
anthropology at The Johns Hopkins Medical 
School, will present a lecture on "Man as 
a Prinate" at 8 p.n. on Thursday, May 5, 
in Roon 119, Osnond Laboratory, 



The lecture, which i3 sponsored 
by the Society of the Signa Xi, will be 
illustrated and will be open to the 
public. 



OF GENERAL INTEREST 



LIBERAL ARTS FACULTY: The faculty of 
the School of the Liberal Arts will 
neet at 4:10 p,n, on Thursday, May 12, 
in Roon 121 Sparks Building, 

* * * 

SENATE: The College S e nate will neet 
at 4:10 p.n. on Thursday, May 5, in 
Roon 121, Sparks Building, 

* * * 

RULES COMMITTEE: The Senate Rules Con- 
nittee will neet at 11 a,n, on Thursday, 
May 5, in Roon 209, Sparks Building. 

* * * 

LUNCHEON CLUB: M.S. Osborne, professor 
and head of the department of architec- 
ture, will address the F.aculty Luncheon 
Club on Monday, May 9, on the subject : 
"Present Day problens of Hone Building." 

* * * 

HOME SPORTS: Wednesday, May 4, 1:30 p.m., 
JV lacrosse, Harrisburg Center; 4 p.n,, 
baseball, Gettysburg; Friday, May 6, and 
Saturday, May 7, golf, Eastern inter— 
collegiates; 2 p.m., lacrosse, Syracuse, 
2 p,n., tennis, Duquesne; 3:30 p.n., JV 
lacrosse, Oberlin. 

* * * 

CAPS AND GOWNS: Candidates for advanced 
degrees nay place orders for caps and 
gowns at the Athletic Store at any tine 
pri or to May 5. 

* * * 

PLAY: The Penn State Players will pre- 
sent at 8 p.n, on Thursday, Friday, and 
Saturday in Schwab . Audit oriun the play, 
"John Loves Mary," Tickets, priced at 
60 cents for Thursday night and $1 for 
Friday and Saturday nights, are on sale 
at Student TTnion Office. All seats are 
reserved. 

* * * 



The Hillel Foundation 
to a showing of "Over- 
new nusical filn in the 
to be shown in the 

at 3 p.n, on Sunday, 
as English titles and 



HILLEL FOUNDATION: 

invites the public 

ture to Glory," a 

Yiddish language, 

Hillel Audit oriun, 

May 8. The film h 

stars Moishe Oysher, renowned cantor. 



FORESTRY BANCOJET : 
try banquet will b 
night, May 7, at t 
Speakers will be B 
Juneau, Alaska, a 
of 1907, M nt Alto 
forester in Alaska 
of Philadelphia, r 
northeastern regio 
fron Mont Alto and 
faculty and i-'iend 
banquet . 



* * * 

The 37th annual fores-* 
e held on Saturday 
he University Club. 
• Frank Heintzlenan, of 
graduate in the Class 
, and now regional 
; and Robie M. Evans, 
egional forester of the 
n. Forestry students 

the campus, as well as 
s, will attend the 



EDUCATION BAliaUET: The third annual joint 
banquet of Phi Delta Kappa and Pi Lanbda 
Theta will be held on Tuesday, May 3, at 
6:30 p.m. at the Nittany Lion Inn. Victor 
E. D'Anico, director of the educational 
program of the Museum of Modern Art, 
New York, N.Y., will be the guest speaker. 
He will discuss "Art and World Unity." 

* * * 

EXHIBIT: The Hillel Foundation is exhibit- 
ing a group of reproductions, original 
prints, and silhouette cuts by three- 
outstanding artists, during the coming 
week— end, Saul Rabino will be represented 
by 22 reproductions of lithographs; Zeev 
Rabin, by color plates depicting scenes 
in Palestine; and M. Gur-Arieh, by 28 
silhouette cuts illustrating the book of 
Genesis. They nay be seen at the Hillel 
Foundation. 



TATE COLLECTION 



CONFERENCE: Thirty audio-visual aids 
instructors from Pennsylvania colleges 
and universities attended a conference 
on the campus Saturday, The conference 
was conducted under the direction of Dr. 
£., W. VanderMeer, associate professor of 
education, and was addressed "by Dr. M. R 
Trabue , dean of the School of Education. 



FIRST PRIZE: The film, "The 
produced by the Motion Pictur 
cording Studio of Central Ext 
won the top award as the best 
traffic safety film produced 

* * * 
EXTEMPORE SPEAKING CONTEST: 
members are requested to advi 
dents that competition in the 
Frizzell Extempore Speaking c 
begin with the preliminary me 
Room 10, Sparks Building, on 
May 9, at 7:30 p.rn. Students 
ter at this time. 



Safest Way," 
e and Re— 
ension, has 

16 mm. 
in 1948, 

Faculty 
se stu— 

John Henry 
ontest will 
eting in 
Monday, 

may regis- 



FRENCH FILM: The French film, "Harvest," 
with Fern Andel, will be shown at the 
Nittany Theatre, Monday and Tuesday, May 
2 and 3, The picture is shown in coopera- 
tion with the International Film Club and 
the Modern Language departments at the 

College* 

* * * 

RETURNS FROM EUROPE: Kalman J. DeJuhasz, 
professor of engineering research, re- 
cently returned from a four month's study 
trip in Europe, covering academic and 
industrial institutes and laboratories 
in Great Britain, Holland, Denmark, Nor- 
way, Sweden, Germany, Austria, Hungary, 
and Switzerland, in the fields of inter- 
nal combustion engines, 

* * * 

SPEAKS: Dr. William M. Smith, Jr., asso- 
ciate professor of family relationships, 



addressed the annual meeting of the New 
York State Home Economics -Association in 
Syracuse, N, Y. on Friday. His topic 
was: "The National Family Life Con- 
ference and You," 

* * * 

TO SPEAK: Dr , F r anklin B. Krauss, pro- 
fessor of Latin, will present a paper, 
"Roman Incentives to Moral Aation" at 
the annual meeting of the Classical 
Association of the Atlantic States in 
Buffalo, N, Y. this week-end. He has 
been secretary-treasurer of the Associa- 
tion for the past six years, 

* * » 

CHOSEN TREASURER: Merrill Wood, assis- 
tant professor of zoology, recently 
attended the annual meeting of the 
Eastern Bird Banding Association in 
Philadelphia and was re— elected treas- 
urer of the organization. 

* * * 

ELECTED: Dr. Lloyd M. Jones, professor 
of physical education, was elected vice- 
president of the American Association 
for Health, Ihysical Education and 
Recreation at the convention in Boston 
recently. Other faculty members attend- 
ing were Marie Haidt, Dr. Ellen D. Kelly, 
Mildred A. Lucey, Hermance Reese, Sher- 
man P. Fogg, Dr. Arthur L, Harnett, Jr., 
John W. Masley, and Dr , J. Bertram 

Kessel. 

* * * 

TO GO TO PRINCETON: Dr. Erich Auerbach, 
visiting lecturer in romance languages, 
has been invited to spend the academic 
year l'949-50 as a member of the Insti- 
tute for Advanced Studies at Princeton, 
N. J. where he will direct an advanced 
seminar of literature at the Institute. 
His new book on romance philology and 
literature has just been released in 
Frankfurt am Main, Germany. 



DR. ERICH AUERBACH TO PRESENT LIBERAL ARTS LECTURE MAY 3 



Dr. Erich Auerbach, visiting lec- 
turer in romance languages, will present 
the third in the series of Liberal Arts 
lectures at 8 o'clock on Tuesday night, 
May 3, in Room 10, Sparks Building. His 
subject will be: "The Rise and Decline 
of the Literary Public in Europe." 



Formerly professor of romance phil- 
ology and head of the department in Mar- 
burg, Germany, and. Istanbul, Turkey, Dr , 
Auerbach is the author of several impor- 
tant books on the French literary pub- 
lic, on Dante, and on mimesis, a pene- 
trating study of realism. 



OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS FROM THE OFFICE OF THE DEAN OF ADMISSIONS AND REGISTRAR 



'/Withdrawals : 

4 Crandall, John Richard, TS, April 13 
6 Henry, Russell A., PNG, April 14 
Reasons for Withdrawal: To be married, 1; poor scholarship, 1; financial, 1; 



4 Brier, Doris L., LD, April 11 
4 Bush, Paul E., Cer . , April 21 



to go to work, 1. 






»- • » 



THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 

FACULTY ftftl&l. BULLETIN 



V 




The Bulletin is published weekly during the College 
year as a means of making official announcements 
and presenting items of interest to the faculty. All 



ronlributiom should be as brief as possible and 
reach Louis H. Bell, Director of Public Information. 
313 Old Main, not later than 10 a m. each Friday. 



VOL. 



NO. 



36 



May 9, 1949 



29 



FACULTY-TRUSTEE 'DINNER TO BE HELD AT NITTANY LION INN' ON FRIDAY NIGHT 



A faculty-trustee dinner, intended 
to be the first of- an annual series^, will 
be -held at the Nittany Lion Inn from 
5:30 p»m« to 8 p.m. on Friday, May 13. 

• "Members of the Board of Trustees 
and assistants to .the President of the 
College will be guests cf the faculty 
for the .occasion. 

Dr. John Dale Russell, of the U. S. 
Office cf Education, will speak on 

"GOETHE IN SONG" RECITAL TO 

"Goethe in Song," a recital 
commemorating the 200th anniversary of 
Goethe's birth, will be presented in 
Schwab Auditorium at 8 p,m« on Monday, 
May 16, 

The recital, a part of the Combined 
Arts Festival, is sponsored jointly by 
the Simmons Series, the Chapel Choir 
under the direction of Willa W, Taylor, 
and the department of music. 

The artists, Barbara Troxell, 
soprano, and Paul King, baritone, will 
sing a program including settings-of 
Goethe's poems by Beethoven, Schubert, 
Schumann, Wolfe, Tschaikow sky , and 
Moussorgsky. The second half of the 
recital will be devoted 't o ' sc le ct ions 
from the opera "Faust" by Gounod, con- 
cluding with the famous church scene. 

Tickets will go on sale at 1:30 p»m. 



"Problems^ of Administering a Modern 
University. n 

Tickets, priced at $2*85, are on 
sale at the Student Union Office, Old 
Main, and will continue on sale 'there 
until the quota for the dinner is sold. 
Faculty of the rank of instructor or 
higher and administrative staff members 
listed in the General College catalogue 
will be eligible .to attend the d-inner. 

BE PRESENTED ON MONDAY NIGHT 

Wednesday, May 11, at Student Union 
Office. Not more than two tickets will 
be, sold- to one person. The tickets 
are priced at 55?( for students and 85^ 
for others. Seats are not reserved and 
doors will open at 7:3 p«m» 

A preview of the concert will be 
held at 8:15 p # m. Wednesday, May, 11, in 
Room 117, Carnegie Hall, when Dr. Philip 
A. Shelley, professor and head of the 
department of German, will discuss and 
play recordings of the songs. The public 
is invited. 

.At .8 p.m. on Wednesday^ May 18, the 
Chapel Choir. will sing the German Requiem 
by Johannes ,rahms, with Miss Troxell and 
King again singing the solos. Tickets 
for this program will be issued, free 
of charge, at the Student Union Office, 
beginning at 1:30 p»m» Wednesday, 



STEPHEN S.PENDER TO PRESENT LECTURE THURSDAY NIGHT 



Stephen Spender, poet and dis- 
tinguished literary figure, will speak 
at 8 p»m, on Thursday, May 12, in 
Ro'om 121', Sparks Building on "German 
Poetic Influences on British Poetry 
Today," 

The lecture is sponsored by the 
Liberal Arts and the Simmons S e ries and 
will be open to the public* 

Spender from 1939 to 1942 was a 
oo-edi+.or of the literary review, 



"Horizon," and in 1946 was, sent on a 
special mission to the British Zone of 
occupied Germany to study the effect of 
Nazism on German intellectuals. The 
book, "European Witness," wa s written as 
a result of the mission. 

Spender also is the author of many- 
other books, including- "Poems," "The 
Destructive Element," "Trial of A Judge," 
"Life and the- Poet," and "Poems of 
Dedication," 



ffittU STATE COLLECTION' 



COMBINED ARTS FESTIVAL CONTINUES WITH EXHIBITS, PROGRAMS 



The 
into the 
exhibit s 

grams , 

The 
painting 
design, 
art , ope 
Building 



Combined Arts Festival continues 
second week with a series of 
and dramat ical and musical pro- 



exhibit of work in architecture, 
} murals, sculpture, dance j music, 
landscape horticulture, and home 
ned at the Temporary Union 

on Saturday* 



Other exhibits include the Combined 
Arts exhibit in the Library; scene design-- 
and photographs of productions in Schwab 
Audit or ium; student murals and sculpture 
in the Temporary Building; student work 
in home art in the Home Economics Build- 
ing; and original prints of modern 
European artists in Simmons Hall* 



17 SENIORS TO BE INITIATED BY PHI BETA KAPPA 



Seventeen seniors have been elected 
to Phi Beta Kappa, national scholastic 
honor society, and will be initiated on 
Monday, May 16, at the Nittany Lion Inn, 

Dr. L, Larry Leonard, assistant 
professor of political science, will 
speak at the dinner following the ini- 
tiation • 

Seniors elected are Janet E. Long, 
Lee Troy, Birdie L. Berman, Ervin E, 
Williams, Raymond H, Robinson, Gloria J, 
Moulton, Louis H. Levi, Rosemary C, 
Maloney, Edmund L. VanDeusen, and 



Robert J. Lowery, Jr,, all of the 
School of the Liberal Arts, 

Edward P» Wizda, Susan D, Bissey, 
Harriet E. Miller, Lucille A, Thomas, 
and Frances A» Welker, all of the School 
of Education; and Stanley N. Levick and 
Albert J. Kazlauskas, of the School of 
Chemistry and Physics, 



Faculty members who did not receive 
a notice of the dinner and initiation 
should call Dr, Teresa Cohen, professor 
of mathematics and secretary of the 
chapter • 



MINUTES OF THE SENATE MEETING OF MAY 5, 1949 



The College Senate met at 4:10 p,m» 
on May 5, 1949, in Room 121, Sparks Build- 
ing, D e an M, R. Trabue presiding. The 
list of members present is on file in the 
Office of the Registrar. The minutes of 
the last meeting were not read since they 
had been published in the Faculty Bulletin 
for April 11, 1949, 

The secretary read communications 
from the following senators stating they 
would be unable tc be present but would 
send representatives: Prof. C. E. Bul- 
linger, Prof, E. F, Osborn, Prof, E. W« 
Callenbach, and Dr, Helen R, LeBaron, 

Letters were also read indicating 
the names of the elected senators for the 
ensuing two years as follows: 

Chemistry and Physics 

Dr, M, R, Fenske 
Dr. M. L, Willard 
Dr , R, C, Raymond 

Educat ion 

Dr. Paul W. Bixby 
Dr, Kinsley R, Smith 
Dr, William L. Lepley 

Engineering 

Prof. L. J, Bradford 
Prof. A, H. Forbes 
Prof , L. Pere z 



Home Economics 

Prof. M. B. Allgood 
Prof, Ina Padgett 
Prof. M. E, Riegel 

Mineral Industries 

Dr. Eugene P. Klier 
Prof. Evelyn C, Marboe 
Prof, Harold J, Read 

Physical Education and Athletics 

Prof, J. F, Bedenk 
Prof, E. C, Bischoff 
Prof. J, D. Lawther 

Graduate School 

Prof. H. M, Davis 
Prof. R, H. Waters 
Prof, J. J, Gibbons 
Dr. James W. Sinden, Dean's representative 

A letter was read from Prof. E, F. 
Osborn, chairman of the Committee on 
Scholarships and Awards submitting the 
names of persons nominated for awards as 
follows : 
Mr, James Herbert Robinson, The John W. 

White Fellowship 
Mr, Marcel Carvallo and Mr, John Dalbor, 
The John W, White Scholarships in 
Spanish 
Mr, Walter Irvin Murray, the John W, 

White Medal 



The letter stated that these nomina- 
tions had been approved by President Mil- 
ho 1 land . 

The annual report of the Senate Com- 
mittee on Calendar was also received from 
the chairman, Prof. E, 17. Callenbach. 

A letter from Mr. J. 0. Keller re- 
quested the College Senate to designate 
the Centers at Harrisburg, Swarthmore, 
Erie, and Bradford for resident instruc- 
tion under Article 73(a) of "Regulations 
for Undergradurte Students," issue of 
1947-43. This letter wa s referred to 
the Committee on Admissions. 

A letter from Mr. A. W. Stewart, 
Chief Recorder, relative to the applica- 
tion of rule 59, 60, and 61, of the "Reg- 
ulations for Undergraduate Students," 
edition of 1947-48, was referred to the 
Committee on Academic Standards, 



Dr. Moore, chairman of the Committee 
on Committees, requested that the names 



The above comnunicat ions are 
in the Office of the Registrar, 



on 



The Senate Breakfast was announced 
for Sunday morning, June 5 at 9 a »q, at 
the Nittany Lion Inn, by the secretary. 
Tickets will be on sale at the next meet- 
ing of the Senate, June 2, or from Mrs. 
Royer, 8 Armory Building. The price 
will probably be the same as last year. 

Prof. Beede, chairman of the Com- 
mittee on Academic Standards presented 
six petitions for his committee as 
follows : 

CLARENCE PETERS to register at Swarth- 
more for 12 credits during the summer 
sessions. Approved, 

CORINNE KIVNIK to take 6 credits at 
Temple University during the summer 
session. Approved. 

WILLIAM B, RUNS HAW permission to take 
6 credits at the University of Pitts- 
burgh for the summer session. Approved. 

JOHN K. BIXLER, JR. permission to sched- 
ule Math 7 or 64 at Harrisburg for the 
summer session. Approved, 

LOUIS A. EVANGELIST permission to take 
6 credits at Altoona summer session. 
Approved. 

BERNARD J B WACHTER permission to earn 
the last five credits toward his degree 
at the University of Mexico in the summer 
of 1949. Approved., 

The report of the Committee is on 
file in the Office of the Registrar. 

Prof, Bab cock, chairman of the Com- 
mittee on Admissions, presented a report 
for his committee on a change in the en- 
trance requirements for certain curricula 
in Agriculture. The report is on file 
in the Office of the Registrar, 



of the newly-elected senators from 
schools not listed above be sent to 
by May 13, 



him 



Dr. van Ormer representing Prof, 
Bullinger as chairman of the Committee on 
Courses of Study, presented the report of 
his committee in two sections 8 Section 
I is on file in the Office of the Regis- 
trar and S e ction II will be printed next 
week. This report will lie on the table 
for one month. 

Prof. L. A, Richardson, chairman of 
the Committee on Public Occasions, pre- 
sented the report for his committee in 
which two exercises for graduation on 
June 6 were listed. The complete report 
of the committee is on file in the Office 
of the Registrar^, 

Dr. Butcher, for Prof, Osborn, 
file chairman of the Committee on Scholarships 
and Awards, moved that the nominations 



for 
iag, 



R, as read earlier in the neet- 
The Senate so voted. 



award s 
be approved* 



Under th 
Prof, Benton's 
not allowed to 
first three we 
table , It was 
adopt this mot 
cuss ion on the 
negat ively . 

Dr. van 
report, in two 
on Courses of 
and adopted: 

Se cti on I, 
A dm i s s i o n 
ent ering 
lum from 
(page 76 



e heading of old business, 
motion "that students be 
drop a course after the 

eks" was removed from the 
moved and seconded to 

ion. After a general dis- 
motion, the Senate voted 



Ormer moved that the April 7 

sections^ of the Committee 
Study be amended as follows 

page 2. Delete - Change: 
requirements for freshmen 
the Pre-Veterinary curricu- 
Sohedule A to Schedule F 
1949-50 catalog ). 



Section I, page 12. Ps; 
"Drop practicum hours," 

The Senate so voted. 



15 include 



Under the heading of new business 
Prof. Beede offered the following re com- 
mend at ion: 

A student nay earn toward graduation 
at the Pennsylvania State College no 
more than the equivalent of the first 
year of work in his curriculum at a 
one-year center, and no more than 
the equivalent of the first two 
years of work in his curriculum at 
a two— year center. 

In calculating such credits, work 
taken in both regular semesters and 
summer session shall be counted, pro- 
vided such work does not violate 
Rule 86 a 

A student who has been enrolled at 
the Pennsylvania State College shall 
obtain from the head of his depart- 
ment prior to registration, permis- 
sion to take such worlc« 
Since this item was new legislation 
it was tabled for one month 

PENN STATE COLLECTION 



Prof, Babcock, for the Committee on 
Admissions, requested unanimous consent 
of the Senate to waive the requirement 
that the motion (jf his committee lie on 
the table f*r one month. This consent 
being given, the Senate voted to approve 

OF GENERAL 

LIBERAL ARTS FACULTY: The faculty of the 
School of the Liberal A r ts will meet at 
4tl0 p,n, Thursday, May 12, in Room 121, 
s parks Building* 

CHAPEL: Rev. Raymond Shaheen, The 
Evangelical Lutheran Church, Williamsport , 
will speak at chapel services at 11 a.m, 
Sunday in Schwab Auditorium* 

* * • 

HOI-IE SPORTS; Tuesday, May 10, 4 p.m. 
baseball, Villanovaj Friday, May 13, 4 p.m, 
baseball, Pittsburgh; Saturday, May 14, _ 
1 p.m., track, Michigan State, 2:30 p.m, 
baseball, Pittsburgh, and 4 p.m. JV 
lacrosse, Swart hmore Center. 

* * • 

LUNCHEON CLUB: Raymond E, Zimmerman, 
associate professor and chief of the divi- 
sion of mineral preparation, will speak on 
" Econonic and Political Aspects of the 
Solid Fuels Situation in Turkey" at the 
Faculty Luncheon Club meeting on Monday 
noon, May 16. *'•• 

FIVE O'CLOCK THEATRE: "A Cup of Coffee," 
a one-act drama by G . Thomas Lyon, senior 
in arts and letters, will be presented at 
5 ••clock Tuesday, May 10, in the Little 

Theatre, Old Main. 

* » ♦ 

LECTURE: Dr. Harold K, Schilling, pro- 
fessor and head of the department of phy- 
sics, will speak on "Sound and Speech" 
at 7:30 p.m. on Tuesday, May 10, in Room 
117, Osmond Laboratory. The lecture will 
be a feature *f National Hearing Week, 
May 9 to 14. The public is invited* 

. * * 
ORIGINAL PRINTS: The exhibition of lead- 
ing modern European artists in Simmons 
Hall consists of original prints instead 
of reproductions of paintings as pre- 
viously stated. It will continue until 
May 18 as a part of the Combined Arts 
Festival program. 

• * * 

PRIESTLEY LECTURE: The 1949 Priestley 
Lectures delivered by D r » L. A, Audrieth 
on the subject of "Acids, Bases, and Non- 
Aqueous Systems" are now available in 
printed form at $2 per copy. Application 
should be made to George L # McMurtrie, 
Petroleum Refining Laboratory. 

• * t 

McFARLAND AWARD t The first annual D a vid 
Ford McFarland Award for Achievement in 
Metallurgy will be presented at 6:30 p.m. 
Thursday, May 12, at a banquet at the 
Nittany Lion Inn to George V. Luerssen, 
chief metallurgist of the Carpenter Steel 
Co., Reading, and a 1915 graduate of the 
College, The award was established by 
the Penn State chapter, American Society 
for Metals, and named for McFarland, now 
profeaaor emeritus of metallurgy, who 



the requirements for admission in the. 
School of Agriculture, 

There being no further business, 
the Senate adjourned. 

R. M. Gerhardt 
Secretary 
.INTEREST 

retired in 1945 after serving as pro- 
fessor and head of the department of 
metallurgy for 25 years, 

* * * 
PHYSICS COLLOQUIUM: Dr. Douglas W, E. 
Axford, research associate in physics, 
will speak on "Infra-Red Studies of 
Rotational Isomerism" at 4:25 p.m. on 
Tuesday, May 10, in Room 117, Osmond 
Laboratory, 

► LECTURE: Dr. L, L. Bernard, professorial 
lecturer in sociology, will speak on 
Argentina and the present social and 
political conditions there at an open 
lecture in Room 121, Sparks Building, at 
8 p.m. on Tuesday, May 10 e The public 
is invited. Dr. Bernard recently re- 
turned from a four-week trip to Argentina 

* * * 

ELECTED: E. L. Keller, executive assis- 
tant in Central Extension and professor 
and director of engineering extension, 
was elected president of the National 
University Extension Association at the 
annual convention last week in Edgewater 
Park, Miss, Seventy-one colleges and 
universities comprise the association 
which has as its purpose the expansion 
and improvement of the program of exten- 
sion teaching on a national scale. 

* * . 

AT MEETINGS : Seven faculty members par- 
ticipated in the 20th anniversary meeting; 
of the Aoou-tioal Society of America in 
New York, N. Y, last week. They were Dr. 
Eric A, Walker, Layman N. Miller, Dr. Pau? 
M, Kendig, Dr. Norman Davids, Edward G, 
Thurston, and Robert M. Hoover, all of 
the Ordnance Research Laboratory, and Dr. 
H, David Rix, of the department of phy- 
sics. Others attending were Roland E, 
Mueser, Rensler McDowell, Richard Vincent, 
and Francis Wertz, of the Ordnance Re- 
search Laboratory, and Dr, Harold K, 
Schilling, Dr. Wesley L. Nyborg, Dr. Ralp.: 
Simon, John P. Walker, Jr., and Casper L, 
Wo.odbridge, Jr», all of the department of 

physics , 

» * * 

GAMMA SIGMA DELTA: Gamma Sigma Delta, 
agricultural honor society, will hold 
their annual banquet and initiation in 
the Methodist Church social rooms at 
6:30 p.m, on Thursday, May 19, 

* * * 

PI LAMBDA THETA: At the final meeting 
of Pi Lambda T^eta, professional educa- 
tion sorority, to be held at 7:30 p.m. 
on Wednesday, May 11, in Atherton Hall, 
Dr. N e H Murphy will be installed as 
president and Jane Bovie as corresponding 
se cretary , 

* * » 



CANDIDATES FOR BACHELOR LEGREES AT COMMENCEMENT EXERCISES ON JUNE 6, 1949 

Following is a list of candidates for bachelor degrees at Commencement 
Exercises on June 6, 1949. Grades for graduating seniors are due in the Recorder's 
Office, 109 Old Main, before 8 a.m. on Thursday, June 2, 1949. 



SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURE 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

Agricultural and Biological Chemistry 



Ernest George Beinhart 
Louis Patrick D e Nunzio 



Harry Eugene Allison 
Philip Henderson Cease 
Philip Walter Eppley 
Justine Austin Fides 
Charles Binkley Forney 



Paul Edward Andre 
Ma r cu s Roy B a 1 dw i n 
Edgar J. Balliet, Jr. 
Paul L, Barnhart, Jr. 
James Lee Cook 
Wa It e r Wo o d Cook 
Irvin Dietle, Jr. 
Phillip John Dillon 
Robert C. Downie 
George Russell Drumm 
Robert Leland Dymond 



Benjamin Thomas Cannavo 
William Marlin Fennell 
Leonard Dale Kimmel 
Allen Charles McCully 



John Benton Felty 
Maurice James Green 
William Davis Hannigan 
Nicholas Holowatch 



Bruce Shearer Blauch 
James Miller Brewer 
Ralph Edgar Dotterer 
Isaac R. Evans, Jr. 
Carl J. Fuchs, Jr. 
William Robert Graf 
Maria Berta Hughes 



Walter Eckert Beam, Jr. 

Joseph Bernecky 

May g a p. t j t. e Pt-i r.a n In iers 



Shirley P. Hoenstine 
Barbara A. Neidig 

A gricultural Economics 

James Ernest Garrahan 
William Joseph Hanlon 
Theodore Kershberger 
John E. Hughes, Jr. 
Guy Nelson Korman 

Agricultural Education 

Donald Henry Fyock 
Carlos Carlton Harry 
Raymond C. Heimbach 
Theodore Wallace Hoffman 
Ralph Maurice Horst 
Morris Jarrett 
Max Beaver MoMillen 
George A. Melson, Jr. 
Paul Eugene Orner 
Julius Russell 

Agricultural Engineering 

Robert Ralston McCully 
Merton Edward McLean 
Ralph Lester Oyler 
Willard F. ^issmiller 

Agronomy 

John Warner Kimmel 
John Richard Nehoda 
Ramon Lee Peterson 
James Curtis Sentz 

Animal Husbandry 

Bruce Lamar Miller 
Lois Ann Peters 
Cole Britton Price, Jr. 
Joseph Herman Robbins 
William W. Twaddell 
Joan Murray Schlosser 
Laura Jane Schrock 

Bacteriology 

Theresa Eleanor Kilinski 
Fiorina Rolore Olivia 



Donald Eugene Nickol 
Francis Henry Tolan 



Raymond Lawrence Maule 
Stanley Kenneth Morris 
John William Shultz 
John Joseph Stahurski 
Frank Wordley Tuppeny, Jr. 



Frank Stoner, Jr. 
Clifford Warren Stroud 
Maurice George Verbeke 

Boyd William Voke s 
Robert J. Wagner 
Robert William Walker 
Ross Wakefield Watts 
Lorin Stanley W e igard 
Martin Benjamin Yarnall 
Robert Eugene Yoder 



John Brooks Semple 
George Shut e 

Harry Harris Yfatt 
Joseph Winton 



James MoSherry Shriver 
Charles Warren Tucker 
Gerard James Weiser 
David Samuel Whitenack 



Albert Gordon S ne infeld 

Harold Edgar Stewart 

Kenneth Guy Trimble 
James Emerson Work 
Helen Elizabeth Young 
Amos Sensenig Zimmerman, Jr* 



Don Miguel Peoples 
Florence Redlich 



-2- 



Ralph S, Anderson, Jr. 
Herman Joseph Auker 
Richard La Mar Beisel 
William Herbert Bingham 
William Robert Bodine 
Samuel A', Bomgardner, Jr. 
August Ernest Branding 
John McKinney Buckalew 
Joseph Mullin Clark 
Paul Francis Corbiere 
Clarence Edward Craver 
William Russel Culp 
Robert Earl Davis 
William Jacob D e isley 



George Armstrong 
Richard Clayton Bedger 
Kenneth Raymond Bromfield 
John Breniser Carey 
Clifford Byers Carts 
Geoffrey B, Coleman 
Grant Davis 
Robert Mahlon Davis 
Paul ^obert D r ury 
William H. Echelmeyer, Jr. 
Orin Lynn Frank 



SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURE (oon'd) 
Dairy Husbandry 

William Graham Disque 
Robert Woods Edinger 
Lawrence Arthur Farb 
Ralph Austin Fritts 
Emil B. Godiksen, Jr. 
Fred Hazelwood, III 
Samuel Frank Henry 
Clifford L. Hinkelman 
Norman W. Ho oven, Jr. 
Marcel Cowan Hughes 
Coyte Hunter, Jr. 
Francis Levi Kirk 
Richard M, Langdon 



Fore stry 

Calvin F. Glattfelder 
Russell J. Hironimus 
Harold W. H cker, Jr. 
Warren Wittke Kock 
John Raymond Longwell 
George Harper Me couch 
Charles Sautter Merroth 
Raymond Marshall Miller 
Caleb L. Morris, Jr. 
Arthur Edward Promis 
Donald W» Riddagh, Jr. 

Horticulture 



Loron Wood Leonard, Jr» 
John Gordon Lowry 
Wi 11 i am A . McC 1 o s k ey 
John Ernest Melchor 
Hervey McCord Painter 
Frank Leslie Shope 
Richard Wilson Snyder 
Fred Stein 

Francis Charles Turner 
William Hibler White 
Eugene Trout Wolff 

William Harrison Yarnell 
James Louis Yetter 



James P. Rosemergey, Jr» 
Robert Swartz Ross 
Robert ^enry Rumpf 
Thomas Emmet Russell 
David Shapiro 
John Shapoczka 
Robert Dutton Shattuck 
John ■'■nomas Steimer 
Ralph Michael Veverka 
Robert Lee Young 



William McKeage Clark 
Stephen Kiehart 
Richard Charles Koch 
Robert Reed McLane 
Edward Milton McMillin 
Robert Carroll O'Knefski 
Charles Andrew Paoly 
Edward Simon Peetz 
Charles W, Pfanstiel 



Pearl Mary BiHer 
Charlotte Isabel Leach 



Alan Berkovritz. 



Paul R ichard Beattie 



Louis Fred Rave, Jr# 
LeRoy Donald Schaller 
Nancy Spencer Schaller 
George Levi Sedwick, Jr, 
Joan Evans S e ltzer 
Olin Shuey Simpson 
Raymond Philip Singer 



Medical Technology 

Hope Irene Madigan 
Mary Jane Pollard 

Poultry Husbandry 

Philip Johnson Hassinger 

Wood Utilization 



Derrill David Smith 

Robert Jerry Snyder 
John Franklin Styer, Jr. 
Joseph Edwin Wentzler 
Donald Ray White 
Walter Edison Wood 



Shirley Joan Rhodes 
Lillian Charlotte Skrabafc 



Ernest Orlando Kistler, Jr. 



Richard Dellwya Blake ly 



Zoology and Entomology 
Barbara Dor sett Amber son 



Louis John Abate 
William Gi en Airgood 
Lewis Arabia 
James Moore Aurand 
Gerald Clinton Berry 



SCHOOL OF CHEMISTRY AND PHYSICS 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

Chemical Engineering 

Douglas Gourlay Brace 
Paul Greiner Briggs 
Everett W, Campbell 
Gustave Melvin Carlson 
Marcel E, Carvallo 



William David Charles 
Russell Harry Collins 
Lewis Haze It on Conklin 
Leon Wilfred Cottrell 
Harry James Dabagian 



-3- 



SCHOOL OF CHEMISTRY AND PHYSICS (oon'd) 
Chemical Engineering (con'd) 



James Shannon Dixon 
Luther Dale Dromgold 
Frank Nelson Fagan, Jr. 
LeRoy Barnes Fisher 
George Peter Gabriel 
Robert Raymond Gehrett , 
Philip Wilson Ghaner 
George R. Gillespie 
John Joseph Haladyna 
James Dallas He inly 
Thomas Joseph Jordan 
Harold Judd 
Joseph Paul Kantor 
Walter Steven Kmak 
Roger Berne 11 Knowles 
Stanley W. La so ski, Jr. 
Wa'llis .-.lien Lloyd 



Alexander Wayne Bouchal 
Eric Davison Brown 
Frank Vernon F a ir 
Arthur G... Grotyohann 
Richard ^cith Hill 
Malcolm Bruce Johnston 
Margaret Viola Jones 



JwO seph • Lawrence Buydos 
Richard Wilson Crawford 
Frank Fekete, Jr. 
Robert Grant Hooker 
William R. Hollabaugh 
Charles B. Hood, Jr. 
Paul J, Jeffers, Jr. 



David McNitt Barron 
Thomas Coyle 
John Donald Cronin 
James Parker Dietz 
James H enrv Doyle 



Bernard Barnett 
Richard Eugene Black 
Solomon Julius' Blatt 
Sylvio Michael Bonaoci 
Abr am Bosler 
William Adam B yj| 
Millard M. Braun stein 
Philip Brooks 
William E. Brown, Jr. 
Robert Campbell Burns 
Frank Bur stein 
Floyd S. Cantrell 
Donald Irvin Cope 
Richard Dale Costlow 
Charles William Delp 



John F, Antonette 
Daniel C. Daube 
James 6, Dunaway 
Floyd Leslie Echols 
Ramon B. Garfinkel 
Arnold Guldberger 
Flora C. Greenwood 



Charles J. Marcincavage 
Henry Kryder Mattern 
Robert Kenneth Mays 
Harold G. Miller, Jr. 
Robert Leland ^iller 
Jr. Robert B, Mitchell 

David Raymond Nalven 
Russell J. Nickerson 
Ray Lynnfield Nickola 
Paul Feron Oberheim 
Louis Noah Parent 
Walter Robert Pas coe 
Fred Adrian Pctrunak 
Frank Sedley Phinney 
Sanford George Robbins 
Richard Melville Roeder 

Chemistry 

Ronald David Kane 
Ralph Spencer Leonard 
Stewart R. Montgomery 
John Patrick Mullaney 
Marguerite E. Naumann 
Barbara Joan Parker 
Norman B. Patterson 

Commercial Chemistry 

William Griffith Jones 
William ^lwood Laughlin 
Harry John Litsch 
William E . McKinstry 
Charles M. Noel 
Theodore August Petry 

Physics 

Frank Crumback Fryburg 
Thomas C. Hutchison 
Donald Mahan Jewart 
Robert Douglas Miller 
Julian ^einheimer 

Pre -Medical Curriculum 

Robert Vernon Dermott 
William Chester Dudek 
Albert James Fessler 
Alan Edmund ^'isher 
Patrick Paris G a n a 
Michael Nick Halikis 
James Lawrence Jenkins 
Albert J. Kazlauskas 
William David Lambert on 
Stanley Nelson Leviok 
Ernest W e llman Lowe 
Phyllis Jean Mowrer 
Hugh Francis O'Donnell 
Theodore Pirozek 
Sidney Earl Pulver 

Science 



Huston B. Killian 
Bernice Mary Li 1 ley 
Charle s Leo McBride 
Elizabeth C. McMahan 
Howard R. Maxwell, III 
Charle s Fillmore Mebus 
George Thomas Miller 



James Alvin Rolls 
Floyd Eugene Romesberg 
Terrell Louis Ruhlman 
Jack Chauvin Schwander 
Cloyd William Sellers 
Clarence E. Si m p Son ^ j r# 
Walter Henry Stauffenberj 
Howard LeRoy Stether s 
Theodore Mark Swain 
James Frederick Thompson 
Anthony Ralph Trotta 
Charles Howard Umstead 
Royburn Walter Wick 
Theodore J'oseph Williams 
Robert Alan W'iss -w 
John Zebiak, Jr, 



Jack Repas 

William Gerald Sheehan 
Lewis Stoddard Stone 
Andrew Torok 

Harry Stanley Wasley 
Robert Charles Witman 
Kathryn Anna Yurick 



Thomas Edward Popoveo 
Alan Neil Richter 
Joseph William Salatka 
Robert William St owe 
Edward Joseph Szymanski 
Edward Richard Vanecek 



William Hugh Schilling 
James William Schmeer 
Ethel Jean Senkovits 
Kenton Holt Underwood 



James Herbert Robinson 
Robert Eugene Sandy 
Sidney Alexander Sidor 
John Wesley Stoker 
Wo If or d Swimmer 
Joseph Philip Viglione 
Robert Palmer W eaver 
Harold Richard Wei daw 
Robert Bruce Wenner 

Edward West 
Lnuis Joseph Wilkie 
Raymond Alvin Williams 
William Russell Wright 
John Gerard Zora 



Eleanor Joan Morawski 
George Washington Mouery 
Frank William Philippbar ' 
TVilliam Frank Ross 
Patricia Helen I. R.wheny 
Eleanor Ruth Trunick 
Clayton Albert Wilson 



~4. 



SCHOOL OF 
BACHELOR 



EDUCATION 
OF ARTS 



Barbara Lucy Bean 
Rita Nancy Beernan 
Susan Dean Bissey 
Paul Joseph Bove 
George B, B roW n, Jr» 
Ros.ly ne M« Bugen 
Mary Louise Coleman 
Mary Agnes Conahan 
Naomi Cooper 
Grant C. Davis 
Margaret M, Denion 
Joann M, Sinodshofer 
Robert Matt heir Engler 
Ruth M» F edernan 
Shirley Mae Foulke 
Jean M, Fpankenf ie Id 
Robert David Geise 
Sidney Gold 
William E. Griffiths 
Jeane Harris Gulliver 
Richard Martin Hersh 
Lois Mae He yd 
Ralph Frederick Hirst 
David Martin Hoke 



Mary Louise Ackison 
Robert Richard Benson 
Constance R» Black 
Margaret ivl r.ry Breece 
Hugh Carlton Daily 
Harriet Joan Denby 
Frances Elise Engel 
Adelaide E, Finkelston 
Mollie Marie Geise 
Joan P. Gerstenlauer 



Michael Andreosky 
Dale Howard Arner 
Marilyn Jean Badger 
Richard B. Barager 
Jean Mr.rie Barrett 
Stella Dorothy Biga 
John Harry Boycs 
Doris Goess Dames 
Florence II . Elderton 
Marjorie Bell Erskine 
Dorothy Marie Fowler 
Dolores Rita Gale 
Marjorie Anne Gorham 
John H, Granahan 
Joan Green 

Durbin C. Hoffman, Jr. 
Marion Ann Holmes 
George Honyak 
Rocco M. Iannetta 
Fay Sylvia Janowitz 
'I'honas Jay Jenkins 
Mary Elisabeth Kapp 



Education 

Mary Louise Hump ton 
Josephine M. Jackson 
Laura E, Johnston 
Willard F, Jones 
Julia Mary Kalbach 
Irene Mary Kochera 
Dorothy J. Kurylo ski 
William Paul Kushner 
Jocleta G. M. Kyle 
Ralph Gene Lantz 
Marion B. H. Little 
Charles Richard Losh 
Louise Lyman 
Virginia M. B McCanna 
Linda Cheers McGlashan 
Ann Catherine McLaughlin 
Mary Joyce McLaughlin 
Ruth J. Mart era na 
Sara Rose Messina 
Betty J. R. Miller 
Diana Nocera 
Grace C. O'Donnell 
Natalie P. R. O'Shell 
Gladys Mae Pendleton 

P sychology 

Betty Anne Gibson 
Doris Jean Hootman 
Helen Joanne Houtz 
Beverly E, ICantor 
Joanne Blum Kapnek 
Albert Keller 
Joan F. MoBrearty 
Andrew Horace McClure 
Harriet Eleanor Miller 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

Robert Ralph Kepple 
June ™helna Kircher 
Barbara Faith Knabb 
Jean Marie LaBar 
Renee Lightstone 
Patricia Ann Lyon 
Mar en Syvertsen McKay 
Stanley Joseph Makowski 
Lawrence Richard Mehal 
Reynold C. Meneeley, Jr # 
Gladdy Lou wilier 
Marjorie Mae Musser 
Paul Leonard Mutzabaugh 
Ruth Ada Neiman 
William Herman Oeser 
Walter Weidman Palmer 
Marjorie L. Park 
Sara Joanne Pepper 
Arlene Louise Perry 
Norma A, Prutzman 
Lois Katherine Resler 

Industrial Arts 



Helen M. M. Pierce 
Irene Lucille Pile ski 

Barbara Ann Porter 
William Hable Preston 
Carolyn Josephine Reese 
William Vi ncen t Repsher 
Judith Marie Retort 
Mary Jane Miller Schwing 
Constance Pearl Seidler 
Michael Si Ian 
Sidney Blair Simon 
Clarence Elmer Sipple 
Joseph Stephen Skof 
Merrill C. Snook, Jr. 
Ruth Seely Snyder 
Margaret M. R, Spencer 
Saul Sperling 
Sarah Anna St over 
Marion Margaret Swetlick 
Jean ouise Terry 
Robert Millard Tressler 
Florence Emma Wakeling 
Edward Paul Wizda 
John Glen Yost, Jr # 



Nancy Parent 
Sonia Podolnick 
Lois Barbara Radiss 
Francis Anthony Scolieri 
Elizabeth Joan Shrum 
Joseph William Tompkins 
Louis Allan Walker 
Frances .*nn Welker 
Frances Marie Winters 



Joseph Andrew Re z nick 
Marian J. M. S a 11a ok 
Grace Margaret Schilder 
Joseph Phillip Sedule, Jr, 
Ruth Marcia Sicherman 
Norman F . H. Silverberg 
Daniel Francis Sk e ath 
Shirley Ann Smith 
Albert Emerson Snyder, Jr. 
Donald Charles Swavely 
Lucille Audrey Thomas 
Alice C a -fci ier i ne Tfalsh 

Helen Sherrick Ward 
Alfred William Willier 
Beverly Jeanne Williams 
Marion Marie Wilson 
Elizabeth Suiter Wise 
Hr.ro Id Francis Witman 
William Wilson Wolf ei-sherger 
Elizabeth Wasters Zinn 



Chester Lewis Angn ] n 



H.-^i-olii Cook Myers^ Jr« 



Richard Anthony Cujrfco 



-5- 



Shirlianne Bush 
Robert G eor g e Chacona 
Margaret C, S. English 
Barbara Winnifred Gillet 



Stanley Ira Alprin 
Nicholas Badida 
Hazel Jane H. Blair 
Virginia Deanq Brown. 
John Raymond onnelly 
Frank Paul Fabyanio. 
Frederick H. Fuller 
Philip Crandall Godfrey 
Frances Anthony Ianni 



Thaddeus Carlisle Best 
Michael Bur da 
Merrill Irvin Hughes 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION (con»d) 

Music Education 

Ruth Allora Graber 
Clarence James Kooher 
Paul Burgner Mar go If 
Steve Raytek # Jr» 

Psychology 

Charlotte R. Jaquish 
Edward M, Kalanevioh 
John Koninetz, Jr. 
Ann Elizabeth Lantz 
Harry Laskey 
Frances Laura Lohr 
Betty Jeanne Mayer 
Claire K. Murphy 

Vocational Industrial Education 

William Harold Morrison 
William Bruce Rager 
Joseph Albert Smertneck 



Floyd Edwar.d Schlegal 
George Wisler Thomas 
Rudolph Leonard Yannitto 



Robert Andr 
Betty Louis 
Earle Alvin 
Vaida Riggs 
Roy Walter 
Paul Daniel 
G-enevieve T 
John Edward 



ew Newt o n 
e Reed 
Rice, Jr. 

Ronber ger 
•Schr-11-cr 

aras 
Taylor 



Charles Benjamin Snyder, Jr. 
William ^enry Snyder, Jr» 
Carl Eugene Stump 



SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 



Robert Dorman Baker 
Roland Henry Bates 
Girard Lester Calehuff 
Francis Herbert Ebersole 
Jacque Roper Edwards 
James Francis Farrell 
Wayne Huxley Fenton 
Frederick Mertins Fisher 



Theodore Bacha 
Herbert Beokhard 
Joseph James Brennan 
Robert F. Feltault 
Warren Levi Gilbert 
Thomas J. Giles 
Daniel R. Hanson 
Alfred G. Kemmerer 



Aeronautical Engineering 

Edward William Horn 
^■o sella Katz 
Alfred Joseph Koorex 
John ^i chard Lux 
Jack Rhind Macaulay 
Harry Kenneth Mellinger 
Charles Amos Neyhart 
Warren Henry Owen 

Architectural Engineering 

Paul M. Kossman 
Alfred L, MacMoran 
John Douglas Miller 
George W. Policastro 
Jack W. Risheberger 
William Andrew Roach 
Albert Karl Sauer 
Lawrence M, Scalera 



Richard Edward Pearson 

Richard Eugene Reed 
John Reginald Rhoads 
Charles Herbert Seaton 
Charles Arthur Stiles, Jr. 
Edmund Michael Walacavage 
Warren William Yenney, Jr» 



Edward Bruce Smith 
William John Spies 
Charles Edward loth 

John William Irostle 
Robert Joseph Wickham 
Jack Will iams 
Wyllian King Ycckey 



Architecture 



Herbert Calvin Anderson 
H, Byron Gates, Jr» 
Frank P« Graham, Jr, 



Robert Leroy Cobaugh 
John Gerard Costello 
John Charles Deck 
Thomas Barbe Dilley 
Richard Thomas Dobson 
Alan Gottlieb Feldman 
James Samuel Fluke 
William A, Garlow, Jr. 
Thomas Anglin Gresha.ni 
Robert Louis Haenel 
Edward James Hammond 
John Har«ld Harbold 
Janes Frank Havhraan 



Allan Hugh Grossman 
Ellis G. Revness 
William H. Sippel, Jr, 

Civil Engineering 

Charles Nelson Hurl 
Charles William Jacobs 
Felix T. Eitlinski 
William F. Klingensnith 
Paul Michael Koch 
Leon Elbert Langford 
James Herbert Little 
Donald David Meisel 
Donald Lee Mowry 
Carl Joseph Nordblom 
Joseph Harry Pa laskey 
Harry Pidluski 



William Bruce Sloan, Jr # 
Paul Aiken s Waterman ' 



Saniuel Edward Probst 

Robert Henry Reinauer 
Albert Edward Rollins 
Peter Philip Santianni 
David Calvin Sins 
Donald Lewis Tanner 
Vincent Albert Toepp 
Charles Jack Trew 
Patrick Joseph Turner^ Jr« 
Aldo Joseph Veronesl 
Thomas Alfred Vogan 
William Charles Williams 



MMMM 



-6- 



Franklin J. Arner, Jr. 
George W. Ashman, Jr« 
Edward Ehredt Atkinson 
John Kenneth. Bates, Jr. 
Albert E. Baxendale 
Herbert E. Blaicher, Jr. 
John William Bornholdt 
David Marsh Briner 
Joseph R. Burgess, Jr. 
•Ralph Boyd Calvert 
Robert L. Casselberry 
Joseph Daniel Clark 
Chester J» Cobosco 
Harry E. Cornish, Jr. 
Sheldon Parker Detwiler 
Robert Eugene Dougher 
Gerald I. Erway 
Ralph JohnEttinger 
Max Robert Feehrer 
Donald Francis Foreman 
John William Francis 
Donald A. Fredrickson 
Robert Louis Golden 
Clinton Harvey Grace 



Le 6"fi" Ah con a 
Robert William Arnold 
George Fenlon Bearer 
Robert Donald Bernhard 
Seymour Harold Biederman 
Ray Ardell Bland 
Robert B. Bossier, Jr. 
Walter G. Bowditch, Jr. 
John Edward Brasco 
Richard Fleet B rown 
Charle s Ray Bryson 
Jesse Fox Burley 
Ralph A. Calderone 
David Buchanan Cloud 
Dell Thomas DeMar 
John E. DeWolf.III 
Robert Charles Dieruff 
Paul Michael Droder 
Joseph Michael Egan 
William M. Ewing a Jr. 
James K, Field 
Robert D. Fowler 
Robert Masters Goss 
Frederick R. Griffiths 
Howard Hagler 



SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING (con'd) 
Electrical Engineering 

Edgar Jodon Harter 
George J, Hasslacher, III 
James S. Holtzinger 
John Hoffman Hopkins 
George Leroy Hotchkiss 
Eugene Thomas Janiczek 
Eugene John Kashmar 
Hugh Rieker Kennedy 
Mark Henry Ketner 
Paul Luther Kolarik 
Haley Fisk Lewis 
Joseph Clemens Lohman 
Andrew Martin Marcinko 
Russell Collins Marker 
Charles Robert Martin 
Richard Herman Meier 
William G. Merritt 
Joseph N. Mitskavich 
Michael Nakonechny 
Paul Eugene Nelson 
Donald Richard Paul 
Charles Scott Phelan 
Harold Henry Rahn, Jr. 

Industrial Engineering 

William M. Hancock 
Claude W, Hart man 
Merle Riley Hartman 
James Lewis Hart sock 
John Linus Hayes 
Henry Herman, Jr. 
Robert Dean Hetrick 
John Warren Holmes 
Charles G, Howard 
Franklin D. Johnstone 
Robert Wilder Jones 
Robert August Kaufman 
Thaddeus S. Komorowski 
Henry John Krueger 
Raynond V. Ksiazek 
Arthur M. Labov'itz 
John Fisher Lammey 
Saul Levinson 
William P. Mallory 
Harold Joseph Marcus 
Henry S. Mellinger 
Robert Leslie Novak 
Donald Franklin Nuber 
Robert Steelman Ogden 
John Joseph O'Neill 

Mechanical Engineering 



Fred T .. -".dams 
James Irving Adams 
Joseph James Agosta 
Donald Eugene Artz 
Warren Stone Ashton 
William Perry Belden 
Ray Frederick Boedecker 
Joseph Roland Bourne 
Richard John Carpenter 
George Womrath Chapman, 



Daniel Thomas Cottone 
Charles ^dward Dandois 
Eugene Paul Davis 
Miles Martin Davis 
Lemoine J. Derrick, Jr , 
Eugene Thomas Doyle 
Walter J, Fallows, Jr, 
Kenneth Nels Flodin 
John Alfred Fogle 
Jr.Larry Locuson Gerwig 



Donald Glenn Reinhard 
Carl Richard Reiter 
Junior Leroy Rittenhouse 
Richard Stanley Rogus 
Ernest Willis Schleicher 
John Albert Shiffler 
Lawrence E. Sienietowski 
Donald Gerald Snyder 
George Anthony Stiftinger 
Lester Edward Stine 
David W e sley Stitely 
Elmer Oscar Stone 
Milton C u tler Stone 
John Marvin Swigart 
Augustus Orloff Thomas 
Robert Vernon Titus 
Thomas Paul Turnbull 
John Henry ^uttle 
Melvin Irvin Widrow 
Glenn Smith Williamson 
Stanley Joseph Witanek 
Reuben Edward Wolfe 
Lawrence Raymond Yorgy 



Clayton Arthur Richmond, Jr, 
Joseph Frank Rigotti 
Frances Louise Rogers 
John Raymond Romine 
John Robert Roney 
Lawrence Louis Rosenfelt 
John Walt Roth, Jr. 
Austin Rozet 
David McDowell Rumbaugh 
Howard Harold Sands 
Harold Lincoln S a unders 
Roland Edward Seely 
Bennie Andrew Slupek 
Norbert G e orge Smolukas 
Ralph Edward S piker 
Roland Howell Steele 

Nicholas Supron 
Allan Vincent Tait 
James Louis Taylcr 
Louis William omayko 
Walter Ford T urnbull, Jr. 
Edgar Chandler Weaver 
Newton William Weiss 
Robert Nelson Zeiger 



John Calvin Grenfell 
Donald William Grimm 
Stanley Gurak 
Raymond A. G U y er ^ j r# 
Lester Stephen Hackenberry 
Howard Louis Hansen 
William E^ W ard Harsch 
Frederic Allen Hicks 
Albert Hirshfield 
Robert Stanley Jacobus 



-7- 



SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING (oon'd) 
Me chanioal Engineering (oon'd) 



Allan Howard Johnston 
Donald George Jupena 
Robert Paul Kapp 
Donald Frederick Keck 
Harold Carl Kersteen 
Donald Patrick K e rwick 
Emerson D ale Ketternan 
John Eugene Knarr 
Chester L. ICtppenhaver 
George Bruce Krug 
Richard s . Lashley 
Stuart Lamar Latsha 



Jack Lilly Acker 
Margaret G. Alexander 
Nancy Neal Ault 
Patricia Anne Babbitt 
Shirley' Louise Babp 
Evelyn liar ie Belli s 
Mary Jane Blizzard 
Ruth Florence Brown 
Kathryn E llen Brucher 
Ma d e ly n R ut h Bu sh 
Eleanor Helene Che sney 
Margaret Lecron Coffnan 
Carolyn Edna Coon 
Mary E, G« Crider 
Margaret J. Cunningham 
Sarah Ann '-'urry 
Lesley Joan Cushnan 
Marian Schade Dills 
Cynthia Janney Doan 
Grace Anna Ebersole 
Emily J. H. Eggert 
Beverly J. Eldridge 
Delores D, Ferguson 
Lois Ethel Flynn 
Cordelia J. Foresman 
Catherine L. ^razier 
Helen Gumrot 
Janet M . Gustafson 



John Martin Boltz 
Roland G, Gfimsley 
Donald "obei*t Heard 
John Gat ins Kemper 
Edward John ICnia'z 
Tliona s Madigan 



William Charles McLain 
Eugene Jeno Martin 
Vincent James Maai 
Kenneth H. Miller 
Robert Hall Moore 
Gordeon L. Morgret 
Joseph Orma Palmiter 
Kenneth A. Pickering 
Joseph E. Policelli 
William G. Reynolds 
John Louis Rindosh 
Harold R* Sehultz 

SCHOOL OF HOME ECONOMICS 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

Home Economics 

Marion Hall 
Mary Edith Harris 
Claire Hillstrom 
Dorothy Jean Huber 
Jean Pauline Hunger 
Mar ye lien Inboden 
Dorothy L. Jansen 
Marilyn Grace Kehrli 
Peggy Brooks Kester 
Phyllis Jean Kline 
Dorothy L. Knowle s 
Mary E, Kuzman 
Marjorie M. Leary 
Mabel Louise Leech 
Camilla Ann Lovett 
Janet Flora Lyons 
Susan Annette McClelland 
Edith G. McClintock 
Barbara Jean McCracken 
Ruth Rebecca McWhirter 
Arlene Louella Mack 
Mary Kat hryn' Madeira 
Mary Louise Mahaffey 
Phyllis May Ma s k 
Lois Jean Miller 
Barbara JoAnn Morris 
Mary M, J. M yer 
Lorraine D. Munz 

Hotel Administration 

William H. Parkhill 
Frank J. Pessolano 
Robert Emmet Ritz 
Walter I. Shaffer, Jr. 
C 1 ar k William Sharon 
Everett Gerlach Sneath 



Francis Carl Schwenk 
Steven Stanley Silwones 
Kenneth -"-lien Sinons 
Andrew John Sottile 
William Frederick Stahl 
Melvin Frank Stoops 
George Edward Turnbull 
Robert Franklin Waltenbaugh 
Robert Gregory White 
George Edward Yockey 
George Harrison Seidel 
Francis Joseph Shinaly 



Ruth Florence Mursch 
Nancy Ann Neiner 
Elsalou 01 sen 
Dorothy Frances Park 
Elizabeth May Parkhurst 
Kathryn Marie Peters 
Mildred Jo Pliska 
Beatrice Marie Rigling 
Shirley Zettle ^obinson 

Jane Rodgers 
Doris A, F. Rowe 
Margaret Elizabeth Schaney 
Marjorie Kathryn Scharf 
Dorothy Ruth Schubert 
Dorothy Elizabeth Shenot 
Joanne Mildred Snyder 
Edna J, G # Sp ear ]_y 
Mary Arlene Spencer 
Lois Merilda Steele 
Janice Stevenson 
Phyllis Carol Tamor 
Alma Lee Thrasher 
Marcia Jean Udine 
Helen Lowry Wilcox 
Frances Laurine Wilson 
Virginia Taylor Wilson 
Betty Jane Yurick 
Lorraine Inez Zimmerman 



Battista Faul Sister 

John Robert Stevenson, III 

JackElliott Uhler 

Donald David Wells 

John Yetter Wills, III 



Charlotte Joan Abbott 
Jeanne'WIelene Abroms 
Marjorie Myrtle Allan 
Evelyn May Armstrong 
Evelyn' Faith Ball 
Ruth Ivel Ballard 
Donald Cather Barnes 
Nanette W. Bartow 
Charles William Bartsch, 
Alan Irwin Baskin 
William J. Betler, Jr. 
Bernard S. Bezar 
Charles J. Birkman, Jr. 
Robert E. Boger 
Anne Cluinn Boyd 
Harry H. Breneman, Jr. 
Frederick A. Brennan 
Joan M. II. Brenner 
Louise Ritchey Brice 
Sally M, Brooke 
Clinton Howard Brooks 
Harold Elmer Brown 
Elaine C. Buechner 
Bettie Jane Burket 
Marie Caccese 
Clara May Carns 
Sidney Cohen 
Eloise C. Cook 
Mary Arlene Craine 
Ralph G. Crcmleigh 
Barbara Davie s 
Beverly Ann Davis 
William John Davis 
Michael Robert Deckman 
Edgar H. DeGraeve 
Charlotte J. S. Delp 
Frank S. Delp, Jr. 
Mark Sampson DelVecchio 
Jean Iladley DuBois 
Claire F. R. Earnshaw 
Arthur Ellis 
John William E nglish 
Ellis Elwood Erdnan 
Henry George Fiehler 
Richard Fisher 
Kennye C, F gel 
Yolanda V, Formando 
Miriam E. Frankel 
Mary Elizabeth Frew 
Charles A. Fulnon 
Shelly Gallanter 
Margaret Joan Geltz 
Virginia C. G ilbcrt 
George R. Ginty 
Adelle Shirley Goldberg 
William Isaac Goldberg 
Marilyn Joan Goodman 
Alfred W. Goodyear, III 
Morton Harold Green 
Julie R. Ha low 
John II . Hamer 
Phyllis May Harkin 
Carol Ann Hecht 
Jacqueline S. Heckert 
David William Heinze 
George Daniel Ileiss 



SCHOOL OF THE LIBERAL ARTS 
BACHELOR OF ARTS 

Arts and Letters 

Elizabeth A. Hemphill 
Mary Alice Hodgson 
Dennie W. Boggard, Jr. 
Charle s A. Horn, Jr. 
Jane C. Hostetter 
Ralph S. Illingworth 
Margaret Ann Irwin 
Linda Mae Jacob son 
Jr* Dorothy E. Johnston 
Robert Allen Kaplan 
Caroline M, Karchncr 
Anthony J. Kerin, Jr. 
Winfred M, King 
Patricia R, Kinkead 
Doris L. Histler 
Mayn-rd R. ICohler, Jr. 
Donald J. Kopelnan 
June Clemens Kratz 
Ralph Bernard Laporta 
Phyllis M. Laudenslager 
E dward Wi 1 liam Lawle s s 
Robert Harvey Leeper 
Annette S. Lefkowitz 
Walter L. Letkiewicz 
Louis Heller Levi 
Rosella Levine 
Sylvia Levy 

Donald Sherwood Little 
Stanley M. Lourimore 
Richard Bishop McCown 
John Reading McHaffie 
Donna M. McLaughlin 
Patricia I. McLaughlin 
James Maxey MacMillan 
Theodore Ralph Mann 
Joseph Raymond Manno 
Harvey Gunn Marcy 
Catherine E. Markle 
Donald M. Marvin, Jr. 
Lila Jane Meisgeier 
Edward John Merges 
William D . Me r ry ma n 
William T. Morris 
Gloria Jeanette Moult on 
C ar o ly n Ma e Mo we r y 
Barclay Maurice Moyer 
Jack Moore Murr 
Romaine Cole Murray 
Alfred George Musrey 
Warren S imp so n Mye r s 
Nancy North 
John Robert Paffrath 
Shirley Louise Peet 
Mary Glenn Pennell 
Angela L. Piccino 
Lawrence Paul Pinno 
David Norman Plessett 
Christie Ann Post 
F. Sims Pounds, Jr. 
Constance E, Preble 
Peter Ralph Prifti 
Marie E. Prutzman 
Robert William Rabold 
Henry Eaton Rea, Jr. 
Lois Helen Reese 
Claire Reicklin 



George William Rhoad 
Carolyn Augusta Rice 
David Chalmer Rice, Jr. 
Pearl Frances Rice 
William Charles Ricketts 
Charles Cassimer Robinson 
Raymond Henry Robinson 
Mary Josephine Roessner 
Barbara Anne Rosenberger 
Beecher Foulke Russell 
Walter Ronald Sapp 
George Bernard Saunders, Jr 
Consuelo Elaine Schaffer 
William Harry Schiele 
Joseph Harry Schultz 
Sylvia Schwartz 
Joseph David Shein, II 
Janet Mae Shute 
Robert Paul Simpson 
Jack Sirott 
Ernest ^ndrew Sladics 
Frederick William Smith 
George Washington Smith 
Richard Albanus Smith 
Edward Solomon, Jr, 
Charles Ro.bert Sowash 
Howard Curtis Sparks 
Shirley Pauline Spector 
Kemit Eugene Staaf 
Elizabeth Ann Stanley 
Leonard David Stein 
Elizabeth Ann Stevenson 
Betty Jeanne Stump 
John William Sullivan 
Jacob Hessler Sweigart,III 
Charles F, Teitelman 
Rachel B. W. Thomas 
Tfilliam Samuel Thomas 
Ivan Bell Thompson 
Robert Dickson Thompson 
John Louis Tiley 
Barbara jinn Titus 
Leo Troy 
Bernard Udis 
Martin Richard Veater 
Albert Verbits 
Raymond Saul Visk 
Philip Augustus Walter 
-rthur George Ward, Jr, 
Charle s Edmund Waring 
G er a 1 d Wi 1 1 iam Wa s sum 
Lloyd Doutrich White, Jr, 
Virginia G, L. Wilde 
June Charlotte Wiley 
Theodore G. Y7ilhelm, Jr. 
Betty Jean Williams 
Ervin Eugene Williams 
Mitchell Hayes Williams 
Ben Hudson Wilson, Jr. 
William Francis Wood 
James Kenneth Woodworth 
Lee Summer Worri low- 
Paul Peter Yevich 
Florence Zalicouitz 



-9- 



SCHOOL OF THE LIBERAL /JITS (con'-d) 



Anna Mae Addy 
He man Stephen Aion 
Edward M. Aiken, III 
Robert Oliver Altnan 
Edward Harding Arns by- 
Francis II. Armstrong 
Bernard Mandel Ashner 
Charles V. Ashurst 
Marjorie Mary Badwey 
Doris Mitylene Baily 
Charles K. Bair 
Fred Stephen Barrouk 
Amr.to Frank Basile 
Peter Michael Bates 
Elner A. Belfanti 
John Edward Benglian 
Fred David Betz 
Willian Christ Bickford 
Eugene Charles Bogdon 
Arthur Eli Bohard 
George F. Brokhoff 
Robert Leslie Carter 
Fhilip Lenker Chapnan 
Suzanne Chappell 
Theodore J. Chichowie 
Louis L. Cohn 
John Willian Collins 
Donald Ray Corey 
Janes Henry Craig, Jr. 
Logan II. Craner, Jr. 
Janes ^der Crockett 
Thonas Joseph Daley 
Richard DeCarlucci 
Allen B. Decker, Jr. 
Bernard Dellaan 
Martin J. Doolin 
Willian R. Dotternusch 
Mildred L. Drongold 
Robert W. Drucker 
Howard Janes Eaton 
Joseph B. Eckenrode 
Irving Effross 
Murray G» Eisenberg 
Ma eke y Ennert 
Arnold II. Epstein 
Paul Leo F arre n 
Francis Felder 
Benny Finer. od 
Walter Revere Fowler 
Edwin Robert Fritz 
Joseph C. F u i ner> Jr. 
Robert E . Gallagher, Jr. 
John B. GehriSj Jr. 
Robert Lockhart 
Louis Glicknan 
Janes Ellis Grant 
Mary G. Greg or 
John Frank Grillo 
Stephen F. Gunrot 
LaRue Edward Gunnison 
Arthur E. Iladley 
Charles T. Halligan 
Charles ^dward Hanner 



Connerce and Finance, 

Jesse Van IIobdo,y 
Donald Irvin Hecker 
Paul Berkley Holder 
Charle s L. Holupka 
Janes W. Hopkins 
Betty L C u Horn 
Herbert A. Houston 
Willian T, Howe 
Harold Stanley Jacobs 
Robert Lee Jacobs 
Willian Arthur Janes 
George G, Kinder nan 
Louis Vincent Kolenda 
Richard Brett Kranich 
John David Krebs 
Veathy P. Kunigonis 
Walter Joseph Lander 
Robert Holn.es Larsen 
Anthony J. Lazusky 
Clare Sylva Lefkoe 
Arnold Robert Levine 
Walter Eugene L e wis 
Ernest J. Lieblein 
William Fenn Loonis, Jr. 
Robert Dalton Loucks 
George John Lychkoff 
Janes Francis Lynn 
Margaret Louisa Lyt e 
Vincent A. McCabe 
.John Joel Mclntire 
Blair L. McKillip, Jr. 
Paul Robert McNeils 
Edwin Sanuel Manbeck 
Calvin E. Marshall 
Willian S. Martin 
Ned Curtis Master 
Ronald S, Meek 
Lawrence J. Me ha lie 
George Mehallow 
Ma r v i n Pie n a k e r 
Donald F, Mills 
Francis C. Murphy 
Walter Irvin Plurray 
Jay Walter Myers 
Peter J, Nastase 
Sterling T, Nicholls 
Vladinir W. Obzut 
Francis E. O'llazza 
Janes Alan Oliver 
Dale Leland Packer 
Louis Jo seph__Pagnotti 
Ray Willian Paint on 
Robert E, Patterson 
Ralph E. Peterson, Jr. 
Dolores J. Piccone 
John F. Piatt, Jr, 
Richard Louis Prave 
Joseph L. Predzinkowski 
Richard Jay Querns 
Willian John Reichard 
Donald Eberly Reist 
John Tobias Repsher 
Thonas A. Roscoe 



Richard Erwin Rosen 
Philip Rosenau 
Herbert Donald Rossnan 
Willian Francis Runbaugh 
Karl Casiner Rutkowski 
Ronald Blackstone S a xe 
Janes L, Scarazzo, Jr. 
George Willis Schautz 
Raynond R« Schraishuh.n 
Robert George Schwartz 
Ralph Howard Scholl, Jr. 
John Ernest Sease 
Stephen Matthew Segal 
Frederick Robert Seitz, Jr 
John Edward Sener 
Thonas Louis S ha deck 
Richard Evan Shaffer 
Milton Shapiro 
Willian Carey Shoenaker 
David Hertz Silverberg 
David Sinclair 
Frank Eugene Sipe 
George Sipida 
Stephen John Skapik, Jr. 
Stanley Glenn Skinner 
George Leo Slcboda, Jr, 
Gale Lyle Snith 
Kenneth Dale Snith 
Casinir R. Sokolowski 
John Solyan 
Janes Francis Spade 
Grove A. Spear ly, Jr. 
Janes Henry S perry 
Leonard Irwin Stape 
Severino Stefanon 
Jack Austin Stevenson 
Dorothy Theresa Stork 
^obert ^larence Sturgeon 
Earl C t Supplee, Jr. 
Est ell J. Swatsworth 
Edward E. Tarulli 
Clifford Buchanan Taylor 
Gust Louis Tekeley 
^ndrew L. Tenser, Jr. 
Robert G. Vandergrift 
Donald Kerr Vannenan, Jr, 
Victor Lee Wallett 
Gilbert Roy Watz 
Reed Thonas leaver 
Leonard Willian Weidner 
Mur ry We i n b e r g er 
Richard Stephen Werner 
Janet Sigrid Wiborg 
George ^onald Widdowson 
Robert Franklin Williams 
David L. Wilson 
John Albert Woche 
Jerry Wolf 

Charles Leonard Wood 
George Constantine Wood 
Joseph Angolo Yanni 
Janes Earl Yochun 
Charles Gii Der t Zoslaw 



American Civilization 



Sonia Marie Bio stein 



Aida Asquini 
Colletta J. Eland 
c harles F. Boiler 
John Bryon Bonnell 
Wilna Brehn 
Edward L, Brcining 
Huston II . Brosious 
Richard M, Brossnan 
Louise E se '-'onte 
Willian George Cregar 
Carl J. Ee Stefano 
Marcus C. El can, Jr. 
David Roger s £ Eldridge 
Jean Watson Findlay 
Willard Freednan 
Arnold Gerton 
Betty Frances Getusky 
Betty Ruth Gibbons 
Gerald Allen Gilnan 
Dorothy J. Hapgood 



-10- 
SCHOOL OF THE LIBERAL ARTS (con'd) 

Journalism 

Barbara Genia Hellnan 
Edward Austin Ilinkle 
Joanne E. Hobbs 
Dorothy M. Hunsberger 
Frances Marie Eeeney 
Vance Cochran Elepper 
Stephen K cbert Krysko 
George Latzo 
Claire Janice Lee 
Zeita Mar ie Ledden 
Patricia J. Lloyd 
George Thona s Lyon 
Eavid L. J. Malickson 
Charles Hi G h a rd Mosey 
Loretta Marie Neville 
George Andrew Ohlnan 
Willian Janes Fade 
Steve George Perialas 
Fred Anthony Perxizzi 



SCHOOL OF MINERAL INDUSTRIES 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 



William Wrightrnan Quay 
Dorothy Agnes Richardson 
Lois Marie Rindosh 
Marie Eloise Roberts 
Albert Edward Sakavich 
Doris Jean Sarnaki 
Nancy Jane Schott 
Lavrrence Albert Sloan 
June Lucille Snyder 
Ro senary Squillante 
Ralph M. Steen, Jr» 
Jane Par cell Stewart 
Eorsey Kenneth Strayer 
Joseph ^othwell Sunner 
John W. Szadziewicz 
Ma 1 c o In Ar t hu r Wh it e 
Wendell Hill Wright 
Edward Donald Yates 
Stanley Joseph Zawadzki 



Ceranics 



Lester Dean Alspach 
Charles E. Brackbill 
Paul Ilorst Crider 
Bartran II. Eilks, Jr. 
Theodore M» Dougherty, Jr, 
Harry Claude Dunegan 
Joseph J. Eovalioh 



Robert Rothaker Bench 
Kenneth E. G lessner 



Joseph Renbrandt Gray 
Joseph Cowden Knight 



Fuel Technology 

Richard II, Organist 
Neman David Phillips 

Geology and Minera logy 

John Francis Mink 
Nornan Kenneth Reynolds 

Geophysics and Geochenistry 

John Daniel More dock 



John Willian Mull 
Harold Enoch Sadwick 
Richard MacDonald Snith 
Donald Frederick Stock 
Richard F r ancis Urban 
George Ralph Wisser 



Wilbert Nornan Sins 



Willian II. Sanpsel, Jr 
Marion W, Titus 



Richard Marsh Atkinson 
Robert Hanpden Aunan 
lavid Robinson Bailey 
Robert Donald Barron 
Joseph Andrew Brown 
Ralph Jenning s Bryan 
Robert Enr.istt Caffrey 
Frederick A» Daggett, Jr, 
Charles John Eavis 



Ax* h bur Va n Za n d t ^ o d d 



Met allurgy 

Jack Edward Fair 
John Walter Harrison 
Howard Edward Hartner 
Enanuel Collins Hirakis 
Clair Little. Jewell 
Sherwood Prentice Jones 
Thona s M c Grath Krebs 
Guy F. McCracken, Jr, 

Meteorology 

William Henry Hpe s 



Glenn Walker Oyler 
Robert F rernon t' Pa,rker 
Edward Paul Quick 
Robert Ellsworth Stitt 
Howard Deforest Wilde, Jr. 
Herbert Willian Wilt 
Frederick M. Winternute 
Earl "ioutz 



Russell Charles Ruhf 



-11- 

SCIIOOL OF MINERAL INDUSTRIES 
Mineral Economics 



CO 



n'd) 



John Douglas Craig , Jr. 
John G. Dello Iaoono 
John F, Fast , Jr. 



Paul Wilder Graff 
Robert Elmer Harris 
Warren H. Kinks, Jr, 



Bernard H'enry Linn 
Carl K. Miller, Jr. 

Mininf Engineering 

Alton Harold Letzler 
John A. McComick 



Rodger S. Nestor, Jr. 
John Anthony Potenza 



John Patrick McNally 
Jack Lloyd Marshall 



Nicholas Lean Altemus 
Frank Earl Eckert, Jr, 
Edmund Dale Haube 
Patrick Wendell Huber 



letroleum and Natural Gas Engineering 

Abraham Kleiner 
Robert Lynn Marshall 
George M. Mitchell 
Robert A, Neville 



Donald Burger Tut tie 
George Patterson West 
Gordon Francis W lfkiel 



SCHOOL OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND ATHLETICS 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 



Robert Ernest Abernethy 
Horace Ashenfelter, III 
Earnest Earl Baer 
William P, Benyish 
William T. Beuka 
Josephine Bihl 
Kathrene Alice Bitner 
William E. Bowser 
Sylvester H. Bozinski 
Harrie Pearl Bragg 
Jean Cameron 
Wallace I. Chambers 
Joseph James Co lone 
Barbara J. Cortright 
Marion Smith Deck 
Anne C, Forncrook 
Anita Anne G e iger 



Marilyn Jeanne Allen 
ioris C, Illingworth 



Robert John Hepburn 
Howard Foster James 



physical Education 

Shirley M Hackenberg 
Patrick L, Hart 
Paul Hudak 
Margaret S. James 
Larry Edward Joe 
Ivan Carstater Kline 
Marian Jane Draemer 
Jane Ellen McCormick 
John E. McIIugh, Jr. 
William I, Meade 
Robert L. Mentzell 
Wallace S, Merchant 
Renee Lucia Mowles 
Elaine Claire Nelson 
Pauline Globisch Parsons 
L eonard E. ^itchie 

Health Education 



Albert Allen McDonald 

Re ere at ion 

J ame s Mar cher S imp s o n 
Donald ^eorge Varga 



Stephen Francis Romeo 
William Bernard Scherer 
William J. Rosborough 
Betty Jeanne Sammons 
John Charles Sheehe 
Milton Simon 
Clayton Joseph Smith 
Louis John Sulpizio 
Samuel J. Tamburo , Jr, 
Wallace "riplett , III 
Robert M. Uricn, Sr . 
Harold Robert Wausat 
Paul LeRoy Weaver 
Marilyn Weiner 
Jacquelyn Wengert 
John Wolosky 



Phyllis Emilie Starr 



Yvonne Paula V/orrell 



CANDIDATES FOR ADVANCED DEGREES AT COMMENCEMENT EXERCISES ON JUNE 6, 1949 

Following is a list of candidates for advanced degrees at Commencement Exer- 
cises on June 6, 1949. Grades for these students are due in the Recorder's Office, 
109 Old Main, before 8 a»m* on Thursday, June 2, 1949, and also must be reported 
before that time to the Dean of the Graduate School on special forms that Trill be 
provided. by the Dean's Office, 



Murray Altmann 
Etta Ma e Ay er s 
Patrick Joseph Boner 
Glenn 0. Carey 
Olivia Grace Crider 
Harold Jacob Fishbein 
Henry Fmnci s Copken 



MASTER OF ARTS 

Herbert Goodrich 

Edgar Richard Harley 

Na n cy IC op 1 i n Jack 

Oliver Hastings Jones, Jr. 

John Miller Kent 

Frank T. Kocher 

Donald Thomas Miller 



William Henry Morris 
Portman Andrews Paget 
Leonard R. Schlauch 
Robert ulan Sigafoos 
Janet Louise Smith 
Robert Lehman Smith 
Lester B. Strickler 



I.. 



John M, Aichele 
Harrison J. Cameron, Jr, 
Frank Hamer Campbell 
Frank Leslie Cof fey- 
Gladys Croner 
Harold Allen Douty 
Elinor L. Eastlack 
Loris Lois Grab 



Charles F, Abel 
Winser Paul Acton 
Calvin C. Anderson 
Julie C. Arentzen 
Carolyn Y. G. Aull 
Jerome E. Bar id 
Robert Carl Baker 
Robert Blaine Barefoot 
John Robert Barnes 
Clifford P. Bastuscheck 
Lucille Marian Benson 
Sidney A, Bernhard 
Arthur S. Beward 
Bennett L, Black, Jr. 
Ben Ami Blau 
Charles Lonald Borror 
Henry Richard Brenner 
James P. Bressler 
Charles W, Cameron 
Margaret E. M. Carey 
Andrew Carson 
Everett B. Chamberlain 
Robert F, Chipak 
Lynn D, Christian 
Michael Chruney 
Gordon Pu— King Chu 
James Laurence Cotter 
William Edward Counts 
Earle Rubert Cressman 
William R, Deazley 
Manuel Benjamin Bell 
John Paul Bevlin 
Lavid B. Loan 
Robert Clayton Early 
Robert Giar^ East 
Franklin James Evans 
Martin Felsenthal 
Theodore Ross Flanagan 
Robert Louis Folk 
Bert H. Garcia, Jr. 
William V, Garner 
Marvin H. Glauberman 
Robert John Glenn 
Myrth Lynn Gochiiauer 
Jeune Marie Good 



-12- 

MASTER OF EBUCATION 

Richard Franklin Hartzell,Jr .Guido Charles Paoli 

John Cornelius Miller Edward C. Pooler 

Allen Snidner Monts Homer M. Savige 

Emma Margaret Moore Lois M, S. Strickler 

Borothy W. Moorhead Mildred Iona Turney 

Walter Edward Morris Lester Solomon Webster 

Nancy Helen Musser Estelle Carruth Work 
John L. O'Brian 

MASTER OF FORESTRY 



Alvin K. Wilson 

MASTER OF SCIENCE 

Jack Peter Green 
Murray Gut nick 
Charles Lowell Hamrum 
Paul Musser Heberling 
Eugene Burke Herman 
Frederick A. Hughes 
Merril Jameson Humbert 
Clifford L. Huntington 
Louis Heinz Jacobson 
William Gerald Jamison 
Vance Clifford Kennedy 
Raymond E. Kourtz 
Martin Jay Krakauer 
Seymour F. Kuvin 
Chester W, Lathrop, Jr, 
Robert Lavid Laughlin 
paang Fei Lei 
John Witt Lewis 
Conrad Rudolph Lickel 
Lawrence W. Linvill 
Barnes W. McCormick 
Mary A. F. McElfresh 
Burd Sheldon McGinnes 
Lawrence J. McGrael, Jr. 
Jean Edna, MaGuire 
Wa Iter Har ol d Ma nn ing 
John Wilson Mausteller 
Hung Kee Miap 
Ernest II. Millard 
Joseph Bonald Moyer 
Stanley Leo Hale 
Natalie R. Nathan 
Fred Nicholas 
Charles A. Norford 
Lonald Emerson Nulk 
Adrian Carlo Nuzzo 
Ralph E. Patterson 
William C. Percival 
Ira David Plank, Jr. 
Edward F. P r ice 
Rhys W. Aees 
Baniel Grube Reiber 
Lonald George ^eihard 
George Robert Reiter 

CIVIL ENGINEER 



Sydney Howard Reiter 
Howard William Rick 
Joseph R, ^iden, Jr, 

Charle s II. Ridenour 
Clare Avis Robinson 

Norma Ruth Robinson 
Melvin A, ^osenfeld 
Lawrence S, Bothstein 
Lawrence V, ^ubright 
Kennard Walter Rumage 
Marigolde Kinney Rumage 
Michael Andrew Samchok 
Robert William Scollon 
Frank Lean Sears 
Keith D. Sheppard 
John Sherrod, Jr» 
C. James Shoff 
Donald S. Shriver 
William Henry Smith 
Wilson K ing Snith 
Rhoads M. Speck 
Lavid Gru.ce Stauffer 
John M. Stevens 
Kenneth James Stodden 
Marjory Beth Stout 
Donald B, Tait 
John Moore T me 
John ^(jTivcp^ T U cker 
Benjamin II. Ulrich, Jr. 
Robert C. Updegraff 
Frank Irvin Varva 
John Pearson Walker, Jr. 
Borothy Wallace 
Jeanette S. Walter 
Norman M. Walter 
William W. Wance 
Charles Edward leaver 
John A. Wenzel 
Edward F inley West lake 
Casper Ligon Woodbridge 
Chen Kun Wu 
William R. Young, Jr # 
John Rishel Zubler 



Benson Leroy Button 
DOCTOR OF EDUCATION 



Miriam Elizabeth Wilt 



Gerald Harold Woerner 



-13- 



DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 



Clayton H. Allen 
Philip Ash 

Robert Lincoln Beacher 
Bean Jefferson Clyde 
Robert James Day 
Charles F, Diehl 
Robert D, Dunlap 
Felix L« duBreuil 
George G, Ecke, Jr, 



Robert Fencil Forker 
Franklin Dewey Fry 
Renzi Gurcay 
Hsioh-Yu Hou 
S au 1 I s s e r ow 
Nathan Jaspen 
John Morris Kelso 
John Arthur Krinnel 
John S. McCartney 



Murry C. McJunkin 
Sanuel Barakat Maloof 
Arnold Martin Matt son 
Janes Alexander Moore 
John D Oliver Newkirk 
Sol Meyer Roshal 
Herbert C. Rothenberg 
Jane s 7/illian Shigley 
Phelps Trix 



;? 



r> 4 



X 






C a. 



THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 



FACULTY 



The Bulletin is published weakly during the College 
year as a means oi making official announcements 
and presenting items of interest to the faculty. AH 




VOL. 



36 



U JLi Li JL i. I 



contributions should be as briei as possible and 
reach Louis K. Bell. Director of Public Information. 
313 Old Main, not later than 1Q a. m. each Friday. 



May 16, 1949 



NO. 



30 



PROCEDURES FOR APPLYING FOR GRANTS-IN-AID OF RESEARCH 



Dr, R, Adams Dutcher, chairman of the 
Council on Research, has announced the 
following procedures to be followed in 
making application for research grants: 

The College budget for the next fis- 
cal year will include an item designated 
as the "Central Fund for Research", This 
fund is administered by the Council on 
Research* It is to be used primarily 
to promote fundamental research through- 
out the College, funds for the support 
of applied research being more readily 
available from other sources. It is in- 
tended that this fund shall be used for 
the support of creative studies in the 
social sciences and the humanities as 
well as the natural sciences. 

Grant s— in— aid are made for one fis- 
cal year, Thus sum that may be allotted 
to a project will be determined by the 
Council on Research after "iving consider* 
ation to all reque st s, including requests 
for the continuance of any of the grants 
made in the present fiscal year,. The 
funds may be used for general maintenance 
and for special apparatus, but not for 
general equipment. 



Applioat io 
be filed with 
Application fo 
office, T hese 
the following 
Study* its pro 
work and prese 
working plan; 
( itemize d ) j ot 
contribute to 
the leaders an 
and an estimat 
ooiaplete the p 
should be file 
new funds beco 

The approv 
partment and o 
is required be 
is considered 
Requisitions a 
by the Chairma 
their approval 
partment and t 
recipient of a 
to file with t 
cil on Researc 
fiscal year, a 



ns for grant s-in— aid should 
the Dean of the School, 
rrns are available at his 
call for information on 
points; Objectives of the 
bable importance* previous 
nt outlookj procedure or 
financial support desired 
her funds, if any, which 
the support of the project; 
d their qualifications; 
e of the time required to 
roject. Applications 
d by July 1, 1949, since 
me available on that" date, 

al of the Head of the De- 
f the Dean of the School 
fore the proposed project 
by the Council on Research, 
re drawn and bills approved 
n of the Council after 

by the Head of the De- 
he Dean of the S c hool. The 

grant— in— aid is requested 
he Dean and with the Coun— 
h, near the close of the 

report on the project. 



CHOIR TO SING GERMAN REftUIEM BY BRAHMS ON WEDNESDAY NIGHT 



The Chapel Choir, under the direction 
of Willa W, Taylor, will sing the German 
Requiem by Johannes Brahms at 8 o'clock 
on Wednesday night, May 18, in Schwab 
Auditorium, It is the second of the 
musical programs honoring the 200th 
anniversary of the birth of Johann Wolf- 
gang Goethe, German author* 

Barbara Troxell, soprano, and Paul 
King, baritone, guest- artists for the 
concert Monday night, will be solists en 



Wednesday night. 

Tickets, limited to four per in- 
dividual, now are available free of 
charge, at the Student Union Office, 
Seats will not be reserved and seats un- 
occupied by 7 j45 p,m, will be released 
to the public. The doors will open at 
7 :30 p ,m. 

To help defray expenses, a voluntary 
contribution will be received at the door 



CONSTRUCTION RE&UIRES REDUCED SPEED AREAS ON CAMPUS 



Because of construction work on the 
campus, reduoed speed areas have been 
established on Curtin Road and on Bur— 
rowes near Recreation Building, 



Planks have been laid across the 
roads and a speed limit' of 6 miles per 
hour has been placed in effect. The 
area marks entrances to the site where 
men's dormitories are under construction, 



ifcNN STATE COLLECTION 



DR. R. ADAMS DUTCUER TO PRESEIIT SIGMA. XI LECTURE TUESDAY NIGHT 



Dr , R, Adams Dutcher, chairman of the 
Council on Research, will speak on "Re- 
search at Penn State" at 8:15 p.m. Tues- 
day, May 17, in Room 119, Osmond Labo- 
ratory B 



The lecture, which will be open 
to the public, is sponsored by the So- 
ciety of the Sigma Xi* 



OF GENERAL INTEREST 



CHAPEL: Rabbi Burton E. Levinson, of 
Temple Sinai, Pittsburgh, will speak at 
Chapel Services in Schwab Auditorium at 
11 o'clock on Sunday morning, May 22, 

* * * 

LUNCHEON CLUB: D r . C, P.. Carpenter, pro- 
fessor of psychology, will present the 
film, "Jackson Hole Wildlife Park" at 
the Faculty Luncheon Club on Monday noon, 
May 23, Because of final examinations, 
the luncheon will begin at 12:20 p.m. and 
end at 1:10 p »m. 

* * * 

HOME SPORTS; Wednesday, May 18, 4 p.m., 
tennis, B u cknell» Thursday, May 19, 4 



»♦ > 



tennis, Washington and Jefferson* 



Saturday, May 21, 1 p.m., track, Notre 
Dame j 2 p.m., tennis, Pittsburgh. Tues- 
day, May 24, 4 p.m., baseball, Bucknell. 
PIAA track, tennis, and golf events have 
been postponed from May 20—21 to May 27- 
28. 

* * * 

FINAL EXAMINATION: The final examination 
for Felix L. duBreuil, candidate for the 
doctor of philosophy degree in electrical 
engineering, will be held at 4 p.m. on 
Friday, May 2 0, in Room 2 07, Electrical 
Engineering Building, 

* * * 

PHI KAPPA PHI: The annual dinner and 
initiation ceremonies of Phi Kappa Phi 
will be held at 6 p.m. on Friday, May 20, 
at the Presbyterian Church. Dress for 
members will be informal. Members who 
have not obtained tickets should call 
Charles C. Dillio, 209 Main Engineering 
Building (Ext. 16 7 J ) . 

* * * 

GAMMA SIGMA DELTA: T he annual banquet 
and initiation for Gamma Sigma Delta, 
agricultural honor society, will be held 
in the social rooms of the Mgthodist 
Church at 6:30 p.m. on Thursday, May 19, 

* * * 

PI GAMMA MU : Dr. C« R, Carpenter has 
been named president, Dr. Stuart W, Frost, 
vice-president, Jane Cowell, secretary, 
and Joseph Bradley, trea surer , of pi 
Gamma Mu, social science recognition 
society. Among new members initiated at 
the ceremonies held Thursday night are 
Martha 0. Fry, assistant director of the 
psychology clinic; Dr. Samuel W« B]_izzard, 
assistant professor of sociology and rural 
sociology; and Henry F, Goeken, supervisor, 
Office Services Division, 

* * * 

SPEAKS: Dr. W, Canard F e rne_ius, pro- 
fessor and head of the department of 
chemistry, recently spake at Duquesne 



University, Pittsburgh,, at 
of the new chemical re sear 
there. His subject was j " 
Coordination Compounds," 

* * * 

APPOINTED: Dr. I. M, Shef 
of mathematics, has been a 
associate editor of the Bu 
American Mathematical Soci 

* * * 

PRESENT PAPERS; Dr. C. R. 
fessor "f fuel technology, 
Wright, professor and chie 
vision of fuel technology, 
papers at the meeting of t 
Chemistry Division of the 
cal Society in Pittsburgh 
Twenty —three students, fac 
members attended the meeti 



the dedication 
ch laboratories 
Structure of 



fer, professor 
ppointed an 
lletin of the 
ety. 

Kinney, prc- 
and Dr» *• C, 

f of the di- 
presented 

he Gas and Fuel 

American Chemi— 

last week* 

ulty, and staff 

ngs. 



Arthur C. Cloet- 



ingh, professor of dramatics, has been 



AWARDED GRANT-IN-AID : 

awarded a grant-in-aid by the Rockefeller 
Foundation for study of the English and 
continental theatre* H e will sail for 
Europe in September and will study the 
theatre in Ireland, England, and the 
Scandinavian countries. 

* * * 

TAKE PRIZES: In a competition for sopho- 
more students in architecture and archi- 
tectural engineering held recently at the 
Beaux Arts Institute, New Y°rk, Penn State 
students took all of the top awards. 
First prize went to Jay H. Lucas, second 
to G»orge J. Doddy, and first mentions 
to Arthur R. Lukens, Frederick E, Sheri- 
dan, -Joseph Brasco, and R e gis L, Gallagher 

* * * 

ATTEND MEETING: Four members of the de- 
partment of psychology staff participated 
in the Pennsylvania Psychological Associ- 
ation meetings in Harrisburg recently. 
Dr. Bruce V. Moore is pre s ident— elect of 
the association, Dr. Robert G. Bernreuter 
is a member of the legislative committee, 
Dr. Lester P. Guest was on the program 
committee, and Dr. W* U. S n yder is a 
member of the nominating committee. Dr, 
Snyder also participated in a panel dis- 
cussion and presented a paper. Other 
department members attending were Dr, 
A. K. Kurtz, Dr , Ha H. Gehman, Barbara 
J, Snyder, and Dean J, Clyde. 
* * * # 

TO ATTEND CONFERENCE: D r • Hazel M. 
HatcheT, professor of home economics ed- 
ucation, will attend a conference in 
Washington D. ' C . this week to consider 
extension problems, experiences, and meth- 
ods appropriate for other countries, 

* * * 



ELECTED: Charles J, Rowland, professor of 
economics, has been elected vice-presi- 
dent of the Williamsport chapter, Associ- 
ation of Accountants, 

* * * 

FORMS ASSOCIATION: A n Association of 
College and Civic Theatres in Pennsylvania 
was formed recently at a conference held 
in Pittsburgh, Arthur C „ Cloetingh, pro- 
fessor of dramatics, was named executive 
secretary for the group, 

* * * 

VISITS CAMPUS; Elizabeth Engelken, of 
Hesse, Germany, visited the S c hool of 
Home Economics last vreek, ^he is spend- 
ing two and one-half months in this coun- 
try observing classes in home economics 
education and studying teaching methods, 

* * * 

ATTEND CONFERENCE: Dr. JaneS G 9 mnell, 
associate professor of business education, 
participated in a panel at the Pennsylv- 
ania Business Educators Association con- 
ference in Reading recently. He was 
accompanied to the conference by 25 
Students majoring in business education, 

» * * 
APPOINTED: H, I, Tarpley, professor of 
electrical engineering, recently was 
appointed to the national committee on 
servomechanisms by the American Associ- 
ation of Electrical Engineers* 



TO CONTRIBUTE ARTICLE: Dr. H, H, Arnold, 

professor of romance language 

invited to contribute an arti 

homage volume to be published 

in Madrid in celebration of t 

birthday of the famous Spanis 

gist, Don Ramon Merendez Pida 



s, has been 
cle to a 

this summer 
he 80th 
h philolo— 
1. 



TO TEACH SUMMER COURSE: G e or 
Dusinberre, associate profess 
chanical engineering, will te 
on Gas Turbines for graduate 
the University of Delaware du 
summer , 

* * « 

BOOK PUBLISHED: Dr. Ellen D # 
assistant professor of physio 
ucation, is author of the tex 
"Teaching Posture and Body M e 
which was recently published 
Barnes and Co, 

* * * 

PARTICIPATE IN MEETINGS; Fou 
of the department of sociolog 
recently participated in the 
annual meetings of the Easter 
logical Soceity in New York, 
Seth W, Russell served on the 
committee while Dr, Jessie W, 
Dr, Samuel W, Blizzard, Jr», 
Dudley Duncan presented, paper 



ge M. 
or of me — 
ach a course 
stu dent s at 
ring the 



Kelly, 

al ed — 
t book, 
chanic s, rt 
by A, S, 



r members 

y faculty 

19th 

n Secio- 

N. Y. Dr, 
execut ive 
Bernard, 

and D r , 0, 

s. 



FACULTY AND EMPLOYEE'S APPLICATION BLANKS FOR FOOTBALL TICKETS IN MAIL 



Faculty and Employee's Application 
Blanks for 1949 football season tickets 
were mailed this week and will be accepted 
through August 15, 

The ticket, priced at $9,60, includ- 
ing federal tax, entitles the owner to 
a reserved seat to the following four 
home games j Sept, 24 — Villanova; Oct , 
8 - Boston College; Oct, 15 - Nebraska; 
and'Oct, 29 — Syracuse, 



Tickets will be allocated 
goal line to the 35— yard line 
Stands, Applicants may state 



from the 
in the West 
a preference 



as to approximate row desired, -■ 

Applications will not be accepted 
for more than two tickets, but persons 
wishing to sit together may file their 
application blanks attached. It is al- 
so explained that additional tickets for 
individual games will not be allotted 
adjacent to season tickets. Tickets 
are not returnable and no refunds will 
be made. 

The sales will be conducted by mail, 
thus eliminating lines at the ticket 
window. Tickets will be mailed about 
September 1, 



OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENT FROM THE OFFICE OF THE DEAN OF ADMISSIONS AND REGISTRAR 



Withdrawals : 

Sp, Harding Martha K,, AL, S e pt. 29, 1948 Sp 
5 Kelchner, G e orge A., IE, April 14 4 
4 Landis, Thomas Moyer, EE, April 13 



. McClure, Dorothy Palmer, AL, May 2 
Zelinski, John Martin, ME, April 7 



Reasons for Withdrawal: Illness, 2; personal, 2; to change curriculum, 1, 

BIOGRAPHICAL MATERIAL ON NEW FACULTY MEMBERS REQUESTED 



Forms requesting biographical infor<*> 
nation have been nailed by the Department 
of Public Information to many new faculty 
and staff members and to others for whom 



the material is not on file. Staff 
members are requested to complete the 
forms and return them to the Department 
of Public Information, 



_ J hNN STATE COLLECTION 



CONFLICT F INAL EXAM INATIONS 

A list of students who will take conflict examinations will be read to the 
class. Only students whose names are on this list are permitted to take the 
conflict examinations. 

ABCh 2 May 24 8 105 Frear Lah II Ea 126 May 27 8 114 IH: : 

ABCh 2a May 23 8 204 Frear Lab Hist 12 May 28 1;20 16 Sparks 

ABCh 35 May 2 3 8 113 Frear Lab Kist 17 May 23 8 11 Sparks 

A£ Ec 5 May 25 8 204 Hrrt Hist 18 May 24 1:20 16 Sparks 

Ag E n g i May 23 8 2 06 Ag Eng Hist 19 May 28 8 17 Sparks 

Agro 28 May 27 8 211 Ag Hist 20 May 28 8 1 Sparks 

AH 17 May 27 8 103 Ag Hist 21 May 27 1:20 6 Sparks 

Bact 1 May 24 8 104 Hort Hist 24 May 28 8 6 Sparks 

Bact 21 May 31 8 113 Frear Lab II E 15 May 27 8 118' H Ec 

Bot 3 May 2 3 8 304 Buckhout Lab II E 109 June. 18 14 H Ec 

Bot 14 May 28 1:20 304 Buckhout Lab H Ec 220 May 28 8 224 H Ec 

Bot 22 May 31 8 304 Buckhout Lab H Ec 405 May 28 8 118 H Ec 

Bot 27 May 23 8 304 Buckhout Lab H A 336 May 23 1:20 118 H Ec 

CE 61 May 23 1:20 101 M Eng Hort 52 May 28 8 204 Hort 

CE 70 May 27 1:20 101 M Eng IE 315 May 26 8 209 Eng C 

Chem 4 May 27 1:20 103 Osmond Jour 4 May 23 8 111 CH 

Chem 20 May 2a 10:20 103 Osnwnd Jour 13 May 25 8 111 CH 

Chem 41 May 23 8' 110 Osmond Jour 15 May 23 8 100 CH 

Chem 441 May 26 8 113 Osmond Jour 42 May 25 8 100 CH 

Con 5 May 27 8 2 Sparks Math 2 May 24 8 14 Sparks 

Con 15 May 27 1*2 16 Sparks Mchs 11 May 27 8 207 E n g A 

Com 25 May 27 1:20 5 Sparks Mchs 12 May 23 10:20 207 Eng A 

Com 3 May 26 7~9pm 219 EE Mchs 13 May 24 8 201 Eng A 

Com 40 May 27 8 1 Sparks Meteor 300 May 24 8 109 Ag" 

Com 41 May 23 8 16 Sparks ME 2 May 25 8 210 M Eng 

Com 90 May 31 8 19 Sparks ME 105 May 25 *1:20 108 M Eng 

DH 1 May 24 8 215 D a iry ME 408 May 2 5 8 106 M Eng 

Dram 61 May 28 8 2 Sparks ME 409 May 2 8 1:2 101 M Eng 

Econ 2 May 24 10:2 14 Sparks ME 413 May 24 8 106 M Eng 

Econ 14 May 24 10:20 3 V, T hite Hall Mng 1 May 24 8 105 MI 

Econ 16 May 28 8 15 Sparks Mus 5 May 31 8 100 CH 

E c on 23 May 26 8 2 Sparks Phil 2 May 27 8 124 Sparks 

Ed 1 May 27 8 204 BB Phys 235 May 26 1:20 113 Osmond 

Ed 52 May 27 8 209 BB Phys 265 May 23 10:20 110 Osmond 

Ed 424 May 27 8 209 BB Phys 301 May 23 8 103 Osmond 

E Comp 90 May 27 3 7 Sparks P S c i 7 June 1 8 104 Osmond 

EE' 1 May 23 8 301 EE Pol Sci 3 May 27 8 228 Sparks 

EE 4 May 27 1;20 2 00 EE Pol 3 c i 4 May 27 10:206 Sparks 

EE 5 May 27 8 200 EE Pol Sci 10 May 28 8 16 Sparks 

E Lit 4 {8) May 27 1:20 11 Sparks PH 1 May 26 1:20 204 Hort 

E Lit 6 May 26 1:2 12 5 Sparks Psy 15 May 2 7 8 204 BB 

E Lit 21 May 24 8 13 Sparks Psy 17 May 27 8 -4 Sparks 

E Lit 24 May 24 8 1 Sparks Psy 419 May 25 8 204 BB 

E Lit 25 May 23 1:20 13 Sparks psy 427 May 26 8 206 BB 

E Lit 26 May 27 1:20 13 Sparks Psy 437 May 27 8 206 BB 

E Lit 60 May 27 8 15 Sparks Psy 471 May 25 1:20 204 BB 

For 37 May 28 8 3 Forestry PU 421 May 27 8 201 EE 

G e og 15 May 25 1:20 105 MI Soc 1(6) May 27 1:20 1 Sparks 

Geog 24 May 23 10:20 225 MI Soc 3 May 26 8 14 Sparks 

Geog 26 May 24 10j20 229 MI Soc 12 May 26 1:20 7 Sparks 

Geol 20 May 27 8 225 MI Span 4 May 23 10*20 304 Sparks 

G e ol 30 May 23 1:20 105 MI Zool 3 May 24 8 113 Frear Lab 

G e ol 31 May 26 8 105 MI Zool 6 May 25 1:20 113 Frear Lab 

Ger 2T May 27 1::20 124 Sparks Zool 25 May 23 8 316 Frear Lab 

Ger 4 May 31 3:30 1 Sparks Zool 41 May 26 8 105 Frear Bab 

ROBERT T. OLIVER NAMED HEAD OF DEPARTMENT OF SPEECH 

Robert T. Oliver, author, educator, sition as head of the Washington Bureau 

and public relations counselor, has been of the Korean Pacific Press, Oliver 

named head of the department of speech, served on the faculty at the University 

effective September 1, H e succeeds John of Korea, Bucknell University, and 

H. Frizzell, who retired in 1946, Syracuse University, He has also been 

guest lecturer at the Asia Institute, He 

Prior to accepting his present po- opened the 1949 Liberal Arts lecture.. sbrlt 

here on February 24, 



PERSONNEL CHANGES 



Following personnel changes approved during the period, April 19, 1949 to 
May 10, 1949, are announced,, Telephone extension numbers are listed for new 
appointees on campus. 



Appointment s ; 

137 Charmain R, Carl 

Geraldine F, Hindenach 
344 Robert M. Koser 

137 John E, LeFrancois 
336J Lois J, Smith 
137 James D» Weir 
55J Januez A. Stalony— Dobrzanski 
84J John S, Egli 
58M Harvey H. Meeker, Jr. 
4 9 Merton B. Purvis 
14 6 J Ruth E. Newman 

Honora A, Noyes 
336M Robert G. Lauffer 
43 John N. Warfield 
John E, M e Ichor 
William H, White 
M* Christine C alp in 
Jean L, Miller 
Geraldine C, Johnston 
137 Betty J« Bloodworth 
122M Lawrence S «, Brungard 

Lynn F, Cramer 
137 Adelaide R, Deibler 
354 P» Richard Kellerman 
Harold R, Michael 
94 Judith Musser 
137 Dorothea E» Reish 
137 Sheila A. S e gner 

3 Richard Summers 
177 Irma Tomassetti 
J. Orville Witts 
96 Forrest D, Young 
177 Ruth L» Sherrod 
397 Margaret R. Blanchard 
33 9 Mary C. Hohenbury 
Melvit E', Lightner 

Re signat ions ; 

Albert A. Laplante, Jr. 
Robert B. Barefoot 
Joseph L , Goo dma n 
Harry M, Hochreiter, Jr. 
Carlton F« Johnson 
George R, McFarland 
Vfilliam H« Smith 
Frank E. Shuster 
Thomas P. Kiser 
Earle L. Edwards 
Helen H. W e bb , 
Robert C. Updegraff 
Frank D, S e ars - 
Nicholas A. Petrick 
Andrew J, Pepper 
Stanley C. Clemence 
Sheldon A, Kohn u 
Don C, Lemmon 
John V. Robertson, Jr. A 
David E» Bradbury 
Everett L. Sutter • 
Mary Lou Foote 
Lester Goldberg 
Robert M, port ^ 



Editorial AssH. - Ordnance Research Laboratory 
Ass't* Ext. Rep. - Agricultural Extension 
Ass't. Chief Recorder - Dean of Admissions 

and Registrar 
Research Assoc. — Ordnance Research Laboratory 
Instructor - Agricultural Extension 
Research Ass f t. - Ordnance Research Laboratory 
Instructor - Engineering Mechanics 
Instructor — Physical Education and Athletics 
instzmctor - Architectural Engineering 
Instructor - Mechanical Engineering 
Ass 5 t, Professor — Economics 
Ass't, Professor — Economics 
Ass't, Professor - Agricultural Extension 
Instructor - Electrical Engineering 
Ass't, Ext. Rep, - Agricultural Extension 
Ass't, Ext, Rep* - Agricultural Extension 
Extension Representative - Agricultural Ext, 
Ass't, Ext. Ren, - Agricultural Extension 
Extension Representative - Home Economics Ext, 
Secretary - Ordnance Research Laboratory 
Carpenter — Physical plant 
D a iry Farm Employee - Dairy Husbandry 
Clerk— typist - Ordnance Research Laboratory 
Draftsman - Physical plant 
Custodian — Hazleton Center 

Clerk— typist — Physical Education and Athletics 
Secretary - Ordnance Research Laboratory 
Clerk — Ordnance Research Laboratory 
Dishroom Man - Simmons Hall 

Library Clerical Ass't, I - College Library 
Herdsman — Dairy Husbandry 
Janitor - Health Service 

Library Clerical Ass't. II — College Library 
Stenographer — Education 
Clerk — Agricultural Extension 
Maintenance Helper - physical plant 



Ass't, Professor — Entomology Extension 

Instructor — Mechanical Engineering 

Instructor - Electrical Engineering 

Instructor - Engineering Mechanics 

Research Assoc, - Ordnance Research Laboratory 

Research Ass't. - Ordziance Research Laboratory 

Instructor - Mineral Technology 

Research Ass't, — Ordnance Research Laboratory 

District Representative — Central Extension 

Ass't, professor - Physical Education & Athlet.ici 

Instructor — physics 

Instructor - Engineering Mechanics 

Instructor - Engineering Mechanics 

Instructor — Mechanical Engineering 

Instructor - Engineering Mechanics 

Instructor - Engineering Mechanics 

Instructor - Electrical Engineering 

Research Ass't, ~ Engineering Experiment S£.atir>n 

Ass't, Ext. Rep, — Agricultural Extension 

Administrative Head - Wi Ikes— Bar re Center 

Vocational Appraiser - Central Extension 

Ag, Library Ass't, - Agricultural Library 

Instructor — Economics 

Appraiser— Central Extension 



Joyce Bloom 
Jean T. Cleland 
Helen M, Friese 
Harvey Grenoble 
Mary E, Lutz 
Jean K» N vak 
Janet Thompson 
Myles S # Wingard 
Dorothy R, Ebert 
Johanna M» Gillmore 
Donald K. Hassinger 
Roger Ho Johnson 
Margaret M, Johnstone 
Claire Mecouch 
Isabel Morisette 
?7illiam G. Neilly 
Gloria Shellenberger 
Jean Vfaltenbaugh 
Margaret Ann Cook 
Gloria Jean Hunter 
Nell S, Huntingdon 
Claudia F # Moore 
Nina G, Pomroy 
Eunice L, Robbins 
HfiOen A» Stroud 
James F, Weaver 



Typist — Central Extension 

Clerk— typist — Physical Education and Athletics 

Secretary — Ordnance Research Laboratory 

Dishroom Man - Nitt'any Dining Hall 

Janitress — Simmons Hall 

Clerk — Ordnance Research Laboratory 

Clerk— typist — Tabulating 

Janitor - Physical plant 

Stenographer — Accounting 

Secretary — Ordnance Research Laboratory 

Maintenance H e lper — physical Plant 

Electrician — Physical plant 

Clerk - Bursar's Office 

Clerk - Bursar's Office 

Stenographer — Accounting 

Janitor — Windcrest 

Clerk— typist — Nittany Dining Hall 

Secretary — Engineering Experiment Station 

Stenographer — Earth Sciences 

Clerk — Instructional Film Research 

Clerk — Agricultural Economics and Rural Sociology 

Library Clerical Ass't, I - College Library 

Clerk— typist — Physical plant 

Clerk — Agricultural Economics and Rural Sociology 

Clerk — Agricultural Economics and Rural Sociology 

Janitor — Health Service 



Leaves of Absence ; 

Glenn R # Moltrup Ass't, Professor — Ordnance Research Laboratory 6—30—49 to 

6-30-50 
Randall E. # S a mpsell Assistant — Industrial Engineering 7-27—49 to 9—19-49 
Ellen Tiffany C a taloger - College Library 4-1-49 ■ to 6-30-49 

Rose H, Sellers Secretary — Physics Indefinite beginning 

5-1-49 
John E. Bubb Janitor — Physical plant Leave ceased 4— 15~49 

Change s of Name : 



Marion E, Bronson to Marion B» Huffman 
MaeL.RaSh to Mae R« Stewart 



Engineering 
Swarthmore Center 



J. 9 j I o lt o s d H 






THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 



FACULTY 



The Bulletin is published weekly during the College 
year as a means of making official announcements 
and presenting items of interest to the faculty. All 




VOL. 



36 



ULLETIN 



contributions should be as brief as possible and 
reach Louis K. Bell, Director of Public Information, 
313 Old Main, not later than 10 a. m. each Friday. 



May 23, 1949 



NO. 31 



TWO COMMENCEMENT PROGRAMS ON JUNE 6; INSTRUCTIONS FOR FACULTY LISTED 



Because of the large number of candi- 
dates for degrees, there will be two Con- 
men cement progrr. r '.s on Monday, June 6, Both 
will be held in Recreation Building. 

At 10:30 a.m., students in the Schools 
of the Liberal Arts, Education, Home Ec- 
onomics, and Physical Education and Ath- 
letics Trill receive degrees. Graduates 
in the Schools of Agriculi -re , Chemistry 
and Physics, Engineering and Mineral 
Industries will receive degrees at the 
2:30 p.m. exercises. Graduate students 
will receive their degrees with the school 
in which they have majored. 

Faculty participating in the proces- 
sion for the morning exercises will as- 
semble not later than 10:15 a.m. on the 
south side of Recreation Building. Dr. 
R, E. Dengler, professor of romance lan- 
guages, will be the Faculty Marshal for 



this group. 

For the afternoon services, faculty 
participating in the procession will 
assemble not later than 2:15 p.m. on 
the south side of Recreation Building. 
Dr. Warren B» Mack, professor of horti- 
culture, will be Faculty Marshal for 
this group. 

While it trill be appropriate for 
faculty to attend the graduation exer- 
cises for the students of their school, 
it is urged that as many faculty members 
as possible attend both commencements. 

Dr. Harlan H. Hatcher, vice-president 
of Ohio State University, will speak at 
the morning exercises while Dr. Daniel A, 
Poling, editor of the Christian Herald 
and president of the World's Christian 
Endeavor Union, will speak at the after- 
noon program. 



AAUP TO HONOR 2 RETIRED FACULTY MEMBERS AT DINNER ON WEDNESDAY NIGHT 



Twenty faculty and staff memberc who 
have retired since last summer or will 
retire prior to July 6 will be honored at 
a dinner sponsored by the Penn State 
chapter, American Association of Universi- 
ty Professors, at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday, 
May 25, at the Nittany Lion Inn. 



Retirees to be 
ments, and years o 
C. Chandlee, chemi 
botany, 40: Carl E 
philology and Coll 
L. Markle, electric 
Thomas W. Mason, ana 



William S. Hoffman 
and Registrar, 38; 
mental hortioultur 
agricultiiral exten 
Fagan, pomology; 3 



honored, their depart- 
f service are j Grover 
stry, 42 j J, Ben Hill, 
, Marquardt , romance 
ege Examiner, 4^; David 
cal engineering, 3 9; 
nalytical chemistry, 39 j 



lyticai. cnemxstry,3' 
Dean of Admissions 
Earle I. Wilde, orna 



38 



tilde, 

S, Bucher, 



"7 — — J - w » 

sion, 30 ; Frank N 



6. 



Carl W, Hasek, economics, 35; Clair 
W, Robinson, geology, 32; Roy D, Anthony, 
pomology, 30; Louis J. Bradford, machine 
design, 30; J. B. R. Dickey, agronomy 
extension, 30; George F. Mitch, economics, 



30; William V.Dennis, rural sociology, 28; 
Leonard A. Doggett, electrical engineering, 
25; James F„ Shigley, veterinary science, 
25; Frederick W, Owens, mathematics, 23; 
Annie L, Haigh, music, 7; Helen B. Owens, 
mathematics, 7. 

Dr. R. Wallace Brewster, professor 
of political science and vice-president 
of AAUP, acting as toast master in place 
of Dr. Corliss R. Kinney, professor of 
fuel technology and chapter president, 
vrill award engrossed scrolls to the hon- 
ored gue st s. 

Speakers will include Dean Hoffman, 
Harry B. Northrup, professor emeritus, 
Mineral Industries Extension Services, who 
will represent the Retired Staff Club; 
and C„ S„ Wyand, administrative assistant 
to the President cf the College. Lynn 
Christy, assistant professor of English 
composition, will lead the group singing 
with Raymond T, Fortuna J o (j supervisor, 
employment division, Personnel Relations, 
at the piano. 



PENN STATE COLLECTION 



RETIREMENTS, OTHER FACULTY CHANGES, APPROVED BY BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



Retirements of three faculty members, 
effective June 30, were among the faculty 
changes approved by the Executive Commit- 
tee of the Board of Trustees on May 13. 

Louis J, Bradford, who joined the 
faculty in 1919, will retire as professor 
emeritus of machine design while John B. 
R. Dickey, professor of agronomy extension, 
also will retire with emeritus rank* He 
joined the faculty in 192 0, George F, 
Mitch, associate professor of economics, 
will retire with 30 years of service* 

Resignations announced include those 
of Joseph H, Boyd, professor of vegetable 
gardening extension, effective June 15, 
who will return to the University of 
Hawaii, and Dr, Oman E. Street, professor 
of agronomy, effective June 30, to accept 
a position at the University of Maryland* 



thre 
writ 
prof 
to D 
prof 
June 
to S 
Reid 
to D 



Sabbatical leaves were approved for 
e faculty members who will study and 
e. -hey are Dr, Chester D* Dahle, 
essor of dairy manufacture, July 1 
ecember 31, 1949; W, R, Gordon, 
essor of rural sociology extension, 

11 to September 12, 1949 and June 11 
eptember 12, 1950;. and Dr. James J, 
, professor of bacteriology, June 15 
ecember 15, 1949, 



Leaves were approved for Dr , Herbert 
Steiner, associate professor of German, 
and for Dr * John M, A n derson, associate 
professor and acting head of the depart- 
ment of philosophy, for the period July 
1, 1949 to June 30, 1950, D r , Steiner 
will teach at Queens College, Now York, 
and study while Dr* Anderson 5? writing 
a book* 

James 0« D-^tt was promoted from 
assistant professor to associate pro- 
fessor of vegetable gardening extension, 
effective June 16, 

Announcement was made of the appoint- 
ment of Carroll L, Key, Jr., chief elec- 
tronics engineer, with Finch Telecom-' 
munications, Inc., as associate pro- 
fessor of engineering research in the 
Ordnance Research Laboratory, effective 
Ma y 1 • 

Robert C, proffitt, of Altoona, was 
named manager of food stores and foods 
buyer, effective May 16, while Margaret 

v."v 

of f 

duct 

empl 

wa s 

Vane 

Hall 



ance was appointed assistant manager 
ood stores in charge of food pro- 
ion. Proffitt since 1938 has been 
oyed by Libby, McNeill & Libby and 
manager of the Altoona district. Miss 
e has been food supervisor in Simmons 



SIX PROGRAMS PLANNED FOR SUMMER ARTISTS COURSE SERIES 



Six programs have been arranged for 
the 1949 Summer Artists' Course Series. 

The series opens during the Inter- 
Session, June 15, with Jean Murai in a 
program, "Folk Songs Around the World," 

During the Main Session, Evelyn Mac— 
Gregor, soloist on three prominent radio 
network programs, will present a program 
July 6; and on July 12, the Ambassador 
Qiuartet and the S Tr iss Bell Ringers will 
present a vocal and instrumental program, 



On July 20, LaMeri and Her Ensemble t 
will appear while on July 28, the Eb— 
onaires, featuring a program of songs, 
are scheduled. The series closes during 
the Post— Session with Guthrie Fry and 
Sarah Revelle presenting a program of 
vocal music on August 16, 

Application blanks for ticekts to 
the four Main Session numbers are avail- 
able at the Summer Sessions office, 102 
Burr ewes Building, They are priced at 



$2,40, 



FIRST TRUSTEE-FACULTY DINNER TERMED SUCCESS 



The first in what is expected to be- 
come a series of annual Faculty— Tru stee 
dinners was attended by more than 200 
faculty me mb e r s and 19 members of t he 
Board of Trustees, Th e dinner was held 
on Friday, May 13, at the Nittany Lion Inn, 

Dr, Corliss R, Kinney, professor of 
fuel technology, served as toastmaster. 
He introduced James Milholland, acting 
president of the College and president of 



the Board of Trustees, who expressed the 
appreciation of the Board, 

Dr , Kinney also introduced other 
members of the Board of Trustees, Dr, 
John W, Gardner, vice— pre sident of the 
Carnegie Corporation; and Dr • John Dale 
Russell, of the U, S, Office of Education, 
who was the speaker of the evening. He 
spoke on "problems of Administering a 
Modern University," 



J OHN 



WHITE AWARDS MADE TO FOUR STUDENTS 



In recognistion of outstanding scholar- 
ship, Walter I, Murray, senior in commerce 
and finance, has been awarded the John W- 



White Gold Medal, 

James H, Robinson, senior in the pre— 
medical curriculum, has been awarded the 



John W, White Fellowship, amounting to 
$600, 

John W* White Scholarships in Spanish 
have been awarded to Marcel Carvallo, . 
senior in chemical engineering, and to 
John B, Dalbor, sophomore in the lower 
divi sio n. 



DRIVE TO COLLECT BOOKS FOR PHILIPPINE STUDENTS OPENS 



To help meet the need for books 
printed in the English language in the 
Philippine Islands, Pi Gamma Mu , social 
science recognition society, with the co- 
operation of Alpha phi Omega, men's ser- 
vice fraternity, and the Christian Associ- 
ation, are collecting used text books. 

Collection boxes have been placed in 



dormitories, the Central Library, Old 
Main, Temporary Union Building, and Rea 
and Derick Drug Store, 

Individuals or fraternities with 
large numbers of books may call Franklyn 
D, Fry (4794), chairman of the drive, and 
committee members will call for the 
books. 



OF GENERAL INTEREST 



MEMORIAL DAY : 
and final exa 
scheduled for 
Day, which wi 

CHAPEL: Ther 
on Sunday, Ma 
day, June 5, 
the Euclid Av 
land, 0., wil 
sermon to the 
will be held 
^here will be 

HOME SPORTS: 
baseball, Was 
tennis 
28, 2 



Offices will be closed 
minations have not been 

Monday, May 3 0, Memorial 
11 be observed as a holiday, 
* * * 

e will be no chapel services 
y 29, but at 11 a.m. on Sun— 
Dr. Bernard C, Clausen, of 
enue Baptist Church, Cleve— 
1 deliver the baccalaureate 

graduates. The service 
in Recreation Building, 

no academic procession. 



>, golf, 
, l. p.m., t 
baseball , Wa 
golf, tennis, 

HELP TO MOVE: 
living in Eas 
ning t o move 
and transport 
Employment Of 



Friday, May 27, 4 p.m., 
hington and Jef f er son jPlAA 

and track j S a turday, May 
ennis, Syracuse! 2:30 p»m,, 
shington and Jefferson; PIAA 

and track, 
* * * 

Faculty and staff members 
tview Terrace who are plan— 
and would like to have help 
ation should call Student 
fice, Ext. 231. 



SUMMER HOUSING: Staff 
of furnished houses or 
are available for the S 
are requested to report 
Summer Sessions Office, 
if the facilities are a 
a part of the session, 
Office desires they be 
some requests are for sh 

* * * 

DEATH: Mrs. O r melle Ha 
71, who taught mathemat 
til her retirement in 1 
18 at her State College 



members knowing 

apartments that 

ummer Se ss ion s 
that fact to the 
E x t, 391. Even 

vailable for only 

the Summer Sessions 

reported since 

ort periods, 

ines Stecker, age 
ios from 1924 un— 
944, died on May 
home , 



NAMED FELLOW; I n recognition of out- 
standing achievement in the science of 
physics, Dr. Marsh W, White, professor 
of physics, has been elected a fellow in 
the American Physical Society,, 



OFFERED COMMISSIONS: Commissions in the 
active reserve of the Army Medical Ser- 
vice Corps are available for qualified 
graduate students in clinical psychology 
and psychophysiology. Details of the 
program are available at the Office of 
Dr. B, V, Moore, head of the department 
of psychology, 

* * * 

INVITED: Dr. Haskell B, Curry, professor 
of mathematics, has been invited to pre- 
sent a paper at the International Con- 
gress of Philosophy and Sciences in Paris 
October 17 to 22, Dr » C u rry doesn't 
expect to be able to accept the invi— 
tat ion, 

* + * 

PRESENTS PAPER: Dr. Joseph Marin, pro- 
fessor of engineering mechanics, pre- 
sented a paper at the meeting of the 
Society for Experimental Stress Analysis 
in Detroit, Mich, last week, 

* * * 

DAIRY SALES: The State College Creamery 
sales room will be open from 9 a.m. to 
4 p.m. on Sundays, 

* * * 

CONDUCTS WORKSHOP: Margaret C, Raabe, 
assistant professor of clinical speech, 
conducted a workshop at the annual 
meetings of the Middle Atlantic Zone of 
the American Hearing Society in Washing- 
ton, D.C. on Friday, She discussed "Use 
of 



3 he discussed 
a Pure Tone Audiometer," 

* * * 



NAMED TREASURER: Harold W, L 
chasing agent, has been re-e 
the third time as treasurer 
National Association of Eauc 
Buyers, H e also was re-name 
executive committee during t 
sessions held in Boston, 

* * * 

ELECTED: Dr. Franklin B. K r 
fessor of La tin, was elected 
of the Classical Association 
Atlantic States at the annua 
held recently in Buffalo, 

* * * 



oman, pur- 
lected for 
of the . 
at ional 
d to the 
he recent 



auss, pro— 
pre s ident 
of the 

1 meeting 



OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS FROM THE OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR AND DEAN OF ADMISSIONS 

Withdrawa 1 s : 



Gr, Boyer, W a lter E,, Psy, May 4 
Gr, Gordon, LaConte, AL, F e b„. 28 
5 Gural, Charles B,, IE, Apr, 15 



4 Palmer, William E,, AgEc, Apr, 23 

6 Ritts, Arch V,, AH, Apr, 23 

Gr, Shoff, Christopher J., EE, May 16 



Reasons for withdrawal; Illness, 3; death of father 2; and financial 1. 

PENN STATE COUECTiOiv 



FEE EXEMPTIONS FOR SUMMER SESSIONS, 1949 



In order for a staff member or any of 
his dependents to be granted the privi- 
leges of exemption from the incidental 
fees for the Int er-Se ssion , Main S ess ion, 
or Post-Session, 1949, the staff member 
should make application immediately in 
the office of his dean or administrative 
officer, specifying the various sessions 
to be attended. 

Separate forms should be submitted 
by the dean or administrative officer for 
each session no later than one week prior 
to the opening of each session* 



Full— time regular employees with 
academic rank are limited to six credits 
with exemption privileges during the en- 
tire Summer Sessions period. 

Full-time regular employee s, other 
than academic employees may take only 
4 o'clock hours of classes per week 
during working hours, regardless of the 
number of credits involved* 

Fees Will be collected in full on 

registration days if the application for 

fee exemption has not been previously 
approved. 



FACULTY LUNCHEON CLUE NAMES STEERING COMMITTEE 



Six faculty and staff members were 
named to the Steering Committee of the 
Faculty Luncheon Club for the 1st se- 
mester, 1949-50. 

T hey are Dr. Albert K, Kurtz, pro- 
fessor of psychology; J. C» Lester, 
associate professor of mechanical engi- 



neering; David H» McKinley, assistant 
professor of economics ;• Dr. Richard C. 
Raymond/ associate professor of physics; 
Elsa C. Lisle, circulation librarian; 
and Dr. Pearl 0. Weston, dean of women. 

Final session of the club for the 
current semester was held on Monday, 
May 23. 



VIEWGRAPH NOW AVAILABLE THROUGH AUDIO VISUAL AIDS 



The Audio Visual Aids Library now has 
a Viewgraph available for examination and 
trial by members of the College staff. 

The equipment enables the instructor 
to write on a transparent plate or piece 
of cellophane at desk level (facing the 
class), and what he writes is projected 



onto a screen in the front of the room. 

The versatile apparatus is very use- 
ful in many classroom situations and '.. 
should also be useful to athletic coaches 
in explaining diagrams of plays, etc. 
Arrangements to see the Viewgraph may be 
made by calling M r s. Ella M, Kitson, Ext. 
176. 



COLLEGE RECEIVES GRANTS TOTALLING $118,700 FOR RESEARCH 



Grants, totalling $118,700, have been 
made to the College for research work 
under agreements recently approved by the 
Board of Trustees. 

New agreements provide for a grant 
of $1200 from the E, I, duPont de Hon- 
ours & Co. for research in the use of 
uramite on turfs. Work will be conducted 
by H. B u rton Musser, professor of .agrono- 
my. A grant of $500 from the Lehigh 
Valley Cooperative Farmers for research 
on artificial breeding, conducted by Dr. 
John 0. Aimquist, associate professor of 
dairy husbandry, also was announced, 

A n other new grant provides $3000 from 
the Viking Fund to complete a study on 
bone density and skeletal developments in 
children. ^he work is conducted by the 
Ellen H. Richards Institute under the 
direction of Dr. Pauline Beery Mack. 



The American Petroleum Institute has 
made grants of $38,000 and $11,500 for 
continuation of work conducted in the 
School of Chemistry and Physics by Dr. 
Robert W, S c hiessler, assistant professor 
of chemistry, and by D r# T&onas S» Oak- 
wood, associate professor of organic 
chemi stry. 

A grant of $44,000 frcm Standard 
Oil Development Co^ provides for the con- 
tinuation of research in the Petroleum 
Refining Laboratory under the direction 
of Dr. Merrell R. Fenske. 

The Joy Manufacturing Co. has made 
a grant of -$20,500 for the continuation 
of a study on underground mechanical 
loading and transportation in mines. The 
work is conducted in the S c hool of Mineral 
Industries under the direction cf David 
R. Mitchell, professor of mining engi«*< 
neering. 









\ J ~ 



c V 



THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 



Jf J\ w U L 1 I 



The Bulletin is published weekly during the College 
year as a means of mafcSng official announcements 
and presenting items of interest to the faculty. All 




BULLETIN 



contributions should be as brief as possible 
reach Louis H. Bell, Director of Public Information, 
313 Old Main, not later Shan 10 a. m. each Friday. 



VOL. 



36 



May 23 , 1949 



NO. 



32 



1742 CANDIDATES FOR DEGREES AT TV/IN COMMENCEMENT EXERCISES ON MONDAY, JUNE 6 



James Milholland, acting president 
of the College, will confer degrees on 
1742 students at the twin Commencement 
Exercises to be held in Recreation Build- 
ing en Monday, June 6. 

Added to the total of 789 degrees 
conferred on Jaauary 31, the number of 
graduates this year will exceed 2500, 

At 10:30 a.m., students in the Schools 
of the Liberal Arts, Education, Home Ec- 
onomics, and Physical Education and Ath- 
letics will receive degrees. Graduates 
in the Schools of Agriculture, Chemistry 
and Physics, Engineering and Mineral 
Industries will receive degrees at the 
2:30 p.m. exercises. Graduate students 
will receive their degrees with the school 
in which they have majored* 

Dr. Harlan H» Hatcher, vice-president 
of Ohio State University, will speak at 
the morning exercises while Dr. D a niel 
A, Poling, editor of the Christian Herald 
and president of the World's Christian 
Endeavor Union, will speak at the after- 
noon program. 

Candidates for degrges, according tc 
Schools, are: Bachelor of Arts in Edu- 
cation, 92 j the Liberal Arts, 434, Bache- 
lor of Science in Agriculture, 208; Chem- 
istry and Physics, 182; Education, 112* 
Engineering, 301; Home Economics, 104; 
Mineral Industries, 80; Physical Edu- 
cation and Athletics, 58; and Without 
Curricular Designation, 1,, 

Master of Arts, 16; Master of Edu- 
cation, 25; Master of Forestry, 1; Master 
of Science, 99; Electrical Engineer, 1; 
Civil Engineer, 2; Engineer of Mines, 1; 
Fuels Engineer, 1; Doctor of Education, 2; 
and Doctor of philosophy, 22, 

Twenty-six of the graduates will re- 
ceive reserve commissions as second 
lieutenants in the Army or Air Force and 
two will receive regular commissions as 
ensigns in the U.S. Navy, More than 1C50 
of the graduates are veterans. 



Waiter I, Murray, in commerce and 
finance, with the highest average in the 
class, will be valedictorian, while 
Richard K, Hill, in chemistry, is the 
salutatorian. Ninety-four other students 
will be graduated with honors. 

Faculty participating in the proces- 
sion for the morning exercises will as- 
semble not later than 10;15 a.m. on the 
south side of Recreation Building, Dr. 
R. E, Dengler, professor of romance lan- 
guages, will be the Faculty Marshal for 
this group. 

For the afternoon services, faculty 
participating in the procession will . 
assemble not later than 2jl5 p.m. on 
the south side of Recreation Building, 
Br. Warren B, Mack, professor of horti- 
culture, will be Faculty Marshal for 
this group. 

While it will be appropriate for 
faculty to attend the graduation exer- 
cises for the students of thair school, 
it is -Urged that as many faculty members 
as possible attend both commencements. 



5 



At 11 o'clock on Sunday morning, June 
_ , Dr, Bernard C. Clausen, of the Euclid 
Avenue Baptist Churoh, Cleveland, 0., 
will deliver the baccalaureate sermon to 
the graduates. He will speak on "The 
Baby Who Could Not Cry," While Commence- 
ment Exercises are open only to friends 
and relatives of the graduates who have 
been given one of the three tickets issued 
to the graduate, the Baccalaureate Service 
will be open to the public. 

At 7:30 o'clock on Sunday night, Class 
Day Exercises will he held in Recreation 
Building, In addition to the valedictory 
and salutatory addresses, class honors 
will be bestowed and Terrell L, Ruhlman, 
class president, will present to the 
College the class gift. The gift consists 
of a check for $2,000. for the Stude2it Book 
•Store and another check for $8,000 toward 
the Student Press fund, 
holland will accept the 
of the College. 



President Mil- 
gifts in behalf 



, oUJ*il'^ 



PROCEDURE FOR SUMMER SESSIONS REGISTRATION OUTLINED 

OR SCHEDULING OFFICE) 



The following procedures will be fol- 
lowed for Inter-Session Registration which 
will be held from 8 a.m. to 12 noon on 
Tuesday, June 7, in Recreation Building, 

STUDENTS WHO HAVE COMPLETED FIRST 
PHASE REGISTRATON: (l) Present white 
notification of admission card at ad- 
vanced registration desk, second floor, 
Recreation Building, and receive envelope 
containing schedule and class cards. Re- 
port to S ec tion 5, main floor, Recreation 
Building, - 



(l) Secure application at Section 1, 

(2 ) Obtain approval of faculty of de*» 
part me nt in which course is to be taken. 
Section 2, 

(3) Present approved application to 
Section 3 to receive class admission ■ 
cards, 



(4) Obtain approval of Advisor (Regular 
Undergraduates) or Director of Summer 

(2) Receive registration forms at Section Sessions 4U (Summer Session Students) 
5. or Dean of Graduate S c hool (Graduate 

Student s ) „ 

(3 ) Fill out schedule in pencil. Please 

follow direct ions on the form. S e ction 6, (5) Receive registrat ion. forms at See** 

t ion 5 , 

(4) Present completsd registration forms 

to checkers in Section 7, (6) Fill out all forms, (Please follow 

instruct long | e Section 6 a 
'5) present schedule form to Fee Assessor, 



Section 8. 

(6) Pay fees at cashier's window, Sec- 
tion 9, and receive stamped admission 
class cards and receipt, 

(7) All veterans report to Armory main 
floor to complete registration. 



(7) Present completed forms at checkers 
table, Section 7, 



(8 



Present schedule form to Fee 



Assessor, Sect ion 8, 

(9) Pay fees at cashier *s window, Sec- 
tion 9, 



NEW STUDENTS (THOSE WHO HAVE NOT PRE* (10 ) All veterans report to Armory main 
SENTED AN APPLICATION TO SUMMER SESSIONS floor to complete registration, 

EVAN PUGH MEMORIAL EXHIBIT OPENS IN LIBRARY; TO CONTINUE UNTIL JULY 15 

To commemorate the 90th anniversary assisted by Marjorie H, Powers and var— 
of the arrival of the first students at ious faculty and staff personnel* 
the College on February 15, 1859, the 
Library has arranged the Evan Pugh Memo- 
rial Exhibit, now on display in the foyer 
of the building. 

The exhibit , which will continue through. 
July 15, was arranged by Mrs, Abbie H, 
Cromer, curator for the Penn State Room, 




LIERARY PUBLISHES SCHEDULE FOR PERIOD JUNE 1 TO 26 



The Central Library will Observe the 
following hours during the remainder of the 
seme st er : 

Wednesday, June 1, 7:50 a.m. to 5 p.m,; 

Thursday— Saturday , June 2-4, 9 a,m, to 5 

p,m,j Sunday, June 5, 2 p.m. to 5 p.m, 

(the lobby will be open from 2 to 10 p.m, 

to enable visitors to the campus to see 

the Pugh Exhibit )j Monday, June 6, 9 a,m, 
to 5 p.m. 



During the Inter— Se ssion, June 7-24, 
the following schedule will be observed: 
Sundays, closed; Mondays through Thurs- 
days, 7:50 a,m» to 9 p,m*; Fridays, 
.m»« Sa + nvrlavs. Q a.. 



7:50 a,m, to 5 p.m,,; 
to 5 p.m. 



'aturdaySj 9 a,m. 



■ On Saturday, June 25, the Library 
will be open from 9 a,m, to 5 p.m, and 
•on Sunday, June 25, the Library will be 
closed. 



EVAN PUGH SCHOLARS NAMED; MEDALS AWARDED 



In recognition of outstanding academic Horst M a Prehl, Edward P, Sugrue, and 
achievements, six seniors and five juniors Harold B, Clark, all juniors, 
have been cited by the Senate Committee on 

Scholarships and awarded medals by the 
Honor Society Council, 

Silver medals have been awarded to J, 
Robert O'Donnell, Gilbert H. Friedman, 



Gold medals .were" awarded to Mackey 
Emmert , 'Clinton H ft Grace, Raymond H, 
Robinson, Jack M<> Murr, William J« Pade, 
and Donald L, Tanner, all seniors. 



OF GENERAL INTEREST 



SENATE: The College S e nate will meet at 
4:10 p.m. Thursday, June 2, in Room 121, 
Sparks Building, Annual reports of the 
Senate Committees are due in the Office 
of the S e nate Secretary, Dean R<, M. 
Gerhardt, on or before June 2, 1949, 

* * * 

AGRICULTURE FACULTY: T here will be a 
meeting of the faculty of the School of 
Agriculture at 4:10 p.m. on Wednesday, 
June 1, in Room 103, Agriculture Building, 

* * * 

ENGINEERING FACULTY: There will be a 
meeting of the faculty of the School of 
Engineering in Room 110, Electrical 
Engineering Building, at 3 p.m. on Thurs- 
day, June 16, 



HOME SPORTS 



• 7 



baseball, Duquesne 



Saturday, June 4, 2:30 p. 



SAM: J , 0, Keller, assistant to the 
president in charge of extension, will 
address the meeting of the Central . 
Pennsylvania chapter, The S 0O i e ty for 
the Advancement of Management, at the 
Penn Belle Hotel in Bellefonte on Thurs- 
day night, June 2, H e will Speak on 
"The Training Program in Japan Since 
World War II." 

* * * 

TO PARTICIPATE: Dr. Eugene T, McDonald, 
director of the Speech and Hearing Clinic, 
will participate in meetings of the 
American Medical Association in Atlantic 
City, N.J, on June 6-10. He will take 
part in a laryngect omized clinic. 

* * + 

IN ROUND-TABLE: Dr , Paul H. Schweitzer, 
professor of engineering research, will 
participate in a round— table discussion 
on "Compound Powerplant s" at the summer 
meeting of the Society of Automotive 
Engineers in French Lick, Ind., June 
5 to 10, 

* * * 

APPOINTED: Dr. A, H, Waynick, professor 
of engineering research, recently wa s 
appointed to the national committee on 
wave propagation by the Institute of 
Radio Engineers, 

* * * 



OPENS EXHIBIT: 
fessor of art e 
hibit of works 
staff members 
College in Tall 



SPEAKS 



W. 



fesgor and head 
chemistry, rece 
affiliate group 
Society at the 
His topic wa s : 
Profession of C 



Viktor LoTrenfeld, pro — 
ducr.tion, opened an ex— 
of art by students and 
of the Florida A, and M, 
ahassee, Fla, recently, 
*■* * 

Conard Fe melius, pro- 
of the department of 

ntly addressed the student 
of the American Chemical 

University of Delaware, 

"Some Reflections on the 

hemi stry ." 
* * * 



JUDGE: Harold P. Zelko, associate pro- 
fessor of public speaking, was one of the 
judges for the seventh annual Tournament 
of Orators sponsored in New York by the 
Hearst Newspapers to determine the champi- 
on high school and college public speakers 



for the East coast, 

* * * 

ON PANEL: D r , Albert F, Buffington, pro- 
fessor of German, attended the annual 
meeting of the Pennsylvania German Folk- 
lore Society at Ursinus College, College— 
ville, recently. He participated in a 
panel discussion on "The Teaching of 
Pennsylvania German," 

* * * 

AT MEETINGS : Christine F„ C a lmon, in- 
structor in housing and home art, last 
week participated in the meetings of 
the National Society for Crippled Chil- 
dren in Chicago, 111, She is architectur- 
al consultant for the group, 

* * * 

TO RECEIVE DEGREE: Dr. David H. Rank, 
professor of physics, will receive an 
honorary doctor of science degree from 
Lebanon Valley College at Commencement 
Exercises on June 6. 

* * * 

SLIDE ACCEPTED: N ra E, Wittman, in- 
structor' in G e rman, has been informed 
that her color slide, "Dusk" was accepted 
by the First Halifax International S a lon 
of Photography and Color Slide Exhibition. 
The picture was taken by Miss Wittman 
along the coast of Alaska last summer, 

* ■+ * 

CONSULTANT: Margaret Riegel, associate 
professor of home economics education, 
will be consultant in the Philadelphia 
Board of Education Workshop for Teachers 
during June and July, Her topic will 
be :"Using Aids in Teaching Family 
Problems , n 

* * * 

TO PRESENT PAPER: Dr. Joseph Marin, 
professor of engineering mechanics, will 
present a paper at the National Applied 
Mechanics meetings of the •"■merican 
Society of Mechanical Engineers in Ann 
Arbor, Mich,, June 13-15, The paper is 
titled "Biaxial Tension— Tens ion Fatigue 
Strengths of Metals," 

* * * 

SUMMER HOUSING; Staff members knowing 
of furnished houses or apartments that 
are available for the Summer Sessions 
are requested to report that fact to 
the Summer Sessions Office, Ext, 3 91. 
Since some requests are for only a part 
of the session, vacancies for even a 
short period should be reported, 

* * * 

ATTEND CONFERENCE: Kelly Y e aton, assist- 
ant professor cf dramatics, will partici- 
pate in four sessions on motion pictures 
at the third annual Dramatics Arts Con- 
ference at Indiana University, Bloomington 
Ind,, June 13-18, Arthur C, Cloetingh, 
professor of dramatics, will join Yeaton 
in attending the conference and as 
national secretary-treasurer of Theta 
Alpha Phi, national dramatics recognition 
society, will participate in the meetings 
of that group at that time. Students -who 
will attend are Frederick E, Leuschner, 

and Fracine B. Toll, 

* * * 

PEN N Sir^fb JO-J-CV I 



GOING ABROAD? Many faculty and staff 
members are planning trips 'Co foreign 
countries during the summer* The De- 
partment cf Public Information would 
appreciate a brief note on proposed trips 
from individuals who will visit other 
countrie s , 

* * * 

CONFERENCE: A High School Chemistry 
Teachers' conference, sponsored by the 
Pennsylvania section of the American 
Chemical Society, was held on the campus 
on Hay 14, 

* * * 

CONFERENCE: A Speech and Hearing Con- 
ference for rehabilitation officers of 



the State Board of Vocational Education, 
Bureau of Rehabilitation, was held here 
last week. It was sponsored by the 
Speech and Hearing Clinic, 

* * * 

ATTENDS MEETING: Dr. H. I» Wilson, di- 
rector of resident instruction in the 
School of Agrioulture, attended a meet- 
ing of the organization and policy 
committee of the American Association 
of Land Grant Colleges and Universities 
in Chicago recently, H c also attended 
a meeting on Sears, Roebuck Scholar- 
ships which was held in Chicago, 



28 MEN ELECTED TO SOCIETY OF THE SIGMA XI 



In recognition of research work done, 
28 men have been initiated bv the 
Pennsylvania State College chapter of 
the Society of the Sigma Xi, 

Among those named to membership are: 
Robert L, Beacher, George M, Dusinberre, 
Hsioh-Yu Hou, G e orge J, Janz, R, Rupert 
Kountz, and Tien-chioh I so. 

Associate members advanced to full 
membership are Clayton H, Allen, Arthur 



Ho Benner, and David G, White, 

Graduate students named to associate 
membership are Leonard W # Aurand, J, 
Norton Brennan, Marvin H, Glauberman, 
Harry M, Luhrs, Walter H, Manning, 
George II, Millman, D a vid G. Skillman, 
Marvin N, Stein, Paul R, Y der, Edward 
M, Griest, Ernest R, Shu.ll, James H, 
Keller, Paul E, Smith, James R, Watson, 
Alvin X, Wilson, and Joseph J, Zelinski, 



OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS FROM THE OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR AND DEAN OF ADMISSIONS 

Change of Name t 
Sara Joanne Pepper to Sara Joanne Pepper Brown ^ senior in education, 



Central Li trary 



THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 

FACULTY AMJ& BULLETI 




The Bulletin if published weekly during the College 
year as a mesas of making official announcements 
and presenting items of interest to the faculty. All 



VOL. 



36 



June 6. 1949 



contributions should be as brief as possible and 
reach Louis H. ©ell, Director of Public Information, 
313 Old Main, not later than 1Q & m. each Friday. 

3 S. 



¥> 



RETIREMENTS OF W, P. LEWIS, W. P. DAVEY APPROVED; OTHER TRUSTEE ACTION 



Retirements of Willard P. Lewis, 
College librarian, and of Dr. Wheeler P. 
Davey, professor of physics and chemistry, 
were approved at the Saturday meeting of 
the Board of Trustees, Both will retire 
August 31 with emeritus rank. 

Ralph W, McComb was named successor 
to Mr. Lewis last September when, be- 
cause of ill health, Mr, Lewis accepted 
the position of associate librarian with 
a leave of absence for one year. He had 
served as librarian since 1931, 

Dr. Davey, who served on the faculty 
from 1909 to 1911 and then returned to 
the staff in 1926, will be succeeded by 
Dr. Raymond Pepinsky, research professor 
of physics at Alabama Polytechnic Insti- 
tute, whose appointment as research pro- 
fessor of physics is effective September 
It 

- Dr , Pepinsky received his under- 
graduate training at the University of 
Minnesota and his doctorate at the Uni- 
versity of Chicago, Dur i ng the war he 
served in the Radiation Laboratory of 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 
He is author of numerous papers and has 
developed new devices and techniques to 
revolut ionize crystallography. 

The Board approved the appointment 
of Dr. Philip J. Elving, associate pro- 
fessor of chemistry at Purdue University, 
as professor of chemistry, effective 



September 1, He replaces Dr. Thomas 



U. 



Ma s o n wh o s e r et ir e me n t with 
rank, effective August 
previously announced. 



emer itu s 



7, had been 



Dr« Elving received his. bachelor's, 
master's and doctor of philosophy de- 
grees at Princeton University. He 
taught at DuBois Undergraduate Center 
from 1937 to 1939, prior to going to 
Purdue. H e also served from 1943 to 
1947 as assistant director of chemical 



research for the publicker Industries, 

Philadelphia , 

Kenneth L» Holderman, professor and 
assistant director of engineering ex- 
tension, was promoted to director of 
engineering extension, effective July 
1» He will replace Edward L, Keller, 
who has held the directorship since 
1935 and will devote his full time to 
his duties as administrative assistant 
to J. 0, Keller, assistant to the Presi- 
dent, in charge of extension*- J 

The Board also announced the resig- 
nation of Dr. S» T, Yuster, professor of 
petroleum engineering and chief of the 
division of petroleum and natural gas, 
effective May 31, D r , Yuster, who has 
been on the faculty since 1934, has 
accepted a position at the University of 
California e . 

Dr. C, W. Pierce, professor of ag- 
ricultural economics, was granted a 
sabbatical leavefor six months, effec- 
tive July 1* He will attend the Inter- 
national Conference of Agricultural 
Economists in Italy and also will serve 
as regional coordinator for research in 
milk marketing for the southern land 
grant colleges. His headquarters will 
be at Mississippi State College. 

A leave of absence for one year^ 
effective July 1, was approved for K. J. 
DeJuhass, professor of engineering re- 
search, who will serve as a research 
specialist with the U» S, Army in 
Germany » 

The Trustees also approved a grant 
from the American Cyanamido Co,, pro- 
viding $800 for research on the use of 
new materials for crab grass control. 
The work will be conducted in the de- 
partment of agronomy under the direction 
of H. B, Musser, professor of agronomy. 



SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURE TO HOLD OPEN HOUSE PROGRAM JUNE 



15 - 17 



Thousands of visitors are expected 
to visit the campus next week to par- 
ticipate in the Open House Program of 
the School of Agriculture June 15, 16, 
and 17 » 



Features include tours of the Col- 
lege' farms and the var ious " buildirgs 
where special departmental exhibits 
have been arranged. ^ N STATH COLLECTION 



MINUTES OF THE SENATE MEETING OF JUNE 2, 1949 



The College Senate met at 4:10 p.m. 
on June 2, 1949, in Room 121, Sparks 
Building, with Mr. A. 0. Morse presiding. 
The list of members present is on file 
in the Office of the Registrar. 



Mr. 
Thayer, a 
Univer sit 
Secretary 
and Music 
or a memb 
? 3^ien . 
Brien wit 
of the Le 
of his wo 
i o d of ye 



Morse introduced Mr. Lynn W. 

member of the faculty of the 
y of Pittsburgh, and Executive 

of the Pennsylvania Forensic 

League, who was present to holi- 
er of our faculty, Mr. Joseph F. 

Mr. Thayer presented Mr. 0' 
h a medallion bearing the seal 
ague as a token of appreciation 
rk with the League over a per- 
ar s . 



The minutes of the last meeting, May 
5, 1949, were not read but approved as 
printed in the Faculty Bulletin for May 
9, 1949. 

Under communications from college 
officers, a letter was read from Dean 
Grace M. Henderson stating that Miss 
D e lla Avery would substitute as a sen- 
ator for Miss Ina Padgett for the Fall 
semester of 1949-50. 

A letter from Mr. C, W. Stoddart, 
Jr. stated Mr . C. M, Spiedel would re- 
present him at this meeting. 

Letters were also read indicating 
the names of the ELECTED SENATORS for the 
ensuing two years as follows: 



Agriculture 

H.O. Triebold 
A.C. Richer 
William F. Hall 



The Liberal Arts 

R.W. Brewster 
Aaron Druckman 
F.B. Krauss 



A letter was read from Mr. W. E, 
Kenworthy advising the Senate that the 
Executive Committee of the Board of 
Trustees had approved the Labor-Manage- 
ment Relations curriculum as recommend- 
ed by the College Senate at its May meet- 
ing. 

Prof, V. A. Beede, chairman of the 
Committee on Academic Standards, pre- 
sented the following cases: 

LILLIAN MALMUD petitions to take six 
credits at the University of California 
during the summer sessions. Approved. 

EVELYN ROTHBERG petitions to take six 
credits at the University of California 
during the summer sessions. Approved. 

HENRI A. GROENHEIM petitions to take six 
credits at Loyola College, Baltimore, 
during the summer sessions. Approved. 

LAWRENCE ALLEN petitions to take six 
credits at Temple University during the 
summer sessions. Approved. 



JAMES H. ZEISLOFT petitions to take six 
credits or less at the Pottsville Under- 
graduate Center during the Main Summer 
Session. Approved, 

JOHN A. BRISLIN, JR. petitions to take 
seven credits at the Hazleton Undergradu- 
ate Center for the summer session. 
Approved . 

GERALD A. WUNZ Petitions to take five 

credits at The Pennsylvania State College 

Center at Erie for the summer session. 
Approved . 

JOSEPH N. BONADIO petitions to enroll in 
lad. Ed. 6v by correspondence during the 
second half of the second semester 1949- 
50. Approved, 

Mr. Beede also presented a letter 
from Mr. A. W. Stewart concerning rules 
59, 60, and 61, of the Regulations for 
Undergraduate Students, edition 1948-49. 
The committee recommended a change in the 
wording of Rule 61 deleting the word 
"failed". The original wording is: 

For the purposes of these 
actions, if courses failed 
have been repeated, the final 
grade shall be substituted for 
the first. However, no fail- 
ing grades shall be deleted 
from the student's transcript, 

the new wording is : 

For purposes of these actions, 
if courses have been repeated, 
the final grade shall be sub- 
stituted for the first. How- 
ever, no failing grades shall 
be deleted from the student's 
transcript . 

Since this was new legislation Mr. R. G. 
Bernreuter asked for unanimous consent to 
waive the Senate ruling of having the item 
lie on the table for one month. Dean 
G. L. Haller seconded the motion and the 
Senate so voted. The Senate voted unan- 
imously to put the new wording of Rule 61 
into effect at once. 

The second part of Mr. Stewart's 
letter suggested that "When a student 
changes his curriculum, any failed courses 
not required in the new curriculum, would 
be counted in computing his average." 
The committee had no recommendation to 
make on this suggestion. The complete 
report of the Committee on Academic Stand- 
ards is on file in the Office of the Re- 
gistrar, 

Prof. M. M, Babcock, chairman of the 
Committee on Admissions, reported on the 
letter received from Mr. J. 0. Keller re- 
questing the centers at Harrisburg, 
Swarthmore , Erie, and Bradford be approved 



SOURCES OF GRANTS-IN-AID FOR RESEARCH 



The following list has been assembled by the Research Policy Committee of 
Sigma Xi, It includes all those institutions which offer outright research grants, 
or which contract authorizations for the support of research or publication in 
fields of active interest to the staff of the Pennsylvania State College. The 
principal source used in this list is National Research Council Bulletin No. 115, 
entitled "Scientific and Technical Societies of the United States and Canada", 
fifth edition, (1948), A copy of this publication is in the reference department 
of the College Library, under the call number 620.5, N21, Reft It is suggested that 
interested faculty members consult this book for further information about any 
foundation or institution which may support research in their particular fields. 
The numbers in the first column of the table are the serial numbers of the listings 
in the book© 

Other sources of information are: (l) "Fellowships and Other Aids for 
Advanced Work" published in 1947 by the Institute of Women's Professional Relations, 
(2) "American Foundations and Their Fields, VI", 1947, Raymond Rich Associates, 
and (3) "American Foundations for Social Welfare", 1938, Russell Sage Foundation. 



No « Name 
23 Aluminum Research Institute 



27 American Academy of Arts and 
Science s 

44 American Association for the 
Advancement of Science 

92 Amerioan Cander Society 



109 American Council of Learned 
S ociet ie s 

129 American Farm Research Asso, 



13 9 Amerioan Foundrymen's Asso, 

141 American Gas Association 

151 American Home Economics Asso. 

159 American Institute of Architects 



167 American Institute of ^ining and 
Metallurgical Engineers 



Field 

Aluminum foundry 

Art and Science 

Science 

Cancer research 

Humanistic sciences 
Agriculture 

Foundry practice 

Production and use 
of fuel gases 

Home Economics 

Architectur e 

Mining and Metallurgy 



Remarks 

Contracts for applied 
re search 

Varying funds for wide 
variety of projects 

Small grants 



Large total available 
through the National 
Research Council 



Funds granted through 
state farm bureaus 

Practical research 

Practical research 

Fellowships and grants 

Fellowships and 
scholarships 



178 American Iron and Steel Institute Iron and Steel 
186 American Mathematical Society Mathematics 



190 American Meteorological Soc, 

191 American Microscopical Soc, 

193 American Museum of Natural 
His t ory 

214 American Petroleum Institute 

215 American Pharmaceutical Asso. 



Met erorology 

Re search with a 
micro scope 

Natural history 
Petroleum 

Drugs 



Small grants for 
publicat ion 



Small grants for 
publioat ion 

Wide variety of grants 



Grants by agreement 
from oil companies for 
specified work 

Small grant s 



PENN STATE COLLECTION 



No , Jfame 

219 American Philosophical S c, 
held at Fhila. for Promoting 
useful knowledge 

227 American Potash Institute 



240 American Railway Engineering 
Assoc iati on 

261 American Society for Psychical 
Re search 

264 American Society for Testing 
Materials 

276 American Society of Civil 
Engineers 

279 American Society of Heating 

and Ventilating Engineers 

280 American Society of Ichthyolo- 
gists and H er p e t ologi st s 

284 American Society of Mechanical 
Engineers 

295 American Society of Refrigera- 
ting Engineers 

322 American Welding Society 

323 American Wildlife Foundation 

348 Asso. for Advancement of Psycho— 
analysi s 

350 Asso, of A mer ioan Colleges 

366 Asso, of Iron and Steel E n gi neers 

398 Biological Stain Commission 

399 Bituminous Coal Research 

505 Corn Industries Research Found- 
at ion 

510 Crop Protection Institute 



5^3 F.vapnr ?>,+, e><\ Milk Association 



6 04 Gypsum Association 



Field 

Mathematics, science 
human it ies 



Agronomy 



Railway Engineering 



Psychic Research 



Physical Testing 



Civil engineering 



Air conditioning 



Remarks 
Large grants 



Use of potassium 
and boron in 
agriculture 



Fellowships and 
grant s 



Cold-blooded vertebrates Small grants for 

public ati on 

Mechanical Engineering Fellowships, scholar- 
ships, grants 



Ref rigerat ion 
Welding 

Conservat ion 

Psychoanalysis 

Higher Education 
Iron and Steel 

Standardization of 
biological stains 

Use of Bituminous coal 
Corn industrie s 



Use of gypsum 



Small grant s 



Funds for research 
on all phases of 
welding 

Grants-in-aid for 
wildlife research 

Endowment funds not 
alio cat ed 

Special grants 

Funds for specific 
research and 
educational projects 

Funds for research 
on stains and stain- 
ing 

Funds for research 

Fellowships for 
research in chemistry 
of corn kernel 

Contracts for research 
in protection from 
injurious insects, 
plant diseases, and 
toxic substances 

Special appropriations 
are made for research 

Funds for special 
studies are 
appropriated 



No, Name Field Remarks 

617 Highway Research Board Funds for research correlation 

and special researches 

639 Illuminating Engineering Soc, Grants are made for research 

in illuminating engineering 
and related fields 

640 Independent Petroleum Assoc. Contracts for research in 
of America petroleum 

652 Institute of American Poultry Funds for research on improve- 

Industries ment of White Rocks for 

general farmer and for study 
of spots in eggs, 

682 John Simon Guggenheim General Entire income is granted to 

Memorial Foundation assist scholars and artists 

703 Lalor Foundation, Ino „ Chemistry, Fellowships and summer 

physics, fellowships 
biophysics 

707 Lifwyn Foundation for Labora- Phylobio logy Variable grounds 
tory Research in •Analytic and 
Social Psychiatry 

710 Linnaean Society of New York Ornithology Awards and publication subsidies 

727 Manufacturing Chemists Asso- Chemical Unspecified support of research 
ciation of the U n ited States Containers and 

Iran sportat ion 

728 Marine Biological Laboratory Biology Grants 

781 Millers' National Federation Milling Funds for Consumer studies 

804 Modern Language Association Language and Monograph and Research Fund 
of America Literature 

816 National Academy of Sciences General Various funds 

833 National Association of "Tool Wool Industry Occasional appropriations 
Manufacturer s 

834 National Audubon Society Wild life Fellowships 
836 National Canners Association Canned foods Grants 

844 National Cotton Council Cotton Industry 

849 National Dairy Council Milk Products 

351 National Electrical Manu- Engineering Appropriations for specific 

facturers Association safety etc. projects 

359 National Geographic Society Geography Funds for specific projects 

864 National Lime Association Lime and burned Fellowships 

lime pro duct s 

878 National Research Council General Grants and fellowships 

881 National Safety Council Safety Unspeoified support of research 

894 National Tuberculosis Asso, Chemical and bio- 

logical study 

896 National Vitamin Foundation Nutrition Funds 

900 Natural Gasoline Association Gasoline Various funds 
of America 



4 
No, Name Field Remarks 

979 Northeastern Wood Utilization Wood and wood waste Funds for special projects 
Council 

988 Nutrition Foundation, Inc. Nutrition Unspecified support of 

re search 

1031 Pennsylvania Grade Crude Oil Petroleum research Unspecified support of 

Association research 

1058 Planned Parenthood Federation Human reproduction Special funds 
of America 

1073 Radiological Society of North Radiology Special fund 
America 

1076 Research Council on Problems Alcoholism and related Grants 
of Alcohol areas 

1083 Rockefeller Foundation General Grants and fellowships 

1099 Seismo logical Society of Earthquakes Unspecified support of 

America research 

1108 Smithsonian Institution Geology, Paleontology Grant s— in— aid 

Zoology, Aercdromics 
Sun and Air studies 

1109 Social Science Research Social Sciences Research planning projects 
Council Grants-in-aid, fellowships 

1111 Society for American Archaeology Research funds 

Archaec logy 

1144 Society of Naval Architects Naval Architecture 

and Marine Engineers and Marine Engineering Special Research 

1149 Society of Sigma Xi General Grant s— in— aid 

1168 Southeast Asia Institute Southeast Asia Specific projects 

1175 Southern California Academy General Grant s— in— a id 
of S c i ence 

1186 Southwest Museum Archaeology and Grant s— in— aid 

Ethnology 

1194 Structural Clay Products Inst. Clay products Grant s— in— aid 

1219 Textile Foundation Fundamental and Ap- Grant s-in— a id 

plied Research in 
t ext ile s 

1267 Wildlife Management Institute Wildlife conservation Scholarships, fellowships 

and management and research awards 



Other sources not listed in the above refer©)ao 



B 



Council on Research 

The Pennsylvania State College Grants-in-aid 

Lucius N. Littauer Foundation Social science Research grants 

235 Fourth Avenue, N,Y. , N.Y. 

Research Corporation, Mathematics, physical Large research grants 

405 Lexington Ave., N.Y, 17 science, engineering 

The Viking Funds Anthropology, anatomy Research grants 

14 E. 71st St., N.Y. 21 physiology" 

Air Materiel Command Army Quartermaster Corps National Advisory Committee for 

Wright Field, Dayton, Ohio Washington, D, C. Aeronautics, Wa shingt on, D. C. 

Office of Naval Research Signal Corps Engineering Lab U.S. Army Engineer Develop— 

Washington, D. C. Fort M mmouth, N. J, ment Lab, Fort Belvoir, Va. 

—Prepared by Research Policy Committee, Society of the Sigma Xi, 



PERSONNEL CHANGES' 

Following personnel changes approved during the period, May 10 to 27, 1949, 
are announced. Telephone extension numbers are listed for new appointees on 
campus. 

Re signat ions ;_ 

Fortunato, Steven L. Research Ass't ■* Bngineering Experiment Station 5-30-49 

Fry, Martha Olson Ass't, Director - Psychology 6-30-49 

Sneegas, Eldon C, Research Assoc, - Ordnance Research Laboratory 5-25-49 

Steiger, Heinerich A, Research Assoc, - Engineering Experiment Station 5-15-49 

Foulkrod, Jean Instructor - Child Development 6-30-49 

Kapp, Robert P, Research Ass't, - Engineering Experiment Station 7-31-49 

Engle, Helen Bus Girl — Student Union 

Krebs, Eleanor W, Clerk — Accounting 

Lawless, Jeanne Stenographer — Industrial Educat ion 

Newsom, Ruby A. Secretary — Ordnance 'Research Laboratory 

Sinkevichj Sonia Clerk - Ordnance Research Laboratory 

Sperry, Helen Key Punch Operator - Tabulating 

Bressler, Florence E, Stenographer *> Psychology 

Kessling, Walter Plumbors Helper - Physical Plant 

McCracken, Mrs, Earleen Stenographer - Forestry 

Robison, James H, Maintenance Helper — Physical Plant 

Wit mo r, Shirley N. Secretary - Bacteriology 

Carlson, Dona Jean Clerk-typist - Dean of Admissions 

Gates, Betty Receptionist — Dean of Admissions 

Gehris, Carlyn E, Secretary - Informal Instruction 6-30-49 

Hoffman, Eleanore H, Secretary — Ordnance Research Laboratory 

Jewell, Ruth M, Stenographer — Agricultural Ext ension 6-30—49 

Lamade, Clara A Secretary — Music Education 6-13-49 

Linsky, Essie D, Clerk— stenographe r - Child Development 

McBeath, Jeanne Bookkeeper — Central Extension 

Pickering, Alice S, Record Clerk — Dean of Admissions 

Rice, Amelia A, Clerk — College Health Service 6-30-49 

Rosenberry, C. 3 # Utility Man - McAllister Dining Hall _ 

Schwer, Andrew Cook — Food Service 6—23-49 

Solyan, Jean D, Stenographer - Agricultural Extension 6-30-49 

St owe, Norma M, Stenographer - Central Extension 

Wintermute, Betty Jo Telephone Operator — Physical Plant 

Forsburg, Janet C, Stenographer — Agronomy 

Hayes, Helen Statistical Clerk — Instructional Film Research 

Morton, Helen S, Secretary — Food Service 

Kramer, Ruth L, Stenographer - Psychology -and Health Service 

Shultz, Vera C. Stenographer — Instructional Film Research 

Szadziewicz, Irene Stenographer - Agricultural Economics & Rural Sociology 

Watkins, LeGrand Cook - Nittany Dining Hall 

Kahn, Gloria B, Statistical Clerk - Institutional Film Research 

Bodle, Margee Clerk-typist - Dean of Admissions 

Donohue, Eileen D, Secretary — Central Extension 

Younkin, Garnet B. Computress - Engineering Experiment Station 

Phinney, Margaret J, Secretary - Ordnance Research Laboratory 

Berry, Margaret M Clerk-typist - Ordnance Research Laboratory 

Craig, Nanette D, Chief Booker - Audio- v isual Aids Library 

Wance, Margie E, Stenographer - Engineering Experiment Station 

Oyler, .Margaret E, Ntjrse — Health Service 

Appoint me nt s : 

137 Baker, Walter L, Research Associate - Ordnance. Research Laboratory 5-16-49 

262 Buck, Roy C, Professor - Agricultural Economic s & Rurual Sociology 7—1-4' 

Kester, Peggy B, Extension Representative - Agri cultural Ext ension 6-3-49 

110J Berger, Phyllis Janet Instructor - Textiles 9-1-49 

55J Bienko, Walter J, Instructor - Engineering Mechanics 9-1-49 

142J Bietz, Irvin H. Instructor - Mat hemat ics 9-1-49 

49 Birnie, Clotworthy Jr, Instructor - Mechanical Engineering 9-1-49 

144 Condee, Ralph W. Instructor - English Literature 9-1-49 

168 Duckworth, James P, Research Assistant - Chemistry 9-1-49 

55J Haenel, Robert L Instructor - Engineering Mechanics 9-1—49 

42 Holt, Edward C, Jr. Instructor - Civil Engineering 9-1-49 

255 Moen, Carl Johan Instructor - Physics 9-1-49 

142M O'Connor, John J. Instructor - Philosophy 9-1-49 

142J Raines, Leila R. Instructor - Mathematics 9-1-49 

49 Sellers, Meal S, Instructor - Mechanical Engineering 9-1-49 



142 M 
107J 

130 

137 
3 94 

340 
3 05 J 

122J 

203 

262 

262 
137 
137 

93M 
93M 

3 83 

137 

236 

137 

3 94 

137 
276 



Finch, Henry A, 
McDowell, Elizabeth 
Miller, Glenn 1, 

Peek, Eben M. 

Key, Carroll L. 
Ball, Margaret 
Fisher, Pauiyne M« 
Holcomb, Lucie 
Meyers, Lee W. 
Fogleman, ^oy K. 
King, Alice M. 
Oldemeyer, Eileen J* 
Sofianek, Marie P. 
McKinley, Joan E. 
Bird, Mona S , 
Blazosky, Clair J. 
Croyle, Charles C. 
Frants, Margaret 
Holcombe, Margaret 
Marsden, Ruth R. 
Miller, Veda C, 
Owens, Carol 
Petcavage, K. Regina 
Sloan, Anne E, 
Chri st opher son, Keith 
Dunlap, Doris 
Confer, Elfrieda B. 
Leaves of Absence: 

Waingrow, Marshall 
Yeager, Elizabeth W. 

Ashton, Marie M. 
Besesparis, Grace 
Bowers, Ella W, 
Guiser, Elmira 
Gust in, Helen M. 
Herman, W, W, 
Johnston, Gertrude 
Keen, Hazel 
Kowalski, Frances 
Lowe, Theodore H. 
Moffett, Gertrude 
Mur p h y , Ma r y Lou 
Rockey, Myra 
Schwer, Evelyn 
Skeath, Elizabeth ] 
Smoyer, Celia E. 
Sp rankle, Charles 
Struble, Catherine 



S. 



M. 



M. 



E. 



M; 



• ry 



Struble , 
Thomas, Betty K. 
Williams, Alvirda 
Seller, Elizabeth 
Zong, Vivian E. 
Minnich, Helen 



Ass't, Professor - Philosophy 9-1-49 

Ass 't .Prof e s sor - Child Development 9-1-49 

Ass 't .Extension Representative - Agri cultural Ext . 5-16=49 

Ass't, in Charge - Central Extension Division 

Community Colleges 5-1-49 
Assoc. Professor - Ordnance Research Laboratory 5-1—49 
Stenographer — Education Placement 
Secretary — President s Office 
Bus Lady - Student Union 
Janitor — Physical Plant 
Maintenance Helper - Physical Plant 
Clerk — Agr icultural Economics & Rural Sociology 
Clerk - Agri cultural Eoo nomic s & Rural Sociology 
Clerk - Agr icultural Economics & Rural Sociology 
Stenographer — Ordnance Research Laboratory 
Secretary — Ordnance Research Laboratory 
Electrician — Physical Plant 
Refrig- Mechanics Helper - Physical Plant 
Secretary — Music Education 
Secretary — Ordnance Research Laboratory 
Record Clerk — Dean of Admissions 
Secretary - Ordnance Research Laboratory 
Stenographer - Education Placement 
Telephone Operator - Physical Plant 
Secretary — Ordnance Research Laboratory 
H. Janitor, Physical Plant 
Secretary — Bacteriology 
Dormitory Operator — Physical Plant 



Instructor — English Liters 
Instructor — Education 
Simmons Dining Hall 
Hittany Dining Hall 
Simmons Dining Hall 
McAllister Dining Hall 
Simmons Di n i n g Hall 
Simmons Dining Hall 
McAllister Dining Hall 
Simmons Dining Hall 
McAllister Dining Hall 
McAllister Dining Hall 
Simmons Dining Hall 
Nittany Dining Hall 
McAllister Dining Hall 
At he rt on Dining H a n 
Simmons Dining Hall 
McAllister Dining H a H 
McAllister Dining Hall 
Simmons Dining Hall 
At he rt on Dining Hall 
At he rt on Dining Hall 
McAllister Dining Hall 
■Simmons Dining Hall 
Simmons Dining Hall 
Stenographer - Veteran Affa 



ture 7-1-49 


to 


6-30-50 


7-1-4 9 


to 


6-3 0-51 


6-16-49 


to 


9-15-49 


6-21-4 9 


to 


9-19-49 


6-23-49 


to 


9-23-49 


6-2 0-49 


to 


9-23-49 


6-24-4 9 


to 


9-22-49 


6-18-49 


to 


9-22-4 9 


6-15-49 


to 


9-23-49 


6-2 0-49 


to 


9-23-49 


6-12-49 


to 


9-12-4 9 


6-2 0-49 


to 


9-22-49 


6-2 3-4 9 


to 


9-2 3-4 9 


6-2 0-4 9 


to 


9-19-4 9 


6-21-4 9 


to 


9-23-49 


6-18-49 


to 


9-15-49 


6-23-49 


to 


9-23-4 9 


6-20-4 9 


to 


9-23-4 9 


6-18-49 


t 


9-22-4 9 


6-23-49 


to 


9-23-4 9 


6-9-4 9 


to 


9-17-49 


6-2 0^4-9 


to 


9-12-4 9 


6-14-4 9 


to 


9-2 3-4 9 


6-22-49 


to 


9-23-4 9 


6-23.-4 9 


to 


9-23-4 9 


ir s 6-1-49 


to 


9-12-49 



Change of Maine ; 

June Kunkle to June Kunkle Griffith - Agriculture 



RALPH DORN HETZEL AWARD ESTABLISHED 



An annual award to be known as the 
Ralph Dorn Hetzel Award has been es- 
tablished in memory of the late Presi- 
dent Hetzel by his wife, Estelle H. 
Hetze 1, 

The award, which will consist of a 
cash prize and an appropriate certifi- 
cate, will be given to the senior class 
man or woman "whose achievement scno** 



lastically and in the other activities 
of college life gives the highest prom- 
ise of that kind of useful citizenship 
in national life expounded by President 
Hetzel*" 

The amount °f "the award, which will 
be made for the first time in 1949, 
will be the annual return on $2,000. 



HAMIviOrp NAMEE CHAIRMAN OF C01.31ITTEE TO STUDY PROGRAMS AT SERVICE ACADEMIES 



Dr« H. P, Hammond, dean of the 
School cf Engineering, has been named 
chairman of a committee to study in - * 
struction in engineering and science 
at the three service academies — Navy at 
Annapolis* Army at West Point; and the 
projected Air Force Academy, 



^he appointment was announced by 
the Service Academy Board, which is 
headed by Dr. Robert L, Stearns, presi- 
dent of the Uni\r e rsity of Colorado, 
and is a part of the Office of the 
Secretary of Defense. 



LIBRARY TO REaUIRE IDENTIFICATION CARDS 



Be 

will r 

ident i 

' a n d o t 

Th 
it is 
have s 

when b 



ginni 
equir 
ficat 

her hi: 

i s me 
expla 
igned 
or row 



ng June 1 
e all per 
ion cards 
at er ial's, 

asure is 
ined , bee 
f ict it io 
ing mater 



3, the College Library 
sons to present 
when borrowing books 



felt to be necessary, 
ause some readers 
us names and addresses 
ials. The request is 



made to insure the return of library 
material, making it available to the 
largest number of people. 

Students should use matriculation 
cards and faculty their College identi- 
fication cards. Others should apply 
at the circulation desk for a library 
identification card to be used when 
borrowing books. 



B.C. JONES RE-ELECTED PRESIDENT OF ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 



B» C. Jones, Pittsburgh, on Saturday 
was re-elected president of the Penn 
State Alumni Association and six other 
incumbents were returned to the executive 
board, Robert K, Cochrane, Pittsburgh, 
was named to the Athletic Advisory Board, 

Others named to the executive board 
were Julia G, Brill, State College* George third vice-president. 



A, Doyle, Philadelphia* Earl E# Hewitt, 
Sr,, Indiana* H. I f S m ith, Washington, 
D.C.; M. J. McCleary, Johnstown* and 
Ivan H. Walker, Belief onto. 

Miss Brill was re-elected first vice- 
president; Doyle second vice-president; 
nd John T. Ryan, Jr., Pittsburgh, 



POOR COMPLETES MURALS IN OLD MAIN 



Henry Varnum Poor has completed his 
work on the murals in Old Main, 

The project, financed largely by 
student funds, was started in 1940 with, 
the Land Grant Fresco on the north wall. 
In March, 1948, poor continued the work, 
completing the Mineral Industries panel 
on the east wall. 



Returning in December, 1948, the 
agricultural panels on the we st wall 
were done and the remainder of the mural 
was completed on June 1, 

The Class of 1932 presented the first 
mural while graduating classes and other 
students in 1946 financed the completion 
of the job. College grants also helped 
to finance the work* 



OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENT FROM THE DEAN OF ADMISSIONS AND REGISTR..R 

Withdrawals : 



6 Berkowitz, Evelyn, AL, March 21 

5 Bohren, Frank Matthew, IE, May 2 

Sp Campbell, James H,, LA, Feb. 25 



6 Cole, Joseph Martin, AH, April 5 

8 Smith, George W„, AL, April 10 

Gr Weitzel, Robert Berk, FhEd, April 2l 



Reasons for Withdrawal; Illness, 4; broken ankle, 1; to accept a position, 1, 



OF GENERAL I1ITERES' 



ENGINEERING FACULTY: The faculty of the 
School of Engineering will neet at 3 p# 
m on Thursday, June 16, in Room 110, 
Electrical Engineering Building « 

* * * 

ELECTED: The National Research Council 
has announced the appointment of B r , 
Robert V, Boucher, professor of agri— 
cultural and biological chemistry, as 
a member of the newly organized Board 
of Agriculture of the Division of Biology 
and Agriculture, T ne board has been 
created "to advance and interpret scien- 
tific knowledge pertaining to agri- 
culture, and to disseminate technical 
and deliberative conclusions among the 
proper agencies and population groups," 

* * * 

TO PRESENT PAPER: Dr. Joseph Marin, 
professor of enginering mechanics, will 
present a paper at the meeting of the 
American Society for Testing Materials 

in Atlantic Cj_ty, N, J. June 27 to July 1» 

* * * 

CALENDAR: Notices for the Main Summer 
Sessions calendar should be received 
at the Summer Sessions Office before 
Monday noon of the week preceeding the 
event , 

* * * 



APPOINTED: Viktor Lowenfeld, professor 
of art education, has been appointed 
chairman of the research committee of 
the Eastern A r t s Association* 

* * * 

TRANSFERRED: Capt, William T 3 McG a rry, 
USN, professor of naval science since 
1945, has been ordered by the Navy De- 
partment to duty in command of Destroyer 
Squadron Nine now based in San Diego f 
Calif„ H e will leave State College 
about July 10, Capt. Edward Cook, USMC 
assistant professor of naval science 
since 1946, also 1 has boen transferred. 
He Will report to Pearl Harbor for his 
n ew a s s i g nme n t . 

* * * 

SUSPEND PUBLICATION: With this issue, 
the Faculty Bulletin will suspend 
publication until the Fall semester, 

+ * * 

INTER-SESSION REGISTRAT ION TOTALS 1810: 
Registration for Inter-Session, held on 
Tuesday, totalled 1810 students. The 
Inter-Session continues until June 24» 

Other dates for the Sumner Sessions are 
Main Summer Session, June 27 t o August 6 
and po st-Se ssiong , August 8 to August 26 
and August 8 to September 17, 

* * * 



Mr Ralph W McCo; 
Central Library 



for resident instruction. The committee 
returned this natter to the Senate with- 
out recommendation but agreed to further 
study the matter if requested to do so, 
but the majority of the committee felt 
that it was not a matter within the juris- 
diction of the Committee on Admissions. 
The motion to ref^r that matter bach to 
the committee did not receive a second. 
Dean Trabue recommended the matter be 
referred to the Advisory Committee on 
Extension Services. This motion was pro- 
perly seconded and the Senate so voted. 

Dr. B.V. Moore, chairman of the 
Committee on Committees, read the stand- 
ing committees for the year 1949-50, 
which had had the approval of Acting- 
President Milholland. These committees 
are a s follows : 

Academic S t a ndards 

Victor Beede, Chairman 

Jean D» Amber son 

R . G . Bcrnreuter 

F. B, Krauss 

J . D , Lawther 

R. W, Lindsay 

L. Perez 

Merit Scott 

Admis sions 



S. L. Land, Chairman 

F. M. Coombs 

Orrin Frink, Jr. 

M. S. Gjesdahl 

Ruth Graham 

W. F. Hall 

H. J. Read 

M, L. ITillard 

R. M. Gerhardt , ex-officio 

At hie t i cs 



F. 


L. Bent ley, Chairman 


H. 


Fishburn 


J . 


H. Olewine 


N. 


R. Sparks 




Calendar 



sh, Chairman 



E. W, Callenba< 

R. M. Gerhardt 

D. J . Peery 

R. C. Raymond 

Mary Jane Wyland 

Ray V. Watkins, ex-officio 

P. C. Weaver, ex-officio 

♦Bernard W, Carbeau 

♦Rose C. Eifert 

Committee s 
B. V. Moore, Chairman 
F.J. Bedenk 
A. W, Gauger 
Brice Harris 
Margaret E, Riegel 
L. S . Rhode s 
H. K. Schilling 
H. 0. Triebold 



Public Occ a s ions 
L. A. Richardson, Chairman 
A. Druckman 
Marie Haiit 
Evelyn C. Marboe 
P. C. Weaver 
H. Fishburn, ex-officio 
W. E. Kenworthy, ex-officio 
Ridge Riley, ex-officio 
College Chaplain, ex-officio 
College Marshal, ex-officio 
♦John C. Wallace 
♦Lois A. Kcnyon 

Publications 



R. W. McConb, Chairman 

F. G. Hcchler 

D. C. Jones 

J . Paul Se Isam 

L. H. Bell, ex-officio 

T. J. Gates, ex-officio 

Re pre sent at iv e on Board of Student 

Publicat ions 
F. C. Banner 

Representatives on Council of Research 



D. 


C. 


Du n c a n 


Eric . 


L, Walker 






Rules 


R. 


E. 


Dengler, Chairman 


J. 




S a u e r 


R. 


W . 


Stone 


R. 


H. 


. Jat er s 


R. 


M. 


Gerhardt, ex-officio 

Scholarships and Awards 


s. 


w. 


Russell, Chairman 


Ma: 


ry 


B. Allgood 


R. 


J.-W • 


Dut cher 


J. 


D. 


Lawther 


E. 


F. 


Osborn 


L. 


s. 


Rhode s 


K i n s 1 


ev R. Smith 


R. 


L. 


Weber 


C. 


E. 


Courses of Study 
Bullinger, Chairman 


D. 


s . 


Cryder 


M. 


E. 


John 


L. 


T. S 
1U « 


Jones 


He! 


len 


R. LeBaron 


D. 


R. 


Mitchell 


P. 


A . 


Shelley 


E. 


B. 


vanOrmcr 


F. 


D. 
M 


Kern, ex-officio 
ilitary Instruction 



B . A . Wh isler, Cha ir ma n 

Esther A. Atkinson 

G. L. Ha Her 

William M, Lepley 

M, T. Lewis 

E. F. Osborn 

. Stoddart 

, Werner 
Ben-Hur Chastaine, ex-officio 

i W, T. McGarry, ex-officio 



c. 


W 


w 


L 


Co 


1. 


Ca 


pt 



♦Selected by the All-College President 



S tud en t We lfare 
I . K . vTil son , Chai 



ex-of f icio 

ex -officio 
officio 
ex-of f icio 



1 o tv c x ± aJC 

H. I". Wilson, Chairman 

a, C. B i s c h o f f 
Paul Bixby 
R. W. Brewster 
W, L. Morgan 
L. T. Bissey 

Pre s . A,F ,C. , 
Peter M, Giesey 

Pres . I.F ,C . , 
H. R. Glenn, ex-officio 
7f, E. Kenworthy, ex-of i _ 
Pearl 0. "„ T eston, ex~officio 
*T. Clayton Allen 
*Shirley M, Gauger 

The question vras raised as to when 
these committees should go into effect. 
Article II, section 2, of the By-Laws 
was read as follows: 

Appointments of the standing 
committees shall be made at 
the June meeting of each Col- 
lege year to take effect im- 
mediately following Commence- 
ment Day and they shall serve 
until the appointments of their 
successors become effective. 



Mr. L. A. Richardson, chairman of 
the Committee on Public Occasions, re- 
minded the members of the Senate of the 
two commencements to be held on Monday, 
June 6 . 

Miss Julia Brill announced that a 
portrait of Miss L.V.T. Simmons will be 
unveiled at 2 p.m. on Saturday in Simmons 
Hall and invited the Senate to attend. 

Under unfinished business, Prof. 
Beede requested that the recommendation 
of the Committee on Academic Standards 
concerning enrollment in Summer Sessions 
at Undergraduate Centers, which had been 
presented to the Senate at its May meet- 
ing, be tabled for further study. There 
was a second to this motion and the matter 
will lie on the table until a request be 
made for its removal for action. 

Under new business, Dr. T .', r , B. Mack 
discussed the present system of computing 
college honors. It was moved by Dr. Mack 
and seconded by Prof, R. J. Clements that 
this matter be referred to the Committee 
on Scholarships and Awards. The motion 
carried . 



Prof. Bullinger, chairman of the 
Committee on Courses of Study, presented 
a supplementary report for his committee 
which had to do with the change of course 
designations for the School of Home Ec- 
onomics. The second paragraph on page 
one of this report reads as follows: 

These course designations are 
not to be used for any schol- 
astic purposes during the col- 
lege year of 1949-50 except as 
they are needed for pre-schedul- 
ing for the Fall semester of 
1950. 

Mr, Bullinger asked for unanimous con- 
sent of the Senate to amend this para- 
graph by the inclusion of the words 
"and for Summer Sessions of 1950." 
This consent being given, Mr. Bullinger 
moved that the report of his committee, 
as amended, be adopted. The Senate 
voted unanimously to accept this report. 
The report of the committee is on file 
in the Office of the Registrar. 

Mr. Bullinger then presented a page 
of amendments to the April 7 and May 5 
reports of his committee. These amend- 
ments had the approval of each department 
concerned. The motion to adopt the May 
5 report with these amendments was carried. 

Annual reports were received from 
the following committees: Admissions, 
Committees, Courses of Study, Military 
Instruction, Publications, Public Oc- 
casions, Rules, Scholarships and Awards, 
and Student Welfare. These reports were 
not read since they will be published in 
the Faculty Bulletin from time to time. 



Mr. Morse then asked Dean F. D, Kern 
to assume the chair so that he could pre- 
sent an item of new business. 

Mr. Morse announced that each year 
estimates of enrollment are made by ad- 
ministrative officers. The Dean of 
Admissions was of the opinion that the 
estimates for Fall 1949 were reasonably 
correct, however, a new element would be 
in effect in that Rule 59 of the Regula- 
tions for Undergraduate Students, edition 
1948-49 will become operative for student;: 
from Centers at the end of the freshman 
year and for students from co-operating 
colleges at the end of the fir-st semester 
of the sophomore year. Rule 59 is as 
follows: 

A student whose scholastic 
average at the end of any 
semester except the first 
semester of the freshman 
year, falls to or below .50 
shall be dismissed from Col- 
lege for unsatisfactory 
scholarship and shall be no- 
tified to this effect by the 
Registrar. For students en- 
tering from co-operating col- 
leges, this rule shall become 
operative at the end of the 
first semester of the' sopho- 
more year , 

The Council of -".dministrat ion has 
been studying this problem and notes that 
if students are dropped by this College 
they have a poor chance of being admitted 
elsewhere. The Council directed that 
studies be made in order that we may re- 
study our admissions procedure. The Dean 



of Admissions presented a report showing 
the number of students that would be 
affected. 

Mr. Morse indicated that over a year 
ago before the .50 regulation was dis- 
cussed, the Council had recommended to 
the President that there be established 
a Division of Intermediate Registration. 
This Division of Intermediate Registra- 
tion was presented to the Board of 
Trustees and adopted on April 2, 1943 and 
described in the Faculty Bulletin on 
April 19, 1948. The Council of Adminis- 
tration was of the opinion that the 
Division of Intermediate Registration 
wa s the best solution, and that it 
should be put into operation at once, and 
that students who are assigned to this 
Division shall be so notified by the 
Registrar. It was also stated that the 
'Committee on Admissions and the Com- 
mittee on Academic Standards had dis- 
cussed this ratter in joint session and 
voted to recommend it to the Senate. 

The proposed change to Rule 59 of 
the Regulations for Undergraduate Stu- 
dents, edition 1948-49, follows: 

A student whose scholastic 
average at the end of his 
fourth or any succeeding sem- 
ester falls to or below .50 
shall be dismissed from Col- 
lege for unsatisfactory 
scholarship, and shall be no- 
tified to this effect by the 
Registrar. A student whose 
scholastic average at the end 
of his second or third semester 
falls to or below .50 shall 
not be permitted to continue 



in any School of the Col- 
lege but shall be enrolled 
in the' Division of Inter- 
mediate Registration. 

It was emphasized the above change 
does not affect the 50^ rule. 

According to a Senate ruling this 
would have to lie on the table for one 
month, however, by unanimous consent it 
could be considered at this time. The 
Chair then asked if there were any ob- 
jections to the consideration. Hearing 
none he declared that unanimous consent 
had been given. It was moved by Mr. 
Morse and seconded by Dean II. P. Hammond 
that Rule 59 be changed. 

After considerable discussion on 
this matter, Dr. B.V. Moore recommended 
an amendment to the proposed change. 

"The proposed rule be an ex- 
periment for two years only." 

This motion was seconded and the Senate 
so voted. The proposed Rule 59 as amend- 
ed was adopted by the Senate. 

Mr . Morse then resumed the chair and 
announced the Senate Breakfast for Sunday, 
June 5 at 9 a.m. at the Nittany Lion Inn. 

Mr. Morse stated that several sen- 
ators were retiring and that the good will 
of the Senate goes with them and that they 
will be missed. He also congratulated 
the faculty on the work that has been done 
and thanked the members of the Senate for 
their attendance and co-operation. 

The meeting adjourned at 6:07 p.m. 



FURMAN H. GYGER, JR., SIX INCUMBENTS NAMED TO BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



Furman H» Gyger, Jr., of Himberton, 
and six incumbents were elected to the 
Board of Trustees on Saturday for three- 
year terms. 

Alumni re-elected George H« Deike, 
Pittsburghj William D Harkins, Phila- 
delphiaj and James B„ Long, Blue Bell* 

Delegates of agricultural and in- 
dustrial societies re-elected D„ Norris 
Benedict, Wayne sbor o ; John H. Light, 



Annville; and William S, ^±ffa.ny f 
Harr isburg. 

Gyger, who was named by the agri~>. 
cultural delegates, replaces J. Eric 
Linde, of Orefield, who had served on 
the B ;ird since 1943, His father, Furman 
H« Gyger, Sr», had served on the Board 
from 1926 until his death in an accident 
on June 17, 1943 Th e new trustee is a 
graduate of the College in dairy husband- 
ry, Cl*,ss of 1937. 



MAIN APPROPRIATION BILL FOR COLLEGE PROVIDES $10,886,000 



On May 27, Governor James Duff signed 
the main appropriation bill of the College 
for $10,836, 000„ 



A sec nd bill in the amount of 
$498,000 to match new Federal grants 
for agricultural extension and research 
was vetoed by the Governor. Earlier 
the Governor had signed special bills 



This . amount was $164,000 less than 
the Legislature had approved and $2,041,000 providing $100,000 to the College "for 
less than the College had requested* It the improvement of the livestock in 



was, however, $836,000 more than the Gov- 
ernor had recommended in his budget mes- 
sage to the Legislature o 



dustry of Pennsylvania," and $15,000 
for research on methods of controlling 
gob pile fires,, 



DR. H. K. WILSON NAMED DEAN OF MEW 

Dr. H c K* Wilson, vice-dean and di- Men and Dean of ^onen, Its purpose is 

rector of resident instruction in the to assist students who desire to change 

School of Agriculture, has been named curricula because of changed objectives 

Dean of Men and director of the Division and those who are having difficulties 

of Intermediate Registration. with certain types of courses. 

At the March 25 meeting of the Ex— Kenworthy will be responsible for 

eoutive Committee of the D ard of Trustees, the coordination and development of the 

W* E» Kenworthy was appoint e& "to the new several student personnel agencies of 

position of Assistant to the President, the College and will assist the Presi — 

in Charge of Student Affairs, and Dean dent in dealing with all matters 

of Men, effective upon the retirement of affecting students other than academic 

Dean' of Men A, R« War nock on September 1* and business affairs* H e will also 

1(J *ith the new move, taken on June 4, Dp, continue as Executive Secretary to the 

Wilson will succeed Dean Warnock, thus President and Acting Secretary of the 

enabling Kenworthy to devote his time Board of Trustees, 
to the new position of Assistant to the 

President, Born and reared on an Iowa farri, Dr. 

Wilson received his bachelor of science 

Dr. Wilson will perform the duties degree at Iowa State College and his 

of the Office of the Dean of Men with master of science and doctor of phil—~ 

special emphasis on the counseling ospphy degrees at the University of 

function, assisted by Daniel A. De — Illinois. He served on the faculty of 

Marino, and will inaugurate the services Iowa State Teachers' College and the 

of the new Division of Intermediate University of Minnesota before coming to 

Registration, authorized by the Board Penn State four years ago as professor 

a year ago, but not yet put into effect, and head of the department of agronomy. 

The Division will replace the Transition He was named vice— dean of the School af 

Section formerly operated by the Dean of Agriculture on July 1, 1946. 

JEROME N. BEHRMOTN SCHOLARSHIP AWARD ESTABLISHED 

a scholarship award has .been e s— planning graduate study at the College, 

tablished to perpetuate the memory of Preference will be given to a student in 

Jerome N, Behrmann, who died on October meteorology, 
l f 1943, while a graduate student in 
meteorology. , The award was established by friends 

and neighbors of the deceased Philadelphia 

The award, which amounts to $100, student and Robert E, Caffrey, of 

will be given annually to a graduating Scranton, war named first recipient of 

senior in the School of Mineral Industries the award. 

PHILIP MURRAY SCHOLARSHIP AWARD ANNOUNCED 

A scholarship, amounting to $300 to his fellow men." 
per semester, has been established at 

the College by Clairton Local 1557, The scholarship will be used " to 

United Steelworkers of ^nerica, assist members, sons, daughters, brothers, 

sisters, or wards of members of Local 

Known as the Philip Murray Scholar— 1557 commence, carry on, and complete 

ship, Award, it was established "in their education at the Pennsylvania 

recognition of his outstanding service State College," 

COLLEGE APPROVES SCHOLARS;: IPS FOR FOREIGN STUDENTS 

The Board of Trustees of the -College fraternity Council; the other by the 

has approved the granting of scholar— Lutheran Student Association, 
ships to four foreign students for the 

Fall term. Two ether students from occupied 

European countries will have trans- 
Two of the students will be dis'— portation furnished by the American Mili- 
placed persons, one brought here and tary Government and will be sponsored 
sponsored by the local chapter of the here by Alpha Zeta and D e lta T n eta Sigma 
National Student Association and Inter— fraternities. 



THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 



F AC U L T Y 



The Bulletin is published weekly during the College- 
year as a means of making official announcements 
and presenting items of interest to the faculty. All 




3 TT T T P T T 



contributions should be as brk-S as possible and 
reach Louis H. Bell. Director of Public Information, 
313 Old Main, not later than 19 e, an. each Friday. 



VOL. 



37 



September 26, 1949 



NO. 1 



DIVISION OF INTERMEDIATE 



m— — 



On July 1, the Division of Inter- 
mediate Registration, approved by. the 



me 



Trustees of the College a year ago, was 



established with Dr 
direct or , 



H« H. Wilson as 



The division was organized with the 
belief that many students with scholastic 
difficulties can be helped if given 
proper guidance and counsel* 

More than 43 students who were 
freshmen last year have been transferred 
to the division* A list of those en- 



n GlSTRATI0N ESTABLISHED 

rolled is published in this issue. 

Guidance work for these students 
was started prior to the arrival of 
the students for Orientation Week and 
will continue until the student quali- 
fies for re-admission in a school or is 
dropped from the College* 

W, Scott Gehrnan, Jr., formerly of 
the department of psychology, has been 
named assistant to Dr. Wilson in con- 
ducting the work. 



DR. R. B. DICICERSON NAMED VICE-DEAN IN AGRICULTURE; OTHER APPOINTMENTS 



Dr. Russell B« Dickerso.n, instructor 
and assistant professor of agricultural 
education here from '193 3 to 1943, was 
named vice-dean and director of resident 
instruction in the School of Agriculture, 
effective September 1. 

Among other appo intment s. approve d 
by the Board of Trustees during the 
summer were t 

Dr. William N.- Leonard, chairman of 
the economics department at Rutgers 
University, professor and head of the 
department of economics. 



Dr. Vance G» Sprague, senior agrono— 

search Labo- 



Dr . Vance G» Sprague, £ 
mist with U, S, pasture Res„ 
ratory here, professor of agronomy. 

Andre L, Jorissen, of the University 
of Liege, associate professor of civil 
engineering. 

Dr. Maurice A. Mook, of University 
of Missouri, professor of anthropology; 



Frank W, Patrick, cf Pittsburgh Steel- 
ers coaching staff, associate professor 
of physical education and athletics; 
and Dr. Nathan Jaspen and Dr. Philip 
Ash, research fellows here, associate 
professors of film research. 

Resignations aocepted included; 

Samuel K. Hoffman, professor of 
aeronautical engineering; Charles W, 
Stickler, associate professor of 
mining engineering; and Dr. Ernest A, 
Lachner, associate professor of f ishei — 
ies biology. 

Leaves were approved for Lawrence 
C» Madison, professor of animal hus- 
bandry extension, October 1 to March 
31, 1950. Leaves for D r « Harold F. 
Alderfer, professor of political 
science and exectuve secretary of the 
Institute of Local Government and 
Dr. Paul H« Wueller, professor of 
economics, were extended to June 30, 
1950. 



DEPARTMENT OF AIR SCIENCE AND TACTICS ESTABLISHED 



A department of air science and tac- 
tics with Lt. Col. John E. Stewart in 
charge, was established at the College 
July 1. 

Work in air science and tactics sinoe 
1946 had 'been offered through the depart- 
ment of military science and tactics. 



The change is in keepirg with the 
establishment of the Air Force as a 
separate branch of the armed services. 

New officers assigned to the de- 
partment are Major Charles J. O'Brien, 
Major Arthur C. Eelfrey, and Lt . Alfred 
F « Polka,- 



**£N1n STATE COLLEC-J 



! I 



PROMOTIONS OF 97 FACULTY, STAFF MEMBERS ANNOUNCED DURING SUMMER 



Promotions of 97 faculty and staff 
members, effective July 1, were announced 
during the summer months, 

Dr c Joseph J, Lowden, associate pro- 
fessor of education, was named professor 
of education in extension and director 
of education extension, A»L, Beam, pro- 
fessor of dairy production and director 
of short courses in agriculture, was 
named professor of dairy production and 
assistant director of resident instruction 
and direector of short courses in the 
School of Agriculture. 

Dr , James M. Robertson, associate- 
professor of civil engineering, was pro- 
moted to professor of engineering research 
in the Ordnance Research Laboratory and 
will be in charge of the Garfield Thomas 
Water Tunnel „ 



Other promotions included: 

Associate professor to professor: 
Clifford R, Adams, psychology; Dr. 



Dr. 

Jessie Bernard, sociology; Julia G# 
Brill, English composition* Fred M, Coombs 
physical educationj George M, Dusinberre, 
mechanical engineering; Francis T, Hall, 
Jr., electrical engineering. 

Merwin W, Humphrey, forestry, Dr. 
Thomas c 9 Kavanaugh, civil engineering; 
Dr. David A, Kribs, botany; Dr • Stuart 
A. Mahuran, journalism; D r . H. Arthur 
Meyer, forestry; Dr , S. T .7illard Miller, 
geography; Dr. Leonard F, Miller, farm 
management * 

Dr, William M, Myers, mineral eco- 
nomics; Dr. Gordon H. Pritharn, physi_ 
ological chemistry; Dr. Alfred G. Pundt f 
history; D r « A. Bruce Sutherland, 
English literature; Dr. Edward B, van 
Ormer, psychology; and Dr. Herbert A. 
Via hi, botany. 



f e s sor 



Maurice K» Goddard, 



associate pro- 



ice k, Goddard, associate pro- 

f forestry and director of the 

Mont Alto branch was named professor o 

f the Mont Alto 



^wiy Mii/u uiouuu was named professor 

forestry and director o^ 

branch. 



of 



William H, Powers, assistant pro- 
fessor of chemistry and director of arts 
and science extension, was promoted to 
associate professor of chemistry and 
director of arts and science extension. 

-■ 

Joseph W, Hunt, assistant professor 
and supervisor of mining extension was 
promoted to associate professor and 
supervisor of mining extension and 
Oscar F. Spencer, assistant professor and 
supervisor of petroleum and natural gas 
extension was promoted to associate pro- 
fessor and supervisor of petroleum and 
natural gas extension. 



Assistant professor to associate 
professor: Dr. Paul M, Althouse, ag- 
ricultural and biological chemistry; 
Doris A, Anders, home economics ex- 
tension; Dr. Thomas F, Bates, minerr- 
alogy; Charles G, Burress, agricultural 
engineering extension; Henry H. Chisman, 
forestry; Vinton v", Detwiler^ engi- 
neering research in the Ordnance Re- 
search Laboratory, 

Dr. Ernest H. Freud, philosophy; 
Dr. Alvin R, Grove, Jr., botany; Dr. 
Louis D. Goodfellow, psychology (ex- 
tension); A, William Ha j jar, archi- 
tecture; Philip F, Halloo!:, architecture 
Kenneth W, Houp, English composition; 
Dr , Henry Janzen, political science; 
Dr, Ellen D, Kelly, physical education 
and athletics, 

R, Rupert Kountz, sanitary engi- 
neering; Dr , Wayne A, Lee, marketing; 
Dr. Kenneth V, Manning, physics; 
David H, McKinley, economics; Dr. 
Ralph F, Nielson, petroleum and natural 
gas engineering; Dr , Clarence I, Noll, 
chemistry; Dr , Leslie M, pape, philoso- 
phy; Ruth L, Pike, foods a nd nutrition; 



and Philip K 
ma chanics, 



Roos, engineering 



Instructor to assistant professor! 
Charles R, Ammerman, electrical engi- 
neering; Mabel B Barton, clothing 
extension; Allen H, Bauer, plant pa- 
thology extension; Dr. Robert Bauer, 
English literature; Grace Bennett, 
foods and nutrition; C, Howard Bingham, 
agricultural engineering extension; 
Robert H, Bohlke, sociology (extension); 
Arthur D, Brickman, mechanical engi- 
neering; Dr . Ira V, Brown, history^ 
Margaret E, Campbell, English litera- 
ture (extension); Arthur S. Carpenter, 
fine arts (extension), 

William S, Clarke, Jr», pomology; 
Kenneth R, Davenport, mechanical engi- 
neering; Dr. Charles L, Fergus, botany; 
Walter L. Ferree, history (extension); 
Bertram H, Garcia, Jr., mechanical 
engineering; Dr. Ha H. Gehman, psy- 
chology; Dr. Phyllis R. Griess, 
geography; Elmer A. Gross, physical 
education and athletics; Harold J, 
Herbein, industrial electricity (ex- 
tension); ?/illiam H. Hill, Jr., English 
composition (extension); Thomas M, 
Hunter, history (extension). 

Marguerite E, Johnson, nutrition 
extension; T, Stuart Marlow, physical 
education; Dr, Neil A, McNall, history; 
Albert S, Mowery, agricultural engi- 
neering; Raymond Nelson, economics 
(extension); Charles J, Noll, oleri*" 
culture; Dr. Wesley L. Nyborg, physics; 
A, Kathryn Pontzer, English composition 



Research as si 


St a nt 


to assistant 


professor : 


Rensl 


er 


J. 


McDowell and 


Webster P. 


True , 


Jr ,, 


both engineering 



(extension); Sydney Rudnan, physical research in Ordnance Research Laboratory; 

education; Charles J. Smith, civil. and Dr. Guy Rindone, ceramics. 

engineering; Robert L. Smith, economics 

(extension); 'Til son R. Smith, electrical Assistant to instructor: Jean M. 

engineering; Glenn Z, Stevens, agri- Goldstein, psychology (part-time); and 

cultural education; Gertrude S. Weaver, Paul W. Prince, dairy husbandry. 

German (extension); Nora E. Wittman, 

German; and pearl I. Young, physics Assistant county agricultural ex- 

(extension). tension representative to associate 

agricultvir al representative: Charles p, 
Fague, J. Stanley Hummer, Claude D, 
Morley, Joseph S, Thurston, and Robert 
A • P ow e r s , 

WATER TUNNEL EEIICA3TI0N TO BE HELD ON OCTOBER 7 

Secretary of the Navy FranciB p 9 nalism curriculum in 1938, and was one 

Matthews will be the principal speaker of the first alumni of the College to 

at the dedication ceremonies for the die in World War II, 
Garfield Thomas Water Tunnel at 2 p.m. 

on Friday, October 7. The dedication and cornerstone 

laying program on October 7 is ex- 

The tunnel, now nearing completion, pected to bring to the campus many 

will be used for testing by the Ordnance prominent government and navy officials 

Research Laboratory. It was named for as well as important perons in re — 

the late Lt . W. Garfield Thomas, who was search, 
graduated from Penn State in the jour — 

OF GENERAL INTEREST 

SENATE: The College S e nate will meet ACTING HEAL: Donald W, Davis, professor 

at 4:10 p.m. on Thursday, October 6, of journalism, has been named acting head 

in Room 121, Sparks Building, of the journalism department during the 

*** absence of Franklin Banner, on leave 

AGRICULTURE FACULTY: There will be a -for the first semester, 
meeting of the faculty of the School *** 

of Agriculture at 4:10 p.m. on Thursday, HOME ECONOMICS TOUR; A tour of the 

September 29, in Room 109, Agriculture School of Home Economics for new 

Building, faculty members will be held at 3 p.m. 



* * 



Thursday, leaving from the Living Center 

CHAPEL;. Perm State-in-China Sunday will f the building, 
be observed on Sunday, October 2, and *** 

the speaker for chapel services at 11 a.m. DEATHS; Deaths announced during the 

in' Schwab Audit or ium will be Dr. James summer months included those of Dr, 

M, Henry, chairman, American Trustees of Ralph L, Watts, dean emeritus, S G hool 

Lingnan University, New York, N. Y. of Agriculture, on July 2 and John R. 

*** Ha swell, professor of agricultural 

REGISTRATION: -Graduate students must engineering extension on June 30. 
register not later than October 5, in- *** 

stead of October 12, as Q rronoously pub-- FACULTY LICENSE TAGS: New faculty 

lished. The fine for late registration members may obtain automobile operating 

will be placed- in effect after Oct. 5, and parking permits at the Office of 

the Campus 'patrol, 320 Old Main, The 

■ PSCA SECRETARY: Luther H. Harshbarger, tap's should be attached to the front of 

until recently engaged in prisoner-of- the automobile. They permit the faculty 

war work with the World's YMCA in Ger- or staff member to drive on the campus 

many, was named executive secretary of and park in established parking areas 

the Penn State Christian Association, on the campus, 
effective September 1, *** 

*** NEW DORMITORY: McElwain Hall, new 

FOODS SERVICES: Foods service in the dormitory for women students, was 

School of Home Economics w ill open on opened for the first time this semester. 
Wedne sday , October 5, Luncheon hours *** 

for the cafeteria and Maple Room, both ACS:Dr. Walter G. Frankenburg, of General 

open Monday through Saturday noon, are Cigar Co., Lancaster, will address the 

11:50 a.m. to 12 : 30 p.m. The cafeteria Central Pennsylvania Section, American 

and Maple Room will also be open for ser- Chemical Society, on October 5 at Juniata 

vice on Monday evening from 5:45 to 6 : 30 College. Reservations for the dinner 

o'clock. Dinner service in the Maple preceding the meeting may be made with 

Room will be from 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. Dr . P. M. Althouse, 13 Frear Laboratories, 

Tuesday through T hur sday evenings. before September 29. 

*** *** 



*£NN STATE COLLECT Of* 



STUDENTS DROPPED UNDER 50# RULE 



Adzierejka, Albina M. 
Ake, David F. 
Alexander James R, III. 
Allebach, Richard B« 
Argyros, Christopher G# 
Arieta, Joseph J. 
Aruffo, Augustus 
Bair, James E« 
Baker, Harry R. 
Balasco, Robert D. 
Balderson, Alfred 
Barrow , William C „ 
Bast, Robert F, 
Batutis, Edward F, 
Benford, Charles L« 
Bennett, Orville.K. 
Bergdahl, Robert F. 
Be van, Lou. is F. 
Biecker, Wayne E, 
Bitner, Gary F. 
Block, Joan A. 
Boch, Francis L. 
Bonnet, Robert C« 
Bowers, Nelson W. 
Boyer, Winston E» 
Brandt, Leon S, 
Briggs, James p. 
Brown, N rman T. 
Burden, Robert E, 
Carter, Robert W« 
Centofanti, Louis G. 
Cohen, Avis R» 
Crombie, John M. 
Cwikla, Martin V, 
Darlington, James p. 
Dean, Samuel K« 
DeCoursey, Thomas R t 
D'Elia, Donald M, 
D e mpsey, James M. 
D e neen, Raymond J. 
De Ncia, Michael D„ 
Destafano, Joseph T, 
Devlin, Christopher J# 
Billing, Paul G a 
Dougherty, Edward E« 
Dunkel, Lee J» 
Durbin, Willard H, 
Eicholtz, Robert C, 
Else, Robert C. 
Ely, Robert J „ 
Fabyanic, Frank P. 
Fahne stock, William F» 
Faryniak, Russell 
F e lski, Edward J. 
Fenstermacher , John W. 
Fetterman, Donald C. 
Flaherty, Joseph E, 
Forbes, John W» 
Foutts, Robert E. 
Frazier, William R., Jr. 
Freistak, Richard T. 
Froimson, Alfred 
Gaggini, Orlando J. 
Garland. Richard 



Ganger, Warren D a 
Gilboux, George B, 
Greaser, T e d E, 
Greene, Herbert L, 
Gufler, Albert W. 
Haley, Donna L. 
Hancock, Howard W, 
Hanley, Francis P, 
Habsen, Robert E. 
Hardcastle, Jerome S e 
Hartzell, Ella B. 
Harvey, Ilo P, 
Haselbarth, Richard R. 
Hestwole, William E. 
Hertzig, Edward F» 
Hess, Norman F., Jr. 
Hine , John C <» 
Hogan, Paul J 
Iloldren, John W. 
House, Marshall W. t 
Howard, Robert W 
Hu nt e r , Harold W , 
Jenkins, James T. 
Johnston, D u ane He 
Johnson, John H», Jr, 
Jones, David D, 
Jones, Russell H. 
Eephcrt, Richard L« 
Eillian, Huston B, , Jr. 
Klein, E, Bernard 
Er a f s i g , F r a nk J • 
Erause , Car 1 J • 
Erestynick, Michael 
Lane, Clifford N., Jr. 
Lane, Norman S # 
Lees, Betty J. 
Lemmon, Herbert M« 
Litman, John A. 
Lloyd, Richard C. 
Loeper, William F, 
Loveless, James D, 
Lucas, Francis A» 
Luciani, Leo R» 
McCullough, Reynolds L. 
McDermott , Francis S, 
McGran, Dale E, 
McEee, Richard L, 
McEiernan, Thomas W., Jr. 
McEnight, James D. 
Mader, Frederick C, 
Ma her, John F» 
Maietta, Ralph J» 
Mann, John A., Jr „ 
Mann, John 
Marchetti, Lavina D. 
Marks, Robert 
Masterson, Allison M, 
Mather, Robert A* 
Mat hew son, Nancy G» 
Miller, D e lbert E c 
Miller, Richard D, 
Miller, Richard K. 
Moffit, Alfred E., Jr. 
Morris, Henry A,, Jr. 



Myers, G e °rge S« 
Neal, George D« 
Niess, William 
Norris, Ralph S* 
Opuda, Eugene V* 
Overoash, Jack S # 
Parr ish, Robert C. 
Phillips, Richard M« 
Prim, Warren W., Jr. 
Raymond, Emidio, Jr. 
.Lich, John W # 
I- ichman, Jerald D« 
Richer, George E« 
Rieker, G e orge E. 
Rile, Joseph B# 
Riordan, John J* 
Ritter, Earl J* 
Robinson, William R 
Rockey, Melvin B, 
Romberger, Ira P a 
Rubin, Albert L, 
Rut ledge, Mark L, 
Ryari, James A. 
Sandler, Henry M» 
Scarcella, Orcnzo N» 
Schaale, S a muel C. 
Scherer, Robert J. 
Scott, Reginald C„ III 
Sellers, Agnew T, Jr. 
Shoemaker, William C, 
Sherman, Guy F„ Jr. 
Siedlecki, John J« 
Simmonds, Ivor 
Simonsen, Francis J, 
Simpson, Robert J« Jr, 
Smith, John H. 
Smith, Robert fi, Jr. 
Spallone, James L« 
Spence, Richard D« 
Splatt, Harold C, 
Sowers, Miles C. 
Steele, Robert B, 
Sunday, Eleanor J« 
Tamburri, Henry A, 
Tartarella, Tom H» 
Taylor, Elmer D« 
Taylor, James R, 
Timtishin, Steven 
Tomassetti, Anthony J. 
Tome, Thomas F. 
Torsella, John A. Jr., 
Trsiani, Louis 
Turner, Eugene 
Uller, G e orge L. 
Underhill, Elaine E 
Vilsack, Hurbert A. Jr, 5 
Vitabile, Charles J, 
W a dlow, Alexander B 6 
Wallace, Oliver F. 
Wasserman, Violette E c 
Werner, Henry Ha 
White, William H, 
Wright, Eenneth R # 
Yerkes, James B, 
Young, Franklin E« 



STUDENTS PLACED ON PROBATION LIST 



Achey, William S., 
Alburger, George C, 
Allen, Gwendolyn 0» 
Allio,. Dick D. 
Altiero, Carl J. 
Andrews, Charles F, 
Andrews, Donald A. 
Apriceno, Dominick A, 
Ar me s, ' Monroe J« 
Armstrong, Robert J# 
Asplund, Henry R, 
Babyar, George,. Jr, 
Bacon,- John W. 
Bair, Lois A. 
B a nfield, Richard D, 
Baranauskas, Joseph M. 
Barnhart, Kenneth- T, 
Bate man, Mary D. 
Bausher, Jordan L. 
Bedard, Albert J. 
Beegle, Harold E, 
Bendistas, Norma J. 
Benning, Stanley 0. 
B e ntz, Richard L# 
Beranek, Glenn C» 
Berg, Charles E, -. 
Best, Cyrus F, 
Binney, John E. 
Blough, Nancy L, , 
Bollinger, Gerald D. 
Bolt^, Frederick 
Bone break, Max I. 
Bovaird, Byron K» 
Bowser, Dean 
Breisch,, Robert E, 
Browand, Kenneth S. 
Brow,n, Albert F.« Jr. 
Brown, Joseph . 
Br own ^ Sony a L». 
Burke, Francis .H. 
Burkes, Francis H. 
Burkhardt, Richard I* 
Burkhart, Charles E. 
Bush, Harold M« 
Callahan," William P. 
Campbell,. Mahlon E. 
Canouse, Jack E., 
Car barne s, Thomas H« 
Casey, James J, ■ 
Cerasuola, Salvadore L. 
Ceck, Edward J. 
Chappell, John M a . 
Che sla, .Edward J» , 
Chizmadia, James R. 
Christ, Robert E» 
Ciampitti, Guerimo F. 
Clouser, Harold W« 
Cclladi, Richard J» 
Conahan, John F« 
Cook, Julian A. 
Cooper, VJarren L. 
Condor, Gilbert E, 
Crowther, George W-« 
Crowley, William F« 
Crummy, William D, 
Cummings, John H« 
Curry, Francis S. 
Daly, Thomas F, 



Davidson, James' G., Jr# 
Day , Jame s D» 
DeArmit, W e sley, J. 
Denis, Heidi A» 
Dibble ^ Lyman S, 
Dillraan, Lon H. 
Di liner, Fred D, 
Dixey, John L. 
Donahue, Edward T. 
' Doolin, Thoma's J, 

Dougherty, LaVerne N. 
Dougherty, Robert E» 
Dougherty, Thomas F. 
Duncan, Donald B, 
Dzuna, John J. 
Eagle, Roland G, 
Edling, James L. 
Elmore, William K. 
Engesser, Edward 0# 
Everly, Paul E« 
Farris, Eugene' F, 
Fegan , Roger L, 
Few, Walter B.,'Jr# 
Fields, Vance R., Jr. 
Fierii, Fred P. 
Filderraan, Theodore 
Finketstori, Walter C, 
Fisher, William P. 
Francis, Donald S. 
Frank, Allen J, 
Frankenf ield, Donald E. 
Frantz, David E« 
Freas, Philip 0. Ill 
Freedman, William A. 
Freeman, Donald' F # 
Frey, Gerald R, 
Fulton, Dian 

Galbraith, Charles R, 
Garbritek, J seph P. 
Gaul, Russell A, 
Gausmafi , Daniel J. 
Gearhart', Paul R'» 
Geist, Jerem 
Genga, Carlo Robert 
Gerlach, Steven J, 
Gibney, ' Jame s R, 
Glass, Melvin 1. 
Glou, "William R, 
Gocek, Leonard M. 
Gonter , "John R. 
Goodwin, G e orge S. 
Greenberg, Harold J,, 
Griffith, Paul C , 
Griffiths, Theodore A. 
Gr°ve, John M« 
Guewa , Chester L, 
Gundel, Frederick M. 
Guydish, John J» 
Hoke, Deli- L, 
Hallal, G e orge L. 
Haloma,, Nikola j 
Hanson, Delores L# 
Harding, Richard L. 
Hartnett, Thomas F. 
Haupt , Gene S „ 
Hau ser , ,Ruth M# , 
Hay, Dor 1 in W, 



Headly, Jay R. 
Healy,. Thomas K, 
He lock.., Joseph. H* 
Henning, John W. 
Henry, John P.. 
Henry, Robert W, 
Heppe,, Grace M#. 
Herr, William G, 
Herstine, Robert A, 
Hess, Jame s E, 
Hileman, Robert R. 
Hindman, Dale B« 
Hogan, Robert W, 
Homan, Doyle K». 
Honsberger, Calvin P« 
Houser, John R» 
Hrubovak, Arthur W, 
Hudson, Marvin R, 
Humes,. James R # 
Huss., Thelma M* 
Hutnyan, Michael 
Iverson, Shirley M» 
Iwancryk, Louis C, 
Johns, Joseph M# 
Johnson, Clark J. . 
Johnson* Gussie 
Jones, Edward D. 
.Kamsler, Theodore 
Kamykoski, Edward J. 
Keller, D a vid L» 
Kelly, Joseph H. 
Kennedy, James E # 
Keough, William J. ■ 
Kes^ler, Frank D, 
Kimmel,.. Nancy E* 
Kirk, Walter B, Jr, 
Kittka,. Edward G« 
KiturkeS, Edward A, 
Kinzie, William R». 
Kirschner, Robert J. 
Kline, Ralph F, 
Kment, Robert P, 
Knight, Merna . 
Knox, Richard M, 
Koelle, Robert R# < 
Korbel, Bernard 
Kott, William M# .. 
Kovalyak, John P» 
Kr.eidlcr, Robert D. 
Kucharsky, David E« 
Kulnatycki, Alex '■-* 
Lando.n, Clifton G, 
Landi3, Kenneth M- t 
Leahy,. Thomas M, 
Lebet, Donald 
Lebo, Donald E# 
Lenchner, Joseph S, 
Leonard, John R» 
Leonard, William C # Jr. 
Leopardo, John E« 
Lerner, M rton H« 
Lerner, 'Norman 
Lindquist, Walter J, 
Listiak, Paul A, 
Livingston, Richard E, 
Loman, Helen I» B# 
London, Clifton G # " 
McArdle, Henry P« 



McCaffrey, Charles L. 
McCaffrey, Cornelia A« 
McCall, John M. 
McClay, Malcolm M. 
McCoy, James L. 
McCue, Mary T, 
McDermit , C a rl J, 
McDivitt, Joan Y« 
McDonald, Gene W. 
McDonald, William R. 
McGriffin, D a rl L. 
McHenry, Murray D», Jr. 
McKenzie, Hugh B. 
McLane, Ernest D, 
McMaster, Richard L. 
Mc Nanara, James E, 
McQ.uccr, James S, 
Magerko, Daniel 
Maietta, Thomas A, 
Malone, Richard H. 
Maloy, Richard F. 
Manning, Robert H. 
Marchetti, John S. 
Ma reus, Ma r v in p « 
Mar ou sky, Vincent A. 
Martini, George J. 
Mason, Howard J» 
Masters, Richard W, 
May, Leslie F,, Jr. 
May er, Paul R » 
Meinhart, Paul W, 
Meyer, Jack P. 
Middle sworth, Richard L, 
Miller, Kenneth R. 
Milsom, D a n 
Minor, Robert C, 
Mitchell, David R., Jr, 
Mack, James M# 
Montgomery, Robert L« 
Moody, Frances A, 
Morgart , Donald T» 
Mowrey, Donald L» 
Musser, Lester W. , Jr» 
Myers, Robert K. 
Myers, Stanley L. 
Neff , William A. 
Nerneroff,' Stanley 
Oberholtz, John R. 
Oeste, James H# 
Orn, Keith P. 
Orth, Robert W. 
Pappas, John 
Parcel!, Peggy Lou 
Parker, William B., Jr a 
Peters, David A s 
Peters, Richard J, 
Peterson, William T. 
petters, Oscar R, 
Phillips, Samuel M« 
Patrick, Janes E. 



Pierce, Marlyn J. 
Pompei, John 
Pop son, Michael 
P.oticher, Byron 3. 
Preble, Constance E. 
Purcell, Vincent I, 
Ramsey, Richard R' # 
Rapp, Martha M« 
Reardon, Kenneth Ni 
Reed, William H. 
Reeser, Jane L. 
Reilly, John V, 
Rich, Leonard A. 
Richards, William A« Jr. 
Rishel, Samuel R.,Jr. 
Robin, Harvey B. 
Rodgers, Vernon P. 
Romanell, Mildred C.T. 
Rossi, Anthony G, 
Ryman,Ann T, 
Sankus, Charles, Jr. 
Sassman, Charles J» 
Sawyer, John L, 
Saylor, Barbara J, 
Scarloss, Joseph 
Schneider, Harvey J. 
S c hott, Thomas A, 
Schrecengost , Bernice A. 
Schuette, George C. 
Sekerak, Michael N. 
Sell, Carl E, 
Sennett, Richard C, 
S e nko, Joseph E« 
Sergi, William C, 
Shapiro, Sam 
Shaull, Karl R, 
Shepta, Andrew 
Shiptoski, Joseph R. 
Shoener, John A. 
Shore, Edgar Gi 
Shortt, William H. 
Shukaitis, George W, 
Silberman, Avon M. 
Simpson, James L« 
Simes, Marilyn J, 
Simon, Richard B, 
Sippel, John A« 
Slabonik, William 
Slavin, Raymond J. 
S lee man, Walter R, 
Smiley, James S, 
Smith, D a le K. 
Smith, Lawrence R« 
Smith, Paul E. 
Smith, Robert R. 
Snyder, Richard C, 
Stankowski, Leon F» 
Stanley, Richard W, 
Starrels, Ruth L. 
Steranko, John W. 
Stevenson, Samuel E« 



Strawn, Arthur C, 
Strong, John E» 
Tamburri, Henry A, 
Tart are 11a, Tom H» 
Taylor, Charles W, 
Taylor, Elmer D, 
Taylor, James R, 
Taylor, Joseph C, 
Temple., Guy H» 
Thompson, Barbara D, 
T imt ishin, Steven 
Tomassetti, Anthony J. 
Torbert, Joseph C» 
Torsella, John A., Jr. 
Trexler, Jack J. 
Troiani, Louis , 
Turner, Eugene 
Tara skewioz , Francis M. 
Troutman, Robert 
Upcavage, Joseph R# 
Uhron, Robert J, 
Urka, Peter F „ 
Valentine, James A, 
Vaughan, Andrew E,, II 
Veil, Madlynne P. 
Vesco, Lewis M. 
Vorsheim, Phyllis E» 
Vosburg, Robert B. 
Walker, Donald T # 
Walsh, Robert E. 
Waltz, Mark E. 
Watson, Robert E . 
Weaver, Edward P. 
Weaver, John D#, Jr. 
Weaver, Theodore F« 
Weiss, Henry B. 
7fenker, Harold E« 
Wetzel, TTalter A. 
White, Vivian D« 
Whittaker, Fred H. 
Williams, Barbara F. 
Williams, Donald W. 
Williams, Elsie M. 
Williams, J. Eddy . 
Williamson, George M. 
Wilson, Louis A. 
Wilt, Stanley W, 
Wirick, W.eldon J«, Jr. 
Withan, Charles R. 
Wood, Donald M. 
Worre st ,. Henry N. 
Wren, Henry K. 
Wyrough, David J. 
Young, James F, 
Young, James S. 
Yount, Robert L. 
Zacko, William E. 
Zimmerman, Luther D, 
Zimmerman, Phillip D. 
Zurfluh, i-llen B, 



STUDENTS TRANSFERRED TO DIVISION OF INTERMEDIATE REGISTRATION: 



Adams, Bernard W . 
Alexander, Robert J, 
Altschuler, Morton W, 
Armstrong, Robert J. 
Arnold, Charles III 
Bailey, -Grant L. 



iaker, Charles 



C. 



Baker, Earl S. 
Baker, John N. 
Baldwin, Elizabeth A, 
B a nk s , R i c ha r d R « 
Barnwell, Alma S. 



Bartek, Leonard J. 
Bartges, John E, 
Barton, Donald E, 
Battle , Jasper C, 
Bausher, Jordar L. 
B e ll, George C„ 



Belli George II • , Jr. 

Bennett, Frederick W. 
Beranek, Glenn C« 
Bergstrom, John W. 
Berkebile, John R. 
Berry, John "V, 
Beynon, Glenn E,,Jr. 
Biddle, Raymond C. 
Bisenius, Charles J. 
Black, Joann F, 
Black, Wilbur H. 
Blazer, Harold L, 
Bloomquest, Robert L« 
Bolara, James R« 
Bolish, Andrew G, 
Bowie, William J, 
Boyce, Foster P, 
Boyle, Joseph E, 
Brahler, Edward F # 
Bridge, William H. 
Brooks, John R» 
Brown, Charles W, 
Brown, Joseph 
Brown, Robert j. 
Bruno, Joseph 1. 
Bryant, George M." 
Budock, G e orge J, 
Burner, Lee E. 
Busija, Joseph D, 
Calkins, John W, 
Campbell, Jean W # 
Campbell, Richard H» 
Carroll, Donald L. 
Carsgo, Edward E, 
Chambers, William F, 
Ch'avar, John W« 
Che s la, Edward J. 
Chominski, Richard A, 
Christ, Robert E» 
Christie, Carroll J, 
Clark, Carroll D. 
Closser, Robert W, 
Cochran, John 3. 
Coffman, Charles W t , Jr, 
Coll,' Jame s T # 
Colwe 11, Jacob I, 
Conahan, Dennis J. 
Conahan, John F, 
Condor, Gilbert E, 
Conriell, Johanne 
Conner, Harold 
C o u s e , William E • 
Cross, My e r s R , 
Crossin, James R. 
Crowley, William F. 
Cruikshar<k, Herbert W* 
Cunningham, Edward L. 
Custer, Fred B # . 
D'Angelo, Elizabeth L. 
Davis, T7i 1 1 ia m A . 
DeConcini, Richard J. 
DeFrees, Clifford L. 
Degler, William A. 
Del coco, James' R, 
Deminski, Leonard S. 
Denis, Heidi Ann 
DeVicaris, Louis E. 
Donkle, David H« 
Doyle, Richard G» 
Dunn, Richard H, 
Egencieder, Charles J, 
Edling, James L. 



Johnson, Howard L» 

Ellenberger, Roy H« 
Elmore, William K. 
Engesser, Edward 0, 
Erickson, William C« 
Fair, Oliver D, 
Fair, Ronald G« 
Farrell, Pete. E. 
Feraco, Frank C. 
Ferguson, John T« 
Fetters , .Claude M» 
Fillo, Gene J« 
Fine sod, Frances M, 
Finkelston, Walter C# 
Firth, Robert D. 
Fisher, George H, 
Fitzgerald, Robert A, 
Flesotte, Richard T. 
.Fleming, Glenn A. 
Forry, Earl C, 
Foy, Thomas R, 
Frankenf ield, Donald E. 
Frantz, David E# 
Freedman, Leon J, 
Freedman, TTilliam A. 
Froberg, Howard C, 
Fryer, Robert L. 
Fulton, James A, 
Galati, Joseph V, 
G a llo, Margaret B. 
Garrerich, Donald R. 
Garyerick, LeRoy H, 
Gausman, Daniel J. 
Genga, Carlo R, 
.Gerhard, Robert A # 
Geschwindt, Donald F, 
Gesey, John C • , Jr. 
Gillespie,. Harold A. 
Givler, Henry E. 
Glaser, John 
Glessner, Willard D« 
Goulden, G.erald G, 
Gould, David M« 
Grabash, Peter J. 
Grater, Robert C, 
Groene, Elmer A. 
Gross, Ruth 

Gruver, Y/alter D,, Jr. 
Guest, Charles H. 
Gundle, Frederick M. , Jr, 
Guydish, John J, 
Guyeski, John P. 
Hackman, Maris R. 
Hagen, Robert J, 
Hammons, A<>C. 
Hankins, Ned S # 
Hanlon, Robert J. 
Hamberger, Robert W, 
Harhi, Michae]. 
Harkins, James D. 
Harrington, Roger T, 
Hartnett, Thomas F. 
. Harwin, Joseph P. 
Haser, Albert F. 
.Havry, William W # 
Headly, Jay R» 
Kealy, Thomas K. 
Henry, John P. 
Henry, Robert 17, 
Herbert, Patrick R, 
Higgins, Joseph C, 
Hile, George P. 
Johnson, Ray M» 



■ Hill, Wesley S # ' 
Himmel, Seymour S. 
Hines.,. Robert W» 
Hoffecker, Robert B. 
Hofmann, Francis R, 
Holdren, Murray F. 
Hollenback, Hugh G. 
Holly,- Philip R, 
Holmstrom, Dorothy K. 
Ho man, Doyle- K. 
Hoover)' Edward. C, 
Hoover ,- Frederick L, 
Hoover, John- W, 
H rak, Warren R. 
Howler, B a rbara 
Hough, Mary R. 
Houser, Norman F, 
Hrin, James F, 
Hudak, Charle s 
Humphreys, Frederick A, 
Hunt , Curt i s G, 
lie s, Jo seph D, 
J a ci: son, Rita T * 
Jamison, James D. 
Johnson, David E», Jr. 
Johnson, Theodore S, 
Johnson, William M, 
Jones, Colson E* 
Jones, John F # > 
Kalmback, Milton P, 
Kampel, Lawrence J., Jr. 
Kapschock, Vincent J. 
Kaspariunas, Albert J. 
Kasoff, David 
Kaufmann, Harry N» 
Kaufmann, Robert L# 
Keller, Howard H. 
Kell'ey, Bernard L« 
Kelly, S a muel F. Ill 
Kerohner, Henry W« 
Kiel, Mary A. 
K imme 1 , Na ncy E . 
Kitchel, Robert -S . 
Klebanoff, Ellis F. 
Koller, William B. 
Kovaltihick, John E, 
Kovalyak, John P, 
Krasinsky, John B» 
Krimmel, Robert' G, 
Kuhn, Joyce 1." 
Kuhnaman, Orria, H# 
Kuperstein, Paul D # 
Kyle , ■ Gilbert E. 
Labar, Paul 

LaBrosse, Edward' G», Jr. 
LaMonica, James N. 
Lamport, Leslie' 
Landis^ Kenneth M # 
Langton, 7 ,Tillard W # 

LaRegina, Dominic J, 
Lazarowitz, Warren 

Lear, William L, 

LeCrone, Fred T. 
Lehman, George E# 
Leonard, Robert R# 
Levin, Marvin M« 
Levy, Irving 
Livingston, William D, 
Lloyd, Russell K» 
Loetzbeier, Thomas W« 
Logan, Isabelle D, 
Long, Bruce C# 



Long, Robert B. 
Loughran, Elizabeth A« 
Loux, Robert W« 
Lundy, James M», Jr. 
McAllister, Ernest W« 
McCartney, Gerald Lee 
MoC leery, Robert B. 
McCorraick, Hugh E, 
McCrea, Hugh F, 
McCullough, James M. 
McDowell, Corl R. 
McGann, Jack A, 
McGee, Ivan C, 
Mcllwain, Thomas 
Mclntyre, Joseph M, 
McKim, Franklin D« 
McKnight, Robert B. 
McMurray, Robert W # 
McMurray, William J« 
'MacFarlane, William 
Mahaffey, G e orge H. 
Mann, Philip E. 
Marcoli's, Burton N« 
Marsh,' Robert B 
Martin, Fred E, 
Martin, Raymond E , , Jr. 
Matuella, Charles G., Jr. 
Matus, John 
Meiss, Carl H., Jr. 
Meyer, Donald W» 
* Meyer, Rachel 
Miller, Jack F. 
Miller, James F., Jr. 
Miller, Lahe R. 
Miller, Robert R, 
Moerder, Janet L» 
Mohnal, Joseph 
Mooney, William J. 
Morgan, Russell J. 
Morris, Jack L« 
Morrison, J"ack M, 
Morrow, Robert D. 
Mo shin sky, Edward W« 
Mozdy*, Louis J. 
Mueller, Fred M. 
Mullen, Patricia A. 
Mundell, Earle D. 
Murphy, John R. 
Myers, G e ne J. 
Nabors, Lyle L. 
Norford, Edward R, 
Nicholson, Gloria D. 
Nolan, Patricia J, 
Oden, Bernard R., Jr. 
Ohreiis't ein, Joan 
Palko, John L« 
Palko, Michael J. 
Palmer, Lee W» 
Parker", Harry H. 
Parker, William B. 
parsons, Richard D« 
Patterson, Richard J. 
Patterson, Robert E. 
Patsakas, Patricia H. 
Patton,' Thomas G«, Jr. 
pauelko, John V. 
Paul-nook, Theodore p. 
Musser, Gorald T, 



Peifer, Anna A, 
Perry, Robert R, 
Perta, Michael F, 
Petcavich, Adam J, 
Peterson, Paul E, 
Pevarnik, Thomas R. 
Pfriem, James R. 
Phillips, Samuel M. 
Pierce, Joseph W, 
Pitt, Joseph I,, Jr. 
podesta, Raymond P. 
Podrasky, John T. 
pollock, Charles, A,, Jr. 
Post, Richard F. 
Pugh, Ronald G. 
Rahm, David A. 
Ramin, Edward 
Reed, William H. 
Rehrig, Charles L. 
Reichwein, Paul J, 
Reiter, Donald R. 
Rich, Leonard A. 
Rishel, Samuel R., Jr. 
Roberts, Rita 
Ritter, Paul R, 
Robinson, Neal 
Rohrer, George R, 
Romano ski, Peter J. 
Rosshirt, Casper J. 
Roth, Leater F. 
•Rudy, Eugene E. 
Russell, LeRoy V, 
Rusz, John L, 
Sassano, Joseph M« 
Savitz, Ephraim A, 
S-aylor, Barbara J. 
•Schaffer, Eugene R, 
Schoen, Robert C. 
Schultz, George W, 
Selfridge, Robert L, 
Seltzer, Bcriiard A. 
Shannon, Richard W, 
Sheehan, Howard P. 
Sheehe, Anna C. 
Shengold, Kenneth E. 
S he r o t a , Wa It or 
Shobert , John L, 
Shoemaker, Daniel 
Shtofman, David S. 
Siekkinen, Duane L. 
Silberman, Aron M. 
Skowronek, Joseph J. 
Slav in, Raymond J. 
Smith, Allen B. 
Smith, Calvin 
Smith, Dale K» 
Smith, Harvey A. 
Smith, Laurence D, 
Smith, Robert R. 
Snead, Clarke R, 
Snook, Ruky F. 
Snyder, Bruce J. 
Snyder, John R., Jr. 
Solowski, Donald N, 
Spaar, Robert 
Spalding, George R # 
Spansler, Nicholas C, 



8 

Specht, Richard K. 

S^t'arr, William P. 

Stauffer, Ivan R. 

S'tauffer, Jack H. 

Stearns, Diane 

Stefanick, Charles B. 

St one , Donald 

Strat os, Jo seph 

Strauss, Thomas J. 

Straw, John T,, Jr. 

Strong, John E. 

Style, Richard 

Svrift, Royden M, , Jr. 

Szutowicz, Janet L. 

Tanner, Donald F. 

Taylor, Robert A. 

Thompson, Edwin L. 

Timlin, Robert A. 

Tintner, Jean S, 

Tolley, David A, 

Tresville, Walter M.S. 

Trimmer, Paul A, 

Turner, Rena L, 

Twitchell, Nancy K. 

Urban, Ralph K» 

Valentine, James A, 

Valentine, Richard E. 

Veil, Elaine I. 

Villono, Vincent W # 

Vorsheim, Phyllis E. 

Wagenfcld, Gilbert B. 

Wagner, Elinor S, 

Wagner, Jacob F, 

Walk en stein, Marvin 

Walsh, Robert E, 

T Walters, Blair L. 

Waltz, Margaret L. 

Warr, Gloria M. 
Watson, Beecher H. 

Weidock, G e orge P. 
Weiss., Henry B» 
W e n s e 1 , War d L , 
Werley, Myles R., Jr. 
Whitehead, Joseph W, 
Wiley, John B. 
Williams, J , Eddy 
Williams, Max J. 
Willsen, Virginia F, 
'Wilson, Earl K. 
Wilso.n, Louis A. 
Wilson, Ray R, 
Wing, C^arlc s .L, 
Winger, Robert H. 
Winoski, Leo A, 
Winters, George L. 
Wolfe, Edward I. 
'food, Donald M. 
Wundcrly, Y7alter B» 
Ziegler, Henry 
Zofchak, Martin J. 
YavoKSky, Eugene J, 
Yawney, Harry W» 
Yocum, John R. 
Yount , Robert L« 
Zaiojis, Henry E« 
Zakor, J hn A, 
Zanvardelli, Norman C # 
Zarnas, Michael S. 



PERSONNEL CHANGES 

The following personnel changes approved during the perio'd, June 6, 1949, 
to September 15, 1949, are announced. 

Resignations : 

Abramson, Edward, Research Associate, Instructional Film Research . 

Adams, Patricia A», Clerk-Typist, Mineral Technology 

Aiken, Ruth A», Personnel Assistant, Personnel Relations., 

Albright, Edna E., Janitress, physical plant 

Alperin, Martin, Instructor, Forestry 

Andreassen, Alexander T , Assistant Professor, Engineering Mechanics 

Archer, M» Amaryllis, Assistant Extension Representative, Home Economics '■ 

Ash, Philip, Research Assistant, Instructional Film Research 

Axford, Doulgas W, E., Research Associate, Physics 

Bacon, Lloyal 0« , Research Assistant, Earth Sciences 

Baney, Helen G,, Nurse, Health Service 

Bates, J e an T», Research Assistant, Ellen H» Richards Institute 

Bauer, Dorothea, Stenographer , 'Educat ion 

Beatty, Rosalie M#, Secretary, Political Science 

Benarick, Constance H,, Clerk-stenographer, Housing 

Bigelow, Richard L«, Instructor, Central Extension 

Bird, Fay M., Clerk-typist, Dean of Admissions 

Bishop, Mary A,, Research Assistant, Mineral Technology 

Black, Mary V*^ Research Assistant, Earth Sciences 
Blanchard, Margaret, Stenographer, Education 
Blowers, Dorothy L», Stenographer, Agricultural Extension 

Boal, Velma C«, Stenographer, Agricultural Economics and Rural Sociology 
Boldereff, Frances M», Publications Production Manager, Public' Information 
Bonadio, Ruby, Secretary, Mathematics 

Boop, W a yne E«, R e search Assistant, Ordnance Research Laboratory 
Bowers, Barbara J., Typist, Agricultural Economics and Rural Sociology 
Boyd, Joseph H«, Professor, Agricultural Extension 
Brandow, Dawn F., Stenographer, Earth S c iences 
Brennan, J, Norton, Insturctor, Forestry 
Briggs, Alberta, Secretary, Ellen H, Richards Institute 
Brughelli, Violet, Instructor, Hotel and Institution Administration 
Bryson, Carol C», S e cretary, Hotel . and Inst itut ion Administration ; 

Cain, Mary, Clerk-stenographer, Summer Sessions 
Caruso, Vfinifred, Clerk-Typist, Central Extension 

Chambers, Maxine M., Stenographer, Industrial Engineering ■ • 

Chapman, Olive M«, instructor,' Chemistry '., . 

Christopher son, Keith He, Janitor, Physical Plant ..'..* 
Cleveland, Ernest L»-, Re search Assistant ^ Physics ... 
Clouser, Roy W. , Farm employee, Agronomy 

Cochran, Gwendolyn E., Stenographer, Personnel Relations 
Connelly, Paul B., Manager, Dining Commons 

Corman, Mary Olive, Photographic Technician, Agricultural Experiment Station 
Counts, William, Research Assistant, Earth Sciences 
Craver, Pauline R,, Stenographer, Agricultural Extension- 
Crawford, Martha J,, Key Punch Operator^ Accounting 
Cruikshank, Thelma, Stenographer, Central Extension 
Curran, Alice M» , Secretary, Central Extension 
Dale, Effie K«, Secretary, Education Extension 

Davis, Harold, Instructor, Mineral Industries Extension Service 
DeGraeve, Mary Lou, Clerk, Agricultural Economics and Rural Sociology 
Dehn, Frances F», Secretary, Ordnance Research Laboratory 
Dilley, Anne, Stenographer, Dean of Admissions 
Douglas, Bodie Eugene, Research Associate, Chemistry 
Dunlap, Robert D», Research Assistant, Chemistry 
Eaton, Mary p,, Clerk-stenographer, School of Home Economics 
Ecke, George G,, Research Assistant, Chemistry 
Eckley, Elizabeth A,, Clerk-typist, Dean of Admissions 
Elhoff, Jacqueline B t , Secretary, President 's Office 
Evans, Marian, Mimeograph Operator, Education -. ; 
Ferdinand, Cleo D„, Stenographer, Agricultural Extension 
Fleming, Vivian K,, Stenographer, Forestry 
Flowers, Alfred E c , Instructor, Mineral Engineering 
Foote, Robert T„, Instructor, Mathematics 
Foster, Abram J., Instructor, Central 'Extension ; 
Fowler, Nancy A., Secretary, General Administration 
Frantz, M e rel P., Janitor, physical plant 



Freilich^ Florence G 9 " g Instructor^ Central Extension 

Friedrich, Gerhard G»,. Instructor , English Literature 

Fritz, Jeannettc M«, Stenographer, Dean of Admissions 

Garison, Mary J», Nurse, Central Extension 

Gates, William B t o Creamery Employee, Dairy Husbandry 

Glatterf elder, Elizabeth W. , Seoretary, Student Advisory Service 

Goodman, Abraham H*, Instructor, Central Extension 

Gordon, William H», Jr., Research Assistant, Ordnance Research Laboratory 

Grady, Ethel R«, Extension Representative, Home Economics Extension 

Gray, Edna G«, Telephone Operator, Physical plant 

Gray, Frederick W«, Research Assistant, Chemistry 

Gregory, Wade F*, Researoh Assistant, Agricultural Economios and Rural Sociology 

Griswold, Leota B#, Nurse, Central Extension 

Gustafson, Bernice, Representative, Agriculture Extension 

Harlan, Helen K», Technician, Animal Husbandry 

Hartranft, Elizabeth P», Seoretary, Home Economics 

Hassinger, Harry, Inventory Clerk, Property Inventory 

Hassler, Margaret G«, Secretary, Chemistry 

Heaston, Clyde E*, Mechanic, Ordnanoe Research Laboratory 

Henzi, Robert C«, District Representative, Central Extension 

Hess, Reuben H D C , Research Assistant, Agricultural Econ6mioa and Rural Sociology 

Hesser, H e len E<i, Stenographer, Agronomy 

Hironimus, Margery M», Secretary, Physics 

Hsban, Charles Jr», Research Associate, Instructional Film Research 

Hoskinson, Ronald C«, Instructor, Botany and Zoology 

Huff, Charles W», Instructor, Central Extension 

Hunter, Carlton E«, Instructor, Industrial Engineer 

Isenberg, Edna S,, Assistant Professor, Central Extension 

Jamison, William Go, Instructor, Agricultural Economics and Rural Sociology 

Jaspen, Nathan, Research Assistant, Instructional Film Researoh 

Jenkins, Betty, Clerk, Instructional Film Research 

Johnson, Virginia F., Clerk, Accounting — Fee Assessor 

Keen, Hazel, Dining Commons Employee, Simmons Hall 

Kellerman, Phillip R«, Draftsman, Physical plant 

Kennedy, Helen V«, Secretary, Business Administration 

Kenney, Frank C«, Custodian, C e ntral Extension 

King, Alice M», Clerk, Agricultural Economics and Rural Sociology 

Kitsenj Ella Mae, Campus Service Booker, Audio-Vi3ual Aids Library 

Klier, Ruth M©« Dietitian, Nittany Dining Hall 

Knepshield, Betty Y», Extension Representative, Home Economics Extension , 

Kolftkoski, Richard S #/ Instructor, Central Extension 

Kowalski, Franoes M» , Assistant Food Supervisor, McAllister Dining Hall 

Kraus, Stanley B«, Chief ' Appraiser., Central Extension 

Kreamer, James C», Technician, Engineering Experiment Station 

Krebs, Fred, Clerk-Typist, Naval Science 

Kreamer, Lois I,,, Secretary, College placement 

Laohner* Ernest A*, Associate Professor, Zoology and Entomology 

Lambour, Florence, Clerk— typist , Property Inventory 

Lander, Martha E*, Laboratory Technician, Health Service 

Lathrop, June C , Research Assistant, Chemistry 

Lawson, Luoille, Clerk-typist, Library - 

Leach, Alice L., Head Cook, Central Extension 

Lehr, Robert P», Detailer Draftsman, Ordnance Research Laboratory 

Lerman, Omar K«, Research Assistant, Instructional Film Research . . 

Leuter, Victor E» , Electronics Technician, Engineering Experiment Station 

Levine, Melvin M« , Instructor, Central Extension 

Light, Martin, Instructor, Forestry 

Linde, John E», Jr»j Instructor, Horticulture 

Lowe, Theodore, Stores Clerk, McAllister Dining Hall 

Luoas, Howard K«, Curator, Museum 

Maddy, Dorothy L«, Secretary, Business Administration 

Marsden, Marilyn, Typist, Mineral Technology 

Martin, Christian L», Jr., Assistant Superintendent, Farm Operations and Service 

Mastrangelo, Sebastian V„.R» ; Research Assistant,.- Chemistry 

Mattson, Virginia G», Clerk-typist, public Information 

Maurer, Virginia D«, Stenographer, Central Extension 

McNutt, Julia M., Stenographer, Central Extension 

McSweeny, Eugene F # , Instructor, Eai"th Sciences 

Melville 4 S « Donald., Instructor, Lducation 

Mertens, Grace N«, Accounting Clerk, Audio— Visual Aids , 




Meyers 

Mi! 

Mil 

Miti 

Miti 

Montgomery, Mildred M», Secretary, Romance Languages 

Murphy, Nell, instruct or , Education 

Moyer, Lynette, Clerk, Accounting 

Nagle, Rosemary C., Secretary— recept ionist , Central Extension 

Naylor, Miriam, Clerk, Accounting 

Netzley, Donald E,, Research Assistant, physics 

Neufer, Virginia B,, Stenographer, Home Economics 

Nicholas, Richard C«, Instructor, Central Extension 

Nicholson, Elizabeth J «. , Instructor, Central Extension 

Noona, Lowell Go, Instructor, Political Science 

Nuzzo, Adrian C , , Research Assistant, Chemistry 

O'Brian, Jeanne B D , Secretary, German 

Owen, Lillian, Clerk-typist, Chemistry 

Page, Jane, Library Clerical Assistant, II, College Library 

Palumbo, Dona T,, Personnel Assistant, Personnel Relations 

Perry, N*A», Instructor, Dairy Husbandry 

Pikus, Roselma, Secretary, President's Office 

Pokrinchak, Barbara, Stenographer, Dean of Admissions 

Pringle, Lois, Clerk, Associated Student Activities . • 

Rager, John L«, Butcher, Simmons Hall and Atherton Hall 

Raines, Leila R», Instructor, Mathematics 

Ream, Paul S„, Machinist, Physics 

Reines, Mervin, Instructor, Central Extension 

Resig, Claire M», Stenographer, Agricultural Extension 

Rice, James E«, Jr*^ Assistant Professor, Economics 

Rittenhouse, Elwood J,, Research Assistant, Chemistry 

Rosenkranz, Grace, Stenographer, Purchasing Agent 

Roshal, Sol M« , Research Assistant, Instructional Film Research 

Rothenberg, Herbert C,, Research Associate, Physics 

Roy, Rustum, Research Assistant, Earth Sciences - • 

Ruth, Eulalia C,, Research Assistant, Ellen H» Riohards Institute 

St. John, Norman, Research Assistant, Agricultural Economics and Rural Sociology 

Salmon, Christine F», Instructor, Housing and Home Art 

Scalera, Kathleen P», Typist,' Purchasing Agent 

Sellers, Rose H», Secretary, Physics 

Shaffer, James D», Instructor, physics 

Sicola, Rosemarie, Stenographer, Dean of Admissions . . 

Sittenfield, Marcus., Instructor, Central Extension , 

Skinner, Esther p», Secretary, Education 

Smith, V c rnon E., Civil Engineer, Physical plant 

Solomon, Matilda, Secretary , Speech Clinic 

Soprano, Mary, S e ar e t f qjr , Engineering Experiment Station • ' 

Spanos, George, Instructor, Electrical Engineering 

Spicer, Sarah F c , Janitress, Housing 

Spiker, Louise C„, Secretary, Sociology 

Spinelli, Teresa. M* , Secretary, Home Economics 

Spitzer, P G nn F., Jr», Research Assistant, Chemistry 

Stetler, Charlene F«, Instructor, Agricultural Extension 

Stotidt, Nancy 0», Telephone Operator, Physical plant 

Street, Orman E«, Professor, Agronomy 

Strickler , Lois, Stenographer, Central Extension 

Struble, Catherine E,, Dining Commons Employee, Simmons Hall 

Sulzer, peter G» f Research Associate, Engineering Experiment Station 

Sunday, Violet R,, Technician, Botany 

Thompson, Lois B., Reference Assistant, Library 

Tice, Jean, Cook, H e alth Service 

Underbill, E r adford B., Assistant Professor, Ordnance Research Laboratory 

Walker, Marshall J,, R e search Assistant, Physics 

Ward, Manning, Groom, Physical Education 

Wasmuth, Gladys V., Assistant Professor, Home Management, Housing 

Wertz, Mildred B» Instructor, Speech 

West, Jo Ann H., Clerk-typist, C c ntfal Extension 

Wildeman, John V., Instructor, Business Administration 

Williams, Betty J,, Secretary, Mineral Technology 

Williams, Gloria, Clerk-typist, College library 

Wilson, J e an R,, Secretary-librarian, Instructional Film Research 

Windrich, Elaine, Instructor, Political Soience 

Witherow, Boyd M,, Instructor, Forestry 

Wood, John L., Instructor, Forestry 



Xirau, Ramon, Assistant Professor, Romance Languages 

Young, Mary L., Cook-housekeeper, Central Extension 

Yuster, Samuel T., Professor, Mineral Engineering 

Zuckerman, John V,, Research As istant, Instructional Film Research 

Retirement s t 

Anthony, Roy D., Professor, Pomology 

Bradford, Louis J,, professor, Machine Design 

Davey, Wheeler P., Research Professor, Chemistry and Physics 

Dickey, John B.R., Professor, Agronomy Extension 

Furst, Bertha H., Recorder, Dean of Admissions 

Hall, Grace L., Hostess, Atherton Hall 

Harter, John F,, Painter, Physical Plant 

Hasek, Carl IT., Professor, Economics 

Hill, J. Benjamin, Professor, Botany 

Lewis, Willard P., College Librarian 

Markle, David L,, Professor, Electrical Engineering 

Mason, Thomas 17., Professor, Analytical Chemistry 

Mitch, George F,, Associate Professor, Economics 

Owens, Frederick W,, Professor, Mathematics 

Owens, Helen B., Assistant Professor, Mathematics 

Schwer, Andrew, Chief Cook, Simmons Hall 

Warnock, Arthur R,, Dean of Men 

Zundel, George L.I,, Associate Professor, Agricultural Extension 

Leaves of Absence t 

Anderson, John M», Associate Professor, Philosophy, 7—1-49 to 6-30—50 

Best, Earl F,, Office Machine Repairman, physical Plant, 5-1-49 - indefinite 

Bratzler, John W», Associate Professor, Animal Nutrition, 10-1-49 to 2-1-50 

Bressler, Leo A,, Assistant Professor, English Composition, 7-1-49 to 6-30-50 

Buehne, Sheema 2,, Instructor, pottsville Center, 7—1-49 to 6-30-50 

Corbin, Eliza, Home Ec. Extension Representative, Home Economics, 10-1-49 to 3-31-50 

Cottrell, Joan, Clerk, Dean of Liberal Arts, 6—7-49 — indefinite 

Dahle, C.D., Professor, Dairy Manufacture, 7-1-49 to 1-1-50 

Dempsey, Laurence F,, Instructor, Central Extension, 7—1-49 to 6-30-50 

Duke, Charles E«, Instructor, Aeronautical Engineering, 7-1-49 to 6-30-50 

Edwards, Marian E,, Secretary, Agricultural Engineering, 9-16-49 to 9-15—50 

Finlon, Francis p., Research Assistant, Ord, R e search Laboratory, 7-27-49 to 6-30-50 

Kipps, Alice M« , Instructor, Central Extension, 7-1-49 to 6-30-50 

Maurer, Eleanor W,, Instructor, C e ntral Extension, 7-1-49 to 6-30-50 

Pepper, J.O., Professor, Agricultural Extension, 8-1-49 to 1-31—50 

Pierce, C.W,, Professor, Agricultural Economics, 7-1-49 to 1-1-50 

Rupp, Charles A,, Professor, Mathematics, 7-1-49 to 6-30-50 

Steiner, Herbert, Associate Professor, German, 7-1-49 to 6-30—50 

Thurston, Edward G,, Research Associate, Ord, Res. Laboratory, 9-1-49 to 8-31-50 

Weight, Glenn S,, Instructor, Central Extension, 7-1-49 to 6-30-50 

Wild, Carl W,, Assistant Professor, Architecture, 7-1-49 to 6-30-50 

Change of Name ; 

Aiken, Elizabeth to Myers, Elizabeth A. 
Burngart, Evelyn to Schultz, Evelyn B. 
Etters, Roxie B. to Collins, Roxie B, 
Tiffany, Ellen M, t o Pugh, Ellen M, 
Vallar, June L, to Arey, June V. 
YJallace, Geraldine to Howard, Geraldine W # 
Webber, Elizabeth to Yeager, Elizabeth W, 
Williams, Betty L. to McBride, Betty W. 






l-X 



THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 



FACULTY 



The Bulletin is published weekly during the College 
year as a means of making official announcements 
and presenting items of interest to the faculty. All 




VOL. 



37 



Oct ober 



BULLETIN 



contributions should be as brief as possible and 
reach Louis H. Bell. Director of Public Information. 
313 Old Main, not later than 10 a. m. each Friday. 



1949 



NO. 



GARFIELD THOMAS WATER TUNNEL TO EE DEDICATEE FRIDAY AFTERNOON 



The Garfield Thomas Water Tunnel, con- 
structed by the Ordnance Research Labo- 
ratory under contract with the Bureau 
of Ordnance, U, S. Navy, will be dedicated 
at 2 p.m, Friday, October 7, 

John T, Koehler, assistant secretary 
of the Navy, will be the principal speak- 
er. Secretary of the Navy Francis p # 
Matthews, who had been scheduled to dedi- 
cate the tunnel, has informed officials 
of the College that he will be unable to 
keep the engagement here. 

Preceding the dedication, a luncheon 
in -honor of Secretary Koehler and State 
Deputy Secretary of Mines W, Garfield 
Thomas and Mrs, Thomas will be held at 
the Nittany Lion Inn. Mr, and Mrs, Thomas 
are the parents of the late Lt , W, Gar- 
field Thomas, Jr., a graduate of the 
College in the Class of 1938, for whom 
the tunnel was named, Betty Thomas, 
supervisor of the McElwain Hall dining 
halls, is a sister of Lt , Thomas, 

Secretary Koehler is a native of 
Pennsylvania and practiced law in New 
York and Pittsburgh prior to becoming an 
attorney for the Bureau of Internal Reve- 
nue and later a special assistant to the 
Attorney General, 

He joined the Navy Department in 1942, 
in 1943 served as beachmaster at Gela in 
the assault phase of the invasion of 
Sicily, Later in the Pacific Theatre, he 
commanded the first Army— Navy— Mar ine Un- 
derwater Demolition Team, For outstand- 
ing service on the beaches of the Marshall 



Islands, he was awarded the Silver Star, 
•He later was promoted to commander. 

Following his release from active 
duty in 1945, Secretary Koehler joined 
the Office of the General Counsel for 
the Navy Department and early this year 
was appointed to his present post* 

Dr , H. P, Hammond, dean of the 
School of Engineering, will preside at 
the dedication, which will open with the 
presentation of a ceremonial key to the 
building. The presentation will be made 
by Admiral A, G, Noble, chief of the 
Bureau of Ordnance, U, S, Navy, and will 
be accepted by James Hilholland, acting 
president of the College, 

Sir. Charles Wright, British scientist 
who during World War II headed the Joint 
British Scientific Mission in the United 
States, will pour into the tunnel water 
taken from the British Towing Basin at 
Haslar, England, The basin was first 
filled in 1887 and for many years was 
used for t esting ship models and marine 
device s , 

Following the address by Secretary 
Koehler, President Milhollaud will de- 
liver the response, Congressman James 
E, VanZandt will speak, and Dr , Eric 
4t Walker, director of the Ordnance Re- 
search Laboratory, will speak in behalf 
of the laboratory staff. 

The laying of the cornerstone, which 
will include a copy of a film made of the 
construction of the tunnel, will conclude 
the ceremonies. 



HAROLD W. PERKINS NAMED TO DEAN OF MEN'S OFFICE STAFF 



Harold w, Perkins, secretary of ad- 
mission at Washington and Jefferson College 
for the past three years, has been named 
an- assistant dean of men, effective 
October 1, 



Perkins and Daniel A, DeMarino, 
also assistant dean of men, will work 
together in counseling men students, 
Dr, II, K, WilSbn, dean of men explained 



PENN STATE COLLEC HON 



■■■ 



ANNUAL EXHIBIT OF "FIFTY BOOKS OF THE YEAR" AT LIBRARY 



The annual exhibit of the "Fifty 
Books of the Year" will continue at the 
College Library through October 16. 

The books, ohosen by the American 
Institute of Graphic Arts from those 
published in the United States in 1948, 
are selected for excellence in design, 
typography, and manufacture. For the 



first time, book jackets were considered 
in the judging and some of these are 
therefore included in the exhibit* 

The American Institute of Graphic 
Arts, through this annual selection, 
promotes the ideas that high standards 
of printing, paper, and binding are 
possible for trade books as well as more 
expensive editions. 



ZR. THOMAS C. KAVANAGH WINS FIRST FRIZE IN 7ESIGN CONTEST 



Ir. Thomas C, Kavanagh, professor of 
civil engineering, has been awarded first 
prize of $3,000 in the 1949 welded bridge 
of the future design contest. 

The award was announced by the James 
F, Lincoln Arc Welding Foundation, Cleve- 
land, 0., sponsors of the competition. 
The problem, was to design a two-lane, 120- 
f t , deck highway bridge of welded con- 



struct ion. 

The award to Dr# Kavanagh was the 
second top national honor to come to a 
faculty member of the School of Engi- 
neering in recent months* On June 23, 
Dr, Joseph Marin, professor of engi— 
neering mechanics, was presented the 
George We sting house Award by the American 
Society of Engineering Education, 



DR. PAULINE BEERY MACK TO, GET 1950 G ARYAN MELAL 



Dr. Pauline Beery Mack, director of 
the Ellen H» Richards Institute, has 
been named recipient for the 1950 Garvan 
Medal. 

The award was recently announced at 
the American Chemical Society meetings 
in Atlant ic City , N. J, and will be pre- 
sented in April at meetings of the di- 
vision of inorganic and physical chem- 
istry of the Society in Detroit, Mich, 

Dr, Mack's selection was based on 
her work on the calcium chemistry of 
bone density which she started in 1927 



and on her direction of graduate students 
engaged in research in the fields of 
human nutrition and textile chemistry. 

The 'Garvan Medal, which is the top 
award for women in chemistry, was es- 
tablished by the late Franois P, Gar- 
van, former director of the Chemical 
Foundation, and is awarded annually or 
when a worthy candidate is nominated. 
Dr. Mack is the eighth woman to receive ] 
the award. Among the previous winners of 
the medal is Dr. Gerti Cori, of Washington 
University, a Nobel prize winner in 
chemi st ry « 



NEW NAMES ASSIGNED TO CAMPUS COTTAGES 



Since sororities on the campus have 
moved from the cottages into dormitories, 
the cottages have been renamed. 

The new names are: Moffatt Cottage, 
formerly Willard House and Kappa Kappa 
Gamma; Spruce Cottage, formerly Guest 
House and Theta Phi Alpha; Elm Cottage, 
formerly Storehouse ana Kappa Alpha Theta, 



Pine Cottage, formerly Sackett House 
and Phi Mu ; Hemlock Cottage, formerly 
Everyn and Delta Gemma; Oak Cottage, for- 
merly Edgewood House and Chi Omega; 
Maple Cottage, formerly Maple Lodge and 
Alpha On i or on Pi; and Willow Cottage, 
formerly the residence of Dean of Men 
A • R • Wa rnoclc, 



INCOMPLETE REGISTRATION TOTALS 10,439 



Although registration for graduate 
students continues until October 5, a 
total of 10,439 students have enrolled 
for the 1st Semester, a count on Thurs- 



day revealed, 

A detailed, complete count of student 
will be published in a later issue of 
the Faculty Bulletin, 



mAbel c Mcdowell retires September 30 



Mabel C, McDowell, professor of cloth- 
ing extension, retired with emerita rank 
on September 30 after 27 years with the 
agricultural extension service. 



Prior to coming to Perm State, Miss 
McDowell taught for 10 years at University 
of Minnesota and for three years at New 
York State Teachers College, Plattsburg, 
N.Y. 



COMMUNITY FORUM PLANNING PROGRAM OF SPEAKERS 

The program for the 1949-50 Connuni- negotiating with a number of outstanding 

ty Forum Series is now being arranged, speakers and the program probably would 

according to Ralph W, McComb, College be completed within the next month, 
librarian and chairman of the Forum. 

It is ( expected that the first speak- 

McCornb said that Eugene Fulmer, chair- er will be presented early in December* 
man of the program committee, has been 

OF GENERAL INTEREST 

SENATE; The College S e nate will meet at Building, and for German,, in Room 229, 

4;10 p.m, on Thursday, October 6, in 'Sparks Building* 

Room 121, Sparks Building. r *** 

*** SWIMMING: Faculty members, their wives, 

ENGINEERING FACULTY: A meeting of the '■ and other college employees may swim at 

faculty of the School of Engineering the Glennland Pool each Monday from 7 

will be held at 5:10 p.m. Thursday, to 10 p.m. It is necessary to obtain a 

October 13, in Room 110, Electrical recreational swim ticket at the Office 

Engineering Building. of the Bursar. They are priced at $1.80 

*** and entitle the holder to swim each 

LIBERAL /JITS FACULTY: A meeting of the Monday night" during the semester, 
faculty of the School of the Liberal , *** 

Arts will be held at 4:10 p.m. on Tues- STUDENT HANDBOOK: Faculty members de- 
day, October 4, in Room 10, Sparks s'iring a copy of the 1949-50 Student 
Building, Handbook should call at the Penn State 

+ ** Christian Association office, 304 Old 

CHAPEL: Rev. Imre Kovacs,the Reformed Main, 

Church, Chester Springs, Pa., will speak *** . 

at chapel services in Schwab Auditorium FOOT SERVICE: The, food service of the 

at 11 a.m. Sunday, October 9, School of Home Economics will open on 

*** Wednesday, October 5, Luncheon is 

SPORTS: Saturday, October 8, 1 p.m., served, Monday through Saturday, from 

soccer, Bucknellj 2 p.m., football, Bos- 11:50 a.m. to 12 ;30 p.m. The cafeteria 

ton College. and Maple Room will also be open for 

*** service on Monday nights from 5:45 to 

REGISTRATION: Graduate students must reg- 6:30 o'clock, Dinner service will be 

ister not later than October 5, instead available in, t he Maple Room from 5:30 p.m, 

of October 12, as erroneously published. to 6:30 p.m, Tuesday through Thursday 

The late registration fee will apply for nights, 
students registering after October 5, . *** 

*** DEATH ANNOUNCED: Announcement has been 

ACS; Ir, Walter G, Frankenburg , director made of the death, of Dr. Earle I. Yfilde, 

of the Research Laboratory of the General professor emeritus of ornamental horti— 

Cigar Co., Lancaster, will address the culture, in Tecumseh, Mich, on September 

Central Pennsylvania section, American 29, Er, Wilde retired from the College 

Chemical Society, at 7;30 p.m. Wednesday, faculty on December 31, 1948 after 36 

October 5, at Juniata College, Huntingdon, years of service. 
He will speak on "The Chemistry of To- *** 

bacco." ' AT SPEECH MEETINGS: Eight faculty members 

*** played active role,s at the Pennsylvania 
FOREIGN LANGUAGE EXAMS: Foreign language Speech As sociat ion. meetings in Harris- 
reading examinations required of candi- burg Friday and Saturday, They were: 
dates for advanced degrees will be given Dr, Robert T. Oliver, Thomas A, Hopkins, 
on November 7 from 7 to 9 p,m, in Room Dr. Eugene T, McDonald, Clayton H, Schug, 
10, Sparks Building. All candidates 'Jo Kays, Joseph F, O'Brien, Dr, Paul R, 
should register before October 7 for Beall, William W, Hamilton, and Y r • 
French and Spanish in Room 300, Sparks Harold E, N e lso,n, 

* * * . 

OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS FROM THE OFFICE OF THE, LEAN OF ADMISSIONS AND REGISTRAR 

Withdrawa 1 s ; 

4 Ames, Robert S., AH, June 6 7 Haupt, Gene Sterling, AL, Aug. 22 

5 Beck, Jan, AL, Aug. 19 4 Rodngues, James, AL, June 6 

5 Cole, Robert L., VlEd, Aug. 25 4 S.achse, Charles William, HA, June 1 

3 Frey, Gerard Roland, HA, S e pt, 2 5 Seitz, Ellamae Elizabeth, -phys , Aug, 29 



Reasons for Withdrawals; Finances, 3; to attend another college, 2j en'li 
in Air Force, lj illness and financial, lj to enroll in Bureau of- Standards S 
Aid— Trainee program, 1, 



st ed 
tud ent 



•DOLLEC. t 



PERSONNEL CHANGES 4 

The following personnel changes approved during the period, June 6, 1949 to 
September 27, 1949, are announced* 

Appointment s ; 

391 Abbott, Charlotte, J», Clerk-stenographer, Summer Sessions 

Adams, June, Counterwoman, Nittany Dining Hall 
338J Adams, Lloyd E,, Assistant Professor, Agricultural Extension 
371J Aiken, Elizabeth, Research Assistant, Mineral Technology 
142J Akutowicz, Edwin J., Assistant Professor, Mathematics 
266J Albright, Joanne, Stenographer, Agricultural Extension 
220 Allen, Charlotte, Clerk-typist, Tabulating 
Alter, Herbert W.», Fireman, physical Plant 
■ 146J Anderson, Howard K., Assistant Professor, Economics 
325 Anfaenger, Rose, Research Assistant, Ellen H« Richards Institute 

Archer, M. Amaryllis, Assistant Ext. Representative, Agricultural Extension 
18 Ash, Philip, Associate Research Professor, Instructional Film Research 
344 Austin, Pauline M», File Clerk, Dean of Admissions 
Baer, Carrie, Count erwoman, Nittany Dining Kail 
86J Baer, Ernest E», Instructor, Physical Education and Athletics 
• Bailey, Jacqueline, Counterwoman, Nittany Dining Hall 
348 Baney, Catherine, Clerk— typ ist , Dean of Admissions 
53J Barrett, Isabel F«, Computress, Engineering Experiment Station 
Barto, Elmer T., Groundskeeper , Physical plant 
344 Barto, Helen J., Stenographer, Dean of Admissions 
480 Barto, Ruth A,, Seamstress, McElwain Hall 

189 Bauar,Dorothea E a , Stenographer, Intermediate Registration 
176 Baumgardner, Mary R., Clerk-typist, Audio-Visual Aids Library 

Beightol, Cora, Counterwoman, Nittany Dining . Hall 
176 Bell, Nancy J., Clerk-typist, Audio-Visual Aids Library 

46 Bell, William B,, Laboratory Mechanician, Mechanical Engineering 
344 'Benner, Patricia, Stenographer, Dean o f 'Admissions 
293J Berg, Gordon L., Instructor, Agricultural Journalism' 

30 Berg, Mary E«, Housekeeper, Housing 
317J Birtley, Willard B., Research Assistant, Ellen H« Richards Institute 

Bisch, Lois, Counterwoman, Nittany Dining Hall 
142J Blau, Julian H., Assistant Professor, Mathematics 
105J Boiling, Lucille M e B., instruct or , 'Home Economics 
146J Boner, Patrick J., Instructor, Economics 

Bowes, Fannie, Dish Room Woman, Nittany Dining Hall 
Brungard, Marie, Counterwoman, Nittany Dining Hall 
272 Boyle, John S,, Assistant Professor, Botany 
137 Braun, Miriam L,, Secretary, Ordnance Research Laboratory 
588 Breece, Margaret M«, Personnel Assistant, Security Benefits Division 

50J Brennan, J. Norton, Instructor, Engineering Mechanics 
580 Brennan, Shirley, Secretary, Auditing Department 
Breon, Maurice D., Cement Tender,' Physical Plant 
356 Bresnock, Dorothy, Secretary, Bsuine ss Administrat ion 
388 Britton, Joseph H», Assistant Professor, Psychology 
104 Burleigh, E, Madeline, Assistant Professor, Home Economics 

96 Broadt, Dorothy, Nurse, Health Service 
262 Brown, Emory J., Instructor, Agricultural Economics and Rural Sociology 
.317J Brown, Walter N. Jr.-, Research Associate, Ellen H. Richards Institute 

Buchanan, U, Grant, 'Clerk of Works, Physical plant 
168 Bu^sony, Joseph, Research Assistant, Chemistry 

Callahan, G e orge, Dishroom Man, Nittany Dining Hall 
47J Caldwell, James W,, Assistant Professor, Industrial Engineering 
Callahan, William H., Electrician, Physical Plant 

Carrigan, M. Ruth, Assistant Extension Representative, Home Economics Extension 
151 Cathcart, James, Secretary, Sociology 

Chandler, Helen, Counterwoman, Nittany Dining Hall 
153 Chapman, Hugh, Instructor, Romance Languages 
137 Chehi, Stephen E # , Designer, Ordnance Research Laboratory 
220 Collinson, William, Supervi sor of Filing and Multilith, Accounting 
Confer, Anna M. , Count erwoman, Nittany Dining Hall 
96 Confer, Anna Mary, Kitchen Helper, Health Service ' 
350 Coppolino, Frances, Typist, Purchasing 

203 Corty, Floyd L., Instructor, Agricultural Economics and Rural Sociology 
352 Crooks, Arleen W., Clerk, Office of the Bursar 

Cox, Harry, Pot, Sink and Utilities, Nittany Dining Hall 

Coyne, John J,, Custodian, Central Extension 

Baer, Charles, Dishroom Man, Nittany Dining Hall 

Beightol, Lewis, Pot, Sink andGeneral Utility Man, Nittany Dining Hall 



236 Cronemcyer, Carl E., Record Clerk, Dean of Admissions 
220 Cunningham, Marion, Accounting Clerk, Payroll 
130 Curran, Alice M. , Stenographer, Central Extension 

96 Davis, Rosemarie, Nurse, Health Service 

Day, Peter A., Custodian, Central Extension 
280 Dayton, Patricia L., Stenographer, Agronomy 

Dean, Jesse W,, Groundskeeper , Physical Plant 

51 DeCarolis, Julius J., Research Assistant Professor, Engineering Exper, Station 
398 Dchn, Frances, Secretary, S-feadont Advisory Service 
110J 



218M 



184 



100 
53J 



2 85M 
388 




ens ion 



111 Dorneman, Jane S,, Clerk-typist, Library 

251 Douts, Marlasee E., Laboratory Technician, Ellen H, Richards Institute 

264M Dunbar, Anne, Agr ic\iltural Library Assistant, College Library 

151 Dunlap, Jean E., Secretary, Political Science 

152 Dutton, Vivian, Stenographer, Speech 

Dyke, C ra, Count erwoman, Nittany Dining Hall 
365 Eakin, James H., Jr., Assistant Professor, Agricultural Extension 
100 Eaton, Mary p., Clerk-stenographer, Administration and Child Development 
393 Ehmann, Gerhard E., Associate" Professor, Education 
399 Elzey> Lydia, Assistant Professor, Education 
344 Fahr, Marlene, Stenographer, Dean of Admissions 
51 Fetterman, Lois R», Stenographer, Earth Sciences 
Fink, Olga B«, Janitress, Simmons 

Fink, Nora, Counterwoman , Nittany Dining Hall 
397 Finley, Barbara, Stenographer,. Education 

Finley, John R., Instructor, Central Extension 
Fletcher, Robert F., Instructor, Agricultural Extension 
Fogle, Harry i, Jr., Electrician, physical Plant . 

Nittany Dining Hall 




on 



Gardner, Dorothy J., Stenographer, 

Gaus, John E., Curator, School of Mineral 

Gehman, T tf, Scott Jr., Assistant Director, Intermediate Registration 

Gerhard, Philip E,, Advanced Registry Supervisor,. Dairy Husbandry 

Globis, C^simir J., Advanced Registry Supervisor, Dairy Plusbandry 

Goater, John Charles J., Assistant Ag. Ext. Representative, Agricultural Ext 




480 
18 Gray, William D., Properties & Procedure Clerk, Instructional Film Research 

11 

183M Gresh, J hn E., Off-set Printer and Multilith Operator, Office Services Div. 

Guditus, Stella, Counterwoman , Nittany Dining Hall 

Hale, Edgar B., Assistant Professor, Poultry Husbandry and Psychology 

Hall, John F., Assistant Professor, Psychology 

Harpster, Harold A., Advanced Registry Supervisor, Dairy Husbandry 

Harpster, John R., Dairy Farm Employee, Dairy Husbandry 
137 Harvill, Emmett L., Machinist, Ordnance Research Laboratory 

Hassinger, Kathryn, Countervj-oman, Nittany Dining Hall 

Hassinger, Nancy M., Seamstress, Dormitories 

Hastings, Margaret, Counterwoman, Nittany Dining Hall 

Hazel, Bessie , Counterwoman , Nittany Dining Hall 
51 Helier, Helen, S e cretary, Engineering Experiment Station 

3.72 Henderson, Frances S», Instructor, Home Economics 

218M Felts, Wayne M. , Associate Professor, Earth Sciences 
388 Guthrie, George M. , Assistant Professor, psychology 



6 
396 Herman, Nancy A., Stenographer, Industrial Education 

Hinman, Harold L«, Assistant Professor, Central Extension 

Holcombe, Frank J», Advanced Regi stry, Supervisor , D a iry Husbandry 

Hoover, Conrad, Advanced Registry, Supervisor , Dairy Husbandry 

Hoover, John S,, Janitor, Physical Plant 
149 Hopkins, Thomas At, Instructor, Speech 

Horner, Russell F,, Painter, Physical Plant 

Hosterman, L. Jane, Count erwoman, Nittany Dining Hall 
386 Hunter, Eleanor, Stenographer, Education 

371J Insley, Robert H,, Research Assistant, Earth Sciences 
182 ishlcr, Janet L,, Clerk-typist, Associated Student Activities 

18 Jaspen, Nathan, Associated Research Professor, Instructional Film Research 

295 Jorgenson, Richard N., Instructor, Forestry 

Kane, Bernard, Pot, Sink, and General Utilities, Nittany Dining Hall 

Kane, Joseph, pot, Sink, and General Utilities, Nittany Dining Hall 
383 Karhan, Theodore, Assistant Professor, Music and Music Education 

137 Kato, Walter Y» , Research Assistant, Ordnance Research Laboratory 

216M Kelley, Jay H., Instructor, Mineral Engineering 
146J Kerley, David M,, Assistant Professor, Economics 

Kerrick, Daniel E,, Advanced Registry, Supervisor , Dairy Husbandry 
220 Kerstetter, Donald, Coding Clerk, Bookkeeping 

Kerstetter, William H», Maintenance Mechanic, Physical plant 

Kessinger, D» Alton, Janitor, Physical plant 
220 Kessler, Helen, Key Punch Operator, Tabulating 

146J Kiger, Frances, Instructor, Economics 

King, Betty Lou, Clerk— typist , C e ntral Extension 

King, Clara, Count e rwoman, Nittany Dining Hall 
153 Klinke, Joan, Secretary, Romance Languages 

262 Knapik, Mary A # , Stenographer, Agricultural Economics and Rural Sociology 

165M Knisely, Charles W, , Research Assistant, Engineering Experiment Station 

Knoebel, Robert, Associate Professor, Industrial Education 

Koehler, Fred, Custodian, C Q ntral Extension 
137 Kohn, Sheldon A., Research Assistant, Ordnance R e search Laboratory 

Korman , Leonard E«, Truck Driver, General Stock 

Koss, Edith, Stenographer, Mineral Industries Extension 

Kovar, Anton J,, Instructor, Forestry (Mont Alto) 
278 Kroll, Dorothea B # , Stenographer, Agricultural Extension 

Krotchko, G e orge D., Instructor, Engineering Extension 

339 Kustanbaut er , S a ra J., Stenographer, Agricultural Extension 

340 Lantz, Ann E», Secretary, President's Office 
220 Lauck, Paul, General Clerk, Accounting 

153 LeSace, Lawrence, Associate Professor, Romance Languages 

54M Lew, Henry G., Assistant P r ofessor, Aeronautical Engineering 
480 Lightner, Paul L., Janitor, McElwain Hall 

142J Lorch, Lee, Assistant Professor, Mathematics 
130 Lord, Hilda P., Clerk-typist, Central Extension 

236 Lorenz, Susan A,, Stenographer, Dean of Admissions 

130 Lucabaugh, Marie E., Secretary, Central Extension and Education 

Lucas, Paul, Advanced Registry, Supervisor, D a iry Husbandry 
220 Luechauer, Gtueenie, Accounting Clerk, Payroll 

Lykens, Margaret, C ount erwoman, Nittany Dining Hall 
334 Lynn, Mary J., Assistant Extension Representative, Agricultural Extension 

Macgreagor, Stephen D,, Advanced Registry, Supervisor, Dairy Husbandry 
MacMillan, George E,, Vocational Appraiser, Central Extension 
184 MacRae, Wendell, Publications Production Manager, Public Information 

150 Mancevice, Ruth, Secretary, German 

335J Manning, Mary V., Clerk, Agricultural Extension 

137 Mansky, Clarence B., Research Associate, Ordnance Research Laboratory 

51 Markle, Catherine E., Stenographer, Engineering Experiment Station 

96 Markley, Helen W., Laboratory Technician, Health Service 

Martin, Rose, C ounte rwoman, Nittany Dining Hall 
220 Masullo, Mary, Switchboard Operator, Accouting Operations 

320M Mausteller, John W,, Research Assistant, Chemistry 
285M McCartney, Morley G., Assistant Professor, poultry Husbandry 
120 McClain, Charles L., Clerk-Utility, Physical plant 

McCloskey, Carol G., Librarian, Central Extension 
344 McConnell, Ann M. , Secretary, Dean of admissions 

137 McCormick, Barnes W» Jr»^ Research Associate, Ordnance Research Laboratory 

437 McCracken, Anne C,, Hostess, Dean of Women 

McCulloch, Rebecca, Nigh Matron, Dean of Women 
43 McCusker, Joseph H., Instructor, Electrical Engineering 

91 McFeeter, Ruth, Instructor, physical Education and Athletics 



THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 



FACULTY 



The Bulletin is published weekly during the College 
year as a. means of making official announcements 
and presenting items of interest to the faculty. All 




BULLETIN 



contributions should be as brief as possible and 
reach Louis H- Bell. Director of Public Information, 
313 Old Main, not later than 10 a. m. each Friday. 



VOL. 



37 



October 10, 1949 



NO. 3 



CAMPUS ENROLLMENT TOTALS 10,928 TO ESTABLISH NEW RECORD 



A total of 10,928 students have en- 
rolled for the first semester, according 
to figures released by Dean of Admission 
R, M. Gerhardt, 

Of this number, 9502 .are regular full- 
time undergraduates; 1208 are full-time 
and part-time graduate students; 213 are 
special or unclassified students; and 5 
are 2-year students in agriculture. 

The enrollment exceeds last year's 
figure of 9801 by 1127 students. The in- 



crease in the number of undergraduates 
over last year is 882 and of graduate 
students, 206, 

A deta iled re port on registration 
of students on csnpus is printed in 
this issue of the Faculty Bulletin, Ex- 
cept for 531 women students, all fresh- 
men are located at off-campus centers, 
state teachers' colleges, or other col- 
leges, and a report on freshmen w ill be 
published later. 



NEW FACULTY, EMPLOYEES WARNED ..BOUT USING OUT-OF-STATE AUTO LICENSE TAGS 



Faculty members and other new employ- 
ees, who have moved to Pennsylvania from 
other states are advised to check Pennsyl- 
vania laws in regard t o t he length of 
time they are allowed to operate their 
automobiles with out-of-state tags. 

The Pennsylvania Motor code pro- 
vides that non-residents of the Common— 
wealth will be exempt from registration 
of motor vehicles for the same time and 
to the same extent as like exemptions 
are granted to the Commonwealth under the 
laws of the foreign state of such non- 
resident. 



It is also provided that the Secre- 
tary of Revenue of the Commonwealt h of 
Pennsylvania may enter into an agreement 
with the duly authorized representatives 
of other states concerning the exemption 
of the residents of Pennsylvania and non- 
residents of Pennsylvania relative to 
the operation of motor vehicles in such 
stat e s . 

Employees are therefore advised to 
communicate with the Seoretary of Revenue, 
Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, Harrisburg, 
to determine the terms of the reciprocity 
agreement entered into between pennsylva*- 
nia and the former state of the employee. 



AAUP TO OPEN MEETINGS WITH DISCUSSION OF INSURANCE AND RETIREMENT BENEFITS 



The local chapter of the American 
Association of University Professors will 
open the Fall semester with a meeting at 
7;30 p.m. on Monday, October 17, in Room 
110, Electrical Engineering Building. 

The session will be open to all fac- 
ulty members and new faculty members es- 
pecially are invited to attend. 



John B. Butler, supervisor, Security 
Benefits Divison, will discuss retire- 
ment and insurance benefits for faculty 
and staff members. 

Brief reports of the activities of 
the chapter will be given and future 
plans considered. 



EXHIBIT OF LITHOGRAPHS, BRONZES OF PABLO PICASSO TO OPEN OCTOBER 17 



An exhibition of 14 large lithographs 
and 4 small bronzes, recent works of Pab- 
lo Picasso, will be shown at Simmons Hall 
beginning on Monday, October 17, and con- 
tinuing through November 7, 

The exhibit, which is touring the coun- 
try under the auspices of the Museum of 
Modern Art, is sponsored here by the de- 



partment of architecture. 

The post-war years have been a period 
of extraordinary exuberance for Picasso 
and the works to be exhibited here are 
emblematic in both style and spirit of 
the artist's fabulous recent outpouring 
of paintings and ceramics, not yet seen 
in this country. PENN STATE COLLECTION 



MINUTES OF THE SENATE MEETING OF OCTOBER 6, 194 9 



The College Senate net at 4:10 p,m, on 
October 6, 1949 in Room 121, Sparks Build. 
ing with A«0# Morse presiding, _ The list 
of members present is on file in the 
Office of the Registrar. The minutes of 
the June 2 meeting were not read since 
they had been printed in the June 6 
issue of the Faculty Bulletin, The Sen- 
ate voted to approve the minutes as 
printed. 



Under co 
oers, le 
ing sena 
able to 
on Octob 
name in 
designat 
Bentley 
Cryder ( 
(Hvitchis 
letters 
Registra 



mmunicat io 
tters were 
tors stati 
be present 
er 6 and n 
parenthe s i 
ed by the 
(Henning ); 
Rose ){ Hal 
on )} and F 
are on fil 
r. 



ns from C 
read fro 
ng they w 
at the S 
aming sub 
s is the 
senator, 
Callenba 
ler (Noll 
orbes (Ha 
e in the 



ollege offi* 
m t he f ollow- 
ould be un— 
enate meeting 
stitutes. The 
substitute 

Messrs, 
oh (Murphy) j 
)j Fernelius 
11), These 
Office of the 



A letter was read from Dean B e n Euwema 
to the effect that Donald W, Davis would 
act as substitute for F, C, Banner ■ on the 
College S e nate from July 1, 1949 to Jan- 
uary 31, 1950, Likewise a letter from 
P,B, Eappj Secretary for the Faculty of 
the School of Engineering stating E.E, 
Ambrosius was elected to replace L,J, 
Bradford on the Senate for the next two 
years. These letters are on file in the 
Office of the Registrar, 

Annual reports for the year 1948-1949 
were received from the Senate Committee 
on Athletics and the representatives on 
the council for research. These reports, 
which are on file in the Office of the 
Registrar, were not read since they will 
be printed in the Faculty Bulletin, 

A letter from H.E, Dickson concerning 
the practice of requesting early grades 
for students about to graduate was read 
and referred to the Committee on Academic 
Standards, 



Under the heading 
ing committees, V 
man of the Commit 
states that since 
College Senate hi 
with power on eig 
the authority pro 
action of October 
summer, 6 9 reinst 
viewed. Of these 
13 were denied, 
transfer were app 
which is on file 
Registrar, was q,c 



of reports from stand— 
ictor A, Beede, chair- 
tee on'Acadenic Standards, 

the last meeting of the 
s committee had acted 
ht student cases, under 
vided by the Senate 

2 , 1947. During the 
atement cases were re— 
, 56 were approved and 
Five cases of probation 
roved. This report, 
in the Office of the 
cepted by the Senate, 



B»V, Moore, chairman of the Committee on 
Committees, stated his commi-ctee had re- 
ceived approval from Acting President 
Milholland for its recommendation that 
J,Hd Olewine be named a member of the 



Committee on Student Welfare, and that 
R,W, Brewster be made chairman of the 
Committee on Student Welfare to re- 
place H,K» Wilson who has been named 
Director of the Divison of Intermediate 
Registration, The recommendation was 
accepted by the Senate, 

C ,E , Bullinger, chairman of the Cnm- 
mittee on Courses of Study, presented 
his October report which is on file 
in the Office of the Registrar, 

Under the heading of new business, Mr, 
Morse reported on the progress of the 
Division of Intermediate Registration 
under the direction of Dean H»K, Wilson; 
director, and W,S, Gehman as assistant 
to the director. An advisory committee 
representing all schools was appointed 
and met frequently during the summer, 
Mr, Morse emphasized that Rule 58 of 
the Regulations for Undergraduate Stu- 
dents, edition 1949—50, does not in any 
way affect the 50% rule, and that the 
acti'on of the Senate at its meeting 
June 2 in no way modifies Rule 59 of 
the Regulations for Undergraduate Stu- 
dents, edition 1949—50, fie stated 
that suggestions have been received to 
merge D,I,R» with the present Transi- 
tion Section and to give the same at- 
tention to students in Transition as 
in the D,I*R, In order to do this a 
minor change is necessary in the Senate 
regulations. Rule 18 of the Regulations 
for Undergraduate Students, edition 
1949-50, which now reads; 



S 

Colle 
be pe 
out b 
dents 
becau 
under 
ted, 
Trans 
of t 
Women 



tudents who have been dropped from 
ge for poor scholarship will not 
rmitted to change curricula with— 
eing formally reinstated, Stu— 

who are not ab'le to change schools 
se of scholastic deficiencies, 

certain conditions, may be admit— 
for one semester only, to" the 
ition Section under the direction 
he Dean of Men or the Dean of 



shall be changed to read; 

Students who have been dropped from 
College for poor scholarship will not 
be permitted to change curricula with- 
out being formally reinstated. Stu- 
dents who are not able to change schools 
because of scholastic deficiencies, un- 
der certain conditions, may be admitted 
for not more than two semesters, to the 
Division of Intermediate Registration, 

Since this recommendation is new legis- 
lation, it will lie on the table for 
one month, 

A vote of thanks was given by the Senate 
to Dean Wilson for directing the Divi- 
sion of Intermediate Registration* On 
notion, Senate adjourned at 4 }40 p,m. 



ENROLLMENT BY CURRICULA 1st SEMESTER 1949-1950 





1 


Sen 


2 


S e n 


3 


S e n 


4 


Sen 


5 


Sen 


6 


S e n 


7 


S e n 


8 


S e n 










M 


W 


M 


■nr 


M 


" W 


M 


W 


M 


V7 


M 


W 


M 


W 


M 


ft 


u 


W 


JL 


AGRICULTURE 




































ABCh 




„ 




^ , 


10 


2 


1 


aa 


17 


4 


5 


mm 


7 


3 


4 


- 


44 


9 


53 


AgEc 


_ 


1 


mm 


_ 


33 


aa 


8 


■a 


34 


— 


4 


- 


45 


- 


13 


- 


137 


1 


138 


AgEd 


mm 




mm 


M 


48 


— 


10 


• 


31 


- 


12 


- 


43 


- 


26 


- 


170 


— 


170 


AgEng 
Agro 

AH 


mi 


— 


„ 


_ 


17 


— 


2 


- 


26 


- 


1 


— 


15 


— 


4 


- 


65 


— 


65 


— 


.a. 


a. 


_ 


35 


_ 


2 


aa 


26 


1 


- 


- 


32 


- 


7 


- 


102 


1 


103 


■ «. 


a. 


m. 


_ 


34 


1 


4 


a. 


17 


1 


3 


- 


36 


1 


4 


— 


98 


3 


101 


Baot 


. 


6 


mm 


_ 


4 


4 


3 


a. 


16 


2 


2 


1 


14 


4 


1 


- 


40 


17 


57 


Bot 


_ 


1 


— 


— 


3 


1 


aa. 


mm. 


2 


— 


— 


- 


4 


' - 


1 


- 


10 


2 


12 


DH 


_ 


_ 


mm 


mm 


45 


1 


1 


_ 


52 


aa - 


4 


mm 


49 


1 


6 


— 


157 


2 


159 


For 


am 


a. 


aa 


aa> 


86 


aa 


1 


aa 


73 


_ 


11 


— 


86 


- 


23 


- 


280 


a. 


280 


Hort 


aa 


2 


mm 


1 


52 


aa 


7 


aa 


47 


1 


3 


- 


42 


3 


14 


mm 


16 5 


7 


172 


PH 


_ 




at 




7 


aa 


a. 


aa, 


9 


1 


2 


- 


5 


- 


2 


- 


25 


1 


26 


PV 


aa 


5 


— 


— 


34 


3 


4 


aa 


22 


1 


2 












62 


9 


71 


ZE 


a. 


2 


_ 


_ 


3 


2 


1 


- a. 


4 


a. 


3 


mm 


11 


1 


4 


- 


26 


5 


31 


MT 


«. 


14 


aa 


aa 


a. 


17 


— 


— 


— 


10 


— 


- 


mm 


6 


- 


- 


— 


47 


47 


WU 


m 




a. 


a. 


10 


aa 


— 


a. 


7 


— 


- 


- 


11 


- 


1 


- 


29 


— 


29 


Total' 


■» 


31 


- 


1 


421 


31 


44 


- 


383 


21 


52 


1 


400 


19 


IIP 


— 


1410 


164 


1514 


CHEMISTRY AND 


PHYSICS 






























ChE 


mm 


mm- 


„ 


f— 


101 


_ 


3 


*■> 


79 


1 


3 


aa 


93 


— 


4 


a. 


283 


1 


284 


Chen 


aa 


a 


1 


— 


35 


5 


5 


' 1 


26 


3 


3 


- 


22 


1 


- 


- 


92 


18 


110 


Phys 


• 


l 


aa 


— . 


18 


3 


1 


1 


19 


1 


7 


- 


34 


- 


5 


- 


84 


6 


90 


PM 


aa 


10 


1 


— 


54 


9 


7 


a» 


43 


7 


5 


- 


46 


1 


5 


- 


161 


27 


188 


Soi 


• 


i 




■a 


8 


2 


1 


- 


10 


2 


- 


- 


14 


5 


6 


1 


39 


11 


50 


CCh 


aa 


— 


1 


- 


a. 


— 


1 


• 


3 


1 


1 


- 


13 


3 


2 


- 


21 


4 


25 


Total 


- 


20 


3 


- 


210 


19 


18 


2 


180 


15 


19 


— 


222 


10 


22 


1 


680 


67 


747 


EDUCATION 




































Ed 


a. 


11G 


_ 


1 


00 


164 


15 


15 


71 


109 


19 


12 


72 


72 


43 


20 


280 


509 


789 


IA 


- 


- 


— 


— 


13 


- 


2 


— 


16 


- 


8 


- 


23 


- 


2 


- 


64 


— 


64 


MEd 


m 


20 


- 


- 


8 


14 


6 


1 


8 


7 


2 


- 


8 


6 


2 


- 


34 


48 


02 


Psy 


— 


18 


- 


1 


31 


30 


18 


5 


33 


19 


10 


2 


57 


20 


27 


7 


176 


1P2 


278 


VIEd 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


• 


1 


- 


3 


- 


2 


- 


5 


— 


3 


— 


16 


— 


16 


Total 


- 


154 


- 


-Z 


114 


208 


42 


21 


131 


135 


41 


14 


165 


98 


77 


27 


570 


659 


1229 


HOME ECONOMICS 


































HEO 


- 


136 


mm 


1 


- 


125 


1 


13 


- 


118 


- 


5 


- 


67 


1 


5 


470 


2 


472 


HA 


— 


1 


m. 


- 


32 


3 


3 


— 


39 


3 


12 


~ 


28 


2 


15 


a. 


12 9 


9 


138 


Total 


- 


137 


- 


1 


32 


128 


4 


13 


39 


121 


12 


5 


28 


69 


16 


5 


599 


11 


610 


ENGINEERING 




































Arch 


- 


- 


- 


.*. 


18 


4 


- 


- 


23 


aa 


a. 


— 


20 


a. 


1 


aa 


62 


4 


66 


AE 


- 


— 


• 


mm 


9 


— 


1 


— 


12 


— 


aa 


— 


21 


aa 


1 


aa 


44 


- 


44 


CE 


- 


— 


- 


mm 


97 


- 


10 


— 


75 


a. 


9 


mm 


71 


— 


18 


aa 


280 


- 


280 


EE 


- 


- 


- 


- 


150 


- 


23 


- 


133 


- 


24 


mm 


145 


a. 


49 


— 


524 


— 


524 


IE 


- 


- 


aa. 


— 


74 


— 


13 


— 


68 


aa 


22 


mm 


98 


aa 


58 


— 


333 


- 


333 


ME 


- 


- 


1 


- 


136 


— 


20 


— 


113 


aa 


21 


ah 


115 


1 


38 


aa 


444 


1 


445 


SE 


— 


— 


— 


a> 


3 


— 


•a 


_ 


12 


.a 


1 


_ 


6 


aa 


aa 


aa 


22 


- 


22 


Aero 


- 


- 


- 


- 


38 


mm 


2 


a> 


27 


aa 


5 


aa 


29 


aa 


9 


■a 


110 


- 


110 


Total 


- 


- 


1 


- 


525 


4 


69 


- 


463 


- 


82 


mm 


505 


1 


174 


- 


1819 


5 


1824 



LIBERAL ARTS 

AL 186 105 42 12 156 112 54 27 438 256 694 

CF -------- 2Z9 13 42 8 284 15 106 8 661 44 705 

Jour - - - - - - - - 52 31 10 1 62 22 26 5 150 59 209 

AC -------- ---____.__ 

LAC ------- -1- --'---- 1 - 1 

LD - 170 11 3 501 181 126 26 ------- 638 380 1018 

LMR --------4-1-8--- 13 -13 

Dotal - 170 11 3 502 181 126 26 472 149 95 21 510 149 186 40 1901 7 39 2640 



, : J XBCTION 



l^en 2 Sen 3_J^ep 4 Sen 5 Sen 6 Sen 7 Sen 8 Sen 
M W M W M W M T J H W M W M W M W M W 

MINERAL INDUSTRIES 



Cer - -• « - 11 -. 1 - 1 - 1 -57 -4- .75 -75 

FT-__-4~----3-12-2- 21 - 21 

G e og ____ 3 _2-----ll--- 16 -16 

GM - 14 - - - - - 2 - 18 - 6 1 40 1 41 

GG____4-----~-7-2- 13 -13 

Met ____i7 _______ 58--- 75 -75 

Mrgy _„__7_2-~-2-22-2- 35 -35 

MEo __„„i_3_____9-31 16 117 

MPE ____.--_-_l-.3--- 4 - 4 

MEng ____ 22 ---1-4-29-4- 60 -60 

PNG ___ - 28 - 7 - - - 2 - 38 - 6 - 81 - 81 

Total _ HI - 15 - 2 - 15 - 264 - 29 2 436 2 438 

P k YS ICA L E DU CATION 



PEd - 19 


_, 


- 61 


29 


7 1 


46 


27 


4 


2 51 


15 


11 


_ 


180 


93 


273 


IIEd - 


— 


1 


- 


1 


3 


- 


- 


- - 


- 


- 


- 


5 


- 


5 


Rec - 


- 


- - 


2 


_ _ 


1 


2 


3 


8 


1 


- 


- 


12 


5 


17 


Total - 19 


- 


- 62 


31 


8 1 


50 


29 


7 


2 59 


16 


11 


— 


197 


98 


295 


TRANSITION 


AND 


DIVISION 


OF 


INTERMEI 


HATE 


REG 


1ST RAT ION 


1 


1 




70 


6 




TRANS - 




- 16 


2 


13 


24 


3 


4 


- 12 


76 


DIR - 


- 


- 115 


13 


















116 


13 


129 



TOTAL - 531 15 7 2113 617 340 63 1744 473 327 43 2165 363 626 75 7330 2172 9502 

Graduate Students 1004 204 1208 

Special Students 94 124 218 

8428 2500 10928 

OF GENERAL INTEREST 

CHAPEL* Bishop Looyd C. Wicke, of the FACULTY TEA: The faculty of the School 

Pittsburgh Area Methodist Church, will of the Liberal Arts will hold ah informal . 

speak at the Chapel services at 11 a,n, tea in honor of new faculty 'nenbers fron 
Sunday, October 16, in Schwab Auditorium* 3 to 5 p.n, Sunday, October 16, in the 

*** Main Lounge of Sinnous Mall, 
LUNCHEON CLUB: Meetings of the Faculty *** 

Luncheon Club will be resumed on Monday COMMUNITY NURSE AVAILABLE: New and 'old 

noon, October 17, at the Hotel State faculty nenbers are advised that a con—' 

Colleges*- Speakers will be Willian S, nun it y nurse is available for hourly ser- 

Hoffnan and Julius E„ Kaulfuss, candi- vice, Arrangenents nay be made by calling 
dates for burgess of State College, Tick- 3162 during the day or 4717 at night, 
ets this year will be priced at $1 each, *** 

*** STATISTICAL QUALITY CONTROL: Sinon 

SPORTS CALENDAR: Saturday, October 14, Collier, director of quality control of 

2 p.n., football, Nebraska; 2:30 p»n,, the Johns— Manville Corporation, will pre— 

cross country, New York University, sent a film, "Modern duality Control" at 

*** 8 p.n. on Tuesday, October 18, in Room 

ENGINEERING FACULTY: The faculty of the 110, Electrical Engineering Building, 
School of Engineering will neet at 5:10 It is sponsored by the student chapters 

p.n, on Thursday, October 13, in Roon of the SAM and ASME and is open to the 

110, Electrical Engineering Building, public,, 

* * * . * * * 

FACULTY MAIL: New faculty nenbers ex- FOOD DEMONSTRATION: Kathryn Sandneyer, 

pecting nail and who have not received of the Evaporated Milk Association, 

it should check the supply of unclaimed Chicago, -111, will conduct demonstrations 

nail on file in Roon 112, Old Main, this week in Roon 2 05, Hone Economics 

*** Building, on the preparation of various 

STUDENT EMPLOYMENT: Students are avail- foods,, The demonstrations will be open 

able for various types of part-tine work, to the public and are scheduled for 9—12 

such as. window washing, house-cleaning, a,n., Oct, 10; 2-5 p.n,, Oct, 11; 9-12 

yard clean-up, leaf raking, and baby a,n., Oct, 12; 9-12 a„n», Oct, 13; and 

sitting. Call Allan Me Reece, ext, 231, 2-5 p.n c , Oct, 14, 

* * » * * » 






NEW ROT C OFFICERS: New officers assigned 
to the department of military science 
and tactics are Capt . Felipe Vias, in- 



fantry; and C 

corps, 



.pt • John P, Doughery, signal 



EVENING CLASSES: Registration for eve- 
ning classes in accounting, typing, and 
shorthand will be held from 7 to 9 p,u, 
on Tuesday, October 11, in Roon 124, 
Sparks Building. Classes will begin on 
Thursday They include: elementary ac- 
counting, 7-9 p. Do Monday and Thursday, 
16 weeks; elementary shorthand 1 and 2, 
8-9:30 p,n,, Tuesday and Thursday, 21 
weeks j speed dictation, 6 ;30-8 p.m. Tues- 
day and Thursday, 11 weeks; elementary 
typing 1, 6:30-8 p.m e , Tuesday and Thurs- 
day, 11 weeks; and elementary typing 2, 
8-9:30 p.m. Tuesday and Thursday, 11 
weeks • 

* * * 

TO RECEIVE DEGREE: Dr* Robert T. Oliver, 
professor and head of the department of 
speech, will be awarded an honorary 
doctor of lavre degree on Saturday, 
October 15, at a special convocation at 
Pacific University, The citation will 
refer to the books that Br. Oliver has 
written, his work in organizing and di- 
recting the food conservation program 
for the Federal government during the 



war; and h is work 
Korean government 
years. 



as an advisor to the 
du r i n g the past t hr.e e 



ATTEND MEETINGS: Victor Beede, professor 
and head of the department of forestry, 
attended the Council of Executives of 
Schools of Forestry at Seattle, Wash, on 
Sunday and Monday, October 9-10, M,W# 
Humphrey, professor of forestry, will 



attend the Society of American Foresters 
meetings in Seattle this week, 

* * * 

..ATTENDS MEETING: , Dr. R. S, Stout, as- 
sociate professor of economics, recent- 
ly attended the 42d annual conference 
on taxation held by the National Tax 
Association in Boston, Mass, 

* * * 

PHI SIGMA IOTA: Phi Sigma Iota, roman- 
tic languages recognition society, will 
meet at 7:30 p ,m, i Wcdne sday , October 12, 
in Room 111, Home Economics Build ing e 

* * * 

ELECTED: Clayton H, Schug, associaxe 
professor of public speaking, has been 
named president of the Pennsylvania 
Speech Association and a permanent mem- 
ber of the Committee on Speech Education, 
and Harold P. Z e lko, associate professor 
of public speaking, has been named to 
the Committee on Speech and Discussion 
as a Means to Better Human Relations, 

* * * 

SEMINAR: Graduate students and faculty 
are invited to attend the weekly 
seminars at 11 a,m, on Thursdays in 
Room 203, Engineering "A" on the gen- 
eral topic of Fluid Mechanic s , They 
are sponsored by the departments of 
aeronautical sngineering and engineering 
mechanics. Graduate students may 
schedule the seminar as Mechanics 514 
for one graduate credit n On Thursday, 
October 13, Dri Norman Davids, associate 
professor of engineering research, Ord- 
nance Research Laboratory, will speak 
on applications of the complex variable 
theory to two-dimensional flow _problems 
D"r> Martin Lessen, associate professor of 
aeronautical engineering and engineering 
mechanics, is in charge of the seminar s r 

+ * * 



OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS FROM THE OFFICE OF THE DEAN OF 



■TSSIONS AND REGISTRAR 



Withdrawa 1 s : 



Gr Berstler, Herman Elliott ,Econ, Oct . 

Gr Brandow, Frederick Milton, Sp.Ed., 

Sept. 30 

4 Dolan, Edward Joseph, EE, Sept. 26 

5 Ellis, Horace L,, PM, Sept. 26 

3 Gaut, Charles H well, IE, S e pt, 24 

5 Gerlach, Steven J., AL, S e pt, 28 

3 Husack, Michael, Ch, Oct. 3 

3 Kurylek, Harry, IE, Oct. i. 



3 LaFontaine, Howard Norbert, IE, 

Oct. 3 

7 Long, Robert James, AgEcj Oct. 1 

5 Pratt, Marjorie, AL, Sept. 3 

3 Sarkis, .G e orge Charles, Ed, Oct. 4 

3 Smith, Howard D., LD, Sept, .30 

1 Snode, Marilyn J., LD, Sept. 30 

3 Stalter, Edward Paul, IE, S e pt. 30 

2 Thomas, Jack William, ME, S. e pt , 28 



Reasons for Withdrawal: To transfer to another school, 6; unable to find ' 
living accommodations, 4; financial, 3; undecided about curriculum, 2; to accept 
position, 1, 



Cha n tf e of Na me : 



7 Weitzenhof er , David, Ed, to Whiting, David (by court order) 



PERSONNEL CHANGES 

Lng personnel changes 
iced. Telephone exte 
employee s, 



Following personnel changes during the period September 26 to October 4, 1949 
are announced. Telephone extension numbers are listed opposite names of new 



'efoot, Shirley M., Secretary, Ordnance Research Laboraton 
-1, Doris, Stenographer, physical Education and Athletics 
.ck, Margaret G», Secretary, President's Office 
,ndow, Dorothy Mae, Instructor, Altoona Center 

»vl w Rn 1 t>>i T? Pnr\L- Q £'m Tin v>c "H 4 -n ■! r\ K Un T 1 



Appointment s t 

374 Altimus, .Myles E» Jr , Instr & Asst Supervisor, Mineral Industries E^t 

Ashton, Marie M» Linen Woman, Simmons Dining Hall 
100 Ayers, Etta M., Recorder, School of Home Economics 

Baer, Charles, Dishroom man, Nittany D'inipg Hall 
137 Barefoot, Shirley M., Secretary, Ordnance Research Laboratory 

115 Beal 

340 Blac! 

Bra: 

Byerly, R^.lph E,, Cook, Simmons Dining Hall 

Carson, Phyllis R,, Stenographer, Altoona Center 

Carson, Roy S«, Janitor, Division of Housing 

Cathcart,- Jane, Secretary, Sociology 

Confer,. Anna Mary, Kitchen H e lper, Health Service 
130 Crawford, Ralph H e , Instructor, Central Extension 
55M Cuff, George Edgar, Instructor, Engineering Mechanics 

Curley, Cecil, Dishroom Man, Nittany Dining Hall 
205R Dannals, James L. Jr., Groom, physical Education and Athletics , 

Doulgas, Bodie E,, Research Associate, Chemistry 

Dugan, Mary, Count.erwoman, Nittany Dining Hall 
100 -Fusetti, Kathryn B*, Stenographer, School of Home Economics 

Garman, Howard F,, Custodian, Harris burg Center 
344 Gearhart, Elizabeth, Clerk-typist, Dean of Admissions and Registrar 
273 Gearhart, Harry F« Jr«, Creamery employee, Dairy Husbandry 

90 Gray, Allen R,, Instructor, physical Education and Athletics 
588 Greene, Joanne, Stenographer, Personnel Relations 

Horton, Loyal E«, Food Supervisor, Nittany Dining Hall 

Kosterman, Jane, Count erwoman, Nittany Dining Hall 
262 Jefferies, Geraldine V«, Clerk, Agricultural Economics and Rural Sociology 

Jelen, Barbara, Stenographer, Mineral Industries Extension Service 
374 Koss, Edith, Stenographer, Mineral Industries Extension 

Kovar, Anton J., Instructor, Forestry (Mont Alto) 
137 Laird, Donald T», Research Assistant, Ordnance Research Laboratory 
130 LaP.ointe, Laura M,, Stenographer, Central Extension 

166J Lessen, Martin, Associate Professor, Aeronautical and Mechanical Engineerini 
366 Maloy, Emmy Lou, Secretary, Mineral Technology 
484 McCulloch, Rebecca, Night Matron, Dean of Women 

McMulloch, David, Janitor, Division of Housing 

Monson, Thomas A,, Instructor, Altoona Center 
88J Morrison, Phyllis, Stenographer, physical Education and Athletics 

Muller, Henry J,, Instructor, Hazleton Center 
130 Hist, Robert J,, Instructor, C e ntral Extension 

Parent, Ida M., Supervisor, Simmons Dining Hall 
43 Pearson, Donald S«, Associate Professor, Electrical Engineering 
130 Pepino, Ethel Jane, Secretary, Central Extension 
105 Peters, Ruth Marie, Assistant Professor, Home Economics Education 

91 Phillips, Freda, Instructor, Physical Education and Athletics 
182 Rachau, Gladys M«, Clerk-typist, As so ciate d ' Student Activities 
283J Thomas, Frank B,, Instructor, Horticulture 

Tien-Hsi, Cheng, Assistant Professor, Harrisburg Center 
262 Tompkins, Shirley E«, Clerk, Agricultural Economics and Rural 'Sociology 
18 Tyo, John H«, Research Assistant, Instructional Film Research 

Uhler, Jack Elliott, Food Supervisor, Nittany Dihing Ha'll 

Wagaman, John, Pot Washer and General Utility Man, Simmons Dining Hall 
482 Wagper, Rose Marie, Asst„ Food Supervisor, McElwain Dining Hall 

White, Frank, Farm Employee, Agronomy 
344 Williams, Avonell, Stenographer, Dean of Admissions and Registrar 
176 Wilson, Jean R., Secretary, Audio— Visual Aids Library 
130 Zucker, Charles, Instructor, Central Extension' 
251 Wolf, Edith Rose, Secretary. Ellen H. Richards Institute 



JL9UIOJ0 8tC[C[Y 



o. ^_ 



THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 

BULLETIN 



FACULTY 




The Bulletin is published weekly during the College 
year as a means cf making official announcements 
and presenting items of interest to the faculty. All 



contributions should be as brief as possible and 
reach Louis H. Bell, Director of Public Information, 
313 Old Main, not later than 10 a. m. each Friday. 



VOL. 



37 



October 17, 1949 



NO. 



COLLEGE TO PLAY ACTIVE ROLE III "THE AARONSBURG STORY" 



The College will play an active role 
in the presentation of "The Aaronsburg 
Story" program at Aaronsburg on Sunday, 
October 2 3. It will be Perm State's 
contribution to Pennsylvania Week, 

James Milholland, acting president 
of the College, is honorary chairman of 
the pageant comrnitteeo He also will 
serve as coordinator for a panel on "How 
to Assure Minority Groups Their Rights 
and Dignities as Americans," 

William R e Gordon, professor of rural 
sociology extension, assisted by Harold 
E c White, instructor in rural sociology 
extension, wrote the historical pageant 
which will be presented by more than 1000 
Centre Count ians at 2 p.m. 

Hummel Fishburn, professor and heed 
of the department of music, is musical 



director for the program /while Elmer 
C« Wareham, Jr e , instructor in music, 
did the musical arrangements, A se- 
lected group of the Penn State Blue 
Band will participate, 

Louis H, Bell, director of Public 
Information, is publicity director. 

The program opens at 9 a,m, with a 
worship service at Salem Lutheran Churc' 
for members and guests. At 9 a,m,, a 
patriotic community service will be 
held, and three brotherhood institutes 
are scheduled for 11 a.m. The pageant 
will be presented at 2 p.m» and a 
symposium from 5 to 6 p«m will close 
the program, 

James H. Duff, governor of the 
Commonwealth, -fill preside at the 
patriotic service and for the closing 
sympo si urn. 



REPRESENTATIVES OF COLLEGES ENROLLING PENN STATE FRESHMEN MEET HERE 



Representatives of 13 of the Pennsyl- 
vania colleges where Penn State freshmen miss 
are enrolled met here on Monday, October Fern 
10, with administrative officials of the depa 
College to discuss education problems, Frin 

deps 

The meetings were held under the Gate 

sponsorship of the committee on co— oper— ment 

ating collcgeSjWhioh handles matters K. S 

pertaining to Penn State students at depa 

these colleges ..yand included department asso 

conferences and a general meeting of iug; 

deans and administrative officials. Exam 



Committee members are Dean 
ions R M. Gerhardt, Dr. W„ 
elius, professor and head o 
rtment of chemistryj Dr» Or 
k, Jr„, professor and head 
rtment of mathematics} Theo 
s, professor and head of th 

of English compositionj Dr 
chilling, professor and hea 
rtment of physics* A„ L, To 
ciate professor of, engineer 

and Dr. C „ O.Williams , Coll 
iner . 



of Ad- 

Conard 
f the 
rin 
of the 
dore J» 
e depart- 
e Harold 
d of the 
bias, a 
ing draiv- 
ege 



LENDING LIBRARY OF FINE PRINTS OPENS 



A lending library of fine prints was 
opened to students and faculty on Fri- 
day in Room 219, H me Economics Building, 

The collection of prints, which in- 
cludes the works of Matisse, V a n Gogh, 
Roughl, and L'Hote Marin, wa s compiled 
by Amy G» Gardner, professor and chair- 
man of the division of home art. 



The charge will be 50 cents per 
print per month and borrowers will be 
responsible for damage tc prints and 
subject toa fine for keeping prints 
overt irae o 

Money from rentals will be used 
to purohase additional prints for the 
lending library. 



PENN STATE COLLEC 



THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 
COUNCIL ON RESEARCH 

GRANTS-IN-AID FROM THE CENTRAL FUND FOR RESEARCH 
APPROVED FOR THE FISCAL YEAR 
July 1, 1949 to June 30, 1950 

Project Project Amount 

Number Leader Title Approved 

school of chemistry AND PHYSICS 



1 Milesj Wyndham Literature on Chemistry Ptiblished in the $ 250 c 00 

United States Prior to 1850 

2 Myers; Vernon Wj Intermoleoixlar Forces 150.00 

3 Ston<_r, Richard G. Refraction of Shock Waves at the Inter- 150,00 

face Between Two Different Gases 

4 Webb, Wayne Compressibility of pure Hydrocarbons 150.00 

5 Yeagley, Henry L A Study of Bird Navigation 225,00 

SCHOOL OF EDUCAT ION 

6 Davison, Hugh M. A Study of School plant Design and Eco- 

nomy of School Construction 150,00 

7 Moore, Bruce V c An Experimental Investigation of Affect— 225,00 

ive States and Trance Induction During 
Sleep 

SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING 

8 Hardenbergh, D. E Size-Effect in Determining Fatigue 150,00 

Properties of Metals 

9 Hsiao, C, C, Distribution of Residual Stress of Cold 175*00 

Rolled Copper, Brass, Nickel and Aluminum 

10 Osborne, Milton S« Architectural Heritage of Pennsylvania 150,00 

11 Shaffer, William R. Constant Strain R a te Control for Dillon 150,00 

Testing Machine 

12 Smith, Charles J. Shaver Creek Hydrologic Study 170,00 

SCHOOL OF HOME ECONOMICS 

13 Smith, William M 9 Attitudes Toward and Experiences in 150 o 00 

Financial Management of Farm Families 

SCHOOL OF THE LIBERAL ARTS 

14 Anderson, John Mo The Individual and the New World 225,00 

15 Buffington, An F, Pennsylvania German Folklore of the 150„00 

Middle Susquehanna Area 

16 Cook, Franklin H, A Trend Study of Electric Power Companies 225,00 

17 DeBoer, Holle Go Pronunciation in Western Pennsylvania 150 o 00 

18 de Levie, Dagobert Origin of German Nationalism 130,00 

19 Elliott, Charles R, Research in Speech Pathology 150,00 

20 Haac, Oscar A, Michelet*s Philosophy of History 225<,00 

21 Harris, Brice Patronage and the Profession of Letters 150 o 00 



Project Project Amount 

N umber Leader^ Title Approved 

SCHOOL OF THE LIBERAL ARTS (con'd) 

22 LeSage, Laurence Contemporary French Literature and German $ 150,00 

Romanticism 

23 McDonald, Eugene T. Air Use of Cleft-Palate Patients in 225,00 

Speech Production 

24 O'Brien, Joseph F, The Formative Period in the Oratory of 150.00 

Thaddcus Stevens 

25 Silva, Ruth C <> The Elect r ral College- and presidential 150,00 

Succession Under Amendment XX 

26 Smith, Warren S » Color Controlled Acting Area Lighting 225 # 00 

for the Small Theatre 

27 Wilson, J, Robert Friedrich List's Contribution to the 150,00 

Economic Progress of Pennsylvania 

28 Yeaton, Kelly Design of Transportable Flexible Theatre 225,00 

SCHOOL OF MINERAL INDUS TRIES 

29 Cook, J hn C, Small Gravitational Effects 150,00 

30 Griffiths, John C, Statistical Summaries and Interrelation— 190,00 

ships of Size Parameters of Sediments 

SCHOOL OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND ATHLETICS 



31 Masley, John W« Construction of a Test to Measure 150,00 

Attitudes Toward Physical Education 
Activit ie s 

PENNSYLVANIA CONFERENCE ON FAMILY RELATIONS TO BE HELD HERE FRIDAY AND SATURDAY 

The development of effective edu- Dr. Bruce V, Moore, professor and 

cational programs in preparation for head of the department of psychology, 

marriage and family living will be the is president of the Conference, 
subject for the Pennsylvania Conference 

on Family Relations to be held here on Other P e nn State faculty members 

Friday and Saturday, October 21 and 22, -who will participate are Dean M. R, 

Trabue, D r . C. R, Adams, Dr. Hugh M« 

Sessions will be held at the Nittany Davison, and Jo Hays, all of the School 
Lion Inn and in the Little Theatre, Old of Education; Dr. Jessie Bernard, pro- 
Main, the first session scheduled for fessor of sociology; A, F, Davis, pro- 
Friday at 12:15 p.m, fessor of physical educat ionj Dr „ 

William M. Smith, associate professor 

Visiting speakers include Dr, 0, of family relationships; Dr. H, R, 

Spurgeon English, professor of psychiatry, Glenn, director, the Health Service; 

Temple University, and Dr. Abraham Stone, and Dr. Rose M, Cologne,, specialist 

president, American Association of Mar- In community adult education, 
riage Counselors, 

DR. HAROLD H. STRAIN TO ADDRESS AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY 

Dr. Harold H. Strain, senior chemist, A native of S a n Francisco, Dr« 

Argonne National Laboratory, Chicago, 111, Strain completed his graduate and under- 
bill address the American Chemical So- graduate work at Stanford University. 
ciety meeting in Room 119, Osmond Labo- He spent two years at Carnegie Insti- 
ratory, at 8;30 p.m. Thursday, October 20. tutinn's Coastal Laboratory, Carmel, 

California and since 1929 has been 

Dr. Strain will disouss "plant Func- associated with the Institution's Di- 

tion and Plant Relationship R e vealed by vision of plant Biology at Stanford, 

Chromatography of the Chloroplast pigments," 



' 



ARTISTS' COURSE PROGRAM DISCONTINUED 



The Artists' Course program will 
not be held this year. 

College officials explained that the 
Course for the past tiro years has oper- 
ated with a loss because of many un- 
sold scats and therefore, until the de- 



sires of students and faculty can be 
determined, the series will be discon— 
t inued. 

The greatly increased rates for 
engaging the finest talent has also con- 
plicated the .problem of supporting the 
Artists' Course, 



OF GENERAL INTEREST 



CHAPEL; Dr. William A» Banner, The 
School of Religion, Howard University, 
Washington,, D«C», will speak at chapel 
services on Sunday morning in Schwab 

Auditorium* 

* * * 

HOME SPORTS: Friday, October 21, 4 p, 
m., cross country, Cornell; Saturday, 
October 22, 2 p.m., JV football, L ck 
Haven State Teachers' College, and JV 
soccer, Frostburg Teachers' College, 

* * * 

FACULTY LUNCHEON: John Y. Roy, assist- 
ant professor of fine arts, will speak 
at the Faculty Luncheon Club at noon 
on Monday, October 24, He will speak 
on "Mayan Culture of Yucatan" and show 
colored slides of pictures taken there 

during the past summer, 

* * * 

MINERAL INDUSTRIES FACULTY: The faculty 
of the School of Mineral industries will 
meet at 4 p.m., Monday, October 24, in 
the Art Gallery, Mineral Industries 
Building, 

* * * 

GALLERY LECTURE: Sybil D, Emerson, 
associate professor of art e ducat ion, and 



Paul 



Norton, assistant professor of 



fine arts, will present a lecture at 
7:30 p.m. Tuesday, October 18, in Sim- 
mons Hall, on the Picasso exhibit which 
will continue there until November 7, 

* * * 



SOCIAL W.CRK CONFERENCE: 
of sociology and. the Soci 
sponsor a conference for 
students interested in so 
career, in Room 316, Spar 
Tuesday afternoon. Speak 
elude Dean Wilbur Newstet 
D, Green, of .the School o 
Pittsburgh; Margaret Beer 
Settlement House, pittsbu 
Hall, executive director, 
Children's Services, Pitt 
J?:ssie Bernard, professor 
and Julia G, Brill, profe 
compos it ion, are in charg 
mo nt s 

* « * 

EXAMINATION: Preliminary examination for 
Glenn LoMnsser, candidate for a doctor of 
philosophy degree with a major in physic a, 
will be held at 1 p.m. Tuesday, October 
25, in Room 215, Osmond Laboratory, 

# * * 

SIGMA XI: New faculty members belonging 
to other chapters of the Society of the 
Sigma Xi, are invited to affiliate with 



The department 
ology Club will 
undergradua t e 
cial work as a 
ks Building, 
ers will in- 
ter and Helen 
f Social Work, 
y , of S oho 
rgh; and Perry 

Fam ily an d 
s burgh* Dr, 

of sociology, 
ssor of English 
e of arrange— 



the Penn State chapter. They shou.ld 
call the secretary, Dr» Beatrice L, 
Hagen, associate professor of mathe- 
mat ics , 

* * * 

OIL PAINTING: An oil painting, titled 
"Rural Scene near State College," has 
been purchased by the School of Edu- 
cation for the conference room in Bur — 
rowes Building, It was painted by 
Martha Shomberg, of State College* 

* * * 

SPEAKS; Dr* M, R, F e nske, director of 
the Petroleum Refining Laboratory, last 
week visited the atomic energy plant of 
the General Electric Co., Hanford, Wash* 
and addressed the chemical engineering 
group of the plant, 

* * * 

PUBLISH BOOKS: Books by two members of 
the department of sociology have been 
published recently, Dr, Walter Coutu 
is author of "Emergent Human Nature," a 
textbook in social psychology, and Dr a 
Jessie Bernard is author of "American 
Community Behavior," textbook in general 
sociology, 

* * * 

SPEAKS: Dr, A, H, Waynick, of the Watson 
Research project staff, addressed the 
Naval R e serve Research Unit 4—4 on 
"Physics of the Upper Atmosphere as 
Determined by Radio Methods" recently, 

* ♦ * 

PARTICIPATE IN MEETINGS; Three faculty 
members will participate in meetings of. 
the Pennsylvania Historical Society at 
Dickinson College, Carlisle, on Friday 
and Saturday, October 21— 22* They are 
Dr, J, Paul Selsam, professor and head 
of the department of history and vice- 
president of the Association; Dr» Philip 
S$ Klein, associate professor of American 
history, secretary of the Association; 
and Dr , Harold E, Dickson, professor of 
fine arts, who will preside at a panel 
on "Pennsylvania's Contribution to the 
Art s . " 

* * * 



OLD FILMS: The division of 
will again present a series 
pictures on the development 
cinema each Wednesday night 



dramat ics 
of motion 
of the 
at 7 o'clock 



in Room 119, Osmond Laboratory* A 
limited number of seats are available 
for interested faculty members, The 
films on Wednesday, October 19, will 
deal with the development of the nar— 
rat ive , 

* * * 



SUMMARY OF TOTAL COLLEGE ENROLLMENT FOR 1949-5 

Center Agri- Chem— Ed« Rome Eng-in- LA. MI Phys, Totals 

or College cult, Bhys« Econ,. eering Ed 

M W M W M :i M W M W M W M ' W M W M Yf T 



ENROLLMENT 0? 1ST SEMESTER FRESHMEN 



Cent er s 



3 


20 


2 


10 


1 


12 


2 


20 



25 


14 


1 


2 63 


23 


13 


«. 


5 32 


18 


3 


2 


2 22 


14 





2 


1 42 



68 


8 


15 


39 


23 


8 


38 


15 


12 


59 


15 


7 



5 


1 


224 


31 


255 


1 


„, 


131 


43 


174 


9 


2 


135 


23 


158 


4 


1 


184 


28 


212 





— 


155 


27 


182 


2 


~. 


155 


22 


177 



Altoona 2 7 

Behrend 18 

DuBois 22 

Harrisburg 36 

Hazleton 16 5 31 5 16 6 2 2 34 39 9 7 

Pottsville 16 1 25 4 15 2 2 4 36 - 51 11 8 

Swart hmore 77 3 56 2 25 25 5 17 99 - 148 29 23 - 14 6 447 82 529 

Totals 212 17 174 14 136 71 14 33 328 1 442 110 80 - 45 10 1431 256 1687 

S t a t c < T eacher's Colleges 

Bloomsburg 1 «■ - - 

California 26 - - 

Clarion 24 — 5 — 

E» Stroud, 14 «■ 2 

Edinboro 25 4 46 1 

Hut zt own 37 1 — 

Lock Haven 4 «■- — 

Mansfield 14 - 2 

Miller sv 9 22 1 — 

Shippensb'g 4 1 

Slippery Rk. 4 - - 

Cheyney — — - 

Indiana 6 — - 

Totals 181 7 91 5 52 42 

Cooperating Colleges 

Gannon 3 «• 3 — ■« «■ 

Keystone 11 *» 15 — 3 2 

Lycoming 17 *■ 7 2 4 2 

St„ Francis 2 «* — •* 1 — 

York 8 2 10 3 6 1 4 23 4 4 -•• 1 1 58 17 75 

Totals 41 2 35 2 11 10 2 4 63 - 32 14 9 - 2 2 195 34 229 

Other Points 



1 


— 


— 


~ «, 


13 


6 


2 


7 54 


6 


- 


— 


- 40 


1 


M 


<m 


<* 23 


5 


z 


*«J 


~* 41 


6 


5 


*** 


- 91 


3 


4 


1 


4 « 


Q 


2 


1 


8 ~ 


5 


14 




9 36 


1 


2 


~ 


«, » 


2 


5 


- 


- 15 


- 


3 


- 


mh and 


52 


42 


7 


28 300 



442 


110 


4 


2 


44 


6 


13 


1 


13 


1 


35 


3 


29 


6 


15 


3 


11 


2 


12 


14 


6 


2 


10 


5 



1 


— 


7 


2 


9 


19 


2 


158 


21 


179 


3? 


M 


91 


1 


92 


2 


- 


77 


1 


78 


1 


- 


180 


10 


190 


1 


I 


164 


13 


177 


1 


3 


24 


14 


38 


1 


1 


51 


17 


73 


2 


3 


30 


41 


121 


3 


M 


14 


5 


19 


1 


1 


32 


11 


43 


<K» 


«*, 


~. 


2 


2 


1 


*•-» 


12 


2 


14 



— ~ 


«- 


4 


<* 18 


- 


12 


- 22 


— 


7 


-. «, 


n. 


1 



1 


- 


— 


— 


11 


- 


11 


1 


M 


1 


M'. 


62 


7 


69 


3 


M 


- 


1 


60 


10 


70 


am 


. — 


•a 


« 


4 


— 


*T 



Mont Alto 126 - 11 - 1 - - - 20 ~ 5 ~ 5 ~ 1 ** 16 9 - 15 9 

State Coll. 9 ~ 8 - 13 » 1 - 17 19 ~ 5 - 2 ~ 74 - 74 

Penn State - 31 « 20 - 154 - 137 - 170 ~ - - 19 « 531 531 

Totals 135 31 19 20 14 154 1 137 37 « 24 170 10 - 3 19 243 531 774 

1st Sera, 

Totals 569 57 319 41 213 277 24 202 728 1 695 341 135 ~ 36 42 275 9 9613730 

2D, 3D, AND 4TH SEMESTER STUDENTS AT PENN STATE CENTERS 

1 17 2 39 8 6 3 39 - 43 11 8 ~ 2 ~ 160 25 185 
- 11 ~ 20 4 ~ - 19 - 22 - 6 - 5 - 87 4 91 

2 16 3 2 4 - m 28 - 47 4 1 » 3 1 123 14 137 
14 1 3 5 2 1 .-23 - 55 3 2 - 3 ~> 135 6 141 

3 58 6 114 18 7 3 109 - 167 18 17 - 13 1 505 49 554 

TOTAL ENROLLMENT FOR 1ST SEMES 

Total 1st Semester Freshmen Off-Campus 
Total 2d, 3d, 4th Semester Students Off-Campus 
Total Special, Unclassified, Transition, DIR Off-Campus 
Total Students on Campus, Including 1st Semester 
Grand Total Enrollment 



Alt oona 


6 


DuBois 


4 


Ha z let on 


8 


Pott sville 


2 


Totals 


20 



TER, 194 9-5 






M 
2769 


W 
43*0 


1 
3199 


505 


49 


554 


mpu s 48 


3 


51 


men 8428 


2500 


10923 


11750 


2982 


14732 



PERSONNEL CHANGES 

Following personnel changes during the period October 4, 1949 to October 7, 
1949 are announced. Telephone extension numbers are listed opposite name s of new 
employee s« 

Re signat ions; 

Albright, Eleanor, V , Clerk,, Bursar's Office 

Brennecke, Marian T„, Stenographer, Central Extension 

Bruner, Helen M« , Stenographer, Agricultural Extension 

Cauffman, Edgar W c , Chemistry Laboratory Assistant, Forestry (Mont Alto) 

Clendenin, William B„, Supervisor-Drafting, physical plant 

Corwin, Margaret, Recorder and receptionist, School of Hone Economics 

Delchamps, Curtis E» Jr e , Research Assistant, Chemistry 

Delchamps, Earsie Ward, Research Assistant, Chemistry 

Devlin, John P e , Appraiser, Harrisburg Guidance 

For land, Tormod, Research Assistant;, Mineral Technology 

Gauthey, Margaret W D , X— Ray Technician, Health Service 

Herman, Nancy Ann, Stenographer, Industrial Education 

Hetager, Lillian, Secretary, School of Education 

Kerstetter, Freda L., Clerk-typist, Agricultural Eoononics and Rural Sociology 

Kline, James L,, Instructor, Central Extension 

Koch, Edith Ho, Secretary, Engineering Experiment Station 

McCoy, Edward P » , Research Assistant, Instructional Film R e search Project 

Ness, Sara K , Psychometrist , Harrisburg Guidance 

Pease, "avid W 0t? Laboratory' Assistant, Mineral Technology 

Stodden, Kenneth J , Research Assistant, Mineral Technology 

Swift, Marion G„, Stenographer, Psychology 

o, Research Assistant, Earth Sciences 



Appo intment s ; 

244 Duncan, Marion Mahan, Laboratory Technician, physics 

244 Henry, Jerome, Laboratory Technician, Physics 

244 Horton, Helen S # , Secretary, physics 

244 Howell # John Foss, Laboratory Technician, Physics 

280 LoBaron, R e xford Do, Farm Euployee, Agronomy 

Lightner, M e lvin E C j, Maintenance Helper, Physical Plant 
137 Lutz, Shirley C o; Clerk— typist 9 Ordnance Research Laboratory 
15 1M McNutt , Julia, Secretary, Sociology 

244 Mosley, John Daniel, Laboratory Technician, physics 
142J Segner, Flo H«>, Secretary, Mathematics 

96 Shaw, Marion, Kitchen Helper, Health Service 
244 Spear, Andrew ?, Jr«, Laboratory Technician, Physics 
241 Yearick, Joanne, Stenographer, Chemistry 

Ret irement s ; 

Gates, William B», Market and Milk Department,- Creamery 
Kerstetter, Robert Ac, Mechanic, Engineering 

Deaths : 



Shirk, Russell 0-,, Janitor, Physical Plant 

Leave of Absence : 
Dale, Effie K«, Secretary, Education Extension 



OTJJO 2^3 ITAjo 



. 



THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 



FACULTY 



The Bulletin is published weekly during the College 
year as a means of making official announcements 
and presenting items of interest to the faculty. All 




VOL. 



37 



BULLETIN 



contributions should be as brief as possible and 
reach Louis H. Bell, Director of Public Information, 
313 Old Main, not later than 10 a. m. each Friday. 



October 24, 1949 



NO. 



DR. WILLIAM N. LEONARD NAMED HEAD OF 3URE/.U OF BUSINESS RESEARCH: OTHER APPOINTMENTS 



h 
re 



Dr, William N» Leonard, professor 
and head of the department of economics, 
been appointed director of the Bu- 
ll of Business Research, and Dr» George 
L, Leffler, professor of economics, has 
been named assistant director. Both 
appointments were effective October 6, 

The Executive Committee of the Board 
of Trustees on October 14 also approved 
10 other appointments, all effective 
September 1, They are: 

Dr, David W, Russell, of the National 
College of Education, professor of edu- 
cation and head of professional field 
services in the School of Education. 

Arthur M. Wellington, vocational ad- 
viser with the Veterans Administration, 
professor of education and psychology. 

Dr. Laurence LeSage, assistant pro- 
fessor of romance languages, University 
of Oregon, associate professor of ro- 
mance languages, 

Robert M, Knoebel, director of in- 
dustrial education, Sunbury high school, 
associate professor of industrial edu- 
cation. He has been teaching at the 



College on a part-time basis for the pas- 
five summers. 



Dr, Martin Lessen, aeronautical re- 
National Advisory Corn- 



search scientist, National Advisory Co 
mittee for Aeronautics, associate pro- 
fessor of aeronautical engineering and 



engineering mechanics 



Donald S„ Pearson, assistant pro- 
fessor of electrical engineering at 
Michigan State College, associate pro- 
fessor of electrical engineering. 

Gerhard E, Ehmann, of University of 
California at Los Angeles, associate 
professor of education, Dr, Wayne M, 
Felts, research geologist with the Texa: 
Co., Houston, Tex., associate 
of geology. 



prof e s sor 



Dr. Jessie McVey Rossman, head of 
clothing and textiles and professor of 
home economics, Florida State University, 
associate professor of home economics, 
and Dr e Margaret 0, Harris Zook, associ- 
ate professor of textiles and clothing 
at University of California at Los 
Angeles, associate professor of cloth- 
ing and textiles (part-time). 



DEPARTMENT OF PERSONNEL SERVICES ESTABLISHED; F. F, MORRIS NAMED HEAD 



A department of Personnel Services 
with Frank F, Morris, administrative as- 
sistant to the treasurer and personnel 
officer, as director, was established by 
the Trustees on October 14. 

James Milholland, acting president of 
the College, explained the action as a 
continuing step in "the development of a 
personnel program which will have as- its 
principal objective the improvement of 



employee relations," 

The new department will be under the 
direction of the Assistant to the Presi- 
dent in charge of Business and Finance 
and will include the divisions of em- 
ployment, job classification, personnel 
records, safety, and security benefits, 

Morris will also continue as adminis- 
trative assistant to the treasurer. 



G. HECHLSR, DIRECTOR OF ENGINEERING EXPERIMENT STATION, TO RETIRE 



F, G, Hechler, director of the Engi- 
neering Experiment Station since 1936 
and professor of engineering research, 
will retire with emeritus rank on De- 
cember 31 after serving 27 years on the 
faculty , 



Oth 



er retirements approved by the 



Trustees on October 14 vrere : William 
B, Gates, creamery employee, August 14, 
30 years of service; John F „ Harter, 
painter, August 31, 21 years; Ida M. 
Parent, supervisor, Simmons Dining 
Hall, August 31, 12 years; and Grace 
L, Hall, hostess, Frances, Athertoit -Hall , 
ii-ugust 31, 10 years. 



DR. ERIC A. WALKER GRANTED LEAVE FOR CONSULTATION ON NATIONAL DEFENSE PROBLEMS 



Dr. Eric A. Walker, director of the 
Ordnance Research Laboratory and head of 
the department of electrical engineering, 
at his own request has been granted a 
leave of absence to serve various govern- 
ment departments in Washington on matters 
of policy relating to national defense. 

The leave became effective October 15 
and will continue until March 15, 1950 e 
During his absence, Robert Aa Hussey, 
business manager, has been named acting 
director of the Ordnance Research Labo- 
ratory, and Francis T a Hall, Jr., pro- 



fessor of electrical engineering, acting 
head of the department of electrical 
engineering. 

Other leaves approved by the Trustee; 
on October 14 include Dr. George Lc 
Leffler, professor of economics and as- 
sistant director of the Bureau of Busi- 
ness Research, a sabbatical leave for 
the second semester, 1949—50, to study 
post- war security markets; and Dr, 
William S, Vincent, professor of edu- 
cation, a leave for the academic year 
1949-50, to continue research work at 
Columbia University* 



COLLEGE OBSERVING .JOHN DEWEY WEEK WITH SYMPOSIUM AND LIBRARY EXHIBIT 



The College is observing John Dewey 
Week this week, marking the 90th birth- 
day of John Dewey; known as "the father 
of education." 

Dr, Carroll D, Champlin, professor of 
education, will preside at a symposium 
at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, October 25, in 
Room 121, Sparks Building, 

Other participants will be Dr* Ray Ho 



Dotterer, professor emeritus of philoso- 
phy; Dr» William Go Mather, professor 
of rural sociology; Dr, Charles C 6 
Peters, professor emeritus of education; 
Dr. Jean j^, Amberson, professor of home 
economics education; and Dr • Lloyd M, 
Jones, professor of physical education. 

An exhibit at the library includes 
typical books, pictures, and articles 
published on John Dewey» 



OF GENERAL INTEREST 



CHAPEL: Dr, Charles C. Noble, dean of 
Hendricks Mem6rial Chapel, Syracuse Uni- 
versity, Syracuse, N«Y« will speak at 
chapel services at 11 a. m, Sunday, Oc- 
tober 30, in Schwab Auditorium, 

» * * 

HOME SPORTS: Saturday, 2 p.m., football, 

Syracuse University*, 

* * * 

LUNCHEON CLUB: Dr. Robert T, Oliver, pro- 
fessor and head of the department of 
speech, will speak on "Can Korea Hold a 
Line Against Communism" at the Faculty 
Luncheon Club meeting on Monday noon, 
October 31, at the Hotel State College* 

* * » 

COURSES OF STUDY COMMITTEE: The Senate 

Courses of Study Committee will meet at 

10 a.m, Tuesday, November 1, in Room 

207, Engineering "C, 



SIGMA XI LECTURE : 
associate profess 
will present the 
at 7;30 p.m. Tues 
Room. 110, Electr 
ingo He will spe 
ing Water," The 
public, 

PLAYERS: Tickets 
to be presented b 
ers October 27, 2 
sale at Student U 
6 0'- cents for Thur 
day and Saturday 



Dr* Andre 
or of civil 
first Sigma 
day, October 
ical Enginee 
ak on "Myste 
lecture is o 



Wi 



* * * 
for "Ah, 
y t he Penn S 
8, and 29, a 
nion Office, 
sday night, 
nights. 



Jorissen, 
engineering,. 
Xi lecture 

2 5, in 
ring Build— 
ry of Flow- 
pen t o the 



lderne ss ," 
tate Play- 
re n ow o n 

Price is 
$1 for Fri- 



SEMINAR: Dr» Henry A, Finch, visiting 
lecturer from the University of Chicago^, 
will address the Philosophy Seminar at 
2 p.m. Tuesday, October 25, in Room 14 9 
Sparks Building, The subject is; 
"Metaphysics, Disenchanted Natural- 
ism, and Experimentalism, " 

* * * 

CIVIL SERVICE EXAMS: Faculty members 
are urged to bring to the attention of 
February and June graduates the ex- 
aminations for Jr Professional^ Jr s 
Management and Jr e Agricultural As- 
sistant e, off ered by the U, S, Civil 
Service Commission, Application for 
the only opportunity to take the ex- 
aminations during the next 12 months 
must be made prior to November 8, The 
previous register of eligibles will be 
discarded. Applications are available 
at the Placement Service, 204 Old Main, 
and at the post Office, 

* * * 

ADULT HOMEMAKINGs Enrollment for courses 
offered in the State College Community 
Adult Homemaking program will be held 
at the State College high school library 
at 7:30 p s m. Wednesday, October 26. 



PHI LAMBDA UPSILON: Phi Lambda Upsilon, 
ohemical honor society, will meet at 
7;30 p.m, Tuesday, October 25, in Room 
119, Osmond Laboratory, Robert Feller, 
j of the chemistry department at Rutgers 
will speak. 



THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE - COUNCIL ON RESEARCH 

Following is a summary of reports on projects sponsored by Grant s—in-Aid from 
the Central Fund for Research for the fiscal year ending June. 30, 1949. 

SCHOOL OF CHEMISTRY AND PHYSICS 



3, A» Witt Hut chison, Rare Earths as Oxidation Catalysts,, 

A continuation of work reported last year. Cerium oxide w-a s found to' be 
the most active oxidation catalyst while lanthanum oxide, was the least active, 

' 4« Thoma s S , Qa kwo o d , Cleavage of Beta— benzilmonoxime , 

The role of the cyanide ion in the cleavage of beta— bei\zilmonoxime ha«s 
been ascertained with certainty. This was done through the use of the non— radio- 
active isotope (Cl3) In cooperation with Do H, Rank and D® W E, Axford, a new_ 
method for determining the ..C^3.(jl2 ratio in CO2 has been developed. 

->• John Mo Schempf o 6-Chloro-5-nitrotoluene-3-sulf onic acid as a Reagent for 

Potassium, 
A method has been developed for recovering potassium, using an aqueous 
solution of sodium 6— chlor 0— 5— nitr ot oluene— 3 — sulf onat e as .a precipitating agent 

6* Wayne Webb Compressibility of pure Hydrocarbons, 

Apparatus has been assembled and tested and collection of data has 
been started, • . . 

34, „ Mary L, Willard , Polarographic Study of 2, 4-dinitrophenylhydrazone s , 

The polarograph shows promise of being applicable as an analytical aid 
in determining this series of compounds, 

SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 



T* J ameS Gemme ll, Economic . Concepts of Youth, Ages 16—19, 

An attempt to teach economic' literacy through a general education 
approach. Manuscript now in the hands of the publisher, 

8, James Gemmell , Research in Business Education, 

Manuscript i'S being prepared on a source book or research guide for re- 
Search workers in the field of business education, 

38, Robert G « Eern reuter , Prediction of Success of Graduate Students, 

The first phase of the study has been devoted to the evaluation of 
techniques and to writing of prediction formulas, 

SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING 



11, Don C» Lemmon , Vibration Loosening of -Threaded Connections, 

Proper nut -bo It alignment reduced loosening under vibratory loads 
Smooth contacting, surfaces also^ decreased the amount of loosening-, and the rate of 
loosening decreased with the number of cycles. The loosening phenomenon seems 
to be a function of friction between contacting surf ace s, w hich increases with the 
number of cycles, 

12, Paul F„ Norton , Thomas Jefferson and the Arts, 

Plans' for two papers have been outlined, based on literature searches 
in off—campus libraries a 

13, Philin K , Roos , Fatigue Stresses in Wood," ■ • 

The collection of data has been completed but data have not been analyzedo 

14, E dw in S, R s c e a plastic Working of Metals, 

The preliminary phase of the study has dealt with the collection of 
bibliographical data, 

15, Charles J Smith , Shaver Creek Hydrologic Study, 

Observations on precipitation, stream flow, wind velocity, humidity and 
temperature have continued^ A map of the drainage basin is nearing completion^ 

16, A.-> H, Zcrban , Thermodynamic Properties of Silicone Fluids, 

Apparatus has been constructed and calibrated for the determination of 
temperature-volume relations for a range from 1600 F, to an experimentally determined 
critical point (tentative) of 450° F, 

I 



SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING - oontd. 

35, M ilton S, Osborne , Architectural Heritage of Pennsylvania, 

Approximately 80 sheets of drawings of important historical buildings 
in Pennsylvania have been made, 

SCHOOL OF HOME ECONOMICS 

10, William M, Smith , JP a Criteria of Mate Selection of Young People, 

" Prc'-te st ed schedules were presented to 534 men and 486 women in various 
localities of Pennsylvania, the data transferred to hollerith cards and sorted in 
a tabulation machine. The results are being computed and arranged in tabular form, 

SCHOOL OF THE LIBERAL ARTS 

1, Samuel P, Bayard , Folklore in W e stern Pennsylvania Counties, 

133 wire and ear recordings of folk songs and instrumental music were 
made during the year. Many new and valuable sources of material have been 
discovered, 

2, Ernest H, Freund , Historical and Analytical Research on the Ideas of Value in 

Western Civilization, 
The first draft of 44 chapters of the proposed book have been completed, 

17, Helen Adolf , Studies in the Grail Legend, 

One manuscript has been prepared for publication and data have been 
collected for future publications, 

18, Erich Auerbach , Levels of Style in Modern Lyric Poetry, 

An article on Baudelaire has been prepared which will be published in 
English and German, 

19, Jessie Bernard, Robert E, Clark , Prediction of Success on Parole, 

Data o~ri 350 Laurelton State Village parolees have been collected and 
these are being edited, coded and tabulated, 

20, Robert J, Clements , A Study of Michelangelo's Aesthetics, 

Additional Italian Renaissance source materials have been consulted 
and the first draft of a 435 page manuscript has been typed, 

21, Haskell B, Curry , Foundations of Mathematics. 

Theory of Combinators has been corrected, further simplified and pre- 
pared for publication, 

22, Joseph H. D ahmus , The Prosecution of John Wyclyf. 

On the basis of two episcopal registers obtained in microfilm from 
England, new interpretations of historical persons and events have been made. To 
be published in late 1949 or early 1950, 

24, Br ice Harris . Patronage and the Profession of Letters in England, 1640-1710. 

Many valuable source materials have been found in off— campus library 
research. To be published eventually in book form, 

25, Scott Keyes , Economic Factors Affecting the Demand for Housing, 

Manuscript (161 pages) entitled "Housing Market Areas in the United 
States" has b.cn prepared. This covers such items as number, size, geographical 
distribut ion and recent growth. Of use to private and public housing market 
analysts as well as to Federal and State officials, 

26, Nelson MoGeary . Government and the Liquor Business, 

A 76— page booklet "Pennsylvania and the Liquor Business" published by 
penns Valley publishers, 1949, 

27, Dorothy B, Scott , Aesthetics of Drama and the Theatre, 

A survey of aesthetics of the theatre has been conducted preparatory to 
the initiation of experimental work. The survey has consisted of conferences, 
examination of work done in outstanding schools and in the Metropolitan Museum, 
Aesthetic trends in Broadway productions have also been noted, 

28, Herbert Steiner , Hof mannsthal • s "Pompilia", 

Volume I has been revised and Volume V is in press and several essays 
are about ready for publication in the Harvard University Bulletin, 



SCHOOL OF THE LIBERAL ARTS - oontd, 

29, Harold P, Seiko , Speech Training in Industry, 

A survey based on questionnaires and consultations has resulted in 
three publications* Several other manuscripts are in the course of preparation,, 

36, Charl e s Fp LeeDecker, John H« Ferguson , Municipal Electric Plants in Pennsyl- 

vania , 
The first systematic inquiry into the operation of municipal electric 
plants by Pennsylvania municipalities has been completed and is being prepared for 
publicat ion, 

37, John Ac, Iviourant «, Philosophy of Soren Kierkegaard, 

Literature sources have been consulted and data compiled preparatory 
to the preparation of manuscript, 

SCHOOL OF MINERAL INDUSTRIES 

30, Thomas F , Bates , Electron Microscope Studies of the Clay Minerals, 

179 samples of clays and related rocks were collected from various 
localities in Pennsylvania, Data are being collected which will be of value to 
ceramic and petroleum industries, 

31, Shiou-Chuan Sun ., The Mechanism of Chemical Coating on Mineral Surfaces, 

The amount of copper abstracted by sphalerite is increased with in- 
creased concentrations of copper chloride and with increased specific surface of 
mineral particles, 

SCHOOL OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND ATHLETICS 

32, Arthur F, Davis , The Present Practices of Teaching Health Education in the 

High Schools of Pennsylvania, 
Clue st ionna ire s were sent to 1172 secondary public schools in Pennsyl- 
vania with a 75 per cent return. Results are being tabulated and studied, 

33, J o h n W , Ma s 1 e y , Construction of a Test to Measure Attitudes Toward physical 

Education Activities, 
An attitude scale has been constructed and is being tested and revised, 

PERSONNEL CHANGES 

Following personnel changes during the period October 7, 1949 to October 17, 
1949 are announced. Telephone extension numbers are listed opposite names of new 
employee s , 

Apjjo intment s : 



130 
220 

326 

358 

282J 



265J 
18 

388 
2 82 J 
130 



137 
390 
371 



Adams, William Frederick, Maintenance H e lper 9 Physical Plant 

Ambandos, Janes, Assistant Specialist, Motion Picture and Recording Studio 

Bertiaux, Evelyn, Clerk-typist, Accounting 

Breon, Ibra F«, Plumber and Steamfitter, physical plant 

Browne, Helen P,, Secretary, Chemistry 

Colpetzer, TTilliam F,, Patrolman, Physical plant 

Counts, William, Research Assistant, Earth Sciences 

Esworthy, Clara E,, Cafeteria Manager, Central Extension 

Frey, John P,, Photography Technician, Agriculture 

Gearhart, Edgar E ,, Plasterer , physical plant 

Hamilton, Harry Loraine, Maintenance Helper, Physical plant 

Henninger, Alvin Roy, Construction Equipment Operator, physical plant 

Johnston, Richard LaVern, Assistant Professor, Animal Husbandry 

Kahn, Gloria, Statistical Clerk, Motion Picture Studio 

Kerr, Ge°r r e T„, Instructor, Central Extension 

Kunze, Flora M,, Stenographer, psychology 

Little, Lawrence B., Instructor, Horticulture 

Martin, Alice W , , Nurse, Central Extension 

Mask, Phyllis M, , Assistant Extension Representative, Agricultural Extension 

Mason, Clarence A,, Janitor, physical plant 

Moore, Claudia F,, Librarian, Ordnance Research Laboratory 

Nelson, June E,, Secretary, Education 

Otley, Kurt, Research Associate, Earth Sciences 

Packer, Doyle E., Patrolman, Physical Plant 



392 

295 
3 96 



Putt, Theophilous C., Patrolman, Physical plant 

Russell, David ¥», Professor, Education 

Smith, Dorothy Grant, Stenographer, Agricultural Extension' 

Weschler, Rosemary Ann, Stenographer, Forestry 

Wishmeyer, William H., Instructor, Central Extension 

Wood, Kay von H., Stenographer, Industrial Education 

Terminations : 



Ashton, Marie l.i. , Linen Woman, Simmons Dining Hall 

Baer, Charles, Dishroom Man, Nittany Dining Hall 

Cathcart, Jane, Secretary, Sociology 

Confer, Anna Mary, Kitchen Helper, Health Service 

Dugan, Mary, Count erwonan, Nittany Dining Kail 

Hosterman, L* Jane, Counterwona n, Nittany Dining Hall 

Jclen, Barbara, Stenographer, Mineral Industries Extension 

Klier, Eugene P., Assistant Professor, Mineral Technology 

Krimmel, John A., Research Assistant, Chemistry 

Parent, Ida M« , Supervisor, Simmons Dining Hall 

Tarr, Lorayne, Research Assistant, Mineral Technology 

Change of Name ; 

Anfaenger, Rooo to Sohulz, Rosa Ai 

Lesher, Edith E» to Rapchick, Edith L, 
Painter, Janice H« to Reese, Janice P c 

CONTRACTS FOR RESEARCH GRANTS TOTALLING MORE THAN $46,000 APPROVED 



Contracts for research grants total- 
ling more than $46,000 have been approved 
by the Board of Trustees* 

They include agreements with: 

American Iron and Steel Institute, 
providing $18,000 for foundamental re- 
search under Dr, E, F. Osborn, professor 
of geochemistry and head of the depart- 
ment of earth sciences. 

Agreements were renewed with: 



American Viscose Co., providing $15,- 
for study of accelerated aging tests 
textile fabrics, in the Ellen H. 



000 

for 

Richards Institute under the direction 



of Dr • Pauline Bsery Mack, Director, 

Abbott Laboratories, Parke-Davis 
Co E , the Upjohn Co., and Eli Lilly 
Co., each for grants of $3,000, for 
penicillin research in the Schools of 
Agriculture and Chemistry and Physics 
under the direction of Dr, Robert W, 
Stone, professor and head of the de- 
partment of bacteriology, 

Edward Orton Jr. Ceramics Foun- 
dation for a grant of $1,200 pro- 
viding a fellowship for studying vitri- 
fication under direction of Dr » E c C, 
Henry, professor and chief of the 
division of ceramics. 



COLLEGE LEASES LAND TO STATE FOR AIR 'NATIONAL GUARD BUILDINGS 



An aircraft control and warning 
station to be used for training purposes 
will be constructed on the College farms 
east of the NYA area by the Pennsylvania 
Air National Guard, 

The Trustees of the College have 
authorized the leasing of the land for 
that purpose in reply to a request from 
Ma j , Gen, F „ Ae Weber, State Adjutant 
General » 

Plans for the buildings are now 
being drawn. The buildings will house 



the equipment and provide facilities 
for the 112th Aircraft Control and 
Warning Squadron* The Squadron is 
commanded by Dr, Walter IT, Brown, Jr., 
research associate in physics, and is 
a part of the 153d Aircraft Control 
and Warning Group, commanded by Dr, 
George L. Haller, dean of the School 
of Chemistry and physics. 

The majority of the 30 officers 
and 238 enlisted men assigned to the 
unit are faculty and students. 



TRUSTEES ESTABLISH RANK OF POST-DOCTORIAL FELLOW 



The rank of po st— doct orial fellow 
has been established by the Board of 
Trustees and will be reserved "for schol- 
ars who have received the doctorate 



and who will be appointed in teaching 
and research for one year and might 



be reappointed for 



second year,' 



7 



THE DIVISION OF INTERMEDIATE REGISTRATION 



, • At' the meeting on April 2, 1948, the Executive Committee of the 
Board of Trustees approved the establishment of a Division of Intermediate 
Registration as recommended by the Council of Administration, 

The following represents a summary of the report and recommendations 
of the Council which was approved by the Trustees along with operational pro- 
cedures as developed by the Director of the Division and the Advisory Committee. 

1» Problem 

The broad problem confronting the faculty and administration of The Pennsyl- 
vania State College is that of establishing the most appropriate means of 
managing student cases of: 

A. Uncertainty as to educational objectives following a period of regis- 
tration in a specific curriculum, 

B, Low-grade scholastic performance preventing continuance in a particu- 
lar curriculum, 

II, Problem Considerations 

A, It is assumed that all students having made decisions to enter various 
curricula and whose scholastic performances are such as to warrant 
continuance will proceed according to present plans, 

B, It should also be assumed that problem cases as outlined require a 
well organized program for their consideration because: 

1, Each case of student maladjustment requires individual treatment 
according to needs, 

2, The student in accepting the privileges of admission has an obli- 
gation to make the most of his opportunities, 

3, The College in granting admission to a student has an obligation 
to provide the best possible means of correcting student' naiad- • 
justnents because the College itself will often be found contribu- 
tory to the troublesome situations, 

4, Problems of student maladjustment have far reaching family and 
social connections involving the general welfare and public re- 
lat ionships , 

III, Principles and Policies of the Division of Intermediate Registration, 

A, Admi ssions : 

The admission of students to the Division of Intermediate Registra- 
tion should depend on whether or not the student concerned gives' evidence, 
in the judgment of those familiar with the case, of being a good candidate 
for remedial treatment. Specifically, a student may be admitted to the 
Division of Intermediate Registration upon the recommendation of the Dean 
concerned and the approval of the Director of the Division, 

At the pre'sent time, the College Recorder effects the transfer of 
student s to the D.I.R, in accordance with the following revision of Rule 
59 of the Regulations for Undergraduate Students as approved by the 
College Senate June 2, 1949, 



"A student whose scholastic average at the end of his fourth or any 
succeeding semester falls to or below ,50 shall be dismissed from College 
for unsatisfactory scholarship, and shall be notified to this effect by 
the Registrar, A student whose scholastic average at the end of his 
second or third semester falls- to or below ,50 shall not be permitted to 
continue in any^ school of the College but shall be enrolled in the Division 
of Intermediate Registration." 

B« Time Limit of Enrollment : 

As a part of the admission procedures to the Division of Intermediate 
Registration, a student should be advised as to the length of time (not to 
exceed two semesters) available to him as a registrant in the Division, 
and that at the end of this time he must terminate his connection with The 
Pennsylvania State College unless he has been accepted as a candidate for 
a degree in a specified curriculum. 

At the time the student is enrolled in the Division of Intermediate 
Registration, he is advised of the following expected attainment: a seme s - 
ter average of 1,2 or better during the first or second semester or an 
average of 1,2 or better for both semesters. 

After the student has completed courses in the first and/or second 
semester which meet the requirements of a specific curriculum and has earn- 
ed the required semester average, the student's record will be reviewed by 
the Director, If the Director views the records favorably, he will submit 
a recommendation to the dean of the school concerned as to status of the 
student who has, met the requirements for transfer from the D,I»R, • 

The dean of the school to which the student desires to transfer will 
take action on the Director's recommendation, and will approve or dis- 
approve said recommendation. The decision of the dean of the school to 
which the student applies for admission is final, 

C, Guidance Program: 

The initial advisory program designed for all students enrolled in the 
D,I,R, consists of the following three phases: 

1, administration of a minimum battery of vocational guidance tests 
and inventories; 

2, group interpretation of test results; 

3, completion of an individual guidance interview with the student. 

The vocational giiidance tests are administered for the purpose of 
helping the student establish more realistic vocational and educational 
objectives after considering the objective measures of aptitude for college 
work, personality factors contributing to success or failure in college, 
vocational interests, achievement in reading speed and accuracy^ and a 
measure of the adequacy or inadequacy of previously established study 
habit s , . • 

Measures resulting from the administration of the above inventories 
along with the student's high school rank are combined and used in comput- 
ing a prediction of the student's sophomore average in terms of Penn State's 
grading system. Predicted sophomore averages are computed for all schools 
of the college with the exception of Physical Education, 

Viewed separately, the inventories and the initial guidance interview 
indicate areas where deficiencies exist and serve as a guide for the estab- 
lishment of individual and/or group remedial programs for meeting the needs 
of the individual students. 



D. Course Selections: 

While enrolled in the Division of Intermediate Registration^ the 
selection of courses need not necessarily follow curriculum requirements, 
but should be made in the light of the needs of the student for basic, 
exploratory and remedial work. The number of courses attempted and the 
combination should be the subject of considerable judgment by the Director 
of the Division and others concerned with the program of the particular 
student « 

At the present time, students enrolled in the Division are permitted 
to schedule a maximum of 15-g credits per semester including Physical Edu- 
cation, R.O.T.C., and non-credit courses. In computing the semester's 
course load, non-credit courses will be viewed as credit courses in ac- 
cordance with the number of hours per week the course meets. Ex: Math 
which meets three hours per week would count as a three-credit course in 
determining the number of credits scheduled during any one semester. 

E. College Credit : 

It is to be expected that most courses taken by students while in 
this Division would carry regular college credit. As a part of the ad- 
mission procedure, however, it should be very thoroughly explained to stu- 
dents that courses may be counted toward a degree only if they meet the 
requirements of the curriculum in which the student may subsequently be 
enrolled. It also should be pointed out that it may. require longer than 
the usual length of time to graduate from college because of the time used 
for enrollment in the Division of Intermediate Registration. 

F. ■ College Activities: 

Subject to rules and regulations established by the College Senate, 
students enrolled in the Division of Intermediate Registration have the 
same privileges in college activities as other students unless a study of 
the individual case of a student reveals that certain specified limita- 
tions should be imposed by the Director of the Division, Registration in 
this Division should be regarded as an opportunity and not as a penalty, 

rv« The Advi.sory Committee 

Representatives from each of the schools have been named to serve as an 
advisory committee to the D.I.R. The members of the committee are: 



Agriculture - 
Chemistry and Physics - 

E ducat ion - 

Engineering - 

Home Economics - 

Liberal Art s - 

Mineral Industries - 

Physical Education - 



R, B. Dicker son 

C. I. Noll 

A, M. Wellington 

E. B. Stavely 

Helen R». LeBaron 

L, T, Dunlap 

H. J.. Read 

J , D, Lawther 



These committee members serve as liaison officers between the D.I # R» and 

the faculties of the schools. Faculty member"?! are urged to confer with 

their school representative relative to questions as to actions and pro- 
cedures. 






WORK OF THE RECORDER'S OFFICE 



TRANSITION SECTION 

a, Students wishing to transfer ffom'one school to another here on 
the campus, with an average between #65 and 1,00, must spend one semester 
in the Transition Section, 

b, Students with an average above 1.00, changing from a nontechnical 
to a technical course, are put in the Transition Section to prove their 
ability to do technical work. 

c. . Students having an average between .51 and .65, doing poor work 
in a technical curriculum and wishing to change to a nontechnical curriculum, 
may also be put in the Transition Section for one semester. 



DIVISION OF INTERMEDIATE REGISTRATION 

a. Those students who entered as freshmen beginning with the first 
semester 1948-49 who had an average of *50 or below at the end of the second 
semester 1948-49, were placed in the Division of Intermediate Registration, 

b Students who failed 50% or more of their work during the second 
semester of their freshman year were dropped from college under the 50/b rule. 
They were not given a chance to go into the Division of Intermediate Regis- 
tration although their average for the year might have been considerably 
higher than those who were in the Division of Intermediate Registration* 



PROBATION • ■ ■ 

a. There are three types of Probation: 

First: Since students are not dropped at the end of the first semes- 
ter cf their freshman year, although they might have failed 50/?! of their work, 
they are put on college probation for the following semester. 

Second: Those freshmen whose average falls between .51 and .65 are 
automatically put on college probation. 

Third: Students who failed 35% of their work scheduled during a 
semester are put on college probation. 

Fourth: Students who are enrolled in the Division of Intermediate 
Registration are automatically on college probation until they bring their 
average higher than ,65, 

Fifth: The individual school also has the privilege of putting a 
student' on probation if he does not keep up with the school's standard. 

Sixth: Since a student may be permitted to remain in the Division 
of Intermediate Registration for two semesters, it is possible for him to re- 
move his probation by bringing up his average to ,66 or better and still re- 
main in the Division of Intermediate Registration, 



J30IOJQ S J C[ q y 



' 



4_ 



THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 



FACULTY 



The Bulletin is published weekly during the Coll >ge 
year as a means of making official announcements 
and presenting items of interest to the faculty. AH 




BULLETIN 



contributions should be as brief as possible and 
reach Louis H. Bell, Director of Public Information, 
313 Old Main, not later than 10 a. m. each Friday. 



VOL. 37 



October 31, 1949 



NO. 



STAFF, STUDENTS REQUESTED TO CONSERVE HEAT, ELECTRICITY, AND WATER 



Staff members and students have been 
requested to co-operate in a program to 
save coal by conserving heat, water, and 
electricit y. 

The Power Plant has not received coal 
since the coal strike began nearly six 
weeks ago and George W. Ebert, director 
of the physical plant, estimates the 



supply on hand will not last more than 
five weeks , 

Suggestions for saving electricity 
include reducing the number of lights 
used in corridors and rest rooms and 
turning out unnecessary lights, Win- 
dows should be closed at night and water 
should not be allowed to run in drinking 
f ounta ins B 



CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION TO OPEN ANNUAL DRIVE OCTOBER 30;DR. DICKERS ON FACULTY CHAIRMAN 



Dr. Russell B. Dickerson, vice-dean 
of the School of Agriculture, has been 
named faculty chairman for the annual 
finance campaign of the Penn State Chris- 
tian Association which opened October 30 
and will continue through November 5. 
The faculty goal is $2500, 

Division leaders are: Capt, John P, 
Dougherty and Marilyn Smith, Air Science 
and Tactics, Military Science and Tactics, 



and Naval Science j Dr. Mary L, Willard, 
Chemistry and Physics; Arnold W„ Asman, 
Mineral Industries; Lee E* Corter, the 
Liberal Arts; Sherman P« Fogg, Physical 
Education and Athletics; A. L. Beam, 
Agriculture; Dr. Winona L. Morgan, Home 
Economics; A, p. Powell, Engineering; 
Dr. Lester P, Guest, Education; Ellen 
Stanley, Library; Merl R, Young, 



Ext e nsi o n; 
trat ion, 



,nd 



Central 
Paul E, Bennerj Adninis- 



GRADE CARDS FOR STUDENTS WHO DROPPED COURSES TO BE RETURNED TO RECORDER 



Facu 
week per 
cards, p 
who have 
unof f ici 
lat ions 
50, shou 
Recorder 



lty a re 
i o d e n d 
roperly 
droppe 
ally a c 
for Und 
Id be s 
. Willa 



remind 
ed Octo 

marke d 
d a c ou 
cording 
ergradu 
dnt to 
rd Hall 



ed the first two— 
ber 2 5 and grade 
for those students 



rse officially or 

to Rule 41, Regu- 
ate Students, 1949- 
tlie Office of the 



who have never attended classes or have 
attended less than two weeks of a course 
which they have not regularly dropped, 
the grade shall be reported as "Ab^ 



it 



Rule 41 reads, in part: "For students 



For students who have officially 
dropped a course during the first two 
weeks, the instructor shall mark the 
grade card "DROP" and return it to the 
Recorder's Office, 



PENN STATE AND OXFORD TO HOLD ANNUAL INTERNATIONAL DEBATE ON NOVEMBER 4 



Penn State will meet Oxford University 
in the 16th annual International Debate 
at 8 p.m. Friday, November 4, in Schwab 
Audit oriuH, 

Oxford will take the affirmative and 
Penn State the negative on the question: 
"Resolved, That the Public Ownership of 
Basic Industries Is in the Best Interests 



of a Democratic Society." 

Penn State debaters are Richard B. 
Schweiker and John Fedako while Oxford 
will be represented by Robin Day and 
Geoffrey Johnson-Smith, Dr. Robert T, 
Oliver, professor and head of the de- 
partment of speech, will serve as chair- 
ma n » 



DISPLAY OF RARE PENNSYLVANIA IMPRINTS AND BOOKS AT LIBRARY 



A display of rare' Pennsylvania im- 
prints and books dealing with Pennsyl- 
vania has been placed on exhibit in the 



first floor lobby of the College Li- 
brary, It will continue until November 
15. 

J?ENN STATE COLLECTIO N 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE SENATE COMMITTEE ON COURSES OF STUDY 



The Courses of Study Committee here- 
with presents its annual report. 

The Committee sponsored another re- 
duction in the length of course descrip- 
t ions* 

Two new curricula were considered and 
approved. One was a Two- Year Applied 

Course in Agriculture which replaced the 
old Two-Year Course in Agriculture. The 
other was a re-submission of the Labor- 
Management Relations Curriculum which had 
been presented previously in May 1947, 

The committee has been helpful to the 
School of Home Economics in its transition 
from a department to a school status. 

Throughout the last two years, the 
committee has received requests to use 
some other designation for the manner 
in which classes are conducted such as 
laboratory, seminar, discussion, etc. 
For years, the description of courses has 
included the words, recitation, lecture 
or practicum as an indication of how the 
courses were given. These designations 
are also tied in with the definition of 
a credit. Likewise, it has received re- 
quests to indicate class hours in such a 
manner as not to agree with the rule for 
defining credits for the course. Ex- 
ample: A three credit course was to be 
given as a two— hour seminar. ■ 

The committee has discussed the above 
requests at some length and wishes to 
propose for consideration the following 
as a procedure and definition of credit 
value which would cover almost if not all 
possible combinations. 

All course work is to be divided in- 
to two classes; 

1. Class-room work, such as lecture, 
recitation, seminar, discussion, 
etc, and which require outside 
preparat ion , 



The value of a credit for the above 
classes of work would be defined as 
follows : 

1. Class-room work: one hour per 
week per semester plus two hours 
per week of preparation, 

2, Pract icum-work s from two to three 
hours per week per semester. 
Maximum of three hours per week 
including preparation. 

At present the catalog description 
includes the credit value placed immedi- 
ately after the course title in paren- 
thesis. The words lecture, recitation, 
and/or practicum appear at the close of 
the coxtrse description. 

The committee wishes to propose for 
consideration that this procedure be 
abandoned and in its place a four-digit 
number in parenthesis appear after the 
course title as follows: 

I,Er 327, Work simplification and Time 
Study (5;l,8j6) 

The meaning of the figures in order 
given would be: 

First number credit value 

Second number- class— room work 

Third number pract icum-r oom 

work 
Fourth number preparation time 

The total hours of class-room work, 
pract icum—ro om work, and preparation 
time with reference to the credit 
value should conform to the defi- 
nitions of credit value given above. 

Variable values for any of the above 
would be indicated 3-6, 

For all graduate courses only one 
number is required, namely, credit value 
unless the others are thought necessary. 



2, Pract icum—ro om work, such as 
practicum, laboratory, demon- 
stration, field work, inspection 
trips, drafting, laboratory re- 
port writing, which requires little 
or no outside preparation, June 

REPRESENTATIVES ON THE COUNCIL FOR 



Respectfully submitted, 

C, E. Bullinger, 
Chairman 



2, 1949 

RESEARCH. ANNUAL REPORT 



During the past year the Council on 
Research operated under a budget for 
$7,500, The largest single expense in- 
curred was approximately $1,000 to publish 
"Publications and Research" of which 1,500 
copies were printed. The council also 
published "Research in progress", a mimo-r 
ographed listing of all the research in 
progress throughout the College, One 
hundred copies were published this year 



so that it could be sent to the Heads of 
the Departments as well as the Deans and 
Librar ie s , 

Approximately $6,500 was allocated 
as grants-in-aid for research. Thirty- 
eight projects were distributed as follows 
Chemistry and physics, 5; Education, 5; 
Engineering, 7; Liberal Arts, 17; Mineral 
Industries, 2; and physical Education, 2, 



? 



Ten patent proposals were submitted to training, training for team research., 

the Council and considered by various the production of a motion picture on 

committees. Five were approved and re- research, and lastly the possibility of 

commended to the College administration inviting German scientists to assist 

for prosecution by the Pennsylvania Re- in 'the College research programs, 
search Corporation. Five were not ap- 
proved and were returned to the Deans Respectfully submitted, 
of the Schools involved. 

During the past year, the Council al- Eric A. Walker 

so considered the establishment of a 'David C, Duncan 

College press, the improvement of graduate June 2, 1949 

ANNUAL REPORT OF SENATE COMMITTEE ON ATHLETICS 

Your committee held seven meetings Many contests are scheduled for the 
during the year. Members of this Com- week of the beginning of the second 
mittee are also members of the College semester and it is impossible to get 
Athletic Advisory Board and have attended the information in by this time. Athletes 
the four meetings of this Board. who have -been eligible for the first 

semester have been allowed to continue 
The School of Physical Education and competition until an official check can 
Athletics maintained 16 varsity and 6 be made. So far there has been no em- 
junior varsity teams during the year, barra s sment » 
These teams competed in 144 intercollegi- 
ate contests at 47 institutions and tvon Checking eligibilities and issuing 
14 championships, ■ of excuses for out of town contests are 

done through the office of the chairman. 
All schedules for these contests were During the year, 1077 candidates for 
reviewed and approved by the Committee the several teams have been checked and 
before contracts were completedo 1147 excuses issued. Most of this work 

is done by the chairman's secretary and 
Again the success of most of the teams all credit is due her for a very fine 
has brought numerous requests for their job, 
participation in contests not on the regu- 
lar schedule. The ' Committ ee has adhered All those associated with the inter- 
to its policy of approving only those collegiate athletic program have co- 
that seem to have special merit and may operated in every way possible. These 
be of some benefit to the participants. include the Dean of the School of Physi- 
cal Education and Athletics and his staff 
The Committee follows closely the the Graduate . Manager of Athletics and 
eligibility codes of the National Col- his staff, the coaches, and the Admission 
legiate Association and the Eastern Col— Office, especially the Recorder. In 
legiate Athletic Conference in which the many cases, it has been necessary to chec' 
College hold memberships, with some of the Dean's' offices and 

all information requested h-a s been given 
To date, it does not appear that the promptly. 
College probation rule has worked any Submitted by the Committee 

hardships on athletes. The greatest Hummel Fishburn 

difficulty with this rule is in checking J, H. Olewine 

eligibility for second semester athletes, N, R, Sparks 

Po La Bent ley j Chairman 
June 2. 1949 

16 STAFF AND FACULTY MEMBERS ATTEND LAND-GRANT MEETINGS 

S'ixteen staff and faculty members School of Home Economics; Dean H, P, 

attended the annual meetings of the Hammond, Kenneth L, Holderman, and F. G. 

Association of Land-Grant Colleges and Hechler, School of Engineering; Dean 

Universities in Kansas City, Mo. last Ben Euwema, School of the Liberal Arts; 

■week. Dean Frank D. Kern, Graduate School; Dr« 

Ho K, Wilson, dean of men; and Edward L. 

They were Dean Lyman E. Jackson. Dr. Keller, professor of engineering exten_ 

F, F, Lininger, Dr» Russell B. Piokerson, sion and assistant director, Central Ex— 

J. Martin Fry, and Lydia Tarrant, of the tension. 
Cohool of Agriculture; Dean Grace M, 

Henderson. Delpha E e Weisendanger , Dr« Dean Hammond, Dean Jackson, Dean 

Helen R» LeBai-on, and Pr« Ruth R. Honey, Henderson, Dean Euwema, and Keller par- 
ticipated in the program* 



L 



OF GENERAL INTEREST 



SENATE: The College Senate will meet at 
4:10 p.m. Thursday, November 3, in Room 

121, Sparks Buildings 

* * * 

CHAPEL: ,Rev, Bradford S „ Abernethy, chap- 
lain, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, 
N»J. will speak at chapel services at 11 
a.n, Sunday, November 6, in Schwab Audi- 
torium. 

* * * 

HOME SPORTS: Saturday, November 5, 1 p.m., 
soccer, North Carolinaj 3 p.m., JV soccer, 
Swart hmore center, 

* * * 

LUNCHEON CLUB: Viktor Lowenfeld, pro- 
fessor of art education, will speak on 
"Art and Society" at the Faculty Luncheon 
Club meeting on Monday, November 7« 

* * * 

COURSES OF STUDY: The Senate Courses of 
Study Committee will meet at 10 a.m. Tues- 
day, November 1, in Room 207, Engineering 

* * * 

FILM CATALOG: Staff and faculty members 
desiring a copy of a newsletter listing 
films added to the Audio— Visual Aids Li- 
brary since the catalog was published 
should call the Audio— Visual Aids Library,' 

Ext. 176, 

* * * 

FILM: "The Golem," a 1920 film directed 
by Paul Wegener, will be presented at 
7 p.m. Wedne sday, November 2, in Room 119 
Osmond Laboratory for Dramatics 61 stu- 
dents. A limited number of seats are 
available for interested faculty members. 



COMBINED ARTS : The Combined Art 
will hold their first meeting at 
Sunday in the Living Center of t 
Economics Building© There will 
program by members of the depart 
music and committees for project 
year will be named, 

* * * 

OPTICAL POINTER: An optical poi 
use with slides and filmstrips i 
ble for examination at the Audio 
Aids Library, Room 9, Central Li 
The pointer sells for less then 
can be operated as a self-contai 
with one battery or with a large 
and an extension cord, 

* * * 

PHI BET.. KAPPA: The local chapt 
Beta Kappa seeks the names of al 
Kappa members in State College o 
whether they wish to be active i 



s Group 

7:30 p.m. 
he Home 
be a short 
ment of 
8 for the 



nter for 
s availa— 
—Visual 
brary, 
$5 .and 
ned unit 
r battery 



er of Phi 
1 Phi Beta 
r vicinity, 

n the 



chapter or not. Those not already af- 
filiated with the chapter are requested 
to send their names together with the 
oollege and date of init iat ion 'to the 
local secretary, Dr« Teresa Cohen, 213 
Sparks Building. Any who are full— time 
members of the College staff can become 
active members of the chepter by payment 
of the annual chapter dues of $1.50 
to the treasurer, Dr, T, F, Bates, 117 
Mineral Industries Building, 

* * * 

AWARDED FELLOWSHIP: Isabel Melendez, 
instructor in romance languages, has 
been awarded a year's fellowship abroad 
under the provisions of the Fulbright 
Act and the Institution of International 
Education, The fellowship, based on 
national competition, covers full ex- 
penses for an academic year in Italy. 

* * * 

DELIVERS PAPER: Dr. I. M. Sheffer, 
professor of mathematics, delivered a 
paper on "The Solution of Sum— Equat ions" 
at the meetings of the American Mathe- 
matical Society in New York on Saturday, 
Other faculty attending were Dr. Orrin 
Frink, Dr. Lee Lorch, Dr. Haskell B<, 
Curry, and Dr. Edwin Akutowicz, 

* * * 

WINS PRIZE: A cleft-palate rehabili 
tation exhibit, sponsored by the Speech 
and Hearing Clinic, Dr. C, S „ Harkins 
and Dr. W R» Harkins, of Osceola Mills, 
and Dr. J. F. Harkins, of Erie, won first 
prize in the scientific exhibit section 
at the American Dental Association 
meetings in San Francisco, 

* * * 

NAVAL RESERVE UNIT; Faculty members 
are invited to participate in Naval Re- 
serve unit meetings held each Tuesday 
night at 7;30 p.m. in Room 200, Engi- 
neering "E"o A radio station N4CAN for 
military code transmissions and K3NRI 
for amateur communications is available 
for use of all members. Those interested 
in joining the Naval Reserve Electronic 
Warfare Company (4—12) should call F, 
H» Yonker, Ext, 14,' 

* * * 

PRESENT PAPERS: D r * J. M. Kelso, Dr, 
Ao H. Wayaick, and Ao H» Benner, of the 
radio propagation laboratory of the de- 
partment of electrical engineering, will 
present papers this week at the Inter- 
national Scientific Radio Union Insti- 
tute of Radio Engineers in Washington, 
DoC* 

* * # 



Jscuoao ©?qqv 



THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 

FACULTY &9WS| BULLETIN 




The Bulletin is published weekly during the College 
year as a means of making official announcements 
and presenting items of interest to the faculty. All 



VOL. 



3 7 



contributions should be as brief as possible and 
reach Louis H. Bell, Director of Public Information 
313 Old Main, not later than 10 a. m. each Friday. 



November 7, 1949 



NO. 



EXHIBIT OF DOUGLAS LOCKWOOD WATTS R COLORS TO OPEN NOVEMBER 10 



An exhibit of water colors by Doug- 
las Lockwood will open in the Simmons 
Hall lounge on Thursday, November 10 and 
continue through November 3 0, 

Lockwood, who resides in State Col- 
lege and has designed several houses in 
the borough, studied in art schools in 
New York, Chicago, and Detroit and for 
two years with Frank Lloyd Wright, 
noted architect a 

After teaching and serving as di- 



rector of the art department at Henry 
Street Settlement, New York, Lockwood 
came to Perm State and served from 1943- 
45 as an assistant in home economics 
and educational psychology, part-time, 

Lockwood* S exhibitions have in- 
cluded a one-man show at Willard Gallery, 
New York and by invitation, he has ex- 
hibited at Art Institute, Chicago and the 
International Water Color Exhibition, 
Brooklyn Museum, 



HANSON W, BALDWIN, CAR L SANDBURG TO APPEAR ON COMMUNITY FORUM SERIES 



Hanson W« Baldwin, military analyst, 
will open the State College Community 
Forum Series on December 7 and C?,rl S a nd" 
burg, well— known poet and author, will 
appear on January 11, Ralph W, McCorab, 
chairman of the Series, has announced, 

Baldwin will speak on "Security in 
an Atomic Age" while Sandburg will pre- 



sent a program of American .folk songs 
and tall t a 1 a s » 

Eugene ?'» Fulmer, chairman of the 
program committee, reports that arrange- 
ments for the other three speakers of 
the series are now being completed. 
Ticket sales, with Jo Hays in charge, 
will bef f in late this month* 



NEW BUILDING DEDICATED BY FENN STATE CENTER AT HAZLETON 



A dedication ceremony was held on 
October 31 at the Penn State Center at 
Hazleton to mark the acquisition of High- 
acres, the former Eckley B, C. Markle 
estate, as the new campus for the Center, 

At the ceremony, it was announced a 
fund— raising drive would be sponsored by 
the Hazleton Educational Council to make 
possible a new gymnasium on the campus. 



J. 0, Keller, assistant to the Pre si- 
dent in charge of Extension, delivered 
the dedication address and Edgar C, 
Weichel, trustee of the College, spoke 
briefly, Fred E# Bitt enbender , also 
a trustee, and David B, Pugh, in charge 
of instruction in Central Extension, 
spoke at the dinner following the dedi— 
cat ion , 



EXCUSES FOR STUDENTS RETURNING TO HOMES TO VOTE AUTHORIZED 



Students who desire to return to their 
homes to vote on Tuesday, November 8, 
have been authorized to be absent from 
clas se s , 

Special excuse forms have been made 



available to the student and when signed 
by the local Judge of Election and pre- 
sented to the instructor, will be ac- 
cepted as authorized excuses for the 
absence of the student , 



LIBRARY ANNOUNCES HOURS FOR THANKSGIVING RECESS 



The Central Library will observe the 
following schedule during the Thanks- 
giving recess; 



Wc 



dnesday, November 23, 7:50 a.m, to 



5 p,m.j Thursday, November 24, closed; 
Friday, November 25, 9 a,m, to 5 p»m»j 
Saturday, November 26 . 9 a.m, to 5 p,m«; 
.and tunday^ ' November 27, closed, 

PENN STATE COLLECTION 



MINUTES OF THE SENATE MEETING OF NOVEMBER 3, 1949 



The College Senate met at 4:10 p.m. 
on November 3, 1949 in Room 121, Sparks 
Building with. Mr. A. 0, Morse presiding. 
The list of members present is on file 
in the Office of the Registrar. The 
minutes of the October 6 meeting were 
published in the Faculty Bulletin October 
10 and hence were not read. The minutes 
were approved as published. 

Under communications from College 
officers, letters were read from senators 
unable to attend the meeting and naming 
substitutes. The substitute is designated 
in parenthesis following the senator's 
name « Miss Ellen K e liy (Miss Dorothy V. 
Briant)* Mr. A„ Ho Forbes (Mr. C a rl Volz); 
and Mr. N, C. Fernclius (Mr. A. W.Hutch— 
ison)* A letter from prof. E. B. van- 
Ormer stated that he would be unable to 
attend Senate meetings since he had a 
class scheduledc However, he would be 
willing to serve on the Senate Committee 
on Courses of Study. These letters are 
on file in the Office of the Registrar, 

Under reports of standing committees, 
Prof. Victor Beede, chairman of the Com- 
mittee on Academic Standards, presented 
cases as follows: 

Clyde R, Schrock, petitions to 
take the examination in Ed«439 
in order that he may take other 
courses which will lead toward 
permanent certification in the 
teaching of traffic safety in 
the secondary schools. Approved 
by the Senate. 

Donald A.-. Cherrie petitions to 
transfer the credits earned at 
Wilkes College during the summer 
session 1949 so that he can gradu- 
ate in February 1950, Approved 
by the Senate ■ 



1) 



:2) 



of the Registrar* 

Mr. Bullinger also drew attention to 
the annual report of his committee which 
was printed in the October 31, 1949 issue 
of the Faculty Bulletin. In this re- 
port was an item relative to credit valuer 
The committee feels this should be studied 
by a special committee, therefore, Mr. 
Bullinger moved that a special committee 
be appointed to study the recommendation 
of the Courses of Study Committee The 
motion carried ,, 

The October report of the Courses of 
Study Committee which has laid on the 
table for one month was not voted upon 
but since no objection was raised, this 
report will be considered approved. 

Under unfinished business the pro- 
posed amendment to Rule 13, in order to 
transfer the duties of the Transition 
Section to the new Director of Inter- 
mediate Registration, was discussed. 
Mr. Morse asked the secretary to preside 
pro tempore in order that he might make 
the notion that the amended Rule 18 be 
adopted, Mr. R. U. Blasingame seconded 
the motion and the Senate so voted. Rule 
18 as a memd ed is as foil ow s : 

Students who have been dropped from 
College for poor scholarship will 
not be permitted to change curricula 
without being formally reinstated. 
Students who are not able to change 
schools because of scholastic de- 
ficiencies, under certain conditions^, 
may be admitted for not more than 
two semesters, to the Divison of 
Intermediate Registration. 



(3) 



Peggy E» DeJure petitions to use 
five credits earned at Mexico 
City College during the last 
summer session, toward completing 
requirements for her degree. 
Approved by the Senate. 



The 
Standards is 
Regi strar . 



report of t he Committee on 
on file in the Office 



Under new business, Prof e B. A, 
whisler asked if it would be possible 
for the Rules Committee to retain the 
same numbers for rules each year, since 
it was very confusing t o have to learn 
new numbers each year, Dr» R. E» Dengler i 
as chairman of the Rules Committe, stated 
the committee would prefer to keep the 
same number but since the S e nate added 
and dropped rules each year it was 
necessary to change the numbers a However, 
Academic the committee would welcome suggestions 



of t] 



prof. Cc Eo Bullinger, chairman of 
the Courses of Study Committee, stated 
the November report of his committee 
would be in the hands of the members of 
the Senate by Monday, The committee is 
holding its meeting on the Tuesday pre- 
ceding the Senate meeting in order to 
take care of as many course and curricula 
changes as possible. But it is impossible 
to have the report of the committee mime- 
ographed in time for the meeting Thursday. 
This report 'w ill be on file in the Office 



with reference to numbering of rules. 

Prof. N. R« Sparks asked about the 
codification of rules which the Senate 
had voted upon last year. Mr . Morse re- 
ported that Dr. S. C, Tanner was working 
on this problem but that he had not made 
a report as yet. 

Mr. Morse stated that since assis- 
tant deans had been appointed to be dir- 
ectors of resident instruction he had 
been asked on various occasions whether 
these assistant deans would hold member- 
ship in the College Senate, Two directors^ 



the Director of Research and the Director 
of Extension, hold membership in the Sen- 
ate, however, the Senate constitution 
makes no provision for membership of 
assistant deans. The question was raised 
as to whether the Senate should amend the 
constitution to provide for this now type 
of' assistant dean. It was the consensus 
of the Senate that .this matter should be 
referred to a committee for study, Dr , 
R, A» Butcher moved that an "appropriate 
committee" be appointed to study this 
matter. It was seconded by prof, Blasin— 
game, and' the motion carried, 

. Dr . Dengler; asked if it were gener- 
ally known that faculty members were wel- 
come to attend the meetings of the Col- 
lege Senate 'without vote and suggested 
that such a statement be published. 



prof. A 
t i o n as to w 
author it ie s 
were working 
fronting the 
fare. It was 
committee j_s' 
with the Col 
it ie s , It wa 
College Psyc 
Committee on 



II. Reede raised the ques*» 
hether or not the College 
and the Borough authorities 
together on problems con— 
C onn it t e e on Student We 1— 
stated that the present 
effectively co-operating 
lege and the Borough author— 
s further suggested that the 
hiatrist be included on the 
Student Welfare, 



lege Psychiatrist : be made an ox officio 
member of. the Committee on Student Wel- 
fare, A discussion followed on the au- 
thority of ex officio members, whether 
or not they hold voting power or advi- 
sory power. Since Dr , Selsam's motion 
is an amendment to the Constitution, it 
will lie on the table for one month* 

Dr. B» V, Moore, as chairman of the 
Committee on Committees, discussed addi- 
tions to committees of persons who are 
riot 'members 'of the College Senate, It wa 
decided to refer the matter to the Com- 
mittee on Committees', 

'It w a s moved and seconded that Dr, 
Selsam's motion be referred to the Com- 
mittee on Committees, 



Dr. Dengler moved, and it was prop- 
erly seconded, that the Committee on Coia— 
mittees be the "appropriate committee" to 
study the question of assistant deans 
holding membership on the College Senate, 

of this matter, Dr, 



Dr , J, P, Selsam moved that the Col— 



Dengler withdrew his motion. 

The meeting adjourned at 5:05 p,m, 

R, M. Gerhardt, 

Secretary i 



CERTAIN ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICES HOVE TO WILLARD HALL 



The following administrative office 
have been moved to Willard Hall: 

Dean of Admissions and Registrar, 
College Examiner, and Secretary of the 
College Senate, all in Room 110, Willard 
Hall, ext . 344, 



Scheduling Officer, Rooms 1 and 2, 
Willard Hall, ext. 347; Bursar, Rooms 5 
and 6, Willard Hall, efct , 352, 

Recorders, including records of grad- 
uate students, alumni, and former stu- 
dents, Rooms 3 and 4, Willard Hall, ext, 
236, 



OF GENERAL INTEREST 



CHAPEL: Rev, Walter Van Kirk, executive 
secretary' of the "Commission "on Interna- 
tional Justice and Goodwill of the Fed- 
eral Council of Churches, will speak at 
chapel services at 11 a.m. on Sunday, 
November 13, in Schwab Auditorium, 



SCHOOL OF AGRICULTUR1 
special meeting of the 



There will be a 
faculty of the 
School of Agriculture for all persons 
interested in meeting Richard E. Pride, 
who just returned from Lingnan University 
in Canton, China, at -4:10 p,m, Tuesday, 
November 3, in Room 109, Agriculture 
Building, It is also possible that Dr, 
Samuel Higginbotton , famottfl for his ag- 
ricultural missionary work in India, will 
be present to participate in the program, 

* * * 
LUNCHEON CLUB: Dr , John A. Sauer, profes- 
sor and head of the department of engi- 
neering mechanics, will address the Fac- 



ulty Luncheon Club at the 
le^e on Monday noon, Novel 
tory of Mechanics,"' 



Hotel State Col— 
:ber 14, on " His— 



SCHOOL OF 
and staff 
meet at 4 



EDUCATION FACULTY: The faculty 
of the School of Education will 
p,m, Monday, November 14, in 
the Hugh Beaver Room, 304 Old Main, Dean 
M, R, Trabue will speak. The meeting is 
the first of a series of professional 
meetings of the School which will be held 
on the first school— day Monday of each 
month. 



GRADE CARDS : 
have dropped 
weeks of the 



Grade cards for students who 
courses during the first two 
semester should be submitted 
as of October 11, the end of the two— week 
period, instead of October 25, as stated 
in the Faculty Bulletin, dated October 31 



THA) 



: G IVING D INNER GUES TS : The Nat i ona 1 



PENN 



. 






Student Association is interested in PENN STATE WIGHT: Penn State night, an 

having foreign students entertained by annual joint meeting of the Pennsylvania 

faculty members during the Thanksgiving Ceramics Association and the Pittsburgh 

holidays, preferably for dinner on Thanhs- section, American Ceramic Society, will 

giving Day or on Sunday, November 27, be held at the Mellon Institute, pitts- 

Faoulty interested in inviting student burg, on Tuesday, November 8, Dr. E, 

guests should call John Doyle, student Q p Henry will report on ceramics activi- 

chairman of the committee, at the Phi ties here and Dr, F, R, Mat son and F, 

Kappa psi fraternity, State College 4908 ^ # Hummel will present technical papers, 

before Tuesday, November 15, Dr, henry serves as managing director 



* * * 



of the association, Roy G, Ehman, as 

AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY: Guy R, M. secretary; and James R, Coxey, as treas- 

Del Giudice, patent lawyer with the So- urer, 

cony-Vacuum Oil Co., Inc., will address *** 

the Central Pennsylvania section, Aneri- APPOINTED: Joseph F, O'Brien, professor 

can Chemical Society, at 7:30 p.m. Tues- f public speaking, has been appointed 

day, November 15, in Room 119, Osmond to the committee on the use of dramatics 

Laboratory. His subject will be: "The an a discussion in the promotion of inter-- 

Chemist and Patents." national understanding. The oommittee 

*** is sponsored by the Speech Association 

FILMS; Three films to illustrate the f America, 
coming of sound will be shown for the *** 

Dramatics 61 class at 7 p.m. Wednesday, CHAIRMAN: Dr. William N. Leonard, pro- 
November 16, in Room 119, Osmond La bora- fessor and head of the department of 
.tory. They are a 1927 Movietone News; economics, recently served as panel 
"Steamboat Willie" by W?,lt Disney (1928); chairman for the New Jersey conference 
and "All Q.uiet on the Western Front" for College Teachers of Government, 
(1930 ) A limited number of seats will *** 
be available for interested faculty, PRESENTS PAPERS; Dr. Shiou-Chuan Sun, 

*** assistant professor of mineral prepa— 

ADULT FOODS COURSE: There are some va- ration, presented two papers at the mid- 

cancics in the Adult Foods Course offered year meetings of the American Institute 

from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. each Monday in f Mineral and Metallurgical Engineers 

Room 108, Home Economics Building, Fee i n Columbus, 0. recently, 
is $5 to cover food costs, Adults may *** 

enroll by calling Mrs. D a vid Cowell, CONFERENCE: Representatives of 20 

State College 6344«, colleges and universities met in Burrowes 



* * * 



Building Saturday to discuss basic teach— 

CENTER MAGE: The final productions of er training courses in visual and other 

"Glass Menagerie" will be presented at sensual aids. The meetings were spon- 

C e nter Stage on Friday and Saturday sored by the department of education, 
nights, November 11 and 12 and November *** 

18 and 19, Tickets are on sale at Stu- SPEAKS: Dr. William M, Smith, associate 

dent Union Office. professor of family relationships, re-" 

*** cently addressed the Western New York 

BIOGRAPHY PUBLISHED: Dr. Harold E s Dick- state Teachers' Conference in Buffalo, 

son, professor of fine arts, is author of N> - Y , on "Behind the Student Is a Family, 
a biography, titled, "j ohn Wesley Jarvio, *** 

American Artist,-" recently published by ELECTED: Dr, William G, Mather, pro- 

the New York Historical Society. fessor of rural sociology, has been elect' 

*** ed vice— pre s ident of the Pennsylvania 

CONFERENCE: The 4th annual Undergraduate public Health Association. 
Speech and Hearing Conference was held *** 

here on Thursday bv the Speech and Hear- CONTRIBUTES PAPER: Viktor Lowenfeld, 

ing Clinic „ More than 130 persons from professor of art education, has contri- 

10 Pennsylvania colleges attended. buted a paper, "Art, a Basic Area in 

*** Human Experience," to the Yearbook of 

SPEAKS; Dr. Stuart A. Mahuran, professor the Western Arts Association, 
of journalism, addressed the Pennsylvania *** 

School Press Association in Williamsport SIGMA ALPHA ETA: Dr. Herbert Cooper, 

Friday on "School News in Y ur Local director of the Lancaster Cleft Palate 

Paper, Clinic, Lancaster, will speak at an open 

*** meeting of Sigma Alpha Eta at 8 p.m. 

TO DIRECT SEMINAR: Dr. William U. Snyder, Thursday, November 10, in Room 312, 

associate professor of psychology and Sparks Building. His subject will be: 

associate director of the psychology "Rehabilitation of the Oral Cripple." 

clinic, will direct a two-day seminar on j xll interested are invited to attend the 

non— d ire ct ive counseling at the U. S, meeting. 
Army Chaplain School, Carlisle Barracks; 
on Wednesday and Thursdayo 

* * * .i .. ... 



OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS FROM THE OFFICE OF THE DEAN; OF ADMISSIONS AND REGISTRAR 

Withdrawals : (Campus) , 

1 Beery, Ruth Marie, Music, Oct. 1 5 Layton, Donald Robert, Cer/ Oct, 13 

3 Biernbaum, Joanne W«, Ed* Oct, 11 3 Lehman, Neal Daniel, EE, Sept. 27 

Gr Boccella, Henry Joseph, For,, Oct, 29 5 McGinn, Francis, Phys, Oct. 5 

3 Budny, Stanley J seph, LD, Oct, 8 5 McKnight, Patricia V<,,Bus,Ed, Oct. 17 

1 Caird, Norma Anne, Ed, Oct, 27 7 Marcus, Mar ilyrr. Renee t AL^ Oct, 23 

3 Carmichael, Susan. LD, Oct „ 14 5 Marousky, Vincent Anthony, CF',"' Oct .39 

7 Carroll, Rea V , Ph e Ed, Oct. 19 3 Miller, Larry G., LD, Oct. 8 " 

7 Ccrman, William Joseph, Ph.Ed, 0ct 19 Gr Orthan, Edward Joseph, LA 5 Oct. 4 

1 Dunlap, Rose Anne, CF, Oct „ 3 4 Pfahles, Thomas William, CE, Oct. 8 

3 Eicher, Robert Leroy, AH, Oct. 25 3 Pitzonka, Walter W 4 . Hort, Oct, 26 

3 Fierman, paula Phyllis, LD, Oct. 12 Gr Potter, Robert Jerome, CF ; Oct, 17 

3 Fitzgerald, Robert Aloysius, DIR,0ct<!,7 5 Prince, Elaine Mae, AL, Oct. 12 

3 Flanagan, Edward John, ME, Oct. 20 5 puskarich, Evelyn V., HEc, S e pt. 30 

Gr Fruth, George William, ME, Oct, 1 1 Robertson, Harold F.Jr., For, Sept. 29 

1 Furman, Shirley Marilyn, Psy, S e pt, 29 3 Sargent, William Elton, l;D, c t , 19 

5 Hamer, John Hayward, For, c t . 6 'Gr Shepherd, George E, Chem, c t , 24 

7 Harrison, Nicholas Harry, ChE, Oct. 11 2 Silar, James Francis, LD, Oct* 5 

3 Heininger, Donald Eugene, LE, Oct, 14 7 Stevenson, Mary Elizabeth, CF, 0ct„31 

3 Heldcnbrand, polly^ HE, c t . 24 1 Sullivan, Edward Joseph, GM, Oct B 11 

3 Johnson, Gussie, PM, Oct. 10 1 Todd,'C A n ne, LD, Oct 17 

5 Kutler, Samuel S,, AL, S e pt, 27 Gr Trimble, Jim Porter, Agro, Oct. 18 

3 Lamaster, Betty Louise, phE, Oct. 3 3 Turets, Maxim David, LD, Oct. 3 

Gr Larrabee, Richard D., psy, Oct. 19 Gr Zukas, J seph Ch-rles-, Met, Oct. 14 

Withdrawal ? ; (Altoon'a Center) 

3 Connaughton, Patrick J., Agro, Oct,, 18 1 Filer, Daniel Harry, AL, Oct. 20 

1 Davis, Richard Edward, MT, Oct, 8 1 Lallive, Francis W„, Pre-Med, Sept. 30 

1 DeBernardiSj. Joseph N»,CF, C G t . 20 1 Miller, Charles Alfred, Pre -Vet , Oct „' 

1 Fanale, Joseph R r „lph, GM, c t . 4 3 Pucciarella, Vincent Ac, ME, Sept, 28 

1 Sinisi^. George Francis, CF,, S e pt. 28 

Withdrawals ; (Behrend Center) 

1 Andrae, John William, Mus.Ed., Sept . 9 1 Henry, Grover'C, CF, Oct a 7 

1 Close, Calvin Lucian, Ag,Ec, c t « 20 1 Keiper, John, ME, Sept* 30 

1 Denmark, Cyrus James, Psy, S e pt. 28 1 Kimmy, Vircel Roosevelt, AL, Oct, 5 

1 Terrill, Herman Allen, Ag Ed, Oct. 5 

Withdrawals * (DuBois Center) 

3 Brubaker, Robert Earl, ChE, c t . 3 1 Guyon, Alvin Lee, Agr, Oct » 26 
1 Clarke, William Francis, ChE, c t • 11 1 Webb, John R., Pra-Vot, Oct «, 18 

Withdrawals ; (ilarrisburg Center) 

1 Buckwalt er , Kenneth J., Meteor, Oct. 5 

Withdrawals : (Hazleton Center) 

1 Blackwell, Donald James, Jr., LA,O c t. 6 1 LaBraico, Florence V,, l"T,.0ct,.4 

1 Brown, George Charles, LA, Oct. 6 1 Mudrick, Donald L., PM, Oct. 5 

1 Coll, Charles William, CE, Oct, 10 1 Osborne, Ronald, Ag»Ed, Oct. 7 

1 DiSpirito, Carmen J, San.E, Oct. 22 Sp Reed, Oscar Franklin, c t , 5 
Unc. Fatsie, Eileen Maureen, Oct. 6 1 Revak, Pauline Anne, MT, G t . 4 

1 Stefanik, Thomas Joseph, Ed, S e pt. 9 

Withdrawals ; (Mont Alto Center) 
1 Winters, Robert Walter, PV, c t . 20 
Withdrawals ; (pottsville Center) 

3 Cook, James Thomas, CF , Oct. 6 1 Doranda, Edward John, AL, Oct. 7 

2 D e nshock, John Michael, CF , c t • 13 1 Scholes, Robert J hn,AL, S e pt. 23 

Reasons for withdrawals: Personal, 29; illness, 12; financial, 19; to accept em- 
ployment, 4; transfer to another school, 6; late registration, 2; inadequate pre- 
paration, 6; re— enter Army, 1; nurses's training, 1; unsatisfactory living accommo- 
dations, 1; marriage, 1; no reason given, 3» 



PERSONNEL CHANGES 

Following personnel chan'es during the period October 20, 1949 to November 1, 
1949 are announced. Telephone extension numbers are listed opposite names of new 
employee s , 

Appointment s ; 

130 Allen, Annie M», Stenographer, Central Extension . . 

Allison, M» Jean, Accounting Clerk, Central Extension 

App, Ruth E 9 , Stenographer, Central Extension 

Baxter, Ruth L», Stenographer, Central Extension 
90 Beaty, Harris William, Swimming Pool Attendant, physical Education & Athletic. 
310 Bonebreak, Max Ivan, Civil Engineer, physical Plant 
53J Bornholdt, John W», Research Assistant, Engineering Experiment Station 

Bowen, Robert C > Laboratory Technician, Physics 

Buckley, Isabel S » , Stenographer, Dairy Husbandry 
177 Crissman, Lottie, Library Clerk Assistant, College Library 
244 Eiland, Phillip Frank, Jr., Research Assistant, Physics 

Eminhizer, Donald W», Groundskeeper , Physical Plant 

Fishel, Max Allen, Maintenance Helper, Physical plant 
Forbes, Eliza, Maid, Housing 
280 Forsburg, Janet Co, Stenographer, Agronomy 
244 Frazer, Benjamin Chalmers, Research Assistant, Physics 

29 Gill, Maude A«, Clerk-typist, Housing 
128 Heinemann, Sally Jean, Clerk-typibt , College Placement 

Hosterman, Ardell W„, Maintenance Helper, Physical Plant 
244 Jarmotz, Paul, Laboratory Technician, physics 
208J Kearney, Regina, General Clerk, Housing 
130 Keim, Phyllis R , Still Photography Technician, Motion Picture Studio 

Kerstetter, Albert S „ , Maintenance Helper, Physical Plant 

Kerstetter, Melvin R , Maintenance Helper, physical plant ■ • 

Kuhn, William R., Maintenance Helper, Physical plant 
371J Kwang-Chi Tu^ Research Association, Earth Sciences 
244 Lehman, Dorothy Fo, Laboratory Technician, Physios 

Lipka, Gust, power Plant * Operato r, Physical plant 

Marshall, John M. , Janitor, Physical plant 

McCurdy, Margaret L., Stenographer, Central Extension 
480 McElwee, Horace Go, Painter, Housing 
207 McElwee, Norma, General Clerk, Housing 
493 Mencely, Marjorie P», Secretary, Engineering 
344 Mumford, M» Jean, Secretary, Admissions 
53J Passow, Robert L c , Research Assistant, Engineering Experiment Station 

Phillips, Herbert F., Maintenance Helper, physical plant 

Richardson, Devona E», Receptionist, Central Extension 
244 Roberts, William J», Research Assistant, Physics 
168 Sager, Eleanor, Clerk— Stenographer , Chemistry 

Sallustio, Elaine Fo, Clerk— typist , Central Extension 
394 Seibert, Bernice P., Stenographer, Education Placement 
372 Shively, Robert R», Research Assistant, Mineral Technology 

Simpson, James, Assistant, Physical Education 

Sittenfield, Marcus, Instructor, Central Extension 

Snyder, D a le M e , Maintenance Helper, Physical plant 

Snyder, James W«, Painter, Physical plant 
305 Snyder, Patricia L., Soda Dispenser, Student Union 
340 Thompson, Alice I«, Secretary, President's Office 

Vigorito, Joseph P,, Instructor, Central Extension 
77M Wilson, Sarah P., Stenographer, Military Science & Tactics 

Wyckoff, John H. Jr., Assistant Agricultural Representative, Agricultural Ext c 



90TJJO sua XIATO 



-J 



THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 



FACULTY 



The Bulletin is published weekly during the College 
year as a means of making official announcements 
and presenting items of interest to the faculty. All 




VOL? 7 



BULLETIN 



contributions should be as brief as possible and 
reach Louis H. Bell, Director of Public Information, 
313 Old Main, not later than 10 a. m. each Friday. 



November 14, 1949 



NO.8 



TRAVELING EXHIBITION OPENS IN HOME ECONOMIC! 



The Student Traveling Exhibition of 
the Cranbrook Academy of Art, Bloonfield 
Hills, Mich,, opened Thursday in the 
Hone Economics Building and will con- 
tinue until t he end of the month. 



The 



collection ihcludes examples of 



ceramics, sculpture, design, painting, 
metal craft, weaving, photography, and 
woodwork. 

The exhibit wa"s arranged by Chris- 
tine F, Salmon, assistant professor of 
housing and home art, who visited the 
Cranbrook Academy last summer,' 



CALENDAR COMMITTEE SEEKS SUGGESTIONS IN EXTENDING COLLEGE CALENDAR 



The S e nate Committee on Calendar will 
soon begin deliberations on extension of 
the College Calendar from August 31, 1951 
to the end of the summer program in 1952, 

The Committee will appreciate re- 
ceiving constructive suggestions from 



all interested members of the faculty 
and from administrative offices which 
have problems related to the calendar. 
Suggestions may be submitted to any 
member of the committee, of which E,W» 
Callenbach, professor of poultry hus- 
bandry, is chairman. 



REPORT OP THE SENATE COMMITTEE ON CALENDAR 



On November 4, 1948 the Committee on 
Calendar presented a tentative proposal 
for extension of the College Calendar to 
September 26, 1951. Subsequently, on 
November 8, a communication listing 13 
items affecting calendar development was 
nailed to each member of the Senate, On 
November 18 at. a apocial meeting of the 
S e nate, most items listed in the com- 
munication were discussed and the senti- 
ment of the Senate expressed. The minutes 
of the speic-. 1 meeting were published in 
the November 22, 1948 Faculty Bulletin, 

On the basis of action's taken by the 

Senate at the speaial meeting and after 

numerous personal interviews with inter— ; 

ested College personnel, a second and 

final report was presented to the Senate 



on December 2, 1948, 

Significant items in the December 2 
report, which was subsequently adopted, 
are : 

1, Amendments to the Senate By-Laws 
whereby : 



a» 



The College Scheduling Of£i-C$tf' 
d Director of Summer Sessions 



become ex— officio members 

• Committee on Calen— 



the S e nate 
dar , 



of 



b,'The date for reporting calen- 
dar extensions is changed 
from December to March* 

2, Effective with adoption of the 
report, extensions of the Col- 
lege Calendar shall be such. that 
two academic ye n .rs and three 
summer sessions are "on schedule" 
as of any June 1 , 

It should also be pointed out that a 
calendar pattern has been developed which, 
if followed 'hereafter, will permit 15 
class hours per course credit for every 
half -day in the week except Saturday 
morning, ..in the Fall Semester, The foot- 
ball half-holiday makes complete uniform- 
ity impossible. 

Finally, through a somewhat complex 
Sumner Program in 1950, the calendar as 
adopted provides for a change from almost 
continuous instruction to two well- 
organized semesters and a 12-weeks summer 
program. 

Respectfully submitted 
Senate Committee on Calen- 
dar 



May 5, 194 9 



E, U, Callenbach, Chairman 



.EDITOR'I 
issue* ) 



NOTE 



Copy of the current calendar is published on pages 5 m^sf /£t£ &&L ECTiO .N 



FORMS FOR APPLYING FOR FULBRIGHT SCHOLARSHIPS ABROAD NOW AVAILABLE 



Application forns for s cholar ship s 
for graduate study, research, and teach- 
ing in 19 countries abroad now nay he 
obtained at the office of the Fulbright 
program adviser, Robert E. Galbraith, 
Roor.i 109-A, Old Main. 

The deadline for submitting appli- 



cations is 5 p.m. on Wednesday, November 
30, 

Those submitting applications will 
be required to appear for interviews be- 
fore the College Senate Committee on 
Scholarships and Awards on December 7, 



OF GENERAL INTEREST 



AGRICULTURE FACULTY: There will be a 
meeting of the School of Agriculture 
faculty at 4:10 p.m, Thursday, November 
17, in Room 109, Agriculture Building. 

* * ♦ 

COURSES OF STUDY COMMITTEE: The Senate 
Cours.es of Study Committee will meet at 
10 a.m. on Tuesday, November 22, in Room 
207 Engineering "C". 

* * * 

CHAPEL: John Henry Frizzell, chaplain 
emeritus, will speak at the chapel serv- 
ices on Sunday, November 20, 

» * * 

CROSS COUNTRY: Tuesday, November 15, 
2;30 p.m., Hew York University; Monday, 
November 21, 4 p.m., Cornell, 

* * * 

LUNCHEON CLUB: D r . E. Willard Miller, 
professor and chief of the division of 
geography, will speak and show slides 
taken in Mexico during the past summer 
at the Faculty Luncheon Club on Monday, 
November 21. 

* * . 

HALF-HOLIDAY: The football Saturday half- 
holiday, authorized by the College Sen- 
ate for students, will be observed on 
Saturday, November 19. 



AIEE-IRE : Joseph Fisher, project engineer 
in the research division of the Philco 
Co., will address the sub-section of the 
American Institute of Electrical Engineers 
and the Institute of Radio Engineers at 
7;30 p,m, Tuesday, November 15, in Room 
219, Electrical Engineering Building, 
He will discuss "Field T e sts of UHF 
Television, " 

* * * 



SIGMA DELTA UPSILON: 
Schulz, research assi 
trition, will speak o 
Silicons" at the meet 
Upsilon at 5:30 p.m. 
15, in the Cafeteria 
Building, 

PS I CHI: Psi Chi, ho 
•fraternity, will meet 
Engineering Building, 



day, November 15, Fo 
meeting at 7:30 p.m., 
films will be shown. 



COMBINED ARTS 
Combined Arts 
220, Home Eco 



: A special meeting of the 
Group will .be held in Room 

nomics Building^at 7 ?30 p.m. 
Sunday, November 20. An interim organi- 
zation of the group Will be discussed. 



FILMS: Three 
coming of sou 
Dr a ma t i c s 61 
November 16, 
tory. They a 
"Steamboat Wi 
and "All CLuie 
.(1930). A li 
available for 



films to illustrate the 
nd will be shown for the 
class at 7 p.m. Wednesday, 
in Room 119, Osmond Labora— 
re a 1927 Movietone News; 
Hie" by Walt Disney (1928); 
t on the Western Front" 
mited number of seats are 

interested faculty members. 



Rose Anfaenger 
stant in human nu- 
n "Chemistry of 
ing of Sigma Delta 
Tuesday, November 
of the Hone Economics 

* * * 

norary psychology 
in Room 107, MS in 
at 7:30 p.m. Tues- 

llowing a business 
two psychological 



AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR METALS : George W. 
Jernstedt, manager of electroplating 
projects for We st inghouse Electric Corp., 
will address t lie Penn State chapter, 
American Society for Metals, at 8 p.m. 
Tuesday night, November 15_4n the -Mineral 
Industries Art Gallery. He will speak 
on "Electrodeposit ion." 



LITHOGRAPHIC FILM: A full-color sound 
film, telling a simplified story of the 
offset lithographic process of printing, 
will be shown under the sponsorship of 
Alpha Delta Sigma, professional adver- 
tising fraternity, at 4:15 p.m. Tuesday, 
November 15, in Room 10, Sparks Building. 

All interested are invited, 

* # * 

TO SPEAK: Kirby Page, social evangelist 
and author, will address a supper con- 
ference at 5':30 p.m. and deliver an address 
at 7;30 p.m. on Tuesday, November 15, at 
the University Baptist Church, The sub- 
ject for the 5;30 meeting, for which 
reservations should be made with Helen 
Striedick (Dial 4113), will be "Can 
Military Weapons Defend Us? and for the 
evening meeting, "What About Russia?" 

* * * 

CONFERENCE: The Fellowship of Recon- 
ciliation, an organization for religious 
pacifists, will sponsor a conference for 
Central Pennsylvania College students 
at Watts Lodge, November 18-20. Inter- 
ested persons should get in touch with 
the Christian Association, Main speaker 
will be Bayard Rustum, noted for his Gan* 
dhian tactics in race relations. 

* * * 



OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENT FROM THE OFFICE OF THE DEAN OF ADMISSIONS AND REGISTRAR 

WITHDRAWALS 

Campus 

\ .' 

3 Ba^er, Mirian Topora, HE, S e pt. 1 1 Thayer, Janes William-, LA, Oct. 4 
1 Bond, Ellen Louise, Psy, S e pt, 26 

8 Cooney, Larry Charles, PEd, Oct, 24 Mont Alto 

4 Fetter, Virginia A., LA, Nov. 5 

1 Heinle, Mary Ellen, Ed, S e pt, 28 1 Donnoyer, Janes Melvin, ME, Oct. 28 

Gr, Hess, Reuben Harvey, AgEc, Oct. 31 

3 Kuhn, Joyce L., DIR, c t , 28 Pottsville 

3 Lowry, Gerald L., WU, Oct. 31 

3 McDonnell, Aloysius J,, EE, Oct. 31 2 palles, Gus S., LA, Oct, 28 

7 Slavetto, Janes John, CF, Nov, 4 

5 Shiffert, J e rone Dale, ABCh, Nov, 7 State College 

1 Tuite, John T., Chen, Oct. 21 

1 Mecca, Franz B,, ME, Oct. 2 9 
Alt oona 

2 Pletcher, Marling Allen, CF , Oot . 19 Swart hr. ore 
1 Reekie, John Gale, CF , Oct. 24 

1 Carter, Edwin Charles, ME,'O c t. 13 

Behrend 1 Gulick, Richard Harley, PNG, Sept. 29 

1 Haddon, Gerard Vinoent^ME, Sept, 2 3 

1 Bookman, Gordon D,, GM, Nov. 4 1 Kernen, George Frederick, IE, S e pt.29 

1 Borkoski, Estelle C, CF , Sept. 23 1 Mazur, Allen, Psy, Sept. 29 

1 O l Donne 11, Joseph Edward, CF , Sept, 3 

Harrisburg 1 Paraskewik, William, ME, Oct, 21 

1 Riccio, Donald Charles, CF, S e pt. 29 

1 Kauffman, Donald E., Ed., Oct. 31 1 Schlenker, Paul Henry, AL, Oct. 3 

1 Sharitz, Raymond Harvey, MS, Oct. 21 

Ha z let on 1 .Skubin, William Robert, ME, Sept. 2 9 

1 Throcknorton, Charles W&ite, CE, 

3 Bauer, Albert L., ME, c t . 27 Sept. 29 

Reasons for withdrawing: Personal, 9; illness, 2; financial, 5j to accept 
eraploynent, 3j transfer to another school, 3; inadequate preparation, 4; narriage, 
1; change of curriculun, 1; uninterested, 1; never attended classes, 2; no reason 
given, 3, 

PERSONNEL CHANGES 

Following personnel changes are announoed, 

Re si£nat ions ; 

Bruch, Charles, A,, Research Assistant, Mineral Technology 

Crock, Dorothy It,, Secretary, Civil Engineering 

Daw sp n , Ma ry, Clerk, Adni s s i o n s 

DeVeas, Rachael F,, Clerk-typist, College Placement 

Dunkel, Kathryn R., Secretary, Central Extension 

Fetzer, Olive, Technical Labor, Aninal Husbandry 

Forbes, Eliza, Dining Hall Employee, Food Service 

Friedman, Louis, Research Assistant, Mineral Technology 

Haentze, Charles B., Instructor, Central Extension 

Harter, Alta, Bookkeeping Machine Operator, Accounting 

Hocking, Carolyn, Assistant Extension Representative, Agricultural Extension 

Kestner, LaZene D», Clerk— Stenographer, Chemistry 

Lightner, Mary Lou, Soda Dispenser, Student Union 

McBride, Betty L., Secretary, Ordnance Research Laboratory 

Metlay, Max, Instructor, Chemistry 

Meyer, Junior H., Mechanic, Physical plant 

Oldsey, Anne I., File Clerk, Admissions 

Rapchick, Edith L,, Extension Representative, Agricultural Extension 

Rittenhouse, Harriet H., Librarian, Ordnance 'Research Laboratory 

Sager, Eleanor, Clerk— Stenographer , Chemistry 

Sa'yer, Patricia J., Secretary, Engineering 

Sherk, Nancy II., Extension Representative, Agri-cultural Extension 

Snyder, Peggy F,> Stenographer, Central Extension 

Stewart, Mae F,, Clerk-typist, Central Extension 

Wahl, Ethel, Secretary, Admissions 

Weaver, L e ster M., Plumber's Helper, Physical plant 



BELOW GR DES ON STUDENTS IN TRANSITION SECTION TO BE REPORTED TO DEAN OF MEN, DEAN 

OF WOMEN 

The following students are in Transition Section for the 1st semester, 1949-50. 
Below grades, which are due on November 22, should be sent to the Dean of Men for 
men students and to the Dean of Women for women students. 

MEN 



Adams, Charles Francis 
Adelman, Andrew 
Alanpi, Daniel Paul 
Attig, James Edwin 
Baldwin, Lewis Thatcher 
Ballot s , Paul 
Bartels, Robert Eugene 
Bennett, William Edgar 
Benning, Stanley 0. 
Binkley,' Robert Harold 
Blachewicz, Allen. 
Bogan, Robert William 
Bossart, Paul N. 
B owma n, Dean D • 
Bowser, Robert Allen 
■ Burke, Edward J, 
Bush, Harold Merle 
Butterw ick, Gilbert N. 
Caputo, Daniel Gabriel 
Carley, Peter King 
Chrietock, George C. 
Clark, Frederick T. 
Clark, William E« 
Coder, Ronald T, 
Colvin, Clarence Olen 
Coyle, Lionel Robert 
Cramer, Roger William 
Crandall, John Richard 
Davidson, A« Dean 
Davis, Wesley Butler 
Dillon, Philip John 
DiMarino, Joseph Nicholas 
DuBois, Robert Hadley 
Dunn, Richard C. 
Eckman, Raymond William 
Elder, Robert L, 
Erbe, William Martin 
Espey, Carl R, 
Evans, Edward Ott 
Fink, James Graham 
Friedman, Leonard M. 
Gery, William Anthony 
Getz, Gerald 
Glenn, Alvin I, 
Gochnour, Robert Lee 
Godber, James Leo 
Goldstein, Lawrence J. 
Gonter, John R. 
Gransback, Harry Herbert 
Guido, Robert G, 
Handwerk, Robert H. 
Hanna, Thomas Alvin 
Harrison, David C. 



Allgood, Elizabeth Carr 
Alt land, Nancy Ann 
Biernbaum # Joanne 
Black, Betty J e an 
Boerlin, paully 
Brown, Sony a L e ona 
Cleary, Janet Abbey 
C off nan, Barbara Ann 



Hickey, William Henry 
Hoskins, Francis Benjamin 
Houston, Harry Allen 
Ivanoski, Leonard Anthony 
Johnson, Chandois Hupert 
Jones, William Thomas 
Kadoich, ?7illiam Louis 
K e lchner, George 
Kennedy, John S. 
Kerstctcr, Ammon W« 
Kerwick, Joseph E dwa r d 
Kilgorc, James Clarkson 
Kolbe, Theodore Earl 
Kreidler, Robert Daniel 
Kukol, George William 
Kunts, Edward John 
Landis, Thomas Moyer 
Laskowski, Henry Francis 
Law, Richard Elmo 
LeMon, Lazarus 
Leonard, Joseph William 
Livingston, Dick E. 
Long, Robert J, 
Makovsky, Edward Stanley 
Maleolm, Robert Cameron 
Malinchok, Paul 
Manetti, Howard Julian 
Martin, Brice Eugene 
Mays, Richard Ray 
McArdle, H c nry Donald 
McClellan, Willis Lee 
McGrellis, James Raymond 
Me dl in sky, Walter Anthony 
Messner, George A. 
Miller, George Robert 
Mitchell, David R. 
Mitchell, Harry Sherman 
Mittica, Rocco C. 
Morgan, Robert. Pierce 
Myers, Ted Ash 
Naginey, Charles Howard 
Nemeroff, Milton A. 
New, Alan Edward 
Olzinski, John Joseph 
Panoplos, Theodore Samuel 
Patterson, David Harvey 
patton, Gilbert Reeder 
Peterson, William T. 
Phillips, Gifford B. 
Pierce, Marlyn Junior 
Pispeky^ Mahlon 
Podrazik, Joseph Edward 
pokorny, F r ank J. 

WOMEN 

Freeman, Florence A, 
Graziano, Joan Edwards 
Hanna, Sarah E. 
Hanry, Nancy Lou 
H e lpgod, Elvira 
Hines, Bettie 
Levin, Mimi 
May, Harriett C. 



Porter, John Miles 
Pratt, Henry Robert 
Rial, John Zundel 
Richards, Howard Clayton 
Rbgers, William Orville 
Rosenberg, J c rome W» 
Rowlands, Warren Lee 
Ruane, Ralph Xavier 
Ruff, Edward Steelman 
Sassman, Bernard Eugene 
Sohooley, Robert Grier 
Schwartz, Stanley Morton 
Scopel, Walter John 
Seely, Charles Blanchard 
Sell, Eugene Henry 
Sever, John Robert 
Shannon, -Lee Howard 
Shelly, .Edgar Warren 
Shivery, George Burton 
Shore, Jack J, 
Sinon, Richard Bernard 
Smiley, James Sisley 
Smith, Ivan Keith 
Swart z, Karl Albert 
Taylor, Elmer Dale 
Taylor, William Raymond 
Thomas, David Aylmer 
Tolley, David Alex 
Tomb, Gerald Ba^nhart 
Torchitti, R. Joseph 
Treni, H e nry Louis 
Uhron, Robert James 
VanAlst, Earle Rioberd 
Veneskey, Chester Joseph 
Villforth, John Carl 
Vlasek, Fred 
Vogel, William Leader 
Vosel, Donald Marvin 
Vrona, Peter 
Waine, Charles Richard 
Waters, William R. 
Wat son, John 
Weaver, Alvin LaVerne 
W e aver, Howard Torrence 
Wenger, Robert 
Whitman, Robert B. 
Williams, Charles Kenneth 
Williams ,. Donald Wayne 
Williams, John Vernoy 
Wise, Fred Wesley 
Wood, Robert A. 
Yackley, William H. 
Yon, K e nneth William 



Miller, J anne A* 
Pfieffer, Patricia E# 
Ricciuti, Jean Ann 
Siegel,'. Annjeannette 
Simes,' Marilyn J'» 
Smith, Evelyn 
Sukoff, Georgiana ' 
Yoh, Barbara 



COLLEGE CALENDAR 



T u es. 



19^9 

S e pt. 21, Wed 
Sept. 26-27, Mon. 
Sept. 28, Wed. 
Nov. 22, Tues. 
Nov. 23, Wed. 
Nov . 28 , Mon . . 
Dec. 20, Tues. 

1950 

Jan . k , Wed . 
Jan. k, Wed. 
Jan. 28, Sat. 
Jan. 30, Mon. 
Feb. 7, Tues. 
Feb. 7, Tues. 



Feb. 10-11, Fri. & Sat. 

Feb. 13, Mon. 

Feb. 28, T u es. 

April k, Tues. 

April 11, Tues. 

April 13, Thurs. 

May 30, Tues. 

June 1, Thurs. 

June 2, Fri. 

June DO, Sat. 

June 11, Sun. 

June 12, Mon. 



September 21, 19^9 to August 31, 1951 

Fir3t Semester 19*+9-50 



June 13, Tues. 
June 13, Tuea. 



June 


30, 


Fri. 


July 


^ 


Tues. 


July 


5, 


Wed. 


July 


6, 


Thurs 


July 


22, 


Sat. 


July 


22, 


Sat. 


July 


2k, 


Mon. 


Aug. 


11, 


Fri. 


Aug, 


12, 


Sat. 


Aug. 


I*, 


Mon. 


Aug. 


1^ 


Mon. 


Sept 


■ 2, 


Sat. 



Sept. 2, Sat. 



Orientation Week begins 
First Semester Registration 
■**First Semester classes begin 8 a.m. 
Mid -Semester below grade reports due 
Thanksgiving Recess begins 11:50 a.m. 
Thanksgiving Recess ends 8 a.m. 
Christmas Recess begins 5 p.m. 



Christmas Recess ends 1:10 p.m. 

Short Courses in Agriculture begin 1:10 p.m. 

First Semester classes end 5 p.m. 

First Semester examinations begin 8 a.m. 

First Semester ends 5 p.m. 

First Semester Graduation Exercises 

Second Semester 19^9-50 , 

Second Semester registration 

Second Semester classes begin 

Short Courses in Agriculture end 

Spring Recess begins 5 p.m. 

Spring Recess ends 8 a.m. 

Mid -Semester below grade reports due 

Memorial Day Recess 

Second Semester classes end 5 p.m. 

Second Semester examinations begin 8 a.m. 

Second semester ends 5 p.m. 

Baccalaureate Day, Class Day 

Commencement Day 

Summer Program 1950 

Registration for Inter -Session and First 6-weeks 
Science Session in a.m. 

Inter -Session and First 6-weeks Science Session 
Classes begin 1:20 p.m. 
Inter-Session end 5:50 p.m. 
Independence Day Reoess 
Registration for Main Summer Session 
Main Summer Session classes begin 8 a.m. 
First 6-weeks Science Session ends 5 : 50 p.m. 
Registration for Second 6-woeko Science Session 
Second- 6-weeks Science Session classes begin 8 a.m. 
Main Summer Session ends 5 : 50 p.m. 
Main Summer Session Graduation Exercises 
Registration for 3 -weeks Post-Session in a.m. 
3 -weeks Post-Session classes begin 1:20 p.m. 
Second 6-weeks Science Session and 3~ wee ks Post- 
Session ends 5 : 50 p.m. 
Second Summer Program Graduation Exercises 






**First Semester -- One football Saturday half holiday by student selection. 



1950 



First Semester 1950 -5 1 



Sept. 13, Wed. 

Sept. 18-19, Mon. & Tues 

Sept. 20, Wed. 

Eov. Ik, Tuea. 

Nov. 29, Wed. 

Dec. k, Mon. 

Dec. 19, Tuea. 

1951 

Jan. 3, Wed, 
Jan. 3, Wed. 
Jan. 18, Thurs. 
Jan. 19, Fri. 
Jan. 27, Sat. 
Jan. 27, Sat. 



Orientation Weak begins 
Firat Semester Registration 
**First Semester claases "begin 8 a.m. 
Mid -Semester below grade reports due 
Thanksgiving Recess begins 11:50 a.m. 
Thanksgiving Recess ends 8 a.m.. 
Christmas Recess begins 5 p.m. 



Christmas Recess ends 1:10 p.m. 

Short Courses in Agriculture begin 1:10 p.m. 

First Semester classo3 end 5 p.m. 

First S e mester examinations begin 8 a.m. 

First Semester ends 5 p.m. 

First Semester Graduation Exercises. 



Feb. 6-7, Tues. and Wed. 

Feb. 8, Thurs. 

F e b. 27, Tues. 

Mar. 21, Wed. 

Mar. 28, Wed. 

April 10, Tues. 

May 29, Tuea. 

May 30, Wed. 

May 31, Thurs. 

June 8, Fri. 

June 10, Sun. 

June 11, Mon. 



Second Semoater 1950-51 

Second Sumeater registration 

Second Semester clasaea begin 

Short Course a in Agriculture end 

Spring Recesa begins 5 p.m. 

Spring Recesa ends 8 a.m. 

Mid -Semester below grade reports due 

Second Semester classes end 5 p.m. 

Memorial Day Recess 

Second Semester examinationa begin 8 a.m. 

Second Semeater enda 5 p.m. 

Baccalaureate Day, Claas Day 

Commencement Day 

Summer Program 1951 

Registration for Inter-Session in a.m. 

Inter-Session classes begin 1:20 p.m. 

Inter-Session ends 

Regiatration for Main Summer Seaaion 

Main Summer Session classes begin 8 a.m. 

Independence Day Recesa 

Main Summer Seaaion ends 5*50 p.m. 

Main Summer Session Graduation Exercises 

Registration for Post-Session in a.m. 

Post-Session classes begin 1:20 p.m. 

Post-Session ends 5 : 50 p.m. 

**Flrat Semester • — One football Saturday half holiday by student selection, 



June 12, 


Tues. 


June 12, 


Tuea. 


June 29, 


Fri. 


July 2, 


Mon. 


July 3, 


Tuee. 


July k, 


Wed. 


Aug. 10, 


Fri. 


Aug. 11, 


Sat. 


Aug. 13, 


Mon. 


Aug. 13, 


Mon. 


Aug. 31, 


Fri. 









C ^ 



THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 



FACULTY 



The Bulletin is published weekly during the College 
year as a means of making official announcements 
and presenting items of interest to the faculty. All 




BULLETIN 



contributions should be as brief as possible and 
reach Louis H. Bell, Director of Public Information, 
313 Old Main, not later than 10 a. m. each Friday. 



VOL. 



37 



November 21, 1949 



NO. g 



STUDENT THANKSGIVING RECESS BEGINS WEDNESDAY NOON 



Classes will be suspended for the 
Thanksgiving recess which begins at 
11:50 a.m. Wednesday, Nov. 23 and con- 
tinues until 8 a.m. Monday* 

Offices will be closed on Thurs- 
day, Nov. 24. 

In a letter to administrative offi- 
cers last week, Janes Milholland, acting 
president of the College, also announced 
that offices, except those, which should 



be open for the convenience of the 
public, may be closed from 5 p.m. Thurs- 
day, Dec, 22 to 8 a.m. Wednesday* Dec, 



for Christmas, Monday, Jan. 



2, will 



be observed as the New Year holiday 
and offices will be closed. 

The Library will observe the fol« 

.ng hours: Wednesday, Nov. 23, 

i a . n . +. n "S -n- 1'->-» Thti y R rl A v . clOSedj 



X lie XjX P I fcix y W X X X UUBUJ. VO OUC X V J- — 

lowing hours: Wednesday, Nov. 23, 
7:50 a.m. to 5 p.m.j Thursday, closed; 
Friday and Saturday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.j 
and Sunday', Nov, 27, closed. 



DR. HAROLD C, URSY , CHEMIST, TO SPEAK HERE DECEMBER 1 



Dr, Harold C, Urry, noted chemist 
and Nobel prize winn r, will speak here 
on Thursday, December 1, 

Sponsored by the Community Forum 
in co-operation with the department of 
physics, Dr» Urey will present a popu- 
lar lecture at 8 p.m. in Schwab Audi- 
torium, There will be no admission 
charge • 

At 4:15 p.m., D r . Urey will present 
a technical lecture before the Physics 
Colloquium in Room 117, Osmond Labora- 
tory, 

Dr. Urey has specialized in the ' 
study of the structure of atoms and 
molecules, thermodynamic properties of 
gases, and the separation of Isotopes. 
He discovered the hydrogen atom of weight 
two and conducted research for the pro- 
duction of heavy water and U235 leading 
to the development of the atomic bomb. 

In addition to announcing the Com- 
munity Forum lecture by Dr. Urey, Ralph 
W, McComb, chairman of the Forum series, 
announced that Styles Bridges, U. S. 



Senator from New Hampshire, and Dr » 
Ira DeA, Reid, noted sociologist, have 
been added to the Forum program. 

Senator Bridges will speak on 
February 2 3 on "Are We Edging into 
Snoialien" while Dr. Reid will speak 
on March 30 on "The American Race 
System* Democracy's Dilemma." 

The final number of the series has 
not been determined as yet, Eugene M. 
Fulr.er, chairman of the program com- 
mittee, explained. 



Tickets for th 
lectures, which op 
Baldwin, military 
7, and includes Ca 
ary 11, are priced 
tax. They will go 
23 at Student Unio 
Commerce Club, and 
Supervising Princi 
public Schools, R 
sponsoring organiz 
handle tickets, Jo 
man. explained. 



e series of five 
ens with Hanson W. 
analyst, on December 
rl Sandburg on Janu— 

at $3, including 

on sale on November 
n, the Library, 

the Office of the 
pal, State College 
epre sent at ivc s of 
ations also will 

Hays, ticket chair— 



STUDENTS CONDUCT POLL TO DETERMINE OPINION ON, A CAMPUS CHEST 



The local chapter of the National 
Student Association is conducting a 
poll among faculty and students to de- 
termine their opinion on conducting* a 
campus chest, one drive for funds which 
WOTXld rwplaoe several drives held each 
year. < 



Information concerning the plan 
has been distributed through adminis- 
trative offices. Faculty are requested 
to express their opinions and return 
the ballot to Mary Fox, chairman of 
the survey, at Student Union Office, 
Old Main, 



PENN 



OF GENERAL INTEREST 



COURSES OF STUDY: The Senate Courses of 
Study Connittee will neet at 10 a,m, on 
Tuesday, N v. 22, in Room 207, Engi* 
neering "C" , 

* ** 

NO CHAPEL: Because of the Thanksgiving 
recess, there will be no chapel services 
on Sunday, Nov» 27, 

* « * 

AAUP : Off— campus undergraduate instruc- 
tion will be discussed by a panel at 
the Arierican Association of University 
professors Meeting at 7;30 p«n. on 
Wednesday, Nov. 30, in Room 121, Sparks 
Building, Dr« Kent Forster, associate 
professor of history, will be Moderator, 
Panel members will be A, 0. Morse, 
assistant to the President in charge of 
Resident Instruction; J, 0« Keller, 
assistant to the President in charge of 
Extension; William H. Powers, director 
of arts and science extension; and Ger- 
hard E, Ehmann, associate professor of 
e due at ion, 

* * * 

LUNCHEON: . Royal M, Gerhardt , dean of 
admissions, will address the Faculty 
Luncheon Club on Monday, Nov, 2 8, speak- 
ing on the subject: "The Inside Look," 

* * • 

HONOR SOCIETIES: Faculty advisors of 
honor societies that do not belong to 
the Honor Society Council are asked to 
contact the secretary, Nora E, Wittman,, 
225 Sparks Bldg. (ext, 150 'J to get a 
copy of the constitution and by-laws 
of the Council, The Council will meet 
at 4:10 p.M, on Thursday, Dec, 8, in 
Room 203, Electrical Engineering Build- 
ing, One representative from each honor 
society is expected to attend the Meet- 
ing. 

» * * 

FIVE O'CLOCK THEATRE: The Five O'clock 
Theatre will present in the Little 
Theatre, Old Main, at ,5 p.M, on Tuesday, 
Nov, 22, the play, "The End of the 
Beginning" by Bruce Catt, There is no 
admission charge, • 

* * * 

CENTER STAGE: "Kind Lady," a psychologi- 
cal melodrama from a story by Hugh Wal— 
pole, will open at Center Stage on Fri- 
day and Saturday, Nov, 25 and 26, Tick- 
ets are on sale at Student Union, 

* « * 

HONORED: John F, Friese, professor of 
industrial arts education, was named a 
"Leader in Industrial Education" at 
the Industrial Arts Conference of the 
Mississippi Valley in Chicago, 111, He 
is on?, of 17 American educators to be 
so honored, one of the 17 having been 
the late Dr , F, Theodore Struck, former 
professor and head of the department of 
industrial education, 

* * • 

SEMINAR: Dr« John M, Anderson, a s soc iate 
professor of philosophy, will address 
the Bhxlo ooj^hy Seminar at 2 p,m, Tuesday 
Nov, 22, in Room 19, Sparks Building, on 



the subject: "Romanticism, Science, and 
the Latter— Day Barbarism in Late 19th 
Century America," 

» * » 

FILM AVAILABLE : The f ilm, "Designing 
Women," an amusing treatment of inter- 
ior decoration and home furnishing 
problems, will be available for screen- 
ing at the Audio— Visual Aids Library 
on Tuesday, Nov, 22, Interested faculty 
members may arrange to see the film 
by calling extension 176, 
» * * 

VISITORS: Two women from Germany, in- 
terested in education in this country, 
last week were visitors to the Schools 
of Education and the Liberal Arts and 
the College Library, They were Eva 
Hollweg and Louise Spennhoff, both 
engaged in education work in Berlin, 
1 * * * , 

FACULTY BULLETIN MAILING LIST: De- 
partments receiving copies of the 
Faculty Bulletin addressed to staff 
members no longer with the department , 
or duplicate copies for one staff 
member, are requested to notify the 
Department of Public Information (ext, 
184) so that necessary corrections can 
b e ma d e , 

* + * 

BOOK PUBLISHED: The McGraw-Hill Book 
Co, has announced the publication of 
"Numerical Analysis' 6f Pleat Flow" by 
George M, Dusinberre, professor of 
Mechanical engineering, 

* * * 

SPEAKS; Dr. Grace M, Henderson, dean 
of the School of Hone Economics, - 
addressed the New J e rsey Home Economics 
Association at Atlantic City, N, J,, on 
"Implementing Education for Home and 
Family Living," 

+ * * 

PRESENTS PAPER: Dr. Hans Neuberger, 
professor and chief of the division 
of meteorology, presented a paper be«» 
fore the National Air pollution sym— 
posiuM in Los Angeles, Calif, The paper 
was titled, "Experimental Study of the 
Effect of Air pollution on the Persist- 
ence of Fog;" 

* * * 

SPF.'KS: Dr, William H. Gray, professor 
of Latin- American history, recently 
addressed the Peruvian Historial Society 
at Lima, Peru, He is travelling in 
Lat in- American countries, 

* * * 

SPEAKS; William J, Reagan, associate 
professor of metallurgy, on Thursday 
addressed the Cant on— Ma ssillion chapter, 
American Society of Metals, in C a nton, 
0,, on "Modern Developments in Steel 
Making, 

* * * 

COMPLETES TOUR: Dr. W. Conard F e rnelius, 
head of the department of chemistry, has 
returned from a trip during which he 
spoke to 11 lroal sections of theAmsrcan 
Chemical Society in Louisiana, Texas, 
and New M e xico # 



ANNUAL REPORT OF . THE SENATE REPRESENTATIVE ON BOARD OF STUDENT PUBLICATIONS 



With one except ion, . student publi- 
cations should be complimented this year 
for their financial end editorial achieve' 
Dents; Skyrocketing printing costs were 



in most cases admirably taken care of by 
substantial increases in circulation aril 

advertising revenue 



Editorial content 
revealed only infrequent examples of 
injudicious, immature statements, and 
generally speaking it reflected the 
serious effort of the various staffs in 
its improved coverage, editing, and make- 
up. 

The Perm State Engineer this year 
was directed by a student editor, George 
F P Bearer of Pittsburgh, whom the ad- 
visers and campus friends of the publi- 
cation, believed to have been one of the 
most capable in recent year s t Outstanding 
e^ioial articles of general interest to 
all engineering students were emphasized. 
The fact that there was a minimum of 
letters of critical comment from read- 
ers, and that both advertising and circu- 
lation income climbed throughout the year 
indicates that supervision and management 
were on a high plane. 



The Bre 
of the studc 
culture dur 
publicat ion 
The Farmer, 
dent magazi 
ma n to be a 
summer will 
the Farmer 
to uphold, 
doubt renew 
former mag a 



eze , a- t emp 
nt s of the 
ing the war 

as a . p r i nt 

the pre— wa 
no , will be 
dded to the 

serve as a 
has a tradi 
ne xt year's 

its effort 
zine's stan 



orary publication 
School of Agri- 
years, will cease 
ed paper next Fall* 
r agricultural stu— 
revived, A new 
school staff this 
dviser* Because 
tional excellence 

staff will no 
s to ma i nt a i n the 
dards. 



Froth has made a small profit from 
the year's activities, and has avoided 
in the main the improprieties of mis- 
directed humor 6 Although the circulation 
this year reached a post-war high of 
2800 copies for one issue, the- next year's 
business staff is. convinced t hat • by the 
use of more efficient sales technique, 
a substantial increase may be possible* 

The erring orphan is Critique, alias 
Portfolio,, alias Old Main Bell. It is 
threatened with immediate burial under an 
avalanche of .$1000, debt, pyramided over a 
period of interesting but unsuccessful 
years. To be or not to be is still, un- 
fortunately, a major question.- The pa- 
tient showed, some signs of life earlier 
in the year when it raised $177 in sub- 
scriptions. From this it published one 
edition, and promised to refund remaining 
revenue to the subscribers. An investi- 
gation by the interested is being launched 
to determine what can be done. 

The Daily Collegian, the students' 
most ambitious publication effort on the 
campus, has managed to keep receipts a— 
bovc expenditures despite advancing costs, June 6, 1949 



Although it is impossible to obtain a 
complete .financial picture of its 
business activities until the close of 
the summer, estimates on outstanding 
national and local advertising bills 
still due would indicate a small but 
satisfactory surplus for the year's 
operation,, 

There, is-, still considerable room 
for improvement in Collegian campus news 
coverage, photography, distribution of 
the paper especially to faculty sub- 
scribers, the efficient collection of 
advertising accounts, and staff organ- 
ization. The newly-elected staff., which 
has held office during the past monlh^ 
has already rcvelaed an eagerness xo 
make these and other improvement s e Be- 
cause some of the difficulties, however, 
lie in adequacy of equipment ti their 
problems can not be expected to be fully 
solved until plans for a student pi ess, 
photo equipment, etc>, materialize^ 
Senior class gifts totaling approximately 
$15,000 for a student press,, accepted 
by the College Board of Trustees, bring 
their plans a step nearer realization. 

The La Vie, because of the large 
amount of art wurk, including line draw- 
ings' and half tones, has been more 
seriously affected by rising costs than 
other publications. It was necessary 
to increase the student assessment this 
year from $10 to $12 to be distributed 
over a three— year period. The increased 
revenue will be adequate to keep the 
organization solvent. The content for 
next year is being improved by placing 
greater emphasis upon informality of 
drawings and. less- on formal building 
photographs. 



What i.s perhaps the most character- 
istic feature of Penn State student 
journalism is its independence and com- 
parative freedom from the dictates of 
faculty advisers, or college administra- 
tors. The question whether there should 
be more school control and perhaps fewer 
embarrassing errors, or less school con- 
trol and a consequent greater responsi- 
bility placed squarely oft the shoulders 
of youth, has long been discussed. It 
is the opinion of your representative 
that our community places the building 
of character in youth a'bbve the easing 
of academic pain from occasional e 
editorial gibes or indiscretions. 



Respectfully submitted, 



Franklin Banner, 
Repre sent at ive 



; 



DAIRY CATTLE BREEDING RESEARCH CENTER DEDICATED 



The Dairy Cattle Breeding Research 
Center was dedicated Friday afternoon 
and a two— day Open House program follow- 
ed the dedication. 

The C e nter, which was built with a 
State appropriation of $95,000, was 
equipped through grants, totalling 
$34,500, from the five central artificial 
breeding co-operatives in the State, 

Speakers at the dedication included 
James Milholland, acting president of 
the College; Dr« Lyman E, Jackson, dean 
of the School of Agriculture; Dr. F, F, 
Lininr r cr, director of the agricultural 



Experiment Station; J, M* Fry* di- 
rector of the Agricultural Extension 
Service; Dr, D, V, Josephson, head' of 
the department of dairy husbandry; 
Albert Madigan, of Towr.nda, president 
of the State Association of Breeding 
Co— operat ive s , and J, L, Williams, 
of Uniontown, chairman of the research 
committee of the Association, 

Following the dedication, Dr« John 
0, Alnquist, associate professor of 
dairy husbandry who will be in charge 
of the center, conducted the guests 
on a tour of the center. 



oAr/Uuo EwkOLLMENT CF VETERANS TOTALS 5073 



Veterans enrolled on the campus for 
the current semester number 5073. This 
oompares to 5597 a year ago, which was 
the largest number of veterans enrolled 

hero. 

The largest percentage of veterans 



was enrolled "two years ago when the 
5362 former servicemen made up 63,8 
per cent of the student body* This 
year, 46 per cent of the students on 
campus are veterans and last year the 
figure was 57,1 per cent. 



65 STUDENTS FROM FOREIGN COUNTRIES ENROLLED 



Sixty— five students fjfin foreign 
countries are enrolled at the College 
this semester. 

China heads the list with 22 while 
Canada has 9 students. Other countries 
represented are; Bolivia, 5; India, 5; 




3 

3 

5 

5 

Gr 

6 - 

1 

1 

Gr 

5 

Sp 

1 

3 



OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENT FROM i'HE DEAi\ OF ADMISSIONS AND REGISTRAR 

WITHDRAWALS 



Campu s 

Charles, Earle V., Bact., Nov, 15 
Clair, Gerald F., AH, Oct. 14 
Home, Lyle Rowald, EE, Nov. 14 
Kelce, Matthew Eli, PM, Nov. 8 
Kramer, Robert W», ABCh,, Nov, 12 
McHugh, Annette S,, AL, Nov. 1 
Metzgcr, Barbara, HE, Sept, 28 
Moskowitz, Cleo, HE, Sept, 30 
Ratnam, Subba, FT, Nov, 11 
Sharpe, Stanley Joseph, M'et, Nov. 14 
Sheehe, John Charles PEd, Oct. 29 
Silbcr, Rosalie S,, AL, Sept. 26 
Stein, Leonard A., CF, N v. 8 
Ulrich, John E,, CF, Nov, 5. 



3 Vail, William Eugene, EE, Nov, 14 
7 Wadlinger, Henry Edward, Jour, Nov, 

10 
5 Werts, Raymond M, , HA, Oct, 28 

Behrend 

1 Baldauf, Mary Barbara, HE,, Nov, 8 
1 Henry, Grover C,, CF, Sept, 28 

pott sville 

1 F-iliziani, Louis Peter, CF , Nov, 10 

Swart hmore 
1 Oranuk, Koler M., PV, Oct, 3 
1 Riff, Harold, PM, Nov, 4 



Reasons given for withdrawing; Personal, 8j illness, 4} financial, 3; to 
accept employment, 2; transfer to another school, 5. 






THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 



FACULTY 




BULLETIN 



The Bulletin is published weekly during the College contributions should be as brief as possible and 

year as a means of making official announcements reach Louis H. Bell. Director of Public Information, 

and presenting items of interest to the faculty. All 313 Old Main, not later than 10 a. m. each Friday. 

37 November 28, 15^9 10 

VOL. NO. 



DR. HAROLD C. UREY TO PRESENT TWO LECTURES HERE ON THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1 



Dr. Harold C. Urey, noted chemist and 
Nobel prize winner who played a major role 
in the development cf the atomic bomb, 
will present two lectures here on Thurs- 
day, December 1. 

At U:15 p.m., Dr. Urey will address 
the Physics Colloquium in Room 119, Osmond 
Laboratory, on "Origin of the Earth." 

Speaking in Schwab Auditorium at 
8 p.m., Dr. Urey will discuss "The Gase 
for Atlantic Union." The talk, for which 



there will be no admission charge, 
will be sponsored l»y the State College 
Community Forum in co-operation with 
the department of physics. 

In connection with Dr. Urey's 
talks, as well a3 the Community Forum 
speech on "Security in an Atomic Age" 
by Hanson W. Baldwin on December 7, a n 
exhibit on atomic energy has been 
arranged at the College Library and 
will continue until next week. 



AAUP SPONSORS PANEL ON OFF -CAMPUS UNDERGRADUATE INSTRUCTION 



Off -campus undergraduate instruction 
will be discussed at the meeting of the 
American Association of University Pro- 
fessors at 7« 30 p.m. Wednesday, November 
30, in Room 121, Sparks Building. 

Dr. Kent Forster, associate pro- 
fessor of history, will serve as moder- 
ator for the panel. 

A. 0. Morse, assistant to the Presi- 
dent, in charge of Resident Instruction, 



will speak on "Future Policy Regarding 
Freshmen" while J. 0. Keller, assistant 
to the President, in charge of Ex- 
tension, will speak on "The Place of 
Undergraduate Centers in Penn State 
Instruction ." 



William H. Powers, director of arts 
and science extension, will talk on 
"Quality of Instruction in Centers" 
and Gerhard E. Ehmann, associate pro- 
fessor of education, will discuss 
"Community Colleges in California." 



SEASON TICKETS FOR COMMUNITY FORUM SERIES NOW ON SALE 



Season tickets for the 19^9-50 Com- 
munity Forum Series now are on sale. 

Priced at $3.00, they may be pur* 
chased at Student Union Office, .101 
Library, Commerce Club, or at the Office 
of the Supervising Principal, State 
College Public Schools. Representatives 
of organizations sponsoring the Forum 
also are selling tickets. 

Jo Hays, chairman of the ticket com- 
mittee, explained that the tiokets now on 
sale will be exchanged on Monday, Decern - 



5, for tickets for reserved seats. 



ber 

The preliminary sale will help prevent 
standing in line for tickets, as has 
happened in past years when the re- 
served seat sales were held. 

The pr'ogram this year includes 
Hanson W. Baldwin,, military analyst, 
December 7J Carl Sandburg, author and 
poet, Janurary 11; Styles Bridges, U. 
S. Senator from New Hampshire, Febru- 
ary 23; and Ira DeA. Reid, noted 
sociologist, March 30. The number for 
April will be announced later. 



REPORT OF THE SENATE COMMITTEE ON STUDENT WELFARE, 1*48-49 



During the past year the Senate Com- 
mittee on Student Welfare authorized the 
following additions to and changes in 
student organisations; 

Keramos, Nittany Grotto, The Greek 
Catholic Orthodox Club, The National 
Association for the Advancement of Col- 
ored People, The Seoandary Education 
Association, The Philosophy Club, The 
History Round Table, Alpha Kappa Delta, 
The Hellenic Society, The Psychological 
Society, Intercollegiate Conference on 
Government, Chemical Engineering So-, 
ciety, The Sociology Club, Junior Hotel 
Men of America and the Sttident Chapter 
of the Society of American Military 
Engine ..rs re— act ivat ed» 

A local social fraternity, Sigma 
Alpha, Was granted permission to accept 
a charter from the national fraternity 
of Sigma Alpha Mu , 

After routine business in the March 



meeting of the Committee, there was a 
general discussion of current con- 
ditions. Ho evidence of organised sub- 
versive activities was found on the 
campus. Fraternity conditions seemed 
to have improved somewhat, and frater- 
nity scholarship averages were reported 
to be highest among large colleges and 
universities in the nation. Men's 
dormitory morale had improved with in- 
creased recreational facilities pro- 
vided. Women's activities were re- 
ported to be good. Student health 
during the year was exceptionally good. 
The planning f or a Student Union Build- 
ing met with Committee approval. During 
the ye"r the Committee has had able 
co-operation from its student members. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Seth W« R u s sel, 'Chairman, 
Senate Committee on Student Uelfare 

A. R» Warnock, Secretary, 
Senate Committee on Student Welfare 
June 2, 1949 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE SENATE COMMITTEE OF ACADEMIC STANDARDS, 1948-49 



F o 1 1 owi n g is a summary of the business 
(32 meetings) of the Committee on Aca- 
demic Standards during the past academic 

year . 

Student Case s 

Alt Qg ether 171 student cases were con- 
sidered. Of these 113 were petitions for 
reinstatement after dismissal f.or scho- 
lastic deficiencies,— of which 78 were 
approved, 2 9 were denied, 6 are held in 
abeyance . 

Recommendations to the Senate Concerning 
poll cy 

~( 1 ) An amendment to Rule 56 to the 
effect that any student reinstated in 
College by the Committee on Academic 
Standards shall be on probation for the 
ensuing semester. (Recommended to Sen- 
ate October 7 - Adopted November 4) 



(2) Extension of time for granting of 
credit by examination in Ed* 439, 
Safety Education. (Senate, November 4) 

(3) Committee went on record in sup- 
port of a minimum of 15 weeks actual 
instruction per semester, (.'enate, De- 
cember 2 ) - 

(4) A proposed regulation 'in regard to 
enrollment in summer sessions at under- 
graduate centers, (Recommended to Sen- 
ate May 5 - tabled) 

5) A proposed change in Regulation 61, 
Recommended to Senate June 2 — Adopted 
June 2 ) 

Very truly yours, 



. Viotor A, Becde, Chair- 
June 2, 194 9 man 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE SENATE C OMMITT] 



ON COMMITTEES, 194 8- 



4 9 



.domic year 1948—49, your 



During the 
Committee on Committees recommended per- 
sonnel f or a few vacancies occurring in 
the S e nate committees. Most, of these 
were incurred by the e stab lifihrnent of the 
new School of Home Economics, A chav.go 
in one <->f the sections ..of the by-laws was 
recommnndof' and approved, which provided 
for representation of all undergraduate 
schools on the Committee on Academic 
Standards , 



The membership of the Senate stand- 
in? committees for 1949-1950 has been 
recommended to the President' of the 
College, and has been approved by him, 
A list of these committees .with names 
of members is attached* 

Respectfully submitted, 

B, V, Moore, Chairman 
June 2 . 1949 



OF GENERAL INTEREST 



CHAPEL: Rev. A, Dixon Rollet, reotor, 
Calvary Episcopal' Church, Pittsburgh, will 



speak at chapel services on Sunday', 



De- 



cember 4 ( 



LUNCHEON CLUB: Dr. Kent Forster, associ- 
ate professor of history, will address 
the Faculty Luncheon Club on Monday noon, 
December 5, on the subject, "Teaching in 
a European Summer Session," 



PHI BETTA KAPPi. 
Day dinner arid 
local chapter o 
held at the Nit 
on Monday, Dec 
professor of ro 
on "The Poets a 
Those planning 
their names and 
vited guests to 
Coheri, pro'-fessd 
213, Sparks Bui 
Wedne sd'ay , Nqvc 



, : The 'annual Founders* 
business meeting of the 
f Phi Beta Kappa will be 
tany Lion Inn at 6t30 p«m, 
mber 5. Dr. H. H. Arnold, 
nance languages, will speak 
nd Our Wild Flowers," 
to attend should send 
the names of their in-* 
the secretary, Dr » Teresa 
'r of mathematics, Room 
Tding, not later than 
mber 3 0. 
* * * 



FILMS: Tiro films, "The City" and "Target 
for Tonight," will be shown at 7 p.m, 
Wednesday, November 30, in Room 119, 
Osmond Laboratory, for Dramatics 61 stu- 
dents, A limited number of seats are 
available for interested faculty members, 

* * » 

SCHOOL OF EDUCATION: Dr. Paul E, Smith, 
of the division of International Educa«* 
tional Relations, U.S. Office of Education, 
will speak at a meeting of the School of 
Education faculty and staff at 4 p.m, 
Tuesday, December 6, in Room 3 04 Old 
Main, His subject will be; "Teacher Ex- 
change: Its Function and Control." 

* * * 

TO COMMAND ROTC : Col, Arthur R, Walk, 
commanding officer 'of the 5th Armored 
Division, Camp Chaffee, Ark., will assume 
command of the Army ROTC unit on December 
15, He will replace Col. Ben-H, Chastaine, 
who will retire from active Army duty on 
December 31 after 33 years of service, 

+ * * 

CENTER STAGE: "Kind Lady" will open a 
six-week run at Center Stage at 8 p.m.. 
on Friday and Saturday, December 2 and 3, 
Tickets, priced at $,90 for Friday night 
and $1,20 for Saturday night, are on sale 
at Student Union Office, 

* * » 

RESTRICT GUNS: Because of damage done 
and hazards created by children firing 
air rifles and, 22 calibre rifles on Col<*» 
lege property, the unrestricted use of 
guns on College property by children of 
15 years of age and under will not be " 
permitted. Campus patrolmen have been 
ordered to apprehend the children and 
confiscate the weapon, 

* * * 

PSI CHI: Psi Chi will hold a business 
meeting for electing new members at 7:15 
p.m, on Friday, December 2 , a nd at 8 p.m, 
in Room 10, Sparks Building, will hear 
Dr, B, Von Haller Gilmer, head of the 



department of psychology at Carnegie 
Institute of Technology, His subject 
will be: "Art er io-venous Amastomosis 
in Body Temperature Sensitivity and 
Control," 

* * * 

HOLIDAY DINNER: Students, in hotel and 
institution administration will serve 
their annual holiday dinner on the 
nights of December 6, 7, and 8, The 
menu, will include turkey or ham and 
other traditional holiday foods. The 
dinner will be served by reservation 
only and reservations may be made by 
calling extension 104, The charge will 
be $1,75, 

*■* * 

ATTEND MEETINGS: Four faculty and ad- 
ministrative staff members attended the 
meetings of the National Interf rat ernity 
Council in Washington, D,'C, last week. 
They were Dr. H, K. Wilson and Harold 
W»- Perkins, o-f- t he Office of the Dean 
of Men; A, R,- War nock, clean of men 
emerit«us; and Dr, Marsh W, White, pro- 
fessor of physics. Dean Warnock is 
educational advisor t o t he Council and 
Dr. White is national secretary of Delta 
Chi fraternity. On Sunday,' Dean Wilson 
attended the executive meetings of the 
Fam' House Fraternity in Chicago, 

* * * 

ATTEND MEETINGS: Four members of the 
department of anirial nutrition attended 
the . or, r)ual meetings of the A n erican 
Society of Animal Production in Chicago 
last week. They were Dr, R, W, Swift, 
Dr. Alex Black, R, II, Ingram, and G, P. 
Barron, Jr, A paper, "The Relative 
Nutritive Value of Kentucky Bluegrass, 
Timothy, \Brome Grass, and Orchard Grass 1 ? 
was presented by Dr , Si/ift, Ingram, 
and R« L. Cowan, 

* * * 

SPEAKS : Charles F, LeeDecker, Jr., 
assistant executive secretary, Institute 
of Local Government, will address the 
National Conference on Government meet- 
ing this week in St. Paul, Minn. His 
subject will be: "Borough Management in 
Pennsylvania," 

• * * * 

PRESIDES:' Dr, Arthur Rose, associate 
professor of chemical engineering, and 
'■ T, J. Williams, research fellow in chen- 
ical engineering-, attended the recent 
Scientific Computation Forum of the 
International Business Machine Corp., 
E n dicott, N,Y, Dr, Rose presided at 
the sessions dealing with calculations 
of chemical constants and distillation 
operations, 

* * * 

ALUMNI: A meeting to form a Penn State 
Alumni Club of Centre County will be 
held at 8 p,m, Monday, December 5, in 
Room 124, Sparks Building, All alumni 
are invited, 

* , * 

FIVE O'CLOCK THEATRE* Tuesday, November 
29, 5 p.m., Little Theatre, "The Three 
Clueens," by H e len Catt, 






4 



WATERCQLORS BY DONG KINGMAN COMPOSE NEW EXHIBIT IN SIMMONS HALL 



Twenty-five water colors by Dong King- 
nan will compose' an exhibit that will open 
in the lounges of Siemens Hall on Saturday, 
December 3, and continue until December 

ei. 

Andrew W # Case, associate professor 
of fine arts, will present a gallery 
lecture in the lounge at 7:30 p.m. on 
Tuesday, December 6, 

Kingman wa s born in San Francisco, 
went to China at the a^e of 5, and re- 
turned to San Francisco 13 years later* 



There he worked in an overalls factory, 
a Chine se' restaurant, and 'later taught 
art , ' * 

Now living in Brooklyn, Kingman 
teaches watercolor at Hunter College 
and Columbia University, ' His paint- 
ings have won prizes at American Water- 
color Society and Chicago Art Institute 
International Watercolor Exhibits, 

The exhibit, sent here by the Mid- 
town Galleries, New York, is sponsored 
by the d epartment of architecture. 



OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENT FROM THE DEAN OF 



v! IS SIGNS AND REGISTRAR 



Withdrawals : 



Campus 

5 Goates, Walter, S., DH, Oct. 24 

5' Mazanowski, Lloyd G„, PNG , Nov, 11 

5 Snulowitz, Arthur I., CF,. Oct, 2 8 

3 Vandergrift, Robert Jay,, Ch, Nov. 17 

Alt oona 



Howser, Donald W., Met, Oct, 7 
R< 



Du Bo is 

Fleming, Charles E., ME, Nov, 17 
Mowrey, Donald L«, VIEd, Nov, 15 
Bro3per, Peter A», AL, Nov, 16 

Pott sville , 

Blankenhorn, Raymond G», AL, Nov, 15 
Corrado, Mary Jane, AL, Nov, 8 



Reasons given for withdrawing: Personal, 2; illness, 5; financial, 2« to accept 
employment, 1, 

PERSONNEL CHANGES 

The following personnel changes were reported during the period November 3, 
to 17* Telephone extension numbers are listed for new appointees, 

App-ointment s 

588 Brassfield, Eileen M», Senior Secretary, Business Administration 

286J Carolus, John M,, Dairy Farm Employee, Dairy Husbandry 

♦7152 'Craig, Frederick W,, Assistant "Water Tunnel Operator, Ord, Res, Lab» 

Fishman, Edward, Instructor, Central Extension 
*6312 Flipse, Robert J,, Assistant Professor, Dairy Husbandry 
287J Giloore, John E., Poultry Farm Employee, poultry Husbandry 
265J Gingrich, Anna, Technical Labor, Animal. Hu sbandry 

Gordon, Mary Alice N., Psychometr i st , Central Extension 
267 Godzeski, Lcretta, Stenographer, Agricultural Economics and Rural Sociology 
287J Hassinger, William L,, Poultry Farm Employee, Poultry Husbandry 
130 Hays, William A,, Vocational Appraiser, Central Extension 
111 Insley, Betty H», Secretary, Food Service ' 
262 Kindig, Z, Alma, Clerk, Agricultural Economics and Rural Sociology 

Moore, Betty Jane, Secretary, Central Extension 

Redmond, Helena I,, Stenographer, Central Extension' 
187 Saxion, Loretta, Clerk, Dean of. Men 

06 Schmidt, Enid, X-ray Technician, Health Service 
130 Sohl, Charles E,, Jr., Instructor, Central Extension 

182 Underwood, G, Marian, Accounting Clerk, Associated Student Activities 
114J 'Ward, Byron E», Shipping & Receiving Clerk, Food Service 
262 Wisman, Melba F,, Clerk, Agricultural Economics and Rural Sociology 
203 Wyker, Elizabeth E,, Clerk— typist , Agricultural Economics and Rural Sociology 

♦State College telephone number. 



jCjTMqi'I X' ej ^ u3 



C, i- 



THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 



FACULTY 



The Bulletin is published weekly during the College 
year as a means of making official announcements 
and presenting items of interest to the faculty. All 




BULLETIN 



contributions should be as brief as possible and 
reach Louis H. Bell, Director of Public Information, 
313 Old Main, not later than 10 a. m. each Friday. 



VOL. 37 



December 5, 19^9 



NO. 11 



TRUSTEES APPROVE PERSONNEL CHANGES 



Promotions, retirements, one appoint •- 
ment, and other personnel changes were 
approved "by the Executive Committee of 
the Board of Trustees on Friday night. 

■ Dr. John A. Sauer, professor and head 
of the department of engineering mechan- 
ics, was named to serve also as acting 
head of the department of aeronautical 
engineering during the absence of Dr. 
David J. Peery.. 

The Trustees earlier had approved a 
leave of absence for Dr. Peery from Feb- 
ruary 1, 1950 to January 31, 1951, to 
work in the airplane industry on the Pa- 
cific coast and study latest develop- 
ments in airplane design. 

The following promotions, all effec- 
tive on January 1, were approved: 

Dr. John C. Griffiths, from assist- 
ant professor to associate professor of 
petrography; Dr. F. Briscoe Stephens, 
from instructor to assistant professor 
of meteorology; and Ray W. Reitz, from 
assistant agricultural extension rep- 
resentative to agricultural extension 
representa ti ve . 

Retirements approved included Belle 
Hubbard., instructor in home economics 
extension, effective November 30, after 
32 years of service; Nicholas M. Rahn, 
agricultural extension representative in 
Carbon county, effective December 31, 
after 32 years of service; James H. Ful- 
ton, plasterer, with 27 years . of service 
and Jacob Mattil, carpenter, with 15 
years . 

Dr. Warren M. Miller, associate sci- 
entist at Brookhaven National Laboratory, 
was named associate professor of chemistry, 



effective February 1. He received his 
doctor of philosophy degree at the Uni- 
versity of California at Berkeley and ' 
his bachelor of science at Ohio State ' 
University and previously served on the 
staffs of the University of California, 
Maryland Research Laboratories, Harvard 
University, and Massachusetts Institute 
of Technology. 

Sabbatical leaves of absence were 
approved, .for six faculty members: 

A. Leland Beam, professor of dairy 
production and assistant director of. 
resident instruction and d.irector of 
short courses in the School of Agricul- 
ture, for six months, beginning March 
1, to study short course work at other 
colleges . 



Charles K. Ha Howe 11, agricultural 
extension representative in Philadelphia 
county, for six months, effective Jan- 
uary 1, to travel and study; Dr. Stuart 
W. Frost, professor of economic entomol- 
ogy, for six months, effective February 
15, to conduct research in Central and 
South America; Dr. Charles D.. Jeffries, 
professor of soil technology, for Febru- 
ary, March, and April, 1950, and May, 
June, and July, 1951, 'to complete a study 
of the minera logical composition of soil 
in Puerto Rico which he started in 19^3. 

Dr. Howard 0. Triebold, professor of 
agricultural and biological chemistry, 
for six months, effective February 15, to 
complete a text on food analysis, study 
the needs of food industries as a basis 
for improving the curricula here, and to 
visit edible fat laboratories; and Dr. 
Paul H. Schweitzer, professor of engin- 
eering research, six months, effective 
July 1, to travel and lecture in Europe. 

PENNSTATE C( - 



MINUTES OF THE SENATE MEETING OF DECEMBER 1, 19^9 



The College Senate met at i+:lO p.m. 
on December 1, I9H9 in Room 121 Sparks 
Building with Mr. A .0 . M rse presiding. 
The list of members present is on file 
in the Office of the Registrar. The 
minutes of the November 3 meeting were 
published in the Faculty Bulletin for 
November 7 an cL hence were not read. 
The minutes were approved as published. 

Under communications from college 
officers, letters were read from sena- 
tors unable to attend the meeting and 
naming substitutes. The substitute is 
designated in parenthesis following the 
senator's name. Prof. N.R. Sparks- (Prof. 
A.H. Zerban); Prof. M.S. Gjesdahl (Prof. 
• R.B.Day); Prof. Wiesendanger (Prof. 
Honey) . 

Under reports of standing committees, 
Prof. E.W. Callenbach, chairman of the 
Committee on Calendar, read a letter 
from Mr. Kenworthy, Secretary of the 
Council of Administration, asking that 
classes that meet only on Saturday in 
the School of Education be hold regard- 
less of whether the College was observ- 
ing the football half -holiday . This 
was tabled to come up under new business. 

The second part of the report of 
the Calendar Committee is as follows: 

1. Recommends that the 19^9-50 Col- 
lege Calendar as approved at the Decem- 
ber 2, 191+8 meeting of the S c nate should 
remain unchanged. 

2. Reports that the days February 1 
.10 and 11, Friday and Saturday, desig- 
nated, for registration of students for 
the second semester of the current 
school year, are interpreted by the 
committee to mean two full days and not 
one and one -ha If days. 

3. Suggests that instructors be di- 
rected to report all grade failures 
directly to the D e ans of Schools in 
which failing students are registered, 
using the regular mid -semester below 
grade forms and making the failure re- 
ports to Deans as quickly as possible 
and in addition to the usual reports to 
the Office of the Recorder. The purpose 
of the special failure reports to Deans 



is the provision of information which, 
transmitted by Deans to student advisers, 
will prevent the registration of students 
subject to dismissal action under the 
50 per cent College rule or supplementary 
School regulations. 

h. Requests that an appropriate com- 
mittee be instructed to make a thorough 
study of certain problems, including 
those submitted below, to the end that a 
policy related to said problems shall be 
adopted and then followed by the Com- 
mittee on Calendar and the Sena to in 
the formulation of future extensions of 
the College Calendar. T^e problems sub- 
mitted are: 

a. Time allowed for registration. 

b. Time allowed for final exami- 
nations . 

c. Registration for final grade re- 
porting in relation to course 
final examinations. 

d. Time allowed for recording grades, 
computing averages, and distrib- 
uting grade reports to student 
advisers. 

e. Time allowance for course section- 
ing. 

f . Consideration of not dismissing 
students for deficient scholar- 
ship at the end of the first 
semester. 

g. A directive to the Senate Com- 
mittee on Calendar as to the exact 
time that should be provided be- 
tween semesters. 

Prof. Callenbach moved that his re- 
port be adopted and Prof. Whisler second- 
ed the motion. Prof. Werner requested 
that each item in the report be voted 
upon separately. The Chair so ruled. 

After a clarifying statement by Prof. 
Callenbach as to why the recommendation 
in Item 1 should be approved, Prof. 
Blasingame moved that Item 1 of the re- 
port be adopted. The motion was seconded 
and carried. 

The Registrar stated that grade cards 
should be delivered to the Recorders 
Office, k Willard Hall, not later than 
12 o'clock noon February 8, 1950. Every 
effort will be made to have semester 
grade reports delivered to the Office of 



the School Deans' by 9 a.m., Monday-, Feb- 
ruary 13. Grades not ^reported by neon 
February 8 cannot be included in the 
semester grade reports . NGR (no grade 
reported) will appear on the printed 
semester grade roport in case the grade 
is not received by noon, February 8, 
1950 at the Recorders Office. 

The Senate decided that no vote was 
necessary on Item 2 of the report. 

Prof. Reedo moved that the Senate 
direct the faculty to carry out the 
suggestions made by the committee in 
Item. 3 • This motion was seconded. Dur- 
ing the discussion which followed, Prof. 
Dengler made an amendment to the motion, 
. suggesting that each student write the 
, name of his adviser on his examination 
paper and the professor could get the 
information to the adviser. There was a 
second to the motion but upon vote of 
the Senate the amendment was lost. The 
original motion as. made by Prof. Reede 
was passed by the Senate. 



Mr. Morse suggested that a special 
committee be appointed to advise the 
Calendar Committee as requested in Item 
k of the report. A motion was made and 



seconded' that a special committee be 
appointed. The Senate so voted* 

The report of the Committee on Cal- 
endar is on file in the Office of the 
Registrar. 

There was no discussion on the ques- 
tion as to whether the Christmas vacation 
should be reduced four days. 

,Prof. Bullinger, chairman of the 
Courses of Study Committee, stated that 
the December report of his committee had 
been mailed and 'that it would lie on the 
table for one month. The report of the 
Committee is on file in the Office of 
the Registrar. 

Prof. Richardson, chairman of the 
Commit"! ^0 on Public Occasions stated 
that plans had boon made for the mid-3-car 
commencement to be held at 2:30 p.m. on 
Tuesday, February 7, 1950, in Recreation 
Building. 



Mr. Morse stated a special committee 
had been appointed to study the recom- 
mendations made in the annual report of 
the Courses of Study Committee. This 
committee consisted of Messrs. Schilling, 
Bullinger, Moore, Mourant, and Williams, 
(continued next week) 



HANSON W. BAIDW1N TO ADDRESS COMMUNITY FORUM ON WEDNESDAY NIGHT 



Hanson W. Baldwin, military editor 
for the New York Times and the country' £ 
foremost military analyst,' will address 
the State College Community Forum at 
8 p.m. Wednesday, December J, in Schwab 
Auditorium. 

Baldwin, who won a Pulitzer prize 



in 19^2, will speak on "Security in an 
Atomic Age." 

Tickets for the Forum series are on 
sale at Student Union Office. They are 
priced at $3> which includes tax, and 
cover the series of five programs. 



COLLECTION OF HERITAGE BOOKS ON EXHIBIT AT COLLEGE LIBRARY 



A collection of more than 100 Herit> 
age Books are now on exhibit at. the 
College Library and will remain there 
until December 20. 



The books, described as "the clas> 



sics which are our heritage of the 
future," represent uhe literature of 
all nations, all ages, and a host of 
au chore . 



Each book is produced as a work of 
art. All are appropriately illustrated 
and covers, type, and paper, guaranteed 
to last for 200 years, are specially 
selected. 



The exhibit is made possible through 
the courtesy of Dr. and Mrs. Joseph G. 
Rayback. Dr. Rayback is assistant pro- 
fessor of American history. 



_ 



OF GENERAL INTEREST 



on "The Interoollegiat e Osmond Laboratory, 

ran at Penn State." 



CHAPEL: Dr. Fred Buschneyer, Mount pleas- 
ant Congregational Church, Washington, 
D. C», will speak at chapel' services on 
Sunday morning, December 11, in Schwab 
Audit oriun, 

* * * 

LUNCHEON CLUB: Harold R. Gilbert, gradu- 
ate manager of athletics, will address 
the Faculty Luncheon Club on Monday noon 
December 12 _ 
Athletic Program at Penn State, " 

* * * 

COURSES OF STUDY: The S e nate Courses 
of Study Committee will meet at 10 a.m. 
Tuesday, December 2 0, in Room 207, Engi- 
neering "C". 

* * * 

SIGMA XI LECTURE: Dr. Edward Creutz, 
head of the department of physics at 
Carnegie Institute of Technology, will 
present the second of the Sigma Xi 
lecture series at 7:30 p.m. on Tvurs — 



EXAMINATIONS: The final examination for 
Tien-Chioh Tso, candidate for the doctor 

major in 

12 a.m. 



of philosophy degree with a . 
agronomy, will be held from 9 to 12 a .m 
Monday, December 12, in Room 215, Frear 
Laboratories, and for Saul Isserow, 
candidate for the doctor of philosophy 
*«.,**.«,» T.r^ + i^ -. r.on^v. j_ n chemistry, at 



uaimiuaijc x ui one u_u \j \i u 

degree with a major in 
2 p.m. Friday, December 

dsnn n rl T.n.'hnvn.t nrv. 



Srvul Isserow, 
philoso; 
stry, at 
16, in Room 301, 



day, December 



in Room 110, Electrical 



Engineering Building. He will discuss 
"Developments in Nuclear R e search." 

* * * 

SALES ROOM: During the winter months, 
the, Creamery S a les Room in the Dairy 
Building will be open on Sundays only 
from 9 a.m. to 1 p . m . 

* * * 

EDUCATION FACULTY: Dr. Paul E. Smith, 
assistant director, Division of Inter- 
national Education Relations in the U.S. 
Office of Education, Washington, will 
address the faculty of the School of 
Education at 4 p.m. Tuesday, December 
6, in Room 304, Old Main. His subject 
will be: "Teacher Exchange, Its Function 
and Control, " 

* * * 

ORAL INTERPRETATION CLASS; Robert Reif- 
sneider, assistant professor of dramat- 
ics, will be guest reader for the Oral 
Interpretation Classes which will meet 
in the Living Center of the Home Eco- 
nomics Building at 8 p.m. on Monday, De- 
cember 12. He will read from the writ~ " •• 
iriga of Tcnne'sse.n Williams. 

* o « 

FIVE O'CLOCK THEATRE: The Five O'clock 
Theatre will present a one— act play, 
"Just Another Friday Night" by Shirley 
Betts, at 5 p.m. Tuesday, December 5. 

* * * 

ENGAGEMENT CALENDAR: The 1950 P e nn State 
Engagement Calendar with 55 new campus 
scenes, now is available at local stores, 
Student Union, and the Alumni Association. 
The price is $1 and the Alumni Associ—' 
ation offers to send the calendar to any 
part of the United States free of charge. 



Students, upon at — 
>f 13, may register as 
te provisions of the 
Act at the office of 



SELECTIVE SERVICE 

taining the age o: 

required under th< 

Selective Serivce 

Robert E. Galbraith, Room 109A Old Main, 



> 

* * * 



E CLUB: The P e nn State 
an alumni organization, 
nvitation to 'any members 



6:30 p.m. on Friday, 
ne planning to attend 
Alumni Office, 104 



CHICAGO PENN STAT 

Club of Chicago, 

has extended an i 

of the faculty or staff, visitirig in 

Chicago, to attend a dinner meeting of 

the Club at Henri 

chandise Mart, at 

December 9, Anyo 

should notify the 

Old Main, 



AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY: Dr.. E, J. 
Cohn, professor of biological chemistry 
and head of the department of physical 
chemistry, Harvard Medical S c hool, will 
address the American Chemical Society 
meeting at 7;30 p.m. on Friday, December 
9, in Room 119, Osmond Laboratory. His 
subject will be: "Interactions of Proteins 
with Each Other, with Ions, and with 
Organic Molecules." 

* * * 

SCHOLARSHIP APPLICATIONS: Scholarship 
applications now are available In Room 132-, 
Sparks Building, and faculty should talk 
to their school representative for in- 
formation relative to eligibility for 
scholarships. Representatives are:. 
Agriculture, R. A. Dutcherj Chemistry 
and Phy.sics, R. L. Weber; Education, 
Kinsley R. Smith; Engineering, L. S. 
Rhodes; Home Economics, Mary B. Allgood; 
the Liberal Arts, Seth W. Russ.ell; Miner- 
al Industries, E» F. Csborn; and Physical 
Education and Athletics, J. D» Lawther. 

* * * 

LECTURE: Larry Livingston, of the Public 
Relations Department, E.I. duPont do 
Nemours and Co., will present an illus<»-' 
trated lecture on "Progress in Better 
Living"at a meeting of . t he American So-» 
oiety of Agricultural Engineers and the 
Penn State Dairy Science Club at 7 p.m. 
on Tuesday, December 6 , in Room 103, Agri- 
cultural Engineering Building. Interested 
faculty are invited to attend. 









THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE COLLEGE 



FACULTY 



The Bulletin is published weekly during the College 
year as a means of making official announcements 
and presenting items of interest to the faculty. All 




BULLETIN 



contributions should be as brief as possible and 
reach Louis H. Bell. Director of Public Information, 
313 Old Main, not later than 10 a. m. each Friday. 



VOL. 



37 



December 12, 19^9 



NO. 



12 



CHAPEL CHOIR TO PRESENT CHRISTMAS PROGRAM SATURDAY NIGHT, SUNDAY MORNING 



The Chapel Choir will again present 
their firat performance of Chriatmaa 
music at a midnight service in Schwab 
Auditorium from 11 p.m. to midnight on 
Saturday, December 17 . The program will 
be repeated at the regular chapel hour 
at 11 a.m. Sunday, December 18. 

The performance in Schwab Auditorium 
will be preceded by a ahort program of 
chorales, which were harmonized by 
Johann Sebastian Bach, played by a braaa 



quartet from the tower of Old Main, 

The main feature of the musical 
aervice will be a short cantata from the 
pre -Bach era written by Buxtehude (l637- 
1707) . In this work, the choir will be 
assisted by a small string ensemble from 
the College Symphony Orchestra. 

The doors to the Auditorium will open 
30 minutes before each program begins. 



WATERCOLOR EXHIBIT OPENS IN MINERAL INDUSTRIES GALLERY 



. The 25th anniversary Watercolor 
Exhibit of the Ohio Watercolor Society 
opened in the Mineral Industries Gallery 
on Sunday and will continue until Decem- 
ber 28. The gallery is open from 9 a.m. 
to 9 p.m. 

Included in the exhibit are the 
watercolors of 51 artists. Among them 



are George Biddle, Arthur Helwig, and. 
Wendell Lawson, Lawson is a former 
member of the department of architecture 
here. 

The exhibit is touring nine cities 
and ia sponsored here by the department 
of architecture. 



STOCK, VALUED AT $2,000, ADDED TO ETHEL AND BAYARD KUNKLE LOAN FUND 



A gift of 30 shares of General Motors 
common stock, valued at approximately 
$2,000, has been given to the College 
and added to the Ethel and Bayard Kunkle 
Loan Fund. 

The gift was made by Bayard D. 
Kunkle, a 1907 graduate of the College, 



of Detroit, who established the fund 
in 19^6. Four subsequent donations have 
brought the value of the fund to 
$25,800. 

The loan fund was established to 
assist married veterans. 



DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS RENAMED DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS AND COMMERCE 



The name of the department of eco- 
nomics has' been changed to department 
of economics and commerce. 

The change was considered desirable 



because of the post-war growth of the 
work in commerce. At present there 
are 60 students registered as majors 
in economics while 1125 are enrolled 
as commerce and finance students. 



MINUTES OF THE SENATE MEETING OF DECEMBER 1, I9I+9 
(Continued from last week) 



Under unfinished business Prof. 
Moore , chairman of the Committee on 
Committees, stated that at the last meet- 
ing of the S e nate, recommendations to 
amend the By-Laws were submitted to thi 
Committee on Committees. The Committee 
on Committees made the following recom- 
mendations: 

1. Acund the By-Laws, Article II, 
Section 1 (c) to include the president 
of the Association of Women's Fraternity 
Counselors and the president of the Col- 
lege Panhellenic Council, and limit the 
official voting to members of the Col- 
lege Senate. The amended section would 
read: "Student Welfare - five members, 
and the Dean of Men, the Dean of Women, 
the College Physician, the president 

of the Association of Fraternity Coun- 
selors, the president of the Inter- 
fraternity Council, the president of the 
Association of Women's Fraternity Coun- 
selors, and the president of the College 
Panhellenic Council, ex off iciis , and 
two student representatives, one man 
and one woman. Non -members of the Senate 
shall serve in an advisory capacity 
without vote, except as provided in 
Section 5." 

2. Amend the By-Laws, Article II, 
by adding a new Section 5,. as follows: 

Section 5 

In all Senate committees, official 
voting is regularly confined 10 members 
of the Senate, The chairman of a com- 
mittee, through courtesy, may extend 
the privilege of voting on specific 
questions to members of a committee 
who are not members of the Senate. 

3. It is recommended that these 
amendments become effective at the 
beginning of the next academic year, 
1950-51. . .. . 

km It is recommended that since the 
Committee on Student Welfare has estab- 
lished a sub -committee, including the 
College Psychiatrist, to work on special 
problems with the Borough authorities, 
no action in regard to the College Psy- 
chiatrist as a member of the committee 
be taken at this time. 



The chair ruled that since the report in- 
cluded new legislation it should lie on 
the table for one month. The report 
of the committee is on file in the Office 
of the Registrar. 

Prof. Dengler, chairman of the Com- 
mittee on Rules presented a recommendation 
that (1) Article I, Section l,of the 
Constitution be amended to include "the 
assistant dean in charge of resident 
instruction from each of the Schools" 
and (2) to change the number of elected 
representatives of each School from six 
to eight. These changes are to go into 
effect with the next academic year. It 
was moved by Prof. Dengler and seconded 
by Prof. Blasingame that the recommen- 
dations of the Rules Committee be adopted 
and that they go into effect with the 
next meeting of the Senate. Prof, Waters 
moved that Item 1 of the report be tabled 
until the next meeting of the Senate. 
This motion was seconded and carried. 
Since Item 2 is new legislation it will 
lie on the table for one month. The re- 
port of the committee is on file in the 
Office of the Registrar. 

Prof. Dengler stated that his com- 
mittee had discussed the matter of 
numbering of Regulations for Under graduate 
Students and that it had been made a 
standing item of business for each' 
succeeding meeting of the Rules Committee 
until the final editing of the Regulations 
for Undergraduate Students for the new 
editions. 

Prof. Bullinger, for the 'Courses of 
Study Committee, asked that the November 
report be removed from the table and 
voted upon. One correction to this re- 
port was to be made. On page 5 in the 
School of the Liberal Arts second semester 
of the sophomore year of the Two* Year 
Secretarial Curriculum, which is to be 
given only in the undergraduate centers, 
Engl. Comp. 20 is to be deleted and Engl. 
Comp. 5 or Engl. Comp. 20 is to be in- 
serted. Prof. Bullinger moved that the 
report, as amended, be adopted. The 
motion was seconded and carried. 



It was moved by Prof. Moore that the 
report of his committee be accepted. 



Under new business Prof. Callenbach 
brought up the matter of tho ro quest 



received through the Council of Adminis- 
tration, that classes in the School of 
Education meeting on Saturday only be 
held regardless of the football half* 
holiday . It was moved by Prof. Blas- 
ingame > and seconded, that this request 
be granted. It was further asked that 
the School of Education obtain from 
the instructors the number of students 
involved in Saturday classes. The 
recommendation will, therefore, lie on 
the table for one month. 

Mr. Morse announced that the Christ- 
mas vacation will end January K at 1:10 
p.m. and that the next Senate meeting 
would be Thursday, January 5 at 4:10 



3 



p.m. and asked if the Senate felt the 
meeting should bo postponed one week. 
Since there was no motion to postpone the 
meeting, Senate will m