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Full text of "The Forfar directory and year book"

"^LIBRARY 



p. 



/Qav^ ^'^mto-' 



7?"]cy)ru. ZA^80 



THE 



FORFAR DIRECTORY, 



AND 



■Y'E^K/ book:. 



FOR 



1888, 

CONTAINING 

A LIST OF THE HOUSEHOLDERS OF THE BURGH, DIRECTORY 

OF TRADES AND PROFESSIONS, LIST OF PUBLIC 

BOARDS, SOCIETIES, ETC. 

ALSO, 

COUNTY INFORMATION, AND A LIST OF FARMERS IN THE 
ADJOINING PARISHES. 



:f»i^ice oiste :F>E3sr3sr'Y". 



('^library''-'!' 

PRINTED & PUBLISHED BY" W. SHEPHERD, CASTLE ST. 

1887. 



Digitized by tine Internet Arciiive 

in 2010 witii funding from 

National Library of Scotland 



http://www.archive.org/details/forfardirectoryy1888forf 



The Publisher takes this opportunity of thanking the increasing 
number of Advertisers for their hberal patronage, and all who have so 
readily supplied information contained in the following pages. The 
Directory for 1888 is issued in the hope that it will be found useful, 
and prove as successful as those of former years. 

Errors and omissions are inseparable from publications of this kind, 
and, as it is the desire of the Publisher to make the Directory as 
accurate and complete as possible, he would feel obliged if such were 
pointed out for correction in future issues. 

39 Castle Street, 

Forfar, Dec. 1887. 



CONTENTS. 



Page. 

Advertisements, Index to 140 

Angling Club 72 

Bands 69 

Bank Offices 65 

Bee-keepers' Society 69 

Bible Society ." 67 

Bicycle Club 73 

Blind, Mission to the 67 

Bowling Clubs 72 

Britisliand Foreign Correspondence 

Association 74 

Building Society 73 

Burgh Funds. ..^. 61 

Charity Mortifications 62 

Chess Club 66 

Chicken Show 69 

Children's Church 68 

Churches 66 

Church Societies 68 

Coal Societies __ 70 

County Information 75-76 

C'Ourts : — 

Burgh or Bailie 63 

Licensing, Burgh 63 

Police 63 

Sheriff 76 

Valuation Appeal 64 

Cricket Club 72 

Curling Association, Angus 72 

Curling Club 72 

Edinburgh Angus Club 69 

Edinburgh Forfar Academy Club ... 69 

Educational Institutions 66 

Factory Workers' Union 73 

Fairs, Markets, &c 52 

Farmers in District 49-51 

Fast Days 74 

Fiars' Prices 76 

Football Clubs 72-73 

Foresters. Ancient Order of 71 

Gas Accounts 63 



Page. 

Gas Corporation 62 

Golf (!lub 73 

Good Templar Lodges 68 

Halls 66 

Holidays 74 

Householders, Female 37-49 

Householders, Male 5-36 

Infirmary 65 

Joiners' Association 73 

Justices of the Peace (Forfar) 64 

Lawn Tennis Club 73 

Library, Public 65 

Literary Society 67 

Magistrates and Town Council 61 

Masonic Lodges 71 

Musical Societies 67 

Oddfellows' Lodge 72 

Parochial Board 64 

Plate Glass Association 69 

Police Commission 62 

Police Commissicm Accounts 62-63 

Post Office ...._. 74-75 

Poultry Association 69 

Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, 

Society for ... 74 

Qiioiting Clubs 73 

Reading Booms 66 

Registrar's Office 65 

Religious Societies 67 

Savings Bank 65 

Saving Societies 69-70 

School Boards— Burgh . t)5 

Landward 65 

Session Clerks 66 

Shepherds, Loyal Ancient 71 

Temjjerance Societies 69 

Tract Society 67 

Trades and Professions 53-60 

Volunteers 66 

Yearly Societies 70-71 



Alj[ANac for 1888 (32 pp.) inserted between pages 76 and 109. 



NORTH BRITISH & MERCANTILE 

INSURANCE COMPANY. 



ESTABLISHED 1809. 



iNCORPORATEn BY ROYAL CHARTER AND SPECIAL ACTS OF PARLIAMENT. 



Resources of the Company 

As at 31st December, 1886. 
I. CAPITAL— 



Authorised Capital 
Subscribed Capital 
Paid-up Capital .. 

II. FIRE FUND- 

Reserve 

Premium Reserve 
Balance carried forward 



III. LIFE FUND— 



£3,000,000 

2,500,000 

625,000 



£1,250,000 
:3SO,910 
107,997 

£1,738,907 



Accumulated Fund (Life Branch) £3,045,719 
Accumulated Fund (Annuity Branch) G07,63G 



£4,253,355 



Revenue for the Year 1886. 

From the Life Department- 
Net Life Premiums, Interest, etc. £488,932 
Annuity Premiums (including 
£86,165, 98 l)V single payment) 
and Interest ' .. .. .. 112,504 



From the Fire Department- 
Net Fire Premiums, Interest, etc. 



£60l,43(; 

1,231,960 
£1,833,396 



The Accumtilatcd Funds of the Life Department are 
free from liability in reaped of the Fire Depart- 
ment, and in like manner the accumtdated Funds 
of the Fire Department are free from liability in 
respect of the Life Department. 



LIFE DEPARTMENT. 

Large and Accumulating Bonlsks. Moderate Premiums. Perfect Security. 

Nine-Tenths of the whole Profits of the Life Assurance Branch 

.are allocated to participating profits. 

Total Bonus for last Quinquennium, £357,227. 

SPECIAL FEATURES. 

Claims paid on proof of death and title. 

Premiums adjusted to each half-year of age. 

Minimum Surrender Values fixed and held at credit of Insured for five years. 

Paid-up Policy of liberal amount granted in place of lapsed Policy, if desired within six months. 

Inaccurate statements in Proposal Papers do not involve forfeiture of Policy unless accompanied 
by fraud. 

Policies in most cases free from all restrictions as to Occupation, Residence, and Travel. 

ANNUITY BRANCH. 
ANNUITIES, Immediate, Contingent, or Deferred, are granted on favourable terms. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

Property of nearly every description insured at Home or Abroad at the Lowest Rate of Premium. 
Losses Promptly and Liberally settled. 

Prospectuses and every information may be had at the Chief Offices, Branches, or Agencies. 

CHIEF OFFICES . . . J EDINBURGH, 64 Princes Street. 

^.^jaxr^j: wx r xv..jio -^ LONDON, fil Threadneedle Street, E.C. 

AGENTS IN FORFAR. 



TAMES TAYLOR, Town-Clerk. 
PATRICK WEBSTER, Westfielcl. 



I W. & T. DON & Co. (Fire only). 
I T. HENDERSON, .Agent, National Bank, 
(Fire only). 

A. B. WYLLIE, Solicitor. 



ANDERSON & CO., 

Wh©lesale ^ Reliail @MpeFS, 

INVITE PUBLIC ATTENTION TO THEIR LARGE STOCK OF 

Which for Quality and Price will bear favourable comparison with the 
Largest Houses in the Country, and being selected from the Stocks of 
the Best Manufacturers, can be confidently recommended for hard 
wear. 

rimmis mo puaidings 

Made from the best Wools, and cannot be surpassed for value. 

BUANKETS, BUANKE;TS. 

Hundreds of Pairs of Blankets laid out for sale. 

Anderson's Real Scotch Teviot Blankets, at 14/6, ij/, and 19/6 a pair, 

have now become " Household Words " and Household Comforts 

to thousands. Try them and you will not be disappointed. 
Real Scotch Blankets, all Pure Wool, 6/6, 7/6, 8/6, 9/6, to/6, 11/6, 

12/6, 13/6, 14/6, 15/6, 17/6, 19/6, 21/6, 22/6 per pair. 
New Exhibition Blankets, real Scotch, all the appearance of English 

make, and three times the wear, large size at 19/6 and 22/6. 

C0TT0N3 & sHtt-rims 

Warranted Pure and Shrunk ; our value and makes are too well known 

to require commendation. 

mmtmvo & tabu^ uinens 

Direct from the best Manufacturers, enable us to give reliable Goods at 

the Lowest Prices. 

Always in Stock, a large variety of Table Covers, Bed Covers, Bed Ticks, Curtains, 
Cretonnes, Furniture Twills, Rugs, Floorcloths, Window Hollands, Muslin Blinds, 
Diapers, Toilet Covers, &c., at prices which cannot be Ijeaten. 

Charities supplied at Wholesale Prices. 

F^^TTEENS FREE ON ^k.I>I>EIC^^TION-. 

ANDERSON & CO., 

145, 145^, ^ 147 EAST HIGH STREET. 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



Male Householders. 



Adam, Charles 
Adam, David 
Adam, George 
Adam, George 
Adam, James 
Adam, William 
Adams, Henry 
Adams, James 
Adams, James 
Adamson, Andrew 
Adamson, Hay 
Adamson, James 
Adamson, James 
Adamson, James 
Adamson, James 
Adamson, James Wilson 
Adamson, John 
Adamson, John 
Adamson, Richard 
Adamson, Robert 
Adamson, Thomas 
Adamson, Thomas 
Adamson, William 
Adamson, William 
Addison, John 
Aitkenhead, Charles 
Aitkenhead, David 
Aldridge, John Mullings 
Alexander, Charles 
Alexander, David 
Alexander, David 
Alexander, George Paton 
Alexander, John 
Alexander, Peter 
Allan, David 
Allan, Douglas 
Allan, James 
Allan, James 
Allan, John 
Allan, William 



Bootmaker 

Mason 

Factory worker 

Labourer 

Gardener 

Carter 

Shuttle maker 

M.D. and Farmer 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

I^abourer 

Residenter 

Residenter 

Weaver 

I/abourer 

Manufacturer 

Grocer 

Labourer 

Factory worker 

Chief constable 

Tenter 

Wood merchant 

Builder 

Labourer 

Blacksmith 

Weaver 

Factory worker 

Clergyman 

Lapper 

Tenter 

Tenter 

Surgeon 

Factory worker 

Lodging house kpr. 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Stableman 

Factory worker 

Joiner 



13 Osnaburgh street 
3 Green street 
33 South street 

15 Manor street 

12 Charles street 
51 Backw}^nd 

78 Dundee Loan 

Oathlaw 

186 East High street 

51 Dundee Loan 
Prior Road 

54 Backwpid 

Newford Park 

30 South street 

3 Bell Place 

St. James' Road 

42 & 44 West High street 

49 West High street 
1 Strang street 
County Place 

3 Green street 

4 Couttie's Wynd 
Headingplacestone cottage 
8 Bell Place 

26 West High street 
6 Archie's Park 

19 Victoria street 
The Parsonage 
130 East High street 
Market Place 

16 William street 
Littlecauseway 

27 John street 

4 Couttie's Wynd 
26 Nursery Feus 

50 South street 

52 South street 
39 Backwynd 

144 East High street 

13 Montrose Road 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



Allardice, Charles 
Allardice, «Toseph 
Allardice, William 
Anderson. Charles 
Anderson, David 
, Anderson, Francis 
Anderson, Hector 
Anderson, James 
Anderson, James 
Anderson, John 
Anderson, John 
Anderson, John 
Anderson, John 
Anderson, John Charles 
Anderson, John Peter 
Anderson, Robert William 
Anderson, William 
Anderson, William 
Andrew, David 
Andrew, James 
Andrew, William 
Archie, John 
Armstrong, James 
Auchterlonie, David 
Bain, Alexander 
Balfour, Alexander 
Balfour, David 
Balfour, William 
Balfour, William 
Balharry, William 
Ballingall, Andrew 
Ballingall, David Christie 
Barclay, George 
Barclay, Robert 
Barclay, Thomas 
Barrie, Charles 
Barron, Alexander 
Barry, Da\id 
Barry, David 
Batchelor, Alexander 
Beattie, James 
Bell, Alexander 
Bell, James 
Bell, William 
Bennet, Alexander 
Bennet, John 
Bennett, Andrew 
Binny, David 
Biimy, James 
Bisset, James 
Black, Alexander 



Labourer 
Farm servant 
Shoemaker 
Labourer 
Labourer 
Factory worker 
Factory worker 
Baker 

V.S. & blacksmith 
Tailor 
Labourer 
Factory worker 
Baker 
Solicitor 
Solicitor 

Late clerk of Supply 
Baker 
Quarrier 
Ilawker 
Shoemaker 
Hairdresser 
Gardener 
Loco, foreman 
Tenter 
Joiner 

Leather cutter 
Labourer 
Labourer 
Currier 
Innkeeper 
Factory worker 
Factory worker 
Carter 
Draper 
Painter 

Factory worker 
Gardener 

Grocer & spirit dlr. 
Quarry -master 
Farmer 
Coachman 
Lapper 
Salesman 
Fireman 

Horsehirer and inn- 
Coachman [keeper 
Labourer 
. Bank agent 
Collector 
Factory worker 
Factory worker 



3 Zoar 

^0 Dundee Road 

169 East High street 

67 Backwynd 

Gallowhill 

6 Horsewater AVynd 

East Sunnyside 

10 West High street 

26 West High street 

18 Montrose Road 

24 North street 

85 Backwynd 

10 West High street 

Glamis 

Lochbank House 

Rose Terrace 

118 East High street 

22 Don street 

64 East High street 

23 St. James' Road 
26 West High street 
Cowiehill 
Whitehills 

33 Prior Road 
21 Manor street 
9 Backwynd 
2 Dundee Road 
18 Glamis Road 

9 Backwynd 

102 West High Street 
32 South street 

16 Montrose Road 
21 Wellbraehead 
29 Castle street 
76 Castle street 
13 North street 
91 Backwynd 
80 Castle street 
58 Dundee Road 
Finavon 
Beech Hill 
12 Charles street 
Belmont Villa 

103 Backwynd 
Castle street 

5 Backwynd 
15 Glamis Road 
West High street 

10 Glamis Road 
7 Green street 
39 John street 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



Black, David 

Black, David 

Black, James 

Black, James 

Black, William 

Blair, Charles 

BJair, Charles 

Blair, David 

Blyth, George 

Blyth, John" 

Boath, Andrew 

Boath, Andrew Petrie 

Boath, David 

Boath, John 

Boath, John 

Boath, Joseph 

Boath, Robert 

Boath, William 

Boath, William 

Boath, William 

Booth, Charles 

Booth, David Phillip 

Bowman, Adam 

Bowman, John 

Bowman, William 

Boyle, James Douglas 

Boyle, James 

Boyle, John 

Boyle, John S. (younger) 

Braid, David 

Broadley John 

Brodie, James, M.A. 

Brown, Alexander 

Brown, Alexander 

Brown, Alexander 

Brown, Alexander 

Brown, George 

Brown, George 

Brown, James 

Brown, James 

Brown, James 

Brown, James 

Brown, James 

lirown, John 

Brown, John 

Brown, Peter 

Brown, Silvester 

Brown, Thomas 

Brown, William 

Brown, William 

Brown, William 



Scavenger 

Tenter 

Mason 

Joiner 

Flaxdresser 

Tenter 

Tailor 

Tenter 

Tailor 

Drill instructor 

Factory worker 

Clerk 

Poultry dealer 

Weaver 

Plawker 

Cloth inspector 

Labourer 

Grocer 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Residenter 

Clothier 

Tenter 

Labourer 

Mechanic 

Draper 

Book canvasser 

Fish dealer 

Fruit & fish merchnt. 

Shoemaker 

Twine spmner 

Rector 

Bleacher 

Factory worker 

Mason 

Labourer 

Engine driver 

Baker 

Society manager 

Factory worker 

Clothier 

Factory worker 

Mason 

Labourer 

Factory worker 

Merchant 

Labourer 

Labourer 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Mechanic 



4 Dundee Road 

120 West High street 

7 Victoria street 

Easterbank 

28 South street 

4 Wellbraehead 

12 Nursery Feus 

2 Bell Place 

17 North street 

49 North street 

11 East Sunnyside 

28 Dundee Loan 
Newmonthill 

29 Glamis Road 
77 North street 
33 North street 
4 Wellbraehead 
23 John street 
Newmonthill 

182 East High street 
Prior Road 

68 Castle street 
96 North street 
25 Market Place 
Kirkton 

3 Castle street 
51 North street 

69 West High street 
94 West High street 

4 Horsewater Wynd 

18 Manor street 
Mansefield House 
17 Victoria street 
25 Manor street 
37 Dundee Loan 

30 West High street 
77 North street 
163 East High street 
24 Green street 

19 John street 
86 Castle street 
13 Canmore street 
12 North street 
Archie's Park 

11 Canmore street 
Laurel Bank 

48 Glamis Road 
22 Prior Road 

12 Canmore street 
1 2^ North street 
37 John street 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



Brown, William 

Brown, William 

Brown, William Thomson 

Bruce, Alexander 

Bruce, David 

Bruce, George 

Bruce, George 

Bruce, James 

Bruce, James 

Bruce, James 

Bruce, James 

Bruce, Richard 

Bruce, Robert 

Bruce, Robert 

Bruce, William 

Burnett, Charles 

Burns, Alexander 

Burns, John 

Burns, Robert 

Burns, William 

Butcliart, David 

Butchart, James 

Butchart, James 

Butchart, John 

Butter, John 

Byars, David 

Byars, George 

Byars, James 

Byars, James 

Byars, John 

Byars, Robert 

Byars, William 

Byars, William 

Byars, William 

Cable, Alexander 

Cable, James 

Cable, James 

Cable, John 

Cable, John 

Cable, William 

Caie, George Johnston 

Caird, Barron 

Caird, Charles 

Caird, James 

Caird, William 

Calder, David 

C alder, James 

Calder, John 

Calder, William 

Calder, William 

Callander, Alexander 



Carter 

Dyker 

Salesman 

Sawmiller 

Carter 

Labourer 

Painter 

Weaver 

Photographer 

Factory worker 

Stoker 

Shoemaker 

Bank agent 

Carter 

Labourer 

Factory manager 

Joiner 

Labourer 

Winder 

Baker [chant 

Grocer & wine mer- 

Factory worker ^ 

Factory worker 

Farm servant 

Farmer 

Contractor 

Tenter 

Manufacturer 

Residenter 

Stationer 

Mason 

Manufacturer 

Factory worker . 

Mason 

Factory worker 

Tenter 

Tenter (foreman) 

Tenter 

Doctor of Medicine 

Draper 

Clergyman 

Labourer 

Labourer 

Quarrier 

Baker 

Dyker 

Mason 

Tenter 

Mason 

Mason 

Cowfeeder 



36 Lour Road 

17 New Road 

65 West High street 
46 North street 
26 North street 
44 South street 

61 Glamis Road 
Zoar 

5 Academy street 

37 North street 
3 Wellbraehead 
40 Backwynd 

63 East High street 
34^ Dundee Tjoan 

11 Horsewater Wynd 
Lour Road 

18 Newmonthill 
42 Prior Road 
7 Newmonthill 
15 Green street 

62 Castle street 
39 North street 

19 Littlecauseway 

19 Littlecauseway 
Nether Turin 

65 Glamis Road 

5 Lappiedub 

62 Yeaman street 
62 Castle street 
1 Glamis Road 
9'd^ West High street 
72 Yeaman street 

20 Dundee Road 

12 Charles street 
3 Arbroath Road 

13 John street 

186 East High street 
1 St. James' Road 

17 East High street 
26 Market Place 
The Manse 

18 Dundee Road 

14 St. James' Road 
Dundee Road 

79 West High street 

3 Charles street 

45 West High street 

Newmonthill 

26 Market Place 

10 South street 

6 Dundee Loan 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



Callender, David 
Callender, John 
Callender, William 
Cameron, John 
Cameron, Peter 
Campbell, David. 
Campbell, George 
Campbell, James 
Campbell, John 
Campbell, Robert H. 
Campbell, AVilliam 
Cargill, Francis 
Cargill, James 
Cargill, James 
Cargill, John 
Carnegie, Alexander 
Carnegie, George 
Carnegy, Patrick Alexan- 
Carrie, David [der Watson 
Cathro, William 
Cathro, William 
Chalmers, David 
Chalmers, George 
Chalmers, George 
Chalmers, William 
Chaplin, John Hurry 
Chaplin, John 
Christie, David 
Christie, David 
Christie, James 
Christie, James 
Christie, James 
Christie, John 
Christie, William 
Christison, William 
Clark, Alexander 
Clark, Andrew 
Clark, Charles 
Clark, Charles 
Clark, David 
Clark, David 
Clark, George 
Clark, James 
Clark, James 
Clark, James 
Clark, John 
Clark, John 
Clark, John A. 
Clark, Peter 
Clark, Robert 
Clark, William 



Rail, porter 

Cowfeeder 

Stonebreaker 

Labourer 

Labourer 

Blacksmith 

Quarrier 

Excise officer 

Coachman 

Milliner 

Water inspector 

Draper (retired) 

Builder 

Shuttlemaker 

Retired builder 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Gentleman 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Railway servant 

Joiner 

Stableman 

Engine driver 

Draper 

Clerk 

Weaver 

Shoemaker 

Night watchman 

Game dealer 

Postman 

Farmer 

Labourer 

Shambles keeper 

Spirit dealer 

Factory worker 

Mason 

Barber 

Labourer 

Lapper 

Draper's assistant 

Stamper 

Plumber 

Mason 

Labourer 

Agent 

Factory worker 

Watchmaker 

Labourer 

Saddler 

Mason 



22 Market Place 
Dundee Road 
1 Broadcroft 
50 Dundee Road 
Stark's Close 
71 Glamis Road 

24 Montrose Road 

17 Green street 
4 Green street 
63 Castle street 
20 liour Road 
Bloomfield Cottage 
Canmore street 

13 Zoar 
Ferryton Cottage 

18 Glamis Road 

88 West High street 
Lour House 

28 Nursery Feus 

14 Zoar 

25 John street 

12 St. James' Road 
Fonah Close 
24 John street 

26 & 28 Castle street 

20 Montrose Road 
67 Dundee Loan 
14 South street 
Headingplacestone 
111 East High street 

8 Glamis Road 
Bankhead 

9 Victoria street 
Bailliewell Brae 

4] West High street 

21 Glamis Road 
91 North street 

44 East High street 
182 East High street 
34 Manor street 
85 West High street 
o Horsewater Wjiid 
97 East High street 

29 North street 

88 West High street 
101 Backwynd 
7 Prior Road 
62 Castle street 
17 Newmonthill 
33 Backwynd 

22 Arbroath Road 



lO 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



Clark, William 
Clark, William 
Clark, William 
Clark, William 
Clark, Wniiam 
Clementsen, John 
Cobb, Alexander 
Cobb, Charles 
Cobb, John Thomson 
Coghill, James 
Colville, James 
Colville, Kobert 
Connel, William 
Conney, James 
Constable, William 
Cook, Alexander Taylor 
Cook, Charles 
Cook, Charles 
Cook, James 
Cook, Robert 
Cook, William 
Cook, William 
Cook, William 
Cooper, George 
Comfoot, Alexander 

Couttie, James 
Couttie, John 
I*' Coutts, John 

Coutts, John 

Coutts, Frederick 

Coutts, William 

Coutts, William, jun. 

Cowie, James 

Cowie, John 

Crabb, David 

Crabb, Robert 

Craig, James 

Craig, Robert 

Craik, Alexander 

Craik, David 

Craik, David 

Craik, James 

Craik, James 

Craik, James 

Craik, James Watson 

Craik, John 

Craik, John Fyfe 

Craik, Peter 

Craik, Robert Fyfe 

Craik, Thomas 

Craik, William Fyfe 



Mechanic 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Clerk 

Mason 

Hotelkee})er 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Teacher 

Mechanic 

Horse breaker 

Joiner 

Engine driver 

G-rocer 

Factory worker 

Constable 

Dresser 

Farmer 

Factory worker 

Retired farmer 

Weaver 

Factory worker 

Plasterer 

Clerk 

Wood turner 

Factory worker 

Groom 

Ropespinner 

Roj)e maker 

Confectioner 

Flesher 

Flesher 

Plumber 

Mason 

Labourer 

Solicitor 

Wood turner 

Weaver 

Manufacturer 

Residenter 

Lapper 

Manufacturer 

Joiner 

Tailor 

Clerk 

Joiner 

Manufacturer 

Tenter 

Proprietor of lands 

Clerk 

Clerk 



8 Arbroath Road 
13 Prior Road 
8 Charles street 
8 Glamis Road 

17 Horsewater Wvnd 
20Zoar 

15 Green street 
Chapel Park 
Hillside Cottage 
20 Manor street 
3 Academy street 
35 Nursery Feus 

1 Cath. Square 

126 East High street 
45 Dundee Road 
County Place 

18 Charles street 
Cossens 

3 Arbroath Road 
65 Castle street 
10 W. Sunny side 

10 Glamis Road 
17 Dundee Loan 
40 Lour Road 

34 North street 
53 Castle street 
Manor street 

20 Wellbraehead 
48 Castle street 
99 Castle street 

2 Manor street 

4 Manor street 
8 North street 

188 East High street 

11 Nursery Feus 

10 Yeaman street 
38 Canmore street 
126 East High street 
Hillpark 

14 Manor street 
186 East High street 
Viewmount 

11 John sti'eet 

101 East High street 
Littlecauseway 
23 John street 
Manor Park 

35 John street 
of Kingston 

14 West High street 
28 Manor street 



FORFAR DIRECTORY, 



II 



Crammond, David 
Crammond, James 
Crichton, Alexander 
Crighton, James 
Crighton, William 
Crockett, ^Villiam 
Crofts, James 
Cruickslianks, William 
Cumming, Alexander 
Cuthbert, Andrew 
Cuthbert, Charles 
Cuthbert, Charles 
Cuthbert, James 
Cuthbert, William 
Dalgety, Alexander 
Dalgetty, Alexander 
Dalgetty, David 
Dall, James 
Dall, William 
Dargie, Alexander 
Dargie, James 
Dai'gie, James 
Dargie, James 
Davidson, David 
Davidson, George 
Davidson, John 
Davidson, John 
Davidson, Peter 
Davie, George 
Davie, Robert 
Davie, Robert 
Deuehar, Alexander 
Deuchar, Alexander 

Dick, Charles 
Dick, David 
Dick, George 
Dick, James 
Dick, William 
Dick, William 
Dickson, James 
Dickson, John 
Doig, Alexander 
Doig, Alexander 
Doig, David 
Doig, Edward 
Doig, George 
Doig, James 
Doig, James 
Doig, James 
Doig, John 



Wood turner 
Joiner 
Ironmonger 
Carter 

Factory worker 
Gamekeeper 
Factory worker 
Factory worker 
Clergyman 
Bleacher 
Ploughman 
Lapper 
Weaver 
Baker 
Draper 

Factory worker 
Tenter 
Joiner 
Mason 

Factory worker 
Mason 
Mason 
Lapper 
Labourer 
Labourer 
Hatter 
Labourer 
Labourer 
Mason 
Carter 

Factory worker 
Shoemaker 
Flesh er and cattle- 
dealer 
Mason 
Stationer 
Factory worker 
Manufacturer 
Clothier 
Tenter 

Cloth Inspector 
Labourer 
Gardener 
Draper 
Mason 
Ropemaker 
Painter 
Labourer 
Cowfeeder 
Mason 
Plasterer 



17 Green street 

51 Dundee Loan 

Cross 

4 Charles street 
1 84 East High street 
Haughs, Glamis 
100 Dundee Loan 

26 North street 
First Free Manse 

18 Nursery Feus 
81 Backwynd 

9 North street 
8 Wellbraehead 

10 Wellbraehead 

55, 57 East High street 

30 South street 

47 South street 

25 Market Place 

3 Bell Place 

3 William street 

8 Dundee Loan 
22 Green street 

86 West High street 

3 Victoria street 

Helen street 

99 East High street 

76 East High street 

6 Newmonthill 

10 Watt street 

Lochside 

85 North street 

49 Castle street 

27 Glamis Road 

28 William street 

1 South street 

52 West High street 
69 Backwynd 

28 Green street 
64 East High street 
45 South street 
10 Newmonthill 
Easterbank 

9 South street 
6 Glamis Road 
8 Watt street 
30 South street 
24 Backwynd 
Quarrybank 
Archie's Park 
30 South street 



12 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



Doig, Thomas 
Doig, William 
Doig, William 
Doig, William 
Don, Gilbert W. 
Don, John Birrell 
Donald, Alexander 
Donald, Alexander Low 
Donald, David 
Donald, George 
Donald, Henry 
Donald, James 
Donald, James 
Donald, John 
Donald, William 
Donaldson, George 
Donaldson, George 
Donaldson, John 
Donaldson, William 
Dorward, George 
Douglas, George 
Dowell, William 
Drewit, Thomas 
Duff, Donald 
Duff, John 
Duff, Thomas 
Duff, William 
Duffus, James 
Dunbar, David 
Duncan, Alexander 
Duncan, David 
Duncan, David 
Duncan, David 
Duncan, George 
Duncan, Henry 
Duncan, James 
Duncan, James 
Duncan, James 
Duncan, William 
Duncan, William 
Duncan, William 
Dundas, David 
Dundas, James 
Dunn, David Watson 
Dunsmuir, WilUam 
Duthie, James 
Duthie, WiUiam 
Dyce, John 
Easson, George 
Easson, James 
Easson, John 



General dealer 

Gamedealer (retired) 

Tailor 

Factory worker 

Manufacturer 

Manufacturer 

Tenter 

Tobacconist 

Grocer & spirit dlr. 

Slater 

Grocer 

Factory worker 

Joiner 

Factory worker 

Tailor 

Factory worker 

Lapper 

Factory worker 

Railway guard 

Gardener 

Draper 

Painter 

Van driver 

Labourer 

Labourer 

Laboui"er 

Factory worker 

Labourer 

Railway shunter 

Tailor's cutter 

Tenter 

Tenter 

SaAvmiller 

Mason 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Tenter 

Factory worker 

Tenter 

Factory worker 

Tenter 

Mechanic 

Fireman 

Rope manufacturer 

Rope spinner 

Currier 

Factory worker 

Labourer 

Joiner 

Joiner 

Signalman 



59 West Higli street 
Ivybank Cottage 
186 East High street 
18 St. James' Road 
Briar Cottage 
Pitmuies House 

17 Manor street 

29 New Road 
17-19 Glamls Road 

18 North street 

80b & c AVest High street 

Backwynd 

12 Watt street 

12 Wellbraehead 

134 Castle street 

88 West High street 

5 East Sunnyside 
17 Manor street 
Catherine Square 
Briar's Lodge 

1 Vennel 

47 East High street 

2 Archie's Park 
17 New Road 
Market Place 

61 West High street 

17 North street 

24 North street 
Gallowhill 

85 East High street 
2 Zoar 

6 Dundee Road 

18 Don street 

6 Wellbraehead 
5 Backwynd 
26 Nursery Feus 

18 Dundee Road 
12 Montrose Road 
1 St. James' Road 
12^ North street 

8 Don street 
o Archie's Park 

34 South street 

35 Dundee Loan 
14 Dundee Loan 

25 Glamis Road 
8 Charles street 

19 Prior Place 
12 John street 

30 Green street 
24 John street 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



13 



Easson, Samuel 
Easson, William 
Easton, James 
Easton, John 
Easton, William Fyfc 
Eaton, George 
Edgar, James 
Edmond, David 
Edward, Charles 
Edwards, John 
Edwards, James 
Edwards, James 
Edward, William 
Edwards, William 
Elder, William 
Elliot, James 
Ellis, Alexander 
Ellis, David 
Ellis, James 
Ellis, James 
Ellis, James 
Esplin, A-lexander 
Esplin, David Boath 
Esplin, James 
Esplin, John 
Esplin, Joseph 
Esplin, Thomas Balfour 
Ewen, James 
Fairweather, David 
Fairweather, Robert 
Falconer, Charles 
Falconer, Daniel 
Falconer, David 
Falknor, William 
Farquhar, David 
Farquhar, James 
Farquharson, Adam 
Farquharson, James 
Farquharson, William 
Fearn, Charles 
Fearn, Stewart 
Fell, David 

Fenton, Andrew l^owson 
Fenton, David C. 
Fenton, David M. 
Fenton, Henry Hardy 
Fenton, John Lowson 
Fenton, John M'Kenzie 
Ferguson, James 
Ferguson, James 
Ferguson, John 



Carter 

Factory worker 

Mason 

Tinsmith 

Labourer 

Flesher 

Carter 

Blacksmith 

Butcher 

Stationmaster 

Residenter 

Weaver 

Baker 

iNlissionary 

Labourer 

Fishdealcr 

Shoemaker 

Pensioner 

Mason 

Painter 

Mason 

Tenter 

Gas manager 

Joiner 

Tenter 

Carter 

Baker 

Wood merchant 

Factory worker 

Crofter 

Labourer 

Watchmaker 

Blacksmith 

Commission agent 

Oiler 

Butcher 

Pedlar 

Builder 

Labourer 

Factory worker 

Policeman 

Labourer 

Clerk 

Baker 

Shoemaker 

Draper 

Factor and Agent 

Warder 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Tanner 



41 Prior Road 

16 Victoria street 
123 Castle street 

10 Wellbraehead 
188 East High street 

8 Castle street 
Market Place 

20 Arbroath Road 

22 Dundee Road 
Victoria street 

72^ West High street 

42 South street 
12 Castle street 
68 Castle street 
Backwynd 

31 Nursery Feus 
Market Place 
29 Backwynd 
7 Lour Road 
Market Place 

34 Yeaman street 
29 John street 
North street 

156 East High street 

35 North street 

9 Backwynd 

25 West High street 
Millbank House 
6 Arbroath Road 
47 Prior Road 

103 Castle street 

104 Castle street 
23a Victoria street 
148 East High street 
Newford Park 

62 East High street 

11 St. James' Road 
St. James' Road 

21 Victoria street 

12 Charles street 
Lininghills 

23 St. James' Road 

36 South street 

141 East High street 
5 Watt street 
70 Yeaman street 
Yeaman street 
County Place 
18 Glamis Road 
15 Watt street 
9 New Road 



14 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



Fercusoii, William 
Ferguson, William 
Fevrier, James 
Ferrier, John 
Fcttes, John 
Findlay, Andrew 
Findlay, Charles 
Findlay, Charles 
Findlay, David 
Findlay, David 
Findlay, George 
Findlay, George 
Findlay, James 
Findlay, James 
Findlay, James 
Findla)', John 
Fleming, David 
Fleming, David 
Fleming, James 
Fleming, Robert 
Forbes, Alexander 
Forbes, Alexander 
Forbes, David 
Forbes, John 
Forbes, Robert 
Forbes, Robert 
Forbes, Thomas 
Fordyce, James Neave 
Forsyth, David 
Forsyth, John 
Fowler, George 
Fraser, Alexander 
Fraser, Dickson 
Fraser, John 
Fraser, Robert 
Freeman, Alexander 
French, Alex. Ross 
FuUerton, Alexander 
Fullerton, William 
Fyfe, Andrew 
Fyfe, George 
Fyfe, James 
Fyfe, James 
Fyfe, James, jun. 
Fyfe, John 
Fyfe, John 
Fyfe, John 
Fyfe, Stewart 
Fyfe, William 
Fyffe, James 
Fyffe, James 



Factory worker 

Mason 

Labourer 

Fireman 

Barman 

Factory worker 

Farm servant 

Labourer 

Turner 

Labourer 

Bleacher 

Labourer 

Mason 

Shoemaker 

Joiner 

Bleacher 

Factory worker 

Labourer 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Grocer 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Factory overseer 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Factory Avorker 

Factory worker 

Druggist 

Pensioner 

Currier 

Gardener 

Railway servant 

Solicitor 

Dentist 

Reedmaker 

Shoemaker 

Labourer 

Painter 

Grocer 

Joiner 

Factory worker 

Weaver 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Baker 

Baker 

Foreman bleacher 

Flesher 



8 Ilorsewater Wynd 

14 Little Causeway 

14 Dundee Loan 

7 Broadcroft 

Dundee Road 

oO Nursery Feus 

Dundee Road 

17 Arbroath Road 

19 Arbroath Road 

50 Dundee Road 

Yearaan street 

26 Zoar 

45 Dundee Road 

42 Lour Road 

178 East High street 

04 John street 
17 North street 

l:')2 East High street 

10 Watt stre'et 
Hillockhead 

122 East High street 

5 Prior Road 
7 New Road 

11 North street 

41 South street 

17 Horsewater Wynd 
50 Dundee Loan 
81 Backwynd 
60 Dundee Loan 
48 Dundee Loan 
Castle street 

42 South street 
7 Victoria street 
69 Glamis Road 
Gallowhill 
Broomroof Cottage 
3S East High street 
Stark's Close 

23 Nursery Feus 
64 Dundee Road 

1 Montrose Road 

2 Arbroath Road 
90 Dundee Loan 
St. James' Road 
10 Wellbraehead 
93^ West High street 
64 East High street 

6 Nursery Feus 
94 North street 
45 South street 
20 Newmonthill 



FORFAR DIRECTORY, 



15 



Fyffe, John 
Fyffe, Robert 
Fyffe, Thomas 
FyfPe, William 
Gavin, William 
Geekie, Peter 
Gellatly, David 
Gemlo, David 
Gerrard, Alexander 
Gibb, Alexander 
Gibb, Thomas 
Gibb, Walter 
Gibb, William 
Gibson, Alexander 
Gibson, David 
Gibson, Graham 
Gibson, James 
Gibson, James 
Gibson, William Alex. 
Glen, James 
Glen, Alexander 
Glen, William 
Glendye, James 
Goode, Peter A. 
Goodall, William 
Gordon, Alexander 
Gordon, George 
Gordon, George 
Gordon, James 
Gordon, James 
Gordon, John 
Gordon, Robert 
Gordon, William 
Gourlay, William 
Gowans, John 
Gracie, David 
Gracie, George 
Graham, David Morgan 
Grant, Alexander 
Grant, James 
Grant, James 
Grant, John 
Grant, John 
Grant, John 
Grant, Thomas 
Grant, William 
Gray, David 
Gray, James 
Gray, James Scott 
Gray, Robert 
Gray, Robert 



Baker 

Factory worker 

Labourer 

Rcsidenter 

Factory worker 

Labourer 

Joiner 

Factor}' worker 

Gas stoker 

Railway porter 

Mechanic 

Mason 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Farmer 

Broker 

Warehouseman 

Factory worker 

Mason 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Lapper 

Shoemaker 

Gardener 

Toy merchant 

Shoemaker 

Factory Avorker 

Joiner 

Gardener 

Factory worker 

Labourer 

Factory worker 

Solicitor 

Joiner [&c. 

Messenger-at-arms, 

Factory worker 

Gas Foreman 

Auctioneer &f armer 

Manure merchant 

Sawmiller 

Factory worker 

Labourer 

Sawmill er 

Tailor 

Mason 

Librarian 

Rail, labourer 

Coachman 

Solicitor 

Grocer's assistant 

China merchant 



50 South street 

1")7 Fast High street 
()7 West High street 
24 Dundee Loan 
r)l|^ West High street 
1 IG Dundee Road 
o4 Lour Road 
G New Road 
-7 Nursery Frus 
1 1 Wellbraehead 

119 East High street 
G Lappiedub 

/U Yeaman street 

LS Littlecauseway 

WhitehiUs 

"21 Dundee Loan 

47 Dundee Road 

18 Littlecauseway 

21 Dundee Loan 

51 Dundee Loan 
75 East High street 
186 East High street 

120 East High street 
13 St. James' Road 
82 Castle street 

42 Dundee Loan 

10 Watt street 

15 Green street 

18 Lour Road 

19 Arbroath Road 
6 Watt street 

16 Charles street 

20 East High street 
16 Montrose Road 
Lily bank 

13 North street 
61 North street 
Slatefield 
Clochtow 

11 Zoar 

16 Dundee Road 

14 Dundee Road 
129 Castle street 
4 Dundee Road 
36 Manor street 

4 Castle street 

17 Montrose Road 

22 Lour Road 
Brigton House 

5 Wellbraehead 
45 Castle street 



i6 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



Greenhill, Charles 
Greenhill, Hugh 
Grcwav, Andrew 
Grewar, David 
Grewar, James 
Guild, David 
Guild, James 
Guild, James 
Guild, Thomas 
Guthrie, George 
Guthrie, John 
Guthrie, Thomas 
Guthrie, William 
Guthrie, William 
Hackney, Alexander 
Hackney, James 
Hadden, James 
Halket, James 
Halkett, William 
Halley, George 
Hanick, Richard 
Hanton, Alexander 
Hanton, Robert 
Hardie, Alexander 
Hardie, David 
Harris, James A. 
Harris, William 
Hastings, Alexander 
Hastings, David 
Hastings, AVilham Elder 
Haxton, Donald 
Hay, Alexander 
Hay, Alexander 
Hay, James 
Hay, Thomis 
Hay, William 
Heath, William John 
Hebenton, David 
Hebenton, James 
Hebenton, AVilliam 
Henderson, Alexander 
Henderson, Alexander 
Henderson, Andrew M. 
Henderson, David 
Henderson, George 
Henderson, George 
Henderson, James 
Henderson, John 
Henderson, Thomas 
Henderson, William 
Hendry, Andrew 



Butcher 

Hotelkeeper 

Factory worker 

Bleacher 

Labourer 

Draper 

JNIason 

Draper 

INIason 

Game dealer, &c. 

Late farmer 

Mechanic 

Plasterer 

Blacksmith 

Labourer 

Tailor 

Blacksmith 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Tenter 

Broker 

Labourer 

Labourer 

Farm servant 

Tailor 

Factory worker 

Saddler 

Currier 

Currier 

Lapper 

Ploughman 

Bakery manager 

Joiner 

Mechanic 

Quarrier 

Joiner 

Printer 

Hosier 

Ironmonger 

Shoemaker 

Tailor 

Ploughman 

Painter 

Joiner 

Weaver 

Factory worker 

Fireman 

Factory worker 

Bank agent 

Factory worker 

Van driver 



143 East High street 
Castle street 

19 East Sunny side 
186 East High street 

13 Charles street 
Chapel Park 

12 Wellbraehead 

Chapel Park 

11 Lappiedub 

Couttie's Wvnd 

Whitehills 

'20 Wellbraehead 

20 Charles street 
10 Backwynd 

17 Zoar 

6^ Backwynd 
23 jSTursery Feus 
52 South street 
7 Prior Road 

18 Newmonthill 

96 East High street 
7 Montrose Road 
17 Arbroath Road 

I Zoar 

'26 North street 
20 Nursery Feus 
62 Dundee Road 
23a Victoria street 
Strang street 
95 East High street 
80 Dundee Loan 
26 Canmore steeet 

7 Academy street 
10 John street 

8 Archie's Park 

29 Nursery Feus 
34 East High street 
8 Littlecauseway 
Chapel Park 

II Green street 
70 Dundee Road 
7 Newmonthill 
17 Green street 
65 Glamis Road 
1 Teuchat Croft 
16 Prior Road 
15 Manor street 

14 Dundee Road 
Cross 

22 Zoar 

30 North street 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



17 



Hendry, David 
Hendry, James 
Hendry, James 
Hendry, K,obert 
Hendry, William 
High, David 
High, John 
Hill, Alexander 
Hill, Alexander 
Hill, Charles 
Hill, David 
Hill, David 
Hill, David 
Hill, George 
Hill, James 
Hill, James 
Hill, James 
Hill, James 
Hill, James 
Hill, John 
Hill, WiUiam 
Hodge, James 
Hood, David Mollison 
Hopton, John 
Hopton, Joseph 
Hosie, William 
Hovels, William 
Howie, John 
Hume, Walter 
Hunter Andrew 
Hunter, Charles William 
Hunter, James 
Hunter, William 
Hunter, William 
Hurry, James 
Hutcheson, Alexander 
Hutchison, George 
Hutchison, Robert 
Hutchison, Robert 
Hutchison, William 
Hutton, James 
Innes, Peter 
Ireland, David 
Ireland, James Forbes 
Ireland, John 
Ireland, William 
Irons, Alexander 
Irons, David 
Irons, David 
Irons, James 
Irons, William 



Mason 

Salesman 

Vintner 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Baker 

Labourer 

Cloth finisher 

Stoneware merchant 

Clerk 

Joiner 

Coachman 

Tenter 

Tenter 

Railway Porter 

Inspector of way 

Factory worker 

Joiner 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Lappcr 

Carter 

Bootmaker 

Factory worker 

Pensioner 

Carter 

Factory worker 

Bleacher 

Spirit dealer 

Blacksmith 

Doctor of Medicine 

Mechanic 

Gardener 

Tenter 

Draper's assistant 

Joiner 

Factory worker 

Saddler 

Ploughman 

Hawker 

Foreman winder 

Millwright 

Tailor 

Mason 

Factory worker 

Baker 

Lapper 

Ironmonger 

Quarrier 

Mason 

Baker 



23 Prior Road 

o West High street 

Montrose Road 

97 West High street 

70 Dundee Road 

o Osnaburgh street 

17 Watt street 

6 Wcllbraehead 

8-10 South street 

Vennel 

liininghills 

65 West High street 

Hillockhead 

163 East High street 

13 Zoar 
Victoria street 

14 Nursery Feus 
I) Littlecauseway 
39 Backwynd 

26 North street 
2 Bell Place 
35 North street 

4 Canmore street 

12 Stark's (^lose 

10 Stark's Close 
94 Dundee Ijoan 
22 Wcllbraehead 
38 John street 
112 Castle street 

5 Prior Road 

59 East High street 
69 Dundee Loan 
54 South street 
22 North street 
73 Backwynd 
52 East High street 
9 Horsewater Wynd 
Vennel 

15 Newmonthill 

13 St. James' Road 

17 Green street 
Gallowhill 

18 Dundee Road 

11 Watt street 
2 Archie's Park 

182 East High street 
48 North street 
26 Green street 
72 Dundee Loan 
2 East Sunnyside 
61 Dundee Loan 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



Jack, John 
Jack, Peter 
Jamie, Adam 
Jamieson, Gumming 
Jamieson, Jfimes 
Jamieson, William 
Jamieson, AVilliani 
Japp, William 
flarman, Joseph 
Jarvis, George 
Jarvis, AVilliam 
Johnston, Alexander 
Johnston, David 
tTohnston, David 
Johnston, David 
Johnston, David 
Johnston, George 
Johnston, James 
Johnston, John 
Johnston, John 
Johnston, Robert 
Johnston, Robert 
,rohnston, William 
Johnstone, Adam 
Johnstone, Alex. 
Johnstone, David 
Jolly, Alexander 
Kay, Solomon 
Keay, James 
Keay, Robert 
Keay, William 
Keay, William 
Keir, Charles 
Keith, Charles 
Keith, Charles 
Keith, David 
Keith, James 
Keith, James 
Keith, Robert 
Keith, AVilliam 
Keith, W^illiam 
Kennedy, Alexander 
Kennedy, Andrew 
Kennedy, David 
Kermach, John 
Kermack, James 
Kermack, John 
Kerr, Alexander 
Kerr, David Mitchell 
Kerr, James 
Kerr, James 



Mechanic 

Publican 

Fish dealer 

Clothier 

Factory worker 

Draper 

Factory worker 

Quarrier 

Hotelkeeper 

Draper 

Draper 

Factory worker 

Late Farmer 

Labourer 

Factory worker 

Wood turner 

Rlacksmitli 

Labourer 

Baker 

Labourer 

Factoi'}' worker 

Draper's assistant 

Drover 

Factory worker 

Wood tvn^ner 

Butcher 

Baker 

Mason 

Tenter 

Blacksmith 

Clerk 

Flesher 

Spirit dealer 

Gate keeper 

Gardener 

Weaver 

Collector of customs 

Dresser 

Factory worker 

Residenter 

Plumber 

Labourer 

Coal merchant 

Bleacher 

Manager 

Labourer 

Factory worker 

Slater 

Clerk 

Labourer 

Slater 



11 Zoar 

1^7 & 29 South street 
Couttie's Wynd 
Rosebank Cottage 

9 South street 

156 East High street 
35 South street 
58 Dundee Loan 

98 North street 
'1 Nursery Feus 
68 Castle street 

7 Glaniis Road 

8 Sparrowcrott 

15 Horsewater Wynd 
15 Manor street 
-Service Road 
Gallowhill 

13 Charles street 
132 East High street 
26 Glamis Road 

7 Glamis Road 
Gallowhill 

12 W^est High street 
119 East High street 
38 North street 

65 West High street 
35 Castle street 

14 St. James' Road 
12 Market Place 

34 Manor street 
37 Glamis Road 
79 Glamis Road 
100 Castle street 

10 Little Causeway 
42 South street 
112 Dundee Road 
74 Dundee Road 
12 St. James' Road 
12 New Road 

24 Canmore street 
78 Castle street 
37 North street 
53 North street 
21 Zoar 

99 East High street 
99 Back wynd 

110 East High street 
10 Glamis Road 
53 North street 
Helen street 
50 Dundee Road 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



19 



Kerr, John 

Kerr, Joseph 

Kerr, Thomas 

Kerr, WilliMiii 

Kettles, Robert 

Kewans, James 

Kidd, David 

Kidd, Joseph 

Kinnear, Alexander 

Kinnear, Charles 

Kinnear, David 

Kinnear, efoseph 

Kinsman, John 

Knox, flohn 

Kyd, James 

Kydd, Alexander 

Kydd, Alexander 

Kydd, David 

Kydd, Cieorge 

Kydd, James 

Kydd, James 

Kydd, William 

Lackie, David 

Lackie, John 

Laing, David 

Laing, John 

Laird, Alexander 

Laird, George 
Laird, James 
Laird, rfohn 

Laird, John, jun. 
Laird, William 
Lakie, John 

Lakie, flohn 
Lakie, William 
Lamb, Robert 
Lamond, Alexander 
Lamond, David 
Lamont, Alexander 
Lamont, Andrew, jun. 
Lamont, George 
Lamont, James 
Lamont, James 
Lamont, Peter 
Langlands, Alexander 
Langlands, David 
Langlands, David 
Langlands, David 
Langlands, James 
Langlands, John 
Langlands, Robert 



Baker 

Factor}' worker 

Mason 

Mason 

Farm servant 

Retired merchant 

Weaver 

Lamplighter 

Quarrier 

Cloth inspector 

Labourer 

Late farmer 

Labourer 

Schoolmastei" 

Clerk 

Weaver 

Tenter 

M.D. & farmer 

Factory worker 

Tailor 

Tailor 

Mechanic 

Labourer 

Cowfeeder 

Bleacher 

Bleacher 

Factory Avorker 

Manufacturer 

Mason 

Mason 

Manufacturer 

Factory worker 

Coal Merchant 

Labourer 

Factory worker 

Mechanic 

Factor}^ worker 

Labourer 

Factory worker 

Cattle dealer 

Factory worker 

Spiritdealer 

Labourer 

Factory overseer 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Plumber 

Baker 

Joiner 

Factory worker 

Tanner 



Wellbraehead 
!) AVellbraehead 

1 1 Watt street 
94 Dundee Loan 

21 John street 
Rosebank 

2 Lappiedub 
Chapel Park 

Archie's Park 

1 1 New Road 

6 Stark's Close 

15 Prior Road 
f) Archie's Park 
St. James' Road 
8 Green street 

1 Lappiedub 
') Lappiedub 
Bogindolla 

16 Dundee Road 
Gallowhill 

n(] C a inn ore street 
4H Lour Road 

12 Charles street 
West High street 

22 Wellbraehead 

1 Charles street 

3 Horse water Wynd 
Rosebank Road 

61 Castle street 
(jrowanbank 
Benholm Lodge 
18 South street 
55 Backwynd 
82 Dundee Loan 
8 Charles street 
43 South street 
6 New Road 
48 Dundee Loan 
10 Lappiedub 
10 Dundee Loan 

2 Lappiedub 

26 West High street 
88 West High street 

24 Dundee Road 
Bailliewellbrae 

137 East High street 
o West High street 
Glamis 

17 Watt street 
39 John street 

25 Canmore street 



20 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



Langlands, Peter 
Langlands, William 
Laverock, George 
Lawrence, James 
Lawson, James 
Leask, John, jun. 
Lennie, Charles 
Lees, Andrew 
Leighton, James 
Leith, Alexander 
Liddell, John 
Liddle, David 
Liddle, Stewart 
Liddle, William 
Lindsay, David 
Lindsay, David 
Lindsay, David 
Lindsay, David 
Lindsay, Graham 
Ijindsay, James 
Lindsay, John 
Lindsay, Thomas 
Lindsay, William 
Lindsay, William 
Lindsay, AVilliam 
Littlejohn, David 
Littlejohn, William 
Liveston, James 
Liveston, James 
Livingston, James 
Livingston, William 
Longmuir, John 
Low, Alexander 
Low, James 
Low, James 
Low, James 
Low, John 
Low, William 
Lowden, William 
Lowson, Alexander 
Lowson, Alexander 
Lowson, Andrew 
Lowson, Andrew, jun. 
Lowson, George 
Lowson, James 
Lowson, James 
Lowson, James 
Lowson, James 
Lowson, James 
Lowson, John 
Lowson, John 



Labourer 

Stoker 

Shoemaker 

Factory worker 

Shoemaker 

Fish dealer 

Agent 

Clerk 

Carter 

Labourer 

Mason 

Cabinetmaker 

Tenter 

Factory worker 

Tenter 

Dyker 

Kesidcntcr 

Publican 

Book canvasser 

Weaver 

Draper 

Vandriver 

C'attle dealer 

AVatchman 

Labourer 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Hawker 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Insurance agent 

Gardener 

Joiner 

Factory worker 

Restauranteur, &c. 

Factory worker 

Tailor 

Labourer 

Plumber 

Mason 

Governor 

Vintner 

Factory worker 

Manufacturer 

Retired saddler 

Railway servant 

Labourer 

Labourer 

Manufacturer 

Railway servant 

Residenter 



5 Victoria street 
5 Victoria street 
Gallowhill 

29 Prior Road 

137 East High street 
22 Wellbraehead 

22 Wellbraehead 
Glamis Road 
Chapel Park 

24 Victoria street 
14 Dundee Loan 
50 East High street 
79 Glamis Road 

52 North street 

25 Market Place 

30 Glamis Road 

17 St. James' Road 
81 Glamis Road 

7 Broadcroft 

110 Dundee Road 
16 Don street 
Academy street 

2 New Road 

38 Canmore street 
28 Zoar 

43 North street 
61 Dundee Loan 
36 Canmore street 
12 Nursery Feus 
16 Charles street 

44 Glamis Road 

8 East High street 
7 Glamis Road 

12 John street 
2-6 Don street 
44 South street 
28 Lour Road 
Teuchat Croft 
52 Dundee Loan 

23 Backwynd 
Poor House 

97 North street 

3 Academy street 
Beech Hill 

2 Sparrowcroft 

3 North street 

18 Dundee Road 
42 Dundee Loan 
Ferryton House 
87 North street 
Strang street 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



21 



Lowson, John 
Lowson, John, jun. 
Lowson, Peter 
Lowson, William 
Lowson, William 
Lowson, William 
Lowson, William, jun. 
Luke, David 
Ejuke, John 
Lunan, Robert 
Lundie, William 
Lyall, William 
Lyon, George 
M'Beth, James 
M'Corkindale, Donald 

Lachlan 
M'Donald, Alexander 
M'Donald, James 
M'Donald, John 
M'Donald, John 
jNI'Dougal, David 
M'Dougal, James 
M'Farlane, Alexander 
M'Farlane, Donald 
M'Gregor, Alexander 
M'Gregor, Alexander 
M'Gregor, James 
M'Gregor, William 
M'Gregor, Wm. Henry 
M'Hardy, David 
M'Intosh, Alexander 
M'Intosh, Alexander 
M'Intosh, Donald 
M'Intosh, Duncan 
M'Intosh, James 
M'Intosh, James 
M'Intosh, John 
M'Intosh, William 
M'Intosh, William 
M'Kay, David 
M'Kay. James 
M'Kay, John 
M'Kay, John Trantham 
M'Kenzie, Alexander 
M'Kenzie, Charles 
M'Kenzie, David 
M'Kenzie, David 
M'Kenzie, David 
M'Kenzie, David 
M'Kenzie, George 
M'Kenzie, John 



Manufacturer 

Manufacturer 

Factory worker 

Writer & bank agent 

Factory Manager 

Manufacturer 

Clerk 

Cowfeeder 

Joiner • 

Labourer 

Joiner 

Labourer 

Baker 

Plumber 

Clergyman 

J labourer 

Blacksmith 

Dairyman 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Shoemaker 

Labourer 

Joiner 

Carter 

Factory worker 

Carter 

Wood turner 

Grocer 

Factory worker 

Ironmonger 

Shoemaker 

Solicitor 

Joiner 

Bleacher 

Blacksmith 

Factory worker 

Joiner 

Blacksmith 

Beltmaker 

Mason 

Bootcloser 

Asylum warder 

Labourer 

Weaver 

Factory worker 

Mechanic 

Tenter 

Factory worker 

Coal merchant 

Tenter 



Hillbank 
Beech Hill 

15 Newmonthill 
West High street 

16 North street 
Hillbank 
Kirkton 

152 East High street 

10 Zoar 

106 Castle street 
144 East High street 
Gallowhill 
93 Backwynd 

14 Canmore street 

Lilybank Villa 

16 Littlccauseway 

11 William street 

13 William street 
Bailliewellbrae 

16 Dundee Loan 
113 Castle street 
Prior Road 

56 South street 

17 Manor street 
Gallowhill 

28 Arbroath Road 

15 Zoar 

75 Glamis Road 
43 North street 

14 Castle street 

30 Zoar 

31 Dundee Loan 
108 Castle street 

13 Manor street 
45 Prior Road 
115 Castle street 
Lunanhead 

104 East High street 
] 3 Glamis Road 

14 Newmonthill 
14 Dundee Loan 
Newmonthill 

9 Teuchat Croft 

4 Dundee Loan 
30 Manor street 

51| W^est High street 
8 Arbroath Road 

5 Broadcroft 

93 West High street 
Gallowhill 



22 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



M'Kenzie, Robert 
M'Kenzie, William 
M'Kenzie, AVilliam 
M'Kenzie, William 
M'Kinnon, Arthur 
M'Kinnon, Joseph 
M'Laggan, A¥illiam 
M'Laren, Alexander 
M'Laren, David 
M'Laren, James 
M'Laren, William 
M'Laren, William 
M'Laren, William 
M'Lean, Alexander 
M'Lean, James 
M'Lean, John Anderson 
M'Lean, John 
M'Lean, Walter 
M'Leish, David 
M'Leod, Kenneth 
M'Math, Robert 
M'Nab, Archibald 
M'Nab, John 
M'Nab, Robert 
M'Nab, Robert 
M'Nab, Robert 
M'Phee, Duncan 
M'Pherson, Alexander 
M'Pherson, Archibald 
M'Pherson, Oliver 
MacdougJill, James 
MacHardy, Alexander 
Mackay, Alexander 
Mackie, Thomas 
Mackie, William 
Macrae, John 
Malcolm, James 
Malcolm, James 
Malcolm, Robert 
Malcolm, William 
Malcolm, William 
Malcolm, William 
Mands, James 
Mands, William 
Mann, James 
Mann, James 
Mann, James 
Mann, John Holmes 
Mann, Joseph 
Mann, William 
Marshall, George 



Factory worker 

Labourer 

Factory worker 

Surfaceman 

Bleacher 

Tanner 

Factory worker 

Plumber 

Carter 

Baker 

Painter 

Labourer 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Builder 

Solicitor 

Weaver 

Farmer 

Confectioner 

Tailor 

Mechanic 

Dresser 

Factory worker 

Clothier 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Painter 

Fireman 

Sewing mach. agent 

Printer 

Factory worker 

Solicitor 

Shoemaker 

Teacher 

Lamplighter 

Labourer 

Labourer 

Night watcher 

Grocer 

Tinsmith 

Gardener 

Plumber 

Factory worker 

Mason 

Gardener 

Hostler 

Mechanic 

Tailor 

Tailor & clothier 

Carter 

Mason 



50 West High street 
79 West High street 
Catherine Square 

28 Zoar 

30 Glamis Road 

21 Glamis Road 

18 AVilliam street 
East Sunnyside 
Gallowhill 

29 Backwynd 
87 Backwynd 

178 East High street 

22 Manor street 
13 Strang street 
36 John street 
New Road 

28 Arbroath Road 
FofFarty, Kinnettles 

31 East High street 
11 Yeaman street 
17 Backwynd 
Headingstone Place 

8 West Sunnyside 
150 East High street 

11 Wellbraehead 
24 Victoria street 
143 East High street 

12 Glamis Road 
12 Yeaman street 
22 North street 

4 Bell Place 
Easterbank 
27 North street 
Lily bank House 
188 East High street 
42 Dundee Loan 
7 Green street 
99 East High street 
22 Glamis Road 

19 New Road 

19 St. James' Road 

6 Nursery Feus 

77 West High street 

68 West High street 

95 Backwynd 

24 Backwynd 

24 William street 

9 Wellbraehead 
12 Littlecauseway 
Gallowhill 

39 Prior Road 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



23 



Marshall, James 
Marshall, John 
Martin, Charles 
Martin, James 
Martin, WilKam 
Mason, Alexander 
Mason, Andrew 
Mason, Peter 
Massie, Joseph 
Massie, William 
Masterton, David 
Masterton, David 
Masterton, George 
Masterton, James 
Masterton, William 
Mather, John 
Mathers, James 
Mathers, William 
Matthew, James 
Matthew, William 
Maver, John 
Maxwell, David 
Maxwell, George 
Maxwell, George 
Maxwell, William 
Mealmaker, John 
Meek, Alexander 
Meldrum, Andrew 
Meldrum, David 
Meldrum, David 
Meldrum, James 
Meldrum, John 
Meldrum, William 
Melvin, John 
Menzies, Adam 
Menzies, John 
Michie, Thomas 
Michie, William 
Millar, Alexander 
Millar, Alexander 
Millar, David 
Millar, John 
Milne, Alexander 
Milne, Andrew 
Milne, Andrew 
Milne, Andrew 
Milne, Charles 
Milne, David 
Milne, David 
Milne, David 
Milne, David 



Draper 

Clerk 

Factory manager 

Grocer & wine mer- 

Joiner [chant 

Cloth inspector 

Mason 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Fireman 

Plasterer 

Factory worker 

Dyker 

Weaver 

Factory worker 

Coal agent 

Shoemaker 

Watchmaker 

Carter 

Draper 

Labourer 

Mechanic 

Mechanic 

Mechanic 

Fireman 

Factory worker 

Shoemaker 

Factory worker 

Grocer 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Baker 

Grocer [chant 

Grocer & wine mer- 

Plumber 

Lapper 

Police constable 

Cowfeeder, &c. 

Carter 

Factory worker 

Farmer 

Carter 

Land owner 

Factory worker 

Mason 

Factory worker 

Manure agent 

Factory worker 

Lapper 

Labourer 

Mason 



108-10 West High street 
'26 William street 
St. James' Road 
34 Castle street 
3 William street 

15 New Road 
West High street 
12 New Road 

26 Dundee Loan 
12 St. James' Road 
108 Castle street 
26 North street 
10 Watt street 
Prior Road 
79 Backwynd 
Market Place 

7 Zoar 

86 Castle street 
'26 North street 

8 Manor street 
12 North street 

16 Watt street 
William street 
Academy street 
21 Montrose Road 
40 West High street 
Gallowhill 

12 Wellbraehead 
95 West High street 
85 Backwynd 

16 St. James' Road 
108 East High street 
Backwynd 

Manor street 

5 Montrose Road 

17 East Sunny side 
58 South street 
Belmont Dairy 

6 Dundee Road 

108 East High street 
Wester Oathlaw 
26^ West High street 
Cherrybank 
54 Dundee Road 
67 West High street 
32 Yeaman street 
5 Market Place 
Helen street 

5 John street 

6 Charles street 
23 Nursery Feus 



24 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



Milne, David, sen. 
Milne, James 
Milne, James 
Milne, James 
Milne, James 
Milne, James V. 
Milne, James, jun. 
Milne, John 
Milne, Jotn 
Milne, John 
Milne, Robert 
Milne, Robert 
Milne, William 
Milne, William 
Milne. William 
Milne, William 
Mitchell, Alexander 
Mitchell, Charles 
Mitchell, Charles 
Mitchell, Charles 
Mitchell, David 
Mitchell, David 
INIitchell, George 
Mitchell, James 
Mitchell, James 
Mitchell, John 
Mitchell, John 
Mitchell, John 
Mitchell, Skene 
Mitchell, Thomas 
Mitchell, William 
Mitchell, William 
Moffat, David 
Moffat, James 
Moflfat, James 
Moffat, John 
Moffat, John 
Moffat, WilHam 
Moir, Robert 
Mollison, Brimner 
MoUison, David 
MolHson, William 
Moncrieff, Alexander 
Monteith, John 
More, David 
Morrice, William 
Morris, James 
Morrison, David 
Morrison, David 
Morrison, James 
Morrison, John 



Weaver 

Railway servant 

Confectioner 

Mason 

Hallkeeper 

Clerk 

House proprietor 

Shoemaker 

Tailor 

Residenter 

Tailor 

Shoemaker 

Dyker 

Plumber 

Labourer 

Lapper 

Fireman 

Flesher 

Photographer 

Factory worker 

Turner 

Shoemaker 

Labourer 

Joiner 

Farmer 

Factory worker 

Labourer 

Plasterer 

Labourer 

Rail. car. inspector 

Factory worker 
Labourer 

Slater 

Draper 

Manufacturer 

Bleacher 

Signalman 

Slater 

Bleacher 

Labourer 

Grocer 

Turner 

Factory worker 

Railway servant 

Cowfeeder 

Sup. of county police 

Labourer 

Joiner 

Wood turner 

Factory worker 

Dairyman 



4 Broadcroft 
7 Yeaman street 
99 East High street 
58 Dundee Loan 
88 Castle street 
46 Glamis Road 
86 Dundee Loan 
138 East High street 
42 John street 
Zoar 

15 Charles street 
50 South street 
7 Yeaman street 
6 Wellbraehead 
61 AVest High street 
9 Manor street 
39 South street 
79 North street 
100 East High street 
125 Castle street 
26 Yeaman street 
12 Charles street 
83 Backwynd 
39 South street 
Quilkoe 

15 Arbroath Road 
9 North street 

16 Watt street 
6 Nursery Feus 
Prior Cottage 

6 Watt street 

122 East High street 

11 New Road 

16 Lour Road 

St. James' Road 

42 West High street 

14 John street 

3 New Road 

25 Glamis Road 

79 West High street 

46 Dundee Loan 

93 East High street 

64 East High street 

Zoar 

New Road 

County Place 

5 Prior Road 

1 Dundee Loan 

39 South street 

22 Prior Road 

Easter Bank 



FORFAR DIRECTORY, 



25 



Morrison, John 
Morrison, John 
I Morrison, William 
^Morrison, William 
Morton, Robert 
Moves, Thomas 
Mnnro, Andrew 
Munro, Bain 
Munro. James 
Munro, James 
Munro, James 
Munro, James 
Munro, Peter 
Munro, William 
Munro, William 
Murdoch, Alexander 
Murdoch, Alexander 
Murdoch, James D. 
]Murray, James 
Murray, William 
Murray, AVilliam Fettes 
Myles, Adam Whitson 
Myles, John 
Myles, Robert Freer 
Myles, William 
Neave, Alexander 
jSTeave, Andrew 
Neave, David 
Neave, James 
Neave, Peter 
Neave, Ritchie 
Neave, William 
Neave, A¥illiam 
Neil, G-eorge 
Neilson, Andrew 
Neish, Patrick 
Newsome, John 
Nicolson, George Shepherd 
Nicolson, James 
Nicoll, Alexander 
Nicoll, Arthur 
Nicoll, David 
Nicoll, David 
Nicoll, David 
Nicoll, George 
Nicoll, James 
Nicoll, James 
Nicoll, James 
Nicoll, James 
Nicoll, James 
Nicoll, James 



Factory manager 

Book agent 

Joiner 

Lapper 

Ropespinner 

Drover 

General dealer 

Ironfounder 

Ironfounder 

Bleacher 

Toy merchant 

Architect 

Factory worker 

Labourer 

Gardener 

Wood turner 

Clerk 

Watchmaker 

Fruiterer 

Blacksmith 

Doctor of medicine 

Solicitor [& surgery 

Writer 

Solicitor 

Baker 

Insurance agent 

Labourer 

Factory worker 

Ironmonger 

Plumber 

Weaver 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Teacher 

Mechanic 

Draper 

Mechanic 

Editor 

Grocer, &c. 

Baker 

Draper (late) 

Weaver 

Cowfeeder 

Factory worker 

Tenter 

Cattle dealer 

Lapper 

Shoemaker 

Joiner 

Cattle dealer 

Gardener 



Kirkton 

77 Glamis Road 

Dundee Loan 

82 West High street 
3 Glamis Road 

24 Backwynd 

85 Backwynd 

89 North street 

89 North street 

186 East High street 

67 Backwynd 

85 Castle street 

1 Bell Place 
Headingstone Place 
Ileadingstone Place 
10 Green street 

6 Wellbraehead 
19 Green street 

83 Castle street 

6 Zoar 

East High street 

Blyth Hill 

Blvth Hill 

Blyth Hill 

50 West High street 

10 Newmonthill 

3 Bell Place 

21 Zoar 

12 East High street 

137 East High street 

9 Green street 

21 Wellbraehead 

81 Backwynd 

16 East High street 
Couttie's Wynd 

1 Lappiedub 
24 North street 
Craigard House 
23 Castle street 

1 Osnaburgh street 
21 Littlecauseway 

2 Broadcroft 

7 Arbroath Road 

1 St. James' Road 

17 Glamis Road 
Kingston Cottage 
144 East High street 
96 West High street 

3 Broadcroft 
Lilybank Villa 
Welshbarns 



26 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



NicoU, James 
Nicoll, John 
Nicoll, John 
Mcoll, John 
Nicoll, John 
Nicoll, Peter 
Nicoll, Eichard 
Nicoll, Robert 
Nicoll, Stewart 
Nicoll, Thomas 
Nicoll, William 
Niddrie, William 
Ogg, William 
OgUvie, David 
Ogilvie, John 
Ogilvy, Alexander A. 
Ogilvy, James 
Oram, Andrew 
Orchison, John 
Orme, John 
Ormond, Abram 
Ormond, Charles 
Ormond, David 
Ormond, James 
Ormond, John 
Ormond, John 
Ormond, John 
Parschi, Ignatiez 
Paterson, Alexander 
Paterson, George 
Paterson, William 
Paterson, William 
Paterson, William 
Paterson, William 
Patterson, William 
Paton, James 
Paton, William 
Patullo, Alexander 
Pattullo, Andrew 
Patullo, Andrew 
Patullo, David 
Pattullo, David 
Patullo, James Lowson 
Peacock, David 
Peacock, George 
Peacock, William 
Pearson, Andrew 
Pearson, David 
Pearson, John 
Peffers, Andrew 
Peifers, John 



Painter 

Factory worker 

Town -officer 

Factory worker 

Late Farmer 

Labourer 

Mason, &c. 

Tailor 

Labourer 

Farmer 

Blacksmith 

Hallkeeper 

Blacksmith 

Shepherd 

Late coal merchant 

Ropespinner 

Shoemaker 

Lapper 

Labourer 

Labourer 

Residenter 

Baker 

Baker 

Factory worker 

Retired agent 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Butcher 

Tenter 

Baker 

Labourer 

Mechanic [Rates 

Collector of Public 

Mason 

Bleacher 

Joiner 

Painter 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Labourer 

Coal merchant 

Factory worker 

Tenter 

Currier 

Factory worker 

Spiritdealer 

Labourer 

Labourer 

Carter 

Dyer 

Dyer 



Zoar 

13 Charles street 
24 Arbroath Road 

21 East Sunny side 
Bellfield House 
17 Backwynd 

17 Dundee Loan 
7 Horsewater Wynd 

6 Watt street 
North Mains 
Academy street 
New Road 

46 South street 

17 Prior Road 
49 North street 

18 John street 

29 East High street 
Strang street 

14 Glamis Road 

86 West High street 
Fernbank 

7 William street 
123 Castle street 
16 Dundee Loan 

9 Cross 

59 Glamis Road 

26^ West High street 

8 Don street 

11 Wellbraehead 
5 Backwynd 

18 Canmore street 

Zoar 

Backwynd 

10 Wellbraehead 

15 Watt street 

10 Arbroath Road 

12 Watt street 
32 South street 
35 South street 

161 East High street 
146 East High street 
7 Teuchat Croft 

22 Arbroath Road 
169 East High street 
41 Dundee Loan 
Dundee Loan 

44 South street 
Newf ord Park 
12 New Road 

9 Victoria Street 
9 Canmore street 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



27 



Peter, Andrew 
Peter, John 
Peters, William 
Petrie, Alexander 
Petrie, Alexander 
Petrie, Charles 
Petrie, Charles 
Petrie, Charles 
Petrie, David 
Petrie, David. 
Petrie, David 
Petrie, George 
Petrie, George 
Petrie, James 
Petrie, James 
Petrie, James 
Petrie, James 
Petrie, James 
Petrie, John 
Petrie, John 
Petrie, John 
Petrie, John 
Petrie, John 
Petrie, Robert 
Petrie, Thomas 
Petrie, Thomas, jun. 
Petrie, Thomas 
Petrie, William 
Petrie, William 
Petrie, William 
Philps, George Mitchell 
Pickard, Thomas 
Piggot, James 
Piggot, Walter 
Piggot, William 
Pirrie, James 
Porter, George 
Porter, William 
Potter, James 
Potter, John 
Preston, James 
Procter, David 
Procter, John 
Proctor, Charles 
Proctor, David 
Proctor, James 
Proctor, Robert 
Proctor, William 
Prophet, Frederick 
Prophet, James 
Prophet, James 



Labourer 

Clothiei- 

Fireman 

Baker 

Mechanic 

Dresser 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Baker 

Labom^er 

Residenter 

Tenter 

Gardener 

Surfaceman 

Labourer 

Carter 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Tailor 

Weaver 

Factory worker 

Shoemaker 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Dresser 

Shoemaker 

Hawker 

Hotel keeper 

Factory worker 

Clergyman 

Labourer 

Lapper 

Factory worker 

Potato merchant 

Butcher 

Joiner 

Vintner 

Clerk 

Labourer 

Labourer 

Weaver 

Weaver 

Baker 

Tailor 

Farmer 

Joiner 

Weaver 

Labourer 

Draper 

Factory worker 



6 Dundee Road 

4 Newmonthill 

8 Academy street 
17 Little Causeway 

8 Glamis Road 
49 Dundee Loan 

9o West High street 
lo East Sunnyside 
182 East High street 
81 Backwynd 
Gallowhill 
Hillockhead 

5 John street 

19 East Sunnyside 
Zoar 
Newmonthill 

20 North street 

16 Dundee Road 

10 Stark's Close 
Hillockhead 

7 Archie's Park 
108 Backwynd 

80 East High street 
184 East High street 

9 John street 

17 John street 

2 Backwynd 

13 G East High street 
150 East High street 

18 South street 
East F. C. Manse 
1 Chapel street 

11 Wellbraehead 
13 Zoar 

15 Backwynd 
22 William street 
51 Dundee Loan 
Castle street 

10 Market Place 

3 Academy street 
71 Backwynd 

24 South street 
20 Nursery Feus 
186 East High street 
68 Dundee Loan 

25 Glamis Road 
17 North street 
15 Manor street 
35 North street 
22 Lour Road 

97 West Hiffh street . 



28 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



Prophet, James 
Prophet, John 
Purvis, Alexander 
Kae, Alexander 
liae, David 
Rae, David 
Rae, Henry 
E,ae, James, jmi. 
Ramsay, Alexander 
Ramsay, Allan 
Ramsay, Andrew 
Ramsay, David 
Ramsay, George 
Ramsay, James 
Ramsay, James Milne 
Ramsay, John 
Ramsay, Robert 
Ramsay, Thomas 
Rankin, James Anderson 
Rankin, John 
Rattray, Alexander 
Rattray, John 
Rattray, John 
Rattray, Peter 
Redford, Alexander 
Ree, Andrew 
Reid, Alexander 
Reid, Alexander 
Reid, David 
Reid, James 
Reid, Joseph 
Reid, Peter 
Reid, AVilliam 
Reid, William 
Reid, William 
Renny, David 
Riddle, William 
Ritchie, Alexander 
Ritchie, Alexander 
Ritchie, David 
Ritchie, George 
Ritchie, James 
Ritchie, James 
Ritchie, James 
Ritchie, Peter 
Ritchie, William Air 
Robb, David 
Robb, Joseph 
Robb, William 
Robb, Wyllie 
Robbie, Charles 



Factory worker 

Painter 

Ploughman 

Storekeeper 

Turner 

Farm servant 

Tenter 

Lapper 

Turner 

Clerk 

Factory worker 

Mechanic 

Joiner ^ 

Labourer 

Clerk 

Joiner 

Joiner 

Factory worker 

Druggist 

Druggist 

Carter 

Labourer 

Farmer 

Mechanic 

Railway guard 

Mechanic 

Labourer 

Clerk 

Tenter 

Bleacher 

Clerk 

Confectioner 

Labourer 

Factory worker 

Weaver 

Policeman 

Weaver 

Clerk 

Drapery agent 

Cowfeeder 

Farmer 

Twinespinner 

Veterinary surgeon 

Engine driver 

Salesman 

Postman 

Toy merchant 

Factory worker 

Labourer 

Labourer 

Publican 



7 Zoar 

47 & 49 West High street 

26 Montrose Road 

] 67 East High street 

30 Green street 

25 Glamis Road 
14 Montrose Road 

26 Arbroath Road 
37 North street 

1 66 East High street 
12 Don street 
80 North street 

14 Charles street 
23 Victoria street 
84 North street 

12 North street 

21 Nursery Feus 

13 St. James' Road 

17 East High street 

19 East High street 
137 East High street 
108 Backwynd 
Templebank 

10 South street 

22 Don street 

6 Montrose Road 
22 Arbroath Road 
26 John street 

15 Wellbraehead 

18 Zoar 

9 Sparrow Croft 

56 East High street 

57 North street 
12 Glamis Road 
9 Watt street 

12 Montrose Road 
5 Broadcroft 

7 Sparrowcroft 

129^ East High street 
Windyedge 

21 Dundee Road 
76 East High street 
East Port Cottage 

20 John street 

22 Yeaman street 
Rosebank Road 
67 Backwynd 

52 Dundee Road 
110 Dundee Road 
18 Dundee Road 
Backwynd 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



29 



Roberts, Charles 
Roberts, James 
lloberts, John 
Roberts, AVilham 
Robertson, Alexander 
Robertson, Alexander 
Robertson, Alexander 
Robertson, Alexander 
Robertson, David 
Robertson, David 
Robertson, Donald 
Robertson, George 
Robertson, George 
Robertson, James 
Robertson, James 
Robertson, James 
Robertson, James Watson 
Robertson, Peter 
Robertson, Peter 
Robertson, Thomas 
Robertson, William 
Rodger, David 
Rodger, James 
Rodger, John 
Rodger, William 
RoUand, Peter 
Rolland, Alexander 
Kolland, Maxwell 
Rose, James 
Ross, Alexander 
Ross, David 
Ross, James 
Ross, James 
Ross, James 
Ross, William 
Ross, William 
Ross, William 
Ross, William 
Ross, William 
Rough, Alexander 
Rough, Alexander 
Rough, George 
Rough, James Pattison 
Roy, Thomas 
Ryder, John > 
Saddler, James 
Samson, James 
Samson, John 
Samson, John 
Samson, John 
Samson, William 



Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Hosier 

Draper 

Engine driver 

Factory worker 

Innkeeper 

Joiner 

Joiner 

Shoemakm* 

Mason 

Mason 

Labourer 

Labourer 

Factory worker 

floiner 

Painter 

Residenter 

Game & fish dealer 

Factory worker 

Farmer 

Painter 

Inspector of Poor 

Surfaceman 

Factory manager 

Railway labourer 

Labourer 

Labourer 

Dresser 

Factory worker 

Policeman 

Plumber 

Labourer 

Tenter 

Baker 

Factory worker 

Grocer, &c. 

Baker 

Shoemaker 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Labourer 

Post Runner 

Compositor 

Pensioner 

Confectioner 

Mason 

Lapper 

Labourer 

Mason 

Mason 



Wellbraehead 
20 AVellbraehead 

4o & 45 East High street 
'20 Wellbraehead^ 
82 North street 
5 Charles street 

20 Osnaburgh street 

16 Charles street 
GallowhiU 

22 Yeaman street 
9 Watt street 

3 Bell Place 

116 Dundee Road 
26 St. James' Road 
13 Watt street 
32 East High street 
52 Castle street 
87 North street 

4 & 6 West High street 

5 Glamis Road 
Cossens of Glamis 

21 West High street 
50^ East High street 
167 East High street 
Dovehillock 

4 Dundee Road 

63 West High street 
?A^ Dundee Loan 
Newmonthill 
7 Green street 

17 Charles street 
105 Backw}aid 

1 Lappiedub 

5 Bell Place 

11 Wellbraehead 
5 Academy street 
St. James' Road 
108 Backwynd 
31 Zoar 

22 Glamis Road 

2 Bell Place 

5 Arbroath Road 

25 East Sunnyside 
91 Castle street 
South street 

65 West High street 
2 Dundee Road 

23 Sunnyside 

26 South street 
Headingstone Place 
Lunanhead 



30 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



Savage, David 
Savage, James 
Seott, Charles 
Scott, David 
Scott, David 
Scott, George 
Scott, James 
Scott, James 
Scott, James 
Scott, James 
Scott, James 
Scott, Robert 
Scott, William 
Scott, William 
Scott, William 
Scott, William 
Sharp, William Westland 
Shepherd, Alexander 
Shepherd, Alexander 
Shepherd, Alexander H. 
Shepherd, Andrew 
Shepherd, Charles 
Shepherd, Chaiies 
Sbepherd, Charles 
Shepherd. David 
Shepherd, James, jun. 
Shepherd, James 
Shepherd, William 
Shepherd, William 
Shepherd, William 
Sheridan, Philip 
Simpson^ Alexander 
Simpson, Alexander 
Simpson, Alexander 
Simpson, Alexander H. 
Simpson, Andrew 
Simpson, David 
Simpson, G-eorge 
Simpson, James 
Simpson, James 
Simpson, James 
Simpson, James 
Simpson, James 
Simpson, John 
Simpson, John 
Simpson, John Watson 
Simpson, Robert 
Simpson, Thomas 
Simpson, William 
Simpson, William 
Sievewright, Colin 



Labourer 

Labourer 

Labourer 

Cattle salesman 

Warehouseman 

Mason 

Saddler 

Auctioneer 

Mason 

Pig dealer 

Factory worker 

Potato merchant 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Joiner 

Factory worker 

Coal merchant 

Baker 

Slater 

Slater 

Baker 

Slater 

Baker 

Tailor 

Baker 

General merchant 

China merchant 

Mason 

Bookseller 

Factory worker 

Mechanic 

Bleacher 

Blacksmith 

Factory worker 

Chemist 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Carter 

Mason 

Joiner 

Factory worker 

Fireman 

Factory worker 

Market gardener 

Draper 

Factory worker 

Fireman 

Weaver 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 



10 Glamis Road 
48 Glamis Road 
15 Zoar 
Whitehills 

30 John street 
13 Newmonthill 
7 Lappiedub 

47 North street 
26 Dundee Loan 
64 East High street 
5 Newmonthill 
Newf ord Park 
93 West High street 
157 East High street 
Zoar 

7 Lappiedub 

23 Victoria street 

9 Osnaburgh street 
59 Dundee Loan 
114 East High street 

22 & 24 West High street 

2 Charles street 
26 Arbroath Road 

3 Osnaburgh street 

8 Watt street 

26^ West High street 

10 North street 
15 William street 
69 Cattle street 
15 John street 
21 New Road 

31 Prior Road 

20 Bailliewellbrae 

11 St. James' Road 
Cross 

11 St. James' Road 
39 Dundee Road 

10 Dundee Loan 
97 Backwynd 

11 Lour Road 

2 Montrose Road 
Helen street 
11 Prior Road 
10 Nursery Feus 
Glamis Road 

9 Cross 
Catherine Square 

24 Market Place 
20 Glamis Road 
61 Dundee Loan 
100 Dundee Loan 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



31 



Skene, Keith Kennedy 
Skeen, Thomas 
Small, David 
Small, John 
Small, Leonard 
Smart, Alexander 
Smart, Andrew 
Smart, Frank 
Smart, George 
Smart, Joseph 
Smith, Alexander 
Smith, Alexander 
Smith, Alexander 
Smith Alexander 
Smith, Andrew 
Smith, Allan 
Smith, Charles J. 
Smith, David 
Smith, David 
Smith, Davidson 
Smith, Edward 
Smith, James 
Smith, James 
Smith, James 
Smith, James 
Smith, James 
Smith, James 
Smith, James 
Smith, John 
Smith, John 
Smith, John 
Smith, John Kerr 
Smith, Peter 
Smith, Peter 
Smith, Robert 
Smith, William 
Smith, William 
Smith, William 
Snowie, John 
Soutar, Alexander 
Soutar, Alexander 
Soutar, Andrew 
Soutar, David 
Soutar, James 
Soutar, John 
Soutar, Joseph 
Soutar, William Murray 
Spalding, Alexander 
Spalding, Joseph 
Spark, James 
Spark, William Gr. 



Boot merchant 

Labourer 

Gas inspector 

Overseer 

Factory worker 

Tenter 

Factory worker 

Joiner 

Manager West Port 

Joiner [Association 

Mason 

Factory worker 

Seedsman 

Labourer 

Labourer 

Tenter [teacher 

Organist and music 

Seedsman 

Tenter (foreman) 

Mason 

Mechanic 

Labourer 

Lapper 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Quarrier 

Labourer 

Seedsman 

Teacher 

Engine driver 

Factory worker 

Shoemaker 

Factory worker 

Tenter 

Ploughman 

Labourer 

Factory worker 

Gardener 

Hawker 

Factory worker 

Engine driver 

Mason 

Manufacturer 

Baker 

Weaver 

Mason 

Clothier 

Mechanic 

Grocer 

Joiner 



75 Castle street 
114 Dundee Road 
Horsewater Wynd 
4 Couttie's Wynd 
25 Glamis Road 
24 Montrose Road 

42 North street 
Prior Road 

"22 Dundee Loan 
182 East High street 

10 Glamis Road 
80 Yeaman street 
30 Glamis Road 

3 Watt street 

108 Dundee Road 

18 St. James' Road 

New Road 

Broomroof 

9 William street 

2 Lappiedub 
46 South street 
38 Lour Road 
18 Zoar 

39|^ Dundee Loan 

3 Charles street 

157 East High street 
Academy street 
9 Glamis Road 
59 West High street 
Newmonthill 

I William street 

28 Yeaman street 
24 backwpid 

11 John street 

I I Horsewatei- Wynd 
186 East High street 

29 Backwynd 
13 South street 
Dundee Road 

3 Prior Road 
15 John street 
22 Don street 
28 Nursery Feus 

43 Prior Road 

20 Canmore street 

Prior Road 

8 Wellbraehead 

4 Sparrow Croft 
68 Dundee Loan 
Market Place 

18 Dundee Loan 



32 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



Stark, Alexander 


Gardener 


Stark, David 


Mason 


Stark, David 


Mason 


Stark, David 


Railway labourer 


Stark, David 


Factory worker 


Stark, George 


Factory worker 


Stark, William 


AVeaver 


Steel, Alexander 


Saddler 


Steele, Andrew 


Farmer 


Steele, David 


Bank agent 


Steele, John, jun. 


Manufacturer • 


Stephen, Alexander 


Labourer 


Stephen, David 


Engine cleaner 


Stephen, William 


Labourer 


Steven, John 


Labourer 


Steven, John 


Engine driver 


Stewart, Alexander 


Joiner 


Stewart, Alexander 


Police sergeant 


Stewart, Alexander 


Tailor 


Stewart, Alexander 


Carter 


Stewart, Alexander 


Factory worker 


Stewart, Andrew 


Weaver 


Stewart, Charles 


Labourer 


Stewart, Charles 


Shoemaker 


Stewart, David 


Weaver 


Stewart, David 


Railway servant 


Stewart, David 


Slater ^ 


Stewart, David Mackie 


Foreman tanner 


Stewart, George 


Factory worker 


Stewart, George 


Joiner 


Stewart, G3orge 


Mechanic 


Stewart, James 


Bleacher 


Stewart, James 


Railway Porter 


Stewart, James 


House proprietor 


Stewart, James 


Mason 


Stewart, John 


• Tailor 


Stewart, John 


Labourer 


Stewart, John 


Vintner 


Stewart, John 


Bottler 


Stewart, Robert 


Painter 


Stewart, William 


Draper 


Stewart, William 


Mason 


Stewart, William 


Grocer 


Stewart, William 


Ploughman 


Stewart, AVilliam, jun. 


Joiner 


Stirling, Andrew 


Quarrier 


Stirling, eTames 


Supt. of Police 


Stirling, James 


Factory worker 


Stirling, John 


Quarrier 


Stirling, Robert 


Gardener 


Stirling, Thomas 


School board officer 



13 Glamis Road 
8 Stark's Close 
24 Yeaman street 
21 St. James' Road 
15 Glamis Road 
13 Charles Sti*eet 

12 Glamis Road 

119 East High street 

Mid Langlands 

East High street 

East High street 

52 Dundee Road 

12^ North street 

40 John street 

127 Castle street 

Gallowhill 

24 East High street 

Cross 

4 Green street 

Lour Road 

7 Horsewater Wynd 

East Sunnyside 

85 North street 

13 Osnaburgh street 
Archie's Park 

33 John street 

12 St. James' Road 

Castle street 

7 Charles street 

8 Broadcroft 

17 Horsewater Wynd 
20 Montrose Road 

14 Zoar 

94 North street 
Rescobie 

12 Newmonthill 
I Prior Road 

1 Arbroath Road 

Wellbraehead 

Gallowhill 

140 East High street 

Roslin Place 

78 North street 

13 Zoar 
Green street 

96 Dundee Road 
Melbourne Cottage 
43 Backwynd 
28 Glamis Road 
182 East High street 
Kirkton 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



33 



Stirling, William 
Stirling, William 
Stirton, David 
Stiven, John 
Stormont, Robert 
Stormonth, James 
Storrier, William 
Strachan, Alexander 
Strachan, Alexander Duff 
Strachan, Andrew 
Strachan, David 
Strachan, George 
Strachan, James 
Strachan, James 
Strachan, John 
Strang, James 
Strang, John 
Strang, Robert 
Stnrrock, Adam 
Sturrock, Alexander 
Stnrrock, Allan 
StmTock, Andrew 
Stmn'ock, Andrew 
Sturrock, David 
Sturrock, David 
Sturrock, James 
Sturrock, William 
Sturrock, William 
Synion, Archibald Ander- 
son 
Tarbat, Alexander 
Tarbat, Alexander 
Tarbat, David 
Tarbat, William 
Taylor, Charles. 
Taylor, David 
Taylor, James 
Taylor, John 
Taylor, John 
Taylor, Peter, sen. 
Taylor, Peter 
Taylor, Robert Grant 
Taylor, Thomas 
Ta}'lor. William 
Thum, Alexander 
Thom, Alexander 
Thorn, Andrew 
Thorn, Andrew 
Thom, Charles 
Thom, David 
Thom, James 



Spirit dealer 

Shoemaker 

Manager 

Baker 

Sawmiller 

Potato salesman 

Mechanic 

Printer 

Sawmill manager 

Shoemaker 

Shoemaker 

Keeper 

Labourer 

Factory worker 

Watchmaker 

Weaver 

Slater 

Barber 

Baker 

Bootmaker 

Restauranteur 

Weaver 

Factory worker 

Labourer 

Factory worker 

Mechanic 

Factory worker 

Residenter 

Architect 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Shoemaker 

Joiner 

Factory worker 

Hatter 

Town-clerk, &c. 

Carter 

Tailor 

Carter 

Factory worker 

Weaver 

Carter 

Watchmaker 

Carter 

Factory worker 

Shoemaker 

Baker 

Billposter 

Shoemaker 

Clerk 



I Green street 

6 Arbroath Road 
3 John street 

126 East High street 
15 Glamis Road 
81 North street 
20 South street 
8 Lour Road 

22 Green street 
14 Don street 

5 Market Place 
Court-House 
Market Place 

8 Dundee Loan 

II Newmonthill 
Newmonthill 

9 Little Causeway 

23 Backwynd 

7 AVatt street 
29 Strang street 
58 Castle street 
12 Glamis Road 
18 William street 

10 Newmonthill 

11 Wellbraehead 
3 Green street 

120 East High street 
11 l^ittle Causeway 

50 East High street 

52 South street 
Nursery Feus 
11 William street 
17 New Road 
56 Dundee Loan 
37 John street 
Heatherstacks 
22 John street 
10 Littlecauseway 
28 Nursery Feus 
135 East High street 
7 Watt street 
Headingstone Place 
99 East High street 
1 Victoria street 
22 Glamis Road 
5 East High street 
Wellbraehead 
7 Littlecauseway 
97 West High street 
New Road 



34 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



Thom, James 
Thorn, John 
Thom, William 
Thom, William 
Thom, William 
Thom, William 
Thomson, Alexander 
Thomson, Andrew 
Thomson, David 
Thomson, James 
Thomson, James 
Thomson, James 
Thomson, John 
Thomson, John Alex. 
Thomson, William Hodge 
Thornton, Archibald 
Thornton, Charles 
Thornton, David P. 
Thornton, James 
Tindal, David 
Todd, Alexander 
Todd, James 
Tosh, Charles 
Tosh, Peter A. 
Tosh, William 
Tough, Peter 
T}Tie, Charles 
Tyrie, David 
Tyrie, John 
Tyrie, John 
Tyrie, Robert. 
Urquhart, Alexander 
Urquhart, Duncan 
Urquhart, Kobert 
Valentine, James 
Valentine, John 
Waddell, Hay 
Waddell, James 
Waddell, William Doig 
Walker, David 
Walker, David 
Walker, David 
Walker, David 
Walker, James 
Walker, James 
Walker, Robert 
Walker, William 
Walker, William, jr. 
Wallace, Thomas 
Wallace, Thomas 
Wallace, William 



Labourer 

Currier 

Factory worker 

Slater 

Factory worker 

Labourer 

Mechanic 

Labourer 

Bleacher 

Insurance agent 

Tenter 

Blacksmith 

Late postmaster 

C^oods agent 

Registrar 

Joiner 

Factory worker 

Shoemaker 

Carter 

Slater 

Tailor 

Factory worker 

L'onmonger, &c. 

Auctioneer 

Labourer 

Factory worker 

Lapper 

Cambmaker 

Tenter 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Game dealer 

Foreman drawer 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Coach painter 

Baker 

Factory worker 

Labourer 

Engine driver 

Butcher 

Labourer 

Labourer 

Police sergeant 

Weaver 

Game dealer 

Clerk 

Tenter 

Factory worker 

Mechanic 



3 John street 

22 Canmore street 

12 Glamis Road 
16 Little Causeway 

14 Charles street 
26 Lorn' Road 
Gallowhill 

64 East High street 

48 South street 
75 Backwynd 

161 East High street 

15 Montrose Road 
Rosebank Road 
Whitehills 

73 East High street 

13 North street 
20 Nursery Feus 

51 West High street 

16 Prior Road 

28 Yeaman street 
8 East High street 
34 Dundee Loan 
18 West High street 

5 Sparrowcroft 
Archie's Park 

64 East High street 
45 West High street 
184 East High street 
75 North street 
10 Dundee Road 

49 Dundee Loan 
St. James' Road 
28 North street 
10 Newmonthill 
Nursery Feus 

22 Wellbraehead 
170 East High street 

24 William street 

25 Strang street 
129 Castle street 

50 North street 

2^ East High ^treet 
44 John street 
20 Victoria street 
Lochside 
3 Lappiedub 
West High street 
West High street 
15 Horsewater Wynd 
53 North street 

6 Lappiedub 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



35 



Warden, David 
Warden, David 
Warden, Frank 
Warden, William 
Waterston, Charles 
Waterston, James 
Waterston, John Edmund 
Waterston, William 
Watson, Alexander 
Watson, WiUiam 
Watt, James 
Watt, John 
Watt, Kobert 
Watt, William 
Webster, Charles 
Webster, George 
Webster, George 
Webster, James 
Webster, Patrick 
Webster, William 
Wedderburn, Alexander 

M' Lagan 
Weir, John 
Welsh, David 
Welsh, John 
Whammond, David 
Whiteford, Alexander 
Whitson, Andrew H. 
\Vhitton, James 
Whitton, William 
Whyte, Alexander 
Whyte, Alexander 
Whyte, Alexander 
Whyte, Andrew, jmi. 
Whyte, Andrew, sen. 
Whyte, David 
Whyte, David 
Whyte, James 
Whyte, John 
Whyte, John 
Whyte, John 
Whyte, Joseph Smith 
Whyte, Robert 
Whyte, Thomas 
Whyte, William 
Wighton, Alexander 
Wilkie, Alexander 
Wilkie, Alexander 
Wilkie, James 
Wilkie, John 
Wilkie, William 



Draper 

Railway guard 

Farmer 

Draper 

Wea ver 

Builder 

Farmer 

House proprietor 

Factory worker 

Weaver 

Labourer 

Shoemaker 

Factory Avorker 

Tailor 

Labourer 

Hall keeper 

Labourer 

Quarrier 

Gentleman 

Dyker 

M.D. 

Clergyman 

Railway guard 

Mason 

Cabinetmaker 

Blacksmith 

Clerk 

Policeman 

Moulder 

Tailor 

Turner 

Coal merchant 

Factory worker 

Hawker 

Potato merchant 

Coachman 

Factory worker 

Labourer 

Tanner 

Farm servant 

Factory worker 

Solicitor 

Factory worker 

Mason 

Society manager 

Factory worker 

Quarrier 

Labourer 

Farm servant 

Shoemaker 



Cowiehill 

28 North street 

Cotton of Lownie 

25 & 27 East High street 

63 Glamis Road 

Glamis Road 

of Pitreuchie 

Newtonbank 

50 Prior Road 

6 Canmore street 

5 Backwynd 
9 Backwynd 

St. James' Road 
154 East High street 

7 Charles street 
Reid Hall Lodge 

9 Littlecauseway 

19 St. James' Road 
Westfield 

51 Dundee Road 

East High street 

St. James' Manse 
Zoar 

14 Canmore street 
38 Canmore street 
76 Dundee Loan 

6 Littlecauseway 

43 North street 
Gallowhill 
Headingplacestone 
3 John street 

25 Prior Road 
Market Place 
Market Place 
1 1 Market Place 

20 Little Causeway 
30 South street 

10 Arbroath Road 
Sparrowcroft 

50 South street 
Helen street 
East High street 

15 Horsewater Wynd 
37 Prior Road 

44 North street 

3 Arbroath Road 
19 New Road 
167 East High street 
107 Castle street 
40 West Hisjh street 



36 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



Willis, William 
Williams, James 
Williamson, James 
Wilson, Alexander 
Wilson, John 
Wilson, Robert 
Wilson, William 
Winter, Alexander 
Winter, George 
Wisbart, Charles 
Wishart, George 
Wishart, James 
Wishart, John 
Wishart, John 
Wood, Charles 
Wood, Charles 
Wood, James 
Wood, James 
Wood, John 
Wood, William 
Wood, William 
Wood, William 
Wright, Peter Stirling 
Wyllie, Alexander Blues 
Wyllie, David 
Wyllie, William 
Wyllie, William 
Yeaman, Alexander 
Yomig, Allan 
Young, Andrew 
Young, Charles 
Young, David 
Young, David 
Young, David 
Young, Peter 
Young, William 
Young, William 
Young, William 
Younger, George 



Hotel keeper 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Spirit dealer 

Pointsman 

Spirit dealer 

Farm servant 

Farm servant 

Labourer 

Grocer 

Coal merchant 

Cattle dealer 

Tenter 

Bleacher 

Mason 

Tenter 

Factory worker 

Labourer 

Factory worker 

Joiner 

Tanner 

Labourer 

Clergyman 

Solicitor 

Mechanic 

Factory worker 

Farm servant 

Linen manufacturer 

Factory worker 

Lapper 

Lapper 

Farmer 

Joiner 

Cowfeeder 

Factory worker 

Mechanic 

Labom-er 

Yarn dresser 

Teacher 



Castle street 

6 Charles street 

24 Victoria street 

155 East High street 

Gallowhill 

105|^ East High street 

28 Lour Road 

10 Lour Road 

21 Victoria street 
28 Dundee Loan 
15 Green street 

120 East High street 
13 Little Causeway 
15 Newmonthill 

5 Academy street 
51^ West High street 
52 West High street 

26 South street 
3 Victoria street 

27 St. James' Road 
3 Victoria street 
Newmonthill 

U.P. Manse 

11 Green street 
Roslin Place 

80b West High street 

13 Broadcroft 
33 Dundee Loan 
182 East High street 

6 Bell Place 

7 Bell Place 
Blairyfadden, Oathlaw 
32 John street 
Fruithill 

14 Charles street 
West High street 

22 Don street 

1 St, James' Road 

Miss E. Black's, Castle st. 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



37 



Female Householders. 



Adam, Marjory 


AVidow 


Adam, Martha 


Spinster 


Addison, eJane 


Spinster 


Alexander, Catherine 


Spinster 


Allan, Elizabeth 


Widow 


Allan, Isabella 


Spinster 


Allan, Jane 


Widow 


Allan, Mar}' 


Spinster 


Allardice, Jessie 


Spinster 


Anderson, Ann 


Widow 


Anderson, Betsy 


Spinster 


Anderson, Elizabeth 


AVidow 


Anderson, Isabella 


Spinster 


Anderson, Jessie 


Spinster 


Anderson, Margaret 


Spinster 


Anderson, Margaret 


Spinster 


Anderson, Martha 


Spinster 


Anderson, Mary 


Widow 


Anderson, Mary 


Widow 


Anderson, Mary 


Spinster 


Anderson, Mary 


Spinster 


Anderson, Susan 


Widow 


Andrew, Margaret 


Widow 


Arnot, Mary 


Spinster 


Arthur, Margaret 


Spinster 


Balfour, Elizabeth 


Widow 


Barclay, Margaret 


Spinster 


Barrie, Elizabeth 


Widow 


Barron, Ann 


Widow 


Beattie, Mary 


Widow 


Beat tie, Mary 


Spinster 


Beedie, Margaret 


Widow 


Belford, Elizabeth 


Widow 


Bell, Agnes 


Widow 


Bell, Elizabeth 


Widow 


Bell, Jessie 


Widow 


Bell, Margaret 


Spinster 


Bell, Margaret Thornton 


Spinster 


Bennet, Amelia 


Widow 


Bennet, Jane 


Widow 


Bissett, Ann 


Widow 


Black, Elizabeth 


Spinster 


Black, Mary 


Spinster 


Blues, Jane 


Widow 


Boath Agnes 


Widow 


Boath, Elizabeth 


AVidow 



St. James' Road 
18 Glamis Road 

5 Venn el 

67 Backwynd 
30 North street 

6 Newmonthill 
44^ Castle street 

5 Prior Road 
22 Glamis Road 
72 Dundee Road 
95 East High street 

9 Archie's Park 

6 Nursery Feus 
Annfield Lane 

11 East Sunnyside 
52 Dundee Road 

107 East High street 
Chapelbank 

13 Wellbraehead 

46 Prior Road 

10 West High street 
5 East H'gh street 

13 Littlecauseway 

14 St. James' Road 
Broomroof Cottage 
10 Yeaman street 
10 Glamis Road 

37 South street 
20 North street 
188 East High street 
13 Little Causeway 
86 West High street 

47 Dundee Road 
182 East High street 
37 Glamis Road 

85 West High street 

3 Bell Place 

85 West High street 
9 Archie's Park 
20 Canmore street 
16 Castle street 
46 Castle street 

108 Backwynd 
12 Lour Road 

100 West High street 

4 Academy street 



38 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



Boath, Elizabeth 


Widow 


5 East Sunny side 


Boath, Jane 


Widow 


Chapel Park 


Boath, Jane M'Nab 


Spinster 


33 North street 


Boath, Margaret 


Widow 


36 North street 


Boath, Mary 


Spinster 


61 Glamis Road 


Boath, Mar)^ 


Spinster 


143 East High street 


Boath, Mary 


Spinster 


72 Dundee Koad 


Boath, Mary 


Spinster 


5 East High street 


Booth, Helen 


Spinster 


27 Strang street 


Bowman, Agnes 




4 North street 


Boyle, Jessie 


Spinster 


Backwynd 


Boyle, Jessie 


Spinster 


11 Horse water Wynd 


Boyle, Mary 


Widow 


3 William street 


Boyne, Barbara 


Widow 


5 Backwynd 


Bradbear, Sarah 


Spinster 


33 John street 


Brew, Jane 


Widow 


24 Market Place 


Brown, Ann 


Widow 


84^ Castle street 


Brown, Catherine 


Spinster 


1 8 Manor street 


Brown, Elizabeth 


Spinster 


Kirkton 


Bruce, Ann 


Spinster 


3 Horsewater Wynd 


Bruce, Ann 


Widow 


24 Victoria street 


Bruce, Elizabeth 


Widow 


16 Yeaman street 


Bruce, Elizabeth 


Spinster 


34 Canmore street 


Buchanan, Agnes 


Widow 


22 Market Place 


Buick, Margaret 


Spinster 


80 East High street 


Bunch, Ann 


Spinster 


1 Bell Place 


Burnett, Margaret 


Widow 


13 South street 


Burns, Helen 


Spinster 


9 Zoar 


Butchart, Isabella 


Widow 


4 Arbroath Road 


Butchart^ Margaret 


Spinster 


4 Lappiedub 


Butchar'u, Mary 


Spinster 


66 Dundee Road 


Huttar, Jane 


Widow 


Auchleuchrie 


Byars, Ann 


Widow 


18 Nursery Feus 


Byars, Mary 


Spinster 


132 East High street 


Cable, Helen 


Spinster 


10 Market Place 


Cable, Jane 


Spinster 


50 North street 


Cable, Susan 


Spinster 


4 Bell Place 


Caird, Margaret 


Widow 


61 West High street 


Caird, Mary Ann 


Widow 


32 North street 


Cairns, Janet 


Widow 


18 South street 


Calder, Ann 


Widow 


5 Prior Road 


Calder, Jessie 


Spinster 


1 St. James' Road 


Calder, Madalene 


Widow 


11 Lour Road 


Campbell, Mary 


Widow 


Wellbraehead 


Cant, Mary 


Spinster 


28 Nursery Feus 


Cargill, Elizabeth 


Spinster 


162 East High street 


Cargill, Marjory 


Widow 


4 Archie's Park 


Chapman, Annie 


Spinster 


Lour Road 


Christie, Elizabeth 




12 Stark's Close 


Christie, Elizabeth 


Spinster 


136 East High street 


Christie, Fanny 


Spinster 


48 South street 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



39 



Christie, Marianne 


Widow 


Christie, Mary 


Spinster 


Chrystal, Catherine 


Widow 


Christison, Elizabeth 


Spinster 


Clark, Elizabeth 


Widow 


Clark, Elspeth 


Widow 


Clark, Margaret 


Widow 


Clarke, Agnes, 


Spinster 


Clarke, Georgina Murray 


Spinster 


Colville, Jane 


Widow 


Constable, Helen 


Widow 


Cook, Ann 


Widow 


Cook, Mary 


Spinster 


Coupar, Isabella 


Widow 


Coutts, Annie 


Widow 


Crabb, Agnes 


Spinster 


Craig, Margaret 


Spinster 


Craik, Catherine 


Widow 


Craik, Elizabeth 


Spinster 


Crighton, Betsy 


Spinster 


Crighton, Jean 


Widow 


Croll, Margaret 


Widow 


Cumming, Catherine 


Spinster 


Cuthbert, Jane 


Widow 


Dakers, Jane 


Spinster 


Dakers, Margaret 


Widow 


Dalgetty, Ann 


Widow 


Davidson, Agnes 


Spinster 


Davidson, Isabella 


Spinster 


Davidson, Janet 


Spinster 


Davidson, Margaret 


Widow 


Deacon, Mary 


Widow 


Dickson, Agnes 


Spinster 


Dickson, Rose 


Spinster 


Doig, Ann 


Spinster 


Doig, Betsy 


Widow 


Doig, Isabella 


Widow 


Doig, Mrs John 


Widow 


Donald, Ann 


Spinster 


Donald, Agnes 


Widow 


Donald, Elizabeth 


Widow 


Donald, Isabella 


Widow 


Donald, Isabella 


Widow 


Donaldson, Mary 


Widow 


Dunbar, Agnes 


Widow 


Duncan, Elizabeth 


Spinster 


Duncan, Jane 


Spinster 


Duncan, Jessie 


Spinster 


Duncan, Sarah 


Widow 


Dundas, Isabella 


Widow 


Drithie, Ann 


Widow 



Kirkton 

72 East High street 

52 West High street 
17 Watt street 

51 Prior Road 
125 East High street 
12 South street 
30 South street 

53 East High street 
39 John street 
Hillockhead 

6 New Road 
93 East High street 
38 Prior Road 
34 Canmore street 
14 Nursery Feus 
93 East High street 
Manor House 
37 North street 
21 St. James' Road 

8 Montrose Road 
150^ East High street 
17 Backwynd 

19 Victoria street 
114 East High street 
19 Backwynd 
114 West High street 
3 Arbroath Road 
'tl Market Place 

26 Market Place 
46 South street 

10 Newmonthlll 
100 Dundee Loan 
50 Dundee Road 

36 West High street 

16 St. James' Road 

9 Montrose Road 
30 South street 

17 Green street 

11 Zoar 

19 Wellbraehead 
14 Watt street 
23 Nursery Feus 
10^ Wellbraehead 

27 John street 
96 North street 

108 East High street 
25 Glamis Road 
29 St. James' Road 
1 William street 
Horsewater Wynd 



40 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



Duthie, Jane 
Dyce, Jane 

Dyce, Margaret MoUison 
Edward, Margaret 
Edward, Mary 
Edwards, Elizabeth 
Edwards, Jessie 
Elder, Isabella 
Ellis, Jessie 
Erskine, Margaret 
Esplin, Mary 
Evans, Eliza 
Ewart, Marjory 
Ewart, Mary 
Fairweather, Ann 
Fairweather, Jane Mair 
Fairweather, Sarah 
Farquharson, Margaret 
Fawns, Agnes 
Fenton, Ann 
Fenton, Mary 
Findlay, Agnes 
Findlay, Ann 
Findlay, Matilda 
Finlayson, Helen 
Fodd, Catherine 
Ford, Ann 
Forbes, Annie 
Forbes, Margaret 
Fordyce, Elizabeth 
Forrest, Jean 
Forsyth, Margaret 
Eraser, Betsy 
Eraser, Mary 
Fyfe, Elizabeth 
Fyfe, Isabella Barrie 
Fyfe, Margaret 
Fyfe, Margaret 
Fyfe, Mary 
Fyife, Janet 
Fyffe, Margaret 
Fyffe, Marjory 
Gall, Mary 
Gall, Mary 
Gemlo, Margaret 
Gibb, Agnes 
Gibb, Ann 

Gibb, Helen Tliomson 
Gibb, Jane 
Gibson, Ann 
Gibson, Elizabeth 



Spinster 


1 St. James' Road 


Widow 


70 Dundee Road 


Widow 


12 Cross 


Widow 


18 John street 


Spinster 


13 Manor street 


Spinster 


25 North street 


Spinster 


25 North street 


Spinster 


29 Manor street 


Spinster 


33 West High street 


Widow 


36 North street 


Widow 


24 Market Place 


Spinster 


11 New Road 


Spinster 


Archie's Park 


Spinster 


4 Archie's Park 


Spinster 


29 Strang street 


Spinster 


113 Castle street 


Spinster 


9 South street 


Spmster 


3 Charles street 


Spinster 


57 West High street 


Spinster 


162 East High street 


Spinster 


64 East Ilig-li street 


Widow 


17 Zoar 


Widow 


109 East High street 


Spinster 


178 East High street 


Spinster 


52 South street 


Widow 


Prior Road 


Widow 


105 Backwynd 


Spinster 


17 Littlecauseway 


Spinster 


30 South street 


Widow 


26 Backwynd 


Spinster 


75 East High street 


Widow 


1 Green street 


Spinster 


72^ West High street 


Widow 


108i Backwynd 


Widow 


6 New Road 


Spinster 


Mylnhall 


Widow 


Couttie's Wynd 


Widow 


2 Lappiedub 


Widow 


17 Backwynd 


Widow 


5 Prior Road 


Widow 


156 East High street 


Spinster 


Littlecauseway 


Widow 


4 Market Place 


Widow 


6 Backwynd 


Spinster 


15 Glamis Road 


Spinster 


5 Bell Place 


Spinster 


8 Little Causeway 


Widow- 


1 Lappiedub 


Spinster 


70 Dundee Koud 


Spinster 


Quarrjbank 




Bankhead 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



4i 



Gibson, Harriet 
Gibson, Jessie 
Gibson, Mary 
Gibson, Mary 
Gibson, JMary 
Glen, Agnes 
Glen, Margaret 
Gordon, Agnes 
Gordon, Elizabeth 
Gracie, Mary 
Grewar, Jane 
Grant, Isabella 
Grant, Isabella 
Grant, Jane 
Grant, Mary 
Grant, Mary Ann 
Gray, Jane 
Gray, Jane 
Gray, Helen 
Gray, Mary 
Gray, Mary 
Gray, Mary 
Grubb, Mary 
Guild, Janet 
Guthrie, Barbara 
Guthrie, Jean 
Hamilton, Jessie 
Hastings, Jane 
Hastings, Janet 
Hazels, Agnes 
Henderson, Ann 
Henderson, Ann 
Henderson, Flora 
Henderson, Jean 
Henderson, Margaret 
Hendry, Jane 
Hendry, Margaret 
Henry, Jane 
Herald, Barbara 
Herald, Jean 
Hiffh, Jessie 
Hill, Ann 
Hill, Helen 
HUl, Helen 
Hill, Margaret 
Hill, Margaret 
Hill, INIary 
Hilton, Jane 
Home, Agnes 
Hood, Catherine 
Hood, Catherine 



Widow 
Widow 

Spinster 
Spinster 
AVidow 
Spinster 
Widow 
■ Widow 
Widow 
Spinster 
Widow 
Widow 
Widow 
Widow 
Spinster 
Spinster 
Spinster 
Spinster 
Spinster 
Spinster 
Widow 
Widow 
Spinster 
Widow 
Widow 
Spinster 
Spinster 
Widow 
Widow 
Spinster 
Spinster 
Widow 
Spinster 
Spinster 
Spinster 
Spinster 
Spinster 
Spinster 
Spinster 
Widow 
Widow 
Spinster 
Widow 
Spinster 
Spinster 
Spinster 
Widow 
Widow 
WidoAv 
Widow 
Widow 



41 Dundee Road 

18 Littlecauseway 
16'2 East High street 

10 South street 
49 Dundee Road 
15 Green street 

75 East High street 
15 Prior Road 
3 Chapel street 
3 Horsewater Wynd 
Market Place 

2 Bell Place 

93 East High street 
Baronhill 

11 Zoar 

14 St. James' Road 
186 East High street 
1 William street 
48 Dundee Road 
17 New Road 
48 South street 
24 Victoria street 
182 East High street 
7 Montrose Road 

20 Charles street 

12 Wellbraehead 
Newmonthill 

3 Chapel street 
27 Prior Road 

23 West High street 

1 St. James' Road 

14 Market Place 
Boal 

70 Dundee Road 
6 Dundee Road 

15 Arbroath Road 
10 Nursery Feus 
10 Zoar 

5 Lappiedub 

17 Manor street 
26 Glamis Road 

2 Prior Lane 

21 Wellbraehead 

6 Newmonthill 
lOi Wellbraehead 
40 Prior Road 

24 Victoria street 
57 West High street 
89 Backwynd 

4 Canmore street 
14 Prior Road 



42 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



Hood, Elizabeth 


Widow 


Nilebank 


Howie, Isabella 


Widow 


74 East High street 


Hutchison, Barbara 


Widow 


Newmonthill 


Hutchison, Mimia 


Spinster 


112 East High street 


Hutchison, Mary 


Spinster 


West Sunnyside 


Hutchison, Mary Ann 


Spinster 


23 St. James' Koad 


Hutton, Agnes 


Widow 


17 Wellbraehead 


Hutton, Isabella 


Spinster 


. 16 South street 


Inverarity, Margaret 


Widow 


19 Manor street 


Inverwick, Ann 


Widow 


73 Backwynd 


Jack, Elizabeth 


Widow 


Market Place 


Jamie, Matilda 


Widow 


William street 


Jarron, Elizabeth 


Widow 


70 West High street 


»)arvis, Mary Ann 


Widow 


2 Nursery Feus 


Johnston, Agnes 


Spinster 


90 Dundee Loan 


Johnston, Agnes 


Widow 


9 Green street 


Johnston, Betsy 


Spinster 


26 St. James' Road 


Johnston, Elizabeth 


Widow 


9 Cross 


Johnston, Jane 


Widow 


92 East High street 


Johnston, Margaret 


Widow 


43 Dundee Loan 


Johnston, Margaret 


Spinster 


8 Lour Road 


Jones, Jean 


Widow 


126 East High street 


Keith, Elizabeth 


Widow 


52 South street 


Keith, Mrs William 


Widow 


Rosebank Road 


Kelachy, Ann 


Widow 


14 Castle street 


Kennedy, Mary 


Widow 


William street 


Kerr, Margaret 


Widow 


7 Watt street 


Kerr, Mrs Robert 


Widow 


16 Zoar 


Kewans, Margaret 


Spinster 


34 Yeaman street 


Kidd, Agnes 


Spinster 


2 Lappiedub 


Kinnear, Isabella 


Widow 


3 Teuchat Croft 


Kydd, Betsy 


Spinster 


4 Lappiedub 


Kydd, Elizabeth 


Spinster 


82 West High street 


Kydd, Mary Ann 


Widow 


102 Castle street 


Laing, Elizabeth 


Widow 


24 East High street 


Laird, Jane 


Spinster 


10 Stark's Close 


Lamond, Mary Ann 


Spinster 


Reedmaker's Close 


Lamont, Ann 


Spinster 


9 Lappiedub 


Langlands, Ann 


Spinster 


19 Backwynd 


Langlands, Ann 


Widow 


67 West High street 


Langlands, Mary 


Widow 


79 East High street 


Latto, Jane 


Widow 


Castle street 


Law, Mary 


Widow 


Belmont House 


Lawson, Margaret 


Spinster 


42 Dundee Loan 


Lawson, Elizabeth 


Widow 


14 Nursery Feus 


Leighton, Jessie 


Widow 


2^ West High street 


Leith, Catherine 


Spinster 


11 Osnaburgh street 


Liddle, Mary 


Spinster 


43 North street 


Lindsay, Helen 


Widow 


16 Zoar 


Lindsay, Isabella 


Spinster 


16 Dundee Road 


LindsaA', Jane 


Widow 


9 Broadcroft 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



43 



Lindsay, Jessie 
Lindsay, Mary 
Lindsay, INIary 
Liveston, Ann 
Logan, Marjory 
Loudfoot, Ann 
Low, Elizabeth 
Low, Isabella 
Low, Isabella 
Low, Jane 
Low, Jessie 
Low, Margaret 
Low, Margaret 
Low, Mary Ann 
Lowden, Isabella 
Lowson, Catherine 
Lowson, Elizabeth 
Lowson, Helen 
Lowson, Helen 
Lyall, Margaret 
Lyon, Betsy Shaw 
Lowson, Isabella 
Lowson, Margaret 
Mackie, Mary 
Malcolm, Elizabeth 
Mann, Ellen 
Mann, Jane 
Marshal, Mary 
Mason, Isabella 
Masson, Mary 
Masterton, Elizabeth 
Matthewson, Jean 
Maxwell, Mrs David 
Meldrum, Ann 
Meldrum, Isabella 
Meldrum, Mary Ann 
Melvin, Margaret 
Michie, Margaret 
Mill, Ann 
Millar, Ann 
Millar, Charlotte 
Miller, Susan 
Milne, Agnes 
Milne, Betsy 
Milne, EHzabeth 
Milne, Isabella 
Milne, Jane 
Milne, Jane 
Milne, Jane 
Milne, Jane 
Milne, Janet 



Spinster 


31 Zoar 


Widow 


Market Place 


Widow 


20 Dundee Road 


Widow 


88 East High street 


Widow 


24 Canmore street 




Stark's Close 


Widow 


18 Newmonthill 


Spinster 


16 Yeaman street 


Spinster 


9 Montrose Koad 


Spinster 


30 Lour Road 


Widow 


15 Charles street 


Widow 


63 West High street 


Widow 


13 Charles street 


Widow 


20 Glamis Road 


Widow 


93 North street 


Spinster 


28 Yeaman street 


Widow 


16 North street 


Spinster 


21 Glamis Road 


Widow 


25 Glamis Road 


Spinster 


11 Arbroath Road 


Spinster 


Letham 


Spinster 


14 Charles street 


Widow 


Chapel Park 


Spinster 


57 West High street 


Spinster 


7 Prior Road 


Spinster 


35 West High street 


Widow 


42 Dundee Loan 


Widow 


50 Glamis Road 


Spinster 


71 West High street 


Spinster 


15 New Road 


Widow 


63 Castle street 


Spinster 


59 Backwynd 


Widow 


13 Market Place 


Widow 


2 Chapel street 


Spinster 


136 East High street 


Widow 


7 Bell Place 


Spinster 


19 Castle street 


Widow 


38 Canmore street 


Spinster 


44 Prior Road 


Spinster 


2 Chapel street 


Spinster 


10 Lappiedub 


Spinster 


73 Castle street 


Spinster 


12 Nursery Feus 


Spinster 


136 East High street 


Widow 


26 St. James' Road 


Widow 


21 Manor street 


Spinster 


26 Market Place 


Widow 


51 North street 


Spinster 


21 John street 


Widow 


178 East High street 


Widow 


11 Montrose Road 



44 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



Milne, Mary 
Milne, Mary 
Milne, Mary 
Mitchell, Agnes 
Mitchell, Betsy 
Mitchell, Elizabeth 
Mitchell, Jane 
Moffat, Elizabeth 
Moir, Ann 
Mollison, Jane 
Moncrieff, Margaret 
Morris, Euphemia 
Morris, Mary Ann 
Morrison, Ann 
Morrison, Cecilia 
Morty, Ann 
Mudie, Helen 
Murray, Jessie 
M'Donald, EHzabeth 
M'Dougall, Susan 
M'Fariane, Agnes 
M'Farlane, Helen 
M'Fariane, Mrs 
M'ljregor, Catherine 
M'Gregor, Mary 
M'Intosh, Catherine 
M'Intosh, Catherine 
M'Intosh, Jane 
M'Kay, Catherine 
M'Kenzie. Isabella 
M'Kenzie, Isabella 
M'Kenzie, Ann 
M'Lauchlan, Ann 
M'Lean, Ann 
M'Laren, Allison 
M'Nab, Margaret 
M'Nab, Mary 
M-NicoU, Mary 
M'Peat, Jane 
M' Queen, Helen 
M'Rae, Elizabeth 
M'Rae, Jane 
M'Keddie, Jane 
Neave, Jane 
Neave, Mary 
Neave, Rebecca 
Neish, Catherine 
Neish, Catherine 
Nicoll, Elizabeth 
NicoU, Jane 
Nicoll, Margaret 



Widow 


10 Wellbraehead 


Widow 


4 Chapel street 


Widow 


6 Charles street 


\\ idow 


2'2 Nursery Feus 


Spinstei- 


o AA'est High street 


Widow 


84 Canmore street 


Widow 


'2 Glaniis Road 


Spinster 


11 Broadcroft 


Widow 


89 North street 


Spinster 


8 Vennel 


Spinster 


20 Manor street 


Spinster 


59 W^est High street ■ 


Spinster 


15 Wellbraehead 


Widow 


22 Dundee Loan 


Spinster 


17 Horsewater Wynd 


Spinster 


7 Zoar 




oQ Dundee Loan 


Widow 


Rosebank House 


Spinster 


6 Newmonthill 


Spinster 


42 Dundee Loan 


Spinster 


8 Glamis Road 


Widow 


81 Zoar 


Widow 


21 Nursery Feus 


Widow 


41 Prior Road 




'6S East High street 


Widow 


Hillside 


Spinster 


11.") Castle street 


Spinster 


8 Arbroath Road 


Spinster 


18 Prior Road 


Spinster 


72^ West High street 


Spinster 


11 Teuchat Croft 


Widow 


6 AA^'ellbraehead 


Widow 


126 East High street 


Widow 


Newmonthill 


Widow 


Headingstone Place 


Widow 


'22 Victoria street 


AVidow 


75 East High street 


Spinster 


12 AVellbraehead 


AVidow 


11 Horsewater Wynd 


Spinster 


20 Dundee Road 


Spinster 


1 Bell Place 


Spinster 


87 West High street 


AVidow 


10 Backwynd 


Spinster 


10 East High street 


Spinster 


84 Dundee Loan 


Spinster 


9 Green street 


AA^idow 


18 Wellbraehead 


Spinster 


18 Wellbraehead 


Spinster 


4 Watt street 


AVidow 


24 Arbroath Road 


Widow 


4 Stark's Close 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



45 



Nicoll, JVIary 
Nicoll, Mrs George 
Nicolson, Elizabeth 
Norrie, Jessie 
Ogg, Margaret 
Ogilvic, Ann 
Ogilvie, Ann 
Ogilvie, Helen 
Ogilvie, Jane 
Ogilvie, Jessie 
Ogilvy, Ann 
Oram, Mary 
Orchison, Charlotte 
Orniond, Agnes 
Ormoud, Helen 
Ormond, Cecilia 
Ormond, Matilda 
Paterson, Jean 
Pattullo, Ann 
PattuUo, Jessie 
Peacock, Elizabeth 
Pearson, Ehzabeth 
Peter, Betsy 
Peter, Margaret 
Petrie, Ann 
Petrie, Mary 
Porter, Ann 
Porter, Jane 
Pratt, Eleanor 
Prophet, Jessie Stewart 
Prophet, Isabella 
Prophet, Sarah 
Pullar, Elizabeth 
Pullar, Helen 
Queen, Ann 
Rae, Annie 
Rae, Betsy 
Rae, Jane 
Ramsay, Barbara 
Ramsa}', Elizabeth 
Ramsay, Isabella 
Ramsa}-, Isabella 
Ramsay, Margaret 
llamsay, Margaret 
Rattray, Jessie 
Reid, Catherine 
Reid, Jane 
Reid, Jessie 
Reid, Jessie 
Reid, Margaret 
Rennie, Euphemia * 



Widow 


8 AVatt street 


Widow 


26 Glamis Road 


Widow 


Catherine Square 


Spinster 


90 Dundee Ijoan 


Spinster 


93 East High street 


Spinster 


9 Couttie's Wynd 


Spinster 


'27 North street 


Widow 


38 Canmore street 


Widow 


1 AVilliam street 


Widow 


3 West High street 


Spinster 


Quarrybank 


AVidOw 


26 Nursery Feus 


Spinster 


14 Charles street 


Widow 


32 West High street 


Widow 


38 Prior Road 




6 Stark's Close 


Spinster 


87 East High street 


Widow 


13 Horse water Wynd 


Widow 


9 AVellbraehead 


AVidow 


30 Nursery Feus 


Widow 


1 Victoria street 


AVidow 


5 Watt street 


Spinster 


36 John street 


AVidow 


Lochside 


Spinster 


21 John street 


Spinster 


134 East High street 


Spinster 


81 Backwynd 


AVidow 


81 Castle street 


Spinster 


95 East High street 


AA'^idow 


24 Lour Road 


Widow 


W^illiam street 


AVidow 


7 Green street 


Widow 


5 Vennel 


Spinster 


Venn el 


AVidow 


10 Stark's Close 


Widow 


130 East High street 


AVidow 


7 Charles street 


AVidow 


44 West High street 


Spinster 


2 Bell Place 


Spinster 


43 Backwynd 


Widow 


103 Castle street 


Spinster 


90 Dundee Loan 


Spinster 


63 Dundee Loan 


AVidow 


Archie's Park 


Spinster 


31 Backwynd 


AVidow 


"22 South street 


Widow 


38 John street 


AVidow 


5 Glamis Road 


Spinster 


12 Wellbraehead 


AVidow 


98 Dundee Road 


Spinster 


20 Arbroath Road 



46 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



Richard, Jessie 


Spinster 


Rickard, Mary 


Spinster 


Riddle, Catherine 


Widow 


Ritchie, Jane 


Spinster 


Robb, Catherine 


Spinster 


Robb, Emily 


Widow 


Robbie, Betsy 


Widow 


Robbie, Isabella 


Widow 


Robbie, Mary 


Spinster 


Roberts, Agnes 


Spinster 


Roberts, Bella 


Widow 


Roberts, Elizabeth 


Spinster 


Roberts, Elizabeth 


Widow 


Roberts, Elizabeth 


Widow 


Roberts, Elizabeth 


Widow 


Roberts, Jane 


Widow 


Roberts, Mary 


Spinster 


Robertson, Agnes 


Spinster 


Robertson, Christina 


Widow 


Robertson, Helen 


Widow 


Rodger, Mary Ann 


Widow 


Rose, Jane 


Spinster 


Ross, Mary 


Spinster 


Rough, Mary 


Widow 


Saddler, Isabella 


Widow 


Saddler, Mary 


Widow 


Scott, Christina 


Spinster 


Sievewright, Susan 


Spinster 


Sim, Mary Ann 


Spinster 


Simpson, Ann 


Widow 


Simpson, Jessie 


Widow 


Simpson, Mary 


Widow 


Simpson, Mary 


Widow 


Shaw, Jessie 


Spinster 


Shaw, Margaret R. 


Widow 


Shepherd, Agnes 


Widow 


Shepherd, Elizabeth 


Widow 


Shepherd, Margaret 


Widow 


Shepherd, Mary 


Widow 


Sime, Ann 


Widow 


Simpson, Jessie 


Spinster 


Small, Isabella 


Widow 


Smart, Ann 


Widow 


Smart, Mary 


Widow 


Smith, Agnes 


Widow 


Smith, Annie 


Widow 


Smith, Emily 


Widow 


Smith, Georgina 


Spinster 


Smith, Helen 


Spinster 


Smith, Isabella 


Widow 


Smith, Janet 


Widow 



16 New Road 
Stark's Close 
80 North street 
Oathlaw 

'11 Dundee Loan 
12 Broadcroft 
132 East High street 
15 Market Place 

17 Dundee Loan 
64 Yeaman street 
15 East Sunny side 

17 North street 
12 North street 

157 East High street 

I Watt street 
Westby House 
38 Prior Road 
12 Nursery Feus 
Headingstone Place 
21 South street 

9 Horsewater Wynd 
125 East High street 

29 Glamis Road 
123 Castle street 
9 Archie's Park 

9 Ai'chie's Park 
6 New Road 

18 Charles street 
46 John street 

II Glamis Road 
34 Glamis Road 
1 William street 

10 Charles street 
4 Nursery Feus 
Annfield House 

109 East High street 
17 Victoria street 
12 North street 
41 Castle street 
63 West High street 
36^ Dundee Loan 
6 Zoar 

30 South street 
49 Dundee Loan 

72 West High street 

33 Prior Road 

162-4 East High street 

Academy street 

97 East High street 

12 Arbroath Road 

26 St. James' Road 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



47 



Smith, Jessie 
Smith, Margaret 
Smith, Mai'garet 
Smith, Margaret 
Smith, Mary Ann 
Soutar, Agnes 
Soutar, Elizabeth 
Soutar, Margaret 
Spence, Jean 
Stark, Agnes 
Stark, Ann 
Stark, Jean 
Stark, Mary 
Stark, Mary Ann 
Steele, Ann 
Steele, Ann 
Steele, Helen 
Steele, Rose Gray 
Stephen, Helen 
Stewart, Ann 
Stewart, Ann 
Stewart, Ann 
Stewart, Annie 
Stewart, Elizabeth 
Stewart, Elspeth 
Stewart, Isabella 
Stewart, Helen 
Stewart, Helen 
Stewart, Joan 
Stewart, Jessie 
Stewart, Mary 
Stirling, Ann 
Stirling, Isabella 
Stormont, Margaret 
Stormonth, Jane 
Strachan, Jessie 
Strang, Georgina 
Sturrock, Isabella 
Sturrock, Jean 
Sturrock, Jane 
Tarbat, Elizabeth 
Taylor, Ann 
Taylor, Helen 
Tear, Esther 
Telfor, Mary 
Thorn, Allison 
Thom, Ann 
Thorn, Bella 
Thom, Jessie 
Thom, Susan 
Thomson, Christina 



Spinster 

Widow 

Spinster 

Widow 

Spinster 

Spinster 

Widow 

Widow 

Widow 

Spinster 

Spinster 

Widow 

Spinster 

Widow 

Widow 

Widow 

Widow 

Spinster 

Widow 

Widow 

Widow 

Spinster 

Widow 

Widow 

Widow 

Widow 

Spinster 

Spinster 

Widow 

Spinster 

Spinster 

Widow 

Widow 

Widow 

Widow 

Spinster 

Widow 

Widow 

Widow 

Spinster 

Spinster 

Spinster 

Spinster 

Widow 

Widow 

Widow 

Spinster 

Spinster 

Spinster 

Widow 

Widow 



79 Backwynd 
17 Charles street 
Hillockhead 

15 Canmore street 

35 North street 

162 East High street 
Strang street 

I William street 

II New Road 
42 Prior Road 
6 Glamis Road 
8 Stark's Close 

12 Glamis Road 
Annfield Lane 

16 East High street 

13 Broadcroft 

28 South street 

3 Castle street 
68 Dundee Road 
1 Watt street 
25 Backwynd 

1 New Road 
21 Osnaburgh street 
12 Wellbraehead 
10 Market Place 
10 Dundee Road 

4 Market Place 
33 John street 

84 East High street 

14 Newmonthill 
67 Glamis Road 

25 St, James' Road 
20 St, James' Road 

15 Glamis Road 
Broadcroft 

4 Market Place 
27 Market Place 

1 Sparrowcroft 

4 Arbroath Road 

2 Bell Plaee 
10 Backwynd 

12 Wellbraehead 
30 South street 

29 John street 
59 Backwynd 

6 West Sunnyside 
14 Watt street 
128 East High street 
Carseburn Road 
136 East High street 

36 Yeaman street 



48 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



Thomson, Elizabeth Lunan 


Spinster 


Eosebank 


Thomson, Jane 


Widow 


Melbourne Cottage 


Thomson, Mary 


Spinster 


5 Glamis Road 


Thornton, Ann 


"WidoAv 


82 AYest High street 


Thornton, Elizabeth 


Widow 


84 West High street 


Thornton, Helen 


Widow 


72| AVest High street 


Thornton, Margaret 


Spinster 


6 Archie's Park 


Thow, Mary 


Widow 


88 Dundee Loan 


Tosh. Ann 


Spinster 


79 Castle street 


Towns, Ann 


Widow 


87 East High street 


Tyrie, Mrs George 


Widow 


102 East High street 


Valentine, Ann 


Spinster 


21 AVellbraehead 


Walker, Ann 


Widow 


10 Littlecauseway 


Walker, Ann 


Widow 


Orchardbank 


AValker, Catherine 


Spinster 


91 Backwjmd 


Walker, Jessie Ann 


Spinster 


41^ Dundee Loan 


Walker, Mary Ann 


Spinster 


19 Newmonthill 


Wallace, Ann 


Widow 


34 Lour Road 


Wallace, Isabella 


Spinster 


48 Dundee Loan 


Wallace, Mary 


Widow 


Strang street 


Warden, Betsy 


Spinster 


16 Charles street 


Waterston, Elizabeth 


Spinster 


38 Castle street 


Waterson, Mary 


Widow 


40| Castle street 


Watson, Alison 


Widow 


7 Watt street 


Watson, Jane 


Widow 


13 Canmore street 


Watt, Ann 


Spinster 


5 Zoar 


Watt, Mary 


Spinster 


15 Manor street 


AVebster, Ann 


Widow 


St. James' Road 


Webster, Elizabeth 


Spinster 


Victoria street 


Webster, Marjory 


Widow 


3 Vennel 


Webster, Kobina 


Spinster 


51 Dundee Road 


Welsh, Euphemia 




42 South street 


Whitton, Mary 


Spinster 


94 Dundee Loan 


Whyte, Charlotte 


Spinster 


Carseburn Road 


Whyte, Isabella 


Spinster 


9 AA^ellbraehead 


Whyte, Margaret 


Widow 


Manor Place 


Wighton, Jane 


Spinster 


1 Broadcroft 


AVilkie, Elizabeth 


Widow 


81 Backwynd 


Wilkie, Margaret 


Widow 


15 St. James' Road 


Will, Isabella 


Spinster 


9 Backwynd 


Williams, Agnes 


Spinster 


13 Horsewater AA'^ynd 


Williamson, Margaret 


Spinster 


6 Dundee Loan 


Wilson, Agnes 


Spinster 


32 Manor street 


Wilson, Ann 


Widow 


10 Arbroath Road 


Wilson, Elizabeth 


Widow 


32 Manor street 


Wilson, Jessie 


Spinster 


3 Broadcroft 


Wishart, Annie 


Widow 


4 Nursery Feus 


A\ishart, Elizabeth 


Spinster 


Newf ord Park 


Wood, Jane 


Widow 


22 St. James' Road 


Wyllie, Elizabeth 


Spinster 


Helen street 


Wyllie, Mary 


Spinster 


1 St. James' Road 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



49 



Yeaman, Agnes 
Yeaman, Helen 
Yeaman, Jane 
Yeaman, Jessie 
Yeaman, Margaret 
Young, Elizabeth 
Young, Margaret 
Young, Margaret 
Young, Margaret 



Spinster 

Spinster 

Spinster 

Spinster 

Widow 

Widow 

Widow 

Spinster 

Widow 



Manor House 
Manoi Plouse 
11 Manor street 
Manor House 
11 Manor street 
18 Yeaman street 
2o Nursery Feus 
17 Newmonthill 
17 Dundee Loan 



FARMERS, AND OTHER RE8IDENTER8, 

In the Parishes of Aberlemno, Dunnichen, Forfar, Glamis, Inverarity, Kinnettles, 
Kirriemuir, Oathlaw, Rescobie, and Tannadice. 



ABERLEMNO. 

Bush, James, Tillywhandland 
Butter, John, Nether Turin 
Calder, William, Woodend 
Cattanach, James, North Mains of Bal- 

gavies 
Davidson, James, Pitkennedy 
Dickson, John, Miiirside of Melgund 
Fairweather, .James, Craiksfolds 
Falconer, Robt. , Wood of Killockshaw 
Fettes, F. , Bog of Pitkennedy 
Gourlay, James, Blebberhill 
Jarron, J. N., Mains of Melgund 
Kennedy, Mrs, Crosston 
Kiddie, William, Milldens 
Leitch, John, Damside 
Lowson, William, Kirkton 
M'Laren, James, Balgarrock 
Martin, John, Netherton 
Matthew, James, (Reprs.), Balnacake 
Milne, D., jr.. North Mains of Turin 
Milne, Peter, Wandershill 
Norrie, James, Howmuir 
Paxton, Alex., Broomknowe 
PatuUo, D., Balglassie 
Reid, WiUiam. Bellyhill 
Salmond, William, Woodwrae 
Scott, George, Southton 
Scott, Robert, Turin 
Webster, P., jr., Flemington 
Wedderspoon, Wm., Mains of Balgavies 

DUNNICHEN. 

Bairnsfather, P., Dumbarrow 
Borthwick, William, Home Farm 
Donald, Charles, East Dumbarrow 
Duke, David, (Reprs.), Drum 



Fettes, F., Pitkennedy 

Gibson, William, Vinney Bank 

Gray, David, Blairs 

Lawrence, William, North Draff an 

Melville, J., Mains of Craichie 

Middleton, D., East Dumbarrow 

Osier, David, (Reprs.), Upper Tulloes 

Osier, William, Nether Tulloes 

Ramsay, David, Hill Kirk 

Ramsay, INIrs J., Drummietermont 

Roberts, Charles, Corston 

Shepherd, James, New Dyke of Lownie 

Smith, D., (Reprs.), East Lownie 

imith:S::'s. [Bumside 

Soutar, John, East Mains 

Sturrock, Charles, Mill of Craichie 

Taylor, Alex. , South Draffan 

Warden, D., (Reprs.), Cotton of Lownie 

Warden, David, West Lownie 

Warden, Wm., East Mains of Craichie 

FORFAR. 

Adam, Robert, Ladenford 
Alexander, David, Muirton 
Alexander, Thomas, Clockbriggs 
Allan, William, Meadow Green 
Bell, David, Lochlands 
Carnegy, P. A. W., Lour 
Carruthers, James, Craignathro 
Christie, .James, Bankhead 
Craik, Robert F., Kingston 
Dalgety, John, Caldhame 
Gold, William, Canmore 
Gowans, John, Lilybank 
Graham, D. M., Slateheld 
Grant, David, Mosside 



5° 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



Lister, George, Mains of Restenneth 
Low, James, (Trustees), Whitewell 
Mount, W. B., Halkerton 
Murray, Dr W. F., Suttieside 
NicoU, George, South Mains 
Nicoll, Thomas, North Mains 
NicoU, William, Inchgarth, &c. 
Petrie, William, Greenordie 
Ramsay, David, Lochhead 
Robbie, James, Loanhead 
Smith, Peter, Bankhead, Lour 
Taylor, James, East Mains, Lour 
Taylor, James, Heatherstacks 
Taylor, James, (Trustees), Hillend, 

Burnside 
Thorns, George, Mid Dod 
Thoms, William, Auchterforfar 
Waterston, John E., Pitreuchie 
Webster, P., Westfield 
Whitton, Andrew, West Caldhame 

GLAMIS. 

Alexander, H. M. , Easter Denoon 
Annand, Alex., Newton 
Arnot, William, Glamis Mains 
Bell, Alexander, Handwiek 
Brown, Wm. D., Easter Drumgley 
Bruce, James, Knockenny 
Cathro, James, Berryhillock 
Cook, Charles, Meikle Cossens 
Duflf, John, IN ether Handwiek 
Gibson, John, Chamberwell 
Grant, Robt., Over Middleton 
Knight, William, Haughs of Cossens 
Jack, Da^'id, Ewnie 
Jxjhnstone, James, Tilework 
Johnston, John, Nether Airneyfoul 
Langlands, David, Hatton of Ogilvy 
Lyon, Joseph, Kilmundie 
M'Kenzie, James, Dryburn 
Milne, Mrs John, Holemill 
Nicoll, John, Nether Middleton 
Porter, James, Lochmill 
Ralston, Andrew, Glamis 
Rattray, John, Templebank 
Reid, James, Little Kilmundie 
Reoch, David, Scroggei-field 
Robertson, Hugh, Lochside 
Ross, William, Nether Di-umgiey 
Stewart, Charles, Upper Drumgley 
Thomson, John, Rochilhill 
Toplis, Robert, Glamis 
Whyte, Archibald, Nether Hayston 
Whyte, James, Upper Hayston 
Whyte, John, Wester Denoon 

INVERARITY. 

Adam, Wm., Wester Meathie 
Brown, Thomas, Carrot 
Dargie, David, (Reprs.), Tarbrax 



Dron, Robert, Fotheringham 

Duncan, William, -Newton 

Ev/art, A. P., Mains of Meathie 

Gall, David and Alexander, Tarbrax 

Grant, James, jr., Ovenstone 

Hill, William, Washingdales 

Jarron, George, Bonnyton 

Millar, James, Mains of Happas 

Millar, Robert, Skair 

Milne, William, Kincreich 

Moir, Peter, Kincreich Mill 

Nicoll, Wm., North Bottymire 

Peters, Thomas, Seggieden 

Ramsay, Robert, (Reprs.), Labothie 

Roberston, Thomas, Hatton 

Salmond, Mrs, Little Lour 

Sime, John, Mill 

Suttie, J ohn, East Grange, Kincaldrum 

KINNETTLES. 

Arnot, Mrs, West Ingliston 

Beverly, G. , North Mains of Kinnettles 

Duncan, John, Turwhappie 

Easton, David, Spittalburn 

Eairweather, William, East Ingliston 

Guthrie, James, Brigton 

Luke, Peter, Mains of Kinnettles 

M'Laren, John, South Leckaway 

M'Lean, W., Foffarty 

Nicoll, Robert, Invereighty Mill 

Paterson, Jas., North Mains, Invereighty 

PatuUo, John, Mid Ingliston 

Rae, David, North Leckaway 

Roy, George, Kirkhill 

Scott, James, Mains of Brigton 

Smith, William, Kinnettles Mill 

EIRBIEMUIB. 

Alexander, John, Ballindarg 

Anderson, John, Redford 

Bain, J. & J. , Newmill 

Barrie, John, Pluckerstone 

Black, J. M., Auchlishie 

Bruce, George, Easter Kinwhirrie 

Cathro, William, Balmuckety 

Clark, James, Knowhead 

Coupar, David T. , Over Migvie 

Crabb, Alex., Ladywell 

Crabb, D., Rosewell 

Dougall, R. (Reprs.), Wester Lednathie 

Ewart, James, Kilnhill 

Ewart, Wm., Sandyford 

Falconer, J., Culhawk 

Ferguson, William, Glenning 

Ferguson, William, Millhall 

Geekie, Wm., East Muirhead 

Guild, Thomas, Herdhill 

Hay, James, Pathhead 

Henderson, C, Chapelton 

Irvine, William, Herdhill 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



51 



Lamb, Alex. , New Kilry 

Ltimsden, Alex. , Wester Kinwhirries 

Lyall, Leonard, Lochside 

M'Intosh, Donald, Garlowbank 

M'Inlosh, J., East Inch 

M'Kay, Thomas (Reprs.), Whitelums 

Milne, Chas., Drumshade 

Milner, James, Barnsdale 

Mitchell, Jas., jr.. Nether Migvie 

Mitchell, James, Haugh 

Munroe, Wm. Woodhead 

Osier, Andrew, Kintyrie 

Osier, William, INIeams 

Robbie, James, Netherbow 

Robertson, John, Denmill 

Rough, George, Fletcherfield 

Rough, William, Longbank 

Sime, Thomas, Overbow 

Smitla, J., Meikie Inch 

Stewart, J. & W., Curmure 

Thomson, Alexander, Burnside 

Tosh, D. (Reprs.), Plovermuir 

Whyte, Alex., Blackbeard 

Whyte, Wm., Sj^ot, etc. 

Wilkie, D., Balstard 

Wilson, William, Balstard 

Winter, D. & J., Balnagarrow 

Wyllie, James, Mains of Glasswell 

Wyllie, Mrs, Balbrydie 

OATHLAW. 

Adams, James, M.I)., Easter Oathlaw 

Batchelor, Alex., Milton, Finavon 

Batchelor, Geo., West Mains, Einavon 

Carnegie, James, Battledykes 

Carnegie, William, Birkenbush 

Davidson, William, Woodside 

Duke, Wm., Newbarns 

Keay, Alex., Wolflaw 

Kydd, David, M.D., BogindoUo 

Lamb, J. & J., Bankhead 

Millar, David, Oathlaw 

Ritchie, W., Ordie 

Webster, J., Parkford 

Webster, J., Meadows 

Wyllie, James, Drumclune 

Young, David, Blairyfeddan 

BESCOBIE. 

Absalon, Misses, Wemyss 
Cobb, Alex., Pitscandly 
Farquharson, F. Greenhead 
Farquhar, W. T.. Pitscandly 
Gibson, Mrs, Baldardo 
Grant, David, jr., Finnieston 
Grant, David, sen., Clochtow 
Guild, Mrs, Mains of Burnside 



Kyd, George, Forester Seat 

Lakie, David, Drimmie 

Martin, J. & J., Milldens 

Milne, D., jr., North Mains, Turin 

Mitchell, Geo., Chapelton, Ochterlony 

Mitchell, James, Quilkoe 

Murdie, W. & J. , Baggerton 

NicoU, Wm., jr., East & West Carsebank 

Powrie, James, Esq., of Reswallie 

Ramsay, David, Fonnah 

Ramsay, James, East Mains of Burnside 

Rough, George, Wardmill 

Sinclair, Alex., Newmill, Balgavies 

Simpson, James, Hatton of Carse 

Storrie, Alex., West Mains, Turin 

Taylor, James, Heatherstacks 

Tyrie, George, Hagmuir 

Watson, Wm., Mains of Ochterlony 

Wishart, Mrs James, Haresburn 

TANNADICE. 

Bell, Wm., Midtown, Glenquiech 

Butter, David, Auchleuchrie 

Cameron, J., Miltonbank 

Carnegie, Wm., jr., Coul 

Davidson, W. , Easter Balgillo 

Dow, James, Wester Memus 

Duncan, Pat., Easter do. 

Farmer, Alex., Muiryhillock 

Farquharson, John, Glenley 

Findlay, D., Auchleish 

Forbes, William, Murthill Mains 

Gordon, W., Kinalty 

Gracie, James, Horniehaugh 

Hay, Alex., Tobees 

Hendry, Wm., West Mains of Coul • 

Keay, John, East Mains of Whitewell 

Lindsay, Arch., Redheugh 

Low, Wm., Strone 

Millar, Robert, Foreside, Cairn 

M'Kay, John, Soutra_ 

M'Kenzie, Angus, Cairn ton 

M'Kenzie, John, Goynd 

M'Laren, Jas., Dirachie 

M'Laren, J., Wester BalgiUo • 

Nicoll, William, Sturt 

Reid, Andrew, Caii-n 

Robbie, C, Barnyards 

Rough, David, Newton 

Scott, C. W., Mains of Whitewell 

Stewart, David, Craigeassie 

Stewart, George, Marcus Mill 

Stewart, John, Noranbank 

Thow, John, Turfachie 

Todd, James, Howmuir 

Turnbull, George, Baldoukie 1 

Wallace, P., Nether Balgillo 






52 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



FAIRS, TRYSTS, and CATTLE MARKETS in Forfarshire. 

When the appointed daj^ falls on a Saturday, Sunday, or Monday, it is generally deferred 
until the following Tuesday, o.s., i.e., old style, twelve days after date in Calendar. 



January. 

Arbroath, hiring & general business, last Sat. 
Coupar-Angus, cattle & sheep, 3 Monday 
Brechin, cattle every Tuesday ; feeing, last 
Kirriemuir, i Monday [Tuesday 

February. 

Brechin, cattle every Tuesday ; horses, last 

Tuesday 
Coupar-Angus, cattle and sheep, 3 Monday 
Edzell, hiring, cattle, &c. , 3 Thursday 
Kirriemuir, i Monday 

March. 

Brechin, every Tuesday 

Coupar-Angus, horses & cattle, 3 Thursday 

Kirriemuir, i Monday ; 2 Friday 

April. 

Brechin, (Trinity Muir), sheep and catde, 3 

Wednesday 
Carmyllie, cattle, 3 Tuesday s 
Coupar-Angus, cattle and sheep, 3 Monday 
Cullew, sheep, last Friday 
Forfar, cattle, horses, 2 Wednesday 
Glamis, i Wednesday 
Glasterlaw, cattle, last Wednesday 
Kirriemuir, i Monday 

May. 

Arbroath, hiring, 26 if Sat. ; if not, Sat. after 
Brechin, feeing, Tuesday after 25 
Coupar-Angus, cattle and sheep, 3 Monday 
Dundee, hiring, 26 if Tuesday or Friday ; 

if not, Tuesday or Friday after 
Dun's Muir, i Tuesday o s 
Edzell, cattle, sheep, i Monday ; feeing, 26 
Forfar, cattle, horses, i Wednesday s ; 

feeing, Saturday after 26 
Friockheim, hiring, cattle, last Thursday 
Glamis, i Wednesday & Wednesday after 26 
Kirriemuir, i Monday and Friday after 26 
Letham, Forfar, cattle and hiring, 26 
Montrose, Friday after Whitsunday s 

June. 

Brechin, (Trinity Muir) begins 2 Wednesday 
and continues 3 days— ist day sheep, 
2nd cattle, 3rd horses 

Dun's Muir, cattle, horses, 3 Thursday 

Forfar, cattle, 3 Friday 

Glasterlaw, cattle, 4 Wednesday 

Kirriemuir, Wednesday after Glamis 

July. 

Arbroath, hiring, and general business, 18 

if Saturday ; if not, Saturday after 
Brechin, Monday after 2 Thursday 
Coupar-Angus, cattle, &c. , 3 Thursday 
Dundee (Stobb's) cattle, sheep, and horse, 
Tuesday after 11 



Edzell, cattle, Friday after 19 

Forfar, cattle, horses. Wed. after i Tues. 

Friockheim, hiring and cattle, Monday after 

Arbroath 
Kirriemuir, horses & cattle, 24 if Wed. ; 

if not, Wed. after ; sheep day before 

August. 

Brechin (Trinity Muir), sheep, cattle, and 

horses, 2 Thursday 
Dundee (First), cattle, &c. , 26 
Edzell, cattle and sheep. Wed. after 26. 
Forfar, sheep, cattle, horses, and wool, 

Wednesday after i Tuesday 
Glasterlaw, cattle, 3 Wednesday 

September. 

Brechin (Trinity Muir), slieep, cattle, horses, 

Tuesday before last Wednesday 
Cullew, cattle, Tuesday before last Wed. 
Dundee (Latter), cattle, horses, 19 
Forfar, horses and cattle, last Wednesday 
Glenisla, sheep and cattle, Thursday before 
last Wednesday 

October. 

Brechin, cattle, every Tuesday till April 

Trinity Muir Tryst 
Cullew, sheep, day before Kirriemuir 
Dundee (Bell's), feeing, i Friday 
Edzell, sheep, cattle, and horses, Thursday 

before Kirriemuir 
Forfar, cattle, 2 Wednesday 
Glamis, Saturday before Kirriemuir 
Glasterlaw, cattle, i Monday after Falkirk 
Kirriemuir, horses, cattle, Wednesday after 

18 ; sheep, day before 

November. 

Arbirlot (Arbroath), cattle, 2 Wednesday 
Arbroath, hiring, 22 if Sat. ; if not. Sat. after 
Brechin, cattle, every Tuesday ; feeing, 

Tuesday after 22 
Coupar-Augus, cattle and sheep, 3 Monday 
Dundee, hiring, 22 if Tuesday or Friday ; if 

not, Tuesday or Friday after 
Edzell, feeing, 22 
Forfar, cattle, i Wednesday ; feeing, 

Saturday after 22 
Friockheim, hiring and cattle, 22 if Thurs- 
day; if not, Thursday after 
Glamis, cattle & hiring, Wednesday after 22 
Kirriemuir, cattle, Wednesday after Glamis 
Letham, cattle and hiring, 23 
Montrose, Friday after Martinmas, s 

December. 

Brechin, cattle, every Tuesday 
Coupar-Angus, cattle and sheep, 3 Monday 
Kirriemuir, i Monday 



JOHN STEEUE i Company, 

1 & 5 CASTLE ST„ & 2 WEST HIGH ST„ FORFAR. 



(Patented 

Price <£7, 10s. 










<2> 

Si 



8t, 





(D =^ 

^ O 

CD --4. 

o o 

§^ 

§ 

^ ^" 

r+ Co 






Kimball & mortoN's 

* ^ T I N " is the result of constant study and x^^actical experience of sewing 
J—/ mechanism since the inti^oduction of tlie Sewing Machine to the world, and is 
a decided advance on anything in the market. The inspection of all desirous of produc- 
ing a really excellent Machine is respectfully requested. 

Terms and full particulars on application to JOHN STEELE & Co., 
1 & 6 CASTLE ST., & 2 WEST HIGH ST., Forfar. 



r; 




' J^EfijH, 

IgOjSlEjliERpTE 
©UpJoEE 

MUSieAL f 



Great Sale of PIANOFORTES, AMERICAN ORGANS, HARMONIUMS, &c.. 



THK STOCK OF A 



MUSICSELLER RE TIRING FROM BUSINESS. 

GOOD flANETTES & COTTjfkQE PI/cNOS, 

FuU Compass, Gilt Panel Fronts and Sconces, &c, at £12, £15, £16, £18, to £25. 

Bxoellent i^uglish and ifotteign pottages and tj^tpiiight f qanas, 

With Iron Frames, Check Actions, Beautifully Designed Cases, at £22, £24, £26, £28, 
to £40— Ordinary Prices, from 45 to 80 Guineas. 

PATERSON, SONS, & Co., beg to announce that they have purchased on very 
favourable terms for Cash the Entire Stock of a Musicseller retiring from Busi- 
ness, which will be offered at immense Reductions in price— in many cases at less 
than Half the Original Cost. Such an opportunity seldom occurs, and should not be 

""''"patersonTsons, & CO., 

130 NETHERGATE, Dundee. Edinburgh, Glasgow, Ayr, & Dumfries. 

PRINCES STREET, PERTlI. 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



53 



DIRECTORY OF TRADES & PROFESSIONS. 



__ Every endeavour has been used to ensure correctness in this List, 
and omissions on being pointed out will be corrected for next issue. 
Names appear in dark type. 



Inaccuracies 
Advertisers' 



Architects 

Carver & Symon, 34 Castle street 
Munro, James, 85 Castle street 



Auctioneers 

Doig, Thomas, 53 West High street 
Graham, D. M. , Littlecauseway 
Scott, James, 6 East High street 
Scott, Robert, Newford Park 
Tosh, P. A. , Castle street 



Bakers 

Anderson, James, 10 West High street 

East Port Association, 133 East High 
street — Wm. D. Joiner, Manager 

Edward, William, 10 Castle street 

Esplin, T. B., 25 AVest High street 

Fenton, D. C, East High street 

Free Trade Association, 151 East High 
street — D. Robertson, Manager 

Fyffe, John, 33 South street 

High Street Association, East High street 
^Alex. Wighton, Manager 

Jolly, Alexander, Backwynd 

Low, William, & Co., 105 Castle st.— 
Alex. Hay, Manager 

Myles, William, 48 West High street 

Northern Association, 11 1 Castle street- 
James Brown, Manager 

Omiond, Charles, 49 East High street 

Ross, William, 107 Backwynd 

Saddler, James, 35 East High street 

Shepherd, Alex., Osnaburgh street 

Shepherd, Andrew, 22 and 24 West 
High street 

West Port Association, 52 West High 
street — George Smart, Manager 

West Town-End Association, 118 West 
High street — James Simpson, Salesman 
E 



Basketmaker 

Robb, David, 40 Castle street 

Berlin Wool Repositories 

Ferguson, Miss, 37 Castle street 
Hebenton, D. , 7 East High street 
PuUar, Miss, 22 East High street 
Roberts, John, 41 and 43 East High street 

Bicycle Dealer, etc. 

Keith, William, 78 Castle street 

Billposters 

Thom, C. Sc Son, 5 Littlecauseway 

Fyfe, David, 35 Nursery Feus 

Blacksmiths 

Anderson, James, 26 West High street 
Guthrie, William, Castle street 
Haddon, James, South street 
M'Intosh, W^iUiam, East High street 
Mackintosh, Alex., Castle street 
Milne, George, Backwynd 
Stewart, Wm. , Backwynd 



Booksellers and Stationers 

Byars, John, i Glamis Road 

Dick, David, East Port 

Laing, Mrs, 24 East High street 

Eawrance, James, 78 East High street 

Lowdon, Mrs, 80 West High street 

Shepherd, W., 39 Castle street 

Thomson, W. H., 73 East High street 



54 



FORFAR DIRECTORY, 



Boot and Shoemakers 

Adam, Charles, Leather Cutter, Osna- 
burgh street 

Balfour, Wm., Leather Cutter, Backwynd 
Christie, David, South street 
Deuchar, Alexander, 49 Castle street 
Dunn, R. & J., 36 Castle street 
Findlay, James, Lour road 
Fullerton, William, 30 Castle street 
Glenday, James, East High street 
Hebington, William, 36 West High street 
Hood, David, 96 Castle street 
Lawson, James, 139 East High street 
M'Dougall, James, 40 East High street 
M'Intosh, James, 11 Castle street 
Meek, A., 42 Castle street 
Petrie, John, 138 East High street 
Petrie, T. , 2 Backwynd 
Robertson, David, East High street 
Smith, Miss, 93 Castle street 
Tarbat, D., 13 East Highistreet 
Thornton, D. P., 84 West High street 



Brewer and Bottler 

Walker, Wm. , junr. , West High street 

Brokers 

Doig, Thomas, 53 West High street 
Gibson, Graham, Dundee loan 
Hanick, Richard, East High street 



Builders and Quarry masters 

Adamson, WiUiam, Headingplacestone — 

Leysmill Quarries 
Cargill, James, Canmore street 
Dick, Charles, A'lontrose road 
M'Lean, James, 36 John street 
Simpson, P. D. , Forfar Pavement Works 

and Myreston Quarries 
Stewart, William, Yeaman street 
Watterston, James, Glamis road — Balma- 

shanner Quarries 



Butchers 

Byars, Robert, West High street 
Coutts, William, 89 Castle street 
Coutts, William, junr., 28 West High st. 
Deuchar, Ale.x. , 45 West High street and 

115 East High street 
Eaton & Fyfe, Castle street 
Farquhar, James, 62 East High street 
Fettes, R. W., 84 Castle street 
Greenhill, Charles, East High street 
Mitchell. Charles, 69 North street 



Nicoll, George, 107 East High street 
Nicoll, WiUiam, 88 East High street 
Pirie, James, 116 West High street 
Walker, David, 2h East High street 



Carters 

Adam, William, Backwynd 
Bennet, Alex. , Canmore street 
Bruce, John, Whitehills 
Callander, Alex. , Dundee loan 
Callander, John, Dundee road 
Crighton, James, 7 Charles street 
Kennedy, Alex., North street 
Masterton, D. , Canmore street 
Miller, David, Dundee road 
Miller, Wm. , West High street 



Chimney Sweeps 

Carrie, James, Castle street 
Langlands, Alex. , 79 East High street 
Shepherd, Alex. , 59 Dundee loan 
Simpson, William, 18 Glamis road 



China Merchants 

Doig, Thomas, 53 West High street 
Gray, Robert, 45 Castle street 
Hill, Alexander, South street 
Munro, Andrew, East High street 
Shepherd, James, junr,, 12 j West High 
street 



Clergymen 

Aldridge, Rev. J. M. , The Parsonage 
Caie, Rev. G. J. , The Manse 
Gumming, Rev. A. , First Free Manse 
M'Corkindale, Rev. D. L. , Lilybank Villa 
Mitchell, Rev. John, 29 Manor street 
Philps, Rev. G. M., East Free Manse 
Weir, Rev. John, St. James' Manse 
Wright, Rev. P. S., U.P. Manse 



Coachbuilders 

Greenhill, Hugh, Littlecauseway 
Stewart, W^m. , Backwynd 



Coal and Lime Merchants 

Bruce, George, dealer. South street 
Ewen, James, Victoria street 

Forfar Co-operative Coal Society — A. Lees, 

Glamis road. Secretary 
Kennedy, Andrew, Victoria street 
Lackie, John, West High street 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



55 



Lakie, John, Railway Station 
Maxwell . D. & G. , P'orfar and Auldbar 
M'Kenzie, George, 935 West High street 
Milne, James, junr. , 86 Dundee loan 
Muir, Thomas, Son, & Patton, Railway- 
Station 
PatuUo, David, 146 East High street 
Roberts, Alexander, Whitehills 
Sharp, W. W., 23b Victoria street 
Victoria Co-operative Coal Society — T. 

Stirling, Kirkton, Secretary 
Whyte, Alex. , 25 Prior road 
Whyte, David, 11 Market place 
Wishart, George, Victoria street 



Confectioners 

Coutts, J., Castle street 
Mitchell, Mrs, 123 Castle street 
Guthrie, George, 66 East High st. 
Gordon, James, 4 East High street 
Hazels, Miss, 23 West High street 
Milne, James, 148 East High street 
M'Leish, David, 31 East High street 
Murray, James, 83 Castle street 
Ormond, Charles, 49 East High street 
Reid, Peter, 51 Castle street 
Saddler, James, 35 East High street 
Shepherd, Andrew, 22 and 24 West 

High street 
Spark, James, 93 & 95 Market place 
Wilkie, James S. , 2 East High street 



Coopers 

Matthew, George, Backwynd 
Robb, David, 40 Castle street 



Cowfeeders and Dairymen. 

Barry, William T. , Ballinshoe 
Byars, David, Glamis road 
Callander, Alexander, 6 Dundee loan 
Callander, John, Dundee road 
Deuchar, Alex. , Glamis road 
Doig, James, Quarrybank 
Lackie, John, West High street 
Liveston, Mrs John, East High street 
Luke, David, 154 East High street 
Michie, William, Horsewater wynd 
Morrison, John, Easterbank 
Nicoll, David, 7 Arbroath road 
Nicoll, Thomas, North Mains 
Nicoll, W., Turf beg 
Proctor, James, Glamis road 
Ritchie, D. , Windyedge 
Ritchie, George, Dundee road 
Robbie, Alex., Caldhame 



Robbie, William, Zoar 
Roberts, Alex. , Whitehills 
Steele, Andrew, Midlanglands 
Stewart, John, Arbroath road 
Watson, James, Butterwell 
Whyte, David, West High street 



Curriers and Leather Merchants 

P'erguson & Whitson, Academy street 
Hastings, Alex. , North street 
Whyte, John, Castle street (Tanner) 



Cutler 

Andrew, William, West High street 

Dentist 
French, Dr., 33 East High street 

Drapers 

Anderson & Co., 145, 145i and 147 East 

High street 
Barclay, R. W. , 29 Castle street 
Bell, Mrs, 85 West High street 
Chalmers, W. A., 26 Castle street 
Dalgety, Alex., 55 East High street 
Doig, Alex., 9 South street 
Fenton, H. H., 158 East High street 
Guild, James, 30 East High street 
Hendry & Warden, 83 East High st. 
Hutchison, Alex., 38 West High street 
Jamieson, W. , 156 East High street 
Jarvis Brothers, 68, 70, & 72 Castle st. 
Marshall, James, 110 West High st. 
Morrison, James, "Polytechnic," East High 

street 
Neish, Patrick, 55 Castle street 
Roberts, John, 41 & 43 East High street 
Roberts, Wm. , Wellbraehead 
Simpson, J. W. , Cross 
Steele, John, & Co. , 1 & 5 Castle street 
Stewart, William, no East High street 
Warden, William, 23 East High street 

Dressmakers, Milliners, &c. 

Those marked ''^ are Milliners only. 

Addison, Miss, 5 Vennel 
Allan, Miss, 99 East High street 
Barclay, R. W, 29 Castle street 
Bell, Mrs, 85 West High street 

Boath, Jane, North street 
Cable, Miss, 50 North street 
*Campbell, R. H., 63 Castle street 
Donald, Miss, Green street 



56 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



Ellis, Miss, West High street 
Esplin, Agnes, 156 East High street 
Fairweather, J. M. , Castle street 
Fenton, H. H., East High street 
Fen ton, Miss, Yeaman street 
Guild, James, 30 East High street 
Hutchison, Alex., 38 West High street 
Inverwick, Miss, Backwynd 
Jarron, Miss, 70 West High street 
Jarvis Brothers, 68, 70, & 72 Castle st. 
Latta, Mrs, Castle street 
Lowson, Miss, Glamis road 
*Mitchell, Miss, 43 Castle street 
Morrison, James, "Polytechnic," East High 

street 
Oram, Miss, 13 West High street 
Orchison, Miss, Dmidee road 
Patei'son, Jane, 38 East High street 
Petrie, Miss, Newmonthill 
Pratt, Misses E. & R. , East High street 
Rickard, Miss, Stark's Close 
Robertson, Miss, Market place 
Simpson, J. W. , Cross 
Smith, Miss, 54^ East High street 
Stark, Miss, Glamis road 
Steele, John, & Co., Castle street 
Stewart, W. , 113 East High street 
Strachan, Miss, Newmonthill 
'Thorn. Miss, 130 East High street 
Thorn, Miss M., 5 Littlecauseway 
Walker, Miss, Newmonthill 
Warden, William, 23 East High street 
Webster. Miss, 33 East High stieet 
* Yeaman, Miss, 87 Castle street 



Druggists 

Abel &; Simpson, Cross 

Anderson & Co. , 38^ Castle street 
Ranken, James A., & Son, East High st. 

Dyer 

Peffers, John, Canmore street 

Fishmongers 

Boyle, John, 69 West High street 
Boyle, John S., 18 Castle street 
Edwards, Alexander, West High street 
Elliot, James, Nursery Feus 
Jamie, Adam, Couttie's Wynd 
Jamieson, Bros., East High street 
Leask, J., junr. , 26 Wellbraehead 
Robertson, Peter, 4 and 6 West High street 
Troup, B. , 118 East Fligh street 

Founder (Iron) 

Munro, James, Foundry, W^hitehills 



Fruit Merchants and Greengrocers 

Black, Wm. , 98 West High street 
Boyle, John S. , 18 Castle st. (wholesale) 
Christie, James, East High street 
Christie, iVIary, 72 East High street 
Gordon, J., 4 East High street 
Guthrie, G., East High street 
Hazels, Miss, 23 West High street 
Murray, James, 83 Castle street 
M'Kenzie, David, North street 
Piggot, Mary, 92 Castle street 
Whyte, Mrs, 19 We.st High street 



Furniture Dealers 

Doig, Thomas, 53 West High street 
Findlay, James, 176 East High street 
Gray, R., 45 Castle street 
Lamont, James, 26 West High street 
Liddell, David, East High street 
Low, Alexander, 7 Glamis road 
M'Intosh, Mrs, Castle street 
Tosh, P. A. , 70 Castle street 
Whamond, David, Castle street 



Game Dealers 

' 'hristic, James, iii East Fligh street 
Guthrie, George, 66 East High street 
Martin, James, 32 & 34 Castle street 

Robertson, Peter, West High street 
Urquhart, Duncan, North street 
Walker, David, 2^ East High street 



Gardeners (Jobbing) 

Adam, John, Manor street 
Adams, James, 12 Charles street 
Andrew, Wm. , 23 St. James' road 
Black, James, 18 Yeaman street 
Doig, Alexander, Easterbank 
Hunter, Wm. , 54 South street 
Kidd, Joseph, Chapel Park 
Mann, James, Backwynd 
M'Kenzie, Kenneth, Lour road 
Murray, James, Castle street 
NicoU, John, Arbroath road 
Simpson, John, Sheriff Park 



Gardeners (Market) 

Archie, John, Cowiehill 
Dick, Walter, Cherryfield 
Duff, Charles, East High street 
Kydd, James, Caldhame 
Low, Mrs, Welshbanis 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



57 



Piggot, Alexander, Padanaram 
Simpson, John, Sheriff Park 
Snowie, John, Dundee road 
Stark, Alex., Glamis road 
Stark, David, St. James' road 



Grocers (not Licensed) 

Boath, William, 23 John street 
Dick, Charles, Montrose road 
East Port Association, 133 East High street 

— Wm. D. Joiner, Manager 
East High street Association — Alexander 

Wighton, Manager 
Free Trade Association, 151 East High 

street — D.Robertson, Manager 
Fyfe, James, 2 Arbroath road 
Gray, Robert, Wellbraehead 
Liddle, William, North street 
Low, Wm., & Co., Castle street. East 

High street, & West High street 
Mollison, David, Dmidee loan 
Northern Association, 11 1 Castle street — 

James Brown, Manager 
Spark, James, 95 Market place 
Tarbet, Mrs, East High street 
West Port Association, 52 West High street 

— George Smart, Manager 
West Town End Association, 118 West 

High street — James Simpson, Salesman 
Wishart, Charles, Dundee loan 



Grocers (Licensed) 

.\damson, John, 40 West High street and 

East High street 
Barry, David, 80 Castle street 
Butchart, D. , 33 Castle street 
Donald, David, 19 Glamis road 
Donald, Henry, 80 West High street 
Martin, James, 32 & 34 Castle street 
Melvin, B. & M., 17, 19, & 21 Castle st. 
Nicolson, James, 82 East High street 
Prophet, Mrs, Prior road 
Ross, William, 12 East High street 
Smith, Mrs L. , 164 East High street 
Smith, Agnes, 72 West High street 
Abel & Simpson, Cross (wine and 

spirits only) 
Bell or Boath, Mary Ann, North street 

(table beer only) 
Walker, Wm. , jr., West High street (Ale 
and Porter onlv) 



Gunsmith 

Findlay, William, Kingston, Forfar 



Hair Dressers 

.Andrew, W. , 29 West High street 
Clark, C. , 44 East High street 
Clark, William, 92 West High street 
Mason, David, 3 East High street 
Petrie, Robert, 138 East High .-treet 
Strang, Robert, Castle street 



Hatters 

Davidson, John, 97^ East High street 

Taylor, John, 60 Castle street 

Also, various Clothiers of Drapers i/i tozvn. 

Horsehirers 

Bennet, Alexander, Castle street 
Greenhill, Hugh, Royal Hotel 
Petrie, W. , East High street ; and County 
Hotel Stables, Castle street 

Hotels 

Those marked * have Sfabli/ig 

'"Clementsen, John, Zoar 
■'^Dyce, Mrs, Cross 
*Greenhill, Hugh, Royal Hotel 
*Jarman, Joseph, Star Hotel 
"'Petrie, W. , Salutation Hotel 
■"'Robbie, Isabella, Market place 
Willis, Wm., County Hotel 



Innkeepers 

Balharry, Wm., " Eagle Inn," West High 

street 
Barry, Elizabeth, 37 South street 
Bennet, Alexander, Castle street 
Bowman, Mrs, " Forfar Arms Inn," East 

Port 
Dalgety, ^Slrs, " Strathmore," West High 

street 
Dick, David, " Burns' Tavern," 81 East 

High street 
Henry, James, 121 East High street 
Hume, Walter, 112 Castle street 
Jack, Peter, 27 South street 
Keir, Charles, " The Globe," Castle street 
Killacky, Mrs, "Stranger's Inn," Castle 

street 
Lament, James, 26 West High street 
Linsday, David, " The Pump," loi West 

High street 
Liveston, Ann, 90 East High street 
Low, James, 2 Don street 
Lowdon, Mrs, " Auction Mart Inn " 
Lowson, Andrew, Market place 



58 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



Crown," East High 



The Vine," 48 Little- 



M'Gregor, Mary, 

street 
Ogilvie, George, " 

causeway 
Peacock, William, Dundee loan 
Porter, Jane, Castle street 
Porter, WiUiani, "Stag Inn," Castle st. 
Robertson, Alexander, Osnaburgh st. 
Robbie, Charles, 47 Backwynd 
Stewart, John, i Arbroath road 
Stirling, William, Backwynd 
Wilson, Alexander, 155 East High street 
Wilson, Robert, "Masons' Arms," East 

High street 

Insurance Agents. 

North British & Mercantile. Agents- 
lames Taylor, Town-Clerk ; W. & J. 
Don & Co. (Fire only) ; Patrick 
Webster, Westfield ; T. Henderson, 
Agent, National Bank (Fire only) ; 
A. B. Wyllie, Solicitor. 

Provident Plate Glass. District Manager 
— W. E. Reid, ]Monikie Manse, Car- 
noustie. v\gent — P. A. Tosh, Forfar. 

Boiler and Steam Power. Agent— P. A. 
Tosh, Forfar 

Ironmongers 

Crichton, Alexander, Cross 

Hebenton, James, 57 Castle street 
Irons, David, 14 East High street 

Mackintosh, Alexander, 16 Castle street 
Tosh, Charles, 18 and 20 West High street 



Joiners and Cabinetmakers 

Bain, Alexander, 26^ West High street 
Farquharson, James, Chapel street 
Findlay, James, 176 East High street 
Hay, Alex. , & Co. , Academy street 
Liddell, D. , East High street 
Low, Alexander, 7 Glamis road 
Martin, William, 21 South street 
Morrison, William, Dundee loan 
.Stewart, William, Backwynd 
Whamond, David, Castle street 

Manufacturers (Power-loom) 

Boath, John, junr. , & Co., Academy Street 

Works — W. Lowson Manager 
Craik, J. & A., & Co., Manor Works 
Don, Wm. & John, & Co., St. James' 

Road and Station Works — Charles 

Burnett, Manager 
Laird, William, & Co., Forfar Linen and 

Canmore Works— W. Rodger, Manager 



Lowson, John, & Son, Haugh and South 
Street Works — John Morrison, Manager 

Lowson, John, junr., & Co., Victoria 
Works — David Stirton, Manager 



Manufacturers (Hand-loom) 

Byars, J. & W. , Nursery Feus 
Waterston, Charles, Glamis road 
Yeaman, Alexander, 33 Dundee loan 



Medical Practitioners 

Alexander, G. P., Littlecauseway 
Cable, J. , East High street 
Hunter, Charles, 59 East High street 
Murray, W. F. , East High street 
Wedderburn, A. M'L., East High street 



Messenger-at-Arms 

Gowans, John, Lilybank 

Millwright 

Innes, Peter, Whitehills 



Music Teachers 

Ewen, Misses, Mill Bank 
Gavin, Wm., 55 West High street 
Kerr, John, East High street 
Neill, James, Whitehills 
Smith, C. J., New road, Organist 
Wilkie, Thomas, North street 



Newsagents 

Byars, John, Glamis road 
Dick, David, East Port 
Laing, Mrs, East High street 
Lawrance, James, 78 East High street 
Lowdon, Mrs, 80 West High street 
Shepherd, W., Castle street 
Thomson, W. H., East High street 



Newspaper Offices 

Dundee Advertiser, Peoples' Journal, 
Peoples' Friend, and Evening Tele- 
gTaph. Branch office— IO5 West 
High street 

Dundee Courier & Argus, and Weekly 
News. Branch Office, 18 East High 
street 

Forfar Dispatch, (Thursdays, gratis), 
76 East High street 

Forfar Herald, (Fridays,) 13 Castle st. 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



59 



Nurserymen 

Duff, Charles, East High street 
Simpson, John, Sheriff Park 
Smith, Alexander, Glamis road 
Smith, David, Broomroof 
Williamson, James, Victoria street 



Painters 

Barclay & Henderson, 74 Castle street 
Doig, George, 30 South street 
Dowell, William, 47 East High street 
Eraser, Thomas, 94 Castle street 
M'Laren & Fyfe, East High street 
Prophet, John, 47 West High street 
Robertson, J. W. , 52 and 54 Castle st. 
Rodger, David, 21 West High street 



Photographers 

Calder, John, 64 East High street 
Dowell, William, East High street 
Mitchell, Charles, 48 East High st. 

M'lntosh, Mrs, Castle street 



Plasterers 

Doig, John, 30 South street 
Guthrie, Wm. , Charles street 
Masterton, David, 20 Canmore street 



Plumbers and Tinsmiths 

Clark, James, 97 East High street 
Fyfe, John, Couttie's Wynd 
Keith, William, 78 Castle street 
Langlands & Milne, 1 West High street 
M'Beth & Milne, Green street 
Malcolm, W. , 15 West High street 
Neave, James, 10 East High street 
Neave, Peter, 1355 East High street 
Soutar, Alexander, 19 South street 



Potato Merchants 

Caird, C. , St. James' road 
Jack, Peter, 27 and 29 South street 
Maxwell, D. &G., Forfar & Auldbar Station 
M'Kenzie, David, 4 North street 
Piggot, William, 15 Backwynd 
Scott, Robert, Newford Park 
Scott, James, East High street 
Whyte, David, 11 Market place 
Wishart, George, Victoria street 



Poultry Dealers 

Boath, David, Newmonthill 
Christie, James, iii East High street 
CMarke, David, 85 West High street 
Guthrie, George, East High street 



Printers 

Christie & Nicolson, Castle street 

Falconer, J. C, Castle street 
Heath & Co. , Backwynd 
M'Pherson, Oliver, East High street 
Shepherd, W., 39 Castle street 



Reedmakers 

Ramsay, William, 35 West High street 
Tvrie, David, 102 East High street 



Refreshment Rooms (Temperance) 

Duncan, Miss E. , 96 North street 
Petrie, Thomas, 2 Backwynd 
Saddler, James, 35 East High street 
Shepherd, Andrew, West High street 

Ramsay, Mrs, 58 Castle street, Forfar Caft? 



Ropespinners 

Dunn & Paterson, Manor street 

Philip, Brodlie, & Co., Forfar Rope Works 



Saddlers 

Clark, Robert, Cross 

HaiTis, William, 505 West High street 

Hutchison, Robert, Cross 

Steele, Alexander, 67 Castle street 



Saw Trimmer. 

Coutts, C, Castle street 

Seedsmen 

Crichton, Alexander, Cross 

Hebenton, James, 57 Castle street 
Irons, David, 14 East High street 

Mackintosh, Alex., 16 Castle street 
Smith, J. & A., 59 West High street 
Tosh, Charles, t8 & 20 West High street 

Sheriff Officer 

Gowans, John, Eilvbank 



6o 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



Slaters 

Donald, G. , 20 North street 

Moffat, William, New road 

Shepherd, A. & C, 116 East High street 

Shepherd, David, West High street 

Solicitors 

Anderson, J. C. , 109 Castle street 
Anderson, J. P., Littlecauseway 
Anderson, R. W. , 53 East High street 
Gordon, William, East High street 
Gray, J. S. , 20 East High street 
Lowson &: Mac Lean, 9 West High street 
AlacHardy, Alexander, Council Buildings 
Macintosh, D. , Town Hall Buildings 
Myles, J. & A. W., & Co., 68 Castle street 
Taylor, James, Council Buildings 
Whyte & Freeman, East High street 
Wyllie, A. B. , 53 East High street 



Tailors and Clothiers 

Booth, D. P., 66 Castle street 
Brown, James, 84^ Castle street 
Dalgety, Alexander, East High street 
Dick, William, 20i West High street 
Gibson, W. A., 25 Dundee loan 
Hendry & Warden, East High street 
Jack & Milne, 117.3 East High street 
Jamieson, J., & Co., Castle street 
Jarvis Brothers, Castle street 
Kydd, James, (Janmore street 
Low, John, 42 Lour road 
M'Nab, Robert, 150 East High street 
Mann, J., 14 West High street 
Marshall, James, 110 West High st. 
Peter, John, East High street 
Petrie, John, 109 East High street 
Proctor, D. , Osnaburgh street 
Spalding, Alexander, West High st. 
Steele, J., & Co., Castle street 
Todd, Alex., 10 East High street 
Warden, Wm., 23 East High street 
Watt, William, Osnaburgh street 
Whvte (iv: Wallace, Osnaburgh street 



Tanner and Skinner 

Wood, William, 3 Victoria street 



Tobacconists 

Andrew, William, West High street 
Donald, A. L. , 10 Castle street 
Leighton, Mrs, 2^ West High street 
M'Leish, David, East High street 
Smart, William, 77 East High street 



Toy Merchants 

Andrew, William, West High street 
Leighton, Mrs, 2^ West High street 
Lowdon, Mrs, West High street 
M'Leish, D. , 31 East High street 
Munro, James, 46 East High street 
Robb, David, Castle street 
Thomson, W. H., East High street 



Veterinary Surgeons 

Anderson, James, 26 West High street 
Ritchie, Tames, East Port Cottage 



Watchmakers 

Clark, John A., 64 Castle street 
Falconer, D. , East High street 
Murdoch, J. D. , 20 Castle street 
Strachan, John, 10 Cross 

Taylor, William, Castle street 



Wood Merchants 

Ewen, James, Victoria street 

Johnston, A., <!s: Son, Service road 
Sharp, W. W., 23b Victoria street 



Wood Turners 

Crammond, David, Backwynd 
Johnston, A., & Son, Service road 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 6 1 



BURGH OF FORFAR. 



Population in 1881 — 12,818. Constituency — Males, 1609 ; Females, 619. 

Parliamentary Representative — John Shiress Will, Q.C. 

Valuation j Lands, ... ... ... ;^3S.227 i o 

for 1887-88. ( Railways in Burgh, ... ... 1648 o o 

MAGISTRATES AND TOWN COUNCIL. 

The Council meets in Council Buildings on the first iVIonday of each month at 6-30 p.m. 
Special Meetings are also held from time to time to dispose of urgent business. 

Wm. Doig, Provost and Chief Magistrate ; John Ferguson, First Bailie ; James M'Lean, 
Second Bailie ; John P. Anderson, Third Bailie ; John Moffat, Treasurer. Peter A. Tosh, 
David Johnston, Robert Fyfe Craik, James Ewen, David Smith, John L. Fenton^ James 
Milne, jr., Keith Kennedy Skene, Daniel Falconer, John Anderson MacLean. 

Officials and Committees. 
James Taylor, Town-Clerk ; Alex. MacHardy, Town Chamberlain. 

Law. — Provost Doig, Bailie Ferguson, Bailie Anderson, Messrs Falconer, Johnston, 
Ewen, MacLean (Convener). 

Property. — Provost Doig, Bailie Ferguson, Messrs Moffat, Skene, Milne, Smith, Bailie 
Ai'Lean (Convener). 

Finance. — Provost Doig, Bailie M'Lean, Messrs Fenton, Ewen, Craik, MacLean, 
Treasurer Moffat (Convener). 

Cemetery. — Provost Doig, Baihe Ferguson, Bailie M'Lean, Messrs Tosh, Johnston, 
Ewen, Smith (Convener). George Patterson, Superintendent. 

Committee under Cattle Diseases Act — Provost and Magistrates. 

Burgh Committee under Licensing Acts — Provost and Urst and Second Bailies. 

Representatives for 

Prison Committees — Perth, Baihe M'Lean; Dundee, Bailie Ferguson; Forfar, Provost 

Doig and Mr Ewen. 

Under Sheriff Court Houses .^ct ... ... ... ... Bailie Ferguson. 

Lunacy Board ... ... ... ... ... Provost Doig. 

Arbroath Harbour ... .. ... Provost Doig and Baihe Anderson. 

Morgan Hospital ... ... ... Provost Doig and Bailie Ferguson. 

Roads and Bridges ... ... ... ... ... Provost Doig. 

Wyllie's Bequest ... ... ... ... James Munro, Distributor. 

BURGH FUNDS (Town Council), 

Burgh Property and Funds as at 6th October, 1887 ..T ... {j'i^'i^A to to 

Debts and Obligations ... ... ... .. ... 29,149 10 8 



Balance in fn\our of Bur^h 



Annual Revenue 
Expenditure 



;^44 


T65 





2 


J> 


i^7 


T4 


3 





7SO 


I 


4 



Deficit for the year ... ... ... £^^2 7 i 



62 FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



CHARITY MORTIFICATIONS. 

Charity Mortifications under the administration of the Magistrates and Town Council of 
Forfar, per the Town-Clerk. Funds as at 6th October, 1887. 

Dr Wyllie s Bequest. — Capital, ^3536, i6s 6d. Interest expended in charity during the 
year, ^^154, 5s. On hand, ^^32, 12s. 

Provost Potter's Bequest of £1000. — Interest, «5!:c., expended on coals for the poor, in 
terms of the bequest, £,^'\, 13s yd. On hand, £0, los lod. 

Bailie Brown's Bequest of £100. — Interest, &c., expended on coals for the ]50or, in terms 
of the bequest, ^8, 7s yd. On hand, ;^30, 19s id. 

Bequest by Joliu PJiilip, C/rirago, amounts, with Interest, to _^286q, 5s 5d. 

POLICE COMMISSION AND GAS CORPORATION. 

Meet on the third Monday of each month at 6-30 p.m. 

Officials. 

William Gordon, Police Clerk ; Alexander MacHardy, Treasurer ; James Stirling, 
Superintendent of Police; D. B. Esplin, Gas Manager; Jonas Harris, Burgh Surveyor; 
William Patterson, Collector of Rates. 

Committees. 

Paving, General Improvement, aiid Poad Committee. — Provost Doig, Bailie M'Lean, 
Messrs Ewen, Skene, Johnston, Milne, Mofifat (Convener). 

Sanitary Committee. — Provost Doig, Messrs Falconer, Smith, Tosh, MacLean, Fenton 
(Convener). 

Watching, Lighting, and Fire Engine Committee. — Provost Doig, Bailie Ferguson, 
Bailie M'Lean, Messrs Tosh, Skene, Johnston, Falconer (Convener). 

Finance Committee. — Provost Doig, Messrs Falconer, Johnston, Fenton, Moffat, Craik, 
Bailie Anderson (Convener). 

Sewage Committee. — Provost Doig, Bailie Ferguson, Messrs Smith, Craik, Moffat, Ewen, 
Johnston (Convener). 

Water Comtnittee. — Bailie Ferguson, Bailie M'Lean, Bailie Anderson, Messrs Craik, 
Moffat, Ewen, Provost Doig (Convener). 

Gas Corporation Committee. — Provost Doig, Messrs Fenton, Tosh, Falconer, Sm.ith 
Johnston, Craik (Convener). 

POLICE COMMISSION ACCOUNTS, as at 14th May, 1887. 

I. — General Police Purposes. 

Surplus last year ... ... ... ... £,"^^6 ^3 3 

Annual Revenue ... ... ... ... 1761 6 7 

^1986 19 loj 

Annual Expenditure ... ... ... 1877 2 Bj] 

Surplus this year ... ... .7^109 17 2| 

II.— Account under Roads Act. 

Surplus last year ... ... ... • ... _;^65 i 11 

Annual Revenue ... ... ... ... 232 i 5 



Annual Expenditure 

Surplus this year 



^297 






4' 


208 


7 


Oj 


m 


16 


4 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 63 



III.— New Shambles Account. 

Surplus last year ... ... ... ... ^9 14 i 

Annual Revenue ... .. ... ... 200 411 



;^209 19 o 
Expenditure ... ... ... ... 234 i 4 

Deficit this year ... .. ;^24 2 4 

IV. — The Local Authority. 

Balance last year ... ... ... ... £'^^^ 16 8 

Annual Revenue ... ... ... ... 1720 3 4 

— ^1902 o o 

Annual Expenditure ... ... ... 1671 5 6 

Balance this year ... ... ^^230 14 6 

v.— Water. 

Surplus last year ... ... ... ... £5'^ 11 10 

Annual Revenue ... ... ... ... 3168 16 o 

^3221 7 10 

Annual Expenditure ... ... ... 2772 2 9 

Balance this year ... ... .^449 5 '^ 

Total Expenditure on Construction of Works ^^48,823 19 11 

VI.— Gas. 

Balance last year ... ... ... ... £90^ 7 3 

Annual Revenue ... ... ... ... 5625 7 4 

;^6S33 14 7 

;^5948 9 10 



Annual Expenditure ... ... ... .!^5359 14 10 

Annuities payable ... ... ... ... 588 15 o 



Balance this year ... ... ;^S85 4 9 



Gas Corporation Office, North Street. Open from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. On Saturdays, 
from 9 to 3. 

Police and Water Assessment Office, Council Buildings. Open from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., 
and from 6 to 8 p.m. On Saturdays, from 10 to 2. 



POLICE COURT. 

Held every lawful day when there is business. Judges — The Provost and Magistrates. 
William Godon, Solicitor, Clerk and Assessor. James Stirling, Superintendent and Pror.- 
Kiscal. 

BURGH OR BAILIE COURT. 

Held as occasion requires. Magistrates Judges. Jamas Stirling, Fiscal ; James Taylor, 
Town-Clerk, Clerk and Assessor. 

BURGH LICENSING COURT. 

For the renewal or granting of Hotel, Public-House, and Grocers' Liquor Licenses. 
Held by the Magistrates on 2nd Tuesday of April and 3rd Tuesday of October. 



64 FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



VALUATION APPEAL COURT. 

Held by the Council on a date between the loth and 30th September. 

FORFAR JUSTICES OF THE PEACE. 

Provest Doig, Baihe Ferguson, John Lowson, jun. , John Myles, John Whyte, P. Webster 
(Westfield), R. W. Anderson, Alexander Craik, John Fyfe Craik, James Lowson, 
William Lowson, Dr Wedderburn, John B. Don. 

FORFAR PAROCHIAL BOARD. 

Committee of Management. 

From the Heritors. — Messrs John Moffat, Academy Street; James Mitchell, Farmer, 
Quilkoe ; David Smith, Seedsman, Broomroof ; William Dowell, 47 East High Street ; 
Bailie Ferguson, Academy Street ; Robert F. Craik, of Kingston ; Provost Doig, Ivybank 
Cottage ; Robert D. Paton, Railway Agent, Whitehills ; John L. Fenton. Yeaman Street ; 
James Dargie, 22 Green Street ; George Porter, 51 Dundee Loan ; James Stuart, Con- 
tractor, Market Place ; John Cargill, Ferryton Cottage ; David Whyte, Market Place ; 
Bailie M 'Lean, 36 John Street ; James Lamont, 26 West High Street ; Peter A. Tosh, 
Canmore Street ; James Binny, 10 Glamis Road. 

Elected Members. — Messrs William Gordon, Solicitor, 20 East High Street (Chairman) ; 
Alexander Johnston, Wood Turner, 38 North Street ; Peter A. Goode, Gardener, 13 St. 
James' Road ; James Williams, Factory Worker, 8 Charles Street ; Thomas Petrie, Shoe- 
maker, 2 Backwynd ; Alexander Strachan, Printer, 8 Lour Road ; David Hardie. Tailor, 
26 North Street ; Henry Rae, Factory Overseer, 14 Montrose Road ; David C. Forsyth, 
Factory Worker, 60 Dundee Loan ; Charles Kinnear, Cloth Inspector, 9 New Road. 

Kirk-Session Members. — Messrs William Fullerton, Shoemaker, Castle Street ; Alexander 
D. Strachan, Clerk, Green Street ; William M'Donald, Shoemaker, Kingsmuir ; Dickson 
Fraser, Currier, Victoria Street ; John A. MacLean, Solicitor, New Road ; Alexander 
Dalgety, Draper, East High Street. 

Sub-Committees. 

Poorhouse Committee. — Messrs Thomas Petrie (Chairman), Henry Rae (Vice-Chairman), 
Baihe M'Lean, David C. Forsyth, Alexander Strachan, Robert Smith, Peter A. Goode, 
Alexander D. Strachan, David Hardie, James Dargie, Peter A. Tosh, John L. Fenton, 
Robert D. Paton, James Williams, Alexander Johnston. 

Fi?iavce. — Bailie Ferguson (Convener), Provost Doig, Messrs Thomas Petrie, John 
Moffat, James Williams, Alexander Strachan, David C. Forsyth, John A. MacLean, 
David Hardie. 

Co77stilting. — Messrs James Dargie (Convener), Pro\ost Doig, John Cargill, Bailie 
Ferguson. 

Feui72g. — Provost Doig (Convener), Bailie Ferguson, Bailie M'Lean, Messrs John 
Cargill, James Dargie, John L. Fenton, John Moffat, James Mitchell. 

Revising. — Messrs Robert F. Craik (Convener), Charles Kinnear, Dickson Fraser, 
Henry Rae, Thomas Petrie, John L. Fenton, James Williams, Alexander Strachan, Peter 
A. Tosh, David Hardie, Peter A. Goode, David C. Forsyth, William Fullerton. 



Poorhouse — Alexander Lowson, Governor ; Mrs Lowson, Matron. 
Medical Officers— Drs Hunter, M 'Lagan- Wedderburn, Alexander, Cable, and Murray. 

Inspector of Poor and Collector of Rates— James Rodger. Auditor — A. B. Wyllie. 
Offices, Newmonthill Street, open from to a.m. to 3 p.m. , and from 5 to 7 p.m. Saturdays,, j 

from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 65 



REGISTRAR'S OFFICE. 

I'arochial Buildings, Newmoiithill Street. Open daily from lo to 12 noon, and from 6 
to 7 evening ; and on Saturdays, from 11 a.m. to i p.m. Births must be registered within 
21 days, Marriages 3 days, and deaths 8 days. Notice of Marriage to be given to the 
Registrar under Marriage Notice Act, Eight clear days previous to Marriage. Registrar — 
W. H. Thomson. 

BURGH SCHOOL BOARD. 

Meets in Coimcil Buildings on first Thursday of each month at 6-30 p.m. Members — 
Rev. G. iM. Philps (Chairman), Messrs John F. Craik, John Laird, jr.. Gumming 
Jamieson, David Whyte, J. W. Adamson, D. M. Graham, A. B. Wyllie, Alex. Freeman. 
] C. Anderson, Clerk ; A. MacHardy, Treasurer ; T. Stirling, Officer. Next election, 
March 1888. 

LANDWARD SCHOOL BOARD. 

Meets in Clerk's Office, Town-House, Forfar, on Saturdays, at 10-30 a.m., when neces- 
sary. Meiiibers — Patrick Webster of Westfield (Chairman) ; David Whyte, 11 Market 
Place; William Findlay, Gunsmith, Kingsmuir ; Patrick Webster, jr. . Flemington ; and 
Andrew W. Welsh, Lochhead. D, Macintosh, Solicitor, Town House, Clerk and 
Treasurer ; John Laird, Lunanhead, Officer. Schools : — Kingsmuir School — George Neill, 
Teacher ; Lunanhead School — John Yuille, Teacher ; Janet Hunter, Assistant. Next elec- 
tion, April 1888. 

PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

Lending department open daily from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m., except Wednesday, 9 a.m. to 3 
p.m. 

Commitiee from Council. — Provost Doig, Bailies Ferguson and Anderson, Messrs Fenton, 
Skene, Falconer, Ewen, MacLean, Craik, and Tosh. From Householders. — James Brodie, 
Teacher ; David Christie, Shoemaker ; William Falknor, Commission Agent ; Alex. Free- 
man, Solicitor ; John Knox, Teacher ; James Moffat, Manufacturer ; Geo. S. Nicolson, 
Editor ; Rev. G. M. Philps, Clergyman ; H. Rae, Factory Overseer ; Rev. P. S. Wright, 
Clergyman. 

FORFAR INFIRMARY. 

Patron, The Right Hon. the Earl of Strathmore ; President, William Lowson, Esq., 
Banker; Vice-President, Gilbert Don, Esq., Manufacturer. Medical Attendants — Drs 
M' Lagan- Wedderburn, Alexander, and Murray. David Steele, Treasurer ; James Taylor, 
Secretary ; Miss E. Tod, Matron. 

NATIONAL SECURITY SAVING'S BANK. 

Estabhshed 1853. Office, 9 West High Street. Open on Monday from 9 a.m. to 12 
noon ; Friday, 6 to 8 p.m. ; and on Saturday from 10 to 12 noon. Receives deposits of 
one shilling and upwards. Total sum due to depositors at 20th Nov. 1886, 2'30:S9i? 4/i- 
Robert Bruce, Treasurer \ W. Lowson, Actuary and Cashier ; J. Lawrie, Accountant. 

BANK OFFICES. 

Bank of Scotland— Robert Whyte & D. Binny, Joint Agents ; L. R. Falconer, Accountant 
British Lmen Company's Bank ... WiUiam Gordon, Agent ; Andrew Binnie, Accountant 
Commercial Bank ... ... Robert Bruce, Agent ; S. M 'Lees,' Accountant' 

National Bank ... ... ... T. Henderson, Agent ; J. Sim, Accountant 

Royal Bank ... ... ... David Steele, Agent; J. Campbell, Accountant. 

Union Bank ... ... ... W. Lowson, Agent ; J. Lawrie, Accountant. 



66 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



Burgh Academy 



EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS. 

f James Brodie, Rector and Mathematical Master 
\ Classical Master. 

Public School 

East Burgh School 

West Burgh School 

North Burgh School 

Wellbraehead School 

Industrial School 

Ladies' Seminary 



Teacher of Drawing 
Teacher of Music 



Geo. Younger, 

John Knox. 

Thomas Mackie. 

John T. Cobb. 

John Smith. 

Miss Campbell. 

Miss Chapman. 

JNlisses Smith, Academy Street. 

... T. A. Watson. 
... John Kerr. 



Parish 

St. James' Parish 
First Free ... 
East Free . . . 



CHURCHES. 



Rev. G. J. Caie. 

Rev. J. Weir. 

.. Rev. A. Gumming. 

... Rev. G. M. Philps. 



United Presbyterian ... Rev. P. Wright. 

St. John's Episcopal Rev. J. M. Aldridge. 

Congregational Rev. D. L. M'Corkindale. 

Baptist ... Rev. John Mitchell. 



SESSION CLERKS, 



Forfar Parish — John Knox, Public School, St. James' Road. 
St. James' Parish — W. Hebington, Green Street. 



HALLS. 



Reid Hall 

West End Reid Hall 

Masonic Hall 

Drill Hall 

Town Hall 

Guild Hall, Green Street 

Greenhill's Hall 

Osnaburgh Street Hall 

St. James' Hall 



accommodates 



1400 j.Q. Webster, Hall-keeper. 
200 J ' ' 

650 — J. Milne. do. 

1000 — W. Niddrie do. 

200 — Mrs Stewart do. 

100 — John Longmuir do. 

400 — H. Greenhill, Proprietor. 

400 — Alex. Robertson, do. 

30Q — John Milne, Backwynd, Hall-keeper. 



VOLUNTEERS. 

A and B Coinpanies Angus Rijies. — Captains — Alex. MacHardy (Major-commanding), 
and Geo. Younger ; Lieutenants — Wm. Findlay and John A. MacLean. Surgeons — Dr 
Murray (Battalion); Dr Alexander (Detachment). Drill Instructor — Sergt. John Blyth. 
Drill Hall and Armoury — New Road. 



READING ROOMS. 

Young Men's Christian Association Reading Room.— No. 35 Castle Street. Open 
fi-om 8 a.m. till 10 p.m. Annual subscription, 6s. ; apprentices, 3s. 

Chess Club meets on Thursday evenings at 6 o'clock in above rooms. W. J. Abel, 
Secretary. 

West End Reading Room. — Dundee Loan. Sheriff Robertson, Patron ; Peter A. 
Goode, President ; David Simpson, Vice-President ; William Littlejohn, Secretary. Open 
daily, 9 a.m. till 10 p.m. 

West End Reading Room Saving Society.— Open every Saturday from 5 to 6 p.m. 
Secretary, James A. Goode ; Treasurer, Peter A. Goode. 

East End Reading Room. — East Port. Sheriff Robertson, Patron ; Henry Rae, 
President. Open daily from 9 a.m. till 10 p.m. 



FORFAR DIRECTORY, 67 



MUSICAL SOCIETIES. 

Forfar Choral Union. — Robert Whyte, Esq., President; Samuel J. M'Lees, Hon. 
Secretary and Hon. Treasurer. Committee — Alex. Freeman, W. Melvin, A. B, Wyllie, 
John ^Marshall, and A. H. Whitson. C. J. Smith, Conductor. Meets in the Academy on 
Wednesday evenings at 8-15. 

Forfar Tonic Sol-Fa Certificated Choir.— D. M. Stewart, President; D. W. Neill, 
Yewbank, W'hitehills, Secretary; David Taylor, Treasurer. Committee — Messrs Leuchars, 
Cuthbert, and Shepherd. John Kerr, A. C., Conductor. Session — September to March. 
Meets in .\cademy on Mondays at 8 p.m. 

Forfar Amateur Musical Society.- J. Mann, President; James Morrison, 1 Dundee 
I.oan, Secretary and Treasurer. Committee — Allan Young, George Ogilvy, James Moir, 
C. Young, Conductor. Meets every Wednesday in the West Burgh School, at 8 p.m. 

RELIGIOUS SOCIETIES. 

Young Men's Christian Association.— Hon. Presidents — Sheriff Robertson and 
Wm. Lowson, Esq. ; President, Dr Cable ; Vice-President, William Jarvis. Directors — 
Messrs Tarbat, Wishart, Thomson, Hutcheson, Heath, and Roberts. Lake R. Falconer, 
Bank of Scotland, Secretary ; W. J. Abel, Assistant Secretary ; John Anderson, Cross, 
Treasurer. Evangelistic Meetings at Kingsnmir on Sabbath evenings, and in First Free 
Mission Hall on Wednesday evenings. Sabbath morning Fellowship Meeting in Rooms, 
35 Castle Street, on Sabbath mornings at 10 o'clock. 

Young Women's Christian Association. — Office-Bearers — President, Miss Taylor; 
Vice-President, Miss Milne ; Secretary, Miss Marshall ; Treasurer, Mrs Edwards. Com- 
mittee — Misses Stewart, Fenton, Welsh, White, Bradbear. Meets in St. James' Hall every 
Saturday evening at 6-45, and on Sabbath mornings at 10 o'clock. 

Salvation Army. — Meetings are held in Masonic Hall, Castle Street, every evening. 

FORFAR TRACT SOCIETY. 

John Ormond, President ; D. Steele, Vice-President and Treasurer ; Re\ . P. S. Wright, 
Secretary. 60 Distributors. Monthly circulation, 3100 Tracts. 

FORFAR LITERARY SOCIETY. 

Honorary President, Sheriff Robertson ; President, Geo. S. Nicolson ; Vice-President, 
Robert Crabb ; Secretary and Treasurer, A. Knox, The Schoolhouse, Forfar. Members 
of Committee — Messrs Roy, Campbell, Falconer, and Hay. Meets weekly in the Forfar 
Academy on Friday evenings at 8-15. 

FORFAR AUXILIARY TO THE NATIONAL BIBLE SOCIETY OF 

SCOTLAND. 

Sheriff Robertson, President; A. W. Myles, Esq., Secretary <& Treasurer. Committee 
of ^Management — The Ministers of the town ; and Messrs R. W. Anderson, W. Lowson, 
John Laird, jr., Alex. Freeman, and W. Sturrock. 

FORFARSHIRE MISSION TO THE BLIND. 

Organised to care for the blind, specially teaching them to read at their homes, and lend- 
ing them l^ooks (free), of which there are fully 1000 in the Library. On the Roll there are 
143 blind persons, 50 of whom can read. 

Annual Meeting, beginning of September, in Town Hall, Forfar. President : 

Secretary and Treasurer — David Steele, Esq., to whom subscriptions may be sent. Mr 
Edwards, Missionary, to whom names of blind persons may be sent ; as also orders for 
work, such as knitting, pianoforte tuning, net cash bags, &c. 



68 FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



CHURCH SOCIETIES, &c. 

Forfar Parish Church. — Bible Classes every Sabbath at 3-30 by Mr Geo. Xeill ; and at 
6-30 by Mr John Smith. Band of Hope meets monthly during winter. Clothing Society 
meets weekly during winter. Sunday School at 3-30 — Mr JVIackie, Superintendent of 
Female Department ; Mr A. D. Strachan, Superintendent of Male Department ; Mr S. 
M'Lees, Secretary and Treasurer. The Kirk-Session meets the first Wednesday of each 
month at 8 p.m. 

St. James' Parish Church. — Sunday School at 3-40 p.m. — Mr John Monteith, Super- 
intendent. Minister's Bible Class for Young Men and Women, 4-40 p.m., every Sabbath, 
at St. James' Hall. Children's Service in Church in afternoon of first Sabbath of March, 
June, September, and December. Clothing Society meets every Wednesday during the 
winter months. 

First Free Church. — Church Temperance Society — Rev. Alex. Cumming, President; 
Wm. Roberts, Vice-President; Miss M'Kenzie, Secretary; D. Tarbat, Treasurer. Meets 
in Hall on the first Wednesday of each month at 8 p.m. Clothing Society, conducted by 
Ladies of the Congregation, meets on Thursdays during November and December. Tract 
Society — Rev. Alex. Cumming, President ; John Anderson, Treasurer. Distributes Tracts 
fortnightly. Sabbath Schools — Congregational at 3-45 p.m. in Hall — W. Lowson, Super- 
intendent. In West Burgh School-room at 4 o'clock — J. Lowson, Superintendent. In West 
End Mission Hall — Mr NicoU, Superintendent. West End Mission Hall, Dundee Loan — 
Service on Sunday evenings at 7 o'clock. Children's Service in West End Mission Hall 
every Sabbath forenoon. 

East Free Church. — Congregational Sabbath School meets at half-past 3. Superinten- 
dent, Mr A. A. Symon. Lunanhead Sabbath School (Mr Wishart, Superintendent) meets 
at 5 p.m. Evening Service at Lunanhead, 6-30 (Committee — Messrs Wishart and A. 
Hutchison). The Minister's Bible Class meets on Sabbath evenings at 6-30. The Guild 
Educational Class meets on Monday evenings at 7. The Industrial Class — Mrs Christie, 
Superintendent, at 7 o'clock on the Monday evenings of the winter months. The Congre- 
gational Prayer Meeting at 8 p.m. on Tuesdays. Children's Choir, Thursdays at 7 p.m. 
Backwynd Meeting (conducted by Mr J. B. Maclaren) every second Monday evening at 8. 

United Presbyterian Church. -^-Missionary Association — Contributions gathered 
monthly by Lady-Collectors. Bible Class and Sabbath School meet on Sabbath Afternoon 
at the close of the service. Weekly Meeting on Tuesday evenings in Session House at 7-30. 

St. John's Episcopal Church. — Sunday School at 2-45 p.m. in the Academy. Children's 
Service in the Church at 3 p,m. , the last Sunday in each month. Church Visitors' Meeting 
at the Parsonage at 3 p.m., the first Monday in each month. Young Men's Guild every 
Tuesday, from October to Easter, at 8 p.m. Young Women's Guild every Thursday, from 
October to Easter, at 7-30 p.m. The meetings are held in the Guild Hall. There is a 
Reading-room in connection with the Young Men's Guild, open every evening from 6-30 to 
9-30 ; and on Saturdays from3 to 9-30. Mothers' Meeting every Monday evening in the Vestry 
at 7 o'clock. Church Working Party at the Parsonage every alternate Wednesday at 3 p.m. 

FORFAR CHILDREN'S CHURCH. 

WiUiam Arthur, Balgavies, President ; William Jarvis, Castle Street, Vice-President ; 
John Mann, Wellbraehead , Treasurer; Wm. Buist, Wellbraehead , Secretary. Office- 
Bearers — George Jarvis, Superintendent of Boys ; Miss Hutchison, St. James' Road, 
Superintendent of Girls. P. T. Shepherd, Leader of Praise ; Miss Janet Pullar, Har- 
moniumist. Service every Sunday forenoon at 11 o'clock in the Masonic Hall. 

GOOD TEMPLAR LODGES. 

"The Dawn of Peace" Lodge, No. 507. — David Johnston, jr.. Chief Templar; 
George Strachan, Lodge Deputy ; Charles Gray, Castle Street, Secy. Meets in St. James' 
Hall every Thursday evening at 8 o'clock. 

"The Forfar" Lodge, No. 717. —George Donald, Chief Templar; W. J. Heath, 
Lodge Deputy ; W. K. Findlay, 34 John Street, Secretary. Meets in St. James' Hall 
every Monday evening at 8 o'clock. 

" Free Caledonia" Lodge St. Andrews Order of Reformed Templars. -Robert Fyfe, 
South Street, Senior Trustee ; James Rose, Newmonthill, Secretary. Meets in St. James' 
Hall on Wednesday evening at 8 o'clock. 



FORFAR DIRECTORY, 69 



MURPHY GOSPEL TEMPERANCE SOCIETY. 

Andrew Shepherd, President ; Alex. Ogilvie, Secretary ; George Maxwell, Treasurer. 
Meets in St. James' Hall on Tuesday evenings at 8 o'clock. 

BRITISH WOMEN'S TEMPERANCE ASSOCIATION. 

Mrs Gumming, President; Mrs Law and Mrs John Graik, Vice-Presidents; Miss E. 
Myles, Treasurer ; Miss Gaie and Miss Grighton, Secretaries. Meetings open to all women. 
Sewing Glass on Wednesday evenings of winter months in First Free Ghurch Hall at 7 
o'clock. 

EDINBURGH ANGUS CLUB. 

The Right Hon. the Earl of Strathmore, Lord-Lieutenant of Forfarshire, Patron ; 
George H. M. Thorns of Aberlemno, Sheriff of Orkney, &c. , President ; The Right Hon. 
the Earls of Southesk, Northesk, Gamperdown, Kintore, Home, and Airlie, Vice-Presidents; 
Thomas Shaw MacLaren, W.S. , 11 Hill Street, Edinburgh, Secretary; Robert Bruce, 
Gonmiercial Bank, Forfar, Local Secretary. 

EDINBURGH FORFAR ACADEMY CLUB. 

Instituted 1885. President, W. Spink, Esq., S. S. G. ; Secretary and Treasurer Mr 
lames A. Lowson, 40 Marchmont Grescent, Edinburgh. The oV^ject of the Glub is to 
bring together all former pupils of the Forfar Academy ; also, to promote as far as 
possible the interests of the Academy in Educational matters. 

POULTRY AND PIGEON ASSOCIATION. 

George Stewart, Gallowhill, President; George Maxwell, Kirkton, Vice-President; 
James Fyfe, St. James' Road, Secretary. Gommittee — John Nicoll, George Gable, Alex. 
Shepherd, Alex. Robertson, Alex. Dalgety, James Morrison, David Hill, David Forbes, 
W. Hastings, David Gable, Gharles Wood, James Gowie, D. Dalgety, James Proctor. 

CHICKEN SHOW. 

Secretary, George Maxwell, Kirkton. Annual Show in September or October. 

BEEKEEPERS' SOCIETY. 

President, Andrew L. Fenton, Yeaman Street ; Vice-President, A. Patullo, South Street ; 
Treasurer, James Binny, Glamis Road ; Secretary, James Saddler, East High Street. 
Gommittee — William Neave, 81 Backwynd ; William Black, South Street ; John Pearson, 
27 New Road ; Andrew Sturrock, Hillend of Lownie ; David Ramsay, North Street. 
Exhibition of Bees, Honey, and Hives, held in Forfar annually. 

VOLUNTEER BRASS BAND. 

This Band consists of 17 players. WiUiam Brown, Bandmaster, 2nd F. R. V., 37 
John Street, Forfar. 

THE BAXTER BRASS BAND. 

William Soutar, 3 Prior Road, Bandmaster ; Alexander Duncan, i Gallowhill, Secretary. 
Meets on Tuesday and Friday evenings in Wellbraehead School. 

FORFAR PLATE GLASS MUTUAL INSURANCE ASSOCIATION. 

Gommittee of Management — Messrs D. P. Booth (Ghairman), John Melvin, William 
Warden, Robert Gray, James Stuart. Messrs James D. Boyle and fames Spark, Auditors. 
W. H. Thomson, Secretary ; William Dowell, Valuator. The operations of the Society 
are strictly confined to Forfar. The Annual General Meeting is held on the third Tuesday 
of April each year. 

THE FORFAR NORTHERN SAVING ASSOCIATION (Limited). 

David Ramsay, 80 North Street, President ; James Easton, 123 Gastle Street, Forfar, 
Secretary; David M. Stewart, 117 Gastle Street, Treasurer. Gommittee — Adam Bowman, 



70 FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



94 North Street ; John Welsh, 13 Canmore Street ; Peter Langlands, 5 Victoria Street ; 
T3avid AitkenheacU 20 Victoria Street ; James Brown, John Street. Committee meets at 
7-30 p.m. on Monday evenings in Rooms, in Castle Street. 

EAST-PORT SAVING ASSOCIATION, Limited.— (Founded 1829). 

William Joiner, Salesman ; William Stewart, President ; James Fyfe, Secretary ; John 
L. Fenton, "Treasurer. Place of Business — 131 and 133 East High Street. 

WEST TOWN-END SOCIETY (Limited). 

James Williams, Chairman ; John Ireland, Secretary ; James Herald, Treasurer. Com- 
mittee — William Keay ; James Ireland ; William Clark ; David Black ; George Donald- 
son. Meets on Monday evenings at 8 o'clock in Conuiiittee Room, 118 West Hiigh Street. 

FREE TRADE SAVING SOCIETY (Limited). 

Andrew Hunter, President ; Thomas Stirling Secretary ; David Robertson, Treasurer and 
Manager. Committee — James Cable, George Maxwell, and Ale.x. Reid. Meets every 
Monday evening at 151 East High Street, at 7-30. 

WEST PORT SAVING SOCIETY, Limited. (Established July 1838.) 

Peter A. Goode, St. James' Road, President ; William Wyllie, 80B West High Street, 
Secretary ; George Smart, 22 Dundee Loan, Treasurer. Committee — J as. Samson, Dundee 
Road; diaries Kinnear, New Road; Alexander Strachan, Lour Road; David Keith, 
Dundee Road ; Alexander Mason, New Road. Meets on Monday evenings at half-past 
Seven in Society Rooms. 

FORFAR CO-OPERATIVE COAL SOCIETY (Limited). 

Alexander Strachan, President ; James Herald Vice-President ; Andrew Lees, Secretary ; 
James MTntosh, Treasurer. Committee — William Duncan, David Henderson, James 
Edward, Henry Rae, Robert Langlands. Collectors — James Binny, William Milne, 
Charles Alexander, Robert Simpson. Auditors — David M. Stewart and Dickson Eraser. 
Membership at 30th September, 1887, 1013. Sales, past twelve months, 3990 tons. iMeets 
every Tuesday at 7-30 p.m. in office, Glamis Road. 

VICTORIA COAL SOCIETY (Limited). 

James Cable, President ; Joseph Massie, Vice-President ; Thomas Stirling, Secretary ; 
Adam Bowman, Treasurer. Committee— George Maxwell, jun. , David Gracie, David 
Craik, Alex. Hill, and William Bowman. Collectors— Robert Lamb, South Street ; James 
Allan,' South Street ; James Smith, Dundee Loan. Meets every Tuesday evening at 7-30 
in Society's Office, Kirkton. 

FORFAR MALE AND FEMALE YEARLY SOCIETY. 

Charles Aikenhead, President; Alex. Strachan, Vice-President ; Charles Wood, Secre- 
tary for Males ; James Todd, Secretary for Females ; And. Stev/art, Treasurer for Males 
win. Thom, Treasurer for Females. Committee — John Byars, West High Street ; .\lex 
Shepherd, Dundee Loan; William Byars, Dundee Road; W. Massie, St. James' Road 
Alex. Strachan, Lour Road ; Robert Milne, Charles Street ; WiUiam Smith, North Street 
John Tyrie, Market Place ; Charles Aikenhead, Archie's Park ; David Forbes, New Road 
Charles Wood, 51^ West High Street, Secretary of Committee. x\uditors — Andrew Lees 
and David Gellatly. Arbitrators — Gumming Jamieson, James Dargie, William Lowson, 
Factory Manager. Meets in West Burgh School-room every Saturday evening from 6 to 
half-past 7 o'clock. Thirty-sixth year of above-mentioned Society. 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 71 



EAST END MALE AND FEMALE YEARLY SOCIETY. 

Douglas Allan, President; Alexander Soutar, Vice-Presidenl ; James Brown, 17 John 
Street, Secretary ; John L. Fenton, Yeaman Street, Treasurer. Conmiittee — 6 Members 
distributed over the district. Meets on Saturday evenings from 6-30 to 8 in East Burgh 
School. 

MONTROSE ROAD YEARLY SOCIETY. 

Andrew Whyte, President; Robert Craig, Vice-President; James Paton, Treasurer; 
Andrew L. Fenton, Secretary. Committee — William Clark, George Rough, Alex. Hill, 
sen. , and Archibald Thornton. 

CASTLE STREET MALE & FEMALE YEARLY SOCIETY. 

|ohn Findlay, 34 John Street, President; John Easton, Wellbraehead, Vice-President; 
Dickson Eraser, Secretary ; James Easton, Treasurer. Conuiiittee — James Moffat, 16 
Lour Road ; John Welsh, Canmore Street ; David Heming, 2 Wellbraehead ; Robert 
Langlands, 25 Canmore Street. Meets from half-past 6 to half-past 7 o'clock on Saturday 
evenings in the North Burgh School — North Division. 

NORTH-END MALE AND FEMALE YEARLY SOCIETY. 

D. Aikenhead, 20 Victoria Street, President; Alexander Brown, 32 Manor Street, Vice- 
President ; Alexander Hastings, Victoria Street, Secretary ; David M. Stewart, Tanworks, 
Treasurer. Auditors — Thomas Petrie, Castle Street ; William Grant, Castle Street. Com- 
mittee — George Winter, 21 Victoria Street ; John Donald, 13 Wellbraehead ; David 
Peacock, 169 East High Street ; George Stark, 13 Charles Street. Meets in North Burgh 
School-Room, South Division, on Saturday evenings from 6 to half-past 7. Hours for 
payment of Sick and Funeral Money — from 9 to 9-30 a.m. ; 2 to 2-30 p.m. ; and 7 to 
7.30 p.m. 

UNITED MALE AND FEMALE YEARLY SOCIETY. 

Peter A. Goode, St. James' Road, President ; Alexander Rae, 167 East High Street, 
Vice-President ; William Wyllie, 80B West High Street, Secretary for Males ; Andrew P. 
Boath, Sunnysicle, Secretary for Females ; John Ireland, 5 Archie's Paik, Treasurer for 
Males ; James Fyfe, St. James' Road, Treasurer for Females. Committee — David Black, 
West High Street ; William Clark, Glamis Road ; James Irons, Sunnyside ; Wilham 
Bowman, Kirkton ; John Small, Couttie's Wynd ; Adam Bowman, 94 North Street ; 
William Brown, Canmore Lane. Meets at No. 2 Vennel every Saturday from 6 to 7-30. 

LOYAL ANCIENT SHEPHERDS— BURNSIDE LODGE, No. 2046. 

Wm. Saddler, W.M. ; James IMackintosh, P.M. ; Wm. Waddel, D.M. Committee- 
John Dundas, O.S. and M.S. ; Wm. Young, M. ; Wm. Lakie, I.G. ; Alex. Stewart, O.G. ; 
Visiting Steward, Henry Adams ; Treasurer, Wm. Duncan ; Secretary, Alex. Esplin. 
All information of the Order can be had from the above Ofifice-Bearers. Meets in Masonic 
Hall Buildings, Castle Street, on the evening of alternate Thursdays. 

ANCIENT ORDER OF FORESTERS— Court '' Beech Hill," No. 6540. 

John Lowson, jr., Escj. , Patron; David G. Lindsay, Chief Ranger; William Cook, 
Sub-Chief Ranger ; William M'Nab, 98 Dundee Loan, Secretary ; Henry Rae, Treasurer. 
Meets every alternate Monday at 8 o'clock, in Masons' Arms Hall, 105 East High Street. 

MASONIC LODGES. 

Kilwinning Lodge, No. 90.— Alex. Duncan, R.W.M. ; W. Walker, jr., Secretary; 
R. Clark, Treasurer. Meets in Robertson's Hall, Osnaburgh Street. 

Lour Lodge, No. 309. — Peter A. Goode, R.W.M. ; John L. Fenton, Secretary ; Wm. 
Keith, Treasurer. Meets in Lodge Room, Masonic Hall Buildings. 



72 FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



THE ROYAL AIRLIE AND FORFAR LODGE OF ODDFELLOWS. 

James Gordon, M.N.G. ; James Smith, V.G. ; James Ramsay, Treasurer; Wm. Clark, 
8 Arbroath Road, Secretary. Committee — David Petrie, David M'Kenzie, Robert Milne, 
David Fairweather, Hay Waddel, James Nicoll. 

CANMORE ANGLING CLUB. 

William Langlands, Victoria Street, President ; James Grewar, Charles Street, Vice- 
President ; David Maxwell, Watt Street, Secretary and Treasurer; Alexander Stewart, 
Horsewater Wynd, Captain. Committee — James Smith, David Shepherd. Annual 
Meeting on the first Saturday of February at 8 o'clock, in the Eagle Inn, West High 
Street. 

BOWLING CLUBS. 

Forfar. — D. M. Graham, President; J. W. Adamson, Vice-President; Dr Alexander, 
Curator ; A. B. Wyllie, Hon. Secretary and Treasurer. Committee — Messrs Ex-Provost 
Whyte, J. A. MacLean, John Knox, J. P. Anderson, D. B. M'Nicoll, and Office-Bearers. 
Kenneth M'Kenzie, Greenkeeper. 

Canmore. — A. H. Whitson, President; William Milne, Vice-President; James M'Beth, 
Curator ; D. Wighton, North Street, Secretary ; James Sim, Treasurer. 

Victoria. — John Kermach, President; Alexander Gordon, Vice-President; William 
Peacock, Secretary and Treasurer. Committee — Wm. Irons, G. C. Cooper, David Mason, 
James Lowson. jSIeets on first Thursday of every month in Club Room. 

STRATHMORE CRICKET CLUB. 

The Earl of Strathmore, Patron ; John Fyfe Craik, Manufacturer, Manor Park, Presi- 
dent ; Andrew Binnie, Secretary and Treasurer. Committee — D. M'Laren, James Low, 
J. Duthie, and A. Donald. 

FORFAR CURLING CLUB. 

Patron, the Earl of Strathmore ; President, Sheriff Robertson ; Vice-President, Jas. 
Brodie ; Sec-etary, D. M. Graham ; Treasurer, D. M. Stewart; Representative Members, 
John Whyte and James Moffat. Committee — John Strachan, George Lowson, John 
Clementsen, William Dowell, William ^lilne, Walter Hume, and D. P. Booth. Pond 
Committee — Walter Hume, D. M. Stewart, and William Waterston. Annual General 
Meeting on or about 25th September in the Reference Room of the Free Library. 

ANGUS CURLING ASSOCIATION. 

Patron, the Right Hon. the Earl of Strathmore ; Patroness, the Countess of Strathmore ; 
President, Walter T. S. Fothringham of Fothringham ; Vice-President, Andrew Ralston, 
Glamis ; Secretary and Treasurer, D. M. Graham, Forfar. Committee — John Syme, 
Fothringham ; John Strachan. Forfar ; John B. Young, Glamis ; Robert Martin, Kirrie- 
nmir ; John Black, Cortachy. Annual Meeting on second Monday of September. 

FOOTBALL CLUBS. 

Athletic. — Hon. President, J. W. Adamson; President, Robert Hampton; Vice-Presi- 
dent, Oliver M'Pherson ; Financial Secretary, David Christie; General Secretary, James 
Black ; Treasurer, John Fyfe. General Committee — J. Cable, C. Evans, J. Samson, and 
all the office-bearers. Match Committee — R. Hampton, J. Black, J. Fyfe, O. M'Pherson, 
J. Lawrie, A. Binnie, G. Jamie. Office-bearers for playing teams — ist team, Captain, A. 
bgilvie ; Vice-Captain, J. Dundas ; Match Secretary, J. Black, Backwynd ; 2nd team. 
Captain, J. Low ; Vice-Captain, G. Soutar ; Match Secretary, G. Jamie, Prior Road. 
Matches played last season by the ist team, 40 — won 29, lost 8, drawn 3 ; scored 215 goals, 
lost 86. Ground, Station Park. Membership 100. 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 73 



2nd F.R.V.— Hon. President, Major MacHardy ; Captain, E. Sheridan; Vice-Captain, 
A. Forsyth; Secretary and Treasurer, J. Tarbat. Committee— Messrs Brown, Smith, and 
Holmes. Ground, Manor Park. 

FORFAR GOLF CLUB. 

William Shepherd, President ; John S. Whyte and Harry Craik, Vice-Presidents ; 
James Brodie, Secretary and Treasurer. Committee— George Younger, John Strachan, 
Robert Crabb, Archibald Thomson, Alex. Spalding. Golf Course at Coninghill. Spring 
meeting, second Saturday in April ; Autumn meeting, third Saturday in October. Medal 
(Handicapped) Competition on the ist Thursday and Saturday of each month, except June, 
July, and August. 

LAWN TENNIS CLUB, 

President, William Lowson, Manufacturer, Hillbank ; Secretary, Edward Cowan, 
Solicitor; Treasurer, J. S. Whyte, Castle Street. Committee— A. W. Myles, Thomas 
Henderson, Bank Agent ; A. B. Wyllie, Solicitor. 

ANGUS BICYCLE CLUB. 

Hon. President, Sir Thomas Munro, Bart., of Lindertis ; Captain, George H. Douglas ; 
Vice-Captain, Wm. Duncan ; ist Bugler, Alex. Duncan ; 2nd Bugler, David Jolly ; Hon. 
Secretary and Treasurer, Charles Mitchell, 125 Castle Street, Forfar. Committee — Thomas 
Shaw, James Duncan, Andrew Findlay, William Keith, and John Guthrie. Meets in 
Robertson's Inn, Osnaburgh Street. Membership, 30. 

QUOITING CLUBS. 

Albert. — President, George Davie; Vice-President, David, Fenton ; Captain, William 
Cook ; Secretary, William Dundas, 34 South Street ; Treasurer, Charles Barry. Com- 
mittee — C. Blair, J. Hill, G. Forbes. 

West-End. — John Boyle, President ; George Towns, Vice-President ; Robert Forbes, 
Secretary, 17 Horsewater Wynd ; Wm. Balharry, Treasurer. Members of Committee — 
fohn Neave, James Robertson, John Hopton, John Fyfe, James Ferrier. 

FORFAR FACTORY WORKERS' UNION. 

Established in October, 1885, as a Trade Protection Society. General Meeting of 
members annually in October. Committee meets on first Friday of each month. Presi- 
dent, Adam Farquharson, St. James' Road ; Secre^^ary and Treasurer, Thomas Roy, qi 
Castle Street ; Collector, D. Dalgety, 47 South Street. 

ASSOCIATED CARPENTERS AND JOINERS OF SCOTLAND. 

William Lundie, 144 East High Street, President ; Alexander Burns, 18 Newmon thill, 
Secretary and Treasurer. Meets every alternate Fridav at 8 o'clock at No. 2 Vennel. 

FORFAR BUILDING AND INVESTMENT SOCIETY. 

A. B. WyUie, Esq., Solicitor, Chairman; George Strachnn, Secretary. Directors — A. 
B. Wyllie, David Johnston, James M'Lean, R. D. Paton, David Milne, William Scott, 
Davicl M'Kenzie, Andrew Oram, W. H. Thomson, David Rodger. Trustees — Robert 
Whyte, William Shepherd, David Steele, and William Lowson. Robert Bruce, Auditor. 
Meets every alternate Saturday from 8 to 9 p.m. in No. 2 Vennel. 



74 - FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



THE BRITISH AND FOREIGN CORRESPONDENCE ASSOCIATION. 

(Instituted ist June, 1882.) 

Forms of application for membership and full particulars may be had by enclosing stamp 
to the Secretary, Mr xAngus M'Lean, 12 Kilblain Street, Greenock, or to W. S. Findlay, 
Post-Office, the official local representative at Forfar. 

SOCIETY FOR PREVENTION OF CRUELTY TO ANIMALS 

(Forfar Branch). 

President, John B. Don, Manufacturer ; Vice-Presidents, William Lowson, Banker, 
and Dr M'Lagan Wedderburn ; Treasurer, David Steele, Royal Bank ; Joint Secretaries, 
J. A. MacLean and A. B. Wyllie. 



HOLIDAYS AND FAST DAYS IN FORFAR. 

NEW YEAR'S HOLIDAY -Monday, 2nd January, 1888. 

ST. JAMES' MARKET HOLIDAYS- commence Friday, 10th Atigust. 

SPRING EAST DAY— Thursday, 3rd May. 

AUTUMN FAST DAY— Thursday, 11th October. 

SHOPKEEPERS' HALF-HOLIDAY— Thursday Afternoon, 



POST-OFFICE ARRANGEMENTS. 
Arrivals at Forfar Post-Office. 

Edinburgh, London, & the South, Dundee, Glasgow, Perth, Meigle, Coupar- 

Angus, ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 5 a.m. 

Dundee and Arbroath, ... ... ... ... ... ... 5 a.m. 

Kirriemuir and Padanaram, ... ... ... ... ... 8 20 a.m. 

Letham, Dunnichen, and Craichie, ... ... ... ... ... 7 40 a.m. 

Ediburgh, London, and the South, Dundee, Glasgow, Perth, Aberdeen, 

Brechin, and Montrose, ... ... ... ... ... 8 45 a.m. 

Perth, ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 1 45 p.m. 

Kirriemuir, ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 3 20 p.m. 

Aberdeen, North, Montrose, Arbroath, Brechin, Fordoun, Laurencekirk, 

Stonehaven, Guthrie, and Dundee, ... ... ... ... 3 20 p.m. 

Kirriemuir, Arbroath, Aberdeen, and North, ... ... ... 6 45 p.m. 

Glamis, Kincaldrum, Aberlemno, Tamiadice, and Douglastown, ... 1 30 p.m. 

Up Special (North), ... ... ... ... ... ... 4 80p.m. 

Despatches from Forfar Post-Office. 

Edinburgh, Glasgow, Dundee, and South, Alyth, Montrose, Aberdeen, 

Brechin, and Kirriemuir, ... ... ... ... ... 7 40 a.m. 

Aberdeen, Arbroath, Brechin, and Montrose, ... ... ... 1 p.m. 

Edinburgh, England, Glasgow, Dundee, Perth, Alyth, Meigle, Coupar- 

Angus, and South, ... ... ... ... ... ... 2 10 p.m. 

Up Special (South), ... ... ... ... ... ... 3 40 p.m. 

Edinburgh, Glasgow, Dundee, and South, Kirriemuir, Perth, and Glamis, 5 40 p.m. 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 75 



Aberdeen, and the North, Glasgow, Edinburgh, Dundee, Fife, Perth, and 

PerthsMre ; also, all English Letters, ... .... ... ... 10 p.m. 

""'Kirriemuir and Padanaram, ... ... ... ... ... 5 a.m. 

■•(rlamis, Tannadice, Aberlemno, Kincaldrum, Douglastown, ... ... 7 a.m. 

"Giithrie, ... .• .■■ ••■ ■■■ •■• 6 a.m. 

* Box cleared for these despatches at ^ a.m. 

Letham, Dunnichen, and Craichie, ... ... ... ... ... 8 45 a.m. 

Lour, ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 8 45 a.m. 

Burnside, &c., ... ... ... ... ... ... •■. 8 45 a.m. 

Money Order (.)ffice open from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m., and on Saturdays till 8 p.m. 

Telegraph Office open from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m., and on Sundays for one hour— viz., 
i) a.m. to 10 a.m. : and for Postal Btisiness from 12-45 p.m. till 1-45 p.m. 

Miss E. LuNAN Thomson, Postmistress. 



Letters can he posted in boxes vow attacked to mail trains on payvient of hd extra postage. 



COUNTY OF FOBFAR. 



Area of the County, 890 square miles. Acreage, 569,840. 

Valuation (-Lands, ;^5i6,io5 8 o\ Qj-oss Total, 

for -^Railways, S4.iS2 o oV /-.q4,ioo, 8 o 

1887-88. l^ Water Works, ... ... ... 23,873 o o) ^^^^' ^ 

Population in 1881 — 266,360. Parliamentary Representative — James W. Barclay. 

Constituency— 11,478. 
Lord Lieutenant— Earl of Strathmore. Clerk of Lieutenancy— John Myles, Solicitor, Forar. 

Convener of County — Sir John Ogilvy, Bart. 
Sheriff— John Comrie Thomson ; Sheriff-Substitutes— Alexander Robertson (Forfar), and 

John Campbell Smith, (Dundee). 
Hon. Sheriff-Substitutes— W. Lowson, George Lyon, John Myles, James Taylor, A. 

MacHardy. 
County Procurator-Fiscal— Robert Whyte ; Assistant do. , Alex. Freeman. 
Sheriff-Clerk and Commissary Clerk — James Ross. 
Depute do. do. — W. Y. Esplin. 

Auditor of Court — W. Y. Esplin. Collector of Taxes — James S. Gray. 
Clerk of the Peace — Thomas Congleton, Dundee ; Depute do. at Forfar — A. W. Myles. 
Commissioners of Supply meet on the first Wednesday of May, and the first Tuesday 
after Michaelmas ; and Committees as occasion requires. 
Road Trustees meet on 29th September. 

Collector of County Rates — James S. Gray. 

Clerk of Supply, ... ... ■•• 1 

Clerk of County Police Committee, .. ... VA. W. Myles. 

Clerk to Local Authority, ... ... J 

Treasurer to Local Authority — J. P. Anderson. 
Assessor under Valuation Act — R. S. Smith, Dundee. 



76 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



County and Forfar District Roads Clerk and Treasurer, 
Forfar District Roads Collector,... 



County Auditor — A. B. Wyllie. 



■" H. P. Anderson. 
Chief Constable — Robert Adamson. 



SHERIFF COURTS. 

Courts for Ordinary Court cases are held at Forfar on Thursdays weekly during Session, 
at Eleven o'clock forenoon. Summer Session commences on the first Thursday of May, 
and ends on the last Thursday of July. Winter Session commences on the first Thursday 
of October, and ends on the last Thursday of March. There is a recess of not e.xceeding 
15 days at Christmas. 

Commissary business is disposed of on same days as Sheriff-Court. Small Debt and 
Debts Recovery Courts are held weekly on Thursday during Session, at 12 o'clock noon. 

Small Debt Circuit Courts are held at Kirriemuir on the third Monday, at Brechin on 
the third Tuesday, and at Montrose on the third Friday of the months of January, March, 
May, July, September, and November. 



FORFARSHIRE FIARS PRICES, Crop 1886, 

Struck at Forfar on yth March, iSSj. 

Per Imperial Quarter. 



Wheat 
Barley 

Chester Bear 
Potato Oats ... 
Common do. 
Peas and Beans 

Rye 

Oat Meal, per Boll of 140 Imperial Lbs. 



• l^ 8 


9 


19 





17 


2 


18 


7 


17 


3 


I 5 


2 


18 


10 


15 


5 



Per Old Boll. 


;^o 


14 


8 





14 


2 





12 


10 





13 


10 





12 


10 





12 


10 





9 


7 





15 


4 



ALMANACK, 1888. 



The Royal Family. 

AlexandrinaVictoria, Queen of the United King- 
dom of Great Britain and Ireland, and Empress 
of India, born May 24, 1819; married Feb. 10, 
1840, to Prince Albert of Saxe-Cobur^h Gotha, 
(born Aug. 26, 1819, died Dec. 14, 1S61.) 

CHILDREN. 

1. Victoria A delaide Mary Louisa.Princess Royal, 
born Nov. 21, 1840 ; married Jan. 25, 185e, to 
Pred.Wilhelm, Prince Imp. of Germany. Has 
issue living two sons and four daughters, with 
two grandchildren. 

2, Albert Edward, Prince of "Wales, born Nov. 9, 
1841 ; married March 10, 1«63, to Princess 
Alexandra of Denmark (born Dec. 1, 1844) and 
has issue living two sons and three daughters. 

8. Alice Maud Mary, born April 25, 1843, married 
July 1 1862, to Prince Louis of Hesse. Died 
Dec. 14, 1878. Has issue living one son and 
four daughters, 

4. Alfred Ernest Albert, Duke of Edinburgh, 
born Aug. 6, 1844, married Jan. 23, 1874, to the 
Grand Duchess Marie of Russia. Has issue 
living one son and four daughters. 

5. Helena Augusta Victoria, born May 25, 1846, 
married July 5, 1806, to Prince Christian of 
Schleswig - Holstein - Sonderburg - Augusten- 
burg. Has issue living two sons and two 
daughters. 

6. Louise Caroline Alberta, born March 18, 1848, 
married March 21,1871,to the Marquis of Lome. 
Has no children. 

7. Arthur William Patrick Albert, Duke of Con- 
naught, and Strathearn, born May 1 , 1850, mar- 
ried March 13, 1879, to the Princess Louise 
Margaret of Prussia. Has issue one son and 
two daughteis. 

8. Leopold George Duncan Albert, late Duke of 
Albany, bom April 7, 1853, married April 27, 
1882, to Princess Helen of Waldeck-Pyrmont. 
Died March 29, 1884. Has issue one son and 
one daughter. 

9. Beatrice Mary Victoria Peodore, born April 14, 
1857, married July 23, 1885, to Prince Henry 
of Battenburg. Has issue one son. 

Annuities to the Royal Family. 

Her Majesty £ £ 

Privy Purse 60,000 

-Salaries of Household .... 131,260 
Expenses of Household .. 172,500 

Royal Bounty, &e 13 200 

Unappropriated 8,040--385,000 

Prince of Wales 40,000 

Princess of Wales 10,000 

Crown Princess of Prussia 8,000 

Prince Louis of Hesse-Darmstadt 6,000 

Duke of Edinburgh 25,000 

Princess Helena (Princess Christian).. 6 000 

Princess Louise (Marchioness of Lome) 6.000 

Duke of Connaught 25,000 

Duchess of Cambridare 6.000 

Duchess of Mecklenburgh-Strelitz 3,000 

Duke of Cambridge 12,000 

Duchess of Teck 5 000 

Princess Beatrice 6,000 

Duchess of Albany . 6,000 

£549,000 



Principal Articles of the Calendar. 

Golden Number 8 

Epact 17 

Solar Cycle 21 

Concurrent 7 

Dominical Letters AG 

Roman Indiction 1 

Julian Period 6601 

Ramadam (Turkish month of abstinence), 
commencing May 12th. 

The year 5649 of the Mahomedan era com- 
mences Sept. 6th. 

Festivals, Fasts, and Anniversaries 

Epiphany Jany, 6. 

Shrove Sunday Feby, VI. 

Ash Wednesday ,, 15. 

1st. Sunday in Lent . ,, 19. 

Palm Sunday Mch, 25 

GoodFriday ,. 30. 

Easter Sunday April 1. 

Rogation Sunday May 6. 

Ascension Day ,, 10, 

Whit-Sunday „ 20. 

Queen's Birthday ,, 24. 

Trinity Sunday ,, 27. 

Accession of Q. Victoria June 20. 

Midsummer day ,, 24. 

Michaelmas day Sept. £9. 

Prince of Wales's Birthday ... Nov. 9 

Advent Sunday! Dec. 2. 

Christmas Day ,, 25. 



Quarter Days. 

ENGLAND AND lEELAND. 

Lady Day March 25th 

Midsummer Day June 24th 

Michaelmas Day Sept. 29th 

Christmas Day Dec. ^51h 

SCOTLAND. 

Candlemas Day Feb. 2nd 

Whitsun Day May 15th 

Lammas Day A^srust 1st. 

Martinmas Day ?\^v, 11th. 

Eclipses for 1888. 

In the year 1888 there will be three eclipses of 
the Sun and two of the Moon. 

I.— A total Eclipse of the Moon, January 28tli, 
visible at Greenwich. 

II.— A partial Eclipse of the Sun, February 
11* h, invisible at Greenwich. 

III.— A piir^ial Eclipse of the Sun, July 8th, 
invisible at Greenwich. 

IV.— A total Eclipse of the Moon, July 23nd, 
partly visible at Greenwich, wliere the Moon 
will set partially eclipsed. 

v.— A partial Eclipse of the Sun, August 7th, 
invisible at Greenwich. 

There cannot be less than two eclipses of the 
Sun every year, but the Moon may be a year 
uneclipsed. 



Holidays. 

Stamp Office. Customs and Excise. 
Mcli. 30 Good Friday • . • • Good Friday 
May 21, 22 Whit Mou. & Tues. 
May 21 Queen's Birthday . . Queen's Birthday 
May 29 llestoration 

June 28 Coronation Coronation 

Nov. 9 Prince of Wales' . . Prince of Wales' 

Birthday Birthday. 

Dec. 25 Christinas Day . . . . Christmas Day 
And also Bank Holidays. 

Eank Holidays. 

England afd Ieeland, 

Good Friday March 30th 

Easter Monday April 2nd 

Whit Monday May 21st 

1st Mondav in August August 6th 

Christmas Day Dec. 25th 

Day after Christmas Dec, 25th 

Scotland. 

New Year's Day Jan. 1st 

Good Friday March 30th 

1st Monday in May May 7th 

1st Monday in August August 6th 

Christmas Day Dec. 25th 

Public Notices. 

Jan. 1.— Dog licenses renewable, 

2.— Quarter Sessions held during this 

week. 

9. — Fire insurances due at Christmas must 

be paid. 

12. — Latest day for banker's returns to be 

delivered at Stamp Office. 

31.— Last day for owners to claim votes 

for election of Guardians. 

31.— Last day for Coroners to transmit to 

Home Secretary returns of inquests for preceding 
year. 

Feb. 14.— Last day for objecting to owners' 
votes for election of Guardians. 

29. — Lastdayfor companies to claim votes 

for election of Guardia ns. 

March 2. — Borough Auditors must be elected. 

6. — Last day for sending in claims and 

objections relative to Local Board elections. 

15 — Last day for publishing notice of 

election of Guardians, 

15. — First day for sending nominations 

of Guardians to the JEleturning Officer. 

25.— P jchial, union and other local 

accounts to be made up to this date. 

26. — Last day for sending in nominations 

for Guardians to Returning Officer. 

April— Common lodging-houses must be 
whitewashed during the first week. 

3. — Quarter Sessions held this week. 

9. — Voting papers for election of Guardians 

to be delivered. 

9.— Fire insurance due March 25th must 

be paid. 

14. — Last day for Clerks of the Peace to 

issue precepts to Overseers respecting lists of 
county votes, and for similar duties to be per- 
forined by Town Clerks of cities and boroughs. 

16".— Newly elected Guardians come into 

office. 

Slay 1. — Local authorities to make return to 
Secretarv of State of copy of any order relating 
to Ballot Act. 



June 1. — Overseers to give notice between this 
day and the 30th to voters who have not paid all 
poor rates due January 5th. 

1.— Latest day for Friendly Societies to 

make returns of 1887 accounts to Registrar. 

19.— On or before this day. Overseers to 

fix on chm-ch doors the register of persons 
qualified to vote for counties. 

19. — Overseers of parishes within cities 

and boroughs to give notice respecting payment 
of rates. 

24.— SheriiJs of London elected. 

25.— Quarter Sessions commence this 

week. 

July.— Special Sessions for licenses to deal in 
game held this month. 

9.— Fire insurances due June 24th must 

be paid. 

20.— Poor rates, due January 5th, must 

be paid on or before this day. 

21. — Overseers in cities and boroughs to 

make out a list on or before this day of the 
persons whose poor rates remain unpaid. 

25.— Last day for county electors to send 

in claims. 

August 1. — Borough and county lists to be 
affixed to church doors for fourteen days. 

1.— Claims of lodgers to be sent in between 

this and the 20th. 

20. — Last day for service on overseers of 

objections to electors in counties. 

20. — On or before this day persons entitled 

to vote as ratepayers, whose names have been 
omitted in the register, must send in their 
claims. 

25.— Last day for service of objections to 

electors in boroughs. 

Sept. 1.— On or before this day, lists of lodgers 
and persons omitted from the list of voters, 
claiming to vote, with particulars of their 
claims, to be published. 

1.— Overseers to make out burgess lists to 

be delivered to Town Clerks, and lists of claims 
and objections for counties to clerks of the 
peace. 

1.— The lists of objections to county 

electors, and claims and objections in boroughs 
to be affixed to church doors till the 15th. 

2. — Lists of jurors to be affixed to church 

doors for the first three Sundays. 

29.— Parochial, union, and other local 

accounts made up to the week end nearest to 
this day. 

—Common lodging-houses to be white- 
washed during the first week. 

Oct. 1. — Mayor and assessors to revise burgess 
list some time'between the 1st and tha 15th. 

10. — Vai'ious licenses expire. 

12.— Bankers' licenses to be taken out. 

13. — Fire insurances due September 29th 

must be paid. [week. 

15. — Quarter Sessions commence this 

Nov. 1. — Municipal councillors to be elected. 

9. — Mayors to be elected. 

12. — Sheriffs to be nominated. 

14.— Solicitors', notaries', -proctors', and 

sworn clerks' certificates expire. 

Dec. 15.— Last day for renewing solicitors' 
certificates. 

21,— Election of common councilmen for 

the City of London. 

24. — Christmas Law Yacation begins. 

24.— Bills of exchange must be provided 

for which fall due on the 25th or 26th. 




PANGBOUENE, BEBKS. 



1SS8. 



Jamiavg. 



31 DATS. 



Phases op the Moojf. 
Last Quarter, 6th, 11-43 morn. 
New Moon 13th, 8-38 Morn. 
First Quarter, 21st, 4-49 morn. 
Full Moon, 28th, 11-19. aft. 



1 


S 


2 


M 


'") 


T 


4 


VV 


5 


T 


6 


F 


7 


S 


8 


s 


9 


M 


10 


T 


11 


VV 


12 


T 


13 


F 


14 


S 


15 


s 


10 


M 


17 


T 


18 


W 


19 


T 


20 


F 


21 


S 


22 


s 


23 


M 


24 


T 


25 


VV 


26 


T 


27 


F 


28 


S 


29 


s 


30 


M 


31 


T 



Sun 






Moon. 

03 CD U3 S 
CO -u 03 O 



1st Sunba^ aftev f mas 
John of Leyden ex., 1536 
The " Warspite " burnt, '76 
Whitehall burnt, 1698 
Battle of Nancy, 1477 
Epiphany 

Allan Ramsay d. 1758 
1st after Epfpfcan^s 
Battle of Kalafat, 1854 
A'bp. Laud beheaded, 1645 
Loss of the " London '" 1866 
Battle of Alumbagh 1858 
Rattle of Chillianwallah, '49 
Pantheon burnt, 1792 
2nb after iSpipbanv 
Hartley Colliery expl. 1862 
Mozart born, 1756 
Storming of Bhurtpore, 1826 
Loss of the " Cimbria," '83 
London Docks opened, 1799 
Louis XVI. guillot'd, 1793 
3r& after lEptpban^ 
Gustavo Dor6 died, 1883 
Flotou died, 1883 
Conversion of St. Paul 
Dover Cliff blown up, 1843 
Peter the Great d., 1725 
Battle of Aliwal, 1846 •; 
Scptuagesima Sun&a^ 
Trial of 1 ieschi, 1836 
Chas. Edw. Stuart d, 1788 



8 8r 
4 Os 
8 8r 
4 2s 
8 8r 
4 4s 
8 7r 
4 7s 
8 6r 
410s 
8 5r 
412s 
8 4r 
415s 
8 2r 
419s 
8 Or 
422s 
58r 
425s 
7o6r 
428s 
754r 
432s 
751 r 
435s 
749r 
439s 
746r 
442s 
743r 



6 37 
49 
9 5 
1021 
1137 
mrn 
55 
14 

3 31 

4 48 

5 59 
4 

58 

8 43 

9 18 
9 47 
1012 
1034 
1055 
1113 
1136 
1158 
aftr 

55 

1 32 

2 19 

3 15 

4 20 

5 31 

6 48 
8 5 



9 25 

10 2 
1035 

11 2 
1128 
1152 
aftr 

44 
16 
54 

2 39 

3 34 

1 37 

5 42 

6 51 

8 1 

9 8 
1014 
1118 
mrn 

22 

1 26 

2 29 

3 34 

4 36 
36 
31 



1SS8. 


(^jtUlUiit|J. 


29 DaIl 


s. 


Phases oe the Moon. 


Sun 


Moon, 


Last Quarter, 4th,7-25 aft. 


^ri, 


•-n C 


isS 


New Moon, 11th, 11-52 aft. 


%f 




First Quarter, 19th, 1-59 morn. 


•ab 


'^g 


Full Moon, 25th, 11-57 aft. 


446s 


< 

9 47 


1 


W 


Wapping Docks op., 1805 


9 tn 


2 


T 


Purification 


740r 


1046 


9 56 


3 


V 


Beau Nash died, 1761 


450s 


1145 


!021 


4 


s 


Quebec Arsenal burnt, 1816 


737r 


mrn 


1046 


5 


s 


Seracjesima 


453s 


i 25 


1122 


6 


M 


Battle of Eyiace, 1807 


733r 


2 30 


1159 


7 


T 


Charles Dickens born, 1812 


457s 


3 39 


aftr 


8 


W 


Sir Salar Jimg died, 1883 


730r 


4 40 


1 40 


9 


T 


Battle of Toulon, 1744 


5 Is 


5 33 


2 27 


10 


F 


Battle of Sobraon, 1846 


726r 


6 2ti 


3 26 


n 


S 


Fenian at. on Chester C'le, '67 


5 4s 


7 16 


4 28 


12 


s 


(Siuinquagesima 


723r 


7 44 


5 43 


13 


M 


Massacre of Glencoe, 1692 


5 8s 


8 16 


6 57 


14 


T 


Shrove Tuesday 


719r 


8 40 


7 42 


15 


W 


Ash Wednesday 


512s 


8 57 


8 55 


16 


T 


Lyceum Theatre burnt, '60 


715r 


y 20 


1015 


17 


F 


Battle of Eupatoria, 1855 


515s 


9 37 


1114 


18 


S 


Capture of Trinidad, 1797 


7llr 


9 59 


mrn 


19 
20 
?,1 


S 1st Sunba^ in Xcnt 


519s 


1022 


16 


M iOccupationof Lahore, 1846 


7 7r 


1053 


1 35 


T i Battle of Guzerat, 1849 


52 is 


1121 


2 29 


22 


W i Fires on the Serpentine, '55 


7 3r 


aftr 


3 33 


?3 


T [Albert Smith died, 1860 


526s 


53 


4 33 


?4 


F ^St. Ilathias the Apostle 


659r 


1 46 


5 17 


25 


S Sir Christopher Wren d.l723 


530s 


3 


6 7 


26 


S 2n6 Sun&a:? in Xcnt 


655r 


4 17 


6 35 


27 


M 'Longfellow born, 1807 

T iTicliiDorne trial ended, '74 


533s 


5 29 


7 9 


28 


650r 


6 5 


7 36 


29 


W 


Rossini born, 1792 


537s 


8 15 


7 53 




p 




fC ^ 




y ^^ '^ 




f| 1 X 




' M« 




l"* ■ \ 


^ 


^ V ,V 


tH 


%% 


o 




« 


nil ^ i " 


(14 


■ ' \l'l 


!zi 


kbUi '^^ i 1 


M 


p 


H 


1' 







PUIHAM CHUECH. 



1888. 



jJtl^Vru, 31 Days. 



I'HASES OF THE MOON. 

Last Quarter, 4th, 3-26 morn. 
New Moon, 12th, 4-21 aft. 
Eirst Quarter, 20th, 8-43 aft. 
Full Moon, 27th, 10-7 aft. 



9 
10 

lis 

12M 
13T 
14|W 

15T 

16 F 

17 S 

is's 

19M 
20T 
2l|W 

22iT 
23iF 

24 S 

25 S 
26M 
27, T 
28: W 
29 T 
30F 
3l'S 



St. David. 

Battle of Maestrecht, 1793 

Serfdom ab, in Russia, 1861 

3r^ Sun&ai3 in lent 

Thames Tunnel op., 1843 

Artemus Ward died, 1867 

Elihu Burritt died, 1879 

Battle of Aboukir, 1801 

Peace of San Stefano, 1878; 

Mazzini died, 1872 

4tb Sun&as }n lent 

Vauxhall bridge op. 1816 

Napoleon outlawed, 1815 

Admiral Byng shot, 1757 

Julius Ceesar ass,, B.C. 44 

Haydock Col. explosion, '50 

St. Patrick. 

5tb Sun&a^ in lent 

Alexander II. ass. 1881 

Sir Isaac Newton d, 1727 

Battle of Alexandria 1801 

Goethe died, 1832 

Nice Opera house burnt, '81 

Loss of H.M.S. Eurydice,'78 

flJalm Sun&ai2 

Battle of Legnano, 1799 

Resurrection 

War with Russia dec. 1854 

Albert Hall opened, 1871 

Good Friday 

Charlotte Bront6 d., 1855 



Sun Moon. 



646r 

540s 
642r 
544s 
637r 
517s 
633r 
o51s 
629r 
554s 
624r 
558s 
620r 
6 IS 
6l5r 
6 5s 
610r 
6 8s 
6 6r 
611S 
6 ir 
615S 
557r 
618s 
552r 
621s 
547r 
620s 
543r 
628s 
538r 



xn (B 

S| 

9 38 
11 
mrn 

30 

1 43 
•3 44 

3 45 

4 43 

5 22 

5 50 

6 23 

6 46 

7 7 
7 23 

7 53 

8 10 

8 25 

9 
9 30 
1010 
1057 
1140 
aftr 

2 

3 24 

4 il 

5 47 

7 23 

8 44 

9 56 
1124 



5g 



8 38 

9 2 

9 33 

10 3 
1048 
1135 
aftr 

1 32 

2 35 

3 44 

4 43 

5 45 

6 50 

7 14 

8 15 

9 22 
1020 
1121 
mrn 

1 33 

2 24 

3 10 
i 5S 

4 32 

5 12 

5 39 

6 2 

6 39 

7 6 
7 44 



1888. 



^pril 



30 Days. 



Phases ob the Moon. 
Last Quarter, 3rd, 12-41 aft. 
New Moon, 10th, 9-7 aft. 
First Quarter, 18th, 11-52 aft. 
Full Moon, 25th, 6-22 aft. 



IS 
2M 

3T 

4 W 

5T 

6F 

7S 

8S 

9M 

10 T 

lliW 

12T 

13 F 

14S 

15; S 

16:M 

l7jT 

18W 

19 T 

20 F 
21;S 

22: S 

23 M 

24 T 
25W 
26 T 
27: F 

28 S 

29 S 

30 M 



Easter Sunba^ 
Cobden died, 1865 
Prince Arthur murd,, 1203 
Goldsmith died, 1774 
Battle of Granson, 14J6 
Storming of Badajoz, 1812 
Bonaparte abdicated, 1814 
low Sunbag 
Lord Bacon died, 1626 
Battle of Toulouse, 1814 
Geo. Canning born, 1770 
Lord Rodney's victory, 1782 
Sir H. Bishop died, 1855 
President Lincoln ass. 1865 
2tib Sunbas aftev ]Eaater 
Battle of Culloden, 1746 
Franklin died, 1790 
Rockingham House b'nt, '63 
Battle of Lexington, 1775 
Long Parl'nt dissolved, 1653 
Execution of Rush, 1849 
3r& Sun&ais after Easter 
-S'i^. George 

Daniel Defoe died, 1731 
St. Mark Ihe Evangalist 
Guillotine first used, 1792 
Montrose defeated, 1650 
Mutiny of the Bounty, 1789 
4tb Sun&ai2 after Easter 
Battle of Fontenoy, 1745 



Sun Moon. 






631s 

534r 

635s 

529r 

638s 

525r 

641s 

520r 

645s 

516r 

648s 

612r 

651s 

5 7r 

655s 

5 3r 

658s 

459r 

7 2s 

455r 

7 5s 

450r 

7 

446r 

711s 

442r 

714s 

438r 

718s 

435r 



P5 



Hirn 

45 

1 55 

2 54 

3 36 

4 3 
4 33 

4 55 

5 19 
5 41 

5 59 

6 23 

6 28 

7 11 

7 41 

8 6 

8 58 

9 30 
1024 
1130 
aftr 

2 8 

3 28 

4 52 

5 20 

7 50 

8 53 
1036 
1143 






8 48 

9 21 
1019 
1114 
aftr 

36 
40 
60 
49 
40 
46 
42 

8 56 

9 50 
1110 
mrn 
5 

13 
58 
36 
19 

3 43 

4 19 

4 44 

5 10 

5 5 

6 9 

6 49 

7 10 



1159 8 13 



Jewish Calendar. 

Year 5648. 

17 Tebet Jany. 1 

1 if'ebat ,. 15 

1 Adar Feby. 14 

13 ,, Fast of Esther. „ 27 

14 „ Purim „ 28 

15 ,, Sbushau Punm ,, 29 

1 Nisan Mcb. 16 

15 ,, Passover ,, 30 

22 ,, End of Passover. April 6 

I Yiar , 15 

IS ., Festival of Omer May 2 

1 Sivan „ 14 

6 ,, Festival of Weeks , 19 

1 Tamuz June 13 

18 „ Feast of Tamuz 30 

1 Ab July 12 

iO ,, . Fast. Destruction of the 

Temple 21 

1 Elel Augt. 11 

Year 5649. 

I Tisri Sept. 9 

•> ,, Fast of Gruedaliah ,, 11 

10 ,, Fast of Expiation ,, 18 

15 ,, Feast of Tabernacles ,, 23 

21 ., Hosanna Raba ,, 2^ 

22 „ Feast of the Eighth Day , bO 

23 , Eejoicing of the Law Oct 1 

1 Hesvan .. 9 

1 Kislev Nov. 7 

25 ,, Dedication of the Temple .. . Deer. 1 
1 Tebet „ 6 

10 „ Fast. Seige of Jerusalem .. . „ 15 

26 „ ,. 81 

The Sportsman's Calendar. 

Dog Li censes renewable J an. 1 

Partridge shooting ends Feb. 1 

Ph:.'!isaiit shooting ends „ 1 

Tweed Rod fishing begins „ 1 

English salmon and trout fishing 

begins „ 1 

Scottish general salmon fishing 

begins „ 11 

Tweed salmon netting begins „ 15 

Fox hunting euds „ 28 

Hare hunting ends „ 28 

Close Season for Fresh "Waterfowl 

begins Mch. 15 

Game Licenses expire April 7 

Oyster season commences Aug. 4 

Grouse and Ptarmigan shooting 

begins „ 12 

Blackcock shooting begins ,, 19 

Partridge shooting begins Sep. 1 

Pheasant shooting begins Oct. 1 

Salmon Rod fishing ends Nov. 1 

Tweed Rod fishing euds „ 30 

Grouse and Blackcock shooting 

ends Dee. 10 

Marriage Licenses. 

Marriage Licenses can be obtained from the 
Surrogates' Office in any district for marriage in 
the Parish Church, after a residence of 15 days 
by the persons about to marry, upon payment 
of fees amounting with the cost of stamp to 
£2 15s. 6d. , , . 1 

Special Licenses are granted by the Ai'ch- 
bishop of Canterbury to marry in a particular 
church, without previous residence in the 
district. The fees average £20 8s. 



Chief High BuiLDUfas.— The following are 
the principal high buildings in the world :— 

PX. IJf. 

Towers of Cologne Cathedral 524 11 

Tower of St. Nicholas at Hamburg 473 1 

Cupola of St. Peter's at Rome 469 2 

Cathedral Tower at Strasbourg 465 11 

Pyramid of Cheops 449 5 

Tower of St. Stephen's^ Vienna 442 10 

Tower of St. Martin's, Landshut 434 8 

Cathedi-al Spire at Freiburg 410 1 

Cathedral of Antwerp 404 10 

Cathedral of Florence 390 5 

St. Paul's, London 365 1 

Cathedral Tower of Magdeburg 339 11 

Victoria Tower, London 531 

Tower of the new Votive Church, Vienna314 11 

Tower of the Rath-haus, Berlin 288 8 

Town Hall, Manchester 286 5 

Towers of Notre Dame at Paris 232 11 



The British Empire. 

Area sq . m . Popul a . 

United Kingdom 120.822 36,000,000 

Europe Izl 175,000 

Asia 934,2'j9 202 560,000 

Africa 258,887 2,480,000 

North America 3,517.011 4,753,700 

South America 117,254 432,250 

Australasia 3,169,583 3,360,40000 

West Indies 11,201 1,070,100 



8,129,118 250,831,450 

Law Terms, 1888. 

Hilary term begins, Jan. 11. ends March 28. 
Easter term begins, April 10, ends May 18. 
Trinity term begins. May 29, ends August 13. 
Michaelmas term begins, Oct 24, ends Dec. 21 

Frosts on the Thames.— The Thames was 
frozen for 14 weeks in 1063, and below bridge to 
Gravesend from 24th November to 10th February 
in 1434. In 1515, carriages passed over the ice 
from Lambeth to Westminster ; and fires and 
diversions were witnessed on the river in 1807. 
In 1684 the river was covered with ice llin. 
thick, and nearly all the birds perished. In 
1716 a fair was held, and oxen were roasted on 
the ice ; this frost continued from 24th November 
to 9th February, A frost in 1740 lasted nine 
weeks, when coaches plied, and festivities of 
various kinds were celebrated, on the Thames. 
From November to January, in 1789, the river 
was passable on the ice opposite to the Custom 
House, and in 1814 booths were erected. An 
intense frost prevailed in that year throughout 
the month of January, after which the river 
was considered safe for foot-passengers. The 
watermen made rough paths, strewn with ashes, 
from bank to bank, for which they charged toll, 
making a considerable revenue. 

Writing ai^d Speaking-.— Habits of literary 
conversation, and still more habits of extempore 
discussion in a popular assembly, are peculiarly 
useful in giving us a ready and practical com- 
mand of our knowledge. There is much good 
sense in the following aphorism :—(^aeo?i) — 
" Reading makes a full man, writing a correct 
man, and speaking a ready va&n. —Dunald 
Steivart, 



w V- ^_ 




ILFRACOMBE. 



1888. 



#lai). 



SI Days. 



Phases ov the Moon. 
Last Quarter, 2nd, ll-4i7 aft. 
New Moon, 10th, 1-23 morn. 
First Quarter, 18th, 11-5 aft. 
Full Moon, 25th, 1 40 aft. 



II T 

2 W 
3T 
41 P 
5S 



24' T 
25 F 

2a s 



St. Philip & St. James 13ir 

Livingstone died, 1873 72'?s 

Jamaica discovered, 1494 430r 
Battle of Tewkesbury. 1469 726s 
Bonaparte died, 1821 426r 

"IRogatton SunM^ 7 Os 

Lord Brougham died, 1868 !23r 
Douglas Jerrold died, 1857 732s 
Half-qusirter day 419r 

Asceyision Bay 736s 

Earl Granville born, 1815 416r 
Sir Ch. Bai'ry died, 1816 739s 
Suii&a^ after ascension 4i.3r 
Henry Grattan died. 1820 
Daniel O'Connell died, 1847 
Mrs. Hemans died, 1835 745s 
Rev. IS". Testament iss.. '81 4 7r 
Oxford Easter Term ends 748s 
Oxford Trinity Term begins 4 4r 
HClbit Sun5a>e 750s 

Bank Holiday 4 Sr 

Sir G. W. Dasent born, 1820 753s 
Mark Lemon died, 1870 359r 

Queen Victoria born, 1819 756s 
trincess Helena born, 1846 357r 
The "Ava" run down, 1879 758s 
Urinit^S Sun&a? 355r 

Earl Russel died. 1878 « Is 

Trinity Law Sittings begin 353r 
Cancer Hospital founded, '3 J 8 3s 
Corpus Christi 351r 



Sun 






Moon. 



p^; 



32 
20 
58 
28 
53 
15 
35 
54 
14 

4 35 

4 £8 

5 25 
5 57 

742s '6 36 
4l0r7 23 

8 18 

9 21 
1030 
1143 
59 

2 19 

3 40 

5 4 

6 28 

7 51 
9 10 
1018 
1113 
1156 
mrn 
30 



CO a 



8 59 
10 4 

nil 

20 

1 28 

2 34 

3 39 

4 43 

5 47 

6 51 

7 55 

8 58 

9 58 
1053 
1142 
mrn 

25 

1 1 



32 
59 
24 
49 
14 
42 
14 
53 
41 
39 
45 
8 54 
10 5 



1888. 



June. 



30 DATS. 



Phases of the Moon. 
Last Quarter, 1st, 0-53 aft. 
New Moon, 9th. 4-34 aft 
First Quarter, 17th, 6-50 morn 
Full Moon, 2.ird, 9-8 aft. 



9 
10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
23 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 
28 
29 F 
30S 



Lord Howe's Victory, 1794 
Garibaldi died, 1883 
tst Sun^as aftev Uvinit^ 
General Wolseley born, '33 
Weber died, 1826 
Count Cavour died, 1861 
First Reform Bill pass ,1832 
Sir John Millais born, 1829 
Charles Dickens died, 1870 
2n^ Sun&a>2 aftev Uvinit^ 
Money Market panic, 1866 
Length of day, 16h. .30m. 
Dr. T, Young born, 1773 
Battle of Marengo, ]810 
Magna Charta signed, 1215 
Dk. of Marlboi'ough, d , 1722 
3vb Sun6a>2 aftev Uvfnits 
Battle of Waterloo, 1815 
Spurgeon born, 1834 
Accession of Q. Victoria, '37 
St. Thomas' Hospital op. ,'71 
Fire in Tooley street, 1861 
Ld.Clive's Vic.at Plassy,1757 
4:tb Sunfcas aftev Uvinits 
(24) Camb. Easter Tm. ends 
Trent Valley R'y open., 1846 
Sir G. B. Airy born, 1801 
Q. Victoria crowned. 1838 
Lord Raglan died, 1855 
Sir Jos. D. Hooker b„ 1817 



Sun 

S^ 

350r 
8 6s 
849r 
8 8s 
348r 
810s 
347r 
812s 
346r 
813s 
345r 
815s 
344r 
816s 
344r 
817s 
344r 
818s 
344r 
818s 
345r 
819s 
345r 
819s 
346r 
819s 
347r 
819s 
348r 
818s 



Moon. 






58 

1 22 

1 42 

2 1 



2 
2 
3 
3 27 

3 58 

4 35 

5 20 

6 13 

7 18 
20 

9 31 

1045 

1 

19 
39 
1 
23 
43 
57 



9 49 
1028 
1059 
1125 
1147 
tnni 



1115 

10 23 

29 

34 

39 

43 

47 

■6 51 

17 52 

i8 49 

'9 41 

11026 

11 4 

' 1136 

mrn 

iO 4 

28 

50 

1 14 

1 40 

2 10 

2 45 

3 27 

4 20 

5 22 

6 32 

7 45 
3 57 
10 7 
1115 




PvICKMOIfD BKIDGE. 



1888. 



Jul!}. 



31 Days. 



Phases of the Moon. 
Last Quarter, 1st, 3-53 morn. 
New Moon, 9th, 6-17 morn. 
First Qi;arter, 16th, 0-13 aft. 
Full Moon, '23rd, 5-45 morn. 
Last Quarter, 30th, 8-30 aft. 



1« 


2:M 


3T 


4W 


5IT 


6iF 


7 


S 


8 


s 


9 


M 


10 


T 


11 


W 


12 


T 


13 


F 


14 


S 


15 


9 


16 


\1 


17 


T 


18 


vv 


19 


T 


20 


F 


21 


S 


22 


s 


2< 


M 


24 


T 


25 


W 


26 


T 


27 


P 


2SS 


29 S 


30 51 


31 


T 



5tb Sunba? after Cnnit^349ro 
Sir Robert Peel died, 1850 817s 26 
Battle of Sadowa, 1866 350r 46 

Indpndce. Day, U.S.A. 1776 817s 1 
Lord Gilford born, 1849 352r 1 

Samuel Lover died, 1868 816s 
Oxford Trinity Term ends 354r 
6tb Sun&a^ after Urintt^ 8i4s 
Fire Insurance expu'es " ^ser 4 
(9th) H'pool har. open, 1835 813s 
Alexandria bombarded, 1882 358r 
Tom Taylor died, 1880 811s 

Thames Erabkmt. open, 1870 4 Or 
The Bastille stormed, 178!^ 8 9s 
7tb Sun&a^ after Urinftg ^ 2r 
Flight of Mahomed, 622 8 7s 
Earl Grey died, 1845 4 or 

Papal infalblty. declrd. 1878 8 5S 
Bp. Wilberforce died, 1873 4 7r 
Lord Westbury died, 1873 8 3s 
Robert Burns died, 1796 410r 
8tb Sunba^ after Urinit^ 8 os 
Marqs. of Hartngtn. b. 1833 412r 
Window tax repealed, 1851 7o8s 
Great fir-e at Baltimore, 1873 415r 
Irish Chrch. Bill passed,1869 755s 
Bank of Eng. founded, 1691 4l8r 
L'pool landg. stage brnt.,'74 752s 
9tb Sunbas after Urtnit^ 42ir 
Relief of Derry, 1689 749s 

Edward Pease died, 1872 424r 



bun 



^^ 



Moon. 



■ -A O 



32 



34 

16 

6 

5 4 

6 10 

7 21 

8 3 

9 50 
11 

26 

1 4i 

3 3 

4 22 

5 37 

6 43 

7 38 

8 23 
58 
26 

9 50 
1011 
1031 
1051 

nil 

1134 



21 

1 26 

2 31 

3 35 

4 39 

5 42 

6 42 

7 37 

8 25 

9 5 

9 40 

10 9 
1035 
1158 
1121 
1145 
mm 
12 
43 

20 
7 
4 
10 
21 
35 



1888. 



JluguBt. 



31 Days. 



Phases of the Moon. 
New Moon, 7th, 6-21 aft. 
First Quarter. 14th, 4-44 aft. 
Full Moon, 21st, 4-20 aft. 
Last Quarter, 29th, 2-18 aft. 



1 

2 
3 
4 
5 

6 

7 48 

8 58 
10 6 
1113 

18 

1 23 



425r 

744s 

428r 

741s 

432r 

737s 

435r 

734s 

438r 

730s 7 

441r 

726s 

441r 

722s 



mrn 


31 

1 10 
57 



8 56 
1014 
1133 
52 



29W 

30,T 

31iF 



Lammas Day 

Captain Marryatt died, 1848 

Mr. Arthur Peel born, 1829 

The ' Louis David 'wrck.1879 

lOtb Sunba^ after Urinit^ 

Bank and general holiday 

Length of day, 15h. Im. 

Sir Arthur Otway born, 1822 

Earl Sydney born, 1805 

G. J. Goschen born, 1831 

Half- quarter day 

Utb Sunba^ after Urinlt^ 

Trinity Law Sittings end 

Printing invented, 1437 

Sir Walter Scott born, 1771 

' Peterloo' M'chstr. mtg.1819 

Admiral Blake died, 1657 

Battle of Gravelotte, 1870 

12tb Sunba^ after Urfnit^ 453rl6 18 1 64 

Abergele Rally. Accdt. 1868 710s 6 56 3 3 

Dr. Adam Clarke died, 1832 457r 7 26 4 15 

Dr. E. B. Pusey born, 1800 7 6s 7 52 5 28 

Treaty of Prague, 1866 5 Or 8 14 6 39 

Massacre of Huguenots, 1572 7 2s 8 34 7 49 

Michael Faraday died, 1867 5 3r'8 54 8 57 

I3tb Sunba^ after Urfnit^ 657s '9 14 10 3 

Bombardmt. of Algiers, 1816 6r,'9 30 11 9 

Dover& Calais cable laid, 1850 653s 10 1 13 

' Royal George' foundrd.1782 510r,1030 1 16 

Turkish Defeat, Plevna,1877 6-t98ll 5 2 18 

John Bunyan died, 1688 5lSr 1147 3 16 



Sun 



GO a) 



02 



Moon. 



52 u 



447r:2 K 

718s 3 24 






27 

3 30 

4 31 
28 
18 

2 

40 

12 

39 

9 3 

9 27 

9 50 

1015 

1044 

1119 

mrn 



450r 4 32 1 
714s 5 30 53 



OUR ILLUSTRATIONS. 



Sandgate. ^ 

Sandgate, in Kent, is a chapelry and hamlet 
two miles "VY.S.W. of Folkstone. The situation 
of the town, which lies along the sea shore, with 
hills rising immediately behind it, is in the 
highest degree salubrious and delightful. Sand- 
gate possesses hot and cold baths, excellent 
accommodation for sea-bathing, a library, and 
reading-rooms. On a neighbouring hill is an 
ancient camp, compi'ising about two acres, said 
to have been the work of King Ethelbert. The 
castle, which was ei-ected in the reign of Henry 
VIIT., has been converted into a martello tower, 
on a very large scale, to combine with other 
martello towers erected on the neighbouring 
hills to defend this part of the coast. The walk 
on the cliffs to Eolkstone is much frequented, 
and the sourroi;nding scenery is of the most 
delightful and varied description. About half a 
mile from Sandgate commences the military 
canal, cut during the great French war, to 
impede the progress of the enemy, in the event 
of a landing being effected on this shore , it is 
about twenty-three miles long, ninety feet broad, 
and eighteen deep, with a raised bank to shelter 
the soldiery, and enable them to oppose the foe 
with better advantage. The canal terminates at 
cliff end, Sussex, and on the cliffs were several 
strong batteries. 

Malvern Priory Church. 

The Priory Church of Malvern forms one of the 
most complete of the old monastic chx\rches of 
England. The first impression of the church is 
the likeness of the tower to the cathedral at 
Gloucester, and the likeness suggests that the 
architects and builders of the one had a hand in 
the other. Nor is this improbable. The whole 
of the external appearance of the church is that 
of the more florid of the pointed and perpen- 
dicular style ol Gothic architecture. The nave 
and pillars are, however, of Norman construc- 
tion. The church is 173 feet long, 63 feet broad, 
and the tower is 124 feet high. The tesselated 
pavement of the church must have been remark- 
able for its ricluiess and beauty. Many of the 
tiles yet remain to bear witness to the fund of 
inventive design of the old potters. At least 
one hundred different designs are noted, among'st 
which armorial bearings of the various families 
comiected with Malvern or the neighbourhood 
are conspicuous. The fanciful carving on the 
monks' stalls, and the ancient monuments, 
deserve the attention of the visitor. The richly- 
coloured reredos, presented in 18S4 by the Rev. 
E. Peek, of Malvern "Wells, and designed by Mr. 
Arthur Bloomfleld, is composed of Mosaic and 
marble. The font is of Norman date, and the 
organ is one of the finest instruments in the 
country. 

Dunluce Castle. 

The Castle of Dunluce, about two miles from 
the singular and interesting curiosity, the Giant's 
Causeway, is one of the most important as well 
as picturesque remains of the kind in Ireland. 
It is situated on an insulated rock, of a hundred 
feet in perpendicular height, v,-hich is separated 



from the mainland by a precipitous chasm of 
about twenty feet wide. The only way by which 
it can be entered is by a narrow wall, one of the 
supporters of the ancient di-awbridge. It seems 
as if it were split off from the terra firma. Over 
the intermediate chasm lies the only approach 
to the castle, along a narrow wall, which has 
been built somewhat like a bridge, from the rock 
to the adjoining land ; and this circumstance 
must have rendered it almost impregnable before 
the invention of artillery. It appears, however, 
that there was originally another narrow wall 
which ran acx^oss the chasm parallel to the 
former, and that, by laying boards over these, 
an easy passage might occasionally be made for 
the benefit of the garrison. The walls of the 
castle are built of columnar basalt, many joints 
of which are placed in such a mamier as to show 
their polygonal sections. It was through 
mistaking the basaltic columns of the Giant's 
Causeway for the walls of Dunluce Castle, and 
exhausting their artillery upon them, that the 
Spanish Armada was caught in the destructive 
storm which completed its ruin. 

Gareloch. 

The pretty arm of the sea, known as Gareloch, 
has its opening in the Frith of Clyde. Its shores 
are of singular beauty ; the little hamlet, sea- 
side mansions, and handsome villa-like erections, 
being richly Avooded, the manse being specially 
beautiful. The sail up the Gareloch is very fine, 
and the head of the loch extremely so, and the 
houses which adorn its gently-rounded shores, 
the quoad sacra parish church and village inn 
improving the picture, which has the Alps of 
AiTOchar, the mountain height of the Cobbler, 
and the Argyle bowling-green, " Incics a nan 
hicendo" the least smooth spot in a most rough 
district. Fi-om the head of Gareloch to the shores 
of Loch-Long, is within two miles, the road to 
Arrochar for Loch-Lomond, or for Loch-Fine, 
leading up its shores while another route leads 
southward by the western banks of the Gareloch 
and the penmsula-like shaped point of Rose- 
neath, as the district is named, which intervenes 
between the Garelech and Loch-Long. 



Bar Gate, Southampton. 

The principal street of Southampton riuis from 
the quay northAvards ; it is upwards of a mile 
in length, and is particularly handsome and 
spacious. This street, Avhich is knoAvn as lligh 
Street, is divided about the middle by an old 
edifice called the Bar Gate, resembling Temple 
Bar in appearance, which once formed one of the 
principal entrances into the town Avithin the 
toAvn Avails. It is a curious and ancient fortified 
gatehouse, with a large room in the upper part 
of the building that is. used as a guildhall. 

Elgin Cathedral. 

Elgin is an ancient and royal city, and the 
capital of the county of Moray or Elginshire, in 
Scotland, It is situated on the Lossie, about 
five miles from its mouth. Its ancient cathedral 
is one of the most magnificent ruins in Scotland. 




^£|rt ember. 



Phases of the Moon. 
New Moon. 6th, 4 56 morn. 
First Quarter, 12th, 10 aft. 
Full Moon, 20th, 5 24 morn. 
Last Quarter. 2Sth. S ?,f) morn. 



9 

10 
11 
12 
13 
U 
15 
18 
17 
IS 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 
28 
29 
30|r 



Partridge shootia^ corn's. 
I4tb Sun&axj after Urinit^ 
Oliver Cromwell died, 165S 
Lord Ashburne died, 1837 
Malta captured, 1800 
Archbishop Sumner d., 1862 
Copeliagen taken, 1807 
Seaham Harbour Col. ex , '80 
I5tb Suu&a^ after Uvinitig 
Duke of Buckingham b. 1823 
Battle of Malplaquet, 1709 
Cleopatra's Needle re-er. '78 
General Wolfe killed, 1759 
Duke of Wellington d., 1852 
L. and M. Railwa.y op., 1830 
I6tb Sundas after Uvinit^ 
John Payne Collier d., 1883 
General Hoche died, 1797 
President Garfield died, 1881 
Battle of the xllma, 1854 
Sir W. Scott died, 1832 
Battle of Zutphen, 1586 
I7tb Sunba^ after Urinits 
Marshal Macdonald d., 1840 
Siege of Paris com. 1870 
Marshal Soult died, 1851 
G. Cruikshank born, 1792 
Strasburg capitulated, 1870 
St. Michael Michaelmas D. 
IStb Sun&as after Urinit^ 



30 Days. 
Sun Moon. 



ci' 



514r 

643s 

ol7r 

638s 

521r 

633s 

524 

629s 

527r 

624s 

530r 

620s 

533r 

615s 

537r 

610s 

540r 

6 6s 

543r 

6 Is 

546r 

556s 

550r 

552s 

553r 

547s 

556r 

542s 

559r 

538s 






O! 



Mm 

38 

1 39 

2 47 

4 

5 17 

6 37 

7 58 
9 19 
1040 
Aft 

16 

2 26 

3 26 

4 16 

4 56 

5 28 

5 54 

6 17 
6 38 

6 58 
17 

7 38 
2 

29 

1 

9 39 

1026 

1121 






4 9 

4 56 

36 

11 

41) 

6 

30 

54 

19 

3 47 

J 20 

10 

1048 

1146 

Mrn 

51 

2 1 

3 12 

4 24 
34 

6 43 

7 50 

8 56 



Phases of the Mooif. 
New Moon, 5th, 2 34 aft. 
First Quarter, 12th, 5 29 morn. 
Full Moon, 19th, 9 9 aft. 
Last Quarter, 28th, I 56 morn. 



1 

5 
7 
6 
1 
50 
Mml3 32 



31) W 



Carab'dge Mich. Term begins 
(1st) Paper duty rpeal'd 1861 
Treaty of Limerick, 1691 
Lord Aug. Loftus born, 1817 
Lord Chelmsford died, 1878 
Battle of Pekin, 1860 
I9tb Sunba^ after tTrinitv 
Great Fire at Chicago, 1871 
Eddystone L'house fin., 1759 
Oxford Mich. Term begins 
Old Michaelmas Day 
Pekin taken, 1860 
Murat shot, 1815 
20tb Sunba^ after Urinit^ 
(14th) Fire Insura'e expires 
Soissons taken, 1870 
Brighton railway op. 1838 
Last English lottery, 1826 
Sir. C. Wheatstone d., 1875 
Thomas Hughes born, 1823 
2lst Sunbais after Urinitv 
Capt. Mayne Reid d., 1883 
Wallsend Col. explosi'n, 1821 
Mich. Law Sittings begin 
Battle of Agincourt, 1415 
Count von Moltke born, 1800 
Lord Iddesleigh born, 1818 
22nb Sunba^ after Urinit^. 
John Leech died, 1864 
Tower Armoury burnt, 1841 
John Buckstone died, 1879 



6 

533s 

6 6r 

529s 

6 9r 

524s 

nl2r 

520i^ 

8]6r 

516s 

619r 

511s 

623r 

7s 
626r 

3s 
629r 
45Ss 
633r 
454s 
636r 
43 Os 
640r 
4.46s 
643r 
442s 
647i 
438s 
65Ii 
435s 
654r 






25 

1 3( 

2 51 

4 10 

5 31 

6 54 

8 IP 

9 43 
II 4 
19 

24 
17 
59 
33 


23 
43 

2 

5 22 

6 4 
6 29 

6 59 

7 35 
S 18 
.1 9 

10 8 
IT 14 
Mrn 
26 3 



'J2. 



4 8 

4 3S 

5 4 
5 29 

5 54 

6 19 
8 46 

7 17 

7 55 

8 42 

9 38 
1042 
1151 
Mrn 

1 2 
13 
23 
31 

5 38 

6 45 

7 51 

8 55 

9 58 
1059 
1155 
46 

SO 
6 

2 37 
5 



1 42 3 30 




■^/2S2gJ2^^^-^ 



HOENSET CHUECH. 



18S8. 



^obember. 



80 Days. 



I'HASES OF THE MOON. 

"New Moon, 4th, 0-2 morn. 
First Quarter, 10th, 4-16 aft. 
Full Moon, 18th, 3-16 aft. 
Last Quarter. 2^th. 5--21 nit. 



A 



All Saints' Bay 
Sir G. F. BDwen born, 1821 
W. Enflelddied, 1797 
23r& Sun&aie after Urinitie 
Battle of Inlierinann, 185i 
Blackfriars B'dg op nd, '69 
Parkhouse explosion, 1882 
John Milton died, 1674 
Prince of Wales born, 1S41 
Martin Luthur barn. 1483 
24tb SunDas after XTrinits 
Half-quarter day 
Fearful storm in B'k Sea,'54 
Earl of Elgin died, 1841 
Domesday Book com'd, 1086 
John Bright born, 1811 
The " Cospatrick" burnt,'74 
25tb Sun&aig after Uvinits 
P, de Lesseps born, 1805 
Cape of Good Hops dis., 1497 
Sir J. Hawkins died, 1593 
The " Ville du Havre"lo3t, '73 
Fenians ex. at M'chester, '67 
Tasmania discovered, 164.2 
26tb Sun&aig after Urinit^ 
Bmp.Darmar of Russia b,'4!7 
Duchess of Teck born, 1833 
Times first prin'd by st'm, '14 
First L'donS. Board elect, '70 
St. Andrew 



63dr 3 

,39s . 

;5Jr5 

425s' 

3r 



SunI Moon. 



en D 



7r 
4.19s 
7101- 
416s 
714r 
413s 
7I7r 
410s 
721r 
4 7s 
72 ir 
4 5s 
727r 
4 2s 
73ir 
4. OS 
7341' 
35SS 
737r 
336- 






1 

22 

46 

12 

37 

59 

113 

13 



37 

2 7 

2 31 

2 61 

3 10 
3 2^ 

3 48 

4 9 
33 

5 1 

5 33 

6 13 

7 2 
7 58 

9 1 

10 9 
1121 

740r mm 
354S 35 
743ri 



5'^ 



353s 3 14 



3 54 

4 18 

4 43 

5 13 

5 49 

6 32 

7 25 

8 29 

9 39 
1051 
mrn 
3 

18 
21 
28 
35 
41 
8 46 

7 50 

8 52 

9 51 
1044 
1129 
8 

41 

1 9 
L 83 

1 56 
■2 19 

2 42 



1888. 



g camber. 



31 DATS. 



Phases op the Mook. 
New Moon, 3rd, 10-6 morn. 
First Quarter, 10th, 6-46 morn. 
Full Moon, 18th, 10-41 morn. 
Last Quarter, 26th. 6-0 vn^yn. 

i 

2 
3 
4 
5 



Sun 



Moon. 



^ o 



ji^ 



Princess of Wales burn, -it 7-t6r 
1st Sunba^ in B&vent 352- 

L'd Chief Jus.Coleridgeb. '20 749r 
Thomas Carlyle b., 1795 351t 
Alexandre Dumas die ', 1870 751r 
Battle of Cawnpore, 1857 350i- 
Sir R. Buller born, 1839 75 ir 
S^ir G. Birdwood b., 1832 349s 
2n& Shh&ss in Bbvent 756r 
King Leopold died, 1865 349s 
Archdeacon Denison b., '05 7.58r 
W. LI. Garrison born, 1804 3i9 
Lord J. Manners born, 1818 8 Or 
Prince Albert died, 1861 349s 
Isaak Walton died, 16S3 8 2r 
3r& Sunba>2 in H5vcnt 349s 

Oxford Mich. Term ends 8 4r 
Length of day, 7h. 46m. 350: 

Cam, Mich. Term ends 8 5r 

Lord Macaulay died, 1859 351s 
St. Thomas 8 6r 

(21) Ld.Beaconsfieldb., 04. 352s 
4tb Sun&a>2 in B&vent 8 7r 

W. M. Thackeray d., 1863 353s 
Cbristmas 2>as 8 8r 

Bank holiday 354y 

Joanna Southcott d., 1814 8 8r 
Earl Grey born, 1802 35fls 

W. E. Gladstone b., 1809 8 8r 
Sunba^j after Cbristmas 358s 
Leon Gambetta died, 1882 8 8r| 



i, 37 
5 3 
1 28 
S 48 
) 58 
1054 
ll:37 
3 10 
!) 36 

58 

1 18 
I 86 

1 55 
15 

2 37 
{ 8 

3 34 

4 12 

4 58 

5 52 

6 53 

7 59 
9 



3 8 

3 39 

4 18 

5 7 

6 9 

7 18 

8 33 

9 48 
11 1 
mi-n 

11 

1 19 

2 25 

3 31 

4 36 

5 41 

6 45 

7 -!5 

8 40 

9 29 
1010 
1044 

8 1114 



1020 1139 



1135 
mrn 
51 



1 
23 
44 



2 101 7 

3 32 1 35 

4 55 2 9 
6 17 2 51 



OUR ILLUSTRATIONS. 



Pangbourne, Bucks. 

As a residence for a time, Pangbourne has 
many attractions ; the scenery in the neighbour- 
hood is very beautiful, wiiilst lovers of the 
" gentle craft " may enjoy themselves here 
abundantly. Though Pangbourne is a very 
ancient place, being held, according to Dooms- 
clay Book, by Miles Grispin of William the 
Conqueror, no trace of its ancient features are 
now to be found. At one time Pangbourne was 
in the Abbacv of Reading ; at another owned by 
the unfortunate Duke of Somerset, who was 
executed in 1553. 

Fulham Church. 

In the parish of Pulham, Middlesex, is the 
palace of the Bishop of London, and in a quiet 
corner of the churchyard lies Theodore Hook, 
surrounded by bishops and abbots, and — 
"A great many more of a lesser degree. 
In sooth a goodly company." 

The list of bishops interred here may be forty, 
beginning with Irkenwald, bishop under Sigi- 
bert, king of the West Saxons, and Conrad, king 
of Mereians. But be they forty, more or less, no 
cultiu-ed Englishman can survey the graves of 
Sherlock and South here, and many more 
" whose works live after them," without feeling 
that this place is indeed a sacred shrine. 

Richmond Bridge. 

One of the most interesting roads in England, 
from its historical associations, crosses the 
Thames over Richmond Bridge. The town of 
Richmond itself is full of interest, and the whole 
district is studded with attractions of the most 
picturesque kinds. Besides the Royal Family 
of England, for many generations, it has been 
the residence of Bolingbroke, Pope, Thomson, 
Sir Joshvia Reynolds, Horace Walpole, Garrick, 
and Colman. Thomson's remains were interred 
in Richmond Church, as were also those of 
Edmiuid Kean. Perhaps in England there is no 
single view so beautiful as that obtained from 
Richmond Hill; nay, it is even claimed that 
there is no view more beautiful in the world. 
Such is the opinion expressed by many foreigners 
who have beheld the landscape attractions of 
many lands. No doubt there is much scenery 
more magnificent, broader, more extensive in 
every Avay, but none so lovely within similar 
limits. 

Ilfracombe. 

Ilfracombe is a parish, seaport, and market 
town in Devonshire, 48 miles I^.W. by N. of 
Exeter. It is at the northern extremity of the 
county, bordering on Bristol Channel. The 
town is chiefly important as a resort for pleasure 
seekers and invalids, who use its warm baths ; 
and as a haven for wind-bound vessels, which 
can put in here when it is dangerous for them to 
enter the mouth of the Taw. Nature and art 
seem to jointly combine in forming the harbour, 
which appears like a natural basin, and is almost 
surrounded by craggy heights, overspread with 



foliage. On three sides the rocks rise in a semi- 
circular sweep ; on the fourth, a bold mass of 
rock stretches nearly half way across the mouth 
of the recess, afl:ording pi'otection to the little 
cove from the northern tempest. This rock, 
which is called the Lantern Hill, and is situated 
on the north side of the harbour, rises nearly to 
a point, and beai's on its summit a lighthouse, 
somewhat in the style of an ecclesiastical struc- 
tiu'e. There is a pier he^e 850 feet in length, 
which was partly built hy Sir Bourchier Wrey, 
the lord of the manor. 

Dartmouth C&stle. 

Dartmouth Castle is not large, and but thinly 
mounted with cannon. It stands in a situation 
highly beautiful, and is siirrounded by a 
number of rich oaks, from the midst of which, 
adding greatly to the picturesque scene, spring 
up the tower and spire of a small church. 
" The view towards the mouth of the harbour," 
observes Dr. Maton, " exhibits such a happy 
assemblage of objects for a picture, that it is, 
perhaps, scarcely to be exceeded. A rocky knoll, 
projecting from the shore, nT^kes an admirable 
fore-ground. One of the side screens is formed 
by the picturesque castle with the adjoining 
church, just emerging from a fine wood, which 
em'iches the right-hand side ; the other, a high 
promontory, with a fort at its feet ; whilst the 
main sea appears in front through a narrow 
opening, and leaves nothing for the imagination 
to wish for in the composition." The vestiges of 
another castle, of a circular form, more ancient, 
but not so strong, are visible at the south end of 
the town. 

Hornsey Church. 

Hornsey is a parish and village in Pinsbury 
division of the himdred of Ossulstone, the former 
including the hamlets of Crouch End, Muswell 
Hill, Stroud Green, a considerable part of High- 
gate, and a part of Pinehley Common. It is 
remarkable for its rural character. The circum- 
jacent country is eminently attractive, by its 
soft ranges of hills : and the New River, which 
meanders through the parish, forms, at many 
points, a beautiful object. Hornsey Church is a 
plain structure of stone, erected about the year 
1500. At the west end is a weighty square to'wei*, 
with graduated buttresses, and an octagonal 
embattled turret at one angle. The interior 
comprises a chancel, nave, and south aisle. The 
aisle is divided from the nave by a range of 
pillars, supporting broad, but pointed arches. 
Here are numerous monuments, but none of a 
very striking character. 



Cool. — A countryman took his seat at an 
hotel table opposite a gentleman who was 
indulging in a bottle of wine. Supposing the 
wine to be common property, our unsophis- 
ticated country friend helped himself to it 
with the gentleman's glass. "That's cool," 
exclaimed the owner of the wine, indignantly. 
"Yes," replied the other, "I should think 
there was ice in it.' ' 



The Protective Effect of Vaccination. 

Dr.Henry Tomkins. medical superintendent of 
the fevei' hospital belonging to the Manchester 
Royal Infirmary at Monsall, in a paper which he 
read at Owen's College, said: — ''The most 
striking of all evidence is, perhaps, Uthat 
derived from the smallpox hospitals themselves. 
Here the protective influence of vaccination is 
seen and proved in a manner beyond alhcavil. 
At Highgate, ^lunng an experience of ""iO years, 
no nurse or servant having been re-vaccinated 
has ever contracted disease, and evidence of the 
same character I can myself bring forward, for 
during the whole time that I have.had charge of 
the fever hospital more than a thousand cases of 
smallpox have passed under my care, yet no 
sjrvant, nurse, porter, or other person engaged 
t'lere, has, after re-vaccination, ever taken it, 
though exposed daily to infection in iti most 
concentrated form. One woman, a laundress 
who escaped vaccination, took the disease and 
died ; one nurse, who some years before had 
sallered from smallpox, and was then considered 
protected, had a very mild attack ; and this 
summer a Avorkman, who did not live on the 
premises, but came in to work as a painter, was 
not vaccinated, and had rather a severe attacsi ; 
and still more recently a servant, who by an 
oversight was allowed to go about her work three 
days before being vaccinated, had, before the 
latterhad run its course, a slight abortive attack. 
Again, among all the students who during the 
p ist two years have attended the hospital for 
clinical instructions, not one has suffered, all 
hiving been re-vaccinated before being per 
mitted to enter the smallpox wards. And in 
their case the false argument which opponents cf 
vaccination have brought forward to explain the 
immunity enjoyed by nurses and others in 
attendance on the sick, viz., that constant Inter- 
course and exposure to infection renders them 
proof against it by the system becoming inured 
to the poison, cannot be applied, as these gentle- 
men attend the hospital only a few hours once a 
week. I d fy the most enthusiastic or con- 
pcientious of anti-vaccinators to produce evidence 
like this on his side of the question, or to bring 
forward even half a dozen persons, choose them 
whence he may, who have not been protected 
against smallpox, and expose them as the 
students are exposed, without more or less of the 
number taking the disease. Facts such as these 
should convert the most ardent anti-vaccinator 
from his folly, and convince him that aweaponof 
defeiceso powerful as vaccination should not be 
left to the ])leasure of the individual, but that 
the State has the right and duty to look after its 
mos thorough performance." 

The Wonders of Physios. 
\Yliat mere assertion will make any man 
believe that in one second of time, in one beat of 
tho pendulum of a clock, a ray of light travels 
over 192,000 miles, and would, therefore, per- 
form the tour of the world in about the same 
time that it requires to wink with our eyelids, 
and in much less than a swift runner occupies 
in taking a single stride ! What mortal can be 
made to believe, without demonstration, that 
the sun is almost a million times larger than 
the earth P and that, although so remote from us 
that a cannon ball shot directly towards it and 
maintaining its full sp ed would be twenty years 



in reaching it, it yet affects the earth by its 
attraction in an inappreciable instant of time ? 
Who would not ask for demonstration when told 
that a gnat's wing, in its ordinary flight, beats 
many hundred times in a second ? Or, that there 
exists animated and regularly organised beings, 
many thousands of whose bodies laid close 
together would not extend an inch? But what 
are these to the astonishing truths which modern 
optical inquiries have disclosed, which teach us 
that every point of a medium through which a 
ray of light passes is effected with a succession 
of periodical movements, regularly recurring at 
equal intervals, no less than 500 millions of 
times in a single second ? That it is by such 
movements communicated to the nerves 
of our eyes that we see— nay, more, that it is 
the difference in the frequency of their recur- 
rence which affects us with the sense of tlie 
diversity of colour — that, for instance, n 
acquiring the sensation of redness our eyes are 
affected 482 millions of millions of times, and of 
violet 707 millions of millions of times per 
second P Do not such things sound more like 
the ravings of a madman than the sober con- 
clusions of people in their waking senses P 
They are, nevertheless, conclusions to which 
any one may most certainly arrive who will only 
be at the trouble of examining the chain of 
reasoning by which they have been obtained. 



Superstitions of Sailors. 

Sailors, as is well known, have a gru^t 
antipathy to commencing a voyage on a Friday, 
and even although the weather and tide may be 
exceptionally in their favour, they prefer to 
postpone setting sail till the following day. 
Thvis, as Southey justly remarks, many a good 
ship has lost that tide which might hive led to 
fortune, because the captain and the crew 
thought it unlucky to begin their voyage on a 
Friday. In this respect, however, they are not 
different from other classes, their being in most 
countries a widespread aversion to this day. 
Indeed, in France this superstition is carried to 
such an extravagant height, that not only is th,e 
number of travellers by rail much smaller thatii" 
on other days, but the difference is also 
materially felt in the receipts of the omnibuses. 
That this superstition retains its hold on the 
seafaring community was prove I in the year 
1871, when, in consequence of the loss of the ill- 
fated turret ship Captain, which had left port on 
a Friday, the Agincourt, in order to satisfy the 
clamour of the crew, did not leave Gibraltar 
on tlie presumedly fatal day. The departure of 
the last-named warship on the Saturday did 
not prevent her strikins on the Pearl Rock a 
short time afterwards. This fact might perhaps 
stagger Jack's faith for a moment ; but super- 
stition is tougher than actual experience in 
many of its phases, and Friday will still be a 
black-letter day in the sailor's calendar Even 
at the present day. too, many a sailor shudders 
to commence his voyage if he should happen to 
sneeze on the left side at the moment of em- 
barking ; whereas to sneeze on the right side is 
thought to betoken a favourable voyage. It is 
considered, moreover, a very unlucky occurrence 
if anyone accidentally numbers the sailors on 
board — on the same principle, no doubt that 
many persons have a superstitious dread of 
counting their gaius.— Leisure Hour. 



The Leaning Tower of Pisa. 

Whether by accident or design— no one can 
now tell— the inclination of the structure makes 
it look and feel to the visitor as if it were about 
to fall. It is 180 feet high, and 13 feet out of the 
perpendicular. This is stated everywhere, and 
is no doubt true ; but I suppose there are many 
persons who, like myself, expected to see a 
building standing erect, the centre of whose top 
was outside the centre of gravity. This is not 
the case by any means. It is true that a rope 
fallingfrom the centre of the top would strike the 
wall at the bottom of the tower side ; but the rope 
would not fall outside the tower wall. In a short 
time I satisfied myself and two other visitors of 
this fact. The apparent contradiction of the 
law of nature disappears then m a moment. 
Taking the building as a whole— letting a line 
fall from the centre of the top— if this line fell 
outside of the base, in that case the building 
would violate the law of gravity if it remained 
standing. I believe the architect planned this 
optical delusion. There are no signs of any 
giving way in the structure — no crack or crevice, 
gives evidence of rapid or slow settling of the 
walls. The architect knew very well how 
easily the eye can be deceived. The firmness of 
the masonry, the gradual ascent, the symmetry 
of the whole, prove beyond a doubt that it was 
built as it now stands. The walls below are 
very thick, and unless these should give way 
there is but one other method by which the 
building could be overthrown. If the stones 
were to slip from their places then little by 
little it would be dislodged ; but the whole 
structure is keyed and bolted and cemented into 
a solid mass. If it leaned nine feet more than 
it does, then it would fall, because the sum of 
its weight would fall outside of the centre of 
gravity. The mystery disappears at once when 
we examine it : but the curious effect upon one's 
nerves in making the ascent and standing on 
the top is nevertheless real. — Correspondent of 
American paper. 

The Holy City of Kairouan. 

Kairou^n was founded about twelve centuries 
ago by the immediate followers of the Prophet 
Mahomet, it having been at first a halting place 
for some scattered parties of his adherents 
whom his death had dispersed. Kairouan is the 
same word which we have corrupted into 
caravan — a body of travellers — and thus the 
derivation of the city's name is obvious. The 
bones of many of those who spoke and lived and 
fought with the Prophet have lain within the 
city undisturbed through all these twelve 
hundred years, in spite of the varying fortunes 
of cause and of country. It is easy to 
understand how the presence of these relics 
renders the city which contains them holy ; and 
so jealously guarded is the sanctity of their 
precincts that very few Christians have ever 
heen admitted within the walls. The few 
European travellers who have entered Kairouan 
have (with one solitary exception) been 
authorised to do so by the reigning sovereign of 
the country, have been the bearers of letters of 
recommendation to the Governor of the Holy 
City, and have been accompanied to its gates by 
a mounted escort, and in later times usually, as 
an additional security, by a dragoman of the 



consul of their own nation. Kairouan was 
formerly the capital of all the Barbary States. 
It is built entirely of brick, with the exception 
of the great mosque, of which I shall have to 
speak presently. The city walls which are 
thick and strong, are of the same material.' As 
a defence against modern artillery, they are 
probably not worth speaking of at all : but 
without that, even a strong and well armed 
force would find it difficult to make Kairouan 
open its gates, if a handful of determined 
defenders had resolved to keep them closed. 
The population is about fifteen thousand souls, 
but there is this peculiarity about the place, 
that by day there is always neafly double that 
number within its-walls. Kairouan is in the 
centre of a district containing the flower of the 
tribes— the busiest, the best mounted, the most 
prosperous— who throng its streets from dawn 
to dark, bringing their own products for sale, 
and buying largely of the goods manufactured 
in the city. It is, in fact not only a Holy City, 
but, for the Arabs, a great business centre. 
There is an important market there for sheep, 
cattle, and all beasts of draught or burthen, 
especially camels ; and this is held daily in a 
great open square in the city, and not on one 
day in the week only, as is the case in most of 
the Tunisian towns or villages Avhere such 
markets are held. The staple products of the 
town are articles in brass and copper, Avoollen 
goods, and hand-made carpets of fine quality. 
For these Kairouan has been celebrated 
almost from the time of its foundation twe've 
centuries back. Among the tombs of Kairouan, 
some of which are fine edifices externallj, but 
which, of course, no Christian is allowed to ap- 
proach, are those of the barber of the Prophet, 
and of the niece of Sidi Ameer, Mahomet's 
trusted minister and friend.— ^ZZ the Year 
Bound. 

MisLEADiNa Names and Woeds. — The 
Providence Journal calls attention to some 
curiosities of misnomer. Black lead is not lead 
at all, but a compound of carbon and a small 
quantity of iron. Brazilian grass never grew in 
Brazil, and is not grass ; it is nothing but stripes 
of palm leaf. Burgundy pitch is not pitch, and 
does not come from Burgundy ; the greater part 
of it is resin and palm oil. Catgut is made from 
the entrails of sheep. Cuttle-bone is not bone, 
but a kind of chalk once enclosed in the fossil 
remains of extinct specimens of cuttle-fish. 
German-silver was not invented in Germany, 
and does not contain a particle of silver. 
Cleopatra's Needle was not erected by the 
Egyptian queen, nor in her honour. Pompey's 
Pillar had no historical connection with Pom- 
pey in any Avay. Sealing-wax does not contain 
a particle of wax, but is composed of Venice 
turpentine, shellac, and cinnabar. The tube- 
rose is no rose, l»ut a species of polyanthus. 
Turkish baths did not originate in Turkey, and 
are not baths, but heated chambers. Whalebone 
is not bone, and is said not to possess a single 
property of bone. 

A literary lady, expressing to Dr. Johnson her 
approbation of his Dictionary, and in particular, 
her satisfaction at his not admitting into it any 
improper words. " No, madam," replied he, "I 
hope I have not soiled my fingers ; I find, how- 
ever, that you have been looking for them." 



Tornadoes in America. 

The destructive effect of a recent tornado 
in Minnesota led the editor of the American 
Architect to invite information from various 
sources as to this class of phenomena Among 
the contributions is a valuable collation of data 
by Gen. Hazen, of the Signal Service. It ap- 
pears that in the passage of those cyclones or 
tornadoes, wind pressures of various amounts, 
from 181b. to 1121b. per square foot, have been 
demonstrated by destruction of bridges, brick 
buildings, &c. The upward pressures are some- 
times as great as the horizontal, and even 
greater. Downward pressures or movements of 
wind have not been clearly proved. Upward 
velocities of 135 miles per hour seem to be not 
unusual, and horizontal velocities of 80 miles 
have been recorded with the anemometer. The 
destructive wind velocities are confined to 
very small areas. A destruction of fences, trees, 
&c., is often visible over a path many miles long, 
and a few hundred yarJs wide ; but the path of 
greatest violence is very much narrower, The 
excessive cases above referred to are observed 
only in small isolated spots, less than l^Oft. 
square, unequally distributed along the middle 
of the track. Thus, in very large buildings, only 
a small part is subject to destructive winds. In 
different parts of thi^ area of maximum severity 
the winds are simultaneously blowing in 
different, perhaps opposite, directions, the 
resultant tending not to overturn or carry off or 
crush in, but rather to twist round a vertical 
axis. Buildings are generally lifted and turned 
round before being toria to pieces. As the 
chances are very small that a building will be 
exposed to the violent twisting action, it is 
evidently the average velocity of rectilinear 
winds within the path of moderate destruction 
that it is most necessary to provide against in 
ordinary structures. These winds may attain a 
velocity of 80 miles an kour over an area, 1,00 'ft, 
broad and generally blow from the south- vest, 
the next in frequency blow from the north- 
west. The time during which an object is 
exposed to the same destructive winds varies 
from six to 60 seconds ; the general average of a 
large number of cases is 16 seconds. An ex- 
posed building experiences but one stroke, like 
the blow of a hammer, and the destruction is 
done. Hence, in a suspension bridge, chimney, 
or other structure liable to be set into destruc- 
tive rhythmic vibrations, the maximum winds 
do not produce such vibrations. The duration 
of the heavy south-west or north-west winds 
over the area of moderate destruction is rarely 
over two minutes. The motion of translation of 
the central spout of a tornado, in which there is 
a strong vertical current, is, on an average, 
at the rate of 30 miles an hour. The relative 
frequency of tornadoes is, in order of decreasing 
frequency, July, May, June . . . January, 
December. In the geographical distribution of 
247 tornadoes from 1794 to 1~;78, the largest 
figures are obtained for New York (24). 
Indiana (2>), Illinois, (20), Ohio and Georgia 
(16 each). &c., but the records are fragmentary. 
The largest number of tornadoes apparently 
occur between 4 p.m. and 5 p.m., the next 
between 5 p.m. and 6 p.m. 

Reading. — No entertainment is so cheap as 
reading, nor any pleasm-e so lasting.— iat/T/ 
Ilary Wortley Montague. 



The Pall Mall Gazette tells the following 
story of Turner on the authority of a living 
artist. Turner happening one day to pass a 
print shop noticed in the window a copy of one 
of the engravings from his famous. " Liber 
Studiorum." The print was in a very dh'ty, 
ragged state, and Turner naturally felt aggrieved 
at seeing the work of his hands in this dilapidated 
condition. Entering the shop, he asked to see 
the master, and when the ma'i came forward 
Turner proceeded at once to blame him in no 
measured terms for having neglected so valu- 
able a print, and for having allowed it to become 
so disfigured. The man protested that it was no 
fault of his, as he did but offer the engraving 
for sale in the same state in which he had bought 
it from some other dealer. This did not satisfy 
Turner, however, and he and the man continued 
arguing in this fashion for some time, each 
making the other more angry by contradiction. 
At last the printseller lost all patience. 
" Perhaps, sir," he said, " when you have quite 
finished what you have to say you will kindly 
tell me what you have to do with this engrav- 
ing ? and what business is it of yours whether* 
the print is clean or dirty?'' " This is what I 
have to do with it," answered the enraged 
artist: " It was I who drew the original of that 
print, my name is Turner, and I did every line 
of that engraving with my own hand. Now, do 
you wonder that I am angry at seeing my work 
in so disgraceful a state?" " Indeed, sir," 
replied the printseller, " so you are the great 
artist himself. All my life long it has been my 
wish that I might some day have the good 
fortune to see Mr. Turner. And now that I 
have seen him, I sincerely hope that I may 
never see him any more." 

The Salt NESS of the Sea is one of its 
mostdistinctivecharacteristics. Besides muriate 
of soda, it contains several other substances, as 
muriatic and sulphuric acid, soda, manganese, 
and sulphate of lime ; these ingredients give to 
sea water that saltness and bitterness of taste 
which render it' disagreeable and unfit for the 
use of man. The sea waters do not hold in 
solution equal amounts of saline matter, the 
water as tested in one locality being in excess of 
that in another. The degree of saltness in 
particular localities varies from temporary 
causes such as the violent tropical rains which 
are collected in the great streams, and re'iurned 
again to the ocean free of saline particles. In 
several places it is found to be less salt at the 
surface than at considerable depths ; and, 
owing to the melting of large masses of ice, it is 
said to be less salt near th*^. poles. The amount 
of saline matter is greatest at a distance from the 
shores, where the ocean is not diluted by the 
volumes of fresh water brought down by rivers. 

Hints on Health. - Any kind of fluid 
largely taken at a meal, or soon after is 
positively injurious to health. A dish of fresh 
water should be kept in every room where the e 
is a fire, especially an open fire. The water 
absorbs the gas arising from the coal and other 
impurities in the air. In clothing the great 
thing is to vary the character and amount 
according to the season, avoiding the extremes 
of always being swathed m flannel, no matter 
what the temperature, or of never wearing 
flannel at all. 



Some Queer Dishes. 

Amongst mammals and birds, it is difficult to 
; say what species are not eaten in the countries 
? where they abound. Probably the big cats ani 
I dogs would be exceptions, thoxxgh one hears now 
I and then of mighty hunters broiling a steak 
, from the lion which has just fallen a victim to 
I their powder and shot ; but in China and other 
parts of the East the smaller domestic varieties 
are recognised luxuries of the table, and are 
exposed for sale as such in the markets. In a 
country so over-populated as China, every morsel 
of any substance that is edible is eagerly sought 
out and devoured, so that not only cats and 
dogs, but rats, mice, slugs, and almost every 
living thing in earth, air, or water, go to feed 
the half-starved masses. Rats are split open, 
dried, pressed, and powdered with a finely- 
ground white bark, which gives them the ap- 
pearance of haddocks as they hang in long 
strings over the vendor's stall. The birds' 
nests, convertible into soup, so often quoted, 
must not be confounded with the industrial 
products of our own starlings and thrushes, 
which might be boiled a long time without 
yielding much nourishment, unless the bird 
happens to be inside ; edible nests really consist 
of a kind of isinglass, and are constructed by a 
small sea bird out of the gelatinous bones of 
dead and decaying fish. Most of them are 
brought from some caverns on the seashore 
north of Shanghai; but they are not very 
plentiful, and there is no great demand for 
them. The soup is thick, slimy, and glutinous, 
and is neither so nasty as might be expected 
nor as nice as could be desired. I have been 
vividly reminded of it in Brittany by a decoction 
of '■ escargots edibles "—land snails. By-fche- 
way, the dogs most in favour with the Chinese 
as ''butcher-meat" are those curious hairless 
ones, of which a good idea may be formed by 
looking at the magnificent pair of E.ampoor 
hounds presented by the Prince of Wales to the 
Zoological Gardens in Regent's Park on his 
return from India. How this hairless breed 
originated is a mystery, but they are found in 
many tropical countries, and are there usually 
highly prized by their owners ; though 
extremely delicate and susceptible of cold, they 
appear to be free from disease — at any rate, the 
skin is healthy and the baldness not in any way 
dependent on existing morbid conditions The 
tradition is that these naked creatures are the 
descendants of the sacred dogs worshipped by 
the ancient Egyptians ; and that the peculiarity 
originated from their being kept perpetually in 
the temples, and bred in and in for centuries. — 
Chambers' s Journal. 



Lead Poisoning from Water and 
Beer Pipes. 

During a meeting of the Manchester Literary 
and Philosophical Society, Mr. Wm. Thomson, 
P.R.S.E., submitted some notes on the subject 
of lead poisoning. He said that tin-lined lead 
pipes are used to a large extent, and principally 
in making communication between the beer in 
the cask and the pump on the counters of beer 
retailers. "Such pipes," he adds, "would 
give the idea of safety, but it is clear that many 
samples may be of such a nature as to con- 
taminate beer with lead to a large extent, as 



the beer contains a certain amount of free acid 
which would in all probability be capable 
of dissolving the lead ; and one would expect 
that the person who consumes the first glass of 
beer from the pump in the morning would get 
that which had remained overnight in the pipe, 
and would imbibe, therefore, a considerable 
quantity— depending on the quality of the tin- 
Iming — of the poisonous metal." In order to 
test whether this was really the case, Mr. 
Thompson obtained some samples of beer drawn 
in the morning from pumps, and found ' ' a 
considerable proportion of lead " to be present 
in each. He obtained a number of samples of 
tin-lined lead pipe from different manufacturers, 
and tested the purity of the tin lining, but 
failed to find one which was not contaminated 
with lead, and which did not contaminate 
water, when left in contact with it for two or 
three days, to a greater or less extent. '' The 
majority contained a large percentage of lead, 
and polluted the water to a great extent." As 
regards another kind, called " tinned-lead pipe," 
the inside of which is covered with a thin 
coating of white metal to afford protection 
against the action of water, Mr. Thomson finds 
as a matter of fact this coating is a mixture of 
lead and tin. He expresses the opinion that 
tin-coated lead pipe is much better adapted 
for use in making communication with the 
water mains in large towns than the ordinary 
lead pipe. Testing their respective values with 
water containing a small proportion of nitrate 
of ammonia, he found , at the end of three hours, 
that the water from the tinned-lead pipe con- 
tained a large proportion of lead in solution. 
In some boroughs this tinned-lead pipe con- 
tained only a trace of lead, whilst that from the 
ordinary lead pipe contained a large proportion 
of lead in solution. In some boroughs this 
tinned-lead pipe is the only kind allowed to be 
used for making communications with the main. 
In other places, Manchester included, ordinary 
lead pipe is generally employed. Mr. Thomson 
has lately observed that the lead pipes which 
have been in use in Manchester for many years 
contaminate water left m them overnight to a 
considerable extent. In Salford, where the 
tinned pipes are employed, he finds the water 
slightly contaminated with lead, but much less 
so than in Manchester. His experience during 
the last few years serves to show "that 
aerated waters are contaminated with lead much 
more often, and in many cases to a much greater 
extent, than one would expect, considering the 
care which is bestowed by good firms on the 
manufacture of these articles." He advises that 
the ordinary carbonate of soda, made by 
Solvay's ammonia process, should be used in the 
preparation of aerated waters, and that the 
salts which it is impossible to obtain free from 
lead should be dissolved in water and filtered or 
boiled with animal charcoal. 



The oldest pieces of wrought iron which are 
known are probably, according to Fortschr der 
Zeit, the sickles which were found by Belzoni 
under the pedestal of the Sphinx in Karnac, 
near Thebes, the blades which Wyse found 
imbedded in the wall of the Great Pyramid, and 
the piece of a saw which Layard dug up at 
Nimrod. These remains are novr owned by the 
British Museum. 



Eyesight, Good and Bad, 

It is not a little remarkable that altliougli 
eyesight is perhaps the most valuable of the 
senses, the majority of th-^ pwblic, so far from 
taking especial care of it, run great risks of 
losing it. The eye is the most wonderful organ 
in the body ; but ninety -nine persons out of a 
hundred are only aware of its value when it 
gives painful evidence of its presence, or, 
through failing powers, compels them to pay- 
some little attention to a possession which should 
never be neglected. 

Every eye-surgeon is day after day repeating to 
successive patients precepts and injunctions 
which should be not only universally known, but 
obeyed, for though, there are many manuals on 
the care of the eyes, it is remarkable with what 

Eersistence old and erroneous ideas retain their 
old on the minds of even intelligent persona. 
Likening the eye to the photographer's camera, 
the image produced on the retina is precisely 
analogous to that which is produced on the 
sensitive plate. By means of the optic nerve, 
the retina is in dii*ect connection with tiie brain, 
which interprets the visual appearances and 
completes the act of seeing— how, we do not 
at present know. It is clear that if the image 
on the retina is blurred or imperfect, the brain 
cannot remedy the defect ; accurate seeing is 
impossible, though as a matter of fact the 
brain does do a great deal to compensate for 
the imperfect optical condition of the eye which 
exists to a greater or a lesser extent in the 
majority of mankind. 

The image of an object falls, as we have 
said, on the retina in the normal eye ; but eyes 
differ, and it is only when the focal length and 
the axial length of the eye are precisely the 
same that the focus of the parellel rays proceed- 
ing from the object falls pi'ecisely upon the 
retina. Such an eye is said to be emmetropic, 
or in measure, while one in which the axial 
length does not correspond with the focal is 
ametropic, or " out of measure." The eye may 
be out of measure in two opposite directions ; 
if the axial length is shorter than the focal 
the rays of light will be brought to a 
focus behind the retina, and we have what is 
called the flat-eye, or hypermetropia ; if, on the 
contrary, the ball of the eye is too long from 
back to front, the rays are brought to a focus in 
front of the retina, and we have a case of 
myopia, or short-sight. Hypermetropia is cor- 
rected by the use of convex lenses, which 
converge the rays and bring them to a forcus on 
the retina, while myopia is corrected by con- 
cave lenses, which diverge the rays and bring 
them to a focus on the more distant retina. 
It is clear that as the amount of hypermetropia 
and myopia must vary in degree, it is of the first 
importance that spectacles should be specially 
adapted to the eyes they are intended to assist. 

^The modern system of measuring the power 
the sight is as accurate and as simple as need 
be, for it is based on a unit represented by the 
French metre, or say forty English inches. 
That is called one dioptric, and the eye which 
can distinguish clearly a certain-sized type at 
that distance is considered normal. No. 2 lens is 
of double the power of the dioptric and half its 
focal length ; that is its focal length is half a 
metre, or twenty inches. Hence it is equal to 
the old l-20th, and No. 4 is the old 1-lOth, and 
so on, half and quarter dioptrics being intro- 



duced in the lower part of the scale to meet the 
requirements of practice. ^ The plus sign is 
used to signify convex lenses, and the minus 
sign for concave. Thus opticians have an 
easily-understood nomenclature and scale to 
which they can readily work. "With the human 
eye we have what is termed a noar-point and a 
far-point, the former being the closest distanGe 
at which vision is clear, and the latter the 
jfarthest. Between these two points the 
accommodation of the eye is brought about by 
til. 3 action of the ciliary muscle upon the 
crystalline lens, the curves of which it alters to 
adapt them to the distance of the object to be 
viewed. As we advance in life the crystalline 
lens loses its elasticity, and the power cf 
accommodation diminishes, until at the age of 
seventy -five the eye become passive and the near 
point is removed to an infinite distance, and we 
have the phenomenon known as presbyopia or 
aged sight, which occurs in all eyes sooner or 
later. 

The Greatest of Engineering Feats. 

The Eorth Bridge is regarded by some persons 
as likely to be the greatest engineering feat of 
either ancient or modern times, Wilh refer- 
ence to its gigantic dimensions, or rather its 
enormous height, attention has just been 
drawn to it in comparison with Tennant's 
chimney at St. Rollox Chemical "Works, which 
is 430 ft. high from the level of the ground. - If 
100 ft. be added to that, then there will be 
obtained the height of one of the piers for the 
bridge, that on Inch Garvie, the small island in 
the centre of the Forth where the structure is 
to be reared. Then, placing another pillar or 
column of the same height at Sighthill Cemetery 
Gate, and one at the Asylum for the Blind— 
the former to the north of the chimney, and the 
other in a direct line to the south— some idea of 
the three piers may be formed which are 
intend d to support the suspension bridge, these 
piers being 1,600 feet separate from each other. 
It is thus seen that there are to be 1 wo spsns 
used in bridging the river. Again, it is said, 
imagine the bridge suspended at such an 
elevation (180ft. above high-w^ater mark) so as 
to allow the largest ship afloat to sail under- 
neath, and a scene is presented to the mind 
enough to make even the boldest holdhis breath. 
The Tay Bridge is a grand affair, but it sinks 
into insignificance when compared with the 
Forth ^viA^e.— Engineering. 

Oeigix of the Swiss "Watchmaking 
Trade.— The history of the introduction of the 
first watch to Chaux-de-Fonds is interesting 
enough. It was brought thither, towards the 
end of the seventeenth centurj, by a cattle 
dealer, and excited much wonder among the 
herdsmen and charcoal burners. But, alas, it 
had not the gift of perpetual motion, and one 
day there was great distress for the wheels had 
stopped. Thereupon a young smith named 
Daniel Jean Richard, who was of an inquiring 
turn of mind, set himself to take the little 
machine to pieces. He succeeded perfectly, 
restored it to life, and thenceforward was 
possessed with the desire of making watches 
himself. After a thousand trials and difficulties 
success crowned his labours, and in the end he 
became the father and founder of what is now a 
most important mnxmidiCinve.— London Society. 



.J^ 



Star-Lore. 

The Bushmen, almost the lowest tribe of 
South Africa, have the same star- lore and much 
the same myths as the Greeks, Australians, 
Egyptians, and Esquimaux. 

According to Dr. Bleek, "stars, and even 
tke sun and moon, were once mortals 
on earth, or even animals or inorganic sub- 
stances, which happened to get translated to 
the skies. The sun was once a man, Avhose 
armpit radiated a limited amount of light round 
his house. Some children threw him into the 
skv, and there he shines." The Homeric hymn 
lo'Helios, in the same way, as Mr. Max Miiller 
observes," looks on the sun as a half god, almost 
a hero, who had once lived on earth." The 
pointers of the Southern Cross were " two men 
who were lions," just as Callisto, in Arcadia, 
Vy^as a woman who was a bear. It is not at all 
rare in those queer philosophies, as in that of the 
Scandinavians, to And that the sun or moon has 
been a man or woman. In Australian fable 
the moon was a man, the sun a woman of 
indifferent character, who appears at dawn in a 
coat of red kangaroo skins, the present of an 
admirer. In an old Mexican text the moon was 
a man, across whose face a god threw a rabbit, 
thus making the marks in the moon. Among 
the Esquimaux the moon is a girl who 
always flies from the cruel brother, the sun, 
because he disfigured her face. Among the New 
Zealanders and North American Indians the 
sun is a great beast, whom the hunters trapped 
and thrashed with cudgels. His blood is used 
in some New Zealand incantations. The Red 
Indians, as Schoolcraft says, " hold many of the 
planets to be transformed adventurers." The 
lowas "believed stars to be a sort of living 
creatures." One of them came down and talked 
to a hunter, and showed him where to find game. 
The Gallinomeros of Central California, accord- 
to Mr. Bancroft, believe that the sun and moon 
were made and lighted up by the hawk and the 
coyote, who one day flew into each other's 
faces in the dark , and were determined to prevent 
such accidents in future. But the very oddest 
example of the survival of the notion that the 
stars are men or women is found in the " Pax " 
of Aristophanes. Trygaeus in that comedy has 
just made an expedition to heaven. A slave 
meets him and asks him, " Is not the story true, 
then, that we become stars when we die ?" The 
answer is '• Certaiiijy ;" and Trygaeus points out 
the star into which los of Chios has just been 
metamorphosed. Aristophanes is making fun of 
some popular Greek superstition. But that 
very superstition meets us in New Zealand. 
" Heroes," says Mr. Taylor, "were thought to 
become stars of greater or less brightness, 
accordiag to the number of their victims slain 
in fight."— Co7'nhiU Magazine. 

About Fleas. 

The perfect insects, as is well kiiwvn, feed 
upon the blood of warm-blooded animals, and, 
as a rule, each species of flea is allotted to 
some particular species or group of species of 
mammals or birds. The insects conceal them- 
selves amongst the hairs or feathers of the 
animal on whose blood they are destined to feed, 
and generally stick to this comfortable and con- 
venient dwelling place for the remainder of 
their joint lives ; but it is curious to see how 



soon after the host is killed, the parasites 
escape from its body and show manifest signs of 
perturbation. The common flea is the best 
known species, from its habit of drawing its 
supplies of food from our own persons. The 
fleas of the dog and cat are distinct, and are 
chiefly confined to those animals, although they 
do not disdain to vary their diet occasionally 
with human blood. Other species are still more 
particularly limited to certain animals, such as 
the squirrel, the hedgehog, the mole, mice and 
rats, and bats. The common fowl also has its 
particular flea ; another infests pigeons, whilst 
others are found m the nests of small birds and 
swallows. The largest British species lives on 
the badger, and measuring an eighth of an inch 
long; an American species is two lines in 
length, and a still larger species is described as 
infesting the Australian porcupine ant-eater. 
The common flea varies a good deal in size in 
different localities. Very large specimens are 
said to occur about the bathing accommodations 
of some watering places, and the flea of the old 
reading room of the British Museum used to be 
noted for its magnitude and blocdthirstiness. 
The muscular strength of the flea is exceedingly 
great. They perfoim the most astonishing 
leaps, covering at a single bound a space many 
times the length of their own bodies, a faculty 
which enables them to vanish in the most 
wonderful manner at the approach of the finger 
of an intending captor. This extraordinary 
muscular energy has been taken advantage of in 
a very curious manner. Fleas have been 
trained to drag small coaches and other objects 
to which they were harnessed, and to perform 
other tricks, when they were exhibited to an 
admiring public under the title of "industrious 
fleas." — CasseU's Natural History. 

Sanguinary Character of Scottish 
History. 

There is a character in Scottish history which 
renders it . attractive to some persons and 
repulsive to others. The story of the kings and 
of the nation is gloomy, turbulent, sanguinary. 
The chronicle from Kenneth MacAlpine to 
Mary Stuart is one of crimes, son'ows, and 
misfortunes. Few of the Scottish kings died on 
their thrones or in their beds Crownless 
monarchs yield their last breath in captivity, or 
are. killed in battle, or they are thrust from 
greatness into a monastery, From the successor 
of Kenneth down to Donald Bane and Duncan 
II. — a period of nearly a century and a half— no 
one king of Scotland came to a peaceful end. 
Of the dozen and a half of succeeding monarchs, 
the roil of whose names closes with that of Mary 
Stuart, a few passed away in peace, and 
regretted b.y their people. But destiny seemed 
to pursue the latter of those sovereigns with 
insatiable severitj'. The name of James is of 
singularly ill omen on this roll. James I., 
after a captivity of a score years in England, 
was murdered in his own country. A cannon 
ball carried off James II. at the siege of Rox- 
burgh ; the third of the name was slain fi.ving 
from battle, where his son was his adversary ; 
the fourth fell at Flodden ; the fifth died of grief 
at the failure of his attempt against England. 
This last was the prophet-king, who said so 
mournfully, when he heard of the birth of his 
sole child, Mary, " Tbe kingdom cam' wi' a lass, 
an' it wull gae wi' a lass. — Athenceum, 



tf_!J»«!m!i_UIJ J.I 



Insec s in Birds. 

A simple and perfectly safe plan of rid- 
ding birds and their ca^es of insect posts, 
and which I have proved with invaluable 
success, is as follows : Take a piece of soft white 
calico, large enough to cover the cage all round 
about two-thirds down ihe wires, cut a hole in 
the middle for the suspending ring to pass 
through. When the bird goes to roost place the 
calico over the cage, so that it hangs as close as 
possible all round. In the morning, as soon as 
any light is admitted into the rooiu carefully 
remove the cloth, upon which a number of 
small red or black insects will be seen ; plunge 
this into boiling water; during the day take it 
out and dry it thoroughly ; repeat this opera- 
tion for several mornings until no insects 
appear. I have not tried it over a perforated zinc 
roof, which would prevent the cloth hanging, so 
close to the cage, and the insects might lodge on 
the roof instead of passing through to the cloth. 
AYith the wire tops I have never known it to 
fail in clearing both the cage and the bird.— 
"Perseverance," in Gardening Illustrated. 



\ 



St. Valentine's Day. 



A stern moralist has considered that " the 
custom of choosing or sending a valentine is a 
ralic of Paganism," but this opinion is so harsh 
and ill-supported that we much prefer to 
believe that it is a mere relic of that nature 
religion which was undobtedly the primitive 
form of worship in north-western Europe as 
elsewhere, and sprang from the recognition of 
the peculiarity of the season. " About this 
time," to quote Bailej'^'s Dictionary, " the birds 
choose their mates, and probably thence came 
the custom of young men and maidens choosing 
valentines or special loving friends on that day." 
Shakspere also alludes, in his " Midsummer 
Night's Dream," to the old saying that birds 
begin to couple on St. Valentine's Day — 

St. Valentine is past ; 
Begin these wood-birds but to couple now. 

The youths of Ancient Rome were wont, we 
know, during the Lupercalia, celebrated in 
February, amongst other things, to put the 
names of young women in a box, from which 
they were drawn as chahce directed. Later on 
the Christian clergy, unable to extirpate what 
theg^ considered a heathenish practice, com- 
l)romised matters by giving it a religious aspect, 
substituting the names of particular saints for 
those of the women, a custom still common at 
the present time in the Roman Catholic Church. 
"Wheth-^r or not the feast of Saint Valentine was 
known to our Saxon forefathers history does not 
relate, but it is sufficiently evident that the 
practice must have spread rapidly in the days 
of the Norman. Chaucer, who died in 1400, 
and Lydgate both wrote verses in connection 
with the daj--, while in 1415, Charles, Duke of 
Orleans, who was taken prisoner at Agincourt, 
and for several years confined in the Tower of 
London, wrote the first poetical love billets that 
have been handed down to us. Considering 
the time these were composed, some being in 
French, others in English they must be allowed 
to possess considerable merit .... That 
eccentric old diarist, Mr. Pepys, notices Samt 
Valentine's Day, thus showing how common 



the practice of observing it then was, and in his 
diary for February 14, 1667. the following entry 
will be found ; "' 1 am also this year my wife's 
valentine, and it will cost me £5." " I find." 
he adds, "that Mrs. Pierce's little girl is my 
valentine, she having drawn me, wliich I was 
not sorry for, it easing me oi something more 
which 1 must have given to others." The game 
entry also shows that it was then thy fashion, 
having just been introduced, to draw mottoes 
as well as names. In those days, indeed, the 
custom of valentine choosing appears to have 
been not only veiy general, but also very 
expensive, as may be judged from the following 
further entry from Mr. Pepy's diary in reference 
to Miss Stuarts jewels : ''The Duke of York, 
being once her valentine, did give her a jewel of 
about £800, and my Lord Mandeville, lier 
valentine this year, a ring of about £500." 
If the foregoing entry may be accepted as a 
fair sample of what was generally expected of 
valentines in those days, the post would 
certainly appear to have been no sinecure, as 
far at least as the pocket is concerned. 



Remarkable Assassinations and 
Attempts during the Present 
Century. 

Paul, Czar of Russia, m nobles, 24th March, 

1801. 
George IV., when Regent, 28th January, 1817. 
Mr. Percivai, premier, by Bellingham, lltli 
May,1812. 

Louis Philippe of Franco, many attempts : by 
Fieschi, 28th July, 1835; Aliband. 25th June, 
1836 ; Mennier, 27th December, 1836 ; Darmes, 
15th October, 1840 ; Lecompte, 14th April, 184G ; 
Henry, 29th July, 1846. 

Ferdinand. Charles III, Duke of Parma, 26th 
March, 1854. 

Isabello II, of Spain, attempts by : La Riva, 
4th May, 1847; Merino, 2nd February, 3852; 
Raymond Fuentes, 28th May, 1856. 

Dennis Affre, archbishop of Paris, 25th June, 
1848. 
Sigour, archbishop of Paris, 18'6, 

Napoleon III., attempts by: Pianori (or 
Laverini ?), 28th April, 1855 ; Bellemarre, 8th 
September, 1855; Orsini, Bernard, and others, 
14th January, 1858. 
Marshall Prim, 2Sth December, 1870 
Alfonso XII. of Spain, attempts by: J. 0. 
Moncasi, 25tli October, 1878 ; F. Otero Gonzalez, 
30th, December. 1879. 

Frederick William IV< of Prussia, attempt 
by Safelage, 22nd May, 1850. 

William I. of Prussia and Germany, attempts 
by : Oscar Becker, 14th July, IS61 ; Hodel, 11th 
May, 1878 ; Dr. Nobiling, 2nd June, 1873. 

Alexander II. of Russia, attempts by : Kara- 
kozow, at St. Petersburg, 16th April, 186(3 ; 
Berezowski, at Paris, 6th June, 1867 ; Alexander 
Solovieff, 14th April, 1879, by explosion of 
Winter Palace, St. Petersburg, l7th February, 
1880. Killed by explosion of a bomb thrown 
by a man who was himself killed, St. Petersburg, 
2 p.m., 13th March, 1881. 

Abraham Lincoln, president of the United 
States, by Wilkies Booth, 14th April, 18G5 

General Garfield, president of the United 
States, by Charles Jules Guiteau, 2nd Julv 
1881. 



mmmmtaitm^ 



Optical Delusions in Arctic Seas. 

One can scarcely, without having experienced 
it, form any idea of the optical illusions which 
are produced by mist in regions where the size 
of the objects which are visible through the fog 
is not known beforehand, and thus does not 
give the spectator an idea of the distance. Our 
estimate of distance and size in such cases 
depends wholly on accident. The obscure con- 
tours of the fog, concealed objects themselves, 
besides, are often by the iirnorance of the 
spectator converted into whimsical fantastic 
forms. During a boat journey in Hinloopen 
Strait I once intended to row among drift ice 
to an island at a distance of some few kilometres. 
"When the boat started the air was clear ; but 
while we were employed, as best we could, in 
shooting sea-fowl for dinner, all was wrapt in a 
thick mist, and that so unexpectedly that we 
had not time to take the bearings of the island. 
This led to a not altogether pleasant row, by 
guess, among the pieces of ice that were drifting 
about in rapid motion in the sound. All exerted 
themselves as much as possible to get sight of 
the island, whose beach would afford us a safe 
resting place. While thus occupied, a dark 
border was seen through the mist at the horizon. 
It was taken for the island which we were bound 
aor, and it was not at first considered remark- 
tble that the dark border rose rapidly, for we 
fhought that the mist was dispersing, and in 
consequence of that more of the land was visible. 
Soon two white snow-fields, that Ave had not 
observed before, were seen on both sides of the 
Ian I ; and immediately after this was changed 
to a sea monster, resembling a walrus-head, as 
large as a mountain. This got life and motion, 
and finally sank, all at once, to the head of a 
nommon walrus, which lay on a piece of ice in 
the neighbourhood of the boat ; the white tusks 
formed the snow-fields, and the dark-brown 
round head the mountain. Scarce was this illusion 
gone when one of the men cried out " Land 
right ahead— high land !" We now all saw 
before us a high Alpine region, with mountain 
peaks and glaciers ; but this too sank a moment 
afterwards, all at once, to a common ice-border, 
blackened with earth. In the spring of 1873 
Palander and I, with nine men, made a sledge 
journey round North-east Land. In the course 
of this journey a great many bears was seen and 
killed. When a bear was seen while we were 
dragging our sledges forward, the train com- 
monly stood still ; and, not to frighten the bear, 
all the men concealed themselves behind the 
sledges, with the exception of the marksman, 
who, squatting down in some convenient place, 
waited till his prey should come sufficiently 
within range to be killed with certainty. It 
happened once during foggy weather on the ice 
at Wahlenberg Bay that the bear that was ex- 
pected, and had been clearly seen by all of us, 
instead of approaching with bis usual supple zig- 
zag movements, and with his ordinary attempts to 
nose himself to a sure insight into the fitness of 
the foreigners for food, just as the marksman 
took aim, spread out gigantic wings and flew 
away in the form of a small ivory gull. Another 
time during the same sledge journey we heard 
from the tent in which we rested, the cook who 
was employed outside, cry out, "A bear, a great 
bear^. No ! a reindeer, a very little reindeer !" 
The same instant a well-directed shot was fired, 
and the bear-reindeer was found to be a very 



small fox, which thus paid with its life for the 
honour of having for some moments played the 
part of a big animal. From tliese accounts it 
may be seen how difficult navigation among 
drift-ice must be in unknown waters. — " The 
Voyage of the Vega," by A. E. Nordenskiold. 



A Lost Dianfiond. 

A youth of Pawtucket, R.I., who wears a 
seven-hundred dollar diamond breast-pin, on 
retiring the other night threw his shirt on the 
floor without removing the valuable jewel. 
The next morning the pin was missing, and a 
vigilant search failed to reveal its locality. It 
happened that there was about the house a hen, 
—a setting hen, kept in the house on account of 
her occupation and because of the cold weather, 
and the thought occurred to the father that the 
pin had become detached from the garment 
when it was thrown down, and the hen, in her 
wanderings, might have been attracted by this 
shining valuable, and gobbled it down, For a 
couple of days Biddy was kept close, not allowed 
to go out of the house, and closely watched in 
the hope of finding the missing diamond. But 
no pin was found. Finally, on the third day, it 
was decided to kill the hen, when sure enough, 
in the gizzard was found the missing pin. The 
gold setting was bent and scratched in the 
efforts of the contents of the gizzard to digest 
it, and one of the smaller diamonds was 
missing, but four of the diamonds were all right, 
and what promised to be a heavy loss was 
averted. 

Christmas Facts and Memoranda. 

Many of the customs that have attended the 
celebration of Christmas in the early ages of 
Christianity have become obsolete. Among the 
Christmas dishes most in vogue were a boar's 
head stuck with rosemary, with an apple or an 
orange in the mouth, plum porridge and mince 
pies. Diocletian, who kept his court at In- 
comedia, hearing that multitudes had i;;sembled 
to celebrate the nativity of Christ, ordered the 
church to be burned. His commands were 
obeyed and all the inmates perished. The 
Christmas of 1525 was called the " still Chnst- 
mas," on account of the plague, which prevented 
the King from holding any festival at Court. 
The mortality was so great that half of thecitizens 
of London are said to have died. The baptism 
of Jesus was celebrated by the Eastern Church 
as early as a.d. 220, and by the Western Church 
as early as a.d. 330. Some authorities fix the 
time earlier for the celebration by the Western 
Church, and put it in the reign of Constantine. 
Miracle plays and Scripture histories are 
synonymous with Christmas. The miracle play 
of " St. George and the Dragon." one of the first, 
is still preserved. There is a town in Germany 
where once in ten years all the inhabitants take 
part in the representation of the life of Christ. 
In the early courts of England, Christmas was 
celebrated by arrangements made by the master 
of the revels, who was appointed by the King 
and was called the lord of misrule. Leland, 
speaking of the Court of Henry VII., A.D., 1489, 
mentions an abbot of misrule, who was created 
for this purpose, who made much sport and did 
right well his o^gq.— American Paper. 



I he Fatal Last Week. 

Towards midnight on December ^28, 1879, the 
writer of these notes happened to be in a Scotch 
newspaper office, and was thus addressed by one 
of the staff : — " Singular thing ! we haven't had 
any disaster to wind up the year with. There is 
usually a great disaster at the finish — there or 
thereabouts. Tli-e old year rarely leaves without 

fiving the world a parting kick somewhere," 
[uUo!" he suddenly broke out ; "here's some- 
thing and no mistake ! " Edinburgh train 
signalled off from Tayport not arrived. Terrible 
gale. Supposed accident on bridge." 

The plunge of the train into the waters of 
the Firth, the flash of a light seen from the 
shore, the sudtien extinction of 70 lives— all these 
particulars came out afterwards. But there was 
enough to produce on the writer's mind a 
superstitious apprehension which will never "be 
eiSaced. The worst disasters at the close of 
188G, unless we count the gale and snowstorm 
from the effects of which all Europe is still 
suffering, are that reported from Driffield, where 
10 men were killed by the fall of a cage down the 
shaft of a coalpit, and the sad lifeboat occur- 
rence on the Lancashire coast, which resulted 
in the drowning of the St. Anne's and the South- 
port lifeboat crews, during a gallant attempt to 
rescuethecrewofaGerman vessel, Atthe closeof 
'85,the country was shocked by the Mardy colliery 
accident, in the Rhondda Valley, by which 77 
men were killed and the remainder of 900 had a 
narrow escape. The year 1884 closed amid 
the frightful ruin of the earthquakes in Spain, 
in which more than a thousand persons perished 
On the 27th of December, 1882, 40 persons were 
killed and 50 injured by the fall of a chimney at 
Sir H. Ripley's mills at Bradford. The close of 
1881 was signalised by thequadruplicate collision 
in Canonbury Tunnel. The Tay Bridge calamity 
sufficiently darkens the last days of 1879. Thus 
we may go back year after year upon the grue- 
some record Eor at least three decades there is 
an almost unbroken series of disasters by sea cr 
land in the last week of the year ; we have space 
to note only a. few of the more remarkable. It 
was on the last but one of 1870, that the Ash- 
tabula railway accident — very similar to the 
Tay Bridge catastrophe— destroyed, by shock, 
drowning, and burning, more than a hundred 
lives. A day or two before five persons had been 
killed and thirty injured at Arlesley siding on 
the Great Northern Railway ; the station master 
at Arlesley went mad on the spot. London 
society was distressed on Christmas-day, 1875 
by news of the droAvning of three nieces of the 
late Mr. Russell Gurney, as well as the crew, by 
the upsetting of a dehabeeah on the Nile ; while 
only two days earlier the training ship Goliath 
was burned, twenty-one boys perishing out of 
480. Yet more sad was the close of 1874, when 
the story of the emigrant ship Cospatrick reached 
these shores. Of 500 souls on board, only five 
were saved, and they were picked up only a few 
hours before they must have succumbed. At 
the same time— on the 24th of December- 
occurred the Shipton railway accident, with its 
terrible total of thirty-four dead and seventy 
injured. Many people will remember the 
harrowing story— we do not intend to repeat it— 
of the sinking of the steam-tug Gipsy Queen in 
the Tyne, and the drowning of eighteen of her 
crew on the 26th of December, 1873. We pass 
over the two preceding yeare with the bare 



mention of the wreck of the English steamship 
Germany and the loss of thirty lives at the 
entrance of the Garonne, and the traction engine 
accident in Glasgow with its havoc among a 
crowd of children. The end of 1870 is memor- 
able in the history of railway disasters. It is 
not only that in the last week (on December 26) 
eight persons were killed at Hatfi' Id, but there 
had been a series of great fatalities from the end 
of November; seven pei'sons being killed at 
Harrow, five at Brockley Whins, and 14 near 
Barnsley. without counting the injured. There 
was also in the fatal last week of 1870 a gun- 
powder explosion at Birmingham, killing seven- 
teen persons outright and maiming or blinding 
more than fifty others. On Christmas-day, 1860, 
a whole family of six, the -wife and children of a 
policeman, were burned to death in a street near 
Burton Crescent. On Boxing-night foiirteen 
persons were trampled upon or suffocated in a 
mad fight for entrance into the pit of the Bristol 
Theatre. That affair will perhaps be remembered 
for the act that those who had managed to get 
into the theatre knew nothing of what had 
happened ; the performance went on to the end 
before anybody but the manager and the police 
knew that seventeen dead bodies were laid out 
in the refreshment room. A terrible colliery 
accident near St. Helens cost twenty-six poor 
fellows their lives on December 80, 1868. Still 
more fatal was the Merthyr Tydfil explosion at 
the close of 1865 ; while to the account of that 
time also must be put the foundering of the 
London, with 220 souls , in the Bay of Biscay. 
Then we come to the Moestig explosion in 1863, 
the loss of the Lifeguard off Flamborough Head 
(fifty-one lives) in 1862, the boiler explosion at 
Hetton Colliery (twenty-three lives) in 1860, the 
wreck of the Blervie Castle (fifty-six lives) in 
1859. and the crushing of fifteen persons to death 
at the A'icroria Theatre in 1858 ; all these 
disasters occiirred in the last few days of the 
year. Research back to a period beyond the 
average memory reveals other examples of 
this strange coincidence. It was on the last day 
but one of 1808 that His Majesty's ship, Anson, 
with her crew of 60, perished in Moiint's Bay. 
It was on the 22nd of December, 1810, that the 
Minotaur, 71 guns, was -wrecked on the Haak 
Bank, with a loss of 360 hands. It was on the 
fatal last week of 1811 that the three English 
men-of-war, St. George, Defence, and Hero, 
stranded on the coast of Jutland, and all the 
crews, numbering about 2,000 men, with 
Admiral Reynolds , were drowned, save only 18 
seamen who, more dead than alive, were washed 
ashore. 

Those who like to philosophise upon the 
phenomena of events may make what use thej' 
please of this recital. It will be remembered 
that the end of the year, in these latitudes at all 
events, is a period when all the forces of nature 
are warring against man ; a period of cold and 
storms and depression and fog— resulting in 
disasters by sea and land, on the railway, and in 
the mine. It may be said that such accidents as 
fires and panics in theatres are specially liable to 
follow upon the peciiliar circumstances of the 
season. But then it happens that the opening 
of the new year has been singularly free from 
calamity ; yet in January the natural conditions 
are not appreciably different from those of 
December. However, we purpose neither to 
explain nor moralist. 



The Oldest Republic. 

The most ancient Republic in the world is 
hat of San Marino, a little old world spot about 
-en miles from the Adriatic Sea, and which is as 
completely forgotten by the rest of the world as 
3 the name of the first shipbuilder. Of all the 
republics of the Italian middle ages this is the 
3nly one Avhich is left. It has withstood 
assaults from all sides and in all forms. 
Moorish invaders, Italian condottieri, Papal 
aggressors, the great first Napoleon himself even, 
jiave failed one and all to pluck the astute 
jMarinese from their lofty hill. The entire 
population of the Republic is 8,000. all told, and 
|:hearmyis l,v>00 strong. The Government is 
vested in a Sovereign Grand Council of sixty 
inhabitants, forty being plebeian, and twenty 
aristocrats by birth. At the end of this 
magnificently-christened executive stands the 
captains regent — the supreme presidents of the 
5an Marino. One of these gentlemen must also 
be plebeian and the other an aristocrat. Their 
term of power lasts only six months, at the end 
3f which time they retire, and other two captains 
regent are duly elected into the vacant place. 
[Nearly everybody, therefore, of note or unusual 
powers and intelligence in iSan 'Marino has a 
;hance of receiving at the hands of his fellows 
;he greatest honour in their power to bestow 
ipon a Marinese citizen. The most laughable 
eature about this tiny toybox republic, 
lowever, is its legal machinery. No less than 
twelve members of the Sovereign Grand Council, 
it appears, are told off to assist the captains 
regent in any litigation which may arise — 
a number which would seem to point to an 
exceeding litigiousness on the part of the 
inhabitants 



Surviving English Superstitions. 

"VVe find that old customs' and habits of a 
domestic nature still exist to a great extent in 
the northern and western portions of England. 
In the north, especially amidst the great Black 
Country, they are almost universal, whilst in 
the Midlands and the south they seem to have 
disappeared. Many of these customs come 
jwithin the category of superstitions, but they 
iare none the less interesting, as tending to dis- 
prove the assertion that "the further north one 
goes, the less sentiment one finds." A few 
^instances will suffice. In the north, no child's 
nails are ever cut on a Sunday, no infant's 
Innils are cut until it has attained the age of one 
year, but are bitten; the inside of a child's 
ii:ii:d3 are never washed until thi'ee weeks after 
r birth ; infants before they are carried down- 
t^stairs are alwa5's taken upstairs, in order to 
11 ensure their course in the world upwards; no 
|| child is shown itself in the glass, or its teething 
i| process will be painful ; cake is always given to 
the first person met on the road to the christen- 
ing; marriages should never be performed on a 
Saturday, but always if possible, on a Wednesday; 
tho person who sleeps first on the wedding night 
will die first, as will the person who kneels first 
' at the marriage ceremony. In Cornwall no 
miner whistles underground ; a Cornish child 
born after midnight will see more of the world 
than ordinary folk, and Sunday is considered an 
.especially lucky day for hirth.— All the Yiar 
Round. 



Phenomena of Sound. 

In the Arctic regions persons can converse at 
more than a mile distant when the thermometer 
is below zero. In air, sound travels from 1130 to 
1142 feet per second. In water, sound passes at 
the rate of 470S feet per second, Sound 
travels in air, about 900 feet for every pulsation 
of a healthy person at 75 in a minute. A bell 
sounded under water may be heard under water 
at 1200 feet distant. Souncs are distinct at 
twice the distance on water that they are on 
land. In a balloon, the barking of dogs on the 
ground may be heard at an elevation of three or 
four miles. On Table Mountain, a mile above 
Cape Town, every noise in it, and even words 
may be heard distinctly. The fire of the 
English on landing in Egypt was distinctly 
heard 130 miles on the sea. Dr. Jameson says, 
in calm weather he heard every word of a 
sermon at the distance of two miles ! Water is 
a better conductor of sound than air. Wood is 
also a powerful conductor of sound, and so is 
flannel or riband. Sound affects particles of 
dust in a sunbeam, cobwebs, and water in 
musical glasses ; it shakes small pieces of paper 
off a string in concord. Deaf persons may con- 
verse through deal rods held between the teeth, 
or held to the throat or breast. Echoes are 
formed by elliptical surfaces combined with 
surrounding surfaces, or by such of them as fall 
into the respective distances of the surface of an 
ellipse, and are, therefore, directed to the other 
focus of the ellipse ; for all the distances from 
both foci to such surface are equal, and hence 
there is a concentration of sounds at those points 
direct from one focus, and reflected back again 
from the other focus. An echo returns a 
monosyllable at 70 feet distance, and another 
syllable at every 40 feet additional. The echo of 
artillery is increased or created by a cloud or 
clouds. Miners distinguish the substance bored 
by the sound ; and physicians distinguish the 
action of the heart or lungs by a listening tube. 
Gamblers can distinguish, in tossing money, 
which side is undermost, though covered by the 
hand. 



The Work op the Heaet.— Dr. Benjamin 
W. Richardson in a recent Cantor lecture, 
speaking of the mechanism of the heart, 
described the number of the pulsation of the 
heart in different animals — in fish, frog, bird, 
I'abbit, cat, dog, sheep, horse — and made a few 
comments on the remarkable slowness of the 
heart— forty strokes per minute — in the horse 
This was followed by a computation of the 
average work performed by the heart in a 
healthy adult man. The work was traced out 
by the minute, the hour and the day, and was 
shown to equal the feat of raising 5 tons 4 cwt. 
one foot per hour, or 125 tons in twenty -four 
hours. The facts relating to the work of the 
heart by the weight of work accomplished was 
supplemented by a new calculation, in which 
the course of calculation was explained by 
mileage. Presuming that the blood was thrown 
out of the heart at each pulsation in the propor- 
tion of sixty-nine strokes per minute, and at the 
assumed force of nine feet, the mileage of the 
blood through the body might be taken at 207 
yards per minute, seven miles per hour, 168 
miles per day, 61,320 miles per year, or 5,150,880 
miles in a lifetime of eighty-four years. 



1 



Boy Inventors. 

Some of the most important inventions have 
been the work of mere boys. The invention of 
the valve motion to the steam enp;ine was made 
by a boy. Watts left the engine in a very 
incomplete condition, from the fact that he had 
no way to open or close the valves except by 
means of levers operated by the hand. He set 
up a large engine at one of the mines, and a boy 
was hired to work these valve levers. Although 
this was not hard work, yet it required his 
constant attention. As he was working these 
levers he saw that parts of the engine moved in 
the right direction, and at the exact time that 
he had to open or close the valves. He pi'o- 
cured a strong cord and made one end fast to 
the proper part of the engine, and the other end 
to the valve lever ; the boy had the satisfaction 
of seeing the engine move off with perfect 
regularity of motion. A short time after the 
foreman came around and found the boy play- 
ing marbles at the door. Looking at the engine 
he soon saw the ingenuity of the boy, and also 
the advantages of so great an invention. Mr. 
Watts then carried out the boy's inventive 
genius in a practical form, and made the steam 
engine a perfect automatic-working machine. 

Buffalo Hunting on the Plains. 

Buffalo hunting is an occupation common to 
all the plain tribes. They are hunted by the 
tribesmen at all seasons, and the bullet, the long 
lance, and the arrow play an equal part in the 
work of destruction. They will even entice 
them into "pounds," V-shaped enclosures, or 
rather traps, where they will be slaughtered 
remorselessly. Sometimes a herd will be driven 
in the direction of a high precipice, and one 
after another, either unaware of the danger or 
unable to avoid it, will tumble over and be 
killed on the spot. If the animals attempt to 
turn back in time, their fate is equally certain, 
for few escape this running the gauntlet of the 
Indians. In the winter they are pursued by 
the Indians in snow-shoes, and numbers are 
killed while struggling almost helplessly through 
the snowdriits. Sometimes the buffaloes will 
attempt to cross a lake on the smooth ice, when 
they become perfectly helpless, and fall an 
easy prey to their enemies. They will be even 
pursued on foot during the summer months, the 
Indians creeping within range by means of the 
disguise of a wolf-skin drawn over their naked 
bodies. The buffalo suspects nothing, for the 
cowardly prairie wolf will never attack the 
buffalo when in herds, but only singly ; then 
the silent arrow soon does its work. So de- 
pendent are many of the tribes on the buffalo 
that if the herds do not approach for a length of 
time within a reasonable distance of the village 
the tribe is reduced to starvation, and there is 
nothing for it but to resort to the buffalo dance. 
So certain is this dance of bringing the game to 
the village that every adult must keep by him a 
mask, composed of the head and part of the 
hide of the buffalo, so that, when occasion 
arises, he may take part in this very necessary 
Terpsichorean rite. It never fails, because with 
a logic as incontestable as that of the rain- 
maker, it has to be continued till the buffaloes 
come. When one man is exhausted, another 
pretends to kill him, and so being supposed to be 
hors de combat, another takes nis place ; and 



thus the weird dance continues, day and nighti 
until the buffaloes come in sight, when, o 
course, it is patent to every unprejudiced mind 
that this 'medicine dance "-^ has been of 
sovereign power. The rate at which buffaloes 
are butchered has rapidly thinned them, and 
though still existing in immense herds, their 
area is year by year narrowing ; and eventually, 
with the settling up of the prairies, their 
intersection by railways, and the general use of 
fire-arms by the Indians, their extermination is 
only a question of time. Thousands are 
annually slaughtered through sheer -wasteful- 
ness, and the hides of the cows being in greater 
request for robes than those of the bulls, the 
former are killed in greater number. In the 
Missouri region alone nearly 4,500,000 werei 
massacred in three years, and the number of 
buffaloes shot annually cannot be much less 
than from a quarter to half a million. When 
Coronado went on his famous expedition hei 
traversed, says Castenada,- the historian of his 
expedition, "immense plains, seeing nothing for 
miles together, but skies and herds of bison" 
To this day, in many places, thousands may be 
seen at one view. When Lewis and Clarke 
first crossed the prairies, tkey saw on one 
occasion as many as 20,000 in a herd. At 
another spot such a multitude of these animals 
were fording the Missouri that for a mile the 
stream was so filled up that they could not pro- 
ceed until the herd had passed. Such sights, if 
not already among the things of the past, soon 
will be, and when the last buffalo becomes 
extinct, the last prairie Indian will disappear.— 
The Peoples of the World. 

Snakes and Insects. 

A very nice little snake story appeared some 
time ago in a paper which devotes a large 
portion of its space to popular natural history, 
and was headed, " Extraordinary Sagacity in 
Spiders." Three of those sapient insects it ap- 
pears, came across a snake and resolved to eat 
him. But first — and this is where the sagacity 
comes in— they artfully spun threads round his 
mouth, and so tied it up to prevent his biting ; 
and then, having him quite helpless and at their 
mercy; they sagaciously devoured his body at 
their leisure. Ants, hovrever, have been known 
to cluster in myriads on a serpent which has 
incautiously strayed into their nest and to 
destroy it, the reptile being unable to shake 
them off ; but it frequently happens that ants 
and other insects or parasites attack a snake's 
eyes and positively eat them, those organs being 
undefended by eyelids and therefore always 
open. The outer layer of the conjunctival 
membrane is continuous with the cuticle of the 
whole body, and is desquamated with it when 
the creature "sheds its skin:" ordinary im- 
purities or particles of foreign matter are got rid 
of in this way, but if the transparent plate 
covering the cornea be perforated, as it is by 
the ravages of these insects, the snake's sight is 
permanently destroyed. This accident has 
frequently happened, in spite of every care, in 
the reptile house at the Zoological Gardens, 
where the cages are very old and the woodwork 
semi-rotten, affording abundant harbour to these 
pests ; in the reptilium, now in course of con- 
struction, Portland cement and zinc will replace 
the use of wood as far as possible.— .4 ^Z the Year 
Bound. L ^ 



Two Remarkable Needles 

The International Exhibition of I^eedlework, 
which was held at Sydenham in July, 18^4, 
included among other curiosities, two things 
which were not the least of the attractions of the 
exhibition. One was the famous needle 
presented to the Emperor of Germany some 
time since under circumstances worth re- 
calling. The Emperor was visiting the 
great needle manufactory at Kreuznach, 
and was desirous of seeing for himself the 
relative power of machinery compared with 
skilled hand labour. A bundle of superfine 
neeciles was placed before him, 1,000 of which 
weighed less than half an ounce, and he 
expressed his astonishment that eyes could be 
bored in such minute objects. Thereupon the 
foreman of the boring department asked his 
Majesty to give him a hair from his beard, and 
receiving it, he bored an eye in it, threaded it, 
and handed back to the astonished Emperor 
this improvised and most peculiar needle. The 
other curious needle was manufactured at 
Eedditch, and presented to the Queen, It is a 
sort of miniature Trajan's column. All around 
it are represented scenes from the Queen's life, 
executed so minutely that a magnifying glass is 
required to distinguish them. This needle can 
be opened, and within it are a number of very 
fine needles, on which also scenes have been 
engraved. 

Growth of London. 

One of the most interesting points in the 
annual report of the Chief Commissioner of the 
Metropolitan Police is the official record he 
supplies of the yearly growth of London. The 
year 1883 has not been a flourishing one for the 
London builders, and the Chief Commissioner 
speaks of their operations being "somewhat 
restricted." These somewhat restricted efforts 
have, however, succeeded in adding 21,110 
houses to the vast aggregate of dwellings which 
is called the metropolis ? thus forming 361 new 
streets and one new square, covering a distance 
of 56 miles and ^<4 yards. It is difficult to form 
any mental picture from these figures. It is 
easier to understand what they mean when we 
compare the number of houses with some 
existing town. Now Brighton in 1881 had 
20,379 inhabited houses, so that London in 1883 
added to itself a town a little bigger than 
Brighton. Bolton, in Lancashire, had 21,043 
houses, so that more were built in London in 
one year than that busy town contains. It 
would require two Coventrys, or more than two 
Baths, orCambridges, or Oxfords, or Ipswiches, 
to represent the additions made to London in a 
single year. Yet 1883 shows a steady falling off 
in tiie highest number of houses built. There 
was an immense bound in 1880, when 24,945 
houses were added to London ; in 1881, the 
highest point was reached, when the number 
was 26,170. It fell to 23,301 in 1882, and then to 
21,110 in 1883. If we put these four years 
together we shall find that from the end of 1879 
to t e end of 1883. London added to itself a 
town larger than Liverpool, Manchester, or 
Birmingham. It must, however, be understood 
that the London to which this vast addition is 
made is not that of the Metropolitan Board of 
Works, but the Greater London of the Metro- 
politan Police. 



The English Languagei 

A pretty deer is dear to me, 

A hare with downy hair : 
I love a hart with all my heart, 

But barely bear a bear. 
'Tis plain that no one takes a plane 

To have a pair of pears ; 
A rake, though, often takes a rake 

To tare away the tares. 
All rays raise thyme, time razes all ; 

And through the whole, hole wears. 
A writ, in writing " right," may write 

It " wright " anrS still be wrong — 
For " write " and " rite" are neither " right," 

And don't to wright belong. 
Beer often brings a bier to man, 

Coughing a coffin brings. 
And too much ale will make us ail. 

As well as other things. 
The person lies who says he lies 

"When he is but reclining ; 
And, when consumptive folks decline, 

They all decline declining. 
A quail don't quail before a storm — 

A bough will bow before it ; 
"We cannot rein the rain at all — 

No earthly powers reign o'er it. 
The dyer dyes awhile, then dies ; 

To dye he's always trying, 
Until upon his dying-bed 

He thinks no more of dyeing. 
A son of Mars mars many a sun ; 

All deys must have their days. 
And every knight should pray each night 

To Him who weighs his ways, 
'Tis meet that man should mete out meat 

To feed misfortune's son ; 
The fair should fare on love alone. 

Else one cannot be won. 
A lass, alas ; is something false; 

Of faults a maid is made ; 
Her waist is but a barren waste — 

Though stayed, she is not staid. 
The springs spring forth in Spring, and shoots 

Shoot forward one and all ; 
Though Summer kills the flowers, it leaves 

The leaves to fall in Fall. 
I would a story here commence, 

But you might find it stale ? 
So let's suppose that we have reached 

The tail end of our tale. 

When to Eat Feuit.— Fruits, to do their 
best work, should be eaten either oh an empty 
stomach or simply with bread — never with 
vegetables. In the morning, before the fast of 
the night has been broken, they are not only 
exceedingly refreshing, but they serve as a 
natural stimulus to the digestive organs. And 
to produce their fullest, finest effect, they shouM 
be ripe, and of good quality, and they should 
ha eaten raw. "^"hat is belter than a bunch of 
luscious grapes or a plate of berries or cherries 
on a summer morning, the first thing on sitting 
down to breakfast ? Or a fine ripe apple, rich 
and juicy, eaten in the same way P In our 
climate apples should constitute not the 
finishing but the beginning of a meal, particulaly 
the breakfast, for at least four months in the 
year ; and fruits, raw or cooked, should make a 
part of the morning and evening meal (pro- 
vided suppers are eaten) during the entire year. 
Farm and Home. 



The British Constitution. 

The Constitution of Great Britain is com- 
posed of the Sovereign and. the three estates of 
tlie realm, the Lords Spiritual, the Lords 
temporal and the Commons. 

The SovEKEiG-N has tlie power of summoning 
and proroguing or dissolving Parliament, or 
dismissing a ministry, and gives the Royal 
assent to measures which have passed both 
houses. The death of a sovereign does not dis- 
solve Parliament, but renders necessary an 
immediate assembling of both houses; and if 
there be no Parliament in existence, the old 
Parliament must re-assemble, and may sit again 
six months. It is also in the power of the 
Crown to call Parliament together by proclama- 
tion for the despatch of business in six days 
from the date of such proclamation, if the 
house be adjourned for a period above four- 
teen days. 

The Lords Spiritual and Lords Tem- 
poral sit together in the same legislative 
chamber, which is called the House of Lords. 
The Lords Spiritual consist of the Archbishop 
of Canterbury and York, and twenty - four 
Bishops of the Church of England ; the number 
not being increased by the successive creation 
of new bishoprics. The Archbishops, and the 
Bishops of London, Durham, and Winchester 
are always entitled to sit ; the other bishops 
only receive a writ of summons when the 
avoidance of a see decreases the total number of 
lords spiritual to less than twenty-six, and the 
writs are issued in order of seniority of ap- 
pointment. A bishop on resigning his see 
ceases to be a Lord of Parliament. The Lords 
temporal may be divided into peers whose right 
to sit is hereditary, representative peei's of 
Scotland and Ireland, and Lords of Appeal. 
The Scottish peers send sixteen representatives 
to the House of Lords, which are elected im- 
mediately after a general election, and sit until 
Parliament is dissolved. The Irish peers elect 
twenty-eight representatives who sit in the 
House of Lords for life. The Lords of Appeal, 
of whom there may be no more than four 
appointed, enjoy the dignity of Baron for life, 
but lose the right to sit on resigning office. A 
Scotch or Irish peer other than a representative 
peer may sit under an inferior title to the one 
by which he is generally known, as a peer of the 
United Kingdom. ^Thus, the Duke of Argyle 
sits as Baron Sundridge and Hamilton, and the 
Duke of Buccleugh as Earl of Doncaster. What- 
ever be the rank of a peer, each is equally 
entitled to sit and vote, and, as in the House of 
Commons, each must be present to record his 
vote. The officials of the House of Lords are 
the Earl Marshal (hereditary office), the Lord 
Gi'eat Chamberlain, the Garter King at Arms 
and the usher of the Black Rod. 

The House of Commons is an elective body, 
chosen by a majority of the people from their 
own body, in which, with certain exceptions, 
any male of full age may be elected to sit as 
rejjresentative of any constituency in the United 
Kingdom. English and Scotch peers are entirely 
disqualified from holding a seat, but Irish peers 
may be returned for any constituency. The fol- 
lowing are also disqualitied:— All English, Scotch, 
and Irish Judges (except the Master of the Rolls 
in England) ; all clergymen of the Established 
Church of any of the three kingdoms ; Roman 
Catholic priests ; the holders of various offices 



specially excluded by'statute (including revenue 
ollicers) ; persons who have been convicted of| 
certain offences ; aliens who have been natural- 
ized (except in certain cases where exceptions 
are made) ; imbeciles ; government contractors 
(except contractors for government loans) ; and 
sheriffs and returning officers within the con- « 
stituencies for which they act. A seat in the 
house is vacated when the holder is created a 
peer, or succeeds to a peerage, or by the accept- 
ance of any office of emolument under the 
Crown, but any member accepting is eligible for 
re-election, should a constituency approve of 
such acceptance ; but this rule does not apply to 
such offices as that of Secretary to the Treasury 
or other similar appointments not held direct i 
from the crown, and a change from one office to 
another does not involve going again to the con- 
stituency. A member cannot resign his seat 
without the consent of his constituents, but he 
may accept the office of honour or profit under 
the Crown, of the Stewardship of theChilternc 
Hundreds, or of the Manors of J^forthstead, 
which is granted to him by the Chancellor of the 
Exchequer, and resigned immediately after its 
purpose is served. 

A peer or peeress of Great Britain, or of Scot- 
land or Ireland, whether representative or not, 
and a peeress, whether by birth, marriage or 
creation— but not a peeress by marriage who 
has become widowed and married a commoner 
— is free at all times from arrest or imprison- 
ment on civil process. The same privilege ex- 
tends to members of the House of Commons 
during the sitting of Parliament, and for forty 
days before the meeting of Parliament and forty 
days after its prorogation, and for an uncertain 
or " reasonable " time after its dissolution. 

Peers who become bankrupt are disqualified 
from sitting and voting in the House of Lords 
until the bankruptcy be determined either by 
being annulled or by the satisfaction of the 
creditors ; and the seat of a representative peer 
for Scotland or Ireland is vacated unless his 
bankruptcy be determined within one year after i 
the date of his becoming a bankrupt. If a mem- , 
ber of the House of Commons be adjudged a ' 
bankrupt, he is unable to sit and vote for one year 
unless the order of adjudication be annulled, or j 
his creditors be satisfied ; and if at the expiration ' 
of one year the bankruptcy be not determined 
in one or other of these ways, the seat becomes I 
vacant. 

Napoleon's Preparations for Battle. 

Before engaging in battle, (says Bourriene in 
his pleasing work), Buonaparte made little pro- 
vision for subsequent events, if successful ; but 
occupied himself much with what ought to be 
done in the case of defeat. I here report a fact 
of which I have often been a witness, leaving to 
his brethren in arms the decision on the merits 
of this conduct. He was enabled to accomplish 
much, because he hazarded all, grasped at all, 
and was cautious in nothing. His excessive 
ambition urged him on to power, and power 
obtained only added to his ambition. None ever 
more firmly held the conviction tliat a nothing 
often decicfes the greatest events. This supplies 
the reason why he was more solicitous in watch- 
ing, than in tempting events; he beheld them 
in theix" progress of preparation and matuiity, 
when, suddenly seizing, he directed them at 
will.— T/je Olio. 



POSTAL REGULATIONS, SAVINGS BANKS, &c. 



Rates of Postage. 

To all parts of the Kingdom, for prepaid letters : 

Not exceeding 1 oz Id. 

Exceeding i oz., but not exceeding 2 oz. l^d. 

And id. additional for every 2 oz. 

A letter posted i;npaid is chargeable with 
double postage, and a letter posted insuffi- 
ciently paid is chargeable with double the 
deficiency. 

No letter must exceed 18 inches in length, 9 
in width, or 6 in depth. 

Post Cards. 

Post Cards, bearing a halfpenny impressed 
stamp, are available for transmission between 
places in the United Kingdom only. They are 
to be obtained at all Post offices, m packets of 
12 for 7d. and 8d. Reply Post-cards lid, each, 
D'oreign Post-cards at Id., lid., and 2d. each. 

Foreign Postage, 

The international scale of postage now in 
force is 2id. per ^ oz for letters, Id., Ijd., and 
id. for post cards, ^d. for each 2 oz. for news- 
papers, and 2id. per 2 ounces for printed 
papers, patterns, and legal and commercial 
documents, and ^d. per 2 oz after. By France 
the rates range from 2^d. to 5d. per ^ ounce for 
letters. Foreign countries not in the Postal 
Union, i oz. letters range front 4d. upwards. 
Registration Fee 2d. 

Book and Newspaper Postage. 

A book packet may contain books or papers, 
whether plain or written or printed upon (to 
the exclusion of any written letter or com- 
munication of the nature of a letter), Photo- 
graphs, when not on glass or In frames, 
and Circulars, may also be sent by Book Post. 
The following are the rates of postage : 

On a registered newspaper ^d. 

On a book packet or unregistered newspaper — 

If not exceeding 2 oz. in weight id. 

If exceeding 2 oz. in weight, for every ad- 
ditional 2 oz., or fractional part of 2 oz. ^d. 

Every packet must be sent without a cover, 
or in a cover open at the ends. 

A packet of registered newspapers must not 
exceed 2 feet in length, 1 foot in width, or 1 foot 
in depth, nor weigh more than 14 lbs. The 
maximum size of book packets must not exceed 
that of letters, nor the weight be above 5 lbs. 
Book packets, in case these rules are infringed, 
if under 8 oz., are charged letter rates, if above 
8 oz., Parcel Post rates, in addition to Id. fine. 

Newspaper wrappers are sold at the following 
prices— 1, |.; 2 Ud.: 8, Ifd., 4, 2id.; 5, 3d.; 
6, 3id.; 7, 4d ; 12, 7d. 

Inland Parcel Post. 

Parcels must not exceed 11 lbs. in weight, nor 
3 feet 6 inches in length, and its length added to 
its girth in the thickest part must not be more 
than 6 feet. The rates of postage are 

Not exceeding 1 lb 3d. 

Every succeeding lb l^d. 

Postage in an all cases must be paid in 
advance. Parcels must not be posted in the 
box, but in all cases must be handed over the 



counter at a Post office. If otherwise posted it 
is subject to Book Post regulations. 

Postal Orders 

Can be purchased at the follovring prices : 

For orders of Is. and Is. 6d ^d. is charged. 

„ 2s. to 10s. 6d Id. „ 

15s. to 20s Ud. 

The sender can order these to be cashed at 
any Post office, .but they must be presented for 
payment within three months of tLeir issue. 

Registered Letter Envelopes 

Are sold at all Post offices, and by Rural Mes- 
sengers, according to size, from 2^d. to 3d. If 
Registered letters are lost the Post-office is liable 
to the extent of £2. 

Post-Office Telegrams. 

The charge for telegrams through the United 
Kingdom, the Scilly, Orkney, and Slietland 
Islands, is 6d. for 12 words, including address, 
and id. each for every additional word. A 
group of five figures is counted as one word, but 
mixed figures as, 7s. 6d., is four words. 

Money Orders. 

Money-orders are granted in the United 
Kingdom at the following rates : 

For sums under 10s., 2d.; 10s., and und^r £2. 
3d. Id. extra for every additional £1 up to £!0. 

Money Orders Payable Abroad. 

Foreign orders are issued at the following 
rates, subject to the regulations of the G.P.O : 
Notexceedmg£2, 6d.;£5,ls.; £7, Is. 6d.; £10,2s. 

Post-office Savings Banksi 

At every Post-office m the United Kingdom 
forms can be obtained free of charge, on which 
twelve penny postage stamps can be fixed, and 
when the form has been thus filled up it will be 
received at any Post-office Savings Bank as a 
deposit for one shilling. 

No deposit of less than one shilling is received, 
nor any pence, and not more than £30 in one 
year. No further deposit is allowed when the 
amount standing in depositor's name exceeds 
£150, exclusive of interest. Interest is allowed 
at the rate of 2^ per cent, per annum— that is, 
one halfpenny per pound per month. When 
the principle and interest reach to £200 no 
further interest is paid until the sum at the 
depositor's credit is reduced bolow that 
amount. Deposits already made in other 
savings banks may be easily transferred to the 
Post-office. Separate accounts may be opened 
in the names of wife and children. The wife's 
deposits become her separate property. 

Government Insurance and 

Annuities 

The lives of persons of either sex between the 
ages of 1 6 and 60, may be insured for not less 
than £20 nor more than £100. The sums 
charged for deferred annuties, or deferred 
[ monthly allowances, vary with the age and sex, 
health, habits, and occupation of the persons. 



STAMPS, TAXES, AND EXCISE DUTIES. 



Stamp Duties. 



£ s. d 



6 



10 



Agebement, or Memorandum of Agree^ 
ment, under hand only, not other- 
wise charged 

Appraisement oe Valuation of any 
estate or effects where the amount of 
the appraisement shall not exceed £5 
Exceeding £5, and not exceeding £10 
and 6d. for every additional £10. 

up to £500. Exceeding £500 

Ap:peenticeship Indentuees : — 

If no premium 

For every £5 or fractional part of £5 
Aemoeial Beaeings: — 

If painted on any Carriage 2 

If otherwise worn 1 

Bills of Exchange And Peomissoet 
Notes, of any kind, whatso'ver,exc'pt 

bank notes :— not exceeding £5 

Exceeding £5, and not exceeding £10 
10 „ 25 

25 „ 50 

50 „ 75 

75 „ 100 

Every £100, and also for every frac- 
tional part of £li)0, of such amount 

Bill op Lading 

Caeeiages, 4 wheels, or 4 cwt 2 

Less than 4 wheels, or under 4 cwt.. . 15 
Ceetificate.— Of goods, &c., being 

duly entered inwards 

Of birth, baptism, marriage, death, or 

burial (certified copy of) 

Deaft, or Order or Letter or Credit 
for payment of any sum to bearer or 

order on demand 

Lease, or Agreement for a Lease : — 
If ths term If definite 
is definite and exceeds 
and does not 
exceed 35 years, 
or is indefinite 
6E / £5 .. £0 6 . 
O 1ft .. 10. 

6 . 
. 
6 . 
. 
6 . 
V 100 . . 10 . 
For every £50, or fractional part thereof — 

050.. 110 0.. 300 
Legacy and Succession Dutt:— 
Lineal issue or Lineal ancestor . . £1 per cent. 
Brothers and sisters of the pre- 
decessor, and their descendants, £3 per cent. 
Brothers and sisters of the father and 
mother of the predecessors, and 

their descendants £5 per cent. 

Brothers and sisters of a grandfather 
or grandmother of the predecessor, 

and their descendants £d per cent. 

Any other person £10 per cent. 

Legacy to husband or wife — Free. 
Patent (Letters) for Inventions :— 
On application for provision, protection 1 

On filing complete specification 3 

Or on filing complete specification witli 

first application 4 

On certificate of renewal (end of 4yrs.) 50 
On certificate of renewal (end of 7yrs.)100 
Or in lieu of the fees of £50 and £100 the 






1^; 



£5 .. 


£0 


10 .. 


1 


15 .. 


1 


"10 .. 


2 


25 .. 


2 


50 .. 


5 


75 .. 


7 


100 .. 


10 



4 
1 



1 

If the term, 
being 

35 years, but definite, 
does not exceed exceed 
100 years. 100 years. 
£0 3 .. £0 6 



6 


.. 


12 





9 


.. 


IS 





12 


.. 


1 4 





15 


.. 


1 10 





1 10 


.. 


3 





2 5 


.. 


4 10 





3 


.. 


6 






following annual fees :— 
Before the expiration of the 

4th year from the date of the patent 10 

5th „ „ 10 

6th „ „ 10 

7th „ „ 10 

8th „ „ 15 

9th „ „ 15 

10th „ „ 20 

nth „ ,. 20 

12th „ ., 20 

13th „ „ 20 

Other small fees are also payable as 
prescribed by the Board of Trade. 
House Duty. 

On inhabited houses of the annual 
value of £20, occupied as a farmhouse 
by a tenant or servant, or in which 
articles are exposed for sale, in the £ 6 
On all others 9 

Income Tax. 

Schedule A. Lands, Tenements, &c G 

Schedule B. occupiers of Farms, &c.. .004 
Scotland and Ireland. ... .S 

Schedules C. D. and E. Incomes 8 

If under.£150,exempt,if under £400.£120 allowed. 

Various Excise Licenses and Duties. 
Licenses to Retail Spieits : 

Of rental under £10 4 10 

15 6 

20 8 

25 11 

30 14 

40 17 

50 20 

„ 100 25 

and £5, on every £100 up to £700. 

License for brewer of beer for sale 1 

Private brewer 4 

Six-day and early closing licenses at lower rates. 

Duty per 36 gallons 6 3 

Beee Retailers:— • 

Beer not drunk on the premises 1 o 

Beer drunk on the premises 3 10 

Wine Retailees:— 

Not drunk on the premises 2 10 

Drunk on premises 3 10 

Dcgs of any kind (penalty £5) 7 G 

Game Licences, if taken out after 1st 
Aug. and before 1st November, to 

expire on July 31st following .300 

After 1st Aug., expire 31st October. .200 
After 1st November, expire 31st July 2 

Gamekeepers 2 

Game Dealer's License 2 

Gun (License to carry) 10 

Hawkers and Pedlars per year : — 

Travelling with horse or ass 4 

If more than one horse, for each 2 

House A •5ents, letting furnished houses 

above £25 a year 2 

Medicines (Patent) dealers, &c. : — 

For each License 5 

Passage Vessels, on board which liquors 

and tobacco are sold, for 1 year 5 

Pawnbrokers.. 7 10 

Refreshment Houses under £.30 rent " . 10 6 

£30 rent or over,., v.'.... :.'....'.. 110 

Retailors of sweets .*. 1 5 

Tobacco and snuff, dealers in 6 3 



ADVERTISEMENTS. IO9 



ESTABLISHED 1835. 






•) 




&¥iir 



FAMILY GROCERS, 

©BA, Xi3mB, AND SpIP^OT fflBP^GHANiPS, 

17, 19, & 21 CASTLE STREET, FORFAR, 

Opposite Mimicipal Buildings. 



TEAS carefully selected from first crop Teas of the best gardens in India, China, 
and Ceylon, and judiciously blended in our own establishment. Good Useful Tea, 
1/8 ; Special Blend, 2/. 

COFFEES fresh ground daily. Lazenby's Pickles and Sauces. 

Finest Vostizza Currants, Sultana and Valencia Raisins cleaned on the premises by the 

Bristol Patent Fruit Cleaner. 

WINES. — Port, Sherry, Claret, Hock, Champagne, Moselle, Burgundy, Madeira, 
Marsala, Sauterne, Chablis. 

Max Gregor's Hungarian.— Carlowitz, Somlau, CEdenburg. Hidalgo's Natural. — 

Manzanilla, Palma, and Fino. 

LIQUEURS. — Curacao, Chartreuse, Maraschino, Benedictine, Kummel, Cherry Brandy. 
Angostura, Orange and Tonic Bitters. Crabbie & Co. 's Ginger Wines and Cordials. 

DUNCAN FLOCK HART d CO.'S AERATED WATERS. 



SPIRITS. 

WHISKY. — Our Famous Old Blend has for many years maintained the character of being 

the perfection of Blended Whisky. From the Extensive Stock we hold of Whisky, 

selected with the greatest care from the best Distilleries in Scotland, we confidently 

guarantee Our Old Blend as being of an uniform quality and of the purest description. 

BRANDY. — Hennessey's Martell, Courvoisiers, and Otard. 

RUM.— Finest Old Jamaica. GIN.— Fockink, Loopuyt, Old Tom. 

MALT LIQUORS.— Bass & Allsopp's Pale Ale. Melvin's and Younger's Edinburgh Ale. 
Barclay, Perkins, & Co. 's Imperial Porter. Raggett's Nourishing Stout and Golden 
Hop Pale Ale. Pilsener Lager Beer. American Champagne Cider. 



Spratt's Patent Poultry Meal, 1/3 per 7 lb. Bag". 
CHRISTMAS COSAQIJES IN GREAT VARIETY. 



Note the Address :— 
J/, ip, &> 21 CASTLE STREET, FORFAR. 



no ADVERTISEMENTS. 



PETRIE'S 

2 BACKWYND (ADJOINING CASTLE STREET), FORFAR. 



9 



^rcabfasis, pinners, 

TEA, COFFEE, HOT PIES, AND ALL TEMPERANCE REFRESHMENTS. 

■"./ Families supplied with Superior GINGER BEER. 
JEinfELLER A SILVERSMITH. 

JOHN STRACHAN, 

^^Watci) & @fIockma&cr, 



Always on hand, a good Selection of the Best Makes of GOLD and SILVER 
English LEVER and Foreign WATCHES and JEWELLERY of 
every description. 



ELECTRO-fLATED GOODS IN (aRE/cT V/eRIETY. 

REPAIRS of all kinds in Town and Country Promptly and Carefully attended to. 

REPAIRS AND WINDINGS CONTRACTED FOR ANNUALLY. 



OPTICAL GOODS KEPT IN STOCK. 
Curling Stones in Stock, or got to Order. 

A. & C. SHEPHERD, 



^' / ^^ 'j~»r' 



116 EAST HIGH STREET, 

And 2 CHARLES STREET, 



ADVERTISEMENTS. Ill 



LOW & CO.'S 



CELEBRATED 



PURE AND { Tr^AT? TJ'RT^ATk^ economical, 

SWEET. f JUUii-J: X)XtXjiA.JL/l NUTRITIOUS. 

Should be used in every Household, 



^h^6y 4ood^. 



dlioide dake^, 
f\ki^ ai|(i Oi'iiki^ented. 



Forfar Bakery, Castle St. 



a^®^ ^ ©®@)'^ 



PUNGENT, ) ^f^ ^C" K C / FLAVOURY, 
PURE. r X JC/ JnL ^ 1 STRONG. 



AT 



2s & 2s Sd per LId., 

SHOULD BE TRIED BY A.LL, 



LOW & CO.'S 



ARE PERFECTION. 



FORFAR BRANCHES :— 

15 EAST HIGH STREET, 106 WEST HIGH STREET, 



AND 



Forfar Bakery Buildings, Castle St. 



112 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



37 CASTLE STREET. 



MISS J. FERGUSON. 

Berlin, Fleecy, Fingering, Merino, and Fine Knitting Wools: 

Stamped Goods for Crewel Work, Embroidery, Bead, 6^ Wool Needle- Work. 

BABY-LINEN and UNDERCLOTHING. LADIES' WORK of all kinds Finished 

and Tastefully Made up. 



"►^' 



k 



JAMES NEILL, 

professor of ^EJiusic an6 dancing, 

YEWBANK, ^A/'HITE HILLS, FORFAR. 



I^pi^ofe lSess0r)S qi-^Gi), etrid. Jfri-v'afe feilasscs ar'i'etr)0-e(a 

Jay app0ir)f IT) er)f . 



STRING BANDS SUPPLIED TO CONCERTS AND ASSEMBLIES. 



¥ Piki\ofofte ki\d Violii) fof 5<Vei\ii)g ?kftie^. 



tP 



TEETH SPECIALIST. 



Best Artificial Teeth 

Inserted on Shortest 

Notice, at most 
Moderate Charges. 



DR FRENCH, 

33 EAST HIGH STREET, 

FORFAR. 

At Home every day. 



TEETM 

Most carefully ex- 
tracted ; also, painless 
extractions under 
Gas, &c. &c. 



PERSONAL ATTENDANCE AND GREAT SATISFACTION GUARANTEED IN ALL CASES, 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 1 1 3 



" Gives a Story of all Round the World." — John Bright. 




fiiiiiiw ttilMmDii ^ 





Daily, One Halfpenny, 

'ONTAINS Latest Telegraphic News, 
freshest Local and District Intelligence, 
Cream of the London and Scotch News- 
paper Press, Ladies' Column by Lady Editor, 
Athletic and Sporting News, Literary, Ex- 
tracts, &c., making the TELEGRAPH one 
of the most Popular Daily Papers published, 
and a splendid Advertising Medium. 



A LARGEST CIRCULATION ^- 
of any Halfpenny Daily Paper in Scotland, 

OUT OF GLASGOW OR EDINBURGH. 



SOLD by all NEWS AGENTS in Town & Country, 



FORFAR BRANCH OFFICE— 10^ WEST HIGH STREET. 



114 ADVERTISEMENTS. 



ffis,i4ii mmwM: 



3 NEW ROAD, FORFAR 

ROOF LIGHTS, CHIMNEY CANS, CEMENT (best London). I^arge STOCK 
ALWAYS ON HAND, FRESH. 

i^ Orders in Town and Country punctually attended to. 

New Suitings, Coatings, Overcoatings, Ulsterings, 

and Trouserings. 

o 

HAVING completed my arrangements for the Season, I am now 
showing a Splendid Selection of the most Fashionable and Reliable 
Goods in the above, and seeing that it is acknowledged that no other 
Clothing House in the Town produces better fitting Garments, or shows 
Larger "Ranges of Fashionable Goods, all of the most trustworthy 
character, and charging the smallest working profit, it will be my con- 
stant endeavour to merit an increased share of Public confidence and. 
support. 

o " 

Gentlemen should INSPECT MY STOCK and COMPARE PRICES, before placing Orders 

elsewhere. 

ROBERT M^NAB, 

150 EAST HIGH STREET, FORFAR. 

Whe F8RMR SISffl^Gi. 

Published every Thursday Afternoon. Guaranteed Gratis Circulation, 

^ 3400. ^ 

THE BEST AIDVEF^TISING JVIEDIUJVI IJM FORFAF^. 
-A 0MVER /V\fHERS©N. EI31T©R AND PRiPRIEPR. ^- 

76 EAST HIGH STREET, FORFAR. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 1 1 5 



"WM. ROSS, 

koks^k & Jfamilg ^roar, Mint Sc §pirit 

JEerckant. 



=»>— =»0«=— <=^ 



Large Stock of GROCERIES and PROVISIONS Fresh, and 
of the Finest Quahty at Lowest Possible Prices. 



WINES AND SPIRITS FULLY MATURED. 
MALT LIQUORS IN SPLENDID CONDITION. 



12 EAST HIGH ST., FORFAR. 

*.x.* Goods delivered free per Van. 



-0 — H» 






f 



Confectioner, 

51 CASTLE STREET, 

FORFAR. 



o 



ftit— o— f« 



Il6 ADVERTISEMENTS. 



JAMES SHEPHEHO, Smr„ 

CHINA MERCHANT, 12i WEST HIGH STREET, 

Has always on hand a large assortment of Staffordshire China and 
Earthenware. Table Crystal from the Best English and Foreign 



Makers. 

NOTETHEADDRESS: — 

JAMES SHEPHERD, Junr., 12^ West High St., Forfar. 

ANDREW SHEPHERD, 

Begs to return his sincere thanks for the kind patronage he has received 
for the past eleven years, and trusts by strict attention to business, and 
putting out a good article, to merit an increased share of support. 

A Choice Selection of CAKES, from 4d per Lb. upwards. 

^111X0 ani ^ingerbr^ab '§o-abt^ at §xkzB to 0uit 

all Partk0, 

SHORTBREAD, PLAIN AND ORNAMENTED. 

TEA-BREAD and PASTRY, 9d per Dozen. SUPERIOR BROWN BREAD. 
SOIREES and FESTIVALS supplied on the Shortest Notice. 



22 k 24 WEST HIGH STREET, FORFAR. 
JAMES MARSHALL 

Invites all those who wish to buy Genuine DRAPERY GOODS at 
Moderate Prices to call at No. no West High Street, Forfar. 

o 

DRAPER, CLOTHIER, & HATTER, 110 West High Street, 

FORFAR. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



117 



DUNDEE 



Weekly News, 

8 PAGES, 64 COLUMNS— PRICE ONE PENNY. 



A rirst-Class Liberal lewspaper. 

©EI^TIflEE) WEEKLY Clf^CUL/tTION, 
UPWARDS OF 121,000 COPIES. 

V— ^r^ — ^r^ "WW "wyr ww v ^ ^w w ^ w^ w^ ■^ 

The "' Weekly News'' publishes regularly : — 



stories by the most Popular Writers. 
Historic Scenes in Edinburghshire, by 

The Rev. Charles Rodgkrs, D.D., 

LL.D. 

Hints on Health, with Answers to Corres- 
pondents, by a Family Physician. 

Rare Old Ballads every week. 

Humorous Scotch Papers, by Timothy 
Tinkle, Bellman and Beadle. 



Prizes weekly for the best Scotch 
Joke. 

Hamely Housekeeping, and Domestic 

Emergency Recipes. 
Fifty Years ago. Draughts Column. 
The Popular Paper for the Discussion 

of Trade Grievances. 



Readers will find the "WEEKLY NEWS " a reliable and 
valuable Medium for answering, through its Corres- 
pondence Columns, enquiries on all matters — Legal, 
Antiquarian, or General. 



PRIZE COMPETITIONS. 



Sold by News Agents Everywhere. 



ii8 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



f 



Published Every FRIDAY MORNING. 



ONLY NEWSPAPER PUBLISHED IN FORFAR. 
LARGE AND INCREASING CIRCULATION. 
BEST MEDIUM FOR LOCAL ADVERTISEMENTS. 



PRINTERS, CABTLE ST., FORFAR. 



MEN'S, YOUTHS', AND BOYS', 

IN GREAT VARIETY, GOOD QUALITY, & CHEAP. 



ALSO, 



©sam^©0 mm^^i 



© 



TIE:s, * SCARFS, * FRONTS, ^ ANP * BRACE;s. 



INSPECTION COEDIALLY INVITED. 



WM. A. GIBSON, 25 Dundee Loan, Forfar. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 1 1 9 



Registered Telegraphic Address— " WHYTE, FORFAR." 



BAwm wa¥m 

^.^v FORFAR. •*^^- 



House— II MARKET PLACE; Office— THE CROSS. 

Stores— Lower MARKET PLACE, & at LAMOND SQUARE. 



Has always for Sale, 
ON MOST REASONABLE TERMS. 

ALSO, 

Best HAND-THRESHED WHEAT STRAW, from 
Belgium and France. 



BRAN and OA TS of the best Feeding Qualities, and as Cheap as any 

one else. 



ALSO, 

HAY FROM PEHTHSHIHE AHG THE €AHSE 

0F STIHUHC. 

etc. etc. 



120 ADVERTISEMENTS. 



For the Best Value in 

TEA-BREAD, SHORTBREAD & CAKES, 

g^onfccfion^, ^am^ & jetties, 

Fruit Wines, Cosaques, Honey, Tea, & Forfar Bridies, 
35 E/cST HI©H STF^EET, fORFAF^. 

D. P. THORNTON, 

8^ ^BST I7IGH STr^BBUi, 

Has always on hand a First-class Assortment of BOOTS and SHOES, 
from the best Manufacturers in the Trade, at very Moderate Prices. 



( 



i would call special attention to my Stock of BOYS' and GIRLS' BOOTS, which 
for durability and price cannot be surpassed. 

BOOTS & shoe;s of auu kinds mad^ 

TO mhsmt. 



REPAIRS OF ALL KINDS EXECUTED ON THE SHORTEST NOTICE. 



Note the Address— 84 WEST HIGH STREET, FORFAR. 

If you want FASHIONABLE and EASY-FITTING HATS, you should TRY 



OF THE 



FORPAR OPERATIVE HAT STORE, 

As he is the only Hatter in Town. Every description of Hat made to Order. 

Hats Dressed and Altered to the Present Fashion. Hats Trimmed for Mourning. 

Splendid Selection of CAPS, TIES, dec. 

97i EAST HIGH STREET, FORFAR. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 121 



6EOR6E GUTHRIE, 

m EIST HIGH ST., FORFIR. 

QUALITY IS OUR LEADING FEATURE. 



We are famous for the fine qualify of our Tea and Buffer. 



H F-^M'lliY GR0GER, WiME MERGH-^NT, ^ 

38 CASTLE STREET, FORFAR. 



FINEST OLD SCOTCH AND IRISH WHISKY, 

2/10 per Bottle ; 16/6 per Gall. 

MRS BELL'S 

OHAPEHY & MIILINEHY Waf«Ho«s€ 

85 VITEST HIGH ST., FORFAR. 

AGENT FOR KEAY BROTHERS, General Dyers, Perth. 



122 ADVERTISEMENTS. 



^006 anb §oa£ B^Terc^ant 



Best English and Scotch Household Coals, 

SCOTCH CAKING COALS. 
ENGLISH AND SCOTCH NUTS. 

SPLINT, STEAM, BLIND, & Small COALS. 

eOAL BRIQUETTES, 



SALT, W^HITIN©, ETC. 

FIREWOOD, CUT TO LENGTHS, DELIVERED AT CURRENT PRICES, 



ORDERS PROMPTLY ATTENDED TO. 



OLD RAILWAY STATION, VICTORIA STREET, 
And FORFAR SAW MILL. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



123 



WOOL MATTRESSES, 14/6 to 221. 



-a 



OS 



00 



CO 



FAMILY MOURNING. 



Special attention is given to this Department. A large variety 
of Goods always kept in Stock. Having a numerous staff of 
Dressmakers, Mantlemakers, and Milliners, Orders for urgent 
FAMILY MOCJRNTNGr can be made up on the Premises on 
Shortest Notice. 

SCALE OF CHARGES VERY MODERATE. 



23 EAST HIGH ST., POEFAR. 



00 



00 



C3 
CO 



SEWING MACHINES AT SPECIAL PRICES. 



WILLIAM FULLERTON, 

Has in Stock a great and varied assortment of First-Class BOOTS, SHOES, and 
SLIPPERS, at Prices to suit all Classes. 

Football, Running, Bicycling, Cricket, and Tennis Shoes, always on hand. 
All sorts of Boots & Shoes Made to Measure on the Shortest Notice. 

NOTE THE ADDKESS — 

30 CASTLE STREET, FORFAR. 

REPAIRING done on the PREMISES. 



A^ EAST m&n STREET, 

HAS always on hand a large variety of Goods, suitable for Birthday and Marriage 
Presents, consisting of Tea-Caddies, Workboxes, Glove and Handkerchief 
Boxes, Ladies' and Gentlemen's Desks, Knives and Forks, Tea and Table 
Spoons, &c. 

Also, a Large Stock of GENERAL GOODS, TOYS, d^c. 

He has also a large selection of MOULDINGS, suitable to every class of Picture. 
PICTURES FRAMED on the shortest notice, at moderate prices, at 

46 East High Street, Forfar. 



124 ADVERTISEMENTS. 



LANGLANDS I MILNE, 

plumbers, 

Gasfitters, Tinsmiths, Bel I hangers, Sec. 

I O^BSit r^iGH STr^Bsm, FoF^PAr^. 

— — :^« < o < @ > e > «><sp— — 

REPAIRS CAREFULLY ATTENDED TO IN TOWN & COUNTRY. 

ALWAYS ON HAND. 
ESTIMATES GIVEN FOR ALL KINDS OF WORK. 

For the BEST VALUE in all kinds of 

■VISIT 

WM. A. CHALMERS'S, 

^© AND ^8 ei^STExEl ST., 
(Corner of Backwynd), 

FORFAR. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



125 




HOOD'S ^ 



*N>!=^0 A>i25<)^ 



»*^ 






^ 



^:^MiC^UL^ ^^\J^ 



ALL WHO REALLY WANT GOOD VALUE SHOULD TRY 

BOOTS, SHOES, and) \jr\r^T\9CJ (BOOTS, SHOES, and 
SLIPPERS. / riiJiJL/ O I SLIPPERS. 

They are of First-Class Workmanship, and manufactured from the best 
rnaterials. ^^ Universal Satisfaction Guaranteed to All. 



EEPAIES. — Special attention is given to this Department — the best materials 
used, and the lowest prices charged. BOOTS EEGUSSETTED. 

CUSTOMER WORK.— As HOOD is a practical tradesman in all the branches of the 
Boot and Shoe Trade, and employs none but the best of Workmen, he can with confidence 
recommend his own make — Pegged, Rivetted, and Sewed. 



Address— HOOD'S, 96 Castle Street, Forfar. 



126 ADVERTISEMENTS. 



HENDRY & WARDEN'S 

83 E:AST HI&H 3T., FORFAR, 

FLANNELS from the Best Makers, BLANKETS, BED & TABLE LINENS. 

IRON BEDSTEADS, MATTRESSES, CARPETS, LINOLEUMS, 

DOOR MATS, SEWING MACHINES. 

9P^ TAILORING DEPARTMENT. 



BEST GOODS AT LOWEST PRICES. 




§uge and ^feeai^ G§al MePQ^a^fe. 

23^^ VICTORIA ST., FORFAR. 



Every description of COAL supplied. WAGON LOADS sent to any 

Station. 

BRIQUETTES — FINEST BRAND — in Large and Satall Sizes, j 



Orders per Post promptly attended to. 









ADVERTISEMENTS. 




127 


cm 


1 


and 


SEE SPECIALTY for SEASON 1888, 

A 12 BY 10 INCHES 



.ARGENTIC BROMIDE ENLARGEMENT, 

A/" HIGHLY FINISHED, 

In ^lassibi: ®ilt Jframi^ of superior qualit}), 

Size 24 by 20 inches, > 

With Crimson Flock & Gold Cut Mount. Also, 12 C.D.V.s, or iCabinets, all for 17/6. 
Groups are charged 2/6 extra. Specimens at Studios. 



CHARL ES MIT CHELL. 

Forfar-EAST HIGH ST. ; KirrieiniLir-STATIOM BEAE ; 
Falhirk-The GARUISOM STUDIO. 

DAVID IRONS, 



EiFdwape ^ Seed MeFQl|aBli, 

14 EAST HIGH STREET, 

Has always on hand a general assortment of House Furnishing Iron- 
mongery, Table Cutlery, N.S. and E.P. Spoons and Forks, Registered 
and Kinnaird Grates, Ranges (close and open fire), Paraffin Heating and 
Cooking Stoves, Mangles, Wringing Machines, Fenders, Fire Irons. 
Blacksmiths', Joiners', and Bootmakers' Furnishings. 



Agricultural Implements, and all General Farm Requisites ; Spades, 
Shovels, Forks, Graips, Sacks, Ropes, Twines, &.c. 



OILS— Burning, Harness, and Machinery. 



128 ADVERTISEMENTS. 



^W^INTER CLOTHINQ. 



H 11' ■^■WWf 



^— 



BEGS TO INTIMATE THAT HIS STOCK IS NOW 

COMPLETE. 



•SPEGI^li MNES ip (DVERG0MT1NGS. WORSTED Glx©THS. 

^ Sy^lTII^GS, for b^e ppesenh Season. 



Gentlemen favouring me with their Orders will have them Tastefully Cut 
and 7iiell Made i?i all the Leading Styles. 



14 WEST HIGH STREET. 14 

Prizes ! Prizes !! Prizes !!! 

My PRIZE for 1888 will be the very best BOOTS & 
SHOES, at the lowest prices — ready-niade or to order. 
Every buyer will win. PRIZE REPAIRING. 



JAMES M'DOUGALL, 

40 EAST HIGH ST., FORFAR. 

FOR BEST VALUE IN 

fLANNELS, BLANKETS, & fLAIDINGS, 

plholesale ^ Betail !t?)i|apei|$, ^ailoijs, pt^illinetis, Biie$$ ^ ^t?lautleiKia)?ei|$, 
68, 70, & 72 CASTLE ST., FORFAR. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 1 29 



MELODEONS, MELODEONS, MELODEONS I 

W. H. THOMSON, Bookseller ^ Stationer, 73 East High St., Forfar. 

Stock for 1887-88 just to hand, Splendid Assortment of Newest 
Styles — decidedly the best and most varied Selection of Melodeons in 
Town. Prices from 4/6 to 20/. 

MELODEONS & CONCERTINAS REPAIRED. 



A Splendid x^ssortment of this Season's Cards, in the various kinds, 
and from the best Makers. Inspection invited. 



W, H. THOMSON, Bookseller & Stationer, 

73 E/cST HISH STF^EET, fORFAt^. 

©HE Hew Shoe Shop. 






Has always on hand a large and carefully selected Stock of BOOTS 
and SHOES of the best quaUty. 

The Best Selling House Slipper— The Original " A " (best quality), 

" Household " Felt Slipper, which can only be got at 

THE NEW SHOE SHOP. 

Ladies Fancy DRESS SLIPPERS in Great Variety, 



REPAIRS and Special ORDERS to Measure Receive PROMPT AHENTION, 



9S CISTLE STREET, FORFIR. 



I30 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 




Gent's Garments made to Measure, 

in first-class Style and Finish. 

WILLIAM DICK, 

€lotkixr & fitter, 

Invites Inspection of his Stock purchased from the 
Best Manufacturers, including all the Newest Styles, 
Fabrics, and Colourings — Quality and Price unsur- 
passed. 

Ulsterings. Overcoatings, and Worsted 

Coatings. 
Scotch Saxony, Cheviot and Homespun 

Suitings. 
West of England Cloths and Suitings. 
Trouserings and Vestings. 
Satin and Pelt Hats. 
Tvreed Hats and Caps. 

Dress, Oxford, and Wool Shirts— all sizes. 
Fronts, Collars, and Cuffs. 
Lambswool and Merino Underclothing. 
Scarfs, Gloves, Braces, & every Requisite 

for Gentlemen's Outfit. 



Having arranged with one of the best Manufac- 
turers of Waterproof Garments in the Kingdom, I 
am prepared to execute all Orders to Measure in all 
Styles and Shapes, at a small percentage over the 
Manufacturer's Prices. A large Selection of Pat- 
terns to choose from. 



A Select Stock of Waterproof Gmnnents always 
on ha?id. 



Observe New Address— 

20 WEST HIGH ST., FORFAR. 



Gentlemen's Shirts 
to Measure. 



Made 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 13I 






9 

Dr^APBi^ AND Smi( fflsr^Gsr^, 

30 & 34 EAST HliiH STREET, 

Has always on hand a First-class Assortment of GENERAL 
DRAPERY GOODS from the best London Houses. I would call 
special attention to my Stock of Dresses — Black and Coloured. Also, 
a Choice Selection of Fancy Goods, suitable for Christmas and New- 
Year Presents. 

DRESS & MANTLE MAKING. 

ABEL & SIMPSON, 

Family ajud Bis-p-e-Rsifig Cf^emists, 

THE CROSS, FORFAR, 

Have alwavs on liand a large and varied stock wf r')-o|n-ii;tary Arucles — 

Perfumery, Hair Preparations, Brushes, Combs, Sponges, and other Toilet Requisites. 

Also, a Stock of HORSE, CATTLE, DOG, & POULTRY MEDICINES. 
. TOBACCO AND CIGARS. 

' PRESCRIPTIONS CAREFULLY AND ACCURATELY DISPENSED. 

Any Article not in stock procured per return post. 



Quinine and Iron Tonic, in bottles, - Is and 2s. 
" Cough-no-niore," „ - Is and Is 6d. 

Chemical Food, „ - Is and 2s. 

Prepared according to Dr Parrish's recipe. 

Essence of Rennet, in bottles, 6d and Is. 

Prepared according to a celebrated Danish recipe. 



SOLE AGENTS in FORFAR for Messrs W. & A. GILBEY, Wine Importers & Distillers. 

On hand, Stock of their Champagnes, Sherries, Ports, Clarets, Cognacs, Whiskies, &c. &c. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 






CXD 



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ADVERTISEMENTS. 133 



5 Littlecauseway, Forfar. 

BILLPOSTING & DELIVERING promptly executed in Town or Country. 

(finculaiis JSddijessed. ftiessages, Ivjight oi; Bay. 



WIUUIAM EDWARD, . 

fmi\i, ^ttnil, ami |^Kii«il ^a^J. 

o 

SHORTBREAD, BISCUITS, TEA & FANCY BREAD 
of every description always on hand. 

GINGER, TEA, PLUM, SEED, SULTANA, RICE, SPONGE, MADEIRA CAKES 

OF FINEST QUALITY ONLY. 

MJ^RRIPQE apd 6HR1S7MPS G^K^S Tasbefully Qpnamenbed. 



10 CASTLE STREET, FORFAR. 



Mas always in Stock a Large and Varied Assortment of BOOTS & SHOES suitable 
for the Season, at Reasonable Prices, made of good material and workmanship, that 
he can recommend to his Customers and the public generally. 

LADIES' BOOTS from 4s 6d to 12s 6d ; 

G-BNTS' BOOTS from 8s 6d to 14s 6d. 

A large lot of Boys' and Girls' Boots to hand, suitable for the season. Boots & Shoes 
of every descri]Dtion made to measure of best material and workmanship. 

OBSERVE THE ADDRESS — 

D. TARBAT, 13 EAST HIGlI ST., FORFAR. 



134 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



ALEX. TODD, 

10 EAST HIGH ST., FORFAR, 

Has always on hand a well selected Stock of TWEED SUITINGS, 
WORSTED COATINGS, and OVERCOATINGS, in all the Newest 
Patterns. 

^I50, l^^i^ies' Jacktings, in vill the l^eaMng 

^abclties. 

Parties giving- him a trial may rely on getting them well 
made, and a perfect fit, at lowest possible prices. 



^ mi^&iH^mw'@ ^ 








ISO EAST HIGH STREET, 

Has always in Stock a very choice selection of MILLINERY, in all 
the Leading Styles. Also, all the NOVELTIES in LACE and Fancy 
Goods for evening wear. 



IJS^SPECTIOX IMVITED. 



130 East High St., Forfar. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 135 






T> 'T,-^. 






AGENT FOE— 

The Provident Plate Glass Insurance Company, Ltd. 
The Boiler Insurance and Steam Power Co., Ltd., for the Insurance and Inspection of 
Engines and Boilers, the Insurance of Workpeople coming under "The Employers' 
Liability Act, 1880," and the Insurance of Individuals against General y\ccidents. 

JAS. W, ROPERtSON, 

^apex^an^ex anb decorator, 

52 CASTLE ST., FORFAR. 



ALWAYS ON HAND. 



LARGE VARIETY OF CHEAP PAPERHANGINGS, BEST QUALITY, 



Estimate© J[iti*itishcb. 

GLASS CUT TO SIZE. 

GLASS, CHINA, EARTHENWARE & FURNITURE 

AT 



GRAY'S 



3 

45 and 47 CASTLE STREET, FORFAR, 

LARGE SELECTION ALWAYS OX HAND. 



136 ADVERTISEMENTS. 



OSNIBURGH BAR. 



ALEXANDER ROBEKTSON, 

^ine axxb Spirit ^^exc^aixt 

Osnaburgh Street, Forfar. 

o 

LUNCHEONS, TEAS, &c., on the Shortest Notice, and 

at Moderate Charges. 

A. R. having possession of OSNABURGH STREET HALL will be 
prepared to take engagements for Marriage Parties, Balls, 
Suppers, &c. Estimates Given. 



L 



PORT WINE, ... ... ... ... 2s 6d to 3s 6d per Bottle. 

SHERRY, 2s6dto3s6d 

FINE MATURED BRANDY. 4s 6d to 5s 

FINE OLD HIGHLAND WHISKY, ... 2s (3d to 3s 

GLENORANT BLEND, ... ... 2s 6d to 3s 

Do. do., ... ... 17s 6d to 18s Gd per GtiUou. 

"The BAILIE NICOL JAR VIE " BLEND of Old 

Scotch Whisky, ... ... ... 3s per Bottle. 

Do. do. do., ... ... 18s per G-allon. 

OLD JAMAICA RUM, ... 3s to 3s 6d per Bottle. 

BASS'S BITTER BEER, 2s 6d per Dozen. 

EDINBURGH ALES, 2s 3d 

LONDON PORTER, ... 2s 6d 

TABLE BEER, 2s 

ALL IN SPLENDID CONDITION. 



DUNCAN FLOCKHART & Co.'s AERATED WATERS. 

^QCJlt fox 

D. NICOLL'S SUPERIOR LEMONADE — Manufactory, Fleuchar Craig, DUNDEE. 
Large Quantities at Wholesale Prices, 



ALL ORDERS PXJNCTUALLY ATTEJ^DED TO. 

OBKLJ^BUEQH BAR. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 137 



AUEXANDER CRICHTON, 

II^ONMONGEI^ ^ SEEDSMAN, 
CROSS, FORFAR, 

HAS always a fine Selection of GENERAL and FURNISHING 
IRONMONGERY, comprising — Grates, Fenders, Fire Irons, 
Brass and other Bedsteads. Also, a good variety of Marriage &: other 
Presents, viz. : — Tea Pots, Cruets, Jelly Glasses, Knives and Forks, 
Spoons (Dinner and Dessert), all E. P. and N. S. — Quality guaranteed. 

Finest Selected SEEDS of all kinds from the best Growers. 



OILS OF FINEST QUALITY ALWAYS IN STOCK- 

:FEE!IDIISr& STTJIFIF'S- 








J.) 



i^kintef ki\d ©edofktof 



^ 



Desires respectful^ to call attention to his New Stock of PAPER-HANGINGS and 
GENERAL DECORATIONS, suitable for Kooms, Lobbies, and Staircases. Pattern 
Books and Decorative Designs sent to any address. A larg-e selection of ROOM and 
PICTURE FRAME MOULDINGS. PICTURES FRAMED. All (Jrders will 
Receive Prompt Attention. 

21 WEST HIGH STREET, FORFAR. 



CHARLES ADA 

i5 OSNABURGH ST., FORFAR. 

Always on hand a Large Stock of TACKBTS, CLAMPS, 
NAILS, & GENERAL FURNISHINGS for Shoemakers. 



LEATHER (Soft or Hard) Cut to Order at Lowest Possible Prices. 



138 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



grapxr, €lothkr, fatter, dui ©utfitt^r. 



Ready-made Clothing of every description ; Worsted Coatings and 
Scotch Tweeds Made to Measure on the shortest notice ; Home-made 
Shirts, Drawers, and Jackets. Dress Goods from the Principal Manu- 
facturers — Latest Styles and Newest Designs. Ladies' Jackets, Dol- 
mans and Mantles ; Special Value in Black French Merinos, i/6 to 3/6. 

A. D. has always in Stock, Flannels, Plaidings, and Blankets, for 
Price and Quality not to be surpassed, all marked in plain figures, 
at keenest Prices. 

INSPECTION and COMPARISON FREEI V INVITED, 

AT 

DALGETY'S, 

55 & 57 EAST HIGH ST., FORFAR. 



BOOKBINDING. BOOKBINDING. 



•i-^-i- 



ir) <KT)Y ^iy^^ OP f^mfepr). 

Good Words, Chambers's Journal, Quiver, &c., 

from 1/9. 






W. SHEPHERD, 39 Castle Street, FORFAR. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



139 



PROVIDENT 



PLATE GLASS INSURANCE CO. 



Ltd., BIRMINGHAM. 



CAPITAL, - - £SS,000. 

This Company insures Plain Plate, Silvered Plate, Ornamental and other Glass, 
against malicious or accidental breakage. 

Amongst the advantages secured to Insurers with this Company are the follotving : — 

Ample Security guaranteed by a large Subscribed Caisital. 

Moderate Rates of Premium. 

Policies cover breakages from every cause whatsoever. This is the only Company 
absolutely free from exceptions. 

Immediate Re-placements. When a breakage requires immediate attention, the In- 
sured may go direct to the Glass Warehouses, or otherwise communicate with the 
Agent or Manager. 

No Re-Insurance charged. The usual practice of other Companies is to make a chai-ge 
for Re-Insurance whenever a breakage occurs. 

Bonus of 10 % allowed on total Premiums paid every 5 years if no claim has been made. 



INSURANGE OF GLASS IN PRIVATE HOUSES. 



No Measurement or Surveys required. 



Premium according to Rental. 



The Owners and Occupiers of Private Dwelling Houses can now insure all the Glass 
in their ordinary Wind(jws and Doors witliout ^[easurement of the Glass, the Pre- 
mium being regiilated by the Rental at the following rates : — 



Rental not exceeding £20 Premium 4/. 
30 „ 6/. 

40 „ 8/. 

50 „ 10/. 



Rental not exceeding £60 Premium 11/. 

70 „ 12/. 

80 „ 13/. 

100 „ 15/. 



District Manager— W. E. REID, Monikie Manse, Carnoustie, 
Agent— P, A. TOSH, Forfar. Glazier— A. BAIN, West High Street, Forfar. 




■ISTEITOi, 

All kinds of TILE WORK, CEMENT WORK, CONCRETE FLOORS, &c. 



20 OANMORE ST., FORFAR. 



hxbtx t0 ^ibertisemtnte. 



PAGE. 

Abel & Simpson, Cliemists 131 

Adam, C. , Leather Cutter 187 

Anderson & Co. , Di-apers .... facing .5 

Bell, Mrs, Draper 121 

Bvitchart, D., Grocer 121 

Chalmers, W. A., Draper 124 

Crichton, A. , Ironmonger 137 

Dalgety, Alex. , Draper, etc 138 

Davidson, J., Hatter 120 

Dick, W., Clothier, etc 130 

Edward, W., Baker 133 

Evening Telegraph 113 

Ewen, James, Wood Merchant, etc. 122 
Eerguson, Miss, Berlin Wool Re- 
pository 112 

Forfar Dispatch 114 

Forfar Herald 118 

French, Dr, Dentist 112 

Fullerton, W. , Shoemaker 123 

Gibson, W A., Clothier, etc 118 

Gray, E., China Merchant, etc 135 

Guild, James, Draper : 131 

Guthrie, G., Gamedealer, etc 121 

Hendry & Warden, Drapers, etc. ... 126 

Hood, D., Shoemaker 125 

Irons, D., Ironmonger 127 

Jarvis Brothers, Drapers, etc 128 

Langlands & Milne, Plumbers 124 

Low & Co., Grocers, etc Ill 

Mann, J., Clothier, etc 128 

Marshall, J., Draper, etc 116 

Masterton, D., Plasterer 139 

Meek, A., Shoemaker 132 

Melvin, B. & M., Grocers 109 

Mitchell, C., Photographer 127 

Moffat, W., Slater 114 



PAGE. 

Munro, James, Toy Merchant, etc... 123 

M'Dougall, J., Shoemaker 128 

M'Nab, R., Clothier, etc 114 

Neill, J. , Music Teacher 112 

North British and Mercantile In- 
surance Company facing 4 

Paterson, Sons, & Co facing 53 

Petrie, Thomas 110 

Provident Plate Glass Insurance Co. 139 

Reid, Peter, Confectioner . 115 

Robertson, A., Osnaburgh Bar 136 

Robertson, J. W., Painter 135 

Rodger, D. , Painter 137 

Ross, Wm., Grocer 115 

Saddler, J., Confectioner 120 

Sharp, W. W., Coal Merchant, etc. 126 

Shepherd, A., Baker 116 

Shepherd, A. & C, Slaters 110 

Shepherd, Jas., jr., China Merchant 116 

Shepherd, W. , Printer, etc 138 

Smith, Miss, Boot INTerchant 129 

Spalding, A., Clothier — facing 2nd 
page of cover and title page 

Steele, John, & Co facing 52 

Strachan, John, Watchmaker 110 

Tarbat, D., Shoemaker 133 

Thom, Miss, Milliner 134 

Thom, C. , & Son, Billposters 133 

Thomson, W. H., Bookseller, etc. ... 129 

Thornton, D. P., Shoemaker 120 

Todd, Alex. , Tailor, etc 134 

Tosh, P. A., Auctioneer, etc 135 

Warden, W. , Draper, etc 1 23 

Weekly News 117 

Whyte, D., Potato Merchant, etc.... 119 



ADVERTISEMENTS ON COVER. 

Barclay, R. W. , Draper, etc Page 2 

Dunn, R. & J., Boot Merchants..' 4 

Martin, James, Grocer 3 



Ii ETTERPRESS P RINTING 

8F EWERY BEmRimiSFl. 

All Orders receive prompt and careful attention, 
are tastefully designed, and well finished. 



Commercial Work of all kinds. 

Memorandttms Of Acco^mt Headino's, 

Posters aiid Handbills iii effective styles. 

Wedding Cards and Invitations. 

''In Memoinant Cards, newest patterns 

ahvays iii stock. 



Specimens ^ :^i^iges on appligation. 

ESTIMATES FURNISHED. 




m CISTLE STREET, FORFlPx. 



Bookseller, Stationer, k Printer, 

39 CASTLE ST., FORFAR. 



Business Books, z^arious sizes Cf Railings, 

Papers, Machine and Hand-made, 

Envelopes, a large stock of all sizes. 

Business Envelopes, good quality, at 2s 6d 

per 1000. Samples on Application. 

Books Rilled, Printed, and Bound 

to any pattern. 

Business Cards, Invoice Headings, &c.. 

Printed or Lithographed. 

Note Paper Headings Neatly Printed or 
Stamped from Die. 

lEonogvwms (Engviili£i)~§ketckcs supplitli. 
DIE-STAJVIPIJ^© 0]\ THE fREMISES. 



Leather Goods of the best makes. 



MUSIC KEPT.— Any Piece got to Order by Return of Post. 




The Religious Tract Society publislies Several Thousands of Books 
foi^ all readers, at all prices, from One Farthing to One Guinea. This 
List gives the Titles of many that are suitable for presentation, 
but the following Catalogues, containing full Lists of the Society's 
Publications, are also issued, and will be forwarded. Post Free, on 
application to The Secretaries, 56, Paternoster Row, E.G. : — 



General Catalogue of Books, con- 
taining, Section I. General 
Literature ; Section II, Story 
Books. 

General Catalogue, Section III. 
Books for the Young under One 
Shilling, Coloured Publications, 
Etc. 

Classified and Descriptive List of 
Books. 



Illustrated Catalogue or Books 
and other Publications. 

Publications Adapted for Cir- 
culating and Sunday . School 
Libraries. 

Tracts, Handbills, Leaflets, and 
other Publications. 

Publications in various Languages. 

Diagrams and Pictures for LECTuaERS. 



The Society's Publications may be purchased of any Bookseller. 



CHIEF OFFICE : 56, Paternoster Row, London. 

A large variety of Presentation Books at all prices may be inspected at the Retail Dep6ts. 
London : 65, St. Paul's Churchyard [Opposite the Northern Entrance to the Cathedral)^ 

AND 164, Piccadilly. 

Liverpool : 18, Slater Street. Manchester : 100, Corporation Street. 

Brighton : 31, Western Eoad. 



f&E RntiGtous Tract society's list. 
One Guinea^ 

The Lands of Seripture. — Illustrated by Pen and Pencil. Con- 
taining "Those Holy Fields" and "The Land of the Pharaohs," by the 
Rev. S. Manning, ll.d. ; and "Pictures from Bible Lands," by the Eev. 
S. G-. Green, d.d. Imperial 8vo. 21s. handsomely bound in cloth gilt. 
This elegantly bound and profusely illustrated volume forms a very suitable 
Presentation Book to a Minister, Sunday-school Superintendent, or Teacher. It gives 
in a concise and interesting form, a large amount of infoi'mation about the places 
mentioned in Scripture, such as would prove of great service to every Bible Student. 



From One Pound to Half-a-Guinea. 



Pioneering in New Guinea. 

By James Chalmers, of New Q-uinea. 
Map and Illustrations. 16s. cloth 
boards. 

Edepsheim's Bible Histopy. 

Complete in four vols, cloth. 16s. 
the set. 

Eadie's Biblical Eneyelo- 

psdia. 13s. 6d. in morocco ; 12s. 6d. 
in calf ; 10s. 6d. half bound. 

D'Aubigne's History of the 

Reformation. One vol., complete, 
16s. in morocco ; 15s. in calf ; 12s. half 
bound. 



The Leisure Hour Volume for 

1887. Half calf, 10s.:6d. 

The Sunday at Home Volume 

fOP 1887. Half calf, 10s. 6d. 

The Boy's Own Annual for 

1887. Nicely boimd in half- 
morocco, 12s. 6d. 

The Girl's Own Annual for 

1887. Nicelyboimd in half -morocco, 
12s. 6d. 

Charlotte Elliott's Journals 

and Poems. 12s. antique morocco 
gilt ; lis. antique morocco plain. 



A Handsome. Gift Book for Birthdays, Weddiyigs, Partings, <&c., or for a School Prize, 

Victoria, R.L : Her Life and Reign. By Dr. Macaulay, 

Author of "Sea Pictures," "Luther Anecdotes," "Gordon Anecdotes," etc. 

With Five Portraits of the Q,ueen, and Sixty Engravings by Edward Whjonper 

and others. Small dto, 10s. 6d. cloth, gilt edges. 
" The author's endeavour has been to recall those qualities in the personal character 
of the Queen and the incidents in her life which have most endeared her to her people 
during the last fifty years ; and he has also aimed at giving a brief but comprehen- 
sive summary of the great public movements of the time. In both efforts he seems 
to have succeeded to admiration. Dr. Macaulay writes en jileine connaissayice de cause. 
He has witnessed the events which he, narrates, and been brought face to face "with, 
the personages whom he portrays. He has the liveliest ocular remembrance of ' Fifty 
years since.' " — Illustrated London Neius. 



Ten Shillings. 

Historic Landmarks in the Christian Centuries. By Eichard 

Heath. With Eighty-foiu* Hlustrations. Quarto. 10s. handsome cloth gilt. 

"Calculated at once to give a bird's-eye view of history, and to impress its most 
important events strongly on the memory." — Standard. 
" Will prove a most acceptable gift-book." — Westerii Morning News, 



Eight Shillings Each 



THE BOY'S OWN ANNUAL. 

Every boy and young man should have 
the "Boy's Own Annual" for 1887. — 
The Ninth Volume of the '^ Boy's Own 
Paper'''' — containing 832 pages of Tales 
of Schoolboy Life, and of Adventure on 
Land and Sea ; Outdoor and Indoor 
Games for every Season ; Perilous Ad- 
ventures at Home and Abroad ; Amuse- 
ments for Summer and Winter; and 
Instructive Papers written so as to be 
read by boys and youths. With many 
Coloured and Wood Engravings. Price 
Be. handsome cloth ; 9s. 6d. gilt edges ; 
12s. 6d. half morocco. 



THE GIRL'S OWN ANNUAL. 

No Young Lady's Library should be 
without the "Girl's Own Annual" for 
1887.— r^e Eighth Volume of the ''■ GirVs 
Own Paper" — containing 832 pages of 
interesting and useful reading. Stories 
by popular writers ; Music by eminent 
composers ; Practical Papers for young 
Housekeepers ; Medical Papers by a well- 
known practitioner ; Needlework, plain 
and fancy ; Helpful Papers for Christian 
Girls ; Papers on Seasonable and Season- 
able Dress, etc. etc. Profusely Hlustrated. 
Price 8s. in handsome cloth ; 9s. 6d. with 
gilt edges ; 12s. 6d. half morocco. 



2 56, PATERNOSTER ROW, LONDON; and of all Booksellers, 



I^E RELIGtOm TRACT SOCIETY S LIST. 




Reduced from] Kensington P^i-ACE. [" Victoria R.I." 

The Queen ivas born in the room on the middle floor of the wing. 



-Wm, i^W 



56, PATERNOSTER ROW, LONDON^ and of all Booksellers. ^ 



The religious iract society's list. 



Eight Shillings Each. 

TEE PEN AND PENCIL SERIES OF 

ILLUSTRATED TABLE BOOKS. 

Imperial Bvo (size of page, 11 hy 7j inches), beautifully Illustrated, and printed onsuperi&^ 

paper, price 8s. in handsome cloth, gilt edges ; or 25s. each in morocco, elegant. 

Just Published, the New Volume of this Series. 

PICTURES FROM HOLLAND. Drawn with Pen and Pencil. 



By EicHARD LovETT, M.A., Author 
one hundred and forty Illustrations. 

The Land of the Pharaohs. 

Illustrated. By Dr. Manning. New 
Edition, thoroughly revised, and with 
many new Engravings. 

Amepiean Pietures by Pen 

and Pencil. By the Eev. Dr. 

Manning. 

Sea Pietupes by Pen and 

Pencil. By Dr. Macaulay. 

English Pictures by Pen and 

Pencil. By Dr. Manning. 

French Pictures by Pen and 

Pencil. By Dr. Green. 

Indian Pictures by Pen and 

Pencil. By William Urwick, m.a. 

Italian Pictures by Pen and 

Pencil. By Dr. Manning. 

Canadian Pictures. By the 

Marquis of Lorne. 



of "Norwegian Pictures," etc. "With 

Australian Pictures by Pen 

and Pencil. By Howard Wil- 

loughby. 

Norwegian Pictures by Pen 

and Pencil. By Eichard Lovett, 

M.A. 

Pictures from Bible Lands. 

By Dr. Green. 

Pictures from the German 

Fatherland by Pen and Pencil. 

By Dr. Green. 

Scottish Pictures by Pen and 

Pencil. By Dr. Green. 

Swiss Pictures by Pen and 

Pencil. By Dr. Manning. 

"Those Holy Fields:" Pales- 
tine. Dlustrated by Pen and Pencil. 
By Dr. Manning. 



Eight Shillings Each, 

The History of the Jews, from the War with Kome to the 

Present Time. By the Eev. H. G. Adams, m.a., Vicar of Old Shoreham, Author 

of " Wykehamica," " Schoolboy Honour," etc. Illustrated. 8vo. 8s. cloth boards. 

This book aims at supplying the want that has long been felt for a brief, consecutive 

sketch of Jewish History from the destruction of Jerusalem down to the present time. 



The Handy Natural History. 

By the Eev. J. G. Wood, author of 

" Homes without Hands," etc. etc. 

With 224 Engravings. Small quarto. 

8s. cloth boards, gilt edges. 
" An excellent book for the young, 
handsomely illustrated, and written in 
fluent and lucid style ." —Saturday Review. 

John Wycliffe and his Eng- 
lish Precursors. By Professor 
Lechler, D.D., of the University of 
Leipsic. Translated from the Ger- 
man by Peter Lorimer, d.d. New 
Edition, very carefully Eevised, by 
S. G. Green, d.d. Portrait and 
Illustrations. 8s. cloth boards. 



The Spanish Reformers, their 

Memories and Dwelling Places. 

Illustrated. By Dr. Stoughton. 8s. 
cloth gilt. 

Homes and Haunts of Luther. 

By Dr. Stoughton. Illustrated. 8s. 
cloth gilt. 

Footprints of Italian Re- 
formers. By Dr. Stoughton. Beau- 
tifully Illustrated. Cloth gilt, 8s. 

William Tyndale. A Biogra- 
phy. A contribution to the History 
of the English Bible. By the Eev. 
E. Demaus, m.a. New Edition, care- 
fully revised. 8vo. 8s. cloth boards. 



Seven and Sixpence Each. 



The Midnight Sky. Familiar 

Notes on the Stars and Planets. By 
Eb'win Dunkin, F.R.S., of the Eoyal 
Observatory .'Greenwich. With thirty- 
two Star Maps and numerous other 
lUustratiohs. Iixip. 8vo. 7s. 6d. 
cloth; 9&. extra boards, with gilt edges. 



Boys' Own Bookshelf. 

Vol. v.— Outdoor Sports. Illustrated. 

Small 4to. 7s. 6d. handsome cloth 

gilt. 
Vol. VI.— Indoor Sports. Hlustrated. 

Small 4to. 7s. 6d. handsome cloth 

gilt. 



4 56, PA TERN0S7ER RO IV, LONDON; and of all Booksellers. 



THE RELIGIOUS TRACT SOCIETY'S LIST. 




^6, PATERNOSTER ROW, LONDON ; and of ali Booksellers. 5 



THE RELIGIOUS TRACT SOCIETY'S LIST. 



Seven Shil 

ANNUAL VOLUME FOR 1887. 

" Behold in these what leisure hours demand, 
Amusement and true knowledge hand in 

hand." 
■The Volume for 1887 of this Family 
Journal of Instruction and Recreation — 
contains 860 pages of interesting reading, 
Tvith numerous Illustrations by Eminent 
Artists. It forms a handsome Book for 
Presentation, and an appropriate and 
instructive volume for a School or College 
Prize. Price 7s. in cloth boards ; 8s. 6d. 
extra boards, gilt edges ; lOs. 6d. half- 
bound in calf. 



Each. 

nnha^ at %amt 



ings 

ANNUAL VOLUME FOR 1887. 

The Illustrated Family Magazine 
for Sabbath Reading. 

This Volume for 1887 forms a very 
suitable Book for Presentation. It con- 
tains 828 pages, "with a gi'eat variety of 
Interesting and Instructive Sabbath 
Beading for every Member of the Family. 
It is profusely illustrated by Coloured 
and Wood Engravings. Piace 7s. cloth 
boards ; 8s. 6d. extra boards, gilt edges ; 
10s. 6d. half-bound in calf. 



Random TPUthS in Common Things. Occasional Papers from 

my study Chair. By the Rev. J. R. Vernon, m.a.. Author of " The Harvest of a 

Quiet Eye." Illustrations. 7s. cloth gilt. 
"It seems even better than ' The Harvest of a Quiet Eye.'"— ilf;-. RusMn. 
" Should be placed nest to Wordsworth on every student's bookshelf." — Standard. 

Six Shillings Each. 



The Crown of Flowers. Poems 

and Pictures from " The Girl's Own 
Paper." Handsomely bound, 6s. 

Work and Adventure in New 

Guinea, 1877 to 1885. By James 

Chaljiers, of Port Moresby, and W. 
Wyatt Gill, b.a. With Illustra- 
tions. Crown 8vo. 6s. cloth. 

Madagascar and France. 

With some Account of the Island, its 
People, its Resources and Develop- 
ment. By George A. Shaw, f.l.s., 
London Mission, Tamatave. With 
many Illustrations. 6s. cloth. 



Winter Pictures. By Poet and 

Artist. An elegant book, most ap- 
propriate for a Christmas or New 
Year's Gift. Profusely illustrated 
in the finest style of Wood Engrav- 
ing. By Edward Whymper. Quarto. 
6s. cloth boards, gilt. 

Ingleside and Wayside Mu- 
sings. A companion volume to 
" The Harvest of a Quiet Eye." 6s. 
cloth gilt. 

Among the Mongols. By the 

Rev. James Gilmour, m.a. (of Peking). 
With Map and numerous Engravings. 
Demy 8vo. 6s. cloth boards. 



Five Shillings Each. 



Ants and their Ways. By 

the Rev. W. Farran White, m.a. 
With numerous Illustrations, and a 
Complete List of Genera and Species 
of the British Ants. 5s. cloth boards. 

The Honey Bee : its Nature, 

Homes, and Products. By W. H. 
Harris, b.a., b.sc. With Eighty- 
two Illustrations. 5s. cloth, 

Chrysostom : His Life and 

Times. By Rev. R. Wheler Bush, 
M.A., F.R.G.s. Crown 8vo. 5s. cloth. 

Edersheim's The Temple in 

the Time of Christ. 5s. el. gilt. 

Edersheim's Jewish Life in 

the Time of Christ. 5s. cl. gilt. 
Every-day Life in China; or, 

Scenes along River and Road in the 
Celestial Empire. By Edwin Joshua 
Dukes. With Illustrations. 5s. 
cloth. 



The Life of Jesus Christ the 

Saviour, for Young People. By 
Mrs. S. Watson. With Engravings. 
Crown 8vo. 5s. cloth. 

Past and Present in the East. 

By the Rev. Harry Jones, m.a.. 
Prebendary of St. Paul's Cathedral. 
With Engravings. 5s. cloth, gilt. 

Glimpses of Maori Land. By 

A. R. Butler, Author of " Stories of 
a Children's Medical Mission." Il- 
lustrated. Crown 8vo. 5s. cloth. 

Jottings from the Pacifle. 

By the Rev. W. Wyatt Gill, b.a. 
Hlustrated. Crown 8vo. 5s. cloth. 

Hanna's Our Lord's Life on 

Earth. 5s. cloth. 

Daniel Moore's Sunday Medi- 
tations. 5s. cloth. 
Mahomet and Islam. By Sir 

Wm. Muir. 5s. cloth. 



6 56, PATERNOSTER ROW, LONDON; and of all Booksellers, 



THE RELIGIOUS TRACT SOCIETY'S LIST. 




The CHURCH-GoiNa Bell. 
Reduced from " The Sunday at Home " Volume for 1887. 



^(>, PATERNOSTER ROW, LONDON ; and of all Booksellers, 7 



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76 Plain Paths Upward and Heaven- 

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LIFE 



A N N U I T I E S. 



ESTABLISHED 1809. 

INCORPORATED BY ROYAL CHARTER AND SPECIAL ACTS OF PARLIAMENT. 

o 

Preside,nt—Wi'& Grace The Duku of Roxburgiie. 
Vice-President — His Grace The Duke of Sdtheeland, K.G. 

EXTRAORDINARY DIRECTORS. 
Right Hon. Lord Noethbour.n e. I Right Hon. The Earl op Aberdeen. 

Right Hon. The Earl of Strathmore. | Sir Matthew White Ridley, Babt., M.P. 



Resources of the Company 



As at 31st December, 1887. 
I. CAPITAL- 



Authorised Capital 
Subscribed Capital 
Paid-up Capital 



II. FIRE FUND- 

Reserve 

Premium Reserve . . 
Dividend Reserve Fund 
Balance carried forward 



£3,000,000 

2,500,000 

625,000 



£1,250,000 

396,642 

100,000 

41,471 



£L788.113 



III. LIFE FUND- 

Accuraulated Fund (Life Branch) £.3,772,579 

Accumulated Fund (Annuity Branch) 682,4 86 



£4,455,015 



Revenue for the Year 7887. 



From the Life Department — 

Net Life Premiums, Interest, etc. . . £502,526 

Annuity Premiums (including 

£125,024, 6s 2d by single payment) 

and interest 150,48fi 



From the Fire Department— 

Net Fire Premiums, Interest, etc. 



£653,00^ 



£1,279,34'( 
£1,932,350 



The Accumulated Funds of the Life Department are] 
free from liability in respect of the Fire Depart- 
ment, and in like manner the Accumulated Funds 
of the Fire Department are free from liability in ^' 
respect of the Life DejJartment. The Investments of 
the Life and Annuity Branches are therefore, in this 
Office, kept absolutely distinct from tliose of the Fire 
Department, and ivill be found separately set forth 
in the Balance-sheets of the Company. 

Large and Accumulating Bonuses. Moderate Premiums. Perfect Security. 

Nine-Tenths of the whole Profits of the Life Assurance Branch 

are Allocated to Participating Policies. 

SPECIAL FEATURES. 

Claims paid on proof of death and title. 

Premiums adjusted to each half-year of age. 

Minimum Surrender Values fixed and held at credit of Insured for five years. 

Paid-up Policy of liberal amount granted in place of lapsed Policy, if desired within six months. 

Inaccurate statements in Proposal Papers do not involve torfeiture of Policy unless accompanied by fraud. 

Policies in most cases free from all restrictions as to Occupation, Residence, and Travel. 

ANNUITY BRANCH. 
ANNUITIES, Immediate, Contingent, or Deferred, are granted on favourable terms. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

Property of nearly every description insured at Home or Abroad at the Lowest Rate of Premium. 

Losses Promptly and Liberally Settled. 

Prospectus and every information may be had at the Chief Offices, Branches, or Agencies. 

CHIEF OFFICES {SndOn!^^"' 

AGENTS IN FORFAR. 



64 Princes Street. 

61 Threadneedle Street, E.C. 



JAMES TAYLOR, Town-Clerk. 
PATRICK WEBSTER, Westfield. 



I W. & J. DON & Co. 
I T. HENDERSON, Agent, National Bank, 
(Fire only). 
A. B. WYLLIE, Solicitor. 



THE 



FORFAR DIRECTORY 

AND YEAR BOOK, 

FOR 

1889, 

CONTAINING 

A LIST OF THE HOUSEHOLDERS OF THE BURGH, 

DIRECTORY OF TRADES AND PROFESSIONS, 

LIST OF PUBLIC BOARDS, SOCIETIES, 

ETC. ETC. ETC. 
ALSO, 

COUNTY INFORMATION, & A LIST OF FARMERS AND 
OTHERS IX THE ADIOINING PARISHES. 



ipiRiCE oisTZE lE^Eiisrnsr^x^. 




FORFAR : 
PRINTED .t PUBLISHED BY W. .SHEPHERD, TASTLI-: ST. 

1888. 



Ip The Publisher has to thank the increasing- number of Advertisers 
for their support, and all who have supplied the information for the 
DiRECTORV for 1889. 

Though rather later than usual in being issued, he hopes it will merit 
the success which has attended former issues. 

Every endeavour has been made to ensure correctness. Any 
suggestions which would tend to obviate inaccuracies, &c., in future 
issues, will be gladly received. 

f 39 Castle Street, 

Forfar, Dtr. 1888. 



CONTENTS 



Page. 

Advertisements, Index to 144 

Angling Club 72 

Bank Offices 65 

Bee-keepers' Society 70 

Bible Society 68 

Blind, Mission to the 68 

Bowling Clubs 72-73 

Building Society 74 

Burgh Funds 61 

Charity Mortifications 62 

Chess Club 67 

Chicken Show 70 

Children's < Jhurch 69 

Churches 66 

Church Societies 68-69 

Coal Societies 71 

Conservative Association 68 

County Information 75-76 

Courts : — 

Burgh or Bailie 63 

Licensing, Burgh 68 

Police 63 

Sheriff 75-76 

Valuation Appeal 64 

Cricket Club. ^.... 73 

Curling Association, Angus 73 

Curling Club 73 

Cycling Club 73 

Edinburgh Angus Club 69 

Educational Institutions 66 

Educational Trust 66 

Factory Workers' Union 74 

Fairs, Markets, &c 52 

Farmers in District 48-51 

Fiars' Prices 76 

Football Club 73 

Foresters, Ancient Order of . . 72 

Gas Accounts 63 

Gas Corporation 62 

Golf Club 73 



Page. 

Good Temj)lar Lodges 69 

Halls 66 

Harriers' Club 73 

Holidays 74 

Homing Pigeon Club ... 74 

Householders, Female 36-47 

Householders, Male 5-35 

Infirmary 65 

Joiners' Association 74 

Justices of the Peace (Forfar) 64 

Lawn Tennis Club 74 

Library, Public 65 

Literary S<iciety 68 

Magistrates and Town Council 61 

Masonic Lodges 72 

I Musical Societies 67 

Oddfellows Lodge 72 

Parochial Board 64 

Plate Glass Association 70 

Police (Jommission 62 

Police Commission Accounts 62-63 

Post Office 51 

I'oultry Association 70 

Prevention of Criielty to Animals, 

Society for . 74 

Quoiting Clubs 74 

Leading Rooms 67 

llegistrar's Office 65 

Keligious Societies 67 

Savings Bank 65 

Saving Societies 70 

School Boards— Burgh 65 

Landward 65 

Session Clerks 66 

Shepherds, Loyal Ancient 72 

'J'emperance Societies 69 

Tract Society 67 

Trades and Professions 53-(»0 

Volunteers 67 

Yearly Societies 71-7ti 



Ar^rANAC for 1889 (32 pp.) inserted between pages 76 and 105. 



MOURNING SUITS 

MADE to Order from Pure All- Wool Woaded Black Worsted Twill 
Coating, neatly braided with finest quality Mohair Braid, and 
beautifully finished, 

From £3, 3s to £4, 10s. 



Latest Styles of TWEED and SERGE SUITINGS, Trimmed and 
made up in the best possible way, 

From 50s to £4. 



Choice Make of STRIPED and Fancy CHECKED TROUSERS, 

From 13s 6d to 24s. 



Gentlemen's Travelhng ULSTERS and HIGHLAND CLOAKS. 
CHESTERFIELD & COVERT OVERCOx\TS. 

SUMMER OVERCOATS. 

[ We will show early in the Spring a Largje and Choice Selection of 
SUMMER OVERCOATINGS, in all the Newest Shades and Colour- 
ings. 



i®jm^ Wmwmhlm Suit 



^D 



The Boys' and Youths' Durable School Suits supplied by us are 
specially made with a view to durability, while at the same time they 
retain elegance of design, and are moderate in price. 

The material is thoroughly reliable, and guaranteed to be AllAVool 
only. The Colours are fast and will not fade. The seams are strongly 
sewn and will not rip, and the linings will wear as long as the gar- 
ments themselves. , 

Liveries of evei||} descmptiou i^f^ade to '(|)iider. 



A. SPALDING. Merchant Tailor, Cross, 



[OVKK. 



(s 

We are really offering the best value we have ever been able to show ii 
several qualities of Dress Shirts, French, Regatta, Oxford, and Tweed' 
Shirts, neatly and strongly made, in all sizes, for Gent.'s, Youths', and 
Boys' wear. Shirts of every description made to order on the shortest 
notice. 

§Y§i©^J® W§8lleFi y^depweap 

Made from the Finest and Purest Natural Coloured (Undyed) Wool. 
We have everything required for Gent.'s, Youths', and Boys' wear, in 
all the better qualities, at very Moderate Prices. Better value in 
Hosiery was never offered. A Trial Order will confirm this. Gentle- 
men can have their Underwear made specially to their measure, in any 
quality of the various kinds of Hosiery, in from 14 to 21 days. 



SILlK flHt> FEliT HATS 

Of Superior Quality always on hand, in all the Leading Shapes & Styles. 

Larg-e and Choice Selection of SCARFS in Silk and Satin, 
in all New Shapes and Styles. 



Steves. 



Special value in Canadian, Toronto, and Driving Gloves. Gloves of 
every description always in stock. 

In every case the quality is right ; I do not sacrifice quality for apparent cheapness. 

HmbFelks. 

Large Assortment of Umbrellas, with Beautiful Handles, Strong 
Frames, and covered with very Superior Cloths, from 5/ to 20/. Better 
value it is impossible to obtain. 

A. Spalding, 



CROSS, FORFAR. 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



MALE HOUSEHOLDERS. 



Adam, David 
Adam, (xeorge 
Adam, George 
Adam, James 
Adam, AVilliam 
Adams, Henry 
Adams, James 
Adams, James 
Adamson, Alexander 
Adamson, Hay 
Adamson, James 
Adamson, James 
Adamson, James 
Adamson, James 
Adamson, James Wilson 
Adamson, John 
Adamson, John 
Adamson, Richard 
Adamson, Robert 
Adamson, Thomas 
Adamson, William 
Adamson, William 
Adamson, William 
Addison, John 
Aitkenhead, Charles 
Aitkenhead, David 
Aldridge, John Mullings 
Alexander, David 
Alexander, George Paton 
Alexander, John 
Alexander, Peter 
Allan, David 
Allan, Douglas 
Allan, James 
Allan, James 
Allan, John 
Allan, William 
AUardice, Charles 
Allardice, Joseph 
AUardice, William 
Anderson, Alexander 
Andei'son, David 
Anderson, David 



Mason 

Factory worker 

Gardener 

Gardener 

Carter 

Shuttle maker 

M.D. and Farmer 

Factory worker 

Mason 

Jjabourer 

Residenter 

Residenter 

Weaver 

Labourer 

Manufacturer 

Grocer 

Labourer 

Factory worker 

Chief constable 

Wood merchant 

Builder 

Labourer 

Grocer 

Blacksmith 

Weaver 

Factory worker 

Clergyman 

Tenter 

Surgeon 

Factory worker 

Lodging house kpr. 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Stableman 

Factory worker 

Joiner 

Labourer 

Farm servant 

Shoemaker 

Quarrier 

Labourer 

Labourer 



3 Green street 
83 South street 
15 Manor street 
28 Glamis Road 

51 Backwynd 

61 Dundee Loan 

Oathlaw 

186 East High street 

35 Prior Road 

Prior Road 

54 Backwynd 

Newford Park 

30 South street 

3 Bell Place 

St. James' Road 

42 & 44 West High street 

49 West High street 
1 Strang street 
County Place 

4 Couttie's Wynd 
Headingplacestone cottage 
8 Bell Place 

42 West High street 
23 Bakwynd 
6 Archie's Park 

19 Victoria street 
The Parsonage 
Market Place 
Littlecauseway 
27 John street 

4 Couttie's Wynd 
26 Nursery Feus 

50 South street 

52 South street 
39 Backwynd 

144 East High street 
13 Montrose Road 
3 Zoar 

20 Dundee Road 
20 North street 
Headingstone Place 
Gallowhill 

23 Wellbraehead 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



Anderson, Francis 
Anderson, George 
Anderson, Hector 
Anderson, James 
Anderson, James 
Anderson, John 
Anderson, John 
Anderson, John 
Anderson, John 
Anderson, John Peter 
Anderson, William 
Anderson, William 
Andrew, David 
Andrew, James 
Andrew, William 
Andrew, William 
Angus, James 
Archie, John 
Armstrong, James 
Auchterlonie, David 
Bain, Alexander 
Balfour, David 
Balfour, William 
Balfour, '\^^illiam 
Balharry, William 
Ballingall, David Christie 
Barclay, George 
Barclay, Robert Vn". 
Barclay, Thomas 
Barrie, Charles 
Barron, Alexander 
Barry, Da\id 
Barry, David 
Batchelor, Alexander 
Beaton, Alexander 
Belford. James, 
Bell, Alexander 
Bell, James 
Bell. William 
Bell, William 
Bell, William 
Bennet, Alexander 
Bennet, John 
Bennett, Andrew 
Binny, David 
Binny, James 
Bisset, James 
Black, Alexander 
Black, David 
Black, AVilliam 
Black, William 



Factory worker 
General dealer 
Factory worker 
V.S. & blacksmith 
Baker 
Tailor 
Labourer 
Factory worker 
Baker 
Solicitor 
Baker 
Quarrier 
Draper 
Shoemaker 
Hairdresser 
(xardener 
Coachbuilder 
Gardener 
Loco, foreman 
Tenter 
Joiner 
Labourer 
Labourer 
Currier 
Innkeeper 
Factory worker 
Carter 
Draper 
Painter 

Factory worker 
Gardener 

Grocer & spirit dlr. 
Quarry-master 
Farmer 
Ploughman 
Factory worker 
Lapper 
Salesman 
Fireman 
Mason 

Factory worker 
Horsehirer and inn- 
Coachman [keeper 
Labourer 
Bank agent 
Collector 
Factory worker 
Factory worker 
Scavenger 
Flaxdresser 
(rreen <rrocer 



6 Albert street 
65 North street 

3 Charles street 

26 West High street 

8 Green street 

18 Montrose Road 
157 East High street 
85 Backwynd 
10 West High street 
Lochbank House 
118 East High street 
'24 North street 
Bankhead Villa 

23 St. James' Road 
26 West Lligh street 

24 St. James' Road 

7 Newmonthill 

1 St. James' Road 
AVhitehills 

33 Prior Road 
21 Manor street 

2 Dundee Road 
18 Glamis Road 

9 Backwvnd 

102 West High Street 

16 Montrose Road 
21 Wellbraehead 
28 Castle street 
76 Castle street 
13 North street 

79 West High street 

80 Castle street 
58 Dundee Road 
Finavon 

90 Dundee Loan 

17 New Road 
15 John street 
Belmont Villa 

103 Backwynd 

6 Glamis Road 
17 John street 
Castle street 

5 Backwynd 
15 Glamis Road 
West High street 

10 Glamis Road 

7 Green street 
39 John street 

4 Dundee Road 
'JS South street 
12 Dundee Road 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



Blair, Charles 
BJair, Charles 
Blair, David 
Blyth, George 
Blyth, John" 
Boath, Andrew 
Boath, Andrew Petrie 
Hoath, David 
Boath, John 
Boath, John 
Boath, John 
Boath, Joseph 
Boath, liobert 
Boath, AVilUam 
Boath, ^Villiam 
Boath, William 
Booth, Charles 
Booth, David Phillip 
Bowman, Adam 
Bowman, John 
Bowman, William 
Boyle, James Don<^las 
Boyle, James 
Boyle, John 

Boyle, John S. (younger) 
Brodlie, George 
Brodlie, John 
Brodie, James, M.A. 
Brown, Alexander 
Brown, Alexander 
Brown, Alexander 
Brown, Alexander 
Brown, Alexander 
Brown, Alexander 
Brown, George 
Brown, George 
Brown, James 
Brown, James 
Brown, James 
Brown, James 
Brown, John 
Brown, John 
Brown, John 
Brown, Peter 
Brown, Silvester 
Brown, Thomas 
Brown, William 
Brown, WilHam 
Brown, AVilliam 
Brown, William 
Brown, William 



Tenter 

Tailor 

Tenter 

Tailor 

Drill instructor 

Faetorv worker 

Clerk ' 

Poulti'v dealer 

Weaver 

Draper 

Fish dealer 

Cloth inspector 

Labourer 

Grocer 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Residenter 

Clothier 

Tenter 

Labourer 

jNIechanic 

Draper 

Book canvasser 

Fish dealer 

Fruit & fish merchnt. 

Rope spinner 

Rope spinner 

Rector 

Bleacher 

Factory worker 

Mason 

Grocer 

Mason 

Labourer 

Engine driver 

Baker 

Society manager 

Factory worker 

Clothier 

Factory worker 

Hawker 

Factory worker 

Bleacher 

Merchant 

Labourer 

Labourer 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Mechanic 

Dyker 

Dyker 



20 Victoria street 

12 Nursery Feus 

2 B(dl Place 

17 North street 
Rosebank Road 
11 East Sunnyside 

28 Dundee Loan 
Newmonthill 

29 Glamis Road 

85 North street 

182 East High street 
83 North street 

4 Wellbraehead 
2?) John street 
Newmonthill 

182 East High street 
Prior Road 

68 Castle street 
25 Market Place 
25 Market Place 
Kirkton 

3 Castle street 
51 North street 

69 West High street 

18 Castle street 

14 Manor street 

32 Manor street 
Manse field House 
17 Victoria street 
25 Manor street 
37 Dundee Loan 

15 Backwynd 

50 Dundee Road 

36 Canmore street 
34 John street 

163 East High street 
24 Green street 

19 John street 

86 Castle street 

13 Canmore street 
Archie's Park 

11 Canmore street 

5 flohn street 
Laurel Bank 

48 Glamis Road 
22 Prior Road 

12 Canmore street 
12 North street 

37 John street 
Broadcroft 

33 Glamis Road 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



Brown, AVilliam 

Brown, William Thomson 

Bruce, Alexander 

Bruce, David 

Bruce, George 

Bruce, George 

Bruce, George 

Bruce, James 

Bruce, James 

Bruce, James 

Bruce, elames 

Bruce, Robert 

Bruce, William 

Burnett, Charles 

Burns, Alexander 

Burns, John 

Burns, Robert 

Burns, Wilham 

Butchart, David 

Butchart, David 

Butchart, James 

Butchart, John 

Butter, John 

Byars, David 

Byars, David 

Byars, James 

Byars, James 

Byars, John 

Byars, Robert 

Byars, William 

Byars, William 

Cable, Alexander 

Cable, David 

Cable, James 

Cable, James 

Cable, John 

Cable, John 

Cable, William 

Caie, George Johnston 

Caird, Charles 

Caird, James 

Caird, William 

Calder, David 

Calder, John 

Calder, William 

Callander, Alexander 

Callender, David 

Callender, John 

Callender, William 

Callender, William 

Cameron, John 



Factory worker 

Associ ation manager 

Sawmiller 

Carter 

Labourer 

Painter 

Shoemaker 

Carter 

Photographer 

Factory worker 

Stoker 

Bank agent 

Labourer 

Factory manager 

Joiner 

Drover 

Winder 

Baker [chant 

Grocer & wine mer- 

Mechanic 

Factory worker 

Farm servant 

Farmer 

Weaver 

Contractor 

Manufacturer 

Residenter 

Stationer 

Mason 

Manufacturer 

Factory Avorker 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Tenter 

Tenter (foreman) 

Tenter 

Doctor of Medicine 

Draper 

Clergyman 

Labourer 

Quarrier 

Baker 

Tenter 

Factory worker 

Mason 

Cowfeeder 

Rail, porter 

Cowfeeder 

Mason 

Salesman 

Labourer 



22 Canmore street 
44 Lour Road 
46 North street 
26 North street 
44 South street 

61 Glamis Road 
66 Yeaman street 
Gallowhill 

5 Academy street 
37 North street 
3 Wellbraehead 
63 East High street 
11 Albert street 
Lour Road 

18 Newmonthill 
42 Prior Road 
7 Newmonthill 
15 Green street 

62 Castle street 
7 Manor street 

19 Little Causeway 

19 Little Causeway 
Nether Turin 

18 Nursery Feus 
65 Glamis Road 
62 Yeaman street 
62 Castle street 
1 Glamis Road 
93^ West High street 
72 Yeaman street 

20 Dundee Road 

3 Arbroath Road 
9 Market Place 

13 John street 

1 >^6 East High street 

I St. James' Road 
17 East High street 
26 Market Place 
The Manse 

14 St. James' Road 
Dundee Road 

6 Wellbraehead 

Chapel Park 

64 East High street 

II Prior Road 
G Dundee Loan 
26 Market Place 
Dundee Road 
30 North Street 

4 Market Place 
50 Dundee Road 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



Cameron, Peter 
Campbell, David 
Campbell, George 
C ampb ell , J ames 
Campbell, John 
Campbell, Robert H. 
Campbell, AVilliam 
Cargill, Alexander 
Cargill, Francis 
Cargill, James 
Cargill, James 
Cargill, John 
Carnegie, George 
Carnegy, Patrick Alexan- 
der Watson 
Carrie, David 
Cathro, William 
Cathro, William 
Cattanach, James 
Chalmers, David 
Chalmers, George 
Chalmers, George 
Chalmers, A¥iUiam 
Chaplin, John Hurry 
Chaplin, John 
Christie, David 
Christie, David 
Christie, David 
Christie, James 
Christie, James 
Christie, James 
Christie, John 
Christie, William 
Christison, William 
Christison, William 
Clark, Alexander 
Clark, Andrew 
Clark, Charles 
Clark, Charles 
Clark, David 
Clark, David 
Clark, George 
Clark, James 
Clark, James 
Clark, James 
Clark, John 
Clark, John 
Clark, Robert 
Clark, William 
Clark, William 
Clark, William 



Heckler 

Blacksmith 

Quarrier 

Excise officer 

Coachman 

Milliner 

Water inspector 

Mason 

Draper (retired) 

Builder 

Shuttlemaker 

Retired builder 

Factory worker 

Gentleman 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Joiner 

Policeman 

Joiner 

Stableman 

Engine driver 

Draper 

Clerk 

Weaver 

Shoemaker 

Night watchman 

Factory worker 

Game dealer 

Postman 

Farmer 

Labourer 

Shambles keeper 

Factory worker 

Gardener 

Factory worker 

Mason 

Hairdresser 

Labourer 

Lapper 

Draper's assistant 

Hairdresser 

Plumber 

Mason 

Labourer 

Agent 

Factory worker 

Saddler 

Mason 

Mechanic 

Factory worker 



57 Backwynd 
71 Glamis Road 

24 Montrose Road 
17 Green street 

■i Green street 
63 Castle street 
20 Lour Road 
Canmore street 
Bloomfield Cottage 
Canmore street 

13 Zoar 

Ferry ton Cottage 
79 West High street 
Lour House 

32 Manor street 

14 Zoar 

25 John street 
25 Manor street 

15 Montrose Road 
Fonah Close 

24 John street 
28 Castle street 

20 Montrose Road 
67 Dundee Loan 
117 East High street 
Headingplacestone 
78 Dundee Loan 
117^ East High street 

8 Glamis Road 
Bankhead 

9 Victoria street 

25 Market Place 

32 West High street 
Beechhill 

21 Glamis Road 
91 North street 

36 East High street 
144 East High street 
34 Manor street 
96 West High street 

96 West High street 

97 East High street 
27 North street 

88 West High street 
101 Backwynd 

7 Prior Road 

33 Backwynd 

22 Arbroath Road 

8 Arbroath Road 
13 Prior Road 



lO 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



Clark, William 
Clark, William 
Clark, William 
Clementsen, John 
Cobb, Alexander 
Cobb, Charles 
Cobb, John Thomson 
Coghill, James 
Connel, William 
Conn, James 
Constable, William 
Cook, Alexander Taylor 
Cook, Charles 
Cook, Charles 
Cook, James 
Cook, William 
Cook, William 
Cooper, George 
Conttie, James 
Couttie, John 
Conttie, AVilliam 
Coutts, John 
Coutts, John 
Coutts, Frederick Thorn 
Contts, AVilliam 
Coutts, William, jun. 
Cowie, James 
Cowie, John 
Crabb, Alexander 
Crabb, David 
Crabb, Robert 
Craig, James 
Craig, Robert 
(Jraik, Alexander 
Craik, David 
Craik, David 
Craik, James 
Craik, James 
Craik, James 
Craik, James Watson 
Craik, John 
Craik, John Fyfe 
Craik, Peter 
Craik, Robert Fyfe 
Craik, Thomas C. 
Craik, William F}fe 
Crammond, David 
Crammond, James 
Crichton, Alexander 
Crighton, James 
Crighton, William 



Factory worker 

Clerk " 

Mason 

Hotelkeeper 

Factory Avqrker 

Factory worker 

Teacher 

jNlechanic 

Engine driver 

Green grocer 

Factory worker 

Constable 

Dresser 

Farmer 

Factory worker 

AVeaver 

Factory worker 

Clerk 

Factory worker 

Groom 

Hostler 

Factory worker 

Rope spinner 

Butcher 

Flesher 

Flesher 

Plumber 

INIason 

Mason 

Labourer 

Solicitor 

Wood turner 

AYeaver 

Manufacturer 

Residenter 

Lapper 

jManufacturer 

Shuttlemaker 

Tailor 

Clerk 

Joiner 

JManufacturer 

Tenter 

Proprietor of lands 

Clerk 

Clerk 

AVood turner 

Joiner 

Ironmonger 

Carter 

Factory worker 



8 Charles street 
8 Glamis Road 
12 Charles street 
20 Zoar 
15 Green street 
Chapel Park 
Hillside Cottage 
20 Manor street 

1 Cath. Square 

126 East High street 

45 Dundee Road 

County Place 

18 Charles street 

Cossens 

3 Arbroath Road 

10 AV. Sunny side 

5 AA'att street 

40 Lour Road 

53 Castle street 

Manor street 

12^ North street 

20 AVellbraehead 

48 Castle street 

91 Castle street 

2 Manor street 
95 Castle street 

10 North street 

188 East High street 
Headingstone Place 

1 1 Nursery Feus 

10 Yeaman street 
38 Canmore street 
126 East High street 
Hillpark 

14 Manor street 
186 East High street 
Viewmount 

11 John street 

101 East High street 

Littlecauseway 

23 John street 

Manor Park 

35 John street 

of Kingston 

14 AVest High street 

28 Manor street 

17 Green street 

51 Dundee Loan 

3 Cross 

■J: Charles street 
184 East High street 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



II 



Crockett, William 
Crofts, James 
Cruickslianks, William 
Cumming, Alexander 
Cuthbert, Andrew 
Cuthbert. Charles 
Cuthbert, Charles 
Cuthbert, James 
Cuthl)ert, William 
Cuthill, James 
Dalgety, Alexander 
Dalgety, David 
Dall, flames 
Dall, AAHlliam 
Dargie, Alexander 
Dargie, James 
Dai'gie, eJames 
Dargie, James 
Davidson, George 
Davidson, John 
Davidson, Peter 
Davie, George 
Davie, Robert 
Davie, Kobert 
Deuchar, Alexander 
Deuchar, Alexander 

Dick, Charles 
Dick, David 
Dick, George 
Dick, James 
Dick, William 
Dick, William 
Dickson, James 
Doig, Alexander 
Doig, Alexander 
Doig, Edward 
Doig, George 
Doig, James 
Doig, James 
Doig, John 
Doig, Thomas 
Doig, William 
Doig, William 
Don, Gilbert W. 
Don, John Birr ell 
Donald, Alexander 
Donald, David 
Donald, Henry 
Donald, James 
Donald, James 



Gamekeeper 
Factory worker 
Shoemaker 
Clergyman 
Bleacher 
Coachman 
Lapper 
Weaver 
Baker 
Engineer 
Draper 
Collector 
Joiner 
Mason 

Factory worker 
Mason 
Mason 
Lapper 
Labourer 
Hatter 
Weaver 
Mason 
Carter 
Tenter 
Shoemaker 
Flesher and cattle- 
dealer 
Mason 
Stationer 
Factory overseer 
Manufacturer 
Clothier 
Factory worker 
Cloth Inspector 
Gardener 
Draper 
Ropemaker 
Painter 
Plasterer 
Cowfeeder 
Plasterer 
General dealer 
Gamedealer(retired) 
Tailor 

Manufacturer 
Manufacturer 
Tenter 

Grocer & spirit dlr. 
Grocer 

Factory worker 
Joiner 



Haughs, Glamis 
100 Dundee Loan 

8 Market Place 
First Free Manse 

16 Nursery Feus 
81 Backwynd 

9 North street 
8 AVellbraehead 

10 Wellbraehead 
Orchard Bank 

55, 57 East HIsh street 

29 Backwynd " 

52 \Vest High street 
3 Bell Place 

17 Newmounthill 

8 Dundee Loan 
22 Green street 

86 West High street 

Helen street 

97^ East High street 

6 Newmonthill 

10 Watt street 

Lochslde 

77 North street 

■19 Castle street 

27 Glamis Road 

Viewbank Terrace 
1 South street 
Helen street 

69 Backwynd 

28 Green street 
34 Yeaman street 
■15 South street 
Easterbank 

9 South street 
8 Watt street 

30 South street 
24 Backwynd 
Quarrybank 
30 South street 

70 West High street 
Ivybank Cottage 
186 East High street 
Briar Cottage 
Pitmuies House 

17 Manor street 

17-19 Glamis Road 

80b & c West High street 

49 Backwynd 

12 Watt street 



12 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



Donald, John 
Donald, William 
Donaldson, George 
Donaldson, George 
Donaldson, Jolm 
Donaldson, William 
Dorward, George 
Douglas, George 
Do well, William 
Downs, Simon 
Duff, Thomas 
Duff, William 
Duff us, James 
Dunbar, David 
Duncan, Alexander 
Duncan, David 
Duncan, David 
Duncan, David 
Duncan, George 
Duncan, Henry 
Duncan, James 
Duncan, James 
Duncan, James 
Duncan, John 
Duncan, William 
Duncan, William 
Duncan, William 
Duncan, William 
Duncan, William 
Dun das, David 
Dundas, James 
Dunn, David Watson 
Dunsmuir, "William 
Duthie, David 
Duthie, James 
Duthie, William 
Djce, John 
Easson, George M. 
Easson, James 
Easson, John 
Easson, Samuel 
Easson, William 
Easton, David 
Easton, James 
Easton, John 
Easton, William Fyfe 
Eaton, George 
Edmond, David 
Edward, Charles 
Edwards, James 
Edwards, James 



Factory worker 

Tailor 

Factory worker 

Lapper 

Factory worker 

liailway guard 

Gardener 

Draper 

Painter 

Labourer 

Labourer 

Factory worker 

Labourer 

Railway guard 

Tailor's cutter 

Tenter 

Tenter 

Engine driver 

Mason 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Tenter 

Factory worker 

Carter 

Tenter 

Factory worker 

Tenter 

Retired farmer 

Tenter 

Mechanic 

Fireman 

Rope manufacturer 

Rope spinner 

Factory worker 

Tanner 

Factory worker 

Labourer 

Joiner 

Joiner 

Signalman 

Carter 

Factory worker 

Bleacher 

JNlason 

Tinsmith 

Labourer 

Flesher 

Blacksmith 

Butcher 

Residenter 

Weaver 



12 Wellbraehead 
134 Castle street 
88 West High street 

5 East Sunnyside 
17 Manor street 
Catherine Square 
Briar's Lodge 

1 Vennel 

•47 East High street 

15 Dundee Loan 

61 West High street 

17 North street 
24 North street 
Gallowhill 

85 East High street 

2 Zoar 

6 Dundee Road 

18 Don street 

6 AVellbraehead 
5 Backwynd 
26 Nursery Feus 

18 Dundee Road 
12 Montrose Road 
24 North street 

1 St. James' Road 
54 North street 
8 Don street 
10 Little Causeway 

24 North street 

3 Archie's Park 

34 South street 

35 Dundee Loan 
14 Dundee Loan 

25 Glamis Road 
25 Glamis Road 
8 Charles street 

19 Prior Road 
12 John street 
30 Green street 
24 John street 

41 Prior Road 

16 Victoria street 
123 Castle street 
123 Castle street 
10 Wellbraehead 
188 East High street 
8 Castle street 

20 Arbroath Road 
22 Dundee Road 
72^ West High street 

42 South street 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



13 



Edward, William 
Edwards, William 
Elder, AVilliam 
Elliot, James 
Ellis, Alexander 
Ellis, David 
Ellis, James 
Ellis, James 
Esplin, Alexander 
Esplin, David Boath 
Esplin, John 
Esplin, Joseph 
Esplin, Thomas Balfour 
Ewen, James 
Fairlie, Arthur 
Fairweather, David 
Fairweather, Robert 
Falconer, Charles 
Falconer, Daniel 
Falconer, David 
Falconer, James 
Falknor, William 
Farquhar, David 
Farquhar, James 
Farquharson, Adam 
Farquharson, James 
Fearn, Charles 
Fearn, Stewart 
Fell, David 

Fenton, Andrew l^owson 
Fenton, David C. 
Fenton, David M. 
Fenton, Henry Hardy 
Fenton, John Lowson 
Fenton, John M'Kenzie 
Ferguson, James 
Ferguson, James 
Ferguson, James 
Ferguson, John 
Ferguson, William 
Ferguson, William 
Ferrier, James 
Ferrier, John 
Findlay, Charles 
Findlay, David 
Findlay, David 
Findlay, George 
Findlay, George 
Findlay, James 
Findlay, James 
Findlay, James 



Baker 

Missionary 

Labourer 

Fishdealer 

Shoemaker 

Pensioner 

Mason 

Painter 

Tenter 

Gas manager 

Tenter 

Collector 

Baker 

Wood merchant 

Fireman 

Factory worker 

Crofter 

Labourer 

Watchmaker 

Blacksmith 

Printer 

Commission agent 

Oiler 

Butcher 

Pedlar 

Builder 

Factory worker 

Policeman 

Carter 

Clerk 

Baker 

Shoemaker 

Draper 

Factor and Agent 

Warder 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Weaver 

Tanner 

Mason 

Tailor 

Labourer 

Fireman 

Farm servant 

Turner 

Weaver 

Bleacher 

Labourer 

Mason 

Shoemaker 

Joiner 



12 Castle street 
68 Castle street 
Backwynd 
31 Nursery Feus 
Market Place 
29 Backwynd 
7 l^our Road 
Market Place 
29 John street 
North street 
35 North street 
9 Green street 

25 West High street 
Millbank House 

26 Arbroath Road 

6 Arbroath Road 
47 Prior Road 

] 03 Castle street 
104 Castle street 
2oA Victoria street 
23 Castle street 
148 East High street 
Newford Park 
62 East High street 

11 St. James' Road 
St. James' Road 

12 Charles street 
Lininghills 

23 St. James' Road 
Lilyfield Cottage 
141 East High street 
5 Watt street 
70 Yeaman street 
Yeaman street 
County Place 

18 Glamis Road 
15 Watt street 
9 Glamis Road 
St. James' Road 
14 Little Causeway 
43 Prior Road 

14 Dundee Loan 

7 Broadcroft 
Dundee Road 

19 Arbroath Road 
50 Dundee Road 
Yeaman street 

26 Zoar 

45 Dundee Road 

42 Lour Road 

178 East High street 



14 



FORFAR DIRECTORY, 



Findlay, John 
Fleming, David 
Fleming, James 
Fleming, Robert 
Forbes, Alexander 
Forbes, David 
Forbes, John 
Forbes, John 
Forbes, Joseph 
Forbes, Robert 
Forbes, Robert 
Forbes ; Robert 
Forbes, Thomas 
Fordyce, James Neave 
Forsj'th, David 
Forsyth, John 
Forsyth, John 
Fowler, George 
Fraser, Alexander 
Fraser, Dickson 
Fraser, Donald 
Fraser, Hugh 
Fraser, John 
Fraser, John 
Fraser, Robert 
Fraser, Thomas 
Freeman, Alexander 
French, Alex. Ross 
FuUerton, Alexander 
Fullerton, William 
Fyfc, Alexander 
Fyfe, Andrew 
Fyfe, David 
Fyfe, George 
Fyfe, James 
Fyfe, James 
Fyfe, James 
Fyfe, James, jun. 
Fyfe, John 
Fyfe, Thomas 
Fyfe, William 
Fyffe, James 
Fyffe, James 
Fyffe, John 
Fyffe, Thomas 
Fyffe, William 
Galloway, John 
Gavin, William 
Gellatly, David 
Gemlo, David 
Gibb, Alexander 



Bleacher 

Labourer 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Grocer 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Bleacher 

Ploughman 

Factory overseer 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Factoiy worker 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Tinsmith 

Druggist 

Pensioner 

C urrier 

Quarrier 

Labourer 

Gardener 

Coachbuilder 

Railway servant 

Painter 

Solicitor 

Dentist 

Reedmaker 

Shoemaker 

Plumber 

Ijabourer 

Weaver 

Painter 

Grocer 

Joiner 

Lapper 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Baker 

Foreman bleacher 

Flesher 

Baker 

Ijabourer 

Surfaceman 

Railway porter 

Factory worker 

Joiner 

Residenter 

Railway porter 



36 tTohn street 

lo2 East High street 

8 Watt street 

Hillockhead 

122 East High street 

7 NcAv Road 

11 North street 

IG N^ewnionthill 

00 Glamis Road 

41 South street 

1 Prior Road 

96 West High street 

50 Dundee Loan 
81 Backwynd 
60 Dundee Loan 

89 West High street 
1 6 Manor street 
Castle street 

42 South street 
7 Victoria street 

32 Dundee Loan 
Prior Road 

69 Glamis Road 

N ewmonthill 

Gallowhill 

20 Canmore street 

Broomi'oof Cottage 

33 East High street 
Stark's Close 

23 Niu'sery Feus 
4 Couttie's AVynd 
64 Dmidee Road 
29 Nursery Feus 
Montrose Road 

2 Arbroath Road 

90 Dundee Loan 

11 Albert street 
St. James' Road 

9S^ West High street 

12 Charles street 
94 North street 
45 South street 

20 Newmonthill 

33 South street 

67 West High street 

24 Dundee Loan 

21 Victoria street 

51 West High street 

34 Lour Road 
6 New Road 

11 AVellbraehead 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



15 



Gibb. Richard 
Gibb, Walter 
(libb, AVilliam 
Gibb, AVilliam 
Gibson, Alexander 
Gibson, David 
Gibson, Graham 
Gibson, James 
Gibson, James 
Gibson, Joseph 
Gibson, William Alex. 
Glen, Alexander 
Glendye, James 
Goode, Peter A. 
Goodall, William 
Gordon, George 
Gordon, George 
Gordon, James 
Gordon, James 
Gordon, John 
Gordon, Robert 
Gordon, AVilliam 
Gourlay, AA^illiam 
Gowans, John 
Gracie, David 
Gracie, George 
Graham, David Morgan 
Grant, Alexander 
Grant, James 
Grant, James 
Grant, John 
Grant, John 
Grant, John 
Grant, Thomas 
Grant, AA'^illiam 
Gray, David 
Gray, James 
Gray, James Scott 
Gray, Robert 
Gray, Robert 
Greenhill, Charles 
Greenhill, Hugh 
Grewar, Andrew 
Grewar, David 
Grewar, James 
Guild, David 
Guild, James 
Guild, Thomas 
Guthrie, George 
Guthrie, John 
Guthrie, Thomas 



Dyker 

Mason 

Dyker 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

I^ate farmer 

Broker 

AVarehouseman 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Mason 

Factory worker 

Shoemaker 

Gardener 

Toy merchant 

Factory worker 

Joiner 

Fuiterer 

Factory worker 

Labourer 

Factory worker 

Solicitor & banker 

Joiner 

Sheriff officer 

Factory worker 

Labourer 

Auctioneer &f armer 

Manure merchant 

Sawmiiler 

Factory worker 

Labourer 

SaAvmiller 

Tailor 

Mason 

Librarian 

Rail, labourer 

Coachman 

Solicitor 

Grocer 

China merchant 

Butcher 

Hotelkeeper 

Factory worker 

Bleacher 

Labourer 

Draper 

Draper 

Mason 

Game dealer, &c. 

Corn merchant 

Mechanic 



'2 East Sunnysidc 

6 Lappiedub 

7 rja])piedub 

.■)4: Yeaman street 

1 8 Littlecausewav 

AVhitehiUs 

-?1 Dundee Loan 

47 Dundee Road 

18 Littlecaviseway 

72^ AVest High street 

21 Dundee Loan 
75 East High street 
120 East High street 
lo St. James' Road 
82 Castle street 

10 AVatt street 

15 Green street 

18 Lour Road 

19 Arbroath Road 
6 AVatt street 

16 Charli'S street 

20 East High street 
16 Montrose Road 
Lily bank 

10 North street 
61 North street 
Slatefield 
Turin 

11 Zoar 

16 Dundee Road 
14 Dundee Road 
129 Castle street 
4 Dundee Road 
36 Manor street 

4 Castle street 

17 Montrose Road 

22 Lour Road 
Ilillbank 

5 AA''ellbraehead 
45 Castle street 

143 East High street 
Castle street 

19 East Sunnysidc 
186 East High street 
13 Charles street 
Chapel Park 
Chapel Park 

11 Lappiedub 
Couttie's AVynd 
Broomroof 

20 AVellbraehead 



i6 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



Guthrie, Thomas 
Guthrie, William 
Guthrie, William 
Hackney, Alexander 
Hackney, James 
Hadden, James 
Halkett, James 
Halkett, William 
Halley, George 
Hanick, Richard 
Hanton, Alexander 
Hanton, Robert 
Hardie, Alexander 
Hardie, David 
Harris, James A. 
Harris, William 
Hastings, Alexander 
Hastings, David 
Hastings, WilUam Elder 
Haxton, Donald 
Hay, Alexander 
Hay, Alexander 
Hay, James 
Hay, Thomas 
Heath, William John 
Hebenton, David 
Hebenton, James 
Hebington, ^ViUiam 
Henderson, Alexander 
Henderson, Andrew M. 
Henderson, David 
Henderson, David 
Henderson, David 
Henderson, George 
Henderson, George 
Henderson, James 
Henderson, John 
Henderson, Thomas 
Hendry, David 
Hendry, James 
Hendry, Robert 
Hendry, William 
Hendry, William 
Herald, James 
High, David 
Hill, Alexander 
Hill, Alexander 
Hill, Charles 
Hill, David 
Hill, David 
Hill, David 



Blacksmith 

Plasterer 

Blacksmith 

Labourer 

Tailor 

Blacksmith 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Tenter 

Broker 

Labourer 

Labourer 

Farm servant 

Tailor 

Factory worker 

Saddler 

Currier 

Currier 

Lapper 

Ploughman 

Bakery manager 

Joiner 

Mechanic 

Quarrier 

Printer 

Hosier 

Ironmonger 

Shoemaker 

Tailor 

Painter 

Joiner 

Factory worker 

Labourer 

Weaver 

Factory worker 

Fireman 

Factory worker 

Bank agent 

Mason 

Salesman 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Van driver 

Factory worker 

Baker 

Cloth finisher 

Stoneware merchant 

Clerk 

Joiner 

Coachman 

Tenter 



9 Backwynd 

20 Charles street 

10 Backwynd 

17 Zoar 

69 Backwynd 
23 Nursery Feus 
52 South street 
7 Prior Road 

18 Newmonthill 

96 East High street 
7 Montrose Road 
17 Arbroath Road 

I Zoar 

26 North street 

20 Nursery Feus 
62 Dundee Road 
2oA Victoria street 
Strang street 

85 Backwynd 
80 Dundee Loan 
26 Canmore steeet 

7 Academy street 
10 John street 

8 Archie's Park 

50^ East High street 
8 Little Causeway 
12 Little Causeway 

II Green street 

70 Dundee Road 
17 Green streer 
6b Glamis Road 
70 Dundee Road 
Whitefordburn 

1 Teuchat Croft 
16 Prior Road 
15 Manor street 
14 Dundee Road 
Cross 

21 Prior Road 

3 AVest High street 

21 Glamis Road 

70 Dundee Road 

o3 Nursery Feus 

Dundee Road 

82 West High street 

36 North street 

8-10 South street 

Sunnyside House 

Lininghills 

80b West High street 

Hillockhead 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



17 



Hill, David 
Hill, James 
Hill, James 
Hill, James 
Hill, James 
Hill, John 
Hodge, James 
Hogg, George 
Hood, David Mollison 
Hopton, Joseph 
Howie, Peter 
Hosie, William 
Hovels, William 
Howie, John 
Hunter Andrew 
Hunter, Charles William 
Hunter, James 
Hunter, William 
Hunter, William 
Hurr}', James 
Hutcheson, Alexander 
Hutchison, George 
Hutchison, James 
Hutchison, Robert 
Hutchison, William 
Hutton, James 
Innes, George 
Ireland, David 
Ireland, James Forbes 
Ireland, John 
Ireland, William 
Irons, Alexander 
Irons, David 
Irons, David 
Irons, James 
Irons, William 
Jack, Peter 
Jamie, Adam 
Jamieson, Gumming 
Jamieson, James 
Jamieson, James 
Jamieson, William 
Jamieson, AVilliam 
Japp, William 
Jarman, Joseph 
Jarvis, George 
Jarvis, William 
Johnston, Alexander 
Johnston, David 
Johnston, David 
Johnston, David 



Rope spinner 

Railway porter 

Inspector of way 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Faclor)' worker 

Carter 

Factory worker 

Bootmaker 

Factory worker 

Draper 

Carter 

Factory worker 

Bleacher 

Blacksmith 

Doctor of Medicine 

Mechanic 

Gardener 

Tenter 

Shoemaker 

Draper 

Factory worker 

Insurance agent 

Saddler 

Hawker 

Foreman winder 

Millwright 

Labourer 

Mason 

Factory worker 

Baker 

Lapper 

Ironmonger 

Quarrier 

Mason 

Baker 

Publican 

Fish dealer 

Clothier 

Factory worker 

Fish dealer 

Draper 

Factory worker 

Quarrier 

Hotelkeeper 

Draper 

Draper 

Factory worker 

Late Farmer 

Labourer 

Factory worker 



4 Watt street 

13 Zoar 
Victoria street 

14 Nursery Feus 
89 Backwynd 

26 North street 
Helen street 
30 South street 

4 Canmore street 

10 Stark's Close 

2 Lappiedub 

94 Dundee Loan 
22 Wellbraehead 
42 John street 

5 Prior Road 

59 East High street 
69 Dundee Loan 
54 South street 

22 North street 
73 Backwynd 

52 East High street 
9 Albert street 

3 Yeaman street 
Vennel 

13 St. James' Road 
17 Green street 
Gallowhill 

23 St. James' Road 

11 Watt street 
2 Archie's Park 

182 East High street 
48 North street 

26 Green street 
72 Dundee Loan 
2 East Sunny side 
61 Dundee Loan 

27 & 29 South street 
Couttie's Wynd 
Rosebank Cottage 

9 South street 
19 New Road 
5 Academy street 
35 South street 
58 Dundee Loan 
98 North street 
2 Nursery Funs 
68 Castle street 

7 Glamis Road 

8 Sparrowcrolt 
15 Albert street 
39 Dundee Loan 



i8 



FORFAR DIRECTORY, 



Johnston, David 
Johnston, George 
Johnston, James 
Johnston, John 
ffohnston, John 
Johnston, Kobert 
Johnston, Robert 
Johnston, AVilliam 
Johnstone, Adamson 
Johnstone, Alex. 
Johnstone, David 
Johnstone, Thomas 
Jolly, Alexander 
Iveay, Solomon 
Keay, James 
Keay, Robert 
Keay, William 
Keay, William 
Keir, Chailes 
Keith, Charles 
Keith, Charles 
Keith, David 
Keith, James 
Keith, James 
Keith, William 
Kennedy, Alexander 
Kennedy, Andrew 
Kennedy, Charles 
Kermack, James 
Kermack, John 
Kermack, John 
Kerr, Alexander 
Kerr, Charles 
Kerr, David j\Iitchell 
Kerr, James 
Kerr, James 
Kerr, John 
Kerr, Joseph 
Kerr, Thomas 
Kerr, William 
Kettles, Robert 
Kewans, James 
Kinnear, Alexander 
Kinnear, Charles 
Kinnear, David 
Kinnear, Joseph 
Kinsman, John 
Knox, John 
Kyd, James 
Kydd, Alexander 
Kydd, David 



Wood turner 

Blacksmith 

Labourer 

Baker 

Labourer 

Factory woi'ker 

Draper 

Drover 

Factory worker 

A'\'ood turner 

Factory worker 

Factorv worker 

Baker " 

Factory v/orker 

Tenter 

Blacksmith 

Clerk 

Flesher 

Spirit dealer 

Gate keeper 

Gardener 

Weaver 

Collector of customs 

Dresser 

Residenter 

Labourer 

Coal merchant 

Postman 

Labourer 

Society manager 

Factory worker 

Slater 

Mason 

Clerk 

Labourer 

Slater 

Music teacher 

Factory worker 

Mason 

Mason 

Farm servant 

Retired merchant 

Quarrier 

Cloth inspector 

Factor}' worker 

Late farmer 

Labourer 

Schoolmaster 

Clerk 

Tenter 

M.D. & farmer 



Service Road 
Gallowhill 

9 Watt street 

132 East High street 

26 Glamis Road 

7 Glamis Road 

GalloAvhill 

12 West High street 

10 North street 
38 North street 

65 West High street 
182 East High street 
35 Castle street 

14 St. James' Road 
12 Market Place 
34 jNlanor street 

37 Glamis Road 
79 Glamis Road 
100 Castle street 
10 Little Causewav 
26 Market Place 
112 Dundee Road 

74 Dundee Road 
12 St. James' Road 
24 Canmore street 
37 North street 

53 North street 

75 Backwynd 
99 Backwynd 
77 Glamis Road 
no East Hio-h street 

10 Glamis Road 
Catherine Square 
53 North street 
Helen street 

65 West High street 
156 East High street 
9 Wellbraehead 

1 1 W att street 
94 Dundee Loan 
21 John street 
Rosebank 

5 Archie's Park 
1 1 New Road 

6 Stark's Close 

15 Prior Road 
5 Archie's Park 
St. James' Road 
8 Green street 

5 Lappiedub 
Bosindolla 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



19 



Kydd, David 
Kydd, George 
Kydd, James 
Ky.ld, William 
Lackie, David 
Lackie, John 
Lainp:, David 
Laiiiii-, John 
Laird, Alexander 
Laird, George 
Laird, -John 
Laird, John, jun. 
Laird, John, sen. 
I./aird, ^Villiam 
Lakie, John 
Lakie, flohn 
Lakie, William 
Lamb, liobert 
Lamond, Alexander 
Lamond, Alexander 
Lamond, David 
Lamont, Alexander 
l.,amont, Andrew 
Lamont, Andrew 
Lamont, George 
Lamont, James 
Lamont, James 
Lamont, William 
Langiands, Alexander 
Langlands, David 
Langiands, David 
Langlands, David 
Langiands, James 
Langiands, John 
Langlands, Robert 
Langlands, Peter 
Langlands, William 
Laverock, George 
Lawrence, James 
Leask, John 
Lees, Andrew 
Leighton, David 
Leigh ton, James 
Leighton, James 
Leighton, John 
Leith, Alexander 
Lennon, John 
Liddell, John 
Liddle, David 
Liddle, Stewart 
Liddle, William 



Weaver 

Factory worker 

Tailor 

Mechanic 

Labourer 

CoAvfeeder 

Bleacher 

Bleacher 

Factory worker 

Manufacturer 

Mason 

Maniifactturer 

Manufacturer 

Factory woiicer 

Coal merchant 

Farm servant 

Factory worker 

Mechanic 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Cattle dealer 

Pig dealer 

Factory worker 

Spiritdealer 

Tjabourer 

Flesher 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Plumber 

Baker 

Joiner 

Factory worker 

Currier 

Labourer 

Stoker 

Shoemaker 

Factory worker 

Fish dealer 

Clerk 

P actory worker 

Carter 

Railway servant 

Joiner 

Labourer 

Tailor 

^lason 

Cabinetmaker 

Tenter 

Factory worker 



2 Lappiedub 
57 Backwynd 
30 Canmore street 
40 Lour Road 
1'2 Charles street 
West High street 
■22 Wellbraehead 
1 Charles street 

1 Albert street 
Carsegray House 
Gowanbank 
Benholm Lodge 
Carsegray House 
1<S South street 
55 Backwynd 

82 Dundee Loan 
8 Charles street 
36 South street 
C) Xew Road 
12 Wellbraehead 
08 Dundee Loan 
10 Lappiedub 
10 Dundee Loan 
15 Dundee Loan 

2 Lappiedub 

26 Wfst High street 
88 West High street 

21 South street 
Bailliewellbrae 

137 East High street 

3 West High street 
Glamis 

17 Watt street 
39 John street 
19 Canmore street 
5 Victoria street 
5 Victoria street 
Gallowhill 
29 Prior Road 

22 Wellbraehead 
Glamis Road 

22 Yeaman sti'eet 
Chapel Park 
186 P]ast High street 
40^ Dundee Loan 
24 Victoria street 
32 Dundee Loan 
14 Dundee Loan 
50 East High street 
79 Glamis Road 
52 North street 



20 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



Lindsay, David 
Lindsay, David 
Lindsay, David 
Lindsay, Graham 
Lindsay, James 
Lindsay, John 
Lindsay, Thomas 
Lindsay, William 
Lindsay, William 
Littlejohn, David 
Littlejohn, William 
Liveston, James 
Livingston, James 
Livingston, William 
Longmuir, John 
Low, Alexander 
Low, James 
Low, James 
Low, James 
Low, John 
Low, AA^illiam 
Lowden, William 
Lowson, Alexander 
Lowson, Alexander 
Lowson, Andrew 
Lowson, Andrew, jun. 
Lowson, George 
Lowson, George 
Lowson, James 
Lowson James 
Lowson, James 
Lowson, John 
Lowson, John 
Lowson, John 
Lowson, John, jun. 
Lowson, Peter 
Lowson, William 
Lowson, William 
Lowson, William 
Lowson, William, jun. 
Luke, David 
[juke, John 
Lumsden, Henry 
Lundie, William 
Lyall, Thomas 
Lyall, William 
M'Beth, James 
M'Connachie, Robert 
M'Corkindale, D. L. 
M'Donald, Alexander 
M'Donald, James 



Tenter 

Dyker 

Residenter 

Book canvasser 

Weaver 

Draper 

Vandriver 

Cattle dealer 

Labourer 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Hawker 

Factory worker 

Insurance agent 

Church-officer 

Joiner 

Factory worker 

Restauranteur, &c. 

Factory worker 

Tailor 

Labourer 

Plumber 

Mason 

Governor 

Vintner 

Factory worker 

Maimfaeturer 

Factory worker 

Retired saddler 

Railway servant 

IManufacturer 

Railway servant 

Residenter 

Manufacturer 

Manufacturer 

Factory worker 

Factory manager 

Manufacturer 

Hostler 

Clerk 

Cowfeeder 

Joiner 

Tanner, &c. 

Joiner 

Dairyman 

I<abourer 

Plumber 

Factory worker 

Clergyman 

1 iabourer 

Blacksmith 



25 Market Place 
30 Glamis Road 
17 St. James' Road 

7 Broadcroft 

1]0 Dundee Road 
16 Don street 
Academy street 

2 New Road 
28 Zoar 

43 North street 
90 Dundee Loan 
36 Canmore street 

10 Glamis Road 

44 Glamis Road 

8 East High street 
7 Glamis Road 

12 John street 
2-6 Don street 
44 South street 
28 Lour Road 
16 Charles street 
52 Dundee Loan 
Gallowhill 
Poor House 
97 North street 

3 Academy street 
Beech Hill 

20 South street 
2 Sparrowcroft 
83 North street 
Ferryton House 
87 North street 
Strang street 
Thornlea 
Beech Hill 

15 Newmonthill 

16 North street 
Thornlea 

12 Nursery Feus 

Kirkton 

152 East High street 

Catherine Square 

58 Castle street 

21 Montrose Road 
Gallowshade 
Gallowhill 

14 Canmore street 
St, James' Road 
Lilybank Villa 
1 6 Littlecauseway 

11 William street 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



21 



M'Donald, James 
M'Donald, John 
M'Donald, John 
M'Dougal, David 
M'Dongall, James 
M'Farlane, Alexander 
M'Farlane, Donald 
M'Gregor, Alexander 
M'Gregor, Alexander 
M'Gregor, James 
M'Gregor, William 
M'Gregor, Wm. Henr^- 
M'Hardy, David 
M'Intosh, Alexander 
M'Intosh, Alexander 
M'Intosh, Donald 
M'Intosh, James 
M'Intosh, James 
M'Intosh, John 
M'Intosh, AVilliam 
M'Intosh, William 
M'Kay, David 
M'Kay. James 
M'Kay, John 
M'Kay, John Trantham 
M'Kenzie, Alexander 
M'Kenzie, Charles 
M'Kenzie, Charles 
M'Kenzie, David 
M'Kenzie, David 
M'Kenzie, David 
M'Kenzie, George 
M'Kenzie, John 
M'Kenzie, Kobert 
M'Kenzie, William 
M'Kenzie, William 
M'Kenzie, William 
M'Kinnon, Arthur 
M'Kinnon, Joseph 
M'Laggan, William 
M'Laren, Alexander 
M'Laren, David 
M'Laren, James 
M'Laren, James 
M'Laren, William 
M'Laren, William 
M'Laren, William 
M'Lean, Alexander 
M'Lean, James 
M'Lean, John Anderson 
M'Lean, John 



Engine driver 

Dairyman 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Shoemaker 

Factory worker 

Joiner 

Carter 

Factory worker 

Carter 

Wood turner 

Grocer 

Factory worker 

Ironmonger 

Shoemaker 

Solicitor 

Bleacher 

Blacksmith 

Factory worker 

Joiner 

Blacksmith 

Beltmaker 

Weaver 

Bootcloser 

Tailor 

Labourer 

Weaver 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Tenter 

Factory worker 

Coal merchant 

Tenter 

Factory worker 

Labourer 

Factory worker 

Surfaceman 

Bleacher 

Tanner 

Factory worker 

Plumber 

Carter 

Baker 

Insurance agent 

Painter 

Labourer 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Builder 

Solicitor 

Weaver 



Gallowhill 

13 William street 

Bailliewellbrae 

16 Dundee Loan 
113 Castle street 
Prior Koad 

56 South street 

17 Manor street 
39^ Prior Road 
28 Arbroath Road 
15 Zoar 

75 Glamis Road 
43 North street 
ll Castle street 

7 Zoar 

31 Dundee Loan 
13 Manor street 
23 Backwynd 
115 Castle street 
Lunanhead 
Academy street 

13 Glamis Road 

14 Newmonthill 
14 Dundee Loan 
72 Backwynd 

9 Teuchat Croft 

4 Dundee Loan 

10 Charles street 
30 Manor street 

8 Arbroath Road 

5 Broadcroft 

93 West High street 

Gallowhill 

50 West High street 

79 West High street 

Catherine Square 

28 Zoar 

30 Glamis Road 

21 Glamis Road 

18 William street 
East Sunnyside 
Gallowhill 

23 Backwynd 

46 Prior Road 

87 Backwynd 

178 East High street 

18 Manor street 

44 John street 

dQ North street 

New Road 

28 Arbroath Road 



22 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



M'Leaii, Walter 
M'Leish, David 
M'Leod, Kenneth 
M'Math, Robert 
M'Nab, Archibald 
M'Nab, John 
M'lSTab, Robert 
M'Nab, Robert 
M'Nab, Robert 
M'Phee, Duncan 
M'Pherson, Alexander 
M'Pherson, Archibald 
M'Pherson, Oliver 
Macdongall, James 
MacHardy, Alexander 
Mackay, Alexander 
Mackie, Thomas 
Mackie, William 
Macrae, John 
Malcolm, James 
Malcolm, Robert 
Malcolm, Robert 
Malcolm, ^^'illiam 
Malcolm, William 
Malcolm, William 
Mands, James 
Mands, William 
Mann, James 
Mann, James 
Mann, John Holmes 
Mann, Joseph 
Mann, William 
Manvor, William 
Marshall, George 
Marshall, James 
Marshall, John 
Martin, Charles 
Martin, James 

Martin, William 
Mason, Alexander 
Mason, Andrew 
Mason, David 
Mason, Peter 
Massie, Joseph 
Massie, Peter 
Massie, William 
Masterton, David 
Masterton, David 
Masterton, George 
Masterton, James 



Farmer 

Confectioner 

Tailor 

Mechanic 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Clothier 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Painter 

Fireman 

Sewing mach. agent 

Printer 

Factory worker 

Solicitor 

Shoemaker 

Teacher 

Lam|)lighter 

Labourer 

Night watcher 

Grocer 

Labourer 

Tinsmith 

Gardener 

Railway servant 

Factory worker 

Mason 

Gardener 

Mechanic 

Tailor 

Tailor & clothier 

Carter 

Mason 

Mason 

Draper 

Clerk 

Factory manager 

Grocer and Avine 

merchant 
Joiner 

Cloth inspector 
Mason 
Hairdresser 
Factory worker 
Factory worker 
Factory worker 
Fireman 
Plasterer 
Factory worker 
Dyker 
Weaver 



Foffarty, Kinnettles 
31 East High street 
I'J: Yeaman street 
17 Backwynd 
Headingstone Place 

8 AVest Sunnyside 
150 East High street 
35 North street 

'24 Victoria street 
143 East High street 

12 Glamis Road 

13 Castle street 
22 North street 

1 Montrose Road 
Easterbank 

27 North street 
Lilybank House 
188 East High street 
42 Dundee Loan 

99 East High street 
22 Glamis Road 
7 Teuchat Croft ' 
19 New Road 
19 St. James' Road 
57 Dundee Loan 
77 West High street 
68 West High street 
95 Backwynd 
Yeaman street 

9 Wellbraehead 
12 Littlecauseway 
Gallowhill 
Gallowhill 

39 Prior Road 

108-10 West High street 

2(1 AVilliam street 

St. James' Road 

34 Castle street 

3 William street 
15 New Road 
West High street 
New Road 
12 New Road 
2() Dundee Loan 

28 John street 

12 St. James' Road 
108 Castle street 
26 North street 

10 Watt street 
Prior Road 



FORFAR DIRECTORY, 



Mather, John 
INIathers, James 
Mathers, William 
Matthew, WilKam 
Maxwell, David 
Maxwell, George 
Mealmaker, John 
Meek, Alexander 
Meldrum, Andrew 
Meldriim, David 
Meldrum, David 
Meldrum, James 
Meldrum, John 
IMeldrum, AVilliam 
JMelvin, John 

Menzies, Adam 
Menzies, John 
Methven, James 
Michie, Thomas 
Michie, WiUiam 
Millar, Alexander 
Millar, David 
Millar, David 
Milne, Alexander 
Milne, Alexander 
^lilne, Andrew 
Milne, Andrew 
Milne, Andrew 
Milne, Charles 
INIilne, David 
Milne, David 
Milne, David 
Milne, David, sen. 
Milne, Jaines 
Milne, James 
Milne, James 
Milne, James, jnn. 
Milne, John 
Milne, John 
Milne, John 
Milne, Robert 
Milne, Robert 
Milne, William 
Milne, William 
Milne. William 
Milne, William 
jNIilne, William 
^litchell, Alexander 
^litchell, Alexander 
Mitchell, Charles 



Coal agent 

Shoemaker 

Watchmaker 

Draper 

Mechanic 

Mechanic 

Factory worker 

Shoemaker 

Factory worker 

Grocer 

Factoiy worker 

Factory worker 

Baker 

Grocer 

Grocer and wine 

merchant 
Plumber 
Lapper 
Baker 

Police constable 
Cowfeeder, &c. 
Carter 

Factory worker 
Farmer 
Residenter 
Mason 

Factory woi'ker 
Mason 

Factory worker 
Manure agent 
Factory worker 
Lapper 
Slater 
Weaver 
Confectioner 
Mason 
Hallkeeper 
Hoitse proprietor 
Shoemaker 
Tailor 
Residenter 
Tailor 
Shoemaker 
Dyker 
Phimber 
Labourer 
Lapper 

Factory worker 
Fireman 
Factory worker 
Flesher 



Market Place 

7 Zoar 

86 Castle street 

8 Manor street 

16 Watt street 
Helen street 

40 West High street 

Gallowhill 

13 Wellbraehead 

95 West High street 

17 Arbroath Road 

16 St. James' Road 
108 East High street 
Backwynd 

Manor street 

79 East High street 

17 East Snnnj^side 
6 Glamis Road 

58 South street 
Belmont Dairy 
6 Dundee Road 
108 East High street 
Wester Oathlaw 
Cherrybank 
67 West High street 
5-4 Dundee Road 
67 West High street 
3^ Yeaman street 
5 Market Place 
Helen street 

5 John street 

6 Charles street 
4 Broadcroft 

99 East High street 
58 Dundee Loan 
88 Castle street 
86 Dundee Loan 
138 East High street 
42 John street 
Zoar 

15 Charles street 
50 South street 

7 Yeaman street 
6 Wellbraehead 

61 West High street 

9 Manor street 

9H West High street 
39 South street 
6 New Road 
79 North street 



24 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



Mitchell, Charles 
Mitchell, Charles 
Mitchell, David 
Mitchell, David 
Mitchell, George 
Mitchell, James 
Mitchell, James 
Mitchell, John 
Mitchell, John 
Mitchell, John 
Mitchell, Skene 
Mitchell, Thomas 
Mitchell, William 
Moffat, David 
Moffat, James 
Moffat, James 
Moffat, John 
Moffat, John 
Moffat, William 
Moir, Robert 
Mollison, David 
Moncrieff, Alexander 
Monteith, John 
More, David 
Morrice, William 
Morris, James 
Morrison, Alexander 
Morrison, David 
Morrison, David 
Morrison, James 
Morrison, John 
Morrison, John 
Morrison, John 
Morrison, AVilliam 
Morrison, William 
Morton, Robert 
Moyes, Thomas 
Muni-o, Andrew 
Munro, Bain 
Munro. James 
Munro, James 
Munro, James 
Munro, James 
Munro, WiUiam 
Murdoch, Alexander 
Murdoch, Alexander 
Murdoch, James D. 
Murray, James 
Murray, John 
Murra}-, William Fettes 
Myles, Adam Whitson 



Photographer 

Factory worker 

Turner 

Shoemaker 

Labourer 

Joiner 

Farmer 

Factory worker 

Labourer 

Plasterer 

Labourer 

Rail. car. inspector 

Factory worker 

Slater ' 

Manufacturer 

Cloth merchant 

Bleacher 

Signalman 

Slater 

Bleacher 

Grocer 

Bleacher 

Railway servant 

Cowfeeder 

Sup. of county police 

Labourer 

Factory worker 

«Joiner 

Wood turner 

Factory worker 

Dairyman 

Factory manager 

Book agent 

Joiner 

Lapper 

Ropespinner 

Drover 

General dealer 

Ironfounder 

Ironfounder 

Stoneware dealer 

Toy merchant 

Architect 

Labourer 

Wood turner 

Clerk 

Watchmaker 

Fruiterer 

Blacksmith 

Doctor of medicine 

Solicitor 



100 East High street 

11 Arbroath Road 
26 Yeaman street 

12 Charles street 
83 BackAvynd 

39 South street 

Quilkoe 

15 Arbroath Road 

9 North street 
IG Watt street 
6 Nursery Feus 
Prior Cottage 

13 Charles street 
11 New Road 
St. Ann's House 
8 Lour Road 

42 West High street 

14 John street 
3 New Road 
25 Glamis Road 
46 Dundee Loan 
64 East High street 
Zoar 

New Road 
County Place 

5 Prior Road 
103 Castle street 
1 Dundee Loan 
39 South street 
22 Prior Road 
Easter Bank 
Kirkton 

36 John street 

3 Dundee Loan 

82 AVest High street 

3 Glamis Road 

24 Backw3nd 

85 Backwynd 

89 North street 

89 North street 

186 East High street 

67 Backwynd 

85 Castle street 

Headingstone Place 

10 Green street 

6 Wellbraehead 
19 Green street 
81 Castle street 
6 Zoar 

East Hioh street 
Blvth Pfill 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



25 



Myles, James 

Myles, John 

Myles, Robert Freer 

Myles, William 

2s'eave, Alexander 

Neave, Andrew 

Neave, David 

Neave, David 

ISTeave, David 

Neave, elames 

Neave, Peter 

Neave, Ritchie 

Neave, William 

Neave, William 

Neavy, John 

Neil, GrBorge 

Neil, James 

Neilson, Alexander 

Neish, Patrick 

Nicolson, George Shepherd 

Nicolson, James 

Nicoll, Alexander 

Nicoll, Arthur 

Nicoll, Charles 

Nicoll, David 

Nicoll, David 

Nicoll, George 

Nicoll, James 

Nicoll, James 

Nicoll, James 

Nicoll, James 

Nicoll, James 

Nicoll, James 

Nicoll, James 

Nicoll, John 

Nicoll, John 

Nicoll, John 

Nicoll, John 

Nicoll, Peter 

Nicoll, Richard 

Nicoll, Robert 

Nicoll, Stewart 

Nicoll, Thomas 

Nicoll, William 

Niddrie, William 

Oakley, David 

Ogg, William 

Ogilvie, David 

Ogilvy, James 

Oram, Andrew 

Oram, John 



Bleacher 

AVriter 

Solicitor 

Baker 

Insurance agent 

Labourer 

Factory worker 

Tinsmith 

Dresser 

Ironmonger 

Plumber 

AVeaver 

Factory worker 

Carter 

Plasterer 

Teacher 

Teacher of dancing 

Mechanic 

Draper 

Editor 

Grocer, &c. 

Baker 

Draper 

Bleacher 

Weaver 

Cowfeeder 

Tenter 

Cattle dealer 

Lapper 

Factory worker 

Joiner 

Cattle dealer 

Gardener 

Factory worker 

Town -officer 

Factory worker 

Late Farmer 

Butcher 

Labourer 

Mason 

Tailor 

Bleacher 

Farmer 

Blacksmith 

Hallkeeper 

Factory worker 

Blacksmith 

Shepherd 

Shoemaker 

Lapper 

Factory worker 



8 Arbroath Road 
Blyth Hill 
Oakbank Cottage 
50 West High street 

10 Newnionthill 
3 Bell Place 

21 Zoar 

14 North street 

11 Can more street 
St. James' Road 
137 East High street 

9 Green street 
21 Wellbraehead 
1 Dundee Road 
8 Charles street 

16 East High street 
12a Castle street 
Couttie's Wynd 

I Lappiedub 
Craigard House 

23 Castle street 

1 Osnaburgh street 
21 Littlecauseway 
11 South street 

2 Broadcroft 

7 Arbroath Road 

17 Glamis Road 
Kingston Cottage 
144 East High street 
96 West High street 

3 Broadcroft 
Prior Road 
Welshbarns 

18 South street 

24 Arbroath Road 
21 East Sunnyside 
Bellfield House 
South Mains 

17 Backwynd 
17 Dundee Loan 
7 Albert street 
6 Watt street 
North Mains 
Acadeni}' street 
New Road 
105 Backwynd 
46 South street 
17 Prior Road 
29 East High street 
Strang street 
Chapel Park 



26 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 






Orchison, John 
Ormond, Abram 
Ormond, Charles 
Ormond, David 
Ormond, George 
Ormond, James 
Ormond, John 
Ormond, John 
Ormond, John 
Paterson, Alexander 
Paterson, George 
Paterson, William 
Paterson, William 
Paterson, William 
Paterson, William 
Patterson, William 
Paton, James 
Paton, James, jun. 
Paton, William 
Patullo, Alexander 
Pattullo, Andrew 
Patullo, Andrew 
Pattullo, David 
Patullo, James Lowsou 
Peacock, David 
Peacock, George 
Peacock, William 
Pearson, Andrew 
Pearson, David 
Pearson, John 
Peffers, Andrew 
Peffers, John 
Peter, Andrew 
Peter, John 
Peters, William 
Petrie, Alexander 
Petrie, Alexander 
Petrie, Charles 
Petrie, Charles 
Petrie, Charles 
Petrie, David 
Petrie, David 
Petrie, David 
Petrie, George 
Petrie, George 
Petrie, James 
Petrie, James 
Petrie, James 
Petrie, James 
Petrie, James 
Petrie, James 



Labourer 

Residenter 

Baker 

Baker 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

lletired agent 

Factory worker . 

Factory worker 

Tenter 

Baker 

Labourer 

Mechanic [Rates 

Collector of Public 

Mason 

Factory worker 

Joiner 

Clerk 

Painter 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Bleacher 

Labourer 

Tenter 

Currier 

Factory worker 

Spiritdealer 

Labourer 

Labourer 

Carter 

Dyer 

Dyer 

Labourer 

Clothier 

Fireman 

Baker 

Mechanic 

Dresser 

Factory Avorker 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Baker 

Tailor 

Residenter 

Tenter 

Factory worker 

Weaver 

(xardener 

Surfaceman 

Labourer 

Carter 



l-i Glamis Road 

Fernbank 

7 William street 

123 Castle street 

12 Stark's Close 

16 Dundee Loan 

9 Cross 

59 Glamis Road 

26^ West High street 

11 Wellbi'aehead. 

5 Backwynd 

18 Canmore street 

Zoar 

Backwynd 

10 Wellbraehead 
15 Watt street 

10 Arbroath Road 

18 North street 

9 Arbroath Road 
32 South street 
35 South street 
91 Backwynd 

7 Teuchat Croft 

22 Arbroath Road 
169 East High street 
41 Dundee Loan 
Dundee Loan 

44 South street 
Newford Park 

12 New Road 

9 Victoria Street 
9 Canmore street 

6 Dundee Road 

4 Newmonthill 

8 <\cademy street 
17 Little Causeway 
8 Glamis Road 

49 Dundee Loan 

5 East Sunnyside 

13 East Sunnyside 
182 East High street 
81 Backwynd 

29 East High street 

Hillockhead 

5 John street 

23 Strang street 

143 East High street 

19 East Sunnyside 
Zoar 
Newmonthill 

20 North street 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



27 



Petrie, James 
Petrie, John 
Petrie, John 
Petrie. John 
Petrie, John 
Petrie, Robert 
Petrie, Robert 
Petrie, Thomas 
Petrie, Thomas, jun. 
Petrie, Thomas 
Petrie, William 
Petrie, William 
Petrie, William 
Philps, George Mitchell 
Pickard, Thomas 
Piggot, David 
Piggot, James 
Piggot, Walter 
Piggot, William 
Pirrie, James 
Porter, George 
Porter, William 
Potter, James 
Preston, James 
Procter, David 
Procter, James 
Proctor, Charles 
Proctor, David 
Proctor, James 
Proctor, Robert 
Proctor, William 
Prophet, James 
Prophet, James 
Prophet, James 
Prophet, John 
Purvis, Alexander 
Rae, Alexander 
Rae, David 
Rae, David 
Rae, Henry 
Rae, James 
Rae, Joseph 
Rait, James 
Ramsay, Alexander 
Ramsay, Andrew 
Ramsay, Andrew 
Ramsay, David 
Ramsay, George 
Ramsay, James 
Ramsay, James Milne 
Ramsay, John 



Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Tailor 

Factory worker 

Tapper 

Factory worker 

Hairdresser 

Factory worker 

Dresser 

Shoemaker 

Hawker 

Hotel keeper 

Factory worker 

Clergyman 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Tapper 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Butcher 

Joiner 

Vintner 

Clerk 

Carter 

Residenter 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Tailor 

Farmer 

Joiner 

Weaver 

Draper 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Painter 

Ploughman 

Storekeeper 

Turner 

Farm servant 

Factory overseer 

Factory worker 

Tinsmith 

Dyker 

Turner 

Factory worker 

Engine driver 

Mechanic 

Joiner 

Labourer 

Clerk 

Joiner 



16 Dundee Road 

10 Stark's Close 
Hillockhead 
108 Backwynd 
Zoar 

184 East High street 
138 East High street 

9 John street 

17 John street 
2 Backwynd 

136 East High street 
150 East High street 

18 South street 
East F. C. Manse 
1 Chapel street 

G Wellbraehead 

11 Wellbraehead 

13 Zoar 

13 Wellbraehead 

22 William street 

51 Dundee Loan 
Castle street 

10 Market Place 
21 South street 

24 South street 

169 East High street 
186 East High street 
99 East High street 

25 Glamis Road 
17 North street 

15 Manor street 
^'l Lour Road 
41 Prior Road 
10 Zoar 

47 & 49 West High street 
"2^ Montrose Road 
1 67 East High street 

30 Green street 
64 Dundee Loan 

12 Montrose Road 
12 Nursery Feus 

16 Glamis Road 

52 Dundee Road 
37 North street 
12 Don street 

31 John street 
80 North street 

14 Charles street 

23 Victoria street 
84 North street 
12 North street 



28 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



Eamsay, Robert 
Eamsay, Thomas 
Rankin, James Anderson 
Rankin, John 
Rattray, Alexander 
Rattray, John 
Rattray, Peter 
Redford, Alexander 
Reid, Alexander 
Reid, Alexander 
Reid, David 
Reid, James 
Reid, Joseph 
Reid, Peter 
Reid, William 
Reid, William 
Reid, William 
Renny, David 
Rew, William 
Richard, John 
Ritchie, Alexander 
Ritchie, Alexander 
Ritchie, David 
Ritchie, George 
Ritchie, James 
Ritchie, James 
Ritchie, Peter 
Ritchie, William Air 
Robb, David 
Robb, Joseph 
Robb, AYilliam 
Robb, William 
Robb, Wyllie 
Robbie, Charles 
Roberts, Charles 
Roberts, James 
Roberts, John 
Roberts, William 
Robertson, Alexander 
Robertson, Alexander 
Robertson, Alexander 
Robertson, Alexander 
Robertson, David 
Robertson, David 
Robertson, Donald 
Robertson, George 
Robertson, James 
Robertson, James 
Robertson, James 
Robertson, James 
Robertson, John 



Labourer 

Factory worker 

Di'uggist 

Druggist 

Carter 

Labourer 

Mechanic 

Railway guard 

Labourer 

Clerk 

Factory worker 

Bleacher 

Clerk • 

Confectioner 

Labourer 

Factory worker 

Weaver 

Policeman 

Labourer 

Joiner 

Clerk 

Drapery agent 

Cowfeeder 

Farmer 

Veterinary surgeon 

Engine driver 

Salesman 

Postman 

To}^ merchant 

Factory worker 

Labourer 

Clerk 

Labourer 

Publican 

Factory worker 

Labourer 

Hosier 

Draper 

Factory worker 

Innkeeper 

Joiner 

Bleacher 

Joiner 

Shoemaker 

Mason 

Mason 

Labourer 

Factory worker 

Joiner 

Tailor 

Painter 



8 Lappiedub 

13 St. James' Road 

17 East High street 
19 East High street 
137 East High street 
108 Backwynd 

10 South street 
22 Don street 
22 Arbroath Road 
26 John street 

15 Albert street 

18 Zoar 

9 SparroAv Croft 

56 East High street 

57 North street 
12 Glamis Road 
9 Watt street 

12 Montrose Road 
Stark's Close 

19 Montrose Road 
7 Sparrowcroft 

129^ East High street 
Windyedge 

21 Dundee Road 
East Port Cottage 

20 John street 

22 Yeaman street 
Rosebank Road 
67 Backwynd 

52 Dundee Road 

110 Dundee Road 

95 East High street 

18 Dundee Road 

45 Backw3'nd 

3 Wellbraehead 

20 Wellbraehead 

43 & 45 East High street 

20 Wellbraehead^ 

5 Charles street 

23 Osnaburgh street 

16 Charles street 
35 North street 
Gallowhill 

22 Yeaman street 
9 Watt street 
3 Bell Place 
26 St. James' Road 

13 Watt street 

32 East High street 

Prior Road 

52 Castle street 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



29 



Robertson, Potci' 

Kobertson, Peter 

Kobcrtsoii, Thomas 

]lobcrtson, William 

Rodger, David 

Rodger, James 

Rodger, .John 

l^olland, Maxwell 

Rolland, Peter 

Rose, James 

Ross, Alexander 

Ross, David 

Ross, David 

Ross, James 

Ross, James 

Ross, James 

Ross, AVilliam 

Ross, William 

Ross, William 

Ross, William 

Rough, Alexander 

Rough, Colson 

Rough, George 

Rough, James Pattison 

Roy, Thomas 

Ryder, John 

Saddler, James 

Samson, James 

Samson, John 

Samson, John 

Samson, John 

Samson, AVilliam 

Savage, James 

Savage, Stewart 

Scott, Charles 

Scott, David 

Scott, David 

Scott, George 

Scott, James 

Scott, James 

Scott, James 

Scott, James 

Scott, Robert 

Scott, William 

Scott, William 

Scott, William 

Scott, William 

Sharp, William Westland 

Shepherd, Alexander 

Shepherd, Alexander 

Shepherd, Alexander M. 



Residenter 

Game & fish dealer 

Factory worker 

Farmer 

Painter 

Inspector of Poor 

Surfaceman 

Labourer 

Railwa}' labourer 

Dresser 

Factory worker 

Policeman 

Factory worker 

Plumber 

Labourer 

Tenter 

Baker 

Factory worker 

Grocer, &c. 

Baker 

Factory worker 

Factory Avorker 

Factory worker 

Post Runner 

Compositor 

Pensioner 

Confectioner 

Mason ^ 

La])per 

Labourer 

Mason 

Mason 

Labourer 

Labourer 

Labourer 

Cattle salesman 

Warehouseman 

Mason 

Saddler 

Auctioneer 

Mason 

Pig dealer 

Potato merchant 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Joiner 

Factory worker 

Coal merchant 

Baker 

Slater 

Slater 



87 North street 

4 & 6 AVest High street 

5 Glamis Road 
Cossens of Glamis 

21 West High street 
50i East High street 
4 Wellbraehead 
o4^ Dundee Loan 

4 Dundee Road 

11 Broadcroft 
7 Green street 
17 Charles street 

12 St. James' Road 
105 Backwynd 

1 Lappiedub 

5 Bell Place 

11 Wellbraehead 
5 Academy street 
St. James' Road 
108 Backwynd 

22 Glamis Road 
5 Glamis Road 

26 Arbroath Road 

25 East Sunnyside 
98 Backwynd 
South street 

65 West High street 

2 Dundee Road 
28 Sunnyside 

26 South street 
Headingstone Place 
Lunanhead 

10 Glamis Road 
81 Backwynd 
15 Zoar 
Whitehills 
49 North street 

13 Newmonthill 

7 Lappiedub 
47 North street 
'26 Dundee Loan 
64 East L[igh street 
Newford Park 

93 West High street 
157 East High street 
Zoar 

8 Lappiedub 

28 Victoria street 

9 Osnaburgh street 
59 Dundee Loan 
114 East High street 



30 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



Shepherd, Andrew 
Shepherd, Charles 
Shepherd, Charles 
Shepherd, Charles 
Shepherd, eTames 
Shepherd, James, jun. 
Shepherd, William 
Shepherd, William 
Shepherd, William 
Simpson, Alexander 
Simpson, Alexander 
Simpson, Alexander 
Simpson, Alexander H. 
Simpson, Andrew 
Simpson, David 
Simpson, David 
Simpson, George 
Simpson, James 
Simpson, James 
Simpson, James 
Simpson, James 
Simpson, John 
Simpson, John 
Simpson, John Watson 
Simpson, Robert 
Simpson, Thomas 
Simpson, William 
Simpson, William 
Simpson, ^AVilliam 
Simpson. 'William 
Sievewright, Colin 
Skeen, Thomas 
Skene, Keith Kennedy 
Small, Charles 
Small, David 
Small, John 
Small, Leonard 
Smart, Alexander 
Smart, Andrew 
Smart, George 
Smith, i'llexander 
Smith, Alexander 
Smith, Alexander 
Smith, Alexander 
Smith, Allan 
Smith, Charles J. 
Smith, David 
Smith, David 
Smith, Edward 
Smith, James 
Smith, James 



Baker 

Slater 

Baker 

Tailor 

Mason 

General merchant 

Mason 

Bookseller, &c. 

Factory worker 

Bleacher 

Blacksmith 

Factory worker 

Chemist 

Factoi'y worker 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Joiner 

Mason 

Joiner 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Market gardener 

Draper 

Factory worker 

Fireman 

AVeaver 

Factory worker 

Joiner 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Engineer 

Boot merchant 

Labourer 

Gas inspector 

Overseer 

Factory worker 

Tenter 

Factory worker 

Grocer 

Mason 

Factor}' worker 

Seedsman 

Labourer 

Tenter [teacher 

Organist and music 

Seedsman 

Tenter (foreman) 

Mechanic 

Labourer 

Lapper 



22 & 24 West High stree 
2 Charles street 
11 Montrose Boad 

1 St. James' Road 
163 East High street 
y Little Causeway 
15 William street 

69 Castle street 

2 Bell Place 
31 Prior Road 

20 Bailliewellbrae 

11 St. James' Road 

Cross 

11 St. James' Road 

39 Dundee Road 

10 Dundee Loan 
39 Bdckwynd 

11 Lour Road 

2 Montrose Road 
Helen street 

161 East High street 
10 Nursery Feus 
Glamis Road 

9 Cross 

22 Manor street 

24 Market Place 
20 Glamis Road 
90 Dundee Loan 
35 South street 
42 Dundee Loan 
100 Dundee Loan 
18 Dundee Road 
75 Castle street 
38^ Dundee Loan 
Albert street 

4 Couttie's Wynd 

25 Glamis Road 
24 Montrose Road 
42 North street 
"1'2 Dundee Loan 

10 Glamis Road 
30 Yeaman street 
30 Glamis Road 

3 "W'^att street 

18 St. James' Road 

New Road 

Broomroof 

9 William street 

9 Zoar 

38 Lour Road 

18 Zoar 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



31 



iSniith, James 
Smith, James 
Smith, flames 
Smith, James 
Smith, James 
Smith, James 
Smith, John 
Smith, John 
Smith, John 
Smith, John 
Smith, Peter 
Smith, Peter 
Smith, Kobert 
Smith, William 
Smith, William 
Smith, William 
Snowie,, John 
Soutar, Alexander 
Soutar, Alexander 
Soutar, Andrew 
Soutar, David 
Soutar, James 
Soutar, John, jun. 
Soutar, Joseph 
Soutar, William Murray 
Spalding, Alexander 
Spalding, Joseph 
Spark, James 
Spark, William G. 
Stark, Alexander 
Stiirk, David 
Stark, David 
Stark, David 
Stark, David 
Stark, George 
Stark, William 
Steel, Alexander 
Steele, Andrew 
Steele, David 
Steele, John, jun. 
Stephen, Alexander 
Stephen, David 
Stephen, William 
Steven, David 
Steven, John 
Steven, John 
Stewart, Alexander 
Stewart, Alexander 
Stewart, Alexander 
Stewart, Alexander 
Stewart, Andrew 



Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Quarrier 

liabourer 

Slater 

Draper's assistant 

Factory worker 

Seedsman 

Teacher 

Shoemaker 

Factory worker 

Tenter 

Labourer 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Gardener 

Hawker 

Factor}" Avorker 

Engine driver 

Mason 

Manufacturer 

Mason 

Weaver 

Mason 

Clothier 

Mechanic 

Grocer 

Joiner 

Gardener 

Factory worker 

Mason 

Gardener 

Factory woi ker 

Factory worker 

Weaver 

Saddler 

Farmer 

Bank agent 

Manufacturer 

Labourer 

Engine cleaner 

Labourer 

Seaman 

Labourer 

Engine driver 

Police sergeant 

Tailor 

Carter 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 



39| Dundee Loan 
o Charles street 
166 East High street 
Academy street 
9 Glamis E,oad 
14: Dundee Loan 

28 Yeaman street 
46 South street 

59 West High street 
Newmonthill 
24 backwynd 
11 John street 

11 Albert street 

29 Backwynd 
13 South street 
Newmonthill 
Dundee Road 

3 Prior Road 
15 John street 
22 Don street 
28 Nursery Feus 
43 Prior Road 
Wellbraehead 
Prior Road 

8 Wellbraehead 

4 Sparrow Croft 
68 Dundee Loan 
Market Place 

18 Dundee Loan 
13 Glamis Road 
8 Stark's Close 
24 Yeaman street 
21 St. James' Road 
15 Glamis Road 
13 Charles Street 

12 Glamis Road 

149 East High street 

Mid Langlands 

East High street 

East High street 

52 Dundee Road 

12^ North street 

40 John street 

57 West High street 

127 Castle street 

Gallowhill 

Cross 

4 Green street 

32 Lour Road 

17 Albert street 

East Sunnyside 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



Stewart, Charles 
Stewart, David 
Stewart, David 
Stewart, David 
Stewart, David 
Stewart, David Mackie 
Stewart, George 
Stewart, George 
Stewart, James 
Stewart, James 
Stewart, James 
Stewart, James 
Stewart, John 
Stewart, John 
Stewart, Robert 
Slewart, Williani 
Stewart, William 
Stewart, William 
Stewart, William 
Stirling, Andrew 
Stirling, James 
Stirling, James 
Stirling, John 
Stirling, Thomas 
Stirling, William 
Stirling, William 
Stirton, David 

Stiven, John 
Stormont, Robert 
Stormoii<"h, James 

Storrier, AVilliam 
Strachan, Alexander 

Strachan, Alexander Duff 

Strachan, Andrew 

Strachan, David 

Strachan, George 

Strachan, James 

Strachan, John 

Strang, James 

Strang, John 

Strang, Robert 

Sturrock, Adam 

Stmn-ock, Alexander 

Sturrock, Allan 

Sturrock, Andrew 

Sturrock, Andrew 

Sturrock, William 

Sturrock, William 

Tarbat, Alexander 

Tarbat, Alexander 

Tarbat, William 



Shoemaker 

AVeaver 

Labourer 

Slater 

Manure agent 

Foreman tanner 

Factory worker 

Mechanic 

Bleacher 

Railway Porter 

House proprietor 

Mason 

Tailor 

Vintner 

Painter 

Draper 

Mason 

Grocer 

Ploughman 

Quarrier 

Supt. of Police 

Factory worker 

Quarrier 

School board officer 

Spirit dealer 

Shoemaker 

Manager 

Baker 

Wood merchant 

Potato salesman 

Mechanic 

Printer 

Sawmill manager 

Shoemaker 

Shoemaker 

Keeper 

Labourer 

Watchmaker 

Weaver 

Slater 

Barber 

Baker 

Bootmaker 

Factory worker 

Weaver 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Residenter 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Joiner 



13 Osnaburgh street 
Archie's Park 

33 John street 
12 St. James' Road 
8 John street 
Castle street 
7 Charles street 
17 Albert street 
20 Montrose Road 

14 Zoar 

91 North street 
Rescobie 

12 Newmonthill 

1 Arbroath Road 

Gallowhill 

•140 East High street 

Roslin Place 

78 North street 

13 Zoar 

96 Dundee Road 
Melbourne Cottage 
43 Backwynd 

7 Watt street 
Kirkton 

I Green street 

6 Arbroath Road 
3 John street 

126 East High street 

15 Glamis Road 
8 1 North street 
20 South street 

8 Lour Road 
22 Green street 

14 Don street 

5 Market Place 
Court-House 
Market Place 

II Newmonthill 
Newmonthill 

9 Little Causeway 
61 Castle street 

7 Watt street 
29 Strang street 
14 South street 

12 Glamis Road 

13 Strang street 
120 East^High street 
11 Little Causeway 
52 South street 
Nursery Feus 

17 New Road 



U 
laii 

Tav 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



33 



Taylor, Charles 
Taylor, David 
[Taylor, James 
Taylor, John 
Taylor, John 
Taylor, Peter, sen. 
Taylor, Peter 
Taylor, Robert Grant 
Thorn, Alexander 
Thoni, Alexander 
Thorn, Andrew 
Thoin, David 
Thorn, James 
Thom, James 
Thom, AVilliam 
Thom, William 
Thom, William 
Thom, William 
Thomson, Alexander 
Thomson, David 
Thomson, James 
Thomson, John 
Thomson, John Alex. 
Thomson, William Hodge 
Thornton, Archibald 
Thornton, Charles 
Thornton, David P. 
Thornton, Jitmes 
Tindal, David 
Todd, Alexander 
Todd, James 
Tosh, Charles 
Tosh, Peter A. 
Tosh, William 
Tough, Peter 
Tyrie, Charles 
Tyrie, David 
Tyrie, James 
Tyrie, John 
Tyrie, John 
Tyrie, liobert 
Urquhart, Alexander 
Urquhart, Duncan 
Urquhart, Robert 
Valentine, James 
Valentine, flohn 
Waddell, Hay 
AVaddell, James 
Waddeli, James 
Waddell, William Doig 
Walker, David 



Factory worker 

Hatter 

Town-clerk, &c. 

Carter 

Tailor 

Carter 

Factory worker 

Weaver 

Carter, &c, 

Factory worker 

Shoemaker 

Shoemaker 

Clerk 

Labourer 

Factory worker 

Slater "' 

Factory worker 

Labourer 

Mechanic 

Bleacher 

Tenter 

Late postmaster 

Coods agent 

Registrar 

Joiner 

Factory worker 

Shoemaker 

Carter 

Slater 

Tailor 

Factory worker 

Ironmonger, &c. 

Auctioneer 

Labourer 

Factory worker 

Lapper 

Cambmaker 

Baker 

Tenter 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Game dealer 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Coach painter 

Baker 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Moulder 



56 Dundee Loan 
37 John street 
Heatherstacks 
22 John street 
10 Littlecauseway 

28 Nursery Feus 
135 East High street 

7 Watt street 
125 Castle street 
22 Glamis Road 

5 East High street 
97 West High street 
New Road 
3 John street 

12 Glamis Road 
16 Little Causeway 

14 Charles street 
•26 Lour Road 
Gallowhill 

29 Nursery Feus 
161 East High street 
Rosebank Road 
Whitehills 

73 East High street 

13 North street 
20 Nursery Feus 

86 West High street 
16 Prior Road 
28 Yeaman street 

8 East High street 
34 Dundee Loan 

18 West High street 

15 Canmore street 
Archie's Park 

64 East High street 
45 West High street 
184 East High street 
37 North street 
75 North street 
10 Dundee Road 
49 Dundee Loan 
St. eJames' Road 
28 North street 
10 Newmonthill 
Nursery Feus 
22 Wellbraehead 
170 East High street 

24 William street 
127 Castle street 

25 Strang street 
129 Castle street 



34 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



Walker, David 
Walker, David 
Walker. David 
Walker, James 
Walker, James 
Walker, John 
Walker, Robert 
Walker, William 
Walker, William, jr. 
Wallace, Thomas 
Wallace, William 
Warden, David 
Warden, David 
AVarden, William 
Waterston, Alexander 
Waterston, Charles 
Waterston, James 
Waterston, John Edmnnd 
Waterston, William 
Watson, William 
Watt, James 
Watt, John 
\>'att, Robert 
Watt, AVilliam 
Webster, Charles 
Webster, George 
Webster, George 
Webster, James 
Webster, Patrick 
Webster, William 
Wedderburn, Alex. M'L. 
Weir, John 
Welsh, David 
Welsh, John 
Whammond, David 
Whiteford, Alexander 
Whitson, Andrew H. 
^Vhitton, James 
Whitton, William 
Whyte, Alexander 
Whyte, Alexander 
Whyte, Alexander 
Whyte, Andrew, jun. 
Whyte, Andrew, sen. 
Whyte, David 
Whyte, David 
Whyte, James 
Whyte, James 
Whyte, John 
Whyte, John 
Wh}i;e, Joseph Smith 



Engine driver 

Butcher 

Labourer 

General dealer 

Police sergeant 

Mason 

Weaver 

Game dealer 

Clerk and brewer 

Factory worker 

Mechanic 

Draper 

Railway guard 

Draper 

Mason 

Weaver 

Builder, &c. 

Farmer 

House proprietor 

Weaver 

Laboui-er 

Shoemaker 

Factory worker 

Tailor 

Labourer 

Hall keeper 

Labourer 

Quarrier 

Gentleman 

Dyker 

M.D. 

Clergyman 

Railway guard 

Mason 

Cabinetmaker 

Blacksmith 

Clerk 

Policeman 

Moulder 

Tailor 

Turner 

Coal merchant 

Factory Avorker 

Hawker 

Potato merchant 

Fruiterer 

Factory worker 

Labourer 

Labourer 

Tanner 

Factory worker 



50 North street 

100 West High .^-treet 

58 North street 

20 Victoria street 
l^ochside 

21 Glamis Road 
3 Lappiedub 
West High street 
West High street 
53 North street 

6 Lappiedub 

Cowiehill 

23 North street 

25 & 27 East High street 

59 Glamis Road 
63 Glamis Road 
Glamis Road 

of Pitreuchie 
Newtonbank 

6 Canmore street 

5 Backwynd 
9 Backwynd 

St. James' Road 
154 East High street 

7 Charles street 
Reid Hall Lodge 

9 Littlecauseway 
19 St. James' Road 
Westfield 

51 Dundee Road 

East High street 

St. James' Manse 

Zoar 

14 Canmore street 

38 Canmore street 

76 Dundee Loan 

6 Littlecauseway 
43 North street' 
Gallowhill 

45 Prior Road 
3 John street 
25 Prior Road 
Market Place 
Market Place 
1 1 Market Place 
6 AVest High street 
30 South street 
South street 

10 Arbroath Road 
Sparrowcroft 
Helen street 



fi! 

fil 



fi 



f 



^ 



^i 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



35 



Whyte, Eobert 

Wliytc, Stewart 

Whyte, Thomas 

Whyte, AYilliam 

Wiohtoii, Alexander 

Wilkie, Alexander 

Wilkie, Alexander 

Wilkie, James 

AVilkie, John 

Wilkie, William 

AVillis, William 

Williams, James 

AVilliamson, James 

Wilson, Alexander 

Wilson, James 

Wilson, John 

Wilson, Robert 

Winter, Alexander 

Winter, George 

Winton, David 

Wishart, Charles 

Wishart, George 

W^ishart, James 

Wishart, John 

^Vishart, John 

Wood, Charles 

AVood, George 

Wood, James 

Wood, James 

Wood, John 

Wood, William 

Wood, William 

Wood, William 

Wright, Peter Stirling 

Wyllie, Alexander Blues 

Wyllie, David 

Wyllie, William 

Wyllie, William 

Yeaman, Alexander 

Young, Allan 

Young, Charles 

Y'^oung, David 
[ Young, David 
' Young, David 

Young, Peter 

Y'oung, William 

Y^'oung, William 

Young, William 

Y^oung, William 

Y^ounyer, George 



Solicitor 

Green grocer 

Factory worker 

Mason 

Society manager 

Factory worker 

Labourer 

Labourer 

Farm servant 

Shoemaker 

Hotel keeper 

Factory worker 

Seedsman 

Vintner 

Salesman 

Pointsman 

Spirit dealer 

Farm servant 

Tanner 

Baker 

Grocer 

Coal merchant 

Cattle dealer 

Tenter 

Tenter 

Tenter 

Saw}'er 

Factory worker 

Labourer 

Factory worker 

Joiner 

Tanner 

Labourer. 

Clergyman 

Solicitor 

Mechanic 

Factory worker 

Farm servant 

Linen manufacturer 

Factory worker 

Lapper 

Farmer 

Joiner 

Cowfeeder 

Factory worker 

Labourer 

Factory worker 

Factory worker 

Sawyer 

Teacher 



East High street 
142 East High street 
15 Albert street 
37 Prior Road 
44 North street 
3 Arbroath Road 

19 New Road 

1G7 East High street 

107 Castle street 

40 West High street 
Castle street 

Charles street 
24 Victoria street 
155 East High street 

108 Castle street 
Gallowl.ill 

105^ East High street 
28 Lour Road 

21 Victoria street 
28 Market Place 
28 Dundee Loan 
15 Green sti'eet 

120 East High street 
13 Little Causeway' 
15 Charles street 

51 West High street 

2 Prior Lane 

52 West High street 

26 South street 

3 Victoria street 

27 St. James' Road 
3 Victoria street 
Newmonthill 

U.P. Manse 

11 Green street 

Roslin Place 

2 West Sunnyside 

13 Broadcroft 

33 Dundee Loan 

182 East High street 

169 East High street 

Blairyfadden, Oathlaw 

32 John street 

Fruithill 

87 West High street 

22 Don street 

1 St. James' Road 
50 Prior Road 

20 Nursery Feus 
46 Castle street 



36 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



FEMALE HOUSBHOL.DBRS. 



Adam, Marjory 
Adam, Martha 
Adamson, Isabella 
Addison, Jane 
Aitcheson, Barbara 
Alexander, Catherine 
Allan, Agnes 
Allan, Elizabeth 
Allan, Mary 
Anderson, Ann 
Anderson, Betsy 
Anderson, Elizabeth 
Anderson, INIargaret 
Anderson, Margaret 
Anderson, Margaret 
Anderson, Margaret 
Anderson, Martha 
Anderson, Mary 
Anderson, Mary 
Anderson, Susan 
Andrew, Margaret 
Arnot, Mary 
Arthur, Margaret 
Barclay, Elizabeth 
Barclay, Margaret 
Barrie, Elizabeth 
Barron, Ann 
Beattie, Mary 
Belford, Elizabeth 
Bell, Elizabeth 
Bell, Jessie 
Bell, Margaret 
Bell, Margaret Thornton 
Bennet, Amelia 
Bennet, Jane 
Bett, Mary Ann 
Bissett, Ann 
Black, Elizabeth 
Black, Mary 
Black, Mary 
Blues, Jane 
Boath, Elizabeth 
Boath, Jane 
Boath, Jane 
Boatli, Jane M'Xab 



Widow 


St. James' Road 


Spinster 


18 Glamis Road 


Spinster 


24 Montrose Road 


Spinster 


5 Venn el 


Widow 


iS^ewmouthill 


Spinster 


67 Backwynd 


Widow 


78 Dundee Loan 


AVidow 


30 North street 


S})inster 


5 Prior Road 


Widow 


72 Dundee Road 


Spinster 


95 East High street 


Widow 


9 Archie's Park 


Spinster 


11 East Sunnyside 


Spinster 


52 Dundee Road 


Spinster 


46 Prior Road 


Widow 


67 Backwynd 


Spinster 


137 East High street 


Widow 


Chapelbank 


Widow 


13 AVellbraehead 




5 East H'gli street 


AVidow 


13 Littlecauseway 


Spinster 


14 St. James' Road 


Spinster 


Broomroof Cottage 


AA'idow 


4 West High street 


Spinster 


10 Glamis Road 


AVidow 


37 South street 


AA'^idow 


20 North street 


AVidow 


188 East High street 


Widow 


47 Dundee Road 


AA'^idow 


35 Glamis Road 


Widow 


85 AA^est High street 


Spinster 


3 Bell Place 


Spinster 


85 West High street 


AVidow 


9 Archie's Park 


AVidow 


20 Canmore street 


AVidow 


16 John street 


Widow 


16 Castle street 


Spinster 


46 Castle street 


Spinster 


lu8 Backwynd 


AA'idow 


7 Victoria street 


Widow 


12 Lour Road 


Widow 


4 Academy- street 


AVidow 


Chapel Park 


AA^idow 


57 AVest High street 


Spinster 


33 North street 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



Boath, Mar}- 


Spinster 


Boath, Mary 


Spinster 


Boath, Mary 


Spinster 


Boath, Mary 


Spinster 


Booth, Helen 


Spinster 


Bowman, Aones 




Boyle, Jessie 


Spinster 


Boyle, Jessie 


Spinster 


Boyle, ]Mary 


Spinster 


Boyne, Barbara 


Widow 


Braclbear, Sarah 


Spinster 


Brew, Jane 


Widow 


Brook, Helen 


Widow 


Brown, Ann 


Widow 


Brown, Fanny 


Spinster 


Brown, Jane 


AVidow 


Brown, Catherine 


Spinster 


Brown, Elizabeth 


Spinster 


Brown, Margaret 


\Vidow 


Bruce, Ann 


Spinster 


Brnce, Elizabeth 


AA'idow 


Bruce, Elizabeth 


Spinster 


Buick, Margaret 


Spinster 


Bunch, Ann 


Spinster 


Burnett, Margaret 


Widow 


Burns, Helen 


Spinster 


Butchart, Isabella 


AVidow 


Butchart, Margaret 


Spinster 


Butchart, Mar}' 


Spinster 


liuttar, Jane 


AVidow 


Cable, Helen 


Spinster 


Cable, Jane 


Spinster 


Caird, Isabella 


Widow 


Caird, Margaret 


AVidow 


Caird, Mary Ann 


AA^idow 


Calder, Mary 


Spinster 


Calder, Madalene 


AVidow 


Cant, Maiy 


Spinster 


Cargill Elizabeth 


Spinster 


Cargill, Marjor}' 


Widow 


Carr, Elizabeth 


AVidow 


Carrie, Ann 


Spinster 


Chapman, Annie 


Spinster 


Christie, Elizabeth 




Christie, Elizabeth 


Spinster 


( 'hristie, Annie 


Spinster 


Christie, Marianne 


AVidow 


Chrystal, Catherine 


XA'idow 


Clark, Elizabeth 


AVidow 


Clark, Elspeth 


Widow 


Clark, Margaret 


Widow 


J^ 





?)C} North street 
61 Glamis Road 
143 East High street 
o East High street 

27 Strang street 
4 North street 
Backwynd 

11 Albert street 
o AA'^illiam sireet 

Backw}'nd 
33 John street 
U Market Place 

12 AA'att street 

166 East High street 

18 AVilliam street 

154 East High street 

1 8 Manor street 

Kirkton 

65 West High street 

3 Albert street 
16 Yeaman street 
32 Canmore street 
80 East High street 

1 Bell Place 

13 South street 
11 Zoar 

4 Arbroath Road 

4 Lappiedub 

G6 Dundee Road 
Auchleuchrie 

10 Market Place 

50 North street 
18 Dundee Road 

61 West High street 
32 North street 

5 Prior Road 

11 Lour Road 

28 Nursery Feus 
162 East High street 
4 Archie's Park 

3 AVatt street 
30 South street 
Lour Road 

12 Stark's Close 
136 East High sireet 
35 South street 
Kirkton 

o'2 West High street 

51 Prior Road 

125 East High street 

62 Castle street 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



Clarke, Aofnes, 


Spinster 


30 South street 


Clarke, Georgina Murray 


Spinster 


58 East High street 


Colville, Jane 


Widow 


1 John street 


Cook, Ann 


WidoAv 


6 ISew Road 


Cook, Elizabeth 


Widow 


15 Albert street 


Cook, Mary 


Spinster 


93 East High street 


Coupar, Isabella 


Widow 


38 Prior Road 


Coiitts, Annie 


Widow 


32 Canmore street 


Cowie, Mary 


Widow 


6 Zoar 


Crabb, Agnes 


Spinster 


14 Nursery Feus 


Craig, JNlargaret 


Spinster 


93 East High street 


Craik, Catherine 


Widow 


Manor Place 


Craik, Elizabeth 


Spinster 


37 North street 


Crichton, Jane 


Widow 


21 North street 


Crighton, Betsy 


Spinster 


21 St. James' Road 


Crighton, Jean 


Widow 


Gallowhill 


Croll, Margaret 


Widow 


150^ East High street 


Camming, Mary 


Spinster 


17 Backwynd 


Cuthbert, Jane 


AVidoAV 


1 9 Victoria street 


Dakers, Margaret 


Widow 


19 Backwynd 


Dalgetty, Ann 


AVidow 


114 West High street 


Davidson, Agnes 


Spinster 


3 Arbroath Road 


Davidson, Isabella 


Spinster 


•2-2 Market Place 


Davidson, Janet 


Spinster 


26 Market Place 


Davidson. Margaret 


Widow 


6 Newmonthill 


Deacon, Mary 


Widow 


10 Newmonthill 


Dickson, Rose 


Spmstcr 


87 West High street 


Doig, Ann 


Widow 


36 West High street 


Doig, Isabella 


Widow 


9 Montrose Road 


Doig. MiS John 


Widow 


;)0 South street 


Donald, Agnes 


Widow 


11 Zoar 


Donald, Elizabeth 


Widow 


19 Wellbraehead 


Donald, Helen 


Widow 


29 New Road 


Donald, Isabella 


Widow 


14 Watt street 


Donald, Isabella 


Widow 


23 Nursery Feus 


Donaldson, Elizabeth 


Widow 


17 Dundee Loan 


Donaldson, Mary 


AV^idow 


4 Bell Place 


Duff, Catharine 


Widow 


17 New Road 


Duncan, Catherine 


Widow 


1 Zoar 


Dunbar, Agnes 


Widow 


27 John street 


Duncan, Elizabeth 


Spinster 


96 North street 


Duncan, Jane 


Spinster 


108 East High street 


Duncan, Jessie 


Spinster 


2i) Glamis Road 


Dundas, Henrietta 


Widow 


1 William street 


Dyce, Jane 


Widow 


70 Dundee Road 


Dyce, Margaret ]\tollison 


Widow 


12 Cross 


Edward, Margaret 


Widow 


18 John street 


Edward, Mary 


Spinster 


13 Manor street 


Edwards, Ann 


Widow 


8 Dundee Road 


Elder, Isabella 


Spinster 


29 Manor street 


Ellis. Elizabeth 


Spinster 


7 Manor street 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



39 



Ellis, Jessie 
E>plin, Janet 
Esplin, Mary 
Evans, Eliza 
Ewart, Marjory 
Fairvveather, Ann 
Fairweather, Jane Mair 
Farquharson , M ar oaret 
Fawns, Agnes 
Fenton, Ann 
Fenton. Mar}' 
Ferguson, Jane 
Fettes, Mary 
Findlay, Agnes 
Findlay, Ann 
Findlay, Ann 
Findlay, Matilda 
Finlayson, Helen 
Fleming, Jane 
Fodd, Catherine 
Fordyce, PLlizabeth 
Forsyth, Margaret 
Eraser, Betsy 
Fyfe, Agnes 
Fyfe, Elizabeth 
Fyfe, Isabella Barrie 
Fyfe, Margaret 
Fyfe, Mary 
Fyfe, jNIary 
Fyffe, Janet 
Fyffe, Marjory 
Gibb, Agnes 
Gibb, Ann 

Gibb, Helen Thomson 
Gibb, Jane 
Gibson, Elizabeth 
Gibson, Harriet 
Gibson, Jessie 
(libson, Mary 
Gibson, Mary 
(xibson, Mary 
Glen, Agnes 
Gordon, Agnes 
(xordon, Elizabeth 
Gordon, Helen 
Grewar, Jane 
Grant, Ann 
Grant, Isabella 
Grant, Jane 
Gray, Jane 
Gray, Jane 



Spinster 


33 West High street 


Widow 


15G East High street 


Widow 


22 Don street 


Spinster 


11 New Road 


Spinster 


Archie's Park 


Spinster 


29 Strang street 


Spinster 


113 Castle street 


Spinster 


3 Charles street 


Spinster 


57 AVest High street 


Spinster 


162 East High street 


Spinster 


64 East High street 


Spinster 


37 Castle street 


Widow 


Dundee Eoad 


Widow 


17 Zoar 


Widow 


109 East High street 


Widow 


23 Nursery Feus 


.Spinster 


5 Teuchat Croft 


Spinster 


52 South street 


Widow 


17 North street 


Widow 


Prior Koad 


Widow 


26 Backwynd 


Widow 


1 Green street 


Spinster 


72;^ West High street 


Widow 


KVAVellbraehead 


Widow 


6 New Road 


Spinster 


Mylnhall 


Widow 


2 Lap])iedub 


Widow 


17 Backwynd 


Widow 


4 Green street 


Widow 


5 Prior Road 


.Spinster 


Littlecauseway 


.Spinster 


5 Bell Place 


Spinster 


8 Little Causeway 


Widow 


1 Lappiedub 


Spinster 


70 Dundee Road 




Bankhead 


Widow 


41 Dundee Road 


Widow 


18 Littlecauseway 


Spinster 


162 East High street 


Spinster 


10 South street 


AVidow 


49 Dundee Road 


Spinster 


15 John street 


Widow 


15 Prior Road 


Widow 


3 Chapel street 


AVidow 


5 Glamis Road 


Widow 


Market Place 


Spinster 


2 Bell Place 


AA^idow 


93 East High street 


AVidow 


Baronhill 


Spinster 


186 East High street 


Spinster 


8 Ai'broath Road 



40 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



Gray, Jane 


Widow 


-I John street 


Gray, Mary 


Spinster 


17 New Road 


Gray, Mar}- 


AVidow 


48 South street 


Gray, Mary 


Widow 


24 A^ictoria street 


Grubb, Mary 


Spinster 


182 East High street 


Guild, Janet 


Widow 


7 ^Montrose IJoad 


Guthrie, Ann 


Widow 


AVhitehiUs 


Guthrie, Ann 


Spinster 


Backwynd 


Guthrie, Barbara 


Widow 


20 Charles street 


Guthrie, Jean 


Spinster 


12 Wellbraehead 


Iladden, Helen 


Spinster 


81 Backwynd 


Hardie, Ann 


Widow 


2 Dundee Road 


Hastings, Jane 


Widow 


o Chapel street 


Hastings, Janet 


Widow 


27 Prior Road 


Hazels, Agnes 


Spinster 


23 AA'^est Hioh street 


Henderson, Ann 


Widow 


14 Market Place 


Henderson, Jean 


Spinster 


70 Dundee Road 


Henderson, Margaret 


Spinster 


8 Dundee Road 


Henderson, Mary 


Widow 


167 East High street 


Hendry, Jane 


Spinster 


15 Arbroath Road 


Hendry, Margaret 


Spinster 


10 Nursery Feus 


Henry, Jane 


Spinster 


10 Zoar 


Herald, Barbara 


Spinster 


5 Lap pie dub 


Herald, Jean 


Widow 


17 Manor street 


High, Jessie 


Widow 


26 Glamis Road 


Hill, Ann 


Spinster 


2 Prior Lane 


Hill, Helen 


Widow 


21 AVellbraehead 


Hill, Isabella 


Spinster 


45 AVest High street 


Hill, Margaret 


Spinster 


10^ AVellbraehead 


Hill, Jane 


Widow 


24 A^ictoria street 


Hilton, Jane 


AVidow 


89 John street 


Home, Agnes 


AA^idow 


89 Backwynd 


Hood, Catherine 


AVidoAv 


4 Canmore street 


Hood, Catherine 


AVidow 


14 Prior Road 


Hood, Elizabeth 


Widow 


Nilebank 


Howie, Isabella 


A¥idow 


74 East High street 


Hutchison, Agnes 


Spinster 


80 South street 


Hutchison, Mimia 


Spinster 


112 East High street 


Hutchison, Mary 


Spinster 


AA'^est Sunnyside 


Hutchison, Mary Ann 


Spinster 


28 St. James' Road 


Hutton, Agnes 


\\ idow 


17 Wellbraehead 


Hutton, Isabella 


Spinster 


16 South street 


Inverarity, Margaret 


AA^idow 


19 Manor street 


Inverwick, Ann 


^Vidow 


78 Backwynd 


Ireland, Betsy 


AVidow 


18 Dundee Road 


Jack, Elizabeth 


AVidow 


iVIarket Place 


Jack, Jane 


AVidow 


11 Zoar 


Jamie, Matilda 


Widow 


Prior Road 


Jarron, Elizabeth 


Widow 


5 Green street 


flarvis, Mary Ann 


Widow 


2 Nursery Feus 


Johnston, Agnes 


AA^idow 


9 Green street 



KORFAR DIRECTORY. 



41 



Joliiistone, Aones 
Johnston, Betsy 
Johnston, Elizabeth 
Johnston, Margaret 
flohnston, Margaret 
flones, Jean 
Keith. Ehzabeth 
Keith, Mrs William 
Kelly, Elizabeth 
Kennedy, Elizabeth 
Kerr, Ann 
Kerr, Margaret 
Kerr, Mrs Robert 
Kewans, Margaret 
Killaeky, Ann 
Kinnear, Isabella 
Kydtl, Barbara 
Kydd, Betsy 
Laing, Elizabeth 
Laird, Jane 
Lamont, Ann 
Langlands, Ann 
Langlands, Ann 
Langlands, Mary 
Langlands, Jane 
Langlands, Jessie 
Latto, Jane 
Law, Mary 
Lawson, Margaret 
Lawson, Elizabeth 
Leighton, Jessie 
Leith, Catherine 
Liddle, Mary 
Lindsay, Helen 
Lindsa}', JMary 
Littlejohn, Agnes 
Liveston, Ann 
Logan, Marjory 
Low, Elizabeth 
Low, Isabella 
Low, Isabella 
Low, Jane 
Low, Jane 
Low, Jessie 
IjOw, Margaret 
Low, Mary Ann 
Lowden, Isabella 
Lowson, Catherine 
Lowson, Elizabeth 
Lowson, Helen 
Lowson, Isabella 



Spinster 


17 Albert street 


Spinster 


26 St. flames' Road 


A'Vidow 


9 Cross 


Widow 


48 Dundee Loan 


Spinster 


8 Lour Road 


Widow 


126 East High street 


AVidow 


52 South street 


Widow 


Glamis Road 


AVidow 


27 John street 


Spinster 


22 Vietoria street 


Widow 


43 North street 


Widow 


7 Watt street 


A'Vidow 


] 6 Zoar 


S]jinster 


34 Yeaman street 


Widow 


14 Castle street 


AVidow 


Teuchat Croft 


Widow 


Chapel Park 


Spinster 


4 Lappiedub 


AVidow 


24 East High street 


Spinster 


10 Stark's Close 


Spinster 


9 Lappiedub 


Spinster 


19 Backwynd 


AVidow 


67 West High street 


AVidow 


36 Canmore street 


AVidow 


154 East High street 


AVidow 


8 Wellbraehead 


AVidow 


Castle street 


AVidow 


Belmont Cottage 


S])inster 


42 Dundee Loan 


AVidow 


14 Nursery Feus 


AVidow 


23 Castle street 


Spinster 


11 Osnaburgh street 


Spinster 


43 North street 


AVidow 


16 Zoar 


Spinster 


39 South street 


Spinster 


35 South street 


AVidow 


88 East High street 


Widow 


24 Canmore street 


AVidow 


18 Newmonthill 


Spinster 


16 Yeaman street 


Spinster 


9 Montrose Road 


Spinster 


30 Lour Road 


AV^idow 


14 little Causeway 


AVidow 


15 Charles street 


AVidow 


63 AVest High street 


AVidow 


20 Glamis Road 


AVidow 


93 North street 


Spinster 


28 Yeaman street 


Widow 


16 North street 


AVidow 


25 Glamis Road 


Spinster 


14 Charles street 



42 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



Lowson, Jane 
Lowson, Margaret 
Lyall, Margaret 
Lyon, Betsy Shaw 
Mackie, Mary 
Mann, Elizabeth 
Mann, Jane 
Marshal, Mary 
Mason, Jsabella 
Masson, Mary 
Masterton, Betsy 
Masterton, Elizabeth 
jNIatthewson, Jean 
Maxwell, Elizabeth 
Meekie, Sarah 
Meldrum, Ann 
Meldrum, Isabella 
Meldrum, Mar}' Ann 
Melvin, Margaret 
Michie, Margaret 
Millar, Ann 
Millar, Charlotte 
Miller, Susan 
Mill, Agnes 
Milne, Ann 
Milne, Annie 
Milne, Betsy 
Milne, Elizabeth 
Milne, Isabella 
Milne, Jane 
Milne, Jane 
Milne, Jane 
Milne, Janet 
]Milne, Mar}' 
Milne, INlary 
Milne, Mary 
Milne, :Marv 
Mitchell, Ann 
Mitchell, Betsy 
Mitchell, Elizabeth 
Moir, Ann 
Mollison, Jane 
Mon-is, Eupheniia 
Morris, Mary Ann 
Morrison, Ann 
Morrison, Cecilia 
Morty, Ann 
Mudie, Helen 
^lurrav, Jessie 
IM'Dougall, Mary 
M'Douojall, Susan 



Widow 


87 North street 


Widow 


Chapel Park 


Spinster 


18G East High street 


Spinster 


Letham 


Spinster 


57 West High street 


Spinster 


35 West High street 


Widow 


42 Dundee Loan ' 


Widow 


50 Glamis Road 


Spinster 


71 AVest High street 


Spinster 


15 New Road 


Widow 


79 Backw}'nd 


Widow 


65 Castle street 


Spinster 


59 Backwynd 


Widow 


13 Market Place ' 


Spinster 


186 East High street 


Widow 


2 Chapel street 


Spinster 


136 East High street 


Widow 


7 Bell Place ! 


Spinster 


19 Castle street 1 


Widow 


38 Canmore street 


Spinster 


2 Chapel street 


Spinster 


10 Lappiedub 


Spinster 


73 Castle street i 


Spinster 


12 Nursery Feus 


Widow 


109^ East' High street 


Spinster 


Bailliewellbrae 


Spinster 


136 East High street 


Widow 


26 St. James' Road 


Widow 


21 Manor street 


Spinster 


26 Market Place I 


Widow 


49 North street 


Spinster 


21 John street 


Widow 


11 William street 


Widow 


10 Wellbraehead ' 


Widow 


4 Chapel street • 


AVidow 


6 Charles street 


AVidow 


32 Manor street 


AVidow 


10 Arbroath Road 


S])inster 


3 West High street ! 


Widow 


34 Canmore street 


Widow 


39 North street 


Spinster 


3 Vennel 


Spinster 


59 AVest High street 


Spinster 


15 AYellbraehead 


Widow 


22 Dundee Loan 


Spinster 


17 Albert street 


Spinster 


7 Zoar 




36 Dundee Loan 1 


Widow 


Rosebank House 


Widow 


20 Zoar 


Spinster 


42 Dundee Loan 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



43 



M'Farlaiie, Agnes 
M'Farlane, Helen 
jM'Fai-lane, Ann 
^r'Gregor, Mary 
^I'lnnes, Ann 
jNI'Intosh, Catherine 
M'Intosli, Catherine 
M'Intosh, Jane 
JM'Kay, Christina 
M'Kenzie, Isabella 
M'Kenzie, Isabella 
M'lvenzie. Margaret 
M'Kenzie, Ann 
M'Keddie, Jane 
M'Laren, Jane 
M'Lean, Ann 
M'Leish, Jane Johnstone 
M'Lean, Jemima 
M'Laren, Allison 
M'Peat, Jane 
M'Queen, Helen 
M'Rae, Elizabeth 
M'Rae, Jane 
Neave, Jane 
Neave, Jane 
Neave, Mary 
Neave, Margaret 
Neave, Rebecca 
Neish, Catherine 
Nicoll, Jane 
Nicoll, Margaret 
Nicoll, Mary 
Nicoll, ]\Irs George 
Nicolson, Elizabeth 
Norrie, Jessie 
Ogg, Margaret 
Ogilvie, Ann 
Ogilvie, Helen 
Ogilvie, Jane 
Ogilvie, Jessie 
Oram, Helen 
Oram, Mary 
Orchison, Charlotte 
Ormond, Agnes 
Ormond, Cecilia 
Ormoiid, Matilda 
Pattnllo, Ann 
Pattullo, Elizabeth 
Pattnllo, Jessie 
Peter, Betsy 
Peter, Margaret 



Spinster 


3 Glamis Road 


AYidow 


31 Zoar 


Widow 


23 Nursery Feus 




(38 East High street 


\\'idow 


3 AVilliam street 


AVidoAv 


Hillside 


Spinster 


115 Castle street 


Spinster 


8 Arbroath Road 


Spinster 


1 8 Prior Road 


Spinster 


72^ West High street 


Spinster 


13 Teuchat Croft 


Widow 


51 AVest High street 


Widow 


6 AA^'ellbraehead 


AVidow 


10 Backwynd 


Widow 


44 North street 


AVidow 


Newmonthill 


Spinster 


29 East High street 


Separate 


90 Dundee Loan 


Widow 


Headingstone Place 


Widow 


11 Albert street 


Spinster 


20 Dundee Road 


Spinster 


1 Bell Place 


Widow 


37 AVest High street 


Spinster 


11 East High street 


Spinster 


14 North street 


Spinster 


90 Dundee Loan 


AVidow 


12 AVellbraehead 


Spinster 


9 Green street 


Widow 


18 AVellbraehead 


Widow 


24 Arbroath Road 


Widow 


4 Stark's Close 


Widow 


8 AVatt street 


AVidow 


26 Glamis Road 


AVidow 


Catherine Square 


Spinster 


90 Dundee Loan 


Spinster 


93 East High street 


Spinster 


27 North street 


AVidow 


38 Canmore street 


Widow 


-26h AA^est High street 


Widow 


3 West High street 


Spinster 


13 West High street 


AA^idow 


26 Nursery Feus 


Spinster 


14 Charles street 


AVidow 


30 AVest High street 




6 Stark's Close 


Sphister 


87 East Hioh street 


AVidow 


9 AVellbraehead 


Spinster 


146 East High street 


AA^idow 


30 Nursery Feus 


Spinster 


56 North street 


AVidow 


Bankhead 



44 



FORFAR DIRECTORY, 



Pctrie, Ann 
Petrie, Mary 
Piggot, Mary 
Porter, Ann 
Prophet, Isaliella 
Prophet, Sarah 
PnlUir, Elizabeth 
Pullar, Helen 
Queen, Ann 
Kae, Ann 
Rae, Annie 
Rae, Jane 
Kamsay, Margai'ct 
Kamsay, Margaret 
Rattray, Jessie 
Reid, Ann 
Reid, Catherine 
Reid, Jane 
Reid, Jessie 
Reid, Jessie 
Reid, Margaret 
Rennie, Eupheniia 
Richard, Jessie 
Rickard, INIary 
Riddle, Elizabeth 
Ritchie, Jane 
Robb, Catherine 
Robb, Emily 
Robb, Mary 
Robbie, [sabclla 
Robbie, Mary 
] Roberts, Agnes 
Roberts, Bella 
Roberts, Elizabeth 
Roberts, Elizabeth 
Roberts, Elizabeth 
Roberts, Jane 
Robertson, Agnes 
Robertson, Annie 
Robertson, Helen 
Robertson, Jessie 
Rose, Jane 
Ross, Betsy 
Ross, Mary 
Rough, Ann 
Rough, Mary 
Saddler, Ann 
Saddler, Isabella 
Saddler, Mary 
Samson, Mary 
Sandeman, Betsy 



Spinster 


21 John street 


Spinster 


134 East High street 


Spinster 


4 Canmore street 


Spinster 


81 iiackwynd 


Widow 


AVilliam street 


A¥idow 


7 Green street 


Widow 


6 Vennel 


Spinster 


Venn el 


Widow 


1 Stark's Close 


Spinster 


90 Dundee Loan 


Widow 


130 East High street 


Widow 


44 West High street 


Spinster 


90 Dundee Loan 


Widow 


1 Archie's Park 


Spinster 


1 St. James' Road 


AVidow 


85 North street 


Widow 


'I'l South street 


Widow 


38 John street 


Widow 


5 Glamis Road 


Spinster 


12 Wellbraehead 


Widow 


98 Dundee Road 


Spinster 


20 Arbroath Road 


Spinster 


7 New Road 


Spinster 


7 Albert street 


Widow 


10 South street 


Spinster 


Oathlaw 


Spinster 


27 Dundee Loan 


Widow 


12 Broad croft 


A^^idow 


Dundee Road 


Widow 


15 Market Place 


Spinster 


17 Dundee Loan 


Spinster 


64 Yeaman street 


Widow 


15 East Sunnysid(i 


S])inster 


17 North street 


AVidow 


157 East High street 


Widow 


90 Dundee Loan 


Widow 


Westby House 


Spinster 


12 Nursery Feus 


Spinster 


13 AVatt street 


Widow 


21 South street 


S})inster 


11 AVellbraehead 


Spinster 


125 East High street 


Spinster 


186 East High street 


Spinster 


29 Glamis Road 


AVidow 


44 Dundee Loan 


AA'^idoAv 


17 New Road 


Spinster 


St. James' Road 


AVidow 


9 Archie's Park 


AVidow 


17 Albert street 


AVidow 


1 AVilliam street 


Spinster 


3 AA^ellbraehead 



FURFAR DIRECTORY, 



45 



Shaw, IMargiirc't K. 
Shepherd, Margaret 
Shepherd. Mary 
Sievevvrioht, Susan 
Sim, Mary Ann 
Simpson, Ann 
Simpson, Jessie 
Simpson, Jessie 
Simpson, ffessie 
Simpson, Mary 
Small, Isabella 
Smai't, Ann 
Smart, JNIar}- 
Smith, Agnes 
Smith, Ann 
Smith, Annie 
Smith, Catharine 
Smith, Elizabeth 
Smith, Emily 
Smith, Georgina 
Smith, Helen 
Smith, Isabella 
Smith, Janet 
Smith, Jessie 
Smith, Margaret 
Smith, Margaret 
Smith, Margaret 
Smith, Mary 
Smith, Mary 
Soutar, Agnes 
Soutar, Agnes 
Soutar, Eliza1)eth 
Soutar, Jane 
Spankie, Mary 
Stark, Agnes 
Stark, Ann 
Stark, Jean 
Stark, Mary 
Stark, Mary Ann 
Steele, Ann 
Steele, Helen 
Steele, Rose Gray 
Stephen, Helen 
Stewart, Ann 
Stewart, Ann 
Stewart, Ann 
Stewart, Ann 
Stewart, Amiie 
Stewart, Catharine 
Stewart, Elizabeth 
Stewart, Elspeth 



Widow 

Widow 
Widow 
Widow 
Spinster 
Widow 
Widow 
S])inster 
Spinster 
Widow 
Widow 
Widow 
Widow- 
Widow 
Widow 
Widow 
Spinster 
Spinster 
Widow 
Spinster 
Spinster 
Widow 
Widow 
Spinster 
Widow 
Spinster 
Widow 
Spinster 
Widow 
Spinster 
Widow 
AVidow 
Spinster 
Widow 
Spinster 
Spinster 
Widow 
Spinster 
Widow 
Widow 
Widow 
Sjiinster 
Widow 
Widow 
Widow 
Spinster 
Widow 
Widow 
Widow 
Widow 
Widow 



Annfield House 

12 North street 

41 Castle street 
1(S Charles street 
1(5 flohn street 

11 Glainis Road 
o4 Glamis Ifoad 
oi^k Dundee Loan 
o-l Dundee Loan 
10 Charles street 
6 Zoar 

30 South street 
49 Dundee Loan 
72 West High street 

1 St. James' Road 
83 Prior Road 
Academy street 
30 South street 
162-4 East High street 
Academy street 

109^ Eak High street 
J 2 Arbroath Road 
26 St. James' Road 
79 Hackwynd 
17 Charles street 
Hillockhei'.d 

13 Can more street 
Academy street 
4H Dundee Loan 
162 East High street 

2 Victoria street 
Strang street 

13 Wellbraehead 
17 Zoar 

42 Prior Road 
6 Glamis Road 
8 Stark's Close 

12 Glamis Road 
Annfield Lane 

16 East High street 
28 South street 

3 Castle street 
68 Dundee Road 
1 Watt street 
75 Backwynd 

1 New Road 
85 North street 
21 Osnaburgh street 
Yeaman street 
12 Wellbraehead 
10 Market Place 



46 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



Stewart, Helen Spinster 

Stewart, Isabella Widow 

Stewart, Jane Ann Spinster, 

Stewart, Jessie Spinster 

Stewart, Jessie AVidow 

Stewart, Jessie Spinster 

Stewart, Joan Widow 

Stewart, Margaret Widow 

Stewart, Mary Spinster 

Stirling, Ann Widow 

Stirling, Isabella Widow 

Stormont, Margaret Widow 

Stormonth, Jane Widow 

Storrier, Ann Spinster 

Strachan, May Spinster 

Strang, Georgina Separate 

Sturrock, Isabella Widow 

Sturrock, Jane Spinster 

Sturrock, Jean Widow 

Suttie, Euphemia Spinster 

Tarbet, Ann Spinster 

Tarbat, Elizabeth Spinster 

Tarbet, Elizabeth Widow 

Tear, Esther Widow 

Thorn, Allison Widow 

Thom, Ann Spinster 

Tlioni, Bella Spinster 

Thorn, Susan Spinster 

Thomson, Christina Widow 
Thomson, Elizabeth Lunau Spinster 

Thomson, Jane Widow 

Thomson, Mary Spinster 

Thornton, Ann Widow 

Thornton, Elizabeth Widow 

Thornton, Helen Widow 

Thornton, Margaret Spinster 

Thow, Maiy Widow 

Tosh, Ann Spinster 

Towns, Ann Widow 

Tyrie, Helen Widow 

Valentine, Ann Spinster 

Walker, Ann Widow 

Walker, Ann Widow 

Walker, Catherine Spinster 

Walker, Jessie Ann Spinster 

Walker, Margaret Widow 

Walker, Mary Ann Spinster 

Wallace, Ann Widow 

Wallace, Isabella Spinster 

Wallace, Mary Widow 

AVarden, Betsy Spinster 



00 John street 

10 Dundee Road 
Drumgley 

14 Newmonthill 
25-27 Backwvnd 

96 AVest-Higii street 
84 East High street 
40 Prior Road 
67 Glamis Road 
25 St. James' Road 
20 St. James' Road 

15 Glamis Road 
Broadcroft 

1 William street 
12 New Road 
27 Market Place 

1 Sparrowcroft 

2 Bell Place 

4 Arbroath Road 

11 Albert street 

168 East High street 
10 Backwvnd 

20 Dundee Loan 

29 John street 

6 A¥est Sunnyside 
14 AVatt street 
128 East High street 
136 East High street 
36 Yeaman street 
Rosebank 
Melbourne Cottage 

5 Glamis Road 

82 AA^est High street 
82 A¥est High street 
72^ West High street 

6 Archie's Park 
88 Dundee Loan 
79 Castle street 

87 East High street 
102 East High street 

21 AA^ellbraehead 
10 Littlecauseway 
Orchavdbank 

124 East High street 

18 Dundee Road 

30 John street 

19 Newmonthill 
34 Lour Road 

38 Canmore street 
Strang street 

16 Charles street 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



47 



Waterston, Elizabeth 


Spinster 


38 Castle street 


Watcrson, Mary 


AVidow 


40^ Castle street 


Watt, Ann 


S])inster 


5 Zoar 


Watt, Helen 


AVidow 


56 South street 


Watt, Mary 


Spinster 


15 Manor street 


AVebster, Agnes 


Spinster 


St. .Fames' Road 


Webster, Margaret 


Spinster 


2 Victoria street 


Webster, Robina 


Spinster 


51 Dundee Road 


Welsh, Eupheniia 




42 South street 


Whamuiond, Angelica 


AMdow 


29 Manor street 


Whitton, Mary 


Spinster 


02 Dundee Loan 


AVhyte, Ann Urc 


Si)inster 


Manor House 


Whyte, Betsv 


AVidow 


50 South street 


AVhyte, Elizabeth 


S])inster 


Annfield House 


Whyte, Isabella 


Spinster 


9 AA^ellbraehead 


Whyte, Margaret 


AVidow 


Manor House 


Wighton, Jane 


Spinster 


1 Broadcroft 


Wilkie, Ann 


AVidow 


Market Place 


Wilkie, Elizabeth 


AVidow 


81 Backwynd 


Wilkie, Margaret 


Widow 


15 St. James' Road 


Will, Isabella 


Spinster 


9 Backwynd 


Williams, Agnes 


Spinster 


13 Albert street 


AVilliamson, Margaret 


Spinster 


6 Dundee Loan 


Wilson, Agnes 


Spinster 


32 Manor street 


Wilson, Agnes 


Spinster 


17 Little Causeway 


Wilson, Elizabeth 


AVidow 


32 Manor street 


Wilson, Jessie 


Spinster 


3 Broadcroft 


AVishart, Annie 


AVidow 


4 Nursery Feus 


AV ishart, Elizabeth 


Spinster 


Newford Park 


AV'ishart, Mary 


AVidow 


78 Dundee Loan 


AVood, Jane 


AA'^idow 


22 St. James' Road 


AA^> Hie, Elizabeth 


Spinster 


Helen street 


Yeaman, Agnes 


Spinster 


Manor House 


Yeaman, Helen 


Spinster 


Manoi House 


Yeaman, Jane 


Spinster 


11 Manor street 


Yeaman, Jessie 


Spinster 


Manor House 


Yeaman, Margaret 


AVidow 


11 Manor street 


Young, Elizabeth 


Widow 


18 Yeaman street 


Young, Janet 


AVidow 


18 South street 


Young, Margaret 


Widow 


28 Nursery Feus 


Young, Margaret 


Spinster 


8 Newmonthill 


Young, Margaret 


Widow 


(3 Bell Place 



48 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



FARMERS, AND OTHER RESIDENTERS, 

IN ADJOINING PARISHES. 



ABERLEMNO. 

Burn, Captain W. X. , Turin House 
BtisIi, James, Tillywhandland 
Butter, John, Nether Turin 
('alder, William, Woodend 
Cattanach, J., North Mains of Balgavies 
Davidson, A. , grocer, Henwellburn 
Davidson, James, Pitkennedy 
Dickson, John, Muirside of Melgund 
Fairweather, James, Craiksfolds 
Falconer, Robt. , Wood of Killockshaw 
Fettes, F., Bog of Pitkennedy 
Fisher, Rev. J. D., F.C. Manse, Aber- 

lemno 
Ford, James, Bellyhill 
Gotirlay, James, Blebberhill 
Grant, David, Turin 
Jarron, J. N. , Mains of Melgund 
Kennedy, Mrs, Crosston 
Kiddie, William, Milldens 
Leitch, John, Damside 
Lowson, William, Kirkton 
M'Laren, James, Balgarrock 
Martin, R. T., Netherton 
Martin, John, Netherton 
Matthew, Wm,, Balnacake 
Milne, D., jr., North Mains of Turin 
Milne, Peter, Wandershill 
Myles, Rev. T. , Manse, Aberlemno 
Norrie, James, Hovi^muir 
Paxton, Alex., Broomknowe 
Patullo, D., Balglassie 
Salmond, William, Woodwrae 
Scott, Geoi'ge, Southtou 
Stewart, J as., Schoolhouse, Aberlemno 
Webster, P., jr., Flemington 
Wedderspoon, Wm. , Mains of Balgavies 

DUNNICHEN. 

Alexander, Miss C. | fxi]]]^;,,]. 
Alexander, John J 
Anderson, J., grocer, Letham 
Barron, Dr, Letham 
Blair, Alexander, forester, Dumbarrow 
Black, W., engine proptr., Dumbarrow 
Borthwick, William, Home Farm 
Brodie, T. D., Tulloes 
Crow, David, Elmbank House, Letham 
Deas, H. S., Schoolhouse, Craichie 
Donald, Charles, East Dumbarrow 
Duncan, Rev. J. P., F.C. Manse, Letham 
Eaton, Wm,, butcher, Letham 
Edward, Chas., baker, Letham 
Gibson, William, Vinney Bank 
Gray, David, Blairs 



Hampton, David, baker, Letham 
Hird, Henry S. , merchant, Letham 
Jackson, Mrs, Kirkbuddo House 
Lawrence, William, North Draffau 
Lackie, Mrs, merchant, Craichie 
Langlands, J., carrier, Auldbar Station 
M'Gregor, Gregor, Dumbarrow 
Macmaster, Rev. H., Manse, Dunnicher 
Melville, J., Mains of Craichie 
Middleton, D., East Dumbarrow 
M'Liroy, D. shoemaker, Letham 
M'Inroy, Wm. , clothier, Letham 
Osier, Mrs David. Upper Tulloes 
Osier, William, Nether Tulloes 
Ramsay, Mrs W. , Drummietermont 
Roberts, Charles, Corston 
Roberts, C, Inspector of Poor, Letham 
Robertson, R., Schoolhouse, Letham 
Shepherd, James, New Dyke of Lownie 
Smith, Mrs, East Lownie 
Smith, David ) -o • n 
Smith; Mrs S. purnside 
Smith, George, Drum 
Soutar, John, East Mains 
Stewart, Hector, horse-hirer, Letham 
Stewart, J. D. , merchant, Letham 
Strachan, J. V., clothier, Letham 
Sturrock, Charles, Mill of Craichie 
Taylor, Alex., South Draff an 
Thornton, Wm., forester, Tulloes 
Warden, David, West Lownie 
Warden, Wm. , East Mains of Craichie 
Wyllie, J. , Dumbarrow Mill 
Young, David, gas manager, Letham 
Young, John, shoemaker, Letham 

FORFAR. 

Adam, Robert, Ladenford 
Alexander, David, Newlands 
Alexander, Thomas, Clocksbriggs 
Allan, William, Meadow Green 
Bell, David, Lochlands 
Carnegy, P. A. W., Lour 
Carruthers, James, Craignathro 
Christie, James, Bankhead 
Craik, Robert F., Kingston 
Dalgety, John, Caldhame 
Gold, William, Canmore 
Gowans, John, Lilybank 
Graham, D. M., Slatefield 
Grant, David, Mosside 
Lister, George, Mains of Restenneth 
Low, Mrs, Whitewell 
Martin, Alex., Muiry Knowes 
Mount, W. B., Halkerton 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



49 



Murray, Dr W. F., Suttieside- 
Nicoll, George, South Mains 
Nicoll, Thomas, North Mains 
Nicoll, William, Inchgarth, &c, 
Petrie, William, Greenordie 
J-Jamsay, David, Lochhead 
Rolibie, James, Loanhead 
Smith, Peter, Bankhead, Lour 
Taylor, James, East Mains, Lour 
Taylor. James, Heatherstacks 
Thoms, George, Mid Dod 
Thorns, William, Auchterforfar 
Waterson, John E., Pitreuchie 
Webster, P. Westfield 
Whitton, Andrew, West Caldhame 

GLAMIS. 

Alexander, H. M., Easter Denoon 
Annaud, Alex., Newton 
Arnot, William, Glamis Mains 
Baillie, John, turner, Glamis 
Beal, Rev. S. G., Parsonage, Glamis 
Bell, Alexander, Handwick 
Bremner, David, grocer, Charleston 
Brown. Wm. D., Easter Drumgley 
Bruce, James, Knockenny 
Cathro, James, Berryhillock 
Cook, Charles, Meikle Cossens 
Crabb, James, forester, Glamis 
Duff, John, Nether Handwick 
Elder, Robt. , saddler, &c. , Glamis 
Eairweather, James, gamekeeper, Glamis 
Ferguson, J. A., architect, Glamis 
Fisher, J. A., Royal Bank, Glamis 
Fleming, Dickson, Schoolhouse, Milton, 

Glen Ogilvy 
Gibson, D., Woodbank, Glamis 
Gibson, John, Chamberwell 
Grant, Dr, Glamis 
Grant, Robt., Over Middleton 
Hogg, William, clothier, Charleston 
Knight, William, Haughs of Cossens 
Jack, David, Ewnie 

Jack, Wm, G., Inspector of Poor, Glamis 
Johnston, James. Tile work 
Johnston, John, Nether Airneyfoul 
Johnston, George, joiner, Glamis 
Langiands, David, Hatton of Ogilvy 
Langlands, D., baker, Glamis 
Langiands, John, grocer, dilamis 
Lindsay, H., Home Farm, Glamis 
Lowden, James, coal merchant, Glamis 
Lyon, Joseph, Kilmundie 
M'Farlane, H., saddler, Glamis 
M'Kenzie, James, Dryburn 
M'Kenzie, Wm. , butcher, Glamis 
Milne, Mrs John, Holemill 
Nicoll, John, Nether Middkton 
Porter, James, Lochmill 
Ralston, Andrew, Glamis House 
Raid, James, Little Kilmundie 



Reoch, David, Scroggerfield 
Robertson, Hugh, Lochside 
Ross, R. G. , Schoolhouse, (Tlamis 
Ross, William, Nether Drumgley 
Smart, David, Templebank 
Steele, A., coal merchant, (ilamis 
Steven, John, merchant, Charleston 
Stevenson, Rev. J., I/L.D., Manse, Gl.imis 
Tait, Henry, V.S., Glamis 
Thomson, John, Robhelhill 
Toplis, Robert, Glamis 
whitton, James, gardener, Glamis Castle 
Whyte, Archibald, Nether Hayston 
Whyte, James, LTpper Hayston 
Whyte, John, Wester Denoon 

INVERARITY. 

Adam, Wm., Wester Meathie 

Brown, Thomas, Carrot 

Dron, Robert, Fothringham 

Duncan, William, Newton 

Elder, P., Schoolhouse, Inverarity 

Ewart, A._ P., Mains of Meathie ' 

Gall, David and Alexander, Tarbi-ax 

Grant, James, jr., Ovenstone 

Hill, William, Washingdales 

Jarron, George, Bonnyton 

Millar, James, Mains of Happas 

Millar, Robert, Skair 

Milne, William, Kincreich 

Moir, Peter, Kincreich Mill 

Nicoll, Wm., North Bottymire 

Peters, Thomas, Seggieden 

Rattray, Alex., Govals 

Roberston, Thomas, Hatton 

Salmond, Mrs, Little Lour 

Sime, John, Mill 

Stevenson, Rev. P., Manse, Inverarity 

Siittie, John, East Grange, Kincaldrmn 

KINNETTLES. 

Arnot, Mrs, West Ingliston 
Baxter, E. A., Invereighty House 
Beverley, G., North Mains of Kinnettles 
Blyth, D., gardener, Kinnettles 
Duncan, John, Turwhappie 
Easton, David, Spittalburn 
Fairweather, Miss, East Ingliston 
Grimmond, J., Kinnettles House 
Guthrie, James, Brigton 
Martin G., Schoolhouse, Kinnettles 
M'liaren, John, South Leckaway 
M'Lean, W., Foffarty 
Nicoll, Robert, Invereighty Mill 
Paterson, Jas.. North jNIains, Invereighty 
Patteson, Rev. T. J., F.C. Manse, Kin- 
nettles 
Patullo, John, Mid Ingliston 
Rae, David, North I^eckaway 
Roy, George, Kirkhill 
Scott, James, Mains of Brigton 



50 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



Smith, William, Kimiettles Mill 
Thomson, John, blacksmith, Douglastown 
Turner, Kev. R., Manse, Kinnettles 

KIRRIEMUIR. 

Alexander, John, Ballindarg 

Anderson, John, Redford 

Bain, J. & J., Newmill 

Barrie, John, Pluckerstone 

Black, J. M,, Auchlishie 

Bruce, George, Easter Kinwhirrie 

Cathro, William, Balmuckety 

Clark, James, Knowhead 

Coupar, David T. , Over Migvie 

Crabb, Alex.. Lady well 

Crabb, D., Rosewell 

Ewart, James, Kilnhill 

Ewart, Wm., Sandyford 

Falconer, J., Culhawk 

Ferguson, William, ^Millhall 

Guild, Thomas, Herdhill 

Hay, James, Pathhead 

Henderson, C., Chapeltf)n 

Irvine, William, Herdhill 

Lamb, Alex. , New Kilry 

Lamsden, Alex., Wester Kinwhirrie 

Lyall, Leonard, Kinnordie 

M'Intosh, Donald, Garlowbank 

M'Intosh, J., East Inch 

Milner, James, Barnsdale 

Mitchell, Jas., jr.. Nether Migvie 

Mitchell, James, Haugh 

Munroe, Wm., Woodhead 

Osier, Andrew, Kintyrie 

Osier, William, Meams 

Robbie, James, Netherbow 

Robertson, John, Denmill 

Rough, George, Fletcherfield 

Rough, William, Longbank 

Sime, Thomas, Overbow 

Smith, J., Meikle Inch 

Stewart, J. & W., Curmure 

Thomson, Alexander, Burnside 

Whyte, Alex., Blackbeard 

Whyte, Wm., Spot, &c. 

Wilson, Thomas, Wester Lednathie 

Wilson, William, Balstard 

Winter, D. & J. Balnagarrow 

Wood, David, Caldhame 

Wyllie, Jas. (Reprs.), Mains of Glasnvell 

W'yllie, Mrs, Balbrydie 

OATHLAW. 

Adams, James, M.D., Easter Oathlaw 
Batchelor, Alex. Milton, Finavon 
Batchelor, Geo., West Mains, Finavon 
Carnegie, James, Battledykes 
C'arnegie, William, Birkenbush 
Davidson, William, Woodside 
Dow, John, gardener. Finavon 



Duke, Wm., Newbarns 

Keay, Alex., Wolflaw 

Kydd, David, M.D., Bogindollo ] 

Lamb, J. & J., Bankhead 

Malcolm, D., Inn, Finavon 

Meek, David, miller, Finavon 

Middleton, Capt. F., Finavon Castle 

Millar, David, Oathlaw 

Ritchie, W., Ordie 

Ritchie, Rev. A., Manse, Oathlaw 

Simpson, D., joiner, I'^inavon 

Thomson, A., Schoolhouse, Oathlaw 

Webster, J., Parkford 

Webster, J., Meadows 

Young, David, Blairyfeddan 

RESCOBIE. 

Absalon, Misses, Wemyss 

Cobb, Alex., Pitscandly 

Dakers, Wm. , Hagmuir 

Don, John B. , Pitmuies 

Farquhar, W. T., Pitscandly 

Farquharson, F., Greenhead 

Gibson, Mrs, Baldardo 

Graham, Walter, Schoolhouse, Rescoliie 

Grant, TJavid, jr., Finnieston 

Grant, David, sen., Turin 

Gviild, Mrs, Mains of Burnside 

Jalland, Boswell G. , Ochterlony 

Kyd, George, Forester Seat 

Lakie, David, Drimmie 

Martin, J. & J., Mildens 

Mitchell, Geo., Chapelton, Ochterlony 

Mitchell, James, Quilkoe 

Murdie, W. & J-, Baggerton 

Nicoll, Wm., jr.. East & West Carsebank 

Powrie, James, Reswallie 

Ramsay, David, Fonnah 

Ramsay, James, East Mains of Burnside 

Roberts(m, Sheriff, I^urnside 

Rough, George, Wardmill 

Simpson, James, Hatton of Carse 

Sinclair, Alex., Newmill, Balgavies 

Storrie, Alex., West Mains, Turin 

Walker, Rev. A., Manse, Rescobie 

Watson, Wm., Mains of Ochterlony 

TANNADICE. 

Addison, John, blacksmith, 'J'annadice 
Anderson, Miss, Hotel, Tannadice 
Butter, David, Auchleuchrie 
Cameron, J., Miltonbank 
Cameron, John, grocer, Tannadice 
Carnegie, Wm., jr., Coul 
Gumming, John, Schoolhouse, Denside 
Davidson, W., Easter Balgillo 
Dow, James, Wester Memus 
Duncan, Pat., Easter do. 
Farmer, Alex., Muiryhillock 
Farquharson, .Tohn, (rlenley 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



SI 



Findlay, D., Aiichleish 

Forbes, William, Murthill Mains 

Gordon, J. F., shoemaker, Tannadice 

Gordon, W. , Kinalty 

Gracie, James, Horniehaugh 

Gray, Alex., cattle dealer, Tannadice 

Hay, Alex., Tobees 

Henderson, .T., Schoolhonse, Tannadice 

Hendry, Wm., West Mains of Coul 

Herkless, Eev. J., Manse, Tannadice 

Keay, John, East ^Vlains of Whitewell 

Lindsay, Arch., Redheugh 

Low, Wm., Strone 

Lunan, J., tailor, Tannadice 

Millar, Robert, Foreside, Cairn 

M'Kenzie, Angus, Gairuton 

M'Kenzie, John, Goynd 

M'Kenzie, — ., Midtown, Glenquiech 

M'Laren, Jas,, Dirachie 



M'Laren, J., Wester Balgillo 

Xeill, J., Mill, Tannadice 

NicoU, William, Sturt 

Reid, Andrew, Cairn 

Robbie, C, Barnyards 

Robbie, J., cattle dealer, Tannadice 

Robbie, John, teacher, Inshewan 

Rough, David, Newton 

Scott, C. W. , Mains of Whitewell 

Soutar, D. W., clothier, Tannadice 

Stevenson, Thomas, Inspectoi of Poor, 

Tannadice 
Stewart, David, Craigeassie 
Stewart, George, Marcus Mill 
Stewart, John, Noranbank 
Thow, John, Turfachie 
Todd, James, Howmuir 
Turnbull, George, Baldoukie 
Wallace, P., Nether Balgillo 



POST-OFFICE ARRANGEMENTS. 

Arrivals at Forfar Post-Office. 

Edinburgh, London, & the South, Dundee, Glasgow, Perth, Meigle, Coupar- 

Angus ; also, Dundee and Arbroath, ... ... ... ... 5 

Letham, Dunnichen, and Craichie, ... ... ... ... ... 7 40 

Kirriemuir and Padanaram, ... ... ... . . ... ... 8 20 

Edinburgh, London, and the South, Dundee, Glasgow, Perth, Aberdeen. 

Brechin, and Montrose. ... ... ... ... ... 8 45 

Glamis, Kincaldrum, Aberlemno, Tannadice, and Douglastown, ... 1 30 

Perth, ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 1 45 

Kirriemuir, ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 3 15 

Aberdeen, Noi'th, Montrose, Arbroath, Brechin, Fordoun, Laurencekirk, 

Stonehaven, Guthrie, and Dundee, ... ... ... ... 3 15 

Up Special (North), ... ... ... ... ... ... 4 30 

Kirriemuir, Arbroath, Aberdeen, and North, Edinburgh and Dundee, ... 6 45 

Despatches from Forfar Post-Office. 

"Kirriemuir and Padanaram, 

"Guthrie, ... 

*Glamis, Tannadice, Alierlemno, Kincaldrum, Douglastown, .. 

Edinbtirgh, Glasgow, Dundee, and South, Alyth, Montrose 

Brechin, and Kirriemuir, 
Letham, Dunnichen, and Craichie, Lour, Burnside, &c., 
Aberdeen, Arbroath, Brechin, and Montrose, 
Edinburgh, England, Glasgow, Dundee, Perth, Alyth, Meigle, Coupar 

Angus, and South, ... 
Up Special (South) ... 

Edinburgh, Glasgow, Dundee, and South, Kirriemuir, I'erth, and Glamis, 
Aberdeen, and the North, GlasgOAv, Edinburgh, Dundee, Fife, Perth, and 
Perthshire ; also, all English Letters, 

"Box cleared for these despatches at 5 a.m. 
Money Order Office open from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m., and on Saturdays till 8 p.m 
Telegraph Office open from 7 a.m. till 8 p.m., and on Sundays for one hour- 
9 a.m. to 10 a.m. ; and for Postal Business from 12.30 p.m. till 1.30 p.m. 
Miss Vj. Lunan Thomson, Postmistress. 



a.m. 
a.m. 
a.m. 

a.m. 
p.m. 
p.m. 
p.m. 

p.m. 
p.m. 
p.m. 



Aberdeen, 



5 

6 

7 

7 40 

8 45 

1 

2 10 

3 40 
5 40 



a.m. 
a.m. 
a.m. 

a.m. 
a.m. 
p.m. 

p.m. 
p.m. 
p.m. 



10 p.m. 



I Letters can he posted in hoxes iinw attached to m(ii\ tvains on paiiment of hi extra postage. 



52 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



FAIRS, TRYSTS, & CATTLE MARKETS in Forfapshire. 

When the appointed day falls on a Saturday, Sunday, or Monday, it is generally deferred 
until the following Tuesday, o.s. , i.e. , old style, twelve days after date in Calendar. 



January. 

Arbroath, hiring & general business, last Sat. 
Brechin, cat. every Tues. ; feeing, lastTues. 
Coupar-Angus, cattle & sheep, 3 Monday 
Kirriemuir, t Monday 

February. 

Brechin, cattle every Tuesday ; horses, last 

Tuesday 
Coupar-Angus, cattle and sheep, 3 Monday 
Edzell, hiring, cattle, &c. , 3 Thursday 
Kirriemuir, i Monday 

March. 

Brechin, every Tuesday 

Coupar-Angus, horses & cattle, 3 Thursday 

Kirriemuir, t Monday ; 2 Friday 

April. 

Brechin, (Trinity Muir), sheep and cattle, 3 

Wednesday 
Carmyllie, cattle, 3 Tuesday s 
Coupar-Angus, cattle and sheep, 3 Monday 
Cullew, sheep, last Friday 
Forfar, cattle, horses, 2 Wednesday 
Glamis, i Wednesday 
Glasterlaw, cattle, last Wednesday 
Kirriemuir, i Monday 

May. 

Arbroath, hiring, 26 if Sat. ; if not, Sat. after 
Brechin, feeing, Tuesday after 25 
Coupar-Angus, cattle and sheep, 3 Monday 
Dundee, hiring, 26 if Tuesday or Friday ; 

if not, I Tuesday or Friday after 
Dun's Muir, i Tuesday o s 
Edzell, cattle, sheep, i Monday ; feeing, 26 
Forfar, cattle, horses, i Wednesday os; 

feeing, Saturday after 26 
Friockheim, hiring, cattle, last Thursday 
Glamis, i Wednesday & Wednesday after 26 
Kirriemuir, i Monday and Friday after 26 
Letham, Forfar, cattle and hiring, 26 
Montrose, Friday after Whitsunday o s 

June. 

Brechin, (Trinity Muir) begins 2 Wednesday 
and continues 3 days — ist day sheep, 
2nd cattle, 3rd horses 

Dun's Muir, cattle, horses, 3 Thursday 

J^'orfar, cattle, 3 Friday 

(jlasterlaw, cattle, 4 Wednesday 

Kirriemuir, Wednesday after Glamis 

July. 

Arbroath, hiring, and general business, 18 

if Saturday ; if not, Saturday after 
Brechin, Monday after 2 Thursday 
Coupar-Angus, cattle, &c., 3 Thursday 
Dundee (Stobb's) cattle, sheep, and horse, 
Tuesdav after tt 



Edzell, cattle, Friday after 19 

Forfar, cattle, horses. Wed. after i Tues. 

Friockheim, hiring and cattle, Monday after 

Arbroath 
Kirriemuir, horses & cattle, 24 if Wed. ; 

if not. Wed. after ; sheep day before 

August. 

Brechin (Trinity Muir), sheep, cattle, and 

horses, 2 Thursday 
Dundee (First), cattle, &c., 26 
Edzell, cattle and sheep. Wed. after 26. 
Forfar, sheep, cattle, horses, and wool, 

Wednesday after i Tuesday 
Glasterlaw, cattle, 3 Wednesday 

September. 

Brechin (Trinity A-iuir), sheep, cattle, horses, 

Tuesday before last Wednesday 
Dundee (Latter), cattle, horses, 19 
Forfar, horses and cattle, last Wednesday 
Glenisla, sheep and cattle, Thursday before 
last Wednesday 

October. 

Brechin, cattle, every Tuesday till April 

Trinity Muir Tryst 
Cullew, sheep, day before Kirriemuir 
Dundee (Bell's), feeing, i Friday 
Edzell, sheep, cattle, and horses, Thursday 

before Kirriemuir 
Forfar, cattle, 2 Wednesday 
Glamis, Saturday before Kirriemuir 
Glasterlaw, cattle, i Monday after Falkirk 
Kirriemuir, horses, cattle, Wednesday after 

18 ; sheep, day before 

November. 

Arbirlot (Arbroath), cattle, 2 Wednesday 
Arbroath, hiring, 22 if Sat. ; if not. Sat. after 
Brechin, cattle, every Tuesday ; feeing, 

Tuesday after 22 
Coupar-Angus, cattle and sheep, 3 Monday 
Dundee, hiring, 22 if Tuesday or Friday'; if 

not, I Tuesday or Friday after 
Forfar, cattle, i Wednesday ; feeing, 

Saturday after 22 
P'riockheim, hiring and cattle, 22 if Thurs- 
day; if not, Thursday after 
Glamis, cattle & hiring, Wednesday after 22 
Kirriemuir, cattle, Wednesday after (jlnmis 
Letham, cattle and hiring, 23 
Montrose, Friday after Martinmas, s 

December. 

Brechin, cattle, every Tuesday 
Coupar-Angus, cattle and sheep, 3 Monday 
Kirriemuir, i Mondav 



1 & 5 CASTLE STREET, 




__^ ,,^.- ^ _^^_^ _^_4,,, ._^ ,,_j_*- _ g, _ ^vj ^ 

LINOLEUMS, /-^V 



'/. 



AND 



CARPETS. 



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O/ 






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nmlt 



/MILLINERY 



AND 



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■liii® 



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AND 



2 WEST HIGH STREET, 




NEW & SECOND-HAND 

Pianos, Oi^gans, & fiEitfmoniixms, 

AT GREAT REDUCTIONS IN PRICE. 

A Very LARGE STOCK to Select from. Great Variety of Designs and Styles. 

HARMONIUMS, from £3 upwards. 
ORGANS, from £8 upwards. 

SQUARE & GRAND PIANOS (Second-Hand), from £5. 
Second-Hand COTTAGE PIANOS, from £10 upwards. 
Large Variety of Excellent COTTAGE PIANOS, ORGANSy 
&c., from -cao to d 20. 



PATERSON, SONS, & CO., 

PRINCES ST., PERTH; ISO ^ETHERGATE, DUNDEE. 

EDINBURGH, GLASGOW, AYR, DUMFRIES, & PAISLEY. 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



53 



DIRECTORY OF TRADES & PROFESSIONS. 



Every endeavour has been used to ensure correctness in this List. Inaccuracies 
and omissions on being pointed out will be corrected for the next issue. Advertisers' 
Names appear in dark type. 



Architects 

C'arver & Symon, 34 Castle street 
Crighton, Robt. , Suttieside 
Munro, James, 85 Castle street 



, Auctioneers 

Doig, Thomas, 53 West High street 
Graham, D. M., Littlecauseway 
MacLean, J. A. (Dundee), Greenhill's Hall 
Scott, James, 6 East High street 
Scott, Robert, Newford Park 
Tosh, P. A. , Castle street 



Bakers 

Anderson, John, 10 West High street 
Anderson, Wm,, 79 East High street 
Brown, George, ico West High street 
East Port Association, 133 East High 

street — Wm. D. Joiner, Manager 
Edward, William, 10 Castle street 
Esplin, T. B. , 25 West High street 
Fenton, D. C, East High street 
Free Trade Association, 151 East High 

street — D. Robertson, manager 
High Street Association, East High street 

— Alex. Wighton, manager 
Jolly, Alexander, Backwynd 
Low, William, & Co., 105 Castle st.— 

Alex. Hay, Manager 
Myles, William, 48 West High street 
Northern Association, in Castle street — 

James Brown, manager 
Ormond, Charles, 49 East High street 
Ross, William, 107 Backwynd 
Saddler, James, 35 East High street 
Shepherd, Alex., Osnaburgh street 
Shepherd, Andrew, 22 and 24 West 

High street 
Thom, Andrew, Wellbraehead 



West Port Association, 52 West High 

street — W. T, Brown, Salesman 
West Town-End Association, 118 West 
High street — James Simpson, Salesman 

Basketmaker 

Robb, David, 40 Castle street 

Berlin Wool Repositories 

Ferguson, Miss, 37 Castle street 

Hebenton, D. , 7 East High street 
Pullar, Miss, 22 East High street 
Roberts, John, 41 and 43 East High street 

Billposters 

Thom, C. & Son, 5 Littlecauseway 

Blacksmiths 

Anderson, James, 26 West High street 
Guthrie, William, Castle street 
Haddon, James, South street 
MTntosh, William, Academy street 
Mackintosh, Alex., Castle street 
Milne, George, Backwynd 
Stewart, Mrs Wm. , Backwynd 

Booksellers and Stationers 

Byars, John, i Glamis Road 
Dick, David, East Port 
Dick, E. S. , Castle street 
Laing, Mrs, 24 East High street 
Lawrance, James, 78 East High street 
Lowdon, Mrs, 80 West High street 
Shepherd, W., 39 Castle street 
Thomson, W. H., 73 East High street 

Boot and Shoemakers 

Balfour, Wm. , Leather Cutter, Backwynd 
Christie, David, 1175 East High street 



54 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



Deuchar, Alexander, 49 Castle street 
Dunn, R. & J., 36 Castle street 
Findlay, James, Lour road 
Fullerton, William, 30 Castle street 
Glenday, James, East High street 
Hebington, Wm., 34 West High street 
Hood, David, 96 Castle street 
Lawson, James, 139 East High street 
M'Dougall, James, 36 East High street 
M'Intosh, James, 11 Castle street 
Meek, A., 42 Castle street 
Milne, R. , 95 East High street 
Petrie, John, 113 East High street 
Petrie, T. , 2 Backwynd 
Robertson, Da\'id, East High street 
Smith, Miss, 93 Castle street 
Stewart, Charles, 15 West High street 
Thornton, D. P., 84 West High street 
Wade, David H.. 11 Osnaburgh street 



Brewer and Bottler 

Walker, Wm., junr. , West High street 



Brokers 

Doig, Thomas, 53 West High street 
Gibson, Graham, Dundee loan 
Hanick, Richard, East High street 



Builders and Quarry masters 

Adamson, William, Headingplacestone 

Cargill, James, Canmore street 

Dick, Charles, Prior road 

M'Lean, James, 56 North street 

Simpson, P. D. , Forfar Pavement Works 

and Myreston Quarries 
Stewart, William, Yeaman street 
Watterston, James, Glamis road — Balma- 

shanner Quarries 



Butchers 

Coutts, William, 89 Castle street 
Coutts, Wilham, junr., 38 West'High st. 
Dalgety, Andrew, 84 Castle street 
Deuchar, Alex. , 45 West High street and 

115 East High street 
Eaton & Fyfe, Castle street 
P'arquhar, James, 62 East High street 
Greenhill, Charles, East High street 
Mitchell, Charles, 69 North street 
Nicoll, George, 107 East High street 
Pirie, James, 116 West High street 
Walker, David, zh East High street 



Carters 

Adam, William, Backwynd 
Bennet, Alex. , Canmore street 
Bruce, John, Whitehills 
Callander, Alex. , Dundee loan 
Callander, John, Dundee road 
Crighton, James, 7 Charles street 
Kennedy, Alex., North street 
Masterton, D. , Castle street 
Miller, David, Dundee road 
Miller, Wm. , West High street 

Chimney Sweeps 

Carrie, James, 99 Backwynd 
Langlands, Alex. , 154 East High street 
Shepherd, Alex., 59 Dundee loan 
Simpson, William, 18 Glamis road 

China Merchants 

Doig, Thomas, 53 West High street 
Gray, Robert, 45 Castle street 
Hill, Alexander, South street 
Munro, Andrew, East High street 
Shepherd, James, junr,, 12§ West High 
street 



Clergymen 

Aldridge, Rev. J. M. , The Parsonage 
Caie, Rev. G. J., The Manse 
Gumming, Rev. A. , First Free Manse 
M'Corkindale, Rev. D. L., Lilybank Villa 
Philps, Rev. G. M. , East Free Manse 
Weir, Rev. John, St. James' Manse 
Wright, Rev. P. S., U.P. Manse 

Coachbuilders 

Greenhill, Hugh, Littlecauseway 
Petrie, W. , Academy street 
Stewart, Mrs Wm. , Backwynd 

Coal and Lime Merchants 

Ewen, James, Victoria street 

Forfar Co-operative Coal Society — A. Lees, 

Glamis road. Secretary 
Kennedy, Andrew, Victoria street 
Lackie, John, West High street 
Lakie, John, Railway Station 
Maxwell, D. & G., Forfar and Auldbar 
M'Kenzie, George, 937 West High street 
Milne, James, junr., 86 Dundee loan 
Muir, Thomas, Son, & Patton, Railway 

Station 
PatuUo, David, 146 East High street 
Roberts, Alexander, Whitehills 
Sharp, W. W., 23b Victoria street 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



55 



Victoria Co-operative Coal Society — T. 

Stirling, Kirkton, Secretary 
Whyte, Alex., 25 Prior road 
Whyte, David, 11 Market place 

Wishart, George, Victoria street 



Confectioners 

Coutts, J., Castle street 
Kerr, John, Victoria street 
Gordon, James, 4 East High street 
Guthrie, George, 66 East High st. 
Hazels, Miss, 23 West High street 
Milne, James, 148 East High street 
M'Leish, David, 31 East High street 
Murray, James, 83 Castle street 
Ormond, Charles, 49 East High street 
Reid, Peter, 51 Castle street 
Saddler, James, 35 East High street 
Shepherd, Andrew, 22 and 24 West 

High street 
Spark, James, 93 &: 95 Market place 



Coopers 

Matthew, George, Backwynd 
Robb, David, 40 Castle street 



Cowfeeders and Dairymen. 

Barry, William T. , BaUinshoe 
Byars, David, Glamis road 
Callander, xMexander, 6 Dundee loan 
Deuchar, Alex. , Glamis road 
Doig, James, Quarrybank 
Lackie, John, West High street 
Liveston, Mrs John, East High street 
Luke, David, 154 East High street 
Michie, William, Albert street 
Morrison, John, Easterbank 
Nicoll, David, 7 Arbroath road 
NicoU, Thomas, North Mains 
Nicoll, W. , Turf beg 
Proctor, James, Glamis road 
Ritchie, D. , Windyedge 
Ritchie, George, Dundee road 
Robbie, Alex. , Caldhame 
Robbie, William, Zoar 
Roberts, Alex. , Whitehills 
Steele, Andrew, Midlanglands 
Stewart, John, Arbroath road 
Watson, James, Butterwell 
Whyte, David, West High street 

Curriers and Leather Merchants 

Ferguson & Whitson, Acadeniy street 
Whyte, John, & Son, Castle street (Tanners) 



Cutlers 

Andrew, William, West High street 

Mason, D, , East High street 



Dentists 

French, Dr., 33 East High street 

Stewart, Dr, East High street 



Drapers 

Anderson & Co., 145, 145*, and 147 East 

High street 
Barclay, R. W. , 29 Castle street 
Bell, Mrs, 85 West High street 
Boyle, J. D., 1 & 5 Castle street 
Dalgety, Alex. , 55 East High street 
Doig, Alex., 9 South street 
Fenton, H. H., 170 East High street 
Guild, James, 30 East High street 
Hendry & Warden, 83 East High st. 
Hutchison, Alex., 72 East High street 
Jamieson, W. , 156 East High street 
Jarvis Brothers, 68, 70, & 72 Castle st. 
Marshall, James, 110 West High st. 
Moffat, James, 10 Lour road 
Neish, Patrick, 55 Castle street 
Nicoll. Arthur, 21 Littlecauseway 
Roberts, John, 41 & 43 East High street 
Roberts, Wm. , Wellbraehead 
Simpson, J. W. , Cross 
Stewart, William, no East High street 
Warden, William, 23 & 25 East High st. 



Dressmakers, Milliners, &c. 

Those marked * are Milliners only. 

Addison, Miss, 5 Vennel 
Barclay, R. W., 29 Castle street 
Bell, Mrs, 85 West High street 

Boath, Jane, North street 
Boyle, J. D., 1 & 5 Castle street 

"Campbell, R. H., 63 Castle street 

Ellis, Miss, West High street 

Esplin, Agnes, 156 East High street 

Fairweather, J. M. , Castle street 

Fenton, H. H., 172 East High street 

Fenton, Miss, Yeaman street 

Guild, James, 30 East High street 

Hutchison, Alex. , 72 East High street 

Inverwick, Miss, Backwynd 

Jarron, Miss, Green street 

Jarvis Brothers, 68, 70, & 72 Castle st. 

Latta, Mrs, Castle street 

Lovv'son, Miss, Glamis road 

Maxwell, Eliza, 22 Montrose road 

Mitchell, Miss, 43 Castle street 



56 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



Oram, Miss, 13 West High street 

Orchison, Miss, Dundee road 

l^etrie. Miss, Newmonthill 

Pratt, Misses E. & R., East High street 

Rickard, Miss, Albert street 

Robertson, Miss, Market plaee 

Simpson, J. W. , Cross 

Smith, Miss, 54^ East High street 

Stark, Miss, Glamis road 

Stewart, W. , 113 East High street 

Strachan, Miss, Newmonthill 

*Thom, Miss, 130 East High street 

Thom, Miss M. , 5 Littlecauseway 

Walker, Miss, Newmonthill 

Warden, William, 23 East High street 

Webster, Miss, 33 East High street 

*Yeaman, Miss, 87 Castle street 



Druggists 

Abel & Simpson, Cross 

Fowler, George, 38^ Castle street 
Ranken, James A., & Son, East High st. 

Dyer 

Pefters, John, Canmore street 

Fishmongers 

Boyle, John, 69 West High street 
Boyle, John S., 18 Castle street 
Edwards, Alexander, West High street 
Elliot, James, 39 South street 
Guthrie, George, 66 East High street 
Hendry, James, 6 West High street 
Jamie, Adam, Couttie's Wynd 
lamieson, W. , East High street 
Leask, J., junr. , 26 Wellbraehead 
Troup, B. , 118 East High street 



Founder (Iron) 

Munro, James, Foundry, Whitehills 

Fruit Merchants and Greengrocers 

Black, Wm. , 8 Dundee road 
Boyle, John S., 18 Castle st. (wholesale) 
Christie, James, East High street 
Gordon, ]., 4 East High street 
Guthrie," G., East High street 
Hazels, Miss, 23 West High street 
Murray, James, 83 Castle street 
M'Kenzie, David, North street 
Piggot, Mary, 92 Castle street 
Whyte, Mrs, 19 West High street 



Furniture Dealers 

Doig, Thomas, 53 West High street 
Findlay, James, 76 East High street 
Gray, R., 45 Castle street 
Lamont, James, 26 West High street 
Liddell, David, East High street 
Low, Alexander, 7 Glamis road 
M'Intosh, Mrs, Castle street 
Tosh, P. A., 70 Castle street 
Whamond, David, Castle street 

Game Dealers 

Christie, James, 1175 East High street 
Guthrie, George, 66 East High street 
Martin, James, 32 & 34 Castle street 
Hendry, James, West High street 

Urquhart, Duncan, North street 
Walker, D. , 2i East High street 



Gardeners (Jobbing) 

Adam, John, Manor street 
Adams, James, 12 Charles street 
Andrew, Wm. , 23 St. James' road 
Black, James, 18 Yeaman street 
Doig, Alexander, Easterbank 
Gordon, J., 4 East High street 
Hunter, Wm. , 54 South street 
Kidd, Joseph, Chapel Park 
Mann, James, Backwynd 
M'Kenzie, Kenneth, Lour road 
Murray, James, Castle street 
NicoU, John, Arbroath road 
Stark, David, 15 New road 



Gardeners (Market) 

Archie, John, Cowiehill 
Dick, Walter, Cherryfield 
Duff, Charles, South street 
Kydd, James, Caldhame 
Low, Mrs, Welshbarns 
Piggot, Alexander, Padanaram 
Simpson, John. Sheriff Park 
Snowie, John, Dundee road 
Stark, Alex., Glamis road 
Stark, David, St. James' road 



Grocers (not Licensed) 

Adamson, Wm. , East High street 
Boath, William, 23 John street 
East Port Association, 133 East High street 
— Wm. D. Joiner, Manager 



FORFAR DIRECTORY, 



57 



East High street Association — Alexander 

Wighton, Manager 
Free Trade Association, 151 ICast High 

street — D. Robertson, Manager 
Fyfe, James, 2 Arbroath road 
Gray, Robert, Wellljraehead 
Jack, R. F., 20 Castle street 
Liddle, Wilham, North street 
Low, Wm., & Co., Castle street, East 

High street, & West High street 
MolHson, David, Dundee loan 
Northern Association, iii Castle street — 

James Brown, Manager 
Spark, James, 95 Market place 
Tarbet, Mrs, East High street 
West Port Association, 52 West High street 

— Wm. T. Brown, Salesman 
West Town End Association, 118 West 

High street — James Simpson, Salesman 
Wishart, Charles, Dundee loan 

Grocers (Licensed) 

Adamson, John, 40 West High street 

Barry, David, 80 Castle street 
Butchart, D. , 33 Castle street 
Donald, David, ig Glamis road 
Donald, Henry, 80 West High street 
Martin, James, 32 & 34 Castle street 
Melvin, B. & M., 17, 19, & 21 Castle st. 
Nicolson, James, 82 East High street 
Prophet, Mrs, Prior road 
Ross, William, 12 East High street 
Smith, Mrs L. , 162 East High street 
Smith, Agnes, 72 West High street 

Abel & Simpson, Cross (wine and 
spirits only) 

Bell or Boath, Mary Ann, North street 
(table beer only) 

Walker, Wm. , jr., West High street (Ale 
and Porter only) 

Gunsmith 

Findlay, William, Kingston, Forfar 

Hair Dressers 

Andrew, W., 29 West High street 

Clark, C. , East High street 
Clark, William, 92 West High street 
Mason, David, 3 East High street 
Petrie, Robert, 138 East High street 
Strang, Robert, Castle street 

Hatters 

Chalmers, W. A., Castle street 
Davidson, John, 97| East High street 
Taylor, John, 60 Castle street 

Also, various Clothiers 6^ Drapers in town. 



Horsehirers 

Bennet, Alexander, Castle street 

Greenhill, Hugh, Royal Hotel 

Petrie, W. , East High street; and County 

Hotel Stables, Castle street 
Stewart, John, Arbroath road 



Hotels 

Those marked * have Stabling 

'""Clementsen, John, Zoar 
*Dyce, Mrs, Cross 
■""Greenhill, Hugh, Royal Hotel 
*Jarman, Joseph, Star Hotel 
""'Petrie, W. , Salutation Hotel 
'■■Robbie, Isabella, Market place 
Willis, Wm. , County Hotel 

Innkeepers 

Balharry, Wm. , " Eagle Inn," West High 

street 
Barry, Elizabeth, 37 South street 
Bennet, Alexander, Castle street 
Bowman, Mrs, "Forfar Arms Inn," East 

Port 
Dalgety, Mrs, " Strathmore," West High 

street 
Dick, David, " Burns' Tavern," 81 East 

High street 
Jack, Peter, 27 & 29 South street 
Keay, William, 112 Castle street 
Keir, Charles, " The Globe," Castle street 
Killacky, Mrs, "Stranger's Inn," Castle 

street 
Lamont, James, 26 West High street 
Liveston, Ann, 90 East High street 
Low, James, 2 & 4 Don street 
Lowdon, Mrs, " Auction Mart Inn " 
Lowson, Andrew, Market place 
M'Leod, James, " The Vine," 43 West 

High street 
M'Gregor, Mary, " Crown," 68 East High 

street 
Peacock, William, 47 Dundee loan 
Porter, Jane, 86 Castle street 
Porter, William, "Stag Inn, "a 13 Castle st. 
Robertson, Alexander, Osnaburgh st. 
Robbie, Charles, 47 Backwynd 
Scott, Andrew, 121 & 123 East High street 
Smith, William, " The Pump," loi West 

High street 
Stewart, John, i Arbroath road 
Stirling, William, 63 Backwynd 
Wilson, Alexander, 155 East High street 
Wilson, Robert, "Masons' Arms," 105 
East High street 



58 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



Insurance Agents. 

North British & Mercantile. Agents- 
James Taylor, Town-Clerk ; W. & J. 
Don & Co. (Fire only) ; Patrick 
Webster, Westfield ; T. Henderson, 
Agent, National Bank (Fire only) ; 
A. B. Wvllie, Solicitor. 



Ironmongers 

Crichton, Alexander, Cross 

Hebenton, James, 57 Castle street 
Irons, David, 14 East High street 

Mackintosh, Alexander, 16 Castle street 
Tosh, Charles, 18 and 20 West High street 

Joiners and Cabinetmakers 

Bain, i\lexander, 26^ West High street 
Farquharson, James, Chapel street 
Findlay, James, 176 East High street 
Hay, Alex., & Co., Academy street 
Liddell, D. , East High street 
Low, Alexander, 7 Glamis road 
Martin, William, 21 South street 
Morrison, William, Dundee loan 
Nicoll, J. , Green street 
Scott, Wm., Zoar 
Stewart, Mrs W. , Backwynd 
Whamond, David, Castle street 



Manufacturers (Power-loom) 

Boath, John, junr. , & Co., Academy Street 

Works — W. Lowson manager 
Craik, J. & A. , & Co. , Manor Works 
Don, Wm. & John, & Co., St. James' 

Road and Station Works — Charles 

Burnett, manager 
Laird, William, & Co., Forfar Linen and 

Canmore Works 
Lowson, John, & Son, Haugh and South 

Street Works — John Morrison, manager 
Lowson, John, junr., & Co., Victoria 

Works'— David Stirton, manager 



Manufacturers (Hand-loom) 

liyars, J. & W. , Nursery Feus 
Waters ton, Charles, Glamis road 
Yeaman, Alexander, 33 Dundee loan 



Medical Practitioners 

Alexander, G. P., Littlecauseway 

Cable, J. , East High street 

Hunter, Charles, 59 East High street 



Murray, W. F. , East High street 
Wedderburn, A. M'L., East High street 



Messenger-at-Arms 

Gowans, John, Lilybank 

Millwright 

Innes, Peter, Whitehills 

Music Teachers 

Ewen, Misses, Mill Bank 
Gavin, Wm. , 55 West High street 
Kerr, John, East High street 
Neill, James, 42a Castle street 
Smith, C. J., New road. Organist 
Smith, Misses, Academy street 
Wilkie, Thomas, North street 



Newsagents 

Byars, John, Glamis road 
Dick, David, East Port 
Dick, E. S. , Castle street 
Laing, Mrs, East High street 
Lawrance, James, 78 East High street 
Lowdon, Mrs, 80 West High street 
Shepherd, W., Castle street 
Thomson, W. H., East High street 

Newspaper Offices 

Dundee Advertiser, Peoples' Journal, 
Peoples' Friend, and Evening Tele- 
graph. Branch office— IO2 West 
High street 

Dundee Courier & Argus, and Weekly 
News. Branch Office — 18 East High 
street 

Forfar Dispatch, (Thursdays, gratis), 
76 East High street 

Forfar Herald, (Fridays,) Osnaburgh st. 

Forfar Review (Fridays), 47 Castle st. 



Nurserymen 

Duff, Charles, South street 
Simpson, John, Sheriff Park 
Smith, Alexander, Glamis road 
Smith, David, Broomroof 
Williamson, James, Victoria street 

Painters 

Barclay & Henderson, 74 Castle street 
Doig, George, 30 South street 
Dowell, William, 47 East High street 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



59 



M'Laren & Fyfe, East High street 
Prophet, John, 47 West High street 
Robertson, J. W., 52 and 54 Castle st. 
Rodger, David, 21 West High street 

Stewart, R. D. , 94 Castle street 

Photographers 

Calder, John, 64 East High street 
Dowell, WiUiam, East High street 
Mitchell, Charles, 48 East High st. 

Al'Intosh, Mrs, Castle street 

Plasterers 

Doig, John, 30 South street 
Guthrie, Wm. , Charles street 
Masterton, David, 20 Canmore street 

Plumbers and Tinsmiths 

Clark, James, 97 East High street 

Fyfe, John, Couttie's Wynd 

Langlands & Milne, 1 West High street 

M'Beth & Milne, Green street 
Malcolm, W., 78 Castle street 

Neave, James, 10 East High street 
Neave, Peter, 1355 East High street 
Soutar, Alexander, 19 South street 

Potato Merchants 

Caird, C, St. James' road 
Jack, Peter, 27 and 29 South street 
Maxwell, D. &G., Forfar & Auldbar Station 
M'Kenzie, David, 8 Arbroath road 
Scott, Robert, Newford Park 
Scott, James, East High street 
Whyte, David, 11 Market place 
Wishart, George, Victoria street 

Poultry Dealers 

Boath, David, Newmonthill 
Christie, James, 117^ East High street 
Clarke, David, 85 West High street 
Guthrie, George, East High street 
Hendry, James, 6 West High street 

Printers 

Nicolson, George S., Osnaburgh street 
Falconer, J. C, Castle street 
Heath & Co., 47 Castle street 
M'Pherson, Oliver, East High street 
Shepherd, W., 39 Castle street 

Reedmakers 

Ramsay, William, 35 West High street 
Tyrie, David, 102 East High street 



Refreshment Rooms (Temperance) 

Duncan, Miss E. , 96 North street 
Petrie, Thomas, 2 Backwynd 
Saddler, James, 35 East High street 
Shepherd, Andrew, West High street 

Ramsay, Mrs, 58 Castle street, Forfar Cafe 

Ropespinners 

Dunn & Paterson, Manor Rope Works 
Philip, Brodlie, & Co., Forfar Rope Works 

Saddlers 

Clark, Robert, Cross 

Harris, William, 505 West High street 

Hutchison, Robert, Cross 

Steele, Alexander, 67 Castle street 

Seedsmen 

Crichton, Alexander, Cross 

Hebenton, James, 57 Castle street 
Irons, David, 14 East High street 

Mackintosh, Alex., 16 Castle street 
Smith, J. & A. , 59 West High street 
Tosh, Charles, 18 & 20 West High street 

Sheriff Officer 

Gowans, John, Lilybank 

Slaters 

Donald, G. , 20 North street 

Kerr, James, 65 West High street 

Moffat, William, New road 

Shepherd, A. & C, 116 East High street 

Shepherd, David, West High street 



Solicitors 

Anderson, J. P. , Littlecauseway 
Gordon, William, East High street 
Lowson & MacLean, 9 West High street 
MacHardy, Alexander, Council Buildings 
Macintosh, D. , Town Hall Buildings 
Myles, J. & A. W., & Co., 68 Castle street 
Taylor, James, Council Buildings 
Whyte & Freeman, East High street 
Wyllie, A. B. , 53 East High street 
Young & Gray, 20 East High street 

Tailors and Clothiers 

Anderson & Co., 145, 145|, and 147 East 
High street 

Blair & Blues, 86 East High street 
Booth, D. P., 66 Castle street 
Boyle, J. D., Castle street 

Brown, James, 84^ Castle street 



6o 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



Dalgety, Alexander, East High street 
Dick, William, 20 West High street 
Gibson, W. A., 25 Dundee loan 
Hendry & Warden, East High street 

Jamieson, J., & Co., Castle street 
Jarvis Brothers, Castle street 
Kydd, James, Canmore street 
Low, John, 28 Lour road 
M'Nab, Robert, 150 East High street 
Mann, J., 14 West High street 
Marshall, James, 110 West High st. 
Peter, John, East High street 
Petrie, John, log East High street 
Proctor, D. , Osnaburgh street 
Spalding, Alexander, Cross 
Todd, Alex., 40 East High street 
Warden, Wm., 23 East High street 
Watt, Wilham, Osnaburgh street 
Wallace, Alfred, Osnaburgh street 
Whyte, Alex. , 45 Prior road 



Tanner and Skinner 

Wood, William, 3 Victoria street 

Tobacconists 

Andrew, William, West High street 
Donald, Miss M., 10 Castle street 

M'Leish, David, East High street 
Smart, Wilham, 77 East High street 



Toy Merchants 

Andrew, William, West High street 

Lowdon, Mrs, West High street 
M'Leish, D. , 31 East High street 
Munro, James, 13 East High street 
Robb, DaN'id, Castle street 
Thomson, W. H., East High street 

Veterinary Surgeons 

Anderson, James, 26 West High street 
Ritchie, James, East Port Cottage 



Watchmakers 

Clark, Robert, 64 Castle street 
Falconer, D. , East High street 
Murdoch, J. D., 2 East High street 
Strachan, John, 10 Cross 

'Laylor, A. , East High street '' 

Wood Merchants 

Ewen, James, Victoria street 

Johnston, A., & Son, Service road 
Sharp, W. W., 23b Victoria street 

Wood Turners 

Crammond, David, Backwynd 
Johnston, A., & Son, Service road 



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POSTERS. HANDBILLS. 



PRINTING 



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EVERY ISESGRIPTiON DQ^E WITH 7-^STE 

AN0 EXPEDITION. 



^taf toner anb ^xintex, &c., 

39 CASTLE STREET, FORFAR. 



SPECIMENS & PRICES ON APPLICATION. 



ESTI2VIATES FiJRNISHED. 

Memorandums. Account Headings. 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 6 1 



BURGH OF FORFAR. 



Population in 1881 — 12,818. Constituency — Males, 1577 ; Females, 598. 

Parliamentary Representative — John Shiress Will, Q.C. 

Valuation f Lands ... ... ... ... ;^35'227 19 o 

for 1888-89. \ Railways in Burgh ... ... ... 1641 o o 

MAGISTRATES AND TOWN COUNCIL. 

The Council meets in Council Buildings on the first Monday of each month at 6-30 p.m. 
Special meetings are also held from time to time to dispose of urgent business. 

Wm. Doig, Provost and Chief Magistrate ; John Ferguson, First Bailie ; James M'Lean, 
Second Bailie ; John P. .Anderson, Third Bailie ; John Moffat, Treasurer. James Ewen, 
David Smith, John L. Fenton, James Milne, jr., Keith Kennedy Skene, Daniel Falconer, 
Robert Fyfe Craik, James MacDougall, Hugh Greenhill, David Whyte. 

Officials and Committees. 
James Taylor, Town-Clerk ; Alex. MacHardy, Town Chamberlain. 

Law. — Provost Doig, Bailie Ferguson, Messrs Fenton, Falconer, Greenhill, Ewen, Bailie 
Anderson (Convener). 

Property. — Provost Doig, Bailie Ferguson, Messrs Moffat, Whyte, Milne, Smith, Bailie 
M'Lean (Convener). 

Fi?iance.—'Pxovo'=>X. Doig, Bailie M'Lean, Bailie Anderson, Messrs Whyte, Ewen, Craik, 
Treasurer Moffat (Convener). 

Cemetery. — Provost Doig, Bailie B'erguson, Bailie M'Lean, Messrs MacDougall, Green- 
hill, Ewen, Smith (Convener.) George Patterson, Superintendent. 

Committee under Cattle Diseases Act — Provost and Magistrates. 

Burgh Committee under Licensing Act — Provost and First and Second Bailies. 

Representatives for 

Prison Committees — Dundee, Provost Doig and Bailie Ferguson ; Forfar, Provost Doig 

and Mr Ewen. 
Under Sheriff Court Houses Act ... ... ... ... ... Bailie Ferguson. 



Lunacy Board 
Arbroath Harbour 
Morgan Hospital 
Roads and Bridges 
Rossie Reformatory 
Wyllie's Bequest 



Provost Doig. 

Provost Doig and Bailie Anderson. 

Provost Doig and Bailie Ferguson. 

Provost Doig. 

Provost Doig and Bailie Ferguson. 

...James Munro, Distributor. 



BURGH FUNDS (Town Council. 



Burgh Property and Funds as at 6th October, li 
Debts and Obligations 

Balance in favour of Burgh ... 

Annual Revenue ... 
Expenditure 



;^73.446 S II 
29,140 o 3 



;^44,305 5 8 

;^2758 10 II 
2618 5 5 



Surplus for the year ... ... ... ... ^^140 5 6 



62 FORFAR DIRECTORY, 



CHARITY MORTIFICATIONS. 

Charity Mortifications under the administration of the Magistrates and Town Council of ! 
Forfar, per the Town-Clerk. Funds as at 6th October, 1888 : — 

Dr Wyllic's Bequest.— <Z2^^^\\2\, JiY:^?)^ 14s 6d. Interest expended in charity during the 
year, ;/^i5o 2s 5d. On hand, £\\ 12s 8d. 

Provost Potter s Beqveat of £\ooo.—\w\<ixQ%\, &c. , expended on coals for the poor, in 
terms of the bequest, £\i^ 3s iid. 

Bailie Brown s Bequest of £100. — Interest, &c. , expended on coals for the poor, in terms 
of the Bequest, ^^lo. On hand, ^'26 is 8d. 

Bequest by John Philip, Chicago, amounts, with interest, to £'2go6 5s gd. 

POLICE COMMISSION AND GAS CORPORATION. 

Meet on the third Monday of each month at 6-30 p.m. 

Officials. 

William Gordon, Police Clerk ; James Stirling, Superintendent of Police ; U. B. Esplin, 
Gas Manager; Jonas Harris, Burgh Surveyor ; Alexander MacHardy, Treasurer; William 
Patterson, Collector of Rates. 

Committees. 

Paving, General Improvement, and Road Committee. — Provost Doig, Bailie M'Lean, 
Messrs Ewen, Skene, Fenton, Milne, Moffat (Convener). 

Sanitary Committee. — Provost Doig, Bailie Ferguson, Messrs Falconer, Smith, Mac- 
Dougall, Greenhill, Fenton (Convener). 

Watching., Lighting and Fire Engine Committee. — Provost Doig, Bailie Ferguson, 
Bailie M'Lean, Messrs Fenton, Milne, Smith, Falconer (Convener). 

Finance Committee. — Provost Doig, Messrs Falconer, Skene, Fenton, Moffat, Craik, 
Bailie Anderson (Convener). 

Sewage Committee. — Provost Doig, Messrs Whyte, Smith, Craik, Moffat, Ewen, Skene \ 
(Convener. ) 

Water Committee. — Bailie Ferguson, Bailie M'Lean, Bailie Anderson, Messrs Craik, 
Moffat, Ewen, Provost Doig (Convener). 

Gas Corporation Committee. — Provost Doig, Messrs Skene, Ewen, Falconer, Smith, 
Whyte, Craik (Convener). 

POLICE COMMISSION ACCOUNTS, as at 15th May, 1888. 

I. — General Police Purposes. 



Surplus last year . . . 
Annual Revenue ... 

Annual Expenditure 



^109 17 2 
2215 2 o 



^^2324 19 2 
2291 7 8 



Surplus this year ... ... ... ^33 11 6 

II. — Account under Roads Act. 

Surplus last year ... ... ... ... ... ^88 16 4 

Annual Revenue ... ... ... ... ... 174 t8 2 



_;^263 14 6 
Annual Expenditure ... ... ... ... 194 \z^ 8 



Surplus this year ... ... ... ^68 t8 to 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 63 



III.— New Shambles Account. 

Annual Revenue ... ... ... ... ... /ii^94 ^9 7 

Expenditure ... ... ... ... ... jC^g'' " 3 

Deficit last year ... ... ... ... ... 24 2 4 

_^2i5 13 7 

Deficit this year ... ... ... £-20 14 o 

IV.— The Local Authority. 

Balance last year ... ... ... ... ... £^3° 14 6 

Annual Revenue ... ... ... ... ... 1868 12 5 

;^2099 6 II 

Annual E.vpenditure ... ... ... ... 1889 14 i 

Balance this year ... ... ... ^^209 12 10 

V. — Water. 

Surplus last year ... ... ... ... ... ;i^449 S i 

Annual Revenue ... ... ... ... ... 3169 15 11 

^3619 I o 

Annual Expenditure ... ... ... ... 3528 12 2 

Balance this 3'^ear ... ... ..." £90 8 10 

Total Expenditure on Construction of Works « _,^49,i97 i i 

VI.— Gas. 

Balance last year ... ,.. ... ... ... ^585 4 9 

Annual Revenue ... ... ... ... ... 5408 6 5 

7^5993 II 2 

;^6l34 5 IT 



Annual Expenditure ... ... ... ... £557° 13 5 

Annuities payable... ... ... ... ... 563 12 6 



Deficit this year ... ... ... ^140 14 9 

Gas Corporation Office, North Street. Open from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. On Saturdays, 
from 9 to 3. 

Police and Water Assessment Office, Council Buildings. Open from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., 
and from 6 to 8 p.m. On Saturdays, from 10 to 2. 



POLICE COURT. 

Held every lawful day when there is business. Judges — The Provost and Magistrates. 
William Gordon, Solicitor, Clerk and Assessor. James Stirling, Superintendent and Pror.- 
Fiscal. 

BURGH OR BAILIE COURT. 

Held as occasion requires. Magistrates Judges. James Stirling, Fiscal ; James Taylor, 
Town-Clerk, Clerk and Assessor. 

BURGH LICENSING COURT. 

For the renewal or granting of Hotel, Pubhc-House, and Grocers' Liquor Licenses. Held 
by the Magistrates on 2nd Tuesday of April and 3rd Tuesday of October. 



64 FORFAR DIRECTORY, 



VALUATION APPEAL COURT. 

Held by the Council on a date between the loth and 30th September. 

FORFAR JUSTICES OF THE PEACE. 

Provost Doig, Bailie Ferguson, John Lowson, jun. , John Myles, John Whyte, P. Webster 
(Westfield), Alexander Craik, John Fvfe Craik, James Lowson, Dr VVedderburn, John B. 
Don. 

FORFAR PAROCHIAL BOARD. 

Committee of Management. 

F)-om the Heritors. — Messrs John Moffat, Academy Street ; James Mitchell, farmer, 
Quilkoe ; Daud Smith, seedsman, Broomroof; William Dowell, painter, 47 East High 
Street ; Bailie Ferguson, x\cademy Street ; Robert F. Craik, of Kingston ; Provost Doig, 
Ivybank Cottage ; Robert D. Paton, railway agent, Whitehills ; John L. Fenton, Yeaman 
Street ; James Dargie, 22 Green Street ; George Porter, 51 Dundee Loan ; James Stewart, 
contractor, Market Place ; David Whyte, Market Place ; Bailie M'Lean, North Street ; 
James Lamont, 26 West High Street ; Peter A. Tosh, auctioneer. Castle Street ; James 
Binny, 10 Glamis Road ; Robert .Smith, 11 Albert Street ; William Gordon, solicitor, 52 
East High Street. 

Elected Members. — Messrs Peter A. Goode, gardener, 13 St. James Road ; James 
Williams, factory worker, 8 Charles Street ; Thomas Petrie, shoemaker, 2 Backwynd ; 
David C. Forsyth, factory worker, 6 Dundee Loan ; Alexander Strachan, printer, 8 Lour 
Road ; Henry Rae, factory overseer, 14 Montrose Road ; William Livingston, insurance 
agent, 44 Glamis Road ; David Hardie, tailor, 26 North Street ; David Fairweather, factory 
worker, 6 Arbroath Road ; David Proctor, tailor, 99 East High Street. 

KirkSession Ale mbers.- -Messrs James Lawrence, factory worker, 29 Prior Road ; 
Alexander D. Strachan, sawmill manager, 22 Green Street; Wilham M' Donald, boot- 
maker, Kingsmuir ; Dickson Fraser, currier, 7 Victoria Street ; John A. MacLean, solicitor, 
Union Bank ; Charles Kinnear, cloth inspector, 11 New Road. 

Sub-Committees. 

Poorhouse Committee. — Messrs Thomas Petrie (Chairman), Henry Rae (Vice-C^hairman), 
Baihe M'Lean, David C. Forsyth, Alexander Strachan Peter A. Goode, Alexander D. 
Strachan, David Hardie, James Dargie, Peter A. Tosh, John L. Fenton, Robert D. Paton, 
James Williams, David Fairweather, David Proctor, Charles Kinnear. 

Finance. — Bailie Ferguson (Convener), Provost Doig, Messrs Thomas Petrie, James 
Williams, Alexander Strachan, David C. Forsyth, John A. MacLean, Henry Rae, William 
Livingston, Charles Kinnear, David Proctor. 

Consulting.— yiessrs James Dargie (Convener), Provost Doig, Bailie Ferguson, Dickson 
Fraser, James Binny. 

Clothing, — Messrs Henry Rae (Convener), David Ross, James Williams, David Proctor, 
Charles Kinnear, David C. Forsyth, Dickson Fraser, James Binny, William M 'Donald. 

Felling. — Provost Doig (Convener), Bailie Ferguson, Bailie M'Lean, Messrs James 
Dargie, John L. Fenton. John Moffat, James Mitchell, James Lawrence, Henry Rae. 

Revising. — Messrs Robert F. Craik (Convener), Charles Kinnear, Dickson Fraser, 
Henry Rae, Thomas Petrie, John L. Fenton, James Williams, Alexander Strachan, Peter 
A. Tosh, David Hardie, Peter A. Goode, David C. Forsyth, James Lawrence, David Fair- 
weather, David Proctor, William Livingston. 

Poorhouse — Alexander Lowson, Governor; Mrs Lowson, Matron. 
Medical Officers — Drs Hunter, M' Lagan- Wedderburn, Alexander, Cable, and Murray. 

Inspector of Poor and Collector of Rates — James Rodger. Auditor — A. B. Wyllie. 
Offices, Newmonthill Street, open from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., and from 5 to 7. Saturdays, 

from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 65 



REGISTRAR'S OFFICE. 

Parochial Buildings, Ncwmontliill iStrect. Open daily from 10 to 12 noon, and from 6 
to 7 evening ; and on Saturdays, from 11 a.m. to i p.m. Births nmst be registered within 
21 days, marriages 3 days, and deaths 8 days. Notice of marriage to be given to the 
Registrar under Marriage Notice Act, Eight clear days previous to marriage. Registrar — 
W. H. Thomson. 

BURGH SCHOOL BOARD. 

Meets in Council Buildings on first Tluirsday of each month at 6.30 p.m. IMembers — 
J. W. Adamson (Chairman), Rev. J. M. Aldridge, Messrs D. M. Graham. John Laird, jr. , 
Cumming Jamieson, A. L. Fenton, John Peffers, Joseph Jarman. Alex. Freeman, Clerk ; 
A. MacHardy, Treasurer ; T. Stirling, Officer. Next election, 1891. 

LANDWARD SCHOOL BOARD. 

Meets in Clerk's Office, Town-House, Forfar, on Saturdays, at 10-30 a.m., when neces- 
sary. Members — Patrick Webster of Westfield (Chairman) ; David Whyte, 11 Market 
Place ; William Findlay, Gunsmith, Kingsmuir ; Robert F. Ciaik, of Kingston ; and 
James Wilkie, Grocer, Lunanhead. D. Macintosh, Solicitor, Town-House, Clerk and 
Treasurer ; John Laird, Lunanhead, Officer. Schools : — Kingsmuir School — George Neill, 
Teacher ; Lunanhead School — John Yuille, Teacher ; Janet Hunter, Assistant. Next 
election, April 1891. 

PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

Lending Department open daily from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m., except Wednesday, 9 a.m. to 
3 P-m. 

Coniniittee from Council. — Provost Doig, Bailie Ferguson, Bailie Anderson, Messrs 
Fenton, Milne, Falconer, Ewen, MacDougall, Craik, and Whyte. From Householders.- — 
Jas. Brodie, teacher ; David Christie, shoemaker ; Wm. Falknor, commission agent ; Alex. 
PYeeman, solicitor; John Knox, teacher ; James Moffat, manufacturer; Geo. S. Nicolson, 
editor ; Rev. G. J. Caie, clergyman ; P. A. Goode, West-End Reading Room ; Rev. P. S. 
Wright, clergyman. 

FORFAR INFIRMARY. 

Patron, The Right Hon. The Earl of Strathmore ; President, Gilbert Don, manufacturer ; 
Vice-President, John Birrell Don, manufacturer. Medical Attendants — Drs M'Lagan- 
Wedderburn, Alexander, and Murray. David Steele, Treasurer ; James Taylor, Secre- 
tary. Miss E. Tod, matron. 

NATIONAL SECURITY SAVINGS BANK. 

Established 1853. Office, 9 West High Street. Open on Monday from 9 a.m. to 12 
noon ; Friday, 6 to 8 p.m. ; and on Saturday from 10 to 12 noon. Receives deposits of 
one shilling and upwards. Total sum clue to depositors at 20th Nov. 1887, ^32,681 11s 
lod. Robert Bruce, Treasurer ; J. A. MacLean, Actuary and Cashier ; J. Lawrie, 
Accountant. 

BANK OFFICES. 

Bank of Scotland — Robert Whyte & D. Binny, Joint Agents ; L. R. Falconer, Accountant. 
British Linen Company's Bank ... William Gordon, Agent ; Andrew Binnie, Accountant. 
Commercial Bank ... ... Robert Bruce, Agent ; S. M'Lees, Accountant. 

National Bank ... ... ... T. Henderson, Agent ; J. Sim, Accountant. 

Royal Bank ... ... ... David Steele, Agent ; J. Campbell, Accountant. 

Union Bank ... ... ... J. A. MacLean, Agent; J. Lawrie, Accountant. 



66 FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS. 

r, 1 A ^ f James Brodie, Rector and I^Iathematical Master. Geo. Younger, 

Burgn Academy -^^ Classical Master. J. Hopkins, English Master. 

Public School ... ... ... ... ... .. John Knox. 

East Burgh School ... ... ... ... Thomas Mackie. 

West Burgh School ... .. ... ... John T. Cobb. 

North Burgh School ... ... ... ... ... John Smith. 

Wellbraehead School ... ... ... ... Miss Campbeh. 

Ladies' Seminary ... ... ... Misses Smith, Academy Street. 

Teacher of Drawing ... ... ... J. Grigor. 

Teacher of Music ... ... ... John Kerr. 



FORFAR EDUCATIONAL TRUST, Capital Fund about £6000. 

Governors. 

From the Toivii Council. — Provost Doig and Councillor Ewen. From Burgh School 
Board. — James W. Adamson, John Laird, jr., and D. M. Graham. From Landioard 
School Board. — Patrick Webster of Westfield. Member appointed by She riff- -'RobexX. 
Whyte, Procurator-Fiscal. James Taylor, Town-Clerk, Secretary. 

Objects of the Trust : — (i) To apply income derived from capital fund (^204) of Milne's 
Bequest, in paying school fees, with books and stationery, of children of persons born 
before date of Scheme, who would have had a right to such payment under the trust dis- 
position of David Milne. (2) To expend a sum not exceeding £j^o on free Scholarships 
for children who have passed in the Third or higher Standards, whose parents or guardians, 
not being in receipt of parochial relief, are in such circumstances as to require aid in pro- 
\iding elementary education. (3) To assist in maintaining Science and Art Classes, or 
paying the fees of pupils requiring" aid for obtaining such instruction. (4) To establish 
bursaries of between ^5 and _^io for pupils who have passed the Fifth Standard, and 
exempted from obligation to attend school, and whose parents or guardians are in such 
circumstances as to require aid for giving them higher education. (5) To establish bursaries 
for higher education of the yearly yaX\\& of between ^'10 and ^15 for pupils attending Forfar 
Academy, and whose parents or guardians require aid for giving them higher education. 

CHURCHES. 

Parish ... ... Rev. G. J. Caie. I United Presbyterian ... Rev. P. Wright. 

St. James' Parish ... Rev. J. Weir. | St. John's Episcopal Rev. J. M. Aldridge. 

First Free, ... ... Rev. A. Gumming. I Congregational Rev. D. L. M'Corkindale. 

East Free, ... ... Rev. G. M. Philps. | Baptist ... 

SESSION CLERKS. 

Forfar Parish — John Knox, Public School, St. James' Road. 
St. James' Parish — W. Hebington, Green Street. 

HALLS. 

Reid Hall accommodates 1400!^ -ts' i » u n i ^ ... 

■\\T ,. -c 1 Tj J Tj 11 -G. vvebster, Hall-keeper. 

West End Reid Hall ,, 200 J ^ 

Masonic Hall 



Drill Hall 

Town Hall 

St. John's Church Hall 

Osnaburgh Street Hall 

St. James' Hall 



o — J. Milne, do. 

1000 — W. Niddrie, do. 

200 — Mrs Stewart, do. 

400 — John Longmuir, do. 
400 — Alex. Robertson, Proprietor. 
300 — John Milne, Backwynd, Hall-keeper. 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 67 



VOLUNTEERS. 

./ and B Coinpaiiies Aiii^iis Rijles.---l^\'A]ox-zom.\\\Wi\<X\\\g, Alex. MacHardy ; Captains— 
Gcor<-^c Younger and John A. MacLean ; Lieutenant — William Findlay. Surgeons 
— Dr\lurray (Battalion) ; Dr Alexander (Detachment). Drill Instructor— Sergeant John 
Blyth. Drill Hall and Armoury— New Road. 

READING ROOMS. 

Young Men's Christian Association Reading Room.— No. 35 Castle Street. Open 
from 8 a.m. till 10 p.m. Annual subscription, 6s ; apprentices, 3s. 

Chess Club meets on Thursday evenings at 6 o'clock in above rooms. W. J. Abel, 
Secretary. 

West End Reading Room.— Dundee Loan.- Sheriff Robertson, Patron ; Peter A. 
Goode, President ; David Simpson, Vice-President ; William Littlejohn, Secretary. Open 
daily, 9 a.m. till 10 p.m. 

West End Reading Room Saving Society.— Open every Saturday from 5 to 6 p.m. 
Secretary, James A. Goode ; Treasurer, Peter xA. Goode. 

East End Reading Room.— East Port. Sheriff Robertson, Patron ; Henry Rae, Presi- 
dent. Open daily from 9 a.m. till 10 p.m. 

MUSICAL SOCIETIES. 

Forfar Choral Union. — Robert Whyte, President; Samuel J. M'Lees, Hon. 
Secretary and Hon. Treasurer. Committee — Alex. P'reeman, W. Melvin, A. B. Wyllie, 
John Marshall, and A. H. Whitson. C. J. Smith, Conductor. Meets in the Academy on 
Wednesday evenings at 8-15. 

Forfar Tonic Sol-Fa Certificated Choir.— President, D. M. Stewart ; Secretary, J. 
C. Falconer, 23 Castle Street ; Treasurer, D. C. Forsyth. Committee — Messrs Leuchars, 
Shepherd, and Wilson. John Kerr, A. C. , Conductor. Session — September to March. 
Meets in Small Reid Hall, Monday evenings, at 8-15. 

Forfar Amateur Musical Society.— J. Mann, President ; David AP Hardy, 43 North 
Street, Secretary and Treasurer. Committee — A. Duncan, George Watt, Andrew Meldrum, 
C. Young, Conductor. Meets every Wednesday in the Wellbraehead School, at 8 p.m. 

RELIGIOUS SOCIETIES. 

Young Men's Christian Association.— Hon. President, Sheriff Robertson ; President, 
Dr Cable; Vice-President, William Jarvis. Directors — Messrs Wishart, Thomson, Heath, 
Roberts, Spalding, and Falconer. Secretary, Wm. J. Abel, Bank of Scotland ; Treasurer, 
John Anderson, Cross. Evangelistic Meetings at Kingsmuir on Sabbath evenings, and in 
First Free Mission Hall on Wednesday evenings. Sabbath morning Fellowship meeting 
in Rooms, 35 Castle Street, on Sabbath mornings at 10 o'clock. 

Young Women's Christian Association.— Office-Bearers— President, Miss Milne ; 
Vice-President, Miss Roberts ; Secretary, Miss Bradbear. Committee— Misses Marshall 
and Brown. Meets in St. James' Hall every Saturday evening at 6-45, and on Sabbath 
mornings at 10 o'clock. 

Salvation Army. — Meetings are held in Masonic Hall, Castle Street, every evening. 

FORFAR TRACT SOCIETY. 

JohnOrmond, President; D. Steele, Vice-President and Treasurer ; Rev. P. S. Wright, 
Secretary. 60 distributors. Monthly circulation, 3100 Tracts. 



68 FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



BURGH CONSERVATIVE ASSOCIATION. 

John Lowson, jun., Beechhill, Hon. President; J. F. Craik, President; G. Lowsonand J. 
W. Adamson, Vice-Presidents ; A. B. Wyllie, solicitor, Secretary ; R. Bruce, bank agent, 
Treasurer. Committee — Messrs J. Brodie, John P. Anderson, G. Donald, W. Michie, J. 
Kewans, D. M'Intosh, D. Christie, A. Murdoch, J. Low, and W. Stewart. 

FORFAR LITERARY SOCIETY. 

Honorary President, Sheriff Robertson ; President, Geo. S. Nicolson ; Vice-President, 
Lalce R. Falconer ; Secretary and Treasurer, A. Hay, solicitor, 20 East High Street. 
Members of Committee — Messrs Roy, Campbell, Forsyth, and Hood. Meets weekly in 
the Academy on Friday evenings at 8-15. 

FORFAR AUXILIARY TO THE NATIONAL BIBLE SOCIETY OF 

SCOTLAND. 

Sheriff Robertson, President ; Robert Bruce, Secretary and Treasurer. Committee 
of Management — The ministers of the town ; and Messrs A. W. Myles, John Laird, jun., 
Alex. Freeman, and W. Sturrock. 

FORFARSHIRE MISSION TO THE BLIND. 

Organised to care for the blind, specially teaching them to read at their homes, and lend- 
ing them books (free), of which there are fully 1000 in the Library. On the Roll there are 
143 blind persons, 50 of whom can read. 

Annual Meeting, beginning of September, in Town Hall, Forfar. President, The Earl 
of Strathmore ; Secretary and Treasurer, David Steele, to whom subscriptions may 
be sent. Mr Edwards, Missionary, to whom names of blind persons may be sent ; as 
also orders for work, such as knitting, pianoforte tuning, net cash bags, &c. 

CHURCH SOCIETIES, &c. 

Forfar Parish Church. — Service at 11 a.m. and 2-15 p.m. Sunday School meets at 
3-30 — Superintendents, John Smith and A. D. Strachan ; Secretary and Treasurer, 
S. M'Lees. The Kirk-Session meets on the first Wednesday of each month at 8 p.m. 
The Ladies' Clothing Society meets during winter on M'ednesdays at 2-30. The Young 
Women's Bible Class meets at the close of afternoon service in the Session-Room. The 
Band of Hope meets occasionally during winter. 

St. James' Parish Church.— Sunday School at 3-40 p.m.— John Monteith, Super- 
intendent. Minister's Bible Class for Young Men and Women, 4-40 p.m., every Sabbath, 
in St. James' Hall. Children's Service in Church on afternoon of first Sabbath of March, 
June, October, and December. Clothing Society meets every Wednesday during the 
winter months. 

First Free Church. — Bible Class on Sabbath e\ening at 7 o'clock. Church Tem- 
perance Society — Rev. Alexander Cunmiing, President ; Charles Wood, Vice-President ; 
Miss Nicol, Seci^etary ; Walter Pigott, Treasurer. Meets in Hall on the first Wednesday 
of each month at 8 p.m. Clothing Society, conducted by Ladies of the Congregation, 
meets on Thursdays during November and December. Tract Society- — Rev. Alexander 
Gumming, President ; John Anderson, Treasurer. Distributes Tracts fortnightly. Sabbath 
Schools — Congregational at 3-45 p.m. in Hall — Charles Hill, Superintendent. In West 
Burgh School-room at 4 o'clock — J. Lowson, Superintendent. In West End Mission Hall 
—Mr Nicoll, Superintendent. West End Mission Hall, Dundee Loan— Service on Sun- 
day evenings at 7 o'clock. Children's Service in West End Mission Hall every Sabbath 
forenoon. 

East Free Church.— Congregational Sabbath School meets at half-past 3— Superin- 
tendent, Rev. G. M. Philps. The Minister's Bible Class meets on Sabbath evenings at 
6-30. Lunanhead Sabbath School— Mr Wishart , Superintendent— meets at 5 p. m. Evening 
Service at Lunanhead— Mr Wishart, Convener— at 6-30. Evening Service in Canmore 
Lane at 6-30 — Convener, A. Hutchison. The Guild Educational Class meets on'' Mon- 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 69 



day evenings at 8. The Industrial Class — Mrs Christie, Superintendent — at 7 o'clock on 
the Monday evenings of the winter months. The Congregational Prayer Meeting at 8 p.m. 
on Tuesdays. Sabbath School Library at 6-45 p.m., and Children's Choir at 7-15 p.m. on 
Thursdays. Backwynd Meeting — Mr M'Laren, Convener — every second Monday at 8 p.m. 

United Presbyterian Church. — Missionary Association— -Contributions gathered 
monthly by ladv collectors. Bible Class and Sabbath School meet on Sabbath' afternoon 
at the close of the service. Weekly Meeting on Tuesday evenings in Session House at 8. 

St. John's Episcopal Church. — Sunday School at 2-45 ]3.m. in the Church Hall. 
Children's Service in the Church at 3 p.m., the last Sunday in each month. Church Visitors' 
Meeting at the Parsonage at 3 p.m., the first Monday in each month. Young A4en's 
Guild every Monday, from October to Easter, at 8 p.m. Young Women's Guild every 
Thursday, from October to Easter, at 7-30 p.m. The meetings are held in the Guild Hall. 
There is a Reading-Room and Recreation Hall in connection with the Young Men's Guild, 
open every evening from 6-30 to 9-30 ; and on Saturdays from 3 to 9-30. The public are 
admitted to the Recreation Hall, which is fitted up with a complete gynuiasium, on the 
payment of id each evening. Mothers' Meeting every Monday evening in the Vestry at 7 
o'clock. 

FORFAR CHILDREN'S CHURCH. 

William Arthur, Balgavies, and L. R. Falconer, Joint Pres. ; William Jarvis, Castle 
Street, Vice-President ; W. Cargill, Canmore Park, Treasurer ; John Chaplin, i Little 
Causeway, Secretary. Office-Bearers — George Jarvis, Superintendent of Boys ; Miss 
Hutchison, St. James' Road, Superintendent of Girls. P. T. Shepherd, Leader of Praise ; 
Miss Janet Pullar, Harmoniumist. Service e\'ery Sabbath forenoon at 11 o'clock in the 
Masonic Hall. 

GOOD TEMPLAR LODGES. 

"The Dawn of Peace" Lodge, No. 507.— Alex. Ritchie, C.T. ; George Strachan, 
Lodge Deputy ; Wm. Fenton, Secretary, Yeaman Street. Meets in St. James' Hall every 
Thursday evening at 8 o'clock. 

"The Forfar" Lodge, No. 717.— Alex. Meek, C.'i'. ; George Donald, L.D. ; Andrew 
Peffers, CanmoreStieet, Secretary. Meets in St. James' Hall every Monday evening at 8-15. 

" Free Caledonia " Lodge St. Andrews Order of Reformed Templars. — Andrew 
Shepherd, West High Street, Senior Trustee ; Peter R. Stirling, 11 South Street, Secretary. 
Meets in St. James' Hall on Wednesday evenings at 8 o'clock. 

" Excelsior " Lodge, No. 83, St. Andrews Order of Reformed Templars.— Andrew 
Whyte, Senior Trustee; D. Proctor, W. M. ; Thomas Elder, 41 Backwynd, Secretary. 
Meets in Small Drill Hall on Thursday evenings at 8 o'clock. 

MURPHY GOSPEL TEMPERANCE SOCIETY. 

President, T. Roy ; Vice-President, Andrew Shepherd ; Treasurer, George Maxwell ; 
Secretary, John Ewart, Archie's Park. Managed by a Committee. Meets in St. James 
Hall on Tuesday evenings at 8 p.m. 

BRITISH WOMEN'S TEMPERANCE ASSOCIATION. 

Mrs Gumming, President ; Mrs Law and Mrs John Craik, Vice-Presidents ; Miss E. 
Myles, Treasurer ; Mrs R. F. Myles and Miss Thomson, Secretaries. Se\ving Class on 
Wednesday evenings of winter months in First Free Chuich Hall at 7 o'clock. Open to all 
women and girls. 

EDINBURGH ANGUS CLUB. 

The Right Hon. The Earl of Strathmore, Lord-Lieutenant of Forfarshire, Patron ; 
George H. M. Thorns of Aberlemno, Sheriff of Orkney, &c. , President ; The Right Hon. 
The Earls of Southesk, Dalhousie, Camperdown, Kintore, Home, and Airlie, Vice-Presi- 
dents ; Thomas Shaw MacLaren, W.S. , 11 Hill Street, Edinburgh, Secretary ; Robert 
Bruce, Commeixial Bank, Forfar, Local Secretary. 



yo FORFAR DIRECTORY. ,i 



POULTRY, PIGEON, AND CANARY ASSOCIATION. 

David Duncan, Bell Place, President ; George Maxwell, Kirkton, Vice-President ; James] 
Fyfe, St. James' Road, Secretary. Committee- -John NicoU, George Cable, Alex. Dalgety, 
James Morrison, James Cowie, Wm. J)onald, John Clark, Wm. A. Gibson, Wm. Harris, 
David Rae, J. Stirling, J. Samson, A. Laird, A. Stewart, R. MacLeod. 

CHICKEN SHOW. 

Secretary, George Maxwell, Kirkton. Annual Show in September or October. 

BEEKEEPERS' SOCIETY. 

President, Andrew L. Fenton, Lilyfield, Yeaman Street ; Vice-President, A. Patullo, 
South Street ; Treasurer, James Binny, Glamis Road ; Secretary, James Saddler, 35 East 
High Street. Committee — William Neave, Honey Cottage, Dundee Road ; William Black, 
South Street ; David Moir, 12 New Road ; Andrew Sturrock, Hillend of Lownie ; David 
Ramsay, North Street. Exhibition of Bees, Honey, and Hives held in Forfar annually. 

FORFAR PLATE GLASS MUTUAL INSURANCE ASSOCIATION. 

Committee of Management — Messrs D. P. Booth (Chairman), John Meh'in, William 
Warden, Robert Gray, James Stuart. Messrs James D. Boyle and James Spark, Auditors, 
W. H. Thomson, Secretary ; William Dowell, Valuator. The operations of the Society 
are strictly confined to Forfar. The annual general meeting is held on the third Tuesday 
of April each year. 

THE FORFAR NORTHERN SAVING ASSOCIATION (Limited). 

David Ramsay, 80 North Street, President ; James Easton, 123 Castle Street, 
Secretary ; David M. Stewart, 117 Castle Street, Treasurer. Committee — Adam Bowman, 
94 North Street ; John Welsh, 13 Canmore Street ; Peter Langlands. 5 Victoria Street ; 
David Aikenhead, 20 Victoria Street ; James Brown, John Street. Conniiittee meets at 
7-30 p.m. on Monday evenings in Rooms, in Castle Street. 

EAST-PORT SAVING ASSOCIATION, Limited.— Founded 1829. 

William joiner, Salesman; James Findlay, President ; William MacLaggan, Secretary; 
John L. Fenton, Treasurer. Place of Business — 131 and 133 East High Street. 

WEST TOWN-END SOCIETY (Limited). 

James Ireland, Chairman ; John Ireland, Secretary ; James Herald, Treasurer. Com- 
mittee — William Keay, Robert Smith, David Christie, Graham Gibson, George Donaldson. 
Meets on Monday evenings at 8 o'clock in Committee Rooms, 118 West High Street. 

FREE TRADE SAVING SOCIETY (Limited). 

Andrew Hunter, President ; Thomas Stirling, Secretary ; David Robertson, Treasurer 
and Manager. Committee — James Cable, George Maxwell, and Alex. Rae. Meets every 
Monday evening at 151 East High Street, at 7-30. 

WEST PORT SAVING SOCIETY, Limited.- (Established 1838). 

Peter A. Goode, St. James' Road, President; William Wyllie, 2 West Sunnyside, Secre- 
tary ; Joseph Massie. Dundee Loan, Treasurer ; William T. Brown, Salesman. Committee 
— Janies Samson, Dundee Road ; Charles Kinnear, New Road ; Alexander Strachan, 
Lour Road ; Alexander MacDonald, Little Causeway ; Alexander Mason, New Road. 
Meets on Monday evenings at half-past Seven in Society Rooms. 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 7 I 



FORFAR CO-OPERATIVE COAL SOCIETY (Limited). 

Alexander Stnichan, I'resiclent ; James Herald, \'iee-President ; Andrew Lees, Seeretary ; 
James M'Intosh, Treasurer. Committee — William Duncan, David Henderson, James 
lidward, Henry Rae, Robert Langlands. Collectors — James Binny, lo Glamis Road ; 
William Milne, 9 Manor Street ; Roljert Simpson, 22 Manor Street ; Charles Alexander, 
130 East High Street. Auditors — David M. Stewart and Dickson Fraser. Membership 
at 30th September, 1888, 1027. Sales, past twelve months, 3985 tons. Meets every Tues- 
day at 7-30 p.m. in office, Glamis Road. 

VICTORIA COAL SOCIETY (Limited). 

James Paton, President ; Joseph Massie, Vice-President ; Thomas Stirling, Secretary ; 
Adam Bowman, Treasurer. Committee — David Gracie, William Clark, David Aikenhead, 
George Hogg, and William Bowman. Collectors — Robert Lamb. South Street ; James 
Allan, South Street ; James Smith, Dundee Loan. Meets every Tuesday evening at 7-30 
in Society's Office. Kirkton. 

FORFAR MALE AND FEMALE YEARLY SOCIETY. 

Charles Aikenhead, President ; Alex. Strachan, Vice-President ; Charles Wood, Secre- 
tary for Males ; James Todd, Secretary for Females ; And. Stewart, Treasurer for Males ; 
Wm. Thom, Treasurer for Females. Committee — John Byars, West High Street ; Alex. 
Shepherd, Dundee Loan ; William Byars, Dundee Road ; W. Massie, St. James' Road ; 
Alex. vStrachan, Lour Road ; Robert Milne, Charles Street ; William Smith, Backwynd ; 
John Tyrie, Market Place ; Charles zAikenhead, Archie's Park ; David P'orbes, New Road; 
"Charles Wood, 51^ West High Street, Secretary of Committee. Auditors — Andrew Lees 
and David Gellatly. Arbitrators — Gumming Jamieson, James Dargie, William Lowson, 
factory manager. Meets in West Burgh School-room every Saturday evening from 6 to 
half-past 7 o'clock. Thirty-seventh year of above-mentioned Society. 

EAST END MALE AND FEMALE YEARLY SOCIETY. 

Douglas Allan, President ; Alexander Soutar, Vice-President ; James Brown, 17 John 
Street, Secretary ; John L. P'enton, Yeaman vStreet, Treasurer. Committee — David Gracie, 
Alex. Soutar, William Clark, James Ross, Douglas Allan, and Alexander Hill. Meets on 
Saturday evenings from 6-30 to 8 in East Burgh School. 

MONTROSE ROAD YEARLY SOCIETY. 

Andrew Whyte, President ; Robert Craig, Vice-President ; James Paton, Treasurer ; 
Andrew L. Fenton, Secretary. Committee — William Clark, George Rough, Alex. Flill, 
sen. , and Archibald Thornton. 

CASTLE STREET MALE AND FEMALE YEARLY SOCIETY. 

John Findlay, 36 John Street, President ; John Easton, Wellbraehead, Vice-President ; 
Dickson Fraser, Secretary ; Janjes Easton, Treasm"er. Connnittee — James Moffat, 10 
Lour Road ; John Welsh, Canmore Street ; Wm. Langlands, 5 Victoria Street ; Robert 
Langlands, 19 Canmore Street. Meets from half-past 6 to half-past 7 o'clock on Saturday 
evenings in the North Burgh School — North Division. 

NORTH-END MALE AND FEMALE YEARLY SOCIETY. 

D. Aikenhead, 20 Victoria Street, President ; Alexander Brown, 32 Manor Street, Vice- 
President ; Alexander Hastings, Victoria Street", Secretary ; David M. Stewart, Tanworks, 
Treasurer. Auditors— Thomas Petrie, Castle Street ; William Grant, Castle Street. 
Committee — George Winter, 21 Victoria Street ; John Donald, 13 Wellbraehead ; David 



72 FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



Peacock, 169 East High Street ; Wm. Morrison, 82 West Higli Street. Meets in North 
Burgli School-Room, South Division, on Saturday evenings from 6 to half-past 7, Hours 
for payment of Sick and Funeral Money — from 9 to 9-30 a.m. ; 2 to 2-30 p.m. ; and 7 to 
7-30 p.m. 

UNITED MALE AND FEMALE YEARLY SOCIETY. 

Peter A. Goode, St. James' Road, President ; Alexander Rae, 167 East High Street, 
Vice-President; William Wyllie, 2 Western Sunnyside,' Secretary for Males; Andrew P. 
Boath, Sunnyside, Secretary for Females ; John Ireland, 5 Archie's Park, Treasurer for 
Males ; James Fyfe, St. James' Road, Treasurer for Females. Committee — David Black, 
West High Street ; William Clark, Glamis Road ; George Donaldson, Sunnyside ; Peter 
Rattray, South Street ; John Small, 9 St. James' Road ; Adam Bowman, 94 S^orth Street ; 
William Brown, CanmoreLane. Meets at No. 2 Vennel every Saturday from 6 to 7-30. 

LOYAL ORDER OF ANCIENT SHEPHERDS (A.U.)— BURNSIDE LODGE, 

No. 2046. 

Alex. Patterson, W.M. ; James Mackintosh, P.M. ; Joseph Spalding, D.M. Committee 
— Wm. Saddler, M.S. and C.S. ; Wm. Young, M. ; D. Irons, I.G. ; G. Masterton, O.G.; 
Visiting Steward, Henry Adams ; Treasurer, Wm. Duncan ; Secretary, Alex. Esplin, 31 
John Street. All information of the Order can be had from the above Office-Bearers. 
Meets in Masonic Hall Buildings, Castle Street, every alternate Thursday. 

ANCIENT ORDER OF FORESTERS— Court " Beech Hill," No. 6540. 

John Lowson, jr.. Patron; David C. Lindsay, Chief Ranger; William Cook, 
Sub-Chief Ranger ; William M'Nab, 98 Dundee Loan, Secretary ; Henry Rae, Treasurer. 
Meets every alternate Monday at 8 o'clock, in Masons' Arms Hall, 105 East High Street. 

MASONIC LODGES. 

Kilwinning Lodge. No. 90. , R.W.M. ; W. L. M' Lean, Treasurer. Meets 

in Robertson's Hall, Osnaburgh Street. 

Lour Lodge, No. 309. — Henry Rae, R.W.M. ; John L. Fenton, Secretary; John A. 
Thomson, Treasurer. Meets in Lodge Room, Masonic Hall Buildings. 

THE ROYAL AIRLIE AND FORFAR LODGE OF ODDFELLOWS. 

WiUiam Clark, M.N.G. ; Alex. Irons, V.G. ; James Gordon, Treasurer ; James Brown, 
13 Canmore Street, Secretary. Committee — David Fairweather, Robert Paterson, Wm. 
Fairweather, David Bruce, James Livingston. 

CANMORE ANGLING CLUB. 

William Langkxnds, Victoria Street, President ; James Grewar, Charles Street. Vice- 
President ; David Maxwell, Watt Street, Secretary and Treasurer ; Alexander Stewart, 
Alljert Street, Captain. Committee — David Shepherd, Alexander Smith, David Masterton, 
Alexander MacDonald, John Smith. Annual Meeting on the first Saturday of February at 
8 o'clock, in the Eagle Inn, West High Street. 

BOWLING CLUBS. 

Forfar.— J. W. Ada,mson, President ; James Moffat, Vice-President ; Dr Alexander, 
Curator ; A. B. Wyllie, Hon. Secretary and Treasurer. Committee — Messrs Ex-Provost 
Whvte, Provost Doig, David Steele,' A. W. Myles, K. K. Skene, and office-bearers. 
Kenneth M'Kenzie, Greenkeeper. 

Canmore.— William Milne, President ; J. D. Lawrie, Vice-President ; James M'Beth, 
Curator ; D. Wighton, North Street, Secretary ; James Sim, Treasurer. 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 73 



Victoria. — President, Alex. Gordon ; Vice-President, Joseph Robb ; Secretary and 
Treasurer, William Peacock. Committee — George Donaldson, Charles Tyrie, Allan Smith, 
John M'Kay, Alex. Shepherd. Meets on first Thursday of every month in Club Room. 

STRATHMORE CRICKET CLUB. 

The Earl of Strathmore, Patron ; John Fyfe Craik, manufacturer. Manor Park, Presi- 
dent ; Andrew Binnie, Secretary and Treasurer. Committee — D. M'Laren, James Low, 
J. Duthie, and A. Donald. 

FORFAR CURLING CLUB. 

Patron, The Earl of Strathmore ; President, Sheriff Robertson ; Vice-President, James 
M'Lean ; Secretary, D. M. (Traham ; Treasurer, D. M. Stewart ; Representative Members, 
John Whyte and James Moffat. Committee of Management — Wm. Dowell, Wm. Milne, 
D. P. Booth, Robert Bruce, J. W. Adamson, K. K. Skene, John Knox. Pond Committee 
— D. M. Stewart, Wm. Waterston, Wm. Porter. Meeting on or about 25th September in 
the Reference Room of the Free Library. 

ANGUS CURLING ASSOCIATION. 

Patron, The Right Hon. The Earl of Strathmore; Patroness, TheCountess of Strathmore; 
President, Walter T. S. Fothringham of Fothringham ; Vice-President, Andrew Ralston, 
Glamis ; Secretary and Treasurer, D. M. Graham, Forfar. Committee — John Syme, 
Fothringham ; John Strachan, Forfar ; John B. Young, Glamis ; Robert Martin, Kirrie- 
muir ; John Black, Cortachy. Annual meeting on second Monday of September. 

ANGUS CYCLING CLUB. 

Hon. President, Sir Thomas Munro, Bart., of Lindertis ; President, James Duncan ; 
Captain, George H. Douglas ; Vice-Captain, Andrew Findlay ; Hon. Secretary and 
Treasurer, G. Fullerton, 30 Castle Street ; ist Bugler, Alexander Duncan ; 2nd Bugler, 
David StirHng. Committee — W. Duncan, D. Edmonds, J. Guthrie, J. Thomson, and J. 
Dickson. Meets in Robertson's Hall, Osnaburgh Street. Membership, 30. 

ATHLETIC FOOTBALL CLUB. 

Honorary President, J. W. Adamson ; President, Robert Hampton ; Vice-President, 
Oliver M'Pherson ; General Secretary, James Black ; Financial Secretary, David 
Christie ; Treasurer, John Fyfe. General Committee — Messrs J. D. Lawrie, J. Samson, 
C. Evans, and all the office-bearers. Captain ist eleven, George Donaldson ; Vice- 
Captain, James Dundas ; Match Secretary, James Black. Captain 2nd eleven, Charles 
Samson ; Vice-Captain, James Taylor. Match Committee — Messrs J. Samson, Fyfe, 
Lawrie, Binnie, Donaldson, C. Samson, Black, and the President. Ground — Station Park. 
Colours — Black and blue striped shirts, dark blue knickers. Membership, 100. Last 
season played 43 matches — won 26, lost 10, drew 7 ; scored 234 goals, lost 114 goals. 

FORFAR GOLF CLUB. 

John S. Whyte, President ; Harry Craik and A. W. Myles, Vice-Presidents ; James 
Brodie, Secretary and Treasurer ; Committee — Robert Crabb, Archibald Thomson, Alex. 
Spalding, K. K. Skene, Charles Burnett. Golf Course at Conninghill. Spring meeting, 
second Saturday in April ; Autumn meeting, third Saturday in October. Medal (Handi- 
capped) Competition on the ist Thursday and Saturday of each month. 

FORFAR HARRIERS. 

J. D. Lawrie, Union Bank, Hon. President ; Andrew Binnie, British Linen Com- 
pany's Bank, President ; Thomas Muckersie, Vice-President ; George R. Tyrie, Captain ; 
John A. Hastings, Vice-Captain ; George A. Home, Secretary and Treasurer. Commit- 
tee — James Thomson, John Killacky, George Fullerton, Da\'id Warden, John Laing, 
Charles C. Coutts, Thomas P. Neill, and Charles Gray. Membership 30. General meet- 
ings first Tuesday of every month at Strangers' Inn, Castle Street. 



74 FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



HOMING PIGEON CLUB. 

President, K. K. Skene ; Vice-President, Hugh Greenhill ; Secretary and Treasurer, 
James Lowson, Glamis Road, Committee — James Hebenton, James M'Beth, Alex. 
Robertson, George Douglas. 

LAWN TENNIS CLUB. 

President, A. B. Wyllie ; Secretary, Harry Craik, Hillpark ; Treasurer, J. S. Whyte, 
Castle Street. Comminee — R. F. Myles, C. Salmond, W. Lowson. 

QUOITING CLUBS. 

Albert. — President, David Fenton ; Vice-President, Robert Proctor ; Captain, Jolin 
Cowie ; Secretary, William Dundas, 34 South Street ; Treasurer, Charles Barry. Com- 
mittee — John Anderson, Robert Forbes, James Craik. 

West-End. — William Grewer, President ; George Towns, Vice-President ; Treasurer, 
Andrew Procter ; Financial Secretary, Robert Forbes ; Match Secretary, Edward Doig, 8 
Watt Street. Committee — James Robertson, David Reid, John Fyfe, John Hopton, 
Edward Doig. 

FORFAR FACTORY WORKERS' UNION. 

Established in October, 1885, as a Trade Protection Society. General meeting of mem- 
bers annually in October. Committee meets on first Friday of each month. President, 
Adam Farquharson, St. James' Road ; Secretary and Treasurer, Thomas Roy, 93 Back- 
wynd ; Collector, Robert Paterson, 10 Glamis Road. 

ASSOCIATED CARPENTERS AND JOINERS OF SCOTLAND. 

James Easson, 30 Green Street, President and Treasurer ; Alexander Burns, 18 New- 
monthill. Secretary. Meets e\ery alternate Friday at 8 o'clock at No. 2 Vennel. 

FORFAR BUILDING AND INVESTMENT SOCIETY. 

A. B. Wyllie, solicitor, Chairman ; George Strachan, Secretary. Directors — A. B. 
Wyllie, David Johnston, James M'Lean, R. D. Paton, David Milne, William Scott, Wm. 
Moffat, Andrew Oram, W. H. Thomson, Da\'id Rodger. Trustees — Robert Whyte, 
William Shepherd, David Steele. Robert Bruce, Auditor. Meets every alternate Saturday 
from 8 to 9 p.m, in No, 2 Vennel. 

SOCIETY FOR PREVENTION OF CRUELTY TO ANIMALS 
(Forfar Branch). 

President, John B. Don, manufacturer ; Vice-President, Dr M'lyagan-Wedderburn , 
Treasurer, David Steele, Royal Bank ; Joint Secretaries, J. A. MacLean and A. B. WVllie. 



HOLIDAYS IN FORFAR. 

NEW YEAR'S HOLIDAY— Tuesday, 1st January, 1889. 
ANNUAL HOLIDAYS— End of July. 
SPRING HOLIDAY— (Date not fixed.) 
AUTUMN HOLIDAY— ( do. ) 

SHOPKEEPERS' HALF-HOLIDAY— Thursday Afternnnn. 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 75 



COUNTY OF FORFAR. 



Area of the County', 890 square miles. Acreage, 569,840. 

Valuation (Lands, .. ... ... ... £.505,405 IG ) -^, n, , , 

for < Railways, 53,278 F^of i/r ir a 

1888-89. (Waterworks, 25,462 o) ti5M,14o lb 

I 

i Population in 1881 — 266,360. Parliamentary Eepresentative — James W. Barclay. 

Constituency — 11,340. 

Lord- Lieutenant — Earl of Strathmore. Clerk of Ijieutenancy — John Myles, solicitor, 

Forfar. 

Convener of County — Sir John Ogilvy, Bart. 

Sheriff— John Comrie Thoms'>n; Sheriff- Substitutes — Alexander Robertson (Forfar), 
and John Campbell Smith (Dundee). 

Hon. Sheriff-Substitutes — John Myles, James Taylor, A. MacHardy. 

County Procurator-Fiscal — Robert Whyte ; Assistant do., Alex. Freeman. 

Sheriff-Clerk and Commissary Clerk — Thomas Congleton. 
Depute do. do. — W. Y. Esplin. 

Auditor of Court — W. Y. Esplin. Collector of Taxes — James S. Gray. 

Clerk of the Peace — George Watt, Dundee ; Depute do. at Forfar — A. W. Myles. 

Commissioners of Supply meet on the fii'st Wednesday of May, and the first Tuesday 
after Michaelmas ; and Committees as occasion requires. 

Road Trustees meet on 29th September. 

Collector of County Rates — James S. Gra3^ 

Clerk of Supply, ) 

Clerk of County Police Committee, ... >A. W. Myles. 

Clerk to Local Authority, ... ... ) 

Treasurer to Local Authority — J. P. Anderson. 

Assessor under Valuation Act — R. S. Smith, Dundee. 

County and Foi'far l^istrict Roads Clerk and Treasurer,... ... I x t> \ i 

Forfar District Roads Collector, j '' • ^ • Anderson. 

County Auditor — A. B. Wyllie. Chief Constable— Robert Adamson. 

SHERIFF COURTS. 

Courts for Ordinary Court cases are held at Forfar on Thursdays weekly during 
Session at Eleven o'clock forenoon. Summer Session commences on the first Thursday 
of May, and ends on the last Thursday of July. Winter Session commences on the 

[first Thursday of October, and ends on the last Thursday of March. There is a recess 

'of not exceeding 15 davs at Christmas. 



76 



FORFAR DIRECTORY. 



Commissary business is disposed of on same days as Sheriff- Court. Small Debt and 
Debts Recovery Courts are held weekly on Thursday during Session at 12 o'clock noon. 

Small Debt Circuit Courts are held at Kirriemuir on the third Monday, at Brechin 
on the third Tuesday, and at Montrose on the third Friday of the months of January, 
March, May, July, September, and November. 



FORFARSHIRE FIARS PRICES, Crop 1887. 

Sti-uck at Forfar on j//? March, iSSS. 







Per 


Imperial Quarter. 


Per Old Boll. 


Wheat, 






... £1 7 10 


£0 14 3 


Barley, 






... 10 


14 11 


Chester Bere, 






... 17 6 


13 1 


Potato Oats, 






... 14 10 


11 1 


Common do., 






... 1.5 1 


11 3 


Peas and Beans, 






... 19 8 


1.5 2 


Rye, 






... 18 


9 2 


Oatmeal, per Bo 


11 of 140 Imperial Lbs., 




... 12 8 


12 7 



OFF TANTALLON CASTLE. 




LANDMARKS OF HISTORY. 



A.D. 

1066. The Battle of Hastings : Norman ConQucst. 

1080. Tower of London built. 

1086. The Domesday Survey completed. 

1096. The Crusades connneuced. 

1171. Ireland was invaded l>y Henry IT. 

1215. Kintr John granted Magna Charta. 

1265. The first Representative Pariiameiit. 

1278. The first Act of Parliament, 6 Edw. I. 

1282. Wales was conquered by Edward 1. 

1308. Mariners' Comj)ass discovered. 

1304. Edward I. reduced Scotland. 

1305. Walliice was captured and executed. 
1346 Battle of Crccy ; the French defeated. 
13-16, Cannon first used. 

1319. Order of the CTarter instituted. 

1:56. The French were defeated at Poictiers. 

)3u;j. Wickliffe began the Reformation. 

1S81. Wat Tyler's rebellion. 

138H. Battle of Otterburn (or Chevy Chase). 

1415. The Battle of Agincourt. 

I42y. Joan of Arc raised the siege of Orleans. 

1453. Constantinople was taken by the Turks. 

1455. The Wars of the Roses conimencrd. 

1461. The House of York came to the Throne. 

1462. The Bible was first printed at Metz. 
1471. Caxton set up liis printing-press. 

1471. Karl of Warwick was killed at Barnet. 

1472. Almanacks were first printed at Buda. 
1-185. Richard III. killed at Bosworth Field. 
1492. The discovery of America by Columbus. 
1509. Acts of Parliament first printed. 

1513. The Battle of Flodden : Scots defeated. 

1535. First English Bible (Covcrdale's). 

1.536. May 19, Anne Boleyn beheaded. 

1538. Parochial Registers first appointed. 

1539. Monasteries were dissolved. 
1.545. Council of Trent. 

1549. Common Prayer enacted. 

1552. Christ's Hospital founded. 

1556. Archbishop Cranmer was burnt. 

1558. Calais was taken from the English. 

15.58. Accession of Quern Elizabeth. 

1571. Royal Exchange first oiiened. 

1572. The .-,t. Bartholomew Massacre. 

1584. Sir Walter Raleigh discovered Virginia. 

1587. Mary Queen of Scots was beheaded. 

1588. The Spanish Armada was defeated. 
1588. Paper first made in England. 

1590. Telescopes invented. 

lOOO. The India Company first chartered. 

1C03. Crowns of England and Scotland united. 

16i'3. Plague in London ; died 56.570. 

1605. The Gunpowder Plot, 5th November. 

1607. Jamestov,-n, fii st English Settlement America. 

1609. The Independence of Holland. 

J 610. Jupiter's Satellites discovered. 

1611. New Translation of the Bible. 

1614. New River brought to London. 
1616. The Death of William Shakespeare. 
1625. Plague in London; died .■M,517. 

1610. The Long Parliament assembled. 

1641. The Star Chamber abolished. 

1642. The Battle of Edgehill. 
16-1.3. First Excise Duties. 

1615. Battle of Naseby ; the king defeated. 
164J. Charles I. was beheaded, .30th January. 
1653. Oliver Cromwell Lord Protector. 
1655. George Fox, first of the Quakers. 
1058. Oliver Cromwell died, September 3rd. 
1660. The Monarchy was restored. 

1662. The Royal Society instituted. 

1664. The Great Plague of London began. 

1666. Great Fire of London. 

1678. The Popish Plot discovered. 

1679. The Habeas Corpus Act was passed. 
1685. The Duke of Monmouth's r.'bellion. 
1685. Gazette first published, Novenaber 7th. 

1689. Parliament elected William and Mary. 

1690. Tiie Battle of the Boyne. 
169-4. Bank of Knglaud established. 
1701. Prussia was first made a kingdom. 
1704. Gibraltar was taken by the Kmrli; h. 

1707. Legislative Union of England with Si-otfand. 



A.D. 

1713. The Peace of Utrecht. 

1714. The Accession of the House of Hanover. 
1720, The South Sea Bu))ble. 

1745. The Scotch Kebellion. 

1752. Style and Calendar altered, September 2nd. 

17.55. Lisbon destroyed by an earthquake. 

1757. Cllve gained the Battle of Plassey. 

1772. The First Partition of Poland. 

1778. War against France. 

1779. Captain Cook was killed. 

1779. War against Spain. 

1780. " No Popery " riots. 

1782. Independence of tlie United States. 

1788. The First Settlement in Australia. 

1792. Prance a Republic. 

1793. Louis XIV. of France was executed. 

1797. Battle of Cape St. Vincent. 

1798. Battle of the Nile. 
1798. The Irish Rebellion. 

1801. The Union of Great Britain and Ireland. 

1801. Copenhagen taken by Nelson. 

1804. Bonaparte made Emperor of French. 

1805. Battle of Trafalgar ; death of Nelson. 
1812. The French Expedition to Ru.-sia. 
1815. The Battle of Waterloo : 18th June. 
1820. The Trial of Queen Caroline. 

1824. The first Burmese War cojiimenced. 

1827. The B.ittle of Navarino. 

1S28. Repeal of Test and Corporation Act. 

1829. Omnibuses first ran in London. 

1829. The lloman Catholic Relief Bill. 

1830. Liverpool and Manchester Railway opened. 

1830. Revolution in France : Charles X. expelled. 

1831. Leopold, King of the Belgians. 

1832. The first Reform Act passed, 7th June. 

1833. Slavery was abolished by Parliament. 

1834. English Poor Law Amendment Act. 
1834. Duty on Almanacks repealed. 

18,"4. Lucifer matches came into use. 

1S34. The Houses of Parliament were burnt. 

18.37. Accession of Queen Victoria, 20th June. 

1838. Great Western steamed to New York. 

1838. Electric Telegraph first constructed. 

1838. Royal lOxchange burned. 

1838. Queen Victoria crowned. 

1839. The first War with China. 

1840. The Marriage of Queen Victoria. 

1840. Penny Postage commenced, 10th Janunry. 

1841. Birth of the Prince of Wales, 9th Novenin r. 

1842. The Imposition of the Income Tax. 
1846. Repeal of the Corn Laws. 26th June. 

1848. French Revolution: Louis Philippe expel h d. 

1848. The Chartist assemblage, 10th April. 

1849. Died of Cholera in London 14,137. 
185:». Sir Robert Peel died, July 2nd. 

1851. The first International Exhibition. 

1852. Louis Napoleon, Emperor of French. 
1852. The Duke of Wellington died. 

185.5. The Capture of Sebastopol. 

1857. The Indian Mutiny broke out. 

1860. Garibaldi's entry into Naples. 

1861. Battle of Bull Run, America, 21st July. 
1861. The Death of the Prince Consort. 

1802. The Second International Exhibition. 
1864. War between Germany and Denuuirk. 

1866. The Battle of Sadowa, 3rd July. 

1867. The Abyssinian War, cost £10,000,000. 
1870. The Capitulation at Sedan. 

1870. Rome again made the Capital of Ital.v. 

1871. The Irish Church was Disestaldished. 
1871. The German Empire was re-established. 
1877. The Russo-Turkish War began. 

1877. The Queen proclaimed Empress of India. 

1878. Afghanistan again occupied. 
1878. Cyprus taken possession of. 

1880. The Second Gladstonian Administration. 

1881. Lord Beaconsfield died. 

1882. Afghan War ended. 

1882. British occupntion of Egypt. 

1886. Opening of the Colonial Exhibition. 

1887. Jubilee of Queen Victoria. 

1888. Death of Emperors William and Frederick 

of Germany. 



HE LIVES "WELL THAT LIVES IN PEACH. 



ANECDOTES OF BYGONE TIMES. 



It was Count Charles de Morny's practice, when- 
ever be dined at a table d'hote, to instruct his valet 
to come in and sit down with the company, place 
himself at the liottom or top of the table, treat his 
master as a perfect stranger, and help him to the 
best of everything ! 

Dr. Kitchen, Bishop of Llandaff, from an idle 
abliot under Henry VIII. was made a busy bishop ; 
Protestant under Edward, he returned to his old 
master under Mary; and at last took the oath of 
supremacy under Elizabeth, and finished as a par- 
liament Protestant. A pun spread the odium of 
his name ; for they said that he had always loved 
the Kitchen better than the Church. 

The most honourable kiss, both to the giver and 
receiver, ever recorded, was that which Queen Mar- 
garet of Prance, m the presence of the whole Court, 
impressed upon the lips of the ugliest nuui in the 
kingdom, Alain Chartier, whom she one day found 
asleep, exclaiming to her astonished attendants, "t 
do not kiss the man, but the mouth that has uttered 
so many charming things." It was worth while to 
be a poet in those days. 

When Junius Brutus and the sons of Tarquin 
asked the Delphic oracle who was to succeed Super- 
bus on the throne of Rome, they received for an- 
swer: "He who shall first kiss his mother." While 
the two Princes hastened home to fulfil what they 
thought was indicated, Brutus fell to the earth, and 
exclaimed, " Thus kiss I thee, oh earth! the great 
mother of us all ! " 

James THE Second, who so seldom said a good 
thing, one day said a very ill-bred one. He declared, 
in the midst of his courtiers, that "he had never 
known a modest man make his way at Court." To 
this observation one of the gentlemen present boldly 
replied, " And, please your majesty, whose fault is 
that?" The King was struck, and remained silent. 

The favourite studies and amusements of the 
learned La Mothe le Vayer consisted In accounts 
of the most distant countries. He gave a strik- 
ing proof of the influence of this master-passion, 
when death hung upon his lips. Bernier, the cele- 
brated traveller, entering and drawing the cur- 
tains of his bed to take his eternal farewell, the 
dying man turning to him, with a faint voice in- 
quired, "Well, my friend, what news from the Great 
Mogul?" 

Charles the Second laid it down as a rule, that 
in his convivial parties the Khig was alivayft absent. 
Being one night in a select party of this kind, one of 
his courtiers, who had contributed a good deal to 
his mirth, ventured to ask him for a place. Charles, 
though he liked the man as a companion, was yet 
unwilling to break through a fixed rule; and he 
therefore quickly replied, "You may depend on it, 
I will speak to the King to-morrow about it." 

Some soldiers once fell upon a watchm.'in in a 
small town in Ireland, in a lonely street, and took 
away his money and coat. He immediately repaired 
to the captain of the regiment, to complain of his 
misfortune. The captain asked him whether he 
had on the v.'aistcoat he then wcn'e when he was 
robbed by the soldiers. " Yes, sir," replied the poor 
fellow. "Then, my friend," rejoined the captain, 
" I can assure you they do not belong to m/'com- 
pnny, otherwise they would have left you neither 
waistcoat nor shirt I " 

Frederic THEGREAThadflvclibraries, all exactly 
alike, and containing the same books, ranged in the 
same order: one at Potsdam, a second at Sans Souci, 
a third at Berlin, a fourth at Charlottenburg, and a 
fifth at Breslau. On removing to any of these places, 
he had only to make a note of the page at which he 
had left off, to pursue his studies without interrup- 
tion on his arrival. Accordingly, ho always bought 
five copies of all books which he wished to possess. 



A MUSICIAN complaining that the tyrant Diony- 
sius gave him nothing, after promising him much, 
for the exercise of his art — " Youfool,weai'c quits,"' 
said the tyr.iut ; " you tickled my ears, and I did the 
very same by yours." 

Sylvester, the translator of "Du Bartas," Fcn- 
Hidered himself fortunate when he found in the 
name of his Sovereign the strongest bo:id of affec- 
tion to his service. In the dedication he iJi -js loyal 
changes on the name of his liege, James i:ituart ; iu 
which he finds a just master. 

It appears by an Act dated in 1510. that in those 
days the Bible was called Bibliotheca, that is, per 
emphasim, "The Lil)rary." The word library was 
limited in its signification then to the Biblical 
writings ; no other books, compared with the Huly 
Wi itings, appear to have been worthy to rank with 
them, or constitute what we call a library. 

Louis XII. one dav looA-ing at himself in his 
mirror, was astonished to icee a number of grey 
hairs on his head. "Ah!" said he, "these must 
be owing to the long speeches I have listened to ; 

and it is those of M. le in particular that have 

ruined my hair." 

A PEiisON, who had some small interest in the 
farming of the taxes, was one day pronouncing an 
eulogiumupon the financiers, maintaining that they 
alone were the support ot the State. " Yes," replied 
his antagonist, "as the rope supports the criminal 
—by hangiug him." 

The Constal)le Anne de Montmorency had a sin- 
gular species of devotion. He was accustomed to 
count his beads during the march of his army ; and 
as he fingered them, he would give orders, some- 
times to set a village on fire — sometimes to sur- 
prise a party, to massacre a garrison, or to hang a 
soldier. 

The Duke de Nivernoiswas intimately acquainted 
with the Countess de Ro(thfort, and never omitted 
going to see her a single evening. As she was a 
widow, and he a w;dower. one of his friends ob- 
served to him that it would be more convenient for 
him to marry the lady. " I have often thought so," 
replied the Duke, " but one thing prevents me : in 
that case, where could I pass my evenings ? " 

The Spaniards, who disliked Sixtus V., circulated 
a report that he had sold himself to the devil, on 
condition of his enjoying the l'<jpedom for six 
years. Afterwards, said they, it happened that a 
young man. aged nineteen, committed a murder in 
Rome, and his judges represented to the Pope that, 
though guilty, his execution ci>uld not take place, 
the law requiring twenty years of age before a 
capital puuishmeut could be inflicted. The I'ope, 
vexed at this disappointment of the ends of justice, 
answered, without thinking, "0,if that is all, I will 
lend him one of luine." At the end of five years, 
Sixtus fell sick; the devil appealed, and told him 
he came to carry him off. Sixtus told him his time 
was not come, as only five years out of the six al- 
lowed him had elapsed ; but the devil reminded hiiu 
of his promise on the execution of the young man, 
and immediately put an end to his life. 

VuEEN Elizabeth loved the Earl of Essex so 
well, that ill a lender moment she gave him 
a ring, telling him that if he ever slunild be 
guilty of undertaking anything against the State 
worthy of death, he had only to send to her that 
ring in order to ensure his pardon. Th.e Earl of 
Essex some time iifterwards fell in love with an- 
other lady, and finally revolted, and was condemned 
to death. In this last extremity he intrusted the 
rins,' to this lady to be conve.xed to Elizaljeth. As 
the lady knew the secret connected with the ring, 
she preferred keeping it, and allowing her lover to 
be beheaded, to running the risk of seeing him un- 
faithful. 



1889 JANUARY 31 days. 




FHL ilRsr lUrTER'i IN tN L\M 



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W 

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6 


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Neto Year's Day. 

Calcutta taken, 1757. 

■ Th'' flood of time is setting on, 
We stand upon its brink." 

Shelley. 

Charles the Bold killed, 1477. 

2nd Sunday aft. Christmas. 

Epiphany. — Twelfth Day. 

Prince Albert Vicior born, 1864. 
Napoleon III. died, 1873. 
Penny Postage commenced, 1840. 
Hilary Law Sittings begi7i. 
Earl of Iddesleigh died, 1887. 



13 

H 

15 
i6 

17 
i8 

L9 

20 

21 

22 

23 
24 

25 
26 



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27 

28 
29 
30 
31 



1st Sunday aft. Epiphany. 

SirThos. Lawrence, artist, died, 1^30. 

British Museum opened, 1759. 
"Learning by study must be won, 
' Twas ne'er entailed from son to son." 
Gay. 

Sir Samuel Garth, an excellent poet 
and physician, died, 1719. He wrote 
the satire called "The Dispensary." 



2nd S unday after Epiphany. 

Louis XVI. executed, 1793. 

St. Vincent's Day. 

Dnko of Edinburgh married, 1874, to 
the Grand Ducliess .Marie of Russia 

Conversion of St. Paul. 
Peace of Breda signed, 1667. 



E'sa. I Scot. 



Mp^t 



S 

M 
Tu 
W 
Th 



3rd Sunday after Epiphany. 

Peter the Great of Russia died, 1725. 
He founded St. Petersburg in 1703. 



Charles I. beheaded, 1649. 

" Dealh "'ill have his day." 

SHAKESPEARE. 



8 8u 
t 4s 

8 7r 
4 7s 
8 6r 
4 10s 
8 5r 
4 12s 
8 4r 

4 15s 
8 2r 
4 18s 
8 Ir 
4 22s 
7 59r 
4 25s 

7 57r 
4 28s 
7 54r 
4 32s 
7 62r 
4 35s 
7 49r 

4 39s 

7 47r 
4 42s 
7 44r 
4 46s 



8 47r 
3 52s 

8 45r 
3 55s 
8 44i- 

3 59s 
8 42r 

4 Is 
8 40r 

4 5s 
8 38r 
4 8s 
8 36r 
4 12s 
8 34r 
4 16s 



8 31r 


19 


4 21s 


20 


8 28r 


21 


4 25s 


22 


8 25r 


( 


4 29s 


24 


8 21r 


25 



4 33s 

8 18r 
4 38s 
8 16r 

4 42s 



TBE MOON'S CHANGES. 



Neio Moon 1st,.. 8 rain, past 9 after. 

First Quar. 9th, ..41 mln. past nmrn. 

Full Moon 17th, ..37 min. past 5 morn. 

Last Quar. 24th,.. 57 min. past 3 after. 

New Moon 31st, ..10 min. past 9 morn. 



STATE LOTTERIES IN ENGLAND. 



THE first lottery in England, so far as 
is known, began to lie drawn on the 
nth of January, 1569, at the west door of 
St. Paul's Cathedral. The scheme, which 
had been announced in 1,567, shows that 
the lottery consisted of forty thousand 
lots or shares at ten shillings each, and 
that it comprehended "a great number 
of good prizes, as well of ready money as 
of plate, and certain sorts of merchan- 
dise." Any profit that arose from the 
scheme was to be devoted to the repara- 
tion of harliours and other useful public 
works. 

Tlie last State lottery in England wa« 
drawn on the 18th of October, 183ii, the 
ceremony taking place in Cooper's Hall, 
Basinghall Street, London. The aboli- 
tion of lotteries deprived the Govern- 
ment of areveuue of £250,000 or £300.000 a 
year ; but it was rightly thought that 
the inducement to gambling held out to 
the public wasa great moral evil helping 
to impoverish many, and diverting atten- 

I tion from legitimate industi'ial modes »f 

j money-making. 

I Whilst lotteries lasted they gave rise 

I to many curious anecdotes, and some of 

I these we shall set d'^wn here. 

Early in the reign of George II., the 
footman of a lady of quality, under the 
absurd infatuation of a dream, disposed 
of the savings of the last twenty years 
of his life in two lottery tickets, which 
proving blanks, after a few melancholy 
days he put an end to his life. In his 
box was found the following plan of the 
manner in which he would spend the 
five thousand pound prize, which his 
mistress preserved as a curiosity : — 

"As soon as I have received the money 
I will marry Grace Towers; but as she 
has been cross and coy I will use her as 



LEISURE IS THE LUXURY OF THE POOR. 



a servant. Every morning she shall get me a mug 
of strong beer, with a toast, nutmeg and sugar in it ; 
then I will sleep till ten, after which I will have a 
large sack iiosset. My dinner shall he on table at 
one, and never without a good pudding. I will have 
a stock of wine and brandy laid in. About five in 
the afternoon I will have tarts and jellies, and a 
gallon bowl of punch ; at ten a hot suiiper. If I 
am in a good humour, and Grace behaves herself, she 
shall sit down with me. To bed about twelve." 

On the 31st of August, 1731, a scene was presented 
which strongly marks the infatuation andignoT'ance 
of lottery adventurers. The tickets for the State 
Lottery were delivered out to the subscribers at 
the Bank of England ; when the crowd becoming 
so great as to obstruct the clerks, they told them, 
" We deliver blanks to-day, but to-morrow we shall 
deliver iirizes;" upon which many, who were by 
no means for blanks, retired; and by this bold 
stratagem the clerks obtained room to proceed in 
their business. 

A gentlewoman in Holborn, whose husband had 
presented her with a ticket, put up prayers in the 
church the iiay before drawing in the followiufr 
manner: "The prayers of the congregation are de- 
sired for the success of a person engaged in a new 
undertaking." 

In the lottery of 1770 the holder of the ticket en- 
titled to the first prize of £20,000 was Captain Towry 
of Isleworth. A very remarkable circumstance put 
it in his possession. Mr. Barnes, a grocer in Cheap- 
side, purchased four following numbers, one of 
which this was; but thinking the chance not so 
great in so many following ones, he carried this 
very ticket back to the offlce, and changed it for 
another. 

On the .5th of January, 1774, at the conclusion of 
drawing the State Lottery at Guildhall, No. ll.Ooo, 
as the last drawn ticket, was declared to be entitled 
to the £i,000, and was so printed in the paper of 
benefits by order of the Commissioners. It won 
besides a prize of £100. But after the wheels were 
carried back to Whitehall, and opened, the ticket 
No. 72,248 was found sticking in a crevice of the 
wheel. Being the next drawn ticket after all the 
prizes were drawn, it was advertised by the Com- 
missioner's order as entitled to the £1,000 as the 
last drawn ticket, " which affair," we are told, 
" made a great deal of noise." 

What were known as "Little Goes" were little 
lotteries on the same plan as the great State Lot- 
teries, and drawn in the same manner. There were 
generally five or six "little goes" m the year, and 
they were actually set up and conducted by two or 
three of the licensed lottery-office keepers. The 
State Lottery was the parent of these "little goes." 
Persons who had not patience to wait till another 
=»tate Lottery gambled during the vacations in a 
" little go." 

A ROMANCE OF A BEDSTEAD. 

Richard III. slept in Leicester at the Blue Boar 
Inn, opposite the Grammar School, the night before 
Bosworth Field, and the bedstead wliereon he 
is supposed to have lain is still preserved, and its 
history has been handed down. In 1613, Mrs. Clarke, 
keeper of that inn, was robbed by her servant-maid 
and seven men, and the story is tlius given by Sir 
Roger Twisden, who had it from persons of un- 
doubted credit, who were not only inhabitants of 
Leicester, but saw the murderers executed :— 

When King Richard III. marched into Leicester- 
shire against Henry, Earl of Richmond, afterwards 
Henry VII., he lay at the Blue Boar Inn, in the town 
of Leicester, where was left a large wooden bedstead, 
gilded in some places, wiiich after his defeat and 
death in the battle of Bosworth was left either 
through haste, or as a thing of little value— the 
bedding being all taken from it— to the people of 
the house; thenceforward this oldbedstead, boarded 
at the bottom (as the manner was in those days), 
became a piece of standing furniture, and passed 
from tenant to tenant with the inn. 

In the reign of Queen Elizabeth, this house was 
kept by one Mr. Clarke, who put a tied on this bed- 
stead, which his wife was going to make hastily one 
day, and jumbling the bedstead, a piece of golddropt 
out. This excited the woman's curiosity ; she nar- 



rowly examined this ai.tiiiu'ited piece of furniture, 
and finding it had a double bottom, took off the 
uppermost with a chisel, upon which she discovered 
the space between them filled with gold, part of it 
coined by Richard III., and the rest of it in earlier 
times. Mr. Clarke concealed this i)iecc of good for- 
tune, though by degrees the effects of it were made 
known, for he became rich from a low condition, 
and in the space of a few years mayor of the town ; 
and then the story of the bedstead came to be ru- 
moured by the servant. 

At his death he left his estate to his wife, who still 
continued to keep the inn, though she was known to 
bo very rich, which put some wicked persons upon 
engaging the maid-servant to assist m robbing her. 
These folks, to the numlier of seven, lodged in her 
house, plundered it, and carried off some horse-loads 
of valuable things, and yet left a considerable cpiaii- 
tity of valuables scattered aliout the floor. As for 
Mrs. Clarke herself, who was very fat, she endia- 
voured to cry out for help, upon which her maid 
thrust her fingers down her throat, and choaked 
her, for which she was burnt ; the seven men who 
were her accomplices were hanged at Leicester 
some time in 161.'!. 



CURIOUS ANCIENT STATUTES. 

Ale.— It any ale-house keeper shall sell less than a 
full (juart of ale for a penny, or of the small ale two 
<iuarts for one penny, he shall forfeitfor every such 
offence the sum of twenty shillings.— ]s<.ya«ies /., 
chap. 9. 

Fairs.— The King commandeth that from hence- 
forth neither fairs nor markets be kept in church- 
yards, for the honour of the Church.— ]3(/i Edivaid 
I. Stat. 2, chap. 6. 

Woollen Cups.— AU persons above the age of seven 
years shall wear upon Sabbath and Holydays, upon 
their heads, a cap of wool, knit, thicked,and dressed 
in England, upon pain to forfeit, for every day not 
wearing, three shillings and fourpence.— l3</t Miza- 
beth, chap. 19. 

Fust Days. — Whosoever shall, by preaching, teach- 
ing, writing, or open speech, notify that eating fish, 
or forbearing of flesh, is of any necessity for sa\ing 
the soul of man, shall be punished, as spreaders of 
false news are and ought to be.— 5</i Elizabeth, chap. 
5, sect. 40. 

Pins. — No person shall put to sale any pins, but only 
such as shall be double-headed, and have th'ir heads 
soldered fast to the shank, and well-smoothed ; the 
shank well thaven; the point well and round filed, 
and sharpened. — 3ith ana '65th Henry VIII., chap. 6. 



TANTALLON CASTLE. 

Thk ruins of Tantallon Castle are situated about 
two miles and a half east of North Berwick. It is 
not known at what f.iie this famous Castle was 
Iniilt. The great strength of the place gave rise to 
the saying, " Ding aown Tantallon, and build a brig 
to the Bass," as feats of equal difficulty. 

A very accurate description of Tantallon is to be 
read in the fifth Canto of " Marmion " :— 
" Bvt scant three miles the band had rode. 
When o'er a height they passed. 
And, sudden, close before them shmved 

His towers, Tantallon vast : 
Broad, massive, high, and stretclling far 
And held impregnable in ivar, 
On a projecting rock they rose. 
And round three sides the ocean floivs 
The fourth did battled ivalls enclose 

A7id double mound and fosse. 
By narrow drawbridge, outworks strong 
Through studded gates, an entrance long 

To the main court they cross. 
It was a fair and stately square ; 
Around were lodgin(is,flt and fair-. 

And towers of various form. 
Which on the court projected far 
And broke its lines quadrangular. 
Here was square keep, there turret high. 
Or pinnacle that sought the sky. 
Whence oft the loarder could descry 
The gathering ocean-storm. 



1889 F E B RUAR Y 28 days 




THE BRAVK BEUMMKIl. 



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Partridge and Pheasant Shooting ends. 
Candlemas — Scotch Quarter Day. 



24 S 

25 M 
26iTu 
27 'w 
28Th 



4th Sunday after Epiphany. 

3. Mar(iuis of Salisbury born, 1830. 

" Mankind by various arts ascend 
The paths to eminence that ten'!." 
Pindar. 

Hackney coaches started in Paris, 1662. 

Mary, Queen of Scots, beheaded, 158". 

Caroline L. TIerschel died, 1848. 



5th Sunday after Epiphany. 

10. Queen Victoria married, 1840. 

Lady Jane Grey beheaded on a scaffold 
erected on a green within tlie 
Tower, 1554. 

St. Valentine's Day. 

Cardinal Wiseman died, 1865. He be- 
came Arch1)ishop of Westminster 
in 1850. 



Septuagesima Sunday. 

Martin Luther died, 1546. 
" Man is his own star, aiid the soid that 
can 
Be honest is the only perfect man." 

Cardinal Newman born, 1801. 

February is emblematically repre- 
sented as a man bearing in his hand 
the astronomical sign Pisces. 



Sexagesima Sunday. 

Count Wallenstein assassinated, 1634. 

" Winter's wraih heciins to quell. 

And pleasant Spring I'ppea.reth ; 
The grass now gins to be refresht. 
The sicalloio peeps out oj her nest. 
And cloudy welkin cleareth." 

Spensek. 



Eng. 


Scot. 


9 !■§ 


ail 
1^ ^ 


7 36r 


8 4r 


4 55s 


4 52s 


7 33r 


8 Or 


4 59s 


4 56s 


7 29r 


7 56r 


5 2s 


5 Is 


7 26r 


7 51r 


5 6s 


5 5s 


7 22r 


7 47r 


5 lOs 


5 10s 


7 18r 


7 42r 


5 13s 


5 14s 


7 14r 


7 38r 


5 17s 


5 19s 


7 lOr 


7 33r 


5 2ls 


5 23s 


7 6r 


7 29r 


5 24s 


5 28s 


7 2r 


7 23r 


5 28s 


5 33s 


6 58r 


7 19r 


5 31s 


5 37s 


6 54r 


7 13r 


5 35s 


5 42s 


6 50r 


7 9r 



" // in February there be no rain. 
It's neither good for hay nor grain." 



THE MOON'S CHANGES. 



First Quar. 7th, ..58 min. past 8 after. 
Full Moon 15th, -.17 min. past 10 after. 
Last Quar. 22nd, ..55 min. past 11 after. 



THE BKAVE DRUMMER. 



SAD menories are attached to tlie 
bridge over the Neckar at Heidel- 
I berg. In the year 1799 the Austrians and 
I the French fousi;ht a bloody battle here. 
The French, far superior in numbers, 
were driven back seven times by two 
hun Ired Huntrarian infantry and eighty 
lancers, were forced to leave the pLacc 
of action, and did not return to it till the 
next morning after the little band of 
heroes had left in the dead of night. 
.Much blood was shed here, and an im- 
mense numberof the French wereeither 
killed by the grape shot of the Austrians, 
or found their graves m the waters of 
the Ncckar. 

The brave act of a French drummer is 
worthy of being committed to posterity. 
Beating to the assault, the drummer, who 
was scarcely beyond the age of boyhood, 
advanced to meet the enemy. A ))all 
shattered his leg. Leaning against the 
parapet of the bridge, however, he still 
continued beating his march, and strove 
to put fresh courage into his comrades 
by the music of his drum. On seeing 
this, one of the enemy's officers is said 
to have dismounted from his horse and, 
slinging a drum across his shoulders, 
constituted himself a rival drummer. 

During the Baden revolution in 1819 
this bridge over the Neckar was threat- 
ened to be destroyed, for the insurgents 
had already undermined it, in oi-der to 
spring it up on the approach of the 
Prussians, and we have only to owe its 
preservation to the courageous resist 
ance of several citizens of Heidelberg. 

The bridge where these events took 
place i3 a beautiful structure : Goethe 
said it was not to be equalled by any 
bridge in the world. It was begun in 
1786, and completed in 1788: it is 700 feet 
long, SO feet broad, and built of strong 
red sandstone. 



JUDGMENT IS TUB CHILD OF OBSEEVATION. 



CHRIST'S HOSPITAL. 

Christ's Hospital in Newgjite Street, London, of 
which a picturesque portion is shown in our engra- 
ving, was founded by Edward VI. on the 26t)i of 
June, 1553, ten days Ijefore his death. The object 
was to estabhsh an hospital for poor fatherless 
children and foundlings. 

It is commonly called "the Blue-coat School," 
from tUcdrc^s 
worn by the 
boys, wliich is 
of the same 
age as t h i' 
foundation ol' 
the hospital. 
'' The dress," 
says Peter 
Cunningham, 
" is a blue coat 
orgown.ayel- 
low petticoat, 
a red leather 
girdle round 
the waist, jel- 
lowstockings, 
a clergyman's 
band round 
the neck, and 
a flat black 
cap of woollen 
yarn, about 
the size of a 
saucer. Blue 
was a colour 
origiaally con- 
fined to sei- 
vaut men and 
boys, nor till 
its recogni- 
tion as part of 
the unifoim 
of the British 
navy was blue 
ever looked 
upon as a 
colour to be 
worn by gen- 
tlemen." 

The follow- 
ing curious 
story is told 
by Pepys the 
diarist in con- 
nection with 
Christ's Hos- 
pital in 1695 : 
'"Two wealthy 
citizens are 
lately dead, 
and left their 
estates, one 
to a Blue-coat 
boy, and the 
other to a 
Blue-coat girl 
in Christ's 
Hospital, the 
extraordina- 
r i n e s s of 
which has led 
some of the 
magistrates to 
carry it on to 
a inatch.which 
is ended in a 
public wed- 
ding—he in his habit of blue satin, led by two of the 
girls, and she in blue with an apron green, and 
petticoat yellow, all of sarsnet, led by tv.'o bovs of 
the hous,-, through Chcapside to Guildhall Chapel, 
where they were married by the Dean of St. Paul's." 




A CITY CORXEK : chuist's hospital. 



SLAVERY IN SCOTLAND. 
Perhaps no passage in our older Scottish poets has 
been oftener <iu(>ted than the lines on Freedom in 
Barbour's Metrical Historv of the Bruce: 



"Ah, Freedom is a nolile thing ; 
Freedom makes men to have lUchuj, 
To man all solace Freedom gives : 
He lives at ease who freely lives ; 
And he that aye has lived free, 
May not ivell knoiv the misery. 
The xvrath, the hate, the spite, and all 
That's compass'd in rhe iKiiite af Thrall." 

The author 
of these lines 
was a slave- 
dealer! From 
deeds which 
vre extant, it 
appears that 
the Chaiiter 
of which he 
w as the arch- 
deacon traf- 
ficked in serfs, 
celling or let- 
ting them on 
lease, like the 
cattle or 
granges on 
their lands. 
In their own 
^^ ords, they 
' set and in 
tack let the 
■whole barony 
of Murthil, 
with its 
h a w k i n g s , 
huntings, and 
fishings, ivith 
its serfs, bon- 
dages, natives, 
and their is- 
sue. The date 
of this lease is 
] 5S8 : Barbour 
died in 1396. 

Many provi- 
sions as to 
ilie condition 
1 f the born 
thralls, serfs, 
or bondmen, 
occur in 
tncient laws ; 
though some 
•Scottish legal 
writers, it is 
s lid, such as 
Craig, Stair, 
and Bankton, 
have denied 
that slavery 
ever existed 
in Scotland. 

One of the 
statutes of 
Siint David, 
who reigned 
tiom 1124 to 
1153, is "of a 
nun found 
without a 
1 o r d." I t 
enacts that 
"if any man 
be found in 
the King's 
land who has 
no proper 
lord, after the King's writ is read in the King's 
court, he shall h.ave the space of fifteen davs to get 
himself a lord. And if within that term he finds no 
lord, the King's justice shall take from him eight 
cows for the King's use, and keep his body for the 
King's behoof until he finds a lord." 

About the same period it appears to have been a 
moot point whether one might of his own will re- 
nounce his freedom ; and it v/as determined by a 
statute that " any free man may if he choose abandon 
his freedom in the King's court, or in any other 
court ; and if he do so he shall never recover it." 



1889 M A K C H 31 days. 




'J'llK GIPSY'S PRUl'HKCV. 



ilF 
2IS 



M 

Tu 

W 

Th 

F 

S 



s 

M 

Tu 

W 

Th 

F 

S 



s 

M 

Tu 

W 

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S 



s 

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S 



St. David's Day. 

Jews— srxvxio in number— banished 
f roin Spain, 14i)2. 

Quinquag.— Shrove Sun. 

llnbert Blair, author of " The Grave," 

died, 1746. 
Shrove Tuesday. 
Ash Wednesday. 

" Hoive'er it be, it seems to me, 
'Tis only noble to be good" 

Tennyson. 

Emperor William of Germany d., IRSS. 



Quadrag.— 1st Sun. in Lent. 

10. Prince of Wales married, 1863. 

About this time spiders begin to ap- 
liear in gardens, for in winter thej:. 
are only seen in houses. 

P. T. Klopstock, poet, died, 1803. 

Close season for fresh-water fish begins. 

Gustavus III. of Sweden assasd., 1792. 

2nd Sun. in Lent - St. Patrick. 

Princess Louise born, 1848. 

Adclina Patti, distinguished vocalist, 

born, 1843. 
Sir Ipaac Newton died, 17-27. Pope 
thus writes of him: 
"Nature and all her works lay hid in 
niyht, 
God said, 'Let Newton be!' and 
all ivas light." 

3rd Sunday in Lent. 
LADV DAY. — Annunciation. 
Duke of Cambridge born, 1819. 
March is noted as a dry month. 
Duke of Alliany died, 1884. 
Rev. John Keble died, 1866. 

" Longest life is hut a day." 

Wordsworth. 



3ll S 1 4th Sunday in Lent. 



Exo. 


Soot. 


^■3 


7 Or 


6 41r 


5 46s 


5 51.S 


6 3Gr 


6 54r 


5 49s 


5 58s 


6 32 r 


6 49r 


5 53s 


6 3s 


6 28r 


6 43r 


5 56s 


6 7s 


6 23r 


39r 


5 59s 


6 lis 


6 19r 


3 31r 


6 3s 


6 14s 


*3 14r 


6 28r 


6 6s 


6 18s 


6 9r 


6 22r 


6 10s 


6 2Js 


6 5r 


6 17r 


6 13s 


6 27s 


6 Or 


6 Ur 


6 18, 


6 32s 


5 56r 


6 6r 


6 20s 


6 36s 


5 Sir 


6 Ir 


6 23s 


6 40s 


5 47 r 


5 56r 


6 26s 


6 44s 


5 42r 


5 Sir 


6 30s 


6 48s 



THi: 3I00N'S CHANGES. 



3 
4 
5 
6 

7 
l 

9 
10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 

O 
17 

18 
19 

20 I! 

21 

22 

( 

24 
25 
26 

27 
28 i 
29 



Neiu Moon 
First Qnar. 
Full Moon 
Last Quar. 



1st,.. 1 niin. past 10 after. 

9th, ..59 min. past 5 after. 
17th, -.47 min. past 11 morn. 
24th, ..54 min. past 6 morn. 



Neio Moon 31st,.. 37 min. past 11 morn. 



THE GIPSY'S PROPHECY. 



There is a singular anecdote told of 
Gharles th- First in connection with 
Hampton Court Palace. The King was 
one day standing at a window there, 
surrounded l)y his children, when a gipsy 
came up and asked for charity. Her 
appearance excited the King's ridicule, 
and he appears also to have threatened 
her, which so enraged the gipsy that she 
took from her basket a looking-glass 
and presented it to the King. He saw in 
it his own head decollated. 

Probably with a natural wish to pro- 
pitiate so prophetical a beggar, or for 
some other reason, money was given 
her. She then foretold tliat the death 
of a dog in the room where the King 
was then would precede the restora- 
tion to his family of the kingdom which 
he was about to lose. 

It is supposed tliat Oliver Cromwell 
afterwards slept in the room referred 
to. He was constantly attended l)y a 
faitbful dog, who guarded his bed- 
chamlier door. On awaking one morn- 
ing he found the dog dead, on wblcli he 
exclaimed in allusion to the gipsy's pro- 
phec^v, which he had been told of, " The 
kingdom is departed from me." Shortly 
afterwards the Protector died. 



OLD EDINBURGH. 

We have a glimpse of old Edinburgh in 
our illustration, which represents the 
Bow-head corner house,with which every 
visitor to the Scottish metropolis used 
to lie familiar. It was one of the finest 
of the old timber-fronted burgher dwell- 
ings in the city, and was taken down in 
1878. There were two elevations— one 



'A MAN IS A LION IN HIS OWN CAUSE.' 



towards the Lawnmarket, the other towards the 
West Bow. " The street floor only," say the Messrs. 
Dimlop, "had a stone wall, the chimneys being 
carried up in the sables of tlie houses on either side. 
A piazza was on the ground floor, towards the Bow, 
and the beams of the upper floors projected over it, 
and over each other with a boldness which made a 
stranger hold his breath. 

" Perhaps this seeming over-weighting of the 
house is best described in the words of one of its 
own tenants— an old man who had been born and 
who had lived for more than seventy years literally 
under its roof, for to him belonged the snail attic 
windows in the gable towards the Bow. ' Feared to 
bide up here on a windy nicht '/ ' said he ; ' no' me ! 
The hoose was built afore Sir Isaac Newton invented 
the centre o' gravity, but depend upon It, the man 
that built it kent o' something just as guid ! ' 

" The northern front was the more ornate. On its 
second floor there were Doric pilasters between the 



" King Charles, two days before his death, which 
took place two years after the massacre, having 
called for Mazzille, his chief physician and com- 
plaining of the pains he suffered, asked him if it 
was not possible that he and so many other cele 
brated physicians that were in his realms could 
give some alleviation to his disorder; 'for I am,' 
said he, 'cruelly and horridly tormented.' To 
which Mazzille replied, that whatever had depended 
on them hud been tried, but that in truth God only 
could be the sovereign physician in such complaints. 
'I believe,' said the king, 'that what yo\i say is true, 
and that you know nothing else. Draw from me my 
custode (or large cap), that I may try to rest.' 

" Mazzille withdrew, and left orders that allshould 
leave the king except three, viz., La Tour, St. Pris, 
and his nurse, whoju his majesty greatly loved, al- 
though she teas a Huguenot. As she had just seal ed 
herself on a coffer, and hegan to doze, she heard the 
king groan bitterly, weeping and sighing ; she then 




OLD KIMNBirUGH. 



windows, whi<'h last were filled with panels of 
glazed lattice-work. 

"The Bow-head house was specially a coign of 
vantage on the occasions of the state entry of the 
rulers of Scotland into their capital. The law of 
precedent, always powerful in court ceremonials, 
was to enter the Grassmarket by tlfee West Pi^rt, 
thence up the steep zigzag of the B(!\v into High 
Street, then to pass slowly down between the then 
unbroken lines of its towering houses to the Netlier- 
Bow Gate, thence by the burg of Canongate to the 
royal home at Holyrood. In some cases the Castle 
was visited. This was done by Queen Mary on her 
state entry on the 2nd of Septemljer, 1561." 



SMITTEN WITH REMORSE. 

In the massacre of St. Bartholomew, according to 
Sully, 70,(KXi Huguenots, or French Protestants, 
including women and children, were murdered 
throughout the kingdom, by secret orders from 
Charles IX., at the instigation of his mother, the 
queen dowager, Catherine de Medicis. 



approached the bed softly, and drawing away his 
cnMode, the king said to her, giving vent to a heavy 
sigh, and shedding tears plentifully, insomuch that 
they interrupted his discourse— 

" ' Ah ! my dear nurse! my beloved woman, what 
bhiod ! what murders! Ah ! I have followed wicked 
advice ! O my God ! pardon me, and be merciful. 
I know not where I am, they have made me so 
perplexed and asritated. How will all this end? 
What shall I do? I am lost for ever! I know it.' 

"Then the nurse thus addressed him: — 'Sire, be 
the murders on those who forced you to order 
them ; your majesty could not help it, and since you 
ne ver consented, and now regret them, believe God 
will never impute them to you. and will cover them 
with the mantle of justice of His Son, to whom alone 
you should look for aid. Ah 1 for the honour of 
God, let your majesty cease from this weeping.' 

"Having said this, she rose for a handkerchief, 
for his was drenched with tears : Charles having 
taken it from her, made a sign that she should 
retire and leave him to repose." 

The dreadful narrative of the massacre of St. Har- 
tholomew is detailed in the history of De Thou. 



1889 ^A P R I L 30 days. 




"WHICH IS THE BETTEK MAN ? 



I 


M 


2 


Tu 


3 


W 


4 


Th 


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F 


6 


S 


7 


s 


8 


M 


9 


Tu 


lO 


W 


1 1 


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12 


F 


13 


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14 


s 


IS 


M 


i6 


Tu 


17 


W 


i8 


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19 


F 


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S 


21 


s 


22 


M 


23 


Tu 


24 


W 


2S 


Th 


26 


F 


27 


S 


28 


S 


29 


M 


30 


Tu 



All Fool's Day. 
I. Prince Bismarck born, 1815. 
" Tlie ti-eb of our life is of a mingled 
yaryi. 
Good and ill together." 

Shakespeahe. 
Catherine I. of Russia born, 1689. 

Ricliard Coeur de Lion died, 1199. 



5th Sunday in Lent. 

Lorenzo deMedicis died, 1492. 

King of the Belgians born, 1835. 

Admiral John Byron died, 1788. 

Pope Gregory XIII. died, 1585. 

Dr. Younar, the author of "Night 
Thoughts," died, 1765, at the age of 
eighty-one. 



Palm Sunday. 

14. Princess Beatrice born, 1857. 
Sir Hans Sloane born, 1660. 
Hilary Law Sittings end. 

" Out ofsiglit, oat of mind."— Gay. 
GOOD FRIDAY. 
m. Lord Beaconsfleld died, 1881. 



-3 m 03 



Scot 



Easter Sunday. 

EAUTBR 2I0NDA Y. Bank HOLl DAY. 

St. George's Daj/. -Shakespeare d., 1616. 

St. Mark's Eve. — There are raany 
country superstitious observances 
attached to the eve of St. Mark's 
Day. 

Edward Gibbon, historian, born, 1737. 



Low Sunday. 

General Boulanger born, 1837. 
Easter Law Sittings begin. 



5 31r 

38s 

5 26r 

6 41s 
5 22r 
8 45s 
5 17r 
Q 48s 
5 13r 
G 51s 

5 9r 

6 55s 

5 4r 

6 58s 
5 Or 

7 Is 
4 56r 

7 5s 
4 52r 
7 8s 
4 48r 
7 lis 
4 44r 
7 14s 

4 40r 
7 18v« 
4 36r 



5 37r 

6 58s 
5 32r 

7 2s 
5 27r 
7 6s 
5 23r 
7 10s 
5 18r 
7 14s 

5 12r 

7 18s 
5 8r 
7 22s 
5 2r 
7 26s 
4 57r 

7 30s 
4 53r 
7 34s 
4 4Sr 
7 38s 
4 42r 
7 41s 

4 37r 

7 45s 
4 33r 



THE MOON'S CHANGES. 



4 
5 
6 

7 
D 

9 
10 
11 
12 
13 

14 

O 
16 
17 

18 I 

19 

20 

21 

( 

23 
24 

25 
26 

27 

28 
29 

O 



Fiist Quar. 8th, ..47 niin. past 1 after. 
Fall Moon 15th, ..19 min. past 10 after. 
Last Quar. 22nd, ..56 mm. past 1 after. 
New Moon 30th,.. 5 min. past 2 morn. 



A TRIAL BY COMBAT. 



AN extraordinary scene in the shape 
of H solemn jousting took place on 
London Bridge on St. George's Day, the 
23rd of April, 1390. 

John de Wells, the English ambassa- 
dor in Scotland, having boasted at the 
Scottish court of the ju'owess of his 
countrymen, a famous knight of that 
country, David Lindsay, Earl of Craw- 
ford, offered to test the Question and 
lower the pride of the Southerner by 
resorting to a trial by combat on London 
Bridge. A royal safe - conduct was 
granted, and Earl David travelled to 
London with a retinue of twenty-nine 
persons. 

The day of battle came. Both parties, 
fully armed, were most honourably con- 
ducted to the bridare, M'hich was splen- 
didly decorated with rich hangings of 
tapestry and cloth of gold. There were 
crowds of noble spectators, the jilace of 
honour being occupieil l)y Richard IT. 

The combatants approached. "The 
signal being given," says an old writer, 
" tearing their barbed steeds with their 
spurs, they rushed, with square-ground 
spears, and a mighty force, impetuously 
to the conflict. Neither party was moved 
by the vehement impulse or by the 
splintering of their spears; so that the 
common people affected to cry out that 
David was bound to the saddle of his 
horse contrary to the law of arras, be- 
cause he sat unmoved amidst the splint- 
ering of lances on his helmet and visor. 

"When Earl David heard this, he 
in-esently leaped off his charger, and 
then as quickly vaulted upon his back 
again without any assistance ; and ta- 
king a second hasty course, their spears 
were a second time shivered by the 



DISEASES AEE OFTEN THE INTEREST OF PLEASUBES," 



shock tliroiigli their hurniiipr desire to comiuer. 
And now a third time were tlie valorous cneinics 
stretched out and runuinK together; liut then tlie 
Enghsh knight was cast down Ijreathless to tlie 
earth, with great sounds of mourning from hia 
countrymen tliat he was killed ! 

"Earl David when victory appeared leapt sud- 
denly to the ground— for he had fought without 
anger and but for glory, that he might show him- 
self the stronger of the champions — and casting 
himself upon Lord Wells, tenderly embraced him 
till he revived and the surgeon came to attend him." 



RICHMOND CASTLE. 

To Alan Rufus. son of Hoel, Count of Bretagne, 
a kinsman of William the Conuueror, who accom- 
panied him in his e.xpedition to England, is gene- 
rally attributed the foundation of both the Castle 
and town of Richmond, in the North Riding of 
Yorkshire ; though by some authorities the town 
is said to have been in existence prior to the 
Conquest. William conferred upon Alan the title of 
Earl of Richmond, and the estates of the Saxon 
earl Edwin, embracing nearly two hundred manors 
and townships, and a jurisdiction over all Ricli- 
mondshire, about a third of the Aorth Riding. 



In the situation of his castle, Earl Alan selected 
what was admirable for purposes of defence: its 
foundation was laid upon an almost perpendicular 
rock, on the left bank of the Swale, about a hundred 
feet above the bed of the river. To the original 
buildings of the fortress additional walls, towers, 
and outworks were erected by the successors of the 
founder. 

The walks round the castle present a succession 
of varied and romantic scenery. Swaledale is in 
many parts skirted with bold rocks, almost covered 
with trees and shrubs. From the hills to the 
north-west of the town the castle and town appear 
to be situated in a valley. 



"TOO MUCHl" 

Fabro Chigi, who was afterwards Pope, under 
the title of Alexander VII., while Nuncio in France, 
was present at the death of Mary de Medicis. He 
asked her if she pardoned all her enemies, and par- 
ticularly Cardinal Richelieu. She said she did, 
from her heart. "Madaiiie," said he, "as a mark 
of reconciliation, will you send hiiu the bracelet 
you wear on your arm?" " Nav," replied she, 
laying her head on the pillow, " that is too much ! " 




1889 MAY 31 days. 




KIN MOM' WILLIE M.T FKKI.. 



vv 

Th 

F 

S 



5 
6 

7 
8 

9 
lo 
II 

12 

13 
14 



S 

M 
Tu 
W 
Th 
F 
S_ 
s 
M 
Tu 



15W 
i6Th 
i7jF 
i8's 



19 

20 
21 

22 

23 
24 

2J_ 

26 S 

27 M 

28 Tu 

29 W 

30 Th 
31F 



s 

M 

Tu 

W 

Th 

F 

S 



Maij Day. — Duke of Connaught born, 

18:>0. 
.Mary, Queen of Scots, aided liy the 

gallart George Doui^las, escaped 

from Loplileveii Castle, in Kinross- 

sliire, 15(58. 



2nd Sunday after Easter. 

r>. Napoleon Bonaparte died, 1«21. 
"Death lays his icy hand ov kings." 
Shirley. 

(.ady Anne Barnard, Scotch poetess, 
died, 1.-S25. Slie wrote tlie well-known 
l)allad of " Aa:d Robin (iray." 

Louis XV. of Prance died, 1774. 

Lord Granville born, 1815. 



3rd Sunday after Easter. 

Regent Murray defeated Queen Mary 
at Langside, 1568. 

Scotch Term of Dliit Sunday. 
"Jog on, jog on, the footpath luay. 
And merrily hent the stilp-a ; 
A inerry heart goes all the day, 
i our sad tires in a mile-a." 

Shakespeabe. 

1th Sunday after Easter. 

Bees begin to swarm in May. and re- 
(iuire attention between the hours 
of ten and three. An old proveri 
says: — load of hay.' 

'' A sivartn of bees in May is worth a 

Pope Leo II. died, 683. 
Queen Victoria horn, 1819. 
Princess Helena born, 1846. 



Rogation Sunday. 

The Matins of Moscow," when 
Prince Demetrius and his Polish 
adherents were assassinated, 1600. 

Restoration of Charles II.. 1660. 

Ascension Day. — Holy Thursday. 

' A good mind possesses a kingdom." 



Enr. 


Scot. 


he 


r3 M <U 


4 28r 


4 24r 


4 


7 27s 


7 57s 


5 


t 25r 


4 20r 


6 


7 30s 


8 Is 


7 


4 21r 


4 15r 


D 


7 .34s 


8 5s 


9 


4 18r 


4 111- 


10 


7 37s 


8 8s 


11 


4 15r 


4 7r 


12 


7 40s 


8 12s 


13 


4 12r 


4 3r 


14 


7 43s 


8 15s 





4 9r 


4 Or 


16 


7 46s 


8 19s 


17 


4 6r 


3 56r 


18 


7 49s 


8 23s 


19 


4 3r 


3 53r 


20 


7 52s 


8 27s 


( 


t Ir 


3 50r 


22 


7 54s 


8 31s 


23 


3 58r 


3 47r 


24 


7 57s 


8 31s 


25 


3 56r 


3 44r 


26 


7 593 


8 36s 


27 


3 5ir 


3 41r 


28 


8 2s 


8 40s 


• 


3 52r 


3 39r 


1 


8 4s 


8 43s 


2 



THE J/OOxV'A' CHAAGE^i. 



First Quar. 
Full Moon 
Last Quar. 
New Moon 



8th,.. 42 niin. past 
loth, ..42 niin. past 

21st, ..53 niin. past 
29th, .20 niin. past 



6 niorn. 
6 morn. 
9 after. 
5 after. 



THE SCOT IN ENGLAND. 



IN the year 1596, William Armstrong, of 
Kinmont, a noted border trooper, 
was taken prisoner by the warden of the 
Western marches of England, and lodged 
in Carlisle Castle. This was in defiance 
of a truce which then existed between 
the wardens of the borders. 

The Lord of Buccleugh, who had the 
charge of Liddesdale, after in vain de- 
manding that Kinmont Willie should be 
set at liberty, gallantly took ths castle 
of Carlisle by surprise one night with a 
body of two hundred men, and effected 
the prisoner's delivery. He crossed the 
Esk at nightfall, broke open the postern 
gate, seized the sentries, forced open 
Kinraont's cell, and was again on Scot- 
tish ground almost before the English 
garrison could draw breath. 

The consequences of this enterprise 
are thus mentioned by Spottiswood :— 
" This fell out on the 12th of April, l.i96. 
The queen of England, having notice 
sent her of what was done, stormed not 
a little. One of her chief castles sur- 
prised, a prisoner taken forth of the 
hands of the warden, and carried away 
so far within England she esteemed a 
great affront. 

" The lieger, Mr. Bowes, in a conven- 
tion kept at Edinburgh the 22nd of May, 
did, as he was charged, in a long oration, 
aggravate the heinousness of the fact, 
concluding that peace could not longer 
continue betwixt the two realms unless 
Buccleugh were delivered up in England, 
to be punished at the queen's pleasure. 

" Buccleugh compearing and charged 
with the fact, made answer :— 'That he 
went not into England with intention to 
assault any of the queen's houses, or to 
do wrong to any of her subjects, but 
only to relieve a subject of Scotland, 



"TRUST NOT A HORBE'S HKEL NOR A DOG'S TOOTH." 



unlawfully taken, and more unlawfully detained; 
that in the time of a general assurance in a day of 
truce, he was taken prisoner against all order, 
neither did he attemiit his relief till redress was 
refused ; and that he had carried the liusiness in 
such a moderate manner as no hostility was com- 
mitted nor the least wrong offered to any within the 
castle; yet was he content, according to the ancient 
treaties observed betwixt the two realms, when as 
mutual injuries were alleged, to he tried by the 
commissioners that it should please their majesties 
to appoint, and submit himself to that which they 
should decree.' 

"The convention, esteeming the answer reason- 
able, did acquaint the ambassador therewith, and 
offered to send commissioners to the borders, with 
all diligence, to treat with such as the queen should 
be pleased to appoint for her i)art." 

The end of the matter was that Buccleugh was 
not delivered up. He, however, was suhsequently 
surrendered into English hands for making an in- 
road into England, for which no justiflcation could 
be pleaded. On this occasiijn Baccleugh seems to 
have remained in England from October, 1597, till 
February, 1598. 

According to ancient family tradition Buccleugh 
was presented to Elizabeth, who, with her usual 
rough and peremptory address, demanded of him 
" how he dared to undertake an enterprise so des- 
perate and presumptuous." 

"What is it," answered the undaunted chieftain, 
"what is it that a man dares not do?" 

Elizabeth, struck with the reply, turned to a lord 
in waiting: "With ten thousand such men," said 
she, "our brother of Scotland might shake the 
firuiest throne of Europe." 



ROYALTY AND A WOODEN SOLDIER. 

In I8(i6, on the approach of the French, the Bourbon 
Court of Naples made so hasty a retreat into Sicily, 
that they forgot and left behind them a superannu- 
ated princess of the family, who was half-sister to 
old King Ferdinand. Though this venerable spinster 
was of illegitimate birth, she received the honours 
paid to the royal blood, and was allowed a sentinel 
of the household troops, who mounted guard at her 
door and presented arms at all her exits and her 
entrances. 

At first it was feared that the French conquerors, 
who were not always liberal in these matters, would 
stop her allowance and leave the old woman in ab- 
solute want The new King of Naples, Joseph Bona- 
parte, however, secured her in part of her pensions ; 
but no sooner was she relieved from the fear of 
starvation, than she was made wretched by what 
appeared to be an equal calamity, and this was tlu' re- 
fusal on the part of the French to allow her a soldier 
as a guard of honour. She petitioned over and over 
again ; she supplicated that this distinction and de- 
light of her life should not, towards its close, be 
withdrawn from her; but Napoleon, who had de- 
clared in his lordly manner that the Bourbons had 
everywhere ceased to reign, was not Itkely to pay 
royal honours to a neglected off-shoot of that race. 

The old woman's heart was absolutely breaking 
under this privation, when, in a lucky moment, one 
of the few friends or attendants who remained about 
her person thought of substituting a wooden soldier 
for a soldier of real flesh and blood. Accordingly, a 
figure was made and dressed up, and, with a musket 
on its shoulder, was posted at the outer door of the 
princess's apartment, in an old house she occupied at 
Portici, not far from the royal villa "f that name. 

This simple contrivance had a happy effect on the 
old woman, who then thought that all royalty had 
not departed from her ; but she soon began to com- 
plain that the statue did not present arms to her, 
which, by a very easy exercise of mechanical in- 
genuity. It might have been made to do. She there- 
fore, after a time, confined herself to her apart- 
ments, enjoying at a distance, through unfolded 
doors, the sight of her mute sentinel, but never 
exposing herself to the mortifying proofs that he 
was motionless as well as mute. The recluse died 
before the restoration of the Bourbons of Naples. 
In 1816 her wooden sentinel was still to be seen at 
the old house at Portici. 



LAWFUL WITCHCRAFT. 

Lord Mansfield had an old woman brought be- 
fore him as a witch, and among other things she 
was charged with riding through the air. The ^'reat 
judge dismissed the case, observing : "My opinion 
is that this good woman should be suffered to return 
home, and whether she do so walking on the ground, 
or riding through the air, must be left to her own 
judgment ; for there is nothing contrary to the laws 
of England in either." 

The history of v/itchcraft in England is a con- 
spicuous proof of the length to which superstition 
will sometimes go. The number of persons put to 
death in England on the charge of witchcraft, up 
to the year ine, has been estimated at not fewer 
than thirty thousand ! 



A MODEST REQUEST. 

A coiiMON saying among certain of the Irish is that 
they are "the boys lit for anything." The hero of 
the following anecdote must have thought himself 
one of that gifted set. 

When the Duke of Ormonde Avas appointed Lord 
Lieutenant of Ireland in the beginning of Queen 
Anne's reign, a certain Irish baronet, a man of some 
interest in his country, requested his grace would 
give him a bishopric, or a regiment of horse, or 
make him Lord Chief Justice of the King's Bench- 
he was not particular which. 



COUNTERFEIT KINGS. 

JoHNES, in his translation of Froissart's Chronicle, 
Vol. I., p. 421, says that at the battle of Poictiers, 
" King John was armed in royal armour, u7id nine- 
teen others like him." 

This custom of arming several in like manner 
to the commander of an army seems to have 
been usual, and was probably carried down at 
least to Richard the Third's time. Shakespeare 
makes Richard say, in the Fourth Scene of the 
last Act : 

"J think there be six Richmonds in the field : 
Five have I slain to-day, instead of Jiim." 

Also, in the First Part of Henry the Fourth, 
Douglas says : 

" Another king ! Then grow like Hydra's heads 
I am the Douglas, fatal to all those 
That wear these colours on them. Wliat art thou 
That counterfeit' St the person of a king f " 



THE WIG-RIOT. 

In the year 1764, owing to changes in the fashion, 
people gave over the use of that very artificial 
appendage, the wig, and wore their own hair when 
they had any. In conse(iuence of this, the wig- 
makers, who had become very numerous in London, 
were suddenly thrown out of work, and reduced 
to great distress. For some time both town and 
country rang with their calamities, and their 
complaints that men should wear their own hair 
instead of perruques ; and at last it struck them 
that some legislative enactment ought to be pro- 
cared in order to oblige gentlefolks to wear wigs, 
for the benefit of the suffering wig-trade. Accord- 
ingly they drew up a petition for relief, which on 
the nth of Feliruary, 1765, they carried, to St. 
James's to present to his Majesty (-ieorge the 
Third. As they went processionally through the 
town, it was observed that most of these wig- 
makers, who wanted to force other people to wear 
them, wore no wigs themselves; and this striking 
the London mob as something monstrously unfair 
and inconsistent, they seized the petitioners, and 
cut off all their haiv par force. 

Horace Walpole, who alludes to this ludicrous 
petition, says, "Should one wonder if carpenters 
were to remonsti'ate, that since the peace their 
trade decays, and that there is no demand for 
wooden legs? " 



1889 — -J XJ N E 30 days. 







«.«>:-' 



,r /V' V-. -v'^jrf.' ^ 







A HOST UY TORCHLIGHT. 



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29's 



Sir John Dugdale born, 1628. 
Sunday after Ascension. 

Prince George of Wales born, 1S05. 
General A^iscount "Wolselcy born, 1833, 

Great Fire at Copenhagen, consuming 
1,303 houses and several churches 
and public buildings, 1795. 

Easter Lmv Sitlings end. 
" Jiest is the siceet sauce of labour." 



Whit Snnday.— Pentecost. 

Whit Monday, — Bank Holiday. 

" Men should be what they seem." 

ilaximus, the short-lived Emperor of 
Rome, sacrificed to the fury of in- 
censed soldiery, at the instance of 
his empress, 4j5. 

Fresh-water close season ejids. 



Trinity Sunday. 

John Wesley born, 1703. 
Trinity Law Sittings iegin, 
18. Battle of Waterloo, 1815. 
Accession of Queen Victoria, 1837. 
Proclamation Day. — Longest Day. 
20. Cor}ms Chrlsti. 



1st Sunday after Trinity. 
MIDSUMMER DAY. 

"Men deal with life as children with 
their play, 
Whofly.<>t misuse, then cast their toys 
away."— Cow PKR. 
Dr. Dodd executed, 1777. 

Queen Victoria crowned, 1838. 

St. Peter. 



2nd Sunday after Trinity. 



Enr. 


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3 44r 


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8 59s 


21 


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9 Os 


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3 30r 


26 1 


8 19s 


9 Os 


27 


3 46r 


3 31r 


18 


8 19s 


8 59s 


29 


3 47r 


3 32r 


«| 


8 18s 


8 59s 


li 


3 48r 


3 33r 


2 



THE MOON'S CHANGES. 



First Quar. 
Full Moon 
Last Quar. 
New Moon 



6th,.. 2 min. past 
13tli,..58 min. past 
20tb,..35 min. past 
28th, ..54 min. past 



8 after. 
1 after. 

7 morn. 

8 morn. 



A HUNT BY TORCHLIGHT. 



THE IMarqucss of Winchester of the 
time of James the Second liad some 
singular habits. Amongst tliese was his 
custom of sitting at table for twelve 
hours at a time. He went to dinner at 
six or seven in the evening, and his 
meal lasted till six or seven tlie next 
morning, during which time he ate, 
drank, smoked, talked, or h'stened to 
music. The company that dined with 
him were at liberty to eat or amuse 
tliemselves,or take a nap whenever they 
were so disposed; l)ut the dishes and 
bottles were all the while standing upon 
the table. When Bishop Cartwright 
went to see him dinner appears to have 
been made a little earlier than usual. " I 
was received by tbe noble marquess." 
says the bishop, "with all kindness ima- 
ginable at dinner from one at noon till 
one in the morning ! " 

A contempoi-ary, Abraham delaPryme, 
in his " iManuscript Epheraeris," tells us 
also that the marquess would make all 
his men rise at midnight, and go hunting 
))y torchlight, as our artist has i-epre- 
sented them in the above illustration. 

It is said, however, that these eccen- 
tricities were adopted for a purpose, 
that purpose being that he might be 
thought unfit for public affairs at a time 
when things were going in a way of 
which he did not approve. The ni.ar- 
quess put off his folly, and appeared in 
his true character of a man of spirit 
when there was a prospect of s.aving the 
country from the effects of Jahies's 
policy. 



PREACHING AND PRACTICE. 

It is related of Fagoii, physician to 
Louis XIA'., that in the middle of au 



THE COST OFTEN SPOILS THE RELISH." 



oration on ilic pernicious effects of tobacco he 
paused, and taking his snuff-liox from his i)ocket, 
refreshed himself with, a pinch, to enable him to 
renew his arguineut. 

BERWICK BRIDGE. 
From an earlj- period there appears to have been a 
bridge across the Tweed at Berwick, though not on 
the same site as the one here shown. A wooden 
bridge which stood about a hundred yards higher 
up the river was carried away by a flood in 1199. It 
was re-built by William, King of Scotland, who then 
held possession of Berwick, after some objections 
on the part of the Bishop of Durham, to whom the 
south shore belonged. The bridge of stone shown 
in the engraving took upwards of twenty-four years 
in building, and was finished in Octol)er, 1634. Its 
length from shore to shore is 931 feet, but it is only 
17 feet wide. There are fifteen arches. 



AN APPEAL TO CHANCE. 

The father of Francesco Sforsa, Duke of Milan, 
when at work in the field was accosted liy some sol- 
diers, and asked if he would enlist. " Let me throw 
my mattock on that oak," he replied, "and if it re- 
mains there I will." It remained there; and the 
peasant regarding it as a sign, enlisted. He became 
soldier, general, prince ; and his grandson, in the 
palace at Milan, said to Paulus Jovius, " You behold 
these guards and this grandeur. I owe everything 
to the branch of an oak, the branch that held my 
grandfather's mattock."' 



LIFE SAVED BY LAUGHTER. 

" The health of Erasmus," says Mr. Charles Butler, 
'was always very di'licate, and he at last began to 
feel the infirmities of oldage. HewasalTlicted l)y an 
iinposthume, and the worst was feared, when he 
was cured of it in an extraordinary manner. . . . 
The perusal of the celelirated ' Litcras Ubscurorum 
Vivorum' threw him into a fit of immoderate laugh- 
ter ; the imposthume burst and the laugher was 
cured." 

A like tale is told of Dr. Patrick Scougal, a Scot- 
tish liishop in the seventeenth century. An old 
woman earnestly ;)esought him to visit her sick 
cow ; the prelate after many remonstrances reluc- 
tantly consented, and walking round the l^east, said 
i-'ravely, " If she live, she live; and if she die, she 
die; and I can do nae mair for her." Not long 
afterwards he was dangerously afflicted with a 
quinsy in the throat: the old woman having got 
access to his chamber walked round his bed, repeat- 
ing the charm which she believed had cured her 
cow ; whereat the bishop was seized with a fit of 
laughter, which broke the quinsy and saved his 
life. 

An old English dramatist alludes to a third in- 
stance : 

" I am come to tell you 
Your brother hath vttended you some sport: 
A (treat physitian, when the pope was siclce 
Of a deepe melaiicholly, presented him 
With severall sorts of mad-men, luhich toilde object 
(Being full of change and sport) fore' d him to laugh. 
And so th' impost-hume broke; the self-same cure 
The duke intends on you." 




BERWICK BRIDGE. 



1889 J XJ L Y 31 days. 




THE FND OF TIIJ CIVIL WAE 



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" July, the month of summer prime. 
Again resumes his Inisi/ time." 

Dog Days begin : end llfh August. 

Independence Day— United State?. 

Our Saxon anoestore called July Hey- 
monat, or Hay month. 



3rd Sunday after Trinity. 

Dr. Robert South died, 1716. 

Mrs. Anne RadclifEe, novelist of the 
romantic school, h. in London, 1764. 

Bombardment of Alexandria, 1882. 

Julius Cfesar born, B.C. 100. In his 
life.ime he is said to have defeated 
three millions of men. 



4th Sunday alter Trinity. 

St. Siuithin's Day. 

A dry summer ne'er made a dear peck. 

Papal Infallibility declared, 1870. 
Foundation stone of Bodleian Library 

laid, 1610. 
Army Purchase abolished, 1871. 



5th Sunday after Trinity. 

21. Robt. Burns, Scottish poet, d., 1796. 

Marquis of Hartington boi'n, 1833. 

Queen M:iry, a prisoner in Lochleven 
Castle, resigned the crown in favour 
of her son, 1567. 

French fleet defeated off Ushant, 1778. 



6th Sunday after Trinity. 

.\ndrew Marvell died, 1678. 

" / consider time as a treasure decreas- 
ino every night, and that ichich every 
day diininishes soon perishes for 
ever." -Sir William Jones. 



Enq. 



3 51r 
8 16s 
3 53r 

8 15s 
3 54r 
8 14s 
3 56r 
8 12s 
3 59r 
8 10s 



■i Ir 

8 9s 

4 3r 

8 7s 

4 6r 

8 4s 

4 Br 

8 2s 
4 llr 
7 59s 
4 13r 

7 57s 
4 16r 
7 54s 

4 19r 
7 51s 
4 22r 

7 48s 



Scot. 



« 1-2 

CO (g !» 

3 38r 
8 56s 
3 39r 

8 54s 
3 41r 
8 53s 
3 44r 
8 51s 
3 46r 
8 48s 

3 50r 
8 45s 
3 53r 
8 43s 
3 55r 
8 40s 

3 59r 

8 37s 

4 2r 
8 34s 
4 6t 

8 3]s 
4 9r 

8 28s 

4 13r 
8 24s 
4 16r 

8 20s 



THE MOON'S CHANGES. 



I First Qnar. 
I Full Moon 
I Last Quar. 
I New Meon 



6th, ..59 min. past 
12th,.. 2 min. past 
l!.th,..45 luin. past 
28th,.. 1 min. past 



5 morn. 
9 after. 
7 after. 
morn. 



A FINAL SKIRMISH. 



THE first skirmish of the civil wars 
took place at Kingston-upon-Thames 
in Jfinuary, 1642, and the last curiously 
enough happened at the same place in 
July six years later. 

The first was when some Royalists at- 
tempted to assemble an armed force to 
seize upon "the magazine of arms" de- 
posited in the town. The committee 
appointed by Parliament to inquire into 
the truth of the rumours relative to this 
assemblage reported " That there were 
about two hundred men there that are 
officers, and that the town is full of 
horses : that they have pistols and carry 
themselves in a disorderly manner, to 
the terror of the people ; that my Lord 
Digby was there on horseback with 
pistols ; that Colonel Lunsford and two 
others of that name were there also ; 
and that there were two rart-l<ads of 
ammunition going to them." 

Colonel Lunsford was apprehended, 
and committed to the Tower, and the 
attejupt of the Royalists was defeated. 
Throughout the civil war, however, 
Kingston remained faithful to Charles 1., 
and in consequence was repeatedly occu- 
pied by both parties. 

The last outbreak of the civil war took 
place, as we have said, at Kingston, in 
.luly, 1648. The Earl of Holland, the 
Duke of Buckingham, and Lord Francis 
Villiers, had assembled six hundred 
horsemen at Reigatc, but had to retreat 
upon Kingston, pursued by a consider- 
able body of Roundheads. 

On a hill near Kingston they made a 
final stand, but "after a gallant defence 
and as sharp a charge," says one of the 
Parliamentarians, "as ever I saw in 
these unhappy wars," were routed. They 
retreated to Kingston, but withdrew 



" SAY WHAT IS WELL AND DO WHAT IS BETTER.' 



during the night, liaving lost Lord Francis Villlers 
and twiuty others slain, and one hundred made 
prisoners. , „ .^. 

"Lord Francis hehaved," says Lysons, 'with 
signal courage ; and after his horse had been killed 
under him, he stood with his back against a tree, 
defending himself against several assailants, till at 
night he sank under his wounds." Upon the tree 
within whose deep shadow hedied, the initials of his 
name were carved ))y some faithful adherent, and 
there they remained till the tree was felled in 1680. 



AN OLD EPITAPH. 

" Stay, passemier, and lend a teur, 
Yoiith and virtue both lie here. 
Reading this, know thou hast seen 
Virtue tomVd at hut fifteen. 
And if after thou shalt see 
Any young and good as he. 
Think his virtues are reviving. 
For examples of those living. 
Practise these, and then thou mat/'st 
Fearless die, witere noiv thou stuy'st. 

OWEN Feltham. 

A NOVEL CAPTURE. 
At the time of Pichegru's irruption into Holland 
(1795), the frost wasunprecedentedly severe, and the 
Texel so completely ice-bouud, that he ordered some 
snuadrons of cavalry to charge across the frozen 
element, and capture the Dutch fleet locked up in it. 



They accordingly clapped spurs to their horses' 
sides, surrounded the ships, and made a capture nf 
them at the first summons, though their whole 
means of offence against a broadside were a few 
hundred sabres and horse pistols ! Welielievethat 
the occurrence stands without a parallel in ancient 
or modern story. 



DOUGLAS CASTLE. 

Douglas Casti,k is an ancient ruin in Lanarkshire, 
not far from Douglas Town. The Douglases, the 
nncient owners of the castle, who so closely linked 
the district of Douglasdale to Scottish story, were, 
says John Hill Burton, the historian, "children of 
the soil, who could not be traced back to the race 
of the enemy or stranger, as, whatever may have 
been their actual origin, they were known as rooted 
in Scotland at the time when the Norman adven- 
turers crowded in." 

The castle, besides all its old-world memories, is 
specially interesting as the Castle Dangerous of Sir 
Walter Scott's last romance, and the last place to 
which he made a pilgrimage in Scotland. 



A ROYAL CHESS PLAYER. 
A Spanish lord having freciuently played at chess 
with Philip XL, and won all the games, perceived 
when his majesty rose from play that he was much 
ruffled with chagrin. The lord, when he returned 
liome, said to his family, "My children, we have 
nothing more to do at court : there we must expect 
no favour ; for the king is offended at my having 
won of him evei-y game of chess." As chess entirely 
depends on the genius of the players, and not on 
fortune, King Philip, the chess-player, conceived he 
ought to suffer no rival. 




1889- 



-AUG-UST 31 days. 




PUNISIIMEXT F(J BAXKllCPTS. 



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Lammas — Scotch Term. 

" Men are but children of a larger 

growth ." — Dry den. 
Mr. Speaker Peel born, 1829. 



7th Sunday after Trinity. 

Bank Holiday. 

Duke of Edinburgh born, 1844. 

Queen Caroline died, 1821. 

Henry VIII. mar. Catherine Howard, 
his fifth wife, 1540 

Rt. Hon. G. J. Goschen born, 1831. 

Stli Sunday after Trinity. 

Trinity Law Sittings end. 
Queen Adelaide born, 1792. 
George Colnian the elder died, 1794. 
Sir "Walter Scott born, 1771. 

"The world agrees 
Thai he lorites well vjlio writes ivith 
ease."— F mo R. 



9tli Sunday after Trinity. 

Robert Bloomtield, poet, died, 18^3. 

Blackcock Shooting begins. 

Battle of Bosworth, 14a5. Richird III. 
iMKt liis life, and his crown was 
placed on the victor's head in the 
Held of battle. 

St Bartholomew. 



10th Sunday after Trinity. 

Sir Robert Walpole born, 1676. 
Landing of Julius Ciesar, B.C. 55. 
Count Axel Oxenstiern died, 1654. 
Louis II. of Hungai'y suffocated, 1526. 

" The ripest frioit first falls." 
John Bunyan died, 1688. 



Rxo. 

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10* 


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18 ij 


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20: 


4 52r 


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( '} 


7 13s 


7 39s 


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4 57r 


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5 Or 


25 


7 43 


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5 Ir 


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7 24s 


28 1 


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5 8r 


• ' 


6 56s 


7 18s 


l| 


5 7r 


5 13r 


2' 


6 ols 


7 13s 


3 


5 lOr 


5 17r 


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THE MOON'S CHANGES. 



First Quar. 4th,..27 min. past 1 after. 
Fall Moon 11th, .43 min. past 4 morn. 
Last Quar. 18th, ..51 min. past 10 morn. 
New Moon 26th,.. min. past 2 after. 



PUNISHMENT FOR BANKRUPTS. 



IN an early and rude state of society, 
bankruptcy is always looked upon 
with harshness and punished cruelly ; 
and perhaps it is really then less excus- 
able than It becomes when commerce is 
7nore advanced, and the returns of tran- 
sactions are less certainly to be depended 
on. Even "Venice in old times had its 
stone of shame for bankrupts. 

Edinburgh followed the example of 
that mercantile city, and set up one of 
her own in the begmning of the seven- 
teenth century. In 1606, the Privy 
Council ordered the magistrates of the 
Scottish metropolis to erect "a pillory 
of hewn stone near the Market Cross ; 
upon the head thereof a seat to l>e made, 
whereupon in time coming shall be set 
all dyvours (bankrupts), who shall sit 
tliere on one market-day, from ten 
hours in the morning till one hour after 
dinner. ' 

The unfortunates were obliged to wear 
a yellow bonnet on these occasions and 
for ever after— the livei'y of shivei^y in 
the middle ages -unless they paid up 
their debts in full, a not uncommon 
event in oldEdinburgh, when they could 
return to their own taste in the matter 
of apparel." 

An act of the Lords of Session in 1688, 
quoted by Dr. Chambers in his interest- 
ing "Domestic Annals of Scotland," is 
more particular regarding the indigni- 
ties to be visited upon dyvours. It 
"oi'dainsthe magistrates of the burgh 
(Where the debtor is incarceratecl), before 
his liberation out of prison, to cause 
him take on, and wear upon his head, a 
bonnet, partly of a brown and partly of 
a yellow colour, with uppermost hose or 
stockings on his legs, half brown and 
half yellow coloured, conform to a 



"OPPEESSION WILL MAKE A WISE MAN MAD." 



pattern delivered to the magistrates of Edinburgh 
to be kept in their Tolbooth ; and tliat they cause 
take the debtor to the Market Cross between ten 
and eleven o'clock in the forenoon, with the foresaid 
habit, where he is to sit upon the debtor-stone the 
space of an hour, and then to be dismissed ; and or- 
dains the debtor to wear the said habit in all time 
thereafter ; and in case he be found either wanting 
or disguising the same, lie shall lose the benellt of 
his bonoraiii." 



AN EARLY NAVIGATOR. 
Who first doubled the Cape of Good Hope? In this 
enlightened age the reply of every schoolboy to this 
query will be, " Why, Vascode l:iama, tobe sure." In 
Portugal, however, a much more ancient navigator 
has been mentioned. Vieyra, an old preacher of 
great renown at Lisbon, said in one of his sermons :— 
" One man only passed the Cape of Good Hope before 
the Portuguese. And who was he? and how?— it 
was Jonas in the whale's belly. The whale went 
out of the Mediterranean, because he had no other 
course: he kept the coast of Africa on the left, 
scoured along Ethiopia, passed by Arabia, took port 
in the Euphrates on the shores of Nineveh, and, 
making his tongue serve as a plank, landed tne 
prophet there." 

Dr. Southey says that the sermons of Vieyra, 
perhaps more than any other compositions in any 
language, display the strength and the weakness 
of the human mind. 



IN HENRY VIII.'S REIGN. 

A WRITER in the early part of the sixteenth century 
tells us that in his time, in the reign of Henry the 
Eighth, the luxury of the table had descended even 
to citizens, and that there were few wliose tables 
were not daily provided with spoons, cups, and a 
saltcellarof silver. Those of a higher sphere affected 
a greater profusion of plate ; and the quantity accu- 
mulated Ijy Cardinal Wolscy, though the precious 
metals are now so copious, still continues to excite 
our surprise. At Hampton Court, where he feasted 
the French ambassadors and their splendid retinue 
in 1528, two cupboards, extending across the lianyuet 
chambei's, were piled to the top with plate and illu- 
minated ; yet, without encroaching on these osten- 
tatious repositories, a profuse service remained for 
the table. Two hundred and eighty beds were pro- 
vided for the guests ; every chamber had a bason 
and ewer of silver, beside other utensils. 



PLAIN DEALING. 

During Sir Robert Walpole's Administration, when 
bribery was common if not universal, there was one 
])articular question which he wanted to carry in the 
House of Commons, to which he knew there would 
be violent opposition, and which was disliked by 
some of his own dependents. As he was passing 
through the Court of Requests, he met a meml)er of 
the opposite party, whose avarice he imagined would 
not reject a large bribe. He took him aside, and 
said, '■ Such a question comes on this day ; give iiii' 
your vote, and here is a bank-l)iH of two thousand 
pounds," which lie put into his hands. The inem)>cr 
made this answer: "Sir Robert, you have lately 
served some of my particular friends ; and when mv 
wife was last at Court, the king was very gracious 
to her, which must have happened at your instance. 
I should therefore think myself very ungrateful 
iputtuig the bank-bill into his pocket) if 1 were to re- 
fuse the favour you are now pleased to ask me." 



WHITFIELD IN PHILADELPHIA, 

Ix his autobiography Franklin gives his recollec- 
tions of the first visit of Whitfield to Philadelphia: 
" In 173J arrived among us the Rev. G. Whitfield. 
He was at first permitted to preach in some of our 
churches, but the clergy, taking a dislike to him. 



soon refused him their pulpits, and he was obliged 
to preach in the fields. The multitudes of all sects 
and denominations that attended his sermons were 
enormous, and it was a matter of speculation to me, 
who was one of the number, to observe the extra- 
ordinary influence of his oratory on his hearers, and 
how much they admired and respected him, not- 
withstanding his common a))use of them by assur- 
ing them that they were naturally half beasts and 
half devils. It was wonderful to sec the change 
soon made in the manners of our inhabitants. From 
being thoughtless or indifferent about religion, it 
seemed as if all the world were growing religious, 
so that one could not walk through the town of an 
evening without hearing psalms sung in different 
families of every street. And it being found in- 
convenient to assemble in the open air, subject to 
its inclemency, the building of a house to meet in 
was no sooner proposed, and per.sons appointed to 
receive contributions, but sufficient sums were re- 
ceived to procure the ground and erect the build- 
ing, which was a hundred feet long and seventy feet 
broad ; and the work was carried on with such spirit 
as to be finished in a much shorter time than could 
have been expected. Both house and ground were 
vested in trustees, expressly for the use of any 
preacher, of any religious persuasion, who might de- 
sire to say something to the people of Philadelphia." 



NOTES ON BELLS. 

The oldest bells have often mottoes such as we 
might expect in the times before the Reformation. 
Dedications and invocations to patron Saints are 
frequent, or to the Blessed Virgin. Tliere is one 
with the letters S. T. O. P. N., which is read " Sancte 
Thoma ora pro nobis," the Saint Thomas not being 
the primitive apostle, but Thomas a Becket. Some- 
times the legend is in poetry, as in the hexameter 
line :— 

" Virginis egregitB dicor Campana Marice." 
In less remote times the insci'iptions were some- 
times made to sound humanmerits as wellas Divine 
praises. Prayers were asked for the donor of the 
liell ; or the donors, when the peal was the result 
of combined benevolence, which led to the comical 
couplet :— 

" At proper time my voice Fll raise. 
And sound to my subscribers' praise." 
This lively gratitude is frequent in the inscrip- 
tions of bells of the eighteenth century, as in those 
of Leominster:— 

" Ki7id Heaven, increase their bounteous store. 
And bless their souls for evermore." 
Sometimes the praise is not graven on the bells 
but on adjacent tablets, as where a brass plate in- 
forms us that— 

" Here lies George Theobald, a lover of hells. 
And of this church, as this epitaph tells ; 
He gave a bell freely to grace the new steeple, 
Ring out his praises therefore ye good people." 
These trivial records are after all rare and ex- 
ceptional in their bad taste, for the mottoes of 
most of the bells, old and new, are worthy of their 
uses and of the places which they occuiiy. Here 
are some of them : — 

" Te Deum Laudamus." 

Eastbourne. 
" Venite, Exultemus Domino." 

I'eterborough Cathedral. 
" Christe, audi nos." 

Westminster Abbey. 
" Omnia fiant ad gloriam Dei.'' 
St. Neots. 
"Fear God, honour the King." 

St. Nicholas, Brighton. 
Wordsworth tells of his favourite church— 
" When the bells of Rylston played 
Their Sabbath music ' God us ayde ' 
(That was the sound they seemed to speak}. 
Inscriptive legend which, I iveen. 
May on those holy bells be seen." 



1889 — -s E P T E M B E R so days. 




''k^\ 



A TRAITORS EXD. 



1 


S 


2 


M 


3 


Tu 


4 


W 


^ 


Th 


6 


F 


7 


S 


8 


s 


9 


M 


lO 


Tu 


II 


W 


12 


Th 


1.3 


F 


H 


S 


15 


s 


i6 


M 


17 


Tu 


i8 


W 


iQ 


Th 


20 


F 


21 


S 


22 


s 


23 


M 


24 


Tu 


2q 


W 


26 


Th 


27 


F 


28 


S 


29 


s 


30 


M 



llth Sunday after Trinity. 

Partridge Hhooting commences. 

Oliver Cromwell died, 1658. 

French Republic proclaiined, 1870. 

Louis XIV. of France, the " God- 
given," born, le.'SS. He had all coin- 
nioii virtues and talents in perfec- 
tion. 

12 th Sunday after Trinity. 

Battle of Flodden, 1513. 

" III fortune seldom comes alone." 

Cromwell took Drogheda, 1649. 

Turkish army routed by John Sobie- 
ski under the walls of Vienna, 1H83. 

Duke of Wellington died, 1852 



13th Sunday after Trinity. 

Charles V., King of Prance, died, 1380- 
He M'as the tirst eldest son of a 
French king who had borne the title 
of Dauphin. 

" The labour ice delight inphysics pain." 
Battle of the Alma, 1854. 
Sir Walter Scott died, 1832. 



14th Sunday after Trinity. 

Virgil died, B.C. 19, and was buried 
near Naples, where a tomb is still 
shown MS his. This famous poet was 
noted for temperance and modesty. 

" The web of our life is of a minciled 
par)i,good and ill together. "Shakk- 

SPEARE. 

Sir William Jones born, 1746. 



15th Sunday after Trinity. 
29.-MICHAELMAS DAY.— 



En':. 


Scot- 






5 19r 


5 25r 


6 36s 


6 53s 


5 22r 


5 29r 


S 31s 


51s 


5 25r 


5 33r 


n 27s 


6 45s 


5 28r 


5 37r 


a 22s 


40s 


5 31r 


5 41r 


6 17s 


6 35s 


5 35r 


5 45r 


6 13s 


6 29s 


5 35r 


5 49r 


6 8s 


6 24s 


5 41r 


5 53r 


6 4s 


6 IBs 


5 44r 


5 57r 


5 59s 


6 13s 


5 47r 


6 Ir 


5 54s 


6 9s 


5 5]r 


6 5r 


5 50s 


6 3s 


5 54r 


6 9r 


5 45s 


5 58s 


5 57r 


6 13r 


5 41s 


5 52s 


6 Or 


6 17r 



THi: MOOD'S CHANGES. 



First Qaar. 2nd,...S5 min. past 
Full Moon 9th, ..53 min. past 
Last (Juar. 17th, ..49 min. past 
New Moon 25th,.. 42 min. past 



7 after. 

1 after. 
4 morn. 

2 morn. 



A TRAITOR'S END. 



THE central figure in our Illustration 
is Lord Wenlock,a noblem;jn of the 
reign of Henry VI., who played a promi- 
nent but not quite consistent part in the 
affairs of those troulilous times. Re- 
warded for his services to the Crown, and 
wounded in defence of the king at the 
battle of St. Albans, he went over to tlie 
Duke of York, whom he afterwards de- 
serted in order to plot with the Earl of 
Warwick for the restoration of Henry. 
Having been appointed to high authority 
by the Earl of Somerset, he was to have 
supported that nobleman at the battle of 
Tewkesbury, but failed to do so. Enraged 

II at his treachery, the Earl on finding him 

I with his troops, cleft his head in twain 

|] with a blow of his battle-axe. 

II 



! THE LIFE OP MAN. 

i! Iv St. Saviour's, Southwark, there is an 
il alabaster tomb of an alderman and his 
|! two wives, and on it is this inscription, 
1 supposed to have been written by Fran- 
I cis Quarles. The style is '•ertainly his, 
i bU't that quaint poet has beeu credited 
I with many productions with which he 

I had nothing to do. 

Like to the damask rose you see, 

II Or like the blossom on the tree. 
Or like the dainty flower of May, 
Or like the morning of the day. 
Or like the sun, or like the shade. 
Or like the gourd which Jona:» had, 
E'en so is man, whose thread is spun, 
Drawn out, and cut, and so is done. 
The rose withers, the blossom blasteth, 
The flower fades, the morning hasteth. 
The sun sets, the shadow flies. 
The gourd consumes, and man he dies 



WINDSOR CASTLE. 
Windsor as a royal castle and domain has existed 
from the Saxon era ol our history. The name, ac- 
cording to Camden, is from Windlexofra, or Win- 
dleshora, from the winding course of the Thames in 
this part. Stow, however, gives two other etymo- 
logies—from Wind us over, from the ferry-boat, 
rope, and pole, and from the Wynd is sore, because 
it lies high and open to the weather. 

One of the most romantic incidents connected 
with Windsor Castle is the imprisonment of 
James I., the poet king of Scotland. His captivity 
here lasted eleven years, and it was at Windsor 
Castle too that he first saw the lady whom he after- 
wards made his wife. 

He had been taken prisoner by the English when 
on his way to France to complete his education. In 
justice to his captors, one must allow that they 
tr 'ated him well : tiiey by no means stinted him in 
learning. He 
was tan g li c, 
and taught tho- 
roughly, says 
an old chroni- 
cler, " to tight 
with the sword, 
to tournay, to 
wrestle, to sing 
and dance ; he 
was an expert 
m e d i c i n e r, 
right crafty in 
playing both of 
lute and harp, 
and s n n d r y 
other instru- 
ni e n t s of 
music, and was 
expert in gram- 
mar, oratory, 

and poetry.'" 

After he had 
been long at 

Windsor, ro- 

jnance found 

for him a 

bride, and 

strange to say 

it was the very 

match that 

policy would 

have dictated. 
He was at 

thetimelodged 

in what is 

known as the 

Maiden's To- 
wer, or the 

Maid of Ho- 
nour's Tower, 

on the south 

side of Wind- 
sor Castle, and 

south-east of 

the Round 

Tower, or 

Keep. He had 

risen at day- 
break, he tells 

us in his poem 

of " The King's 

Quhair," and 

oppressed with 

thoughts of 

his captivity, 

had strayed to 

the window, to 

look out on the 

active world in 

which he had 

no share. The 

window over- 
looked a little 

garden, a sweet 

spot, laid out 

with arbours 

and green al- 
leys, and so 



thickly encompassed with trees and hedges that 
passers-by could hardly see into it. 

Perched on the green twigs, the nightingale was 
singing, and inspired by her song, the royal poet 
thought of love, a passion to which he had hitherto 
been a stranger, when indulging in tender reflec- 
tions, he cast his eyes downwards, and beheld " the 
fairest and the freshest young flower" that he had 
ever seen. It was a handsome young lady. Her 
name, her station, he knew not. She was accom- 
panied by two female attendants, and about her 
si)orted a little hound jingling with bells "proba- 
bly," says Washington Irving, " the small Itahan 
greyhound, of exquisite symmetry, which was a 
parlour favourite and pet among the fashionable 
dames of ancient times." 

The lady was no other than Jane, or Joanna, Beau- 
fort, a damsel of royal descent by both parents. 
She was cousin-german to the king. Without 
knowing anything of her station, J.ames fell vio- 
lently in love. 
History is si- 
lent as to how 
they met, and 
how he de- 
claimed his pas- 
sion, but we 
know this 
much, that 
Joanna Beau- 
fort gave her 
heart to her 
royal love r, 
and that they 
lived long in 
mutual love 
and sincere af- 
fection. 

The wedding 
was celebrated 
with great 
splendour. 
James then 
moved north- 
wards with a 
stately train, 
enlarged from 
his own coun- 
t r y as he 
crossed the 
border, and 
was crowned ai 
Scone on the 
21st of May in 
the year 1424. 
The only thing 
giving a mer- 
cenary touch 
to the arrange- 
ments was a 
demand made 
by England for 
forty thousand 
pounds to pay 
for the expense 
of his mainte- 
nance ; but the 
French wars 
made money a 
strong object 
with the Eng- 
lish Court, and 
the fourth part 
— ten thousand 
pounds — was 
remitted as a 
marriage - por- 
tion for the 
young queen. 
James's for- 
tune was one 
little known 
among kings— 
to fall in love 
with a fair 
damsel casu- 
ally seen, and 
just the right 
one too. 




VIRW FROM THE LIBRARY WINDOW, WINDSOR. 



1889 O C T O B E H 31 days. 




THF, BATTl.K OF THE WOLNUKD WAllltlUkS. 



I 

2 

3 

4 

J_ 

6 

7 
8 

9 
lo 
II 

12 
13 

14 

15 

i6 

17 
i8 

20 

21 

22 

23 
24 

25 
26 

27 

28 

29 

30 
31 



Tu 

W 

Th 

F 

S 



s 

M 

Tu 

W 

Th 

F 

S 



s 

M 

Tu 

W 

Th 

F 

S 



s 

M 
Tu 
W 
Th 
F 
S_ 
s 
M 
Tu 
W 
Th 



Pheasant Shooting begins. 

Jerusalem taken liy Saladin, 1187. 
Saladin and liis infidels treated the 
conquered with the tenderest hu- 
manity. 

Jonathan Edwards horn, 1703. 



16th Sunday after Trinity. 

Battle of Lepanto, 1571, in which 
14,000 Christian slaves were rescued 
from captivity. 

" Boughs are daily rifled 
By the gusty thieves. 
And the book of Nature 
Getteth short of leaves." — Hood. 



17tli Sunday after Trinity. 

Sir William V. Harcourt horn, 1827. 

Torricelli, inv. of barometer, 1).,1608. 

Houses of Parliament burned, 1834. 

Sir Philip Sidney died, 1586. 

Lord Palmerston died, 1865. 
"All men think all men mortal but 
t hemse lves." 

18th Sunday after Trinity. 

Battle of Trafalgar, 18a5. 

" The palm belongs to him who de- 

sei~ves it." 
Sir M. Hicks-Beach born, 1837, ( 

Michaelmas Law Sittings begin, ■,, 
St. Crispin. ^ 

Count Von Moltke born, 1800. ' 



19th Sunday after Trinity. 

St. Simon and St. Jude. 

The month of October in Rome was 
held sacred to Bacchus. 

All Hallows' Eve. 



EXG. 


Scot. 

3 .2 .? 

CO oi ^-^ 


* 
1^ 




6 7r 


6 24r 


9 


5 27s 


5 36s 


10 


6 lOr 


6 28r 


11 


5 23s 


5 30s 


12 


6 14r 


6 32r 


13 


5 18s 


5 26s 





6 17r 


6 36r 


15 


5 14s 


5 20s 


16 


6 21r 


6 40r 


17 


5 9s 


5 16s 


18 


6 24r 


6 44.r 


19 


5 5s 


5 lis 


20 


6 27r 


6 49r 


21 


5 Is 


5 6s 


( 


6 31r 


6 53r 


23 


4 57s 


5 Os 


24 


6 34r 


6 58r 


25 


4 53s 


4 56s 


26; 


6 38r 


7 2r 


27 : 


4 49s 


4 51s 


28 


6 41r 


7 6r 


' 


4 45s 


4 46s 


1 ; 


6 45r 


7 lOr 


2 


4 41s 


4 41s 


3 


6 48r 


7 14r 


4 


4 37s 


4 37s 


5 


6 52r 


7 19r 


6 


4 33s 


4 33s 


D ■ 



THE MOON'S CHANGES. 



First Quar. 2nd,.. 33 min. past 1 morn. 

Full Moon 9th, ..26 min. past 1 morn. 

Last Quar. 17th, ..37 min. iiast morn. 

New Moon 24th, ..26 min. past 2 after. 

Firat Quar. 31st,. .31 min. past 8 morn. 



THE WOUNDED WARRIORS. 



ONE of the illustrious monarchs of 
Ireland was Brien Boronilie, who 
was killed at the battle of Cloutarf in 
the beginning of the eleventh century, 
after having defeated the Danes in no 
fewer than twenty-five engagements. 
It was he of whom Moore wrote the well- 
known song :— 

"Remember the glories of Brien the brave." 

Tliere is an interesting circumstance 
related of the Dalgais, the favourite 
troops of Brien, when they were inter- 
rupted in their return from the battle of 
Clontarf by Pitzpatrick, Prince of Os- 
sory. The wounded men entreated that 
they might be allowed to fight with the 
rest. 

"Let stakes," they said, "be stuck in 
the ground, and suffer each of us, tied to 
and supported by one of these stakes, to 
be placed in his rank by the side of a 
sound man." 

Between seven and eight hundred 
wounded warriors, pale, emaciated, and 
supported in this manner, appeared, 
mixed with the foremost of the troops ! 
Never was such another siLrhtexliibited. 

To this incident Jloore has alluded 
in the song just mentioned :— 

"Forget not our wounded companions, 
irho stood 
In the day of distress by our side: 
While the moss of the valley grew red 
with their blood, [died ! 

They stirred nut, but conquered and 
The sun, that now blesses our arms with 
its light. 
Saw them fall upon Ossory's plain ;— 
Oh ! let him not blush, when he leaves us 
to-night. 
To find that they fell there in vain I " 



WAE MAKES THIEVES AND PEACE HANGS THEM. 



VALIANT BEHAVIOUR. 

When General O' Kelly -was introduced to Louis 
XIV., soon after the battle of Fontenoy, his majesty 
oltserved.that Clare's regiment behaved well in that 
engagement. "Sire," said the general, "they be- 
haved well, it is true ; many of them were wounded ; 
but my regiment behaved better, for we were all 
killed!" 



AT THE PLAY. 

Emeric GoBiER DE Banault, While ambassador in 
Si)ain, was present at the performance of a piece re- 
presenting the battle of Pavia, and, seeing a Spanish 
actor beat down the person who played Francis I., 
set his foot upon his neck, and compel him to ask 
(juarter in the most ignominious terms, was so 
transported with rage, that he leaped upon the 
stage, and in the presence of the whole audience 
ran his sword through his body. 



THE CITY WATCH IN 1714. 

" All the streets," says Defoe, writing of the Metro- 
polis in 1714, "are extremely well guarded by watches, 
or guards, who carry no other arms about them 
than dubs, or great staffs ; for, as this is a country 
of drinking, which often makes mankindfool-hardy, 
Hre-arnjs would be of dangerous consequence, if 
used here, as they are in the more southern 
countries. The watchmen are generally so civil as 
to lead a strayed stranger to his lodgings with a 
lanthorn: and if he prove mutinous, l)ut not out- 
rageous, they only carry him to their round-house, 
where he passes the night at a small expense, till 
the fumes of his wine are evaporated : but for 
vagrant rogues they are very usef uUn carrying them 
iiumediateTy to prison : and thus they keep the 
peace of the city." 



THE KING'S THREE DAUGHTERS. 

FouLQUES DB Neuilly, a Celebrated preacher of 
his day, addi'essing himself in a prophetic style to 
Richard I., King of England, told him he had three 
daughters to marry, and that, if he did not dispose 
of them soon, God would punish him severely. 
" You are a false prophet," said the king ; " I have 
no daughter." " Pardon me, sir," replied the priest, 
"your Majesty has three. Ambition, Avarice, and 
Luxury: get rid of them as fast as possible, else 
assuredly some great misfortune will be the con- 
sequence." " If It must be so then," said the King, 
with a sneer, " I give my Ambition to the Templars, 
my Avarice to the Monks, and my Luxury to the 
Prelates." 



A TALE OF VOLTAIRE. 

One day Voltaire, when a young man of about 
twenty-four, read to La Motte, wliolnda prodigious 
memory, a tragedy which he had written. La Motte 
listened with the greatest possible attention to the 
end. "Your tragedy is excellent," said he, "and I 
dare answer beforehand for its success. Only one 
thing vexes me ; you have allowed yourself to 
borrow, as I can prove to you, from the second scene 
of the fourth act." Voltaire defended himself as 
well as he could against the charge. "I say no- 
thing," answered La Motte, " which I cannot sup- 
port, and to prove it I shall recite this same scene, 
which pleased me so much when I first read it that 
I got it by heart, and not a word of it has escaped 
me." Accordingly he repeated the whole without 
hesitation, and with as much animation as if he had 
composed it himself. All present, at the reading of 
the piece, looked at each other and did not know 
what to think. The author was utterly confounded. 
After enjoying his embarrassment fora short time— 
" Make yourself easy, sir," said La Motte, " the scene 
is entirely your own, as much your own as all the 
rest ; but it struck me as so beautiful and touching, 
that I could not resist the pleasure of committing 
it to memory." 



REVENGE ON A BANKER. 

In the Irish rebellion of 1798, J. C. Beresford, Esq., 
a banker, and member for Dublin, rendered himself 
so \ery olmoxious to the rebels, in couseeiuence of 
bis vigilance in bringing them to punishment, that 
whenever they found any of his bank notes in 
plundering a house, the general cry was, "By 
thunder! we'll ruin the rascal ! we'll destroy every 
note of his we can find!" and they actually de- 
stroyed, it is supposed, upwards of £20,000 of his 
notes during the rebellion. 



OUT ON BAIL. 
There were at Rome four different ways of detain- 
ing the accused in custody, viz., the common jail ; 
commitment to a military guard; commitmeuL to 
the c.-ire of the consuls, or other magistrates, in 
tlieir own houses; and lastly, security for the per- 
son's appearance, which is what we call being out 
upon bail. 



OLD PLAYING CARDS. 

Cards, which were invented at the close of the 
fourteenth century, as they were drawn and painted 
l)y the hand, were proportionablyidear, and were not 
in general use until the reign of Edward the Fourth. 
The price of a single pack was 18s. 8d., a very con- 
siderable sum in those days. They were originally 
very different from those in use at present. In 
shape they were square; and instead of suits of 
spades, clubs, hearts, and diamonds, their marks 
were rabliits, pinks, roses, and flowers of columbine. 
The figured cards were veiy prettily devised; a 
queen riding on horseback with a rabbit liesideher, 
marked the queen of rabbits, or of clubs. A rustic- 
looking man, grotesquely dressed, and standing in 
a strange attitude, with a pink beside him, signified 
the knave of pinks, or diamonds. 



"ONE OF THE RIGHT SORT." 

M. Fleury was in 1848 private secretary to the 
Duchess of Orleans. When the Revolution of Feb- 
ruary iM-oke out, a rabble invaded the Palais Royal, 
where the princess resided, and began smashing 
works of art, lectures, statuettes, and knick-knacks. 
All the household was seized with panic except M. 
Fleury, who, throwing off his coat, smeared his face 
and hands with coal, caught up a poker, and rushed 
among the mob, shouting, "Here— I'll show you 
where the best pictures are! " So saying, he plied 
his poker upon furniture of no value, and, thus 
winning the confidence of the roughs, was able to 
lead them out of the royal apartments into the 
kitchen regions, where they spent their patriotic 
fury upon the contents of larder and cellar. A few 
days after he had saved the Palais Royal, M. Fleury 
was recognised in the streets as the Duchess of 
Orlean.s' secretary, and mobbed. He was being 
somewhat roughly hustled when a hulking water- 
carrier elbowed his way through the throng, and 
roared, "Let that man be ! He is one of the right 
sort. He led us to the pillage of the Palais Royal 
the other day." 



A LACONIC INSCRIPTION. 

The following lines were found, in 181.S, engraven 
on a stcme, among the ruins of the Friary, at Guild- 
ford :— 
" Si sapiens fore vis, sex serva gum tibi mando 
Quid, dicas, et ubi, de quo, cui, qiiomodo, quando. 
Nunc leqe, niincora, nunc cumjervore labora, 
Tunc er'it hora brevis, et labor ipse levis." 
Translation. 
" // you are willing to be ivise, 
These six plain maxims don't despise : 
Both ivhat you speak, and how take care, 
Of, and to whom, ana when, and where. 
At proper hours, read, v-ork, and pray. 
Time then will fly, and work be play." 

R. W. 



1889 — ^N O V E M B E R so days. 




INVADliSU KAGLAKU IN 1745. 



IIF 

2S 



17 

i8 
19 

20 
21 

22 
23 



S 

M 

Tu 

W 

Th 

F 

S 



24 

25 
26 

27 
28 

29 
30 



S 

M 

Tu 

W 

Th 

F 

S 



All Saints' Day. 

Sir Samuel Romilly died, 1818. 



20th Sunday after Trinity. 

Admiral Benbow died, 1702. 
Gunpowder Plot, 1605. 

" Treason does never prosper, what's 
the reason ? 
Why, when it prospers, none dare 
callit treason." —H.AB.Ri:sGTOS. 

Prince of Wales Tjorn, 1841. 



21st Sunday after Trinity. 

Mai'tinmas — Scotch Term. 
Richard Baxter born, 1615. 

" Those who in quarrels interpose 
Must often loipe a bloody nose."- Gay. 

Domesday Book completed, 1086. 
John Bright born, 1811. 



22nd Sunday after Trinity. 

Cardinal Pole died, 1558. 

Ferdinand de Lesseps born, 1805. 

Thomas Chatterton, poet, born, 1752. 

Princess Royal born, 1840. 

St. Cecilia. 

Cardinal Pole arrived in England, 1554. 

23rd Sunday after Trinity. 

November was called by the ancient 
Saxons Wint-vwnat, or wind-month. 

" How many things by season seasoned 
are 
To their riciht praise and true per- 
fection."— Shakespeare. 

Oliver Goldsmith born, 1728. 

St. Andrew's Day. 



Bng. Scot. 



THE MOON'S CHANGES. 



24 



Full Moon 1th,.. 5 min. past 4 after. 

Last Quar. 15th, ..36 min. past 8 after. 

New Moon 23rd, ..44 min. past 1 morn. 

First Quar. 29th, ..29 min. past 5 after. 

AN INVASION OF ENGLAND. 



WuEN Prince Charlie invaded England 
in November, 1745, two thousand High- 
landers of his armj^ crossed the Esk at 
Longtown. The tide was swollen, and 
nothing was seen of them diiring the 
passage but their heads and shoulders. 
When they reached the opposite shore 
the ipipers struck up, and they danced 
reels till they were dry again. 

The Prince entered England on the 8th 
of November, and took up his quarters 
at a place called Reddings, in Cumber- 
land. On the succeeding day he was 
joined by the western column, who 
brought with them the unpleasant news 
that they had lost thirty carts of the 
baggage in consequence of a surprise by 
the country people at Lockerby. 

Even thus early on their progress 
southwards, the Highland army lost a 
wreat portion of its number by desertion. 
The eastern column, led by Charles him- 
self, suffered most liy this cause, the 
disinclination to a southward march 
prevailing chiefly among the Camerons 
and Macdonalds. The Lanarkshire and 
Stirlingshire roads are described as 
having for some days absolutely swarmed 
with the men who thus abandoned the 
standard ; and great quantities of arms 
were found lying in the fields adjacent 
to the line of march, which the deserters 
had flung away to facilitate their pro- 
gress towards the north. 



A CERTAINTY. 

^ Honest Harry's alive!" — " Hoiv do you 

know it f " says Ned. 
' Oh, Fm perfectly sure— for Dick said he 

was dead." 



L18HARY"i 



"great actions ENCOURAaE GREATER." 



TINTERN ABBEY. 

Thk picturesque ruins of Tintern Abbey are situated 
in Monmouthsliire, eiglit miles above Chepstow, on 
tlie river "Wye. The style is a transition from Early 
English to Decorated, and in beauty of composition 
and delicacy of execution the abbey yields to few 
edifices in the l;ingdom. Tintern was built on the 
siiot where Theodoric, Kingof Glamorgan, was killed 
whilst fighting under the banner of the cross 
against the pagan Saxons in the year 600. The abbey 
was founded in 1131. Tintern has always been a 
favoured locality for poets and visitors of a poetic 
turn of mind. 



SUMMARY JUSTICE. 

Thk laws made by Rirhard I. for the i)reservation 
of good order in his fleet when sailing to Palestine, 
are worthy of notice. They were as follows :— " He 
that kills a man on ship-board, shall be tied to the 
liody, and thrown with it into the sea. If he kills 
one on land he shall be buried with the same. If it 
be proved that any one has drawn a knife to strike 
another, or has drawn blood, he shall lose his hand, 
if he strikes with his fist without effusion of blood, 
lie shall be thrice plunged into the sea. If a man 
insult anotherwith opprobrious language. so oftenas 
he does it, to give so many ounces of silver. A man 
convicted of theft to have his head shaved, tarred, 
and feathered, and to lie left on the first land the 
ship shall come to." Richard appointtd officers to 
see these laws executed with rigour, two (jf which 
were bishops. 



A CHILD'S TOY. 

FOK the amusement of Louis the Fourteenth, when 
a child, a piece of mechanism was constructed by a 
M. Camus, that probably was never exceeded Viy the 
ingenuity of man. It consisted of a small coach, 
drawn by two horses, in which was the figure of a 



lady, with a footman and page behind. This coach 
being placed at the extremity of a table of a deter- 
minate size, the coachman smacked his whip, and 
the horses immediately set out, moving their legs 
in exact imitation of the natural action of those ani- 
mals. When the carnage reached the edge of the 
table, it turned at a right angle, and proceeded along 
that edge. When it arrived opposite the place where 
the king was seated, it stopped, and the page getting 
down opened the door ; upon which the lady alighted, 
h;iving in her hand a petition, which she presented 
with a curtsy. After walking some time she 
again curtsied, and re-entered the carriage ; the 
page then resumed his place, the coachman whipped 
his horses, which began t(j move, and the footman, 
running after the carriage, jumped up behind it. 



POPULAR PASTIMES. 

Thk p pular pastimes of the time of James the First 
are enumerated iu the following lines, in a little 
work entitled "The Letting of Humour's Blood in 
the Head-vaine; with a new Morisco daunccd by 
seven Satyres upon the bottome of Diogenes' 
tubbe.' 8vo. Lond., 1611. 
" Man, I dare challenge thee to throw the sledge, 
To jump or leape over ditch or hedge, 
To wrastle, play at stooleball, or to runne : 
To pitch the barre, or to shoote off a gunne : 
To play at loggets, nine holes, or ten pinnes : 
To try it out at foot-ball by the shinnes : 
At ticktacke, Irish noddie, maw, and ruffe. 
At hot-cockles, leap-frog, or blindman-btiffe ; 
To drink halfe-pots, or deale at the whole can : 
To play at base, or pen-nnd-ynkhorne Sir Jhan ; 
To daunce the morris, play at barley-breake. 
At all exploytes a man can thinke or speake ; 
At shove-groate, ventei'-poynt, ov crosse and pile. 
At beshrow him that's last at yonder style ; 
At leaping o'er a Midsommer-bon-fler, 
Or at the drawing dun out of the myer ; 
At. any of those, or all these presently, 
Wagge but yo-tir fingei; I am for you, I ! " 







TINTERN ABBEY. 



1889 D E C E M B E R — ^Sl days. 




.VX ATTACK Oy THii KAXK OF ENOLAXn. 



1 s 

2|M 

Tu 

W 

Th 

F 

S 



S 

M 

Tu 

W 

Th 

F 

S 



15 


s 


i6 


M 


17 


Tu 


i8 


W 


19 


Th 


20 


F 


21 


S 



s 

M 

Tu 

W 

Th 

F 

S 



29| S 

30 M 

31 Tu 



1st Sunday in Advent. ;' 

1. Princess of Wales born, 1844. 

Nicholas Breakspeare, the only Eng- 
lish pope, elected, ]154. 

Mozart, famous composer, died, 1792. 

" To live in hearts we leave behind 
Is not to die." — Campbell. 



2nd Sunday in Advent. 

Gustavus Adolphus the Groat b., 1504. 

Black Game & Grouse Shooting ends. 

Charles XII. of Sweden killed, 1718. 

Sir Mark Isaiiibard Brunei, enarineer 
of the Thames Tunnel, died at 
London, 1849. 

Prince Albert died, 1861. 



3rd Sunday in Advent. 

George Whitefleld born, 1714. 

■' Years following years, steal some- 
thing every day. 
At last they steal us from ourselves 
aicay." — Popk. 

Lord George Gordon l)ora, 1750. 

21. Michaelmas Tmw Sittings end. 
St. Thomas.— Shortest Day. 



Enr. Scot. 



4th Sunday in Advent. 

"Some must watch, while some must 
sleep. 
So rims the world away." 

SHAKKSPTi^ARK. 

CHRISTMAS DAY. 

Bank Holiday.— Boxing Day.' . 
St. John the Evangelist. 
Innocents' Day. 



Sunday after Christmas. 

9. Ptt. Hon. W. E. Gladstone b., 1S09. 
New Year's Eve. 



7 50r 
3 50s 
7 52r 

3 50s 

7 55r 
3 49s 
7 57r 
3 493 

7 59r 
3 49s 

Ir 

3 49s 
3r 

3 493 
4r 

3 50s 

8 6r 
3 51s 

8 7r 

3 52s 
8 7r 
3 53s 
8 8r 
3 55s 
8 8r 

3 57s 
8 9r 
3 58s 



8 29r 
3 38s 
8 31r 
3 37s 

8 35r 
3 36s 
8 37r 
3 35s 
8 40r 
3 35s 
8 42r 

3 34s 
8 43r 
3 35s 
8 44r 
3 36s 
8 46r 
3 37s 

8 47r 
3 37s 

8 48r 
3 38s 
8 48r 
3 40s 
8 4Si- 

3 42s 
8 48r 
3 453 



THE MOON'S CHANGES. 

Full Moon 7th,..52 min. past 9 morn. 

Last Quar. 15th, ..58 min. past 2 after. 

New Moon 22nd, ..52 min. past after. 

First Quar. 29th,.. IC min. past 5 morn. 



THE BANK IN DANGER. 



DURING the formidable riots of 1780, 
the Bank of England was in con- 
siderable danger. In one night there 
had arisen the flames of six-and-thirty 
tires. The Catholic chapels and the tal- 
low-chandlers' shops had been univer- 
sally desti-oyed ; Newgate had been 
sacked and burned. The mob, half 
thieves, at last decided to march upon 
the Bank, but precautions had fortu- 
nately been taken there. The courts and 
roof of the building were defended by 
armed clerks and volunteers, and there 
were soldiers ready outside. The old 
pewter inkstands had been melted down 
into bullets. The rioters made two 
rushes : the first was checked by a volley 
from the soldiers ; at the second, which 
was less violent, Wilkes rushed out, and 
with his own hand dragged in some of 
the ringleaders. Leaving several killed 
and many wounded, the discomfited mol) 
at last retired. 

These were the celebrated "No Popery 
Riots." Blue ribbons were generally 
mounted to give assurance of sound 
Protestantism, and it was a prevalent 
movement to chalk up "No Popery" in 
large letters on doors. A foreign Jew in 
Houndsditch, we read, inscribed on bin 
door, "This house is a sound Protestant." 
Grimaldi, an Italian actor newly come to 
England, with exquisite satire, put up 
on his door " No religion ! " 

The leader in this strange outburst 
was Lord George Gordon, who was 
thrown into the Tower and tried for high 
treason, but a jury decided that the case 
did not warrant such a charge, and he 
was acquitted. The best condemnation 
that could be administered to the zealots 
he had led was the admission generally 
made of his insanirv. 



GUICK EETUENS MAKE RICH MERCHANTS." 



A PROOF OF LEARNING. 

Ik the old romance of the Seven Sages of Rome it 
is related that these masters ascertained if their 
IHHiil was sufficiently learned by placing four leaves 
of ivy under each post of his bed. Unaware of w)iat 
had been done, the pupil betook himself to rest, but 
in the morning when he awoke— 

" The child looked here and there, 

Up and down and everywhere. 

Mis masters asked, ' What him teas ? ' 

'Parfai /' he said, ' aferly case ! 

Either I am of wine drunk. 

Either the firmament is sunk, 

Either waxen is the ground 

The thickness of four leaves round : 

So much, tonight, higher I lay, 

Certes, than I lay yesterday.' " 
The sages were now fully satisfied. 

" The masters then well understood 

He knew enough of all good." 



A PHILOSOPHER'S EPITAPH. 

Paul Pateb, professor of mathematics at Dnntzlc, 
died on the 7th of December, 1724, in his 68th year, 
leaving this epitaph for his tomb ; "/fie situs est 
Paulus Pater, mathematum professor, qui nescivit in 
vita quid sit cum morbis conftictari. ire moveri^ cupi- 
ditate aduri. Decessit vita coelebs. In Enghsh it 
may run, " Here lies Paul Pater ,professor of mathe- 
matics, who knew not in this life what ic was to be 
afflicted with disease, to be moved by anger, or in- 
flamed by avarice. He lived and died a bachelor." 

Jj'epitaphe est cells d'un veritable philosophe, says 
his biographer: and perhaps truly, if the French 
academy be the true school of philosophy. I think 
that he was a better and a wiser man, who, con- 
cealing his name, caused his grave to be inscribed, 
" Vixi, Peccavi, Poenitui, Naturae Cessi." " I lived, 
sinned, repented, and died." 

This epitaph was, in Camden's time, to be seen 
" in the cloister on the north side of Saint Paules, 
now ruinated." 



CURIOSITIES OF PARISH REGISTERS. 

Tii ROUGH scarcity of paper or the way wardness of 
the keepers, many strange notices have found their 
way into parochial registers, those barren abstracts 
of the annals of mortality, 

" where to be born and die 

Of rich and poor makes all the history." 

An old record of funerals at Aberdeen gives a re- 
cipe for averting the pains to which weak brains 
are exposed by a debauch overnight, or as it is 
phrased,! "Against the held aiking by to muckill 
drinking." Another legal record at the same place 
is enlivened by two fashionable songs of the year 
1507. A private note-book is elsewhere preserved, 
where Scripture texts, memoranda of Puritan ser- 
mons, and the last words of dying Covenanters, are 
huddled up with such profane tunes as " If the Kirk 
would let me be," " The Rantin' Laddie," and 
" Green grow the rashes." More useful, but scarcely 
less impertinent, entries occur in English registers. 
At Ricliniond, in Yorkshire it is written, "Buried, 
Mr. Matthew Hutchinson, Vicar of Gilling,— worth 
£50 a-year;" and, "Buried, Mrs. Ursula Allen,— 
worth £600." This superfluity is perhaps more to be 
commended than the slovenly style of the clerk of 
Lincoln's Inn Chapel: "1722. This day were married 
by Mr. Holloway, I think, a couple whose names I 
could never learn, for he allowed them to carry 
away the licence." 

Prance furnishes still more amusing examples. 
The curate of Saint Andre-des-Arts subjoins to the 
entry of a marriage on the 31 st July, 1589, the 
following amiahle reflections : " On the first day of 
August, 1589, Henry de Valoys, sometime King of 
France, was in arms at Saint Cloud.with his heretics 
and the King of Navarre and his abetters, laying 
sieao -o Paris, of which he had given the pillage to 
the robbers of all sects who accompanied him, 
having sworn the death of every person of condition 
within its walls, except htretics and their adherents, 



so that he might overthrow the Church of our Lord, 
and establish heresy in the heart of Prance. But by 
the just judgment of God, who would not suffer 
such a perverse tyrant and hypocrite to reign any 
longer, he was slain l)y a religious of the order of 
the Jacobins, called Friar Jacques Clement, which 
religious (may his soul rest in peace 1) was instantly 
murdered by the attendants of the said Henry." 

" On the 30th of June, 1644," writes the priest of 
La Villette, " I said mass for the repose of the soul 
of Francois Caiguet, who was my good friend, and 
made several gifts ',o my church." Another curate 
of the same place expresses himself thus : " Buried 
on the 21st of December, 1675, Jean Tessier, labourer, 
. . . a mild and peaceable man, who on all occasions 
showed great deference and respect to his pastors." 

AN OLD COLLECTION OF JESTS. 
A CURIOUS book was left in manuscript by the poet 
William. Drummond of Hawthornden. On the title- 
page of it was inscribed, " DEMOCRiTiE,a Labyrinth 
of Delight, or Worke preparative for the Apologie 
of Democritus; containing the Pasquills, Apo- 
theames, Impresas, Anagrames, Epitaphes, Epi- 
graines, in French, Italiane, Spanishe, Latine, of this 
and the late age before." Specimens of this collection 
have been printed in the ArcbaeologiaScotica. The 
following extracts from it will, we hope, be found 
not uninteresting. Some of them, it will be ob- 
served, carry the genealogy of certain familiar jests 
a hundred years beyond the work of Mr. Joseph 
Miller. 

A Frenchman said, above all the pies in England, 
he loved occupy. 

A physician wondered how his horse could be sick, 
and not change his cohmr. 

One examining a milkmaid, asked her if she did 
keep the ten commandments? "No," says she, " I 
keep sheep." 

One who had fired a pipe of tobacco with a ballad, 
swore he heard the singing of it in his head there- 
after for the space of two days. 

A gentleman of Bedlam being asked if ever he 
was married, "You know all," says he, "I am mad, 
yet was I never so mad as to marry." 

At Oxford, a professor having got a new gown, 
someone saying it was too short, answered, "Let it 
alone, it will be long enough ere I get another." 

A painter being challenged for having painted a 
unicorn without a horn, replied, " It was not yet a 
year old, and that with time the horn would come." 

When they told George Buchanan that the Earl of 
Mar had gotten the government of the young king, 
he asked presently, "Who then shall have the 
government of the Earl of Mar 1" 

An honest man falling unawares in a ditch, 
desired his servant to help hiin out of it. ' Stay a 
little," replied his servant, "till I see if this be in 
my covenant, otherwise I will call some other to 
help you." 

George Buchanan said to one who complained, as 
they were riding, of the weakness of his memory, 
'■ that his horse was a great deal more forgetful, for, 
being but even now stricken with his spurs, he 
forgot it presently." 

Queen Elizabeth entering Bristol, a speech was to 
be delivered to her. The honest man begun, " May it 
please your sacred majesty, I am the mouth of the 
town ; " and then, all amazed, forgot the rest. She, 
sporting, said once or twice, "Speak, good mouth 1 ' 

One asking alms, being inquired what calling he 
was of, answered, "He was a poor scholar;" l)ut 
when he was set to read, and could do nothing, he 
replied, " He told them truly that he was liut a poor 
scholar, for he could not read so much as a single 
letter." 

Two Low Country men being in Scotland, the one 
asked the other how it was possible the men were 
so tall and big, and the horses so little? "Do you 
not know that," said the other, "the men here eat 
all the horses' bread?" meaning, of our oat bread 
which the commons use. 

The Marquis of Hamilton came to visit Sir Francis 
Bacon after the time of his great disaster, but found 
few to open his doors ; and asking him how he did, 
''■ Well," replied he, " your lordship is come to see a 
ruinous building, for the rats and vermin are all 
fled away from me." 



ONE man's fault IS ANOTHER MAN'S LESSON." 



WHAT'S IN A SURNAME? 

There is a sreat deal in surnames. What glimpses 
of old life they sometimes give us : they are little 
bits of history; revelations of human interest; 
scraps of poetry and humour; notes of affection, 
ridicule, sarcasm, and impertinence; often stories 
condensed into a single word. It is not surprising 
that they go to form a subject possessing a peculiar 
fascination, and that some people on their way 
through the world keep their eyes on signboards 
and their fingers turning over directories. 

It is a common error to suppose that surname is a 
corruption of sirename, and only another way of 
saying /rtf/i er's wa?Me. The word either means owr- 
name-a name given over and above the Christian 
name— or had its origin in the fact that at first the 
family name was written over (sur) the other 
name, as 

" de Cobbeham 
John." 

Names certainly go back to Adam, but the origin 
of surnames is nothing like so remote. They cannot 
be traced much farther .back than the latter part of 
the tenth century. They were first employed in 
France, and particularly in Normandy, and at the 
Conquest were brought into England. 

According to Mr. Lower, the practice of making 
the second name stationary and transmitting it to 
descendants came gradually into common use during 
the eleventh and three following centuries. It was 
not, however, established on anything like its 
present footing till the time of the Keformation. 
The introduction of parish registers may have 
materially ctmtributedto encourage the practice. 

Partnerships sometimes bring about ])eculiar con- 
junctions of names. There are well-authenticated in- 
stances of Sparrow and Nightingale, Birch and School- 
ing, Able and Willing, and several others equally ap- 
propriate. Catchem and Cheetham for a legal firm is, 
however, probably an invention, and so with Pen 
Quill, and Driver. The best that can be said of these 
is that they are ((uite possible ; so are Coy and Shy, 
Quarrel and Millachap, Bagwell and Saclcit, Bush- 
fortn and Hastaway, Blinks and Winks, Bacon and 
MuUon, Child and Littleboy, Trip and Golightly, 
Found and Pickup, Gabble and Chataway, Gaze and 
Stare, Breeze and Bloio, Charity and Scattergood, 
Strongfelloiv and Slenderman, Angler and Fish, 
Mouser and Cat, Day and Knight. 

In Scotland the locality of some names is par- 
ticularly well defined. We have MacDonald, Mac- 
Kenzie, Robertson, and Steioart, in the north ; Scott, 
Kerr, Blliot, Johnston, and Maxwell, in the south ; 
Gordon, Forbes, Grant, and Ogilvie. in the east ; and 
Campbell. Cameron, MacLean, and Kennedy, in the 
west. "This arises from the clansmen having 
made a practice of taking the name of their chiefs 
and considering themselves members of their 
family by adoption if not otherwise." 

There are some names met with in England which 
appear never to have crossed ihe Border. Amongst 
those of which England may thus claim to have a 
monopoly, we find Churchyard, Deadman, Sccnnp, 
Sivindler, Gotobed, Slaughter, Startup, Tv^entyman, 
Allbones, Littleprond, Fudge, Puddle, and Wildblood. 

The most prevalent surnames in Scotland, accord- 
ing to Mr. George Seton, are Smith, the name of one 
person in every sixty-nine; MacDonald. one in 
seventy-eight; Brown, one in eighty-nine, Robert- 
son, one in ninety-erne ; Campbell, one in ninety-two ; 
Thompson, one in ninety-five ; and Steivart, one in 
ninety-eight. " One person in every twelve in Scot- 
land," says Mr. Seton, " will answer to one or other 
of these seven names." 

The Smiths in England and Wales are calculated 
to be about one in every seventy-three of the popu- 
lation. If we take the three common names of 
Smith, Jones, and Williams, one person in every 
twenty-eight will answer to one or other of them. 

Life with a good number is a struggle at the best, 
and the success that attends us is influenced more 
than people sometimes think by the names we bear. 
Even the sound of a name is of consequence*. 
" Harsh names," says Isaac Disraeli, "iwill have, in 
spite of all our philosophy, a pamfnl and ludicrous 
effect on our ears and our associations. It is 
vexatious that the softness of delicious vowels or 
the ruggedness of inexoral)le consonants should at 



all be connected with a man's happiness, or even 
have an influence on his fortune." 

Some names, indeed, are almost fatal to success- 
they simply suggest jokes and encourage familiarity. 
A man has no hesitation in proving "by thumps 
upon your back how he esteems your merit" if you 
are called Twigger, or Tapp, or Trundle, or Littleboy, 
but he would hardly venture on it were you a more 
aristocratic Montgomery, or a Gascoic/ne. 

For a man to inherit an absurd or insignificant 
name is to have a stone tied i-ound his neck in 
childhood to keep him all his life in the depths of 
obscurity. It would be diflicult to find a famous 
character in literature, art, or anything else, with a 
surname the least approaching in character to, say, 
Toothaches, or Bang, or Baby. Who could fancy a 
Sguib, or a Gabble, visited at any time by the inspira- 
tions of genius ? 

John Wilkes expressed this idea once in con- 
versation with Dr. Johnson. Thev were speakin-,' 
of Elkanah Settle, the last of the City Poets. "There 
is something,' in names," said Wilkes, "which one 
cannot help feeling. Now Elkanah Settle sounds so 
queer ; who can expect much from that name ? 
We should have no hesitation to give it for John 
Dryden in preference to Elkanah Settle from the 
names only, without knowing their different 
merits." 

Considerations such as these— not to speak of 
testamentary injunctions and conditions attached 
to deeds of entail— have induced people from time 
to time to change their names. The world lieing as 
it is, and man's instinct leading him to fasten on 
and worry the ridiculous, it is often a sensible pro- 
ceeding. Cuthbert is made to take the place of 
Cuddy,Mc Alpine of Halfpenny, Belconibe of Bullock, 
De Winton of Wilkins, and Epliraini Bug is trans- 
formed into the aristocratic Norfolk Hoivard. 

It seems to be the established law both of Eng- 
land and Scotland thac one can take a surname or 
change it at pleasure without any royal, parliamen- 
tary, or judicial authority whatever. No permission 
is needed ; the only difficulty is to get other people 
to recognise the change. The ordinary method, 
however, is to obtain a royal licence, tiie chief use 
of which appears to be in proving identity, should 
that ever be necessary. 

In connection with short names, a pleasant anec- 
dote is quoted by Disraeli from Puller : " An opulent 
citizen of the name of John Cuts (what name can be 
more unluckily short?) was ordered by Elizabeth to 
receive the Spanish ambassador, but the latter 
complained grievously, and thought he was dis- 
paraged by the shortness of the name. He ima- 
gined that a man bearing a monosyllabic name 
could never, in the great alphabet of civil life, have 
performed anything great or honourable ; but when 
he found that honest John Cuts displayed a hos- 
pitality which had nothing monosyllabic in it, 
he groaned only at the utterance of the name of his 
host." 

The various spellings of the name Shakespeare 
have been collected by Mr. J. O. Halliwell-Phillips, 
and the following list, which gives the result of 
his researches, "is very instructive," says Mr. A. 
J. Ellis, "as to the capabilities of the English 
language to indulge the tastes of those wh» hold 
that variety is charming." 



Chacsver. 

Saxpere 

Saxspere 

Schackspere 

Schakespeare 

Schakespeire 

Schakespere 

Schakspere 

Shakspare 

Shackspeare 

Shackspere 

Shackspire 



Shagspere 

Shakesepere 

Shakespear 

Shakespeere 

Shakespere 

Shakespeyre 

Shakispere 

Shakspeare 

Shakspere 

Shaksper 

Shakspeyr 

Shakuspeare 



Shaxeper 

Shaxkcspere 

Shaxkspere 

Shakyspere 

Shaky sper 

Shaxper 

Shaxpere 

Shaxspere 

Shaxsper 

Shaxpeare 



In Scotland the most remarkable instances of 
the various spelling of surnames are found in 
Lindsay, Stirling, and Montgomery, which appear 
to have been written respectively in no fewer 
than eighty-eight, sixty-four, and forty-four w.r.r- 
ent forms. 

James Mason. 



"beware of the geese when the fox preaches.' 



KINGS AND QUEENS OF ENGLAND. 



Kings 
and Queens. 




2 • 

S-.S 


Reirined 
Y. M. D. 




a. 


William the Conriiieror. 

William Rufus 

Henry I 

Stephen 


1027 1066 
1057 1087 
1068 1100 
1105 1135 


20 8 15 
12 10 7 
35 3 2/ 
18 10 


1087 
1101 1 
1135 
1154 


60 
43 

67 
49 



THE SAXON LINE RESTORED. 



Himvy II. .. 
Ricliard I. .. 

.lolin 

Henry III... 
Edward 1. .. 
Edward II. . 
Edward III. 
Richard If.. 



1133 1154 


11.=)6 


1189 


1165 


1199 


1207 


1216 


1239 


1272 


1284 


1307 


i3n' 


1.^,27 


1.366 


1377 



34 


6 18 


1189 


9 


7 3 


1199 


17 


4 23 


1216 


56 


19 


1272 


34 


7 17 


1.307 


19 


6 12 


1.327 


50 


4 27 


1377 


22 


3 7 


1399 



HOUSE OP LA\CASTER. 

Henry IV I1367|1399| 13 5 .30 |141.Sl 46 

Henry V 1,389 1413 9 5 10 1422 33 

Henry VI Il42l|l422| 38 6 3 1 1461 1 39 

HOUSE OF YORK. 

Edward IV 1144211461122 1 5 114831 41 

Edward V 14711488 2 16 1483 12 

Richard III |l443|l483l 2 1 26 |l485| 42 

THE FAMILIES UNITED. 



Henry VII 

Henry VIH 

Edward vr 

Queen Mary 

Queen Elizabeth . 



1456 
1492 
1.537 

1516 
153o 



1485 
1.509 
1.547 
1 bo'A 
1.558 



23 


7 30 


1.509 


37 


9 6 


1547 


6 


5 9 


1553 


5 


4 11 


1.5,58 


44 


4 7 


16(3 



THE UNION OF THE ENGLISH AND SCOTCH 



CROWNS. 



James I. ... 
Charles I. .. 
Charles II. 

.lames II 

William III. 
Mary II. i.. 



1566 
160O 
16.30 
16.33 
1650 
1662 



1603 
1625 
1649 
1685 

1689 



22 


3 


1625 


23 


10 3 


1649 


36 


7 


1685 


3 


10 5 


1688 


13 


20 


1702 



58 
48 
54 
67 
(-51 
132 



THE UNION OP THE TWO KINGDOMS. 

Queen Anne 1665 1702 

George 1 1660 1714 

George IF I6a3 1727 

George in 1738 1760 

George IV 1762 1820 

William IV 1765 18.30 

Queen Victoria 1819 1837 



12 4 24 


1714 


12 10 10 


1727 


a3 4 14 


17611 


59 3 4 


1820 


10 4 28 


1830 


6 11 'ib 


1837 



The Commonwealth, under Cromwell and 
Son, lasted from Jan. 30th, 1649, to May 29th, 1660 
11 years 3 months 29 days. 



his 
; or 



CHANGES IN THE ROYAL TITLE. 

The following table, prepared by Mr. Baden-Powell, 
shows the actual alterations which have been made 
m the Royal style and titles in this country :— 
Year. Sovereian. Style. 

1066 William i. .. King of the English. 
110:) William II. . ^Englelandes King. 
ii3i «5tPi.hpn /King of the English, Duke of 

u.i.y btepoen ....| the Normans. 

TTpnrv TT /King of England, Duke of Nor- 
tieuiy 11. ..j^ mandy and Aquitaine. 

King of England, Lord of Ire- 
land, Duke of Normandy and 
(. Aquitaine. 
PToriv^r TTT /King of England, of Ireland, 
uenry in... j j^^^^^ ^^ Aquitaine. 

TTHwoi-H TTT /King of England and France, 
Edwaid ill. j ^^^^ Lord of Ireland. 

f King of England, Heir and Re- 
Henry V. ..-! gent of France, and Lord of 
y freland. 
King of England and France, 
and Loi'd of Ireland. 



1154 



1199 John 



1429 Henry VI. 



Year. Sovereign. 



1544 Henry VII 



1559 Elizabeth 



,.{ 



1603 James I. 



1801 George III. 



1877 Victoria 



..../ 



Style. 
King of England, France, and 
Ireland, Dcfenderof the Faith, 
and on earth the Supreme 
Head of the English and Irish 
L Church. 

J Queen of England, France, and 
1 Ireland, Defender of the Faith. 
("King of England, Scotland, 
■< France, and Ireland, Defender 
I of the Faith. 

rQueen of Great Britain, France 
J. and Ireland, Defender of the 
L Faith. 

fOf the United Kingdom of 
-I Great Britain and Ireland 
L King, Defender of the Faith. 
Of the United Kingdom of 
Great Britain and Ireland 
. Queen, Defender of the Faiih, 
V Empress of India. 



KINGS AND QUEENS OF SCOTLAND. 

Began to 
Navies. Reiqn. 
Robert II. (Stewart) 1371 
Robert III 1390 



Begun to 
Names. Reign. 

Malcolm (Ceanmohr) 1057 

Donald (Bane) 1093 

Duncan 1094 

Donald (Bane) rest. 1095 

Edgar 1097 

Alexander 1 1107 

David 1 1124 

Malcolm (Jlfftide?!).. 1153 
William iThe Lion) . 1165 

Alexander II 1214 

Alexander III 1249 

Margaret 1286 

John(Balliol) 1292 

Robert I. (;Bruce) .. 1306 
David II 1329 



James 1 1406 

James If 14.37 

James III 1460 

James IV I4s8 

James V 1513 

Mary 1542 

Krancis and Mary .. 1553 

Mary I5ti0 

Henry and Mary 1565 

Mary 1567 

James VI 1567 

(Ascended the throne of 

England as James I., 

2Wi March, ims. 



WELSH SOVEREIGNS AND PRINCES. 

Independent Princes, a.d. 840 to 1282. 

Roderick the Great ^j'} 

Anarawd, son of Roderick 8/7 

Howel Dda. the Good 9^"^ 

Jefan and Jago ^^^ 

Rowel ap Jefan, the Bad ^'^" 

Cadwallon, his brother 984 

Meredith ap Owen ap Howel Dha 985 

Idwal ap Meyric ap Edwal Voel 992 

Llewelyn ap Sitsy Iht 1015 

lago ap Idwal ap Meyric 1023 

Griffith ai Llewelyn ap Sit.sylht 1034 

Bleddyn 1063 

Tiahaern ap Caradoc 1073 

Griffith ap Cynan 1079 

Owain Gwynedd 1136 

David ap Owain Gwynedd l '69 

Llewelyn the Great 1194 

David ap Llewelyn .• • 1240 

Llewelyn ap Griffith, last Prince, 1246; slain 1282 

English Princfs, a.d. 12S4 to 1841. 
Edward of Carnarvon, afterwards King Edward 

II. of England; born 1284 

Created Prince of Wales 1301 

Edward the Black Prince, son of Edward III... 1.S43 
Richard (Richard II.), son of the Black Prince 1.377 

Henry of Monmouth (Henry V.) 1399 

Edward of Westminster, son of Henry VI 1454 

Edward of Westminster (Edward V.) 1472 

Edward, son of Richard III. (died 1484) 1483 

Arthur Tudor, son of Henry VII 1489 

Henry Tudor (Henry VIII.), son of Henry VII. 1503 

Henry F. Stuart, son of James I. (died 1612) 1610 

Charles Stuart (Charles I.), son of James 1 1616 

Charles ( Charles II.X son of Charles 1 16.30 

George Augustus (Geoi'ge II.), son of George I. 1714 
Frederick Lewis, son of George II. (died 1751).. 1729 

George William Frederick (George III.) 1751 

George Augustus Frederick (George IV.) 1762 

Albert Edward, son of Queen Victoria 1841 



STAMPS, TAXES, LICENCES, EXCISE DUTIES, &c. 



s. d. 

1 

2 

3 

6 

9 



BILL STAMPS. 

£ 

if ot exceeding 5 

•£5-\ /- 10 

I'll but not ) 1^ 

50 C exceeding i f. 

75 J LlOO ..10 

And every additional £100, or frac- 
tion of £100— is. 

DAYS OF GEACE. 

Bills of Exchange or Promissory 
Notes payalJle at any time after 
date have three days of grace al- 
lowed ; thus, a bill dated Jan. 1 at 
two months date is not due till 
March 4 ; but by a recent Act no 
days of grace are allowed on Bills 
drawn at sight, or on demand ; 
such must, therefore, be paid on 
presentation. 



RECEIPTS. 

Receipt for the payment of 

£2 or upwards Id. 

Persons receiving the money to 

pay the duty. 
Penalty for giving a receipt, liable 
to duty, not duly stamped— £10. 

The person giving the receipt 
shall, before the instrument be 
delivered out of his hands, ol)- 
literate the stamp by writing his 
Name or Initials, together luitti the 
true date of his so ivriting,m such 
a manner as to show clearly and 
distinctly that such stamp has 
lieen used. 

Letters acknowledging the safe 
arrival of Bills of Exchange, &c., 
and other securities for money, 
are no longer exempt from the 
Stamp Act, but must have a 
Stamp affixed. 

Penalty for refusing to give a 
duly stamped receipt in any case 
where receipt is liable to duty— 
£10. 

OHEQUES. 

Bankers' Cheiiues Id. 



PATENT (LETTERS) FOR IHVEN- 
TiONS. 

On application for pro- ^ ^' "^• 
visional protection ..100 
On filing complete speci- 
fication 3 

On certificate of renewal 

(before end of 4 years 

from date of patent).. 50 

Ditto (before the end of 

8 years from date of 

patent) 100 

Or the following annual 
fees may be suljsti- 
tuted for the fees of 
£50 and £100 :— 
Before the expiration 
of 4th year from date 

of patent 10 

5th year lo 

6th „ 10 

7th „ 10 

8th „ 15 

9th „ 15 

10th „ 20 

11th „ 20 

12th „ 30 

13th , 20 



LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANIES. 

On every £100 of capital 

to be raised 2 



LICENCES AND EXCISE DUTIES. 

£ 8. d. 
Appraisers & House Agts 2 

Armorial Bearings 1 1 o 

„ „ on a Carriage 2 2 
Arms,grant of,stampdty. 10 
Auctioneers, Anl. Licence 10 
Bankers' Annual Licence, 

United Kingdom — 30 
Beer and Wine Retailers 4 
„ not to be consumed 

on the premises — 3 
Beer drunk on premises 3 10 
„ not drunk on the 

premises 1 5 

Brewers' Licences :— 
Brewer of Beer for sale 10 
Duty per 36 gallons — 3 
Carriages,Annual Licence 
(Great Britain).— For 
every carriage with 
four or more wheels, 
drawn by two or more 
horses or mules, or 
drawn or propelled by 
mechanical power — 2 2 
For every carriage with 
four or more wheels, 
drawn by one horse 

or mule only — 1 1 

For every carriage with 

less than four wheels 15 
For every Hackney car- 
riage 15 

Dogs, any kind, Gt. Brit. 7 6 
., (Ireland) one dog.. 2 6 
Game Licences : - If taken 
out after 31st July 
and before 1st Novem- 
ber, to expire on 31st 

July following 3 

After 31st July, expire 

31st October 2 

After 1st November, ex- 
pire 31st July 2 

Occasional Game Li- 
cence for any period 

of fourteen days 1 

Gamekeepers, Gt. Britain 2 
Game Dealer's Licence ..200 
Gun (Licence to carry) .. 10 
Mari-i.Tge Licence, Special, 

England and Ireland 5 

„ By Superin- 
tendent Registrar .. 10 
Medicine (Patent)Dealers, 

Gt. Brit., ann. Licence 5 
Passenger Vessels, on 
l)oard which liquors 
and tobacco are sold : 
„ „ one year ..500 

„ „ one day . . i o o 

Pawnbrokers 7 10 

Plate :— To sell 2 oz. of 
Gold, or 30 oz. of 
Silver, and upwards • . 5 15 
To sell less than above 2 6 
Plate— Dty.on Gold per oz. 17 
Silver „ 16 
Publican's (Fnittd Kingdom) li- 
cence to sell spirits, beer, and 
wine to be consumed on the 
premises :— If rated under£l0 
£410S.; £15, £6 ; £20, £8 ; £25, 
£11 ; £30, £14 ; £40, £17 ; £50. 
£20 ; £100, £25 ; and £5 for each 
additional £100, with a maxi- 
mum of £60. 
Servants— Annual Licence 
for every Male Ser- 
vant in Great Britain 15 



Retailers of Sweets 15 

Tobacco &Snuff, dealers in 5 3 
Wine Retailers :— To be 

consumed on premises 3 10 

„ Oil Licences 2 lo o 



AGREEMENTS, &C. 

Agreement, or Memorandum 
of Agreement, under hand only, 
of the value of £5 or more, when 
not otherwise charged— 6d. Ditto, 
to let a furnished house for less 
than a year, the rent lieing above 
£25— as. 6d. Agreement for a Lease 
not exceeding ,35 years, the same as 
on a lease. An Agreement should 
be stamped within 14 days of date. 
The penalty for stamping after 
that period is £10. 
Affidavits and Declarations, 2s. 6d. 

APPRENTICE INDENTURES. 

Without premium — — 2s. 6d. 
With prem., for every £5 5s. Od. 

Articles of Clerkship to Solicitor 

in England or Ireland .. £80 

„ For Lancashire, Durham, or 

Scotch superior courts — £00 



INCOME TAX. 

Incomes amounting to £150 a 
year and under £400 are rated at 
6d. in the pound, but £120 of the 
total income is not taxed. Annual 
incomes of £400 and upwards are 
rated at 6(1. in the pound without 
any deduction. 



GOVERNMENT INSURANCE AND 
ANNUITIES. 

The lives of the persons of either 
sex between the ages of 14 and 65 
may be insured for not less than 
£5 nor more than £100: or if the 
amount does not exceed £5, not 
under the age of 8 years. The 
Postmaster-General is also em- 
powered to grant Immediate or 
Deferred Annuities for any 
amount not less than £1 or more 
than £100 to any person not under 
the age of 5 years. 

The following examples show 
various ways in which Insurances 
may be effected :— The life of a 
I\Iaie or Female between 21 and 
22 years of age may be insured for 
£10, by an annual payment 
throughout life of 4s. 4d. (id. a 
week) ; or by an annual payment 
to the age of 60 of 4s. 8d. ; or by a 
single payment of £4 48. ; or a 
person between 21 and 22 years of 
age having, say, £9 deposited in 
the Post Office Savings Bank, the 
interest on which is 4s. 6d. a year, 
can direct that 4s. 4d. of this 
amount of interest be applied to 
the payment of premiums on a 
Life Policy for £10; he can thus 
maintain his Life Insurance with- 
out decreasing his capital of £9. 

A sura of money may be insured 
on the attainment of the age of 
60 years, or sooner in the event of 
death, by the payment of a single 
or annual premium, and a sum of 
money may be insured at the 
expiration of lo, 15, 20, 25, 30, .35, or 
40 years, or sooner in the event 
of death, by the payment of a 
single premium according to the 
age of the insured person. 



LAW SITTINGS, ECLIPSES, AND MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION. 



THE CIVIL LIST. 

Hhu Majesty— £ 

Pri \-y Purse 60,000 

Salaries of House- 
hotel 131,260 

Expenses of House- 
hold 172,500 

Royal Bounty,&c. 13,2tX) 
Unappropriated .. S,040-385,0(X) 
Pensions (limited to 
£1,200 per annum).... 22,029 

407,(529 



ANNUITIES TO THE ROYAL 
FAMILY. 

Prince of Wales 40,noo 

Princess of Wales 10,0U0 

Km press Frederick of 

Germany 8,000 

Duke of Edinlnirgh 25,000 

Princess Christian of 

Schleswig-Holstein C,000 

Princess Louise Olar- 

chioness of Lome) 6,000 

Duke of Oonnaught 2.5,000 

Duchess of Albany G,iXX) 

Duchess of Cambridge .. 6,000 
Duchess of Mecklenl)urg 

Strelitz 3,000 

Duke of Cambridge 12,000 

Duchess of Teck 5,000 

Princess Beatrice (Prin- 
cess Henry of Batten berg) 6,000 

SPECIAL WEIGHTS & MEASURES. 

A Fodder of Lead is 
19jcwt., or 2184 lbs. 

A Firkin of Butter .. 56 lbs. 

A Stone of Butcher's 
Meat (London) 8 lbs. 

A Stone of Horse- 
man's Weight 14 11)P. 

A Stone of Iron Shot 14 lbs. 

A Stone of (xlass 5 lbs. 

A Seam of Glass, 24 st. 

of 5 lbs., or 120 lbs. 

A Faggot of Steel . . 120 lbs. 

Pig Ballast 53 lbs. 

Cask of Bristles 10 cwt. 

A Bale of Feathers 
about 1 cwt. 

A Pocket of Hops ..IJ to 2 cwt. 

A Bag of Hops, nearly 2^ cwt. 

A Hogshead of To- 
bacco 12 to 18 cwt. 

A Sack of Potatoes . . 168 lbs. 

A Sack of Coals 224 lbs. 

A Sack of Flour .... 280 lbs. 

A Dicker of Hides .. 10 skins. 

A Dicker of Gloves . . 10 dozen. 

A Last of Hides 20 dickers 

A Last of Feathers 17 cwt. 

A Last of Gunpowder 24 barrels. 

A Roll of Vellunj, 5 

doz. or .'. ...... 60 skins. 

COMMERCiAL NUMBERS. 

12 Articles 1 Dozen. 

13 Ditto 1 Long Dozen. 

12 Dozen 1 Gross. 

20 Articles 1 Score. 

5 Score 1 Com. Hundred. 

6 Score 1 Great Hundred. 

80 Deals 1 (J^iiarter. 

4 Quarters 1 Hundred. 

24 Sheets Paper..! Quire. 

20 Ditto 1 Ditto outsides. 

25 Ditto 1 Printer's Ditto 

20 Quires 1 Ream. 

21J Ditto 1 Printer's Ditto 

2 Reams 1 Bundle. 

10 Ditto 1 Bale. 



BANK HOLIDAYS, 1889. 

Easter Monday April 22 

Whit Monday June 10 

First Monday in August Aug. ."> 
Thursday Dec. 'M 



LAW SITTINGS, 1889. 

Begin. Unci. 

Hilary Sittings Jan. 11 .. Apl. 17 
Easter do. . . Apr. 30 . , June 7 
Trinity do. .. JunelS .. Aug. 12 
Michaelmas do. Oct. 24 .. Dec. 21 



UNIVERSITY TERMS, 
18S9. 

OXFORD, 

Begin. End. 

Lent Jan. H .. Apl. IS 

Easter Apr. 24 .. June 7 

Trinity June 8 .. Julv 6 

Micliaelinas .. Oct. 20 .. Dec. 17 
The Act, July 2. 

CAMBRIDGE. 

Lent Jan. 8 .. Apr. 1 

Easter Apr. 23 . . June 24 

Michaelmas .. Oct. 1 .. Dec. 19 
The Commencement, June 18. 

MINISTERIAL SALARIES. 

Prime Minister and Foreign £ 

Secretary 5,000 

First Lord of the Treasury 5,000 

Chanc. of the Exchequer • . 5,(X)0 

Home Siecretary 5,000 

Indian Secretary 5,000 

Colonial Secretary 5,(X»o 

Secretary of War 5,000 

Lord Chancellor of Eng- 
land 10,000 

Lord Lieutenant of Ireland 20,(XX) 
First Lord of the Admi- 
ralty 4,500 

Lord President of the 

Council 2,000 

Vice-President of the Coun- 
cil of Education 2,000 

President of the Board of 

Trade 2,0CO 

Lord Privy Seal 2,000 

President of Local Govern- 
ment Board 2,000 

Chancellor of the Duchy of 

Lancaster 2,000 

First Commissioner of Pub- 

licWorks 2,ooo 

Postmaster-General 2,500 

Lord Steward of the House- 
hold , 2,000 

Lord Chamberlain 2,000 



ECLIPSES IN 1889. 

In the year 1889 there will be 
three Eclipses of the Sun, and two 
of the Moon :— 

Jan. 1.— A Total Eclipse of the 
Sun, invisible at Greenwich. 

Jan. 17.— A Partial Eclipse of the 
Moon, parily visible at Green- 
wich. 

June 28. — An Annular Eclipse of 
the Sun, invisible at Greenwich. 

July 12.— A Partial Eclipse of 
the Moon, partly visible at 
Greenwich. 

Dec. 22.— A Total Eclipse of 
the Sun, invisible at GreenAvich. 



REGISTRATION OF BIRTHS, &c. 

In England an infant should be 
registered Within six weeks after 
its Birth. JSTo fee is payable; but 
after 42 days, a fee of 7s. 6d. is 
chargeable. 

ISotice must be given of Deaths 
to the District Registrar. Let this 
be done early, as a certificate must 
be obtained to give to the minister 
who performs the funeral service. 

In /Scotland a Birth must lie 
registered within 21 days. A Mar- 
riage must be registered within 
three days. A Death must be 
registered within eight days. 

INTEREST TABLL 

Without giving an elaborate 
series of tabulated figures to as- 
certain the interest due on anv 
given sura, at 2^, 3, 5, or any other 
rate per cent., any pc.-son may cal- 
culate for himself the amount of 
interest by a very simple process. 
The amount of interest upon one 
pound for every month at 5 per 
cent, is one penny. Having ascer- 
tained what any given sum 
amounts to at 5 per cent., other 
rates maybe calculated l)y adding 
to, or dividing it, thus : g moiiths. 
5percent.for£80wouldbe£2 6 
2j per cent., which is one- 
half 1 

3 per cent, is six-tenths . . 1 
3J per cent, is seven-tenths 1 

4 per cent, is four-flf ths . . 1 
If the intei-est should be more 

than 5 per cent., then the extra 
rate of interest must be added. 
Thus for 6J per cent, add one- 
fourth ; for 74 per cent, add one- 
half. 



12 



TABLE TO CALCULATE WAGES 
AND OTHER PAYMENTS. 



Yr. 


Pr. Mnth. 


Per Week. 


Pr. Day. 


£ 


£ s. 


d. 


£ s. d. 


s. d. 


1 


1 


8 


4.J 


05 


2 


3 


4 


9i 
1 l| 
1 6l 


li 


3 


5 





2 


4 


6 


8 


2h 





8 


4 


1 11 


3i 


6 


10 





2 3i 


4 


7 


11 


8 


2 8i 


4. J 


8 


13 


4 


3 02 


5i 


9 


15 





3 5i 


6 


10 


16 


8 


3 10 


6i 
7| 


11 


18 


4 


4 2| 


12 


1 





4 7i 


8 


13 


1 1 


8 


4 111 


8J 


14 


1 3 


4 


5 4i 


9| 


15 


1 5 





5 9 


10 


16 


1 6 


8 


6 1| 


lOi 

11: 

11: 

1 0. 


17 


1 8 


4 


6 6i 


IS 


1 10 





6 10$ 
7 3i 


19 


1 11 


8 


20 


1 13 


4 


7 8 


1 H 

1 7! 

2 2i 


30 


2 10 





11 6 


40 


3 6 


8 


15 4i 


50 


4 3 


4 


19 2 


2 9 


60 


5 





1 3 Oj 


3 SJ 


70 


5 16 


8 


1 6 lOv 


3 10 


80 


6 13 


4 


1 10 8; 


4 4i 


90 


7 10 





1 14 7: 
1 18 :>: 


4 llJ 

5 5| 


100 


8 6 


8 



If the Wa^es be Guineas instead 
of Pounds, for each Guinea add 
Id. to each month, or Jd. to each 
Week. 



POST-OFFICE INFORMATION. 



RATES OF POSTAGE. 

To andfrom all parts of the Uni- 
ted Kingdom, for prepaid letters. 

Not exceeding 1 oz id. 

Excdg. loz. butnotexcdg.L'oz. l.Jd. 

„ 2 oz. „ 4 oz. I'rf. 

„ 4 oz. „ 6 oz. 2id. 

„ 6 oz. „ .s oz. 3d. 

„ 8 oz. „ 10 oz. 3jd. 

„ 10 oz. „ 1-' oz. 4d. 

and so on at the rate of id. for 
every additional two ounces. A 
letter posted unpaid will lie 
charged on delivery with double 
postage, and a letter posted in- 
sufficient lyprepaidwi 11 he charged 
with double the deficiency.— An 
Inland Letter must not exceed 1 
foot 6 inches in length, 'J inches 
in width, or 6 inches in depth, un- 
less it be sent to or from a Govern- 
ment Office. 

RECISTRATIOH. 

By the prepayment of a fee of 
twopence, any letter, newspaper,or 
l)Ook-packet may be registered to 
anv place in the United Kingdom 
or British Colonies. The Post- 
Office will not undertake the safe 
transmission of valuable enclo- 
sures in unregistered letters ; and 
unregistered letters found to con- 
tain coin will, on delivery, be 
charged with a registration fee of 
M: If a registered article be lost 
the Post-OHice is liable to the ex- 
tent of £5. 

REGISTERED LETTER ENVELOPES 

Are sold at all Post-Offices, and 
by rural messengers, according to 
size, from 2id. to 3d. each. 

POSTAGE ON INLAND REGISTERED 
NEWSPAPERS. 

Prepaid liat^s.— For each Regis- 
tered Newspaper, whether posted 
smglv or in a packet— One Half- 
penny ; but a packet containing 
two or more Registered News- 
papars is not chargeable with a 
higher rate of postage than would 
be chargeable on a Book- Packet of 
the same weight, viz.. One Half- 
penny for every 2 oz., or fraction 
of 2 oz. 

Unpaid Rates. — A Newspaper 
posted unpaid, or a packetof News- 
papers posted either unpaid or in- 
sufficiently paid, willbe treated as 
an unpaid, or insufficiently paid, 
Book-Packet of the same weight. 

The postage must be prepaid 
either by an adhesive stamp, or by 
the use of a stamped wrapper. 
Every Newspaper or packet of 
Newspapers must lie posted either 
without acoverorin a cover open 
at both ends. If this rule be 
infringed, the Newspaper or 
packet will be treated as a letter. 

No Newspaper, whether posted 
singly or in a packet, may contain 
any enclosure except the supple- 
ment or supplements belonging to 
it. If it contain any other, it will 
be charged as a letter. 

No packet of Newspapers may 
exceed 14 lbs. in weight, or two 
feet in length by one foot in width 
or depth. 



INLAND PARCEL POST. 

For an Inland Postal Parcel, the 
rate of postage, to be prepaid in 
ordinary postage stamps, will be- 
Not exceeding in weight 1 11)., Sd. ; 
and for every additional lb. up to 
the maximum of 11 lbs., Ijd. 

Ma.^imuiu length 3 feet 6 inches; 
maximum length and girth com- 
bined, 6 feet. 

A Parcel Post Service has been 
established between the United 
Kingdom and the countries of 
the Continent of Europe and 
the British Colonies and Foreign 
Possessions generally. For rates 
and other conditions, see the 
Post Office Guide, published 
quarterly. 

IJJSURAXCE AND COMPENSATION. 

The Postmaster- General will, 
subject to rules, give compensa- 
tion for loss and damage of inland 
parcels as follows : — 

(l.) Where no fee except postage 
is paid^ the Postmaster-General 
will give compensation to an 
amount not exceeding £l. (II.) 
Where, in addition to the postage, 
an insurance fee of id. is paid, 
the Postmaster-Genei'al will give 
compensation to an amount not 
exceeding £.5. (III.) Where, in 
addition to the postage, an in- 
surance fee of 2d. is paid, the 
Postmaster - General will give 
compensation to an amount not 
exceeding £10 In no case will 
a larger amount of compensation 
than £10 be paid. 

INLAND BOOK POST. 

The Book Post rate is One Half- 
penny for every 2 oz.or fraction of 
2 oz. A Book-Packet may contain 
not only books, paper, or other sub- 
stance in ordinary use for writing 
or printing, whether plain or 
written or printed upon (to the ex- 
clusion of any written letter or 
communication of the nature of a 
letter), photographs, when not on 
glass, and anything usually apper- 
taining to such articles in the way 
of binding and mounting, or neces- 
sary for their safe transmission by 
post, but also Circularswhen these 
are wholly or in great part printed, 
engraved, or lithographed. 

Every Book-Packet must be 
posted either without a cover or in 
a cover open at both ends ; it may, 
however, be tied with string. 

No Book-Packet may exceed 
5 II )S. in weight, or one foot six 
inches in length, nine inches in 
width, and six in deptli. 

A Book Packet, if the rules are 
infringed, is chargeable if under 
8 oz. in weight as a letter packet, 
and if over 8 oz. it is transferred 
to the Parcel Post, and charged a 
fine of Id., in addition to anj' de- 
ficient Parcel Postage. 

POST CARDS. 

Post Cards, bearing a halfpenny 
impressed stamp, are available for 
transmission between places in the 
United Kingdom only. They are 
sold at 7d., or of finer quality at 8d. 
per doz. They can also be had in 
smaller numbers or singly. Reply 
Cards are now sold. Foreign Postal 
Cards, Id., IJd, and 2d. each. 



MONEY ORDERS. 

Money Orders are granted in the 
United Kingdom, as follows :— 
For sums not exceeding - £l,2d. 

„ „ exc. £l&not exc. £2,3d. 

., » ,, £2 „ „ £4,4d. 
„ £4 „ ,. £7,5d. 

„ „ „ £7 „ „ £10, Gd. 

POSTAL ORDERS. 

Postal Orders are now issued at 
any Money Order Office in the Uni- 
ted Kingdom, and atMalta, Gibral- 
tar, and Constantinople. Terms : 



is. .. 


hd. 


3s. 


6d. 


Id. 


10s. . . Id. 


is. 6d. 


id. 


4S. 




Id. 


10s. 6d. Id. 


2s. . . 


Id. 


4s. 


6d. 


Id. 


15s... lid. 


2s. 6d. 


Id. 


.5s. 




Id. 


20s. . . l|d. 


3s. .. 


Id. 


7s. 


6d. 


Id. 





Postal Orders are not payable out- 
side the United Kingdom, except 
at Malta, Gibraltar, and Constan- 
tinople. 

MONEY ORDERS PAYABLE ABROAD. 

Foreign Orders are issued at the 
following rates : — 

If payable in Austria, Belgitiin, 
Denmark, Danish West Indies, 
Dutch East India Possessions, 
Egypt, France, German Empire, 
Austria-Hungary, Holland, Italy, 
Japan, Norway, Portugal, Sweden, 
Switzerland and United States, 
&c.,orthe British Possessions and 
Colonies :— On sums not exceeding 

£2 OS. 6d. I £7 Is. 6d. 

£5 .... Is.Od. I £10 .... 2s.0d. 

POST-OFFICE SAVINGS BANK. 

Deposits of one shil ling upwards 
will be received from anydeposi tor 
at the Post-Offlce Savings Banks, 
provided the deposits made in any 
year ending the 31st December do 
not exceed 30^, and provided the 
total amount does not exceed 1.50^. 
exclusive of interest. When prin- 
cipalandinterestamount together 
to £200, all interest will cease. 

"TAKE CARE OF THE PENCE." 

At every Post-Offlce in the United 
Kingdom forms can be obtained, 
free of charge, on which twelve 
pennypostage stamps can beflxed, 
and when the form has lieen thus 
fliledupwith twelve penny stamps 
it will be received at any Post- 
Offlce Savings Bank as a Savings 
Bank deposit for one shilling. 

STOCKS CAN BE BOUGHT 

At any Post-Offlce Savings Bank. 
Any depositor who wishes can in- 
vest £10, or any larger sum up to 
£100, in Government Stock at the 
current price of the day. Mot 
more than £3(X) stock in all can 
be credited to any one account. 
The same facilities are afforded for 
selling out stock. The commission 
for purchase or sale of Stocks is 
for any amount not exceeding £25, 
9d. ; and 6d. for each £23 after. 

POSTAL TELEGRAMS. 

Charge throughout th" United 
Kingdom, 6d. for twelve words; 
names and addresses of sender and 
receiver included. Usually, how- 
ever, there is no necessity to tele- 
graph sender's address. Each ad- 
ditional word, ^. Numbers in 
addresses counted as one word. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. IO9 



^tatxan ^ave^ouse. 



Established 1886. 
••{=»•«=?•• 



B. & M. MELYIN, 

Jfamili) Grocers & Si,in« ^Icrchants, 

If, if, ^ ^i Ommtlm St., F©ffff®^, 

Opposite Municipal Buildings. 

TEAS, 

Carefully selected from first crop Teas of the best gardens in India, China, and Ceylon, 
and jiidiciovisly blended in our own Establishment. Good Useful Tea, 1/8 ; Special 
Blend, 2/. 

COFFEES fresh ground daily. Lazenby's Pickles and Sauces. 

Finest Vostizza Cairrants, Sultana & Valencia Raisins cleaned on the premises by the 

Bristol Patent Fruit Cleaner. 

WINES — Port, Sherry, Claret, Hock, Champagne, Moselle, Burgundy, Madeira, 

Marsala, Sauterne, Chablis. 
Max Gregor's Hungarian. — Carlowitz, Somlau, CEdenburg. Hidalgo's Natural. — 

Manzanilla, Palma, and Fino. 
LIQUEURS.— Curacao, Chartreuse, Maraschino, Benedictine, Kummel, Cherry Bi-andy. 

Angostura, Orange and Tonic Bitters. Crabbie & Co.'s Ginger Wines and Cordials. 

^unciin cjflockhart iXnh (to.'s ^^emteb SSntcvs. 

WHISKY.— Our Famous Old Blend has for many years maintained the character of being 

the x^erfection of Blended Whisky. From the Extensive Stock we hold of Whisky, 

selected with the greatest care from the best Distilleries in Scotland, we confidently 

guarantee Our Old Blend as being of an uniform quality and of the purest description. 

BRANDY.— Hennessey's Martell, Courvoisiers, and Otard. 

RUM.— Finest Old Jamaica. GIN.— Fockink, Loopuyt, Old Tom. 



MALT LIQUORS. — Bass & Allsopp's Pale Ale. Melvin's and Younger's Edinburgh 
Ale. Barclay, Perkins, & Co. 's Imperial Porter, liaggett's Nourishing Stout and 
Golden Hop Pale Ale. Pilsenev Imager Beer, American Champagne Cider. 

SPECIAL FOR XMAS. 

CHAMPAGNE— Shipped direct from France before the rise of duty. 
CARTE ROSE, 36/ per Dozen. 
CARTE BLANCHE, 42/ per do. 
Sample Bottle, 3/ and 3/6. 



GHRi8T(V\AS G©SpgyES IN GRE^T V./\R1ETY. 



H 



no 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



WINTER CLOTHING. 



J 



f) 







BEGS TO INTIMATE THAT HIS STOCK is now COMPLETE. 



SPECIAL LINES in OVERCOATINGS, WORSTED CLOTHS, and 
SUITINGS, for the present Season. 

Gentlemen favouring me with their Orders will have them Tastefully Cut and 
Well Made in all the Leading Styles. 



"^ ts) 



^ij^mi. 



14 \SrEST 



mAwifp 



STREET. 14 



|3 lumbers, 

Gasfitters, Tinsmiths, Bellhangers, <S^c. 

1 WEST HI(§H STI^EET, fORFAl^. 



REPAIRS carefully attended to in Town and Country. 



I^afge ^todk of Ifoi|rqoi]gefy f^tifi^i^l]ii)^^ 
Always on hand. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. Ill 



^amfcr axxb ^ccorafor, 

Desires respectfully to call attention to his New Stock of Paper-hangings and 
General Decorations, suitable for Rooms, Lobbies, and Staircases. Pattern Books 
and Decorative Designs sent to any Address. A large selection of Room and Picture 
Frame Mouldings. Pictures Framed. 

All orders will receive prompt attention. 

31 WEST HIGlI STREET, FORFAR. 

WILLIAM FULLERTON 

Has always on hand a First-Class selection of Boots, Shoes, and 
Slippf:rs from the best manufacturers in the trade, at prices which 
defy competition. 

Always on hand a Splendid Stock of BOYS' and GIRLS' BOOTS at the very 

lowest possible prices. 

DRESS SLIPPERS in great variety. Colour to match any Dress on a day's notice. 

A// kinds of Athletic Shoes kept i?i Stock, 

LAWN TENNIS SHOES SOLED & HEELED. 

REPAIRING DONE ON THE PREMISES. 

Boots and Shoes made to measure, Hand-Sewn, 
Machine-Sewn, or Pegged. 

NOTE THE ADDRESS :— 

William Rullei^ton, 

30 CASTLE STREET, FORFAR. 

2 BACKWYND (adjoining Castle Street), FORFAR. 

Hot Dinneps & Luncheons from 12 till 3. 

Tea, Coffee, Hoi Pies, and all Temperance Refreshments. 



Families supplied with superior Ginger Beer. 



112 ADVERTISEMENTS. 



THE 



^oi^ikf w^ml Seview 




Published every Friday Morning. 
4 Pages Demy— Price ONE HALFPENNY. 



ALTHOUGH recently established, the FORFAR REVIEW has 
already secured a firm footing in Forfar and the Howe of 
Strathmore, which embraces a population of upwards of 20,000. No 
eifort nor expense is spared in popularising the Paper. 



Fu/I and Oareful Reports of all Local Matters. 
Serial Stories. Chips. 

Stories and Traditions of Forfar. 
Humorous Doric Sketciies. 
Ladies' Column. 

Literary Extracts, &c. 



§est ^etus^jajin* for ^bbi^rtis^rs. 

EVERY ADVERTISEMENT EFFECTIVELY DISPLAYED. 



Printers and /TTTTAnrTT Q^ f" C^ 

Publishers- 1 rliliAirl Oc \^\J. 
Offices— 47 Castle St., Forfar. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



113 



FINEST VIOLIN STRINGS, 



VIOLINS, CONCERTINAS, and MELODEONS Repaired. VIOLIN BOWS Re-haired. 



REGISTRY OFFICE for SERVANTS. 

29 and 31 WEST HIGH STREET, FORFAR. 




PETER REID, 

1 (sASTLE StI^EET, 




IP ft ia w Ik 



m 



m^ 




Established 1794. 




?^^^ 



yj 



Tkm^ 



CHINA MERCHANT, \2h WEST HIGH ST., 

Has always on hand a large assortment of Staffordshire CHINA and 
EARTHENWARE. TABLE CRYSTAL from the Best English and 
Foreign Makers. 



Note the Address— JAMES SHEPHERD, Jun., 12i West High Street, Forfar. 



114 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



ALEX. ROBERTSON, 

OSNABURGH STREET, FORFAR. 



LUNCHEONS, TEAS, &c., on the Shortest Notice, and 
at Moderate Charges. 

A. R. having possession of OSNABURGH STREET HALL will 
be prepared to take engagements for Marriage Parties, Balls, 
Suppers, &c. Estimates Given. 



JSRieE LIST. 



2s Gd to 3s 6d per Bottle. 

2s 6d to 3s 6d ,, 

4s 6d to 5s ,, 

2s (kl to 3s ,, 

2s 6d to 3s ,, 

17s (jd to 18s Gd i3er Gallcm. 

3s per Bottle. 
18s per Gallon. 

OS to 3s 6d per Bottle. 



POET WINE, 

SHERRY, 

FINE MATURED BRANDY, 

FINE OLD HIGHLAND WHISKY, 
GLENORANT BLEND, 

Do. do., 

"The BAILIE NICOL JARVIE " BLEND of Old 
Scotch Whisky, 

Do. do. do., 
OLD JAMAICA RUM, 

BASS'S BITTER BEER, 

EDINBURGH ALES, 

LONDON PORTER, 

TABLE BEER, ... 2s 

ANY QUANTITY TO THE TRADE AT W^lIOLESALE 
PRICES— ALL IN SPLENDID CONDITION. 

DUNCAN FLOCKHART cb Co.'s AERATED WATERS. 

Agent for D. NICOLL'S SUPERIOR LEMONADE— Manufactory, Fleuchar Craig, DUNDEE. 
Large Quantities at Wholesale Prices. 



2s 6d per Dozen. 

2s 3d ,, 

2s 6d 



ALL ORDERS PUNCTUALLY ATTENDED TO. 



OSNABURGH BAR. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 1 1 5 



JACK'S TEA 

At Is 8d per lb. has no equal at the price. Superior to most 

local 2/ Teas. 



JACK'S 2s TEA. a* 



Strong. Rich. Liquoring. Flavouring. 

Pronounced by all who have tried it to be the best obtainable at the Price. 
EXQUISITELY CHOICE BLEND at 2s 6d. 



A BOON TO COFF^^ DRINKERS- 

The Finest Coffees the world produces ROASTED and GROUND 
on the premises, lOd to Is 8 d peP lb. Finer cannot be had. 

ROBBRT~F. JACK, 

20 CASTLE ST., FORFAR. 

JAS. W. ROBERTSON, 

ay>ex^axi(^cx anb decorator, 

52 CASTLE ST., FORFAR. 

ALWAYS ON HAND, 

LARGE VARIETY OF CHEAP PAPERHANGINGS, BEST QUALITY. 

ESTIMATES FlJRNISllEr). 

CTURES FRAMED. 

GLASS CUT TO SIZE. 



Il6 ADVERTISEMENTS. 



ROBERT M^NAB, 

150 EAST HIGH STREET, FORFAR, i 

Has always a Complete Stock of the Newest and Most Fashionable 
Materials suitable for Gentlemen's wear. 



Best Black Diag-onal Coating's, Tweed Suiting's, Over- 
coating's, Ulstering's, and Trousering's. 

A Beautiful INDIGO SERGE, all Wool, six quarters wide, at 4s per yard, suitable for 
either Ladies' or Gentlemen's wear. 

Gentlemen's Hosiery of every Description, both light and heavy. Hats, Caps, Braces, 

Scarfs, Ties, Gloves, and Shirts. 



All former Measures kept. Orders by Letter pronipty attended to. 
Patterns by Post or otherwise when requested. 




yj^ rrJ^^^TJ^ 



"\. B&mMM 




©OBAGGONISJII^ 
8 CASTLE STREET, 

Has always on hand a LARGE SELECTION of FANCY GOODS, 
Habana, Indian, and Mexican 

Gigaps i^d GI|§i(ie ^sbaQQSS. 

ALSO, 

EGYPTIAN & AMERICAN CIGARETTES OF 
THE BEST BRANDS. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. II7 



LO^W & CO.'S 



CELEBRATED 



PURE AND ( Tilflrl r\r\HATt ' economical, 

SWEET. i liv/Af Oliillili/ ( NUTRITIOUS, 

Should be used in every Household. 



Superior Pastry and | Choice Cakes, 

Fancy Goods. | Plain and Ornamented. 

FOl^Ffl^^ BflKE^V, Castle Street. 



PUNGENT, ) ^Ir 3K^ <A\ Is ' FLAVOURY, 

• PURE. j ^ JEl} ^^^ @) 1 STRONG. 

AT 

2s and 2s 8d per Lb., 

SHOULD BE TRIED BY ALL. 



LOW & CO.'S 
QOLD MEDAL HAMS 

^RE PERFJECTION- 

PORPAR BRANCHES :- 

i5 EAST HIGH STREET, io6 WEST HIGH STREET, 

AND 

FORFAR BAKERY BUILDINGS, CASTLE ST. 



Hi 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



JAMES MARSHALL 

Invites all those who wish to buy Genuine DRAPERY GOODS 
at Moderate Prices to call at No. no West High Street, Forfar. 



DRAPER, CLOTHIER, & HATTER, 110 West High Street, , 



i^ 






BEST QUALITY ONLY KEPT. 



S) 



Imported Direct from one of the Best Makers in Germany. 

SPLENDID ASSORTMENT. NEWEST STYLES. 
QUALITY UNSURPASSED. 



BEST SELECTION of MELODEONS in FORFAR at PRICES to suit everybody. 

PRICES— 4s 6d, 5s, 5s 6d, 6s, 6s 9d, 7s, 7s 6d, 8s, 8s 6d, 
10s 6d, lis 6d, 12s 6d, 13s 6d, 14s 6d, 15s, 18s, 25s. 

MELODEONS & CONCERTINAS REPAIRED. 



BOOKSELLER, AND FANCY GOODS WAREHOUSEMAN, 

73 East High Street, Forfar. 

KTO'TICIxEj.— To FARMERS, GAMEKEEPERS, and 
others requiring FIRST-CLASS HAND-MADE BOOTS, 
Leave your Measures with 



0] yML,^9, 




36 EAST HIGH STREET. 

ALL SORTS OF READY-MADE BOOTS and SHOES IN STOCK. 

Repairing on the Shortest Notice. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 1 1 9 



DAVID MASTERTON, 

Plain I and | Ofnam^ivtal | Plastef€f 



All Kinds of Tile Work, Cement Work, Concrete Floors, &c. 



20 CANMORE STREET, FORFAR. 



AS PRACTISED BY 

mm wmwMGm^ 

TEETH SPECIALIST FORFAR, 

Can hardly fail to give Greatest Possible Satisfaction, as all Cases 
and Classes receive most careful personal attention from Dr French. 
CHARGES MOST MODERATE. 



EXCELLENT SETS of TEETH, from £2. BEST TEETH, 5s each, on Vulcanite. 
GOLD, Extra. Painless Extraction under Gas, 2s 6d. 



Visits Kirriemuir, Tuesdays 11 to 1 ; Fridays, 11 to 5. At Home all other Hours. 



Surgery and Residence — 

33 EAST HIGH ST., FORFAR. 

For the best Value in 

FRUIT WINES. COSAQUES, HONEY, TEA, & FORFAR BRIDIES, 

Try SADDLiEf^'S, 

35 EAST HIGH STREET, FORFAR, 



I20 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



<» i?~=~r 'i' 



HOOD'S 



I 



BOOTS *& + SHOES. 







ALL who really want Good Value slioixld Try HOOD'S BOOTS, SHOES, and 
SLIPPERS. They are of First-Class Workmanship, and manufactured from the 
best materials. 

Universal Satisfaction Guaranteed to all. 



REPAIRS. — Special attention is given to this Department — the best materials used, and 
the Lowest Prices charged. BOOTS RE-GUSSETTED. 



CUSTOMER WORK.— As HOOD is a practical Tradesman in all the branches of the 
Boot and Shoe Trade, and employs none but the best workmen, he can with confidence 
recommend his own make — Pegged, Rivetted and Sewed. 



Address-HOOD'S, 96 Castle St., Forfar. 



:,l: 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 121 



READY-MADE CLOTHING, 

In great Variety, G-ood Quality, and Cheap. 

ALSO, 

Shirts, Drawers, Ties, Scarfs, Fronts, and Braces. 



INSPECTION CORDIALLY INVITED. 



25 DUNDEE LOAN, FORFAR. 




Published Every FRIDA Y MORNING. 



Large and Increasing Circulation. 

Best Medium for Local Advertisements. 



Publisher-GEORGE S. NICOLSON, 
Printer, Osnaburgh Street, Forfar. 



122 ADVERTISEMENTS. 



Gent's Garments made to Measure, in first-class Style and Finish. 



UXllililRCn DICK, 

CLOTHIER <fe Matter, 

Invites Inspection of his Stock, purchased from the Best 
Manufacturers, including all the Newest Styles, Fabrics, and 
Colourings — Quality and Price unsurpassed. 

Ulsterings, Overcoatings, and Worsted Coatings. 
Scotch Saxony, Cheviot and Homespun Suitings. 
West of England Cloths and Suitings. 
Trouserings and Vestings. 
Satin and Felt Hats. 
Tweed Hats and Caps. 
Dress, Oxford, and Wool Shirts— all sizes. 
Fronts, Collars, and CuflFs. 
Lambswool andMerino Underclothing. 
Scarfs, Gloves, Braces, and every Requisite for 
Gentlemen's Outfit. 



Having arranged with one of the Best Manufacturers of 
Waterproof Garments in the Kingdom, I am prepared to 
execute all Orders to Measure in all Styles and Shapes, at a 
small percentage over the Manufacturer's Prices. A large 
Selection of Patterns to choose from. 

A Select stock of WATERPROOF GARMENTS always 
on hand. 



Observe New Address— 

20 WEST HIGH STREET, FORFAR, 

Gentlemen's Shirts Made to Measure. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 1 2 3 




"^-'G 




cm «^ 



DRAPERY AND MILLINERY WAREHOUSE, 
85 W^ST HIGH SJRtt^> FORFAR, 

Agent for KEAY BROTHERS, General Dyers, Perth. 



^ Jeweller # Silvei^srQitl;). ^ 

JOHN STRACflAN, 



Always on hand, a good Selection of the Best Makes of GOLD and SILVER 
English LEVER and Foreign WATCHES and JEWELLERY of every description. 



ELECTRO-PLATED GOODS IN GREAT VARIETY. 



REPAIRS of all kinds in Tenon and Goiintry Promptly and Carefully attended to. 

glc^Jvitrs anil SGSinliinijs Qiontraxttli for ^nnttailn. 



OPTICAL GOODS KEPT IN STOCK. 

Ciirling Stones in Stock, or got to Order. 



^^^HOLESALE & RETAIL. 

RiSH AND Game Dbalei^, 

66 EAST HIGH ST., FORFAR. 



124 ADVERTISEMENTS. 



Registered Telegraphic Address—" WHYTE, FORFAR." 



DAVID WHYTE, 



*'^'maii?^^jak -.^^ 



House— 11 MARKET PLACE ; Office— THE CROSS. 

Stores— Lower Market Place, and at Lamond Square. 



Has always for Sale, 

SUPERIOR POTATOES, 

BEST ENGLISH AND SCOTCH COALS, 

On most Reasonable Terms. 

ALSO, 

Best HAND-THRESHED WHEAT STRAW, from 
Belgium and France. 

BRAN and OATS of the best Feeding Qualities, and as cheap as any one else. 

ALSO, 

HAY FROM PERTHSHIRE and THE CARSE OF STIRLING. 

ETC. ETC. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. I 2 i 



DAVID IRONS, 

i4 EAST HIGH STREET, 

Has always on hand a general assortment of House Furnishing Iron- 
mongery, Table Cutlery, N.S. and E.P. Spoons and Forks, Registered 
and Kinnaird Grates, Ranges (close and open fire), Paraffin Heating 
and Cooking Stoves, Mangles, Wringing Machines, Fenders, Fire Irons, 
Blacksmiths', Joiners', and Bootmakers' Furnishings. 



Agricultural Implements, and all General Farm 
Requisites ; Spades, Shovels, Forks, Graips, Sacks, 
Ropes, Twines, &c. 

OILS— Burning", Harness, and Machinery. 

JAMES NICOLSON, 

CASH OHOCER, 

Italian Mm^^houseman, lea, SEinc mib cSpivit 

82 EAST HIGH STREET, FORFAR, 

PETER A. TOSH, 

Jlxtctioiucr, ^alxtator, mxb Jturnituri^ gleakr, 
CASTLE STREET, EORFAR. 

AGENT FOR— 

'ihe Provident Plate Glass Insurance Company, Ltd. 
The Boiler Insurance and Steam Power Co. , Ltd., for the Insurance and Inspection of 
Engines and Boilers, the Insurance of Workpeople coming under "The Employers' 
Liability Act, t88o," and the Insurance of Individuals against General Accidents. 
I 



126 ADVERTISEMENTS. 



HENRY H. FENTON 

Desires to thank those who have favoured him with their patronage 
during the last fifteen years his business has been conducted at' 158 
East High Street, and to intimate that he has now removed to those 

NEW & COMMODIOUS PREMISES, 

170 & 172 EAST HIGH ST. (East Port), 

where, in addition to the MILLINERY DEPARTMENT so success- 
fully carried on by Mrs Fenton, he has added that of 

DRESS and MANTLE-MAKING, under Experienced Management. 



SHOP ADDRESS f ^AST HIGH i ^^^^^^ ADDRESS 

170 ( STREET. ) 172 




WM. ROSS, 

WHOLESALE & FAMILY 

Large Stock of GROCERIES and PROVISIONS Fresh, and of the 
Finest Quality at Lowest Possible Prices, 

WINES & SPIRITS FULLY MATURED, 

MALT LIQUORS in Splendid Condition. 



12 EAST HIGH STREET, FORFAR. 

•_.,.* Goods delivered free per Van. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. I 2 7 



JAMES CLARK, 

Plumber and Tinsmith, Gasfitter, Bellhanger, Coppersmith, and 

Zincworker, 

9T EAST lIlGlI STREET, FORFAR. 



AGENT FOR MUSGRAVE'S SLOW COMBUSTION STOVES. 

All Ki?ids of Water Fittins;s done on the most approved principle by first-class ivorkmen. 

IRONMONG-BRY FURNISHING-S. 

A^ILLIAM SCOTT, 

JOINER, e/flSIJvJETJViy)fKER, & ©LAZIER, 



JOBBING CAREFULLY ATTENDED TO. 

CHARGES MODERATE. 

D. P, THORNTON, 

BOOT -A.ITID SI3:OE]VC.A.ICEK, 

84 West High Street, 

HAS always on hand a P^irst-Class Assortment of BOOTS AND SHOES, from the 
Best Manufacturers in the Trade, at VERY MODERATE PRICES. 



I would call special attention to my Stock of BOYS' &. GIRLS' BOOTS, 
which for durability and price cannot be surpassed. 

o 

BOOTS & SHOES Of jALL KINDS MADE TO ME/rSURE. 

Repairs of all kinds executed on the shortest notice. 



NOTE THE ADDRESS- 

84 WEST HIGH STREET, FORFAR, 



128 ADVERTISEMENTS. 



1 



All the Newest Designs in Mouldings. 113 



13 



hJO 



ho 

S3 



13 



13 BAST HIGH STREET, 

Has always in stock a large assortment of GOODS 
suitable for Birthday and Marriage Presents, Also, a large 
selection of Toys. All classes of Pictures Framed at Very 
Low Prices. Note New Address — 

13 EAST HIGH STREET (Opposite the Post Office). 



Cardboard kept, and Pictures Mounted. 



Hi 



13 






,nK%i>^OJA£% rfK'f^^J^ 



SPECIALTY ENLARGEMENT, 

A 12 BY lO INCHES 
HIGHLY FINISHED, 

In Massive Gilt Frame of Superior Quality. 

Size 24 by 20 inches, 

IV/f/i Crimso7i Flock avd Gold Cut Mount. Also, 12 CD. V.'s or 6 Cabvicts, all 

for 17I6. G)vi/ps air charged 2/6 extra. Specimens at Studios. 

CHARLES_MITCHELL. 

FORFAR— East Hig-h Street ; KIRRIEMUIR— Station Brae ; 
FALKIRK— The Garrison Studio. 

JAMES Kerr, 



65 WEST HIGH STREET, FORFAR. 



ESTIMATES GIVEN. 



ALL KINDS OF SLATER WORK DONE. REPAIRS CAREFULLY ATTENDED TO, 
COMBINED WITH MODERATE CHARGES. 



AUVERTISEMENTS. 



129 



JAMES EWEN, 



ESarT^IBXjISHEili 1840. 



Best English and Scotch Household Coals. 

ENGLISH & SCOTCH NUTS. 

SPLINT, STEAM, BLIND, & SMALL COALS. 
COAL BRIQUETTES. 



SALT, WHITING, &c. 

FIREWOOD, CUT TO LENGTHS. 

All Delivered at Cttrrent Prices. 



©rbers ^Jromptlp Ettcnbcb ta. 



DEPOT AND OFFICES- 

OLD RAILWAY STATION, VICTORIA STREET, 

AND 

FORFAR SAW MILL. 



1 ^O ADVERTISEMENTS. 



83 EAST HIGH STREET, FORFAR. 



JACKETS, Ulsters, Furs, Umbrellas, Clouds, Wool Squares, Wrap 
Shawls, Flannels, Plaidings, Scotch and English Blankets. Bothy 
Blankets, Bothy Sheets, Down Quilts, Bed and Table Linens, Carpets, 
Linoleums, Mattresses. 

TWEED COATINGS, TOP COATINGS. 

MEN'S CLOTHING Made to Measure. 

SCARFS, COLLARS, FRONTS, SHIRTS. 

MEN'S CHAMOIS VESTS and CARDIGAN JACKETS. 

BOYS' LEATHER LEGGINGS, 2/6 to 4/. 

TRAVELLING RUGS and PLAIDS. HAND BAGS. 

ANDREW SHEPHERD, 

|lakcr iUxb ^onfutiontx\ 

Begs to return his sincere thanks for the kind patronage he has received 
for the past twelve years, and trusts by strict attention to business, and 
putting out a good article, to merit an increased share of support. 



A Choice Selection of Cakes, from 4d per lb. upwards. 

AT prices to suit ALL PARTIES. 

SHORT BREAD, Plain and Ornamented. TEA BREAD and PASTRY, 9d per Dozen. 
SOIREES and FESTIVALS supplied on the Shortest Notice. 

TKMPE^ANiZK ISEF^KSyMKNTS. 

22 & 24 WEStIiTgH ST., fwhr. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. IM 



Pr:ofessoi^ of Music 5c DaQciQg, 

42a CASTLE STREET, FORFAR. 



;i^i|ivate Xijcssons given, and ;t?invate glasses aiiranged 
btj appointment. 



STRING BANDS Supplied to Concerts and Assemblies. 

^^^^^fc Pianoforte and Violin for Evening Parties. "o^ 

^^^^ — • — i^^M)P®'s — — ^^ 



ABEL & SIMPSON, 

Janni| # & * gispeusing » C|emisls, 

THE CROSS, FORFAR. 
Sole Agents in FORFAR for Messrs W. & A. GILBEY, Wine Importers &. Distillers. 

On hand, Stock of their Champagnes, Sherries, Ports, Claret, Cognacs, "Wliiskies, &c. 

BERLIN WOOL REPOSITORY, 

MISS J. FERG-USON. 

Berlin, Fleecy, Fingeping*, Merino, & Fine Knitting* Wools. 

Stamped Goods for Crewel Work, Embroidery, Bead, and Wool Needle-Work. 

BABY-LINEN and UNDER - CLOTHING. LADIES' WORK of all kinds 
Finished and Tastefully Made up. 



112 ADVERTISEMENTS. 






$ 



SliflTEl^S, 



116 BAST HIGH STREET, 

And 2 CHARLES STREET, 



FORFAR. 



ALEX. TODD, 

TAILOR AND CLOTHIER, 

40 EAST HIGH ST., FORFAR, 

Has always on hand a well-selected Stock of TWEED SUITINGS, 
WORSTED COATINGS, and OVERCOATINGS, in all the Newest 
Patterns. 

Also, LADIES' JACKETINGS, in all the Leading Novelties. 



Parties g-iving him a Trial, may rely on getting them 
WELL. MADE, and a PERFECT PIT, at LOWEST 
POSSIBLE PRICES. 



JOHN LAKIE, 

Gojiij, Dime, and Di^aeb fflBrjcIjjirjT, 
NEW RAILWAY STATION, FORFAR. 

o 

BAKEHOUSE AND STEAM COAL ALWAYS ON HAND. 

o 

Orders punctually attended to. Fresh Supplies of DRAFF Weekly. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



m- 



W\ 



sys) 








THE PEOPLE'S FAVOURITE NEWSPAPER. 



t 



The Best Scottish National Weel<ly Paper ; Radical 
Politics ; Foremost in every Reform for the 
Benept, Enlightenment, and Elevation of the 
People ; Complete News of the World. Three- 
Fourths Million Readers every Week. 

m\i IS THE 7PE p wm THE " people's douRNAL" 



SPECIAL FEATURES. 

Aunt Kate's gossips wi' Guidwives. 
Weekly Competitions — A Prize Silver Watch 

Every Week. 
Legal Jottings, by a Lawyer. 
Poetry of the People. 
Scottish Legends and Traditions. 
Opinions of the People. 

New Scotch Stories— By favourite Authors. 
Fullest Local and Widest General News. 



The "People's Journal" 

Is Read in all Parts of the World. 
SATURDAYS, ONE PENNY. SOLD EVERYWHERE. 



1 34 ADVERTISEMENTS. 



ALEXANDER DALBETY 



^WHOLESALE & RETAIL 



^upx^ iM\\t% %^Mt% I ^tfttt^tf* 
55 k 57 EAST HIGH STREET, 

FORFAR, 

ipiPlAKES this opportunity of thanking his numerous Customers, 
SwR,) and the Public generally, for the very liberal patronage he has 
tJ^*. received for upwards of twenty years, and assures them that it 
will always be his endeavour to give them a SUBSTANTIAL 
ARTICLE at a REASONABLE PRICE. 



ALL GOODS ^LARKED IN PLAIN FIGURES. 



A. D. would call special attention to his Large and Varied Stock of 

The BEST VALUE in the North of Scotland. 
INSPECTION & COMPARISON FREELY INVITED. 



The TAILORING DEPARTMENT receives Special Attention— 
FIT and WORKMANSHIP GUx\RANTEED. The Largest and 
Best Selection of WORSTED COATINGS, OVERCOATINGS, 
SCOTCH TWEEDS, CORD and MOLES, A. D. every had the plea- 
sure of offering for selection 

AT HIS 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 1 35 



QUALITY IS OUR LEADING FEATURE. 



We are famous for the fine quality of our Tea and Butter 

D- BlJTCflART, 

Family Gi^ogbi^, &3inb GQei^ghanui, 

g§ CASTLE STREET, FORFIR. 



FINEST OLD SCOTCH & IRISH WHISKY. 

2/10 per Bottle ; 16/6 per Gall. 





ARE THE BEST INVESTMENT 
IN FORFAR. 



Every Description of BOOTS Made to M easier e. 



1§ WES¥ §ISi S¥REE¥. 



BRING YOUR REPAIRS. 



136 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 




ESTABLISHED 185 1. T~H 

\^. W^. SHARP, 

^OAL AND IlIME (ElEr^GHANT, 

23b VICTORIA STREET, 

(Old Sta^tioxx) r'orfa.r. 



Every Description of COAL supplied. WAGON LOADS sent to any Station. 



BRIQUETTES, Finest Brand, in Large & Small Sizes. 



Orders per Post promptly attended to. 



J. f). >iif^f)oCS 



J 



^aic^xna^ex anb 3etx>e££ex, 

(CORNER OF OSNABURGH STREET), 

2 EAST HIGH STREET, 

FORFAR, 

Has always on hand a Splendid Selection of the undermentioned 
Goods. 



Evoy Description of Em^Hsli and Foreii^ii 
GOLD and S/L VER WA TCHES. ^ 



A Beautiful Assortment of 

REAL DL4'M0ND RLYGS. 



BAROMETERS Repaired and Refilled. 



ELECTRO SILVER-PLATED GOODS 
of Every Description. 



All Kinds of CUTLERY Kept in Stock. 



All kinds of Repairs promptlv and carefully 
attended to. CLOCK WLWD/XG by 
the Year. 



STERLING SIL VER-PLA TE of Every 
Description on the Shortest Notice. 



AD VERTI SEMENTS. I 3 7 



If you want FASHIONABLE and EASY FITTING HATS, you should TRY 

J. DAVIDSON, 



OF THE 



ForfaP OPEt^flTlVE HRT STOt^E, 

As he is the only Hatter in Town. Jilveiy description of Hat made to Order. 
Hats Dressed and Altered to the Present Fashion. Hats Trimmed for Mourning. 

Splendid Selection of CAPS, TIES, &c. 

97* EAST HIGH STREET, FORFAR. 






MMMMmm 

Faroily (Srocer, 

40 W^ST HIGH ST., FORFAR. 



Finest Goods at the Lowest Possible Prices. 

FINEST OLD WHISKIES AT 17s, 16s, and 15s a GALLON. • 

My Whisky at 17s is five years old and sure to give satisfaction. 

\]MES MEM EIK'^, 



FISH, GAME, & POULTRY DEALER, 

6 WEST HIGH STREET, FORFAR. 



REAL LOCH FYNE HERRINGS. 



SMOKED HADDOCKS. 



SHELL FISH of every description in their Season. 



138 advp:rtisements. 



THE NEW SHOE SHOP. 

(Diss Smith 

Has always on hand a large and carefully selected Stock of BOOTS and 
SHOES of the best quality. 

SPECIAL LINES IN 



Ladies' Kid and Calf BOOTS, guaranteed waterproof and 
noiseless, can he had either for buttoning or lacing. 
Tiie Original "A " (best quality), Household Felt Slipper. 

Ladies' Fancy DRESS SLIPPERS in great variety. 

REPAIRS AND SPECIAL ORDERS TO MEASURE RECEIVE PROMPT 

ATTENTION. 



93 CASTLE STREET, FORFAR. 

ALEXANDER CRICHTON, 

CROSS, FORFAR, 

Has always a fine Selection of GENERAL and FURNISHING 
IRONMONGERY, comprising — Grates, Fenders, Fire Irons, Brass &: 
other Bedsteads. Also, a good variety of MARRIAGE PRESENTS, 
viz. : — Tea Pots, Cruets, Jelly Glasses, Knives, and Forks, Spoons 
(Dinner and Dessert), all E. P. & N. S. — Quality Guaranteed. 

Finest Selected SEEDS of all kinds from the best Growers. 

OILS OF FINEST QUALITY ALWAYS IN STOCK. 

FEEDING STQFPS. SHEEP DIP. ROPES, &c. &c. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 1 39 



FOR BEST VALUE IN 



FLANNELS, BLANKETS, AND PLAIDINGS, 

TRY 

JARVIS BROTHERS, 

Wholesale and Retail DRAPERS, TAILORS, MILLINERS, DRESS and MANTLEMAKERS, 
68, 70, & 72 Castle Street, FORFAR. 

GLASS, CHINA, EARTHENWARE, k EURNITURE, 

AT 



45 and 47 CASTLE STREET, FORFAR, 

And at 244 HIGH STREET, ARBROATH. 

LARGE SELECTION ALWAYS ON HAND. 

W. HEBINGTON 

Has always in stock a Large and Varied Assortment of BOOTS and 
SHOES, suitable for the season, at reasonable prices, which he can 
recommend to his customers and the public generally. 

BOOTS and SHOES made to measure, by Hand or Machine, ensuring Ease and Comfort. 

REPAIRS CAREFULL Y A T TEND ED TO. CHARGES MOD ERA TE. 

34 WEST HIGH~STREET, FORFAR. 

JOHN TAYLOR, 

yATTK5. 

The oldest established Hat business in Forfar. " TAYLOR, The Hatter," for Hats 
and Caj)s, is a household word in Forfar. 

We claim to sell cheaper and shew a larger variety of beautiful goods, than any other 
house in Town. All the proper things in Scarfs, &c., for Marriages. 
Mourning Hats, Caps, Weepers, Ties, &c., &c. 
HATS, CAPS, awl COATS trimmed for Mourning in a few minutes. 

6o CASTLE STREET, FORFAR. 60 



140 ADVERTISEMENTS. 



Published every Thursday Afternoon. Guaranteed Gratis Circulation, 

3 "ZOO. 

The Best Advertising" Medium in Forfar. 

OLIVER M'PHERSON, EDITOR and PROPRIETOR, 

re EAST HIGlI STREET, FORFAR. 

C. THOM & SON, 

5 n'iTa"i!iR(3:i\i!iSRWJ^ir, forfai^. 



Billposting and Delivering Promptly Executed in Town or Count?')'. 
Circulars Addressed. Messages, Night or Day. 

BOOKS BOUNO to aey Patt*™. 

^OtCpSlpCI^ ] Stamped from Die, 

8t Envelopes or Neatly Printed 



^- P^OTO ^- AlfBUMS, ^- 

^. Dehthei^ ^ Goods, e 

OF THE FINEST MANUFACTURE. 



■ }a« ♦ MT^ « 



W. SHEPHERD, Bookseller and Stationer, 

39 CASTLE STREET, FORFAR. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



141 



A?V^ILLIAM ED^W^ARD, 

Family, Bread, & Biscnk Baker, 

♦^- . 

SHORTBREAD, BISCUITS, TEA 6- FANCY BREAD 
of every description ahvays on hand. 

GINGER, TEA, PLUM, SEED, SULTANA, RICE, SPONGE, MADEIRA CAKES 

OF FINEST QUALITY ONI^Y. 

MARRIAGE & CHRISTMAS CAKES Tastefully Ornamented. 
DISHES COVERED TO ORDER. 



10 CASTLE STREET, FORFAR. 

W^ILLIAM MOFFAT, 

3 NEW ROAD, FORFAR. 

IIUUF LIGHTS, CHIMNEY CANS, CEMENT (best Loudou). Laiye STOCK 
ALWAYS ON HAND, FRESH. 

t^" Orders in Town and Country punctually attended to. 

WILLIAM MALCOLM, 

iluif^beF, ^iHsmjtel^, and SagfifeteF, 

78 CASTLE STREET, FORFAR. 



All Orders punctually attended to 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



Boys' and Girls' Boots for School Wear. 



CO 



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CD 

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ADVERTISEAJENTS. 



143 



^Ei)i)l^@ 



/1T-AT1©J^§ 



:^ Pi^iDted iv Silvei^ ir^ 4 

-^ The Newest Styles. 4 



W. SHEPHERD5 Printer, 

39 CASTLE ST., FORFAR. 



a 



In criemottmtn " Cat^ds, 

PRINTED OX SHORTEST NOTICE. 



LARGE SELECTION OF LATEST DESIGNS. 



INDEX TO ADVERTISEMENTS. 



PAGE. 

Abel & Simpson, Chemiists 131 

Adamsou, John, Grocex" 137 

Anderson & Co., Drapers facing 60 

Andrew, Wm., Tobacconist, etc. ... 113 

Bell. Mrs, Draper 123 

Boyle, J. D., Draper, etc facing 52 

Bntcliart, D. , Grocer 135 

Clark, James, Plumber 127 

Crichton, A. , Ironmonger 138 

Dalgety, Alex., Draper, etc 134 

Davidson, J., Hatter 137 

Dick, W., Clothier, etc....^ 122 

Donald, M. AI., Tobacconist 116 

Edward, W. Baker 141 

Ewen, James, Wood Merchant, etc. 129 

Fenton, Henry H. , Draper 126 

Ferguson, Miss, Berlin Wool Ke- 

pository 131 

Forfar Dispatch 140 

Forfar Herald 121 

Forfar Review 112 

French, Dr, Dentist 119 

Fullerton. W., Shoemaker Ill 

Gibson, W. A.., Clothier, etc 121 

Gray, R., China Merchant, etc 139 

Guthrie, G., Gamedealer, etc 123 

Hebington, Wni., Shoemaker 139 

Hendry & Warden, Drapers, etc. .. 130 

Hendrv, James, Gamedealer, etc. ... 137 

Hood, D., Shoemaker 120 

Irons, \). , Ironmonger 125 

Jack, Robert F., Tea Merchant 115 

Jarvis Brothers, Drapers, etc 139 

Kerr, James, Slater 128 

Lakie, John, Coal Merchant, etc. ... 132 

Langlands & Milne, Plumbers 110 

Low & Co. , Grocers, etc 117 

Malcolm, W. , Plumber 141 

M ann, .J. , Clothier, etc 110 

Marshall, J., Draper, etc 118 

Masterton, I)., Plasterer 119 



PAGE. 

Meek, A., Shoemaker 142 

Melvin, B. & M., Grocers 109 

Mitchell, C, Photographer 128 

Moffat, W., Slater 141 

Munro, James, Toy Merchant, etc. 128 

M'Dougall, J., Shoemaker 118 

M'Nab, R., Clothier, etc 116 

Murdoch, T. D., Watchmaker 136 

Neill, J. , Music Teacher 1.31 

Nicolson, James, Grocer 125 

North British and Mercantile In- 
surance Coy facing title page 

Paterson, Sons, & Co facing 53 

People's Journal 133 

Petrie, Thomas Ill 

Reid, Peter, Confectioner 113 

Robertson, A., Osnaburgh Bar 114 

Robertson, J. W., Painter ... 115 

Rodger. D., Painter Ill 

Ross, Wm. , Grocer 126 

Saddler, J., Confectioner ... 119 

Scott, William, Joiner 127 

Sharp, W. W. , Coal Merchant, etc. 136 

Shepherd, A.. Baker ; 130 

Shepherd, A. & C, Slaters 132 

Shepherd, Jas. jr., China Merchant 113 

Shepherd, W., Printer, etc 140, 143 

and facing 61 

Smith, Miss, Boot Merchant 138 

Spalding, A., Clothier facing 4&5 

Stewart, Charles, Shoemaker 135 

Strachan, John, Watchmaker 123 

Taylor, John, Hatter, etc 139 

Thorn, C. & Son, Billposters 140 

Thomson, W. H., Bookseller, etc. ... 118 

Thornton, D. P.. Shoemaker 127 

Todd, Alex., Tailor, etc 132 

Tosh, P. A., Auctioneer, etc 125 

Warden, W., Drajjer, etc facing 

2nd page of cover 
Whyte, D., Potato Merchant, etc.... 124 



ADVERTISEMENTS ON COVER. 

Barclay, R. W. Draper, etc Page 2 

Dunn, R. & J. , Boot Merchants 4 

Martin, James, Grocer 3