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Full text of "Future homemakers [serial]"

THE LIBRARY OF THE 

UNIVERSITY OF 

NORTH CAROLINA 




THE COLLECTION OF 
NORTH CAROLINIANA 



C6U0.5 
F99n 

19^6-63 



This book must not 
be taken from the 
Library building. 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 



http://archive.org/details/futurehomemakers19561963 










FUTURE HOMEMAKERS 

* North Carolina Association * 



VOLUME XV 



OCTOBER, 1956 



NUMBER 1 




Fifty-four North Carolina F.H.A. Members and Advisers Among 2,110 
Delegates to the National Convention in Chicago, 111., July 2-6, 1956 



District I — Joyce Currin, Adviser, Murfreesboro 
Jeannette Worthington, Ayden, State President. 
Betty Cummings, Tarboro. 

District II — Mrs. Alma Phillips, Adviser, Jones Central; 
Margaret Carol Banks, Southwood 
Jenny Lou Taylor, Deep Run, State Song Leader. 
Delores Carol Heath, Jones Central. 
Jackie Young, Beaufort. 
Myra Jane White, Southwood. 
Ann Taylor, Southwood. 
Polly Stroud, Southwood. 

District III — Mary Elizabeth Burns, Adviser, Pinehurst 

Helen Lewis, Red Springs, State Historian. 
Barbara Adcox, Pinehurst. 

District IV — Mrs. Florence Sorrell, Adviser, Benson 
Margaret Rand, Garner, State Parliamentarian. 
Ann Lou Ford, Garner. 
Ann Rowe, Garner. 
Janet Arlene Vick, Bailey. 
Sue Weaver, Bailey. 
Lane Farmer, Bailey. 
Sonja Manning, Bailey. 
Charmayne Ann Perry, Lowe's Grove. 
Sue Wheeler Denning, Benson. 
Becky Smith, Benson. 
Sarah Brown, Mills, Louisburg. 
Annette Fuller, Mills, Louisburg. 
Marion Ashe, Northern. 



District V — Mrs. Cora Whitehead, Ramseur 

Doris Teague, Liberty, State Reporter. 
Sarah Moore, Liberty. 
Martha Jean Jones, Ramseur. 
Sondra Vestal, Tri-City Central. 
Carolyn Hennis, Stokesdale. 
Ann Aldridge, Bartlett- Yancey. 
Janice Powell, Bartlett- Yancey. 
Helen Patsy Hunt, Bartlett- Yancey. 

District VI — Mrs. Mary Kate Faulkner, Marshville 

Penny Niven, Waxhaw, State Treasurer. 
Pillie Ann Boatwright, Monroe. 

District VII — Mrs. Madge Young, Taylorsville 

Clyde Templeton, Union Grove, State Secretary. 
Carol Scott, North Davidson. 
Joan Zimmerman, North Davidson. 
Kay Goodman, Boyden. 

District VIII — Mrs. Mary L. Smith, Clyde A. Erwin 

Becky Hayes, Harris, State Vice-President. 

Carol Weir, Valley Springs. 

Lib McLean, North Buncombe. 

Judy Reese, North Buncombe. 

Ann Featherston, Rutherfordton-Spindale. 

Nancy Rosenthal, Shelby. 

Mrs. Harriette Holton, Shelby. 

State Adviser — Faye T. Coleman 



Future Homemakers Who Earned State Homemakers Degree in 1955-56 



Ayden — Brownie Harrington, Jeannette Worthington, Betty Lou 
Tripp. 

Bartlett- Yancey — Janice Marie Powell, Joyce Ann Olive. 

Bath — June Brinn, Sylvia Boyd, Geraldine Sawyer. 

Bladenboro — Lettie Sue Hickman, Josephine Davis, Bonnie 
Hester, Linda Faye Bullard. 

Belvoir-Falkland — Barbara Jenkins. 

Cary — Carolyn Ross. 

Chicod — Freddie Lucille Cox, Virginia Evans, Frances Jean 
Mills, Betsy Jean Spain. 

Clyde — Elaine Curtis, Joy Young. 

Cobb Memorial — Carolyn Austin, Lemma Jane Strader, Fran- 
ces Ward. 

Deep Run — Jenny Lou Taylor, Jo Anne Jones. 

Franklin — Fannie Allen, Barbara Martin, Patricia Ann Melton. 

Garner — Maggie Ann Rowe, Nina F. Jackson. 

Lee H. Edwards — Frances Kinser, Lenora Roberts, Clara 
Pruett, Mary Linette Harwood. 

Kenansville — Betty Chambers, Callace Marie Jones, Barbara 
Wells Mitchell, Patsy Quinn. 

Kings Mountain — Becky Blanton, Jane Byars, Betsy Thron- 
burger. 

Liberty — Nathalia Teague. 

Mount Holly — Janet Adcock, Violet Brooks, Barbara Green, 
Christine Helton, Margaret Louise Helton, Betty Howard, 
Helen Jones, Amelia Kelly, Gloria Lowe, Amelia McGinnis, 
Betty Massey, Shirley Lee Mauney, Kathleen Preslar, Judy 
Thompson. 

Needham Broughton — Rachel Gulley, Glenda Faye Edge, Susan 
Elizabeth Davis, Sandra Strickland, Martha Stephenson, 
June Watson, Jane Hedrick, Barbara Randolph. 



North Davidson — Carol Stadheim. 

Old Fort — Margaret Cressman, Jeannette Elaine Morris. 

Pamlico County — Margaret Harris, Betsy Pane, Betsy Ruth 
Paul. 

Pikeville — Gail Lancaster, Jane Sasser, Tommie Ann Lan- 
caster, Helen Elks. 

Red Springs — Betsy Garruth, Janet McRacken, Edna Rose 
Duncan, Frances Ann Lewis. 

Reynolds— Sue Merrell, Wilma Jean Wagner. 

Roper — Jacqueline Skiles, Patricia Hassell, Theresa Maude 
Peele. 

Rutherfordton-Spindale — Betty Brown, Anne Featherson, Pau- 
line Griffin, Nelle Mauney, Linda Lewis, Patricia McDaniel, 
Patti Shehan, Sandra Putnam, Joan Robertson, Daphne 
Wingate. 

Shelby — Susan Lutz, Charlotte Barry, Sarah McEntire, Amanda 
Lee Baker. 

Stedman — Louine Armstrong, Carolyn Ann McDonald, Co- 
renna Royal, Delphine Adams. 

Stokesdale — Joy Ann Pegram, Sarah Middleton, Orlanda Jane 
Pope, Bonnie Robertson, Barbara Vernon, Glenola White. 

Sumner — Lois Cook. 

Sylva — Ruth Crawford. 

Tri-City — Sondra Vestal, Jacqueline Allen. 

Tri-High — Katherine Scruggs, Patricia Crawley, Anne Melton, 
Kathleen Jackson, Doris Hamrick, Margaret Brindle, Becky 
Piercy, Frances Hamrick, Mildred Horn. 

Valley Springs — Barbara Greene, Betty Lou Hollifield. 

Waco — Melba Grigg, Delia Faye Seism, Shirley Goodman. 

Wakelon — Linda Dale Bailey. 

W. R. Mills — Martha Allen, Sarah Brown, Anna Green Partin, 
Helen E. Allen, Annette Fuller, Peggy Ann Perry. 



STATE DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 

Division of Vocational Education 

Raleigh, North Carolina 



Future Homemakers of America 




Editor's Note: This story (con- 
densed) as told by Jenny Lou 
Taylor to the editor of the Kinston 
"Daily Free Press" will help Future 
Homemakers in all of North Caro- 
lina realize to some degree the 
appreciation of these delegates for 
the opportunity to attend this con- 
vention — so beautifully planned 
and well-organized. 

It was 4 a.m. July 1, and I was 
beginning my "Cinderella Week." I 
was leaving for Chicago to attend 
the National Convention of the 
Future Homemakers of America. 

Soon after I arrived at the Raleigh 
Seaboard Station at about 6:30 a.m., 
FHAer's from all directions began 
streaming in. The hub-bub of girls 
renewing old acquaintances and 
making new ones was briefly inter- 
rupted by the train's arrival. We all 
waived good-byes. 



All of us were excited when we 
caught glimpses of the Lincoln Me- 
morial and Jefferson Memorial from 
the train window as we entered 
Washington, D. C. During our two- 
and-one half hour wait Jackie and I 
went to the Capitol. I looked to 
the top of the dome and chills went 
down my back. It was breathtaking. 

Washington is truly a beautiful 
city. One is always conscious that 
herein lies the records of the history 
of our country; and here, year after 
year, a few who represent the people 
of our country, make decisions 
which affect us all. 

We arrived in the Windy City 
around 8 a.m., and at first I could 
only see railroad tracks, trains and 
tall dirty buildings. Then we took 
taxis to the Conrad Hilton Hotel, 
and the beauty of this 25-story build- 
ing left me speechless! It shocked us 



to find 12 elevators in the hotel. 
After we were registered we shot 
up in one of these elevators to 
the 1 6th floor, where we were to live 
for a week. 

I was one of the five North Caro- 
lina delegates who had been chosen 
to participate in the All-States 
Chorus. There were 107 members 
of this Chorus. Each member had 
received at her home a copy of the 
music and words to several songs 
and had been instructed to learn the 
words and to practice singing the 
songs to music before coming to the 
convention. With this preliminary 
preparation, only a few rehearsals 
were necessary with our very gifted 
and talented director, Mr. Jerome K. 
Ramsfield of Chicago, Illinois. 

In the evening Mr. F. Leroy Nel- 
son was in the lobby at the organ. 
Girls from all over the country were 



requesting their state songs — espe- 
cially Texas. He played "Carolina 
in the Morning" and "Carolina 
Moon" for us. The girls really got 
excited when he played "Dixie," 
which I believe was the most fre- 
quently-heard song at the conven- 
tion. 

That evening we attended the 
fireworks display at Soldiers Field. 
People of all races and creeds were 
there, and I think all had the same 
glad feeling as the band played "The 
Star Spangled Banner." 

We enjoyed some other first-class 
entertainment, including the "Crew 
Cuts" and "The Breakfast Club," 
where we saw Dick Noel, Peter 
Donald, Sam, Homer and Jethro. 

Thursday afternoon our North 
Carolina group went on a guided 
tour. Our visit to the Swift Company 
was interesting and informative, al- 
though we had chill bumps when we 
came out of the chilling room. 

Our driver told us that Chicago 
has only 3,000 churches but 6,000 
taverns. Its population of 5,000,000 
is expected to be doubled in four 
years due to the new St. Lawrence- 
Great Lakes waterway now under 
construction. 

Our banquet Thursday night was 
really beautiful. The Hawaiian dele- 
gation presented each delegate with 
a baby orchid, flown to Chicago 
from Hawaii that afternoon. There 
were 18 different dishes on the menu. 

On Friday we heard reports and 
later met for our last general ses- 
sion when our new national officers 
were installed in a beautiful and 
impressive ceremony. 

The end of the official convention 
was a sad occasion, for we had all 
enjoyed it so much, but I think that 
all of us were glad to be heading 
back for North Carolina. 

This time I did stay awake to see 
Pittsburgh at night. The lights shin- 
ing brightly through the fog and 
smoke made a lovely sight. 

You could just tell when we arrived 
in our "Old North State." The grass 
was greener, the sky more beautiful 
and the scenery prettier. (Of course 
I imagine we were a little prejudiced 
because we are "Tar Heels.") 

I sang all the way home from 
Washington. When I arrived in Ra- 
leigh, I was almost sick from my 
singing and the excitement, happy to 
see my family and friends, sad at 
leaving my new friends, and very 
thankful that I had had the oppor- 
tunity to spend a "Cinderella Week" 
in the "Windy City." 




Nancy Rosenthal was elected at the North 
Carolina State Convention as a candidate 
for the office of National Secretary, and 
at the National FHA Convention in 
Chicago she won in the election and will 
serve as secretary to the National organi- 
zation for 1956-57. North Carolina Future 
Homemakers are proud to have Nancy, 
a member of the Shelby Chapter and the 
North Carolina Association of Future 
Homemakers of America, to be a member 
of the National Executive Council. 



FHA WORKSHOP— 
B. F. GRADY CHAPTER 

On June 19, 20, 21, and 26, 1956, 
officers, chapter parents, and com- 
mittee chairmen of the B. F. Grady 
Chapter met in the home economics 
department for a leadership training 
workshop. 

Topics for the workshop included; 
Duties and Responsibilities of Of- 
ficers; Parliamentary Procedure; 
Yearbooks; and Plans for the New 
Year. 

Each session began with the open- 
ing ceremony led by our new presi- 
dent, Nancy Grady. At the close of 
each session, the group enjoyed a 
social hour. 

During the week, each officer was 
given the opportunity of presiding 
at one of the sessions. Chapter 
parents attended regularly, and were 
most interested and co-operative. 

A rough sketch of the yearbooks 
was made which will be completed 
in the fall, when plans are more 
definite. Yearbooks will include a 
list of past presidents, present of- 
ficers, and members; opening and 
closing ceremony; requirements for 
degrees of achievement; projects: 
and a calendar of chapter activities 
including program topics, date and 
place of meetings — as well as special 
events. Leadership workshops do 
much to strengthen the FHA phase 
of the homemaking program! 



CABARRUS COUNTY FHA 
OFFICERS WORKSHOP 

The Cabarrus County FHA Of- 
ficers Workshop for the 1956-57 
officers was held at Mt. Pleasant 
High School on Tuesday, August 21. 

This workshop is a gathering of 
all the officers from each club in 
the county for the purpose of learn- 
ing their duties and how to properly 
carry them out. 

The workshop consisted of eight 
groups each being directed by an 
adviser. 

There were four chapter mothers 
present. The total number of of- 
ficers present was 53, advisers 8, 
making the total present 65. Last 
year there were approximately 300 
FHA members in Cabarrus County. 

Dinner for the group was served 
picnic style in the home economics 
department. 



The Lenoir-Greene FHA Rally 

was held at Gold Park on April 19. 
Each chapter in the two counties 
participated in some way. 

Contentnea Chapter gave an in- 
terpretation of the creed followed 
by a play written by Lois Grey of 
the Moss Hill Chapter in which 
Moss Hill FHA members partici- 
pated. 

Officers for 1956-57 were in- 
stalled. 

Also on the program was a fashion 
show given by three students from 
each school who modeled dresses 
made in home economics class. 
Girls of La Grange also modeled a 
variety of styles from the Style Shop. 
We closed by singing our FHA 
Prayer song. Everyone skated until 
supper was served. At supper we 
had a choice of barbecue chicken or 
pork. 

The Wingate Chapter was hostess 
to the social hour following the 
Anson-Union Bi-County Rally. 

The Rally program consisted of — 

Band Concert — Wingate Band 

Song and Dance — Two Marsh- 
ville girls 

Welcome — Wingate FHA pres- 
ident 

Response — Principal of Win- 
gate School. FHA member — 
Lilesville 

Fashion Show — "Graduation 
Through Vacation" Belk's 
Stores in Wadesboro and 
Monroe, Models from chap- 
ters in Anson and Union 
counties 

Relaxers — Song leader and 
pianist 

Installation Service 



The Meaning of the Rose 



(This skit was presented during Vesper Services at the 1956 F. H. A. Camp at 
White Lake, N. C, by the Franklin Chapter. Parts of the rose — roots, stems, etc. — 
were placed on a large board as the parts were narrated.) 



As you know the red rose is the flower of the Future 
Homemakers of America. Our Official Guide explains it this 
way. "The rose has been the favorite flower from remotest 
antiquity. It is found in almost every country on the northern 
hemisphere and is capable of cultivation in every state and 
territory of the nation." 

A red rose is symbolic of vibrant, glowing health which con- 
tributes to happiness and efficiency in home and group life. 

In the rose each separate petal is necessary for the formation 
and beauty of the full grown flower. So are an attractive per- 
sonality, strong character and physical beauty necessary to a 
well-rounded individual. 

As a rose must have sunlight and water, provided by God, 
for growth and beautiful color, so must a girl have the good 
example, guidance and encouragement which only can come 
from good parents in a good home to grow to full maturity. 

We are going to show you a comparison between the growth 
of a rose and the growth of a girl. Starting with the root of 
the rose we shall trace its growth up to the full bloomed rose. 

ROOTS— 

The roots of a rose are symbolic of the home and family 
from which we come. Our families have given us the beginning 
of life and laid the foundation on which we will build our lives. 
They have cultivated the soil and provided the things necessary 
for growth. The influences that come from our homes are deeply 
instilled in our roots and most of them will never be changed. 

The branches of this root represent these influences. 

Our families have given us the foundation for health, both 
mental and physical. We have been guided through the de- 
pendent, immature years toward achieving independence and 
maturity. From our families we have learned that respect for 
the individual is the basis of a growing affection which if 
properly fostered, leads to the desire to have us reach our 
best development. 




GIRLS (left to right): Barbara King, Greta Moser, Ruth 
Dunbar, Jolene Slate . . . Members of the Franklin Chapter. 



Other roots that are firmly established by a good family are 
a sense of security and personal worth. It is important that we 
feel that we belong and as we grow into adults we will still 
have that sense of security that comes from the serenity and 
stability of good family life. 

Roots of certain character traits have been cultivated. Loy- 
alty, honesty, truthfulness and patience are some roots that 
should be firmly established by the family. The spiritual de- 
velopment — reverence for God should begin in the home. There 
is no better place to establish religious ideals. Jesus set the 
example for the well-rounded personality by increasing in wis- 
dom, stature and in favor with God and man. The family could 
have no better example for guiding the growth of the young 
in the home. 

Thus, the roots of our life are cultivated by our family life 
from which we should learn to meet life with high hopes and 
courage to face new situations with the expectation of great 
achievements. 

STEM— 

Just as the stem of the rose comes from the roots and is 
sustained throughout its growth to maturity so the child comes 
from the home and is nourished and guided there toward a 
mature life. It is in the home that we pass from a stature of 
complete dependence to independence. This period is rich 
in educational possibilities and emotional satisfactions. 

The stem of the rase as well as the roots need rich soil, 
water, warmth, and sunshine for growth into a healthy plant that 
support the leaves and blossoms. The child also needs the 
factors that will help him grow into a well-rounded person 
so that he may face life courageously. 

First, he needs the factors which are necessary for physical 
growth and the building of a healthy body. 

Second there needs to be the opportunities to grow in wisdom 
and develop the abilities. 

Third, guidance in relationships with the family and friends 
is essential for social and emotional growth. 

Fourth, no personality is complete without the sunshine of 
God's love. During this period of growth one should seek and 
maintain a reverent attitude toward God and a mind that seeks 
for "the true, the beautiful and the good." 

THORNS— 

Growing up has its thorns too. There are often conflicts in 
our lives. 

You might recall a few of the thorns such as your first day 
in school when perhaps you were away from your mother 
and home for the first time; losing your front teeth; shyness and 
bashfulness; embarrassing occasions; times when you were 
scared. Freckles or straight hair were probably thorns to some 
of you. 

There are other thorns too in growing up. We are often in 
conflict with ourselves and our families. One moment we 
may behave in a childish manner and the next instant demand 
our rights and privileges as an adult. One moment we want 
our mother to make our decisions for us and then demand 
the right to decide for ourselves. We are afraid of being different 
and at the same time may not like what the crowd is doing. 
(Continued on page seven) 



Public Appreciation 



Our Number One 



Our Public Is Interest 



"The first ingredient of any successful public relations pro- 
gram is good deeds. What is said about Future Homemakers, 
what is done by Future Homemakers, how it is said, and how 
it is done combine to form the public picture of this organiza- 
tion. The Challenge of Developing Sound Public Relations is 
Worth Accepting." So stated Mr. Hugh E. Muncy, Executive 
Manager, Illinois Chain Store Council, who spoke on "Public 
Relations Depends On You" at the National FHA Convention 
in Chicago, July 2-6, 1956. 

Congratulations to all of you who are engaged in public 
relations projects and activities. Some of you have reported 
very worthy deeds which should promote good relations in 
your school or community. A few of the activities as reported 
are briefly described here: 

Angier — For the Opening of school on September 4 a group 
of the FHA girls arranged a bulletin board in the hall of the 
high school building wishing the teachers and students a good 
school year. The official emblem was placed in the center with 
red lettering above and below it, expressing the chapter's 
wishes. 

The girls brought flowers to the Home Economics depart- 
ment and an arrangement was made for each classroom. A 
card with the FHA emblem and best wishes extended to each, 
was placed on the desks with the flowers. Arrangements were 
also made for the auditorium. 

Bartlett- Yancey — "Family and Friends Night" sponsored by 
the Future Homemakers of the Bartlett- Yancey Chapter has 
been one event of the year when activities in the homemaking 
program in the school and community are made known to the 
community public. Last spring interest in the program was so 
high that the school auditorium was overflowing for the spe- 
cial occasion. 



Hope Mills — The FHA officers of the Hope Mills school 
planned to help the principal again this year. They fixed ma- 
terials for front hall bulletin boards, and fixed badges and 
diagrams for themselves to use on the first day of school. 

Spencer — Future Homemakers of America at Spencer High 
School are busy these days making arm bands for civil defense 
workers here. The brassards will be used in the civil defense 
exercise scheduled for Salisbury on October 4 and in other 
phases of civil defense activity. There are 74 members in the 
Spencer Chapter. They made 888 bands. 

Shelby — On September the seventh the FHA members had a 
tea honoring the new freshmen of Shelby High. A very attrac- 
tive bulletin board with an octagon shaped clock — hands set 
at 3:30, the time for the FHA meetings during the year and 
large letters — Now Is the Time (above the clock) To Join FHA 
(below the clock). The tea helped prospective Future Home- 
makers to become better acquainted with FHA and what it 
stands for. 

New Hanover — Included in the program of work of the New 
Hanover Chapter are the following plans: 

1. Observance of FHA Week — Monday — Select a secret pal 
from the chapter and do something nice for her each day; 
Tuesday — Put a vase of flowers on each teacher's desk in high 
school. There are 89 teachers in our school; Wednesday — A 
television program using one of the skits from the National 
Convention; Thursday — "Do A Job For Mom Day"; Friday — A 
Tea in the home economics department after school for all 
new members, the home economics faculty, and each girl's 
mother. 

2. November — the Chapter will secure through the welfare 
agency at school the names of several needy families and pre- 
pare baskets of food for them at Thanksgiving. 



A house was built and furnished by the Durham High School 
students of Vocational-Bricklaying, Carpentry, Homemaking, 
and Machine Shop. During Open House homemaking students 
show the public the draperies and other furnishings planned 
and made by them. 



At the ironing board is Edna Rose Duncan, Betty Crocker 
Winner, Finance Chairmen FHA. Left of picture: Ruth 
M( Arthur. FHA Parliamentarian, and right is Betty Gray 
Dorman, FHA President. In the background is our FHA 
emblem and the Hi-Fi record player the chapter bought last year. 




allenge For 1956-57 

-Let's Tell Our Story! 



Rutherfordton-Spindale — During their annual Mother-Daugh- 
ter Banquet, Future Homemakers of America of the Ruther- 
fordton-Spindale Chapter portrayed to their mothers and guests 
what membership in our organization could mean to each of its 
members. This portrayal was presented in pantomime with a 
narrator. The program interprets many phases of the total 
homemaking program. A copy of the complete script may be 
obtained from the state office by request. The introduction of 
this program is as follows: 

NARRATOR: 

If someone asked you what you considered to be the greatest 
promoter of good in the world, what would be your reply? 
Would it not be love? Tonight we shall look at some of the 
ways in which love finds expression — 



In the home, where each member plays an important role, 
and has an unselfish concern for the others; 

In the community, where time and talents are given willingly; 

And into a broader realm, by extending a helping hand to 
our brothers around the world. 

Let us see how our world may have truth, love, security, and 
faith as realities, not dreams. 

Taylorsville — Homes are being made more livable in the 
Taylorsville community as a result of individual home projects 
following a unit "Making Our Homes More Livable." Among 
the projects selected are: Cleaning Up the attic and burning 
rubbish; cleaning up the back yard and planting flowers; 
pruning shrubbery; repairing back steps; painting bedrooms; 
washing curtains and draperies; and painting and refinishing 
old furniture. 



NEWS STORIES FOR YOUR HOMETOWN PAPER— 

1. You do not need to write a heading or title for the story. The editor will decide this. Space may be felt 
at the top of the page for the heading. 

2. If possible type the story and double space it. 

3. Use names but be accurate in spelling the names and be sure that recognition is given to the right person. 

4. It is very important that the first sentence be alive. It is the lead sentence. Read the samples below: 



This 

"Fun Night" is all that the names implies when as many as 350 

Future Homemakers and Future Farmers in County 

gather together for an evening of planned and supervised 
recreation. 

A letter from the Chief of Education Projects Section of the 
United Nations, M. L. Abeille, has been received by the 
president of chapter. The letter is an acknowledge- 
ment of the receipt of UNESCO Coupons from the chapter and 
an explanation of how the coupons will be used for home 
economics equipment in a Korean School. 

"If you were a native of and your boy friend or your 

steady took you out for a date you would be certain to have a 

chaperone." This information came from a native 

of who visited the homemaking department at Surry 

High School and made a talk to Future Homemakers and 
their parents at the March meeting of the chapter. 

"Welcome Mother Dear" in bold letters greeted the Mothers 

of Future Homemakers in the school on Valentine's 

Day. 

More attractive and more livable homes are being noticed by 

families and friends of Future Homemakers in the 

community as a result of many individual and class projects 
in the homemaking program at the school. 

Understanding people whose culture, customs and habits are 
different from our own is one way to help promote "Interna- 
tional good will." This is the belief of the program planning 

committee of the chapter. This year five foreign born 

residents of the community have been invited to participate in 
programs. 

Were you one of the proud mothers at last night's P. T. A. 
Meeting? Homemaking students demonstrated with poise and 
efficiency many skills acquired as a result of their training in 
homemaking classes. 



Not This 

Future Homemakers in County entertained the 

Future Farmers at the annual Fun Night Event on Saturday, 
December 5. 

During the regular monthly meeting of the Chapter, 

the secretary read a letter which had been received from the 
United Nations Korean Reconstruction Agency. 



The FHA chapter had a visitor from on 

the program for the regular meeting in March. 



Members of the FHA entertained their mothers on 

Valentine's Day with a Tea. 

Many Future Homemakers of the chapter have 

selected projects in their homemaking classes this year which 
will improve the appearance of their homes. 

The Program planning committee of the chapter 

decided to invite some local people who are foreign born to 
take part in some of the FHA programs during the year. 



The Program for the P. T. A. meeting last night was presented 

by Mrs , the home economics teacher, and her home 

economics classes. 



Continuous Through the Year 



The outstanding activity of the 
past year's work was the joy of 
"reaping the harvest" of plans which 
were made three years ago. When 
Leaksville High School and Draper 
High Schools were consolidated as 
Tri-City, we had to attend school on 
the second shift for about six weeks. 
At least until it was possible to push by 
the workmen and enter through class- 
room doors to have classes. Teach- 
ing, above the noise of the hammers, 
saws and electrical machinery of the 
contractors within the building and 
the bulldozers on the outside, was 
no easy task. However, we were so 
overjoyed with the dream of the 
completed building that we did not 
fret about the few months of diffi- 
culty, until we learned that the brick 
wall being laid about 4 feet outside 
the home economics windows was 
to be an open coal bin. Having been 
taught and in turn teaching the girls 
to make the most of the situation at 
hand, we jokingly named the coal 
pile "Black Mountains" and, on one 
occasion, the coal was made into an 
attractive center piece for a lunch. 

We began immediately to think 
what might be done in the four feet 
of space between the building and 
the walls of the coal bin. After con- 
sidering several ideas the Tri-City 
Chapter of the Future Homemakers 
of America decided to plant climb- 
ing roses — hoping the roses would 
screen our "Black Mountains." We 
began a study of roses, accumulating 
bulletins from the extension agents, 
nursery, and a catalog from Jackson 
and Perkins Co. — the world's larg- 
est rose growers. From this material 
and talking with local rose growers, 
we learned that it was too late to 
plant the roses. This didn't kill our 
enthusiasm; we kept our plans until 
the fall and during National FHA 
Week, we planted ten climbers, eight 
of which were the Blaze and two 
Paul Scarlets, along the wall of the 
coal bin/Anticipating the annual ac- 
tivity of our FHA Club of putting a 
rose on each teacher's desk, we 
planted a dozen rose bushes for cut- 
ting and making flower arrange- 
ments. In the spring of 1954 we 
worked, fed, sprayed, and nursed 
the bushes with little results. Again 
in the fall we worked, fed and 
sprayed our little plants. We con- 
tinued to nurse our roses and had 
asked the Vocational School to make 




F. H. A. Girls typing runners. Reading left to right: Sondra Vestal, Vice-President 
will be President next year; Jackie Allen, Treasurer for two years, senior; Rachel 
Lynch, incoming Vice-President; Carol Houchins and Barbara Hatcher. 



us a fence. Not until after they began 
blooming on the ground did we get 
any encouragement about securing a 
fence of iron pipe in a cement 
base so that would stand. The 
rest was left to the FHA girls. 
Again we worked, fed, sprayed, and 
put pine needles around the bushes 
for the summer. During the winter 
of 1955-56 we painted the fence and 
finally tied the runners up. As our 
spring was late coming, the roses 
were just beautiful during that try- 
ing last month of school. Not only 
did we enjoy them but we swelled 
with pride when such remarks as 
these were made by the students, fac- 
ulty, principal and superintendent: 

"Aren't the roses beautiful?" 

"We are certainly enjoying your 
roses from our windows!" 

"I declare they are beautiful! It's 
a shame they are not on the front 
side of the building." 

"Your group certainly had an ex- 
cellent idea three years ago when 



they planned to plant the roses to 
screen the coal pile. They are far 
more attractive than the coal!" 

This is an everlasting project as 
we must continue to work, feed, 
spray and nurse our roses from year 
to year, but it will also be an ever- 
lasting enjoyment as they bloom 
from year to year and the shrub 
itself will screen "Black Mountains" 
from the eyes of the students, teach- 
ers, and others who visit the home 
economics department of Tri-City. 



COVER PICTURE 
Two officers of the North Caro- 
lina Association of Future Home- 
makers of America, Penny Niven, 
Treasurer, and Doris league, Re- 
porter, greet Dr. and Mrs. J. War- 
ren Smith as they enter the 
Memorial Auditorium in Raleigh 
to attend the 1956 State Conven- 
tion of Future Homemakers of 
America. Dr. Smith is the Director 
of Vocational Education in North 
Carolina. 



THE MEANING OF THE ROSE 

(Continued from page three) 
Conflicting ideas of different generations often are like thorns. 
We are all familiar with "Now in my day things were different." 
The thorns will always be there but whether we can handle 
the rose without being pricked will depend on how we can 
face these conflicting situations. Through sharing experiences 
and openly discussing these conflicts with our parents we can 
come to an understanding that will be acceptable to both. Then 
we can say with the poet, "every rose has its thorns, but ain't 
the roses sweet." 

BUDS— 

From this stem that is sustained by the roots grows the 
buds which will later develop into the beautiful flower. 

The buds are symbolic of the developing beauty and talents 
of the young girl. You are growing out of the awkward age, 
when you felt you were all legs and arms, into a young 
woman of charm, poise and good manners. You have learned, 
or you are learning the importance of such characteristics as 
adaptability, self-confidence, patience, the joy of living and 
honesty in dealing with people and many others. The finer 
and more worthy these goals, the greater value they will have 
to you and the community where you will live. 

The care and development and the use we make of op- 
portunities at this time are most important to help us grow 
into full maturity and be the kind of grown-up we want to be. 

A rose may be carefully cultivated up to this stage of de- 
velopment and have beautiful buds, but will never open into 
beautiful flowers if the same loving care is not continued. So 
we are at this stage of development in our lives and it is up 
to us to make the choice that will determine whether our lives 
will open out to give beauty and service to the world or whether 
we will wither and die. 

LEAVES— 

While the home is the center of our lives and usually has 
the greatest influence in our growing up, there are other in- 
fluences that are important. 

The teachers we have during our school years have a great 
influence in molding our characters as well as helping form 
habits and attitudes. Preachers and Sunday School teachers 
share in our growth, too, by helping us attain a deeper reverence 
toward things spiritual and a greater faith in God. 

The kinds of friendships we form are very important. A 
real friendship that is based on sharing and understanding will 
grow into deep affection. Then, there must be confidence and 
loyalty if a friendship is to be lasting. Honesty and sincerity 
are also important. The friendships you have can help you 
develop these traits if the friend values these characteristics 
and tries to incorporate them in his own life. Thus the leaves of 
our rose represent these influences in the process of growing 
up — our teachers, preachers, Sunday School teachers and our 
friends. 

FULL ROSE— 

As our rose opens into full maturity, we see the beauty of 
each petal as it contributes to the beauty and elegance of the 
full blown rose. Thus, when we see an attractive personality, 
it too has the beauty of a rose. "To be grown-up means to be 
physically mature; next, to understand oneself; and then to have 
attained inner harmony and established goals that direct one 
toward consistent effort; wise choices and self-control." The 
grown-up is able to understand life's problems and to face them 
confidently. She's able to plan a satisfying design for living. 
She makes this plan "home centered" thus providing a power- 
ful support for her normal physical well being, mental growth, 
and emotional fulfillment. 

Thus, when you see a full grown rose in all its beauty, 
think of all the qualities that go into the making of a beautiful 
life — the life that is the goal of every Future Homemaker. 



ODE TO A WARDROBE 

Loaded with clothes 
That all need repair 

Plenty to wash — 

Nothing to wear. 

Filled with assortment 
of fabrics and cloths 

Inhabited yearly 

By ravenous moths. 

A joy to possess 

A dread to keep straight 

Contents are never 

Quite up to date. 

Your space is too small 
Contents quite old. 

Some old shoes are even 

Covered with mold. 

Though I quite often gripe, 
At your contents outdated. 
In my estimation 
You're really high rated. 

Not the things that are in you, 

or even about you, 

But what would I do, Oh 
Wardrobe without you. 

Judy Reese 

North Buncombe Chapter 

Weaverville, N. C. 



THE NATIONAL CONFERENCE ON 
CITIZENSHIP— SEPTEMBER 16-19, 1956 

Representing Future Homemakers of America at the 
National Conference on Citizenship were three of our 
national FHA officers: Ardis Armstrong, Vice-President 
from Montana, Helen Lerro, Treasurer from Massa- 
chusetts and Nancy Rosenthal, Secretary, from North 
Carolina. 

There were 1,000 delegates from 800 organizations 
present. For this year — Election Year — the theme "The 
Voting Citizen" was a very timely one. As Future 
Homemakers we are below the age for voting on com- 
munity, state, and national issues and in elections. What 
can we do? On the program were such nationally known 
people as — Honorable Thomas D'Arcy Brophy, Past 
President of the American Heritage Foundation and 
Honorable Charles P. Taft, Mayor of Cincinnati and 
Past President, Federal Council of Churches of Christ in 
America, and Honorable George V. Allen, former As- 
sistant Secretary of State, now Ambassador to Greece. 
Each was concerned with the preservation of our Amer- 
ican Heritage — to govern ourselves through ballot. 

Please plan to give some consideration to what You 
can do in your community to get a large percentage of 
eligible voters to go to the polls — and vote in November. 
Less than 60 per cent of the eligible voters went to the 
polls in 1952. Many of these were bankers, doctors, 
dentists, and members of business clubs. 



B dFa|rter (tatter? 



"Garden of Love" was the Theme of 
the banquet given by the Anderson FHA 
and FFA chapters honoring their parents 
last spring. Highlighting the evening's 
program were two pageants. "The Family 
That Does Not Co-operate" and "The 
Family That Co-operates" presented by 
Earl Bradley. Jimmy Alfred, Myra Al- 
dridge and Norma Ann Troxler. All the 
committees — program, decorating, food, 
hospitality and others co-operated beauti- 
fully to make this one of the most reward- 
ing experiences of the year. 

The Aycock Chapter of the Future 
Homemakers of America had a most 
successful year last year under a new 
system. The group had grown so large we 
found the executive council handling 
problems which girls were reluctant to 
discuss in such large gatherings. The 
personal element was disappearing and 
with it interest and co-operation. 

Last fall four sub-groups were formed 
according to classes. These groups met 
every other Monday during class period, 
using the full period when needed. These 
were considered committee meetings 
where pertinent problems were worked 
out. 

Once each month regular chapter meet- 
inges have been held. At this time the 
committee groups gave reports of their 
activities. And these groups took turns 
providing the program for these regular 
meetings. 

During the year each group entertained 
parents or mothers in separate socials. 
The chapter did not have a joint banquet. 

In this way more Future Homemakers 
were able to take part in chapter activities 
more interest was aroused and much more 
was accomplished. 

"Families Together" was the theme of 
the Mother-Daughter Banquet by the 
Beaufort Chapter last spring. Jackie 
Young, FHA president, and Frances Bell 
were in charge of the program. Narrators 
for the flash-backs of the home and com- 
munity activities of the FHA were Sandra 
Haskins and Pauline Woodard. Jackie 
Young, was one of the eight delegates 
from District II to the National Con- 
vention in July. 

The Bear Grass chapter of the Future 
Homemakers of America honored their 
parents with a tea given in the home eco- 
nomics department. The room was deco- 
rated with native spring flowers. The 
refreshment table was centered with a 
lovely arrangement of dogwood and jas- 
mine carrying out a green and yellow 
color scheme. Punch, yellow and green 
party cakes, party mints, and nuts were 
prepared and served by the Future Home- 
makers. Most of the parents of the FHA 
members attended. 

In discussing a home, school, and com- 
munity beautification project, the B. F. 
Grady chapter felt that "charity begins at 
home" — so they decided that they should 
work on their clothing laboratory in the 
Home Economics Department. 

A steering committee was appointed 
and plans got under way for goals to be 
reached including means of financing the 



project. The school, county, and home 
economics girls and their mothers joined 
hands to complete this project. 

We badly needed more space, so we 
persuaded our superintendent to have a 
wall removed between the clothing lab 
and living room, which meant for added 
space and better arrangement of furnish- 
ings. They also patched our plastering and 
furnished paint for our walls, tables and 
chairs and cabinets. 

FHA members got busy raising funds 
to finance their part of the project which 
included painting, sanding floors and pur- 
chase of floor covering, new adjustable 
ironing board, electric sewing machine, 
refinishing two chairs and a table, and 
material for slip covers and curtains. One 
of our chapter mothers, who runs an 
upholstery shop, volunteered to assist two 
girls with the slip cover. Several of the 
FHA girls stayed after school and made 
the curtains and refinished furniture. 
Some of the FFA boys assisted in sanding 
the floors. The school purchased one 
electric sewing machine for us. 

When our project was completed, we 
held open house at PTA. Our FHA 
swelled with pride at the impression that 
our beautification project had made. 

FHA Degrees were explained at the 
April Meeting of the Boyden Chapter. 
Ann Miller, degrees chairman, was in 
charge of the program. "Declaration of 
Intention" blanks for both the Junior 
and Chapter degrees were given out. Kay 
Goodman, who is second alternate to the 
office of national secretary represented 
the Boyden Chapter and the Davie- 
Rowan Bi-county Federation at the Na- 
tional FHA Convention this summer. 

The Cerro Gordo Chapter of Future 
Homemakers had a visitor from Ceylon. 

She was Mrs. Ranee Fernando, who 
gave a talk, and answered questions about 
her native land. 

Mrs. Fernando is an attractive, soft 
spoken, dark haired lady. She speaks 
English well, in fact she teaches in English 
in Ceylon. 

She is a Home Economics teacher and 
is going to school over in Detroit, 
Michigan, on a scholarship. 

Ceylon is a small island country off 
the southern tip of India. It is about half 
the size of North Carolina, with a popu- 
lation of about six million. The weather 
is hot all year round. 

Mrs. Fernando was dressed in the na- 
tive attire of the Ceylonese people. It 
consisted of a piece of cotton material, 
because of heat and cost, six yards long 
and 42 inches wide, which was wrapped 
loosely around the body. The Sari is also 
used as a hat. On her feet were strap 
sandals. Jewelry is very popular and 
plentiful in Ceylon. 

The principal food of the Ceylonese is 
rice. Cocoanut is also very useful, in fact 
every part of the tree is used. Their food 
habits are quite different from ours. They 
use almost no milk. 

The homes have cement floors, which 
are polished. We were interested to learn 
they only have half walls in their homes 
and schools for ventilation. Outside the 
city there are few of our conveniences. 
No TV even then. The people sleep 
under mosquito netting to keep out the 
insects. 



The dating and marriage customs are 
peculiar to us. In some cases the parents 
choose the lifemate, but this is changing 
somewhat. They usually marry around 20. 
When couples date they always have 
chaperones. 

The schools in Ceylon are different 
from ours. The girls and boys go to dif- 
ferent schools. The girls wear white uni- 
forms. They have three months of school, 
then a month of vacation, all year round. 
All religious holidays are observed. Mrs. 
Fernando who teaches the senior girls all 
of their subjects, makes $40 a month. 
Their homemaking course is similar to 
ours. 

"So Dear To Our Hearts" was the 
theme of the Clyde Chapter for their 
Mother-Daughter Banquet which took 
place on Valentines' Day. 

During dinner Elaine Curtis presented 
us with several piano selections. After- 
ward an interesting program was given 
by members of the FHA. Rosemary New- 
man gave the welcome and her mother, 
Mrs. James Newman, gave the response. 
Amelia Robinson gave "Her Children 
Shall Call Her Happy" from the Bible. 
Mrs. Bonnie Shook, a member of the 
faculty, gave an inspiring speech on the 
relationship of a mother and a daughter. 
And then with the skit that had been pre- 
pared by ten girls on the "Broken Hearted 
Old Maids Club," we had an opportunity 
to howl with laughter. Patricia Lindsey 
closed the program with the singing of 
"Good Night Mothers, Farewell Daugh- 
ters." 

Future Homemakers of the Erwin Chap- 
ter planned and sponsored a program in 
April which had far reaching results as 
an interpretation of the homemaking 
program to the people in the Erwin com- 
munity. The program included: A devo- 
tional "Builders of Homes"; an explana- 
tion of the creed; and explanation of how 
FHA fits into the school program; a his- 
tory of the organization in celebration 
of its 10th anniversary, presentation of 
honorary memberships, special thanks 
to interested and co-operative individuals, 
solo singing and dancing and readings. 
The Fashion Show, and a Social Hour in 
the home economics department. 

The proud fathers of the Glendale 
FHA members decided last year that it 
was high time they were invited to one 
of the annual socials previously held for 
mothers. So a Parents Banquet honoring 
both mothers and fathers was planned. 

The many expressions of appreciation 
from our fathers for being included made 
us feel truly rewarded for our efforts 
in preparing for this Parents Banquet 
instead of the Mother-Daughter Banquet. 

In addition to our parents, our guests 
included Mr. E. S. Simpson, Johnston 
County Superintendent of Schools, who 
was the featured speaker and with him 
was his lovely wife. Other guests were 
the local school committee, the high 
school faculty, and the former President 
of our chapter. Miss Betty Jane Boyette. 

"Wearing of the Green" was the theme 
of the Mother-Daughter Banquet of 
Greenwood Chapter of the Future Home- 
makers of America last spring. 

The approach of St. Patrick's Day in- 
fluenced the program for the evening and 
was further accentuated in the decorations 



of the cafeteria, the appointments and the 
three-course dinner menu. 

Mrs. Robert Wallace, Lee County 
bookmobile librarian and a former mem- 
ber of the Greenwood FHA chapter, 
spoke briefly on the importance of home- 
making. Mrs. Wallace stressed the im- 
portance of homemaking as a career. 

Many careers today are open to a 
woman, she said, but still homemaking is 
the greatest, the most satisfying and 
the most rewarding. Homemaking, she 
stressed, is not confined to four walls, but 
reaches out into all phases of community 
life. 

She urged her listeners to "have faith 
in your mission in life because lack of 
it has caused multitudes of failures. When 
we believe in ourselves we lift ourselves 
out from the masses and become an 
individual." 

The FHA entertained at the Robert B. 
Glenn High School. 

More than 400 Future Homemakers of 
America and Future Farmers of America 
joined together in the annual fun night 
event for chapters in Stokes and Forsyth 
counties. 

Kay Krites, president of the Forsyth 
County FHA Chapter, was in charge of 
the program. 

Music was furnished by the Glenn 
High School Band and the Forsyth 
County FFA Band. Square dancing, talent 
events and round dancing were features 
of the program. 

Glenn, Kernersville, Walnut Cove, 
Clemmons, Griffith, Walkertown and 
Northwest high schools participated in 
the talent show. 

Mrs. R. L. Kuykendall of Kernersville 
and Mrs. Nina Freeze of Walnut Cove 
are faculty advisers for the FHA fun 
night. 

The Mills FHA'ers played host at the 
annual Franklin-Nash Bi-County Rally 
last spring. A full page — front page — 
spread in the Franklin Times all about 
our organization appeared during the 
week prior to the day of the Rally. The 
principal speaker for the event was Mr. 
C. H. Fries, assistant Superintendent of 
Nash County Schools. Greetings were 
extended by Mr. M. L. Rowland, Princi- 
pal of Mills School, and Dr. Cecil Rob- 
bins, President of Louisburg College. 
Election of officers for 1956-57 was the 
main item of business. A Fashion Show 
sponsored by the Fashion Shoppe with 
FHA members modeling highlighted the 
afternoon program. 

Five residents of Morehead and vicinity 
who were born in foreign countries were 
guests of the Morehead City Chapter at 
its annual Mother-Daughter buffet supper 
last spring. Each was presented with a red 
rose, and as they were introduced by 
Patsy Holt, our president, each one made 
a short talk. They were Mrs. Larry Can- 
non, born in Holland; Mrs. Odell Adams, 
born in the Bahamas; Mrs. M. J. Loutit 
from Scotland; Mrs. O. G. Sterlen from 
Norway, and Mrs. Ward Ballou, a French 
Bride. Our theme "International Good- 
Will" was carried out by having a group 
of flags of the nations on the center 
table, and by using strips of crepe paper 
in the colors of the flags lengthwise of 
each table covered with white cloths. 

The Future Homemakers of the Norlina 



Chapter honored their mothers at a Tea 
in the Home Economics Department 
Friday, May 11 from 2:00 until 3:00 
o'clock. Chapter mothers, Mrs. George 
Reed and Mrs. Allen Kimball were in 
the receiving line with the chapter of- 
ficers. Frozen fruit punch, fancy sand- 
wiches, cake squares, cheese biscuits, and 
mints were served. These were prepared 
and served by the third year home eco- 
nomics girls. 

There are fashion shows and fashion 
shows, but seldom one in which the men 
are favored. Future Homemakers of 
Northern High School decided to do 
something about it, and their Dads got a 
hilarious surprise. 

It was "Daddy Date Night" for the 
FHA chapter. The girls entertained their 
fathers at a sumptuous banquet first, 
showing off cooking skills. The decora- 
tors in the chapter got a workout too, 




carrying out an "April Showers Bring 
May Flowers" theme in the generous 
centerpiece arranged around umbrellas. 

But the piece de resistance of the eve- 
ning was the fashion show of men's 
clothes. Barbara Hill modeled sports 
clothes; Helen Dunlap showed what the 
well-dressed working man should wear; 
and Bobbie Hutchins wore the latest in 
pajamas. Judy Holloway and Marion 
Ashe had parts in the program, with 
Sylvia Goodwin, club president, presid- 
ing with the assistance of Miss Annie S. 
Wootten, adviser. 

Marion Ashe, President of the Chap- 
ter, attended the National Convention in 
Chicago and she is making plans to work 
on her State Degree this year. Also she is 
taking definite action to continue to 
strengthen her chapter. 

All members of the North Davidson 

FHA Chapter were quite busy several 
weeks before Valentine. They were plan- 
ning and preparing for their Mother and 
Daughter Banquet. A delicious meal was 
served and afterward we had a wonder- 
ful program which included several solos, 
a resume of the years work in our chap- 
ter, and a fashion show. A beautiful 
corsage was presented to our adviser, Mrs. 
H. E. Parker. After the banquet our 
mothers were given a chance to get 
acquainted. 

To add an extra spark of interest to our 
spring fashion show, the FHA'ers of 
Prospect Hill decided to invite Miss North 
Carolina to participate in the show and 
to give us some last minute pointers on 
modeling. Too, we had just done an ex- 
tensive amount of redecorating in the 
home economics department and wanted 



to have open house for the community to 
see our accomplishments. 

It was an exciting day for all the pupils 
and parents of Prospect Hill. Miss Arnold 
reigned as Queen during the fashion show. 
The models were home economics pupils 
and the garments were made by them in 
homemaking classes. 

The president of the Red Springs FHA 
Chapter, Betty Gray Dorman, has been 
collecting dolls for eight years and at the 
present time has 100 dolls in her col- 
lection. She is a member of the Interna- 
tional Doll Club which entitles her a doll 
directly from a foreign country each year. 
Betty Gray made a talk about her hobby 
and displayed approximately 60 dolls 
from her collection at a meeting of the 
chapter last spring. 

Two FHA girls of the Shelby Chapter 
received $50 War Bonds. These students 
plan to major in home economics in 
college. Ella Foy Suttle, daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. A. C. Suttle, and Martha Reid, 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Show Reid 
were winners. Miss Suttle plans to enter 
W. C. U. N. C. and Miss Reid will enter 
Queen's College. 

The Rev. John Robinson, pastor of 
Pleasant Grove Baptist Church at Vander, 
was guest speaker at the annual Mother- 
Daughter Banquet held in the Stedman 
school cafeteria on Tuesday evening. 

Sarah Lou Owen, president of the 
Stedman Chapter of Future Homemakers 
of America, recognized special guests 
present, including the honorary chapter 
members and honorary chapter mothers. 

The chapter mothers for this year at- 
tending were Mrs. W. H. Kelly, Mrs. R. E. 
McDaniel, Mrs. W. D. Fisher, Sr., and 
Mrs. Godbold. They presented a corsage 
of red roses to each of the old and new 
officers. 

Chapter projects of the Tri-High FHA 
Chapter in Rutherfordton County during 
1955-56 included operation of our school 
infirmary and starting a fund to buy a 
wheel chair to lend to anyone in the 
community needing one. 

A program entitled "Building the Em- 
blem" was presented at the Weldon FHA 
Mother-Daughter Banquet by Romano 
Nelmus, Adelaide Newsom, Marty Pierce, 
Rachel Newsom, Nancy Garner, Joyce 
Newsom, Charlotte Elias and Becky Inge. 
Velma Ferrell presented Pat Clark with a 
chapter degree pin to be worn with tn t 
degree pin she received last year. Wait- 
resses were members of the 8th jjrade. 

Mrs. O. C. Stroud, Sr., of Ayden was 
speaker of the evening at the Winterville 
FHA Mother-Daughter Banquet. Mrs. 
Stroud stressed the main essentials nec- 
essary in making a good home as taught 
in FHA. Her inspiring talk encouraged 
all "To work for good home and 
family life for all." Mrs. Stroud stressed 
that "It's not what you say, but what you 
do which will actually make your FHA 
dreams become realities." 

Jeannette Worthington, State FHA 
President was a special guest. Jeannette 
presented 13 beautiful red roses to de- 
serving members and outstanding friends 
of the FHA. 

The Future Farmers of America served 
the dinner under the supervision of their 
agriculture teachers, Mr. E. F. Hubbard 
and Mr. Douglas Bryant. 



Scenes of the Stcite (Join 



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FUTURE HOMEMAKERS 

* North Carolina Association * 



VOLUME XIV 




DECEMBER 1956 



Number 2 



Cijristmatf Htoeas; for tfje Reporters! 



What type of a reporter are you 
for your local FHA chapter? Do you 
only report the regular meeting to 
your newspaper? Why not show 
your chapter and your community 
that you can be a reporter with a 
"nose for news." 

As a reporter, how do you help 
your chapter celebrate Christmas? 
Do you put your imagination to 
work and suggest ideas which will 
help your chapter to progress? There 
are many ways at Christmas that 
you and your chapter can celebrate 
this sacred holiday. 

There are probably families in 
your own home town who have never 
experienced the true spirit of Christ- 
mas. Why not help them receive 
this joy? 

Your chapter can always hold 
carolings and take along baskets of 
fruit for those who are sick, or the 
aged, or those in the hospitals — 
especially hospitals for crippled 
children. 




There are many other Christmas 
ideas that you as a reporter can help 
your chapter carry through; but 



remember to be sure to let the public 
know what your FHA is doing! 

Don't wait! Begin today to help 
your FHA as a reporter! 

By Doris Teague 
F.H.A. State Reporter 



FHA 

I'm glad I belong to FHA 

It helps me journey along lifes way, 

And as I dream about the world, 

I can see a teenage girl. 

As she grows day by day, 

Her adviser tells her of FHA. 

When she grows up 

I'm sure she'll know, 

Just how to cook, and how to sew, 

And how to iron, and how to clean, 

And how to do all sorts of things. 

Ann Holloman and 
Glenda Harker 
Jones Central Chapter 



North Carolina Association of Future Homemakers of America 



State Officers 
1956-57 

President — Jeannette Worthington, Ayden 
Vice-President — Becky Hayes, Harris 
Secretary — Clyde Templeton, Union Grove 
Treasurer — Penny Niven, Waxhaw 
Reporter — Doris Teague, Liberty 
Parliamentarian — Margaret Rand, Garner 
Historian — Helen Lewis, Red Springs 
Song Leader — Jenny Lou Taylor, Deep Run 



District Advisers 
1956-57 

Joyce Currin — Murfreesboro 
Mrs. Mary L. Smith, Clyde A. Erwin 
Mrs. Madge Young, Taylorsville 
Mrs. Mary Kate Faulkner, Marshville 
Mrs. Cora Whitehead, Ramseur 
Mrs. Florence Sorrell, Benson 
Mary Elizabeth Burns, Pinehurst 
Mrs. Alma T. Phillips, Jones Central 



State Adviser 

Mrs. Faye T. Coleman 



STATE DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 

Division of Vocational Education 
Raleigh, North Carolina 



No Excuse for Eligible Citizens in Shelby Community 
Not Voting November 6, 1956 



You haven't got a chance, Joe 
Voter; you'll have to vote whether 
you like it or not — the FHA has 
seen to that. 

Time was when you could beg 
off your ballot on the grounds you'd 
tend to incriminate your kids if you 
left them alone while you went off to 
vote. 

But leave it to the FHA — this 
association dedicated to making 
homes in the future — they've come 
up with a special baby-sitting service 
for election day. 

Nancy Rosenthal, FHA president, 
Shelby High School, masterminded 
it. She offered the services of her 
FHA chapter to Mayor Harr Wood- 
son, who accepted with alacrity. 

Next thing you know Miss Rosen- 
thal turned the whole thing over to 
a committee headed by Mary Lynn 
Lutz with Julia Sherer as co- 
chairman. 

The committee set up an all-day 
deal for Tuesday from 8:30 to 6:30 
(when the polls closed). All you had 
to do was call the FHA operator at 
4101 and a baby-sitter would be 
right over. 

This was one time when both 
kids and the baby-sitter got a break. 

Incidentally, this Miss Rosenthal 
is a resourceful FHA'er. Said she, 
analyzing the baby-sitter to voter re- 
lationship: "If the citizen can pro- 
vide transportation for the girl, fine; 
if not, a transportation committee 
will be set up by the students." 



FAMILY LIFE CONFERENCE 
CHARLOTTE, OCTOBER 29-30 

Clyde Templeton, State FHA 
Secretary, represented the State 
FHA Association of Future Home- 
makers at the North Carolina Family 
Life Conference held in Charlotte, 
October 29-30. Included in the re- 
ports by Clyde of the meetings she 
attended is this — First Demon- 
stration Session. 

(Fourth grade students are not 
given homework over the week end, 
but are asked to complete a little 
project which they can share with 
their families. They each give a 
report of their project on Monday 
morning.) 

Contents of Demonstration 

1 . Together, the group decided on 
Friday for each class member to 




Mayor Harry Woodson reads a letter suggesting an FHA baby-sitting plan for 
election day. It was written by Nancy Rosenthal, Shelby High FHA president, who 
stands at far right behind mayor. Mary Lynn Lutz at left, was chairman of FHA 
Committee which would provide baby-sitting service for potential voters, who 
otherwise might not be able to cast a ballot. 



provide a surprise for either parent 
over the week end. Each one waited 
eagerly to report his surprise as the 
teacher called on him. 

2. By having no school assign- 
ment, the students expressed having 
more time to spend with their 
parents. 

3. They thought that they enjoyed 
their lessons at school more by hav- 
ing less homework. 

4. The projects made the children 
feel as if they were an important 
part of their families; thus, estab- 
lishing a feeling of security. 



5. It gave them a realization of 
what their parents do by actually 
helping them. 

6. Some of the students even went 
so far as to draw illustrations and 
write little stories about their 
projects. 

7. Personalities were certainly- 
brought out as the children told their 
project story. For those who would 
not speak otherwise, the oral discus- 
sion was a step toward improving 
those personalities. 

8. As the children fulfill their 
(Continued on page three) 



1956-57 GOAL II . . . 

To Help Members Understand the Oppor- 
tunities Open to Them in the Field 
of Home Economics 



Future Homemakers who are in- 
terested in continuing their formal 
education after high school and are 
considering a major in home eco- 
nomics will be interested in what a 
former FHA member and an FHA 
officer of her local chapter has to 
say about her College Home Eco- 
nomics Club. 

What Ruth Turnage has said in 
her talk "What the Home Econom- 
ics Club Means to Me" could be a 
challenge to every Future Home- 
maker. Here is a copy of her speech. 

"WHAT THE 

HOME ECONOMICS CLUB 

MEANS TO ME" 

What does the Home Economics 
Club mean to me? Is it merely an 
organization for which I possess a 
membership card, just a means by 
which I get my picture in the year- 
book? Or is it really a club in which 
I use my time, talents, and labor 
to foster the interest and develop- 
ment of Home Economics? I sin- 
cerely trust that it is the latter. 

What does the Home Economics 
Club mean to you? Is it an organiza- 
tion in which you find much enjoy- 
ment from really being a member? 
Does your membership in this club 
help you to develop socially, spiritu- 
ally, and educationally? Does this 
club offer to you many opportunities 
to meet people — girls who are pre- 
paring for a similar profession as you 
are and women who have already 
become professional experts in their 
own field? 

Is it a club in which you work 
to help others, to foster international 
good will, to become a good citizen 
and community leader, and simply to 
learn to live with others? 

If you are not getting these things 
from being a member of our Home 
Economics Club, perhaps I can help 
you find out why you are failing to 
be a successful club member. You 
have, no doubt, heard that you get 
out of a thing exactly what you put 



into it. Just how much have you 
really put into your club? 

To me the East Carolina College 
Home Economics Club has been a 
doorway, providing many oppor- 
tunities to help me become a more 
well-rounded individual. When I en- 
tered college as a Freshman I 
immediately became a member of 
the Home Economics Club. It was 
only a few days before I was ap- 
pointed to serve on the Refreshment 
Committee and found myself busy 
helping plan the club's parties and 
refreshments for various meetings. 
Working on this committee gave me 
the chance to meet some of the other 
Home Economics majors personally, 
and become friends. This enabled me 
to develop socially by working with 
others and sharing their experiences 
and ideas. 



a » 



As a Sophomore I served as co- 
chairman of the refreshment Com- 
mittee for our club. I not only 
furthered my experience in foods 
by preparing and serving the re- 
freshments at our meetings but I 
also gained experience in acting as 
hostess to the group. 

Our club meetings have consisted 
of a variety of very interesting pro- 
grams. At these meetings I not only 
meet with girls who are studying to 
enter the same profession as I am, 
but many of our programs include 
visits from professional women. One 
of these programs was a panel dis- 
cussion on "What Home Economics 
Offers You." The panel was com- 
posed of a home demonstration 
agent, a teacher, a home economist 
on TV, a power and light company 

(Continued on Inside Back Cover) 




These are Future Homemakers too. Only they are no longer affiliated with 
our organization. You see they are college students and our organization does 
not include college students. These girls are members of the East Carolina College 
Home Economics Club. They are preparing the Home Economics Club Bazaar 
to be held an Dec. 6, 1956. This semester they are residents in the Home Manage- 
ment House. Left to Right, They are: Polly Kearney, Francis Williamson, Sara 
Bryson and Mozella Bass. 



A WORD TO CHAPTER OFFICERS ^nic and Business? 



Are you one of the estimated 
4,000 FHA chapter officers in North 
Carolina? 

The honor of holding an office in 
your FHA Chapter carries with it 
many responsibilities and challenges 
which can result in an improved 
you and a growing chapter. 

You were elected because your 
co-workers had faith in your ability 
to lead. Are you desirous of develop- 
ing to the upmost those qualities 
which will enable you to be truly 
worthy of the faith entrusted in you? 
Ask yourself these questions: 
1. Am I interested in the growth 
and development of all mem- 
bers of the chapter and do I 
have the ingenuity and imagi- 
nation to suggest experiences 
and activities which will mean 
growth of the individual? 



2. Am I thoughtful enough to 
express genuine thanks and 
appreciation for even the 
smallest contributions made by 
members? 

3. Am I happy over the accomp- 
lishments of my co-workers? 
Do I express my pride in them? 

4. Am I competent in my job as 
an officer? Am I prompt? Do 
I perform my specific duties to 
the best of my ability? 

Helen Lewis, your State Historian, 
offers this bit of advice. "For your 
New Year's resolutions remember A 
job worth doing, is worth doing 
well', so girls, with these words I 
challenge you, the Future Home- 
makers of tomorrow. Serving as your 
State Historian through 1956-57 is 
giving me a broader outlook on the 
Future Homemakers of America." 



LOOKING AHEAD 

IN FHA 

National FHA Week— April 7-13, 
1957. Please don't worry if you 
observed National FHA Week the 
first week of November — the week 
which for a number of years has 
been proclaimed National FHA. At 
the National FHA Convention it 
was announced that the dates had 
been changed, but the final decision 
of the week of April 7-13 was not 
known until later. 

"Today's Teenagers, Tomorrow's 
Homemakers" has been chosen by 
members of the National Executive 
Council as the theme for the 1957 
National FHA Meeting which will 
be held at Purdue University in 
Indiana during July, 1957. Em- 
phasis will be: "Family Happiness is 
Our Responsibility; Planned Action 
Prepares Us." Detailed plans are in 
the making. Watch for later infor- 
mation in Teen Times and this 
magazine. 

Recommendations of the National 
Committee on Emblematic Ma- 
terials included: that state officers' 
pin be made available for state of- 
ficers to purchase, and that the state 
officers pin be the gold pin with the 
ruby in the guard; the purchase of 
their pins either for or by a state 
officer would be optional. Either the 
pin or guard, or both may be pur- 
chased by the state officer at the 
end of her term of office. (State 
officers watch for announcements 
regarding this.) 



FAMILY LIFE 

(Continued from page one) 

project duties, they gradually as- 
sume more responsibility. 

9. This was a great plane where 
the individuals could meet with a 
common interest. (The project of a 
retarded child was no different from 
that of an exceptional child.) 

10. The children expressed this 
feeling for their families: "If we 
didn't have a family, we wouldn't 
be here." 

Techniques of Demonstration 

1. The teacher put the children at 
ease before their discussion started; 
a close relationship between student 
and teacher existed. 

2. The teacher did not commend 
one student's project more highly 
than that of another; thus, a feeling 
of superiority was not present among 
class members. 

3. Realizing that some children 
are not reached through the church, 
such projects are thought to help 
them. 

4. They were learning how to state 
information about intimate things 
of the home. 

5. This is a good channel through 
which children can interview parents 
because in some instances, the chil- 
dren had to have help to complete 
their project. 



Yes, it is possible. The FHA girls 
at North Buncombe High School 
proved it when they got together to 
plan the years activities for the club. 

The 22 girls who held their Junior 
Degrees divided into groups to 
choose some good ideas on projects, 
activities, and to help to write the 
constitution for the North Buncombe 
Chapter of Future Homemakers of 
America. The disputed ideas were 
voted on; therefore no arguments 
occurred. 

After the business session, the 
girls and advisers went to the Com- 
munity Center in Weaverville for 
an indoor picnic. This was planned 
to be an outdoor affair but the 
weather did not permit. 

The FHA organization at North 
Buncombe is planning to be very 
active this year. 

One of our ideas has already 
been fulfilled. The FHA booth which 
we entered in the Intermountain 
Fair, won second prize. This was 
entitled: Future Homemakers Have 
a Barrel of Fun. 

On Wednesday, October 10, the 
FHA girls at North Buncombe had 
a picnic and party after school at 
the Community Center at Lake 
Louise. This was in honor of the 
new members. 

A COUNTY FHA NEWSLETTER 

Reporters in twelve chapters in 
Wayne County contributed to a 
newsletter which was distributed at 
the Wayne County FHA Rally. Faye 
Sutton of Seven Springs is the re- 
porter of the Wayne County Federa- 
tion. It is assumed that she, with her 
adviser, and the chapter members, 
was responsible for getting the 
Newsletter mimeographed and dis- 
tributed. 

Contents of this Newsletter were: 
Theme for the Year, which is Ca- 
reers in Homemaking; names of the 
county officers for 1956-57; and 
FHA Opening Ritual; and then 
news from each chapter. The news 
of chapters included names of of- 
ficers, plans for the year, and ac- 
counts of projects and activities 
underway or already completed. 
(See Chapter Chatter for some of 
these accounts: Rosewood, New 
Hope, Mt. Olive, Brogden, Seven 
Springs, Grantham, Eureka, Fre- 
mont.) 

FHA State Convention will be 
held in the Memorial Auditorium. 
Raleigh, N. C, Saturday, March 
30, 1957. 



Our Vision . . . 

WAS EIGHT-FOLI 



A Day at a Dist\ 



"With our purposes clearly in mind . . ." the Rally 
programs were underway. There were eight of them — 
eight Rallies, each held in a different section of North 
Carolina. It is only at the annual district rally that 
attendance is not delegated and each FHA'er affiliated 
has the privilege of attending her district rally. Invita- 
tions were extended to many others, including parents, 
school officials, and prospective Future Homemakers. 
Attendance exceeded 6,500 in the eight districts. 

Programs were carefully planned and well-organized. 
Our district advisers and our state officers deserve our 
highest respect and our heartiest thanks for assuming 
such able leadership in sponsoring this big event — the 
annual District FHA Rally. In return the district ad- 
visers, carrying the major portion of the responsibility, 
and the state officers, who presided so effectively and 
graciously have expressed their heart-felt appreciation to 
all those who participated so willingly and efficiently 
in any phase of the program to which they were assigned 
or to which they themselves volunteered their service. 

Why have these District Rallies continued in North 
Carolina through the years since the founding of the 
organization? Are the values of such meetings worth 
the time and effort required of so many? 

Viewing the total picture which encompasses all the 
state of North Carolina, your state FHA adviser points 
out a few of the values she has observed and which 
she feels to be good reasons for the growth in attendance 
from year to year. 

1 . Greater appreciation of the goals and purposes of 
the organization are gained. 

2. Ideas for programs with a purpose and ideas for 
worthy projects are obtained. Practical applica- 
tions are made in the local chapters. 

3. For each participant, a warm feeling of satisfaction 
from accomplishment is experienced. Recognition 
for participation by fellow members, parents, and 
advisers and visitors encourage and inspire the 
members to bigger and better accomplishments. 

4. The nature of the programs is such that spiritual 
and inspirational values are received. 

5. The systematic and democratic precedures used 
in the election of the state officer to represent the 
district and to fill a specific office in the State 
Association provide opportunity for each chapter 
to have a voice in the election and an opportunity 
to learn something about each candidate as well 
as see her in action before casting votes. 

We can be both grateful and proud that an outsider — 
one who recently attended a Rally to cover the news for 
his paper — caught the true spirit of the occasion and 
sensed the intangible values of being a part of this 
group of fine teen-agers who are growing "by degrees" 
into mature womanhood. The editorial appearing in 
the Hamlet paper is one of which every Future Home- 




Upper left — On the day of the Rally — registration is 
first on the Agenda. This is a scene at District VIII 
Rally held at the Clyde A. Erwin School in Buncombe 
County. Receiving the identification tag is Mr. T. C. 
Roberson, Superintendent of Buncombe County 
Schools. Left inset — Noteworthy of each Rally Pro- 
gram were skits and demonstrations which interpreted 
goals and purposes of our organization. Here is a 
scene of one such program at District I Rally. Lower 
left — Highlighting each Rally Program was a speaker, 
who spoke on topic which closely related the Rally 
theme, You In Home — In Chapter, In School, In 
Community. Dr. Irvin Sperry, professor in the School 
of Home Economics at W.C.U.N.C., who is shown 
here with Jenny Lou Taylor, State Song Leader and 
Judy Home, President of the Richlands Chapter addressed the Ful* 
Homemakers in three Districts — II, VI, and VII. In the backgroti ' 
note the North Carolina Map which was used in the Roll Call»f< 
Counties and Chapters in the district. Upper right — Three, four, five d 
sometimes even more candidates ran for a state office in each distil 
Running for the office of State Treasurer in District V were Veiie* 
Clark, Jamestown; Patsy Hunt, Bartlett Yancey; Jane Kirkman, Pleaii' ; 



LND STATE-WIDE 



lly — In Pictures 




*len; Margaret Baxley, Sumner; and Carolyn Hemnis, Stokesdale. 
: Running for the office of State Historian in District II are Doris 

(ring, Maury; Jane Barrow, Lucama; Agnes Rhue of Swansboro; 

\ Jackie Young, Beaufort. Lower right — There are displays and 

bits from most of the Rallies. Take home ideas are furnished 

ugh the use of bulletin boards and such exhibits as the one shown 

The exhibit was prepared by the Belmont Chapter in District VIII. 



maker in North Carolina and every adviser should be 
proud. It is reproduced here for all of you to see. 



HOMES OF NEXT GENERATION 
WILL BE IN GOOD HANDS 

THERE WERE NEARLY 800 of them, and every 
one was taking part in dead earnest in whatever role 
he had been cast — in registration, in hospitality, in the 
entertainment, in running for office, in politicking, or 
simply in voting. Most were members of the organization 
known as Future Homemakers of America, some where 
visitors; all were attending the North Carolina District 
III Rally at Hamlet Saturday. 

It was our privilege to visit that rally. In years to 
come, these now — young people will be attending "con- 
ventions" but somehow "rally" is at their present age 
the more — appropriate term for the meetings held by 
these girls for it reflects better the enthusiasm they put 
into them. 

Old as we are, we were caught up to a degree in the 
breathlessness of the occasion — the genuine adolescent 
excitement, the sincerity, the beauty of what they were 
doing. There was a clean feeling about it all. It was a 
heartlifting experience. 

These young people were practicing democracy in 
their rally and snowing that they have learned much. 
In the skits which were part of the program, and in the 
entertainment segment at noon, they displayed imagina- 
tion and genuine talent. And of course there is a lot 
of credit due their adult leaders. 

But if these girls are the Future Homemakers of 
America, the home of the next generation in our land 
will be in good and able hands. 



Although there was similarity in the programs of 
each Rally, there were differences. A similar pattern 
was followed in each district but, personalities being 
different everywhere, it is only logical that each Rally 
program had certain characteristics unique in itself. 

From newspaper clippings, minutes, etc., are bits of 
news from Rally programs. 

DISTRICT I 

"Extra, Extra, read all about FHA" echoed down 
the aisle as Mary Lois Cullipher tried to sell the use 
of our publications issued by the national and state 
offices." 

Helen Lewis, State Historian from District III was 
visiting District I Rally, and proved to be very helpful 
as she asked each candidate questions concerning her 



attitudes toward FHA. On-the-spot interviews were 
aids to the voters in the audience. 



DISTRICT II 

A Pageant: Highlights of the National Convention — 
Future Homemakers You are Important: 

In Home — The Family Album 
In Chapter — Meaning of the Rose 

Gypsy Dance 

"Extra, Extra" 
In School — Your Manners Are Showing 
In Community — Hometown U. S. A. 

This pageant — in four parts — was presented during 
the afternoon session of District II Rally. The narrator 
had this to say in conclusion: 

"The theme of this rally has centered around YOU, 
Now the question mark is, what will YOU do? 
The job of chapter activities depends on YOU 
Now the question is what will YOU do? 
Your job begins when you arrive at home 
That job is to make the results of this rally known. 
To your parents and teachers who have given much 

to you 
To your home, chapter, school, and community, 

too." 



DISTRICT III 

Barbara Adcock, a delegate to the 1956 National FHA 
Convention at the Conrad Hilton Hotel, Chicago, Illi- 
nois, reported to members at the District III Rally in 
original verse. Her report included an account of the 
full week of the convention. The beginning of the re- 
port is recorded here. 

"On the morn of July first in Raleigh, N. C. 
At the railroad station there was a sight to see. 
There were ten advisers and forty-three girls 
All dressed in their best with their hair in curls. 
The rrain took off and we were on our way 
To the National FHA Convention in Chicago the 

next day. 
Although we were tired, we stood the trip well 
And moved right in the Conrad Hilton Hotel. 
There were girls over here and girls over there 
But though I looked good, not a boy anywhere. 
There were twenty-one hundred girls from city and 

farm 
And even some from Puerto Rico, Hawaii and Guam. 
The theme of the National Convention was you — 
In Home, Chapter, School, and Community too. 
The meetings got started with a speech and a song 
And seemed to get better as the days went on. 
Dr. S. M. Brownell was the first one we heard 
From the Office of Education he brought us a word." 



DISTRICT IV 

Mr. Horace Seeley, Assistant Treasurer Carolina 
Power and Light Company, Raleigh, North Carolina, 
was the speaker at District IV Rally. 

In summarizing his speech, Mr. Seeley had this to 
say: "So — You see the three streams of our life — first 
the stream to make the most of what you have; second, 
the stream to solve your own problems day by day; and 
third cross over the bridge in human relations. These 
three streams flow and feed into a large lake that make 
up a person — The lake of self-respect." 



DISTRICT V 

District V Rally was held on a college campus— 
Elon College. Dr. L. E. Smith, President of the college, 
was present and extended a warm welcome to the 
Future Homemakers present. The Elon College Home 
Economics students joined hands with the Elon College 
High School Future Homemakers in serving as joint 
hosts for the Rally. The rally theme was "A Glimpse 
Into District V Crystal Ball." 

Dr. Lyda Shivers, head of the Sociology Department of 
Woman's College in Greensboro was speaker. "A good 
marriage does not just happen," she emphasized, "It 
has to be earned as do all the other things which 
represent the finest values in life." Dr. Shivers stated. 

DISTRICT VI 

District VI Rally was the only Rally to be held during 
the month of September. Because of this and because of 
the warm friendships and common interests developed 
among the state FHA officers during the National Con- 
vention and the State Executive Council Meeting in 
August, several of the state officers and one of the 
district advisers accepted Penny Niven's invitation to 
visit her and attend the District VI Rally. These visiting 
officers were Becky Hayes, State Vice-President, Helen 
Lewis, State Historian, and Doris Teague, State Re- 
porter. Other guests who were recognized by Penny, 
State Treasurer, and presider at the District VI Rally 
were: Miss Mary Hines Leonard, Assistant State Super- 
visor of Home Economics Education; Mrs. Mary Kate 
Faulkner, FHA adviser for District VI; Mr. and Mrs. 
Olin Niven, parents of Penny; Mrs. Elizabeth Johnson, 
Penny's chapter adviser; Mrs. Ann Baker, Penny's 
former chapter adviser, who was her adviser when she 
was elected as State Treasurer. 

DISTRICT VII 

Dr. Irvin V. Sperry, Professor of Family Develop- 
ment at Woman's College of the University of North 
Carolina, was the Speaker at three of the eight District 
Rallies, 

According to minutes of District VII, Dr. Sperry 
stole a place in the heart of each Future Homemaker as 
he discussed — "You in home, chapter, school, and 
community." He kept the girls laughing the first few 
minutes with his report on research to find out the 
definition of "Love" and its effect on the teen-ager 
of today. In the last part of his talk he gave ten im- 
portant suggestions for helping a girl to improve her 
personality and to make her a more worthwhile member 
of her "home, school, chapter, and community." He said 
that FHA is a very important organization for two 
reasons: 

"It helps to make for happy homes today, and it helps 
to establish happy homes in the future. These homes 
are the foundation of our society." 

DISTRICT VIII 

The secretary of our national organization of Future 
Homemakers of America, Nancy Rosenthal of the Shel- 
by Chapter, spoke to the members at District VIII 
Rally on the national growth of this organization. 

Chief speaker at the Rally was Dr. Robert Seymour 

of Mars Hill, a graduate of Duke, Yale Divinity School, 

and the University of Edinburg. His topic was "You 

Are Important." Dr. Seymour stressed that you have 

(Continued on inside back cover) 



REMINISCENCE 

Many things of value often happen in a chapter or 
a county FHA group which may have failed to reach 
the headlines. Though not exactly current news, the 
articles below describing projects and programs of 
Future Homemakers in North Carolina should have 
definite appeal and stimulation for many active FHA 
members. 

Future Homemakers Earned Money To Help 
Toward Hurricane Relief 

"A Talent Show" with admission fee was the means 
by which the Orange-Durham Bi-County FHA Federa- 
tion managed to raise funds to help some people who 
were living in one of the hurricane damaged areas in the 
fall of 1955. 

From the Superintendent of Public Welfare in the 
county to which the money was sent came the following 
expression of appreciation: 

"Again we wish to thank you and the members of the 
Future Homemakers of America for the money which 
you sent to this department for hurricane relief. 

The money has been used to help three of our high 
school seniors with their graduation expenses. These 
three seniors had been selected with the help of the 
principal and teachers since their families had received 
quite a bit of storm damage. 

These students graduated with honors. Also, one was 
president of the Senior Class, one president of the Beta 
Club, and the other receiving a scholarship from the 
Alumni Association of the School. 

On behalf of these students we wish to express our 
appreciation for your thoughtfulness." 

Miss N. C. Day At Prospect Hill High 

(Prospect Hill is one of North Carolina's newly affili- 
ated chapters, and its members are quite proud of their 
accomplishments and their plans for 1956-57.) 

To add an extra spark of interest to our spring fashion 
show, we decided to invite Miss North Carolina to par- 
ticipate in the show as well as to give us some last minute 
pointers on modeling. Too, we had just done an exten- 
sive amount of redecorating in the Home Economics 
department and wanted to have open house for the 
community to see our accomplishments. 

Of course, we were overcome with delight when Miss 
Faye Arnold wrote us her gracious acceptance. Our 
excitement never waved from that moment on through 
all the preparations for her coming. P.T.A. members 
participated by attending open house and by having 
Miss Arnold as a dinner guest. 

Miss Arnold reigned as queen during the fashion 
show and the Home Economics girls presented 
to her and the packed audience the spring fashions 
which they had made. The program ended with a 
talk by Miss Arnold on "Inner Beauty" which I am sure 
inspired every listener. Her gracious manner, her poise, 
her depth of thought along with her outer beauty made 
her an excellent representative of the ideal girl. 

Yes, Miss North Carolina Day at Prospect Hill was 
a thrill we will never forget! 

A Sample — Year's F.H.A. Program Plan 

Included in the 1956-57 Yearbook of the Wilton 
FHA chapter is a month-by-month skeletal program 
plan. (In the yearbook also is listed names of members 
on refreshment committee each month.) 



September: 

Membership Drive 

Monthly Meeting — Sept. 21 — 7:00 p.m. 

Initiation Service, Hayride and Refreshments 
October 5 th 

Program: Knowing Your FHA 
Special Events: 

Oct. 13 District Rally 

Oct. 24 U. N. Day — Chapel Program; 

Devotional, Song, skit, Talk on U. N. 
November 2nd 

Program: Practicing Democracy Throughout the 

World 
Special Events: 

Make posters urging people to vote 
Make and serve candy and cookies to voters 
December 7th 

Program for Month: New Christmas Ideas 
Special Events: 

Dec. 19 Mother-Father-Daughter Banquet 
January 4th 

Program: "Home, School and Community Beauti- 
fication." Our newest project. (A skit) 
Special Events: 

Help beautify our home, school and community: 
paint mail boxes, plant flowers and grass 
February 1st 

Program: "How is your SGIQ" — Panel Discussion 
Special Events: Safety and Civil Defense 
March 1st 

Program: Spring Fashions 
Skit — "The Case of Miss Judgment" 
Special Events: Family night 
April 5th 

Program: "What Will You Do With Your Future" 
Special Events: April 7-13 — National FHA Week 
Special plans for each day of week 
Sun. Church Observance 
Mon. Bulletin Board and Badges 
Tues. Help Teacher Day 
Wed. Help Mother Nite 
Thurs. Clean Up Day 
Fri. Mind your manners day 
Sat. 
May 3rd 

Program: "Fun for All" 
Special Events: P. T. A. program 




Left to Right: Faye Murphy, Mrs. Joe Warren, FHA Adviser; 
Faye Arnold, Miss North Carolina (at the time the picture 
was made); Edna Blalock and Lorraine Smith — Examining a 
suit made by Edna in which jacket lining matched blouse. 



Educationally Speaking 

Special Events Can Mean 
Milestones Toward Growth 



Imaginary Situations: 

Your chapter has volunteered to 
serve as hostess to the county FHA 
Rally. You have been appointed 
chairman of the decoration commit- 
tee. You were appointed because you 
had demonstrated with artistic skill 
certain floral arrangements in the 
home economics department. But 
for this big event what will you do? 

Would you do this? 

1. Meet with members of your 
committee and consider such 
things as the program for the 
meeting, the place of the meet- 
and what social or recreational 
activities are planned. 

2. Answer such questions as: 
Is this a good opportunity to 
tell others through exhibits 
what we are learning in our 
homemaking course? What do 
we want to display? How can 
we arrange this display to be 
most effective in line design, 
etc? Where will we need flower 
arrangements? What is avail- 
able in the way of flowers, 
greenery, or fruit at little or 
no cost? Can an attractive 
ornament or grouping of dec- 
orative objects be used as a 
substitute for a flower arrange- 
ment in places? What about 
containers and equipment? 

Where can we get help? 
What books in our department 
can we study and review for 
ideas? 

3. After securing answers to the 
above questions, outline a 
schedule of work for each 
committee member and make 
definite plans as to time, place, 
etc.. for going into action. 



Since your chapter is the hostess 
chapter you will want to appoint a 
hospitality committee. This is an 
important committee because in a 
way the members of this committee 
determine the atmosphere of the 
Rally. Whether or not visitors feel 
welcome may depend upon how well 
this hospitality committee performs. 
Indirectly every member of the 

8 



hostess chapter will need to serve 
on this committee but specific re- 
sponsibilities will rest with the ap- 
pointed committee. Just what will 
be the duties of this committee? One 
way to discover your duties is to 
recall the small courteous acts di- 
rected to you on occasions when you 
were a visitor. Most always it will 
mean — A sincere welcome and 
greeting to visitors upon arrival, giv- 
ing directions and information, in- 
troductions, explanations, and just 
conversing about things in general. 
There is no better opportunity to 
begin acquiring the art of pleasant 
conservation. 



The newly elected officers for 
1957-58 who will be installed at the 
State Convention in Raleigh on 
March 30, 1957 are: 

President — Becky Hayes, Harris — 
District VIII. 

Vice-President — Becky Nifong — 
North Davidson — District VII. 

Secretary — Barbara Ellis — North 
Mecklenburg — District VI. 

Treasurer — Margaret Baxley, Sum- 
ner — District V. 

Reporter — Jane Eagles — Mills — 
Louisburg — District IV. 

Parliamentarian — Betty Jo Lowder- 
milk. Southern Pines — District III. 



Historian — Jane Barrow- 
— District II. 



Song Leader — Jean Jackson 
Edgecombe — District I. 



Lucama 
West 






Creative Thinking Is a Part of Education 



Members of the Fremont Chapter 
demonstrated their power of imagi- 
nation when they wrote and pre- 
sented a skit entitled "I'll Challenge 
That." The characters include. 

Master of Ceremonies 
Jacoby 

Gertie, Going Steady 
Lorrie, Lotsa Friends 
Susie, Uncertain 
Anna, Face Facts 
Julia, Justa Housewife 
Hannah, Happy Homemaker 
A Family of five and two neigh- 
bors for a Pantomime 

To give an idea of the type of 
program it is, the introduction is 
printed here. (If you should like to 
reproduce the skit in your chapter 
or county unit, you may secure a 
copy of the script by writing to the 
state office and requesting it.) 

Stage arranged as a television set: 
microphone in center, contestants 
box large enough for two contestants, 
3 chairs on each side for contestants: 
Large clock face on back wall with 
sign underneath "on the air." 

Master of Ceremonies: Station 
F. H. S. now presents "I'll Challenge 
That!" sponsored by the Future 
Homemakers of America. Our spon- 
sors are well known throughout the 
United States and its territories. 
The Wayne County Unit Chapter 
adopted for its years programs the 
title "Careers in Home Economics." 



Tonight our program is presented by 
the Fremont Chapter of FHA. The 
secret word for tonight is Home- 
making. 

M. C. Jacoby: Please bring on the 
contestants. Our contestants for to- 
night were selected at random from 
the local club members. 

(Contestants enter and take their 
respective seats, gibbering and laugh- 
ing arranging skirts, etc.) 

M. C: All of you understand the 
rules of the game. Each time the 
secret word is used we will have a 
round of applause from the audience. 
Contestant number one will please 
step to the microphone. Your name 
please? 

Gertie, Going Steady: No. 1 

M. C: And what is your challenge. 
Gertie? 

No. 1: I'd like to have a steady 
boy friend but my parents and my 
best friend, Mary, many friends, 
say that I'm too young to go steady. 
It makes me mad to have someone 
always say "You're too young for 
this" or "You're too young for that!" 
How is a girl going to get to know 
enough about the boy she wants to 
marry unless she soes steady with 
him? 

No. 2: I'll challenge that! 

M. C: And what is your name? 

No. 2 Lorrie: Lotsa Friends, and I 
would like to help Gertie face some 
facts. Gertie, how old are you? 



1956-1957 GOALS 

(Continued from page two) 

worker, a dietitian, and a home- 
maker. This is just one of the many 
ways in which the club has helped 
broaden my field of education. 

Our club gives gifts to many or- 
ganizations including the Interna- 
tional Scholarship Fund, Care, Red 
Cross, and Cancer Drive. At Christ- 
mas we adopt a needy family and 
give them gifts of food, clothing, 
and toys. To some of these families 
we are the only Santa Claus they 
know. Having a part in sharing with 
others, especially those less fortunate 
than ourselves is a wonderful and 
rewarding experience. Such projects 
as these have helped me grow 
spiritually and become a better 
Christian. By helping those less 
fortunate than myself I am actually 
learning to become a good citizen — 
to serve others. 

It is through the activities of the 
East Carolina Home Economics 
Club and the enjoyment that I get 
from being a member of such a 
wonderful club that I've discovered 
a desire — a rapidly growing desire 
to learn to play, work, and live with 
others and most of all to serve my 
fellowman and my God. 

Perhaps you think that what I say 
sounds fine but that everyone can't 
be a committee chairman or an of- 
ficer in the club. This is quite true 
but this is only a minor part of a 
club or organization. There are many 
more jobs to be done. For instance, 
one of our money-making projects 
is a bazaar. This one project pro- 
provides an opportunity for every 
member to take an active part in the 
club. There are articles to be made 
in the clothing laboratory; candies, 
cookies, and fruit cakes to be cooked; 
posters for advertisement to be 
drawn; and canned goods to be 
brought from home. Then on the 
day of the bazaar girls are needed 
to arrange an attractive display of 
the things to be sold plus acting as 
sales girls during the bazaar. So you 
see there are plenty of opportunities 
for you to take part in and serve 
your club. 

This year I am Vice-President of 
the Home Economics Club and 
chairman of the Program Commit- 
tee. I realize that this is a big re- 
sponsibility and a challenge. It is a 
challenge for me to serve. It pro- 
vides an opportunity for me to serve 
the Home Economics Club and my 
fellow-club members by giving to 
them good, wholesome, and inter- 
esting programs creating enthusiasm 
in Home Economics; to serve my 



community, which is temporarily 
East Carolina College, by becoming 
a well-rounded person and helping 
others. 

It is to you — Home Economics 
Club Members — that I offer this 
challenge to take an active part in 
your club's activities. An organiza- 
tion with inactive members is like 
a plane with only one wing because 
the damaged wing prevents the plane 
from rising and making a successful 
flight. You, the inactive members, 
prevent the club from making a suc- 
cessful flight in accomplishing its 
purpose. It is definitely true that the 
Home Economics Club needs you. 
Far more important is the fact that 
you need the club even more than 
it needs you, because you need the 
challenge of learning to serve well 
yourself, your family, your com- 
munity and your nation. The Home 
Economics Club is an organization 
which can give you this training if 
you give to it your hearty co-opera- 
tion. This is what the Home Eco- 
nomics Club means to me. Will you 
not allow it to mean the same to you? 



OUR VISION 

(Continued from page 6) 

a big part in making your home 
what it is; that we need to apply 
God's gifts of mental powers; and 
that a community is what it is be- 
cause of the kind of people who 
live there. 



{Ifaprer dfalfer" 



We have talent at Brogden: Sue Smith, 
Carolyn Overman, Virginia L. Davis, 
and Jean Edmondson sang "Born to Be 
With You" at the County Fair and won 
2nd place. The prize money, they gave 
the FHA chapter. 

Come next Tuesday and some of us 
will be trying new hair styles. Mr. Thomas 
Martin, a beautician, is giving our pro- 
gram on hair styling. 

On September 3, the Erwin FHA 
girls served both elementary and high 
school teachers in the Home Economics 
Building at the conclusion of a pre-school 
teachers meeting in the library. 

Before school began, several girls made 
a "Welcome Back to School" poster, 
which was placed on the bulletin board 
in the high school building. 

The most important achievement of 
this year was the printing of the first 
handbook of the FHA. 

The following projects have been pro- 



posed for the year: to help a needy family; 
to serve the football team; and to make 
favors for hospital trays at Christmas and 
sing carols for the patients. 

The Grantham FHA program was be- 
gun this year with a meeting of the of- 
ficers to plan the year's work. Our first 
meeting at school was enjoyed with a 
fall Fashion Show. The thirty freshmen 
girls who were being initiated took part. 
At our last meeting we had an interesting 
program on dry arrangements. 

Our exhibit at the County Fair was a 
very great success. We are all proud of 
the blue ribbon we won. The theme of 
our exhibit was marriage vs. divorces. 

Mrs. W. H. Cherry spoke on "How to 
Buy Clothes" at the November meeting of 
the Future Homemakers of Morehead City 
School on Friday. Mrs. Cherry displayed 
two dresses, one which could be used for 
several different occasions, by removing 
the jacket or by making a jumper of it; the 
other one which could be used only as a 
dressy dress. In selecting clothing, Mrs. 
Cherry stressed "think." Teen-age Con- 
sumer is a new National Project this year 
for the organization. 

Fall fashions for the young and the 
"young at heart" were really on parade 
Thursday night, October 25, as Future 
Homemakers and co-operating members 
of the second and third year home eco- 
nomics classes of Jones Central School 
presented a fashion revue as the feature 
program for the Jones County Fair. The 
same seventy-odd participants, arrayed in 
creations of their own, demonstrated that 
"more than ever it's fun to sew, to create 
better fashions from better fabrics." 
Dresses displayed the new look — some 
full and some slim-skirted but all soft 
and supple. An array of colors and fab- 
rics were much in the limelight too. 
As for fabrics, tweed of all Hnds hit 
a keynote, as well as wools in a variety 
of weights, corduroy, synthetic fibers, and 
winter cottons in stripes, plaids and prints. 

Besides winning third place with the 
fair exhibit the Mt. Olive Chapter had 
three girls to enter the talent contest. 
Norma Carol Summerlin won first prize 
with her pantomime and baton-twirling 
act. Carole Brock and Molly Dotson who 
sang a duet won a first prize also. 

Our Rosewood Chapter is planning and 
preparing for our Mother-Daughter Ban- 
quet which will be on Friday night, No- 
vember 2. "Autumn Leaves" is the theme 
being carried out. 

The theme of the Seven Springs exhibit 
at the county fair was "All Together in 
Home. School, and Community." We 
were all proud of the light blue ribbon 
we won. 

The Wagram FHA officers met in the 
Home Economics Department for a spa- 
ghetti supper on Monday night, Novem- 
ber 5, and to plan the month's activities. 
The supper was prepared and served by 
the vice-president, Mary Shaw, and the 
reporter, Margaret Blue McKinnen, under 
the guidance of the chapter adviser, Miss 
Mary Ella Ingram. 



Future Homemakers of America 



CREED 

Wc are the Future Homemakers of America 

We face the future with warm courage, 

And high hope, 

For we have the clear consciousness of seeking 

Old and precious values. 

For we are the builders of homes, 

Homes for America's future. 

Homes where living will be the expression of everything 

That is good and fair. 

Homes where truth and love and security and faith 

Will be realities, not dreams. 

We are the Future Homemakers of America. 
We face the future with warm courage, 
And high hope. 




"The homes of tomorrow are in 

the hands of the youth 

of today" 




CAROLINE SAYS: 



Fill your Cookie Jar with these dainties and you will 
be prepared when friends drop by during the Christmas 
Holidays : 

NUT BALLS 

2/3 cup butter or margarine 
1 cup ground nut meats 

(pecans, walnuts, black walnuts, etc.) 
1 cup flour 
3 tablespoons sugar 
1 teaspoon vanilla 

Cream butter, add other ingredients, and work with 
fingers until well blended. Pinch off bits and roll in 
balls the size of large marbles. Bake on lightly buttered 
cooky sheet in moderately hot oven (375° F.) about 
10 minutes. Roll while hot in powdered sugar. Makes 60. 

Note: To cream is to soften or blend (if com- 
bining two or more ingredients) by rubbing 
against the side of a bowl with the back 
of mixing spoon until the mixture is as 
smooth as cream. 

Recipe and definition of cream — taken from The 
Boston Cooking School Cook Book by Fannie Mer- 
ritt Farmer. 



/" 




FUTURE HOMEMAKERS 

* North Carolina Association * 



VULUMt Alv 




MARCH 1957 



NUMBtK i 




State (Z&vtvettttovt ^taaAe&f 



Hear Mrs. Bernice McCullar of Atlanta, Georgia, 
talk on how to develop your personality. She writes 
about the "doings of FHA'ers" in Georgia every Sun- 
day for the Atlanta Constitution. She's charming, and 
witty and has plenty of sense. 

Hear a panel of N. C. FHA'ers tell how they de- 
velop their programs around our Four Purposes. 

Hear Gilbert Alligood, FFA President (1 Boy — 
3,000 Girls). 

Learn our new State FHA Song composed by Farm- 
ville Members. 

Make new friends from other chapters. 

See our State Capitol. 

Have a good time. 

Jeanette Worthington, President 



1956-57 Membership 

North Carolina has 456 chapters this year with a membership of 21,889. 

North Carolina Association of Future Homemakers of America 



State Officers 
1956-57 

President — Jeannette Worthington, Ayden 
Vice-President — Becky Hayes, Harris 
Secretary — Clyde Templeton, Union Grove 
Treasurer — Penny Niven, Waxhaw 
Reporter — Doris Teague, Liberty 
Parliamentarian — Margaret Rand, Garner 
Historian — Helen Lewis, Red Springs 
Song Leader — Jenny Lou Taylor, Deep Run 



District Advisers 
1956-57 

Joyce Currin — Murfreesboro 
Mrs. Mary L. Smith, Clyde A. Erwin 
Mrs. Madge Young, Taylorsville 
Mrs. Mary Kate Faulkner, Marshville 
Mrs. Cora Whitehead, Ramseur 
Mrs. Florence Sorrell, Benson 
Mary Elizabeth Burns, Pinehurst 
Mrs. Alma T. Phillips, Jones Central 



State Adviser 

Mrs. Faye T. Coleman 



STATE DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 

Division of Vocational Education 

Raleigh, North Carolina 




The Future Homemakers Float of the Rocky Mount High School which appeared in the Homecoming Day Parade. Standing: 
Peggy Bulluck. Front row, left to right: Judy Cobb, Joyce Jones, Linda Speight. Center back: Doris Williams. Back row: Alice 
Starling, Elizabeth English, Betty Lou Jones. 



PARADE! 



Jriendihip 



A friend is like old music loved and heard 
beyond parched years of silence; like a light 
burning among dark mountains, staunch and warm 
after long travel through a lonely night. 

No need of words has friendship, but the touch 
of hand says all there is to say. 

A friend is like strong sunlight in our hearts 
though our steps falter and the years be grey. 

Frances Frost. 



We love a parade! These were 
the words repeated by the mem- 
bers of the Rocky Mount Senior 
High School chapter of the FHA 
as they industriously worked pre- 
paring a float for the Homecoming 
Day Parade. 

The decorations of the float car- 
ried out the colors of the club with 
red and white crepe paper. Our 
emblem was mounted on a white 
background. Peggy Bulluck repre- 
sented "Miss FHA" and stood over- 
looking the six seated members, 
who represented the various objec- 
tives of the club. 



IN MEMORIAM 

Emily Lawson Edwards 

Orrum High School 

December 6, 1956 



HERE'S HOW 



You and ] know how rewarding 
FHA is; why not let as many other 
girls know as possible? Of course, 
they will enjoy participating in our 
activities and they can help make 
our organization a bigger and better 
one. Let's let them know about 
FHA . . . Here's How! 

Our present members are our 
best sources for encouraging new 
members; they are the key to the 
success of our membership drives. 
If the old members are kept in- 
terested in our program, they will 
automatically stimulate the interest 
of prospective new members. 

There are advantages in holding 
membership drives in both spring 
and fall. Chapters which hold fail 
drives favor them because of the 
enthusiasm the girls have after re- 
turning from their summer vaca- 
tions. Chapters which hold mem- 
bership drives in the spring feel that 
the membership dues are less press- 
ing since annual and newspaper 
subscriptions, book fees and locker 
fees have been paid. If the execu- 
tive council can plan committees 
and make program suggestions 
during the summer, the club looses 
no time organizing in the fall. Also, 
if the old members renew their 
membership in the spring, the fall 
drive can concentrate on the fresh- 
men. 

It is important that our meetings 
be held at a time that is most con- 
venient for the members. The Bis- 
bee, North Dakota, chapter reports 
that they enjoy having luncheon 
meetings. Other schools like this 
idea too. They like getting their 
meal trays from the lunchroom and 
eating in the home ec. lab. The 
Shelby, North Carolina, chapter 
finds that immediately after school 
is the time that suits them; and 
7:30 p.m. for the Belmond, Iowa, 
chapter is most convenient. 

Today's membership drives seem 
to cater to rising freshmen. If a girl 
develops an interest in FHA at 
this time, she usually retains it 
throughout her high school years. 
At "Eighth Grade Day" sponsored 
by the Beulah, North Dakota, 
chapter, a style show of clothes 
made and modeled by the girls is 
presented. They have displays 
concerning FHA activities and 
achievements, and various club of- 
ficials explain the purposes of our 



club to these rising freshmen. It's a 
good idea to invite the mothers of 
our members to an affair of this 
type. After all, they are our shining 
examples. 

The Belmont, Iowa, chapter 
suggests introducing FHA in a 
similar way at a picnic for the eighth 
graders; several other chapters 
have found a "Freshman Tea" 
successful. Have you considered a 
"Slumber Party" with all the pro- 
spective members invited to join 
you at an all-night session at school? 
Of course, plenty of mothers would 
be on hand just in case a pillow 
fight gets out-of-hand! The Beulah, 
North Dakota chapter also gets 
credit for this idea. 

The Boulder City, Nevada, chap- 
ter says that bulletin boards always 
attract attention. Be sure to put 
them in conspicuous places such as: 
home ec. labs, study halls, and hall- 
ways. (See the back cover for 
several ideas.) This is a terrific 
project for your public relations 
chairman. 

"Make sure your chapter ac- 
tivities get plenty of publicity in the 
school and local newspapers," says 
the chapter in Reform, Alabama. 
(Remember to send news of what 
you are doing to the state and na- 
tional magazines . . . everyone is 
anxious to know!) 

At your first meeting you can 
suggest that each FHA'er bring a 
prospective member as her guest. 

Let's keep our meetings and ac- 
tivities interesting. It is as important 
to keep our members as it is to get 
them. 

Good luck . . . and happy 
hunting! 

Nancy Rosenthal 
National Membership 
Chairman 



Dear Mary, 

I'm real excited about the FHA 
STATE CONVENTION on March 
30 in Raleigh. It's my first trip 
to a convention so naturally I want 
to be "just right." Since you've been 
to two of them please, please an- 
swer my letter right away and give 
me some pointers on what to do 
and what to wear. 



Sincerely, 



Jean 



Dear Jean, 

Of course you are excited over 
Our Convention. I remember how 
I felt on my first trip. Our adviser 
helped us decide what to wear and 
how to behave so it was real easy 
for us. Weil! you know there will 
be about 3,000 more FHA'ers in 
Raleigh for the big event so natu- 
rally we take over the down-town 
area and all the people there are 
wondering what our Badge FHA 
means. So we must be courteous 
and well behaved on the streets, in 
the stores and wherever else we go 
then our organization will get a 
good recommendation from all the 
people. Of course, you know all 
about behavior in public places, 
but I thought I'd just emphasize 
this. We heard that the town has 
been quite impressed by us at other 
conventions. 

About dress — You know how 
people think about girls who study 
home economics — They have 
everything! Anyhow, you ought to 
wear clothes that are becoming to 
you and not too fussy — say a 
suit with hat and gloves, or the 
dress you wear to church or some- 
thing like that. Of course, if you 
wear high heels a lot that's O.K. — 
but don't forget you walk a lot on 
pavements and you can get real 
tired wearing high heels all day. Oh 
yes, I did say hat, didn't I? Any 
small cover for the head is appro- 
priate especially at this time of the 
year. 

Since it will be on Saturday there 
will be a lot more people on the 
streets so remember to walk in two's 
most of the time so everybody can 
pass without crowding. 

I remember the fine time I had 
eating out — my first time in a big 
city. My adviser said we ought to 
try some new dishes when we went 
to the restaurant so I decided I 
would. Who wants to eat the same 
dishes we get every day at home. 
It's a lot of fun so try it. 

You know N. C. has a law against 
throwing trash on the highway — 
costs you $50.00 if you do, so I 
think we should be careful about 
throwing trash around the audi- 
torium and outside. Sometimes, we 
forget and do things we wouldn't 
dream of doing at home and that 
is poor citizenship. 

Here's to a GRAND FHA 
CONVENTION and a glorious trip 
for you. 

Sincerely, 

Mary 

P.S. Leave the chewing gum at 
home. 




Mother-Daughter-Father-Son Banquet, Rock Ridge High School. 



Richland f HA 



HOSTS AT TEA 



The Richlands Future Home- 
makers entertained their mothers 
and friends at an informal tea on 
Valentine's Day from 2:00 till 4:00. 
We wanted to let them know we 
were thinking about them, and at 
the same time give them a chance 
to see our new home economics de- 
partment. 

All the girls had a part in plan- 
ning and presenting this tea. We 
served Russian tea with dainty 
cookies, ham biscuits, open-faced 
sandwiches, and roasted nuts. The 
second year girls were responsible 
for baking the biscuits, and since 
the first year girls were beginning 
their cooking unit, they baked the 
cookies, which were of different 
sizes and shapes. They also made 
the Russian tea. The second year 
girls were also responsible for the 
decorations. The valentine decor 
was used throughout the room. The 
blackboard was made up to re- 
semble one huge valentine card to 
the mothers. A red Indian head 
cloth covered the serving table with 
white cut-out paper designs. The 
design was created by one of the 
FHA girls. Popcorn strung on wires 
and dipped in wax made an at- 
tractive centerpiece for the table, 
making something which resembled 
larkspur. 



There were approximately 200 
guests present, including mothers. 
teachers, and board members' 
wives. Everyone seemed to enjoy 
our hospitality. We enjoyed giving 
the tea so much tat we are trying 
to find some excuse to have another 
one! Carol Waters, Reporter 

Careers in Home Economics 

Alamance County home econo- 
mists entertained a group of stu- 
dents from the various schools in 
February. The girls were chosen be- 
cause they were interested in home 
economics as a career. The tables 
were decorated with yellow and 
black tapers and yellow spring 
flowers. Tiny cardboard keys, signi- 
fying "The Key to a Happy Fu- 
ture" were used as place cards. Five 
members in various fields partici- 
pated in a panel with Mrs. Caroline 
Veno, home economist for Duke 
Power and Light Company, acting 
as moderator. Others included in 
the panel were Miss Jessie Potts, 
dietitian at Woman's College, Miss 
Katherine Millsaps, home demon- 
stration agent, Mrs. Roy Apple, a 
homemaker, and Mrs. Helen Pope, 
home economics teacher at Walter 
Williams High School. 



Ideas for FHA 

Doris Teague, Reporter 

How can our chapters make 
FHA Week — April 7-13 an im- 
portant one this year? While brows- 
ing through some FHA newsletters 
from other states I got some ideas 
that I want to pass on to your chap- 
ter which may be different from 
some you have used in the past. 

To help publicize your chapter 
see if a local merchant will let you 
decorate a store window. Use your 
FHA emblem, the colors and some 
of the work of your chapter mem- 
bers. Since it is our anniversary you 
could emphasize the Happy Birth- 
day idea. 

Ask your principal to let you con- 
duct chapel one day. At this pro- 
gram you can emphasize the 
spiritual side of family living. 

To interest the other girls in the 
high school and the members of the 
eighth grade in both FHA and 
home economics you could have a 
pretty but inexpensive tea to honor 
them and the teachers. A program 
describing the four purposes of our 
organization would be very appro- 
priate. 

Needless to say, all FHA mem- 
bers can attend church either as a 
group in one church or as smaller 
groups in the church to which they 
belong. Ask your minister to preach 
on the Importance of the Family. 

By all means hold a chapter 
meeting during the week so each 
member will get renewed under- 
standing of the meaning of FHA 
and exchange ideas of what mem- 
bership in our organization has 
meant to each girl. 

These are only a few suggestions. 
Get busy and plan now how your 
chapter will observe FHA Week 
and don't forget to interpret your 
ideas and work to John G. Public. 



For You a Double Future in Home 
Economics — Career Bulletin 25c 

American Home Economics 
Association, 1600 20th St., 
N. W., Washington, D. C. This 
booklet is dedicated to the 
home economists of tomorrow 
and to their parents, teachers 
and counselors who encourage 
them to explore career possi- 
bilities and to make a choice 
both happy and wise. 



Muncy on , , 

PUBLIC RELATIONS 



By HUGH E. MUNCY 

Executive Manager 

Illinois Chain Store Council 

National FHA Meeting 



What Is Public Relations? 

Public Relations means relations 
with the public, a fundamental at- 
titude of mind which places the in- 
terests of others ahead of selfish 
interests. It is doing good and get- 
ting credit for it. It is building and 
holding good will. 

Why Is Public Relations Important 
For Future Homemakers? 

The continued and expanding ef- 
fectiveness of Future Homemakers 
of America is dependent upon pub- 
lic appreciation of and attitude to- 
ward the principles and practices 
of this organization. 

Who Is Responsible for the Public 
Relations of Future Homemakers? 

This is the responsibility of each 
chapter member. Officers and ad- 
visers have additional leadership 
responsibilities. 

How Is an Effective Public 
Relations Program Built? 

I. Locating Your Publics 

A. Internal 

B. External 

1. Family 

2. School administrators and 
teachers 

3. Fellow students 

4. Prospective members 

5. Businessmen 

6. Representatives of public in- 
formation media 

7. Church and community lead- 
ers 

8. Community organization 
members 

II. Determining Present Attitude 
Toward Future Homemakers 

A. Unaware of organization — the 
challenge of providing full in- 
formation. 

B. Complete approval — The chal- 
lenge of maintaining approval. 

C. Complete disapproval — the 
challenge of building approval. 

4 



III. Action — Effective Utilization of 

A. Publicity 

1. Newspapers 

2. Radio 

3. Television 

4. Displays 

5. Exhibits 

6. Demonstrations 

B. Opportunities for community 
co-operation 

1. Service groups 

2. Welfare organizations 

3. Business groups 

C. Personal contacts 

1. School 

2. Family 

3. Community 

D. The "thank you" and expres- 
sions of appreciation 

Summary 

The first ingredient of any suc- 
cessful public relations program is 
good deeds. What is said about Fu- 
ture Homemakers, what is done by 
Future Homemakers, how it is said, 
and how it is done combine to form 
the public picture of this organi- 
zation. The challenge of develop- 
ing sound public relations is worth 
accepting. 



Safety IN THE HOME 

"Safety in the Home" was the 
topic selected for an adult class and 
presented by the "Future Home- 
makers" of Jones Central School on 
Monday night December 10 in the 
homemaking department. The idea 
of the FHA presenting an adult 
class originated in a previous execu- 
tive council meeting of the girls. 
The group felt that it would be a 
good way to interpret some of the 
class activities for the public, as 
well as an excellent way to impart 
helpful information to others. The 
topic for presentation grew out of a 
unit the girls were studying on 
"Health and Home Safety for the 
Family." 

The program began by present- 
ing a skit on Safety in the Home 
entitled "The House That Wasn't 
Haunted," which appeared in the 




Mrs. Johnson of Wayne County Red 
Cross Chapter accepts the wheel chair 
from Carol Jordan. There is a placard 
attached to the chair bearing the name 
of the FHA. 



January 1954 issue of Teen Times. 
"Did you know that accidents in 
American homes kill thirty-one 
thousand every year and injure 
another four and a half million? 
Besides the sorrow, the pain, 
the suffering, there's an alarming 
money cost which amounts to 600 
million dollars annually." Immedi- 
ately the girls had the undivided 
attention of the group. How such 
things as scatter rugs, old papers, 
floppy shoes, frayed electric cords, 
old window screens, and other haz- 
ardous objects can cause these 
dreadful happenings was artfully 
portrayed by the girls. 

Following the skit, each person 
was given a check sheet on "Is 
Your Home Free from Fire Haz- 
ards?" taken from January 1955 
Teen Times. The check sheet was 
read, discussed, and evaluated. 

An excellent mimeographed 
sheet on helpful points to remem- 
ber in order to have "Safety in 
Family Living" was then distributed 
to the group. This was taken from 
the bulletin "Safety in Family 
Living" prepared by the Depart- 
ment of Home Economics and Na- 
tional Commission on Safety Edu- 
cation of the National Education 
Association. Washington, D. C. A 
helpful discussion followed the 
reading of these safety hints. 

The approaching Christmas sea- 
son was not forgotten and each 
member was given a pamphlet dis- 
tributed by "The Accident Preven- 
tion Section, North Carolina State 



Board of Health," Raleigh, on 
"Safety Hints for Christmas." 

Last but not least a picture por- 
traying several hazardous ways of 
doing things was passed out and 
each one present entered into a 
lively discussion on "What's wrong 
with this picture?" Approximately 
40 wrong things such as ironing 
cord around hot iron, connecting 
appliances from light sockets, peek- 
ing in steaming pots, pulling out 
appliance cord by cord, and exten- 
sion cords running across floors 
were named. 

Was the class a success? Did the 
adults really feel it was helpful? 
Was it a good FHA project? Who 
knows? Remarks led us to believe 
that the information was helpful, 
that it was well presented, and that 
it was a good reminder of how care- 
less one can be and how this care- 
lessness may be overcome. Good 
attention and class participation 
showed interest of the group. Girls 
experienced a certain joy and satis- 
faction of a job well done. All in 
all we believe that the project 
helped to bring the adults closer 
to the school and the FHA organi- 
zation closer to the public. 



that could be used by incapacitated 
people. Finally the day arrived 
when the accumulation of funds 
from money-making projects was 
sufficient to purchase the wheel 
chair. It is in the local office of 
the Red Cross ready for use. Since 
there have been several requests 
in the past for such assistance, FHA 
members in Wayne know it will 
soon be in service and gratefully 
appreciated. We commend them for 
this worth-while project. 



FHA NATIONAL MEETING 

PURDUE UNIVERSITY 

LAFAYETTE, INDIANA 

JULY 1-5, 1957 

This is the third part of the cyle 
which National FHA follows as a 
pattern for national meetings and 
means the representation from the 
states will be small. North Caro- 
lina can send a total of 7 delegates 
(5 youth and 2 adults). Our Na- 
tional officer, Nancy Rosenthal will 
be counted in the seven. The state 
office and advisers are working on 
a plan for selection of our represen- 
tatives from the incoming officers. 



GOAL ACCOMPLISHED 

FHA'ers in Wayne County be- 
came interested in the welfare of 
the sick in the county several years 
ago. After talking with the Health 
and Welfare Departments about 
some way of helping with this prob- 
lem they decided to work on the 
project of purchasing a wheel chair 



PLANNING FOR CAMP? 

FHA'ers will rent the FFA Camp 
at White Lake for the weeks of 
May 27-June 1 and June 3-8. 
Begin making your plans early to 
enjoy the fun, recreation and 
leadership training which the camp- 
ing experience affords. More infor- 
mation at a later date!! Look for 
it! 




Poster used al District Rally made by Emma Moore of Flat Rock Chapter. Lorali 

Cronkhite (L) and Emma. 



Do You Have 
a Right? 

MRS. BETH DENNISTON 

Editor, "Teen Times" 

"Thief! Thief!" the first article 
cried. "You are stealing me." 

If printed pages could talk, those 
words would be heard often. 

And the first article would con- 
tinue: "If they would have given 
me credit, I wouldn't mind being 
copied. In fact, I would have been 
flattered if someone thought I was 
good enough to be reprinted." 

To answer, the reprinted article 
might say: "This wasn't a premedi- 
tated crime. I just didn't think. I 
guess I forgot my manners. I didn't 
mean to pass off your ideas as my 
own." 

As the above conversation points 
out, reprinting without crediting the 
source is bad editorial etiquette. 
And bad manners can get one in 
trouble — morally, and sometimes 
legally. 

A rather ugly name, Plagiarist, 
can be applied to those who forget 
their printing manners. 

While one page shouted "Thief," 
another was threatening: "I'll sue! 
I'll sue!" 

That is a copyrighted article 
talking. 

"They can't print me without first 
getting permission. I belong to the 
people who printed me. (Or in 
other instances the article belongs 
solely to the author.) They paid for 
the right of ownership. I'd be very 
happy to be reprinted, but they 
should have asked permission. I'll 
teach them a lesson. I'll sue!" 

Though these two conversations 
deal with printed articles, they also 
apply when copying other works 
— ideas, artistic reproductions, 
poems and even expressions. When 
an uncopyrighted work is reprinted, 
one should credit the source as it's 
only good manners. Before reprint- 
ing a copyrighted work, one must 
gain permission from the owner of 
the copyright. 

Keep these conversations in 
mind! 

Some materials in state news- 
letters and some articles, skits and 
devotions sent to national head- 
quarters for Teen Times have 
been shrieking "THIEF" and "I'LL 
SUE." 

5 



Mirror, Mirror On 
the Wall 



A skit by Judy Reese 
North Buncombe High School 

Carolyn 

Mirror, Mirror on the wall 
Tell me is it true of all. 
These FHA's in Buncombe County 
What do they do to earn their bounty 
Are they waiting for future days 
To work for better means and ways 
Or are they busy as of now? 
Are they mirror, where and how? 

Mirror 

Carolyn, I'm glad you asked me that. 

Sit down and lets have a little chat. 

Now you represent the FHA. 

And before I go farther, I'd like to say, 

That that is a wonderful organization 

And furthermore has quite a good reputation. 

The girls around here aren't letting it down 

Now, what reason have you for that terrible frown? 

Carolyn 

Gee Mirror, I'm sorry but its just well — you see 

Activities mean quite a great deal to me. 

In FHA we have certain set goals 

And some people thing that — (that poor unlearned 

souls) 
That FHA is strictly for fun 
That nothing constructive is ever done. 
And mirror that rumor just isn't so 
But do FHA's here, help others to know. 

Mirror 

Well I happen to know that goal number one is 
"Promote family living and increases family fun" 
Well Lee Edwards decided to do just that 
So they sat and they planned and they planned and 

they sat. 
They planned for themselves and their moms a nice tea, 
Successful and fun for L. E. 

Carolyn 

Now they have a virtue I certainly treasure 
They successfully mixed their business with pleasure. 
And in doing the things such as that year by year 
Some FHAer's choose a future career! 

Mirror 

Right Carolyn, how observant of you. 

Did you also observe that that's goal two? 

And while we are at it Carolyn (forsooth) 

Remember how Reynolds gave dollars for truth. 

And remember that that's part of goal No. 3 

Understanding our neighbors but you were telling me. 

Carolyn 

These girls can claim no immunity, 

To training in school, chapter, community 



They really are taught to participate! 
That's the last of the goals of our state. 

Mirror 

But they've been doing more than those things, 

For ins.ance look at Valley Springs. 

They started with cloth 'n' thread V sewing. 

Working, playing, but steadily growing. 

Add some paint to perk up features 

To make a new lounge for the Valley Springs Teachers. 

Carolyn 

Vow! Was that project ever a honey! 
And saved somebody a lot of money. 
(Laugh from the Mirror) 

Mirror 

Erwin's spent some money too 

Guess what they are trying to do? 

They've a debt, they're helping pay 

They want to pay it right away 

FHAer's can't keep these 

they're helping buy their new deep freeze. 

Carolyn 

Another chapter aids their school 
They sure do practice the golden rule. 
Do they ever use that wonderful unity 
To help improve their own community? 

Mirror 

Well North Buncombe had a Hobo Day 
On one early, cold spring day 
They raked yards and painted fences 
Working like people out of their senses 
For five hours they worked like mad 
Then got together and a picnic had. 

Carolyn 

Well, I must say their lesson they've learned 
That nothing ventured is nothing earned. 

Mirror 

Now take a look at the chapter at Owen 
It can't be said that wild oats they're sewing 
They serve the Veterans hospital near 
Not just once but once every year. 

Carolyn 

I'll bet that meal was mighty good 

And those boys liked something besides the food 

Namely the presence of feminine faces 

Hats off to you girls, you'll all go places. 

Mirror 

Biltmore also has what it takes 

Namely $40.00 dollars from the sale of fruit cakes. 

That much money can sure come in handy 

lust one word for that so I'd say it was dandy. 

Sometime in the coming days 

Enka's starting something worth praise 

Prettier homes are what they seek 

So they're going to sponsor "Home Beautiful Week." 



Teachers are a busy bunch 

Gulping breakfast — skipping lunch 

For their teachers' welfare is fearful 

So they gave each an apple — then faces were cheerful. 

Carolyn 

We've eight chapters in this territory 

So that just about ends your part of the story. 

Mirror 

Whooa Carolyn, don't stop me yet 
There's one thing we're about to forget 
Girls with perpetually busy hands 
Must surely have some future plans. 

Carolyn 

I did forget and goodness knows 
I surely want to hear of those. 

Minor 

Well Owen has a bit of gloom 

The barren state of their first aid room 

Equipment and linens they plan to obtain 

A nice cheerful room — what a sure cure for pain. 

And Biltmore's planning will surely rate 
They've a little gift they want to donate 
A waffle iron is the gift by name 
And then serve a supper of the same. 
(Saffles 1 mean) 

It takes hard workers to make things tick 
And Reynolds too is concerned with the sick 
Their services are quite necessary 
To keep their first aid room sanitary. 

The Future Homemakers out Erwin way 

Are planning to work with the FFA. 

They're planning a project for charity. 

A Merry White Christmas — for less fortunate than we. 

Valley Springs is selling greetings 

To make some money outside of meetings 

This project is sure some money to earn 

And Carolyn, that helps their neighbor in turn. 

Some department improvements they've made include 

tiling — 
And making new curtains, now we know why they're 

smiling. 

North Buncombe is planning to buy a gift too 
A movie projector (no less) and brand new 
Now that goal is high — that will be a big test. 
But they're kinda like Texans — they like big things 
best. 

The Lee Edwards girls are loaded with talent. 
And their Christmas project is sure something gallant. 
A childrens home they entertain 
That's helping others — some in pain. 

Carolyn 

Mirror I'm not worried now 

But with all these things I don't know how 

I'll ever remember them one by one 

Could we kind of review all this work thats been done. 




m 

!■■■■■*■•■■ 



1956 State Fair Exhibit illustrating some of the work done 
by home economics students. 



Mirror 

Woe is me the bitter cup 

Questions like that just cover me up!! 

(Posters) 
There's something I wish I could help you to see 
That you really don't need a magic mirror like me 
From chapter projects to chapter elections. 
A good self searching will show your reflection. 
And if your work isn't showing much movement. 
Maybe you'd better try a little improvement. 

Carolyn 

Was I awake or was I sleeping 

Well anyway I'm glad they're keeping up their work 

in FHA 
'Cause tomorrow's homes are in our hands today. 



BLACK CAT 

By Nancy Byrd Turner 

Don't never cross a road what a black cat cross — 

'Tain't nothin' but sorrow, 'tain't nothin' but loss. 

Brindle cat, spotted cat, dem's all right; 

Safety in a yaller cat, blessin' in a white; 

But de black cat ructious, wid a bristle in his tail. 

He fotchin' for de Debbie, and he better not fail. 

De black cat travel wid his belly in de dus'; 

He gwine whar he gwine, and he gwine kase he mus". 

Black cat, black cat — when he cross yo' track. 

No matter whar you gwine, 

To a dippin' or a dyin'. 

No matter whar you hurryin', 

To a marryin' or a buryin' — 

YOU BETTER TURN BACK! 




'''" ■ :■ ■ ' 



-1L : - 



The FHA in Mills School has done 
it again — they topped all previous rec- 
ords in the success of a Christmas dance 
at the Green Hill Country Club Satur- 
day night with the senior girls as host- 
esses. Over 100 girls and boys enjoyed 
the festive occasion and atmosphere 
from 8 o'clock until 11:30 p.m.. the 
chaperones, Mr. and Mrs. Max T. Brown, 
Mrs. R. L. Eagles, Mr. and Mrs. Osnevad 
and Mrs. Q. S. Leonard added to the 
merriment in dancing and helping with 
the music. 

The dance room was beautifully deco- 
rated in the Christmas motif. Mr. Plott 
at Leggetts saw to it that we had the 
best in decorations. The punch, cakes, 
nuts and mints were just right for the 
party, too. We will always enjoy the 
memories of this wonderful Christmas 
party. 

The Betty Crocker test was given Tues- 
day to 20 Senior girls. This is the first 
time this test has been given in our 
school. The test was a knowledge and 
an aptitude test for the Betty Crocker 
Search for the American Homemaker of 
Tomorrow. 

Mrs. W. H. Cherry Spoke on "How to 
Buy Clothes'' at the November meeting 
of the Future Homemakers of Morehead 
City School Friday. Mrs. Cherry illus- 
trated her talk by displaying two 
dresses; one which could be used for 
several different occasions by removing 
the jacket or by making a jumper of it; 
the other could be used only as a dressy 
dress. 

In selecting clothing Mrs. Cherry 
stressed, "Think, when buying clothing." 
Teen-age Consumer is a new National 
Project this year for the organization. 

The Coopers FHA and FFA Chapters 
honored their mothers and fathers at 
the annual Mother-Daughter-Father-Son 
Banquet, Wednesday night, December 
12, at 7 p.m., in the new school lunch- 
room. The Christmas theme was used in 
decorating the lunchroom. 

Bobby Lancaster, FFA president, was 
master of ceremonies. He extended a 
cordial welcome to everyone present. 
The invocation was given by Mr. E. C. 
Pearce. During the meal Violet Strick- 
land gave a toast to the mothers, using 
as her theme, Christ's mother to which 
her mother, Mrs. M. B. Strickland re- 
sponded on behalf of all mothers present. 
Charles Lamm gave a toast to the fathers 
arid his father, J. H. Lamm, rendered 
a very inspiring response. 

Mr. John Willey, FFA Adviser, recog- 
nized the guests present, one of whom 
was Dr. Catherine T. Dennis, State 
Supervisor of Home Economics Educa- 
tion. 

Members of the school board, high 
school faculty, and members of the 
teachers family were among the 200 at- 
tending the banquet. 

Dr. Donald Melvin, pastor of the 
Tabernacle Baptist Church in Wilson, 
N. C, gave a very inspiring speech using 
"The Home" as his topic, and Mom, 
Pop, Junior, and Sis as the main charac- 
ters. 

8 



The B. F. Grady Chapter of Future 
Homemakers of America held their an- 
nual Christmas Party on December 1 1 
in the Home Economics Department. 
We had five charming young ladies as 
our hostess. They were Miss Carolyn 
Outlaw, Betty Lou Waters, Rubyleene 
Waters, Lorraine Howell and Doris 
Taylor. 

We had a very inspiring devotion 
which was led by Joyce Harper. 

Then we played some interesting 
games led by Joette Smith. After the 
games, the hostess served delicious re- 
freshments which consisted of punch, 
cookies, salted pecans, mixed candy and 
open faced sandwiches. 

When the most wonderful time came 
was when we all exchanged gifts. We 
presented our chapter Mothers with 
Poinsettias and our Fathers with shaving 
sets. We also presented our adviser. Miss 
Thelma Dilday with a piece of her 
crystal. 

To climax it all we filled two needy 
boxes for needy families and went 
Christmas caroling. 

The Kernersville Chapter of Future 
Homemakers of America and Future 
Farmers of America held their Annual 
Christmas Party on Thursday night, De- 
cember 13 in the High School cafeteria 
which was beautifully decorated under 
the supervision of Glenda Redmon. 

Games and square dancing were en- 
joyed throughout the evening. Entertain- 
ment was furnished by a Boys' quartet 
which included George Grace, Bartlett 
Warren, C. W. Pope, and C. A. Lemons 
with Kay Veach at the organ. The dance 
band also came in after their practice 
and played one number. The group sang 
Christmas Carols, led by Peggy Jones 
and Glenda Redmon. 

Mrs. Roy Landreth and Mrs. Iris 
Vance, Future Homemakers' Chapter 
Mothers were present to enjoy the oc- 
casion along with Mr. C. V. Sigmon, 
principal and Mrs. R. L. Kuykendall, 
FHA Adviser and Mr. Sherrill, FFA 
Adviser. 

After refreshments were served, gifts 
were exchanged. There were 80 mem- 
bers present. The gifts were presented 
by the presidents. Norma Evans and 
Jimmy Beeson. 

A Christmas Party was held at the 
Rotary Club House in Yanceyville on 
Saturday night, December 15 at 7:30. 
The theme of the party was "Putting 
Christ in Christmas." No gifts were given 
to each other, but each girl presented a 
toy or some other gift at the door and 
these were given to needy families in 
the county. 

One of the highlights of the FHA year 
was Monday when Mr. Ralph Aldridge 
spoke to the FHA on "Home Beautifi- 
cation." He had various types of shrub- 
bery and told us where to plant them 
and how to take care of them. Mr. Al- 
dridge is the 4-H leader for Caswell 
County and has worked with us for the 
past five years. 

A very surprised man was seen at 
the FHA Officers Party held at the new 
school cafeteria, Tuesday night. This 
man was Rev. Carl May. one of our 
FHA club fathers. 

Rev. May is one of our ministers and 
is leaving the first of December to go 
to Rowan County. 

It goes to show a woman can keep a 
secret, for Mrs. May had known about 



the surprise party for two weeks. It 
seems she planned to have a last fling 
then changed her mind and said let's 
go to Yanceyville. 

Patsy Hunt, president; Rachel Shel- 
ton, Degree Chairman; and Omega 
Prevette conferred an honorary degree 
on Rev. May and presented him a Club 
Father pin. Other guests present were 
Mr. Ed Cook, Mrs. Hahn. Mrs. L. G. 
Page, and Mr. Parthemos. Mr. Parthe- 
mos is the science teacher and loved by 
all the pupils. 

We shall miss Rev. May. For two 
years he has worked with us, speaking 
and showing slides and this year be- 
came Club Father. He attended the Dis- 
trict Rally at Elon and afterwards he 
said "I never knew you all did so much." 
We wish Rev. May much success on his 
new charge. 

Elise Chapter members have been mix- 
ing fun with work. 

In July our executive council met and 
planned the program of work for the 
year to include monthly group meet- 
ings, individual projects, socials, pro- 
grams and executive board meetings. 

In September we introduced the FHA 
to prospective members. Seventeen of 
our girls declared that they wanted to 
work toward a Junior Homemaking De- 
gree. During this month several of the 
FHA girls helped prepare and serve a 
meal for the local and county boards of 
education. Also, the FHA officers at 
Elise attended an officer's workshop at 
West End High School on September 21. 
On September 24. the new members and 
chapter parents were formally initiated 
in what we thought was a beautiful 
ceremony. Twenty-Six members attended 
the Moore County FHA Rally at 
Carthage. 

What did we do in October? We or- 
ganized a baby sitting center for the 
monthly PTA meetings. We had fun 
entertaining and serving the children. 
We made hot chocolate and cookies for 
them. Yes, October was a big month for 
us. We planned to run Sandra Wilson 
for State Parliamentarian. Sixteen mem- 
bers attended the District III FHA Rally 
at Hamlet. During October our yearbook 
committee finished the yearbook of 
which we are very proud. 

November: There were two big events. 
The first event was our spaghetti supper. 
The purpose of the supper was to raise 
money to send an officer to a National 
FHA Convention some time in the 
future. We raised around $60.00. The 
other event was our Float in the Christ- 
mas Parade. Our theme was: "In FHA 
We Learn." To pay for the float we 
sold popcorn balls at the parade. 

The Future Homemakers and Future 
Farmers of America of Southwood 
School held their annual Mother- 
Daughter - Father - Son Banquet on 
Wednesday, December 12, 1956, at 7:00 
o'clock in the school cafeteria. 

A pageant, "The Meaning of the 
Rose," was presented by a group of 
FHA girls while Linda Vause served as 
Reader. 

The Shelby Chapter of the Future 
Homemakers of America combined busi- 
ness and pleasure Friday night at the 
home of Mrs. Roger Laughridge. An 
outdoor supper was served to 80 mem- 
bers by Mrs. Laughridge and the club 
mothers, Mrs. Martin Rosenthal, Mrs. 



Herman Eskridge, Mrs. W. W. Wallace 
and Mrs. Forrest Wolfe. 

Two fifty dollar bonds were presented 
to the outstanding FHA members who 
plan to major in home economics in 
college. Ella Foy Suttle, daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. A. C. Suttle, and Martha 
Reid, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Snow 
Reid were winners. Miss Suttle plans to 
enter W.C.U.N.C. and Miss Reid will 
enter Queens College. 

Junior Homemaker Degrees were 
awarded to 18 members and chapter 
degrees to seven members. 

The January meeting of the Future 
Homemakers of America of the Shelby 
chapter was held in the auditorium Tues- 
day afternoon at 3:30. The refreshment 
table was in front of the stage where 
about 75 girls served themselves. 

Mrs. Roland Leath was introduced by 
Linda Callahan, chairman of the pro- 
gram committee. In discussing "Court- 
ship and Marriage," Mrs. Leath stressed 
what wonderful opportunities the FHA 
girls have this day and time. "Marriage 
is for adults, and courtship is a trial 
and testing period. Marriage is a partner- 
ship and a compromise." 

She stressed when you marry a fellow, 
you do "marry" his family, and she sug- 
gested maybe one should not keep 
dating a boy one would not marry. 

The importance of similar background 
and religion is most important. 

The members of the Union Grove 
FHA Chapter were as busy as bees last 
spring working to provide a silver tea 
service for community use. After sales of 
vanilla flavoring had been conducted 
and the service was purchased, the chap- 
ter held a tea honoring parents of the 
community. The lovely spring tea at- 
tracted some three hundred people. 

The regular monthly meeting of the 
Red Springs chapter of the Future Home- 
makers of America was held in the 
Red Springs High School auditorium Fri- 
day, December 14. 

After the business session, led by 
President Eleanor McNeill, a Christmas 
program was presented by the program 
chairman, Rebecca Singleton. 

The devotional was simple but very 
impressive. While Rebecca Bowen read 
the Christmas story in Scripture form 
over a backstage microphone, several 
girls portrayed the Biblical characters 
in the Bethlehem scene. Dramatizing the 
scripture were: Shepherds, Gail Sessoms, 
Faith Russel, Jean Cribb; Wise men, 
Delane Humphrey, Barbara Hales, 
Melba McNeill, Mary Dale Bowen; 
Joseph, Louise Holmes; angel, Frances 
Gibson; Heavenly Host, Brenda Smith, 
Carolyn Taylor and Linda Parnell. 

After the Drama, a Christmas prayer 
was given by Sandra Ashford. The pro- 
gram began with a pantomime presenta- 
tion of Eugene Field's poem, "Jest Fore 
Christmas" by Martha Kinlaw. 

This was succeeded by a drama in 
story form of The Little Math Girl by 
Gail Huggins. The action took place in 
front of the curtain while the story was 
read backstage by Rebecca Singleton. 

This program was also given in a 
special assembly for the entire Student 
body. 

The Jamesville Chapter helped a very 
needy family in their community at 
Christmas with gifts of food, clothing, 
and money for buying gifts for all eight 



children including toys, games and new 
clothing. "You can well imagine our in- 
creased enjoyment of Christmas because 
we helped this family in the com- 
munity." 

The Future Homemakers of the 
Derita Jr. High visited the County Home 
on Wednesday, December 19 and pre- 
sented a Christmas program to the old 
folks. 

While they were waiting for everyone 
to gather they sang Christmas Carols. 
After they arrived they told the mean- 
ing of each letter in the word Christmas. 
The Christmas story was told with carols 
in between paragraphs. 

Little paper angels were passed out 
to the people and were placed on the 
supper trays that went to the bedridden. 
Also little packages of Christmas candies 
and cookies which had been made the 
day before were passed out. 

"Sew a thought — reap a deed" or 
so the Buncombe County FHA'ers be- 
lieve. They sewed their thought in the 
form of plans at a luncheon at the local 
S & W and sure enough on November 
15, 1956, they reaped their deed. They 
had a banquet. But an extraordinary 
banquet. From our eight affiliated chap- 
ters came their eight officers, their ad- 
visers and their school principals. And 
oh! yes the principal's wives. County 
and city school superintendents, assist- 
ants, and their wives were also invited. 
This was the first banquet of this type 
in Buncombe County in over ten years!! 
Our program was designed to emphasize 
the purposes and importances of FHA. 
We thought it was a grand success. 

FHA projects and activities were re- 
ported on by Betty Ann Johnson, Mary 
Gail Haynes, Glenna Parris, Lib McLain 
and Linda Thompson of the North Bun- 
combe Chapter; Nancy Duprey, Owen 
Chapter; Annetter Harwood, Lee H. 
Edwards Chapter; Carol Weir, Valley 
Springs Chapter; and Earlene Roberts, 
Erwin Chapter. 

Judy Reese, Lib McLain and Carol 
Weir presented the Catchy Chorus they 
had learned at the National FHA Con- 
vention in Chicago. Virginia Perkins and 
Nancy Allen concluded the program with 
a song. 



HIGHER EDUCATION 
IS WORTH WHILE 

Young people often wonder 
whether higher education is worth 
the hard years of work, of study, 
and often, of sacrifice of their pres- 
ent wants. 

Here are some statistics on life 
time earnings, classified by educa- 
tion which seems to prove that it's 
worth it. 

The average elementary school 
graduate in a lifetime will earn 
$116,000. 

The average graduate of high 
school in a lifetime will earn 
$168,000. 

The average graduate of a col- 
lege in a lifetime will earn 
$268,000. 

A college education on the aver- 
age costs $9,000 — compare it with 
the returns. 




Miss Betty Craft, a senior at Ayden High 
School, was crowned queen of the home- 
making festivities. She has been an active 
FHA member all four years in High 
School, is president of Tri-Hi-Y, treasurer 
of the Beta Club and participates in the 
high school chorus and athletics. 

Betty plans to continue her education 
in the fields of primary education and 
religious education upon graduation from 
high school. 



SPRING 

I had forgotten that the world 
Wore such a shining grace of green; 
Or that a poplar tip, unfurled, 
Could bow against the wind, and 

lean 
So delicately on the air. 
The same thin three that, winter 

long 
Stood desolate and stripped and 

spare. 
I did not know that it was strong 
As gentle things may often be. 
To come into its own again 
Or could so tacitly explain 
The winter-riddle out to me! 

— Selected. 



IMPORTANT DATES 

March 30 State Convention 

April 7-13 FHA Week 

May 22-June 8 Camp 

July 1-5. ...FHA National Meeting 



Future Homemakers of America 



CREED 

We are the Future Homemakers of America 

We face the future with warm courage, 

And high hope, 

For we have the clear consciousness of seeking 

Old and precious values. 

For we are the builders of homes, 

Homes for America's future. 

Homes where living will be the expression of everything 

That is good and fair. 

Homes where truth and love and security and faith 

Will be realities, not dreams. 

We are the Future Homemakers of America. 
We face the future with warm courage, 
And high hope. 




"The homes of tomorrow are in 

the hands of the youth 

of today" 




CAROLINE SAYS: 

Families are the most important social unit in the 
world. 

Doing any job well builds the foundation of future 
success. 

Hobbies permit you to express yourself in an original 
way. 

Getting along with family members is the basis of good 
relationships throughout life. 

Consideration of others is the real essence of good 
manners. 

Good grooming is essential to well-dressed appearance. 

You don't fall in love, you srow into it. 



» 










MUilMMiMfflM 



I 



North Carolina Association * 



VOLUME XIV 




APRIL 1957 



NUMBER 4 



From Your Retiring Preside?! t- 



JEANNETTE WORTHINGTON 



Dear Future Homemakers, 

Serving as vice-president and 
president of the North Carolina As- 
sociation of the Future Home- 
makers of America has been such a 
wonderful experience for me that 
I would like to tell you about it. 

Last summer, at the National 
Convention in Chicago, Illinois, I 
met many marvelous people. Girls 
from every state in this na- 
tion exchanged ideas. Approxi- 
mately 2,000 girls worked together 
to help make our organization 
stronger. Every delegate received 
enthusiasm, information, and in- 
spiration to make her a better FHA 
member in her own chapter. All of 
our meetings at the convention 
opened with our opening cere- 
mony, and some of the most thought 
provoking devotions I have ever 
heard. Although there were girls 
from every state and several terri- 
tories — Alaska, Hawaii, and Puerto 
Rico — we were aware of the fact 
that all of us loved the same land 
and the same God. It was at this 
meeting that I really learned to love 
and appreciate the Future Home- 
makers of America. 

Being president of the North 
Carolina Association of Future 
Homemakers gave me the privilege 
of attending the state convention 
of the North Carolina Future Farm- 



COVER PICTURE 

This picture of the 1957-58 of- 
ficers of the North Carolina As- 
sociation of Future Homemakers 
of America was taken at the 
March 30, 1957, State Conven- 
tion just before they were installed 
to their respective office. Reading, 
from left to right, these officers 
are: Jane Eagles, reporter, of the 
Mills Chapter in District IV; 
Margaret Baxley, treasurer, of the 
Sumner Chapter in District V; 
Jane Barrow, historian, of the 
Lucama Chapter in District II; 
Becky Hayes, president, of the 
Harris Chapter in District VIH; 
Betty Jo Lowdermilk, parliamen- 
tarian of the Southern Pines Chap- 
ter in District III; Barbara Ellis, 
secretary of the North Mecklen- 
burg Chapter in Distrct VI; Jean 
Jackson, song leader of the West 
Edgecombe Chapter in District I; 
and Becky Nifong, vice-president 
of the North Davidson Chapter in 
District VH 



er's last June and to bring greetings 
from our organization. This was 
really a thrilling experience. Imag- 
ine being the only girl in the midst 
of 2,000 boys. 

The thrill of a lifetime came when 
I was chosen with Penny Niven, 
your 1956 state treasurer, to repre- 



I can assure you that the ex- 
periences I have had as your state 
officer have enriched my life. The 
new friends I have made, and my 
association with some of the very 
finest girls, teachers, advisors, and 
supervisors in the world has been a 
most rewarding experience. My 




Jeanette poses with mother and father at the State FHA Convention in Raleigh. 



sent the Future Homemakers of 
America at the National Meeting 
of the American Institute of Co- 
operation, at State College in Ra- 
leigh. Here we worked with boys 
and girls representing every Farm 
Youth organization in the United 
States and several foreign countries, 
learning about Farm Co-operatives. 
This was a meaningful experience, 
and one that I shall never forget. 

On another occasion, I repre- 
sented the North Carolina Future 
Homemakers at a Breakfast Meet- 
ing of the Home Economists at the 
Robert E. Lee Hotel in Winston- 
Salem. 

I have also attended several of 
the district rallies and Mother- 
Daughter Banquets throughout the 
state, where I became acquainted 
with many wonderful FHA girls 
and advisors. 

They say every experience 
changes a person's personality, and 



ideals and purposes in life have 
been raised to a higher plane. 

Future Homemakers I want to 
thank each of you for giving me 
this wonderful opportunity. I wish 
sincerely that each of you could 
have shared these thrilling experi- 
ences with me. I have always re- 
membered that I was your represen- 
tative. I wish for our organization 
continued progress. As thousands of 
girls all over the United States 
strive to achieve the goals of our 
great organization, we are helping 
to build a better world because 
truth, love, security, and faith are 
the very basis of world peace and 
happiness. 

Good-bye Future Homemakers. 
Good-bye. to you, the greatest girls 
in the world. God bless you, Future 
Homemakers, God bless you every- 
one. 

Jeanette 



TUtiencU 'PW/t 7Vee6—/tpici 7-? 2. '57 



Observed In North Carolina Chapters 



In the Sunday Star News, Wil- 
mington, North Carolina, a full 
page was devoted to our FHA pro- 
gram. Barbara Jones, FHA presi- 
dent, emphasized our eight pur- 
poses. Quoting from the Newspaper 
are excerpts from the Star News 
concerning National FHA Week, 
April 7-12. 

"This week of special observance 
is one of the most important events 
of the year for members of the 
Future Homemakers. 

Throughout the United States 
and its territories, young girls will 
mark the week with special pro- 
grams and activities. 

Here in Wilmington the Future 
Homemakers have planned a num- 
ber of activities including a tea on 
Thursday and going to Church as a 
group on Sunday. 

Other events include putting 
flowers on each teacher's desk, 
choosing a secret FHA pal and 
doing something nice for her each 
day. The secret pals will be revealed 
at the conclusion of the week's ac- 
tivities. 

Teachers and mothers of the 




A SPECIAL OBSERVANCE DURING FHA WEEK— Mary Ann Ittner, Fayc Mat- 
thews and Jacqueline Gene prepare for the Future Homemakers Tea. Teachers 
and mothers of the girls were special guests. In preparation, Faye cleans the silver, 
Mary Ann prepares the food, and Jacqueline arranges the flowers. 



FHA girls have been invited to the 
Thursday afternoon tea. The girls 



have also set aside a special day 
during the week to help their Moms. 



FHA IN WASHINGTON HIGH SCHOOL 



Program opens with two or three 
girls trying to talk at once. Several 
distinct statement can be heard — 

"What else did you do?" 
"They looked so cute!" 
"Who's our next president?" 
Mother: Say, what are you girls 

so excited about? 

1st Girl (excitedly) : Oh, mother. 

May I have some money to join 

the FHA at school. 

Mother: FHA! Mercy, that's 
Federal Housing Administration. 
What's that doing in the high 
school? 

2nd Girl (laughingly) : No, Mrs. 
Carr, FHA to us means Future 
Homemakers of America. It is a 
national organization. It is open to 
all high school girls who are taking 
or have taken home economics. 



Mother: What are the purposes 
of your organization? 

3rd Girl: We have 8 all told. 
The first is to work for good home 
and family life for all. 

1st Girl: Another is to promote 
international good will. 

2nd Girl: Don't forget the one 
that emphasizes the importance 
of worthy home membership. We 
strive to have happy homes in every 
way. 

3rd Girl: By presenting programs 
for meetings, the officers planning 
our work, and encouraging family 
councils we try to foster the de- 
velopment of creative leadership in 
home and community life. 

Mother: Don't you try to encour- 
age girls to take home economics. 

1st Girl: Well, we not only try 



to get girls to take it, but we try to 
further interest in home economics 
throughout the community. 

3rd Girl: These cute games we 
learn and camp life provide whole- 
some individual and group recrea- 
tion. 

2nd Girl: To encourage democ- 
racy in home and community life 
is an important purpose also. 

1st Girl: Yes, as is the one to 
promote a growing appreciation of 
the joys and satisfaction of home- 
making. 

Mother: These purposes are all 
fine but what do you do to try to 
promote these things? 

2nd Girl: We have a meeting 
twice a month and have a special 
program based on our purposes. 

(Continued on page 7) 



?4tt Vtttdeilefttty s4i(*i 



PUBLIC SERVICE 

As We Strive to Accomplish Our Goals and Purposes 



East Wilkes Chapter Activities: 

Three hundred students received the Salk vaccine 
recently at a clinic sponsored by the East Wilkes FHA 
Chapter. The FHA girls did all of the secretarial 
work and helped during the clinic. A local doctor and 
four local nurses volunteered their services. Two ad- 
ditional clinics for the two vaccinations are planned. 

The group also assembled 250 pre-school booklets 
for the East Wilkes School district. 

A doll was also bought by the group and given to 
the children's ward at the Hugh Chatham Memorial 
Hospital. Mrs. Nina S. Tharpe and Mrs. Beulah Col- 
lins are advisers for the 65 FHA members at East 
Wilkes. 

Altamahaw-Ossipee Chapter Activities 

The Altamahaw-Ossipee Chapter of the Future 
Homemakers of America sponsored a series of dis- 
cussions in the school Monday through Thursday, 
March 11-14 in the area of "Education for Family 
Living." The public was invited to attend these pro- 
grams all of which were held in the school auditorium. 
Several outstanding speakers in the field of human 
relationships assisted as consultants in the series. 

"Getting Along in the Family" was the topic for 
9:15 a.m. on Monday. Miss Annie Laurie Burton, 
Alamance County Department of Public Welfare spoke 
on the topic and led a discussion afterward. 




Dr. Lyda Gordon Shivers of the faculty of Woman's 
College, Greensboro, spoke on the topic, "Getting Along 
With Other Teenagers," at 1:00 p.m. Tuesday. She 
also presided over a discussion period. 

Wednesday at 9:15 a.m., Rev. Tom Freeman, pas- 
tor of Hocutt Memorial Baptist Church, Burlington, 
talked about "Getting Ready to Assume Responsi- 
bilities in Marriage." 

Mrs. Corrine Grimsley English, specialist in family 
life education with the Extension Service of the North 
Carolina State Department of Agriculture, conducted 
two sessions on Thursday at 1:00 p.m. She was mode- 
rator for a panel of students discussing the topic, 
"Developing Well-Rounded Personalities." The panel 
attempted to handle questions which their fellow stu- 
dents submitted during the week of emphasis on human 
relation. 

At 7:30 p.m. Mrs. English presided over the pro- 
gram for the monthly PTA meeting. She used students 
in a forum-type discussion of some of the problems 
confronting teenagers as their personalities develop. 

Then on Tuesday, March 19, the panel appeared on 
the County School's radio program from Burlington. 
Sandra Madren, president of the A-D Chapter of 
Future Homemakers and editor of the school news- 
paper, presided over the panel composed of Jerry 
Garrison, Lacala Patterson, Rhonnie Smith, Carolyn 
Terrell, and Connie Thiel. They discussed some of 
the questions which the high school students had sub- 
mitted during the week. 

Ramseur Chapter Activities 

Home and school beautification is being stressed by 
Ramseur Future Homemakers. Here is a group in 
picture on left deciding where the shrubbery should be 
placed around the gymnasium. 



The shrubbery has been placed and these FHA members are 
finishing the job. Reading from left to right is the president, 
Velma Allen; vice-president, Linda Brady; Mary Tate Graham, 
Nancy Henley and Cynthia Leonard. 



VESPER SERVICE— BEGAN THE OBSERVANCE 

OF FHA WEEK IN THE JONES CENTRAL 

CHAPTER 

At 5:30 p.m. on Sunday, April 7, in the Music Room 
of the Jones Central School, members of Jones Central 
FHA Chapter gathered for Vesper Service. 

The Devotional was given by Rev. Lewis Dillman, 
Bible teacher at Jones Central. 

Individual members who explained the meaning and 
significance of our organization — motto, flower, colors, 
emblem — were Joyce Whaley, Sue Carol Boyette, Billie 
Parker, and Linda Kay Mallard. Marie Price acted as 
president during the Service. 

"FHA in Focus" was the topic of the speech by Rev. 
D. E. Hill, a teacher at Jones Central. 

Refreshments were enjoyed in the Home Economics 
Room following Vesper Service. 



Ym in FHA 

(Tune of: A Little White Duck) 

I'm in FHA here in Wake County, 
I'm in FHA here in Wake County, 
(I'm in FHA-in North Carolina) 
(I'm in FHA-in North Carolina) 

We work and play on the newest fad 
Brag and strut and say we're glad. 

I'm in FHA here in Wake County. 
(I'm in FHA-in North Carolina) 
F. H. A. 



The Thousand Legged Worm 

(POLLY WOLLY DOODLE) 

Said the thousand legged worm as he gave 
a little squirm, "Has anybody seen a leg 
o'mine?" 

"For if it can't be found, I shall have 

to hop around on the other nine-hundred, 
ninety-nine!" 



CHORUS: 

"Hop around, hop around! On the other 
nine-hundred-ninety-nine. 

For if it can't be found, I shall have to 

hop around on the other nine-hundred- 
ninety-nine!" 

— Submitted by Janet Powell of the Apex Chapter 
who says these have been used at Chapter 
Meetings, and County Rallies. 



POEM 

Written by Barbara Pope of the Coats 
Chapter who is working toward receiving a 
Chapter Homemaker Degree. (The poem 
was submitted by Joyce Johnson, Reporter 
of the Coats Chapter. 

I am a member of FHA 

With many thoughts and much to say. 
About my work to be in future years 

With much to learn and much to fear. 

But first let me tell you what it means to me, 
To be able to follow the steps of a recipe. 

To take material and be able to sew, 
By a complicated pattern with ruffles and 
bows. 

To be able to understand a child at play 

And not to interrupt his work for the day. 

When he's building or playing with dolls 
Or his everlasting love and work with cars. 

In my work at home, I'm proud to say 
I'm able to pretend in my make-believe 
way. 
With no one to say "you're doing that wrong" 
But be able to work and work on your 
own. 
Whether it be with a child or a brother 
It's nice to know you're a sister and 
mother. 
At home, at school, at work, and at play, 
Work with ease in your new found way. 

A good home life is hard to build. 

It takes courage, determination, and a lot 
of will. 
So do your best no matter what, 

With what you have and not what you've 
not. 

Whether you are poor, good, or bad, 
Happy, contented, or even sad. 

These things aren't important to us 
Just be forgiving and able to trust. 

It doesn't matter what your occupation 
Just work and live by our organization. 

Follow the rules and never forget 
That FHA is the best club yet. 

To be able to lead and follow as well, 
Your work in the future will be able to 
tell. 

So watch what you do and what you say 
And always remember our FHA. 

So Remember: 

F stands for the future and the things you 

can do. 
H for the good homemakers, for me and 

you. 
Last but not least I'm sure you agree 
A for America built by homemakers to be. 



AMONG U J 



THE 1957 STAT] 



Yes, the annual State FHA Con- 
vention of March 30, 1957 is over, 
and the record of the events of this 
day is now being packed away — 
Among Our Souvenirs. Years later 
we shall enjoy reviewing all the 
happenings of this day. 

Even before the program began, 
we were appalled as we watched 
all the girls surrounding us. All were 
attractively dressed, and the poised 
and gracious manner of each dele- 
gate made us proud of our organi- 
zation. 



Following the processional and 
the allegiance to the flag we en- 
joyed a most inspiring devotional 
presented by the Sandy Ridge 
Chapter. A reading entitled "The 
White Birds" was given by Sarah 
Joyce. This was followed by the 
beautiful voice of Winona Roberts 
who sang "Above the Hills of 
Time." She was accompanied by 
Angela Wall. 

As we browse through our pro- 
gram notes of the 1957 State Con- 
vention, we will recall vividly the 



words of welcome by Becky Hayes, 
vice-president of our state associa- 
tion. With clarity and sincerity 
Becky spoke: 

"From the outer banks, the sand- 
hills, the foothills and the moun- 
tains, we come again this thirtieth 
of March 1957, for our annual State 
FHA Convention. It is fitting that 
we meet here in our capital city 
which is representative of all our 
beloved Carolina from Cherokee to 
Currituck. 

To me has fallen the honor of 



"There is no need for any adviser or member to fail in securing help with chapter organization and guidance with the use of 
these FHA publications," stated the narrator of the Beaufort FHA Chapter, Sandra Haskins, in this portion of the FHA In 
Focus program. 




INSTALLATION CEREMONY — 1957-58 officers were installed in an impressive ceremony at the State FHA Convention. 
4 






SOUVENIRS! 



CONVENTION 



bidding you welcome. You — Par- 
ents, Guests, Advisers and Sister 
Future Homemakers. To each I ex- 
tend a warm welcome. We are 
grateful that you could be with us. 
We hope that our meeting together 
will prove to be a wonderful experi- 
ence which you will long remember 
wth pleasure. 

Recently as Gov. Hodges went 
to Kansas City he made the re- 
mark "I'm going to bring home the 
bacon." He did and we are still 
proud. 



We are planning to take some- 
thing home with us — stimula- 
tion, inspiration, and determination 
mixed tastefully with southern 
graciousness, beauty and charm; 
because along with Mrs. Hodges 
we know that even bacon needs a 
womanly touch to make it more 
appealing and desirable. 

This is our challenge and with- 
out your support we cannot attain 
the goals. 

We welcome and invite you to 



help us make this our most suc- 
cessful FHA meeting ever! 

Again I bid you welcome, 
thanks. 

Even the business of the day took 
on color when our state officers 
stepped to the microphone and re- 
ported to the huge audience — 
their specific duties of the year. 
Penny Niven, state treasurer, illu- 
strated the financial story of the 
State in an interesting manner. 

As a result of Penny's presenta- 



Secretary of the National Organization, Nancy Rosenthal, presents plans for the 1957 National Meeting to be held at Purdue 
University July 1-5, 1957. The Theme of the national meeting is Today's Teenagers — Tomorrow's Homemakers. 




Honorary Membership was conferred on four persons who had rendered outstanding service to the homemaking program in 
North Carolina. This year the Executive Council elected the following people: Mr. A. B. Combs, Director of the Division of 
Elementary and Secondary Education, of the State Department of Public Instruction. Mrs. Elizabeth Hedgecock Sparks, Home 
Economics Editor of the "Winston-Salem Journal." Mrs. Roger Laughridge, chapter grandmother for the Shelby FHA Chapter 
for the past four years. Mrs. Wilbur Worthington of Ayden, N. C, Mother of our State FHA President, Jeannette Worthington, 



tion members should be more aware 
of how this organization is financed 
through its membership fees. 

FHA'ers who sang the FHA 
Chant from the Red Springs Chap- 
ter were: Beth Duncan, Helen 
Lewis, Sally Gentry, Frances Gib- 
son, Sandra Overstreet, Pat Trout- 
man, Eleanor McNeill, Janet Currie, 
Madeline Thomas, Peggy Ratley, 
Janet McRacken, Rebecca Single- 
ton, Barbara McGoogan, Pianist. 

"FHA In Focus" — a feature 
portion of the afternoon program 
was an excellent illustration of how 
chapters in North Carolina operate 
to achieve state and national FHA 
Goals. 

Planning the Year's Program is 
most important for a successful year 
in FHA. The Wilton Chapter made 
this evident in a pantomine. Nancy 
Blackley was the narrator. Others 
who participated were: Billie Grif- 
fin, Annabelle Latta, Jannie Harris, 
Emily Currin, Sue Jean Jenkins, 
and Ann Montague. 

The script used by Nancy is re- 
corded here: 
Plans — such a very simple word, 

'tis true; 
But, oh, so important for FHA'ers 

like you. 
For any program of work to be a 

success, 
Time must be spent planning each 

separate quest. 

So, for the next few minutes, al- 
low us to demonstrate 

How the purposes and goals kept 
our chapter wide awake. 

Early one morning — 'twas a hot 

summer day — 
The adviser greeted the officers, 

who had been installed in May. 

Each one brought paper, books, clip- 
pings, and a head full of plans. 

We see each as over this material 
she scans. 

Plans, ideas, goals and ambitions 

are combined and sifted; 
From this mixture, a program of 

work was lifted. 

Our leaders were present and fairly 

well trained, 
But new members were needed to 

keep us sustained. 

So a goal was set — forty members 

to obtain; 
The FHA picture was complete 

when we added the last name. 

Adviser, officers, members, chap- ~~ 

ter parents — that's our crew; As Future Homemakers grow and 

Then committees were named, the improve as individuals, and as 

time had come to work, we knew, members of their family, their 



To promote better family living — 

that's goal one; 
What could be nicer than a Familv 

Night for fun? 

Then the Parent-Daughter Banquet 

— a bit more dignified. 
We knew from the response that 

Lady Luck was by our side. 

"What will your future be?" is a 

question oft asked. 
To show the open field in home 

economics — that was our task. 

To understand our neighbors, both 

at home and abroad, 
A program with the skit "Not 

Wanted" caused the people to 

applaud. 

Then there is the training which all 

of us need. 
To participate in activities, to be 

able to lead. 

We want others to realize that it 

makes good sense 
To familiarize ourselves with "Mr. 

Civil Defense." 

Let's beautify homes, schools, com- 
munity, too: 

Clean up time, mailbox painting — 
there is so much to do. 

Co-operation, they say, is the key 

to success. 
Work together with FHA'ers and all 

the rest. 

Rallies, conventions, monthly pro- 
grams, and special activities: 

All this gave us a year of work and 
festivities. 

The plans, now on paper, seemed 

of great size; 
We knew that we must work if they 

were to materialize. 

A yearbook was planned and given 

to each member; 
It was full of information and great 

services could render. 

Vital information was included, you 

bet; 
Creed, emblem, purposes — so we 

couldn't forget. 

Each month's activities were 

planned in detail; 
Regular programs, special projects 

— our work couldn't fail. 

The story is told — there's nothing 

more to relate; 
Just plan your program of work 

for '57-'58. 



school, and their community, they 
begin to appreciate the value of 
setting up goals and making definite 
plans for achieving these goals. 

Gwen Richardson and Martha 
Ann Fuller of the Lee Edwards 
Chapter in Asheville presented an 
informative program on "How We 
Work Toward Degrees of Achieve- 
ment." First steps in starting with 
the Degree program, the importance 
of careful planning with the ad- 
viser, the importance of an active 
and interested Degree Committee, 
the need for planning home ex- 
periences and classroom activities 
which will help to achieve goals — 
were all clearly described by these 
two Lee Edwards Chapter members. 

"Interpretation of Our FHA 
Goals and Purposes" in Buncombe 
County, as explained by Judy 
Reese and Mary Gale Haynes of 
the North Buncombe Chapter, 
should have given to all delegates 
inspiration and ideas for telling the 
public of our achievements in our 
Future Homemakers activities and 
projects. Judy and Mary Gale de- 
scribed methods of interpretation 
used in Buncombe County which 
included: 

1. Dinner for principals and su- 
perintendents at which time an 
original skit, entitled "Mirror, Mir- 
ror on the Wall," written by Judy 
Reese was presented. 

2. Special radio and television 
programs. 

3. Newspaper write-ups and a 
full page of pictures of project ac- 
tivities of members. 

4. County Fair Exhibits. 

5. Participation in county and 
district FHA rallies. 

6. Special individual and group 
projects for home, school, and com- 
munity improvement projects. 



"Using Our FHA Publications" 
can mean progress and advance- 
ment for members of the Future 
Homemakers of America. Mrs. 
Geraldine Beveridge, adviser of the 
Beaufort Chapter and her FHA 
members helped us to understand 
how helpful these publications are. 
Sandra Haskins, who was narra- 
tor for this skit not only described 
each publication but gave sugges- 
tions for the use of each of the 
publications. If you desire informa- 
tion about how to order these pub- 
lications, write to the State FHA 
office, Department of Public In- 
struction, Raleigh, N. C. 



RADIO PROGRAM 

(Continued from page 1) 

Then we take projects to help carry 
on the work. 

3rd Girl: Yes, for example, in 
September the officers, which were 
elected last spring, had a meeting 
with our adviser to decide what type 
of program would be most interest- 
ing to us. They also suggested pos- 
sible projects for us to take. 

2nd Girl: Do you remember 
hearing the girls tell of giving a 
needy family a gift of food during 
Thanksgiving? All the girls brought 
food from home and packed it into 
a basket. We carried it to the 
family we chose on the day before 
Thanksgiving. Boy, what a good 
feeling we had. 

1st Girl: Oh, don't forget those 
dolls that were dressed. The Sal- 
vation Army gave us dolls and each 
FHA member made a cotume for 
it. These were to be given to chil- 
dren who would have no Christmas 
without those dolls. 

2nd Girl: You know, I'm looking 
forward to the Valentine Dance that 
is being given in February. What 
fun we'll have with gay decorations, 
party dresses, and boys. 

1st Girl: Then, mother, in March 
there is a State Rally to be held in 
Raleigh. All the districts come to- 
gether to have a big meeting. We 



get to meet the State supervisors 
and officers, and there is always a 
wonderful program on some phase 
of homemaking. Of course, the thrill 
of spending the week end in the city 
is always an exciting experience. 

3rd Girl: Then, Mrs. Carr, the 
highlight of the year is the Mother- 
Daughter Banquet which is held in 
the cafeteria. For weeks we plan 
and prepare to invite our mothers 
and the school administration to a 
banquet in their honor. 

2nd Girl: Then after school is 
over for the regular term the girls 
take off for FHA camp held at 
White Lake. Here they learn 
crafts, swim, play many games, 
learn how to become better citizens 
and gain many friends. Every 
minute of the day is planned so no 
one has time to get homesick. 

Mother: My, it all sounds so ex- 
citing that I wish I were back in 
high school, just so I could 
be in the Future Homemakers of 
America. 

1st Girl: Mother, here's our FHA 
Prayer song. 

(Sing song) 

Those participating on the pro- 
gram were: Barbara Galloway, as 
Mother; Marie Moore, Judy Tyer; 
and Joan Wells. 








Former State FHA Officer, Peggy Spruill from Pamlico County High School in 
Bayboro is now preparing to teach Home Economics as she works with FHA mem- 
bers of the Washington High School during her period of Student Teaching. A radio 
program "FHA in Washington" is being prepared. Reading from left to right are: 
Judy Tyer, Barbara Galloway, Peggy Spruill, and Marie Moore, President of the 
Washington Chapter. The picture was taken in the FHA corner of the home eco- 
nomics department. 



The Altamahaw-Ossippee Chapter of 
the Future Homemakers and Future 
Farmers gave their annual Mother- 
Daughter, Father-Son Banquet March 9 
in the school cafeteria at 7:00 o'clock. 

For this occasion the red and white 
color scheme was used throughout the 
decorations. Down the middle of each 
table were red and white crepe paper 
streamers and candles. On the head 
table was a beautiful centerpiece of red 
carnations and white gladioli. Place 
cards were small ruffed nut baskets. 

Connie Theil presided as toastmaster. 
Following the invocation by Kay Good- 
man, Sandra Madren, FHA president, 
and Mack Garrison, president of the 
FFA, welcomed the mothers and fathers 
and responses were given by Mrs. 
Howard Gerringer and Mr. David Moore. 

During the meal, Caren and Phyllis 
Cole sang the "Banana Boat Song." Clyde 
Madren and Donald Whitesell presented 
a skit "A Trip to the Graveyard." The 
FHA and FFA report of events were 
given by Carolyn Terrell and Scott 
Truitt. 

Sandra Madren, one of the senior par- 
ticipants in the national Betty Crocker 
"Search for the American Homemaker 
of Tomorrow," received an award as 
winner in the Altamahaw-Ossipee High 
School. Mrs. Rachel Troxler, FHA ad- 
viser, made the presentation. 

J. Allen Lewis, superintendent of 
Rockingham County Schools, delivered 
the main address as a climax to the 
evening's program. He told the parents 
to make the most of their children be- 
cause they grow up quickly. He urged 
the children to make the most of their 
journey along life's way. 

Mr. Jack Dunn, FFA adviser, awarded 
door prizes to some of the parents and 
youth. 

The Beaufort Future Homemakers of 
America sponsored a Twerp (Daisy Mae) 
Dance from 8:00 to 11:00 Friday night 
at the American Legion Building. Girls 
invited the boys and the admission was 
25 cents each. 

All students in the county were in- 
vited, announced Mrs. David Beveridge, 
FHA adviser. Chaperons were Mrs. Ar- 
vis McGehee and Mr. and Mrs. L. C. 
Smith. 

Recently the second year home eco- 
nomics girls studied parliamentary pro- 
cedure. The sixth period girls held a 
meeting to elect their officers. Those 
elected were president, Frances Mears; 
vice-president, Lillie Lewis; secretary, 
Barbara Fulcher; corresponding secre- 
tary, Mary Sue Moore; program chair- 
man, Charlotte Carter; and reporter, 
Margaret Springle. 

The next step was the biggest of all: 
naming our club. After a buzz session 
we decided to vote between two "The 
Two P's Club" and "The Order Backing 
Ladies." In case you're wondering what 
the two mean, we'll tell you. In the 
first one, the 2 P's stand for Parlia- 
mentary Procedure. The second one, 
"The Order Backing Ladies," means we 
are the ladies who back the orders of the 
club. The latter was chosen. 

During the rest of the week we 



learned how to carry on a meeting in 
general. On Friday we had our evalua- 
tion test. Then we held a meeting and 
the program chairman had made out 
another test for us. We learned a lot 
from this unit which was supervised by 
Mrs. Beveridge. 

Students at Beaufort High School col- 
lected money for the Heart fund. They 
were according to Mrs. Potter, co- 
chairman of the drive. Representatives 
of the Hi-Y, Future Homemakers of 
America, Debating Club, and Beta Club 
participated in this project. 

Miss Gladys Ellis of London, England, 
was the speaker at the March meeting 
of the Boyden Future Homemakers. 

Miss Ellis gave an interesting talk on 
British school and home life. 

"English school children at the age of 
IVA enter secondary schools according 
to their IQ," she explained. According 
to Miss Ellis, most of their time is spent 
with academic subjects rather than do- 
mestic sciences. Cookery, laundry, and 
housekeeping are the three basic courses 
taken in domestic science. When Miss 
Ellis attended school, a flat or apart- 
ment was used for learning the house- 
work. 

The housing and social problems of 
the young people were stressed by Miss 
Ellis. During the war, one-third of the 
British houses were destroyed, causing a 
great shortage of homes. Flats for 
married couples rent for $12 per week 
unfurnished. It is extremely hard for 
a single person to find good lodging. The 
upper social class lives in the burroughs. 

England's "Socialized medicine" plan 
was explained by Miss Ellis. She told of 
the good care which the people received. 
Americans, Miss Ellis, said, are more 
carefree, make more money, and spend 
more than their English-speaking friends 
across the sea. 

Prior to Miss Ellis's talk, a brief busi- 
ness meeting was held in which plans 
were made to attend the state FHA 
rally, March 30. Libby Arey, president, 
presided. 

Approximately 25 members of the 
Salisbury chapter of the Future Home- 
makers of America attended the County 
Rally at Mount Ulla last month. 

Kay Goodman, vice-president of the 
local chapter, introduced the speaker, 
Dr. Nelson Moore of Pfeiffer College. 

Much in evidence was the live-at- 
home and do-it-yourself training of the 
FHA and the FFA of Chinquapin High 
School as they joined hands to hold 
their annual Mother-Daughter, Father- 
Son Banquet in the high school cafeteria 
on Friday evening, March 15. For this 
event honoring their mothers and fathers, 
the girls and boys, under the co- 
sponsorship of Mrs. Nettie C. Herring 
of the Home Economics Department and 
Mr. Willard Buffkin of the Agriculture 
Department, set forth active proof that 
a banquet can be staged without going 
beyond the local level for materials or 
talent. 

Besides the usual social value derived 
from an event of this type and the 
family-style co-operation experienced, 
the lads and lassies found this to be 
also an educational venture. With a 
setting in old Holland, some study of 
the Dutch people, their land, customs 
and language was necessary as was evi- 
denced by "Hwhnchen" (Barbecue 
chicken), the main course on the all- 
Dutch menu, and the dykes, tulips and 
other symbols of the Netherlands used 

8 



in all the speeches for the occasion. The 
girls flexed their artistic and culinary 
talents in the making of wooden-shoe 
nut cups, windmdl table decorations, 
Dutch-boy and girl place cards, the 
fashioning of Dutch Iris with ferns and 
pink and white ribbons into corsages, 
and in their preparation of the pound 
cake and waldorf salad. Also brought 
prominently into the picture were the 
ever important patterns, needles and 
thread needed to transform the eighth 
grade waiters and waitresses into little 
men and women of the happy land of 
canals and tulips. The boys made special 
use of their saws and hammers in build- 
ing table extensions, and of their ladders 
in hanging streamers and other decora- 
tions in the banquet hall. 

Presiding as host and hostess for the 
occasion were Jimmie Bostic, president 
of the local chapter of the Future Farm- 
ers of America, and Eloise Sholar Carter, 
president of the Chinquapin Chapter of 
the Future Homemakers of America. As 
after-dinner speaker, Mr. L. P. Beverage 
of Burgaw, district manager of the 
R. E. A., left with the boys and girls 
some interesting "Thoughts for To- 
morrow." Of the 206 people in attend- 
ance, a record number for an event of 
this type at Chinquapin, all seemed in 
agreement that the banquet was a de- 
lightful success. 

The FHA and FFA Chapter of Jones 
Central High School honored their 
mothers and fathers at a banquet in the 
school cafeteria on April 5 at 7:30. 

Bobby Barbee, FFA president, opened 
the special occasion by giving the "wel- 
come" to the mothers and fathers and 
special guests, Jenny Lou Taylor and 
Douglas Hill. 

Mr. J. W. Allen, principal of Jones 
Central, gave the blessing. 

After the meal, Delores Heath, FHA 
president, introduced Jenny Lou Taylor, 
state FHA song leader and district presi- 
dent from Deep Run, who spoke on 
"Building a Home" and stressed that 
love is one of the most important build- 
ing stones. 

Bobby Barbee introduced Douglas Hill, 
president of the Southwood Federation, 
who spoke on "The Organization of 
FFA." 

While waiting for some films to be 
shown, Jenny Lou led the group in a 



song. The films shown were of some 
FHA girls and their projects and families. 
Pat Parker and her family were "Playing 
Together," Billie Parker and her family 
and Delores Heath and her family were 
"Planning Together," Bonnie Meiggs and 
her family were "Working Together," and 
Mary Jo Bender and her family were 
"Worshiping Together." Films were 
shown of Linda Kay Mallard and Eliza- 
beth Wells, also. Linda Kay "modeled" 
some of the clothes she made. Elizabeth 
showed a chart on her project "Teenage 
Consumer," and a film of Elizabeth and 
her mother shopping together was shown 
to conclude the program. 

Delores Heath gave the closing cere- 
mony with all the FHA girls repeating 
the creed. 

After the banquet, everyone adjourned 
to the music room for recreation. 

Joyce Whaley 
FHA Reporter 

The members of the New Hanover 
Future Homemakers of America honored 
their mothers Friday night with a 
Mother-Daughter banquet. The banquet 
was held in the Home Economics De- 
partment with 65 persons attending. 

For decorations a color scheme of 
green and white was used with red 
roses, the flower of the organization, 
as the centerpiece on each table. 

The menu consisted of baked ham, 
garden peas, sweet potato souffle, cole 
slaw, biscuits, cherry cake, coffee and 
iced tea. 

The program was centered around the 
purpose of the organization with Joyce 
Cathey, Margaret Olson, Mary Szczer- 
leiak, Linda Sanford, Barbara Jones, 
Lynda Stevens, Mary Margaret Ginn 
taking part. The first part of the pro- 
gram entitled, "Our Land and Flag," 
carried out the thought that our in- 
fluence in the home radiates its light 
far and wide throughout the land. The 
second part entitled, "Builders of the 
Home," carried out the thought that a 
house should not only be of material 
things, but also of love, faith and trust. 
The third part entitled, "Toward New 
Horizons," carried out the thought that 
we should live better today, so that our 
lives and those of our family may be 
better tomorrow. 




This is the second year home economics class of Boyden. Unusual is the fact that 
there are four boys and four girls in the class. 



FHA MEMBERS EARNING THE STATE 
HOMEMAKER DEGREE IN 1957 



Bath High School — Meredith Brooks, June Garrett, 
Barbara Pinkham, Peggy Joyce Waters 

Franklin — Ruth Dunbar 

Liberty — Sarah Moore and Doris Teague 

Rockwell — Midgie Huneycutt 

Robert B. Glenn — Patricia Plaxico, Rebecca Ann Kin- 
namon and Linda Motsinger 

Union Grove — Clyde Templeton 

Sumner — Margaret Baxley and Olivia Carolyn Tippett 

Bladenboro — Joyce Dove, Shirley Smith, Betty Jo 
Vaught, Glenda Sue Burney and Joyce Hester 

Red Springs — Peggy Ratley, Helen Lewis, Janet 
Conoly, Eleanor McNeill and Patricia Troutman 

Stedman — Hellon Beard, Vivian Ann Williams, Lois 
Evelyn Atkinson 

B. F. Grady — Mary Gold Wallace, Connie Jo Wells, 
Linda Marilyn Holt, Nancy Lillian Grady, Rubylene 
Waters and Ann Kornegay 

Bartlett Yancey — Nancy Jean Page, Elizabeth D. John- 
son, Marie Gwynn, Omega Prevette, Jo Anne Mc- 
Kinney, Helen Patsy Hunt, Rachel Shelton 

Benson — Rebecca Smith 

Berea — Barbara Hobgood 

Durham Sr. — Carolyn Sue James 

Grantham — Lydia Ann Spain, Barbara Jean Keen, 
Lena Ruth Britt, Bobbie Jean Gray, Becky Jones, 
Dorothy Price 

Hillsboro — Betsy Ann Hall 

Kenansville — Barbara Jean Brown, Gail Newton 

Louisburg — Betty Jane Eagles 

Pikeville — Lillie Dare Sasser, Bobbie Crocker, Vir- 
ginia Crumpler, Effie Lancaster 



Rosewood — Carol Jordan, Evelyn Collins 

Roxboro — Mildred Louise Brown. Delaine Parker 

Wood 
Swansboro — Agnes F. Rhue 
Wallace-Rose Hill — Mary Vann Wilkins 
Warsaw — Rebecca Eason, Frances Mathis, Pauline 

Costin, Sara Frances Kirby, Catherine Blalock 
Franklinton — Sara Eason 

Wilton — Billie Griffin, Jannie Harris, Nancy Blackley 
Reynolds — Gail Hughey, Marilyn Smith 
Shelby — Nancy Rosenthal 
Flat Rock — Emma Moore 
Harris — Becky Hayes 

Rutherfordton - Spindale — Jane Blankenship, Judith 
Moss, Lillian (Duncan) Bailey, Mary Alice Car- 
son, Peggy Hill, Linda Logan, Ann Pate, Barbara 
Walker 
Tri-High — Carolyn Hawkins, Rebecca Taylor, Alice 

Walker, Barbara West, Peggy Ann Blanton 
Lee Edwards — Ruth Ann Goforth, Gail Jackson 
Kings Mountain — Mary Ellen Baker 
Old Fort — Dorothy Bailey, Eileen McEntire 
Enka — Carolyn Ruth Roberts, Dorothy Williams, 

Wanda Ruth Carter, Eva Ann On- 
Cool Springs — Barbara Ann Guffy 
Conway — Pat Hedgepeth 
Deep Run — Vonnie Lou Noble 
Grifton — Joyce Dudley, Phyllis J. Dudley 
South Edgecombe — Jessie Calphurnia Ellis 
Tarboro — Sarah Elizabeth Cummings 
North Buncombe — Judy Reece 



1956-57 Membership 

North Carolina has 456 chapters this year with a membership of 21,889. 

North Carolina Association of Future Homemakers of America 



State Officers 
1956-57 

President — Jeannette Worthington, Ayden 
Vice-President — Becky Hayes, Harris 
Secretary — Clyde Templeton, Union Grove 
Treasurer — Penny Niven, Waxhaw 
Reporter — Doris Teague, Liberty 
Parliamentarian — Margaret Rand, Garner 
Historian — Helen Lewis, Red Springs 
Song Leader — Jenny Lou Taylor, Deep Run 

State Adviser 

Mrs. Faye T. Coleman 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 

Division of Vocational Education 
Raleigh, North Carolina 



District Advisers 
1956-57 

Joyce Currin — Murfreesboro 
Mrs. Mary L. Smith, Clyde A. Erwin 
Mrs. Madge Young, Taylors ville 
Mrs. Mary Kate Faulkner, Marshville 
Mrs. Cora Whitehead, Ramseur 
Mrs. Florence Sorrell, Benson 
Mary Elizabeth Burns, Pinehurst 
Mrs. Alma T. Phillips, Jones Central 



Future Homemakers of America 



CREED 

We arc the Future Homemakers of America 

He (ace the future with warm courage, 

And high hope, 

For we have the clear consciousness of seeking 

Old and precious values. 

For we are the builders of homes, 

Homes for America's future. 

Homes where living will be the expression of everything 

That is good and fair. 

Homes where truth and love and security and faith 

Will be realities, not dreams. 

We are the Future Homemakers of America. 
We face the future with warm courage. 
And high hope. 




The homes of tomorrow are in 

the hands of the youth 

of today" 




CAROLINE SAYS: 

May is the month when most schools will end the work 
of the year. 

Now is the time to evaluate the work of your FHA 
Chapter and your contributions to the goals of the 



Now is the time to carefully select your officers for 
next year — girls who will work, who sincerely 
want to accomplish our goals, and who take their 
responsibilities seriously. 

Now is the time to do some preplanning for next year. 

Now is the time for you to resolve that you will be 
an active member in fulfilling the purposes of 
FHA. 

Here's wishing you a happy and fruitful summer va- 
cation. 







C}od3~ Understanding Oar Neighbors 'Both At 4-hne and Abroad 



FUTURE HOMEMAKERS 

* North Carolina Association * 



VULUMt AY 



UCIUbtK !50/ 



INUMDCK I 




Calendar Reminders 



Dues: State and National dues are to be in the State 
office by January 15, 1958, if your chapter is to be 
affiliated for 1957-58. 

The amount of the dues is 55 cents per member — 
plus 10 cents per member contributions for helping 
defray expenses of state officers and district advisers 
to national meetings. This makes a total of 65 cents 
per member. The" State office is responsible for for- 
warding the national dues to the national office. 

Degrees of Achievement: Deadline dates for filing 
Declaration of Intention to work for the Junior and 
Chapter degrees and the completed reports are set by 
the local Chapter Degree Committee. The deadline 
date for filing Declaration of Intention to work toward 
the State Homemaker Degree is November 15. (A 
request for forms must be sent to the State Adviser 
earlier in order to receive the blanks and to get the 
Intention form filled in and returned to the State office 
by November 15.) 



State Convention: Date — March 19, 1958. 

Place — Memorial Auditorium, Raleigh, North Caro- 



lina. 



National FHA Week: March 23-29, 1958. (Due to 
the Easter date, FHA Week will be earlier this year.) 

National Meetings: 1958 — July 7-1 1 Hotel Muehle- 
bach, Kansas City, Missouri, 600 delegates (members 
and advisers) of Future Homemakers of America. 

1959— July 13-17 Conrad Hilton Hotel, Chicago, 
Illinois, 2.500 delegates (members and advisers) of 
Future Homemakers of America. (Begin now to plan 
to send a delegate to represent your chapter or your 
county federation.) 

Annual Report: One copy is due in the State office 
by June 1, 1958, and earlier if possible. One copy is 
to be filed in the department. 



North Carolina Association of Future Homemakers of America 



State Officers 
1957-58 

President— Becky Hayes, Harris VIII 
Vice-President — Becky Nifong, North Davidson VII 
Secretary — Barbara Ellis, North Mecklenburg VI 
Treasurer— Patsy Hunt, Bartlett, Yancey V 
Reporter— Jane Eagles, Mills, Louisburg IV 
Parliamentarian — Betty Jo Lowdermilk, Southern 

Pines III 
Historian — Jane Barrow, Lucama II 
Song Leader — Jean Jackson, West Edgecombe I 



District Advisers 
1957-58 

Sadie Frances — Washington I 

Mrs. Geraldine Beveridge, Beaufort II 

Mrs. Sarah G. Shaffer, Stedman III 

Mrs. Robinette Husketh, Wilton, Franklinton, Rt. 1 IV 

Mrs. Glenna Lewis, E. M. Holt, Burlington, Rt. 1 V 

Mrs. Amelia Sheffield, Star VI 

Mrs. Nina Thorpe, East High. Ronda VII 

Betty Shealy, Cherryville VIII 



State Adviser 

Mrs. Faye T. Coleman 



STATE DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 

Division of Vocational Education 

Raleigh, North Carolina 



FUTURE HOMEMAKER OFFICERS 
■k RECEIVE TRAIMNQ * 



CABARRUS COUNTY 
WORKSHOP 

From Cabarrus County comes the 
report of the third annual workshop 
for all chapter officers in the county. 
This included officers from eight 
schools in the county. There were 
approximately eighty in all who met 
during the morning of August 20 in 
the Winecoff School. The advisers 
were the instructors or consultants, 
each adviser working with one group 
of officers — the presidents, the vice- 
presidents, the secretaries, etc. 

Lunch was served buffet-style in 
the homemaking department. A 
second session followed after lunch. 
The meeting adjourned at 2:00 p.m. 
It had been planned that this work- 
shop be held at Happy Lake, but 
because of bad weather, it was held 
at Winecoff School. 



POLK, TRANSYLVANIA 
HENDERSON 

Tri-County Workshop 

Place: Camp Arrowhead — near 
Tuxedo, N. C. 

Time: September 13 and 14, 1957 
Story: How thrilled the officers 

were to finally have a workshop for 
the tri-county FHA. And out to 
CAMP ARROWHEAD! Polk and 
Transylvania and Henderson Coun- 
ty FHA officers together with their 
sponsors had a week end of fun and 
work at Camp Arrowhead. Friday 
afternoon opened with a general ses- 
sion. This included a devotional, 
the opening ceremony, and intro- 
duction of guests (we were so glad 
to have the district supervisor, Miss 
Swann — in black and white plaid 
shorts too!). 

After the general opening service 
we went into discussion groups all 
over the big camp; some in the 
"Falls" room, some in the game 
room, some in the mess hall, and 
perhaps some even in "Lower 
Egypt" (the toilet room!). In the 
discussion groups the purpose was 
to help each officer do a better job 
in performing the duties of her 
respective office. Qualifications and 




Wanda Sumner, president of the Tri- 
County Federation (Polk, Transylvania, 
and Henderson) from Etowah chapter, 
and Joy Griesmeyer, the Tri-County re- 
porter of the Hendersonville chapter, 
make final plans for the Tri-County 
workshop, only two days away. This 
planning took place in the Home Eco- 
nomics Department in the Hendersonville 
School. 



lots of suggestions for being a good 
officer were given. 

At about 5:30 we left discussion 
groups and wandered around the 
camp, starving to death and waiting 
for the dinner gong. It finally came 



and did we enjoy our dinner. After 
dinner Mr. Carter, Assistant 4H 
Director for the state, led us in games 
and singing. He gave many ideas 
and helps for the FHA song leaders 
and we all had a marvelous time 
singing and going "bear hunting." 
After vespers we went to our cabins, 
but of course we did not go to sleep 
for hours. The sponsors kept call- 
ing us to stay in the cabin for we 
were on the side of the mountain 
and really hanging over a lake! 

Saturday morning we met together 
and exchanged ideas which came out 
of the group discussions; heard Miss 
Swann discuss degrees of achieve- 
ment; and had Mr. Adams, former 
Illinois State FFA Executive Secre- 
tary, to talk to us about leadership 
and opportunities for those who are 
officers in any youth organization. 
It was fun! It was thrilling! It was 
helpful! It was inspiring! 



GRANVILLE-PERSON 

With a view to learning "more 
about how to make our organization 
a meaningful experience to mem- 




Chapter officers from Polk, Transylvania, and Henderson counties at Camp Arrow- 
head near Tuxedo to receive training for their responsibilities in their chapter 1957-5N. 



bers," officers and advisers in the 
Granville-Person bi-county organiza- 
tion had an all day meeting at the 
Helena High School Saturday Sep- 
tember 21. The program for the 
day ran something like this: 

Short General Session 
Devotion 

Discussion of Day's Plans 
Announcements 

Group Meetings of Officers, Ad- 
visers or Consultants 
(Ways of making each chapter 
a good one by increasing 
efficiency of officers, proper 
reporting, parliamentary pro- 
cedure etc.) 

Lunch served by Helena Chapter 
(Lunch consisted of wieners, 
drinks, and ice cream.) 

A Model Chapter Meeting — 
Demonstration and a report of 
work done in workshop recrea- 
tion. 



Report of the National Conven- 
tion by Jane Eagles given at District 
IV Rally by Barbara Catlette, Patri- 
cia Hicks, and Maria Gupton in the 
form of a relaxer. 

(Audience participates by stand- 
ing and acting the parts led by 
Patricia and Maria from the stage.) 

I awoke (yawn) Saturday morn- 
ing and jumped (jump) out of bed 
with a feeling of excitement and 
uneasiness. At first this seemed 
strange but then I remembered 
(point to head) — Today I left for 
the National F.H.A. Convention at 
Purdue University in Lafayette, 
Indiana. I ran (run) to the bath- 
room, cut on the water and at- 
tempted to wash my face (wash 
face). I dressed and went down 



Future Homemaker — a Delegate to 
Denmark — From American Field 
Services International Student Ex- 
change 

Gail Harwell, a Future Home- 
maker of the East Mecklenburg 
Chapter, was one of the six Charlotte 
and Mecklenburg County high 
school students to go abroad as a 
delegate from the American Field 
Services International Student Ex- 
change. Gail was to sail from 
Montreal — with 892 students from 
schools in the United States. 

Gail's specific assignment was to 
live with a farm family in Spezlsby, 
Stege, Denmark. There are five 
children in the family. 

Her experiences in her Chapter 
and homemaking classes were very 
helpful in preparing her for the trip. 
Last year she was secretary of her 
Chapter. She has earned her Junior 
Homemaker Degree. As a third 
year home economics student, Gail 
made her wardrobe for the trip. 
She also held down a job at an 
A & P Food Store to earn some 
money for the trip. An "Essay on 
Savings" won for her a savings bond. 
We hope to see some pictures of her 
activities abroad in a future issue of 
this magazine. 



stairs (walk down) to try to eat 
breakfast. I gulped my orange juice 
and swallowed my other breakfast 
whole, (demonstrate) I then 
checked my suitcase (looks 
through). Everything was there in- 
cluding my 9 slips, (count 9) 

I left Raleigh with the other girls 
from North Carolina. As we waved 
(wave) good-bye we were sorry to 
have to leave our parents and friends 
but then we had an adventure before 
us. We changed trains in Richmond, 
Virginia, and got with other girls 
on their way to the convention. We 
spent the night (sleep) on the train 
which was quite an experience for 
most of us. 

We ate (eat) breakfast in Cinn. 
where we lost (stop) one of our 

(Continued on page eight) 



Those of you who attended the 
District Rally in your respective 
district during October will recall 
hearing a report from one of these 
officers who were delegates at the 
National meeting at Purdue Uni- 
versity in Lafayette, Indiana. Many 
ideas for the Rally Programs were 
brought back to North Carolina by 
these delegates. The delegates are: 



Left to right (standing) Becky 
Hayes, President; Barbara Ellis, 
Secretary; Jane Barrow, Historian; 
Jane Eagles, Reporter; (front row) 
Margaret Baxley, Treasurer (at the 
time of the National meeting); 
Nancy Rosenthal, Secretary of the 
National organization; and Jean 
Jackson, State Song Leader. 



"Young women should set good ex- 
amples for young men follow them." 




*7eUi«tf Oun Stony 



THROUGH COLOR SLIDES 




No doubt you often receive a difficult assignment 
from one of your teachers. It just seems that no ideas 
are forthcoming and that you don't seem to have the 
human resource for tackling the job. But eventually 
the beginning takes shape and you surprise yourself with 
your own creative power. 

Last year your state adviser and Ann Rowe, of the 
Garner Chapter, a member of the National Projects 
Committee, were asked to assign ten chapters to pre- 
pare color slides of experiences and activities of mem- 
bers in carrying out Goal IV — To provide training for 
each chapter member for participation in home, school, 
and community activities. 

These chapters told a beautiful story, through slides, 
of worthy and rewarding experiences of F.H.A. mem- 
bers. 

At the Robert B. Glenn School, three Future Home- 
makers decided to meet a real need of their school — 
to redecorate the teachers' lounge. These three made 
their plans and set their goals for working toward earn- 
ing their State Homemaker Degree, and included in the 
goals was the improvement of the teachers' lounge. 
The pictures on the left show: No. 1 — Pat Plaxico, 
Linda Motsinger, and Rebecca Kinnamon as they sit 
down and record their plans on paper. 

When the building was new the painters had painted 
the walls of the lounge a bold pink with a strip of red 
at the baseboard line. The color combination and tone 
was an insult to the girls who had become color con- 
scious. A soft green was decided for the walls. The 
girls planned to do the painting themselves. To remedy 
the glare from the windows, a sheer draw curtain was 
planned. They also decided to hang pictures and to 
add potted plants to make the room more cheerful. 

On Friday afternoons and Saturday mornings these 
F.H.A.'ers donned their blue jeans and busied them- 
selves painting the room. In picture: No. 2 — Pat, 
Linda, and Rebecca are cutting the panels and sewing 
them together for the draw curtains which will be hung 
from a cornice board. This activity took place on 
afternoons after school. In picture: No. 3 — The girls 
are trying the pale yellow boucle marquisette for effect. 
The material was chosen to filter the light and add 
softness at the windows. No. 4 — The girls decided that 
growing plants would make the lounge more inviting. 
Linda has just planted a dish garden and tries it out 
on the end table. No. 5 — Pictures emphasizing the 
color scheme were to add the finishing touch. Here, 
Pat and Rebecca try a picture for the effect they want. 

The teachers find the lounge more relaxing and at- 
tractive with its soft green walls, pale yellow draw cur- 
tains, pictures and growing plants. Thanks to the 
F.H.A. girls. 

In addition to the pictures — featured on this page 
of the project by the three girls from the Robert B. Glenn 
School, who were earning the State Homemaker Degree, 
you will be interested to know about the nature of 



activities pictured by other chapters 
through slides. 

The stories as shown are sum- 
marized below: 

Pamlico County Chapter: A proj- 
ect, which has continued from year 
to year, is to work with school offi- 
cials and other organizations in 
improving the school and keeping 
it clean and attractive. Each year 
F.H.A. members look forward to 
the suppers sponsored by the P.T.A. 
The F.H.A. members plan the deco- 
rations for the cafeteria, set the 
tables, serve the meal, and act as 
hostesses during the evening. As 
hostess, the members greet the 
guests at the door, direct them to 
the serving line, often carry a tray 
for a child or an elderly person, 
and help the guests find seats. Then, 
during the dinner, the F.H.A. mem- 
bers take turns at the piano furnish- 
ing soft dinner music. Having been 
successful at these projects, the 
F.H.A. members are frequently re- 
quested to help with social activities 
in local communities. 

Script For Using the Slides — Pre- 
pared by the E. M. Holt Chapter — 
Slides Depict Goal IV: America's 
future depends upon her homes. 
Homes such as the one we see rep- 
resented here by the Pike family. 



(1) This family is just returning 
home after a visit with the married 
daughter. They are Mr. and Mrs. 
Walter Pike; their teen-aged daugh- 
ter, Cobina; younger daughter, 
Ramona; and small son, Riley. 
Cobina, a Future Homemaker, will 
graduate from high school this year 
and Riley will start to school next 
year. 

(2) Mrs. Pike realizes that her 
family has healthy appetites so she 
immediately goes to the kitchen to 
prepare dinner. Her two daughters, 
Cobina and Ramona, always assist 
her with the meals and sometimes 
surprise mother by preparing a meal 
all by themselves. Ramona is seen 
setting the table while Cobina 
washes lettuce for the salad. 

(3) While the girls are busy in 
the kitchen, Mr. Pike takes a few 
minutes to finish painting the edge 
of a bench that is to be used in the 
living room. After painting, the 
bench will be complete except for 
attaching the metal legs. Mr. Pike 
enjoys helping to make the home 
more comfortable and beautiful. 

(4) Riley has washed his hands 
but he calls for mother to come 
wash his face. Like most boys, he 
hates to wash his face; and too, he 
doesn't want to be late for that 
meal. 




Float made by Morehead City Chapter of Future Homemakers. Colors red and 
white — white background, red trimmings and letters. Girls wore white, carried red 
roses tied with red ribbon. The President (at top), Jenie White, wore red, carried 
white roses with white ribbon. 



(5) After dinner, the girls have 
washed the dishes and it's time for 
studies. Mrs. Pike is shown here 
patiently explaining the English 
sentences that Ramona doesn't quite 
understand. Cobina is getting ready 
for her next book report that will 
soon be due. 

(6) After lessons have been pre- 
pared, each family member likes to 
relax in his favorite chair before 
getting ready to retire for the night. 
Riley wants Ramona to help put his 
train on the track while dad watches 
television and mother thumbs 
through the latest McCalls Maga- 
zine. Cobina is in the next room 
having a very private conversation 
with her boy friend on the telephone. 

(7) However, before retiring for 
the night, the family ends their day 
with family worship in the living 
room. Mother usually has charge 
of these devotions because her Bible 
selections are always so interesting, 
although they sometimes take turns. 
They know that a family that wor- 
ships together, stays together. 

(8) Here dad is seen taking time 
to read to his son that favorite horse 
story, Black Beauty. After one 
story, Riley goes for his pajamas. 

(9) He returns to find that dad 
has fallen asleep in the armchair. 
No doubt he has had a busy day. 
Riley, a big boy now, is proud of 
the fact that he can put his pajamas 
on all by himself. Here, he is finish- 
ing the task by struggling with the 
last shoe. 

This is only one afternoon m the 
Pike home. Let's see them at other 
times. 

( 1 0) The Pikes enjoy sharing their 
home with others, and other girls 
certainly enjoy sharing the Hi-Fi 
with Cobina. Wanda and Linda Jo 
are frequent visitors in the after- 
noons. 

(11) Sometimes Linda Jo plays 
the piano and the whole family 
gathers around to sing hymns and 
popular songs. This is a phase of 
recreation in which everyone partici- 
pates and this family enjoys doing 
things together. 

(12) Cobina has taken Home 
Economics since she has been in 
high school and she likes to sew in 
her spare time. Here we see mother 
and daughter working together in 
the sewing room that, dad helped 
plan and build. 

(13) At another time, we see 
Cobina well pleased with one of the 

(Continued on page eight) 




F.H.A. members of the Jonesville High School Chapter helped in making drapes and selecting pictures for the principal's office. 
Reading left to right: Nancy Allgood, Jean Myers, Florence Gray, Josephine Holcomb, Carolyn Everidge, and principal, Mr. 
Guy T. Swain. 



THE WAY WE 



WORK 



IS IMPORTANT 



Recruitment 

Take the way we help new and prospective members 
to know and understand our organization. Some chap- 
ter members have thought of ingenious ways to interest 
others and to hold the interest throughout the year and 
beyond. As with most organized activities, it is neces- 
sary that we think far ahead, so before a school term 
is ended our plans for another term already begin — 
with an eye toward the incoming homemaking students 



who will be eligible to join our Chapter of Future 
Homemakers of America next year. 

Mary Ann Brady of the Elise Chapter in Robbins 
prepared a talk to give to the rising freshman class on 
May 15, 1957. She also passed out invitations for the 
girls to join the F.H.A. 

Mary Ann's talk included a summary of the activities 
of the chapter since she had become a member with 
comments on how the chapter projects had helped in 



the homes, the schools, and community; and how in 7/|//|/l/|/)/| f 

turn the individual member herself had grown and 
developed from her participation in the programs, 
projects, and other activities sponsored by the chapter. 



A Chapter Newsletter 

A Newsletter was used in the Enka Chapter to bring 
its members up to date on happenings and plans. This 
way of informing members might help in many chap- 
ters, especially large chapters. 

A copy of Enka's Newsletter: 

Everyone has been so busy we thought a newsletter 
would help to bring our members up to date. 

1. Our next event will be a wiener roast at Rhodo- 
dendron Park, May 7 from 3:30-7:30 p.m. The cost 
will be $1.00 per couple or 50c per person. You can 
pay Eva Ann, Dot Williams, Patsy Massie, Mrs. Kinser 
or Mrs. Williams. The deadline for paying is Friday, 
May 3. All members are urged to bring dates or a 
friend. 

2. May 3. Our next meeting will be devoted to 
election of officers. Nominations have been made and 
are: President: Carolyn Crawford; Vice-President: 
Geraldine Hubbs; Secretary: Carolyn Roberts; Treas- 
urer: Margaret Kirby; Historian: Betty Lou Crowder; 
Parliamentarian: Marilyn Plott; Reporter: Pat Mauney; 
Chaplain: Elaine Ballinger; Song Leader: open. We 
will have nominations from the floor and voting will 
be by secret ballot. 

3. May 17. The last meeting will be installation 
of officers for 1957-58. 

4. Are you interested in going to Camp White 
Lake from June 3-7? Enka has an allotment of ten. 
The cost is $10.50. Cost of transportation is not defi- 
nite. See Mrs. Williams if you are interested. 



Old and Precious Memories — For Our Members 
in Enka Chapter 

Sixteen F.H.A. girls, Mrs. Crowell, Mrs. Orr, and 
Mrs. Williams went to Raleigh March 29 and 30 for 
the State F.H.A. Convention. We stopped at W.C. 
Salem, Wake Forest, Duke, St. Mary's and State 
College. 

In Raleigh, Dot. W., Eva Orr, Wanda C, and Caro- 
lyn R. received their State Degree, the highest honor 
an F.H.A. 'er can get. Carolyn Crawford is the new 
County F.H.A. Secretary. Congratulations, Carolyn! 

F.H.A. week events: Sunday — a group went to our 
President's Church for 1 1 :00 services. Monday — Devo- 
tionals over the P. A. system, a tea from 2:30-3:00 in 
the Homemaking Dept. for all club presidents. A Coffee 
Hour was held from 3:00-4:00 for the faculty. Tuesday 
— Our club president wrote a letter to all eighth grade 
girls which she delivered in person. We also had 
"clean-up" and "No Gripe" day. 

Our Mother-Daughter Banquet was very successful. 
Sixty mothers and daughters attended. Entertainment 
was an original skit, "This Is Your Life" by some of 
our members. The Charleston stole the show. 

The Adult Class has been going on for 3 weeks in 
the Homemaking Dept. Have you asked your mother 
or neighbor to attend? 



DOES IT NEED TO BE RIDICULOUS? 

Are there not times when the ridiculous costumes 
and the silly behavior which we see on parade during 
the initiation of new members in many chapters become 
just a little embarrassing? Even to some of our public 
this may prove to be the only interpretation of our 
organization. 

The largest chapter in North Carolina, the Ruther- 
fordton-Spindale Chapter, deserves commendation on 
the manner in which new members are inducted in the 
organization. The initiation program is described here: 

Each new member is assigned to an older member, 
who becomes the "big sister." The "big sister" helps 
the new member with her responsibilities. A check 
sheet is prepared for the new member to use. The check 
sheets are turned in at the end of twelve days and filed 
for future reference. A copy of this check sheet is 
printed here so that you may see. You may decide for 
yourself the value of this type of initiation as con- 
trasted to the supposedly comical one. 



F.H.A. INITIATION DAY'S 

Please check 12 of the following items and turn this 
check sheet in to your F.H.A. sister on Nov. 21. 
I,. , did these: 

1.... Learned F.H.A. creed and repeated it to my 

F.H.A. sister. 

2 ...Learned purposes and motto of F.H.A. and 

repeated them to F.H.A. 

3 Did something special for my F.H.A. sister. 

4 Wore red and white for initiation service Thurs- 
day at Act. Pd. before the student body. 

5 Reported to the assigned teacher and did at 

least one good deed. 
SUGGESTIONS: Wash blackboards. Clean out 
desks. Fix bulletin board. Dust bookshelves. 

6 Cleaned out my locker. 

7 Was courteous at school and home. 

8 Sold at least two boxes of Christmas Cards. 

9 .Wore a smile for everyone I met. 

10 Attended F.H.A. Coke Party. 

11 Attended District Rally at Central. 

12 ..Did 2 of the following activities at home to 

relieve Mother's dutys. 

13 Cleaned room Ironed.... Washed 

windows Arranged room 

Dusted the furniture Cooked a meal..... 

Vacuumed or swept floors. 

14 Plan to work toward the Junior Homemakers 

Degree this year. 

15 Publicized F.H.A. by telling others about it. 

Continued on inside back cover 



Creativity- Unlimited 

Among our Chapter Members 



SYMBOLS OF F.H.A.— FROM AN F.H.A.'ERS POINT 
OF VIEW 

Written by Linda Rouse of the Southwood Chapter as she worked 
toward earning her Chapter Degree. 

Our emblem is a very treasured part of our F.H.A. 
It shows that tomorrow's homes are in the hands of the youth of today. 
"Toward New Horizons," our motto, is inscribed on its lower half; 
A home in the center is held by two hands which will toil the future 

path. 
On the upper plane of the emblem we find our name so dear — 
"Future Homemakers of America" so proud we are to hear! 
Red and White we chose — our distinguished colors; 
We liked these above all others. 

They are symbolic of youth which is bound to succeed, 
For youth has the courage and determination which successes need. 
Innocence and purity, two wonderful traits, 
Help to make this color combination one that really rates. 
The red rose is the flower of the F.H.A. 
It grows everywhere in the U.S.A. 
Our rose is a symbol of vibrant, glowing health, 
And this, you know, is our richest blessing of wealth. 
The health of our members makes home a happier place, 
And improves home efficiency at a very rapid pace. 
Yes, our emblem, colors, and flower — 
We're proud of each of these, 
And our members — each and every one — 
We hope that they will please. 



God's Creed for F.H.A.'ers 

To build homes in the future that will never be broken or suffer decay, 
We as Future Homemakers of America with determination must begin 

today! 
The foundation which is essential in building hath by God already 

been laid; 
In Him, Christ the Lord, we as Future Homemakers of America shall 

be staid. 

Time cannot destroy God's wonderful promises which are from above, 
Which are to bless, enrich, and care for us — the recipients of his 

love. 
So let us face the future confidently by trusting Him today; 
He who is our great strength, everlasting guide, and present stay! 

By: Jean Jackson 

State Song Leader 



A Unique Way to Present The 
Year's Program 

The Elise Chapter of the Future 
Homemakers of America held their 
first meeting on September 4, 1957. 
To present the program of work 
for the year as drawn up by the 
executive council to the members 
and others, members of the council 
wrote the following rhymes and 
adopted the costumes for each 
month of the school year: 

September is here, we welcome you 

all. 
Come and look into our crystal ball. 
(Fortune teller carrying a fish bowl.) 

In October we think of frolics and 
fun; 

But we really think you are the 
lucky one, 

To see our program without a flaw, 

Based on procedures of Parlia- 
mentary Law. 

(Skirt and blouse of newspaper and 
carrying a gavel.) 

In November we give thanks to 

God above, 
For all we have and those we love, 
And also we would welcome B. J., 
To speak to us on dating today. 
(Pilgrim lady) 

Now that Christmas time has come, 
We will surely have some fun, 
With our jolly recreation, 
And program on Christmas decora- 
tions. 
(Red evening gown) 

As January rolls around, 
And new resolutions we have found. 
A program of becoming hair styles, 
Will certainly leave us all in smiles. 
(Old Father Time carrying an hour 
glass.) 

In February our Mother-Daughter 
Dinner 

Will surely be a winner. 
And a talk on nursing careers 
Will help in the future years. 
(Nurse uniform) 

The officers blow in with the March 
wind, 

(Continued on page eight) 



NATIONAL CONVENTION 

(Continued from page two) 
girls. She took the right train and 
we missed it. 

We arrived in Lafayette, Indiana, 
Sunday and took a taxi to Purdue 
Union. We all piled into one taxi, 
suitcase and all (step in). We ex- 
plored (look) every corner and 
crack on the Union Building which 
was our convention headquarters for 
the week. Then we unpacked (un- 
pack) and ironed (iron) some of 
our most wrinkled clothes. Monday, 
most of the girls were beginning to 
arrive. We met loads of friends, 
(shake hands) 

I had plenty of writing (write) to 
do since I was recorder for my group 
— "Teen-Agers Code for Family 
Living." 

Monday night, Nancy Rosenthal 
presided over the general session 
which I must say was done expertly, 
(clap) After the session we had a 
get acquainted social in the ball- 
room. We sang songs and played 
games. (All sing "The More We Get 
Together.") 

Some of the meetings we had 
while there were "Teenagers' Prob- 
lems" which was of special interest 
to each of us. Dr. Christenser's talk 
and panel on this was indeed helpful. 
There was another panel headed by 
Mrs. Coleman on "Citizens Have 
Responsibilities." Perhaps the most 
interesting thing presented was 
"Rainbow Round the World" (cir- 
cle) in which 17 states participated. 
Interesting reports on "Highways to 
Better Living" were given at the 
last general session. 

As we toured the famous Purdue 
Campus, we talked, sang, and be- 
came better acquainted. "By, By 
Love" was the favorite that week. 
(Song by group here — appropriate 
"The More We Get Together" may 
be sung. ) 

Friday found us boarding (step 
in ) the train for home. None of us 
wanted to leave. Purdue had cap- 
tured our hearts, (cry) In Cinn. 
the relatives of the historian, Jane 
Brown, took us all out to supper 
between trains. We again spent the 
night on the train (sleeps) and boy, 
were we tired. We arrived in Ra- 
leigh Saturday where our parents 
met us. (hug) We were all tired 
but extremely happy. Those memo- 
ries will be always remembered. 




A "Demonstration on How to Pin- 
Curl" was the program for the September 
meeting of the Swansboro Chapter. The 

demonstration was given by the Swans- 
boro Beauty Shop Operator, who also 
gave pointers on hair styling. 

Election of officers for 1957-58 was 
the business of the meeting. 

A social period was included, at which 
time the sixty members who were pres- 
ent, enjoyed punch and cookies. 



Plans for activities were made for the 
Washington Chapter when the officers 
with the two advisers and two student 
teachers from ECC held a workshop im- 
mediately following the opening of school 
on September 16. The year's program 
of work was planned and committees set 
up. 

The girls decided that since they were 
to meet every second and fourth Tuesday 
in each month they would have one pro- 
gram and one business meeting a month, 
alternately. The programs which were 
planned seemed varied and quite inter- 
esting. Two money making projects 
which the girls decided upon were to 
sponsor the dance after the football 
game on October 25 and to sell dish 
cloths. 



Plans for activities in the Mills Chap- 
ter indicate a full but exciting year for 
its members. Participation in the District 
IV Rally in Roxboro on October 5 is of 
its first concern. With Jane Eagles, the 
1957-58 State Reporter, to help with 
ideas, which she brought back from the 
National meeting, the members were more 
than willing to help Jane and the District 
Planning Committee with the program 
for the Rally. A preview of the Pageant. 
"Rainbow Around the World," appeared 
on WUNC - TV on October 2. 

Other plans of the Chapter included: 

1 . Preparing and serving refreshments 
at the September P.T.A. Meeting. 

2. Special projects of the Chapter — 
such as the magazine campaign for in- 
creasing the treasury. 

3. Chapel Program on "Initiation 
Day." Devotion was a reading "This 
Land and Our Flag" with the American 
Flag waving in the background. Dances, 
relays, a fashion show, and kicking foot- 
balls were some of the activities for the 
initiation part of the program. 



The Beaufort Chapter under Adviser 
Mrs. David Beveridge. will sponsor again 
this year the dances after the football 
games. October 4. following the "big" 
game, will be their first dance. 

The F.H.A. members will also act as 
waitresses for an Eastern Star luncheon 
sponsored by the Wesleyan Service Guild 
in the Methodist Church building Sep- 
tember 14. 



YEAR'S PROGRAM 

(Continued from page seven) 

And delegates to the State Conven- 
tion we send 

We serve to the Educo a supper so 
fine, 

Which we may read about in "Teen 
Time." 

(Delegate dressed to go to the Con- 
vention.) 

In April to show others of our work, 
So no doubts can possibly lurk, 
We must have an effective plan, 
To help our FHA expand. 
(White dress and red accessories.) 

As School comes to an end in May, 
It is both a sad and joyful day, 
But first we would certainly like to 

mention. 
Our report on the State Convention. 
(Bathing suit) 

Now that you have seen our skit 
We will let you rest a bit; 
And just in case you are concerned. 
The meeting is now adjourned. 

On Friday, September 6, 1957, 
at 6:30, at the High School, Home 
Economics Department, the council 
entertained their Chapter Mothers 
and the Advisers of the Adult Class 
with a buffet Supper. 



COLOR SLIDES 

(Continued from page four) 

formals that she and mother have 
made for the Junior-Senior banquet. 
As they observe the finished prod- 
uct, Ramona dreams of attending 
her first prom. 

(14) The Pike children are learn- 
ing at an early age that life holds its 
responsibilities. One of Ramona's 
duties is to take care of Henry the 
bird. She cares for him daily and 
cleans his cage and perches as 
needed. 

(15) Shiny floors are a must for 
Cobina. One of her household 
chores is to buff the floors. I bet you 
can't guess who waters the plants! 
Yes, that job belongs to Riley. 

(16) Ramona and Cobina share 
their bedroom and they take pride 
in keeping it neat and clean. They 
even share in the bed making and 
are quite pleased with their roll- 
apart beds which help conserve 
space in a normal sized room. 

(17) Mr. Pike's Saturday after- 
noon job is mowing the lawn and 
Mrs. Pike works to keep the weeds 
away from her flowers and shrub- 



8 



bery. Young Riley is content just 
to play with his tractor. 

Indeed, the Pike family appears 
to be an industrious one. Can it be 
that they strive to make this home 
happy by family work, family play, 
and family worship? 



Joint planning and working with 
the Future Farmers of America re- 
sulted in increased interest and en- 
thusiam among members of the 
Fuquay Springs Future Homemakers 
as they prepared for the big event — 
a Valentine Dance. The slides show 
the following: 

(1) A committee making overall 
plans. 

(2) Boys and girls cleaning and 
decorating. 

(3) Girls preparing the refresh- 
ments. 



"Families Together" — was the 
project which the Jones Central 

Chapter chose to emphasize and the 
slides this chapter made deal with 
four phases of family living — work- 
ing, worshipping, planning, and 
playing together. A warm, glowing 
atmosphere of happiness is evi- 
denced by the expression of joy and 
satisfaction on the faces of those 
in the pictures. Planning for beauti- 
fying the homes, working together 
to carry out plans, wholesome family 
recreation, and family worship are 
clearly illustrated in the slides. 



The Wilton Chapter in Granville 
County. 

The slides prepared by the 



Wilton Chapter tell two stories. One 
is of the community beautification 
project — painting mailboxes in the 
community. The second story is 
about the "Patient in Bed" project 
which developed from a unit in 
Health and Home Safety. The slides 
illustrate how to make a patient 
comfortable with proper back rests, 
knee supports, supports to keep the 
weight of the cover off the patient's 
feet, and other improvised articles 
for certain conditions of a patient. 
One slide shows an attractive and 
nutritious meal being served to the 
patient. 

LATTIMORE F.H.A. 
EXECUTIVE COUNCIL— 
A BUSY GROUP 

1957-58 promises to be a good 
year for the Lattimore Chapter, for 
the officers have been busy making 
plans for the year. We were very 
fortunate in having Miss Louise 
Swann, District Home Economics 
Supervisor, and Mrs. Mary Smith, 
former District F.H.A. Adviser, 
visit us and work with us, principally 
on degrees. Following the detailed 
work on degrees we discussed 
F.H.A. in general and were given 
some very helpful suggestions on 
membership drives, programs, initia- 
tion, and other chapter problems. 
After a half day of general dis- 
cussion and exchange of ideas we 
decided that we must do some 
follow-up work and make some 
more definite plans. Mrs. Harris, 
our adviser, suggested that we might 
like a day or two at her mountain 



cabin at Lake Lure where we could 
work out more detailed plans for 
the year's work. We packed her 
car with food, clothes, cameras, and 
film and headed for the mountains. 
Needless to say, we spent some time 
swimming, eating, picture making, 
and all that goes with a mountain 
holiday. At the same time, we 
centered our thoughts on our plans 
for the year and came away with 
renewed interest and enthusiasm for 
our chapter. We were very grateful 
to Mrs. Harris for sharing her vaca- 
tion with us and for the encourage- 
ment given us in our plans for the 
year. 

SPENCER F.H.A. CHAPTER 
CIVIC COMMITTEE REPORT 

A new year brings to every F.H.A. 
Chapter new members, new inter- 
ests, and new activities. 

Before we even had time to settle 
into a regular routine our Civic 
Committee was called upon to help 
with the annual Alumni Banquet. 

Eight of our many faithful mem- 
bers met in the school cafeteria to 
set tables to seat 175 persons. 



Certificates of Award for Junior 
and chapter degrees may be ordered 
from Edwards & Broughton Co., 
North Boulevard, Raleigh, N. C. 
The prices of the certificates are: 
25c each or 6 for $2.00; 12 for 
$3.75; 25 for $7.25. Overprinting of 
names, in one line, can be done by 
the same firm for $1.00. 



INITIATION DAY'S 

Continued from page six 

16 ...Let Mother and Dad have a night off while I 

stayed at home. 

17 Know officers of local offices. 

18 Understand parliamentary procedure used in 

meetings. 

19 Plan to attend all meetings. 

20 ....Am serving on some committee. 

(Name It— ) 

21 Desire to serve on a committee. 

(Check selection or name another) 

Program Serving 

Hostess Social 

— Reception Public Relations 

Board Bulletin Food or Menu 

22.... Did something special for my brother or sister. 

23.* Did my assignment on special duty. 

* Everyone is urged to do this one. 



A schedule was prepared helping each new member 
and her big sister to know what day and what time 
during the day the various jobs would be performed. 

At end of the initiation days a formal initiation serv- 
ice (the one found in the Official Guide) is presented 
before the student body. 



The Spencer Chapter welcomed its 56 new members 
into the organization in a commendable way, also. It 
was an all-day initiation, ending with a reception in the 
Home Economics Department. 

The new members wore red and white and a red rose 
during the day. Some of the requirements during the 
day were carrying books for the sophomores, bowing 
to them, saying the F.H.A. Creed, singing the F.H.A. 
song, and refusal to talk to boys. 

The reception, which climaxed the day, was in honor 
of the new members, the chapter parents, the school 
faculty, school board members, and local ministers. 
New members wore party dresses. Officers wore eve- 
ning gowns. 



Future Homemakers of America 



CREED 

We are the Future Homemakers of America 

We face the future with warm courage, 

And high hope, 

For we have the clear consciousness of seeking 

Old and precious values. 



For we are the builders of homes, 

Homes for America's future. 

Homes where living will be the 

That is good and fair. 

Homes where truth and love and security and faith 

Will be realities, not dreams. 




expression of everything 



The homes of tomorrow are in 

the hands of the youth 

of today" 



We are the Future Homemakers of America. 
We face the future with warm courage, 
And high hope. 



I 




CAROLINE SAYS: 

News Is Needed: 

This magazine. The N. C. Future Homemakers 
Magazine, needs news items. Teen Times, your na- 
tional magazine, needs news items. Stories with pic- 
tures — stories which may help another Chapter group 
or member get an idea that will grow into original ideas 
for chapter activities. Original poems and stories are 
needed. A home project of FHA members makes a 
good story. 

Please refer to your September, 1956, Teen Times 
for the article "What's News and How to Write It"; 
and refer to the November, 1956, Teen Times for these 
human interest stories — The Dessert of Writing and It's 
a Snap. 

The New Chapter Handbook: (It is hoped this book- 
let will be off the press in late October. Orders are now 
being accepted.) Chapters may purchase copies at 65 
cents. 

Sing With FHA (Developed by National Recreation 
Committee.) Now available at 20 cents per copy. 

FHA In Focus (Revised 1957) This new illustrated 
brochure should be available some time in October — 
3 cents per copy. 

(The order form in September 1957 Teen Times 
may be used to order the above and other FHA publi- 
cations.) 



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North Carolina Association 



VOLUME XV 



DECEMBER 1957 



NUMBER 2 



WMTED! 

News Items . . . About You or Your Chapter 



What do you enjoy reading in this North Carolina 
Future Homemakers magazine? What you enjoy 
reading about other Future Homemakers and their ex- 
periences, they will no doubt enjoy reading about you 
and your experience. Why don't you send to your State 
Adviser some stories about what you or other members 
of your chapter have accomplished in improving home 
and family living? Home, school, and community im- 
provement projects will be of interest to fellow members 
also. Though your contributions may seem small, your 
story may influence many members to work toward 
achieving a similar goal with success. 

Perhaps Future Homemakers would enjoy reading 
about: 



1. How you planned for and observed a special 
day in your home. 

2. How you applied at home some special skill 
you acquired through your home economics 
training. 

3. How you improved your relationships with 
other people. 

4. How you improved the house in which you live. 

This list could go on and on. But hope you have an 
idea and that News Stories will be coming to the State 
office soon. Pictures which help tell your story are 
needed also. 



North Carolina Association of Future Homemakers of America 



State Officers 
1957-58 

President — Becky Hayes, Harris VIII 
Vice-President — Becky Nifong, North Davidson VII 
Secretary — Barbara Ellis, North Mecklenburg VI 
Treasurer — Patsy Hunt, Bartlett, Yancey V 
Reporter — Jane Eagles, Mills, Louisburg IV 
Parliamentarian — Betty Jo Lowdermilk, Southern 

Pines III 
Historian — Jane Barrow, Lucama II 
Song Leader — Jean Jackson, West Edgecombe I 



District Advisers 
1957-58 

Sadie Frances — Washington I 

Mrs. Geraldine Beveridge, Beaufort II 

Mrs. Sarah G. Sheaffer, Stedman III 

Mrs. Robinette Husketh, Wilton, Franklinton, Rt. 1 IV 

Mrs. Glenna Lewis, E. M. Holt, Burlington, Rt. 1 V 

Mrs. Amelia Sheffield, Star VI 

Mrs. Nina Tharpe, East High, Ronda VII 

Betty Shealy, Cherryville VIII 



State Adviser 

Mrs. Faye T. Coleman 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 

Division of Vocational Education 
Raleigh, North Carolina 



JOYS AND SATISFACTION OF 



HOMEMAKING 



On October 4, a day before Dis- 
trict VII Rally, the Statesville 
Record and Landmark newspaper 
printed an excellent news story with 
many illustrative pictures on the 
Joys and Satisfaction of Homemak- 
ing. The Story was entitled, "A 
Timely Salute to Future Home- 
makers of America." The pictures 
illustrated the experiences of the 
Future Homemaker in her classroom 
and in her home performing activi- 
ties which should bring joy to a 
homemaker. 

Quoting from the news story are 
the paragraphs below: 

"A teen-age girl may go home 
from school next week and announce 
she will plan and help prepare meals 
for the family for a week. 

"This announcement may cause 
some curious and doubtful looks to 
be exchanged by her father and 
mother. But she will probably be 
serious. It may be she has selected 
that for her project. 

"Another teener may be working 
on a blouse, a pair of pajamas or 
even a dress as her project . . . 
another may be redecorating her 
room or making plans with her fam- 
ily for a larger project of renovating 
the kitchen or adding storage space. 
These activities are not unusual 
among a large group of girls who 
attend homemaking classes in Iredell 
County Schools and in Statesville 
City Schools. 

"These girls can earn special 
recognition in their homemaking 
work. There is a state homemaker's 
degree, chapter degree and junior 
degree all of which can be earned 
by developing outstanding leader- 
ship and in Future Homemakers 
work. 

"Chapters do outstanding work on 
the international, national, state, 
and local level. The girls work 
hard to send CARE packages to 
those more unfortunate than them- 
selves. They raise funds for and 
often assist with equipment for their 
Home Economics departments: do 
baby sitting for mothers attending 
preschool clinics and parent-teacher 
meetings. It usually falls to the 
girls in the homemaking classes to 




THEY COOK— Brenda McLelland, two, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William V. 
McLelland, a future homemaker, gets a few pointers on cooking from her aunt, 
Brenda McLelland, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. G. L. McLelland, Monticello Drive, 
who is a homemaking student at Scotts High School. Brenda is beginning her 
second year as a member of Future Homemakers Scotts Chapter. 



plan and prepare refreshments for 
groups meeting at the schools and 
they usually do waitress duty for 
school dinners and banquets. 

"The interest stimulated in these 
teen-age girls through their home- 
making classes and their Future 
Homemaker work is probably of 
more value to community develop- 
ment and to the homes of the future 
than any other one phase of the 
high school program." 

"Child Care is one of the most 
important and most interesting proj- 
ects in the homemaking courses in 
the Buncombe County schools," as 
stated in the Asheville Citizen Times 
Newspaper. This year the second 



year homemaking students have 
young visitors (3-5 years of age) 
come to the school three consecutive 
days, remaining all day, with the 
different classes playing with them, 
preparing their fruit juice snack in 
mid-morning, settling them for 
naps, serving nutritionally-balanced 
lunches at noon, and otherwise 
"playing mother." The children en- 
joy this maturing away-from-home 
experience and many have been 
looking forward to their trips to 
school for several weeks. (One little 
girl explained to her mother, "I'll be 
gone all day, so you be sure to mop 
and dust and make the beds and do 
the dishes, even if I'm not here.") 



What America Means to Me . . . 



Let us look at a young man just 
getting off a large ocean liner in the 
busy port of New York. He is be- 
wildered and friendless. What can 
he do and where can he go? 

He has heard and read about this 
great country with its streets paved 
with gold and fortunes waiting to be 
claimed. To his eager eyes the port 
looks like any other he has seen, but 
deep in his heart he knows that there 
is a difference, a great difference. 

Here, free from the dictator- 
ship, desolation of communism, 
from the ruins of Germany, the lonli- 
ness of displaced persons camps, or 
the bleakness of little countries 
devastated by war, he can start 
anew, be accepted for what he is, 
not for what he has been; and he 
can live the life of a free man. He 
has the same opportunities as the 
next person for bettering his posi- 
tion, and he can worship as he 
pleases. Here he will make life long 
friends out of total strangers, try for 
a higher education and finally be 
free from the constant fear which 




Reading from left to right: Velio Kuuskruu, Jr., Cherryville High School (who 
has been in this country eight years). Foreign exchange students Ann Duthion 
and Lutz Rodenhoff who took part in skit, "Around the World," during District 
Vni Rally Program. 



plagues his fellow countrymen over- 
seas. Here he can finally find peace 
of mind. Who is this young man? 



He may be anyone of the hun- 
dreds of thousands of refugees 

(Continued on page 6) 




Say, FHA'ers, 

HAVE ¥011 HEARD... 



about the 1957-58 National Projects Survey'.' We have 
eight chapters in North Carolina taking part in this 
survey. These eight chapters will fill out questionnaires 
concerning the national project, Teen-age Consumer. 
These questionnaires will be concerning: Hobbies, 
Recreation and Movies, Dates, Parties and Other Social 
Activities since the entertainment phase of the Teen-age 
Consumer Project is being stressed. On returning these 
questionnaires to me, I will compile a report for North 
Carolina. This report will be sent to Mary Esther 
Goldchien, National Vice-President of Projects. From 
our report and from the reports sent in by the other 
National Projects Committee members, Mary Esther 
will compile a report that will be given at the 1958 
National FHA Meeting. 

The objectives of this survey are to increase interest 
in the Teen-age Consumer Project and to make teen- 



agers aware of their spending in the area of entertain- 
ment and the influence it has on the family. 

A tip of the hat to those chapters that are participating 
in the National Projects Survey! 

By Jane Barrow, 

Member National Projects Committee 




My Week at F. H. A. Camp 



This year I was elected Vice- 
President of the Lee Woodard High 
School FHA. I was glad to get to 
go to camp because 1 knew that it 
would help me out a lot in my duties. 
When I started my study for plan- 
ning our yearbook I took all the 
notes I could. I knew that they 
would also help me. During our 
week at camp 1 had lots of time to 
dance, play ping-pong, and other 
games. We nad wonderful meals 
while we were at camp. 

When it was time to come home, 
I hated to leave. Our wonderful 
week was behind us, so we had to 
say good-by to all our new friends. 

Then back at school I studied 
over the information I had gained. 
It was a "life saver." Mrs.Yelverton 
and the girls agreed they had saved 
us a lot of thinking. We used most 
of the programs that were suggested 
at camp. We have already had three 



of our programs and they turned out 
nicely. 

I was proud of my week because 
along with having a good time I 
knew I had learned a lot and I 
would be a better FHA member. 

I know I will be a better officer 
and will do a better job working on 
my chapter degree. 

by "Tookie" Minshew 



An example of the value of 
leadership training at camp is illus- 
trated in a letter from Mrs. Ialeen S. 
Mode, Franklinton, North Carolina. 

"We did enjoy the camp program 
at White Lake so much. I am en- 
closing a few notes taken on Degrees 
by Emily B. Pearson on Wednesday, 
June 5." 

1. Have an August workshop to 
plan program and degrees for year. 

2. In September have a degree 
program appoint a degree com- 
mittee. 



3. In January have a meeting to 
check progress. 

4. Award degrees at banquet or 
other special occasion. 

5. Use the program of work to 
plan the projects and programs. 

Group meetings notes on program 
planning. 

1. Have parliamentary procedure 
demonstrated by boys group. 

2. Film strip on parliamentary 
procedure. 

3. Have a preacher who has been 
abroad to speak. 

4. Country customs, dress, and 
prepare native dishes at a meeting. 

5. Fashion show by freshman. 

6. A day at camp skit. 

7. Installation of officers. 

8. Progress of degrees program. 

9. Pre-election duties of officers. 

10. Initiation of new members. 



SUNDAY EVENING VESPER 
SERVICE 

Jones Central Future Homemakers 

Perhaps your Chapter could be 
responsible for a Vesper Service in 
your community churches occasion- 
ally, too. 

As a part of the Service in which 
the Jones Central FHAers partici- 
pated, a speech "What FHA Means 
to Me" was given by Sue Carol 
Boyette, a member. The opening 
paragraph of Sue Carol's speech be- 
gan like this: 

"Hello, mothers, fathers, teachers, 
and friends. We are very happy to 
see you out this Sunday evening. Each 
and everyone of us would like to say 
that we hope this FHA Vesper Serv- 
ice will be an inspiration in your 
life. I would like to speak for just 
a few minutes on "What FHA 
Means to Me." — 

Then near the close of Sue Carol's 
speech she said this: 

"I can say from the very bottom 
of my heart FHA has been an in- 
spiration in my life. This is my last 
year of high school, next year 1 hope 
to continue my education in Home 
Economics. I hope if I ever reach 
the goal and graduate I will be an 
adviser who is as wonderful and en- 
couraging to my students as my ad- 
viser has been to me and all the rest 
of the girls." 



A Future Homemaker and Her 

Cftrtsrtma* 

A Future Homemaker spends Christmas 

In a self forgetting way. 

She keeps herself busy, 

Helping others have a happy day. 

She bakes cookies for the children, 
To less fortunate ones, she takes toys. 
She helps make her own self happy, 
By helping girls and boys. 

To the aged she pays a visit. 

And when the notes of the last carols fall. 

She marvels at her happiness, 

For she is the happiest of all. 

By Nancy Harmon 

(Nancy is the president of the Harris Chapter of Future Home- 
makers of America. You will recall that our 1957-58 State 
President, Becky Hayes, is also from the Harris Chapter.) 



6(j^^(^W(^^^ ta . . . 



OUR ST7 
THE M/ 



The dream of our pioneers is 
being realized today. As evidenced 
by our programs, we have grown 
from the mechanical memory work 
of the earlier years in our organiza- 
tion to the accomplishments in 
homemaking which make our or- 
ganization a unique one and which 
demonstrates the joys and satisfac- 
tions possible in the life of the 
homemakers. 

The scope of our program is 
broad, extending far beyond the 
walls of the individual homemaker's 
home; a successful homemaker is 
concerned with the welfare and hap- 
piness of her next door neighbor, 
the progress of the educational sys- 
tem in her community, the growth 
of the church, and the spiritual pro- 
motion of high moral values among 
the people in her community. From 
her own community, the homemaker 
now looks to other communities, 
even to communities in other lands 
and to the home life in these com- 
munities abroad. 

"Understanding our Neighbor 
Abroad," was a goal which received 
a great deal of emphasis in all eight 
District Rallies which were held 
during the month of October, 1957. 
A pageant, "Rainbow Around the 
World," was presented at several of 
the District Rallies. The pageant 
was an adaptation of one which was 
presented at the National Meeting 
held at Purdue University, Lafayette, 
Indiana. The Future Homemakers 
in each district decided that this was 
a good opportunity to dramatize 
phases of living habits and to inter- 




District I FHA Rally, October 26, 1957, Austin Auditorium on the campus of 
East Carolina College, Greenville, North Carolina. "Roll call of counties." 



pret some of the customs in various 
lands. Exchange students and for- 
eign born students were on the 
program in several districts. 



The main business of the day at 
each Rally was the election of the 
state officer to serve for 1957-58. 
One officer included in the invita- 
tion newsletter to the District Rally 
a letter to officer candidates, which 
is printed here as a possible source 
of help for electing qualified officers 
in Federations and Chapters, as well 
as in districts. 

"Hi" Candidates! 

You certainly are to be compli- 
mented and admired for submitting 
your services to the North Carolina 
Future Homemakers. You must 
have realized that there will be work 
involved, but, oh, so much fun, too! 
The people you will be associating 
with will be among the "choice" 
girls from North Carolina. 

Have you read the preceding 
sheets — especially the regulations 




District I FHA Rally, October 26, 1957, Austin Auditorium on the campus of East 
Carolina College, Greenville, North Carolina. "Rose Ceremony" or "Youth Looks 
Ahead." Shown here are students from West Edgecombe High School who are 
portraying the various directions a high school graduate, symbolized by the rose 
bud, may take. The directions are nursing, secretarial work, dietitian, and teacher. 
Later, the homemaker comes out and she is symbolized by a full blown rose. The 
script of this portion was written by West Edgecombe, as was the roots and stem. 
Greenville High School students wrote and presented the portion concerning the 
leaves and thorns which represented the school, church, homemaking classes, 
outside influences and hardships in life. 



which govern the election of the 
state officer? Be sure that you fit 
into the requirements. 

Would you like to know what 




Rhoda Blanton doing Chinese dance, 



FFICERS AND OUR DISTRICT ADVISERS AND TO ALL 
PARTICIPANTS IN THE EIGHTH RALLY PROGRAM 



* a ■ | 

Man Hn 1 


H= D 1 

*^! In! — I ""WMi 


m 2 ( '^3 j 







Davidson County Chapters, District VII Rally. Pageant: Understanding Our Neigh- 
bors Abroad. 



kind of campaign skits girls from 
all over North Carolina seem to feel 
are more effective? From hearing 
comments around, the girls seem to 




agree that the skits which have a 
direct relationship with the duties 
of the office (Treasurer) make them 
"think" more. 

Some suggestions for a skit might 
be as follows: 

Personify some part of the treas- 
urer's job (piggy bank and money) 
and let them talk about you, but 
don't let your pig and money do all 
the talking. We especially want to 
hear from you! 

You have plenty of rope for the 
campaigns, but there must be some 
set rules: 

1. No favors advertising candi- 
dates will be given out. 

2. A time limit of four minutes 
of each candidate. There will be 
someone to call time if you run too 
far over the four minutes. 

If there are any questions, please 
feel free to write me. 

The best of luck to you! 
Sincerely, 
Jane Eagles 
President, District 
State Reporter 
Louisburg, N. C. 



IV 



"AS WE SAW IT" 

This part of the District I Rally 
Program was in the form of a TV 
program on newsreel showing what 



happened during the day as well as 
some unusual reactions of the FHA 
members who had come from all 
corners and sections of District I. 
Those taking part in the program 
appeared to be veterans in the art 
of acting and impersonation. 

The Chapters presenting this 
original method of evaluating the 
Rally were the Belvoir, Falkland, 
and the Tarboro chapters. Included 
in this TV program were committee 
reports which were alive and enter- 
taining. 

DISTRICT III 

Ten Future Homemakers dressed 
to represent various countries gave 
the roll call of chapters by counties. 
A contribution was made by 
each county representative to the 
UNESCO fund which was located 
back of a World Globe on the stage. 

"Getting to Know You" was the 
topic used by five students of the 
Presbyterian Junior College, Max- 
ton, North Carolina. Each of the 
five students came from a different 
country. The countries represented 
were: Korea, Peru, El Ecuador, 
Venezuela, and Cuba. 



CHRISTMAS PROJECT 

Securing toys for children in hos- 
pitals for Christmas is a project of 
the Albemarle Chapter of Future 
Homemakers of America. 

Some of the activities of the Albe- 
marle Chapter during the Christmas 
Season include: 

1. Election of Reba Stamper to 
be "Miss Albemarle FHA" 
and ride in the Albemarle 
Christmas parade. 

2. A demonstration on lighting 
and decorations for Christmas 
by a representative of Duke 
Power Company. 



skit, "Around the World." (District VIII) 




"Rainbow Round the World," Wayne County Federation presented at District II 
Rally, Beaufort, October 5, 1957. 



There Must Be Many 
Interesting Stories . . . 



On the Day of a District Rally 
One Chapter Reports: 



"It was a cold and early Saturday 
morning at Boyden High School. 
Between shivers and snoozes we 
FHA'ers began to wonder if Anne 
Clifton was coming or not. The 
F.H.A. district rally was scheduled 
to begin at 10:30 sharp and the 
minutes were ticking away! One 
anxious girl called Anne and found 
that if she hadn't called, Anne would 
still have been sleeping. Anne ex- 
plained that she had scattered notes 
all over the house instructing her 
family to wake her. However, her 
family hadn't awakened to find the 
notes to awake her. (Huh?) 

After we arrived in Statesville, 
(Anne managed to drag herself out 
of bed and come along) everything 
seemed to be against us. Kay Good- 



man didn't feel well and was taken 
by Miss Hall to the home of Mr. 
and Mrs. Southall, who were very 
good friends of hers. They lived 
opposite the school. The lunches in 
Miss Hall's car were transferred to 
Katharine Dearborn's car. Katha- 
rine didn't know about this and later 
she, Kay, some other girls, and some 
poor souls' lunches went to town! 
These poor souls, namely Nancy 
Small and Chris Rankin, were 
wandering around wondering what 
happened to their lunches! Luckily, 
they wandered across the street to 
the Southalls' home and while they 
were looking into all the cars for 
their lunches, Miss Hall spotted 
them. After Miss Hall had ex- 
plained to them about the little trip 




their lunches had taken, Mrs. South- 
all, noticing the starved looks on 
their faces, offered them something 
to eat. 

Beth Smith, Boyden's exchange 
student, also had a wonderful time 
at the rally talking to Barbara Peter- 
son, Statesville's exchange student. 
Beth enjoyed the ride to Statesville, 
but exclaimed that Americans drive 
"so fast." 

After the rally, Miss Hall's car- 
load of girls was very shocked to 
find themselves parked in a parking 
lot near a car that was on fire! 

This indeed was a fitting end to 
the adventures of Boyden's FHA'ers 
in Statesville where "That rally 
became a riot!" 



Statesville High School Chapter Officers at information table — District VII Rally. 
Left to right: Diane Lunsford, Vice-President; Sandra Williams, Secretary; Dotty 
Plyler, President; and Linda Elfiott, Treasurer. 



WHAT AMERICA 

MEANS TO ME 

(Continued from page 2) 

who have come to this great 
land of opportunity and security. 
He has the same problems, whether 
they be large or small, as those 
of the other newly arrived ref- 
ugees, the same fears and the 
same opportunities. What does 
America mean to him? A land with 
more automobiles and telephones, 
more bathtubs and safety razors, 
public schools and medicine? No — 
America to him is a country where 
a person can be free to think, to 
speak, and to act, without barbed 
wire and machine guns; A place 
where he can be free from fear of 
non-existence tomorrow because the 
"honorable leader" has heard a 
rumor on him; where he can raise 
a family and attend church without 
opposition; where the government 
exists for him, not he for the govern- 
ment. America to him is the hope 
and faith in the future where men 
enjoy equality and freedom. It is 
up to us to keep his hopes alive. 

What does America mean to me? 
It is a land of opportunity where 
one can reach positions of trust, and 
the heights of honor by traveling on 
the road of work and the pathway 
of duty. Let us ask God to always 
keep it that way. 

How do I know these things? 
Well, you see, I came to America 
on a large ocean liner just eight 
years ago from a small displaced 
persons camp in Europe. 1 have 
found that this is what America has 
meant and will mean to me. 

Written by Velio Kuuskraa, Jr., 
Cherryville High School, and pre- 
sented by him in the skit "Around 
the World" at the District VIII 
Rally. 



Future Unlimited for the Girl 

Trained In Home Economics 



Voice (Off stage): All aboard! 
All aboard! Future Unlimited now 
loading for Mt. Success . . . Con- 
necting with Lake Ability, Port 
Energy, Skill Junction, Pleasant Val- 
ley and Happy Isle. Passengers 
board through special gate. First 
call: All aboard-d-d-d! 
train record up briefly, 
lights up on stage — "Information" 
is right and "News Butch" left, 
(booths would be clever or you can 
just have the characters by mike.) 
conductor comes to entrance of 
train platform. 

Voice (Off stage) : Hey! Wait a 
minute! This isn't a regular train. 
What's going on here? Information! 
Information! Check schedule! Re- 
port schedule! 

Information: This is Information! 
Your question, please? 

Voice: Future Unlimited! Is it 
clear? What is it? Is it regular? 

Information: Future Unlimited is 
a career special — all clear — leaves 
every spring, regularly, carrying pas- 
sengers from home economics edu- 
cation courses to Mt. Success. Stick 
around — get a cross section of pas- 
sengers. 

News Butch (Nasal monotone) : 
Cigars, candy, and cheezy wheeze. 
Special cases for college degrees. 
Protect your diploma from rain and 
snow. It's time to show the world 
what you know! 

I. clothing enters (well dressed, 
but carrying length of material). 
Checks ticket with conductor. 

Voice: Say, she's a beauty; but 
her dress is something new in the 
travel costume line. What's the extra 
material for? 

Information: She's decided on a 
career in clothing and textiles. And 
you, my dear sir, will have to adjust 
your perspective a bit. This isn't an 
ordinary train with regular travel- 
ers — this is a super special. Our 
passengers won't be wearing togs 
of travel but clothes from the ward- 
robe of CAREERS IN HOME 
ECONOMICS. Careers designed to 
improve home and family living in 
many fields. 

II. textiles boards the train (she 
is spotlighted). 

Voice: Well, she's checked her 
tickets and she's on her way. Now 
that happens? 



Information: Clothes and fashions 
could catch her. She may start as a 
saleswoman in a store, advance to 
stock or even buyer. She may pro- 
duce fashion shows, plan advertising 
layouts, become a personal shopper, 
promote educational fashion pro- 
grams, demonstrate patterns or spe- 
cific products in the garment field . . . 
Oh, any number of things can come 
her way! Or, if chemistry and physics 
were part of her college course, she 
may do textile research, testing, 
or work with detergents in relation 
to fabrics. Or she may use her 
knowledge of textiles working in the 
field of interior decoration, but, 
whatever the route, she'll find inter- 
esting, well paying work. She won't 
regret her college degree with a 
major in clothing and textiles. Good 
luck — lucky lady! 

Exit clothing. Train record up 
briefly. 

Voice: Hey! Is someone ill? Hurt? 
Convalescent? The "gal in white" is 
coming my way! 

Information: Don't get so jumpy! 
This passenger on the career special 
is headed for work in the field of 
nutrition. 

News Butch: Candy, chewing 
gum, little white pills, carrots, calo- 
ries, vitamins . . . for all ills. Bal- 
anced diets for the fat and the slim, 
all the knowhow for health, vigor, 
and vim. 

III. Nutrition boards train. 

Voice: Do I have to become a 
patient to get to know this fascinat- 
ing bit of femininity? 

Information: Well, you might find 
her in a hospital kitchen as a dieti- 
tian, or with a health department of 
a city, county or state. Maybe you'll 
find her in the consultation room of 
a large institution, planning diets for 
patients, or with a community health 
agency. Could be that she would do 
research in a laboratory . . . with a 
commercial foods company, her 
typewriter nearby so that she might 
write articles for others to read or 
perhaps you may find her demon- 
strating for a public service com- 
pany, how to use the latest gas or 
electric equipment. 

Voice: H'm . . . Would that I 
could read . . . Ah, Beautiful. 

Information: Get your mind on 



your business. The boss is looking. 
Nutrition enters train. 

Voice: All aboard! All aboard! 
Careers unlimited — Second call! 
Passengers board thru special gate. 
Enter food service — goes to con- 
ductor. 

News Butch: Candy, chewing 
gum, tomato and lettuce on rye, 
spaghetti, chocolate eclairs, or plain 
apple pie. 

Voice: Hey! I've missed my lunch! 
Where has the time gone? 

Information ( Disgusted ) : You 
haven't missed a meal! Look at your 
waistline! Just a suggestion of food 
and you're off for the nearest gravy 
train! 
Food service boards train. 

Information: You're simply being 
introduced to a future tea room, 
cafeteria or cafe manager. She knows 
public eating places use about one 
fourth of all the food eaten in the 
U.S.A. She likes to work with food, 
is healthy, energetic, and ready for 
lots of hard work. She has chosen 
public food service for her career. 
She has her college degree — plus 
experience gained by working during 
school vacations. She may even be 
employed by the department of food 
service for an airlines company, or 
railway or steamship . . . and see 
the world. Or, she may arrange, 
describe and photograph those de- 
licious connections we see in color 
magazines. 

Voice: If she can cook as good as 
she looks, maybe I could get the job 
of professional taster. I love all kinds 
of food . . . specially vanilla. 
Food service exits into train. 

Voice: All aboard! All aboard! 
Future Unlimited now loading. Pas- 
sengers board thru special gate . . . 
Hey! Here comes a happy Harriet! 
What's her line? 

Information: That's easy — a teach- 
er, of course. Look at that smile . . . 
and those adoring students. They 
were students in the high school 
where she did her student teaching 
last year before she graduated from 
college. They are eager to see her 
off to her first job. 

V. Teacher has entered and is 
checking ticket — talking with her 
students. 

Information: But such wonderful, 
surprising things — and such satis- 



faction at the close of each day. This 
girl has chosen a career that will offer 
many, many opportunities for serv- 
ice. The vocational homemaking 
teacher has the opportunity to be- 
come a leader in working with the 
families in her community. She 
would also sponsor a chapter of 
FHA and think what fun that would 
be. She's really standing tiptoe on 
the edge of a thrilling time for teach- 
ers. Education for homemaking is 
now basic education in any school. 
The demand for qualified teachers 
runs ahead of the supply every 
year. The age range of the student is 
wide; nursery school thru college, 
and even adult classes. The subject 
matter varies — food, clothing, de- 
signing, home management, budget- 
ing, recreation, home decorating and 
furnishing. Plan now to join other 
FHA members when they board 
Future Unlimited as homemaking 
teachers. 

Teacher enters train. Students wave 
goodbye and leave. 

Voice: Yeah! It makes me yearn 
for my youth. Teachers weren't 
quite like that when I went to 
school . . . All aboard! All aboard! 
Hold everything! Someone's late! 

VI. Home Economics journalism 
rushes on — goes to conductor. 

Information: She isn't late. She 
always travels that way! She's mak- 
ing a deadline for the newspaper, 
radio or TV. 

News Butch: Candy, cigars, chew- 
ing gum, microphones, carbon, 
close-ups, recorders, telephones. 
Journalism on train. 

Information: This is a glamour 
job! Or, so we are told by the public 
that watches. But, it takes hours and 
hours of trials, rehearsals, retakes 
and rewrites. It's home economics 
public relations, demonstrations, ad- 
vertising, broadcasting, televising, 
This girl has to move fast. In 
fact, she must be prepared to do 
at least three things at the same time: 
use her hands, her voice and her 
mind. Fascinating intriguing, spe- 
cial. She's a dramatic artist, a food 
expert and a walking encyclopedia 
on questions concerning the home 
and home equipment. For a home 
economics major in combination 
with speech and journalism courses 
— it's a marvelous career. The future 
is bright for the girl with that special 
talent. 

To do and to sell. To know and 
to tell. 
Journalism enters the train. 

Information: Let's don't forget 
that many other interesting oppor- 



tunities for employment are open 
to the trained home economist in all 
areas of living such as home demon- 
stration agents, family life specialists, 
child development and family coun- 
selors, and housing consultants. 

Voice: All aboard! All aboard — 
Last call. 

Wedding music. Bride and groom 
enter, followed by two couples in the 
wedding party throwing rice. Mother, 
father and little sister of bride fol- 
low and stand waving farewell. 

News Butch: 

VII. Bride and Groom Board 
Train. 

Information: Here's the grandest 
career of all . . . homemaker. The 
career which combines all the knowl- 
edge acquired for the rest of the 
list. This is the career which every 
girl wants sooner or later. Their 
high school, college or university 
home economics training will not be 
wasted. She'll be sort of home eco- 
nomics jack-of-all trades: home- 
maker, companion, educator, psy- 
chologist, nurse, housekeeper, cook, 
recreation specialist, community 
leader, general manager, nutritionist. 
She'll measure her success on the 
job not by a pay check, but by the 
health and happiness of each indi- 
vidual in her family. Look how she 
glances lovingly at her mother and 
father and little sister . . . and they 
at her. She's learned at home what 
a happy family life can mean — she's 
prepared for a wonderful journey 
as a parent and leader in her com- 
munity of Future Unlimited. 
Bride and groom are joined by 
others who have entered train pre- 
viously. All wave farewell as train 
record comes up. Lights begin to 
dim on stage until just a spot on 
train remains. 

News Butch: Cigars, candy, ideas 
for you, too — Get wise, all you gals 
begin now to see what you, too, can 
do! 

Information: Go to your nearest 
travel agency directed by your own 
FHA advisor — write or visit your 
nearest college for literature on these 
and many, many wonderful oppor- 
tunities for service and profitable 
employment. Invite a college home 
economics major to talk at your 
next meeting. Begin now to plan as 
freshmen, sophomores, juniors, and 
seniors — for your trip on Future Un- 
limited thru Careers in Home Eco- 
nomics. 

This skit was given at the 1954 
Oklahoma State FHA. It was written 
by Mary Gray Thompson and ap- 
peared in Teen Times magazine, 
April, 1955. 



Hapter (fraffm 



The Beaufort FHA'ers and their Ad- 
viser, Mrs. Geraldine Beveridge felt a 
deep sense of satisfaction over the success 
of District II Rally, which was held at the 
Beaufort High School. Mrs. Beveridge 
was the District II Adviser. Serving as 
district adviser and as adviser of the 
hostess chapter meant assuming a tre- 
mendous responsibility. 

Twenty-eight new members were in- 
stalled in the Beaufort Chapter during an 
impressive candlelight ceremony. 

A Future Homemakers Chapter has 
been organized in the Guilford High 
School this year with twenty-three affili- 
ated members. Quoting Pat Ward, Guil- 
ford Chapter Reporter: 

"Though we are small in number, we 
hope to accomplish much before the year 
is over. We've already started on our 
degree work. We are planning to buy a 
mixmaster, pots and pans for our chapter 
project and individual girls are planning a 
home project. For our school project we 
are helping to raise money to plant grass 
and shrubbery around the school. We are 
planning to make a visit to the Order of 
the Eastern Star Home, and put on a 
program and carry fruit and flowers as a 
community project. 

"In our F.H.A. we have been studying 
about being an all around person. We 
have learned that personality is every- 
thing about you that makes you an in- 
dividual, that character is a collection 
of character in a collection of char- 
acteristics and attitudes, which largely de- 
termine the way you think and act, while 
integrity is what gives uprightness to char- 
acter. It has been brought out that self 
discipline is when a person disciplines 
themselves and it is the only discipline 
that leads to the development of a strong 
character, it is believed that by the time 
a boy and girl leaves high school the 
character traits in their personality are all 
practically formed. 

"Always choosing to do right builds in- 
tegrity thus developing personality. It is 
further believed that some of the factors 
that make up personality are: Emotional, 
physical, mental, spiritual and social. We 
have learned that intelligence is using 
what you have to the best advantages. 
We decided that we would sum up by 
saying that personality is the body, mind, 
and spirit working together as a unit. Our 
aim in F.H.A. is to grow this year and 
hope that we will have a larger member- 
ship next year." 

The Morehead City Chapter of Future 



COVER PICTURE 

Singing Christmas Carols are 
Donnye Barnhill, Vice-President of 
the Benerenue Chapter and Kay 
Davis, President of the Benvenue 
Chapter. 



HOBO DAY \l 




On a very cloudy Saturday in 
November the Murfreesboro Future 
Homemakers of America rose bright 
and early. As they dressed in their 
hobo clothes (patched blue-jeans, 
big brother's old shirt, and dad's dis- 
carded hat) they thought of what 
was ahead. 

Armed with their lunch tied in a 
bright handkerchief on the end of a 
stick, the hobos marched forth to do 
the jobs they had acquired earlier in 
the week. 

Posters had been made, articles 
published in the local paper, notes 
sent home to parents by the school 
children, and a door-to-door canvass 



in the area assigned to inform the 
public that the invasion of the hobos 
would take place. 

All morning they labored at rak- 
ing leaves, baby-sitting, running er- 
rands, washing windows, trimming 
hedges, polishing silver, and a 
variety of other jobs. 

At 12:00, tired and hungry, but 
elated over their financial success 
they arrived at the Home Economics 
Building for lunch and rest. 

Then forward march and they are 
off once more. 

After a very long afternoon, in- 
terrupted by showers of rain, they 
called it a day. Needless to say, all 



were tired, had blisters and sore 
muscles galore, and were ready to go 
where there is "no place like." 

Monday morning with the blisters 
healing and the muscles nearly back 
to normal, they called their day a big 
success and said "Let's do it again — 
next Spring!" Oh yes, the $50.00 
pay they received was the best medi- 
cine they could take. 

There is just no substitute for en- 
thusiasm. Miss Currin, homemaking 
teacher at Murfreesboro, states. "We 
are having the best success in our 
FHA that we've had since I've been 
in Murfreesboro. I have a hard time 
keeping up with their enthusiasm." 



Homemakers held a special initiation 
program in the auditorium prior to the 
date of the District II Rally in Beaufort. 
After the Invocation, the 45 initiates filed 
into the auditorium. Seven veteran mem- 
bers, dressed in the organization's colors, 
red and white, presented a very timely 
and meaningful program entitled "The 
Gift of Love." Following this was the 
formal, but impressive Initiation Service. 
Each new member was presented with an 
F.H.A. pin, and each signed her name in 
the secretary's roll book. 

Members of the Swansboro Chapter 
learned how to make a copper planter 
from their home economics teacher, 
Mrs. David Strole. Mrs. Strole had on 
display a planter, previously arranged — 
one which contained an assorted arrange- 
ment of green plants. 

Susan Jones, a member, gave an in- 
teresting talk on flower and plant arrange- 
ments. 

Sixty-three new members of the Sted- 
man Chapter were initiated in October. 
Rev. Raynolds of the Cokesbury Method- 
ist Church gave the Devotion. 

Mrs. Maxine Faircloth gave an inspir- 
ing talk on what Future Homemakers of 
America had meant to her as a student, 
and now as a homemaker. Each member 
walked across the stage to receive her 
membership card. 

Emily Vinson, a member of the Sted- 
man Chapter, played a piano solo. 



STATE OFFICERS FOR 1958-59 

Elected at 1957 Fall Rallies— 

(They will be installed at the State Convention, March 29, 1958) 

President — Becky Nifong, District VII, North Davidson High 
School 

Vice-President — Nancy Edwards, District VI, Wingate High School 

Secretary — Cynthis Leonard, District V, Ramseur High School 

Treasurer — Sybil Beasley, District IV, Coats High School 

Reporter — Joanne Matthews, District III, Central High School, 
Cumberland County 

Parliamentarian — Joyce Harper, District II, B. F. Grady High 
School 

Historian — Betsy Benthall, District I, Woodland-Olney High 
School 

Song Leader — Mary Gale Haynes, District VIII, North Buncombe 
High School 



Future Homemakers of America 



CREED 

We are the Future Homemakers of America 

We face the future with warm courage, 

And high hope, 

For we have the clear consciousness of seeking 

Old and precious values. 

For we are the builders of homes, 

Homes for America's future. 

Homes where living will be the expression of everything 

That is good and fair. 

Homes where truth and love and security and faith 

Will be realities, not dreams. 

We are the Future Homemakers of America. 
We face the future with warm courage, 
And high hope. 




"The homes of tomorrow are in 

the hands of the youth 

of today" 




CAROLINE SAYS: 

December 26th 

This day I devote 
Each and Every December 
In thinking of friends 
I forgot to remember. 

Wish 

I want all kinds of feelings in my life. 
We gain from all our joys and sufferings. 
Contentment gives us health and beauty too. 
And courage is the gift that sorrow brings. 

—The Cheerful Cherub 







FUTURE HOMEMAKERS 

"orth Carolina Association 




VOLUME X 




FEBRUARY 1958 




NU> 



DON'T READ 



This Page 



(This article was prepared for 
you by your state reporter — Jane 
Eagles.) 

Flash! The Martians have 
landed! Could you catch a read- 
er's eye as well with an F.H.A. 
• flash"? Flash! Mother-Daughter 
Banquet a Bang! The first step for 
writing an article is to catch the 
reader's eye. 

"Mothers and daughters ate sup- 
per together at school cafeteria for 
the F.H.A. banquet." (Gads! I'm 
glad I didn't go to that dull ban- 
quet.) "F.H.A. 'ers honored their 
favorite Moms at a 'gala' affair." 
(Now — I wish I had gotten an 
invitation to that swell affair.) You 
had a ball, so why not let the public 
know. Everything done in your or- 
ganization worth writing about 
should be worth reading. 

"Don't Read This!" Do I hint a 
use of psychology? It can be used 
very effectively. I'M NOT GOING 
TO SAY ANYTHING WORTH 
SAYING, SO BY ALL MEANS 
DON'T READ THIS. Could any- 
one tear you away from read- 



ing this now? WHAT EVER YOU 
DO, DON'T CONTINUE READ- 
ING THIS ARTICLE. I'M NOT 
GOING TO SAY ANYTHING 
YOU'LL BE INTERESTED IN. 

An 
effec- 
tive use of 
symbols such 
as this keeps a 
reader following 
your article. While 
you have their atten- 
tion, lay the "goodies" 
of your chapter on thickly. 
A Christmas FHA party could 
be written in this Christmas tree 
form. 
Try it 
some- 
times. 

If you are lucky enough to be in 
a vicinity where there is a news- 
paper printed, you could let the 
world know about your activities 
through that newspaper. The edi- 
tors are usually very co-operative 
and more than glad to help you ad- 



vertise your activities . . . WAIT! 
DON'T PUT DOWN . . . you 
haven't finished yet. . . . During 
F.H.A. week, the Franklin Times 
gave the Louisburg Chapter a 
whole page in their newspaper. The 
town of Louisburg and the sur- 
rounding community know that a 
Future Homemakers organization is 
active in their school. Do the peo- 
ple of your community know how 
active your chapter is? GET TO 
WORK REPORTER!! Use all the 
tricks of the trade, but "get on the 
missile." Ready, aim, FIRE — your 
Future Homemaker news. 



OUR COVER 

Shown is Jane Eagles, State 
FHA Reporter, and Peggy Tomlin- 
son, Franklin-Nash County FHA 
Secretary-Treasurer, with A. F. 
Johnson, Jr., Managing Editor, 
and Elizabeth Johnson, Business 
Manager, of the local paper. They 
are compiling a page of news to 
be used for publicity for a Bi- 
County FHA Rally. 



North Carolina Association of Future Homemakers of America 



State Officers 
1957-58 

President — Becky Hayes, Harris VIII 
Vice-President — Becky Nifong, North Davidson VII 
Secretary — Barbara Ellis, North Mecklenburg VI 
Treasurer — Patsy Hunt, Bartlett, Yancey V 
Reporter — Jane Eagles, Mills, Louisburg IV 
Parliamentarian — Betty Jo Lowdermilk, Southern 

Pines III 
Historian — Jane Barrow, Lucama II 
Song Leader — Jean Jackson, West Edgecombe I 



District Advisers 
1957-58 

Sadie Frances — Washington I 

Mrs. Geraldine Beveridge, Beaufort II 

Mrs. Sarah G. Sheaffer, Stedman III 

Mrs. Robinette Husketh, Wilton, Franklinton, Rt. 1 IV 

Mrs. Glenna Lewis, E. M. Holt, Burlington, Rt. 1 V 

Mrs. Amelia Sheffield, Star VI 

Mrs. Nina Tharpe, East High, Ronda VII 

Betty Shealy, Cherryville VIII 



State Adviser 

Mrs. Faye T. Coleman 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCT ION 

Division of Vocational Education 

Raleigh, North Carolina 



HOME EXPERIENCES tlmZs 



Future Homemakers experience 
much satisfaction in achieving goals 
as they plan and carry out a home 
experience. Faithe White of the 
Saratoga Chapter in Wilson County 
chose as her project "Helping The 
Aged In My Community. 7 ' After 
completing her project, Faithe wrote 
the following interesting report of 
her experiences: 

"I chose for my project visiting 
the aged of my community because 
I felt it would cheer others and it 
would also help me knowing that I 
had helped others. It wasn't neces- 
sary for me to spend money be- 
cause we have a surplus of milk 
and butter at home. So to the people 
I visited I carried milk or butter. 

"My first visit was to Mrs. Frank 
Glover, a widow who lives alone. 
I stayed about three hours, and 
helped her by sweeping the floor 
and cooking a meal. For the meal 
I cooked hamburger, cream pota- 
toes, garden peas and for dessert I 
had peaches. After washing dishes, 
we talked for about an hour. I 
took Mrs. Glover a quart of milk. 
I am sure Mrs. Glover enjoyed my 
visit. I know I enjoyed it. 

"My second visit was to Mrs. 
Wooten and her daughter, who are 
both widows and stay alone. I 
stayed about an hour, and we talked 
of many things. Often I said some- 
thing funny and they both laughed. 
I am sure they enjoyed and ap- 
preciated my visit because later 
they sent me some flowers from 
their garden. To them I also took 
milk. 

"My third visit was to Mr. and 
Mrs. George Whitley, an elderly 
couple who have no children. I 
talked approximately a half hour 
with them. Mrs. Whitley told me 
that she was planning to move. I 
offered to help, but she thanked 
me and said that she already had 
a lot of help promised. I gave them 
a half pound of butter. 

"My fourth visit was to Mr. and 
Mrs. Albert Bennett. Mother took 
me; and because the children were 
home by themselves, we did not 
stay long. We were there about 
twenty minutes. We talked most of 



the time, and they seemed to enjoy 
the visit and would have liked for 
me to have stayed longer. I gave 
them nearly a gallon of milk for 
which they thanked me several 
times. 

"I enjoyed my visits and I'm glad I 
chose that as my project. I feel 
as if I have helped to bring some 
joy to the homes I visited." 



Paulette Ward from Durham 
Senior High School chose as her 
home experience — Making Ar- 
rangements or Centerpieces, Setting 
the Table, and Preparing a Surprise 
Salad or Dessert for the Family 
During Christmas Week. 

Included in Paulette's report un- 
der the section Things I Have 
Learned are the following excerpts: 

"I never realized it took so long 
to plan the week's menu of salads 
and desserts to be more attractive. 
It was also hard to get the grocery 
list made accurately for shopping 
for the week. I never realized how 
much it involved and the technique 
it took to put the finishing touches 
on arrangements and centerpieces 
for the table. 



"This project helped me to realize 
that it is hard to be a housewife 
and it takes a long time to be good!" 

Paulette's Mother wrote her 
evaluation. Among other things she 
states: 

"I am proud of Paulette's plan- 
ning for her centerpiece or arrange- 
ments, surprise salads or desserts. 
She made an outline for each 
day's project and followed this 
outline for the week. 

"I observed her centerpiece or ar- 
rangement for the table very care- 
fully; and, in my opinion, she has 
very good taste, as to the size, 
variety, and effectiveness of color." 



NOTICE! 
The Future Homemakers Song 
which was presented by the Farm- 
ville Chapter at the 1956 State 
Convention is now available for 
chapters for 10 cents per copy. 
Copies may be secured from Miss 
Elsie Seago, Home Economics 
Teacher, Farmville High School, 
Farmville, North Carolina. Enclose 
a long, stamped self-addressed en- 
velope. 



First year homemaking girls at Lee Edwards High School, Asheville, North Carolina, 
entertain three faculty members at a luncheon in their department. ii-jiiv 





/ Can Tell All My 
Troubles to Tammy 



Since I took child care in my 
second year of Home Economics, I 
have someone to whom to tell my 
troubles. 

Our home economics class made 
many types of stuffed animals. We 
had many varieties which included: 
ponies, teddy bears, lambs, poodles, 
puppies, kittens, and tigers. They 
were stuffed with cotton, foam rub- 
ber, and some were even stuffed 
with old nylon hose. The cost 
ranged from 50 cents to $3 de- 
pending upon the materials used. 

We were thinking of children 
when we made the toys, but it 



seemed we liked them well enough 
to keep them for our own use. Some 
of the names were Stevie, Goober, 
Jumbo, Tammy, Pokie, and Pee- 
Wee. 

Now, you see we have someone 
to whom to tell our troubles, prob- 
lems, and secrets. You know why, 
don't you? Why? Because he can't 
talk. He's a good listener!! 

Second Year 
Home Economics Class 
Rock Springs High School 
Denver, North Carolina 



Understand Our Neighbors — Emphasized 



Needham Broughton High School 

is very fortunate due to its situation. 
Being located in Raleigh, the capital 
city, Broughton is fortunate in stu- 
dents being from all over the world. 
This year the school has enrolled a 
boy from Budapest, a girl from Bag- 
dad, and a girl from Brazil. 

The FHA chapter decided to take 
advantage of this factor and have a 
panel discussion. Suham Shankindge 
from Brazil and Elosia Fredeieco 
from Bagdad made up the panel. 
They answered questions on cus- 
toms, school life, and dating! The 
girls were mostly interested in their 
dating customs. In Brazil the teen- 



agers are always chaperoned and 
travel in groups. No one ever dates 
without a chaperon, and one is never 
alone with persons of the opposite 
sex. The teen-agers have one big 
dance a year and smaller ones 
throughout the season. For the big 
dance, celebrations go on all night 
long and a breakfast is served 
around 5:00 p.m. followed by a day 
on the beach. 

Suham very readily replied, "Well, 
we are much different from that." 
She went on to say that they are very 
much like us in that they can date. 
They are not chaperoned and date 
many different boys. Everyone 



thoroughly enjoyed this fascinating 
panel and would suggest you try the 
same thing if you have any students 
from abroad. 

The first and fourth units of the 
Raleigh Chapter of the Future 
Homemakers of America had a sup- 
per meeting on February 6 at 5:30. 
The meeting was held at the S & W 
Cafeteria Capital Room, in down- 
town Raleigh. The general business 
meeting was held, then a representa- 
tive from Merle Norman Cosmetics 
gave the program on care of the 
facial complexion. The lady se- 
lected her model from the group and 
demonstrated the proper cleansing 
and make-up for a teenage girl. She 
gave the girls free samples of powder 
case and a card which entitled them 
to receive a free demonstration on 
skin care. 



CORRECTION! 

In the October, 1957, issue of 
the North Carolina Future Home- 
makers Magazine there was an 
error in the date of the State Con- 
vention. The date of the State Con- 
vention is Saturday, March 29. The 
guest speaker for the Convention is 
Mrs. Bernice McCullar, from the 
Education Department in Georgia. 
All who have had the privilege of 
working with Mrs. McCullar know 
that she has a dynamic personality. 
Her experiences with Future Home- 
makers in Georgia and throughout 
the nation make her doubly quali- 
fied to help all of us as we strive to 
strengthen our program in North 
Carolina. 

Webster Chapter 
Sponsors Projects 

The Webster Chapter proudly 
reports three activities which helped 
to tell the public of Future Home- 
maker activities. Three major activi- 
ties are: 

A Radio Program on FHA Goals 

and Purposes 
An Open House — Chapter 
Mother, Mrs. Joe Fulmer, was 
hostess 
FHA Members were represented 
at a county-wide Health Con- 
ference. 
(This was sponsored by the local 
Medical Society and Halcyon Club.) 
This year the chapter has fifty- 
five members, the greatest number 
in its history. Five members at- 
tended the District VIII Rally in 
Cherryville. The radio station had 
just opened in Sylva when the mem- 
bers gave the radio program. 



Christmas Party 

for 

JVlom and Bad 



Banquet night was fun for Moth- 
ers, Fathers, Sons, and Daughters 
at the La Grange High School. 

It's Christmas! Star paper, star 
burst, and Sputnik gave us a back- 
ground of gold and white. Christmas 
trees made from soap flakes, can- 
dles made from beaten paraffin, 
adorned our tables. A huge Christ- 
mas tree covered with soap flakes 
and snowballs and bells made by the 
students gave accent to our decora- 
tions. 

Our FHA Boys, led by James 
Nelson, gave a very impressive 
opening ceremony. The invocation 
was given by Mr. W. A. Smith, 
superintendent of Kennedy Home. 
A very warm welcome was given 
by David Naylor, an FHA boy. 
The response was by Mr. Claude 
Aldridge. Guests were presented by 
Mr. Wade Ferguson, FHA adviser. 
Two of our important guests were 
Miss Molisia Barbour and Mrs. 
Margaret Barnhardt, student teach- 
ers from East Carolina College, who 
contributed greatly to the success of 
the banquet by helping in food prep- 
aration, taking pictures, and deco- 
rating. 

The Future Homemakers helped 
in preparing the large amount of 
food, in making their own costumes, 
in decorating for the occasion. We 
were able to serve around two hun- 
dred guests a delicious Turkey 
Supper for the amount of 50 cents 
each. 

The parade of winter clothes 
ranging from church wear to tora- 
dor pants preceded the spectacular 
"Parade of Dances" which included 
the Mexican Hat Dance, Spanish 
Dance, Square Dance, Waltz, High- 
land Fling, Minuet, Polka, Bop, 
Charleston, and the Hula. The cos- 
tumes, made by the girls, were made 
from war surplus materials. 

As a mixer, the tables were pushed 
back, and mothers, fathers, guests, 
teachers, and students danced the 
Shoddie. Students enjoyed dancing 
with Mothers and Fathers. Many 
left by saying this should be done 
at least once a month. 




Tbe FHA girls at Celeste Henkel in their exchange class with the boys are making 
markers for their yards under the supervision of Mr. Perrell. 

EXCHANGE CLASSES in Harnett County 



The following units have been 
suggested for the homemaking 
teachers to use in teaching the 
boys: Ninth grade manners at 
home, school, and table manners, 
dress and grooming. Tenth grade, 
food combinations and quick meals. 
Eleventh grade, family relation- 
ships. 

For the agriculture teachers to 
teach the girls: Ninth grade, Parlia- 
mentary procedure. Tenth grade, 



simple home mechanics and repairs, 
safety in electric appliances. Elev- 
enth grade, home beautification, 
landscaping, mixing paints, and re- 
finishing furniture. 

The idea of exchange classes is 
not something new. Mr. Proffit, 
county superintendent, approves 
the plan. A committee composed of 
agriculture and homemaking teach- 
ers met with Mr. Proffit to make 
final plans. 



Mrs. Houston Henderson (a parent in the community and a teacher) bathing her six- 
month-old baby for second year Home Economics Class. 

Miss Mathews, the student teacher, from Western Carolina College, Cullowhee, is 
helping Mrs. Henderson. Miss Mathews had done part of her student teaching in 
Child Care. 

Mrs. Morgan's class and my class were combined for this demonstration. Both 
groups had been working on Child Care. 




, 



National and State 

PRO 



HOW MUCH DO TEEN-AGERS SPEND ON I 




One of our national projects is 
the Teen-age Consumer Project. 
This article concerns a survey made 
in North Carolina. Jane Barrow, of 
Lucama, is a member of the Na- 
tional Projects' Committee. She has 
been working with eight chapters 
in the state, collecting data on teen- 
age spending for recreational ac- 
tivities and hobbies. 

The findings of this survey have 
been very interesting to me and ] 
would like to share them with you. 

Questionnaires were sent to the 
eight chapters and each member 
was given one. 

The first questionnaire con- 
cerned teen-age hobbies. The re- 
sults showed that eighty-six per cent 
of the members have hobbies, the 
favorite ones being cooking, sewing, 
and reading. The average amount 
of money spent yearly by each girl 
for her hobbies was $11.83. 

It was proved that the hobbies 
were beneficial to their families, as 
well as themselves. Cooking gives 
pleasure, as does sewing, and saves 
money. Reading proved to be edu- 
cational, entertaining, and enjoy- 
able. The majority thought their 
hobby would be useful in future 
life. 

The second questionnaire con- 
cerned spectator sports. The results 
showed that eighty-two per cent of 
the members enjoyed sports as a 
spectator. A large per cent seemed 
to feel that these sports were ex- 
pensive and that an average of 
$29.19 is spent yearly by each girl. 
The favorite spectator sports listed 
were basketball, baseball, football, 
tennis, golf, and roller skating, in 
that order. 



The third questionnaire, concern- 
ing participant sports, showed that 
sixty-one per cent of the members 
preferred participant sports rather 
than spectator sports and that they 
were less expensive. The results 
showed an average of $8.94 spent 
per girl over a period of one year 
on this type of recreation. Fa- 
vorite participant sports were skat- 
ing, basketball, swimming, dancing, 
softball, ping pong, and bowling. 

I found the last questionnaire one 
of the most interesting. It concerns 
dates, parties, movies, and other 
social activities. 

Seventy-five per cent answered 
that they enjoy spending their lei- 
sure time dating, dancing, and at- 
tending movies. 

Parties proved to be one of the 
most popular social activities. Fa- 
vorite types listed were birthday, 
pajama, holiday, dancing, and 
church parties. 

The dating results showed that 
the majority of the members dated 
once or twice a week, thirty per 
cent of the members dated none, 
twenty-five per cent of the members 
dated three times a week, and five 
per cent of the members dated five 
or six times weekly. 

Other favorite types of personal 
entertainment were movies, records, 
reading, television, radio, and car 
riding. 

The results showed that approxi- 
mately $23.71 is spent yearly per 
girl for personal entertainment. 

I hope each of you will enjoy 
making comparisons with what ap- 
pears to be the average teenager of 
North Carolina. 

(Article written by Patsy Hunt, State 
Treasurer.) 



$ $ $ $ I 

MOST PI 



100% 



75% 



50% 



25% 






Cooking 

PERSONAM 



100% 
90% 
80 % 
70% 
60% 
50 Vc 
40% 

0-/ 

30% 
20% 
10% 








































































— 










Par 


ties Mov 


ies Dan 


ci: 



hj o r 





3IES— SPORTS— DATES— PARTIES— MOVIES 



$ $ $ $ 



IOBBIES 



1 


1 



Reading 



AINMENT 




WISE BUYING AND USE OF MONEY 



Reading TV 



Radio 



Interpreting the Teen-age Con- 
sumer Project, as well as gaining co- 
operation from parents was the pur- 
pose of the program presented by 
Future Homemakers of the Liles- 
ville Chapter at a PTA meeting dur- 
ing November. 

The Chapter news report as given 
by the adviser, Mrs. Wall, is as 
follows: 

"For the skit, we used as a guide 
the Teen-age Consumer skit in 
March, 1957, 'Teen Times,' pages 
1-3. We enlarged on this by using 
two, three, and four girls for each 
entrance, rather than one. They 
were dressed as described in the 
skit. In addition, the girls danced 
on to the stage, each group with a 
novelty step and forming a tableau 
in the center of the stage. The three 
girls with the large silver dimes, 
sang a jingle to the tune of "Row, 
Row, Your Boat," which ran as: 

Save, save, your dimes 

It's the best, you know 

For your clothes and food for school 

Because you need them so. 

The stretchy dollars were made 
of plastic sponge and colored with 
green cake coloring. After the un- 
veiling of the poster, the entire 
group danced in costumes and sang 
original words to the tune, "In the 
Middle of an Island." 

WHEN DADDY GIVES US A 
DOLLAR 

When daddy gives us a dollar, 
We will spend it very wisely 



Cashmere sweaters are our weak- 
ness. 
Just a blue or red will do. 

When daddy gives us a dollar, 
Off to the bank we'll go hurrying. 
Save and share will be our motto. 
What good homemakers we'll be. 

A bright new car we'd all love, 
Just riding down the road, 
Oh, no we must spend money 
wisely. 

When daddy gives us a dollar, 
We will purchase according 
What ever we buy — a pleasure it 
will be. 

As a follow up, the homemaking 
classes began the study of Wise Buy- 
ing and Use of Money. In the course 
of our study, we made trips to the 
different food stores, the first time 
to study meats. The next trip we 
studied buying canned and frozen 
foods, also, vegetables. Each student 
had charts for recording informa- 
tion. This information was compiled 
in class. After this, we made trips to 
the ready-to-wear stores. Here the 
girls followed the same procedure 
with household linens, dresses, lin- 
gerie, sweaters, and other apparel. 
We then studied about investments. 

The girls were interested in 
knowing how much they were now 
spending, so each one kept an ac- 
count of all expenditures for a week. 
(Continued on inside back cover) 




Home Preparation for an Emergency is shown in this exhibit prepared by the North Carolina Council of Civil Defense. 



The Civil Defense and 
Home Safety Project 



As stated in the Suggested Pro- 
gram-of-Work in the September, 
1 957, issue of Teen Times magazine, 
the Civil Defense and Home Safety 
Project helps Future Homemakers 
be prepared for disasters — natural 
disasters such as hurricanes, floods, 
tornadoes, and home accidents — and 
man-made disasters such as wars. 

As we work toward achieving 
Objective IV — To Provide Training 
for Each Chapter Member for Par- 
ticipation in Home, School, and 
Community Activities — we should 
plan for some defense and safety 
practices. The Home Protection- 
Exercises, a booklet on A Family 
Action Program, published by the 
Federal Civil Defense Administra- 
tion, offers excellent suggestions for 
practices in the home and in the 
classroom. 

In a booklet prepared by the 
American Vocational Association — ■ 



Civil Defense and Vocational Edu- 
cation, it is suggested that home 
economics education and training 
is closely related and adaptable to 
civil defense functions. 

Included in the recommended 
contributions which homemaking 
students can make are: 

1. Learn how to use food supply 
recommended for emergency shelf 
(simple menus and preparation). 

2. Give more emphasis to quick 
techniques of clothing construction 
and renovation of clothing. 

3. Learn how to work under 
emergency conditions with makeshift 
and improvised equipment. 

4. Learn how to care for children 
under emergency conditions. 

5. Give attention to sanitation 
practices to follow under emergency 
conditions. 



Mary Bines Leonard, 
Charles fl. Moser Wed 

Miss Mary Hines Leonard, 
daughter of Mrs. George N. Leon- 
ard and the late Mr. Leonard, and 
Charles H. Moser, son of the late 
Mr. and Mrs. H. J. Moser of 
Jefferson City, Tenn., were mar- 
ried on Saturday, the 8th, in the 
Corinth Baptist Church, Nashville, 
North Carolina. 

The Rev. J. W. Kincheloe offi- 
ciated and music was presented by 
Mrs. Charles Grainger, pianist. 
George A. Leonard gave his sister 
in marriage. 

Mrs. George A. Leonard was 
matron of honor. Mrs. Leonard 
was former State FHA adviser. 

Hugh J. Moser was his brother's 
best man. Ushers were Thomas A. 
Dean of Louisburg and Lawrence 
Leonard of Nashville. 

The bride attended East Caro- 
lina College and the University of 
North Carolina. For the past few 
years she has been employed as 
Assistant State Supervisor of Home 
Economics Education with the 
N. C. Department of Public In- 
struction. 

Mrs. Moser is an honorary 
member of the North Carolina 
Association of Future Homemakers 
of America. 



NOTICE!! 

Election of Candidates for 

National Office of Historian 

The Historian's Duties: 

1. Keep Records, pictures, and/or other material of historic importance 
to the organization. Assemble the following materials: 

a. Publicity concerning national meetings. 

Secure clippings of all articles and pictures appearing in the 
the newspapers about the meetings. Mount and place them in 
the hard-back %Vi" x 11" folder provided by the national 
office for that purpose. A copy of the official program for all 
national or regional meetings should be included. The his- 
torian will make arrangements for securing the programs and 
news clippings at those meetings which she cannot attend. 

b. Publicity concerning national officers representing FHA. 

This will include clippings of all articles and pictures from 
the newspapers about national officers appearing on FHA or 
other programs to represent the national organization. The 
historian will need to solicit the help of each national officer 
and ask each to send the publicity about herself. 

2. Carry out special projects that relate to the work of the historian. 

3. Give the historian's notebook to incoming historian at the close of the 
national meeting. If this is impossible because of the type of national 
meeting(s) held, give it to the assistant national adviser, who will, in 
turn, give it to the incoming officer. 



Advisers Note: 

Send name and address of candidate to Mrs. Faye T. Coleman, state 
adviser, on or before March 5, 1958. Written qualifications should be at- 
tached giving the following information. The candidate must not be above 
Junior class level. 



Name of Candidate Age. 

Classification in High School, 1956-57 

School Address 

Home Address 

Father's Name , Telephone No.... 

Name of Local Adviser... 

Address 




The Bartlett Yancey Chapter is plan- 
ning a "Sweetheart Ball," February 8. 
We have found that these socials are 
very successful in our school. Each mem- 
ber has an opportunity to help plan and 
prepare the party, and many of the girls 
plan and make their own dresses. 

We are very pleased that one of our 
members, Linda Bradshaw, is working for 
her State Homemakers Degree. 

In the near future, our chapter is 
planning to conduct several fund-raising 
activities. 



The Elm City Future Homemakers 

had a gala evening on November 22 when 
they entertained their mothers at a 
Mother-Daughter Banquet. 

The FHA sextet sang "Come Ye 
Thankful People" following the devo- 
tion. Piano solos, welcome speeches, talks 
of the Future Homemaker program, a 
humorous reading, awards of Junior and 
Chapter Degrees, and a skit entitled 
"Builders of Homes" made up the major 
portion of the evening's program. 

Sixth grade and eighth grade girls 
served the meal which was prepared by 
the cafeteria workers. Ninety-one were 
present for the banquet. A harvest theme 
was used in the decoration Cornucopias, 
pumpkins, fruit, red berries, miniature 
gourds, color leaves were used on the 
table along with orange and green burn- 
ing tapers. Small turkey candles were 
used as favors. 



Number of years of homemaking instruction completed 

Number of years of membership in FHA 

FHA Offices held: State District. 

Chapter 



Mothers and faculty members were 
honored by FHA members of the Hen- 
derson Chapter in December. The re- 
freshment table was overlaid with a red 
cloth. The centerpiece was a large red 
burning candle encircled with greens and 
Christmas tree ornaments. At one end 
of the buffet was a large poinsettia in- 
terspersed with greenery. The other end 
was graced with red candles and greens. 
On silver trays were assorted cookies cut 
in the shape of snowmen, Christmas 
trees, Santa Claus and other symbols. 
Other refreshments were fruit cake, holi- 
day candy squares, cheese straws, cream 
cheese and olive sandwiches and pi- 
mento cheese sandwiches. 

The living room of the department was 
also decorated for the social. The coffee 
table held an original arrangement of 
greens adorned with tinsel and Christ- 
mas balls. In the classroom the bulletin 
board was decorated with a tree of 
Christmas cards while the blackboards 
revealed scenes pertaining to Christ's 
birth. 



Contributions the candidate has made to the FHA program on local, district 
and state levels: 

Contributions the candidate has made to his home and family: 
Contributions the candidate has made to the homemaking program: 
Other comments: 



At the December meeting of the More- 
head City Chapter Joyce Styron gave the 
origin of several of the Christmas Carols. 
A committee was appointed to look after 
the punch which the chapter was asked 
to prepare and serve for the Christmas 
Dance to be sponsored by all the or- 
ganizations of the school. The chapter 

(Continued on page eight) 




WHOLESOME 



GROUP RECREATION 



Pictured here are a group of 
FHA'ers who have been working 
with a group of high school boys in 
making preparations for a television 
show, Top-Ten Dance Party. Betty 
Lou Cash, president of W. R. Mills 
Chapter, organized the group. She 
is pictured on front row — fourth 
girl from left. 

Barbara Brown, an FHA mem- 
ber, held several dance lessons in 



the school gym to help boys to learn 
to dance that did not know how. She 
organized the group, put notices of 
meetings up, checked with Princi- 
pal about building, heat, etc., and 
arranged with her FHA Adviser, 
Mrs. Marjorie Leonard, to be pres- 
ent. Mrs. Max T. Brown, State 
Honorary Member and Chapter 
Mother, was also present for the 
dance. 



CHAPTER CHATTER 

(Continued from page seven) 

sold peanut brittle and all 100 boxes were 
sold. 

At the January meeting held on Janu- 
ary 3 several of the second year Home 
Economics members modeled the gar- 
ments they had made. Mrs. A. B. Rob- 
erts, of the Woman's Club, spoke to the 
girls about their project in getting a 
foreign student for our high school next 
year. She told the girls they would be 
the hostesses and asked their cooperation 
in raising the money and in helping pro- 
mote this project. 

The President, Jessie White, urged the 
girls to work on degrees and suggested 
the girls begin to think about attending 
camp at White Lake. The club voted to 
buy a new song book, some of the new 
copies of "FHA in Focus" and several 
copies of "Helps for Students to Evaluate 
Their Own Growth." 



are county officers lead group dis- 
cussions. 

Each of the North Buncombe chap- 
ters four clubs have been very busy with 
projects to make money for the Home 
Economics Department. They have 
served dinner to the Men's Club, Lion's 
Club, and Home Demonstration Club; 
have been in charge of concession stands 
at ball games; sold candy, Christmas 
cards; and had cake sales and cake walks. 

We have had many interesting pro- 
grams this year. We have had a panel 
discussion on boy and girl relationship, 
a film on parliamentary procedure, and a 
talk on hair styling given by a local 
beauty parlor operator. That is just a 
few of the many interesting ones. 

Twenty members are planning to at- 
tend the State Convention in Raleigh 
during FHA week. North Buncombe will 
be honored to have Mary Gale Haynes 
installed as State Song Leader. 

A Mother-Daughter Banquet is being 
planned for sometimes in the early 
spring. 



Eighteen officers of North Buncombe 

High School's 200 Future Homemakers 
attended an officer's workshop at Erwin 
High School. Two of our members who 

8 



Chapter of Canton, North Carolina, 
working like beavers. 

We chose as our club project this year 
— to raise enough money for the club to 
visit Williamsburg. Virginia, in June. 

Some of our girls did special projects. 
Those who finished their sewing project 
first, worked on making doll wardrobes 
to sell at Christmas. We took scraps from 
our blouses and skirts and made doll 
clothes. One girl's mother had bought a 
new cashmere coat. The coat was too 
long, so she had it cut off. From the 
scraps one of the girls made a beautiful, 
fitted doll coat, which we sold. 

In addition to making doll clothes to 
sell at Christmas, we made and sold 
stuffed animals. 

We made some money from our 
Christmas project and we hope to con- 
tinue it next year. 



The Spencer FHA Chapter was fea- 
tured in a fashion show entitled "A 
Dreamer's Holiday" at an assembly pro- 
gram in the Spencer High School. In her 
dream, the "Dreamer" saw girls modeling 
a variety of school clothes, sportswear, 
housecoats, party dresses, and Church 
clothes. Mrs. Julia Slate, FHA adviser, 
who was in charge of the program re- 
ports that 95 models took part in the 

The election of officers and planning 
the program of work for the year were 
given attention early in the fall by the 
members of the Davie Chapter under 
the leadership of Mrs. Annie S. Hyde, 
adviser. A highlight of FHA activities 
was the Halifax County Federation Rally 
held early in the school year. A large 
number of Davie members attended and 
participated in the program. 



Henderson FHA members sponsor a 
sale. Led by President Dawn Rooker and 
Sponsor Mrs. Virginia Cobb, the Future 
Homemakers of America sold plastic 
tablecloths, laundry bags, and coat hanger 
covers during October. Proceeds will be 
used to finance club projects. 

At the close of last year, the Club pre- 
sented to the Home Economics Depart- 
ment a coffee table, and a .small rug, 
which are now beirfg J used Itf : fhe living 
room of the Department. . , . . . 



The Future Homemakers of the '-New- 
port Chapter made plans early for chap- 
ter projects and activities. Plans for a 
square and round- dance were discussed. 
Money-making projects, including the 
sale of Stanly products. 



This school year of 1957-58 has found 
us Future Homemakers of the Canton 



Carteret County was one of the first 
two counties in the State to exceed each 
year's total returns in the 1957 Christmas 
Seal Campaign. The FHA Chapters in 
the county were very active in this cam- 
paign. 

Morehead City Future Homemakers of 
America made $20.19 for the March of 
Dimes in Morehead City. Elizabeth 
Highsmith, Lily Willis, and Alice Wade 
sold blue crutch pins. FHA advisor is 
Mrs. Florence Cordova. 

The amount of money collected by 
Morehead City School today totals 
$102.70. Late receipts pushed the total 
over $100. 



Leadership Workshop FINANCIAL STATEMENT 



for 
F.F./L Officers 



The Buncombe County F.H.A. 
officers are much better informed 
of their duties after January 8, when 
a leadership workshop was held at 
Clyde A. Erwin High School. All 
F.H.A. officers from the seven 
neighboring Buncombe County High 
Schools were invited to attend. 

After a short devotional, Miss 
LaSalle Light, a former F.H.A. 
State Officer, gave a very interesting 
talk, on "What F.H.A. Meant to 
Her." The group then divided and 
each of the county officers led a 
discussion group "On the duty of 
each officer." The individual groups 
were given one hour for a discussion 
then the group assembled back in 
the auditorium, where a record from 
each group sat on a panel and 
discussed what each group had 
achieved. 

Guest speakers were Mrs. Halt 
Callaway, Asheville Times Society 
Editor, Light, and Mr. Burrell 
Smith of Carolina Power and Light 
Company. 



FHA FUNDS 

August 31, 1957 ..$43,953.73 

Camp 30,000.00 

$13,953.73 
Less Delegate Fund 4,174.38 

Balance in FHA Fund : $ 9,779.35 

FHA DELEGATES FUND 

1950-51 $ 289.02 

1951-52 537.73 

1952-53 1,262.06 

1953-54 327.69 

1954-55 661.62 

1955-56 272.62 

1956-57 823.64 

Total (with interest) $ 4,174.38 



WISE BUYING AND MONEY 

(Continued from page 5) 

We then drew up a clothes program 
for a three-year period. With all 
this data, the girls planned a budget. 

Several of the girls are now talk- 
ing with their parents about the pos- 
sibility of being allowed to manage 
a part of the money now being spent 
on them. I have suggested that they 
prove their ability by asking for the 
privilege of buying the family food 
for a period of time, then widen- 
ing their scope as they gain experi- 
ence and skill." 



Certificates of Award for Junior and 
chapter degrees may be ordered from 
Edwards & Broughton Co., North Boule- 
vard, Raleigh, N. C. The prices of the 
certificates are: 25c each or 6 for $2.00; 
12 for $3.75; 25 for $7.25. Overprinting 
of names, in one line, can be done by 
the same firm for $1.00. 



FHA CAMP FUND 

1938-1948 (including U. S. Government Bond 1942; 

interest on Bond and donations) $ 6,976.79 

1948-49 1,716.39 

1949-50 2,338.14 

1950-51 1,522.87 

1951-52 '. 1,525.63 

1 952-53 978.66 

1953-54 2,022.61 

1954-55 , 1,688.15 

1955-56 1,129.49 

1956-57 627.01 

Interest on Bond 1947-1957. 360.00 

Over-all Interest % amount invested 9,114.26 

Total - - $30,000.00 



Future Homemakers of America 



CREED 

We are the Future Homemakers of America 

We face the future with warm courage, 

And high hope, 

For we have the clear consciousness of seeking 

Old and precious values. 

For we are the builders of homes, 

I lomes for America's future. 

Homes where living will be the expression of everything 

That is good and fair. 

Homes where truth and love and security and faith 

Will be realities, not dreams. 

We are the Future Homemakers of America 
We face the future with warm courage, 
And high hope. 




"The homes of tomorrow are In 

the hands of the youth 

of today" 




CAROLINE SAYS: 

The important event for March is FHA State Con- 
vention, Raleigh Memorial Auditorium March 29, 
1958. I'll be looking forward to seeing you. 

RARE FRIENDS 

Why are true friends so rare 
I ask with mournful sigh — 
I ought to ask instead: 
What kind of friend am I? 

— The Cheerful Cherub 







FUTURE HOMEMAKERS 

* North Carolina Association • 



VOLUME xv 





NUMBER 



CANDIDATE FOR NATIONAL HISTORIAN 




Elected as North Carolina's candidate for the office 
of National Historian of the Future Homemakers of 
America, Ann Carole Helderman is now making prepa- 
rations for her campaign during the national meeting 
in Kansas City, Missouri, during July. 

Ann Carole is an accomplished girl with a well- 
rounded personality. She enjoys activities connected 
with home and family living. Ann Carole makes her 
clothes, helps in decorating and furnishing her home, 
helps with the food preparation, shares with family 
decisions, and is active in church, school, and com- 
munity projects. 

Ann Carole is a member of the Rockwell Chapter 
in Rowan County. 

Fhe North Carolina Association of Future Home- 
makers of America will feel confident in Ann Carole's 
ability to represent the Association well should she be 
elected as National Historian for 1958-59. 



OUR COVER 

1958-59 officers are featured on our cover. These officers who 
were installed at the State Convention are: District I, Betsy 
Benthall; District II, Joyce Harper; District III, Joanne Mat- 
thews; District IV, Sybil Beasley; District V, Cynthia Leonard; 
District VI, Nancy Edwards; District VII, Becky Nifong; Dis- 
trict Vin, Mary Gale Haynes. 



North Carolina Association of Future Homemakers of America 



State Officers 
1957-58 

President — Becky Hayes, Harris VIII 
Vice-President — Becky Nifong, North Davidson VII 
Secretary — Barbara Ellis, North Mecklenburg VI 
Treasurer — Patsy Hunt, Bartlett Yancey V 
Reporter — Jane Eagles, Mills, Louisburg TV 
Parliamentarian — Betty Jo Lowdermilk, Southern 

Pines III 
Historian — Jane Barrow, Lucama II 
Song Leader — Jean Jackson, West Edgecombe I 



District Advisers 
1957-58 

Sadie Frances — Washington I 

Mrs. Geraldine Beveridge, Beaufort II 

Mrs. Sarah G. Sheaffer, Stedman III 

Mrs. Robinette Husketh, Wilton, Franklinton, Rt. 1 IV 

Mrs. Glenna Lewis, E. M. Holt, Burlington, Rt. 1 V 

Mrs. Amelia Sheffield, Star VI 

Mrs. Nina Tharpe, East High, Ronda VII 

Betty Shealy, Cherryville VIII 



State Adviser 

Mrs. Faye T. Coleman 



STATE DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 

Division of Vocational Education 
Ralei"h. North Carolina 



j4 *?tUnty *7#& friow. 

OUR STATE PRESIDENT 



Once upon a time the FHA 
needed a new state vice-president. 
Mrs. Coleman said, "FHA members, 
go look in the mountains, the hills, 
and the valleys of the Western Dis- 
trict of N. C. and don't come back 
until you've found a candidate for 
vice-president. She must be well 
groomed, active in FHA, holding at 
least her Junior degree, a sophomore 
in high school, and a leader in her 
school and community." 

As the Carolina moon rose and 
set over town and countryside, the 
seasons changed; and with these 
changes came the end of the search 
for a candidate, for, in the Harris 
Chapter, she was found. 



Those were the words of a hopeful 
FHA'er in the fall of 55 at the Dis- 
trict VIII Rally. The girl in the fairy 
tale was elected and she reigned as 
state vice-president and president 
during the years 56-57 and 57-58. 
As in all Fairy Tales, these have 
been happy and meaningful years, 
not only for the lucky girl, but for 
her family and small community. Of 
course, there have been some trials 
and tribulations — such as, How 
shall she begin her articles? or, 
Which dress shall she wear? But 
when the girl's mother and father 
and five sisters and brothers pitched 
in, these problems were soon solved. 



While the fairy girl was working 
on her FHA degrees, especially her 
state, her family enjoyed and bene- 
fited by her planned and carried-out 
experiences. She planned, prepared, 
and served special meals with all the 
family sharing in the preparation 
and serving. With her brother and 
sister, she surprised her mother and 
father with an Anniversary Dinner. 

Much home improvement has 
been made as a result of the girl's 
enthusiasm. The family planted 
flowers and grass to improve the 
yard, and redecorated some rooms. 
This was really a learning experience 
and fun for everyone. 

All fairy characters want to do 
good for others. Since she had a 
Christmas teen-age party as an FHA 
project, her parents encouraged her 
to do more entertaining; because, 
being a wise girl, she made the family 
a part of her plans, preparation, 
and work. Her community shouted 
with glee about the many helpful 
things she did. She sponsored the 
March of Dimes, and the result 
meant that Harris School had more 
money for the polio fund. 

Being a versatile and talented girl, 
she danced, sang, and talked for 
many of the civic organizations. This 
gave her a chance to really put to 
use many of the things she had 
learned through her FHA activities. 



Becky's family planted flowers and grass to improve the yard. From left to right: 
Mr. Hayes, Mrs. Hayes, Elizabeth, Becky's sister, and Becky. 




In her church, the fairy girl enter- 
tained the young children with a 
party, because, after all, they, too, 
need their social life. 

To tell you FHA girls (and maybe 
boys) what the experiences as FHA 
vice-president and president have 
meant to her would take volumes, so 
she would like to mention some of 
the highlights, such as: the 1956 
National Convention in Chicago, the 
1957 planning meeting at Purdue 
University, attending the FHA 
Camp and the FFA Convention. 

Yes, girls, the story is true, but 
it doesn't have to be a fairy tale, for 
any FHA'er, whether she is a state 
officer or not, can enjoy and benefit 
from many of the wonderful experi- 
ences and opportunities which this 
girl has experienced. And as she, 
Becky Hayes, in reality the fairy 
tale girl, comes to the end of her 
reign, she should like to say, "Thank 
you, Future Homemakers of North 
Carolina, for making this story one 
in which these experiences and op- 
portunities will help us all to live 
happier everafter." 



NOTICE!!! 

National Meeting — July 7-11 
Kansas City, Missouri 

Three delegates can come from 
the membership at large. These 
three delegates should each repre- 
sent a different district. For example 
Mary Jones may be from District 
VIII, Alice Smith from District III, 
and Sarah Thomas from District I. 
If your chapter or your County 
Federation is interested in sending 
a delegate or if an individual 
qualified member is interested in 
attending at her own expense, please 
write immediately to the State Ad- 
viser and further information about 
the meeting will be mailed to you. 
The estimated cost per delegate is 
$150. Applications received first will 
be given first consideration. 



NOTICE! 

The Future Homemakers Song 
which was presented by the Farm- 
ville Chapter at the 1956 State 
Convention is now available for 
chapters for 10 cents per copy. 
Copies may be secured from Miss 
Elsie Seago, Home Economics 
Teacher, Farmville High School, 
Farmville, North Carolina. Enclose 
a long, stamped self-addressed 
envelope. 



NATIONAL FHA WEEK 



Activities of Chapters during Week 
of March 23-29: 

Cary Chapter 

1 . A devotional was presented by 
an FHA'er in each home room in 
high school. 

2. Bible verses were written on 
each high school bulletin board. 

3. Each member wore red and 
white to emphasize the colors of our 
organization. The officers wore 
badges. 

4. Jelly beans, candy, cookies, 
gum, popcorn, and other goodies 
brought by FHA'ers were taken to 
the Cherry Building at Dix Hill for 
the mentally sick children by our 
advisor, Mrs. Jordan. 

5. Family night — each member 
did a good deed for her family. 

A Devotional Presented During 
National FHA Week 

Religion in the Home: Home re- 
lationships have their origin in the 
heart of God, and at the very begin- 
ning of creation. 

Home, as God intended is a thing 
of exquisite beauty. Its various 



loves — that of parent for child — 
child for parent — and children for 
each other. These loves are like a 
light breaking through from the great 
love of God himself. Jesus taught us 
to call God "Father," ourselves sons 
or children of God, himself our elder 
brother. The home as God made it 
bears the nature of the divine plan. 
It is important to know that religion 
has a place in the home and in the 
heart of each member of it. The 
parents united in holy love trans- 
plant the seeds of Faith in us that 
we may put God first in our lives 
and worship and reverence his Holy 
Name. 

As Future Homemakers we are 
indebted to the future generations 
to plant the seeds of faith ourselves, 
that the word of God may abound 
in every life. 

There are ways we can do this. 
By reading the Bible daily with the 
family. By praying with the family 
and also privately when we are in 
need of divine Guidance and most 
of all keeping God first in our lives. 

We must also be active in the 
church and become members when- 
ever one is old enough to realize 



FUTURE HOMEMAKER 



Discovers Herself 

By Sylvia Simpson, Pembroke Chapter 



I've been in Homemaking classes 
for two years, and active in FHA 
for three years. I'm an 11th grader, 
and I'm thrilled to tell you a little 
about Homemaking, FHA, and me. 

First I'd better tell you about me. 
I'm 16 years old. I have one brother 
who is 8. Then, of course, there's 
my mom and dad. 

I've really learned to appreciate 
these swell folks, especially after our 
freshman unit in Homemaking called 
"Being a Well-Rounded Person." 
As a result of this unit, I decided 
upon a "Get - Along - With My 
Family" home project. 

Up to that time I never thought 
very much about my family. I just 
rather took the members of it for 
granted. In fact, I don't really be- 



lieve I ever thought of them as 
personalities with whom I could 
have fun and fellowship. After I 
started working on my project I 
learned there were many things we 
could do together. We have planned 
our vacation, we've gone to pro- 
grams, and we've learned to enjoy 
each others companionship. 

In working toward my degree I 
also took a food preparation project. 
My mother was overweight so I 
prepared low-calorie meals for her. 
As a result of this, she lost weight, 
looked better, and felt better. You 
see, it has worked two ways — I'm 
a better girl; we're a happier family! 

My brother didn't co-operate 
very well with me until I started let- 
Continued on page seven 



that he is a sinner and needs a Sav- 
iour. 

Live to make a life 
Do not live to make a living 
Rather live to make a life 
For the measure to Succeeding 
Is your service in the Strife 
All you ever leave behind you 
When your soul has crossed the 

bay 
Is the good you've done to others 
As you tarried by the way 
Build a life as pure as Crystal 
Build a spirit full of love 
Build your mind by Noble Think- 
ing 
Build a Faith in God above 
Build your life with Care and 

Patience 
As the Sculptor hews the stone 
With the master as your model 
And your eyes upon the Throne 
Noble lives have seen the beacon 
Lighting mankind's upward way 
They who serve are the immortals 
Fathers of a Better Day 
Let your light shine out in service 
Noble living, Noble deeds 
And until time's course is ended 
Good will Blossom From the 
Seeds. 

— Written by Pat Eason's Mother for Pat to 
present. 

Ahoskie Chapter 

President, Jewel Snipes, appointed 
different members to work on the 
following projects during the week. 

1. Attending church together on 
Sunday night. 

2. Serving refreshments to the 
teachers on Teacher's Day. 

3. Sponsoring school clean-up 
day. 

4. Preparing an FHA bulletin 
board to be placed in the main high 
school hall. 

5. Collecting magazines to be 
taken to the hospital. 

6. Writing a letter to the eighth 
grade girls encouraging them to join 
the FHA next year. 

7. Climaxing the week was the 
state convention held in Raleigh. 

To conclude the observance of 
National Future Homemakers of 
America Week, 14 Junius H. Rose 
High School Future Homemakers 
are attending the State Convention 
in Raleigh today. 

Future Homemakers from all over 
America have been celebrating FHA 
Week (March 23-29) and approxi- 
mately 3,800 Future Homemakers 
from North Carolina convened in 

Continued on page six 



Home Experiences Help Future Homemaker 



From the Badln Chapter as re- 
ported in the "Stanly News and 
Press," Albemarle, N. C. 

The goal of homemaking instruc- 
tion in the school is to help pupils 
develop into the kind of persons and 
home members who will be able to 
assume successfully the complex re- 
sponsibilities of homemakers. In 
order to achieve such a goal it is 
essential for pupils to participate in 
a wide variety of experiences — 
experiences which are closely related 
to problems encountered in the 
home and in the community which 
give the pupils confidence in their 
ability to meet new situations with 
satisfaction. 

Future homemakers experience 
much satisfaction in achieving goals 
as they plan and carry out a home 
experience. 

Lynn Abernethy chose as her 
experience, "Improving My Room." 
The first thing Lynn did was to paint 
her room, then she had a bookcase 
cut and painted to fit into a special 
place. She says, "It is much more 
useful, looks nice, and is easier to 
clean." With the addition of a place 
to study with table, chair, lamp, 
new curtains, pictures, a bedroom 
chair, better lighting arrangement, 
electric clock, radio and study lamp, 
the room is lovely. Lynn says, "The 
old room looks like a brand-new 
one," and is so very comfortable. 

Several girls have chosen meal 
preparation as experiences ranging 
from breakfast preparation to pre- 
paring, serving, and entertaining at 
Christmas dinners. 

Thelma Talbert wanted to learn 
new and better ways to cook attrac- 
tive meals. In this work her mother 
says, "Thelma has helped me a lot, 
learning more about food prepara- 
tion. It gave me more free time for 
other things. When mother and 
daughter share an interest in this 
type of experience they are sharing 
other ideas of homemaking." 

Billy Dick says, "When I do the 
house work my mother does not 
have it to do." To see each room 
clean and neatly furnished is a re- 
ward to any young lady. 

Mrs. Drye in expressing herself 
concerning Cornelia Ann's work 
says, "I think all girls should take 
an interest in the home and Cor- 



nelia's work will help her in later 
years." 

Freezing foods for winter use was 
a joy to Joyce Morton. 

There is the area of child develop- 
ment that Future Homemakers en- 
joy. Judy Hooks has this to say 
about some of her experiences, "I 
taught Debbie not to take Frank's 
toys away from him, to let other 
children play with her toys, to play 
well by herself, and not to cry after 
people. I have learned to be patient 
with children and to treat them with 
kind and loving care." 

Miriam Drye considers baby sit- 
ting a real experience and wonder- 
ful training for a job some day — 
"maybe a governess." Baby-sitting 
is a test in skill in management and 
trustworthiness to her. 

Varied experiences in clothing are 
chosen by the girls such as Evelyn 
Moore making clothes for her cousin 
for which she was paid for her work. 
Becky Kluttz making her skirts and 
jumpers for her wardrobe rather 
than buying them. Loretta Ross, 
improving her wardrobe for any 
occasion. Bonnie Ridge is anxious 
to improve her sewing and develop 
better skill and techniques in the 
construction of a jumper which she 
needed to add to her wardrobe. 
Rosanne Hollis agrees with these 
girls that one learns to save money, 
develop skill, and also get a lot of 
pleasure while doing something very 
worthwhile. Patricia Dick made a 
blouse — her first. 

Patricia Burris says, "Better 
grooming, good posture development 
come after results of long time prac- 
tice," which is proven by Frances 
Stuart who is one of the county par- 
ticipants in the County Posture 
Contest. 

Community experiences in church 
work, P.T.A., and civic work offer 
a wonderful opportunity for Future 
Homemakers to aline themselves 
with worthy and beneficial experi- 
ences. 

Every home experience should 
help a girl to improve her techniques 
of doing tasks of the home and 
should lead to a growing apprecia- 
tion of time and energy spent as an 
important concern of the home- 
maker. 

Jane Barker from Stanly County 



expresses her feelings concerning her 
experience, "My First Garden" in 
a poem she wrote. 

MY FIRST GARDEN 

Down in my backyard, 
There's a patch of fertile ground 
And to make it a spot of beauty, 
I began to look around. 

First I got my hoe and shovel, 
My pick and trowel, too, 
Then I purchased flower seeds 
Zinias and forget-me-nots, so blue. 

Cosmos and tuberoses 
Carefully, I did sow. 
I watered and watched for them 
And hoped that they would grow. 

Spider lilies and marigolds 
I planted in the sod. 
I weeded them, and with patience, 
I left the rest to GOD. 



A REPORT FROM THE 
BUNKER HILL CHAPTER 

Buzzing with activities all year, 
the Bunker Hill Chapter proudly re- 
ports the following activities: 

1. Fair booth at Catawba County 
Fair — blue ribbon award. The 
theme was centered around baby 
sitting. 

2. Fashion show at P.T.A. — spon- 
sored Fall Festival. 

3. Provision of food and clothing 
for needy families. 

4. Joint parties with FFA. 

5. Bakes Sales — to help with March 
of Dimes, Heart, and Cancer 
drives. ($101.71 realized.) 

6. Radio program during FHA 
Week. 

7. Magnolia tree placed on school 
ground. 

There are two incompleted proj- 
ects at the present. One is the pur- 
chase of a dryer for the department. 
Some money was made by feeding 
the local Masons, but more must be 
obtained. The other project is to 
help provide pictures for the newly 
furnished lounges and reception 
room at our school. 



From the Laurel Hill Chapter comes a poem written 
by Mary Anna Evers, as she worked toward earning 
her Chapter Degree. 

F.H.A. 

F is for fun for all who belong. 

U is for unison when we sing our sonj. 

T is for teacher, our helper and guide. 

U is for her understanding aptly applied. 

R is for the rose, our flower we know. 

E is for enthusiasm that we show. 

H is for honesty which we practice. 

O is for officers who serve to exactness. 

M is for our motto, tried and true. 

E is for economizing that we learn to do. 

M is for merit marked by degrees. 

A is for all the things done for these. 

K is for the keys to a new way to live. 

E is for education that all clubs give. 

R is for rules which we must obey. 

S is for success which will come our way. 

O is for obedience to all regulations. 

F is for friends we make in club negotiations. 

A is for ambition to get ahead. 

M is for memories, never dead. 

E is for excellence in all we do. 

R is for realization of all that's true. 

I is for initiation, oh what fun! 

C is tor good conduct of everyone. 

A is for all the things that we say are combined 
together to make F.H.A. 



Children at Party 

To learn how to play with children was one objec- 
tive in the Guilford High School Homemaking Classes. 
Future Homemakers giving the Easter Party are Carole 
Alley, Patricia Richardson, and Betty Shuler. 




Mrs. McCullar^s Speech 

"The Art of Being an Attractive Girl" 

was the topic used by Mrs. Bernice McCullar, the de- 
lightful speaker for our 1958 State FHA Convention. 
Mrs. McCullar captured the hearts of the 3,800 Future 
Homemakers, Advisers, and guests with her vivid il- 
lustration, quotes, and with the sincerity of her context. 
A reporter of the Morehead City Chapter aptly sum- 
marized the essence of Mrs. McCullar's speech as 
follows : 

She gave four suggestions for being a woman of 
strength and understanding: Be interested in everything 
around you and keep a friendly countenance, be serene 
and calm but don't be mediocre, learn to get along with 
people, and have faith in yourself, in other people, and 
in God. 




Mrs. McCullar was educated at Georgia State College 
for Women and Mercer University. Daughter of a Bap- 
tist minister and has been active in the religious field. 
She was admitted to the Georgia Bar and practiced 
law with her husband, the late Judge C. B. McCullar. 
After his death she returned to the Georgia State College 
as Director of Public Relations for this Institution and 
as member of the English Faculty. In 1950 she joined 
the Georgia State Department of Education as Director 
of the Office of Information, a position she now holds. 
In this capacity she edits the Georgia FHA News, 
interprets the program through radio and newspaper. 

Well known as an educational leader, church worker, 
lecturer and writer. Her pungent wit and humor in the 
book Wit and Wisdom of Main Street has been used 
by such radio and TV personalities as Don McNeill on 
The Breakfast Club and Ed Sullivan on Toast of New 
York. She is the mother of two children, a son and 
daughter, and the doting grandmother of two little boys. 



Reading left to right: Dr. Catherine T. Dennis, State Super- 
visor of Home Economics Education; Becky Hayes, State Presi- 
dent; Dr. Irwin V. Sperry and Mrs. Sperry. Becky Hayes, FHA 
President and Jim Sinclair, FFA President. Honorary Member- 
ship was conferred on Dr. I. V. Sperry, Mrs. W. C. Pressly, 
Mrs. Wilbur Hayes, and to Dr. Vester Mulholland (not present). 
State Degree Winners. Pictured in white are state officers who 
earned the State Homemaker Degree. Pitt County Future 
Homemakers who participated in Pageant — "Future Home- 
makers Look Ahead." 



A Coveted Award 

for any Future Homemaker 
State Homemaker Degree 

While applicants for the State Homemaker Degree waited 
for word of approval or rejection on the application, screening 
committees were diligently at work reviewing the reports. Pic- 
tured here are some of the members of the screening and 
evaluation committee in District II as they worked one Satur- 
day in the La Grange Home Economics Department. Ad- 
visers and members in the picture are left to right, Mary Bryan 
Wooten, La Grange; Mary Gold Walker, B. F. Grady; Mrs. 
Wade H. Ferguson, La Grange; Martha Dare Garris, La 
Grange; Mrs. Geraldine M. Beveridge, Beaufort; Jane Bar- 
row, Lucama, State FHA Historian; Cauley Jones, Moss HilJ; 
Anne Douglas Fields, Walstonburg. Standing is Mrs. Mabel L. 
Hall, District Supervisor, Greenville. 




March 29, 1958 

Atkinson — Shirley Faye Dixon, Mary 
Nell Shaw. 

B. F. Grady — Nell Dixon Garner, 
Joyce Harper, Patricia Herring, June Ann 
Smith, Betty Lou Waters. 

Bartlett- Yancey — Linda Bradshaw. 

Benvenue — Vernelle Greene, Jeannette 

New. 

Beulaville — Jessie Mae Rhodes, Betty 
Lou Williams. 

Bladenboro — Nettie Sue Britt, Ella 
Dean Bryan, Carolyn Freeman, Joyce 
Hester, Ann Johnson, Willie June Pait. 

Brogden — Marilyn J. Gainey, Tiffany 
Wiggins. 

Clyde A. Erwin — Sharon Edwards, 
Martha Fisher. 

Coats — Sybil Beasley, Marjorie Byrd, 
Patricia Byrd, Patricia Ann Ennis, Joyce 
Johnson, Norma Lee Johnson, Vickie Lou 
Lee, Ruth Lewis, Linda Parrish, Barbara 
Ann Pope, Barbara Lynne Stewart. 

Cobb Memorial — Virginia Austin, 
Marie Fitzgerald, Marie Jones, Shirley 
Thompson. 

Concord — Miriam Penninger, Peggy Jo 
Widenhouse. 

Contentnea — Carol Edwards, Mary 
Lou Tilghman. 

Deep Run — Glenda Sue Noble, Kath- 
ryn Olivia Smith. 

Elise — Mary Ann Brady, Lorna Cock- 
man. 

Etowah — Margie Orr, Wanda Sumner. 
Flat Rock — Frieda (Ann) Camp, Jean 

Osteen, Barbara (Ann) Sosebee. 

Franklin — Peggy Bondurant, Peggy 
Eades, Ann Fleming, Wilma Golding, 
Frances Ann Howell, Judy Beamer. 

Franklinton — Jean Pearce. 

Glen Alpine — Dottie Giles. 

Grantham — Sallie Ann Best, Violet 
Bryan, Elizabeth Ann Laws, Annette 
Stevens, Dora Lee Thornton, Betty Gray 
Kornegay. 

Grifton — Esther Hill Coward, Frances 
B. Davis, Sallie Mewborn, Emily Nelson. 

Helena — Linda Alice Rhew. 

High Point — Belinda Duckworth. 

Hillsboro — Ann Wilkerson. 

Jamestown — Patsy LaMarr. 

Jones Central — Sue Carol Boyette, 
Elizabeth Wells, Joyce Whaley. 



Kings Mountain — Elizabeth (Alice) 
Crawford, Jean Hicks. 

La Grange — Mary Bryan Wooten. 

Laurel Hill — Betty Jane Boland, Betty 
Ann Jackson, Priscilla Sanders, Helen 
Smith. 

Lee Edwards, Asheville — Martha Ann 
Fuller, Mary Louise Goforth, Gwen 
Richardson. 

Liberty — Faye Foushee, Linda Gard- 
ner, Doris Smith. 

Lumberton — Linda Britt, Elizabeth 
Bullard, June Leggett. 

Marshville— Flora Faye Helms. 

Maury — Doris M. Beaman. 

Mills, W. R.— (Doris) Jean Baker. 

North Buncombe — Nancy Dillingham, 
Mary Gale Haynes, Helen Roberts. 

North Davidson — Carol Scott. 

Owen — Nancy DuPuy, Dianne Nesbitt, 
Betty Patton, Anne Woodcock. 

Pinehurst — Carol Sheffield. 

Ramseur — Linda Brady, Wincey Cox, 
Judy Maness. 

Red Oak — Carolyn Frances Hunt, 
Feme Dozier Jones, Diane Price. 

Red Springs — Frances Gibson, Barbara 
McGoogan, Sandra Jean Overstreet, Re- 
becca Singleton, Barbara Watson. 

Reynolds — Wilma Jean Keever, Clara 
Jean Reed. 

Richlands — Brenda Gail Trott, Mar- 
garet Ann Thomas, Audrey Mozingo. 

Rockwell — Ann Carole Helderman. 

Roper — Diane Gaylord. 

Rutherfordton-Spindale — Marjorie 
Cole, Merrill Hamlin, Sybil Huffstickler, 
Rebecca Ledford, Jane Lewis, Judy Pos- 
ton, Gail Robertson, Ann Woodall. 

Southwood — Lottie Faye Outlaw, Linda 
Rouse. 

Stedman — Melba Rose Autry, Emma 
Lou Faircloth, Theresa McDaniel, Mar- 
jorie McLaurin, Sue Ellen McLaurin, 
Carolyn Royal, Emily Lynn Vinson, Shir- 
ley Ann Williams. 

Tarboro — Peggy Stell. 

Tri-High, Caroleen — Doris Matheny, 
Glenda Phillips, Judy Powell, Reita 
Waters. 

Union Grove — Eloise Huie, Margaret 
Templeton. 

Valley Springs — Carol Weir. 



Waco — Joyce Gantt, Recca Greene. 

Wallace-Rose Hill — Janet Allison, Vic- 
toria Bryan Carr, Mary Ellen Surratt. 

Walstonburg — Vivian Beamon, Bonnie 
Burch, Brenda Jean Dail, Ann Fields, 
Leafy Mae Jones, Ann Wooten. 

Washington — Marie Moore, Margaret 
Ann Shepherd, Joyce Sykes. 

Weldon — Pat Clark. 

West Edgecombe — Faye Goff, Harriett 
Horton, Jean Jackson. 

Winterville — Barbara Manning. 



NATIONAL FHA WEEK 

Continued from page two 

Raleigh this morning as a climax to 
the celebration. 

The afternoon session was high- 
lighted by the presentation of "Youth 
Looks Ahead," a ceremony compar- 
ing the growth of a girl with the 
growth of a rose, the official flower 
of the FHA. This ceremony was re- 
written and presented by 21 mem- 
bers of the Pitt County Federation 
of Future Homemakers of America. 

This ceremony, before it was re- 
written, was presented at the District 
I FHA Rally in the fall at East 
Carolina College and again at the 
County FHA Rally March 18 at 
J. H. Rose High School. 

Two East Carolina College Play- 
house members, Bubba Driver and 
Tommy Hull, directed the final 
version in anticipation of its being 
presented at the State Convention. 
Mrs. Elizabeth Bodkin directed the 
music and accompanied the pro- 
gram. 

Madge Stancill and Vickie Avery 
participated in the chorus while 
Frances Moseley placed parts of the 
rose in the ceremony. Mary French 
Hawes represented the ultimate in 
Future Homemakers as the Home- 
maker, the most noble profession of 
all. 



Greetings and Message from 

Our Past State President, 1954-55 




Hello, Future Homemakers! 

As an ex-Future Homemaker and 
an about-to-be home economist, I 
have something to tell you. I'm Betty 
Calhoun, and a senior in Home 
Economics at East Carolina College. 
I want to talk to 
you about the pos- 
sibility of continu- 
ing your education 
in home econom- 
ics after gradua- 
tion, by telling you 
something about j 
my own experi- 
ences. 

I can't remember when I ever 
actually decided to become a home 
economist. As my high school years 
passed, it seemed to be perfectly 
natural that this would be my choice 
for my future vocation. I enjoyed 
home economics more than any 
other subject, mainly because it was 
so practical. When I enrolled at 
East Carolina, I just "did what came 
naturally," and became a home eco- 
nomics major. I have never re- 
gretted my choice. 

There is a saying that a home 
economist must be 1/3 Betty 
Crocker, 1/3 Marilyn Monroe, and 
1/3 pack horse. However true this 
is, nevertheless, we home economics 
majors receive some training in each 
area. We learn about foods, not 
only how to prepare them attrac- 
tively, but how to select them for the 
best possible nutrition. We learn 
that a home economist must be well 
groomed, not only for her own sake, 
but to uphold our profession. As 
for learning how to be a pack horse 
— well, we certainly have plenty of 
practice. Every time you see a girl 
on campus with an armload of 
books, boxes, magazines, flowers, 
clothes, etc. — there goes a home 
economics major. 

Of course not all of college is 
work. There are many opportunities 
for fun and recreation. At East 
Carolina home economics majors 
are one of the most popular groups 
on campus. We participate in many 
extra-curricular activities, such as 
student government, clubs, and 
recreational activities. Of course, we 
don't have an FHA, but we do have 
a home economics club, which is a 
grown-up FHA. We do many worth- 
while things in our club, and really 
gain much valuable experience. We 



also have a home economics honor- 
ary, Phi Omicron, of which I am 
very proud to be a member. This 
is an organization of girls who have 
done outstanding work in the field 
of home economics at East Carolina. 

As you know, there are many 
phases of home economics, and it is 
difficult to make a choice. I have 
already made my choice. I am 
going to become a teacher. I am 
doing my student teaching now, and 
I am really learning a lot about the 
teaching profession, and enjoying 
every bit of it. But there are other 
fields besides teaching: demonstra- 
tion work, extension work, design- 
ing, dietetics, and most important of 
all, homemaking. Whatever profes- 
sion you might choose, you can re- 
ceive training in that particular field 
at the college of your choice. 

As probably you have guessed by 
now, I am very enthusiastic about 
home economics. I must give some 
credit to the FHA for this interest. 
I was a member for four years, and 
during my Senior year, I served as 
president of the State Organization. 
May I encourage you Future Home- 
makers to continue your education 
by becoming a home economist. 
You will find, as I have, that it is a 
most rewarding and satisfying pro- 
fession. 



DISCOVERS HERSELF 

Continued from page two 

ting him help me with some of my 
activities and showing him how he 
could become a real part of the work 
and fun around home. For instance, 
my family helped me plan a pajama 
party for a few of my girl friends. 
They offered suggestions as to food, 
entertainment, etc. They helped me 
roll up my rugs, get the food ready 
to serve. My brother said he thought 
a pillow fight would be a lot of fun. 
It was fun for all of us and relieved 
mom and dad of some of the jobs 
they would probably otherwise have 
done. 

I can see that because of my FHA 
project in Family Relations, we get 
along better, have more time for 
family fun, and have better feelings 
and a keener understanding of each 
other as individuals. I know my own 
home of the future will be a better 
one because of these wonderful 
experiences. 



I've had some wonderful things 
happen to me because I'm an active 
FHA member and a Homemaking 
girl! Last year we had a tornado in 
our town. Five of the FHA mem- 
bers helped the Salvation Army 
distribute clothing and food to the 
homeless. I never really knew how 
much organizations like that did for 
needy people. My horizons were 
broadened very greatly! 

Because I belong to the FHA, I've 
had other wonderful experiences. I 
have attended District Rallies, State 
Conventions, and FHA Camp. Last 
year, at the District III Rally, I ap- 
peared on the afternoon program 
in the skit, "What's Cooking? in 
FHA 'Round The World," written 
by our Chapter and presented by the 
Robeson County group at the Rally. 
The entire program had as its pur- 
pose Goal III. "To understand our 
neighbors at home and abroad." This 
was a real experience for me. 

There is one more thing that I'd 
like to tell you that has happened 
to me because I'm active in FHA 
and Homemaking. FHA has made 
me conscious of the fact that there 
is work in my community that I can 
do to make it a better place in which 
to live. 

Some of the things I've done have 
been with other members of our 
FHA Chapter. We have visited our 
Cancer Center and have baked cook- 
ies and candies for the patients. And 
FHA members have contributed 
canned foods, clothing, and other 
things for needy families at Christ- 
mas. 

While I was working for my 
Junior degree I was a member of 
our Sunday night Training Union 
Class. I would probably never have 
seen these opportunities to serve the 
religious life in our community, had 
I not been working on my degree 
and looking for an opportunity to 
serve. 

Do you see the Benefits FHA and 
Homemaking offer? They are three: 

You. 

Your Family — both your present 
and your future one! 

Your Community — Perhaps I 
should say the world instead. 

I know I'm a better me because 
I'm a homemaking girl and an active 
FHA member. You can be, too! 
Just try it! 



Honoring Our Mothers and 
Interpreting Our Program 



Beneath the eyes of a sleepy Japa- 
nese moon, the Cary Chapter of the 
Future Homemakers of America 
held their Mother-Daughter Annual 
Social. 

The "gala" affair began with a 
song and poem dedicated to our 
mothers. We discovered that our 
mothers were much better sports 
than we had previously thought. For 
example in one game we fed crackers 
to each other blindfolded. In another 
game mothers tried to recognize 
daughters by merely seeing the nose. 

The highlight of the party was an 
authentic Japanese dance performed 
by three of our members who had 
lived in Japan. A gaily-painted 
Japanese mural painted by the FHA 
members provided an interesting 
background for the dance. Colorful 
Japanese fans and butterflies 
adorned the walls, while Japanese 
lanterns hung gracefully from the 
ceiling. Adding to the educational 
side of the party was a showcase in 
which a complete Japanese outfit 
was shown. 

It was at this occasion that Junior 
and Chapter degrees were awarded. 

A tiered conversational piece — a 
miniature Japanese house made 
from citrus fruit — adorned the table. 
Around the Japanese house were 



goodies of all kinds — sandwiches, 
olives, cookies, and punch. 

The fortune cookies attracted 
special attention, because of the for- 
tunes which were so cleverly con- 
cealed in them. 

This year for our international 
project our chapter chose to send 
money for overseas relief through 
UNESCO. Plans had been made to 
send it to a European Country, how- 
ever, the FHA'ers took such an 
interest in the small, overcrowded 
country of Japan that we decided to 
send our contribution to the people 
who have had some of the worst 
luck in the world — the Japanese. 



"The Homes of Tomorrow Are In 
The Hands of The Youth of Today.*' 
This was the theme used by Rev- 
erend Russell Flemming who was 
guest speaker at the Mother-Daugh- 
ter Banquet of the Benvenue Chap- 
ter. Beginning with a humorous 
definition of "girl" and "daughter," 
Reverend Flemming carried his 
listeners' thoughts to the more 
serious responsibilities, duties, and 
privileges of a mother and daughter. 

David Harper, a talented young 
Rocky Mount senior, and a come- 
dian in his own right, entertained the 



group with his comic remarks and 
antics, and led in group singing. 

Mrs. Fred T. Langford, sponsor 
for the Benvenue FHA Chapter, 
presented certificates and pins to 
forty-seven girls in recognition of 
achievements they have made in 
FHA work. 

Mrs. Langford recognized Ver- 
nelle Greene and Jeanette New, two 
Benvenue seniors who are applicants 
for the State Degree. To be eligible 
to be a state degree candidate, a 
girl must have successfully com- 
pleted two years of home economics, 
received both Junior and Chapter 
degrees, and held office in her local 
FHA Chapter. 

In addition to the FHA girls' 
mothers, special guests included 
these: Mrs. L. S. Inscoe, wife of 
County Superintendent of Schools 
and Home Demonstration Agent in 
Nash County; Mr. R. T. Griffin, Jr., 
a member of the Nash County Board 
of Education; Mr. Ralph Sturtevant, 
member of the Benvenue School 
Board; Mike Barnhill, president of 
the Benvenue Chapter of the Future 
Farmers of America; Mrs. B. H. 
Saunders, manager of the lunchroom 
at Benvenue School; the members 
of the high school faculty. 



Future Homemakers Become Volunteers 



at Orthopedic Hospital 



The volunteer work is of value to 
the hospital, assisting as it does in 
the extremely busy W.N.C. Ortho- 
pedic Clinic, and it is of much value 
to the girls who take part. Members 
of the Future Homemakers of Amer- 
ica at Clyde A. Erwin High School 
are learning the value of volunteer 
service through a Saturday morning 
project at the Asheville Orthopedic 
Hospital. 

There is a long list of Future 
Homemakers who signed up for 
duty, and plans are for continued 
service during the summer months 
when school is not in session. 

The girls became interested in the 
Orthopedic Hospital because Mrs. 
Burwell Smith, their sponsor, is a 

3 



member of the Rhododendron Club, 
and the club also has many interests 
at the hospital. 

Mrs. Norma Morgan, the other 
FHA adviser at the school, believes 
that the girls get invaluable training 
in leadership and in assuming re- 
sponsibility, learning to follow direc- 
tions and work with other groups — 
some of which they learn in the class- 
room studies and put into practice. 
For example, the child care unit in 
home economics courses now means 
a lot more to the girls than it did 
before. 

The instructors feel that the girls 
will continue to be community- 
conscious and to do community 
work long after they complete their 
school work. 



The girls say that giving time they 
could well use for themselves has 
proved the joy and satisfaction of 
doing for others. 

And the girls say they are show- 
ing that teen-agers are interested in 
worthwhile things, "not just having 
fun." 

The girls help the patients get 
ready for the doctors — some of the 
patients are very young and some 
are very frightened at the strange 
procedings; they get the records for 
each patient to present to the phy- 
sician with the patient; they take 
patients to the X-ray rooms; they 
baby-sit youngsters waiting their 
turn or they help entertain children 
who are not patients but who are at 
the clinic because the parents had to 




Located near the Seymour Johnson 
Field in Wayne County, the New Hope 
Chapter found it convenient to invite a 
foreigner to speak during a regular meet- 
ing. The members are always pleased 
with programs of this nature. The fashion 
show also proved to be a big event and 
a successful one. 

The Mother-Daughter Buffet Supper 
was considered the highlight during FHA 
Week. Mrs. G. L. Overman of Golds- 
boro entertained the group with her 
humorous remarks of the past and pres- 
ent time of mother and daughter experi- 
ences. 

One of the most successful years ever 
is reporter by the Red Springs Chapter. 
One of the busiest months was October. 
Forty-nine members along with the ad- 
viser, Mrs. Stanton, and an honorary 
member, Mrs. McDonald, attended Dis- 
trict HI FHA Rally in Rockingham. 
Several members were in the pageant 
"FHA Around the World." A window 
display for the Fall Festival was another 
outstanding project during October. 

During November, the Initiation Pro- 
gram and a party took place. Membership 
cards and FHA magazines were distrib- 
uted and reviewed. 

A covered dish supper for mothers 
followed by a play, "The Blue Overall 
Angel," proved to be very successful. 
Other projects during December included 
visiting the rest home and taking cup 
cakes and other delicacies to the Cancer 
Home in Lumberton. 

A play "Mrs. Pennigal's Cat" was the 
main feature of the January meeting. 
This play was also given for the entire 
student body during an assembly pro- 
gram. 

February was for business — money 
making projects, a panel discussion, and 
plans for a social. 

March included many activities in ob- 
servance of National FHA Week, attend- 
ing the State FHA Convention, and 
preparing members in planning for degree 
work another year. Five members of the 
Red Springs Chapter received the State 
Homemaker Degree at the State Con- 
vention this year. 

The Falliston Chapter was host to 210 
Future Homemakers in ten chapters in 
Cleveland County at a recent Rally. "To 
Promote Better Living" was the theme 
and the speaker, Mrs. L. B. Connor, used 
as her topic "Family Relations." 

In addition to members present were 
nine Chapter Mothers, nine Advisers, 
Mr. Gray, Falliston Principal, and Miss 
Louise Swann, Area Supervisor of Home 
Economics Education. 



"Personality" was the subject of the 
address given by Mrs. C. G. English of 
the North Carolina State College Exten- 
sion Division at the Warren-Vance Bi- 
County FHA Rally. All chapters partici- 
pated in the program and approximately 
250 members, advisers, and mothers were 
present. 

Spencer Chapter won the attendance 
prize — with 72 members present at the 
Rowan-Davie Bi-County Rally which was 
held during National FHA Week. More 
than 300 members and guests attended. 
The Rally was held at China Grove 
School. Mr. Carson, the Principal, 
brought greetings, Mt. Ulla Chapter pre- 
sented the Devotional, Boyden Chapter 
was in charge of entertainment, and 
decorations were prepared by the Rock- 
well Chapter. 

Each chapter elects an officer. The 
office held in each chapter rotates each 
year. 

Observance of National FHA Week in 
the Morehead City Chapter began with 
emphasis on service to the high school. 
Devotions were conducted by members 
over the intercom sending messages on 
personal influence and good family rela- 
tions. Red roses were presented to each 
teacher. Courtesy was the ware one day. 
Family day was Saturday and Church 
Attendance in groups on Sunday. 

The Ruffin Chapter this year cleared 
$267.35 from the beauty pageant which 
this chapter sponsors annually. Forty-six 
girls participated in the pageant. Each 
girl is sponsored by a local merchant. 
The money will be used for improving 
the Home Economics Department. 

"Degrees of Achievement" was the 
program for the March meeting in the 
Boyden Chapter. The program was 
planned by Jan White, vice-president. 
Ann Carole Helderman from the Rock- 
well Chapter spoke on the requirements 
for degrees and value of them to the 
member. 

Newport FHA members sponsored a 
sale led by our adviser, Mrs. Ruby Sim- 
mons. The members sold coat-hanger 
covers and sponges. The FHA members 
also have monthly bake sales, and the 
past two sales have turned out success- 
fully. The proceeds will go toward our 
Mother-Daughter Banquet. 

At our last FHA meeting we had a 
guest speaker, Mrs. Gerry Beveridge, the 
FHA Adviser from Beaufort, North 
Carolina. She spoke to us concerning 
FHA Degrees. 

We would like to share with you our 
FHA activities in the Nebo Chapter for 
the 1957-58 school year. 

After selecting qualified officers and 
chapters mothers, we began a campaign 
to gain new members for our club. We 
set aside activity period each second and 
fourth Wednesday for our regular meet- 
ings. 



bring them along when the children 
who are patients were brought. 

The FHA chapter has other com- 
munity projects, but the work at 
clinic is hands-down favorite. 

Clara Buckner states, "Yes, we 
could stay in bed these Saturday 
mornings! But we are helping to 
prove that most teen-agers aren't 
'juvenile delinquents.' The little that 



we can do, helps other teen-agers, 
too." 

"Really, it's all fun," says Sharon 
Edwards, the chapter president. "It's 
fun, partly because we don't have 
to do it, partly because we feel that 
it is helping us to become a part of 
the community, and partly because 
we feel that we are doing something 
that is needed." 



A committee was appointed to plan 
our program of work for the year. Plans 
were made to begin on several projects 
immediately, the first of which was the 
seeding of an unattractive area outside 
the home economics department. In ad- 
dition to sowing grass, tulip bulbs and 
candytuft" were planted. By the time the 
first blades of grass began to peep out of 
the ground we had forgotten the aching 
muscles and blisters we had after those 
hours of digging, raking and pulling 
weeds. 

Having successfully completed our first 
project we sat out to improve our first-aid 
room. Several chairs and a storage shelf 
were painted, draperies were made for the 
window, and sheets, pillowcases, towels, 
washcloths, blankets, and pillows were 
purchased or donated to make the room 
more attractive and convenient. A sched- 
ule was drawn up so that two FHA girls 
are responsible for the care of the room 
each week. 

At Thanksgiving we prepared and de- 
livered a basket of fruit to a rest home 
in the community. The smiles and words 
of thanks convinced us this should be a 
part of our activities each year. 

In September our school was host to 
the Schoolmasters Club. The FHA girls 
decorated the school lunchroom in a Japa- 
nese motif and several of the waitresses 
donned authentic Japanese costumes. 

Another highlight of our year was the 
trip to district FHA Rally at Cherryville. 
Seventeen members, two chapter mothers, 
and our advisor attended the rally. Our 
club enjoyed helping with the exhibits 
prepared by the McDowell County and 
Marion High clubs. 

Our plans for spring include a Mother- 
Daughter Banquet, the state FHA Rally, 
observance of FHA week, and a picnic 
honoring our chapter mothers. 

Of courst, to carry out the projects we 
needed "money in the bank." At the 
beginning of the year a finance committee 
was appointed which suggested sponsor- 
ing a chicken pie supper and the sale of 
personalized stationery and furniture 
polish. The chicken supper netted seventy 
dollars. For the sale of the furniture 
polish and stationery the club divided 
into two teams with the agreement that 
the winning side be treated to a party by 
the losers. Our chapter has also sold pies, 
cakes, and fudge. 

We feel our chapter work this year 
has been successful due to advance plan- 
ning and learning to work together. We 
hope other chapters have had as much 
fun as we have had in our FHA work 
this year. 

By Gloria Wise, President. 

Big babies, little babies, middle-size 
babies or just any size — were contestants 
in the Baby Contest sponsored by the 
Mayodan Chapter of the Future Home- 
makers of America under the leadership 
of Miss Ruth Hyder, the advisor. There 
were thirty-one contestants. 

Along with the Contest there was a 
Talent Show with talent from in and 
around Mayodan taking part. "The 
Squares" of Madison were winners in the 
Talent Division and Ricky Richardson 
in the Baby Contest. The FHA will use 
the $326.50 for projects. 

The group chose "Our Mother's Love" 
for the theme of the Mother-Daughter 
Banquet to be held during National FHA 
Week. Plans are being made to observe 
National FHA Week with each day set 
aside as a special day. 



Future Homemakers of America 



CREED 

We are the Future Homemakers of America 
We face the future with warm courage, 
And high hope, 

For we have the clear consciousness of seeking 
Old and precious values. 

For we are the builders of homes, 

Homes for America's future. 

Homes where living will be the expression of everything 

That is good and fair. 

Homes where truth and love and security and faith 

Will be realities, not dreams. 

We are the Future Homemakers of America, 
We face the future with warm courage. 
And high hope. 




"The homes of tomorrow are in 

the hands of the youth 

of today" 




Caroline says: 

Perhaps your Chapter may wish to sing these words 
by Mrs. Walter Latham, Bethel, N. C. 

BLESS F. H. A. 

Tune: Bless This House 

Bless our F. H. A. we pray 
Grant us wisdom all the way 
Bless our aims, so high and clear 
Building futures without fear. 

Bless our homes in every hall 
Let Thy peace live over all. 
Bless our work that it may show 
Hope and courage as we go. 

Grant our members vision bright 
Striving always for the right. 
Bless the dreams of hope so rare 
With faith ascending like a prayer. 

Bless the F. H. A. within 

Keep us pure and free from sin. 

Guide us all that we may be, Homemakers inspired 

by Thee 
Grant that we may ever be, the hope of our country. 

This song was used in the Pageant, "Future Homemakers 
Look Ahead" which was presented hv the Pitt Count}' Federa- 
tion during the 1958 State Convention, 



Future Homemakers 

Hope to Grow Through . . . 





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Personal Development 

Better Family Living 

Stronger FHA Chapters 
Correlated with the 
Homemaking Program 

Understanding Our 
Neighbors 

Participating in 
Community Affairs 




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FUTURE HOMEMAKERS 

* North Carolina Association * 



VOLUME XVI 




OCTOBER 1958 





en* 



daA (lemmde/iA 



Dues: State and National dues are to be in the State 
Office by December 1, 1958, if your chapter is to be 
affiliated for 1958-59. 

The amount of the dues is 55 cents per member — 
plus 10 cents per member contributions for helping 
defray expenses of state officers and district advisers 
to national meetings. This makes a total of 65 cents 
per member. The State Office is responsible for for- 
warding the national dues of 15 cents per member to 
the national office. 

Degrees of Achievement: Deadline dates for filing 
Declaration of Intention to work for the Junior and 
Chapter degrees and the completed reports are set by 
the local Chapter Degree Committee. The deadline 
date for filing Declaration of Intention to work toward 
the State Homemaker Degree is November 15. (A 
request for forms must be sent to the State Adviser 
earlier in order to receive the blanks and to get the 
Intention form filled in and returned to the State Office 



by November 15.) This year a Plan of Work is to be 
filed with the Declaration of Intention. 

State Convention: Date — April 4, 1959. 

Place — Memorial Auditorium, Raleigh, N. C. 

National FHA Week: April 5-11, 1959. 

National Meeting: 1959 — July 13-17. Conrad Hil- 
ton Hotel, Chicago, Illinois, 2,500 delegates (members 
and advisers) of Future Homemakers of America. 
(Begin now to plan to send a delegate to represent your 
chapter or your county federation.) 

Annual Report: One copy is due in the State Office, 
by June 1, 1959, and earlier if possible. One copy is 
to be filed in the department. 

Important!! Affiliate early. 
Send news items to State office. 



North Carolina Association of Future Homemakers of America 



State Officers 
1958-59 

President — Becky Nifong, North Davidson VII 

Vice-President — Nancy Edwards, Wingate VI 

Secretary — Cynthia Leonard, Ramseur V 

Treasurer — Sybil Beasley, Coats IV 

Reporter — Jo Anne Matthews, Central-Fayetteville III 

Parliamentarian — Joyce Harper, B. F. Grady II 

Historian — Betsy Benthall, Woodland-Olney I 

Song Leader — Mary Gale Haynes, North Buncombe 
VIII 



District Advisers 
1958-59 

Mrs. Theresa Brown, West Edgecombe I 
Margaret Carol Banks, Southwood II 
Mrs. Ada Melvin, Bladenboro III 
Mrs. Dorothy Hales, Boone Trail IV 
Mrs. Edith P. Morgan, Franklinville V 
Mrs. Helen Thompson, Endy VI 
Mildred Beamer, West Yadkin VII 
Mrs. Patsy C. Bowers, Glen Alpine VIII 



State Adviser 

Mrs. Faye T. Coleman 



STATE DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 

Division of Vocational Education 
Raleigh, North Carolina 










Planning the program for the year are left to right Miss Annie S. Wootten, adviser in Northern High School; Jane Sanford; 
Betty Gilchrist, chapter president; Barbara Smith, Faye Painter; Miss Cleo Codas, Home Economics teacher. 



Ideas Are Born 



Through Group Planning 



A "Welcome to Freshmen" was 
an idea which materialized during 
a meeting of FHA members in the 
Northern High School in Durham 
County before the opening of school. 
Some old members would wear 
badges and serve as guides to assist 
freshmen girls in finding classrooms. 
Charts of welcome would be pre- 
pared and displayed. Other plans 
included: 

1 . A big square dance, for whole- 
some recreation and for income to 
carry out worthy projects. 

2. A county fair exhibit: Title, 
FHA Trains for Leadership Through 
Home, School, and Community 
Projects. 

3. Shrubs and trees planted on 
the school ground using money 
earned from dance and fair exhibit. 

4. Help two deserving families at 
Christmas by contributing used and 
new clothing, toys, canned foods, 
and potatoes. 



5. Nut cups to be used on trays 
of ward patients at the V. A. Hospi- 
tal. 

6. Magazines and scraps of ma- 
terials for inmates at the county 
home. 

7. A social for mothers or for 
both parents. 

■fi *£ & ^ 

"We've sent this little flower 
We hope it brings you cheer. 
It says we're glad to have you, 
At N.H.H.S. this year. 
We're happy that You're with us, 
And hope that God will grant, 
A friendship that will be here, 
Much longer than this plant." 

By Pat Badon, A Future 
Homemaker at New Han- 
over High School 

This poem was attached to each of 
the brightly decorated pots of Ger- 
man Ivy, Coleus, and Geranium — 
one of which was placed on each 



teacher's desk just prior to school 
opening. The project resulted from 
co-operative planning and work by 
members of two student clubs of 
New Hanover High School — The 
Future Homemakers of America and 
the Distributive Education Club. 

The plants were truly a co- 
operative effort. Jerry Matthews, 
Distributive Education student, se- 
cured the planters from the store, 
where he is employed on the Co- 
operative Training program. Mr. 
and Mrs. George West, 2401 Shirley 
Road, furnished the cuttings, which 
the Future Homemakers, under 
supervision of the advisor, Mrs. 
Alton Wright, rooted. Several mem- 
bers of the two clubs assisted in 
wrapping the planters with foil and 
ribbons being guided by Miss Caro- 
lyn Dukes, teacher in the Home 
Economics Department. 

Many students from each club 
Continued on page three 

1 




An FHA MEMBER can develop 
personally through the "Degree of 
Achievement" Program. 

Nancy DuPuy's story about her 
degree work is an interesting one. 
(Part of her story as told by Nancy 
is printed here.) 



Nancy DuPuy redecorates her brother's 
bedroom. Refinishing furniture, making 
curtains, adding ruffles to pillows and a 
lamp shade in the guest bedroom, and 
finally adding a coat of paint and select- 
ing rugs were among the activities of the 
homemaking project which preceded 
Nancy's interest in improving her broth- 
er's room. 



Self Improvement - a goal for all 



Once upon a time there was a 
little girl who lived with her mother 
and father and twin brother in a 
brown house. Her name was Cin- 
derella. Now, Cinderella's family did 
everything they could for her, but 
she was still unhappy. You see, 
Cinderella wanted to take home 
economics. She was always dream- 
ing of the things she could make, 
the pretty clothes for herself and 
her mother, curtains for her brother's 
room, and a great big cake for Dad- 
dy! At last, when she began to learn 
the wonderful art of homemaking, 
her home economics teacher became 
her fairy godmother and helped her 
make all her dreams come true. 

Cinderella came home one day 
very much excited. She had joined 
FHA and was quite thrilled over all 
the things they planned to do that 
year. She participated in all the 



FHA Chapter activities wholeheart- 
edly and tried to do her part in each. 
She was very pleased that year when 
her classmates nominated her to a 
county office. 



The North Carolina Association 

of 

FUTURE HOMEMAKERS OF AMERICA 

^taie JHonwrnaber jBftrrtE 

This is to certify that Nancy DuPuy 
having satisfied all the requirements 
of this degree is hereby entitled to 
all the honor and opportunities 
pertaining thereto. 
In witness thereof this 29th day of 
March, 1958. 

Becky Hayes 

State President 
Faye T. Coleman 

State Adviser 



During her two years of home 
economics instruction she gained 
lots of valuable knowledge and had 
many happy experiences. She was 
asked to give a demonstration of the 
correct way to make biscuits for her 
home economics class and the dis- 
trict adviser. Cinderella was some- 
what nervous and rather surprised 
when they turned out pretty good! 
Her mother was pleased as the hous- 
ing unit inspired Cinderella to re- 
finish a dresser and then a desk for 
her room. She got a big kick out 
of making the costumes of two High- 
land Dancers for herself and another 
girl who did the Highland Fling in 
the May Day exercises. Cinderella 
became real interested in sewing, so 
she decided to fix her summer ward- 
robe as a home project. She worked 
very diligently and greatly profited 
by it! When her home economics 






teacher sent in the write-up, Cinder- 
ella just beamed with joy when it 
received third place in the district. 

Now, Cinderella enjoyed FHA 
and home economics so much that 
when her teacher suggested that she 
work on her degrees she was de- 
lighted. She received her Junior 
Homemaker Degree when she was 
in the ninth grade and her Chapter 
Degree in March 1957. Then she 
began with great enthusiasm to 
think and consider her plans for the 
State Homemaker Degree. 

First, Cinderella decided to work 
on her personal goals. Since she 
enjoyed sewing and wanted to im- 
prove this skill, she took as her 
project making herself more at- 
tractive by choosing the correct 
styles and accessories. She spent 
approximately $18.00, thirty hours 
on sewing and shopping, and lots 
of worthwhile energy on this proj- 
ect. The satisfactions received from 
compliments of family and friends 
plus that feeling of being "well 
dressed" were rewards for all efforts. 

Cinderella enjoys school; she is 
an "A" student and participates in 
many school activities and in such 
organizations as the Student Council, 
Future Teachers Association, Beta 
Club, Bible Club, Latin Club, and 
School Annual Assistant Editor. 

As to FHA, this is her third year 
of really good times. In FHA she 
has served as Vice-President last 
year and has planned a full year as 
President now. She was commenta- 
tor for a style show which was given 
to the P.TA. and also spoke at a 
Buncombe County Officers' Ban- 
quet. 

Cinderella always greatly enjoyed 
the FHA Rallies and attended all 
that were possible. She would come 
back like a "recharged battery," 
ready to remake the whole chapter! ! 
She found these Rallies to be a great 
help in understanding the State Pro- 
gram of Work and in suggesting 
ideas which could be carried out 
when she returned home. Her coun- 
ty officers held a workshop for all 
the local chapter officers and Cinde- 
rella and the other officers attended 
this meeting. It proved to be a 
wonderful help to the officers, and 
all the members benefited indirectly. 

Cinderella and the other four 
girls who were working on their 
State Degrees felt that they should 
do a project for the school along 
with their ones for community and 
home. They chose to paint the 
cabinets in the kitchen of the Home 
Economics Department. One Febru- 
ary Saturday, all came in old jeans 
Continued on page eight 



BASIC TO PERSONAL 
DEVELOPMENT IS: 

(food 'family &t/wq. 



It's Fun to Try 

(Summary of a Home Experience 
of a Future Homemaker in the Liles- 
ville School) 

Who said, "Two can live as 
cheaply as one?" Even so, it is fun to 
try. How do we know? Our class in 
homemaking has been working hard 
to prove this old adage. We have 
learned that with family co-opera- 
tion, a good plan and some buying 
know how, money can be stretched. 
Dorothy proved this to be true, even 
though she was buying groceries for 
eleven rather than two. 

Dorothy, the oldest of eight chil- 
dren, wanted the experience of han- 
dling money, so she could learn 
how to use it wisely. With her par- 
ents' best wishes, she began to plan 
the spending of the family's food 
dollar. The results indicate that she 
planned well, for she kept within 



her budget allowance and at the 
same time met the nutritional needs 
of her family. 

Dorothy realized that she was suc- 
cessful in this home experience be- 
cause she planned well in advance. 
She understood the value of reading 
newspaper advertising and helpful 
hints found in feature articles on the 
women's page. Buying the right va- 
riety, style and container size to 
meet specific needs, contributed to 
her success. During the entire ex- 
perience proven procedures for buy- 
ing groceries were followed, such as 
brand name selection, label reading, 
special seals and guarantee identifi- 
cation. 

More than money management 
was learned. Dorothy says, "It takes 
family co-operation to make a food 
allowance work and sometimes it 
isn't easy. But it is worth the effort, 
for it's lots of fun and a real satis- 
faction to work with a large family." 



These Future Homemakers received many benefits from serving on the Committee 
for evaluating applications for the State Homemaker Degree. 




You Play a Part 



In Your Chapter's Progress 



Program for "Teens With a Purpose" 



Progress in any organization re- 
sults from a composite of vision, 
imagination, ideas, thinking, worth- 
while goals, plans, action, and con- 
tinuous evaluation. 

"Teen With a Purpose," the theme 
of the National Meeting in Kansas 
City, Missouri, with programs cen- 
tered around this theme brought to 
each delegate an awareness of her 
responsibility as a Future Home- 
maker in recognizing her purposes 
and in formulating goals for the at- 
tainment of these purposes. 

Margaret McKinnon of the Wa- 
gram Chapter expresses her feelings 
when she repeats the Creed of the 

Future Homemakers of America. 

* * * 

We are the future Homemakers of 

America 
We face the future . . . 

and what a future . . . 
never before so many oppor- 
tunities 
never before so many chal- 
lenges. 
There will be hardships, but we will 
face them with warm courage . . . 
and high hope. 



(courage because it will not be easy; 
hope because we can conquer.) 
Conquer because we have the con- 
sciousness of seeking old and pre- 
cious values, 
Values which have been con- 
quered and have been secured 
truth . . . 
freedom . . . 
happiness . . . 
perseverance . . . 
love . . . 
qualities we seek to build into our 
homes and into America's future. 

Let us live 

and in living express all that is 
good and fair. 

Let us live 

and through living make truth 
and love prevalent, security 
and faith realities. 

Let us live 

and in living build America 
into one big home in a stable 
community. 

Let us live and worship God 

with an increased faith and zeal. 





Understanding our neighbors abroad 
was featured in a Banquet program of 
the Cary Chapter. 



Let us live and love 

to make our lives richer and 
fuller. 
Let us live for security 

made strong for all people. 

Our home must be worldwide, 
It must include our world family, 
It must be built on faith, 

faith in ourselves and in our 
purpose. 
Hold fast Future Homemakers . . . 

cling to courage . . . 

Live . . . and Hope! 

By Margaret McKinnon, 
President, Wagram Chapter 



Lexington F.H.A. members enjoy making preparations for their "Daddy-Daughter" 
Dinner. 



Daddy- Daughter Supper 

A supper and a program for 
fathers sponsored by FHA members 
helped to interpret to them the nome- 
making program in the Lexington 
School. 

The meal was an excellent one, 
composed of fried chicken, gravy, 
creamed potatoes, green beans, 
tossed salad, biscuits, cup cakes and 
ice cream, and iced tea. The fathers, 
as well as the daughters, enjoyed the 
meal very much. After the meal, we 
had group singing conducted by our 
song leader. 

The officers presented a program 
especially for the fathers explain- 
ing the purpose and meaning of the 
FHA after which there were several 
pictures made. 

Fathers became better acquainted 
with each other during the clean-up 
period by the daughters. 



The Voices and the Voice 



(Devotional given by Iowa at 1958 National FHA Meeting, Kansas City, Missouri) 
Voices of girls in white follow the voice which is opposite on the left-hand side of the page. 



Speaketh Hate (Girl dressed in black) 

I am the voice of Hate — 

I am the clamor of war, the heat of anger, the persistence of 

prejudice. 
I build mighty weapons and threaten the world with my dark 

power; 
I crush the weak and helpless. 
I tear my enemies asunder. 
I tread upon those different from myself. 
I build the world of yesterday and will control the world of 

tomorrow — 
Come unto me, you awakening masses, and I will give you 

power! 



(Voices of 3 or 4 girls dressed in white at side of stage read 
all of the lines on this side of the page.) 

Not by might, nor by power, but by my Spirit, says the Lord 
of hosts. 

I am the way, and the truth, and the life; no one comes to the 
Father, but by me. 

I say to you, love your enemies and pray for those who per- 
secute you. 

j 



Speaketh Fear (Girl dressed in yellow) 

I am the voice of Fear — 

I am the great sustainer of things as they are. 

I am the force that blinds, the power that paralyzes. 

I cripple reforms — agonize in indecisions — foster despair. 

I isolate men from each other in the rigid boundaries of class 

and race. 
I have nourished the hearts of men through all time. 
Come unto me, you awakening masses, and I will lull you to 

sleep again. 



God did not give us a spirit of timidity but a spirit of power 

and love and self-control. 
God is love, and he who abides in love abides in God and 

God abides in him. . . . 
There is no fear in love, but perfect love casts out fear. 



I am the voice of Greed — 

To him who has, I give more, and to him who has not, I take 
away even the little he has. 

I fill my stomach and throw away what is left. 

I do not share. 

I fill my mind with knowledge and use it for my own ad- 
vantage. 

I exploit the world for my satisfaction, and do not teach, 
strengthen, or uplift. 

Come unto me, you awakening masses, 

I will fill your stomachs and your minds and your spirits, and 
we will take the place of your oppressors. 



I am the bread of life; he who comes to me shall not hunger. 

and he who believes in me shall never thirst. 
He who sows sparingly will also reap sparingly and he who 

sows bountifully will also reap bountifully. 
As each has received a gift, employ it for one another, as 

good stewards of God's varied grace. 



Speaketh Pride (Girl in green) 

I am the voice of Pride — 
I appeal to the selfishness of men's hearts. 
I promote jealousy and envy in individuals and in nations. 
I make gods of men. 

I am ruthless, passionate, dishonest, lustful. 
I gorge myself on ignorance and superstition. 
Come unto me, you awakening masses, and I will give you the 
vanity of fame. 



Whoever would save his life will lose it, and whoever loses 
his life for my sake will find it. 

Where jealousy and selfish ambition exists, there will be dis- 
order and every vile practice. 

If any man would come after me, let him deny himself and 
take up his cross and follow me. 



The Awakening People Speak 
(Dressed as a peasant or in red.) 

I am the voice of the illiterate, the oppressed, the hungry, the 

dying. 
I am eagerly questioning, persistently demanding, pathetically 

clinging. 
I am riotous, tempestuous. 
I am silent, listening. 
I am a whisper in despair, a cry in oppression, a shout in 

awakening. 
I am hoping, groping, dreaming, scheming. 



I call heaven and earth to witness against you, this day, that I 
have set before you life and death, blessing and cursing; 
therefore, choose life. 

Come to me, all who labor and are heavy-laden, and I will 
give you rest. Take my yoke upon you, and learn from me. 

He has sent me to proclaim release to the captives and re- 
covering of sight to the blind, to set at liberty those who 
are oppressed, to proclaim the acceptable year of the Lord. 



The People Speak Again 

I have heard the voices and the Voice 
And I must choose between them. 
Who will bear me witness? 
Who will my counselor be? 



Projects Which Contribute To 

111 




Left to right: Gloria Wise, Margaret Holland, Frances Perkins, Helen Watson, 
Barbara Owens. 



Brighter homes and a better to- 
morrow are both possible for the 
Future Homemaker who takes ad- 
vantage of the opportunities which 
are hers through her homemaking 
courses and her FHA chapter ac- 
tivities. 

According to a member of the 
La Grange Chapter, values from 
membership are: 

In the School 

Co-operation among students 
through committee work and 
chapter projects. 

A wonderful student-teacher re- 
lationship through work on proj- 
ects and programs related to 
homemaking and our FHA 
Goals. 

In the Home 

Pride in the interior and exterior 
surroundings. 

Better understanding of other 
members of the family and im- 
proved relationships in the home. 

In the Community 

Participation in community af- 
fairs through chapter projects, 
and later as a homemaker, ex- 
ercising leadership in church and 
community organizations which 
will strengthen the community. 



COVER PAGE 

Our cover girl is Becky Nifong of 
the North Davidson Chapter, who 
is President of our North Carolina 
Association of Future Home- 
makers of America. 



But most of all, the Future Home- 
maker of today hopes to reflect in 
her future home-understanding 
among family members, co-operation 
and security, and all the factors es- 
sential for happy family life. 

The project may be an individual 
one or a group project. Almost any 
project in any area of the home- 
making program — housing, foods, 
clothing, child development, family 
economics, or family relations — can 
directly or indirectly contribute to 
community development. 



As a group, the Ahoskie Chapter 
of Future Homemakers of America 
sponsored a school clean-up day 
during FHA Week. 

Members of the Ahoskie Chapter 
also collected magazines and carried 
them to the hospital in the com- 
munity for the patients in the hospi- 
tal. 



A community fair is sponsored 
in a number of communities. It may 
be called the "Fall Festival," or 
some other title which is appropriate 
to the community and/or season. 

The Eli Whitney Chapter co- 
operates each year with the com- 
munity fair which is held at the Eli 
Whitney School. 

Last year the Anderson School 
Vocational Department, the Ander- 
son P.T.A., and the Home Demon- 
stration Clubs in the Anderson 
Community sponsored a community 
fair. Future Homemakers in the 
school participated. 



Community 



s Development 



The fair, which was held in the 
school gymnasium, was made up of 
home-made and home-grown ex- 
hibits. Students and community 
enthusiasm and interest were ap- 
parent during the entire fair prepara- 
tions. Throughout the preceding 
summer when food preservation was 
at its height, the spirit of friendly 
competition prevailed. Throughout 
the preceding winter when farmers 
and their families had some leisure 
time many fine seams were sewn and 
many beautiful quilts pieced and 
quilted, again with a spirit of friendly 
and gainful competition. 



F.H.A. 

We build the homes of tomorrow 
That will stand forever and aye, 
Founded on love and friendship, 
For we are the F.H.A. 

We'll take our forefathers' courage, 
And put it to use today, 
We'll fit the children of coming years, 
To live in a better way. 

Taking a measure of kindness, 
Mixed with facts that we've learned 

today, 
We'll build for America's future, 
For we have the will and the way. 

So here's to F.H.A. — greetings. 
We really mean it when we say, 
We'll do our best to support you, 
As we build for a better day. 

An original poem by Delane Hum- 
phrey of The Red Springs, North 
Carolina, Chapter 
Ideas Are Born — Throush 



The words and music to the FHA 
State Song which was adopted 
several years ago can be ordered 
from Miss Elsie L. Seago, Fann- 
ville High School, Farmville, N. C. 
(10c per copy) 



"dfapfer dTarrer 



The A. C. Reynold Chapter reporter 
states that the Future Homemakers in 
her chapter were actively engaged during 
1957-58 school term with service projects 
for people in the community. Children 
at the Orthopedic Hospital received help 
at Thanksgiving; and colored eggs were 
prepared by FHA members and delivered 
to the children at Easter. At Christmas 
the members were Santa Pals for a fam- 
ily of seven. 

During FHA Week, a daily devotion 
for the entire school was presented by 
FHA members. Initiation of new mem- 
bers and a tea honoring them was given. 
Officers used the beautiful emblem service 
for interpretation to the entire student 
body. 

The Bethel High School Home Eco- 
nomics Class booth was number one at 
the Southern States Fair in Charlotte. 

"From Rubbish to Beauty" was the 
title of the booth. The display was com- 
posed of grease can lids, farm crops, and 
wild flowers. The lids were covered and 
used as trays with crops and flowers ar- 
ranged as baskets and pictures. The cost 
involved in putting on the display, ac- 
cording to Mrs. Wootten, the adviser, 
was approximately $10. First Prize was 
$75. 

The Cabarrus County F.H.A. Work- 
shop made up of eight schools represent- 
ing Cabarrus County met at Happy Lake 
near China Grove on Thursday, August 
21, 1958, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. to make 
plans for the coming year. 

Attending were eight F.H.A. sponsors, 
57 F.H.A. officers out of 475 F.H.A. 
members, and two chapter mothers, Mrs. 
Brady Black of Bethel and Mrs. Frank 
Earnhardt of Mount Pleasant. 

Following the morning session they 
were free to partake in the various activi- 
ties provided at the lake. After this they 
had a weiner roast in the picnic area 
preceding the afternoon session. 

The song leader group announced plans 
for a song writing contest in an effort to 
obtain an official county song. One song 
from each school will be submitted and 
all will be judged by the group at a time 
to be selected. 

Each of the officers were divided into 
groups from the different clubs which 
consisted of one sponsor and eight girls 
from the different schools. 

The lovely Georgian Colonial Cottage 
at Durham Senior High School was the 
scene of the Mother-Daughter Banquet 
held on April 23, 1958. 

In honor of the occasion each FHA'er 
pinned a rose on the shoulder of her 
mother. Mrs. Alice Tillett, was the guest 
speaker. She is the Supervisor of Ele- 
mentary Education in the City of Dur- 
ham, and was voted as the "Outstanding 
Mother of the Year" in Durham. Mrs. 
Tillett presented in her own dramatic and 
humorous manner one of Sidney Porter's 
short stories, "Johnny Valentine." Offi- 
cers and members practiced the art of 
being gracious hostesses during the eve- 
ning. 



The Elsie Chapter at Robbins outlines 
the program of work for 1958-59 as fol- 
lows: 

September 

Program: Business meeting and intro- 
duce program of work. 

Project: To get new members. 
Social: Initiation of new members. 

October 

Program: Joint recreation program 
with Candor High School. Led by Miss 
Ruth Jewel from the State Department of 
Public Instruction. 

Project: To run a girl for the office of 
state song leader. 

Social: District Rally at Wilmington, 
N. C. 

November 

Program: "How to Buy Clothes by a 
local merchant." 

Project: Supper to raise funds for our 
FHA. 

Social: County Rally. 

December 

Program: A demonstration on making 
Christmas decorations. 

Project: Sharing in the Care Project. 
Giving a supper for Woodmen of World 
to raise money for the Home Economics 
Department. 

Social: Buffet Supper for Chapter par- 
ents and Adult Advisory Committee. 

January 

Program: A minister will speak on 
"Good Relations in the Family." 

Project: Giving gifts to girls at Samar- 
cand. 

Social: Going to Samarcand. 

February 
Program: "A Career as a Home 
Demonstration Agent." 

Project: Planning FHA Week. 
Social: Mother-Daughter Banquet. 

March 

Program: Election of Officers for Next 
Year. 

Project: FHA Week. 

Social: Eighth Grade Tea and Installa- 
tion of Officers. 

April 

Program: "Sing Together." 

Project: Southern Pines Garden Tour. 

Social: State Convention. 

May 
Program: Report on State Convention. 
Project: Campus Clean Up. 
Social: County Rally. 

A yearbook was prepared and pre- 
sented to Future Homemakers of the 
Fremont Chapter very early in the year. 
The book contains a directory of mem- 
bers and officers with telephone numbers, 
committee chairmen, the FHA Creed, 
the FHA Prayer Song, and the program 
topics along with names of the partici- 
pants in the program and the names of 
the chairman for each program. Some 
of the planned topics are: January — 
Proper Grooming. February — Choice of 
a College. March — How Do You Rate 
With Yourself? April — Etiquette. May — 
Child Care. 



Although the theme for the Haywood 
County Rally was, "FHA in Dreamland," 
the skits, musical numbers, and in fact, 
all parts of the rally program, demon- 
strated or illustrated that the dreams 
could become realities. Each chapter in 
Haywood County participated in the pro- 
gram. Canton High School and Fines 
Creek High School each gave a skit on 
"Careers in Home Economics." The 
Bethel Chapter gave the Invocation. A 
skit on program planning was presented 
by the Crabtree Chapter. Group singing, 
installation of 1958-59 officers, and busi- 
ness were also included in the rally pro- 
gram. 

A feature article about her homemak- 
ing department and the FHA was written 
by a senior at the Jones Central High 
School for the school paper. The purpose 
was to interpret to school officials, to the 
entire student body, and to parents pur- 
poses and goals of our organization with 
accounts of activities which help to 
achieve goals. 

Sections of the feature article had the 
following titles: 

Home Economics Department Has 
Made Steady Progress 

Exchanging Equipment Is Difficult 
New Washer Purchased 
Department Raises Own Money 
Food Preservation and Sewing Stressed 
Projects Make Homemaking Real 
Child Care Project Outstanding 
Future Homemaking of America Sup- 
plements Homemaking Program 

Members of the Kernersville Chapter 
feel that the beauty of their Mother- 
Daughter, Father-Son get together is that 
they manage to get into the school for 
these occasions people who never go to 
the school at any other time. 

This "Get-Together" doesn't have to 
be a formal or informal banquet. It can 
be a picnic, a buffet meal, or a party 
with refreshments — each with some type 
of program or exhibit for interpretation. 

A fashion show followed a Mother- 
Daughter Reception in the Lansing 
School. Future Homemakers modeled 
dresses made in the homemaking classes. 

The decorations were very appropriate 
representing a garden using the white 
picket fences. The fence had an archway 
and was surrounded by flowers, shrub- 
bery, a wishing well and white benches. 

The Mt. Gilead Chapter aided with 
the work of the Foster Parents, Inc., an 
organization which is a unit of UNESCO, 
by making dolls to be distributed to needy 
children overseas. 

Officers for the 1958-59 school year 
were installed at the close of the 1957-58 
term. The candlelight ceremony was 
held in the school auditorium on May 
13. A red carnation was presented to 
each mother present. A social hour fol- 
lowed. Punch and cookies were served 
by FHA members. 

"A Close Look at Ourselves" was the 
topic used by Mrs. Corrine G. English, 
N. C. Extension Specialist in Family 
Relations, during the Spring Rally of the 
Nash-Franklin Federation of Future 
Homemakers. The Rally was held in 
the auditorium of the Spring Hope High 
School. The Middlesex Chapter was in 



charge of the entertainment which was 
presented in the form of relaxers. 
Cooper's Chapter was responsible for the 
Devotion. 

A part of the afternoon's program was 
the awards of Degrees of Achievement. 

The North Buncombe High School 
Chapter of Future Homemakers of 
America observed FHA Week by a series 
of special activities and programs. 

The highlight of the week was a 
Mother-Daughter Banquet held in the 
school cafeteria. Other special observ- 
ances included a worship service Sunday 
morning when many of the members 
attended the service of Flat Creek Bap- 
tist Church. 

"Be Kind to Teachers Day" was ob- 
served. Posters were placed in the 
windows of business houses in the five 
outlying school districts. Each morning 
an FHA girl gave a devotional over the 
Public Address System. The student body 
requested that this continue after the 
week was over. 

At the end of the week seventeen girls 
attended the State Convention in Raleigh 
where three of them received State De- 
grees. 

The fourth period FHA'ers presented a 
combined fashion and talent show to the 
student body. Several cake walks have 
been held. The proceeds from both 
activities were used to buy equipment 
for the Home Economics Department. 

Modeling some of the latest creations 
of the sack rage were the forty-five 
"Initiates" of the Norwood Chapter. A 
big sister created an attire for her little 
sister. Each attire was created from a 
burlap or feed sack, some odds and ends 
of material and ribbon (used to trim the 
sacks and accessories), lamp shades 
(fashioned into very lovely hats), and 
lots of ingenuity. 

After each member had modeled her 
outfit to its best advantage, typical of 
the "Roaring Twenties." awards were 
presented for the most original, the most 
representative of the roaring twenties, 
the best tailored, and the outfit with the 
best color combination. 

As a part of the recreation a Charles- 
ton contest was held. 

As a climax to the evening of fun and 
frolic, the chapter officers served refresh- 
ments to all eighty members, mothers, 
and friends in attendance. 

"Hi Fi Fashions," a fashion show 
presentation highlighted the evening pro- 
gram when members of all FHA Chap- 
ters in Stanly County held a Rally in the 
Endy High School. Members of the 
Badin and Albemarle chapters served 
as models. The impressive Installation 
Service was used for installing the 1958- 
59 officers of the County Federation. 

The Norwood Chapter conducted an 
inspiring devotional, and greetings were 
offered by the Endy High School principal 
and the president of the Endy Chapter. 

Entertainment was provided by several 
girls from the Badin and Endy chapters, 
and included a tap and ballet dance by 
Lynn Abernathy of Badin. 

Miss Harris, the new president, con- 
ducted the closing ritual. Then the group 
moved to the Home Economics Depart- 
ment where refreshments were served by 
the Endy Chapter. 

8 



Self Improvement— 

Continued from page three 
and sweatshirts bringing their paint 
brushes in hand. They worked very 
hard and the results were amazing! 

During FHA Week, the girls 
wanted the whole school to know 
what FHA was doing! So, a chapel 
program with a short talk and a 
humorous skit was put on with 
Cinderella as moderator and fellow 
FHA'ers in the other parts. Also, 
at Christmas, the club members 
made a display of gifts which could 
be made inexpensively and placed 
it in the school lobby for all to see. 

When the time came for the 
Buncombe County Fair, the girls 
really found their opportunity to 
"tell the world." Cinderella and 
several other girls met to work on 
ideas and plans for two booths at 
the fair. After hard thinking, they 
came up with a solution; the FHA 
booth would emphasize the Fourth 
purpose, "to work for good home 
and family life for all," and the 
home economics booth would 
demonstrate how the homemaking 
instruction revolved around the 
homes of tomorrow. In the FHA 
booth, they tried to show the phases 
of family life when family members 
should be together, with worship 
as the center, and radiating out to 
work and play. 

As to church work and community 
participation, Cinderella has served 
as Secretary, Vice-President, and 
President of her local youth group 
at church and is now worship chair- 
man and pianist. She also was 
chosen to attend the County Family 
Life Conference her freshman year. 

Cinderella was on the committee 
which worked on services and activi- 
ties for a United Youth Week, Jan. 
26-Feb. 2, 1958. The committee 
members worked on posters, an- 
nouncements on the radio, and 
articles for the newspaper. A chapel 
program at school was arranged 
with a speaker and an interpretation 
of the poster and theme. Cinderella 
took part in this service and in the 
community service Sunday night 
February 2. A foreign ministerial 
student from Brevard College was 
the speaker and all churches were 
invited. 

Cinderella's main project for com- 
munity participation was her help 
in the local horseshow. She has a 
Registered Tennessee Walker and is 
Vice-President of the local Equita- 
tion Club. She is real "horse-crazy," 
so she was very much excited and 
happy that she could help. She 



worked with several girls to make 
fourteen posters advertising the 
show. As a member of the club she 
helped to sell tickets, make the num- 
bers, and thread the sleeve bands. 
Cinderella and Red Wing, her 
horse, tried to stir up interest and 
then rode in the afternoon and eve- 
ning shows. This horseshow was 
sponsored by the P.T.A. and the 
proceeds went to provide free 
lunches to under-privileged children 
at school. 

Cinderella first took finishing up 
a small guestroom which heretofore 
had just been a "deposit" as her 
homemaking project. She began 
with the furniture, since all extra 
furniture had been placed here. She 
moved out some, added some and 
shifted what was left. The holly- 
wood bed was unchanged, but she 
took out a small dresser which had 
a brown chintz skirt to match the 
curtains. This she used to make a 
valance for the curtains, a cover for 
a low cedar chest, pillowcases for 
two small pillows on this chest, 
ruffles for a new lampshade, and a 
ruffled pillowcase for the pillow in 
an antique family rocker which was 
added. Then Cinderella and her 
mother painted the room a bright 
yellow. With the addition of two 
brown rugs and a "coffee" chenille 
bedspread which were on hand, the 
room was complete and the result 
was a bright, cheery, old-fashioned 
bedroom. The total cost was $8.00 
for the paint and lampshade. 

But Cinderella had enjoyed this 
so much that she decided to extend it 
to her brother's room. Since Dave's 
room was papered in a tan shadow 
plaid, she chose a spice brown 
textured bark (which was on sale!) 
and made draperies and a matching 
bedspread for his hollywood bed. 
She, also here, rearranged a few 
things, but left his desk which con- 
tains his amateur radio station and 
is built with bookcases. These, she 
made him clean out and had him 
place his junk radio parts here, 
instead of in the corner! She re- 
upholstered the seat in a straight 
back chair for his rig and placed a 
large, bright world map on the wall 
above his bed for color. Her daddy 
has promised to make a low book- 
case to replace a small, battered one 
and she is to help by putting the 
finish on it! She plans to center a 
colorful picture over this bookcase 
and to arrange his books and a globe 
effectively. She also plans to dye a 
loop rug dark green to place beside 
his bed. But the main thing, or at 
least the thing she is most proud of, 



was the slipcover she made for an 
armchair for Dave's room. This 
material, a light green with a modern 
design, was also on sale. She worked 
on it most of two days and wouldn't 
have been able to finish it without 
the help of the pussycat!!! She spent 
$11.00 on the material and had 
just loads of fun! In fact, so much, 
that now she is in the process of re- 
covering a chair for the living room! 

Cinderella said herself that she 
thought working for her State De- 
gree was very rewarding and worth- 
while, and her parents surely felt 
that it had been profitable! 

Now Cinderella is happy, and 
with all this experience and train- 
ing, she hopes someday to marry a 
handsome prince and to live happily 
ever after. 

Oh ... by the way . . . Cinderella 
is Nancy DuPuy of the Owen FHA 
Chapter in Buncombe County. 



Report on Speakers 

JVatianul FHA. Meeting 

Kansas City, Missouri 

By CYNTHIA LEONARD, State Secretary 



Ideas are Born — 

Continued from page one 
took part in the project which was 
described by several of the teachers 
as being one of the most thoughtful 
gestures to have happened to them 
since being in New Hanover County. 

Miss Peggy Moore, new English 
teacher, coming here from teaching 
in Henderson last year said, "Al- 
ready these students have made me 
feel at home." Mrs. Berneice Bjone- 
rud, head of the Commercial De- 
partment and beginning her 29th 
year at New Hanover said, "If the 
actions of these two clubs are an 
indication, then we should have a 
fine student body this year." 



"Necessity is the Mother of In- 
vention." And so it was with the 
Waco High School Home Econom- 
ics Department who realized the 
need for a place to fit the garments 
which they made in class. 

A search was begun for materials 
to make a screen to separate one 
corner of the department. 

Old stage equipment was found 
and cut down to size and hinged 
together by the boys in the Agricul- 
ture Shop. 

The screen was covered by some 
of the FHA girls in a modern- 
designed wallpaper to blend with the 
color scheme of the department. 

The cost was small (only 35 cents) 
because the covering materials were 
furnished by a local Shelby firm. 



During the seven general sessions 
of our National FHA Meeting, we 
welcomed four very inspirational and 
informative speakers. 

Mr. Hubert Wheeler who is Com- 
missioner of Education from Jeffer- 
son City, Missouri, was our first 
speaker. Mr. Wheeler spoke at our 
opening session and used as his topic. 
"Take a Look, You are the Future 
Homemakers." 

Yes, we are the future home- 
makers and as such our responsibili- 
ties are great and very numerous. 
Did you know that there are 150,- 
000,000 girls in the United States 
today and that their children will 
number 350,000,000? That sounds 
like quite a lot of Americans, doesn't 
it? 

Mr. Wheeler strongly recommends 
the teaching profession as a sure 
way to help others, better our com- 
munity, and still earn a good, steady 
salary and have time to be a capable 
homemaker and mother. 

Mr. Wheeler says that "economic 
stability is ours if we but keep it." 
He points out that working hours 
have been reduced from eighteen to 
eight; Working days have come down 
from seven, to six, to five, with four 
predicted; And the merging of farm 
and surburban areas is near at hand. 

We are also in an age where auto- 
mation plays a very important part. 
As Carl Sandburg said, "the people 
of the twentieth century have taken 
the ball of the earth and made a 
little thing." 

And as for us, Mr. Wheeler pre- 
dicts a "fabulous future" if we but 
prepare for it. 

The theme of our second general 
session was "Recognizing the Value 
of Education" and Dr. Charles 
E. Koeble, Dean of Faculty at North- 
west State College in Maryville, Mis- 
souri, spoke to us on "Why an 
Education?" 

Dr. Koeble gives four guides to 
us in obtaining an education. The 
first is self evaluation. Consider your 
assets and liabilities. Take person- 
ality tests, achievements tests, and 
others that can be obtained from 
teachers, counselors and employ- 
ment agencies. Take college en- 
trance exams — Evaluate Yourself. 



The second guide is self direction. 
Set up possible goals and check 
them out. Investigate realistically 
income, hours, future, associations, 
and necessary training. 

The third guide is self realization. 
Realize your goal, striving always 
to better what you are doing. 

The fourth and last goal is self 
confidence. Never lose faith in your- 
self and your ability to succeed. 

Dr. Koeble left us with this ad- 
vice. "Don't be satisfied with less 
than the best and get an education, 
for an education is to make of you 
that which you can become if you 
will." 

At our third general session our 
theme was "Becoming Better Citi- 
zens." Our speaker, Yaraslava 
Sachno, a student at Marymount 
Junior College at Arlington, Vir- 
ginia. She spoke to us on "What it 
Means to be a Citizen." Yara came 
from Czechoslovakia, a communist 
land of constant fear and restraint 
and found a new home, new friends, 
and a new way of life opened to her 
as she saw for the first time the be- 
loved Miss Liberty and could almost 
hear her say, "Bring them your tired, 
your poor, your tempest tossed to 
me. I lift my lamp beside the golden 
door." 

Through "Voice of America" and 
"Radio Free Europe" these people 
learned the truth. It is our duty as 
citizens to be well informed so as 
to keep giving them this truth and to 
carry out our responsibility to our 
nation, future citizens, and the whole 
world. 

Our last speaker was Dr. Royden 
C. Braithwaite, director of the Col- 
lege of Southern Utah at Cedar City, 
Utah. Dr. Braithwaite spoke at our 
fifth general session, the theme of 
which was "You and Others." He 
gave us several points that would 
help us in our relationships with 
others. 

The first being, "Think and 
Thank." Second, "Reverence for 
Life." Third, "Appreciative Under- 
standing." Fourth, "Nurturing God 
Given Talents." Fifth, "Being Re- 
sponsible for Life Fulfillments." 

Dr. Braithwaite said, "man must 
feel himself to be a co-creator with 
God." 



Future Homemakers of America 



CREED 

We are the Future Homemakers of America 
We face the future with warm courage, 
And high hope, 

For we have the clear consciousness of seeking 
Old and precious values. 

For we are the builders of homes, 

Homes for America's future. 

Homes where living will be the expression of everything 

That is good and fair. 

Homes where truth and love and security and faith 

Will be realities, not dreams. 

We are the Future Homemakers of America, 
We face the future with warm courage, 
And high hope. 




The homes of tomorrow are in 

the hands of the youth 

of today" 




Caroline says: 

You will probably want to learn the words and music 



to: 



LET THERE BE PEACE ON EARTH 
(Let It Begin With Me) 

Let there be peace on earth 
And let it begin with me: 
Let there be peace on earth. 
The peace that was meant to be. 

With God as our Father, 
Brothers all are we. 
Let me walk with my brother 
In perfect harmony. 

Let peace begin with me, 
Let this be the moment now. 
With ev'ry step I take. 
Let this be my solemn vow: 

To take each moment and live each moment 

In peace eternally. 

Let there be peace on earth 

And let it begin with me. 

Music can be ordered from: 
Hansen Publications, Inc. 
119 W. 57th Street 
New York 19, New York 





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FUTURE HOMEMAKERS 

* North Carolina Association * 



VOLUME XVI 



DECEMBER 



The * % Old Fashioned Christmas" 

Are The Values Worth Reviving? 



Can you imagine the joy and 
happiness experienced by the child 
and all members of the family when 
all share in making decorations for 
the house and then trimming the 
tree that was perhaps cut from the 
family's farm or from a neighbor's 
forest (with permission, of course). 
Stringing popcorn, making chains 
from strips of colored paper, gather- 
ing pine cones and holly berries and 
mistletoe and running cedar, etc., 
can prove to be a wholesome, de- 
lightful experience for all, especially 
the children. 

Then after the tree is all decorated 
what fun it would be to gather in 



the kitchen and pull candy or deco- 
rate cookies, or help with that 
favorite Christmas cake. The chil- 



dren can shell the nuts, cut fruit, and 
clean the mixing bowls, and help 
with errands for mother. 



State C^icex* *?*% 1959-60 



ELECTED AT 1958 FALL RALLIES 

(They will be installed at the State Convention, April 4, 1959) 
President — Nancy Edwards, District VI, Wingate High School 
Vice-President — Sammie Gatlin, Dist. V, Franklinville High School 
Secretary — Ann Alphine, District IV, Dunn High School 
Treasurer — Kail Hall, District III, Rowland High School 
Reporter — Elaine Parker, District II, Jones Central High School 
Parliamentarian — Celia Clark, Dist. I, Robersonville High School 
Historian — Catherine Blanton, District VIII, Shelby High School 
Song Leader — Dawn Crissman, District VII 



North Carolina Association of Future Homemakers of America 



State Officers 
1958-59 

President — Becky Nifong, North Davidson VII 

Vice-President — Nancy Edwards, Wingate VI 

Secretary — Cynthia Leonard, Ramseur V 

Treasurer — Sybil Beasley, Coats IV 

Reporter — Jo Anne Matthews, Central-Fayetteville III 

Parliamentarian — Joyce Harper, B. F. Grady II 

Historian — Betsy Benthall, Woodland-Olney I 

Song Leader — Mary Gale Haynes, North Buncombe 
VIII 



District Advisers 
1958-59 

Mrs. Theresa Brown, West Edgecombe 1 
Margaret Carol Banks, Southwood II 
Mrs. Ada Melvin, Bladenboro III 
Mrs. Dorothy Hales, Boone Trail IV 
Mrs. Edith P. Morgan, Franklinville V 
Mrs. Helen Thompson, Endy VI 
Mildred Beamer, West Yadkin VII 
Mrs. Patsy C. Bowers, Glen Alpine VIII 



State Adviser 

Mrs. Faye T. Coleman 



STATE DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 

Division of Vocational Education 
Raleigh, North Carolina 



@&<sifitei 'Pnaject 



Improving Family Relationships 

With Older Members of Family 



How many teenagers these days really enjoy being 
with their grandparents? When staying with the older 
members of the family, comments similar to this one 
are heard all too often. "Oh, no — do we have to stay 
with grandma today? All she wants to do is sit and 
talk. Besides, she doesn't understand any of the things 
I do." 

The girls belonging to the Future Homemakers of 
America from Bessemer High School in Greensboro 
felt that many grandparents are left out of the family 
group at times because of lack of understanding between 
the older family members and the teenage members. 

With this in mind, the FHA girls took as one of then- 
projects for this year, the improvement of family rela- 
tions with the older members of the family. The girls 
decided some ways to get to know their grandparents 
better would be to listen to their stories, talk about the 
family photographs, and to ask questions about some 
of the ways they did things when they were young. 

Through their project, the girls were able to learn 
more about their grandparents and to learn more about 
the customs during the time they were growing up. To 

Pictured from left to right is June Cranford; her grandmother, 
Mrs. James Cranford; Mary Ann Fuller; and Kathy Collins. 
They are all enjoying some of Mrs. Cranford's old photographs 
of her family. The girls are members of the Bessemer High 
School. 




their surprise, the girls found the dating customs were 
very different. Because most of the dating was done 
at home, it was up to the girl to have many things 
planned for the evening. Other popular types of enter- 
tainment for dates were square dances, hay rides, and 
parties — all well chaperoned, of course. Some of the 
girls decided it would have been great fun to ride in a 
buggy and go to a real square dance, rather than go to 
so many movies. 

Both the girls and their grandparents thoroughly 
enjoyed this project. The older and younger generation 
were drawn closer together and more understanding 
between the two resulted. 

There seems to be nothing the older set enjoy more 
than sitting down and talking about days gone by. The 
girls have learned a great deal about their own family 
background, the customs, and the dress of another 
generation. 

Besides learning so much about the oldsters, the 
grandparents have learned more about the teenagers 
and have come to enjoy doing things for them which 
their parents don't have time to do; such as knitting that 
crew neck sweater her granddaughter has been wanting. 

Much more unity, happiness, and understanding has 
been the result of the joint efforts of this project. 



SPECIAL THANKSGIVING CELEBRATION 
HONORING MOTHERS AND FATHERS 

Southwood Chapter 

FHA & FFA 

The cornucopia overflowed with a bountiful harvest 
of fruits, leaves, nuts and vegetables in the Southwood 
Cafeteria, Agriculture Room, and Home Economics 
Department on the evening of November 19, 1958, 
when the Future Homemakers and Future Farmers 
honored their mothers and fathers. A back drop of 
emphasis was designed by Henry Harper portraying 
"Thankful Hands" with the first verse of Psalm 136, 
"O give thanks unto the Lord; for He is good; for His 
mercy endure th forever." 

The banquet program— with FHA and FFA mem- 
bers in charge was: 

Recitation: "Why Are We Here?" 

Invocation 

Welcome to Guests 

Toast to Parents and Friends 

Continued on next page 



Group Singing: "Come Ye Thankful People" 

Recitation: "Indian Summer" 

Special Talent Numbers: Instrumental music, sing- 
ing by four members, and a solo 

Recognition of Special Guests: Superintendent of 
Lenoir County Schools, Supervisor of County 
Schools, Principal of School, and Local County 
Board. Special thanks were expressed to the FHA 
and FFA Advisers. 

Recitation: "I'm Thankful" 

Solo: "God Bless Our Families" 
(to the tune of "Bless This House") 

Reading: "What Thanksgiving Means to Me" 

Vocal Solo: "How Great Thou Art" 

Group Singing: "Over the River and Through the 
Wood" 



WELCOME TO FUTURE HOMEMAKERS 
OF THE WAYNE COUNTY FEDERATION 

(At the first county rally at Pikeville on 
Tuesday, October 7, 1958) 

By Barbara Jean Clark, Goldsboro Chapter 

Welcome, welcome, all ye old members and all ye 
new ones. 

Welcome, this word has a meaning that has probably 
never been mentioned before. The word really has a 
lot to do with an FHA member. Each letter in welcome 
tells us something that FHA members should strive to 
do. Let us endeavor to be these things at all times. 



W— Willing 

An FHA member should be willing to do her part 
for the best of the community. 

E — Eager 

FHA'ers are eager to learn and do for the good of 
the people. 

L — Labor 

An FHA members is ready to be of any help to 
those who need help at any time. 

C — Considerate 

FHA members are considerate of everyone. They 
realize that everyone has separate opinions and 
they always consider the other person's opinions. 

O — Opportunity 

An FHA member looks for the opportunity to help 
and serve her school, family, friends, city, and 
country. She fills the need she is best suited for. 

M — Makers 

FHA members are makers of the homes. The 
world could not survive without us, so we should 
step in and fill this responsibility. 

E— Effort 

An FHA members puts forth an effort in any task 
she is assigned whether great or small. She trys to 
co-operate with whomever she is working. 

WELCOME 

Put them all together, they spell welcome, a word 
that means the world to the FHA of Goldsboro High 
when they try to do their best. Through our FHA we 
are inspired to become better leaders for a better world. 



Two worthy projects in the Tri High Chapter at Caroleen, N. C, are illustrated here. Left: Operation of School Infirmary — 
An infirmary worker and an alternate are on call each period if needed in the infirmary. Joyce S. Hill, an infirmary worker 
and State Home maker applicant, gives first aid to Charlene Wilson, whose finger was injured. Brenda Lynch, who is an infirmary 
worker, is checking the first aid book to be sure that proper first aid is rendered. Right: Making Tray Favors for the Homes 
for the Aged and County Hospital — Nan Philbeck and La Vern Gibson discuss the project with their adviser, Mrs. Mildred H. 
Reid. 



HOMEMAKIMG 
CHILD CARE 





RELATIONSHIPS 
CLOTHING 

HEALTH 

NT 



In co-operation with the Welfare De- 
partment, Future Homemakers of the 
Lumberton Chapter planned this Christ- 
mas party for a group of twelve children. 
For place cards the FHA'ers painted the 
mugs and used one at each place setting. 




PROMOTING INTERNATIONAL 
INTEREST AND UNDERSTANDING 



By Bessemer FHA Chapter 



Other countries have ways of life 
which differ from ours here in 
America. Mrs. Peter Eways, mother 
of one of the Bessemer High School 
FHA Chapter girls, talked to the 
chapter about the way of life in her 
native country of Palestine. 

The American families vary from 
being very close together to very far 
apart in family life and relationships. 
In Palestine, there is a close and 
meaningful relationship among the 
family members. Much love, re- 
spect, and courtesy is shown to each 
other. 

While in America more and more 
housewives are working at public 
jobs, in Palestine the husband con- 
siders it an insult if his wife works 
outside the home. Her role is con- 
fined to housekeeping and to rear- 
ing the children. In the non-indus- 



trial towns, many of the men have 
to work in another town to provide 
means of support for their families. 

Being less delinquent and more 
appreciative might begin to describe 
the children of Palestine. Since edu- 
cation is paid for, it is not taken for 
granted as in America. The children 
are more interested and sincere in 
their efforts. 

Household chores such as making 
beds, washing dishes in a basin and 
carrying water from the community 
well are carried out by the children. 
While the children are still young, 
they begin to learn to sew and em- 
broider. Elaborate embroidering is 
characteristic of the Syrian garment. 
Assisting their mother in cooking 
soon follows. Syrian foods have 
many combinations unfamiliar to 
the American. Many have unusual 



ingredients such as lentite beans, 
cypress seeds, and wheat meal which 
gives the foods delightfully different 
flavors. 

The children's friends are always 
welcome in the home and much of 
their recreation is games similar to 
those of America. Other recreation 
is conducted by the church and 
school. The basis for this organized 
recreation is the belief that children 
are less likely to go astray. 

Sometimes we tend to feel that 
the American way of life is the only 
way. But all the things we consider 
important really had a foreign be- 
ginning and were brought to this 
country by our ancestors. Since 
learning more about the country of 
Palestine and the people, we realize 
more the importance of world wide 
understanding and harmony. 



Many weeks of advanced plan- 
ning and preparation precede the 
big event — the District FHA Rally. 
Future Homemakers and advisers in 
eight areas of the state simultan- 
eously exercise their imagination and 
ingenuity in planning a Rally Pro- 
gram which will help interpret some 
of the goals and purposes of the 
homemaking program. Plans are 
made and then action must follow. 
Responsibilities must be delegated. 
Many members and advisers will be 
included in the final preparations. It 
matters little whether or not you live 
in the extreme west, the piedmont 



Interpreting Our Goals or 

* * * DISTRIC 



provement and enrichment of family 
living is invaluable. An added value 
is the growth of the individual par- 
ticipant in developing certain of her 
inherent abilities — such as leader- 
ship, skills, art of working and 



Before the date of the Rally in 
District IV, local newspapers and 
radio stations in the area announced 
the coming event with a preview of 
the program. This editorial ap- 
peared in The Sanford Herald: 




iy!!!!i[l!!H!!H;i::::l:i::»?::::?:l;::d 



Dressed as fairies, Ann Cobb and Rose Stephens hung stars on the FHA letters in the background as Freda Britt called the 
roll by counties at District I Rally. The stars were of white paper edged in silver glitter, each star bearing the name of a county. 



area, or the coastal area, you have 
an opportunity to participate in the 
district program. This is true be- 
cause the North Carolina Associa- 
tion is organized into eight districts 
— your chapter is in one of these 
districts. 

The experiences in planning and 
preparing a Rally Program which 
has as the overall purpose, the im- 



socializing with other youth and 
with adults. 

If a member has no active part 
in planning and preparing for the 
program, she can still be a very 
active participant by observing and 
formulating ideas which she may 
carry to her chapter for planning 
activities to strengthen her chapter 
and its members. 



A Welcome to FHA 
Central High School, Sanford 
and Lee County are pleased to play 
host Saturday for the meeting of 
District IV of the State Future 
Homemakers Association. Some 
800 to 900 students from 12 
counties will attend. 

We hope their visit here will be 
instructive and fun, too. Somehow, 



turposes Through . . . . 

RALLIES « * 



the name of their group intrigues 
us. We are glad to note the growth 
of interest in homemaking arts 
among high-school age girls. 

No one needs to be reminded 
that homemaking is one of the 
world's most important jobs. But 
too long the calling went without 
public recognition or scientific 
study. Future Homemakers and 
their advisers, drawn from the ranks 
of home economics teachers, ap- 
parently are starting early to change 
all this. May their tribe increase! 



FHA members in District V were 
very pleased to have present as their 
guests: Miss Vergie Lee Stringer, 
Assistant Supervisor of Homemak- 
ing Education, who brought greet- 
ings from Woman's College; Dr. 
Naomi Albanese, Dean of Home 
Economics at Woman's College; 



Mrs. Rebecca Smith and Miss 
Louise Lowe, instructors at Wom- 
an's College; Miss Mary Floyce 
Price, graduate assistant and 10 stu- 
dent teachers from Woman's Col- 
lege Home Economics Department. 
Conrad Powell, Ruffin FFA Chapter 
president, brought greetings on be- 
half of the Ruffin FFA'ers. 

Since Sammie Gatlin was elected 
to the office of vice-president of the 
State Association during the Rally, 
she, with her adviser, Mrs. Edith 
Morgan, has attended two District 
Rallies held in other parts of the 
state. This could probably be 
termed "pre-service training" for 
assuming her responsibilities as 
vice-president 1959-60 and as presi- 
dent 1960-61. 



Program features at the District 
VI Rally included: Speaker, Rev. 



Jerry Faulkner, the Christian Edu- 
cation Director of Central Meth- 
odist Church, who gave a very 
wonderful talk on the topic, "Teens 
With a Purpose." He helped all to 
realize that our purpose in life is to, 
"Be what you are — but be the best 
you can be." 

Relaxers: Miss Charlene Rotha, 
physical education teacher of the 
Albemarle Junior High School, led 
the group in some very entertaining 
relaxers. 

Skit: "Ins and Outs," by East 
Mecklenburg Chapter, followed by 
a panel discussion of the skit by the 
Wadesboro Chapter. 

Entertainment: Tap dance, Lynn 
Abernathy, Badin Chapter; Panto- 
mime, Frances Hussey, Nancy Efird, 
and Ann Mercer, Endy Chapter. 

Illustrating and Telling the Story 
of the National Meeting: Nancy 
Edwards. 



At the District VIII Rally a panel 
of future homemakers interviewed 
home economists on purposes of the 
organization helping members to 
understand opportunities open to 
them in the field of home economics 
and the value of continuing their 
Continued on inside back cover 



District vin Rally— Left to right: Mary Gale Haynes, North Buncombe Chapter, Song Leader of North Carolina Association 
or Future Homemakers; Nancy Edwards, Vice-President, Wingate; Mrs. Patsy C. Bowers, Glen Alpine, District Adviser; Shyrl 
Allison, President Lee Edwards Chapter and Buncombe County FHA organization. 




There Is a Career For You in. . . 



Home Economics 



The skit here is entitled: A Trip 
to the Moon on the Trans-Plane- 
tary Air Way. The idea on "Careers 
in Home Economics" came from a 
past issue of Teen Times Magazine. 
Some of the script is original and 
written to fit in with the rally theme, 
"Family Living in the Sputnik Age." 

The program was presented at 
District III Rally under the direction 
of Mrs. H. L. Burleson of the 
Barnesville Chapter. 

A Trip to the Moon on the 
Trans-Planetary Air Way 

Stage is arranged to represent an 
air terminal. A desk in center, small 
chair, and mike on a table. Name of 
airline displayed. Down stage R is 
also a small table, chair and mike 
for narrator. Rows of seats are near 
center, but on either side for pas- 
sengers. 

When curtain is drawn girl at 
center desk is busy arranging papers, 
etc. Narrator is taking her place at 
other table, some of the passengers 
are already seated, others are seen 
coming in glancing here and there. 

Characters: 

Bell Attractive Clothes: Dressed 
in neat travel outfit, with accessories, 
carries pattern book or some sewing 
equipment. 

Teresa Textiles: Wears a lab coat 
or coat, carries beak;r, flask, etc. 

Betta Nutrition: Wears white uni- 
form, carries nutrition books, charts, 
etc. 

Florence Food Service: Dressed 
in white suit, carries tray or large 
pot. 

Tillie Toiler Teacher: Dressed as 
school teacher, has folder, test 
papers, roll book, etc. 

Judy Journalism: Shoulder bag, 
camera, glasses, wears attractive 
suit. 

lma Interior Decorator: Wears 
dark skirt, attractive smock, carries 
blueprint, maybe piece of drape 
material over arm, etc. 



Bride and Groom: Dressed as 
they were for the wedding, followed 
by two couples in wedding party, 
also father, mother, and small sister 
of the bride. 

Moon Man: Use your imagination 
as to how he should be dressed. 



Skit: 



Way 



T.A.: Trans-Planetary Air 
Announcing: 

T.A.: Attention please — calling 
flight of Trans-Planetary Air Ways 
now loading at gate Careers for Mt. 



Success recently established on the 
Moon with landing at Lake Ability 
on Mars, Port Energy on Venus, 
Skill Junction on Jupiter, Pleasant 
Valley on Pluto and Happy Isle on 
Saturn. Since this flight "Future 
Unlimited" is the first to leave the 
earth carrying only passengers 
trained in Homemaking, and only 
those who have volunteered their 
services as an outcome of Mr. Moon 
Man coming down to earth in search 
of co-workers to aid him in estab- 
lishing more permanent residence on 
the moon, credentials will have to 



This was one of the exhibits at the State Counselors' Conference at Davidson College 
October 31 and November 1, 1958. Looking at the exhibit is Julia Bynum Barrett, 
Girls' Counselor at the Josephus Daniels Junior High School. 




be presented and checked. Pas- 
sengers making the flight have not 
been able to contact Mr. Moon Man 
directly, but as stated before are 
going on this flight as a result of his 
request for volunteers, however, they 
do hope to meet him on the trip. 

Nar: May I remind you that this 
isn't an ordinary flight, these pas- 
sengers won't be wearing togs of 
travel, but clothes from the ward- 
robe of "Careers in Home Eco- 
nomics," Careers designed to im- 
prove home and family living. Each 
passenger will please report to the 
Inter-Planetary desk when called. 
T.A.: Miss Bell Attractive Clothes. 
She's decided on a career in clothing. 
(Clothing gets up — goes to desk and 
presents credentials, then steps 
back of T.A.) 

Nar: Clothes and fashion could 
catch her. She may start as a sales- 
woman in a store, advance to stock 
or even buyer. She may produce 
fashion shows or plan advertising 
lay outs, become a personal shopper, 
promote educational fashion pro- 
grams, demonstrate patterns or 
specific products in the garment 
field. Oh, any number of things may 
come her way. (Clothes leaves.) 

T.A.: Miss Nutrition — calling 
Miss Betta Nutrition. (Nutrition gets 
up — opens bag looking for cre- 
dentials — goes to desk presenting 
them, then moves back.) 

Nar: Well, you might find her in 
a hospital kitchen as a dietitian or 
with a health department of a city, 
county or state. Maybe you'll find 
her in the consultation room of a 
large institution planning diets for 
patients, with a community health 
agency, or it could be she would do 
research for Du Pont or some other 
company in a large laboratory — with 
a typewriter near by so she might 
write articles for others to read, or 
perhaps you may find her demon- 
strating for a public service company 
on how to use the latest gas or 
electric stove, or other equipment. 

T.A.: Again calling passengers 
for the "Super-Sonic Flight Future 
Unlimited." Miss Tillie Toiler 
Teacher. (Teacher who has been 
chatting with some of her students 
gets up, fumbles for her possessions, 
hesitantly leaves the students and 
goes up to the desk to present her 
credentials.) 

Nar: That's easy — a teacher of 
course. Look at that smile and those 
adoring students. They were stu- 
dents from the school where she 
taught this past year, they were most 



eager to see her off since she has 
promised to get them a "Moon Boy 
Friend." (Teacher and students 
stand to back.) 

Nar: But such wonderful sur- 
prising things, and such satisfaction 
at the close of the day. This girl has 
chosen a career that will offer many, 
many opportunities for service. The 
vocational Homemaking teacher has 
the opportunity to become a leader 
in working with families in her 
community. She would also sponsor 
a chapter of the Future Homemakers 
of America, and this would make 
FHA inter-planetary, just think 
what fun that would be. (Leaves.) 

T.A.: Miss Ima Interior Decora- 
tor. (She is absorbed in looking 
through a magazine and doesn't 
seem to hear. ) I repeat — Miss In- 
terior Decorator, Miss Ima Interior 
Decorator. (Gathers up her be- 
longings and starts to desk.) 

Nar: From cave man to moon 
man the establishment of a home is 
common. To add beauty, conven- 
ience and comfort is the task of this 
girl. (Here she presents her cre- 
dentials.) This girl works in the 



fascinating realm of color, structure, 
and design and may be employed by 
firms of interior decoration, large 
department stores, as consultant or 
serve as home furnishings editor of 
a magazine. 

T.A.: Miss Food Service — Miss 
Florence Food Service, your flight is 
scheduled to leave in five minutes. 
( Florence gathers up her things and 
goes up to the desk — then moves 
back.) 

Nar: This passenger has chosen 
public food service for her career. 
You have just seen the manager of 
a future tea room, cafeteria or res- 
taurant. She knows public eating 
places use about one third of all the 
food eaten in the U. S. A. She likes 
to work with food and has chosen 
public food service for her career. 
She has her college degree. Who 
knows she may be employed by the 
department of food service for an 
air line company, or she may ar- 
range, describe, and photograph 
those delicious foods we see in color 
magazines. If she does return from 
the flight to the Moon, we would 
all like to be the official taster of 



West Edgecombe Fair Exhibit 



The Future Homemakers of 
America of West Edgecombe made 
an exhibit to be shown at the county 
fair. The theme was Civil Defense 
and it was entitled, "We Are Ready, 
Are You?" Civil Defense is one of 
our national projects. The booth 
was arranged with a wood stove, 
kerosene can, shelves of food. 



games, a bed, lamp, shovel, frying 
pan and other cooking and eating 
equipment, cans for disposal of 
waste, purified water, first aid sup- 
plies, and all other minor articles 
necessary for a family to stay alive 
during any type of disaster. The 
girls were awarded a first prize blue 
ribbon. 




ORE PREPARED 

are you?^ 




those delicious planetary foods she 
would bring back with her. (Leaves.) 

T.A.: Miss Teresa Textiles — 
please report to the desk, Miss Tex- 
tiles. (She is looking around and 
then makes her way to the desk.) 

Nar: Chemistry and physics were 
majors in her training so she may do 
textile research — and they are 
needed, since man is producing more 
and more fabrics each year. Surely 
in this marvelous age of science no 
career in Homemaking has a more 
promising future. (She leaves.) 

Judy Journalism comes rushing 
in. hands full, bag on shoulder, also 
a camera, she seems to be all excited. 

T.A.: Still calling passengers for 
the Super-Sonic Flight "Future Un- 
limited." (Upon seeing Judy, her 
expression changes.) She says: No, 
she isn't late, she always travels that 
way. She's making a deadline for the 
newspaper, radio or TV. This is 
really a glamour girl. But it takes 
hours and hours of trials, rehearsals, 
retakes, and rewrites. 

Nar: Journalism is home eco- 
nomics public relations, advertising, 
broadcasting and televising. This 
girl has to move fast. In fact she 
must be prepared to do at least 
three things at the same time, use 
her hands, her voice, and her mind. 
She is a dramatic artist, a food ex- 
pert, and a walking encyclopedia on 
questions concerning home and 
home equipment. For a home eco- 
nomics major in connection with 
speech and journalism courses it is 
a marvelous career. The future is 
bright for the girl with that special 
talent. (Leaves.) 

Nar: Let's not forget that many 
other interesting opportunities for 
employment are open to the trained 
home economists in all areas of liv- 
ings as home demonstration agents, 
family life specialists, child develop- 
ment, family counselors, health 
educators, and housing consultants; 
but this first flight to the moon could 
not earn' them all. 



Plan of Work for Achieving 
Goal IX of the State 

Homemaker Degree 

By Elaine Shepherd 
North Buncombe High School 

Standard IX 

Help others in the community to 
understand the goals of a broad 
homemaking education program. 



Goal I 

To prepare displays on FHA pur- 
poses and Civil Defense. 

a. Hall case 

b. Gather materials 

Goal II 

By preparing devotions empha- 
sizing the importance of the 
home. 

a. Devotion given to entire stu- 
dent bodv dailv, sponsored by 
FHA. 

b. Study booklets and phamplets 
for devotions. 

Goal III 

To show the participation of 
Home Economics and FHA in 
school and community activi- 
ties by writing an article for 
school annual, 
a. Page to be devoted to Home 
Economics and FHA first time 
this year. 

Goal IV 

To encourage individuals to take 
Home Economics. 

a. Talk to eight grade students 
b. Talk to girls in high school who 
have failed to take at least one 
year of Home Economics. 




One of the most important projects 
of the Newport Chapter this semester is 
the FHA Doll. Rose Simmons, chapter 
reporter, states: "We wouldn't be sur- 
prised if our FHA Doll isn"t the best 
dressed girl in town. The FHA girls have 
made many outfits for her. We plan to 
sell chances on her and plan to have the 
drawing before Christmas." Proceeds will 
be used for projects and activities which 
will help to strengthen the chapter and 
its members. 

Many of the Newport members are 
interested in earning degrees of achieve- 
ment this year. 

The Mayodan Chapter was host to the 
Rockingham County FHA Rally in Octo- 
ber. "Do's and Don*ts on Dating'' was 
the topic of the panel discussion — a fea- 
ture of the program at the rally. Panel 
members were: Principal of Mayodan 
High School. Mr. J. C. Atkinson: mother. 
Mrs. Jim Tom Williams: President of 
Student Council. Ronnie McGhin. Bonnie 
Williams, Vice-President of the Rocking- 
ham County Federation, was moderator. 

Following the entertainment, which in- 
cluded a skit, "Hubba Hubba." by the 
Mayodan Chapter, an invitation was ex- 
tended to all to visit the Home Economics 
Department and to go to the cafeteria for 
a reception and dance. 

The Bethel Chapter has an enrollment 
of 88 this year. Already the chapter 
members have earned over SI 50 for send- 



Mrs. David Beveridge's third year home economics class, Beaufort High School, is 
shown using local materials in making dried arrangements. The materials used were 
nuts, leaves, berries, pine cones, seed, seed pods, sea oats, driftwood, burrs, and 
flowers. Shown in the picture, foreground, are Nancy Pittman, Helen Mason, and 
Sara Roarty. Standing, left to right, are Marsha Hill, Norma Jean Gainer, Dorothy 
Ransom, Monya Eubanks, Virginia Arthur, Paula Hill, Barbara Fulcher, Mary Sue 
Moore, Roberta Willis, Billie Jean Skarren, Diane Garner, Glenda Harris, Joyce 
Sewell, and Becky Adams. 




8 



ing a delegate to the National Convention 
in Chicago. $75 was made on exhibits at 
two fairs — Cabarrus County Fair and 
the Southern States Fair in Charlotte. An 
FHA float in the Christmas parade is a 
project for December. 

The Star Chapter reports on their 
initiation. Our initiation scheme was in- 
teresting this year. We used the different 
stages of a girl — beginning with the baby 
and ending with grandmother. We cli- 
maxed the day by crowning an "Initiation 
Queen." We collected 3,747 pennies that 
day, a nice addition to the treasury. We 
made pictures and it will appear in our 
local paper. 

The Beaufort Chapter hopes to boost 
the attendance of PTA for their school 
this year. Parents during the past years 
have said, "We can't go to PTA because 
we can't find a baby sitter." 

This is no longer an excuse because 
the FHA is prepared to take care of the 
children of all ages. 

The FHA girls entertain the children 
with stories and pictures from the school 
library, recreational games, toys, and 
records. 

Many parents will appreciate and use 
this added service. It will give them the 
opportunity to watch and listen to their 
older children who may take part in the 
program. 

The Carteret County newspaper de- 
scribed the FHA float as one of the most 
impressive units in the homecoming 
parade. 

The New Hope Chapter won first place 
in the Exhibit Division at the annual 
Wayne County Agriculture Fair held this 
year near Goldsboro. The exhibit was 
centered around "Qualifications and 
Qualities of Good Homemaking." 

Second place was won by Seven Springs 
and Mount Olive. Third place was won 
by Rosewood and Pikeville. Fourth place, 
Grantham; and fifth place by Eureka. 

"Family Relations" was the theme used 
for the exhibit of Richlands Chapter at 
the Onslow County Fair. A cartwheel was 
used. On the hub was printed "Affection," 
signifying that the hub of family life is 
affection. On each of the spokes of the 
wheel were certain traits that should 
radiate from the hub. One member re- 
ceived three blue ribbons, three red rib- 
bons, and six white ribbons on the prod- 
ucts she exhibited at the fair. 

Future Homemakers in Person County 
had a part in planning for and helping 
prepare the Person County "Challenge" 
exhibit at the State Fair. 

The Person County exhibit was spon- 
sored by the County Agricultural Workers 
Council with Tom Hobgood, assistant 
county agent, as chairman. The entry was 
entitled, "Finer Spiritual Values — The 
Power for Putting Your Community Into 
Orbit." There were three cutaway sec- 
tions: (1) "Communion With God," illus- 
trated with a church scene. (2) "Learning 
To Serve," illustrated with a school 
scene, and (3) "Working Together," illus- 
trated with a farm and home scene. Scale 
models were used in each section. 

This exhibit portraying better farming 
and better rural family living won the 
first place cash award — $650. 



DISTRICT RALLIES 

Continued from page five 

education. Panelists included: Jean 
Cordell, Valley Springs Chapter; 
Miss Peggy Rice, homemaking 
teacher at Leicester High School; 
Shyrl Allison, Lee Edwards Chap- 
ter; Nancy Edwards, Wingate Chap- 
ter, vice-president of N. C. Associa- 
tion of FHA; and Rhoda Blanton 
of Shelby Chapter. Guests inter- 
viewed were Mrs. Helen Curry, 
homemaking teacher, Morganton 
High School; Mrs. Walter Yow, 
homemaker, Asheville; Miss Lau- 
retta Head, dietitian at Oteen Vet- 
erans Hospital, Asheville, and 
mystery guest, Mrs. Elizabeth 
Sparks, home economics editor of 
Winston-Salem Journal and Sentinel, 
Winston-Salem. Mrs. Sparks is 
widely known as a newspaper food 
columnist. She told the Future 
Homemakers that the dual responsi- 
bility of being a homemaker, wife 
and mother and a home economist 
in business can be exceedingly 
satisfying, but requires good man- 
agement of time and resources. 



Devotional by Beaufort Chapter 
at District II Rally, New Bern. 
Scripture — Psalm 27: Kay Temple 

Poem — Life 

Life is a gift to be used every day, 
Not to be smothered and hidden 

away; 
It isn't a thing to be stored in a 

chest 
Where you gather your keepsakes 
And treasure your best; 
It isn't a joy to be sipped now and 

then, 
And promptly put back in a dark 

place again. 

Life is a gift that the humblest 

boast of, 
And one that the humblest may 

well make the most of; 
Get out and use it as much as 

you may; 
Wear it, and use it as much as 

you may. 
Don't keep it in niches and 

corners and grooves— 
You'll find that in service its 

beauty improves. 

Prayer: Ruth Treschan (A German 
refugee who has been in U.S.A. 
3 years.) 

O Lord Jesus, who has told us 
in Thy Holy Word that Thou 



love us, and gave Thy Life for 
us, keep us in that love, and help 
us more and more to read, love 
and understand Thy work, that 
we may learn of Thee and of 
Thy Holy Spirit of Thy Father 
in heaven. Amen. 

Song: Soloist — Bobbi West; Ac- 
companist, Judy Gillikin 

Oh, Lord in my heart I have 

something to tell, 
So I'll start from the first 
When on my knees I fell; 
I asked for mercy and that you 

supplied, 
Now my sins are forgiven, 
I have nothing to hide. 

Just want to tell you I'm thankful 

for all that you've done, 
For the stars and the moonlight 

and the setting sun; 
When my work here is through, 
I'm coming home to be with you, 
Just want to tell you I'm thankful, 
that's all. 

When I feel discouraged, You're 

there to see me through; 
Of all the friends I've known 

there's no one like You, 
All my needs you supply, 
Oh, it makes me want to cry, 
Just want to tell You, I'm thank- 
ful, that's all. 



IMPORTANT DATES 

The State Convention — Raleigh 
Memorial Auditorium, Raleigh, 
North Carolina, April 4, 1959. You 
will receive information about the 
program early in 1959. 

National FHA Week — Follows 
the Convention — April 5-11, 1959. 

The National Convention — Con- 
rad Hilton Hotel, Chicago, Illinois, 
July 13-17, 1959. Many have 
expressed interest in sending a dele- 
gate. At this time there is not suffi- 
cient information to send the appli- 
cation forms which should be ready 
early in the year. In the meantime 
it will help if the chapter adviser will 
send a note to the state office indi- 
cating plans to send a delegate. 
Even if this has already been done 
orally or by letter it would be wise 
to do so now. This will give some 
idea for planning the trip. 



Future Homemakers of America 



CREED 

We are the Future Homemakers of America 
We face the future with warm courage, 
And high hope, 

For we have the clear consciousness of seeking 
Old and precious values. 

For we are the builders of homes, 

Homes for America's future. 

Homes where living will be the expression of everything 

That is good and fair. 

Homes where truth and love and security and faith 

Will be realities, not dreams. 

We are the Future Homemakers of America, 
We face the future with warm courage, 
And high hope. 




"The homes of tomorrow are in 

the hands of the youth 

of today" 




Caroline says: 



Christmas — More Meaningful When Family Members 
Share in: 



Worship 

Christmas caroling 

Attending special church services and programs 

Reading passages in the Bible about the birth of 

Christ 
Listening to and telling Christmas stories 

Planning 

The dinner menu 

Tasks to be performed 

The guest list 

Gifts 

Decorations 

The Final Preparation 

Carrying through the plans above. 




FUTURE HOMEMAKERS 

-North Carolina Association- 




NUMBER 3 




OUR 
COVER 



One of the most breathtaking of 
North Carolina's natural beauties 
is Hickory Nut Falls. Plunging 400 
feet over granite cliffs high in the 
Appalachian Mountains, the water- 
fall provides sightseers with a truly 
awesome spectacle. 

Thousands of motorists yearly 
travel U.S. 74 to Chimney Rock 
Park near Asheville, N. C, where 
Hickory Nut Falls is located. Visi- 
tors to the Park see the remarkable 
Chimney Rock itself as well as 
many other unusual rock forma- 
tions. 

The hike to Hickory Nut Falls 
may be made along the Cliff Trail. 
Before reaching the Falls itself, one 
comes upon Inspiration Point where 
a gorgeous panorama of beauty 
spreads out below. Hickory Nut 
Falls is to the west, the emerald 
waters of Lake Lure to the east and 



Hickory Nut Gorge and the Rocky 
Broad River below awe the viewer. 

The alternate trail to the Falls — 
Skyline Trail — passes the Opera 
Box, a lovely sheltered spot to view 
the mountains rolling away in the 
distance. Further along the trail, the 
majestic Satan's Head perches on 
the cliffside surveying the scene be- 
low. The highest point on the trail, 
Exclamation Point, provides a gor- 
geous view of a 75-mile vista. 

At the end of the trail the hiker 
reaches Hickory Nut Falls itself. A 
charming mountain stream ambles 
to the cliff edge and drops suddenly 
a distance of 400 feet into the val- 
ley below. This whimsical surprise 
of nature provides a breathtaking 
view to the sightseer. The sheer 
beauty of crystal waters cascading 
down the steep cliff wall is a sight 
not soon to be forgotten. 

The great cliffs are formed of a 
kind of stone formed only at depths 
of a mile or more within the earth. 
As a result, there has been no per- 
ceptible erosion of the rock over 
which the water falls in centuries. 
Geologists are unable to explain this 
remarkable phenomenon. 

Amazingly, the pool at the base 
of the falls contains trout, hardy 



fish which swim upstream, climbing 
1,100 feet in less than one-half 
mile. Trout also live in the stream 
acove the falls. 

The stream that forms Hickory 
Nut Falls once served a useful pur- 
pose by supplying power for a grist 
mill for a community of more than 
30 families who lived at the top of 
the mountain at the turn of the 
century. They dammed up the 
stream and created a pond to sup- 
ply their power needs, but the flood 
of 1916 swept all traces of their 
mill away. 

An interesting sidelight on the 
Falls is told by Norman Greig, 
President of Chimney Rock Park. 
Many years ago, about 1885, neigh- 
borhood boys wanted to know how 
high the waterfall was. A gourd and 
a long string were dropped to the 
bottom. At a shotgun signal from 
the boys at the bottom, the string 
was cut at the top, and was car- 
ried home to be measured. 

The huge stone pylons at the en- 
trance to Chimney Rock Park are 
an invitation to travelers, with an 
hour or a day to spend, to see the 
many natural wonders of the Park, 
including the inspiringly beautiful 
Hickory Nut Falls. 



North Carolina Association of Future Homemakers of America 



State Officers 
1958-59 

President — Becky Nifong, North Davidson VII 

Vice-President — Nancy Edwards, Wingate VI 

Secretary — Cynthia Leonard, Ramseur V 

Treasurer — Sybil Beasley, Coats IV 

Reporter — Jo Anne Matthews, Central-Fayetteville III 

Parliamentarian — Joyce Harper, B. F. Grady II 

Historian — Betsy Benthall, Woodland-Olney I 

Song Leader — Mary Gale Haynes, North Buncombe 
VIII 



District Advisers 
1958-59 

Mrs. Theresa Brown, West Edgecombe I 
Margaret Carol Banks, Southwood II 
Mrs. Ada Melvin, Bladenboro III 
Mrs. Dorothy Hales, Boone Trail IV 
Mrs. Edith P. Morgan, Franklinville V 
Mrs. Helen Thompson, Endy VI 
Mildred Beamer, West Yadkin VII 
Mrs. Patsy C. Bowers, Glen Alpine VIII 



State Adviser 

Mrs. Faye T. Coleman 



STATE DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 

Division of Vocational Education 

Raleigh, North Carolina 



Over 24,000 copies of the North Caro- 
lina Future Homemakers magazines are 
delivered to the Home Economics office 
in the Education Building where they are 
processed for mailing. They arrive at the 
office in individual packages of 400 
copies. This picture shows two of the 
secretaries, the state adviser, and the 
messenger clerk preparing to get the 
packages in the mail. 




OUR MAGAZINE SPEAKS! 



You didn't know what I went 
through before I reached you, did 
you? 

First, I waited for news from 
you, and some pictures, too, which 
would tell the story of what you 
are doing. Then I was all mixed up 
trying to decide where your news 
and picture best fitted in my pages 
and columns — And, those cap- 
tions aren't easy either! I want you 
to read me and I may just make it 
too dull or I may make it sound 
like some of our advertisements — 
too far-fetched to be interesting or 
practical. 

Space is to be considered, too, and 
I'm only 12 pages including the 
covers. 

Now I ponder! What do you want 
to read? I would like for all 24,083 
of you to be interested in what I 
am saying and in addition I would 
like to help you in some way to 
strengthen your chapter programs 
and to help you do things as an 
individual to develop in some con- 
structive way. But I need your help. 
too, if you are to get the kind of 
articles, stories, and pictures you 



want. After all you make the news, 
and you have the story to tell. You 
tell your story in writing and pic- 
tures, and from there on — well, 
this is what happens to me: 

I am placed in a typewriter 
and: the secretary to the State Ad- 
viser of the North Carolina Associa- 
tion of Future Homemakers begins 
pounding on me. Before that, of 
course, I'm edited and your story 
may sound slightly or a great deal 
differently from the way you told 
it, but it is usually told in one way 
or the other. 

After my layouts have been 
made, and my cuts ordered from 
the engraver, my typewritten copy 
is turned over to the printers. The 
foreman at the print shop marks 
each piece for the size and kind of 
type, and the width it is to be. 
Then I am turned over to the lino- 
type machine. 

The linotype is a complicated 
machine having a keyboard which 
looks somewhat similar to a type- 
writer. The linotype operator types 
me out on the keyboard and I come 
from the machine in lines, each one 



a solid piece, which is cast from 
molten metal. When I am in type, 
I am then put on a galley, which is 
a metal tray about 22 inches long. 
My face is then covered with ink 
by a roller, and a sheet of paper 
put over my face. I am run through 
a proof press, and the piece of pa- 
per then carries a perfect impres- 
sion of my face. This is a proof. 
My proof is turned over to the 
proofreader and I am read care- 
fully to see that all my words are 
spelled correctly. Then back to the 
linotype and any errors are cor- 
rected. 

My editor then takes the cor- 
rected proof sheets and pastes up 
a dummy, fitting in my reading mat- 
ter with proofs of my cuts, which 
have by this time been returned 
from the engraver. If she has fig- 
ured right, everything is fine. But 
if she has overestimated, and there 
is more type than my pages can 
hold, she must decide what to leave 
out. If there isn't enough, she must 
write some more. 

Now that I am in dummy form 
(no wisecracks, now, about me 



1 



being a dummy) — I go back to 
the printer, and the foreman gives 
me to one of his men, who is called 
a compositor. This man takes my 




"The linotype operator . . . types . . ." 

type and cuts, and puts me together 
according to the way my editor has 
pasted me up. I am inked again 
and another proof made of each 
page. I am beginning to look like 
a magazine at this stage. Now to 
the proofreader where I am checked 
again, and then to my editor for 
her final check. 

Back I go to the printer! Final 
corrections are made, and then I 
go to the lock-up man. He takes 
my four cover pages, and separates 
my red from my black, and puts 
the part that prints in black in a 
steel frame, which is called a 
"chase." My parts that print in red 
are put in another chase. Then my 
inside eight pages are put in still 




"/ go to the printing press . . ." 

another chase. Each one of these 
chases is called a "form," and each 
form is a separate printing opera- 
tion. 

Now I go to the printing press. 
My forms are locked on the "bed" 
of the press, the press is loaded with 
paper, the ink fountains are filled, 
and the pressman presses a switch. 
Rollers run over my face, spreading 



ink smoothly. A huge steel cylinder 
picks up a single sheet of paper, 
and presses it firmly against my 
inked face. I come out the end of 
the press a printed sheet. My cover 
must go through the press twice, 
once for the black and once for the 
red. When I get through with the 
presses, I am two large flat sheets, 
printed on both sides. The smaller 
of the two sheets is my cover, two 
pages on each side of the sheet. The 
other sheet is my inside eight pages, 
four pages on each side. 

Now on to the folding machines! 
My sheets are fed through these 
complicated machines and they 
come out folded, with each page 
where it should be. 

Then I am fed to the gang 
stitcher. This is a long machine with 
an endless belt. By hand, my two 
forms are put on this belt, my in- 
side first, and farther on down the 
belt, my cover. This machine then 
puts the cover over my inside and 
puts two wire staples in my back- 




". . . fed to the gang stitcher" 

bone. Now I am really getting some- 
where! I am all together with all 
my pages in right order, but my 
sides are all rough, and some of 
my pages won't open. 

I am now taken to the cutting 
machine, which is a huge power 
driven knife, razor sharp. My top. 
bottom and outside edge is trimmed 
smooth. 

At last I am done! I am new 
loaded on a truck, and carried to 
my editor who. together with her 
staff, puts your name and address 
on me and today you found me in 
vour mailbox. 



A cookbook, "Favorite Recipes 
of Alabama Vocational Home Eco- 
nomics Teachers," has been pub- 
lished as a money making project 
for FHA Chapters in Alabama. 
The cost of the book is $1.00. 
Copies may be ordered from Miss 
Ruth Stovall, State Supervisor, 
Home Economics Education, State 
Department of Education, Mont- 
gomery 4, Alabama. 



Community, 
^Development 

Program 

Dianne Dibrell, a former Future 
Homemaker from Mills River 
Chapter in Henderson County and 
who is now a student at Woman's 
College in Greensboro, explained 
some of the specific values of the 
community development program 
at a meeting of the Asheville Agri- 
cultural Development Council. 

"The biggest problem that con- 
cerns youth today is the feeling of 
not being wanted. 

And Community development 
has backed up its youth by giving 
us a chance to sit on councils or- 
ganized in individual communities. 
They give us a chance to speak our 
ideas and to carry though on all of 
them. They have inspired an in- 
terest in youth and because of this 
interest, we have set our goals 
higher." 

Miss Dibrell described the type 
of things young people are doing 
and can do in community programs 
and ended with this plea: "Train 
us — guide us — believe in us." 



After taking a course on Family 
Relations in Mrs. Julia Slate's Home 
Economics class, I was inspired to 
write the poem. "Cleaning Up Her 
Room." The poem is typical of me 
as well as any other teenage girl 
on a Saturday morning. 

CLEANING UP HER ROOM 

She throws a pile of sweaters 
Hurriedly on a chair; 
Discards a bunch of stockings 
She thinks beyond repair; 
Takes down two pretty pictures 
Too childish for her taste 
Picks up some candid snapshots 
And tears them up in haste. 
She moves the bed and dresser, 
Observes them with a moan. 
Flops in the nearest armchair 
And then decides to phone. 
She talks about the movies 
And then about her dates; 
She switches conversation 
From chemise to dirty plates. 
She ignores her task of dusting. 
Forsakes the mop and broom. 
But following mother's order 
She's "cleaning up her room." 

Ann Scruggs 

North Rowan Chapter 



AFTER GRADUATION FROM 
HIGH SCHOOL— WHAT? 

yesterday: Officers of Our State Association 
Today: College Students 

What happens to each of you after you receive that high school diploma 
is a concern of many. Parents, teachers, and friends keep a watchful eye 
on your progress. 

Each Future Homemaker will be interested in hearing a progress report 
on our state officers of the two past years. 



OFFICERS— 1956-57 



STATUS— 1958-59 



President — Jeannette Worthington Meredith College, Raleigh 

Vice-President — Becky Hayes Converse College, Spartanburg, S. C. 

Secretary — Clyde Templeton Wake Forest College, Wake Forest 

Treasurer — Penny Niven Woman's College, Greensboro 

Reporter — Doris Teague... - Greensboro College, Greensboro 

Parliamentarian — Margaret Rand Woman's College, Greensboro 

Historian — Helen Lewis Greensboro College, Greensboro 

Song Leader — Jenny Lou Taylor.. Meredith College, Raleigh 

Noteworthy: At Greensboro College, Helen Lewis and Doris Teague 
room together. At Meredith College, Jenny Lou Taylor and Jeannette 
Worthington room together. 

OFFICERS— 1957-58 STATUS— 1958-59 

President — Becky Hayes... ..Converse College, Spartanburg, S. C. 

Vice-President — Becky Nifong 

Serving as 1958-59 president — Senior in High School 

Secretary — Barbara Ellis Woman's College, Greensboro 

Treasurer — Patsy Hunt Stratford College, Danville, Va. 

Reporter — Jane Eagles Meredith College, Raleigh 

Parliamentarian — Betty Jo Lowdermilk 

Historian — Jane Barrow -.- .....Mt. Olive Jr. College, Mt. Olive 

Song Leader — Jean Jackson Completed a Business Course 

Nancy Rosenthall, National FHA 
Secretary 1956-57, is now a student 
at Cornell University, Ithaca, N. Y. 

In a Christmas message, Nancy 
had this to say: 

"I love Cornell but the work con- 
tinues to get harder, and the 
weather continues to get colder. The 
catalogue didn't mention this. What 
do I do now?" 

According to Jenny Lou Taylor 
and Jeannette Worthington — "Col- 
lege activities helps one to 'live a 
more useful and satisfying life' and 
prepares one to 'face the future with 
warm courage and high hope'." 

A diary prepared by Jenny and 
Jeannette will give you a greater 
insight into "college life," and help 
to prepare you if you plan to con- 
tinue your education and plan to 
live on a college campus. 

May 1, 1957 — The rainy, cold 



weather did not dampen our spirits 
as we came to Meredith for our 
first week-end visit and the May 
Day activities. We, Jeannette and 
Jenny, were surprised to see each 
other at the registration desk. After 
a memorable week-end, we antici- 
pated rooming together in the fall. 

September 11, 1957 — Today we 
moved into our dormitory room. 
Each of us had more boxes and 
clothes than we realized we pos- 
sessed. This was the day our coun- 
selor and "big sister" helped us to 
feel at home in our "new home 
away from home." 

September 12, 1957 — This is 
our first morning at Meredith and 
as we walk down the stairs on our 
way to the auditorium, we see a 
familiar face. It is Ann Rowe, who 
attended the National FHA Con- 
vention in Chicago with us. During 
the week we met many other girls 
who were FHA'ers. 

September 16, 1957 — Church 
activities are important to us in our 
lives here at school. This first Sun- 
day we were welcomed and al- 
though a little homesick, took our 
places among the college students 
to worship. 

September 20, 1957 — FHA pre- 
pares girls for leadership and this 
fact was proved when Jenny Lou 
was elected to serve our Freshman 
Class as president. History repeated 
itself in 1958 when Jane Eagles, an- 
other former state officer was 
chosen to lead her class here. 

October 6-11, 1957 — Dear to 

(Continued on page eight) 




Left to right: Jenny Lou Taylor, State 
porter 1957-59; Jeannette Worthington, 
tory room after quiet hour and study. 



Song Leader 1956-57; Jane Eagles, State Re- 
State President 1956-57, relaxing in a dormi- 



BECKY NIFONG 

State President 

Your state president is 18-year- 
old Becky Nifong. She is the daugh- 
ter of Mr. and Mrs. L. R. Nifong 
and has one sister, Phyllis. Her ac- 
tivities have been numerous and 
varied during her high school years. 
In keeping with this Becky was re- 
cently voted "Most Versatile" by 




BECKY NIFONG 

the members of her class. Her ac- 
tivities include being a member of 
the 4-H Club for five years. Becky 
has held the office of president 
three years and secretary one. Many 
awards have come her way while 
in the 4-H Club. 

Five foot Becky laughs as she 
tells of her experiences during the 
two years she was a member of the 
Girls' Basketball Team. Her com- 
ment was, "I warmed the bench 
most of the time." 

Since the North Davidson Band 
was organized three years ago, 
Becky has enjoyed sharing her 
musical talents by playing the clari- 
net for two years and playing the 
bells one year. Other musical tal- 
ents include singing with the 
Golden Melody Girls' Quartet for 
four years and during that time they 
have won nine trophies and several 
cash prizes. 

Becky has been on the majorette 
squad for three years, served as 
vice - president of her freshman 
class, a member of Future Teachers 
Club for one year, a reporter for 
the school newspaper staff as a 



Our 1958-59 

Get to Know Them Better Before 



senior, school winner of "I Speak 
for Democracy" Contest and placed 
second in county. 

Blonde, blue-eyed Becky has 
won several titles during her 
high school years. She has been 
crowned Miss Erlanger, Miss Indus- 
try, School Christmas Queen, and 
was a member of the school's Valen- 
tine Court. 

Of course Becky has taken an 
active part in FHA activities. This 
is what she has to say about it: 

"Through FHA and Home Eco- 
nomics I learned about child care 
and how to understand children. 
Had it not been for this training, I 
would not be able to take the re- 
sponsibility of teaching a class of 
15 beginners at church. 

"The State Rally is not far off. 
After this I will be leaving my post 
as President very regretfully. My 
work with Mrs. Coleman, the state 
officers and others with whom I 
have been closely connected in FHA 
marks a most meaningful period in 
my high school days. To you. Fu- 
ture Homemakers, I am most grate- 
ful. 

"Soon graduation time will be 
here. My days of schooling will be 
completed, I will start my climb in 
the adult world to make my own 
living. Although my days as a Fu- 
ture Homemaker will be over, I shall 
always remember them. These ex- 
periences will serve as a guide in 
years to come because I will then 
be a Real Homemaker." 



NANCY EDWARDS 
State Vice-President 

"When 1 attended the State Con- 
vention in 1957 little did I dream 
that at the next State Convention 
I would be installed as your State 
Vice-President," says Nancy Ed- 
wards. 

Living in a small college town 
Nancy is a member of a family of 
five. She has an eighteen-year-old 
brother and a thirteen-year-old sis- 
ter. Her mother teaches and her 
father is a poultryman. 

Nancy puts FHA at the top of 
her interest list but also says she 




NANCY EDWARDS 

enjoys her many school activities. 
She has served as Chapter Secre- 
tary and Parliamentarian. At Win- 
gate High School she participates 
in many activities. This year Nancy 
was elected President of the Junior 
Class. She is serving as Vice- 
President of the Band, Art Editor 
of the school paper, and Circula- 
tion Manager of the annual. Last 
year Nancy was tapped into the 
Beta Club and she is also a mem- 
ber of the Glee Club and 4-H Club. 
For three years she has been a 
cheerleader. Even though these ac- 
tivities keep her busy she manages 
to be an honor student. 

Nancy states, "As I look back 
over my two years as a member of 
the Future Homemakers organiza- 
tion I suddenly realize it has had a 
special meaning for me. It has given 
me many experiences that are price- 
less. I have had opportunities to 
travel and make new friends. It is 
helping me to grow as an indi- 
vidual, to develop leadership and 
improve my presonality. Through 
the Future Homemakers organiza- 
tion I have a deeper appreciation for 
the art of homemaking. 

"I shall never forget my wonder- 



ate Officers 

State Convention April 4, 1959 



ful experiences at the National 
Meeting in Kansas City, Missouri, 
this summer. Seeing the various 
phases of FHA work unfold before 
me I realized with a great organi- 
zation ours is. 

"I would also like to express to 
each of you a personal 'thank you' 
because you are the ones who made 
it possible for me, as one of your 
state officers, to attend the National 
Meeting." 

To major in Home Economics in 
college is what Nancy is planning 
now and she is sure the skills she 
acquires through FHA work will be 
a great benefit to her in this career. 



CYNTHIA LEONARD 

State Secretary 

Your State Secretary for 1958- 
1959 is Cynthia Leonard. Cynthia 
is sixteen years old and a junior at 
Ramseur High School. She is the 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. H. 
Leonard of Ramseur and has one 
younger brother, Gerry. Family ac- 
tivities play a very important part 
in Cynthia's life. 

Since her freshman year in high 
school Cynthia has been interested 




in FHA work. She was chapter sec- 
retary last year and is now vice- 
president of her chapter. 

Cynthia is also active in other 
school organizations. She is secre- 
tary of the Junior class and a mem- 
ber of the Beta Club, Library Club, 
Glee Club, French Club, Music 
Club, and The Order of Rainbow 
for Girls. 

Church plays an important role 
in Cynthia's life. She is an active 
member of the choir and pianist for 
the Intermediate Department at 
Sunday School. She enjoys teach- 
ing in Bible School in the summer 
and is pianist for Baptist Training 
Union. She is community missions 
chairman of Girls' Auxiliary. 

Work in Home Economics and 
FHA and writing a column of teen 
news for a local paper are helping 
Cynthia to begin making prepara- 
tions for a career in Home Eco- 
nomics and Journalism. 

Cynthia remembers her election 
as State Secretary as "one of the 
most exciting and wonderful events 
of my life!" Her installation at the 
State Convention and the trip to 
the National Meeting at Kansas 
City, Missouri, last July rank at the 
top of her list of memorable events. 

To each of you Future Home- 
makers, Cynthia says, "Serving you 
as your State Secretary is indeed a 
privilege. I am looking forward to 
working with and meeting many of 
you this year." 



CYNTHIA LEONARD 



SYBIL BEASLEY 
State Treasurer 

"I remember attending, as a 
sophomore, a District IV Rally. In- 
side, a little tug told me how won- 
derful it would be to be a state 
FHA officer. FHA meant so much 
to me that I wanted to share it with 
many other girls. Little did I dream 
that this would be nourished into a 
reality, but it did when I was elected 
State Treasurer. Holding this office 
has been the highlight of my life. 
Words could never express what I 
have gained. My only wish is that 
each of you could really share my 
experiences with me. Working with 



the state officers has been a rare 
privilege. Nothing could replace our 
irip to the National Meeting in Kan- 
sas City, not only because of the 
invaluable knowledge I received, 
but because of the fellowship of so 
many wonderful girls from all over 
the world. 

"Being a member of my local 
chapter has been very beneficial. I 





SYBIL BEASLEY 

have served as chapter parliamen- 
tarian and county historian. Work- 
ing on and heading various com- 
mittees has given me leadership 
training. Working for and earning 
the Junior, Chapter, and State 
Homemakers Degrees has helped 
me mature as well as added to my 
knowledge things about FHA and 
homemaking. FHA Camp at White 
Lake I attended one summer was 
an enjoyable as well as profitable 
experience. 

"Some other of my school ac- 
tivities in addition to my FHA work 
include Beta Club, Student Council, 
Glee Club, Teenage Club, Future 
Teachers of America, school paper. 
Assembly Chairman, Class Re- 
porter, Yearbook editor, Chief 
Marshal, class plays, and Miss 
Coats High of 1958. The Miss Coats 
High contest is sponsored by our 
FHA Chapter. 

"I enjoy, too, my work in the 
Coats Baptist Church where I am a 
member. I am a member of the 
Baptist Training Union, Young 
Woman's Auxiliary, and the choir. 



I prepare our weekly bulletins and 
am pianist and assistant organist. 

"After graduation from high 
school, I plan to major in science 
education at the college of my 
choice. 

"I can never measure what FHA 
has meant in my life, but it has 
had a great deal of influence. It 
has helped me meet people and has 
given more depth, new ideas and a 
broader outlook to my life. As I 
said, serving as a state officer has 
been the highlight of my life be- 
cause it has meant working with 
other FHA'ers who are indeed 'the 
cream of the crop.' And that means 
each of you. Good luck always to 
each of you and may God bless 
you." 



JO ANNE MATTHEWS 
State Reporter 

'"I was born into a tightly knitted 
farm family with three brothers, 
Bobby, A. B., and Dwight; and one 
sister, Mary Donna. My mother and 
father, Mr. and Mrs. Cecil O. Mat- 
thews, have taught each of us the 
meaning of sharing, the joy of com- 
panionship, and the respect and 
worship of God. From early child- 
hood we have attended Clement 
Baptist Church together. 

"For generations my ancestors 
have been farmers, tilling the soil. 
We grow numerous crops and I take 
an active part working in the field. 

"I am a senior at Central High 
School, and enjoy taking a part in 




A 



JO ANNE MATTHEWS 



school activities. As a freshman I 
earned a letter on the Varsity 
Basketball team, as a junior I was 
selected as an All-County player, 
and this year I am captain of the 
team. I am treasurer of the Mono- 
gram Club. This is my second year 
as secretary of the Beta Club. Being 
in the Junior Play and being a mar- 
shal for graduation were highlights 
of my Junior year. Each year I 
have been a class officer and this 
year I am President of the Senior 
class. I was voted "Best Ail-Around" 
by the Senior class. Driving a school 
bus and working on the annual staff 
is great fun. I have completed many 
4-H projects and have won district 
and territorial awards in them. Since 
1 joined 4-H I have held all offices 
in school and served as secretary 
and vice-president in the county or- 
ganization. My favorite subject is 
typing. 

"FHA has always been my favor- 
ite organization. Since joining I have 
attended all the State and District 
rallies. As a freshman I was 
awarded the "Best Groomed" award 
in the chapter. As a sophomore I 
received my Junior Homemaker's 
Degree and served as secretary of 
the chapter. My junior year was a 
busy one. I was president of the 
chapter, presided at the Bi-County 
Officers Institute, was elected and 
installed as State Reporter, and re- 
ceived my Chapter Degree. This 
year I am again serving as presi- 
dent of the Central Chapter. Re- 
cently, I was chosen as the school's 
"Betty Crocker Homemaker of To- 
morrow." 

"As for my future, I hope to at- 
tend Woman's College, U.N.C. to 
study home economics. With a de- 
gree in this field, I plan to enter 
the honorable profession of teach- 
ing, and pass the knowledge I have 
obtained on to others. My aspira- 
tions? To be able to give my family 
the same type of home life that my 
parents gave me. 

"To you, Future Homemakers of 
North Carolina and especially Dis- 
trict III, working with you as a state 
officer has been the most wonderful 
experience of my life. Nothing can 
compare with attending the National 
Convention and meeting girls from 
all over the world, being installed 
as a state officer, or presiding at 
the District Rally. Thanks to you 
for this privilege. I'm looking for- 
ward to seeing you at the State 
Convention in March." 



JOYCE HARPER 

State Parliamentarian 

It was a frightened Joyce who 
stood in front of the sea of faces 
on October 4, 1958, in the New 
Bern High School Auditorium. Yes, 




****!» 



JOYCE HARPER 

frightened but very happy. Happy 
that she had reached the goal she 
had set as a freshman at her first 
State Convention. She had hoped 
some day to be a state officer and 
preside at a District Rally. The 
dream had come true, and it was a 
wonderful experience. 

Eighteen-year-old Joyce lives on 
a farm with her parents, her fifteen- 
year-old sister, Lu Jean, and her 
nine-year-old brother, Rodney. She 
and her family have always lived 
on the farm and together they at- 
tend Harper-Southerland Presbyte- 
rian Church where she has become 
a member of the choir and the 
Youth Group. 

Joyce has attended B. F. Grady 
School from the first grade on. 
Upon entering high school she was 
caught in the constant flurry of 
events. She became a cheerleader 
and class reporter, but the first or- 
ganization she became a member 
of was the Future Homemakers of 
America. Many opportunities were 
brought Joyce's way through the 
FHA. She had the privilege of at- 
tending the rally, the State Conven- 
tion, and summer camp. Also, she 
earned her Junior Degree. 

In her sophomore year she be- 
(Continued on page eight) 



TDnapuMtA. otf *)Htenfrte&Lt£oK& 



BETTER IIIERSTMDING 

OF 

OUR ORGANIZATION 



Bailey Chapter 

One of the best ways to gain a 
better understanding of any organi- 
zation is to become acquainted with 
its leaders or people who have 
been in the organization for a long 
time. This is exactly what the Bailey 
FHA'ers decided to do to help us 
learn more about our organization. 
Miss Alice Strawn, Supervisor of 
Student Teachers at East Carolina 
College and an honorary member 
of the FHA, visited our chapter and 
discussed the opportunities that we 



find in home economics. Her talk, 
"Reach for a Star" was informa- 
tive, entertaining, and most inspir- 
ing. We all became more aware of 
what a vast field home economics 
is and how we need to prepare our- 
selves to meet its challenge. 

Another program that has rpoven 
to be a highlight of the year was 
our visit from Mrs. Glenda Noble 
Johnson, a former FHA state of- 
ficer. Mrs. Johnson, now an em- 
ployee of Carolina Power and Light 
Company, spoke to us on "FHA 




Standing is Ramona Tolson, new FHA President of the Charlotte and Mecklenburg 
Federation of the Future Homemakers of America. Seated at the left is Shelley 
Raymer, Secretary of the federation. 

"We hope that our new county organization, Charlotte and Mecklenburg divisions, 
which was formed for the 1958-59 school year will help us to be more interested 
in FHA, homemaking, and each other. We have planned to have lots of fun together. 

"For one of our projects this year we served as hostesses for the Parade of Homes. 
The girls played with the pony that was given away as door prize and they enjoyed 
doing this. The county club received $100 for this project. One of our projects that 
we are looking forward to this year is the county rally, which we are in the process 
of planning." 



and What It Means to Me." 
"Through my experiences in the 
FHA, I can now face the challenge 
of homemaking with faith that I 
shall be successful," said Mrs. John- 
son. She also told the group that 
she now had a wide circle of friends 
that she became acquainted with 
when she was a FHA member. Mrs. 
Johnson concluded her talk with a 
beautiful individual interpretation 
of what our FHA creed had meant 
and would always mean to her. 

The Bailey Chapter recently 
danced its way right into the hearts 
of many people who have been crip- 
pled by infantile paralysis by ob- 
serving former President Franklin 
Roosevelt's birthday. The Bailey 
FHA'ers sponsored a "Sock Hop" 
in the school cafeteria and gave the 
proceeds to the March of Dimes in 
memory of President Roosevelt. 



Granite Quarry Chapter 

An important service project of 
the Granite Quarry Chapter was to 

have a White Christmas. Each girl 
brought clothes or canned food 
wrapped in white paper. The white 
gifts were boxed up and given to 
the Salvation Army for distribution 
to needy families in Rowan County. 
Through this project each girl was 
given the satisfaction of knowing 
that she was helping to keep the 
true meaning of Christmas. 

As a money making project the 
club sponsored a bake sale. Each 
girl either baked a cake or a pie or 
helped to sell them. The money re- 
ceived from this project was added 
to the treasury and will be used for 
a mother-daughter banquet to be 
held later this year. 

Another favorite project of the 
club is to sponsor "Twirp Week" 
each year during the week of Valen- 
tine's Day. The entire school par- 
ticipates and a lot of fun is the re- 
sult of the planning of the FHA. 



Beaufort Chapter 

Fathers in the Beaufort School 
Community were made aware of the 
Future Homemakers goals and of 
some of the activities in the total 
homemaking which are carried on to 
meet these goals. A Father-Daughter 
Covered Dish Supper was held in 
the fall. In addition to presenting 
a well - planned interpretive pro- 
gram, each FHA member was re- 
sponsible for bringing her father 
and enough food for eight people. 



1958-59 STATE OFFICERS 

(Continued from page six) 

came vice-president of her chapter 
and earned her Chapter Degree. 
That same year Joyce was tapped 
into the National Beta Club and 
was elected Chief - cheerleader. 
Through experience in Home Eco- 
nomics she learned to design and 
sew most of her clothes. 

She became president of her 
FHA Chapter in her junior year, 
but the highlight of the year oc- 
curred on October 5, 1957, when 
she was elected State Parliamen- 
tarian. She was installed on March, 
1958, and that same day she walked 
across the stage to receive her State 
Homemaker's Degree. 

Joyce's other activities kept her 
busy, too. She became a school bus 
driver, a member of the Monogram 
Club, a Marshal, and was again 
elected Chief - cheerleader. 

This year Joyce is a senior and 
vice-president of her class. She 
drives a school bus, is a typist on 
the annual staff, and is assistant 
Chief - cheerleader. Now, she is 
looking forward to the State Con- 
vention. 

After graduation she hopes to 
win a scholarship and wants to at- 
tend Flora Macdonald College. She 
plans to major in business or library 
science. 



BETSY BENTHALL 
State Historian 

Betsy Benthall, your State His- 
torian, is an active eighteen-year- 
old senior at Woodland-Olney High 
School. During Betsy's years in high 
school at Woodland-Olney she has 
participated in many activities and 
won numerous honors. Last year, 
as a junior, she was awarded the 
History Medal for the entire school 
and had a leading role in the 
graduation exercises by serving as 
Chief Marshal. Betsy has made out- 
standing contributions to the organi- 
zations which she is a member of. 
They are as follows: Beta Club, 
Glee Club, Literary Society, Annual 
Staff, Paper Staff, and Basketball 
Team. 

If you mention FHA to Betsy, 
she will eagerly tell you of the many 
happy experiences she has enjoyed 
as State Historian. At the top of the 
list would be attending the National 
Future Homemakers Convention in 
Kansas City. Missouri, with the 
other state officers and the South 




BETSY BENTHALL 

Carolina delegation. Another im- 
portant event was attending the Ex- 
ecutive Council Meeting in Raleigh 
last summer, and of course, the Dis- 
trict I Rally. In the Woodland- 
Olney Chapter, Betsy has served as 
a local officer of Future Home- 
makers and has earned her Junior 
and Chapter degrees. 

Mr. and Mrs. R. C. Benthall of 
Woodland, North Carolina, are very 
proud of Betsy. Together they have 
attended the Baptist church in 
Woodland. Now Betsy is taking an 
active part as a church member. She 
is assistant organist for church, 
pianist for Training Union, assist- 
ant pianist for Sunday school, and 
a member of the church choir. 

After graduation Betsy is plan- 
ning to enter Meredith College as 
a Home Economics major. 



MARY GALE HAYNES 

State Song Leader 

"My name is Mary Gale Haynes. 
I am seventeen years old and I live 
at Barnardsville. My parents are 
Mr. and Mrs. Fred Haynes; and I 
have one sister, Leslie, who is nine 
years old. Our home is in the coun- 
try so naturally I live on a farm. 

"If you were to pass by our place 
in the summer, you would probably 
see me in our tobacco patch or the 
corn field. You might even see me 
riding our mule. 

"I am a member of Dillingham 
Presbyterian Church where I am 
pianist and Junior Choir director. 



I am also president of our Youth 
Fellowship. 

"I am a senior at North Bun- 
combe High School. This year I was 
elected president of the Senior Class, 
Feature Editor of our annual, and 
Miss High School. I am a member 
of the Beta, French, and 4-H clubs, 
and also a member of the Student 
Council and, of course FHA. 

"About this time last year, I was 
getting over the excitement of being 
elected State Song Leader. As I re- 
call that, it was the longest one I 
have ever spent in my life. Then, 
finally, when Becky Hayes an- 
nounced the winner, I laughed, then 
cried. This was the happiest mo- 




MARY GALE HAYNES 

ment in my life, a State Officer in 
FHA. So many times since then, I 
have wondered if it were all a 
dream. I remember all the wonder- 
ful times I have had and then I 
know that it is all true. 

"I have enjoyed FHA more than 
any other thing in my four years of 
high school. I feel that I have 
learned more about the decisions 
I will have to make than girls who 
haven't been members, especially in 
leadership training." 



AFTER GRADUATION 

(Continued from page three) 

the hearts of all college students 
are the traditions they share with 
all their college's alumnae. The first 
of these traditions at Meredith is 
Rush Week. Both the Philaretian 



8 



and the Astrotekton literary so- 
cieties sponsor parties and encour- 
age you to join with them. We fell 
in love with Milton, the "Phi" teddy 
bear who is mascot. We also felt a 
challenge in the "Phi" motto, "Plain 
living and high thinking," and went 
"Phi" on Decision Day. Later Jean- 
nette was elected to be the fresh- 
man society marshal. 

October 18, 1957 — Later in the 
fall, the Athletic Association spon- 
sored Corn Huskin' Bee. We had 
fun planning our costumes. Jenny 
was dressed as Bessie the Cow — 
complete with cow bell, and Jean- 
nette was dressed as a milkmaid. 
And we were quite amazed to hear 
our biology teacher win the hog call- 
ing contest and to see our dignified 
English teacher dressed as Little 
Tommy Tinker. 

March 9, 1958 — A typical Class 
Day — 7:45: We are standing in 
line in the cafeteria for breakfast 
when our suitemate comes in and 
gives us our mail. Jeannette heard 
from a certain East Carolinian, and 
Jenny heard from her parents. 
Granny Taylor also sent a box of 
food — roasted pecans, fudge, and 
pecan crescents. We'll eat this to- 
night during study hours. 

8:30: First class. Jeannette goes 
to Latin, and Jenny has history. A 
former Latin teacher here told the 
Latin class about her recent trip to 
Rome. The history class had an un- 
expected "pop" on the assignment. 

9:30: Jenny is in French class; 
Jeannette is in Physical Education 
class and taking folk dancing — 
and enjoying it. 

10:30: Chapel. All the students 
assemble during the busy day to 
take a short time out for worship. 
Today one of the Raleigh ministers 
was the speaker. A missionary who 
had been in Africa 10 years was 
here last week, and Dr. Waldo 
Beech of the Duke University fac- 
ulty will be here next week. 

The College Chorus also sang an 
anthem this morning. They really 
have a way with music. We are 
eagerly anticipating their Spring 
Concert. 

11 :00: Back to class. This period 
we have chemistry class together. 

12:00: Lunch. We sat with 
Jackie Young of Beaufort, who also 
went to the National Convention 
with us. 

2:00-5:00: This is the afternoon 
we learned the principles of pres- 
sure canning and canned corn and 
soup in our home economics foods 



course. We were also reminded that 
Mr. Austin Baer from the new 
School of Product Design at N. C. 
State would be the speaker at our 
next Home Economics Club meet- 
ing. That sounds interesting. 

6:00: Family style dinner. After 
a busy day of classes, it is relaxing 
to sit down with your friends at 
mealtime. Tonight the group sang 
"Congratulations" to several of the 
girls who had been tapped into the 
Silver Shield, an honorary leader- 
ship society here on campus. 

7:00 - 10:00: Study Hours — 
need I say more? 

10:00: There is never a dull mo- 




ment at Meredith after study hours. 
Many nights popcorn parties are 
held in the suites, or surprise birth- 
day parties are given. A group of 
girls may be together talking over 
the events of the day and sharing 
a box of food from home. Tonight 
our suitemates helped us devour 
the food Granny sent this morning. 

10:45: We had Family Altar, a 
devotional period for all the girls on 
our hall, in our room tonight. We 
all agree that this is the right way 
to come to the end of a busy day. 

11:15: Lights out and good night. 
After all, there is another big day 
ahead tomorrow. 



MAGIC DREAM 

By ELAINE SHERRILL 

Across the way in her little room 
Sits sad little Sally filled with gloom. 
She has a problem on her mind 
As most girls do, you'll often find. 

The problem concerns the proper clothes 
To flatter her looks and please her beaus! 
To make a dollar go as far as she can 
And all the bargains to carefully scan. 

She finds it hard to get the right style 
In a dress that's chick, be it flannel or faille. 
She worries about what tomorrow will bring 
In the way of clothes for she hasn't a thing. 

More dresses and skirts she needs for each day 
But she hasn't much money with which to pay. 
"Ho Hum!" How she wishes that she could sew 
For beautiful fabrics can be purchased quite low. (Yawn) 

It's getting late, she must go to bed! 

Maybe the future will be brighter ahead. 

Mr. Sandman, bring her a dream 

About the best looking clothes she has ever seen. 

Sprinkle all your magic ideas around 
So she will be completely high style bound. 
Put her to sleep right and quickly send 
A variety of fashions in the latest trend. 

(After fashion revue) 

It's time to wake up, little sleepy head 

Because a brighter future does lie ahead. 

You can have attractive clothes just designed to suit you 

But here's one thing you will have to do — 

Sign up for homemaking at Lee Edwards High. 
That beautiful school in the land of the sky. 
In clothing you'll learn the tricks of the trade 
And before you know it, your clothes will be made! 

wmmm :«* mm 



w 
m 

I 




Future Homemakers of America 



CREED 

We are the Future Homemakers of America 
We face the future with warm courage, 
And high hope, 

For we have the clear consciousness of seeking 
Old and precious values. 

For wc are the builders of homes, 

Homes for America's future. 

Homes where living will be the expression of everything 

That is good and fair. 

Homes where truth and love and security and faith 

Will be realities, not dreams. 

We are the Future Homemakers of America, 
We face the future with warm courage, 
And high hope. 




"The homes of tomorrow are in 

the hands of the youth 

of today" 







CAROLINE ANNOUNCES: 



Deadline date for sending credentials for candidate 
for office of National Treasurer — March 15,1959. 



Every chapter should have at least one copy of the 
Chapter Handbook. This can be ordered from the order 
blank sent to each chapter after affiliation. 



Remember the date of the State FHA Convention 
April 4, 1959. at the Memorial Auditorium, Raleigh 
North Carolina. 



7t 



I/, 



to 



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AV 




'.fV* 






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FUTURE HOMEMAKERS 

* North Carolina Association * 




MAY 1959 



NUMBER 4 



^m 



Cover Picture: 



The Wright Memorial is located the gliding of plane surfaces in the 1903. Now — Let's recall the changes 
at Kill Devil Hills in Eastern North air. Here they could get the eleva- and developments which have re- 
Carolina. This is the spot which was tion for a take-off and the steady suited during the 56 years which 
chosen by the Wright Brothers, Or- winds for support. These first at- have followed! Seems almost un- 
ville and Wilbur, to experiment with tempts were made in September, believable, doesn't it? 



North Carolina Association of Future Homemakers of America 



State Officers 
1959-60 

President — Nancy Edwards, Wingate VI 

Vice-President — Sammie Gatlin, Franklinville V 

Secretary — Ann Alphine, Dunn IV 

Treasurer — Kay Hall, Rowland III 

Reporter — Elaine Parker, Jones Central II 

Parliamentarian — Celia Clark, Robersonville I 

Historian — Catherine Blanton, Shelby VIII 

Song Leader — Dawn Crissman, Boonville VII 

(See picture on page 5 — names are listed above read- 
ing from left to right) 



District Advisers 
1959-60 

Mrs. Rachel F. Swindell, Bath I 

Mrs. Julia P. Kennedy, Moss Hill II 

Mrs. Berline R. Baldwin, Clarkton III 

Mrs. Pearl Stroud, Dunn IV 

Mrs. Gwendolyn Griffin, High Point Sr. V 

Mrs. Betsy R. Blankenship, East Mecklenburg VI 

Mrs. June G. Reichle, Davie Co. Cons. VII 

Mrs. Frances S. Bartlett, North Buncombe VIII 



State Adviser 

Mrs. Faye T. Coleman 



STATE DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 

Division of Vocational Education 

Raleigh, North Carolina 



Future Homemakers Shoot for 



HIGH G 





"To be Future Homemakers with high goals," was the 
58-59 motto of the Wingate Chapter. We're shooting 
high in order to reach our goals. This is the success 
story of how we've rung baskets for the months of 
September through March. 

GOAL I. TO GET ACQUAINTED. 

The stage is in September and the characters are 
FHA girls. As backs are tanned, hearts are warmed 
toward new members who are being welcomed at a 
get-acquainted outing at Cheraw Beach. 

GOAL II. TO BE INITIATED. 

To the October Initiation these Hobos brought not 
only their knapsacks, but also their noggins which 
were filled with a creed, a song, and the purposes of 
FHA. Every new member should know these vital 
things. 

GOAL III. TO BROADEN SPIRITUAL VALUES. 

The religions of the world were explained and 

honored at the District VI Rally in November. Future 



Homemakers from the Wingate Chapter participated 
in an inspiring pageant. 

GOAL IV. TO HONOR OUR MOTHERS. 

Inspired by the Christmas Spirit, daughters showed 
their love and appreciation as they honored those who 
had guided them — their mothers. December is the per- 
fect time for a Mother-Daughter Banquet. 

GOAL V. TO STRESS HOMEMAKING SKILLS. 

The Biscuit Baking Contest, sponsored by the FHA, 
was such a success that our advisor and our principal 
have decided to make it an annual affair. Drab days 
in January were lightened by the smell of hot biscuits 
which were being made by the 36 contestants. 

GOAL VI. TO UNDERSTAND OUR NEIGH- 
BORS ABROAD. 

At the February meeting two Turkish girls came to 
explain the Home Economics program for teen-age 
girls in Turkey. 

GOAL VII. TO INFORM OTHERS ABOUT 
FHA. 

Radio was our medium when we sought to inform 
the public of our organization. March days were spent 
Continued on Cover 3 




Goal I. To Get Acquainted — Cheraw Beach. 




Goal III. To Broaden Spiritual Values. 



Goal VI. To Understand Our 
Neighbors Abroad. 



Goal V. To Stress Homemaking Skills. 



Search for Ideas for 1959-60 

by Reviewing Programs of 1958-59 



Idea for Initiation 

The students at Clyde A. Erwin 

High School were surprised one 
morning to see what appeared to be 
at first glance visitors from foreign 
lands. A closer look, however, 
proved that these "visitors" were 
members of their own student body. 
The Clyde A. Erwin FHA Chapter 
was having its initiation program. 
This initiation was different from 
any we had ever had and many 
thought it was the best. 

The new members were dressed 
as girls from different countries such 
as Holland, Hawaii, and Mexico. 
They chose these countries because 
these were the countries that FHA 
has helped by the sale of UNESCO 
stamps and because this type of 
initiation would help to carry out 
one of our goals of the state and na- 
tional organizations to understand 
our neighbors both at home and 
abroad. Each girl chose a country 
and went to the library to find how 
the girls in that particular country 
dress. The best costume was judged 
by the applause of the old members. 
The winner, the little Japanese girl 
with her exotic attire, was presented 
with an FHA pin. 

Each new member was required 
to know the creed, the motto, the 
flower, the color, and the purposes. 
Fines were collected from those who 
could not meet this requirement. 
The money is to be used to buy 
an FHA banner for the chapter. 

This initiation drew the atten- 
tion of the whole school. It also 
helped those who had not joined 
FHA to decide that they might like 
to join next year. 

Dedication of Yearbook to 
Mothers of Members 

The Attractive Yearbook for 
members of the Beulaville Chapter 
was dedicated to the mothers of its 
members. 

'From the first time the doctor 
placed a tiny pink bundle in your 



»®« 



arms until now, you loved and 
cherished us. Because we want you 
to know that we appreciate the sac- 
rifices you have made for us, we 
wish to honor you, our mothers, by 
dedicating our yearbook to you. In 
the years to come we shall strive 
to make you proud of us by be- 
coming good leaders and good 
homemakers in our communities." 

The yearbook included the Creed, 
Purposes, Emblem, Colors, Flow- 
ers, Motto, Program Topics for the 
year. Chapter Officers and Quad 
County Officers, Chapter Parents, 
Committees, Important Dates of the 
year. Opening and Closing Ritual, 
members having received degrees, 
and qualifications for Junior, Chap- 
ter, and State Degrees. 



Banquet Program Ideas 

The theme, "Mother Is A Jewel," 
was effectively carried out at the 
Belvoir - Falkland Mother-Daughter 
Banquet. 

An arrangement of three dozen 
red roses was placed on each of the 
main tables. The other tables had a 
jewelry box containing jewelry and 
surrounded by candles as the center- 
piece. 

The bulletin board was eye catch- 
ing with the words, "Mother Is A 
Jewel," spelled with red roses. 

"Jewels In Your Future" was the 
topic used by Miss Alice Strawn, 
who was guest speaker, for the oc- 
casion. Miss Strawn is Teacher Edu- 
cator in the Department of Home 
Economics at East Carolina College 
in Greenville. 

The Valentine motif was used in 
decorations for the Mother-Daughter 
Banquet held by the Elm City Chap- 
ter. A six-foot heart was used as a 
background for the program. Center- 
piece arrangements on the banquet 
tables were silhouette of hearts with 
carnations and fern interspersed with 
red burning tapers and ivy. Heart- 



shaped programs and candy cups 
marked the individual places. 

A program of interpretation was 
presented. This program included; 
an impressive devotional, "The Gift 
of Love," a welcome to mothers, a 
talk, "What FHA Means to Me," 
Poem on Home, School, and Com- 
munity Beautification. Piano solo, 
"The Lord"s Prayer," the presenta- 
tion of Junior and Chapter Home- 
makers Degrees, and a Summary of 
FHA Activities of the past year. 



It was a Yuletide Banquet for 
mothers, fathers, daughters, and 
sons at the Rock Ridge school. 250 
people were served at this banquet. 
At the north end of the room were 
the three wise men leading camels 
in the comfort of sheltering pine 
trees. In the distance could be seen 
a yellow moon surrounded by glit- 
tering stars against a dark blue sky. 

On the west side of the room was 
a crude stable in which Mary was 
seated by a manger holding the new- 
born child. Numerous animals were 
surrounding the stable, looking on 
while the Holy star glittered over- 
head. 

Each table was lighted separately 
with sparkling candles. The head 
table, overlaid with white cloth was 
centered with a Christmas arrange- 
ment. 

Both the Future Farmers and the 
Future Homemakers participated in 
a special program in the auditorium 
following the dinner. 

FHA girls presented "Fashionable 
Dreams," a demonstration of ap- 
parels that were designed and made 
by them. 

The group then assembled back in 
the cafeteria where the tables had 
been moved back along the walls 
leaving the center of the floor open. 
The empty space was readily oc- 
cupied with sliding feet as the old 
and young alike entertained them- 
selves by square dancing. 



OBSERVANCE OF NATIONAL 

FHA WEEK 



Plans for FHA Week began in 
many chapters several months be- 
fore the week of April 5-11, Na- 
tional FHA Week. 

Carrying out the purposes of the 
organization was foremost in the 
minds of the committee members of 
the Bailey Chapter as plans were 
made for observance of this special 
week. 

Sunday — Worship Service Day 

Participate in Worship Service in 
local churches with a Choir com- 
posed of Future Homemakers sing- 
ing FHA Prayer Song. Other FHA 
members sit in body with Chapter 
Mothers. Printed announcement 
about FHA in Church Bulletin and 
posters on church bulletin board. 

Monday — Publicity Day 

Proclamation of FHA Week by 
School Principal who will be pre- 
sented a red rose. 

Poster in classrooms and down- 
town windows. Special radio pro- 
gram. 

Tuesday — School and Community 
Improvement Day 

Clean-up campaign in school. En- 
courage all to keep lockers clean. 
"I'm a Litterbug" sign placed on 
lockers needing cleaning. Conscious 
of opportunities to help all the 
teachers. Wash windshield of car 
owners (teachers and visitors at 
school). Place sticker on car "Your 
Windshield Was Washed — Compli- 
ments of Future Homemakers." 

Clean windows of local Volunteer 
Fire Department. 

Visit homes where members of the 
family are sick. 

Members not participating in any 
of above will write a letter to some- 
one in the hospital or sanitorium. 

Thursday — Family Day 

Performing at least one duty 
Mother usually does. 

Chapter Mothers invited to the 
Home Economics Department (8 
Chapter Mothers). 

Friday — Wholesome Recreation 
Day 
Outdoor wiener roast, followed 
by a "Sock Hop." (Proceeds to be 



>®« 



used to help defray expenses of send- 
ing two delegates to the National 
FHA Convention.) 



"Well, what do FHA'ers do?" Is 
a question which the Beaufort Chap- 
ter members tried to answer during 
NATIONAL FHA WEEK. Through 
well-planned programs during the 
week the goals of the organization 
and the means used by the members 
for achieving the goals were ex- 
plained and exemplified. Effective 
use was made of the news press, the 
local radio station, a Mother-Daugh- 
ter Banquet. (In the fall a successful 
Father-Daughter covered dish sup- 
per was held.) Contacts with people 
as the Mayor, who proclaimed FHA 
Week in Beaufort, attendance and 
participation in Church Services in 
groups, and attendance on April 4th 
(day prior to FHA Week) at the 
14th annual Convention of the North 
Carolina Association of Future 
Homemakers of America. 

The citizens of Beaufort are cer- 
tain to be more aware now of the 
true values which active members 
may derive from participation in 
carrying out the goals of this organi- 
zation. 

Glimpses of FHA'ers In Action in 
West Edgecombe Community. 

Each day of FHA Week was ob- 
served in a very special way. A few 
of the activities which are different 
from those suggested in the account 
given from other chapters are: 

"The FHA decorated the tables 
in the lunchroom with copies of a 
blessing typed off on white paper 
with a red construction background 
to carry out the FHA colors, red and 
white. Members brought flowers 
from home and decorated the tables 
with them. 

FHA members wore red and white 
name tags throughout the week to 
identify them. 

In addition to the FHA Prayer 
Song as a response to the pastor's 
prayer on Sunday, the "Emblem 
Service" was presented. 



Several girls from the chapter 
visited the various hospitals in Rocky 
Mount. They carried lollipops for all 
the small children and scripture 
verses for the older people. Another 
of the duties performed by our FHA 
members was making tray-cards. 
These cards were red with a Bible 
verse written in white to carry out 
the FHA colors. A little token of 
friendship was attached to it. On 
Wednesday these tray-cards were 
taken to Rest Homes. 

One of the many activities during 
FHA Week was a window display 
at J. C. Penney's. The name — The 
Wheel of Future Homemakers — was 
given to the display. The idea was 
centered around a huge, old fash- 
ioned wheel from the spokes on 
which ribbons were attached. These 
ribbons were attached to dolls 
dressed to represent seven different 
fields of home economics: nurse, 
teacher, airline hostess, interior dec- 
orator, dietician, homemaker, bride, 
and graduate. This showed the wide 
range of careers open to young wom- 
en in this field. 

On Saturday members partici- 
pated in a radio program. 

The FHA'ers bought rose bushes 
and enjoyed setting them out beside 
the Home Economics building and 
the lunchroom. A fence was built 
for the roses to run on. The posts 
were donated. Next year abundance 
of red and white roses is expected! 

New Life to Old Window Curtains — 
A Project 

The following story is told by 
Nancy Huntley of the Beaufort 
FHA Chapter. It indicates some 
values our home economics training 
in school can have in our own home 
living. This story was sent to 
the Progressive Farmer entitled. 
"Mother Learns a Lesson." 

While working on a Future 
Homemakers of America project, I 
learned from my home economics 
teacher that old nylon or da- 
cron marquisette curtains can be 
bleached, dyed, and starched in the 
automatic washing machine or by 
hand. A commercial bleach quickly 
removes old colors and any dye will 
penetrate the fibers. A medium 
Continued on Cover 3 



THE 14th ANNUAL ST 



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& 



& 



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ft 



■k 



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Colonel Laren Jenks, Post Chaplain at 
Fort Jackson spoke on the topic, "We 
Are Builders of Homes." 



Miss Anne Hall, retired Home Economics 
teacher, and Mrs. Madeliene Street, fac- 
ulty member of the School of Home 
Economics at Woman's College, received 
Honorary Membership in the State Asso- 
ciation. Becky Nifong, State President, 
presents the award. 




Jo Anne Matthews, State Reporter (right) announces the top three of the eleven who 
campaigned for office of candidate of National Treasurer. Winner was Catherine 
Blanton of Shelby (nest to microphone); Cynthia Leonard of Ramseur, 1st alternate 
and 1958-59 State Secretary; and Susan Chandler, 2nd alternate, North Buncombe 
Chapter. 



A Letter to the 20,000 
Members Who Were Not 
Delegates to the Convention. 

Dear Future Homemakers of North 
Carolina, 

It was a beautiful day in Raleigh 
on April 4, 1959. Natives of Raleigh 
and visitors to the Capital City won- 
dered what was happening when 
they observed the great number of 
attractively dressed girls in town. 
They were impressed with their po- 
liteness and their gracious manners. 

Visitors at the Convention com- 
mented on the clever, but refined 
manner used by members who were 
campaigning. Eleven girls in North 
Carolina were seeking the candidacy 
for the office of National Treasurer. 
Election of this candidate was a 
major feature of the Convention pro- 
gram. Competition will be keen at 
the National Convention with South 
Carolina, Virginia, and North Caro- 
lina each seeking votes from all 12 
states in the Southern Region for the 
office of Treasurer. (Tennessee, hav- 
ing had the National Historian for 
1958-59 will be ineligible to have a 
candidate for Treasurer for 1959-60. 
On a rotation system one of the 4 
states listed above may have an 
officer each year, but all states in 
the Southern Region have voting 
delegates who elect the officer. The 
number of voting delegates is based 
on membership in each state. North 
Carolina for instance with its mem- 
bership of 24,083 will have only 3 
voting delegates.) May as well give 
you a report now on the results of 
the election returns at our State Con- 
vention. Catherine Blanton of the 
Shelby Chapter won. The two run- 
ner-ups were Cynthis Leonard of the 
Ramseur Chapter, 1st alternate, and 
Susan Chandler of North Buncombe 
Chapter, 2nd alternate. 

You would have enjoyed the 
Choral Music directed by our State 
Song Leader. Mary Gale Haynes. 
The voices from the fifty Buncombe 
County members could be heard in 
all parts of the filled auditorium. 
The voices were beautiful and the 
music had an uplifting effect on the 



E CONVENTION — 1959 



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£ 



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tV 



*k 




Panel Members (top picture) discuss seriously "How Youth Organizations Work Cooperatively for Community Progress." From 
lert to right Becky Nifong, FHA President, who was moderator. Representatives of other organizations are Frank Stitch, III, Na- 
tional Honor Society; Nancy Mitchell, Beta Club; Roy Murphy, Student Council; Roger Mozingo, Future Farmers; and Nancy 
Edwards, Future Homemakers. Pictured below— 1959-60 officers of the State Association of Future Homemakers of America, 
(for names, office, district and school of each see inside of front cover.) 



audience early in the morning of our 
Convention. 

A salute goes to each of our state 
officers for performing so efficiently 
her responsibilities for the Conven- 
tion Program. You would have been 
proud of each of them. 

Our guest speaker, Colonel Laren 
Jenks, Post Chaplain, Fort Jackson, 
Columbia, South Carolina — very 
handsome in his military uniform — 
had much to offer to each of us in 
his philosopical advice in "Building 
Better Homes." His background of 
experience made his remarks carry 
weight and special meaning to all of 
us. 

School youth organizations have 
many goals and purposes which are 
common to all, although each or- 
ganization has some goals and con- 
tributions which are uniquely its 
own. A representative of several 
school organizations appeared on a 
Panel speaking on an assigned sub- 
topic related to the overall topic, 
"School Youth Organizations Work 
Cooperatively For Community Prog- 
ress." 

Becky Nifong, as Moderator, in- 
troduced the panel members and 
projected questions. Each organiza- 
tion representative was very serious 
and sincere in the statements made. 

Quotes are given here in order 
that you may understand that citizen- 
ship is a goal common to most school 
organizations. 

Frank Stitch, III — National Honor 
Society 

"To belong to the National Honor 
Society one must possess qualities of 
leadership. To be a good leader, one 
must be intelligent, possess a good 
character, and be able to serve as 
well as lead. 

"The National Honor Society 
serves as a stimulus to potential lead- 
ers by holding before them the re- 
ward of recognition and the need 
for success — Emphasizing qualifica- 
tions of scholarship, character, 
leadership, and service, the National 
Honor Society will continue to train 
students for efficient and contribut- 
ing citizenship." 

Nancy Mitchell — Beta Club 

"What better way can outstanding 
youth lead than by setting not only a 
good, but an influential example. If 
we hope to help in building a better 
community we must each begin by 
first building a better you and a 
better me. By performing such seem- 
ingly small deeds as lending a help- 
ing hand, speaking an encouraging 
word or showing a kind gesture are 



contributing more to those around 
us than it is possible to measure, 
while we are being strengthened in 
character as well as prestige." 

Roger Mozingo — Future Farmers 

"The officers, with the help of the 
adviser, at a regular chapter meeting 
try to motivate the members and in- 
spire them to the point where they 
are not only willing but anxious to 
help plan and move forward with a 
good community development pro- 
gram. 

"Committee chairmen are selected 
for all important phases of the de- 
velopment program and they in turn, 
meeting with the adviser, plan and 
conduct a community survey to find 
out what the needs really are and 
determine the best type of com- 
munity development program to 
undertake." 

Nancy Edwards — Future Home- 
maker 

"Today we are considering some 
of the challenges of 1959 as we, the 
Future Homemakers, prepare for 
family living in our communities. 
We are living in a scientific age 
which is bringing about changes in 
our way of life, attitudes, traditions 
and education. This age finds a 
larger percentage of our girls enter- 
ing the fields of science and mathe- 
matics, but the majority are still 
expected to provide happy, success- 
ful homes for the young men of this 
generation and to bear, nurture, and 
care for the next generation. Sta- 
tistics show that girls are assuming 
these responsibilities at an early age. 

"By the time a girl becomes of age 
for marriage she must have learned 
to be a manager, nurse, counselor, 
diplomat, teacher, cook, decorator. 



SONG 

Tune — "Around the World In 80 
Days." Words written by Helen Rob- 
erts, North Buncombe High School 
Chapter. 

Around the world in every home. 

No one could have a mother 

Who is sweeter than my own. 

You urge us on, when hope seems 
gone 

With humbleness within my heart 

I now do bow to you. 

I pray somewhere, sometime, some- 
how 

I'll be as good with patience kind 

As my dear mother now. 

May God on you, pour out his bless- 
ings low 

Oh, mother dear, I love vou so. 



gardener, and carpenter; as well as 
a responsible citizen in her commun- 
ity. She needs some degree of spe- 
cialization in all of these fields in 
order to fulfill her responsibilities as 
a wife, mother, and community 
leader, and at the same time to be 
a person in her own right. 

"How can a high school girl re- 
ceive this training in such a short 
time? The answer is found in our 
homemaking program and in the 
Future Homemakers' organization. 
When we look at the goals set up in 
our national program of work we 
can easily understand how they help 
us prepare for family living. Heading 
the list is the goal: To Promote Bet- 
ter Family Living. Many girls plan 
and carry out with other family 
members home projects which will 
contribute to good family living such 
as: food purchasing, care for young 
children, preparing food, provision 
of first aid kits, emergency food 
shelves, wise buying, and home 
beautification. Many girls have home 
responsibilities which train them in 
the art of homemaking. Our FHA 
encourages family altars and Church 
Day services during FHA Week 
which are essential to the spirit- 
ual development of a girl. In the 
churches of our communities she 
receives inspiration of faith and 
spiritual strength. 

"Our girls have not forgotten their 
individual development and im- 
provement. We find them budgeting 
their allowance and improving their 
appearance and personality. 

"Safety at home and in the com- 
munity is another great part of our 
forward movement in the promotion 
of better family living. 

"Goal four finds our chapters 
busy training their members for 
participation in home, school and 
community activities. This goal is 
designed to help Future Home- 
makers plan ways of making their 
homes, schools and communities, as 
well as our state more attractive. It 
directs girls in their responsibilities 
for volunteer services in civil defense 
and community drives such as Heart, 
Christmas seals. Red Cross, Polio 
and Cancer. 

"When a chapter or an individual 
girl follows through on any worth 
while project set up by our FHA 
she will receive training which will 
give her the basic preparation for 
marriage and family living. 

"We must remember that indi- 
viduals make up a family and fam- 
ilies make up the community. It 
may be a family which must get 
along on a shoe string. But this string 
must be made of the risht material — 



strong, — close-woven, — enduring. 
This string must be flexible enough 
to bulge at times or stretch one way 
or the other without breaking, strong 
enough not to break under the slight 
weight of trouble, close-knit enough 
so that if one thread is frayed a little, 
the whole thing does not ravel, dur- 
able enough to withstand a reason- 
able amount of friction, and able to 
bend a little without breaking — yet 
always tight enough to hold the 
family together for the sake of our 
communities. Communities are only 
as good as the people who live in 
them and as a result the responsi- 
bilities of community progress rest 
upon us, the Future Homemakers of 
America." 

It is difficult to describe the effect 
the Pageant, "Wide, Wide Heart," 
had on every person in the audience. 
All were inspired by the portrayal 
of the characters of the meaning of 
these words: 

"The World stands out on either 

side 
No wider than the heart is wide; 
Above the world is stretched the 

sky, 
No higher than the soul is high. 
The heart can push the sea and 

land 
Farther away on either hand; 
The soul can split the sky in two; 
And let the face of God shine 

through. 
But East and West will pinch the 

heart 
That cannot keep them pushed 

apart; 
And he whose soul is flat — the sky 
Will cave in on him by and by." 

Members of the Dunn Chapter 
presented this Pageant with a stage 
setting which was very effective. The 
flags of the United Nations, the cos- 
tumes of countries, the spot lights, 
and the clear speaking voices made 
the program one to be remembered. 

And as always, the beautiful In- 
stallation Service, left the out-going 
officers a little tearful, but at the 
same time happy for having had the 
opportunity to serve us. They will 
not forget us. We will not forget 
them, and we will be seeing them 
and hearing from them. As for the 
incoming officers, they are at the 
present joyous in preparation for the 
National Convention in Chicago 
where they will gain many ideas and 
increased enthusiasm and inspiration 
for assuming their responsibilities as 
officers next year. 

There is so much more to tell you 
about the Convention, but maybe 
this letter will give a general impres- 
sion. Wish it were possible for all 



Convention Pictured cAvallaole 



Members who are interested in 
securing pictures which were taken 
by Mr. Alton Daniels, 1618 Sunrise 
Avenue, Raleigh, North Carolina, 
may order them at $2 per picture. A 
brief description of each Photograph 
Number is listed below. Please send 
your order directly to Mr. Daniels 
at the address shown above indicat- 
ing the Photograph Number. 

Photograph No. 1 — Overall view 
of crowd in Lobby of Auditorium be- 
fore beginning of program. 

2 — Information desk with Mrs. 
Frances Horton, Edna Roberson, 
and Brenda Roberson from the Mill- 
brook Chapter; and a teacher from 
Clyde A. Erwin Chapter. 

3 — Buncombe County Chorus 
under the direction of Mary Gale 
Haynes. 

4 — Stage setting including all 
those who were seated on the stage 
during the early morning program. 

5 — Treasurer's report by Sybil 
Beasley of the Coats Chapter. 

6 — Speaker — Colonel Laren T. 
Jenks. 

7 — Panel — Becky Nifong, Frank 
Stith, III, Nancy Mitchell, Ray Mur- 
phy, Roger Mozingo, and Nancy 
Edwards. 

8 — Conferring State Honorary 
Membership on Miss Ann Hall and 
Miss Street by Becky Nifong. 



9 — Susan Astin receiving State 
Degree from Becky Nifong, Cynthia 
Leonard, and Joyce Harper. 

10 — Members who received de- 
grees. 

11 — (a) Opening scene "Wide, 
Wide Heart" by Dunn Chapter, (b) 
With costumes — This picture will be 
available in color soon. 

12 — Jo Anne Matthews in charge 
of election — Catherine Blanton as 
candidate, Cynthia Leonard 1st al- 
ternate, and Susan Chandler 2nd 
alternate. 

13 — Scene outside of Auditorium 
— Alice McCoy taking Ann Craft's 
and Ruina Heath's picture. 

14 — Scene at lunch on steps out- 
side of Auditorium — Janet Carpen- 
ter and Barbara Hefner. (My feet 
hurt.) 

15 — Scene at lunch — Janice 
Sandlin, Faye Kennedy, Judith Ken- 
nedy, and Glenda Thomas eating out 
of back of car. 

16 — Installation Service. 

1 7 — Catherine Blanton with Cam- 
paign Manager on stage while cam- 
paigning for the office of candidate 
for National Treasurer. 

18 — FHA State President — 
Becky Nifong and FFA State Presi- 
dent — Roger Mozingo. 

19—1959-60 State officers in- 
stalled. 



A Future Homemaker 
Wins Top Honors 



North Carolina's Betty Crocker 
Homemaker of Tomorrow is Hesta 
Brint Royster of Falliston High 
School, Falliston, N. C. Hesta re- 
ceived the highest rating in a written 
examination on homemaking knowl- 
edge and attitudes administered to 
9,378 senior girls in 388 schools 
throughout North Carolina. She will 
receive a $1,500 scholarship from 
General Mills and becomes a candi- 
date with 47 other state winners and 
the representative from the District 



24,083 members to get together for 
a Convention. 

Best regards, 

Delegates to the 1959 
State Convention 



of Columbia for the title of Ail- 
American Homemaker of Tomor- 
row. 

Sylvia Elaine Burroughs. Edney- 
ville High School, Edneyville, rated 
second in North Carolina and will 
receive a $500 scholarship. Her 
home is in Bat Cave, N. C. 

The test in this fifth annual na- 
tional homemaking program was 
designed and judged by Science Re- 
search Associates of Chicago. The 
school of each state Homemaker of 
Tomorrow will receive a set of the 
Encyclopaedia Britannica. The na- 
tional runner-up will receive a 
$4,000 scholarship, third place win- 
ner a $3,000 award, and fourth 
place winner a $2,000 grant. 



{frapfer (frailer 



~»-^~-,. —■„., . : -n ,, V 1,11, 



One of the highlights of the cele- 
bration of FHA Week at Lee Ed- 
wards High School was the Mother- 
Daughter Banquet at the S&W 
Cafeteria with Sheryl Allison, Presi- 
dent, presiding. Jo Ann Morgan was 
program chairman. 

The program consisted of reports 
on the State FHA Convention on 
April 4 in Raleigh and a Panel 
Discussion on Teenage Problems. 

To each of four members of Mills 
Chapter in Franklin County a cer- 
tificate of achievement was presented 
from the Curtis Vocational Divi- 
sion, Independence Square in Phila- 
delphia, for achievement in practical 
sales work and in recognition of 
outstanding ability in salesmanship, 
business proficiency, and school 
spirit. The four receiving the award 
are: Sue Wilson, High Salesman; 
Joy Cattrell, Iris Matthews, and 
Carolyn Gupton. 

The Roxboro FHA'ers presented 
an "Ed Sullivan Show" at the Gran- 
ville-Person Bi-County Rally held in 
Stovall in March. During the pro- 
gram, Nancy Long of Roxboro who 
had been elected from her chapter 
to enter the race for the candidate 
from North Carolina to run for the 
office of National Treasurer, was in- 
troduced as a visiting celebrity in 
the audience. 

Twelve Future Homemakers of 
the Roxboro Chapter appeared on 
the Peggy Mann T.V. Show on 
WTVD modeling garments which 
they had made in home economics 
class. 

The B. F. Grady Future Home- 
makers of America and the Future 
Farmers of America honored ap- 
proximately 200 mothers, fathers, 
sons and daughters, and guests at 
the annual Mother-Daughter and 
Father-Son Banquet. 

Rev. Reid Erwin of Chinquapin 
was the guest speaker. 

The Mexican theme was used in 
the decorations and the program. 
Judy Kornegay, song leader, enter- 
tained the group with a solo, "South 
of the Border," and guests were 
recognized by Joyce Harper. 

The Mayodan Chapter selected 
"Home of Every Lands" as the 
theme for the annual Mother-Daugh- 
ter Banquet on March 20th. Homes 
of different lands were used for dec- 
oration. 

Following the introduction of spe- 
cial guests, a report of the chapters 



achievements of the year was given. 
Nine members received the Junior 
Degree of Achievement, and ten 
members received the Chapter De- 
gree. 

Miss Louise Lowe, who is cur- 
rently with the Teachers Education 
Program at Woman's College and a 
former Assistant State Supervisor of 
Home Economics Education, was 
guest speaker. 

The Granville-Person FHA Fed- 
eration held its annual Bi-County 
Meeting at 3:30 P.M. on March 20th 
at Stovall High School. Annie 
Catherine Stovall introduced the 
speaker, Sam D. Bundy, humorist 
and principal at the Farmville High 
School. The audience was enter- 
tained by his jokes and witty re- 
marks, but a great lesson was 
cleverly woven into the talk. In clos- 
ing he pointed out that the best 
things in life are free. 

Included in the evening's program 
were: A buffet style supper; group 
singing; skits; presentation of attend- 
ance award, which went to the Bethel 
Chapter; and the final impressive 
Installation Service. Annie Catherine 
Stovall, the new president closed the 
1959 Rally Program. 

The Elise Chapter of Robbins, 
N. C, had a very successful and en- 
joyable year. They began the year 
with the initiation of 18 new mem- 
bers. 

In October we had a joint recrea- 
tion program with Candor High 
School, led by Miss Ruth Jewel from 
the State Department of Public In- 
struction. We also attended the Dis- 
trict IV Rally at Wilmington, N. C, 
and ran Mary Ann Brady for state 
treasurer. 

At our regular November meeting 
the Rev. Mr. Chaffin spoke to us on 
"Good Relations in the Family." 
We attended the county rally at 
Vass, and gave a buffet supper for 
Chapter parents and Adult Advisory 
Committee. 

In December we had a demonstra- 
tion on making Christmas decora- 
tions and carried gifts to the girls at 
Samarcand. 

"How to Buy Clothes" by Mrs. 
Hazel Pollock, merchant of local de- 
partment store, was our January pro- 
gram. We also had a very successful 
spaghetti supper to raise money for 
FHA. 

In February Mrs. Nancy Carrie 
spoke to us on the subject of "A 
Career as a Home Demonstration 
Agent." The highlight of the month 
was our Mother-Daughter Banquet. 

The election and installation of 
new officers for the year 1959-60 
highlighted our March program. 



April is the most beautiful month 
of the year and the second and third 
year girls proved it by attending a 
garden tour of Southern Pines and 
coming back with "Ows" and "Ahs." 
We also attended the state conven- 
tion where Sandra Wilson received 
her state degree. 

We rounded out our year by sup- 
porting a campus clean up and at- 
tending the county rally at Aberdeen. 

It has been a very enjoyable year 
and we are looking forward to our 
next years in FHA. 



ECHO FROM 



A FABRIC 



By OLIVIA HOLLOMAN 

Dunn FHA Chapter 

It shouldn't happen to a person 
what happens to me! 

Here I am sitting on this old 
counter in a department store. Peo- 
ple come in and stare at me as if 
I were a monstrosity. Why, some 
of the things they say is enough to 
make me blush! 

"I like the design, but what a 
color! It is terrible!" 

I don't say a word, but I think 
to myself, "You are not so pretty 
yourself." 

Then a teen-ager comes into the 
store. I like her from the first. She 
says I'm "divine"! Whatever that 
means? She buys six yards of me. 
I'm so proud! I know I will make a 
beautiful sheath. 

After they try to suffocate me 
by putting me in an old bag, my 
new owner starts to walk. 

When we get home she throws 
me to the floor. When she returns, 
she has everything you can imagine : 
scissors, tape-measure, pieces of 
paper, candy and a coke! 

I think to myself, "I'm too young 
to die." 

She lays me out flat — lays those 
pieces of paper out on me and then. 
"Ow! She's finishing me off!" Oh. 
she has stopped. Why. she's 
making a dress. How nice! She 
finishes cutting me and starts stick- 
ing me with a needle. "That hurts!" 

Oh. she is putting the dress on 
now! "I'm so excited!" 

I'm so ashamed! Of all the treach- 
erous things to do! What will my 
friends say when they see her in 
this? 

Whoever thought I would be 
made into a "Sack"!!! 



8 



NATIONAL FHA WEEK 

Continued from page 3 

starch solution will give a crispness 
to the curtain, help eliminate the 
ironing problem, and prevent ab- 
sorption of dirt and dust while hang- 
ing at the windows. 

Starched curtains should be hung 
dripping wet along the straight side 
with clothespins clipped to the hang- 
ing ruffle to serve as weights to pull 
the curtain taut down from the 
clothes line. Shape the ruffle by 
hand as they dry. 

My mother says that she learned 
a valuable lesson from my project. 
It helps her to save time, energy, 
and money when she redecorates 
the other windows in our home. 



Portion of an Original 
Devotional 



by Gloria Faircloth 
President of Elm Coty Chapter 



We have all heard the song "He's 
Got The Whole World In His 
Hands." When we listen to these 
words on the radio or sing them ab- 
sently to ourselves at home, we think 
only of it as a popular song. But, 
stop and think! Doesn't it have a 
special meaning to each of us? 

Our abilities can be no more than 
our faith and hope in God. Even 
when things go wrong our faith in 



Him will help us to overcome our 
trials. 

If each of us would realize that 
we are "In His Hands" and that we 
can do nothing without His help; we 
would strive harder to do His will 
and make the best of our talents and 
abilities which would be pleasing in 
His sight. 



National Convention of 
Future Homemakers of 
America 

North Carolinia's quota for the Convention: 

Members — 87. Adults — 22. Total— 109. This 
quota includes all the state officers, district advisers, 
candidate for National Treasurer, and her adviser. 

At the present time there are 75 in North Carolina 
who have applied. 

If your chapter or county group wishes to send a 
delegate please write to the state adviser. Some infor- 
mation has been sent to each chapter. 

Those who have applied may expect to receive a 
copy of the tentative program and other information 
soon. 



HIGH GOALS 

Continued from page 1 

in preparation for a short program presented by sev- 
eral of our members. 

GOAL VIII. TO SUPPORT OUR ORGANIZA- 
TION. 

April promises the State Convention which will be 
followed by National FHA Week. Our aim is to be well 
represented at the Convention and to support our 
chapter activities during FHA week. 

GOAL IX. TO EVALUATE AND TO LOOK TO 
THE FUTURE. 

With the climax of the year, May will be a month 
for taking inventory of our achievements and looking 
to the future. 

As we count the goals we have rung, we hope to 
mark up the year 58-59 as a VICTORY! 





GAMP 


JUNE 


1 - 6 






Appl 


ications for Camp indicate that all cabins will be filled to capacity, all 


cots occupied, 


and all 


seats 


in the dining hall taken. 












Let us hope that each Camper will take 


advantage of all the 


training in 


recreation and leader- 


ship. 


The opportunity to meet and get to know, Future Homemakers from 


various sections of the 


state should mean much to each camper. 











Future Homemakers of America 



CREED 

We are the Future Homemakers of America 
We face the future with warm courage, 
And high hope, 

For we have the clear consciousness of seeking 
Old and precious values. 

For we are the builders of homes, 

Homes for America's future. 

Homes where living will be the expression of everything 

That is good and fair. 

Homes where truth and love and security and faith 

Will be realities, not dreams. 

We are the Future Homemakers of America, 
We face the future with warm courage, 
And high hope. 




"The homes of tomorrow are in 

the hands of the youth 

of today" 




Caroline Says: 

"My Feet Hurt" 

This cry was expressed by nearly 4,000 Future Home- 
makers at the Memorial Auditorium and downtown 
Raleigh during the noon hour on the day of the Con- 
vention of the North Carolina Association of Future 
Homemakers of America, April 4th. 

This picture of Janet Carpenter, Derita, N. C, and 
Barbara Hefner, Derita, N. C, was caught by our 
photographer during the lunch hour. 





HOMEMAKERS 

North Carolina Association * 



VOLUME XVII 



OCTOBER 1959 



NUMBER 1 




GawMoa/i (leminde/il. 



Dues: State and National dues are to be in the State 
Office by December 1, 1959. if your chapter is to be 
affiliated for 1959-60. 

The amount of the dues is 55 cents per member — 
plus 10 cents per member contributions for helping 
defray expenses of state officers and district advisers 
to national meetings. This makes a total of 65 cents 
per member. The State Office is responsible for for- 
warding the national dues of 15 cents per member to 
the national office. 

Degrees of Achievement: Deadline dates for filing 
Declaration of Intention to work for the Junior and 
Chapter degrees and the completed reports are set by 
the local Chapter Degree Committee. The deadline 
date for filin g Declaration of Intention to work toward 
the State Homemaker Degree is November 15. (A 



request for forms must be sent to the State Adviser 
earlier in order to receive the blanks and to get the 
Intention form filled in and returned to the State Office 
by November 15.) A Plan of Work is to be filed with 
the Declaration of Intention. 

State Convention: Date — March 26, 1960. 

Place — Memorial Auditorium. Raleigh N. C. 

National FHA Week: April 3-9, 1960. 

National Meeting: 1960 — July 11-15. Statler Hilton 
Hotel. Washington, D. C. 900-1.000 delegates (mem- 
bers and advisers) of Future Homemakers of America. 

Annual Report: One copy is due in the State Office 
by June 1, 1960, and earlier if possible. One copy is 
to be filed in the department. 

Important!! Affiliate early. 

Send news items to State office. 



North Carolina Association of Future Homemakers of America 



State Officers 
1959-60 

President — Nancy Edwards, Wingate VI 
Vice-President — Sammie Gatlin, Franklinville V 
Secretary — Anne Alphine, Dunn IV 
Treasurer — Kay Hall, Rowland III 
Reporter — Elaine Parker, Jones Central II 
Parliamentarian — Celia Clark, Robersonville I 
Historian — Catherine Blanton, Shelby VIII 
Song Leader — Dawn Crissman, Boonville VII 



District Advisers 
1959-60 

Mrs. Rachel F. Swindell, Bath I 

Mrs. Julia P. Kennedy, Moss Hill II 

Mrs. Berline R. Baldwin, Clarkton IJJ 

Mrs. Pearl Stroud, Dunn IV 

Mrs. Gwendolyn Griffin, High Point Sr. V 

Mrs. Betsy R. Blankenship, East Mecklenburg VI 

Mrs. June G. Reichle, Davie Co. Cons. VII 

Mrs. Frances S. Bartlett, North Buncombe VIII 



State Adviser 

Mrs, Faye T. Coleman 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 

Division of Vocational Education 
Raleigh, North Carolina 



Our Cover: 

LIBRARY OF RESTORED TRYON PALACE 



"For We Have The Clear Consciousness of Seeking Old 
And Precious Values." — From Our FHA Creed 

North Carolina's rich historical heritage as portrayed 
through old homes is exemplified in the cover picture of 
our magazine. Governor Tryon's Library in Tryon Pal- 
ace in New Bern contains some 400 of the 500 volumes 
in the collection owned by Governor William Tryon 
when he occupied the original Palace in 1770. 

Though the art of good and gracious living can be 
achieved under the humblest of circumstances, we can 
gain great appreciation for the artistry in design of 
furnishings and architectural structure through a glimpse 
into the grandeur of this beautiful restored Palace in 
North Carolina. Tryon Palace has been described as "the 
most beautiful building in the Colonial Americas," its 
architecture is unique in America in that it was designed 
as a London vicinity house. 

From England came much eighteenth century ma- 
terial, such as the beautiful mantels, brass locks, wood- 
work, doorways, inside shutters, the 1741 wrought-iron 
gate and railing at the Palace approach, and urns and 
stone baskets for the gardens. 

Two shades of paint on the interior of the Main 
Building are known to have been there originally, for 
they were copied from bits of plaster, excavated there. 



along with thousands of other artifacts, during the 
archaeological research. 

The early history of North Carolina becomes more 
real and alive as one views the restored Palace. 

This mansion was the first fixed Colonial Capitol, in 
1770, serving not only as the Capitol, but as the resi- 
dence of the royal governor. 

In the Palace on August 25, 1774, met the first Pro- 
vincial Convention of North Carolina, the first anywhere 
in America to be called and held in defiance of British 
orders. 

Governor Richard Caswell and other State officials 
elected under the first Constitution of the independent 
State of North Carolina were inaugurated there on 
January 16, 1777. The first State General Assembly con- 
vened in this State Capitol on April 7, 1777, and met 
there from time to time as late as 1794 when the State 
Capitol was moved permanently to Raleigh. 

President George Washington was entertained there 
at a banquet and ball on April 21, 1791, during his 
visit to New Bern. Many other distinguished personages 
were guests at the Palace. 

Note: The factual information of the restored Palace 
was taken from a leaflet issued by The Tryon Palace 
Commission, 1958. 



A PLAN 



The Initial Step In Developing 
"Our Blueprint For Action' 



The Chapter Yearbook or Hand- 
book has been of invaluable help in 
many chapters. With the multitude 
of school, church, and community 
activities, each offering opportuni- 
ties for members to develop potential 
abilities, it is even more important 
that each member have a copy of a 
chapter book and use it continually 
for reference during the year. The 
contents might include the following: 

Name of Officers 

Name of Chapter Parents 

Standing Committee Chairmen — 

and members (possibly) 
Committees for Special Events — 

(possibly) 



Name of Sponsor 

Chapter Constitution 

Policies 

Degrees of Achievement — Symbol 

and/or requirements 
Program Plans for Year 

(The Wheat Swamp Chapter set 
up program plans last year as fol- 
lows: 

Plans for the Year 
October 13. 

Program on Degrees 
Yearbook completion 
Planning session by Degrees 
Committee before October 13. 



November 10. 

Program on making and keeping 
homes beautiful 

Planning session to complete ar- 
rangement of Home Beautifica- 
tion Program before November 
10. 

December 8. 

Program, "Making Others Happy 
Through FHA Work." 

January 12. 

Program, "Vocation in Home- 
making" 

Planning meeting for program at 
regular meeting 

FHA Banquet — Thursday, Janu- 
ary 8, 1959. 

February. 

Program on "Civil Defense and 

Home Safety" 
Planning session on program 
(Continued on Cover 3) 



1 



Shorty Short Storied 



LOOKING TOWARD THE FUTURE 



About Interesting Projects 
of Future Homemakers 
in North Carolina 




Because Joan Howarth, a Future Homemaker of the 
McClintock Junior High School, was very fond of babies 
and because she wants to become a nurse in a Maternity 
Ward, she decided to select as her home project in her 
Home Economics Class "Learning to Care For Babies 
and Small Children." Joan observed the behavior pat- 
tern of eight-month-old twin boys while baby sitting 



with them and their two sisters (one 3V2 years old; the 
other 6 years) and a brother 9 years of age. Joan learned 
many other things about each child as she watched them 
at play and at mealtime, at bedtime, etc. The emotional 
responses and the mental and physical development of 
the twins were studied carefully in order to gain a 
greater understanding of them. 



UNDERSTANDING A NEIGHROR ARROAD 

From Trondheim, Norway, came Astrid Sundt, eigh- 
teen years of age and a senior in High School. The 
Hudson School was participating for the first time in 
the Foreign Exchange Student Program. 

Astrid found it difficult to believe that she had a list 
of subjects from which to choose. In making out her 
schedule, she chose to take Homemaking II, and proved 
to be a very apt student. The girls watched with interest 
the progress that she made in class, and they found that 
she too had much to contribute. 

Christmas time made the girls think a great deal about 
Astrid, and the fact that she was so far away from 
home. They wanted to know what they could do to 
insure a very "Merry Christmas" for her. Group work 
on this project began, and it was decided that the 
chapter would celebrate "Christmas in Norway." To 
set the stage, Astrid spoke to our FHA Chapter in early 
December, on the traditional way Christmas was cele- 
brated in her native land. The girls were more en- 
thusiastic than ever, and ready to begin work. Each girl 
served on some committee and the entire activity was 
well organized. 

The department was decorated in keeping with the 
Christmas greens used in Norway. Astrid was dressed 
in her native costume and Christmas cookies and cakes 
along with punch was served. The cookies, cakes and 
punch were made by Norwegian recipes taken from a 



book she had brought with her. Games were played and 
even though the music was not typical Norwegian, it 
added much to the occasion. 

All of the girls had a wonderful time, especially 
Astrid. Too, each girl felt that she had contributed to 
the party's success because she was a member of a 
committee. Toward the end of the party, the girls pre- 
sented Astrid with a gift of lingerie. They felt that they 
had had a part in making her first Christmas away from 
home a happy one. 



SURMOUNTING ORSTACLES 

In Reaching Most Any Goal — There are obstacles 
to surmount. 

Need we be discouraged? 

An adviser's account of a Chapter activity in her 
school should give one faith in what can be accomplished 
when the desire is strong enough and the activity a 
worthy one. 

"Very early during the planning of FHA Chapter 
activities a Mother-Daughter get-together (a covered 
dish buffet supper) was mentioned. This idea was con- 
tinually discussed at each planning meeting and it ap- 
peared evident that such an occasion must be included 



in the year's plans even though there seemed to be 
numerous odds to overcome. 

As usual there was the matter of finances. All chapter 
funds on hand and all that it seemed feasible for the 
chapter to earn were already planned for in the chapter 
budget. Individual and school schedules were crowded 
with academic and extra activities and there seemed to 
be no time to prepare a meal for 150 people. Again 
there were no funds to buy food or hire it prepared. 

These problems and others didn't dampen the en- 
thusiasm of FHA'ers to have their mothers as guests at 
a meal. A tea or party was suggested, as a substitute, 
but these ideas had little appeal to the girls. 

The executive council seemed positive from the very 
beginning that a covered dish buffet supper was the 
answer, and so it was. 

Although I had my doubts as to the outcome of 
such an occasion I tried hard to direct the work with 
an air of confidence. 

Committees set up were numerous and included all 
83 chapter members. A chairman and two co-chairmen 
headed most committees. 

By a given date the attendance committee had a 
complete list of all FHA'ers and their Mothers who 
expected to attend. From a menu planned by the food 
committee each girl was asked to bring a certain food 
with some suggestion as to the amount. On the written 
food plan, given to each girl, was an escape clause allow- 
ing her to contact the food committee if she preferred 
to bring another food. We were surprised that no one 
asked to change to another food and only one girl 
notified us that she and her mother would be unable to 
attend. No girl came without her mother. One girl, who 
was sick felt her responsibility so strongly that she sent 
her chicken even though she could not come. In the 
event that it was not practical for girls to bring such 
foods as fried chicken or potato salad they were 
assigned canned fruit for the salad, pickles, lettuce, or 
a package of rolls. 

By supper time on the appointed day the decorating 
committee had the school cafeteria attractively decorated 
with red roses, (both real and paper ones made by the 
girls), green ivy, and white candles. The colored pro- 
gram covers completed the tables. 

Chapter Mothers worked with the food arrangement 
committee in receiving food and placing it on the table. 
One chapter mother and the wife of a county school 
board member made this remark about the food table, 
"No Woman's Club or Church Supper has ever looked 
prettier." 

The only help hired was a colored woman to work 
with the clean-up committee on those stacks and stacks 
of dishes used by 160 people who attended. No chapter 
funds were spent for food. 

The program — A Friendship Garden of Red Roses — 
was adapted from an article in the N. C. Future Home- 
makers Magazine. Colored slides compared the life of 
a Future Homemaker with that of a rose as a script 
was read. 

Faculty members and mothers were the only guests. 

This experience strengthened my belief in the theory 
that success comes when activities are well planned 
and have enthusiasm back of them. As far as I know 



there was one hundred per cent co-operation among 
FHA members from the smallest detail to the most 
glamorous of duties." 



PEN PALS 

In the past many requests for names of pen pals 
have come to the state office. It is now possible to secure 
from the national office names of pen pals from Japan, 
the ages ranging from 12-17. 

Please write to the state office early if you are inter- 
ested in having a pen pal. Address your request to Mrs. 
Faye T. Coleman, State FHA Adviser, Department of 
Public Instruction, Raleigh, North Carolina. 



A CHAPTER CONSTITUTION 

A MUST FOR KEEPING THE GOVERNMENT OF 
THE CHAPTER RUNNING SMOOTHLY. 

The suggested skeletal outline for your Chapter Con- 
stitution given here is taken from pages 53 and 54 of 
the Chapter Handbook. For help in filling in the out- 
line you will need a copy of your Official Guide and a 
copy of the Chapter Handbook which can be ordered 
from: 

Future Homemakers of America 
National Headquarters, U. S. Office of Education 
U. S. Dept. of Health, Education and Welfare 
Washington 25, D. C. 

Suggested Outline 

Article I. Name and Purposes 
Article II: Organization 
Article III: Membership 
Article IV: Emblem, Flower and Colors 
Article V: Active Membership Degrees of Achieve- 
ment 
Article VI: Officers 
Article VII: Meetings 
Article VIII: Dues 
Article IX: Amendments 



HONORARY MEMBERSHIP 

Has your chapter conferred honorary membership 
upon any individual in your community recently? 

Number 3 under Section A of Article III of the Con- 
stitution of the North Carolina Association which deals 
with Membership is as follows: 

Section A 

3. Honorary Membership. Any individual who has 
helped to advance the homemaking program or has 
rendered outstanding service to the Future Home- 
makers of America may be elected to honorary 
membership by a majority vote of the members 
present at any regular meeting or convention or 
by a majority vote of the chapters of the state. 

The awarding of honorary memberships shall be 
limited to four for the state association in any one 
year and to one for each of the local chapters of 
the association in any one year. 



The NATIONAL FHA Convention 



® 



Conrad Hilton Hotel 
July 7-13, 1959 



® 



"How will I ever be able to let 
other people know what this ex- 
perience has meant to us, especially 
to me?" remarked one of the dele- 
gates to the National Convention, 
as the train on the return trip was 
nearing Raleigh. "I know what it 
has meant to me, but putting into 
words all I have gained is next to 
impossible." This is in spite of all 
her determination to so relate her 
experiences and to so illustrate the 
many and varied ideas presented 
during the convention program in 
a way that many, many Future 
Homemakers in North Carolina 
may benefit from this 1959 Con- 
vention. 

It will be very difficult for any 
delegate to portray to others the 
real values received from attending 
and participating in the National 
Convention. Everything about the 
convention was exciting. The pro- 
gram alone provided inspiration, 
enthusiasm, ideas, keener insights 
into ways of improving personal and 
family living and ways of strength- 
ening our chapters through im- 
proved programs and projects. In 
addition — there was the thrill of 
traveling by railway in two private 
cars — reserved for Future Home- 
makers of North Carolina (what 
happened en route to Chicago and 
the return trip can be left to your 
imagination); the ordeal of getting 
baggage and self from the station 
to the hotel — and finally from 
hotel back to station, with extra 
baggage accumulated; the breath- 
taking view of our home for a week 
in the beautiful Conrad Hilton Ho- 
tel, the friendly atmosphere which 
prevailed all week (everyone — 
maids, porters, clerks, managers, 
bus drivers, taxi drivers, elevator 
operators — seemed interested in 
us and our program and made us 



feel at home even in the elaborate 
surroundings); and lastly but not 
least there was the wonderful 
relationships with many Future 
Homemakers from other states 
throughout the United States. 

Notes taken by Lottie Faye Out- 
law, a member of the Southwood 
Chapter and a delegate to the Con- 
vention indicates the challenge 
which is ours as presented by speak- 
ers on the program. 

Notes taken of the speech by Dr. 
Lawrence G. Derthick, Commis- 
sioner of Education, U. S. Depart- 



ment of Health, Education, and 
Welfare, Washington, D. C, include 
the following excerpts: 

We make a living out of what 
we get; we make a living out of 
what we give. 

To rise above the masses, one 
must put pressure on oneself. 

Soon there will be so many ad- 
vances, people will have to be re- 
educated every eight or ten years. 

Getting married too soon puts a 
ceiling on potential abilities. If he 
can't wait leave him. There's one 



^Delegate* 



Adult Delegates: Mrs. Berline Bald- 
win, Miss Margaret Carol Banks, Mrs. 
Frances Bartlett, Mrs. Betsy R. Blank- 
enship, Mrs. Faye T. Coleman, Mrs. 
Eva Deanes Gray, Mrs. Harriette 
Holton, Miss Catherine Ingram, Mrs. 
Evelyn K. Johnson, Mrs. Julia Ken- 
nedy, Mrs. Gertrude McRae, Mrs. 
Edith P. Morgan, Mrs. Kathleen F. 
Nicholson, Mrs. June G. Reichle, Mrs. 
Florence Sorrell, Mrs. Pearl 0. Stroud, 
Mrs. Rachel Swindell, Mrs. Nina S. 
Tharpe. 

Youth Delegates: Jenny B. Abrams, 
Anne Alphine, Nola Sue Auman, 
Olivia Barbee, Sybil Beck, Catherine 
Blanton, Ann Brock, Arline Brooks, 
Audrey Bunce, Zona Carawan, Susan 
Chandler, Celia Clark, Gail Couch, 



Brenda Coward, Betty Cox, Dawn 
Crissman, Libby Crowell, Florie Currie, 
Nancy Edwards, Vennie Lou Edwards, 
Betty Jon Fletcher, Theresa Foster, 
Sue Garrison, Sammie Gatlin, Theda 
Haithcock, Bonnie Hail, Kay Hall, 
Judy C. Hedgepeth, Darius Lee Hicks, 
Prise ilia Holland, Anne Johnson, 
Brenda Johnson, Barbara Jean Jones, 
Kakie Jordan, Cynthia Leonard, Betsy 
Lucas, Joan Deloria Lunsford, Jean 
McClamrock, Linda Manning, Lou 
Mathis, Celia May, Judy Mock, Ruth 
Ann Nesbitt, Lottie Faye Outlaw, 
Elaine Parker, Elizabeth Peters, Mary 
Linda Pinkham, Patricia Powers, Sue 
Reardon, Julia Renegar, Jann Sam- 
onds, Betty K. Smith, Ann Souther, 
Catherine B. Towe, Jo Anne Viver- 
ette, Christine Waters, Margaret 
Weimer, Diane Wilson, Gloria Young. 





understands 
ne aiid abrood. 



state, and national levels. 

u^rAP/r at PUSFOSB » future Homemakers of America camj on ^P'?'" 
K3fc help them to m prove personal, fam,. M , and 
comrnun'rtq living. 





develop (Heir individual potential abilities. 




This picture of the exhibit on display at the National F. H. A. Convention is being used at various professional national meet- 
ings and conventions to further interpret the organization of Future Homemakers of America — its sponsors, its members, its 
goals and purposes and activities. 



waiting at the right time. (If not, 
you go out and find one! ) 

Three magic phrases to catch a 
man: (1)1 think so, too! (2) Say 
it again! and (3) You're wonderful! 

Seeing others mistakes while ig- 
noring your own — story of the 
sieve who chided the darning needle 
for having a hole in it. The sieve 
couldn't see its own holes; all it 
could see was the darning needle's 
one hole. 

If I have a thousand friends, I 
haven't one to share. But if I have 
one enemy, I meet him everywhere. 

Keep smiling — keep folks won- 
dering what you've been up to. 

Smile a while and another smiles 
and after a while there are miles 
and miles of smiles. 

Benito Mussolini's motto: Be- 
lieve, Obey, Fight. 

John Wesley's motto: Believe, 
Obey, Love. 

Be careful how you live. You may 
be the only Bible some people will 
ever read. 

From Dr. Glenn R. Hawkes, Pro- 
fessor and Head Department of 



Child Development, Iowa State Col- 
lege, Ames, Iowa, Lottie Faye re- 
corded the following: 

Look to this day for it is life. 
Yesterday is a dream. Tomorrow is 
a vision. Happiness is living today, 
not tomorrow. Don't do away with 
tomorrow, but do enjoy today. 

You are a real person. Enjoy 
who you are. Learn to live with 
yourself. Understand and appreci- 
ate the worth of the human people. 

The way you hear is up to you. 
Each person sees differently. 

The family is like an octopus and 
a porcupine. Octopus — You can 
never escape from your family — 
neither can you escape from an 
octopus; each holds on. Porcupine 
— Things in a family get sticky 
and bother you sometimes. You 
usually back away — as you do 
from a porcupine. 

(Illustration — To man: "What 
are you going to do?" To lady: "I 
don't know — it's your dream.") 

The gulf of space between par- 
ents and children is a problem. Par- 
ents are growing also. Adolescence 
is not easy, and neither is middle 



age. Understand that everyone in 
your family is growing. 

Your family tomorrow is some- 
thing to think about. It will last 
longer than your family now. Take 
time to insure your happiness and 
success in marriage. 

Good homes do not just happen. 
You have to work. Husbands and 
wives must have respect for each 
other's opinions. 

Family living calls for real living. 
Make family living "quality living" 
— really awakening and enjoying 
bodily sensations. Make the minutes 
you have with your family count. 

Your family today and your fam- 
ily tomorrow is up to you. 



NEW JACKET 

The new FHA Blazer Jacket is 
now available. It is white wool with 
bright red piping and the official 
emblem is on the pocket. The jacket 
can be ordered from Marshall Field 
and Company, Chicago, Illinois. 
Only affiliated chapter members 
may order. Sizes are from 10-20. 
Each $14.95. 



FHA'ers All 

RELAXER PRESENTED 
BY TEXAS AT THE 1959 
FUTURE HOMEMAKERS 
OF AMERICA NATIONAL 
CONVENTION 



(As the underlined words of the 
following scene were read the girls 
concerned with these words stood up 
and waved.) 

Narrator: 

Dear Diary — This has been such 
fun, sharing this glorious week in 
Chicago with all of these wonderful 
Future Homemakers! 

I have met such outstanding girls 
from the Atlantic Region, the Pacific 
Region, the Central Region, the 
Southern Region, and some girls all 
the way from Hawaii, Puerto Rico, 
and the Virgin Islands. 

Not only have these girls been in- 
teresting and outstanding, but their 
directors, advisers, teachers, and 
parents, as well. 

These FHA'ers began putting a 
new life into the city of Chicago 
throughout the days of Sunday and 
Monday. Some of these people ar- 
rived by plane, others by special 



trains, special busses, and still others 
came in cars, from all over this great 
country. 

Among all of these 2,000 FHA'ers 
I have met almost that many differ- 
ent types of girls. I have met blondes, 
brunettes, red-heads — tall and slen- 
der girls, short and plump girls — 
those with blue eyes, green eyes, 
brown eyes — those who are shy and 
bashful — those vivacious ones who 
never die down. 

We have all found that we have 
something in common with each 
other — whether it was rushing des- 
perately to a meeting and arriving 
late after all — or going without 
breakfast to be on time — sitting 
shoeless through the interesting 
speeches — worrying about tipping 
the bellboys — how much? — and how 
to do it smoothly — shopping in Mar- 
shall Fields — gaining a better appre- 
ciation of our foreign neighbors by 
attending the International Trade 
Fair — and reaching the conclusion 
now that staying up so late last night 
wasn't such a good idea after all! 

We have all had the privilege of 
meeting Chapter Officers — District 
Officers — Area Officers — State Of- 
ficers — and our old and new Na- 
tional Officers. 

And — its so good to be able to 
say now that we know Miss Edna 
Amidon — whom we have all heard 
so much about. 



We are also proud to have met 
our National Advisers, Miss Lois 
Oliver and Miss Mildred Reel, and 
the members of our National Ad- 
visory Council. 

Dear Diary — I do so hate to see 
this convention come to an end, be- 
cause I have met so many new and 
wonderful friends and experiences — 
but now this FHA National Conven- 
tion of 1959 will be an impressive 
memory because of its tremendous 
success. Now we all agree that this 
wonderful success has come to us as 
a result of much preparation — plan- 
ning, diligent work, and the complete 
co-operation of our National Ad- 
visers, the National Advisory Coun- 
cil, State Advisers, State Directors, 
Area Advisers, District Advisers, 
Teacher Educators, Homemaking 
teachers, all of the Presidents, Vice- 
Presidents, Secretaries, Treasurers, 
Parliamentarians, Historians, Pi- 
anists, Songleaders — and our won- 
derful parents. 

Because of all of these, who have 
participated, and under the guidance 
of our teachers, and above all under 
the guidance of our God, I know we 
have all gained knowledge and en- 
thusiasm that will help us as Future 
Homemakers of America, to go on 
toward New Horizons. 

Goodbye now, Diary — 

Until we meet again. 



Narrator: 

Our skit takes us to a downtown 
Chicago department store where we 
find Miss FHA Chapter. She is a 
very charming Chapter, dressed in 
a solid organization, buttoned with 
FHA emblems, but she is lacking 
the proper accessories to give her a 
well-rounded appearance. Let's see 
what we can do for her. 

We'll start with her shoes, fash- 
ioned by TEEN TIMES. In TEEN 
TIMES you can get new ideas for 
the many different activities which 
will help your chapter step forward 
with new ideas. 

To heighten this growing outfit is 
this Official Guide hat. Sitting on 
top of the world, this guide includes 
facts, history, ceremonies, rituals, 
the Constitution and By-Laws, which 
your chapter cannot go without. 

Here is her charming "Sing With 
FHA" bracelet. Your chapter's heart 
will sparkle like the stars when its 
members sing from this FHA Song- 
book. 

Another important part of the cos- 



SKIT ON 
"PUBLICATIONS 



// 



Presented by Missouri at the second 

general session at the 1 959 National 

FHA Convention 



tume is this pair of gloves which 
can symbolize your parents and how 
they guide you. The booklet, "You 
and Your Chapter Parents" seems 
to fit the hands of this customer. 

This is FHA's "Handy Andy" 
Chapter Handbook purse. This is an 
absolute must for every FHA outfit. 
It helps you to make new goals, plan 
programs, and bring about leader- 
ship. 

And last but not least, this little 
red rose will brighten up Your Focus 
on FHA. 

Now before you leave, Miss FHA 
Chapter, here is a souvenir to take 
home to your adviser. This "Hand- 



book for the Teachers" will help the 
students evaluate their growth. 

Now you see an FHA Chapter 
with all the proper accessories. 

Your own chapter can be just as 
complete, for all these publications 
are on sale in the Writing Room just 
outside the Ballroom. 

BE A WELL-DRESSED CHAP- 
TER! 

II. 

Presented by Missouri as a follow-up 

skit at the sixth general session at 

the National FHA Convention 

Narrator: 

In this scene we find Miss FHA 
Chapter again visiting her favorite 
shop, the Publications Center. She 
is looking for fresh accessories, for 
her last season's shoes, hat, bag, her 
gloves and flower have that wilted 
look. 

If you will remember, her shoes 
were fashioned by TEEN TIMES, 
so new and up-to-date every month; 
her bracelet of gold by "Sing With 




Mothers of FHA members in the home 
economics department at Alexander-Wil- 
son High School had an opportunity to 
see their daughters in the role of hostesses 
and to view a display of their work when 
they were honored at a tea given under 
the direction of Mrs. Jack Stephens, home 
economics teacher. 




£**M& &£j&j 



the girls to 125 parents, teachers, and 
Chapter members. 

Four of the officers served as hostesses 
at the tea: President, Rae Von Gumm; 
Vice-President, Joyce Scarlett; Secretary, 
Betty Stout; Treasurer. Kay Brewer. 

The Executive Council of the Future 
Homemakers of the Beaufort Chapter 
invited the school principal to meet with 
them when plans for the year's activities 
were made. Certainly this should be help- 
ful to both members and the principal in 
planning the calendar in order to have as 
few conflicts as possible. 

Laughter swept through the audience 
many times as "Scattered Showers," a 
one act play, was presented by the Cullo- 
whee Chapter of the Future Homemakers 
of America. The play, an outgrowth of 
our study of Child Development, is one 
of a series about the climate in the home. 
Starring in the play were three sophomore 
girls; Frankie Dills, Bette Bridges, and 
Karen Vom Lehn. They played the roles 
of the mothers of three 'nicely dressed 
little boys — imaginary boys that is. The 
play was a big success and thoroughly en- 
joyed by teachers and pupils alike. 

Corina Hoots and Jo Watts from the 
Etowah Chapter of the Future Home- 
makers of America are busily making 




book satchels for the retarded children 
in Henderson County. The chapter has 
chosen the School for Retarded Children 
as their principal project for 1959 and 
1960. 

In the New Bern Chapter, each day of 
National FHA Week was observed in a 
very special way. Members attended 
Church of choice on Sunday to begin the 
week's observation. Devotionals were 
given over the intercom system at school 
each school day except Wednesday. 



There was on display projects com- 
pleted by the first, second, and third year 
home economics students, and exhibits 
included aprons, personal grooming note- 
books, boy-girl relationship notebooks, 
dresses, jumpers, and blouses, suits, hous- 
ing notebooks, baby dresses, pillow cases, 
aluminum trays, ming gardens, and 
Christmas ideas and decorations. 

Party sandwiches, nuts, mints, cookies, 
and punch were prepared and served by 



FHA"; her gloves fashioned by Your 
Chapter Parents, the booklet that 
shows how to add warmth to any 
Chapter. 

This so-badly worn handbag, the 
Chapter Handbook, has carried all 
of Miss FHA Chapter's daily neces- 
sities in its many compartments. 

Here now frayed rose is the FHA 
in Focus which carries the first facts 
about FHA. 

Even the buttons, of FHA em- 
blems, are frayed or missing, and 
her Official Guide hat has lost its 
queenly state. 

Miss FHA Chapter needs a new 
outfit to begin the school year! 

Is your Chapter dressed for fall? 

If not, follow Miss FHA Chapter's 
example and hurry to the Publica- 
tions Center. It will be open just 
one more time, Friday morning — 
that's tomorrow — from 9:00 to 
10:00 o'clock. Look smart, be smart, 
follow Miss FHA. 

CUT THE CORNERS AND 
HEAD FOR THE CENTER — 
FHA's PUBLICATION CENTER! 



NEWS from FHA 
FEDERATION 



When chapters in a county or in 
a group of counties organize to form 
a Federation, interest seems to be 
higher. This is another opportunity 
for sharing with your neighboring 
chapters ideas for achieving the goals 
of our organization. Getting to know 
more members, developing leader- 
ship, and many values can be derived 
from participating in a Federation 
program. 

A workshop for officers of the 
Alamance County Chapters of Fu- 
ture Homemakers of America was 

held before school opening in the 
Home Economics Department of 
Walter Williams High School in 
Burlington. During the first session 
when all officers met jointly, Jo Mc- 
Adams, a special guest, highlighted 
the program as she led the group in 
songs. Duties and problems were 
discussed in each officer group. 
Helps were given by the adviser in 
charge, and ideas exchanged in the 
groups should help to strengthen the 
FHA program in Alamance County 
this year. 

"Know Yourself" — The impor- 
tance of understanding the self first 
to effective leadership was the theme 
of the Buncombe County meeting of 
officers and chapter mothers of Fu- 



ture Homemakers of America. A. C. 
Reynolds Chapter was hostess to the 
group. R. A. Tomberlin, Director of 
Instruction, county schools, ad- 
dressed the group on the theme of 
the workshop. 

Group meetings on duties of the 
various FHA officers were led by 
State Representative, Gordon H. 
Greenwood of Black Mountain; 
L. P. Miller of the County Board of 
Education; Miss Louise Swann of 
Asheville, Assistant State Super- 
visor of Home Economics Educa- 
tion; Wade Hampton, Reynolds 
Teacher; and Johnny Whisenunt of 
Lee Edwards High School. 

Future Homemakers from Frank- 
lin-Nash Bi-county Federation had 

reason to be proud of their accom- 
plishments during the week at FHA 
Camp in June. Franklinton. Bailey, 
and Mills (Louisburg) shared a 
cabin. Two members of the group 
who represented the cabin in ping- 
pong came out second place in the 
camp. The entire group played vol- 
ley ball and the group won the 
Championship award. The group 
was second place in the talent pro- 
gram, and was runner-up for the 
cabin having earned the most points 
during the week. 



A Playback o^ . . 

A FUTURE 
MlRIMi CAMP 



On the last evening of Camp, all 
campers relived the week up to that 
point. From the program printed 
here it is hoped you may get a men- 
tal picture of a typical week at 
Camp. The program was prepared 
by advisers from the Glenn, South- 
west, and Bailey Chapters. Just 
about every camper participated in 
the presentation. 



S LIFE 



Friday Night Camp Program — 1959 
Narrator: 

We look in on three F.H.A. girls 
who did not get to come to camp 
this year. They have received cards 
and letters from friends at camp and 
have met at Carol's house to com- 
pare notes and to watch television. 
We find them talking about the fun 
they are missing. 

(The girls sit on a blanket in the 
middle of the floor, eating and "ad- 
libbing" a conversation about what 
they are missing. Then one girl 
turns on the television in an effort to 
get their mind off camp. The TV 
comes on in the middle of the pro- 
gram "The Price Is Right!" To 
designate the programs, a girl holds 
a poster with the name of the pro- 
gram on it. ) 

THE PRICE IS RIGHT 

Mistress of Ceremonies: The next 
item going up for bids is a trip to the 
F.H.A. camp at White Lake near 
Elizabethtown, North Carolina. 

This trip will be available the first 
week in June. You will have de- 
licious meals served in the true camp 
atmosphere. You will be sleeping in 
screened cottages under the tall pines 
native to that area of the country. 
Organized sports, and swimming will 
keep you busy and give you an op- 
portunity to get that good sun tan 
early this year. 

Bids are now going up for this, 
our last item . . . Panel bids . . . 
(ad-libbing). 

(Panel: Quen Burgess, Nancy 
Brannon, Maxine Liles.) 



...» 1-7 



M.C.: I am sure your bids must 
be too low . . . but we will open the 
envelope and see who is our winner 
of this fabulous vacation. The price 
is $10.50 . . . and our winner is 
Quen Burgess. (Bell rings) And 
here's a bonus offer . . . While you 
are at the camp you will take a boat 
trip across the crystal clear water to 
the great amusement center at Golds- 
ton Beach where there will be fun 
for all. You will travel across the 
lake by pleasure cruiser. While there 
you will enjoy the bump cars, the 
roller coaster, and the exciting tilt-a- 
whirl. 

Our grand winner tonight is Quen 
Burgess. We'll see you next week at 
the same time. Now a word from 
our sponsor. 

COMMERCIAL: Girls sing "On 
with the Texize — off with the dirt." 
If your cottage is one of those with 
marks on the wall, dirt on the table 
and sand under the beds . . . What 
you need is Texize Cleaner. 

M.C.: The State Department of 
Public Instruction in Raleigh now 
presents a public service announce- 
ment. (Safety Skit — "Sammy's 
Safety 'Speriences.) 

(A girl changes channels after 
making a comment.) 

TO TELL THE TRUTH 

(Three girls stand on stage, all 
dressed similarly.) 

M.C.: What is your name, 
PLEASE? 

(Each girl answers with: My 
name is Louise Beeson.) 

What is your name, Please? 

What is your name. Please? 

As the girls come forward, will 
the panel listen carefully to the 
following facts. 

I, Louise Beeson, am a member 
of the Walkertown F.H.A. Chapter. 
I have been to several other camps. 
This week I have been helping raise 
the flag. When we return home I will 
go to Camp Shirley Rogers as a 
Counselor. Next year, I will be 
president of our chapter. 



We will now have the voting. 
(Asks for each vote. Each panel 
gives her reason for her vote. ) 

Will the real Louise Beeson please 
step to the center? 

Will our other members tell us 
who they are and what they do? (I 

am and I have 

been calling the names of those 
lucky ones who have received mail 
this week.) 

(I am and I have 

played the clarinet each morning the 
flag was raised.) 

M.C.: We will now have a word 
from our sponsor: 

COMMERCIAL: (A girl who is 
very sunburned, looking very un- 
comfortable says: "If you want to 
have a lovely tan without blisters, 
the product you need is Ski and See 
— Right away, without delay — 
hurry over to Elizabethtown, only 6 
miles away and buy Ski and See. 

M.C.: Instead of Playhouse 90 to- 
night the F.H.A. network presents 
a special program — the presentation 
of the Caroline Awards. 

We are indeed happy to have all 
of you with us tonight for the pres- 
entation of the "Caroline" awards. 

First, we have Miss Sharon 
Daughrety who will present the first 
"Caroline" award for the best talent 
as portrayed last Tuesday at the 
Stunt Night Program. Miss Daugh- 
rety will also present the Fashion 
award. 

Awards: 

M.C.: We are indeed honored to 
have with us tonight as special guest 
Miss Ruth Jewell, Consultant of 
Public School Music. She and her 
music class will entertain us with a 
dance number. Miss Jewell. 

Dance: 

M.C.: Now, Miss Betty Briggs 
will present the Caroline winners of 
the Relay and Horseshoe contests. 

Awards: 

M.C.: Again we have Miss Jewell 
and her music class entertaining us 
with a song. 

Song: 

M.C.: Miss Jean Holt will present 
the volley ball and Ping Pong win- 
ners. 

Awards: 

We have a lovely Japanese dancer. 
Miss Carolyn Dellinger, who will 
entertain us with our next number. 

Dance: 

M.C.: Miss Ann Jessup will pre- 



8 




A scene of Future Homemakers at White Lake Camp during the recreational swimming period. 



sent the softball and Free Throw 
awards at this time. 

Awards: 

M.C.: Mrs. Coleman will present 
the award for Cabin Clean Up. 

Award: 

M.C.: Now, is the moment we 
have been waiting for. Who will be 
the camp winner for this 1959 
F.H.A. Camp? Miss Stewart will 
present this award. 

Award: 

M.C.: Again, I want to say thank 
you to Playhouse 90 for giving their 
time so that the 1959 Caroline 
Awards could be televised this eve- 
ning. 

Channel F.H.A. signs off the air 
with a special vesper program. 

Vespers: 

(Girls on floor have a conversa- 
tion about getting their names on 



the list early to be sure that they get 
to camp next year.) 

THE END 

(Note: The girls giving out the 
awards used envelopes and pro- 
cedures similar to those on the 
Emmy or Academy Awards.) 

THE INITIAL STEP 

(Continued from page 1) 

Program on "Home Experiences" 
Home Experience bulletin board 
Planning session for program. 

April. 

Program; a week of food, fun, and 
fellowship at Camp. By mem- 
bers that attend camp a plan- 
ning session for program. 

May. 

Program on Parliamentary Pro- 
cedure 
Planning session for program. 



Plans for F.H.A. Week 

Sunday. 

Have FHA Sunday School. 
Monday. 

Publicity Day, Bulletin Board and 
news in newspaper. 
Tuesday. 

Courtesy Day, Home and School 
put roses on desks. 
Wednesday. 

Clean-up Day; building, lockers, 
grounds, and dress and act your 
best. 
Thursday. 

Family and Fun Day. 
Friday. 

Chapel Program. 
Saturday. 

Attend State Rally at Raleiah.) 
Creed 
Flower 
Colors 
Motto 
Purposes 
Opening and Closing Ceremony 



Future Homemakers of America 



CREED 

We are the Future Homemakers of America 
We face the future with warm courage. 
And high hope. 

For we have the clear consciousness of seeking 
Old and precious values. 

For we are the builders of homes. 

Homes for America's future. 

Homes where living will be the expression of everything 

That is good and fair. 

Homes where truth and love and security and faith 

Will be realities, not dreams. 

We are the Future Homemakers of America, 
We face the future with warm courage, 
And high hope. 




"The homes of tomorrow are in 

the hand of the youth 

of today" 



■■yW 




Caroline says: 

Nothing can be much more tragic than for a chapter 
which started out with big plans by interested and 
enthusiastic members to fail to carry out the plans. 
The result is first disappointment and later loss of 
interest. It is better to select fewer objectives and 
fewer experiences and be fairly assured of success 
than to attempt many and do a poor or mediocre job 
with each. i 



THE LEADER 

A leader is best 

When people barely know he exists, 

Not so good when people obey and acclaim him, 

Worst when they despise him. 

Of a good leader who talks little. 

When his work is done, his aim fulfilled. 

They will all say, "We did this ourselves." 

Chinese Proverb 
Michigan Newsletter 




World's Largest Living Christmas Tree in Wilmington, 













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FUTURE HOMEMAKERS 

* North Carolina Association * 



VOLUME XVII 



DECEMBER 1959 



NUMBER 2 



A feasant ©Ijougljt 



When at dusk, the heavens seem to glow in all their mighty splendor, 

And all the falling dew does scent the earth with freshness, 
When chamber doors are closed once more and gentle sleep does slide 

Into its rosy depth, 
All seems well with us, the peasants of life, for nothing is left 

But the beauty of sleep. 

When sleep has hushed the weak and the weary, I, in my bed of thought, 

Do listen to the sounds that romp in the midnight darkness. 
As my thoughts do twist and twine from thrill to dullness, I think of those I could have helped along 

the way. 
I think of this and nothing more! 

Velma Nance, Senior Secretary 
Marshville Chapter of Future Homemakers 



North Carolina Association of Future Homemakers of America 

State Officers District Advisers 

1959-60 1959-60 

President — Nancy Edwards, Wingate VI Mrs. Rachel F. Swindell, Bath I 

Vice-President — Sammie Gatlin, Franklinville V Mrs. Julia P. Kennedy, Moss Hill II 

Secretary — Anne Alphine, Dunn IV Mrs. Berline R. Baldwin, Clarkton III 

Treasurer — Kay Hall, Rowland III Mrs. Pearl Stroud, Dunn IV 

Reporter — Elaine Parker, Jones Central II Mrs. Gwendolyn Griffin, High Point Sr. V 

Parliamentarian — Celia Clark, Robersonville I Mrs. Betsy R. Blankenship, East Mecklenburg VI 

Historian — Catherine Blanton, Shelby VIII Mrs. June G. Reichle, Davie Co. Cons. VII 

Song Leader — Dawn Crissman, Boonville VII Mrs. Frances S. Bartlett, North Buncombe VII 1 

State Adviser 

Mrs. Faye T. Coleman 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 

Division of Vocational Education 
Raleigh, North Carolina 




Catherine Wood Blanton 

During the past months, as your 
National Treasurer, I have been for- 
tunate enough to go to Washington, 
D. C, twice, representing the Future 
Homemakers of America. 

My first exciting and rewarding 
journey to the Nation's Capital was 
made on September 15. On that day 
Mrs. Harriette Holton, my local ad- 
viser, and I arrived at the Capitol 
Building just in time to catch a 
glimpse of our Soviet visitor, Mr. 
Khrushchev and also of our own 
President Eisenhower. 

Having been patriotically inspired 
by giving Mr. Khrushchev our cool 
welcome, we spent the remainder of 
our four days in Washington at the 
fabulous Shoreham Hotel. There, 
with two other national officers, I 
represented the Future Homemakers 
as a delegate to the Fourteenth Na- 
tional Conference on Citizenship. 
During those splendid and well-filled 
days, we heard excellent speakers, 
such as The Honorable Arthur S. 
Flemming, Secretary of Health, Edu- 
cation, and Welfare, who inspired us 
to serious and constructive thinking. 
We also took part in small discussion 
groups — meeting youth and adult 
representatives from all over our 
nation and exchanging ideas and 
suggestions pertinent to increasing 
one's knowledge and appreciation of 
United States citizenship. 

During the second day of the 
conference, we witnessed on the 
beautiful Washington Monument 
grounds the first Naturalization Cere- 
mony ever held out of doors. The 
day was September 17, National 
Citizenship Day, and as thirty-four 



An Open Letter 

to the North Carolina 

Future Homemakers" 



representatives from twenty-three 
foreign countries took their oath of 
citizenship, I was filled with deter- 
mination to return home and try to 
make others, especially young peo- 
ple, aware of their citizenship rights 
and responsibilities. 

As a climax to our wonderful 
stay in Washington, hearing military 
bands, youth panels, vocal groups, 
and marvelous speakers, Mrs. Hol- 
ton and I were invited to attend a 
reception at the Swiss Embassy given 
by the Ambassador himself, in 
honor the New Bern, N. C, Tryon 
Palace Hostesses. 

In accordance with the theme of 
this year's conference, which was 
taken directly from the motto of 
the organization: "United States 
Citizenship — Know It; Cherish It; 
Live it," I sincerely believe that I 
have broadened my knowledge and 
appreciation of citizenship, and I 
hope that in some small way, I can 
perhaps share this inspiration with 
you. 

My second trip to Washington 
began September 28, when Mrs. 
Holton and I again flew to the Na- 
tion's Capital for the National Ex- 
ecutive Council meeting. It was good 
to see the other national officers 
again and to renew the brief ac- 
quaintances that we had made dur- 
ing the past summer at our National 
Convention in Chicago. It was also 
wonderful to meet with the officers 
of the New Homemakers of America 
and the members of the National 
Advisory Board. 

At this meeting we reviewed our 
individual national projects and 
made plans for our 1960 National 
Meeting, which will be held also in 
Washington, D. C, during the 
month of July. I was very impressed 
by the number of decisions and plans 
concerning the convention that we 
were permitted to make. I never had 
realized before that our organization 
was so extremely democratic, in that 
its policies and programs are gen- 
erally determined by the youth mem- 
bers of the Executive Council. 




Since the chief job of this meeting 
was to consider arrangements and 
features for the National Conven- 
tion, I would like to tell you that I 
know that all of you who attend next 
year's meeting will enjoy the activi- 
ties that have been planned for you. 
I hope that many of you will be able 
to attend and that those of you who 
do not will read about it and enjoy 
the convention publications. 

As you can readily see, I have 
been rather busy traveling, meeting 
new people, and exchanging ideas. 
Finally I have returned home to be- 
gin my technical duties as National 
Treasurer. 

I am now overcome with gratitude 
to you, for your having made all of 
this possible for me. As members of 
the North Carolina Association of 
Future Homemakers of America, 
you chose me to represent you as 
your national officer. To all of you 
I say a heart-felt thank-you. As the 
days and years pass and my memory 
becomes dull because of the passage 
of time, I know that remaining vivid- 
ly will be the remembrance of my 
marvelous year as your National 
Treasurer. 

Very sincerely yours, 
Catherine Wood Blanton 
State Historian and National 
Treasurer, Future Home- 
makers of America 



F.H.A. Educational 
Exhibits 

Since many people fail to realize the importance of 
a good breakfast, the Jones Central FHA'ers prepared 
as their educational exhibit at the county fair a booth 
stressing the way to score high on breakfast. 

Illustrative drawings were made by the FHA girls. 
A poor breakfast and a good breakfast were displayed, 
and clockwise menus were given. Educational material 
for everyone was prepared, also. 

Why is breakfast important? Because a person has 
not eaten anything for twelve hours or more. If break- 
fast is skipped or skimped, about midmorning a feeling 
of hunger or fatigue occurs. From one-fourth to one- 
third of our day's food allowance should come from 
breakfast. 

Those who skip breakfast because they are afraid of 
gaining weight, should remember that breakfast foods 
are the least fattening and most important. A good 
breakfast should consist of fruit, cereal, whole-wheat or 
enriched bread, butter or fortified margarine, milk or a 
hot beverage and a breakfast meat if desired. Remember 
breakfast is the most important meal of the day. Eat a 
good breakfast! 

New greens, vibrant blues, browns, rich maroon red, 
and gold were seen as the girls from the Jones Central 
Chapter paraded the new fashions at the Jones County 
Fair. 

The fabrics of wool, winter cottons, and new blends 
were most noteworthy. Plaids were popular, too. 

Styles that are always good were most popular. The 
shirt-waist, the sheath, and the princess lines were seen. 
The weskit trimmed with braid or fringe, the very best 
of fashion this season, was modeled by several girls. 

Everyone enjoyed the fashion show, especially the 49 
girls participating! Elaine Parker, our own State Re- 
porter was narrator. Reporter of Jones Central 

Rebecca Foscue 




Chowan High School Chapter 

A dark brown paint was used by Future Home- 
makers of the Roxboro Chapter to paint the shadow 
boxes (made by the F.H.A. President's father) to use 
in the Person County Fair Exhibit. Pale yellow army- 
supply-store fabric was used for the background. 

FHA members dressed the dolls, made fabric bed- 
spreads and curtains, papered the interior of the boxes 
and made the furniture from paper and pictures. An 
electrician donated two spotlights which were very 
effective. 

The blue ribbon went to the exhibit and with it the 
award of $45. 



The Chowan High School Chapter of the Future 
Homemakers of America, with the help of their adviser, 



Roxboro Chapter 




IN HOME ECONOMICS WF 



amdyEcortornic 1 ; 




Clothing 




Health 




Pictured her» is Nancy Olive of the Bartlett Yancey Chapter. 
Nancy was one of the girls to model in the Danville, Va., Fashion 
Show held annually during the Danville Fair. The theme for the 
show was "Out of the world in fashions." 

Mrs. Loraine H. Rogerson, won the trophy for having 
the best fair exhibit at the Chowan County fair. 

The trophy was presented to Mary Alice Perry, presi- 
dent of the Future Homemakers of America, by Mr. 
Roy Spruill, representative of the Home Feed and 
Fertilizer Company. 

The Chowan Chapter is real proud of the cup and 
will work real hard in the future to win it again. If the 
Chapter wins it three times in succession, the Chapter 
can keep it permanently. 

The Chapter has won the blue ribbon several times 
but this was the first year anyone in our group has re- 
ceived the trophy. 



The exhibit below was entered in the Cabarrus County 
Fair by the Harrisburg Home Economics Group. They 




won first prize of all the entering home economics ex- 
hibits. 

As shown in the picture, the FHA'ers are trying to 
show how to give clothing the professional look. In the 
lower left and right corners are pull-over sweaters that 
were made into cardigan sweaters and decorated. Just 
above the sweaters are belts made with contour belting, 
and a collar with cording. Also shown are mono- 
grammed blouses, a blouse decorated with lace, a shirt 
and matching bermudas, skirt and matching weskits, a 
dress with cording, and a dress decorated with a sash. 
The group learned very much from this experience. 



Interpretation Through the 

Medium of the Local Newspaper 

Appearing in The Daily Reflector, Saturday afternoon 
edition of the Greenville newspaper, was a full page 
feature article on the Pitt County Future Homemakers 
of America. Reflector's Woman's Editor, Peggy Smith, 
clearly defined the over-all goals and purposes of our 
organization. Quotes from her article follow: 

"The over-all goal of the group is to help individuals 
improve personal, family and community living. Each 
year, members of local chapters develop a program of 
work including projects and experiences which will help 
them work toward their goal. 

"In order that the public may know how this organi- 
zation affects its members, the Daily Reflector has pic- 
tured the eleven presidents of FHA Chapters in Pitt 
County on this page and reported the accounts given by 
each president on 'What FHA Means to Me'." 

Sue Ellen Hunsucker, president of the Winterville 
Chapter who thinks of FHA as a service made this 
statement, "Any organization of which one is a member 
offers opportunities and responsibilities, but the Future 
Homemakers of America does more. It gives the girls 
the inspiration and the incentive to work and to accom- 
plish. FHA members, in every activity, are given the 
responsibilities of leadership and of following — each 
being involved in an intricate system of co-operation. 
Our work in the organization prepares us for bigger 
duties in the future and introduces problems that we 
are obligated to solve. 

"The work of our organization is vital to our nation. 
The purposes for which we stand should be the basis 
for every home. I am proud that I can have a small 
part in our magnificent purpose — to serve our com- 
munities, our nation, and our homes as Future Home- 
makers of America.'" 

When asked what the chapter meant to her, Shirley 
Whitehurst, president of the Bethel Chapter, made 
these statements: "Because I am a teenager, 1 know 
that the homes established in the near future will 
be done so by girls and boys who have beliefs, attitudes 
and training similar to mine. 

"We want for ourselves and our future families the 
best opportunity will provide. To have this, we must 
study and learn those things that will make for better 
living. 

"Future Homemakers of America is just one of the 
many phases in Homemaking Education, but it is one 
whose goals and aims are forever reaching toward new 
and better horizons. Being a FHA member today means 
a better family member tomorrow." 



Each year one important feature 
of the day's program is sharing the 
National Convention Program with 
all Future Homemakers in the re- 
spective district. The North Caro- 
lina Association will benefit greatly 
from the experiences of the 77 dele- 
gates to the 1959 Convention. 
Reports of the Convention were 
different in each district, but in each 
district members could be proud of 
the originality and the creativeness 
of those delegates giving the report 
— and all members, no doubt, caught 
the enthusiasm and appreciation of 
each delegate for having had this 
opportunity to attend a national con- 
vention. 

Another very important feature 
of the Rally program is the election 
of the state officer for the coming 
year. Not every candidate can win — 
but each candidate, with her sup- 
porters, is to be commended for hav- 
ing run and for having made a real 
contribution toward strengthening 
her chapter, her district, and finally 
the State Association. 



Though a similar pattern was 
used in each district for the day's 
program there was some variation 
in the special feature programs as 
seen in the skeletal outline below: 



REVIEW and MS 

OF THE DAY 



The Day of the Rally in Eight Districts 
in North Carolina 



DISTRICT I 

"Hands" — Devotion 
County Chapter 



by Pamlico 



Welcome — Mr. M. B. Weaver, 
Principal of Pamlico County 
School 

Greetings — Mr. G. W. Harriett, 
Superintendent of Pamlico 
County Schools 

Sing With FHA— Led by Mr. 
Charles Stevens, Choral Direc- 
tor, Washington High School 

"Youth in the Home, Today and 
Tomorrow" — Reverend Earle 
J. Rogers, First Baptist Church, 
Washington, D. C. 

Solo — Jane Du Laney, Edenton 
Chapter 

Pageant— "The Big, Big World 
and the People In It" — Rich 
Square Chapter 

DISTRICT II 

"Hands" — Devotion by Mary 
Bryon Wooten, La Grange 
Chapter and Kay Rivenbark, 



Soprano, Southwood Chapter 

Welcome — Mr. Frank Mock, 
Principal, Grainger High 
School 

Greetings — Mr. Jean P. Booth, 
Superintendent, Kinston City 
School 

"You Have Tremendous Possibili- 
ties" — Dr. Jerome G. Toloch- 
ko, Rabbi of Temple Israel, 
Kinston, North Carolina 

Sing with FHA — Mr. James Hall, 
Choral Director, Grainger High 
School 

Solo — "Autumn Leaves" — Polly 
Glover, Rock Ridge 

Jerry Howard and His Ivy Leag- 
uers — Directed by Mr. Harry 
Shipman, Band Director, 
Grainger High School 

Pageant— "The Big, Big World 
and The People In It" — Wayne 
County Chapters Directed by 



Checking the Rally Program in District VII are (left to right) Mrs. Frances Barlett, home ecomonics teacher at North Bun- 
combe High School and District eight adviser; Catherine Blanton of the Shelby Chapter and State Historian; Barbara Jean 
Nix of Bethel; Judy Renfro of Cullowhee; and Beula Adkins of Owen. 




vaSSS&.-^r- 




The Roll Call by counties in District II. 



Mr. Clifton Britton, Director of 
Dramatics, Goldsboro High 
School 

DISTRICT III 

Welcome — Rayceine Carpenter, 
President, Fayetteville Senior 
High School 

Greetings — Mr. Sam R. Edwards, 
Principal of Fayetteville Senior 
High School 

Relaxer — "Getting To Know 
You" — Lumberton Chapter 

"Developing Our Potential Abili- 
ties" — Mr. Bert Ishee, Princi- 
pal, Alexander Graham School 

Luncheon Entertainment — Scot- 
tish Dancers, A Spanish 
Dancer, and Group Singing 

Souvenirs of the National Con- 
vention — Rockingham Chapter 

DISTRICT IV 

Hands" — Devotion by Benvenue 



Chapter 
Welcome — Mr. 



Joseph Holliday, 



Principal, Needham Broughton 
High School 

Greetings — Panthea Gupton, 
President, Needham Broughton 
Chapter 

Pageant — "The Big, Big World 
and the People In It" — Benson 
Chapter 

Talent Time — Wake Forest Oc- 
tette, Dunn's Crewnecks 

"Youth Can Be Charming" — 
Miss Billye Cook, Nancy Tay- 
lor Charm School 

DISTRICT V 

Skits on the Four Objectives of 
Our Organization — by dele- 
gates to the 1959 National 
FHA Convention 

"Blueprint For Action" — Rev- 
erend Thomas Haggai, Pastor, 
Emerywood Baptist Church, 
High Point, N. C. 

DISTRICT VI 

Devotions — Harrisburg Chapter 
Welcome — Sara Jean Hildreth, 



President, Wadesboro Chapter 

Greetings — Mr. B. F. Strickland, 
Principal, Wadesboro High 
School 

Greetings — Mr. W. F. Wilder- 
muth, Supt., Wadesboro City 
Schools 

"Youth Can Do" — Dr. Morris 
Husted 

Relaxer — Dianne Wilson, Gar- 
ringer Chapter 

Talent — Ann Black, Bethel Chap- 
ter; Linda Hildreth, Wadesboro 
Chapter 

"Youth Can Do, Through Home 
Economics" — Mrs. Billy Jean 
Simpson, Mrs. North Carolina 
of 1959 

DISTRICT VII 

Devotion — Beaver Creek Chapter 
Greetings — Johnson Stillman, 
Principal North Rowan High 
School 
Greetings — Charles Erwin, Super- 
intendent, Rowan Schools 



DISTRICT I RALLY, BAYBORO, OCTOBER 3— Pictured; seating his wife and other family members at lunch in honor of 
the guests at the District I Rally is Rev. Earl J. Rogers of Washington. He was introduced as morning speaker by his daughter, 
Emmy, a member of the Washington Chapter of Future Homemakers. Also pictured with the family is Celia Clark, State 
Parliamentarian, and Mrs. Rachel Swindell, District I Adviser. 




Relaxer — Judy Pardue, West 
Yadkin 

Skit — "A Salute to the 50th An- 
niversary of Home Economics" 
— East Wilkes Chapter 

DISTRICT VIII 

Devotions — Rutherfordton-Spin- 
dale Chapter 

Welcome — Future Homemakers! 
— Scottie Chandler, President, 
Hendersonville Chapter; Mr. 
Hugh Lockaby, Principal, 
Hendersonville High 

Greetings — Supt. Hugh D. Ran- 
dall, City Schools; Supt. J. M. 
Foster, Henderson County 
Schools 

"You and Your Family" — Dr. 
I. V. Sperry, Professor, Family 
Life Education, Woman's Col- 
lege, UNC 

Panel Discussion "The Girl and 

Her Family" — Patsy McKin- 



ney, Forest City Chapter 
Relaxer — "Getting To Know 

You" 
Music — Hendersonville High Jazz 

Band 
"Charmingly Yours" — Mrs. Jack 

Keeter, Rutherfordton; Ruther- 

fordton-Spindale Chapter 
Let's All Sing — Rebecca Wilson, 

Edneyville Chapter 

Every Future Homemaker in 
North Carolina and those interested 
in the homemaking program in our 
schools are indebted to our district 
advisers, our state officers and plan- 
ning committee members for the very 
fine educational programs provided 
through our District Rallies each 
year. Our state officers who preside 
at the Rallies offer much in the way 
of incentive and enthusiam as they 
demonstrate that "Youth Can Do," 
and that we all want to strive to de- 
velop our potential abilities. 




BLUEPRinT FOR ACTIOf) 










A skit "A Salute to the 50th Anniversary of Home Economics" was presented by 
the East Wilkes Chapter at District VIII Rally. 

"Food Comes first" for Potential Youth Power 

North Carolina is among the many states in the country now participating 
in this new program — "Food Comes First" for Youthpower. It is based on 
Youthpower and the value and importance of proper nutrition for the 
teenage group, and is supported by the entire food industry. This project 
was activated as a result of nationwide concern over the health of the na- 
tions' youth. 

The North Carolina Farm Bureau Federation has volunteered to take 
initial leadership in establishing a statewide committee to plan a program 
for the next few months. A successful nationwide program will depend upon 
activity leading up to the selection of 6-10 well qualified boys and girls to 
attend the nationwide Youthpower Congress in Chicago in February, 1960. 

According to present plans, the North Carolina Association of Future 
Homemakers of America will be represented at the Congress. 

Watch for further development of this project in your local newspaper. 



A PATTERN 
FOR LIVING 

Given at State Officers' Workshop 

By Jeanice Paul 

State Parliamentarian 

Alabama Association of F.H.A. 

We, in Home Economics, believe 
in a plan for doing everything. We 
want a budget for our time and 
money, a recipe for preparing a dish, 
a pattern for making a garment, and 
1 can name many other plans and 
patterns that we need and use. A 
major one in my mind is a plan for 
our lives or a pattern for living. 

I have chosen just such a pattern 
in one short verse of scripture taken 
from the 2nd chapter of Luke. This 
chapter, you know, deals with the 
birth of Christ and his boyhood. The 
52nd or last verse of this chapter is 
and I read, "And Jesus increased in 
wisdom and stature, and in favour 
with God and man." 

Our responsibility here and at all 
times is to gain knowledge and apply 
that knowledge for the betterment 
of ourselves today, our families to- 
morrow, and mankind at all times. 
Next, let us think of how important 
it is that we keep our bodies clean 
within and without, filled with 
nutritious food and wholesome 
thoughts so that we may develop 
our statures to their full Dotentiality. 
May we through this development 
never lose sight of God and never 
fail to realize that through Him our 
strength and counsel comes. A 
steadfast faith, a wholehearted love 
for God, and sincere and dedicated 
practice of the Ten Commandments 
he laid down for us opens the 
way for His favor and certainly 
paves the way for us to draw the 
favor and trust of our fellow man. 

In this day of atomic fear, tran- 
quillized security, and satellistic 
speed, we now in our youth must 
establish a philosophy of life based 
on Christian principles if we are to 
achieve any degree of the ever- 
searched-for intangible — called — 
Peace. If we here "today, the makers 
of tomorrow's homes, can establish 
our pattern after Jesus and let that 
pattern be radiantly shown in what 
we think, say and do — then tomor- 
row's world will be more secure and 
more sublime with God's love and 
satisfying peace. 

Prayer: Dear Heavenly Father, 
help us to have beauty of soul and 
spirit as we pattern ourselves after 
the only perfect example. 



Applauding Our 
Chapter Reporters 

Who Are Promoting Good Public Relations as 

They Tell the Story of Activities Which 

Interpret Our Goals and Purposes 



From the National FHA Program 
of Work, two objectives were se- 
lected by members of the North 
Buncombe FHA Chapter. These two 
objectives are: 

1. To develop a better under- 
standing of our families and to con- 
tribute to their well being. 

2. To interpret the value of home 
economics as a basic part of our 
total education. 

Having adopted the above objec- 
tives the following projects were 
planned: (1) to contact the PTA 
group to see what they are doing 
to improve educational and spiritual 
values in home, school, and com- 
munity (2) to sponsor a progressive 
dinner (3) to make a collection of 
family prayers and mount in a scrap 
book to present to our family (4) to 
prepare kits on Careers in Home 
Economics and other professions 
(5) to donate to the school and 
city libraries (6) to have a panel of 
chapter members to present a pro- 
gram on the "Values of Homemak- 
ing and FHA." (7) to write more 
articles for the school paper, the 
town paper, our North Carolina 
Future Homemakers Magazine, 
and our national magazine Teen 
Times. 

Reporter: 

Linda Gail Burleson 



"Good Footsteps Make Progress" 
was the theme of the Rutherford 
County Future Homemakers annual 
workshop, which is in reality a train- 
ing school for officers. 

Mr. Forrest Hunt, principal of 
the Tri-High — the school in which 
the workshop was held, delivered a 
welcome. Greetings were extended 
by the president of the Tri-High 
Chapter, Janan White and the Tri- 
High Chapter mother, Mrs. Perry 
Byers. 

"Footsteps Toward Stranger 
Membership," a program presented 
with the use of colored slides by the 



Cool Springs Chapter proved to be 
very educational and helpful to all 
chapters in the Federation. 

Following the opening session 
officers divided into groups accord- 
ing to the office held. In each group 
(presidents, vice-presidents, secre- 
taries, treasurers, reporters, etc. ) it 
was the officer in the County Federa- 
tion who, with the help of her ad- 
viser led the discussion. Through 
these group sessions, each officer 
became more aware of the duties 
and responsibilities of her office, and 
received suggestions for ways of suc- 
cessfully fulfilling these duties and 
responsibilities. 

A request from Chapter parents 
following last year's workshop re- 
sulted in the following suggestions 
regarding the responsibilities of 
Chapter Parents: 

SUGGESTIONS FOR 

RESPONSIBILITIES OF 

CHAPTER PARENTS 

1 . Help plan social events. 

2. Serve in place of adviser at 
local chapter meetings when adviser 
is unable to attend. 

3. Work with a committee to 
carry out a special responsibility. 

4. Help the F.H.A. adviser at 
any meetings the chapter is hostess 
for. 

5. Attend local and county, and 
if convenient attend district and state 
meetings helping with transportation 
if needed. 

6. Attend chapter meetings and 
some of the executive council meet- 
ings. 

7. Offer to participate in some 
chapter activities such as: help with 
community projects, participate on 
a program, participate in social 
hour, clip items for the scrapbook, 
help with fair booth, and others. 

8. Work with degree applicants. 

9. Help a new home economics 



teacher to become acquainted with 
the community. 

10. Assist with publicizing and 
interpreting chapter activities to the 
community such as: F.H.A. Week, 
American Education Week and sum- 
mer activities. 

1 1 . Chaperone for special oc- 
casions such as: field trips, social 
events, etc. 

Reported by 

Patsy McKinney 

President of 

Rutherford County Federation 



The Clarkton Chapter of Future 
Homemakers of America initiated 
new members in a candlelight serv- 
ice held in the Home Economics 
department. The program was 
planned to carry out one of our goals, 
"Promoting Good Will," and the 
group welcomed Miss Virginia Par- 
sons who spoke on her recent trip 
abroad. Miss Parsons said, "I am 
happy to know that Future Home- 
makers are doing such a wonderful 
work in promoting international 
good will." 

At the November meeting of the 
Clarkton Parent Teachers Associa- 
tion, Future Homemakers presented 
two skits. Senior girls presented a 
short play, "Got a Date?" which in- 
cluded a fashion show. Each girl 
modeled the garments she had made 
in class. 

"The Big, Big World and the Peo- 
ple in It," was a skit given by the 
Freshman F.H.A/ers. Comments 
afterward proved that our work was 
as worthwhile as it was fun! 

Reporter, 

Jane Gail Lathan 



The first program of the year for 
the Beaufort F.H.A. Chapter was a 
candlelight installation and initiation 
service with 36 new members taken 
in the chapter. 

F.H.A. Chapter members will 
sponsor football dances, sell cans 
of candy and dish cloths in order to 
purchase a new gas stove for the 
foods lab. 

The Beaufort won first prize of 
$10 for the Home Economics ex- 
hibit at the County fair. It was on 
correct methods of ironing. It was 
planned and organized by third year 
home economics girls and was dis- 



played by Sandra Whitehurst and 
Sandra Jo Poke. 

Frank Cassians, an insurance 
man, explained the need and benefits 
of family insurance to the second 
year girls. They have been studying 
money management. 

The F.H.A. girls will provide 
free baby sitting in the home eco- 
nomics department for each P.T.A. 
meeting. Refreshments were served 
by Future Homemakers at the first 
meeting of the Parent-Teachers 
Association. 

A well chaperoned dance held in 
the Scout Building was sponsored by 
the F.H.A. chapter following the 
football game. Admission was 35 
cents. 

Nancy Huntley 

Beautfort Chapter Reporter 



The Robert B. Glenn Chapter has 
an enrollment of 108 members. This 
year we gained 33 new members. 
Our plans for the coming year in- 
clude many activities which will 
benefit our school, chapter, and 
community. Recently thirteen of our 
members attended the District 5 
Rally at High Point. 

Jeanne Weavil 
Chapter Reporter of 
Robert B. Glenn F.H.A. 
Chapter 



Fair Week Activities — Rosewood 

"Is the Gobblebug Getting Your 
Dollars?" was the title of the ex- 
hibit prepared by the Rosewood 
Future Homemakers. The exhibit 
received a blue ribbon and fifty dol- 
lars at the Wayne County Fair on 
September 14. There were nine other 
home economics exhibits — Fremont 
received second place and New Hope 
placed third. 

The Rosewood exhibit was plan- 
ned one rainy night in July by mem- 
bers of the fair exhibit committee. 
Faye Woodard was chairman of the 
committee and Becky Jordan, 
F.H.A. president, played an im- 
portant part in making the gobble- 
bug become a reality. The idea came 
from a cartoon in a home economics 
bulletin on money management. 
With the "gobblebug" eating dollars 
as an attention-getter, the girls plan- 
ned to make a sample budget, di- 
viding the dollar according to the 
needs of an average family. Ways 
to control the dollar were listed 
briefly on a poster. Money manage- 

8 



ment booklets were used to complete 
the exhibit. The colors used were 
black and white with accents of red. 
Good balance, proportion and other 
principles of art were considered. 

The exhibits were evaluated by 



three home economics teachers (not 
in the county), who used a score card 
in judging. 

This was a real learning experi- 
ence — and a rewarding one for the 
hard work it required. 




PAKISTAN I/noon* 



Syed Hamid and Rabia Mah- 
mood from Karachi, Pakistan, de- 
lighted members of the Needham B. 
Broughton chapter of the F.H.A. 
with their many interesting remarks 
about life in their native country. 

On leave of absence from the Uni- 
versity of Karachi, Mr. Mahmood is 
working on his Ph.D. in Zoology at 
North Carolina State College. At the 
University, he worked in the science 
department and did much toward 
getting it organized. 

Mrs. Mahmood told the girls 
something about the troubled history 
of their twelve-year-old country. 
Pakistan was once a part of India 
but was divided into two free coun- 
tries after petition by the Moslems 
and Hindus. East and West Pakistan 
are now separated by India. 

Mrs. Mahmood then proceeded to 
tell us about the family customs of 
her people. As in other Eastern 
countries, the teen-age boys and girls 



do very little together — no dating, 
dancing, or going to the same school! 
The girls spend much of their time 
learning to cook and sew, as well 
as getting an education. Marriage 
customs were especially interesting. 
A girl's family picks several young 
men who are well educated, have 
good jobs, and come from good 
families, and invites them to several 
parties. From what the girl sees and 
hears about the men, she must de- 
cide which one she wants, or she 
may turn away all of them. Even 
though this system may not seem 
good to us, it has resulted in ex- 
tremely few divorces for the people 
of Pakistan, compared to those of 
America. 

Today, Pakistan is swiftly becom- 
ing a modern country. The women 
have "lifted their veils" and are 
working along with the men as doc- 
tors, lawyers, and teachers in order 
to help their nation achieve its place 
in the world. 



Presented by Utah Future Homemakers of America 
At the 1959 National Convention 

Sacred music as background to the very last statement when 
FHA Prayer Song will be played. 

Posters required: Large one for background — 3 girls holding 
it: "Let Your Light So Shine." Four other small scrolls held 
by four students — written on scrolls: 

"Imagination" 
"Opportunity" 
"Responsibility" 
"Enthusiasm" 
Another poster can be used in front of the podium including 
statement: "Live FHA Ideals — Truth, Love, Security, Faith" 

Narrator: In New York Harbor between Manhatten and 
Staten Island lies a sunken shoal called Robin's Reef. A light- 
house stands there to warn of hidden dangers to those who go 
by sea. For years the keeper of Robin's Reef Lighthouse has 
been a woman, now an elderly widow, by the name of Mrs. 
Jacob Walker. I would like to tell you the life story of Mrs. 
Walker as she tells it in her own words: 

"I was a young girl living at Sandy Hook, New Jersey, when 
I first met Jacob Walker. He was the keeper of the Sandy Hook 
Lighthouse. He took me there as his bride and we were very 
happy. Some years later we were transferred to the Robin's Reef 
Lighthouse. After four years my husband caught a cold while 
tending the light. The cold turned to pneumonia and they took 
him to a hospital on Staten Island. I remained behind to look 
after the light. A few nights later I saw a rowboat coming 
through the darkness. Something told me the message it was 
bringing. Two days later we buried my husband on a hillside 
on Staten Island not too far away to be seen from the lighthouse. 
Every morning since then, I stand at the porthole when the sun 
comes up and look out across the water toward Jacob's grave. 
Sometimes the hill is green, sometimes it is brown, sometimes 
it is white with snow. But I always get a message from him. 
It is the same thing I heard him say more often than anything 
else in life. It is always the same, just three words: 'Mind the 
Light'!" 

Ever since that beginning so long ago the greatest need of 
the world has been for more light, for more "light minders," 
more "light carriers." 

"Let your light so shine before men. that they may see your 
good works and glorify your Father Which is in Heaven." We, 
as Future Homemakers of America have a light of truth, love, 
security, and faith that glows brightly, as if it were touched by 
our Creator. Let us unfold our light from beneath the bushel, 
hold it high, and let the whole world see and know our wonder- 
ful organization. In order that others may profit from our light, 
we must improve our flicker into a steady, never-failing beam, 
filled with courage and determination to succeed. 

Each one of us has been blessed with talents and gifts in 
order to build our character, not selfishly, nor for world ac- 
claim, but in the service of our fellow men, for the uplift and 
enrichment of others. And as we exercise our God-given talents, 
we shall be added upon and gain new talents, abilities, and a 
stronger light to help others. We do not want to bury our light 
under a bushel. It is our responsibility to cultivate each gift 
we have been given — to shine our light into the lives of others. 
First, in adding fuel to our torches, let us set our FHA ideals 
high, that nothing may mar or corrode them. We do not want 
them so low that they may be easily attained, for "in following 
the course of least resistance, men and rivers grow crooked." 
Let us think of our ideals as the highest peak on the highest 
mountain. 

I want a mountain always in my heart, 

A white unconquered peak, aloof, apart, 

Gold in the dawn, dark Cameo at night. 

Challenging me to scale its Godlike height. 

Oh, may I never reach that high white shrine. 

For the goal belongs to God — but the climb is mine. 

Yes, Future Homemakers, 

Aim for a goal, then start on your way, 

It may take a year, or only a day. 

Be sure to travel slowly and watch for mistakes, 

But Oh, don't worry about the time it takes. 

The path may be rough and mostly uphill. 

But you'll get mighty close by using your will. 



This poem may well be light to the life of not only US, but 
to many others around us. We are largely the creatures of our 
own environment and associations. Let us beware of anything 
that lowers the ideals or makes us satisfied with anything less 
than our level best — with anything but excellence — or which 
tries to make us believe that being mediocre is good enough, or 
that ordinary will do. It is the mind which will be satisfied with 
nothing but the best, and which will have nothing to do with 
anything less than excellence, that achieves that which is worth- 
while. 

Girl Holding Scroll "Opportunity": Along with our high 
ideals, let us show others that we are mindful to the light of 
"opportunity." Let others see that we, the Youth of America, 
are selective and choose only those opportunities which will be 
most uplifting and rewarding, those which will be life-enriching. 

Narrator: The wise girl will make more opportunities than 
she finds. We do not ever want to be blind to opportunities, 
simply because we feel we do not have time to take them. 
Both the time and the opportunity will fly by, never again to 
be offered to you. "Lost! — somewhere between sunrise and sun- 
set, 2 golden hours, each set with 60 diamond minutes. No re- 
ward is offered for they are gone forever." After we have firmly 
grasped our golden opportunities, let us take upon ourselves 
the responsibility of doing the very best we can with them. 

Girl Holding Scroll "Responsibility": We, as Future Home- 
makers of America, have not only the opportunity of making 
the homes of the future great, but a responsibility to set a firm 
foundation for our future homes in our homes of today. Let 
the light of "responsibility" shine brightly in our homes so it 
will carry on in our future. 

Narrator: No one rides dead-head on the road to happiness — 
if we reach that goal, we must pay the fare. 

One of the most dangerous things on a railroad is an engine 
moving without cars. It has power, it has speed, but it has no 
responsibility. It may leave the roadbed on a curve — a curve 
that it easily negotiates if it is pulling a string of cars. Like the 
railroad locomotive moving aimlessly without cars, is the person 
who goes through life without responsibilities. He may lose his 
sense of balance on a curve of life, and that curve may be just 
the one that a person with proper responsibilities would hardly 
notice. When given responsibilities, take them, and remember — 
one minute of Do It Now is of more value than ages of Put It 
Off. God made America fruitful: As FHA'ers we have the re- 
sponsibilities of keeping our nation great. 

Now let's add Imagination and Enthusiasm to our responsi- 
bilities — and we will indeed have found the spark that sets our 
light of responsibility aflame. 

Girl Holding Scroll "Imagination": 
Take Imagination and Enthusiasm 
And Hitch the two together, 
Then fix your gaze on the highest star 
And forget about the weather. 

Take a pound of pluck and energy 

And mix with an ounce of thrift. 

Then forward march to the heights ahead, 

And don't be begging a lift. 

Girl Holding Scroll "Enthusiasm": 
Pick out the hill you want to climb 
And fix your gaze on the peak 
Then blaze your way to the very top, 
The bottom is reserved for the weak. 

Narrator: 

Imagination and Enthusiasm — 

Mark you! this matchless team 

Is yours to harness and drive to the goal, 

Of all your heart has dreamed. 

Imagination and Enthusiasm — 

Oh, girls, if you are wise, 

You'll give 'EM the rein, then fix your gaze, 

On the brightest star in the skies. 

All Five Girts: (Turn to sign and lift their inner hands up 
toward sign.) Yes, "Let your light so shine that it may become 
a beacon to all those who need help." 

Narrator: And remember — "It isn't necessary to blow out the 
other person's light in order to let your own light shine." 



.. ■:,;.;., Mil 



Future Homemakers of America 



CREED 

We are the Future Homemakers of America 
We face the future with warm courage, 
And high hope, 

For we have the clear consciousness of seeking 
Old and precious values. 

For we are the builders of homes, 

Homes for America's future. 

Homes where living will be the expression of everything 

That is good and fair. 

Homes where truth and love and security and faith 

Will be realities, not dreams. 

We are the Future Homemakers of America, 
We face the future with warm courage, 
And high hope. 




"The homes of tomorrow are in 

the hand of the youth 

of today" 




Caroline says: 



''Toward Mew Horizons" 

I was once asked, "Why do we have an F.H.A. motto, and 
what does it mean to you?" 

Since then I have often thought. "What does it mean to me? 
Toward what new horizons are we. the Future Homemakers of 
America, striving?" 

Webster says. "A horizon is the limit of one's mental vision." 
The apparent meeting of the earth and the sky, the meeting of 
our present and our future, the meeting of time and eternity — 
these are our horizons. 

Our future — the vast unknown that stretches before each of 
us — what does it hold? We cannot see beyond the horizon of 
each present moment; therefore we must prepare ourselves for 
whatever may come. The homemaker of today is not only a 
wife and mother, but a teacher, a nurse, a social and civic leader, 
and often a breadwinner, as well as the manager of her home. 
How much more, then, will be the responsibility of tomorrow's 
homemaker: her home may be in the realms of outer space! 

We, the youth of today — the homemakers of tomorrow — must 
prepare ourselves to meet the new horizons stretching before us. 
We must be ready to accept the challenge of the world of to- 
morrow; it will be in our hands. 

Kay Hall. State Treasurer 



% 



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mm. 



* 



At 



Painting — By John Singleton Copley in The North Carolina Museum of Art, Raleigh, N. C. 



FUTURE HOMEMAKERS 

* North Carolina Association * 



VOLUME XVII 




FEBRUARY 1960 




NUMBER 



OUR 

COVER 

PICTURE 

This painting, purchased by the 
state from the original one million 
dollar grant which was appropriated 
by the North Carolina General As- 
sembly in 1947, is by John Single- 
ton Copley. It is a large portrait of 
Sir William Pepperell and his 
family, of Boston, Massachusetts. 



This painting shows the influence 
of English portraiture on our Ameri- 
can school of painting. 

At the outbreak of the revolution, 
Pepperell fled to England because 
of his loyalty to the British crown. 
With him he took his American wife, 
Elizabeth Roy all (daughter of the 
Honorable Isaac Royall of the Mas- 
sachusetts Council) and their chil- 
dren. Mrs. Pepperell died en route 
and was buried in Halifax, Nova 
Scotia. Our painting was executed 
some time after the arrival of the 
father and children in England. The 
painter also arrived in England 



about the same time and most likely 
used Mrs. Copley as model for the 
figure of the mother. Since he had 
painted Elizabeth Royall and her 
sister at an earlier time in Boston, 
he depended on his memory and 
possibly on sketches for her features. 
The North Carolina Museum of 
Art, one of the South's newest and 
finest museums, located just off his- 
toric Capitol Square in Raleigh, is 
a source of pride to every North 
Carolinian as theirs was the first 
state in the nation to set aside pub- 
lic funds to found an art collection 
for its people. 



Carolina Association of Future Homemakers of America 



State Officers 
1959-60 

President — Nancy Edwards, Wingate VI 

Vice-President — Sammie Gatlin, Franklinville V 

Secretary — Anne Alphine, Dunn IV 

Treasurer — Kay Hall, Rowland III 

Reporter — Elaine Parker, Jones Central II 

Parliamentarian — Celia Clark, Robersonville I 

Historian — Catherine Blanton, Shelby VIII 

Song Leader — Dawn Crissman, Boonville VII 



District Advisers 
1959-60 

Mrs. Rachel F. Swindell, Bath I 

Mrs. Julia P. Kennedy, Moss Hill II 

Mrs. Berline R. Baldwin, Clarkton HI 

Mrs. Pearl Stroud, Dunn IV 

Mrs. Gwendolyn Griffin, High Point Sr. V 

Mrs. Betsy R. Blankenship, East Mecklenburg VI 

Mrs. June G. Reichle, Davie Co. Cons. VII 

Mrs. Frances S. Bartlett, North Buncombe VIII 



State Adviser 

Mrs. Faye T. Coleman 



STATE DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 

Division of Vocational Education 

Raleigh, North Carolina 



NATIONAL 



FHA 



MEETING 



If we are to have representation 
from all sections of North Carolina, 
it will be best if each district could 
send two delegates in addition to 
the state officer (whose expenses 
will be paid from the 10 cents con- 
tribution of the members ) . The na- 
tional treasurer, Catherine Blanton, 
is included in the quota. 

The delegate must be an active 
FHA member. She should be capa- 
ble of making a contribution to the 
convention program and be able to 
bring the "Convention Back Home" 
in order to strengthen local pro- 
grams as well as county, district, 
and state programs which will even- 
tually strengthen the entire State As- 
sociation. 

Applications from those who wish 
to attend will be considered on the 
basis of the date the application is 
received in the office, the number 
of applicants from any one district, 
and the qualifications of the appli- 
cants. If one district should have 
only one applicant and another dis- 
trict has four or five, then the appli- 
cations from the district having the 
larger number of applications will 
be considered. The applicant's atti- 



tude, interest, and enthusiasm in the 
home economics program are im- 
portant factors. Remember that a 
senior graduating in 1960 will have 
little opportunity to apply her learn- 
ings and experiences at the conven- 
tion in her local chapter and the 
state program next year. 

Below is an estimate of the Con- 
vention Expenses: 

Registration ...$ 3.00 

Room (3 persons per room) 
$4.50 per person per day, 
plus 3 per cent tax (5 days) 23.18 

Train fare (round trip) 13.37 

Box lunch enroute 85 

Transfer of luggage 1.00 

Tips 1.00 

Tour of Washington 1.50 

Return trip-meal on diner 2.00 

Meals for the entire week ex- 
cept Thursday noon but in- 
cluding the Thursday night 

banquet 21.60 

(Delegates will be free to 
select their own eating 
places Thursday noon. ) 

$67.50 



IMPORTANT DATES!! 

For Spring and Summer 1960 
State Convention : Raleigh 

Memorial Auditorium 
March 26, 1960 

Camp 

Future Farmers — White 
Lake 

May 30- June 4 
June 6-June 1 1 

National F.H.A. Meeting 

Statler Hilton Hotel 
Washington, D C. 
July 1 1-15 

Quota for North Carolina 
Members — 27 
Adults— 7 
Total— 34 

Who will attend: 

1 . All state officers plus 
National Treasurer. . 8 

2. Adults 7 

Adviser of National 

Officer 1 

District Advisers . . .5 

State Adviser 1 

3 Delegates at large rep- 
resenting chapter, 
county, or district 

Youth 19 

Adults 




From left to right are the chapter officers: Kitty Towe, Secretary; Marilyn Taylor, Vice- 
President; Judy Hedgepeth, President; Judy Whitley, Treasurer; and Sandra Odom, Chair- 
man of the Project Committee and Mr. John Loughorn. 



One hundred and thirty - eight 
members of the Benvenue Chapter 
of the Future Homemakers of 
America had a busy schedule in 
December making and repairing 
toys for children of needy families. 

It all began at the November 
meeting. Sandra Odom, Chairman 
of the Christmas Project, held a 
workshop on Repairing Old Toys. 
Her enthusiasm was caught by each 
member which resulted in every 
member bringing a toy to the De- 
cember meeting. Mr. John Laug- 
horn. Chairman of the Christmas 
Activities for the Rocky Mount Jay- 
cees, was on hand to accept the 
toys which were distributed by his 
organization. 

Members should be commended, 
according to Mrs. Fred Langford. 
Chapter Adviser, for a "job well 
done." All work was done by mem- 
bers outside school hours. This proj- 
ect may have grown out of the de- 
sire of FHA members to bring joy 
and happiness to every little girl on 
the Christmas Opportunity List. 

1 



"Winter Wonderland of Fashion " 



A great upsurge in interest in 
home sewing was in evidence at the 
Lee Edwards High School in De- 
cember when Homemaking classes 
II and III (105 students) presented 
a fashion show entitled, "Winter 
Wonderland." 

Special guests at the revue were 
students in the homemaking depart- 
ments of David Millard and Hall 
Fletcher Junior High schools, and 
Mothers of homemaking students at 
Lee Edwards High School. 

Mrs. Kennedy, the home eco- 
nomics teacher, feels that the home- 
making course as a whole, particularly 
the section devoted to family budget- 
ing, is having a desirable influence on 
early marriage. One girl at least has 
told her that she was contemplating 
marriage before she has finished her 
education until she reached the budg- 
eting section. That made her think 
and she put off her plans. 

The script, written by Helen 
Glenn, and announced by Vickie 
Greene is printed here: 




WINTER WONDERLAND OF FASHION— A skit entitled "Winter Wonderland" served as the 
setting for a showing of 105 costumes made and modeled by Homemaking Classes Two and 
Three of Lee Edwards High School. Modeling their own creations are Joan Brendle, tenth 
grader; Danna Post, 12th; Sarah Peacock, tenth; Glenna Wilson, 12th; Kay Matheson, 12th 
and Miss Fortune. 



It's wintertime and it's quietly snowing; 

While above the tree tops the wind is blowing. 

The snowflakes are making the ground glistening white 

Making ready for Christmas and Santa's visit at night. 

The outside weather may be chilly and bad 

But on the inside all hearts are happy and glad. 

The fireplace is glowing and everyone is warm 

While making preparations for a happy Christmas morn. 

The tree is glowing with ornaments so bright; 
Popcorn and gifts make decorations just right; 
Hanging Christmas cards will add to the fun 
Increasing the Christmas spirit which has just begun. 

All of this makes minds wander far away 
Dreaming and planning for the coming holiday; 
A new coat for Mom and a new tie for Dad; 
New clothes for Sis in the latest fad! 

But Sis keeps thinking of those clothes she saw today. 
If she could just buy them, she would feel quiet gay! 
Their colors were perfect; they fit like a glove — 
These for her wardrobe, she dearly would love! 

She's already priced them but the cost is too high! 

But she wants those garments so bad she could "cry! 

SHE HAS AN IDEA— a good one I'll confess! 

She's decided to make those garments because the cost will be less! 

She went out and bought materials and started to sew 
But there were too many things she just didn't know. 

WHAT COULD SHE DO NOW? 

Easy — She joined a homemaking class one day 
And became a good seamstress or so they say! 

We'll soon find out in a fashion revue 

Which the FHA is sponsoring for you. 

Watch for our star wearing clothes she has made 

And you'll find out her sewing really has paid. 



3fn JWemortam 

On January 6, 1960, as the New 
Year was beginning, Linda Wade 
Clarke, promising young daughter 
of Mr. & Mrs. Hal Clarke, and a 
member of the Junior Class of 
Celeste Henkel High School, left 
this world to enter that land of 
perfect happiness and lasting peace. 

Linda had completed the Junior 
Homemaker Degree and had 
started on the Chapter Degree. 
She was very active in the follow- 
ing clubs: Beta, FHA, Glee, FTA, 
and Science. 

We miss Linda, but our com- 
forting thought is that the grave 
can not hold God's own. We think 
of Linda at this moment as living 
more vibrantly, more joyously, and 
more abundantly than an earthly 
world could allow. 



Young Moderns CAN Make Money Behave 



Consumer Education — National Project 
of Future Homemakers of America 






The problem of personal and 
family finances may seem compara- 
tively minor to us now, but it will 
be a very real and major part of 
our world of tomorrow; and tomor- 
row follows close on the heels of 
today. Soon each of us will be leav- 
ing our present homes to make new 
lives for ourselves, whether it be in 
college, business, or our own new 
homes. And each of us will then be 
responsible for our time and money 
and how they are used. 

Often we hear "money isn't 
everything!" Money really isn't 
everything, but rather a means to 
an end, whether that end be shelter, 
food, clothing, personal luxury, or 
the advantages of an advanced edu- 
cation. Though it should not be the 
most important thing in our lives, 
money — or the lack of it — does 
cause many serious problems. Rec- 
ords show that a great number of 
divorces and broken homes stem 
from money problems. Wise man- 
agement can make our money get 
for us at least some of the things we 
want. 

Values determine how we spend 
our money. To some, higher educa- 
tion is the goal toward which their 
resources are to be directed; to 
others it may be a fine house, a 
big car, more entertainment, or more 
insurance for the future. Even one 
who has the highest values, how- 
ever, can have a careless attitude 
toward his money and will still be 
no better off financially. 



Assuming more responsibilities is 
a great part of growing up. At first 
these responsibilities include dress- 
ing ourselves and forming good 
grooming habits. Later there may 
be added the duty of some house- 
hold chores and the care of our pets. 
At our age these responsibilities 
should include managing our own 
finances. 

It is necessary to plan ahead if 
our money is to do the most good. 
This means budgeting our finances. 
Some find budgeting to be a grim 
and tiresome job; it needn't be. We 
should first take into consideration 
our income and all the things we 
want to do with it. That means 
setting aside money for routine 
needs such as lunch money, recrea- 
tion, and clothing; it also includes 
providing for special expenses which 
might arise. 



It follows logically that it makes 
good sense to keep financial rec- 
ords. This need not involve long 
hours spent struggling over big black 
ledgers with involved bookkeeping 
methods; keeping records can be a 
simple process. It can also be a 
source of personal satisfaction; even 
when our money doesn't stretch as 
far as we would like, it is some 
consolation to know where it did go. 
Anyway by keeping tabs on how 
each dollar is spent we can per- 
haps stretch them. 

One point to keep in mind is that 
most young people cannot afford to 
do all the things they would like to 
do at once. When they try, they 
often find themselves head-over- 
heels in debt. But with more wide- 
awake attitudes toward our finances 
and with better management, we 
young moderns can make our money 
behave. 

Kay Hall, State Treasurer 



Young Moderns Can Make All Resources 
Behave - With Good Management of: 

TIME ENERGY 



TALENT 



APPRECIATIONS 



SKILLS 



CREDIT 



POTENTIAL POWER 

COMMUNITY SERVICES 



ELAINE PARKER 

State Reporter 

How does it feel to be a state of- 
ficer? Just wonderful! On October 4, 
1958 when I was elected State Re- 
porter by District II, I began the 
most exciting year I have ever 
known. 

I live on a farm, just outside of 
Pollocksville, with my parents, Mr. 




and Mrs. Edward Parker, my four- 
teen year old sister, Susan, and my 
eleven year old brother, Jack. I'm 
a country "gal" and proud of it! 

I have always enjoyed participat- 
ing in school activities. I have been 
an attendant for Home Coming for 
two years, and an attendant for 
Monogram Sweetheart for three 
years. I have been a member of the 
4-H Club for eight years, and have 
held many offices. This year I am 
president of my school club and my 
community club. I am also secre- 
tary of the County Council and was 
president during 1958-59. I have 
held the office of reporter in the 
Beta Club and class editor of our 
yearbook. I am also a member of the 
Math-Science Club. In my sopho- 
more year I served as FHA chapter 
secretary. During my junior and 
senior years I have had the honor 
of serving as president. 

My trip to the National FHA 
Convention in Chicago last summer 
was one of the highlights of 1959. 
But this was just the beginning! At 
State 4-H Club Week, I was tapped 
into the State 4-H Honor Club. 
Then during our annual county fair, 



I won the title "Miss Jones County" 
of 1959-60. It is easy to see that 
this has been a most exciting year 
for me. 

I am a member of the Pollocks- 
ville Presbyterian Church. I have 
sung in the choir for eight years, 
helped in Vacation Bible School, and 
am now serving as president of my 
Senior High Fellowship. 

FHA has played a major part in 
my life. By attending rallies, state 
conventions, camp, and now serving 
as State Reporter, I have had many 
wonderful experiences. I have met 
girls from all over the state and 
made many new friends. 

I would like to urge each of you 
to continue your work in Future 
Homemakers of America. Work for 
your Junior, Chapter, and State de- 
grees! I shall cherish my degrees 
and FHA always! 



DAWN FLEMING CRISSMAN 

State Song Leader 

My name is Dawn Fleming Criss- 
man. I am seventeen years old. I 
have two sisters, Judy, who is eigh- 
teen and now a freshman at Greens- 
boro College and Daphne, who is 
nine, one brother, Fleming, who is 
six. We live on a farm with my 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Eugene 
Crissman, one mile north of Boon- 
ville, North Carolina. 

We have 4,000 chickens on our 
farm. I gather eggs and help grade 
them, ready to send to the hatchery, 
drive the tractor in hay making time 
and help in the house. 

I am a Junior at Boonville High 
School. I am the vice-president in 
our local 4-H Club, also I am rec- 
reation and song leader in the 
county. I am a member of the 
school chorus and French Club. 
And of course FHA where I am the 
song leader in our local chapter and 
FHA recreation leader in the 
county. 

I am a member of the Boonville 
Methodist Church where I sing in 
the choir and am secretary of my 
Sunday school class. I am secretary 
of the Methodist Youth Fellowship; 
also the Fellowship Chairman and 
recreational leader of the MYF in 
the Elkin-Yadkin Sub-District. 

A year ago now I was living 
through one of the most exciting 
experiences of my life, having been 
elected state song leader in FHA. 



WHO' 



On the Excci 

North Caroi 

Future- Home 



Five of our state officers have pid 
introduction to the 24,169 member A 



It was hard for me to belhe 
when Becky Nifong announced fit 
I was the new state song leacrj 
That marked the beginning of a 
happiest year of my life. 

Then came all the trips and mtt4 




ings which I attended with glfl 
pleasure. The trip to Chicago bfl 
the National Convention waH 
wonderful and exciting experiet» 
for me. I know I will never foM 
it. 

I have enjoyed FHA and I trjis- 
ure all I have learned in it dung 1 
my high school days. I know it M* 
help me all through my life ete- 
cially in homemaking and lea':r J 
ship. 



WHO 



buncil of the 
sociation of 
s of America 



ief sketch of themselves by way of 
'i0 chapter advisers. 



a Junior at Rowland High. We are 
members of the Rowland Baptist 
Church. 

My parents own a small restau- 
rant about a mile from our home 
where I have worked since it was 
opened in 1957. In October, 1959, 
an explosion wrecked the restau- 
rant and seriously injured several 
members of my family, but we plan 
to reopen Stonie's Grill in the very 
near future. 

Of course I am very much look- 
ing forward to college. Next year I 
plan to enter the Woman's College, 
U.N.C., to study Home Economics. 

Now my year as a State FHA of- 
ficer is about to become a memory. 
In March, Nancy Britt of Barnes- 
ville will become your State Treas- 
urer; I wish her much success and 
happiness. 



receive from FHA and from my 
study of Home Economics in the 
future will be of inestimable value." 
The National FHA Convention 
was a wonderful and inspiring experi- 
ence for Sammie. "The warm friend- 
ship of the other FHA girls gave the 
whole week a very special glow. 
There were so many wonderful events 
and new experiences during this 
week." 




KAY HALL 

State Treasurer 

have just begun to realize how 
y fortunate I am to be an Ameri- 
i citizen, a state FHA officer, a 




I school senior, and a girl! This 
i' has helped me to become 
Ire of my many blessings, and 
ahis I say a most sincere "Thank 
af" to all of you who have made 
ossible. 

fy home is about eight miles 
qi Rowland, where I am a Sen- 
lit a small high school of about 
1 hundred fifty students. I have 
I older brothers, both married, 
i a sixteen-year-old sister who is 



SAMMIE GATLIN 

State Vice-President 

Sammie Gatlin, your State Vice- 
President for 1959-1960, is a junior 
at Franklinville High School. Seven- 
teen-year-old Sammie is the oldest 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Sam Gat- 
lin and she has two sisters, fifteen- 
year-old Jean and eight-year-old 
Beth. 

Sammie, an A student, has mem- 
bership in many clubs and organiza- 
tions which includes the following: 
Beta Club, French Club, Mono- 
gram Club, and Music Club. Sam- 
mie has been in the 4-H Club for 
five years and during this time she 
has won several awards, ribbons, 
and certificates. Basketball has 
taken much of Sammie's time for 
the past three years. She has earned 
her high school letter, but she still 
gets in plenty of "bench warming." 
FHA is Sammie's number one ac- 
tivity. She has been chapter song 
leader and is now serving as 
treasurer of her chapter. Sammie 
holds her Junior and Chapter de- 
grees, and is now working on her 
State degree. She says, "FHA is the 
most rewarding of all my activities. 
Nothing has given me deeper satis- 
faction or such a sense of achieve- 
ment. I realize that FHA is doing 
much for me now, and I know that 
the benefits and assets that I will 




Sammie had the pleasure of at- 
tending FHA camp at White Lake 
one summer. This proved to be 
profitable as well as enjoyable. 

In the annual "Voice of Democ- 
racy" essay contest, Sammie was 
placed first in her school and also first 
in her county. 

"In October I had the oppor- 
tunity to attend the 'Family Life 
Council' in Durham. Through this 
experience I have gained im- 
measurable knowledge and under- 
standing of the problems that af- 
fect family life." 

Sammie and her family attend the 
Franklinville Baptist Church where 
all are active members. Sammie en- 
joys her church work very much. 
She is a member of the choir, the 
Young Woman's Auxiliary, and the 
Training Union. Sammie is pianist 
for the Intermediate Department in 
Sunday school and for the Young 
People's Department in Training 
Union. She is also an eager partici- 
pant in the annual Youth Week pro- 
gram of her church. 

Sammie has attended two state 
conventions and she is looking for- 
ward to March and the 1960 con- 

( Continued on Inside Back Cover) 



Freda's Saturday Radio 
Show—FHA— WOHS 



Freda: Opening and introduction. 

Then, Mrs. Holton, what actually 
is F.H.A.? 

Mrs. Holton: Future Homemak- 
ers of America; under U. S. Dept. 
of Health, Education, and Welfare; 
membership is optional to girls and 
boys who are studying or have 
studied homemaking education in 
secondary schools; there are ap- 
proximately 500 thousand members 
in all of the fifty states plus Puerto 
Rico and the Virgin Islands. 

Freda: Catherine, from an 
FHA'ers point of view, what are 
some of the projects that are being 
carried out nationally by the Future 
Homemakers? 

Catherine: I can best sum up 
what FHA'ers do by telling you 
about our motto and its significance 
to all Future Homemakers: The 
motto is "Toward New Horizons." 
This motto is a challenge. It re- 
minds members that their contribu- 
tions to home life today will in- 
fluence the kinds of homes they will 
have tomorrow; and that the family 
life of the members will influence 
the community and ultimately the 
world. I would also like to add that 
this year the organization has put 
into action a new national project. 
Youth Can Do. This project will be 
in continuous use for three years in 
all state associations. 

Mrs. Holton: The National Pro- 
gram of Work for 1959-62 includes 
four objectives with suggested proj- 
ects under each. 

Freda: Thank you. Now I would 
please list these in order to give us 
a clearer picture of the work that 
will be carried on for the coming 
years in our local chapters? 

Mrs. Holton: (Explains objectives 
and projects.) 

Freda: Thank you. Now I would 
like for us to learn more about your 
activities as members of the 
National Executive Council? Cath- 
erine. 



Catherine: As National Treasurer 
of the Future Homemakers of 
America, I have really been busy 
during the last few months. 

Freda: I understand that you and 
Mrs. Holton, have really become al- 
most District of Columbians. Piease 
tell us about your first trip to Wash- 
ington. I believe that you were both 
delegates to the Citizenship Confer- 
ence, weren't you? 

(This report was in the Decem- 
ber issue of the North Carolina 
Future Homemakers of America 
Magazine.) 



would you please tell us a little 
about her office and the State Ex- 
ecutive Council? 

Mrs. Holton: Certainly, Freda. 
Catherine is State Historian and Presi- 
dent of District VIII Rally. Here she 
presided over a meeting in the Fall 
at Hendersonville where about 
1,000 girls attended. She went to 
Raleigh last August to make plans 
for the State Convention which 
will be held in Raleigh this spring. 
You might also be interested to 
know that Catherine has written 
articles for the State FHA Maga- 
zine, the National Magazine, Teen 
Times, and also for the Progressive 
Farmer, McCall's Magazine and a 
new Youth Christian publication. 
Frankly, Freda, I don't see how 
Catherine does so much, and you 
know she is a student at Shelby 
High and is taking 6 subjects. 

Freda: Believe it or not, that's 
ture, I happen to know about her 
wonderful record. Tell me, Mrs. 
Holton, hasn't Shelby had a lot of 
publicity with all the Future Home- 
maker honors? 




RADIO INTERVIEW — Miss Freda Lynch, center, "Pace" Reporter for Shelby High School, 
is shown above interviewing Mrs. Harriet Holton, left, Shelby High Home Economics teacher 
and local adviser of the FHA, and Miss Katherine Blanton, right, who is national treasurer of 
the Future Homemakers of America and president of the local FHA. Miss Lynch is heard each 
Saturday at 12:15 over WOHS. 



Freda: All of that sounds won- 
derful! It doesn't seem as if you 
left one stone unturned. I do un- 
derstand that you both returned to 
Washington for a second time. 
Catherine, would you please tell us 
about this trip? 

Catherine: (Tells about Execu- 
tive Council Meeting.) 

Freda: Mrs. Holton, I also under- 
stand that Catherine is serving this 
year as a State FHA Officer — 



Mrs. Holton: Yes, Freda, it is 
good for our school and city. We 
were interviewed on Don McNeil's 
Breakfast Club in Chicago, Cath- 
erine was on coast-to-coast TV 
news, movie-tone news and none of 
this has gone to her head. She is 
one of the most wonderful students 
I have ever worked with. One more 
thing. I believe you would be in- 
terested in. Our State Magazine, 
which is published in Raleigh, gave 



Shelby a big plug in November. 
Carol Dare said that Shelby was not 
only famous for governors, but also 
for FHA National Officers. She re- 
minded her readers that Nancy 
Rosenthal was National FHS Secre- 
tary three years ago and now Nancy 
is majoring in home economics at 
Cornell. Then, Catherine is carry- 
ing away all the honors now as Na- 
tional FHA Treasurer. Approxi- 
mately one-half million members are 
in the national organization. Well, 
figure it out for yourself. We are 
either lucky or we have some out- 
standing students at Shelby High — 
maybe it is both of them. 

Freda: Thank you, Mrs. Holton. 
Catherine, I understand that your 
duties as national treasurer are not 
at a stand still now after your trips 
to Washington. Tell me, what oc- 
cupies your time as national 
treasurer? 

Catherine: You are certainly 
right, Freda. My work has just be- 
gun. I am now doing the desk-work, 
as it might be called. As national 
treasurer, I am also Chairman of 
the National Finance Committee for 
1959-60. Each year the chairman 
carries on a project concerning fi- 
nances of related fields. This year I 
am working with eight committee 
members from eight different states 
all over the nation. I also have 
thirty-two sub-committee members, 
who work under the eight committee 
members. As all my work is carried 
on through correspondence, it is my 
duty to formulate my project and 
to send letters to my committee. This 
year, my project is to revise a list of 
lucrative, educational, and purposeful 
projects. This list will later be made 
available to all chapters for their 
use in establishing workable budg- 
ets. I am anxiously awaiting the re- 
sults of my survey. The response 
from all those working with me has 
been wonderful. 

Freda: Thank you. I really wish 
that we had longer to talk, but it 
seems that time has just about run 
out. Is there a closing comment that 
either of you would like to add? 

Catherine: As you can readily 
see, I have been rather busy — 
traveling, meeting new people, ex- 
changing ideas, and returning home 
very tired, but overcome with appre- 
ciation to the vast number of people 
who have made all of this possible 
for me. As the days and years pass 
and my memory becomes dull be- 



cause of this passage of time, re- 
maining vividly will be the remem- 
brance of my marvelous year as 
National Treasurer of the Future 
Homemakers of America. 

Mrs. Holton: Freda, we have en- 
joyed talking to you today and we 
hope that some of our comments 
will help your listeners see the chal- 
lenge which confronts the youth of 
our nation in the changing world. 
Surely, the homes of tomorrow are 
in the hands of the youth today. 

Freda: Closing. . . . 




The Etowah FHA Chapter has 
been making Christmas stockings to 
be distributed to the Henderson 
County retarded children. In addition 
to making the stockings for the chil- 
dren, they also made gifts for the 
children to give to their mothers. 
The mothers received these gifts 
when they attended the Children's 
Christmas Party. 

The Richlands Chapter of Future 
Homemakers has been busy since 
school began. We initiated forty- 
five girls in the fall. 

In October we entered an exhibit 
in the Onslow County Fair. Our ex- 
hibit emphasized safety precautions 
in health. 

When wool garments were fin- 
ished in the second year class, 
we put on a fashion show as a 
chapel program. The show was put 
on in a very unique way using Daisy 
Mae and Little Abner (of the comic 
strip) as leading characters to add 
a bit of humor to the show. We 
were asked to give our fashion show 
in P.T.A. Everyone thoroughly en- 
joyed the show. We received many 
compliments on our suits and dresses 
at the time and are still getting them. 

Six of our FHA girls served at 
the NCEA Banquet held in Decem- 
ber at our school. We always enjoy 
getting to serve at a banquet and 
we learn by doing it. 

Our chapter remembered the four 
retired teachers in our community. 
To two of them we gave boxes of 
home-made candy, and for two of 
them we made attractive Christmas 
trees from tooth picks and styro- 



foam. They were very happy that 
we had remembered them. One of 
the teachers has been confined to 
her bed since June. This is what she 
wrote us, "Thanks so much for the 
Christmas tree. It has made my 
Christmas more cheerful and I have 
enjoyed it a lot." 

In October two of our chap- 
ter members, Anne Barbee and 
Miriam Taylor sponsored through 
our FHA the UNICEF project. 
Through their efforts we were able 
to send to headquarters a check for 
$12 to be used for needy children. 

As most of you probably remem- 
ber, it was cold the Tuesday before 
Christmas, but the FHA girls in 
Franklinville were warmed by the 
smiles of the old and invalids to 
whom they were caroling. 

First we got in the spirit by put- 
ting a Christmas window display of 
clothes, stuffed animals, and toys in 
a downtown store. 

For one particular family in a 
near-by city, Santa Claus didn't wear 
a red suit and whiskers. In fact, 
Santa wasn't even of the masculine 
gender, for he appeared to that 
family in the form of FHA girls. 

As one of our projects, our chap- 
ter sponsored a needy family's 
Christmas. The family, whose name 
was obtained through the local wel- 
fare department, consisted of a 
mother and five children — four 
boys and a girl. 

Collections of clothing, food, and 
toys were made by the FHA'ers. 
Two nights before Christmas, the 
gifts were taken to the home of the 
family. A warm friendly reception 
awaited the visiting girls as they 
played the role of Santa's helpers. 
The delighted looks on the faces of 
the mother and five children 
warmed our hearts and helped to 
show us the real meaning of giving 
at Christmas. 

The fourth Sunday in January 
was hard on our feet but helpful to 
the National Polio March. Our 
members turned out in numbers to 
collect money from our neighbors 
and friends in the Polio March 
FHA. 

Our club is planning to sponsor 
a Grandparents Night Banquet. We 
shall present small gifts and show 
them how our club is helping us be 
better citizens of our community 
now and better mothers later. 



Growing as a Future Homemaker of America 



Degree Applicants Gain a Greater Appreciation for 

"Good" Homes and "Wholesome" Family Living 

As They Strive to Achieve Goals of the Organization 



Excerpts from the application re- 
port of Juanita Ann Alkazin, Scot- 
land Neck Chapter — 1959. 



"Making a home a happy and 
comfortable place to live is an art 
and science. It involves knowing 
how to do many things. The prob- 
lems and skills of homemaking 
come under the general heading of 
home economics. 

"It unifies knowledge from many 
fields in solving home-life problems. 
It draws on science, art, social 
science, psychology, and mathemat- 
ics. It makes instruction personal 
for students by teaching them how 
to dress becomingly, eat better, care 
for their homes, and live happily 
with their families. It also teaches 
the importance of good citizenship 
and of taking an active part in 
social and civic affairs. The home 
economics teacher is an adviser, a 
pal and a problem - solver. She 
teaches the facts of life to eager 
youths. Her job is a hard one that 
brings her the satisfaction of having 
played a part in developing our na- 
tion's future. 

"In my family, home life has 
been very important. We are a close 
family and take pride in this. It is 
hard to put in words the pride I 
have for my family. As the time for 
me to leave home draws closer, we 
have spent more time together. This 
close union of ours has meant a lot 
to me and probably will have bar- 
ing on my future. 

"My mother is active in club work 
and is president of the BPW Club 
of our town. My father owns a grill. 
My brother who is only 15 years 
old has a great talent for drawing 
and painting. He has done a por- 
trait of my father which was very 
good. My love for my family has 
been expressed by my willingness 
to work for my family, especially 
in time of an emergency. I con- 
tribute my abilities and achieve- 

8 



ments to my home training and cor- 
rect guidance in school. 

"I must give home economics the 
honor of making me more con- 
scious of my interests and abilities. 
Without this course I could not have 
been able to take these responsi- 




JUANITA ANN ALKAZIN 
Scotland Neck Chapter 

bilities as I did. The true value of 
homemaking is essential to every 
girl for her success as a woman in 
the world today." 

Consumer Education 

"In our family it is the custom to 
buy when it is needed. Many times 
during Christmas we give needed 
items of clothing. Mother has been 
on a diet and has been loosing 
weight. Therefore, she needs some 
new spring or summer outfits. We 
are at present making her two out- 
fits and as she needs clothes she 
makes them. Mother and I both 
sew and since we are both hard to 
fit, we make just about all of our 
clothes. Brother's needs were satis- 
fied by a gift of a sweater, coat, 
and shirts. David and I buy sweat- 



ers that we both can wear, for we 
bodi wear the same size. 

"At present I am concerned about 
going to college. Since I have en- 
tered high school my parents have 
been preparing me for college. At 
different occasions, I have received 
my set of luggage and a clock radio. 
On every item of clothing we have 
put a good hem or seam for a longer 
wear and they are made out of 
good quality materials. This year we 
started saving for my class ring 
which I will receive this year. To 
sum things up, my greatest need 
now is for the future, for which 
we are preparing. 

"During this past summer I had 
the responsibilities of keeping house 
and managing mother's store for 
seven weeks. If anything should 
happen to my mother or father I 
feel like I could run the home ef- 
ficiently enouah until I could get 
aid." 



The Number One Man in My Life 

"Here stands a figure of a man 
in front of his store. An everyday 
scene, but what is so special about 
this man? Like many other men he 
is about five feet 8 inches, heavy 
set, a little gray at the temple, and 
bald on top of his head — a 60-year- 
old man who has seen life in its 
splendor and in its hardship. 

His life began in a little Mediter- 
ranean country in 1897. Being a 
member of a large family it was a 
hard life. His early family life was 
a split one. Very early in his child- 
hood his father and some of the 
children came to America. At the 
age of nine, he and the rest of his 
family followed. From a quiet, 
peaceful town they came to bustling 
New York. Upon father's arrival here 
he was placed in the 5th grade, but 
only to stay in school till he reached 
the 8th grade. For a large family, it 
was a heavy burden on the father, so 
our mystery man went to work to help 
support the family. That was his 
hardship, working and slaving for 
his parents. Many years later, his 
parents died and were buried in At- 
lantic City. 

After 35 years in Atlantic City, 



he came to Scotland Neck to open his 
store, still unmarried. Then he be- 
gan corresponding with a widow in 
Mississippi. On March 2, 1941, he 
was married. On January 17, 1942, 
a girl was born. Poor Dad! Was he 
down-hearted because he had ex- 
pected it to be a boy. Two years 
later along came a boy. Heaven 
help us! What a boy! He did win 
a dollar off the doctor on this one. 
Now he has been in Scotland Neck 
for 22 years. 

Here we are at the beginning. 
There stands a figure of a man in 
front of his store. You have seen 
his life in hardship and splendor. 
A character, whom once you meet, 
you'll never forget. Maybe 60 years 
old, but deep down he is just like 
a kid. As any boy who has worked for 
him in the last 22 years. He hasn't 
changed except for that bald spot on 
top. That's right! Ask any boy and he 
will tell you that Dad is still the 
understanding patriarch. When the 
boys need money, advice, or help, 
there he is with his helping hand. 
If we don't watch him, he'll give 
his shirt off his back. Of course, 
there are bad sides to his character. 
Not being able to keep a secret 
heads the list of his vices. One night 
we were entertaining guests. Mother 
had told him about something that 
was to be kept quiet. At the table 

he began, "Did you know ...?" 

Mother changed the subject, "I like 
that dress you have on." Again he 

started, "How about ?" Mother 

finally kicked him. "What have I 
done now?" he replied. One of the 
women said, "Can't you see, she 
wants you to shut up." Like a child 
it just about killed him. 

To know this man, you must have 
the skill of a mind-reader. For in- 
stance, the other day at the table 
he told my brother to get rid of 
this. He did not explain what "this" 
was. Finally, we found out he wanted 
Brother to have a hair cut. 

Strong and hefty as a 16-year- 
old boy, he is ready to go a round or 
two anytime. But loving the outdoors, 
he finds it hard to stay in; so, if you 
find a sign on the door "closed," he 
is probably home in the yard or 
gabbing somewhere. 

Yes, there stands a man who 
when he wants something, will not 
stop until he has it. A man whose 
every dream is fulfilled. He has a 
place in which to enjoy the com- 
forts of home, a family, a devoted 



wife, and a business to support his 
family. Maybe at times, he is a 
little strict or old-fashioned; but, he 
is still the number one man in my 
life. 

Let me tell you about my dad 
Who whips me when I'm bad. 
Who provides me with bread and 

butter 
With never a word to utter. 
Through each and every page, 
I have told his life age. 
The number one man in my life 
Is "my dad." 



you so very much for giving me this 
opportunity and honor." 



A Well Chosen Home Project Can 

Bring Satisfaction to a Future 

Homemaker and Her Family 

A unit on Housing and a gift 
of a painting set resulted in an in- 
teresting home project for Sandy 
Strader, enrolled in a home eco- 
nomics class at Cobb Memorial 
High School. 

One major reason for selecting 
this project was as Sandy stated, 
"This was an inexpensive way to 
acquire some new pictures for my 
room." 

Some learnings she expected to 
achieve as she worked with oil paint 
on the pictures were: 

1. To follow instructions 

2. To paint carefully and stay 
within the lines 

3. To avoid geting paint on self 
or furnishings 

4. To avoid wasting paint 

5. To make a schedule of work- 
ing time 

6. Time to start and stop: plus se- 
lecting a place with good lighting. 



WHO'S WHO 

Continued from page 5 

vention. The state convention last 
spring marked a milestone in her 
life and March will mark another. 
Sammie remarks, "Words can never 
express what I have gained as a state 
officer. The association with the 
other officers and with all the other 
gracious and wonderful people af- 
filiated with this FHA organization 
does much to build character, per- 
sonality, and a genuine respect for 
humanity. My deepest and most 
sincere desire is that each of you 
might have a share in the experi- 
ences of your state officers. Thank 



ANNE ALPHINE 
State Secretary 

'Til never forget that day in San- 
ford, at the District IV rally when 
I was elected your State Secretary. 

It was the happiest day of my life. 
In fact, this whole year has been 
like living in fantasy. Attending the 
National Convention in Chicago, 
111. during the summer and presid- 
ing over the District IV rally this 
fall have been thrills that are un- 
explainable. I've met many won- 




derful FHA girls and learned a 
great deal about the Future Home- 
makers of America. To me, the 
FHA is the best organized club in 
any school today." 

Your State Secretary, Anne Al- 
phine, is 16 years old and is a 
junior at Dunn High School. She 
lives with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. 
Jesse Alphine. She is the oldest of 
four children. She has a sister, Kay, 
and two brothers, Clifton and Er- 
nest. 

Last year she was the Dunn chap- 
ter president and Harnett County 
vice-president. This year she is serv- 
ing as Harnett's FHA president. 

Anne's other activities include 
the Beta Club, FTA, Student 
Council, and Sanitation Committee 
chairman for her school. She is the 
assistant pianist and organist for the 
church that she attends. 

"Working with FHA these years 
has helped me to decide on a fu- 
ture with home economics. At the 
present time, I am planning to at- 
tend Woman's College in Greens- 
boro to further my education." 



IK- ■:'llPft ?S i 



Future Homemakers of America 



CREED 

We are the Future Homemakers of America 
We face the future with warm courage, 
And high hope, 

For we have the clear consciousness of seeking 
Old and precious values. 

For we are the builders of homes, 

Homes for America's future. 

Homes where living will be the expression of everything 

That is good and fair. 

Homes where truth and love and security and faith 

Will be realities, not dreams. 

We are the Future Homemakers of America, 
We face the future with warm courage, 
And high hope. 




"The homes of tomorrow are in 

the hand of the youth 

of today" 




Caroline says: 



"Do you know that your thoughts rule your life, Be 
they pure or impure in the strife? As you think — so you 
are, And you make or you mar Your success in the world 
By your Thoughts." 

"You can never tell what your THOUGHTS will do 
In bringing you hate or love; for THOUGHTS ARE 
THINGS, and their airy wings Are swifter than carrier 
doves. They follow the law of the universe, — EACH 
THING MUST CREATE ITS KIND: And they speed 
o'er the track to bring you back Whatever went out 
from your mind." 

Anonymous 

Taken from: Something To Live By 

By: Dorothea S. Kopplin 



"I 
J 



Miur. 1'ihiihi si \n mucins 



Sommie Gailmg Franklin- ne Jordan, Cary, Vice-President. Standing from left to right 

Faye Smith, B F Grody, Treasurer, Sue Wallace, Bath, Reporter; Nancy Evans, Eost Mecklenburg, 
Song Leader; Suson Chandler, Weaverville, Parliamentarian, ond Elaine Renegar, Hormony, Historian. 




iiiiiiiiwnii'iiii'iMi 



i 



North Carolina Association 



VOLUME XVII 





NUMBER 4 



■ 





\ 



Vm&T QUALITIES MEM LOOK 
FOR VH SELECTING k W»F£ 




Chapter Program— Fuquay Springs 



The Future Homemakers of 
America meeting held March six- 
teenth in the high school auditorium 
featured an all-male panel discus- 
sion on "The Qualities Men Desire 
When Selecting a Wife." This pro- 
gram was planned to emphasize all 
of the club's purposes and to help 
each girl improve herself. 

Fred Manley, popular vocational 



agriculture teacher at Fuquay 
Springs High School, moderated the 
panel. Also expressing their views 
on the pertinent questions for dis- 
cussion were the following teachers 
and students: Howard Cayton, a 
teacher of seventh-grade health and 
physical education; Fred L. Hunt, 
vocational agriculture teacher; Le- 
onidas Betts, a high school Eng- 



lish teacher; Skipper Phelps, an out- 
standing Junior; and Richard Engle, 
president of the Student Council. 

From a list of previously prepared 
questions, the panel was first asked 
about the importance of a woman's 
physical beauty when a man is con- 
sidering her for his wife. They 
agree that although physical beauty 
was important, of more importance 
is an attractive personality. The re- 
ligious, economic, and social back- 
ground of the boy and girl, accord- 
ing to the panel, should be similar. 
The panel also agreed that there is 
no magic age for a boy and girl to 
be married but that this depends en- 
tirely on the maturity of the couple. 

"Definitely!" was the only com- 
ment when the men were asked if 
they expected their wives to be able 
to carry out homemaking activities. 
In regard to the most desired per- 
sonal character trait, it was the con- 
sensus of the panel that unselfish- 
ness is most often sought when men 
are looking for a wife. "Party" girls 
will never be seriously considered 
for marriage but will only be re- 
membered when a man desires a 
good time. 

Mr. Manley began a summation 
of the points discussed, but was un- 
able to finish because of the lack of 
time. 



North Carolina Association of Future Homemakers of America 



State Officers 
1959-60 

President — Nancy Edwards, Wingate VI 

Vice-President — Sammie Gatlin, Franklinville V 

Secretary — Anne Alphine, Dunn IV 

Treasurer — Kay Hall, Rowland III 

Reporter — Elaine Parker, Jones Central II 

Parliamentarian — Celia Clark, Robersonville I 

Historian — Catherine Blanton, Shelby VIII 

Song Leader — Dawn Crissman, Boonville VII 



District Advisers 
1959-60 

Mrs. Rachel F. Swindell, Bath I 

Mrs. Julia P. Kennedy, Moss Hill II 

Mrs. Berline R. Baldwin, Clarkton III 

Mrs. Pearl Stroud, Dunn IV 

Mrs. Gwendolyn Griffin, High Point Sr. V 

Mrs. Betsy R. Blankenship, East Mecklenburg VI 

Mrs. June G. Reichle, Davie Co. Cons. VII 

Mrs. Frances S. Bartlett, North Buncombe VIII 



State Adviser 

Mrs. Faye T. Coleman 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 

Division of Vocational Education 
Raleigh, North Carolina 



APRIL 3-9, 1960 

Memorable Days in the Life of 
Future Homemakers in North Carolina 



Values of this organization with its 
clearly defined purposes and objectives 
were demonstrated and illustrated in com- 
munities in all areas of the state as most 
of the 460 chapters in North Carolina ob- 
served National FHA Week in very spe- 
cial ways. 

STANLY COUNTY FHA CHAPTERS 
HAVE INTENSIVE PROGRAM 

How does it feel to be county officers 
of Future Homemakers of America of 
Stanly County? Just wonderful. However, 
it is mixed feeling, one of appreciation, 
one of obligation, and a feeling of the 
need of self-improvement and training. 

The county officers feel very grateful 
to have been chosen as a representative 
group from each chapter in the county, 
meeting together from time to time plan- 
ning county programs, sharing ideas, and 
enjoying fine fellowship. We are proud 
of our organization and what it stands for 
in every girl's life. 

In recognition of the world we live in 
and National Future Homemakers of 
America Week where there are Future 
Homemakers who believe that better 
homes will make a stronger nation, and 
that better understanding between na- 
tions will make a peaceful world. I, 
Evelyn Moore, your Stanly County FHA 



President, urge you Future Homemakers 
to work for these great intangibles and 
to begin with the materials at hand — 
yourselves, ycur families, and your 
homes. 

Home is a special kind of word in any 
language. To the Badin members of Fu- 
ture Homemakers of America home is as 
integral a part of their activities and 
purposes as it is of their name. 

The members have tried hard to de- 
vise projects to use their knowledge and 
skills in all different areas of homemak- 
ing. Programs have been planned to de- 
velop a better understanding of the family 
members and to contribute to their well- 
being. The officers met in August and 
planned and printed a yearbook and set 
up tentative programs. 

Future Homemakers of Richfield have 
shared in various activities which have 
given them some insight into aspects of 
homemaking. 

In October they planned for the follow- 
ing year and joined in fellowship singing. 
Initiation in November provided a chance 
for clean fun. At the Christmas program, 
demonstrations were given on Christmas 
decorations. The January meeting was 
rather unusual. During the evening the 
home economics department became a 
temporary gymnasium. In February mem- 
bers experimented with cookies and 
punch. 



Linda Brantley, Nancy Brannon, and Esther Williams exercise their abilities for talking as 
they rehearse for a radio piogram, which was given on "Publicity Day" Monday. The Bailey 
Chapter participated in various activities during the week as they celebrated the 15th birthday 
of Future Homemakers of America, in conjunction with National FHA Week. 




The county officer. Ann Crowell, rep- 
resented the Richfield FHA in the Christ- 
mas parade. The float which she and the 
other officers of the county rode was 
very attractive. The girls' sense of balance 
was severely tested in the course of jolts, 
stops, and starts. 

The Oakboro FHA has been active this 
year, participating in all the rallies. First 
was the county rally held at Norwood. 
Next was the district rally held at Wades- 
boro. The last and most important rally 
was the state rally held at Raleigh. 

This year started a new point system. 
The girl who accumulates the largest 
number of points wins a trip to FHA 
Camp. 

The first meeting of the year for the 
Norwood chapter was an impressive 
candlelight installation and emblem cere- 
mony. Initiation was the chief topic for 
October when the new members provided 
entertainment. The club tried to spread 
a little Christmas cheer by going caroling 
through the community. 

With the new year, the girls' thoughts 
turned to their personal appearance. They 
invited Miss Elizabeth Ann Byrd. a for- 
mer Norwood FHA'er, who had just com- 
pleted a beauty course, to visit them. She 
showed the members how to set and 
comb a hair style that would be popular 
for special occasions. She also demon- 
strated the proper use and selection of 
make-up. 

Club projects have included a scrap- 
book of cartoons which was presented to 
the Stanly County Hospital for use in 
the lounges. The club also sold home 
products to help finance their projects. 

In June, all of the officers of the New 
London School attended the County FHA 
V/orkshop which was held at the school. 

During the Christmas season, the club 
made favors for the trays for the patients 
at the Stanly County Hospital. Another 
project which the club plans to complete 
by the end of the school year is the pur- 
chasing of rubber toys for the Murdock 
School for Retarded Children. 

Personal improvement and understand- 
ing foreign friends has been a keynote 
of the meetings held and planned during 
this year for the Albemarle chapter. Some 
of the girls joined with the New London 
Chapter in exhibiting an interesting ap- 
proach toward solving family problems at 
home, entitled "Have Problem — Will 
Talk," which won second place at the 
Stanly County Fair. 

Seven of the girls attended the state 
convention. Following the convention 
daily activities which emphasized FHA 
week were as follows: 

Teachers received red roses which were 
placed on their desks. 

Bulletin boards around the school 
helped to support the FHA emblem and 
creed. 

Coffee and doughnuts were served to 
the teachers in the office before class. 

All of the girls wore red and white 
ribbons with the FHA emblem on their 
sweaters and blouses. 

Last fall the Endy-Oakboro Future 
Homemakers exhibit won first place at 
the county fair. The booth was centered 
by a bride and groom with two paths 
leading away. One showed footprints of 
selfishness, alcohol, nagging, high school 
marriages, jealousy, no religion, and un- 
faithfulness. The other path featured foot- 
prints of family worship. Golden Rule, 



1 



similar background, honesty, trust, un- 
derstanding and love. 

Individual project work has not been 
neglected by the girls this year. At Christ- 
mas time some members made cookies 
and paid a visit to five different homes 
in the community where there are shut- 
ins. They said they chose to do this to let 
the shut-ins know that the young people 
had not forgotten them, and also to learn 
some of the problems that confront these 
people. 

Under Carolyn Drake's leadership. 
Stanfield's Chapter of Future Homemak- 
ers of America used for their theme for 
this year "Learning About FHA." 

Last year at the June workshop, held 
at New London High School, the girls, 
learned about the responsibility of the 
FHA officers. They have applied what 
they learned this year in their respective 
offices. 



and FFA played games and danced at 
the party. 

A "hobo" day and bake sale concluded 
the annual celebration Saturday. The pro- 
ceeds will be used to make a contribution 
to the Bailey Volunteer Fire Department, 
and to send a delegate to the National 
FHA Convention in Washington. D. C. 

The 138 members of the Benvenue 
Chapter highlighted the observance with 
their annual Mother-Daughter banquet at 
Buck Overton's Tuesday evening. Jasper 
Smith, comptroller of North Carolina 
Wesleyan College, was the guest speaker. 
His topic was "These Changing Times." 

Mrs. Fred T. Langford and Mrs. 
George V. Safy, sponsors of the FHA 
group, presented certificates and pins to 
59 girls in recognition of achievements in 
the FHA degree program. 

Members of the Coopers chapter made 
posters featuring FHA slogans, prepared 



Homemakers of America celebrated Na- 
tional FHA Week April 3-9. Each day 
the girls had a special project which they 
carried out. Friday was "Club Grand- 
mother Winnie Laughridge Day." "Miss 
Winnie" was presented an FHA compact, 
flowers and a gift "for one who had 
everything" — a large box wrapped like 
a letter was presented by Claudia Aber- 
nethy. This contained stationery, stamps, 
all occasion cards and postal cards. 

When the FHA girls arrived at her 
home she surprised them with delightful 
refreshments — so typical of the FHA 
Grandmother. Mrs. Laughridge is a State 
Honorary FHA member. She received this 
honor in Raleigh three years ago. 

Other activities for the week were as 
follows: 

Church FHA Day. Ministers were sent 
letters and were asked to recognize our 
club during their announcements. 



NASH CHAPTERS JOINED EN 
OBSERVING NATIONAL FHA 
WEEK, APRIL 3-9 

The Bailey FHA chapter celebrated 
the 15th birthday of Future Homemakers 
of America as they observed National 
FHA Week. Preparations for the annual 
celebration began several weeks ago by 
the appointment of a committee to make 
plans for various activities during the 
week. The committee devoted much time 
in planning the various activities to carry 
out the purposes of the organization. 

Activities included: chapter participa- 
tion in the group worship at the Bailey 
Baptist church on Sunday. 

Members served as usherettes, pianists, 
and the group singing a special selection, 
"The FHA Prayer." Maxine Liles read 
the scripture, followed by a special prayer 
by Linda Manning for the FHA Worship 
service. The chapter displayed an ar- 
rangement of flowers, consisting of red 
roses, the chapter flower. 

Monday was devoted to publicity for 
the FHA organization. The day began 
when the president and committee chair- 
man presented the principal of Bailey 
High school a red rose and requested that 
he proclaim the week of April 3-9 as 
National FHA Week. 

Posters were displayed on bulletin 
boards and store windows in Bailey to 
make everyone aware of National FHA 
Week. 

Community Day was observed Tues- 
day, as the FHA'ers made cookies and 
took time out from their schedule to visit 
friends in their community who were con- 
fined to their homes. 

Wednesday, the Bailey chapter ob- 
served "Teacher Appreciation Day" by 
honoring the high school faculty at a 
luncheon. Each class was given a basket 
by the FHA members to be used in a 
clean-up campaign. All FHA'ers came to 
school dressed in the colors of their or- 
ganization, red and white. 

Thursday was set aside as family day 
and was observed by each member of 
the FHA chapter taking part in some 
responsibility normally assumed by their 
mothers. Each family was encouraged to 
plan some type of recreation for the 
evening. 

Friday night's program was postponed 
until Saturday night. The Bailey FHA 




A group of FHA members from the Davie County Consolidated High School making plans to 
celebrate National FHA Week. The members made their blazers. They are from left to right 
standing: Jean Alexander, Linda Foster, Carolyn Soin, Jane White. Seated: Thresa Foster, 
Mary Lois Nichols, Barbara Foster, and Linda Boger. 



bulletin boards at the school, and planted 
red rose bushes. 

During the year, FHA members sent 
cards and flowers to families in which 
there was death or sickness. At Christ- 
mas, the young homemakers decorated 
the cafeteria, the principal's office, and 
the home economics department. 

Twenty Coopers girls earned the junior 
degree and 16 earned the chapter degree 
during the year. 

Next month, the Coopers chapter will 
present a fashion show at the meeting 
of the Parent-Teachers Association. The 
girls will model garments made in home 
economics classes. 

The Middlesex FHA group made plans 
for its annual Mother-Daughter banquet, 
highlight of the year's activities. 

In December, the chapter sponsored a 
talent contest with top honors to Phyllis 
Hales for her piano solo. 

The Shelby Chapter of the Future 



Bulletin boards decorated by club girls 
and refreshments served to the faculty 
in Home Economics Laboratory. 

Story in paper, pictures made; the 
chapter presented a flash camera to home- 
making department. 

Chapel program on FHA with panel 
discussing "Teen-Age Problems." 

Wear red and white day. Emblems 
made for each member. 

"Miss Winnie Day," Club Grand- 
mother. 

"Do a good deed day." 

The Davie FHA Chapter observed Na- 
tional FHA Week by choosing a chapter 
project for each day of the week. (1) 
All ministers in the county recognized 
the FHA members attending church in a 
group and they mentioned that it was the 
beginning of National FHA Week. (2) 
A devotional for the student body and a 
chat about our organization was given to 
(Continued on Cover 2) 



STATE WINNER inthe 
BETTY CROCKER— 

Search for the Home- 
maker of Tomorrow 



Carol Anne Pyles, daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Paul E. Pyles of Cary, 
received the highest rating in a 
written examination on homemak- 
ing knowledge and attitudes admin- 
istered to 10,112 senior girls in 395 
schools throughout the state. She will 
receive a $1,500 scholarship from 
General Mills and become a candi- 
date with 49 other state winners for 
the title of Ail-American Home- 
maker of tomorrow. 

Carol Anne has been an active 
FHA'er for three years at which 
time she has served on numerous 
committees. She always has been a 
willing, dependable worker. Carol 
Anne says, "FHA has helped stimu- 
late my interest in the art of home- 
making. I have learned through 
working on various Future Home- 
Maker committees that careful plan- 
ning and thought are essential to a 
well-rounded person. This has given 
me poise and confidence that I have 
needed as President of the Student 
Body." 

In the homemaking field Carol 
Anne is especially interested in 
clothing construction and makes 
most of her own clothing. One of 
her clothing projects was an attrac- 
tive Easter outfit. 

In addition to being in the Future 
Homemakers of America, Carol 
Anne is in the Future Teachers of 
America, Beta Club, on the Year- 
book staff, and President of the 
Cary High Student Body. She is a 
member and regularly attends the 
Cary Methodist Church. 

She plans to enter the Woman's 
College of the University of North 
Carolina next fall and hopes to be 
a high school teacher when she 
graduates. Carol Anne feels prepa- 
ration for college has already been 
made by the good, down-to-earth 
experience gained especially from 
her Future Homemaker chapter and 
various other school and church ac- 
tivities. 

On April 23 Carol Anne and ad- 



visor, Mrs. Lucille M. Jordan began 
an expense-paid tour of New York 
City, Williamsburg, Virginia, and 
Washington, D. C. On the tour were 
the other state winners and advisors. 
The trip ended in Washington, D. C, 
on April 28 where the All-American 
Homemaker of tomorrow was an- 
nounced. 




CAROL ANNE PYLES 



Sfrtc&6>, SftiatA 



Now gather round friends, 
if you'd like to hear 

This saga of how I bathed 
baby so dear; 

Let's call the whole thing 
"Operation Splish-Splash" — 

So here we go, and 
we're off with a dash! 

First, Let us assemble 
the things that we'll need; 

Of all his small wants we 
Must surely take heed. 

Let's check over the list 
to make sure they're all here. 

As the time for this cleaning 
operation draws near. 

Pajamas, diapers and, 
yes, rubber pants. 

These are made ready well 
in advance; 

Undershirt, too, and booties 
for his feet. 

Everything ready, so clean 
and neat. 

A towel, some soap and a 
wash cloth so white, 

These too, we must have if 
we do it just right; 

Some rubber boats and 
some plastic ducks small — 

These things he'll enjoy and 
he won't even bawl! 

Now comes the tub-filling 
with water so warm. 

To soothe him and please 
him 'twill work like a charm. 

Then tumble him in from 
his head to his toes — 

He'll coo with delight as 
everyone knows. 

Next, take him out dripping, 
so fragrant and sweet. 



And towel him off from 
his head to his feet. 

Pajamas come next with a 
bottle of milk. 

For this wee little brother 
as soft as pure silk! 

Then into his bed, and 
cover him well. 

Of this experience I'm happy 
to tell. 

My poetry's poor, and I haven't 
much time. 

But let me just say ere 
I close up my rhyme. 

Brother Donnie was happy, 
and so. too. was I, 

We were always ready to 
"give it a try." 

My project has helped 
me in so many ways — 

My mother approved it, and 
gave it her praise; 

My teacher commended, she 
thought it well done — 

And truly I think many 
values I've won. 

A few minor points I 
may have left out. 

But you can, I am sure, 
tell what it's about. 

Twas a happy experience, 
rewarding and good. 

And I learned to bathe 
babies, as all homemakers should. 

Ten times did I bath this 
wee little mite. 

An experience truly heart- 
warming and bright, 

I'm glad that I had in 
this splish splashing a part 

For this wee little brother 
so close to my heart! 



F.H.A. Convention 

IN PICTURES 

The Convention Program focused 
attention to the 1959-62 Objectives. 

Dr. Naomi G. Albanese, Dean 
of the School of Home Eco- 
nomics, Woman's College, Greens- 
boro, N. C. was guest speaker, using 
the topic "There Is A Place For 
You In Home Economics." 

A pageant followed which dra- 
matically protrayed ways by which 
members can work toward achiev- 
ing our over-all goal — to help 
individuals improve personal, fam- 
ily, and community living now and 
in the future — through concen- 
trated efforts on the four objectives. 

Top photos — Left to right: 
Scene of presentation by the Ben- 
son Chapter intrepreting Objective 
IV — Understanding Our Neigh- 
bors. Treasurer's report by Kay 
Hall, State Treasurer. Dr. Naomi 
Albanese, Dean of the School of 
Home Economics and Nancy Ed- 
wards, State FHA President. 

Second row: Mrs. Florence Car- 
dova, Miss Helen Stuart, and Vergie 
Lee Stringer receive honorary mem- 
bership certificates from state presi- 
dent. Scene from skit presented by 
the Scotland Neck Chapter on Ob- 
jective II — Understanding Family 
Members. Grainger Chapter in Kin- 
ston also helps to intrepret Objec- 
tives II in the skit "This Isn't 1890." 

Middle Inset: Registration ran 
smoothly due to the excellent co- 
operation of registration committee 
members. "Splish Splash" — A 
presentation by the Ahoskie Chap- 
ter is printed in this issue. 

Bottom photos: Representing Fu- 
ture Homemakers of America at 
National Meetings and reporting 
during the State Convention were 
from left to right — Kay Hall, State 
Treasurer, who represented the 
North Carolina Association of Fu- 
ture Homemakers of America at 
the Southern Safety Conference in 
Jacksonville, Florida; Nancy Evans, 
installed during the State FHA Con- 
vention as 1960-61 State Song 
Leader from East Mecklenburg who 
represented the State FHA Associa- 
tion at the Youth Power Congress 
in Chicago; and Catherine Blanton, 
National Treasurer — a member 
of the National Executive Council 

— and State Historian, represented 
Future Homemakers of America at 
the Citizenship Conference in Wash- 
ington, D. C. Nancy Edwards, FHA 
President and Norris Tolson, FFA 
President. Objective III: Interpret- 
ing The Value of Home Economics 

— A skit by the Bailey Chapter. 



* Ot-'ECTIV] 

GETTING TO 
KNOW OUR 
NEIGHBOR 



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INTERPRET 
IITHE VALUE OF 
Ikohe EQMOMICS I 



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Well Planned Programs 
Are Essential for 
Special Occasions 



Dr. Catherine T. Dennis, state 
supervisor of Home Economics, was 
introduced as a special guest at the 
Coopers Mother-Daughter Banquet. 
In response to her introduction, Dr. 
Dennis pointed out the growing 
recognition of the field of home 
economics as important to our 
future, not only in developing tech- 
niques in homemaking, but also in 
improving relationships, ideals, and 
attitudes. She emphasized the chang- 
ing role of the American woman and 
the part home economics must play 
in preparing today's teen-ager for 
that role. 



TOAST TO THE MOTHERS 

By Carol Brown 

Gatesville Chapter 

Tonight we are here to honor our 
mothers and show them our appre- 
ciation for all they have done for 
us. We love our mothers because 
they are a part of us. Our mothers 
protect us from dangers, difficulties, 
and disappointments. Yet, they do 
not dominate our lives. They help 
us develope our qualities of charac- 
ter that will remain with us through- 
out our lives. The most potent in- 
fluence in the life of a child, and 
the most powerful force in deter- 
mining his character is the home. 
The mother in the home, not only 
makes it a happy, cheerful place for 
her children, but also helps to build 
a stronger community and finer na- 
tion. It is with great pleasure that 
we honor our mothers here tonight. 
And now I propose a toast — to 
those to whom we owe all that we 
are and for whom we would like to 
be all that they believe we are — 
our mothers. 



RESPONSE 
By Mrs. W. E. Brown 

No greater joy can come to the 
heart of a Mother than to see her 
daughter develop into a fine type of 
womanhood. 

In our daughters we relive our 
own girlhood over again. It is in- 
stinctive for us to want for our 
own daughters everything that we 
ourselves missed in life. Being a 
mother is a difficult task for we 
want to protect you, our daughters, 
from all difficulties, dangers, and 
disappointments. Yet we do not wish 
to dominate your lives, and we 
realize that only by meeting with 
hard knocks will you be able to 
develop character and strength that 
will enable you to deal adequately 
with the problems of life. 

No real mother ever thinks twice 
before making a personal sacrifice 
for her daughter's welfare. We do 
that instinctively; that is, a part of 
the bargain we made with life and 
God. And no matter what the cost 
in time, effort, and sacrifice in- 
volved in rearing our daughters, we 
are repaid a thousand times over 
when we see them developing into 
fine upright young women. Forgive 
us, daughters, if at times we boast 
a bit about you and show inordinate 
and ill concealed pride in what you 
accomplish. You are a very extra- 
ordinary person to us. We love you, 
not because of your accomplish- 
ments or the awards you have made, 
but because you are our daughters. 
You may be, and probably are, "as 
full of faults as an old shoe," but 
love makes us blind. Looking at you, 
we see your fine qualities which no 
amount of faults can obscure. 



We love you, our daughters, be- 
cause you are a part of us, because 
you give to our lives a sense of ful- 
fillment, because you make us feel 
that we are needed, and because so 
long as there is any way in which 
we can aid or help you our mission 
in life is not completed. Truly our 
daughters are our finest possessions. 

The very best that we could wish 
for you in the years to come is that 
you may know the happiness and 
contentment that come from having 
a home and daughters of your own. 
And may your daughters be the 
same source of pride and comfort 
and joy to you that you have been 
to us. The love of a daughter makes 
any mother a better mother and 
brings out the best that is in her. 

And now, to those of the newer 
generation who, in making new 
paths, carry our faith, our hopes, 
and our hearts' encouragement, I 
propose a toast to our daughters. 



"In our hands we are holding 
husbands, homes, children, doc- 
tors, nurses, churches, teachers, 
and preachers" said Mr. Grant 
Banks, Jr., speaker for the first ses- 
sion of the Rutherford County Fu- 
ture Homemakers at their annual 
rally. Mr. Banks emphasized all the 
abilities girls need to develop in 
order to grow into good homemak- 
ers, citizens and Christians in his talk 
on "Developing Our Potential Abili- 
ties." 

The inspiring devotions were pre- 
sented by the Harris Chapter after 
which an unusual roll call was held. 
Each county officer placed an artifi- 
cial red rose on which was printed 
the total membership of the club 
and the total number present on a 
flannel board to make an attractive 
flower arrangement in a cardboard 
container when completed. 

Also carrying out the theme of the 
rally, "Youth Can Do," Mrs Mary 
Ann Fathing, nutrition consultant 
from the State Board of Health, 
spoke on "Foods Come First For 
Youth Power." 

The new officers, who were intro- 
duced, gave reports of local chapter 
activities on the county project, 
"Civil Defense." Many worthwhile 
things have been done and more 
are planned. 

The Mother-Daughter, Father- 
Son Banquet was a kick-off for FHA 



Courtesy and National FHA Week 
— April 3-9 in the Lucama School. 

The banquet program included: 
Junior and Chapter Degree Awards; 
recognition of members who re- 
ceived State Homemakers Degrees; 
a skit entitled "Journey Through 
FHA Land" which explained ac- 
tivities and experiences throughout 
the year. The devotional was "A 
Strong Woman" presented by mem- 
bers of the chapter in memory of a 
recently deceased woman in the 
community. A chorus of FFA and 
FHA members, directed by a stu- 
dent, and a solo by the Lucama 
principal added much to the ban- 
quet program. 

The week of April 3-9 was FHA 
Courtesy Week. The following ac- 
tivities were carried out: presenta- 
tion of roses to the teachers, be 
courteous to teachers, taking ele- 
mentary children out for exercise, 
replacing shrubs around Home Eco- 
nomics Cottage, and a devotion over 
the inter-com. 



We Interpret 



Our 1959-62 Objectives! 

Pageant at the 1960 State Convention 



National Convention of 
Future Homemakers of 
America, July 11-15 

North Carolina's quota of dele- 
gates has been increased from 34 
to 50. As of May 2, the quota of 
adults has been filled — 8 district 
advisers, adviser to the national of- 
fice, and the state adviser. Includ- 
ing the 8 state officers for 1960-61, 
our national treasurer, and fifteen 
applicants at large, we have a total 
of 34 delegates. This means that 16 
additional members may attend. 

Important: If your chapter de- 
cides to send a delegate or if you 
wish to attend as an active member, 
discuss this with your chapter ad- 
viser and notify the state adviser 
by May 18. Since only 16 addi- 
tional applications can be accepted, 
the earliest post marked letter or 
telephone call will be accepted. 

Cost of the convention and trans- 
portation is listed in the February 
issue of the North Carolina Fu- 
ture Homemakers of America 
Magazine. Please refer to this issue. 
A special bank account will be 
opened for convention expenses of 
delegates. All applicants will be sent 
forms to return with a check to the 
state office. Additional information 
concerning the convention will be 
sent to each delegate following re- 
ceipt of this form and check. 



Prologue: Sammie Gatlin 

(As curtain rises quartet (Com- 
posed of Dawn Cressman, State 
Song leader and three girls from the 
Boonville Chapter) starts singing 
"Marching to Pretoria") 

Future Homemakers, the world 
beckons us toward new horizons! 
We are greatly needed; to really be 
of any great service, we must first 
prepare ourselves for whatever the 
future holds. To make definite plans 
and to be prepared for future op- 
portunities is to have half the battle 
won. Just as a construction crew 
would never attempt to build a 
towering skyscraper without a blue- 
print, neither should we start build- 
ing our lives without a plan. 

A great world lies ahead in the 
space age for the Future Home- 
maker who is prepared when op- 
portunity knocks. Women constitute 
a huge reservior of untapped re- 
sources in the business world. To 
gain success in an increasingly com- 
plicated world, a woman must have 
thorough training and be willing to 
work hard. Likewise, the career of 
homemaking requires varied skills. 

Many ingredients are needed for 
a good home. A wise homemaker 
follows her recipes very carefully in 
order to get the desired results and 
it is with this same meticulous care 
that we should develop our homes. 
The first ingredient for a happy 
home is 2 cups of love. Second, 2 
cups of warm understanding. Add 
to this 4 teaspoons of thoughtfulness, 
and 2 teaspoons of helpfulness. Sift 
together thoroughly, then stir in an 
equal amount of work and play. 
Add 3 teaspoons of responsibility. 
This responsibility must be shared 
jointly by all the family members. 

Our FHA Program of Work for 
1959-62 is designed to help us pre- 
pare for a useful and satisfying life. 
Today we are presenting some inter- 
pretations that may help us under- 
stand our four objectives: 

Objective One 

(Bugler) 

(Page — Placard) 

"To develop our potential abili- 
ties." The two projects for this ob- 



jective are Teenage Consumer and 
Youth Can Do. Because finances 
play such a leading role in family 
life, the Teenage Consumer project 
was selected to help us learn how to 
manage time, money, and energy, 
wisely. Today we have four most 
interesting characters who propose 
to tell us of the poor treatment we've 
been giving them lately. Miss 
Budget, if you will. . . . Presented 
by the Ramseur and Franklinville 
Chapters. 

Skit I 

Quartet — Upward Trail 

Because we believe in the impor- 
tance of the family, we must add a 
few more ingredients to our recipe 
for a happy home. Season to taste 
with study and culture, then fold in 
a generous amount of worship and 
faith in God. 

Objective II 

(Bugler) 

(Page — Placard) 

"To develop a better understand- 
ing of our family members and to 
contribute to their well being." Will 
be given in three parts. 

For part one we have Juanita 
Ann Alkazin of the Scotland Neck 
Chapter, a high school senior on her 
graduation night, as she thinks of 
her wonderful family life. Other 
chapter members pantomime her ex- 
periences as she talks. 

Skit I, PART I 

"Splish! Splash!" — Gloria Carter 
of Ahoskie and chapter members tell 
us about her little brother and her 
home experience. "Splish! Splash!" 

Skit II, PART II 

In our classes and our chapter 
meetings we have discussions about 
how to get along with friends and 
members of our families, but we sel- 
dom hear about getting along with 
grandparents. The Kinston Chapter 
will present a skit, "Granny, This 
isn't 1890." 

Skit II, PART 3 

Quartet — FHA Round 

Good homes and families don't 
just happen. They come by our un- 



derstanding, knowledge, and respect 
for others' differences. Good homes 
take study and putting knowledge 
into effect. Training for homemak- 
ing gives us the skills and the knowl- 
edge needed to improve our homes, 
therefore, let us add an additional 
ingredient — wisdom. 

Objective III 

(Bugler) 

( Page — Placard ) 

"To interpret the value of home 
economics as a basic part of our total 
education." The project, "Your fu- 
ture with home economics," as de- 
signed to education. Are we aware 
of the many and varied horizons 
that would be opened to us as a 
trained home economist? 

The Bailey Chapter will present. 

Skit III 

Quartet — "In Christ, There is 
no East or West" 

This world we live in is made up 
of many, many people. People who 
are alike in many, many ways, yet 
different in many, many ways, also. 
We must have an open, intelligent 
mind and a loving and understand- 
ing heart if we are to be channels 
of international good will and fel- 
lowship. Let us add a full measure 
of faith, hope, and charity to our 
recipe for a happy home. 

Objective IV 
(Bugler) 

(Page — Placard) 

"To promote good will through 
getting to know our neighbors at 
home and abroad." A presentation 
by the Benson Chapter is designed 
to help us develop greater under- 
standing and appreciation for peo- 
ple in our own and other countries. 

Skit IV 

We have presented some impor- 
tant ingredients of a happy home: 
love, understanding, thoughtfulness, 
helpfulness, equal amounts of work 
and play, responsibility, study, cul- 
ture, worship, faith in God. wisdom. 





NOTICE! 




Lost 


articles at the State 


FHA 


Convention will be sent to the 


owner 


upon request. Include 


a de- 


scription of the article with the re- 


quest. 







faith, hope, and charity to our happy 
home. Let us place these ingredients 
in a pan well greased with security 
and lined with respect for person- 
ality. Now sprinkle lightly with a 
warm sense of humor. Next allow 
to set in an atmosphere of demo- 
cratic planning and of mutual shar- 
ing. Bake in a moderate oven. 
When well done, remove the top 
with a thick coating of Christian 
teachings. 

Serve on a platter of friendliness 
garnished with smiles. Result — a 
happy home. 

Now, we conclude this spotlight 
on our program of work. May we 
use it in charting a blueprint for 
action in the year ahead as we grow 
as future homemakers. 

One of the skits dealing with the 
care of the small child in the family 
is reproduced here. 

Narrator: 

In our Family Relationship classes 
and our FHA meetings we have dis- 
cussions about how to get along with 
friends and members of our families, 
but we seldom hear about getting 
along with grandparents. The Kin- 
ston Chapter will present a skit, 
"Granny, This Isn't 1890." The first 
scene takes place in the home eco- 
nomics department followed with a 
scene at Linda's home. 
Skit: 

Narrator: This skit has pre- 
sented a problem which is not 
unique to many boys and girls. 

In the skit that has just been pre- 
sented. "How might all this diffi- 
culty have been avoided? How can 
we as teenagers help older people 
such as grandparents feel that they 
belong?" 

1 . Pay them attention and take 
time to talk to them. 

2. Offer encouragement and 
praise. 

3. Realize that everyone is an in- 
dividual. Try to understand him. 

4. Include them in family affairs. 

5. Show them love, consideration, 
and respect. 

6. Introduce them to your friends. 

7. Let them feel that you respect 
their opinions. Ask for advice and 
help. 

8. Remember their special occa- 
sions and give them gifts, flowers, 
etc. Always try to bring older peo- 
ple into the group. This takes under- 
standing and time. 



DEGREE WINNERS 

District I 

Bath: Helen Sullivan 

Bethel: Shirley Whitehurst 

Chicod: Carole Anne Lassiter. Carole 
Sue Stokes, Sandra Gaskins 

Conway: Betsy Sumner 

Creswell: Linda Oliver 

Winterville: Lora Ellen Hill 

District II 

Beaulaville: Glenda Thomas 

B. F. Grady: Alice Faye Smith, Bobbie 
Herring, Frances Gail Grady. Judi 
Kornegay. Sandra Smith Herring 

Chinquapin: Donna Faye Lonier, Elea- 
nor Cavanaugh. Joyce Swinson. Sonja 
Lanier 

Contentnea: Cappy Jo Langston, Jeanne 
Carr, Vennie Lou Edwards 

Jacksonville: Kaye Greene, Lillian S. 
Nicholson. Martha Melton 

La Grange: Helen Hardy 

James Kenan: Lura Ann Penny 

Lee Woodard: Barbara Pittman. Brenda 
Lucas, Joan Yelverton. Judith Carroll 
Base. Linda Faye Gardner 

Lucama: Janice Taylor. Sylvia Watson 

Penderlea: Shirley Gurganus 

Richlands: Anne Barbee. Miriam Taylor 

Rosewood: Alice Ellen Newell. Lynda 
Radford. Margaret Ellen Rose 

Saratoga Central: Carolyn Langley. 
Faithe White 

Wallace Rose Hill: Beth Mattocks. Janice 
Newton. Linda Mozingo, Wanda Per- 
kins 

Walstonburg: Becky Winstead. Beverly 
Lang, Connie Parker. Joyce Cox. 
Mary Elizabeth Gave. Nancy Carol 
Adams. Pat Harrell 

District III 

Cameron: Judy Stanley, Sallie Phillips 

Red Springs: Carol Jane Lewis. Delane 
Humphrey, Helen Edwards. Sandra 
Barden 

Rowland: Kay Hall. Mary Crawford 

Seventy-first: Jean Spears. Peggy Harris 

Stedman: Audrey Bunce, Bonnie Hall. 
Geraldine Albertson. Joanne Strick- 
land, L. Rebecca Faircloth. Mary Tar- 
rant, Patsy Melvin 

District IV 

Angier: Doan Wood. Judith Ann Ennis 

Bailey: Ann Brock 

Benson: Sharon Barbour 

Benvenue: Betty Spain. Catherine Towe, 
Joan Morris. Jo Ann Viverette. Judith 



Melton, Judy Hedgepeth, Olive Korne- 
gay 
Coats: Barbara Langdon, Gayle Johnson, 
Nora Avery, Sandra Poole, Susan C. 
Johnson 

Corinth-Holders: Joyce Barham, Linda 
Parrish, Shirley Moody 

Dunn: Anne Alphine 

Durham Sr.: Suzie Apple 

Helena: Frances Walters 

Needham Broughton: Carol Coxe, Pan- 
thea Gupton 

Roxboro: Barbara Oakley 

Wilton: Joan Perry 

District V 

Bartlett Yancey: Brenda Cook, Linda 
Slaughter, Nanci Payne, Sharon 
Slaughter 

Central (Davidson Co.): Shirley Jean 
Black 

Franklinville: Camilla Jane Saunders, 
Ersell Shane, Linda Presnell, Priscilla 
Ann York, Rebecca Anne Stout, Sam- 
mie Gatlin 

Gibsonville: Brenda Gerringer 

Gray Chapel: Barbara Rae Cox, Louise 
Kime 

Madison: Doris Louise Shelton 

Mayodan: Audrey Smith, Bonnie Wil- 
liams, Donna Amos, Judy Ann Gro- 
gan, Lenna Vaughn, Linda Via, Louise 
Goins 

North Davidson: Carol Dorsett Murphy 

Ramseur: Anna Rae Hodgin, Jane Cra- 
ven, Linda F. Caudle, Peggy Lawson 

Robert B. Glenn: Jeanne Weavil 

Seagrove: Betty Lee Luther, Betty 
Richardson, Carolyn Trogdon, Doris 
Voncannon, Kay Asbill, Linda Jo John- 
son, Linda Sue Brewer, Rebecca Au- 
man, Sue Richardson 

Walnut Cove: Mary Katherine Redmon 

District VI 

Kings Mountain: Dianne Neal 
No. Three: Carolyn Wright 
Shelby: Judy Dale, Kay Wilson 



District VII 

East Wilkes: Arlene Brooks 

District Vffl 

Bethel: Barbara Jean Nix 

Bryson City: Shirley Becker 

Clyde A. Erwin: Lorraine Brown, Mary 
Lynn Sluder 

Enka: June Taylor, Louise Elders, Pa- 
tricia West 

Etowah: Carolyn Kilpatrick, Corina 
Hoots, Jean Watts, Josephine Watts 

Flat Rock: Bessie Mae Levi 

Lee Edwards High: Joyce Warren, Lynn 
Hampton, Rebecca Morgan 




This year there are 105 members in 
the Needham Broughton chapter. Last 
fall they sponsored the annual Good Luck 
Dance. The theme was "Autumn Para- 
dise," and it was very successful. 

After the December PTA meeting the 
FHA had their annual money-making 
project, a bazaar. Each member donated 
an article to be sold. They had a variety 
of things — cakes, candy, stuffed ani- 
mals, aprons, pies, Christmas decorations, 
and Christmas stockings. 

In November they were the host school 
for the District IV Rally. There were 
over 1,000 girls at the meeting. 

The Vance-Warren County Future 
Homemakers held its spring rally at the 
John Graham high school in Warrenton 
on April 13. 

Installation of new officers, a talent 
show, and fashion parade were highlights 
of the program. The Littleton chapter 
was responsible for the roll call; the Zeb 
Vance chapter, programs; and the John 
Graham members were in charge of the 
stage, flowers, and refreshment. 

The Madison-Mayodan Chapter hon- 
ored their mothers at the Mother- 
Daughter Banquet held in the Mayodan 
cafeteria March 18. The theme of the 
banquet, "Mother Is a Jewel," was car- 
ried out with approximately one hundred 
and seventy-five persons attending the 
event. 

Beaufort Future Homemakers cele- 
brated National FHA Week by contrib- 
uting their services to the school faculty 
members during the week. The faculty, 
their students, and the FHA members 
enjoyed the relationship and help during 
this occasion. 

During one of the meetings the presi- 
dent used a check-list in helping the 
group to evaluate the program of work 
for the past year. The evaluation proved 
that the members and officers had been 
busy helping to improve themselves, the 
local chapter, school, community, and 
state association. 

A few of the Cary chapter's participa- 
tion during the week was a chapel pro- 
gram, news report in the Cary paper, 
blessings on cafeteria tables, coffee for 
the teachers, and Daddy-Date Night 
which concluded the program. 

Excerpts from the West End School 
News Articles: 



North Buncombe: Irene Ball, Linda 
Burleson, Sue Garrison, Susan Chand- 
ler 

Rutherfordton-Spindale: Betsy Denson, 
Catherine Sumners. Jane Sherrill, Kaye 
Yelton, Madge Guffey, 

Tri-High: Diane Hicks, Ingrid Byers 

Valley Springs: Ruth Finch 

Webster: Anne Sellars 



Haven't heard many rumors about the 
Home Economics Mid-Term exams being 
short and easy. Miss Kernodle has one 
favorite answer that popped up on a 
completion blank. The answer, Wrights' 
Brothers Aeroplane was in the place 
where Wrights' Silver Cream should have 
been. However, she says that plane might 
come in handy yet for her to get around 
in to see "What's Cooking." 

Wonder what a man's shirt is doing 
on display in the Clothing Lab? Carolyn 
Lewis Coggins is proud of the sports shirt 
she made for her father. So proud, in 
fact, you probably saw her modeling it 
at recess one day. That size 44 looked 
real cute on you Carolyn! Hubby's will 
have to be sized down a bit. Carolyn's 
father says that from now on she can 
make plenty of his shirts — he likes 
her's best. Now she is getting ready to 
make a white one using the flat fell 
seam! 

Barbara Garner and Jean Hannah — 
Orchids to you for those hard hours spent 
on your home projects! We know that 
both you and your families are enjoying 
those freshly painted living rooms with 
their cheerful colors. 

Have you noticed our display of Nu- 
trition posters in the cafeteria? Follow 
our slogan "Map your meals for better 
health." 

The FHA'ers are constantly trying to 
find inexpensive ways to make our school 
more attractive whether it be a simple 
poster or a requested pair of draperies. 
Your suggestions and comments are wel- 
come. 

We are very proud of our modern 
kitchen wall cabinets, we hope it won't 
be too long until new base cabinets and 
sinks are added. Then we'll be ready for 
the kitchen walls to have a face lifting 
of plastering and paint. 

The March meeting of the Alexander 
Wilson Future Homemakers of America 
club was a recreational program with the 
members and their dates participating. 
Recreation was led by Gerald Johnson, 
physical education and health teacher at 
Elon High School. Mr. Johnson directed 
us in new square dance steps, entertain- 
ing games, as well as round dancing. 

The Home Economics Department at 
Anderson High School had a Fashion 
Show taped at WFMY-TV, Channel 2, 
Greensboro, N. C, on Monday, March 
14. The group consisted of 25 girls under 
the direction of Mrs. Ella E. Taylor, 
teacher of Vocational Home Economics. 
The program was presented on Miss 
Carol Stoker's "Second Breakfast" at 
9:15 a.m., March 15. 



NASH CHAPTER 

(Continued from page 2) 
the student body over the inter-com sys- 
tem. (3) Coffee served to the teachers 
in the homemaking department all during 
one day. (4) News articles in county 
paper. Special improvements were made 
in the homemaking department. (5) All 
teachers in the high school given a red 
rose upon arrival at school. (6) These 
projects included bulletin boards and dis- 
plays in the homemaking department and 
throughout the school. (7) Luncheon for 
all FHA members. 



ia vml:.:.::i 



Future Homemakers of America 



CREED 

We are the Future Homemakers of America 
We face the future with warm courage, 
And high hope, 

For we have the clear consciousness of seeking 
Old and precious values. 

For we are the builders of homes, 

Homes for America's future. 

Homes where living will be the expression of everything 

That is good and fair. 

Homes where truth and love and security and faith 

Will be realities, not dreams. 

We are the Future Homemakers of America, 
We face the future with warm courage, 
And high hope. 



Caroliae says; 



The summer months, free from 

I studies and school activities, 

| should be a wonderful time to put 

into application training received 

in homemaking classes and FHA 

activities. 

Don't forget our four goals: 

Goal 1. Develop Potential 
Abilities. 

Goal 2. Better Understanding 
of Family Members. 

Goal 3. Interpret the Value of 
Home Economics. 

Goal 4. Promote Good Will 
Everywhere. 





FUTURE HOMEMAKERS 

* North Carolina Association * 



VOLUME XVIII 




OCTOBER 1960 




NUMBER 1 




COVER 
PICTURE 



Artist, Jeff Hill, recognized the 
many opportunities open to a Future 
Homemaker member after he had 
reviewed the contents of our Chapter 
Handbook and issues of our North 
Carolina Future Homemakers Maga- 
zine. Two years ago he designed the 
winter scene on the December issue. 

The caricuture sketches on the 
cover page clearly portray some of 
the values which Future Home- 
makers seek to achieve. Namely, 
Self Improvement, Better Home and 
Family Life, Community Improve- 
ment Through Service, and Whole- 
some Recreation. 

Through many and varied activities 



National Meeting 
in 1961 

Who?— 1,000 delegates (Mem- 
bers and advisers) Future 
Homemakers of America 
Where? — Chase-Park Plaza 

Hotels, St. Louis, Missouri 
When?— July 3-7 
"The National Association of Secon- 
dary-School Principals has placed 
this activity on the Approved List 
of National Activities for 1960- 
61." 



these goals are being reached in vary- 
ing degrees in all eight of the districts 
outlined on the map of North Caro- 
lina. 



Emblematic 
Materials 

FHA emblematic materials should 
be ordered from only authorized 
dealers which are: 

L. G. Balfour Company (official 
jewelry, etc.) 

711 14th Street, N. W. 

Washington 5, D. C. 

Ringer St. Croix Company (official 
jacket — Eisenhower type) 

3300 N. E. Fifth Street 

Minneapolis 18, Minnesota 

Marshall Field & Company (offi- 
cial jacket — blazer type) 

Chicago, Illinois 
(Balfour and Marshall Field adver- 
tisements are included in the Septem- 
ber, 1960 issue of Teen Times.) 



NOTICE !!!! 



Two copies of the October, 
1960 issue of the North Caro- 
Future Homemakers of 



Una 



America magazine will be sent 
to every chapter which affiliated 



for the 1959-60 school year. 
A copy for each member will 
be mailed immediately after 
affiliation dues for 1960-61 are 
received in the State office. 



North Carolina Association of Future Homemakers of America 



State Officers 
1960-61 

President — Sammie Gatlin, Franklinville V 
Vice-President — Kakie Jordan, Cary IV 
Secretary — Nancy Britt, Barnesville III 
Treasurer — Alice Faye Smith, B. F. Grady II 
Historian — Elaine Renegar, Harmony VII 
Parliamentarian — Susan Chandler, Weaverville VIII 
Reporter — Freda Britt, Murfreesboro I 
Song Leader — Nancy Evans, East Mecklenburg VI 



District Advisers 
1960-61 

Miss Frances Newby, Perquimans I 

Mrs. Emily R. Wells, Wallace-Rose Hill II 

Mrs. Louise Burleson, Barnesville III 

Miss Ruth Turnage, Bailey IV 

Mrs. Agnes L. Farthing, Ragsdale V 

Mrs. Mary Miles, Anson VI 

Virginia Coltrane, North Surry VII 

Mrs. Sue T. Glovier, Old Fort VIII 



State Adviser 
Mrs. Faye T. Coleman 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 

Division of Vocational Education 
Raleiszh, North Carolina 



Future 
lliiiui'iiiiiki'i's 
Learn How to 
Stretch the 
Food Dollar 



"Managing the Food Dollar" is 
a unit the Future Homemakers have 
really enjoyed this year. We have 
learned many things that will be help- 
ful to us when we become home- 
makers. As a supplement to our 
classroom bookwork, we visited the 
grocery stores downtown in a search 
for values. Some of the points we 
learned to use as a guide for wise- 
buying are: 

1. Save when planning meals by — 

a. Planning well-balanced meals 

b. checking advertised specials 

c. Planning meals as far in ad- 
vance as is feasible 

d. Planning each day's meals as 
a unit 

e. having menus flexible 

f. considering cost, time, energy, 
and quality 

g. making and using a shopping 
list 

h. arranging items according to 
counters 

2. Save when shopping for foods 
by- 

a. considering location and physi- 
cal aspects 

deciding the best time to shop 
knowing your requirements 
being alert to value 

e. comparing price, quality, and 
planned use of foods 

f. reading the labels 

g. taking advantage of specials 

h. watching for alternate choices 

3. Save when preparing foods by — 

a. storing food properly 

b. using all of what you buy 

c. using tested recipes 

d. using proper cooking utensils 

e. cooking vegetables in little or 
no water 

f. cooking meats at low temp. 
These suggestions can be very 

helpful to every homemaker, as they 
have been to us. 

Clara Denning, Sharon Bar- 
bour, Benson F.H.A. Chapter. 



I w m m 



b. 
c. 
d. 




Clara Denning and Sharon Barbour wrote article on "Managing the Food Dollar." This picture 
appeared on a poster which the City Market manager displayed to advertise his weekend special. 



Some Resource Material Which May 
Relate to Your Program of Work 



Hi Neighbor brochure — 

U. S. Committee for UNICEF United Nations, New York 

World Neighbors, Incorporated brochure — 

Headquarters: 1145 19th Street, N. W., Washington 6, D. C. 

Packet of Safety Materials from: 

The American Red Cross National Headquarters, Washington 6, D. C. 
"Baby Care Is A Family Affair," "Accident Prevention Check List for 
Child Safety," "Tornado Safety Rules," "Teaching Johnny to Swim," and 
other leaflets are included. 

Is Your Home Fall Proof? 

National Safety Council, 425 N. Michigan Avenue, Chicago 11, Illinois. 

A Family Is the Strength of all its Members — 
Metropolitan Life Insurance Company, New York, N. Y. 

Your Vote Counts and Voters Check List — 

The American Heritage Foundation, 11 West 42 Street, New York 36, 
N. Y. 

Safety on Wheels — 

Nationwide Insurance, Columbus, Ohio 

UNESCO At Your Service— 

Public Liaison Division, New York Office of UNESCO, Room 2201 
United Nations, New York 

The Opportunities That Books Offer — 
The Children's Book Council, Inc. 
175 Fifth Avenue, New York 10, N. Y. 



Sample Illustrations of What a Fui 



By well-planned and carefully executed projects and 
activities, a Future Homemaker informs her neighbors of 
what she is working toward. Her aims and 
objectives are focused on 

Self -Improvement 

Good Home and Family Life 

Service and Citizenship 

Wholesome Recreation 

Injected in all plans and activities are Provoking Thoughts 
on What— After High School??? 



FATHERS ARE 
WONDERFUL, TOO 

Have you ever included your 
wonderful fathers in your FHA 
chapter plans? The Harris FHA 
Chapter tried the idea by sponsoring 
a Father-Daughter Buffet Supper, 
and it was such a success that they 
know you will want to try it, too. 

You may think your dad is just 
a "man to dole out money" when 
it comes to having fun, but get him 
out with a group of frolicking 
FHA'ers, eating hamburgers with 
all the trimmings, and believe it or 
not — you'll have a frolicking pop! 

To start the evening on the "right 
foot," the fathers were given time 
before supper to become acquainted 
while Martha Davis played some of 
those favorite tunes that all fathers 
enjoy. 

The hamburgers were delicious, 
and the very thing to keep the fath- 
ers unaware of their P's and Q's. 
For an hour they, in the eyes of 
their daughters, simply turned into 
delightful teenagers, and were twice 
as much fun. 

Have you ever seen men pass a 
ring on a toothpick completely 
down a dining hall? The girls de- 
clared that it couldn't be done, but 
the fathers beat them at their own 
game. Many more games were 
thoroughly enjoyed. 

Talent was discovered that night 
that no one knew existed. The 
Harmon sisters, Yvonne, Doris, and 
Dorcus blended perfectly on an old 
favorite melody. Some of the 
seniors presented an appropriate 
pantomime, "Father Knows Best." 
Surprise turned into glee when 
father-daughter special was pre- 
sented by Rita Robbins and her 



father, Clyde H. Robbins. Diane 
Hopper gave a "Tribute to Our 
Fathers," which was the first serious 
moment of the evening. 

Wynona ended the gala evening 
with a very appropriate poem about 
"Our Fathers." Truly this night was 
enjoyed and will be remembered by 
everyone who participated. More 
binding relationships between fath- 
ers and daughters show that the 
evening was one well spent. The 
lasting benefits of the evening will 
always be of value to the FHA girls 
and their fathers. 



DISPLAY OF HANDICRAFTS 
ATTRACTED ATTENTION AT 
MOTHER-DAUGHTER BAN- 
QUET 

An attractive and colorful bulletin 
board immediately struck the eye 
as one entered the front hall of the 
Garner High School on the night of 
the Mother-Daughter banquet. On 
a red background was the FHA 
emblem. Beneath it were stairsteps 
on which one must climb to reach 
her homemaker degree. Names of 
girls working toward achieving a 
degree were printed on the steps in 
order of progress made at this time. 

Draped on the back of the office 
bench were sweaters hand-knitted 
by two FHA members. More sweat- 
ers, but incomplete, by other mem- 
bers were on the bench. On the left of 
the bench were other articles which 
included a pillow and a caterpillow 
made by a chapter member. On 
each side of the bench were re- 
finished picture frames containing 
mirrors. Beneath one mirror was 
a refinished table on which lay a 
refinished violin with artificial ivy 




As a token of appreciation to the faculty, 
Erwin FHA members washed cars for them 
during National FHA Week. 




Donna Abernathy, Pam Kimery, and Linda 
Anderson of the Haw River chapter model 
church and travel costumes which were made 
in home economics class. 




"The strategy of handling one and two 
year old children" was the title of a home 
experience, by Elizabeth Ann Harkey from 
Myer's Park School in Mecklenburg County. 



ire Homemaker Is Working Toward 




These FHA members of the Erwin Chapter 
attended the First Baptist Church in a group 
during National FHA Week. 




Members of the Chicod Chapter take pride 
in the school grounds. Three FHA members 
are shown here cleaning the grounds around 
the home economics cottage. 



*rc,. , *Hre «««*-■-• ■ J <fli; 




winding in among the strings. The 
violin would make an interesting 
wall arrangement. Underneath an- 
other mirror was a ceramic table 
made by one of the FHA'ers. 

Across the hall was a display of 
the following items: 

White and colored doilies 

White terrycloth bathroom cur- 
tains 

A dressing table 

A pretty dress 

A round scatter rug 



Miss Winnie Laughridge, an honorary mem- 
ber of the State Association of Future Home- 
makers of America from Shelby, N. C, is 
honored by members of the Shelby Chapter. 



FHA HIGHLIGHTS 
IN CULLOWHEE 

"We are the builders of homes, 
homes for America's future. . . ." 
These words are a challenge to every 
Future Homemaker of America. 
Each of us has an important role 
to play in building our nation's fu- 
ture, and we realize that we must 
have adequate preparation if we are 
to give a command performance. 

The Cullowhee Chapter of the 

Future Homemakers of America, 
like many other chapters throughout 
our state and our nation, are striv- 
ing to do just that. Active partici- 
pation from each member enabled 
our chapter to complete a year's 
program that was both successful 
and enjoyable. 

Last fall our calendar was filled 
with planned activities for each 
month of the year. Some of the 
plans carried out were: 

1 . Just before Thanksgiving the 
freshman girls entertained their par- 
ents and the faculty members at a 
tea and style show. 

2. Before we knew it Christmas 
had come and gone. Our FHA 
Chapter had co-sponsored a white 
Christmas campaign at school and 
had made a family very happy with 
gifts of clothing, food, and toys. We 
found happiness ourselves in making 
others happy. 

3. In March our chapter was 
represented by five delegates and 
our sponsor at the State FHA Con- 
vention. 

4. During National FHA Week 
dresses that had been made by three 
chapter members were displayed in 
the window of Elsie's Dress Shop in 
Sylva. Red roses were presented to 
each high school faculty member. 

5. Our busy year was climaxed 



with a high school assembly pro- 
gram. The first part of the program 
consisted of an emblem service in 
which the meaning of the different 
parts of our FHA emblem were ex- 
plained. Following the emblem 
presentation, 24 girls modeled 
spring dresses they had made. 

As the year comes to a close we 
can happily look back on a year 
of valuable, now experiences, all of 
which helped to mold our future 
happiness. As future homemakers, 
"We face the future with warm 
courage and high hope." 



SUMMER RECREATION PRO- 
GRAM, ROWLAND HIGH FHA 

(Copy of letter sent to citizens in 
the Rowland community). 

FHA is undertaking a Wednesday 
night program to be held in the Com- 
munity Center (old Home Econom- 
ics buildins) during the summer from 
9-11 p.m. 

Rowland High School boys and 
girls, graduates, and their special 
guests are welcome to come to dance, 
to play ping-pong or to just sit and 
talk. 

Each time an FHA officer and her 
hostess will be in charge, assisted 
by at least one other hostess and host 
(if possible); the FHA officer will 
arrange for selling drinks and play- 
ing the music. She will open and 
close the building. 

The hostesses will have complete 
authority. The boys and girls are 
supposed to stay and we hope will 
enjoy themselves, but if the hostesses 
wish to close before 11:00 p.m., 
they may do so. 

We need YOU to help this pro- 
gram. If many parents will assist, the 
task will be light on all. If you are 
unable to come the night assigned to 
you (see enclosed schedule), please 
change with another hostess and if for 
some reason you can't do that, please 
phone Sara Lee Sellers as soon as 
you can so that a substitute may be 
secured. 

Please take this responsibility and 
help our program succeed. 

Very truly yours, 
Sara Lee Sellers, 

President, FHA 
Mrs. Albertine P. McKellar, 

Advisor 




We Are 
Strolling 
Along 
Down 



The 50 North Carolina delegates 
to the 1960 National Meeting at the 
Statler Hilton Hotel in Washington, 
D. C, July 11-15 are engrossed in 
pleasant memories of this new and 
exciting experience. Elaine Rene gar, 
State Historian, relates this: 

Listen! I hear music. Where is it 
coming from? Sounds like it is com- 
ing from this room. What large 
doors; I can hardly open them. My! 
What a lovely room — red, white, 
and blue, and look up there at the 
flags. There must be one from every 
State and there are so many girls in 
here I am sure there are some from 
every state. Now I can see where 
the music is coming from. It is the 
orchestra of the United States Ma- 
rine Band conducted by the As- 
sistant Director, Captain James B. 
King. 

The 1960 National Meeting of 
the Future Homemakers is now in 
session under the direction of An- 
drea Krishnitz in the Presidential 
Ballroom of the Statler Hilton. Fol- 
lowing the opening ceremony we saw 




A 



one 



the advancement of the colors, a 
joint Service Color Guard with Lieu- 
tenant Roberta Roberts of the 
United States Marine Corps in 
charge. 

After the greetings, welcome and 
presentation of the objective, we 
were given our P's and Q's to follow 
this week. Then, we seemed to no- 
tice that something had gone wrong. 
If you did not find out why the 
program was so unorganized at the 
end, I am sure you saw the news 
article in the Post on Tuesday morn- 
ing titled, "Arthur S. Fleming, Sec- 
retary of Health, Education, and 
Welfare, stood up 1,000 girls in 
Washington last night." 

Before the close of the first Gen- 
eral Session, our National Officers 
told us what to expect from 
"This Week." 

Group singing and a lovely, yet 
inspiring devotion got us well on 
our way for the second General Ses- 
sion. Following the roll call of the 
States, we were presented our ob- 
jective . . . "Citizenship Begins at 
Home." This was followed by a 
panel discussion directed by Mrs. 
Margaret W. Fisher. 

Our Third General Session 
was a Business Meeting. After a 
report from the discussion groups. 
We received the reports of the 
Secretary, Treasurer, and Re- 
gional Vice-President, President, 
Historian, and Parliamentarian. In 
the reports we were told what was 



DELEGATES TO N 



Suzie Apple, Dianne Beckener, Nancy Britt, 
Betty Brown, Janet Brown, Susan Chandler, Judy 
Dale, Anne Davis, Nancy Evans, Sammie Gatlin, 
Evelyn Green, Bessie Heath, Doris Hess, Nelda 
Holder, Betty Sue Honeycutt, Lyndia Faye Jones, 
"Kakie" Jordan, Carolyn Langley, Maxine Liles, 
Nancy McCleny, Phyllis Moffitt, Joyce Oakes, 
Glennie Overman, Amelia Phillips, Peggy Quinn, 
Elaine Renegar, Kay Rintz, Rita Robbins, Hazel 



4 




being done to aid our projects. The 
reports included: Youth Can Do, 
Family Fitness, Teenage Consumer, 
Family Unity, Betterment for El- 
ders, and Public Relations. 

In the Teenage Consumer's re- 
port, we saw the Old Woman Who 
Lived in a Shoe. 

There was an old woman who 
lived in a shoe 

This ole woman knew what to do. 

Her children were FHA'ers that 
knew how to buy anything 

From appliances to bloomers 

For they were good teenage con- 
sumers. 

During the Public Relations re- 
port we were given this recipe for 
P.R.'s Birthday Cake: 

1 pinch of Purple Pixie Dust 

1 cup of smiles 

2 ideas in polka-dot sacks 

2 measures of community serv- 
ice 

2 measures of careers in home 
economics 

Sift in potential abilities and par- 
ticipation. Add family togetherness 
with fun and frolic. Sprinkle with 
enthusiasm and creative ability and 
serve with the Public Relations sil- 
ver service spoon. 

Following these reports we were 
then introduced to our 1960-61 Na- 
tional Officers. 

Look at the Washington Monu- 
ment. Listen! I hear music again. 
I believe it is coming from the 
Sylvan Theater which is located be- 



hind the Monument. Now I can see 
that it is the United States Army 
Chorus under the direction of Cap- 
tain Samuel Loboda. 

Tonight I have seen and realized 
how much my American Heritage 
really means to me by attending the 
pageant "Papers of Fire." 

No one wanted to miss the 6th 
General Session on Thursday morn- 
ing because we were to hear music. 
This time it was the All-States 
Chorus under the direction of Mary 
Lou Alexander. 

Look who is now being intro- 
duced. It is the Honorable Arthur S. 
Fleming. I am really glad he had 
a second chance to speak to us be- 
cause I don't believe anyone can 
ever forget his inspiring speech 
about our Heritage. 

Thursday afternoon was time for 
each of us to really be grateful to 
our Heavenly Father for our Ameri- 
can Heritage. It was on this after- 
noon that we saw many of the great 
memorials erected to our forefathers 
as well as many other points of in- 
terest while touring our Capitol City. 

Listen once more! I hear music. 
It, too, is coming from the Presi- 
dential Ballroom, but this time I 
find it set for a banquet and across 
the room I see the source of music. 
It is the United States Waves Chorus 
directed , by Musician 2nd Class 
Ralston Pitts. Following a delicious 
and lovely meal, during which we 
received orchids from Hawaii, we 



heard an address by the Honorable 
Katherine H. Stone, member of a 
House of Delegates in Virginia. This 
was followed by the Presentation of 
Honorary Memberships and an In- 
ternational Talent Show. 

During the closing General Session 
on Friday, we heard the reports of 
the National Committees. Catherine 
Blanton, North Carolina's own Na- 
tional officer, gave us a report of the 
finance of our national organization. 
She told us where our money came 
from and where it has gone. She 
also gave us a list of helpful hints 
for chapter moneymaking projects. 

Hand puppets were used in giving 
us the Teen Times report. They 
told us of the many and varied uses 
of Teen Times. 

While whispering quite "loudly" 
about the numerous and very inter- 
esting projects which were carried 
on throughout the nation, five scouts 
gave us the National projects report. 
Road signs and terms were used to 
compare the values of FHA and 
Home Economics in our Public Re- 
lations report. 

At the close, we were given a re- 
port on how to take the "convention 
back home" by our listening team 
members. This chain of ideas was 
a charm bracelet filled with charms 
to represent each session or meeting 
of the convention. 

The installation of 1960-61 Na- 
tional officers brought to a close the 
1960 National Future Homemakers 
of America Convention. 



NAL FHA MEETING 




Sauls, Alice Shepard, Faye Smith, Patricia 
Smith, Emmetta Stirewalt, Betty Tate, Marilyn 
Taylor, Sue Wallace, Judy Whitley, Alieen Wil- 
son, Judith Wood, Priscilla York, Mrs. Louise 
Burleson, Virginia Coltrane, Mrs. Sue T. Glovier, 
Mrs. Mary Miles, Miss Frances Newby, Miss 
Ruth Turnage, Mrs. Emily Wells, Catherine Blan- 
ton, Mrs. Harriette Holton, Mrs. Faye T. Coleman. 






Objective II: To develop a better understanding of our family members and to contribute to their 



well-being 



PROJECT: FAMILY UNITY 

Through Family Unity experiences we may learn to 
understand and develop a closer relationship with mem- 
bers of our family and learn to be a co-operative member. 



PROJECT: FAMILY FITNESS 

Family Fitness experiences will concentrate on the 
physical, mental, social, emotional, and spiritual well- 
being of all family members. 




The camera caught this pose of Nancy Edwards, 1959-60 State FHA President of the 
North Carolina Association, as she was entering church with her family. 



" The Home Td Like 
to Have 



>> 



A prize-winning essay by Cynthia Leonard, Ramseur Chapter 



Every girl dreams of the day 
when she will marry and have a 
home and family of her own. I am 
no exception. As a Future Home- 
maker, I look forward with great an- 
ticipation to the time when I will be 
a present homemaker. I fully agree 



with journalist, educator, and writer. 
Dr. Will Durant, who said, "There 
can be no fulfillment of life's ulti- 
mate purpose without a successful 
marriage and a good family life." 

As I grow older my dreams of my 
future home begin to take form. 



and I visualize some very real and 
vital attributes that I want my home 
of tomorrow to possess. 

First of all, it will not be my 
home, but our home. My husband 
and I will work and plan as a unit 
to build a home upon the Christian 
principles in which we believe. 

It is not a part of my dreams that 
my home of tomorrow be housed in 
a mansion of brick or stone. I would 
rather it be built on the enduring 
cornerstones of love, faith, respect, 
and security; for our home must be 
of such a quality that it will endure 
for a lifetime. 

Such a home must have an abun- 
dance of love. A deep, true love 
which abides among all of the family 
members. The love upon which our 
home is based must be patient, self- 
less, long suffering, and kind. It must 
be a love which will bear all strife 
and withstand all conflict — a love 
which will endure forever. 

To withstand the fears and the 
tensions of the advancing age of 
nuclear fission and space travel, 
there must be ever present within 
our home, faith which is unwaver- 
ing — faith in God, faith in the things 
which are right, and faith in our- 
selves and each other and our ability 
to succeed as a family. 

I hope that within our home there 
will also be respect. Respect for the 
individuality of each family member 
— respect which encourages him or 
her to develop strong, true, inde- 
pendent traits. I hope also that our 
family will live and work together 
in such a way that those about us 
will have respect for our home. 

In my dreams I see our home as 
a secure place, and security is a gift 
which I sincerely wish to offer my 
children. I want to establish the kind 
of home where my children will 
grow strong mentally, physically, 
spiritually, and emotionally free 
from fear and anxiety. 



SUSAN CHANDLER, State Parlia- 
mentarian, Offers Helpful Tips to 
You 

"How Much Parliamentary Pro- 
cedure Do You Know?" 

1 . Who takes charge in the Presi- 
dent's absence? 

2. What are three ways of voting? 

3. When are the four times the 
motion to adjourn is not in order? 

4. What are the two kinds of 
committees? 



5. What rules of Parliamentary 
Procedure do the Future Home- 
makers of America follow? 

6. Why might the President leave 
the chair? 

7. Name some things the minutes 
should contain. 

"Answers" 

1. The Vice-President. 

2. Secret ballot, show of hands, 
acclamation. 



3. (1) When a speaker has the 

floor. 

(2) When a vote is being 
taken. 

(3) After it has just been 
voted down. 

(4) When assembly is in the 
midst of business which 
cannot be abruptly stopped. 

4. Standing and special. 

5. Robert's Rules of Order. 

6. She might wish to take part 



A copy of the order blank, which will be sent to each Chapter upon receipt in the State Office of the affiliation 
dues, is reproduced here for your use now. The "Chapter Handbook" is essential for all chapters. 

ORDER BLANK 



FUTURE HOMEMAKERS OF AMERICA 

Department of Health, Education, and Welfare 

Office of Education 

Washington 25, D. C. 

Please be sure to give correct mailing address Date 



Name.. 



Terms: Net Cash 



Address Make checks or money orders payable to: 

FUTURE HOMEMAKERS OF AMERICA 
City State 



Quantity 



Publication 



Amount 



Official Guide for Future Homemakers of America 25^ each 

(describes the organization, its purposes, bylaws, etc.) 

Chapter Handbook 65if each 

(gives chapter members, advisers and others help in planning, 
carrying out and evaluating the local chapter program) 

A Guide to Help You Grow as a Future Homemaker of America 25<f each 

(gives suggestions for students and guides for working 
toward Junior and Chapter degrees) 

A Guide for Helping Students Evaluate Their Own Growth 25^ each 

(handbook for teachers in guiding students' growth in the 
homemaking program and in their FHA work) 

You and Your Chapter Parents 20tf each 

(gives ideas on ways to work with parents in the local chapter) 

Sing with FHA 20^ each 

(includes various types of songs for group singing) 

Cooperative and Competitive Activities in Home Economics Education 15c each 

(a discussion of educationally sound ways of worikng to achieve 
worthwhile goals; includes a guide for judging activities) 

Subscription to TEEN TIMES — national magazine of FHA $1.00 per yr. 

Mat of Official Emblem 15<- each 

(for newspaper publicity purposes) 

Emblem Stencil 50<f each 

(contains 9 emblems in four sizes on a mimeograph stencil) 

FHA in Focus 03^ each 

(illustrated brochure describing FHA) 



TOTAL: 



in a discussion. She would call the 
Vice-President to the chair and hand 
her the gavel. 

7. Name of organization, date, 
presiding officer, secretary, motions 
made and result, committees ap- 
pointed, committee reports, some- 
thing about the program. 

In a chapter meeting there is no 
need to be formal to the extent of 
dulling the spontaneity of spirit, but 
there must be some order to enable 
a chapter to function properly. 

Purposes of parliamentary pro- 
cedure — 

To give courtesy and justice to 
every member. 

To give consideration to only one 
thing at a time. 

To give every member an oppor- 
tunity to be heard. 

To give consideration to the opin- 
ions of all with the understanding 
that the majority determines final 
decisions. 



Seeing Is Believing 



By RUTH B. LAWRENCE 

F.H.A. Adviser 
Cobb Memorial High School 



LET IT RAIN, LET IT RAIN, 
LET IT RAIN! 

What's a picnic without rain? 
Even though the climate was wet, 
our spirits at Durham Senior High 
were not dampened at our Father- 
Daughter Picnic. 

As we arrived at the local park's 
picnic area, monstrous, gray clouds 
hung over in the sky. Each of us 
whispered a wistful prayer that they 
would "go away and come again 
some other day." Before our festivi- 
ties were well on their way, many 
of us had to dash away from the 
shelter to raise our convertible tops 
or car windows. 

Even with the sudden rain, how 
could our spirits be dampened with 
a delicious lemon-meringue pie smil- 
ing up at you and golden brown fried 
chicken teasing your appetite? 

Our guests-of-honor were our fa- 
vorite beaux, our fathers. As we pre- 
pared the many lovely foods, we 
kept in mind "the way to a man's 
heart is through his stomach." Each 
tempting bite was mixed with love 
and care. 

What a sight it was to see our dads 
pile their plates high and later return 
for seconds and thirds! The more 
they ate, the more they seemed to 
enjoy every bite. 

As a crowning touch to our picnic, 
we made several dads very proud 
by announcing that their "Little girls" 
were to be next year's chapter officers 
and delegates to the National Con- 
vention in Washington. 



"I'd rather see a sermon than 
hear one any day" — gave Cobb 
Memorial an idea for their Mother- 
Daughter banquet. Instead of hav- 
ing a program along with the meal 
and talking about their progress dur- 
ing the year they decided it would 
be a good idea to display their year's 
work. By doing this, it would help 
the mothers to see actually what the 
girls had been doing and also help 
the girls to evaluate the unit and see 
for themselves what they had ac- 
complished during the school term. 
They could also take a look into the 
future to see what was in store for 
them next year. 

Large letters were cut and hung 
from the ceiling to illustrate the 
various areas of home economics 
studied. The display included arti- 
cles made at home and in class. 

In the child care unit the fresh- 
men girls set up a baby sitter corner 
with posters of various things neces- 
sary to be a good baby sitter. Music, 
songs, books, records, home made 
toys, bought toys and other things 
were here to represent entertaining 
small children. The 10th grade set 
up under the child care unit a bath 
tub with a doll for bathing instruc- 
tions, bassinet for sleeping habits, 
baby food and formula for feeding 
a baby, medicine for sickness, cloth- 
ing, toilet training and some things 
to help train children in good be- 
havior and habits. The third year 
unit was illustrated with diets, 
clothes and routine for expectant 
mothers, pictures of an embryo, 
preparation for a new baby and 
changes to expect in the home when 
the family increases. 

These illustrations helped the 
mother to see that the girls were 
not only studying child care in home 
economics, but it helped them to see 
how much the girls would miss if 
they failed to take home economics 
more than one year. 

There were six other phases of 
home economics displayed in the 
same way showing the things the 



girls had learned and the results. 
Displays were as follows: quilt tops, 
pillow cases, table cloths, place 
mats, painted pictures in frames, 
upholstering a chair, house plans 
built with cardboard and the land- 
scaping, flower arrangements, jellies, 
jams, preserves, pickles, canned 
vegetables, baked cookies and cakes, 
clothing garments and many other 
things done in the various units. 

The banquet was served in the 
cafeteria and following it the guests 
were invited to the department and 
classroom to see the exhibits. 

Yes, it was quite a bit of work, 
but so rewarding as you stood back 
and watched the girls and the guests 
enter and listen to the girls as they 
beamed and began talking — 

"Hey Mama, Sue and I did this," 
"Come here Mama, and see the 
house I planned and built of card- 
board, and look at my landscap- 
ing," "See Mama, I told you the 
pickles would keep" or "Look at 
my jelly, it's as pretty as yours." 

There were many comments 
among the students as they beamed 
with pride in showing off their year's 
work but even the teacher beamed 
a little as she continued to listen — 

"I never realized before the 
things taught in home eco- 
nomics" 

"Well, until now I thought sewing 
and cooking were the only 
things taught in home eco- 
nomics" 

"I sure do hope Judy will be able 
to take home economics three 
years" 

As you plan your banquet this 
year or other activities, keep in 
mind that one look at the work 
being carried on in the department, 
one picture in the paper, one speech 
over the radio is far more valuable 
than all the words and its just like 
a canceled check — you have proof 
that Home Economics is a must in 
our communities of N. C. 



8 



BIT OF HUMOR 

Teacher: "What animal is satis- 
fied with the least nourishment?" 

Robert: "The moth, teacher. It 
eats nothins but holes." 



The teacher was trying to get her 
class to understand something about 
the ether. "What is it that pervades 
all space," she asked — "something 
which no wall or door can shut out?" 

"The smell of boiled cabbage," 
spoke up the class wit. 



Teacher: "Every day we breathe 
oxygen. What do we breathe at night, 
Willie?" 

Willie: "Nitrogen." 



A teacher asked her class to draw 
a picture of that which they wished 



to be when they grew up. The pupils 
went diligently to work with paper 
and pencil, some drawing pictures of 
soldiers, policemen, fine ladies, etc. 
They all worked hard, except one 
little girl, who sat quietly holding her 
pad and pencil in hand. 

The teacher, observing her asked: 
"Don't you know what you want 
to be when you grow up, Anna!" 

"Yes, I know," replied the little 
girl, "but I don't know how to draw 
it. I want to be married." 



A teacher called for sentences 
using the word "beans." 

"My father grows beans," said the 
bright boy of the class. 

"My mother cooks beans," said 
another pupil. 

Then a third popped up: "We are 
all human beans." 



Teacher: "What is the surest way 
to keep milk from souring?" 

Dorothy: "Leave it in the cow." 



"But. Betty dear," advised her 
mother, "you are not getting all the 
peelings off the potatoes!" 

"Yes, I am, Mother," replied 
Betty, "all except in the dimples." 



"Father." 

"Well, what is it?" 

"It says here, 'A man is known by 
the company he keeps.' Is that so, 
Father?" 

'Yes, yes, yes." 

"Well, Father, if a good man keeps 
company with a bad man, is the good 
man bad because he keeps company 
with the bad man, and is the bad man 
good because he keeps company with 
the good man?" 



OPERATOR'S 
LICENSES 



Operator's Licenses were issued 
in freshman clothing classes at Haw 
River to students who could suc- 
cessfully thread the head and bobbin 



of the machine and operate it with- 
out confusion. A bulletin board 
displayed at the beginning of the 
clothing unit with this simple ques- 
tion: "Are You A SMO?" created 
much interest and curiosity on the 
part of the students. Spelled out 
SMO means Smooth Machine Opera- 
tor. The operator's license (a card 



similar to a driver's license) is re- 
quired as the preliminary step in 
the construction of the first garment 
in home economics classes. Mothers 
report that their daughters are so 
proud of these little licenses that 
they carry them in their wallets right 
along with some of their most treas- 
ured pictures. 



o 

o 



E2 



5 ° 

Cfl o 




Restrictions: 



Name.. 



Address. 



City.. 



.State.. 



This is to certify that the person herein named has passed all tests for threading both top and bottom of machine 
and putting in needles correctly. 



Date issued: 
Expires 9-1-60 



(Signature in full ) 



issued by: 



commissioner of seamstresses 
Not valid until numbered and signed by commissioner 



Future Homemakers of America 



CREED 

We are the Future Homemakers of America 
We face the future with warm courage, 
And high hope, 

For we have the clear consciousness of seeking 
Old and precious values. 

For we are the builders of homes, 

Homes for America's future. 

Homes where living will be the expression of everything 

That is good and fair. 

Homes where truth and love and security and faith 

Will be realities, not dreams. 

We are the Future Homemakers of America, 
We face the future with warm courage, 
And high hope. 




"The homes of tomorrow are in 

the hand of the youth 

of todav" 




Caroline Says — 

During 1959-60 the number of members in the 461 
chapters in North Carolina totaled 24,169. 

By districts the numbers were: 

District I 2,752 

District II 3.254 

District III .V. 3.192 

District IV ......3.719 

District V 3,495 

District VI 3,047 

District VII 1.999 

District VIII 2.711 

MAY WE CONTINUE TO GROW!!! 






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North Carolina Association 



VOLUME VIII 




FEBRUARY 1961 




NUMBER 3 



OUR 

FEBRUARY 

COVER 

Highlight of the banquet program 
was the presentation of an honorary 
FHA membership to Don Whitley, 
Wilson Daily Times Farm Editor. 
Mr. Whitley was chosen as an honor- 
ary member by a unanimous vote of 
the Bailey Future Homemakers chap- 
ter. 

Ann Brock, president, presented 
a gold key to Mr. Whitley, symbolic 
of an honorary membership into the 
FHA organization. During the pre- 
sentation, Miss Brock stated that the 
recipient had used his time and talent 
to promote the purposes and the 
overall program of the Future Home- 
makers of America. 

His many services have been given 



National Safety Council 

NONA'S NOTES 
JANUARY-FEBRUARY, 1961 



Sitting — 

When you stop and think about it 
safety is the big concern of parents 
when sitters take over. 

Here are some safety tips for 
baby sitters: 

Accept caring for children as an 
important job to be done safely. 

Keep outside doors locked. Never 
open the door for strangers. 

Follow parents' instructions as 



given, doing such extra work as 
agreed upon. 

Answer the telephone courteously 
and take the message in writing. 

Eat only the food that has been 
left for you. 

Have guests only if the parents 
agree. 

Stay awake and on the job as 
you are hired to do. 

Leave the house in as good order 
as it was when you arrived. 



in publicizing the local, district, state 
and national participation of the 



Bailey chapter in the FHA activities 
for the past three years. 



North Carolina Association of Future Homemakers of America 



State Officers 
1960-61 

President — Sammie Gatlin, Franklinville V 
Vice-President — Kakie Jordan, Cary IV 
Secretary — Nancy Britt, Barnesville III 
Treasurer — Alice Faye Smith, B. F. Grady II 
Historian — Elaine Renegar, Harmony VII 
Parliamentarian — Susan Chandler, Weaverville VIII 
Reporter — Freda Britt, Murfreesboro I 
Song Leader — Nancy Evans, East Mecklenburg VI 



District Advisers 
1960-61 

Miss Frances Newby, Perquimans I 
Mrs. Emily R. Wells, Wallace-Rose Hill II 
Mrs. Louise Burleson, Barnesville III 
Miss Ruth Turnage, Bailey IV 
Mrs. Agnes L. Farthing, Ragsdale V 
Mrs. Mary Miles, Anson VI 
Virginia Coltrane, North Surry VII 
Mrs. Sue T. Glovier, Old Fort VIII 






State Adviser 
Catherine T. Dennis 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 

Division of Vocational Education 
Raleigh, North Carolina 



1960-61 Affiliated FHA chapters in the North Carolina Association 
453 chapters — 25,068 





TO EACH 
OF YOU!! 



PLEASANT memories bordering on nostalgia en- 
gulf me at this moment as I write this farewell 
message to you following my recent resignation as 
State Adviser of the Future Homemakers of America. 

As State adviser for the past seven years, my experi- 
ences have been many and varied. Each experience has 
been interesting and enriching. "Getting to know You" 
has been the most pleasant and rewarding experience of 
all. This has been more than a mere acquaintance. 
There was much I learned about you through corres- 
pondence. Always there was a close unity felt as I 
reviewed and published news articles of your activities 
and accomplishments. In reviewing State Degree appli- 
cations, it was as though 1 had made a personal visit 
in your home and met all members of the family — and 
even the neighbors. Your annual reports often proved to 
be more interesting than a popular novel because these 
were truly "true stories." 

I was able to attend many local banquets and socials, 
many county workshops and meetings, and many Dis- 
trict Rallies. At each of these events 1 observed with 
pride the comprehensive understanding and appreciation 
of youth as you demonstrated and interpreted the values 
found in our Creed, Motto, and Purposes. I cannot 
forget our annual State Convention to which three to 
four thousand came each year; many of you partici- 



pated on the program and each of you were a partici- 
pant as you listened attentively and began thinking of 
how you could strengthen your chapter on your return 
home. Every year there was one week when a few of 
us became a very close knit family for the week of the 
National Meeting. Memories of the close relationship 
during this very special week will be remembered and 
cherished always. Then, there was Summer Camp — 
two weeks in early summer when we became well- 
acquainted. We learned much in leadership and recrea- 
tion. Yes, I shall even miss the nightly rounds with 
the flashlight and the shh-ing as we passed the cabins 
with wide awake Future Homemakers waiting for us to 
retire. 

On December 10, 1960, 1 was married to Conder 
Stinson Williams, 2626 Churchill Road, Raleigh, North 
Carolina, and as much as I shall miss my work with 
Future Homemakers and the home economics program 
in the State, it seems imperative that my time now be 
devoted to my new family. The principles, the purposes, 
and the goals of the Future Homemakers of America 
will be my guide as I strive with my family to make 
a happy home for all of us. 

May you continue to work toward achieving the 
goals of our organization. Remember there is no substi- 
tute for a Happy Home. 



Faye T. Williams 



1 



The Thirteenth Annual Conference 

of the 

NORTH CAROLINA FAMILY LIFE COUNCIL 



WEST MARKET STREET 
METHODIST CHURCH 

Greensboro, North Carolina 

Excerpts from the program by 
by Sammie Gatlin, State FHA Presi- 
dent. 

The family life cycle is constantly 
changing. There are three main 
stages in this cycle: (1) marriage, 
(2) having children, and (3) the 
children leaving the home. But this 
cycle is rapidly changing. Men and 
women want to get married at a 
younger age. In 1890 the male aver- 
age was twenty-nine, but it dropped 
to twenty-two and seven-tenths years 
of age in 1957. In 1890 the average 
age for the first marriage was twenty- 
two, but it dropped to twenty years 
of age in 1957. 

Women are having their first child 
at an earlier age. In 1940 the aver- 
age age was twenty-three for the first 
births, but in 1958 it dropped con- 
siderably. Parents are much younger 
than previously. For this reason, 
responsibility comes earlier, too. 

Fathers are younger when they 
marry than they formerly were. 
There is a sharp rise in the fertility 
of both young and old fathers. 

There is a tendency to marry 
earlier and to have larger families. 
This factor points to the growing 
strength and popularity of family life 
in the United States. Thus we have 
evidence of strength rather than 
weakness in family life in this nation 
for the present and also for the 
future. 

Nine out of ten births now are to 
women under thirty. The strength 
of the family is shown by the increase 
in family size. The child-bearing 
cycle has been pushed to an earlier 
age. Child birth is much safer than 
previously. Currently ninety-six per 
cent of all births occurred in hos- 
pitals. But there are some areas in 
North Carolina where the percentage 
of births occurring in hospitals is as 
low as fifty-three per cent. 

Today there is an increase in the 
total number of married couples. The 
peak of family responsibility has be- 
come considerably earlier, and the 
size of the family has increased. 





There is little difference today in the 
average size of American families 
except in the non-white south where 
the average family is somewhat larger. 
The average life span has increased 
twenty years since 1900. About two 
out of every three white baby boys 
living today in the United States will 
live to see the first quarter of the 
twenty-first century. 

The number of widows has been 
mounting steadily. Presently there 
are about eight million widows in 
the United States. There are several 
reasons for this number. Females 
have a more favorable mortality 
trend. Widowhood has shifted to 
older ages, yet the duration of widow- 
hood has lengthened. Young widows 
must seek gainful employment in 
order to support their children. 

North Carolina has undergone a 
shift in places where the people live. 
Thirty-one per cent of all North 
Carolinians live in eight counties. 
This densely populated area begins 
at Raleigh and moves up the Pied- 
mont. One-third of the state's popu- 
lation lives in nine counties. Mecklen- 
burg County contains more people 
than the twenty-five smallest coun- 
ties. The rate of growth in North 
Carolina will be only two-thirds that 
of the national rate. Three hundred. 



twenty-five thousand North Caro- 
linians left the state, and most of 
them were young. The reason for 
this migration to other states is the 
sad lack of good paying jobs within 
the state. 

Because of the rising tide of teen- 
age marriages, there is a great need 
for some information given at a 
period prior to these marriages. The 
husband is much less mature than the 
teenage wife. Early marriage places 
vocational limitations on both part- 
ners. There is evidence of a lack of 
preparation for marriage and parent- 
hood and the responsibility of sup- 
porting an early family. 

The average age of marriage has 
dropped in all progressive countries. 
The decline has been greater for men 
than for women. As a result there 
is a narrow age gap between the ages 
when people marry. Well educated 
people usually marry later than the 
less educated. Marriages from the 
fourteen to seventeen age levels have 
shown no increase. Statistics show 
that men from twenty to twenty-four 
are the most vulnerable to marriage. 
Ten per cent of all marriages are with 
brides under eighteen and grooms 
under twenty. The favorite age 
combination is eighteen to twenty 
for brides and twenty to twenty-two 
for grooms. Thus the marrying age 
for girls is eighteen to twenty and 
twenty to twenty-two for men. One- 
third of the women marries at eight- 
een and nineteen. 

There are varied reasons why 
Americans are marrying early. Mar- 
riage fluctuates with existing business 
conditions. In the earlier days boys 
had sex freedom with the low class 
girls, but today both boys and girls 
have sexual freedom. Our dating 
system is the chief factor in early 
marriages. The boy exploits the girl 
sexually, and the girl exploits the boy 
financially. 

There are fewer obstacles to mar- 
riage than there was formerly. To- 
day marriage is much less of a com- 
mitment. Now women work before 
the children come, and then again 
after the last child is in school. Be- 
cause of present methods of birth 
control, marriage does not necessarily 



entail children as previously. A fam- 
ily can be postponed if conditions 
are bad, but not marriage. The fact 
that the act of marriage is irrevocable 
has reduced the obstacles to mar- 
riage. Some couples say that if their 
marriage doesn't work, they can get 
out of it and try again. 

Early marriage is not restricted to 
those of low economic conditions. 
The pattern of the working wife and 
the student husband is quite evident 
today. Of the students under dis- 
cussion thirty per cent are male stu- 
dents, but only ten per cent of them 
are female. 

High school marriages are not 
more likely to occur in the low 
economics class. But in such cases, 
family relations seem to be poor. The 
parents accept these early marriages 
and co-operate with church wed- 
dings. The high school marriages are 
more likely to be conventional wed- 
dings. The tendency to start dating, 
going steady, and becoming engaged 
is a characteristic of early marriage. 
Girls who marry early usually date 
older boys during their dating years. 

Early marriage tends to increase 
the number of children that each 
woman has. Families are begun and 
closed early. As a result, mothers 
are healthier and have fewer mis- 
carriages. They can take better care 
of the children, and they are less 
burdened with a sense of responsi- 
bility. These young mothers are more 
flexible in adapting to their situation. 
But this early motherhood makes 
women less professionally ambitious. 
To them work is only a means to an 
end — never a career in its full sense. 
This is a tremendous waste of the 
intelligence of our women. 

The younger the two parties are, 
the less stable is the marriage. Early 
dating and going steady contribute 
to early marriages. Parents think it 
cute for their kids to date and to go 
steady. It is a tragic fact that thirty 
to fifty per cent of high school mar- 
riages involve pregnancy. Strict mar- 
riage regulations somewhat reduce 
early marriage. Our schools must give 
married students special counseling. 
Early marriage is a permanent trend, 
and it constitutes both a problem and 
a challenge. 

An increased enrollment of mar- 
ried students in high schools can be 
expected. There are three categories 
of married students: ( 1 ) the married, 
(2) the secretly married, and (3) 
those who drop out of school to get 
married. It is our responsibility to 
Continued on page six 




Fayetteville members rehearsing for a Thanksgiving program for the elderly women at the 

Confederate Women's Home. 



1 96 1 FHA National Meeting 



Where? Chase-Park Plaza Hotel, 
St. Louis, Missouri. 

When? July 3-6, 1961. 

How Manx? From North Caro- 
lina — 36— 7 adults and 29 FHA'ers. 

How Much? About $150.00 if 
entire N. C. quota attends. 

National Office for Area Sub- 
region C: Vice-President of Recrea- 
tion. 

Theme: Youth — Measure Your 
Values! 

Objectives: To recognize what 
values are. To understand where and 
how we get our values. To realize 
how values affect our decisions. To 
stimulate further thinking about our 
values. 



FINAL APPLICATIONS FOR 
STATE HOMEMAKER DE- 
GREE DUE IN OFFICE OF 
AREA SUPERVISOR ON 
OR BEFORE MARCH 15. 



Characteristics Which Should Be 

Considered when Selecting a 

Candidate for a National 

Office 

She should: 

— be a good manager of time. Get 
jobs assigned her done promptly. 

— be cooperative and dependable. 
Assume responsibility and carry 
through. Meet obligations promptly. 
Work without constant prodding. 

— recognize that being a national 
officer involves responsibility as well 
as honors. Be willing to work for 
the betterment of the organzation and 
in all ways exemplify the standards 
of a good Future Homemaker. 

— get along well with people. Re- 
spect others' viewpoints. Delegate 
authority well and get others to ac- 
cept responsibility. 

— express herself clearly and well. 
Have a voice that can be heard. 

— be self-confident. Meet situa- 
tions tactfully. 

— make good appearance. Be 
neat, tastefully dressed and well- 
groomed. 

— have a cooperative family who 
has a real interest in FHA. 





& 




Mei 



tli oughts i 

Yes, indeed, on these pa;s 
memories of the eight distlct 
from your rally . . . 

The following happy g|l* 
District I, Mahel Louise (J* 
II, Judy Cubberly, Fike Hfli 
High; District IV, Kakielfa 
Ross, Altamahaw Ossipee tgl 
coff High; District VII, W 
District VIII, Dianne Ef-a 
They will be installed at fir 




e pictures which bring back 
See if you can recall one 

your officers for 1961-62. 

Perquimans High; District 
't III, Ruth Guin, Stedman 
kry High; District V, Jan 
ct VI, Rosalie Ervin, Wine- 
e, Union Grove High; and 
therfordton-Spindale High, 
onvention on April 15th. 



My Ideal 



OF MARRIAGE 



Most every girl looks forward to 
the day when she will say, "I do," 
to the one she has chosen for her 
life partner. Therefore, I know that 
1 am no exception when I say that 
I look forward with great anticipation 
to that day and even more forward 
to the days that will follow. I fully 
agree with Bishop Hazen G. Werner 
who said, "A wedding is a ceremony, 
but marriage is an achievement ac- 
complished by continuous growth." 

My definition of marriage is the 
coming together of two emotionally 
mature persons to share their lives 
and to unite for mutual enrichment 
in every possible manner. I believe 
that only through marriage can men 
and women attain their highest good. 

Love is essential in all marriages, 
but it alone cannot make a happy 
one. It is the basis, but love-plus is 
the genuine recipe, love plus a num- 
ber of things according to the make- 
up and desires of the couple. One 
essential quality for a happy marriage 
is common sense. We must realize 
that marriage is a reality, not a dream, 
and that it is not a bed of roses. It 
is good for a couple to have disa- 
greements, but they should profit by 
them. Marriage is somewhat like a 
garden. We have to do more than 
just plant seeds. 

Falling in love is easy, but staying 
in love is hard. Many marriages are 
at first based on romantic love. After 
marriage one can discover so much 
about the partner. Discovery changes 
romantic love to realistic love or in- 
difference. Realistic love is the stuff 
of which happy, secure marriages are 
made. A dash of romance added to 
realistic love is fun; it is desirable, 
but not essential. 

1 have heard many say that success 
in marriage is a matter of finding the 
right person, but I disagree to some 
extent. I feel that it is a matter of 
being the right person. Lots of peo- 
ple are strictly concerned with find- 
ing "Mr. or Miss Right," forgetting 
that marriage is for two and that they 
themselves should be right. 

Success or failure in marriage will 
depend uopn the partners themselves. 
It takes two to make a marriage and 
it will be what they make it. There 



is less friction and the results are 
always better if those working to- 
gether will pull in the same direction. 
Happy, lasting marriage is a goal 
that involves a sound adjustment 
between two people. Only working 
together for the good of themselves 
as one, can success in marriage be 
attained. 

Nancy Britt 
State Secretary 



THREE IMPORTANT EVENTS 

National FHA Week 
April 9-15 

State Convention 

Memorial Auditorium 

Raleigh 

April 15 

FHA Camp Weeks 

White Lake 

May 28-June 3 

June 5-June 10 



ANNUAL CONFERENCE 

Continued from page 3 

formulate plans to take care of the 
needs of married high school stu- 
dents. A survey of married students 
in North Carolina accredited high 
schools has been conducted by The 
Woman's College. This survey shows 
that more than eighty per cent of 
the reporting schools had married 
students enrolled. The county schools 
and the mountain schools had a 
larger enrollment of married students. 
Eighty-two per cent of the married 
students were female, and only eight- 
een per cent were male. The twelfth 
grade girls accounted for one-half of 
the married students. Most schools 
determined whether or not to admit 
married students by the individual 
cases. Fifteen per cent of the schools 
reporting restricted all activities of 
married students. Some required a 
hearing before the board of educa- 
tion before they could return to 
school after their marriage. One-half 
of the schools reporting dismissed all 
of the students as soon as pregnancy 
was known. One-eighth said married 
students were not an asset to the 
school, and ten per cent were unde- 
cided. One-half of those schools 
reporting said that married students 
were a problem. Some said that 




Father-Daughter Cover Dish Supper Given by Beaufort FHA'ers to honor their dads. 



married students were more settled 
than the other students. 

There were numerous reasons why 
married students were considered to 
be a problem. They were said to 
influence other students to marry. 
Also they discussed their personal 
marital experiences. Married stu- 
dents were reported to not fit into 
the school pattern. They expected 
special privileges and snowed evi- 
dence of immaturity. These students 
produced poor scholastic achieve- 
ment. Married students were re- 
ported to be a problem first of all 
to other students and, secondly, to 
themselves. One-fifth reported hav- 
ing a course in family life education 
available for married students. Four- 
fifths of those who reported such 
courses available said courses were 
offered in home economics. Ninety- 
six per cent of those schools reporting 
said family life units were offered in 
home economics. Only fourteen per 
cent reported a planned counsel 
provided for married students. The 
guidance or teacher counselor did 
the counseling. Eighty-five per cent 
said that nothing was done to help 
married students in any special way. 
Some schools reported guidance and 
study groups under the direction of 
the home economics teacher. 



As a 

Swiss FHA'er Sees Us 



Memo to— 

Committee 
Members of 
National Projects 

From — Bettie Cook, Vice-Presi- 
dent of National Projects, Moody 
High School, Moody, Texas. Con- 
cerning the project and plan of action 
for 1960-61. 

Project: "To Give Publicity to 
Youth's Constructive Contribution to 
Society." 

Goals: To encourage chapters to 
develop activities relating to the 
National Projects. 

To encourage them to tell others 
what youth are doing constructively. 
Plan of Action: 

Recommend that each committee 
member develop, with her own chap- 
ter, a project relating to one of the 
six national projects. 

Each committee member contact 
her state adviser for the selection of 
three chapters in her state to work 
on the same project. 



I am Judith Lutz. foreign exchange 
student from Berne. Switzerland. 
Berne is a pretty city, nearly as 




big as Charlotte and eight hundred 
years old. There I attend a private 
school and take about twelve sub- 
jects. 

Every Friday afternoon from two 
o'clock until eight o'clock I took 
homemaking last year because every 
girl in our State has to take home 



economics courses before she is eight- 
een years old. On these afternoon 
classes we first had a workshop 
either on sewing, nursing, or house 
cleaning; followed by preparing a 
dinner. 

Here in Shelby High School I take 
third year home economics and I 
enjoy this very much because it is 
the subject where I learn the most 
about the people in the United States. 
It amazes me to see how you all 
master good management by doing 
homemaking so quickly and easily, 
using modern methods and machines. 

Imagine my surprise when I saw 
our jelly on the display at the Cleve- 
land County Fair. Also something 
to write home about is making bis- 
cuits and rolls because I've never 
even heard of these! And, different 
and delicious is ice-cream, made in 
a freezer. 

Home projects I like because we 
learn to put into practice at home 
what we study in class. This brings 
closer relationship between parent, 
teacher, and school. 

Another thing I like very much is 
the FHA. In Switzerland we do not 
have a club like FHA. Therefore, 
it has been a new experience for me 
to work towards new horizons with 
our home economics girls in extra 
curricular club activities. 



Proposal 

Ideas for getting your activities 
underway — 

1. Select one of the six national 
projects listed: 

Objective I. To develop our po- 
tential abilities. 

Projects: Youth Can Do. Teen- 
age Consumer. 

Objective II. To develop a better 

understanding of our family members 

and to contribute to their well-being. 

Projects : Family Unity. Family 

Fitness. 

Objective III. To interpret the 
value of home economics as a basic 
part of our total education. 

Project: Your Future With 

Home Economics. 

Objective IV. To promote good 
will through getting to know our 
neighbors at home and abroad. 

Project: Getting to Know You. 



2. Refer to Program of Work — 
pp. 13-18 in September 1959, Teen 
Times as a means of getting ideas for 
activities. 

3. See what has been done by 
other chapters to carry out projects 
as reported in Teen Times, April, 
pp. 3, 5, 6, and 8; Feb. 1960, pp. 
13-14; Nov. 1959, pp. 1, 2, and 5. 

Ideas for publicizing 

1. Make it interesting to your 
local chapter by trying some of these 
techniques — a film and panel, demon- 
stration, outside speakers, field trip, 
program using all chapter members. 

2. Tell your story to others 
through radio, news articles, tele- 
vision, talks to civic or service 
groups. 

3. Use criteria for good news 
story — See Public Relations, page 59, 
in Chapter Handbook, in preparing 
news story. 

Freda Brttt, State Reporter 




The 176 members of the Benvenue 
Chapter of the Future Homemakers of 
America held their fifth meeting of the 
year on January 11, in the school audi- 
torium. 

After the opening ceremony, led by 
president Marilyn Taylor, program chair- 
man Mary T. Burnette introduced the 
guest panel. Mary T. chose her idea for 
the program from "The Home, The Hub 
of Good Citizenship," a theme used at 
the National Convention last July. The 
panel, with Mrs. June M. Looney, Guid- 
ance Director of Nash County Schools 
as moderator, discussed citizenship in the 
home, community, and school. Other 
panelists, Mrs. H. P. Glasgow, a par- 
ent; Mr. R. B. Gordon, Benvenue 
principal; and W. T. Adams, minister, 
discussed grood citizenship in their re- 
spective fields. 

The panelists brought out the fact 
that the skills of good citizenship are not 
learned over night, but by degrees. The 
pre-school child has his own small world 
to live in and never gives much thought 
to others. When the child begins school, 
his world widens and he learns that he is 
not the only person in the world. As the 
child matures and his world becomes 
even larger, not just including the home 
and school, but the church and the com- 
munity also, he must learn self-discipline 
and how to work with others for the 
good of the community and not just 
himself. 

As Rev. Adams pointed out, the Bibli- 
cal story of the Good Samaritan presents 
three attitudes toward life: (1) What's 
yours is mine, if I can get it; (2) What's 
mine is mine and I'll keep it; and (3) 
What's mine is yours if you need it. 
A good citizen strives to be the person 
with the third characteristic, not selfish. 
but sharing. 

After the discussion, a question and 
answer period followed which allowed 
FHA members to ask the panel questions 
concerning good citizenship. 

Boone Trail Chapter of FHA 

Mamers, North Carolina 

Dear Girls: 

Let me take this opportunity to ex- 
press my appreciation for the very en- 
joyable evening at your Mother and 
Daughter banquet. From its very begin- 
ning to the end it reflected the efforts of 
people who know what they are doing 
and who know how to get it done. 

The menu was a delightful and com- 
plete choice; the food too was very en- 
joyable and deliciously prepared. One 
would not have thought that it was pos- 
sible to have decorated an ordinary 
school lunch room as attractively as you 
had done. The program was both enjoy- 
able and informative, a tribute to those 
responsible for its planning and presen- 
tation. I especially enjoyed the special 
singing and wish to express my admira- 
tion for those who are willing to partici- 
pate in such things that others may re- 
ceive a measure of enjoyment. 

The thoughtful and responsible charac- 
ter which was reflected in this banquet 



gives every indication that many happy 
and successful future homemakers are 
now enrolled at Boone Trail. 

So for a father who found himself 
delightfully entertained at your Mother 
and Daughter banquet, let me say thank 
you and God bless you. 

In appreciation. 

Ray Sparrow, Minister 

Mrs. Frances Jarman, "North Carolina' 
First Lady of Radio," was guest speaker 
at the FHA annual Mother-Daughter 
banquet which was held at Credle School 
in Oxford. She spoke on "Charmed Man- 
ners," a subject dear to her heart as she 
has conducted several charm schools 
throughout North Carolina as well as 
having been over 20,500 radio programs. 

Following Mrs. Jarman's speech, a 
fashion show was given by the waitresses 
entitled, "Fall of Fashions." Such origi- 
nals as a "tea dress" covered with tea 
bags and "print dress" made of news 
print were modeled by the eighth grade 
waitresses. 

The banquet, which is the highlight of 
the FHA'ers year, included a toast to 
the mothers by Nancy Farabow (with 
her mother responding). The "Cinder- 
ella" theme was carried out in decora- 
tions. A storybook castle was in the 
background, a slipper on each placecard, 
and a big clock showed the approaching 
magic hour of twelve. "Everyone fell into 
the magic spell and left the banquet in 
clouds of enchantment, saying this was 
certainly a most successful banquet," 
commented Susan Daniel. 

The skit presented by the Creedmoor 
girls illustrated an actual classroom 
scheme in the area of housing. The girls, 
with their teachers, were planning to 
decorate the bedroom, dining room, and 
living room of the Home Economics Cot- 
tage. The over-all goal was stated — 
activities suggested — and a money 
making project was suggested and dis- 
cussed as means of financing the project. 
The classroom discussion helped one 
girl to see what she could do at home to 
improve the appearance of her own bed- 
room. This led the teacher into the 
home for a home visit. While in the home 
the teacher was able to help the girl and 
her mother to see home experiences, FHA 
and classroom activities as a combined 
unit. The girl chose to use the work on 
her bedroom as a goal towards improving 
the appearance of her home in her FHA 
degree work. 

December 21, 1960 was a big day for 
the ten East Henderson FHA girls. We 
prepared Christmas boxes for the chil- 
dren at the Greenville Rescue Mission. 
Greenville, South Carolina. We left the 
school about four o'clock and carried 
fourteen boxes of clothing and food. 

We reached Greenville about four 
thirty and distributed jumping Santa 
Clauses, which were made by several 
FHA girls, to forty-three small children. 
We visited with the children and were 
shown by the "mothers" throughout the 
orphanage. These small children are from 
broken homes or homes where the par- 
ents are unable to take care of the chil- 
dren. 

The children showed such excitement 
as we visited them and seemed delighted 
with their gifts. As we drove home it 
gave us a special warmth to be able to 
spread a small ray of joy during Christ- 
mas. 



The Fayetteville Senior High Chapter 
of FHA, working to achieve their sec- 
ond objective, "To develop a better un- 
derstanding of our family members and 
to contribute to their well-being," gave 
to the Confederate Women's home a very 
enlightening Thanksgiving program. The 
program was given on Wednesday, No- 
vember 23 at 3:45 p.m. 

At the beginning of the program to 
help the ladies better understand our 
organization, Linda Krause read the FHA 
Creed. Camelia McRae. our president, 
then led the group in a prayer. After 
this the FHA Choir presented a Coral 
reading entitled. "A Thanksgiving Hymn." 
A skit bringing to mind pictures of 
the first Thanksgiving was next on the 
program. Participating in the skit were: 
Dot Crane and Charlotte Cade as In- 
dians: Katherine McMillian as Priscilla, 
an old fashioned Pilgrim girl; Suzanne 
Chiotakis as the Pilgrim boy and Joanne 
Parrish sang a solo. "Ah Believe Me is 
All Those Endearing Young Charms." 
Mary Cade played the piano for the en- 
tire program. In conclusion the Future 
Homemakers Choir sang, "Faith of our 
Fathers" and "Come Ye Thankful." 

By sharing with the elderly ladies a 
little of their time and Thanksgiving 
spirit, our FHA'ers learned a great deal 
about older people. Because of this ex- 
perience a satisfying and joyous memory 
accompanied them throughout their 
Thanksgiving holidays. 

On Wednesday night. December 7. the 
Gatesville Chapter of Future Homemak- 
ers of America entertained at a Mother- 
Daughter Banquet in the Gatesville High 
School Cafeteria. 

The theme for the occasion was 
"Christmas in Winter Wonderland." A 
color scheme of blue and white was used. 
Painted snow scenes were placed on 
each wall of the cafeteria. The tables were 
covered in white table cloths with sap- 
phire blue runners down the center. Cen- 
terpieces for the tables were triple 
candle holders with twisted blue tapers 
surrounded by silver magnolia leaves and 
blue sycamore balls. The program covers 
and place cards were of blue and white 
with snow ski scene printed on them. A 
decorated Christmas tree stood in one 
corner of the room. A lighted Santa 
Claus and his reindeer were hung out- 
side the window headed toward the 
Christmas tree. A blue spotlight shone 
on a painted scene on the bulletin board 
which illustrated the theme of the ban- 
quet. The entrance doors of the cafe- 
teria were covered in white and deco- 
rated with red bells, stars, and Merry 
Christmas in silver letters. 

Marian Parker, President of the FHA, 
served as toastmaster for the evening. 
After the opening FHA ceremony, 
Marian welcomed the guest and Mrs. 
Thomas Parker responded. Olivia Taylor 
gave the toast to the Mothers after which 
Mrs. W. P. Taylor responded. 

Special music for the program was by 
Peggy Carter, Faye Lane, and Olivia Tay- 
lor, who sang "Winter Wonderland." 
Linda Jordan sang "White Christmas" 
and Joy Brown sang "Silver Bells." 

The main feature of the program was a 
Christmas Fashion Revue presented by 
the Home Economics II and II classes. 
The garments modeled by the girls were 
constructed in Home Economics classes. 
The Christmas Fashion Revue, entitled 



8 



"Santa's Secret" was preceded by a short 
skit in which Corbett Hand played the 
part of Santa Clause. The script for the 
show, written in rhyme by Carol Brown 
and Vivian Casper, was narrated by 
Frances Neble. Etta Brown Spivey ren- 
dered background music as the girls 
modeled their garments in front of a 
snow scene on the bulletin board. 

Mrs. Evelyn B. Willey, Home Eco- 
nomics teacher, awarded eleven Junior 
Homemaker Degrees to Sandra Williams, 
Peggy Green, Faye Lane, Roxie Moore, 
Doris Eason, Jane Tinkham, Faye Fel- 
ton, Linda Eure, Patricia Umphlett, 
Detra Hedgepeth, and Olivia Taylor and 
three Chapter Homemaker Degrees to 
Judith Johnson, Nellie Yelton, and 
Vivian Casper. 

The banquet was concluded by the 
members repeating together the FHA 
Creed. Everyone then sang together "Si- 
lent Night." 

For fifteen months, a young member 
of the Jordan Chapel Community, thir- 
ten-year-old Melvin Andrews, had been 
suffering from rheumatic fever. He was 
confined to a small room away from the 
world of noisy laughter and fun shared 
by other children. His world was dark 
and lonely as he prayed for comfort 
and cheer. 

Meanwhile, back at Grantham High 
School, a group of girls were carrying 
out a projejct in which they learned 
about home care of the sick. The na- 
tional goal of the Future Homemakers 
is "to promote good will through knowing 
our neighbors at home and abroad." To 
combine these efforts, the club members 
decided to become sunbeams brightening 
the isolated world of Melvin Andrews. 

They began by gathering fruit for a 
sunshine basket which several of the 
girls presented to Melvin. His face was 
the picture of happiness as he received 
it. During National FHA Week, the 
members contributed get - well cards 
which were sent to him daily. Slowly, he 
learned to laugh again through the comic 
books brought to him. At Christmas, the 
girls played Santa Clause by decorating 
a Christmas tree which they carried to 
him, along with a model airplane. Each 
of the girls sent him a cheerful Christ- 
mas card. 

Melvin has written several letters of 
thanks, telling the girls how much 
brighter they have made his life by sur- 
rounding him with pretty cards, toys, and 
comic books. He wrote that he would 
never forget what wonderful friends they 
iave been to him. 

These future homemakers are happily 
rewarded by having Melvin back in 
school now and knowing that they helped 
to encourage him. 

"Six Steps to Survival" was the title 
of a display arranged in a local depart- 
ment store window recently. Southern 
Pines has a very inactive Civil De- 
fense Program. Our chapter's main pur- 
pose to stimulate interest by showing 
what preparation was needed before a 
disaster occurred. Our display illustrating 
the six steps with a background of an 
atomic explosion was most effective. Peo- 
ple began to ask questions. 

Questions were not enough for the 
enthusiastic FHA members in Southern 
Pines. Each member began assembling 
necessary home supplies and cleaning 
basements. This enthusiasm has spread 



somewhat but not enough. Our chapter 
plans to continue this project each year 
until local Civil Defense officials pro- 
mote an active program. 

The Future Homemakers of America 
Chapter of Stedman, North Carolina, held 
their annual dance with the Future Farm- 
ers of America in November. Instead of 
having just the usual dance they wanted 
to do something different. They decided 
to have a Masquerade Party since the 
clubs had never had one. After much 
planning and hard work the night finally 
arrived. Everyone walked through a door 
covered with multi-color streamers and 
stood amazed at the "new world" in the 
cafeteria. Glittering mask and stars were 
lovely beneath the colored floodlights. 
Through the air floated baloons and the 
music played when everyone danced. 
Guests looked around and greeted L'il 
Abner and Daisy Mae, Little Red Riding 
Hood, and the Big Bad Wolf, a couple of 
beatniks, Cinderella, a pioneer couple, 
Scottish dancers, a Chinese maid, flap- 
pers, gypsies and many others. At the 
end of the Ball, it was easy to see that 
everyone had enjoyed the dancing and 
refreshments and it would be a night 
long remembered. 

Charlotte F.H.'ers Begin Active Year 

The Garinger High School chapter of 
the Future Homemakers of America has 
started the 1960-61 year off with a bang. 

First, we elected officers who are as 
follows: President, Mary Fisher; Vice- 
President, Pris Tillman; Secretary, Nancy 



Helms; Treasurer, Pat Tillman; and 
County Representative, Gwen Rodgers. 
Miss Francis Ryan and Mrs. Virginia 
Boyd are our advisors. 

Our first project was a "Surprise Pack- 
age" booth for our school carnival, which 
took place on October 21, 1960 at Gar- 
inger High School. Several members of 
the club baked or bought all kinds of 
goodies to go in boxes which were 
wrapped attractively and sold at a price 
between fifty cents and a dollar. Long 
before the carnival was over, we had sold 
all of our boxes and had made fourteen 
dollars. However, since half of all the 
money taken in went to the Student Coun- 
cil, which sponsored the carnival, we 
made a profit of seven dollars. Our booth 
was decorated with red and white crepe 
paper, and we used the FHA banner in 
the background. 

Our second big project was helping 
the county chapter distribute pamphlets 
door-to-door for a local paint company. 
For this the Mecklenburg County chap- 
ter will receive a check for two hundred 
dollars. 

For Christmas we helped another 
school club to play Santa Clause to a 
needy family. Each member brought her 
old toys and clothes which were in good 
condition. Then we wrapped them and 
on Christmas Eve, representatives from 
each club took the gifts to the family. 

More activities have been planned for 
the remainder of the year so we are 
hoping that our projects may have helped 
your club plan the rest of its year. 



TRIAL OF COUNTY EDUCATOR 
PROVED TO BE ENTERTAINING 



Mr. J. J. Tarlton, that notorious 
superintendent of public instruction 
in Rutherford County was placed on 
trial Thursday night at Central High 
School's cafeteria by the Home Eco- 
nomics teachers of the county and 
the Future Homemakers of America 
members. 

The Mock Trial followed the 
theme of whether Mr. Tarlton should 
be allowed to retire next June or 
not. Several key witnesses were 
called to the stand to testify on the 
subject at the trial, which was pre- 
sided over by "Judye" Rita Robbins, 
president of the county FHA. 

His summons read as follows: 

State of North Carolina, County 
of Rutherford, in the Court of Public 
Schools: The Rutherford County 
Home Economics Association, plain- 
tiff, vs. Jesse J. Tarlton, accused. 

This matter comes before the 
County on motion of the Rutherford 
County Home Economics Associa- 
tion. It appears that Jesse J. Tarlton, 
accused, has applied for retirement. 

IT IS, THEREFORE, OR- 
DERED, that the accused appear at 
7:00 o'clock p.m., December 8, 



1960, in the Central High Cafeteria 
to show cause, if any he can, why 
he should be allowed to retire. You 
are the honor dinner guest of the 
Plaintiff. 

And the summons was signed by 
the members of the Home Economics 
Association as jurors and plaintiffs. 

Following the delicious meal 
served by the FHA girls, the court 
was called to order and "Judge" 
Robbins took her seat on the bench. 
Bonnie Hamrick of Ellenboro was 
prosecuting attorney, and Betsy Den- 
son of Central was defense attorney. 

Actually, Mr. Tarlton should feel 
close to the organization, because he 
is one of the few men in the county 
that can claim membership in the 
Future Homemakers of America. In 
1954 he was voted an honorary mem- 
bership in the FHA, and it is an 
honor of which he is very proud. 

A plaque was presented Superin- 
tendent Tarlton in appreciation for 
the many years of service given to 
the education of the youth of his 
county and particularly for his aid 
to the FHA program in the county. 



Future Homemakers of America 



CREED 

We are the Future Homemakers of America 
We face the future with warm courage, 
And high hope, 

For we have the clear consciousness of seeking 
Old and precious values. 

For we are the builders of homes, 

Homes for America's future. 

Homes where living will be the expression of everything 

That is good and fair. 

Homes where truth and love and security and faith 

Will be realities, not dreams. 




"The homes of tomorrow are in 

the hand of the youth 

of today" 



rm 



We are the Future Homemakers of America, 
We face the future with warm courage, 
And high hope. 



Caroline Says: 

Knowing when to say nothing 
also shows a final command 
of the language. 

Do not expect the harvest the 
day after the seed is sown. 

Without tact you can learn 
nothing. 

There is only one important 
moment in your life — that 
is now. 

Courtesy is the art of living in 
a crowd. 




m 

s 



cu+o 



YOUTH RESPONDS 




FUTURE HOMEMAKERS 

* North Carolina Association * 



VOLUME VIII 



A 

Good 

Secretary 



OUR MAY 
COVER 

Ann Scott, Billy Clark, President 
of Fayetteville Senior High, and 
Gretchen Bens strike for our benefit. 



A GOOD SECRETARY! Is that not what every organization or club 
needs and depends upon? Without a good secretary no club could function 
properly or adequately. 

Are you a secretary? If so, why not be an ideal one by possessing the 
traits I have listed below. 

I — is for industrious, initiative and interest 
D — is for dependability and diligence 
E — is for efficiency in everything one does 
A — is for accuracy — work that's "A" plus 
L — is for Learning — an absolute "must" 

S — is for sincerity expressed every day 

E — is for enthusiasm one possesses 

C — is for cooperativeness and courtesy one stresses 

R — is for reliance 

E — is for effort and eagerness 

T — is for one's tactfulness and tolerance toward all 

A — is one's attention in things, big and small 

R — is for responsibility 

Y — is for one's yearning to prove ability 

If you try a little harder, perhaps you can be an "IDEAL SECRETARY." 

Nancy Britt, State Secretary 



North Carolina Association of Future Homemakers of America 



State Officers 
1960-61 

President — Sammie Gatlin, Franklinville V 
Vice-President — Kakie Jordan, Cary IV 
Secretary — Nancy Britt, Barnesville III 
Treasurer — Alice Faye Smith, B. F. Grady II 
Historian — Elaine Renegar, Harmony VII 
Parliamentarian — Susan Chandler, Weaverville VIII 
Reporter — Freda Britt, Murfreesboro I 
Song Leader — Nancy Evans, East Mecklenburg VI 



District Advisers 
1960-61 

Miss Frances Newby, Perquimans I 
Mrs. Emily R. Wells, Wallace-Rose Hill II 
Mrs. Louise Burleson, Barnesville III 
Miss Ruth Turnage, Bailey IV 
Mrs. Agnes L. Farthing, Ragsdale V 
Mrs. Mary Miles, Anson VI 
Virginia Coltrane, North Surry VII 
Mrs. Sue T. Glovier, Old Fort VIII 



State Adviser 
Catherine T. Dennis 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 

Division of Vocational Education 
Raleigh, North Carolina 



1960-61 Affiliated FHA chapters in the North Carolina Association 
453 chapters — 25,068 



Convention Comments . . . 

15th Annual State Convention 



Three thousand, nine hundred and 
ninety-seven registered and some 
turned away so the rumor goes. It 
was a glorious sunny day with 
enough cold to lift the spirit and ex- 
hilarate us. The impressive presenta- 
tion of colors by the Four Oaks 
Chapter and our pledge of allegiance 
gave a few moments of solemnity 
to the occasion. Our President, Sam- 
mie Gatlin presided with poise and 
serenity so that no one could imagine 
that she had quivering knees! 

Following the presentation of the 
condition of our finances in a very 
original way by our treasurer, Alice 
Faye Smith, the real program got 
under way. For forty minutes you 
could have heard a pin drop while we 
listened attentively to a talk by Rev. 
Albert G. Edwards, pastor of the 
First Presbyterian Church on 
"Strengthening Spiritual Values in 
the Family." He gave four important 
ideas to remember: 1. There must 
be some coercion in family living 
to instill habits which help young 
people to begin developing values 
for self. 2. That through good con- 
versation and exchange of ideas we 
begin to set ideals for ourselves. 

3. That imitation begins early in the 
life of a child and those who are 
nearest to him are the people he 
imitates. This fact makes it doubly 
important that parents and older 
children set good examples and, 

4. Spiritual training must begin early 
and in the home. The inspiration 
gotten in home is important in the 
development of all family members. 

Following Dr. Edwards' address. 
Honorary State Membership was 
conferred upon Dr. Naomi Albanese, 
Dean of the School of Home Eco- 




nomics, Woman's College in Greens- 
boro; Mr. James Everette Miller, 
Assistant State Superintendent of 
Public Instruction; and Dr. Dallas 
G. Herring, Chairman of the State 
Board of Education. 

After fifteen years, the constitu- 
tion of our organization was amend- 
ed by adoption. Then everyone scat- 
tered for lunch. Some did not leave 
the grounds as evidenced by Jones 
Central and Southwood Schools. 

As usual, we had a treat in hear- 













1 1'"] ', l ~ 








f-F~ 


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—4 : 






j«"#- '_i:_rjj| 




ing greetings from the F.F.A. Presi- 
dent. This year Bobby Robinson 
traveled all the way from Marshall 
to bring them. 

Mary Elizabeth Overton gave an 
interesting report on her trip to 
Atlanta to attend the Southern Re- 
gional Safety Conference and Freda 
Britt likewise reported on her trip 
to Chicago to attend the National 
Youth Power Conference. 

Then came the highlight of "How 
Pretty Can You Be" by Mrs. C. Lee 
Revell of Columbus, Georgia. Her 
talk was centered on making the 
most of our assets. She gave some 
interesting demonstrations on pos- 
ture, walking, and sitting and she 
carried on a rapid fire question- 
answer period from the floor. 

Girls earned their State Home- 
maker Degree and received their 
certificates. 

The impressive installation service 
closed the meeting with the 1961- 
62 officers as follows: Mabel Louise 
(Pete) Cook, Treasurer, District I; 
Judy Cubberly, Secretary, District 
II; Ruth Quinn, Vice-President, Dis- 
trict III; Kakie Jordan, President, 
District IV; Jan Ross, Song Leader, 
District V; Rosalie Ervin, Historian, 
District VI; Linda White, Parlia- 
mentarian, District VII; and Diann 
Edwards, Reporter, District VIII. 
The district advisers were introduced 
in order of districts with Anne Las- 
siter, Mrs. Norma Lee Yelverton, 
Mrs. Retha Thompson, Mrs. Gladys 
Farnell, Mrs. Hazel Tripp, Mrs. 
Mary N. Copple, Mrs. Dorothy 
Felts, and Mrs. Elizabeth H. Reed. 

And last, but not least, Becky 
(Continued on page 8) 




Youth Responds . . . 

TO SAFETY MEASURES 
IN THE HOME 



"Teens For Safety" was the theme 
of the Youth Division of the 22nd 
Annual Southern Safety Conference 
and Exposition in Atlanta, Georgia, 
March 5, 6, 7, 1961. There were 
approximately 250 youth delegates 
in attendance from 14 Southern 
States: Arkansas, Alabama, Florida, 
Georgia, North Carolina, South 
Carolina, Oklahoma, Virginia and 
West Virginia, Louisiana, Missis- 
sippi and Texas. 

The program of the Youth Di- 
vision of the 1961 Conference was 
a continuation of the effort begun 
in 1955 to give the Youth of our 
Southland an opportunity to meet 
together in order that they may be- 
come more aware of the need for 
Youth leadership in safety activities 
and that they may plan a more con- 
certed attack on accidents of all 
types and especially those with which 
Youth are concerned. 

"A Safer Southland— The Chal- 
lenge of the Sixties" was the subject 
discussed at the first general session 
of the Youth Division. At this ses- 
sion, youth delegates divided into 
four workshop groups — School — 
Home — Farm and Home Safety. 

I attended the Home Safety work- 
shop as the official delegate of the 
Future Homemakers of America 
from North Carolina. 

Because more than 4,000,000 
people are injured and over 27,000 
killed each year in home accidents, 
we realized the utmost importance 
in "planning an action program in 
Home Safety for the High School." 

Home Safety is today one of the 
greatest unsolved problems in the 
Safety field. In addition to the 27,000 
deaths there have been between 4,- 
000,000 and 5,000,000 people in- 
jured and approximately 130,000 
permanently disabled in home ac- 
cidents annually. Annually, 14,500 
are killed by home falls and 5,000 
are killed by home burns. Home ac- 
cidents kill more children (one to 



fourteen years of age) than any dis- 
ease. There is one death from a home 
accident every 18 minutes — one in- 
jury every seven seconds. 

What can the Future Homemaker 
of America do to help solve the 
vital problem? We cannot make 
every home a safe home, but we can 
initiate in our Future Homemaker of 
America Plan of Work a program of 




Mary Elizabeth Overton, Benvenue Chapter, 
represents N. C. FHA'ers at Southern Safety 
Conference. 

Home Safety Education which will 
approach the problem in our own 
homes. Through our program we 
must teach Future Homemaker of 
America members the cause of 
Home Accidents together with some 
means of preventing them if we are 
to promote safer home living for the 
high school girl and her family. 

The Home Safety Section Work- 
shop made the following recommen- 
dations for an Action Program after 
three sessions were held. 

1 . That, due to changing patterns of 
American culture, the Southern 
Safety Conference consider adding 



another workshop to the present 
framework of the Youth Section to 
deal with the problem of Recrea- 
tional and Outdoor Safety. 

2. That the safety groups for the 
1962 workshops be furnished a more 
comprehensive supply of resource 
materials both before and during 
the conference. 

3. That young people take em- 
phatic steps to acquaint their fa- 
milies with the preparations for dis- 
asters and to encourage that each 
home is prepared by having neces- 
sities such as first-aid kits and food 
supplies, etc. as well as by having 
actual disaster drills. 

4. That youth organizations be 
included in the Civil Defense pro- 
grams on the national and state levels 
and that Civil Defense be promoted 
by young people through skits, tele- 
vision shows, displays, etc. 

5. That each school adopt a proj- 
ect of checking each home repre- 
sented by using checklists available 
through the National Safety Council 
and in this way find and eliminate 
home hazards. 

6. That each school have a 
planned program for the year in 
home safety which will include 
using school and home safety check- 
lists, assembly programs, radio pro- 
grams, school and community news- 
paper articles, posters, and exhibits, 
and other means of arousing aware- 
ness and concern in home safety. 

7. That young people become fa- 
miliar with and encourage action 
toward more strict enforcement of 
gas and building codes. 

8. That all baby cribs, beds, and 
toys be furnished with non-poisonous 
varnish and paints. 

The safe way can become ha- 
bitual by Future Homemaker of 
America members through safety 
practices in the home. Family safety 
is the whole family's responsibility. 
A creative attitude will help us to 
stand on our feet safety- wise. We must 
all think of safety practices to keep 
our homes safe. 

REMEMBER: We all want to do 
things the easy way. Human nature, 
that's all. The safe way becomes the 
easy way with just a little thought 
and practice. Home Safety is a 
"round the clock" job. The injury 
you prevent or the life you save may 
be a loved one's or it may be . . . 
YOUR OWN! 

Mary Lib Overton, 
Benvenue Chapter. 



FREDA BRITT AT 
NyP CONGRESS 



Dear FHA'ers: 

When I received a letter from our 
state supervisor, Dr. Dennis, telling 
me that I was one of the six delegates 
who would represent North Caro- 
lina at the National Youth Power 
Congress in Chicago, I was indeed 
a surprised and very happy FHA 
girl. 

On Tuesday, March 8, I met the 
other delegates, Dianne Monroe, 
Nancey Basenight, Rusty Taylor, 
Rodney Howell, and Cole Porter in 
Raleigh. We were all anxious to 
learn exactly what this "Youth Con- 
gress" was all about. The N. C. 
Farm Bureau which was sponsoring 
us had a "send off" breakfast on 
Wednesday morning. Commissioner 
L. Y. Ballentine and Mr. Wallace 
Parker of the Farm Bureau were 
present to give us some ideas of 
what we would be doing. Then, off 
into the wild, blue yonder, we went. 
This in itself was quite an experience 
since only one of the delegates had 
ever flown before. 

We arrived in Chicago about 1 :00 
o'clock and headed for the Hilton 
Palmer House, which was the head- 
quarters for the Congress. 

That evening we had our first meet- 
ing to learn our purposes and to get 
organized. "Food Comes First for 
Youthpower" was the theme as it 
(Continued on page 7) 



Youth Responds . . 



TO GOOD EATING 



Parents who complain that their 
youngsters pull a vanishing act at 
meal-time might benefit by running 
the whole show with a little more 
zeal. 

Admitting that teenagers were 
sometimes responsible for a decline 
in family dining, a group of outstand- 
ing youngsters representing teen- 
agers across the country, declared 
that adults in the family must show 
stronger leadership in effecting a 
return to this American tradition. 
They felt the family should dine 
together during two meals a day, at 
least, to preserve and strengthen 
family unity. 

Paul S. Willis, president of Groce- 
ry Manufacturers of America, Inc., 
underscored the youngsters' com- 
ments on family dining and said that 
true respect and understanding be- 
tween children and parents are a 
result of shared experiences. And 
there are few better ways, he pointed 
out, to bring the family into closer 
contact for full companionship than 
by gathering them around the dining 



table. We should emphasis food for 
its social aspects as well as for its 
nutritive value, and enjoy mealtime 
as a family retreat from the day's 
hustle and bustle. 

Mr. Willis also said that the Con- 
gress was most successful in its aims 
to bring about a better understand- 
ing of the food industry as a whole to 
the adult as well as the teenage pub- 
lic, and to point out the various 
steps required in processing food 
from the time it leaves the farm 
until it reaches the table. 

The delegates, who met with food 
industry representatives, educators, 
nutritionists and civic leaders, also 
resolved to press for a movement 
to promote better breakfasts in their 
homes and local communities to keep 
teenage nutrition up to par. 

During the conference, the dele- 
gates elected two "All-American 
Teenagers" — seventeen - year - old 
Dianne Monroe of Rockingham, 
North Carolina, and Allan Ander- 
son, 18, of Chapin, Illinois. 




Becky Brown of Hamlet Chapter, North Caro- 
lina's candidate for Vice President of Rec- 
reation. 



Erwin F.H.A.-F.F.A. entertain Mothers and Dads. 



Youth Responds . . 

LEARNING TO LIVE 
WITH CHILDREN 



From the viewpoint of the three 
groups involved, the "Playschool" 
conducted recently by the Home 
Economics Department of Stokes- 
dale School was a tremendous suc- 
cess. Mrs. Margaret Coltrane, Home 
Economics Teacher, conceived the 
idea of a "Playschool" when she 
was planning a unit of study on child 
development. 

Eighteen home economics girls 
spent five weeks studying the unit. 
Two of these weeks they conducted 
the "Playschool." The first week 
prior to the school was spent in 
talking about what a playschool is, 
the value of the school to pre-school 
children and in making plans for the 
school the two following weeks. The 




last two weeks were spent in further 
study and evaluating the school. 

The school was held for ten chil- 
dren in the 2-6 year age group in 
the morning from 8:30 until 10:30. 
The children were selected from the 
response to a questionnaire the girls 
had sent out. 

Each girl was required to assist 
for 2 hours in the school and to ob- 
serve for four hours. Each girl ob- 
served a child (the same child) and 
noted the reactions of the child. 

The second year students studied 
food for children, prepared and 
served snacks to them. The third 
year students studied behavior and 
emotional problems. 

From the viewpoint of the home 
economics girls, the experience has 
developed for them a deeper interest 
in small children, a further recogni- 
tion of the value of play in a child's 
development, more respect of the 
child as an individual, a better un- 
derstanding of how a child grows 
and develops, and better habits, of 
precaution in caring for young 
children. 

From the experience, the children 
have had the opportunity to share \\ ith 
a group, play with toys and materials 
not usually available at home, to 
enjoy music and musical games with 
other children, to develop their crea- 




tive ability through various play ma- 
terial and to have had a good time. 
The experiment gave the teacher 
the opportunity to present the unit 
of study in an interesting and ab- 
sorbing way so that it was a real 
learning experience for the pupils. 

TOTS AND TEENS 

Since the beginning of the second 
semester the girls in Durham High 
have been studying Child Care. After 
making reports and various discus- 
sions on the different phases of child- 
hood, they had a more vivid under- 
standing of children. Each girl had 
an observation sheet to make a 
careful studv of a small child. 

On February 24. 1961, the first 
year home economics classes enter- 
tained children from the ages of two 
to five. The party was given for 
the purpose of observing the actions 
and sayings of small children. 
(Continued on page 8) 




LOVING IS SHARING 

Our Hillbilly 



By NANCY JAMES 

Since Christmas some one in the James 
family, Mr. Ralph E. James, Sr., my 
dad; Mrs. Ralph James, my mom; Raiph, 
Jr., my older brother; Nancy (that's me); 
and Sam, my younger brother, always 
asks "Who is going to pick up our 'Hill- 
billy' this weekend?" 

It all began before Christmas. Sam and 
I asked Daddy and Mother if we could 
adopt a little girl for the holidays. Look- 
ing back with mixed emotions, I'm not 
sure whether we thought it would be fun 
to shop for toys again, whether we had 
the feeling of wanting to give or just 
what it was. 

Daddy tried one orphanage and then 
another. We all shared in the joy when 
one of them told us we could come out 
and meet the girl who could spend 10 
days of Christmas with us. 

After attending church and having 
lunch, we rode out to meet our child. 
Our whole family talked at the same 
time on the way to the orphanage: each 
trying to convey to the other what the 
little girl would probably be like. We 
decided that our four-year-old would have 
blue eyes, dimples, and long curls — a 
Christmas doll. But no, our Joan Hill 
was nine years old, short for her age, with 
beautiful chestnut hair. Mother had al- 
ways said that she thought her Jameses 
had the largest brown eyes that she had 
ever seen, but Joan's topped them all. 
The minute we saw her she smiled, not 
from ear to ear, but "all over," if you 
know what I mean. 

The date set to pick her up was on 
Christmas Eve and the fun began for us 
with our Christmas shopping. 

Weeks of anticipation were to follow 
and in these weeks before Christmas 
we shopped for Joan, buying everything 
from toys to clothing. I do not know 
which member of the family had the most 
fun shopping for her. As the weeks drew 
nearer to Christmas we began to try to 
hurry time along. Finally the big day 
arrived. On Christmas Eve Daddy went 
to the orphanage to get her. When she 
arrived she was glowing, but one could 
tell this experience was going to be 
new and exciting for her. She was rather 
shy at first, but we all knew that as 
soon as she got used to us she would 
change. 

On Christmas Eve my steady, Nathan, 
and I were double dating to a midnight 
church service. About 10 o'clock Sam 
and Joan were playing cards and he 
asked, "Joan, what do you want for 
Christmas?" 

She replied, "I wanted a bicycle, but I 
know I can't have one." 

I'm told that Ralph, Jr., Daddy and 
Mother sighed deeply and held on tight 
until Joan was tucked in bed. Then the big 
conference got under way. You could 
have probably heard statements like the 
following: "Gee, if I had just known. I 
sent all of the bicycles back to Green- 
ville." 

Ralph, Jr. kept saying, "Dad, please 



let me go to the Greenville warehouse 
and get one; I'd stay up all night. I'd 
go back to Raleigh and eat sandwiches 
for two months if she can have a bike." 

Mother said, "There will be other 
times, her birthday or next summer." All 
of them were almost sick! (Daddy tells 
it straight — that Mom said with tears, 
"I want her to take a bicycle back with 
her, or I can't send her back.") 

We were unable to get the bicycle by 
morning, but after an extensive search 
we were able to get one the following 
Thursday. 

After a night that seemed like an 
eternity, Christmas morning finally ar- 
rived. We were all excited because we 
wanted to see how Joan would react on 
Christmas morning. On the eventful day, 
she came bouncing down the stairs and 
headed toward the living room just as if 
she had been with us all of her life. 
She walked into the living room, sur- 
veyed what was before her, and marched 
straight for her Santa Claus. A smile 
crept across her face as she saw what 
was before her. That smile expressed 
more happiness than any words could 
ever say. After that we couldn't keep her 
quiet. "I've a present from Grandmother 
James. Who's she? Where does she live? 
Why did she give me a present? Look 
what I got! Oh! Boy!" These and many 
other sayings were uttered by her on the 
most confused and most wonderful Christ- 
mas morning I have ever spent. 

After she had gotten used to us it 
was only a matter of time until she grew 
to like our friends. She fell in love with 
my best friend, and, believe it or not. 
my boy friend also. 

Another great urge of Joan's was to 
answer the telephone. No matter where 
we happened to be, if the telephone rang, 
we could hear Joan racing to answer it. 
She soon got so used to the phone she 
could distinguish one person's voice 
from another. Then in her high little 
voice she would announce to the house- 
hold. "Nancy, it's Nathan." 

One bright Thursday morning Joan 
and I went to the hair dressers. It was her 
first trip to the beauty salon and believe 
me she was excited. In fact, she was so 
excited she could hardly sit still, but 
somehow she managed. As she was having 
her hair combed out, she would eye her- 
self one way and then another. 

When she got home, she was afraid 
to move for fear the curl would come 
out. Every five minutes she would ask, 
"Is the curl coming out of my hair?" 
The curls just had to last through Thurs- 
day evening since Judy Green, one of my 
best friends, and I were having a semi- 
formal dance for about forty-five of our 
friends. During that afternoon Joan was 
in the middle of all the decorating for 
the dance. She was here and there hand- 
ing us scissors, hammers, evergreens, and 
continually asking, "Where is it at?" 

And Nathan and Judy's boyfriend 
David, answering her with the old, teas- 
ing reply, "Behind the at." 

Judy and I had made holiday corsages 



from round peppermint candy and red 
ribbon for each girl that was coming to 
the party. Joan was so thrilled when we 
told her she could pin the corsages on the 
girls when they arrived. With the party 
underway, she had a ball dancing with 
a number of the boys. Before the party. 
Sam had teased her about having the 
first dance, but when the time came for 
the first dance, she had a stomach ache 
from sipping too much fruit punch during 
the day. 

As the hour drew near for Joan to 
go back to the orphanage, no one would 
consent to take her back. Daddy insisted 
that he had to watch the football games. 
Ralph. Jr.'s excuse was, "I just can't do 
it." Finally someone had to do something. 
They were tying the bicycle in the back 
of the car when Mother, Judy, Sam, 
Joan, and I came out of the house with 
all her clothes and toys. She gave them 
both a big hug and a kiss and I saw 
Daddy's hand going into a familiar pocket 
for a dollar. She kissed him on the cheek 
and then put her hands on her hips and 
looked at him with those laughing eyes 
and said. "What's the matter with you? 
Aren't you gonna kiss me good-bye?" 

It wasn't the ordeal to take her back 
that we had expected. Her brother met us 
and helped untie the bike. All the children 
were coming back from the house they 
had been visiting and were full of news 
and excitement. 

Along with all the farewells. Joan was 
told that we would pick her up on Friday 
after school for the week end. 

On one of the week ends, snow was on 
the ground and Ralph, Jr. was home: all 
the family went bowling. She was an 
awkward sight trying to roll the ball down 
the alley, but somehow she managed to 
get one strike. Joan had such a grand 
time. On this eventful visit Joan gave the 
unforgettable name "Sir Pappa Bear" to 
Daddy. On Sunday, she was giggling and 
teasing when Mother overheard her say. 
"Oh, I don't want to go back to the 
orphanage." 

My mom's reply seemed to be the 
answer that would have to be given. 
Mother said, "Joan, we just play like this 
on holidays and week ends. Daddy goes 
to work in the mornings. 1 go to work 
also; Ralph, Jr. has to go back to school: 
Nancy has her job at home and school 
tomorrow, and so does Sam. Would you 
want to stay in this big ole house by 
yourself?" "Oh. no," was her reply. 

Joan is here this week end, wiggling 
right beside me on the sofa while I am 
trying to share our wonderful experiences 
with you. There are so many funny little 
incidents I could tell you — how she pulls 
the cover off me at night: shopping for 
new shoes and boots; telling Grand- 
mother two boys kissed her under the 
mistletoe; the afternoon rides; her first 
sleigh ride in the snow; Joan in the 
bleachers yelling for me at the basketball 
games; crawling up in Daddy's lap pre- 
tending she was afraid of the television 
program: shampooing and rolling her 
hair; helping do the dishes, wanting to go 
in the car with any member of the family 
who happened to be going; waking me 
up in the mornings; playing the radio, and 
writing love notes to everybody on the 
kitchen blackboard. 

Speaking of the blackboard we wrote 
a note to Joan saying "We love you. our 
Miss Joan Hill." Is this not the secret to 
all good family relationships? 



Youth Responds . . . 

GETTING TO KNOW YOUR 

NEIGHBORS AT HOME 

AND ABROAD 



Fayetteville Senior High Chapter 
of Future Homemakers of America 
worked toward their national goal, 
"Understanding our neighbors at 
home and abroad," at a recent meet- 
ing in the home economics lab. 

The group heard a panel of five 
foreign ladies discussing customs of 
their own countries. The panel an- 
swered questions asked by the 
audience. 

When asked what means of trans- 
portation teenagers use on dates in 
the countries represented, Mrs. 
Frank Moore from Japan said, 
"They don't have cars, so most of 
them walk." 

In Russia, Mrs. J. M. Kaplan 
explained, teenagers walk and go by 
street cars. 

Mrs. Clarence Beck from England 
responded that teens don't usually get 
to drive a car because they can't get 
their license until they are 17, so 
they are forced to use buses. 

"Teenagers don't get a chance td 
use a car," Mrs. Thomas Vaughn 
from Austria replied; "they usually 
catch a bus. Sometimes they go on 
mountain hikes and take bicycles." 

Mrs. Gertrude McNabb from Ger- 
many said, "Often in the summer 
time teenagers travel the country by 
bicycles. They stay overnight at 
hotels, supervised lodging places for 
young people. 

"Travel for dates is mainly by 
streetcar or bus since few teenagers 
have cars," she added. 

"In Russia" Mrs. Kaplan said, "it 
isn't sophisticated for the sexes to 
show interest in each other publicly. 
They have a sophisticated flirtation." 
She added that girls follow the interest 
of the boys. "If the boy is interested 
in music, the girl becomes interested 
in music." 

Before the war, marriages of 
many Japanese young people were 
arranged, Mrs. Moore said; but to- 
day Japan has become somewhat 
Americanized. "Many of their dat- 
ing customs are the same as yours," 
she told F.H.A. members. 

"All married women wear the 




Anne-Kirsti Hogo 

same hair style. This makes it easy 
for everyone to know who is mar- 
ried and who is not." 

Mrs. Beck said that English 
schools are not coeducational. 'This 
is good, we feel, because the girls 

(Continued on inside back cover) 



MEET ANOTHER 
FOREIGN STUDENT 

I am Anne-Kirsti Haga, foreign 
exchange student from Oslo, Nor- 
way. I live just outside the capital 
with my parents and three younger 
brothers. 

The school systems in Norway 
and in the U.S.A. are two entirely 
different systems. When we in Nor- 
way finish the seven-year-long ele- 
mentary school at the age of 13-14, 
only the students of higher academic 
ability can continue to the five or six- 
year-long high school. In Norway 
we have no opportunity to select 
the courses which we wish to take, 
so in high school we have about 
sixteen subjects, although we study 
some of them only one or two peri- 
ods a week. 

We start with sewing and knitting 
two periods a week in the fourth 
grade of elementary school, and con- 
tinue with this throughout the school. 
In sixth and seventh grade we have 
cooking, one whole schoolday for 
about six weeks in the fall and spring. 

These two years of cooking are 
the only education in cooking a 
Norwegian high school girl gets if 
she is not attending a Home Ec. 
college afterwards. Sewing, however, 
is continued the two first years of 
high school. 

So, as you see, in Norway we 
don't have home economics like you 
have it here. We have sewing and 
cooking, but we lack family living 
and home management tremen- 
(Continued on page 8) 




Youth Responds . . . 

UNDERSTANDING ELDERLY 
FAMILY MEMBERS 



Fayetteville Chapter choir bright- 
ened the day for the residents of the 
Confederate Women's Home with a 
song fest. 

Rowan County Chapters prepared 
sunshine-baskets and tray favors to 
the nearby VA hospital; visited 
other hospitals and rest homes in 
the county to liven the residents with 
a "conversation." 

Planning for Christmas 

By 
BARBARA JEAN ALEXANDER 

Pamlico County High School 

I chose this Christmas project be- 
cause to me Christmas is the best 
time of the year. We always deco- 
rated the house, but we have the 
same things each year. That is why 
fixing some new decorations is the 
first thing I want to do. 

Christmas is sad when you think 
of families who cannot buy gifts or 
the old people who are so lonely 
since all their children are gone away 
from home. It does me good, or it 
just adds a lot to my Christmas, if 
I think I have made someone else 
happy. Last year I fixed some toys 
for a needy family. This year I 
think it would be nice to do some- 
thing to cheer an old person. We, 
Elaine and I, have decided to take 
a box of cookies and candies to a 
couple of old ladies who live alone, 
but once had families to share Christ- 
mas with them. 

Elaine and I worked on the candy 
and cookies together. We had a de- 
lightful time making the cookies. 
The baking went along smooth, but 
we had more fun decorating them 
with the bright colored icings. We 
first followed set patterns for each 
shape of cooky, but after decorating 
a few, we used our own imagination 
and created original decorations 
which we thought were attractive. 
We made two kinds of cookies and 
two kinds of candy. 

On one Saturday in November 
my parents and I decided that I 
should spend some time with my 
grandparents. They had just returned 
home from the hospital after a few 



weeks of treatment for injuries su- 
stained in an automobile accident. 
Of course, they wanted to return to 
their own home, but they would 
need someone to cook, clean house, 
and stay with them at night. I wanted 
to stay so I could prove to my 
family that I could really be using 
my home economics training. It 
seemed a good idea to me to use this 
experience as my home project for 
my Home Economics II class. 

On Sunday morning I arose as 
soon as I was called. Grandfather 
had already built the fire in the 
wood cook stove and with some 
directions I learned how to build 
the fire myself. Grandmother ex- 
plained to me where everything was 
kept and how they liked their break- 
fast cooked. She always put the 
coffee on to help me get started. 
Breakfast was easy to prepare be- 
cause I got things in order first. My 
home economics class had studied 
"foods and nutrients" which helped 
me to plan the breakfasts. "Variety 
is the spice of life," I think, so each 
morning something would be a little 
different. All the breakfasts would 
be centered around eggs with a meat, 
fruit or juice, cereal, bread and 
coffee. 

After breakfast I washed the 
dishes, straightened the kitchen, 
swept, dusted, and got in wood or 
coal if it was needed. Then I would 
prepare my grandparents for their 
day before I left for school. 

When I returned from school I 
would help my aunt or my mother 
prepare supper. Then I would wash 
dishes, sweep, do homework, cook 
or bake, wash out clothes, or sew. 
The week before Christmas I spent 
the evenings making stuffed dolls for 
some little girls. 

On Fridays I cleaned the upstairs 
and the front rooms that were not 
used often. 

Sunday dinner was a family time 
with each person bringing a dish to 
contribute toward dinner. Then in 
the afternoon they all visited with us. 
Christmas Day was celebrated the 
same way. 

As my grandparents began feel- 



ing better they wanted to help with 
the house work and get outside more 
often. On Fridays Grandfather and 
I went to the grocery store to buy 
the groceries and to do the necessary 
errands. Grandmother was begin- 
ging to cook again and soon she 
didn't need me anymore. So on the 
sixteenth of January I went home. 
I feel the courses I took in Home 
Economics have prepared me for 
my future homemaking. I had stu- 
died child care, cooking, sewing, 
nutrition and family relationships. 
The latter became very important to 
me when my grandparents began to 
get discouraged and felt they were 
a burden on us. It was necessary for 
us to encourage them and make 
them feel wanted and needed. 
Another lesson I learned was that 
older people want friends and rela- 
tives to call upon them for they long 
to remain members of the com- 
munity. Donna Fox 



FREDA BRITT 

(Continued from page 3) 
had been for the Congress last year. 
There were about 125 delegates rep- 
resenting twenty-four states. One of 
the first things I noticed and which 
was prevalent throughout the three 
days, was the high calibre of young 
people there. Everyone was so 
friendly and seemed to be sincerely 
interested in learning what we, as 
the Youthpower of America, could 
do to keep America healthy. 

From the beginning we realized 
that this was a program for THE 
INDIVIDUAL. It was the young 
people's Congress. We had leaders 
and resource people to guide us, but 
it was up to us to contribute and 
gain the most out of every session. 

One of the most outstanding fea- 
tures to me was the discussions. We 
were divided up into small groups 
of about 20 with a delegate taking 
the initiative in starting the discus- 
sion. It was interesting to find that 
the problems we have in North Caro- 
lina are much the same as those fac- 
ing teenagers of Kansas, California, 
and all the other states. The groups 
discussed such topics as: Food and 
Nutrition, Food Industry careers. 
Food and Community, Food for 
Health and Fitness, Food for Family 
Mealtime, and Food for Fun and 
Happiness. The resource people, 
specialists in their fields gave us the 
background material. We took it up 
from there. 

In my group the problem of teen- 



agers skipping breakfast was dis- 
cussed and we tried to find ways by 
which we could "bring back break- 
fast" in our homes. Also, the prob- 
lem of family unity at mealtime was 
widely discussed — how we could try 
to stop this "eating in shifts," and 
plan at least one meal in which the 
family ate together. There were other 
good discussions — not only about 
food for our family but we took a 
look at the food problems of our 
communities and then widened the 
scope to what we as the Youthpower 
of America can do for a starving 
world. 

Not only did we talk about food, 
but believe me we also had plenty 
of it. On Thursday there was a 
luncheon with Rev. Bob Richards, 
former Olympic star, to give us a 
really inspiring talk. Friday night, 
we had an International Banquet 
and very good program. At my table 
there was a student from the Phil- 
ippines and that talking to her was 
especially interesting to me because 
my dad was over there during the 
last war. In fact, throughout the 
whole congress we were privileged 
to hear many prominent speakers. 

All work and no play makes Jack 
a dull boy — so good times were in- 
cluded on the program. Meeting 
girls and boys from the other states, 
other FHA'ers was fun while listen- 
ing to other accents was amusing. 
And, can you imagine dancing to 
two orchestras? Well, we did after 
the Thursday banquet. 

• Oh Friday afternoon, we were 
divided up into smaller groups to 
tour some of the food industries that 
were helping to sponsor the Con- 
gress. I visited the Chicago Board 
of Trade and had a really interesting 
afternoon. Others went to Quaker 
Oats Company, Swift Company, 
Campbell Soup, etc. 

There were so many important 
things said, so many exciting ideas 
given that I believe all of the dele- 
gates went home interested and ready 
to do something about this "busi- 
ness" of nutrition. 

I am grateful to the N. C. Farm 
Bureau for making part of the Na- 
tional Youth Congress, and I am 
even prouder to belong to our FHA 
organization because we are the 
"Youth Power" who have a very 
important part to play in helping 
people, both young and old, to leam 
to eat better, feel better, and look 
better. 

Food is important to you as a 
person — to your family for good 




Rockingham Chapter Presents New Flag to School. 



health, to the economy of America, 
and as a symbol for Peace to millions 
of underfed peoples of the world. 
Freda Britt 



YOUTH RESPONDS 

(Continued from page 4) 

In preparing for the party, invita- 
tions were made by the girls and 
were given to each child to be in- 
vited. The girls made animals from 
construction paper, crepe paper hats, 
and napkins in the form of animals. 
In the center of the refreshment ta- 
ble, the construction paper animals 
were arranged in the form of a circus 
parade. The girls divided into groups 
of three and were responsible for 
reading books, singing, playing 
games, and other activities as means 
of entertainment for the children. 

The refreshments consisted of 
orange juice, and to carry out the 
theme of the circuit, cookies were 
made in the shape of gingerbread 
men. Droopy, Yogi Bear and others. 

As the children were preparing 
to leave they were each given a hat, 
balloon, and a couple of the paper 
animals as favors. Some children 
were having so much fun they did 
not want, to leave. 

After the departure of the children 
a class discussion was held. Each 
girl told of her experience with the 
child she was observing. It was gen- 
erally agreed that the experience with 
the children was a profitable one 



FOREIGN STUDENT 

(Continued from page 6) 
dously. My mother wrote the first, 
and so far, the only text-book in 
this three years ago, so we have 
started, but it takes a long time to 
get it into every school. We hope 
to get it more developed and worked 
out in the next few years. 

Here in Monroe High School I 
take home economics and enjoy it 
very, very much. We have a new 
beautiful Home Ec. department and 
a beautiful kitchen to "operate" in. 
It amazes me to see all the modern 
machines you have in these depart- 
ments, and all the fast, smart meth- 
ods after which to work. 

Just now we are working on our 
Spring projects, and I am looking 
forward to seeing what we can do to 
improve our homes. These projects 
are very good for us, because the 
homes and the school get closer to 
each other. 

I also enjoy very much to be a 
F.HA.'er this year. I have been to 
rallies and conventions, and enjoy 
these tremendously. I have a lot to 
take with me back to Norway, a lot 
to tell mv mother, my teachers, and 
friends. Thank you for teaching me 
and giving me so much! 

CONVENTION COMMENTS 

(Continued from page 1) 

Brown from Hamlet was elected 
to represent North Carolina as can- 
didate for National Vice-President 
in Charge of Recreation. Looks like 
we have a winner! 



8 



HAPPY URLS WIN THEIR STATE IIIIMH Iklill DEGREE 



District I 

Bath Chapter: Phyllis Jean Cutler, 
Christine Waters. Pantego Chapter: Me- 
lisia Wallace. Jamesville Chapter: Diane 
Griffin. Conway Chapter: Sarah Evelyn 
Darden. Creswell Chapter: Viola Moore. 

District II 

Beulaville Chapter: Sue Duff, Peggy 
Quinn, Judy Williams. B. F. Grady: San- 
dra Blythe Bell, Scarlett Raye Hill, Janice 
Holt, Lynda Westbrook. Wallace-Rose 
Hill Chapter: Lois Hawes. Walstonburg 
Chapter: Ruby Moore. Lou Strickland. 
Jones Central Chapter: Gretchen 
Davis, Margaret Jones, Martha 
Pruitt. Contentnea Chapter: Margaret 
Harrell, Ruina Heath, Joyce Oakes, 
Southwood Chapter: Janice Clark. Moss 
Hill Chapter: Priscilla Holland. Atkinson 
Chapter: Gayle Foyles, Shelby Mclntyre, 
Sarah Wells. Brogden Chapter: Mary Lois 
Grady, Ann Scott. Grantham Chapter: 
Carol McGee Best, Iris Joyner, Janet 
Laws, Mary Alice Thigpen. Nahunta 
Chapter: Janice Anderson, Shirley Baker, 
Lillian Davis, Linda Sasser, Betsy Thomas. 
Rosewood Chapter: Doris Rebecca Jor- 
dan. Elm City Chapter: Anne Davis. 
Lee Woodard Chapter: Janet Lewis, Peg- 
gy Reason. Lucama Chapter: Silha Marie 
Ellis, June Kirby, Virginia Ann Kirby, 
Sandra Cora Mercer, Jean Pittman. Sara- 
toga Chapter: Bonny Draper, Barbara 
Jean Harrell. 

District III 

Williams Chapter: Angelia Diona 
Powell. Central Chapter: Mary Barbara 
Ray. Pine Forest Chapter: Sandry Llorens, 
Stedman Chapter: Jean Strickland, La- 
vetta Strickland. Hoke County Chapter: 
Janice Mclnnis. Cameron Chapter: Gay- 
nelle Tillman. Barnesville Chapter: Nancy 
Britt. Diane Britt, Brenda Leggette, John- 
nie Lou Prevatte, Doris Walters. Linda 
Walters. Pembroke Chapter: Brenda 
Brewington, Maureen Dial. Arlita Lowry. 
Red Springs Chapter: Kathy Ratley. 



District IV 

Creedmoor Chapter: Carolyn Duke, 
Joyce Keith, Sue Keith, Linda Lane, 
Shelia Lester. Coats Chapter: Cheyle 
Dorman. Carol Jones. Benson Chapter: 
Gloria Allen, Clara Cobb, Anne Johnson. 
Camille Levinson. Corinth Holders Chap- 
ter: Saundra Green, Joyce Ann Johnson. 
Judy Wall. Four Oaks Chapter: Peggy 
Johnson. Princeton Chapter: Jean Adams, 
Linda Stewart. Bailey Chapter: Barbara 
Sue Lamn, Kay Thompson. Benvenue 
Chapter: Judith Ann Joyner, Sally Lucas, 
Mary Elizabeth Overton, Marilyn Taylor, 
Judy Carol Whitley. Red Oak Chapter: 
Frances Gupton. Needham Broughton 
Chapter: Carolyn Cherry, Judy Rhodes. 
Cary Chapter: Katherine Jordan. Amelia 
Phillips. Fuquay Springs Chapter: Jerry 
Johnson. Garner Chapter: Evelyn Green. 
Joyce Stevenson. 

District V 

Anderson Chapter: Linda Aldridge. 
Bartlett Yancey Chapter: Joyce Whitlow. 
Central Chapter: Ann Carrick, Donese 
Comer. North Davidson Chapter: Brenda 
Hines. Southwest Chapter: Vicky Brown, 
Jacquelyn Casey. High Point Chapter: Sha- 
ron Frazier. Jamestown Chapter: Judith 
Bryan Webster. Gray's Chapel Chapter: 
Judith Bryan Webster. Gray's Chapel: 
Lynda Blake. Randleman: Jadene Frazier. 
Ramseur Chapter: Dairus Hicks. Sea- 
grove Chapter: Margaret Auman, Jane 
Boone, Verna Dean Cole, Ann Eaton, 
Betty Jo Johnson, Carolyn King, Janet 
McCaskill, Betty Sue McNeil, Katherine 
Yow. Madison-Mayodan Chapter: Do- 
rinda Black. Elaine McCollum. Walnut 
Cove Chapter: Mary Ruth Bullins, Mar- 
gie Shelton. Judy Smith. 

District VI 

Bethel Chapter: Rachel Ann t-urr. Rita 
Elaine Linker. 



District VII 

Davie County Consolidated Chapter: 
Kay Rintz. Harmony Chapter: Ann Car- 
ter, Elaine Renegar. Union Grove Chap- 
ter: Jane Ireland. North Surry Chapter: 
Sandra Beasley, Glenda Caudle, Sue Chil- 
dress, Linda Draughn, Geraldine Fletcher, 
Sharon Jones. East Wilkes Chapter: Mary 
Frances Key. 

District VIII 

A. C. Reynolds Chapter: Carolyn Alex- 
ander. Lee H. Edwards Chapter: Emilie 
Bostic, Lynn Brewer, Pat Caldwell, Linda 
Kay Downey, Ann Gosnell, Eleanor Lois 
Hipps, Donna Norton, Sherry Snipes, 
Gale Todd, Elaine Warf. Clyde A. Erwin 
Chapter: Rita Ann Hensley. North Bun- 
combe Chapter: Brenda Dillingham, 
Nancy Dillingham, Helen Fisher, Melba 
Hawkins, Betty Sue Honeycutt, Shelby 
Pendergast, Nancy Yount. Valley Springs 
Chapter: Nancy James, Lillie Tandy. Glen 
Alpine Chapter: Barbara Jean Wright. 
East Henderson Chapter: Saundra Anders, 
Ruth King. West Henderson Chapter: 
Linda Praytor. Lorene Rhodes. Cullowhee 
Chapter: Frankie Dills, Irene Hinds, 
Karen vom Lehn. Chase Chapter: Phyllis 
Baldwin, Ada Jane Ledbetter, Janan 
White. Rutherfordton-Spindale Chapter: 
Laura Lang Carson, Diann Edwards. 



NEIGHBORS 

(Continued from page 6) 

have very few social pressures. They 
do not worry about how they look 
or shapes instead of their studies." 

The age for marriage in Austria 
is in the early twenties. Mrs. Vaughn 
added. 

Elizabeth Parnell, a club member, 
said that the girls who attended en- 
joyed the discussion, and some may 
even try some of these new customs 
on their own boy friends. 




Happy Girls Win Their State Homemaker Degree 



Future Homemakers of America 



CREED 

We are the Future Homemakers of America 
We face the future with warm courage. 
And high hope, 

For we have the clear consciousness of seeking 
Old and precious values. 

For we are the builders of homes, 

Homes for America's future. 

Homes where living will be the expression of everything 

That is good and fair. 

Homes where truth and love and security and faith 

Will be realities, not dreams. 

We are the Future Homemakers of America, 
We face the future with warm courage, 
And high hope. 




"The homes of tomorrow are in 

the hand of the youth 

of today" 



Carolina Says: 

Accidents are a major menace 
to America's health. 

Help keep your community 
accident-free. 

Check your home for accident 
hazards. 

How's Your "Eat-quette?" 
Are you a Tsafkaerb Reg- 
dod? Remember a child is a 
little "you." 




HjHlfilSsEI! 



CCWo 



TEEN-AGE 
CONSUMER 




TURE HOMEMAKERS 

North Carolina Association * 



VOLUME IX 




OCTOBER 1961 




NUMBER 1 



Is Tour Chapter Planning a 
Program on Consumer Education? 



A nationwide survey conducted 
by Seventeen Magazine reports that 
America's teen-age girls spend the 
colossal sum of AVi billion dollars a 
year! With this astounding figure in 
mind, how has your chapter devel- 
oped the national project — Teenage 
Consumer? 

Last year the following chapters 
developed the project in varied ways. 
Some of the ideas are listed below : 

Exhibit — "Be A Wise Consumer" 
— North Buncombe 

Christmas Bazaar — Each member 
made and donated a gift to be sold. 
Altamahaw-Ossipee 

Raised money to give $100.00 
scholarship to senior girl who will 
enter college this fall. Graham 

Field trip to department, furni- 
ture, grocery, and electrical appli- 
ance stores. Anson 

Planned chapter programs — 
"How to Buy Meat and Save on the 
Food Bill" and "Buying Sports- 
wear." Wadesboro 

Cooperated with two other county 
chapters in preparing a blue ribbon 
fair booth — "Buy Ways that Make 
Cents" featuring ideas on stretching 
the food dollar. Beaufort 

Borrowed examples of ready- 
made cotton dresses in different price 
groups and compared them with 



dresses which were made in class. 
Elizabethtown 

Arranged a table of inexpensive 
and useful gifts for a bride-to-be for 
a chapter program. Havelock 

A representative from the bank 
spoke at a chapter meeting on man- 
aging and saving money and financ- 
ing a home. Fayetteville Central 

Planned and prepared party re- 
freshments emphasizing efficient use 
of time, energy, and money. Gates- 
ville 

During the "January White Sale" 
our chapter planned a program 
stressing good buymanship of linens. 
Contentnea 

Two chapter members presented 
ideas from the book "The Hidden 
Persuaders" by Vance Packard. 
They stressed some of the things 
used by advertisers to appeal to the 
consumer to urge him to buy. Pem- 
broke 



Hi, Future Homemakers of North 
Carolina! I am quite excited about 
being your State FHA Adviser. I 
came into this position July 1 with 
a wonderful initiation treat — I 
climbed aboard the train with your 
twenty-five FHA delegates bound 
for the National Convention in St. 
Louis. What wonderful Future 



Homemakers and what a wonderful 
convention! 

I am a native North Carolinian 
from High Point. I attended the 
Allen Jay High School, was a Future 
Homemaker, and later majored in 
Home Economics Education at the 
Woman's College. After teaching 
vocational home economics four 
years, I completed my master's de- 
gree also at the Woman's College. 
Last year I taught at the Ohio Wes- 
leyan University. However, with a 
husband at Carolina and home sick- 
ness for the Tarheel State, I returned 
to this state as your State Adviser. 

It has been exciting and stimulat- 
ing to work with your Executive 
Council in August. Their goals and 
ideas for the year are clearly in mind. 

As you and your chapter plan 
projects and activities this year, 
please send to us a picture and ar- 
ticle to use in this magazine. Other 
girls are most interested in what you 
are doing. 

I shall be looking forward to get- 
ting to know you from your articles, 
at rallies, and at the state convention. 
May you have a most successful 
chapter this year. 

Mrs. Ernestine H. Frazier 



Our cover girl is a student at 
Clyde A. Erwin High School 
studying management. 



North Carolina Association of Future Homemakers of America 



State Officers 
1961-62 

President — Kakie Jordan, Cary IV 
Vice-President — Ruth Guin, Stedman III 
Secretary — Judy Cubberley, Fike II 
Treasurer — Mabel Louise Cook, Perquimans Co. I 
Historian — Rosalee Ervin, Winecoff VI 
Parliamentarian — Linda Faye White, 

Union Grove VII 
Reporter — Diann Edwards, Rutherfordton- 

Spindale VIII 
Song Leader — Jan Ross, Altamahaw — Ossipee V 



District Advisers 
1961-62 

Mrs. Marjorie Spencer, Tarboro I 
Mrs. Norma Yelverton, Lee Woodard II 
Mrs. Retha Thompson, Williams III 
Mrs. Gladys Farnell, Fuquay Springs IV 
Mrs. Hazel Tripp, Madison-Mayodan V 
Mrs. Mary Copple, Mount Holly VI 
Mrs. Dorothy Felts, East Rowan VII 
Mrs. Elizabeth Reed, Sylva-Webster VIII 



State Adviser 

Mrs. Ernestine H. Frazier 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 

Division of Vocational Education 
Raleigh, North Carolina 




Kakie Jordan 



1 have just begun to realize how 
very wonderful it is to love "Living". 
Because I am so very fortunate in 
being an American teenager, a high 
school senior, a girl, and North 
Carolina's State Future Homemaker 
president. As teenagers, all of us 
have many things to do and to see 
and to learn and to be. As in my 
case, I feel I have actually become 
part of the letter meaning of FU- 
TURE HOMEMAKERS, because 
it has taught me so much and has 
helped girls from North Carolina to 
California. I have found that if you 
let it, FHA can enrich every facet of 
your personal make-up. 

Life as your State President has 
many rewards, including exciting ex- 
periences and much hard work. 
FHA, along with many other things, 
has combined to enrich my life. Of 
course, my family is a large part of 
this enrichment. I live in Cary, nine 
miles from Raleigh, with my mother 
and father, Mr. and Mrs. Graydon 
W. Jordan, a brother, Miller, 15, a 
dog, Tribble, and a cat "Cinky". My 
daddy works in Raleigh as a State 
Tax Administrator and my mother 
is a teacher at Cary Senior High 
School. All of us are member of the 
Cary Baptist Church, in which we 
participate in all its activities, and 
attend regularly together. 

My school activities for this year 
include being a member of the Beta 
Club, Spanish Club, and Dramatics 
Club. Interested in journalism, pos- 
sibly as a career in conjunction with 
Home Economics. I am the Cary 
teen writer for the Raleigh Times 



Life as your 

State F.H.A. President 

By Kakie Jordan, F.H.A. President 



newspaper and have been a member 
of the paper staff at school for three 
years. A basketball player for three 
years, (1 never hit the basket!). 1 
am presently secretary of the Varsity 
Club. This generally takes care of 
my school activities. 

Count Tolsior once said: "The 
vocation of every man is to serve 
other people." Serving you as your 
State President is a real pleasure 
and privilege. My services include 
many activities, duties, and respon- 
sibilities. I have been FHA reporter 
and vice-president in my local chap- 
ter. These offices along with the 1 10 
members in our chapter gave me the 
push and experience I needed to run 
for a state office. Nothing gives me 
greater satisfaction than a sense of 
achievement. Junior, Chapter, and 
State Homemaker Degrees are 
among those achievements most 
highly cherished. Being a state officer 
two years, as vice-president and 
president, has given me double life 
enrichment and double duty, so to 
speak. Some of my most important 
duties are planning and presiding 
over district rallies, district planning 
meetings, executive meetings, and 
the state convention. For two years 
I have taken an active part in the 
camp program at White Lake. I have 
been fortunate in being able to at- 



tend and participate in three na- 
tional conventions; one in Chicago 
(1959), Washington, D. C. (1960), 
and this past year in St. Louis, 
Missouri, (1961). While attending 
my first national convention the sum- 
mer prior to my sophomore year, I 
was entranced by the array of work 
and good done by the Future Home- 
makers from all over the United 
States and of the high rank of leader- 
ship North Carolina held, as fourth 
largest in membership. This tended 
to make me want to push North 
Carolina even to further heights by 
developing the potential of each in- 
dividual in our state, whether it be 
in leading the chapter or promoting 
it by being a good committee mem- 
ber. 

Of course, there are many out- 
standing privileges, too, for example, 
I represented you, FHA'ers, at the 
State Future Farmers of America 
Convention in Raleigh and brought 
greetings to approximately 3,000 
good-looking boys! Also, I repre- 
sented you at two meetings of the 
North Carolina Youth Fitness Com- 
mission held in Raleigh this summer. 
Ways and means of improving youth 
fitness in North Carolina were dis- 
cussed and plans made. By the way, 

(Continued on inside back cover) 



Study of Teenagers and Their Money 



Experts in economics are quoting 
for us figures in the millions of dol- 
lars which they say will pass through 
the hands of our teen-agers within 
the next few years. How this money 
is used, the attitudes and habits de- 
veloped in relation to the handling 
of money by these teen-agers will 
have a tremendous influence upon 
the economic condition of the homes 
and families of the future. What can 
we do in our classes to help teen- 
agers develop a set of values which 
will guide them in handling their 
money in such a way to give satis- 
faction to themselves, as well as 



others? How can we help them to 
realize the effect their spending 
habits have on the economy of the 
nation, and even the world? How 
can we help them to evaluate the 
barrage of advertising being beamed 
at these inexperienced purchasers 
with many wants and dollars to 
spend? To help us to be more aware 
of the amount of money our students 
have and how they use it, we are 
making a small study on "Teenagers 
and Their Money." 

Dept. of Home Economics 
of the NEA 



1 




Are You . . 



Cons 



umer 



Wise? 



OUR FHA FAIR BOOTH 

As ideas were being tossed about at Frank- 
lin High School summer FHA workshop, the 
idea for "Teenage Consumer" was pulled from 
our Program of Work, plus some materials 
that were on file. 

The idea was to show the contrast between 
Susie Spender who squanders her money on 
Broke Street, ond Patsy Planner. Patsy and 
her budget book do not show in this picture, 
but she is "in the chips" on Money Avenue. 

Members who worked on the booth include: 
Carol Hedden, Ann Blaine, Barbara Talley, 
and Nancy Howard. The school art depart- 
ment and their instructor, Miss Jean Hemphill, 
did the background for the booth, and helped 
"build" the shopping center. It was very 
colorful! 



( 6 ) Always insist on well-known 
names. 

(7) Have a panel discussion on 
whether teens should buy on credit 
terms. In most cases you will find 
that it is according to the particular 
situation. 

After you have experienced some 
of these projects you will find that 
you have more money, more time, 
and energy and are more satisfied 
with yourself as a wise person. But, 
remember in order to achieve your 
purpose and become an asset to your 
family, chapter, community, church, 
etc., you must not stop working. You 
must continue until you have mas- 
tered your purpose. Then and only 
then will you be that successful per- 
son in the future who has had a past 
of wise management. 



By Ruth Guin, State Vice-President 



To many teenagers of today one 
of the hardest things to do is to learn 
to manage wisely. As the saying 
goes, "behind every successful man 
there is a woman," so also behind 
every wise and successful person 
somewhere in the past background 
there has been wise management of 
their time, money, and energy. 

Today, there are so many ways 
for teens to develop their under- 
standing of managing wisely. How 
would you like to be one of those 
lucky people who never seem to run 
into any problems in managing? 
Well, it's very simple. Look my sug- 
gestions over below, or maybe you 
can think of some more that would 
widen your knowledge as well as be 
fun: 

( 1 ) Have a local merchant speak 



at your school and have him or her 
give you tips on wise purchasing. 

(2) Learn how to select quality 
articles so you can get the very best 
for your money. 

(3) Learn how to value "bar- 
gain" articles, that is, whether they 
are really worth the little they are 
asking or whether they would be 
better off in the garbage can. 

(4) Learn to care for the articles 
you purchase, especially clothing. 

( 5 ) Have a project at school on 
a certain color scheme for the fall, 
summer, or whatever. In this project 
you buy things that match your color 
scheme and none other. Perhaps if 
your color scheme is red, don't buy 
an orange sweater just because you 
think it's different. 




Ruth Guin 



We Like to Study Family 

MONEY MANAGEMENT! 



Home economics is a lot more 
than cooking and sewing — just how 
can one learn family money manage- 
ment, ask girls at Durham Senior 
High. 

Family money management is 
taught by allowing the students to 
plan a budget for a newly married 
couple. This budget is one that is 
shaped to suit the needs of the in- 
dividual couple and is neither con- 
fining or restricting. 

The budget only provides for the 
husband's salary with $267 to spend 
each month. The wife's salary can 
either be put in a building and loan 
account to draw interest or on the 
unpaid principle of a home should 
the couple buy their home when they 
are first married. 

The main objective of having the 
wife save her salary is to keep the 
couple from experiencing living on 
a lower income level when the wife 
no longer can work outside the 
home. 

Record keeping is very important 
both in planning a budget and fol- 
lowing one. It's easy to keep records 
of income and expenditures when 
you set up a simple form and jot 
down the amount of your income 
and expense in a minute or less every 
day. 

Budgeting wasn't a great shock to 
the girls for each area of the home- 
making program centers around 
money. The girls learn how to cook, 
they learn how to use recipes "from 
scratch" so they won't have to buy 
so many expensive packaged foods. 
They are urged to try different foods 
and brands so they will know which 
their family likes best. 

When studying housing the stu- 
dents are taught unholstery and 
drapery making, they cover lamp 
shades and make table linens. And 
anyone who has ever had any of 
these things done by a professional 
knows what a saving that can be. 

This is the model budget that the 
girls set up for a newly married 
couple with $267 take home pay: 

Rent $50 19% 

Food 44 16% 



Car 40 

Utilities 

Electricity 7 

Water 3 

Phone 3 

Fuel 10 

Insurance 

Health 12 

Car 3 

Accident 4 

Furniture 17 

Car Expenses 20 

Household 16 

Church 13 

Medical 7 

Savings 5 

Recreation 3 



14% 
9% 



7% 



7% 
7% 
6% 
5% 
4% 
2% 
1% 



The upkeep and expenses on the 
car were cut down considerably 
when the girls decided that a small 
foreign car was the most practical 
kind for a young couple to buy. (One 
of the girls drastically cut the amount 
of payments on the car. When she 
was asked what kind of car she plan- 
ned to buy she answered airly, '"Oh, 
a third-hand straight shift." She 
quickly changed her mind, however, 
when she was given some idea of 
what the cost of repairs and upkeep 
on it would be.) 

Household expenses, of course, 
cover a multitude of items including 
cleaning supplies, cosmetics, laundry 
and a newspaper subscription. 



Glenda Emery, at right, is discovering the importance of keeping good records all year 
around as she practices completing an income tax blank while Cathy Leathers, at left, shows 
her how the textbook says it should be done and Judy Bradley leans over to offer an en- 
couraging word. 




Meet Me in 
Saint Louis! ^ 



Diann Edwards, State Reporter, Rutheriordton-Spindale 
High School 



1961 MIRACLE RECIPE 

DO you want the recipe for the marvelous dish 
known as the 1961 National Meeting held in the 
Chase Park Plaza Hotels, in St. Louis, Missouri, 
July 3-6? Twenty-five North Carolina delegates traveled 
from Raleigh to St. Louis by train just to see some 
famous cooks, our national officers, cooking up this 
miracle recipe. 

First measure Va cup of travel on a Seaboard train 
across country to St. Louis. Living on a train for two 
days was a new experience for most of the girls. The 
first night about bed time all the girls began to pull out 
treasured pictures of their boy friends. They were im- 
mediately labeled such names as "The Greek God" and 
"Hercules," so that by bed time all were pretty well 
versed on each girl's love life. 

In Vs cup of travel most girls would expect to find 
a small sprinkling of boys. The delegates were about 
to give up hope when the train stopped and boys began 
to board the train in droves. Our car, which by the way 
was reserved, was instantly filled with shaved-headed 
marine reservists, most of whom were college freshmen. 
But, as all good things must come to an end, the boys 
were left when the girls changed trains in Washington, 
D. C. Having an hour in our national capital, the dele- 
gates scraped up a smidgeon of travel by walking from 
the train station to the capitol building. Then all aboard 
to St. Louis. 

Part of this ¥n cup of travel was in St. Louis in street 
cars and taxis from the hotel up town and back. St. 
Louis is one of the biggest towns many of the girls had 
ever seen. We loved St. Louis because it had every 
imaginable type of shop and store. Nevertheless, the 
delegates seemed to wind up in the bakery three times 
out of four, buying doughnuts to take back and eat in 
their lovely hotel rooms. 

At this point fold in Va cup of well-planned, usable 
programs on the topic of Youth Measure Your Values. 
This theme was developed through Dr. Bernice Moore's 
speech on "What are Values?" Dr. and Mrs. Russell 
Smart guided the audience in determining where and 




First Row: Doris Young, Mrs. Dorothy Felts, Judy Quinn, Rj 
Guin, Ann McKnight, Jane White, Mabel Louise Cook, A 
Vestal, Mrs. Hazel Tripp, Rosalee Ervin, Kathy Bean, Jl 
Cubberley, Ann Jennings, Mrs. Glady Farnell, Elizabeth PowJ 
Second Row: Dr. Catherine T. Dennis, Mrs. Elizabeth Ral 



how we get our values. Finally Dr. Glen Hawkes 
tested the girls who were in attendance for ranking nine 
values included in a test. We ranked the values in the 
following order: education, family life, pleasure, effici- 
ency, concern for others, economy, health, status and 
friendship. Needless to say, we were a bit disturbed 
that friendship ranked last on the list. However, Dr. 
Hawkes suggested that this might be due to our con- 




SsWuSS^V^- EniCSt,ne H - F — ''• Bl11 '-' 
! Mrs Marv ronnff^ Rmh An D n °u avis ' Mrs ' Retha Thom P- 
dtaker Mr, Y M PP 'c SuSanne Ra y bu ™> Ellen Pratt, Polly 
fcf s - Marjone Spencer, Mrs. Norman Lee Yelverton 
oe Jordan absent when picture was taken eiverton. 



'^ss$s$s$$$s$$~~$$$$$<^~~$^^ 



sidering dating as something more than just friendship. 
In order to get ideas from all the delegates now add 

] /4 cup of participation. The girls really got a chance 
to sound off by singing all the new and different relaxers 
led by the very popular Sharon Porter. Each state had 
members in the All States Chorus, which added beauty 
to the daily meetings. 



At the final session the delegates divided into buzz 
groups and discussed ways to stimulate further think- 
ing among teenagers on values. These groups also plan- 
ned ways to continue work on values in the local chap- 
ters and in the state organizations. 

North Carolina participated by entering a candidate 
for the office of national vice-president of recreation. She 
was a lovely, brown-haired girl with a charming smile 
Becky Brown of Hamlet, N. C. Becky did not win but 
she ran a close second. 

Next throw in a pinch of opera to put everyone in a 
dreamy make-believe world. The FHA'ers were privi- 
leged to go to the largest outdoor theater in the world 
the Municipal Opera, to see The Great Waltz. The cos- 
tumes and singing were excellent. Another thing out of 
the ordinary about the opera was that the theater is the 
only outdoor theater in the United States that is air- 
conditioned. 

Any convention without good food is not a success: 
so add 1/4 cup of food. That was no problem at all be- 
cause the food was way out of this world. Most of the 
food was served in the exhibition hall in the Chase Hotel. 
At night sometimes the Future Homemakers went to the 
restaurant in the Chase. One night it was filled with 
Philadelphia Phillies, who were more than willing to give 
their autographs. But that is not all, some nights the 
delegates had doughnuts in their rooms and from their 
windows they watched the floor show on the terrace. 

The food on the train was delicious too, but most of 
the girls weren't accustomed to paying a dollar seventy- 
five cents for a bacon and tomato sandwich. Neverthe- 
less, they got so hungry that prices were often second 
concern. 

Well, now add the last ingredient, one more Ve, cup 
of travel. As North Carolina's twenty-five delegates left 
the terminal station in St. Louis there were feelings of 
mixed emotions of girls who longed to stay but°who 
were happy to be going home to see their families and 
boy friends. This two day trip on the train was not void 
of the presence of the opposite sex. The train was 
filled with army boys that the girls were forbidden even 
to look at on the long way home. But, you guessed it 
right, the delegates couldn't quite live up to this, because 
the soldiers were sort of cute. 

After one day and night on the train the FHA'ers 
again arrived in Washington, and then after a 15 minute 
lay-over, they were on their way to Raleigh and home. 

You have the ingredients, now all that is left to do is 
to sift the ingredients together and you have the best 
national convention ever. To appreciate fully this dish, 
you should try it sometime, for this dish, your national 
FHA convention, will always head the list of your 
favorite recipe. 



Betsy has two main interests — her own art work and preservation 
of family treasures. 

The oldest and perhaps the most treasured family piece which she's 
tackled is a clock which belonged to her paternal great-great 
grandfather. 

Betsy Hine 

Glenn High School 





To be wise consumers when selecting household appli- 
ances is most important to Patsy Tyson, Faye Brantley, and 
Nancy Purkerson of Spring Hope. No doubt they are 
learning to check the name plates, fit of handles, weight, 
materials, brand, ease of assembly, and use as they become 
wise teenage consumers. 



Linda redecorated her bedroom as a home experience. She began 
her revamping job by painting her room orchid and painted her 
bookcase bed, chest, dresser, and chairs with a flat black paint. 

With the help of her Home Economics teacher, Linda chose a 
figured cotton chintz material and made new draperies and a match- 
ing bedspread. 

The young decorator picked up the soft green from her draperies 
by making covers for two chairs in the same shade of cotton sateen. 
She added a pale green and cream-colored mosaic table. 

Linda Kimball 
Glenn High School 




Jrave \J[ou a Project on 



Money and Time 
Management 



By Christine Marie Waters 

Bath High School 



The understanding that responsi- 
bility, hard work, and sound judge- 
ment are necessities in a good life 
is probably the greatest gift my 
parents have given me. They have 
taught me, at an early age, to accept 
responsibility no matter how hard it 
seems to be. In realizing this, I found 
I could reach my goals. I know this 
is the reason I decided to take the 
project of working and purchasing, 
on my own, a sewing machine. 

As school came to a close in the 
spring, I began planning my sum- 
mer's work. I live in the tobacco 
region of North Carolina and there 
are many jobs to be found on the 
community farms. As I am well ac- 
quainted with farm work, I was able 
to find work for six days a week. 

As the month of June came and 
the crops were in the young growing 
stage, I began work. I worked eight 
long weeks housing tobacco. The 
summer was a long and hot one. 
One day I would almost scorch my 
feet on the hot ground and the next 
day I would shake in my boots as a 
summer rain storm broke through 
the sultry air. From six o'clock in the 
morning until six or seven o'clock in 
the evening, I worked six days a 
week and eight weeks in all. I drove 
tractors, helped hang tobacco, load- 
ed dry tobacco, and did other jobs 
that were all in the routine of a day's 
work. I don't actually know whether 
determination or enjoyment pushed 
me on, but my summer was one I'll 
long remember. 

I learned more than just how to 
work hard, but also how to get along 
with people, how to give a little in- 
stead of take, and how to rely on the 
ever important idea of doing a job 
well if it's worth doing at all. 

As the summer came to a close, 
my savings had grown. I was ready 
to purchase my machine as soon as 



I could investigate and search for 
values. Thus, I began my search for 
the ideal sewing machine. I wanted 
a machine that had all of the new 



features. I studied various brands 
in the order catalogues and I visited 
several stores. 1 talked with several 
people acquainted with machines 
and discussed different models of 
machines. Finally, I made my choice 
of a machine which had the attach- 
ments and some special features. I 
was especially pleased with the 
twenty year guarantee for all parts. 
I, at last, had accomplished my goal! 

It was now time for me to get my 
school clothes. As I wanted more 
for my money, yet good values, I 
chose to sew as much as possible. 
I selected wool fabric and lining for 
three skirts and green fabric for a 
shirtwaist dress. 

I enjoyed making the shirtwaist 
dress as it was the first one I had 
tried to make with cuffed sleeves. 
The color of the dress was enhanced 

(Continued on inside back cover) 



Planning Meetings Does Help! 



During their planning meeting at 
the home of their adviser, Mrs. 
Catherine Meadows, on August 10, 
the Garner High School FHA of- 
ficers set up goals for the coming 
year that would help them develop 
more consideration and respect for 
older people, also to develop a bet- 
ter understanding of other countries 
and their values. The Future Home- 
makers included in their calendar of 
activities for the coming year — an 
ice-cream supper for initiation of 
new members, a Daddy-Date Night, 
Clothing an orphan, Good Luck 
Dance, and Mother-Daughter Ban- 
quet. 

In order to carry out these plans, 
they agreed to meet every two 
months to evaluate the Chapters 
progress toward these goals and to 
set up work plans for incompleted 
projects. 

The president, Nelda Holder, 
along with the vice president, Char- 
lotte Herbert, challenged the secre- 
tary, Susan Ferrell; the treasurer, 
Sterling Banks; the parliamentarian, 
Carolyn Sealey; historian, Judy Ma- 
son; and songleader, Judy Stone, to 
select committees from each class 
to help them carry out their objec- 
tives. 

Charlotte Herbert's scrapbook of 
her trip to the National Convention 
inspired the entire group to follow 
standards set up by our national 



leaders. This entire group recom- 
mended some degree work as a pre- 
requisite for any chapter officer. 

The meeting was focussed on 
some of last year's activities and how 
they could be improved. They rea- 
lized that all of the members enjoyed 
the yearbooks last year. It was de- 
cided that the yearbooks should con- 
tain the names and addresses of the 
officers, dates of rallies, dates of 
chapter activities and the motto, 
creed, and purposes of their organi- 
zation. 

Now that they had their projects 
chosen they planned ways to carry 
them out. In order to bring happi- 
ness to older citizens, they planned 
to sing Christmas carols at Rest 
Homes and at aged peoples resi- 
dence. They also began thinking of 
ways they could get a better under- 
standing of people from other na- 
tions. They discussed maybe adopt- 
ing a child from overseas. They 
would support it financially and send 
toys and clothes. Another idea was 
to have a child in their home over 
the Christmas holidays. 

If at the end of a school year, you 
realize that your chapter has had to 
leave out a lot of important activities 
that you had hoped to get in, why not 
plan a planning meeting. That's just 
what the Garner Hinh School FHA 
did! 

Charlotte Herbert 
Garner High School 




Officers of the Beaufort chapter, 
Future Homemakers of America, 
met to plan projects for the new 
school year. 

Dail Barbour, president, conduct- 
ed the meeting. Other officers at- 
tending were Bonnie Ward, vice- 
president; Tina Willis, secretary; 
Mary Ann Dudley, treasurer; Irene 
Whitehurst, reporter; Clara Quidley, 
historian; Julia Piner, recreation 
leader. 

Projects adopted were the con- 
tinuation of the PTA babysitting 
clinic, co-sponsorship of a county 
dance, achievement of degrees, ac- 
quisition of handbooks, care of the 
first aid room, mother-daughter and 
father-daughter banquets, bulletin 
board displays, sponsorship of an 
assembly program and departmental 
and school improvements. 

Improvements planned for the 
home economics department this 
year include a larger refrigerator, 
tote trays and cabinets, new tables, 
an easel stand, new curtains, ma- 
chine covers, and other smaller 
items. 

To raise funds to finance the proj- 
ects, the officers decided to sponsor 
dances after the home football games 
and to sell roasted peanuts, candy, 
greeting cards, and dishcloths. 

A year of planning and work 
made the planting of 150 rose bushes 
around North Buncombe football 
field a reality. 

Money was raised by the FHA 
to purchase the bushes and the peat 
moss to improve the soil. 

The FFA boys worked in order 
to prepare the soil and the holes for 
the bushes. The Agriculture teacher 
talked to each of the classes on the 
proper way to plant a rose and to 
care for it. During the last week, 
the boys and girls worked together 
and planted the bushes. Due to pre- 
training no one missed a class and 
all the bushes were planted in one 
day. 

In May a special chapel program 
was called in Erwin High School 
auditorium to present the coveted 
interclub council plaque to the out- 
standing school club of the year. 
The high school faculty had cast 
their votes several days previously 
by secret ballot for the club they 
thought had done the most for the 



school and in helping it become a 
better school for all. 

Everette Thomas, President of 
Student and Inter-Club Council pre- 
sented FHA president, Melba Har- 
din the plaque in behalf of the club. 

The two runners-up clubs were 
the Future Business Leaders of 
America and the Student Council. 

Members of the Future Home- 
makers of America and their 
teacher-advisers from nine schools in 
Richmond, Scotland, and Hoke 
Counties held a workshop in the 
Home Economics Department at 
Hamlet High School. 

Becky Brown of Hamlet reported 
to the group her experiences while 
attending the National FHA Con- 
vention at St. Louis. 

Becky's report was given as she 
formed a "charm bracelet", placing 
on a chain an illustrated paper 
"charm" representing each highlight 
of the convention. 

Following Becky's report, buzz 
sessions were held on projects, pro- 
gram ideas, and degrees as the girls 
shared ideas which had proven suc- 
cessful in their own FHA chapters. 

The meeting was closed with a 
picnic lunch. 

Approximately sixty Gaston 
County Future Homemakers of 
America met for an all-day training 
workshop at Tryon High School. 

Those attending were local chap- 
ter officers, advisers, and chapter 
mothers. 

And the day's program of enter- 
tainment was the Belmont chapter's 
Kitchen Kabinet Band. With instru- 
ments made from kitchen utensils, 
they cleverly presented two num- 
bers, "Hobbies" and "Dixie". 

Other skits were planned and con- 
ducted by members of the Tryon 
and Bessemer City Clubs. 

H. F. Livingood, principal of 
Tryon High School, extended greet- 
ings to the group and discussed some 
of the responsibilities of leaders. 

Miss Louise Swann spoke on 
Back-to-School activities of value 
to chapters, selection of projects, 
and ways of working to carry out 
worthwhile goals. 



Barbara Bullard from East Meck- 
lenburg High School chose to help 
care for people who were unable to 
completely care for themselves as 
her home experience. Barbara stated 
that she was especially interested in 
going into hospital work as a career 
and this phase of nursing was es- 
pecially interesting. 

Some of the experiences and satis- 



factions Barbara accomplished are 
as follows: 

"Since these patients are physi- 
cally handicapped, their problems 
are different from other patients. 
Since 1 do plan to make a career 
of nursing, 1 thought that any ex- 
perience would help me to decide 
definitely what I would most enjoy. 
"I contacted the hospital and dis- 
cussed the possibility of becoming 
a volunteer worker during the sum- 
mer, holidays, and week ends. 

"One of the things I learned was 
how to keep my feelings under con- 
trol. I assumed at first that 1 would 
be unable to look at the patients. 
Soon, however, I found that they 
were not as disabled as it appeared 
the first few days. 

"This work was very rewarding 
personally and I wish more students 
had the same opportunity to do such 
wonderful work!" 

The Bartlett- Yancey Chapter of 
the FHA was really busy celebrat- 
ing FHA Week! Their activities 
were many — involving all the Bart- 
lett Yancey FHA girls. Each girl 
agreed to carry out special duties of 
each day of the week. Their duties 
were listed as follows: 
Monday: Advertise FHA through 
posters placed in school hall and 
in stores at Yanceyville. Also to 
help make a bulletin board illu- 
strating the purpose of FHA. 
Tuesday: Home Day. Be cooperative 
and appreciative toward family 
group. Perform special duties and 
be as helpful as possible. Learn 
to prepare a new dish and serve 
to the family. 
Thursday: Each FHA member plan- 
ned to bring fruit to school in 
order to prepare a "Happy 
Wishes" basket to send to the 
County Boarding Home. 
Friday: Teachers Day: Purpose was 
to encourage cooperation between 
teachers and pupils. The FHA 
members presented teachers of the 
Bartlett-Yancey High School an 
apple and also a floral arrange- 
ment. 
Saturday: State FHA Convention 
held in Raleigh and we were well 
represented with as many mem- 
bers attending as was allowed. 
Sunday: Attended all services at 
church and sat with our families. 
As you can see, FHA strives to 
help the Future Homemaker be- 
come a well-rounded individual. 
The motto, "Toward New Horizons" 
is taught to us in our monthly pro- 
grams and many activities in FHA. 
"Salary is not paramount in con- 



8 



sideration of job opportunities; 
wealth is not the most important 
thing to strive for," said Betty 
Feezor, well-known home econo- 
mist and radio and TV personality, 
in an address to members of the 
Shelby chapter of Future Home- 
makers of America. 

After deflating the primary im- 
portance of material wealth, the 
speaker listed some of the spiritual 
riches toward which her listeners 
might strive. 

Her remarks, made at the FHA 
Chapter's annual Mother-Daughter 
banquet at Cleveland Country Club, 
were tied in with the banquet theme 
of "The pot of gold at the end of 
the rainbow." 

Listing pretty clothes as one of 
the important coins in the average 
girl's pot of gold, she advised, "Don't 
be a copyist. Pick what looks good 
on you. Buy the dress that is plain, 
basic, of good material, which knows 
no season." 

Popularity, she said, is another of 
the golden coins craved by the aver- 
age student. In seeking to be popu- 
lar, she advised, "Depends on what 
you have been taught, not on what 
others think. Be on guard against 
the point of temptation." 

In seeking happiness as a golden 
coin, she urged, "Don't expect to 
find it in more things. Be yourself, 
act like yourself." Identifying her 
own philosophy of life with the 
Christian philosophy, she advised, 
"Ask the Guide for a roadmap." 

Approximately 130 FHA mem- 
bers, their mothers and visitors were 
present for the banquet. Visitors in- 
cluded two honorary members. 

The first meeting of the Benvenue 
chapter was held in the school audi- 
torium September 12. 

Special guest was Mrs. Shirley 
Woodard, manager of the campus 
room at the Youth Shop. In her 
opening remarks Mrs. Woodard 
stressed that the well-dressed high 
school girl must plan her wardrobe 
and shop with this plan. Then she 
pointed out that accessories were 
very important if the girl expected 
to be fashion smart and well-dressed 
from head to toe. 



State Convention 

Raleigh Memorial 

Auditorium 

March 31, 1962 



LIFE AS YOUR STATE FHA 

(Continued from page 1) 

watch for the "fitness" booth at the 
State Fair, October 16-21. 

If there is one thing I enjoy, that 
is meeting new people and making 
new friends. Several times I have 
spoken at Mother-Daughter ban- 
quets, district rallies, and helped 
teach classes at workshops. This af- 
forded me a chance to learn you 
better. If any of you would like me 
to attend or help out in any of your 
meetings, I shall be glad to, if my 
schedule permits. In conjunction 
with all of this, I have written an 
article on careers for Teen Times 
(April issue, 1961) and was in 
charge of our State FHA Calendar 
(January issue, 1961). During the 
year, I will write various other ar- 
ticles or skits for our FHA magazine. 

When I think of all FHA has done 
for me, fellow Future Homemakers, 
it makes me feel like the gentle 
brown cow when the milk truck 



passes. On the side of the truck were 
the words: pasteurized, homoge- 
nized, chocolate, skimmed, and so 
forth. The cow looked at his cow 
friends and said, "It makes us feel a 
little inadequate, doesn't it?" 

That is the way I feel toward all 
of you, 25,000 Future Homemakers 
in North Carolina, but I hope your 
confidence is with me, because I am 
doing and will continue to do my 
very best for you. 



MONEY AND 
TIME MANAGEMENT 

(Continued from page 7) 

with gold buttons on the cuffs and 
blouse. I completed my garment with 
a wide belt made of the same fabric. 
With all of my money gone and 
the summer over, I would have 
otherwise been blue, but not this 
time. I felt I had really accomplished 
something and had something to 
show for a long summer's work! 



Capsule Vreatment on 



"CREDIT 



?? 



A capsule treatment of some 
fundamentals that may come in 
handv to new homemakers or estab- 
lished families in the handling of 
their money management problems 
are: 

1. Set aside 10 per cent of actual 
take home pay in the form of liquid 
savings. 

2. Use credit sparingly and weigh 
the advantage of immediate acquisi- 
tion as against delaying while ac- 
cumulating all or part of purchase 
price. 

3. Do not let total monthly in- 
stallment payments exceed 20 to 25 
per cent of monthly take home pay. 

4. As a general rule, limit pay- 
ments to any single creditor to not 
more than 10 per cent of take home 
pay. (An exception may be made in 
the case of the purchase of an auto- 
mobile.) 

5. Do not contract a debt for more 
than the period for which you can 
project your future income and 
outgo. 

6. Make the largest down pay- 
ment within your means and the 



shortest terms of repayment, allow- 
ing liberally for any contingency that 
might prevent you from carrying out 
your agreement. 

7. When purchasing a home, the 
sale price should not exceed twice 
gross annual income and monthly 
payments should not exceed 25 per 
cent of monthly take home pay. 

8. Be prompt in payments. A 
good paying record insures future 
accommodation, while tardy pay- 
ments can destroy your credit stand- 
ing and, in turn, seriously effect your 
future living standards. 

9. Installment credit should be 
used for emergencies, necessities, 
and durable goods, not for luxuries 
and services quickly consumed. 

10. Your local bank is likely to be 
your best source of credit, both from 
the standpoint of reasonable terms 
and integrity. 



Remember ! ! 

Send your affiliation dues to State 

Office by Dec. 1 



Future Homemakers of America 



■ 



CREED 

We are the Future Homemakers of America 
We face the future with warm courage. 
And high hope, 

For we have the clear consciousness of seeking 
Old and precious values. 

For we are the builders of homes, 

Homes for America's future. 

Homes where living will be the expression of everything 

That is good and fair. 

Homes where truth and love and security and faith 

Will be realities, not dreams. 

We are the Future Homemakers of America, 
We face the future with warm courage, 
And high hope. 




"The homes of tomorrow are in 

the hand of the youth 

of tnrlav" 



!!.:; 







Caroline Says: 

If a man empties his purse into his head no man can 
take it away from him. An investment in knowledge 
always pays the best interest. 

The only reward of virtue is virtue: The only way to 
have a friend is to be one. 

The reward of a thing well done is to have done it. 

Nothing great was ever accomplished without enthusi- 
asm. 



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FUTURE HOMEMAKERS 

* North Carolina Association * 



'OLU^ 




£&l . . . 

Some chapters 
during the past year 
have been busy pre- 
paring and present- 
ing programs on 
"Family Unity" and 
and "Family Fit- 
ness." You may 
find some of their 
ideas helpful in 
planning your chap- 
ter program. 




• Presented a skit to members on Civil Defense. They 
stressed the necessities for family survival in case of 
an emergency. — Altamahaw-Ossippee 

• Panel discussion, "What a Man Expects in His Wife." 
— Candor 

• Panel discussion at PTA meeting, "How Families 
Can Live Together Successfully." — Cameron 

• Showed film, "Teenage Eating Habits" followed by 
a discussion. — Cool Springs 



• Each girl kept an account of what she spent for one 
month. At the next monthly meeting they compared 
their expenditures with the annual family income. — 
Elizabethtown 

• The theme of the Mother-Daughter Banquet was 
"Building Better Homes for a Better World." The 
speaker concentrated on the development of social, 
emotional and spiritual well being of all family 
members. — Valley Springs 

• A tribute was made to grandmothers at a chapter 
meeting. The feature of the program emphasized the 
important role grandmothers play in family rela- 
tionships. — Haw River 

• A mock fashion show of hats, using the theme 
"Safety in the Home." — La Fayette 

• Debate on physical health versus mental health 
(helped to establish a better understanding of their 
close relationship). — Oak City 

• Learned simple first-aid measures which one can 
apply in an emergency. — Norwood 

• "Give Your Heart to Your Family," theme during 
Valentine Week. Family activities were promoted. — 
Chase 



OUR COVER — The reigning FHA Sweetheart is Libby 
Warwick. On her right and left respectively are Susan 
Kay Woodall (Miss North Carolina) and Patricia Wil- 
liams. Libby and Patricia are Future Homemakers of 
the Hobbton Chapter. 



DECEMBER COVER— The attractive young lady on the 
December magazine cover was Blenda Caulder of the 
Laurinburg chapter and the two children were Danny 
and Peggy Chavis. 



North Carolina Association of Future Homemakers of America 



State Officers 
1961-62 

President — Kakie Jordan, Cary IV 
Vice-President — Ruth Guin, Stedman III 
Secretary — Judy Cubberley, Fike II 
Treasurer — Mabel Louise Cook, Perquimans Co. I 
Historian — Rosalee Ervin, Winecoff VI 
Parliamentarian — Linda Faye White, 

Union Grove VII 
Reporter — Diann Edwards, Rutherfordton- 

Spindale VIII 
Song Leader — Jan Ross, Altamahaw — Ossipee V 



District Advisers 
1961-62 

Mrs. Marjorie Spencer. Tarboro I 
Mrs. Norma Yelverton, Lee Woodard II 
Mrs. Retha Thompson, Williams III 
Mrs. Gladys Farnell, Fuquay Springs IV 
Mrs. Hazel Tripp, Madison-Mayodan V 
Mrs. Mary Copple, Mount Holly VI 
Mrs. Dorothy Felts, East Rowan VII 
Mrs. Elizabeth Reed, Sylva-Webster VIII 



State Adviser 

Mrs. Ernestine H. Frazier 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 

Division of Vocational Education 
Raleigh, North Carolina 



440 chapters 26,824 members 



LIVING IN BALANCE 
BEGINS IN THE FAMILY 



The fourteenth annual conference 
of the North Carolina Family Life 
Council was held in Charlotte at the 
Myers Park Baptist Church, Octo- 
ber 22-24, 1961. Two State FHA 
officers, Dianne Edwards and Rosa- 
lee Erwin, attended and reported an 
interesting and worthwhile meeting. 

The theme for the conference was 
"Living in Balance Begins in the 
Family." The opening session was 
a panel presentation "Gaining Per- 
spective: The 'State of Being' of To- 
day's Family — a Balance Between 
Realism and Idealism." This panel 
was moderated by Dr. Mildred I. 
Morgan and composed of the fol- 
lowing panel members: Patricia Ann 
Lawerence, M.D., Charles Starting, 
M.D., Dr. Carlyle Marney, Judge 
Willard I. Gatling and Dr. Irwin V. 
Sperry. 

The second session was keynoted 
with an address by Robert N. Ruth- 



erford, M.D., Obstetrician from the 
University of Washington at Seattle. 
Dr. Rutherford spoke on "Conserv- 
ing and Enriching Family Well Be- 
ing." 

At the luncheon Mrs. Robert N. 
Rutherford, a former marriage 
counselor, spoke on "The Cleopatra 
Course-Ways to Reburnish Charm." 

During the third meeting of the 
group a symposium was held at 
which time various representatives 
of organizations made their con- 
tributions showing how "Dynamic 
Family Interaction is Accomplished 
Through Many Channels." Among 
these speakers was our own Rosalee 
Erwin, Historian for the North Caro- 
lina Future Homemakers of Amer- 
ica. 

After the symposium the audience 
was given a choice as to which group 
meeting it would attend. The sub- 



jects presented by a group leader 
were as follows: 

Child from Birth to 6 

Early School Age Child 6 to 12 

Later School Age Child 13 to 21 

High School Students 

College Students 

The next general meeting used 
the theme "Preparation for Respon- 
sible Family Living" and was high- 
lighted with an address by Dr. 
Olin T. Binkley, Dean Southeastern 
Baptist Theological Seminary whose 
subject was "The Four Religion 
Needs in the Home." 

The last speaker for the three day 
conference was Frances L. Ilg, M.D., 
Director of the Gesell Institute of 
Child Development who chose as 
her subject "Living in Balance Be- 
gins in the Family." 

Perhaps at no one conference has 
so many outstanding speakers been 
included in a program. We shall long 
remember the North Carolina Fam- 
ily Life Council Meeting held in 
Charlotte. We wish every FHA 
member could have had the oppor- 
tunity of attending this wonderful 
series of meetings. 



HOME ECONOMICS 

. . and Its Role in 
Satisfying Home Life 



By Pete Cook 
State FHA Treasurer 



A butcher, a baker, a candlestick 
maker — have you ever noticed that 
each of these world-famous occupa- 
tions is directly connected with home 
economics? The variety, the quan- 
tity, and the quality of home econ- 
omics careers are almost unbeliev- 
able; yet one is available to any 
person with the desire and ambition 
to attain such a career. 

Perhaps I am more aware than 
the majority, of the priceless bene- 
fits of a degree in home economics 
because I have a sister who has a 
B.S. from East Carolina in this field. 
Now as Mrs. Dolan A. Winslow, 
wife of a United States Air Force 
Captain and the mother of two small 
children, she has the full time oc- 
cupation of a homemaker. Prior to 
her marriage Mrs. Winslow was Sue 



Cook. She has derived experiences 
from having studied home econ- 
omics, teaching home economics, 
and being a homemaker in Charles- 
ton, South Carolina; Tokyo, Japan; 
and presently Tacoma, Washington. 
Surprisingly enough, Sue is singing 
the praises of home economics loud- 
er than ever before. 

This is what she has to say to you. 



Calling all Future Homemakers 
to the aid of their country! Believe 
me, all the experience you gain in 
preparation for your role as a home- 
maker in the Space Age is of great 
importance, not only to you, but to 
our country as well. 

In the past five and half years we 
moved seven different times. Three 
of these years were spent living in 





Japan. I am convinced the life of 
an Air Force Wife is ever changing. 
The personal experiences gained 
from majoring in Home Economics 
at East Carolina and from teaching 
for two years in Elizabeth City have 
proven invaluable to me. 

Life in Japan was interesting, but 
what a challenge it presented! There 
we were, two rural North Caro- 
linians, living in the largest city of 
(Continued on page 6 ) 



1 



Last summer I was fortunate to 
take a tour of England, Holland, 
Germany, Austria, and France with 
singers from the University of Ten- 
nessee, where I am studying home 
economics. 

While most of the students con- 
centrated their attention on music. 
I took the opportunity to increase 
my knowledge of the European con- 
tributions to our American homes. 

Since so much of our furniture, 
fashions and foods has evolved 
from the European civilization, I 
was aware of the typical resem- 
blance of our furniture to theirs, but 
not so much resemblance to our 
fashions, because it is well known 
that the American woman is the best 
dressed woman in the world. 

The first stop on our itinerary was 
London. While most of the singers' 
time was occupied with the corn- 



was there any trash, dirt or filth. 
Everywhere we looKed there were 
unique apartment dwellings with bay 
windows. I did not see an apart- 
ment without lace curtains hanging 
at the windows and each one was 
meticulously clean — so clean, in 
fact, that a passerby could see all 
the way in the homes. Inside, the 
walls looked as if they had been 
whitewashed; outside, the sidewalks 
and buildings looked as if they had 
been scrubbed with a fine-bristle 
brush. 

The contrast of Germany to Hol- 
land was one of black to white. 
Germany was a country of war- 
scarred buildings and Hitler's multi- 
million dollar and multi-hundred 
mile Autobahn. 

As everyone knows, Germany is 
a country of Hummel figures, beer- 
gartens (gardens), and picturesque 



European Impressions 

By Angela Upchurch 

Home Economics Major, University of Tennessee, Former 

Future Homemaker Durham Chapter 



pulsory concerts, I took time to go 
shopping. 

I had always heard of British 
tweeds and the quality of them. I 
was surprised, however, at the rela- 
tively few shoppers who actually 
wore British tweeds on the street. 
Of course, the material was dis- 
played in the department stores. 
But the English, being conservative, 
did not appear to be so enthusiastic 
about purchasing the woolen textiles 
as were the tourists. 

To be truthful, I looked at some 
British tweeds, lovely fabrics, but 
prices were unreasonable once they 
were converted into our money; 
therefore, I decided to purchase the 
typical Scottish military plaid — 
Black Watch. 

From London we took a train to 
the coast and crossed the English 
Channel to Holland on a liner. 

I do not believe that I have ever 
been so impressed with the cleanli- 
ness of a country as I was with 
Holland. 

One always hears of how meticul- 
ous the Dutch are, but not until you 
can see it for yourself can you fully 
appreciate the attempt at perfection 
that these people make. 

Nowhere that our bus travelled 



Berchtesgarten. From one extreme 
to the other, Germany has almost 
anything any tourist would want. 

Ah, Vienna! What a change from 
everything we had observed before 



— from the preponderant baroque 
buildings to the unique underground 
gift shoppes. 

As for the dress of the typical 
Austrian woman — every one that I 
saw wore dark hose, black spool- 
heel shoes, white woolen pleated 
skirts, and usually, brown hip-length 
sweaters. Not even in Paris did I 
see an awareness of style among the 
average French woman as I did 
among the average Austrian woman. 
Surprised? I must admit that I was! 

While we were in Vienna, we 
were all determined to see Schon- 
brunn Palace where the Kennedys 
and the Khrushchevs had attended 
a concert only a few weeks pre- 
viously. 

The ballroom was actually gaudy 
— which is typical of the Baroque 
influence. Murals were painted on 
the ceilings and walls. These sym- 
bolized cherubs and The Omnipo- 
tence. 

The predominating colors were 
gold and blue, while the background 
of the walls was painted white. 

The most interesting room that I 
saw was the boudoir of Marie An- 
toinette, the daughter of Maria 
Theresa. Dainty blue and white 
printed china squares were used on 
the walls instead of wallpaper. Gold 
and white Louis furniture was up- 
holstered in heavy printed blue and 
white material. 

Since the Baroque color for the 
outside of the buildings was a shade 

(Continued inside back cover) 




Angelia Upchurch as a "Consumer Buyer in Europe.' 




A VIEW OF 



Convention 
Speaker 

Dr. Walter K. Kerr, who is known 
throughout the nation and the world 
for his interest in youth and his 
leadership of youth activities, will 
be the keynote speaker at our State 
FHA Convention. 

Dr. Kerr has recently resigned as 
pastor of the Marvin Methodist 
Church in Tyler, Texas from which 
he has been pastor for the past ten 
years in order that he might give 
himself full time to youth work in a 
youth crusade for God and Free- 
dom and has now founded the Wal- 
ter Kerr Youth Crusade. The pur- 
pose of the crusade is to help the 
youth of America and the youth of 
the world in their fight for freedom. 
Dr. Kerr has just returned from a 
Youth Mission in the Orient. The 
purpose of the youth mission was to 
prepare the Korean Youth for the 
free elections which would be held 
in Korea in 1966. The young people 
realized that if they are to have a 
democracy they must have energy. 
Dr. Kerr spoke to over 60,000 Ko- 
rean Youth. Eight thousand were 
converted to Christian faith. Many 
of them were Moslems, followers of 
Confucius and Pagan. Quite signifi- 
cant is the fact that 600 of those 
converted were communists. 



The North Carolina delegates to 
the National FHA Convention held 
in St. Louis last summer, had the 
opportunity of hearing Dr. Kerr and 
are looking forward to his visit to 
North Carolina. 



College Life 

By Nancy Edwards 
State FHA President 1959-1960 



High school FHA activities — a 
memory and teaching home econ- 
omics in the future — a dream, these 
are the things surrounding the pres- 
ent of a college student majoring in 
Home Economics Education. Dur- 
ing my freshman year at Woman's 
College of the University of North 
Carolina, I became familiar with 
the staff, curriculum, and fellow stu- 
dents of the School of Home Econ- 
omics. The first semester orientation 
course designed to enlighten fresh- 
men of the requirements and op- 
portunities in the field of home 
economics proved to be extremely 
informative and interesting. Talks 
from professors and panel discus- 
sions enabled us to learn more about 
the careers that we were choosing. 

The electives for freshman home 
economics students include clothing, 
art, and food preparation. Each of 
these is a one semester course. Art 
was my first choice and the six hours 
that I spent in the art lab each week 
were fascinating. Besides learning 
the basic principles of design and 
color, I began to understand and 
appreciate modern art. Second se- 
mester, I exchanged my brush and 
paints for measuring spoons and a 
foods lab manual. In Food Prepara- 
tion I studied the nutritive value, 
preparation, and preservation of 
numerous foods. Rather than pre- 
paring complete meals, the lab work 
in this course was concerned with 
the study and preparation of food 
in certain groups. Even though 
french fries and pancakes do not 
taste good together, they were both 
included in the lab on fried foods, 
so we prepared them at the same 
time. 

Home Economics courses were 
only a part of my freshman curric- 
ulum. Classes in chemistry, history, 
English, Spanish, and physical edu- 
cation kept me busy. Those first 
quizzes and the term papers that 



F. H. 


A. 


Camp 


May 


28-June 2 


June 4-J 


une 9 



followed made me aware that col- 
lege is not as hard as everybody 
tells you — it's harder. 

There is also the brighter side of 
college life, such as Rat Day. The 
upperclassmen woke up at the burst 
of dawn and during the day that 
followed we gained first-hand ex- 
perience as underdogs. 

Becoming adjusted to living in a 
small gray room on third floor was 
an additional hazard. My roommate 
and I consoled each other with the 
knowledge that none of the other 
girls had the privilege of living in 
the smallest room on campus. There 
is never a dull moment in a dormi- 
tory with over a hundred girls. 
Bridge parties, sharing care pack- 
ages from home, and the excitement 
of mail from a certain male con- 
tribute to the pleasant side of college 
life. In addition Mid-Winters at 
Wake Forest, fraternity parties, and 
the Elliot Hall Ball helped to make 
my first year at college a memorable 
one. 

During the year I also became 
familiar with the activities of the 
Home Economics club. A picnic, 
Christmas bazaar, and informative 
programs are included in this or- 
ganization's activities. The Home 
Economics club banquet in May was 
one of the highlights of my freshman 
year. At this banquet I was recog- 
nized as the recipient of the Danforth 
Freshman Leadership Training 
Scholarship. The last of July, I 
journeyed to Muskegon, Michigan 
to spend two delightful weeks in 
mental, religious, physical, and so- 
cial training at Camp Miniwaca. 
Associating with girls from fifty 
states and several foreign countries 
reminded me of the National FHA 
Conventions I attended. 

The Future Homemakers Organi- 
zation gave me a deeper apprecia- 
tion for the art of homemaking. 
After graduation in 1964 I hope to 
become a home economics teacher; 
so I can help other girls to realize 
the importance of home economics 
training as a background for ALL 
careers. 







DO YOU 

District Rai 



These pictures no doubt bring \m 
you recognize a familiar pose? 



i 



The 1962-1963 officers and advi 



DISTRICT I Secretary, Mary CJ 
Mrs. Margaret Frit 

DISTRICT II Vice President, Ju| 
Miss Emily Lois St 

DISTRICT III President, Ruth Gl 
Mrs. Myrtle StogmJ 

DISTRICT IV Recreation Leader(j 
Mrs. Nancy Dardny 

DISTRICT V Historian, Kathy A 
Mrs. Margie S. Elj 

DISTRICT VI Parliamentarian, Jg 
Mrs. Alice ForbisJl 

DISTRICT VII Reporter, Brenda « 
Mrs. Arlene Patted 

DISTRICT VIII Treasurer, Sandra* 
Miss Barbara Wis : 

They will be installed as officers id 



ICALL . . . 
b Last Fall? 



ghts of the eight district rallies. Do 



s follows: 

oyner, West Edgecombe 
loskie 

imith, B. F. Grady 
Elm City 

man 
t 

le Herbert, Garner 
P 

rth Davidson 
brtown 

sne, Shelby 
:klenburg 

I Union Grove 
l Surry 

ist, Clyde A. Erwin 



s at our State Meeting on March 3 1 





RROUND THE YEAR WITH 



C" 



^ 



d |b#/iS! 








Getting to Know You 

Last year Alice Avett, a student at Hudson High School, selected as her 
home experience the decorating and preparation of a room for an exchange 
student. Alice was most interested in making this room furnishings typical 
of those enjoyed by the average American girl, so that her friend would 
be truly living American-style. 

In August, Claudia Kubin, from Germany, came to America to live with 
Alice and to attend Hudson High School. 

Claudia, and Alice have written the following article to acquaint us with 
Claudia and some of the German customs. 



Claudia Kubin, foreign exchange 
student at Hudson High School ar- 
rived in New York on August 21. 
She came by ship from Rotterdam, 
Holland, with about 900 students, 
enroute to the United States under 
sponsorship of the American Field 
Service Program. Claudia is 17 years 
old, and comes from Heilbroun, a 
town of 90,000 inhabitants in the 
southern part of Germany. There 
she attended one of the six high 
schools in Heilbroun which is an 
all-girl school. The students have no 
choice of their subjects, instead they 
have thirteen required. During the 
first four years of high school she 
had Home Economics which in- 
cluded knitting, crocheting, em- 
broidering, simple sewing, and food 
preparation. 

Claudia is now a senior at Hudson 
High School and is taking Home 
Economics II. She is a member of 
the Future Homemakers of America 
Club, Future Teachers of America, 
Honorary member of the Student 



Council and Beta Club, and a mem- 
ber of the varsity basketball team. 
This is a new experience for her, 
for there are no clubs of this type 
in Germany. 

Claudia is making her home in 
Hudson with the Reverend Clegg 
Avett family. Reverend Avett is pas- 
tor of the local Methodist Church. 
She has an American sister Alice, 
17 years of age, who is a senior in 
high school and is very active in 
school activities. She is taking Home 
Economics II and is Parlimentarian 
of the Hudson FHA chapter. Her 
American brothers are Wallace, who 
is 20 years old and a senior at 
Carolina, and Jim, who is 14 years 
old and a freshman in high school. 

In Germany, Christmas prepara- 
tions start with the Advent season. 
The last four Sundays before Christ- 
mas are called the Advent Sundays. 
For each Sunday people light one 
candle on their Advent wreath of 
fir branches so that on the last Sun- 
day four candles are burning. 





- ; 




On December 6th, "Nikolaus 
Day" is celebrated. Children put a 
big shoe in front of their doors be- 
fore they go to bed and next morn- 
ing it is filled with sweets and other 
goodies. 

Christmas Eve is Holy Night, the 
night of Christ's birth. You can find 
a Christmas tree in every home. The 
tree is decorated with gold, silver, 
or colored Christmas balls and little 
sweets. Burning candles are on the 
branches of the tree. The smell of 
wax and the fir tree together with 
all the delicious confections make 
for a very festive occasion. Gifts 
are exchanged and opened on Christ- 
mas Eve. Everybody is happy and 
one can hear the same melody in 
Germany as well as in America — 
"Silent Night, Holy Night." 



HOME ECONOMICS 

(Continued from page 1 ) 

the world. Life was stimulating, ex- 
citing, and rewarding; but yet so 
unlike our parental homelife. 

Japan is one of the strategic areas 
in the Far East, and the battle be- 
tween democracy and communism 
is just as prevalent there as in other 
areas of the world. The Japanese 
were very interested in our demo- 
cratic way of life, and it is best as 
it is practiced in our homes. This is 
so different from the patriarchal 
family. My husband flew to most of 
the Far East and we both went to 
Hong Kong. From these experiences 
we have agreed that the American 
way of life is the way of life for us. 

Our life as service personnel is 
full of constantly changing physical 
settings, separations, and other char- 
acteristics that one would consider 
as threats to our marriage. In spite 
of them all we have achieved a 
semblance of calmness and stability, 
and have found our marriage to be 
fulfilling and rewarding. 

So let me encourage all of you to 
develop these opportunities for ex- 
periences and say that I personally 
feel much of our present happiness 
stems from the background in Home 
Economics. Please remember, in our 
homes we develop our most vital 
natural resource and upon this our 
democratic way of life is dependent. 



Claudia Kubin and Alice Avett. 



Final Applications for 
State Homemaker Degree 

Due In Office of Area 

Supervisor On Or Before 

February 28, 1962 



Each of us should make a real 
effort to know our neighbors better. 
Helping others is not only bene- 
ficial to them but to us, also. It is 
not hard to be nice to people; all 
it takes is a little giving of ourselves. 
Why not try smiling and saying 
"hi" to everyone you pass in the 
halls at school? Although this may 
seem strange to you at first, before 
long it will be the natural thing to 
do. Simple gestures such as this will 
make other people happier, and they 
will remember you for your friend- 
liness. 

Another thing you can do is sin- 
cerely try to understand others. In 
other words, find out what makes 
them "tick." Forget about yourself 
and concentrate on what your asso- 
ciates say and do. When talking with 
others encourage them to express 
their ideas and beliefs. Give them 
your opinions in exchange. This can 
afford better understanding between 
you. 

Getting to know and to help 
others seems to me to go hand-in- 
hand. There are numerous ways 



GETTING TO KM 
YOUR NEIGHBOR 



By Judy Cubberley 
State FHA Secretary 

your local FHA chapter can help 
the less-fortunate. Look at some 
suggestions I have listed below. 

1 . Let each girl in your chapter 
"adopt" a shut-in to visit once every 
two weeks. 

2. Have a magazine drive. Let 
this be school-wide. Give the maga- 
zines you collect to your local hos- 
pital. 

3. Sponsor a school-wide old 
clothing and toy drive. Give the 
articles you collect to your local wel- 
fare agency. 

4. Take an Easter opportunity. 

5. Have an Easter party for the 
underprivileged children in your 
community. Be sure to hide eggs for 




the children to find. This is fun for 
everyone! 

The happiness you receive from 
knowing and helping others is well 
worth your effort. The rewards are 
many and very satisfying. 



Chase Future Homemakers Shared Christmas 

With Senior Citizens 



Christmas was given a special 
meaning when Chase FHA'ers shared 
the holiday season with the elderly 
people in their communities. Before 
the holidays began each FHA girl 
was given a sheet of suggestions to 
help carry out the Chapter project, 
"Enjoying, Helping, and Under- 
standing Older People." These sug- 
gestions were developed by a com- 
mittee in an effort to help carry out 
a chapter project continued from 
last year — "Senior Citizens are Im- 
portant." 

The suggestion sheet included 
ideas from baking cookies to pre- 
senting programs. However, the girls 
were encouraged to do things which 
they thought would best meet the 
needs of an elderly person or per- 
sons and give them personal satis- 
faction and enjoyment. 

Many an elderly heart was glad- 
ened during the holiday season due 
to this project, and a great number 
of Chase FHAers reaped the results 
of a gratifying experience. 

A wide range of activities was 
carried out by the girls. For exam- 



ple, one girl invited an older couple 
to eat Christmas dinner with her 
family; another spent the afternoon 
with a blind lady; some addressed 
Christmas cards for neighbors; still 
others made Christmas candy and 
cookies with their grandmothers; 
fruit baskets were delivered and 
visits were made; one took care of 
her grandparents to give others time 
off; and others did things ranging 
from singing Christmas Carols, visit- 
ing rest homes, wrapping gifts, and 
putting up Christmas decorations 
for older people. 

Ninety-five home economics girls 
took part in making tray-favors for 
seven homes for elderly people in 
the county. The girls brought from 
their homes pine cones, pieces of 
ribbon, sweet-gum balls and Christ- 
mas cards. 

After everything had been col- 
lected, one day of classes was de- 
voted to painting pine cones, sweet- 
gum balls, tying ribbon, cutting out 
Christmas scenes, and putting all 
this together into 180 lovely tray 
favors. Each favor carried a Christ- 



mas wish and the signatures of the 
Chase FHA chapter. 

At the same time in the other 
home economics department, tradi- 
tional Santa Claus boots were being 
made under the supervision of three 
State Homemakers Degree appli- 
cants. These boots were cut with 
pinking shears from red broadcloth 
and stitched with Christmas green. 
When the boots were finished, they 
held a Christmas card bearing greet- 
ings, the name of the FHA chapter, 
and a candy cane. 

Fifty-five tray-favors were carried 
to the county hospital to be used 
on Christmas day. 

The three State Homemaker De- 
gree applicants enjoyed delivering 
all the tray-favors to the rest homes 
and the hospital. 

In summing up our work done on 
this project, we feel that we bene- 
fited more than the elderly people. 
But, there is one thing we all learned 
and that is, "Senior Citizens are Im- 
portant, and they do have something 
to offer youth, if we will give them 
a chance." 



LIFE IN 
OKINAWA 



By Jackie Evans 
Millbrook Chapter 



Have you Remembered the Senior 
Citizens in your Community? 



By Lou Massey 
Clayton High School 



My family and I have recently 
returned from a tour of duty in 
Okinawa, a small island in the 
Pacific. 

Everything in Okinawa is still very 
primitive. Instead of the beautiful 
self-defrosting refrigerators which 
Americans use, the people of Oki- 
nawa preserve their food by placing 
it in the water at the bottom of a 
well. Only some of the more for- 
tunate families can afford an ice 
box! 

The Okinawans prepare their 
meals on a small coal stove, similar 
to our barbecue grills. The main 
foods in their diet are rice, fish 
(either raw or cooked) and tea made 
of rain water. 

The schools are quaint and simple 
in structure since building materials 
must be produced by hand. The 
buildings are constructed of bamboo 
and rice paper, and are "open air" 
for summer comfort. The children 
attend school the year around ex- 
cept for a four weeks period when 
the rice is harvested and families 
enjoy festivals. 

The people enjoy sports as track, 
swimming, baseball and fishing 
(which is also done as an occupa- 
tion). 

The Okinawans manufacture lux- 
urious silks, brocades and wooden 
statuetes. The art and skill involved 
in making these has been passed 
from generation to generation for 
many centuries. 

As we here in America enjoy 
many of the luxuries of life it is 
difficult to realize that people of 
other countries endure many hard- 
ships and that their customs are dif- 
ferent from ours. Through friend- 
ship, and a better understanding of 
a country's culture, we as Americans 
can win the friendship of other peo- 
ple and nations and have a peaceful 
world. 



IN MEMORIAM 

Jo Cameron 

December 28, 1961 

Apex District 



In planning FHA activities for 
the year, the Clayton Chapter of the 
Future Homemakers of America 
thought it would be fun to share our 
Chapter activities with a group of 
Clayton's elderly women. The girls 
looked around and located six 
women whom they wanted to adopt 
as Chapter grandmothers. Notes 
were mailed to them and each graci- 
ously accepted the honor. 

Planning projects for these FHA 
grandmothers has meant lots of fun 
to our members. As part of our 
Christmas activities the Future 
Homemakers visited these grand- 
mothers. Standing outside the win- 
dows, the girls, dressed in white 



blouses and holding lighted candles, 
sang Christmas carols. Eager to 
interpret FHA to our grandmothers, 
we presented each of them a red 
rose bearing the symbolism of the 
rose of our organization. 

Reaction from our grandmothers 
were varied. Their smiles, laughter, 
and a few tears mixed with a whole 
lot of gratitude made us realize that 
we had not only accomplished one 
of our FHA goals, but we had con- 
veyed the true spirit of Christmas. 

Has your Chapter selected grand- 
mothers? Why not add this to your 
plans next year. Our Chapter has 
found this to be one of our most 
rewarding experiences. 




Clayton Future Homemakers sing to senior community members. 



1962 NATIONAL FHA MEETING 

Where? Hotel Utah Motor Lodge, Salt Lake City, Utah. 

When? July 9-12, 1962. 

How Many? From North Carolina — 35 — 8 adults and 27 FHA'ers. 
How Much? $275.00 if entire North Carolina quota attends. 
National office for Area Subregion C: Reporter. 
Theme: Guideposts for Progress. 

Objective: To introduce and Interpret the Program of work for 1962- 

1965 and motivate members to use it. 
North Carolina would like to fill its entire auota of delegates to this 
meeting. Discuss with your chapter the possibility of sending a delegate 
to gleen ideas for projects and activities for your chapter next year. Write 
to your state adviser soon if you wish to send a delegate. 



EUROPEAN IMPRESSIONS 

(Continued from page 2) 
of sandstone, Schonbrunn was no 
exception and had been painted 
sandstone, too. 

Wienerschnitzel was my favorite 
dish throughout Europe, and while 
I was in Vienna, I ordered it at 
every opportunity. Wienerschnitzel 
is actually pork, breaded and broiled. 
It is a specialty of Vienna and costs 
only about fifty cents a serving. 

From Vienna, we took an over- 
night train to Paris. As dawn was 
approaching, I raised the shade of 
my' compartment and noticed the 
buildings tall and narrow with lou- 
vered shutters. There was a simi- 
larity between the French and Ger- 
man buildings, the only difference 
being that the French buildings had 
louvered shutters that so many 
homes in America use today. 

Truthfully, Paris was disillusion- 
ment to me except for the metamor- 
phosis that took place at night when 
all the street lights were on and 
glimmered on the Seine. At that 
time, all the dirtiness and shabbiness 
that was so evident during the day 
was hidden for a while. 

There was a similarity of Ver- 
sailles to Schonbrunn with a lot of 
gold leaf and murals on the ceilings. 
Even though Versailles is larger than 
Schonbrunn, Schonbrunn has more 
rooms. The French garden on the ex- 
terior of Versailles was not so im- 
pressive as the one at Schonbrunn, 
perhaps because I saw the one at 
Schonbrunn first, or because there 
was no imaginative arrangement of 
the flowers at Versailles, or maybe 
because the French did not seem to 
take an interest in the upkeep of the 
foliage and plants. 

On our landing at Idlewild, I 
realized that there is no place like 
the United States with its neon signs, 
billboards, and brightly colored 
automobiles. A trip abroad makes 
one more appreciative of the heri- 
tage that is his in this prosperous 
land and at the same time makes one 
aware of the European contributions 
to our society. 



laprer ufatfers 



IMPORTANT EVENTS! 
National FHA Week 
April 1-7. 

State Convention 

Memorial Auditorium 

March 31. 



Bartlett-Yancey, Anderson, Prospect 
Hill and Cobb Memorial chapters co- 
operated with the Danville Fair Commit- 
tee in September. Future Homemakers 
from each of the chapters made garments 
suitable for various occasions and mod- 
eled these during the fashion review. 

The Bath, Fuquay Springs, Forest Hills, 
Sylva-Webster and Harmony chapters 
are participating in the National Finance 
Committee project. The objective of this 
work is "to help Future Homemakers 
recognize the various expenses they must 
face upon entering college, a business 
school, or some other institution of higher 
education." Elizabeth Powell of the Fu- 
quay Springs chapter is North Carolina's 
official committee member. 

A new refrigerator was presented to 
the Beaufort homemaking department 
by the FHA chapter. The money was 
raised through the sale of cards, candy 
and dish cloths. The girls are now raising 
money to buy trays and cabinets for the 
department. 

The Chinquapin chapter gave its 
Mother-Daughter Banquet on December 
13, in the school cafeteria. A red and 
green color scheme was used in the deco- 
rations. Each mother received a red or 
green hat pin cushion. 

Mrs. Edwin Lanier, formerly from 
Wisconsin, spoke on the comparative dif- 
ferences in food habits. One example of 
a strange food eaten in Alaska was moose 
which could be served twenty-three dif- 
ferent ways. She explained that traveling 
could be intriguing and educational. 

A visit to a Slimorama studio was a 
feature for the October meeting of the 
Durham chapter. An illustrative lecture 
on hair care, stvling and figure control 
was of primary interest. 

The Elm City chapter honored their 
mothers at a Mother-Daughter Banquet 
at the school on November 21. A Thanks- 
giving motif was used throughout the 
banquet room and gave a backeround 
for the theme "Harvest Time." The 
theme was carried out in the use of 
yellow mums, cornucopias, Indian corn 
and ivy. The program started with "What 
is Thanksgiving?" a skit written by an 
FHA member. Miss Alice Strawn. field 
teacher trainer at East Carolina College, 
was guest speaker and talked on "You 
and Home Economics — Today and To- 
morrow." Honorary membership was 
conferred to Mrs. Fred Davis, a chapter 
mother. 

This has been quite a busy year for 
the Hobbton Future Homemakers. The 
year was started in August by selecting 
a chairman for the following committees. 
Miss Hobbton Pageant. Sweetheart Ball. 
Mother-Daughter Banquet and Degrees of 
Achievement Committee. 

The degrees committee drew up stand- 
ards for degree work. The Declaration 
of Intentions were filed by 30 girls and 
13 girls have passed the first standards 
set up by this committee. 

On November 17, the annual Miss 
Hobbton Pageant was presented by 
the Hobbton Future Homemakers of 
America. This is their way of demon- 
strating "Youth Can Do." 



On December 22, the members hon- 
ored their sweethearts and crowned a 
senior girl as sweetheart of the dance. 

During the first week of December the 
FHA beau was selected and will be 
recognized at all functions and in the 
school annual. 

Nash and Franklin County Bi-County 
rally was held at Coopers High School. 
Mr. C. Ray Privette, a faculty member 
at Louisburg College, was guest speaker 
for the rally. He centered his remarks 
around the theme, "Youth — Measure 
Your Values." 

The Oxford chapter visited the Bryant's 
Rest Home during the Christmas holi- 
days. The girls shared Christmas verses, 
poems and carols with the patients. Later 
they returned to the homemaking cottage 
to enjoy refreshments. 

The Robeson County FHA chapters 
sponsored their first county-wide officers 
training workshop, on October 26, at 
Littlefield High School. The program on 
Parliamentary Procedure was presented 
by the officers of the Littlefield chapter 
of the Future Farmers of America. Each 
officer attended her respective workshop. 
The workshops were designed to promote 
more effective work and leadership by 
the officers. The area supervisor and state 
adviser were present for the meeting. 

In the fall, the Shelby Future Home- 
makers practiced food preservation and 
entered products in the Cleveland County 
Fair. They also prepared a booth "Be- 
tween You and Destruction," stressing 
food, water and equipment necessary for 
survival. 

December 6, was the highlight of the 
year when the West End FHA and FFA 
held their first joint banquet in the new 
school cafeteria. 

The guest tables were centered with 
a Christmas arrangement made by the 
Future Homemakers. 

Reverend Dan Norman, Minister of 
the Eureka and Lakeview Presbyterian 
Churches spoke on "Youth — Measure 
Your Values." 

A feature of the evening was a panel 
discussion in which parents and students 
discussed, "Does Father Know Best?'" 

The North Buncombe FHA held a 
Christmas skating party Monday, Decem- 
ber the eleventh at Spud's Roller Rink. 
Most of the girls who attended were 
not very good skaters and the ones who 
could skate were kept in laughter by the 
antics and mishaps of the non-skaters. 
Several games were played, the most 
interesting one being the one in which 
the girls exchanged comical gifts with 
each other. After the gifts had been 
opened each girl was asked to make up 
a poem about her gift. 

On Monday, December the eighteenth, 
several FHA'ers took fruits to the Park- 
way Nursing Home to give to the elderly 
folks. After the fruits had been distri- 
buted, the girls sang carols. The people 
were delighted at hearing the familiar old 
songs and the girls delighted at singing 
them. 

For an after Christmas project the 
FHA is sponsoring a drive for Christmas 
cards. The cards will be sent to mission- 
aries in foreign countries. The entire 
school has been asked to help with this 
project. 

As another project the Club has voted 
to send money to Medico. The money 
will come from several fund-raising proj- 
ects of the Club. 



CAROLINE SAYS: 



WORLD 

Love has many voices. 

It speaks in the eyes of a child with a pet, 

in the smile of a mother holding her new- 
born, 

in the touch of hand upon hand when the 
way is narrow and the darkness 
blinding. 

Love says, "I am your friend. You are my 
friend. 

Together, we make a world." 
Text by Anne Renick 
Minutes, Nationwide Insurance Co. 








A TRIBUTE TO THE NEW CHAPTERS OF 1961-1962 



Alexander High School 
Bowman High School 
Brevard Ir. High School 
Charles B. Aycock High School 
Clayton High School 
East Davidson High School 
East Montgomery High School 
East Surry High School 
Ellenboro High School 
Gaston High School 
Greene Central High School 
Jacksonville High School 



Jordan-Matthews High School 
Ledford High School 
Leland High School 
Lillington High School 
Louisburg High School 
Thomasville Jr. High School 
Maxton High School 
Middlesex High School 
Mount Airy High School 
Newton-Conover High School 
Parkwood High School 



Pittsboro High School 
Rohanen High School 
Spring Hope High School 
South Rowan High School 
Sun Valley High School 
Surry Central High School 
Union High School 
Waco High School 
West Lincoln High School 
Wilson Jr. High School 
Wilson Mills High School 
Youngsville High School 



OW( 



Youth Can Do 




A* 3 



FUTURE HOMEMAKERS 

* North Carolina Association * 



\E IX 



MAY 1962 



NUMBER 4 



Show Your Community that 

"Youth Can Do" 

Rachel Farmer 
Bailey Chapter 

Has your chapter decided on a project for this 
year? Perhaps you already have, but if you have 
not, why don't you select one? Projects are just as 
helpful as a news article in obtaining favorable 
recognition from your community. 

If you are lacking ideas why don't you go to the 
town council, the mayor, or some of the civic or- 
ganizations for help. They will be glad to help you 
get started because they like to see their young peo- 
ple taking some initiative. 

My local chapter has tried to have one com- 
munity project during every National FHA Week. 



We have, in past years, had a clean-up drive, 
cleaned the firehouse and made cookies for the older 
citizens and shut-ins. 

Each year, the people in your community are 
asking for volunteers to help with the March of 
Dimes and the Heart Sunday. These make excellent 
projects. You could participate as an individual 
person or your chapter could lead the drive. 

Last year our club had its first Hobo-day. When 
the people of our town found out how strenuously 
our girls worked, they were extremely surprised and 
proud. 

Girls, we are members of that notorious group 
called "youth." We have to prove ourselves many 
more times than other groups do. 

As Future Homemakers we can establish projects 
and by carrying them out we prove to the American 
communities of today that the youth can do, and 
are doing. 



OUR COVER — Doris Young, President Beaufort Chap- 
ter, picks flowers for adults in the community during 
National FHA Week. 



MR. ALTON DANIELS will make 8 x 10 glossy prints 
of convention pictures. If pictures are desired, send $1.50 
per picture to the State Office by May 20. 



North Carolina Association of Future Homemakers of America 



State Officers 
1961-62 

President — Kakie Jordan, Cary IV 

Vice-President — Ruth Guin, Stedman III 

Secretary — Judy Cubberley, Fike II 

Treasurer — Mabel Louise Cook, Perquimans Co. 1 

Historian — Rosalee Ervin, Winecoff VI 

Parliamentarian — Linda Faye White, 
Union Grove VII 

Reporter — Diann Edwards, Rutherfordton- 
Spindale VIII 

Song Leader — Jan Ross, Altamahaw— Ossipee V 



District Advisers 
1961-62 

Mrs. Marjorie Spencer, Tarboro I 

Mrs. Norma Yelverton, Lee Woodard II 

Mrs. Retha Thompson, Williams III 

Mrs. Gladys Farnell, Fuquay Springs IV 

Mrs. Hazel Tripp, Madison-Mayodan V 

Mrs. Mary Copple, Mount Holly VI 

Mrs. Dorothy Felts, East Rowan VII 

Mrs. Elizabeth Reed, Sylva-Webster VIII 



State Adviser 

Mrs. Ernestine H. Frazier 

STATE DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 

Division of Vocational Education 

Raleigh, North Carolina 



442 chapters 26,827 members 



Girls, Get Wise to Your Future! 



Economists, sociologists and psy- 
chologists are all suggesting that the 
next rive or ten years are going to 
bring dynamic changes in our civili- 
zation that will directly affect the 
women's role in the home and in the 
labor market. 

Needless to say, grandma's role 
seems to have been a rather uncom- 
plicated life though one which re- 
quired great physical stamina. She 
was charged with the task of rearing 
a large family, staying in the home 
to provide some of the basic necessi- 
ties as making clothing, preparing 
food which was locally grown and all 
without the aid of our modern-day 
time saving devices. The home and 
the family were her primary con- 
cerns. 

The American girl today still holds 
to those values of providing a home 
and rearing a family, but many other 
serious factors are effecting her role 
in the home and complicating her 
tasks. Economic necessity, more ad- 
vanced training of women — many in 
the fields which were primarily for 
men — conquest of disease, innova- 
tion of many laboring saving devices 
to eliminate long hours devoted to 
home care, fostering of female tal- 
ents and the longer life span of 
women are forcing a reappraisal in 
the values girls hold for the future. 
With a longer life span and hours be- 
ing freed from doing household 
chores, neither housework nor the 
rearing of children can absorb all of 
our lives. Even today authorities tell 
us that the average girl who grad- 
uates from college will work outside 
the home for twenty-five years. 
Girls with less education will work 
for a longer length of time. 

The available manpower is de- 
creasing while there is an intensify- 
ing increase in demand for workers 
just to feed, house, clothe, educate, 



and maintain health of an expanding 
population. Add to this the people 
needed to produce the extras and 
luxuries that we demand and the ma- 
terials, equipment and machinery 
which must be maintained in order 
for this country to maintain its place 
in a tense and technological world 
that is engaged in a struggle for sur- 
vival. Clearly we see that women will 
have to take employment outside the 
home, that they will have to assume 
a dual role as homemaker and wage 
earner and that they will have to be 
educated for these dual responsibili- 
ties which for many girls begins at 
an early age. 

Studies by psychologists indicate 
that before marriage girls of every 
socio-economic level eagerly give lip 
service to the idea of working after 
marriage but, once married, inward- 
ly and often disastrously resist work. 
High school girls even confess that 
early child rearing is a good way to 
get out of the work-a-day world. 
Two surveys in the midwest give 
some evidence on this attitude. One 
hundred young married women, with 
preschool children, yet working at 
full time jobs were interviewed in a 
city of medium size. The education 
of this group ranged from a well- 
paid principal to an undereducated, 
unskilled worker in a factory. 
Eighty-five per cent of the group re- 
ported that they had never expected 
to work after marriage. The remain- 
ing fifteen per cent stated that they 
had not planned to work full time 
after the birth of the first child. 

The need to make a living for the 
family is given as the reason why 
women work. Recent figures suggest 
that almost 20 per cent of all families 
are supported by a woman's earn- 
ings. Even in households headed by 
a man, many women share heavily 
in breadwinning because of illness, 



aged parents, inflation or costs of 
educating children. 

Let's look at the future of girls 
and women not through rose-tinted 
glasses but viewing the future more 
realistically, for the majority of girls 
will assume that dual role of mother 
and wage-earner. Preparation for 
this dual role is essential. Take a 
fresh look at self-understanding and 
understanding other people. No 
longer are we self-sufficient for rela- 
tionships are so complicated and in- 
terrelated that we must strive to get 
along with our fellow man in job 
occupations, in helping maintain na- 
tional economy and in giving the 
family members more advantages 
than can be secured by the earnings 
of the head of the family. 

How will we meet the compro- 
mise situation of family and outside 
employment? We can begin now to 
avail ourselves of every opportunity 
for a good education. Seek guidance 
in deciding on a future vocation and 
begin even now to cultivate attitudes 
and skills which will enable one to 
have a rewarding life even as dual 
responsibilities are being assumed. 
Management of one's time, energy 
and money in managing the home, 
skill in food preparation for nourish- 
ing meals, sharing in decision mak- 
ing, and much preplanning will be 
needed in maintaining a satisfying 
family situation. This is where some 
home economics education will be 
invaluable help in later life. 

Though less time may be available 
to spend with the family, we can 
emphasize quality through well- 
planned family participation in all 
activities. Gaining insight into how 
family living changes in its various 
stages and learning to make choices 
in terms of family practices, stand- 
ards and values is all a part of the 
educational process for the future 
for good family life. 



YOUTH RESPONDS. . 



National Youthpower Congress 



Glenda Emory 

The National Youthpower Con- 
gress, an organization dedicated to 
the purposes of improving the nu- 
tritional status of youth and inter- 
preting some of the careers available 
in the food industry, was held in 
Chicago, Illinois March 28-31. 

Twenty-three states sponsored 
delegates to this meeting. Included in 
the delegation from North Carolina 
were Karen Cash, Hoke Smith, 
Marilyn Timberlake, David Crock- 
ett, Ann Daniel, Larry Whittington, 
Woodrow Carroll, Jr., George Kyle 
and myself, Glenda Emory. Each of 
the delegates represented a youth 
organization as 4-H Club, FFA. 
YMCA, Youth Fitness Commission, 
Boy and Girl Scouts and the FHA. 

At the beginning of the meeting 
the delegates were divided into eight 
small discussion groups. The topics 
for discussion dealt with nutrition, 
fitness, family meal patterns, adver- 
tising misinformation, distribution of 
food products, manufacturing, and 
agriculture. Mrs. Muriel Wagoner, a 
nutritionist, stated that teenagers 
who believe that certain foods should 
be left out of the diet, simply because 
in large amounts they may add addi- 
tional weight around the hips and 
waistline, should reconsider their se- 
lection of food. All foods are nu- 
tritious and should be included in the 
diet but it is not desirable to include 



an abundance of one food to the ex- 
clusion of others. 

Rarely do we read a newspaper, 
magazine or watch television that 
we do not see a product promising 
to help us reduce those "ugly 
pounds." No less frequently do we 
read of a woman who lost 125 
pounds as she followed a "fad" diet. 
Quick reduction of weight, espe- 
cially when the food may lack the 
daily nutritional requirements, often 
causes serious harm to the body, by 
making it highly susceptible to dis- 
ease. We must not confuse those 
foods high in nutritional value with 
those high in caloric content. Foods 
may be very rich in nutrients and 
very low in calories and likewise 
those foods high in calories may con- 
tain only a small quantity of nu- 
trients. 

Recently with the anxiety over 
national problems, both parents 
working, and diversified family in- 
terests, the family meals are fre- 
quently not a time of fellowship and 
enjoyment, but rather a hasty snack 
prior to getting away to a meeting or 
a date. Teenagers across the nation 
recognize this serious problem and 
encourage more family meals to- 
gether, and more time spent enjoying 
and knowing other family members. 
This is a problem in which the solu- 
tion must be shared by both adults 
and youth. 

Karen Cash, an FHA member 
in the Forest Hills chapter, was 




elected one of the four "Top Teens ' 
because of her participation in the 
discussion group on proper nutri- 
tion. 

Delegates gained a greater insight 
in food production by touring some 
food processing companies as Swift 
and Company, National Dairy Coun- 
cil, and the Corn Products Com- 
pany. 

Mr. Bob Cox of Chapel Hill spoke 
at the closing assembly on "Food 
and Youth Fitness." We were re- 
minded that food and exercises are 
both essential for building a strong 
mind and body. 

We left the meeting with a deter- 
mination to improve our own dietary 
patterns and habits, to help our 
families to recognize the importance 
of family meals together and to en- 
courage our friends and associates 
to eat better in order to look and feel 
better. 



Have you taken a good look at 
yourself lately? WHAT do you see? 
Is there a sparkle in your eyes, glow 
in your skin, brightness in your hair, 
bounce in your step, and a pretty 
shape to your figure? These are basic 
for a natural beauty. 

A beauty diet is a habitual, life- 
time program of eating, for beauty is 
really a by-product of good health. 
Scientific research studies reveal that 
girls' diets during the teen years are 
less adequate than boys because girls 
are always trying to lose weight. Cast 
aside any false ideas you may have 
about diets and learn how you can 
gain or lose weight with nutritious 
food that can reap huge beauty 
benefits. 

Because so many young people 
have neglected to eat properly, we 



For 
NateraJ 

Beaety 

Kakie Jordan 
FHA President 

have been accused of becoming soft 
and not measuring up in fitness with 
the youth of other countries. 

Being concerned about this prob- 
lem, President Kennedy has set up a 
National Commission for Youth Fit- 
ness. Governor Sanford has also set 
up a steering committee to plan a 
teen fitness program for our state. 



Last summer this committee made 
up of different youth groups such as 
the Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts, 4-H. 
FFA, Future Homemakers and the 
advisers of these youth groups met 
two times to discuss the fitness pro- 
gram in North Carolina and what 
could be done to improve teen nu- 
trition. The theme for the meetings 
was "Fitness is Everybody's Busi- 
ness." Through general discussion, 
the following ideas were considered 
by the group for their "action pro- 
gram": 

1. A set of slides on nutrition be 
made available to local groups 

2. Fair booth at state and county 
fairs 

3. Greater participation and em- 
phasis on Youth Fitness Week 

(Continued on page 6) 



A Small 

Child Took 

My Hand 



Jo Marshall 

Southern High School 

(Durham County) 

After much contemplation con- 
cerning what to do for my home 
economics projects, I hopetully ar- 
rived at tfte North Carolina Cerebral 
Palsy Hospital. As I walked down 
the well-waxed halls, I felt as though 
l were a job applicant rather than a 
volunteer aid. A small tortie-haired 
fellow incased in a neck brace and 
crutches, calmly proceeded to in- 
quire as to whom 1 might be. Having 
a brother near his age, kept me from 
being startled by his boldness, and 
yet 1 found myself wondering if chil- 
dren with cerebral palsy were not 
different from other children. I knelt 
down beside him and thrust out my 
hand and announced just as serious- 
ly as he had asked, that I was Jo. 

Miss Ava Albritton, head-nurse 
for the Cerebral Palsy Hospital, led 
the way down the hall to meet the 
children. We went into a large room 
with a television and a hundred chil- 
dren crammed into it. After proceed- 
ing through the traditional process 
of being introduced to the children 
and the girls who work with the chil- 
dren, I felt all the workers eyes look- 
ing in my direction. Evidently they 
were either waiting to see my re- 
action to the children or to see 
whether I would pivot around and 
leave. I tried to make the muscles in 
my face untighten and I faked a non- 
chalant expression and made my 
way through the mass of wheel 
chairs, crutches, walkers and beds 
on rollers to a little boy lying on the 
floor. I went from one child to an- 
other, getting each to smile and talk 
to me. 1 put my "rubber face" to use, 
and got them to chuckle. I caught a 
wink and an "A. O.K." sign from one 
nurse to another and knew that I had 
received their approval. 

When I arrive at the hospital in 
the afternoon, the children are in 
the recreation room playing. Some 
want you to read a book to them the 
moment they catch a glimpse of you 
coming around the corner. I always 




go "table hopping" and speak to 
each child. It seems very important 
to the children to remember their 
names, so I have learned almost 
forty of the children. 

When the children talk, they al- 
ways like to hold or touch your hand. 
They are fascinated with my watch 
and ring. One little girl named Cora, 
often stops me to listen to her spell 



"arithmetic" and everytime it is 
spelled incorrectly. 

When the children are prepared 
for dinner each must have a bib in 
place. Each child has a specific seat 
at dinner and before the food is 
served each must drink a glass of 
milk. I feed two children, one who 
has both hands in braces, both legs 
in braces, and who must lie on a bed 
on rollers all the time. 

After the children are dressed in 
their night clothes they go back to 
the recreation room to watch tele- 
vision. I stay with them to try to 
mediate arguments and to shift wheel 
chairs and beds so everyone can see 
the screen. 

Now that my project is almost 
complete I realize that children at 
the Cerebral Palsy Hospital are not 
miserable, mistreated or rejected but 
are happy rather normal children. 
All the time spent in helping at the 
hospital has provided a deep and re- 
warding experience — an experience 
which has aided me as I grow and 
mature into an adult. 



Baby Sitting for Love and Money 



Pam Coughenour 
Laurinburg Chapter 

Baby sit? I love it! I enjoy baby 
sitting because I love to see the cute 
expressions that children have, but 
most of all I like to be with them and 




take care of them. Besides I get most 
of my money from babysitting. 

In school we learned to organize 
a babysitting kit. A kit includes pad 
and pencil, sheet with important in- 
formation, snack, flashlight, sweater, 
apron, one or two no-cost gifts, book 
to read or homework. I haven't been 
using the babysitting kit long be- 
cause I just learned about it this 
year, but I have found that every- 
thing becomes easier with the right 
equipment. 

The parents of the children you 
keep will feel more comfortable and 
happier if you use the babysitting kit. 
It shows the parents that you have a 
real interest in babysitting. 

Here is a comment from one 
mother: 

"I think the babysitting kit is mar- 
velous! It is so reassuring to see the 
sitter coming prepared to work. It is 
nice to leave home knowing the tele- 
phone numbers and any special in- 
structions are written down. It is so 
easy to get rattled when things go 
wrong. Written instructions help to 
prevent this." 

I think the babysitting kit is a huge 
success. It has helped to keep our 
telephone ringing for more babysit- 
ting — for love — and money. 



3 



A Penny Saved, A Penny Earned 




Polly Whitaker demonstrates the steps involved in covering a pair of shoes. In photo number one, she has covered the front 
of the shoe with glue and, making sure the point of the fabric is at the toe of the shoe, she's preparing to glue the fabric to the 
shoe. In the second picture she's carefully smoothing the fabric. Notice that there is about ¥2 inch overlapping. This overlapping is 
trimmed (picture number three) so that just enough is left to push under the sole as Polly is doing in the fourth picture. The fifth 
photo is of another shoe, all finished except for the heel. One side of the fabric has been glued down, just past the center seam, 
and Polly is bringing the other side over it and turning the rough edge under. In the last picture Polly models her shoes which 
match the jacket and blouse of the suit she made. (A demonstration on covering shoes will be a feature at camp.) 



FHA AIDS MOBILE DENTAL UNIT 



Betsy Warren 
Prospect Hill Chapter 

"I haven't decided on a vocation 
to pursue when I finish high school." 
This statement was one frequently 
heard at the Prospect Hill High 
School this year. 

Realizing the importance of find- 
ing some answers to the problem, 
the Future Homemakers decided to 
investigate some local opportunities 
for further vocational training. 

Some students were interested in 
becoming a dental assistant when 
they finished high school, some first- 



hand experience was very helpful in 
reaching a final decision. 




Faye Pruitt of Prospect Hill Chapter is 
shown serving as dental assistant to Dr. 
Lewis Lamb, dentist with the mobile unit. 



Dr. Lamb, a dentist, was hired by 
the state to operate a mobile dental 
unit at various schools. Of course, 
he needed an assistant, and while it 
was his usual practice to have adults 
in the community to serve in this 
capacity, he agreed to let some of the 
more interested FHA girls take on 
the task. 

This idea proved to be a success 
either way you look at it. It has given 
North Carolina at least one more 
future dental assistant and it also 
helped some of the girls to decide 
that they did not want this type of 
work. 



ENRICH YOUR LIFE THROUGH READING 



Camelia Howell 
Statesville Sr. High School 

Early last fall I became 
interested in many and va- 
ried subjects related to 
homemaking. Though some 
of the subjects are included 
in my homemaking classes, I 
needed to read from several 
sources in order to secure 
further information in each 
of the areas. 

The subjects of particular 
interest were: beauty care, 
family relations, flower ar- 
ranging, baking, knitting, 
and refinishing woods. I se- 
lected books and magazines 
in the local library that gave 
step-by-step directions and 
information on each of these 
subjects. 




After studying the litera- 
ture, I made flower arrange- 
ments, baked some foods 
for my family and even re- 
finished some large antique 
picture frames which now 
hang in our living room. A 
long-term project I selected 
was knitting a sweater for a 
friend, which I hope to finish 
by Christmas 1962! 

I would recommend a 
similar project for all girls 
who are interested in learn- 
ing new techniques and 
ideas. Through this experi- 
ence I have learned how to 
look for information I need 
and once I found the infor- 
mation I adapted it to my 
own interests and needs. 
Certainly the project will bet- 
ter equip me for my future 
role of a homemaker. 



FHA'er Uses Home Economics 
To Bring in Profits 



Gloria Reynolds 
Southern Pines High School 

Are you wondering how you can 
finance invitations, cap and gown 
and all of the other necessities for 
graduation? I was faced with this 
problem last fall, and as I thought 
about it, I decided that I could put 
my home economics education to 
work for a profit! 

After hearing some ladies in my 
community express a desire to know 
how to sew, I decided that I would 
teach an adult clothing class. 

On November 6, my two pupils, 
Mrs. Talbert and Mrs. Boyette, and 
I met at Mrs. Talbert's home. There 
we discussed quality of cloth, the 
pattern, the guide sheet, and sewing 
terms. We also discussed the layout 
of the pattern on the fabric and how 
much extra fabric should be bought 
if it has a nap. I also explained that 
all pieces of a pattern should be cut 
running the same way on corduroy. 
Then they asked me questions and I 
answered them the best I could. This 
first lesson lasted approximately two 
hours, after which Mrs. Talbert 
served refreshments. 



Our second lesson took place on 
November thirteenth. My pupils had 
their patterns already laid out on 
their fabric and I checked the layout. 
Mrs. Talbert had chosen a straight 
skirt and weskit of wool plaid. Mrs. 
Boyette chose purple corduroy 
slacks and white broadcloth blouse. 

After I had checked the layouts, 



they cut their fabrics, however, for 
the corduroy slacks, we had to make 
a slight hip alteration before cutting. 

After cutting out their garments, 
I showed them how to mark their 
darts with tracing paper and wheel 
or tailor's tacks. This lesson also 
lasted approximately two hours. 

Our third lesson together con- 
sisted of sewing. Mrs. Talbert and 
Mrs. Boyette took turns using Mrs. 
Talbert's machine, while I super- 
vised. 

On Saturday, I helped Mrs. Boy- 




ette individually at her home. We 
completed her garments except hem- 
ming the blouse and slacks. I showed 
her how to clip the seams of the 
slacks and hem them. 

The following Saturday. I helped 
Mrs. Talbert individually, and we 
completed her outfit. 

My sewing classes were completed 
the first of December. 1 now had 
enough self-confidence to sew for the 
community. My greatest need was 
money for my graduation invitations. 
I began by making buttonholes for 
my neighbors. My homemaking 
teacher obtained a price list for ma- 
chine and bound buttonholes from 
Singer Sewing Center. With only 
about four dollars earned from mak- 
ing buttonholes, I still needed money 
for invitations. 

A neighbor wanted a coat reno- 
vated — so why not me! I removed 
the large collar — cut a smaller one 
and added a velvet upper collar. The 
coat became a lovely Chesterfield 
and I added four more dollars to my 
account. 

The invitation money was due in 
one week — the day Christmas holi- 
days began. A friend needed a dress 
for the holidays. I had just enough 
time to make a basic blue wool 
sheath, fully lined. With eight dollars 
for making the dress, I now had six- 
teen dollars which was exactly the 
price of my invitations. 

The class and my other sewing 
experiences were fun and rewarding. 
Even though I have my invitations. 
I plan to continue making button- 
holes and garments as a means of 
earning money for necessary gradua- 
tion expenses. 



Youth Asks Home Economists 





I selected an experience which I 
called "Careers In Home Econ- 
omics" for study and investigation 
last fall. The basic reasons for my 
choosing this experience were to 
better acquaint myself with the vari- 
ous careers in the field of home 
economics, and to analyze my own 
personal abilities, interests and char- 
acteristics, so that I might decide on 
which phase of the field I was the 
most interested. 

I planned personal interviews with 



Linda Evans 
Chicod Chapter 

seven home economists in the area 
around my home. These people rep- 
resented college teachers, heads of 
departments, high school teacher, 
homemakers, and the Extension 
Service. I wrote letters to the home 
economist at Virginia Electric and 
Power Company. Colonial Stores 
and to the State EHA Adviser. Each 
of these people told me why they had 
majored in home economics and also 
why she enjoyed her work in her 
particular chosen field. 

I secured references relating to my 
subject, and with the information I 
had gathered from various sources, 
I wrote an article on "Home Econ- 
omics As A Profession" for our local 
newspaper and recorded an eight 
minute radio program. 

I think the most important thing 
I learned from this experience is the 
new-found respect I have for the 
field of Home Economics and those 
people who are in it. Not only is it 
an interesting work, but also a very 
necessary and important work. 



North Carolina's nominee for the office 
of National Recorder is Ann Putnam 
from the Shelby Chapter. 



FOR NATURAL BEAUTY 

(Continued from page 2) 

4. Schools 

a. Health classes after school 
for everyone 

b. Wasted food displays used 
in lunchroom 

c. Animal experiments used 
with white rats 

d. Emphasis on nutritious 
snacks for teens such as collard 
sandwiches 

What is our responsibility as 
Future Homemakers in this fitness 
program? With a little imagination 
and initiative, numerous ideas can 
be put to work! 

Films such as: America Learns to 
Fly (with nutrition). More Life in 
Living, Skimpy and a Food Break- 
fast, and many more can be obtained 
from your local health department. 
Panels, debates, or discussions en- 
titled: A Good Diet Today, Invest- 
ment Tomorrow, Food and Fads in 
Relation to Nutrition, could be pre- 
sented. Classroom groups could 
study menus at local restaurants. 
"Fads for Nutrition" could be started 
in school encouraging groups to 
serve milk drinks at parties and to 
eat lettuce, carrots, or fruit for 



snacks. Posters entitled. ".Are You 
Beautiful?" surveys on how many 
students eat breakfast, and displays 
showing food wastes could be used 
to remind us to eat properly. 

With the realization that good eat- 
ing habits can improve natural 
beauty, it should make an impression 
on every' good Future Homemaker 
to eat the proper foods in the proper 
quantity daily. All of us are patriotic 
and believe in helping our country to 
be strong — this is the way we as 
Future Homemakers of America, 
can help! 



STATE HOME>L\KER 
OF TOMORROW 

Miss Doris Elizabeth Holton, a 
senior at Thomasville High School, 
is North Carolina"s 1962 Betty 
Crocker Homemaker of Tomorrow. 

As state winner. Doris will receive 
a S 1,500 scholarship, which she will 
use as a home economics major at 
Woman's College in Greensboro. 

Carolyn Sue Daggy of North 
Mecklenburg High School. Hunters- 
ville, rated second in North Carolina 
and will receive a S500 scholarship. 




CONVENTION HIGHLIGHTS 



Memorial Auditorium, Raleigh, North 
Carolina was the site for the 16th annual 
convention of the North Carolina Asso- 
ciation of Future Homemakers of Amer- 
ica on March 31. 

Even though April showers came in 
March, the spirits of 4,459 excited Future 
Homemakers showed no signs of being 
dampened, for this was the day we had 
eagerly awaited! 

The Honorable Terry Sanford, Gover- 
nor of North Carolina, spoke to the dele- 
gates on "Youth — Measure Your Values." 
The Governor challenged us to examine 
our values of education and good home 
and family life. "The youth of our state 
can do much to strengthen an educational 
system," he stated, "by realizing the 
value of an education now in order to 
prepare for a future vocation and a satis- 
fying personal and family life." He fur- 
ther stated, "that it is not enough to pro- 
vide beautiful schools and excellent 
faculty, that youth must strive for excel- 
lence in learning for a future based on 
rapid change and expanding opportuni- 
ties." 

Participating on the program in addi- 
tion to the state officers, were representa- 
tives from Chase, Clayton and Hobbton 
chapters. The Moore County chapters 



Brenda Templeton 
1962-1963 State Reporter 

presented a pageant "Salute to the Stars 
and Stripes" during the afternoon session. 

Weldon Faircloth, vice-president of the 
North Carolina Association of Future 
Farmers, brought greetings from the FFA 
organization. 

Mrs. Ernestine Frazier, State FHA Ad- 
viser, reviewed plans for the 1962 Na- 
tional Convention. These plans were espe- 
cially exciting for those delegates who 
will be the official representatives from 
our state on July 12-15. 

State Homemaker Degrees were 
awarded to 198 girls who have made out- 
standing contributions through their proj- 
ects and experiences this year. 

Honorary memberships into the asso- 
ciation are awarded annually to those 
persons who have made outstanding con- 
tributions to the education of our youth. 
Memberships this year were awarded to 
The Honorable Terry Sanford, Governor 
of North Carolina; Mr. C. W. McCrary, 
President, Acme-McCrary Corporation; 
Dr. Gerald B. James, Director of Voca- 
tional Education, State Department of 
Public Instruction; Mrs. Helen L. Curry, 



Assistant State Supervisor of Home Econ- 
omics Education; and Mrs. Ernestine H. 
Frazier, State FHA Adviser. 

Ann Putnam from Shelby, North Caro- 
lina was elected North Carolina's nomi- 
nee for National Reporter. 

Presentation of the district advisers and 
the installation of the 1962-1963 officers 
was conducted by our charming 1961- 

1962 president, Kakie Jordan. The 1962- 

1963 state officers are as follows: Mary 
Catherine Joyner, Secretary, District I; 
Judy Faye Smith, Vice President, District 
II; Ruth Guin, President, District III; 
Judy Horton, Recreation Leader, District 
IV; Kathy Bean, Historian, District V; 
Jackie Greene, Parliamentarian, District 
VI; Brenda Templeton, Reporter, District 
VII; Sandra Pendergrast, Treasurer, Dis- 
trict VIII. The district advisers were in- 
troduced in order of district I- VIII: Mrs. 
Margaret Freeman, Miss Emily Lois 
Stephens, Mrs. Myrtle Stogner, Mrs. Nan- 
cy Darden, Mrs. Margie S. Eller, Mrs. 
Alice Forbis, Mrs. Arlene Patterson, and 
Miss Barbara Wise. 

Our retiring president had remarks of 
gratitude for the entire group, after 
which time the incoming president, Ruth 
Guin, took charge of the closing cere- 
mony. 



Members of the Beaufort FHA achieved 
their last goal of the year when two tote- 
tray cabinets with seventy-two trays were 
installed in the homemaking department. 

"Being Better Teen-age Consumers" 
has been the objective of the Benson 
Future Homemakers this year. Members 
have been very busy selling products, col- 
lecting clothes for overseas relief, plan- 
ning a tea and banquet to honor their 
mothers and participating in the District 
IV Rally. 

"Youth-Know Your Values" was the 
theme of the Benvenue chapter Mother- 
Daughter Banquet. 

The dining hall was beautifully dec- 
orated with the clubs' colors. Each table, 
covered with a white cloth, had as a cen- 
terpiece, red styrofoam letters — "FHA" — 
used alternately with white candles and 
red net in crystal candle holders. Pepper- 
mint carnation corsages and favors were 
the group sounded a note of warning to 
at each of the guests place. 

Dr. Catherine T. Dennis in speaking to 
the girls concerning the importance of 
obtaining all the education of which they 
are capable. She cited the limited number 
of jobs open to high school graduates. 
She also quoted figures showing the odds 
against the success of marriage among the 
very young. 

Ninety-seven girls were presented cer- 
tificates and pins in recognition of 
achievement in the degree program. 

Mothers of the Canton High School 
members were entertained at a delicious 
buffet dinner in February. A valentine 
motif was used in the decorations. A skit, 
"Builders of Homes" was presented fol- 
lowing the dinner hour. 

Sale of the cookbook, "Favorite Rec- 
ipes of America Home Economics Teach- 
ers," has been a successful project of the 
Clarkton chapter. 

With the purpose being "to provide 
wholesome individual and group recrea- 
tion," the FHA invited the FFA to help 
plan a Valentine Hop. This was a most 
enjoyable event and there are plans to 
make it an annual affair. 

The home economics cottage, decorated 
with roses and azaleas, provided the set- 
ting for the Farmville Mother-Daughter 
Banquet. The guest speaker was Miss 
Alice Strawn from East Carolina College. 
The title of her talk was "You and Your 
Future." Miss Strawn encouraged the girls 
to at least finish their high school educa- 
tion and then take further training to be 
equipped for making a living. Miss 
Strawn gave good advice to her listeners 
with these words: "Keep morally sound. 
I know Pitt county and I know the type 
of background you have had. Keep those 
morals given to you when you go out on 
your own." 

Miss Judy Cubberly, state secretary, 
gave a report on the national FHA con- 
vention held in St. Louis last summer 
at the Fike High School Mother-Daughter 
Banquet. 

Mrs. Frazier, state adviser, then gave 
a talk, stressing the value of setting ones 
goals early so that they might measure 
their values. 

An explanation of the purposes and 
aims of FHA was presented by Sylvia 
Vick. 

A song and dance routine, "Through 
the Years," was given by several of the 
members. 

Faye Jenkins was awarded the Betty 
Crocker Home Economics Award. 




A special treat was in store for the 
monthly meeting of the Fuquay Springs 
chapter held on Thursday, April 12. Be- 
cause of the unusual and outstanding pro- 
gram, the entire high school was invited 
to attend the meeting. 

The meeting opened with the FHA 
ceremony, presided over by Miss Jeanne 
Farabow. Mr. E. N. Farnell, principal 
of Fuquay Springs School, introduced 
Mrs. Sherrill Akins, the first state FHA 
president. Mrs. Akins commented on the 
beginning of the organization and ex- 
pressed pride at being a member of the 
FHA. Miss Becky Capps introduced the 
special guest speaker, Mr. James Madhu 
of India. Mr. Madhu is principal of one 
of the largest mission schools in India. 
He is a dedicated Christian, and came to 
Duke Divinity School to become a more 
efficient lay preacher. He has a master's 
degree from Syracuse University. In June, 
he will return to India to his wife and 
four children and continue his work. 

Mr. Madhu spoke to the audience on 
the role of a wife in India. He said most 
of them were uneducated, as the men in 
India did not believe in the woman work- 
ing outside the home. He also said the 
women were very humble, and considered 
their husband the "god" of the household. 

Mr. Madhu reminded the members 
several times that America was a "won- 
derful country," and urged them to up- 
hold its strength and prosperity in the 
future. He said that Americans were in- 
telligent, but they were also "lazy" and 
did not realize all the conveniences they 
had as compared to most countries. He 
urged the members to keep a close re- 
lationship with God, who he said has 
"chosen this wonderful country to bless 
with freedom, strength, and prosperity." 

After his talk, he answered several 
questions brought up by the audience, 
and received warm applause. The FHA 
presented him with a donation to take 
back to India and help spread the cause 
of Christianity. 

The Garland chapter of Future Home- 
makers have been very busy during the 
past year in demonstrating to their com- 
munity, by their many and varied ac- 
tivities, the "Youth Can Do." 

The first project for this year was to 
purchase a new sewing machine for the 
Home Economics Department. The 
money necessary for this project was 
raised by the members making and selling 
cakes. 

In the social activity category, we held 
the Annual Christmas Party. As usual this 
event was thoroughly enjoyed by all. 
This spring the Mother-Daughter Ban- 
quet was another successful occasion. 

Baby Sitting for parents who would 
otherwise have been unable to attend im- 
portant PTA meetings was a worthwhile 
project, and one which we feel sure was 
appreciated by this Parent Teacher group. 

Early this spring, we really went to 
work in earnest and we feel proud of the 
"face lifting" we gave to the Home Eco- 
nomics room. The cabinets have been 
painted a gleaming white which tends to 
give the room a more spacious appear- 
ance. New curtains purchased through 



the special efforts of the younger mem- 
bers added the needed home-like atmos- 
phere. 

And still our plans for progress go on! 
Better and bigger projects are in the mak- 
ing. We know we will find much satis- 
faction in our accomplishments while 
showing others in our community the 
"YOUTH CAN DO". 

The members of Harding FHA pre- 
pared a covered dish supper for one of 
their meetings. Tables were decorated in 
the national colors of red, white and blue 
and were arranged as two long tables, 
making the group appear to be two large 
families. At this supper each girl brought 
some special food that she prepared. 

During the school year they have 
helped to prepare refreshments for the 
various programs given by the PTA, the 
faculty, the Piedmont Guidance Council, 
and the school secretaries. 

"What Color Is Our World" was Mrs. 
Jessie Moye's topic at the Havelock 
Mother Daughter Banquet. She displayed 
souvenirs and showed slides which were 
taken on her world tour. 

The cafeteria was decorated with bright 
Japanese lantern, souvenirs and colorful 
scarves. The waitresses wore authentic 
costumes from different countries to carry 
out the international theme. 

The Jones Central chapter used "Edu- 
cation and World Peace" as the theme of 
the Mother-Daughter Banquet. The pro- 
gram was written and delivered by 
Brenda Parker. Included in the program 
was the singing of songs from many 
foreign countries. 

The dining tables were lighted with red, 
white and blue candles. A large world 
globe was in the center of each table sur- 
rounded by miniature flags of the nations 
of the free world. 

The Jonesville chapter presented a de- 
lightful program for the Parent Teacher 
Association. More than 100 elementary 
school children and FHA'ers combined 
their efforts in staging "Fashions and 
Tunes" which aptly described the presen- 
tation of music and lovely ensembles 
made and modeled by home ecomonics 
students. 

The Oxford chapter held their annual 
Mother-Daughter Banquet in November 
and invited Mrs. Rosa Tillett to be their 
speaker. Since her retirement, Miss Til- 
lett has made traveling and sightseeing 
her hobbies. Her talk was based on a trip 
to Africa she made last summer. A United 
Nations theme was carried out in the 
program and the decorations by using 
flags and the traditional colors of red, 
white and blue. 

A display contrasting the obsolete and 
modern methods of ironing entitled, "Do 
You Have the Ironing-board Blues?" won 
first prize for the chapter this year. 
Painted cigar boxes equipped with a 
needles, thread, pins and other small 
items were made and given to each 
teacher in the school. 

In observance of National Egg Month 
the Red Springs chapter decorated eggs 
for the Rest Home and children's ward 
at the South Eastern Memorial Hospital. 

Rutherford County chapters empha- 
sized "Being a Good Teen-age Consumer" 
at a recent rally. Specialists in the areas 
of fabrics, design and selection of ready- 
made garments spoke to the group. 

National FHA Week has been filled 
with many activities by the Shelby chap- 



8 



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199 FHA'ers Receive State Homemakers Degrees 



DISTRICT I 

Bath Chapter: Judith Lee Sullivan, Sue 
Brinn. Marlene Wallace, Faye Foreman. 
West Edgecombe Chapter: Bettie Lee 
Eason, Evelyn Brake, Mary Catherine 
Joyner. Gatesville Chapter: Vivian Cas- 
per. Conway Chapter: Alice Kaye Panton. 
Woodland Olney Chapter: Sarah Ann 
Joyner. Belvoir-Falkland Chapter: Sue 
Pierce. Chicod Chapter: Carol Ann Gas- 
kins. Stokes-Pactolus Chapter: Judy War- 
ren. 

DISTRICT II 

Beaulaville Chapter: Jo Ann Bostic, 
Kaye Mercer. B. F. Grady Chapter: 
Geraldine Faye Wiggins, Mary Linda 
Grady, James Kenan Chapter; Nell West, 
Shelby Batts, Betty Rouse, Linda Blan- 
chard, Peggy Ruth Todd. Greene Central 
Chapter: Linda Harrlison, Dianne Bea- 
man, Geraldine Moore, Windy Miles, 
Faye Frances Wooten, Barbara Moore. 
Jones Central Chapter: Cynthia West- 
brook. Contentnea Chapter: Kay Shep- 
herd, Judy Faye Smith, Jennifer West, 
Pamela Odham. Southwood Chapter: 
Emma Lee Rouse, Lane Waller. Jackson- 
ville Chapter: Carolyn Simpkins, Patsy 
Ann Morton. Richlands Chapter: Sylva 
Batchelor. White Oak Chapter: Rebecca 
Lois Hardee, Peggy Collins, Mary Mea- 
dows. Grantham Chapter: Jane Lee. 
Mount Olive Chapter: Margaret Ann 
Sutton. Lucama Chapter: Sandra Simp- 
son, Sallie Elizabeth Lucas, Mary Eliza- 
beth Bass, Nancy McClenny, Judy Carol 
Bass. Lee Woodard Chapter, Frances 
Barnes, Betsy Campbell, Sarah Lewis, 
Carolyn Lucas, Judy Mercer, Rebecca 
Parrish, Linda Webb. Rock Ridge Chap- 
ter: Phyllis Nichols. Elm City Chapter: 
Dene Bottoms. 

DISTRICT III 

Bladenboro Chapter: Carolyn Single- 
tary. Clarkton Chapter: Joyce Anne 
Baldwin. Whiteville Chapter: Ruth Ann 



Angel. Stedman Chapter: Brenda Whita- 
ker, Betty Lockamy. Sadie Lockamy, Ann 
McKnight, Dianna Tart, Becky Cain, 
Judy Smith, Ruth Guin. Seventy-First 
Chapter: Martha Penland. Central Chap- 
ter: Helen McPhail, Sandra Rayburn, 
Louise Blackman. Hamlet Chapter: Becky 
Brown, Carol Adamac. Red Springs Chap- 
ter: Ann Thomas, Norma McLeod, Nancy 
Brock, Hazel M. Hall. 



DISTRICT IV 

Durham Sr. Chapter: Ellen Pratt. 
Creedmoor Chapter: Carolyn Peace, 
Faye Beck, Betty O'Neal. Oxford Chap- 
ter: Sandra Day. Coats Chapter: Laura 
Johnson. Dunn Chapter: June Lee Mathis. 
Corinth-Holders Chapter: Jane Boykin, 
Alene Crocker. Benson Chapter: Joyce 
Whittengton, Rebecca Benson, Robin 
Vann. Benevue Chapter: Marie Stiltner, 
Libby Barnes, Laura Rowe, Judy Harri- 
son, Wanda Smith, Mary T. Burnette, 
Judy Renee Bone, Laura Strickland, Jo 
Carol Alderson. Bailey Chapter: Rachel 
Farmer. Coopers Chapter: Linda Lamm, 
Judy Cone. Hillsboro Chapter: Dora 
Bradsher. Garner Chapter: Susan Ferrell. 
Needham Broughton Chapter: Rosina 
Coburn. 

DISTRICT V 

Bartlett Yancey Chapter: Barbara Bla- 
lock, Nancy Newman, Becky Stephens, 
Marvyn Hooper, Karolyn White, Bento 
Kay Covington. North Davidson Chapter: 
Kathy Bean. Robert B. Glenn Chapter: 
Dianne Shugart, Lorita Smith. Southwest 
Chapter: Judy Lutz, Kay Howerton. Sum- 
ner Chapter: Sandra Smith. Summerfield 
Chapter: Phyllis Wilson, Mary Lou Bar- 
row, Mildred Pope. Seagrove Chapter: 
Carol Hodgin, Brenda Loggains, Linda 
Guthrie, Emilie Auman, Jean Frye, Linda 
Lou Thomas, Peggy Jean Wilson, Ruth 
Ann Davis, Norma Jean Greene, Martha 
Tedder. Randleman Chapter: Lucinda 



Davis. Ramseur Chapter: Doris Hess. 
Trinity Chapter: Linda Johnson. Frank- 
linville Chapter: Judith Rodgers, Anne 
Vestal, Jean Simpson, Elizabeth Sower, 
Judy Voncannan, Jean Gatlin, Sarah Jane 
Maness, Rebecca Rich. 



DISTRICT VI 

Bethel Chapter: Joyce Simpson. Kings 
Mountain Chapter: Marian Plonk. Shelby 
Chapter: Jackie Greene, Sara Staley, 
Martha Spangler, Nancy Tedder, Ann 
Putnam, Cathy Alexander, Darlene Phil- 
beck, Suzanne Ramsey, Brenda Crisp, 
Imogene Conley, Frances Allen. Endy 
Chapter: Patricia Radford. Oakboro 
Chapter: Larcenia Smith. New London 
Chapter: Peggy Maners, Carolyn Morton, 
Sue Thompson . 



DISTRICT VII 

Harmony Chapter: Linda Barker, 
Lynne Reid, Linda Wallace. East Wilkes 
Chapter: Sheldon Jolley, Pamela Barker, 
Gail Martin. 

DISTRICT VIII 

Charles D. Owen Chapter: Brenda 
Vess, Carolyn Moore. North Buncombe 
Chapter: Helene Bradley, Sylvia Pratt, 
Wanda Hawkins, Judy Freeman. Clyde A. 
Erwin Chapter: Gwen Self, Sandra Pen- 
dergrast. Lee H. Edwards Chapter: Robin 
Kirby, Leigh Stevens, Elizabeth Bagwell, 
Judy Chandler. Enka Chapter: Janet 
Moore. East Henderson Chapter: Sheila 
McMinn. Hendersonville Chapter: Jo- 
hanna Wiggins, Page Bowden. West Hen- 
derson Chapter: Judy Drake, Linda 
Drake, Barbara McCall. Ruth Merrill. 
Cullowhee Chapter: Marilyn Owen, 
Rachel Bishop, Sandra Wood. Chase 
Chapter: Rebecca Hawkins, Edith Vick- 
ers, Mary Ann Burgess. Rutherfordton- 
Spindale Chapter: Phyllis Roberson, Pam 
Blankenship. 



ter. Monday the chapter served the fac- 
ulty refreshments. Tuesday a program on 
clothing was given in class to all the 
ministers' wives in Cleveland County. 
Later on in the afternoon some of the 
FHA girls went to the county home and 
presented a program. Wednesday was set 



aside as Mrs. Wennie Laughridge Day 
and members of the chapter visited Mrs. 
Laughridge and another honorary mem- 
ber, Mr. J. B. Howell. On Thursday a 
play entitled "Careers in Home Econom- 
ics" was given by ten of the members. 
Highlight of Spring Hope High School's 



participation in National FHA Week, 
was a Mother-Daughter Banquet. Bar- 
bara Miller, chapter president, opened 
the program with the ritual used for all 
meetings. A feature of the program was 
an explanation of the FHA organization 
and review of the eight FHA purposes. 






CAROLINE SAYS: 



FHA IN POETRY 

FHA is a great organization; 
Just ask girls all across the Nation. 
It's a club which offers many benefits, 
Not just a place to talk and sit. 

FHA affords worthwhile advice — 
"Where to go," and "how to look nice." 
"How to cook and sew and clean"; 
FHA's really neat — see what I mean! 

FHA's a great club to join; 

I'm really proud that we have one. 

Next club meeting, make sure you're there: 

Then you. too, can say, "I'm an FHA'er." 

Dorly Jackson 
Dunn Hiah School 




"The homes of tomorrow are in 

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FUTURE HO 

North Carolina Association 



volume x 




JANUARY 1963 




NUMBER 2 



EDITORIAL 



WILSON DAILY TIMES 

Two representatives of the "Wilson Daily Times" 
attended the District II FHA Rally at Charles B. 
Aycock School, Wayne County, on October 6, 1962. 
The following editorial appeared in the "Times" 
subsequently. 

Our Answer to Russia 

Isn't it unfortunate that CBS or any of the big 
television networks do not go to the grass roots 
and get some real pictures on how youth is taught 
in America. The day at Charles B. Aycock School 
on Saturday, when District II of the Future Home- 
makers of America held their meeting, would have 
been the perfect answer to the Russian film on 
education. 

It would have taken only one side of the ques- 
tion, the young women's answer to Russian educa- 
tion and the future it holds. But so convincing 
were the projects and program that little is left 
to be added other than the scientific side of edu- 
cation. 

The FHA program covered every area of living, 
with special emphasis on education, citizenship, 
as well as the most important of all professions, 
homemaking. We would gladly have offered the 
program Saturday as an answer to Russia on edu- 
cation without any change or coaching, and no 
added props were necessary. 



It is unfortunate that the big networks do not 
get closer home to the subjects discussed. We sat 
there and thought of this angle as we watched the 
juniors and seniors speak with poise and assurance, 
with conviction and sincerity. And all were dressed 
in the latest fashion. In other words you do not 
have to be drab to be intelligent. 

The fresh viewpoint, the assurance that they have 
something to offer the world, and the determination 
to make their contribution, sparked another 
thought. 

Wouldn't it be an eye opener if the "dyed in the 
wool" politicians, the diplomats and the foreign 
affairs experts could forget all the intrigue, power 
politics and international protocol and listen to a 
fresh approach to living, from those who feel that 
there is more right with the world than there is 
wrong. 

We are certain there are many areas in govern- 
ment that could have benefitted from attending the 
FHA day on Saturday, for these young people were 
discussing values on which there is no price, and 
without which life is not worth the effort — and be- 
fore peace comes to this world, many of the goals 
the FHA members talked about must become 
realities. 



OUR COVER 

Becky Bagley, Durham chapter, observes Mary 
Catherine Painter at an easel in a local kinder- 
garten. 



NORTH CAROLINA ASSOCIATION OF FUTURE HOMEMAKERS OF AMERICA 



State Officers 
1962-1963 

President — Ruth Guin, Stedman III Mrs. 

Vice-President — Judy Faye Smith, B. F. Grady II Miss 

Secretary — Mary Catherine Joyner, West Edge- Mrs. 

combe I Mrs. 

Treasurer — Sandra Pendergrast, Clyde A. Erwin III Mrs. 

Historian — Kathy Bean, North Davidson V Mrs. 

Reporter — Brenda Templeton, Union Grove VII Mrs. 

Parliamentarian — Jackie Greene, Shelby Sr. VI Miss 
Recreation Leader — Judy Horton, Bailey IV 



District Advisers 
1962-1963 

Margaret S. Freeman, Ahoskie I 
Emma Lois Stephens, Elm City II 
Myrtle D. Stogner, Hamlet III 
Nancy W. Darden, Durham Sr. TV 
Margie S. Eller, Walkertown V 
Alice P. Forbis, West Mecklenburg VI 
Arlene S. Patterson, East Surry VII 
Barbara Ann Wise, Enka VIII 



State Adviser 

Mrs. Ernestine H. Frazier 



STATE DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 

Division of Vocational Education 

Raleigh, North Carolina 



Since the adoption of the National 
Objective, "Strengthening my educa- 
tion for future roles," by our State 
FHA Association, the reality of a 
loss of interest in learning has, to me, 
been more evident than ever before. 
The school drop-out rate has in- 
creased tremendously. Students are 
abandoning the confinement of at- 
tending school and are jumping 
"head-first" into the river of life — 
a river too wide for many of them to 
swim. "Why," the drop-outs say, 
"should I stay in school when I can 
be free and independent, making a 
living of my own." It is too true 
that a relief from studies and the 
liberties of self-sufficience have a 
definite appeal. However, before 
embarking on such an enduring cruise 
as life's career, a student should 
ponder upon the loss he will suffer 
and the opportunities he will sacrifice 
if he leaves school without a diploma. 
First is the factor of being capable 
of staying in tune with the times. 
Education has, in this new atomic 
age, become more essential than ever 
before. Men are leaving the bounda- 
ries of the earth and are exploring in 
the vastness of space. The human 
mind must be trained to meet the 
challenge of this new era of progress. 
The first step of preparation includes 
a high school education. Before man 
can even hope to understand the 
complicated scientific facts of modern 
America, he must have achieved this 
first goal. 

Second is the matter of oppor- 
tunity. As time progresses, the stand- 
ards of living become higher, and 
the opportunities become greater. 
No rational person wants to render 
himself incapable of pursuing a 
worthwhile career which will satisfy 
his desires. Even a small child, when 
asked his vocational ambition, nearly 
always responds by naming some 
highly respected occupation. It seems 
though, that during the maturing 
process, the ambition becomes 
weaker, and the hopes fall. The stu- 
dent may belittle the opportunities 
afforded a graduate in comparison to 
the gaiety to be enjoyed for the mo- 
ment in quitting school. Most drop- 
outs will finally become employed, 
but not in the type of work which 
they have hoped for, and with small 
opportunity for advancement. The 
wise student must conclude that op- 
portunity upon opportunity is avail- 
able for an educated person, while 
scarcely any desirable work is open 
to the drop-out. 

Also to be considered is the very 



Why 

Stress 

Education? 

By Mary Catherine Joyner 
State Secretary 




important idea of responsibility to 
one's country. How many times does 
today's youth hear, "Young people, 
your future looks dim." It is true — 
the future of youth does seem doubt- 
ful, but preparation must still be 
made for the future which they expect 
to enjoy. With the nations of the 
earth battling out their differences, 
and countries being threatened with 



new ways of life, young people must 
keep informed and guard their minds 
against the insults of other peoples. 
In the hands of the youth lies the 
future of our America. Yes, the task 
facing young people is great, and only 
with thorough training and keen in- 
terest can they meet the challenge. 
To the future leaders of this nation 
is being entrusted a great responsi- 
bility — a responsibility which is their 
duty to uphold and which must be 
preceded by ardent learning. 

Pride holds a very high position 
in the minds of everyone. Pride in 
family, pride in surroundings, and 
pride in work are all important. If 
one hopes to indulge in his chosen 
vocation, he must first realize the 
necessity of proper training, and must 
take the steps toward that end. 

Not to be forgotten is the ad- 
vantage of education to self. There 
are so many profits to be reaped from 
a good education. One should set 
his goals in accordance with his abili- 
ties and work earnestly to achieve 
them. If a person is capable of 
furthering his education in a higher 
learning institution, he would be very 
unjust to himself not to strive for a 
college degree. Whatever one's tal- 
ents and abilities may be, he must 
use them wisely and get the "top 
price" from them. 

These and other opportunities 
which go "hand-in-hand" with edu- 
cation must be considered when any 
temptation comes to desert school. 
On one occasion Aristotle was asked 
how much educated men are superior 
to those uneducated: "as much," said 
he, "as the living are to the dead." 
Youth must strive to be in the su- 
perior category, and to receive the 
best education possible. 



Sharing Is Receiving 



West Henderson Chapter 

A pall of gloom hung over the 
West Henderson FHA chapter last 
fall as members gathered in the home 
economics department to plan their 
community projects for the year. It 
seemed to many of the girls that all 
of their ideas had been used so many 
times before — there was just nothing 
new to do! 

The specific objectives to be ac- 
complished in any project were: to 
give aid to citizens who were ill or 
handicapped; to gain some under- 



standing of available institutional 
services; and to develop an awareness 
of other peoples needs and how per- 
sonal contributions and services may 
make a happier life for them. 

Soon several members suggested 
that some local health institutions be 
contacted in order to learn what was 
needed for their patients, and then 
committee groups could plan some- 
thing for each institution. Imme- 
diately they discovered that they 
could work with the American Red 
Cross, retarded children of Hender- 
Continued on page 8 



"I Am a Part of All I Have Met. . " — Tennyson 



This quotation from Tennyson's 
Ulysses is certainly one that relates 
itself to the life of any individual. 
When a child is born, it enters the 
vast social and physical world. 
Eventually, the world presents to the 
individual all types of physical ob- 
stacles such as obtaining food, shel- 
ter, and a means of making a living, 
and a vast and intriguing social world. 
The social area concerns us here. 

If we trace the social contacts of 
an average teen-age girl from birth 
until mariage we will find: mother, 
father, family, church, school, and 
many other expected social interac- 
tions. These are areas that all girls 
become a part of, but there are many 
others that are entered into by choice. 
By this I mean the many friends, 
clubs and other social activities that 
are available to the teenager. Some 
girls do not have