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Full text of "History of Dane County"

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1248174 



GENEALOGY 



COLLECTION 



ALLEN COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 1833 00828 6210 



HISTORY 



OF 



DANE COUNTY 



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BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL 



MADISON 

Western Historical Association 
1906 



History of Dane County. 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 12481 



Elling B. Aaker is one of the prominent farmers of Dunkirk 
township, where he owns a well improved landed estate of two 
hundred acres. Like many others of the leading agriculturists of 
Dane county, Mr. Aaker is a native of Norway, where he was 
born May 12, 1837, and he is a son of Botton and Martha (Elling- 
son) Aaker. who immigrated to America in 1857 and became 
pioneers of Dane county, settling in Pleasant Springs township, 
and later removing to Dunkirk township, where they passed the 
remainder of their lives. They became the parents of seven chil- 
dren, of whom only thrc attained to years of maturity: Julia, who 
became the wife of Lewis Iverson, is now deceased; Elling B. is 
the subject of this sketch, and Susan is the wife of Nels Jenson. 
Elling B. Aaker preceded his parents in immigrating to America, 
having come in 1856, and having been twenty years of age at the 
time. He proceeded directly from New York city to Dane county, 
Wisconsin, and purchased one hundred and twenty-five acres of 
wild land, in Pleasant Springs township, reclaiming the major por- 
tion of the same and there continuing to reside until the spring of 
1885, when he sold the property and purchased his present fine 
homestead, of two hundred acres, in Dunkirk township, being the 
owner of twenty acres in Pleasant Springs township also. His 
farm is equipped with good improvements in the matter of build- 
ings and is maintained under effective cultivation. In politics Mr. 
Aaker is affiliated with the Republican party, and he and his 
family hold membership in Christ church. Norwegian Lutheran, 
in the citv of Stoughton. June 13, 18G8, Mr. Aaker was united in 



18 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

marriage to Miss Anne Quale, daughter of Andrew and Christy 
( Nelson) Quale, who were natives of Norway and who settled in 
Pleasant Springs township, this county, in 1858, here passing the 
residue of their lives. To Mr. and Mrs. Aaker have been born ten 
children : Andrew and Martha are twins, the latter being now the 
wife of John Bakke, of Iowa; Ben : s deceased; the next two in 
order of birth are Carl and Christian; Marie is deceased; Henry is 
a resident of Stoughton ; Emma is the wife of Ferdinand Rasmus- 
sen ; and the two youngest children are Lydia and Caroline. 

Herman Aaroen is one of the worthy citizens contributed to 
Dane county by Scandinavia, a source from which Wisconsin has 
drawn much of its best citizenship and gained much of its material 
and civic prosperity. He has for a number of years been num- 
bered among the successful farmers of Blooming Grove township, 
and has won success and independence through his own efforts,, 
having come to the new world as a young man without financial 
means and having worked his way upward through earnest and 
honest endeavor. Mir. Aaroen was born in Sogendahl, Norway, in 
August, 1857, and is a son of Johan Ingebret Aaroen and Mar- 
garet (Olson) Aaroen, who passed their entire lives in Norway. 
He received limited educational advantages in his youth, and con- 
tinued resident of his native land until he had attained the age 
of twenty-one years, when he immigrated to America, being com- 
pelled to borrow, from a friend, sufficient money to pay his pas- 
sage across the Atlantic. From that time forward he has never 
received any assistance from extraneous sources, and he is deserv- 
ing of credit for the determination and worthy effort which have 
brought to him so marked prosperity within the intervening years. 
He has been a resident of Blooming Grove township since 1894, 
and of his original homestead farm he now retains twenty-five 
acres, to which he devotes his attention as a general farmer. On 
the place he has made good improvements, and he is also the 
owner of a nice residence property in the neighboring village of 
McFarland. where he expects to take up his abode eventually. 
For some time he did contracting on a small scale, but his princi- 
pal vocation lias been that of farming. Mr. Aaroen is held in 
high esteem in his community and is an unassuming and worthy 
citizen. He gives his support to the Republican party and he and 
lii— family hold membership in the Norwegian Lutheran church. 
December 33, 1886, Mr. Aaroen was married to Miss Anna Sko- 
gen, daughter of Serum and Maggie (Kleven) Skogen, of Pleasant 
Spr'ngs township, and following is a record of the names and re- 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 19 

spective dates of birth of the ten children of this union, only one 
of the number being deceased. Samuel Johan, May 3,' 1887; Mar- 
tin Olous, January 11, 1889, died January 13, 1898; Maria Jose- 
phine, November 15, 1890; Gerhard Martin, October 10, 1892; 
Albert Herman, August 22, 1894; Andrew Oliver, July 28, 1896; 
Martin Olous (2d), December 31, 1898; Bordina Luella. February 
6, 1901 ; Serina Rebecca, December 14, 1902, and Idella Helena, 
October 29, 1904. 

Hon. Henry Cullen Adams, congressman from the second dis- 
trict, was a typical example of the kind of man to whom Americans 
are fond of referring as a natural result of peculiarly American in- 
stitutions. He was a native of Verona, Oneida county, N. Y., and 
was born November 28, 1850. His parents, B. F. and Caroline M. 
(Shepherd) Adams were also natives of the same place. He was- 
one of the line from which President John Adams sprung. His 
father, Benjamin Franklin Adams, was a graduate of Hamilton 
College, New York. While in Hamilton College the elder Adams 
was a charter member of the Psi Upsilon fraternity and, as principal 
of an academy at Oneida, N. Y.. was instructor of the late P>. J. 
Stevens of Madison. His mother was Eunice Webster a first 
cousin of Noah Webster of dictionary fame and Mr. Webster was 
a frequent caller at the Adams home. The family came west in 
the early fifties settling at Beaver Dam, then coming to Liberty 
Prairie, near Madison. The father died in 1902. the mother some 
years before. They were carried to Wisconsin by the tide of im- 
migration which swept westward about the time of his birth, and 
he became a resident of Jefferson county at the age of six months. 
In that county and in Dane he spent his boyhood years, supple- 
menting his instruction at the district schools with the more prac- 
tical knowledge of farm life in all its details, which knowledge be- 
came in later years the instrument which led to his political pre- 
ferment. His later achievements, if they formed a part of his 
plan of life, were to have been reached by other means, and his 
early efforts were all directed toward advancement through the 
usual methods of scholarly attainments. His first academic work 
was done at Albion Academy, Dane county, in 1868 ; the following 
year he entered the University of Wisconsin, but after two years of 
study he was compelled on account of failing health to give up his 
work ; and a second attempt to complete his collegiate course, even 
after a three years' rest, resulted in a second physical breakdown. 
In spite of these discouragements he subsequently read law in the 
offices of Nathaniel W. Dean and Gregory & Pinney. In 



20 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

realizing the necessity of an active out-door life he purchased a 
farm near the city of Madison, set it out to small fruits, and ap- 
plying to its management the business methods for which his 
studies had laid the foundation, he soon began to realize a good 
return for his investments. He also stocked his farm with a herd of 
thorough-bred Jerseys and added a dairy to his establishment. 
He not only personally superintended his fruit and dairy business 
but actually performed many of the laborious duties connected 
with it. He varied the work of this period by occasionally teach- 
ing; in the winter of 1877 he taught a country school in the town 
of Burke in which his immediate predecessor was F. W. Hall and 
the one before that was Senator R. M. La Follette. Mr. Adams 
was always actively interested in political affairs and in 1880 en- 
tered the arena as a stump speaker, a part which he filled in every 
subsequent campaign up to the present time. In 1883 he was 
elected to represent the southeast assembly district in the state 
legislature, by a majority of over seven hundred votes and was re- 
elected the next term, increasing his majority to over a thousand. 
During the later term he served as chairman of the house commit- 
tee on claims. For three years following this legislative ex- 
perience he spent the winters in company with Mr. Morrison, 
in conducting farmers' institutes throughout the state, and while 
giving in this work the results of his own experience and observa- 
tion, he incidentally formed a wide acquaintance throughout the 
agricultural communities, and made many friends who rallied to 
his support when he became, later, a candidate for congressional 
honors. Three years as president of the state dairymen's associa- 
tion, and two years as secretary of the state horticultural society, 
supplemented this acquaintance and made his name a household 
word among the farmers. About this time, (1887), he entered the 
editorial field, for which he was somewhat prepared through act- 
ing as correspondent for a number of agricultural periodicals, and 
became, for a short time, manager and editor of the Western 
Farmer, published in Madison. In 1888 he was a delegate-at-large 
to the convention which nominated Benjamin Harrison for presi- 
dent, and the same year was appointed superintendent of public 
property by Governor Hoard, serving for two years. At the ex- 
piration of this time he became associated with C. M. Dow & Co., 
and later with Mr. Vernon, and divided his attention between his 
farming interests and a real estate business. Governor Upham ap- 
pointed Mr. Adams as dairy and food commissioner, in 1894, and 
the wisdom of his selection for this important position was en- 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 21 

dorsed by two of his successors in office, Governors Scofield and 
La Follette. It was during his incumbency of this office that he 
rendered such efficient service to the farmers of this state by his 
efforts in the passage of the law which prohibited the manufacture 
of filled cheese and colored olemargerine. At the time of Mr. 
Adams' appointment, Wisconsin dairy products had fallen from 
the high grade which had established for them an international 
reputation to a very low place, on account, especially, of the pro- 
duction of filled cheese, and it has taken years to restore to them 
the confidence of the public, and for this restoration the dairymen 
are largely indebted to Mr. Adams. Following the agitation in 
Wisconsin most of the other dairying states have passed stringent 
laws along the same line, and these were supplimented, after a 
three years' struggle, by the enactment of a national law putting 
an almost prohibative tax upon the production of oleomargine. 
In this agitation Mr. Adams took a very active part, and his many 
visits to the national capital in the interests of pure food enact- 
ments, made him familiar with life in Washington, and gave him 
the wider outlook upon affairs which that familiarity brings, and 
when in" 1902, his name came before the voters of the second con- 
gressional district as a national representative, he had fully demon- 
strated his ability to fill it, and the confidence of his constituency 
in him has been shown by two re-elections to the same office. Mr. 
Adams came before the public eye during the most recent session 
of congress more than at any time in his political career, through 
his work for the meat inspection law now in effect. During the 
latter part of the session, after President Roosevelt exposed the 
packers, Senator Beveridge formulated an amendment to the agri- 
cultural bill, providing for inspection of packing houses. This 
amendment caused a bitter fight, especially the clause providing 
that the packers pay the expense, and one providing for both day 
and night inspections. When the fight was at its bitterest point, 
Mr. Adams saw the president and they agreed upon the measure 
which is now a law. His reputation for honesty and fair dealing 
was such that in the very storm center of politics he was always 
trusted and sometimes feared by both factions of his party. 
His taste and judgment in literature was excellent and he was. 
possessed of a dry humor, slightly tinged with good-humored 1 , 
sarcasm, which made him an exceedingly entertaining companion 
and his self-poise under the trying conditions in which an aspirant 
for political honors is sometimes placed was remarkable. During a 
recent campaign an uncompromising friend demanded of him. "Are 



22 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

you a Stalwart or a Hal f-B reed ?" With a twinkle of his eye he 
gravely responded, "I'm running for congress." Mr. Adams was 
married October 15, 1878, to Miss Annie B. Norton, who was born 
in Lowell, Mass., and reared in Madison. Their four children, 
Benjamin Cullen, Frank Shepherd, Mabel and Carrie were all 
born in Madison. Notwithstanding the fact that Mr. Adams had 
not been in robust health for many years the announcement of his 
death. July 9, 1906, came as a shock to his many friends. He died 
at the Auditorium, Chicago, on his way home from Washington. 
Speaker Cannon appointed as members of the hofise funeral com- 
mittee the following congressmen: John J Esch, Wiscons'n; J. W. 
Babcock, Wisconsin; W. E. Brown, Wisconsin; C. H. Weisse, 
Wisconsin ; J. II. Jenkins, Wisconsin; James H. Davidson, Wiscon- 
sin; H. A. Cooper, Wisconsin; E. S. Miner. Wisconsin; W. H. Staf- 
ford. Wisconsin ; Theo Otjen, Wisconsin ; James S. Sherman, New 
York; J. Adam Bede. Minnesota; James A. Tawney, Minnesota; 
A. L. Brick, Indiana; Martin H. Madden, Chicago; John Lamb, Vir- 
ginia; H. S. Boutell, Illinois; J. V. Graff, Illinois; William Wil- 
son. Illinois; A. F. Dawson, Iowa; H. P. Goebel, Ohio; Thomas 
Marshall, North Dakota; A. J. Barchfeld, Pennsylvania; Jesse 
Overstreet. Indiana ; Harry C. Woodyard, West Virginia ; E. L. 
Hamilton. Michigan. Mr. Adams' death called out many expres- 
sions of appreciation from prominent men, not only in his own 
state, but from those who had become acquainted with him in the 
wider circles into which his position in congress brought him. 
The limits of this brief memoir prevent their reproduction here, 
but the spirit which animated them is well represented, especially 
in regard to his later work, in two or three excerpts. Governor 
Davidson said: "I have known Honorable Henry C. Adams for 
many years. On my first acquaintance he impressed me as a man 
of unusual talent and wide attainments. Mr. Adams was a most 
genial gentleman and readily made friends. As a member of con- 
gress he took a commanding position, and his battle for the agri- 
cultural interests of the country will cause him to be long and 
gratefully remembered. The death of Mr. Adams at this time is 
a distinct loss to the state and to the country." Colonel Casson : 
"As a public speaker Congressman Adams attracted more atten- 
tion in the house than any other man in twenty years. On sev- 
eral occasions, notably when he spoke on the Philippine tariff bill. 
was this shown. On the conclusion of that speech the house took 
an informal recess and the entire house crowded around to con- 
gratulate him. Ik- was intensely popular and I considered him 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 33 

the best talker in the house. He was emphatically a growing man. 
He had much yet to develop. He had made a very successful 
member of congress. He had a way of doing things, of getting 
there. He had a tact and talent which eminently fitted him for 
successful work in a legislative body. It can truly be said of him 
that he was an orator, that in debate he was always ready for the 
occasion." 

Michael Adler, of Waunakee, born in Germany July 13, 1853, 
is the son of Germans, Nicholas and Alary (Michaels) Adler. The 
father died in Germany in 1860, and some years after the widow 
and her two sons, John Adler. now of Cross Plains, and Michael, 
the subject of this sketch, came to America. Michael came to 
Berry township, Dane, in 1868, and went to work on a farm; two 
years later he went to Springfield and in 1882, joined his mother 
and brother in Cross Plains, where they had located in 1873. At 
the latter place he bought forty acres of land, to which he has 
added from time to time, and is now, through his own diligence 
and good jnanagement, the possessor of a farm of two hundred 
acres. He is actively interested in the welfare of the Democratic 
party, and has held many offices of political trust, having served 
five years as justice of the peace, two years as trustee of the village 
of Waunakee, five years as supervisor of Cross Plains township, 
and three years on the county board, which last position he 
holds at present. He married January 11, 1876, Miss Annie Mer- 
gen, who was born in Dane, March 3, 1855. She is the daughter 
of Jacob and Mary (Schauffhausen) Mergen, both born in Ger- 
many ; he came to Dane in 1853 and she in 1854, and on April 24, 
of that year they were married. Mr. Mergen's first wife, (who was 
a Miss Biddinger) died in Xew York City in 1853. Of the six- 
children of the first marriage, three are living, and of the nine 
children of the second marriage, of whom Mrs. Adler is one, seven 
are living. To the subject of this sketch and his wife, twelve chil- 
dren have been born of whom five died in infancy; those living are, 
Michael P., who lives on the old homestead; John J., of Vienna 
township; Henry, of Madison; Math. F., Joseph, Mary and Anna. 
Mr. Adler has retired from active life and resides in a beautiful 
home in the village of Waunakee. 

William Albers, farmer and teamster of the town of Madison, 
was born in Hanover, Germany, May 28, 1841. his parents. William 
and Catherine (Rinkhoft) Albers. both being natives of that 
province. The father died before the subject of this sketch was 
born and the mother afterward married William Mollenbard, a 



34 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

carpenter by trade. In 1858 the family came to America and set- 
tled in Dane county. There the stepfather bought a large farm 
and followed farming and carpentering the rest of his life. Wil- 
liam Albers is the only child of his parents, though his mother had 
four children by her second marriage. As a boy he had but little 
opportunity to acquire an education, being compelled by circum- 
stances to work on the farm. At the age of eighteen years he left 
home and went to work in a brick-yard at St. Louis. In 1861 he 
returned to Dane county, bought a team and has been engaged in 
teaming more or less ever since. Some time later he bought the 
farm where he now lives, and upon which there is a sand and 
gravel pit, from which he derives considerable revenue. Mr. Al- 
bers is a fine example of that industry and thrift which is a dis- 
tinguishing characteristic of the German people. Beginning life 
with small capital and limited opportunities he has achieved suc- 
cess through his own efforts. In political matters he is classed as 
a Democrat, though in local elections he votes for the man rather 
than for the candidate of any party. He is a member of the 
Turner society of Madison, and of the old fire company No. 2. He 
has been twice married, first in 1861 to Augusta, daughter of 
Fritz Smith, a native of Saxony, and his second wife was Sophia 
Smith, daughter of Philip Smith. She died July 2, 1902, aged 
fifty-one. By this second marriage he has five children living and 
one deceased, viz : Charles, Susie, George, William, Kate, all 
living at home, and Margaret, the last named dying in early child- 
hood. 

Fritz Albrecht, Sr., a retired farmer, whose home is in Middle- 
ton, was born in Mecklenburg-Schwerin and came to America with 
his father, Carl Albrecht. when he was three years old. The latter 
was bom at Bresegardt, Mecklenburg, was married at Middleton 
to Mi^s Maria llinrechs of Bresegardt, and was a foreman on the 
German roads. In 1855 he set sail with his family for America 
and was seven weeks en voyage. They located at Middleton and 
obtained a farm of forty acres in section 14, having nine acres un- 
der cultivation, and a log dwelling. This farm Mr. Albrecht pro- 
ceeded to clear dnring the hours when he was not active in his 
duties as an employee of the C, M. & St. P. R. R. He was a 
stanch Democrat and with his family supported the German 
Lutheran church. Mr. Albrecht died in 1878 aged sixty-five, his 
wife in 181 !. aged fifty-six. ( )f their seven children but two (John 
and Fritz) are living, both at Middleton. Fritz Albrecht was born 
November 3, 1852, and grew to manhood on his father's farm, re- 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 25 

ceiving" such education as the country schools of that time af- 
forded. He worked the farm for many years and was also em- 
ployed in threshing for seventeen years. At the present time he 
is the owner of a splendid farm of two hundred and seventy-two 
acres just south of Middleton and a pleasant home in Middleton, 
which he has occupied since 1905. He is a Democrat and has al- 
ways been much interested in politics, but more in school affairs, 
in which he has been active as clerk of the school board of Middle- 
ton for twelve years and clerk of the district school board for 
nine years and treasurer for twelve years of high school. For 
three years he was chairman of the town board also town treas- 
urer 1883-4 and served on county board 1886-7 and 1892. October 
5, 1873, he married Miss Mary Hinrichs, daughter of Jacob and 
Marie (Rieland) Hinrichs of Mecklenburg-Schwerin. Nine chil- 
dren were born to them, of whom four sons are now living; Will- 
iam, who is a carpenter of Madison, Wis. ; Fritz. Jr., who farms 
the old home farm ; Emill, who is a painter by trade and lives at 
home ; and Frank, the youngest, also at home. All of the sons 
have the best education afforded by the Middleton schools, for 
whose welfare their father has always labored. 

Orin Alderman, a farmer in the town of Pleasant Springs, was 
born in the neighborhood where he now lives, February 1-1, 1858, 
and is of German and Norwegian descent. His father, Walter Al- 
derman, was born in Baden, Germany, February 14, 1822, his par- 
ents being John and Frances Alderman. The father died while 
Walter was still a small boy, and in 1830 the widow and her son 
came to America. After living two years in Buffalo, N. Y., they 
went to Detroit, where they remained for six years, Walter find- 
ing employment in a hotel. Then they removed to Milwaukee r 
where he worked in a hotel until 1845, when they came to Dane 
county. About this time Walter Alderman married Caroline Wit- 
tleson, who was born in Norway but came to Wisconsin in 1840. 
He obtained forty acres of land in the town of Dunkirk, upon 
which he built a shanty and began farming. Later he bought 
some land in the town of Pleasant Springs, and added to his first 
purchase until he owned over two hundred acres. He was a Re- 
publican in political matters and a member of the Lutheran church. 
The children of Walter and Caroline Alderman are as follows : 
John, who now runs a hotel and hardware store at Crookston. 
Minn. ; Catherine, wife of Iver Johnson, of Avon. Wash. : Adeline,. 
now deceased, was the wife of Iver Anderson, of Pleasant Springs : 
Mary Ann, wife of Ole Lothe. of Pleasant Springs: Frances, living 



26 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

at Crookston. Minn. ; Orin, the subject of this sketch; Julia and 
Frederick, now both deceased; Turena, living- at Crookston; and 
Elizabeth, wife of Rev. Martin Mickelson. Orin Alderman at- 
tended the schools in Pleasant Springs in his early boyhood, but 
the death of his father restricted his opportunities to acquire an ed- 
ucation, as he had to begin work at an early age. In 1889 he 
bought one hundred and twenty acres of the old home place, and 
here he carries on a general farming business. He raises a con- 
siderable quantity of tobacco, and also pays some attention to 
stock raising and dairying. In politics and religion he has fol- 
lowed the affiliations of his father, being a Republican and a mem- 
ber of the Lutheran church at Stoughton. He has never married. 

Edwin K. Allandslee, proprietor of the "Central Restaurant" in 
Stoughton. was born in Telemarken, Norway, September 6, 1853. 
He is a son of Knud and Rannae Allandslee. His widowed 
mother, with her nine children, immigrated to the United States 
in 1866, coming direct to Wisconsin, where she purchased eighty 
acres of land in the town of Dunn, Dane county. Subsequently 
she made her home in the town of Rutland with the subject of this 
sketch and died there. Her children were Osman, George. Stener, 
Edwin K.. John, Dagna, Gunhild, Asloug and Rannae. Edwin K. 
was brought up in Dane county from the time he was thirteen 
years of age. receiving such educational advantages as the schools 
afforded. One year of his life was spent in Pleasant Springs and 
twenty-five years on the old homestead in the town of Dunn. In 
1862 he purchased one hundred and sixty acres of land in the 
town of Rutland, where he lived until 1900. In the latter year he 
removed to Dunkirk, purchasing fifteen acres, of land just out- 
side of the corporation limits of Stoughton. This he now uses as 
a market garden to supply the restaurant which he has conducted 
since August, 1905. His place of business has now become one 
of the principal centers of a growing city. In 1881 Mr. Allandslee 
was united in marriage to Gunhild Berge, a native of Norway, and 
to this union have been born eight children, Rannae. Oliver, Julia, 
Anna. Signa, Clarence. Alfred and -Arthur. The family are all 
communicants of the Lutheran church. In his political connec- 
tions Mr. Allandslee is a Republican. 

Hans J. Allberg, foreman of the Amerika Publishing Company, 
was born near Trondhejm, Xorway, August 12, 1866. His par- 
entS were Anders Peterson and Hannah (Peterson) Allberg, both 
natives of Norway, where the father was a mechanic. They never 
came to America, the father dying in the old country at the age of 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 27 

•sixty-four years and the mother when she was fifty-three years of 
age. Of their five children Hans J. was the youngest. The others 
are Peter A., a mechanic, now living in Madison ; Paul, a farmer 
living near Walcott, N. D. ; Martin, now and for several years 
county surveyor of Ottertail county, Minn., living in Henning; and 
Helmar B., living in Norway. Hans J. Allberg received his educa- 
tion in the public schools of Norway, and after coming to this 
country in 1884 attended the schools here. His trade of printer 
lie learned in Minneapolis, Minn., where he worked three years. 
In the fall of 1887 he came to Madison and was employed on dif- 
ferent papers until 1896 when the "Amerika" a Norwegian paper 
•of which Prof. R. B. Anderson is the editor-in-chief, was moved to 
this city, since which time he has been with that paper. For some 
six years he edited and managed a Norwegian paper in Stotfghton, 
-called "The Normannen." which he later sold. The paper was 
removed to Madison and consolidated with "Amerika." On 
October 15, 1892, Mr. Allberg married Betsey, a daughter of 
Erick E. and Martha Hovland of Pleasant Springs and to this 
union three children have been born, Arthur Herman, Elmer Mar- 
tin and Hazel Lenora. Mr. and Mrs. Allberg are members of the 
Norwegian Lutheran church. For some years Mr. Allberg was 
secretary of the church board. He is a member of the Modern 
Woodmen of America. 

Professor William Francis Allen, one of the distinguished 
scholars and educators of the state and nation, was born in Xorth- 
boro, Mass., September 5, 1830. His father was Joseph Allen, a 
minister of the old church of that town. His preparatory school- 
ing was obtained partly at home and partly at Leicester Academy 
and Roxbury Latin school. In 1851 he was graduated from Har- 
vard and spent the next three years as a private instructor in New 
York city. The years 1854-56 were spent in European study and 
travel, chiefly at Berlin, Goettingen and Rome. In Rome he de- 
voted his attention for several months to a study of the topo- 
graphy of the ancient city ; he also visited Naples and Greece be- 
fore returning to the United States in 1856. These were the years 
of his specialized effort wherein he laid the foundations for h's life 
work in Latin, history and Roman antiquities. Prof. Allen next 
taught for seven years in the English and classical school in West 
Newton, Mass. He was married July 2, 1862, to Mary T. Lam- 
bert of the latter town, who died in 1865, leaving one child. Kath- 
arine. During the last two years of the Civil War he served in 
the south as an agent of the treedmen's and sanitary commissions, 



28 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

ministering to the cause of education among the blacks. While 
in this employment he gathered materials for a collection of negro 
songs, published in 1867, under the title of "Slave Songs." After 
the close of the war he was for one year professor of ancient lan- 
guages at Antioch College, Yellow Springs, Ohio, and one year at 
Eagleswood Military Academy, Perth Amboy, New Jersey, 
While here he accepted a call to the chair of ancient languages and 
history in the University of Wisconsin, with which institution he 
was associated during the remainder of his life; in 1870 his chair 
was changed to that of Latin and history, and in 1886 to that of 
history alone. June 30. 1868, he married Margaret L. Andrews of 
Newburyport, Mass.. and three children were born of this union,. 
Andrews. William W. (deceased) and Philip. Professor Allen 
died in Madison, Wis., December 8, 1889, after a brief illness, from 
pneumonia. He gained an international reputation in the literary- 
world for his labors and publications in the field of Roman history 
and antiquities. He is also the author of numerous Latin text- 
books of standard merit ; numerous review articles in The Nation, 
North American Review, and other leading critical journals; has 
published a large number of well known monographs of marked 
excellence. Among his best known works are his "Annals of Taci- 
tus." and "History of the Roman People" (Ginn. 1890). In the 
midst of his busy life as educator and writer, he found time for 
numerous outside activities, and was a director of the Madison 
free library, aad a trustee of the Unitarian church. He was be- 
loved by students, associates and all who knew him, and has left 
the impress of his scholarly personality on many generations of 
students. No one man has added more to the splendid reputation 
of the great university with which he was so long and intimately 
associated. 

Francis M. Ames is a native-born son of Dane county, and dur- 
ing all of his long and active career he has resided within her con- 
fines. He was born in the town of Oregon, March 23, 1847, and 
is the son of John N. and Mary Ann (Ball) Ames, pioneer settlers 
of the county, who are deserving of more than a passing mention 
in a volume devoted to the history of worthy citizens, past and 
present. John X. Ames was born July 7, 1822, in Steuben, Oneida 
count}'. X. Y., and is descended from noble Revolutionary ances- 
try. Mis grandfather, Nathaniel Ames (born April 25, 1761, in 
New Hampshire) was a farmer and a Protestant Methodist 
preacher, who served under Washington and experienced the mis- 
eries of that winter camp at Valley Forge. In 1800 he settled in 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 29 

the wilderness near the headwaters of the Mohawk river, and there 
built him a home in which he resided for a number of years. 
He was married to Miss Sarah Hall, a native of Albany county, 
N. Y., who became the mother of eleven children, one of whom, 
David H., was the grandfather of the subject of this review. Al- 
though eighty-four years of age, in the summer of 1845, Nathaniel 
Ames, the old Revolutionary veteran, with his wife and five of his 
Children, (Frances, Jonathan, Naomi, Perymus and Ira), migrated 
to the wilds of the then territory of Wisconsin and settled on sec- 
tion 22 of what is now the town of Oregon, in Dane county. 
There his wife died, in July, 1851, at the age of eighty-four, and 
nine years later the old gentleman moved to the village of Oregon, 
where he died in August, 1863, aged one hundred and two years, 
doubtless the oldest white man wdio ever lived and died in Dane 
county. He was a Mason and was buried under the auspices of 
that order. David H. Ames, son of the venerable patriot, was 
born near Albany, N. Y., served through the war of 1812, and died 
but comparatively a few years ago, near Trenton Falls, N. Y.. aged 
one hundred and one years, nine months and twenty-seven davs. 
He married Miss Betsy Norton, who was a native of Herkimer 
county, N. Y., and a granddaughter of General Norton of the Rev- 
olutionary War. She also lived to be very old. John N. Ames, 
father of our subject, and son of David H. and Betsy (Norton) 
Ames, came with his grandfather to Wisconsin, in 1845, and was 
the only one of the eleven children born to his parents who made 
his home in this state. He lived on the original half-section en- 
tered by his grandfather until 1870, and then purchased two hun- 
dred and forty-four acres, lying on both sides of the track of the 
Chicago and Northwestern railroad, two miles south of Oregon vil- 
lage, and in the heart of the best farming land in that section of 
Wisconsin. On this farm he built a large two-story farm house, 
a substantial basement barn and other buildings, and although he 
began his independent career with $100 which he had earned as 
monthly wages, few men made greater or more constant progress. 
Mr. Ames married, in his and her native town, Miss Mary A. Ball, 
daughter of Eusevius and Keturah (Weld) Ball, her father being a 
native of Massachusetts and of Revolutionary ancestry, as was 
also her mother, who was born in Orange county. N. J. Mr. 
Ames still lives at the old homestead, enjoying the fruits of his 
early endeavors. Mrs. Ames died February 4, 1893. Five chil- 
dren were born to them, all on the old Oregon farm: Francis M., 
John F., Sarah A., William L. and Florence A. Francis M. Ames 



30 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

is the eldest of these children and is the one to whom this sketch 
is especially dedicated. He received his primary education in the 
district schools of Oregon, and supplemented the knowledge thus 
gained by taking a course at the University of Wisconsin at Madi- 
son. He resided at the home of his parents until 1876, when he- 
was married and located on the farm where he still resides, in sec- 
tion 32 of the town of Rutland, the place being known as the old 
Axtell farm. It comprises two hundred and fifty acres, and since 
taking possession of it Mr. Ames has made many needed improve- 
ments, including a beautiful residence which he built in 1893. In 
addition to this homestead he owns two hundred and eighty acres- 
in Brooklyn, Green county, which tract is known as the Willis 
Hazeltine place. Mr. Ames has always followed farming of a 
general nature, raising oats, corn, hay and wheat, and in live stock, 
and breeds hogs, horses and cattle quite extensively. In politics he 
gives an unwavering allegiance to the principles of the Prohibition 
party, but has never aspired to official position. In 1904 the Far- 
mers' Mutual Banking & Trust Company of Brooklyn was organ- 
ized, and Mr. Ames was elected as the first president of the organi- 
zation, serving in that capacity for two years, and he is now secre- 
tary of the same. Our subject was married on August 15, 1876,. 
to Miss Alice C. Main, daughter of R. P. and Cordelia A. (Dakin) 
Main, who are given extended mention on another page of this 
volume, in the sketch of their son, Edwin D. Main. Mrs. Ames 
was a school teacher in her early life, and is a lady of culture and 
refinement. She is the mother of seven children, the names and 
other facts concerning whom are here incorporated : F. Marion 
attended school at Evansville, graduated in the commercial college 
at Madison, and is now the book keeper at the chair factory at 
Brooklyn. J. Quincey is at present attending Yale college, being 
a member of the class of 1907. and is assistant secretary of the 
college Y. M. C. A. He has also been a student at the University 
of Wisconsin and he was in St. Louis two years and in Manila for 
the same length of time, being in the civil service of the govern- 
ment. He has also made a trip around the world, visiting- 
Shanghai, London, Rome, Paris, and other notable places. He is 
now preparing himself for the practice of law. Hallie, the third 
child, is assistant cashier and book keeper in the bank of Evans- 
ville. She is a graduate of the Evansville Seminary and the com- 
mercial college al Madison and taught several years. Tressa at- 
tended the Whitewater Normal school for two years, and has been 
teaching for the past three years, being the teacher in the primary 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 31 

department of the high school at Brooklyn. Robert P. took a com- 
mercial course in the Madison Business College, then went to Mon- 
tana for a while and was book keeper for a time at'Canastota. S. I ). 
He is now at home engaged in the management of his father's 
farm. Paul Main and Sadie Minnie (twins) are graduates of the 
high school at Evansville, of the class of 1906. In 1893 all of 
these children attended the World's Fair at Chicago, and in 1904 
they visited the St. Louis exposition. 

A. O. Amondson is a retired farmer of Cambridge, of Norwegian 
birth and ancestry. With his parents, Ole and Ingobar (Larson) 
Amondson, he came to the United States when he was twelve 
years old and located at Christiana, Dane county, Wis., after one 
winter spent at Jefferson Prairie. Eleven children were born to 
Ole Amondson and his wife, of whom A. O. is the oldest living 
son. Rhoda, the oldest daughter, is married and lives in Iowa ; 
Betsy is Mrs. O. D. Olson of Grand Forks, N. D. ; Martha is the 
wife of I. Isaacson of Rock county, Wis.; Christie married Nicholi 
Anderson of Rockdale. Ole Amondson was a blacksmith and a 
skilled worker in metals but when he came to Wisconsin he en- 
gaged in farming. The voyage was made in a sailing vessel and 
the family was twelve weeks upon the ocean. They landed at 
New York, in July, 1844, and came to Wisconsin by way of the 
Great Lakes, the common route at that time. The farm upon 
which they lived comprised one hundred and sixty acres and upon 
it a dug-out was soon constructed to be followed later by a sub- 
stantial home. Besides the work of the farm Mr. Amondson was 
the blacksmith for the young community, made plows, tinkered 
guns, etc. He died at the old homestead in January, 1861, and his 
wife in May, 1881. Mr. Amondson was a member of the Luth- 
eran church and in political sympathy a Democrat, though he was 
never active in politics. A. O. Amondson, better known as Ed., 
was born in Voss, Norway, September 26, 1832, attended the home 
schools and assisted his parents with the work of the farm. In 
1850 he crossed the plains to California and after a difficult and 
dangerous journey of four months arrived at Placeville, Cal., where 
he worked in mines and in a store. Returning to Dane county 
after several years in California he bought one hundred and twenty 
acres of the old home farm and there he carried on a prosperous 
general farming business for thirty years. In 1898 he retired and 
since then has made his home in the village of Cambridge. A 
'member of the Republican party Mr. Amondson has always been 
an active worker for the advancement of the community and has 



32 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

served as a supervisor and as a member of the town board of Chris- 
tiania. 

Ed. Amundson, a prominent farmer of Rutland, was born in Nor- 
way and came to America with his brother and sister, in 1871. Of 
a family of eight children but three left their native land, Ole, 
who lives with his brother, Anna, whose home is in Pierce county, 
Wis., and Ed. The other members of the family remained with 
the parents, Amund and Martha (Olson) Larson, in Christiania. 
Ed Amundson was born Feb. 15, 1845, at Christiania, attended the 
common schools and worked on the farm until he was twenty-six 
years old. when he sailed for America and located at Pleasant 
Springs. Here he remained for a number of years and in 1896 
purchased one hundred and forty-two acres of farm land in the 
town of Rutland, which is his present home. Many improvements 
have been made by him upon the farm, until it is now very com- 
pletely equipped. Mr. Amundson is a Republican in his political 
affiliations but has never taken an active part in politics. He is 
a member of the Stoughton Lutheran church. October 9, 1873, 
he married Miss Inga Erickson, daughter of Eric Erickson and 
Lena (Olson) Erickson, natives of Norway. Mrs. Amundson has 
a sister, Rebecca, and a brother, Edward, living in Dane county, 
but the remainder of the family never came to America. Eight 
children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Amundson, all of whom 
have attended the schools of Rutland and Stoughton. They live 
in Rutland; Alfred and Oscar are farmers; Sophia is a dressmaker; 
Hannah. Edwin, Josephine, Idella and Alf. Theodore remain at home. 

Christian Anderson, a merchant of Deerfield, was born in the 
town of Christiana, Dane county, March 26, 1853. His parents 
were Andrew and Cary (Nelson) Anderson, both natives of Nor- 
way. They came to Wisconsin about 1847. bought forty acres of 
school land in the town of Christiana, but later traded that farm for 
another in the same neighborhood and there lived the remainder of 
their lives. The mother died in October. 1860, and the father in 
the following January. W^hen the war broke out the two older 
brothers rented out the farm and entered the army. At that time 
Christian was only eight years old. He was taken by a neighbor, 
with whom lie remained for a year. He then worked for different 
persons until he was fifteen years of age. when he went to work in 
a wagon factory at Cambridge. He was there but a short time when 
his arm was seriously injured by a circular saw, disabling him for 
a year. This accident still affects the use of his arm. He next 
worked in hotels at different places for about five years, at the end 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 33 

of which time he went to Chicago and found employment in an 
organ and furniture factory . Mr. Anderson has now an organ and 
several ornamental pieces of furniture of his own construction, 
having become an expert cabinet maker in spite of his injured arm. 
While in Chicago he attended the evening schools, adding to the 
elementary education he had obtained in the public schools in the 
town of Christiana. On New Year's day, 1880, he married Anna 
Hendrickson, who was born in Norway, Dec. 10, 1849. Her par- 
ents, Hendrie and Sarah (Arandt) Hendrickson, were both natives 
of Trondhjem, Norway, but came to the United States in 1865, 
settling first in Michigan, but a year later they located at Oxford- 
ville, Rock county, Wis., where they bought a farm and there 
passed the remainder of their lives. They had three children, Mrs. 
Anderson being the only one now living. In 1885 they removed to 
Deerfield, where Mr. Anderson erected the building in which his 
store is established, and where he has ever since been engaged in 
the mercantile business. Mrs. Anderson is an accomplished mil- 
liner, having had several years experience in some of the leading 
milliner stores of Chicago, and she is engaged in that business in 
connection with her husband's store. They have a large patronage 
and conduct a store that would be a credit to a much larger town. 
Mr. and Mrs. Anderson have had two children, but both died in 
infancy. In political matters Mr. Anderson is a Republican and 
takes an interest in public matters, both general and local, and has 
served two terms on the village board. He and his wife belong to 
the Norwegian Lutheran church and take considerable interest in 
church work. 

Iver Anderson, a farmer in the town of Pleasant Springs, was 
born at Bergen, Norway, February 22. 1836. He is a son of An- 
drew and Christine (Ouam) Ellingson, both natives of the stift in 
which Bergen is located. They were married in their native land 
and in 1848 embarked in a sailing vessel for America. After a 
voyage of seven weeks and two days they landed in the city of 
New York, from which point they came directly fo Wisconsin and 
settled in the town of Dunkirk, in Dane county. He bought one 
hundred and eighty acres of unimproved land, opened it to culti- 
vation and lived on that farm until his death. He was a Democrat 
in his political views, and both he and his wife belonged to the 
Lutheran church. Their children were as follows : Elling, now 
living in Dodge county, Minn. ; Iver. the subject of this sketch ; 
Andrew, deceased; Nels, a farmer in Dodge county, Minn.; Susan, 
living in the town of Dunkirk; Annie, also living in Dunkirk; 
3— iii 



34 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

Martha; Jacob, and Christ ne. deceased. Iver Anderson re- 
ceived a primary education in Norway, but after coming to 
America the requirements of the new country made it neces- 
sary for him to assist his father in the clearing and cultivation of 
the farm. He lived with parents until he was twenty-eight years 
of age, when he bought one hundred acres of land where he now 
lives. This farm, which he bought from his father, had a log cabin 
on it and about thirty acres were cleared. He now owns two 
hundred and sixty acres and has one of the best improved farms 
in the neighborhood. He does a general farming business, raises 
a good deal of tobacco, and devotes some attention to raising stock. 
Politically he is independent, though he takes a worthy interest in 
town affairs and has held the office of school clerk and treasurer 
for thirty years. He is a deacon in the Christ church, Lutheran, 
of Stoughton, and is somewhat active in church work. He* has. 
been twice married. His first wife was Miss Adeline Alderman, 
by whom he had three children, viz : Kate, now the wife of An- 
drew Beck, of the town of Pleasant Springs ; Caroline, wife of 
Samuel Brickson, a farmer of Pleasant Springs; and Mileda, now 
deceased. The mother of these children died in 1874, and Mr. 
Anderson married Inger Erickson, a native of Norway. By the 
second wife he has the following chlidren. Arthur, Edward, Bes- 
sie, Clarence. Mary, Ida, Christine and Andrew, all living but Ar- 
thur. Mr. Anderson has been an industrious man all his life, and 
whatever degree of success he has attained has been entirely due 
to his own energy and good judgment. He is well known and 
generally respected in the community where he lives. 

John N. Anderson, a well-known carpenter of Stoughton, was 
born at Endresogn, Norway, Feb. 12, 1858. He is a son of Nels 
and Ela (Oldstatter) Anderson and until he was sixteen years of 
age his training was obtained in the Norwegian schools. At that 
age he immigrated to the L T nited States and located in Dane 
county, and the city of Stoughton has since been his home. For 
several years he "hired out" to the farmers of the vicinity but in 
1880 started in to do carpentering work. Since that time he has 
been continuously at it and is known today as one of the best men 
in his line in the city. He has also done some contracting, but 
has generally preferred to do the mechanical part of the work. 
( >n February 27, 1888, Mr. Anderson was united in marriage to 
Carrie (or Kara), daughter of Halvor Burthe and Olive (Quale) 
T >rgeson, natives of Norway who were pioneers of both Jefferson 
and Dane counties. The issue of this union is two daughters. 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 35 

Ella A. and Geneva M. All of the family are members of the Nor- 
wegian Lutheran synod and communicants of Christ church. 
Stoughton. In his political relations Mr. Anderson is a stanch 
Republican. 

John W. Anderson, retired, of Mazomanie village, was born in 
Union county, Ohio, Sept. 26, 1836. He was a son of William and 
Mary (Argo) Anderson. William Anderson was born in Rich- 
mond, Va.. and his wife first saw the light of day near Pittsburg, 
Pa. The subject's paternal grandfather, John Anderson, was a 
wealthy planter and slave owner of Virginia. William Anderson 
remained in Virginia until he was about twenty-one years of age 
and then removed with his wife to Union county, Ohio, about 1833. 
In 1846 they moved again, this time to Platteville, Wis., where 
they remained one year. Iowa county was their next place of lo- 
cation and there Mrs. Anderson died. Shortly after Mr. Ander- 
son went to Iowa to live with a daughter, at whose home he 
passed away. Both he and his wife were members of the Advent- 
ist church. Seven children were born to them. The father and 
two sons enlisted in the Union army ; the father was in Company 
K, Fiftieth Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry and saw a year's serv- 
ice. Benjamin, a son, was in Company H, Eighth Wisconsin Infan- 
try, and was killed in the battle of the Wilderness. John W. 
Anderson, the subject of this sketch, enlisted in Company G, Elev- 
enth Wisconsin Infantry, in October, 1861. His regiment was in 
the battle of Bayou Cache, in General Steele's division. Ill health 
kept him in the hospital at Mound City, 111., for a time, and on his 
release he was discharged from the army. Up to the time of his 
enlistment, from the age of seventeen, he had worked out, and after 
h"s discharge from the army he went to Cottage Grove, in this 
county, where he farmed for four years. For the following thirty- 
five years he farmed in the town of Arena, Iowa county ; the next 
few years he spent in the village of Arena and in October, 1904, he 
retired and located in the village of Mazomanie. Mr. Anderson is 
a Republican and a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. 
He has been twice married. His first wife was Annie, daughter 
of John and Martha (Johnson) Gallagher, to whom he was married 
in March, 1863. Mr. and Mrs. Gallagher were both natives of Ire- 
land. Four of the ten children who blessed this first union are 
still living. They are Addie, the wife of James Gorst of Arena r 
Winnie, the wife of James Ray. a farmer near Arena: Ralph J., a 
merchant at Arena, married to Addie Dodge ; and Nettie, the wife 
of Torrence Hughes, a merchant of Astoria, Oregon. Mrs. An- 



36 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

derson died October 1, 1899. On July 14, 1901, Mr. Anderson was 
married to Mrs. Lizzie Good ; widow of Thomas Good, a farmer of 
the town of Cottage Grove, who was murdered August 27, 1899. 
She was a daughter of Jesse and Ann (Wilcox) Augh, natives of 
England, who came to this country in 1840 and settled in Long 
Island, N. Y. From Long Island Mr. Augh moved to Sun Prairie, 
this county, and later to Richland county, where he died. Mr. 
Anderson is a member of A. R. McDonald post, No. 52, of Mazo- 
manie. Grand Army of the Republic. 

Ole O. Anderson (deceased) was a successful and well-known 
farmer of Albion, son of Ole O. Quale and Susan (Gornan) Quale 
of Norway. With his brothers, Nels and Andrew, Ole O. Ander- 
son came to Wisconsin and settled at Albion. Nels obtained a 
farm in section 4 and made it his home until his death in 1856. 
Andrew sold his farm in section 5 and went to Winnebago county, 
Iowa. Ole O. was born June 19, 1825, in Sogendahl, Norway, 
learned tailoring in Norway and worked at that trade until he came 
to the United States, after which he has always engaged in farm- 
ing. His land was located in different parts of Albion and he 
lived in section 4. His property consisted altogether of three hun- 
dred and sixty acres. During the first years of his residence in 
Dane county, Mr. Anderson was employed in various different 
tasks but soon found it all he could do to manage his rapidly im- 
proving property, which has become very valuable. He was a 
member of the Republican party but took no active part in county 
affairs. He was however very prominent in the work of the Nor- 
wegian Lutheran church, for whose welfare he was always ready 
to labor. In October, 1851, he married Miss Gurie Peterson, who 
was born in Sogen, Norway, March 28, 1832, daughter of Peder 
and Caroline (Beck). Another daughter, Caroline, married Tosten 
Thronson of Sogn, Norway, and came to Albion in 1844. Four 
children were born to them ; Thomas, who lives at Albion ; Andrew, 
of Cambridge; Christopher (deceased) and Christiana, (deceased) 
who married A. Larson of Clear Lake, Iowa. Twelve sons and 
daughters blessed the marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Anderson. Susan, 
the oldest daughter, is the widow of Ole Barsness of Minnesota. 
Caroline is Mrs. Martin Mason of Albion. Nicholas, who lives on 
the old homestead, was for a time engaged in tobacco dealing in 
Stoughton and also owned a store. He takes an active inter- 
est in politics and was elected to the assembly in 1898 by the Re- 
publican party. He has also served in local offices, as chairman, 
supervisor, etc. For twelve years he has been a member of the 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 37 

board of directors of the Albion Fire Insurance Co. and its presi- 
dent since 1898. He is a trustee and devoted member of the East 
Koshkonong Congregational church. Andrew is a farmer of Al- 
bion. Peter B. resides in Stoughton. Maria is Mrs. Allen Alme 
of Pleasant Springs, Wis. Henry C. owns one hundred and sixty 
acres of the old farm, where he carries on a prosperous general 
farming business. His especial interest is live-stock, which he 
raises for pleasure as well as profit. Durham cattle and French 
coach horses are bred upon his farm. Martin O. is a farmer at the 
old home. Joseph is a farmer and real estate dealer of Stoughton. 
Dena Elizabeth is Mrs. Gulich Osgarn of Pleasant Springs. Ed- 
ward J. is a photographer of Minneapolis. Olive J. married Otto 
N. Nelson of Albion. Mr. Anderson lived on the farm he bought 
when he first came to Wisconsin until Jan. 31, 1888, when he died 
surrounded by his children. 

Osvald C. Andersen, a leading merchant tailor of Madison, 
whose place of business is at 27 North Pinckney street, was born in 
Copenhagen, Denmark, on May 14, 1874. He is a son of Ole and 
Johanna (Nelson) Andersen. The father is still a resident of Co- 
penhagen, where he is foreman in a sugar factory. Although six- 
ty-four years of age he is still in vigorous health. He has never 
even visited the New World. The mother died in 1885 at the age 
of forty-two. Both she and her husband were members of the 
Lutheran church. Another son, Charles W.. and the only other 
child, is a jeweler in Madison. The subject of this sketch was edu- 
cated and learned his trade in Copenhagen. In 1892 he sought new 
fields and came to the United States, locating in Buffalo. N. Y., 
where for a short time he worked as a coat maker. For a short 
time Mr. Andersen was employed in Chicago, and in July, 1893, 
arrived in Madison. He found employment with L. W. Gay and 
worked for him until 1899 when he became a partner, the firm name 
being Gay & Andersen. In 1902 Mr. Gay left the firm to enter the 
real estate business and since that time Mr. Andersen has con- 
ducted the business alone. That he is an excellent and thor- 
ough workman both as a ladies' and gentlemen's tailor is proven 
by the prosperity which has been his. On Dec. 5, 189G. Mr. Ander- 
sen married Sofie. daughter of L. and M. Jensen of Aarhus, Den- 
mark. This union has been blessed with four children. Victor S.. 
Olga F.. Waldemar C. and Osvald N. Both Mr. and Mrs. Ander- 
son are members of the Norwegian Lutheran church. Mr. Ander- 
son is a member and treasurer of the Madison society of the Danish 
Brotherhood of America. Modest, retiring and courteous he is a 



38 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

model c'tizen who has won for himself a large place in the com- 
munity. 

Hon. Rasmus B. Anderson is without doubt the most distin- 
guished and widely known of American-Scandinavians. The basic 
facts of his birth and birthplace are as follows: he is native-born, 
but of Scandinavian parentage; his native village being Albion, 
Dane county, and the date January 12, 1846. About his parentage 
there is a flavor of romance, as, contrary to all the unwritten but 
inexorable caste laws of European countries, there was consum- 
mated, in 1830, a marriage between the son of a Norse Quaker peas- 
ant, Bjorn Anderson, and Catherine Von Krogh, the daughter of 
Lieutenant Von Krough, of a long line of aristocratic, military an- 
cestors. Following the bitter disapproval of Mrs. Anderson's family, 
Bjorn Anderson organized a movement for the planting of a Norse 
colony in America, a movement which was consummated in 1836 
by the arrival in this country of the first large company of Nor- 
wegian emigrants. After a stay of two years in Rochester, N. Y., 
Mr. and Mrs. Anderson moved west, first to a Norse settlement in 
LaSalle county, 111., and later to the town of Albion, Dane county, 
then an unbroken forest wilderness. There some ten years later, 
their son, Rasmus, was born, his father's death following four years 
after, in 1850. The son received his first instruction in the district 
schools, and in his early teens was already preparing, under the 
tutorage of a Lutheran pastor, for his collegiate work ; this he be- 
gan at a college founded by Norse Lutherans, at Decorah, Iowa, 
known at that time as Luther College. Even at that time he 
evinced an independence of spirit which brought him into collision 
with the college authorities, and which has always since character- 
ized his public utterances. Notwithstanding this, however, his 
acquirements as a linguist were such that in 1866, when he was 
only twenty years of age. he received the appointment as professor 
of Greek and the modern languages at Albion Academy, in this 
county. His work in that department soon attracted the atten- 
tion of the officials of the University of Wisconsin, and after a few 
months of post-graduate work, he was appointed instructor in lan- 
guages in that institution. In 187.-), the chair of Scandinavian lan- 
guages and literature was created for him, and this position he 
filled until 1883, when he resigned to devote himself to other lines 
of work. During his work in the university, Mr. Anderson had 
made the acquaintance of his distinguished countryman, Ole Bull, 
and in company with him visited Norway in 1872. This compan- 
ionship was the means of his introduction to the most noted schol- 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 39 

ars and literary people of the Scandinavian countries, Bjorn Bjorn- 
son being among the latter. Ole Bull heartily seconded Professor 
Anderson's project of founding a Scandinavian department in the 
university library, and gave him valuable assistance toward the 
attainment 6f that purpose. This acquaintance abroad, his early 
writings and translations, and his lectures on Norse mythology 
and literature delivered between the years 1874 and 1877, in Bos- 
ton, Baltimore and other places, prepared him for the position of 
United States minister to Denmark which was tendered him in 
1885. by President Cleveland. This position he held for four years, 
and filled so well that upon the election of President Harrison, a 
petition, signed by many prominent men of Denmark, Norway and 
Sweden, was presented, asking for his retention in that office, his 
strong personality and varied accomplishments rendering him an 
acceptable addition to social and literary as well as to diplomatic 
circles. Professor Anderson is at the present time occupying an 
editorial chair in the sanctum of "Amerika," one of the largest Nor- 
wegian papers in the United States and one which by reason of his 
vigorous political writings exerts a wide influence among the num- 
erous Norse people of the country and especially of the large com- 
munities of the middle west. Ever since his early controversies 
with the clergy of the Norse Lutheran church on the subject of 
their attitude toward the public schools. Professor Anderson has 
stood for, not alone a loyal interest in the mother country, but for 
the adaptation of foreign elements to the use and advancement of 
the home of their adoption, and has thus rendered a positive serv- 
ice not only to his own countrymen, but to this country, as well, 
in its difficult task of transmutating into a homogeneous whole the 
conflicting elements of which this nation is composed. Of Profes- 
sor Anderson's voluminous work as a writer, space will not permit 
a detailed account. His first book, "Julegave." was written in Nor- 
wegian in 1871. This is a collection of Norse folklore stories, 
and was followed in 1874 by "Den Norske Maalsag." also in Nor- 
wegian. His first book in English was "America not Discovered 
by Columbus," which has passed through a number of editions and 
was translated into Norwegian. His "Norse Mythology," pub- 
lished in 1875. is the book which established his literary reputation. 
It has been translated into four or five languages and is 
generally accepted, even by the most critical authorities, as the 
only adequate and authorative treatment of this subject in t lie- 
English language. "The Viking Tales from the North." "The 
Younger Edda," "History of the Literature of the Scandinavian 



40 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

North, from the Earliest Period to the Present Time," "The Elder 
Edda." are some of his principal translations. He also wrote an 
introduction of fifty pages to Auber Eorestier's translation of "The. 
Spellbound Fiddler," a "Guide into Teutondom," etc. Beside his 
numerous books Professor Anderson has been a wide contributor 
id the best current magazine literature, appearing in the Atlantic 
Monthly, the Epitome of Literature, the Journal of Comparative 
Literature, the American Antiquarian, the London Academy, etc. 
He has published a number of pamphlets in both the English and 
Xorse languages on various subjects, and has been a contributor 
to five or six of the leading enclyclopedias, including the American 
supplement to the Brittanica, Chamber's and Johnson's. A glance 
over a complete bibliography of Professor Anderson's literary work, 
— which includes many books, pamphlets and articles beside those 
enumerated, but largely along the same line of the Scandinavian 
language, literature and early religion, — show that his work is 
largely of a critical rather than of a creative nature. What a man 
of his linguistic ability, excellent diction and industry might have 
accomplished in the line of more original work, if he had not been 
so strongly attracted to the poetical and fascinating lore of the 
northern myths, can be only surmised, but he could probably have 
achieved success in almost any line of literature to which he ad- 
dressed himself. In the work actually accomplished he has suc- 
ceeded in opening, to a large class of readers, the gates to fresh 
and fascinating fields of literature. Professor Anderson has been 
selected as editor-in-chief of what will be, when completed, the 
most sumptuous edition of works in Scandinavian subjects ever is- 
sued. This is a fifteen volume library representative of Scandi- 
navian mythology, romance, folk-lore and history, and known as 
the Xorroena Library. The mechanical work on these volumes 
represents the highest art in bookmaking. Professor Anderson 
married, July 21, 1868, Miss Bertha K. Oleson, of Cambridge, Wis., 
a native of Christiania, Norway, who came to this country with 
her parents, when she was a child. They have had five children : 
Hannah I',.. born April 18, 1869; died April 18. 1870; Carletta C, 
born December 4, 1870; George K., born November 7, 1872; Hjal- 
mar O., born June 7. 1876; and Rolf Bull, born December 17, 1883. 
The family resides at 316 North Carroll street, Madison. 

Sern Edward Anderson has always lived in Albion and is the 
son of one of its pioneers,. Amund Anderson. Amund was born in 
Norway in March, 1806. and in 1840 settled in Dane county, Wis. 
His wife. Ingeborg, was first married to Erick Johnson, with 




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BIOGRAPHICAL. 41 

whom she left Norway in 1836 and came to the United States, 
landing in New York city after a stormy voyage of thirteen weeks. 
Mr. and Mrs. Johnson lived in La Salle. 111., where Mr. Johnson 
died in 1838, leaving two children and his young wife. John, the 
oldest son, served in the First Kansas Volunteers for five years 
and went to Wyoming where he engaged in mining and ranching. 
Betsey Johnson, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Erick Johnson married 
John J. Naset of Bloomer. Mrs. Johnson married Amund Ander- 
son and came with him to Albion. Wis., where in 1840 he pur- 
chased one hundred and sixty acres of land in section 2. Settlers 
were few in the vicinity at that day but two other families came 
from Illinois with the Anderson's and located near by. They were 
devoted members of the Norwegian Lutheran church and belonged 
to the East Koshkonong church from its organization. Six chil- 
dren were born to Mr. and Mrs. Anderson : Martha is the widow of 
Thore Smithback of Christiania ; Andrew A., who farms part of the 
old homestead, married Sarah Hendrickson and after her death, 
married Agnes Johnson ; Sern E. lives at the old home. Marie 
Ingeborg is the widow of N. E. Smithback of Christiania; Martin 
is a prosperous farmer of Oakland, Wis. ; Sena is the wife of C. O. 
Tellefson of Rockdale. Sern E. was born on the farm at Albion. 
April 26. 1848, attended such schools as the district afforded at 
that time and early interested himself in the work of his father's 
farm. In March, 1874, he married M"ss Helen Matteson. who came 
from Norway in 1868 with her parents and lived at Rockdale. 
Two children blessed the marriage ; Adolph, who married Betsey 
Johnson, is a farmer and resides at the old homestead; Nordahl is 
also at home. Mrs. Anderson died in 1890. She and her husband 
always attended the East Koshkonong church. Mr. Anderson has 
never held political office but is a Republican in his political affilia- 
tions. He is secretary of the Hillside Creamery Co. 

William H. Angell is one of the sterling pioneers and most hon- 
ored and influential citizens of the village of Sun Prairie, where he 
has maintained his home for more than sixty years, having been 
prominently identified with the developed of the village and sur- 
rounding country. Colonel Angell was born in West Haven. Addi- 
son county. Vermont, on June 20, 1813, and he has ever exempli- 
fied the sturdy attributes so characteristic of the true New England 
type, while he is a representative of families founded in that sec- 
tion in the colonial era of our national history. He is a son of 
Newell and Charity (Blackman) Angell. the former of whom was 
born in Washington countv. New York, on December 20, 1879, 



42 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

while the latter was bom in the same state, on April 17, 1789, while 
her death occurred in West Haven, Vermont, on June 23, 1822. 
Newell Angell was a millwright by trade, and he came to Sun 
Prairie. Wisconsin, in 1*4(>, to take charge of the erection of a mill 
for his s<ui. William H., the subject of this sketch, passing the re- 
mainder of his life in the Badger state. He died in Vernon county, 
on March 9, 1863, and his remains rest in the cemetery at Sun 
Prairie. After the death of his first wife he married Mary Hollis 
Ransome, whd was born in Connecticut, in 1801, and who died in 
Vernon county. Wisconsin, on November 5, 1872. Newell Angell 
was always a stanch advocate of the principles and policies of the 
Democratic party, and was prominent in public affairs in Vermont 
for many years, having been a man of much intellectual power and 
mature judgment. He was a son of Augustus Angell, who served 
in the Continental line in the War of the Revolution, having en- 
listed when but fourteen years of age ; the latter's father likewise 
rendered valiant service as a patriot soldier in the great struggle 
for independence. Augustus Angell and also his son, Newell, 
were soldiers in the war of 1812. Colonel William H. Angell, who 
secured his title from able service as lieutenant colonel in the 
Vermont militia, was reared on the homestead farm of his paternal 
grandfather, in the old Green Mountain state, being identified with 
the work and management of the same until he had attained the 
age of eighteen years, while he was accorded the advantages of the 
common schools of the locality and period. Thereafter he was 
engaged in farm work and employed more or less at the carpen- 
ter's trade until 1844, when he determined to immigrate to Wis- 
consin and cast in his lot with the pioneers of that territory which 
was not admitted to the Union until about four years later, in 1848. 
lie made his way to Dane county, whose manifold attractions 
proved adequate to cause him to make permanent location here. 
He took up his residence in Sun Prairie,, being practically one of 
the founders of the village, and he forthwith identified himself 
with the interests of the locality and showed the progressive 
spirit and indomitable enterprise which have made the men of New 
England such valuable pioneers in opening up the various western 
state-. \\v erected a grist and saw mill in the embryonic village, 
'" 1847, and he has ever since been identified with the lumber 
business here, bavin- formerly conducted extensive operations in 
the manufacturing of lumber, while it may consistently be noted 
in this connection that he furnished the oak lumber for the con- 
struction of the vault in the office of the state treasurer in the old 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 43 

capitol in the city of Madison. In 1868, associated with two other 
representative citizens. Colonel Angell formulated the charter un- 
der which Sun Prairie was incorporated as a village, and he had 
the distinction of being chosen first president of said village, while 
since that time he has been called upon to serve in this capacity 
for many years, having been elected at varying intervals and hav- 
ing ever shown a lively and insistent interest in all that has con- 
cerned the welfare and material progress of the town and its peo- 
ple. Colonel Angell has an attractive residence in Sun Prairie, 
where he also owns considerable other real estate, while in the 
vicinity he has a finely improved farm of one hundred acres. He 
has been most successful in his business career, and for a number 
of years past has given considerable attention to the extending of 
financial loans on real estate security. He is liberal, generous and 
public-spirited, fair and honorable in all the relations of life and 
expecting the same attitude on the part of others, and he has the 
unqualified esteem of the entire community in which he has so 
long lived and labored and which owes so much to his interposition. 
He gave nine acres of land in the village to the fire department, the 
same to constitute a public park, the dedication of the park occur- 
ring on his birthday anniversary, June 20, 1903, and being a notable 
public event in the locality. In politics Colonel Angell has always 
been firm in his allegiance to the Democratic party, having cast 
his first presidential vote for that stanch patriot and statesman. 
General Andrew Jackson. He served as supervisor of Sun Prairie 
township for the long period of twenty-one years, and was twice 
chosen chairman of the county board of supervisors. For a num- 
ber of years he was president of the Token Creek and Sun Prairie 
Anti-Horsethief association. He was the originator of the Sun 
Prairie Cemetery association, with which he was identified for fifty- 
two years. He has been for many years a consistent and valued 
member of the local Baptist church, which he has served in the 
capacity of trustee, his wife also having been a devoted member 
of the same church. On January 16. 1844, Colonel Angell was 
united in marriage to Miss Electa L. Abernethy, who was born in 
Addison county. Vermont, in 1818, and who remained his faithful 
and cherished companion on the journey of life for more than half 
a century, the gracious association being terminated with her 
death, April 8, 1895. Of the six children of this union all died 
young except two sons. William Edwin, who was reared and edu- 
cated in Sun Prairie, was a soldier in a Wisconsin regiment in 
the Civil War. and is now associated with his father in the lumber 



44 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

business ; Darwin C, who was likewise reared in Sun Prairie, 
passed fifteen years in the west, having been engaged in the coal 
business in Kansas, but he is now associated with his father, under 
the firm name of William H. Angell & Son. 

Andrew E. Arneson is one of the most highly respected citizens 
of the village of Mt. Horeb, and while he has not been a lifelong 
resident of Dane county his residence has been so near the dividing 
l'ne that his interests have been identical with those of her citizens. 
He was born in Norway on February 25, 1840, and is the son of 
Allen and Sarah Arneson, who came to America in 1850 and lo- 
cated in the town of Blue Mounds. The father was a farmer in 
the old country and after his migration to the United States he 
followed the same occupation until his death, which event oc- 
curred in 1852. and the mother still resides on the old home place 
at the advanced age of ninety-six years. The subject of this re- 
view is one of eleven children born to these parents, seven of whom 
grew to manhood and womanhood. Mr. Arneson was permitted 
to attend school only about two or three months, but by close ap- 
plication of his talents and the exercise of his perceptive faculties 
he has overcome this handicap to a considerable degree and is a 
well-informed man. He commenced his independent career as a 
farmer when but nineteen years old at Ridgeway, Iowa county, 
Wis., where he purchased land and followed the occupation of a 
tiller of the soil until 1897. On account of ill health in the latter 
year he retired, and since that time has been a resident of Mt. 
Horeb. He was married in 18G1 to Miss Mary Anderson of Perry, 
Dane county, daughter of Halfer Anderson and wife, who settled 
in Dane county in 1854 and are both now deceased. To the sub- 
ject of this review and wife 1here have been born eleven children, 
six of whom are living: Julia married C. M. Grimstad and resides 
in Brigham township, Iowa county; Andeline married G. G. Mandt 
and resides at Stoughton, Dane county; Emma married A. F. 
Gramm and resides in Mt. Horeb; Henry remains on the home 
farm ; Sarah married T. J. Dahle and is now deceased; Ida married 
Peter Nace and resides near Mt. Horeb; and Clarence remains at 
home with his parents. While living in Iowa county Mr. Arneson 
served as town assessor one year, and as chairman of the town 
board twelve years; and since his removal to Mt. Horeb he has 
served as president of the village five years and as supervisor three 
years. He is a member of the Lutheran church, is one of the 
trustees .if the local church organization, and fraternally he is 
one of the worthy and honored members of Ren. Dickison post, 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 45 

G. A. R. The latter distinction is of course accorded him by 
reason of his service in the military service of the United States 
during the Civil War. He enlisted on February 14, 1865, in Com- 
pany A, Forty-ninth Regiment Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry, as 
a private, and served with that command until November 8, 1865, 
when he was mustered out with his regiment, by general orders 
from the war department. The regiment left the state on March 
8, 1865, and after reaching St. Louis was sent to Rolla, Mo., where 
it was engaged in guard duty during the greater part of the term 
of service. Mr. Arneson also had two brothers in the service, 
Christ Arneson. enlisted on October 19, 1861, in Company C, 
Fifteenth Regiment Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry, and d ed on 
February 10, following, of disease contracted in the service. Allen 
Arneson entered the service on September 19, 1861, as a private in 
Company G, Sixteenth Regiment Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry 
and served until June 5, 1865, when he was mustered out on ac- 
count of the cessation of hostilities, having participated with Sher- 
man in the March to the sea and the campaign of the Carolinas. 

Christ Asbjornson, a prominent retired farmer of Stoughton, 
was born near Flekkefjord, Norway, January 7, 1840, and is a son 
of Asbjorn and Isabel (Thompson) Hanson, who immigrated to 
America in 1852, making Dane county their destination. They 
passed the first winter in Dunkirk township and in the following 
spring the father purchased eighty acres of wild land in Pleasant 
Springs township. He reclaimed a portion of the tract to cultiva- 
tion and made good improvements on the property. He there con- 
tinued to reside until 1885, when he returned to Dunkirk township, 
where he passed the remainder of his life, having attained to the 
venerable age of ninety-four years. He reared a family of four 
sons, Hans C, Tom, Peter C, and Christ. Tom is now deceased. 
The subject of this review received his early educational training 
in the schools of his native land, having been twelve years of age 
at the time of the family immigration to America. He was reared 
to manhood on the old homestead farm, in Pleasant Springs town- 
ship, where he remained until 1885, when he purchased two hun- 
dred acres of land in Dunkirk township and removed to the same. 
In 1893 he bought another farm of two hundred acres, one hun- 
dred and sixty acres of the tract being in Dunkirk township and 
the remaining forty in Albion township. He still owns both farms. 
with the exception of eighty acres of the latter, which he sold. He 
continued to reside on the place first mentioned until 1901, when 
he retired and took up his residence in Stoughton, where he owns 



46 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

an attractive home, on East Main street. He has been most suc- 
cessful as a farmer, having- accumulated a handsome property and 
being one of the substantial and popular citizens of the county in 
which he has so long lived and so effectively labored. He has been 
one of the extensive tobacco-growers of the county, and his farms 
are largely devoted to this product at the present time. In politics 
Mr. Asbjornson is a stanch adherent of the Republican party, and 
he has been accorded distinctive marks of popular confidence and 
esteem. He served as supervisor of Dunkirk township for three 
years, was clerk of the school board two terms and in 1904 he was 
elected alderman of Stoughton, from the second ward, serving one 
term. Both he and his wife are members of the Norwegian 
Lutheran church in Stoughton. In 1878, Mr. Asbjornson was 
married to Miss Helen Severson, daughter of Sever Michaelson, 
one of the well known pioneers of Dane county, whither he came 
from Norway. The children of this union are three in number: 
Emma is the wife of Abram Severson, Thea is the wife of Trace 
Christehson, a prominent jeweler of Stoughton, and Andrew, the 
eldest of the three, is one of the successful farmers of the county. 

General David Atwood, journalist and politician, was born in 
Bedford, N. H.. December 15, 1815, the scion of a vigorous and 
long-lived family. The stock was good English Puritan, and the 
pioneer of the family was John Atwood, who settled at Plymouth 
in 1643. The boy David had a strain of Scotch-Irish in his blood. 
Such scant education as he was able to secure was obtained in 
winter attendance on the district school of Bedford ; summers, he 
worked on the farm. Among his boyhood friends were Horace 
Greeley and Zachariah Chandler, later United States senator from 
Michigan. When only sixteen years of age he left home and was 
apprenticed to Tredway & Atwood, printers and law-book publish- 
ers, at Hamilton, N. Y. His brother. John, was the junior mem- 
ber of the firm. During the five years of his apprenticeship he be- 
came master of the printer's craft in all its departments. In the 
years 1838 and 1839 he travelled about 10,000 miles with a horse 
and wagon through New York, Pennsylvania, Maryland, Virginia, 
Ohio and several of the western states as a law-book agent. The 
experiences of those years were a source of much pleasure to Gen- 
eral Atwood in other life, and his word-pictures of those pioneer 
days were always of remarkable interest. In 1839. when twenty- 
four years old. he joined with his brother. John, in the publication 
of the 1 familton Palladium, a weekly Whig newspaper. In the cam- 
paign of L840 lie was a vigorous supporter of General Harrison,. 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 47 

and in that of 1844, of Henry Clay. His strenuous labors through 
these years undermined his health and compelled him to with- 
draw from the Palladium. He purchased a farm near Freeport, 
111., where he met with nothing but misfortune, financially, and 
lost his savings. However, the two years spent on the farm had 
recruited his health, and he was enabled to return to his profes- 
sion. It had long been his ambition to establish a daily paper at 
some state capital, and the new territory of Wisconsin, then in 
the full tide of western immigration, strongly appealed to him. 
The village of Madison was then but a name to Colonel Atwood, 
but he resolved to go there in the full assurance that it would 
develop with the territory, soon to become a state. He reached 
Madison, October 15, 1847, and at once became connected with the 
Madison "Express" at a small salary. His duties were manifold 
and arduous, and in his own words he was "editor, reporter, com- 
positor, foreman, and all hands." He reported the last two ses- 
sions of the territorial legislature, and was in constant attendance 
as a reporter during the protracted session of the constitutional 
convention which drafted the organic law under which Wisconsin 
was admitted to the Union. In October, 1848, Colonel Atwood 
purchased the "Express," which appeared in November as the 
"Wisconsin Express" with many improvements. Only the in-i 
domitable will, courage, judgment and industry of young Atwood 
sustained the W r hig "Express," as there were two opposition 
Democratic papers published at the capital, both of which were 
supported by ample capital as well as state patronage. In June, 
1852, a consolidation was effected with a new Whig paper called 
the "Statesman," which had appeared in the spring of 1850, but 
the new enterprise failed, and out of the wreck. General Atwood 
by his own efforts founded the "Wisconsin State Journal," daily 
and weekly, whose first number appeared September 28, 1852. 
The "State Journal" was the only Whig paper at the capital until 
the organization of the Republican party in 1854, when it espoused 
the principles of that party, and has ever since been its champion. 
In 1853 he associated with himself Horace Rublee. afterwards min- 
ister to Switzerland under President Grant, and long and favor- 
ably known as the brilliant editor-in-chief of the "Milwaukee Sen- 
tinel." Mr. Rublee was succeeded by Major J. O. Culver, whose 
association with the "Journal" continued until January. 1877, after 
which General Atwood was the sole proprietor until his death. 
During his residence in New York. Mr. Atwood had been succes- 
sively adjutant, major and colonel of Xew York militia, and in 



48 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

L851, in Wisconsin, was appointed quartermaster-general of the 
state; in I80S he became major-general of the fifth division of state 
militia. In 1861 he was chosen to represent the capital district 
in the state legislature, and rendered active and efficient service 
in the work of raising and fitting troops for the front. Lincoln ap- 
pointed him internal revenue assessor on the creation of that office 
in 1862, but he was removed from office by President Johnson in 
lsiiii for "offensive partisanship," the first Wisconsin officer thus 
sentenced. He was mayor of Madison 1868-9, and in the latter 
year received a flattering vote in the Republican convention for the 
nomination of governor. Hon. B. F. Hopkins, who represented 
the capital district in congress, died in January, 1870, and General 
Atwood was elected as his successor in the 40th congress, tak- 
ing his seat February 23. He was an industrious and eminently 
useful representative, serving on the important Pacific railroad 
committee, and being instrumental in the passage of some of the 
important bills of the session. He declined re-election. From 
1872 until the close of the Centennial in 1876, he served as com- 
missioner from Wisconsin to the great international exposition, 
and was for a time president of the full body which embraced 
names of national reputation. In addition to the offices above 
mentioned. General Atwood served in various other capacities. He 
was a justice of the peace in 1849; a village trustee in 1854; for 
thirteen years treasurer of the State Agricultural Society, and 
twenty-four years a director; for sixteen years a member of and 
president of the board of trustees of the State Hospital for the in- 
sane ; for many years a member of the Madison school board, and 
for a time its president ; long a trustee and member of the executive 
committee, for five years the secretary, and for a long series of years 
the president of the Madison Mutual Insurance Company ; for a long 
time the president of the Madison Gas Light and Coke Company ; a 
director in several railroad enterprises; after 1849, one of the 
most active and useful members of the State Historical Society, 
and for eight years prior to 1876, a member of the Republican 
national committee. In 1849 he married at Potosi, Wis., Mary 
Sweeney, formerly of Canton, Ohio. There were born to them 
two sons and two daughters, the eldest of them Charles David, who 
was vice-consul at Liverpool from 1872-76, and later an able as- 
sociate editor of the Wisconsin State Journal; in 1874 he married 
Elizabeth, daughter of Dr. A. J. Ward, one of the leading phy- 
sicians of Madison; he died in 1878 at the beginning of a brilliant 
career; his son David is the fourth generation of David Atwoods. 



BIOGRAPHICAL. - ~M Q « ^A 49 

Harry F. and Alary L. still reside in Madison at the old homestead 
on Monona avenue ; Elizabeth G. resides in Milwaukee, having 
married Edward P. Vilas, a distinguished lawyer, the brother of 
ex-Senator Wm. F. Vilas. In person General Atwood was of me- 
dium size, with dark blue, expressive eyes, and a large shapely 
head, set off in after years by a flowing white beard and hair. His 
features w r ere fine and regular, and his face beamed with a kindly 
expression. He had a remarkably clear, analytical mind, a very 
retentive memory, was a charming conversationalist, and a politi- 
cal journal'st of rare power. He was a politician of the best type, 
and never permitted partisan rancor to interfere with his kindly 
intercourse with men of every political creed. He was a repre- 
sentative of the highest type of western pioneers, and under 
his hospitable roof, for more than forty years, were entertained 
a long line of politicians, journalists, statesmen, and scholars, 
representing many sections and countries. In his latter years, 
with his snow-white hair and long, flowing beard, he bore a strik- 
ing resemblance to the portraits of the poet Bryant. His death 
created a void hard to fill. His editorial associates felt the loss of 
an inspiriting presence, the community at large that of a public 
spirited citizen, and his family lost a beloved and devoted father 
and husband. His death occurred December 11, 1889, after an ill- 
ness of brief duration, and the end came calmly and peacefully. 

Aslak B. Auby, of Norwegian origin,, is one of the successful 
young farmers of Pleasant Springs. Bjorn and Margaret (Olson) 
Auby, his parents, came to America from Telemarken, Norway, 
where they spent their youth and early married life. In 1860, they 
came over in a sailing vessel and landed at Quebec after a voyage 
of ten weeks. Thence they proceeded to Milwaukee and after a 
short stay decided to locate near Stoughton, where they rented a 
farm in section 3-4. After working this land for six years they 
were able to purchase eighty acres of farm land, which they im- 
proved and made their permanent home. Mrs. Bjorn Auby died 
in 1876 and her husband survived her until 1901. The family, con- 
sisting of six children, of whom four are living, has always been 
prominent in the Western Lutheran church, of which the parents 
were members. The children were educated in the district schools. 
Betsey, the oldest daughter, and Henry, the youngest son, died ; 
Annie, the second daughter, is the wife of L. L. Brote, a farmer of 
Pleasant Springs ; Ole operates a farm in Dunkirk and Lars is also 
a farmer. Aslak B. was born at Pleasant Springs February 28, 
1869, and worked on the home farm until he was twenty-one years 
4 — :ii 



50 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

of age. He then settled on the farm where he now lives and 
worked it three years, lie farmed O. K. Roe's farm for three 
years and finally purchased the first tract of eighty acres, com- 
monly called the Jacobson place. Under his management the farm 
has been greatly improved and increased in value. Mr. Auby is 
a Republican in his political affiliations and was a member of the 
town hoard for two years and school treasurer for three years. 
September 24, 1890. he married Miss Mary Jacobson, daughter of 
Jacob and Mary Jacobson, also natives of Norway, who came to 
America in 1850. Mr. and Mrs. Auby have had four children;; 
John. Ruby, and Ren living, and Mildred, who died in infancy. 

John H. Auby, a farmer ,in the town of Deerfield, was born No- 
vember 12. 1857, in the neighborhood where he now lives. His 
grandparents. Lars and Catherine (Larson) Auby, were both born 
in Norway, the former in 1778 and the latter in 1780. They were 
among the pioneers of Illinois, but later came to Dane county and 
there passed the rest of their lives. Hans Auby, the father of the 
subject of this sketch, was born in Norway, July 4, 1824, and the 
mother, whose maiden name was Helga Halverson, was born 
there on August 12, 1826. They were married December 13, 1847,. 
and to them were born the following children: Helen Catherine, 
born August 20, 1848, married Halvor A. Nestestu and is now 
living a widow at Deerfield; Louis, born December 9, 1850, married 
Cornetia Tarson, and lives in South Dakota ; Carl Henry, born 
March 11. 1853, married Catherine Fairweather, and lives at 
Galena. 111. ; Benjamin O., born August 2, 1855, married Henrietta 
Melang and resides in the village of Deerfield; John H., the subject 
<>t this sketch; Lizzie B., born April 26, 1860, now the wife of 
John Ollis. an attorney of Madison; Henrietta Christiana, born 
Inly 18. 1862. married Andrew Husebo, and now lives at Sioux 
Falls. S. D. ; Marion Christene, born April 4, 1866, and died Feb- 
ruary in. 1892. The father of these children came to America 
July 4, 1843, and made his way directly to Wisconsin. He worked 
as a farm hand for a year near Milwaukee, and then went to 
Illinois, where Ik- was employed in the lead mines for two years. 
About three years later he came to Dane county with his parents,. 
who boughl one hundred and sixty acres of land, on which the sub- 
ject of this sketch now lives. Here Hans Auby died on December 
9, L895, and his widow now lives with her daughter in Deerfield. 
John II. Auby received a common school education in the town of 
Deerfield and at the age of twenty-five years went to Clark county. 
S. I )., where hi' entered three hundred and twenty acres of land 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 51 

under the homestead law, and farmed there for two years. He 
then sold his land and returned to Dane county. For three years 
he worked his father's farm on the shares, and after his death 
bought out the other heirs and continues to reside on the old home- 
stead. He is a Democrat in his political affiliations and has been 
elected a member of the town board three times, now serving his 
second term as chairman of the board. On March 20, 1889, he was 
united in marriage to Miss Jennie, daughter of James and Mary 
(Nellen) Copland,, of the town of Medina. Her father came to 
Wisconsin at an early date and settled in the town of Medina, 
where he died in May, 1905, the mother still lives on the old home- 
stead. Mr. and Mrs. Auby have four children : Arthur H., born 
June 21, 1891 ; Leonard James, born June 18, 1893 ; Gladys Evelyn, 
born August 20, 1897; and Lawrence C, born December 20, 1901. 
Stephen C. Baas has long been a well-known citizen of Madison. 
For many years he owned a boat livery on Lake Monona and is an 
authority among fisherman and lovers of water sports. From boy- 
hood he learned to handle boats and to understand the vagaries of 
inland seas, for his father and uncles were fishermen and exporters 
of fish in Milwaukee. Henry Baas, father of Stephen, came to 
Milwaukee from Pomerania, with his parents when he was a young 
lad. With his brothers, Henry, Chris, and Will, he ran fishing 
smacks near Milwaukee and cured fish for Milwaukee and Chicago 
markets. Henry married Miss Sophia Siggelko, a native of Meck- 
lenburg-Schwerin. In 1863 they came to Madsion and opened a 
grocery store on Williamson street. Mr. Baas enhsted in the 
Ninth Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry and was sent to Little Rock,. 
Ark., where he suffered from illness produced by the climate. In 
1865 he returned to the store which he managed until his death in 
1869. His widow still resides in Madison, eighty-six years of age. 
Of the six children, three are living. The oldest son, William, 
died in 1896. He was born in Milwaukee in 1853, married M'ss 
Carrie Showers and left one son, Arthur, who is a book-keeper 
with the Marshall Field Co. in Chicago. For many years William 
Baas was proprietor of the Madison Hotel. Stephen C. is the sec- 
ond son ; Amelia, the oldest daughter lives with her mother in 
Madison ; Lucy is also at home ; Minnie and Emma died in in- 
fancy. Stephen C. was born in Milwaukee, Jan. 3, 1855, attended 
both German and English schools and also the Northwestern Busi- 
ness College at Madison. He engaged in the shoe business for 
some years but his tastes led him to seek an out-of-door life and 
until 1905, when he sold his business, his boat-landing was a Mecca 



52 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

for fisherman. May 14, 1879, he married Miss Emily F. Mayer.. 
daughter of Casper .Mayer and Elizabeth (Steinle) Mayer. Mrs. 
Mayer was a native of Baden and Mr. Mayer was also born in Ger- 
many. They came to Madison in 1853 and Mr. Mayer re- 
sided in the city until his death in 1884. Mr. Mayer's 
oldest son. Caspar A., lives in Madison. Anna is the wife of Will- 
iam Vallender. Theresa M. is Mrs. Peter Hoven of New Haven, 
Conn. Emily F. is Mrs. Bass. Bertha M. is the wife of George 
Breitenbach of Madison. Helen L. is Mrs. Harry Hunt of Madi- 
son. Mrs. Baas has marked musical ability which has been inher- 
ited by her one son, Alexius H., who is one of the most popular 
singers of Madison. Alexius was born May 18, 1885, was gradu- 
ated from the Madison high school, and from the University of 
Wisconsin with the class of 1906. When he was a little lad he 
began to sing in the choir of St. Raphael's church and has been a 
member of that choir ever since. He also plays the pipe-organ 
and piano but is best known as a singer. Madison people always 
regard it a great treat to hear his wonderful voice and he is well- 
known in many other cities. He expects to start for Berlin soon 
where he will take an advanced course in music and will remain 
abroad in these pursuits for perhaps a couple of years. 

Ulysses S. Baer, first assistant dairy and food commissioner and 
dairy expert of the state of Wisconsin, secretary of the state cheese 
makers' association (the largest organization of its kind in the 
world), vice president of the Wisconsin cheese and butter educa- 
tional scor'ng contest association, and associate editor of the 
Cheese and Dairy Journal and Creamery Reporter, was born at 
Ithaca, Richland county, Wis., Aug. 21, 1873. His parents are 
1). \Y. and Malinda (Daniels) Baer, the former a native of Ohio, 
the latter of New York state. Both came to Wisconsin when 
children, the Baer family settling in Sank county and the Daniels 
fam'ly in Marquette county. For several years Mr. and Mrs. 
I). \\ . I'.aer have made their home at Hartford, Washington county. 
Wis., where D. YY. Baer is a hardware merchant, machinist and 
contractor. U. S. Baer is the oldest of their five children, the 
others being Melvin (deceased) ; Lillie, now Mrs. J. K. Powell of 
(Jtica, X. Y. ; Daisy, proprietor of a dress-mak'hg establishment 
in Milwaukee, and Edna, a student in the University of Wisconsin. 
I'. S. I'.aer. the subject of this sketch, embarked in the dairy busi- 
ness in Richland county in the year 1887, entering the dairy de- 
partment of the University of Wisconsin in the winter of 1891. 
In 1892 he received a graduating certificate from that institution 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 53 

and the same year was appointed to the position of assistant in- 
structor in dairying at the Wisconsin dairy school, serving the 
school in that capacity during the winter months only. During 
the summer months of those years he was personally engaged in 
the manufacture of both butter and cheese in Richland and Juneau 
counties. In the spring of 1893 he had charge of the instructional 
work in dairying, given in the "short courses" at the Minnesota 
experiment station, St. Anthony Park, Minn. In the spring of 1895 
he was called to the Pacific coast to take charge of work of the 
same nature at the Washington state agricultural college and 
school of science, located at Pullman, Wash. Early in the season 
of 1895 he was employed by the Wisconsin state dairymen's asso- 
ciation as its expert traveling cheese-instructor, which position he 
held until October, 1899, when he resigned to accept the appoint- 
ment as chef instructor in cheese-making at the Wisconsin experi- 
ment station, which position he gave up to accept an appointment 
by Gov. Robert M. La Follette, as first assistant dairy and food 
commissioner and dairy expert in 1903. Mr. Baer's special fitness 
for the position was long recognized, and since h's incumbency of 
the office he has filled every requirement. Fraternally he belongs 
to the Knights of Pythias and to the Woodmen of the World. 
Mr. Baer is unmarried and makes his home at 450-452 West Gil- 
man street, Madison, Wis. The dairy press of the entire country 
unanimously said of Mr. Baer at the time of his appointment: 
"By ability, technical training, wide and varied experience, Mr. 
Baer is pre-eminently qualified to perform in a highly efficient a"nd 
satisfactory manner the duties of the position. He is widely known 
among the alumni of the dairy and agricultural college of the Uni- 
versity of Wisconsin, among the membership of the Wisconsin 
dairymen's, cheese makers' and butter makers' associations, and 
by dairymen generally throughout the state and country at large, 
among whom there was a strong sentiment favor'ng his last ap- 
pointment to a public office of trust." 

William R. Bagley, lawyer, was born at Charles City, Iowa, on 
April 2, 1860. After completing his literary education he studied 
law and was admitted to the bar in his native state, in 1883, re- 
moving to Madison, Wis., in the same year, and he has practiced 
his profession in the capital city ever since. His fam'ly consists 
of himself, wife, and four children. 

Nelson R. Bailey, retired farmer of Madison, Avas born in Essex 
county, N. Y., August 2. 1835. His parents, Samuel and Almira 
(B'sby) Bailey, were both born in the same county, there grew to 



54 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

maturity, and after their marriage came to Wisconsin, settling in 
what is known as the "Bailey neighborhood." near Sun Prairie, in 
1846. Here Samuel Bailey bought three hundred and forty acres 
of unimproved land, which he opened to cultivation and passed the 
remainder of his life on the farm. He was one of the pioneers of 
the Republican party and held a number of offices during his life- 
time. He and his wife were members of the Methodist Episcopal 
church. Four of their children are still living. John is a physi- 
cian at Sioux City, la.; Nelson R. is the subject of this sketch; 
Eugene R. is a retired farmer at Selma, Kan. ; and Martha is the 
wife of Edgar Cobb, residing at Colby, Wis. Nelson R. Bailey 
lived at home with his parents until his marriage to Miss 
Amanda R., daughter of Richard F. and Jane (Young) Cameron, 
in November, 1863. She was born in Chautauqua county, N. Y., 
her parents being nat'ves of the "Empire State." the father of 
Morgan and the mother of Saratoga county. They came to Wis- 
consin in 1846. Their children were Amanda R., now Mrs. Bailey; 
J. W., a physician and dentist at Salina, Kan. ; Helen F., wife of 
W. E. Bailey, and F. Y., who died in July, 1904. In August, 1864, 
Mr. Bailey enlisted as a private in Company M, First Wisconsin 
Heavy Artillery, and served until June, 1865, his regiment during 
that time being stationed at Washington, D. C, on guard duty- 
While in the service he filled the position of clerk to the captain of 
his company. He was educated in the public schools and taught 
two terms. Until April, 1902, he continued to live on the old home- 
stead. He then sold all the farm except fifty acres, retired from 
active pursuits and took up his residence in Madison. Politically 
he is a Republican, and in religious matters is a member of the 
Methodist Episcopal church. He has held several local offices and 
takes a deep interest in all questions relating to the public weal. 
Mr. and Mrs. Bailey have had four children. Thurman C. died at 
the age of nine months, and Randolph A. died at the age of five 
years. Wallace is a dentist at Cadott, Wis. He married Antonia 
Rosenberg and has one son, Thurman. Ada B. is the wife of Clar- 
ence L. Kocher of Madison, and has one son, Russell B. 

Edward T. Baillie is one or the representative exponents of the re- 
tail mercantile interests of the city of Madison, being junior mem- 
ber of the firm of Schmedeman & Baillie, merchant tailors and deal- 
ers in clothing and men's furnishing goods. Mr. Baillie has the dis- 
tinction of being a native of the famed old city of Edinburgh, Scot- 
land, where he was born April 19. 1866, being a son of Peter and 
Catherine (Tapp) Baillie, both of whom were likewise born in the 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 55 

land of hills and heather. In his native land Peter Baillie fol- 
lowed the carpenter's trade for many years, becoming a successful 
contractor, and there he continued to reside until his death, his 
widow still maintaining her home in Scotland. The subject of this 
sketch and one of his sisters are the only representatives of the fam- 
ily in America, his two sisters and one brother being still resident 
of Scotland. Mr. Baillie was reared to maturity in his native land, 
receiving the advantages of the excellent schools of Edinburgh. 
On his twenty-second birthday he severed the home ties and set 
forth to establish a home in America. He landed in Philadelphia, 
whence he came direct to Madison. Here he secured a position as 
clerk in the grocery establishment of Alexander Findlay, at the cor- 
ner of King and Doty streets, remaining thus engaged for a period 
of four years, at the expiration of which he became night mailing 
clerk in the postoffice, retaining this incumbency about two years, 
then becoming bookkeeper in the dry-goods establishment of R. B. 
Ogilvie, who was then one of the leading merchants of the capital 
city. His next position was that of clerk in the clothing and mer- 
chant-ta'loring establishment of the firm of Grinde & Schmedeman, 
and he continued thus engaged until the dissolution of the firm, 
when he entered into partnership with Mr. Schmedeman. February 
18, 1904, since which time they have continued the enterprise under 
the firm name of Schmedeman & Baillie, the senior member being 
Albert G. Schmedeman. Their finely appointed establishment is 
located at 25 East Main street and they control a representative pat- 
ronage, catering to the discriminating trade of the city, the univer- 
sity and the territory normally tributary to the cap tal city. Mr. 
Baillie gives his support to the Republican party and both he and his 
wife are communicants of the Catholic church. He is affiliated with 
the Knights of Columbus, the Modern Woodmen and the Independ- 
ent Order of Foresters, and he enjoys marked popularity in both 
business and social circles. July 7, 1892, Mr. Baillie was united in 
marriage to Miss Julia O. O'Dea, who was born and reared in Mad- 
ison, being a son of Patrick and Ellen O'Dea, the former of whom 
is deceased and the latter of whom still resides in Madison. Mr. 
and Mrs. Baillie have three children. — Joseph, Helen and Edward. 
Lewis Baker, of Waunakee, is a native of Prince Edward's Island, 
born February 25, 1827. His father, Robert Baker, was born in 
Bait' more, Md., in 1778 and his mother in Dover, Kent county. Eng., 
in 1785. Mr. Baker's paternal grandparents were Quakers, and on 
account of religious persecution, left Baltimore during the Revolu- 
tionary 'War. They found a refuge in Prince Edward's Island, 



56 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

where they reared their family ; there his father married, spent most 
of his life and d : .ed in 1864; his wife, Ann (Moice) Baker died in 
1864. In 1812, Robert Baker went to Baltimore, and under an 
injunction was detained three years. During this time he found 
employment with his uncle in a shoe factory. He and his wife had 
eight children, of whom four are living. Mr. Baker's maternal 
grandparents were Episcopalians. The subject of this sketch re- 
ceived his education in the common schools of Prince Edward's 
Island. In 1852 he went to Maine and engaged in the lumber busi- 
ness. 'Three years later he came to Madison and located at Pheas- 
ant Branch, where he remained one year and then went to Wood 
county, where he again engaged in the lumber business. In 1860 
he came to what is now Waunakee and settled on eighty acres of 
land. The village of Waunakee, named by Simeon Mills of Madi- 
son, was in 1871 platted by Mr. Baker and Mr. George F'sh and that 
part north of Main street was located on Mr. Baker's land. He 
has increased his acreage to four hundred and has made all the im- 
provements upon his farm. For the past ten years his son, Theodore 
W r , has been associated with him in farming and the breeding of 
Aberdeen Angus cattle ; he has also for twenty-five years been a 
breeder of road and carriage horses. While Mr. Baker in an active 
Republican, he is not an aspirant to office, but has served on both 
the school and village boards. He is liberal in his religious views. 
He was married February 14, 1854. to Mrs. Sophia Taylor, born in 
I'rince Edward's Island n 1825, of parents who were resident there. 
Their children are Emeline, wife or R. B. Parker, of Cleveland, 
Ohio; Lilly, wife of W. R. Rudd, of St Paul, (deceased, 1899); 
I lattie,. died at age of five years; Theodore W., farmer and in part- 
nership with his father; Lewis R., a veterinary surgeon and em- 
ployed by the government; resides at Kansas city, Kansas. Mrs. 
Baker, wife of the subject of this sketch, died June 13, 1900. 

Loren Baker is a prominent farmer and stock-raiser of the town 
of Medina and came to Dane county with his parents, Gaylord and 
Adeline (Sperry) P>aker, when he was ten years of age. Gaylord 
Baker was born in Watertown, Jefferson county, N. Y. in 1821. the 
son of Stephen and Margaret (Lemon) Baker; and his wife was 
born in ( >hio, < >ctober 18, 1825. Mr. Gaylord Baker was educated 
in Jefferson county, X. Y. and came to Jefferson county, Wis., in 
1845 and to Medina in 1864. He obtained a farm of one hundred 
and three acres in Medina township and there his wife still lives. 
Mr. Baker died in 1902. Six children were born to them, of whom 
but four are living. Mr. and Mrs. Baker attended the Universalist 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 57 

church. Loren Baker was born in Watertown, Jefferson county. 
"Wis., December 13, 1854, attended the common schools in Dane 
county and the Marshall Academy and assisted his father in the 
work of the farm, which is now his home. He has a fine farm of 
one hundred and fifty acres with well-kept buildings and modern 
improvements. He makes a specialty of fine coach-horses and Dur- 
ham cattle and carries on a general farming business. Mr. Baker 
is a Republican, as was his father, but is not active in politics al- 
though interested in the welfare of the community. In 1888, he 
married Miss Alice Wood, who was born in the town of York, Dane 
county. Wis., the daughter of G. D. W T ood and Lovina (Van Dass- 
beck) W T ood, who came to Dane county from New York state. 
Mrs. Wood died in 1881 and Mr. W'ood now res'des in Portage. 
Mr. and Mrs. Baker have four children ; Truman, Lewis, Melvina 
and Hattie. The family received their education in the home 
schools and attend the Baptist church. Mr. Baker is a member of 
the local branc'i of the Modern Woodmen. 

Lloyd M. Baldwin, of Belleville, is the son of Julius and Clara 
(McLaughlin) Baldwin ; the former came to Wisconsin with his pa- 
rents about fifty years ago ; they came from Canada, settled in Dane 
county and engaged in farming. Mr. Julius Baldwin still owns 
the old homestead in Oregon township where his father settled, 
although he gave up the active management of it a few years since 
and made his home in the village of Brooklyn. Mrs. Clara 
(McLaughlin) Baldwin is a native of Ohio, daughter of W. W. 
McLaughlin, who came from Ohio to Wisconsin nearly seventy 
years ago, when his daughter was a baby. He settled in the town 
of Brooklyn. Green county, and there spent his life. He was one 
of the very earliest of the pioneers who faced the hardships inci- 
1 dent to life in an unbroken forest wilderness, far from a base of 
supplies, and with only the most rudimentary means of communi- 
cation and transportation. The difficulties of the situation were 
increased for him by the death of his wife which occurred before he 
left Oho for what was then the new northwest. He was a man who 
was actively interested in public affairs and was frequently called 
upon to fill local offices. Mr. L. M. Baldwin is one of a family of 
seven children, all living except one ; they are Charles, of Madison ; 
Clinton, of Brooklyn ; Lloyd M.. the subject of this sketch ; Mimmie 
married P. A. Haynes, of Brooklyn ; Myra, (deceased) ; Boyd, on 
the old homestead in Oregon; Daisy, at home in Brooklyn. Mr. 
L. M. Baldwin passed his boyhood on the farm and amid the usual 
surroundings., advantages and disadvantages of rural life : when he 



58 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

was twenty-one he began life for himself as a clerk in Gray's gen- 
eral store of Brooklyn. After four years of commercial life he 
engaged in farming for two years and then returned to his former 
employment and position, where he remained three years longer; 
he again took up farming as an occupation, this time go'ng west 
and setting in Spink county, S. D. which was his home for eight 
years, at the end of which he returned to Brooklyn and stayed one 
year before engaging in his present business as a meat dealer and 
butcher in Belleville. There he has a finely equipped market, and 
since beginning his enterprise in 1902 has built up a flourishing 
trade, not only in the village, but, by means of his wagon, he sup- 
plies a large demand among the rural population. He was married, 
first, to Miss May L. Gray, of Oregon, who was born in the town of 
Brooklyn, Green county. She died in October, 1891. After her 
death, Mr. Baldwin married Mrs. Rosa Upton, a native of Dane 
county. They have one child, Harold Lloyd, aged two years. 
Mr. Baldwin is a member of the M. W. A. and Loyal Americans. 

George Baltes, of Dane, is a man whose varied interests have 
made him a prominent factor in the life of his community from his 
majority to the present time. He comes of German ancestry. 
His parental grandfather, George Baltes. and his wife were both 
natives of Germany ; the former, born in 1804, came to Roxbury 
township, Dane county, in 1847. There he became the owner of a 
large farm of two hundred acres, where he resided unt'l his death 
in 1882, and where his wife continued to make her home up to the 
time of her death. The maternal grandparents came to Springfield 
township in 184G. where both died of the cholera in 1853. Peter 
Baltes, father of George Baltes, the subject of this sketch, was born 
in Germany in 1840, and came to this country with his parents in 
1847. He was educated in the common school of Roxbury, and 
followed the occupation of both the farmer and the blacksmith. He 
died in 1896, and his wife, Theresa Dahnn, born in Pennsylvania 
in 1845, (now Mrs. Taylor of Waunakee), and six of his nine child- 
ren survive him. George Baltes was born May 17, 1867, in the town 
<>f Springfield, Dane county, and was educated in the public school 
at Springfield Corners. He began his independent life as a farmer, 
and st'll, although his active interests are directed into other lines, 
owns a farm of two hunded and twenty acres in Columbia county. 
He followed at different times the occupation of cream-gatherer, — 
a pursuit developed by the exigencies peculiar to a dairy country, — 
and that of a saloon-keeper, and for twenty years operated a thresh- 
ing-mach'ne. At the present time he divides his attention between 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 59 

the duties of a hotel-keeper and those of a manufacturer of lumber. 
Mr. Baltes political affiliations are with the Democratic party, and 
he has served the public in the capacity of treasurer of Spr'ngfield 
township. He and his family are members of St. Martin's Catholic 
church. His marriage occurred October 4, 1886, in Springfield, 
Dane county, to Miss Ationie Raemisch, daughter of Frank 
and Louise (Ruhl.) Raemisch both natives of Germany and among 
the pioneers of Mazomanie township, Dane county. Mrs. Baltes 
mother died in Sauk county, in 1905, but her father is still living 
and resides in Baraboo. Mr. and Mrs. Baltes have two children, 
Peter and Henry. 

Hon. Charles Valdo Bardeen (deceased), a res' dent of Madison 
from his appointment to the supreme bench, February, 1898, until 
his death, March 20. 1903, was born in Brookfield, Madison county, 
N. Y., September 23, 1850. Five years later his parents, Rasselas 
and Maria (Palmer) Bardeen removed to Wisconsin, locating in 
Dane county, where his boyhood was spent on a farm near the vil- 
lage of Albion, and his early education was obtained at the district 
schools. The vicinity of Albion Academy offered the opportunity 
for the beginning of his higher education and he was graduated 
from that institution in 1870. Following this he entered the Uni- 
versity of Wisconsin but was obliged to discontinue his studies on 
account of failing eyesight, and he went to Colorado where he re- 
mained for two years, being associated while there with Alva 
Adams, afterward governor of Colorado. Upon his return to Mad- 
ison he entered the law department of the university from which 
he was graduated in 1875 ; he was admitted to practice in the courts 
of Wisconsin and the United States in June of the same year. His 
first partner was Roger C. Spooner, youngest brother of Senator 
John C. Spooner, and they opened their office at Wausau. Carl H. 
Mueller afterward joined the firm and after the retirement of Mr. 
Spooner, the partnership was continued until 1877 as Mueller & 
Bardeen. Following this a partnership was formed with Gen. 
John A. Kellogg, which lasted until the death of Gen. Kellogg in 
1882. In 1883 Judge Bardeen became associated with W. H. Myl- 
rea, afterward attorney general, and in 1885 Judge Louis Marchetti 
was added -to the firm and this partnership was maintained until 
April, 1891, when Mr. Bardeen was elected to the posit'on of judge 
of the sixteenth judicial circuit; in 1897 he was reelected without 
opposition, having the support of the entire bar of the circuit for 
the office. In February, 1898, Governor Scofield appointed Judge 
Bardeen to a vacancy in the supreme court, occasioned by the death 



GU HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

of Hon. A. W. Newman, and in April following he was, without 
opposition, elected to fill the remainder of the term. He was a mem- 
ber of the society of Elks, and of the Masonic order, belonging in 
the latter organization to the Forest lodge, No. 130; Wausau chap- 
ter, R. A. M. No. 51 ; St. Omar commandery, K. T. No. 19, and was 
elected in 1892 grand high priest, R. A. M., of Wisconsin. He was 
married June 17, 1876, at Albion, Wis., to Miss Frances H. Mdler, 
a classmate of Albion Academy. His wife and three children, 
Eleanor (Mrs. Maurice Johnson), Charles V., Jr., and Florence, 
survive him. The first-born, Bessie, died in infancy. Two broth- 
ers. Alden R. and Henry L., reside in Wausau, one, Claire B., in 
Milwaukee, and one brother, Frank, and a sister, Mrs. Arthur Yale, 
in Colorado Springs, where she is a practicing physician. These 
are the few fundimental facts in connection with the life of a man 
whose untimely death, in his very prime and in the midst of a most 
successful career, called forth from the bench, the bar and the press 
of the state such expressions of sorrow and appreciation as are ac- 
corded to few men n public life. From the superabundance of ma- 
terial thus supplied it seems difficult to select the fitting expres- 
sion in which the essence of a man's life and influence may be con- 
densed, and yet from these many sources, — from public associates 
and pr'vate friends, from official documents and political oppo- 
nents, from fraternal and society records, from the relations of the 
intimate family life, — the inferences drawn have a singular unanimi- 
ty. They agree upon his native ability, — the inheritance of a sturdy 
New England ancestry, — which built the successful achievements 
of his later life upon the strong foundation of that personal endeavor 
which lim'ted circumstances necessitated. By sheer force of char- 
acter, he made his way to the front. They agree in their estimate 
of him as a student; while disclaiming genius, as that term is too 
frequently applied, he is credited with the genius which is the pow- 
er of concentrated application. A "hard worker," a "close student," 
a "painstaking student," are terms constantly applied to him. As 
an attorney the emphasis of his associates is placed upon his thor- 
ough equipment, his accuracy, his clear-headed, fair-minded hon- 
esty, his candor and his fearlessness, — some of which qualities any 
successful attorney must possess, but which are seldom found in 
such measure and completeness were exhibited in the character of 
Judge Bardeen. In his official capacity both in the e'reuit and su- 
preme court, his judicial temperament was fully recognized and h's 
opinions were characterized by a clarity, logical sequence, and con- 
scientiousness that well merited the opinion that a "few more years 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 61 

on the supreme bench would have raised him to an equality with 
the greatest jurists that Wisconsin ever produced, as even at fifty- 
two he was little below that mark". His work as a lawyer was not 
marked by orator'cal flights and yet he was a most convincing 
speaker, and as a judge his instructions to a jury were models of 
legal diction, clearness and simplicity. And yet it is, perhaps as a 
man, as a fr'end, as a citizen, that his life appeals most strongly for 
an enduring recognition. The qualifies which distinguished him in 
his professional 1 fe were even more in evidence in his association 
with his personal friends ; and while of a somewhat retiring dispo- 
sition, his genial temper, kindliness of heart and loyalty, united 
to a distinguished presence and pleasing personality, gave him a 
place peculiarly his own in the esteem of h's wide circle of intimate 
friends, as well as in the still wider circle of acquaintances. Per- 
haps out of all the tributes to his memory which the death of Judge 
Bardeen called forth there is no more just or appreciative one than 
that expressed by Rev. F. A. Gilmore, from which a few phrases 
may be culled ; "His life was normal. There are no gaps in it. . . 
All that he became was already foreshadowed in his youth. . . 
He was an honest, laborious, k'nd-hearted man; simple, direct, 
affable ; an able lawyer and an upright, conscientious judge. His life 
is an open book wherein the youth may read how the highest posi- 
tions are open to any man who adds to talent, — industry and hon- 
esty. He ornamented a profession which offers few prizes to mere 
genius unaccompanied by application. . . He united a broad 
grasp of legal principles, gained by labor and research, with ac- 
curacy and fidelity in investigation. . . With all his gifts and 
strength of character he had a charming and direct simplicity of 
manner and speech. He was enamored of truth, right and good- 
ness ; he loved these deeply. Truth and right were for him the 
attributes of God. He trusted in God with a large and beautiful 
faith. . . I know of no severer test of a man's life than the 
way he faces death. He stood this last supreme test so well and 
bravely that in this he was perfect." 

One of Judge Bardeen's strong characteristics was the great inter- 
est he took in young attorneys just starting out on their careers — 
the counsel he gave them, the aid and encouragement he extended 
them — was a part of the man, and many are the now well-estab- 
lished attorneys who look back upon his kindness to them. 

Samuel J. Barry, (deceased), was a prominent farmer of Verona ; 
he was born at Wa'ddington, St. Lawrence county, X. Y., March 
16, 1834, a son of Samuel Barry, of Tipperary, Ireland. H's father 



62 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

died when he was two years old and his mother ten years later. 
There were five children in the family, three boys and two girls. 
Mr. Barry was reared and educated in his native place, and in 1852, 
at the age of eighteen, he came to Madison; he followed various, 
occupations for a while and in 1856, began farming for himself. 
He married Mary Jane Welch, by whom he had two children, Mrs.. 
Patrick Burns, of Fitchburg, and Mary, who married Thos. Lucas,, 
of Madison. After the death orf his wife, he married, April 30, 1872, 
Hannah, daughter of James Sullivan, — mentioned elsewhere, — 
by whom he had three children, Lillie Bertha, died, aged seven ;. 
Charles J. ; George F. Mr. Barry came to Verona in 1871, and en- 
gaged in farming there until his death, February 12, 1905. His 
wife and two sons survive him and operate the farm of two hundred 
and forty acres for general farming and stock raising. In 1862 Mr. 
Barry enlisted in Company B, Eleventh Wisconsin Infantry; after 
serving three years he re-enlisted as a veteran volunteer ; he was 
in the army of the west, escaped injury during his four years of ser- 
vice, and returned after receiving his honorable discharge. He- 
was a member of the G. A. R., an active Democrat, and a number 
of times the holder of local and town offices. He and his family 
are members of the Catholic church of Madison. George F., sec- 
ond son of Samuel J. Barry, and grandson of James Sullivan, of 
whom mention is made elsewhere, married Miss Frances Stack of 
Verona, and resides on the old homestead with his mother and 
brother. 

John H. Barsness, retired, of the village of Black Earth, was born 
at Barsness, Saagen, Norway, on April 4, 1836. His parents were 
Herman Johnson and Christina (Peters) Barsness, natives of Nor- 
way, where the father was born in 1807 and the mother in 1800. 
The father was a brewer by trade. In 1856 he started for America 
with his family. The trip was made in a sailing vessel and it was. 
more than five weeks before he arrived in Quebec, Canada. From 
'Quebec he traveled to Milwaukee, thence to Black Earth where he 
purchased eighty acres of wild land. After some years spent in 
improving and clearing the place the father pulled up stakes and" 
went to Polk county, Minn. The mother died November 30, 1881,. 
and the father followed on April 14, 1887. There were five chil- 
dren in the family, of whom John H., the subject of this sketch,, 
was the oldest; Peter, (died in 1866); Inger, Martha and' 
Inga. The family were all members of the Lutheran church. John 
H. Barsness attended the public schools of Norway and the district 
schools of this county. In L858 he started out on life's journey.. 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 63 

He hired out to the farmers of the vicinity for a few years and in 
September, 1864, enlisted in Company G, Sixteenth Wisconsin Infan- 
try. The regiment saw service with the Army of the West and 
later was with Sherman on his march to the sea. Mr. Barsness 
was taken sick and was invalided for some time. He received an 
honorable discharge from the army at Washington, D. C. in 1865, 
and returned to Wisconsin. Two miles south of Black Earth vil- 
lage in the town of Vermont was a place of one hundred and ten 
acres with a small clearing and a log house, which Mr. Barsness 
purchased and upon which he settled. This farm furnished him 
a means of livelihood until 18,98, when he retired and went to Black 
Earth village to live. Politically he is a Republican. He has held 
the office of school director and been honored with other minor 
offices. He is a member of and an active worker in the Norwegian 
Lutheran church of Black Earth. On June 15, 1866, Mr. Barsness 
married Sarah, daughter of Ingabrecht and Sarah (Severson) Nel- 
son of Norway, and on June 15, 1906, they celebrated their fortieth 
wedding anniversary. Mr. and Mrs. Nelson lived and died in the 
old country, where the father was a farmer. Four of the children 
came to this country when Mrs. Barsness was twelve years old, fet- 
tling in Black Earth. Twelve children have been born to Mr. 
and Mrs. Barsness. — Christina, March 23, 1867; Nels, August 31, 
1869, died February 11, 1884; Hannah Sophie, born September 27, 
1871, died November 18, 1902 ; Peter, a practicing dentist at Middle- 
ton, born December 8, 1873 ; Hermand, working the homestead 
farm, born April 9, 1876 ; Edwin Samuel, June 20, 1878 ; Selina, 
September 7. 1887; Joseph, September 27, 1882; Nelsina, August 
21, 1884; Ida Amelia in 1887; Melvin, July 29, 1889; and Nels 
Gerhard, July 27, 1892. Upon moving to Black Earth Mr. Barsness 
built himself a fine residence, which is today one of the most beau- 
tiful homes in the community. 

Seth Bartlett, one of the well known citizens of the town of 
Madison, was born at Strafford, Orange county, Vt., Jan, 1, 1823. 
his parents being Jesse and Nancy (Strong) Bartlett, the former a 
native of Vermont and the latter of New Hampshire. The Bartlett 
family is one of the old and honored families of the "Green Mount- 
ain State," the greatgrandfather of the subject of this sketch having 
been the first governor of Vermont. Jesse Bartlett was a carpen- 
ter by trade and was called the "great hewer," because of his pro- 
ficiency with the broad-ax. He was a fine singer, was a man of 
jolly disposition, and was noted for his great physical strength. In 
the earlv days of Minnesota he went to Minneapolis and all trace 



G4 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

of him was lost. His wife died on July 17, 1878. Their children 
were Lucinda, < Irmal K.. Seth, Cynthia, Hannah and Jackson. 
Seth, the subject of this sketch, is the only one of the family now 
living. At the- age of fourteen years he ran away from home and 
went to Boston, where he learned the trade of carpenter and cabi- 
net-maker. In 1846 he came to Madison, and there worked at his 
trade until the discovery of gold in California. He then drove his 
own team and made the trip overland to the new gold fields, living 
for a time at Hangtown, after which he went to Sacramento, wdiere 
he helped to build a large hotel. After a few years in California 
he returned to Madison by water, forty days being required for the 
voyage. He then engaged in the livery and horse buying business, 
and during the war bought more horses for the government than 
any other man in the county. After the war he bought the place 
in the town of Madison where he now lives, and where he owns 
two hundred and seventy-six acres of fine land, upon which he has 
made all the improvements. In addition to his farming interests, 
and the raising of fine horses and cattle, he has speculated exten- 
sively in real estate, in which he has been very successful. Mr. 
Bartlett, while claiming affiliation with the Republican party, is 
one of those men who always places the general welfare above mere 
party considerations and votes for the best man, especially in local 
affairs. He has never aspired to public office, though he takes a 
commendable interest in all matters of public policy, and keeps h' in- 
self well informed on political topics. Beginning life for himself 
at an early age his opportunities to attend school were cut off, 
and all the educat'on he has was acquired by self-study. He has 
been a great traveler, has spent several winters in Florida, and few 
men have a better general working education. Mr. Bartlett is 
one of the charter members of Madison Lodge, No. 5, Free and 
and Accepted Masons, and he is also a member of the Independent 
( )rder of Odd Fellows. He married Miss Hannah Ogden, daughter 
of Abram and Mary Ogden. of Michigan, and to this union was 
born one daughter, Jessie, now the wife of Walter C. Xoe. of Madi- 
son, and the mother of four children, viz: "Walter, Mary, Roberta 
and Edgar. Mrs. P.artlett was a member of the Congregational 
church and her husband was one of the liberal contributors toward 
the erection of the church. Mr. Bartlett also as an adopted daugh- 
ter. Miss Mary Linde. an accomplished young lady and a native of 
Germany. For a man of his years Mr. Bartlett is well preserved, 
due in a large degree to his cheerful disposition and his correct 
habits of living. He is well known and universally respected for 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 65 

his good sense, his public spirit, and his broad charity for the 
opinions of others. 

Albert O. Barton, managing editor of the Wisconsin State Journal, 
a daily evening paper published in Madison, was born on a farm 
in the town of Primrose, Dane county, Dec. 11, 1869. He is a son 
of Ole and Mary Ann (Twedten) Barton, both natives of Norway, 
who came to this country at the ages of seven (1818) and three 
(1852) respectively. The father was educated in the schools in the 
town of Blue Mounds, where his father had located. In 1862 Ole 
Barton enlisted in Company D, Twenty-Third Wisconsin Volunteer 
Infantry. This regiment participated in the disastrous Red river 
expedition under General Banks, in the reduction of the forts at 
Mobile, the fight at Spanish Fort and the other engagements of the 
brigade. While home on a furlough in 1863 he was married. 
Mr. Barton was mustered out at Mob'le in 1865 and on his return 
from the war began farming on one of the La Follette farms in the 
town of Primrose. Since that time he has purchased several farms 
of his own, and today conducts a two hundred and twenty-four 
acre place in the same town. During the winter months he taught 
school. He was one of the first farmers to arouse an interest in the 
dairy business, and was very influential in the erection of the cheese 
factory in Primrose, Feb. 6, 1878. He is an enthusiastic and loyal 
member of the Grand Army of the Republic and attends all en- 
campments of the order. Mrs. Barton died August 16, 1878, at the 
age of thirty-eight years and her husband was married a second t'.me 
in 1881 to Miss Ingeborg Oakland of Primrose. By his first wife 
he is the father of five children, and by his second wife of eight. He 
has held all the offices that it is within the power of the town elect- 
ors to fill. Pie has been justice of the peace, town clerk, chairman 
of the town and school district clerk. Probably no other man is 
more widely or favorably known over the county than Mr. Barton. 
Several years ago he purchased a farm in Taylor county, and has 
overseen the operation of it in connection with the management of 
the home place. 

Albert O. Barton was educated in the district schools of the town 
of Primrose and completed his preparatory educat'on in the Dodge- 
ville high school. He then entered the University of Wisconsin 
and was graduated from that institution with the degree of B. L. in 
the class of 1806. Immediately after completing his scholastic la- 
bors he entered the newspaper field, in the employ of the Madison 
Democrat. He continued thus until 1903, in the meantime 
rising to the managing editorship. In the spring of that year he 
5 — iii 



6Q HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

assumed the same position with the Wisconsin State Journal and 
has remained with that publication ever since. During his colle- 
giate course he was active in journalism, being one of the editors 
of the Daily Cardinal, a student publication. He has frequently 
contributed to and corresponded regularly for St. Paul, Minneapolis, 
New York and Boston papers and different magazines. For 
some years after graduation he was editor of the Alumni Magazine, 
a periodical issued by the graduates of the state university. In 
1895 he published a book entitled "The Story of Primrose from 
1831 to 1895", being a history of the township. In 1899 Mr. Barton 
spent the summer abroad, visiting the British Isles, Germany and 
the Scandinavian countries. He has also traveled extensively 
through the south and Canada, contributing letters on the same 
to the magazines and periodicals interested. When the Ygdrasil 
society of Madison, composed of the Scandinavian college men of 
the town, was formed, he was one of the charter members. He has 
done considerable research work along the line of Scandinavian his- 
tory and literature, in which he is much interested. Politically 
Mr. Barton is a Republican, belonging to the dominant wing of the 
party. He has never aspired to public office and despite the fact 
that he has labored hard and earnestly in behalf of the principles 
he upholds he has never sought appointment to office as a reward 
for his work. He has the distinction of having been the last secre- 
tary of the Republican city committee before the operation of the 
new primary election law. On June 2i. 1901, he was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Ada Winterbotham, a native of Madison, and a 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Winterbotham of Madison. 
Both Mr. and Mrs, Winterbotham are graduates of the University, 
of Wisconsin. Mrs. Winterbotham finishing her course with the 
class of 1865, the first class which contained "co-eds" to graduate 
from the state institution. Mr. and Mrs. Barton have one son, 
Harold Edward Sharp, and a daughter. Mr. Barton is a member 
of the Sons of Veterans and an alumnus of the Athenaean literary 
society of the University of Wisconsin. His friends pred'ct a bril- 
liant future for him in the literary world. 

Thomas Barton is one of the progressive farmers of the town of 
Blue Mounds, and as his entire life has been spent in that vicinity 
the esteem in which he is held by his neighbors is a flattering tribute 
to his integrity and probity of character. He was born on the place 
where he now resides on August 1, 1866, and is a son of Ole and 
May (Thompson) Barton, both of whom were natives of Norway. 
The father came to America in 1848. and in the same vear settled 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 67 

on the place where the son now resides and where the father spent 
all of his life after coming to Wisconsin. He was one of the early- 
settlers of Dane county and lived nearly a half century within her 
confines, dying in August, 1895, at the advanced age of seventy- 
nine years. Thomas Barton, whose name introduces this review,, 
is one of a family of six children that were born to the pioneer pa- 
rents above mentioned, and he was reared in the town of Blue 
Mounds, receiving his education in the public schools, and his occu- 
pation has always been that of a farmer. His well improved farm 
comprises one hundred and ninety acres of extremely fertile land. 
Mr. Barton was married on November 13, 1895 to Miss Emma 
Kably, daughter of Philip Kably, a long-time resident of the 
town of Blue Mounds but now residing in the village of Mt. 
Horeb. Mr. and Mrs. Barton have become the parents of four child- 
ren ; Adele, Oscar, Myrtle and Earl. Our subject has always been 
a strenuous worker in the ranks of the Republican party and con- 
sistently believes that continued application of the principles of that 
political organization will solve any problems of government that 
may present themselves. In addition to general farming, which 
he carries on quite extensively, he also devotes considerable atten- 
tion to the co-ordinate industries of stock-raising and dairying. 
Of the brothers and sisters of the subject of this review, Anna mar- 
ried Andrew Jacobson and resides in Richland county, Iowa ; Carrie 
married John Hogred and resides in Mt. Horeb ; Bennett resides at 
Blue Mounds ; Edward at Blue Mounds and Julia at Mt. Horeb. 
where the mother of these children also resides. Bennett Barton, a. 
brother of the subject of this review, was born in the town of Blue 
Mounds on April 1, 1870, and was reared there, receiving his educa- 
tion in the public schools. He supplemented the knowledge thus 
gained by attending school' at different times in Dodgeville and 
Black Earth, and the years of his early manhood were devoted to the 
occupation of teaching. He commenced farming for himself in 1894 
on the place where he now resides, comprising one hundred and 
ninety-two acres, and there he has since met with flattering success- 
in the business of general farming and dairying. He was married 
Feb. 12, 1894, to Miss Julia Haakenes. daughter of Hanse Haakenes. 
a prominent farmer of the town of Blue Mounds, and to this union 
there have been born five children : Orvin, Eleanor. Harland, Benja- 
min and Margaret. Mr. Barton is a Republican in his political 
affiliations and his personal worth and ability have been recognized 
by election to the office of justice of the peace, which position he 



68 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

at present fills. H's religious faith is expressed by membership 
in the Norwegian Lutheran church. 

Robert McKee Bashford, a leading member of the Madison bar, 
was born in La Fayette county, Wisconsin, December 31, 1845. His 
father was Samuel Morris Bashford, a native of New York city who 
was reared by a relative, Dr. Morris, and educated as a physician. 
After his removal to Grant county, Wisconsin, in 1835, he discarded 
the practice of medicine for the more congenial pursuit of agricul- 
ture. His first wife died soon after his coming west and on June 
27, 1843, he married Mrs. Mary Ann (McKee) Parkinson, the widow 
of W. C. Parkinson, the daughter of Robert McKee. of Edwards- 
ville. 111., and a native of Kentucky. Robert M. Bashford is a son 
of this second marriage. Mr. Bashford is one of the best known 
of Madison's c'tizens, having been before that community since he 
entered the state university in 1863, as a student of general literature 
and law, as the editor of a leading paper, as city attorney, as mayor, 
as state senator, as well as in the capacity of a practic'ng attorney 
in a private firm for much of the time. His university studies were 
taken leisurely, as he was not graduated from the college of liberal 
arts until 1870 and from the law school in 1871. This deliberate- 
ness was partly the result of financial necessities, as he varied his 
school life by teaching and had even before graduation served as 
the principal of schools in Linden, Poynette and Darlington. He 
had, however, -the advantage of entering upon his later work with 
more maturity of character than the young man has usually attained 
whose road to professional proficiency is strewn with metaphorical 
flowers. While pursuing his law studies at the university, he 
attained practical knowledge of his profession in the office of Smith 
& Lamb, a leading law firm of Madison. After his graduation he 
did not enter upon an active practice for some years, as he formed a 
partnership with John B. and A. C. Parkinson and George Raymer 
for the purchase of the Madison daily and weekly Democrat, wh'ch 
occupation engaged his attention for five years. During his asso- 
ciation with this paper it was enlarged, changed from an evening to 
a morning paper and supplied with new presses and material. In 
its editorial management, he pursued a liberal policy and carried out 
his views with characterstic independence, and frequently directly 
against the violent opposition of certain factions of his own party. 
It was during his editorial connection with this paper that there was 
formed the coalit'on of the liberal Republicans and the Democrats 
which nominated Horace Greeley for the presidency, and also, in 
the state politics, that union of the Grangers and the Democratic 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 69 

party which resulted in the election of William R. Taylor as gover- 
nor. The subsequent legislation and the testing of its validity by 
the courts, has had wide-reaching results, as it established the rights 
of the state in the control of railway corporations. During this same 
time Mr. Bashford compiled the legislative manual for the years 
1875, 1876, 1877 and 1878, and was engaged in the publication of 
the revised statutes of Wisconsin for 1878. This work resulted in a 
familiar knowledge of legislative enactments and methods, and with 
affairs of the state. In 1876. Mr. Bashford gave up his work in 
connection with the paper and entered upon the practice of h's pro- 
fession as a member of the firm of Gill, Bashford & Spilde, which 
partnership he held until 1880. In 1881 he became a member of 
the law firm of Tenney, Bashford and Tenney, of Madison, which 
held his office there until 1885, when an office under that firm name 
was opened in Chicago, and continued until 1885, when Mr. 
Bashford returned to Madison and formed a partnership with Hon. 
James L. O'Connor, later attorney general, which continued for a 
number of years. Mr. Bashford is at present the senior member 
of the firm of Bashford, Aylward & Spenseley. Mr. Bashford's 
service in municipal affairs have been noteworthy. He was the city 
attorney from 1881 to 1886 and in that capacity defeated the propo- 
s'tion to give to a private corporation a franchise for the construc- 
tion of the city waterworks. Moreover, he secured the legislation 
by which the city was empowered to construct, own and operate 
its own waterworks, and, the year following, that work was begun. 
Throughout all the business of contracting and supervising the con- 
struction of the waterworks and sewers, he rendered efficient service 
to the city. In 1890 Mr. Bashford was elected mayor of the city 
of Madison, coming into office at a time when the conditions ren- 
dered that office a particularly trying one. The financial condition 
of the city treasury would not admit of needful improvements, or 
even defray the necessary expenses connected with municipal life, 
and at the very opening of his administration, charges were pre- 
ferred against two members of the council and the chief of the fire 
department, for corrupt practices in conection with the city finances. 
This investigation, resulting in the removal of all the parties ac- 
cused, was an unpleasant beginning for the official head of city 
affairs, but Mr. Bashford conducted the investigation with such 
thoroughness coupled with fairness, as commended him to all law- 
abiding citizens ; and he was supported in this action by the common 
council, the press and the general public, as having performed a 
difficult and unpleasant duty in a spirit of judicial equity. The 



70 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

financial condition of the city treasury was met, during Mr. Bash- 
ford's incumbency, by the sale of certain city property, and thus he 
was enabled to inaugurate necessary work upon the streets. A 
quarry and a steam road roller were purchased, and by the aid 
of special assessments the work of a thorough street improvement 
was begun, which has been continued up to the present time, and 
which contributed so largely to the beauty and comfort of Madison 
as a residence city. Mr. Bashford's services in the larger field of 
state politics are considerable, and while he has labored for the suc- 
cess of the party with which he is politically allied, he has always 
reserved for himself the liberty of his private judgment, and has, on 
many occasions, beginning with his early editorial work, been able 
to influence the attitude and action of his political confreres. He 
has frequently been selected to serve on central committees and to 
act as delegate for the city, the county and the state, and in 1884 
.was a delegate to the national Democratic convention at Chicago, 
was also served as state senator from 1891 to 1895. Previous to the 
last judicial election, Mr. Bashford received a very flattering endorse- 
ment from the Madison bar, as a nominee for the position as judge 
of the supreme court, but which after consideration, he declined to 
accept, notwithstanding a very generally expressed opinion as to his 
fitness for that position. Mr. Bashford's legal career has been one 
which has developed a well-rounded character, and he is considered 
as one of the able members of the^ Wisconsin bar. He has been 
associated with many cases involving large interests, and perhaps 
-obtained his greatest distinction as an attorney from his prosecu- 
tion of the suits against the ex-treasurers of Wisconsin for the recov- 
ery of interest upon the public funds ; he was engaged in these cases 
as special council by Governor Peck, and was associated with Attor- 
ney General O'Connor and Senator Vilas. Mr. Bashford was em- 
ployed as special counsel for Secretary of State Houser in the suit 
brought in the summer of 1904 by S. A. Cook and others to deter- 
mine the regularity of the state ticket nominated by the Republican 
convention of that year and with his associates succeeded in obtain- 
ing in the supreme court, a decision in favor of the ticket headed by 
Governor La Follette ; in 1906 he was employed as special couns-:: 
for the state in the suit brought in the supreme court to test the val- 
idity of the inheritance tax and made the brief and argument on the 
reargument ordered by the court, the final decision sustaining the 
law upon the grounds for which he contended. Mr. Bashford has for 
many years been a professor of the college of law of the Univer- 
sity of Wisconsin, and his work has covered a broad field and has 



BIOGRAPHICAL 71 

been singularly acceptable to the hundreds of students who have 
had the benefit of lis instruction. Mr. Bashford was married No- 
vember 27, 1873, to Miss Florence E. Taylor, who was born at 
Cottage Grove, Dane county, June 16, 1854 a graduate of the Uni- 
versity of Wisconsin, and a daughter of ex-Governor Taylor. She 
died August 16, 1886. leaving one daughter. Florence M., who was 
born September 4, 1875. and who was married to C. F. Spensley 
in 1891. February 7, 1889, Mr. Bashford married Miss Sarah A. 
Fuller, daughter of M. E. Fuller, one of the leading business men 
of Madison. Two of Mr. Bashford's brothers, John Wesley and 
James Whitford, and a half-brother, Samuel Whitney Trousdale, 
are also graduates of the University of Wisconsin. John W. Bash- 
ford, who died at Hudson in March, 1905, was a lawyer of promi- 
nence, who had served his city as attorney and mayor and also as 
a member of the board of regents of the University of Wisconsin. 
The other brothers are ministers in the Methodist Episcopal church. 
At the last general conference. James W. Bashford, who had occu- 
p'ed prominent positions in the church, was elected to the position 
of bishop. 

George Adam Batz, the president of the Farmers' & Merchants' 
bank of Sun Prairie, is well-known in the community as a successful 
farmer and has won international recognition by some of the pro- 
ducts of his farm.. He is the son of Dane county pioneers, Peter 
and Johanna (Terronf) Batz, who were natives of Germany. Peter 
Batz was born in Bavaria. April 25, 1822, and came to Milwaukee 
in 1848. In the same year he was married in Milwaukee and came 
to the town of Bristol, where he obtained a farm of eighty acres. 
For three years he worked out, at $10.00 per month, while his wife 
managed the home property. Mr. Batz traded in lands, at one 
time owning eight hundred and forty acres in Bristol. In 1891 
he went, to Sun Prairie and organized the Farmers' and Merchants' 
Bank. For ten years the bank was a private institution in which 
Mr. Batz was assisted by his sons, George P. and Erhard, and in 
1901 it was incorporated as the Farmers' and Merchants' Bank of 
Sun Prairie, with George A. Batz as president, his father, Peter 
Batz, retiring from active business. George A. was one of a fam- 
ily of ten children, five sons and five daughters, all of whom are 
living. Two brothers. John and Valentine, I've in Minnesota, 
where Valentine has a seat in the state senate. The family are 
prominent in the Roman Catholic church, whose first log chapel 
and whose present edifice in East Bristol, Peter Batz a'ded in erect- 
ing. The experiences of Peter Batz in the early days of the com- 



72 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

munity are typical of the hardy pioneer; he was forty-eight days 
crossing the Atlantic and after reaching - Milwaukee, walked the rest 
of the distance to Dane county. George Adam, son of Peter Batz, 
was born in Bristol, January 22, 1865, attended the Bristol district 
school and the Roman Catholic school of East Bristol. He has 
always devoted most of his attention to farming and resides upon 
farm of two hundred and sixty acres in Bristol, where he raises 
Holstein cattle and carries on an extensive sheep-raising business. 
Cheviot sheep are his specialty and Mr. Batz was the second man 
in Wisconsin to breed this particular strain. Fine Clydesdale 
horses are also raised by Mr. Batz. He is a careful student of farm- 
ing methods and keeps well abreast of the times, employing modern, 
up-to-date methods. The premium on Dutch clover was awarded 
to Mr. Batz at the World's Columbian Exposition at Chicago in 
1893, both for quality and for the largest yield (ten bushels to the 
acre), and at the World's Fair at St. Louis, he won the gold medal 
for his exhibit of red kidney beans and also a premium for his oats. 
Like his father, Mr. Batz is always active in promoting the inter- 
ests of the town and has served as supervisor and secretary and di- 
rector of the school board. He is identified with the Democratic 
party. January 22, 1894, occurred the marriage of George A. Batz 
and Miss Catherine Germinder, daughter of Alois Germinder. Four 
children have blessed the marriage; Peter Clements, Cita Barbara, 
Mary Regina and Prisca Barbara. The family attend the Sun 
Pra'rie Catholic church. At the golden wedding celebration of Mr. 
and Mrs. Peter Batz. forty-eight grandchildren were present. In 
the bank at Sun Prairie owned by the Batz family, George A. is 
president, George P., vice-president, Erhard, cashier and Misses 
Johanna and Anna, assistant cash'ers. 

Hubert J. Bauhs has been a resident of Dane county from the time 
of his birth, is the owner of a well improved farm in Cross Plains 
township. He was born in this township, September 14, 1863, 
and is a son of Adam and Anna Mary (Jorden) Bauhs, both 
ol whom were born and reared in Germany. Adam Bauhs came to 
America about the year 1851, and his future wife accompanied her 
parents on their immigration to the United States, about the same 
time. Adam Bauhs located in Perry township. Dane county, soon 
after his arrival in Wisconsin, and two years later removed to Cross 
Plains township, where he purchased a tract of wild land, in sec- 
tion 31, reclaming a good farm and continuing to reside on the 
homestead for forty years. He passed the closing days of his life 
in the home of the subject of this sketch, his death occurring 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 73 

November 25, 190-1. He was a Democrat in his political procliv- 
ities, and both he and his wife, who passed away March 9, 1880, 
were communicants of St. Mary's Catholic church, at Pine Bluff. 
Of the thirteen children seven are living, namely: Mary who is the 
wife of Lawrence Michaels, of Barron county, this state ; William, 
who is a farmer of Middleton township; Hubert, who figures as the 
immediate subject of this sketch; Joseph, who is a carpenter and 
contractor of Appleton, Wisconsin; John, who is employed as 
teamster at the University of Wisconsin ; Elizabeth who is the wife 
of John Haack, of Madison ; and Frances, who is the wife of Henry 
Miller, of Middleton, Wis.; Hubert Bauhs was afforded the advan- 
tages of the public school in Pine Bluff, and he continued to be 
associated in the work of the home farm until his marriage, when 
he became concerned in the same line of enterprise on his own 
responsibility. He purchased one hundred and twenty acres In sec- 
tion 10, Cross Plains township, the tract being to a large extent in 
its wild state, with no improvements of more than nomenal order. 
He has reclaimed the land to cultivation, has erected good buildings, 
and he has been very successful in his operations as a general farmer 
and dairyman. In July, 1905, he engaged in the saloon business 
in Cross Plains, but he also continues to give his personal super- 
vision to his farm. Mr. Bauhs is a staunch supporter of the causes 
of the Democratic party, and he served twelve years as townsh'p 
treasurer, was a member of the town board four years, and has held 
other minor offices. His preferment in this way indicates the high 
esteem in which he is held in the community. He :s a communicant 
of the Catholic church and is a liberal supporter and active worker 
in the same. He was treasurer of the St. Francis church, Berry 
township, for six years. November 25, 1885, Mr. Bauhs was united 
in marriage to Miss Theresa Mary Birrenkott, daughter of Michael 
Birrenkott, who was one of the honored pioneers of this county, 
more specific mention of the family being made in the sketch of 
Adolf Birrenkott, on another page of this work. Mr. and Mrs. 
Bauhs have seven children, namely: Adam J., John M., William H., 
Michael A., El"zabeth Clara, Peter J., and Victor M. 

Edward Baus, a cigar manufacturer of Madison, was born in 
Prussia, Germany, February 13, 1846. His parents were Richard 
and Sophia (Hess) Baus, who came to this country from Germany 
in 1851. They lived first in Cleveland, Ohio, then in Watertown, 
Wis., and on February 18, 1853, arrived in Madison. The trip 
from Watertown was made with ox-teams and horses. The snow 
was deep and in some places the roads were almost impassable, 



74 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

but the hardy pioneers persisted and finally reached Madison after 
untold hardships. The father continued his business as cigar 
maker after his arrival continuing in it actively until his death on 
May 8, 1880. His wife passed away some eight years later, at the 
age of sixty-seven. The two children were Edward and Johanna, 
widow of Capt. August Bartsch of Oakland, Cal., who has one son, 
Edward E. Bartsch. Edward Baus received his education in the 
common schools of Madison, and upon the completion of his school 
work learned his trade from Bernhardt Nienaber, a pioneer cigar- 
maker of the city, and in 1863 started a business for himself. Later 
his father assumed active control of the business, continuing it 
until his death, when Edward again took charge. The trade has 
grown rapidly and Mr. Baus and his partner, Mr. Walters, now 
employ seven or eight operatives the year round. On April 21, 
1877, Mr. Baus married Anna, daughter of Andrew and Sophia 
Hippenmeyer, the latter of whom is now deceased. Mrs. Baus is 
the fifth of the six Hippenmeyer children. The others are Andrew, 
Jr., a machinist employed by the Fuller & Johnson company; 
Charles, a barber at Stoughton ; Alexander, a moulder of Madison; 
Clara, widow of John Ambrecht, of Madison ; and Alma, wife of 
Henry W. Lamp, a machinist. Mr. and Mrs. Baus have two chil- 
dren, — Richard Edward, a graduate from the University of Wis- 
consin in the mechanical engineering course, now in the employ of 
the Western Electric company in Chicago ; and Irma J., a stenog- 
rapher employed by the American Thresherman company. Mrs. 
Baus and her daughter are members of the Congregational church. 
Mr. Baus is a member of the Turnverein. He is an excellent 
marksman, and has in his possession two gold medals won in 
tournaments, one in the state of Wisconsin and the other at Phila- 
delphia during the centennial celebration of 1876. 

Daniel Bechtel, one of the extensive farmers and progressive citi- 
zens of Blooming Grove township, is a native of the old Keystone 
state of the Union, having been born in Larry's Creek, Lycoming 
county, Pennsylvania, August 31, 1845, and being a son of John 
and Catherine (Eyer) Bechtel, the former of whom was born near 
Reading. Burks county, that state, while the latter was born in Dry 
Valley, Union county, Pennsylvania. The paternal grandfather, 
Peter Bechtel. was likewise born in Burks county, of stanch Ger- 
man ancestry, the fam'lv having been one of the first to settle in 
Pennsylvania. John Bechtel was reared to the sturdy discipline of 
the farm, but when a young man he turned his attention to freight- 
ing on the canal, later engaging in the lumber business; for some 



BIOGRAPHICAL. ! 75 

time he operated two saw mills and a grist mill in Pennsylvania. 
In 1850 he traded his grist mill for a tract of land in Pleasant 
.Springs township, Dane county. Wisconsin, and in the autumn of 
the same year he came with his family to this county, making the 
journey via the canal and great lakes to Milwaukee, whence they 
completed their journey to Madison with team and wagon, this be- 
ing before the advent of railroads in this section. On his arrival 
JVlr. Bechtel found that he had been egregiously swindled, in that 
the land which he had secured in exchange for his mill was a marsh, 
and, under the conditions which then existed, entirely unavailable 
for development into farming land. He therefore purchased forty 
acres of land, and in a log house which had been previously erected 
on the place he and his family spent the first winter. In the fol- 
lowing spring he purchased the farm — now owned and operated by 
his son Daniel, subject of this review, — and moved on the place in 
1853. Here he made the best of improvements, including the erec- 
tion of a substantial and commodious brick residence, becoming 
one of the prominent and influential citizens of the township and 
continuing to reside on the homestead until his death, which oc- 
curred on February 5, 1876. His wife long survived him, continu- 
ing to remain on the home farm until she too was summoned into 
the life eternal, her death occurring in 1900, at the venerable age of 
eighty-one years. Daniel Bechtel was a child of five years at the 
time of his parents' removal to Dane county, and he has resided on 
the old homestead farm for more than half a century, while he has 
identified himself with the best interests of the community and is 
a successful farmer and popular citizen. After attending the dis- 
trict schools he supplemented the discipline by a course of study in 
a business college in Madison, — the institution now known as the 
Northwestern Business College. He remained with his parents, 
with utmost filial devotion, until both were called to the world be- 
yond, and since the death of his father he has had the supervision 
of the farm, of which he is now the owner, having greatly improved 
the place, making it one of the best in the township, while he has 
added to the area of the original homestead until he is now the 
owner of two hundred and eighty-five acres. Mr. Bechtel is one 
of the prominent representatives of the Democratic party in the 
county, and has been called upon to serve in various offices of 
public trust and responsibility. He served three terms as township 
clerk, and for a period of twenty years he represented his township 
on the board of supervisors of the county. In November, 1882, he 
was elected sheriff of the county, serving one term, of two years, 



76 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

while in 1896 he was elected a member of the assembly of the state 
legislature, retaining the office one term. For six years Mr. Bech- 
tel was president of the Cottage Grove Fire Insurance Company, 
of which he has been secretary since 1900. He is a member of the 
lodge of the Benevolent & Protective Order of Elks in Madison. 
He has two brothers and one sister, one of the brothers residing in 
Howard county. Iowa, and the other in Clark county, Wisconsin, 
while the sister, Mary A., is the wife of Fred Lohff, of Madison. 
Mr. Bechtel has never married. 

Frank Joseph Beck, deceased, was for years a trusted employe 
of the Chi. & N. W. Ry Company in the city of Madison, and 
during his residence in that city won the respect and esteem of 
a large circle of friends. He was a native of the kingdom of Austria 
and was born on March 19, 1844. His parents were Frank and Anna 
Beck, who were also natives of Austria, and the father during life 
was a man of considerable prominence, holding the position of 
mayor of the city in which he lived. In the Beck family there were 
five children, three of whom are now living: Joseph, who is a very 
wealthy man, resides in Italy ; Ferdinand is a resident of Virginia 
City, Nevada; and a sister still remains in Austria. The subject of 
this review received his education in his native country and in Italy, 
and in his youth prepared himself for the occupation of a machine- 
est. He migrated to America in 1874, and coming directly to Wis- 
consin first worked at his trade in the Chi. & N. W. Railway 
shops in Baraboo and also at Kendalls, where he was foreman of 
the round house, remaining thus employed for about nine years. 
He was then promoted to foreman of the Chi. & N. W. Railway 
round house at Madison, and he then established his home in the 
capital city, where he resided until the occurance of the unfortu- 
nate accident which resulted in his deatn, in January, 1898, he being 
killed by the explosion of an engine. He had purchased a home at 
1130 Jenifer street, in Madison, which his widow still owns. Mr. 
Beck was married on August 10, 1874, to Miss Louisa Ann Magerl, 
who is also a native of Austria, born May 1, 1855, the daughter of 
Wenzel and Ann (Ploner) Magerl. Mr. and Mrs. Beck became 
the parents of two children, a son and a daughter, the former of 
whom. Joseph F., married Elizabeth Purcell and resides in Madi- 
son, and the daughter, Frances C, resides at home with her mother. 
Mrs. Beck received an excellent education in Switzerland and is a 
woman of high intellectuality and an energetic disposition. She 
is an experienced masseur, of exceptionable ability in that line; is 
highly respected, and takes a great interest in her children. Her 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 77 

religious faith is that of the Methodist church, her husband hav- 
ing also been a member of that denomination, and the latter also 
had membership in the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. He 
was a Republican in his political affiliations. 

Joseph D. Beck, commissioner of labor and industrial statistics, 
was born in Vernon county, near the village of Avalanche, March 
14, 1866. His father, Mitchell Beck, was born in Pennsylvania, 
March 3, 1838, saw service for three months in the Civil War in 
Company A, Twenty-fifth Wisconsin infantry with Gen. Jeremiah 
Rusk, and was with Sherman on his march to the sea, receiving an 
injury to his right arm while driving an artilery wagon, which 
crippled him for life. He died May 19, 1897, at the age of sixty- 
nine. Mitchell Beck's father, Josiah Beck, was a farmer of Penn- 
sylvania and Ohio, who in 1818 removed to that part of Crawford 
county, Wis., which later became Bad Ax county, and still later 
Vernon county, where he died at the age of sixty-two. His wife 
was Mary Mitchell, who lived to be eighty-six years of age. Of 
the'r eight children but two are living, — Eva, Mrs. W. C. Snod- 
grass of Pacific Grove, Cal., and Armilda, Mrs. J. P. Melvin, who 
lives on the Beck homestead in Vernon county. Josiah Beck's 
father, John Beck, in the early part of the nineteenth century, 
owned the only mill in what is now the city of Johnstown, Pa., and 
which was carried away by the great flood. Mitchell Beck mar- 
ried Susanna A., daughter of Joseph and Mary (Showen) Snod- 
grass, natives of Virginia, who removed to Indiana and later, in 1853, 
to what is now Vernon county, Wis., where they died. The daugh- 
ter mentioned was born October 27, 1846, and died July 6, 1890. 
She was one of twelve children, of whom three are living. Mitch- 
ell and Susanna A. Beck were the parents of fourteen children, — 
Joseph D.. of Madison, being the oldest. He received his education 
in the common schools of Vernon and Richland counties, and had 
one term in the Richland Center high school. From 1886 to 1889 
he taught in the country schools of Vernon county, and for the fol- 
lowing five years was principal of and taught in the graded schools 
of Cashton, Wis., and held the office of village clerk of Cashton in 
1895. He then entered the Stevens Point Normal School, receiv- 
ing his diploma from that institution in 1897. The school year of 
1897 — 1898 he was principal of the Wesfby school and the next three 
years was at the head of the Cashton high school.. In the fall of 
1901 he entered the University of Wisconsin as a junior and received 
his degree in 1903. On Jan. 1, 1903, he was made deputy commis- 
sioner of labor and industrial statistics by Commissioner Halford 



78 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

Erickson. Upon the appointment of Mr. Erickson to the railway- 
rate commission by Governor La Follette in 1905, Mr. Beck was pro- 
moted to the head of the labor bureau, and still occupies that posi- 
tion. On November 24, 1888, he married S. Jane, daughter of I. W. 
and Sally Peavy, of Vernon county. Mrs. Peavy died while Mrs. 
Beck was still a chid; Mr. Peavy died in 1905 at the age of eighty- 
six. Mr. and Mrs. Beck have had two children, — A. Lori, born 
April 11, 1890, died April 17, 1893 ; and Maud Ethel, born in August,. 
1891, and died three months later. Politically Mr. Beck is a Repub- 
lican, a strong and influential member of the La Follette wing of the 
party. Fraternally he is a Mason, a member of the Modern Wood- 
men of America, of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, in which 
order he has held all the offices in the subordinate lodge, and all the 
offices except grand master in the grand lodge, and is at present the 
incumbent of the office of deputy grand master. 

Hon. George W. Becker, mayor of Stoughton and a prom- 
inent grocer of that city, was born in Frankfort, Germany,. 
April 13, 1851, a son of Valentine and Elizabeth Becker. The pa- 
rents immigrated to America in 1854, locating in Jefferson county, 
where the father purchased a tract of land at Fort Atkinson and 
lived the rest of his days. He was a mason-contractor by vocation. 
His three children are John, Catherine, (now the wife of Jacob West- 
erfield) and George W., the subject of this sketch. The latter was. 
but three years of age when the family settled in Fort Atkinson, 
where his scholastic training was acquired. When he had completed 
his studies he served his apprenticeship as a mason and bricklayer 
under his brother John, and at the age of twenty-two launched out 
as a contractor. In 1882 he removed to Stoughton to engage in the 
same business and followed it continually up to 1889. Many of 
the business blocks and fine residences of Stoughton are monuments 
to his sk'll and artistic ability. The last building which he erected 
before retiring from the business was the Erickson block, one of 
the principal business blocks of the city. In 1889 Mr. Becker em- 
barked in the grocery business and has been successfully engaged 
in it s'nce that time. In politics he is a staunch Republican and as- 
the representative of his party has several times been selected to 
offices of public trust. In 1885 — 1886 he was a member of the city- 
council and in 1893 served on the county board of supervisors. In 
April, 1906, he was chosen by a large majority to be the executive- 
head of the municipality for a term of two years. In 1873 Mr. 
Becker married Miss Libbie Keat, daughter of Philip and Mary 
Keat of Jefferson county, Wis. Mr. and Mrs. Becker have no chil- 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 79 

dren. The mayor is a member of Kegonsa Lodge, No. 73, Free and 
Accepted Masons. He in a genial, courteous and hearty, — a man 
well equipped to fill any position of public trust. 

Warner Becker, (deceased), was for over thirty years a well- 
known stone mason and contractor in the city of Mad' son, and many 
of the stately buildings of the capital city were erected under his 
supervision. Mr. Becker was born in Germany, February 14, 1840, 
and was one of six children born to Frank and Catherine Becker, 
the parents being also natives of the Fatherland. Our subject 
was the only one of his family that ever came to America. He 
received a fair education in the excellent common schools of his 
native land, and served for a time in the regular army of Germany, 
but in 1860, at the age of twenty years, he severed all relations with 
the institutions of that country and turned his face toward the land 
of freedom and better opportunities. Coming directly to Wisconsin 
he first "worked as a common laborer and mason-helper, being thus 
employed about seven years and in the meantime gaining a good 
knowledge of contracting and building. He then began an independ- 
ent career as a contractor and followed the same very successfully 
until his death, which occurred about ten or twelve years ago. He 
became a property owner in the city of Madison, and a few years 
prior to his death purchased two full building lots on East Main 
street, where he erected two houses, in one of which his widow 
still resides. He was an honest and industrious citizen, and his 
success was due entirely to his enterprise and intelligence, assisted 
by the wise counsel of his faithful wife. The subject of this re- 
view was married on April 11, 1874, to Miss Barbara Schneider, 
born in Germany, August 12, 1843, daughter of John and Barbara 
(Wonderly) Schneider, who migrated to America and were 
respected citizens of Sauk City, Wis. In the Schneider family there 
were seven children, and five of these are living: Clara married 
John Vaner and resides in Dubuque, Iowa ; Barbara is the widow of 
the subject of this memoir; Nicholas married Ave Veda, and his 
wife is now deceased ; Andrew married Anna Williams and resides 
in Dane county; John married Anna Williams (not a relative of his 
brother's wife) and resides at Baraboo, Wis. Mr. and Mrs. Becker 
became the parents of four children, the names and other facts con- 
cerning whom are here given : Bernard is a practicing physician 
in St. Louis ; John married Carrie Hauk and resides in the city of 
Madison ; Katie resides at home with her mother; and Clara married 
Matthew Schmitz and is deceased. Warner Becker, whose name 



80 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

introduces th's review, was a Democrat in his political affiliations, 
and his religious faith was that of the Roman Catholic church. 

J. S. Bell, of Brooklyn, a veteran of the Civil War, comes of a 
soldierly line. He was born in Sussex county, N. J., February 9, 
1842. His parents. Almond and Mary (Sutton) Bell, were na- 
tives of the same state, the former born in 1800 and the latter in 1821. 
Mr. Bell's paternal grandfather, Josiah Bell, was in the Revolution- 
ary War, and took part in that famous crossing of the Delaware, 
leaving his blood-stained tracks upon the ice and snow. That he 
was no weakling is shown by the fact that he not only survived the 
incredible hardships of the war but lived to the extreme old age of 
ninety-eight years. Mr. Bell's parents were married in New Jersey 
and resided there a number of years before coming west in 1848. 
They came to Dane county, staying for a few weeks in Cookville. 
and then setled in Rutland township, buying one hundred and 
twenty acres of land of Rogers & Cummings ; this Mr. B-ell im- 
proved, and made his home continuously until the time of his death, 
April 28, 1900, except one year that he spent in California. His 
widow is still living upon the old homestead. Mr. J. S. Bell was 
a child of six years when he came with his parents to Wisconsin. 
He rece'ved his education in the public school of district number 
five, and was a young man of nineteen at the breaking out of the 
Civil War. He promptly enlisted as a private soldier in Company 
D, Second Wisconsin Infantry, and served four years, two months 
and nine days. He enlisted May 19, 1861, was sworn into the U. S. 
service June 19, and mustered out July 1865, following the close of 
the war. He took part in a number of battles and was appointed 
captain in the battle of the Wilderness, by General Grant. In one 
engagement he was wounded in the head and left for dead on the 
field where he was captured by the Confederates. His wound was 
neglected, for the first ten days not even washed, and he suffered 
the privations of three rebel prisons, Libby first, for four months, 
then Tuscaloosa, where he first saw the black flag raised, and then 
four months in Salisbury prison. Mr. Bell belongs to the Repub- 
lican party, has been treasurer of the town of Rutland for four years, 
and postmaster in the village of Brooklyn for eight years. He was 
was a charter member of the Masonic and Modern Woodmen's 
lodges in Brooklyn, and Master for first five years after organiza- 
tion ; was a charter member of the Evansville chapter of 
I. Q. O. F., to which he belongs ; he is also a member of G. A. R. 
Post, No. 41, of Evansville. He was married, November 4, to 
Miss Elnora V. Colburn, daughter of Hobart and Katherine 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 81 

( Prouty) Colburn, who came from Vermont and settled in Rutland, 
where the father died two years ago, and where the mother is still 
living - . They have five children, Bertha M., (Mrs. Albert Wink- 
ler), of Iowa; Dr. Hugh R. Bell, of Ft. Atkinson; Harvey H. ,who 
is in the west; Leslie H., of Iowa; LeGrand L., at home. All 
were born in Rutland and educated in Brooklyn and Madison. Mr. 
Bell has lived in Brooklyn for twenty-five years ; he has an interest 
in one hundred acres of land now in the probate court, and owns 
property in the village. He still has many interests although 
he has retired from some or his more active labors. 

Charles W. Bennett, a respected merchant of Black Earth village, 
was born at Hemyock, Devonshire county, England, August 3, 1854. 
His father, Frederick Bennett, was born in Comstock. England, in 
1816. The maiden name of the subject's mother was Betty Lutley, 
born in Hemyock, England in 1816. In 1867 Frederick Bennett 
brought his family to America, settling in the town of Black Earth 
on one hundred seven and a half acres of section 23. For several 
years the family home was on this farm, and then Mr. Bennett re- 
tired and removed to Black Earth village ; he acted as local preacher 
of the Methodist Episcopal church for many years. He died in 
1899, and his wfe died in the same year; both at the ripe old age 
of eighty-three. They had six children, Frederick M., a farmer 
and miller of Black Earth ; Agnes M., wife of Jas. Holway of 
London. Ohio; John, who died in infancy; Samuel, a retired 
farmer living in Black Earth ; Charles W., and Edward, who 
died October 16. 190-4. Charles W. Bennett was educated in 
the common schools of England and those of Black Earth. At the 
age of twenty he left home and went with his brother Frederick, 
into the meat business in Black Earth village. In 1902 he and 
his brother bought an interest in the Black Earth Roller Mills, the 
firm name being Bennett Bros. & Ward. Beside their milling busi- 
ness the Bennett brothers own six hundred acres of the best farm- 
ing land in the township. Politically Mr. Bennett is a Prohibition- 
ist, and has twice, in 1902 and 1904, been elected as the member of 
the town board of supervisors. Mr. Bennett is not a member of 
any church, but attends the Methodist Episcopal church, of wh'ch 
his wife is a member. He has been married twice. In October, 
1884, he was wedded to Nora Haseltine, who died in 1892. His 
second wife was Mertie B. Hewitt of Mt. Sterling, Ohio. He has 
no living children by his first wife ; by his second marriage he had 
three sons, Hewitt F. and Donald and an infant son. Mr. Bennett 
6 — iii 



82 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

is an active member of the Black Earth Camp of the Modern Wood- 
men of America. 

Egbert Bennett, one of the pioneers of Dane county, now living 
retired in the town of Dunn, was born in Albany, N. Y., June 4, 
1819. His father. William C. Bennett was born in Stephenson, 
Rensselaer county, N. Y., and his grandfather, whose name was 
also William C. Bennett, was a native of Connecticut from whence 
he came to Stephenson, N. Y., purchased land, engaged in farming, 
and there spent the remainder of his days. The father of the sub- 
ject of this sketch enlisted as a volunteer for the War of 1812, but 
was never called into the service. He learned the trade of a tanner 
and currier, and went to Albany, N. Y., as a young man, where he 
conducted the business until 1821. In the latter year he removed 
to Coblesk'll. Schoharie county, and continued the same business 
there until 1837, when he moved to Chenango county, purchased a 
farm and engaged in agricultural pursuits. He resided in Chen- 
ango county until 1848, and then came to Wisconsin and spent the 
remainder of his days in Dane county, dying in 1854. He chose as 
his helpmate in life Miss Laura Mygatt, who was born in Dutchess 
county, N. Y., the daughter of Isaac and Sarah (Smith) Mygatt. 
After her husband's death Mrs. Bennett returned to New York for 
the purpose of visiting friends and she died in Albany county of 
that state. Two children were reared by this couple Egbert and 
Isaac M. Egbert Bennett was reared to manhood in his native 
state and educated in the public schools, which, though limited, 
were better than the average existing in that day. He resided with 
his parents until 1848, and during the last few years of that time 
was in charge of their farm. In 1846 he made his first visit to the 
territory of Wisconsin and purchased a tract of land at where is 
now situated the village of Oregon in Dane county. After a short 
stay there he returned to his Eastern home and remained until 1848, 
when he again came to Wisconsin, this time for the purpose of mak- 
ing a permanent settlement in Dane county. His first employment 
in the embryo Badger state was cradling wheat for a neighbor, and 
he continued to work as a farm hand for a short time. Dane 
county' was then but sparsely settled, Stoughton was a village of 
about 300 inhabitants, Madison had about 2,000, with two 
hotels and a bank, and much of the land on all sides of the new state 
capital was still owned by the government. Deer and other wild 
animals roamed at will over the unpreempted soil with a freedom 
born of a common and undisputed possession. Home-made wagons 
were in general use, oxen were used almost exclusively as beasts 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 83 

of burden, and in the absence of railroads the farmers' grain was 
hauled to Milwaukee. Mr. Bennett says that in those days families 
who lived two miles west of his residence would come to a spring 
on his farm every day and get their water supply. A short time 
subsequent to the date of his permanent settlement in Dane county, 
Mr. Bennett purchased ten acres of land, upon which now stands 
the principal part of the village of Oregon, erected a home, and 
while residing there improved the first tract of land which he had 
purchased. The bank building in Oregon occupies the site of the 
residence then erected by Mr. Bennett, and it was the first frame 
building to appear in the village. In 1857 Mr. Bennett disposed of 
the ten acres mentioned and purchased a tract of eighty acres in 
section 31 of the town of Dunn, having at the time a frame house 
and forty acres broken. ' He began at once to make further im- 
provements on the place and was soon the owner of two hundred 
and ten acres, with good buildings, which has been his homestead 
for years. Aside from this he accumulated one hundred and twenty 
acres more, part of which he sold and the remainder he gave away. 
Mr. Bennett was married, February 9, 1840, to Miss Margaret Mir- 
anda Holmes, who was born in Albany, N. Y., the daughter of John 
and Alma (Robbins) Holmes. Mrs. Bennett died October 16, 1884, 
having become the mother of two children, the names of whom and 
other facts concerning them are as follows : Huldah Celestia, the 
eldest, was born December 1, 1840, and is the wife of Mason M. 
Green, of Estilene, S. D., and the mother of two children, George 
and Hattie. William C, the second child, was born on March 4, 
1843, married Louisa Griffin, a native of Albany county, N. Y., 
and died October 5, 1877, having become the father of five children, 
two of whom are now living — William C. and Lewis J., both of 
whom are practicing physicians in the village of Oregon. Mr. 
Bennett was formerly a Whig and cast his first presidential vote for 
William Henry Harrison, but he has been a Republican since the 
formation of that party. He was the first postmaster of Oregon, 
receiving his appointment from President Pierce, and was chair- 
man of the town of Dunn in 1864 and has served on the side board 
four terms. He joined the Masonic lodge at Evansville, Wis., in 
1854. Although eighty-seven years of age, he is in full possession 
of his faculties, congenial, generous, exceedingly sociable and hos- 
pitable, and is ever endeavoring to please others. 

Michael Berg is a retired pioneer farmer of the town of Perry 
and a veteran of the Civil War. His parents, Iver and Carrie Berg, 
were natives of Norway, where Mr. Berg served for a time in the 



84 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

army. Michael was born in Norway, October 13, 1830, and came to 
Wisconsin in 1853 with several brothers and sisters. For a few 
years he worked out by the day and then purchased eighty acres in 
the town of Perry, where he lived ten years. He then sold this 
property at a considerable profit and purchased one hundred and 
forty acres also in the town of Perry, to which was later added one 
hundred and sixty acres. Mr. Berg has now a fine property, well- 
equipped, and a large proportion of it under cultivation. His suc- 
cess has been earned by untiring energy and patience. Iver Berg 
had six children, of whom five came to America. Ever and Austin 
reside in Iowa; Ole in Trempeleau county. Wis.; Anna in Prim- 
rose and Ingebor in Norway. Michael served the Union cause 
during the Civil War as a private in the Twenty-second Regiment 
of Wiscons'n Volunteer Infantry. His detachment was engaged in 
guard duty and Mr. Berg served from October, 1864 to May, 1865, 
when he was discharged at Madison. In October, 1856, he married 
Miss Barbara Haaverud, born July 26, 1833, daughter of Knudt and 
Christina Haaverud, the former of whom never come to America. 
Eleven children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Berg; Carrie (deceased) ; 
Ever married Emma Johnson and lives in Perry ; Knudt (de- 
ceased) ; Christine married Oliver Iverson and resides in Kossuth 
county, Iowa ; Carrie lives with her parents ; Anna Olena is the 
w'fe of George Matson of Moscow, Iowa county; Evan married 
Annie Stenseth and lives in Sioux county, Iowa ; Carena is the wife 
of John Jensvold of Kossuth county, Iowa ; Anna Berthine is Mrs. 
Edward Benson of Mount Horeb ; Ingebor married Theodore 
Johnson and lives in Clark county. Wis. ; Henry lives with his par- 
ents. Mr. Berg is allied with the Republican party and is a mem- 
ber of the Norwegian Lutheran church. 

John B. Berge, a retired farmer, living in the village of Deerfield, 
was born at Voss, Norway, January 7, 1832. both his parents, Bun- 
gel and Mary (Golickson) Johnson, being natives of that country. 
Mr. Berge received a moderate education in the schools of Norway, 
and in 1850 came alone to America, making his way directly to 
Dane county. He bought one hundred and sixty acres of land 
from his brother, who had purchased it from the government a 
short time before, and began farming. In 1890 he bought some lots 
in the village of Deerfield and built the house in which he now lives. 
However, he still owns the farm, which is now conducted by his 
son. In politics he belongs to the Republican party ; has served five 
terms as town treasurer ; four terms as assessor ; and has several 
times been elected as a member of the board of supervisors. He is 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 85 

a member of the Norwegian Lutheran church, and is a man of high 
moral principles, noted for his generosity. In the fall of 1855 he 
married Angeline Michelson Erdall, daughter of Michael Erdall, 
and they have the following children : Bungel and Michael on the 
home farm in Dane county ; Nickoli in Vernon county ; Tena, mar- 
ried Peter B. Winde of Deerfield ; Ellen, married Andrew Hollman, 
St. Croix county. 

Ole O. Berge, who carries on a general farming business in the 
town of Dunn, is an experienced farmer and has lived in the vicinity 
of Dunn for nearly thirty years. Born in Tellemarken, Norway, 
June 14, 1862, he came to America when a boy of fifteen, with a cous- 
in, and located in the town of Dunn. Two of his brothers and a sis- 
ter came to America later but the remainder of the family, which in 
all numbered nine children, remained in Norway, where three have 
died. Mr. Berge's father, also Ole O., married Julia Osman and 
lived in Tellemarken, Norway, of which place both were natives. 
In 1866 she was left a widow and later married Ole Evenson of 
Tellemarken. They were members of the Lutheran church, in 
which they brought up their family. Ole O., the subject of this 
sketch, received such education as the common schools of Telle-' 
marken afforded and embarked for the west in 1877. For a time 
he worked out upon farms near Dunn and then rented a farm. In 
1896 he purchased twenty-two acres of farm land to which he soon 
added another tract of thirty-seven and one-half acres, which is his 
present home. All of the improvements have been made by Mr. 
Berge, who has spared no pains to make his property valuable. He 
bu'lt the comfortable home and has made many other additions to 
the farm upon which he raises much fine stock, also grain, tobacco, 
etc. Mr. Berge started in with no capital but by his ambition and 
energy and his own unaided efforts has made himself one of the 
substantial members of the community. He is a Republican but 
has never been an active politician and is a member of the Stough- 
ton Lutheran church. In 1889, he married Miss Gunil Knutson, a 
native of Norway. Seven children have been born to them ; Oscar, 
Carl, Gilmer, Alma, — who died in infancy, — Alma, the second, 
Clara and Olin. All attended the home schools and the Lutheran 
church. 

Peter B. Bergum, owner of one of the large farms of Dane county, 
located at DeForest, Wis., was born on the old homestead at Bristol, 
October 4, 1856. His parents were Botolf and Betsy (Farness) 
Bergum, both of whom were born in Norway. Botolf Bergum left 
the old country and arrived at Bristol about 1846 where he passed 



86 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

the remainder of his life. His wife immigrated to America in 1844. 
They were married in Dane county, and had five sons and one 
daughter, all of whom are living. They settled on a farm and by 
thrift and diligence greatly prospered, finally becoming the owners 
of six hundred acres of land. Botolf died in Bristol, March 23, 1904, 
and his wife died April 8, 1903. Peter Bergum was thus one of a 
family of several children. He received such an education as the 
common schools afforded. His father had been a strong Repub- 
lican and a member of the Lutheran church and the son followed 
in the foot-steps of his parent in politics and in religion, as well as 
in occupation. Farm-bred and farm-reared, he became an unusually 
successful agriculturist. He now owns two hundred and seventy 
acres of land, which he devotes to his extensive tobacco interests. 
He also makes a specialty of Poland China hogs, short-horned cat- 
tle, and thorough-bred Shropshire sheep, his interest in dairying 
having led him to serve as president of the creamery of North 
Bristol. He is honored and respected by the community and is one 
of the trustees of the Lutheran church. He married on October 30, 
1879, Susan Amundson, who was born in Chicago, March 14, 1862, 
the daughter of Arne and Inger Amundson, both of whom were 
born in Norway. Mr. Amundson came to this country when a 
young man, living first in Chicago and then in California. He re- 
turned to Norway, but came back to Chicago where he was married. 
After his marriage he settled in Hamden, Columbia county, Wis., 
in 1865, where he died in 1889, his wife surviving him until Septem- 
ber 2, 1905. Beside the father and mother, the family consisted of 
five children, three sons and one daughter of whom are now living. 
Seven children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Bergum as follows : 
Bennie, educated at Stoughton academy and the Dixon normal 
school, engaged in farming; Albert and Andrew, educated at Albion 
academy and both farmers ; Emma, a student of Albion academy ; 
Arthur, Mabel and Lena, the last three being at present at home. 

Charles Bernard, Sr. In retirement after a busy life covering a 
period of more than four score years, Charles Bernard, Sr., is en- 
joying his declining years at his home, 624 East Gorham street, liv- 
ing with his son, William P. Bernard, and family. His life of 
eighty-two years has been one of industry, frugality and thrift, and 
unt'l six years ago, when he fell and injured his spine, there were 
few days that he was not actively engaged in some useful form of 
work. Extremely fond of water and being connected with the boat 
building trade from his youth, Mr. Bernard finds a keen degree of 
pleasure, even at his advanced age, in gazing upon the broad ex- 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 87 

panse of Lake Mendota, a fine view of which his room at the family 
residence commands. In the summer months a favorite spot of the 
aged boat-builder was in an easy chair in the boat-house adjoining 
the pier where, with observation glasses, he would note the move- 
ments of the lake craft and watch the steamer Columbia, which 
was largely his own creation. Mr. Bernard was born in Baden, 
Germany, May 23, 1823, coming to this country when a lad of but 
eight years. He learned tailoring in New York city during a resi- 
dence there of thirteen years and at the same time became quite 
expert in cabinet making, which was accounted a desirable trade 
in those days, everything being done by hand. Just as Mr. Bern- 
ard was arriving at man's estate the Mexican War broke out and he 
was among the first to enroll, enlisting in the Second artillery of 
New York, with which regiment he saw five years of active service. 
He part'cipated in many battles and was with General Winfield 
Scott at the bombardment of Vera Cruz. The storming of the 
fortress of Chapultepec and the capitulation of the city of Mexico, 
he remembers well, and the fight at Cherabusco, where he was 
wounded, is vivid in his memory. Mr. Bernard was shot in the 
right shoulder by one of Colonel Reilly's deserters, the ball pene- 
trating the joint. After he felt the sting of the missile, he fired 
nineteen of the twenty cartridges in his belt, then fainted from loss 
of blood. After a hospital residence of several months, Mr. Bernard 
was appointed standing orderly under Colonel Monroe, a position 
he held until mustered out of the service. 

At the hosp'tal the ball was extracted from the wound and given 
to the young man who treasured it as a keep-sake until more re- 
cent days, when it disappeared. At the beginning of the Civil War 
Mr. Bernard joined the Sixth Wisconsin Battery, but was not long 
in the serv'ce. The desire to better his position in life induced the 
young man to look to the west for opportunity and he came to 
Madison in 1851. He had accumulated some money and this he en- 
trusted to a friend who promised to purchase with it a nice tract 
of land for him west of Madison, but he proved false to his agree- 
ment, took the money and skipped for parts unknown. This cir- 
cumstance changed his plans and there was no alternative but to 
begin tailoring again until he could accumulate enough to begin 
building row-boats. His shop was located on the lot owned by 
George Stoner. where now stands the Bethel Lutheran church. 
Mr. Bernard acquired his knowledge of the proper construction of 
boats, while working in the Brooklyn navy-yard where he was em- 
ployed as finisher on large vessels. The pointers thus gained stood 



88 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

him in good stead, for, with money gone, there was no prospect of 
getting a farm as he had planned and the boat business promised 
a livelihood. In 1890 he built his first steamboat, which he named 
Ann in honor of his daughter, who now lives in Cincinnati. After 
two years on Lake Mendota, the Anne was sold and was taken to 
Green Lake. In 18!).'$ the year of the world's fair in Chicago, Mr. 
Bernard built the Columbia, the work on both vessels being done 
by hand. Last spring the Columbia was dismantled and superseded 
by the new steamer, Wisconsin, built by the Madison Boat Com- 
pany and owned by William P. Bernard. In 1849 at New York 
c'ty. Miss Margaret Cartes became the wife of Mr. Bernard, com- 
ing to Madison with her husband in 1851. Nine children were born 
to them, five sons and four daughters. Those now living are 
Charles Bernard, Jr., chief of the city fire department of Madison ; 
Henry Bernard, captain of the fire department; William P. Bernard, 
boat and ice-yacht builder of Madison ; and George Bernard of Sioux 
City. Iowa, superintendent of a telephone company. Only two 
daughters are living, — Mrs. H. J. VanKeulen of Madison and Mrs. 
F. G. Pfafr of Cincinnati. Catherine died at an early age and a few 
months ago Mrs. Frank Baker passed away. A son, George, died 
in Chicago, and Mrs. Bernard was called seventeen years ago. Mr. 
Bernard's parents died at a comparatively early age, his father be- 
ing killed in battle and his mother died from grief soon after, at the 
age of forty-eight. He has but one brother living. This is Constan- 
tine, whose home is in New York city. Mr. Bernard is a member 
of the Mozart lodge, I. O. O. F., and has been connected with the 
old No. 2 fire company since 1859. Although seriously hampered 
physically by reason of the injury to his spine six years ago. this 
veteran of two wars finds enjoyment in reading and recalling events 
of earlier days. He is possessed of strength of memory quite re- 
markable. Mr. Bernard's career is one of that varied character 
common only to the generation now almost gone. 

Charles Bernard, Jr., chief of the Madison fire department, and 
a son of Charles Bernard, Sr., whose sketch appears elsewhere in 
this volume, was born in New York city on February 22, 1849. His 
early educational advantages were such as were afforded by the 
Mad'son schools and during the time he was not occupied in the 
pursuit of knowledge he assisted his father in his boating and fish- 
ing business. At the age of twenty-two he served his apprentice- 
ship as a painter and followed that vocation continuously up to 
1899. Six years of that time he was senior member of -the firm of 
Bernard, Dresen & Rhodes. Mr. Bernard's connection with the 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 89 

Madison fire department dates from 1871. In that year, just one 
week before the great Chicago fire, he became a member of the 
old E. W. Keyes steam engine company. Upon the disbandment 
of that company he joined the S. U. Pinney hose company, and for 
some time was its captain and treasurer. It was while he was a 
member of the hose company that the city council in 1882 elected 
him to the position of assistant chief of the department. He served 
in that capacity for seven years, and then was placed in charge of 
the department, which position he has most capably filled since that 
time. When the exigencies of the city required a larger depart- 
ment Mr. Bernard gave up his other business interests so as to de- 
vote his entire time to the needs of the department. In 1900 the de- 
partment was placed under civil service and he was chosen perma- 
nent chief by the board of fire and police commissioners. In politics 
the chief shows a preference for the Democratic party, but has never 
aspired to political office. His religious affiliations are with the 
Presbyterian church. In 1873 Chief Bernard married Miss Mary 
McConnell, a daughter of Richard McConnell of Madison. Two 
children have been born to this union. — Bertha, the wife of Charles 
Warlike of Madison, and Henry, a stenographer for the Portland 
safe company of Portland, Oregon. 

Dr. Joseph H. Bertrand s a leading physician and business man 
of De Forest, Wis., and. the descendant of a Canadian family. His 
father's father came from France to Canada and his mother's par- 
ents were early French settlers of Canada. Peter Bertrand, father 
of Joseph H., was born in Canada, educated there and there mar- 
ried to Miss Seraphine Courtmanche, also a native" of Canada. In 
1855 they came to Chicago and made that city the'r permanent 
home. Mr. Bertrand died in 1883 and his wife in 1905. They were 
members of the Church of Xotre Dame (Roman Catholic) in Chi- 
cago. Two sons and one daughter were born to them, all of whom 
are living. Joseph H. was born in Chicago, September 27, 1862, 
attended the public schools in that city and was graduated from the 
College of Physicians and Surgeons of the University of 111., in 1886. 
For a short time he practiced medicine in Chicago but, seeing a fav- 
orable opportunity in De Forest, has been ever since successfully 
engaged in practice there. Since 1891 he has been engaged in the 
drug business and also aided in the organization of the De Forest 
State Bank in 1902, of which he has always been president. A' 
Republican in political sympathy. Dr. Bertrand is first and foremost 
an active and public-spirited man, to whom De Forest can look for 
interest in her welfare. He is particularly accive in the promotion 



90 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

•of the best interests of the De Forest schools. In the Hansann 
Lumber Co., he is president and principal stock-holder. With the 
following' medical societies he is identified: the Central Wisconsin 
Medical Society, the Dane County Medical Society, the State 
Medical Society of Wisconsin, and the American Medical Associa- 
tion. He is also a member of the Wisconsin State Pharmaceutical 
Association and was instrumental in the organization of the De For- 
est Mutual Fire Insurance Co., of which he was President for a num- 
ber of years, November 26, 1891, he married Miss Tina Dahl, daugh- 
ter of N. L. Dahl, an account of whose life appears elsewhere. 
Three children have blessed the marriage ; Pearl, born February 13, 
1896 ; Norman and Joseph Bernard. The family are identified with 
the Lutheran church. 

George Bevitt, an inventor of Madison, was born at Stanley Hill, 
near the city of Wakefield, Yorkshire, England, October 2, 1819. 
He is a son of George and Elizabeth (Smith) Bevitt, both natives 
of Yorkshire. The father was a carpenter and mill-wright, and also 
built boats. The paternal grandfather, William Bevitt, lived near 
Thorn and was also a carpenter. He had a large family, owned 
considerable real estate, was the poor pay-master for two villages 
and kept a hotel. He also built and was the owner of several boats 
and two of his sons were sailors. George Bevitt, the subject of the 
sketch, is one of a family of ten children, and the only one to come 
to this country. He received a fair education in the schools of his 
native county, and after leaving school learned the trade of cabinet 
maker. At the age of twenty years he left home and for about two 
years worked at his trade as a journeyman in different localities. 
He then went to Bolton, where he found employment in an organ 
factory and later started in business for himself. In 1849 he came 
with his family to America, and on September 20, of that year, 
arrived at Madison. Here he worked for Darwin Clark and others 
as a cabinet maker, until he was employed by the Chicago, Milwau- 
kee & St. Paul Railroad Company to look after the pumping sta- 
tions, etc., in Illinois and Wisconsin. While thus employed he 
invented a tank-spout and valve which is now used by the leading- 
railroad companies of the United States. He also invented a car- 
coupler and various other appliances, having taken out altogether 
twenty-two patents. Mr. Bevitt was a member of the old fire com- 
pany No. 1, and was for six years a constable of Dane county. In 
1841, at Leeds, England, he married Miss Mary, daughter of Rob- 
ert and Mary Critoph, and to this marriage were born twelve chil- 
dren, only three of whom are now living. Mary E. is the wife of 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 91 

Rev. Justin Thompson, of Poynette, Wis. ; Henrietta J. lives with 
her father; and Hannah is the wife of William L. Steele, a whole- 
sale jeweler of Chicago, with offices in the Masonic Temple. The 
mother of these children died in March. 1902. 

Ole Bilstad, a well-known Cambridge druggist, has been engaged 
in mercantile business for a number of years. He is of Norwegian 
descent, both of his parents having been natives of Telemarken, 
Norway. His father. Even, was a farmer in Norway and was there 
wedded to Miss Dagna Midgard. In 1813. they came to the United 
States in a sa'ling vessel, which was twenty-one weeks in crossing 
the ocean. After a very short stay in New York, where the vessel 
arrived at length, the young couple came to Wisconsin and settled 
on a farm in Oakland, Jefferson county. Their property consisted 
of one hundred and sixty acres obtained from the government and 
on it they bu'lt a rude dug-out and proceeded to improve the farm. 
The first wheat they raised was carried ten miles to Lake Mills on 
the back of the pioneer farmer. Their efforts were crowned with 
success and later the dug-out was replaced by a snug cabin. In 
1866 the farm was sold and the family moved to Dane county and 
purchased eighty acres of improved farm property. Five children 
were born, but two of the older ones, Stena and Tollaf, died. Tona, 
the second child, now lives at Seattle, Wash. Gunel lives at Neils- 
ville, Wis. and Ole. the subject of this sketch, is the youngest son. 
The family attended the Lutheran church. Ole Bilstad was born 
at Oakland, Jefferson county, March 28, 1848, attended in the win- 
ter time such schools as the district afforded in those days and 
helped his parents on the farm in his spare time. October 24, 1872, 
he married Miss Ingobar Mandt and soon after came to Cambridge, 
where he was employed as clerk by T. C. Stagg, who owned a drug 
and general store. He became Mr. Stagg's partner and a dry goods 
department was added to the store. In 18"79, Mr. Bilstad bought 
the drug business and since that time has carried on a drug, sta- 
tionery, paint and wall-paper business. Mr. Bilstad is a Republ'can 
in political sympathy and has served as trustee and school clerk in 
the village for a long period. With his family he attends the Pres- 
byterian church of Cambridge. Mrs. Bilstad is the daughter of 
Gunder T. Mandt, a prominent citizen of Stoughton, Wis., whose 
sketch appears elsewhere. Four children were born to Mr. and 
Mrs. Bilstad: the oldest son. Gunerius E., attended the Cambridge 
schools, the Stoughton Academy and the University of Wisconsin ; 
was also graduated from the Northwestern Medical College and is a 
practicing physician of Cambridge. His wife was Miss Clara W ar- 



92 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

ren, daughter of Dr. George B. Warren, of Chicago, and they have 
a family of three children. George, Esther and May. The oldest 
daughter of Ole Bilstad is Sena D., wife of John Richardson of San 
Francisco, Cal. Clara, the next in age, is the wife of Will F. Krip- 
pen of Barron, Wis., and they have one child, Paul B. Florence O. 
Bilstad, the youngest daughter, resides with her parents at Cam- 
bridge. Mr. Bilstad is a member of the Masonic Blue Lodge No. 
135 of Cambridge and Dr. Bilstad belongs to the State Medical 
Society of Wisconsin. 

Wenzl Binstock, a farmer in the town of Cottage Grove, was born 
at Waterloo, Jefferson county, Wis., June 11, 1863. His father, 
whose name was also Wenzl, was a native of Austria. He grew to 
manhood in his native land, married there Hannah Freidel, and 
June, 1859, located in Jefferson county. After nine years on this 
farm they sold it and bought s'xty-eight acres in another locality. 
Here they added to their possessions until they owned a fine farm 
of one hundred and seventy acres, where they passed the remainder 
of their lives. Of their ten children six are still living. They are 
August, living retired at Waterloo ; Peter, a farmer at Sun Prairie ; 
Wenzl, the subject of this sketch ; Hannah, now Mrs. Frank Veith r 
of the town of Medina ; Rose, the wife of Ferdinand Vieth, of Wat- 
erloo, and Anna, the wife of Anton Thomas, of Sun Prairie. At 
the age of twenty-five years Wenzl Binstock, the son, began farm- 
ing for himself on a farm belonging to his father. This tract of 
land he afterward bought, and it has been his home ever since he 
commenced life on his own account. On April 17, 1888, he married 
Mary, daughter of Vincent and Victoria Semon, of the town of 
Medina, and Mrs. Binstock has been a real helpmate to her husband 
in all his undertakings. This, coupled with the fact that he is a man 
of super 'or judgment and untiring energy, accounts for his success. 
He and his wife have had the following children. Hattie, born 
March 2, 1889 ; Anna, born on March 28, 1891. and died on October 
5. 1891 ; twins, born March 25, 1893, one of them died in infancy and 
the other. John, died on September 8, 1893 ; Cary M , born March 26, 
L896. Vincent and Victoria Semon, had four children, viz: Mary, 
now Mrs. Wenzl Binstock ; Joseph, living in Illinois; John, at Ocon- 
omowoc, Wis.; and Vincent, living in the town of Medina. Mr. 
Binstock is a member of the Catholic church and in his political 
amTations is classed as an independent voter. He belongs to the 
Lodge of Woodmen at Cottage Grove, and to the Catholic Order of 
Foresters. 

William H. Birkinbine, one of the successful farmers and stock- 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 93 

growers of Sun Prairie township, was born :n Delafield, Waukesha 
county, Wisconsin, October 1, 1854, and is a son of Henry R. and 
May (Austin) Birkinbine, the former of whom was born in Penn- 
sylvania, in 1807, and the latter in the state of New York, Decem- 
ber 15, 1833. The father came to Madison, Wisconsin, in an early 
day and there erected the first saw mill for the late Andrew Proud- 
fit. He later settled near the city of Milwaukee, where he owned 
and operated a saw mill for a number of years. * He passed the clos- 
ing' years of his life in Nashville, Tennessee, where he was for some 
time employed as a machinist. He was both an engineer and mill- 
wright, and finally was placed on the retired 1st of pensioned en- 
gineers of the Nashville & Chattanooga Railroad. His twin 
brother, William, was awarded a prize as an engineer at the World's 
Columbian Exposition, in Chicago, in 1893. Henry Birk'nbine was 
a Democrat in politics, in earlier life, but supported the Republican 
cause from the time of Lincoln until his death, which occurred in 
1888. His w'dow now resides in Scotland, South Dakota, and of 
their four children two are living. The paternal grandfather of 
the subject of this sketch was a native of Germany, whence he em- 
migrated to America, locating in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, where 
he passed the remainder of his life, having been in independent cir- 
cumstances financially. The maternal grandfather, Hezekiah Aus- 
tin, was born in the state of New York, and came to Wisconsin 
about 1845, settling in Waukesha, where he engaged in the work 
of his trade, that of blacksmith. Both he and his wife, whose 
maiden name was Lucinda Stowell, cont'nued their residence in 
Wisconsin until their death. William H. Birkinbine completed his 
educational trailing in the public schools of Sun Prairie, and he has 
made farming his vocation in life, while he has won his way to 
success and independence through earnest and well directed per- 
sonal effort. He now owns a well improved and valuable farm of 
one hundred and ninety acres, one hundred acres of which are in 
the corporat'on of Sun Prairie and the remainder in Sun Prairie 
township, the tract being all in one body, however. In 1903 he 
erected his present large and well equipped barn, and in 1904 com- 
pleted his fine modern residence. He gives his attention to general 
farming ard stock raising and is alert and progressive in his methods 
and ideas, while he commands the esteem of all with whom he 
comes in contact. Mr. Birkinbine is a stanch Republican, but has 
never sought official preferment. He is identified with Sun Prairie 
Lodge, No. 143, Free and Accepted Masons, and attends and gives 
support to the Methodist Episcopal church, of which Mrs. Birkin- 



94 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

bine is a member; he assisted in the erection of the present church 
and parsonage of the denominat'on in Sun Prairie. On March 5, 
1884, Mr. Birkinbine was married to Miss Emma Haner, who was 
born in Bristol township, this county, November 19, 1854, being a 
daughter of Jacob and Sarah (Stroup) Haner, now residents of Sun 
Prairie. Mr. and Mrs. Birkinbine have five children, whose names, 
with respective dates of birth, are here entered : Eva, January 27, 
1885; Minnie, September 13, 1886; William Frank, October 4, 1888; 
Sarah, December 3. 1890 ; and Robert, November 10, 1893. 

Adolph Birrenkott is one of the leading stock-growers and far- 
mers of Cross Plains township, which has been h's home from the 
time of his birth, and no citizen of this locality is held in more dis- 
tinctive confidence, while his progressive ideas and marked business 
acumen need no farther voucher than that afforded in the success 
which stands to his credit and the attractive appearance of h's fine 
farm. He was born on the home farm of his parents, in section 28, 
this township, June 7, 1855, and is a son of Michael and Clara M. 
(Kalshauer) Birrenkott, both of whom were born in Rhenish Prus- 
sia ; they came to America as young folk and their marriage was 
solemnized after their arrival here, both having left the fatherland 
about the year 1852. Michael Birrenkott was born in Kerpen, Ger- 
many. September 7, 1830, a son of Adolph and Margaret Birrenkott, 
with whom he came to America when about twenty-two years of 
age. The family made Dane county their destination, and Michael 
and his father first purchased one hundred and twenty acres of wild 
land, in section 28, Cross Plains township, erecting a primative log 
house on the place and later making an addition to the same, while 
they grappled with the forest and improved a good farm. The par- 
ents of Michael here passed the remainder of their lives. Clara M. 
(Kalshauer) Birrenkott was born July 13, 1830, having been a 
daughter of John and Theresa Kalshauer, who came to Dane county 
about the same time as did the Birrenkott family. Michael Birren- 
kott became a man of prominence and influence in the community, 
having served as supervisor and assessor of his township and hav- 
ing been a stanch adherent of the Democratic party, while both he 
and his wife were communicants of the Catholic church. His death 
occurred January 12, 1874, and his widow entered into eternal rest 
February 26. 1884. Of the nine children the subject of this sketch 
was the first-born and eight of the number are living, one having 
died in infancy. The names of the others are here entered in order 
of their birth : Theresa, Gertrude, John, Jacob, Peter, Michael J. 
and Joseph. All are still resident of Dane county. Adolph Birren- 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 95 

kott was afforded the advantages of the schools of his native town- 
ship and after the death of his father he remained on the old home- 
stead with his mother until the time of his marriage. He still con- 
tinued on the old homestead, however, and eventually purchased 
the interests of the seven other heirs, and he now owns two hun- 
dred and eighty-six acres of well improved land. He has individu- 
ally made many improvements, in the way of erecting and remodel- 
ing buildings and the farm is one of the model places of the town- 
ship. He now gives his attention more especially to the raising of 
h'gh-grade live stock, having short-horn cattle, which he buys and 
feeds and then places on the market each year, while he also raises 
horses and swine and has a considerable dairy business. He is a 
great fancier of fine horses and has several standard-bred horses of 
distinctive beauty and value. He is a stalwart in the local camp of 
the Democratic party and he has been chairman of the township 
board twelve years, while he has held other local offices and is 
recognized as one of the political leaders of his township. He and 
lis wife are communicants of St. Mary's Catholic church, at Pine 
Bluff, and he was treasurer of the parish seven years. November 
24, 1885, Mr. Birrenkott was united in marriage to Miss Anna J. 
Conrad, who was born in Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, March 
21, 1866, being a daughter of John J. and Katherine (Herchenroder) 
Conrad, who were born in Germany. They settled in Lancaster 
county, Pennsylvania, where they remained until 1868, when they 
came to Dane county, Wisconsin, where they passed the remainder 
of their lives. Mr. and Mrs. Birrenkott have seven children, whose 
names and dates of birth are as follows : Margaret K., May 1, 1887 ; 
Michael J., May 21. 1888; Clara M., February 6, 1892; Theresa ]. r 
March 20, 1891; Katherine M., August 20, 1900; Anna E., Septem- 
ber 3, 1902 ; and A. Verner J., April 18. 1905. 

Grant E. Bissell operates one of the largest farms in Vienna town- 
ship. His father, Henry H. Bissell, was a native of New York and 
a pioneer of Columbia county, where he came with his father, Uri 
Bissell, in an early day. Henry Bissell was married in Columbia 
county, to Miss Cacindra Wilkins, also a native of New York, and 
lived for a number of years upon a farm. For some years past he 
has been the owner of a hardware store and lumber-yard at Brown- 
town, Wis., but has retired from active business and resides in 
Madison. Mr. and Mrs. Bissell are members of the Adventist 
church. Their family circle included nine sons and daughters, of 
whom all but two are now living. Grant E. Bissell, their son, was 
born at West Point, Columbia county. Wis., July 1, 1868, attended 



06 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

the common schools in Green and Dane counties and later the 
Northwestern Business College. For a short time he followed the 
profession of school-teaching but soon turned his attention to farm- 
ing and at present rents the David Robertson property of eight hun- 
dred acres and carries on an extensive general farming business be- 
sides raising short-horned cattle, Clydesdale horses and Poland 
China hogs. His sympathies are with the Prohibition movement 
and he is allied with that political party. February 15, 1893, Mr. Bis- 
sell married Miss Addie Dodge, who was born in Roxbury, Dane 
county. Wis., daughter of George and Ellen (Brereton) Dodge. 
Mr. Dodge was born in New York and his wife in Ireland. They 
were early settlers of Dane county and now reside in Roxbury 
township. To Mr. and Mrs. Bissell were born five children and all 
are yet at home. Ellen C. is the oldest daughter and (in order of 
their ages) the other members of the family are Albert H., Grace E., 
Dorothy E. and George E. The Bissell family are identified with 
the Methodist Episcopal church, in which they are active workers. 
Jerome Bixby is one of Dane county's pioneers, whose strong and 
hearty old age comes as the crown of an active and useful life. 
A native-born American, as were both his parents, Mr. Bixby is the 
son of George Bixby, who was born in Connecticut and Eunice 
(Taylor) Bixby, whose birthplace was near the Susquehanna river 
in New York. Their home was in Genessee county, N. Y., for 
many years and their later life was spent with their son Jerome, in 
Wisconsin. Five children were born to them : Mallisa, the eldest, 
is the wife of A. D. Stevens of Oregon, Wis. ; Hulda is Mrs. J. Smith 
and lives in Illinois; Jerome was the next son; the youngest son 
died and Elizabeth, the youngest daughter, married Mr. L. Miller 
and resides in Bureau county, 111. Jerome was born in Genessee 
county, N. Y., May 11, 1827, received such limited education as the 
schools of the district afforded at that time, and came west in 1845, 
When he was a boy it was customary for the children of the com- 
munity to go barefoot to church and the mistress of the house con- 
sidered herself fortunate if she had a calico dress to wear, home- 
spun being the common garb. Jerome Bixby located in Ogle 
county, 111., for one year, then came to Janesville, Wis., and drove 
a team between Janesville and Milwaukee for three years. His first 
visit to Stoughton was made in 1847 and in 184!) he located there. 
He saw the first lumber hauled for Stoughton buildings the first 
store opened by Luke Stoughton, etc. In 1851 he purchased eighty 
acres of farm land near Rutland and became one of the first resi- 
dents of that community. The original homestead has been en- 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 97 

larged and the farm now consists of one hundred and eighty acres 
of fine farm land, which has been improved in every way. It is 
known as the "Island Lake Farm," the name bestowed upon it by 
its owner, and upon it is carried on a general farming business, in- 
cluding the raising ol fine stock. Mr. Bixby also owns a large tract 
of land in Aurora county, S. Dak., and is heavily interested in Colo- 
rado mines. A Republican in sympathies Mr. 'Bixby has never de- 
voted much time to politics, though he has served as a member of 
the town board for two terms. For three years he was delegate 
to the Farmers' National Congress and has attended county conven- 
tions. He is a member of the Stoughton branch of the I. O. O. F. 
February 14, 1892, he married Miss Mary S. Emmons, daughter of 
Isaac and Emily Emmons, whose home is in New York state. 

Claus Black is one of the highly respected citizens of the town 
of Oregon, and although more than two-thirds of his life was spent 
in the far-away land of his birth he is contented in the knowledge 
that his sons and daughters are enjoying the privileges and advan- 
tages guaranteed to all in their adopted country, America. It is 
to the citizens of foreign birth such as he who is the subject of this 
brief review, that we are indebted, in part at least, for our material 
advancement and national prosperity. Mr. Black was born on the 
island of Lolland, Denmark. August 12, 1825, the son of Ole Larson 
and Bertha Marie (Hanson) Black. He grew to manhood in his 
native country, was educated in her schools, and then showed his 
loyalty and allegiance to the government by serving as a soldier in 
the war between Denmark and Germany, in 1848-50. In 1882, with 
his wife and ten children, he migrated to America. Three children 
preceded him to this country, and one remained in Denmark for 
another year. He first settled in the town of Union, Rock county, 
where he rented land for one year, and then bought a farm in the 
town of Oregon, Dane county, where he is now living a retired life. 
The difficulties confronting this family can hardly be real'zed by 
the native-born American. When they arrived on Wisconsin soil 
none of them could speak a word of English, but with unusual 
determ' nation and natural ability of a high order they succeeded 
nicely and were soon reckoned among the substantial citizens of the 
community in which they lived. Aside from the subject that first 

demanded his attention that inexorable "first law of nature" 

self-preservation, Mr. Black early took more than a passing interest 
in American institutions and especially affairs of a local nature. 
He became a convert to the political faith of the Democratic party 
and has given faithful allegiance to that organization since he first 
7— iii 



98 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

exercised the high prerogative that goes with American citizenship. 
The date of his marriage, which was solemnized in the country 
that gave him birth, was in October, 1856, and the lady of his choice 
was M'ss Sena Hansenaskafta, who was also born in Denmark, 
May 16, 1835, the daughter of Hans and Anna Dorothy (Barcusson) 
Hansenaskafta. The names of the children of Mr. and Mrs. Black, 
and other information concerning each of them are appropriately 
given in this connection : Theodore Olaf resides in South Dakota ; 
Theresa Maria is now wife of Mace Matson. of the town of Fitch- 
burg; Rasmus lives in Minnesota; Louis is given more extended 
mention on another page; Dora is the w'fe of Peter Miller, of the 
state of Washington ; Wilmer married Francis Neibur and resides 
in the town of Rutland ; Sena became the wife of Henry Lutz, of 
M'lwaukee, and is now deceased; Hans married Ida Wood and 
resides in the town of Dunn ; Christian resides at the old home ; 
Anna Marie is the wife of Halvar Rhinedahl, of Sun Prairie, Wis. ; 
Fredrika Amelia is the wife of William Bates, ol the town of 
Oregon ; Mary is the wife of John Bjoin, of Stoughton ; Nels Peter 
married Sadie Hagan and resides in the town of Oregon; and 
Lovie C. remains at home where he has charge of the farm and of 
the general affairs of the family. He was educated in the district 
schools of the town of Oregon, and is a young man of more than 
ordinary intelligence. He is an active member of the Knights of 
Pythias lodge at Oregon, and is exceedingly popular wherever 
known. 

Louis Black is one of the thrifty farmers of the town of Oregon, 
who, by his industry and careful management has won a posi- 
tion of influence in. the community in which he resides. He is one 
of the sons of Claus Black, who is given appropriate mention on 
another page of this volume, and with the family the subject of 
this review came to America in 1882. Louis Black was born in 
Denmark on December 20, 1863, and hence was eighteen years of 
age when the family decided to try their fortunes in the new world 
Having received a fair education in his native tongue, after locat- 
ing in America he supplemented the knowledge thus gained by 
attendance upon the district schools of the town of Oregon, and 
w'th good natural ability and force of character he was thus 
equipped to solve the problems of an independent career. He 
made his home upon the parental farm until 1894, and then pur- 
chased sixty acres of excellent land in the town of Oregon, upon 
which he has since lived, and which he has greatly improved by the 
erection of a fine residence, barns, fences, and the addition of other 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 99 

improvements necessary to the making of an up-to-date homestead. 
On March 7, 1894, he was married to Miss Anna Barmhisel, a native 
of the state of Ohio, but reared and educated in Grant county, Wis., 
to which place her parents had removed a few years after the close 
of the Civil War, in which her father had rendered valiant service 
as a Union soldier. Mr. Black takes an independent position in 
political matters, not allying - himself with any party organization, 
but giving his support to men and measures as they meet the 
approval of lis conscience and good judgement. His religious 
affiliation is with the Methodist Episcopal church. 

James Blake, a retired farmer of Mazomanie, was born in County 
Clare, Ireland, August 15, 1835. He is the eldest of three children 
born to Henry and Margaret (Mangen) Blake, the father a native 
of county L'merick and the mother of county Claire. The other 
two children were Mary and Henry. The mother died in Ireland 
in 1819, and the father married a widow named McGrath, but no 
children were born to his second marriage. In 1851 the family 
came to America on a sailing vessel, landing at Quebec, Canada, 
after a voyage of five weeks. From Quebec they came by way of 
the Great Lakes to Milwaukee, and from there to Janesville, Wis., 
where the father went to work on the construction of the Chicago, 
Milwaukee & St. Paul railroad, assisting to build the road as far 
west as M'ddleton. In 1855 he bought a tract of government land 
in the town of Vermont and lived on it for several years, when he 
went to Green county. Wis., and there lived the rest of his life. 
James Blake had but limited opportunities to acquire an educat'on. 
Soon after coming to this country he began driving team, grading 
the railroad on which his father was employed, and later secured 
employment as a farm hand. While thus engaged he studied nights 
and learned to read and write. He was next employed in a flour 
mill at Monticello for two years, after which he ran a mill for 
John Adams in Iowa county for some time. He then bought land 
of his father and began farming for himself. Five years later he 
sold this farm and bought two hundred acres in another locality, 
in the town of Black Earth, and lived there for twelve years. He 
then bought the four hundred and thirty-eight acres known as the 
"Summer Side" farm, and lived on it until 1889. He then sold this 
farm and took up his residence where he now lives, on ten acres of 
ground near the town of Mazomanie. In his political afhTations 
Mr. Blake is a Democrat. He has served on the town and village 
boards of Vermont, Black Earth and Mazomanie, and has been 
called at times to serve as a grand juror or a member of the jury 



100 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

in the United States district court. lie belongs to the Cathol'c 
church at Mazomanie and has been a liberal contributor to its many 
worthy charities. His brother Henry served four years in the Civil 
War as a private in Company A, Eleventh Wisconsin Infantry. 
On July 5, 1857, James Blake and Catherine Denen, daughter of 
Jeremiah Denen, a native of County Cork, were united in marriage, 
and to this union have been born eight children. George is the 
railroad agent at Inman, Kan. ; Patrick H. is cashier of a bank at 
Orofino, Idaho; James W. is president of the Fidelity state bank, 
of the same place ; Jeremiah J. is an attorney at Boise, Idaho ; 
Margaret R. is the wife of J. B. Carey, of Cloquet, Minn.; Kate, 
deceased, married J. P. O'Grady, cashier of the state bank of Ober- 
lin, Kan.; Helen is now the wife of J. P. O'Grady; Elzabeth is the 
wife of Edward L. Murphy, of Pennoc'k, Minn. All the children 
are well educated, six of them having taught school, and all are 
doing well. 

Henry D. Blanchar is a prominent farmer and stock-raiser of the 
town of Windsor which is his birth-place. He is the son of Wil- 
liard Blanchar, who came from New York to Wisconsin in 1848. 
Horace Blanchar, father of Williard, was born in New York and 
came to Dane county in 1850. He married Miss Lovisa Pyer, also 
a native of New York. Williard Blanchar was born in Chautau- 
qua county, N. Y. April 20, 1822, married Miss Elvira Cooper, born 
in 1824, and came to Dane county, Wis., in 1848. He obtained a 
farm of one hundred and twenty acres in the town of Windsor and 
lived there until 1883, when he sold the farm and went to live in 
Madison. Mrs Blanchar died in 1851. The second wife of Mr. 
Blanchar was Miss Mary Reynolds and now lives in Madison, Wis. 
Mr. Blanchar died in 1888 in Florida. Four children were born to the 
first marriage, of whom three are living, and five children blessed 
the second marriage, of whom three are living. Mr. Blanchar was 
prominent in the comuunity, held the office of superviaor and treas- 
urer in the town and was allied with the Republican party, as is 
also his son Henry. Henry D. Blanchar was born in Windsor 
township April 7, 1850, attended the home schools and the North- 
western business college in Madison, Wis. For a year he engaged 
in business in Souix Falls, S. D.. but preferred the occupation of 
farming and in 1S83, purchased the old homestead in Windsor, a 
farm of two hundred twenty-nine and one-half acres, which has 
since been his home. Mr. Blanchar devotes considerable attention 
to stock-raising and has Holstein cattle, Poland China hogs and 
Shropshire sheep, with which he is very successful. Mr. Blanchar 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 101 

is a Republican and has served as supervisor of the town for a num- 
ber of years. April 12, 1883, he married Miss Anna Chambers, who 
was born in Springfield township, Dane county, in September, 1855, 
daughter of William and Jane (Dunlap) Chambers, who were na- 
tives of Ireland and came to Springfield in 1853. In 1880 they went 
to live in Madison and after nine years residence in that city came 
to live in the home of Mr. Blanchar at Windsor. One son, Stan- 
ley E. was born to Mr. and Mrs. Blanchar in 1885, educated in the 
Windsor high school and married Miss Grace Rob nson, daughter 
of Barber F. Robinson. The family attend the Congregational 
church. 

Henry Bliefernicht is a well-known farmer and stock-raiser of 
De Forest. He is the son of Daniel Bliefernicht, who was born in 
Germany, July 7, 1800, and there married Miss Sophia Radio, also 
a native of Germany. Their married life was spent on a farm in 
Germany and Mrs. Bliefernicht died there in 1850, forty-five years 
of age. Ten children were born to them, of whom seven are now 
living. Mr. Bliefernicht came to the United States with his son 
Henry in 1852 and lived for a time in Watertown, Wisconsin. In 
1864 they located upon a farm in the town of Windsor and Daniel 
Bliefernicht lived until 1885. The family attended the Lutheran 
church of which their son Henry is a member. Henry was born in 
Germany, December 31, 1812, attended school there and afterward 
in Jefferson county. He early engaged in farming and commenced 
by renting, in 1864, the farm which is now his own. In 1868 he 
purchased the property, consisting of one hundred and sixty acres, 
and he has improved and equipped his farm until it has become a 
valuable property and a comfortable home. He makes a specialty 
of Polled Angus cattle and Poland China hogs. Mr. Bliefernicht 
has served the community as assessor and treasurer and super- 
visor of the town of Windsor and is allied with the Republican 
party. April 10, 1870, occurred his marriage to Miss Freada 
Klingenberg, born in Germany in 1850, daughter of John and Char- 
lotta (Knutz) Klingenberg. who came to the United States from 
Germany in 1853. Mr. Klingenberg was born in Germany in 1830 
and h's wife in 1827. After a short residence in Columbia county 
they moved to Morrisorfville, where Mrs. Klingenberg died in 1903 
and her husband still resides. Three of their seven children are 
living. To Mr. and Mrs. Bliefernicht have been born six children ; 
Regina, William, Daniel, Amelia, Martha and Hulda. 

John Bliven is the owner of a fine farm of one hundred and eighty 
acres in the town of Albion, which has been the home of the familv 



102 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

since 1843 and was the birth place of the present owner. His 
grandfather came from Washington county, N. J. to Alfred, N. Y. 
in an early day and there Horace, father of John, grew to manhood. 
Of a family of eight children but three came west, Silas, Horace and 
William. Silas went to Nebraska. William made his home in 
Evanston and Horace settled in 1839 where the city of Milton now 
stands. He was a shoe-maker by trade but engaged in farming in 
Wisconsin. In 1813 he went to Albion and purchased a farm of 
eighty acres to which he added from time to time until the property 
comprised one hundred and eighty-six acres. His first home was 
built of logs but he was successful in his enterprise and soon con- 
verted his farm into a profitable property with substantial buildings. 
Mr. Bliven belonged to the Seven Day Baptist church and was 
instrumental in the organization of a branch in that community, 
was a charter member of the church at Milton and also at Albion. 
Carpenter as well as shoe-maker and farmer, Mr. Bliven was em- 
ployed on many of the buildings of the neighborhood, gave his ser- 
vices as well as financial assistance to the erection of the Albion 
academy and was always a generous and public-spirited man. He 
was a Republican but never desired political office. In 1843 he 
married Miss Charlotte Clement of Dunham. Canada, and eight 
children were born to them ; William, who lives with his brother 
John, up on the old farm ; Mary J. who is Mrs. Buchanan of Jack- 
son, Mich. ; Susan M., Mrs. Alexander Campbell of Albion ; John B. ; 
Amos, who resides in Carthage, S. Dak ; James G., also 
on the farm ; Eliza, Mrs. Chas. Smith of Albion ; John G. who died i n 
infancy. Mrs. Bliven died in 1878 and her husband in 1881. John 
Bliven was born in Albion, attended the district schols and the 
Albion academy and has been occupied with farming since he was a 
a young man. January 15, 1875, he married Miss Julia Van Horn 
of Cambridge, who died November 10, 1893. The present Mrs. 
Bliven was Miss Jessie Van Horn, sister of Mr. Bliven's first wife 
and daughter of Nathan Van Horn, a pioneer of Jefferson county, 
who built the first woolen mill in Wisconsin. Mr. and Mrs. Bliven 
have three children : Marjorie, Marian and Doris. . The family are 
identified with the Seven Day Baptist church of Albion. 

Aslak Bohle is a native of Norway but. has been a resident of 
Perry township since he was a boy of thirteen and has for many 
years been engaged in farming in that vicinity. With his parents, 
Ole and Enger (Kmultson) Bohle, he came to the United States in 
1873 and settled in Dane county, Wisconsin. Ole was employed 
as a farm hand in Perry for several years and in 1883 purchased an 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 103 

eighty-acre farm, which he cleared and improved and made his per- 
manent home. For twenty years he owned this farm and but re- 
cently retired, sold the homestead and went to live with his son, 
Aslak. Seven children were born to Air. and Mrs. Ole Bohle, of 
whom Alask is the oldest son. Alask was born in Ordahl, Norway, 
October 22, 1861, attended school in Norway and continued his edu- 
cation in the district school of Perry near his home. At the age of 
twenty years Aslak left his father's home and purchased a piece of 
land in the town of Perry, one hundred and nineteen acres in extent, 
which is his present home. To this twenty-one and one-half acres 
more were added and the whole farm improved and converted into 
a profitable and valuable property, on which Mr. Bohle carries on a 
general farming business. In August, 1886, he married Miss Mila 
Anderson, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. (Milam) Anderson, residents 
of Iowa. Of the twelve children who blessed the marriage, but 
eight are living, all with their parents. In order of their ages, they 
are : Inda, Oliva, Amanda, Albert Edwin. Anna Amanda, Otto 
(deceased), Carol. Matilda (deceased), Melvin, twins who died in 
infancy and Thea. Mrs. Anderson was one of a large family, at- 
tended school in Norway and came to America with her parents 
when a young girl. She and her husband preserve their associa- 
tion with the Norwegian Lutheran church. Mr. Bohle is a member 
of the Republican party although not an active politician. 

Hon. Hans Borchsenius, retired, who makes his home at 717 Lang- 
don street, Madison, was born at Nestved, Island of Seeland, Den- 
mark, September 19, 1832. His parents, Carl W. and Elizabeth D. 
(Arneson) Borchsenius, never came to the United States, the father 
remaining in the mercantile business in Denmark until his death. 
Hans Borchsenius received his educational training at the academy 
in Nestved and in 1856 sailed for the New World. After two months 
in New York, he arrived in July of the same year, at the Badger capi- 
tal. In his native land he had been in the same business as his father, 
and after coming here had a hard struggle for a time to maintain 
himself, the difficulties of a new language and the other trials which 
a new citizen has to meet being hard to master. He was willing, 
however, and soon found opportunities to make a livelihood, doing 
any honorable work that came his way. For several months he 
drove the mail stage between Madison and Portage. He felt, how- 
ever, that the best means of accomplishing his object was to learn a 
trade, so he served an apprenticeship on the Norwegian American, a 
Democratic publication, and soon afterward was enabled to purchase 
the controlling interest in it, changing its name to the North Star. 



104 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

Through his publication he naturally became interested in politics 
and in 1858 was the candidate of the Democratic party for county 
clerk, being defeated by a small majority. Gen. Lucius Fairchild 
and Justice S. U. Pinney, both of whom later became famous in 
the annals of this commonwealth, were on the same ticket and were 
both defeated. In 1861 Mr. Borchsenius entered the army as adju- 
tant of the Fifteenth Wisconsin Infantry, but owing to severe illness 
he was compelled to resign before the cessation of hostilities. Be- 
fore entering the army he changed his allegiance from the Demo- 
cratic to the Republican party. After he returned from the war 
Governor Lewis, who was then secretary of state, appointed him to 
clerkship in his office, from which he was transferred to the state 
land department where he served for five years. He was then 
elected county clerk of Dane county and served as such four years. 
He was then appointed United States gauger and served one year. 
When Ludington ran for governor Mr. Borchsenius published a 
campaign paper called "The Wisconsin Banner", which was instru- 
mental in electing the governor and secretary of state on the Repub- 
lican ticket. The governor then appointed Mr. Borchsenius tim- 
ber agent for the state to protect the railroad lands on the Chippewa 
and Red Cedar rivers. While serving in this capacity he became 
interested in northern Wisconsin and in 1877 he removed to Bald- 
win. Wis., to engage in the real estate and loan business. While 
residing in Baldwin, he was twice elected president of the village. 
He was also a member of the county board and was elected chair- 
man of the same. In 1891 President Harrison appointed Mr. Borch- 
senius chief of the internal revenue division in the treasury depart- 
ment, Washington, D. C, in which capacity he served until Cleve- 
land was elected. In 1896 Mr. Borchsenius was elected a member 
of the legislature from St. Croix county intending that this should 
be his last political office. At the end of his legislative term Mr. 
Borchsenius retired from active life and returned to Madison to 
live, building the home which he now occupies. In religious mat- 
ters he is identified with the Lutheran church. On November 10, 
1859, he married Miss Martha M. Bakke, born in Norway, a daugh- 
ter of Hans E. Bakke, of Christiana. This union has been blessed 
with three children — William Carl, of Baldwin ; Dora H., widow 
of Emil Rasmussen, who now makes her home with her father; 
and George Valdemar, late clerk of the United States court in 
Alaska. Mrs. Rasmussen has a daughter Edith, who intends to 
enter the University of Wisconsin in the fall of 1906. 

Judge Arthur B. Braley was born at Parry, Wyoming county, 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 105 

N. Y., February 11. 1824, the only son of Rufus and Hepzee (Fos- 
ter) Braley. Rufus Braley was a native of Adams, Mass., and one 
of the early settlers of western New York ; Hepzee Braley was the 
daughter of Daniel Foster, a soldier in the Revolution, who fought 
at the battle of Monmouth church ; she was a Quaker and lived 
and died in that faith, her pure life aiding materially in the forma- 
tion of her son's character. Arthur B. suffered the loss of his 
father when only fifteen years old, and thrown on his own resources, 
his opportunities for obtaining an education were very limited. 
He went to live with a wealthy relative for a short time and while 
in h's home found an opportunity to indulge his strong fondness 
for the immortal bard of Avon, a fondness which lasted to the end 
of his days, and rendered him in after life one of the most scholarly 
critics of Shakespeare in Madison. In the spring of 1846 he emi- 
grated to Wiscons'n, first settling at Delavan, where he completed 
his law studies, and in 1848 was admitted to the bar in Madison. 
He moved to Madison in 1852. In 1856, when Madison was in- 
corporated as a city, he was elected first police justice, and held 
that office for three successive terms of two years each. In 1864 
he was elected a member of the Madison common council, serving 
for three years. During the presidential campaign of 1864, he was 
in editorial charge of the "Wisconsin Daily Patriot," and, on the 
close of the campa'gn, returned to the practice of his profession. 
In the spring of 1868 he was elected city attorney of Madison, and 
during the presidential campaign of this year again took up edi- 
torial work as chief political editor of the "Madison Daily Demo- 
crat." In the spring of 1869 he moved to the village of Waukesha, 
Wis., where he remained until the fall of 1870. He then returned 
to Madison, and in the spring of 1872 was re-elected police jus- 
tice, without opposition. The legislature created the municipal 
court for the city of Madison and county of Dane in 1873, and 
Judge Braley was elected, without opposition, its first judge in 
1874, for a term of six years. He was re-elected in 1880 and again 
in 1886. Meanwhile the criminal jurisdiction of the court was 
much enlarged in 1875 and made concurrent with that of the cir- 
cuit court in all crimes except that of murder, and it now became 
a court of record. 

Judge Braley was strictly honest in the discharge of his official 
dut'es, and those who knew him best say that, if he erred, it was 
from error of judgment as he had the highest regard for the duties 
of his office. He was a man of fine literary attainments, and his 
character sketches of the great poet Shakespeare are especially ad- 



106 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

mired. Mr. Braley was married February 11, 1855, at Madison, to 
Miss Philida Stevens; none of their three children survived, and 
Mrs. Braley died in 1879. In 1880 he was again maried, to 
Alta E. Jordan, of Allegany county, N. Y., and one son, A. Burton 
Braley, a graduate of the University of Wisconsin, was born to 
them. Judge Braley died while serving his third term as muni- 
cipal judge, January 31, 1889. 

Prof. Thomas H. Brand, head of the Voice Building and Voice 
Culture Institute of Madison, was born in New York city, May 16, 
1836. He is a son, and only survivor of three children, of Enoch 
Francis and Catherine ( Mahabe ) Brand, the former a native of 
England and the latter of Toulon, France. A' sister, Kittie, (Mrs. 
J. B. Merrill,) and her four children were burned to death in the 
Kenosha hotel fire of 1871. Prof. Brand received his preliminary 
education in New York, and was graduated from the Bacon school 
in Cincinnati, Ohio. He also attended Lawrence University at Ap- 
pleton. Wis., and was for a time a student in the University of 
Wisconsin, having been a classmate of the Hon. W r . F. Vilas at 
the latter institution. Upon the completion of h's studies he went 
into the office of Dr. Galan Rood of Stevens Point, Wis. For a time 
he engaged in the practice of medicine, but the work was not pleas- 
ing and he went into voice building. In 1860 he accepted a posi- 
tion as instructor in the Northwestern Military college of Fulton, 
111. In this institution he lectured on political economy, general 
business and taught French for two years and at the same time 
was associated with the Lyons (Iowa) Female College. For the 
two years following he was deputy revenue collector for the fifth 
district of Iowa, having headquarters at Des Moines. In 1867 he 
came to Madison, his mother and sister having already located here. 
He immed'ately opened a conservatory of music, had charge of the 
music in St. Raphael's, the Congregational and the Baptist 
churches. He was also at the head of the music department of the 
city schools and had special classes in the University of Wisconsin. 
Some t'me later Prof. Brand was asked to take charge of the gen- 
eral outside business of the Redpath Lyceum bureau, and for 
twenty-three years he served in this capacity, severing his con- 
nection with the company in 1900. This work took him to prac- 
tically every country of the world and he has visited at different 
times England, Ireland, Wales, Scotland, Belgium, France, Austro- 
Hungary. Russia. Poland, Norway, Sweden and Denmark. He 
has managed the lecturing tours of Matthew Arnold, Cannon 
Farrer, Justin McCarthy, R. A. Proctor, the astronomer, Robert J. 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 107 

Burdette, George D. Wendling, and Robert Mclntyre ; was for eight 
years special manager for T. De WittTalmadge, and for five years 
served in the same capacity for John B. Gough. Since 1900 he has 
"been in Madison conducting, with eminent success, a voice build- 
ing institute. He has had many noted pupils, among them Hon. 
Robert M. La Follette, Hon. Emil Baensch, Judge Anthony Dono- 
van and Hon. T. C. Richmond. Prof. Brand was married in 1866 to 
Martha E., daughter of Asa Goodrich of New York, and to this 
union have been born three children — Clarence I., the eldest — 
familiarly known as "Cad" Brand, and famous as the cartoonist of 
the Milwaukee Sentinel, — married Miss Ada Van Dusen of South 
Madison, and has one child, Clarence Van Dusen Brand. The sec- 
ond child, Kittie, is the wife of George E. Sullivan of Stillwater, 
Minn., and the mother of three children, — Catherine, Daniel and 
Goodrich. The youngest daughter, Bessie G., is the secretary of 
the University School of Music. Mrs. Brand is a member of the 
School of Music faculty, instructing in mandolin, guitar and banjo. 
For ten years she was at the head of the department of music of 
the city schools, and for twelve years was a member of the Con- 
gregational cho'r, of which church both she and her husband are 
members. Prof. Brand is also a member of the Blue Lodge, Free 
and Accepted Masons. He is a man of broad culture, exceedingly 
"well read, combining with rare good judgment an intellectual force 
seldom met with. A man of fine physique, his dignified carriage 
marks him as the embodiment of moral power. He has a keen 
insight into men and events, and into the motives which govern 
them. Genial, courteous, kindly, one who knows him does not 
wonder that he was picked from among hundreds of others for 
positions of trust and honor. 

Selwyn Augustus Brant was born August 19, 1857, in Decatur 
county, Iowa, and is the son of Charles Alexander and Armina 
(Ensign) Brant. The parents moved to LaGrange, Ind., in 1863, 
where the mother died Sept. 4, 1866. Selwyn A. was reared at La 
Grange and educated in the public schools of that town. Since 
1883 he has been engaged in publishing books and in 1887 came to 
Madison. He was married, May 29, 1889, to Anna Katherine, 
daughter of William and Katherine Alice (Dreher) Swint, of Boon- 
ville, Ind. Mrs. Brant was born Dec. 2, 1868 in Louisville, Ky.. 
and was educated. at the convent of Saint Mary's of the Woods, 
near Terre Haute, Ind. Mr. and Mrs. Brant have four children : 
Charles William, born January 31, 1893; Selwyn Augustus. Jr., 



108 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

born March 24, 1805 ; Paul Swint, born March 10. 1001 ; Swint En- 
sign, born June 14, 1003. 

George H. Breitenbach, of the firm of George C. Breitenbach & 
Son, is a familiar figure in Madison business circles. The success- 
ful firm of merchants has borne its present name since 1800 and 
does a large retail business. George C. Breitenbach, father of 
George H. has lived in Madison since 1850. With his father, also 
George, he came from his native Bavaria in 1846, when he was 
three years old, and lived for four years near Rochester, N. Y. 
George C. was a wagon-maker and after his arrival in Madison- in 
1850. worked at his trade and was for some time employed by the 
Fuller & Johnson Co. as foreman in the wood department. In 
1800 he engaged in the grocery business in the 800 block on Will- 
iamson street and carried on that business until his death in 1004. 
Mr. and Mrs. Breitenbach have always been devoted members of 
the Church of the Holy Redeemer and Mr. Breitenbach was a char- 
ter member of St. Michael's Society of that church. Thirteen 
children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Breitenbach. George H. is the 
oldest son and manager of the grocery store at 851-53 Williamson 
street. John P. and Julius, managers of the shoe business of Brei- 
tenbach Bros., South Pinckney St., Anna T. is Mrs. J. E. Dengel 
and lives on Jenifer St., Madison. Amelia and Bertha live with 
their mother. Edward W. is a member of a theatrical company. 
Agnes is stenographer for Murphy & Kroncke, Madison. Otto 
works in the store. Mabel is a teacher of music. Louisa and Vera 
and Elizabeth reside with their mother at the old home. George H. 
was born in Madison, February 23. 1868, attended the Madison 
public schools and learned the book-binder's art with Grimm Bros. 
He was also engaged in the same work for a time in Chicago and 
in the United States printing offices at Washington, D. C, but re- 
turned to Madison to engage in his present business in 1800. Oc- 
tober 18, 1808, he married Miss Bertha Mayer, daughter of Casper 
Mayer and sister of Mrs. Stephen Baas. Mr. Breitenbach takes an 
active interest in politics, has served on the county board and is a 
member of the Democratic party. With his wife he attends the 
Church of the Holy Redeemer and is a prominent member of St. 
Michael's Society. He is a member and officer of the B. P. O. E. 
of Mad' son and takes an active interest in the affairs of the order. 

John P. Breitenbach, of the firm of Breitenbach Bros., was born 
in Madison. Aug. 3, 1868. His parents were George C. and Eliza- 
beth (Kremer) Breitenbach, both natives of Germany, the father 
having been born in the village of Breitenbach, named after this 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 109 

family. The mother was born in Luxembourg. George C. Breit- 
enbach was born Aug. 2, 1843, and left his native land with his 
parents when but three years of age. The family lived for short 
periods in New York and Milwaukee and arrived in Madison, May 
2, 1850. George Breitenbach had one brother, Henry, and three 
s'sters, Margaret, Mrs. John Dickert of Madison ; Mary, Mrs. 
Joseph Splonskowski of Marion, S. D. ; and Teresa, who lives with 
her brother. The marriage of George Breitenbach and his wife, 
Elizabeth, took place in 1865, and to them were born fourteen 
children : George H., — one of the firm of Breitenbach & Son, groc- 
ers, of Madison, — who married Bertha Mayer; John Peter, the 
subject of this sketch; Ann T., Mrs. John Dengel, resides in Madi- 
son, and is the mother of two children, Irene and Philip; Julius 
Herman, member of the firm of Breitenbach Bros., married Mary 
Edgar and has three children, Janet Mary, William Edgar and 
George Charles ; Amelia C., Bertha M., and Elizabeth, living in 
Madison ; Edward M., lives in Chicago, where he is stage manager 
of one of the theaters; Agnes, a stenographer; Otto C, a clerk in 
the store of Breitenbach Bros. ; Mabel, teacher of music in Madi- 
son ; Lou'se and Vera in the public schools. Frank, a twin of 
Bertha, died in 1881 at the age of four years. John P. received his 
education in the public and parochial schools of Madison. After 
completing his school work he was employed in a bank, serving 
as bookkeeper some fourteen years. In 1897 he entered the boot 
and shoe business in the firm of Breitenbach Bros. In 1901 and 
1902 he served as alderman from the sixth ward of the city, and 
for the same time was the council's representative on the school 
board. On June 22, 1893, he married Matilda, daughter of Herman 
and Marie (Krueger) Schubring, of Sauk City. Wis. Mr. and Mrs. 
Schubring now make their home in Madison. Mr. and Mrs. 
Breitenbach have four children, — Arthur August, Lillian Gertrude, 
Robert Eugene and Florence Louise. Both Mr. Breitenbach and 
his wife are members of the Holy Redeemer Catholic church, and 
he is also a member of the Knights of Columbus, of the Woodmen 
of the World and of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, 
of which latter organization he is the secretary. Mr. Breitenbach 
is a man of fine physique, unlimited good humor and an excellent 
example of the successful business man. He owns and lives in a 
fine residence in the sixth ward. 

Samuel D. Brickson, a substantial farmer of the town of Pleasant 
Springs, was born in the town of Rutland, Dane county, December 
5, 1867. He is a son of Daniel and Annie (Berge) Brickson. natives 



110 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

of Sorgen, Norway, where the father was a fiisherman and farmer. 
On coming to Amer'ca, Daniel Brickson settled first in Cottage 
Grove. Then he bought a small farm in Rutland and later sold 
it and located about half a mile east of Stoughton. Then he re- 
moved again to a farm of sixty-seven acres in Cottage Grove town- 
ship, where he remained for twenty-two years. Daniel Brickson 
was always a farmer. He died March 7, 1902, and his wife passed 
away in 1892. He always voted the Republican ticket and was 
active in the work of the Lutheran church, of which he was a mem- 
ber. Seven children were born to him and his wife. They are 
Brick, of Stoughton, Wis. ; Belle, wife of Hans Wolf of Hartland,. 
Minn. ; Nels, a farmer near Janesville, Wis. ; Ole, who is farming 
the old place near Cottage Grove ; John, employed in a packing 
house in Lincoln, Neb. ; Samuel D. ; and Albert, engaged in the in- 
surance business in Deerfield, Wis. Samuel D. Brickson received 
his education in the district schools of the vicinity, had the benefit 
of two terms in Albion Academy and one term in the Stoughton 
schools. Until he was twenty-four years old he lived at home,, 
and then he started farming "on his own hook." In 1897 he 
bought what was known as the Alma place of one hundred and ten 
acres in Pleasant Springs and later added sixty acres to it. He has 
made many improvements on the place, chief among which is the 
fine residence built in 1901. Politically he is a Republican and as 
such has served as school clerk for five years, and as road overseer. 
He is a regular attendant and member of Christ Lutheran church 
of Stoughton. On April 12, 1891, he married Cora, daughter of 
Iver and Adeline (Alderman) Anderson, of Pleasant Springs. This 
union has been blessed with seven children, Derby, Iver. Aves, 
Silas. Arthur, Walter, and Howard. The four eldest children at- 
tend the district school. By his energy and good judgment Mr. 
Brickson has risen to a place of influence in the community. 

Stanley Jerome Briggs, "M. D., one of the able and popular physi- 
cians and surgeons of the younger generation in Dane county, is 
successfully established in the practice of his profession in Sun 
Prairie. He was born at Dodgeville, Iowa county, Wisconsin, 
October 11, 1877, and is a son of Melanthon J. and Eliza Jane (Ed- 
wards) Briggs, the former of whom was born in Kalamazoo, Mich- 
igan, March 31, 1846, and the latter in Dodgeville, Wisconsin. 
March 27, 1849. Isaac U. Briggs, grandfather of the doctor, was 
born and reared in the state of Vermont, and became one of the 
pioneers of Michigan, while he passed the closing days of his life 
in Mazomanie, Dane county, Wisconsin. His wife, whose maiden 



BIOGRAPHICAL. HI 

name was Salome Hickox, was a native of Canandaigua, Xew York, 
and she died in Rockford, Illinois. The maternal grandfather of 
Dr. Briggs was William Edwards, a native of Wales, whence he 
came to America when young; he was one of the argonauts who* 
went to California in search of gold, and he died in that state, in 
1860, while his wife, whose maiden name was Esther Davis and 
who was a native of Staffordshire, England, was a resident of 
Dodgeville, Wisconsin, at the time of her death. Melanthon J. 
Briggs secured his early educational training in the schools of 
Mazomanie, Wisconsin, after which he studied law under the pre- 
ceptorship of Asa M. Eastland, of Richland Center, this state, being 
admitted to the bar in 1871. He was thereafter engaged in the 
practice of his profess'on for a number of years in Dodgeville, 
Wisconsin , becoming one of the representative members of the bar 
of the state. He and his wife, the latter now deceased, resided in 
the city of Philadelphia, Pennsylvan'a, where he is engaged in the 
work of his profession. He is a stanch adherent of the Democratic- 
party and was prominent in public affairs in Iowa county, Wis- 
cons'n, for many years. He served as district atttorney, repre- 
sented the county in the state legislature and was the candidate of 
his party for the office of attorney general of the state, being de- 
feated by normal political exigencies. He served about two years 
as postmaster at Dodgeville. January 23, 1862, he enlisted in Com- 
pany H, Seventeenth Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry, being made- 
sergeant of his company, and served two years as color bearer,, 
while he took part in seventeen important engagements, continu- 
ing in the ranks of the brave "boys in blue" until the Union arms- 
were crowned with victory. February 23, 1865, he was promoted' 
to the office of second l'eutenant and transferred to Company A, 
Forty-eighth Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry, with which he served 
until the close of the war. His father served as a major in the 
war of 1812. Dr. Stanley J. Briggs completed the curriculum of 
the Dodgeville high school, after which he was for two years a 
student in the literary department of the University of Chicago, 
also taking a course of lectures in the medical department of that 
institution, while in 1900 he was graduated from Rush Medical Col- 
lege, Chicago, one of the most celebrated medical schools of the 
west, duly receving his degree of Doctor of Medicine. After the 
graduation he passed two years in most profitable work as interne 
in Cook County Hospital, in the western metropolis, and he then 
became house physician at the Wisconsin Hospital for the Insane 
at Mendota, where he served until December, 1901, when he lo- 



112 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

cated in Sun Prairie. There he has built up a very successful gen- 
eral practice, and he enjoys the esteem of his professional confreres, 
being a close observer of the unwritten code of ethics, and also 
enjoys marked popularity in social circles. He is a member of the 
American Aledical Association, the Wisconsin Medical Society, 
and the Dane County Medical Society, and is affiliated with the 
Modern Woodmen of America and the Equitable Fraternal Union. 
In polit'cs Dr. Briggs maintains an independent attitude. 

The military history of the direct ancestors of Dr. Briggs is re- 
markable. Beside the service of his father in the Civil War and 
that of his grandfather in the War of 1812, already noted, his great 
grandfather served in the Revolution and his great great-grand- 
father in the French and Indian War. 

Charles Ilsley Brigham is a descendant of the family that gave 
to Dane county its first permanent settler, and the place where 
he now resides is near the location made historical by his great- 
uncle, Ebenezer Brigham, as the spot on which the first house was 
erected to shelter a white man in what is now the important county 
of Dane. David Brigham, a brother of Ebenezer and the grand- 
father of the subject of thns review, was also a very early resident 
of this section of the Badger state. He was born in Worcester 
county, Mass., August 15, 1786, and came to Wisconsin in 1839. 
He was a lawyer by profession, having been graduated from Har- 
vard University in 1810, after which he was a tutor in Bowdoin 
College, and subsequently read law. In 1818 he became estab- 
lished in the practice of his profession at Greenfield, Mass., where 
he married his wife, whose maiden name was Elizabeth Franklin 
Ripley. David Brigham and wife removed to the embryo capital 
of Wisconsin in 1839 and he continued in the practice of his pro- 
fession there until his death four years later, the exact date of his 
demise being August 16, 1843, being at that time the senior mem- 
ber of the Madison bar, as well as an officer and leading member 
of the Congregational church. His wife survived him many years 
and died in Madison at the residence of her daughter, Mrs. H. G. 
Bliss, November 3, 1879, in the eighty-seventh year of her age. 
Ebenezer Brigham, who had the honor of being the first permanent 
settler in Dane county, was a younger brother of David and was 
born on April 28, 1789. He came west in 1814, and in 1828 set- 
tled at Blue Mounds (this region at that time being a part of the 
teritory of Michigan), and he resided there until his death, accu- 
mulating in the meantime a large tract of land. The parents of the 
subject of this review were Jerome Ripley Brigham and wife, the 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 113 

maiden name of the latter being Alary Noyse Ilsley. The father 
was the son of David Brigham, before mentioned, and was born at 
Fitchburg, Mass., July 21, 1825, and the mother was born at East- 
port, Maine, June 8, 1838. The father came to Wisconsin with his 
parents but soon thereafter returned to New England and entered 
Amherst college, from which he was graduated in 1845. He was 
a member of the Alpha Delta Phi (Greek letter) fraternity. After 
his graduation he returned to Wisconsin and read law in Madison, 
being admitted to the bar soon thereafter, and wa,s appointed the 
first clerk of the supreme court. In 1851, he removed to Milwau- 
kee and became a member of the firm of Wells & Brigham, the 
firm name afterwards being changed to Wells, Brigham & Upham. 
Mr. Brigham became prominent in his profession and also in pub- 
lic affairs of a political nature. He served as city attorney of Mil- 
waukee, regent of the University of Wisconsin, and was a member 
of the legislature when the present charter of the city of Milwaukee 
was granted, being chairman of the committee that framed the 
same. He was also a member of the board of fire and police com- 
missioners when the civil service system was inaugurated in Mil- 
waukee, and he filled other positions of trust. He gave an un- 
swerving allegiance to the principles of the Republican party and 
contributed in all honorable ways to the furtherance of the- inter- 
ests of that political organization. Mr. Brigham died in Milwau- 
kee in 1897. His son, Charles Ilsley Brigham, whose name intro- 
duces this memoir, was born in the city of Milwaukee in February, 
1862, and is one of four children now living that were born to J. 
Ripley Brigham and wife — the latter died on August 13, 1894. Of 
these children Bessie married Charles W. Badgley and resides in 
Denver: the next in order of birth is our subject; Mary Ripley re- 
resides with Charles I., who is her only brother, and Katherine mar- 
ried Dr. Philip R. Fox, a more extended mention of whom is given 
on another page of this volume. Charles I. Brigham was reared in 
Milwaukee and there received his preliminary education in the 
public schools and at private institutions. He was graduated from 
the Milwaukee high school in 1881. and in the autumn of the same 
year entered the University of Wisconsin, from which institution 
he was graduated with the class of 1885. He then taught school 
for a time, after which he spent one winter on a ranch in Colorado. 
In 1888 he took charge of the farm where he now resides, one mile 
east of Blue Mounds and four miles west of Mt. Horeb, the place 
comprising about eight hundred acres of fine land, and there he 
carries on an extensive dairy business, which is his principal occu- 
8— iii 



114 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

pation. His farm is the largest division of land in the town of 
Blue Mounds. Although a Republican in his party affiliations, he 
is inclined to be independent in his views, and his worth as a citi- 
zen has been recognized by election to the position of chairman of 
the town board. 

John Q. Brigham, of Madison, comes of English stock who set- 
tled in America before the Revolution, and his grandfather took 
part in that memorable struggle. His name was Stephen Brigham, 
and that of his wife Sarah Harrington, both natives of Massachu- 
setts. He d'ed in Oneida county, N. Y., in 1848, aged ninety-six 
years, his wife having passed away some years before. His par- 
ents were Stephen Brigham, Sr.. born in Massachusetts, in 1783 
and Elizabeth (Stevens) Brigham. born in Oneida county, N. Y., 
in 1803. Stephen Brigham, Jr., went to Oneida county with his 
parents when a child, and lived there until his death in 1850. His 
wife died in 1870; they had seven children, Eleanor; Richard H. L. ; 
George W. ; Marian C. ; Sarah M. ; Emma O. ; John Q. ; the sub- 
ject of this sketch. Mr. Brigham was a farmer and surveyor, a 
Whig, and the family was connected with the Presbyterian church. 
He took part in the war of 1813. The maternal grandparents were 
of English birth, and settled in Oneida county, N. Y., where both 
died. John Q. Brigham received his education in Oneida county, 
first in the common schools, afterward in Aurora and Vernon 
Academies. He began life as a farmer of Oneida county, and at 
the age of twenty-six, — he was born March 7, 1848. — came to 
Burk, and located on one hundred and sixteen acres of land, from 
which he afterward sold a small tract of ten acres. He is a breeder 
of Holstein cattle and raises tobacco and sugar beets. Mr. Brigham 
is a Republican and has held a number of elective offices ; he was 
county treasurer for four years, chairman of Burk for two years and 
clerk of the town for two years. He is an attendant of the Baptist 
church of the city of Madison. He was married, January 15, 1876, 
to Miss Mary T. Carpenter, a native of Vernon township. One' da 
county, N. Y.. daughter of Orson and Harriet (Tilden) Carpenter, 
both natives of New York, and who died in Oneida county of that 
state; Mrs. Brigham was one of a family of three sons and two 
daughters, of whom one son and both daughters arc living. To 
Mr. John Q. Brigham and his wife have been born five children, 
Zayda B. ; John C. who died in infancy; Electa S. ; Stephen O. ; 
Horatio M. 

Frederick W. Brinkhoff is one of those worthy citizens of Ger- 
man birth who have contributed so materially to the development 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 115 

and stable prosperity of Dane county, and he is now numbered 
among the representative farmers of Cottage Grove township, 
where he owns a fine landed estate of two hundred acres, in sec- 
tion 21. Mr. Brinkhoff was born in Germany, March 14, 1845, and 
is a son of Henry H. and Anna Catherine (Bode) Brinkhoff, both 
of whom were born and reared in Germany. The father was born 
in 1804 and died in 1887 ; the mother was born in 1805, and died in 
1880. They came to America in 1865, and passed the closing years 
of their lives in Dane county, honored by all who knew them. 
Fredrick W. Brinkhoff was reared and educated in his native 
land, whence he accompanied his parents to America, arriving in 
New York city. September 24, 1865, and being twenty years of 
age at the time. The family remained in New York city one year 
and then came to Wisconsin and located in Sun Prairie township, 
Dane county. Here the subject of this sketch was employed in 
various labors for two years, after which he purchased a team and 
began working land on shares, thus continuing for one year. He 
then received nine hundred dollars from his parents and applied 
this sum to the purchase of his present fine farm, where he has ever 
since maintained his home, developing the place into one of the 
best farm properties of this part of the county. When he secured 
the land only a small portion of the same was cleared, while the 
improvements were of a very insignificant order. Years of earnest 
toil and endeavor have brought their due reward, and in surveying 
his attractive and productive estate today Mr. Brinkhoff may well 
feel that the deprivations and vicissitudes of the early days were 
not endured in vain. Mr. Brinkhoff has purchased lots in the at- 
tractive village of Cottage Grove, and he looks forward to taking 
up his residence there when he finally retires from active service, 
which time is in the remote future, for he retains his energies and 
ambition unimpaired and is best satisfied when on active duty in 
c'onnect'on with the supervision of his farm. He is a stanch ad- 
vocate of the principles of the Prohibition party and both he and 
his wife are members of the Evangelical church. He was for two 
years a member of the township board of supervisors, and was for 
a number of years a member of the school board. In April, 1864, 
Mr. Brinkhoff was united in marriage to Miss Louisa Wessellner. 
who was born May 9. 1843, being a daughter of Frederick and 
Margaret (Aspelmeier) Wessellner, both natives of Germany. In 
conclusion is entered a brief record concerning the children of Mr. 
and Mrs. Brinkhoff: Henry John, born July 21, 1865, is now a 
member of the firm of Wiedenbeck, Dobelin & Company, black- 



116 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

smith and wagon supplies, Madison; Louisa May, born January 3, 
1866, became the wife of August Steffen, and her death occurred 
January 3, 1895 ; Carrie Wilhelmina, born October 3, 1868, is mar- 
ried and resides in Madison ; Frederick William, born December 18, 
1871, died July 21, 1898; William Herman, born February 3, 1874, 
resides in the city of Madison; Emma Augusta was born June 17, 
1876, and died July 5, 1896 ; Samuel Herbert was born July 26, 1878, 
and died June 3, 1897 ; Ella Amanda, born September 5, 1880, died 
January 3, 1886 ; Clara Gertrude was born March 31, 1884, and Mil- 
ton Ellsworth, June 28, 1886. 

Thomas Evans Brittingham, of Madison, was born in Hannibal, 
Mo., May 18, 1860, and is the son of Dr. Irvin Baird and Mary J. 
(League) Brittingham, the latter of whom is deceased. Thomas E. 
attended Hannibal college. In 1880 he moved to Clear Creek 
Gulch, Chaffee county, Col., and afterward to Lake county, Cal., 
in both of which states he followed the mercantile business. He 
located in Merrill, Wis., in 1885, and came to Madison in Decem- 
ber, 1888, having been engaged in the lumber trade since coming 
to this state. At Portland, Jefferson county, Wis., on December 5, 
1889, he was married to Miss Mary Lucy Clark, a graduate of the 
Un'versity of Wisconsin, born December 5, 1868, a daughter of 
James Adams and Mary (Hughes) Clark. Mr. and Mrs. Britting- 
ham are the parents of three children : Margaret, born May 19, 
1892; Harold Hixon, born March 21, 1894; and Thomas Evans, Jr., 
born March 2, 1899. 

Andrew S. Brown, senior member of the firm of Brown Bros., 
livery, is a native of Dane county. He was born in the town of 
Verona, April 3, 1855, of good Scotch stock. His father was Alex- 
ander Brown, born in Fifeshire, Scotland, who learned the trade 
of ropemaker in the land of his nativity. In 1843 he sailed for the 
United States and after a stormy passage of eleven weeks he 
landed in New York. His relatives learned of the storm which 
had overtaken the vessel and had given up all hope of ever hearing 
of him again. His arrival was late in the evening and his worldly 
possessions consisted of a ten cent piece and the clothes on his 
back. He made the acquaintance of another Scotchman, William 
Brown, who secured him a position in a rope factory, and at seven 
the morning after his arrival he reported for work. This factory 
furnished him employment for seven years, six years of which he 
was its foreman. By the end of the first year he had saved enough 
money to have his wife and two children come over, the passage 
taking seven weeks. In 1850, a number of Scotch families in the 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 117 

east banded together and came west, forming a colony which set- 
tled in Verona, and Alexander Brown and his family came with 
them. Several hundred acres of land were entered by Mr. Brown 
and deeded by him to the colonists. For the first time in his life 
he undertook farming, but with characteristic energy he took hold 
and made a success of it, living and managing one hundred and 
eighty-seven acres until his death, a result of appendicitis, on De- 
cember 14, 1882. In the early days the only market for his wheat 
was in Milwaukee, and he would make yearly trips with it. It is 
related of him that he would often walk three miles to the woods, 
cut one hundred fence rails, and return in the evening apparently 
unfatigued. He was a devout Presbyterian and a great Bible stu- 
dent, and was exceedingly well read and always spent his evenings 
in study, mathematics being his favorite diversion. His wife Mar- 
garet (Smith) Brown, was a native of the same shire in Scotland 
Although nearly eighty-eight years of age she is wonderfully well 
preserved in mind and body. She makes her home with her young- 
est daughter in the town of Fitchburg. Andrew S. Brown is one 
of eleven children, two of whom, twins, died in infancy. The other 
children were Jeanette, died soon after the family's arrival in this 
country; William, farming 1,200 acres in Mower county, Minn.; 
Anna, wife of James Leslie, a Brownsdale, Minn., farmer; Ellen, 
wife of James Henderson, a retired farmer of Verona; Agnes, wife 
of James Eddy, a retired farmer of Verona ; Elizabeth, wife of 
John Lemont, a coal operator in the British possessions near Wash- 
ington ; Myron, in business with his brother, married Sarah 
Donkle, by whom he has four children, — Leslie, Mabel, Jennie, and 
Alexander ; and Emma, Mrs. Floyd Mutchler in the town of Fitch- 
burg. Andrew S. Brown received his education in the schools of 
Verona, and then worked on Jiis father's farm until he was eighteen 
years of age. For seven years he was a salesman for Lamont & 
Roach in the hardware and machinery business ; four years were 
spent with the Fuller & Johnson Company and eleven years with 
S. L. Sheldon in the farm implement business. In the fall of 1892 
he was elected sheriff of Dane county on the Democratic ticket, and 
no Democrat since that time has filed the office. During his term of 
office he took forty-five men and one woman to the state peniten- 
tiary. The two years following the incumbency of the sheriff's of- 
fice were spent on the road for the Fuller & Johnson Company. In 
January, 1897, Mr. Brown started his present business and has 
carried it on with great success. His stock is valued at $10,000. 



118 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

On November 13, 1877, he married Katherine M., daughter of John 
and Agnes Mausbach, natives of Germany, and by this union has 
three children, — Iva. married June 7, 1905, to Albert C. Wolfe, a 
La Crosse attorney ; Edna Agnes, born Dec. 27, 1884, died Novem- 
ber 3, 1893 ; and Margaret Alexander, in her second year in the 
high school. Mr. Brown is a member of the Presbyterian church. 
a Knight Templar Mason, a member of Monona Lodge, No. 12, 
Knights of Pythias, of the Benevolent and Protective Order of 
Elks, and of Ban) r an Camp, No. 365, Modern Woodmen of Amer- 
ica. 

Charles William Brown, deceased, was long and actively identi- 
fied with the agricultural interests of the town of Fitchburg, and 
deserves recognition among his confreres of that noble occupation. 
He was born in Wheeling, W. Va., August 5, 1854, and was the 
only son born to William Brown and his wife Elizabeth, who came 
to Wisconsin and located in Dane county when the subject of this 
review was a mere boy. A daughter, Mary Elizabeth, is the wife 
of Thomas Seals and resides at Bridgeport, Ohio. The parents 
established their home in the town of Fitchburg, and there 
Charles W. Brown received his education in the district schools, 
attending a few terms also in Rutland. When he had reached the 
required age he began his independent career and worked as a 
farm hand until after his marriage in 1876, and then removed to 
Minnesota, where he farmed for two years. In 1878 he returned to 
Fitchburg, and after renting a place for about two years moved to 
the old parental homestead and resided there twelve years. He then 
removed to the Kiser place in the same township, and after remain- 
ing there two years moved to another farm, and a year later to an- 
other in the same township, where he resided until his death, Novem- 
ber 8, 1898. Mr. Brown was a Democrat in his political affiliations 
and his religious faith was expressed by membership in the Cath- 
olic church. He was married November 28, 1876, to Miss Mar- 
garet Ann Connor, who is a native of Connecticut, born August 30, 
1854. and the daughter of Patrick and Ann (Colager) Conner, both 
of whom were also natives of the Nutmeg state. These parents 
came to Wisconsin in 1855 and first located in the town of Rutland, 
where they bought a farm and resided about fifteen years, after 
which they moved to Oregon, where the father died in January, 
1881, and the mother still resides. In the Connor family there 
were seven children, of whom the wife of the subject of this re- 
view is the eldest. The others are: Bridget, who married James 
Brazee and resides in the town of Fitchburg; Thomas Peter, who 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 119 

resides in Oregon ; Mary Jane, who is the widow of William Emer- 
son and resides in Madison ; Catherine, who is unmarried and lives 
w!th her mother in Oregon ; John, who married Dorothy Hamm 
and resides in Stoughton ; and Barney, who is deceased. After the 
death of Mr. Brown his widow purchased a farm of eighty acres in 
the town of Dunn, where she now resides. Mr. and Mrs. Brown 
were the parents of ten children : James Riley married Catherine 
Handle and resides in Madison ; William Patrick married Anna 
Foster and resides with his mother; Mary Elva married Arthur J. 
Grady and resides in Fitchburg; Anna Elizabeth is deceased; and 
Charles Ambrose, John Danford, Catherine Arstina, Archie Paul. 
Margaret Helen, and Joseph Lyle, reside at home. 

John Brown, a farmer of the town of Dunn, was born in New 
York city, June 21, 1840. He and a sister. Mary, deceased, were 
the only children of Morris and Johannah (Berry) Brown, natives 
of Ireland. John Brown came to Wisconsin with his parents in 
1855 and located in the town of Dunn, where the father had pur- 
chased forty acres. The farm was enlarged by the addition of 
forty acres w'thin a few years, then of thirty acres more of an 
adjoining farm, and in a few years by the purchase of the remainder 
of the adjoining farm, making in all a place of two hundred and 
thirty-five acres, part of which is on Lake Waubesa. By platting 
and selling a part of his lake-shore lots, Mr. Brown has realized 
qu'te a neat profit. John Brown always lived with his parents. 
He had the management of the farm for some years before his 
father's death, September 23, 1900, in his ninety-ninth year. His 
mother died in 1878. In politics Mr. Brown is independent; in reli- 
gious matters he is affiliated with the Catholic church. November 
20, 1877, he maried Lucy, daughter of Patrick and Bridget (Geary) 
Crane, residents of the town of Fitchburg. She was one of seven 
children, six of whom are living, — Patrick, a real estate dealer of 
Beloit; Lucy, wife of John Brown; William, dealer in coal and 
wood in Madison ; Joseph, in the Klondike when last heard from ; 
Andrew, traveling salesman for the Ohio Steel Range Company, 
who makes his home in Beloit ; and Xora. wife of H. E. Hanan of 
Oregon. The marriage of John and Lucy Brown has been blessed 
with eight children, — Morris Patrick, born November 17, 1878; 
Joseph Henry, born June 12. 1881 ; Nora Jane, born April 2, 1883 ; 
John James, born February 22, 1885 ; David George. April 14, 1887 ; 
Mary Lucy, October 18, 1891; Josephine Bridget. January 2, 1894; 
and one child who died in infancy. Mr. Brown is a man much re- 
spected by his neighbors. 



120 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

John Brown, general merchant and postmaster at Riley, Dane 
county, was born on section 11, town of Springdale, and is a son 
of M'chael and Margaret (Lynch) Brown, the father being a native 
of Kings County, Ireland, and the mother of near St. Lawrence, 
N. Y. Michael Brown was born in 1823, and was a son of John 
and Mary (Martin) Brown. He came to America in 1844, and lo- 
cated in Westchester county, N. Y., where he remained one year 
and then removed to Ohio. Later he returned to New York, and 
then moved to Wisconsin in 1849, locating first at Fitchburg, in 
Dane county. He afterward sold his place there and purchased 
the farm where his son now resides in the town of Springdale, and 
there followed farming the remainder of his active life, in later 
years taking up his residence in the village of Mt. Horeb, where he 
died, January 9, 1899, at the age of seventy-six years. His re- 
ligious faith was manifested by a strong adherence to the Roman 
Catholic church, and in politics he was conservative, voting for 
those he considered the best men. For a number of years he was 
treasurer of his school district, and he always took a deep interest 
in public affa'rs, especially those of a local nature, but he never 
sought office. He was a first-class farmer, an upright man in 
every sense of the word, and one that could always be depended 
upon. He was married to Miss Margaret Lynch in 1851, and she 
still resides at the family home in the village of Mt. Horeb. They 
were the parents of twelve children, eleven of whom are living: 
Peter resides at Acme, Iowa; John is tbe subject of this review; 
Patrick lives in Minnesota ; Joseph resides in Springdale ; Mary 
married Samuel Farrell and resides in Cross Plains ; Ella married 
Michael Hobbs and resides in the town of Oregon ; Margaret mar- 
ried William Ryan and resides in Minnesota; Thomas is a photog- 
rapher in Mt. Horeb ; James is a real estate dealer and resides in Mt. 
Horeb ; and Theresa and Anna remain at home with their mother. 
John Brown, whose name introduces this review, was reared on the 
farm where he now resides and received his education in the pub- 
lic schools. He commenced life as a farm boy, but changed his 
occupation in 1882 and engaged in the business of buying and ship- 
ping stock. One year later he engaged in the general mercantile 
business at Riley and has conducted an up-to-date establishment 
ever since, adding to his duties, for about eighteen years, the busi- 
ness of buying grain. He was one of the promoters and is now 
president of the Pine Bluff Telephone Company, which purchased 
the Pine Bluff Central and was incorporated, September 27, 1904, 
with a capital stock of $10,000. The company covers the territory 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 121 

from Riley to Mt. Horeb, Cross Plains, Middleton, Klevenville, and 
serves farmers along the line. Mr. Brown is also the proprietor 
of the Riley Creamery, and he is interested in real estate in the 
northern part of Wisconsin. He was married on May 26, 1890, to 
Ella M. Farrell, daughter of Richard Farrell, who was one of the 
early settlers of Cross Plains, and he now resides with his danghter, 
Mrs. Brown. Our subject and wife have one son, James. Mr. 
Brown has served as postmaster at Riley for the past seventeen 
years, and prior to his appointment as such was assistant postmas- 
ter with full control of the office for a period of five years. One 
rural mail route leaves the office at Riley and makes daily trips. 
Our subject is a Republican in politics, and aside from the office 
mentioned he has filled the position of justice of the peace and town 
clerk. Fraternally he has membership in the Modern Woodmen 
of America. 

Herbert L. Brown, of Cottage Grove, is well known as a success- 
ful stock dealer, and is a representative of one of the old and hon- 
ored families of Dane county. His father, Orvin Brown, was born 
in Monroe, Ashtabula county, Ohio, July 18, 1820, being a son of 
Roswell Brown, who became a pioneer of Wisconsin. Roswell 
Brown was born in Hillsdale, Columbia county, New York, Feb- 
ruary 4, 1796, having been a son of Luther and Mary (Greene) 
Brown, the former of whom was born in Scoharie county, New 
York, and the latter near Newport, Rhode Island ; she was a daugh- 
ter of Christopher Greene, who was a brother of the distinguished 
General Nathaniel Greene, of Revolutionary fame. Christopher 
Greene was twice married, both of his wives having been daughters, 
of Governor Ward, one of the colonial governors of Rhode Island. 
Christopher Green's father was a preacher of the society of Friends. 
Roswell Brown, grandfather of the subject of this review, married 
Lucretia Raymond, who was born in Hillsdale, Columbia county, 
New York, November 17, 1799, being a daughter of Jacob and 
Elizabeth (Webster) Raymond, the latter of whom was a relative 
of Noah, Webster and Daniel Webster. Roswell Brown was a 
cabinet maker by trade, and he followed work along this line for 
many years, — in New York, Pennsylvania and Ohio. From Eagle- 
ville, Ashtabula county, Ohio, he started with his family for Wis- 
consin in 1841, making the trip overland with wagon and ox-team. 
He related how much difficulty he encountered while passing 
through what is now the city of Chicago, his wagon having stuck 
in the mud of one of the principal streets of the town, and that so 
deeply that he was compelled to secure aid in prying out the ve- 



122 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

"h'cle. He made his way to his destination, in Dane county. Here 
he secured one hundred and twenty acres of government land, the 
tract being heavily timbered. He thus gained place among the 
pioneer settlers of the county, his farm being located in Cottage 
Grove township. He manufactured the first cheese ever made in 
the county, pressing the same in its mold by placing it beneath the 
weight of a corner of rail fence. He also manufactured butter- 
workers, the same being practically the models of the present-day 
butter workers known under the patents of Cornish, Curtis & Green. 
He made no attempt to patent his device, and years later the firm 
above mentioned took up practically the same idea, patented the 
device and placed it on the market, where it has had a large sale. 
Roswell Brown later secured more government land, eventually 
becoming one of the extensive landholders of the county. He was 
a soldier in the War of 1812, having served in New York city. His 
life was one of signal usefulness and honor. He attained to the 
age of eighty years, his death occurring August 29, 1866, in Cot- 
tage Grove township. 'He was prominent and influential in local 
affairs of a public nature in the pioneer days and was one of the 
founders and builders of Dane county. A' fine oil portrait of this 
•stanch pioneer is placed in the fine library of the Wisconsin State 
Historical Society, in the city of Madison. His wife died, at 
Springfield, Erie county. Pennsylvania, March 7, 1832. Following 
is a brief record concerning the children of Roswell Brown. Orvin 
was the father of the subject of this sketch ; Caroline, who became 
the wife of Alexander Hammond, died in Cottage Grove township ; 
Isaac died before the removal of the family to Wisconsin ; Mary 
married Allen Harrs, of Cottage Grove township, and she now re- 
sides in the. Black Hills district of South Dakota; Margaret died 
prior to the removal of the family to Wisconsin. Orvin Brown 
was twenty-one years of age at the time when he came to Dane 
•county, and here he remained at the paternal home until his mar- 
riage, which occurred April 21, 1847, at Sun Prairie, this county, 
where he wedded Miss Clarinda A. Bailey. The marriage cere- 
mony was performed by Rev. J. G. Kanouse, the pioneer Presby- 
terian minister of the county and grandfather of Walter S. Ka- 
nounse, the well known merchant of the village of Cottage Grove. 
Mrs. Brown was born in Ticonderoga, Essex county, New York, 
May 4, 1826. being a daughter of Samuel and Almira (Bisby) 
Bailey, the former of whom was born in Connecticut and the latter 
in New Brunswick, Canada. The family located in Dane county, 
Wisconsin, in 1846. Samuel Bailey was a son of John and Asenath 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 123 

(Hopson) Bailey, both of whom were native of Connecticut and 
the former of whom was lost at sea. After his marriage Orvin 
Brown began farming on his own account. He purchased one 
hundred and twenty acres of government land, in sections 8 and 17, 
Cottage Grove township, adjoining his father's farm on the east, 
and located one-half mile west of the present Cottage Grove sta- 
tion. It should be noted that his father, Roswell Brown, for many 
years conducted a general country store on his farm, and that his 
house was also one of the early hotels, or taverns, of this part of the 
county. Both the tavern and store were conducted on str'ctly 
temperance principles, which could not be said of the average 
pioneer establishments of the sort. Orvin Brown continued farm- 
ing upon the old homestead until the death of his wife, in 1881, 
when he removed to Sun Prairie, having disposed of the farm. 
Following is a brief record concerning his children : Maria L., 
who was born February 22, 1849, married T. L. Heacker. after 
whose death she became the wife of Otis Baker, who is also de- 
ceased, his widow being now a resident of Sun Prairie ; Ida A., 
who was born December 15, 1850, is the wife of R. B. Gibbons, 
postmaster at Cottage Grove ; Norman B., who was born October 
2, 1854, and who married Alice Starks. is now a resident of Ells- 
worth, Pierce county, Wisconsin ; Roswell E., who was born Janu- 
ary 11, 1857, married lone Brant and they reside at White Lake, 
South Dakota ; Samuel F., who was born March 24, 1858, and who 
married Nettie Kelley. resides in the city of Madison, Wisconsin; 
Stella C, who was born April 13, 1862, is deceased; Kittie G., who 
was born May 31, 1864, is likewise deceased ; and Herbert L. is the 
immediate subject of this sketch. The mother of these children 
died October 28, 1881. She was a devoted member of the Baptist 
church, have been baptized in the church of her native town, 
Ticonderoga, New York, May 2, 1843, and from the same she se- 
cured dismission by letter, May 2, 1846. She became an active 
worker in the churches of this faith in Cottage Grove and Sun 
Prairie, her death occurring in the former township. Orvin Brown 
died at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Gibbons, in Cottage Grove, 
February 16, 1894. Herbert L. Brown, whose name initiates this 
article, was born on the homestead farm, in Cottage Grove town- 
ship, February 16, 1867, and after availing himself of the advan- 
tages of the district schools he continued his studies in the Madison 
Academy. He was fourteen years of age at the time of his moth- 
er's death, after which he passed most of his time in the home of 
his sister, Mrs. Gibbons, until his marriage, which occurred in 1890. 



124 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

He then engaged in the buying and shipping of live stock, estab- 
lishing his home and headquarters in the village of Cottage Grove. 
Two years later he removed to the city of Madison, and for one 
year he had the management of what is known as the Picnic Point 
farm, on the shores of Lake Mendota. He then returned to Cot- 
tage Grove and engaged in the general merchandise business, in 
wh'ch he continued three years, at the expiration of which he sold 
the store and resumed the stock business, in which he has since 
continued with marked success. He is known as an enterprising 
and reliable business man and public-spirited citizen, and is held 
in high esteem in his native county. In politics he is a stanch 
Republican, and he has served as township clerk and also as justice 
of the peace. He is affiliated with the Woodmen of America and 
both he and his wife are zealous members of the Presbyterian 
church in Cottage Grove, in which he is an elder and was a mem- 
ber of the building committee for the erection of the church. Octo- 
ber 8, 1890, Mr. Brown was united in marriage to Miss Venice L. 
North, daughter of William and Sarah (Slagg) North, both of 
whom were born in England. They now reside in the village of 
Cottage Grove, their daughter, Mrs. Brown, having been born in 
the town of Albion, this county, June 6, 1867. Mr. and Mrs. Brown 
have two sons, William H., who was born June 18, 1895, and Ros- 
well Edward, born July 30, 1906. 

Edmond James Browne, journalist, of Black Earth, comes of a 
long line of New England patriots. Abraham Browne came with 
his wife from Bury St. Edmunds. Suffolk, England, in 1630 and 
became the first settler and surveyor of Watertown, Mass. The old 
homestead there is still the abiding place of his descendants, who 
from generation to generation have filled the various town offices., 
Jonathan Browne, born Aug. 24, 1724, was a captain in the battle 
of Lake George and during the Revolutionary War was in the com- 
m'ssary's department of the Continental army. Francis Browne 
the date of whose birth was Nov. 16, 1755, was a soldier in the 
Revolutionary War and saw service at Lexington, Bunker Hill and 
many other engagements. Another Francis Browne, born Decem- 
ber 4, 1786, was one of the earliest advocates of the abolition of 
slavery. Guilford D. Browne, born at Acworth,N. H., August 8, 
1828, was for twenty-eight years a member of the west Wisconsin 
conference of the Methodist Episcopal church. His wife was Mary 
Elizabeth Fisher, born in Bath, Me., December 27, 1827. To this 
union, on December 5. 1863, at Agawam, Mass., was born Edmond 
James Browne, the subject of this sketch. Guilford D. Browne 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 125 

died January 5, 1898, and his wife passed away on March 3, of the 
same year. After passing through the courses of the common 
schools, E. J. Browne entered the printing business, his first labor, 
in 1881, being that of an apprentice in the office of the Mondovi, 
Wis., Herald. Since 1889 he has been continuously engaged in 
the editing and publishing of weekly papers in the following places 
in the state : Knapp, Dunn county ; Eleva, Trempealeau county ; 
Prairie du Sac, Sauk county and Black Earth, Dane county. From 
1893 to 1899 he edited the Sauk County News at Prairie du Sac and 
in September, 1901, established the Black Earth Times. While in 
Dunn and Trempealeau counties he was in partnership with a 
brother. In politics he is identified with the Republican party and 
his religious affiliations are with the Methodist Episcopal church. 
On May 12, 1891, Mr. Browne married Miss Hannah L. Jackson of 
Eleva, daughter of John and El'zabeth (Little) Jackson. To this 
union have been born the following children : Lillie Elizabeth, 
February 16, 1892; Marshall Francis, September 14, 1893; Lottie 
May, October 6, 1894 ; Nellie Josephine, September 24, 1895 ; Ma- 
cinda Ann, October 21, 1897; Lizzie Amelia, August 24, 1900; and 
Charles Dudley, February 26. 1904. Macinda died at Prairie du 
Sac, February 13, 1899. Mr. Brown is identified with the Modern 
Woodmen of America, and his wife a member of the Royal 
Neighbors. 

J. H. Brumm is one of Middleton's well-known merchants, who 
was born in that village May 13, 1862, and has always made it his 
home. Of German descent, his father, J. E. Brumm, was born in 
Mecklenburg and his mother, Frederika Brumm, in Machtegeburg. 
J. E. Brumm came to America with his parents when a boy and has 
lived in Middleton since 1852. When twenty-two years old he 
bought a forty acre farm of prairie land in section 30 and lived there 
four years. He then bought another eighty acres in the same sec- 
tion, selling the first and made this his home for many years, finally 
selling it to his son William. He then bought a fine home in Mid- 
dleton, where Mrs. Brumm resided until her death May 16. 1906, 
aged sixty-four years and seven months, her husband having died 
in 1901 at the age of sixty-one. J. H. Brumm was educated with 
the other two sons in the Middleton grade and high school and 
started for himself in the general merchandise business in 1888. 
In 1890, a complete line of farm machinery was added to the stock 
as well as pumps and windmills. In 1905 the J. J. Rosenmeyer 
pickling factory was also purchased and the firm :s now Brumm 
& Brumm. Mr. Brumm is a memeber of the Modern Woodmen 



126 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

and the B. P. O. E. chapter at Madison. He is a Republican and a 
trustee of the village of Middleton. October 6, 1885, he married 
Miss C. Lubcke, daughter of J. H. and Mary Lubcke. of Middleton, 
and they have a family of six children, who attend the Middleton 
schools ; Wilbert, Fidelia, Gilsey, Anita, Birtie and Lorene. The 
family attend the German Lutheran church. 

August F. Brunkow, of the firm of Brunkow & Mueller, brew- 
ers, of Pheasant Branch, was born at Doelitz, Germany. August 30, 
1857. His father, William Brunkow, and his mother, Caroline 
(Zabel) Brunkow, were both natives of Doelitz, where Mr. Brun- 
kow was a laborer. They embarked for America in 1869 and lo- 
cated in Pottawatomie county, Kansas, where they obtained three 
hundred and sixty acres of farm land. This farm became their 
permanent home, where they still reside. Ten children were born 
to them : August F.. William, Minnie, Herman, Paulina, Ferdi- 
nand, Matilda, Albert, Frank and Theresa. Mr. Brunkow, Sr., is 
a Democrat but has never aspired for office. With his family he 
belongs to the German Lutheran church. August F., the oldest 
son, was sent to school in Germany and also in the country schools 
in the neighborhood of the farm in Kansas. When he had attained 
the age of nineteen years he commenced to learn the brewing in- 
dustry at Kl'nkert's brewery in Racine, Wis. and remained there 
seven years. Subsequently he was employed in the Best (now 
Pabst) brewery of Milwaukee. In 1884 the Pheasant Branch brew- 
ery was purchased by August Brunkow and his brother-in-law, 
John G. Mueller, and together they thoroughly overhauled and re- 
fitted it and put it in a most prosperous condition. The experience 
of Mr. Brunkow in the well-managed companies of Racine and 
Milwaukee proved invaluable and he and his partner have been 
able to establish a most successful business. They built a new malt 
house and put in a new thirty-five horse-power engine, etc., and 
now find market for all they can produce in the surrounding village* 
and towns. Mr. Brunkow is a Democrat in his political sympathies 
but has never taken an active part in politics. He is one of the 
trustees of the German Lutheran church at Middleton and secretary 
of the board. He is deeply interested in the concerns of the church 
and has done much to promote its welfare. In 1892, he married 
Miss Louisa Mueller, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John C. Mueller and 
they have two children, Pauline and Elenora, both of whom are 
attending school. 

Gen. Edwin Eustace Bryant was born in Milton, Franklin county, 
Vermont, January 10, 1835. He was educated at academies and at 



BIOGRAPHICAL. \2T 

New Hampton Institute, Fairfax, Vermont, and then taught for five 
years in common schools and academies, meanwhile pursuing" the 
studies of languages and law. He came to Wisconsin in the spring 
of 1857, locating at Janesville, where he was admitted to the bar the 
same year. He commenced the practice of his profession at Mon- 
roe, Wis., in the fall of 1857. In 1859 he purchased the Monroe 
Sentinel, In connection with General Bintliff. He was married 
June 29, 1859, to Louise S. Boynton. by whom he had four children, 
— Elva L., Fronimay, Mertie and William Vilas. In the Civil 
AVar he enlisted in June, 1861, as a private in Company C, Third 
Wisconsin Infantry, but was promoted to the sergeant-major be- 
fore leaving the state ; next served as lieutenant, and was made 
adjutant of his regiment in 1862. In 186-1 was appointed by the 
secretary of war as commissioner of enrollment for the third dis- 
trict of Wisconsin, and in 1865 was commissioned lieutenant-colonel 
of the Fiftieth Wisconsin Infantry, serving with that rank for a 
year in Missouri, as judge advocate of courts martial and military 
commissions. In 1868 he was appointed adjutant general of the 
state and private secretary to Governor Fairchild. serving in those 
capacities from 1868 to 1871 ; was the law partner of Sen. William F. 
Vilas from 1872 to 1883 ; member of the assembly, 1878 ; assistant 
attorney-general of the United States post office department, 1885— 
89 ; dean of the college of law, University of Wisconsin, 1889-1904 ; 
pres'dent of the state commissioners of fisheries, 1893-99 ; vice- 
president of the state geological and natural history survey, 1897— 
99. General Bryant was the author of numerous books on prac- 
tice and pleading, military history and the postal service. He was 
an accurate and forceful writer, and his law works are adopted as 
the standard by the profession, as well as being used as text books 
in various law schools. He died at his home in Madison, Aug- 
ust 11, 1903. 

Gen. George E. Bryant, one of the heroes of the Civil War, and 
now superintendent of public property, was born at Templeton, 
Worcester county, Massachusetts. February 11, 1832, son of 
George W. and Eunice (Norcross) Bryant. His ancestors for sev- 
eral generations resided in New England, the paternal branch being- 
Irish, and the maternal, English. Representaitves of both branches 
fought in the Revolutionary War. General Bryant's father was a 
mechanic and farmer, in moderate circumstances, but gave his son 
a good education, and after preparing for college in the Black River 
Academy at Ludlow, Vt., young George took the full course at 
Norwich Universitv, Vt., a military college, where Generals Dodge 



128 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

and Ransom were classmates, and Admiral Dewey was a room- 
mate. He then studied law in the office of Norcross & Snow, of 
Fitchburg, Mass., and was admitted to the bar in 1856. He at once 
came west and located in Madison, Wis., forming a partnership 
with Hon. Myron H. Orton, which continued until the outbreak of 
the Civil War. He had been elected alderman of the city of Madi- 
son in 1861. He was captain of the Madison Guards, a volunteer 
organization which had been formed in the winter of 1857-58. Its 
services had been tendered to Governor Randall as early as Janu- 
ary 9, 1861, and this tender was accepted by April 16, 1861, being 
the first company accepted in Wisconsin for active service. It 
was assigned as Company E of the First Wisconsin Volunteer In- 
fantry and participated in the battle of Falling Waters. Mr. Bry- 
ant served three months as captain of this company, and afterwards 
three years as colonel of the Twelfth Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry. 
From July 21, to November 4, 1864, he commanded the 
First brigade, Third division of the Seventeenth army corps, — "a 
brigade, which was never driven from a position, and never failed 
to take one when ordered." When mustered out of serv'ce in 
November, 1864, he was very ill, and in his own words, he "hardly 
expected to reach Madison alive." He returned to his farm near 
Madison and engaged in raising fine blooded stock. He is a well 
known to breeders of horses and cattle, especially through his fre- 
quent articles in the agricultural press upon the origin and worth 
of the "Morgan" and "Clay Pilot" horses. He served twelve years 
as judge of Dane county ; was state senator, 1875-76, and member 
of the assembly, 1899-1900 ; in 1878 became secretary of the Wis- 
consin state agricultural society, and served for five years; was a 
delegate to the national Republican convention in 1880, where he 
was one of the "306" who remained steadfast to General Grant ; 
was quartermaster-general with the rank of brigadier-general for 
s'x years, during the terms of Governors Ludington and Smith. 
He has been a delegate to many state and other conventions, and 
in the Republican state convention of 1890 nominated Gov. Win. D. 
Hoard. He has been a member of the Republican state central 
committee for many years, and for several years its chairman. In 
1882 he was appointed postmaster of Madison by Prescient Arthur, 
when he established the free-delivery system and raised the office 
from the second to the first class ; he was appointed to the same 
position under President Harrison. Since 1900 he has been state 
superintendent of public property. 

General P)ryant married Sus'e A. Gibson, a native of Fitchburg, 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 129 

Mass., September 27, 1858, and they are the parents of three chil- 
dren : Hattie E., George E., and Frank H. As a citizen he com- 
mands universal respect, as one who has been faithful to every 
trust imposed, 

Sivert Bryngelsen, a retired farmer of the village of McFarland, 
was born in Alraen near Bergen, Norway, December 3, 1828. His 
parents, Bryngel and Martha Bryngelsen, were both natives of 
Norway. Five of the father's brothers were in the Swedish w*ar 
and Sivert was named after one who lost his life in that contest. 
In 1855 Sivert came to this country and though he claimed Mil- 
waukee as his home from 1855 to 18G6, he spent most of the time 
as a sailor on the lakes. At the end of that time he came to Dunn 
township and located on his present place. Eighty-five acres of land 
which he purchased bordered on Lake Waubesa. He has platted 
his property and sold several lake-shore lots, realizing handsomely, 
on his investment. Like so many of his fellow countrymen he be- 
longs to the Republican party and the Lutheran church. In No- 
vember, 1859, he married Martha, daughter of Elling Olson and 
Anna (Sjure) Ellingson Boe Sogn, natives of Norway. Mrs. 
Bryngelsen first saw the light of day in Norway on September 13. 
1830 and received her education in the common schools of her na- 
tive land. She and two sisters, Gertrude (Mrs. Nesbeth) and Anna 
(Mrs. Anderson), both living in Minnesota, and a brother Ole. liv- 
ing in the same place, are the only survivors of a family of nine. 
To Sivert and Martha Bryngelsen have been born five children, — 
Brown Marthin, December 30, 1860; Edward Olai, September 18, 
1862 ; Anton Marthin. September 28, 1864, married, and employed 
in a furniture factory in Evansville. Ind. ; Martha Barnelle Serene, 
March 8. 1869 ; and Bernert Peter Johann, October 15, 1872, died 
July 18, 18?7. 

Sjur Sjurson Bue, a retired farmer of Deerfield. was born in Ber- 
genst'ft, Norway, November 23, 1829. His parents were Sjur 
Arnson and Ingebor Anderson, natives of the same stift. In 1850 
Sjur came to Dane county. After two years of common labor he 
grew restless and went to Australia. For three years he worked 
in the gold mines around Melbourne, Victoria, and after getting his 
stake he started for England and Norway. In 1857 he returned to 
Wisconsin, married, bought one hundred and twenty acres of land 
from lis father-in-law and settled down. Here he continued to 
reside until 1903, when he sold all but a couple of acres, and retired. 
In February, 1865, Mr. Bue enlisted in Company FI. Forty-ninth 
Wisconsin Infantry. Nine months later the company was mus- 
9— iii 



130 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

tered out without having seen any actual service. He has repre- 
sented his town on the town board several terms as a Republican ; 
in religion he upholds the tenets of the Lutheran faith. In Novem- 
ber, 1857, he married Martha, daughter of Andrew and Marthana 
(Johonson) Enderson, natives of Norway. Mrs. Bue was born 
October 6, 1838, and was educated in the common schools of Nor- 
way and the Deerfield schools. Twelve children have blessed this 
union, only two of whom are now living, — Ingebor Malene, born 
October 11, 1858, now Mrs. Andrew Brictson of Deerfield, and 
Sarah Mathena, born November 4, 1860, now Mrs. C. E. Vollin of 
Jackson county, Wis. The other children were A'ndrew Sjur, born 
January 18, 1865, died April 8, 1886 ; Emma Burthea, born Septem- 
ber 12, 1867, d'ed November 3, 1878; John, born January 8, 1868, 
died November 6, 1878 ; Thea Carena, born January 13, 1870, died 
November 2, 1888 ; Arroen Marthena, born May 29, 1872, died April 
11. 1892; Hannah Maria, born September 14, 1875, died in Novem- 
ber, 1878 ; Albert Julius, born March 29, 1878, died in November, 
1878 ; John Albert, born October 30, 1880 and died the same day ; 
Hannah, born May 15, 1883, died July 15, 1883; and Charles Albert, 
born June 2, 1884. died June 30, 1884. Mr. Bue has practically cir- 
cled the globe and tells many interesting tales of his travels. 

James Bull is now living retired in a pleasant home in Wingra 
Park, after a varied career, the greater part of his act've life, how- 
ever, having been devoted to the noble occupation of farming. 
He was born in Derbyshire, England, on December 3, 1837, and his 
parents were Isaac and Sarah (Burrows) Bull, also natives of 
Britain. To these parents were born eleven children, seven of 
whom are now living, their names and other information concerning 
them being as follows : Sarah, married William B. Kerr and re- 
sides in Waukesha county, Wis. ; Charlotte is now Mrs. McBean 
and resides in Pewaukee ; Julia married Thomas Kerr and res : des 
in Hartland. Wis. ; Wm. Merton resides in Waukesha county ; 
James is the subject of this review; John resides in Kansas; and 
Joseph resides in Mason City, Iowa. James Bull, whose name in- 
troduces this memoir, received his primary education in England 
and after the migration of his parents to America attended school 
in Waukesha county, Wis., for a time. The date of the immigra- 
tion of the family was in 1844, and Waukesha county was its per- 
manent location, the father purchasing a farm there upon which 
he resided until his death in 1874. Our subject started his inde- 
pendent career at the age of eighteen years, first working on a rail- 
road for about three months, after which he returned home and 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 131 

worked for his father on the farm, remaining one year. He then 
came to Dane county and worked for an uncle near Mt. Horeb one 
year, after which he went to Rockford, 111., where he worked as a 
farm hand for another year. Returning then to Wisconsin he en- 
tered into a partnership with his brother and together they farmed 
a rented place for a time, and later our subject went to Burke, 
where he was employed as overseer for the H. P. Hall dairy, for 
two years. He then crossed the lake to what is now known as 
Esther Beach and there worked a farm for two years, and while 
there helped to plant all the shrubbery, now so pleasant to look 
upon at Ethelwyn park. From there he moved to Waubesa lake, 
where he remained three years, and then moved on a farm in the 
town of Madison, where he remained one year. Returning then to 
Waubesa lake, he remained one year, after which he again went to 
Ethelwyn park and worked the farm there for two years. He then 
purchased the old Harvey farm, which contained thirty-six acres, 
adjoining Judge Bryant's place in the town of Madison, and re- 
mained there eight years. In the autumn of 1891 he sold his prop- 
erty and bought a home in Wingra Park, his being the fourth fam- 
ily to take up a residence in Madison's beautiful suburb, and he re- 
sided in this home thirteen years. He then sold his residence and 
purchased two lots near by, upon which he erected a house, and 
there he and his good wife now reside in the full enjoyment of a 
comfortable old age. He planted the first trees in Wingra Park on 
Grant street. While his career as related has been an active one, 
he found time to respond to his country's call for men in the dark 
days of the early sixties. On February 23, 1864, he enlisted in 
Company I of the Thirteenth Regiment Wisconsin Infantry, as a 
private and served until September 18, 1865, when he was mus- 
tered out of service by order of the war department, hostilities 
having been ended and peace once more established. During his 
service he participated in the battles of Decatur and Huntsville. 
Ala., though most of the time was devoted to guard duty, and he 
also played in the regimental band. Mr. Bull was married on 
November 25, 1863, to Miss Elizabeth Hindrich, born in Germany, 
January 14, 1842. Her parents were George and Mary A'nn Hind- 
rich, both natives of Germany; her father dying when she was an 
infant, her mother afterward remarried and lived in Chicago. Mr. 
Bull maintains an independent attitude, politically, giving his sup- 
port to men and measures that meet his conscientious approval, 
and he and wife are members of the Methodist church. 

Dr. James Davie Butler was born in Rutland, Vt., March 15, 1815. 



132 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

He was graduated from Middlebury College in 1836, and from And- 
over Theological Seminary in 1840. A distinguished scholar, and 
lifelong traveler, he made the first of his many European trips in 
1842, at a period when such journeys were far less common than 
they have since become. He made a pedestrian tour through Ger- 
many, Austria, Italy, Switzerland, France, and Great Brita'n; met 
many distinguished scholars during his leisurely trip, and returned 
late in 1843. He made three subsequent trips to Europe and also 
journeyed around the world, to the Hawaiian Islands, to Cuba, and 
his Wanderlust, at one time or another, drew him to most of the 
known places on the earth's surface, and acquainted him with all 
manner of men and civilizations. He is said to have been a pas- 
senger on the first train to Portland, Oregon, over the Northern 
Pacific road. On his return from his first European trip he was 
successively pastor of the Congregational churches at Burlington 
and Wells River, Vt., South Danvers, Mass., and Cincinnati, O. 
He was called to the chair of Greek in Wabash College, Crawfords- 
ville, Ind., in 1854, and in 1858 became professor of ancient lan- 
guages and literature in the University of Wisconsin, being then 
in his forty-third year, and Madison remained his home until the 
time of his death. Many of the older alumni of the university re- 
call with pleasure Dr. Butler's rare enthusiasm for learning, his 
sparkling wit, and the remarkable range of his information. He 
resigned his chair in 1868, and devoted the subsequent years of his 
long life to travel, study, the ministry and the lecture platform. 
His extensive travels and his scholarly attainments made him es- 
pecially successful as a public lecturer. He was of a genial and 
sociable nature, and few men had a wider circle of friends and cor- 
respondents, scattered in the four quarters of the globe. He was 
a prolific writer, being a well known contributor to the pages of the 
New York Nation, Lippincott's Magazine, Magazine of American 
History, the Bibliotheca Sacra, the Wisconsin Historical Collec- 
tions, and numerous other publications, while many of his public 
addresses have been printed and widely circulated. The long use- 
ful and scholarly life of Dr. Butler drew to a close in 1905, sur- 
rounded by his family and numerous friends, when he died at his 
home in Madison, at the ripe old age of ninety. 

Edward Byrne is one of the old and highly respected farmers of 
the town of the town of Fitchburg, which place has been his home 
during practically all of the past half-century, but his nativity was 
in the little Emerald Isle, the country that has given America so 
many of her leaders in the various walks of life. The exact date 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 133 

of the birth of Mr. Byrne is not known, as the family record was 
unfortunately destroyed many years ago, but it is probable that the 
event occurred about 1840. His parents were Edward anu dCather- 
ine Byrne, both of whom were also natives of Ireland, and in 1854 
they removed with their children to America. The family came di- 
rectly to Wisconsin by way of the great lakes, landing at Milwaukee, 
and then by the new railway to Dane county, the final destination 
and location being in the town of Fitchburg. Edward Byrne, our 
subject, had received a common school education in his native coun- 
try, and upon coming to America devoted his energies to overcom- 
ing the difficulties that presented themselves to the early pioneers. 
Upon reaching manhood he purchased two hundred acres of land 
in section 21, town of Fitchburg, the same on which he- now resides, 
and immediately devoted his energies to its clearing and improve- 
ment ; he afterward sold forty acres. He has resided on this tract 
of land ever since, with the exception of two years which he spent 
in Chicago, and he has successfully followed the business of gen- 
eral farming, including the raising of hogs, cattle, sheep and horses. 
Politically he gives an allegience to the principles of the Demo- 
cratic party, and the esteem in which he is held by his fellow citi- 
zens is attested by the fact that he has served three years as treas- 
urer of the town of Fitchburg, and he has also been clerk of his 
school district for a long time. His religious faith is manifested by 
by membership in the Catholic church. Mr. Byrne was married 
on February 22, 1870, to Miss Ellen Barry, daughter of James and 
Elizabeth (McDonald) Barry, prominent residents of the town of 
Fitchburg, both of whom are now deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Byrne 
are the parents of eleven children, the names and other information 
concern'ng whom are properly given a place in this review : Cath- 
erine is the wife of John Lacy, of the town of Fitchburg; Theresa 
is the wife of Frank Hayes and resides in Canada ; Margaret is the 
wife of William Byrnes of the town of Oregon ; Sarah and James 
res'de at home; Beezie is a professional nurse at Colorado Springs; 
Mary is deceased ; and Edward, Nellie, Irene and Anna reside at 
home. All of these children were born at the old homestead in 
the town of Fitchburg, and they all received their education in the 
excellent district schools. James L. Byrne was the fifth ch'ld and 
the eldest son born to these parents, and at the early age of fourteen 
years he started in life for himself, first working for an uncle, (now 
deceased), for a number of years. He was born in the town of 
Fitchburg k February 7, 1880, and although still quite young, as we 
reckon ages, he has a considerable competence to show as the re- 



134 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

ward of his early industry and singleness of purpose. He owns one 
hundred and ten acres of land in sections 16 and 22 of the town of 
Fitchburg, the farm being well improved and under a high state of 
cultivation. This farm he rents out to competent tenants, and as he 
is unmarried he remains at home, where his services are devoted to 
assisting in the management of his father's affairs. The young man 
has a bright future before him, and has already won a position 
a substantial and progressive citizen. 

James Byrne, a retired farmer in the village of Oregon, is deserv- 
ing of special mention in a work of this nature by reason of his high 
character and the results he has achieved by his industry and fru- 
gality. He was born in the county of Wicklow, Ireland, and is one 
of four children born to Michael and Anne Byrne, all of whom mi- 
grated to America and took up their residence in Wisconsin. Of 
these Michael resides in the town of Fitchburg, Dane county ; Anna 
and Lizzie are deceased, and James is the immediate subject of this 
review. James Byrne was educated in the schools of the Emerald 
Isle, and prior to his migration to America traveled extensively 
in Europe. He dealt largely in horses, having a natural adapta- 
tion for the business of handling the equine breed, and he can relate 
many interesting experiences, representing nearly every county in 
Ireland. He came directly to Wisconsin from his native land, in 
1870, and worked as a farm hand for about six years. He then 
bought one hundred acres of land in the town of Fitchbnrg, where 
he did general farming for about seven years, and then sold the farm 
to O. A. Fox, of Madison, and then rented a farm in the same town 
for three years longer. He next purchased one hundred and sixty 
acres in the town of Oregon, upon which he resided for nine years, 
and then sold and bought eighty acres only a mile distant, where 
he lived for seven years. He then sold again and purchased a com- 
fortable home in the village of Oregon, where he now lives in retire- 
ment and expects to reside the remainder of his life, enjoying the 
fruits of years of activity. He is a man of much energy, never being 
idle at any season of the year, and his success is due largely to the 
unusual determination which is a prominent trait of his character. 
This was evidenced in lis early life, while in the business of hand- 
ling horses, and he seemed to take an especial delight in subdu- 
ing the most vicious of those which came into his possession. Mr. 
Byrne was married in 1876 to Miss Katie Murray, born in Green 
county, Wis., in 1858, the daughter of James Murray, an old resident 
of that part of the state. Mrs. Byrne became the mother of six 
children, and died when the eldest was but eight years old, thus 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 135 

leaving a family of little ones to the care of a lend and indulgent 
father. Concerning these children the following information is 
appropriately given in this review : Anna T. is now Mrs. Lamp, 
of Durand, Wis. ; James W. and Agnes reside at home ; Lizzie is 
deceased ; George remains at home, and Eddie is deceased. Mr. 
Byrne is independent in his political views, and his religious belief 
is manifested by membership in the Catholic church. He possesses 
the attributes that go to the making of the good citizen, and by his 
careful management and sound judgement has been able to accu- 
mulate a competency ; but he modestly disclaims that all the credit 
is due to his own efforts, and devoutly believes that Providence 
has favored him in his different undertakings. 

James Byrne, who is recognized as one of the progressive and 
up-to-date farmers of the town of Fitchburg, is a native of the 
Green Mountain state, having been born at Burlington, Vermont, 
on October 2, 1849. His parents, David and Rose (Kilin) Byrne, 
were both natives of Ireland, who migrated to America early in life 
and settled in the state of Vermont, where they resided for thirty 
years. Then following the westward course of empire they came 
to Wisconsin and took up their residence in the town of Fitchburg. 
Dane county, and there spent the remainder of their lives. The 
father was a farmer by occupation, and upon coming to Dane county 
purchased one hundred and sixty acres of land, partly improved, a 
portion of which is now owned by the son whose name introduces 
this review. Fourteen children were born to these parents, twelve 
of whom are living, — a son, William, who served in the Union army 
during the Civil War, and a daughter are deceased. James Byrne 
was a small boy when his parents took up their abode in Dane 
county, and he received his education in the schools of the town of 
Fitchburg. He remained at home with his parents until their de- 
m'se, and by purchase came into possession of the homestead 
seventeen years ago, so that his residence has remained unchanged 
during all the years he has lived in Dane county. His farm com- 
prises one hundred and twenty acres of well improved land in sec- 
tion 29, town of Fitchburg, and he occupies his time in general 
farming, including the raising of cattle, hogs and sheep to a consid- 
erable extent. Mr. Byrne gives an unswerving allegience to the 
princ'ples and policies of the Democratic- party, and his religious 
faith is expressed by membership in the Catholic church of the vil- 
lage of Oregon. He has never married 

James M. Byrne has been a resident of the town of Fitchburg 
during the past twenty years, and so well has he ordered his affa'rs 



136 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

and so indefatigably has he toiled that he has won a secure posi- 
tion among the progressive and prosperous farmers of that portion 
of Dane county. Mr. Byrne was born in the county of Dublin, Ire- 
land, on June 26, 1861, and was the son of Lawrence and Anna 
(Doyle) Byrne, who were also natives of Ireland. The opportuni- 
t'es for securing an education were very limited, but our subject 
attended school for a time at Kingston, Ireland, and when he was 
eleven years old came with his parents to America. They located 
in the state of New York, and there he supplemented the scholastic 
training he had received by attendance upon the public schools. 
His father bought land in the Empire state and continued to reside 
there until his death, which occurred a few years later. There were 
three children born to Mr. and Mrs. Byrne, and after the father's 
death, the mother married a Mr. O'Brien, and to this union three 
children were born. The mother of our subject, a sister, and two 
half-brothers still reside in New York, and only two of the family 
live in Wisconsin, viz., James M. Byrne, whose name introduces 
this review, and a half-brother, Peter O'Brien, who is a flagman 
at Brooklyn, Wis. The subject of this sketch was thrown upon h's 
own resources at the age of fifteen years, and he worked as a com- 
mon laborer during the summer months and attended school dur- 
ing the winter months. In 1886 he came to Wisconsin and located 
in the town of Fitchburg. Dane county, where he was employed as 
a farm hand for some time. He then purchased the farm upon 
which he still resides, containing one hundred and twenty acres, 
and proceeded to make the excellent improvements thereon. The 
success that has, crowned his efforts is due to his own unflagging 
industry, a'ded by a congenial and provident helpmate. Mr. Byrne 
was married on February 16, 1887, to Miss Alice Kinney, a native 
of Fitchburg, born October 15, 1869, and daughter of Michael and 
Alice (Lynch) Kinney, prominent residents of that town. Four 
children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Byrne : Jessie M., 
Alice E., Lester Joseph, and Albert John. In politics the subject 
of this review gives an unswerving allegiance to the principles of 
the Democratic party, and he and Mrs. Byrne are members of the 
Catholic church. 

John A. Byrne is one of the oldest citizens of the city of Madison, 
both in point of age and in time of actual residence, more than fifty 
years having elapsed since he established his home in the then un- 
pretensious village. He was born in Ireland, August 11, 1820, 
and is the son of James and Ellen (Sheehan) Byrv.e, both of whom 
are also natives of the Emerald Isle. His father was one of those 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 137 

Irish patriots, who formed the Society of United Irishmen in 1798, 
and under the leadership of Robert Emmett, endeavored, in 1802, 
to overthrow English domination and establish an independent gov- 
ernment for Erin. Being unsuccessful in the efforts, James Byrne,, 
accepted the result philosophically, and turning his attention to in- 
dustrial pursuits, remained in his native land until his death. He 
was a distiller by occupation. John A. Byrne, whose name intro- 
duces this review, received his education in the land of his birth and 
continued to reside there until 1847, in which year he migrated to> 
America. This was one year before the admission of Wisconsin 
into the Union as a state, and upon coming to the territory Mr. 
Byrne settled in Columbia county, where he purchased land. That 
county rema'ned the place of his residence until 1854, when he 
removed with his family to Dane county, and has resided here 
ever since, all.but five years of the time in the city of Madison. He 
has engaged in farming to some extent, especially during the five 
years when he resided in the town of Blooming Grove, but his bus- 
iness during life has been principally that of a land speculator. 
In politics he has given an unswerving allegience to the basic prin- 
ciples of the Democratic party, but has never essayed the roll of an 
office-seeker. However, he has been called by his fellow men to 
positions of trust, among them being chairman of the town board 
of Blooming Grove for a number of years, and after his removal 
to Madison in about 1857 or 1858, he served a term as alderman of 
the fourth ward. He was also immigrant agent for the state ot 
Wisconsin dur'ng the year 1853. Mr. Byrne was married on April 
22, 1841, to Miss Marie E. McKinnon, who was born in Dublin, 
Ireland, the daughter of John and Isabel (Jamison) McKinnon, 
both being of Scotch ancestry. The marraige of Mr. Byrne and 
wife occurred at Six-Mile-Bridge in the county of Clare, on the date 
above mentioned, according to the service of the Episcopal Church 
of England, and at the city of Limerick on the same day according 
to the Roman Catholic service, by dispensation. Mrs. Byrne died, 
January, 30, 1894, having become the mother of ten children, the 
names and other information concerning whom are given as fol- 
lows : Isabel resides at home and follows the occupation af 
teaching; John M. is a resident of the state of Missouri ; -James is 
deceased; Ellen is the wife of G. F. Merrill, of Ashland, Wis.; 
Marie married N. E. O'Dell and lives in the state of Iowa ; Patrick J. 
resides in Kansas City : Agnes F. is deceased ; George R. is a resi- 
dent of Kansas City ; Agnes Kate resides at home, and Mary L. is 
the wife of Prof. Charles S. Slichter. of Madison. All of these 



138 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

children were well educated in the public schools of Madison and 
the "University of Wisconsin. The father is a Catholic in his re- 
ligious faith. 

Hon. Romanzo Bunn, judge of the western district of the Fed- 
eral court in Wisconsin from 1877 to 1905, was born in Oswego 
county, N. Y., September 24, 1829. In studying the history of 
Wisconsin one cannot help noting how large is the debt of the 
Badger state to New York for her contribution, in the pioneer days, 
of the material out of which a strong commonwealth may be 
erected. Judge Bunn is typical of this class. The American his- 
tory of his family may be traced back for some generations, and a 
union of the characteristics of the Dutch of New York and the 
English of New England probably account for the sturdy qualities 
which have enabled Judge Bunn to achieve success out of appar- 
ently unhopeful conditions. His father, Peter Bunn, was a native 
of New York and followed the vocation of the farmer, putting into 
it that strenuous endeavor which the conditions of life then de- 
manded. Although belonging to a long-lived race he died of a 
fever at the age of fifty-four. He married Miss Polly A. Jackson, 
who survived her husband many years, dying at the age of seven- 
ty-one. She spent her later life in Wisconsin to which state her 
children had preceded her. Peter Bunn and his wife were both 
members of the Methodist Episcopal church. The early life of 
Judge Bunn was that of the ordinary farmer boy, and his early 
education such as could be obtained at the district school. By his 
own efforts he was enabled to receive an academic education, 
alternating his attendance at the Springfield academy with teach- 
ing, and occupying his leisure with elementary law studies. At 
the age of nineteen he entered the office of McAckeron & Myers, 
Elyria, Ohio, and the following year (1850), he pursued his studies 
with W. H. Wood, of Ellicottville. N. Y. Here he followed the 
usual routine of young men fitting themselves for attorneys in 
the middle of the nineteenth century, — and read, practiced in just- 
ice courts, stopping occasionally to teach a term of school to pro- 
vide the necessary funds for the frugal life of the self-supporting 
student, — until he reached the first goal of his ambition and was 
admitted to the bar in the fall of 1853. Mr. Wood formed a part- 
nership with his former clerk and the following year both of them 
came west. Mr. Bunn was accompanied on the trip by his young 
bride, formerly Miss Sarah Purdy, a native of Oneida county, 
N. Y., and a descendant of old New England families. They 
settled in the village of Galesburg and there Mr. Bunn began his 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 139 

active legal career. The conditions were such that only a mod- 
erate degree of success was possible, and after a residence of six 
years, he sought a larger field in the town of Sparta, Monroe 
county, where he soon became a leading member of the bar, his 
practice there dating from 1861. In 1868 he was elected judge 
of the sixth circuit, was re-elected in 1871 and held the position 
until 1877. The death of James C. Hopkins, of Madison, judge of 
the western Federal district, on September 3, 1877, left a vacancy, 
and to this position Romanzo Bunn was appointed. October 30, 
of the same year, by President Hayes, a position which he filled 
until his resignation in 1905. Judge Bunn was entitled to retire 
upon full pay, for several years before he availed himself of the 
privilege, finding more satisfaction in the continuation of his active 
work than in the leisure which is the goal of so much endeavor. 
Beside filling his judicial duties, Judge Bunn has lectured before 
the law class of the University of Wisconsin, and was also the 
lecturer on Federal jurisprudence at the Northwestern University, 
Evanston, 111., for two years. His career as a jurist has been 
marked by just and wise decisions and in all departments of legal 
work, as attorney and lecturer as well as judge, he has won the 
respect of the public and the esteem and confidence of his associ- 
ates. His sense of equity is well-developed and takes precedence 
in thought to technical quibbles. He is a man of fine literary 
discrimination, and is fond of his library. He is a member of the 
Madison Literary Club and frequently appears upon its programs. 
He is also fond of out-door life and is a devoted disciple of Isaack 
Walton, displaying in his ardor for this quiet sport qualities which 
w r ould hardly be suspected by those who knew him only in the 
court-room. He has a kindly and sympathetic nature and retains 
to a remarkable degree the characteristics whch marked his youth, 
showing the strong fibre of the original grain which has been but 
slightly affected by his contact with the world. While he votes 
with the Republican party, Judge Bunn has never taken a very 
active part in either local or state politice. Both he and his wife 
are attendants of the Congregational church, and their beautiful 
home on Langdon street has been for many years a center of 
hospitable life. They are the parents of five children, the three 
sons having all followed their father's profession of the law. The 
two older sons. Charles W. and George L., established themselves 
a number of years ago in St. Paul where one is now the judge of 
the circuit court and the other general counsel for the Northern 
Pacific Co. The youngest son, John M., is a practicing attorney at 



140 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

Spokane Falls, Wash. One daughter, Fannie, is married to C. B. 
Chapman, a leading real estate man of the city of Madison and the 
other, Miss Mary, resides with her parents. The latter is actively 
interested in the philanthropies of the city and especially in the 
city hospital and the training school for nurses recently established 
in connection with it. She has been chairman of the committee on 
the training school, has worked out its plans, prepared its bulletins 
and had charge of its course of lectures, and has devoted con- 
scientious care to every detail of the work. 

Upon his retirement from the bench the Milwaukee Sentinel of 
January 6, 1905, makes the following comment: "After a term of 
office covering nearly three decades in the remarkable development 
of his state, during which litigation of great importance has com- 
manded his judicial attention no word of impeachment of his hon- 
esty has ever been truthfully uttered. This fact may well be stated 
as epitomizing his record as an officer and a man." 

Orvis Leslie Burd, cashier of the Belleville state bank, is one of 
the younger generation which claims Wisconsin as a native state ; 
he was born October 18, 1869, in the town of Verona, and is the 
son of William R. and Eliza Ann (Mutchler) Burd, both of whom 
were born near Harmony, N. Y., the former on September 22, 1828, 
and the latter December 12, 1828. They came to Wisconsin and 
settled in Verona, and engaged in farming until 1891 when Mr. 
Burd retired from active work and removed to the village of Ver- 
ona where he now resides. They had nine children. Magg'e, mar- 
ried Wallace Morse of Verona, now of Baraboo ; Gertrude (de- 
ceased) ; Luella, married Willis Morse, of Verona, now of Madison ; 
Emma, (deceased) ; Elona, married John S. Colby of Story ; Flattie, 
married Robert Harvey, of Chicago ; Sarah married O. W. Donkle, 
of Verona, now of Black Earth; Orvis L.. the subject of this 
sketch; Clinton B., of Madison. Mr. Burd was brought up on the 
farm in Verona and received his early instruction in the schools 
of the v'llage ; he afterward attended Pond's academy at Madison, 
taught school one year and then went to the business college at 
Dixon, 111., and took a course in short-hand and commerce, and was 
graduated from the institution [n 1891. and at once entered the em- 
ployment of Mr. E. F. Riley, secretary of the board of regents of 
the University of Wisconsin, at Madison, and remained there as 
chief clerk until July 1, 1903, when, in company with Prof. H. L. 
Russell, of Madison, he purchased the bank of Belleville, — Profes- 
sor Russell taking the presidency of the bank, and Mr. Burd acting 
as cashier, which important position he still occupies. Mr. Burd 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 141 

was married August 16, 1894, to Miss Grace Inez Wilson, of 
Perry, 111. ; they have two children, Elizabeth, aged seven and 
Katherine, aged five. Mr. Burd is a member of the order of Free 
and Accepted Masons, of the I. O. O. F„ M. W. A., E. F. U., 
Beavers, and Good Templars ; he is a Republican and served as clerk 
of the town of Madison for five years. Mr. and Mrs. Burd are 
members of the Presbyterian church. 

A. L-. Burdick, member of the well-known dry-goods firm of 
Burdick & Murray, was born in Madison November 13, 1858. His 
parents were Lewis H. and Harriet A. (Williams) Burdick. 
Lewis H. Burdick was born in Vermont, spent his early life in 
New York state and came to Madison at an early date. He was 
an expert carpenter and practically all of the public and large 
buildings of the city are witnesses of his skill and handiwork. He 
died in 1884 at the age of seventy-eight. His wife died in 1892 at 
the age of sixty-eight. A. L. Burdick is an example of the type ot 
man who has worked his way up from the bottom step of the lad- 
der to the top. He was one of nine children, only three of whom 
are living, Maurice A., a hardware merchant in an Oklahoma city; 
Emma. Mrs. S. I. Mould of Dubuque, la. ; and A. L., the subject 
of this sketch. He was educated in the Madison city schools, but 
even before he had completed school he had started on a business 
career. From the time he was nine years old until he was thir- 
teen he worked in a hotel managed by an uncle, Eleazer Grover. 
At thirteen he started in the drygoods business as an errand boy 
and general utility man, and for ten years continued in that capa- 
city for the late William Dudley. When the firm became Dudley 
& Zehnter he retained his position with it, remaining ten years, 
and then "went on the road" for a year for an eastern concern sell- 
ing fancy goods. The following thirteen years were spent with 
the R. B. Ogilvie company in the capacity of general manager. 
He then purchased H. N. Antisdel's interest in a wholesale notion 
company, and three years later he and his partner, T. Gibbs Mur- 
ray, bought out the Ogilvie dry goods company and have since con- 
ducted that business with great success. On September 12, 1899, 
Mr. Burdick married Miss M. E. Purcell. a native of Madison, and 
a daughter of Timothy and Catherine Purcell. Mr. and Mrs. Bur- 
dick are members of the Catholic church and Mr. Burdick is a dis- 
trict deputy and grand knight of the Knights of Columbus. He is 
a Republican in politics, a member of the so-called "Half-Breed" 
wing of the party. His admiration for the junior senator from 
Wisconsin is unbounded. 



142 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

Michael J. Burke, deceased, was a resident of the city of Madison 
for fifteen years prior to his death, and during that time won the 
respect and esteem of a large circle of friends. He was born in 
England, of Irish parentage, the date of his birth being July 6 r 
1851. and his birthplace was Yorkshire, England. His parents- 
were James and Bridget (Fordy) Burke, both natives of Ireland 
who removed to England in early life and their spent the remainder 
of their days. Michael J. Burke received his education in the 
schools of Leeds, England, and as soon as he had reached the age 
of eligibility he joined the English militia, with which he served 
for eleven years and then received an honorable discharge. In his 
youth he also learned the trade of a brick and stone mason, and 
worked at the same prior to coming to America. He was married 
November 29, 1873, to Miss Mary McHale, daughter of Owen John 
and Ann (Allan) McHale, of Yorkshire, England, where the daugh- 
ter was born on March 22, 1856. On April 8, 1881, Mr. Burke left 
the English shore for America, landing at Toronto, Canada, from 
which place he crossed over to Massachusetts in May. His wife 
sailed on July 30, following, for Massachusetts, where she joined 
her husband, and they remained in that state one year, leaving 
there August 1, 1882. Wisconsin was their destination, and ar- 
riving at the city of Madison in due time Mr. Burke secured em- 
ployment as a brick-layer on the capitol building then in course of 
construction. He was at work on the building when the structure 
collapsed, November 8, 1883, and in the catastrophe he received in- 
juries from which he never recovered. Both legs were broken, 
other wounds and internal injuries were received, and for two years 
he was unable to do work of any kind. Having then partially re- 
covered, he entered the hotel business in Madison, and after eigh- 
teen months in a rented building sold the business and bought a 
lot in West Madison, where he built what is now known as the 
Commercial House. There Mr. Burke died, in 1897, and his widow 
continued the business until July, 1900, when she rented the prop- 
erty for three years and in April, 1903, bought the beautiful home 
at 534 West Mifflin street, where she now resides. She is a woman 
of much determination and natural business ability. Five children 
were born to Mr. and Mrs. Burke, the names and other informa- 
tion concerning whom are given as follows : John J. married 
Rachel Gonstead and resides in Madison, he and wife being the 
parents of the following children : Henrietta Regina, Mary 
Josephine, Dorothy, Grace, Adeline, Esther ; the second son, James 
Alyious, is deceased; Anna E. married James Callahan, resides in 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 143 

Madison, and is the mother of the following children : James 
Michael, Murty Raphael, Jolyi Henry, Thomas Burke, and May 
Elmore ; Thomas J. married Catherine McNamara and resides in 
Chicago; and Mary A. married Henry O'Neil, resides in Madi- 
son, and is the mother of the following children : Myrtle Frances, 
Michael Henry, and Harold Edward. Michael J. Burke was a 
Democrat in his political proclivities, and the family are members 
of St. Raphael's Catholic church. 

Ernest F. Burmeister, former sheriff of Dane county, is pro- 
prietor of the Elks Hotel, in Middleton, and is one of the popular 
citizens of his native county. He was born May 24, 1867, on a farm 
in Middleton township, this county, the place of his birth being lo- 
cated four miles southwest of the village of Middleton. He is a 
son of Henry and Eliza (Pierstoff) Burmeister, both of whom were 
native of Germany, the father having been born in Mecklenburg. 
March 19, 1826, and having served the requisite period in the Ger- 
man army. In 1857, he came to America, making Dane county his 
destinat'on. He settled on a tract of forty acres of land in section 
26, Middleton township, the place being known as the old Indian 
Forty and being the farm on which the subject of this sketch was 
born. He was there engaged in agricultural pursuits for eight 
years, at the expiration of which he sold the property and removed 
to Verona township, where he purchased one' hundred and twenty 
acres. He lost this property through misfortune and then began 
anew, on what was known as Nine-mound Prairie farm, where he 
passed the remainder of his life, his death occurring October 19, 
1876. He was a prominent member of the Grange and both he and 
h's wife were zealous members of the Lutheran church. He aided 
in the building of the first church of this denomination in Middle- 
ton township. His Wife came with her parents to Middleton Junc- 
tion, and here their marriage was solemnized. Mrs. Burmeister was 
likewise born in Mecklenburg, Germany, and she now ma'ntains 
her home in the village of Middleton. Of the children those living 
are Henry, Emma, Carl, Ernest F., William, Otto and August. 
Those deceased are Andrew, August (1st). John and Clara. Ernest 
F. Burmeister, the immediate subject of this sketch, received the ad- 
vantages of the public schools and was reared to the sturdy life of 
the farm. At the age of twenty-one years he secured employment 
as a mechanic, in the shops of Kundert & Hissig of Green county. 
Wisconsin. In 1888 he was married and thereafter was employed 
in the mercantile establishment of his father-in-law, in Mount Ver- 
non, for a short time. He then took up his residence in Canby, 



144 . HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

Minnesota, where he served eight months as city marshal. In 
1892 he returned to Mount Vernon, soon afterward taking a posi- 
tion as traveling representative for a large manufactory of agricul- 
tural machinery. Later he established himself in the livery busi- 
ness in the city of Madison and after disposing of the same he be- 
came turnkey and deputy sheriff, under C. W. Alead. He there- 
after served one year and four months as jailer, under Sheriff C. F. 
Moulton, and was finally promoted to serve the full term as under- 
sheriff. He also held this office under the administrat'on of Sher- 
iff G. M. Kanouse. In the fall of 1889 Mr. Burmeister was elected 
sheriff of Dane county, on the Republican ticket, being the first 
German and the youngest man and having the largest majority 
of any man ever elected to this office in the county. He contin- 
ued incumbent one term, giving a most excellent administration of 
shrievalty, and he thereafter made a tour in the west, returning to 
Dane county in 1894 and purchasing the Elks Hotel, in Middleton, 
which he has since conducted successfully. He is a candidate 
for the office of sheriff for the election of the autumn of 1906. Mr. 
Burmeister is identified with the Benevolent and Protective Order 
of Elks, and Fraternal Order of Eagles, the Equitable Fraternal 
Union, the Modern Woodmen and the Independent Foresters. In 
1888 Mr. Burmeister was united in marriage to Miss Julia Weltzen, 
whos'e parents were pioneers of Dane county. The six daughters of 
Mr. and Mrs. Burmeister are: Lillian. Eula, Florence, Marie, Lu- 
cille, and Ouida. 

Almon A. Burr, a prominent farmer of the town of Medina, is a 
native of Medina, Dane county, Wis. The Burr family are of 
English origin and two brothers came over in the Mayflower, soon 
followed by another brother. Two settled in the east and one in 
the south and from one of the eastern branches Almon A. Burr is 
descended and represents the ninth generation of his family in the 
United States. His father, Augustus T., was born in 1822 in 
Med'na county, Ohio, was educated in Ohio, married Miss Cath- 
erine Lucas, who was born in Litchfield, Conn., in 1818. They 
came to Dane county in 1845, two years after their marriage and 
were pioneers of the new country. They obtained a farm in sec- 
tion 12 and afterward moved to section 11 which they made their 
permanent home ; Mrs. Burr there died in 1892 and her husband in 
1902, the latter eighty years of age. Two sons were born to them ; 
Theron Burr, of Evansville, and Almon A., of Medina. Mr. Bun- 
was a Republican and active in politics. In Ohio he held the office 
of state deputy sheriff. He was a member of the Masonic order. 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 145 

Almon A. Burr was born in Medina, November 30. 1858, attended 
school in Medina and the Waterloo high school and taught school 
for eight years. For twenty-seven years he has been engaged in 
farming and has a splendid farm of two hundred acres. He is also 
interested in the Waterloo Canning and Pickling Association and 
secretary of the organization. He is associated with the Republi- 
can party and takes great interest in politics. As treasurer and 
clerk of the free high school he has endeavored to promote its in- 
terests and has also labored for the district schools as clerk and 
treasurer. June 25. 1884, Mr. Burr was married to Miss Violetta 
Thompson, born in Medina. August 20, 1852. daughter of Amos 
and Adaline ( Muzzy) Thompson, who lived in Cattaraugus county, 
N. Y., before they came to Dane county. Mr. Thompson is a 
veteran of the Civil War and a member of the G. A. R. He served 
during the last year of the war in the First Regiment Wisconsin 
Heavy Artillery, Company H. Mr. and Mrs. Thompson have five 
ch'ldren. Seven children have blessed the marriage of Mr. and 
Mrs. Burr ; Harvey Ray, Amy Estelle, Edna Christina, Jennie May, 
Allen Russell. Mabel Violetta and Dorothy Adele. The family 
attend the Methodist Episcopal church. Mr. Burr is a member of 
the Waterloo Lodge No. 63, F. & A. M. and the Modern Woodmen. 
Mrs. Burr is a prominent member of the Eastern Star. 

George T. Burthe, a prominent farmer of the town of Dunkirk, 
was born in Rock county, Wis., February 18, 1863, and is a son of 
Halvor and Alice (Evans) Burthe, natives of Norway. For a re- 
view of the family history see the sketch of Albert Torgeson. 
From the time he was four years of age Mr. Burthe lived in the 
town of Pleasant Springs, receiving his education in the schools of 
that township. He has always pursued the vocation of farmer. 
He now owns three tracts of land in the town of Dunkirk, compris- 
ing some two hundred acres, and one hundred and twenty acres in 
the town of Pleasant Springs. Since 1892 he has made the farm in 
the town of Dunkirk his home. In 1886 Mr. Burthe was united 
in marriage to Anna, daughter of Thomas and Susan (Quale) Asle- 
son of Dunkirk, and to this union have been born three children. 
— Theodore, Stella and Oilman. Mrs. Burthe's paternal grand- 
parents, Asle and Astle Thorson, came to Dane county from Nor- 
way in 1846 and in the spring of 1847 settled in the town of Dun- 
kirk, where they lived the rest of their lives. Her parents are still 
living, making Dunkirk their home. Her maternal grandparents, 
Andrew and Christie (Ouam) Quale were born in Norway, and set- 
tled in Dunkirk in 1848. In his political affiliations Mr. Burthe is 
10— iii 



146 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

associated with the Democratic party. He and his wife are mem- 
bers of the United Lutheran church. Mr. Burthe is one of the 
representative citizens of the community. 

Albert Burull, superintendent of the Mandt Wagon Co., of 
Stoughton, was born in Toten. Norway, August 19, 1853, son of 
Olaf A. Grau and Karina Burull. Olaf was a blacksmith and ma- 
chinist in Norway where both he and his wife spent their entire 
lives. Albert Burull was educated in the common schools in Nor- 
way and grew to maturity in his native land. For some time he 
was employed in the government telegraphic service, his work 
being the construction of new lines through the country. Con- 
vinced by the reports of fellow-countrymen who had preceded him 
to the United States that his labor would there receive better 
recompense, he embarked for America in 1880 and settled in 
Stoughton, where he was immediately employed by the T. G. 
Mandt Wagon Co., now known as the Stoughton Wagon Co., in 
the steam fitting and engineering department. With this company 
he worked in different capacities, part of the time as foreman of 
the wheel department, until 1896, when he became connected with 
the Mandt Wagon Co., also founded by T. G. Mandt. as superin- 
tendent, which is his present position. On May 19, 1883, Mr. 
Burull married Miss Elsie Mandt. daughter of Guilder G. and 
Jorunde (Siunis) Mandt, who were pioneers of the town of Pleas- 
ant Springs. Three daughters were born to the marriage ; Oleda J., 
Palma and Edna A. Mrs. Burull is a member of the Methodist 
Episcopal church and her husband of Christ Lutheran church of 
Stoughton. Mr. Burull takes a lively interest in politics, is a Re- 
publican and has represented his ward on the city council for nine 
years, rendering faithful and efficient service to the city. He is a 
member of the Modern Woodmen organization of the F. and A. M. 
and of the Beavers. 

Allen R. Bushnell, lawyer, and counsel and treasurer of the Wis- 
consin Life Insurance company of Madison, was born in Hartford, 
Trumbull county, Ohio. His father was Dr. George W. Bushnell. 
who was born August 11, 1800, in Connecticut. For many years 
he was a practicing physician in Ohio, where he was widely known 
as a man of strong individuality and mature judgment. He died 
on August 8, 1892. Dr. Bushnell's wife was Sallie Bates, also a 
native of Connecticut, where she was born in 1801. Both the doc- 
tor and his wife were members of the Disciples' church, the doctor 
serving as elder for more than a generation. Mrs. Bushnell died 
in 1866. Of the eight children of Dr. and Mrs. Bushnell onlv three 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 147 

are living : Sarah married Charles Davies after being left a widow 
by S. D. Watkins, now lives in Lancaster, Wis. ; Allen R... the sub- 
ject of this sketch ; and Amoret, now Mrs. A. W. Rewey of Platte- 
ville. Allen R. Bushnell. was educated in the Hartford, Ohio, 
high school and Oberlin and Hiram colleges, his collegiate 
work being a special course to fit him for the law. When 
he had completed his school work he came to Wisconsin and 
entered the law offices of Hon. Steven O. Paine at Platteville, 
taught school to help pay expenses, was admitted to the bar 
at Lancaster and on December 1, 1857, he hung out his own 
shingle in Platteville. He was elected district attorney of Grant 
county in 1860, and continued his practice there until May, 1861, 
when he resigned his office, and under President Lincoln's call for 
75,000 volunteers, enlisted as a private in the "Platteville Guards," 
which afterward became Company C, Seventh Wisconsin Volun- 
teer Infantry, and he was elected first lieutenant of the company. 
This regiment became a part of the Iron Brigade, and was in most 
of the battles of the Army of the Potomac. Mr. Bushnell saw some 
of its sharpest fighting, — was within a few feet of Maj. F. W. Oak- 
ley when the latter lost his arm, — and he was promoted to captain 
of his company. In 1863 Mr. Bushnell received his honorable dis- 
charge from the army on surgeon's certificate, for disability in- 
curred, and he returned to Ohio, where for a year he was under the 
care of his father. In 1864 he returned to Wisconsin to resume the 
practice of law, but instead of continuing in Platteville he removed 
to Lancaster in Grant county. In 1872 he was elected and served 
as a member of the lower house of the Wisconsin legislature. 
Later he framed a bill which was passed, making Lancaster a city, 
and he was elected its first mayor. For four years he was United 
States district attorney for the western district of Wisconsin, and 
was then elected in the third district to the fifty-second United 
States congress. It is worthy of note that this body was the first 
to take any action on the election of United States senators by di- 
rect vote of the people, and it was Mr. Bushnell who introduced 
and helped to push through the lower house a proposed constitu- 
tional amendment to that effect. In 1891 Mr. Bushnell removed 
to Madison. His connection with the Wisconsin Life Insurance 
Co., began in 1895, when he was made counsel for the company, 
soon after being made a director. In 1900 he was made secretary 
and in January, 1905, he assumed his present position. Mr. Bush- 
nell was a candidate, in the spring of 1906, for election to the Y\ is- 
consin supreme bench. He has been twice married, first in Septem- 



148 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

ber, 1866, to Laura, a daughter of Esquire Addison and Martha 
(Barber) Burr, of Vermont. By this marriage he had one daugh- 
ter, Mabel, now the wife of James B. Kerr of St. Paul, Minn. His 
first wife died in 1873, and in May, 1875, he married Mary F., 
daughter of Cyrus and Fanny (Barber) Sherman of Lancaster, a 
cousin of his first wife. To this union was born one son, who died 
in infancy. Mrs. Bushnell is a member of the Episcopal church 
and her husband of the Congregational. Mr. Bushnell is a Royal 
Arch Mason, and has held nearly all the offices which the order 
can bestow, except that of tyler. Politically Mr. Bushnell is an old 
school Democrat, and has long stood high in the councils of his 
party. 

John R. Caldwell, president of the Morrisonville state bank since 
its organization, has been a prominent farmer of the county for a 
number of years. As indicated by his name, Mr. Caldwell is of 
Scotch origin and his grandfather, John Caldwell, came to Wiscon- 
sin in 1850 and resided upon a farm of two hundred acres in Col- 
umbia county. His wife was Janet Robertson, also a native of 
Scotland. Their son, Robert Caldwell, was born in Scotland in 
1837, was educated in Scotland and came to Columbia county, Wis., 
with his parents when he was a boy of thirteen years. He assisted 
his parents with the work of clearing the new farm and early com- 
menced farming for himself. He married Miss Elizabeth Caldow, 
who was born in Scotland in 1838 and came to Wisconsin in 1853 
with her parents, locating in Columbia county. Eight children 
blessed their marriage; John R., William K., Adam (deceased), 
David A., Charles P.. Mary, Martha and Thomas A. Robert Cald- 
well was a successful farmer, the owner of three hundred and eighty 
acres of land and active in the interests of the community, where 
he held several offices. He was an adherent of the principles of 
the Republican party. Mr. Caldwell died in 1885 and his wife in 
November, 1888. They were both prominent in the Presbyterian 
church. John R. Caldwell, their oldest son, was born in the town- 
ship of Arlington, Columbia county, March 2, 18G3, attended the 
Arlington school and the Poynette high school and soon devoted 
his attention to farming. He is the owner of a fine farm property 
in the town of Vienna, in all three hundred and twenty acres, which 
he keeps in a prosperous and profitable condition. Clydesdale 
horses, short-horned cattle and Poland China hogs are bred upon 
his farm and an extensive general farming business carried on. 
Mr. Caldwell is a Republican and supervisor in Vienna and is the 
president of the Arlington Farmers' Mutual Fire Insurance Co. 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 149 

November 5, 1889, occurred his marriage to Miss Elizabeth Morri- 
son, daughter of James Morrison, — for whom the village of Mor- 
risonville was named, — and four children have been born to the 
marriage. Robert James is a student at the Lodi high school. 
The younger children are Jennie Elizabeth, Marjorie Temple and 
Jessie Florence. 

William K. Caldwell, of Morrisonville, was born in the township 
of Arlington, Columbia county, January 25. 1865. He attended 
the common and high school of Poynette, and was graduated from 
the Northwestern Business College in 1887. He first turned his 
attention to school-teaching, as the young man fresh from college 
is apt to do, and continued in that work for four years before join- 
ing the ranks of the educated farmer, — a class which in this state 
is steadily raising the grade of agricultural life as a profession. 
He came from Columbia to this county in 1899, purchased the 
farm on which he resides, consisting of two hundred and forty 
acres. He is an extensive feeder of horses, also general farmer 
and stock-raiser. In politics he belongs to the Republican party, 
and although intelligently interested in public matters is not an 
office-seeker. He is a member of the United Presbyterian church 
as is also his wife, to whom he was united March 9, 1899. She 
was Miss Elizabeth M. Ferguson, daughter of Andrew and Agnes 
( Harvey) Ferguson. Mrs. Caldwell's parents are natives of Scot- 
land, her father being born there in 1823 and her mother in 1828. 
Mr. Ferguson came to Illinois in 1841 and settled in ^'heatland, 
Hill county, where he was married in 1852. His wife came to 
Illinois with her parents, James and Jennett (Kerr) Harvey, about 
1844. They had a family of eight children, five of whom are still 
living. Mr. Ferguson is a farmer, a Democrat and a supporter of 
the United Presbyterian church of which his wife is a member. 
Mr. and Mrs. Caldwell have two children, Harold Ferguson, born 
March 8, 1900. and Lester Earl, born August 25, 1902. Robert 
Caldwell, father of Wm. K. Caldwell, is mentioned in this work in 
connection with the sketch of John R. Caldwell. 

George Call, Jr., is a well-known farmer of the town of York, 
where he has resided since he was a boy ten years old. George 
and Eliza (Griswold) Call, his parents, were born in Ancrum, Col- 
umbia county, N. Y., and came to Dane county in 1852. George 
Call was descended from an old American family. His father,. 
Jacob Call, was born in Connecticut and Mrs. Jacob Call's father 
served six years and nine months in the Revolutionary W ar. 
George Call w r as born December 4, 1812, was educated in New 



150 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

York and married Miss Eliza Griswold in 1833. She was born 
February 22, 1809, and was the daughter of Oliver Griswold, a 
farmer of Connecticut, who lived for a time in New York and later 
in Dodge county, Wis., where he died. Mr. and Mrs Call had three 
children ; the oldest son, Eli, died ; the second son is George, Jr., 
the subject of this sketch, and the only daughter, Annette, married 
Herman Schultz in 1888. Mr. Schultz is a native of Germany and 
came to Marshall in 1872. For a short time he made Waterloo his 
home and spent the residue of his life farming in the town of Me- 
dina. Mr. and Mrs. Schultz died, leaving nine children, all of 
whom are living at the present time. When Mr. and Mrs. Call 
came to Wisconsin, they at once obtained an eighty-acre farm, to 
which they added from time to time, until at the death of Mr. Call 
in 1884, he owned one hundred and forty-one acres. His wife lived 
but a few years longer, until September, 1900. Mr. Call was a Re- 
publican as is his son, George, Jr. The latter was born in Ancram, 
N. Y. May 23, 1842, attended school in York and has always been 
engaged in farming. He has a fine farm of one hundred and nine- 
ty acres, where he carries on a general farming business and also 
raises stock, including red-polled cattle. February 21, 1873, he 
married Miss Harriet E. Carskaden, who was born in York, June 12, 
1852, daughter of Orson Carskaden, an account of whose life ap- 
pears elsewhere in this work. Three children were born to Mr. and 
Mrs. Call, but they have been very unfortunate in the loss of the 
two younger children, James G., who was born August 1, 1877 and 
died in 1883 and Florence May, who was born July 29, 1881 and 
died in 1883. The oldest son, William Henry, was born January 
25, 1875, educated in the Waterloo high school and takes charge 
of the farm, following in the footsteps of his father. 

Charles H. Campbell, a progressive farmer of Berry township, 
was born in the township of his abode, Dane county, Wis., July 22, 
1866. After the death of his father, his mother, who was a native 
of the state of New York, was married, in 1869, to John Hawley, 
of Berry township, and by this marriage had six children, five of 
whom are living. Mr. Campbell was educated in the common 
schools of the vicinity in which he was reared, and upon reaching 
manhood selected farming as his life's occupation, and has success- 
fully followed the same. For several years he owned a farm in 
Berry township, but having sold it now rents what is known as the 
"Sfaultz farm," containing two hundred and forty acres. Mr. Camp- 
bell is quite an extensive breeder of Poland-China hogs, and in 
addition follows general farming and stock-raising, and also does 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 151 

a somewhat extensive dairy business. He is a Republican in pol- 
itics, and with his wife is a member of the Norwegian Lutheran 
church. Mr. .Campbell was married, October 20, 1892, to Miss 
Lizzie Anderson, who was born in Sauk county, Wis., May 6, 1873. 
She is the daughter of Benjamin and Catherine (Cook) Anderson, 
the former of whom was born in Norway in 1833, and the latter is 
a native of Pennsylvania, where she was born in 1843. They came 
in early life to Sauk county. Wis., and moved from there to the state 
of Washington, about 1897. There the father died in 1904, leaving 
the widow and seven surviving children, nine having been born to 
the parents. To Mr. Campbell and wife six children have been 
born as follows: Harry (deceased), Elsie, Clifford, Violet, Pearl, 
Velma. 

Judge Jairus H. Carpenter was born at Ashford (now East- 
ford), Conn., February 14, 1822. He was educated in the schools 
of his native town and at Hollister Academy, Mass. After teach- 
ing school for seven terms, he began the study of law in 1844, com- 
plepting his studies with the Hon. L. P. Waldo, a prominent attor- 
ney of Tolland, Conn., and was admitted to the bar in March, 1847. 
He practiced his profession at Willamatic, Conn., until the spring 
of 1857, when he came west and located at Madison, Wis., where he 
has since resided. He married Martha C. Kendall, a native of 
Palmer, Mass., in 1852. He espoused the principles of the Repub- 
lican party at the time of its formation, and served as alternate 
delegate to its first national convention at Philadelphia and as 
delegate to the convention which nominated General Fremont for 
the presidency in 1856. His first professional partnership in Mad- 
ison was with John W. Johnson, 1857-58 ; then he formed a partner- 
with General Ezra T. Sprague, under the firm name of Carpenter 
and Sprague, 1858-61 ; in 1868 was formed the partnership of Car- 
penter & Chase, which continued until 1874, at which time Captain 
Chase removed to Souix City, la. Since that date Judge Carpenter 
has had no partner. He is a careful, painstaking lawyer, an effec- 
tive jury advocate, and noted for the zeal and earnestness with 
which he espoused a client's cause, when he had accepted a re- 
tainer. He was for three years a member of the Madison common 
council, and president of that body and acting mayor for several 
months in the absence of the mayor. • He has always taken a strong 
interest in educational matters, as is evidenced by his long service 
of twenty- eight years on the city board of education of which he 
"was president 1867-1890. He has been a member of the law fac- 
ulty, University of Wisconsin, since 1868, and was the dean of that 



152 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

body the first nine years after its organization. He received the 
honorary degree of A. M. from Yale college in 1874, and L.L. D. 
from the University of Wisconsin in 1876. In 1900 he was made 
Jackson professor of law, emeritus, in the University of Wisconsin. 
The Wisconsin supreme court appointed him to revise the probate 
laws of the state in 1878, and he was one of the commissioners to 
superintend the publication of the revised statutes of 1878. In 
1885 he was appointed county judge by Governor Rusk, to fill the 
vacancy caused by the death of Judge Sanborn, and held that 
position until January 6, 1902. He made a patient, conscientious 
and impartial judge, giving excellent satisfaction both to the bar 
and the people. 

Though now in his eighty-fifth year, he is a well-preserved man, 
and retains to a marked degree his mental and physical activity. 
His well-ordered life, cheerful and social nature, and remarkable 
strength of constitution, inherited from his New England ances- 
tors, bid fair to give him a much longer lease of life. His parents 
were Palmer and Martha (Brown) Carpenter, who settled in Minne- 
sota in 1856, and made that state their home during their last years, 
honored and respected by all who knew them. 

Prof. Stephen H. Carpenter, deceased, for ten years prior to his 
death occupied the chair of English Literature in the University of 
Wisconsin, and in the larger portion of an active life spent in the 
city of Madison he became well known and highly respected by 
the citizens thereof. Professor Carpenter was born in Fairfield, 
Herkimer county, N. Y., August 7, 1831, and his parents were Cal- 
vin G. and Laura (Haskins) Carpenter, both of whom were natives 
of New York and spent their lives in that state, the father having 
been a Baptist minister of considerable note. The parents died at 
Phelps, Ontario county, X. Y. Prof. Carpenter received his edu- 
cation in his native state, was graduated from the University of 
Rochester, and in 1852 he came to Madison and accepted a position 
as instructor in the I nivcrsity of Wisconsin. After officiating one 
year in that capacity he retired from the chair he occupied and be- 
came the editor of a periodical, known as the "Western Fireside." 
He edited that and other publications until 1859, and then went to 
Missouri for the purpose of teaching Latin in a seminary at Pal- 
myra, in that state. But the breaking out of the Civil War and the 
active military operations in that section caused the institution to be 
closed during the period of hostilites, and after one year spent there 
Mr. Carpenter returned to his home in Madison. Soon after his re : 
turn he was appointed clerk of the city of Madison and filled that 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 153 

position until 1868, when he again became an instructor in the 
University of Wisconsin, occupying the chair of English Litera- 
ture from that time until his death, December 7, 1878. In politics 
Prof. Carpenter was an old time Whig, but after the disintegration 
of that party he generally gave his support to nominees of the 
Democratic faith, although he was never what could be called an 
active politician or an "offensive partisan." Aside from the office 
of city clerk, mentioned above, he also served on the Madison school 
board for a number of years. His religious faith was expressed in 
his membership in the Baptist church, and although he was never 
a regularly ordained minister he preached a great deal in the vari- 
ous churches of Madison and surrounding country. Prof. Carpen- 
ter chose as his helpmate and companion on the journey of life, 
Miss Frances Curtis, who was also a native of Herkimer county, 
N. Y., being born in the village of Frankfort, and the marraige 
occurred on May 14, 1856. Mrs. Carpenter's father was Ira Cur- 
tis, who was born in Connecticut, and in early life followed the mer- 
cantile business. In 1853 he migrated to Wisconsin and bought a 
farm in Richland county, where he followed agricultural pursuits 
for a number of years, finally moving to the city of Madison, where 
he and his good wife both died at the residence of their daughter, 
Mrs. Carpenter. The maiden name of the mother was Nancy 
Myers, and she was a native of the state of New York. Although 
born in the same state and county, Prof. Carpenter and wife had 
never met until they took up their residence in Wisconsin. They 
saw Madison grow from a small collection of houses to a preten- 
tious city, and Mrs. Carpenter recalls that when she first came 
here there was but one little church in the village. Her husband 
built the house in which they still reside, at 424 Wisconsin Avenue, 
and he planted the seeds from which grew the stately trees that now 
stand in front of the residence. Prof. Carpenter was a member 
of the Masonic order and of a leading college fraternity. 

James Garrison, a well-known and greatly respected member of 
Rutland's farming community, is a native of England. He is a pio- 
neer of Dane county and his life is typical of that of the fine old 
settlers of Wisconsin, and of whom so many started with only their 
willing hands as capital and have made the state what it is and inci- 
dentally gained for themselves a prosperous livelihood and many 
warm friends. Mr. Carrison's parents, John and Elizabeth (Car- 
ter) Carrison, were born in Cambridgeshire, England, and spent 
their childhood, youth and early married life in their native village. 
In 1854, they embarked for America and came west as far as Rut- 



154 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

land, bringing with them their yonng family. Mr. Carrison ob- 
tained one hundred and forty acres of wild land, which he imme- 
diately set to work to improve and it became their permanent home, 
where they spent the remainder of their lives. Their family were 
brought up in the Baptist church and of their five children, four 
are living. The oldest son is James, the subject of this sketch. 
George is a retired farmer, who makes his home in Oregon, Wis., 
Mary is dead. William resides in Osage, Iowa. Sarah, the young- 
est, makes Orleans, Neb. her home. James was born in Ramsby, 
Cambridgeshire, England, November 5, 1832, came to America 
with his parents when he was twenty-two years old but had little 
opportunity to go to school, as it was necessary for him to work on 
the farm. Until 1864 he lived with his parents and worked very 
hard helping to clear and improve their farm. He then bought his 
farm in section 14, Rutland township, and set to work upon that farm 
which had been very little improved. In 1859, he married and he 
and his wife worked together to make a comfortable home of their 
new property. In this they have been very successful and in 1886, 
they retired from active work to enjoy the fruits of their many 
years of industry. Mrs. Carrison was Miss Mary Ann Tibbit, 
daughter of Edward and Ann (Roth) Tibbit of Norfolk, Eng., and 
is one of a family of ten sons and daughters. Mr. and Mrs. Tibbit 
came to America in 1854 and settled on a farm in Rutland. Mrs. 
Tibbit lives in Stoughton and his been a widow since 1889. Mary 
Ann is the oldest daughter; Jane resides in Mitchell county, Iowa; 
George in Mason City, Iowa; Becky in Northwood. Iowa; Fred- 
rick is a farmer in the town of Dunn, Dane county; Sarah, Edward, 
Ruth and an infant child died ; Susan lives in Rutland. Mr. and 
Mrs. Carrison have had three children. Charlotte married Peter 
O. Thompson, a farmer of Deerfield, Dane county, Wis. Twelve 
children make up their family circle; Henry, Ann, William. Emma, 
James, Herman, George, Clara, Chester, Raymond, Martha and 
Peter, Jr. Martha Carrison, the second child, is the wife of Seth 
Stockton, a farmer of Dunkirk and has two children, Irene, and 
Leslie. Annie died in infancy. Mr. Carrison is a Republican in 
his political sympathies, has been school treasurer and held other 
local offices. He is a member of the Baptist church, which his 
family also attend. His children have been educated in the Rut- 
land and Stoughton schools, in which he has taken an interest 
since the early days. While Mr. and Mrs. Carrison suffered many 
of the hardships of a young and wild country, they have likewise 
reaped its rewards. 




Mr. and Mrs. Orson Carskaden. 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 155 

Orson Carskaden was the owner of a large and valuable farm 
in the town of York. He was born at Salt Point, Dutchess county, 
N. Y., August 17, 1818, where his father, James Carskaden, was a 
wheelwright. James Carskaden was a native of Dutchess county 
and was there educated and married. His wife was Miss Harriet 
Adsit of Dutchess county, and nine children were born to the mar- 
riage, of whom two are living. Mr. Carskaden was of Scotch an- 
cestry and his father came to the state of New York in colonial days 
and served his country in the Revolutionary War under General 
Wayne. Orson Carskaden was educated in Dutchess county, 
N. Y. , and came to Wisconsin in 1848. He purchased an eighty 
acre farm in Dane county, improved it in every way and added to 
it one hundred and twenty acres, making a farm of two hundred 
acres in a fine state of cultivation. Mr. Carskaden raised consider- 
able stock and devoted special attention to his Durham cattle and 
Poland China hogs. He was a Republican and held office as treas- 
urer and supervisor in York township. For years Mr. Carskaden 
was in the Masonic order and was the oldest member of the Water- 
loo Lodge, No. 63, F. and A. M. He also belonged to the Water- 
loo Lodge of the I. O. O. F. during its entire existence. In Novem- 
ber, 1839, he married Miss Lovina Bashford, who was born in the 
state of New York in 1822, the daughter of George and Tamina 
(Woodward), Bashford, who came to Dane county from New York 
in the early days and spent the residue of their lives in the town of 
Medina. Mrs. Carskaden died May 12, 1876. Seven children were 
born to Mr. and Mrs. Carskaden ; four are deceased, Mary, Ta- 
mina, Annette and William ; Harriet, Laura and George are the 
surviving members of the family. In May, 1879, Mr. Carskaden 
was married a second time, his wife being Miss Amarilla Dodge, 
daughter of Willis Dodge, elsewhere mentioned in this work. Mr. 
Carskaden led a long and interesting life and took an active part 
in the work which built up a great commonwealth in the half 
century of his life in Wisconsin. He died November 23, 1905. 

Michael Cashen, (deceased), was born in Ireland, January 2, 1835. 
His mother died in Ireland, when he was a baby, and his father, 
Anthony Cashen, afterward came to America and settled in Ver- 
mont, where he spent the remainder of his life, living to the ex- 
treme old age of ninety-three years. The subject of this sketch 
was educated in Ireland and came first to Vermont, where he was 
married, May 2, 1855, to Miss Margaret Dempsey, the daughter of 
James and Nancy (Foley) Dempsey. They came to Wisconsin 
the same year, and the following year came to Madison. Mr. 



156 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

Cashen bought two farms near Richland Center, Richland county, 
but not finding farming a congenial occupation, he sold them, 
and returned to the business which he had been engaged in in 
Vermont, before coming west, that of yard-master for the railroad. 
He subsequently owned a farm in the town of Blooming Grove 
but never lived on it. He occupied the position of yard-master for 
forty-two years, working up to one week of the time of his death, 
which occurred April 11, 1897. Mr. Cashen was in his earlier life 
a Democrat, but of later years voted with the Republican party ; 
he was a member of St. Raphael's Catholic church, and belonged 
to the St. Raphael's benevolent society, and to the Catholic Knights. 
Mrs. Cashen was seventeen years old when she came with her pa- 
rents to the United States; after her marraige to Mr. Cashen, in 
Burlington, Vt, her parents accompanied herself and husband to 
Wisconsin. Mr. and Mrs. Cashen have had thirteen children : the 
three oldest boys are dead ; there are five sons living, James, John, 
Michael, Harry and Gregory, and five danghters ; Mrs. P. Regan, 
Katherine, Mrs. Francis Cox, Margaret and Mrs. Bessie Dugan. 
The children were all born in Madison, except Mrs. Regan who 
was born in Portage. When Mr. and Mrs. Cashen came west much 
of the land lying between the lakes was swamp land, and they 
saw its evolution from that state into the beautiful city of to- 
day. Mrs. Cashen owns her comfortable home at 402 W. Wilson 
St., and other property in the city. 

Hon. John B. Cassoday, chief justice of the supreme court of 
Wisconsin, is the distinguished successor of a long line of jurists 
who have, in something over the half century since the establish- 
ment of that branch of the judiciary in the state, handed down that 
long line of decisions which have given Wisconsin its high rank 
in the courts of last resort. He was born in Herkimer county, 
N. Y., July 7, 1830, and was left fatherless at the age of three 
years. His mother returned with him to her own people in Tioga 
county, Pennsylvania, and the story of his early life is one of 
poverty and privation, which only strong native powers would 
have enabled him to overcome, and to have insured, despite hard- 
ships, that success which has merited and received the highest 
recognition. His early education was attained at the district 
schools at irregular intervals while he worked for his board at the 
same time. He took advantage, however, of every opportunity to 
increase his store of knowledge and managed to supplement the 
meager instruction of the country school of the early days with one 
term at the school in the village of Tioga, and another at the 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 157 

Wellsborough Academy. At the time he was seventeen years old 
and during the next four years, he crystallized his elementary 
learning into more exact form by teaching, when opportunity of- 
fered, and. meanwhile,, worked at whatever employment could be 
obtained. Later he was able to spend four years in academic 
study, two at Knoxville Academy, Pennsylvania, and two at Al- 
fred Academy, New York, and was graduated from the latter. He 
spent one year at the University of Michigan and later entered the 
law school of Albany, N. Y., and read law with an attorney of 
Wellsborough, Pa. The decade immediately preceding the Civil 
War was one of active immigration to the comparatively new 
region in the upper Mississippi valley, then known as the North- 
west, and the young attorney followed the line of march of these 
soldiers of fortune, and coming to Wisconsin in 1857, settled in 
Janesville, and continued his study of law under the direction of 
Judge Conger, one of the leading attorneys of that time and place. 
The following year he became a partner in a local firm under the 
name of Bennett, Cassoday and Gibbs, and continued this associa- 
tion until January, 1866. The two years following he carried on 
his practice alone, and then formed a partnership with Mr. Mer- 
rill which lasted until 1873, when the latter retired from practice. 
The firm of Cassoday and Carpenter succeeded that of Cassoday 
and Merrill and continued until November, 1880, when, a vacancy 
having occurred on the supreme bench by the death of Chief Just- 
ice Ryan, in October, and the promotion of Associate Justice Cole 
to that office, John B. Cassoday was appointed by Governor Smith 
to fill the same. In April, 1881, in April, 1889, and again in 1899 
Judge Cassoday was elected, each time without opposition. In 
1895 he was promoted to the position of chief justice to succeed 
Hon. Harlow G. Orton. In 1898 he was made president of the Bar 
Association of Wisconsin. Judge Cassoday's political record previ- 
ous to his advancement to the supreme bench was one of active, 
though temperate support of the Republican party, with which he 
has been affiliated since its organization. He was a delegate to the 
national Republican convention in Baltimore, which renominated 
Lincoln in 1864, and served upon the committee of credentials. 
He was elected to the assembly in 1864 and again in 1876. both 
times filling important positions, the first time on the railroad and 
judiciary committees and the second as speaker of the assembly, 
serving in each position with credit to himself and satisfaction to 
his party. He was chairman of the Republican state convention 
for 1879 and entered actively into the campaign. The following 



158 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

year he was delegate -at-large to the national convention at Chi- 
aocg and chairman of the Wisconsin delegation. He presented 
the name of the late E. B. Washburne as Wisconsin's choice for the 
chief executive and supported his nomination by a brilliant speech ; 
and later with fifteen other Wisconsin delegates broke the deadlock 
in the convention by announcing the transfer of their votes to James 
A. Garfield. He took a very active part in the presidential cam- 
paign of that year as he had frequently done on other similar oc- 
casions. 

As a practicing attorney, Mr. Cassoday was one of the ablest 
and most successful in the state. Endowed with a well-balanced, 
keen and analytical mind, he brought to the work of his profession 
in addition, an abundance of hard work and painstaking industry. 
These qualities, combined to his ever courteous treatment of an 
opponent, and his conscientious attitude toward court and client, 
not only earned for him the sincerest respect of the profession, 
but brought him a great volume of business during his twenty- 
three years of general practice. A few of the more important 
cases in which he was engaged are the following: Jackman will 
case, 26 Wisconsin. 104; Chapin will case, 32 Wisconsin, 557; 
Culver vs. Palmer, Smith vs. Ford, 48 Wisconsin, 115; Rowell vs. 
Harris Manufacturing Co., and Sargeant Manufacturing Co. vs. 
Woodruff, the two last being patent cases in the Federal courts. 
To the bench. Justice Cassoday brought a well-stored mind and 
untiring energy. His decisions have been characterized by keen 
analysis, patient search for all the underlying facts, and a mas- 
terly grouping of details, which have caused his opinions to be 
quoted as authority throughout the land. He is widely known to 
the profession as an authority on the important subjects of consti- 
tutional law and wills ; a few of the opinions he has written which 
bear on these subjects, and which have been widely quoted in the 
courts of other states and by well-known text writers, are, con- 
stitutional law : Wisconsin Central Railway vs. Taylor County, 
52 Wis., 37 ; Baker vs. State, 54 Wis., 368 ; Cathcart vs. Comstock, 
56 Wis., 390 ; Chicago & Northwestern Railway Company vs. 
Langlade County, 56 Wis., 614; State ex. rel. vs. Forest County, 
74 Wis., 610 ; State ex rel. vs. Ryan, 70 Wis. 676 ; J. S. Keator Lum- 
ber Company vs. St. Croix Boom Company, 72 Wis., 62 ; State ex. 
rel. vs. District Board, 76 Wis., 203; State ex. rel. vs. Mann, 76 
Wis.. 469; State ex rel. vs. Cunningham. 82 Wis., 39 and 83 Wis., 
90; State ex rel. vs. Stewart. 60 Wis.. 587: On the subject of 
wills; Will of Mary P. Ladd, 60 Wis., 187; Scott vs. West, 63 Wis., 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 159 

529 ; Newman vs. Waterman, 63 Wis., 612 ; will of ward, 70 Wis., 
251 ; Ford vs. Ford. TO Wis.. 19, and the same case, 72 Wis., 621 ; 
will of Slinger, 72 Wis., 22 ; will of Ehle, 73 Wis., 445 ; Baker vs. 
Estate of McLeod, 79 Wis., 534; Burnham vs. Burnham, 79 Wis., 
557; and Saxton vs. Webber, 83 Wis., 617. 

In addition to his official duties, Justice Cassoday has found time 
to lecture for many years to the college of law of the University 
of Wisconsin, and has thus found means to impress upon the young 
men of that great institution his views of the important topics of 
constitutional law and wills. His well known work entitled 
"Cassoday on Wills" is used as a text book in the University of 
Wisconsin law college, and in several other law schools. No stu- 
dent who has ever taken work under Justice Cassoday has failed 
to be impressed by the profundity of his learning, or his sym- 
pathetic kindness as a man. He was universally beloved by all his 
students for his many lovable qualities as a friend and teacher, 
while all respected him for his scholarly attainments. 

Justice Cassoday is the author of various papers which he has 
prepared for literary societies and other learned bodies from time 
to time, among which are, The Law and Lawyers, Lord Mansfield, 
The American Lawyer. American Citizenship, Our Magna Charta, 
John Scott, and John Marshall ; James Kent and Joseph Story, in 
Yale Law Journal, volume 12, pages 146-153, and Mathew Hale 
Carpenter, about to appear in a book containing sketches of sixty 
of the most eminent American jurists, who died prior to 1900. 

John Catlin, one of the earliest pioneers of Madison, was born in 
Vermont in 1803, and was admitted to the bar in the east in 1833. 
He was clerk of the territorial supreme court of Wisconsin at its 
first session in Belmont, 1836, and continued in that capacity in 
Madison until 1839. In February, 1837, when the Hon. Moses M. 
Strong, of Mineral Point, began to plat the town site of the fut- 
ure capital in the neighborhood of the Capital Park, he was assisted 
in the work by John Catlin. On February 15, 1837, a postoffice 
was first established in the town of Madison, and John Catlin was 
appointed the first postmaster. Owing to the lack of mail facilities, 
the office was not opened for business until May 27, succeeding, 
and then the first mail was received and distributed in Eben Peck's 
log house on lot 8. block 107. August 20, 1842, Mr. Catlin was 
again appointed postmaster, serving until December 28, 1844, when 
he was succeeded by his brother. Steptoe Catlin. When first ap- 
pointed, Mr. Catlin employed the half-breed, St. Cyr, to build him 
a log house where the present postoffice now stands, north corner 



160 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

of Mifflin street and Wisconsin avenue. This was the first attempt 
to erect a permanent building, which was not roofed and finished 
until summer. (The Story of Madison, by Reuben Gold Thwaites.) 
Mr. Catlin was admitted to practice before the supreme court in 
1839, and was the first lawyer in the county and the 'first district 
attorney, (1839). He was a member of the first "Board of Visi- 
tors" of the University of Wisconsin, and was chosen secretary at 
the first and only session of the board, December 1, 1838, at which 
session the legislature was requested to at once appropriate the 
congressional land grant of two townships for the benefit of the 
proposed university. He served as clerk of the territorial house of 
representatives, 1838-1846, and was secretary of the territory, 1846- 
48 ; was president of the Milwaukee & Mississippi Railroad Com- 
pany for a number of years, being the first railroad in the state ; 
was the first Dane county judge, as distinguished from probate 
judge, and served from January 1, 1850 to October 31, 1850; was 
a member of the territorial council, 1845 ; a life member of the 
State Historical Society ; charter member and first Master of Madi- 
son Lodge No. 5, Masons, 1844 ; one of the incorporators of the 
Madison Mutual Insurance Company, 1851 ; was one of the organ- 
izers of the Madison Select Female school (May, 1842), which 
was maintained only a year, and an incorporator and first president 
of the Madison Female academy. 1846. In 1846 he started the first 
abstract office in Dane county and the second in the state, in 
association with E. M. Williamson. The first church society or- 
ganized in the village of Madison was one wherein sixteen of the 
leading pioneers, including John Catlin, unite to form a parish of 
the Protestant Episcopal church, 1839. Mr. Catlin died at Eliza- 
beth, N. J., August 4, 1874. 

Chandler Burnell Chapman was born in Middlebury, Yt., July 7, 
1815. He received his earlier education in his native state and was 
graduated from a College of Medicine in the state of New York 
where he was married to Miss Mary Eugenia Pease in June, 1837. 
The young couple settled in Trumbull county, Ohio, where Doctor 
Chapman practiced his profession until May. 1846, when he came 
to Madison, Wisconsin, then a settlement of less than four hun- 
dred persons. He accomplished the journey in one week's time by 
means of private conveyance, steamboat and stage. In addition 
to his practice of medicine and surgery in Madison, Doctor Chap- 
man devoted a part of his time to his duties as professor of chem- 
istrv and other studies at Miami and Cincinnati Colleges of Medi- 
cine. At the outbreak of the Civil War he accompanied the Sixth 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 161 

Wisconsin Regiment as surgeon and later was appointed surgeon 
of the famous Iron Brigade, which contained among others the 
Second, Sixth, and Seventh Wisconsin Regiments. During the 
later years of the war Doctor Chapman served as medical director 
of the Army of the Rio Grande under General Heron, — his entire 
service covering the period between June, 1861 and August, 1864. 

Dr. James A. Jackson. # one of the most eminent surgeons of south- 
ern Wisconsin in speaking of Doctor Chapman said : "I have the 
happiest recollection of my old friend Dr. Chandler B. Chapman. 
I remember how in my enthusiasm I looked up to the old doctor 
as a monument of skill and wisdom and how I earnestly hoped that 
the day would come when I too would be as great and as good a 
man. He was a most able chemist and was recognized as one of 
the most capable surgeons of his time, and as I look back upon 
him I believe him to have been much in advance of his time in 
surgery. I used to listen with great intentness to his discourses 
on the various new chemical processes of which he was the master 
and nothing pleased me more than to hear him describe the steps 
of some difficult operation which he had performed, and not in- 
frequently they were operations which would be considered diffi- 
cult, and would be undertaken, only by the foremost surgeons of 
this time. From his words I gathered much of the inspiration 
that has been so useful to me in my later career. He was one of 
the organizers of the Dane County Medical Society, other members 
of which were Dr. Favill, Dr. J. J. Brown, Dr. Heath, Dr. Jos. Hob- 
bins. Dr. Wm. Hobbins and others. He was a man of courteous 
manner, kind and affable to his friends, associates and patients, 
and was held in the highest esteem by all the members of his pro- 
fession." 

Doctor Chapman was very fond of travel and made two journeys 
to the Old World, spending a year and more on each trip. His 
observations at these times formed the subject matter of many 
lectures delivered at Madison and other places. During the later 
years of his life he became deeply interested in the development 
of the state of Kansas and spent much of his time in Emporia, the 
home of his daughter, Eugenia, who was the wife of Almerin Gil- 
lette, a prominent lawyer and state official. Doctor Chapman died 
at his home in Madison, May 18, 1877, leaving a widow, a daughter, 
Eugenia Gillette, and a son. Chandler Pease, all of whom have 
since died. 

Chandler B. Chapman, president of the Southern Land Company 
and vice-president of the Oriana Stave Mill Company of Virginia, 
11— iii 



162 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

was born in Madison, December 15, 1870. His parents were Gen- 
eral Chandler P. and Sarah E. (Turner) Chapman, the former a na- 
tive of Ohio, and the latter of Jefferson county, Wis. Chandler B. 
Chapman for three years attended the University of Wisconsin with 
the class of 1891. For a time after leaving college he was em- 
ployed in the office of the city engineer, and then went into the 
abstract office with his father. In 1900 he gave up the abstract 
business and removed to Williamsburg, Va., where he had pur- 
chased several farms. In 1903 he returned to Madison and has 
made his home here since. During the Spanish-American War 
Mr. Chapman was first lieutenant and adjutant of the First bat- 
talion. First Wisconsin Infantry, and was also ordinance officer 
for that regiment. The troops were at Jacksonville, Fla., some 
four months, during which time the First Wisconsin lost seventy- 
six men through sickness. Mr. Chapman married, on June 18, 1896, 
Miss Frances Bunn, a native of Sparta, and daughter of Judge 
Romanzo Bunn. To this union was born one child, Sarah, who 
died in August, 1900, at the age of two years. Mr. Chapman be- 
longs to the Chi Psi college fraternity and he and his wife are mem- 
bers of the Presbyterian church. 

Chandler Pease Chapman was born in Bristol, Trumbull county. 
Ohio, February 13, 1844. He came to Madison with his parents, 
Dr. Chandler Burnell and Mary (Pease) Chapman in 1846 and re- 
sided there until his death May 12, 1897. In 1861, at the age of 
eighteen, he enlisted in the Civil War as private in Company D, 
Sixth Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry and was appointed hospital 
steward under his father, the surgeon of the regiment. Having 
been discharged for disability in 1862, he returned to Madison and 
engaged in newspaper work. Later he became proprietor of the 
Dane county abstract office in which business he remained the rest 
of his life. Considering a thorough knowledge of law important 
to his success in his business he prepared himself for the state 
examination and was admitted to the bar. His study of probate 
and real estate law was especially thorough and his opinion on any 
point of law in these branches was especially sought after by most 
members of the Madison bar. He* was prominent in the order of 
Free Masonry, a leader in the Presbyterian church, an active cur- 
ator of the Historical Society and recognized on the board of sup- 
ervisors and in other fields of civic usefulness as an energetic, 
clear-headed, public-spirited worker with whom it was an inspira- 
tion to be associated. He achieved his widest reputation, however, 
in connection with the Wisconsin National Guard which he re-or- 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 163 

ganized and placed on a footing equal in many respects to that 
of any state in the Union. His service in the state militia began in 
18T9 as captain of the Lake City Guard. In 1881 he became assist- 
ant inspector general (with rank of lieutenant colonel). January 2, 
1882, under Governor Rusk, he was appointed adjutant general 
(with rank of brigadier general) and continued in this same office 
until January 7, 1889. The great work which he did in this capa- 
city is thus described by his successor Gen. Charles King in an arti- 
cle published in Outing (Volume 18, pages 34—112) under the title 
of "The National Guard of Wisconsin." "It was Chapman who 
moulded the scattered battalion and companies into regiments each 
in its own district ; Chapman who strove from the outset to eradi- 
cate all the old militia parade ideas and to bring the Guard to a 
business basis ; Chapman who chose the regular army as the stand- 
ard for Wisconsin soldiery; and who first brought regular offi- 
cers in as instructors and 'Coaches' of the raw command. It was 
he, who little by little, weaned 'the boys' from their first loves, 
the tailed coat and plumed shakos and taught them to be men in 
the regulation dress of the regular service. It was he who de- 
vised the methods for the rapid mobilization of the Guard ; planned 
their service, uniform and equipment ; exploded the old inspection 
system and started the new one ; instituted the regimental camps 
with 'regulars' as drill master and coaches ; originated the annual 
conventions and has presided over their deliberations from that 
time to this (1891), and it was he who fathered the impulse that 
made practice with the rifle the most important item in the in- 
struction of our guardsmen, and who was the leader in the move- 
ment that secured to our state soldiery the admirable tract of land 
for our encampments and the rifle ranges pronounced by every ex- 
pert who has visited them unequalled in the whole country." Few 
aside from General Chapman's intimate friends realized the diffi- 
culties that had to be overcome in the re-organization of the Na- 
tional Guard. The popular idea of the "Militia" was shown plainly 
by Governor Rusk on an occasion when he was asked to co-operate 
in an effort to get a much needed appropriation from the legislature. 
His refusal to help was accompanied by the statement that "a few 
companies of my old veterans are worth more than the whole 
National Guard." It remained for the Milwaukee riots in 1885 to 
prove the value of the National Guard, and in this connection a bit 
of heretofore unwritten history may be interesting. A few think- 
ing men had feared a riot for some time, but the large majority 
believed that the trouble would soon blow over. The governor 



164 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

made a personal investigation at South Milwaukee, and came home 
with his famous remark, "These men need bread, not bullets." Be- 
lieving this and perhaps fearing the effect of the order on the popu- 
lar mind he naturally refused to approve an order for ammunition 
which General Chapman wished to send in to the Rock Island 
arsenal. Practically speaking there was no ammunition in the 
armories ; and when the troops were finally rushed in on a night 
call to save Milwaukee, there was not enough ammunition to serve 
three rounds apiece to the men. If the rioters had known it they 
had Milwaukee at their mercy and with this knowledge the scenes 
that had only a short time before been enacted at Cincinnati wouLd 
have been repeated, and probably with more violence, at Milwaukee. 
General Chapman had, however, so firm a belief that there would 
soon be trouble that when refused permission to order the ammuni- 
tion that was so sorely needed, he wrote personally to the Rock 
Island arsenal asking that an ample supply be placed in the ex- 
press office ready for shipment on telegraphic order. This order 
was not long delayed, for the trouble- in Milwaukee grew more 
serious, the sheriff became unable to cope with the situation and 
finally a hurried consultation resulted in a night call for the troops. 
In a few hours they were pouring into Milwaukee and the law abid- 
ing citizens breathed easier ; but the few who knew the facts in 
regard to the ammunition supply worried through many anxious 
hours before the trucks finally rolled in laden with the heavy 
square boxes that meant so much to the city. It was unquestion- 
ably this forethought that saved the day, for without this ammuni- 
tion the troops could not have taken the march and fired the volleys 
that broke the back of anarchv in Wisconsin. In the autumn of 
1892 General Chapman was stricken with paralysis and was there- 
after an invalid. Although he partially recovered his faculties and 
spent much time in genealogical research and in his duties as re- 
corder of the Loyal Legion, his public work was over. The fol- 
lowing with much of the subject matter of this article was taken 
from a memorial published in the proceedings of the Wisconsin 
Historical Society: "He will long be remembered throughout the 
state as a man of remarkable energy, splendid organizing abilities, 
marked individuality, yet with a heart as gentle as his career was 
spotless." In 1866 he was married to Miss Sarah Turner, daugh- 
ter of Peter H. Turner, a pioneer of eastern Wisconsin. Mrs. 
Chapman survives him with their daughter, Annie Turner, and 
son. Chandler Burnell. 

Captain William Charleton is now living retired in Madison after 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 165 

a most eventful and useful life spent in agricultural pursuits and 
as a public official, and also as a defender of the flag during "the 
days that tried men's soiils." He was born at County Armagh, 
Ireland, October 11. 1831, and is the son of Andrew Donaldson and 
Constantia (Jamison) Charleton, also natives of the same country. 
The father removed his family to America in 1843, and then con- 
tinued his migration westward, intending to locate in the state of 
Michigan. Being informed that his proposed destination was an 
unhealthy country he decided to come to Madison. Wis., then the 
embryotic capital of a future state. On May 4, 1844, he landed 
with his family at Milwaukee, in which place he remained until 
July, and then went to Walworth county, locating eight miles east 
of Whitewater. The father had previously selected a farm there, 
but it not being as large as he desired he came to Dane county and 
secured more land, in what is now the town of Verona. When 
they entered the town of Verona it had not yet been named, and 
only a few white settlers were to be found within the limits of that 
congressional township. Those who were there had settled at 
Verona Corners and were almost unanimously of the type known 
as Pennsylvania Dutch, although a settlement of Scotch people was 
found along the Sugar river in the west part of the township. In 
the town of Verona, William Charleton, whose name introduces 
this review, grew to manhood. He spent his early life on his 
father's farm, attended the pioneer institutions of learning, and was 
able to obtain a very good education. In 1852, having reached the 
proud age of twenty-one years, he decided to seek a home further 
west. He walked to Galena. 111., and there took a boat for St. Paul. 
The government had just thrown open the Fort Snelling reserva- 
tion, which now comprises Hennepin county, Minnesota. The gov- 
ernment's price on the land was $1.25 per acre and Mr. Charleton 
with many other prospective purchasers, waited at St. Paul, the 
militia refusing to allow any one to cross the river. Where Min- 
neapolis now stands there were then but a few small shanties, and 
the home-seekers remained several weeks waiting to get to the land 
office — and then were astonished and chagrined to learn that the 
tract of land had been preempted on the steps of the capitol at 
Washington, and had been bought by a half-dozen men, who im- 
mediately raised the price to twelve dollars per acre. Mr. Charle- 
ton returned to Galena, a sadder and wiser man. and from that 
place walked home in two days, the distance being eighty miles. 
He then entered eighty acres of land in the town of Verona (a farm 
that he still owns) and began improving it. In those early days 



166 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

there was very little money in circulation, there being nothing but 
a little gold and silver coin, and it was almost impossible to raise 
the money with which to pay taxes. Mr. Charleton cut wood and 
hauled it to Madison, where he sold the same for $1.25 a cord, and 
then was obliged to take his pay in flour and groceries. Just after 
the completion of the railroad from Milwaukee to Madison he 
hauled a load of wheat to the latter place, and he was among the 
first to patronize the new market. But with all the drawbacks and 
hardships of those early days, the neighbors were congenial and 
were ever ready to divide with each other, and Mr. Charleton says 
that he sometimes regrets that the good old days are gone. In addi- 
tion to attending and improving his pioneer farm he commenced 
teaching school in the town of Springdale and followed that occu- 
pation during a portion of each year until the breaking out of the 
Civil War. Mr. Charleton enlisted, on November 8, 1861, in Com- 
pany B of the Eleventh Regiment Wisconsin Infantry as a private. 
The first engagement in which he participated was on August 2. 

1862, at Wilkinson's Plantation in Mississippi. By his soldierly 
conduct he won the esteem of his superiors and by successive pro- 
motions he reached the grade of second lieutenant on January 23, 

1863, and served as such in the desperate battle of Port Gibson on 
May 1, 1863, also at Willow Springs, Jackson, Miss., Champion's 
Hill, Black River Bridge, and throughout the entire siege of Vicks- 
burg, his company being continually on guard for fatigue duty. 
During the siege of Jackson that followed the fall of Vicksburg he 
was very active, and on July 14, 1863, was promoted to the rank of 
first lieutenant. In February, 1864, he re-enlisted as a veteran and 
took part in all the subsequent service of his regiment until the 
final assault at Fort Blakeley, Ala., on April 9, 1865, when he was 
severely wounded while leading his company against one of the 
fortifications. He was sent to the hospital in New Orleans and 
four weeks later came to Madison, but he joined the regiment 
again in August, was promoted to captain of his company on Au- 
gust 23, and served with his command until mustered out at Mobile, 
Ala., September 4, 1865. Mr. Charleton then returned home and 
at the autumn election was chosen as one of the Dane county repre- 
sentatives in the general assembly, serving during the session of 
1866. The following autumn he was elected county treasurer and 
served two terms, and again in 1875 he was chosen as a member 
of the general assembly. He also served one term as sheriff of the 
county, during the years 1878-9. He joined the Republican party 
when it was first organized in the capitol park at Madison, in July, 



BIOGRAPHICAL. Ki? 

1854, and affiliated with that political organization until within the 
past few years, during which he has assumed an independent posi- 
tion, supporting men and measures that meet his conscientious ap- 
proval, regardless of the party guidon they may happen to bear. 
He has served eighteen years, on the county board of supervisors, 
having been first elected to that position in 1860, and after the close 
of the war served continuously until 1878 ; and was again elected 
to the same position in 1896. While holding public office at inter- 
vals he studied law and became very proficient in the knowledge 
of it. but he never practiced the profession, except to give advice 
to friends, as he did not like the methods employed in the regular 
practice. He says, however, that the fault lies more with the cli- 
ents than with the attorneys, a fact that is quite generally recog- 
nized. Mr. Charleton remembers well the first church built in the 
town of Verona, and he attended the first meetings ever held 
therein. He also listened to the first sermon delivered in the town 
by Matthew Fox, an uncle of Dr. Philip Fox of Madison, and fre- 
quently listened to the latter's father, who was a Methodist mis- 
sionary. Rev. M. A. Fox organized the first church in what was 
then known as the "Scotch Settlement" on Sugar river, and the 
Methodists were organized about the same period. Our subject 
remembers well one Sabbath when the Rev. M. A. Fox preached. 
The church was too small for the large audience, so the meet- 
ing was held out of doors in Mrs. Robinson's yard. While 
the reverend gentleman was talking one of the good lady's hens 
flew toward him. and Mr. Fox remarked to Mrs. Robinson, "The 
Fox has scared your hens." In the Charleton family there were 
eight children, but only four are now living, one of whom is the 
subject of this review. Mr. Charleton was married on June 2, 
I860, the lady of his choice being Miss Elizabeth Eleanor Fargo, 
born in Erie county. Pa., April 15, 1837, the daughter of Robert 
and Eleanor (Randall) Fargo. These parents are deceased, as aje 
also all of their eleven children. Mrs. Charleton having passed away 
February 3, 1899. As regards the ancestry of Mr. Charleton it was 
commonly supposed to have been Scotch-Irish, but upon investi- 
gation it was found that he was Xorman-French, his ancestors hav- 
ing been in the north of Ireland for about four hundred years, and 
they were there at the time of the Irish conquest. They came to 
England with William, the Conqueror, and went to Ireland during 
the reign of Henry the Second, with Strongbow. John Charleton, 
an ancestor of our subject, was one of the first seventeen members 
of the Order of the Garter. Six children were born to William 



168 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

Charleton and wife, of whom Amsley and Eleanor are deceased ; 
William, Jr., resides at home ; as does also Fannie ; and Florence 
and James are deceased. Mr. Charleton is a member of the Pres- 
byterian church. He is a member of the G. A. R. 

James Willis Chase is a representative of one of the honored 
pioneer families of Dane county, where he has passed his entire life. 
He is one of the extensive farmers and stock-growers of Bristol 
township, is the owner of the well equipped grain elevator in the 
village of Sun Prairie, where he is also interested in the lumber 
business, and is one of the well known and popular citizens of this 
section of the county. Mr. Chase was born on the old homestead 
farm, in Bristol township, this county, September 27, 1852, being a 
son of Moses and Sarah (Ives) Chase, the former of whom was 
born in the village of Craftsbury, Orleans county, Vermont, in 1820, 
while the latter was born in Erie county, New York, in 1830. 
John Chase, grandfather of the subject of this review, was a scion 
of a family founded in New England in the colonial days, and he 
passed the closing years of his life in Orleans county, Vermont, 
having been a farmer by vocation. The maternal grandfather. 
Riley Ives, came from the state of New York to Wisconsin in an 
early day, settling in Palmyra, Jefferson county, and continuing 
resident of this state until the close of his life. Moses Chase was 
reared and educated in Vermont and came to Wisconsin about 
1850, settling in Bristol township, Dane county, where he reclaimed 
a valuable farm, the same being now in the possession of his son, 
subject of this review. He removed to Spokane, Washington, in 
1898, and is there living retired, having acquired a competency. 
He is a Republican in his political proclivities, and he and his wife 
have long been members of the Methodist Episcopal church. 
They became the parents of nine children, and three sons and two 
daughters are now living. James W. Chase secured his rudi- 
mentary education in the district schools, after which he attended 
the high school in Sun Prairie and later was a student in the Uni- 
versity of Wisconsin for one term. He was reared to the sturdy 
discipline of the farm, and has never abated his allegiance to the 
great basic art of agriculture, through his identification with which 
he laid the foundation of his notable success. He now owns two 
fine farms in Bristol township, the area of his landed estate being 
five hundred and twenty acres, and he resides on one of the farms, 
being engaged in diversified agriculture, including the raising of 
tobacco upon a large scale, and in the raising of live stock. In 
1897 Mr. Chase erected the grain elevator in Sun Prairie, and has 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 169 

since conducted the same, his eldest son, Frederick W., being now 
associated with him in the enterprise, under the firm name of J. W. 
Chase & Son. Mr. Chase owns a half interest in two tobacco 
houses and is also engaged in the lumber business in Sun Prairie, 
as a member of the firm of Chase, Gross & Mann. His homestead 
farm, on which he resides, is one of the most attractive places in 
this part of the county, having the best of improvements, including 
a residence, one of the oldest brick houses in the section, which 
is located one and one-half miles from Sun Prairie. Mr. Chase has 
attained marked success as the result of his own well directed ef- 
forts, being one of the substantial and influential citizens of the 
county and commanding the esteem of all who know him. In 
political affairs he is found stanchly aligned as a supporter of the 
cause of the Republican party, and he served four successive terms 
as supervisor of Bristol township, while he also served one term 
as assessor. He has been treasurer of the Bristol Mutual Insur- 
ance Company during the greater portion of the time since its 
organization. In a fraternal way he is identified with the Modern 
Woodmen of America. His wife is affiliated with the Catholic 
church. In the year 1875 Mr. Chase was married to Miss Bern- 
ardina Myer, who was born in Germany, in 1852, being a daughter 
of Francis and Bernardina Myer, who emigrated from Germany 
to America and took up their residence in Bristol township, this 
county, about 1854, here passing the remainder of their lives. To 
Mr. and Mrs. Chase have been born ten children, all of whom are 
living, namely: Frederick W., Edith, Emma, Benjamin, Kate, 
Philip, Sarah. George, Charles, and Beatrice. 

Sidney A. Chase is recognized as one of the progressive business 
men of the city of Stoughton, where he is a member of the firm of 
Beattie & Chase, wood and coal dealers. Mr. Chase was born 
in Rockton, Winnebago county, Illinois, September 30, 1846, be- 
ing a son of Alonzo F. and Martha A. (Adams) Chase, both of 
whom were born in New England, where the respective families 
were founded in the colonial era of our national history. The par- 
ents came from the state of New York to the west in 1844. locating 
in Winnebago county, 111., where the father purchased one hundred 
acres of land, later disposing of the property and removing to Oak 
Park, Minn., where he likewise secured property, which he eventu- 
ally sold, taking up his residence in Wauseon, that state, where he 
passed the remainder of his life, as did also his wife. Of their two 
children the subject of this sketch is the elder, his sister, Matilda, 
being the widow of Charles M. Smith and being now a resident of 



170 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

Sioux Falls, S. D. Sidney A. Chase was reared to maturity in his 
native county, where he received a common school education. While 
still a young man he located at Clinton Junction, Wis., where he 
engaged in the livery business, in which he there continued six 
months, after which he was a resident of Evansville, this state, 
for three years, and of Jefferson for one year. For the ensuing six 
years he followed various lines of enterprise, in Wisconsin and 
Michigan, and in 1877 he located in Stoughton, where he again es- 
tablished himself in the livery business, in which he continued suc- 
cessfully for fifteen years, after which he was clerk in a local hotel 
for two years. In 1894 he engaged in his present business of deal- 
ing in wood and coal. The firm of which he is a member controls 
an excellent business and is one of the substantial concerns of the 
sort in Dane county's second city. Mr. Chase was a soldier of the 
Union during the last year of the Civil War, having enlisted, Au- 
gust 1, 1864, as a private in Company B, One Hundred and Forty- 
sixth Illinois Volunteer Infantry, and having been but fifteen years 
of age at the time. He continued in the service until the close of 
the war, having received his honorable discharge July 25, 1865. 
He is a stalwart supporter of the principles and policies of the Re- 
publican party but has never been ambitious for office, though he 
served one term as city assessor of Stoughton. He is a member of 
the Free and Accepted Masons, the Knights of Pythias and the 
Grand Army of the Republic. September 30, 1874, Mr. Chase was 
united in marriage to Miss Ida M. Simpson, daughter of Robert and 
Mary J. (Ranney) Simpson, of Yorkvillc, Michigan, and of this 
union were born two sons, — Henry, who is deceased, and Frank, 
who resides in Stoughton. 

Andrew Christensen, of Stoughton, is established in a success- 
ful business as a mason contractor and is a loyal and progressive 
citizen. He was born in the town of Rudkjobing, Denmark. Aug- 
ust 11, 1864, being a son of Christ and Annie (Jensen) Hansen, 
who came to America in 1883, settling in Rutland township, Dane 
county, Wisconsin, where the father turned his attention to agri- 
cultural pursuits, in which he continued until his death, at the age 
of seventy-nine years. His wife died at the age of seventy-two 
years. Prior to coming to America he had followed the trade of 
shipbuilding. Following is a brief record concerning his children : 
Rasmus was killed in a railroad accident near Oregon, this county ; 
Kate is the wife of Hans E. Christensen ; Lena is the wife of Hans 
Hansen; Andrew is the subject of this sketch; Peter and Lewis 
were both sailors and were drowned at sea. Andrew Christensen 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 171 

was reared to the age of nineteen years in his native land, where 
he received his early educational training - . At the age noted he 
accompanied his parents on their immigration to the United States. 
In Dane county he learned the trade of plasterer and bricklayer, 
and he continued to follow the same in Rutland township until 
1900, when he located in Stoughton, where he has since been en- 
gaged in business, having been an independent contractor since 
1897. In politics he is arrayed as a supporter of the principles of 
the Republican party, and in a fraternal relation he is affiliated 
with Kosciusko Lodge, No. 73, Free and Accepted Masons, and 
with the local organization of the Woodmen of America. He and 
his wife are members of the Lutheran church. February 27, 1900, 
Mr. Christensen was united in marriage to Miss Augusta Larsen, 
daughter of Rasmus and Lena (Frederickson) Larsen, of Rutland 
township, and of this union have been born two children, Vera and 
Stanley. 

James Christiansen, of Waunakee, is a native of Denmark, son of 
Andrew and Margaret Christiansen. His father came to the United 
States in 1868, and being satisfied after a two years residence that 
the conditions of life were promising, returned to Denmark for his 
family, with whom he settled in the town of Leeds, Columbia 
county ; three years later he came to Vienna township, in Dane. 
Later with all of the family with the exception of the son. James, 
he moved to Nebraska, where he resides at the present time. He 
is a considerable land owner there but has retired from the active 
management of his farming property. He is independent in 
politics, and is a member of the Lutheran church ; his wife, who 
belonged to the same church, died in Nebraska in 1900. James 
Christiansen was born in Denmark, December 29, 1861, and at- 
tended the public schools of Leeds, Columbia county, and Vienna, 
Dane county. He farms in a large way and owns in the towns of 
Springfield and Vienna over a thousand acres of land. He began 
life by working, for the long period of fourteen years, by the month, 
and has acquired his property by his own industry coupled with 
good business ability. He has made all the improvements on his 
home farm, including the buildings which are all new. He is an 
extensive raiser of tobacco, having, in 1905. forty acres. His 
farm is stocked with short-horn cattle and Poland China hogs 
Mr. Christensen is independent in politics and a prohibitionist 
in sentiment; his church affiliations are with the Catholics. He 
was married in 1886 to Miss Susie Diederick, born in Germany, of 
German parentage. Peter Diederick, Sr.. her father, was a citizen 



172 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

of Dane township from 1872 until 1905 when he moved to Spring- 
field township. Mr. and Mrs. Christiansen have no children of 
their own but have adopted three, Alvie, Hazel and Lillian. 

Morten Christensen, a successful contractor and builder of the 
city of Stoughton, is another of the honored citizens of Scandina- 
vian birth who have assisted in the upbuilding of Dane county. 
He was born near the city of Copehagen, Denmark, December 5, 
1854, and is a son of Christian Anderson and Kavian (Mortenson) 
Anderson. He was reared in his native land, where he received a 
common-school education and where he served an apprenticeship 
of ten years to the carpenter's trade. In 1882 he immigrated to 
America, making his way directly to Stoughton, where he worked 
at his trade as a journeyman for one year. In 1883 he went for a 
trip through various sections of the west, finally locating in 
Nebraska, where he remained three years, at the expiration of 
which he returned to Denmark. In 1890 he came again to the 
United States and resumed his residence in Stoughton, and for the 
past fifteen years he has done a very prosperous business as a con- 
tractor and builder, having a high reputation for reliability and 
high-grade workmanship and having erected a number of churches 
in this section of the county, besides business blocks and many 
fine private residences in the city of Stoughton. In politics he 
accords a stanch allegience to the Republican party, and in a frater- 
nal way he is affiliated with the Modern Woodmen of America, and 
both he and his wife and daughter are members of Our Saviour's 
Lutheran church. In 1891 Mr. Christensen was united in marriage 
to Miss Karian Mortensen, who was born in Denmark, being a 
daughter of Ole and Johanna (Nielson) Mortenson, and the only 
living child of this union is the one daughter, Viola. 

Christen Christenson is the head of the well known jewelry firm 
of C. Christenson & Son, of Stoughton. and is one of the leading 
business men and highly honored citizens of Dane county's at- 
tractive second city. Mr. Christensen is a native of Norway, in 
which fair land of the north he was born May 23, 1845, being a son 
of Christen Hanson and Ann Marie (Ravn) Hanson. He was 
reared to maturity in Norway, in whose schools he received his 
early educational training. At the age of fifteen years he entered 
upon an apprenticeship at the jeweler's trade, serving five years 
with one firm and becoming a thoroughly skilled workman. At 
the age of twenty years he engaged in business for himself, in 
Hollen, where he met with due success under the conditions which 
surrounded him. He there continued in business seventeen years, 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 173 

at the expiration of which, being convinced that superior opportu- 
nities were to be had in America, he immigrated to this country 
with his family. He took up his residence in Stoughton, where he 
has since maintained his home and where he has gained success 
and prominence as a business man, so that it is needless to say 
that he has no regret for the decision which led him to leave his 
native land and cast in his lot with that of Stoughton. Soon after 
his arrival in this city he established himself in the jewelry bus- 
iness, in which he has since continued, and he now has one of the 
most attractive and finely equipped establishment of the sort in the 
city, catering to a large and representative trade and having the 
unqualified esteem of the community. It may be said without 
fear of justified contradiction that he has one of the handsomest 
retail jewelry stores to be found in this section of the state. In 
February, 1893, Mr. Christenson admitted his eldest son, Trace, to 
partnership, and the enterprise has since been conducted under the 
firm name of C. Christenson & Son. In July, 1870, Mr. Christen- 
son was united in marriage to Miss Liv Halverson, who was born 
in the same district of Norway as was he himself, and to them have 
been born six children : Hilda, who became the wife of Torlif 
Berge, is now deceased ; Anna is the wife of John Edson ; George is 
deceased ; Trace is associated with his father in business, as already 
noted ; and the two younger children are Louisa and Halvor. Mr. 
Christenson, in company with his wife, went to Norway in May, 
1905, passing nearly a year in the land of his nativity and renewing 
old acquaintances and associations ; they returned to Stoughton in 
June, 1906, and here an equally cordial greeting was given them by 
their many friends. In politics Mr. Christenson is independent. 
His children are members of the First Norwegian Lutheran church 
of Stoughton, 

John Christianson, well-known farmer and business man of Christ- 
iania, has owned his present home in the town of Christiania since 
1883. Besides his general farming occupations he is extensively 
interested in dairying and is secretary and treasurer of the Prairie 
Queen creamery. He is also the local representative for several 
steamship line. In 1899 he organized the Prairie Queen Telephone 
Co..the first rural telephone of Dane county and is still its manager 
and superintendent. Christian Paulson, his father, was born in 
Nas Hedemarken, Norway, and there married Miss Olava Isaacs- 
dotter. Mr. Paulson was a farmer and a brush-maker and spent his 
entire life in Norway. After his death in 1856 Mrs. Paulson mar- 
ried Mathias Jardsberg, with whom she came to the United States 



174 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

in 1881. six children were born to the first marriage and three to 
the second. Randina, the oldest, lives in Christiania; John is the 
oldest son ; Paul resides in Edgerton ; Johanna in Christiania ; 
Agnes in North Dakota ; Christian at Sumner, Wis. ; Martin in 
Christiania ; Ole in Cambrdge and Julia in Chippewa county. Wis. 
John was born in Nas Hedemarken, Norway, January 10, 1848, 
attended school in Norway and left home when he was eight years 
old. Until he was eighteen he worked out and then he came to 
America. For a time he worked for Halvor Kravick of Christ- 
iania, raised tobacco and farmed on shares. In 1881 he sent to Nor- 
way for his mother, step-father and the younger children and in 1883 
was able to purchase his home in section 10. All of the improve- 
ments on the farm have been made by Mr. Christianson, whose 
active and industrious life has been rewarded by success. He is a 
Republican in political affiliations and has served as justice of the 
peace for a number of years and as assessor. October 1, 1880, he 
married Miss Susan Johnson of Voss, Norway, and nine children 
were born to the marriage. Caius and Oscar, the older sons, are 
engaged in the creamery business in Rutland township. Sarah re- 
sides in Madison, Wis. Julia lives in Cambridge. Ruth, Stella, 
Alvin, Herbert and Arthur are at home. Mrs. Christianson died in 
1902 and Mr. Christianson married Marie Monson of Nas, Norway, 
in August, 1904. One son of this marriage, Marion Harold, was 
born in 1905. The family attend the Lutheran church of Cam- 
bridge. 

Darwin Clark. — The history of a community, of a state, of a na- 
tion, is chiefly the chronicles of the lives and deeds of those who 
have conferred honor and dignity upon society, whether in the 
broad sphere of public labors or in the more circumscribed but 
not less worthy and valuable realm of individual activity through 
which the public good is promoted. The name borne by the sub- 
ject of this memoir is one which has stood exponent of the most 
sterling personal characteristics, the deepest appreciation of the 
rights and privileges of citizenship in our great republic, and is 
one which hs been connected with the annals of the city of Mad- 
ison from the practical inception of its history. A strong man and 
true was Darwin Clark, and he left upon the history of the capital 
city the definite impress of exalted integrity and worthy accom- 
plishment, having resided here continuously for a period of sixty- 
two years, and up to the time when he was summoned into eternal 
life, February 11, 1899. Mr. Clark Was born in Otego, Oswego 
county, New York, May 12. 1812, being a son of Isaac and Eunice 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 175 

(Davis) Clark, the former of whom was born in Sturbridge, 
Worcester county. Massachusetts, September IT, 1783, and the lat- 
ter in Schrewsbury, Rutland county, Vermont, February 22, 1790. 
The respective families were founded in New England in the early 
colonial epoch, and authentic records show that both the paternal 
and maternal grandfathers of Mr. Clark were loyal soldiers in the 
Continental line during the War of the Revolution. His parents 
were persons of intelligence and sterling character, and his child- 
hood and youth were thus compassed by beneficent home influences; 
he was reared to be God-fearing, honest and honorable, self-reliant 
and industrious, tolerant and kindly, and throughout his long and 
useful life he never swerved in the least from the dominating prin- 
ciples which were thus early instilled into his receptive and appre- 
ciative mind. After being afforded the advantages of the common 
schools of his native town he put his scholastic requirements to 
practical test and utilization, teaching three successive winters in 
country schools and then entering upon an apprenticeship at the 
trade of cabinet-making at which he became a skilled artisan. He 
continued to follow his trade as a vocation until he had attained his 
legal majority, when his aggressive spirit prompted him to move 
to the wonderful west and cast in his lot with its pioneers. It may 
safely be said that he never regretted the choice which led him to 
establish his home in Madison, as one of the first settlers of the 
beautiful lake-ensconced city. The long and weary journey was 
made by sailing vessel on the Great Lakes and by means of the 
other primitive conveyances of the day, and he arrived in what is 
now the city of Milwaukee, May 26, 1837. Madison had been se- 
lected as the capital of the newly organized territory of Wisconsin, 
the site of the city having then been marked by a solitary log cabin. 
Soon after his arrival in Milwaukee, Mr. Clark was engaged with 
the little party of pioneers who came to Madison to erect the first 
capitol building, arriving at his destination at ten o'clock in the 
morning of June 10, 1837. Another publication has gracefully 
spoken of this journey and Mr. Clark's identification with the same, 
in the following words : "The weather had been very 
unfavorable for this band of pioneers, but when Madison 
was but a few miles distant the sun burst fortfh in splendor 
and Mr. Clark named the spot his party had just reached 
'Sun Prairie,' which has since been a familiar name." From 
that time forward until his death Mr. Clark knew no other 
home than Madison, and he witnessed the development of the beau- 
tiful "Citv of the Lakes'' from the unbroken wilderness, contribu- 



176 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

ting his full share to the civic and material upbuilding of the place 
in which his pride and his affection centered. A kindly, Christian 
gentleman, who believed in doing good to the community in which 
he lived, his steady determination never to be a drone in the civic 
hive made him a beneficent force in many directions. If his exam- 
ple were followed generally by men of wealth and business stand- 
ing there would be no lack of power behind any public movement 
leading in the direction of advancement and better government 
based on better citizenship. Mr. Clark was in close touch with the 
community through all its early years and struggles, holding many 
offices, public and private. He was instrumental in laying out and 
beautifying Forest Hill cemetery, which name he suggested, and 
in this consecrated spot he now rests. Mr. Clark was a distinct 
individual and was in many ways a remarkable man. No shadow 
of wrong or suspicion of evil ever rested upon his reputation in any 
of the relations of life ; kindness and tolerance dwelt with him as 
constant guests, equivocation or compromise with conscientious 
conviction were innately impossible with him. In his life and char- 
acter lie lessons of inspiration and incentive, and his name merits 
a high place on the roster of the honored pioneers of the city, the 
county and the state. About 1846 he embarked in the furniture 
business. In that year he went to Chicago and bought a load of 
chairs, which was his first stock of furniture not made in his own 
shop. Through legitimate business enterprise he accumulated a 
competency and was ever ready to lend his aid and influence in 
support of all measures tending to conserve the general welfare. 
He was a Democrat in his political allegience, and he was called to 
many offices of public trust and responsibility, having ever com- 
manded the unqualified confidence and esteem of the comunity. He 
was a member of the board of aldermen for four years, was presi- 
dent of the city council one year, was for some time an active and 
valued member of the board of education, and in 1860 was acting 
mayor of the capital city. He was an attendant of the Protestant 
Episcopal church, and aided liberally in the upbuilding of the par- 
ish and the edifice of Grace church. On August 31, 1848, was sol- 
emnized the marriage of Mr. Clark to Miss Sarah L. Goodnow, 
who was born in Webster, Monroe county, N. Y., and who died in 
Madison, March 5. 1854. The only child of this union was Edward, 
who was born on May 1, 1850, and who died on August 19, of the 
following year.On May 20, 1858, Mr. Clark was united in marriage 
to Miss Frances Ann Adams, who was born in Akron, Ohio. Tan 
nary 16, 1833, being a daughter of Harry and Julia Ann (Mew ell) 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 177 

Adams, the former of whom was born in Panton, Addison county, 
Yt., December 6. 1806, and the latter in Elizabethtown, Essex 
county, N. Y., July 21, 1813. The father died April 18, 1868, at 
Vergennes, Yt., and his wife survived him by many years, her death 
occurring in Madison, Wis., August 2, 1904. at the advanced age 
of ninety-one years. Mr. Clark lived over fifty years in the old 
homestead on Webster street ; several years after his death Mrs. 
Clark built the beautiful home at 105 East Wilson street, where she 
expects to spend the rest of her life. Mr. Clark built the block at 
the corner of Webster and Main streets in 1879, and many years 
previous to that date he built the store at 118 East Main street, in 
which he engaged in the furniture business for more than forty 
years. The two daughters of Mr. and Mrs. Clark are still living. 
The elder, Frances Louise, married Paul Holmes Wood of New Jer- 
ssey, and is the mother of two children, Harold Paul and Henrietta 
Holmes. The younger daughter, Grace, is the wife of Frederic 
King Conover, of Madison, the official reporter of the Wisconsin 
supreme court, and they have four children. — Frederic LeRoy, 
Marion Clark, Julian Darst and Daphne Grace. 

Hamilton G. Clark, one of the successful and popular farmers 
of Cottage Grove township, is a representative of one of the hon- 
ored pioneer families of this section of the county. He was born on 
the homestead farm, in section 9, Cottage Grove township, April 
10, 1852, being a son of James and Margaret (Clark) Clark, both 
of whom were natives of County Down, Ireland, where the former 
was born in 1819, and the latter in 1818. Their marriage was solem- 
nized in Ireland, whence they immigrated to the United States in 
1847, landing in New York city, where they resided some time. 
In 1849 they came to Dane county, where the father was employed 
at farm work until 1852, when he secured a tract of school land, in 
section 16, Cottage Grove township. He developed the property 
into a good farm and there passed the remainder of his life, his 
death occurring in 1888, at which time he owned one hundred and 
ninety-two acres. He achieved a competency through earnest and 
honest endeavor, and he ever retained the confidence and esteem of 
his fellow men. His devoted wife survived him by more than a 
decade, her death occurring in 1901. Both were zealous members 
of the Presbyterian church. Concerning their children the follow- 
ing brief data are entered : John died at the age of twenty-two 
years; Hamilton G., subject of this review, was the next in order 
of birth ; Mary A. is the wife of D. W. Houston, of Cottage Grove 
township; Martha J. is the wife of J. D. Van Arnam and they re- 
12— iii 



178 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

side in the village of Cottage Grove ; James died at the age of three 
years ; William R. resides on the old homestead farm, in Cottage 
Grove township ; Maggie and Nancy were twins, the former being 
the wife of James E. Showers, of Cottage Grove township, and 
the latter, who died in 1890, was the wife of R. J. Arthur. Hamil- 
ton G. Clark was reared on the home farm and his early educational 
advantages were those afforded by the public schools of the local- 
ity. He remained with his parents until he had attained to the 
age of twenty-four years, when he married. He then rented land 
in Cottage Grove township and began his independent career as 
a farmer, in 1875. He farmed on rented land about four years and 
then purchased his present well-improved homestead of one hun- 
dred and seventeen acres, in section 10, Cottage Grove township, 
the place having formerly been known as the Thomas Dailey farm. 
Mr. Clark erected the present buildings, including the modern two- 
story frame residence, a barn thirty-six by eighty-four feet in di- 
mensions, a tobacco shed twenty-six by seventy feet and other 
excellent farm buildings. He gives his attention to diversified 
farming and stock-growing, making a specialty of raising tobacco 
and also raising hogs somewhat extensively. Since 1895 Mr. Clark 
has devoted considerable of his time and attention to the buying 
of grain and live stock, being at the present time associated with 
his brother, William R. in this line of enterprise. He now resides 
in the village of Cottage Grove, having turned the active man- 
agement of the farm over to his younger son. Mr. Clark has long 
been influential in public affairs in his township and has been 
called upon to serve in offices of local trust, his preferment indicat- 
ing the esteem in which he is held in the community. He was in- 
cumbent of the office of township treasurer two terms, was town- 
ship clerk one term, and four terms he served as chairman of the 
township board, being thus ex officio member of the county board 
of supervisors. In politics he is a stanch adherent of the Demo- 
cratic party. December 10, 1874. Mr. Clark was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Eliza Dailey, who was born in Cottage Grove town- 
ship, July 1, 1853, being a daughter of Thomas and Nancy (Lemon) 
Dailey, sterling pioneers of the township. Of the children of Mr. 
and Mrs. Clark it may be recorded that Mabel, who was born Feb- 
ruary 8, 1877, is the wife of Henry M. Derleth, of Cottage Grove 
township, and they have one child, Clark F. ; James H., who was 
born September 4. 1879, remains at the parental home; and 
Wayne J., who was born June 22, 1884, has charge of the home- 
farm ; he married Miss Gheah Rinden. 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 179 

Samuel Clarke is a well-known farmer of Albion, son of John G. 
and Harriet Clarke, who came to Wisconsin in 1842 from York- 
shire, England. A brother of John G. Clarke, Samuel, had pre- 
ceded them two years before and obtained a farm in section 15, 
town of Albion, where he was joined in 1842 by his brother, John, 
and his parents, James and Judith Ann (Hobson) Clarke. James 
Clarke landed in New York city with his family after a perilous 
voyage of many weeks on an old sailing vessel, came by way of 
the Great Lakes to Milwaukee and thence with ox teams to Albion. 
A farm of two hundred and forty acres was purchased by James 
Clarke, and father and sons set bravely to work to clear and im- 
prove their property. In England James was employed as head 
book-keeper in a cotton factory where John also worked and no one 
of the family had ever been a farmer. The difficulties of the new 
country were many even to experienced farmers, but thrift and 
energy triumphed over obstacles which would have discouraged 
less persevering men, and the Clarkes were successful from the 
beginning of their life in America. Seven children were born to 
Mr. and Mrs. John G. Clarke: Judeth Ann Craig; Hannah Croft; 
James, a farmer in Rock county, Wis. ; Matilda, who is married 
and lives in Rock county, Wis. ; Samuel, the subject of this sketch 
and Clara, who is Mrs. Thomas Pierce of Albion. Samuel was 
born in Albion, attended the district schools and the Albion 
academy and early interested himself in farming. The farm origi- 
nally obtained by James Clarke was purchased by his son John 
and its management succeeded to his son Samuel, who now owns 
it and has added to it another eighty acre tract which he bought 
in 1897. About one hundred acres are under ' cultivation and an 
extensive general farming business is carried on. Mr. Clarke is 
interested in stock-raising, has a fine herd of cattle, a considerable 
number of horses and pure-bred hogs. As a young man he learned 
the carpenter's trade but has always preferred to give most of his 
attention to farming and keeps well posted on up-to-date farming 
methods. Mr. Clarke is a school director and has held other local 
offices. He is a stanch supporter of the principles of the Repub- 
lican party. Mr. Clarke has been twice married. His first wife 
was Miss Louisa Dickinson. In 1895 he married Mrs. Clara L. 
Stronse, widow of Samuel Stronse. Five children blessed the sec- 
ond marriage ; Beulah Leora, Ruth Eveline, Violet Gertrude, Edna 
Louise and v John Warren. Three children were born to Mrs. 
Clarke by her former marriage ; Ethel May. Norman and Lyman. 
The family attend the Primitive Methodist church of Albion of 



180 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

which John G. Clarke and his brother, Samuel, were among the 
first members. 

J. Frank and Charles E. Cleary are the men, who under the firm 
name of Cleary Bros, conduct one of the large, farming interests of 
the county, at Sun Prairie, Wis. They are sons of Patrick and 
Mary (Nolan) Cleary. Both parents were born in Ireland, the 
former, November 15, 1833, and the latter August 5, 1835. The 
paternal grandfather, James Cleary, was born in Ireland and in 
1851 came to America, settling in Onondago county, New York. 
In 1854 he removed to Dane county, Wis., where he died in 1876. 
His wife was Mary Kennedy, who died in Ireland previous to his 
removal to this country. Their son, Patrick, the father of Frank 
and Charles was educated in Ireland and came to this country 
with his father about the time of his majority. For several years 
he was employed in Sun Prairie by Col. W. Ff. Angel, but in 1863 
he removed (to Bristol, where he purchased eighty acres of land, 
adding to his holdings until he possessed three hundred and thirty 
acres. He was married October 29, 1863, and died at his home in 
Dane county, December 14, 1894. In politics he was an independ- 
ent. He and his family were members of the Sacred Heart church 
of Sun Prairie. The old homestead formed the nucleus of the fine 
farm of three hundred and thirty acres now owned and operated 
by Cleary brothers. As boys they were educated in the common 
schools of this district and at Sacred Heart college in Watertown 
In addition to the possession of a large number of short-horned 
cattle the Cleary brothers are interested in dairying and are also 
extensive feeders of cattle. Charles is treasurer of the North Bris- 
tol creamery association. In politics both belong to the Demo- 
cratic party. Frank has served as justice of the peace, was town 
clerk for six years, and is now serving his second term as chairman 
of the town. Like their parents their church affiliations are Cath- 
olic. Members of the family of Patrick Cleary are as follows : 
J. Frank was born June 19, 1868, and is a member of the firm of 
Cleary Bros. ; Dr. B. L. was born August 10, 1870, educated in 
Stoughton college, and graduated from Rush Medical college in 
1900, and now practices his profession at Edgerton, Wis. ; Nettie, 
born November 5, 1873, is now Mrs. George Schernecker of Madi- 
son, Wis. ; George, born August 10, 1875,' is a farmer of Bloomer, 
Wis. ; Charles E., born March 2, 1878, belongs to the firm of Cleary 
Bros. Frank is a member of the Catholic Order of Foresters. The 
firm of Cleary brothers is recognized as a standard trade-mark of 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 181 

sincerity and honesty and this has been one of the major reasons 
for the business success of the partners. 

William Coffey, deceased, for many years a farmer of the town 
of Cottage Grove, was born in Boston, Mass.. July 22, 1840. His 
parents were Patrick and Annastasia (Lantry) Coffey, both natives 
of Ireland. The family immigrated to the United States when Mr. 
Coffey was a boy, coming directly to Cottage Grove township, 
where they entered two eighties of government land. The old 
folks lived the balance of their lives in Cottage Grove. What op- 
portunities Mr. Coffey had for obtaining an education were very 
limited, being only those afforded by the district schools of Cottage 
Grove. During the early part of his manhood he traveled much. 
After his marriage he earned a livelihood for himself and family 
by working land on shares for several years, managing, by frugal- 
ity and hard work, to accumulate sufficient money to purchase one 
hundred acres of land, where the widow and family now reside. 
Politically he was a Democrat and as such served his town as asses- 
sor and justice of the peace. His religious affiliations were with 
the Catholic church. On February 20, 1865, Mr. Coffey married 
Susan Ann Reynolds, daughter of Daniel and Mary Ellen (Rey- 
nolds) of the town of Cottage Grove. (For further mention of 
Mrs. Coffey's family see the sketch of Daniel Reynolds). Five 
children blessed this union — Mary Ellen, born December 16, 1865, 
the wife of John Coughlin of Cottage Grove ; William James, born 
November 14, 1867, a carpenter by trade, married Catherine Mur- 
phy, and is now a resident of Yale, S. D. ; Daniel Edward, born 
May 29, 1871, a carpenter by trade and an accomplished violinist, 
lives at home; John Albert, born December 29, 1878, lives at home; 
and Susan Ann, born September 30, 1881. The youngest daughter 
is a teacher ; she received her preparatory education in the district 
school of the town of Cottage Grove and was given a teacher's 
certificate at the Whitewater Normal school five years ago, since 
which time she has been engaged in her profession. All the chil- 
dren are musically inclined, and all play some instrument, violin or 
piano. Miss Susie plays both the piano and violin. Mr. Coffey 
died April 10, 1897. He was a sterling, upright citizen, of frugal 
habits, a man much admired and respected by all with whom he 
came in contact. 

Charles J. Coggins is a highly respected citizen and office-holder 
in the town of Fitchburg, where he has had his residence for the 
past sixteen years. He was born in western Northamptonshire, 
England, on May 19, 1861, and is one of five children born to Henry 



182 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

and Elizabeth (Bonham) Coggins, the mother and four children 
still residing in the mother country and the father being deceased. 
The father of our subject was a farmer by occupation and the latter 
was reared in the quiet surroundings of a country life. He re- 
ceived his education in the common schools of his native country, 
and at the age of twenty years, in April, 1881, he migrated to the 
United States and located at Cold Springs, Jefferson county, Wis. 
There he remained until the spring of 1890. engaged in farming, 
and then came to Dane county and settled in the town of Fitch- 
burg, where he has resided ever since. After coming to Fitchburg, 
in partnership with Charles Parish he purchased one hundred and 
forty acres of land, and two years later bought an additional one 
hundred and fifty acres, which joined the original purchase. In 
December, 1901, they sold this large tract of land and purchased 
the place where they now reside, which comprises two hundred and 
and seventy-three acres of well improved land. Aside from the 
business of general farming they make a specialty of raising cattle, 
sheep, and hogs, in the live stock line, and they are also extensive 
growers of tobacco. Mr. Goggin's success -is very gratifying to 
himself and his many friends, as he started in life with compara- 
tively nothing, and has reached his present status by hard work 
and intelligent management of affairs. He is a Republican in his 
political affiliations, has served in the responsible position of super- 
visor of the town of Fitchburg, and at the present time is treasurer 
of school district No. 6. His fraternal associations are expressed 
by membership in the lodge of Modern Woodmen of America at 
Verona. Mr. Coggins was married on June 10, 1886, selecting as 
his helpmate Miss Lucy Higbee, daughter of George and Serena 
(Ransom) Higbee, natives of the state of New York. These par- 
ents were early settlers in Jefferson county, coming there several 
years before the Civil War. Later they entered eighty acres of 
government land, near Cooktown in Rock county, and the father 
always followed farming as an occupation. Both of these parents 
are now deceased. To Mr. and Mrs. Coggins there have been born 
six children, the two older ones having been born in Jefferson 
county and the others in the town of Fitchburg. Their names fol- 
low: Edith, Harry. Minerva, Glenn, Winnie and Edna, all living 
at home. Charles Parish, who is associated with Mr. Coggins in 
the extensive farming operations referred to, was born, September 
14, 1856, at Coldspring, Jefferson county, Wis., and is the son of 
George and Sarah (Coggins) Parish, natives of England who came 
to the United States about 1846 and settled in Jefferson county, 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 183 

Wis. There they preempted eighty acres of government land and 
experienced all the trials and surmounted the difficulties that pre- 
sent themselves in a pioneer life. The father and mother have both 
been dead for many years. Charles Parish, their son, was educated 
in his native town of Coldspring. and in 1890 accompanied Mr. 
Coggins to the town of Fitchburg in Dane county, where they have 
been equal partners in business ever since, Mr. Parish being a 
member of the Coggin's home circle. Although nature endowed 
him with a small stature and limited the possibilities of his physical 
development, yet he is possessed of more than the ordinary mental 
qualifications, and the deficiency in brawn is more than offset by a 
good supply of brain power. He was reared and baptized in the 
Episcopal faith and still maintains his membership in that denomi- 
nation. He has never married. 

John Lewis Colby is as yet a comparatively young man, but he 
has achieved a degree of success in his undertakings that is usually 
only attained by men after years of strenuous endeavor. Mr. 
Colby was born in the town of Oregon, Dane county, on August 
27, 1862, and he is the eldest son of Romanzo H. Colby, who is 
given a more extended mention on another page of this volume, 
which is devoted to biographical and genealogical review. Our 
subject received his education in the district schools of Oregon and 
at Evansville, and remained with his father upon the farm until 
he had attained to his legal majority. He then worked one of his 
father's farms during the summer and officiated as a school teacher 
in the winter. At the age of twenty-two he purchased eighty acres 
of land where the Story postoffice now stands, and he owned and 
managed this farm until 1904, teaching school also twelve winters 
in succession, at Mt. Horeb two years and in the town of Verona 
one term, the remainder of his pedagogic work being in his native 
town of Oregon. On March 1, 1896, he purchased the general 
store business of N. E. Lamb, with postoffice in connection, at 
Story, and continued that business for nine years, when he sold 
out and removed his family to Wingra Park in order that his chil- 
dren might have the superior educational advantages there afforded. 
In 1903 he purchased one hundred and twenty-seven and one-half 
acres of land, in Oregon, lying just across the road from the home 
of his father, and he still owns the place, although not personally 
engaged in its cultivation. He purchased the general mercantile 
establishment at Wingra Park in April, 1906, and is catering to the 
trade of that vicinity in a way that is satisfactory to his many 
patrons and remunerative to himself. Mr. Colby was married, 



184 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

November 12. 1891, and the maiden name of his wife was Elona 
Burd. who was born in the town of Verona, March 11, 1864. She 
is one of nine children born to William R. and Eliza A. (Mutchler) 
Burd, highly esteemed residents of Verona. The names of the 
children in the Burd family, with other facts concerning them, are 
thus given : Maggie married W. W. Morse and resides in Bar- 
aboo. Wis. ; Gertrude is deceased ; Lucella married Willis Morse 
and resides in Madison ; Emma is deceased ; Elona is the wife of 
the subject of this review ; Hattie married Robert I. Harvey and 
resides in Chicago ; Sarah married O. W. Donkle and resides in 
Black Earth, Wis. ; Leslie O. resides in Belleville, a biographical 
sketch of whom appears in this volume ; and Clinton B. married 
Frankie Case and resides in Brooklyn. To Mr. and Mrs. Colby 
there have been born three children : Grace, Helen Maud, and 
Harold Leslie. In political affairs Mr. Colby maintains an inde- 
pendent attitude, giving his support to men and measures as they 
meet the approval of his enlightened judgment, regardless of the 
party emblem they may bear. The confidence of the public in his 
integrity and ability has been attested on several occasions. He 
had charge of the Story postoffice in the town of Oregon eight 
years, until it was abolished by the location of the rural route, and 
he filled the responsible position of justice of the peace for the 
same length of time. He was also secretary and treasurer of the 
Story Creamery Company for several years. His religious faith is 
that which is taught by the Methodist church, and in this as in 
other matters he gives a hearty and unselfish support. 

Romanzo H. Colby is another of the substantial citizens of the 
town of Oregon, who, by his industry and honorable methods has 
won for himself a reasonable competence and the respect and es- 
teem of all who know him. He was born in Erie county, N. Y., 
on February 18. 1839, and his parents — Giles and Julia (Childs) 
Colby — were also natives of the Empire state. Our subject at- 
tended the district schools in the place of his birth until nine years 
of age, when, in 1848, the family removed to Wisconsin and settled 
near Mt. Zion, in Rock county, and he finished his education there. 
The father rented a farm on Rock Prairie, where he remained two 
or three years, and then moved his family to Monticello, where for 
two years he worked a farm on shares, and then moved to a farm 
in Rutland township. Dane county. He remained at the latter place 
about two years, and then moved to Exeter, in Green county, where 
the father, mother and oldest son died of typhoid fever, in 1854, 
the father being fifty-five years old at the time of his death. After 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 185 

this sad breaking of the home circle the remaining members of the 
family became scattered, and the surviving sons came to the town 
of Oregon, where the subject of this review commenced working 
by the month as a farm hand and continued so engaged for seven 
years, after which he began farming independently. But the tocsin 
of war soon called him from his peaceful pursuits, and on February 
22, 1864, he enlisted as a private in Company I of the Thirty-sixth 
Regiment Wisconsin Infantry. This regiment was organized at 
Camp Randall, Madison, under the supervision of Col. Frank A. 
Haskell, and it left the state on May 10, 1864. With the regiment 
Mr. Colby participated in the fighting about Spotsylvania Court- 
house, the second battle of Cold Harbor, and on the Jerusalem 
plank road. In the latter engagement, on June 22, 1864, he was 
severely wounded, receiving a bullet through his left arm, which 
made it necessary to have a part of the bone removed, and he was 
sent back to the Harwood hospital at Washington. He was trans- 
ferred to the veteran reserve corps on January 18, 1865, and was 
mustered out on February 9, following, on account of the disabil- 
ity caused by the wound. Mr. Colby has a picture, which he re- 
ceived in July, 1864, representing a view of the hospital where he 
was confined. After his discharge from the army he purchased 
ninety acres of land, lying east of his present residence, and built 
a dwelling house thereon in 1866. He then sold that property and 
purchased the place where he now resides. He has always fol- 
lowed the occupation of a farmer, and in that exclusive line of work 
has achieved flattering success, wholly unaided, excepting by the 
wise counsels and encouragement of a faithful wife. Mr. Colby 
now possesses two hundred and sixty acres of land. There were 
five children born to the parents of the subject of this review, and 
of these four are still living: Henry M. resides at Scranton, la.; 
Lorenzo, who is the twin brother of our subject, resides in Tuscola 
county, Mich. ; and G. S. Colby resides at Willamette, Ore. Mr. 
Colby was married in the month of June, 1863, to Miss Louise 
Faulkes, daughter of John and Nancy (Ford) Faulkes, of the city 
of New York. She is one of a family of seven children, six of 
whom are living: Charles resides in Leroy. la.; Anna is now Mrs. 
Smith and resides at North Chicago ; George resides on a farm near 
the subject of this review; and Emma resides in North Chicago. 
Mr. and Mrs. Colby are the parents of eight children, the names 
and other information concerning whom follow : John L. married 
Elona Bird and resides in Wingra Park; Nona E. married Charles 
Baldwin, of Madison, and is now deceased ; Ralph F. married 



186 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

Emma Balfour and resides in the village of Oregon ; Gertrude mar- 
ried Ira Dalrymple and resides in Belleville ; Charles Edward is 
deceased ; Charles C. resides with his father ; Arthur A. married 
Jane Leslie and resides on a farm near his father ; Grace E. died 
in infancy. Mr. Colby is a Republican in his political affiliations, 
and has served one term on the Oregon town board. In religious 
faith he is a Spiritualist. ■' 

William Chelis Colby is now living retired in a beautiful home 
in South Madison after a career of more than ordinary usefulness, 
divided between the occupations of railroading and farming. He 
was born in the village of Salisbury, Merrimack county, N. H., on 
February 5, 1830, and is the only survivor of a family of three chil- 
dren born to William and Sophia (Mason) Colby, both of the par- 
ents being natives of Warner, N. H. Our subject attended the 
common schools of his native place and at the early age of sixteen 
years began life as a workman on railroads. He came to Wiscon- 
sin in 1854, and his first employment in the Badger state was in 
the construction work on the Milwaukee road from Prairie du Chien 
to Milwaukee, in which he continued for fifteen years, during the 
last seven years of which he had entire charge of the construction 
work. He was then employed as a conductor for about seven 
years, but because of failing health he quit the railroad business 
and purchased a farm in the town of Madison, the place known as 
the old VanBergen farm, and he resided thereon twenty-seven 
years, engaged in general farming and stock-growing. He then 
sold his farm and purchased other property from his wife's parents, 
also situated in the town of Madison, and he resided there until 
1902, when he sold out to the company that erected the Battle 
Creek Sanitarium on Lake Monona. Mr. Colby then purchased 
fifteen acres of land in South Madison, where he built a beautiful 
home in which he now resides. In his political views the subject 
of this review gives an unswerving allegiance to the time-honored 
principles of the Democratic party, and his personal worth and 
ability has been recognized by his fellow citizens in a substantial 
way. He has held the office of supervisor, representing the town 
of Madison on the county board of which he is the present chair- 
man, and has also filled the responsible position of assessor seven 
terms. Fraternally he holds membership in the Masonic lodge of 
the city of Madison. Mr. Colby was married on March 7, 1864, 
and the lady of his choice was Miss Hannah Lawrence, a native of 
London, England, where she was born, August 14, 1841. Her par- 
ents were Thomas Saffre and Charlotte (Scott) Lawrence, who 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 187 

migrated to America and were respected citizens of the town of 
Madison. They became the parents of twelve children, six of 
whom are living: John Thomas resides in the city of Madison; 
Hannah is the wife of the subject of this review; Thomas resides in 
Denver; Richard resides in New York; Charlotte married a Mr. 
Phillips and resides in San Francisco; and George resides in the 
city of Madison. 

Charles MacLain Colladay, a retired resident of the city of Madi- 
son, is a descendant of a long line of Colladays of Pennsylvania. 
Charles Colladay, son of Jacob Colladay, was born in Philadelphia, 
June 17, 1764. On July 27, 1786. Charles Colladay and Ann Mac- 
Lain) were united in marriage. Ann MacLain was born June 4, 
1767. The youngest child of Charles and Ann Colladay was 
born April 12, 1809, and was named William MacLain Colladay. In 
course of time William McLain Colladay married Mary Ann Kirk 
(born May 19. 1814.) and with his bride started for Canada imme- 
diately after the wedding, which occurred May 29, 1832. Not hav- 
ing sufficient money to pay two fares, the bride rode and the groom 
walked the entire distance. From Canada the young couple drifted 
to Illinois, where for several years Mr. Colladay was mail carrier, 
transporting the mail between Aurora and Chicago, and making 
the journey on foot. In the early forties the Colladays came to 
the town of Dunn. There was but one other family in the town- 
ship at the time, — the Wetherbys, who later moved to California. 
Starvation seemed to stare them in the face on their arrival on the 
banks of Lake Kegonsa. Mrs. Colladay was so weak from hun- 
ger that she could proceed no farther. Her husband in search for 
food came upon a school of suckers crowded into a small bay of the 
lake. With a pitchfork he gathered enough of the fish to last for 
some time. Mrs. Colladay preserved them by putting them up in 
a brine of her own make. A few days later Mr. Colladay killed 
two deer with one shot, and the venison and the fish lasted through 
the winter. In the spring the husband obtained work in Stoughton 
as a carpenter, walking six miles night and morning in order to 
comply with the provisions of the homestead law. The first frame 
house erected in Stoughton was built by Mr. Colladay; the first 
bridge across the Rock river on the road between Madison and 
Janesville and the first saw and grist mills of the vicinity were his 
handiwork. After seven years he had fulfilled the requirements 
of the homestead law and he settled down to farming, which. occu- 
pation he followed until his death, which occurred November 26, 
1893. He always took an active part in politics. He was a Repub- 



188 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

lican and he served two terms in the assembly and two in the 
senate. He held a great many local offices in the town of Dunn ; 
he served as justice of the peace in the early days and performed 
many marriage ceremonies. He had added to the farm until it 
contained some five hundred acres of excellent land. Mrs. Colla- 
day passed away February 12, 1876. It was through Mr. Colladay 
that the Masonic lodge of Stoughton obtained its charter, he hav- 
ing walked to Milwaukee and advanced the money to obtain it. 
He was also a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows 
of Stoughton. To Mr. and Mrs. Colladay thirteen children were 
born — Amanda, born March 2, 1833, in Grenville, Ontario, where 
she died a year later; John B., born March 16, 1836, died September 
30, 1865 ; Sarah Ann, born January 26. 1838, died March 4, 1841 ; 
Emma Jane, (now Mrs. T. P. Camp of Portage. Wis.,) born No- 
vember 22, 1840 ; George W., born November 28, 1842, died July 6, 
1862 while serving in the army ; Theodore A., born February 28, 
1844, died November 17, 1881; Alva W., born January 28, 1846, 
lives in Northwood, la. ; Forest H., born April 21, 1848, lives in 
Madison; Alvira (Mrs. James Bean, of Aberdeen, Cal.), born April 
23, 1850; Alice A.. (Mrs. William Keenan of the town of Dunn), 
born February 21, 1852 ; William E., born March 25, 1854, resides 
in Washington, D. C. ; Dora A., (Mrs. Charles Moore of Waterloo, 
la.), born October 15, 1856; and Charles M., born October 21, 1858. 
It is said that Alva W. Colladay was the first white child born in 
the town of Dunn. 

Charles MacLain Colladay was seventeen years of age when he 
began life for himself. For several years he worked the father's 
farm on shares, and upon the father's death in 1893 he purchased 
of the other heirs a clear title to one hundred and thirty acres of 
the state. In 1899 he retired, and built the beautiful residence at 
325 West Washington avenue where he now makes his home. The 
family spends the winters in Madison and returns to the 
farm in the summer, where Mr. Colladay conducts a high- 
class summer resort. He has about one and one-half miles 
lake front of Lake Kegonsa devoted to that purpose. It is 
one of the finest locations to be found in the country and 
during each season the place is patronized by a large as- 
sembly of prominent guests from various parts of the 
county. Politically Mr. Colladay is a Republican, but has never 
held office. Though not a member of any church his sympathies 
are with the Congregational faith. On December 28, 1887, he mar- 
ried Catherine Elizabeth, daughter of Edward and Harriet (Hub- 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 189 

bard) Whaling, of Deerfield. Airs. Colladay was born October 
20, 1858, in the town of Dunn and received her education in the 
district schools and the Madison high school. She is the third of 
the four children in the Whaling family, the others being Byron, 
born September 29, 1852, lives in Osborn, Kansas; Perry I., born 
July 29, 1856, died February 14, 1900 ; and Alice, born March 5, 1864, 
lives in Dodgeville, Wis. To Charles and Catherine Colladay have 
been born two children, — Earl Whaling, May, 20, 1891, and Charles 
McLain, Jr., June 12, 1896. Mr. Colladay is a well educated man, 
having attended Albion Academy after having received all the in- 
struction to be had from the district schools. He is a member of 
the Kegonsa Lodge, No. 73, Stoughton ; the Madison chapter, No. 
4, and the Robert Macoy Commandry, No. 3, Madisqn. 

Daniel B. Collins, M. D„ one of the well-known and skillful phy- 
sicians and surgeons of Dane county, was born in Madison, August 
15, 1863, of good Irish stock. His father was Daniel H. Collins, 
born in the county of Limerick, Ireland, where he was a tanner for 
a time and later in the dairy business. In 1849 he came to the 
United States, his objective point being Madison. After his arrival 
here he married Mary McKeen, also a native of the Emerald Isle, 
and by her had six children, — M. C, a merchant of St. Paul, Minn., 
Frank and Daniel B., (M. D.), living at home; Nellie, head nurse of 
Racine college, Racine, Wis. ; Elizabeth, widow of James Hopkins, 
now living at home ; Genevieve, now Mrs. Henry Cummings of 
Milwaukee, where her husband is a practicing attorney. Mr. Col- 
lins was a good type of the old-school gentleman and a lifelong 
Democrat. He always took an active interest in the municipal and 
county politics and at one time served as a representative from the 
third ward in the common council. From the time of his arrival 
here until his death on July 17, 1903, in his seventy-eighth year, 
he never left the city. The following tribute was paid to the de- 
cedent: "In the passing of Daniel H. Collins the world loses an- 
other of the old school. He settled here when Madison was a small 
village a half century ago. Coming with Wisconsin's early pio- 
neers, who were known for their rugged honesty, their indomitable 
will and their noble principles, he aided in building up the charac- 
ter of this great commonwealth as well as contributed to its mater- 
ial prosperity. He was an indulgent father and a faithful hus- 
band. He was a man of more than ordinary intelligence, his ad- 
vice and counsel were often sought by his fellow-men on vexed 
questions. He was ever ready to give aid and comfort to those in 
distress, he added much to the sum of human happiness. The 



190 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

world is better for his having lived. While unostentatious in his 
bearing, he possessed the proud spirit of the knights of old. founded 
upon lofty principles, a noble character and high ideals. Though 
not demonstrative in religion he ever remained in close communion 
with his Creator. He was a true lover of nature, refined and ar- 
tistic ; the birds of the air and the flowers of the fields were his 
friends." 

Dr. D. B. Collins, the subject of this sketch, derives his descent 
remotely from Fiacha Fighinte, son of Daire Cearb, son of Olioll 
Flann Beag, who is number eighty-seven on the line of Heber, and 
more immediately from the famous Sept of O'Cuileann or Cuil- 
eann, anglicized O'Collins or Collins. They were the lords of 
Eighter Conghalach of Lower Connello in the County of Limer- 
ick, Ireland. The grants were given them by King Charles I of 
England. January 1, 1649, and one month before he was be- 
headed, January 30, 1649. The doctor received his education in 
the high school of Madison and in the University of Wisconsin,, 
reading medicine in the office of the late Dr. F. H. Bodenius while 
attending college. In 1887 he was graduated from the Rush Medi- 
cal college of Chicago with the degree of M. D. and the following 
three years he spent in Muscoda, Wis., practicing medicine. In 1890' 
he returned to the city of his birth and has practiced here continu- 
ously since. When the course in pharmacy was established at 
the University of Wisconsin Dr. Collins was a member of the first 
class. For some years he was physician to the United States pris- 
oners in this county and is at present the examining physician for 
several large insurance companies. Dr. Collins has never married. 
He is a member of the American and State Medical Association, the 
Central Wisconsin and Dane county Medical Societies, and the 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. He makes his home 
with his mother at 506 South Baldwin street. 

Cooley L. Comstock, a retired farmer and merchant, residing in 
the village of Oregon, was born fifteen miles from Erie, in Erie 
county, Penn., August 16, 1844. His father. William Comstock, 
was born in Rhode Island, and his grandfather. Aaron Comstock r 
was a native of the same state, moving from there to Otsego, N. Y., 
and thence to Wisconsin, and spent his last years in Rock county. 
William Comstock was a natural mechanic, and followed the trade 
of stonemason and carpenter, in connection with farming, all of his 
life. He was maried in Otsego county, N. Y., to Miss Fanny Cha- 
pin, a native of that county, where she was born, in the town of 
Butternuts, July 5, 1810. Soon after their marriage, Mr and Mrs. 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 191 

Comstock removed to Erie county, Perm., where he resided for a 
few years, and then, in 1844. emigrated to the territory of Wiscon- 
sin. He came by team to Lake Erie, and there took a boat for Mil- 
waukee, landing in the latter city with but $1.50 in his pocket. He 
came by team from Milwaukee to Dane county, and having a good 
trade he secured employment and was soon living in comparative 
comfort. At that time this section of country was but sparsely 
settled, and the greater portion of the land belonged to the govern- 
ment domain. Mr. Comstock was a very useful adjunct to the re- 
gion in which he settled, by reason of his mechanical skill, and a 
number of the log houses and barns which he erected are still stand- 
ing as silent mementoes of his handiwork. Game was very plen- 
tiful in those days, and the family larder could easily be supplied 
with meat from the surrounding forests. Mr. Comstock selected 
forty acres of government land in section 31, in what is now Dunn 
township, and at once built a log house and commenced to make a 
farm. He bought a cow and a pair of oxen, and as there were no 
railroads he was compelled to haul his grain to Milwaukee, and 
with the oxen this meant a trip of six or seven days, when the 
weather was good. Wheat sold as low as twenty-five cents a 
bushel, but Mr. Comstock usually managed to get a load of mer- 
chandise, to haul back for Madison parties, Bean & RogaL 
and thus adaed to the profits of his trip. As his means accumulated 
he bought other land, until his farm contained two hundred acres, 
and at the time of his death, in February, 1873, he was one of the 
well-to-do farmers in that section of the county. His wife was the 
daughter of Luke Chapin, who was a native of Connecticut, but in 
early life he moved to New York and spent his remaining years, 
there. He served as a soldier in the war of 1812. The maiden name 
of his wife was Thirza Shaw, and she also died in the town of 
Butternuts. N. Y. Mr. and Mrs. William Comstock were the pa- 
rents of four children: Francis C, deceased; Melissa A., now Mrs.. 
Grout, of Monroe, Wis. ; Cooley L.. is the subject of this review,, 
and Edgar W. residing in the village of Oregon. They were all ed- 
cated in the schools of Dane county. Cooley L. Comstock, to whom 
this memoir is especially dedicated, was but an infant when he came 
to Wisconsin with his parents, hence he has no recollection of any 
other home. He attended the pioneer schools of Dunn township, 
his father being a warm friend of the common school system and 
donated the land on which to build a school house. The son com- 
menced life as a farmer and remained with his father until he 
reached the age of twentv-rive vears. He then bought farm in sec- 



192 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

tion 32, of Dunn township, where he resided for three years, and 
then selling it he returned to the old homestead, where he resided 
until four years ago, and of which property he is still the owner. 
The farm contains two hundred acres of fine land, well improved. 
In 1902 Mr. Comstock removed to the village of Oregon and en- 
tered the mercantile business, which he followed for two years, and 
then retired from active participation in affairs and is living in quiet 
enjoyment of the fruits of an industrious career. He has recently 
erected a fine dwelling house in the village of Oregon, where it is 
hoped that many years of happiness will yet be the lot of himself 
and his estimable wife. Mr. Comstock was married, February 28, 
1866, to Miss Demarius Johnson, who was born in the town of 
Dunn, daughter of Solomon and Polly (Baker) Johnson, prominent 
citizens of that locality, the father having migrated from the state 
of New York to Dane county in 1845. Mr. and Mrs. Comstock 
are the parents of two daughters, — Leila, who resides at home, 
and Fanny J. who is the wife of Russell Jones, an extensive 
farmer and blooded-stock breeder of Oak Hall, Wis. Each of the 
daughters received an excellent education in the schools of Dunn 
township and the village of Oregon. Mr. Comstock was form- 
erly a Democrat, but in the more recent years has assumed an inde- 
pendent attitude in political matters. He served two terms as 
chairman of the town board of Dunn, and has also held school 
offices. The family is connected with the Methodist church in 
Oregon, and Mr. Comstock has membership with the Modern 
Woodmen of America. 

Rev. M. A. Condon, who has been for the past seventeen years 
the pastor of the church of the Holy Mother of Consolation, at 
Oregon, in Dane county, is a native of Dodge county, Wis., hav- 
ing been born at Hustisford on December 1, 1885. He was born 
of Irish parents and his boyhood days were spent on the farm, and 
in the district schools he received his preliminary education. He 
was one of the first students to be enrolled at the Sacred Heart 
college, of Watertown, Wis., opened in September, 1872, and he re- 
mained as a student there for five years, completing the classical 
course in June, 1877. In September of the same year he entered 
the seminary at St. Francis, near Milwaukee, and there took a four 
years course in philosophy and theology. There he received his 
sub-deacon and deaconship on April 2 and 3, 1881, from the Most 
Reverend Archbishop Heiss. Father Condon was ordained to the 
priesthood in the seminary chapel by Bishop F. X. Krautbauer on 
June, 26, 1881. His first mission after ordination was at Maple- 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 193 

ton. in Waukesha county, where he was a pastor for eight years, 
and in 1889 he was transferred to Oregon, Dane county, where he 
has since been located as pastor of the church of the Holy Mother 
of Consolation. Under his pastorate the congregation has in- 
creased in numbers and a prosperous condition generally is evi- 
denced on every hand. 

Henry Clinton Cone is a successful farmer and stock-raiser of 
the town of York, where his family have lived for many years. 
He was adopted by G. A. Cone and his wife Aroxia (Porter) Cone, 
daughter of Garett Porter, whose biography appears in this work. 
Both Mr. and Mrs. Cone were natives of Cattaraugus county, 
N. Y., and Mr. Cone's parents, Massena and Elizabeth (Purple) 
Cone, were born in New York and came to Kenosha county, Wis., 
in 1838. They moved to the town of York in 1845. Of their six 
children, G. A. Cone, born April 8, 1829, is the only survivor. He 
attended school in Kenosha, and in Marshall county, Ind., and 
learned the blacksmith's trade. He and his wife are both prom- 
inent in the Methodist Episcopal church and Mr. Cone is a member 
of the Prohibition party. For some time he held the office of 
justice of the peace. His home is a fine farm of one hundred and 
thirty-three acres in the town of York, which he worked for many 
years, but which is now managed by his son Henry. Mrs. G. A. 
Cone was born May, 31, 1830, -and died July 25, 1901. Henry 
Clinton Cone was born in Dodge county Wis., October 5, 1862, 
attended school in York, also at the Marshall Academy and the 
Waterloo high school. He owns a farm of forty acres and likewise 
manages his father's farm and makes a specialty of fine short- 
horned cattle and Poland China hogs. Like his father, Mr. Cone 
is allied with the Prohibition party and is active in political affairs. 
He has twice been assessor of the town. In March, 1888, he mar- 
ried Miss Minnie Cone, daughter of Sterling and Mary (Wood- 
bridge) Cone, of Oshkosh, Wis. Sterling Cone was a prominent 
member of the Jefferson county bar and a member of the state 
legislature from Dodge county. He died in 1887. Mr. and Mrs. 
Cone have had five children. The oldest, Roxie M., is a senior in 
the Medina high school; Evaline and an infant child are deceased; 
Hattie Bell is a freshman in the high school and Merrill S. is in the 
grade schools. The family attend the Methodist Episcopal church 
and are active in church work. Mr. Cone is a member of the Mar- 
shal branch of the Modern Woodmen. 

James Conklin (deceased), was from sturdy and naturally pro- 
gressive stock, the son of John and Catherine Conklin. and was 
13— iii 



194 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

born in Burlington, Chittenden county, Vt, June 12, 1831. The 
family left the somewhat restricted conditions of the east to find 
broader fields of industry in the west, and arrived in Madison, 
(then a village), in October, 1819. The subject of this brief sketch 
soon found work which, although hard at times, he followed with a 
will, obeying the scriptural injunction, "Whatsoever thy hand find- 
eth to do, do it with thy might." But there soon appeared before 
him more prosperous fields. As early as 1854 the firm of Conklin 
& Gray (Neely Gray) was established, and in a short time became 
extensively known and very freely patronized. In fact it was the 
most prominent house in this section in handling wheat and 
other cereals. This being the time that the Milwaukee & Prai- 
rie du Chien Railway reached Madison and remained here for sev- 
eral years, it was the grand opportunity for Mr. Conklin to demon- 
strate his business abilities. His manly appearance, his good, calm 
nature, affable and honest manner soon attracted the attention of 
farmers who came in for many miles and from all points of the 
compass with their products. The business of the firm rapidly 
increased, and it became prominent as the headquarters for farm- 
ing implements. Later the railroads branched out in all directions 
and cut off the market trade to a great extent. The firm changed 
to Conklin & Sons, and the rapid growth of Madison (then a city) 
required that wood, coal and the staple articles necessary in business 
houses and in homes, should be handled. Extensive yards, with the 
latest devices, were established ; and the yards at West Madison 
are today and for a long time have been on a par with any to be 
found in much larger cities. Another large yard is established in 
the sixth ward. At these headquarters all kinds of building mater- 
ial are found, such as brick, cement, lime, sewer pipe, etc. The firm 
is also engaged in the ice business, the largest in any city in the 
state outside of Milwaukee. This great plant is found at the foot 
of Hancock street, on the shore of Lake Mendota,and the main 
office is at 105 East Washington avenue. But James Conklin had 
a high and honorable standing in the social and political world. He 
ably represented the capital city district in the state senate in 1885 
and 1887 when important matters were before it for consideration. 
He was elected for the occasion and his work was decidedly effec- 
tive. He was mayor of the city in 1881, 1882, and 1883, and again 
in 1887. In 1882, when he was at the head of the city govern- 
ment our efficient water-works were established; and it was- 
greatly owing to his constant work and influence that the handsome 
site was secured, — a whole block, now a splendid park,— for a trifle- 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 195 

over $-1,000, each lot being- now worth that sum. He represented 
the fifth ward, when it was first formed, in 1876, and again in 1877 ' r 
and was a member of the board of water commissioners from 1884 
to 1889 inclusive. As a member of the board of education he 
served in 1873, 1881-83, 1893,and 1891-98. In February, 1894, he 
was appointed postmaster of Madison, and a grand ovation followed. 
He served the full term, — four years. The large and handsome 
business block on the corner of State and Johnson streets was built 
by Air. Conklin. He was one of the organizors of the Bank of Wis- 
consin, Madison, and a director of it for many years. Mr. Conklin 
was married in Madison, January 29, 1853, to Miss Mary Egan, 
and for almost half a century their home was a happy one. The 
faithful husband died February 28, 1900, and his loving helpmate 
followed eighteen months later. There were born to them seven 
children — James E., Margaret E., Matthew H., Kate, Mary Jane, 
Lucy and John W. Four are living. The sons have conducted 
the business since the death of their father. 

Edward J. Conlin is a native of the 'town of York and resides 
Upon the farm which was his birth-place, where he engages in gen- 
eral farming. His parents, Bartholemew and Catherine (Bolger) 
Conlin, were born in Ireland, educated there and came, at different 
times, to the United States. Bartholemew Conlin was born in 
1820 and embarked for America in 1848. He obtained a large farm 
of unimproved land, improved it himself and established a com- 
fortable home. He married Miss Catharine Bolger, who came to 
Dodge county with her parents in 1848. Nine children were born 
to them ; the oldest died in infancy ; the others are Bridget, Thomas,. 
Mary, James, Michael. Theresa, Edward and Banty. Mrs. Conlin 
died in 1871 and her husband in 1894. The family is prominent in 
the Roman Catholic church. Air. Conlin was a Democrat, as is his 
son, Edward J. The latter was born in the town of York, Feb. 
22, 1867, attended the district school and the Columbus high school 
and pursued a course of study at the Northwestern Business Col- 
lege. He takes an active interest in politics and has served three 
years as town clerk and is now chairman of the town board. He 
has a pleasant home on the farm which his father labored to clear 
and has improved and acided to it many modern conveniences. He 
is a member of the Roman Catholic church. 

Hiram Conry, of Sun Prairie, comes of good fighting stock. His 
maternal grandfather took part in the American Revolution ; and 
his father, although Irish by birth, and fifty-one years old at the 
breaking out of the Civil War, enlisted in the Eleventh Wisconsin 



196 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

Infantry, 1861, and served during- the war. The subject of this 
sketch also enlisted as private in Company F, Sixteenth Wisconsin 
Regiment, December, 1863 and served until the close of the war, 
taking part in the Atlantic campaign, the famous march from At- 
lanta to the sea and also the march from Buford to Washington, 
D. C. His brother Benjamin also enlisted with the first three- 
months men, in Company A, Thirty-third Illinois Volunteers Infan- 
try, and reenlisting, served during the war. Thomas Conry, 
father of Hiram, married Miss Jane Moretts, a native of New York, 
born in 1800; they came to Dane in 1856. He was at that time a 
Democrat, but the stirring events of the years soon following 
changed his political attitude, and he cast in his fortunes with the 
newly organized Republican party; although for many years a 
resident of Dane, both Mr. Conry and his wife died in Chippewa 
county. 

Hiram Conry was born in Franklin county, Vt., June 25, 1836, 
and received his education in the common schools of his native state ; 
lie came to Wisconsin with his parents in 1856 then a young man 
of twenty. With the exception of the years that he served in the 
war, a year and a half in Evansville and a year and a half in the 
town of Burk, his residence has been in the town and village of 
Sun Prairie ; he owns seventeen acres about his home, and eleven 
acres within the corporation of the village. In politics, Mr. Conry 
is a Prohibitionist and is an attendant of the Methodist Episcopal 
church. The family into which Mr. Conry married, — July 3. 1859, 
— is equally noted for the characteristics of courage and patriotism. 
Miss Eunice Churchill, born in Niagara county, N. Y., Oct. 23, 
1839, daughter of Enos and Nancy (Searls) Churchill, had ancestors 
on her father's side who came over in the Mayflower, and she is 
also a direct descendant of Gov. Bradford of the Massachusetts 
colony. The paternal great grandfather of Mrs. Conry also served 
in the Revolution ; from him the genealogical line is, a son, Seth 
Churchill, who married Eunice Dergee ; his son, Enos Churchill, 
born in Vermont 1797, married Nancy Searls, born in Massachu- 
setts 1797, and removed to New York; they came to Dane in 1814 
settled on a farm in Sun Prairie, and here died, he in 1891 and his 
wife in 1885. He was a carpenter by trade, a Whig in early life 
and later a Republican ; he and his wife were spiritualists. To Mr. 
and Mrs. Hiram Conry have been born seven children, all living, 
Myron W. ; Mary; Mervin ; Elmer; Oscar; Ida; Lena. 

William Cook, a prosperous farmer of the town of Springdale, 
was born on a farm near where he now resides, July 20, 1852. He 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 197 

is the son and only surviving child of John and Margaret (Ingles) 
Cook, an older sister, Margaret, having died when sixteen years 
of age. The parents were both natives of Scotland, the father 
having been born in the Highlands of that country and the mother 
in the city of Edinburgh. They were married in their native land 
and came to America in 1850. The father gave his attention to 
farming, followed that occupation in Scotland, and upon coming to 
Dane county took up eighty acres of government land in the town 
of Springdale, which has been the place of residence of the family 
during all the succeeding years. The father died on July 30, 1865, 
at the age of thirty-seven, the result of being kicked by a horse, 
and the mother passed away in 1892, aged eighty years. The sub- 
ject of this review was reared in Springdale and received his edu- 
cation in the public schools of that town. After the death of his 
father, his mother rented the farm out for three years, and then the 
son, although but sixteen years old, purchased a team and took 
upon himself the responsibility of cultivating and managing the 
place. Success attended his efforts from the first, and he has never 
regretted the fate that cast his lines with the basic industry of 
agriculture. He now owns a finely-improved farm, comprising 
two hundred and eighty acres, and aside from the general farming 
of the same he gives a great deal of attention to stock-raising and 
dairying. In the latter industry he has his own separator and ships 
the cream. He is also engaged in the business of buying and ship- 
ping grain at Riley's Station, and in this as in all of his other ven- 
tures he has won pronounced success. Mr. Cook was married. 
August 18, 1871, to Miss Nancy Jane McCaughey, who was born 
on the place where she and her husband now reside. Her parents 
were James and Maria McCaughey, both of whom were natives of 
Ireland. They migrated to America and located in the town of 
Springdale, Dane county, at an early date, and there spent the re- 
mainder of their lives, the father dying in 1852 and the mother in 
1886. Mr. and Mrs. Cook are the parents of eight children, the 
names and more particular mention of whom follow : Sarah J. 
married Martin F. Krueger and resides in the city of Madison ; 
John remains at home with his parents ; Maggie married William 
Salmon of the town of Springdale, and is deceased ; James is in the 
grain-buying business with his father at Riley's Station ; and Wil- 
liam, Agnes, Marie and Marjorie are at home. .Mr. Cook is a Re- 
publican in his political affiliations and has served as a member of 
the school board. Fraternally he has a membership in the lodge 
of the Modern Woodmen of America at Verona. 



198 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

Col. Charles F. Cooley is a descendant of an old New England 
family. The family records go back four generations to Alex- 
ander Cooley, a native of Connecticut. He removed from Con- 
necticut to New York in the early part of the nineteenth century, 
was a volunteer in the War of 1812 and was severely wounded in 
the battle of Sackett's Harbor. His son, Alexander Cooley, Jr., 
was also a native of Connecticut and took part with his father in 
the war. He was engaged in both farming and the lumber busi- 
ness, first in Lewis, then in Livingston and finally in Chautauqua 
county. He moved to Villenova in the last named county in 1822, 
and made his home there the remainder of his life. He was en- 
gaged in farming and in the lumber business with his brothers, 
Robert and Harry, during their residence in Lewis county, and the 
whole family was included in the subsequent removals. They built 
their own log houses, spun and wove the cloth for their garments 
and furnished their larder by their skill in the huntsman's craft. 
All of the experiences of pioneer life, which their descendants re- 
peated in the forest wildernesses of Wisconsin, were theirs. Alex- 
ander, Jr.. married Miss Lydia Soloman, a native of Lewis county, 
who reared a family of five sons and three daughters. She spent 
her last years at the home of one of her sons in Chautauqua county. 
Warren Cooley, the son of Alexander, Jr., and father of the sub- 
ject of this sketch, was born in Livingston county, N. Y., May 16, 
1822. His early education was of the primitive sort that was ob- 
tainable in the backwoods schools seventy-five years ago, but fol- 
lowing the death of his father in 1837. he made his home with a 
family of Friends, and later went with them to live in Utica, where 
his educational opportunities were greatly improved. He began 
the carving out of his own fortunes two years before he became of 
age, entering first into the employ of a general merchant. Shortly 
afterward he went into the lumber business, subsequently going 
into mercantile business for himself in Utica, in 1855. Not long 
after he moved to Wisconsin, locating in Columbia county, first 
near Fort Winnebago, and afterward near Lodi, following agricul- 
tural pursuits, until 1885, when he moved to Madison and there 
■spent the remainder of his life. He was married, November 5, 1844, 
to Miss Harriet Isabella Martin, the daughter of Andrew and May 
(Wilkins) Martin, all natives of England. From this union five 
•children were born ; Charles F., the subject of this sketch ; An- 
toinette, Edward, Oscar and Minerva H. Mrs. Cooley died in 
August, 1877. Charles F. Cooley began his school life in Utica 
N. Y.. and received his later instruction in the schools of Portage, 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 199 

Columbia county. He worked on the farm in the intervening va- 
cations of his boyhood, until the stirring events of 1860 and 1861 
brought him to a premature manhood, and he enlisted in Company 
C, Twenty-third Regiment of Wisconsin Volunteers. After one 
year's service he was obliged to return home on account of ill 
health and received his discharge, being at that time only sixteen 
years of age. After recuperating by a short rest he again entered 
the army in Company A, Thirty-seventh Infantry, and remained 
in active service until the close of the war. He belonged to the 
Army of the Potomac, and took part in the battle of Petersburg, 
June, 1864, and witnessed the mine explosion on July 30, of the 
same year. The hardships of army life, however, proved too great 
for a boy of his years and he left the army at the close of hostili- 
ties, somewhat shattered in health, and sought to repair it by a resi- 
dence of some years in the bracing climate of what is now North 
Dakota. While there he was in the employ of the Northern Pacific 
Railroad. His residence as a citizen of Dane county began in 1872 
when he established himself in the city of Madison as a dealer in 
fuel, and from a small beginning, gradually built up his, present 
flourishing business. Colonel Cooley is a Republican and a mem- 
ber of the G. A. R. but has never- occupied himself actively in poli- 
tical affairs. He was married May 12, 1872, to Miss Julia Frederick- 
son, a native of Dane county, and a daughter of Peter and Julia 
Frederickson. They have six children, Harry, Alexander, Fanny, 
Ida, Sarah and Charley. Colonel Cooley received his military 
title and commission as a member of the staff of General Rusk. 

Dayton Benjamin Coon carries on a successful general farming 
business on the old Coon farm in the town of Utica, Dane county, 
where he was born October 1. 1851, son of Captain Wm. Henry 
Harrison Coon and Harnia (Burdick) Coon. The Coon family 
were originally named Macoon and came to Rhode Island from 
Aberdeenshire, Scotland. John Macoon with seventy-five other 
men obtained a large tract of land in Rhode Island in 1661, and was 
made president of Westerly village. This was the first community 
of Seventh-day Baptists in the United States. The name became 
corrupted to Coon in the last century and Joshua Coon, a descend- 
ant of that family left Rhode Island for New York and settled in 
Brookfield, Madison county, where he became prominent and suc- 
cessful. Joshua Coon, generaly known as Squire Coon, married a 
Miss Brown, daughter of a Baptist minister and they were active 
in the work of the Baptist church, the first one in the vicinity of 
Brookfield. Their crrandson, W. H. H. Coon, was born in Brook- 



200 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

field in 1818, was educated there and was a captain in the state 
militia. In 1846, he and his wife came to Wisconsin and purchased 
four hundred acres of land in the town of Utica which was their 
home during the remainder of their lives. Captain Coon died in 
1898 and his wife in 1900. Both captain and Mrs. Coon were en- 
thusiastic members of the Baptist church and were instrumental 
in the organization of the church of Seventh-day Baptists in Utica 
in January, 1850. Captain Coon was a Republican, served as 
chairman of the town board and as postmaster at Utica and also 
at one time owned a store at Utica. Five children were born to 
Captain and Mrs. Coon. Fred W., the oldest son, a banker and to- 
bacco dealer at Edgerton, married Miss Clara McDougal and they 
have five children ; Grace, Minerva, Winifred, Helen and Warren ; 
Dayton Benj. is the scond son; Ann the oldest daughter, is de- 
ceased; the next daughter married A. B. Stillman of Kansas and 
they have seven children; — Claude, Clara L.. Ruth A., Henry N., 
James I., Rose H. and Dayton Theodore ; James H., the secretary 
of the cooperative creamery association of Utica, is a merchant in 
Utica and married Rose Kelly of Salem, W. Va. Dayton B. Coon 
married in December, 1786, Miss Mary A. Potter, who was born 
in Albion in 1855, daughter of Stephen Potter. Three children 
blessed the marriage. — Elan Potter who married Mabel E. Wheeler 
(deceased), is a graduate from the University of Wisconsin and re- 
sides with his parents ; Phelps Lester attends Milton College and 
Rachael Ann attends the home schools. 

John Coughin, one of the substantial citizens and representative 
farmers of Cottage Grove township, Dane county, was born in that 
township, February, 12, 1860, and is a son of John and Bridget 
(Roach) Couglin, both of whom were native of Ireland. The par- 
ents came to Dane county about the year 1852, having previously 
resided in Milwaukee, where the father was a drayman for a num- 
ber of years. He removed to Dane county, as did also three of his 
brothers and one brother-in-law, all taking up their residence on 
adjoining farms in Cottage Grove township. There were no rail- 
roads in this section at the time, and the trip from Milwaukee was 
made with teams and wagons. Mr. Coughlin reclaimed his farm 
from the forest and became one of the representative citizens of his 
township, where both he and his wife continued to reside until their 
death. They became the parents of eight children, namely: Mar- 
garet, who is now the wife of John Galvin, of Cottage Grove town- 
ship ; Mary, who is the wife of Mr. Ryan, of the city of Chicago; 
Bridget Ann, who is the wife of Michael Conlin, of Madison ; Eliza- 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 201 

beth, who is the wife of Charles H. McCloskey, of M adison ; John, 
who is the immediate subject of this sketch; Kate, who is the wife 
of John Lewis, of Rockford, Illinois; Ella, who is deceased; and 
Agnes, who is the wife of Francis Mullen, of Marshall, Wisconsin. 
John Coughlin, the immediate subject of this review, was reared on 
the home farm, early beginning to contribute to its development 
and cultivation and remaining with his parents until their death. 
His educational opportunities were those afforded in the district 
school, which he attended during the winter months, devoting his 
time to the work of the farm during the summer seasons. Upon 
leaving the home farm he purchased his present place, which he 
has developed into one of the valuable farms of the county, the 
land being under effective cultivation, while the buildings are of 
substantial and attractive order, making the place one of the model 
farms of this section. Mr. Coughlin has been indefatigable in his 
efforts and has won a worthy success, while his able and devoted 
coadjutor has been his faithful wife, who has aided most effectively 
in gaining the independence and prosperity which they now enjoy. 
Both are communicants of the Catholic church, and he is a stanch 
Democrat in his political adherency,, having never been a seeker of 
office but having served two years as clerk of his school district. 
On January 19, 1887, Mr. Coughlin was united in marriage to Miss 
Mary E. Coffey, daughter of William and Susan Ann (Reynolds) 
Coffey, of Cottage Grove township, and they became the parents 
of five children, namely : John William, born November 2, 1887 ; 
Bridget Irene, born October 11, 1889; William Francis, born Febru- 
ary 23, 1891 ; Walter Daniel, who was born August 7, 1891, and died 
July 11, 1898 and Stanley Walter, born February 28, 1906. 

William Cox is now living retired in the city of Madison, which 
place was the scene of his active career, and where many buildings 
stand as monuments to his mechanical ability. He was born near 
the city of Bath, Somersetshire, England, on March 13 1830, and 
is one of six children born to Robert and Bethsheba (Fountain) 
Cox, who were also natives of the mother country. Of the six 
children mentioned but two are now living — the subject of this 
review, and his brother Robert, who is living retired in the city of 
Milwaukee. William Cox was educated in private schools in his 
native land and was fifteen years old when with his parents he mi- 
grated to America. The family settled in the state of New York r 
on the St. Lawrence river, and resided there two years, after which 
a removal was made to Ohio, where the family took up a residence 
near Akron and remained two vears. Another removal was then 



202 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

made, this time to Cleveland, where the father operated as a con- 
tractor. Duing two years of the residence in Ohio the subject of 
this review worked as a carriage maker, and he also acted as over- 
seer of his father's teams for a number of years. About 1859 the 
family removed to Wisconsin, and the father rented a hotel in the 
city of Madison and conducted the same until his death, which 
occurred during the Civil War period, and the mother passed away 
five years later. At one time twenty-one printers who were em- 
ployed in the State Journal office boarded with Mr. Cox. The sub- 
ject of this review started his independent career at the age of 
eighteen years, and his first venture was in buying timber which he 
cut into cord wood and sold the same in the city of Cleveland. 
After the removal of the family to Wisconsin he began carpenter- 
ing in the city of Madison, and among the buildings upon which he 
worked are the First National bank, the Park Hotel, the postoffice, 
the Vilas House, and in fact all the principal buildings in the city 
erected prior to 1902, when he retired. During this time he bought 
a lot and erected a beautiful home on Hancock street. He then 
sold this residence and built a house on East Dayton street which he 
sold later and then went to Nebraska. But the west had no charms 
for him, and after a residence of five months in the Tree Planters' 
state he was glad to get back to Wisconsin. He then erected the 
home where, with his son-in-law, he now resides, and where he ex- 
pects to reside the remainder of his days. Mr. Cox was married 
on September 11, 1864, and the lady of his choice was Miss Rachel 
Halverson, born in Norway, December 25, 1844. daughter of 
Halvor Halvorson. Two children were born to this union : Em- 
manuel Robert married Minnie Randolph and is deceased — his 
widow resides in Black River Falls, Wis. ; Bathsheba Matilda mar- 
ried Edward Goodman and is the mother of three children — Rus- 
sell, Edward and an infant daughter. Mr. Goodman is in the em- 
ploy Fuller & Johnson. The subject of this review is a Republi- 
can in his political affiliations and his religious faith is that of the 
Methodist church. 

Bartholomew Coyne, deceased, was for nearly forty years one of 
the most highly respected citizens of Madison, and his unimpeach- 
able character was attested by continued employment in responsible 
capacities with various financial and other institutions where hon- 
esty and trustworthiness were in demand. Mr. Coyne was a na- 
tive of the Emerald Isle and was born in Sligo county, Ireland, 
on September 31, 1818, his parents being John and Winifred (Cain) 
Coyne, both of whom were also of Irish birth. The father and 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 203 

mother lived out their alloted years and died on their native soil. 
The subject of this sketch received his education in Ireland and as 
a young man removed to England, where he resided several years. 
He was married on November 16. 1848, to Miss Mary Anderson, a 
native of the city of London, where the marriage occurred, his wife 
being the daughter of Thomas and Mary (Hunt) Anderson, both 
of whom were English-born. In 1853 Mr. and Mrs. Coyne sailed 
for America, and, landing in Xew York, they remained in that city 
for a short time and then removed to Pennsylvania, where they re- 
sided until 1856. In the year mentioned they journeyed westward 
and took up their residence in the city of Madison. Wis., the trip 
hither having been made by the way of Chicago. Mr. Coyne con- 
tinued to reside in the capital city the remainder of his life, dying 
on August 8, 1891, and his good wife still resides at the family 
residence, No. 131 N. Bruen street. Mr. Coyne gave an unswerv- 
ing allegiance to the principles and policies of the Democratic 
party, and in religious affairs he was loyal to the Catholic faith. 
Realizing the advantages of an education, it was the constant pur- 
pose of himself and wife to equip their children in this regard, and 
they obtained their reward in seeing their sons and daughters grow 
into useful and competent men and women. Eight of these children 
are living. The eldest daughter is Mrs. Cossiboin: Thomas P. 
served four terms as clerk of Dane county, and was at the time of 
his death, the weigh-master of the city of Madison. He was killed 
in an accident, in Madison, June 19, 1906. while attending the 
funeral of a friend. James resides in Seattle, W ash. ; Mary is a 
teacher in the public schools of Eau Claire, a position which she has 
held for more than fifteen years. Elizabeth resides in Superior, 
Wis., as does also her sister, Mrs. Wolfden ; Kate is the wife of 
Mr. Frauley ; Joseph resides with his mother, and William is a 
practicing attorney of Madison. 

William Crapp is recognized as one of the progressive farmers of 
the town of Oregon, and his success has been achieved entirely by 
his own efforts and the counsel and economy of his. faithful wife. 
He was born in England, September 11. 1857, being one of the six- 
teen children of Thomas and Elizabeth (Keam) Crapp, both natives 
of England, where the mother still resides, the father being de- 
ceased. The parents of our subject were among the unfortunate 
many in the mother country who. being poor, have but a slim 
chance of bettering their condition, and the father earned the liv- 
ing for himself and family by working by the month or day. Wil- 
liam Crapp received his education in the schools of his native land, 



204 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

and realizing' the few opportunities that present themselves in Eng- 
land, in 1884 he and his young wife set sail for America. First lo- 
cating in Canada he remained in the dominion three years, and then 
came to Dane county, Wis., by the way of Chicago. He located 
in the town of Dunn, where he worked as a farm hand for a time, 
and then purchased forty acres of land in the town of Fitchburg. 
near Lakeview, upon which he resided until 1895. He then sold 
his farm and purchased another, comprising one hundred and twenty 
acres of land, a large part of which was improved, in the town of 
Fitchburg. where he has resided ever since. There he has given 
his entire attention to the tilling of the soil, combined of course 
with the kindred occupation of stock-raising. In the latter line he- 
has devoted his efforts mainly to the breeding of Shropshire sheep,, 
in which he has been very successful, and he also follows dairying" 
to a considerable extent. Since purchasing the farm on which he 
resides he has added extensively to its improvements, mainly in 
the matter of buildings, and in the erection of these he has spent 
about $4,000, building a fine residence, a barn, granary, etc. Mr. 
Crapp is independent in his political views, and gives his support to- 
men and measures as they appeal to his ideas of right and expe- 
diency, uninfluenced by the fetich of a party name. He was mar- 
ried on June 16, 1882, to Miss Jane Hooper, daughter of John and 
Ann Hooper, of Saint Neots, England, where the father follows the 
occupation of a farmer. Mr. and Mrs. Crapp were members of the 
Church of England before coming to America, but they now are 
members of the Presbyterian denomination. They have no chil- 
dren. 

Charles Cripps, a retired farmer of the town of York, came to 
Dane county with his parents when he was a young lad and has 
always resided in the locality. William and Hannah (Gregory) 
Cripps, his parents, were both natives of England, were married 
there and after some years came, in 1840, to the United States. 
They located in York and made it their permanent home. Thir- 
teen children -were born to them, of whom six are living. Mr. 
Cripps died at the advanced age of eighty-four years after an ac- 
tive and useful life. He was one of the pioneers of the new com- 
munity and helped to lay the foundations of its prosperity. 
Charles Cripps was born in England August 19, 1826, attended 
school in England and in Dane county and aided his father in the 
establishment of the new home. He has seen the development 
of the district from a sparsely-settled, wild country, abounding in 
game, to its present condition of prosperity, and shared in the labor 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 205 

incident to its improvement and also in the rewards. He owns 
a fine farm of one hundred and seventy-nine acres, which until 
recent years he managed himself. He has now given it into the 
care of his son, Charles H. Cripps. Mr. Cripps is a Republican but 
has occupied himself with the business of his farm rather than in 
taking an active part in politics. In March, 1856. he married Miss 
Abigail Irons, who was born in Otsego county, N. Y., December 19, 
1825, daughter of Samuel and Betsy (Weaver) Irons, who came to 
Dane county about 1840 and lived there the remainder of their 
lives. One daughter was born to Mr. and Mrs. Cripps, Imogene, 
who died in 1885. Charles H. Cripps, their adopted son, married 
Miss Hannah Austin of Elba, Wis., February 22. 1894. They 
have one daughter, Imogene. born September 9, 1898. 

George A. Cripps is a well-known and successful farmer of York 
township. With his brother, Frederick H.. he owns one hundred 
and sixty acres of farm property upon which they carry on a gen- 
eral farming and stock-raising business. Fine Hereford cattle are 
raised upon this farm as well as other varieties of stock. Their 
father, William W. Cripps, was born in England in December, 1828, 
was educated in England and came to the United States in 1855. 
He obtained a farm in the town of York and set about clearing and 
improving it. Mrs. Cripps, nee Emma Smith, was born in England 
April 22, 1838, and married in England to William Miles, with whom 
she came to America and lived in Columbia county, Wis. She was 
soon left a widow and Mr. Cripps became her second husband. 
Eight children were born to them, of whom six are living. Mrs. 
Cripps was a member of the church of England. For the remain- 
der of his life Mr. Cripps operated the farm in York and died there 
in 1895. He was Republican and active in local affairs. George 
A. Cripps was born in Hamden, Columbia county, Wis., November 
18, 18G4, attended school in the town of York and assisted his 
father on the farm. He still lives at the old home arfd by the en- 
ergy of father and sons it has been transformed from wild land to 
a complete and well-equipped farm. Mr. Cripps is, like his father, 
a Republican in his political affiliations but is not active in politi- 
cal life or an office-holder. April 7, 1897, he married Miss Anna 
Moutz. daughter of John and Victoria (Moutz) Wolfer of Colum- 
bus, Wis., who was born in Germany, August 22, 1873. Mr. and 
Mrs. Cripps have one son and one daughter; Reuben John, born 
June 1, 1904 and Emma Victoria, born April 17. 1900. Mrs. Cripps 
is a devoted member of the German Catholic church. 

Charles Giles Crosse, M. D., is one of the representative members 



206 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

of the medical profession in Dane county, and he has been en- 
gaged in the practice of his profession in Sun Prairie for the long 
period of forty-five years, also being identified with the drug busi- 
ness during this time, so that he is entitled to consideration as one 
of the pioneer physicians and business men of this attractive and 
thriving village. Dr. Crosse was born in Cortland county, New 
York, April 26, 1828, and is a son of Daniel and Mercy (Fish) Crosse,, 
the former of whom was born in New Hampshire, of stanch old 
colonial stock in New England, while the latter was born in 
Broome county, New York, having been a distant relative of 
Hamilton Fish, who was secretary of war during the administra- 
tion of General Grant. Joseph Crosse, grandfather of the doctor, 
served seven years as a soldier in the Continental line during the 
War of the Revolution. Daniel Crosse took up his residence in 
Chautauqua county, New York, in an early day. later removing to> 
Cortland county, whence he removed with his family to Ohio in the 
thirties, settling in Lake county. He remained a resident of the 
Buckeye state until 1846, when he removed to the new state of 
Wisconsin, where he passed the remainder of his life, his death oc- 
curring in Whitewater, Walworth county, in 1882, while his wife- 
there passed away in 1878. In early life he followed the black- 
smith trade, but he later became a clergyman of the Methodist 
Episcopal church, laboring thereafter in the vineyard of the divine 
Master until he was summoned to the life eternal. He was a man 
of noble character and strong mentality and was numbered among 
the pioneer ministers of his church in Wisconsin. He was origin- 
ally a Democrat in politics, but united with the Republican party 
at the time of its organization, ever afterward remaining a stanch 
advocate of its principles. Of his twelve children ten lived to at- 
tain maturity and of the number five are living at the time of the 
compilation of this sketch, in 1905. Dr. Charles G. Crosse secured 
his earlier educational training in the common schools of Ohio, 
after which he attended an academy at Mentor, Lake county, that 
state,' finally entering the Western Reserve College, where he com- 
pleted his more purely literary education. In 1853 he was gradu- 
ated from the Cincinnati Medical College, from which he received 
his well earned degree of Doctor of Medicine, and he then located in 
Amherst. Lorain county, Ohio, where he was engaged in the prac- 
tice of his profession until 1854, when he came to Wisconsin and 
located "in Newport, Sauk county, where he continued in practice 
until the 1st of January, 1860, when he took up his residence in 
Sun Prairie, where he has since maintained his home and where- 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 207 

he has long held high prestige and popularity in his profession, con- 
trolling a large and representative practice. In 1865 he became as- 
sistant surgeon in the Fiftieth Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry, serv- 
ing" about one year. Soon after locating in Sun Prairie Dr. Crosse es- 
tablished a drug store there, and with this line of enterprise he has 
ever since been identified, having now a well equipped and attrac- 
tive establishment. Since 1880 his son, Dr. Theodore P., has been 
associated with him in the business, as well as in the practice of his 
profession, under the firm name of Crosse & Crosse. Dr. Crosse 
owns a valuable farm, lying contiguous to the village of Sun Prairie 
and is also the owner of a fine farm in Minnesota. He is unswerv- 
ing in his allegiance to the Republican party, with which he has 
has been aligned from the time of its organization, having cast 
his first Republican vote for General John C. Fremont, first presi- 
dential candidate of the "grand old party." Dr. Crosse was presi- 
dent of the village of Sun Prairie for three years and a member of 
the municipal board of trustees a similar period, while for five years 
he was supervisor of Sun Prairie village, and in 1880 was a member 
of the assembly of the state legislature. The doctor was one of 
the charter members of Sun Prairie Lodge, No. 143, Free and Ac- 
cepted Masons, and was its worshipful master for the first fifteen 
years ; he was also affiliated with the local organization of the In- 
dependent Order of Odd Fellows until its discontinuance. Septem- 
ber 26, 1853, Dr. Crosse was united in marriage to Miss Rowena 
Smith, who was born in Lorain county, Ohio, July 17, 1830, being 
a daughter of David and Fannie (Barnes) Smith, both of whom 
died in Ohio, Mrs. Crosse being the only survivor of their nine 
children. Dr. and Mrs. Crosse became the parents of three chil- 
dren : Theodore P. is individually mentioned in this history ;: 
Charles Sumner Crosse is the publisher of a paper (Republican), 
in Stoughton, Wisconsin ; and Edith, who was graduated from the 
University of Wisconsin, as a member of the class of 1880, was 
united in marriage, in 1883, to Edward Gleason, and her death oc- 
curred in 1884. 

Charles S. Crosse, editor and proprietor of the Stoughton Hub, 
was born near Kilbourn, Columbia county, Wis., March 22, 1858, 
a son of Charles G. and Rowena (Smith) Crosse. His paternal 
grandparents were David and Mercy Crosse of Cortland county. 
N. Y., and the maternal grandparents, David and Fanny Smith. 
were born in Amherst,' Lorain county, Ohio. Charles G. Crosse, 
the father of the subject of this sketch, was born in Cortland 
county. N. Y., April 26, 1828, and first came to Wisconsin in 1854. 



208 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

locating at Hart Prairie, Walworth county. Wis. Subsequently 
he removed to Sauk county and in 1860 settled at Sun Prairie, 
which place has since been his home. He is a well known physi- 
cian whose life is recorded at some length in the preceding sketch. 
Charles S. Crosse passed his boyhood days in Sun Prairie and re- 
ceived what educational advantages the school of that village of- 
fered. In 1877 he started the Sun Prairie Countryman, a weekly 
publication, and conducted it until 1889. That year he sold out his 
interest and went to Little Falls, Minn., where he was the chief in- 
fluence in the inception of the Little Falls Herald. His residence in 
the village continued only nine months, however, his connection 
with the paper being severed in the fall of the same year. He 
then came to Stoughton, where he purchased a controlling inter- 
est in the Stoughton Hub, which weekly publication he has since 
been successfully conducting. On June 2o, 1884, Mr. Crosse was 
united in marriage to Clara Bell, daughter of Orin and Rosina 
Washburn of Sun Prairie and by this union is the father of two 
sons. — Charles W., a cadet in the U. S. naval academy at Anna- 
polis, and Giles W. Politically Mr. Crosse is influently identi- 
fied with the Stalwart wing of the Republican party. He is a mem- 
ber of Kegonsa lodge, No. 13, Free and Accepted Masons. 

Theodore Parker Crosse, M. D., who is engaged in the prac- 
tice of his profession in Sun Prairie, as a member of the firm of 
Crosse & Crosse, also conducting a successful drug business, is a 
son of that honored pioneer physician, Dr. Charles G. Crosse, with 
whom he is associated under the title just noted and of whom 
specific mention is made on other pages of this work, so that a re- 
capitulation of the family history is not demanded in the present 
connection. The doctor was born in Newport, Sauk county, Wis- 
consin, on October 3, 1855, and January 1, I860, his parents moved 
to Sun Prairie, where he has ever since made his home. He duly 
availed himself of the advantages afforded in the local schools, 
and then passed two years as a student in the University of Wiscon- 
sin. In 1876 he was matriculated in that celebrated institution. 
Rush Medical College, in the city of Chicago, where he completed 
the prescribed course and was graduated as a member of the class 
of 1879, with the degree of Doctor of Medicine. He had previously 
had most effective professional preceptorage under the direction of 
his father. August 1, 1880, Dr. Crosse became associated with 
his father in the practice of his profession in Sun Prairie and also 
in the drug business, and he has well upheld the prestige of the 
honored name which he bears, both as a physician and surgeon 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 209 

and as a loyal and public-spirited citizen. He is one of the leaders 
in the local ranks of the Republican party, and has been supervisor 
of this village for many years, while has has also served as village 
president and been incumbent of other offices. He is a member 
of the state and county medical societies, and is affiliated with Sun 
Prairie lodge, No. 143, Free and Accepted Masons.. April 5, 1882, 
Dr. Crosse was united in marriage to Miss Ella Mary Rood, who 
was born in the state of Pennsylvania, being a daughter of Henry 
Rood, who was a resident of Sun Prairie at the time of his death. 
Dr. and Mrs. Crosse became the parents of three children : 
Edith is a member of the class of 1906 in the University of Wiscon- 
sin; Frank died in 1904; and Theodore Giles is attending the public 
schools of Sun Prairie. 

John Culb, a prosperous farmer of the town of Oregon, was born 
in the province of Bavaria, Germany, on September 11, 1848, and is 
one of three children born to Henry and Elizabeth (Brown) Culb 
both of whom are also natives of the Fatherland, where the father 
served six years in the German army. John Culb was reared to 
manhood in Bavaria and his education was limited to three months 
during which he attended a public school there. He was the only 
one of the family who ever came to America, and in 1867, when 
but nineteen years old, he bade adieu to home and kinsfolk and 
sailed for the land of better opportunities. Coming directly to Dane 
county, Wis., he worked as a farm hand for the first eight years, 
and then began independent farming by renting land, which method 
he followed until 1890. During the latter year he moved to the 
village of Oregon and purchased a house and three lots near the 
Northwestern Railway station, where he resided four years 
and which property he still owns. In 1894 he purchased in the 
valley of Oregon, the homestead where he now resides, compris- 
ing eight acres, and in 1905 bought another house with four and 
three-fourths acres of land adjoining the place of his residence. 
His career has been a successful one, but it appears the more remark- 
able when it is known that he came to America unable to speak 
or comprehend a word of the English language, and with a decid- 
edly limited education in his native tongue. But he applied himself 
assiduously, not only his work but to books and periodicals, 
and by a constant practice of this and he has not only succeeded 
in a material sense but he is as well posted on current topics as the 
average man in any community. In politics he maintains an inde- 
pendent attitude and gives his support to men and measures that 
meet the approval of his better judgment regardless of party label 
14 — iii 



210 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

or partisan prejudice. He and his wife are consistent members of 
the Lutheran church. Mr. Culb was married on May 1, 1876, the 
lady of his choice being Miss Catherine Goerges, a native of Mil- 
waukee, where she was born on July 7, 1853. She is one of twelve 
children born to Henry and Catherine Goerges, who now reside 
at Middleton, Wis. Ten children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. 
Culb : Lucy Elizabeth married Matthew Parr and resides in Be- 
loit, Wis. ; Anna is employed in the city of Madison ; Lena resides 
with an uncle in Minnesota ; Henry George is at home ; Mary mar- 
ried William Ward and resides in Brooklyn, Wis. ; and Frederick, 
John, Janette, Edward and Earnest Mark reside at home. 

J. H. Cunningham, D. D. S., practicing his profession in Madi- 
son, was born in the same city on Jan. 3, 1865. He was one of 
twelve children of Patrick and Julia Cunningham, both born in 
Ireland, the former in 182-1 and the latter ten years later. The 
father served for a short time in the Union army during the Civil 
War. Two years after his marriage in New York in 1855, he 
brought his wife to Madison. The seven surviving members of the 
family are David W., Thomas J., Hanna V., J. H., the subject of 
this sketch, Mrs. Kelly of Chicago, Mrs. A. O. Bush of Madison 
and Alice J., now living in California. The father died in his sixty- 
fifth year and the mother in her seventieth. Dr. Cunningham re- 
received his preparatory education in the Madison schools and then 
acquired his technical training in the Chicago college of dentistry, 
being graduated with the class of 1896. Since 1899 he has prac- 
ticed in the city of his nativity, and now enjoys a large and lucra- 
tive business. Politically Dr. Cunningham is affiliated with the 
Democratic party but has never aspired to office. He is a com- 
municant of the Roman Catholic church. On June 29, 1905, Dr. 
Cunningham led to the altar Miss Agnes S. Dempsey, daughter 
of Dennis and Mary Dempsey of the town of Blooming Grove. 
There are no children in the family. In a fraternal way the doctor 
is identified with the Knights of Columbus. 

George W. Currier, deceased, for thirty-four years prominently 
identified with the business, social, educational and religious circles 
Stoughton, was born at Topsham, Orange county, Vt., May 9, 1847. 
He was one of three sons of Edson and Lucinda (Graves) Currier, 
the other two being Charles, deceased, and Frank, now clerk of the 
municipal court of Dane county. In October, 1866, he came to 
Wisconsin, making his home with an uncle in Fulton, Rock county, 
Wis. 3 for about a year. In the fall of 1867 he entered Albion 
academv and alternately taught school and attended classes until 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 211 

he was graduated from that institution in 1872. In September. 
1873, he was elected principal of schools in Stoughton, then a vil- 
lage, and for four successive years was re-elected to the position. 
During the last session of the forty-fourth congress he was ap- 
pointed to a position in the house of representatives and in 1878 
was chosen principal of the Shawano, Wis., schools. The follow- 
ing fall Mr. Currier returned to Stoughton and engaged in the 
general insurance business and continued in it until he was again 
chosen, in 1880. as the head of the Stoughton school system. 
This position he held until 1885, when he re-embarked in the insur- 
ance field, and in that business he continued successfully until his 
death. His political associations were with the Republican party, 
and for twenty years, as the representative of that organization, 
he served as justice of the peace. In 1874 he was the Republican 
nominee for clerk of the court and at one time was editor of the 
Stoughton Courier, a Republican weekly. In March, 1876, Mr. 
Currier was united in marriage to Annette, daughter of Dr. Burrow 
and Caroline A. (Sheldon) Burdick of Edgerton, Wis., and to this 
union were born two children. — Louis Claire and Zoe L., the latter 
now the wife of Ray G. Anderson. Mr. Currier's death occurred 
suddenly on May 14, 1906, a hemorrhage of the brain being the 
cause. He possessed to a high degree the esteem of his fellow citi- 
zens and was ranked as one of the most influential and prominent 
men of Stoughton. Any movement having for its object the bet- 
terment of his home city found hearty co-operation in this most up- 
right man. His sudden demise cast a pall of gloom over the city. 
In no place has his loss been more keenly felt than in the congre- 
gation of the First Methodist Episcopal church, in whose activities 
he had taken a leading part for many years, and among the mem- 
bers of the city library board, of which he was a member. The 
Stoughton Hub remarked editorially of Mr. Currier. 

"Nature used her choicest model of a man when she molded 
George W. Currier. His life was gentle. He demeaned no living 
thing. He was tender, sympathetic, charitable and wondrous 
kind. If he had grievances, he smothered them. Resentment was 
not in him ; indeed, he would condone a grievous wrong unto him- 
self rather than harbor it. A cheery smile, a genial 'Good morn- 
ing,' a warm handclasp were his passports, and he used them every 
day in the year to one and all alike. He was never belligerent. 
He would not and could not antagonize aggressively. His battles 
were always for the right, but he waged them quietly, inoffensively 
and with malice toward none. In nothing was he fanatical, but was 



212 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

always tolerant, clear-headed and broad. Clean, wholesome humor 
had for him a wondrous charm and he was full of it to the brim." 

Charles Albert Curtis, captain United States army, retired, now 
commandant of the University of Wisconsin corps of cadets, whose 
home is at 505 Frances street, Madison, was born at Hallowell, 
Kennebec county, Me., October 4, 1835, a son of Charles Stubbs 
and Amanda Fit'z Allen (Haram) Curtis, the former a native of 
Leeds and the latter of Bath, Me. Captain Curtis is a descendant 
of William Curtis, who arrived in New England on the ship Lyon 
in 1632. His paternal great-grandfather, William, was a first ser- 
geant of a company raised in Hanover, Mass , for the Revolution- 
ary War. His maternal great-grandfather, Abner Curtis, was a 
second lieutenant of another company from Hanover recruited for 
the same conflict, which company also contained Captain Calvin 
Curtis, later a distinguished officer of the Continental army, and 
fourteen others of the name of Curtis, all lineal descendants of 
William, the immigrant of 1632. The committee of correspond- 
ence and safety for 1775 and the years following contained as mem- 
bers Abner, Bezaleel and Lemuel Curtis, three brothers. There 
were few organizations, either military or naval, raised in the town 
of Hanover during that critical period of American history which 
did not contain some member or members of the Curtis family. 
Many of them had served with the English army in the French and 
Indian war. The blockhouse of Hanover, erected in the early days 
to guard against Indian attacks, was called the Curtis garrison, 
and what is now Main street was in the early times known as Cur- 
tis street. The famous Curtis forge of Hanover, — which has been 
in the possession of the family since 1790, — prior to 1852, when the 
government established its own works, made all the anchors for the 
United States navy. On his mother's side Captain Curtis is a di- 
rect descendant of Captain John Haram who commanded in the 
Revolutionary War a company raised in the district of Maine. The 
subject of this sketch received his preparatory education in the Ver- 
mont military college and his collegiate training in Bowdoin col- 
lege, Maine. From July 17, 1861, to April 14, 1862, he served as 
private military instructor to the field officers of the First Maine 
Infantry, then in the Army of the Potomac, and was then commis- 
sioned second lieutenant in Company F, Fifth United States In- 
fantry. The appointment was made by Pres. Abraham Lincoln 
for "extraordinary merit." After receiving his lieutenancy he con- 
tinued service in the same army through the Peninsular campaign 
and up to the battle of Antietam. In 1864 he served with his regi- 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 213 

ment in New Mexico and became a participant in the Indian wars, 
fighting against the Navajos, Apaches, Sioux and Cheyennes from 
1864 to 1869. His promotion to a first lieutenancy was made March 
30, 1864, and to the captaincy September 27, 1865. In December, 
1870, he was placed on the retired list of the army and since that 
time has been continuously engaged as commandant at some in- 
stitution of learning. In 1899 he was appointed a colonel in the 
Wisconsin National Guard by Governor R. M. La Follette. In 
his political affiliations Captain Curtis is a Republican. His reli- 
gious connections are with the Protestant Episcopal church, and he 
is identified with many other organizations, among them the 
Masonic fraternity, the Military Order of the Loyal Legion, the 
Grand Army of the Republic, the Society of the Army of the Poto- 
mac, the Organization of the Sixth Army Corps, , the Sons of the 
American Revolution, Alpha Pi Sigma fraternity and the Society 
of the Scabbard and Blade. On May 17, 1866, Captain Curtis was 
united in marriage to Miss Harriette L. Hughes, daughter of Bar- 
nett and Martha Lane (Clark) Hughes of Ashland, N. H. To this 
union have been born five children, — Wardon A., Laurence A. 
George Hughes (died in infancy), Dorothea Hughes, and Barbara 
Hilton. Captain Curtis has done considerable writing for news- 
papers and periodicals and has had one book published by the Har- 
pers. 

E. R. Curtiss, Madison's veteran photographer was born in 
Southington, Conn., May 6, 1836. His preparatory education was 
such as the common schools furnished and his business training 
was received in Albany, N. Y. In 1859 he came to Madison and es- 
tablished himself in business. His first gallery was in the Badger 
block, which occupied the present 'site of the Bowman block, and 
then moved to the Keyes building. After his removal from the 
Keyes building he conducted his studio in the Klauber block for 
twenty-three years. The next five years the Curtiss galleries were 
in the Fairchild block and in 1888 they were removed to their pres- 
ent location in the Pioneer block. There is probably no photo- 
grapher in the state who has had before his camera so many men 
of note as has Mr. Curtiss. Every member of the legislature 
from the session of 1866 to that of 1905 has been "snapped" by 
him, as have also all the governors and other state officers. The 
negatives are all in Mr. Curtiss' possession. On May 11, 1859 Mr 
Curtiss was united in marriage to Eva A., daughter of John A. and 
Martha Lingenfelter of Fonda, N. Y., and to this union were born 
three children, — Fred W., also engaged in photography in Madison ; 



214 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

May E., wife of H. C. Geiger of Atlanta, Ga. ; and Helen Gertrude, 
wife of Paul M. Keely of Sanford, Fla. Mrs. Curtiss is a member 
of and a substantial worker in the First Methodist Episcopal 
church of Madison. Her husband is a member of the Benevolent 
and Protective Order of Elks. Courteous, genial, kindly, Mr. Cur- 
tiss has won for himself an enviable position in the hearts of his 
fellow citizens ; while his integrity,, square dealing and enterprise 
have placed him in the front rank of Madison business men. 

James William Custer, a prominent farmer of the town of Dunn, 
was born near Madison, Jefferson county, Ind., on March 29, 
1834. His father, Jesse Custer, a descendant of Daniel Boone, was 
born near Lexington, Ky., in April, 1800 ; the mother, nee Nancy 
Spurgen, was born in the same locality in 1804. Of the seven 
children in the family four are still living, — Rual F., Isaac, and 
Daniel Boone, all living in the old home in Indiana, and James Wil- 
liam, a resident of Dunn township, and the subject of this sketch. 
What opportunity James William had for an education came in the 
schools of Kentucky. When eighteen he started life for himself. 
His first employment was cutting saw logs, and it occupied his time 
until he was twenty. Another year was spent in a lumber mill and 
in 1855 he came to Wisconsin, working as a farm hand for a year. 
After five years spent in working land on shares he was enabled to 
buy a piece of land one hundred and sixty acres wholly unim- 
proved ; today this is one of the best equipped and most success- 
ful farms in the vicinity. Politically he is a man of influence in 
the councils of the Republican party and for six terms served as 
town chairman and one term as supervisor. Mr. Custer for the 
past seventeen years has been custodian of the school funds. In 
religious matters he is a stanch believer in the principles of the 
Methodist Episcopal church. On December 11, 185G, he married 
Gertrude, daughter of Philip and Catherine (Dubois) Vanburen. of 
Kingston, N. Y. Mrs. Custer was born July 17, 1838, and was edu- 
cated in the public schools of Kingston. Of thirteen children of 
the Vanburen family Mrs. Custer is the only one still living. The 
marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Custer has been blessed with eight 
children, — John Wesley, born January 3, 1858, married Mary J. 
Shoultz, and lives in the town of Dunn ; Frank, born January 19, 
I860, married Louisa Shadel, and now lives in South Madison ; 
Myrtilla Florence born November 29, 1861, married Myron Conry, 
and lives in Bruce, Wis. ; Boone Cary, born December 13, 1863, 
died February 9. 1883 ; Jesse, born September 6, 1866, married 
Jessie Morse and now lives in Olivia, Minn.; James William, Jr., 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 215 

born March 4, 1870, married Lena Palmer, now resides in Delton, 
Wis. ; Philip, born February 16, 1873, married Jennie Morse, and 
now lives on his father's farm ; and George Washington, born 
October 18, 1876, and lives in the town of Blooming Grove. Mr. 
Custer expects to spend the remainder of his days in the midst of 
the community in which he has attained so prominent a place. 

Christian Anderson Dahle was prominent in Dane county for 
many years and spent the last years of his life from 1890 until his 
death, April 7, 1905, retired from active business in his pleasant 
home in Morrisonville. He was born in Norway, December 31, 
1831, son of Andrew and Rhoda (Marcus) Dahle, both natives of 
Norway. Mrs. Andrew Dahle died in Norway and her husband 
came to the United States in 1852, locating on a farm in the town 
of Bristol. After a few years in Bristol he went to Minnesota, 
where he died. Christian A. Dahle was educated in Norway, came 
to Bristol township upon reaching Wisconsin and soon after went 
to the northern woods, where he was employed for three years. 
Returning to Dane county, he farmed for a while in the town of 
Vienna and finally purchased a farm in Bristol, upon which he re- 
sided and carried on a successful farming business for twenty-eight 
years. For about three years he engaged in mercantile pursuits in 
Sun Prairie and then moved to Morrisonville, where Mrs. Dahle 
now resides. Mrs. Dahle was, before her marriage, Miss Anna 
Johnson, and was born in Norway in 1839, daughter of John Sjur- 
son and Christiana (Anderson) Sjurson, both of whom were born 
in Norway in the year 1798. In 1848. they came to Dane county 
and owned a farm in the town of Bristol. Here Mrs. Sjurson died 
in 1878 and her husband lived for some years longer. He died in 
Sun Prairie in 1889. Mr. and Mrs. Dahle were blessed with twelve 
children, but have been saddened by the loss of nine of their sons 
and daughters. The oldest daughter, Randea Maria, and John, the 
oldest son, are deceased ; Christiana Carolina, Andrew and Marcus 
are the living sons and daughter. The other children were Ole 
Andreas, John, Benne Edwin, Ella Josephine, Edwin John, Benne 
John and an infant. The family is identified with the Lutheran 
church. Mr. Dahle was a Republican in political sympathy but 
not an active politician. 

Herman Bjorn Dahle, an esteemed and prosperous citizen of Mt. 
Horeb and for two terms the representative of the second district 
of Wisconsin in the lower house of the United States congress, was 
born March 30, 1855, in the town of Perry, Dane county. He 
comes of excellent Norwegian stock. His father, Onon Bjornson 



216 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

Dahle, first saw the light of day in Telemarken, Norway, October 4, 
1823, not far from the birthplace of Aasmund Olafson Vinje, Nor- 
way's greatest lyric writer. His education was the best offered 
to people of Mr. Dahle's means. He attended school until he was 
nineteen years of age, first in the district schools and then for a 
time at Bronkeberg seminary. The first five years of his life after 
the completion of his studies were spent in teaching in his native 
parish. While the labor was congenial the salary was not such 
as to permit of an easy or even comfortable life, and Mr. Dahle, 
in the prime of his manhood, decided to seek his fortune in the 
new world. He arrived in New York on July 5, 1848, and started 
immediately for Wisconsin by way of the Hudson river, the Erie 
canal and the Great Lakes. Milwaukee was reached in August of 
the same year, but his stop there was not long, crossing the lake 
to Michigan to work in the woods. After a few weeks, however, 
he returned to Milwaukee and was ill there for some time. Upon 
recovering he sought the Norwegian settlement at Koshkonong and 
being physically unable to work at manual labor, taught parochial 
school for ten dollars a month, board and lodging coming from the 
parents of his pupils. Thus was the winter of 1848-1849 spent. In 
the spring a cousin, Knute Dahle, joined him and the two pioneers 
"hired out" for the summer and fall. It was evident to both 
Dahles that there was no more than a bare existence to be had 
from this kind of labor so they determined to cast their lot with 
the emigrants to the California goldfields, the excitement of which 
was then at its height. The start of the journey westward was on 
foot, through Madison, Blue Mounds and Platteville to Galena. 
111., where a steamer was taken to St. Louis. The winter of 
1859-60 saw the Dahles cutting wood near St. Louis in order to ob- 
tain money enough to continue their journey. The hardships and 
trials endured in the journey across the prairie and mounta'ns 
would fill a small volume; suffice it to say that after successfully 
combating the fatigues and overcoming the difficulties incident to 
the trip the Dahles arrived in Georgetown, Cal., on August 5, 1850 
Here they met a countryman, a sailor, who had a claim near by 
and offered them the opportunity of working it for him. The 
claim proved to be worthless and the two young men, with seven 
dollars each, given them by their newly found friend, started for 
Sacramento. At Sacramento they went to work on the levee at 
$75 a month. Cholera was raging in the vicinity at the time and 
Knute was stricken. The attack was not severe, however, and as 
soon as he was able to move his cousin took him to San Francisco 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 217 

and from there, by steamer, to Oregon. During the winter they 
earned a livelihood by cutting and rafting trees to a saw mill near 
Salem and in the spring returned to the goldfields. At Yreka, 
where gold had been but lately discovered, the Dahles were fairly 
successful, but before end of the summer their water supply gave 
out and they removed to a claim on the Humbug river. They 
"struck it rich" on the Humbug and after prospecting for some 
time in the vicinity, they determined to return to Koshkonong. 
The trip was made via Sacramento, San Francisco, the Isthmus of 
Panama, New Orleans, St. Louis and Galena to Koshkonong, 
where they arrived on January 3, 1853. Later in the same year 
O. B. Dahle located in Perry, where he opened a small store. His 
business interests in this town continued until 1897, when he re- 
tired and removed to Mr. Horeb. In 1854 O. B. Dahle married 
Miss Betsy Nelson of Racine and the union has been blessed with 
several children, four of whom are still living, Hon. Herman B., 
the subject of this sketch ; Mrs. James A. Peterson of Minneapolis, 
a graduate of the University of Wisconsin ; Theodore Dahle, asso- 
ciated with the former congressman in the Mt. Horeb business 
concern; and Henry L. Dahle of Mt. Horeb. Hon H. B. Dahle 
received his education in the district schools of the town of Perry 
and for a while attended the University of Wisconsin. In 1877 he 
married Miss Anne Kittleson of Perry and the same year removed 
to Mt. Vernon, where he engaged in the general merchandise busi- 
ness. Ten years later he made Mt. Horeb his home, becoming" 
the senior partner in the firm of Dahle Brothers. He is also 
largely interested in and was one of the incorporators of the Mt. 
Horeb bank. \ His first election to congress was in 1898, and in 1900 
he was re-elected, receiving some 22,000 votes. Politically he is a 
Republican and has for many years been a leader in his party. 

Charles Dahlk is a prosperous farmer of Middleton and a veteran 
of the Union army. With his brother he came to America in 
1857 and located in Middleton. The brothers were natives of 
Mecklenburg-Shwerin, where their parents, Christian and Sophia 
Dahlk always lived. Christian was a laborer and the father of 
four sons and two daughters, of whom Charles and John came to 
America and afterward Frederick Joachem. Charles was born Au- 
gust 29, 1830. received his education in the common schools in Ger- 
many and upon coming to Middleton, became a farmer. Taking 
up eighty acres of wild land in section 32, he proceeded to clear it 
and later added to it another eighty acres. Many improvements 
were made and substantial buildings erected. In 1878 this farm was 



218 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

sold and the present "homestead purchased. This was formerly 
owned by Samuel Billings and was already under cultivation. Mr. 
Dahlk built he barns in 1880 and rebuilt the house the same year. 
He is a member of the Republican party, has held a position on the 
school board and other local offices. In 1864 he enlisted in the 
Forty-second Regiment of Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry as a 
private in Company I. Until the end of the war his regiment was 
stationed at Cairo and engaged in picket and guard duty there. 
The last year he served under Captain Michals. In November, 
1865, Mr. Dahlk married Miss Esther Lillibridge of Middleton, a 
daughter of Clark and Eliza (Tift) Lillibridge, who came to New 
York from Washington, R. I., and in 1857 came to Wisconsin. 
Mr. Lillibridge was a farmer and lumberman. Mr. Dahlk has 
joined the Evangelical Association and is one of its earnest sup- 
porters. 

Chas C. Dahn, of Waunakee, was born in Germany, December 
31, 1867, and came with his parents to Dane in 1869. His father, 
William Dahn, born 1839, and his mother, Frederica (Schwenn) 
Dahn, born 1838, were also Germans ; they came first to the town 
of Dane but soon after moved to Vienna, where they owned a farm 
of two hundred acres. This Mr. Dahn improved and paid for by 
his own hard labor, and was their home for many years until they 
felt that their age and toil entitled them to the more restful con- 
ditions of village life, and they made their residence in the village 
of Dane. Charles, being scarcely more than a babe when his par- 
ents came to this country, has received an American education in 
the common schools of Vienna. He has followed his father both 
in the choice of his occupation and in the industry with which he 
improves his farm of one hundred and twenty acres. He is allied 
to the Republican party in his politics, and he and his wife, — as 
are also his parents, — are members of the Lutheran church. On 
January, 1895, he was married to Miss Louise W 7 ilke, who was 
born in Dodge county, October 20. 1871. She is the daughter 
of Carl and Caroline (Schwenn) Wilke, who are also mentioned in 
this work. Their children are Deloy Agnes, born December. 3, 
1896, William Carl, born January 27, 1897. died January, 1897; 
Elmer Otto, born December 21, 1899; Roy Ernest, born April 21, 
1905. 

Bjorn T. Daley has been a prominent and successful farmer of 
the town of Perry for many years and is the son of a pioneer of 
Dane county. He was born in Nessedal, Norway, August 1-1, 1848, 
son of Torge and Anna (Johnson) Daley, both natives of Norway. 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 219 

The family embarked for America in 1852, when Bjorn was a child 
four years old, and came to Dane county immed ately upon their 
arrival in the United States. Koshkonong was their first home but 
after one year Mr. Daley purchased a farm in the town of Perry 
which was his home until his death in 1861. His widow con- 
tinued to reside upon the farm with her children and died there in 
1890. There were four children in the family : Bjorn, John, who 
now lives in North Dakota ; Anna, Mrs. Hans Severson of Pierre, 
South Dakota'; Carrie, Mrs. Martin Kittleson of North Dakota. 
Bjorn attended school in Perry and after his father's death assisted 
his mother and brothers in the work of the farm, gradually assum- 
ing the entire control. He resided upon the old homestead of 
two hundred acres until 1906, when he left it to the care of his 
son and purchased a small home of sixty-five acres near Dahle- 
ville, which is his present home. Mr. Daley has seen the growth 
of the country from a wild, sparsely settled district to a fertile 
and productive land and has always stood ready to do his part in 
any work for the advancement of the community. He has served 
as treasurer of the school board for twenty-five years, took the 
United States census in that neighborhood in 1900 and has served 
several terms as supervisor, and is secretary and treasurer of the 
Perry Fire Insurance company, serving his second year. He is a 
member of the Republican party. In 1871, Mr. Daley married 
Miss Mary Iverson, a native of Norway, who died in 1880. Six 
■children were born to the marriage: Isaac married Alma Boden 
and lives in Perry ; Anna is Mrs. Oscar Olson of Minnesota ; 
Theodore resides with his parents ; Amanda married Carl Hoiby of 
New Glarus ; two children died in infancy. The second wife of 
Mr. Daley was Miss Hannah Peterson, also a native of Norway, 
daughter of Edward and Maren Peterson. Seven children blessed 
the marriage ; Oscar, who married Miss Emma Peterson and lives 
in Iowa county; Clara, Albert. Thea, Alvin and Ruth, who reside 
with their parents. 

James O. Davidson, Into the career of the present governor of 
the great state of Wisconsin have entered no elements of special 
dramatic intensity, no startling episodes. He has risen to success 
and distinction by normal means and through worthy effort. In 
reviewing his life it is found that interpretation follows fact in a 
direct line of derivation, and that each step has in a measure 
presaged what the next would compass with all of surety and de- 
termination. Governor Davidson has risen to the position of ex- 
ecutive head of one of the creat commnwealths of the union, a 



220 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

state of cosmopolitan social fabric, and he has made a definite im- 
press upon his times as a loyal and public spirited citizen, holding 
inviolable the interests of the people and showing that sturdy 
manhood from whose well-springs come all that is best and most 
permanent in life. He is the first of Scandinavian birth or lineage 
to be elevated to the gubernatorial chair of Wisconsin, and the 
honor is one well merited. His past services having clearly in- 
dicated the solidity and unassuming integrity of this sturdy son of 
the fair Norseland. James O. Davidson was born in Sogn, Nor- 
way, February 10, 1854, coming of a sterling lineage but of a family 
whose lives but exemplified the "short and simple annals of the 
poor." His parents are deceased but he has two sisters living. 
His early training was such as to beget in him a deep appreciation 
of the dignity of honest toil and endeavor, and principles of honesty 
and industry were inculcated in his mind, to dominate and direct 
a life of great usefulness in broader fields than the lad himself 
could possibly apprehend or realize. His early educational ad- 
vantages were exceedingly limited in scope, "the only schooling he 
received being from itinerant religious instructors who traveled 
from farm to farm, imparting instruction to the children of one 
family and then passing on to the next farm, returning again at in- 
frequent intervals." The resume of Governor Davidson's life 
from which the above excerpt is taken, continues as follows: 
"This may have been a blessing, as in not be surfeited with an 
overabundance of studies his mind developed normally, and ex- 
hib'ts today a keenness that adds force to the arguments of those 
who are contending for what they call a rational method of edu- 
cation, where the brain is not prematurely forced beyond the 
strength of the body, to later suffer from reactionary effects." It 
may well be imagined that a youth fostered under such influences 
and conditions would wax strong and self-reliant, the spur of 
necessity having ever a potent and beneficent function when ap- 
plied to the one who is intrinsically stanch and valiant of soul and 
purpose. Quoting again from the article to which recourse has 
already been had, "At the age of eighteen years he arrived in Madi- 
son, Wisconsin, friendless, penniless, unable to speak or under- 
stand the language of the country and in debt for his passage 
money. The first work he did was on a farm. Later he learned 
the tailor's trade, and then abandoned this to clerk in a general 
store. Within a few years he had saved enough to enable him to 
open a general at Soldiers' Grove, Crawford county, and this 
place has ever since been his home, his business increasing from 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 221 

year to year. In 1885 his store was destroyed by fire, entailing a 
loss of ten thousand dollars, this being attributed to incendiaries, 
but the store was immediately rebuilt. In 1892, when the cause of 
the Republican party appeared hopeless in Wisconsin and in 
Davidson's county, the leaders of the party, in casting around for 
an especially strong candidate for the legislature, picked up Mr. 
Davidson and, in spite of his protests, nominated him as a candi- 
date for the assembly. That these leaders had not mistaken in at- 
tributing to Mr. Davidson those qualities which make a man 
strong, had not overestimated his popularity and strength, was 
later demonstrated by the fact of his election, although every other 
Republican candidate whose name appeared on the ticket with him 
was defeated. A contest was inaugurated in the assembly but his 
election had been so decisive that even a Democratic assembly al- 
lowed him to retain his seat. Twice he was re-elected, but he 
never forgot that he was in the assembly to represent his con- 
stituents. With a mental grasp of the fundamental principles up- 
on which rests the foundation of representative government, he 
stood aloof from the corporation control that had dulled the con- 
science of too many who have been elevated to similar positions 
of trust, and he introduced and had the satisfaction of seeing 
framed as law. a bill for the taxation of express companies, by 
which they were taxed for the first time in the history of the state ; 
also a bill to increase the taxes paid by telegraph, telephone, sleep- 
ing car, insurance and other corporations. During the legislative 
session of 1895 Mr. Davidson introduced and secured the passage 
of a law creating the office of state bank examiner, which has led 
up to the present efficient and highly satisfactory system of bank 
supervision securing, as it does, the confidence of depositors, thus 
placing the business of banking on a higher and safer plane, and 
today Wisconsin's banking law is the model for many of the other 
states. Mr. Davidson was elected state treasurer in 1898 and re- 
elected in 1900, bringing to that office the same careful business 
methods applied in his private affairs. ''The interest on public 
funds turned into the state treasury during his tenure of office was 
one hundred and one thousand dollars, or three-fold greater than 
under previous administrations, and of the three million dollars 
of public funds invested by him as treasurer there was not a dol- 
lar's loss to the state." In 1902 Mr. Davidson was elected lieu- 
tenant governor of the state, on the ticket with Hon. Robert M. 
La Follette, now United States senator, and from this fact it will 
be seen that the people of Wisconsin were determined to retain 



222 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

him in the public service, though he had been involuntarily drawrt 
into the political arena at the start. "As presiding officer of the 
senate Lieutenant Governor Davidson was as fair and courteous 
as he personally is genial and popular with his associates." The 
resignation of Governor La Follette to accept the office of United 
States senator, brought Mr. Davidson to the gubernatorial chair, 
into which he was inducted January 1, 1906. His record, official 
and private, is unblemished and he has in a high degree the ele- 
ments of personal popularity and strength. He never inclines in 
the least to spectacular effects but moves calmly and effectively 
along the course of honor and integrity in official capacity, bring- 
ing to bear his full powers in fostering and protecting public in- 
terests and showing a keen and accurate administrative ability. 
He has never violated a trust placed in his keeping, and his career 
in the field of public life and activity has been creditable alike to 
him and to the great state of his adoption. From the article from 
which the previous quotations are made are drawn the following 
appreciative statements. "He is a strong man, of vigorous intel- 
lect, honest to the core, one entirely in sympathy with the Repub- 
lican policy as outlined by President Roosevelt, and thoroughly in 
favor of restoring to the people the rights which in the past few 
years have been taken from them by the usurpation of the great, 
corporations. While he is a man of strong convictions and always 
ready to stand for what he believes is right, he is not so radical but 
what in every movement he displays a coolness of judgment, a 
breadth of vision, a keenness of insight and a fairness that make 
him a safe and able man for the office of governor. The story of 
the life of James O. Davidson should be an inspiration to young 
men, convincing them that the development of character is more to 
be sought than the accumulation of wealth, offering in itself the 
highway that is most likely to lead to success worthy the name."' 
At Readstown, Wisconsin, was solemnized the marriage of Gov- 
ernor Davidson to Miss Helen Bliss, and they have two daughters, 
Mabel and Grace, the former of whom was a student in the Uni- 
versity of Wisconsin with the class of 1906. The governor was. 
reared in the faith of the Lutheran church, in which he was con- 
firmed, but the family is now affiliated with the Methodist Episco- 
pal church. He is a Mason of high rank and is also identified with 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Modern Wood- 
men of America. 

Thomas Davidson of Verona, is the son of Scottish parents, 
Adam and Mary (Ferry) Davidson. The former was born at 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 223 

Greenlaw, Scotland, May 5, 1811, and came first to Toronto, Can- 
ada, where he remained one year, coming to Dane county in 1844, 
and settling on the farm now occupied by his son, Adam. They 
had six children, of whom the subject of this sketch was the old- 
est; the others were Neal, (deceased); Adam, of Verona; Sarah, 
married Thomas Thomas, of Dodgeville ; Bridget, married Melvil 
Proud of Madison ; Maggie, married Dennis McMahon, of Emery, 
S. D. Thomas Davidson was born in Verona, Jan. 11, 1847, was 
reared in his native place, obtaining his education at the public 
schools. He adopted the vocation of farming and in 1878 bought 
the place where he at the present time resides. It consists of four 
hundred and forty acres in sections 29, 31 and 32. He is a gen- 
eral farmer and stock raiser, making a specialty of the breeding of 
short-horn Durham cattle. He was married Feb. 7, 1877, to Miss 
Agnes White of Verona, who was born on the place where they 
now reside. They have had five children, Jennie, deceased, William, 
Margaret, Jessie and Blanche. Mr. Davidson is a Republican and 
has held a position on the school board. Mrs. Davidson's father 
was Peter White who was born in Scotland, came to this country 
when a young man, being one of the pioneer settlers of this local- 
ity and located in Dane county in 1850 ; he married Miss Jessie 
Black, also a native of Scotland. He was a farmer all his life, but 
died when Mrs. Davidson was about eight years old, in 1866, aged 
about forty ; Mrs. Davidson's mother died in 1865, aged twenty- 
seven. There were three children, Agnes Adalaide, (Mrs. David- 
son) ; Jennie Eveline, (Mrs. Adam Davidson) ; John Alexander, 
who died when a child. The family belonged to the Presbyterian 
church. 

Hon. Romanzo E. Davis, ex state senator and merchant of Mid- 
dleton, Wis., has for many years been prominent in state and local 
politics and was one of the early residents of the village. He is the 
son of Jepther and Harriet (Conger) Davis, who came from New 
York state to Wisconsin in 1846, locating in Green county. Here 
Mr. Davis was a woolen manufacturer in which business and the 
management of a large farm in Green county, his son, Romanzo, 
assisted him. Mr. Davis was a Democrat. Eight sons and daugh- 
ters were born to Mr. and Mrs. Davis, of whom the eldest daughter, 
Elmira, died ; Corintha lived in California, but is now deceased, 
passing away at the age of eighty-three } r ears ; Louisa and Electa 
are dead; Truman lives at Madison, Wis.; Amanda is employed in 
the United States postal department in Washington,. D. C, and 
Sarah resides in Chicago, 111. All were educated in the home 



224 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

schools and Romanzo was one of the students at the University of 
Wisconsin in its early days, from 1850 to 1853. R. E. Davis was 
born in Wyoming county. N. Y. in 1831, came with his parents to 
Attica, Green county, Wis., and remained with them until he was 
twenty-five years of age. In 1857 he was engaged in forwarding 
houses, in the grain and commission business in Cole county, Mo., 
as clerk, and four years later, started in the grain business at Cross 
Plains. In 1865 he located at Middleton and soon became promi- 
nent in local affairs. At that time Middleton was a small village 
but the center of a prosperous and growing farming community 
and for four years Mr. Davis was occupied in shipping grain and 
produce to Milwaukee. Becoming interested in politics, he was 
elected to the state senate on the Republican ticket in 1869 and 
occupied his seat four years. He was .elected for four years more 
on the Democratic ticket. Winfield Scott was the first candidate 
for president voted for by the young politician. After 1872 he 
voted the Democratic ticket. In 1877 he was nominated for lieuten- 
ant governor, but failed to be elected. In 1879 he opened a store 
for general merchandise in Middleton and carried on a large and 
flourishing business until 1887, when he retired. Mr. Davis was 
a member of the I. O. O. F. of Midclleton and was Grand Master of 
the state in 1880. Also a charter member of the Masonic Lodge 
of the village, he was for many years prominent in the order. For 
two years he was appointed by Governor Ludington, one of the 
trustees of the State Hospital for the insane at Mendota and has 
been for seven years one of the commissioners of the Dane county 
poor farm and asylum. At one time he was president of the Mid- 
dleton Fire and Lightning Ins. Co., and is now its secretary. In 
1861, Mr. Davis married Miss Miltimore from New York and they 
still make Middleton their home. 

Truman P. Davis, retired, of 235 West Gilman street, Madison, 
was born at Sheldon, W r yoming county, N. Y., August 23. 1828. 
His father, Jepther Davis, was born in Wales, Mass. At the age 
of eighteen, Jepther's father gave him his time and he learned the 
manufacture of woolen goods. In Attica, N. Y., he married Har- 
riet Conger, a native of Oneida county, N. Y. In 1844 he left New 
York and drifted west through Illinois and Michigan, looking for 
a suitable location for a mill. In Green county, Wis., he finally 
found a spot best suited to his purpose. Four acres of land with 
desirable water power were purchased and Mr. Davis erected a 
carding mill, which he operated for twelve years and then sold. 
This was one of the first mills in the state, and the town which 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 225 

grew tip around it was named Attica, after the town of that name 
in New York. Of the eight children born to Mr. and Mrs. Jepther 
Davis four are now living, their ages averaging about seventy-five 
years. Truman P. Davis' education was very limited. With his 
father's family he came west, arriving in Milwaukee at noon on 
April 25, 1846, and at Attica, May 2. He worked in the factory 
with his father until he was twenty-one. In 1852 he returned to 
the east and stayed there two years. The western fever was 
strong in Mr. Davis, however, and he came back to Green county 
and opened a general store. In 1863 he sold out and went to Wal- 
worth county, where he took to farming for the benefit of his 
health, keeping an interest in several cheese-factories and a general 
store. Later he went to Middleton and for several years kept a 
store there. In 1885 he located in Madison ; and in 1895 he built 
the home where he now resides at 235 West Gilman street. Un- 
like his father, who was a radical Democrat, Air. Davis is independ- 
ent in politics. He served the citizens of the town of Attica, as 
justice of the peace two years. His church affiliations, like his 
mother's, are with the Methodist Episcopal church. On April 25, 
1851, he married Nancy E., daughter of Simeon P. and Anna M. 
(Farnham) Noyes. Mr. Noyes first saw the light of day on April 
3, 1800, in Canaan, N.- H. ; Mrs. Noyes was born in Bennington, 
N. Y., October 18. 1810 ; they were married December 31, 1828. 
Five children were* born to them, — Annetta, deceased, wife of 
Charles H. Wilder; Almira, deceased, wife of Marvin Colton ; 
Nancy E., (Mrs. Davis) ; George S., deceased, and Ira. deceased. 
Simeon P. Noyes was a farmer who went from Black Rock, N. Y., 
to Bennington, N. Y., where he was a very extensive farmer, some- 
times employing as many as thirty men. In 1856. he went 
to Evansville, Wis., and later removed to Walworth county, where 
he died. He also farmed extensively in Wisconsin. His first wife 
died in 1811 ; he was married a second time to Electa Powers of 
Sheldon, N. Y., who died in 1898 at the advanced age of ninety- 
three. Truman P. and Nancy E. Davis have had four children, — 
Ida, died in infancy; Romaine E., drowned August 27, 1903; he was 
president of the First National bank at Park Falls, Minn., also 
president of the Akley bank of Akley. Minn., and left a widow and 
two children, Donna and Rudyard E. ; Etta Estella, wife of Prof. 
J. W. Shuster, of the University of Wisconsin ; and Nellie E., died 
in infancy. In 1893 Mr. Davis retired from an active business. 

Edward F. DeBower is a representative citizen of Vienna. He 
is of German descent, although his name indicates, perhaps re- 
15 — iii 



22G HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

motely, a French ancestor. His grandparents, Eden and Gesina 
(Folken) DeBowers, were born and died in Germany, the former 
attaining the age of sixty-five and the latter seventy-five years. 
His parents were Simeon and Marie (Froh) DeBower, born re- 
spectively in 1832 and 1845 ; the former came to America in 1857 
and settled in Vienna township. He was accompanied by a 
brother, Gerd DeBower, and the brothers took a farm and worked 
in partnership for some time. With the thrift characteristic of 
their nationality, they were the owners of a fine tract of three hun- 
dred and twenty acres of land at the dissolution of the partnership. 
Mrs. DeBower came to America in 1870 and was married after her 
arrival here. Mr. DeBower afterward associated his son, Edward, 
with him in his farming operations, and at the time of his death, 
owned, clear of debt, a farm of three hundred and forty-eight acres. 
He was in politics a Republican, and both he and his wife were 
members of the Lutheran church. The family of five children all 
received a good education. The oldest, Emily, began in the com- 
mon school, and finished in the academy connected with the North- 
western Business college. She married John Christiansen, and 
lives at Berrien Springs, Mich. Edward, the subject of this sketch, 
was born April 28, 1873. He early became his father's assistant 
on the farm and afterward fitted himself for independent work in 
the Northwestern Business college, Madison, having been gradu- 
ated from that institution in 1892. Following graduation he 
taught school for two years, and then took up his life on the farm, 
purchasing eighty acres of the old homestead. This he runs as a 
stock farm, specialties being short-horn cattle and Poland hogs. 
He is a Republican and a member of the Methodist Episcopal church 
and continues his interest in educational and public affairs as clerk 
of the school board and assessor of the town of Vienna. His two 
sisters, Louise and Tillie were educated at the Stoughton academy; 
the elder is a teacher and the younger resides at home. Andrew J. 
the youngest of the family, was educated in the Lodi high school, 
and was graduated with the class of 1902. He served as telegraph 
operator and station agent at Manyaska, Minn., for two years, and 
was at Toledo. Iowa, with the C. & N. W. R'y. Co. He also took the 
census of Vienna for 1905. He is at present taking the electrical 
engineering course at Scranton Correspondence school. The fam- 
ily record exhibits unusual marks of thrift, energy and intelligence, 
every member of it being act'vely engaged in honorable employ- 
ment. 

Dennis Dempsey, one of the pioneers of Dane county, was born 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 227 

at Ballincash, county of Wexford, Ireland, August 4, 1820, his 
parents, Morgan and Dorothy (Foley) Dempsey, both being na- 
tives of the Emerald Isle. For four hundred years the Dempsey 
family were Irish farmers, succeeding each other in the county of 
Wexford. Dennis Dempsey was educated in the common schools 
of his native county, and in early life was a miller. After his mar- 
riage he pursued the avocation of a farmer. On September 11, 
1843, he was married to Mary, daughter of Owen and Catherine 
(French) Dempsey, of county Wexford, and on March 24, 1850, 
embarked with his wife and three children on a vessel bound for 
America. Upon landing in this country they made their way di- 
rectly to W sconsin, which was then on the frontier. The father 
purchased eighty acres of land in the town of Blooming Grove — 
the present family homestead — and to this he afterward added one 
hundred and sixty acres, making a farm of two hundred and forty 
acres of fine land. He was Democrat in his political affiliations, 
held the office of town treasurer and other local offices. In re- 
ligion he was a Catholic and helped to erect the first Catholic 
church in the city of Madison, where he held his membership until 
his death, which occurred on Feb. 19, 1904. During his life of 
more than half a century in the county he was always regarded as 
one of the most worthy of her representative citizens. t Dennis 
and Mary Dempsey had ten children, five sons and five daughters. 
Owen, (deceased) ; Dora M. ; Mary Ann, (deceased) ; Morgan is a 
Catholic priest in Detroit, Mich.; W'lliam; Catherine is the wife 
of Warren A. Carter, a prominent lumberman of Ludington. Mich. ; 
Agnes S., is the wife of Dr. John Cunningham of Madison; Es- 
ther E. ; Dennett R. who has resided in Denver for several years ; 
and John still lives on the old homestead. Mrs. Dennis Dempsey 
died September 22. 1900. 

, William Dempsey. the third son and the fifth child of Denis 
and Mary Dempsey, was born at Blooming Grove, Dane county, 
April 6, 1856. He was educated in the common schools in the 
town of Blooming Grove and at Madison, and after attaining his 
majority went to Nebraska, where he opened a grocery and pro- 
vision store, and also purchased a farm of one hundred and sixty 
acres of land. Owing to the depression caused by dry seasons, 
he sold his stock of goods and returned to the old homestead, 
though he st'll owns his farm and store building at Alliance, Neb. 
He says he expects to spend the remainder of his days on the farm 
where he was born, and which is endeared to him by many hal- 
lowed associations. In his political views Mr. Dempsey is a 



228 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

Democrat, — one of the kind who is always ready to defend his 
principles. While living in Nebraska he was elected to represent 
his county in the general assembly and served one term. He has 
also held the office of clerk in the town of Blooming Grove. He 
is a member of the Catholic church in Madison and is a contributor 
to its charitable work. He has never married. 

William H. Denison, deceased, for many years a prominent and 
prosperous business man of the capital city, was born in Madison, 
Aug. 12, 1858. He was a son of Henry and Mary (Pyncheon) 
Denison, the latter a native of Madison, born in 1846 when that 
city was but a village. The father was a native of Brookfield, 
New York, who was drowned in 1865 while serving as a volunteer 
in the Union army. His widow afterward became Mrs. John B. 
Eugene, and is still a resident of Madison. The subject of this 
sketch was the only child of the family. He was but seven years 
of age at the time of his father's death. His "bringing up" was 
In Madison, where he attended the common schools and when fif- 
teen years of age began driving a dray for John Pyncheon, an 
uncle, who had purchased his father's business. After a year's 
work as an employe of his uncle he purchased the controlling inter- 
est in the business and from 1874 until the time of his demise was 
the active manager of it. The company has grown from a one- 
horse affair with headquarters in a dilapidated shed to a concern 
of considerable dimensions. The barns of the company today are 
in a substantial brick building, and the equipment is many times 
as large as originally. By good business management and econ- 
omy Air. Den' son built up the business until it has become exceed- 
ingly remunerative. For many years, in connection with his other 
affairs, he made a business of shipping ice to packing firms in large 
cities. The revenue derived therefrom was by no means small 
and at the time of his death he was one of the most comfortably 
situated men of the city. On August 7, 1876, he married Miss 
Anna Sullivan, who died in November, 1891. His second mar- 
riage occurred March 12, 1893, to Mrs. Margaret (Shanley) Sulli- 
van, a native of Madison of Irish ancestry, her father and mother. 
Michael and Margaret (Foley) Shanley, both emigrating from 
the Emerald Isle. They were pioneers of the state, having arrived 
in 1841. Mr. Shanley died September 21, 1881, and his wife on 
April 18, 1893. They were members of the Catholic church. Their 
six children were John B., now an engineer on the Rio Grande 
railroad, who resides at Denver, Colo. ; Thomas C, a railroad yard- 
master at Minneapolis ; James C, a railroad employe, living in 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 229 

Minneapolis; Bernard M., depot master at Chicago; Ella, who died 
in her tenth year; and Margaret, the widow of W. H. Denison. 
By a previous marriage, on January 25, 1880, to William Sullivan, 
an engineer employed by the Chicago & Northwestern road, Mrs. 
Denison is the mother of three children. Ella Sullivan makes her 
home with her mother, and acts as her private secretary. She is a 
graduate of the Madison business college and an efficient and prac- 
tical book keeper. Maud Sullivan became the wife of E. W. Batch- 
elder of Pennsylvania and is the mother of one child, Dorothy. 
William H. Sullivan is an electrician working in Minneapolis. Mr. 
Denison's death occurred September 19, 1894. His widow has 
assumed charge of the business and it is prospering. Mr. Deni- 
son was a man of sound business sense and genial, k'ndly manner. 
His death cast a pall of gloom over all his friends. 

Albert R. Denu, a young attorney of Dane county, and a mem- 
ber of the firm of Alesserschmidt & Denu of Madison, was born in 
Dane county, April 9, 1877. He is a son of Philip and Albertine C. 
(Steffen) Denu, natives of Germany, who came to the United 
States in 1871, settling in Mazomanie, the same year. In 1891 the 
father removed to Madison and became an oil merchant, in which 
business he has been interested ever since. There were five chil- 
dren in the family, the subject of this sketch being the eldest. 
Emil H. is advertising manager of the State Journal, a daily paper, 
published in Madison. Willard R. is a druggist in Beloit. 
Autie L. is a member of the University of Wiscons'n class of 1908. 
The other child died in infancy. Albert R. Denu is a graduate of 
the Madison high school in the class of 1895 and of the University 
of Wiscons'n in the class of 1899, with the degree of B. L. Dur- 
ing the scholastic year of 1899-1900 he taught in the Madison high 
school and then went to Washington, where he entered the law de- 
partment of the Georgetown University. In 1903 he was gradu- 
ated with the degree of LL. B. and the following scholastic year 
was an instructor in the department of oratory in the University 
of Wisconsin. Since that time he has been engaged in the practice 
of law, and has been eminently successful. The firm as it is now 
formed was established in January, 1906. Mr. Denu practices in 
all the state courts and the federal courts within the state. While 
a student in the high school he was a member of the debating team 
which defeated a similar team from the east division high school 
of M'lwaukee. Again while a university student he was on the 
two winning debating teams which defeated the Universities of 
Iowa and Illinois. During his course at Georgetown he repre- 



'230 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

sented his school on the debating team which won from Columbia 
law school. In his senior year at the University of Wisconsin he 
was the winner of the final oratorical contest and represented his 
school in the incollegiate contest at Oberlin, Ohio. Politically he 
is a Republican. During the campaign of 1904 he took an active 
part, speak ng in practically all the towns and villages of the 
county. He filled some of the engagements in Dane county, 
which Gov. R. M. La Follette was unable to meet. On numerous 
occasions he has delivered Fourth of July and Decoration day ad- 
dresses. At the present time Mr. Denu is a candidate for the 
Republican nomination for district attorney of Dane county. On 
November 22, 1905, he was united in marriage to M'ss Adeline 
Belsham. a native of England who came to the United States with 
her parents when a small child. Her parents, Christopher and 
Hannah M. (Grounsell) Belsham, are now residents of Madison, 
the father being employed as a mechanic. Mrs. Denu is a mem- 
ber of the Baptist church. Her husband is considered one of the 
rising young lawyers of the community. 

Clark B. Devine, M. D., is a promising young physician of Mar- 
shall. He was born in Oregon, Dane county, Jan. 12, 1879. His 
parents are Judson B. Devine. born in Pennsylvania, June 28, 1846, 
and Margaret (Kellor) Devine, a native of Canada, born April 14, 
1854. His paternal grandfather. Dewitt Cl'nton Devine, a native 
of Pennsylvania, and five brothers, came west and all settled on 
farms in Oregon township, Dane county; all of this family of young 
pioneers, with one exception, have died in their adopted home, and 
the father of Dr. Devine resides in the village of Oregon. His 
maternal grandfather came to Dane from Canada in 1856, and died 
in Wisconsin. Dr. Devine's father came to Wisconsin with his 
parents when he was a babe six weeks old, received his educat'on 
in the common schools of the county and has practically spent his 
whole life within its boundaries. Politically he affiliates with the 
Republican party and has held various town offices. He marr'.ed 
the widow of his half-brother, who had, at the time of her second 
marriage, one son; the subject of this sketch is the only child of 
the second marriage. Dr. Devine has received a liberal education 
having been graduated from the Oregon high school in June, 1895, 
from the Un'versity of Wisconsin with the class of 1900 and from 
Rush Medical College of Chicago, in 1903. He began his practice 
of medicine in Marshall, where he is meeting with success in his 
chosen profession. In politics, he follows the family trad'tions and 
votes with the Republican party. On October 26, 1904, he was 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 231 

married to Miss Alice J. Man son, who is a native of Texas, born 
Oct. 24, 1879, the daughter of Alexander P. Manson and Sarah, his 
wife, of Belleville, Wis. Dr. Devine is a member of the E. F. U. 
and M. W. A. and Beavers, and :s the examining physician for all 
these societies ; he also belongs to the Royal Laborers and has 
acted in the same capacity for that association. 

Michael Devine (deceased) was for many years a resident of 
Madison, well-known in the city. He was born in Ireland in 1827, 
son of Patrick and Catherine (Lonergran) Devine, both natives of 
Ireland. Mr. Devine commenced life as a railroad man and by 
faithful and untiring effort won for himself a comfortable home 
and an established position in the community, where he made many 
warm friends. In October, 1851, he married Miss Margaret Mull- 
downey, who was born in Ireland in 1834, daughter of Hugh and 
Mary (Whalen) Mulldowney. Mr. Devine was one of a family of 
eight children. Both Mr. Devine and his wife were confirmed in 
the Roman Catholic church, which Mrs. Devine regularly attends. 
Eight children were born to them; John (deceased). Joseplrne, 
who resides with her mother ; Hubert Augustine, who married 
Mary Clarke and resides in Fond du Lac, Wis. ; Katherine, who 
married Charles L. Wright and resides in Caro, Michigan ; Mary 
Alice res'des with her mother; James Gilbert and Ephraim De 
Forrest are deceased ; William Henry makes his home with Mrs. 
Devine. Mr. Devine was identified with the Republican party. 

John Dickert is the efficient fireman and day watchman at the 
postoffice building in the city of Madison, and during his incum- 
bency of that position during the past twenty years he has proven 
himself worthy of the confidence imposed. He was born in the 
state of Bavaria, a part of the German Empire, on May 19, 1842, 
and is the son of John and Maria ( Dauer) Dickert, both of whom 
were natives of the same country, the father having served in the 
regular army of Germany for about six years. Of the five children 
born to these parents, the subject of this review is the only sur- 
vivor. The father came to America with his family ; n 1852, and 
resided there for the ensuing ten years, when he removed to Madi- 
son, W T is. He remained in Dane county only one year, engaged 
as a farm hand, and then returned to New York, entered the busi- 
ness of gardening and resided there the remainder of his life. He 
and his wife have both been deceased for several years. John 
Dickert, whose name introduces this review, attended school in 
Germany until he was ten years of age, when he accompanied his 
parents to America. He then attended school in New York for a 



232 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

time, but when seventeen years old he began the battle of life, and 
after coming to Madison worked as an apprentice in a chair fac- 
tory for about two years. He then entered the service of the gov- 
ernment as a carpenter, enlisting for the term of six months, and 
at the expiration of that time returned to Madison and worked for 
a furniture-manufacturing firm for one year. He then entered the 
employ of a firm in Madison, engaged in the manufacture of plows, 
and remained so employed for about four years. His next employ- 
ment was w.'th the firm of Fuller & Johnson, and after eight years 
with that manufacturing institution he worked as a fireman in 
Fauerbach's brewery for four years. He then accepted the posi- 
tion he now holds, and has filled the same very acceptably, as is 
evidenced by his long employment therein. Possessing the frugal- 
ity so characteristic of his race, as a result of his years of toil he is 
surrounded with evidences of material prosperity. The first pur- 
chase he made in Madison was a lot in Fitch's addition to the city, 
which he sold later and bought another upon which he erected the 
beaut' ful home where he now resides. Mr. Dickert was married 
on May 22, 1866, to Margaret Breitenbach, who was born in the 
state of New York, Oct. 19, 1848, and whose parents, George and 
Margaret (Shuman) Breitenbach, were natives of Bavaria, Ger- 
many. Of the five children born to Mr. and Mrs. Breitenbach, 
four are living, viz : Margaret, who is the wife of the subject of 
this review; Theresa; Mary, who married S. B. Splonskowski; 
and Henry, who married Helena Hauk. Mr. and Mrs. D'ckert are 
the parents of nine children: Frank George, resides at home; 
Salome Mary, resides in the city of Madison ; Louie M. L., resides 
at home; Henry Adolph, married Nettie Vetter and resides in 
Madison; Mary T., resides with her s'ster Salome; Anton William, 
married Frances Morhauser and resides in Madison ; Joseph John, 
Addie Catherine, and Francis T., reside at home. Mr. Dickert and 
family are members of the Roman Catholic church. 

George L. Dickinson, a prominent farmer of Alb'on. is the son 
of William Dickinson, one of the first settlers of the town, and re- 
sides upon the farm, which was the original home of the family in 
Dane county. William Dickinson was a native of Yorkshire, Eng- 
land, born in 1820, and was a merchant in Yorkshire. He was 
twice married, his first wife being Miss Mary Bogthroyd, also of 
Yorkshire. Five children were born to the marr'age; Elizabeth, 
the wife of S. Humphrey of Edgerton ; Ann. the wife of J. D. 
Spike of Edgerton ; Isaac (deceased) ; Sarah, the wife of George 
Vickers of Edgerton ; Martha, Mrs. Tames Stewart of Edgerton. 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 233 

Four children blessed the second marriage ; Weetman, who mar- 
ried Miss Lucy Esgar and lives in Edgerton ; George L., who lives 
on the old farm; Louisa (deceased) ; Laura, who married Dr. J. L. 
Holton of Edgerton and with whom Mrs. Dickinson resides. Wil- 
liam Dickinson came to Albion in 1841 and obtained a farm of one 
hundred and sixty acres in section 14. Indians and wild game 
were plentiful but neighbors were few in number. Farm produce 
was hauled by teams to Milwaukee and many other difficulties had 
to be overcome. School advantages for the children were meagre. 
George L. was born in Albion, February 27, 1865, attended the dis- 
trict school of Albion and always worked upon the farm. Mr. 
Dickinson died in 1875 and George, his son. purchased the old 
homestead and has since resided there. He has made many im- 
provements, erected new buildings, etc. He carries on an exten- 
sive general farm'ng business but is especially interested in stock- 
raising. Shropshire sheep are bred by him and he has a fine herd 
of cattle. Mr. Dickinson makes a study of modern farming meth- 
ods and is very successful. May 18. 1898, he married Miss Eliza 
Otto of Hebron, daughter of Julius Otto of Jefferson county. One 
daughter, Arma Louisa, blessed the marriage. Mr. Dickinson is 
a member of the Republican party but is not ambitious to hold of- 
fice. He is school treasurer of the district in which he lives. The 
family are all devoted adherents of the Primitive Methodist church, 
which was the denomination of their father in England. 

Charles J. Dodge is proprietor of the Eclipse Creamery of Wind- 
sor and owner of a one half interest in creameries at Keyser, 
Token, Lodi and Stewart, of all of which he is manager. He came 
to Windsor in 1890 and has ever since been prominent in the busi- 
ness circles of the community. The family are of Connecticut 
descent ; Chester Dodge, grandfather of Charles J., was born in 
Connecticut and married Miss Martha Cone, also of Connecticut. 
They lived in Jefferson county, N. Y., and later near Pulaski, Os- 
wego county. Their son, Marcus W. Dodge, was born in Jeffer- 
son county. N. Y.. August 21, 1821, was educated in the home 
schools and married Miss Julia Ann Hendrickson. who was born 
near Richland in the same county, January 15, 1823. In 1854, they 
came to Lake county. 111., and bought a farm near the village of 
Barrington. Mr. Dodge died in 1894 and his widow still lives in 
Barrington, eighty-three years of age. Eight children were born 
to them and s'x sons are now living. Mr. Dodge was a Republican 
and actively interested in local politics in Barrington, where he 
held several offices of trust. The family was identified with the 



234 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

Baptist church. Charles J. Dodge, son of Marcus W., was born 
at Cuba, Lake county. 111., Oct. 12, 1856, attended school in the 
village of Barrington, Cuba township, and graduated from the Cook 
county normal school. He began to teach when he was but fifteen 
years of age and continued in this profession for thirteen years, 
seven years in the common schools and six years as principal of 
the high school at Barrington. He then came to Windsor and 
engaged in the creamery business in which he has been very suc- 
cessful. Mr. Dodge is still interested in school and educational 
affa'rs and has served on the Windsor school board for nearly six- 
teen years and is also a member of the board of the Windsor town- 
ship free high school, on which he has served for seven years. Mr. 
Dodge is a member of the Republican party. August 21, 1878, he 
married Miss Elizabeth Wilson, who was born in Aberdeenshire, 
. Scotland, Aug. 12, 1855, daughter of George and Mary (Craig- 
mile) Wilson, who came to Cook county. 111., in 1858 and settled 
upon a farm. To Mr. and Mrs. Dodge were born five children ; 
Florence Adele, Charles Wilson, Mary Louise, Anna Edith, 
Chester Lyman. The family attend the Congregational church. 
Mr. Dodge is a member of the local branch of the Modern Wood- 
men. 

George Dodge, farmer, stock-breeder and highly respected citi- 
zen of Roxbury township, was born in the township of Lyme, Jef- 
ferson county, N. Y., on March 14, 1828. His parents were Wil- 
liam King and Mary Ann (Hubbard) Dodge, the .former of whom 
was born in Block Island (an island in the Atlantic ocean, about 
twenty miles from the ma'nland of the state of Rhode Island, of 
which Block Island is a part), the date of his birth being Novem- 
ber 7, 1797, wh'le the mother was born in the state of New York, 
March 9, 1800. They were married in Jefferson county, N. Y., 
and lived there for a number of years afterward, the father's occu- 
pation being that of a farmer. In 1844 they migrated to Wiscon- 
sin, locating first in Jefferson county, the place of settlement being 
on Rock river, but in 1847 they changed their abode to Waukesha 
county, and two years later came to Dane county and established 
a home on one hundred and sixty acres of forest land that they 
preempted from the government by soldiers' land warrant. Here 
they lived the remainder of their lives, both surviving to a good old 
age and enjoying in their declining years the fruits of their pioneer 
struggles. The mother died August 8, 1881, and the father on 
June 29, 1887. A large family of ch'ldren was born to them, 
seven of whom reached manhood and womanhood, and four are 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 235 

yet living. The parents were both devout members of the Metho- 
dist church, and died in the faith that had been a comfort to them 
•during life. George Dodge, son of these honored pioneers, and 
the immediate subject of this review, attended the schools of Jef- 
ferson county, N. Y., until he had reached the age of sixteen years, 
and then he accompanied his parents to their far-away home in 
the Badger state. After coming to Wisconsin he added to his 
store of knowledge by attending for a time the primitive schools of 
Waakesha county, but the demands of existence in that early day 
precluded the thoughts of any extended scholastic training, and 
his attention was early given to farming. He came to Dane 
county with his parents in 1849, and Roxbury township has been 
his home and farming his vocation during all of the intervening 
years. Industry and frugality, guided by a high order of intelli- 
gence, have accomplished the result that is always the portion of 
those virtues, and Mr. Dodge is recognized as one of the sub- 
stantial citizens of the county. He owns a fine farm of two hun- 
dred acres, and aside from general farming devotes considerable 
attention to the breed'ng of Poland-China hogs, short-horned cat- 
tle and Shropshire sheep. In politics he is a Republican, but the 
desire for official position has never been his 'and so-called public 
honors have never lured him from the "even tenor of his way." 
The religious faith of his parents is the one to which he adheres, 
and he and his wife are valued members of the Methodist Episcopal 
church. He was married on May 1, 1853, to Miss Ellen Alecia 
Brereton, who was born in Kings county, Ireland, November 30, 
1833. She is the daughter of George and Ellen (Huelette) Brere- 
ton, both of whom were of Irish birth. Mrs. Dodge's parents mi- 
grated to Canada, in 1849, and there the mother d'ed on December 
28 of the following year. In 1852 the family came to Dane county. 
Wis., settling in Roxbury township, where the father died on Feb- 
ruary 12, 1853. There were born to these parents nine children, 
three of whom died in Ireland before the emigration of the family, 
and the other six came to America with their parents and are still 
living. To George Dodge and wife there have been born nine chil- 
dren, as follows: Edwin (deceased), Marv Ellen, William Edwin, 
Martha Elizabeth, (deceased). George Brereton, Willoughby 
King, Mary Ellen, Adaline Harriet, and John Abner. 

Edward Donkle, deceased, was for many years a leading farmer 
in the town of Verona., and later a highly respected citizen of the 
city of Madison. He was born in Mercer county. Pa., March 17, 
1833, and was one of the eight children of Peter and Lydia Donkle, 



236 , HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

natives of the same county and state. Six of the children men- 
tioned are living, Caroline, Mary and Henry residing in the town 
of Verona; Emaline, who is now Mrs. Reuben Myers, resides in 
the same town; Catherine, who is now Mrs. Matts, lives in Kansas;, 
and Betsey, who is now Mrs. Nye, has her residence in Verona. 
The subject of this review attended the public schools in Penn- 
sylvania, and also one or two terms after the removal of the family 
to Wisconsin, he being but twelve years of age when lis parents 
became residents of Dane county, in 1845. Beginning his inde- 
pendent career he formed a partnership with one of his brothers, 
and together they purchased several yokes of oxen and began 
breaking new ground and making it ready for cultivat on. They 
continued this occupation for several seasons, and also bought a 
a threshing machine outfit, which avocation they followed eleven 
consecut've autumns in partnership with two brothers-in-law,. 
Messrs. Nye and Myers. In 1858 our subject bought eighty acres 
of land adjoining one hundred and fifty acres, which comprised his 
father's homestead, and he resided thereon about six years. In 
the meantime he purchased the family homestead, or rather the 
interests of the mother and the other heirs in the same, as the father 
had previously died. Mr. Donkle and family resided on the old 
homestead until 1894, then purchased a house and lot at 532 West 
Wilson street, Madison, and later sold his farm. He also purchased 
two full lots in Wingra Park, where he erected two beautiful resi- 
dences, one of which Mrs. Donkle occupies, the other being the 
residence of her daughter and son-in-law, while the property on 
Wilson street is leased to tenants. When the tocsin of war was 
sounded and a call for men was made .to preserve the integrity of 
the nation our subject was one of those who offered his services 
to the government. On September 2, 1864, .he enlisted as a private 
in Company K of the Forty-second Regiment Wisconsin Infantry 
and served with that command until June 20, 1865, when the war 
being ended, he was mustered out with his regiment. He was en- 
gaged in guard duty during his entire term of service and was 
stationed for the most part at Springfield, 111. Mr. Donkle was 
married on January 1, 1857, to Miss Martha J. White, born at 
Hartford, Washington county, N. Y., November 1, 1839. She is 
the daughter and one of nine children born to Stephen and Mary P. 
(Smith) White, the former being a native of New Hampshire and 
the latter of Massachusetts. Of these nine children three only are 
l'ving: Martha j. is the widow of the subject of this review; 
Sarah is the widow of Mr. Richard Blackburn and lives in the 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 237 

town of Verona; and Marietta is the widow of William Donkle 
and resides in Verona. Stephen White, the father, came to Dane 
county in 1848 and purchased forty acres of land in the town of 
Springdale, where he resided many years, but later he sold this 
farm and resided with his daughters until his death about -1875. 
The mother was born in 1800 and died in the town of Verona in 
1890. To Edward Donkle and wife there were born seven chil- 
dren. Orlin S. married Miss Melissa Myers and resides in 
town of Verona ; Sarah A. married Myron Brown and resides in 
the city of Madison ; Mary F. married William Burmeister and re- 
sides at Wingra Park; Horace B. is deceased; Judson married 
Margaret Henderson and resides in the town of Verona, where he 
is a successful merchant; Alfred D. F., deceased, had just com- 
pleted a medical course in Chicago prior to his death, had received 
his diploma and was nearly through with his hospital training; 
Lucius B. is a practicing physician and surgeon in Chicago; he 
makes a specialty of surgery. The subject of this review was a 
Republican in his political affiliations, and his religious faith was 
expressed by membersh'p in the Baptist church of which he was a 
deacon several years, as were also his two brothers, Henry filling 
that office at the present time. He had strong opinions on the 
temperance question and was at one time a member of the order 
of Good Templars. Two of his sons are enthusiastic members of 
the Masonic order. 

J. B. Donkle, postmaster and general merchant of Verona, was 
born in Verona township, October 19, 1871 ; he is the son of Ed- 
ward and Martha (White) Donkle. the former being a native of 
Mercer county, Pa., and the latter of Xew York. Flis grand- 
father, Peter Donkle, of old Pennsylvania stock and originally of 
German descent, came to Wisconsin at an early date, bringing his 
family and settling in Dane county, where he remained until lis 
death. His son, Edward, was born March 17, 1833, and reared 
on the farm, adopted farming as his own vocation, and continued 
in it until about 1891, when he retired from active work and made 
his home in Madison, where Mrs. Donkle resides at the present 
time. They had a family of seven children, O. S. Donkle, of 
Verona ; Sarah, married M. F. Brown of Madison ; Fyetta, married 
William Burmeister of Madison ; Horace, deceased ; J. B., the sub- 
ject of this sketch; Alfred, deceased; Lucius, a physician of Ch- 
cago. Mr. Edward Donkle was a staunch Republican in his poli- 
tics, and in sympathy with the prohibition movement. He died 
May 2, 1902. His wife was born November 17. 1839, and is still 



238 , HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

living. Mr. J. B. Donkle was reared in Verona township, edu- 
cated in the public schools and in Way land academy, Beaver Dam. 
When he finished his school education, he occupied himself with 
farming for four years ; at the end of that time he entered into the 
general mercantile business in which he is at present engaged ; he 
has also other interests outside of his store, as he has been post- 
master of Verona since March 5, 1898, is a director of the bank of 
Verona, and has interests in the Mt. Vernon telephone company. 
He was married December 28, 1898, to Miss Margaret M. Hender- 
son, who was born in Salina. Kansas. Her father, James P. Hen- 
derson, is a native of Scotland, and now a resident of Verona. Mr. 
Donkle belongs to the Republican party, and also to F. & A. M. r 
No. 5, of Madison, and to the Modern Woodmen of America. One 
child born to the union July 16,. 1905, died February 17, 1906. 

Dr. Lyman C. Draper, distinguished antiquarian and collector of 
historical materials, for thirty-three years secretary of the Wis- 
consin State Historical society and one of the leading spirits in its 
work, was born at Hamburg, Erie county, N. Y., September 1, 
1815, the son of Luke and Harriet (Hoisington) Draper. The 
pioneer of the family was James Draper, who settled at Roxbury, 
Mass., about 1650. His paternal grandfather Jonathan Draper, 
was a solder in the Revolutionary War, and his maternal grand- 
father. Job Hoisington, fell in the defense of Buffalo, during the- 
War of 1812 ; and, during the latter struggle, his father was twice 
taken prisoner on the Niagara frontier. His early education was 
obtained in the best schools of the day at Lockport, N. Y., where 
his father had moved with his family in 1821. Libraries in west- 
ern New York were then unknown, but young Draper was able to 
procure and read some works dealing with border adventure and 
Indian warfare, books, which gave direction to his subsequent 
tastes and studies. His first school composition was on General 
La Fayette, whom he saw during his visit to the United States in 
1825 ; and his first contribution to the press was on Charles Car- 
roll of Carrollton, in 1833, whose death had recently occurred. 
This was published in the Rochester Gem, a literary paper. He 
journeyed to Mobile, Ala., in 1833, at the invitation of Peter Rem- 
sen, a cotton factor then, who had married his cousin, returning 
north in the summer of 1834 by way of New Orleans, and the 
Mississippi and Ohio rivers to Granville. O., where he remained 
two years. He then visited his parents at Toledo, where they had 
moved. Th's was a vacation trip in the late summer of 1835, and 
while in Toledo, he participated in the "battle of Mud Creek," in 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 239 

the env'rons of Toledo, one of the episodes of the Ohio and Michi- 
gan boundary difficulties of that day. In 1836-37 Mr. Draper 
spent a year at Hudson River Seminary, Columb'a county, N. Y., 
and then resided in the family of his patron and friend, Mr. Rem- 
sen, near Alexander, Genesee county. X. Y.. where he pursued his 
studies and an extensive course of reading. While in Mobile he 
had begun the collection of unpublished facts and traditions con- 
nected with border history and biography, and the habit thus es- 
tablished became his life work. In the collection of his materials 
he journeyed tens of thousands of miles, by public conveyances, 
on horseback, and on foot, with knapsack and note books, obtain- 
ing many original diaries and manuscripts, and forming a unique 
and unrivalled collection of historical data, filling two hundred and 
fifty manuscript volumes, covering the Anglo-American settle- 
ments, the border warfare in the west from the first settlements 
in Virginia, down to the death of Tecumseh, in 1813, and 
the defeat of Weatherford and the Creek Indians in 1814. In 1840 
Mr. Draper went to Pontotoc, Miss., where he edited a weekly 
newspaper for a time, and later engaged in rough farming fifteen 
miles from a postoffice. serving also as justice of the peace. In 
1842. he went to Buffalo as clerk in the canal superintendent's 
office, and then returned to Pontotoc once more. After this, in 
1844, he again resided with Mr. Remsen, then living near Bait- 
more, and subsequently, near Philadelphia, continuing his collec- 
tion of unique historical materials, and mak'ng frequent journeys 
through the western and southwestern states. Mr. Remsen died 
in 1852. and Dr. Draper came with his friend's family to Madison, 
Wis., in the fall of that year; he subsequently married Mrs. Rem- 
sen, and made Madison his home from this t'me on. In 1853, on 
the re-organization of the Wisconsin State Historical society, Mr. 
Lyman was chosen its first secretary and executive officer. He 
served in this capacity from January, 1854, to January. 1887, when 
he was succeeded by the present incumbent, Reuben Gold 
Thwaites. During the years 1858 and 1859 he served the state as 
superintendent of public instruction, and performed a splendid 
work in organizing and systematizing the work of his department, 
and rendering the public schools of the state efficient and useful. 
He inaugurated the system of conducting teachers' institutes, and 
procured the passage of a law for establishing town school-li- 
braries throughout the state. As a result of this law a librarv fund 
of $88,784 was raised in I860, but the Civil War coming on, this 
splendid law was unfortunately repealed by the legislature. Hor- 



240 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

ace Mann, the apostle of free schools, thus characterized Mr. 
Draper's report of 1858 : "It presents the most persuasive and 
effect'. ve argument in favor of education that has ever been offered 
to the world." While holding this office he was ex-ofdcio a mem- 
ber of the board of regents of the University of Wisconsin, 
and was ever profoundly interested in the work and development 
of that noble institution. In 1850, Granville College, Ohio, con- 
ferred on him the degree of A. M., and, in 1871, the University of 
Wisconsin that of LL. D., in recognition of his services as a col- 
lector of the h'storical literature of the country, and in building 
up the great historical library of Wisconsin for the benefit of 
scholars and investigators. While Mr. Draper was perhaps the 
most remarkable literary antiquary in the United States, and by 
his indefatigable industry was able to gather together a rich mine 
of books, manuscripts, letters, diaries, newspaper files, etc., cov- 
ering the border settlements and warfare in the Ohio, Cumberland, 
Tennessee and Mississippi valleys, together with much of the bor- 
der Revolutionary history of New York, Pennsylvania, West 
Virginia, the Carolinas and Georgia, he published very little ; he 
seemed to take a much livelier interest in collecting than in editing. 
His love of accuracy and completeness was a passion with him, and 
he deferred, until too late, the publication of works which he, of all 
men, was best qualified to write. Said the historian Bancroft: "I 
look forward with eager and impatient curiosity for the appear- 
ance of your lives of Boone, of Clark, and of James Robertson, 
and so many others. Time is short, I wish to read them before I 
go hence. Pray do not delay, the country expects of you this ser- 
vice." This is but one of many hundred expressions by eminent 
h'storians, scholars and publicists, urging him to productive effort. 
He edited the society's publications, chiefly consisting of the bi- 
ennial Wisconsin historical collections, portrait gallery catalogue 
(tr'ennial), and the annual reports; several pamphlets, two school 
reports, "The Helping Hand," and also published "King's Moun- 
tain and its Heroes," "Madison, the Capital of Wisconsin," and 
left behind him a large number of unpublished manuscripts. Of 
his rich collections of historical materials, he gave freely and- un- 
selfishly during his life for the use of others, and he has left the 
whole to the State Historical society, a munificent bequest, and 
an enduring monument to his genius as a collector. Both in pub- 
lic and in private life, he was affable, and unostentatious, devoting 
his best efforts to the study of American history and the interests 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 241 

of the society. He retired from the society, January, 1887, and 
died August 27, 1891. 

Simon Dreher, of Oregon, is of Pennsylvania stock. He was 
born in Evansville, Rock county, April 15. 1853. His parents were 
Simon and Alary Ann (Widows) Dreher. both born in North- 
hampton county, Pa. Simon, Jr., has spent all his life in Dane, 
and all except eight years in the town of Oregon ; the exception 
was a time that he lived in the town of Primrose. He was edu- 
cated in the district schools of the township, and lived at home 
until he was twenty-four, when he began life on his own account, 
hulling clover, and doing other kinds of work, as opportunity offered 
or necessity demanded, for twelve years. Sixteen years ago he 
bought a farm of eighty acres situated one and three-fourths miles 
from the village of Oregon, which has since been his home. He 
has greatly improved the place since becoming the owner, putting 
up all the buildings, and runs it as a farm for general purposes. 
He is a Republican in politics and is a member of the Modern 
Woodmen, belonging to the lodge at Oregon. He was married on 
April 18, 1880, to Miss Alma Blanche Chandler, daughter of Rich- 
ard B. and Mary (Cross) Chandler, the former of whom was born 
in Oxford county, Maine, and the latter in the state of Vermont. 
They have three children, Mary and Warren, born in Primrose, and 
Richard, born in Oregon. In the fifty-three years s'nce his birth, 
Air. Dreher has seen many changes take place in his nat've state, 
and has especially observed those in the vicinity of his home, where 
wild land has been transformed into flourishing farms, and towns 
and v'llages built up with all the modern conveniences of life and 
transportation. 

Edward H. Drews, D. D. S., one of the rising young practition- 
ers of dentistry in the city of Madison, was born February 7, 1876, 
in the city where he now makes his home. He is a son of William 
and Dora (R'eder) Drews, the former a native of Mecklenburg 
and the latter of Hanover, Germany, who came to the United 
States some time before the War of Secession. The father, who 
is still living and conducts a hardware store at 939 Williamson 
street, was a soldier in the army of the German emperor. His wife 
died May 9, 1901. The subject of this sketch is the younger of the 
two sons, the only children, of the family. The brother, Fred C, 
is employed by the father. Dr. Drews received his preparatory ed- 
ucation in the schools of Atadison. His technical training was 
acquired at the dental department of Northwestern University at 
Evanston, 111., he being graduated with the class of 1897. The first 
16— iii 



242 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

year and a half following his graduation he practiced his profes- 
sion in Chicago and since that time has conducted an office in 
Madison. He 's a skillful workman in his line, and a courteous 
and thorough gentleman. On May 1, 1902, Dr. Drews was united 
in marriage to Edith A., daughter of Mr. and Mrs. C. C. Bennett, 
the wedding occurring in Madison. Mr. Bennett is assistant su- 
perintendent of public property of the state of Wisconsin. H!s 
home is at 30 East Johnson street, Madison. The home of Dr. 
Drews is at 10 North Butler street. In religious affairs the doctor 
is inclined to the German Lutheran faith, in wh'ch belief he re- 
ceived his early training. 

William Drews, who conducts an up-to-date hardware store at 
939 Williamson street, was born in Germany on Christmas day, 
1842. H's father and mother, Henry and Elizabeth* (Becker) 
Drews, also natives of Germany, came to the United States in 1871 
and settled in the town of Middleton. The father was a farmer, 
and followed that vocation until his death in 1883 at the age of 
sixty-two. His widow is still living, making her home with a son 
in Middleton and is in her eighty-sixth year. Of a family of five 
daughters and five sons all but one survive. The subject of this 
sketch has lived in Madison since 1868. Before his immigration 
to Wisconsin he was a brickmaker by vocation, but after his ar- 
rival he engaged in the hardware business which has furnished him 
a lucrative means of livelihood ever since. His place of business- 
is one of the best equipped and most conveniently located in the 
city. In 1871 Mr. Drews married Miss Dora Rieder, born in Ger- 
many, and by this union is the father of two sons. Fred C. assists 
h's father in the conduct of the hardware business. A sketch of 
Dr. E. H. Drews, the younger, appears elsewhere in this volume. 
Mrs. Drews died May 9, 1901, at her home in this city. She was a 
kindly, genial, wholesome woman whose loss was deeply felt by 
all who knew her. Like her husband she was a communicant of 
the German Lutheran church and a devout worker in the society. 
Mr. Drews is well fixed in a financial way and owns several p'eces 
of valuable city property. Since coming to Madison he has seen 
many changes in the town, but all the while has kept abreast of 
the advance. He is an enterprising, thrifty and substantial cit'zen. 

August Duckert, a prosperous farmer of the town of Cottage 
Grove, was born in the province of Brandenburg, Germany, No- 
vember 13. 1848. His parents were William and Gusta (Grep) 
Duckert, natives of the same place. The father still makes his. 
home in the old country with a daughter. Another daughter is a 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 243 

resident of Jefferson county, Wis. From the time he was six 
years old until he was fourteen he attended the public schools of 
Germany. In 1870 he entered the army of the emperor and served 
throughout the Franco-Prussian War. He was a participant in 
the battle of Metz and many other engagements. His service irt 
the army continued until 1883, when he received an honorable" 
d'scharge and immediately started for America. His first home 
was in Oakland, Jefferson county, where he found employment as 
a farm hand, the wife also being employed on the same farm. 
They continued to reside in this vicinity for twelve years and then 
purchased a house and lot in London, Jefferson county, Mr. Duck- 
ert going to work for the Chicago & Northwestern Railroad com- 
pany. After a three years' residence there he sold his home and 
moved to the town of Cottage Grove, where he owns and man- 
ages a farm of two hundred and forty acres. This place :s said to 
be one of the finest places in the county, although when Mr. Duck- 
ert bought it it was wholly unimproved. In politics Mr. Duckert 
is a Democrat, but has never sought official preferment. In re- 
ligious matters he is allied with the German Lutheran church. On 
November 28, 1874, he married Gusta, daughter of Charles and 
Gusta (Wendland) Rothneck. Mrs. Duckert is a native of Ger- 
many, where she was born May 4, 1854. By her marr'age to Mr.. 
Duckert she is the mother of ten children. Theodore H., born 
March 11, 1875, married Anna Puncel, who died shortly afterward, 
leaving two small children, who now make their home with their 
grandparents. Their father is an employe of the Chicago & North- 
western Ry. Co. William Fred, the second son, born January 29,. 
1877, is in the employe of the same company as a carpenter. He 
marred a Miss Cunningham of Cottage Grove, where he makes his 
home. Charles Fred, born July 20, 1881, makes his home in Los 
Angeles, Cal. Gustaf A., born November 6, 1879, is a blacksmith 
at Cottage Grove ; he married a Miss Nettie Holland of the same 
village. Richard H., born September 18, 1883, is a student at the 
University of Wisconsin at Madison. Henry Fred, born August 
26, 1886 ; Eddie Fred, born August 6, 1888 ; Artie, born May 6, 
1890 ; Dorothy Mary, born July 16, 1893 ; and Gertrude, born Aug- 
ust 9, 1895, all reside at home. The mother was herself one of 
nine children, eight of whom are living. Mr. Duckert is essentially 
a self-made man. All that he possesses he owes to his own efforts, 
and those of his wife, who has Indeed been a helpmate. 

Edward G. Dunlap, of Madison, is a native of Oneida, N. Y., born 
October 3, 1846. His parents, Sylvester Dunlap, born January 26,. 



244 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

1821, and Elinma (Cottrell) Dunlap, born February 16, 1824, were 
natives of the same place. They were married in New York and 
came to the town of Burke, Dane county, in 1844, and bought 
government land ; they returned to New York, but in 1846 came 
back to Burke and located there, where they lived until their death, 
his occurring in December 8, 1902, and hers July 4, 1904. They 
had four children, of whom three are living. They kept a store in 
Burke for about four years. Mr. Dunlap was one of the large 
farmers of the county, owning about four hundred acres of land. 
He was allied with the Democratic party and filled the office of 
assessor for eleven successive years. H s son, Edward, was reared 
in Burke and educated in the public schools of the township ; he is 
a farmer by vocation and owns two hundred and forty-five acres 
of land in the town of Burke, about three and one-half miles from 
the city of Madison. He is a general farmer and stock raiser, and 
a breeder of Galoway cattle. He was married May 9, 1880, to Miss 
Ervilla Ranney, born in Burk, April 3. 1858, daughter of Nathaniel 
and Harriet (Davis) Ranney, both natives of Vermont, the former 
iborn in 1834 and his wife in 1838. They came to Dane county 
rabout 1850, and there he died in 1880; his widow lives in Minne- 
sota. Mr. and Mrs. Dunlap have one son, Edward Gardner, born 
August 14, 1884; he was educated in Burke, follows the occupation 
of a farmer, and lives with his parents. He married December 21, 
1904, Miss Nelly Loomis, daughter of William Loomis of Wind- 
sor, Dane county. Wis. Mr. Dunlap's maternal grandparents were 
Gardner and Irene (Gardner) Cottrell, natives of New York, who 
came to Burke in 1842. In 1848 Mr. Cottrell, following the tide of 
imm'gration which made the years of '48 and '49 an epoch in the 
history of that state, went to California, but returned to Burke in 
1850, and two years later went to Minnesota, in which state both 
he and his wife died. 

Walter R. Dunphy, of the firm of Dunphy & Stone, publishers 
of the Sun Prairie Countryman, one of the representative news- 
papers of Dane county, is one of the most progressive and loyal 
young business men of the village of Sun Pra rie, while he is a 
scion of one of the pioneer families of the county. He was born 
in Bristol township, Dane county, Wisconsin, on July 10, 1875, 
and is a son of Martin and Alice (Croak) Dunphy, both of whom 
were born in Ireland, where they were reared and educated, while 
their marriage was solemnized in Sun Prairie, where they still 
maintain their home. The father is the owner of a valuable farm 
in the immediate vicinity, in Sun Prairie adjoin'ng village, and is 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 245 

one of the honored citizens of that community, having served sev- 
eral terms as one of the board of village trustees. He is a stanch 
adherent of the Democratic party, and both he and his wife are 
communicants of the Church of the Sacred Heart, Roman Catholic. 
They have two sons and two daughters. Martin Dunphy came to 
America in 1852. and located in Dane county in 1856, having been 
identified with the development and upbuilding of the county and 
having always commanded the esteem and confidence of the com- 
munity in wh'ch he has so long made his home. His wife is a 
daughter of Thomas and Margaret (Shea) Croak, who immigrated 
to the United States from the Emerald Isle, in 1855, settling in 
what is now the city of Janesville. Rock county, Wisconsin, where 
they passed the remainder of their lives. Walter R. Dunphy was 
afforded the advantage of the public and parochial schools of Sun 
Prairie, and at the age of fifteen years entered upon an apprentice- 
ship at the printers' trade, becoming a competent workman. In 
1896 he purchased a half interest in the Sun Prairie Countryman, 
with which paper he had previously been connected for some time, 
and he has since been editor and manager of the same. The paper 
is published on Thursday of each week, is a six-column quarto and 
is well edited and well printed, while the plant of the concern is 
well equipped, the job department having a good patronage, wh'le 
the paper circulates in the best homes of this part of the county. 
In politics Mr. Dunphy is a stanch supporter of the Democratic 
party, and he has served as secretary of the board of education and 
as a member of the village board, res'gning the latter position in 
August, 1905 ; while he was president of the board of trustees of 
the Sun Prairie public library from the time of its organization 
until August. 1905, when he resigned the office. He is a communi- 
cant of the Church of the Sacred Heart, and is affiliated with the 
Catholic Order of Foresters and the Knights of Columbus. 

William Durkopp, a well known farmer of Middleton, occupies 
and owns the farm commonly called the Whittlesey place, on which 
he has lived since 1898 and carries on a general farming and stock- 
raising business. He is a Democrat in his political sympathies 
and takes considerable interest in politics, being one of the village 
trustees. His father John Durkopp. was a farmer of Mecklenburg- 
Schwerin, Germany, and there married Miss Frederika Watlee of 
the same place. They came to America in 1855 and landed in New 
York city after a perilous voyage of eight weeks. Mrs. Durkopp's 
parents accompanied them and together they commenced to clear 
forty acres of wild land in section 15. A log cabin was built which 



•24G • HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

the family occupied for a time. This farm was sold and another 
near Springfield purchased, wh'ch was partly improved. Mr. 
Durkopp was a Democrat but never an office-seeker. He and his 
wife were loyal members of the German Lutheran church. Seven 
children were born to them: Dora, the wife of Henry Rickman of 
Hungerford, Mich. ; Charles, a farmer of Middleton ; Mary, who 
married John Lubcke of Middleton ; William, the subject of this 
sketch; Frank, a furniture dealer and photographer In Middleton; 
Caroline, the w'fe of Louis Russ of Middleton; Augusta, the 
youngest daughter, married Charles Wessenberg of Middleton. 
William was born in Middleton, February 13, 1859, was educated 
in the district school and worked on the parental farm until he was 
twenty-seven years of age. May 18, 1888, he married Miss Carrie 
Wessenberg, daughter of William and Frederika Wessenberg, 
natives of Mecklenburg-Schwerin. They have two children, Elsie 
and John. 

Henry L. Duxstad is the owner and manager of a fine farm of 
one hundred acres in section 1, town of Christiania, where he has 
resided since 1881. The property was purchased by Mr. Duxstad 
soon after his marriage and since the death of his wife he has lived 
there with his children. Considerable tobacco is raised upon his 
farm, also grain, hay, etc., but dairying is Mr. Duxstad's main in- 
terest and to his stock he devotes much of his time and care. 
Lars O. Duxstad, father of Henry, was a native of Voss, Norway, 
and came to the United States when he was a young man. For a 
time he worked out upon farms in Illinois and later bought for 
himself a farm of one hundred and sixty acres in Dane county, 
Wis., near Albion. He was one of the earliest settlers of the 
neighborhood and his new purchase was wild and unimproved. A 
dug-out sheltered him for the first few months and the game he 
could shoot added to his support. By patient labor the land was 
cleared and a more comfortable dwelling erected, where Mr. Dux- 
stad spent the rest of his life. He died in 1865 and his wife in 
1902. Mrs. Duxstad was also born in Voss, Norway, and was Miss 
Isabelle Halloway. She spent three years in Chicago before her 
marriage to Mr. Duxstad. Both were devoted members of the 
Norwegian Lutheran church, whose organization in the township 
they helped to establish. Six children were born to them. Ole, 
the oldest son, resides in Nebraska on a farm ; Charlie is with his 
older brother; Annie, married Andrew Ellison of Christiania; 
Henry L., is the subject of this sketch; Betsey (deceased) ; Lewis, 
is a ranchman of Sweetwater county, Wyoming. Henry L. was 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 247 

born in Albion, February 14, 1859, attended the home schools and 
with the exception of a few months' work for the neighboring far- 
mers, remained with his father until his marriage. In 1881, he 
married Miss Margaret T. Nory, who was born in Jefferson county, 
Wis., daughter of Ole Nory. The marriage was blessed with four 
children. Lawrence is a telegraph operator of Alliance, Neb., on 
the C, B. & Q. R. R. ; Isabella, George and Joseph are with their 
father at the old home. Mr. Duxstad is an independent voter in 
political matters and not allied with any political party. 

Frank Hynard Edsal, M. D., is comparatively a new comer in 
Madison, but has in the few years that he has practiced in the city, 
established in his specialty as an oculist, a reputation for careful, 
conscientious and skillful work, not only in the city but through- 
out southern Wisconsin. He was born in Hamburg, New Jersey, 
August 12, 1862. His early education was received in the schools 
of Stamford, Connecticut and his medical training at the Univer- 
sity of Pennsylvania. Before coming to Madison, Dr. Edsall prac- 
ticed for seventeen years in the city of Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, 
and held honorable positions among the medical fraternity of that 
state ; he was president of the Pittsburg Academy of Medicine and 
secretary of the Alleghany County Medical Society. He has inter- 
ested himself in matters of public welfare since coming to Madison 
in 1898, and especially in connection with the Carnagie Library 
building. To his personal efforts more than to those of any other 
person is clue the fact that the Madison free library is housed in 
the beautiful and commodious building on the corner of Carroll 
and Dayton streets erected by the gift of $75,000 from Mr. Andrew 
Carnagie. He has been a member of the board of directors of the 
Madison free library, and is intensely interested in its service and 
development. Dr. Edsall is also interested in athletics and belongs 
to the Country Club, having been one of the twenty charter mem- 
bers ; he is now secretary of a society numbering two hundred, with 
a waiting list. The club owns a beautiful club house and grounds 
near Maple Bluff and a short distance east of Lake Mendota. The 
doctor has been a member and a vestryman of Grace Episcopal 
church and owns a commodious and pleasant home on the corner 
of Langdon and Henry streets. He is also a man of good literary 
ability, is a member of the Madison Literary Club and is the asso- 
ciate editor of the Wisconsin Medical Journal. He married .Miss 
Anna E. Warner, of Wilmington, Del., who has, since coming to 
Madison, entered actively into the social life of the city ; she is at 
present secretary of the Madison Woman's Club. 



248 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

Gunder Edwards, dealer in flour, feed and seeds. Deerfield, was 
born in Telemarken, Norway, January 2, 1841; his 'parents, Avan 
Edwards and Ingeborg Olesdaughter, both being natives of that 
province. In 1859 he came to America, locating in the town of 
Burke, Dane county, Wis. His cousin advanced him the money 
to pay his way to this country and for a year he had to work to re- 
pay his debt. He then worked for another farmer during the win- 
ter, after which he was employed by J. V. Robbins until August 15, 
1862, when he enlisted as a private in Company I. Twenty-third 
Wisconsin Infantry. He was in the engagements at Chickasaw 
Bayou, Arkansas Post, Cypress Bend. Port Gibson, Champion's 
Hill, Black River Bridge, the siege of Vicksburg, and several minor 
skirmishes. On November 3, 1863, he was taken prisoner at Car- 
rion Crow Bayou, La., and was held until May 1, 1864, when he 
was exchanged and rejoined his regiment. He was then at the 
battle of Little Jackson, La., in the military operations about 
Spanish Fort and Fort Blakely, and was mustered out at Mobile, 
Ala., July 5, 1865. After being discharged from the service he 
returned to Wisconsin and in the fall of 1865 bought forty-five 
acres of land from his cousin and began farming. Soon afterward 
he bought forty acres in the town of Madison. In 1869 he sold 
both these tracts and bought a farm in the town of Pleasant Springs, 
where he made his home until 1898. In 1886 he bought two hun- 
dred and twenty acres in the town of Christiana, but did not live 
on it, and owns the same at present. During the last five years of 
his residence at Pleasant Springs he conducted a feed and imple- 
ment store in the town of Stoughton. In 1897 he came to the vil- 
lage of Deerfield, where he started another store of the same kind 
in partnership with his son Alfred, and in 1898 removed his family 
to Deerfield. A year later he sold the business in Stoughton to 
John Bjoin. In the fall of 1902 he sold the implement business 
in Deerfield to Alfred Edwards & Co., but retained the feed, seed 
and grain business. Mr. Edwards is a fine example of what can 
be accomplished by industry and frugal management. Starting in 
life without a dollar he has, without any assistance, accumulated 
a competency for himself, and has given his family comfortable 
surroundings. Politically he is a Republican. For nine years he 
was school treasurer of the town of Pleasant Springs ; was one year 
the town treasurer ; was several years a member of the board of 
supervisors, and is now serving his fifth year as director of the 
Deerfield high school. He is a member of the Norwegian Lutheran 
church and was for six years counsel of the synod. On July 1, 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 249 

1862, he married Miss Sibbe L., daughter of Narie and Margaret 
(Leverson) Torgeison, of the town of Burke, and to this marriage 
have been born the following children. Eddie N., born May 23, 

1863. married Anna Johnson and now lives at McFarland, Wis. ; 
Mary O., born July 27, 1866, married Andrew Rine and lives on the 
the farm in Pleasant Springs ; Emma A.. September 4, 1869, now 
Mrs. Nels Orvold, lives in the town of Dunn; Theodore, January 
21, 1872, married Mary Olson and lives at McFarland; Alfred, 
April 28, 1874, married Carolina Jensen and lives in Deerfield ;. 
Tilla A., born May 8, 1876, married Thomas Ossen and lives at 
McFarland; Anna K., born November 16, 1878, now at Janesville,. 
where she holds a position as stenographer and typewriter; Mal- 
vina, born April 10, 1881, and died December 22, 1884; Gerhajt, 
born July 27, 1884, and married Lizzie Quammen, and Malvina, 
born December 3, 1886, are at home with their parents. 

Christ O. Egeland, timekeeper for the Stoughton Wagon Com- 
pany, was born in Norway, March 3, 1858, coming of stanch 
Norseland stock and being a son of Ole and Martha (Johnson) 
Yorgeson. He was reared and educated in the land of his nativ- 
ity, completing the curriculum of the common schools and supple- 
menting this by a course in a local school of navigation, where he- 
secured a diploma of the best degree in 1877. He then secured a 
position on a sailing vessel named "Ganymedes," on which he held 
the office of second mate, later was promoted first mate. He 
crossed the Atlantic twelve times while in the maratime service, 
remaining all this while on the same vessel. In the spring of 1882; 
he took up his permanent residence in America, making Wiscon- 
sin his destination and settling in Stoughton, where he soon after- 
ward entered the employ of the Stoughton Wagon Company, his. 
first service being work in connection with the making of wagon 
boxes. Later he was assigned to a position in the carriage depart- 
ment and still later was employed in the pattern-making depart- 
ment. With the exception of a period of about eighteen months, 
he has remained consecutively in the employ of this company, and 
has won promotion through faithful and effective service, having 
held his present position since 1900. In politics he is an advocate 
of the cause of prohibition and he takes a lively interest in public 
affairs of a local order, and served one term as representative of 
the third ward of Stoughton on the board of county supervisors. 
He is a prominent and valued member of the Norwegian and Dan- 
ish Methodist Episcopal church, in which he is a local preacher. 
Mr. Eg-eland has been twice married. November 12, 1881, he 



250 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

wedded Miss Olena Olsen, daughter of Paul Inborg Olsen, of 
Norway, and of this union were born five children, namely : Olga, 
Emma, Elna, Oscar and Clarence. Mrs. Egeland was called to the 
life eternal on October 10, 1892, and on July 25, 189G, Mr. Ege- 
land was united in marriage to Miss Martha Helbarg, daughter of 
Michael Helbarg, a native of Norway, and they are the parents of 
three sons. — Merrill, Wilbur and Earl Morris. 

Rev. Thore Eggen, pastor of Bethel Lutheran church, Madison, 
was born in Os, Norway, July 6, 1859, the son of Nels and Marit 
(Nygaard) Eggen. The family came to America in 1870. locating 
first in Rushford, Minnesota, where they remained two years. In 
1872 they moved to Barron county, Wisconsin, where the father 
took up a homestead and which is his home at the present time, 
the nearest village being the little hamlet of Prairie Farm. The 
mother died in 1874. Rev. Mr. Eggen is the second of a family of 
seven children; the others are Paul in Minnesota; Jens (deceased) ; 
Ingred, married to C. P. Hanson, of New Auburn, Chippewa county, 
the supervisor of assessments ; Ole and Mollie. (twins) ; the former 
is a mail carrrier in Omaha, Nebraska, and the latter a resident of 
New Auburn ; Amelia, married Oscar Anderson, of Sand Creek, 
Dane county ; Peter, the youngest, resides on the home farm with 
his father. The subject of this sketch received his early education 
in Norway, as he was eleven years of age at the time of the removal 
of the family to America. After coming to this country he was sent 
to the public schools of Minnesota and Wisconsin and in 1873 he 
entered Luther College at Decorah, Iowa, from which he was grad- 
uated in 1879 with the degree of A.B. ; he then took a three years' 
course at the Lutheran seminary, of Madison, receiving his degree 
from this institution in 1882. He served as assistant pastor of the 
Norwegian Lutheran church of Decorah, for two years and was then 
installed as the pastor of the same church, which position he filled 
until 1892. At that time he responded to a call from the Lutheran 
church of Grand Forks, North Dakota, where he remained until 1895. 
He then accepted the pastorate of the Bethel church of Madison, 
which has been his field of work up to the present time. The 
church was organized in 1855 and has a membership of about four 
hundred. The church edifice is on the corner of North Hamilton 
and Butler streets, and its first pastor was Rev. H. A. Preus who 
officiated for a long term of twenty-seven years. Rev. Mr. Eggen 
was married on August 2(5, 1882, to Miss Regina Neprud, of Coon 
Valley, Vernon county, Wisconsin. She is the daughter of Nels 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 251 

Neprud, deceased. Her parents were among the early settlers in 
that part of the state. 

Lars S. Egre is one of the prosperous farming community of 
Christiania. He is the son of Stephen Sjuren Egre and Ingobar 
(Quale) Egre, natives of New Bergen, Norway. Both parents 
were educated in Norway and came to the United States early in 
their married life. In 1850 they embarked for Quebec but imme- 
diately proceeded further west and settled in Dane county, Wis., 
section 4, town of Christiania. Their farm consisted of one hun- 
dred and twenty acres of wild land, which the family cleared and 
improved. Seven children were born to Stephen Egre. Seren S. 
lives in Pleasant Springs ; Lars S. is the second son ; Breta is Mrs. 
Charles Roam of Christiania ; Martha is the wife of Martin Sco- 
land and resi.des in Turner. S. D. ; Annie is Mrs. H. O. Tuxley of 
Cambridge ; Betsy is the wife of Theo. Olie of Eau Claire county ; 
Andrew makes his home in Christiania. Mr. Egre died in 1861 and 
his wife in 1902. Lars S. was born in Christiania, Dane county, 
Wis., February 18, 1852, attended the district school near his home 
and lived at home with his father assisting in the management of 
the farm until he was twenty-six years of age. At this time, 
November 31, 1878, he married and soon after purchased a farm 
of one hundred and twenty acres in section 10, town of Christiania. 
All of the improvements have been made by Mr. Egre- and in 1899 
a large brick farmhouse was erected. Mr. Egre carries on a pros- 
perous general farming business and is well posted on modern farm- 
ing. Mrs. Egre was Miss Bertha Roam, daughter of John and 
Barbara (Lien) Roam of Normandahl, Norway. The Roam family 
were pioneer settlers of Dane county. To Mr and Mrs. Egre were 
born six children ; Nelia D., Ella, John E.,' Sandie A., Belinda L.. and 
Lenota J., all of whom reside with their parents. The family are 
members of the Norwegian Lutheran church south of Rockdale. 
Mr. Egre is a loyal adherent of the Republican party. 

George Eighmy, deseased, was born in Genesee county. N. Y., in 
October. 1831. His parents. Jacob and Pamelia Eighmy, were na- 
tives of the same state, where Jacob Eighmy was a farmer. 
George was the second of six children, the others being Freeman, 
who now lives in McFarland ; Eugene, who makes his home in Madi- 
son ; Elizabeth, now Mrs. Moulton ; Kate and John. George received 
what education the common schools of his native county afforded. 
Upon the completion of his school work his first labor was done as 
a "farmer. In 1864 he struck out for the west, and for three years 
made Chicago his home. In 1867 he purchased sixty-five acres 



252 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

of land on Liberty Prairie in Dane county, and moved onto the 
property the same year. For fifteen years Mr. Eighmy farmed 
this property, and in 1883 removed to Deerfield, where the following 
eleven years he managed the leading hostelry of that village. At 
the end of that time he brought his wife and family to Madison 
and built the handsome residence at 1010 East Gorham street, 
where the widow and the son now make their home. It was here 
that Mr. Eighmy passed away in November 1898. On March 15, 
1864, he married Martha, daughter of John and Nancy (Schofield) 
Radcliff. Though Mrs. Eighmy was born in Northhampton, Mass., 
her parents were natives of England, who early in the century 
located in Massachusetts and later moved to Genesee county, N. Y., 
where they died. Their children were Betsy, widow of Thomas 
Brierly, living in New York state; Esther, widow of .Alva Holton 
of New Hartford, N. Y. ; Mary. Mrs. Joseph Wrigley, deceased ; 
Joseph, an architect of Chicago; Benjamin, a farmer living near 
New Hartford, N. Y. ; Jane, widow of George Coles, living in Chi- 
cago ; Sarah, Mrs. Park Overocker, residing in New Hartford N. Y. ; 
and Mrs. Eighmy. To Mr. and Mrs. Eighmy was born one son, 
George Sanford, who is now a prosperous real estate dealer in Mad- 
ison. Though Mr. Eighmy never aspired to office, he was a life 
long Democrat and his opinion was highly valued by his party 
leaders. 

Charlies A. Elies is the owner of the mill at Token Creek and 
learned the miller's business with his father in Germany. Charles 
August Elies, father of Charles A., was born in Germany in 1831 
and was a miller. He married Miss Mary Oltersdorf, born in 1838 
in Germany, and six children blessed the marriage, of whom three 
daughters and one son are living. Mr. Elies died in Germany in 
1878 and his wife in 1876. Charles A., their son, was born in 
Germany, December 15, 1861, was educated in Germany and worked 
in the mill with his father. In 1883. he came to the United States, 
worked in a mill at Ripon and then went to Markesan, Green Lake 
county where he resided for six years. In 1891 he was employed 
by Gottlieb Maisch of Token Creek in his mill, where he remained 
for three years. On account of ill health he left the mill and 
worked as a carpenter for five years, after which he rented the mill 
at Token Creek and finally purchased it. He is also the owner of 
his home in Token Creek and fifty-five acres of farm land. Mrs. 
Elies was before her marriage Miss Paulina Paskarbeit and was 
born in Germany, January 15, 1863, daughter of Carl and Heft- 
rietta (Kordasky) Paskarbeit, who came from Germany to Ripon 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 253 

township and thence to Token Creek. Six children were born to 
them, of whom four are living. Air. and Airs. Elies were married 
June 15, 1884, and have had nine children. Only five are living; 
Herman, Martha, Ida, Emma and Arthur. The family attend the 
Lutheran church of Sun Prairie. Mr. Elies is allied with the 
Democratic party in his political sympathy. 

Nelson W. Ellefson, proprietor of the Ellefson lumber yards at 
1988 Railroad street. Madison, was born in the town of Pleasant 
'Springs, Dane county, October 6, 1856. He is a son of Torbjorn 
Skaato and Sigri (Felland) Ellefson, both born in Norway. The 
father was one of the pioneers of Pleasant Springs, settling in 
what afterwards became the Norwegian settlement of Koshkonong. 
He came in 1845 and his wife a year later, and they were married 
shortly after her arrival. The father was a farmer. He was a 
devout member of the Lutheran church and helped hew the tim- 
bers of the first church of that denomination, built in this section of 
the state. His death occurred in Iowa in 1876, in his sixty-third 
year. His widow is still living at the age of eighty-two, making 
her home with a daughter, Airs. A. G. Felland, in the town of 
Burke. There were seven children in the family. Eliza, the wife 
of Dr. Sanderson, died at her home in Minnesota recently. She 
was fifty-four years of age. Stena is the wife of Lars Anderson 
and now lives in Minnesota. Air. Anderson is a veteran of the 
historic Fifteenth Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry. Martin is liv- 
ing in South Dakota. Trina. Airs. A. G. Felland, lives in the town 
of Burke. Ingoberg died in Alinnesota at the age of twenty. 
Sophia, the youngest, now Airs. Knute Reindahl resides in Chi- 
cago. N. W. Ellefson attended the schools of Des Moines, la., 
and Aladison, and upon the completion of his studies engaged in 
the lumber business, becoming a representative of a firm in Winona, 
Minn. Subsequently he removed to Alinneapblis to take up the 
same line of work. In 1899 he returned to Aladison, purchased a 
lumber yard and "set up" in business. Since that time he has been 
most eminently successful in operating it. In November, 1883. Mr. 
Ellefson was united in marriage to Aliss Sophia Sanderson, a na- 
tive of this county, and a daughter of Evan and Serena Sanderson, 
both deceased. This union has been blessed with five children. 
Alabel and Elmer Thaulow, both graduates of the Aladison high 
school, are members of the class of 1907 in the University of Wis- 
consin. Clarence F. is also a graduate of the same preparatory 
school and is attending the University of Wisconsin. Elsie Lu- 
cretia has just completed her first year in the high school. The 



£54 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

youngest is Edward Arnold. The family are all members of the 
United Lutheran church. The father is a member of the Blue 
Lodge of the Masonic order and of the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows. He has been the incumbent of all the offices of the latter 
organization. Among his friends Mr. Ellefson is known as a man 
of sterling integrity, sound business sense and unimpeachable 
character. 

John Ellestad gained prominence and success as one of the pro- 
gressive farmers of Blooming Grove township, where he accumu- 
lated an extensive land estate and where he continued to reside until 
his death, which occurred July 10, 1891. He was a son of John and 
Grace Ellestad, who were natives of Norway, and he was born in 
1853, in Norway, coming with his parents to America before he 
was a year old. The family located in Dane county, near the pres- 
ent homestead farm on which his widow and family reside, and he 
was reared to manhood in this township, remaining with his parents 
until he was about twenty-one years of age and assisting in re- 
claiming and operating the home farm. He attended the district 
school at intervals, when his aid was not required in the work of the 
farm, and on the foundation thus established he rounded out a good 
fund of knowledge, being a man of intelligence, well informed in re- 
gard to the affairs of the day. After attaining his majority he was 
employed on the farm of one of his brothers for several years, and 
he continued to work as a farm employe until he was about thirty- 
one years of age. when he purchased the two hundred and eight 
acres which now constitutes the family homestead. He made the 
best of improvements on the place, which is one of the valuable 
farms of the county. He manifested much energy and ambition, 
while he so ordered his life as to retain at all times the unquali- 
fied esteem and confidence of his fellow men, while his interests 
were centered in his home and family, where his noble character 
showed forth in its brightest form. He was a loyal supporter of 
the Democratic party, and was a member of the Norwegian Luth- 
eran church, as are also his widow and children. In 1875 Mr. 
Ellestad was united in marriage to Miss Anna Halverson, daughter 
of Evan and Anna Halverson, of Blooming Grove township, and of 
the seven children of this union all are living except the eldest, 
John J., who was born Dec. 1, 1878, and who died Aug. 1, 1901. 
The names and respective dates of birth of the other children are 
as follows: Evan, Oct. 15, 1879; Anna Julia, Aug. 4, 1881; Sarah 
Bertina, Jan. 20, 1884; Theodore, Dec. 8, 1885; Henry, Oct. 29, 
1887; and Anna Alice, July 5, 1890. 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 255 

Nels J. Ellestad, one of the prominent farmers and honored and 
influential citizens of Blooming Grove township, which he served 
many years in the office of township supervisor, was born in Nor- 
way, August 9, 1841, being a son of John and Gro (Peterson) 
Ellestad. The father was born in the year 1805, and in his native 
land learned the shoemaking trade, to which he there gave his 
attention as a vocation until 18-18, when he immigrated with his 
family to America, sailing from the city of Bergen on May 7, and 
arriving in New York city on July 4. The family came at once to 
Dane county, settling in Blooming Grove township, where the 
father purchased a tract of wild land, in section 23. The greater 
portion of the land was covered with heavy timber, and no portion 
was under cultivation. He erected a log house and bravely set him- 
self to the task of reclaiming the land and making a home for his 
little family. He became one of the well-to-do farrmers of the 
township and continued to reside on the homestead until his death, 
which occurred in 1891, his widow surviving him, having attained 
the venerable age of eighty-nine years. Of the ten children nine are 
still living, three residing in Blooming Grove township and the 
other six in the state of Iowa. Nels J. Ellestad was a lad of seven 
years at the time of the family immigration to the United States, 
and owing to the exigencies of time and space his educational ad- 
vantages thereafter were limited in scope, being confined to an irreg- 
ular attendance in the district schools of Blooming Grove town- 
ship. His parents were in limited circumstances, and the condi- 
tion of life in the new country called for strenuous exertion on the 
part of all members of the family. The county was sparsely settled 
and Milwaukee was the nearest market point, so all grain had to 
be transported to that place, usually by means of ox teams. Deer 
and other wild game were plentiful and did much to supply the 
family larders of the hardy pioneers. The subject of this sketch 
at once began to lend his aid in the clearing and cultivation of the 
farm, and has been said of that period in his career. "Those early 
days of industry were of incalculable benefit to him, as thereby 
wre inculcated habits of usefulness and frugality that have never 
been forgotten." He continued to reside on the home farm and 
assist in its management until he had reached the legal majority, 
when he left the parental roof and for the ensuing two years 
turned his hand to whatever honest labor he could secure. He 
then purchased a portion of his present homestead, which now 
comprises two hundred and twelve acres, finely improved, and 
constituting one of the most valuable landed estates of Dane county. 



256 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

He purchased the property from his father, and the same is loca- 
ted in section 23, 26, and 27. Thrift and prosperity are in evidence 
on every side, and with substantial buildings and finely cultivated 
fields, the place is one which cannot fail to attract attention as evi- 
dently representing the property of a man of enterprise and pro- 
gressive ideas. In his political allegiance Mr. Ellestad has ever 
been a stanch supporter of the Democratic party, and for two 
years he held the office of township treasurer, while he was a mem- 
ber of the township board of supervisors for many years. He and 
his family hold membership in the Norwegian Lutheran church. 
April 15, 1862, Mr. Ellestad was united in marriage to Miss Anna 
Nelson, who was born in Norway, being a daughter of Tolaf Nel- 
son and Mary (Peterson), who were later residents of Crawford 
county, Wis. Concerning the children of this union the following 
record is entered : Julia, born May 16, 1863, is the wife of Edde 
Ofrerdahl, of Springdale township ; Mary, born February 5, 1865, 
died October 26, 1900 ; Anna, born March 23, 1867, remains at the 
parental home; John, born May 10, 1869, died February 19, 1901, 
leaving a widow and one child, residents of Green county, Wis- 
consin. The other children remain at the parental home, their 
names and respective dates of birth being as follows : Tolaf, De- 
cember 29, 1871; Nels, Jr., February 23, 187-4; Peter, September 1, 
1876; Marin, November 27, 1878; William, January 12, 1881; 
Albert, November 27, 1883 ; and Emma, February 20, 1886. 

John O. Ellickson manages the farm of one hundred acres in 
section 27, town of Christiania, of which eighty acres was pur- 
chased by his father in 1880. He was born in Janesville, Septem- 
ber 14, 1864, son of Lars and Anna Marie (Onstad) Ellickson, who 
were both natives of Norway. Lars was born in Hardanger and 
in 1857 came to Wisconsin, where he met his wife, who came from 
Sogen in 1854. Mr. Ellickson was a tailor and worked at that 
trade for thirty years. He then bought the farm in Dane county 
and with the aid of his sons erected buildings and made many im- 
provements on the property where together they carried on a suc- 
cessful farming business. Mrs. Ellickson died in 1896 and her 
husband lives with his son's family on the old homestead. Four 
children were born to them ; Edward has a farm in section 21, 
Christiania, married Betsey Teigset and has five children, Alfred, 
Luella. Clarence, Bernie and Minerva; John O. is the subject of this 
sketch ; Louisa is Mrs. Oscar Lier of Rio, Wis., and has one 
daughter, Mytle ; Arthur C. is a farmer at Arlington, Wis., and 
married Charlotte Johnson. The family belong to the First Nor- 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 257 

wegian Synod Lutheran church. John O. and his brother Edward 
attended the Janesville public school and John O. has always lived 
with his father. October 13, 190-A, he married Miss Alma Louisa 
Lier of Christiania, daughter of Lars and Gunild Lier. Lars is the 
son of Knudt Lier. a pioneer of Christiania. A daughter, Mel- 
vina G. was born to Mr. and Mrs. John Ellickson December 
25. 1905. 

Lars O. Ellingsrud was born in Norway, March, 1857, and died 
in Albion, Dane county, Wis., in February, 1888. He was a promi- 
nent farmer of the township where he lived since 1876. Lars was 
the son of Ole Ellingsrud, who spent his entire life in Norway. 
"V\ "hen he was twenty-one years of age Lars decided to try his for- 
tunes in the west and made the voyage to the United States in an 
old sailing vessel, which was many weeks crossing the Atlantic. 
For several years he lived in Minneapolis and in 1876 came to 
Albion, where for two years he rented a farm and then puchased 
one hundred and twenty acres in section 5. On it stood an old log 
hut ; the stables and all of the equipment, including comfortable 
farm buildings, were added by Mr. Ellingsrud, who was a success- 
ful farmer. In 1876 Mr. Ellingsrud was married to Miss Andria 
Stokstad, who was also a native of Norway. Mrs. Ellingsrud still 
makes the old farm her home. Three children were born to the 
marriage. The oldest daughter, Clara, is Mrs. John Halvorson of 
Dunkirk; Rudolph O., who manages the farm, was married 
November 22, 1905, to Miss Louie Davis, who was born in Albion, 
daughter of Hiram and Maria Davis ; Inga the youngest daughter, 
lives with her mother. Rudolph has always lived at home, attended 
the home schools and at the age of sixteen years assumed the man- 
agement of the farm for his parents. He raises tobacco, oats, corn, 
hay, etc., and keeps a herd of about twenty-five cattle and also is 
interested in poultry raising. He is active in matters which con- 
cern the welfare of the community, is a member of the school board 
and road commissioner. Rudolph is allied with the Republican 
party. The family is identified with the United Lutheran church 
of Stoughton. 

John A. Elliott, a successful farmer of Black Earth, was born in 
Kennebec county, Maine, August 22, 1827. His parents were 
Jotham and Lydia (Meder) Elliott, both natives of Massachusetts. 
Early in life Jotham Elliott went to Maine where he worked in 
the woods for several years, and then removed with his family to 
Grafton county, New Hampshire. That county was the family 
home for about twenty years. In 1856, he came to Wisconsin, re- 
17 — iii 



258 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

maining about six years ; he then moved to Iowa, and after a resi- 
dence there of two years he came to Black Earth. The subject's 
mother was a devout member of the Baptist church. Of the eight 
children of Jotham and Lyclia Elliott only two are now living, 
Mary Ann, widow of I. J. Sargent, living in Brookfield, Vt., and 
John A., the subject of this sketch. When he was fourteen years 
of age, John left his home to "work out" and in 1854 he came west, 
as far as Janesville, Wis. In November, 1857, he came to Madison ; 
lived one year in the town of Verona, and moved from there to 
Blue Mounds, where he lived on a rented farm nine years, having 
also a forty which he had purchased ; after selling that he lived in 
Lafayette county for two years and then bought one hundred and 
ninety-four acres of partly improved land on section 27 in the town 
of Black Earth. In 1878 he sold the farm and purchased nine acres 
in Black Earth village, where he has since resided. Mr. Elliott is 
one of the pillars of the Black Earth Congregational church. His 
politics fit in with his religion, — he is a strong Prohibitionist. On 
November 24, 1859, he married Clarinda (Pitkin) Elliott, the widow 
of his brother Jonathan, by whom she had five children, Joseph P., 
Jonathan P., Irving J., Clara J. and Naidie. John A. Elliott was 
the father of one child, John F., who died at the age of sixteen. 

Harvey H. Emery is a well-known and successful farmer of Rut- 
land, which was his birth-place. John P. Emery, his father, was a 
carpenter in Vermont, married his first wife there and came west 
in 1846, locating in the town of Dunkirk, where he purchased one 
hundred and sixty acres of land. This he later exchanged for a 
farm in Rutland and in 1867 bought a farm in section 11, which 
he subsequently made his home. Five children were born to his 
first wife, of whom J. 0. Emery of Madison is the only survivor. 
Catherine, George, Jane and Henry were the other children. Henry 
was killed at Gainesville during the Civil War. John Emery's sec- 
ond wife was Miss Mary Danks of Vermont and three sons were 
born to them, Harvey, Charles and Ellsworth, of whom only the 
first is living. The Emery family have always been active workers 
in the Free-will Baptist church, of which H. H. Emery contem- 
plates writing a history. H. H. Emery was born August 3, 1857, 
attended school at Rutland and at Whitewater and early engaged 
in farming. His present farm he has occupied since 1880 and has 
improved it and managed it carefully. It is in very prosperous 
condition and on it Mr. Emery carries on a large business. He is 
an independent and prohibitionist in politics and is at present town 
assessor, though he has never endeavored to obtain political recog- 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 359 

nition, unlike his father, who held many offices in the county. In 
January, 1879, Mr. Emery married Miss Hannah A. Hunt, daughter 
of Charles and Hannah Hunt who came from England to 
Herkimer county. N. Y., in 1839. They later located in Rutland, 
where Mr. Hunt owned a farm. Of their thirteen children. Mrs. 
Emery is the only one living. Mr. and Mrs. Emery have three 
children, all graduates from the Stoughton high school. The old- 
er daughter, Linnie L., is also a graduate from the Whitewater 
normal school and was a successful teacher before her marriage. 
She is the wife of Prof. T. I. Doudna, who is a prominent and suc- 
cessful teacher, at present located in Richland Center. Lloyd 
Franklin, the only son, is a farmer of Rutland and attended the 
state agricultural school in 1892-3. Maud A., the younger daugh- 
ter, resides with her parents. 

J. Q. Emery, dairy and food commissioner of the state of Wis- 
consin, was born in the town of Liberty, Licking county, Ohio, 
September 15, 1843. His ancestor, Anthony Emery, landed in Bos- 
ton in 1635. His parental grand parents were Caleb and Margaret 
(Powel) Emery; his parents were John P. and Huldah (Darling) 
Emery, the former a native of New York and the latter of Ver- 
mont. John P. brought his family to Dane county in 1816, settling 
in the town of Dunkirk, and later removing to the town of Rutland. 
Both he and his wife were members of the Free Will Baptist church, 
the first edifice of that denomination being built on his farm. He 
was several times a member of the town board of supervisors. By 
his marriage to Huldah Darling he was the father of five children : 
Catherine ; Henry, a member of the Seventh Wisconsin Infantry 
and killed in the battle of Gainesville, August 23, 1862 ; J. Q., who 
also, in August, 1862, enlisted with Captan Miller in the Twentieth 
Regiment of Wisconsin volunteers ; being under age, and having 
then his only brother in the Seventh Regiment, Wisconsin volun- 
teers, his father refused to sign his enlistment papers ; George and 
Jane, who died in childhood. After the death of his first wife, 
which occurred in 1851, he married Mary Danks, and to this union 
were born three children : Harvey Hall, a farmer ; Ellsworth, died 
in childhood ; and another child who died in infancy. J. O. Emery 
received his elementary education in the common schools of Dane 
county. He was graduated from the Albion academy, receiving 
the degree of Ph. B. in 1866. In 1882 Beloit college conferred upon 
him the honorary degree of A. M. His career as a teacher began 
in 1863, when he taught for some time in the district schools. Af- 
ter his graduation from Albion, he was macTe a teacher there, and 



260 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

later was elected without opposition to the position of school sup- 
erintendent for the eastern district of the county, resigning two 
years later (in 1869) to accept the principalship of the Union 
graded schools of Grand Rapids. Shortly after his removal to 
Grand Rapids, he was made school superintendent for Wood 
county and was re-elected inl871. These two positions he held 
for four years, resigning both in 1873 to accept the principalship 
of the Fort Atkinson high school, in which position he remained 
for sixteen years. Of his work in this school, the Columbian His- 
tory of Education in Wisconsin contains this estimate : "Here for 
sixteen years Professor Emery labored with an earnestness and de- 
votion to the work which attracted the attention of educators 
throughout the state, and won for him the love and admiration of 
hundreds of pupils who were fortunate enough to come under his 
able and inspiring instruction. Few men in the history of Wiscon- 
sin have been so universally approved and commended by parents 
and citizens as was Professor Emery in Fort Atkinson. While en- 
gaged as principal of this school, he became widely known through- 
out the state by the interest he manifested in the state teachers' 
association, the efficient work which he performed in the capacity 
of instructor of institutes, and in the diligent sympathy he has 
shown in aiding and encouraging the younger members of the 
teaching profession." In 1889, he was chosen unanimously by the 
state board of normal school regents as president of the state nor- 
mal school at River Falls, without any solicitation whatever on his 
part. His occupancy of this position continued for four years 
during which time the school experienced such phenomenal growth 
as to attract general attention throughout Wisconsin. In conse- 
quence of the wide acquaintance of the people with his ability, he 
was nominated for state superintendent of schools on the Republi- 
can ticket in the fall of 1894, and was elected. He was re-nomi- 
nated by acclamation and re-elected in 1896, receiving 265,940 
votes, the largest number ever given to any candidate for a state 
office in Wisconsin. As state superintendent he was ex-officio a 
member of the board of regents of normal schools and of the state 
university, of the state library commission and of the geological 
survey. Mr. Emery has been president of the Wisconsin teacher's 
association and for many years has taken an active part in the pro- 
ceedings of that organization. Previous to his election as state 
superintendent he was frequently appointed official visitor to nor- 
mal schools, and was a member of the board of examiners for 
teachers' state certificates. As state superintendent he maintained 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 261 

the confidence and esteem of the public. When Professor Emery- 
assumed charge as dairy and food commissioner of the state of 
Wisconsin there were but five members on the commission. Un- 
der his administration the number of commissioners has been in- 
creased to eighteen and every one is an expert ; instead of one 
chemist, as when he assumed charge, there are now three. The 
laws relating to dairy and food, under his recommendations and 
efforts, have been greatly modified and expanded. The exhibits 
Professor Emery has made of food adulterations at state and county 
fairs and in all the leading cities of the state, accompanied by ad- 
dresses on food adulteration, have resulted in a great awakening of 
the public on that question. At the time of his appointment he 
was president of the state dairymen's association and a member 
of the board of regents of normal schools. Mr. Emery cast his first 
vote for Abraham Lincoln, and has never voted any other than the 
Republican ticket since. Probably no man is more widely known 
in the agricultural and educational circles than is Professor Emery. 
In 1869 he married Marie T., daughter of Giles F. Lawton, of Al- 
bion, and to this union have been born two children, — Daisy Mabel, 
who died at the age of twenty months ; and Sydney Lawton, now 
in company wtih his father and managing the farm in Albion. 
Both Professor and Mrs. Emery are members of the Congrega- 
tional church. 

Merton Jay Emerson, one of the well-known citizens of Cottage 
Grove townshp, where he has a fine farm and also conducts a well 
equipped general store, was born in Sandy Creek, a little village 
in Oswego county, New York, June 3, 1849. In the old Empire 
state were also born his parents, Minot Ely Emerson and Lucy C. 
(Wright) Emerson, who removed thence to Wisconsin and settled 
in Dane county when he was about seven years of age which was 
about fifty years ago. Here they passed the remainder of their 
lives, having been honored residents of Cottage Grove township, 
with whose development in the pioneer days the father was closely 
identified, having been a farmer by vocation. This worthy couple 
became the parents of five sons, three of whom are deceased, the 
only living brother of the subject of this review being R. E. Emer- 
son, who is now a resident of Boise, Idaho. Five of the sons were 
gallant defenders of the Union in the Civil War, having 
been members of Company I, Twenty-third Wisconsin Volunteer 
Infantry. Merton J. Emerson was reared on the pioneer farm, in 
Cottage Grove township, and his educational advantages were 
limited to the somewhat primitive district schools of the period- 



262 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

He became largely dependent upon his own resources when but 
ten years of age, and well and successfully has he fought the bat- 
tle of life, gaining a worthy success. At the age noted he secured 
employment on a neighboring farm, and he was thus engaged for 
three years, while for the following three years he was employed 
on the farm of his father. The next year he was elsewhere 
employed in the same arduous field of endeavor, and in the mean- 
while he zealously saved his earnings, providing for his mainten- 
ance by means of money earned through his musical ability, the 
violin being his favorite instrument and his services being in much 
demand on the occasion of the dances given in the locality. He 
finally began working land on shares, thus continuing until 1876, 
and three years later he made his first investment in real estate, 
purchasing five acres, in Cottage Grove township. Three years 
later he purchased an adjoining twenty-three acres, taking up his 
residence on the place in 1882, in which year he also purchased 
another tract, of twenty-two acres, contiguous to his original 
place, while still later he added another tract, of thirty-two acres, 
to his homestead. He made good improvements on the place and 
continued to reside on the same until March, 1899, when he also 
purchased forty-seven acres, in close proximity to the old place, 
and removed to the new farm, where he opened a general store, 
which he has since conducted most successfully, in addition to 
supervising the operation of his fine landed estate, which now 
comprises one hundred and twenty-nine acres. Mr. Emerson 
started at the foot of the ladder and has known what is implied in 
every upward step, since the same has been made entirely through 
his careful and determined efforts. He is a citizen whose name 
is a synonym for integrity and honor, and this fact, as coupled with 
his genial nature, has gained to him a host of warm friends in the 
county in which the major portion of his life has been passed. He 
takes a loyal interest in local affairs of a public nature, but has 
never sought office and is independent in his political attitude. 
October 24, 1877, Mr. Emerson was united in marriage to Miss 
Viola DeVoe, who was born September 12, 1857, being a daughter 
of Amos M. and Sally (Lewis) DeVoe, natives of New York and 
early settlers of Dane county. Her father was a member of Com- 
pany I, Twenty-third Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry, in the Civil 
War, and died while in the service. Of his five children all are liv- 
ing except one. Mr. and Mrs. Emerson became the parents of six 
children, all of whom are living except the eldest, Clayton E., who 
was born January 19, 1880, and died August 8, 1890. The other 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 263 

children all remain at the parental home, their names, with re- 
spective dates of birth, being as follows. Bertha I., August 14, 
1882; Pearl B., September 12, 1884; Adaline P., February 18, 1887; 
Minot E., September 20, 1892 ; and Alta C, March 5, 1896. 

Lars M. Engesether, of DeForest, was born at Vienna township. 
May 25, 1855, on the farm where he lived until recently, when he 
rented it and moved to his place in Cumberland, Barron county. 
He is of Norwegian ancestry, both his paternal grandfather, John 
Engesether, and his paternal grandfather, Lars Mennes, having 
having been natives of that country and died there. His maternal 
grandmother, Ingeri (Larson) Mennes was born September 20, 
1788. She came to Dane in 1854 and made her home with her son- 
in-law, in the later years of her life, and up to the time of her 
death, December 12, 1879, in her ninety-second year. The parencs 
of Lars Engesether. Mikkel J. (born 1819.) and Synneva L. (Men- 
nes) Engesether, (born, March 15, 1822), were educated in Norway 
and married in that country in 1844, and the same year came to 
Dane county, living first near Western church, about six miles 
north of Stoughton ; cwo years later they came to Vienna township 
and settled in section 24, on a farm of one hundred and twenty acres, 
and two years afterward, about 1848, removed to section 25 to the 
farm now owned by their son, Lars. Mr. Engesether was a 
Lutheran and one of the founders of the Norway Grove Lutheran 
church. Afterward, in 1883. he with others built the first Lutheran 
church of DeForest, of which he and his wife were members until 
their death. Like so many of his compatriots, he was a Republi- 
can in politics. He was the father of eleven children, Ingerie, died 
1844 (infant) ; John died in 1872, at the University of Wisconsin; 
Engerie, now wife of Armond O. Haukeness ; Carrie, widow of 
Hans Grinde; Lars, born 1853, died (infant) ; Lars M., born 1855; 
Ingerie, born July 13, 1861, died September 25, 1861; Jens, born 
May 25, 1865, and died August 19, of same year; Jens, born Octo- 
ber 14, 1866, died April 28, 1873 ; Maria, wife of O. O. Larson, born 
September 18, 1862, died October 20, 1892; Synneva, wife of An- 
drew Esse. Lars M. Engesether began his education in the com- 
mon schools'; this he supplemented by a term of six months at the 
Marshall academy, and several terms at the Northwestern academy 
of Madison. Mr. Engesether followed farming as an occupation 
and has been very successful in his chosen work ; his farm at one 
time covered two hundred and ten acres, but he has disposed of 
about forty acres. In Barron county he owns a large tract of six 
hundred and ninety acres, and one hundred and thirty-eight acres 



264 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

of which are within the limits of the city of Cumberland. His is 
a stock farm used principally for the breeding of short-horn cat- 
tle and Poland China Hogs. He is a Republican and has acted as 
supervisor for one term ; he was also a census taker in 1900. He 
was one of the first committee to plat the old cemetery at Norway 
Grove, and he and his family are members of the first Lutheran 
church, which his father helped to found. He married, March 9, 
1886, Miss Johanna Johnson, daughter of Ole and Ingeborg (Rowe) 
Johnson both of whom were born in Norway, he in March 23, 1835, 
and she on March 28, 1826. Mr. Johnson and his wife came to 
Dane about 1860, and located in Medina township; in 1899 they 
came to DeForest, having retired from the strenuous life of the 
modern farm. They are members of the Norway Grove Lutheran 
church, and Mr. Johnson is a Republican. To Mr. and Mrs. Enges- 
ether have been born nine- children ; Sina Ingebor, born December 
3, 1886; Amanda Josephine, born February 4, 1888; John L.. born 
September 19, 1889; Ingeborg L., born April 1, 1891, and died April 
13, 1892; Ingeborg Maria, born January 28, 1893; Maria Jennis, 
born July 4. 1894; Mitchell L., born February 10, 1897; Otto L., 
born March 10, 1902; Lilly Johanna, born May 4, 1904. 

Ludwig England, who conducts an up-to-date and well stocked 
hardware store in the village of Mt. Horeb, is one of the younger 
representatives of the business interests of that thriving place. He 
was born in Norway on September 11, 1865, and is the son of Lars 
and Orelog England, both of whom were also born in the land of 
the Norsk. The family migrated to America in 1866, and, coming 
directly to Wisconsin and to Dane county, settled in the town of 
Primrose, where the father engaged in farming and followed that 
occupation until his death, in 1895, at the age of seventy-three years 
The mother still resides on the old. homestead in Primrose. The 
subject of this review is one of eight children that were born to 
these parents of whom five are living — Tena married Mathias 
Strommen and resides in Minnesota ; Lewis is a resident of the state 
of Iowa ; Christian resides on the old La Follette farm in the town 
of Primrose; Ludwig is he whose name introduces this review; 
and David resides on the old homestead in Primrose. Our subject 
was reared and educated in the town of Primrose and spent his 
early life on the farm, following the occupation of a tiller of the 
soil until 1901. In 1903 he removed to Mt. Horeb and engaged in 
the hardware business in company with Olaf Hanson, under the 
firm name of Hanson & England. About a year later Mr. England 
purchased the interest of his partner and has since conducted the 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 265 

business alone, carrying- an extensive line of general hardware, 
builders' supplies, stoves, etc., and has met with a very gratifying 
success. Our subject was married on March 3, 1882, to Miss Mary 
Anderson, of the town of Primrose. Mr. England is a Republican 
in his political affiliations and his ability and worth as a citizen 
has been recognized by election to the office of clerk of the school 
board. Fraternally he has a membership in the Modern Woodmen 
of America and also in the Beavers. 

Iver L. Erdahl, a farmer of the town of Pleasant Springs, was 
born on October 16, 1851, not far from where he now lives. His 
father. Lewis Gunderson, was a native of Hardanger, Norway, 
grew to manhood and married there and after his marriage came to 
America, settling in the town of Pleasant Springs. There he 
bought two hundred acres of land, which he improved and lived 
on it until his death at the age of eighty-three years. Once he 
visited his old home in Norway. He was a member of the 
Lutheran church. He and his wife had ten children, viz: Christ 
Iver L., Ellen, Tena, Gunder, Nels, Lewis. Betsy, Sophia and John. 
Christ and Nels are deceased ; Iver and Lewis are farmers in the 
town of Pleasant Springs ; Ellen lives in the town of Dunkirk ; 
Betsy lives in Milwaukee, and the rest live in Stoughton. Iver L. 
Erdahl received a moderate education and lived with his parents 
until he was about twenty-four years of age. On June 9. 1876. he 
married Maria Norgard. daughter of Peter and Susanna Osmon- 
son, and for six years managed his father-in-law's farm. He was 
then associated with his uncle, Iver G. Lunde, for one year, after 
which he located where he now Jives. He now owns two hundred 
and twenty acres of the best land in the neighborhood, and carries 
on a general farming business. Politically Mr. Erdahl is a Repub- 
lican and takes an active interest in public affairs. He has held 
local offices and served on the school board. He is a member of 
the West Lutheran church, of which his father was one of the 
founders. The parents of Mrs. Erdahl came to Dane county about 
1845, being among the pioneer settlers. They are both now de- 
ceased, leaving two children, Mrs. Erdahl and Andrew who now 
lives on the old homestead. Mr. and Mrs. Erdahl have had eleven 
children, seven of whom are yet living. Susan is the wife of John 
Wesland, of Pleasant Springs; Peter and George are at home ; 
Clara. Earl Clarence and Mabel are so unfortunate as to be in- 
mates of the deaf and dumb asylum at Delavan. 

Lars P. Erdahl, a thrifty farmer of the town of Pleasant Springs 
was born in Hardanoer countv, Norway, November 16. 1S14. His 



266 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

parents were Ingebright Pederson, born January 28, 1809, and Anna 
Helnsdaughter, born January 15, 1810. The father was a tailor, 
and in 1847 with his wife and three sons he landed in New York 
after a voyage of four weeks. From New York to Buffalo the 
family traveled on canal boat; thence to Milwaukee by steamer, 
and from Milwaukee to the town of Pleasant Springs by ox-team. 
On June 21. 1847, the father took out his citizenship papers at 
Madison. He and a cousin got eighty acres in section 2 with a 
small clearing and a log house and lived there two years. Then 
the father bought three hundred and fifty acres of land in sections 
20 and 21. The first winter the family lived in a dugout, and the 
next summer put up a log house. There were seven children in the 
family, Hilga, who went to Kansas in 1860 and died there in 1862 ; 
Peter, a retired farmer of Evansville ; Lars P., the subject of this 
sketch ; Guri, died in infancy ; Helen, deceased ; Betsy, deceased ; 
and an unnamed infant who died in Norway. Peter Erdahl married 
Sarah Hawkins of Winnebago county, Wis., and by her had 
six children, Albert, Ellsworth. Julius, James, Annie (deceased), 
and Vilina. Peter Erdahl was the first man to enlist in the Union 
army from Pleasant Springs. He was a private in Company G, 
Third Wisconsin Infantry and acted as regimental color bearer. 
During one of the campaigns of the Army of the Potomac, of which 
the Third Wisconsin took part, Peter was wounded and taken pris- 
oner. He received an honorable discharge in 1865. Lars P. Er- 
dahl also saw some service in the Civil War, in the quartermaster's 
department in Arkansas. He was educated in the Lutheran church 
schools, and at the age of eleven, he attended the district school. 
For one year he was a student at Albion academy. While Mr. Er- 
dahl has traveled a great deal he has always made Pleasant Springs 
his home. In 1877 he clerked in a store in Dell Rapids, S. D., then 
for four years he was in St. Paul, traveling part of the time for 
the Fuller & Johnson Company of Madison ; for another year and 
a half he was in the hardware business at Rothsay, Minn., with A. 
Anderson & Co., and in the same business for another year at Fer- 
gus Falls. Minn. ; for some time he was purchasing agent for the 
Millers' Association of Minneapolis. Since 1885, however, he has 
managed the homestead farm and done some carpenter work. Mr. 
Erdahl was formerly a Republican and as such served one term as 
town treasurer and on the party central committee ; he was also a 
member of the school board for three terms. Latterly, however, 
Mr. Erdahl has worked under the banner of the Prohibition party. 
He is a devout and faithful member of the Lutheran church of 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 267 

. Pleasant Springs, whose first structure his father helped build. 
He has always been a bachelor. A profound thinker, he is one of 
the best-read members of the community. His farm of two hun- 
dred acres is in many ways a model. He is a member of Social 
Lodge, Independent Order of Odd Fellows of Stoughton, and since 
1875 has been a member of Atlantic Encampment, No. 50. 

Edward Erickson, one of the progressive and popular business 
men of the city of Stoughton, where his interests are varied and 
important, was born in Christiania, Norway, March 21, 1860, 
"being a son of Elias and Gunwild (Andusdatter) Erickson. The 
father immigrated to America in 1869, making his way directly to 
Wisconsin and locating in Perry township, Dane county, where he 
worked at farming two years, at the expiration of which, in 1871, 
his family joined him. They took up their residence in the village 
of DeForest, and for several years thereafter he was in the employ 
of the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railroad Company. In 
1880 he purchased a farm of sixty-five acres, in Cottage Grove town- 
ship, where he passed the remainder of his life, his death there 
occurring in 1884, at which time he was sixty-five years of age. 
His wife survived him by several years. They reared a family of 
six children, namely: Edward, Valborg, Caroline Inga, August 
Cornelius, Andrew and John. Caroline I. is now the wife of Wil- 
liam Huntley. The subject of this review secured his rudimentary 
education in his native land, having been eleven years of age at 
the time of the family immigration to the United States. He was 
reared to maturity in Dane county, where he attended the common 
schools and effectively supplemented his previous training. In 
1882 he located in Stoughton, where he was employed in the T. G, 
Mandt Wagon Works for the ensuing years. He has, since 1887, 
conducted one of the most popular buffets in the city. He has also 
dealt extensively in real estate and has made many judicious in- 
vestments in local realty as well as buying and selling property in 
Minnesota. In 1891 he built his present place of business, and in 
1902 he erected his handsome residence, at a cost of eight thousand 
dollars. In 1905 he erected what is admitted to be the finest busi- 
ness block in the city, the same being utilized for store and office 
purposes and representing an outlay of sixteen thousand dollars. 
He is enterprising as a business man and public-spirited as a citi- 
zen. In politics his support is given to the Republican party and 
both he and his wife are members of the Lutheran church. April 
25, 1885, Mr. Erickson was united in marriage to Miss Gjertrud, 
daughter of Ole Amundson, of Liberty Prairie, this county, and 
they have two daughters, — Alma and Amy. 



268 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

Edward Erickson, a farmer of Rutland, is of Norwegian birth and 
ancestry. His father, Erick, married Inger Tulfson and of their 
eight children, three are now living in America ; Rebecca, who re- 
sides in Pleasant Springs, Edward and Inger in Rutland. Edward 
Erickson was born in Christiansen, Norway, August 3, 1846, re- 
ceived his education in the common schools in Norway, and re- 
mained with his parents until 1882, when he embarked for America. 
The first three years of the new life were spent at Pleasant Springs, 
the next period at Dunkirk, in both of which places he rented farms. 
Finally Mr. Erickson purchased an eighty-acre farm in Rutland 
which is his present home and of which he has made a valuable 
property. In October, 1874, he married Miss Carrie Knutson, 
daughter of Capt. Knute Osuldson and Pauline (Paulson) Osuld- 
son, whose home was in Norway. Capt. Knute Osuldson was a 
sea-captain of many voyages but his home was always in Norway, 
although four of his children came to America. Mr. and Mrs. Erick- 
son have four children ; Emih a painter of Madison, Wis. ; Peter, 
Christina and Edward, who live with their parents. Mr. Erickson 
is a member of the school board and a Republican, though he has 
never been an active politician. He is a member of the Lutheran 
church. One of our Norwegian-American citizens, who came to 
America with no fortune but his energy and thrift, Mr. Erickson 
succeeded in winning from the west a substantial and comfortable 
livelihood. 

Truls T. Erickson, deceased, was the son of pioneers of Dane. 
His parents came in a very early day to Vienna township, where 
the subject of this sketch was born, one of a family of fifteen child- 
ren, only three of whom are now living. The home was maintained 
here for many years, and here Mrs. Erickson died in 1887. In 1885, 
Mr. Erickson moved to Minnesota, where he resided until his 
death, September 24, 1890. He was a Republican, and all of the 
family were connected with the Hauges Lutheran church. Truls 
T. Erickson, Jr., received a good practical education at the common 
schools, the Marshall academy and the Northwestern Business 
college of Madison. After leaving school he turned his attention 
to farming. He owned a good farm of one hundred and fifty acres, 
upon which he had made most of the improvements, at the time of 
his death. His affairs were left in such order that with the aid of 
her children. Mrs Erickson has been able to add to the homestead 
and has now a fine property of two hundred acres. On November 
8, 1877, Mr. Truls Erickson, Jr., was married to Miss Randie Samp- 
son, daughter of Lars Sampson, who is mentioned in this work. 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 269 

Their children are, — Charles Ebenezer, a farmer ; he attended school 
at Mt. Horeb three years and Decorah college one year ; Simon 
Lewis, educated at De Forest high school and Northwestern Busi- 
ness college, Madison ; Theodore Martin, educated in De Forest high 
school ; as was also the daughter, Sadie Rosina ; the youngest, John 
Carl, followed his high school work by academic study, being at the 
present writing a student of Red Wing seminary. Mr. Erickson 
appreciated the value of a thorough equipment for the young man in 
these days of eager competition in business life, and provided all 
of his children with that practical intellectual training which fits 
them for positions of trust and profit. 

Hon. N. C. Evans, M. D., is one of the prominent physicians of 
Dane county and a very skillful and successful surgeon, maintaning 
a private hospital in the village of Mt. Horeb, which place has been 
his residence throughout all of his useful professional career. He 
is a son of Christian Evanson, who was born in the province of 
Christiania, Norway, December 24, 1819. While in his native 
country the father was engaged as a drover and dealer in live stock, 
but later he learned the tinners' trade, and in 1854 he came to 
America. Mr. Evanson was married in Norway to Rachel (or Rag- 
nild) Nielson Brekke, a native of that country, and who came to 
America with her brother, Lars Nelson, in 1848, preceding her 
husband by about five years. They came by sailing vessel and were 
sixteen weeks on the voyage, having been grounded on a rock 
near England and obliged to wait for repairs. After landing in 
New York they came by the Erie canal an.d the lakes to Milwaukee, 
then to near Stoughton and later to Madison, where her husband 
joined her when he arrived in America. The father was then with- 
out money, having failed on account of Modum's nickel mine shut- 
ting down, his customers being miners and not able to meet their 
obligations. But by hard work the mother had saved about $350, 
and they first engaged in keeping a boarding-house in Madison, one 
year, and then purchased one hundred and twenty acres of land on 
section 14, in the town of Perry, paying three dollars per acre for 
the same. They lived about four years in a "dug-out," covered with 
sod, etc., after which they erected a more commodious residence, 
in which they lived until the death of the mother in 1892, at the age 
of seventy-three years. Some time after the death of his wife the 
father removed to Mt. Horeb, and there died at the residence of 
his son on April 2, 1897, at the age of seventy-eight years, both 
father and mother being laid to rest in the cemetery at Mt. Horeb. 
The father added to his original purchase until he owned two nun- 



270 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

dred and forty acres of the finest land in the town of Perry, and in 
addition to his farming interests he engaged in the mercantile bus- 
iness for several years. In 1872 he was appointed postmaster of 
Forward, Dane county, and although not a politician he served as a 
member of the board of supervisors and as assessor and treasurer 
of the town. Mr. and Mrs. Evanson were the parents of four child- 
ren : Christian, deceased, was buried in Rochester, N. Y. ; Annette 
is the wife of Peter A. Tyvan and resides in Mt. Horeb ; Niels C. 
is the subject of this review; and Matilda, who died at the age of 
three and one half years, was buried in the old Perry cemetery. 
Niels C. Evans, the immediate subject of this review, was born on 
the old homestead in the town of Perry, July 10, 1857. His peo- 
ple were strongly opposed to the common schools, and he therefore 
studied the catechism and learned what he could under adverse 
circumstances until twelve years of age. He was then permitted 
to attend the public schools during the winter terms the follow- 
ing four years, after which, in company with another boy, he started 
for Postville. Green county, where they attended school three 
months. Mr. Evans returned home every Saturday, walking the 
entire distance of ten miles, and on Monday morning took provis- 
ions to last through the week. After leaving this school he at- 
tended the Worthington Business College, at Madison, three 
months, after which he continued his studies at home. He was 
then in poor health, and consequently had much time for study. In 
1881 Mr. Evans began the study of medicine, under Dr. A. J. Ward,, 
of "Madison, with whom he remained from September until the fol- 
lowing April. He was an apt student and made rapid progress. 
The following autumn he entered the College of Physicians and 
Surgeons, at Chicago, from which he was graduated on March 4, 
1884. and then began the practice of his chosen profession at Mt. 
Horeb. His practice has been of a general nature. A few years 
after his arrival in Mt. Horeb, on April 8, 1888, he established a 
drugstore in the village, and he still continues it, with a competent 
apothecary in charge of affairs. Dr. Evans was married October 9,. 
1879, to Miss Lena C. Lewis, a native of Norway, and whose parents 
were prominent citizens in the town of Perry, the father being 
Lewis Lewis, who migrated to America with his family when the 
future Mrs. Evans was but a child. To this union have been born 
four children : Carl Milo has charge of his father's drugstore ; 
Nora Lydia is a clerk in the state bank at Mt. Horeb ; Belle Rosetta, 
and Walter Clarence are in school. The doctor is prominent man 
in his community, and although he has tried to hold aloof from poll- 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 271 

tics he has given an unswerving- allegiance to the basic principles 
of the Democratic party. In recognition of his ability and personal 
worth he has been frequently urged by his friends to accept posi- 
tions of trust. During the autumn of the year 1892 he received the 
nomination for member of the assembly on the Democratic ticket 
in the fourth district of Dane county, and at the ensuing election 
received a majority of 117 votes over all other candidates and a 
plurality of 385 over the next highest. In his home town he re- 
ceived forty-three Republican votes and lost but five of his own 
party. Besides this legislative position he has held several local 
positions : president of the village of Mt. Horeb, two years ; chair- 
man of the town board one term, and he is the present supervisor 
of the village. Professionally he is a member of the county, state 
and national medical societies, and of the international congress 
on tuberculosis, having attended the meeting of the same at St. 
Louis. Dr. Evans is president of the state bank at Mt. Horeb, 
was one of its promoters, and has been identified with it since 
its organization. He is a member of the firm of Hessig, Grinde & 
Evans, hardware dealers, and is also president of the Mt. Horeb 
Independent Telephone .Company. His fraternal relations are with 
the A. F. and A. M., lodge No. 227, at Mt. Horeb, the Robert McCoy 
commandery. No. 3, of Madison ; and he is also a member of the 
Modern Woodmen of America and of the Woodmen of the World. 
Knudt Evenson, a farmer near Deerfield, was born at Lourdal, 
Norway, April 8, 1849. his parents being Evan Holton and Gunneld 
Hamsatvet. In 1860 the family came to Stoughton, but soon after- 
ward went to the town of Cottage Grove, where for about two years 
they lived on different farms, the father working as a hired man or 
a tenant. They then bought a farm in the town of Deerfield, where 
they continued to live until the death of both parents. Knute 
Evenson received a limited education in the district schools of the 
town of Cottage Grove and at the age of fourteen years began life 
for himself as a farm hand at the wages of seven dollars a month. 
He worked for various employers, continually bettering his posi- 
tion until the year 1869. One year he was in the employ of ex- 
Governor Taylor, receiving for that year $200. In 1869 he bought 
twenty-eight acres of land from Mr. Taylor and began farming" 
on his own account. Three years later he bought fifty-five acres 
more, and in 1876 erected a house on the farm and lived there 
until 1894, having in the mean time added to his farm until he 
owned one hundred and five acres. He then traded this farm to his 
father-in-law for the one on which he now lives, and which con- 



272 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

tains two hundred and eighty-four acres. His father came to Amer- 
ica about a year before the rest of the family and Knudt borrowed 
money from his sister to pay the passage of himself and mother, and 
this debt was paid from his first earnings. On February 10, 1875, 
he married Anna Johnson, who was born on March 3, 1855, the 
daughter of Elling and Dorotha Johnson, of Deerfield. To this 
marriage have been born the following children : Dena, born Jan- 
uary 16, 1876, now the wife of Lars Nesthus, living near her pa- 
rents; Hilda born November 5, 1878, stenographer for the Boston 
Construction Company, of Seattle, Wash., Elling, born March 16, 
1862; Emma, born March 5, 1884; Louisa, born March 3, 1889; 
Clara, born March 2, 1891. The four younger children are at home 
with their parents. Mr. Evenson is independent in his political 
opinions. From 1874 to 1876 he was deputy sheriff of the county; 
for ten years was a member of the town board ; was district clerk 
for twenty-five years, and is now serving his fifth year as district 
treasurer. He is president and manager of the Oak Park Creamery 
Association, and was for four years constable. He is a member 
of Deerfield camp, No. 1413, Woodmen of America, in which he 
has held the office of consul, and he and his wife belong to the Nor- 
wegian Lutheran church. 

Peter Faber, contractor and builder, carpenter and joiner, whose 
residence is at 302 South Park street and whose place of business 
is at 808 Chandler street, was born in the town of Badem, Kr. Bit- 
bury R. P., Trier, Germany on the Rhine, December 21, 1854, His 
parents were Michael and Elizabeth (Herber) Faber, both natives 
of Germany. The father was a farmer in the Fatherland, but after 
coming to Madison in 1887 he lived a retired life. He died at the 
age of seventy and his wife at the age of eighty-one. They were 
both communicants or the German Catholic church and their final 
resting place is Calvary. Cemetary, Madison. The subject of this 
sketch is the oldest of five children. Mary, Mrs. Jacob Seifer, the 
eldest, died in Chicago at the age of thirty-five. John is a carpenter 
in the state of Washington. Gerhardt lives in Olympia, Wash., 
William is a mason making Madison his home. Peter Faber went 
to farming after the completion of his scholastic work in Germany. 
In 1880 he sailed for the United States, and upon his arrival here 
settled in Chicago. It was there that he served his apprenticeship 
as a carpenter and followed his trade for six years. In 1886 he came 
to Madison and for the following six years was employed at his 
vocation. Subsequently, in 1892, he entered the contracting field. 
That he has been successful is evidenced by his amount of patron- 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 273 

age and the quantity of work he has on hand. He employs from 
ten to twenty men the year around. Many of the churches and 
schools in the immediate vicinity of Madison were built by Mr. 
Faber and the quality of his workmanship is such that he is known 
all over the country. On Thanksgiving day, November 30, 1882. 
Mr. Faber led to the altar Miss Catherine Michaels, born in Ger- 
many, and a daughter of Nicholas and Anna (Wickart) Michaels. 
The mother is still a resident of Emperor William's kingdom. 
Her husband died about the time of his daughter's marriage. Mr. 
and Mrs. Faber are the parents of nine children. Mary and Anna 
are dressmakers in Madison. Michael is employed by his father. 
The other children are Margaret. Peter L. (died at nine years of 
age), Gerhart, Cathrina, Peter II., and Elizabeth. The family are 
communicants of the Roman Catholic church. Mr. Faber is promi- 
nently identified with the Catholic Foresters. He is a splendid 
workman, and a worthy, reliable citizen. 

Hendrick O. Fadnes, a well-known and successful farmer of the 
town of Christiania, is a native of Voss, Norway, where he was 
born July 24, 1833. His father, Ole H. Fadnes. was born in Voss, 
educated there and owned a good farm property which he sold in 
1816 in order to try his fortunes in the United States. He married 
Miss Susan Berstad, in Norway, and two children were there born 
to them, — Hendrick O., and Nels. Their daughter Carrie, who is 
the widow of Hendrick Bringberg, was born in Wisconsin. 
The voyage from Norway to New York occupied over six weeks 
and was followed by the long journey to Milwaukee on the lakes. 
At Milwaukee Mr. Fadnes' purchased an ox team and a wagon, 
which carried the family to Dane county, and in the vicinity of 
Deerfield, where a brother and cousin also settled, he obtained a 
farm. One hundred and twenty acres belonged to the original 
homestead but a tract of eighty acres was soon added to it and later 
sixty-five acres more. In 1892. Mr. Fadnes died and his wife in 
1895. They were devoted members of the Norwegian Lutheran 
church to which their son Hendrick also belongs. Hendrick at- 
tended school in the new home. He assisted his father in clearing 
and improving the farm and has always made fanning his business. 
Many improvements on the old homestead are due to his thrift and 
energy and he there carries on an extensive business, raising stock 
as well as hay, corn, grain, etc. A Republican in his political sym- 
pathies, Mr. Fadnes is always interested in local affairs and has 
served the community as supervisor and member of the school 
18— iii 



27-t HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

board. In May, 1855, he married Miss Annie Knutson, daughter 
of Andrew Knutson, a farmer of Cambridge, who came from Nor- 
way in 1855. Eight children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Fadnes. 
The oldest son, Ole. died. The next son, also named Ole, lives at 
Rio, Wis. Usher resides in Columbia county. Andrew H. is a 
farmer of Christiania, Susan and Knute make their home in Colum- 
bia county. Martin is a citizen of Cambridge and the youngest 
child died in infancy. 

General Lucius Fairchild, soldier statesman, was born in what 
is now Kent, Portage county, Ohio. He was the son of Jairus 
Cassius and Sallie (Blair) Fairchild, the former of whom was a na- 
tive of New York, born December 24, 1801. The General's mother 
was from New England and of Scotch-Irish descent, — a woman of 
vigorous personality, and noted for her kind and hospitable nature. 
The parents were married in Ohio and made their residence in 
Cleveland in 1834. coming to Madison, the territorial capital of 
Wisconsin in 1846 when Lucius was fourteen. He obtained his 
education in the common schools of Cleveland, Twinsburg academy 
in that state, and in the academy of Waukesha, Wis. When a lad 
of only seventeen he made the trip across the plains to California 
by ox-team, and spent six years in the Golden State, accumulating 
some gold and much practical experience. Speaking of his life 
there he said : "I was forced to depend upon my own energy to 
attain anything, and there was no alternative but incessant labor. 
Since that period I have always been fond of work and glad to 
have plenty of it." While in the mountains of California he had 
his first political experience, as a delegate to the convention which 
nominated Governor Bigler, and by reason of an accident en route, 
sat in the convention without a coat, or a cent in his pocket. Soon 
after his return to Madison he was elected on the Democratic ticket, 
circuit court clerk for Dane county, and made a business-like and 
courteous official. He was admitted to the bar in 1860. The Civil 
War interrupted his legal- career, just beginning, as he was one of 
the first to respond to the first call for volunteers, enlisting as a 
private. He was made captain of his company, the "Governor's 
Guard," which was assigned as Company K, First Wisconsin 
Volunteer Regiment. He was tendered the position of lieutenant- 
colonel of his regiment by Governor Randall, but declined it on the 
ground that he was not qualified. His military career was brilliant 
in the extreme and and he saw much hard service, most of it as 
colonel of the Second Wisconsin, which formed a part of the fa- 
mous Iron Brigade commanded at first by Gen. Rufus King, of Wis- 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 27S 

consin, and assigned to the first division of the first army corps.- 
General Fairchild participated in the battles of Gainesville, second 
Manasses, South Mountain, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Chancell- 
orsville and Gettysburg, besides innumerable skirmishes. His left 
arm was shattered at Gettysburg, so that amputation was necessary, 
and he was forced to return to Madison to recruit his health, and 
while home received the appointment of brigadier-general of vol- 
unteers. In August, 1861, President Lincoln had appointed him 
captain in the Sixteenth Regiment of the regular army. While 
convalescing, much to his surprise, the Union convention of Wis- 
consin made him its candidate for secretary of state, and influen- 
tial friends pursuaded him, much against his own wishes, that in his 
enfeebled condition he could better serve his country by accepting 
the nomination, than by returning to the front. He is said after- 
wards to have much regretted that he did not follow his own im- 
impulses and remain in the army ; and this, too, despite his great 
success in office. Said one who knew him well : "Thus closed a 
military career, than which there were few more brilliant and val- 
uable. He passed from private to brigadier-general in a little over 
two years, and every step of the progress was earned. He was an 
indefatigable worker, and gave all his time and best judgment to 
the service and aimed to improve every detail which came within 
his province. He was but thirty-two years of age when disabled 
by his wound. Such a rise, at such an age, and in so short a time, 
demonstrates conclusively his value as a soldier and his possession 
of rare qualities of organization and leadership." After resigning 
his rank in both the regular and the volunteer service, General 
Fairchild was elected secretary of state, and on the expiration of 
his term was three times elected governor of the state on the Re- 
publican ticket, each time by a handsome majority. He brought 
much executive ability, and a high order of zeal,- and fidelity to the 
public interests, to the discharge of his public duties, being espec- 
ially active in promoting the educational interests of the state. 
One year after his retirement to private life, in December, 1872, 
he was appointed by President Grant, United States consul to Liv- 
erpool, England. In 1878 he was promoted to the position of con- 
sul-general at Paris and then to the office of minister-plenipoten- 
tiary at the court of Madrid. In England, France and Spain he 
evoked high commendation from those to whom he was sent. Said 
Liverpool journal years after his departure, "No American consul 
ever made more friends at this port," and said another journal, 
"While in Europe he made shipping and international commerce 



276 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

the subject of complete study." In March 1881, he resigned his 
post at Madrid, and returned to America to educate his children, in 
part, at home. On his arrival in Madison, March 2, 1882, he re- 
ceived an ovation. He was ever loyal to his military comrades and 
they loved him. He was made senior vice-commander in chief of 
the G. A. R., from May, 13, 1869, to May 12, 1870; state department 
commander from February 4, 1886, and commander-in-chief of the 
G. A. R., August 4, 1886 ; also, commander of the Wisconsin com- 
mandery of the military order of the Loyal Legion from May 7 T 
1884, to May, 1887; and the commander-in-chief of the order- of the 
Loyal Legion on October 11. 1893. 

As a private citizen he was of the highest usefulness, and a 
splendid example of high thinking and doing, and took great inter- 
est in all the affairs of the day affecting country, state, town and 
neighborhood. He was especially active in the work of building 
the state historical library. He was married in 1864 and had three 
children, two of whom, with the widow, survive him. He had a 
remarkably strong face, indicative of kindness, decision and frank- 
ness ; in person he was of medium size, with a well knit frame, 
active and powerful ; he was direct and positive in speech, some- 
times with a soldier's bluntness which men do not dislike, and he 
was destitute of all cant or affectation. His death took place 
May 23, 1896. 

01eH. Farness, of DeForest, is one of the earliest settlers in the 
county, coming from Norway, — where he was born November 28,, 
1826, — in 1847. His parents, Herman and Rande H. Farness. 
were born in Norway, and after the death of Mrs. Farness there, 
her husband followed his son to America, coming in 1856, but he 
lived only two years after his arrival here. Ole H. Farness re- 
ceived his education in Norway, and upon coming to Dane took up 
one hundred and twenty acres of government land. He obtained 
more, from time to time, until, at one time, he owned six hundred 
and twenty acres. He is at the present time a general farmer and 
stock-raiser, on a farm of three hundred and ten acres. He is a 
Republican and a member of the Lutheran church. He was mar- 
ried in 1847, to Miss Gertrude Esse, (born in Norway, April 13, 
1827), by whom he had six children. Lars, Herman, Rande, Ole, 
Betsey, Herman, of whom only one, Rande, is living. His first 
wife died June 2, 1859, and the following year he married Miss 
Anna Nelson,— daughter of Nels Knutson,— who died March 3, 
1902. Her children were Gertrude, Nels, Thomas, Thomas, Jo- 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 277 

seph, Sarah. Betsey, Joseph, Simon and Benjamin ; of these the 
elder Thomas, Joseph and Sarah died. 

Creighton P. Farnsworth, M. D., medical superintendent of the 
Madison sanitarium at South Madison, was born near Mulberry 
Grove, Bond county, 111. His parents were Henry C. and Adaline 
(Muelter) Farnsworth. both natives of Ashtabula county, Ohio. 
The father was a farmer until President Lincoln's call for 75,000 
men was issued. He attempted to enlist but was rejected because 
of his youth. Three months later, however, he was accepted and 
succeeded in joining his company, K", of the Twenty-ninth Ohio 
Volunteer Infantry. He was a partcipant in the battles of Chan- 
cellorsville and Gettysburg, and then the Twelfth army corps, of 
which the Twenty-ninth Ohio belonged, was merged with the 
Eleventh corps to form the Twentieth and went west to assist in the 
siege of Chattanooga. The regiment saw service in the battles of 
Lookout Mountain, Ringgold, Fort and Kenesaw Mountains, Peach 
Tree Creek, in the military operations about Atlanta and Savannah, 
and the engagements at Averasboro and Jonesboro. When hostili- 
ties had ceased the regiment participated in the grand review at 
Washington and was then mustered out. Mr. Farnsworth returned 
to Ashtabula and was married, proceeding thence to Bond county, 
111. His residence there continued until 1875. when he removed to 
Mount Hope, Grant county, Wis., to engage in farming. He still 
makes Grant county his home, although now retired. His wife 
died in 1881 at the age of forty-six. They were both members of 
the Seventh-day Adventist church. Their daughter Pearl, now 
Mrs. Benjamin Pendleton, is the only survivor, beside Dr. Farns- 
worth, of the five children. Dr. Farnsworth received his prepara- 
tory education in the high school at Mount Hope. His medical 
training was acquired in the sanitarium at Battle Creek, Mich. 
On September 4. 1900, he was united in marriage to Miss Anna 
Bennett, a student in the medical course at Battle Creek. As a 
wedding trip Dr. Farnsworth and his bride accompanied President 
Charles Kendall Adams, of the University of Wisconsin, on a trip to 
Europe, remaining abroad three months and visiting points in Italy. 
Switzerland, France. Germany and Belgium. Dr. Farnsworth was 
President Adams' physician and the voyage was taken with a view 
to benefiting the latter's health. Upon their return to Madison 
Dr. Farnsworth accepted a call to become superintendent of the 
Guadalajara sanitarium of the state of Jalisco, Mexico. This place 
has one of the finest locations in the world, at an elevation of fifty- 
two hundred feet, and has a capacity of one hundred patients^ 



278 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

The doctor remained there one year and then went to Chicago 
where he took an advanced course along the lines of electric treat- 
ment and surgery. In a few months he came to Madison to accept 
the position he now holds. He has organized the corporation and 
superintended the erection of the sanatarium. It has a capacity 
of seventy patients and is filled practically all the time. Inclusive 
of nurses and doctors it employs some forty people. The location 
on the shore of Lake Monona is quiet and exclusive, — altogether 
an ideal spot for such an institution. A nurses' school is conduct- 
ed in connection, of which Dr. Farnsworth is also superintendent. 
He belongs to the county, the state and the American medical asso- 
ciations. The doctor and his wife have two children, a boy and a 
girl. Both Dr. and Mrs. Farnsworth are members of the Seventh- 
day Adventist society, and the doctor of the Modern Woodmen 
of America. Dr. Farnsworth is a man of wide and successful ex- 
perience, is eminently fitted to superintend such an establishment, 
which fills a long felt want in this section of the state. 

George A. Farr is the owner of one of the fine farms of Cottage 
Grove township, his homestead being situated in section 9, and he 
is one of the popular and prosperous citizens of this section of the 
country, while further interest attaches to the consideration of his 
career in this work by reason of the fact that he is a native son of 
Cottage Grove township, where his parents took up their abode 
more than half a century ago. He was born on the pioneer farm 
of his father, in the township mentioned, on August 18, 1853, being 
a son of Horatio and Lucinda (Barrows) Farr, the former of whom 
was born in the state of Vermont and the latter in that 
of New York. The paternal grandfather was a valiant soldier in 
Continental line during the War of the Revolution, the Farr family 
having been founded in New England in the early colonial era. 
George A. Farr was reared on the home farm, early beginning to as- 
sist in its reclamation and cultivation, while his educational advan- 
tages were those afforded in the district schools and Albion Acad- 
emy, which latter institution he attended one term. His father 
was twice married, four children having been born of the first union, 
while George A. was the first born of the three children of the sec- 
ond marriage. His brother, Charles, is a prosperous farmer of 
Dunn township, Dane county, Wisconsin, and his sister. Seraph, 
is the wife of Thomas Willey, of Lake Mills, this state. The par- 
ents of Mr. Farr came to Dane county in September, 1852, and the 
father purchased a tract of government land in Cottage Grove 
township, the same being covered with the native forest and having 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 279 

no improvements. They resided on this place a short period, and 
then disposed of the property, the father thereupon purchasing an 
other place, in the same township where he and his wife passed the 
remainder of their lives, having" been folk of sterling character and 
having been uniformly esteemed in the community- The father 
died in 1882, and the mother in 1890. George A. Farr continued to 
be associated in the work and management of the home farm until 
he had attained the age of twenty-seven years, when he purchased a 
farm of forty acres, in his native township, there being actively en- 
gaged in farming about twelve years, at the expiration of which 
he sold the place and purchased his present fine homestead, which 
comprises about sixty-seven acres, practically all being available 
for cultivation, while the improvements are of substantial order. Mr. 
Farr has never manifested any desire for public office, but has been 
a stanch supporter of the cause of the democracy and has given his 
aid and influence in furtherance of enterprises and undertakings 
tending to advance the general welfare of the community. He is 
affiliated with the Modern Woodmen of America. On May 5. 1881, 
Mr. Farr was united in marriage to Miss Kate Durfey, who was 
born March 12, 1851, her parents, Loomis and Ellen (Hooven) Dur- 
fey, having likewise been numbered among the pioneers of Cottage 
Grove township. She was the third in order of birth in a family of 
seven children, and following is a brief record concerning the others : 
Flora is the wife of John Sanders, of Colorado ; Henry is deceased ; 
Edgar is a resident of the city of Madison ; Delilah is the wife of 
Andrew Oually of Chicago. Illinois : Nellie is the wife of Elwood 
Emerson of Chicago ; and Lillie is the wife of O. C. Whaling, of 
Dodgeville, Wisconsin. Mr. and Mrs. Farr have four children, name- 
ly : Winifred who was born May 20, 1882, and who is now the wife 
of Daniel Moe, of Cottage Grove township ; Nellie D., who was born 
Dec. 20, 1883, and who is now the wife of Herbert R. Cone, of Cot- 
tage Grove township ; Charles Earl, who was born April 18, 1891 ; 
and Clarence Albert, who was born October 20. 1896. 

Anthony O. Farrell is one of the highly respected retired farmers 
of the town of Oregon, which has been his home for many years, 
and where by honest effort and strenuous toil he has gained a com- 
petence that makes his declining years ones of quiet enjoyment. 
He was born in the county of Sligo, Ireland, on May 2, 1828, and 
is the son of Matthew and Bridget ( Feeney) Farrell. both natives 
of the Emerald Isle, where they spent ali the years of their use- 
ful lives. They were the parents of six children, only two of 
whom are now living, the subject of this sketch having a sister, 



280 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

Mary, who is the wife of Michael Crowe and resides in the village 
of Oregon. Matthew Farrell served for thirteen years as a sol- 
dier in the British army. Anthony O. Farrell, whose name intro- 
duces this memoir, received his education in the schools of his 
native country, and continued to reside there until he had reached 
the age of twenty-six years. He then, in 1854, sailed for America, 
in the ship, Conqueror, and first took up his residence in Vermont, 
where he resided twelve years, working a part of the time in the 
marble quarries and when not thus engaged being employed as 
a farm hand. In I860 he came to Wisconsin and first secured em- 
ployment on the railroad then being constructed between Brooklyn 
and Madison. He followed this occupation for three years, then 
worked on a farm for about two years, after which he worked land 
on shares, and in 1875 purchased the one hundred and twenty acres 
of land in the town of Oregon, which he had previously been farm- 
ing, and on which he has since continued to reside. He was mar- 
ried in 1856, to Miss Ellen Dunn, who was also a native of County 
Sligo, Ireland, and the date of her birth was May 8, 1857. Her 
father was Lawrence Dunn and the maiden name of her mother was 
Bridget Kelly. In the Dunn family there was a large family of 
children, but only two daughters came to America — Bridget.who 
married a Mr. Gilfeather, and she who became the wife of Mr. 
Farrell — both of them being now deceased. Nine children were 
born to the union of Mr. and Mrs. Farrell : Matthew T. married 
Catherine Keigen and resides in the town of Union ; Patrick L. 
married May Kelley and is now deceased. — his widow resides in 
Dakota ; Bridget married Byron Andrew and resides in Superior, 
Wis. ; Edward married Mary Wallace and resides in South Dakota ; 
Ellen married Olamp Garvoil and resides in the town of Rut- 
land ; Mary Augusta is deceased ; John William resides in Chi- 
cago ; Margaret Ann, now Mrs. Silver, resides at Kilbourn, Colum- 
bia county. Wis. ; and Anthony J. married Wilhelmina Ace, and 
resides with his father. Mr. Farrell is a Democrat in his politi- 
cal affiliations, and his religious faith is expressed by membership 
in the Roman Catholic church. 

James M. Farwell, for many years a successful farmer in the 
town of Vienna, is of New England descent and the son of one of 
Windsor's pioneers. His father, James Farwell, was the son of 
Oliver and Enseba Farwell. who always lived in Vermont. Their 
son, however, came west in 1846, when forty-four years of age, 
and lived upon a farm at Windsor station until his death in 1878. 
The long journey was made with a team and consumed a number 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 281 

of weeks. Mr. Farwell married Miss Mandana Castle, born in 
Vermont in 1801, and two sons and three daughters were born to 
them, all living except one son. As justice of the peace for many 
years, none of Mr. Farwell's decisons were ever reversed. He was. 
allied with the Republican party. Both husband and wife were 
members of the Universalist church. Their son, James M., was 
born in Westford. Chittenden county, Vermont, July 5, 1835, was 
sent to school in his native town in Vermont and in Windsor 
and early engaged in farming. He now is the owner of three hun- 
dred and sixty acres of fine farm property in the township of 
Vienna, where beside his other farm industries he raises Poland 
China swine and a herd of registered Holstein cattle. Like his 
father, Mr. Farwell is a Republican but devotes little time to 
active participation in political matters. January 16, 1867, he 
married Miss Mary J. Hilliard, who was born in Ohio, December 3l v 
1846, daughter of Martin E. and Lura A. (Sartwell) Hilliard, 
natives of Ohio. Mr. and Mrs. Hilliard came to Windsor in 1850, 
where Mr. Hilliard died in January, 1904, and his widow is still 
living, seventy-nine years of age. Of their five children three are- 
living. Mr. and Mrs. Farwell have had five children ; the oldest 
daughter, Alice, and the next daughter, Ida May, attended the- 
home schools and the latter died in 1895 ; Hartwell, the oldest son, 
lives at home ; Estella is the wife of Ole Anderson ; Charles W,, 
a graduate of the DeForest high school, married Miss Sadie Durkee 
and has one daughter. Fern Luva. The family are members and 
workers of the Congregational church. All have attended the home 
schools. 

John Fassbender, Jr., of Springfield, is an active factor in the 
life of that community, having filled various offices of public trust 
as town and village official. He was born in Springfield, October 
21,- 1857, of German ancestry. His grandparents on both sides of 
the family, — John and Margrett Fassbender, and John and Christ- 
ina Nettekoven, — were born and died in Germany. In June, 1856, 
John Fassbender, Sr., born in Germany August 15, 1824, came to 
the town of Springfield. He was thirty- two years of age at the 
time, and had been a soldier in the German army before seeking 
his fortune in the new world. In December, 1856, Miss Veronia 
Nettekoven also came from Germany to Springfield, and the fol- 
lowing year, February 11, 1857, they were married. Mrs. Fass- 
bender was nine years the junior of her husband, her birthday 
occurring October 4, 1833. They made their home at Spring- 
field, and the subject of this sketch was the oldest of eight child- 



282 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

ren — three sons, John, Henry and Peter, and five daughters, 
Christina, Maggie, Mary, Aggie and Anna, — who were born to 
them. John Fassbender, Jr., was educated in the public school of 
Springfield, and is an insurance agent by profession. A Demo- 
crat politically, he has acceptably filled the positions of a notary 
public, justice of the peace, town treasurer and town assessor. He 
is a member of the Catholic church and is unmarried. 

Dr. John Favill, perhaps the moat prominent of the early physi- 
cians of Madison, Wis., was a native of Herkimer county, N. Y., 
and received his medical education at Harvard University. His 
wife was Louisa Baird. a daughter of Henry S. Baird, of Green 
Bay, one of the prominent pioneers of Wisconsin, the first attorney 
general of Wisconsin, and president of the first council of the terri- 
tory. Her mother, Elizabeth T. Baird, was descended from the 
ruling chiefs of the Ottowa nation, with an admixture of French and 
Scotch blood, and was a great-niece of President Monroe. Dr. Favill 
came to Wisconsin in 1846, locating at Lake Mills, Jefferson 
county, where he practiced two years ; in 1848 he moved to Madi- 
son, which was his residence ever after. During his long life of 
thirty-five years in Madison, he filled a large place in the commun- 
ity, being admirably endowed both by education and natural 
ability. He was lovingly called "Old »Dr. Favill" by all who knew 
him, and had a character so pure and lofty, that he was readily 
given first place in the hearts of his fellow townsmen. Dr. 
Charles S. Sheldon of Madison writes : "He was independent and 
liberal in his views, charitable in his judgments, generous and 
unselfish ,to a fault, his friends and admirers were legion, and he 
is still mourned in many households." His death occurred in 
Madison, December 9, 1883. He is survived by three children, 
Therese, Dr. Harry Baird, a prominent physician of Chicago, 111., 
and Eleanor, wife of Horace K. Tenney, a lawyer of Chicago. " 

Carl J. G. Felland, secretary of the Stoughton Lumber Associa- 
tion, was born in Pleasant Springs township, this county. Septem- 
ber 28, 1857, being a son of Gunder (Gunderson) and Tone (Neve- 
stedt) Felland, who came from Norway to America in 1846, be- 
coming pioneers of Pleasant Springs township, Dane county, where 
the father purchased eighty acres of government land, in section 
25. He reclaimed this tract and subsequently added to the same 
one hundred and twenty acres adjoining, developing one of the 
valuable farms of this part of the county and continuing to reside 
on the homestead until his death, which occurred July 24, 1887, 
at which time he was seventy-one years of age. He secured his 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 283 

-naturalization papers under the name of Gunderson, but he later 
adopted the surname of Felland as did also his brother. His wife 
is still living. They reared a family of six children, namely: Guil- 
der, Olaf. Ole. Elsa (widow of G. Gjorgensen), Carl J. G., and 
Trena Serena (wife of Ole Sundbey). Carl J. G. Felland was 
reared to the sturdy discipline of the homestead farm and after 
securing a good preliminary training in the public schools of his 
native township he entered Monona Academy, in the city of Madi- 
son, where he continued his studies for some time. He thereafter 
continued to be identified with the operation of the old home farm 
until 1901, and he still owns the property. In the year mentioned 
he .took up his residence in the city of Stoughton, where he has 
since maintained his home. In August, 1900, the Stoughton Lum- 
ber Association was organized and Mr. Felland was one of those 
interested in the organization and incorporation of the concern, 
of which he has been secretary since 1903. The company has ex- 
cellent facilities and controls a large business. In politics he gives 
his support to the Democratic party, and he and his wife are mem- 
bers of the Lutheran church of Pleasant Springs. September 28. 
1898, Mr. Felland was married to Miss Elsie Lee, daughter of 
Ole H. and Marie (Trobaten) Lee, of Pleasant Springs township, 
and the one child of this union is Gonard Andreas. 

Gunder W. Felland, a farmer in the town of Pleasant Springs, 
was born at Moe, Telemarken, Norway, April 2-4. 1843. His par- 
ents, Wetley and Astrid (Reinen) Gunderson, were both natives 
•of that place. They were married in 1839 and the father followed 
farming in his native country until 1846, when, with his wife, and 
two of his brothers, Gunder and Ole. he came to America. The 
voyage was made in the brig "Washington," a sailing vessel, and 
they were nine weeks and two days on the water. They landed 
at New York, went from there to Buffalo by way of the canal, and 
then by steamer to Milwaukee. There they got a team and came 
to' the town of Pleasant Springs. Together the three brothers ob- 
tained one hundred and twenty acres of land, put up a log cabin 
and began making a home. In 1855 Wetley Gunderson pre-empted 
forty acres of government land and later bought eighty acres more, 
and lived on this farm until his death, which occurred in 1899 
He was a Democrat in his political faith and in church matters 
was a Lutheran, being one of the founders of the West Lutheran 
-church. His wife died in 1897. Of their eight children five are 
still living. They are Andrew, a farmer in the town of Burke; 
Martin, living in Worth county, la. ; Ingeborg, living at Rothsay. 



284 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

Minn.; Elsie, at Stoughton, and Gunder W., the subject of this 
sketch. Mr. Felland received only three months schooling, in the 
common schools, the greater part of his education having been ac- 
quired by self study. In his youth he learned the blacksmith's 
trade and worked as it for several years. In 1869 and again in 
1872 he visited different parts of Iowa, looking for a location, and 
after that lived with his parents, taking care of them in the declin- 
ing years. He now owns one hundred and twenty-five acres of 
good land, upon which he carries on a general farming business, 
giving considerable attention to stock raising and dairying. Al- 
though a Democrat in his political views he is by no means an 
active politician. He is a member of the West Lutheran church, 
in the town of Pleasant Springs, and has always been active in 
church work. On June 21, 1880, he married Emma C. Larsen, 
whose parents. Andrew and Jeannette (Everson) Larsen, were na- 
tives of Christiana, Norway, but came to the United States in 1867 
and settled at Stoughton. where the mother died in 1875. Mr. and 
Mrs. Felland have six children. Jeannette S. and Marie A. are now 
attending the Albion academy ; William A., Olaf E., Lydia A., and 
Clara G., are attending the home schools. 

George H. Fett, secretary of the Menges Pharmacy company of 
Madison, and manager of the University avenue pharmacy of that 
firm, was born in Madison, February 23, 1876. He is a son of 
George and Katherine Fett, the former born in Prussia, November 
5, 1839. and the latter in Alzey, Hesse Darmstadt, Germany, Au- 
gust 29, 1841. The father enlisted February 13, 1864. in Company 
C, Fourth United States Infantry. With his regiment he partici- 
pated in the engagements of the Wilderness, May 6 and 7, 1864, 
Spottsylvania Court-house, May 12 to 19. inclusive, North Anna 
river, May 24, Harris Court-house, June 2. Cold Harbor, June 7,. 
and Petersburg, June 17 to 20. The regiment was also present at 
Appomattox when Gen. Robert E. Lee surrendered. Mr. Fett en- 
tered the service as a private, and when he was mustered out on 
February 13, 1867, had risen to the rank of corporal. George H. 
Fett received his preparatory education in the public schools of 
Madison. On September 13. 1891, he entered the drug business as 
an apprentice for Wilson & Fox, with whom he remained a year. 
He then became an employe of A. F. Menges, with whom he has 
since remained. In 1893 he successfully passed the examination 
for assistant pharmacist given by the state board of pharmacy and 
three years later was given a certificate as pharmacist by the same 
board. In politics Mr. Fett belongs to the Republican party and 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 285 

his religious affiliations are with the German Methodist church. 
He is identified as a member of the Wisconsin Pharmaceutical 
Association ; Henry Harnden camp, Sons of Veterans ; and Madi- 
son Lodge, No. 410, of the Benevolent and Protective Order of 
Elks. He is recognized as a young man of principle and character 
and one of the ablest of the younger generation of Madison busi- 
ness men. 

Joseph F. Fiebiger owns and operates a large farm in Medina 
township. His father, Joseph Fiebiger, was a native of Bohemia 
and spent his life in Germany. Joseph Fiebiger. Si\, married Miss 
Francis Blaha, a native of Moravia. Joseph Fiebiger, Jr.. was 
born in Bohemia, September 14, 1846, spent his boyhood at the 
parental home but early decided to try his fortune in the west and 
came to America in 1867. His first home in America was in 
Jefferson county, Wisconsin, and he managed a hardware store in 
Jefferson, Jefferson county, for a period of fourteen years. He then 
located in Dane county and obtained one hundred and fifty-five 
acres of farm land which he improved and farmed and made his per- 
manent residence. On this property in Medina Mr. Fiebiger carries 
on a general farming business and raises a large amount of stock. 
He is a Democrat and much interested in local affairs, particularly 
those pertaining to schools. For six years he was a school director 
of the Medina free high school and was also for four years the 
town assessor. In 1872, he married Miss Johanna Hebl who was 
born in Waterloo, Jefferson county, Wis., August 3, 1854, and is 
a daughter of John Hebl, whose life appears elsewhere in this 
work. Five children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Fiebiger, all of 
whom received the benefit of education in the Medina free high 
school, whose interests their father had labored to promote. 
George John, the oldest, afterward studied medicine and is a prac- 
ticing physician of Waterloo, Wis. The younger children. Anna, 
Eddie, Elinor and Lydia, remain at home. Elinor and Lydia are 
students at the high school. The family are members of the 
Roman Catholic church of Waterloo. 

William E. Fincher, a prosperous young farmer of Oregon, is a 
Pennsylvanian by birth. Both he and his parents, Joseph and 
Dorothy (Losh) Fincher, were natives of Lycoming county. Pa. 
His father and two brothers served in the Civil War; his father, 
who was a farmer and horse dealer, died when he was eight years 
old and his mother the following year, both in Pennsylvania, leav- 
ing a family of six children, Margaret, (Mrs. Waltz, deceased) ; 
Sarah, (Mrs. Day), of Pennsylvania; Clara, (Mrs. Fry), of Will- 



286 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

iamsport ; William E., the subject of this sketch; Frank, of Oregon;-. 
Catherine, of Oregon. All the children were born and educated in 
Pennsylvania and lived there until they reached maturity. Mr. 
Fincher was thrown upon his own resources at an early age, and' 
began taking care of himself when he was only fifteen years old.. 
He followed various occupations but principally the care of trot- 
ting horses; at one time he had a retail milk-route. In 1897, when 
he was twenty-three years old. — he was born January 2, 1874, — 
he came to Oregon, Dane county and began farming; he bought a 
farm of one hundred acres upon which he has rebuilt the fences, 
and made other improvements, and which is run for general agri- 
cultural purposes. Two years after coming to Oregon he married 
Miss Laura Williamson, daughter of John and Phoebe (Bethel) 
Williamson, of Oregon township, who was born in the same place. 
They have one child, Raymond Franklin, born on the home farm 
Mr. Fincher is a Republican, and although comparatively a new 
comer, — among the native born and the pioneers of the fifties, — has. 
entered heartily into the life of his chosen home, serving on the 
school board and winning the esteem of the community by his. 
friendly spirit and neighborly offices. 

James E. Fisher, deceased, was during life one of the most widely 
known and highly respected citizens of the city of Madison, in 
which he had his residence during all of a long and honorable 
career. He was descended from good old Anglo-Saxon stock and 
had his nativity in the country which has been in the van of civili- 
zation and progress for centuries. Mr. Fisher was born in Not- 
tingham, England, November 2, 1836, and was the son of Edward' 
and Charlotte (Dutton) Fisher, the father having been born and 
reared in W r ales. While a young man Edward Fisher moved to 
Nottingham, England, and engaged in the manufacture of lace, in 
which he was very successful, and he continued in that business- 
until 1845, when he came to America and located at Madison, the 
embryonic capital of the future state of Wisconsin. About 1847 
he returned to England and remained two years, when he again 
made the journey to America, accompanied by his only son, whose 
name introduces this review. They embarked at Liverpool on the 
sailing vessel "Plymouth Rock" and landed at Boston thirty-five- 
days later. From that city the father and son made their way via 
railway to Buffalo, and thence on the lakes to Milwaukee, from 
whence they came by team to Madison. At that time the capital 
city was a very small village and not a line of railroad was in the 
state of Wisconsin, and the greater part of the commonwealth was. 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 287 

uninhabited except by the Indians. There were no convenient 
markets and produce was very cheap, the inevitable consequence 
of a scarcity of money. But the elder Mr. Fisher had brought 
some money with him, and he engaged very profitably in the busi- 
ness of loaning the same to those who were more unfortunate than 
he. He also purchased considerable land which is now incorpor- 
ated in the city of Madison, and he it was who planted those trees, 
whose widespreading branches now furnish such convenient 
shade on Mifflin and Webster streets. Mr. Fisher continued to 
reside in Madson until his death in 1852. The maiden name of the 
mother of James E. Fisher was Charlotte Dutton, and she was 
a native of the same city as was her husband. She was loth to 
leave the land of her birth, and upon the migration of her husband 
and son to America she remained in England until 1857, when 
she was induced to make the journey hither through the earnest 
solicitation of her son. She died in Madison in 1885, having reared 
three children : Angelina, James E. and Anna, the son being the 
one to whom this memoir is especially dedicated. As has been 
stated, our subject was the only son, and he received his early 
education in the schools of Nottingham, his native city, and after 
coming to America he supplemented the knowledge he had secured 
by attending the public school of Madison for some time. After 
the death of his father he left school to learn the trade of cabinet- 
maker, serving a three-years' apprenticeship, and then after work- 
ing as a journeyman one year, in 1857 he engaged in business for 
himself, becoming the senior member of the firm of Fisher, Bab- 
cock and Reynolds. This parnership continued until 1872. when 
Mr. Fisher purchased the interest of the other members of the firm 
and became the sole proprietor. His establishment was conceded 
to be the leading one of the kind in Madison, and he continued in 
business until the date of his death, February 14, 1896. his mercan- 
tile career continuing over a period of thirty-nine years, exceeding 
that of any other merchant in the city, with possibly one exception. 
He was located during all of this time at the corner of Pinckney 
and Clymer streets, and during the later years carried on his flour- 
ishing business in a magnificent brick structure, three stories 
high, which was erected under his personal supervision. Mr. 
Fisher was a member of the Episcopal church, and was active and 
influential in all matters pertaining to the public good. In politics 
he gave an unswerving allegiance to the principles of the Repub- 
lican party, and although he never sought political distinction or 
office, he was recognized as a leader in public affairs, being in a 



288 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

large measure for many years ''the power behind the throne". For 
seventeen years he was officially connected with the city fire-de- 
partment, and for many years was treasurer of the St. George 
Society, being one of its charter members at its incorporation in 
1856. He was a great lover of out-door sports and was captain of 
the Capital City base ball club in 1868. He was the local leader 
all those who delighted in the dog and gun, and was the origi- 
nator of the renowned hunting-boat, "Solid Comfort," which cost, 
when furnished, $2,400, and contained all the appliances for hunt- 
ing and fishing, combined with the comforts of home life. One 
possessing the attributes with which he was so richly endowed 
must always win friends, and in the case of Mr. Fisher they were 
as numerous as his acquaintances. To sum up his good qualities, 
in the language of one who knew him well, he was "a genial, 
public-spirited man, and a capable and popular citizen." Mr. 
Fisher was married on December 31, 1885, to Mrs. Mary (Groes- 
beck) Rundle, a native of the state of New York and the daughter 
of Chester and Lorena (Deveaux) Groesbeck. One child was born 
to his union, Edward J., who resides with his mother and attends 
school in Madison. — a worthy son of an honored parentage. 

William P. Fisher, of Middleton, is a native of Ireland, but 
coming to America with his parents at the age of five years, he has 
practically known no other than the home of his adoption. He 
was born August 4, 1844. His parents, John and Margaret (Mc 
Laughlin) Fisher, were both born in Ireland, the former in 1792 
and the latter in 1798. They came to New Jersey in 1849 and 
the following year to Racine, which was their home for s : x years. 
In 1856 they removed to Dane, living in the town of Berry for thir- 
teen years, when the last change of home was made to Springfield, 
where Mr. Fisher died in 1890, at the extreme old age of ninety- 
eight years. Although his wife was six years his junior and passed 
away some years earlier yet even then she passed, by over half a 
decade, the allotted "four score." They had two children, 
William P., the subject of this sketch, and Bernard P.; a resident 
of the town of Fitchburg. Mr. Fisher received his early education 
in the common school, and supplemented that by academic studies 
in Prof. George's seminary. Madison. He reached his majority 
the closing year of the Civil War but the previous year had enlisted 
as a private in Company G, of the Forty-ninth Regiment. He was 
mustered out at Madison in November, 1865. At the close of the 
war he entered upon his active life as a farmer and has continued 
in that occupation to the present time. His home farm in Spring- 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 289 

field consists of one hundred and sixty acres, and he also owns a 
farm of one hundred and twenty acres in Dane. In politics he is 
independent, and he and his family are members of the Catholic 
church. January 15, 1872, he was united in marriage to Miss Jane 
Glennan, in Fitchburg township, Dane county, by whom he had ten 
children ; Mary Ann, of Evansville ; John Edward, Margaret, Jane, 
Kate. William, Rose, Francis, Daniel and Ellen, all living. Mrs. 
Jane (Glennan) Fisher was the daughter of Edward and Ellen 
(Madden) Glennan. both natives of Ireland, his birth-year being 
1821 and hers 1812. They came to Philadelphia in 1847, and lived 
there ten years. During the subsequent years they made their 
home successively in Madison (1858), Blooming Grove (1864), 
Springfield (1870), and lastly in Fitchburg, their present home. 
They had six children. Mr Glennan is politically affiliated with 
the Democratic party, and he and his family belong to the Catholic 
church. 

John P. Fladtland of Christiania township is a well-known 
farmer of that community, where he has lived for many years. 
He has a fine farm with modern buildings which he has erected 
and carries on a general farming and stock-raising business. In 
1897 the new dwelling was built at a cost of $3,500 and a large 
new barn and tobacco shed complete the group of new buildings. 
Born in Sogan, Norway, June 19, 1853, Mr. Fladtland came to 
Wisconsin with his parents, Peter Stdge and Anna (Olson) Stdge 
in 1856. Peter was a gardener in Stdge, Norway, and there worked 
for sixteen years in one place. He determined, however, to attempt 
to better his fortunes in the west and accordingly took passage with 
his wife and six children in a sailing vessel. They landed in Que- 
bec after eight or ten weeks and then continued their journey to 
Stoughton. Wis., finally obtaining a farm in the town of Dunkirk, 
Dane county. Seven years were spent in this locality and then 
Mr. Stdge purchased a farm in section 23. town of Christiania. 
This farm consisted of eighty acres of wild prairie land, which Mr. 
Stdge improved, adding buildings as needed. Mrs. Stdge died in 
1892 and after her death her husband went to Douglas, county, 
Minn, where he died in 1896. Six children were born to them; Bet- 
sey, the eldest daughter, is Mrs. Nels Hanson of Dodge county, 
Minn. ; John P. is the oldest son ; Sina married Herman Shelkiope 
of Stoughton ; Ole resides in Mannon. Ward county. N. D. ; Hattie 
is Mrs. Arnt Hendrickson of Minneapolis ; Peter died aged eleven 
years. John P. attended the Rockdale schools and assisted his 
father with the work on the farm. He learned the carpenter's 
19— iii 



290 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

trade and was also for a short time engaged in threshing but most 
of his life has been spent in farming. In October, 1880, he married 
Miss Mary Johnson, a native of Norway, daughter of John and 
Betsey (Larson) Johnson, who were farmers in Norway and came 
to the United States in 1871. They resided in Edgerton and after- 
ward in Christiania and now live in Baker county, Minn. Of their 
seven children, all but the oldest daughter, Julia, are living. Mrs. 
Fladtland is the oldest living daughter. Mr. and Mrs. Fladtland 
have five children ; Alfred, a prosperous farmer of Ward county, 
N. Dak. ; Nordel, Henry, Florence and Letta, who reside with their 
parents. All have attended the Rockdale schools and are members 
of the Lutheran church. Mr. Fladtland is a Democrat but has 
never taken an active part in political matters. 

Joseph E. Flanagan, an intelligent, energetic and exceedingly 
popular young farmer of the town of Oregon, is the son of worthy 
Irish immigrants, who was born in the city of Stoughon, Dane 
county, on January 17, 1871. His parents were Martin F. and 
Sarah (Cunningham) Flanagan, both of whom were natives of the 
Emerald Isle, the father being born at Galway, November 9, 1823, 
and the mother at Sligo, June 24, 1832. Tradition has it that the 
founder of the Flanagan family in Ireland was a Spanish officer 
who was taken prisoner at the time of the victory of the English 
over the Spanish "forces in the latter part of the sixteenth century. 
This officer is believed to have drifted to Galway, Ireland, where he 
took the name of Flanagan, married and became the head of the 
Irish family of that name. Martin Flanagan migrated to the 
United States from Canada in 1863, and coming to Wisconsin 
first located at Stoughton, Dane county, where he worked during 
the harvest time of that year for Luke Stoughton, the founder of 
the city that bears his name. Mr. Flanagan was then employed by 
the Chi. & N. W. Railroad Company on construction work, while 
that road was being completed into Madison, and he remained in 
the employ of that railroad company three years. He then took up 
his residence in Stoughton and was employed there as a construc- 
tion foreman for twenty years, after which he sold his home there 
and purchased the farm in the town of Oregon, where his 
son, the subject of this review now resides. When Mr. Flanagan 
first came to Stoughton, the site where the city now stands had 
only a mere cluster of small "shacks," rude dwellings of the hardy 
pioneers of that locality. Oxen hitched to home-made wagons — 
predecessors of the twentieth century automobile — were the means 
of conveyance and transportation in that day, and the farmers cut 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 291 

their grain with the cradle and threshed it with the flail. While 
a small boy in his native land, Mr. Flanagan took the temperance 
pledge from the Father Matthew .and during his life was consist- 
ently opposed to the use of intoxicating liquors as a beverage. 
Though never a radical political Prohibitionist, he always thought 
it best to leave liquor alone, as he frequently saw the effects of its 
baneful influence. Although the parents of his wife resided at 
Dunham Flats, Canada, Mr. Flanagan and his wife were married 
at White Hall, N. Y., in February, 1855, and for forty-five years 
they traveled the path of life together, the wife dying on December 
24, 1900, and the husband on September 27, 1903. Five children 
were born to them, the names of and other facts concerning whom 
are given as follows: Mary A. is deceased; Simon married Miss Kit- 
tie Fitzgibbons, of Monroe, Wis., and now resides in Kansas City, 
Mo. ; John M. married Miss Alice Lawler and resides in the town of 
Dunn, Dane county; Joseph E. is the subject of this review, and 
Katie resides with the latter on the old homestead. Joseph E. Flan- 
agan was educated in the high school of the city of Stoughton, and 
remained at home during the most of the time until the death of his 
parents, and during the winters of 1891-2-3 he taught in the dis- 
trict schools. He and his sister, Katie, recently purchased the 
interest of the other heirs in the old homstead and live thereon. 
Mr. Flanagan is a Democrat in his political belief and is a member 
of the Catholic church in the village of Oregon. 

O. F. Flint is one of the highly respected citizens of the village 
of Oregon, where he has resided since 1904. but his residence in 
Dane county dates back to the days of his boyhood. He was born 
in the state of Maine, his parents "being James M. and Sarah (Gore) 
Flint, both of whom were also natives of the Pine Tree state, the 
respective families of each being long resident there. Farlin Flint, 
the father of James M., was one of the earliest settlers of what is 
now the town of Rutland, Dane county, where he took up two 
hundred acres of government land and upon the same lived until 
he was eighty years of age and then went to New Hampshire 
where he died, aged eighty-four years. James M. Flint also mi- 
grated from his Eastern home, and coming to Dane county in 1858, 
settled in Rutland and pursued the life of a farmer until his death, 
himself and wife having both passed away several years ago. 
After reaching manhood in Maine, and until his removal to Wis- 
cconsin, he conducted a saw and shingle mill in his native state. 
O. F. Flint, whose name introduces this memoir, was born, April 7, 
1848, and hence was but ten years old when his parents came to 



292 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

what was then "the far west." He received his education in the 
Flint school in the town of Rutland, and assisted his father on the 
home farm until he had reached the age of twenty-seven years. 
He then purchased a farm for himself and followed agricultural pur- 
suits incessantly and with good success until 1904, when he sold 
his farm and moved to the village of Oregon, where a fine home and 
six acres of land affords him the respite he desires and a reasonable 
amount of activity in gardening. Mr. Flint is a pronounced Pro- 
hibitionist in his political views, and while living in the town of 
Rutland served as a school official for a number of years. He was 
married on February 19, 1879, to Miss Sarah J. Carrison, a native 
of England, who came to the United States with her parents when 
but eight years old. She is a member of the Free Baptist church 
in the town of Rutland. Mr. and Mrs. Flint have no children. 
Mrs. Flint's parents, George Carrison and wife, are honored citi- 
zens of the village of Oregon, having been residents of Dane county 
since 1867, and her paternal grandfather had lived here for more 
than fifty years prior to his death. 

Arthur O. Fox, of Madison, was born on his father's farm in 
the town of Fitchburg, Dane county ,Wisconsin, November 2, 1855. 
He was a son of Dr. William H. Fox, one of the pioneers of the 
state, a sketch of whose life appears elsewhere in this work. Arthur 
was educated in the common school of his home district, a private 
school at Detroit, Michigan, and the University of Wisconsin, 
spending three years in the last named institution. He began his 
business career in the accounting department of the Michigan Cen- 
tral Railroad, at Detroit, and while in this position became inter- 
ested in the live stock traffic between Canada and the United States 
to such an extent that he determined to become a stock importer and 
breeder. Accordingly returning to Wisconsin, he bought a tract 
of land adjoining his father's farm and commenced sheep-breeding 
and importing. This business proved eminently successful and 
developed much beyond his expectations so that within twenty 
years, he had become the largest breeder of pure-bred, pedigreed, 
mutton sheep in the United States and had accumulated a tract of 
farming lands, approximating one thousand acres, adjoining and 
including the old family homestead. In the early nineties, Mr. 
Fox also became interested in various other real estate operations 
and as the city of Madison offered special advantages for the pur- 
suit of this business, as well as for the education of his several child- 
ren, he removed in 1895 to the capital city. Here he soon became 
identified with some of the leading manufacturing and banking 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 293 

institutions of the city. His recognized business judgment and 
foresight caused his associates to confer on him positions of trust 
and responsibility. Among the various enterprises with which he 
has been identified is the Northern Electrical Manufacturing Com- 
pany, which was formed at Madison in 1895 for the purpose of man- 
ufacturing electrical machinery. He was chosen at the beginning 
to take the general management of its affairs and under his direc- 
tion the plant was built and equipped. This company has grown 
from nothing in 1895 to one of the largest and most prosperous 
manufacturing institutions in the West, its products going all over 
the world, and its sales amounting to a million dollars annually. In 
1903 the position of president of the company was bestowed upon 
Mr. Fox in addition to that of general manager, both of which 
positions he now holds. The growth and prosperity of this insti- 
tution has been an important factor in the upbuilding of the east- 
ern part of the city of Madison. It is of especial interest to note 
that Mr. Fox was one of the first to recognize the importance of the 
introduction of the uses of electricity and electrical machinery on 
farms. Some of the first electrical equipments installed on farms in 
the United States were made and installed by the Northern Com- 
pany in 1898, under his direction, and the success of these has led 
to the quite general introduction of the use of electricity on farms. 
Mr. Fox says that within ten years, plows and other farm imple- 
ments will be very generally propelled by electricity instead of 
being drawn by horses. Upon the death of his father, Mr. Fox 
acquired and still owns the old homestead farm which his father 
bought from the government in 1841 and 1842, to which much has 
since been added. In 1882. Mr. Fox was married to Miss Anna 
Williams, daughter of Chauncey L. Williams of Madison. To 
them were born seven children as follows : Morris F., Cornelia 
Lillian, Annie Myra, Katherine, Neill W., Lucia and Helen. 
All except Helen, who died at the age of five years, are now living. 
The oldest son Morris, is now associated with his father in business. 
Joseph Grierson Fox, of Oregon, was born in Suntown, Ireland, 
about fifty miles from Dublin, April 12, 1822. His parents were 
William and Eleanor (Lynn) Fox, both natives of Ireland. His 
father was a merchant of Dublin, but after coming to the United 
States, he took up the occupation of farming, settling in La Grange, 
Ind.. which remained his home. Joseph Fox was one of a family of 
ten children, six brothers and four sisters, and was about eleven 
years of age when he accompanied his parents to this country. In 
1844, then a young man of twenty-two, he came to Dane county and 



294 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

took up one hundred and sixty acres of government land in the town 
of Oregon. To this he added from time to time until he had a fine 
farm of three hundred and fifty-five acres of improved land which 
was devoted mostly to the raising of Belgian horses. Mr. Fox 
affiliated with the Presbyterian church and in politics with the 
Democratic party ; he served as the register of deeds of Dane county. 
He was twice married ; his first wife, whom he married June 22, 
1845, was Miss Mary Lalor, daughter of Patrick Lalor, of Tena- 
kill, Queens county, Ireland. By her he had four children, George 
Fox, M. D., of Janesville ; Anna Catherine, (deceased); Eleanor, 
now Mrs. Wm. Kiser, of Mena, Ark.; Joseph Patrick, (deceased). 
Mrs. Fox died August, 30, 1850. On May 24, 1855, Mr. Fox 
married Harriet Lucinda, — daughter of Christian Adamson, Esq., 
of Ballinlack, Ireland, — who died February 24, 1895. They had 
one son, J. H. Fox, who was born May 20, 1856, and who married, 
June 16, 1886, Ida, daughter of John O. Kiser, Esq., of Fitchburg 
township ; they have one daughter, Carrie Dora, born November 
30, 1890. All of the children and the grandchild of Mr. J. G. Fox 
were born in the town of Oregon. J. H. Fox is a member of the 
Modern Woodmen of Oregon, and his father was a Mason. The 
latter died June 17, 1906. 

Jacob P. Fox is the owner of a farm in Dane county and is a 
well-known member of the community. Conrad and Catherine 
(Smith) Fox, his parents, came from Germany, where Mr. Fox 
was born in 1813 and his wife in 1818. Their home was in Water- 
loo township, Jefferson county, where they obtained an eighty acre 
farm, which has since been the home of the family. Here Mr. 
Fox died in 1874 and his wife in September, 1902. Or their twelve 
sons and daughters, but five are living. The family attended the 
Lutheran church. Jacob P. Fox was born April 1, 1861, at Water- 
loo, Jefferson county, Wisconsin. He attended the district school 
but was early obliged to make his own way ; he worked out upon 
farms in the neighborhood and was employed by Orson Carskaden 
for seven years. In 1894, he purchased the eighty-acre farm.which 
is his present residence and which he has improved and equipped 
in many ways. He raises short-horned cattle and Poland China 
hogs and also various kinds of farm produce. With no assistance, 
by his own energy and thrift he has made for himself a prosper- 
ous and comfortable home. He is a member of the Republican 
party but devotes himself to his business rather than to active 
participation in politics. September 14, 1886, he married Laura L. 
(Carskaden) Fox, daughter of Orson Carskaden of York and 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 295 

widow of Conrad Fox, brother of Jacob P. Fox. Conrad Fox died 
in 1881, leaving two children ; George O., who married Miss Odelia 
Dobbelstein and Charles C. Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Fox have one 
son, Earl J., who was born November 3, 1894. The family is 
identified with the Methodist Episcopal church. 

Philip Fox, M. D., of Madison, belongs to a family noted as 
among the pioneer families of Dane county, and also for the num- 
ber of its members that have devoted themselves to the medical 
profession. The family comes from Moat-a-Granough, County 
Westmeath, Ireland, and the original form of the name is 
An Sionnach, Fox being the Anglicized form. The history of the 
family in America already covers four generations, the first being 
Rev. William Fox. who with his wife, Eleanor (Lynn) Fox and 
six children came to America in 1834 and made their home, first in 
Tecumsah, Michigan, and soon after in La Grange county, Indiana. 
They had been preceded by their second son, William H. Fox, who 
came to Cleveland, Ohio, in 1833, being at that time nineteen years 
of age. In 1839 he joined his family in La Grange county and 
soon after began the practice of medicine at Lima, in that county. 
In the autumn of 1842 the two brothers, Dr. William H. and 
George, aged respectively twenty-eight and twenty-two years, 
left La Grange county and drove across the country to Chicago 
and then continued their journey through the forests and oak open- 
ings of southeastern Wisconsin, passing through the frontier vil- 
lages of Janesville and Delavan and located in the town of Fitch- 
burg, Dane county, both entering land in section 35. George en- 
tered one hundred and twenty acres at the land office in Milwaukee, 
and then returned to Indiana and spent the winter in Michigan 
City, La Porte county ; but in the following spring in company 
with his wife and two children returned to make a permanent set- 
tlement. He built a log-house, sixteen by thirteen feet, which was 
the family home for thirteen years and the temporary home of 
other relatives who soon followed these pioneers. The wife of 
George Fox, whom he married in Indiana, was Catherine Keenan, 
a native of King's County, Ireland, who came to the United States 
in 1838. They had six children, of whom two sons, Philip, of 
Madison, — the subject of this sketch, — born at Lima, Indiana. 
March 27, 1840, — and William of Milwaukee, were physicians, and 
one daughter, Ellen, married a physician, (Dr. Wilson). Their 
other children were Maria, (Mrs. Capt. Gerraughty) ; Katie, (Mrs. 
G. Barry) ; and Addie, (Mrs. D. E. Kiser). Upon the farm, re- 
claimed from the wilderness and afterward increased to three hun- 



296 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

dred and twenty acres, and upon which, in 1856, a substantial stone 
house was built. Dr. Philip Fox spent his boyhood, and that con- 
tinued to be his home until 1870. His school life, after passing 
through the primitive training of the district schools was spent at 
Sinsinawa Mound, Wisconsin, and his medical training was obtained 
at Bellevue Hospital Medical College, from which he was graduated 
in March, 1863. In December of the same year he entered the army 
as assistant surgeon of the Second Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry, 
and remained in service until July, 1864, when he was mustered out, 
and returned to Wisconsin and began his private practice in com- 
pany with his uncle. Dr William H. Fox of Fitchburg. In 1870, he 
removed to Janesville. where he remained for six years, and then 
located in Madison where he has remained until the present time. 
He was married in Madison, in September, 1866, to Miss Anna 
Reynolds, by whom he has had four children, Philip R., Anna K., 
Mary J., and George W. The two sons are also physicians ; 
Philip R., usually known as "Dr Rodney", was born in Fitchburg 
township, June 23, 1867. He was educated in the schools of Madi- 
son. Prairie du Chien and Watertown, and studied medicine at 
Rush Medical College, Chicago, and was graduated from that 
school in 1890. Following graduation he spent a year and a half 
as interne in the Presbyterian Hospital of Chicago, and has since 
been associated with his father in the practice of medicine in the 
city of Madison. The younger son, George W., was born in 
Janesville, January 30, 1875. He was educated at the University 
of Wisconsin and Rush Medical College, and was graduated from 
the latter in 1897. He also entered the Presbyterian Hospital as 
interne and remained there until October, 1899. The following 
year he located in Milwaukee, where he is practicing at the present 
time. Beside his private practice he is the attending surgeon and 
secretary of staff of St. Mary's Hospital, attending surgeon of the 
Emergency Hospital and surgeon for the Wisconsin Central 
Railroad. He is a Republican and a member of the Roman Catho- 
lic church. He also belongs to the Phi Delta Theta, the Milwau- 
kee Yacht Club, the Milwaukee Medical Society, the Milwaukee 
County Medical Society, the Wisconsin Medical Society and the 
American Medical Association. The members of the medical 
fraternity in the Fox family have held and still hold a high 
rank as physicians and surgeons, and the older men, especially, 
have been of great service to the profession as consulting physi- 
cians. 




Dr. Wm. H. Fox. 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 297 

Philip R. Fox, M. D., is one of the leading physicians of the city 
of Madison, and he has attained to this enviable position as a 
lesnlt of a thorough technical education, close and careful atten- 
tion to his professional duties, and the further practice of keeping 
up-to-date in all things pertaining to the science of medicine and 
surgery. He is another of the Dane county boys who have re- 
flected credit upon her citizenship and institutions, and his suc- 
cessful career is gratifying to a host of warm personal friends. Dr. 
Fox was born in the town of Fitchburg. Dane county, June 23, 
1867, and is one of four children born to Philip and Anna E. (Rey- 
nolds) Fox, a more extended mention of whom is given on another 
page of this volume. Philip R. Fox received his preliminary educa- 
tion in the district schools of his native town and in the Catholic 
parochial school at Madison, supplementing the knowledge thus 
gained by a course in the Jesuit college at Prairie du Chien and at 
Sacred Heart college in Watertown, Wis. Having thus completed 
his literary education he entered Rush Medical College at Chicago, 
and was graduated from that institution with the class of 1890.. For 
the eighteen months following the completion of his professional 
course- of studies he was an interne in the Presbyterian Hospital at 
Chicago, and on March 15, 1893, began the regular practice at Madi- 
son. He devotes himself to the general practice of medicine and to 
surgery, and his ability is recognized by employment as the district 
surgeon for the Chicago & Northwestern Railroad Company, to the 
duties of which he attends in addition to his general practice. 
Dr. Fox is a Democrat in his political views, but has never al- 
lowed a craving for office to interfere with the duties of his chosen 
profession. His religious faith is expressed by membership in the 
Catholic church, and his fraternal relations are with the patriotic 
order known as the Loyal Legion. Dr. Fox was married on 
October 18, 1902, to Miss Katherine Brigham, a native of Milwau- 
kee, and to this union one child has been born, Anna, born in Madi- 
son, January 13, 1904. 

William H. Fox, M. D„ deceased, was one of the pioneers of 
Dane county, and for many years one of its most popular physi- 
cians. He was born at Moate-a-Granough in the county of West- 
meat, Ireland. September, 1814, his parents being, William and 
Eleanor (Lynn) Fox. The original family name was O'Cathar- 
naigh. This family originally owned the major part of the county 
of Westmeath and a part of the barony of Kilcoursey in King's 
County, Ireland. About 1185 A. D. because of some deed of valor 
in war by one of the O'Catharnaigh lords he was called "An Sion- 



298 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

nach," (The Fox,) thereafter all of his descendants to the present 
have borne the name "Fox." Galtrim Castle, now the property 
of Hubert Fox, Esquire, still stands just outside of Dublin, the last 
remaining monument of this old family name and estate in Ire- 
land. Upon one of the walls of this old castle still hangs an old oil 
painting representing Queen Elizabeth in the act of re-granting 
certain tracts of land to Matthew Fox and his four sons, James, 
John, Joseph and William, and conferring on the eldest the title of 
Lord of Kilcoursey. In the painting stands the Queen with parch- 
ment in hand, the Earl of Leicester near her and the five Foxes 
standing in front of them. Copies of this picture were made some 
twenty years ago by Melville E. Stone of Chicago, (now general 
manager of the associated press) a relative of the Foxes, then trav- 
eling in Europe. Several of these copies are now in the hands of 
A. O. Fox, Philip Fox and other survivors of the family. Dr. 
Fox received his early education at the hands of private tutors in 
his native country and at the age of nineteen years came to America, 
(1833), locating at Cleveland, Ohio. There he remained for about 
six years, during which time he acquired a medical education and 
then, in 1839, removed to Lima, Ind. There he began the practice 
of his profession and followed it until the fall of 1841, when he 
made a visit to Wisconsin. Being favorably impressed with the 
country south of Madison he went to the Milwaukee land office 
and entered a farm in the township of Fitchburg, one and a half 
miles north of the village of Oregon. The following spring he 
brought his family to the farm, which was then on the frontier, and 
commenced improving it. Several brothers and sisters of the doc- 
tor came to Wisconsin about the same time, locating in the vicin- 
ity. All were blest with many children and the Fox settlement 
became famous in pioneer days for the generous hospitality of this 
large family. From a very early day down to the present time 
this family has been closely identified with the progress of Dane 
county. In 1842, Doctor Fox built upon his farm and furnished 
a log house in which his Wisconsin housekeeping then began. 
Although this log house consisted of but two rooms, no wayfarer 
ever knocked at the doctor's door without receiving a generous 
welcome and being told that there was plenty of room for him 
to pass the night. The old farm above alluded to has been kept 
in the family and now belongs to his son, Arthur O. Fox. As a 
physician. Dr. Fox, bore a high reputation and was widely known 
and respected. The hardships and exposures of his early pioneer 
life had developed in him a ruggedness peculiar to the frontier, yet 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 299 

lie possessed a child's gentleness of nature and his heart responded 
quickly in sympathy to those in distress. He possessed to a great 
■extent that peculiar imagination common to the Celtic race which 
enabled him to find beauty and simplicity in the very wildness and 
ruggedness of things about him and caused him to prefer always 
the environments of a country farm home to those of city life. As 
lie gradually accumulated lands they were always well handled so 
that, added to his reputation as a physician and surgeon, he also 
was widely known as one of the representative and successful far- 
mers of the state, and his large lawn of great rugged burr oaks be- 
came a land mark for miles around and still stands preserved just 
as he found it in 1841 when he saw it for the first time in posses- 
sion of wild deer. His wife was Cornelia Raymond Averill of New 
York state. They were married in December, 1841, and moved to 
Wisconsin in the spring of the following year. Mrs. Fox was of 
New England parentage and a direct descendant of Col. Benjamin 
Simonds a prominent Revolutionary leader of Williamstown, 
Mass. She died in April, 1864. To. Dr. and Mrs. Fox were born 
four daughters and a son. The second daughter, Adeline, died un- 
married when twenty-one years of age. The others still survive and 
are as follows, Catherine (Mrs. C. F. Adamson), of Madison; 
Anna (Mrs. Wm. F. Vilas), of Madison; Lucia (Mrs. John M. 
Byrne), of Kansas City, and Arthur O. Fox of Madison. Doctor 
Fox was a member of the convention in 1847 which adopted the con- 
stitution of the state of Wisconsin. He was always alert in public 
affairs and always favored any movement having for its object the 
advancement of public interests. He died upon his farm near Ore- 
gon, Wisconsin, in October, 1883. and his body now lies in the Ore- 
gon cemetery overlooking the old farm which he chose in pioneer 
days, it being his expressed w r ish that this should be his last resting 
place. 

Prof. David B. Frankenburger, A. M., LL. B., deceased, for many 
years at the head of the department of oratory and rhetoric in the 
University of Wisconsin, was born in Edinburg, Lawrence county, 
Pennsylvania, October 13, 1845, the son of Lewis and Elizabeth 
(Kale) Frankenburger. The father was a native of Virginia and 
the mother of Columbiana county, Ohio. Professor Frankenburger's 
ancestors were landowners of North Germany, and the paternal 
grandfather came to America in 1760 whi'e ttill a youth, and during 
the American struggle for independence was a soldier of the Conti- 
nental army. The original Frankenburger home in the United 
States was near the boundary line of three states, Virginia, Mary- 



300 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

land and Pennsylvania and the name for many years was a familiar 
one in the Old Dominion and the Keystone state. Intermarriage 
with the best of French, Irish and Scotch stock has mingled with 
the original German blood of the family until kinship with a bet- 
ter part of the world may readily be established. Lewis Franken- 
burger was a merchant in Pennsylvania until 1855 when he removed 
to Green county. Wis., to engage in farming. Later he removed 
to Butler county, la., where he also followed agricultural pursuits. 
Prof. Frankenburger, the youngest of the four children in the fam- 
ily, was but ten years of age when he came to Wisconsin with his 
parents. For nine years he helped with the farm work in the sum- 
mer and in winter attended the district schools. The preparation 
for a collegiate course was received at Milton academy and at the 
age of twenty-one years Prof. Frankenburger entered the Univer- 
sity of Wisconsin, which institution in 1869 conferred upon him the 
degree of P>achelor of Philosophy. The following two years were 
spent in the study of law in the law department of the Uni- 
versity, and in 1871. after receiving the degree of Bachelor of Laws 
he entered upon a professional career in Milwaukee. He con- 
tinued to practice law for some seven years, and was then offered 
by the regents of the University of Wisconsin the chair of oratory 
and rhetoric, which he accepted and filled with eminent success 
until his demise. In 1882 Prof. Frankenburger sought, by a course 
in Boston, to strengthen his qualifications as a teacher of oratory. 
Although not an active participant in the political field he was a 
life-long Republican. In religious matters he associated himself 
with the Unitarian society of Madison and was an energetic and 
influential partaker in all its activities. On June 24, 1880, Prof. 
Frankenburger was united in marriage to Miss Mary Storer. eldest 
daughter of the late George L. and Mary F. (Johnson) Storer. of 
Madison. Mrs. Frankenburger was a native of Portland, Me., 
who came to Wisconsin when seventeen years of age. She at- 
tended the Milwaukee College and is a graduate of the University 
of Wisconsin. Prof, and Mrs. Frankenburger became the parents 
of two daughters ; Margaret, twenty years of age, is a student 
the State University, and Dorothy, fifteen years old, is attending 
the high school. On February 6, 1906, Prof. Frankenburger suc- 
cumbed to cerebro-spinal meningitis, leaving to mourn his loss 
a host of friends among the alumni of his alma mater and the citi- 
zens of his home city. The Wisconsin Society of Sciences, Arts 
and Letters, the Madison Literary Club, of which organization he 
was a charter member, the Humane Society and the Six O'Clock 



BIOGRAPHICAL. » 301 

Club all valued highly his membership and suffered in his death 
an irreparable loss. Nowhere will he be more missed than in the 
alumni gatherings of the University of Wisconsin, to which insti- 
ution he was what Dr. Holmes was to Harvard — the college poet. 
In earlier years he was a frequent contributor of verse to educa- 
tional periodicals and became exceedingly popular with literary 
connoisseurs for the exquisite culture of his poems. 

Mrs. Phillis Gallagher Frawley, residing at 620 Langdon street, 
Madison, was born in Rock Island, Ireland. With her parents, 
Samuel and Sarah (Burchell) Gallagher, she came to Madison in 
1857. by way of Quebec and the Great Lakes to Milwaukee, thence 
by stage to Madison. The father was engaged in the shoe business 
in Madison for a number of years. His death occurred when he 
was fifty-six years of age and his widow passed aAvay in her sev- 
enty-fourth year. The subject of this .sketch, the youngest of a 
family of seven children, was an infant when the family arrived in 
the capital city. When the somber cloud of war appeared on the 
horizon of national unity Samuel Gallagher offered his services 
in behalf of the preservation of the Union, but because of ill health 
was prevented from serving. Mrs. Frawley received her prelimi- 
nary education in the common and private schools of Madison and 
then for a time attended the University of Wisconsin ; then for 
three years she taught school. Her marriage to Henry P. Frawley 
occurred March 17, 1877. In religious matters Mrs. Frawley is 
affiliated with the Protestant Episcopal church. For many years 
she conducted a boarding house at 620 Langdon street, and at 
different times has had as many as eighty university students 
under her charge. She has shown a foresight and judgment in 
the matter of real estate values which have placed her in the fore- 
most rank of capitalists. The new Frawley flats on Mendota court, 
rcently erected by her, were the first modern flats built in Madi- 
son, with steam heat and all modern improvements. Beside these 
flats Mrs Frawley is the owner of much valuable realty. Of her 
father's family there are two others beside herself living in Madi- 
son, — John Gallagher, a dealer in tents and awnings, and Mrs. 
E. L. Baker of 424 North Murray street. 

Augustus M. Frish, general manager of the Advance Thresher 
Company, whose Wisconsin headquarters are at 052 Jenifer street, 
is a native of Monroe county, Wisconsin. He is a son of August 
and Barbara (Robb) Frish, both natives of Germany. The father 
was educated in the Fatherland and removed to this country, settling 
in Dane county, when but twenty years old. Later he went to 



302 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

Monroe county, where the subject of this sketch was born Feb- 
ruary 28, 1863, and subsequently to Juneau county, where he died 
April 9, 1899. His widow is a resident of Tomah, Wis. She has 
passed the sixty-eighth milestone but is still vigorous. Only the 
two younger children of the family of four are still living. Bar- 
bara, Mrs. Fred Finger, died at the age of thirty-one and Emma 
passed away while still a child. Joseph, the youngest, is a broker 
at Tomah. Augustus M. Frish received his education in the dis- 
trict schools and the Tomah high school. Upon the completion 
of his scholastic labors he went to work in a machine shop and af- 
ter a few years became a "full-fledged" machinist. He then en- 
tered the service of the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha 
Railway in the engine department and at the age of twenty had 
become a locomotive engineer. In 1891 he gave up railroading to 
go on the road for the Advance Thresher company and after eight 
years of service as traveling salesman was promoted to his present 
position of general manager. His field of operations includes 
Illinois and Wisconsin, and the Madison office has ten employees 
under Mr. Frish's direction. On October 1, 1889, Mr. Frish was 
united in marriage to Mary Liddane, a native of Monroe county,, 
and a daughter of Patrick and Bridget Liddane, both deceased- 
This union has been blessed with three children, — Gertrude Gen- 
evieve, Ruth and Evaline. The family are communicants of the 
Catholic church. Mr. Frish is a member of the Knights of Colum- 
bus, the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, the Modern 
Woodmen of America and the United Commercial Travelers. 

John Froggatt, of Middleton, is one of Dane county's pioneers, 
whose own unaided efforts have made him a substantial member 
of the community. His parents, William F. and Anna (Robinson) 
Froggatt, lived in Derbyshire, England, and out of a family of 
seven brothers and sisters John was the only one who came to 
America. John was born in 1823 and spent part of his early years 
at the home of his grandfather, Robert Froggatt. He started to 
work on a farm while quite young and worked for two years for 
five dollars a year. After this he found employment in brickyards. 
Dissatisfied with his poor surroundings the young man took pass- 
age in a sailing vessel, the Mayflower, in March, 1849, with his 
young wife. The boat was disabled in the Irish Channel in a col- 
lision and obliged to return to Liverpool for repairs. After slight 
delay in same month the persistent youth again set sail and landed 
in New York in April with but sixty dollars in his pocket. This 
he used to rent a farm near Buffalo, Erie county, N. Y., which he 




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BIOGRAPHICAL. 303 

worked for three years, leaving it to come to Wisconsin. Here 
his hopes were not disappointed and after renting for a season 
he was able to buy forty acres of wild land in Springfield township 
which became his permanent home. The first building on it was 
a log cabin erected by the hands of the owner but it was soon suc- 
ceeded by more substantial ones and the farm has been added to 
and improved until it now includes five hundred and forty acres 
of fine land. Mr. Froggatt has given considerable attention to the 
breeding of fine cattle in which he has been successful. He is 
now retired and built his present home in Middleton in 1904, where 
two of his children live. Mr. Froggatt was a Republican until 1887, 
when he allied himself with the temperance cause. He has always 
been active in church matters, in England, in the Wesleyan church 
and in America, in the Methodist Episcopal church, where he has 
been a class leader for fifty years. Mrs. Froggatt was before her 
marrige Miss Mary Gill, daughter of William and Hannah Archer 
Gill of Derbyshire. Three children of Mr. and Mrs. Froggatt are 
now living; Walter G., born January 9. 1854, is a farmer of Middle- 
ton. He has never married and is a partner of his brother, James 
Henry; the latter was born October 28, 1855, at Springfield, Dane 
county, and was educated in the county schools and also at the Uni- 
versity in Madison in the winter of 1875-76. He spent the winter of 
1877-78 in California, sight-seeing, but returned to the old home 
and began farming. In 1889 he married Miss Mary Lappley of 
Dane county, daughter of John and Mary (Smith) Lappley, old 
settlers, now living in Middleton ; they have three children, Lill- 
ian M.. Edward J. and Fannie J. Wesley E., the youngest, was 
born August 30, 1870, received his professional training at Rush 
Medical College, and is now practicing his profession of medicine 
at Cross Plains. The lack of early educational advantages has 
been so greatly deplored by Mr. Froggatt that he taught himself 
the rudimentary branches and has made up to his children what he 
was denied himself and all have good educations. 

Richard Douglas Frost, one of the honored pioneers of Blooming 
Grove township and one who has been prominent in the industrial 
and civic upbuilding of the community and in the public affairs of 
the county, claims the old Empire state of the Union as the place 
of his nativity. He was born in the town of Schaghticoke, Rens- 
selaer county. New York, October 9, 1821. His father, Stephen 
Frost, was born in Washington county, New York, and was a son 
of Ezra Frost, who was born in one of the New England states, of 
Scotch ancestrv, and who removed from Massachusetts to Wash- 



304 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

ington county. New York, settling in the village of Union, where 
he was engaged in the general merchandise business until the time 
of his death. Stephen Frost was reared to manhood in Washington 
county, where he secured good educational advantages. He was 
employed as a clerk and later as a bookkeeper in the village of 
Union, whence he removed to the city of Brooklyn, where he was 
long employed as an expert accountant and where he continued 
to reside until his death. His wife, whose maiden name was 
Elizabeth Cooper, was born near Fort Edward, Washington county. 
New York, being a daughter of Richard and Sarah (Osborne) 
Cooper, who were of English ancestry. Richard Cooper was born 
in the state of New York, May 12. 1771, and he passed his entire life 
in the old Empire state, his parents having been natives of England. 
His wife likewise was born in New York state, April 2, 1783, her 
father having immigrated from England to America in the col- 
onial days and having continued a resident of New York until his 
death, at an advanced age. After the death of her first husband 
Elizabeth (Cooper) Frost became the wife of John Dusenberry,. 
and they reared two children, — Joseph and Mary, the subject of this 
sketch having been the only child of the first marriage. His 
mother continued a resident of Schagticoke until the time of her 
death. Richard D. Frost was about eleven years of age at the time 
of his father's death, and he was carefully reared by his devoted 
mother and his stepfather, securing the best -available educational 
advantages of the locality and period. After his marriage he re- 
moved to Troy, New York, in which city he assisted in establishing 
a gingham factory, the second of the kind in the United States, and 
he continued to superintend the operation of this manufactory until 
1850, when his health became so impaired that he was compelled to 
seek less sedentary occupation. In 1848 he had purchased a tract 
in section 20. Blooming Grove township, Dane county, Wisconsin, 
and when he sought a change of vocation and climate he decided to 
locate on his farm in the wilds of the Badger state. He made the 
trip by railroad to Buffalo, whnce he proceeded by way of steam- 
boat on Lake Erie to Detroit, Michigan. From that city he made 
his way by the Michigan Central Railroad to New Buffalo, at the 
foot of Lake Michigan, where he secured lake transportation to 
Milwaukee, from which point he came by stage to Madison. The 
pleasant old days of the stage coaching have long passed, save as 
enjoyed in a superficial style by the votaries of fashion, but at the 
time when Mr. Frost came to Wisconsin the stage coach was an 
established and valued institution in covering long distances, as 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 305 

the railways had not yet penetrated so far in the frontier 
districts. For a number of years past Air. Frost has rented his fine 
farm, which was reclaimed and improved by him and which com- 
prises a large area of most productive and valued land, 
and has lived essentially retired, enjoying the rewards of his long 
years of earnest toil and endeavor. February 4, 18-11, Mr. Frost 
was united in marriage to Miss Sarah M. Van Anden, who was born 
in Schaghticoke, New York, being a daughter of Bernard and 
Clarissa (Robinson) Van Anden, the former of whom was born in 
beautiful Mohawk valley of New York, of Holland parentage, 
and he continued resident of New York until his death.. His wife 
passed the closing years of her life with her daughter, Mrs. Frost, 
in Dane county, Wisconsin ; her father, Nathaniel Robinson, was 
a native of New England and was a patriot soldier in the Continen- 
tal line during the War of the Revolution. Mr. and Mrs. Frost 
became the parents of three children, — Lewis, Emma E. and Sarah 
M., the last named having been born in 1849 and having died in 
1865. Emma is the wife of M. E. Flesh and they reside in the city 
of Chicago. Lewis, the only son, was reared and educated in Dane 
county, and he was one of the brave soldiers who represented this 
state as a loyal defender of the Union in the Civil War. 
He enlisted, in 1862, in Company I, Twenty-third Wisconsin 
Volunteer Infantry, with which he participated in many important 
engagements, having been once seriously wounded in battle. He 
was promoted from private to first lieutenant of his company, with 
which he remained in active service until the close of the war, 
when he received his honorable discharge. He is now a prominent 
business man of Winona. Minnesota, He married Miss Julia 
Karns and they have three children. The subject of this review 
has been identified with the Republican party from the time of its 
organization, and he has been a stalwart advocate of its principles 
and has been an influential factor in its local councils. He has held 
various offices of trust, having been township assessor and having 
represented Blooming Grove township on the county board of 
supervisors for twelve years. In 1887 he was elected a represent- 
ative of Dane county in the assembly of the state legislature, where 
he labored to further such legislation as would redound to the ben- 
efit of the state. He was for several years a member of the execu- 
tive committee of the Wisconsin State Grange, and was also a 
director of the Northwestern Relief Association, and director and 
treasurer of the Cottage Grove Fire Insurance Company. He has 
20— iii 



306 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

ever stood for all that is best in citizenship and now, venerable in 
years, he has the unqualified esteem and confidence of the people 
of the county in which he has made his home for more than half a 
century, while he is sustained by the loving companionship of 
his cherished and devoted wife, to whom he was married fully 
sixty-five years ago. 

James Gallagher, an esteemed citizen of Madison, was born at 
Rock Island, county of Cork. Ireland, May 11, 1833. He is a son of 
John and Martha (Johnson) Gallagher, both natives of the county 
of Cork, both of which families went from England into Ireland 
at an early date. The subject's paternal grandfather was the first 
Gallagher to come to this country, settling in Rochester, N. Y. 
John Gallagher followed in 1855, coming directly to Dane county, 
and started farming near Cottage Grove. John Gallagher and his 
wife were devout members of the Church of England. Of their 
twelve children there are only three living, James, the subject of this 
sketch. Thomas, a farmer in Clark county, Wis., and Frank, a 
farmer in Deerfield. Thomas and another son, Michael, were mem- 
bers of the Eleventh Wisconsin infantry during the Civil War. 
James had little opportunity to go to school. He learned the shoe- 
maker's trade in Ireland and worked at it there until 1851, when he 
determined to seek his fortune in the New World. After a passage 
of five weeks and three days on a sailing vessel he landed in Que- 
bec, with only two dollars in his pocket. From Quebec he went to 
Kingston, Ontario, and for three months drove team at $3.50 per 
month. At Rochester, N. Y. he worked at his trade for a year 
and then came to Madison where he established a shoe store on 
Webster street. For twenty years Mr. Gallagher continued in the 
shoe business and later went into the grocery business. For the 
past few years he has been dealing in real estate in a small way. 
Mr. Gallagher is the owner of considerable improved real estate in 
the city. Together with his son-in-law Jno. W. Salter, he has 
just completed one of the most modern and up-to-date flat buildings 
in Madison. This is situated at 12 and 1-4 Webster street and 
contains six five and six-room flats, all square, finished with hard 
wood floors, furnished with steam heat, electric lights, etc. 
Another flat building facing on Hamilton and Webster streets con- 
tains six four, five and six-room flats, finished the same as the 
new flat except as to heating. He also owns a rooming-house at 
334 W. Main street ; his home residence at 114 North Hamilton 
street ; two houses on Baldwin street, 205 ; three full lots ; one house 
on East Dayton street ; also the California Fruit store, a three 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 307 

story building ; five lots on the bay where the new park is being 
made ; a lot on Wingra Heights, and twelve acres near the fair 
grounds. All the Gallaghers have been and are stanch Repub- 
licans, and although James Gallagher has never been an aspirant 
for office, he has always worked hard for the success of his party. 
He is a member of the Congregational church of Madison. On 
October 26. 1857 he married Jane, daughter of William H. and 
Ann (Jackson) Hartley. Mr. and Mrs. Hartley were natives of 
Yorkshire, England, and came to Westport, this county, in 1850. 
Although Mr. Hartley had been a brewer and later a sailor in the 
British navy, he took up farming with great success when he came 
to this country. Both he and his wife died on their Westport farm. 
They had three children.Jane,(Mrs. Gallagher). "William H. and 
Mary, deceased. James and Jane Gallagher have had eight child- 
ren, only three of whom are now living: William H., living at 
home and engaged in the real estate business with his father ; 
Jennie A., the wife of John W. Solter of Unity, Wis. ; and Arthur 
J., employed in the postoffice at Madison. All of the children were 
educated in the Madison schools. Mr. Gallagher was a member 
of the old Fire Company. Xo. 1, of Madison. Both the sons are 
Elks and Knights of Pythias. Not many years ago it was a com- 
mon belief that "Jim" Gallagher knew everybody in Dane county. 
Ira Garfoot has been a resident of Cross Plains township from 
the time of his birth and is now numbered among the prosperous 
farmers and popular citizens of this section of the county, being a 
representative of the third generation of his family in Dane county. 
He was born on the old homestead farm, March 31, 1867, and is 
a son of John and Emily (Simpson) Garfoot, both of whom were 
born in Leicestershire, England, and both of whom came with their 
respective parents to America. John Garfoot was a son of Will- 
iam and Mary (Busier) Garfoot, and the family settled in Cross 
Plains township, this county, about 1855. William Garfoot pur- 
chased eighty acres of wild land, in section 20, and reclaimed a 
good farm before his death, both he and his wife passing the closing 
years of their lives in the village of Black Earth. They became the 
parents of eight children, of whom four are living. Elizabeth, 
Sarah and William reside in Black Earth township, and Henry in 
Mount Horeb, Blue Mounds township. John Garfoot, father of 
the subject of this sketch remained with his parents until he had 
reached the >age of seventeen years, when he enlisted in the Thir- 
tieth Wisconsin, Company C. Upon returning he engaged in 
farming on his own responsibility, becoming one of the progressive 



308 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

farmers and highly esteemed citizens of his county and continuing 
to reside on his homestead farm, in sections 8 and 9, this township, 
until his death, which occurred March 31, 1900, his cherished and 
devoted wife having been summoned into eternal rest April 17, 1885. 
Their marriage was solemnized in this county and both were com- 
municants of the Protestant Episcopal church ; his political alle- 
gience was given to the Republican party and he always took a 
lively interest in local affairs of a public nature. Concerning the 
nine children in the family the folowing brief entry is consistently 
made: Ira, whose name initiates this article, is the eldest; Eva is 
the wife of William H. Britt, of Mount Horeb, this county ; Wil- 
liam is a farmer in Roberts county, So. Dakota ; Alva is engaged in 
farming in Middleton township ; Ralph follows the same vocation 
in Iowa county, Wisconsin ; Addie is the wife of William Danz, 
of Mazomanie township; May E. (Garfoot) Higgins resides in 
Mazomanie ; Charles and George remain on the old homestead farm. 
Ira Garfoot was educated in the public schools of his native town- 
ship and continued to be associated in the work of the home farm 
until he had attained the age of twenty-live years, when, in 1892, 
he purchased his present farm, of one hundred and twenty acres, in 
section 8, Cross Plains township, adjoining the old home place of 
his honored father. He has made many improvements on the farm 
and is careful and progressive in his carrying on of all departments 
of the farm work, so that he has been eminently successful in his 
operations, having given no little attention to the dairy business in 
connection with general agricultural work. In politics he is inde- 
pendent of strict partisan lines, but the esteem in which he is held 
in the community is indicated in the various offices in which he has 
been called upon to serve. He is one of the supervisors of his town- 
ship, having been incumbent of this office for the past three years, 
was clerk of his school district six years, and has held other 
minor offices. He is affiliated with the Masonic fraternity 
and the Modern Woodmen of America, and is distinctively 
popular in both business and social circles in his home town- 
ship and county. March 26, 1892, Mr. Garfoot was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Anna Belle Howery, who was born and reared in this 
township, being a daughter of Andrew and Elizabeth (Carden) 
Howery, the former a native of Virginia and the latter of Wiscon- 
sin. Mrs. Garfoot died February 5, 1905, and is survived by two 
children, — Gladys and Earl. 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 309 

Albert Francis Garvoille, of Belleville, is a native of France, born 
August 17, 1861. His parents were Xavier and Marie (Carteron) 
Garvoille, both French. Mr. Garvoillle was brought up on a farm 
and as a young man served in the French army ; he came to America 
before the rest of the family and worked in the vicinity of Belleville. 
He enlisted and took part in the Civil War, serving until its close ; 
he then returned to Montrose township, and engaged in farming 
on the place where Joel Ramer now resides, and afterward bought 
land in section 23. Mrs. Garvoille with the children came to Wis- 
consin in 1862, when the subject of this sketch was about one year 
old. In 1874, the family removed to Clay county, Nebraska, where 
they took up land and engaged again in farming, remaining three 
years. The total destruction of their crops by the grasshoppers 
for two successive years caused their removal to Kansas where 
they remained one year, but finding the climate unhealthful, they 
returned to their early home in Wisconsin, occupying the farm 
where the father now resides. Albert F. Garvoille is the second in 
a family of eight children ; the others are Victor, of Belleville ; Mil- 
lie, at home; Olampe, of Oregon ; Euphemie, married Alfred Peller, 
of Sauk; Julia, married Paul Begey, of Muscatine, Iowa; Louis, at 
home ; Mary, married John King, of Brooklyn. Mr. A. F. Garvoille 
received his education in the public schools of Nebraska and Kansas. 
He began life for himself at the age of twenty-one, working by the 
month ; he worked on the university farm at Madison from 1891 
to 1893, under the superintendence of Professor Henry, and after 
leaving there rented a farm in the town of Montrose for seven years. 
In 1899 he was the owner of one hundred and sixty acres of the best 
land in the township, which he runs for general farming, stock 
raising and dairying. He was married in November, 1892, to Miss 
Margaret Tierney, of Madison, who was, before her marriage a 
teacher of Dane county. To this union have been born four child- 
ren, Leo, the oldest, died in infancy; Eleanor, born January 10, 
1896; Albert John, born September 23, 1898, Gordon, born May 5, 
1902. Mr. Garvoille has always been a stanch Republican, casting 
his first vote for James G. Blaine, in 1884; he is at present the Re- 
publican chairman of the town of Montrose. He is a member of 
the Catholic church, of the Catholic Knights of Wisconsin, and of 
the M. W. A. 

Albert W. Gaston, one of the well known farmers and popular 
citizens of Cottage Grove township, has been a resident of Dane 
county during the major portion of his life and is a scion of one of 



310 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

its pioneer families. He was born in the village of Saline, Washte- 
naw county, Michigan, November 11, 1835, this being before that 
state had been admitted to the Union. He is a son of Albert and 
Eliza Ann Gaston, the former of whom was born in Massachu- 
setts and the latter in the state of New York, from which latter state 
they immigrated to Michigan and thence to Wisconsin, having been 
numbered among the early settlers of Cottage Grove township, 
Dane county. Here the father took up government land, and the 
old homestead is the farm upon which the subject of this sketch 
now resides and which he owns. Albert W. Gaston was nine years 
of age at the time of his parents' removal to Dane county, and he 
was reared to the invigorating discipline of the pioneer farm, while 
he attended the somewhat primitive district schools when opportu- 
nity presented. He remained at the parental home until he was 
about twenty-five years of age, when he purchased a farm in Ore- 
gon township, where he remained about eight years, at the expi- 
ration or which his father deeded him eighty acres adjoining the old 
homestead. On this farm he was engaged in agricultural pursuits 
about twelve years, in the meanwhile making many improvements 
on the place, and he then sold the property and engaged in the liv- 
ery business in the city of Madison, his headquarters being what is 
known as the old Hayden barn, on East Washington avenue. Two 
years later he disposed of his stock and business and returned to 
the old homestead farm, where he has ever since resided. Mr. 
Gaston is one of the stanch adherents of the Republican party in his 
township, but has never been an aspirant for public office. He 
is a member of the Presbyterian church. December 14, 1865, he 
was united in marriage to Miss Eliza Ann Smith, who was born 
January 24, 1845, being a daughter of Matthew and Ann Smith, 
at that time residents of Oregon township. Mrs. Gaston is de- 
ceased, being survived by one son, Albert A., who now resides in 
Madison. 

Peter Gauer, chief engineer of the waterworks pumping station, 
first saw the light of day in Alsace-Lorraine, France (since 1871 a 
part of Germany), on April 14, 1855. His parents, Peter and Bar- 
bara (Grebille) Gauer. both natives of Lorraine, came to the United 
States in 1873, settling in Milw.aukee. The father had been a 
shoemaker in his native land but after his arrival in this country 
led a retired life. He died in 1874 at the age. of sixty-four. The 
mother died sixteen years later in her seventy-fourth year. Both 
parents were members of the Catholic church. Of their eleven 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 311 

children four are still living'. John and J. N. are residents of Mil- 
waukee and Catherine, the widow of William Anyotte, makes her 
home in the same city. Peter Gauer received his education and 
learned the machinests' trade in his native country. In 1873 he 
came to this country with his parents and entered the employ of 
a furniture firm in Milwaukee as fireman. He remained with this 
concern some three years, becoming engineer after the first six 
months' service. He then became foreman of a pipe-laying gang 
for the Milwaukee steam supply company, a company which sup- 
plied steam for heating and power to residences and business 
houses. The company had thirty-three boilers in operation, each 
supplying over one hundred horse-power. When the pipe-laying 
was done he entered the works as foreman of the firemen and six 
months later was promoted to the position of engineer. The con- 
cern became insolvent after a few months and Mr. Gauer for the 
next thirty months was in the employ of E. P. Allis engine works. 
In 1883 the Hoffman & Billings company entered into a contract 
with the city of Madison to fit out the water works. The contract 
stipulated that the company was to supply an engineer for the first 
year of operation and Mr. Gauer was selected by the company to 
fill the position. At the end of a year Mr. Gaiter was offered per- 
manent employment as waterworks engineer by the board of water 
commissioners, and accepted. That he has filled the position effi- 
ciently and well is manifested by his continuous service of some 
twenty-three years. In April, 1882, he was married to Miss Helen 
Scheithauer, a native of Milwaukee and a daughter of Jacob and 
Helen (Biegel) Scheithauer. Jacob Scheithauer died at the age of 
forty-five in 1873. His widow is still a resident of the Cream City. 
The marriage of Mr. Gauer has been blessed with five children. 
Helen Carolina is the wife of Charles L. Van Arsdale of Chicago. 
Julius Peter is in the employ of the Allis-Chalmers company of Mil- 
waukee and is engineer of a machinery erecting gang. He seems to 
have inherited much of the skill and ingenuity of his father as he is 
making a great success of his work. Paul George is a student at 
the Wisconsin Academy in Madison. The other two children are 
Ferdinand Joseph, attending the public schools, and Edward 
August. The family are members of the St. Patrick Catholic 
church. Mr. Gauer is also a member of the Fraternal Order of 
Eagles and of the National Association of Stationary Engineers, 
of which organization he has served as president for five years. 



312 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

A model citizen and skillful engineer, he well merits the esteem 
and respect which the community holds for him. 

William M. Gay has resided on his present beautiful farm, in sec- 
tion 4, Blooming Grove township, since 1868, while he has made 
his home in the county the greater portion of the time since 1856, 
having been the first of the name in the county, where now are to 
be found several families bearing the cognomen. Mr. Gay was 
born in what was then known as Log City, in Knox county, Illin- 
ois, August 30, 1838, and is a son of Joseph and Maria (Rhodes) 
Gay, the former of whom was born in Addison county, Vermont, 
and the latter in Chittenden county, that state. The respective 
families were founded in New England in the colonial era of our 
national history. The parents were numbered among the pioneers 
of Illinois, where they continued to reside until death, honored by 
all who knew them. William M. was reared in his native county, 
and his early educational advantages were those afforded in the com 
mon schools of the locality and period. He early manifested a dis- 
tinctive proclivity for the work of a salesman, his ability in the line 
being, perhaps, an inherent endowment, characteristic of so many 
of those who have emanated from good old New England and have 
justified the title of Yankee, the most significant of all American 
pseudonyms of the sort. Suffice it to say that for many years he 
followed the vocation of a salesman, in various lines, and in this con- 
nection he made his first visit to Madison, Wisconsin, July 2, 1856, 
while thereafter he made frequent sojourns in the capital city, 
which was then but a small village. In 1868 he purchased his pres- 
ent beautiful farm, of one hundred and sixty acres, and took up his 
permanent residence in Dane county. He developed and improved 
the place and continued to give his personal attention to its opera- 
tion until very recent years. He is now living essentially retired, 
after long years of indefatigable and successful enterprise as a 
farmer and stock-grower, and still resides on his farm. He has 
been a stanch supporter of the cause of the Republican party from 
the time of its organization, but has never sought official prefer- 
ment. His family belong to the Congregational church. Septem- 
ber 29, 1875, Mr. Gay was united in marriage to Miss Elizabeth 
Hiestand, daughter of Jacob R. and Mary A. (Statesman) Hies- 
tand, of Blooming Grove township. Her father is deceased and a 
memorial tribute to him is entered on another page of this work. 
Mr. and Mrs. Gay became the parents of five children, all of whom 
are living except the second, Francis Joseph, who was born Janu- 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 313 

ary, 22, 1878, and died in 1885. The names of the living children 
are here entered, with respective dates of birth : Harry Hiestand, 
July 17, 1876; Mary E., October 18, 1880; Dellgracia Barbara, 
December 17, 1884; and Arthur William, November 24, 1886. 

Era Hall Gerard is a successful business man and popular citizen 
of Stoughton, is one of the prominent members of the Masonic 
fraternity in this part of the state, and is well entitled to recogni- 
tion in this history. He is engaged in the lumber business in 
Stoughton, where he also manufactures tobacco boxes. Mr. 
Gerard was born in the village of Sparta, Elgin county, Ontario, 
Canada, March 9, 1850, and is a son of Norman and Jane (Brown) 
Gerard ; the former was born in the state of New York, his ances- 
tors being Friends, and the latter, of Irish descent, in the province 
of Ontario, Canada. The parents came to Wisconsin as pioneers in 
1850, settling in Omro, Winnebago county, where the father was 
engaged in lumbering for twenty-two years, assisting materially in 
the developing of the great lumber industry of the state. He then 
removed to Grand Rapids, this state, where he continued in the 
same line of enterprise for thirteen years, since which time he has 
lived retired and made his home with the subject of this sketch, in 
Stoughton. Era H. Gerard was reared to manhood in Wisconsin 
and early became familiar with the details of the lumbering busi- 
ness. He was afforded a good common-school education, and he 
continued to be associated with his father's business until 1879, 
when he located in Webster City, Iowa, where he established him- 
self in the retail lumber business. In 1880 he removed to Austin, 
Minnesota, where he was engaged in the same business for the en- 
suing three years, at the expiration of which he returned to Wis- 
consin, taking up his residence in Stoughton in May, 1885. Here 
he has built up a large and prosperous retail lumber trade, having a 
well-equipped plant. Mr. Gerard is a stanch Republican in his po- 
litical allegience, and his wife is a member of the First Baptist 
church of Stoughton. He is affiliated with Kegonsa Lodge, No. 73,' 
Free and Accepted Masons, and January 3, 1906, he was installed 
as it's secretary an office to which he has been elected for twenty-one 
consecutive terms. He is also identified with Madison Chapter, 
No. 4, Royal Arch Masons; Robert McCoy Commandery, No. 3, 
Knights Templar; and has attained to the thirty-second degree of Scot- 
tish Rite Masonry, being a member of the Wisconsin Consistory, of 
Milwaukee, and is also affiliated with the adjunct organizations of the 
time-honored fraternity. — the Order of the Eastern Star and the An- 



314 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

cient Arabic Order of the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. April 28, 1872, 
Mr. Gerard was united in marrage to Miss Harriet Grout, daughter 
of Ebenezer and Triphona (Stone) Grout, residents of Ontario, 
Canada. Mr. and Mrs. Gerard have three adopted children, Ora 
B., Milo C. and Marjory. Ora B. is now the wife of William Dear- 
born. 

Charles Martin Gest was born in the town of Windsor and for 
some years was employed as a railroad fireman but in recent years 
has been occupied with farming in his native township, where he 
owns a good farm of sixty-four acres. His parents, Charles and 
Frederika Gest, were natives of Germany and early settlers of Dane 
county, where they arrived in 1851. They purchased a farm in the 
township of Windsor and made it their permanent home. Mrs. 
Gest died in 1872 and her husband in 1901. Their family con- 
sisted of six children, of whom all but one are living. After 
his wife's death Mr . Gest married again, his wife being Mrs. 
Dora Dorchlag, whose present home is in Madison. The family 
was identified with the Lutheran church. Charles Martin Gest 
was born on the farm in Windsor, October 24, 1859, attended school 
in De Forest and after two years of railroad work purchased a 
farm and has given special attention to stock-raising. His 
Norman Percheron horses, short-horned cattle and Shropshire 
sheep all show the skill with which they are bred and cared 
for. The fine modern buildings on the premises have been 
all erected by Mr. Gest since he bought the farm. Mr. Gest is in- 
dependent in his political beliefs but active in the interests of the 
community. November 29, 1883, he married Miss Anna Rade- 
macher, who was born in Windsor, April 1, 1863, daughter of Otto 
and Elizabeth (Thien) Rodemacher, who came from Germany to 
Dane county in 1851. Mr. Rodemacher died in 1893 and his widow 
lives in East Bristol, Wis. Three of their five children are living. 
Mr. and Mrs. Rodemacher were members of the Roman Catholic 
church, as is also their daughter Anna and her family. Mr. and 
Mrs. Gest have one daughter, Elizabeth, born June 27, 1899, and two 
adopted sons, Raymond, and Charlie, aged respectively eleven and 
nine years. Mr. Gest is a member of the Brotherhood of America. 

Robert B. Gibbons, the genial postmaster at Cottage Grove and 
one of the leading citizens of that community, is a native of Canada, 
having been born at Marimache, New Brunswick, on November 
10, 1845. He is a son of John and Eunice (Sommers') Gibbons. 
John Gibbons was born in Ireland in 1810, and after his father's 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 315 

death in 1819, came to the province of New Brunswick with his 
mother, where he continued to reside until 1854. Eunice Sommers 
was born in Connecticut on November 20, 1813, her ancestry dating 
far back in Xew England history. Her paternal grandfather was 
a soldier in the Continental army during the Revolutionary War. The 
Sommers family removed from Connecticut to New Brunswick early 
in the century and it was here that the daughter Eunice met and be- 
came the wife of John Gibbons. By this union there were seven 
sons and three daughters born. James, the eldest, enlisted Decem- 
ber 1, 1862, in Company H, Third Wisconsin Cavalry as a private 
and received an honorable discharge when the regiment was mus- 
tered out September 8, 1865. His death occurred in 1897. John H. 
enlisted November 22, 1861, in the Eighth Battery, Wisconsin 
Light Artillery, and was mustered out January 17, 1865. He died 
August 23, 1905. Charles became an immigrant to California in 1859; 
he died in Butte, Montana, several years later. Phoebe Ann 
became the mother of Oliver R. Mather. She passed away 
several years ago. Isabella R.. now Mrs. Malcolm Davidson, 
resides in Sun Prairie. Henry enlisted August 14, 1862, in Com- 
pany G, Twenty-ninth Wisconsin Infantry and with his regiment 
was mustered out June 22, 1865. His death occurred in Minnesota, 
Edmund A. enlisted at the same time and in the same company as 
did his brother Henry, and on September 27, 1864, was promoted to 
be second lieutenant of Company I, First Wisconsin Heavy Artillery. 
As such he was mustered out June 26, 1865. His present residence 
is Mankato, Minn. The eighth member of the family in the order 
of age was Robert B., the subject of this sketch. Eunice J., the 
third daughter, is the wife of I. U. Flannagan of Sun Prairie. 
George A., the youngest, is now in the western states. John Gib- 
bons removed his family from Canada to Dane county in October, 
1854, and located in the village of Sun Prairie. There he remained 
the first winter and then purchased a farm of some two hundred 
acres in the town of Bristol where he remained until 1864, remov- 
ing thence to Sun Prairie again. Following the example of his 
sons, on May 16, 1864, ne enlisted in Company D, of the Fortieth 
Wisconsin Infantry and was mustered out just four months 
later. At the time of his enrollment in the Union army he was 
a clerk in the office of the secretary of state in Madison, 
and after his discharge from the army he returned to the 
same work. He was twice elected on the Republican ticket 
as register of deeds of Dane countv and at the time of 



316 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

his death (June 20, 1875) was in the employ of the government 
as postmaster at Sun Prairie. His widow survived him until the 
late nineties. Both parents were life long and ardent members of 
the Baptist church. Robert B. Gibbons was but nine years old 
when he came with his parents to Wisconsin. He received a some- 
what meager education in the district schools and spent his early life 
on the farm. In June, 1861, he left his home at Sun Prairie and 
came to Madison, where he attempted to enlist in the Second Wis- 
consin Infantry, but his father suspected where he was gone and 
sent another son to bring him home. With his brother John he went 
to Knowlton, Marathon county, Wis., and worked in the pineries 
until November, 1861. Then, although but sixteen years old, he en- 
listed in the Eighth Battery, Wisconsin Light Artillery. The fol- 
lowing winter was spent in Camp Utley at Racine and in March, 
1862, the battery was taken to St. Louis, where the allotment of 
horses and cannon was made. After six weeks of drill at Fort 
Leavenworth the battery went by boat to Columbus, Ky., where it 
was disembarked and joined an expedition through Kentucky and 
Tennessee into Mississippi. At Jacinto, Miss., Mr. Gibbons was 
invalided to the field hospital with typhoid fever, and was subse- 
quently removed to the hospital at Iuka, Miss. Shortly afterward 
Iuka was threatened by the Confederates and the sick and wounded 
were removed to Jackson, Tenn. The enemy occupied Iuka the 
night after the incapacitated troops had been removed. At Jack- 
son Mr. Gibbons was honorably discharged because of physical 
disability and his father brought him back to Sun Prairie on a cot. 
After his recovery he attended the seminary of his home town for a 
few months and on June 26, 1863, he re-enlisted in the Federal ser- 
vice, this time in the Thirteenth Battery, Wisconsin Light Artillary. 
The place of enrollment was at Whitewater, whence it went into 
camp at Camp Washburn in Milwaukee. In March. 1864, the bat- 
tery was sent to Cairo, Ills., and then by boat to New Orleans, only 
to be ordered to return before disembarking to Baton Rouge. At 
Camp Williams near Baton Rouge the battery remained until hos- 
tilities had ceased, making frequent reconnaissances into the sur- 
rounding country. On July 20, 1865, Mr. Gibbons received an hon- 
orable discharge in Milwaukee and the following fall and winter he 
spent in Sun Prairie. In the spring of 1866 he went to Minnesota 
where he spent the summer as an employe in a brickyard and in the 
fall made a trip on foot to Knowlton, Wis. This was his home until 
1885. During the winter months he worked in the woods and in 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 317 

the summer rafted his lumber down the Wisconsin river to the Miss- 
issippi. During the last five years of his residence in Knowlton he 
was pilot of lumber rafts on the Wisconsin river. It was in 1885 
that he came to Cottage Grove to engage in retail lumber business. 
For seven years that industry furnished him means of livelihood 
and in 1892 he sold out his interest. From that time he worked at 
carpentering until his appointment on July 11, 1897. as postmaster 
at Cottage Grove. He has held that position continuously since, 
even through the various changes in the congressional representa- 
tives from this district. Mr. Gibbons is identified with the Lucius 
Fairchild Post of Madison, of the Grand Army of the Republic and 
with the Madison lodge of Free and Accepted Masons. In Octo- 
ber, 1871, he was united in marriage to Ida Brown, born and 
brought up in Cottage Grove, and daughter of Orvin Brown. Ros- 
well Brown, father of Orvin Brown, was one of the famous charac- 
ters of early days in Wisconsin and his portrait hangs in state 
historical library in Madison. Four children have been born to 
Mr. and Mrs. Gibbons. Ruth became the wife of L. C. Graves, 
agent of the Chicago & Northwestern Railroad Co. in Cottage 
Grove. Josie Belle died at the age of twenty-two months. Robert 
O. is a graduate of the Universty of Wisconsin with the class of 
1903 and is now a teacher in Carroll College, Waukesha, Wis. 
His wife was Agnes Pratt. Bret H., the youngest, died in infancy 
Dr. George Lewis Gibbs is a prominent practicing physician of 
Marshall, Wis., and is the descendant of quite a remarkable family. 
His grandfather. Daniel Gibbs, was a native of England whose wife 
was Miss Whitehall of German descent. He came to Jefferson 
county, N. Y., and thence to Dodge county, Wis., in 1852. He there 
lived to the great age of ninety-nine years and nearly four months. 
The mother of Daniel Gibbs was one hundred and fourteen years ot 
age at the time of her death. The son of Daniel Gibbs, John 
Fletcher Gibbs, was born in Otsego county, N. Y.. in 1820, and was 
a merchant and fur buyer for the American Fur Co. He married 
Miss Adelia M. Crossman, who was born in New York in 1838. 
John F. Gibbs was active in politics in New York, where he was 
elected sheriff of Jefferson county. In 1852 he came to Dodge 
county, Wis., and for some time carried on an extensive trade in 
furs and also obtained about seven hundred acres of land. In 1860, 
he began to study for the ministry and in 1861 received his license, 
continuing his work under the local pastor in Dodge county. Or- 
dained a deacon in the Methodist Episcopal church in 1868, he was 



318 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

made an elder at Whitewater in 1873 and in 1874 came to Oconomo- 
woc, where he spent the remainder of his life. He was a Republi- 
can. Since Mr. Gibbs' death in 1902, Mrs. Gibbs has lived in Mil- 
waukee. George Lewis Gibbs was born in Dodge county, Wis. 
March 28, 1867, the son of Rev. and Mrs. John F. Gibbs. He at- 
tended school in Dodge county and the high school at Oconomo- 
woe. In 1890 he was graduated from the Hahnemann Medical Col- 
lege and began the practice of his profession in Palmyra, Jefferson- 
county, Wis. In 1895 he located at Marshall where he soon took 
the front rank in his profession and established a large practice. 
He is interested in real estate in the western states and owns a 
delightful home in Marshall. Dr. Gibbs is a Republican in his 
political affiliations and a member of the village board and actively 
promotes the interests of the village. June 19, 1891, he married 
Miss Perle Martin, who was born in Menominee Falls, in 1873, 
daughter of Nelson D. and Lettie (Mapes) Martin, whose home 
has been in Milwaukee for a number of years. Dr. and Mrs. Gibbs 
have two children, Darrell Dean and Verrene Lillian. The family 
is associated with the Methodist Episcopal church. Dr. Gibbs is 
a member of the Waterloo Lodge, No. 63, F. & A. M., a Royal 
Arch Mason and also, belongs to the M. W. A. and E. F .U. 
The medical societies with which he is affiliated are the Dane 
County Medical Society, the Wisconsin State Medical Society, the 
American Medical Association and the Central Wisconsin Medical 
Association and the State Homeopathic Medical Society. 

Peter C. Gilberson, physician and surgeon at Mt. Horeb, was 
born in Hachland, Norway, August 1, 1864, and came to America 
with his parents in 1S69. He was the only son of Christian and 
Gulbjar (Holman) Gilberson, whose farm home in Norway was 
Amensrude. Both of them were natives of Norway who migrated 
to America and settled on a farm near Fennimore, Grant county, 
Wis., where the mother now resides at the age of seventy-six years 
The father made farming his occupation during all of his life, 
and died in 1902, at the age of seventy-four years. The subject of 
this review is one of three children, Anna, his eldest sister, being 
the wife of Ola T. Oleson, of Fennimore, Grant county, and Gena 
is married to B. N. Berry and resides on ihe old family homestead. 
Dr. Gilberson was reared on the parental farm and received his 
preliminary education in the public schools. Having decided upon 
the medical profession as his life's vocation he entered the Keokuk 
Medical College at Keokuk, Iowa, and then completed his medical 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 319 

course at the Milwaukee Medical College, graduating with the class 
of 1895. He immediately engaged in the practice of his profession 
in Iowa county, Wis., and remained there until June, 1898, when he 
removed to Mt. Horeh, where he has since been located, engaged 
in the general practice of medicine and surgery. He was married 
on November 9, 1887, to Miss Emma Gillies, of Grant county, 
Wis., daughter of Malcolm Gillies, one of the pioneer settlers in 
that part of the state and a very prominent citizen. The father and 
mother were both natives of Pennsylvania. The father died in 1888 
and the mother now resides at Bloomington, Wis. Dr. and Mrs. 
Gilberson are the parents of four children : Mildred Cecil, Ethel 
Genevieve, Clarence Peter and Margaret Grace. The doctor is a 
member of the county, state, and American medical societies, and 
keeps thoroughly up to date in his profession by being a subscriber 
to and student of the best current literature pertaining to the Es- 
culapian science. His religious faith is expressed by membership 
in the Methodist Episcopal church, and politically he is a Republi- 
can with decidedly independent proclivities.. 

John Gilbert has but recently taken up his residence in the vil- 
lage of Oregon, and is now living in comparative retirement, after 
years of arduous and fruitful toil upon the farm, which is located 
but a few miles from the place of his present abode. He is a son of 
Schuyler Gilbert, one of the pioneer citizens of Dane county, and it 
is but proper that in this review more than a passing mention 
should be given the latter. Schuyler Gilbert was born October 11, 
1819, in Tully, Onondaga county, N. Y., and his early life was 
spent there as a farmer. He came west in 1845, and located in the 
town of Oregon, Dane county, where he first purchased forty acres 
of land, to which he soon added forty acres by purchase and forty 
of government land, and afterward purchased an additional 
forty-five acres, thus making his farm to consist of one hundred 
and sixty-five acres of land, which he improved and brought to a 
high state of cultivation. About the first necessity after locating 
here in the woods was a place of habitation, and Mr. Gilbert built 
a log shanty, with puncheon floor, an oak door and a "six-light" 
window, without glass, the latter being made from the cover of a 
dry-goods box. The cabin was roofed with shingles sawed out by 
himself and wife, and this was the family abode during the first sum- 
mer following the advent of Mr. Gilbert into the wilds of this west- 
ern country. But in November, 1846, they were able to move into 
a good log house, the lumber used being sawed from timber "bor- 



330 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

rowed" from speculators' lands in Green county, and this answered 
the need of a comfortable home until 1869, when Mr. Gilbert 
erected a good frame house on his farm, in which he and his good 
wife spent the remainder of their lives. The hard times exper- 
ienced by the early pioneers and the difficulties with which they had 
to contend will never be fully appreciated by those of a later gen- 
eration. Mr. Gilbert converted all of his first crop of wheat into 
seed for the following year, and then split rails at fifty cents per 
hundred to obtain money with which to buy wheat at fifty cents 
per bushel for bread. He was compelled to walk more than two 
miles each day, to and from his work. The first wheat he mar- 
keted was drawn to Milwaukee by oxen, three weeks being con- 
sumed in making the round trip. Mr. Gilbert was married, in De- 
cember, 1844, to Miss Hancy Hills, of Fabius, Onondaga county, 
N. Y., and together they endured the trials of a pioneer life, not un- 
mixed, however, with happiness. They both lived to enjoy the 
abundant fruits of their early toil and privations, the wife dying on 
January 26, 1889, and the father on April 1, 1894. Five children 
were the result of their union, four of whom survive. Frank is 
a resident of the state of Kansas ; Mary E., became the wife of 
John Draher, of the town of Oregon, and is now deceased; 
John is the immediate subject of this review; and Josephine 
(now Mrs. Faulkes) and Alice (now Mrs. Marshall) both reside 
in the village of Oregon. All of these children were born on 
the old homestead, and all were educated in the district 
schools. John Gilbert was born on March 31, 1861, and remained 
with his parents on the old homestead until he had attained to his 
majority. He then began farming for himself and has successfully 
followed that honorable calling for nearly twenty-five years, only 
recently retiring and taking up his residence in the village of 
Oregon. He owns two hundred and five acres of well-improved 
land, which stands as a high testimonial to his energy and indus- 
trious habits. He was married on December 23, 1888, taking as his 
partner for life Miss Flora B. Lockwood. daughter of Henry D. 
and Emma Toles) Lockwood, of Beloit. \Yis., the latter of whom 
is deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Gilbert are the parents of two promis- 
ing children, Henry S. and Cora E,, both of whom are now stu- 
dents in the Oregon village schools. In politics Mr. Gilbert gives 
an unswerving allegiance to the Republican party, although he has 
never entered the lists as an office seeker, and he holds a member- 
ship in the lodge of the Modern Woodmen of America at Oregon. 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 321 

Leigh B. Gilbert, the efficient mason contractor of Madison, was 
born in Rockingham county, N. H., November 4. 1860. His parents 
were W. T. and Sarah H. (Bartlett) Gilbert, one of whom died 
in 1901. They were members of the Methodist Episcopal church 
of Auburn, N. H., where they made their home. The father was 
a shoemaker by vocation. The four children of the family are in 
the order of their, ages Frank H., Leigh B., Harry S. and Kate A. 
The eldest makes his home in Auburn, N. H., where he is chief of 
police. Harry S., is a mason at Rogers Park, a suburb of Chicago, 
111. Kate is the wife of Melvin Hall and makes her home in Au- 
burn, N. H. Leigh B. received his education in the Auburn 
schools. He served his apprenticeship as a mason at Evanston, 
111., and worked at it for ten years, entering business for himself 
in 1891 at Evanston. He remained in the Illinois city until 1900, 
when he came to Madison to do the mason work on the engineering 
building of the University of Wisconsin. He also built the North- 
ern Electrical Company's plant, the Carnegie library, the Gisholt 
foundry and the additions to the main shop, the new street car 
barns, the Amercan Plow Company's factory, the American Shred- 
der Company's plant, the new Schlitz hotel, the O. D. Brandenburg 
residence, one of the finest in the city, Mrs. Frawley's and the Gal- 
lagher flats, the addition to the hospital for the insane at Mendota, 
the new Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul depot at West Madison, 
the Wisconsin building, the Vroman block and the mason work on 
the A. Cohn tobacco warehouse. These are but a few of the many 
buildings Mr. Gilbert has had a hand in erecting, and their struct- 
ural beauty are ample evidence of the skill and ingenuity of the 
builder. On September 8, 1883, he was united in marriage to Miss 
Nellie C. Campbell of Evanston. Mr. Gilbert is a member of the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Benevolent and Pro- 
tective Order of Elks and the National Union. He is a much re- 
spected citizen of the community where he has so recently made his 
home. 

Elling Gilbertsen (Guttormson) is a prominent farmer of the 
town of Dunkirk and a native of Norway. His parents, Guttorm- 
son and Guri Oleson, resided in Buskkerud, Hallingdal. Norway 
and there their son Elling was born November 21, 1860. He at- 
tended the common schools of his native city and remained with his 
parents until he was twenty-one years of age when he determined 
to cross the seas and live in the United States. His first home in 
the west was in Greene county, 111., and here he worked out by the 
21— iii 



322 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

month for the farmers of the neighborhood until 1883. At that 
time he came to the town of Dunkirk and spent eight years raising 
tobacco on shares. He succeeded in saving enough money to pur- 
chase a farm of ninety acres and upon this he made all the improve- 
ments and continued the culture of tobacco, with which he was 
always very successful, besides other kinds of farm produce. 
Each year he raised from ten to twelve acres of tobacco. May 5, 
1885, he married Miss Mary Peterson of Dunkirk, daughter of 
Amund and Agnes (Bovre) Peterson, who were natives of Norway 
and early settlers of Dane county. Six children blessed the mar- 
riage ; Ada, Gustave, Emma, Clarence, Morris and Rudolph. Mr. 
Gilbertsen and his wife are devoted members of Christ Lutheran 
church of Stoughton. Mr Gilbertsen is a Republican in his politi- 
cal affiliations. 

Ed. Gilbertson, a successful farmer, owns one of Rutland's hand- 
somest homes. His parents, Gilbert Wethal and Bertha (Bjornt- 
sen) Wethal were natives of Christiania, Norway, where 
their early married life was spent. Mr. Wethal was a carpenter 
in America, where he came in 1879. Ed. Gilbertson has one sister, 
Annie, the wife of Hans Hansen of Minneapolis, and two brothers, 
Hans, a carpenter in Minneapolis, Minn., and Anton, a physician 
of Minneapolis, and a graduate of the University of Minnesota. 
Ed was born in Christiania^ December 10, 1853, attended the com- 
mon schools in Norway and worked on a farm as a boy. After he 
came to Stoughton he worked in different, places on farms 
and purchased his present home in [Rutland in 1892. His 
farm consists of one hundred and twenty acres in section 15 with 
many substantial improvements. In 1905 a new and modern house 
containing ten rooms, was built at a cost of $2,200. Mr. Gilbert- 
son is a Republican and takes an active interest in local politics. 
For six years he was supervisor and has been school clerk and held 
other local offices. In April, 1882, he married Miss Thea Johnson, 
daughter of John and Nicalina Hansen who came to America from 
Norway, in 1882, to live with Mr. and Mrs. Gilbertson. Eight 
children have been born to them ; John, Minnie, Nora, Emma, 
Esther, Bertha, May and Agnes. All have attended the district and 
Stoughton schools and the family attend the First Lutheran church. 

Gilbert L. Gilson resides on a farm in section 7, Albion. He is 
the son* of Lewis and Gertrude (Ramsey), both natives of Norway. 
Lewis Gilson came to the United States with his parents from Hade- 
land in 1851, when he was thirteen years of age, and lived in Wan- 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 323 

paca county in the town of Scandinavia, of which his father Gilbert 
was one of the very early settlers. In 1860 Lewis left Waupaca 
county and came to Dane county ,where he worked out for the farm- 
ers until 1869, when he was able to purchase an eighty-acre farm in 
section 7. This he improved, erected suitable buildings upon it 
and made it his home the remainder of his life. Here his three chil- 
dren were born and here Mrs. Gilson died in 1891. Martha, the old- 
er daughter, married Peter Murkve of Albion ; Hannah, the young- 
er, is the wife of Ole Westby, a farmer of the town of Burke ; 
Gilbert L. was born in Albion, August 5, 1865, attended the home 
schools and has always lived at the old family home. At the age of 
seventeen he engaged in tobacco raising in which he was very suc- 
cessful and since 1890 has been the sole manager of the farm owned 
by his father. In 1897 he purchased the homestead and upon it 
carries on a general farming business. He raises considerable 
stock and grain, hay, tobacco, etc. He has made many improve- 
ments upon the place and has a nice property. April 11, 1906, 
he married Miss Ida Reindahl, who was born in the town of 
Burke, Dane county, daughter of Thomas and Ingebog (Mosley) 
Reindahl, who were farmers of Burke and natives of Telemarken, 
Norway. Mr. and Mrs. Gilson are loyal members of the West 
Koshkonong Norwegian Lutheran church. Mr. Gilson is a Dem- 
ocrat in his political sympathies but does not desire to participate 
actively in political matters. 

Alois Gmeinder is a leading citizen of Sun Prairie. He comes 
of a long established and well-to-do family of the kingdom of Wurt- 
emburg, Germany. His paternal grandparents were Alois and 
Susie (Hinkle) Gmeinder. Air. Gmeinder followed the two occupa- 
tions of butcher and veterinary surgeon. His parents, Frank and 
Geneveve (Wild) Gmeinder, were comfortably established in a 
good home in Wurtemburg, but moved by an honorable ambition 
for even better things, they disposed of their property to the extent 
of about five thousand dollars, and in 1861 came to Dane county; 
this continued to be their home until their death, his occurring in 
1883 and hers in 1886. The subject of this sketch was the oldest 
of a family of five and the only one living at the present time ; one 
brother, Bennet, took part in the Civil War. He enlisted in Com- 
pany- K, Second Wisconsin Infantry, and died in 1862. He is bur- 
ied at Arlington Heights. Mr. Gmeinder was born July 11, 1836, 
and received his education in Germany, coming to America as a 
young man of eighteen, (1854). For several years he worked by 



324 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

the month at Green Lake, Marquette county, and in Dane county ; 
in 1861 he settled on a farm as an independent farmer and followed 
that occupation for over forty years, retiring' in 1902. He owned 
at one time four hundred acres of land, but upon his retirement 
reserved only one hundred and sixty. He bought property in Sun 
Prairie, and has a pleasant home there for his declining years. He 
is a man who has won for himself the respect of the community 
as a good citizen. In his earlier life he was a Democrat in his poli- 
tics, but later adopted the principles of government as set forth 
by the Republican party. The family are all connected with the 
Catholic church. He married, in February 1868, Miss Lena 
Enders, a native of Germany. Her parents, Matthew and 
Kate (Cline) Enders came from Germany and settled in the town of 
Springfield where they spent the remainder of their lives. Mr. and 
Mrs. Gmeinder have had ten children, three of whom died in in- 
fancy; those living are, Kate, Joseph E., Robert, Louis M., Rose, 
Lena and Mary. 

Lawrence A. Goebel of the town of Perry has always been a 
farmer and a very successful one. His parents, Michael and Mary 
Anna (Bower) Goebel, were natives of Germany and Switzerland, 
respectively. Michael Goebel served his term in the German army 
and came to the United States in 1845. He worked for three years 
in the lead mines in the vicinity of Galena, 111. and crossed the 
plains to California in 1848, at the beginning of the great western 
movement to the gold mines. After a few years in the mines in 
California he returned to New York, where he landed after an ocean 
voyage of six months duration. At this time he was married and 
brought his wife to Wisconsin, purchasing, with the gold brought 
from California, a farm of eighty acres. To this more was added 
until Mr. Goebel had a splendid property of six hundred acres. 
From unimproved property it was slowly converted into a valuable 
farm, well-equipped with buildings and machinery. This became 
the permanent home of Mr. and Mrs. Goebel and here Mr. Goebel 
died in 1876 and his wife in 1905. Thirteen children were born to 
them ; John, who lives at Burlington, N. Dak. ; Gregor, a Roman 
Catholic priest of St. Cloud, Minn. ; Michael, who lives in Sioux 
City, Iowa ; Mary, Airs. Fred Turk of Waloutchee, Washington ; 
Catherine, Mrs. Robert Gorst of Mazomanie ; Emerentia, who lives 
with her brother Frank in the town of Perry ; Joseph, who lives in 
Perry ; Lawrence A. ; Anna (deceased) ; Alois and Frank, who live 
in Perry ; Teresa, Mrs. Ed Arneson of Taylor, Jackson county, Wis. 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 325 

Pauline, Mrs. Jacob Gerber of Neilsville, Clark county, Wis. ; 
Lawrence A. was born in the town of Perry, Dane county, April 21, 
1865, married May 24, 1886, and began his married life on a farm 
of one hundred and twenty acres which he purchased from his 
father. His wife was Miss Julia Olmer, born in Vermont township, 
daughter of John and Fredricka (Degenhardt) Olmer, natives of 
Germany. Six children blessed the marriage ; Matilda Pauline, 
Edward, Anna Irene, Amelia Cecilia, Julia Maria and Lauretta 
Teresa. The family are members of the German Catholic church. 
Mr. Goebel votes the Democratic ticket on national issues but is 
independent in his opinions on local government. He has never 
desired to hold office. Mrs. Goebel was one of a family of four 
children. Her brother, Richard Olmer, married Mary Fifer 
and lives in Humphrey, Piatt county, Nebraska. Amelia is the wife 
of Sam Caldwell of Humphrey. Maria married Albert Bohn of 
Toronda, Kansas. Mr. and Mrs. Olmer came to Wisconsin in 1851, 
obtained a farm of two hundred and forty acres in the town of 
Vermont, Dane county, and spent the residue of their lives there. 
Mr. Olmer died in 1891 and his wife in 1895. After her husband's 
death Mrs. Olmer lived for a short time in Mazomanie. Both the 
Goebel and Olmer families became prominent in the community 
and Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence Goebel are worthy successors of their 
parents, always active in every worthy cause. Mr. Goebel is a 
member of the Modern Woodmen. 

Horace A. Goold, who is now living in retirement in the town 
of Oregon, Dane county, is another of the valiant ones who re- 
sponded to the call for men during the early sixties, and as a mem- 
ber of a Wisconsin regiment risked his life that the nation founded 
by the fathers of the Republic might continue to exist. Mr. Goold 
was born in Concord township, Erie county. N. Y., December 9, 
1834, and is one of seven children born to John and Fanny 
(Wheeler) Goold, the father being a native of Vermont and the 
mother of Massachusetts. Only two of the children of these par- 
ents are now living, Cornelia, who is the wife of Yv ni. Xorthey of 
North Yakima, Wash., and Horace A., who is the subject of this 
review. John Goold came with his family to Wisconsin in 1842, 
driving the entire distance from the state of New York, and first 
selected a location in Rock county, near the present site of Johns- 
town, where he preempted one hundred and twenty acres of govern- 
ment land. There the family resided about three years, when the 
father died. The mother then disposed of the farm in Rock county 



326 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

and rented a place near the city of Madison, where she and the 
children resided one year, and then removed to Lake View and later 
to the town of Oregon. About two years later they moved to the 
town of Union, in Rock county, then to Rutland and finally to 
Grant county, where Mrs. Goold died, August 12, 1895. Horace A. 
Goold was thrown upon his own resources quite early in life owing 
to the poverty of his parents, and at fifteen years of age he began 
working by the month as a farm hand. This he continued until 
about the time of his marriage, when he purchased eighty acres ot 
government land in Grant county. Later he sold this and pur- 
chased forty acres in the town of Woodman, in the same county, 
to which he afterward added forty acres more and continued to re- 
side thereon for a period of forty-one years. In 1902 he sold this 
farm and bought a very convenient home in the village of Oregon, 
where he and his good wife are now enjoying a well-earned respite. 
In regard to Mr. Goold's military career it can be said without 
reservation that it was one of which he may well be proud. 
He enlisted on August 13, 1862, as a private in Company I, Twen- 
tieth Regiment of Wisconsin infantry, and served with that com- 
mand until more than three months after the surrender of Lee, being 
mustered out of the service on July 14, 1865, With his regiment 
he participated in the battle of Prairie Grove, Ark., in which his 
company lost three killed and thirteen wounded, was engaged 
throughout the entire siege of Vicksburg, and in the battles of 
Atchafalaya, La., Fort Morgan, Ala., Brownsville, Tex., Spanish 
Fort, Ala., Van Buren, Ark., Yazoo City and Franklin Creek, Miss. 
Mr. Goold was married, January 27, 1856, to Miss Sarah Jane Law- 
rence, daughter of Luke and Mary (Hunt) Lawrence, of Cam- 
bridgeshire, England, where Mrs. Goold was born on January 24, 
1839. The Lawrence family came to America in 1849, the mother 
dying on the sea during the voyage. The father settled with his 
children, thirteen in number, in the town of Rutland, Dane county, 
and later moved to Grant county, Wis., where he died December 
15, 1803. Of his children only two survive, Mrs. Goold and her 
sister, Mary A. To. Mr. and Mrs. Goold there have been born 
five children. Fannie Margaret, the wife of A. F. Koschkee, of 
Mt. Hope, Grant county ; Melinda, the wife of A. Fleckensteine of 
Chicago; Horace Luke married Miss Nellie Pratt and resides in the 
town of Oregon. Fred C. married Nellie Ashmore and resides in 
Grant county; and Lottie L. is the wife of H. W. Linton, of Bara- 
boo, Wis. In politics, Mr. Goold is a Republican. 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 327 

Christ H. Gorder is a well-known farmer of Perry township, 
where he settled in 1871 immediately upon his arrival in the United 
States, and has lived on the same farm during almost the entire 
period. He was born May 18, 1849, in Christiania, Norway, son of 
Harold and Cam (Peterson) Johnson, the former a veteran of the 
Norwegian army. Christ received his education in Norway and 
when he came to Wisconsin in 1871 was employed for several years 
as a farm laborer. Soon, however, he procured a farm in the town 
of Perry, containing one hundred and twenty-five acres and began 
to work it for himself, meeting with much success. This prop- 
erty he has owned ever since that time though for a short period 
he rented and worked at the mason's trade. Returning to farming 
he made that his permanent occupation and carries on an extensive 
general farming business. One brother of Christ Gorder, Hans A., 
lives in Norway and one sister, Guneil, who married Hans Hanson, 
resides in Iowa. The other two members of the family are de- 
ceased. Mr. Gorder married in 1871 Miss Anna Olson, a native ot 
Norway and six children blessed the marriage, of whom three are 
living. Clara married T. O. Thompson of Mount Horeb and 
Hannah married Charles Dickinson and resides in Iowa county and 
Minnie married Edward Dickinson, of Iowa. Mrs. Gorder died 
and in September, 1899, her husband married Mrs. Mary (Ander- 
son) Hanson, daughter of Arne and Carrie (Gilbertson) Anderson. 
Three children were born to Mrs. Gorder by a former marriage ; 
Hannah, (Mrs. Emil Smouldt), Clarence A. and Delia, all of whom 
reside in Madison. The family attend the Norwegian Lutheran 
church. Mr. Gorder is a Republican in his political sympathies but 
has never devoted much of his time to active participation in poli- 
tical matters. 

Emil A. Grabbert, a farmer, residing at Fitchburg, was born at 
Middleton, Dane county, May 20, 1879. His parents. Frederick 
and Minnie W. (Lubcke) Grabbert, were both born in Mecklen- 
burg, Germany, the former in 1845 and the latter in 1853. The 
father came to America as a young man and located at Middelton, 
where he bought eighty acres of land, partly improved, and began 
the life of a farmer. Sometime later he sold this place and bought 
one hundred and sixty-seven acres of unimproved land, upon which 
he erected buildings and made his home. He married in 1870 and 
his death occurred in 1885. In 1887 his widow was married to William 
Schmedeman, who was for nine years a member of the county 
board of supervisors. Emil A. Grabbert is the youngest of three 



328 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

children born to his parents. Emma is the wife of Louis Messer- 
smith, of Fitchburg, and Randolph is a farmer in that locality. 
Emil was educated in the home schools and has always lived with 
his mother, managing" the farm left by his father. He pays con- 
siderable attention to stock raising", though he carries on a general 
farming business. He is a member of the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows, belonging to the lodge at Middleton, and all the 
family are members of the Lutheran church. Few young men in the 
community are better known or more highly esteemed than Emil A. 
Grabbert, as he possesses in a marked degree all those qualities that 
go to make a good citizen, honesty and industry being his distin- 
guishing traits of character. 

Charles Grabow, Jr., one of the progressive and representative 
farmers and stock-growers of Cottage Grove township, has gained 
prosperity through his own efforts and his life has been character- 
ized by unselfishness and by that sterling integrity which ever be- 
gets popular confidence and esteem. He was born in Germany, 
November 20, 1862, and is a son of Charles and Christine Grabow, 
the former of whom passed his entire life in Germany and died in 
1880, when the subject of this sketch was eighteen years of age. 
Charles Grabow, Sr., served three years in the German army and his 
vocation was that of farming. Charles Grabow, Jr., to whom this 
sketch is dedicated, was reared on the farm and secured his early 
educational training in the excellent schools of his native land. 
Upon the death of his father he assumed the burden of providing 
for the needs of himself and his aged mother, and in this connection 
it should be noted that the latter is still living and is an honored 
inmate of his home, where she is cared for with deepest solicitude 
and affection in her declining years. After his father's death Mr. 
Grabow secured work on a farm and he thereafter continued to be 
thus employed until the time of his mariiage, after which 
he worked by the day for two years. At the expiration of that time 
he immigrated to America, being accompanied by his wife and her 
parents. They took up their residence in Dane county, where Mr. 
Grabow was employed as a farm hand for the ensuing seven years, 
in the meanwhile carefully saving his earnings, so that he then was 
enabled to purchase his present fine farm of eighty acres, in section 
21, Cottage Grove township. He has made many improvements 
on the place and is thorough and energetic in the carrying forward 
of all portions of the farm work, so that his success has been pro- 
nounced. He is a man of strong intellectualitv, taking- a lively in- 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 329 

terest in all that concerns the welfare of his home county and 
state, while his generous and genial disposition has gained to him 
the esteem of the community in which he resides and in which he is 
regarded as a valuable citizen. He gives his support to the cause 
of the Republican party and both he and his wife, as well as his 
mother, are members of the German Lutheran church. June 1, 
1886, Mr. Grabow was united in marriage to Miss Ernestine Sim- 
don, who was born in Germany, May 8, 1864, a daughter of Chris- 
tian Frederick and Henrietta Wilhelmina (Fry) Simdon, who came 
to America with their daughter. Following is i. record concerning 
the children of Mr. and Mrs. Grabow: Lizzie Marie, the oldest, 
died in infancy ;Herman Frederick, who was born August 20, 1887, 
died on the fifth of the following month ; Otto Paul, who was born 
April 20, 1889. died May 21, 1890; Anna Augusta, born December 
2, 1890, died April 27. 1891, and the following are the names and 
dates of birth of the five living children, — Martha Lena Augusta, 
February 2. 1892; Charles Frederick, December 20, 1891; William 
Albert, December 29. 1896 ; Lizzie Amanda, May 16, 1898 ; and 
Mary Ida Elizabeth, June 27, 1903. 

Daniel Grady (deceased), son of Lawrence Grady, was born in 
Ireland, one of a family of nine children. When he was eighteen 
years bf age he came to America, leaving his parents in the old 
country. He came to Fitchburg, Dane county, and remained for 
several years with his brothers. He bought the place where the 
family now reside, and which was his home at the time of his death. 
December 23, 1900. Mr. Grady was twice married; his first wife 
was Hannah, daughter of Patrick and Sarah (Brooks) Meehan. of 
Pittsfield, Mass. Mrs. Grady's father was a native of Ireland who 
settled first in Pittsfield, Mass., and came west to Richland Center, 
Richland county, in 185?. He was a hotel-keeper, and followed that 
business most of his life. He died in Casenovia, Richland county, in 
April, 1882 ; his wife died at Baraboo. in 1881. Mrs. Grady was one 
of six children : Mary, married John Regan of Milwaukee ; Michael ; 
Mrs. Grady; Sarah (deceased), married Henry Reynolds; Patrick, 
of Lincoln ; Catherine, married Frank Plummer, of Baraboo. Mr. 
Grady had four children by his first wife : Helen of Fitchburg ; 
Caroline, married Otto Vethein of Middleton ; Arthur and Willie, 
twins; Arthur married Miss Alva Brown, a resident of Fitchburg 
township, and Willie has a farm near Fitchburg. Mr. Grady was 
married to his second wife. Mrs. Arthur Callahan, July '•>. L878 ; she 
had two children, Marv and Daniel, who both died in infancy. 



•330 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

They have also had four children ; one daughter, Catherine, is mar- 
ried to Isaac Lewis, of Madison, and one son, Daniel, is at home. 
Mr. Grady was a Democrat and a member of the town board. 
George F. Grady, a farmer of the town of Dunn, was born in the 
town of Fitchburg, Dane county, January 17, 1864. He is a son of 
Frank M. and Antoinette (Dunn) Grady, the father a native of 
Ireland and the mother of Canada. Frank Grady came to Wiscon- 
sin in 1854, getting work as foreman of the "76" farm in the town of 
Burke. After a few years he purchased a farm in the town of 
Fitchburg, where he remained until his death on December 19, 
1893, as the result of an accident while returning from Madison. 
Shortly after the widow moved to Madison, and George started 
life for himself. He had had splendid opportunities for an educa- 
tion, but had never taken advantage of them. Until 1900 he devot- 
ed his time to trotting horses and then returned to the old farm. 
On December 4, 1902, he married Sarah, daughter of Michael and 
Margaret (Cunningham) Lally. Mr. Lally was a native of Ireland 
who first saw the light of day in August, 1822. He came to Amer- 
ica in 1841, working for some fourteen years for Captain Cook of 
Boston, and then coming to Wisconsin. For three years he was 
employed on the William White farm and then purchased two hun- 
dred and seventy acres in section 21 in the town of Dunn. Here he 
remained until his death, which occurred March 9, 1895. Mr. Lally 
was married three times ; his first wife was Ellen Mecarty, who 
died shortly after giving birth to a son, James, now retired and 
living in Grand Forks, N. D. ; he was married a second time to 
Mary Ellen Kegen, the mother of Ambrose M., living in Madison ; 
John, deceased, and William H., a conductor on the Chicago, Mil- 
waukee & St. Paul railway, making his home in Chicago ; his third 
wife, Margaret Cunningham (died in 1900), was the mother of 
Sarah (Mrs. Grady), Charles, deceased, and Stephen, a farmer 
near Mauston, Wis. Mrs. Grady was born June 13, 1859, and re- 
ceived her education in the schools of the town of Dunn. Mr. 
and Mrs. Grady have no children. Since their marriage they have 
lived in the town of Dunn, on a well-improved and finely equipped 
farm of one hundred and sixty acres. There are eight children in 
the Grady family, seven of whom are living, — James S.. a con- 
tractor of Madison; Nellie (Mrs. Martin Lyons) living in Madi- 
son; George F., the subject of this sketch; Nettie, Frank T., Law- 
rence Edward and Charles W., all living with the mother in Madi- 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 331 

son. Mr. Grady is a Democrat and takes an active interest in poli- 
tical events. He and his wife are members of the Catholic church. 
Patrick H. Grady is a prosperous and highly respected citizen 
of the town of Oregon, in Dane county, where he has been engaged 
in the noble occupation of tilling the soil for several years. He is 
a native of Rutland county, Vermont, and his parents — Thomas 
and Anna (Hart) Grady — were both born in the Emerald Isle. 
The father first came to Wisconsin in 1857, and worked as a com- 
mon laborer for about one year ; then returned to Vermont and 
worked as a quarryman for sixteen years. In the month of March, 
1876, he again came to Wisconsin and took up his residence at 
Lake View in Dane county, where he was employed as a common 
laborer for the ensuing two years. He then bought one hundred 
and twenty acres of land in the town of Oregon and began general 
farming. He greatly improved the farm and met with a success 
that was commensurate to his efforts. He died at his home in 
Oregon in August, 1904. Thomas Grady and wife were the parents 
of nine children, of whom the subject of this review was the first- 
born, the names of the others with additional facts concerning 
them being as follows : Thomas married Jane Condon and resides 
in Oregon ; William married Anna Dietrich and also resides in the 
town of Oregon ; Hannah married Charles Martin and resides in 
Oregon village. Bridget married George Montgomery and resides 
at Lake Mills, Wis. ; Anna married Adolph Piller and resides at 
Oregon village ; Maggie is the wife of Dill Joslin of Yankston. S. D. ; 
Mary and Michael reside in Oregon village. Patrick Grady re- 
ceived his education in the district schools of his native state, and 
also attended school in Massachusetts ; where his parents resided 
before removing to Wisconsin. At the age of thirteen years he be- 
gan work as an employe in the cotton mills of Massachusetts, and 
was thus engaged for seven years. He then came to Wisconsin and 
worked on the railroad while the rails were being laid from Evans- 
ville to Madison, in 1876. He continued at the railroad work for 
about three years and then began working as a farm hand, continu- 
ing so employed for about sixteen years, during the last five of 
which he was employed at the 'asylum farm, near Madison. He 
then rented a farm in the town of Springfield, on which he resided 
for five years, and then moved to the town of Oregon, where he 
and a brother purchased two hundred acres of land. In the divi- 
sion of the same, later, our subject retained eighty-eight acres, upon 
which he now resides, surrounded with a reasonable amount of the 



332 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

comforts of life. The possession of these is the result of his per- 
sonal efforts, aided by the counsel and sympathy of a faithful wife. 
"He was married on October 16, 1894, to Miss Catherine Doylen, 
born in the town of Blooming Grove, the daughter of John and 
Mary (Finlay) Doylen. Mrs. Grady has two sisters, both of whom 
reside in the city of Madison — Mary, the widow of Frank Roland, 
and Margaret, the wife of Fred Simon. Mr. and Mrs. Grady have 
four children, all of whom reside at home ; Mable, Anna C., Leo, 
and Raphael F. In his political views Mr. Grady gives allegiance 
to the Democratic party, and he and his wife are members of the 
Catholic church. 

W. F. Grady, of Oregon, was born at Bellows Falls, Vt., June 22, 
1863. His father, Thomas Grady, of whom mention will be found 
in connection with the sketch of Patrick Grady, and his mother 
Anna (Hart) Grady, were natives of Ireland. Mr. Grady received 
his education in the Oregon schools, supplementing his studies in 
the Oregon high school by work in the schools of Madison and 
Evansville. He came to Dane county with his parents in 1876, and 
since starting out for himself at the age of twenty-two, has divided 
his time between teaching and farming. He taught school at 
Waunakee three, years, and has also taught sixteen winters. He 
had some experience in farming during his boyhood, and turned 
that knowledge to account when he decided to take up farming for 
a livelihood ; that was some five years ago, and he owns at the 
present time a farm of one hundred and twelve acres, mostly un- 
der cultivation. Mr. Grady has been assessor of Oregon for the 
past four years, and also serves as treasurer of the school funds. 
He is a member of the Catholic church of Oregon. He is the third 
of a family of four sons and five daughters ; their names are Patrick ; 
Thomas; W. F., the subject of this sketch; Michael; Mary; Han- 
nah; Bridget; Anna; Maggie. He married, October 19, 1892, Miss 
Anna M. Diedrich, daughter of Peter and Katherine (Aniel) Died- 
erich, who came from Germany in 1871, when Mrs. Grady was six 
years old ; they settled in Dane township on eighty acres, which 
they cleared and on which they built a house. They are still living 
near Waunakee ; they had a family of twelve children, of whom all 
except two, Anna and Casper, are living; the others are Mary; 
Peter; Math.; Michael; Susan; Anna, (Mrs. Grady); Katherine; 
Lena ; Joseph ; John. Mr. Grady is a member of the Modern Wood- 
men of Oregon ; he and his wife have seven children, all living, 
Francis D., Henry J., and William, born in Springfield, Thomas L., 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 333 

born in Waunake.«i, Lillian C, Nora and John, born in Oregon. 
The older children attend school in Oregon. 

James Graham is a retired farmer of Stoughton and a veteran of 
the Civil War. He is a native of Canada, son of Edward Graham 
and grandson of Robert Graham, the latter a farmer in Canada 
during his entire life. Edward Graham married Isabella Sheffield, 
daughter of Robert Sheffield, also a native of Canada. Edward 
Graham was born in Canada and there engaged in farming. While 
a young man he served as a volunteer in the English army undei 
General Brock in the war of 1812. His son James was born Sep- 
tember 28, 1820, in Martin township, near Toronto, Canada, spent 
his youth and early manhood at the parental home and came to the 
United States in 1857. He first lived in the town of Rutland, Dane 
county, and worked out by the month on farms in that neighbor- 
hood. After four years of this life he commenced to work on 
shares which he continued for a year. In the spring of 1862 he vol- 
unteered as a private in Company D, Seventh Wisconsin Volunteer 
Infantry. The regiment was active in the battle of South Mountain 
and Mr. Graham participated in the battle before he succeeded 
in reaching his regiment and aided in carrying from the field 
wounded members of his own company without recognizing them. 
He was so badly hurt at the battle of Antietam that he was obliged 
to accept honorable discharge on account of disability after three 
months service. Returning to Dane county he resumed farming 
and from that time followed various occupations until 1904 when 
when he retired from active labor. July 25. 1848, Mr. Graham 
married Miss Elizabeth Wagner, daughter of Andrew and Rebecca 
(May) Wagner of Canada and ten children were born to the mar- 
riage: William; Eli; Hannah, the wife of Augustus Eddy; Eliza- 
beth (deceased), the wife of Frederick Myers; Samuel; Bertha, 
Mrs. Gilman Austin; Esther, widow of Charles Deboux ; Hiram, 
Nettie (deceased), wife of John Stump; Mabel (deceased), wife of 
William Coleman. Mr. and Mrs. Graham are members of the Bap- 
tist church. Mr. Graham belongs to the Philo C. Buckman Post 
No. 153 G. A. R. of Stoughton and is allied with the Republican 
party. 

James H. Greening, a pioneer farmer of the town of Mazomanie. 
was born in Worcester, Worcestershire county, England, Decem- 
ber 31, 1841. His father, John Greening, was born in Hereford- 
shire. England, in 1815. His mother, nee Maria Kelley, was born 
in Worcester, England, in 1816. John Greening was a shoemaker 



334 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

by trade ; his wife was a straw braider. On June 10, 1847, with his- 
family, he landed in New Orleans after a harassing passage of 
seven weeks in a sailing vessel. Coming directly to Mazomanie he 
settled on forty acres of section 7, and later obtained one hundred 
and sixty acres more of the same section, where he built the house 
in which James H. Greening still lives. Beside James H. there 
were six children, Clara E., wife of Charles Kerr of Mazomanie; 
Charles F., a merchant of Grand Meadow, Minn. ; Elizabeth, wife 
of William S. Parr of Mazomanie ; Anna E., deceased, widow of 
Frank R. Warner ; Amelia, wife of L. C. Oulmonm, Minneapolis ;. 
Laura V., wife of Hon. W. A. Nowlan of Grand Meadow, Minn. 
John Greening passed away February 22, 1900 ; his wife died June 
18, 1897. On May 13, 1864, James H. Greening enlisted in Com- 
pany K (Captain C. H. Barton), Fortieth Wisconsin Infantry 
(Col. W. A. Ray) and served for one hundred days as orderly ser- 
geant of his company. Wliile in the service he saw no actual fight- 
ing, the regiment being assigned to guard and picket duty in the 
vicinity of Memphis. It was some months before Mr. Greening re- 
covered from the effects of his camp life. His education was such 
as the home schools afforded. With the exception of five years 
spent in the woods near Juneau, Wis., he lived with his parents until 
their death. Both he and his father were stanch Republicans, and 
as such James Greening has been elected, at different times, to all 
of the town offices. In 1870 Mr. Greening married Ella J. Richards 
of Platteville. She died in 1874. On July 15, 1890 he married 
Leora M., daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Moses Laws of Vermont. 
This union was blessed with four sons ; J. Claude, born April 6 r 
1891 ; Paul Edgar, born August 1, 1892; Frank Russell, born March 
29, 1894 ; Wilbur Charles, born October 15, 1895. Mr. Greening is 
a member and commander of A. R. McDonald post, No. 59, Grand 
Army of the Republic. He is also a member of Crescent lodge, No. 
97, Free and Accepted Masons, and has been high priest of Chap- 
ter 59, R. A. M. For thirty-three years Mr. Greening made a good 
deal of sorghum, the superiority of which is vouched for by all 
who try it. 

John W. Greenman was a farmer in the town of Vienna from 
18G2 until 1897, when he retired and moved to Morrisonville. He 
is the son of James Greenman and grandson of Jeremiah Greenman 
of Providence, R. I. Jeremiah Greenman was a soldier in the Revo- 
lutionary War. James Greenman was born at Providence in 1805,. 
was educated in Rhode Island and married Miss Mary Washington. 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 335 

White, who was born in Rhode Island in 1812. They lived for a 
time in Fulton county, N. Y. and came to Dane county, Wisconsin, 
in 1874. Here they lived for two years and then went to Redfield,. 
S. Dak., where Mr. Greenman died in 1885 and his wife in 1890. 
Of their six children, but four are living - :. James Greenman was a 
carpenter. His son, John W., was born in Fulton county, N. Y., 
May 7, 1833, was educated in the home schools and learned the 
blacksmith's trade. He was a manufacturer of wooden measures 
in Jefferson county, N. Y., and in 1858, came to Dane county where 
he engaged in farming. During one winter he resided in Aurora, 
111., and also for a time he was in Columbia county, Wis. In 1862 
he purchased a farm in the town of Vienna and made that his per- 
manent home. He is also the owner of property in S. Dakota and 
in Wood county, Wis. In 1897, he sold the farm and since then 
has resided in Morrisonville. Allied with the Republican party,. 
Mr. Greenman has held the office of constable and has been, treas- 
urer and clerk of the school board of Vienna for twenty-one years. 
January 16, 1856, he married 'Miss Melissa Tarbull, who was born 
in Adams, Jefferson county, N. Y., November 21, 1839, daughter of 
Obijah and Olive (Hemstreet) Tarbull, who came to Vienna from 
New York in 1862. Mr. Tarbull was a veteran of the Civil War and' 
three sons also served in the Union army. To Mr. and Mrs. Green- 
man were born four children. Edward J. the oldest son, was gradu- 
ated from the Northwestern Business College at Madison and is a 
dealer in farm produce. He married Miss Viola Hyde and they 
have one daughter, Edith. Edward J. Greenman resides at Bethel,. 
Wood county, Wis., as does also his sister, Alice Marilla, who married 
Thorben Ohnstad. Mr. and Mrs. Ohnstad have seven children ; 
Addie, Jessie. Melissa, Clara, Raymond, Hazel, Leonard. Grace 
Greenman, the second daughter of John W., Greenman, is Mrs. Wil- 
liam Mcintosh of Lodi, W r is., and has three children ; Verna, Ed- 
ward, and Lawrence. Jessie the youngest of the family, was first 
married to Andrew Quammen who died in 18*92. One son, Robert, 
blessed the marriage. After the death of Mr. Quammen, his widow 
married Walter Sutherland of Tomah, W T is., Mr. Sutherland died 
in 1902, leaving one son, Roy. 

George F. Gregg, a successful farmer of the town of Madison,, 
was born at Brookfield, Waukesha county, Wis., July 13. 1864. 
He is the oldest child of Jefferson Gregg (see sketch) and Jennie 
(Parker) Gregg. George F. Gregg received his education at the 
schools near his home and later spent five years at the high school 



336 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

at YVauwatosa, Wis., from which he was graduated in 1887. In 
1888 he started farming in Waukesha county and two years later came 
to Dane county, purchasing one hundred acres of what was known as 
the Johnson farm one mile west of Forest Hill cemetery. Mr. 
Gregg is a Republican in politics, in which he has always taken a 
great deal of interest, and has been chairman of the town board. 
He is a member of the First Congregational church of Madison. 
On May 31, 1888, he married Hettie L., daughter of E. J. and 
Mary A. (Mitchell) Grover. and to this marriage have been born 
three children. Walter, Marian and Ralph. Mr. Gregg is a mem- 
ber of Madison Camp Xo. 365. Modern Woodmen of America. His 
farm is one of the best improved pieces of land in the county. 

Jefferson Gregg, retired, was born in Milwaukee, Wis., August 
15, 1836, his parents being of New England extraction. His father 
Hendrick Gregg, born in New Hampshire in 1807, was, after his 
father's death in 1816, taken to Stockbridge. Madison county, N. Y., 
where he grew to manhood. He married Clarissa M. Leland a na- 
tive of Massachusetts, and in 1836 came to Milwaukee and bought 
one hundred and sixty acres of canal land in Milwaukee county, 
cleared one hundred acres, and in 1852 sold it to the county for a 
''County Farm." He then bought about four hundred and forty 
acres near Elm Grove, partly improved, and from this tract he and 
his son Jefferson cut a large quantity of hard-wood timber, some 
of the trees being four feet or more in diameter. He served as as- 
sessor and chairman of the town board and took an active interest 
in political affairs as a Democrat. He was killed in 1881 whiL 
crossing the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul railroad at Elm Grove. 
His wife died the same year. She was a devoted member of 
the Baptist church. They were the parents of the following 
children viz : Helen, deceased ; Jefferson the subject of this sketch ; 
Mary, deceased; Flarrison a miner at Deadwood, S. D. ; Sarah D., 
widow of Wells Coe, now living at Deadwood ; George, who was 
killed at the battle of Murfreesboro in 1862; Ella, died in infancy; 
Clara who married a man named Hanks, is widowed and is now 
living at Granville, Wis.; Eewis, a farmer near Elm Grove; and 
Katie, now the wife of D. K. Warren, of Wauwatosa, Wis. Jeffer- 
son Gregg received a limited education in the common schools, and 
continued to live with his parents until he was twenty-six years old. 
He then began farming for himself near Elm Grove, until 1866 
when he removed to Chippewa county which was then a wild and 
sparsely settled country. This was in the pioneer days of that sec- 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 337 

tion. He located near Jim's Falls, established a school there, and 
took an active part in developing the county. He was the first 
school officer of the district. He followed farming there until 1870, 
when he returned to Elm Grove in 1884. In 1888 he removed to 
Dane county. Here he was actively engaged in farming for some 
years, when he retired and now lives at 412 Murry street, in the city 
of Madison, where he owns a comfortable residence, and also owns 
other property in the city. Mr. Gregg is a Prohibitionist in his 
political belief. He takes an active interest in public affairs having 
served as chairman of the town board of the town of Brookfield, 
and was for some time a member of the school board. In religious 
matters it is no flatter}' or exaggeration to say that he is one of the 
pillars of the Congregational church, in which he now holds the 
office of deacon. In November, 1862, he was united in marriage to 
Miss Rhoda J. Parker, and to this union have been born the follow- 
ing children : George, Hendrick, Mabel and John P. George and 
Hendrick are farmers in the town of Madison ; Mabel is the wife of 
Lyman G. Wheeler, a prominent attorney of Milwaukee ; and 
John P. is a traveling salesman and resides in Madison. All the 
children are well educated, having attended the state university or 
or graduated from high school. Mr. and Mrs. Gregg travel a great 
deal. They have spent two winters in California and two in Florida 
and Mrs. Gregg has spent one season in Europe. 

Jared Comstock Gregory, one of the prominent lawyers and 
citizens of Madison, Wis., was born January 13, 1823, in the town 
of Butternuts. Otsego county, New York. He was the eldest son 
of Ebenezer Gregory, Esq., and Millie (Maxwell) Gregory whose 
father, James Maxwell, was a revolutionary soldier. He was edu- 
cated at Gilbertsville academy, in his native county, and read law 
with Judge Noble, of Unadilla. He was admitted to practice in 
1848, and began his legal career as a member of the Otsego county 
bar. Always a consistent adherent of the principles and policy of 
the Democratic party, he was its unsuccessful candidate for con- 
gress in the district where he resided in 1856, running far ahead of 
his ticket. The following extracts are taken from a review of h!s career, 
after his death, February 7, 1892, by the Hon. Silas U. Pinney, justice 
of the supreme court of Wisconsin and for twenty-one years his law 
partner: — "In the same year of his admission to the bar he was 
married to Miss Charlotte Camp, and they made their home at 
Unadilla, New York, until they settled in Madison, Wisconsin, in 
1858. Three children of this marriage. — Stephen S. Gregory, one 
22— iii 



338 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

cf the prominent attorneys of Chicago; Charles N. Gregory, a mem- 
ber of the Wisconsin bar and a gentleman of very considerable at- 
tainments and reputation (at present dean of the college of law, at 
the University of Iowa) ; and an unmarried daughter, Cora W. 
Gregory, — with Mrs. Gregory, survive him. Upon his arrival in 
Wisconsin Air. Gregory formed a law partnership with the writer, 
under the firm name of Gregory & Pinney, which continued for 
over twenty-one years, — other persons at different times being as- 
sociated with them, — in which they secured a large practice in 
important litigation and met with marked success. After July, 

1879, he continued his practice with his son, Charles N. Gregory, 
under the firm name of Gregory & Gregory, until the time of his 
death, maintaining his former high position at the bar. From al- 
most the outset, on his arrival in Wisconsin, he took high rank as 
a lawyer and citizen, and soon formed extensive business and so- 
cial relations, and, being a gentleman of such public spirit, he soon 
became a popular and highly useful member of society in his local- 
ity and one of the most prominent citizens in the state. He took 
particular interest in educational affairs, and served with great 
fidelity for twelve years as one of the regents of the University of 
Wisconsin. Pie was of signal service in that capacity when the in- 
stitution was a feeble one of uncertain promise, and until it took 
acknowledged position and rank with the best educational institu- 
tions of the country. In 1873 he served with ability one term as 
mayor of the city; in 1881 he was the candidate of his party for 
member of congress in the Madison district, — the nominal ma- 
jority of the opposite party being nearly 4,000, but he was defeated 
by a majority of about 1,000. He was postmaster of Madison dur- 
ing the first term of office of President Cleveland, and gave great 
satisfaction, administering the affairs of the office in the most 
creditable manner. He had often been mentioned in connection 
with other positions, and while taking an active interest in politi- 
cal affairs, he avoided rather than inclined to candidacy for office. 
It should be added that Mr. Gregory was a delegate from Wiscon- 
sin to the national Democratic convention held at Cincinnati in 

1880, and was one of the vice-presidents of the convention. When 
Mr. Gregory settled in Wisconsin the condition of affairs in the 
west was unpromising and full of difficulty and embarassment. 
A great financial revolution had recently swept over the country 
and prostrated business interests. Litigation was abundant and 
more than usually unprofitable. . . . There was more experi- 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 339 

ence than money to be obtained in practicing law, yet it was at this 
juncture that the services of a lawyer of quick business perceptions 
and sound judgment were of great value. . . . He negotiated 
and completed an early and therefore advantageous compromise of 
our city debt, which was an enormous burden in the estimation of 
men of that day He, with General George B. Smith, Judge J. C. 
Hopkins, General Simeon Mills, General David Atwood and others, 
was particularly active and useful in securing the location and build- 
ing of railroads to and through Madison. He was prominent in the 
struggle before the legislature for many years, in relation to railroad 
enterprises and the disposition of the land grants; and for a long 
series of years and at the time of death, he was the local^ attorney 
and advisor of the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railway Com- 
pany, at Madison, and enjoyed its confidence in a very high degree. 
Mr. Gregory as a lawyer was a learned, wise and prudent counsel- 
lor and an efficient advocate in the trial of jury cases. He was an 
agreeable and entertaining speaker and gifted with the ability to 
perceive almost intuitively the considerations and motives that 
influenced human conduct. He did not particularly devote him- 
self to the consideration of complicated legislation or the study of 
complicated legal problems, yet in all such cases his suggestions 
and general views were very valuable. He chose rather to adjust 
such controversies and to devote himself more particularly to the 
non-contentious departments of professional life. He was emi- 
nently of gentle and peaceful disposition, disposed to settle and 
adjust controversies rather than litigate them ; but when he felt 
compelled to a different course he was an antagonist of whom one 

had need to beware In my judgment he belonged to that class 

of the profession who are extremely serviceable to their clients, and 
whose services do not always receive in public estimation the 
acknowledgement and recognition that fidelity, integrity and ability 
deserve. He was a man of many friendships, and I think he had no 
enemies. Mr. Gregory was an agreeable and instructive conversa- 
tionalist, and had mingled so extensively in social, business and 
professional circles that he had a large fund of interesting anec- 
dotes and experiences, which made his society attractive. He was 
fond of society life and its enjoyments, refinements and friendships 
He was of kindly, sympathetic nature ; he adhered to his old friends 
and acquaintances with singular firmness, and was one ot the tru- 
est of friends. He was a member of Grace Episcopal church, and 



340 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

all matters which pertained to the advancement of Christian work 
enlisted his active interest." 

John Griffiths, deceased, one of the pioneer printers of the city 
of Madison, was born in Shrewsbury, England, February 5, 1832. 
•He was a son of William and Hannah (Ganon) Griffiths, also born 
in England. The father was a minister of the Methodist Episco- 
pal church who came to this country with his family about 1844, 
landing at New Orleans and coming up the Mississippi to Fort 
Madison, and thence to Madison, Wis. Both parents had brothers 
serving in the English army under Wellington who were killed at 
Waterloo. In the early days Mr. Griffiths was accustomed to sup- 
ply pulpits around the county. He and his wife both passed away 
in Madison. The public schools of Madison furnished John 
Griffiths with his scholastic equipment, upon the completion of 
which he served his apprenticeship as a printer. For many years 
he and ex-Gov. George W. Peck worked at the case together. 
When it became necessary to get recruits for the Union army dur- 
ing the Civil War, by conscription, Mr. Griffiths was drafted, but 
finding himself unable to leave his family he supplied a substitute. 
About 1870 he retired from the printers' trade and devoted his time 
to the management of his land interests, in which he was heavily 
involved. On June 15, 1871, he married Sarah M., daughter of 
Samuel and Cecelia (Lewis) Carman of Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 
The Lewis family were the founders of Poughkeepsie and a great 
great grandfather of Mrs. Griffiths, (on the maternal side) Col. 
L. D. Barnett, was the representative of Dutchess county in the 
Colonial Congress from 1717 to 1724. Samuel Carman was a phy- 
sician who came to Wisconsin in the hope of benefitting his health 
in 1853, and died here six years later. Mrs. Carman also passed 
away while a resident of Madison. Mrs. Griffiths' birthplace was 
Lakeville, Livingston county, New York. To Mr. and Mrs. 
Griffiths were born three daughters, — Anna, now living with her 
mother ; Mary Elizabeth, Mrs. Charles Palmer of Madison ; and 
Katherine, Mrs. Harry Herd of Madison. Mr. Griffiths was af- 
filated with the Republican party of the state, but never held office. 
His death occurred August 17, 1905, at the home at 424 North 
Pinckney street, where the widow still resides. 

John J. Grimm, proprieter of the old and well-known bookbind- 
ing concern, was born in Madison February 10, 1858. His parents 
were Gottlieb and Elizabeth (Krueger) Grimm, natives of Ger- 
many. Gottlieb Grimm was born March 16, 1831, and came to Mad- 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 341 

ison in the early forties. He was the first and for many years the 
only bookbinder of Madison. For several years he was a member of 
the city council and in 1875 was the city treasurer. He died Janu- 
ary 27, 1903. from a stroke of apoplexy. His wife, sixty-eight years 
of age, is still living in Madison. Of the eleven children of Gott- 
lieb and Elizabeth Grimm eight are still living, — John J. ; Mary, 
Mrs. Augustus Xebel of Madison ; Mathilda, Mrs. Michael Dieder- 
ich, of Madison ; Elizabeth. Sister Devota, the mother superior at 
the Chippewa' Falls Catholic school; Crescentia, widow of Mr. 
Baudler, of Madison; Julia, Mrs. Thomas Revord, of Minnesota ; 
Amanda, Sister Theophila, in a Chicago Catholic school ; and 
Anna M., at home. Rosalia, Mrs. Henry Kessenich, of Madison, 
died in June, 1906. John J. Grimm received his education in the 
schools of Madison. Upon the completion of his school work he 
went into his father's plant and learned the business. Later he was 
taken into partnership with his father and upon the death of the 
latter he assumed control of the entire business, which has grown to 
large proportions under his able management. On May 31. 1881, 
he married Margaret, daughter of Peter and Anna M. Zirkel. To 
this union have been born seven children, — Herman J., a druggist ; 
John P. and Henry G., who work with their father; Rosalia, at 
home ; Matilda and Amanda school girls ; and Frances X. Like 
their parents Mr. and Mrs. Grimm are members of the Catholic 
church. Mr. Grimm is a member of and treasurer of the Knights 
of Columbus. 

Hon. Hans S. Grinde was a prominent business man and repre- 
sentative citizen of De Forest from 1874, when he came to the vil- 
lage, until his death April 20, 1892. He was born in Norway, the 
son of Sjur L. and Gertrude (Roisum) Grinde, and was brought 
by his parents to the United States in 1847. They located on a 
farm in the town of Windsor and there Sjur Grinde died in 1893 
and his wife in 1895. Mr. Grinde was a blacksmith but devoted his 
energies principally to the care of his farm. Twelve children 
were born to the Grindes, eight of whom are living. The family are 
members of the Norway Grove United Lutheran church. Hans S. 
Grinde was born November 27, 1845, came to Wisconsin when he 
was two years old, attended school at Windsor and the Albion 
Academy and was an under-graduate of Luther College of De- 
corah, Iowa, and the L T niversity of Wisconsin. For a time he 
taught school and in 1874, came to De Forest, where he entered 
into partnership with Andrew Moldstad in a mercantile business. 



342 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

After two years Mr. Grinde engaged in the lumber business and 
also owned a grain elevator. For years he was employed by the 
railroad company as station agent at DeForest. Always active in 
political life he was elected by the Republican party to the state 
legislature in 1886 and also served the town as clerk and the county 
as treasurer from 1888 to 1890. May 18, 1873. he married Miss 
Carrie Engeseather, who was born in Vienna, Dane county, Wis., 
July 27, 1851, daughter of Michael and Synneva (Menes) Enge- 
seather, natives of Norway. Mr. and Mrs. Engeseather came from 
Norway to Dane county in 1845 and located on a farm in Vienna 
in 1847. Here they spent the residue of their lives and Mr. Enge- 
seather died in 1893 and his wife in 1905. Eleven children were 
born to them and four are living. The family was prominent in 
the First Lutheran church. Eight children were born to Mr. and 
Mrs. Grinde ; G. Josephine, Seward C., Joseph M., Arthur I., Lau- 
rence A., Hattie C, Sadie M. and Hazel C. The family is identi- 
fied with the First Lutheran church of Norway Grove. Mr. 
Grinde was a valued member of the community and was devoted 
to its best interests for the eighteen years of his life among its peo- 
ple and at his death left many friends. 

Lars S. Grinde owns one of the largest farms, consisting of four 
hundred and sixty-three acres, in the township of Vienna. Mr. 
Grinde is a native of the town of Windsor, of which his parents, 
Sjur L. and Gertrude (Johnson) Grinde were pioneers. They 
were both born irt Norway and came to Windsor in 1846, where 
they obtained a farm of four hundred and eighty-three acres. Of 
this property their son Lars owns three hundred and sixty-three 
acres. Mr. Grinde was a blacksmith as well as a farmer. Eight 
of their twelve children are living. Lars S. was born in the town 
of Windsor, Dane county, May 27, 1848, attended the home schools 
and the University of Wisconsin and has always engaged in farm- 
ing. When he was twenty-one years of age he began work upon the 
farm which has since been his home and where for a number of 
years he has carried on an extensive farming business. Considera- 
ble stock is raised upon the farm. Mr. Grinde is an adherent to the 
principles of the Republican party but not an office-holder. On 
November 7, 1872, Mr. Grinde married Miss Tngeri Johnson, who 
was born in Norway, December .28, 1848, daughter of Peter John- 
son (elsewhere mentioned) and sister of Nels Johnson, a sketch 
of whose life is published in this work. Twelve children were 
born to Mr. and Mrs. Grinde. Sjur L., the oldest son is elsewhere 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 343 

mentioned. Peter Gifford, born March 28, 1875, was educated in 
the Stoughton Academy and De Forest high school, and is a hard- 
ware merchant in De Forest. Leonard Austin, born September 23, 
1876, died in 1882, aged six years. Joseph Idell was born December 
31, 1877, and died October 22, 1883. George A., born February 15, 
1880, was graduated from the Luther College of Decorah, Iowa, and 
now a student at the College of Physicians and Surgeons in Chi- 
cago. Gertrude Louisa, born July 21, 1882, was graduated from the 
Lodi high school in 1902 and is engaged in teaching. Leonard A., 
born February 25, 1883, attended the De Forest high school. 
Ida Josephine born October 5, 1884, was also graduated from the 
De Forest high school and is a teacher. Joseph Herman, born 
January 11. 1886. and Mabel Jorine. born May 10, 1887, are seniors 
in the De Forest high school. John E., born July 14, 1889, died in 
1892. aged three years. Eugene L., born October 6, 1890, is the 
youngest son. The family attend the First Lutheran church of De- 
Forest. 

Sjur L. Grinde, a very successful young business man of Wind- 
sor township, is deserving of special mention in a work of this char- 
acter, for although young in years he has adready made an impress 
upon public affairs and won for himself the universal respect and 
esteem of the community in which he lives. He is a native of Dane 
county, having been born in the township of Vienna on November 
4, 1873. He is the son of Lars S. and Emma (Johnson) Grinde, the 
former being also a native of Dane county, while the latter was 
born in Norway, but as the parents are given special mention upon 
another page of this publication a repetition in this connection is 
not necessary. Sjur L. Grinde received his education in the com- 
mon schools of his native township, and added to the knowledge 
thus gained by taking a course at the Stoughton academy. Upon 
reaching manhood he decided upon the occupation of a farmer and 
followed that ancient and honorable vocation until 1901, in which 
year he removed to Morrisonville and engaged in the stock busi- 
ness. His intelligence, integrity and natural adaptability to the 
business, united with an unflagging industry has won for him an 
enviable success and given him a high standing for one of his years. 
In politics he has always adhered to the principles of the Republi- 
can party, and in recognition of his personal merit he has been 
called to fill the position of supervisor, representing Windsor town- 
ship upon the county board. In religious matters he also takes the 
interest of a sood citizen, and he and familv are consistent mem- 



344 HISTORY ,OF DANE COUNTY. 

bers of the First Lutheran church of De Forest. Mr. Grinde was 
married on November 15, 1899, to Miss Bertha Linde, daughter of 
John P. Linde, who is given further mention on another page of 
this volume, in the sketch devoted to A. P. Linde. Mr. and Mrs. 
Grinde are the parents of three children : Lillian Irene. Ghea Dina 
Estelle, and Thedora Johannes. 

Charles William Grosser, deceased, died in 1903 while in the 
prime of a vigorous manhood, and at a time when he had emerged 
from the poverty that enthralled his youth and caused his pros- 
pects to be anything but encouraging. He was born at Camp 
Douglas, Wis., on October 22, 1861, and was one of seven sons of 
Charles Grosser and wife, the parents being immigrants from Ger- 
many. The subject of this review received a limited education in 
the schools of Camp Douglas, and at the early age of fifteen years 
left home and began his independent career. He first worked as a 
farm hand by the month and day, and continued so employed until 
1880, in which year he located in the city of Madison and for four 
years worked as a helper on the Science Hall building of the Uni- 
versity of Wisconsin. He then removed to the town of Fitchburg 
and worked as a farmer for L. E. Stone for a period of one year, 
after which he returned to Madison, where he worked as a laborer 
for two years. He then removed to the farm upon which his 
widow now resides, in the town of Dunn, and there followed the 
occupation of farming until his death. May 9, 1903. Since that 
sad event Mrs. Grosser has continued to manage the farm, renting 
the fields to other parties and retaining for her own use a small 
tract for gardening purposes. The maiden name of Mrs. Grosser 
was Amelia Lipke. She was born in the city of Madison, May 22. 
1864. and is one of seven daughters born to William and Louisa 
Lipke, former residents of Madison. Of these seven daughters nut 
two are now living: Gusta, who is the widow of Henry W. Beglinger 
and resides in the city of Madison, and Amelia, who is the widow 
of the subject of this review. Of the seven sons in the Grosser 
family all are living, excepting Charles, our subject. Mr. and Mrs. 
Grosser became the parents of two children, Lillian and Sadie, both 
of whom reside at home with their mother. Mr. Grosser was a 
Democrat in his political affiliations and his religious faith was ex- 
pressed by membership in the German Lutheran church, to which 
his wife and daughters also belong. 

Carl F. Gruendler, an enterprising carpenter and contractor of 
Madison, was born August 6, 1S.*>7, in Germany on the Rhine. 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 345 

His parents were Fred and Hannah (Schweickert) Gruendler, both 
natives of the Yaterland. The father's vocation was that of farm- 
ing, and he followed it all his life. He passed away in his sixty- 
ninth year and his wife while in her sixty-eighth. Of the eight 
children there are but two survivors^ Rose, the only other beside the 
subject of this sketch, making her home in her native land. .A 
brother Fred, immigrated to the United States in 1892, and four 
years later succumbed to typhoid fever. Hi's widow, Anna (Ko- 
pitch) Gruendler, returned to Germany with her two children after 
his death. Carl F. Gruendler received what education the schools 
of his native land afforded and learned his trade across the water. 
Up to 1882, the year of his immigration to this country, he "hired 
out." His first location was in Madison, and he has been a useful 
citizen of the community ever since. For twenty years after his 
arrival he worked for contractors and in 1892 "set up" in business 
with a partner. After four years he assumed the management of 
the business alone. His specialty is the building of residences, of 
which a great many in Madison are monuments to his skill and 
handiwork. In 1883 he was united in marriage to Wilhelmina 
Schmieder, a native of the German empire, and a daughter of 
Stephen and Louisa (Hauser) Schmieder. She crossed the ocean 
alone in 1883, her mother following in 1897. The latter now makes 
her home on a farm in Dane county with another daughter, Mrs. 
Rosa Koltes. There were eight children in the Schmieder family, 
of whom six are living. Louisa, Mrs. Schallich, resides in Cali- 
fornia. Carl Schmieder lives in Calhoun, Wis. Matilda, wife of 
Daniel Hoover, and Amelia, wife of Adolph Kuelling, live in Ger- 
many. Mr. and Mrs. Gruendler have six children. Charles John is 
a press-feeder, living in Madison. Fred H. is a machinist work- 
ing for the Scanlan-Morris company. Adolph Victor is employed 
in the German American bank. The others are Rosa Louisa, Al- 
bert Victor and George. Mrs. Gruendler is a member of the Holy 
Redeemer Catholic church. Her husband is a member of the 
Modern Woodmen of America, the Turnverein and the Maenner- 
chor. A modest, retiring but substantial citizen he has won the re- 
spect of all with whom he has come in contact. 

G, T. Gullickson, a well known farmer in the town of Pleasant 
Springs, was born on July 1, 1850, in the neighborhood where he 
now lives. His father, Thurston Gullickson, was born in Tele- 
marken, Norway, but came while still a young man to America. 
After locating at Pleasant Springs he married Thirbur Halverson, 



346 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

also a native of Telemarken, bought one hundred and eighty acres 
of unimproved land in section 15, and there lived until his death 
in 1875. His widow is now living in the town of Burke with a son. 
They were members of the Lutheran church and were the parents 
of eight children, viz: Gulick T., the subject of this sketch; Isa- 
bella living in Clark county, Wis. ; Halvor, a farmer in the town of 
Pleasant Springs ; Ole, also a farmer in the same vicinity ; George 
and Henry, farmers in the town of Burke; Martha, living in the 
town of Burke, and Julia, at Stoughton. Gulick T. Gullickson re- 
ceived a moderate education and lived with his parents until he at- 
tained his majority. He then bought seventy-five acres of land 
from his father and lived npon it for two years, when he sold it 
and bought one hundred and forty acres where he now lives. This 
place he has improved until he has one of the best farms in the lo- 
cality. He raises all kinds of grain and tobacco, and does a gen- 
eral farming business, also paying some attention to dairying and 
.stock raising. He is a Republican in his political views and a mem- 
ber of the Lutheran church. On July 16, 1876. he married Ellen, 
daughter of Iver and Maren Olsen, natives of- Norway, who came 
to this country in 1867 and located at Stoughton, where both 
passed the rest of their lives. Mr. and Mrs. Gullickson have eight 
children, viz: Tillie, Gerena, Thomas, Ole, Julius, Malida, Ella 
and Harold. Tillie is the wife of Ole Loftus of Monroe county, 
AYis., and the others are at home, attending the home schools. 

Ole E. Gulseth is a well known and successful .resident of Dane 
county. From his early youth he carried on an extensive farming 
business in the town of Christiania but in recent years has been 
more interested in the real estate business and now makes his 
home in Madison. With his parents Even Erickson and Gunild 
(Harrison) Gulseth. he came to the United States in 1849 when he 
was eleven years old. Even Gulseth was a farmer in Gulseth, Nor- 
way, and brought six children to American on a sailing vessel. After 
a stormy voyage they landed in New York and continued their jour- 
ney as far as Whitewater, Wis., where they purchased a farm. For 
fifteen years this was the home of the family and then the parents 
moved to Utica. where they lived with their son Erick until the 
death of Air. Gulseth in 1877 and that of his wife in 1878. Six chil- 
dren were born to them. Harris is a farmer and painter of Iola, 
Wis. Esther married Andrew Ingebrigtson of Whitewater. Marie 
married Andrew Holverson. both of whom are deceased. Eric Even- 
son was a farmer in section 31, Christiania, and married Kissen Nel- 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 347 

son. Halvor lived in Albion, married Tora Matteson and died in 
1905; his widow still lives oh the farm in Albion. Ole E. was born 
June 16, 1838, attended the home schools when possible but owing 
to the change of residence of his parents opportunity for school at- 
tendance was limited. At the age of twenty-three years he left 
home and obtained a farm in Pleasant Springs, where he lived until 
1863. when he purchased his present home. The farm in Chris- 
tiania consists of one hundred and fourteen acres upon which all the 
improvements have been made by Mr. Gulseth. In December, 
1860, he married Miss Ingeborg Johnson, who came from Holden, 
Norway, with her parents, Amund Erickson and Lieve (Dorhalt) 
in 1844. The marriage was blessed with ten children. The older 
•ones. Lavina, Amelia and the next daughter, also named Amelia, and 
Maria are deceased. Martin E. married Miss Sarah Berge of 
Deerfield, who died in 1904 leaving two children, Olen Jerome 
and Inestheny. Amelia Josephine married Edward Fods, a car- 
penter of Stoughton. They have had three children ; Russell, Lloyd 
and Eva Josephine, the last of whom is deceased. Alfred S. married 
Miss Samanda Brickson of Madison, and has three children ; Oscar 
is a farmer of Sun Prairie and married Miss Clara Bjornstad. Mel- 
ward G. is a farmer of Madison. Thea is the wife of Thomas Hal- 
vorson of Madison. Mr. Gulseth and his family have always been 
loyal members of the Pleasant Springs church. Mr. Gulseth is a Re- 
publican but has never desired office. 

Rev. Severin Gunderson is one of the most popular citizens of 
the village of Mt. Horeb and is a recognized leader in church and 
educational affairs. He was born June 13. 18-*>4, in Bergensteft. 
Norway, and at the age of fifteen years went to Bergen, the capital 
city of the province, where he secured employment as clerk in a 
grocery store. Later he worked in a wholesale and retail estab- 
lishment and remained in the city until 1871, when he emigrated 
to America, his chief purpose being to prepare himself for the 
ministry. Upon his arrival in the United States he at once entered 
Luther college at Decorah. Iowa, and remained as a student 
there five years. Later he spent three years at the Lutheran sem- 
inary in Madison, Wis., and was ordained at La Crosse in 1882. 
His first charge was that of the Norwegian Lutheran church at 
Madison, where he remained eight years, and in 1890 he removed 
to Mt. Horeb to take charge of the congregations in Springdale, 
Blue Mounds, Vermont and Black Earth, also serving a congre- 
gation at Mt. Horeb four years. He was one of the chief pro- 



3-48 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

moters of the Mt. Horeb Lutheran academy at the latter place. 
Rev. Severin Gunderson was married September 28, 1882, to Miss 
Clara Antona Widsted, who is a native of Hammerfest, Norway, 
the most northern city in the world. To this union there have 
been born eight children: Sophia, Gerhard (deceased). Dorothea 
(deceased), Valborg, Dorothea, Gerhard, Sigurd,, and Hector, all 
of the surviving ones remaining at home with their parents. Rev. 
Severin Gunderson takes great interest in everything that con- 
tributes to the moral and material betterment of the community in 
which he resides. He pays considerable attention to affairs of a 
public nature, and in his political views he gives allegiance to the 
principles of the Republican party. 

John D. Gurnee was born in Rockland county. N. Y., December 
25, 1831, and was the oldest child of Daniel S. and Abigail (Wood- 
ward) Gurnee, who were also natives of that county. Their an- 
cestors were of Huguenot descent, and were prominent residents 
and land-owners in that section of the Empire state. The name of 
Gurnee in Rockland county was an insignia of prominence and char- 
acter, and John D. Gurnee's native ability and worth came to him 
as an inheritance. Daniel S., his father, a fine scholar, largely 
self-made, was well read in history, national affairs, politics and 
theology. He died in Brooklyn in 1873 at the age of seventy-five 
years. The mother of John D. Gurnee, a woman of the highest 
Christian character, beloved by all who knew her, died while the 
future distinguished Madison citizen was yet a boy, but from her 
he inherited the kindness and gentleness of spirit for which he was 
noted. His grandfather, on his father's side, was Judge John J. 
Gurnee, after whom he was named. During the Revolutionary 
War, General La Fayette was entertained for six weeks at the home 
of Judge Gurnee, and on the general's return to France he in- 
sisted on his host returning with him to claim an estate of im- 
mense value, to which General La Fayette assured him he was 
heir, but the trials incident to an ocean voyage in those days 
caused him to decline. John D. Gurnee was graduated from 
Princeton University in 1854, and afterward studied law with Judge 
Hasbrouck of Newburgh, N. Y. Immediately after being ad- 
mitted to the bar, he came west and setttled in Madison in 1857, 
where he at once entered upon the practice of his profession. For 
a number of years he gave much of his time to the investment of 
large sums of money in real estate in Wisconsin, and the attention 
he gave to that business caused him to withdraw from more active 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 349 

professional pursuits. In later years his inclinations led him to 
devote his time largely to the quiet of office practice, and he seldom 
participated in the labor and worry of jury trials. He enjoyed 
the confidence of his professional associates and all business men 
who availed themselves of his counsel in difficult matters. He 
was industrious and untiring in his pursuits, honorable in all the 
relations of life, and was distinguished for his ability and his safe 
and wise counsels. Mr. Gurnee took a lively interest in public 
affairs, but was little inclined to hold office himself. He accepted 
the nomination for the assembly from the Democratic party in 1871, 
and served during the session of 1872, devoting himself closely to 
the affairs of legislation and enjoying the fullest confidence of his 
associates and constituents. He was appointed by Governor Wash- 
burn a member of the park commission, and aside from those al- 
ready mentioned held no official positions. He severed his con- 
nection with the Democratic party in 1896. and thereafter took no 
active part in political affairs. In 1863 Mr. Gurnee married Miss 
Madeline M. C. Reynolds of Madison, Wisconsin, and she with 
three sons survive him, Daniel C, with Armour & Company of 
Chicago; John S., who is a wholesale merchant in California, and 
Paul D., all of whom were born, reared and educated in Madison. 
An only daughter, Anna Breese, died in 1880, while yet in her girl- 
hood. Aside from his immediate family, Mr. Gurnee is also sur- 
vived by an only sister, Martha Antoinette, wife of Rev. A. Messier 
Quick, of Brooklyn, N. Y. Paul D. Gurnee, one of the promising 
young men of the city of Madison, was born in that city March 31, 
1872, and was educated in the public schools and at the University 
of Wisconsin, and was graduated from' the law department of the lat- 
ter institution w!th the class of 1900. In politics he gives allegiance 
to the principles of the Republican party, particularly to those cham- 
pioned by the junior senator from Wisconsin, Robert M. La Fol- 
lette. He was appointed to the position of actuary of the de- 
partment of insurance of Wisconsin on November 1, 1905. His 
social affiliations are with the Phi Delta Theta of the university, 
the Phi Delta Phi of the law alumni, and he is also a member of 
the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. Mr. Gurnee resides 
with his mother at 115 East Gilman street, in Madison. 

Hans C. Guthaug is the owner of a farm of three hundred and 
fifty acres in the town of Perry, in which locality he has lived ever 
since he came to the United States in 1878. He was born in Nor- 
way, May 20, 1843, son °f Christopher and Martha (Erickstead) Lar- 



350 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

son, natives of Norway. Both father and son served in the Norwe- 
gian army, the former five years and the latter one year. In 1878,. 
the year of his marriage, Hans determind to come to America and 
upon his arrival in Dane County commenced to work out as a farm 
hand which occupation he continued for four years. He then pur- 
chased a farm of eighty acres in Perry township, improved the prop- 
erty and made it his home for eighteen years. After selling this farm 
he bought one hundred and twenty-six acres which is his present 
home and a short time ago added another tract of one hundred and 
twenty-six acres. This large and valuable farm is the reward of years 
of perseverance and industry on the part of Mr. Guthaug and is evi- 
dence of the wisdom of his judgment in farm affairs. May 8, 1878,. 
Mr. Guthaug married Miss Mary Olson, born in Norway, Nov. 14, 
1858, daughter of Ole and Martha (Omansdauter) Hanson of Nor- 
way. Six children were born to the marriage; Betsey Matilda, the 
wife of Arne Anderson of Clark county, Ole Christian, James Gus- 
tave, Clara Otilda, Lena Estella and Hilda Maria. All but the oldest 
daughter reside with their parents. Mr. Guthaug was the fifth child 
of a family of eleven, of whom but three are living. Mrs. Guthaug 
has three sisters and one brother, all of whom came to America. Car- 
rie is Airs. Olaf Lacken of Blue Mounds. Hans Edset is a resident 
of Primrose, Anna is Mrs. Oneson and lives in Clark county, Wis. 
Lena lives in Chicago. Mr. and Mrs. Guthaug are identified with the 
Norwegian Lutheran church. Mr. Guthaug is a republican in his 
political affiliations. 

Alois Haack, one of the representative farmers and dairymen of 
Cross Plains township, was born in Germany, December 6, i860, and 
is a son of Alois and Justina Haack, who were likewise born in that 
same section of the German empire, where the father followed agri- 
cultural pursuits until 1852, when he came with his family to America,, 
locating in New York city, where he was employed in a glass manu- 
factory three and one-half years, at the expiration of which he re- 
turned to the old home in Germany, where he passed the remiander of 
his life, both he and his wife dying in 1891. They were communi- 
cants of the Catholic church. Of their five children the subject of 
this sketch was the third in order of birth. August, Julius and Lud- 
wig are deceased, and Justina still resides in Germany. Alois Haack 
was afforded the advantages of the schools of his fatherland, where 
he was reared to matur'ty and where he learned the trade of shoemak- 
ing. The confinement incidental to this vocation caused his health to 
become impaired, and in 1884 he came to Amerca and took up his resi- 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 351 

dence in Dane county, Wis., where he has since continued to make his 
home and where he has gained the unqualified esteem of those with 
whom he has been thrown in contact. He purchased one hundred and 
forty acres of land in section 16, Cross Plains township, where he has 
developed a valuable farm, upon which he has made good improve- 
ments in the way of buildings and other permanent appurtenances. 
He gives his attention to diversified agriculture and to dairying and 
has been zealous and constant in his application to work, having 
gained independence and prosperity through his own efforts. He 
gives his allegiance to the Democratic party but has never sought or 
held office of any description. He and his wife are communicants of 
the Catholic church, being members of the parish at Pine Bluff. In 
1887 Mr. Haack was united in marriage to Miss Annie Kalshire, who 
died in 1892, being survived by three children, — Peter, Frank and 
Mary. For his second wife Mr. Haack married Miss Annie Holtz, a 
native of Dane county, and they have three children, — Justina, John 
and Matthew. 

Gustave Haack is a successful and popular business man in the 
village of Pine Bluff, Cross Plains township, where he has a well 
equipped establishment. He was born in Reidern, Bavaria. 
Germany, February 3, 1867, and is a son of Isadore Haack who passed 
his entire life as a forester in the Forest of Liningen at Auerbach,. 
passing away November 16, 1905. But few representatives of the 
family have come to America. Frank Haack, a brother of the sub- 
ject of this sketch, was a resident of California at the time of his death,, 
having there been identified with the hotel business. Gustave Haack 
was reared to maturity in his native land, where he received some- 
what limited educational advantages and where he learned the carpen- 
ter's trade. In 1889 he came to the United States, landing in the 
city of New York May 3. He was engaged in farming in Butler 
county. Pa. until 1893, when he came to Dane County, Wisconsin, 
being employed at Mount Horeb about one year, after which he passed 
a brief interval in Pennsylvania. Upon his return to Dane county 
he located in the city of Madison and opened a grocery store at 301 
Frances street. Three years later he removed to 610 University ave- 
nue, where he was engaged in the same line of enterprise for the ensu- 
ing two years. He then sold his property and business in the capi- 
tal city and removed to Pine Bluff, where he has since conducted a 
general store, and where he has been successful in his efforts. 
He is a skilled artisan at the carpenter trade, and followed the 
same at intervals for a number of years. He is independent in poli- 



352 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

tics, and both he and his wife are communicants of the Catholic 
church, holding membership in St. Mary's church, in their home town. 
November 10, 1897, was solemized the marriage of Mr. Haack to 
Miss Anna M. Link, daughter of Joseph and Elizabeth Link, of Madi- 
son, and of this union have been born four children all of whom are 
living, — Louis G., Raymond A., Marion G. and Elizabeth Anna Cas- 
ilia. Yolkin Kukenbrand, grandfather of Mrs. Haack, was born in 
Bavaria in 1815 and came to this country in 1843 settling at Hampton, 
Portage county, where he died December 18, 1895 being in his eigh- 
tieth year. His wife preceded him by eighteen years. 

John H. Hagenah, traveling salesman for the J. I. Case plow 
works of Racine, Wis., whose home in Madison is at 1044 Jenifer 
street, was born near Hanover, Germany, January 28, 1844. His 
parents were Christopher and Elizabeth (Oehlers) Hagenah, both 
deceased. Christopher Hagenah was a German farmer who set- 
tled in Reedsburg, Wis., on his arrival in this country. He was 
widely and favorably known around Reedsburg and for a time was 
the chairman of the town board. His death occurred at the home 
of his son in 1888. His wife passed away just a week after land- 
ing in the the United States. The subject of this sketch was the 
eldest of their five children. Of the remaining children the follow- 
ing facts are of interest. Peter, born in 1847, died in 1903 in Reeds- 
burg. Claude was killed in the latter seventies in a railroad ac- 
cident on the Chicago & Northwestern Railroad. Henry, a travel- 
ing salesman for the McCormick Farm Implement company, 
resides at Hillsboro, Wis. George is a retired business man who 
makes his home in Reedsburg. John H. Hagenah received his ed- 
ucational advantages in German schools. In January, 1867, he 
immigrated- to this country and a year later went to Kilbourn City, 
where he became clerk in the Tanner House. The following year 
he went to Baraboo, and the next year removed to Chicago. His 
employment there was with the Elder & Taylor hardware com- 
pany. In 1870 he settled in Reedsburg. where his father had 
located, and with a partner established the hardware concern of 
Hagenah, Gifford & Company. This business continued until 1888 
and in 1889 Mr. Hagenah came to Madison. For three years he 
was traveling salesman for the David Bradley Manufacturing com- 
pany of Kankakee. 111., and then assumed his present position w r ith 
the J. I. Case establishment. While a resident of Reedsburg he 
was chairman for one year of the village board and for two years 
was town treasurer. He also belonged to the consreeration of St. 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 353 

John's church. On April 26, 1878, Mr. Hagenah was united in 
marrage to Miss Catherine Meyer, also a native of Hanover, Ger- 
many, and a daughter of Henry and Elizabeth Meyer. Mrs. Meyer 
died in September, 1905, in her eighty-fifth year. Her husband, 
although eighty-five years of age, is an active farmer residing near 
Logansville, Wis. To Mr. and Mrs. Hagenah have been born five 
children. Two died young, Alvin when nine months old and 
Ralph in his twelfth year. The latter was a boy of exceptional 
promise. Clara, the eldest, is the wife of Philip Kuehne, secre- 
tary-treasurer of the Madison Dairy Produce Company of Madison. 
A sketch of William J., the only son living, appears elsewhere in 
this volume. Alma, the youngest, is at present traveling in 
Europe. Mrs. Hagenah is a member of the Lutheran church. 
Her husband is a member of the Independent Order of Good For- 
esters, of which organization he has been noble grand, a member 
of the A. O. U. W.. is a thirty-second degree Mason, and a mem- 
ber of the Wisconsin consistory. He is a man of whom nothing 
but good is spoken, a thorough gentleman and a wholesome citizen, 
^illiam J. Hagenah, deputy commissioner of labor and industrial 
statistics and one of the leaders of the coming generation of bar- 
risters, was born in Reedsburg, Sauk county, Wis., Jan. 25, 1881. 
He is a son of John Henry and Catherine (Meyer) Hagenah. 
William J. Hagenah was educated in the Madiscn schools, graduat- 
ing from the English and science courses of the high school in 1899. 
In 1903 he was graduated from the academic department of the Uni- 
versity of Wisconsin with the degree of B. L. Two years later he com- 
pleted 'the law course in the same institution and was given the degree 
of LL. B. On March 7, 1906, he was made deputy commissioner of 
labor and industrial statistics and has been serving in that capacity 
since. From 1903 until his appointment to his present position he 
served as statistical clerk in the same department, keeping up his 
studies in the law school. Mr. Hagenah is a member of the Evan- 
gelical church and of the Phi Alpha Delta legal fraternity. During 
his collegiate course he was one of the leaders of the university on the 
forensic platform. He was leader of the debating team representing 
the University of Wisconsin which in 1903 defeated a team from 
the University of Iowa and the following year was on the team which, 
debated with and defeated the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor 
in 1904. He was one of the orators in both the 1903 and 1905 com- 
mencements and in 1901 was a member of the joint debate team. At 
present he is a special investigator for the Pennsylvania society for 
23— iii 



354 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

the prevention of cruelty to children. He was a delegate froim the 
state at large to the national convention of charities and corrections 
held at Philadelphia, May 9 to 16, 1906. Mr. Hagenah is unmarried. 
His friends predict a brilliant future for him. 

Stephen Haight, who owns and operates a large farm in the town 
of Christiania is a native of Wisconsin and son of one of its pioneers. 
His father, John T. Haight, was a native of Monkton, Vermont, and 
married Miss Elizabeth Holmes of the same place. He came to Wis- 
consin in 1832, lived at Fort Atkinson and Koshkonong, where he 
owned a farm and became prominent in territorial and state affairs. 
As attorney and surveyor he was interested in land titles in the new 
country, where much litigation ensued and he also took a prominent 
part in politics. A Democrat in political affiliations he represented 
his district in the legislature and held many minor offices. Five chil- 
dren were born to John Haight and wife; Mary E., who lives at the 
old home; Julia, also at home; Ann, the wife of George Pounder of 
Fort Atkinson, Wis. ; John T., who farms the old homestead and 
Stephen, the subject of this sketch. Stephen was born at Kosh- 
konong, Jefferson county, Wis., June 23, 1843, received such education 
as the schools of the district afforded at that time and lived at home 
until he was thirty-two years of age. In October, 1874, he married 
Miss Etta Ives and came to Dane county, town of Christiania, where 
he purchased a farm which has ever since been his home. Mrs. 
Haight is the daughter of Gideon and Mary Ann (Silverton) Ives, 
who were early settlters of Jefferson county. Mr. Ives was a native 
of Connecticut and Mrs. Ives of Canada. The marriage was blessed 
with four children; John T. is the principal of the Cambridge high 
school. He married M'ss Augusta Granger. George I. is a lawyer 
with offices at 134 S. Clark St., Chicago, 111. He was educated at 
Fort Atkinson, Madison and the Northwestern University, at Evans- 
ton, and has been in Chicago engaged in the practise of law since 
1889. W. Harrison attended the University of Wisconsin and was 
a student in the Northwestern University law school, where he was 
graduated with the class of 1906. Bert S. attended the agricultural 
college of the University of Wisconsin and is engaged with his father 
n the management of the farm. A large general farming business is 
carried on by the father and son and considerable tobacco raised, but 
their specialty is butter-making in which they are very successful. 
For seventeen years the butter from their farm has been shipped, to 
Congle Bros, of Chicago, 111. Mr. Ha'ght has a splendid farm of 
iwo hundred forty-five acres with one hundred sixty-five acres under 
cu 1 iivation and raises a fine breed of Holstein cattle and also Poland 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 355 

China hogs. Mr. Haigh't is a member of the Fort Atkinson Blue 
Lodge No. 139 of the Masonic Order and takes much interest in its 
affairs. 

John P. Halbach, the genial and efficient sheriff of Dane county 
during the term of 1905-1906, was born in Louisville, Ky., June 10 : 
1861. He was a son of Lewis and Henrietta (Stoltz) Halbach, 
natives of Germany. The father was born April 26, 1836, at Bruck- 
muekl-bach, Rhein Bavaria, and lost his life while working in a 
foundry, a heavy casting falling upon him and crushing him. His 
wife died a year previous, aged thirty-eight, leaving six children, — 
Lewis, now deceased ; Henrietta, now deceased ; John P., the sub- 
ject of this sketch ; Catherina, wife of Dr. Embery of Chicago ; Ed- 
ward Charles, superintendent of the Winslow Bros, company of 
New York ; and William, now foreman of a printing establishment 
in San Antonio, Tex. Two other children, an infant and Michael 
Lewis, passed away before the death of their mother. John P. 
Halbach received his education in the common schools of Louis- 
ville, Ky. There, also he learned the trade of harness maker. On 
coming to Madison he established the John J. Halbach Harness 
company, and has since successfully maintained it. Politically he 
is a Republican and before his elevation to the office of sheriff had 
served two terms as supervisor from the fourth ward of Madison. 
On May 29, 1882, Mr. Halbach married Cora, daughter of Zachariah 
and Martha Ramsdale. Mr. Ramsdale died October 5, 1901. aged 
sixty-eight years. Mrs. Ramsdale is still living and makes her 
home with her daughter. Mr. and Mrs. Halbach have one son,. 
Lewis Frank, a pupil in the high school. The sheriff is a member 
of the Masonic fraternity, the Benevolent and Protective Order of 
Elks, and the Modern Woodmen of America. Mrs. Halbach is a 
member of the Episcopal church. 

Francis Waterbury Hall, an attorney-at-law, member of the firm- 
of Tenney, Hall & Tenney and one of the leading members of the 
Madison bar, is descended through a long line of American ancestry,, 
being the eighth generation of the Waterbury family in America. He 
was born in the town of Medina, Dane county, Wis., Feb. 4, 1853, 
and is the son of Sylvester and Rebecca (Waterbury) Hall, the father 
being a native of Deerfield, N. Y., born August 23, 1807, also belong- 
ing to an old colonial family, and the mother a native of Massena, 
N. Y., born June 24, 1810. Sylvester Hall was the son of Benjamin 
G. and Esther (Taylor) Hall, the former having been born in Rhode 
Island in 1772. The Waterbury family — the maternal ancestry — was 



356 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

founded in America by John Waterbury, who came to Massachu- 
setts, and a little later to Stamford, Conn., in 1646, and the com- 
plete ancestral line from him to Francis W. Hall is as follows : 1st, 
John; 2nd, David; 3rd, John; 4th, Isaac; 5th, Peter; 6th, Sliadrach; 
7th, Rebecca; 8th, Francis Waterbury. Sergeant David Waterbury, 
the second in the Amierican line, was an officer in the colonial wars 
and it is from his services that the descendants of the present gener- 
ation are entitled to membership in the colonial patriotic societies. 
The Waterbury family rendered conspicuous service during the Revo- 
lutionary War. In "Heroes of the Revolution" the following state- 
ment is found: "There were four John Waterburys in the army, known 
as John, John, Jr.; John, 2nd; and John, 5." Of the one known as 
"John 2" it is said, "Although he was fifty-eight years old at the be- 
ginning of hostilities, he shouldered his musket and marched with 
the younger men." There were a number of other Waterburys in the 
Revolution, — most of them from Stamford, Conn., and among them 
Gen. David Waterbury, who raised the first regiment for the defense 
of New York, and Peter Waterbury, of whom there is found the fol- 
lowing in the Public Records of Connecticut, Vol. 2, under date ol 
October, 1779 : "Upon a memorial of Peter Waterbury, of Stamford, 
and Jesse Waring of Norfolk, showing the assembly that they be- 
longed to the coast-guards and were captured at Stamford and are 
now confined in the sugar-hause in New York and held as hostages," 
etc. Then follows an appeal for an exchange for two men named 
Hoit, and the record concludes: "Resolved by this assembly that his 
Excellency, the Governor, be, and hereby is, empowered and requested 
to make an exchange of said Waterbury and said Waring for said 
Hoits." Additional authority obtained from the town clerk's office of 
Stamford, from the "History of Stamford" and from the family 
records, identify this Peter Waterbury as the son of Isaac Waterbury 
the great grandfather of F. W. Hall of this sketch. Francis Water- 
bury Hall received his education at the Waterloo academy, the Eau 
Claire seminary and the University of Wisconsin, receivng 
from the last the degrees of A. M. and LL. B. He fitted himself for 
the practice of the legal profession and was admitted to the bar in 
1876, in Madison, where he practiced until 1879, and then removed 
to Portage, Wis., where he entered the ministry and officiated as pas- 
tor of the Methodist Episcopal church of that place for the ensuing 
three years. In 1883 he returned to Madison and resumed the prac- 
tice of law and has since been so engaged, his business connections 
having been as follows:' Hall & Hand; Sanborn & Hall; Smith, Rogers 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 357 

& Hall ; Rogers, Hall & Donovan ; Bushnell, Rogers & Hall ; Hall & 
Sheldon ;F. W. Hall ; Tenney, Hall & Tenney ; Tenneys, Hall, & Swan- 
son; and Tenney, Hall & Tenney. Any sketch of Mr. Hall's life 
which excluded his work as a teacher of Biblical law and literature 
would be incomplete. For a number of years he gave a course of lec- 
tures before the students of ancient classical literature of the Univer- 
sity of Wisconsin, on "Spirit and Prominent Characteristics of the 
Hebrew Code," "Public Insitutions Developed by the Code," "Com- 
parison between the Hebrew Code and the Fundamental Elements of 
Common Law," and "Hebrew Law in Civilization." A similar course 
developing somewhat more the literary characteristics of the Bible 
was given before the Biblical Literature department of the Downer 
College Endowment Association .and at Lawrence University. Pres- 
sure of other work :has compelled Air. Hall to decline many other invi- 
tations to lecture along this and other lines, although he has fre- 
quent calls both as a lyceum and campaign speaker; but he still re- 
tains his position as teacher of the students' class in the Meth- 
odist Episcopal church, and has won in that work a national reputa- 
tion. The class grew from about forty to one hundred and fifty with 
an average attendance of about one hundred. Mr. ,Hall uses the 
methods of the lawyer in the presentation of his lesson. A correspon- 
dent of the Sunday School Times says, "The central theme is seized 
upon at the start, details being grouped so* that it progressively 
stands out in bolder lines. Vividness is at the same, still farther in- 
creased by keen analytical questions, aptly put, that connect the 
theme with events within the experience, reading or imagination of 
his class." His "Lawyer's Notes on the International Lessons" have 
received very wide and favorable comment. Many of his students be- 
long to the law college and through them he exerts a wide influence 
which will be felt in the moral attitude of the Wisconsin bar of the im- 
mediate future. In politics Mr. Hall is independent, although in re- 
cent years he has usually voted with the Republican party and was a 
delegate tothe national convention at Chicago in 1904 He has al- 
ways declined to enter the field of politics as an aspirant for office, 
but ,has nevertheless taken an active part in all movements, political 
or other, pertaining to good government and the betterment of social 
conditions. During the struggle over the freight commission bill 
in 1903, in his speech before the assembly committee, the press of the 
state accredited him with "a speech so much more able than any other 
that has been made before any legislative committee recently as to be 
in a class by itself," and also "that it is sufficient for any one man to 



358 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

be known as the man who made that speech." He has contributed 
much to the advancement of the city of Madison, especially in the 
movements connected with the development of the public library and 
the establishment of the city hospital. The former he served as sec- 
retary for nineteen years, during- which time the beautiful new build- 
ing was erected; on the board of the latter he has served since its in- 
ception, selecting the site, and obtaining an option upon it. He was 
secretary for about three years — the difficult years of establishing the 
enterprise in public favor — and has since served as vice-president, 
treasurer and president, having held the last position for two years, 
and being at the present time at the head of the hospital board. His 
versatility is shown by his activities in these widely varying lines, in 
all of which his personality is strongly felt ; and to intellectual ability of 
unusual grasp and analytical power he has added the culture of ex- 
tensive travel and wide reading. Mr. Hall was married, November 
26, 1875, to Miss Mary J. Tuttle, a class-mate in the University, and 
a daughter of Stephen L. and Ann (Brabb) Tuttle, of Rockford, Kent 
county, Mich. Mrs. Hall belongs, on her father's side, to one of the 
most widely-known of the colonial families, and on her mother's, to 
one of the "county" families of Yorkshire, England. No children 
were born to Mr. and Mrs. Hall but they have an adopted son, Laur- 
ence Waterbury Hall, born March 15, 1899. Mr. Hall is a member of 
the Madison Lodge of Free and Accepted Masons. 

George W. H. Hall has spent all his life in Albion on the farm 
where he was born and is a well-informed and successful farmer. 
His farm contains two hundred and seventy acres, of which about 
two hundred and thirty are under cultivation and he has a fine 
equipment. Mr. Hall raises good crops of tobacco, grain, hay, etc., 
but devotes himself particularly to his stock, raising fine pure-bred 
short-horned cattle and Poland China hogs. Part of his large 
property he leases to a tenant and manages the remainder himself. 
George W. H. is the son of Samuel Hall of England and Ann 
(Wright) Hall, second wife of Samuel. Mr. Hall was a farmer in 
England but became dissatisfied with his prospects there and came 
to the United States in 1844 before his marriage. With his brother 
George, who accompanied him on the voyage he purchased one 
hundred acres of land from the United States government, located 
in the town of Albion and this was his home until his death. The 
property was afterward divided between the brothers. Three chil- 
dren were born to Mr. and Mrs. Hall ; Martha, who married Dexter 
Wilson of Edgerton ; George W. H., who lives at the old home; 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 359 

Sarah (deceased). George W. H. was born in Albion on the 
farm September 11, 1869, attended the district schools and the 
Albion Academy and early engaged in farming. February 22, 
1893, he married Miss Jessie B. Green, who was born in Dayton, 
Wis., daughter of Thomas Green of Albion. Two children blessed 
the marriage ; George H. and Dorothea Genevieve. The family 
are prominent members of the Primitive Methodist church of 
Albion, which Samuel Hall aided in organizing in the early days. 
Mr. Hall is an independent voter, preferring to vote for whom he 
considers the best man rather than to ally himself with any political 
party. , 

Rev. Hans H. Holte, pastor of the United Norwegian Lutheran 
church of America at Mt. Horeb. is a native of Norway, born 
December 15, 1867. He came to the United States with his parents 
when he was but one year old .and they first located at Spring 
Grove, Houston county, Minn. The father's name was the same 
as that of his son, and he followed the occupation of a tailor in his 
native land ; but became a farmer after coming to America. 
The family remained in Minnesota about twelve years and then re- 
moved to North Dakota, locating near Noble, in Cass county, 
where the parents resided until a short time ago. The subject ot 
this review is one of a family of eight children — five sons and three 
daughters — that were born to these parents. Mr. Holte remained 
at home until he was twenty-one years of age, and then attended 
school until he was ordained for the ministry. His education was 
received in St. Olaf college at Northfield, Minn., where he took 
a three-year course, and this was supplemented by attendance upon 
the Concordia college at Morehead, Minn., for three years ; and he 
also spent three years at the United Church Seminary at Minneapo- 
lis, from which last named institution he was graduated with the 
class of 1899. He was ordained at Minneapolis on September 14, 
1899, and immediately came to Mt. Horeb, where he has officiated 
ever since. He has a congregation that includes about eighty 
families, and he preaches each alternate Sunday in the Norwegian 
language, all other services, Sunday school work, etc.. being in 
English. Rev. Mr. Holte was married on June II, 1900, to> Miss Min- 
nie Thompson, of the town of Blue Mounds, and to this union there 
have been born two children: Esther Monica (died at the age of 
nine months), and Herman James, at home. 

Burton J. Halverson is one of the leading young farmers of the 
town of Medina and represents the third generation of his family in 



360 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

Dane county. His father, Asmund Halverson, was born in Norway 
in 1839, came with his parents to the United States in 1843 an( l lo- 
cated in Waukesha county. In 1848, the family moved to the town 
of Medina, where they obtained one hundred acres of government 
land. Asmund Halverson attendied the district school and always 
worked upon the home farm, aiding his father to clear and improve it. 
He married Miss Louisa A. Ellis, who was born in 'Waterbury, 
Conn., in 1840, and six children were born to the marriage, of whom 
three are living. Asmund was prominent in the community and ac- 
tive in political affairs, a member of the Republican party and the 
representative of Medina township upon the board of supervisors. 
He attended the Baptist church, of which his wife was a member. 
Mrs. Asmund Halverson died in 1891, and her husband in 1905. 
Burton J. Halverson was born in Medina, on the old farm, May 23, 
1877, educated in the home schools and the Medina free high school. 
He early engaged in farming and is now the owner of the old home- 
stead, a fine farm of one hundred twenty-six acres with many modern 
improvements. Dairy farming is his specialty and he keeps well- 
posted on .everything which leads to the improvement of methods and 
equipment for that business. Like his father, he is a Republican, 
interested in the welfare of the community, which his forefathers were 
instrumental in founding. 

George F. Halverson, general agent for Wisconsin for the 
Walter A. Wood Mower and Reaping Machine Company of Hoosic 
Falls, N. Y., was born in Dane county, Wis., December 27, 1864. 
He is a son of Osmund Halverson Sobier and Louise Ellis, the 
former a native of Norway, the latter of Connecticut. The father 
came to the United States with his parents when but three years 
of age in 1837, locating in Wisconsin. He was a farmer all his 
active life and held many offices of trust and honor, although he 
never sought them. When the sons became of age they changed 
the name from Halver Sobier to Halverson. The father died Jan- 
uary 1, 1905, at the age of sixty-eight. His wife's death occurred 
in her fifty-second year. She was a devout member of and earnest 
worker in the Baptist church, her father. Rev. Harmon Ellis, being 
a minister of that denomination who came to Wisconsin as a mis- 
sionary in the early days. The subject of this sketch is the oldest 
of five children. Harmon, a traveling salesman, makes his home 
in Sun Prairie. Vinnie died in her third year. Burton J. is oper- 
ating the home farm in the town of Medina. Vinton died when 
fifteen years of age. George F. Halverson received his scholastic 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 361 

education in Lake Mills, Wis. He remained on his father's farm 
until 1892 when he came to Madison to learn the machinist's trade. 
He acquired a knowledge of farm implements and machinery whicn 
induced him to enter that line of business and for the past fourteen 
years he has followed that line. On December 7, 1892, Mr. Halver- 
son was united in marriage to Miss Flora A., daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Allen Cobb of Sun Prairie. Five children have been born to 
this union, Lyne Harvey, Helen Jeanette, Ellis Cobb, George May- 
nard and Mary Lucile. The parents are members of the First 
Methodist Episcopal church and the father of the Free and Ac- 
cepted Masons and of the the Union Commercial Travellers. Mr. 
Halverson is considered one of the rising young business men of 
the community. 

Gunder Halverson, a prosperous farmer of the town of Pleasant 
Springs, was born near Shearne, Norway, June 25, 1835. He is the son 
of Halver and Margaret (Halverson) Jergunson, natives of Norway, 
wHo were devout members of the Lutheran church. Of their eight 
children only two are now living. John is farming in Norway. 
Gunder, the subject of this sketch, was the only member of the family 
to come to America, arriving in 1861 after a stormy passage of eight 
weeks. From Quebec he went to Whitewater, Wis., and from there 
to Menomonie, where he enlisted in the fall of 1862 in Company B, 
Fifth 'Wisconsin Infantry. His regiment took active parts in the bat- 
tles of Gettysburg and Fredericksburg and minor skirmishes 
and engagements. Gunder was overcome by heat during one of the 
campaigns and was sent to a Washington hospital. In 1864 he re- 
ceived an honorable discharge from the army and soon after purchased 
the place where he now lives, one hundred twenty acres in the town of 
Pleasant Springs. When he first moved onto the farm there was only 
a small clearing and a log house. All the improvements on the place 
were made by Mr. Halverson; the bank barn, thirty-six by fifty-four 
fee; was built in 1891 ; the home, an elegant structure, was erected 
in 1897. While tobacco is the chief product of the farm, there are 
many other crops raised. Politically Mr. Halvorson is a Republican. 
Like his parents, he is an ardent Lutheran and worships at the 
Western Lumeran church of Pleasant Springs. He has been twice 
married; his first wife was a Miss Oleson, who died in 1868, two years 
after her wedding. By his second wife, nee Betsy Holton, he has 
had six children, — Martin, educated at Stoughton Academy, a farmer 
in the town of Christiana ; Nora, Edwin and Rosella, all at home. 
The children have all attended the district school. Mr. Halverson is a 
member of the Stoughton post. Grand Army of the Republic. 



362 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

Hiat Halverson, deceased, was born in the town of Dunn, Dane 
county, Wis., May 20. 1850. He was a son of Stener and Dogena 
(Oualeyj Halverson. natives of Norway. Stener Halverson came 
to Wisconsin in 1345. settling in Milwaukee. After a short resi- 
dence there he went to Chicago, where he did teaming with oxen, 
often hauling loads of hay over what are now Chicago's principal 
thoroughfares. Land in the vicinity of what is now the business 
district of that city was selling at $1.25 an acre. After a few 
months of this labor Mr. Halverson came to Wisconsin again 
settling in Stoughton, on eighty acres of government land. For 
some two or three years he acted as a kind of guide for new set- 
tlers ; he would haul grain to Milwaukee and then conduct emi- 
grants to their new homes near Stoughton. An opportunit}^ was 
offered to secure a larger piece of land, so he sold his Stoughton 
farm and purchased one hundred and sixty acres in the town of 
Dunn, a portion of it on Lake Kegonsa. Here he built a log hut, 
making the roof of sod. The nearest neighbors were the Stough- 
ton people. It was not an unusual occurrence for the Indians to 
visit Mrs. Halverson while her husband was away. On one oc- 
casion a party of them came begging and Mrs. Halverson gave 
them some bread and pork. Not satisfied with that they demanded 
the blankets and when refused them they raised their tomahawks 
and threatened Mrs. Halverson's life. She was equal to the oc- 
casion, however, and snatching a large knife from the table she 
raised is above her head and drove the Indians from the yard in 
confusion. As an illustration of the laziness of the red man, Mr. 
Halverson often told of an Indian who came to him one day while 
he was threshing beans and begged for some. Mr. Halverson 
agreed to give him the beans, but told the applicant that he would 
have to thresh them himself. The Indian spread his blanket, put 
the beans into it, took the heavy flail and started to work. He had 
taken no more than half a dozen strokes, when he threw down the 
flail in disgust, caught up his blanket, scattering the beans to the 
right and the left, and strode away. Mr. Halverson remained 
on this farm until his death, having added to it from time to time 
until it contained four hundred and six acres. His estate also in- 
cluded two hundred acres in the town of Dunkirk, part of which is 
now Halverson's addition to the city of Stoughton. In 1889 he 
divided his estate among his four children, remaining of the eight 
born to him, two sons in the town of Dunn, a daughter in Stough- 
ton and a son in Boone county, Neb. Hiat Halverson received his 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 363 

•education in the Albion Academy. When a mere boy he started 
life as a farm hand, and later went to Nebraska. Five years of his 
life were put in here as a farm hand ; at the end of that time he 
returned to Wisconsin where, on March 1, 1887, he married Martha, 
daughter of Andrew and Sigre Maria (Larson) Torson, natives of 
Norway. Mrs. Halverson first saw the light of day in Norway on 
September 1, 1854. Of her father's family of ten children, seven 
.are living, five in this country, — Louisa (Mrs. Amdrew Johnson) ot 
the town of Rutland; Josephine (Mrs. Lewis Johnson) of the town 
of Dunn ; xAugust and Samuel, of Taylor county, Mich. ; and Mrs. 
Halverson. Shortly after their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Halverson 
"went back with a brother of Mr. Halverson to Nebraska, where 
the two brothers purchased one hundred sixty acres of land in 
Boone county. Upon the division of the father's estate in 1889 
Hiat Halverson received the homestead and one hundred and seven 
acres of land. He immediately returned and took up his residence 
there. On November 13, 1899, Mr. Halverson died, leaving a 
widow and one child, a daughter, Dogena, eleven years old. 
Mrs. Halverson and the child still occupy the old homestead. 

Louis A. Halverson is the buttermaker of the Medina Cheese and 
Butter Company, which he has managed successfully for some years. 
He was born in Waukesha county, Wis., Aug. 30, 1858, of Norwegian 
parentage, lived with his parents at Deerfield, Dane county, Wis., 
where he engaged in farming for a number of years. Since 1893, he 
has been occupied with the manufacture of dairy products, especially 
butter and cheese. Dec. 15, 1897, he married Miss Fannie Griffin, 
who was born in Illinois, daughter of Winston J. and Anna (Thomp- 
son) Gnffin. Three children were born to the marriage: Leo Griffin, 
Neal Fenton and Ethel Anne. Osborn Halverson, father of 
Louis A., was born in Norway in 1833, came to the United States 
with his parents when he was ten years old, lived for a short time on 
a farm in Waukesha county and later in Deerfield, where he died in 
1889. Halver and Betsey Aspenson, the first representatives of the 
family in Dane county, came to the United States from Norway in 
1843 an d settled in Medina in 1848, where they owned a farm of 
one hundred twenty-six acres and there resided the remainder of their 
lives. Their son, Osborn Halverson, married Miss Olena Heimdal, 
also a native of Norway, who came to Dane county with her parents 
in 1843. Of their family of six children but three are living. Osborn 
Halverson was a farmer and he and his wife were associated with the 
Lutheran church. Winston Griffin, father of Mrs. Louis Halverson, 



364 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

was the son of John and Martha (Winston) Griffin, Virginians of 
Irish ancestry. The father, John Griffin, was born in Culpepper 
county, Va., in 1770, and died in 1851. He married Martha Winston, 
who was born in 1774, near Richmond, Va., as was also their son, 
Winston J., in 1810. The family moved to Kentucky in 181 5 and 
settled near Harrodsburg. Winston Griffin married Miss Anna 
Thompson who was born near Zanesville, Ohio, May 22, 1824. Her 
father was also born near Zanesville, Ohio, in 1790 and died in 1876 
aged eighty-six. Her mother nee Lydia Bowers, born in 1792, was 
a native of the same place, and died in hJdgar county, 111., in 1846. 
Winston J. Griffin diedl in his seventy-sixth year, but his widow is 
still living, well and hearty at the advanced age of eighty-one years. 
Mrs. Halverson is a member of the Methodist church. Mr. Halverson 
is a Democrat but does not take a very active part in political affairs. 
Melvin S. Halverson, a representative furniture dealer and fu- 
neral director of the city of Stoughton, claims the old Badger state 
as the place of his nativity, having been born in Manitowoc, Wiscon- 
sin, November 7, 1879. He is the son of Simeon and Matilda (Ter- 
kelson) Halverson, both native of Norway, and his paternal grand- 
father was Halver Oaas, who came from Norway to America and set- 
tled in Manitowoc county, Wisconsin, about 1855, there purchasing 
and reclaiming one hundred acres of land and becoming one of the in- 
fluential farmers of that section, where he continued to reside until 
his death, in 1899. Of his children Ole and Simeon are deceased, and 
those living are Aslak, Christopher, Gurine (Mrs. Thomas Aslakson), 
Annie M. (Mrs. Christian Jacobson), and Karen. Simeon Halverson, 
father of him whose name initiates this sketch, was reared to man- 
hood in Manitowoc county, and his entire active career was one of close 
and successful identification with the great basic industry of agricul- 
ture. He cleared and improved a farm of one hundred acres, and on this 
homestead he remained until his death, which occurred in 1895, at 
which time he was fifty-seven years of age. His widow died twelve 
days later at the age of fifty-four. They reared a family of seven 
children: Hans, Anna (wife of Oscar Gunderson), Christopher, Louis, 
Martin, Melvin S. and Norman. Melvin S. Halverson was reared 
to manhood in his native county, where he early became inured to the 
sturdy discipline of the home farim and where he received the advan- 
tages of the public schools. At the age of seventeen years he initi- 
ated his independent career, taking up the vocation of chimney sweep- 
ing and following the same for four months. He then secured a po- 
sition as clerk in one of the larger merchantile establishments in Man- 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 365 

itowoc, continuing in his line of occupation two years, at the expira- 
tion of which, in 1899, he took up his residence in Stoughton, where 
he entered the Stoughton Academy, in which he completed an eight 
months' business course, after which he served four years as book- 
keeper, two years with the Stoughton Wagon Company and two with 
the Mandt Wagon Company. March 29, 1904, he engaged in the 
furniture and undertaking business in this city, being associated in the 
enterprise with E. J. Kjolseth, under the firm name of Kjolseth & Hal- 
verson, until November 14, 1905, when the partnership was dissolved 
by mutual consent, Mr. Halverson purchasing the interests of his 
partner and having individually continued the business since that 
time. He is a progressive business man and loyal citizen, is a Repub- 
lican in his political proclivities, is affiliated with the Knights of 
Pythias, and both he and his wife are members of Christ church, Nor- 
wegian Lutheran. October 15, 1902, Mr. Halverson was married to 
Miss Sena Erdahl, daughter of Guilder and Trine (Felland) Erdahl, of 
Stoughton, and they have one child, Esther Margaret. 

Nels Halvorsen (Kalhagen), the efficient and popular superin- 
tendent of the shops of the Stoughton Wagon Company and repre- 
sentative of the third ward on the board of alderman of the city 
of Stoughton was born on the farm Kalhagen in Holmedal, Prae- 
stagields, on July 4, 1852. He is a son of Gaardman Halvor xA.n- 
derson Kalhagen and his wife Oline Thorsdatter. The schools of 
his native land afforded him his early educational advantages, and 
there also he served an apprenticeship at the trade of cabinetmaker, 
tot which he devoted his attention about five years. Later he was 
employed for a similar period as a ship carpenter and while acting 
in this capacity visited the East and W r est Indies. In 1884 he 
came to the United States, taking up his residence in Stoughton, 
where he has since continued to make his home. For the first six 
months he was employed at the carpenter's trade, working for 
Lars Vingum. and he then entered the employ of the Stoughton 
Wagon company, with whom he has since remained and in whose 
shops, by faithful and able service, he has worked his way up to 
his present responsible position. He has the confidence and 
esteem of his employers and of the men who work under his direc- 
tion. He has been incumbent of the office of shop superintendent 
since 1894. He is the inventor of the first and only anti-tip bob- 
sleighs in America, as well as the Vicking bolster spring for 
wagons, steel bolster sticks for lumber wagons, skeins for double 
trusses on lumber wagons, steel-bent hounds for the same class of 



366 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

vehicles, and other useful devices which are utilized by the com- 
pany by which he is employed. He is a stanch advocate of the 
principles of the Republican party and takes a lively interest in 
public affairs in his home city. He is serving his first term as a 
member of the board of aldermen, representing the third ward. 
He and his family are members of the First Norwegian Lutheran 
church, and he is affiliated with Social Lodge No. 60, Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows. September 27. 1883, Mr. Halvorsen was 
united in marriage to Jannikke Ostensdatter Haaland, the daughter 
of Osten Bergentsen Haaland and his wife Johanne Jensdatter. 
She was born March 26, 1852. Mr. and Mrs. Halvorsen have six 
children, namely: Jennie T., Laura O, Ada E., Harry B., 
Geneva A., and Esther C. 

Halvor Halvorson is one of the prominent farmers and influential 
citizens of Blooming Grove township, and is present chairman of 
the township board of supervisors. Mr. Halvorson was born in 
the township which is now his home, the date of his nativity hav- 
ing been April 22, 1852. He is a son of Evan and Anna (Olsen) 
Halvorson, both of whom were born and reared in Norway, the 
former having been born in 1810 and the latter February 14, 1817. 
They were numbered among the pioneers of Dane county, where 
the father became a prosperous farmer, in Blooming Grove town- 
ship, where he died June 24, 1901 ; his widow still resides on the 
old homestead and is in excellent health, though nearing the age 
of four score years. The subject of this sketch is administrator of 
his father's estate. Halvor Halvorson received limited educational 
advantages in his youth, having attended the district schools in an 
irregular way. His father greatly objected to his securing an 
English education being loyal to the language of his native land, 
but the son has made good this early handicap, having been a close 
observer and having gained a wide fund of information and definite 
knowledge through personal application and through active asso- 
ciation with men and affairs. He was reared to the sturdy dis- 
cipline of the farm, and when he initiated his independent career 
he took up such legitimate labor as would render him due returns, 
following principally pursuits of a mechanical nature. In 1881 he 
became a fully qualified mason and plasterer, and he followed his 
trade as a vocation about fifteen years, after which he engaged in 
farming, in Pleasant Springs township, where he remained two 
years, at the expiration of which he purchased his present finely 
improved homestead, in section 21, Blooming Grove township, 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 367 

where he has a landed estate of two hundred and seven acres. He 
is a man of marked executive ability and indomitable energy, and 
the results are shown in the thrift and prosperity so evident in his 
attractive farmstead. Mr. Halvorson is generous, genial and 
kindly, progressive in his ideas and ever ready to lend his aid and 
influence in the support of all measures advanced for the general 
good of the community. His pleasant home is a center of hos- 
pitality, and the family is prominent in the social life of the com- 
munity. Mr. Halvorson is aligned as a stanch supporter of the 
principles and policies of the Democratic party, and is one of the 
leaders in public affairs in his township. He served two years as 
township treasurer, and was chairman of the township board of 
supervisors from March 27, 1892, to March 26, 1896, while in 1902 
he was again elected supervisor, and has since been re-elected each 
year, his last election having occurred on April 4, 1905. He is 
the present chairman of the board and in his official capacity he 
has done much to further the best interests of the township and 
county. He and his family are members of the Norwegian Luth- 
eran church. On October 11, 1880, Mr. Halvorson was united in 
marriage to Miss Carry Johnson, who was born May 29, 1859, a 
daughter of Hans and Carry (Yvesager) Johnson, of Blooming 
Grove township. Mr. and Mrs. Halvorson have one son, Theo- 
dore E., who was born January 3, 1881, and who is associated with 
his father in the work and management of the home farm. He 
married Miss Sarah Anderson, who was born in Norway, March 15, 
1882, and they have one child, Harley Cornelius, who was born 
July 26, 1904. 

Jacob Halvorson is a prominent farmer near Dahleville, where 
he owns a large farm, one of the best equipped in this section of the 
country. He is the son of Halvor Evenson, who was born in Norway, 
spent his entire life there and died in i860. Halvor Evenson marred 
Hagg Jacobson and after the death of her husband Mrs. Evenson, in 
1861, came to the United States with her two sons and two* daughters. 
The family all worked together to gain a foothold and in 1866 bought 
a farm in the town of York, where Mrs. Evenson lived until her death 
in 1896. Jacob was born in Telemarken, Norway, Dec. 25, 1844, had 
but little opportunity to go to school and assisted his mother in every 
way possible after the arrival of the family in Wisconsin. When they 
became established he purchased a farm in Iowa county, containing 
one hundred twenty acres to which he has since added eighty acres. 
This property Mr. Halverson retained, gradually cleared it. brought 



368 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

almost all of it under cultivation and added substantial buildings, 
modern farm machinery, etc. For many years he has carried on a 
general farming business with which he has been very successful and 
he now contemplates the sale of his property and retirement from ac- 
tive business. A brother of Mr. Halvorson, Evan, resides near, 
and Turil who married Ona Killeswick, resides in the town of York, 
Green county. In October, 1870, Jacob married Miss Turbier Olson, 
who was born irri Norway in 1837, daughter of Ole and Tngebor Olson, 
and four children were born to the marriage. Henry the oldest, re- 
sides in South Dakota, Ole Andreas in Dodgeville, John at home and 
Hannah Maria in Los Angeles, Cal. The family is identified with 
the Norwegian Lutheran church. Mr. Halvorson is a Republican and 
has served as school clerk for three terms. 

Rev. John Halvorson, who has in his charge the Lutheran con- 
gregation of Rockdale was born in Stavanger City, Norway, De- 
cember 4, 1861, and came to the United States with his parents 
when he was but ten years old. At the age of eighteen, after being 
graduated from Luther college, he entered Northwestern university 
at Watertown, Wis., and was graduated in 1881. He studied 
theology in Concordia seminary, St. Louis, and at Luther seminary. 
Madison, and when he was ordained in 1884 was prepared to hold 
services in any one of three languages. Soon after his ordination 
he was called to Mayville, N. Dak., next took charge of the church 
of Norway Lake, Minn., and then of Zion church of Minneapolis. 
In 1902 he came to Rockdale. From 1890 to 1894, he was English 
lecturer at the Norwegian Luther seminary in Minneapolis and 
also preached often in English. In 1889. he married Miss Bertha 
Glesne of Norway Lake, Minn., the first white person born in that 
township. Their family consists of seven children : Ella Clara. 
Elmer N., Sigurd J., Inga M.. Ruth E., Victor D., and Signe J. C. 
Rev. John Halvorson is the son of Zacharias and Ellen (Peterson) 
Halvorson of Stavanger City, Norway, who were members of the 
Norwegian Lutheran church. Zacharias was a baker by trade but 
entered the marble business in Marshalltown, Iowa, where he 
located upon his arrival in the west. After three years in Mar 
shalltown he moved with his family to Decorah. which was his 
home the reaminder of his life and is still the home of his widow. 
He was trustee and secretary of the Norwegian Lutheran church 
of that community. Of the seven children of Zacharias Halvorson. 
but three are now living. The Rockdale church, of which Mr. 
Halvorson has charge, is the out-growth of the old East Kosh- 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 369 

konong Synod church, which was organized in 1844 and became 
part of the first Norwegian Evangelical Lutheran Synod of Amer- 
ica, containing twenty-seven other organizations at its beginning. 
The East Koskonong church is the oldest of these united churches 
and the mother of many others. Its first pastor was Rev. J. W. C. 
Dietrichson, the second, Rev. A. C. Preuss, then for thirty-one years 
Rev. I. A. Otteson. He was followed in 1891 by Rev. D. G. Ristad 
and since 1902, the parish has been under the care of Rev. John Hal- 
vorson. The latter is interested in Scandinavian history and 
literature and particularly in the lives and careers of his com- 
patriots in the United States and has published a historic account 
of the Norwegian Evangelical Lutheran Synod, part of a complete 
history of representative Scandinavians of the United States. He 
is also the author of a treatise on the Minnesota district of the 
synod. 

Henry A. Ham, a well-known Stoughton butcher, served his ap- 
prenticeship with his father in England, where Henry was born and 
grew to manhood. The home of the family was Congressburg, 
Somersetshire, England, and there Edward Ham and his father, Jo- 
seph, were butchers for many years. Henry was born in Congress- 
burg, March 8, 1848, son of Edward and Emma (Baker) Ham and 
was apprenticed to h's father until he reached the age of twenty-one 
years, when he came to the United States and located at Whitewater, 
Wis. There he was butcher and farmer for ten years and in 1879 
moved to Stoughton, which has since been his home. In 1881 the 
firm of Nye & Ham opened a market in Stoughton and after one year 
the partnership was dissolved and Mr. Ham continued in business 
alone. Until 1902 he carried on a most successful business by him- 
self and at that t'me retired and was succeeded by his son George, 
who has since carried on the business. George Ham has a finely 
equipped market furnished with all modern appliances and conducted 
in a thoroughly scientific manner. April 2, 1867, Mr. Ham married 
Miss Martha Alvis, a native of Congressburg and daughter of John 
and Eliza (Ball) Alvis. Tour jchildren blessed the marriage; 
George, Anne, who married Andrew Swenson, Hattie M., the wife 
of Griffith Jehu and Dot E., who is Mrs. John Connor. The daughters 
were all born in Whitewater. George, the only son, was born in 
Congressburg, England, August 15, 1868 and was but ten months old 
when his parents brought him to Whitewater. He attended the 
Whitewater schools and followed in occupation, the footsteps of his 
father and grandfathers. Mr. Ham is a Republican in his political 
24— iii 



370 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

sympathies and is always ready to do his share to promote the best 
interests of the community. He owns a substantial business block of 
three stores on East Main street in Stoughton and a pleasant home. 
His energy and ability have made him prominent in the ranks of 
Stoughton business men. 

Edward C. Hammersley, one of the representative farmers of the 
town of Madison, was born at Barnett, England, November 20, 1847. 
His parents, William and Ann (Barwise) Hannmersley, were both na- 
tives of that country, the former of Cheshire and the latter o( Liver- 
pool. The father was a farmer, dairyman and veterinary surgeon 
prior to his coming to this country. In January, 1850, he landed in 
America, and the same year located on eighty acres of wild land in the 
town of Madison. Early in the Civil War he enlisted in Company L. 
Third Wisconsin cavalry, and served as a veterinary surgeon until his 
death, which occurred at Little Rock, Ark., in 1864. His widow 
survived him until March 5, 1888. Their children were Elizabeth, 
Sarah, Edward C, William and Ann, (twins) George, Harriet and 
Mariam. Edward C. Hammersley 's opportunities to acquire an edu- 
cation were extremely limited, as the death of his father made it nec- 
essary for him to aid in the support of the family. He therefore 
stayed at home, cleared his father's estate of indebtedness, and upon 
arriving at maturity began life for himself on rented land. After a 
few years in this manner he bought eighty acres where he now lives, 
improved it and added to it until he now owns nearly six hundred 
acres in Dane county, besides other property. For many years he 
dealt in live stock, and has been prominently indentified in real estate 
transactions. Politically Mr. Hammersley is a Democrat'. For 
some time he served as clerk of the school board, and was for nine 
years treasurer of the town of Madison. On September 15, 1880, he 
married Miss Ella A., daughter of Andrus and Alary (Lemon) Viall, 
and to this marriage have been born the following children. Charles 
Edward, an attorney, living at home with his parents, Ellen, now a 
student at the state university; Fay, a farmer, attended the Wisconsin 
Academy; Mildred and George, both students at the Wisconsin Acad- 
emy, and Morris, attending the district schools. Mr. Hammersley is 
a fine example of a self-made man. Beginning life in the most hum- 
ble circumstances, he has risen to his present social and business 
standing by his own energy and a strict adherence to correct principles, 

Robert Alexander Hammond resides on the farm in Cottage 
Grove township, on which he was born, the date of his nativity 
having been August 18, 1855. It is interesting to note the fact that 
all of his children have been born in the same house and room in 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 371 

which he himself was ushered into the world. He is one of the 
prominent farmers and popular citizens of his native township and 
county and represents one of the sterling- pioneer families of this 
section of the state. His father, Alexander Hammond, was born 
at historic old Fort Ticonderoga, New York, June 22, 1800, and 
died September 28, 1879, at the age of seventy-nine years. He 
.took up his residence on the present homestead farm of the subject 
of this review in the year 1815, and he reclaimed the same from the 
virgin forest, thus aiding materially in forwarding the march of 
improvement in this now attractive agricultural district. His wife, 
whose maiden name was Caroline Brown, was born in the state of 
Pennsylvana, in 1821, and came with her parents, Roswell Brown 
and wife, to Cottage Grove in 1837. She survived her husband by 
many years, her death occurring on February 13, 1893. Of their 
children it may T>e recorded that three died in infancy. Emma 
who became the wife of Frank B. Marble, is now deceased; Joann 
is the wife of George M. Kelly, of Cottage Grove township ; and 
Robert Alexander is the younger of the two surviving chilnren 
He was educated in the district schools, which he attended in an 
irregular way, his advantages being limited, as schools were not 
of high standard in this vicinity in his boyhood. He assisted in the 
reclamation and other work of the farm, and has always made his 
home on the place, which comprises one hundred and sixty acres, 
in section 20. Good buildings add to the attractions of the home- 
stead, while all departments of the farm show careful and effective 
management on the part of the progressive owner. Mr. Hammond 
gives his political allegiance to the Republican party and has served 
two terms as a member of the township board of supervisors. He 
and his wife are members of the Presbyterian church. On May 
7, 1877. Mr. Hammond was united in marriage to Miss Annie Ar- 
thur, who was born in County Deny, Ireland, on November 8, 1856, 
being a daughter of Samuel and Eliza (Steel) Arthur, both natives 
of County Derry, Ireland, the. former of whom was born March 19, 
1831. and the latter in 1826. The family came to the United States 
in 1858, and came directly to Cottage Grove, Dane county. Both 
died on their horn stead in Cottage Grove, the father in November 
5, 1899. and the mother on April 5, 1890. To Mr. and Mrs. Ham- 
mond have been born six children, namely Mary Maud, who was 
born March 10. 1880, and who is the wife of C. J. Nelson, of 
Stoughton, Wisconsin ; Arthur Asa, who was born September 28, 
1881, on the home farm ; Harry Howard, who was born June 7, 
1883, and who died in infancy; Edith Emma, who was born July 13- 



372 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

1885 and who died in infancy ; Olive May, who was born December 
13, 1889; and Robert Lee, who was born February 18, 1895. 

Gisle Julson Hamre was, for the greater part of his life, a farmer 
in the town of Christiana and still owns two hundred and twenty-five 
acres of farm property in the township, which he leases, having- retired 
from active business life. He is the son of Jule and Anna Gisleson, 
who were natives of Nummedahl, Norway, married there and came to 
the United States in 1842. They made Wisconsin their goal and after 
the long journey across the ocean and thence by the lakes to Milwaukee, 
they procured a team to bring them to Dane county and obtained a 
farm in section 33, Christiana. Helick, brother of Jule, who came to 
Portage in 1838, soon joined them and purchased a farm in section 28. 
They were among the first settlers of the district. The home of -Jule 
consisted of two hundred acres of wild land, with a log cabin and this 
the young couple improved and always made their home. Six chil- 
dren were born to them, of whom four are living ; Gisle J. is the oldest 
son; Christian lives in Christiania ; Jule J. and Alex, are farmers of 
Christiania. The family have always been devoted members of the 
East church of Christiania. Gisle Julson was born in Nummedahl, 
Norway, April 1, 1840, and came with his parents to America when he 
was two years old. He attended the home schools and assisted his 
parents with the farm and lived at home until he was twenty-six years 
of age. IWith his brother Guilder he purchased a farm of one hundred 
acres in section 34 and this they worked together for four years. In 
September, 1870, he married Miss Martha Peterson, who was born in 
Gubensthal, Norway in 1843, daughter of Peter Evenson and Bertha 
( Larson) Evenson. Mrs. Hamre came from Norway with her 
biothers and sisters in 1869. Of a family of five she is the only sur- 
vivor. After their marriage, Mr. and Mrs. Hamre lived on the old 
homestead in Christiania for some years and then moved to Utica. 
They are members of the East church of Christiania. Mr. Hamre is 
a Democrat in his political affiliations, as was his father, but has never 
desired to hold office. 

John K. Hamre is a retired farmer of Morrisonville. who came to 
Wisconsin from Norway. His parents, K!. G. and Tura (Malend) 
Hamre, were natives of Norway and lived upon a farm. Of their 
four children John K. is the only survivor. Mr. K. G. Hamre died 
in 1884 and his wife in 1848. John K. was born in Norway, January 
15, 1844, was educated in Norway and there engaged in trade with the 
tarmers, from whom he bought farm produce and to whom he delivered 
manufactured goods from the city. For five years he owned and 
managed a farm in Norway, which he afterward sold in eleven differ- 



. BIOGRAPHICAL. 373 

ent sections, each a farm. In 1868, he married Miss Bertha S. 
Meland, daughter of Sjur and Anna (Tjugen) Meland, of Norway. 
In 1874, Mr. Hamre came to the United States, with the intention 
of making it his home and lie purchased a farm of one hundred and 
twenty acres in Leeds township, Columbia county, Wis, In 1875, he 
brought his family to the new home and there resided until 1902, 
when he moved to Morrisonville. The farm was ,added to until it 
comprised four hundred and thirty-five acres and is a well equipped 
and valuable property. Mr. Hamre also ownes an eighty-acre tract 
one-half mile from Morrisonville Eleven children were born to Mr. 
and Mrs. Hamre; Knudt, Turi, and Sjur (deceased) were born in 
Norway. The other children were born in Spring Prairie, Wis.; 
Eddie, Carrie (deceased), John, Carl, Benne (deceased) Anna, Benne 
and Joseph. The family attends the Lutheran church. Mr. Hamre 
is a member of the Republican party but not active in political affairs. 
He is extensively interested in gold, copper and coal mines and is a 
stock-holder in the Alaska Central Ry. 

Christian Hansen. — In the great competitive struggle of life, 
where each must enter the field and fight his way to the front, or 
else be overtaken by disaster of time and place, there is ever par- 
ticular interest attaching to the career of one who has turned the 
tide of success and gained the haven of substantial prosperity 
through well directed personal effort. Christian Hansen, president 
and manager of the Wisconsin Wagon Company, manufacturers 
of high-grade carriages and delivery wagons, in the city of Madi- 
son, has indelibly impressed his influence on the commercial his- 
tory of the capital city, has proved a force in local industrial affair j 
and aided in furthering the commercial advancement of his city 
and county, while he has never failed to realize the responsibilities 
which success imposes, having ordered his life on a high plane of 
honor and integrity. Mr. Hansen was the founder of the flourish- 
ing and important enterprise at whose head he now stands. The 
Wisconsin Wagon Company dates its inception back to August 
20, 1874, while the concern was duly incorporated under the laws 
of the state, in 1883, with the present executive corps, comprising 
Mr. Hansen and his two sons. He is president and manager, as 
has already been noted : Clarence S., is secretary, and Harry E., 
treasurer. The business was started on a very modest scale, the 
original location of the little shop and salesroom having been on 
Webster street, between King and Main streets, where operations 
were continued, with gradual expansion of the facilities of the 
plant, until 1883, when the present finely equipped building was 



374 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

erected by the company, on Blair street, the cost of the same, with 
the improvements now represented in the plant, being about ten 
thousand dollars. In this building the company manufacture the 
best grade of carriages, buggies and delivery wagons and also do 
general repair work in this line, employing skilled artisans in the 
handling of all details of manufacture. They also deal in medium 
and high-grade carriages and other vehicles in addition to those of 
their own manufacture, having a well appointed emporium for all 
finished work, while the trade controlled is large and representa- 
tive, indicating the reliability of the products of the factory and 
the correct business methods which have begotten popular confi- 
dence and support. The trade of the company extends throughout 
the wide section of the territory of which Madison is the normal 
commercial and distributing center, and also ramifies into other 
states than Wisconsin, while it is constantly expanding in scope 
and importance. An average of ten men is retained in the employ 
of the company in carrying forward the work of the plant and sales 
departments, while the entire capital stock of the concern is held 
by Mr. Hansen and his sons, who are numbered among the repre- 
sentative business men and honored citizens of Madion. Chris- 
tian Hansen comes of stanch Danish lineage, and was born in 
Schleswig-Holstein, Germany, which was then a Danish province, 
on June 2, 1852, being a son of Hans and Catherine (Mueller) Han- 
sen, who were natives of the same place, where they passed their 
entire lives, Germany acquiring the province through force of arms 
in 1864. George Jorgenson. a half-brother of Christian Hansen, 
was at that time in the military service of Denmark and took part 
in the conflict with the German forces. In 1867, having previously 
availed himself of the excellent advantages of the schools of his 
native province, Mr. Hansen entered upon an apprenticeship at the 
trade of carriage woodworking, in the town of Nordborg, on the 
island of Alsen, where he remained until 1870, when the Franco- 
Prussian war broke out. Having no desire to be drafted into the 
service of the German empire, Mr. Hansen, with a few personal 
effects, made his way to Denmark's capital, the city of Copenhagen, 
and about two weeks later he decided to seek his fortunes in 
America, having a good knowledge of his trade and being ani- 
mated by that self-reliance and determination which have been the 
main factors in securing his advancement in life. From Copen- 
hagen he sailed to England and thence proceeded to Glasgow, Scot- 
land, finally embarking for New York city, where he landed late 
in July of the year mentioned, his capitalistic reinforcement at the 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 375 

time being represented in about fifty dollars in gold. At that 
period gold still commanded a premium in the United States, but 
as he was not aware of this fact and was not familiar with local 
customs, he failed to realize the advance which due him on ex- 
changing his gold for the currency of the country. From New 
York Mr. Hansen made his way to Chicago and thence to Madison, 
making his advent in Wisconsin's capital city on September 12. 
1870, and securing work as a day laborer on the construction of 
the Chicago & Northwestern Railroad, whose line was at that time 
being extended into Madison. Young Hansen had not been ac- 
customed to wielding a shovel, and his hands showed a full com- 
plement of well developed blisters ere he had worked long in his 
new field of endeavor, but he persisted in his efforts until some- 
thing better offered. He finally secured work at his trade, enter- 
ing the employ of T. E. Bird, of Madison, with whom he remained 
until the spring of 1873, after which he was engaged in work, for 
short intervals, in Rockford and Chicago, 111., and Janesville and 
Baraboo, Wis., returning to Madison in 1874 and engaging in busi- 
ness for himself, as designated in the earlier part of this article. 
It is most gratifying to note the success which has resulted from 
his earnest and well directed endeavors, his factory being now one 
of the largest of the sort in this section of the state, while his repu- 
tation as a business man and as a loyal citizen is of the highest. 
His career has been a somewhat varied and eventful one, but he 
has pressed steadily forward to a definite goal and has gained that 
independence and prestige which such application and worthy effort 
ever justify. In politics Mr. Hansen gives his allegiance to the 
Democratic party, and he always manifests a deep interest in the 
civic and material welfare of his beautiful home city, though never 
seeking office of any description. In a fraternal way he is affiliated 
with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. October 30, 1875, 
was solemnized the marriage of Air. Hansen to Miss Margaret Wil- 
son, who was born and reared in Dane county. Wis., being a daugh- 
ter of Thorbjon Wilson, an honored pioneer of this part of the state. 
The children of this union are three in number, — Harry E., 
Daisy E.. and Clarence S., the sons being associated with their 
father in business, as already noted, and beinp- numbered among 
the prominent and popular young business men of the capital city. 
The children belong to Grace Episcopal church. 

Henry Drury Hanson, Jr., the editor of the Oregon Observer, was 
born April 18, 1862. in Dunkirk, Dane county. His father Henry D. 
Hanson, St., was born in Lincolnshire, England, and came to the Uni- 



376 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

ted States in 1851, when twenty-one years old. His mother Sarah 
(Filling-ham) Hanson, was also English by birth, and came to this 
country a year later. Mr. Hanson stayed for a few months in the 
vicinity of Buffalo, N. Y. and then came on to Rock county, Wis., 
where he became acquainted with his wife; they settled in Dunkirk, 
and bought sixty acres of land there, which he still owns and has in- 
creased to one hundred" acres. Mrs. Hanson died July 20, 1904, after 
the family had, moved to Stoughton, where Mr. Hanson still resides. 
Henry D. Hanson, Jr., is one of a family of eight, three sons and five 
daughters, all of whom are living except one daughter. He was edu- 
cated in Hanerville school, and later attended Milton college. He was 
only sixteen when he started out for himself, and worked By the 
month for two years, and then attended Milton college for three ; in 
March, 1884, he bought out a one-half interest in the Oregon Ob- 
server, and six months later his partner sold to E. B. Owen, and the 
firm was Hanson & Owen until July, 1885, when Mr. Hanson pur- 
chased the entire interest. The Observer is Republican in politics, and 
during his management of it, Mr. Hanson has built up the circulation 
from three hundred to one thousand subscribers, beside increasing the 
size of the paper. Mr. Hanson is a member of the Presbyterian church ; 
lie was married June 16, 1897, to Miss Mabel Johnson, daughter of 
C. D. and Lucy Johnson, of Oregon village. Mrs. Hanson was born 
in Dunn township, and was a teacher in the Oregon schools before her 
marriage; she has since served three years on the board of education. 
Mr. Hanson has served on the village board and as village treasurer, 
several times. He is a Royal Arch Mason, and belongs to the 
I. O. O. F., the Modern Woodmen and the Eastern Star. Mrs. 
Hanson also belongs to the Eastern Star and is serving the second 
year as matron. 

Fred P. Harmon, postmaster of Belleville, was born in the town 
of Montrose, Dane county, August 15, 1857, the son of Ezra and 
Laura Ann (Smith) Harmon, both natives of Rupert, Vt., and belong- 
ing to old New England families. They were married in their native 
state and came to Wisconsin about 1850, remaining for a year in 
Exeter, Green county; the following year they came to Montrose 
township, Dane county, where Mr. Harmon bought a farm and en- 
gaged in farming until the time of his death, in 1870, at the age of 
fifty-four. Mrs. Harmon survived her husband thirty-five years, 
passing away in 1905 at the ripe old age of eighty-three years. They 
reared a family of four children, viz., DeWitt, who served in Company 
H, Wisconsin volunteer infantry, during the Civil War; he returned 
from the army sick and died about a month after reaching home; 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 377 

George F., of Paoli ; Fred P., the subject of this sketch; Mary V. 
married Arthur Cady, of Detroit, Mich. Fred P. Harmon was reared 
in his native town, in the public and private schools. He spent his 
boyhood on the farm, and after arriving at manhood followed that vo- 
cation until 1885. The homestead, which he had purchased, he sold at 
that time, and in 1887 went into the business of butchering, which he 
followed until 1901. On May 2, 1903, he received the appointment as 
post-master of Belleville, a position which he has occupied up to the 
present time. In 1882, he was married to Miss Louise, daughter of 
Jacob Moss, (deceased,) of the town of Montrose, and one of the 
early settlers. Mr. and Mrs. F. P. Harmon have a family of seven 
children, Myrtie ; Dora M. ; Dewitt D. ; Hazel; Lucille; Loyd; 
Mildred. Mr. Harmon's political affiliations are with the Republican 
party, and he has served as the assessor of Belleville and the town of 
Montrose. 

The Harnan Sisters are the proprietors of the largest private 
hotel in the city of Madison, and as a select boarding place, their 
establishment is widely and favorably known. Being located 
at No. 122 West Washington Avenue, but a few steps from the Capi- 
tal Square, and with accommodations of the best, it ranks as a leader 
among the private hostelries of the city and receives an extensive pat- 
ronage from people of culture and refinement. The sisters who con- 
duct this model boarding place are the daughters of John and Mar- 
garet (Bergen) Harnan. both of whom were born near Dublin. Ire- 
land. After their marriage in the Emerald Isle the father and mother 
came to the United States about fifty years ago and first established 
their home near Pottsville, Pa., where for a number of years Mr. 
Harnan had charge of a coal mine. He then moved with his family 
to Wisconsin and located in Iowa county, near the village of Arena, 
where he purchased land and followed the occupation of a farmer 
during the remainder of his life. He died at Arena about 1891. and 
his wife passed away in Madison in 1901. They were the parents 
of four children: Mary is the widow of Thomas Cass, and she with 
her sister, Dora, who is the second in order of birth, are the proprie- 
tors of the Harnan Hotel ; John M. was graduated from the law depart- 
ment of the University of Wisconsin, and is now practicing his profes- 
sion in Colorado' Springs; and Margaret, the youngest of the children, 
resides with her sisters. Thomas Cass, the husband of Mary (Harnan) 
Cass, died in 1894, no children having been born of the union. The 
Harnan sisters came to' the capital city about 1885 and were employed 
in different hotels for a number of years, thus gaining a practical 
knowledge of the business, which has been of much value to them in 



378 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

the successful management of their own establishment. The fine 
building which they occupy was built under their personal direction, 
and in 1897 they opened the hotel, receiving a good patronage from 
the beginning, and the place has steadily grown in popularity under 
their careful management ever since. The religious faith of the sis- 
ters is expressed by membership in the Catholic church 

Gen. Henry Harnden, one of the most widely known among Wis- 
consin's heroes of the Civil War, inherited from a long line of 
hardy and courageous ancestors the qualities which made him con- 
spicuous in an epoch which especially brought into notice men of 
brave and rugged character. His ancestors were among the very 
early settlers of Massachusetts, the earliest being Richard Harnden. 
General Harnden's father, Jonathan Harnden, the fifth of the Ameri- 
can line, was born in 1786 and his grandfather, Benjamin Harnden, 
born 1740, was a lieutenant in the Revolutionary War. Other 
members of the family also bore a notable part in that struggle for 
independence. On the maternal side there is a family history of sea- 
faring people, which accounts for Henry Harnden's five years of 
experience as a sailor. He was born at Wilmington, Mass., March 
4, 1823, and received his early education in the schools of his native 
town. He escaped from the monotony of life in a mill town when 
he was eighteen years of age and sailed in a vessel bound for the 
coast of Africa. Before his return he made two trips around Cape 
Horn, visited many points on the west coast of South America, and 
landed once on the site of San Francisco, (1839) getting a glimpse 
of that California which Dana made familiar in his "Two Years 
Before the Mast." At the time of his return home the Mexican 
War was in progress and he followed the call of the adventurous 
in his blood to that scene of action, witnessed the debarkation of 
General Taylor's troops and assisted in the removal of the wounded 
of the battle of Palo Alto to New Orleans. Upon his return to 
Massachusetts he married, in 1848, Miss Mary Lightner, of Bos- 
ton, and two years later joined the army of gold-seekers who were 
wending their way across the continent to California. Upon this 
journey his party had several encounters with the Indians and other 
thrilling adventures. Soon after his return from this expedition, 
in 1852, he and his wife migrated to Wisconsin, settling in the town 
of Sullivan. Jefferson county, where he remained for a number of 
years, although at the breaking out of the Civil War he was operat- 
ing a mill at Ripon. He promptly responded to the call for volun- 
teers, closing up his business and advising his employes to follow 
his example in offering their services to their country; and it is 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 379 

upon record that they did so without exception. Henry Harnden 
■enlisted as a private in Company D, First Wisconsin Cavalry, July 
15, 1861, and was soon after promoted to the position of sergeant. 
On January 1, 1862, he was promoted to the position of captain of 
Company L. The history of the First Wisconsin Cavalry is Gen- 
eral Harnden' s war history, and the esprit du corps which is so fre- 
quently commended in the official reports of its action was largely 
due to the fact that it contained a few men of General Harnden's 
type, the fervor of whose intrepid spirit commuicated itself to the 
whole body. One historian speaks of the advance of the First 
Wisconsin as "a line of glittering steel that came upon the enemy 
like the wind ;" Gen. R. B. Mitchell says in less picturesque phrase, 
"The First Wisconsin Regiment is, by long odds, the best regiment 
in the division at skirmishing." Another charge in which General 
Harnden was the leader is recorded as "the most brilliant of the 
campaign." The First Wisconsin Cavalry was assigned first to 
Camp Benton, St. Louis, and later to Cape Girardeau, and their 
early history w T as connected with the movements of the war in 
Missouri and Arkansas. At Scatterville, July 10, 1862, Company 
L under the command of Captain Harnden, attacked and routed a 
detachment from Colonel Allen's command, capturing some and 
putting the rest to flight. The regiment suffered greatly from 
disease during its stay in Missouri, at one time, Captain Harnden 
being in command, but three officers and sixty men were able to 
ride. In 1863 the regiment was transferred to the Army of the 
Cumberland. General Rosecranz writes under date of June 9, 
"The First Wisconsin will be here (Murfreesborough, Tenn.,) by 
Saturday," and from that time until the close of the war it is identi- 
fied with that army, and participated in all its marches and battle 2 . 
The official records, as a rule, are not greatly given to compliment- 
ary phrasing, yet in those covering this period General Harnden is 
repeatedly noticed for gallant conduct in action. "On the 26 (23) 
five companies of the regiment (First Wisconsin) and a portion of 
the Fourth Indiana Cavalry charged a brigade of Confederate 
cavalry near Burnt Church . . . routing them 
There Captain Harnden was severely wounded while gallantly lead- 
ing the charge." Similar commendations which the limits of this 
article forbid quoting may be found repeatedly in the official docu- 
ments. The Wisconsin Roster briefly sums up General Harnden's 
war record as follows: "Enlisted, Rome. Jeff. Co.. private. Q. M. 
Serg. Promoted Capt. Co. I, January 1. 1862. Wounded. May 23, 
1864, at Burnt Hickory, Ga. Promoted Major, May 24, 1864. 



380 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

Wounded, April 16, 1865. Brevet General, U. S. Vol., March 13, 
1865." This brief record covers four years of service, over thirty 
engagements, several severe wounds and a general line of conduct 
as a soldier that carried him from the position of private to that of 
brigadier general. Any person can read between the lines the full 
meaning of this record. The memorial presented to Mrs. Harnden 
by the G. A. R. upon the death of her distinguished husband per- 
haps expresses as well as so brief a document can the place, which 
General Harndon held in public esteem and in the hearts of his 
comrades of the field. 

"Brig. Gen. Henry Harnden, late Commander of the Department of 
Wisconsin, G. A. R., enlisted as a private in the First Regiment, Wis- 
consin Cavalry, August, 1862. He passed with conspicuous merit 
through the office of corporal, quartermaster, sergeant, lieutenant, 
captain, lieutenant-colonel, colonel to that of brevet brigadier general. 
He distinguished himself during his military service on very many oc- 
casions. In the spring of 1862, at the head of less than two hundred 
men he charged a largely superior force of the enemy, at Scatterville, in 
Missouri, capturing a large number of prisoners and a large quantity 
of munitions of war. At the battle of Burnt Hickory, he made a bril- 
liant attack with a force of about six hundred upon body of Confed- 
erates numbering several thousand, driving them into' confusion and 
defeat. Though badly wounded, he bade h's men f Go on' and not 
mind him. He participated in over thirty battles and was wounded 
several times ; yet amid it all no man ever saw him flinch for a moment 
from the discharge of any duty involving the honor of a soldier or the 
responsibility of a commander. The various names by which he was 
called by the troops in his command such as 'Old Puritan,' 'The 
Fighting Captain', and 'Old Honesty', bespoke the profound faith 
and regard in which he was held by the men who placed their lives 
and the honor of their country in his keeping. The famous General 
McCook repeatedly selected him for the execution of the most danger- 
ous and difficult expeditions and gave frequent expression to his con- 
fidence in General Harnden's bravery, coolness and remarkable trust- 
worthiness. The crowning glory of his long and arduous military ca- 
reer was the capture of the fleeing president of the confederacy, Jeffer- 
son Davis. At the close of the war he retired to his farm covered with 
well-earned renown and enshrined in the affection of every man who 
had served with him. One year ago his comrades of this department 
selected him with great unanimity as their commander. He was old 
and enfeebled with wounds, yet he gave to this new expression of their 
trust the same full measure of devotion and adherence to dutv that had 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 381 

so richly characterized his whole life. His heart beat high and warm 
for his old comrades and he entered upon the discharge of his duties 
with the most inspiring zeal. In March last he obeyed the summons 
of the Great Commander to 'come up higher'. His death was in full 
keeping with the brave life he had led, and he was followed to his 
grave by a guard of honor from his old regiment and a large concourse 
of mourning friends. In this brief and inadequate recital of a few inci- 
dents in the life of a brave and self-sacrificing patriot and citizen, we 
are deeply impressed with the high standard of patriotic and political 
duty which governed his life. Men like General Harndcn stand forth 
as grand expositors to the youth of our country of the value of Amer- 
ican institutions. He was a product of those institutions and gladly 
made every sacrifice in their defence. We, his comrades, cherish his 
memory and deeply mourn his death. To his family we extend the 
sincere sympathy of men who knew him when 'tried by fire' and who 
glory in the fact he was never found wanting." Although General 
Harnden was. perhaps, best known to the general public in connection 
with the dramatic episode of his capture of Jefferson Davis, yet that 
was but one of a long succession of thrilling incidents connected with 
his varied career. General Harndert's account of the capture, pub- 
lished in 1898, in a dainty little volume, is an important historical doc- 
ument in the consideration of the closing events of the war. Upon his 
return from the field he entered actively into the interests of civil life ; 
he was elected a member of the assembly from the third district of 
Jefferson county, and in the legislature of 1867 was chairman of mil- 
itary affairs. He was appointed by Governor Fairchild as one of the 
trustees of the Soldiers' Orphans' Home and was financial agent of 
the board. He was appointed United States assessor of the second col- 
lection district of Wisconsin and later United States collector of in- 
ternal revenue, which latter office he held for ten years. His later life 
was spent in Madison. His death occurred March 17, 1900, and he is 
survived by his wife and three daughters, Mrs. W. E. Main. Mrs. 
Rhoda Clark and Miss Flora. One daughter, Laura, passed away be- 
fore her father. The personal characteristics by which General 
Harnden will be remembered by his intimate friends include a wonder- 
full}' genial and kindly nature, which is not often found in connection 
with the strong will and indomitable purpose which made him a great 
commander. Many men have encircled the globe but few are able to 
reproduce for the pleasure of their friends the life of other lands with 
the vividness which characterized General Harnden's narratives. He 
was par excellence, a story-teller, and as such will long be remembered 
in the social circle and by the camp-fire of his comrades, as in the 



382 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

larger world his memory will be revered for the greater deeds in the 
defense of the institutions of his country. 

Louis A. Harrison, the able and popular manager of the Brit- 
tingham & Hixon Lumber Company at McFarland, is a native son of 
Dane county, where he has pased practically his entire life thus far. 
He has gained success by determined and legitimate effort, having been 
dependent upon his own resources from his boyhood days. He was 
born in Dunn township, July 10, 1863, and is a son of Osman and 
Anna (Ottum) Harrison, both of whom were born and reared in Nor- 
way, while they were numbered among the early settlers in Dane 
county, the father having been a woodworker by vocation. Louis A. 
Harrison early learned the lessons of practical industry, having com- 
menced to work and aid in his own support when but ten years of age, 
while his educational advantages were limited to a brief and irregular 
attendance in the public schools. The only financial assistance he has 
ever received from his boyhood days to the present was an inheritance 
of seventy-five dollars from his father's estate. He has worked his 
way upward on the ladder of success and is to-day in charge of im- 
portant industrial interests, while he is also* the owner of a good farm, 
in Blooming Grove township, in the immediate vicinity of McFarland. 
He resides on his farm, which is well improved and under effective 
cultivation, and his wife is the owner of an adjoining tract, making 
the place a very desirable one. For a number of years Mr. Harrison 
followed the vocation of draftsman and builder, having erected many 
bu'ldings in this part of the county, and for the past six years he has 
been manager of the business of the Brittingham & Hixon Lumber 
Company, which controls a large busness. Mr. Harrison is a stanch 
adherent of the Democratic party, is a member of the Order of 
Beavers, and both he and his wife hold membership in the Norwegian 
Lutheran church. In 1883 Mr. Harrison was united in marr'age to 
Miss Betsey Swenson, who was born May 11, 1861, being a daughter 
of Swen and Segne Sundwick Swenson, who are now residents of 
North Dakota. Mr. and Mrs. Harrison have eleven children, whose, 
names, with respective dates of birth, are as follows: Hatt'e, March 16, 
1884; Tilhe, February 9, 1887; Oscar, January 12, 1889; Willie, Janu- 
ary 31, 1 891 ; Adolph, March 9, 1894; Laura, September 6, 1896; 
Hazel and Hester, twins, July 25, 1898; Oden, September, 1899; 
Idilla, September 2, 1901 ; and Luella, June 29, 1904. 

David Harrop, retired, of the village of Mazomanie, was born in 
Cheshire, England, January 20, 1825. His parents, John and Ann 
(Murrissey) Harrop, were both natives of Cheshire, where John 
Harrop worked at his trade of mining, (three hundred feet under 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 383 

the ground) and in later life took to farming-. They had eight chil- 
dren, two of whom died in infancy. The others were Harriet, Anna, 
Abram, John, Ann and David. The last is the only member living. 
David was educated in the church schools of England and there 
learned the tailor's trade. After a service of seven years he came to 
America, landing in Boston and going from there directly to Mazo- 
manie, where he arrived June 16, 1845. He was a member of the 
British Temperance Emigration society, through whose influence he 
got a farm in Iowa county after he had worked at bis trade for a time. 
He now owns three hundred acres of farm land in Iowa county, be- 
sides a farm near Mazomanie village. Politically he is a Republican, 
but has never aspired to office. Mr. Harrop is a striking example 
of Christian manhood and a devout member of the Congregational 
church. His father and mother were both Methodists. On March 2, 
1845, he married Mary, daughter of Robert and Martha Gorst, both 
natives of Cheshire, England. Robert Gorst was one of the founders 
of the British Temperance Emigration society. To David and Mary 
Harrop were born eigiht children, four of whom are now living; 
Martha Ann, wife of Frank Wilson, Iowa county, la.; John, manag- 
ing a farm and a mill in Arena, Wis. ; Sarah Ellen, proprietor of the 
Hotel Cumberland, Cumberland, Wis. ; and Wesley, farming the old 
homestead farm. Mrs. Harrop died November 10, 1905. The chil- 
dren all received the best education the schools of the vicinity afforded. 
William Hartwig, an industrious and successful farmer of the 
town of Deerfield, was born in Blomberg, Germany, October 24, 
1857. He was one of four children of William and Minnie (Plot; 
Hartwig, natives of Germany. His education was rather limited, 
being only what the public schools of the Fatherland offered, and 
the three years of soldier's life required of every German citizen. 
William's service was from 1877 to 1880. In 1882 he came directly 
to Wisconsin from the old country. For five years he worked as a 
farm hand ; three years more he worked tobacco land on shares ; 
two years longer he rented a farm and then he bought the farm of 
one hundred and two acres which is now his home. Politically he 
is independent ; religiously he is affiliated with the German 
Lutheran church. On September 14. 1882. he married Mary, 
daughter of Christian Blanck, a native of Germany. Mrs. Hartwig 
was born May 8, 1859. Ten children were born of this marriage, — 
Herman, August 22, 1883; Ida, April 29, 1885; Otto, April 2. 1887; 
Addie, October 23, 1888; Albert, December 22, 1891; Amelia. Janu- 
ary 26, 1893; Ella, May 23, 1895; Walter, June 11, 1897; Rudolph. 
July 3, 1899 ; and Willie, January 22. 1902. Mr. Hartwig started to 



384 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

win his way with the debt of his transportation to pay. His suc- 
cess and prosperity are due to the thrift and industry which has 
characterized his life. His domestic happiness can well be the 
envy of his neighbors. 

Lorenzo Hatch is a retired farmer of Marshall and an old resi- 
dent of Dane county. His ancestors were members of the Connecti- 
cut Colony and both his grandfather and great-grandfather, the latter 
a major in Connecticut militia, served the patriot cause in the Revolu- 
ionary War. Wells Hatch, the father of Lorenzo, was born in Con- 
necticut in 1790, received his early education there and married Miss 
Mary Rexford, likewise a native of Connecticut. Ten children 
blessed their marriage of whom but one. Lorenzo, is living. Their 
early married life was spent in New York and in 1814. Wells Hatch 
took his family to Virginia, where in the operation of a saw-mill and 
a farm his son Lorenzo assisted him. Lorenzo was born in Chenango 
county, N. Y. March 17, 1823, attended the Sherman Academy in 
Chenango county, N. Y. and accompanied his parents to Virginia. 
Early in the year of 1851, Lorenzo- came to Wisconsin and pur 
chased a farm of ninety acres near Marshall, where he now resides. 
This he worked and improved and has made a pleasant home. In 1848, 
he married Miss Clara E. Adsit, a native 'of New York and daughter of 
Stephen and Betsey Adsit, early settlers of Dane county. Four chil- 
dren were born to Mr. and Mrs. Hatch; Adsit C, Susan M. Mary 
and Josephine. Some time after Mrs. Hatch's death in 1858, Mr. 
Hatch married Miss Amelia Kellogg and three children were born 
to them; Guy and Edith, both deceased, and Lorenzo, Jr., who is a 
graduate of the Medina high school, a prosperous farmer and town 
clerk. Mr. Hatch was again left alone by the death of his wife in 
1879 and married Mrs. Achsa A. Parfrey, who died in 1893. Mr. 
Hatch has been prominent in town affairs and is a Democrat in polit- 
ical sympathy. He has served on the board of supervisors, for some 
years as its chairman ; has been assessor and justice of peace. 

Halvor Haugan, a prominent farmer of Pleasant Springs, was 
born in the town of Pleasant Springs, Dane county, Wis., October 
17, 1849. His parents were Ole and Malan (Grunhild) Haugan, 
natives of Ever Telemarken, Norway. In 1848 they started for 
America on a sailing vessel, the trip consuming eleven weeks. 
After landing in New York they came west by way of the Erie 
canal to Buffalo, thence to Milwaukee by steamer and from Mil- 
waukee to Pleasant Springs by ox-team. The first year here the 
father earned a living by hauling wheat to Milwaukee, the trip 
taking a week each way. The price paid was worth the trip, as it 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 385 

never fell below forty cents a bushel. After hiring out for a year 
the father bought one hundred and twenty acres of partially im- 
proved land in Pleasant Springs township. There he built his 
home and passed the rest of his days. Ole Haugan was a Repub- 
lican in politics, and a Lutheran in religion. He helped build the 
old log church where the Lutherans of the vicinity first worshipped. 
Four children were born to him and his wife; Halvor. the subject 
of this sketch, Samuel, a farmer of the town of Dunkirk, Ole, work- 
ing the homestead farm, and Rachel, deceased, the wife of G. Nel- 
son. Halvor Haugan's education was limited. He worked hard 
as a boy and stayed at home until he was twenty-eight years old. 
In 1877 he bought a farm of one hundred and twenty acres in sec- 
tion 27, where he still resides. All the improvements on the place 
Mr. Haugan has made. He built- his barn in 1883 and his home, 
one of the finest in the county, in 1888. Later he added forty acres 
to the farm, and today is known as a grower of high grade tobacco 
A Republican in politics, he has served three years as school clerk 
and two terms on the town board. In 1904 and 1905 he was a dele- 
gate to the Farmers' National Convention, and has served on the 
state central committee. He is a member of and an active in the 
West Lutheran church of Pleasant Springs. On January 27, 1876. 
he married Ingebor Everson, a native of Norway, who died Febru- 
ary 2, 1900, aged forty-two. Seven children blessed this marriage : 
Emma, wife of Charles Huber of Pleasant Springs, and the mother 
of three children, Vilbut, Inez and Halvor H. ; Lena, wife of Erick 
Hoverland, a farmer of Pleasant Springs ; Regina. Oscar, Nora, 
Ruth and Hlarry, the last five being all at home. By his thrift and 
energy Mr. Haugan has developed into one of ihe most prominent 
and successful farmers of the community. 

The Hausmann Brewing Company was represented for many 
years by Joseph Hausmann who was born in Baden, Germany, May 
26, 1828, and was the son of Jacob and Anna Hausmann. He came to 
America in March, 1852, locating first at Freeport, 111., from which 
point he move. I. in 1854, to Portage, Wisconsin, where he worked in 
the brewery business until 1859. In 1863 he located in Madi- 
son. Previous to this time, about 1858, William Voight had built up 
a small brewery on the corner of State and Gorham streets, (on the 
site now occupied by the Hausmann brewery), and the breaking out 
of the Civil War, the establishment of Camp Randall, and the conse- 
quent influx of not only soldiers, but many civilians, greatly increased 
die business of the brewery, and it was during this flush of business 
that the plant was purchased by Joseph Hausmann. He is a man of 
25— iii 



386 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

much business ability and under his management the plant was en- 
larged from time to time, by the build. ng of the brew-house, ice- 
houses, cooling and storage rooms, etc., until it occupied more than 
two-thirds ot the block. Mr. Hausmann carried on the business in 
his own name until 1892 when it was incorporated and three of his 
sons were actively associated with him in the business. Joseph Haus- 
mann was president of the corporation, William P., vice-president, 
Carl J., secretary and treasurer, and another son, Otto B., was also in- 
terested as a stock-holder. October 22, 1902, the senior member of the 
firm retired, Carl J. was elected president and Otto B., vice-president. 
Air. Hausmiann's death followed not long after his retirement. Joseph 
Hausmann served in the army in his native country and saw fourteen 
months of active service in the revolution of 1848 — 49 and received a 
sabre wound on one cheek. He was married July 1, 1858, to Miss 
Sarah Blass, who was born in New York city, February 11, 1839. 
They had six children, Albertna, born March 7, 1859; William P., 
born March 7, 1861 ; Carl J. born February 3, 1863; Otto B., born 
April 27, 1865; Oscar, born November 20, 1867, and died October 21, 
1879, and Clara, born November 15, 1869, and died March 6, 1871. 
Mr. Joseph Hausmann belonged to the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows and the family is connected with the German Catholic church. 
Rev. Christian J. Hausner. the able and honored pastor of St. 
Mary's church, at Pine Bluff, Cross Plains township, is one of the 
earnest workers of the Catholic church in Dane county and is well 
entitled to representation in this publication. Father Hausner was 
born in Pleasant Prairie township, Kenosha county, Wisconsin, 
February 6. 1873, and is a son of Christoph and Katherine (Engel) 
Hausner, both native of Simern, Luxemburg, (Germany), where the 
former was born in 1831 and the latter in 1841. Christoph Hausner 
immigrated to America in 1856, becoming one of the pioneer far- 
mers of Kenosha county, where he has since maintained his home 
and where he is held in high esteem by all who know him. He is 
a communicant of St. George's church, in the city of Kenosha, and 
has been active in the parish work for many years. His marriage 
to Miss Katherine Engel was solemnized February 6, 1862, and her 
death occurred November 18. 1898. Of their twelve children four 
died in infancy, and concerning the others the following data are en- 
tered, the names being mentioned in the order of birth :. Henry, 
died March 12, 1898; John is a farmer in Kenosha county; Matthew 
completed his educational training in the Catholic normal school 
at St. Francis, Wisconsin, and was thereafter 1 successful teacher, 
following the pedagogic profession fifteen years and now being a 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 387 

traveling salesman, with residence at Keoltztown, Osage county, 
Missouri; Susan is the wife of Henry Beien, of Kenosha, Wiscon- 
sin ; Mary and Frank remain with their father on the old home- 
stead, of which the latter has the general charge. Rev. Christian )., 
of this sketch, was the next in order of nativity ; and Katherine is 
the wife of John Radigan, of Kenosha. The subject ot this brief 
tribute secured his rudimentary, education in the district school 
near his home and thereafter continued his studies in the parochial 
school of St. George's church, in Kenosha. In 1889 he entered St. 
Francis Seminary, at St. Francis, Milwaukee county, where he com- 
pleted the prescribed course in 1898, being duly graduated and be- 
ing ordained to the priesthood on June 19, of that year. He said his 
first mass in St. George's church, Kenosha, on June 26, 1898, and 
his first charge was that of assistant in St. Joseph's church, in the 
city of Milwaukee. He was then appointed pastor of St. Mary's 
church, at Bristol, Kenosha county, with Wilmot as a mission 
This latter charge had been vacant sixteen years, and Father Haus- 
ner succeeded in infusing much of vitality into the spiritual and 
temporal life of the parish, where he remained four years, at the 
expiration of which he came to his present charge, where he labors 
with all zeal and consecration in his holy calling. Since he came 
to the parish a new rectory has been erected at a cost of $3,500 
and many improvements made in and about the church. He has 
merited the good will and high esteem not only of his own people 
but of the whole community. 

Hank H. Hawkinson is a substantial land owner of the town of 
Dunn. His birthplace was McFarland and the date, September 22, 
1 861. His parents were Hans and Christene Hawkinson, natives of 
Norway. Hans Hawkinson came to Dane county in 1857. For sev- 
eral years he earned a livlihood by hiring out to different farmers, 
accumulating enough money to purchase sixty-one and one-half acres 
of land in the town of Dunn. From time to time he added to this 
until in 1883 it contained some two hundred and eighty odd acres. 
Hank Hawkinson received his educat'on in the district schools of 
Dunn township. When twenty-two years old he purchased two 
hundred and sixty-four and one-half acres of the homestead, the 
father retaining eighteen acres to which he retired when he gave up 
active farm life. Since 1883 he has conducted this farm with great 
success. In politics Mr. Hawkinson is a Democrat. In religious af- 
fairs he unites with the Norwegian Lutheran church. On March 15, 
1882 he married Carrie, daughter of Mike and Marie Larson of the 
town of Pleasant Springs. Mrs. Hawkinson was born December n, 



388 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

1857, in Norway, and she received her education in the schools of 
Stoughton. Her parents came to Dane county when she was three 
years old. By her union with Air. Hawkinson she is the mother of 
seven children, — Harlie Julius, born August I, 1883; Alfred Marvin, 
born February 2$, 1885; Bennie Christian, November 14, 1886; Leman 
Clarence, born July 11, 1892; Ella Maria, born July 3, 1894; Clara 
Hannah, born December 14, 1896; and Edwin Samuel, born October 
2, 1899. All the children are living at home. By frugality and per- 
severance Mr. Hawkinson has become one of the prosperous citizens 
of the community. His wife has truly been a helpmate, as well as an 
inspiration. Mr. Hawkinson had one sister, now Mrs. Roge, of the 
town of Rutland. His mother died in 1901 while making her home 
with this daughter. 

John D. Hayes, Madison's pioneer blacksmith and horseshoer, 
whose place of business at 212 and 214 South Pinckney street, was 
born in the capital city June 3, 1859. He comes of good Irish stock, 
his parents, Dennis and Ann (McCormick) Hayes, having both been 
born on the Emerald Isle, the father in the city of Limerick and the 
mother in the County Tipperary. Dennis Hayes was a tailor who 
learned his trade in the city of Limerick and from the time of his 
coming to this city in 1847 to the time °f ms death, August 3, 1862, 
was employed in the M. S. Klauber company. He was an honest up- 
right man, well and favorably known among his neighbors. His 
wife died at the age seventy years in 1882. She was a kindly, 
motherly woman, one of those ever ready to assist in case of sickness. 
They had four children. James, for many years yardmaster for the 
Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railway, met his death in a railroad 
accident. Patrick died in 1881 at the age of twenty-three. He was a 
skillful horseshoer, learning his trade with Judge Anthony Donovan, 
for whom he worked six years. Margaret is the wife of Frank Brad- 
ford, a conductor on the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railway. 
The youngest was John D. He received his education in the public 
schools of his native city and served his apprenticeship as a horse- 
shoer under Judge Donovan, for whom he worked eight years, in 
the same shop which he now conducts. In 1886 he purchased a half 
interest in the establishment and two years later assumed entire con- 
trol. He is one of the three oldest men following this vocation in 
the city. On November 25, 1885, Mr. Hayes was united in marriage to 
Mary, daughter of Peter and Mary (Naughtin) Barry of Madison. 
Mrs. Barry was an aunt of Rev. Father John M. Naughtin of St. 
Raphael's church, Madison. Mr. Barry was a native of the same 
city in Ireland from which Dennis Hayes hailed, coming to Wiscon- 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 38& 

sin in 1842. For many years, until his death in 1904, he conducted 
a grocery store on Main street in Madison. Mr. and Mrs Barry 
had four children. James H. was for several years private secretary 
to ex-Senator William F. Vilas and a graduate of the department of 
law of the University of Wisconsin in the class of 1884. From Mad- 
ison he went to Milwaukee, where he was connected with the legal 
firm Jenkins, Bottom and Vilas and later,, in Chicago, with Keep 
& Loudan. His death occurred in 1893. He was a most promising 
young man and his death cast a pall of gloom over the whole com- 
munity. Miss Sarah Barry makes her home in Chicago. Bridget 
resides in Madison. Mary became the wife of John D. Hayes. Mr. 
and Mrs. Hayes 'have five children; Mary, for some time librarian for 
Prof. Harper of the department of botany of the state university; 
Martha, John, Margaret and Sarah Romona. The family are mem- 
bers of the Catholic church. Mr. Hayes is prominent in Catho- 
lic fraternal circles, being a Catholic Knight, a Forester and a Knight 
of Columbus. Politically he is a Democrat and as such served two 
consecutive terms of two years each in the city council. He fathered 
the twelve o'clock closing ordinance for saloons and was influential 
in the passage of many of the measures relating to streets. At the 
present time (1906) he is a member of the board of water commis- 
sioners. 

George Haynes is numbered among the prosperous farmers and 
exemplary citzens of the town of Rutland, where he has resided for 
several years, although his residence in Dane county covers the period 
of his lifetime, with the exception of the first two years. He was 
born in Washtenaw county, Mich., December 22, 1854. and is one of 
five children born to Marvin H. and Angeline (Speer) Haynes, the 
father being a native of the state of New York ?nd the mother of 
Washtenaw county, Mich. Of the children born to these parents four 
are living, the names and places of residence of whom are as follows: 
George, the subject of this review, resides in the town of Rutland; 
Almon, of the village of Brooklyn; Nora, the wife of Zala Baldwin, of 
the city of Madison, and Irene, who is now Mrs. Lev/is Ford of the 
village of Brooklyn. The parents of these children came to Wiscon- 
sin and settled in the town of Rutland, Dane county, in 1856, and for 
about two years the father worked as a common laborer, seldom if 
ever receiving more than fifty cents per day. He was then employed 
in a saw and grist-mill for four years, as general manager, and gave 
up this position to become a soldier in the Union army He enlisted 
August 10, 1861, in Company D, Seventh Regiment of Wisconsin in- 
fantry as a private, and served with it until February 25, 1863, when 



390 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

he was discharged on account of disability caused by a wound received 
at the battle of Gainesville, Virginia. The Seventh Regiment, to which 
Mr. Haynes belonged, became a part of the celebrated "Iron Brigade," 
the history of which is familiar to every one who has taken more than 
a passing interest in the part that Wisconsin took in the Civil War. 
The engagement at Gainesville, Va., August 28, 1862, was one of the 
bloodiest battles of the war, and the fact was attested in the calendar 
of many a Wisconsin homestead, as it was fought by the "Iron 
Brigade" alone, which suffered severely in killed and wounded, Mr. 
Haynes being among the latter. After being mustered out of the 
service he purchased forty acres of land in the town of Rutland, later 
added fifty-six acres, and resided on this farm about thirty years. He 
then sold out and bought a comfortable home in the village of Brook- 
lyn, where he lived in retirement until his death, October 6, 1902. 
The mother died in Madison, December 30, 1904. George Haynes, 
whose name introduces this memoir, was less than two years old 
when his parents moved from the Wolverine state to Wisconsin, and 
he received his education in the seminary at Evansville, Rock county. 
At the age of seventeen years he began as an apprentice to learn the 
trade of a carpenter, but after one year he found that the work was 
too hard for him, so he returned home and worked as a farm hand 
until he reached the age of twenty-two. He then began working rented 
land, paying cash rent for about fifteen years, when he was able to buy 
a farm of one hundred acres in the town of Oregon. He then sold this 
farm and bought another in the town of Rutland, upon which he has 
since had his residence. The date of his marriage was October 29, 
1876, and the lady of his choice was Miss. Ellen Guernsey, who was 
born in the town of Dunkirk, February 24, 1857. Mrs. Haynes is one 
of eleven children born to Otis and Adeline. (Aldridge) Guernsey, of 
whom seven are living, as follows : Adelaide, now Mrs. Bolles, cf 
Knapp, Wis.; Freeman, who resides at Voltaire, N. D.; Amasa, of 
Huron, S. D. ; Eben, of Voltaire, N. D. ; Ida, now Mrs. Palmer of 
Stoughton, Wis. ; Alice, the wife of B. J. Kehoe, of Madison, and El- 
len, who is the wife of the subject of this review. Mr. and Mrs. 
Haynes are the parents of five children, the names and other facts con- 
cerning whom are given as follows : Ernest E. married Silvia Wilcox 
and resides in the town of Dunkirk; Iva Maud is the wife of Asa 
Goodrich, of Milton, Rock county, Wis.; Leila Angeline, now Mrs. 
Geo. Jackson of Milton, Wis.; Marvin Otis and Ida Frances reside at 
home. Mr. Haynes is a Republican in his political affiliations, and 
though he has never sought office he has served as school director for 
a number of terms. His religious views are expressed by a member- 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 391 

ship in the Methodist church, and his standing- is very high in the 
community in which he resides ; Tor he is known as a man of much 
energy and natural ability, a kind and loving husband and father, pub- 
lic spirited and ever ready to assist a worthy cause. 

Charles R. Head, M. D., was one of the honored pioneer physi- 
cians and surgeons of Albion, where he was engaged in the prac- 
tice of his profession for nearly half a century and where his death 
occurred June 19. 1906, about two months prior to his eighty-sixth 
birthday. Dr. Head was born in Alfred, Alleghany county, New r 
York, August 30, 1820, being a son of Solomon and Sarah (Coon) 
Head, both representative of families founded in America in the 
colonial epoch. The mother was a descendant of the prominent old 
Maccoon family, which was settled in Rhode Island in an early 
day. Solomon Head was a contractor and also owned a large farm 
in the Susquehanna valley, near Wilkesbarre, Pennsylvania . from 
which state he removed with his family to the state of New York, 
where they maintained their home for a number of years. They 
then set forth for the wilds of Wisconsin, settling in Milton, Rock 
county, as pioneers of 1839. In 1843 Solomon Head established a 
home in Albion township, Dane county, where he purchased one 
hundred and sixty acres of government land, the entire tract be- 
ing in the wild state, and here he reclaimed a considerable portion, 
both he and his wife remaining on the homestead until they were 
summoned from the field of life's endeavors. Both were zealous 
and devoted members of the Seventh-day Baptist church. To them 
were born six children, and of the number only two are now living, 
Sylvia and Henry, both of whom remain resident of Albion town- 
ship. Dr. Head, subject of this memoir, passed his youth in the 
state of New York and received good educational advantages, hav- 
ing attended college at Alfred, that' state, and Castleton. Vermont, 
and having secured his medical education by private study and by 
attendance in the College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York 
city, from which celebrated institution he was graduated with the 
degree of doctor of medicine, in 1848. He forthwith rejoined his 
parents, in Albion, Dane county, Wisconsin, where he entered upon 
the active work of his chosen profession, in which he there con- 
tinued for forty-five years. None unfamiliar with the conditions 
which obtained in those early pioneer days when he first essayed 
his labors in this section can fully understand the arduous and un- 
remitting toil, the self-abnegation and the generous fidelity which 
actuated this typical physician of the day. The country was thinly 
settled, roads were none or of the most primitive type, and in sum- 



392 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

mer's heat or winter's rigors and storms Dr. Head made his way, 
night or day, over many weary stretches of road to minister to 
those in affliction, and his kindly ministrations and cheerful pres- 
ence brought comfort to many an isolated sufferer. His name was 
a familiar one in almost every household in the region and his prac- 
tice extended even beyond the environs thereof. When he was 
called to his final rest, in the fullness of years and honors, there 
were many of the representative families, of even the second and 
third generations, who felt his loss with a sense of deep personal 
bereavement. He was significantly humanity's friend, and he rode 
and wrote during a long and active life, bearing comfort and conso- 
lation and encouragement into many a home. The family retained 
possession of the original farm in Albion township, gradually add- 
ing to its area until it comprised a valuable landed estate of two 
hundred and forty acres, and of this property Dr. Head also had 
the general care and supervision during his father's declining years. 
The place has since been divided among his children, with the ex- 
ception of the homestead of eighty acres which he retained to him- 
self until his death and which continues to be the residence of his 
widow. The doctor was a stanch supporter of the Union cause 
during the climacteric period of the Civil War, and from 1863 to 
1865 he was surgeon of the board of enrollment. For three terms 
he served as a member of the assembly in the state legislature, — in 
1854. 1856 and 1863, and he was uncompromising in his allegiance 
to the Republican party. He stood in all things for the highest 
type of citizenship, doing all in his power to further the material, 
moral and civic development and prosperity of his county and state 
and having been especially interested in educational affairs. He 
was one of those primarily instrumental in founding Albion 
Academy, for the support of which he contributed generous sums 
of money, besides furnishing" a large amount of material for the 
construction of the academy buildings. For forty years he was 
president of the board of directors of the institution. His religious 
faith was that which made for faithfulness in all the relations of 
life, and his was a symmetrical and noble and useful manhood. 
May 13, 1854, was solemnized the marriage of Dr. Flead to Miss 
Seraphkia Potter, daughter of Joseph and Rachel (West) Pottei, 
of Rensselaer county, New York, who removed thence to Wiscon- 
sin in 1848, purchasing a farm in Albion township, this county, 
where they passed the residue of their lives. Dr. and Mrs. Head 
became the parents of four children, namely: Charles R., who died 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 393 

in 1858; Grace, who died in infancy; Dr. Louis R. who is a repre- 
sentative physician of the city of Madison, where he controls a 
large practice ; and Mark A., who is one of the successful agricul- 
turists of Albion township, residing on a portion of the old home- 
stead ; he was engaged in the drug business for a number of years 
but was compelled to retire on account of impaired health. 

John F. Hebl was born in Austria. October 20, 1846, and came to 
America with his parents when he was three years old ; his first home 
was in Jefferson county, and it was in the common schools of that 
county that he received his education ; after a residence there of 
twenty-five years he came to Dane, (1876). He located on the farm 
which is at the present time his home, and entered into the life of the 
community as a member of the Catholic church, as a member of the 
Grange, as a supervisor of the township, — an office to which he was 
elected several times, ait the present time serving his second term as 
as chairman of the board, — and, since 1890. as president of the 
Farmers' Mutual Fire Insurance Co. He married, in i860, Miss 
Frances Springer, daughter of Joseph and Anna Springer, early 
Gterman settlers of Medina township. Their children are Matilda, 
Mary, Charles, Alvina, U'lma, Dotty and Tena, of whom all except 
Tena and Lotty are living. Mr. Hebl's parents, John and Mary 
(Odoum) Hebl, were natives of Austria, and came to the United 
States in 1850, making their home in Jefferson county, where Mrs. 
Hebl died the same year; her husband survived her nearly half a 
century, dying in 1897. He was a farmer by occupation, a Democrat, 
— as was also his son, the subject of this sketch, — and both he and his 
wife were members of the Catholic church. Of their seven children 
five are living. 

Charles M. Heer, one of the prominent farmers and stock breed 
ers of Roxbury township, has been a life-long resident of Dane county, 
having been born in the township in which he resides, June 25, 1868. 
He is a son of Martin and Amelia (Honeisen) Herr, both of whom 
are natives of Germany, the former being born in 1826 ami the latter 
on April 7, 1832. The father migrated to America about 1847 or 
1848, and the mother a year or two later, both settling in the state of 
New York, where they met, and they were married in 1850. Four 
years later they continued their travels westward, selecting Wisconsin 
as the state for their permanent abode, and after a vear spent in Dodge 
county they came to Dane county and established their home in Rox- 
bury township, on the farm now owned in partnership by their son, 
George M., and daughter, Anna. Here they lived the remainder ol 
their lives, maintaining the high regard of their neighbors and the 



394 HISTORY OF DANE COUNTY. 

veneration of dutiful children. They were members of the Lutheran 
church, and the father claimed allegiance to the Democratic party. 
These worthy parents had born to them eight children, and it is fitting 
in this memoir that mention should be made of each: John, the eld- 
est, is a prosperous farmer in Sauk county. Margaret and Emma are 
residents of Lodi. George M. remains upon the old homestead of one 
hundred and fifty-three acres, and also owns eighty acres in Dane 
township; with his brother (the firm being known as Heer Bros.), he is 
a breeder of Short-horn cattle and Duroc Jersey hogs ; he is also an 
extensive feeder of stock. In politics he is a Republican. Anna also 
lives on the homestead. Mary, another daughter, died at the age of 
four years and three months. Charles M. is the immediate subject 
of this review, and Frank is a resident of Caledonia, Wis. Charles 
M. Heer received his education in the common schools of the vicinity 
and in the high school at Lodi. Upon reaching manhood he decided 
to make farming his life's occupation, and that he selected wisely is 
shown by the flattering success that has been his portion. He owns a 
fine farm of one hundred and ninety acres, and is an extensive breeder 
of short-horned cattle and Shropshire sheep. He showed his cattle 
at the international stock show in Chicago., in 1905, and had the dis- 
tinction of receiving several first premiums. At the Wisconsin state 
fair he took nearly all of the second, besides some first premiums. 
He also raises Duroc Jersey hogs, and is an extensive feeder and ship- 
per of live stock in general. For "Royal Sultan," the prize-winner at 
the international stock show, standing at the head of the short-horned 
herd, the owner has refused $3,000. In politics Mr. Heer is an adher- 
ent of the Republican faith, and has filled the position of clerk of his 
district for twelve years in succession. He wds married, on May 8, 
1893, to Miss Mary M. Mills, of Columbia county, Wis., the daughter 
of Job and Mary Amanda (Dye) Mills, who were very early settlers 
of Columbia county, and who now reside in Lodi, Mr. Mills being an 
extensive land-owner (and an active, participant in affairs generally. 
Mr. and Mrs. Heer have a family of four very interesting and prom- 
ising children : Francis, Vernon, Josephine and Marion. 

William C. Hegelmeyer, secretary of the Storghton AVagon Co., 
is of German origin. His grandfather, Frederick Hegelmeyer, was one. 
of the advance guard of the mighty army of Germans who 1 settled in 
Milwaukee county, where he located in 1835. He was a farmer in 
Milwaukee county as was also Leonard Wiler, maternal grandfather 
of William Hegelmeyer, who came to Milwaukee county from Penn- 
sylvania in 1836. John Hegelmeyer, son of Frederick, was foreman 
of a lumber yard in Milwaukee and for sever