(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Children's Library | Advanced Microdevices Manuals | Linear Circuits Manuals | Supertex Manuals | Sundry Manuals | Echelon Manuals | RCA Manuals | National Semiconductor Manuals | Hewlett Packard Manuals | Signetics Manuals | Fluke Manuals | Datel Manuals | Intersil Manuals | Zilog Manuals | Maxim Manuals | Dallas Semiconductor Manuals | Temperature Manuals | SGS Manuals | Quantum Electronics Manuals | STDBus Manuals | Texas Instruments Manuals | IBM Microsoft Manuals | Grammar Analysis | Harris Manuals | Arrow Manuals | Monolithic Memories Manuals | Intel Manuals | Fault Tolerance Manuals | Johns Hopkins University Commencement | PHOIBLE Online | International Rectifier Manuals | Rectifiers scrs Triacs Manuals | Standard Microsystems Manuals | Additional Collections | Control PID Fuzzy Logic Manuals | Densitron Manuals | Philips Manuals | The Andhra Pradesh Legislative Assembly Debates | Linear Technologies Manuals | Cermetek Manuals | Miscellaneous Manuals | Hitachi Manuals | The Video Box | Communication Manuals | Scenix Manuals | Motorola Manuals | Agilent Manuals
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "A history of the Sixty-third U.S. infantry, 1917-1919"

ORV 

THE 

Y-THIRD 




THE LIBRARY 

OF 

THE UNIVERSITY 

OF CALIFORNIA 

LOS ANGELES 



DEPARTKEMAL .. 'j, AGO 




CJ^-i^-'^-/^' /<2-^^^^i-V. 



A 
HISTORY 

OF THE 



SIXTY-THIRD 
U. S. INFANTRY 

1917-1919 




PUBLISHED BY 
MEMBERS OF THE SIXTY-THIRD U. S. INFANTRY 

1920 



Copyright, 1920 

BY 

H. H. BISSELL 



D 



Foreword 

WHEN the United States entered the big war in 1917, 
I was stationed in Honolulu, senior Lieutenant 
Colonel of the Infantry arm, and, like dozens of 
other officers, was aching to return to the mainland and get to 
work with a regiment. 

Late in May the press announced the formation of a Divi- 
sion for France and I cabled my classmate. General Pershing 
at Washington as follows: "Please get me assigned regiment 
infantry your division for France." So far, he has not replied. 

Congress declared war early in April, 1917, but did not 
pass the army bill until the middle of May and it was six weeks 
later when I got orders assigning me to the 63d Infantry, and 
two weeks more before I was able to join it at Presidio of San 
Francisco, California. 

There were 18 officers and about 700 men present when I 
took command on July i6th, and during the first week about 
440 recruits joined, and at the rate men were volunteering all 
over the country it looked as if the regiment would soon be 
filled to war strength. 

In August, 27 lieutenants joined from the first Training 
Camp at Presidio, but meantime several captains and majors 
had been promoted and sent to other regiments and a few weeks 
later 122 selected non-coms, had to be sent to the National 
Army, and there were constant drains upon the enlisted 
strength by the Quartermaster Corps, Engineers, etc. Allur- 

iii 

764361 



iv Foreword 

ing prospects of promotion and increased pay were put before 
these men, but the cold fact was that the officers wanted 
trained men rather than train them themselves. 

In December, nearly 50 more officers came from the second 
Training Camp but the end of the year found only 1176 en- 
listed men present. Given three times this number we would 
soon be ready to make holes in the German line. Someone 
must have suspected that this hope would become a reality and, 
accordingly, in January and February more than half the 
regiment was scattered from San Diego, California, to points 
in Utah and Idaho where there were "utilities" that were sus- 
pected of needing soldiers to guard them. 

It would have been heartrending but for the fact that 
during the previous five months an esprit had been developed 
in the regiment which led to snappiness, precision, and ''pep," 
which, in turn, produced keenness and pride in the officers and 
men and a manifest determination on their part to make the 
regiment better than any other. 

That their ambitions were fully realized needs no attest 
from me, for the fact was made evident by the comments of 
hundreds of disinterested officers who watched the work of the 
regiment at Presidio and at Camp Meade and by the French 
and English Officer-Instructors at both places. The regiment 
spoke for itself wherever it was and in whatever work or train- 
ing it was engaged. 

As for the methods or policies which produced this result, 
I can recall nothing particularly original or unusual. While 
children and girls seem to thrive on flattery and petting, grown 
men need neither. The husky, who had a burning desire to 
kill the Kaiser, learned more from being told what was wrong 
than he could learn from being commended for what was right. 
"H(juquets" have a place and use among politicians, speakers, 
and the like, but the man in uniform soon learns to know and 
"feel" when he is right or good in any training and needs no 



Foreword v 

one to tell him, but he doesn't always know when he is wrong 
or bad and needs someone to tell him and tell him why. 

For months, officers' call was held twice daily — once on 
the training ground and again at headquarters. They were 
constantly impressed with the responsibility that rested upon 
them, and with the fact that efficiency could only be obtained 
by being efficient themselves, and that the qualities of leader- 
ship could only be realized when all points of the game are 
thoroughly absorbed. 

The officers were nearly all active, energetic, and enthu- 
siastic in the desire to learn and gradually inspired in the men 
the same energy and enthusiasm. Full use was made of every- 
thing new in training methods. Officers were encouraged to 
take the various courses at the School of Arms at Fort Sill, and 
their knowledge was promptly imparted to the regiment upon 
their return. The services of the French and British Instruc- 
tors were used daily until every organization had ample officers 
and non-coms, for training all their men in all the specialties of 
the infantry service. 

And when, in late May and June of 1918, 2150 drafted men 
were added to the 1500 then in the regiment, they were quickly 
and systematically trained in the rudiments of the game, were 
absorbed by their companies within four weeks and after a 
week's touch of elbows with their comrades of longer training, 
it was difficult to tell the five-week men from the five-month or 
five-year men; the new men found a pace had been set for them 
by their comrades and quickly absorbed the spirit which they 
found. 

The Band has grown from eight to fifty members and while 
many of the instruments were owned by the individuals or 
bought by subscriptions of officers, a similar spirit had grown 
in the organization and its music had a swing to it that would 
make a cripple march well. 

Beginning with one modest song, in the summer of 191 7, 



vi Foreword 

the regiment had a repertoire of eleven songs eight months 
later, and all had a punch and a whack which inspired the men 
and produced amusement and pleasure and added materially 
to the general esprit. 

It was beautiful to see the regiment grow in discipline and 
efficiency in spite of the shortage of officers, men, and tools 
with which to work, and in spite of the long delayed inspiration 
that \\ as to come from orders to go to France. It was just as 
beautiful to find that when the Armistice came in November, 
19 1 8 — just three weeks before the regiment was to sail — the 
men behaved like the well-trained and thoroughly disciplined 
soldiers they were instead of ''going to pieces" in disgust. 
They doubtless indulged in lurid streaks of justifiable profanity 
sotto voce, but they did not yell their heads ofi" like hoodlums 
who preferred home to a chance at big game abroad. 

It will always be a source of satisfaction and pride to me 
that I commanded this splendid regiment of loyal officers and 
men, and to have been privileged to take it abroad and deliver 
the fighting efficiency which it possessed would have gratified 
me more than any number of General's stars in the gift of the 
government. 

R. C. Croxton, 

Colo7iel, Retired. 
(Colonel, 63d Infantry to Jan. i, 1919.) 



TO THE MEN WHO DIDN'T GET ACROSS 

We'll soon be back from this terrible war, 

Covered with honor and medals galore : 
Back from chasing the horrible Huns — 

Back from the roar and crash of the guns — 
Back from doing our duty well; 

Regular heroes we are — Like Hell. 

We'll soon be back on the job again, 

Out of the wind, the snow, and the rain, 
Where we fought fierce battles against the Huns, 

Using our mouths instead of our guns, 
Back from doing our wonderful stunt 

Of marking time on the "Maryland Front." 

Yes, we'll soon be back from doing our "bit" 

Showing "our courage" and proving our "grit" — 

Playing our part in the awful jam 
By eating some meals on Uncle Sam. 

In fact there is nothing to possibly mar 
Our wonderful record in winning the war. 

We know what we'll face when we're home once more, 
How they'll "kid" us and "josh" us about "our" war, 

And say we were "soldiers of peaceful ways" — 
Oh, we'll hear all that to the end of our days — 

And we'll only reply to the boys who "kid" 
"By God! we tried, and that's more than you did!" 



Contents 



Foreword ...... 

Introduction ..... 

Headquarters Company 

The Sappers and Bombers Platoon 

The Stokes Mortar .... 

How it Feels to be Shelled by the Stokes 

The Pioneer Platoon . 

The Signal Platoon 

The One-Pounder Platoon 

The Band Section 

Mounted Orderly Section 

Miscellany . 

Machine Gun Company . 

Supply Co.mpany . 

Medical Department 

First Battalion, Sixty-third U. S. Infantry 

Provost Guard, ist Battalion, 63RD Infantry Detachment 

Company "A" . 

Company " B" . 



PAGE 

iii 
I 

17 
31 
34 
43 
45 
50 
56 

59 
63 
65 
72 
87 

lOI 

109 

113 
117 
129 



X Contents 








PAGE 


Company " C" . 






143 


Company " D" . 






157 


Second Battalion, Sixty-third U. S. Infantry 






167 


Company " E" . 






171 


Company "F" 






185 


Company "G" . 






191 


Company " H " . 






205 


Third Battalion Sixty-third U. S. Infantry . 






215 


The New ^'ork Detachment 






219 


Company " I " . 






227 


Company " K" . 






241 


The Model Company ..... 






247 


CO.MPANY "L" . 






257 


Company "M" 






270 


In Me.moriam ...... 






283 


Rosters 




. 


. 285 



Illustrations 



Colonel Richard C. Croxton 
Colonel Charles J. Nelson 
The Sixty-third U. S. Infantry 
Lieutenant Colonel Harry H. Bissell 
Captain W. Stewart Paul 
Captain William P. Woods . 
Captain Robert E. McGill . 
Captain Theodore A. Oberlander 
Captain Robert D. Horton . 
First Lieutenant Arthur F. Pierson 
First Lieutenant Wendell L. Clemenson 
In the Field ...... 

Second Lieutenant Wallace A. Maciejewski 
Captain Leo J. Daly .... 

Second Lieutenant Matthew F. Shubert 
Second Lieutenant F. E. Childs . 
Second Lieutenant Don Riley 
Our " Leatherlegs" .... 

Machine Gunners All .... 



Frontispiece 

facing 
following 



I 
8 

15 
16 
16 
16 
16 
29 
29 
29 

69 
70 
70 
70 
70 
70 
77 
77 



xu 



Illustrations 



Suicide Squads .... 

"Let 'er Buck!" .... 

"Punchers'" IN Disguise 

First Lieuten.ant Archer L. Lerch 

Second Lieuten.ant X'ictor Thomason 

First Lieutenant Willi a.m L. Conway 

.\L\joR Harry E. Clay 

ALajor Tho.mpson M. Baird 

Captain Ja.mes S. Hewson 

Captain Frank H. Collins 

Captain Ezra F. .Mertz 

First Lieutenant Tho.mas F. Moore 

First Lieutenant Judson F. Browne 

First Lieutenant Frank A. .Murphy 

First Lieutenant W'illia.m S. Crawford 

First Lieutenant Irving R. Hardy 

First Lieutenant Francis J. Slattery 

Chaplain James H. Dunha.m . 

Chaplain Daniel F. Desmond 

Chaplain .Melvin V. Ogle 

Regimental Officers 

Headquarters Company 

Machine Cun Company 

Supply Company 

,\LAjfjR W'alilr F. Black 

Second Lieutenant Edgar ,\L Haas 



78 
89 
90 
99 
99 

99 
100 
100 
103 
103 
103 
103 
103 
103 
103 
103 
103 
104 
104 
104 



following 1 08 

I I I 
1 1 1 



Illustrations 



Xlll 



First Lieutenant Alfred P. Kitson 

First Lieutenant Lorenzo D. Macy 

The Chosen Few .... 

First in Their Lines 

Captain Wilson G. Bingham 

First Lieutenant Henry D. McCary 

First Lieutenant Raymond R. Tourtillott 

Inside and Out .... 

Ready for Anything 

In and Out of Khaki 

First Lieutenant Frank J. Leard 

Captain Grady H. Pendergrast 

First Lieutenant Ralph E. Powell 

First Lieutenant Fred H. Reynolds 

Second Lieutenant Walter M. Hampton 

Second Lieutenant William P. Strong 

Sergeants Madden and Stiles Hard at it 

All the Comforts of Home . 

First Lieutenant Albert C. Newell 

First Lieutenant Eugene E. Pratt 

Captain Thomas L. McMurray 

Second Lieutenant Harold L. Turner 

First Lieutenant Martin Miller 

The Necessities of Life 

"As You Were" 

First Lieutenant Clarence L. O'Niel . 



PAGE 
I I 

I I 

15 
16 
19 
19 

19 

20 

125 
26 

33 

33 

33 

33 

33 

33 

34 

34 

145 

145 

145 

145 

'45 

146 

55 

59 



XIV 



Illustrations 



Captain Leslie T. Lathrop . 

Second Lieutenant John F. Farley 

Second Lieutenant James A. Kehoe 

Remember God's Country? 

Can You Forget This? . 

"A" Company 

"B" Company 

"C" Company 

"D" Company 

.\L\joR H. H. Walker .... 

First Lieutenant Garth B. Haddock 

Captain Francis W. Kernan . 

First Lieutenant George W. ^'ouNG, Jr. 

First Lieutenant Francis C. Lewis 

Captain Richard M. Winfield 

Second Lieutenant Frank H. Tyson 

First Lieutenant Reuben E. Halston . 

Coast to Coast ..... 

Oh, What Sights! ..... 

Second Lieutenant Leonard W. Hartigan 

First Lieutenant Chesley F. Jenness 

First Lieutenant Tully C. Garner 

Second Lieutenant Benjamin Knight 

Second Lieutenant Alvin O. Bloedorn 

"The President's Own" 

Formal Guard .Mount and Parade 



159 
159 

159 
163 
164 



following 1 66 



169 
169 
169 
173 
•73 
>73 
173 
•73 
177 
178 
193 
193 
193 
193 

•93 
194 
203 



Illustrations 



XV 



"E" Company 
"F" Company 
"G" Company 
"H" Company 
Major Leland S. Hobbs ...... 

Second Lieutenant William E. Field .... 

Major Elmer E. E. Swanton, Q. M. C. . 

Banquet in Honor of Colonel R. C. Croxton, April i i, 1919 

"Yimca" and His "Ath-a-letes" . 

First Lieutenant Edward D. J. Coughlan 

Captain Walter A. Mack 

Second Lieutenant Harry Boissonnault 

The Regimental "Champs" 

These are "The Hard Boys" 

Such Things Happen 

First Lieutenant Clinton L. Markley 

First Lieutenant Kenneth B. Gunn 

Captain William V. Witcher, Jr. . 

Second Lieutenant William M. Hutchins 

First Lieutenant Laurence E. McDonald 

Murphy's Midgets .... 

First Lieutenant Jonathan W. Edwards 
Captain Irving C. Avery 
First Lieutenant Elijah G. Arnold 
First Lieutenant Roy T. Rouse 
Second Lieutenant Harold L. Green 



following 2 1 4 



217 
217 
217 
218 
225 
226 
226 
226 
233 
234 
234 
245 
245 
245 
245 
245 
246 
259 
259 
259 
259 
259 



XVI 



Illustrations 



First Lieutenant Oliver R. Clark 
Who Won the War" .... 
First Lieutenant Alexander Clarkston 
First Lieutenant Evan C. Dresser 
Captain Stanley A. Thomson 
Second Lieutenant Lawrence J. Brack 
First Lieutenant Clyde H. Plank 
No Offense, "Gobs"! . . . . 

"L' Co.MPANY 

"K" Company 
"L" Company 
".M" Company 



PAGE 

260 
273 
273 
273 
273 
273 
274 



following 282 



A HISTORY 

OF THE 

SIXTY-THIRD U. S. INFANTRY 




' > • ;i-~>\f»2'^say!3*a^»'?a»?:*^.*5.'^i.iw4'.'Vi??ii'-i'jftr 



History of the 63 rd U. S. Infantry 



Introduction 

LITTLE need be said by way of an introduction for the 
following work, for, like "Topsy," it merely grew. 
That phrase may very aptly be applied to the regiment 
as well. It does not take years to make history, and espe- 
cially true is this in time of war — hence we offer no apology 
for the length of ours. Then, too, we feel that our history 
is one of which every soldier should be proud — for truly it 
dates back to the organization of the 12th Infantry (July, 
1798), the parent organization of the 63rd Infantry. The 
former regiment has an excellent record and fought in the 
battles of 1812, 1845, the Indian campaigns, the Spanish- 
American War, and the Philippine Insurrection. 

It is not our purpose to recite the history of the 12th 
Infantry, but from the campaigns in which our parent was 
engaged it emerged with its share of the spoils of war, as well 
as the scars incident to the horrors of the battlefield, and 
one third of the 12th Infantry, consisting of sixteen officers 
and about six hundred enlisted men, became members of the 
63rd U. S. Infantry. 

The regiment came into existence June i, 19 17, at the Pre- 
sidio of San Francisco, California, in compliance with General 
Orders No. 62, War Department, 1917. The first to command 



2 History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 

the regiment was Major C. H. Miller, who, however, was re- 
lieved by the assignment of Lieutenant Colonel Willis Uline 
on June 13th. Of the company commanders nothing need 
be said here, as each company has compiled its own story, 
and mentioning them would only entail useless repetition. 
Non-commissioned officers' schools were established and train- 
ing commenced immediately. 

The Fifteenth Provisional Infantry Brigade was organized 
about June 30th, consisting of the 12th, 62nd, and 63rd Regi- 
ments, Colonel E. F. Taggart was commanding officer. 

The nucleus of the regimental band, Band Leader John 
Walters in charge, was organized at the same time and in the 
same manner as the remainder of the regiment. It was care- 
fully built up, in part by personal subscription from the officers, 
until it reached a remarkable state of efficiency. It has long 
been a custom in the army to spare the band, which as a rule 
practiced but a few hours each day — a concert now and then — 
and a growl forthcoming in the event of an extra hour's play- 
ing. It was not so with this band, for they were caused to 
practice or play eight hours a day. Mr. Walters was an able 
leader — conscientious and diligent in his work — and was 
competent to instruct in any instrument. 

Every Colonel must have a hobby — and so the band was 
the hobby of ours! It was recruited from eight to the 
authorized strength of twenty-eight with twelve men at- 
tached; later it totaled fifty-four members. It has been 
thought fitting to dwell somewhat upon the band because 
of its evident influence upon the entire personnel. Of the 
men who were at the Presidio of San Francisco, California, 
how many will forget how proud we were to stand in line 
for ceremony or to "form up" in front of the singing stand 
and sing the fourteen regimental songs .^^ Hundreds and 
sometimes thousands of spectators vied daily for a place 
near the stand. The band played for one week at the 



Introduction 3 

Orpheum Theater, San Francisco, where its excellence was 
recognized. 

Little can be chronicled with reference to Lieutenant 
Colonel Uline and Major Miller, due to their extremely short 
stay with the regiment. Colonel Richard C. Croxton joined 
the regiment July i6, 1917, and remained our commanding 
officer up to the time of his retirement, December 30, 1918. 
Colonel Croxton was a soldier in everything the word implies, 
a gentleman, kind, just, absolutely firm; his personality set 
a standard to be attained by all — his character inspired every 
officer and man to loyalty. 

During the month of July, 441 recruits joined the regiment, 
which number brought its strength up to 1054. 

Up to this time no further assignment of officers had been 
made, and the regiment was indeed short of commissioned 
officers. However, on August 29th, twenty-seven second 
lieutenants, graduates of the Reserve Officers' Training Camp, 
Presidio of San Francisco, California, reported for duty. 
This number brought our commissioned personnel up to 
about forty-five. 

During the month of September, 1917, Major Herman 
Koehler, Master of the Sword at West Point, had been in- 
structing the students of the Second Reserve Officers' Training 
Camp at the Presidio of San Francisco in calisthenics, at the 
conclusion of which a course was extended to commissioned and 
enlisted representatives of the regiment, who in turn instructed 
the entire regiment. At the same time a course in bayonet 
fighting was instituted by the same instructor and methods. 

A number of French and British commissioned and en- 
listed instructors had been sent from abroad and it was our 
good fortune to have ours in the persons of Captain Clavel 
and Lieutenant Batel, French army. The instruction con- 
sisted principally of new infantry attack formations and was 
quickly absorbed by all. 



4 History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 

With the advent of October came a new hobby of our 
Colonel — singing. It was strange to hear the numerous opin- 
ions expressed, but the reader may be impressed with the 
fact that from singing just one song, which later developed 
into fourteen, there grew an esprit which was a delight to see. 

In hand with singing came the establishing of French classes 
which were taught by the Rev. C. L. Miel. The classes were 
held in the Y. M. C. A. hut. 

We now pass to December 15th, which day was of consider- 
able moment to the regiment, for instead of a badly needed 
assignment of men there came from the Second Reserve Offi- 
cers' Training Camp, Presidio of San Francisco, one captain, 
thirty-two first lieutenants, and ten second lieutenants. They 
were immediately assigned to companies and very quickly 
adapted themselves to the daily routine. 

The Regimental Intelligence Section was organized during 
the month of December with Lieutenant E. H. Clark, Jr., 
as Intelligence Officer. The companies were called upon to 
furnish selected men to fill this section and it was not long 
before they were an extremely efficient body. Second Lieu- 
tenants Donald H. McLaughlin and Edmunds Lyman also 
became members of the Intelligence Section. Lieutenant 
Lyman later became Divisional Interpreter, nth Division. 

There were also being held at this time Bayonet, Trench 
Mortar, Sniping and Scouting, Machine Gun, and Grenade 
Schools which were taught by British commissioned and non- 
commissioned officers. 

On December 31, 1917, just preparatory to dissolving the 
Fifteenth Provisional Brigade, the Brigade passed in review 
before Colonel E. F. Taggart. It was at this time that the 
1 2th and 62nd Regiments left for Camp Fremont to become 
part of the 8th Division. 

Our regiment now numbered ninety-four commissioned 
officers and eleven hundred and seventy-six enlisted men. 



Introduction 5 

We now had hopes of an early recruitment and visions 
of ioining a Division soon. But no! This is what happened. 
On January lo, 1918. Captain Alan Pendleton left with a 
detachment of sixty-three men for guard duty at the Aviation 
Field, North Island, San Diego, California. Captain Pen- 
dergrast departed with a detachment of twenty-five for Beni- 
cia Arsenal. Sergeant Reed of Company "C" entrained with 
ten men for Los Angeles, California, for duty at one of the 
quartermaster depots. This detachment was added to by 
a detachment of twenty-five a few days later. 

As you may well guess, our hopes were somewhat shattered, 
but our spirit remained high, for shortly after the departure 
of the last detachment, gas drill and instruction were com- 
menced and continued up to the signing of the Armistice. 

We had hoped that the last detachment sent out was to 
have been the last detachment to leave the Regiment, but 
in February, Captain Thomas L. McMurray, commanding 
Company "C," departed for Long Beach, California, for 
guard duty at the Craig Shipbuilding Company. Captain 
R. N. Winfield, commanding Company *'D," departed with 
his company on the same date for Garfield, Utah, where he 
was to guard the International Smelting and Refining Com- 
pany. On February 7th, Company "E," with First Lieu- 
tenant A. C. Newell commanding, departed for the Presidio 
of Monterey, for duty at that post. Company "H" sent out 
a detachment, commanded by Sergeant Royal B. Allyn, on 
February i8th, for the purpose of guarding the Moore Ship- 
building Company at Oakland, California. On February 
2ist, Second Lieutenant Fred C. Lindquist, departed with 
twenty-nine enlisted men for guard duty over the storage 
warehouses at Lompoc, California. On February 27th, 
twenty-eight enlisted men, commanded by Captain A. F. 
Schmitz, 6th Battalion, United States Guards, departed for 
duty at the Schaw-Batcher Shipyard, South San Francisco, 



6 History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 

California. At this time the regiment was covering territory 
from Idaho to Southern CaHfornia, and as far east as Utah 
with httle possibiHty of the regiment being brought together 
for some few months to come, but on March 3rd Captain 
Winfield returned to the Presidio of San Francisco, Cahfornia. 
It was not long after when all of the detachments were recalled, 
and July 22nd saw the regiment once again within its own bar- 
racks at the Presidio, when the detachment at Benicia Arsenal 
returned. 

On March 13th, fifteen second lieutenants reported for 
duty from the Army Service School at Fort Leavenworth, 
Kansas. In April, classes were established for the instruc- 
tion of non-English speaking soldiers. 

Our numbers on June 30, 1918, totaled one hundred and 
twenty-eight commissioned officers and thirty-six hundred 
and four enlisted men. The esprit now was higher than ever 
before and it was indeed an inspiring sight to watch the regi- 
ment form daily for ceremony on the old Presidio Parade 
Ground and immediately after form up for singing. On 
August 2nd, the regiment passed in final review before Briga- 
dier General E. J. McClernand. 

On August 1 2th, the regiment entrained for Camp Meade, 
Maryland, where we were to become a part of the 22nd In- 
fantry Brigade, nth Division. On August 30th the regiment 
began target practice, firing special Course **C" with the 
Lee-Enfield rifle. 

On the morning of September 6th, immediately after the 
regiment had returned from the target range, five hundred and 
sixty-three enlisted men were transferred to the 72nd Infantry 
forming the nucleus of that regiment. There were also trans- 
ferred at this time a number of commissioned officers. 

While at the Presidio a number of enlisted men had been 
recommended f(jr commission as second lieutenants in the 
National Army, and on September 5th, these deserving non- 



Introduction 7 

commissioned officers received their appointments. Several 
were assigned to the 63rd Infantry, and the others to various 
infantry and machine-gun organizations within the division. 
On September 9, 1918, the Regimental Model Company, 
commanded first by Captain W. Stewart Paul, and later by 
Captain W. V. Witcher, was formed, in accordance with 
Table of Organizations of July 18, 1918. This company was 
used for attack instruction and exhibition purposes and staged 
an ideal attack formation for the nth Division on September 
25th. On October 30th, the company executed a second 
exhibition attack and assault, with an actual protective bar- 
rage of machine-gun, Stokes mortar, and 37-mm.-gun fire. 
On November 6th the Model Platoon from the company, 
commenced an attack exhibition for the War College Motion 
Pictures photographs, which continued about two weeks. 
The officers and men of this company received praise from the 
Division Commander, as well as from various staft' officers 
from the War Department who witnessed the exhibition. 

During the month of September, four hundred and fifty- 
nine recruits, principally draft men, were received from the 
154th Depot Brigade; and a recruit course of five weeks was 
commenced. These men by no means equalled the standard 
of the men we had brought with us from the Pacific Coast, 
being much smaller in physique and of lower mental quality. 
The majority of them were returned to the Development 
Battalion. 

Early in October, the epidemic of Spanish Influenza struck 
the regiment, resulting in a total number of deaths of two 
officers and ten enlisted men. This is a remarkable feature, 
since it is well known that hundreds were dying in other regi- 
ments. The few deaths in this regiment may be attributed 
to the precautionary measures taken by our commanding 
officer and the surgeon. The men were examined a number 
of times daily and any man found to be suffering from any 



8 History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 

ailment whatever was immediately sent to the hospital for a 
thorough physical examination. In this way, all patients 
were handled in the early stages. The death of these two 
officers and the ten enlisted men struck every man as though 
he had lost his own brother and comrade. 

On October 2Sth, the Advance School Detachment of 
twelve officers and twelve sergeants, departed for over-seas, 
arriving at Liverpool, England, November 8, 1918. 

A number of second lieutenants in the regiment, having 
been recommended to be first lieutenants, were transferred 
to the 72nd Infantry, and four to the 32nd Machine Gun 
Battalion. Eleven second lieutenants were transferred to 
the 63rd Infantry from the 72nd Infantry. 

Upon November 2nd the regiment was fully equipped and 
was, with the exception of a few convalescents from the influ- 
enza and a very few recruits, fully trained and ready for 




■»*» 




Introduction 9 

over-seas duty. On November 9th the regiment, in company 
with the remainder of the Eleventh Division, was reviewed 
by the commanding general. 

With the signing of the Armistice on November nth 
came a disappointment which was hard to stand, and Colonel 
Croxton, in his foreword, has adequately expressed the opinion 
and feeling of the officers and men. 

On November 29th the regiment was placed at the disposal 
of the commanding general. Eastern Department. We 
were to replace United States Guard troops which were at 
that time on Provost and Utilities guard duties. 

The following letter was addressed to the commanding 
officer of the 63rd Infantry on December 4th: 



Headquarters nth Division, U. S. Army 
Camp Meade, Mar\'land, 
December 4th, 19 18. 

Colonel R. C. Croxton, 

Commanding, 6^rd Infantry, 
Camp Meade, Md. 
My dear Colonel Croxton: 

Orders having been received to place your regiment at the disposal 
of the Commanding General, Eastern Department, I desire to place on 
record in this informal way, my appreciation of the efficient and loyal 
service performed by you as Regimental Commander while a member 
of this Division. 

Notwithstanding the fact that your regiment was only recently 
organized, you have by your energy, zeal, and good judgment, brought 
it to a high state of discipline and training. 

The spirit of the regiment is excellent and its bearing and soldierly 
performance of duty have been an inspiration to other units in the 
Division. 

My best wishes go with you and your regiment in its new field of duty. 
Cordially and sincerely yours, 

J. McI. Carter, 

Major General, U. S. A., 
Commanding. 



10 History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 

On December 23rd, Company "K" and a detachment of 
Company *'I," Captain Walter A. Mack commanding, 
departed for Provost Guard duty at New York City, New 
York. 

On January 3rd the regiment passed in final review before 
Colonel Richard C. Croxton, who had been retired after thirty 
years service, on December 30, 1918. The retirement of 
Colonel Croxton came as a shock to all. An impromptu 
dinner was arranged and during the speeches that evening 
many officers and several of the enlisted personnel were seen 
to be dabbing at their eyes with their handkerchiefs. The 
officers presented the Colonel with a beautiful watch and a 
cigarette holder, while the enlisted men presented him with a 
handsome diamond stick pin. The spirit inculcated into the 
regiment by Colonel Croxton exists today and it is the hope 
of every member that it will continue. 

The period between December 23d and early February 
saw the regiment again being split up into small detachments. 
The Third Battalion, plus Company "E," was sent to New 
York. The First Battalion went to Curtis Bay, Maryland, 
Company "F" to Camp Holabird, Maryland, while the 
Headquarters, Machine Gun, Supply, and "G" companies 
were sent to East Potomac Park, Washington, D. C. All 
of these detachments were performing Provost Guard and 
police duty. 

This duty was most undesirable to men who had trained 
hard and faithfully for the "big show" abroad, only to find 
themselves pacing the streets with little to do and restricted 
authority in the doing of that little. Their main value con- 
sisted in being on call as special patrols to go to dance halls 
and such places where the mere entry of the patrols quieted 
soldiers and sailors under the influence of liquor. 

The result was that this fine body of men sought discharge, 
rather than continue a duty which seemed childish as com- 



Introduction 



II 



pared with their strenuous eighteen months of preparation 
for doing the work of real soldiers abroad. 

As this book goes to press very few of the men who were 
"on their toes" and ready to sail for France in November, 
1918, remain with the regiment, but it is believed that none 
will cease to be proud of their service with the regiment, nor 
will they ever doubt that the regiment would have faced and 
chased the Huns (had it but had a chance) with the same 
loyalty, determination, and efficiency which was displayed in 
training for the job. 




BUT TttESE STOPPED U5 



nve: were: readv 



12 



History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 



OVER THERE 

Johnnie get \'our gun, get your gun, get your gun. 

Take it on the run, on the run, on the run; 

Hear them calHng you and me — 

Ev'ry son of liberty; 

Hurry right away no dela\', go today, 

Make j^our daddy glad to have had such a lad- 

Tell your sweetheart not to pine — 

To be proud her boy's in line. 

CHORUS 

Over there — Over there — 

Send the word, send the word, over there, 

That the Yanks are coming, the Yanks are coming; 

The drums rum-tum-ming ev'ry where — 

So prepare — Say a pray'r. 

Send the word, send the word to beware; 

We'll be over, we're com-ing over. 

And we won't come hack till it's over over there. 

{Repeat loud, then J allow with "Dixie," — men whistling — then 
repeat chorus loud.) 




CR.0X.TONS CANAR.IES 

• IN F"niSCO 



XSSRjSiSvti^i 



"f^'im 



iMM 



^^Mk 



THF PUNCIIIKG SIXTV-TIIIRn 

(IVri/leii for the regiment) 



FIRST VERSE 

There's a guy we've got to kill, 
And his name is Kaiser Bill; 
And the skunk has got a swelling in his 
head ; 
The French and British guns, 
Have held his rotten Huns, 
But it's us that's got to strike him till he's 
dead. 



CHORUS 

We'll drive him 'cross the Rhine, 

And imprison him, the swine. 

In an Allied camp: he'll wish that he were 
dead. 
Then we'll ask him if he's heard 
Of the Punching Sixty-Third, 

And fill his dirtv carcass full of lead. 



SECOND VERSE 

For the \'ankees he will dread. 
And he'll think what Sherman said 
When through Hindenburger's line we do 
advance; 
For the lives that he has crushed. 
And the women he's debauched, 
We, with shot and shell, will blast him 
out of France. 



THIRD VERSE 

In the battle's roar and shock. 
When our bombs begin to drop. 
Our hand grenades and Yankee cannons 
roar; 
When he hears our eagle scream, 
And he sees our ba\onets gleam. 
Then too late this war of his he will 
deplore. 

13 






^iSMf^ 








-^Tt^ 







" so LONG " 

(U'riiien for the regiment) 

We all know it's mightx" slow, 
But we'll get there just the same; — 
Each Service star — For America 
Helps to send the damned old Kaiser 
And the Crown Prince down to Hell; 

so — 
Hurry up — that's the stuff — 
Let us go over the top. 
We'll raise the Stars and Stripes in old 

Berlin 
And let Democracy rule — supreme. — 



CHORUS 

We're going over there be\ond the seas ; — 
We're goin' to put the Kaiser on his 

knees; — 
We'll help the other boys who are so 

brave and true and tired too — 
Our hearts are filled with joy and not 

with pain — 
We know our efforts will not be in vain — 
W'e know our Countr\' needs us — over 

there; 
Our Sweethearts waiting — over here — 
So Au Revoir to our loved ones — So 

Lons. 






'i- '' 



14 




Lieutenant Colonel Harry H. Bissell 
15 




'5 C 




= ^ 




~ ^ 



i6 









{) / 




HEADQUARTERS Company was cradled at Angel Island. 
a cragg\', wooded point rising with an air of abrupt 
inquin' from the blue waters of San Francisco Bay. 
It learned its first military steps by painful, dogged effort 
on the spacious drill grounds of the incomparably lovely 
Presidio, and grew into a sturdy organization of keen fighting 
specialists in the great army cantonment at Camp Meade. 
MaPv'land. 

The transformation of the awk\vard. bewildered recruit, 
herded, heedless of his comfort, by unsympathetic and raucous- 
voiced *'non-coms. " through those Angel Island and Presidio 
days, into the sman, self-confident soldier of a few months 
later was one of the almost-miracles of our organization and 
training methods that brought the amazed Hun to his knees 
considerably in advance of the earliest date the most san- 
guine optimism had suggested. Just how it was accompHshed 
only God and our ofticers know. Partial explanation may 
be found in the character of the material out of which Head- 



1 8 History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 

quarters Company, and in fact the whole regiment, was 
fashioned. Nature itself is kind to the Western man. Wide 
spaces in which to grow and work and play; clear, vivid skies 
that seem a little nearer and more personal than they do 
anywhere else; strong winds that have their vigorous and 
invigorating way with mountain and valley and shore; air 
that is sweet and unpolluted by the smoke of crowded manu- 
facture and the ceaselessly churned dust and grime of huddled 
populations — these are the priceless birthright of the Westerner. 

Headquarters Company struggled into skeleton formation 
during July, 1918. The two preceding months witnessed a 
steady procession of embryo soldiers to Angel Island from 
Montana ranges, Idaho mines, Oregon and Washington farms, 
California ranches. Most of them thought "Parade Rest" 
was some sort of order for stopping a column of marching men, 
and wouldn't have known whether a trombone was a bird or 
a musical instrument. But the two indispensable primary 
qualities of the good soldier they had in abundance — strength 
and courage. Also, the great majority knew how to shoot. 
And the nature of their accustomed environment tended to 
teach them self-reliance and initiative. So the seed was 
good. Sedulous care, informed skill and patience and under- 
standing achieved the harvest. 

Headquarters Company did not get across. Singly and 
collectively it indulges, and always will indulge, in a little 
selfish regret over that fact. But it was ready, and always, 
too, will feel proud and grateful that it had been pronounced 
fit to go. What fun and what bitterness, too, were crowded 
into those brief weeks in and about San Francisco! The bit- 
terness vanished long ago, became, in fact, one of the laugh- 
able recollections of those colorful days. But it was real 
enough then. Never were men more strangely placed than 
many of these Headquarters Company soldiers. Big chaps 
from the Butte copper mines, for example, choking and glar- 



Headquarters Company 19 

ing under the verbal castigation of a snappy, sweating, dis- 
gusted little sergeant whom they could pulverize between 
their huge fists. Cowpunchers from around Cheyenne and 
Pendleton, accustomed to giving and exacting a punctilious 
courtesy in their dealings with one another, quivering with 
helpless rage when told to "get to hell out of" one place or 
another. It wasn't the " non-com'. s" fault. On Angel Island 
where thousands of civilians, aggressively independent Ameri- 
can citizens, received their first taste of Army discipline along 
with their uniforms, there was neither time nor strength to 
waste upon efi^orts towards scrupulous courtesy or painstaking 
consideration of anyone's sensibilities. It was a constant 
marvel how those doughty corporals and sergeants of regulars 
supported the daily and nightly strain. Nevertheless the 
most ardent patriotism was inclined to cool a little under 
their treatment. It blazed up again, however, when, out- 
fitted and finger-printed and catalogued so completely that 
one guiltily suspected the Government knew whether one ever 
ate sugar on one's lettuce. Angel Island was left joyfully behind 
and the Presidio, two miles across the fairest of ocean reaches, 
was attained. 

It was the citizen-soldier's first big step — those two short 
miles. Unlike his arrival at the Island receiving depot, he 
landed here, in outward semblance at least, a soldier. From 
the very first, the attitude of his military superiors was vastly, 
gratefully, different from that which his first encounter with 
the species had led him to expect. As one sergeant in the 
East Cantonment recruit barracks put it: "Over on the Island 
they treat you like dogs. Here we treat you like men, and 
we expect you to act that way." A fellow's self-respect in- 
stantly revived. God knows it needed resuscitation! As I 
say, it is funny now; really one of those memories of a new 
and strange experience no one would willingly part with. It 
was different then. 



20 History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 

What first impressed the recruit in the East Cantonment 
was that he at last was really an integral part of that army 
which was to preserve American honor and save civilization 
from the German blight. He quickly sensed a spirit of frater- 
nity and cooperation that was helpfully inspiring. He felt 
that officers and enlisted men alike, equally, were straining 
together toward the accomplishment of a great and noble 
purpose. It caused him promptly to resolve not to shirk his 
share. 

I believe I may truthfully record that not one of those 
eager young soldiers faltered in his determination from that 
time on; certain it is that there was no diminution of effort 
until that fateful nth of November, when realization came 
that they could no longer hope to take the field against the 
hosts of Hindenburg. 

Less than five months had elapsed and yet what great, and, 
in many instances, curious changes they had wrought; no 
less to the individual soldier than to the world which he so 
gallantly had helped to withhold from the barbarians' grasp! 
When, after five weeks' drill in the School of the Soldier and 
the School of the Squad, some three hundred men were ad- 
vanced from the recruit barracks and became Headquarters 
Company, 63rd Infantry, U. S. Army, friendships were formed 
which will endure a life time. Old outlooks upon life were 
completely altered. Contacts were experienced whose influ- 
ence will always be felt. Many of the three hundred had 
never before been in a town of any size; few, comparatively, 
were familiar with the innumerable aspects of a great city. 
And then San Francisco, gay, proud, luringly beautiful, as 
variable in her moods and fascinatingly complex in charac- 
ter as a royal charmer of old France, suddenly burst upon 
their astonished consciousness. Courted them. Loved them. 
Lavished upon them every attention out of a generous heart 
swelling with pride and trust and gratefulness. The nights 



Headquarters Company 21 

in which she feted them, the days off duty in which she catered 
whole-heartedly to their every need and desire, amply com- 
pensated for the hardships of the daily drill ground. There 
was a month of this, a brief and glorious and, it must be con- 
fessed, a painful month. Rifles that are now carried as easily 
as a walking stick, tugged and tore at protesting muscles then. 
Heads now immovable during the fastest drill, then ducked 
and twisted in amusing concern as rifles were brought from 
the shoulder to the order or port. First Lieutenant A. F. 
Pierson, upon whom the onus of drilling the more awkward 
recruits fell, often prayerfully adjured a platoon to walk into 
the bay and be done with trying to be soldiers. By the time 
recall sounded most of them wished they had. At reveille 
each morning they hoped he would insist upon it. 

Finally squads right, or left, was executed well enough so 
that the Company Commander's eyes were no longer red 
from weeping. Packs could be unrolled at drill with good 
prospect of stuffing back a preponderance of their contents. 
Sergeants no longer looked at their platoons as if wondering 
why this cross had been put upon them. There was less 
reporting to the Orderly Room after Saturday inspection to 
be caustically lectured upon the value and virtue of an ab-so- 
lute-ly spotless rifle. Headquarters Company, in short, was 
shaping up when the welcome orders to move came and on 
the morning of August 12, 1918, the 63rd entrained for France. 

To be sure, its immediate destination was Camp Meade, 
Md., but in the mind of every private, at least in Headquarters 
Company, that meant merely an annoying interruption of 
their journey. An anathematized delay of two or possibly 
three weeks for the purpose of putting the finishing touches 
upon an outfit that every one of them already sincerely con- 
sidered as good as they come, or, at any rate, the peer of any 
regiment before ever it had plunged into the inferno over-seas. 

The writer will never forget the morning of the departure 



22 History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 

from San Francisco. Before daybreak the bugle sang its 
song to wakefulness. But how different from other mornings, 
when we awoke to curse its inexorable summons, did its music 
sound! It crept sweetly into our sleeping consciousness, 
softly exulting in the fulfilment of a glorious promise. It called 
us to be up and off for France. And, unlike other mornings 
when we clung stubbornly to our blankets until the last 
possible moment consistent with safety, we leaped to answer it. 

Packs had been rolled the night before, for the most part, 
and it required but a few minutes to form in front of barracks, 
answer roll-calls, and troop through the still heavy darkness 
to waiting baggage cars, soon filled with extra equipment. 
Breakfast was a sketchy affair. All save the most phlegmatic 
were too excited to pay any attention to the menu which 
upon all previous mornings, no matter what its excellence, 
was always the subject of lengthy comment, mostly derogatory. 

When, preceded by the staff, the regiment, with the band 
and Headquarters Company in the lead, fell into line for the 
march to the depot and began its impressive procession, it is 
a safe wager that most of the men in line, from Colonel Croxton 
down to the lowliest ''buck," already felt like conquering 
heroes. 

Almost as such, indeed, the regiment was acclaimed along 
the line of march. Its peculiarly western character made it 
an object of special endearment to the cheering crowds which 
thronged the pavement and wildly waved flags and handker- 
chiefs from windows and house-tops. Since then the 63rd 
has had the high honor of marching up Pennsylvania Avenue 
in Washington, when a battalion passed in review before the 
President, but it is doubtful if it has ever experienced since, 
or ever will, as proud a thrill as flashed through it then, firing 
every eye with a light of joyful purpose, stiffening its bearing, 
giving an upward tilt to out-thrust chins. The regiment 
looked w ell that day. 



Headquarters Company 23 

Headquarters Company traveled across the continent in 
the first section of the troop trains. With it rode the Colonel 
and his staff, as also the band. Very especially the band. For 
Lieutenant Walters' 54 — count 'em — 54 reed and brass artists 
contributed greatly to the pleasure of our six-days' trip. 
Music had always played a big part in the development of 
the regiment. Colonel Croxton subscribed to the view of 
those holding that the man who went into action singing was 
the adversary most to be feared. And part of the morning 
drill at the Presidio had been devoted to singing, so that we 
possessed a very creditable repertoire of songs. These echoed 
and reechoed across the continent; every time the train stopped 
the band piled off and "the boys" gathered around. We all 
hope the songs will be pleasantly remembered — if not for the 
excellence of their rendition, then for the glad and grateful 
spirit in which they were sung. 

How we were plied with cigarettes and candy and cofTee 
and sandwiches! Everywhere, even when our train merely 
slowed down! I suppose it is well enough known to justify 
admission that poker has always been popular in the army. 
And there were "old heads" at the Presidio who were always 
willing to teach neophytes all the fine points. Their patience 
and profits were unfailing. Hence many left the Presidio 
with sadly depleted stores of tobacco and sweets. None 
suffered because of it, however, owing to the generosity of 
Red Cross workers and others who welcomed and bade us 
God-speed, almost in one breath, in that flight across country. 

No one will forget the night of arrival at Camp Meade. 
It was after midnight when we were awakened and hastily 
gathered our equipment together. It was after two o'clock 
in the morning when we reached barracks and flung ourselves, 
fully dressed, on iron cots sans mattresses or blankets or any- 
thing conducive to slumber. The trip had fatigued us, prin- 
cipally for the reason that wherever we were due to pass 



H History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 

through a town of any size at night, most of us had stayed up 
to cheer and be cheered. It was, perhaps, ten minutes past 
two when we were awakened to carry Gargantuan boxes and 
Brobdignagian barrels from wagons and trucks into barracks. 
No time was lost in bringing up supplies on that occasion. 
The S. O. S. was on the job with both of its feet and all of ours. 
Thereafter until dawn we alternately tumbled off to sleep and 
were rudely roused to carry something at fifteen-minute inter- 
vals. We began to suspect that the "intensive training" we 
were scheduled to undergo at Camp Meade would prove to 
have a number of unpleasant features. 

Situated on a sandy plain, broken by a few wooded hil- 
locks, also plentifully overspread with sand which was partic- 
ularly and offensively a conspicuous feature of the landscape 
on windy days. Camp Meade lies seventeen miles southeast of 
Baltimore and about thirty miles from Washington. Both 
points are worthy of passing remark, for Baltimore is the 
place where every soldier went when he could borrow eighty- 
eight cents, while Washington is the place from which staff 
colonels and generals and first assistant secretaries of things 
used to drop over with flattering frequency to see how we were 
turning out — and of course we were always turning out. 
Still, we did not mind it, for they all left with very agreeable 
impressions of the fighting effectiveness of the 63 rd. We 
know their compliments were sincere; otherwise our gruff, 
well-loved Colonel would never have repeated them. Enco- 
miums from Colonel Croxton were indeed praise from Sir 
Hubert. He did not believe in coaxing a soldier with com- 
mendation. 

But we were perfectly aware of the pride and affection 
which ever underlaid even his most scathing criticism, and 
no company felt a greater sense of irreparable loss than did 
Headquarters Company the day he passed between our ranks, 
drawn up at the "present," and so, out of our lives. 



Headquarters Company 25 

"Intensive training" was inaugurated with a swiftness that 
portended the whirlwind character of the relentless drill and 
ceaseless instruction which followed. At first Headquarters 
Company, together with the rest of the regiment, spent its 
days in a resumption of squad, platoon, and company elemen- 
tary movements. This was followed by a brief period of fast 
bayonet work on assault courses, where swinging dummies 
were torn to pieces by savage lunge and slash, and where the 
difficulties of "going over the top" fully armed and accoutered 
were first learned. Between times, battle formations formed 
a vigorous and interesting item of drill. 

I don't know what the opinion of our officers was anent 
our response to instruction. My own idea is that it was not, 
comparatively, a heart-breaking labor to whip these men into 
fighting trim. Strong, healthy, eager for the chance to show 
"Heinie" the joke in picking a fighting American for a foe, 
they sprang at their several tasks with a vigor and zest that 
should have been gratifying to their instructors, and brought 
to bear in the solution of their individual and collective prob- 
lems a degree of intelligence which must have in a measure 
facilitated the work of training. I am speaking and thinking 
of Headquarters Company; not of myself, one of the least 
of that brave and devoted band of true comrades. 

The training was hard and often more than a little taxing. 
The weather those first August and September days — un- 
speakable. We had thought some days in July back at the 
Presidio were hot. Certainly they had seemed so when we 
were doing the " double " with arms and a full pack. But they 
were so bitter cold in comparison with what was regarded as 
a mild degree of warmth at Meade that the recollection of 
them brought a shiver. The only way we ever got tolerably 
cool was to talk about the "hot weather" back home. 

When our officers considered that Headquarters Company 
was sufficiently versed in the rudiments of the regimental 



26 History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 

drill and work, the company was divided into platoons; each 
having an individual character and purpose, and then the 
company became a "company of specialists." There were 
organized the One-Pounder Platoon, Intelligence Section, 
Sappers and Bombers Platoon, Signal Platoon, and the Pioneer 
Platoon. ''Drill" as theretofore known and practiced was 
largely abandoned, or rather, subordinated to instructional 
activity in the different platoons. Of course this was still 
"drill" in the broad, military sense, but the change and the 
addition of new interests was enthusiastically greeted. 

Intense rivalry developed among the four platoons, and 
nothing could have had a finer effect. Each man was firmly 
convinced that his platoon was the sole one of real value to 
the regiment; the others were merely brilliant examples of 
inept effort. Good enough, possibly, for those unfitted for 
the high mission of his own platoon, containing as they did 
men who must be used somewhere, but they'd soon find out 
what was what when they had to call upon the li'l ol' one- 
pounder, or the Stokes, or whatever it might be! Naturally 
instruction progressed at an amazing rate. It is literally true 
that, looking back, even when checking up events date by 
date, it is next to impossible to realize how much of accom- 
plishment was crowded into so brief a period. 

While a preponderance of its members will always render 
allegiance first to their great and beloved West, Headquarters 
Company will always think of Baltimore and Washington 
with emotions of profound gratitude and warm affection. Of 
what city can anything finer be said than that it made the 
stranger "doughboy" quartered near it without his desire or 
consent, forget his characteristic diffidence and wistfulness for 
home. And both these hospitable Southern cities did just 
that in generous, magnificent measure. There were dances 
for him every night he could attend, distinguished by the 
presence of breath-taking beauties, delightfully sympathetic, 



Headquarters Company 2^ 

graciously interested if it pleased him to talk about it, in 
that time his little brother James caught poison ivy, or why 
his folks couldn't afford to paint the barn last year. In every 
church was a place, and a person, to remind him of the pastor's 
"study" back home. And if he wanted to eat, all he had to 
do was just to look as if he could stand a little something more. 
He could count upon being coaxed. As a second choice of a 
home town I think every one of us would pick Baltimore or 
Washington. And that is the apotheosis of compliment. 

As this is written. Headquarters Company is doing provost 
guard duty in Washington. Soon most of those who have 
been proudly a part of the company through those vivid San 
Francisco days, and the harder period of training at Camp 
Meade, will become a part of the constantly growing army 
of Red Chevron wearers. Already many good friends and 
true have said good-bye with eyes that were a little moist 
and voices just a trifle lacking in their usual firmness. But 
the friendships that have been formed during such eventful 
months of association and companionship are not of a kind 
that can be closed by a handclasp, or ended with a word of 
farewell. They will endure long after we have all departed 
for our several homes, always to add to the treasures of mem- 
ory and to help us in our association with our fellows, among 
whom we will continually seek for someone like the man who 
was our army "pal." 



2^ History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 



FAMOUS SAYINGS BY OFFICERS OF THE REGIMENT 

Gen. Burt: "Now that 'manual' was executed splendidly." 

Col. R. C. C: "Rotten! Rotten! Have that company do that 
over again," 

Captain Woods: "Check up." 

Rouse: "Confidentially, the Colonel just told me that " 

Capt. Clark at the football game: "Get Crouter, get Crouter." 

Lt. Purvis on Nov. nth: "The war is not over, by order of Major 
General Carter." 

Major Walker: "Gimme the pencil." 

Guess the originator of the next three. 
"Oh you Cole Eight." 
" I never had to work, but I always have." 
" I'm good for any amount up to ten thousand." 

Question: "What is the proper procedure to quell a riot? 

Answer: "Stack Arms, and Fall Out." 

Lt. Walters: "It iss de best band. I vill demonstrate." 

The Colonel (Topsy-turvy land): "All officers will wear boots and 
spurs. All men will wear leather hat strings, and their shirt collars out." 

"ZIP"— 

" Don't let your mess sergeants run your companies." 

"Whatnots." 

" I'M tellin' you how to cook prunes." 

" Everybody take his whistle." 

"Get in step with the band." 

"Tell 'em where and when. If I can't understand it, how do you 
expect them to understand it?" 

"There'll be no more banquets in the field." 

"Of Course they'll say the men don't like salmon. Nobody likes 
salmon thrown out on a tin plate from a can, it isn't fit for dogs to eat. 
They don't know how to prepare it." 

"Where are the first sergeants?" 

"Well, why isn't he here? Send for him." 

(To Capt. Clark): "Follow it up." 

"Show that sentry on No. i how to walk post." 




Captain 
Robert D. Horton 






•n 


■ 


^Br 








J 

1 


j^ 



First Lieutenant 
Arthur F. Pierson 



First Lieutenant 
Wendell L. Clemenson 



29 




30 



The Sappers and Bombers Platoon 

THE Sappers and Bombers Platoon of Headquarters Com- 
pany — that is indeed a high sounding appellation for 
a hard-working body of men. I use "hard-working" 
advisedly, for they kept at work from early until late. And 
no murmurs or complaints were heard. They knew that a 
single well-directed shell would cause more casualties than a 
score of rifles; they knew that to be in position to fire that 
shell, the mortar and the ammunition must be brought up to 
the firing position; they knew — how well they knew it! — the 
weight of that mortar and also the peculiar fact that its weight 
doubled for every hundred yards traveled; they knew that 
owing to its bulk, ammunition must not be wasted and the 
mortar never fired until absolutely sure of the result; they 
also knew that to succeed in getting that mortar forward and 
in position, cover must be utilized to the utmost and that to 
advance with that bulky weapon undiscovered was a trick 
that the average man could not master without long practice. 
Because they knew these facts, knew them through an 
abundance of actual firing practice, each man in the platoon did 
his utmost in perfecting marksmanship, in gaining the ability 
to act and think coolly and collectedly when under fire and when 
firing in return; also in estimating range and in gaining speed 
and celerity in getting into action when once in position. 
Every man of the platoon realized that the Stokes was a 
weapon of utmost value to the regiment in attack or defense 
— if opened up on the right spot at the right moment ! 

31 



32 History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 

The record of the Sappers and Bombers Platoon of Head- 
quarters Company was excellent. The platoon was selected 
to fire some 150 rounds of live ammunition while under a 
barrage from twenty-four machine guns at the divisional 
machine-gun demonstration. This was the first time the 
men had been under fire, and the first time they had handled 
live shells; yet all behaved like veterans. 

The next event of importance was the demonstration for 
the 63rd Infantry ordered by Colonel Croxton. The entire 
regiment was assembled on a side hill at the Stokes mortar 
range while the platoon gave a two-hour demonstration of its 
ability in action, both in fire from position and in "slung" fire. 

Finally, in conjunction with the Signal Platoon, the platoon 
gave the officers of the nth Division an example of the effec- 
tiveness of the Stokes in night fire from |)osition, illustrating 
the different rates of fire, fire control, and fire direction, as 
well as liaison with battalion and regimental headquarters 
in trench warfare. The enemy on that fateful night (well re- 
presented by Captain Johnson, Lieutenant Haas, and Sergeant 
Ransdell) had a plentiful supply of ammunition, flares, and 
rockets, a Stokes mortar, and a Browning automatic. In 
fact, before the show was over, the night became so vociferous 
that the residents of Baltimore thought a battle with artillery 
support was in progress, and the I^altimore [)apers the next 
morning chronicled the event. It was a demonstration as 
near to actual battle conditions as possible, and the oflficers 
who froze on that hill and watched the firing, following in 
detail our work on the different targets, will testify to its 
effectiveness as a tactical demonstration as well as a spectacle. 

In brief, the platoon, whenever and wherever used, proved 
itself. There were no failures, no slip-ups. If we had sailed, 
the platoon would have made good from the start on the other 
side. The effectiveness of the Stokes depends entirely on the 
training, discipline, and physical condition of the men using 



The Sappers and Bombers Platoon 



00 



it. And the platoon was ready for action. The only regret 
of the men in the phitoon was that they did not get the oppor- 
tunity to cross and there render an account of themselves. 

In closing, a word is due Captain Horton. He allowed us 
to have an absolutely free hand in the training. He did not 
attempt to lay down a fixed and arbitrary scliedule, but had 
enough confidence in the platoon to execute — "Hands ottl" 




^"^ 






^^ 



The Sixty- Third Sang away the " Flu ' 



The Stokes Mortar 

THE day the announcement was made to Headquarters 
Company that monotony of drill was to be relieved by 
the formation of new platoons of a special character, 
its members were keenly interested. They had heard vaguely 
of what was purposed, and had a hazy conception of the func- 
tions of the Stokes and the wicked little one-pounder. With 
the nature of signal and pioneer work they were somewhat 
more familiar. 

It happened to be Lieutenant Scott who sketched to the 
company the part the Stokes mortar was playing on the West- 
ern Front. He outlined the nature of its work so attractively 
that before he had proceeded far it was evident, should he 
ever fall on evil days, he could choose his place before the 
bannered tents of the torch and sawdust world. Men nudged 
one another and looked questions and nodded affirmative 
replies. In the argot of the "spieler" or "barker" of a very 
different sphere, many were already "hooked!" 

He went on to explain the work of sappers and bombers 
and when he finished he called for volunteers. A number 
responded, but not enough to form a skeleton organization. 
Some had their thoughts turned toward the other platoons. 
Then the Lieutenant guilefully explained that the work to 
be undertaken was of the most dangerous character. Some- 
times, at the front, stocks of grenades were exhausted, and 
there were delays in replenishing them from the rear. In such 
emergencies, grenades and bombs had to be extemporized out 

34 



The Stokes Mortar 35 

of whatever materials were available. One of the first things 
to be taken up was study and practice in this, and, of course, 
accidents would be a logical corollary. He didn't blame any- 
one for hesitating to join, and he wouldn't hold their failure 
to do so against them. Almost before he had finished, enough 
additional men jumped forward to furnish the required number. 

No time was lost in inaugurating study and practice. First, 
there were lectures upon the composition and mechanism of 
the British and American types of grenades. Great and wel- 
come stress was laid upon the absolutely safe character of 
the latter, always provided instruction in their use was faith- 
fully followed. For a time, some were skeptical of such 
assurance, but this apprehension gave place to something like 
the contempt of familiarity as the days passed. Every morn- 
ing or afternoon an hour or so was spent in practicing throwing 
for distance and accuracy, from standing and prone positions. 
While the motions and principle of throwing a grenade are 
at direct variance with those governing pitching a baseball, 
old baseball heads seemed, somehow, to excel. Private, since 
Corporal, R. C. Hughes, who in civil life was a local Portland 
baseball star, was early picked as one of the platoon's crack 
bombers. Private, since Sergeant, Charles W. Ransdell, who 
during his California school days was more interested in dia- 
mond than mathematical dimensions, also distinguished him- 
self. He and Private, since Sergeant, Earl Denned, of Long 
Beach, California, were selected to attend a camp school of 
instruction in the Stokes, returning to the platoon two weeks 
later with neat certificates as instructors themselves. 

Coincident with their return, the platoon received its first 
mortar. It was a queer-looking afi"air, more like a maimed 
light artillery piece with no sighting mechanism and a breech 
that sagged wearily to the ground, than like the mortars of 
Civil War days, pictures of which were familiar. Only the en- 
thusiasm and faith in it which was evinced by Lieutenant W. 



36 History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 

L. Clemenson, platoon commander, quieted the vague sense 
of betrayal felt by some of the Stokes servers. Later every 
one came to acknowledge a profound admiration, approaching 
affection, for this bomb-throwing weapon, which in a tight 
place is one of the infantry's best bets and surest comforts. 

How we babied that gun and were babied by it! We would 
toil and sweat to fix its legs in the hard surface of the drill 
ground, so that it might rest easily; then adjust the base plate 
at a comfortable angle at its back; swab out its throat; pat 
it soothingly, and then when we asked it to cough out a dummy 
shell at a nice, easy target it petulantly spat it in some other 
direction. Of course we had overlooked something. The 
traverse was wrong, or the stand crooked. Eventually we 
grew to know the Stokes as we did our Enfields and could 
count upon the same sure, satisfying response from it. Never 
intended for exact fire — as is the one-pounder, for example — 
the Stokes will nevertheless depopulate a locality within a 
radius of thirty yards from where its lazy shell decides to 
descend and rest. 

When we attained a degree of mastery of the gun which 
enabled an impartial observer to guess what we were shooting 
at without wounding our feelings, five more mortars were 
added to the platoon, and we began work under conditions 
approximating those we expected to meet in France. 

It was still weeks before peace and rumours of peace began 
to disturb our dreams of getting across. The camp was tightly 
held in the grip of a quarantine against influenza, but we had 
been assured we would sail, once it was lifted. To this belief 
everyone clung tenaciously until the great guns on the Western 
Front lapsed into silence for the first time in four years. 

With six guns in our possession, the platoon took over a 
range peculiarly adapted to Stokes work. Its topography was 
of a character to include every obstacle and embrace every 
problem and advance which actual warfare might develop. 



The Stokes Mortar 37 

There were gullies and ridges and woods and angular promon- 
tories, and a field well pitted with shell-holes. We fought over 
and through and around and in and out of these with unflag- 
ging ardor and interest. And credit for any particular fidelity 
to our tasks, or a desire to excel in our particular work, is 
largely due to our platoon commander. Quick with an approv- 
ing smile, and seldom sterner in condemnation than a look of 
disappointment, he kept the platoon constantly upon its 
collective toes. 

All corporals of the six guns accepted him quite openly 
as their model. Corporal Jaffe, of San Francisco, and Corporal 
Park D. Agnew, of Billings, Montana, were two of the gun. 
crew commanders. They were convincing demonstrations of 
the axiom that size doesn't always count. Diminutive in 
stature they undoubtedly were, but it didn't prevent their find- 
ing ranges, or getting the maximum of performance out of the 
old ** Stove-pipes." As their platoon leader once observed, 
"they are small, but right there." Corporals Ed. F. Coady 
and "Chick" O'Connor, borrowed from the one-pounders, 
notably helped the good work along. Corporal Charles Ger- 
many, cool and never at a loss in any problem, and "Big Bill" 
Force (from Medford, Oregon, as he was fond of relating), 
together with Corporal John J. Youngberg, an alert, dashing 
type of chap from Portland, completed the complement of 
gun commanders. From first to last — for the old division of 
Headquarters Company into platoons has apsed with the 
accession of the different duties of peace-time guard work — 
all crews strove together for the excellence of the platoon 
with the utmost harmony. 

This was most noticeable in the platoon demonstrations 
and battalion problem work, where each gun was operated 
independently, while the work of all guns was coordinated. 
The first demonstration to occur seemed to make a decided 
impression upon a number of distinguished military chiefs 



38 History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 

present from Washington. It certainly made a deep impres- 
sion upon the men, for it was the first time they had fired 
"Hve" ammunition, and throughout a large part of the "show" 
they were under a machine-gun barrage laid down by twenty- 
four guns. 

The site chosen lent itself ideally to the maneuver. Six gun 
pits for the mortars had been dug in sloping ground, fronting 
an old house and barn and line of trees some six hundred yards 
distant across a railroad track. These represented the enemy's 
position. Well to the rear, on the sides and crest of a hill, 
were hidden the machine guns. These opened up to hold the 
enemy back of a line selected in front of his position, while 
an infantry attack was launched. The mortars, aided by a one- 
pounder, smashed at the enemy's position throughout the action, 
following up the infantry as soon as the last wave had passed. 

It was all intensely interesting and exciting. Numbers 
3 and 4 of each gun crew affixed ballestite rings to the cartridge 
container, to augment the propelling power of the cartridge 
used, inserted the detonating charge, and piled the ammuni- 
tion up as best they could in the narrow pits, until ready to 
pass to number 2 who pulled the safety pins and passed the 
shells to number i for firing. The stacks of deadly explosive 
were joggled by every explosion of the gun, there was always 
a chance that the shells might be improperly loaded, or have 
some defect of manufacture, or that number i might become 
excited in case of a misfire, and, in extracting the *'dud'- 
from the mortar, cause it to explode. Any explosion in the 
pit would render the services of an undertaker for anyone 
therein entirely superfluous. But, raw and green as they were, 
the crews handled themselves in a cool, confident fashion and 
there were no accidents. Early in the action, owing to some 
misunderstanding, of orders, it was necessary for some of 
the ammunition members to leave their pits and dash off to 
the left flank for additional shells. Machine-gun bullets 



The Stokes Mortar 39 

were flying overhead and now and then some fell short, but 
no one seemed perturbed. It was all in the day's work. 

When the order to advance was given, the guns were 
quickly knocked down, and the corporals leaped out of the 
pits with base plate and intrenching shovel. Number i 
tossed the forty-eight pound barrel out of the pit and followed 
it, cussing vehemently, for he had neglected to reckon upon 
its being hot enough to blister his hands. I know, for I was 
one of them. Number 2 scrambled after with the elevating 
stand which upholds the mortar's muzzle. The ammunition 
members, numbers 3 and 4, crawled out in turn loaded down 
with from four to six 12-pound shells. Then, alternately 
advancing at a brisk pace in a long skirmish line, and flatten- 
ing out in the short grass and stubble of a rough field, we closely 
followed the infantry. When the enemy was routed from his 
position — as, of course, he was ! — the infantry began to consoli- 
date its gains, while the Stokes section intrenched itself and 
prepared to check any counter-offensive. From first to last 
a deal of valuable experience was gained from the day's work. 

Shortly afterward Lieutenant Haas, fresh from service with 
Stokes outfits overseas, was assigned to the platoon, and 
materially aided in preparing it for what might lie ahead. He 
introduced "slung fire," which to us was an innovation, into 
the work of the section. We learned that it was common 
to open warfare. It quickly appealed for several reasons. 
"Slung fire" consisted simply in dispensing with the elevating 
stand, leaving the gun in two parts only, the barrel and the 
base plate against which the breech rested on the ground. 
This meant first that No. 2 of the crew was relieved of a 32- 
pound burden and so was free to help his mates. The corporal 
took the place of the elevating stand in that he straddled the 
barrel and held the muzzle up by means of a wooden collar 
with handles. He also replaced the traversing gear by simply 
shifting the barrel to right and left, guided by a rough line 



40 History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 

for sighting which was painted along the barrel. It gave one 
somewhat the sensation of firing a cannon from the shoulder. 
Surprising as it may seem, after a very little practice it was 
possible to fire just as effectively in this manner as with the fixed 
stand. Of course, in both cases the degree of elevation deter- 
mined the range, or distance ; this was measured by a clinometer 
laid along the barrel in whatever style of firing was employed. 

One valuable feature of "slung fire," in fact the main 
reason tor employing it, is the increased speed with which a 
Stokes can be brought into action. On a day when the platoon 
demonstrated for the whole regiment, we advanced some 30 
yards at the double to cover under the brow of a hill and were 
pumping shells at "the enemy" 40 seconds after we started 
to advance. Naturally with some 3500 men and their officers 
watching, and every man-jack of them ready to criticize 
another branch of the service, we were doing our best. We 
felt amply rewarded when "the Lieutenant" looked satisfied. 

The same day occurred our first experience with shell- 
holes. Those on the Western Front were more dangerous, 
no doubt, but they could not have been a whit more uncom- 
fortable or exasperating, burdened down as we were with an 
awkward, heavy "stove-pipe" that just would misfire once 

in a while in spite of H and highwater. We dived into those 

holes like rabbits into their burrows, and crawled out like 
reluctant ants. A few wriggled from one to another, but this 
proved such a slow, laborious, painful process that most of 
us took a chance and bolted from pit to pit at an awkward, 
bent-over, jumping lope that must have resembled the progress 
of a badly scared epileptic rheumatic. Please remember the 
weight of the barrel and those shells! 

Perhaps the most realistic fiction we engaged in was a 
night "action" and, appropriately enough, it practically ter- 
minated our serious training, for the armistice was signed a 
day or two later. A system of very methodical trenches 



The Stokes Mortar 41 

meandered in aimless way around the brow of a hillock which 
sloped gently up from a saucer-like valley, the opposite edge 
of which was lined with a thick fringe of woods. Between 
stretched No Man's Land, dark and filled with sinister possi- 
bilities. We occupied the trenches; the enemy held the wood. 
We knew where their machine guns and mortars were, or had 
been, and patrols had brought back word of unusual and sus- 
picious activity at a certain point. We had also been aware 
of enemy patrols moving stealthily out there in the dark- 
ness. But, in balance of the highly desirable knowledge we 
possessed concerning the enemy's positions and activities, 
we were virtually certain they were as fully apprised of our 
own most precious secrets. This much all the men in the 
platoon knew; also that an action of some sort was expected. 

The gun corporals had maps locating their fire objectives, 
and were consulting them from time to time in the six gun pits, 
which were in reality merely widened places in the trenches, 
and situated at points of strategic advantage. These were 
screened by canvass coverings to prevent the guns' flashes 
from revealing their positions. Candles, the light of which was 
carefully guarded, permitted of map and clinometer reading. 

The post command was just in the rear of the gun to which 
I was attached. Suddenly, from its direction came a runner 
with orders to open up. And the fire was on. 

Gun after gun flashed and barked and sent their slow shells 
whirling through the. night toward the opposite slope. Little 
streaks and balls of fire showed where they dropped with a 
crash of flame. Sergeant Ransdell was over there somewhere, 
bravely ready to retaliate as the enemy, and just at that mo- 
ment I did not particularly envy him his chevrons. For one 
thing, our fire was just a trifle too uncertain. But the flash 
of the descending shells enabled us to alter elevations and 
directions so as to bring to bear more accurately upon our 
targets, when need arose. 



42 History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 

It seems that we had surprised an enemy patrol close to our 
own wires and before streaking it for home they flung a few 
souvenirs in the form of grenades that exploded with a dis- 
concerting noise in unpleasant proximity. Now and then, 
before this patrol gained the security of its own lines and our 
withering fire had silenced the supposititious foes, star-shells 
and rockets soared aloft and lit up the intervening territory 
with a greenish glare of light that brought out every object, 
sharply silhouetted. For once, rivalry and rancor shall mag- 
nanimously be forgotten. Sneers and jeers shall be generously 
forgiven. Inferiority shall be charitably passed by. The 
signal platoon, so they tell me, besides helping to illuminate 
the landscape in an interesting manner, did a very pretty piece 
of work in their cooperation in our success. So be it. 

And that brings us down to the day of the armistice, for 
with it, the platoon passed out of being; at least as an eager, 
live, purposeful, aggressive organization, sure of its laurels 
whenever it came to argue with Fritz over a disputed bit of 
French soil. The shell remained, but the spirit had gone. 

That mad Thursday of the first mistaken celebration of 
peace will live always in my memory. The first extra editions 
of the Baltimore papers had carried little more than a bare 
flash of the signing of the armistice. While we sat around 
barracks, sick in soul, we hoped it was not true; hoped against 
the conviction of reason that there was some mistake. But 
when inquiries seemed to establish beyo;id any and all doubt 
that our chance was gone, the chance for which we had la- 
bored hard and with high hopes, we gave up and sat on our 
bunks, not by twos and threes as always before, but by our- 
selves, too bitterly disappointed even to talk it over. 

Some of the organizations in camp undertook a parade, 
dignified by a mocking, blaring band and torches, but the 63rd 
Infantry was not represented. Assuredly, the Stokes Mortar 
Platoon had no heart — or stomach — for such a demonstration. 



How it Feels to be Shelled by the Stokes 

UPON the occasion of the night firing problem staged 
by the Stokes Mortar Platoon at Camp Meade, I 
had the pleasure of witnessing the affair from the 
enemy's lines. 

We (the enemy) consisted of Captain Johnson, Lieutenant 
Haas, and myself. We were armed with one three-inch 
Stokes mortar and eight rounds of ammunition, an automatic 
rifle, a box of hand grenades, a couple of mines, and a number 
of rockets. 

Our position was in a small gully about five hundred yards 
from the hill upon which the mortars of the platoon were 
entrenched. From this position we commanded a splendid 
view of the entire front, and the spectacle which I witnessed 
was one which I shall always remember. 

The platoon's fire was very accurate — too accurate, a time 
or two, for safety to the "enemy." For fragments of their 
bursting shells flew just a trifle too close for comfort; they 
had a nasty whine as they passed over our heads. 

But the most impressive feature to me was to see the belch 
of the guns, the signal rockets in air, and to smell the gun 
powder. It all gave a wonderful impression of reality. 

Hitherto my experience with the Stokes had been from 
behind the guns, not from in front; but I got a new impres- 
sion of them when I became the one who was being shot at, 
and it increased my respect for the weapon. 

In the daytime you could have watched the flight of the 

43 



44 History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 

shells and could have been able to tell whether or not it was 
necessary to duck your nut for safety. But that night all I 
could see was the flash of the guns, hear the dull hum of the 
shell in the air, see the flash of the bursting charge, and smell 
real powder. It was a novel experience. 

Captain Johnson and Lieutenant Haas took care of the 
automatic rifle, the rockets, and grenades. Once while chang- 
ing their position I was afraid that the battle had become a 
little too realistic and that they had been struck by pieces of 
shells which were dropping around them. But I had plenty 
to do to keep me busy, for I handled the mortar which we had 
set up. I was platoon leader, gun commander, and crew all 
in one, and had the time of my life feeding shells into the old 
girl. The only thing I was sorry for was that the ammunition 
gave out too soon. But it was great sport while it lasted. The 
only reason Camp Meade was not "shot up right" was that 
the gun would not shoot far enough. And from what was 
said afterwards, I understand that the advance signal party 
in the outpost in No Man's Land kept their heads down with- 
out any repeated orders from the officer in charge. 

The entire experience was a novelty. The plan was splen- 
didly carried out and credit is due one and all who helped to 
make it a success. For my part I feel greatly honored in 
belonging to a platoon which could carry out such a program 
successfully, and in being under the command of the ofl^icers 
who trained us so painstakingly, overlooking our awkwardness 
as beginners, encouraging us through our struggles, and help- 
ing us to become, I think without a doubt, the best Stokes 
mortar platoon in the Lafayette Division. 



The Pioneer Platoon 

WHEN the 63rd Infantry was at the Presidio of San 
Francisco I enHsted in Headquarters Company and 
tried to join the mounted orderly section. Not being 
able to distinguish the port side of a horse from the stern, I 
was informed by the stable sergeant to beat it, 

I took this as a good hunch and went to the band leader 
and asked him for a job pounding the bass drum. He tried 
me out and said, "Good Lord, if I keep you in the band 
Colonel Croxton will try me." 

Being in a company of specialists whose favorite expression 
was, "We are the brains of the army" — I found that I must 
qualify for something or else go to a line company and do 
squads east all day long. 

I told the first sergeant that I had been a clerk, so he put 
me to work in the orderly room. I forgot to tell him that my 
clerical ability was limited to selling B.V.D.'s in Alaska in 
the winter time, so when he gave me a typewriter I wasn't 
able to write my name even when I used the "hunt and find" 
system. 

I was shunted from the "Top's" office to the kitchen as 
a permanent K.P. The mess sergeant was Irish, the cooking 
instructor was a Swede, and I was sweating. Not long after 
I was promoted to be permanent K.P., the order came to move 
the regiment to Camp Meade. Glorious! I was now to 
leave my native California for France! 

On the morning in August that we climbed aboard the train 

45 



46 History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 

I was tired but happy. I had loaded junk on the cars all the day 
before until late in the night and the rest of that night I had 
spent saying good-bye to my friends and to my best San Fran- 
cisco girl. I asked the mess sergeant to let me continue to 
work in the kitchen car on the trip to Camp Meade as then I 
could wear my fatigue clothes, eat when I wanted to, beat the 
hikes and Red Cross bath houses along the route, and tell the 
girls along the road what a fine cook I was, how I fed the boys, 
and a lot of other first-class California bull. I became very 
much infatuated with a dame in a Kansas tank town where we 
stopped to take water — Kansas has always been a watering 
place. As the train pulled out I clinched and smacked her 
right on the lips before she was next to my little stunt. But 
Oh, Boy! My company commander saw me and when I ran 
to the cook car, climbed on, and was ready to pat myself on 
the back for the trick I had turned, the Captain beat me to 
it. In fact he almost knocked me down, he patted me so hard. 
I turned around to give him a growl but got one from him 
instead. *' Young fellow," he said, *'you are getting too pro- 
miscuous with your kisses. Hereafter you stay on the car 
when the train stops." Well, I stayed on the train all right 
after that, and confined myself to waving my best from the 
kitchen door. 

When we reached Camp Meade I was relieved from K.P. 
and went to drilling every day. I was told I had been recom- 
mended for the Depot Brigade, but being such a swell singer 
and being needed to play the part of a soubrette in our show, 
I was retained for the time being. 

About this time the platoons of Headquarters Company 
were being organized, so I got busy and tried to figure where 
I could head in. Sappers and Bombers .f* .^? NO! I didn't 
want to read range tables out in the rain off a rubber book. 
Signal Platoon??? NO! I would only cross the wires and 
get to talking to myself. One-pounder Platoon??? NO! 



The Pioneer Platoon 47 

I was a better singer than the Loot who led the one-pounder 
bunch, and he was sore at me for that reason. Besides, too 
much danger for me — a cannon at one end and a Missouri 
mule at the other. I couldn't stand that combination. 

There was only one thing left — The Pioneer Platoon. 

The dictionary says that a pioneer is one whose business 
is to march before an army to prepare the roads, make intrench- 
ments, etc. Not having a great conception of things military 
I naturally confused Pioneer Platoon with Premier au Feu — 
which I think means first to scrap. I had come into the army 
for that very little thing, so I said — " Pioneers for me." Our 
friend Lt. A. F. Pierson was in command of this platoon, and 
at that time none of us knew what a pioneer was supposed to 
be or do, but we hoped it would be something nice. We 
knew "pioneer" meant being out in front of every one else; 
so imagine our disgust when we visited the 8o8th Pioneer 
Infantry Regiment at Camp Meade and found they were 
"shines" and all they had to do was to build roads and 
trenches. Sherman was right; for here we were — the huskies 
of the company — all rough and ready to fight, but with nothing 
to do except build trenches. (I sometimes thought we dug 
more of them in Meade than they had in Europe.) 

But soon that disgusted feeling wore off — especially after 
we had been issued our implements of war, namely: picks 
and shovels, and had been drilled in their use for a couple of 
weeks. 

Now all you high-brows think that a pick and shovel guy 
does not have to know anything to belong to a pioneer platoon; 
so I am going to list for you the different things the platoon 
had to learn before we considered ourselves real pioneers. 

Trades required in the platoon: plumbers, carpenters, 
miners, construction foremen, timbermen, concrete men, 
shoemaker, tailor, sailmaker, rigger, canvas worker, lumber- 
jacks. 



48 History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 

The platoon must know how to handle and make the fol- 
lowing: knots and lashes, block and tackle, the handling of 
heavy weights, field pile drivers, the cutting and clearing of 
timber and brush, the construction and repair of roads, explo- 
sives and demolition, trail building, use of concrete, camp 
expedients, bridges, fords, pack transportation, trench con- 
struction, wire entanglements, chevauxde frise, abattis,fougasse^ 
trous de loup, inundations, concealment of obstacles, camou- 
flage, street barricades, gabions, facines, hurdles, revetments 
of wire and timber, dummy trenches, splinter and bomb proofs, 
sniper and observation posts, listening posts, trench drainage, 
latrines, dressing stations, approaches and communications, 
cave dugouts, strong points, woods for defense, buildings for 
defense, trench lighting, trench construction at night, trench 
repair, and reversal. 

Right in this little list the pioneer speaks more French 
than half the ginks who have been to Brest or Bordeaux. 
Besides the pioneer must know the I. D. R. His platoon is 
armed with rifles, grenades, etc., so that if his outfit can't 
lick the enemy he can drop his shovel and pick up his rifle 
and do it for them. 

Our work was hard at times but we were a cheerful lot; 
we were working for our company, our colonel, and our country. 

What made it so hard for the Pioneer Platoon was the 
occurrence of such things as I am about to relate; the regiment 
was short of coal at Camp Meade for a time. The Pioneers, 
being the most expert men of Headquarters Company in the 
use of tools, went out and cut wood for the company. They 
didn't mind that, but at night when they came in after a day's 
work, they would go to the wood pile to get some wood for 
the platoon quarters that they had cut during the day and 
would find that the other platoons had organized a **hot stove 
league" and were batting 500 around a fire made with the 
wood the pioneers had cut for themselves. 



The Pioneer Platoon 49 

Another. There were no coal bins at Camp Meade in the 
63rd Infantry area, so the pioneers made some of logs. When 
they had them nicely finished and filled with coal the regi- 
ment moved. We had a hard time finding logs for this job. 
Nothing but dead timber was allowed to be cut. Occasionally 
some near-sighted boob would cut a live tree and we had to 
get it out of the woods before the Military Police spotted us; 
they were trimmed and hauled in as soon as possible. One 
day the near-sighted boob, not finding enough dead trees, 
proceeded to make dead ones. We hauled them in and the 
Colonel saw the green sprigs on them and asked Corporal 
Cox if those were dead trees. He said: "No, sir, but they 
soon will be." Corporal Cox said to one of the men with him: 
**The Old Man can see more with one eye that I can with two." 
"Hell," the other replied, *'he can see more with his blind 
eye than I can with my two." 

There were fifty-four men in the Pioneer Platoon and as 
that is too many to mention each personally, I can only 
given an estimate of the platoon as a whole. They were all 
loyal, ambitious, and willing to do or to die for their country, 
and it is our regret that we had no opportunity to participate 
in the victory that was won in no small part through the efi^orts 
of the Pioneers of the allied countries. Picks and shovels 
help to make or destroy cities and our hope is that in the 
future we will be required to handle them in peaceful pur- 
suits only. 



Tne Signal Platoon 

FROM the organization of the 63 rd Infantry there were 
gradually attached to Headquarters Company men 
whose previous experience and employment had 
brought them in contact with electricity in its various branches ; 
electricians, linemen, telegraph operators, telephone men, and 
others. The ultimate purpose in view was the establishing of 
a regimental signal platoon. 

Shortly after our arrival at Camp Meade, early in Sep- 
tember, 191 8, the Signal Platoon was formed, with ten non- 
commissioned officers and some thirty privates, with the 
intention of increasing the number until the required war 
strength was reached. During the following four months 
of its life the members were subjected to a never ending and 
persistent effort to master the various methods of signalling 
used by the army. 

Lieutenant Hunter, an enthusiastic, precise, and energetic 
officer was placed in command, a man whose previous experi- 
ence and training stood him in good stead in bringing a success- 
ful termination the particular work in hand. 

Our daily time was divided into periods of instruction; 
a portion to the study of the telegraph code, semaphore, wig- 
wag, aeroplane panels, heliograph, use of the telephone, 
telegraph, and wireless instruments, physical exercise, and 
drill. Short lectures were given daily on elementary elec- 
tricity, and care and maintenance of instruments and lines in 
order to acquaint the men with the fundamental principles 

50 



The Signal Platoon 51 

of the instruments we come in contact with and their installa- 
tion and repair. In this way our work was varied and the 
probability of its becoming monotonous was avoided. 

Credit at this time must be given to a French sergeant, 
stationed at Camp Meade to give instruction in this signal 
work. His service on the Western Front in France had taught 
him the necessity for precise care in regard to detection of 
signals by the enemy. His manner of relating his own per- 
sonal experiences and observations, resulting from using the 
necessary precautionary methods created an interest in the 
secretive use of the heliograph and telegraph. We learned 
the practical use of the heliograph, sky rockets, aeroplane 
panels, smoke bombs, etc., and their value for quick commu- 
nication, especially during the time of advance. 

After several weeks of class instruction, the platoon was 
given the opportunity to make some practical installations, 
working in conjunction with the Pioneer Platoon, whose 
model trenches, dugouts, and outposts were used as a base of 
operations of telegraph and telephone lines, switch boards, 
etc., each center of communication being connected in the 
manner best suited to the location. Model wire trenches 
were dug as a means of protection and concealment, care 
being taken in the method of drainage. 

During the latter part of October and November field 
maneuvers were carried out by the battalions of the regiment, 
proving an additional source of endeavor. The platoon was 
divided on each occasion to receive instruction both in assault 
and defense. During the advance in these problems, over 
seemingly endless stretches of territory, the men were loaded 
down with lamps, batteries, wire, instruments, etc., which 
were a constant source of annoyance, especially as the neces- 
sary crowding of an action of several days' duration into a 
period of several hours for the purpose of instruction, was 
something of a handicap to successful signalling. However, 



52 History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 

some practical knowledge was gained by these operations, 
especially in the selection of stations, the speediest method of 
signalling and the manner of effective concealment. In order 
to shorten our messages and to insure the accuracy of steno- 
typed messages constantly coming in use, a code was adopted, 
pursuant to methods used in actual warfare, whereby a com- 
bination of letters would relay a message of great length and 
immediate importance. Speed of transmission was gained, 
with less possibility of error. All messages were written in 
full on the blanks issued for that purpose, actual time of re- 
ceipt and forwarding being kept; each message numbered, 
recorded, and filed, so as to show prompt delivery and to 
maintain at the same time a permanent record. These opera- 
tions were gradually enlarged upon until later they included 
regimental and brigade operations, working in conjunction 
with aeroplanes, by which communication was established 
and maintained from the front line trenches to divisional 
headquarters. 

Sergeant Donald C. Smith, a soldier with a number of years 
of service, and the ranking non-commissioned officer of the 
platoon, was in charge of the daily drill. It was soon learned 
that this daily drill was being accepted by the boys as a welcome 
relaxation from their studies and lectures. Our few months 
in the service had taught the individuals that the dress and 
appearance of a soldier was an accumulation of his own per- 
sonal endeavor. Squad and platoon drill was constantly 
given and the snap with which the instruction and orders 
were executed soon won for the platoon comment for its drill 
work and appearance. 

During the latter part of October, in recognition of Lieu- 
tenant Hunter's persistent endeavor to bring the platoon to 
its state of efficiency, he was placed in command of Brigade 
signalling. At his advancement. Lieutenant Foulkrod was 
placed in direct charge of the work of the platoon instructions 



The Signal Platoon 53 

and operations. He was a man quick to appreciate the things 
well done and to resent an action which was wrong. The 
genial disposition of this officer and the keen personal interest 
he took with the men, soon won the respect of them all and 
his requests at all times assumed the proportion of a command. 

About this time Sergeant Donald Smith and Corporals 
Zimmerman and Moran were selected to attend the officers' 
training camp. At the departure of Sergeant Smith, Cor- 
poral Wimberly was made Sergeant, continuing ranking non- 
commissioned officer in charge until the return of Sergeants 
O'Connell and Keeton, who had gone overseas some time 
before. 

An advance unit from the nth Division was sent to 
France late in October, for the purpose of special instructions 
in the latest methods in use there and Corporal O'Connell 
and Private Keeton were advanced to sergeants and sent with 
this unit. Shortly after the arrival of the unit the armistice 
was signed and after a few weeks over there the men were 
returned to their organizations at Camp Meade. 

On an evening during the last week in November,, in co- 
operation with the Stokes Mortar Platoon, a ''quiet night" 
on a small sector was staged, which proved exciting to the 
men participating and the spectators witnessing, the latter 
being the divisional officers. Stokes mortars were placed in 
various emplacements in the trenches, carefully concealed 
and camouflaged. In these emplacements and in other dug- 
outs were established such places as Divisional, Brigade, and 
Battalion Headquarters, with signal connection between each 
important center by means of telephones, buzzers, and visual 
lights. When zero hour arrived the outpost directed the 
firing of the barrages and direct firing of the guns by means 
of the rockets and flares, these being relayed to the proper 
places by the various methods, each verifying the other, until 
the ''battle" was on in full force. The signalling and firing 



54 History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 

went on without interruption or mistake and the problem was 
terminated by a hand grenade attack by the Bombers and 
Sappers men, which brought home the fact that some so-called 
"quiet nights" would not be so quiet as the title would 
indicate. 

During the time of operations with the Battalion field 
problems the Signal Platoon shortage of men required a detail 
to be used from the Stokes Mortar Platoon as runners. The 
Stokes men freely accused the Signal men of manufacturing 
fake messages to keep the "dog robbers" busy and the ''flag 
wavers" made no denial. Many times there were but a few 
minutes left for the runners to catch their breath, to the deep 
disgust of the Stokes men and great joy of the Signal bunch. 
That the opportunity for revenge finally came we shall have 
to admit, to our sorrow. The Stokes outfit had been doing 
some extensive target practice and the Signal Platoon was 
detailed to assist in gathering up the unexploded mortar shells 
and fragments. Several warm afternoons were spent gather- 
ing up sacks full of cast iron from the wide expanse of the 
wooded range and the growls from the Signal men on these 
occasions sounded like the moans of lost souls. That our 
scores were equalled is admitted by both outfits. 

On one of the warm afternoons Corporal Germany, then 
a private, was one of the runners detailed from the Stokes 
Platoon. He was instructed to go to Brigade Headquarters 
to ascertain their supply of rockets and return with several of 
a particular color urgently needed at visual center. So Ger- 
many started out at double time in the direction of Brigade 
Headquarters. After an hour or two of anxious waiting for 
rockets, Germany came back, out of breath and wringing with 
perspiration and reported, *'they have plenty of rockets, sir." 
Questioning brought out the fact that he had missed Brigade 
Headquarters and in his wanderings had run into Divisional 
Headquarters of the nth Division. He had been well re- 



The Signal Platoon 55 

ceived by several colonels and a general or two, after he had 
had considerable trouble with some Military Police orderlies. 
After ascertaining that there was a plentiful supply of rockets, 
he was unable to talk them out of any or in his bewilderment 
he forgot to get any. So upon his return his overheated condi- 
tion and his disturbed temper amused us greatly and the 
incident will remain a merry memory in the Signal Platoon. 



The One-Pounder Platoon 

WHEN the one-pounder gun, or "pound wonder," as it 
is jocularly known, arrived at the Presidio, immedi- 
ately there were numerous applications to join that 
particular platoon — possibly because of the business-like 
appearance of it, but probably because it presented an 
opportunity to get away from the burden of shouldering 
a rifle. 

However those pleasant anticipations were soon shattered 
by the Colonel's " ultimatum " that there would be no specialty 
work until the regiment moved East. 

The journey from the Presidio to Camp Meade appeared 
like going from the "sublime to the ridiculous" until we had 
become acclimated (a matter of about two trips to Baltimore). 
There the much-sought-after bi-weekly pass became the most 
important thing to look forward to — except pay day. Oft 
times after we had pleaded in vain with the company com- 
mander for permission to go on pass to visit some recently 
acquired relative, we suspicioned that the "top" was the one 
who had blocked our pass because he wanted some of us for 
table waiters and K.P.'s over the week-end, but these suspicions 
could not be confirmed because of the sphinx-like silence of the 
orderly room force, who would have made splendid witnesses 
for the Standard Oil. 

Shortly after our arrival at Meade we were organized into 
the One-Pounder Platoon, and started to work in earnest. 
It was a happy day when we turned in our rifles to the supply 

56 



The One-Pounder Platoon 57 

sergeant and secured pistols; at least we simulated pistols, 
for didn't we have the holsters? 

While Lieutenant Conley, who was made over-night from 
a sergeant, was attending school, we were instructed by Capt. 
Morton, who initiated us into the gun drill and positions of the 
various numbers. The Captain had been at Fort Sill, and 
there had evidently listened to some German propaganda 
about the weakening of morale in our army; so he made us 
run for lOO yards at a fast double carrying the gun or tripod 
— a mere matter of 90 pounds or so. But we didn't mind it 
so much, for we had the pleasure of seeing the runs and falls 
illustrated by the ''C.C." before we were required to do them 
ourselves. 

The work in class, in which we received instruction in the 
intricacies of direct and indirect fire, line of fire and angles, 
angle of departure, range quadrant, etc., resulted in so much 
scratching of heads (we were forced to scratch so as to appear 
to be thinking!) that it wouldn't have given any cootie in the 
world a chance to find a home. Only a few of us were candid 
enough to admit that we did not understand the various techni- 
cal things explained to us. The arrival of the pounder mule 
was a great relief to "Nick," for he said to Lieutenant Conley: 
"Lieutenant, have you picked out anyone to lead that mule 
yet? If not, please pick me, as I can handle that job." 

After Lieutenant Conley returned from the division school, 
our training progressed rapidly, as we took part in every 
battalion problem and often opened simulated fire in time to 
theoretically demolish the "enemy" machine guns. 

However, on the day of the division show, when the troops 
of the 63rd actually advanced for several hundred yards under 
machine gun, Stokes mortar, and one-pounder fire, we demon- 
strated the result of our long hours of training by scoring a clean 
hit on our target (a small one, 1 100 meters away), on the third 
shot, in spite of the fact that the range had to be estimated. 



58 History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 

On another problem the mule and Sergeant Conrad had 
an argument and the mule won hands down, resulting in the 
sergeant's uniform being expended under the heading of "fair 
wear and tear." The Pioneer Platoon had to be called out 
to fill in the furrow caused by that mule in dragging our 
platoon sergeant close, very close, to terra firma. 

Before writing finis, it would hardly be fitting to omit an 
occurrence which illustrates the ready wit of a member of 
our company who was returning from Baltimore late one night 
and was unsteadily winding his way to quarters via the 72nd 
Infantry with a package containing two large bottles — not 
coca cola — under his arm. Being spotted by a sentinel, the 
following dialogue ensued: 

'^Halt! Who is there.?" "Sergeant K , orderly for 

a General Officer!" *' Advance, Sergeant K , to be re- 
cognized. What have you in that bundle.?" **The General's 

laundry!" ''Pass on, Sergeant K !" This is a concrete 

illustration of how close one may come to the guard house 
and yet escape unscathed. 



The Band Section 

NOW comes forward the 63rd Infantry Band to inscribe 
in the history of the regiment its part in the great 
World War. Unhke the other units of the regiment, 
we did not make our reputation by hard drilHng under the 
scorching sun but rather in the darkened rehearsal room where 
we daily assembled to blow long tones and were busy 
^'pinching" up. 

We lay claim to having within the band both the largest 
and smallest men in the regiment. To Sergeant Otto Ricke 
falls the honor of being the largest; he is known as the daddy 
of the band and is therefore called " Pop." To Gcv, rge Cannon 
falls the honor of being the smallest man. He answers to 
the name of "Runt." 

The chief heckler of the band was Kite; Riley was chief 
victim. From morning until night Kite was at it. Such 
things as putting a dead mouse in his pocket or sticks in his 
bed, drawing a pistol, and similar things went to make up 
the day. The greatest event in Riley's army life was when 
he entered the gas mask relay race. Of course Riley never 
was built for a runner, but he was game to the end and took 
his position in line. As he went tearing down the course the 
ground came up and met him, and he gave the boys a fine 
impersonation of Billy Bounce. After picking him up, he was 
asked if he was hurt, and his only reply was — **My, but that 
was a nawsty fall." 

The days on the rifle range gave rise to the following: In 

59 



6o History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 

a certain tent one afternoon after pay day a number of men 
were playing the national game, when suddenly the voice of 
Sergeant Ball was heard in the distance: "I'm going up to 
turn the band out for first-aid drill." As everyone knows that 
Ball's voice can be plainly heard for several blocks, there was 
considerable confusion in that tent. Out of the tent went men, 
money, cards, and blankets and then off to the woods, where 
the game was continued without further interruption. 

The great mystery of the range always has been — Who 
milked that cow.? Now as far as we know the mystery has 
never been properly solved, so we offer this as an explanation. 
As you well know, Riley always had several trunk loads of 
toilet articles, sanitary washes, complexion beautifiers, face 
creams, etc., around his bunk at Meade and when off duty 
was always to be found at the showers with his customary can 
of condensed milk. (Milk baths are wonderful for an artistic 
temperament.) Now there were no showers at the range, and 
the belief has grown that Riley milked that cow and thus 
secured his usual milk bath. 

There is another member of the outfit who cannot be over- 
looked — C-C-C-Collins, who came to the band from a ranch 
in California. Kite, as usual, found his weakness and every 
morning could be seen pointing his finger at him and saying 
*'C-C-C-Collins!" Sergeant Cook also had the habit of 
stammering when excited, and Kite was in his glory when he 
got them to arguing with each other. 

Other members of the outfit have contributed their bit to 
the life of the band and for the most part we have been a big 
family with everyone helping to make things pleasant for the 
rest. 

WELL KNOWN SAYINGS 

Read 'em and weep Hugh S. Ledford 

Cut the cards Olaf Olson 

Ha, Ha, Ha! No fooling Tony Salvagno 



The Band Section 



6i 



We will wear our slickers 

The Colonel says 

We're hitting over here 

1 knowed it 

We want our discharges 



Victor Pantaleoni 
Lee White 
Walter Emerick 
Roy Kite 
Milton Herberg 



If you don't sign the pay roll, you don't get no pay ist Sergeant Ball 

When you know a man well enough and long enough, you 
give him a nickname indicative of his peculiarities, and hence 
the following: 



Charles E. Clagg 
Frank E. Bogue 
Otto F. Ricke 
Albert E. Heyworth 
Charles W. Cook 
Lee W. Pembleton 
John W. Swilling 
George Hartley 
Emil E. Sund 
Pulver D. Ackerman 
Joseph Zubereny 
Tony Salvagno 
Thayer E. Camp 
George A. Cannon 
Fred Goettel 
Roy Kite 

James W. Thompson 
Milton A. Herberg 
Dorman B. Hodgson 
William B. McClintock 
Paul S. Scrimsher 
Vern L. B. Stalter 
Andrew M. Barlelme 
George L. H. Caldwell 
Jaroslav Cap 
Lloyd Casebeer 
Mansel G. Clark 
Nelson W. Collins 



Felicitas 

Bogus 

Pop 

Aloha Oe 

Satchel Face 

Pinky 

The little drummer boy 

Zeb 

The Ruler 

P. D. 

Zub 

S. O. S. 

Groucho 

Runt 

Hunyark 

Father Time 

Jimmie 

Piccolo Pic 

Lunch Hound 

Birdie 

Windy 

Slowly 

Flossy 

Goat Island 

Jerry 

Schlitz 

Manzy 

C-C-C-Collins 



62 



History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 



John A. Elmer 
Walter D. Emerick 
William F. Lunge 
Otto Lantinen 
Hugh S, Ledford 
Clarence Leland 
Simon M. Lozano 
Aschille Massei 
Olaf R. Olson 
Robert A. Mitchell 
Clarence E. Piper 
Victor Pantaleoni 
Richard E. Ricke 
Everett H. Shaw 
Elzo D. Vincent 
Robert R. Walton 
James E. Welch 
Lee R. White 
Robert Dunbar 
Charles G. Yost 
Adolph Landuyt 
Charles Long 



Barber Pole Cadet 

Walter Daniel 

Anaheim Shoe Peddler 

Ottoe 

Shanty 

Boston 

Mex 

One Num 

Swede 

Boob McNut 

Dizzy 

Pagliacci 

Iowa Farmer 

Chicken 

Winnie 

Saxophone Pete 

Bald Jack Rose 

Senor Blanco 

Society Red 

Wall Hop 

Belgian Rose 

Chisel 



Mounted Orderly Section 

DO not forget the Mounted Orderly Section, for if you do, 
the Colonel and his staff will have to walk. The first 
members of the Mounted Orderly Section — besides 
Ignatz, Black Beauty, and myself, were transferred from the 
mounted orderly section of the 12th Infantry. It must be 
said of them that through their exhibition of horsemanship 
and their knowledge of all things pertaining to mounted work, 
they were such an inspiration to the recruits assigned to the 
section that on the day of the final Divisional Review at Camp 
Meade, Brigadier General Burt, Commanding the 22nd In- 
fantry Brigade, personally complimented the section upon 
their splendid appearance. 

This was in no small degree due to the ceaseless efforts of 
Sergeants Waldron and "Jack" Smith and Horeshoer *' Swede" 
Serstad. Corporals Fitzgerald and Sconyers, formerly of the 
mounted section, were of great assistance in its successful 
organization. In later days came Private Osborne, who is 
always willing to do his best to entertain the folks with his 
fancy riding and rodeo stuff. The section, in conjunction with 
the Supply Company, held several rodeos or wild west shows, 
as the Easterners call them_, at Camp Meade and also at 
Washington, D. C. They were all successfully conducted 
and seemed to be well liked. 

If it had not been for the mounted orderlies. Captains 
Horton and Johnson, as well as Chaplain Oggel, would still be 
walking. Due to the assistance and advice of the orderlies 

63 



64 History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 

and their ability to maintain a sober countenance when the 
above named officers were being spilled about the bull-ring, 
these equestrians can now mount unassisted. 

Trusting that these few lines will find you all in the best of 
health and that Colonel Nelson and Captain Clark will never 
wish to ride, I remain, 

BiLLiE Burke. 
Col. Croxton's Favorite Charger. 




Whem WillWeGetIt? 






Miscellany 



THE One-Pounder Platoon was going out on a problem 
at Camp Meade. Private Nichols, wagoner, was 
guiding his trusty mule along on its way with a master 
hand. As they passed the guardhouse of the 72nd Infantry, 
the sentry on post came to "Present Arms" to an officer who 
was passing. 

Nick did not see the officer for whom it was intended, but 
he did see the salute. He promptly saluted in return and 
then, turning to the bunch, laughingly exclaimed: "Haw, 
Haw! The damn fool saluted the mule!" 

His Tongue Was Oiled 

Saturday morning at Camp Meade was a time of terror 
for the average "rookie" — at least until after inspection hour. 
For the officers who minutely examined his arms and equip- 
ment were able to detect dust and dirt in corners and crevices 
of gun and bayonet he didn't even know existed until atten- 
tion was sarcastically directed to them. And a favorite 
method of punishing derelictions — favorite with the officers, 
that is! — was to deprive the hapless offender of his week- 
end pass to Baltimore or Washington. 

Among the newly drafted recruits to Headquarters Com- 
pany was a little red-haired Scotch-Irish boy from Baltimore. 
s 65 



66 History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 

He was never willfully negligent in the care of his equipment; 
nevertheless seemed unable to have it in the required state of 
perfection on those fateful Saturday mornings. Several times 
when his weekly visits to "home and Mother" were imperiled 
by such misfortune, he managed to escape from the no pass 
penalty by a ready retort to some scathing comment from an 
inspecting officer. 

One Saturday the lieutenant took his bayonet, glanced at 
it quickly but searchingly, and then thrust it under "Red's" 
nose. 

"Your bayonet was given you to fight with as well as your 
gun, you know," he observed caustically. "You aren't sup- 
posed to forget you have it and let it rust. What good will a 
rusty bayonet be in a scrap over there.?" 

"It won't get that way over there, sir," answered "Red" 
quickly. 

"Oh, it won't, eh? And why won't it.?" 

"I'll keep it too busy, sir," said "Red." And again he 
got his pass. 

SONG WITHOUT MUSIC 

I wish I had a chevron on my arm, 
I wish I had a chevron on my arm, 

Not the sort a sergeant wears 

Nor the kind that comes in pairs 
But I wish I had a chevron on my arm. 

Yes, I wish I had a chevron on my arm, 
Oh, I wish I had a chevron on my arm. 

All desire for honors fled 

Sure the kind I want is red 
Yes, I wish I had a chevron on my arm. 

While at Camp Meade, Captain Horton decided that Head- 
quarters Company needed practice in passing in review, and 
hence the company, in column of platoons, was marched in 



Miscellany 



67 



review before one of the lieutenants, who acted as reviewing 
officer. 

The One-Pounder Platoon brought up the rear of the 
column, and at the proper moment. Lieutenant Conley, com- 
manding the platoon, gave the command "Eyes right." All 
members of the platoon at once executed the movement except 
the mule drawing the one-pounder gun. 

"Nick'' Nichols led the mule. 

Captain Horton, who was observing the drill, at once 
shouted to Nichols: "Have that mule execute *eyes right'!" 

Nick took the order literally, and promptly smashed the 
mule on the left side of the jaw. The mule at once turned its 
head to the right oblique, eyes fixed on the reviewing officer, 
and, though rather astonished at the whole thing, held the 
position until the command "Front" was given. 

After the drill was over, Nick came to the Captain, saluted, 
and said: "Sir, I am sorry that I forgot to have that mule do 
*eyes right' without your reminding me of it. It was a slip- 
up on my part. The next time I'll do it right without your 
having to shout at me." 

That marked the turning-point in 
the mule's career. From then on the 
mule took the I.D.R. as seriously as 
did Nick. 

Private Ansel A. Cooper, Headquar- 
ters Company: ''My one ambition is to 
go to town Saturday and get away from 
the overlasting 'Outside—Police Up!', 
I've policed up so many times that 
even when I'm down town I can't pass 
a cigarette butt on the sidewalk with- 
out catching myself bending over to 
pick it up." 





In the Field 



69 





Second Lieutenant 
Wallace A, Maciejewski 



Captain 
Leo J. Daly 




Second Lieutenant 
Matthew E. Shubert 





Second Lieutenant 
F. E. ChUds 



Second Lieutenant 
Don Riley 



70 




71 



Machine Gun Company 

MAY 15, 1917, was a busy day at the Presidio of San 
Francisco, California. It marked the arrival of the 
1 2th U. S. Infantry, just reheved from border service 
which they had performed for four years. Amid the hustle 
and bustle of the first few days rumors were rife as to the 
probable division of the regiment and possibility of a speedy 
departure for France. All gossip was set at rest when, a week 
later, orders were received calling for formation of two new 
regiments — the 62nd and 63 rd regiments of Infantry — using 
the 1 2th Infantry as a nucleus of the new organizations. 

In the quarters of the Machine Gun Company, 12th In- 
fantry, June 1st, Captain Cooper of that unit called in all the 
men picked for transfer to the new companies. They were 
for most part skilled machine gunners who had seen a complete 
enlistment on the Mexican Border. With a few short words 
of appreciation for past services and an appeal for even stricter 
devotion to duty in the newer units, he closed by giving them 
orders to proceed to their new outfits. Of the twenty-one 
pioneers who reported to Lieutenant I. C. Avery, Commander 
of the Machine Gun Company, 63rd Infantry, only one re- 
mained at the signing of the armistice — Sergeant John Roddy. 
With one officer and twenty-one men a machine-gun company 
could not seem complete; so, quite properly, the Quarter- 
master Corps sent us twenty-two mules; a rather asinine 
balance of power. 

The company soon settled down to the regular grind of all 

72 



Machine Gun Company 73 

machine gunners: gun drill, study of gun mechanism, and care 
of mules. The latter were of the toughest variety known; 
they had to be "broke.'* So jaunts through the parks and 
along the beach were in order; sprained arms and ankles, 
marred countenances, and sore heads were the mules' share 
in hardening up the "old soldiers." 

Though the company was handicapped by frequent change 
in the type of gun under the tactful guidance of Lieutenant 
Avery, steady progress was made. The Benet-Merdier, the 
Chauchat, the Maxim, and the Vickers guns were used in 
succession. The short time allowed for each gun required 
intensive work but all were mastered. 

Meanwhile men were selected from every other company 
in the regiment and sent to the Machine Gun Company. The 
organization increased by fits and starts till by September 30, 
1917, the enlisted personnel numbered sixty-five men. Came 
a change in command. On September 27th, Captain Marshall 
H. Quesenberry, two years out of West Point, took the helm. 
Regret at the loss of Lieutenant Avery was mitigated by his 
promotion to the grade of first lieutenant. Apparently Cap- 
tain Quesenberry merely came on a flying visit, for, a few weeks 
later he was off to take a fling at the School of Small Arms, 
Fort Sill, Okla. Lieutenant Avery again assumed command. 
At the same time Lieutenants Fred H. Reynolds, Justin F. 
Barnard, and William F. Stromeyer were added to the 
company. 

From October to December French and English officers 
were detailed to instruct the company in the latest tricks of 
machine gunnery, with special emphasis on its use in trench 
warfare. This taste of the real stuff started rumors that we 
would soon be in France. With that thought in mind men 
worked like badgers and trenches and dugouts appeared with 
such speed as to bewilder the teachers. "These Americans," 
the Frenchmen would say, "zey work like ze Hell." 



74 History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 

January 3, 1918, Captain Quesenberry returned. Training 
went on apace. The Colt gun was adopted. The new com- 
mander insisted on well-nigh perfection in every detail. What 
appeared small defects to a less experienced soldier were as 
sins to him. Withal he was agreeable and the men responded 
willingly. "Pep" became the characteristic of the Machine 
Gun Company drill and other captains of the regiment were 
soon challenging their men to drill like "Captain Quesenberry's 
outfit." 

In April a non-commissioned officers' school was opened. 
About the same time Lieutenants H. C. Boehme, E. E. Crouter, 
A. L. Lerch, and A. L. Gralapp were assigned to the company. 
It became known that the regiment was to be brought up to 
war strength, with recruits from the April draft. On May 2d, 
eighteen hundred men, nearly all Oregonians, arrived at 
camp. Intensive training, separate from the regiment, was 
their lot, under the able direction of Captain Alan Pendleton. 
During this time Captain Quesenberry was busy selecting the 
best material for his organization. The result proved itself 
in the one hundred men of splendid physical type and high 
average mentality who joined the company June 26th. New 
"non-coms" were made entirely from old men. Two weeks 
later, July loth, the Inspector-General, then on an official 
tour of all the camps in the Western Department, inspected 
the 63rd Infantry; he declared the Machine Gun Company 
the best that he had seen on his entire trip. 

Less than a week after the General Inspection it was defi- 
nitely announced that we were to go to Camp Meade, Md. 

August 1 2th we marched through San Erancisco to the 
train amid much cheering of God's people. Places of historic 
interest, the benevolence of the Red Cross at all the larger 
towns, and frequent stops to enable men to "stretch themselves" 
and listen to the regimental band tended to relieve the ennui 
that only a long trip on a troop train can produce. A swim 



Machine Gun Company 75 

at Kansas City, Missouri (Red Cross again), was the most 
agreeable incident of the journey. 

Hard work the motto of Camp Meade; we got down to it 
the day after our entrance. One week later we were sent to 
the range. Intensive work in the new Browning gun was 
begun immediately. Two weeks of this and then back to 
camp, where we found that we had recovered our old company 
commander, Captain I. C. Avery. Meantime orders had been 
received calling for the 63 rd to give birth to another regiment, 
the 72nd Infantry, which, with the 63rd, was to constitute the 
22nd Infantry Brigade. Accordingly twenty-five men left 
our company for the Machine Gun Company, 72nd Infantry. 
Their places were taken by Eastern draftees. 

Came the Influenza. It spread with alarming rapidity. 
The camp was quarantined: all welfare huts, library, theaters, 
etc., were closed. Within four weeks over ten thousand men 
in the Division had been stricken, early a thousand of whom 
died. The 63rd came out of this trying ordeal with flying 
colors — and the Machine Gun Company more so. In the 
whole regiment only thirteen died : the Machine Gun Company 
had only four cases and no deaths — the record of the regi- 
ment. Not only that. The closing of welfare huts and theaters 
rendered some other sort of entertainment imperative. Out- 
door entertainment and increased athletics were looked to. 
Musical and histrionic talent in the Machine Gun Company 
was of such high character as to produce the famous ** Suicide 
Quartette" as well as more than a third of the cast in the musi- 
cal comedy Never Again, rendered with great elan by the 
regimental players in camp, in Baltimore, and in Washington. 
In athletics too, the company showed its caliber by producing 
the champion tug o' war team of the camp. 

The company was at its maximum efficiency. Overseas 
equipment was issued November 5th. All was in readiness 
to move on a day's notice. Not a man in the company 



76 History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 

who was not straining at the leash. The premature armistice 
rumor of November 7th bid fair to give us the knockout blow. 
We revived somewhat on the swift denial of the tale, but the 
actual signing of the armistice sent all our hopes spinning hell- 
ward. Incidentally it revealed the substantial spirit of the 
Machine Gun Company; for the armistice was indeed the 
acid test of the morale of all organizations; and some of them 
collapsed under the strain. Not so the 63rd. Discipline, 
well-builded, so permeated every company of the regiment 
as to carry us through this trial with reputation not only 
untarnished, but even magnified to an enviable degree. 

During the two months that followed rumor brought us to 
Siberia, France, New York, and the Mexican Border. Early 
in January we learned of our assignment to military police 
duty in Washington, D. C, to take effect January 15th. 
Again we lost Captain Avery, this time to be succeeded by 
Captain Alan Pendleton, who had supervised the recruit 
training of many members of the company. On the morning 
of the fifteenth Captain Avery came up to bid us farewell. 
We answered with three rousing cheers for the man who had 
seen the organization in embryo, had directed its steps through 
the difficult formative period, and had finally come back to 
lead us overseas. 

Since our arrival in Washington, January 15th, we have 
been at military police duty continuously, with quarters at 
East Potomac Park. During that time the company per- 
sonnel had been steadily decreasing through discharges from 
the service. The rest of us look forward in anticipation to 
the day that will find us back in civilian life. And, for the 
faithful service which each one of us has rendered, we will go 
out to face the period of reconstruction with confidence, with 
broader vision; in short, better — if less credulous — social 
men. 




Our "Leatherlegs" 




Machine Gunners All 
77 




Suicide Squads 
78 



THE AFFIDAVIT BLUES 



(A Forecast) 

It was 1969, Two aged men, khaki-clad, wandered slowly along the 
seawall that encircles East Potomac Park. One a tall, well-built, figure, 
with waving white locks flowing down to his shoulders; the other, short, 
thickset, but apparently suffering from rheumatism. Both, I should 
judge, were well above seventy. 

For a long time neither spoke. The taller man gazed out across the 
river at the setting sun. 

" Darby," he broke out, turning majestically toward his companion, 
"how long have we been here?" 

"Let me see," taking a greasy thumb-worn notebook from his hip- 
pocket; "here it is: January 15, 1919 — Holy mackerel! Fifty years!" 

"And me affidavits haven't been heard from yet," grumbled Jack 
Mannion, for it was the old salt. " But, then," he added consolingly. 




79 



8o History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 

(he had become accustomed to delay), " they say that the first fifty years 
are the worst." 

"But have they left regimental headquarters yet?" queried 
" Darby." 

"Oh, sure; those guys are fast. The adjutant promised me he put 
on extra speed for mine, and he got them through, too — they left here 
in 1928." 

"Not a bad start, Jack. But how about that investigation?" 

"Well, you see, when the investigators got there all the folks were 
dead and gone — that was in 1940. So they writes back and says that 
the only thing my people depended on me for was to build headstones 
over their graves." 

"That ought to have got you out." 

"Sure and it should"; Jack waxed indignant: "but when the 
Commanding Officer of the Eastern Department (the third successor 
to the 1919 C. O.) read that, he scratched his head. It was a terribly 
ponderous question for him. He was still scratching his head when he 
was retired in 1950." 

"Darby" was sobbing, piteously. 

"And when his successor finally did make up his mind to discharge 
me," fairly screamed the now wrathful Jack, "some desk cootie disco- 
vered that the notary public had omitted the second "m" in the fourth 
word of the sixth line of the third page, and he had the whole thing 
started all over again." 

" Darby" was crying aloud. "Terrible, Jack, terrible," he blubbered. 
Jack sniffled. There was a lump in his throat. He controlled himself 
with an effort and went on: "Another month to get new affidavits, which 
1 started through channels in 1955. I haven't heard of them since." 

" Darby" became eloquently sympathetic. 

" During that time we have seen empires fall and new kingdoms arise: 
the dear old boozesheviki sent to their death and Milady Nicotine mur- 
dered. But," his voice choked with grief, his breath came falteringly, 
" we-haven't-seen-good- old — Frisco or — Mission Street." 

"Ah! Dear old Mission Street!" murmured both simultaneously. 

For a long time, with heads bowed, both wept silently. Darby 
dropped his notebook into the river. Mannion threw at the 63rd Head- 
quarters a look that bespoke the utterest abandonment. Then the two 
men gazed at each other. They stepped to the water's edge. Came a 
splash. A circular wave radiated about them; and telltale bubbles 
rose airily to the surface. 



The Affidavit Blues 8i 

Ten years later General Stubblefield was appointed commander of 
the Eastern Department. His first hour at his desk was a startling one. 
He looked hard at a paper before him. It read: "Application for Dis- 
charge." Below, in bold handwriting was the name, "Jack Mannion." 
He took up the phone. "Colonel McMahon 63rd? Yes. Discharge 
Private Jack Mannion immediately account dependents. Case is urgent." 

Colonel McMahon of Frederick, Md., tugged at his mustache ner- 
vously; then wrote: "Captain Stewart, M.G. Co., discharge Private 
Jack Mannion at once." 

At the same moment. Private Max Simon, fishing near the very 
place where the Missionites had disappeared years before, saw a single 
bubble rise to the surface. He looked and listened intently. He heard 
in voices strangely like those of "Darby" Norton and Jack Mannion; 
and a third which he did not recognize — it may have been that of old 
Davy Jones — the singing of 

THE AFFIDAVIT BLUES 
(Music: Chopin's Funeral March) 

We heard with joy of those things — affidavits. 

We learned by them we could the army lose; 
Enthusiasm marked our letters homeward — 

We hadn't heard of affidavit blues. 

We waited anxiously, expected always, 
An answer that would bring the best of news; 

We felt it then — a slightly hectic fever, 
'Twas the merest touch of affidavit blues. 

They came at last — we brought them to the Captain 

And let him on their raison d'etre muse; 
He sent them on — that hectic flush had left us. 

That slightest touch of affidavit blues. 

When, day by day, and week by week, we heard not 

A single word, nor found the smallest clues. 
The terror gripped us — held us, made us haggard — 

The second stage of affidavit blues. 

6 



82 History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 

Then, month on month, and year on year, we waited; 

The time was flitting fast — they would not choose; 
We're losing weight — and hair — we're going loony: 

A dire stage of affidavit blues. 

As years passed on we tried to drown our sorrow 
In pints and 'arf pints — gallons, too, of booze; 

"All whisky's good" but I'll cry halt on varnish, 
It didn't cure my affidavit blues. 

Then came the day 1 got the fatal answer: 
That they could only my request refuse. 

I leaped into the famed Potomac River, 
Cast to despair by affidavit blues. 

In Neptune's hell, with Davy Jones you'll find me; 
If you have been like me, this hint you'll use: 
"Hell's pretty tough, but things could be some worser 
And one of them is affidavit blues." 



Jokes and Joshes and Libels 



83 



JOKES AND JOSHES AND LIBELS 

Page Diogenes. — Trewett ought to join the Department of Justice. 
The story goes that friend Trewett lost an O, D. Shirt. Vowing to get 
the thief if there 
was one, he took 
his only remain- 
ing shirt out to 
the clothesline, 
brought a big 
dry-goods box to 
the scene, and 
proceeded to 
crawl in, with 
three days' ra- 
tions. When he 
had gotten his 
eye adjusted to 
the knot-hole, he 
fainted. The 
shirt was gone ! 

Old John Roddy is responsible for the following advice to a rookie: 
" Don't let them know how much you know — make 'em think you don't 
know nothin' ." 




There is someone in 



who has complete possession of Jimmie 



Bond's heart; anyhow he was heard murmuring this literary gem: 

Far away in California, 
'Neath the Oklahoma skies, 
Lives my Alabama sweetheart 
With the Mississippi eyes. 

The day the false armistice rumor was published happened to be 
the day we received our "45's." Lunn remarked that our getting the 
guns was a sure sign the war was over. The next day the guns were 
taken in for inspection. This from Lunn: "It's all wrong, Venus, it's 
all wrong. The war's still on." 



Casteel was an exceptionally good barber when he was honing razors. 



84 



History of the 63rcl U. S. Infantry 



About December 12th, Mac stepped into the O.R. in a most military 
manner and requested Wednesday afternoon pass. When asked where 
he wanted to go he wheezed out this one: "Oh! I thought I'd like to run up 
home and spend Xmas and New Year's holidays with the folks." 

During the epidemic someone hinted that a "Charlie Chaplin Eye- 
brow" would be a good preventive. "Stub" must have been misinformed, 
for he passed the eyebrow stage and developed a most luxuriant growth 
which was the envy and dismay of all, even forcing "Two Gun Steve" 
to demobilize the one he had imported from "Over There." 



H0NE5T, MISJWXR RI5K, |'n NOT 
nfiRRlED. YOVJ ABE THE OJLY 
OiP-i. I CoOLO EVER Love ;^___ 

Bflp-R Look uke fl^ 
HeRRING, ETC - ETC- 

ETC. 








With a copy of La Vie Parisienne in one hand, the Police Gazette in 
the other, and a suspicious-looking bulge in his right hip pocket, Jimmie 
Bond faced the B.S. end of the lower squad-room and delivered his 
" Counsels to Young Men," an excoriating treatise on prize-fighters, booze- 
fighters, and would-be gallants. 



The time the mules were being broken in, Swanstrom was supply 
sergeant and Stubblefield was an acting buckaroo. The mule got the 
best of the argument and grave fears were entertained for Stub's skin 
and bones; Swanstrom ran over at the double and we though he was 
going to render first aid. "Hey, there," he yelled, "did you ruin that 
saddle?" 



Jokes and Joshes and Libels 



85 



One hot day in August, 1918, the loungers on the front veranda were 
very much surprised to see Stubblefield drive past in a large machine. 
Before they had rcovered from their surprise, old Stub again passed 
by and in a few minutes he again majestically drove past; this time, 
however, close scrutiny revealed a slight moisture on his noble brow — 
the heat of the day was getting him — but his fourth trip was his down- 
fall. For the lower part of the machine became detached and, alas! 
the secret was out — Stub had both feet on the pavement going at full 
speed. 




Great excitement prevailed shortly after our arrival at Camp iVleade 
when Jolly rushed to the First Sergeant and exclaimed: "Oh! do hurry, 
something dreadful is happening. I 
don't know whether it is a German in- 
fernal machine or what — but please do 
hurry." Mendel hastily buckled on his 
belt and called Cory, Sudbrock, Chrislu, 
and McMann and dashed madly toward 
the stables. Wearing the scene, every 
precaution was taken and they silently 
approached the place whence strange 
sounds issued. Mendel instructed Cory 
to silently encircle the objective. Again 
and again came that strange " Pattooee" 
and then mournfully thunderous rumbling. The attackers were just 
about to rush in, when a wondrously harmonious melody was wafted 
through the air. Enraptured, they waited, and their minds were entirely 
set at ease by the chorus "Pattooee and 1 knew him when he was all 
right." It was our peerless quartet, Harry Jones, Huyson (Red) John- 
son, Hog, and Porter. From that time we all welcomed the deep rumbling, 
for it always presaged some worth-while harmony. Our quartet was in 
great demand all over camp, at the Hostess House, and Regimental shows, 
and very fittingly furnished one of the big hits at the farewell banquet 
given Colonel Croxton. And just to think that Jolly discovered them! 
Do tell! 



Copt Pcodlentbn 13 -thinking of" trimming 
all the -trees. 



With Willy Davis furnishing that seductive Southern darky shuffle 
and Irish Martin and Micky McCabe, the hot-footed clog of Erin, many 
periods of desperation were passed without violence. 



86 



History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 



One of Rags Davis's favorite forms of amusement was to drag out a 
little green book and read a name and address, and then, with a far-away 
look in his eye, rave over some beauty of bygone days. Dudley John- 
son thought this a great idea and is now on his fifth volume. The Har- 
vard Classics will look like a leaflet when Dud gets through. 

The real reason for Pound's daily siesta did not come to light until 
he was seen on several successive nights tripping the light fantastic with 
the school marms. Maybe that accounts for the copy of "Vocational 
Guidance" we found on his bunk. 

Do you want to know the names of Weiman's Champion Tug-o' War 
team? Here they are and every one of them is a reason for their cham- 
pionship: Casteel, Cory, Bollenbaugh Bros., Hanns, Faltus, Sudbrock, 
Harry Jones, Gagen, Yassenoff, Weidman, and Voile. 





THE name Supply Company indicates in a general way the 
object and purpose of this organization. A word of 
explanation will make this clear. 
The object is to centralize into as few hands as possible 
the equipping of a regiment. 

The purpose is to obtain the supplies necessary for equip- 
ping the troops and distributing them as quickly as possible. 
Both are accomplished by the company commanders turn- 
ing into the supply office a list of supplies needed. Then the 
supply officer makes a consolidation of these lists into a requisi- 




OUR. BUSY DAY AT-RE&»nENTAL 5UPPUY OFFICE 
87 



88 



HIstory'of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 




>.S you WERE 



tion on the different branches of supply, draws, and distributes 
to the different companies. 

The duties of the Supply Company are many and varied. 
Picture in your mind a group of 3700 men, all sizes and shapes. 
These men must have shoes, stockings, underwear, leggings 
breeches, shirts, coats, hats, hat cords, collar ornaments, 
overcoats, raincoats, shelter halves and poles, blankets, mess 
equipment, rifles, belts, bayonets, bedsacks, straw to fill the 
bedsacks, and cots to sleep on, and a place provided to sleep 
in. Then comes the mess. The outdoor life of our men 
makes for good appetites and our Government is very liberal 
in providing good food for the men in the Army. This in- 



\ ' / 



^ 1/ 




A3 VOU AEE 







"Let 'er Buck!" 

89 




'Punchers" in Disguise 



Supply Company 



91 




CHOW TIME 



eludes everything on the market, in season. Perishable 
supplies are drawn every day and non-perishable every ten 
days. Stoves have to be provided, and utensils, fuel, and water. 
In fact, everything that goes into a man to make him big, 
healthy, and strong, and everything that goes on him to make 
him look the man that he is, comes through the Supply 
Company. 

Now when you have your men clothed, feeding regularly, 
sheltered, and working hard, there comes a time when they 
expect something in the way of pay for what they are doing. 







s \ 



ML 



/X. 



iBBl Ijil 130] ■111 iBfl p^^^n^A ^M^ 







IPdDILlKEIB TUIP 2 2 



92 



History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 



Again the Supply comes in and pays off the men, settles the 
commissary accounts of the different companies, draws the 
difference in cash, and pays this to the companies for a com- 
pany fund. 

Medical supplies also are drawn through the Supply 
Company. 




A regiment changes station. The Supply Company pre- 
pares the bill of lading, loads all property on cars, gets trans- 
portation for freight and men, and upon arrival at a new 
station unloads the freight and delivers it to the different 
companies. 

To perform these duties, what is generally known as the 
Supply Company was organized. 

It consists of the supply officer as company commander, 
two first lieutenants and two second lieutenants as officers, 
one ordnance sergeant, one corporal of ordnance, and six 
privates for ordnance department, three regimental supply 
sergeants, four supply sergeants, one first sergeant, one mess 
sergeant, one stable sergeant with corporals, horseshoers, 
wagoners (mule-skinners), saddlers, cooks, and privates, to 
make a total of 164 enlisted personnel. Organization tables 
allow the Supply Company 275 draft mules, 7 riding mules, 
and 9 horses with wagons and other equipment. 



Supply Company 



93 



As can be seen, the Supply Company is organized with the 
view of giving the best service and doing the most good to the 
largest number of men in the regiment. In order to accompHsh 
this it is necessary to have the full support of the commanding 
officers of the regiment and full cooperation of the company 
commanders. This has been given by the officers of the 63 rd 
Infantry and, because of this fact, the 63 rd Infantry has a good 
Supply Company, capable of meeting most emergencies as 
they arise. The record of the company shows that the com- 
pany was composed of men of more than ordinary ability. 
There was never a job too small or a job too large for us to 
handle. The spirit of getting things done, loyalty to the cause 
for which they enlisted, loyalty to their officers and regiment, 
good-fellowship among themselves, and love for our long-eared 
friends are among the many characteristics that have made 
the Supply Company a success. All did their best and put 
all they had in the game with the result that the regiment as 
a whole was well taken care of by their Supply Company. 




SUPPUY CO. AT DOLL IN CAMP MEADE 



94 



History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 




Astp«nuou« occo^of.on hos tffoUeft Corj.Sn..1-K 



"I'M FEELING KINDA BLUE" 

I'm feelin' kinda cheated and I'm feelin' kinda blue, 
Account o' layin' here in camp and all the big job through. 

The armistice is signed up tight, 

They've got the Germans beaten right, 

And all the world is gay and bright — 
But still I'm feelin' blue! 

They said our bunch was ready to start for overseas. 

They gave us great big hob-nailed shoes and caps and warm "O. D's. 

They put us through the long hard mill, 

The skirmish and the gas-mask drill; 

We went right at it with a will — 
And then the war fell through! 



A cinch we were to go across, but then there came the Mlu." 
They quarantined us for a month, so what were we to do? 
I'll never get the chance again 
To march along in France, an' then 
I'll soon wear "civie" pants again, — 
Oh, Hell, I'm feelin' blue. 



The Injection 



95 



THE INJECTION 

A cotton swab, 
A needle hot, 
A little sting. 
You've got your shot. 




If you were a Rookie that had come to the 63rd Regiment at Camp 
Meade — and heard — 

Colonel Croxton bawl out a ^^f- 
Shavetail, 

Or Captain Jones lecture on 
military courtesy and discipline, 

Or Captain Horton, when you 
went by with the sweater on that 
"she" had sent you, 

Or the medical officer over at 
the Infirmary when you refused 
to take salts. 

Or what one of the mess ser- 
geants told a new K. P., 

Or Sergeant Boyer of "F" Co. telling how they worked 'em when he 
was a recruit. 

Or saw — 

Sergeant Oliver cleaning mule hair out of his toothbrush with a 
"cootie" comb, 

Or Osborn or "Red" Inman go round the barracks at a dead run 
standing up on their horses. 

Or Keeley "double-timing" it up to the red barn and back, with Ser- 
geant Clump of "A" Co., after him. 

Or the M. P. after he had tried to stop the "party" behind the K. C. 
hall the night of the party. 

Or Wood, of the Supply Co., thirty-eight hours after his week-end pass 
began. 

Or the scrap at the Headquarters Company, 

Or Jack Ellis making 'em police up down at the Supply Company, 

Or Driggars riding the horse that had the Remount "bluffed," 

Believe me, you decided right off that you sure were one rookie in a 
regular outfit. 



96 



History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 



Found: In the "Issue Ticket" file of Supply Sergeant Ellis the 
following telegram: "Ten pound baby boy arrived this morning." 
Jack is wondering how he is going to produce the goods when the Zone 
Inspector comes around. 

It is very bad policy to make a purchase without first sampling the 
goods, which was proven to the sorrow of one of the boys who paid seven 
dollars and fifty cents of perfectly good money for a quart of pure vinegar 
which retails at any grocery store at twenty-five cents. All is not gold 
that glitters and all is not whiskey that comes with a Government seal. 




S^t. Oliver givinc) our"DEAfJ"-f=rier\<i odvite. 



The Sad Tale of a Camp Meade M. P. 97 



THE SAD TALE OF A CAMP MEADE M. P. 

This is the tale of Horatius McFee, 

Camp Meade "anti-liquor" M. P., 

And the trouble he fell in when he started quellin' 

Some guys in the line Infantrie. 

Extreme conscientious was he, 

His orders he kept to a T, 

And he took great delight 'n this one-sided fightin' 

With stewed guys that hardly could see. 

'Twas a happy Horatius McFee, 

Detailed as Chief of M. P.. 

To keep rum from prancin' and spoilin' the dancin/ 

At the Infantry hop and soiree. 

Twas a big-feeling Horatius McFee 

Who went to the hall as M. P., 

He walked proudly in and he ogled the wimen. 

And kept order throughout the soiree. 

At last our Horatius McFee 

Espied the departure of three, 

And a dry rasping throttle deduced that a bottle 

Might be passed with the contents of " tea." 

Then out stole young Horatius McFee, 

His duty lay plain as could be; 

By the moonlight he watched 'em until he had "kotched" 'em. 

A-pullin' their bottle of tea. 

Then up stepped young Horatius McFee, 
" You're pinched guys, now come on with me," 
When they didn't foller, he grabbed on the collar. 
Of a guy quite as hard boiled as he. 

But alas for the valiant M. P. 

In his haste he had quite failed to see, 

In the guy he would murder, an old Sixty-thirder, 

Instead of a rookie like he. 



98 



History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 



A week in the hospital he 

Lay before he even could see, 

A full week of repenting and bitter lamenting, 

Not seeing the six and the three. 

To the C. O. went Horatius McFee, 
"Sir, please send me down to Camp Lee," 
Where the Sixty-thirder, in cold-blooded murder, 
Can't beat up an M. P. like me. 

Now the moral for every M. P. 
Has to do with the care with which he 
Should size up his guy' an' be careful at tryin' 
To bust up a Sixty-third spree. 




"its no riot" _ 

JUSr OUH PUPULflK. MAIL OKDERLy-CUETIS-IN HIS DAILY IZOUTlN&^Ji'"'" 




First Lieutenant 
Archer L. Lerch 





Second Lieutenant 
Victor Thomason 



First Lieutenant 
William L. Conway 



99 




Major 
Harry E. Clay 




Major 
Thompson M. Baird 




THE Medical Detachment of the 63rd Infantry was or- 
ganized June 18, 1917, at the Presidio of San Francisco, 
CaL, under the direction of Captain Everett O. Jones, 
surgeon. The original organization was composed of picked 
men from the Ambulance Co. No. 2 and Post Hospital, and 
its members were all from the Western or Middle Western 
States. 

July 6, 1917, Captain Jones was succeeded by Captain 
Ernest C. Dalton as surgeon. Captain Dalton had recently 
returned from the Mexican border and, on coming to the 63 rd, 
was promoted to the grade of major. Under him the men were 
trained in all modern methods of emergency first-aid work, 




mSANlTY squa-d" 
lOI 



102 History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 

hospital corps duties, and preliminary- gas defense. Instruc- 
tion was given in Prench by Pirst Lieutenant William H. 
Blanchette, a doctor and native of France, who spoke the 
language fluently. The men also attended other French 
classes in the Y. M. C. A. Hut. In addition they were given 
an instructive course in medical moving pictures in the Oregon 
Building. 

The training consisted of six hours' drilling and field work, 
one hour of French and one hour first-aid and minor surgery 
each day, excepting Saturday and Sunday, and a twelve to 
fifteen-mile hike once a week. 

At the Presidio the Hospital Corps inoculated the entire 
regiment of approximately four thousand men against typhoid 
fever and smallpox. At Camp Meade these men were again 











9h. 






;j:.f. 
















Captain 
James S. Hewson 



Captain 
Frank H. CoUins 



Captain 
Ezra F. Mertz 




First Lieutenant 
Thomas F. Moore 



First Lieutenant 
Judson F. Browne 




First Lieutenant 
Frank A. Murphy 





First Lieutenant 


First Lieutenant 


First Lieutenant 


William S. Crawford 


Irving R. Hardy 
103 


Francis J. Slattery 






Chaplain 
James H. Dunham 



Chaplain 
Daniel F. Desmond 



Chaplain 
Melvin V. Ogle 




104 



Medical Department 



105 




War is H— !" 



inoculated with Lipo 
pneumococcic vaccine, 
making in all about 
sixteen thousand 
"shots" of vaccine and 
eight thousand vaccina- 
tions. Every possible 
precaution was taken 
to immunize the entire 
regiment against con- 
tagious disease. 

Physically the men 
of the Hospital Corps 
were of a husky type 
and often distinguished 
themselves. On one 
occasion, after having 
been ridiculed as weaklings, they outpulled in a tug of war the 
heaviest line company team in the regiment. 

It is worthy of note that when the regiment entrained at 
San Francisco, in eight train sections, each section was accom- 
panied by six medical corps men and one medical officer, who 
did their work so well that the regiment arrived at Camp 

Meade with only one case of sickness 
developing throughout the trip. 

It was a matter of regret to the 
whole regiment that, on September 6, 
1918, twenty men and three medical 
officers were taken from the unit to 
form the Medical Corps of the 72nd 
Infantry, with Captain Clay as sur- 
geon. One week later Captain Clay 
was transferred back, relieving Major 
Dalton as surgeon of the 63rd Infantry, 




io6 History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 




LT-WAYMAN HAS A nETHOD ALL HIS OWN 



and promoted to grade of major. Major Dalton was then 
transferred to the 71st Infantry and later to the PhiHppine 

Islands. 

The Hospital Corps was 
there filled with men mostly 
from the States of Ohio and 
New York, who, under the 
able direction of Major Clay, 
were trained to a state of 
efficiency second to none in 
the United States Army. The 
men were fully prepared for 
overseas front line duty when 
the armistice was signed. Colonel Pillsbury, surgeon of the 
nth Division, to which this organization belonged, used the 
Medical Corps of the 63rd Infantry as an example in personal 
appearance as well as paper work for the other medical units 
of that division. 

In writing the story of the 
Medical Department we take 
pleasure in mentioning Mrs. 
Clay, who accompanied her 
husband, Major Clay, to 
Camp Meade, where she ^ 
greatly endeared herself to 
the men of the Medical De- 
partment. Mrs. Clay had 
been a trained nurse and, 
during the influenza epidemic 
at Camp Meade, gave herself 
unsparingly in beautiful ser- 
vice. 

Major Clay was succeeded by Major Thompson M. 
Baird as surgeon. Major Baird is a graduate of the Jefferson 




"rniA ■2>E LUX 

OkjR *,TTERNQ0N Ptt^FOI\'A/\NCE 



Medical Department 



107 




MAaoR. CLflt WITH HIS FAVORITE SLEEPY JIM 



Medical College, of Philadelphia. Before entering the service 
he had a large practice in Wilkes-Barre, Pa. Major Baird 
served with the 58th Infantry 
of the 4th Division in France 
and had the honor of leading 
the ist Battalion into action 
near the Vesle River on August 
4, 191 8, by order of Brigadier- 
General E. E. Booth. For 
bravery on this occasion he re- 
ceived the Distinguished Service 
Medal. On August 10, 1918, 
while attending a wounded man 
on the field of battle, near Fismes, he was gassed and wounded. 

Recovering from his wounds, which were considered fatal, 
he was assigned chief of Medical Service R. C, Military Hospi- 
tal No. 8, in Paris. 

The Medical Department is proud of his record and highly 
favored by his new assignment. 

The men of this detachment responded to their country's 
call and, finding places of service in the Medical Department 
of the 63rd, have done their work well. Had they been per- 
mitted to go to the front, they would have returned with the 
honors of war. 

Whatever their military rating, there is much in these 
men of the Medical Department to inspire one with strength, 
optimism, and hope. They share in the high rating given by 
the War Department to the whole regiment. 

It does not take much sagacity to predict for men so 
thoroughly trained for success in war success in peace. 

"Peace hath her victories no less renowned than war." 
To all who served so well we wish the victories of peace. 




io8 





'^ 






I I '. 




*."■■ 



'Mvm. 








^ 













Headquarters Company 



r 




-1 H rl a 






IT -F -t*- 




m^Mi^m^mjM&mm^ 



Machine Gun Company 







r. '• 



^. ^' ■',')' 



T yvT vf 



J^MMaMsM 









^ 






^ ' *^^^ Cf. ^^" -"i>^'i V' " 5^. .<-f' 










*-T^ 



#^- 




i- f^ r ^ ^ 






i4 



,v*», ^ 






^ 



First Battalion, 
Sixty-third U. S. Infantry 



109 




Major Walter E. Black 




Second Lieutenant 
Edgar M. Haas 



First Lieutenant 

Alfred P. Kitson 

III 



First Lieutenant 
Lorenzo D. Macy 



SOME DON'TS FOR THE SOLDIER AND EX-SOLDIER 

Don't, for }our own sake, }our friends, and )'our Country, forget that 
}ou have seen Honorable Service as an American Soldier. 

Don't be "slouchy" in the way 30U wear }'our clothes. Don't leave 
your overcoat unbuttoned or wear your hat on the side of your head. 

Don't amble along; walk erect; "poke out" your chest and snap 
into ever\'thing you do. 

Don't be a Rowd\'; carry yourself like a Soldier. It wasn't the 
"Hard Guys" that won the war. 

Don't fail to salute an Officer when you meet him. It's the sign of 
fellowship in the Honorable Profession of Arms, and shows civilians that 
you have military breeding. 

Don't be discourteous to the civilian population which has stood 
behind >ou so nobly by giving money to the many agencies for your 
comfort. 

Don't forget that you are going home to that mother who knows 
you are the best soldier Uncle Sam ever had, or ever will have, and for 
her sake, if for nothing else, Keep your Record Clean. 

Don't, if }ou are an Overseas Soldier, call the man who did not get 
over a "Slacker." You were lucky and he wasn't, that's all. Many a 
better man that \ou didn't have a chance at the big fight, and if you 
insult him, he will be doing right if he takes part of his disappointment 
out on \ou. 

Don't be the " Fall Gu\" and buy fake campaign buttons or ribbons. 
You only cheapen ^our uniform and make yourself look ridiculous. 
Wait until the Government authorizes a Campaign Badge that you can 
wear with credit and pride. 

Don't hang around the city until you are "broke" and can't get home. 
Go home now and get back on the job. 

Don't ever cease being thankful that you were privileged to defend 
the Rights of Humanity in War, and when you go back to civil life, de- 
termine that you will uphold the same fine ideals which inspired you as 
a soldier. You have shown the world how you can Fight; now show 
it how you can Live. 

Lorenzo J). Macy, 
First Lieutenant, 63rd Infantry, 
Commanding Provost Guard. 



Provost Guard, ist Battalion, 63rd Infantry 

Detachment 

THE Provost Guard for Baltimore City was taken over 
by the 63rd Infantry Detachment, January 23, 1919, 
reUeving the nth Division Mihtary PoHce Detach- 
ment, which returned to Camp Meade, Md., at that time, to 
be mustered out. 

The guard consisted of fifty men of the ist BattaHon, 
under command of First Lieutenant Lorenzo D. Macy. 
Major Walter E. Black, commanding ist Battalion, 63rd 
Infantry, Curtis Bay, Md., was provost marshal until his 
transfer to command of 2nd Battalion, East Potomac Park, 
Washington, D. C, when this office was filled by his successor, 
Major Albert R. Dillingham. 

Headquarters for the Guard was established at the Central 
-Police Station, No. 2 East Saratoga Street. A small room 
on the first floor was used as an office and orderly room. 
Quarters for the men were on the third floor. Here, three 
large airy rooms, shower baths, and pool room, with player 
piano installed, made assignment to the detachment very 
attractive. 

Arrangements were made for the men to mess at the 
W. C. C. S. Hotel, Holliday and Lexington Streets. By this 
arrangement the rations were drawn from the Quartermaster 
and turned over to the manager of the hotel, and the men 
were furnished a splendid mess at no additional cost. 

8 113 



1 14 History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 

The work was interesting. Most of the offenses dealt with 
were of minor character, and, with the exception of the A.W. 
O.L. and desertion cases, due almost entirely to drink. Much 
of the effort put forth by the guard was in bringing boot- 
leggers to justice. 

When off duty many visits were made to the courts, espe- 
cially the police courts. Go to any police court if you want to 
study life. Not life as it should be, or can be, but life as it is, 
with a great number of weak-willed and habit-wrecked beings 
who are brought before the magistrate to answer for their 
weakness and their crime. Like actors on a stage, but with 
a bitter realism not possible there, they run before you the 
whole gamut of human emotion. 

The hearty cooperation of the Police Department, and the 
splendid character of the men at the head of the department, 
made the work much more pleasant than it otherwise would 
have been. 

The men of the detachment displayed good judgment, 
grit, and loyalty; they carried themselves like men and sol- 
diers and discharged the hard duties of the provost guard 
in a manner worthy of the 63rd Infantry. 




115 




First in Their Lines 
Ii6 



Company ''A" 

UPON the organization of the regiment, fifty men and 
*'Spot," under the command of the only officer of the 
company, Captain Wallace McNamara, moved up to 
the barracks to be occupied by the 63rd Infantry, and formed 
Company "A." It was a big job starting all over again but 
we all put our shoulders to the wheel, and pushed hard. We 
were small, but were all strong for Company "A." 

On July 28, 1917, Lieutenant Allan Pendleton reported 
to the company and took command, relieving Captain Mc- 
Namara, who then became regimental adjutant, then was 
soon transferred, and we were left with only one officer. An 
addition of thirty-one recruits and four non-commissioned 
officers was made during July, bringing the enlisted strength 
of the company up to ninety men. The new men soon became 
boosters and before long we became almost like an old outfit. 
At this time we organized a baseball team that held its own 
with the best in the regiment. 

With the addition of three new officers, work began in 
earnest. We built dummies, made fencing sticks, and dug 
various kinds of trenches. The Company Fund bought more 
athletic equipment and we played as hard as we worked. 

Things went smoothly through October, although we did 
our "Squads East," sang Over There, and counted "One, — 
One, — Two," with increasing snap. The first Thanksgiving 
dinner of Company "A" was held in a very elaborately 
decorated mess hall. Menu cards with the Company roster on 

117 



ii8 History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 

each one were given out. They made a big hit, and so did 
the dinner. Mess Sergeant Henry T. Klein had forgotten noth- 
ing and every one went away "full." As on Thanksgiving, 
we had a big Christmas spread. 

Early in January, out of the clear sky an order came for us 
to proceed to North Island, San Diego, California. We 
loaded our property on the boat at the Presidio docks and, 
eighty strong, plus *'Spot, " started on our trip. On January 
nth we arrived in San Diego, rode across the San Diego Bay 
to North Island, and at once moved into tents. 

North Island is in reality a long peninsula projecting out 
into San Diego Bay, connected to the mainland on the Coro- 
nado side by a long, narrow " Sand Spit." On the island is the 
well known Army Aviation Station, and Rockwell Field. 
The Navy also has a part of the Island for the use of her 
aviators. 

All day long, day after day, there were planes in the air 
flying about like busy bees buzzing around a honeycomb. 
They were not only in the air but everyAvhere; we were there to 
guard them against fire and destruction, and we did it. Two 
immense searchlights were at once put up, which lighted practi- 
cally the whole island at night. They were so strong that the 
officer of the day could mount the hundred-foot tower and, by 
turning the lights about, could almost tell whether his sentries 
were on post! No one was allowed on the island without a 
pass, and the rule was rigidly adhered to. Frequent night fire 
drills were held; on these occasions the island had to be en- 
circled in double time, but we did it, not always, however, 
with full clothing equipment. The guard was severe at first 
but, with the addition of seventy-two men who were at once 
sent to us from the regiment, it became much easier. 

We weren't on guard all of the time, and when on pass were 
in close range of Camp Kearney and Camp Taliaferro and 
within four hours of Los Angeles. From camp we could 




Captain Wilson G. Bingham 





First Lieutenant 
Henry D. McCary 



First Lieutenant 
Raymond R. Tourtillott 



119 





- IHm^lUG 



^ / ^ i 1^ 
I ^ ■ f 



i» 




Inside and Out 



Company ''A" 121 

plainly see Point Loma, Fort Rosecrans, and the entrance to 
San Diego Bay. The famous Hotel Del Coronado was but a 
thirty minutes' walk from camp. Very often in the morning, 
before our work-out, we were hiked across the "Sand Spit" 
and around the hotel and then through its beautiful grounds. 
"Spot" used to make all trips with us and would even try to 
help sing Over There^ as we hiked along. 

We had a very good baseball field, basketball court, and 
soccer field; and we used them all. Plenty of athletic equip- 
ment was furnished and, in spite of the lazy and tropical 
weather, there was always someone working out. Rabbit 
drives, however, were the greatest diversion and more fun, 
because they brought results on the mess table the next day. 
A skirmish line would be formed and the island combed. 
Each drive paid a dozen or more rabbits, w^hich, when cleaned 
and cooked, tasted pretty good. 

Although Company "A" had come by this time to be a big 
family, and we had ideal climatic conditions, everyone still 
longed to be back on the San Francisco flats. March ist 
brought an unexpected order to return to San Francisco. 
Lieutenant Pendleton read it in the mess hall, and had there 
been any roof on that place, the cheering would have raised 
it off ! The order also called for the sending out of four separate 
detachments to be attached to Company "C, " 63rd Infantry. 
A change, however, was all we wanted, and it all sounded 
mighty good. On March 4th a detachment of one corporal 
and seven men left for Long Beach, California; one corporal 
and seven men for San Pedro, California; one corporal and ten 
men to New Idria, California; and one sergeant, four corporals, 
and twenty-one men for Wilmington, California; the rest of the 
company entrained at the same time for San Francisco, and 
returned over the same route, arriving there on the morning 
of March 5th. We at once moved into the brick barracks. 
The detachment sent to Long Beach was quartered in 



122 History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 

barracks and did guard over the Craig and Los Angeles Ship- 
yards. The San Pedro detachment guarded the Los Angeles 
Shipyard and Dry Docks. The men lived in barracks, the 
climate was very good, and the guard not particularly hard. 
The men sent to New Idria guarded the Cinne-bar Quick- 
silver Mines, which are said to produce nearly three-fourths of 
the total output in the United States. The men were quartered 
in new barracks. At Wilmington the wooden shipyards of the 
Chandler Shipbuilding Company and Fulton Shipbuilding 
Company were guarded. The men lived in barracks and, 
although the guard was stiff, liked the place very much. 

In July all men on detached service joined the company 
and, in accordance with the ever-prevalent rumors, everything 
was made ready for a quick departure east. 

The company left San Francisco on August 12th and 
arrived at Camp Meade, Maryland, on the morning of the 19th, 
where we started to work in earnest. Everyone believed 
now that he would at last get a chance at the Hun, and was 
preparing himself. 

In September Captain Oscar H. Beasley was assigned and 
took command of the company. He greatly inspired the men 
in their training, due to the fact that he had been "Over 
There" and had fought the Hun himself. When the armistice 
was signed "A" Company still had plenty of "pep" and 
broke up a Development Battalion parade in celebration of the 
so-called peace treaty. On January 17th the company left 
Camp Meade, with the ist Battalion for Curtis Bay, Maryland, 
and at once settled down in tents. On March 24th Captain 
Beasley became a civilian and Captain Wilson G. Bingham 
succeeded him in command, making the seventh company 
commander "A" Company has had during its short existence. 
We believe this to be the record in the regiment. We are very 
progressive and like variety. 

{Coticluded on page 128) 



The Sixty-Third ''Growl 



123 



THE SIXTY-THIRD "GROWL" 



Tune: Silver Threads among the Gold. 
Copyright by 63rd Infantry. 

I 



Darling, I am growing old, 
Silver stripes instead of gold. 
Now that peace in Europe nears, 
I'll be back in seven years. 

II 

I'll drop in on you some night, 
With my whiskers long and white, 
Yes, the war is over, dear. 
And we are going home, I hear. 

HI 

Home again with you once more. 
Say — by nineteen twenty-four. 
Once by now I thought I'd be 
Sailing o'er, across the sea, 

IV 

To the place we hear each day, 
But I'm stuck in Curtis Bay. 
You can hear the gang all curse. 
War is Hell, but peace is worse. 



V 



When the next war comes around, 
In the front line I'll be found, 
I'll rush in again, "pell-mell," 
Yes, I will, I will like Hell! 



124 History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 



ANTHONY COENEN, TENOR 

In full accord with the versatility of the company is Private Anthony 
Coenen, the six-foot tenor who starred at the Liberty Theater at Camp 
Meade, Maryland, when the regimental show was staged there. 

Coenen came from Tucson, Arizona; in civil life he studied voice 
culture under the direction of the National Opera at Mexico City. It 
was real talent that Coenen brought to Camp. 

Coenen sang the leading male part in the musical comedy at Camp 
Meade in a clear sweet tenor and won great distinction. After his 
appearance at Camp Meade, officers heard him in their private clubrooms 
and noted civilians listened to him in their homes in Baltimore and 
Washington. The company also enjoyed his lyrics in the mess hall at 
the wonderful Thanksgiving dinner of 1918. 

At present Private Coenen is under training with Dr. Frank Damrosch, 
the famous teacher of voice for the Metropolitan Opera Company of 
New York City. With such a teacher as Damrosch, and such a fine tenor 
voice as he has, Coenen should soon be ready for a bright career. 

BENEATH "O. D." 

There are oodles of advantages in being a Regular. Then again 
there ain't. For instance, intensive training under a broiling Southern 
sky, wearing the regulation O. D. uniform. 

We all remember those blistering August days, stabbin' the dummies. 
The more the salty brine rolled down our manly torsos, the more we 
wondered why in Hell we weren't issued khaki shirts and breeches. But 
we didn't get them ; so we continued to perspire and froth at the mouth. 

1 can remember how glad we were to be in a deep trench. We used 
to huddle up in a little ball to take advantage of the bit of shade thus 
afforded. Somehow, though, there was always an officer around to 
"take all of the joy out of life," and up we'd get and start anew. We 
could have been tried for what we thought — but what a blessing it is that 
we can think what we please! 





Ready for Anything 
125 




In and Out of Khaki 

126 



Jokes 127 

THE AMERICAN SOLDIER 

He's a driller and a drinker, 
He's a gambler and a sport, 
He's a hard old hand at hiking, 

but at work he's rather short, 
But the devil likes his fighting 

and the hearty way it's done; 
He's a cross between a Christian 

and the devil's only son, 
He has vices like the most of men 

and virtues like a few. 
But when you thump his mettle 
You will find its ring is true. 
He's a mixture, made of Capsicum 

with fire to make it hot. 
On his record as a soldier there 

is not a single blot. 
He's a khaki-colored cyclone 

with the lightning in its heart, 
And he never yet has turned his back 

nor played the coward's part. 
He is honored by the title of a 

soldier and a man; 
He is Uncle Samuel's nephew and 

he's all American. 

"ETHEL" 

It is not every organization that is favored in having a lady on its 
roll. We have Ethel. This is the way of it. The Sixty-third staged a 
show at Camp Meade, Maryland. No show is a go unless it has female 
characters. So we had to have several impersonators. "A" Company 
furnished Private Carl Ecker who impersonated a nifty little waitress to 
perfection. Carl made a very cunning maid for the main act and pulled 
off a stunning ballet dance between acts. As Carl is not very tall, you 
could not have told him from a real girl unless you actually knew it was 
he. "Miss" Ecker made such a well-remembered hit that the fitting 
female name "Ethel" was bestowed upon him, and it has seemed to 
stick. They say Ethel is married to a sure-enough lady; now would you 
believe it? 



128 History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 

(Continued from p. 122) 

We have lost most of our old timers through transfers, 
officers' training camps, etc., — we even lost **Spot" while 
crossing the plains of Nevada, but the "A" Company spirit 
is still in existence and, although but one hundred and fifty- 
four strong, we still believe we are the best company in the 
regiment. 



Company */B' 




AV/f/? '%f /(ic/kf ' 



SOME misguided comedian once got a laugh when he 
begged, "Let me jine up with *B' Company, so I'll 
be there when they go, and be there when they come 
back." What he meant by "there" is somewhat 
hazy, but if his desire was to be on the job at all 
times, never to be lacking in the pinches, to be 
loyal always, "B" Company of the 63rd Infantry 
would have suited him exactly; for, whatever the 
task (and there have been many with less glory 
than pain) the men of this, the second lettered 
company of the regiment, have never been found wanting. 

Our history was the history of the regiment until the day 
in January when we were ordered to Benicia Arsenal for guard 
duty there. 

Benicia Arsenal, once the most desirable army post in 
California, is a good mile from the village of Benicia, which 
has seen better and brighter days, having 
been at one time capital of the Bear State. 
The arsenal is a distributing point for 
Western Department ordnance, and a great 
quantity of fixed ammunition and high ex- 
plosive was stored there during the war. 
Triton was the chief source of worry, and 
after learning that it takes but eighty 
pounds of this powder to destroy the largest 
ship afloat, a vigilant guard was maintained over the million 
9 129 




'j?//vrr' nooR£ 



130 History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 



/feep Me boy-s- ■jony 
i>y /jin^/nn /7<f/»7 tpe//ce- 
up ^ie ciro<yr/£^s of /He 



or so pounds in the arsenal warehouses. Colonel Frank Baker, 
retired, commanded the post, and did all in his power to make 
—^ the men and officers com- 

wWAT j 

'%1%A fortable. 

The passing of six 
rather uneventful weeks 
left the company, officers 
and men, in a state of an- 
ticipation, not anticipation 
that anything would hap- 
pen at the arsenal, but that 
orders would come for the 
outfit to rejoin the regi- 
ment. The men argued 
that the business of preventing the explosion of T. N. T. 
was all right for ordnance troops, but that a company of the 
63 rd Infantry should be actively engaged in making good 
Germans out of live ones somewhere in France. Naturally, 
from such a mood a crop of rumors spread, and " B " Company 





r/,e yTTCrj urere rc/c/ i>o/<'or-c /eff^,„y /To^ r^o r'/^/erff,ra& 7/^<f/ 

was leaving the arsenal on an average of twice a month. Opti- 
mism gave place to dark despair, however, when, instead of 



Company *'B" 



131 




orders to leave, word came that the company was again to be 
reinforced, this time by a detail of fifty men and two oflicers. 
This addition 
so overcrowd- 
ed the quar- 
ters that it 
was necessary 
to move most 
of the com- 
pany to what 
is known as 
Benicia Bar- 
racks. These 

hlllldinO'S Shofty-^ ' toi/or- .s/racA o/'/ef /"/ </oy . 

long in a state of disrepair, had been partially renovated for 
the use of a temporary ordnance school for the training of 
non-commissioned oflicers, and are situated about a mile from 
the arsenal proper. Timber for the construction of the bar- 
racks was shipped around the Horn in the early eighties, and 
they had housed many an outfit before " B " Company took 

possession. At one time 
General U. S. Grant 
served there as a captain. 
Amid these surround- 
ings and with the pros- 
pect of several more 
months of isolation be- 
fore them (it being spring) , 
several of the men passed 
from bachelordom into a 
state of marital bliss. 
A greater amount of 










drill was now possible, inasmuch as the men were doing guard 
less often, and an efi^ort was made to catch up with the rest 



132 History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 







of the regiment in San Francisco. Several of the other de- 
tachments were being called in, and glowing accounts of the 

development of the 63 rd into a fight- 
ing machine were being received at 
the arsenal. Recruits from Wash- 
ington and Oregon had been assigned 
to the regiment, and "B" Company 
was informed that its quota of men 
was waiting for it at the Presidio. 

Finally, after six and a half 
months' watchful waiting, orders 
came for the company to move to 
San Francisco. On July 22, 1918, after being relieved by a 
detachment of United States Guards, the outfit entrained for 
the Presidio. The resurrection of "B" Company, the last 
organization to be recalled, completed the reconcentration of 
the regiment, and gave substance to the rumors that the 63 rd 
was to be almost immediately sent east for overseas training. 
The company, after getting its new men, numbered two 
hundred forty-four, and entered into preparations for the east- 
ward move with enthusiasm and interest. It was not long be- 
fore the men had as good a knowl- 
edge as the other companies of the 
subjects taken up in their absence. 
Of the trip to Camp Meade 
little need be said, since each unit 
of the organization shared alike in 
this experience. Indeed, from this 
time the story of " B " Company is 
so closely linked with that of the 
regiment that a detailed account 




lev^S F^or^ MOMC 



would entail useless repetition. ^"^ "" 

Hence it is the ambition of this narrative to picture, as nearly as 

possible, events that concern "B" Company as a company. 





First Lieutenant 
Frank J. Leard 



Captain 
Grady H. Pendergrast 





First Lieutenant 
Ralph E. Powell 



First Lieutenant 
Fred H, Reynolds 




Second Lieutenant 
Walter M. Hampton 




Second Lieutenant 
William P. Strong 



133 




Sergeants Madden and Stiles Hard at It 




All the Comforts of Home 
134 



«t> " 



Company "B 



135 



Kuhn: "Say, Gaines, is Madden from a rural 
section?" 

Gaines: "No, why the cross-examination?" 

Kuhn: "Well, I saw him try to post a letter 
in the fire box over in Baltimore recently." 

Lieutenant Powell: "Schultz, that hat looks 
pretty seedy. Draw a new one." 

Schultz: "Yes, sir. And I would like to get 
a new pair of breeches. 

Lieutenant Powell: "They look O. K. from 
here." 

Schultz: "Yes, sir, but I split them in the 
third regimental exercise." 

Officer of the Day: "Costello, what are your wing: Halt, who dere? 

^.^«^-«1 ^^A^^^Zi" Voice: Officer of the day. 

general orders.'' wing: what, you come. 

Costello: "Sir, I have been in the army nine Zf °"^' ^^ "^^^^ ^^^'^ 
months and you are the first to ask me." 





136 History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 



At Camp Meade, by the dim light of a few lanterns, all 
property was removed from the cars into a great mud hole, 

alongside of which the 
engineer had obligingly 
halted, and afterward 
transferred to trucks upon 
which *'B" Company 
made a not too triumphal 
entry into Camp Meade. 
Upon reaching barracks 
it was a case of "every 
man for himself and the 
devil for all." While 
awaiting breakfast, which 







the cooks immediately be- 
gan to prepare, the men 
curled up on the floor, with packs for pillows, and snatched an 
hour of much needed rest. The floor, which had recently been 
oiled, left its lasting impression on our O. D. blouses and 
breeches. This, however, wasn't discovered until daylight, 
which disclosed other conditions little conducive to comfort. 
After cleaning the barracks and getting the kitchen fairly well 
established, it was found that 
the company had been directed 
to the wrong quarters, and it 
was a case of pull up and 
move again. 

During the weeks of train- 
ing which followed on drill 
field and range, the men of 
'*B" Company worked hard 
and faithfully. 

Intensive training only half-expressed what the company 
was going through. All were busy mastering the bayonet, 




•SAYS He: oua-MT 

To BE HOM e TO 
HELP >e=AW. 



<<D" 



Company "B 



^2>7 




f\ MRN SHOULD N£V£F LOS£ Hli OflP eSPeClftCLY 
OH MIS wiPDinor nut. 



while the bombing, ritie grenade, and automatic rifle squads 
were doing double duty. The men quickly learned the new 
combat formations and were more than once commended 
for the manner in which they advanced on an imaginary 
machine-gun nest, or cleaned out a German trench. 

In spite of rumors that an armistice was to be signed be- 
tween the Entente powers and the German Empire, interest 
was at fever heat on the day of 
the divisional review before Major- 
General Carter. The company 
looked formidable, indeed, arrayed 
in overseas togs, and contributed 
its share in making the regiment 
the best-looking and best-drilled 
outfit of the division. 

Then came the signing of the armistice, and, although 
enthusiasm died out to a large degree, as was natural without 
the incentive of future foreign service, the men never forgot 

that they were members of " B " Com- 
pany, nor failed in any duty. It was 
a disappointed but game outfit that 
finally gave up hope of reaching 
France. In January, **B" Company 
came with the First Battalion, under 
Major Walter E. Black, to Curtis 
Bay, Maryland. 

History, as ever, repeats itself, 
and "B" Company once more finds 
itself guarding T. N. T. and several 
other mild forms of explosive. In 
fact, it is believed that if T. N. T. had 
never been invented, the outfit would 
long ago have covered itself with glory on European soil. As 
it is, the government just had to have this organization at 



J/m 13 in tie /»/// 
/ ^vffojm th€ 

their ovn /■/., 




The "o/d fo//(s "are o/noys- 
e/eo-tei/ m/Ae/i they ht«^ o/ 



138 History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 

home. It is a sadly depleted company, hardly recognizable 
as the one which left San Francisco almost a year ago. Many 
men have been discharged, leaving a total of one hundred 
and thirty-two on the roster, exclusive of twelve provost 
guards in Baltimore. 

So much for "B" Company's modest part in the great 
war, for that it was a part cannot be denied. Just as it took 
all kinds of men to make the army, it took all kinds of duty to 
gain victory. Those who wear white service chevrons have 
an interest in that victory, and "B" Company w^ould un- 
doubtedly have worn the gold with credit, had the opportunity 
been offered. 







When the 63rd Regiment Left Home 139 

WHEN THE 63RD REGIMENT LEFT HOME 

Situated there . . . 

At the Golden Gate . . . 

On the edge of the West . . . 

The rim of the world . . . 

Where it first saw light of day . . . 

As an Army unit ... 

Commanded by the best Colonel . . . 

The most-loved Colonel . . . 

The Army knew . . . 

The 63rd Regiment of U. S. Infantry . . . 

Inspired by the fire and enthusiasm . . . 

Of its energetic Commander . . . 

Commenced its training in earnest . . . 

The busy days glided by . . . 

Swiftly, surely, crowding each other ... 

Hope ran feverishly high . . . 

Hearts beat fast with snap and "pep" . . . 

As they marched and drilled . . . 

Worked and sang ... 

All men worked as one . . . 

Hoping eventually to smash the Hun . . . 

That single thought imbued them all . . . 

All hearts loyally beat together . . . 

Hope and confidence . . . 

Showed in each face and eye ... 

Coordination and strength . . . 

Marked the "Outfit" as its own . . . 

The amalgamation of units was complete ... 

The proud new regiment had found its soul. 

Time passed and weeks . . . 

Quickly hurried into months . . . 

Yet no man flinched or faltered . . . 

But worked and hoped . . . 

Prayed and waited . . . 

Finally . . . 

Like a thunderbolt from the clear sky . . . 

It came . . . 

Hurrah! Hurrah! Hurrah! 



140 History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 

The longed-for travel order . . . 
The great pulse of the "outfit" quickened . . . 
Pent-up hope surged again . . . 
On that memorable August day . . . 
The sunshine was brighter than ever before . . . 
Snatches of "rag time" rent the air . . . 
An airplane purred lazily overhead . . . 
Whitecaps galloped gaily on the Bay . . . 
Sailboats and numerous craft . . . 
Plyed here and there . . . 
The famous old Foghorn . . . 
Was for once silent . . . 
The distant, dignified hills . . . 
Silent, majestic, unperturbed . . . 
Smiled down as if desiring . . . 
To lend their strength and poise . . . 
To the proud 63rd . . . 
Feverish packing over . . . 
Came the command" Fall in" . . . 
The band played for the last time . . . 
In the Old Presidio . . . 
The regiment sang as never before . . . 
' We're going over and we won't, come back . . 
Till it's over "Over There" . . . 
In column of squads . . . 
The regiment headed out . . . 
While Old Presidio ... 
That has seen many soldiers . . . 
In previous years, come and go . . . 
Watched again . . . 
As the roads reechoed . . . 
The Rymth, Rymth, Rymth . . . 
Of marching feet. 

Down Lombard and Van Ness . . . 
Across Market to 3rd and Townsend . . . 
Marched the Proud 63rd . . . 
Showing in step and bearing . . . 
The results of hard training . . . 
Eyes snapping with pride . . . 



When the 63rd Regiment Left Home 141 



As they scented the battle fields . . . 

Afar off. 

Mothers and fathers . . . 

Sisters and brothers . . . 

Wives and sweethearts . . . 

Friends and countrymen . . . 

Lined the way . . . 

Shedding tears . . . 

Applauding, waving fond farewells . . . 

To the pride of the West . . . 

Uttering silent prayers . . . 

Knowing these hardy men . . . 

Would win in any cause . . . 

They were called upon to defend . , . 

The Tourist cars were filled . . . 

To full capacity . . . 

The whistle shrilled . . . 

The wheels moved slowly . . . 

Gradually gaining in momentum . . . 

As the powerful locomotive . . . 

Belched smoke and power . . . 

Thousands of arms went up waving . . 

Thousands of lusty voices . . . 

Were heard cheering . . . 

As the train pulled away . . . 

The figures in olive drab . . . 

Watched the crowd and station . . . 

Gradually fade from sight . . . 

Like a beautiful Western sunset . . . 

Studded with a million blending colors . 

The clickety click of the car wheels . . . 

Broke in on each man's reflections . . . 

The sinking, evening sun . . . 

Cast long swift shadows . . . 

Of the flying troop train . . . 

The voices of the happy troops . . . 

Were heard above the noise of the train 

Singing, " It's a long way to Berlin 

But we'll get there . . . 

And we're on our way, by Heck." 



142 History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 

HEARD ABOUT CAMP 

It is hard to remember the days when Durkin used to say "thay" for 
say, and "thave" for shave. He now has a new set of teeth that will 
make his pleasing smile popular with the tooth-paste advertisers. 

Sergeant Levalley was made provost sergeant for ten days, just long 
enough to have the baseball diamond leveled up by the boys in the coop. 
Now Levalley is clamoring for a D. S. C. 

Andy Smart sat down on post one day to fix his sock. It is a good 
thing there was not a washtub full of water handy for the O. D. might 
have witnessed "September Morn" instead of the "Barefoot Boy." 

Sergeant Madden recently called a taxi to take some of his friends for 
a ride, and upon arrival they were astonished to find that said taxi was 
decorated with a large gong and footman Bradley, at their service. 

Company "B" is not assured of protection from fire, for Baker, the 
Oregonian chicken dresser, was recently appointed to a seat on the Curtis 
Bay fire chariot. 

Swede Orbek claims he can't understand Baltimorians. He says 
that in the country he comes from they call it a "yug," but Marylanders 
say "yimmiyon." 

"Jim Riordan" forgot he was in the army at Camp Meade. During 
the intermission at a show in the Auditorium he asked a friend to step 
out and tip one over with him. That is one reason we feel the shows 
helped the boys to relax and forget for a time at least the grind of the 
old drill grounds. 

Charley Moore says he had excited an idea. He is going to get a 
camouflage wife. 

"Selvera, what are your special orders for this post?" demanded the 
officer of the day on a dark night at Benicia Arsenal. 

Said post was a building filled to the ceiling with T. N. T. Selvera, 
who at that time was by no means the master of his English tongue that 
he is now, still had the right idea. 

"Speecial order?" he began. "Mus' walk 'round thees buUdink. 
Keep fine watch out. Eft git seek, call corp'ral guart. Lot nobody come 
'round thees post. Eft come, shoot 'um. Try shoot 'urn flat." 

The O. D. continued the motion, confident that Selvera's post would 
be well guarded. 



ompany C 

THE best company of the best regiment of the United 
States Army had its beginning at the Presidio of foggy 
San Francisco on June i, 1917, when fifty enhsted men, 
commanded by Lieutenant F.C. Phelps, were transferred from 
Company "C" of the 12th Infantry, to become Company 
**C, " 63rd U. S. Infantry. Seventeen of this number were 
recruits. Lieutenant Phelps, after giving Company "C" its 
start in history, was relieved of his command by Captain C. 
S. Bendel on June 21st. 

Captain Bendel was transferred on July 13, 1917, and 
the command was taken over by Lieutenant Eugene Weiss. 
On July i8th, Captain H. M. Bankhead was assigned and 
took command; for the first time, Company "C" had two 
officers, Lieutenant Weiss not being relieved until July 31st. 

Lieutenant Edgar A. Tully was assigned to Company **C" 
on August 8, 1918, and Captain John H. Harrison on August 
15th. With Captain Harrison, came the big hat which re- 
posed just over his right ear and the familiar: "Put that hat 
on straight." 

Through the fall season, company life was peaceful and 
quiet, the usual fatigue and guard being in evidence but 
nothing out of the ordinary, except a passing back and forth 
of ** assistant" details, to help out with the recruits at Fort 
Barry. 

Lieutenant McMurray was assigned to Company "C" on 
September 27th, and on September 29th, Captain Bankhead, 

143 



144 History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 

while on detached service at Fort Sill, Oklahoma, where he 
went August 15th, was appointed Lieutenant-Colonel of 
Infantry. 

From January 7, 1918, until the middle of April, Sergeant 
Reed, Corporal Hacker, and a detail of ten men were in Los 
Angeles acting as a Quartermaster guard. 

During the latter part of January, came word that the 
company was to be divided into several detachments, 
for industrial guard in various localities. There was ample 
time given us for preparation but we were all very much con- 
cerned over the item of pay; at last, on the day before we were 
to leave, the company was paid and we were given a few 
hours' leave, in which to distribute the pay-roll over the most 
deserving sections of San Francisco and Oakland. Everyone 
was cautioned to remain near quarters after eleven o'clock 
of the night before departure, but the more adventurous ones 
made frequent trips into the outside world and it was truly 
miraculous that all were present the next morning when the 
company was assembled. The detail was made up for the 
New Idria station and, after its departure, the remainder of 
the company with Captain Clay, M.C., and his corps of ** pill- 
rollers," under the command of Lieutenant McMurray, 
started for Long Beach, California, February ist. This detail 
reached Los Angeles the next morning and was again divided 
into two detachments. One, of forty men, under the command 
of Lieutenant Tully, went to San Pedro to assume the guard 
of a shipbuilding plant; the remainder of the company, 
under the command of Lieutenant McMurray, went to Long 
Beach to establish company headquarters and mount guard 
over another shipbuilding plant. 

The New Idria men, whose duties were the guarding 
of the Cinnebar Mines, got little comfort from the first glimpse 
of their new station — just hills, red rock, and shanties. But 
they soon forgot that the mail arrived by stage only three 





First Lieutenant 
Albert C. Newell 



First Lieutenant 
Eugene E. Pratt 




Captain 
Thomas L. McMurray 





Second Lieutenant 
Harold L. Turner 



First Lieutenant 
Martin Miller 



145 




The Necessities of Life 
146 



Company *'C i47 

times a week and that the weather through February and 
March was a nightmare of rain, snow, and red mud. The 
hotel brought pleasure (helpmates, in a few cases) into the 
lives of the men; Camp Two, with its rocky hillsides and 
** burrows, " the singing classes in the schoolhouse, and San 
Carlos, with its aerial tramway and its Spanish cooking, 
lightened the off hours. The I. W. W. (Idria Wild Women) 
proved alluring; for their benefit a dance and cake auction was 
held in the mess hall, and, later on, for forty soldierettes from 
Hollister High School, the boys staged a Thrift Stamp Dance. 

There were other dances that proved rare treats out there 
sixty-three miles from civilization, one, for instance, which 
celebrated the opening of some new bungalows which had 
been built on the hill back of the schoolhouse; another was 
held in the new squad room which had been built for *'A" 
Company's detachment. Talk about "ye old times" back on 
the farm and the early days of the wild and woolly West ! They 
had nothing on these social affairs — lanterns, candles, 'n every- 
thing, even to the music. As "Hoop" used to say, "If they 
get sore, they may take the orchestra out under their arm." 
Even the widow who lived across the street from quarters 
laid in a stock of the latest jazz numbers for her phonograph. 

During the winter and early spring when the slush and mud 
was knee-deep, Lieutenant McDonald put in an urgent request 
for boots, so that walking post would become something less of 
an adventure; in answer, two bulky boxes arrived on the stage 
one day, during the hottest and dryest months of the year. 
Soon after this (on July 23rd), orders came for the detachment 
to rejoin the regiment at the Presidio. 

By the last of April most of the detachments were back at 
the Presidio (the New Idrians were the last to arrive) ; here 
the customary guard and fatigue were resumed. We fell back 
into the old rut of garrison affairs and made ourselves known 
once more in the social life of San Francisco and Oakland. 



148 History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 

Some time in May there came "floating down the wind" 
rumors of a lot of "babes '* and then "overseas ! " as soon as the 
recruits could be whipped into shape. The " babes " materialized 
in a great horde from Angel Island on May 25th; by the last of 
July we were up to full war strength. From then on, we 
lived under a nervous tension of anticipation. Each new 
rumor pertaining to departure brought a shout from those who 
heard it and the training was speeded up all along the line. 

For some time we had good reason to believe we 
would soon be sent to Camp Meade, Maryland, for intensive 
"overseas" training but it was not until about August 8th 
that we received definite word. After our trip across the 
continent, we settled down to hard work at Camp Meade. 
A week at the range, our loss of forty men to "C" Company of 
the 72nd, a few days at Glen Burnie, followed close on our 
arrival. Quarantine for the "flu" shut down on September 
14th, but the work kept on; Lieutenant Stephens, back from 
the front, started us in a new kind of training. Hand grenade 
work and "automatic" practice were the new features. 

A reorganization of the company became necessary when 
Sergeant Peters left us on September 26th. 

After this we were chiefly occupied with "bunk-fatigue," 
when not on the training field, and the days were a succession 
of heart-breaking attempts to become top-notchers in every- 
thing pertaining to Hun-extermination. Some of the boys 
even learned strong language and, to this day, many of them 
remember the words they learned then and hoped some day to 
whisper into the ear of a Hun — hence the frequent statement 
nowadays, "No, I don't swear but I know all of the words." 
Notwithstanding the fact that our daily training demanded 
wallowing in the sand of the training field, and rifles generally 
carried good loads of sand in bore and magazine, everything 
had to be spick and span for Saturday inspection and the 
company's woodpile became the means of convincing some 



Company "C" 149 

of us that guns simply must be clean for inspection, regardless 
of the week's adventures and accidents. 

During October we learned, to a certainty, that if the 
Kaiser held out much longer we would get a crack at him. 
''Overseas" equipment was "dished out" to us from time to 
time and with each addition a new series of photographs was 
started and a good many of the men have photographs show- 
ing each stage in the evolution of uniform, from "home guard" 
to "overseas." 

After giving us just about all one man could be expected to 
give, in the way of "pep" and the technique of Hun-slaughter, 
Lieutenant Stephens left us for the Machine Gun Company on 
October nth. We still frequently heard his snappy com- 
mands of "Aaaaat-ees," which always carried a delightful 
little squeak at the end, and we have often wondered whether 
or not he resented hearing us mimic this command when 
he was sighted somewhere in our vicinity — probably not, 
though, as it generally brought a smile of recognition to his 
face and he knew he was not forgotten. 

The armistice news came to us as "straight stuff" on the 
day of Lieutenant Stephens' departure but it was several days 
before we were willing to believe it and let our hopes fall fiat. 
Many of the other organizations in camp went wild with the 
news and their serpentines and processions of bands were 
sources of annoyance to most of the company, who, with the 
news of peace, discovered that they had been "left in 
the soup" and had devoted many months of hard work 
to the starting of something they couldn't finish. 

Thanksgiving came with its big dinner and numerous 
invitations from friends in towns near-by. The "flu" quaran- 
tine had been lifted early in November but training had con- 
tinued to be strenuous during the entire month, so very few of 
us took advantage of available liberty-days until Thanks- 
giving, and that period brought very pleasant relaxation. 



150 History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 

More ''parties," and very little hard duty, brought us to 
New Year's and the rumors of our assignment to a new station 
came more frequently. Curtis Bay was the result. Life 
here was uneventful and not long after our arrival "homing 
fever" seemed to spring up in the company. The company 
orderly room was immediately flooded with applications to be 
discharged. The reasons were multitudinous and various, 
but, as the saying goes, ''variety is the spice of life." The 
fever did not seem to limit itself to the enlisted personnel of the 
company but took root in the officers as well. Our old friend, 
Lieutenant Matson, whose new acquisition was: "Requisi- 
tion gone forward," picked up and left us. We all hope 
that he has the success in civil life that he had as supply 
officer of the company and then of the battalion. 

The company was taken over by Lieutenant Pratt when 
Captain McMurray left us in March for the school at Camp 
Benning, Georgia. 



Spicy Spasms 151 

SPICY SPASMS 

Kelly has put in for his old job in a San Francisco bank — as a banker, 
Kelly ought to make a good janitor. 

Sergeant Trickle, of Post Exchange fame, has returned to his many 
acres up in the wheat country — acquired with the spoils of war. 

Sergeant Higgins looked like a prosperous bootlegger to the M. P. 
in Camp Meade, when he came off pass from Baltimore. His suit case 
promised a rich find but Mr. M. P. couldn't catch old "Dad" napping; 
all that could be found in said suit case was a military hairbrush, tooth 
paste, a few socks, and a comb. 

The famous old International Squad was the "cream of the earth," 
and no disputing it. "Jew" Hurowitz was the original number one and 
some pivot he was; number two was from the far east and a regular Yip 
Sing Highbinder, named Gwee. Number three was the famous big- 
mouth Peche, he being a Polly- voo-Fransay; number four was the crazy 
harp, named Dinnie Meeham Farrell, who had never seen the Emerald 
Isle but whose ancestors had kissed the " Blarney Stone." 

Now for the rear rank: number one, named Giavaras (a Greek), to 
run over the Jew if he stopped too quick; number two, a gent from Japan, 
named Minamoto, who was the runt of the squad but knew the nomencla- 
ture of the rifle from A to Z. Number three was a regular Swenska who 
was A. W. O. L? for six days when they found out he was in the hospital. 
Number four, second in command, was a regular fellow, named Boggiano, 
a "Wop" from California, who was some heel buster on his forward man. 
Altogether they were some squad, even if they had to have an interpreter. 

Sergeant Harry Miller writes from the young ladies' seminary, where 
he is teaching military tactics according to his own adaptations of the 
I, D. R., Guard Manners, etc., that he is having some difficulty in con- 
vincing his Lieutenant of the wisdom of revising military functions to 
suit the circumstances; he says the soldierettes pie the deal almost every 
evening when they try to dance during Retreat and Colors (some of those 
calls are kinda jazzy) and that he has had to cut out reveille entirely, as 
the first morning's experience was altogether too much for a diffident 
married man who still loves his wife and four children. 



152 History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 

"Hoopsnake" Armstrong is famous for the originality he exhibits in 
some of the combinations of ingredients he throws together for mess, but 
the last straw fell one morning when he threw the salt bag at the pan of 
fried spuds and forgot to stir up the result. Very shortly after breakfast 
he was presented with Major Black's order, reducing him from Cook ist 
Class to Cook 3rd Class. 

While at the Camp Meade range, Corporal Roberts was searching his 
tent for some missing article, when Private Correl entered and solicitously 
asked if he could assist in the search. Bob answered that some one had 
taken the squad's skirmish line and instructed him to draw a new one 
from the Supply Sergeant. Fortunately the supply tent was un- 
occupied at the time, so Correl was spared a trip to the hospital. 

Soldier: "Why that kind of tobacco, Frank?" 
Ulrich: " Rebenstorf can't smoke it." 

We can't remember the name of the Lieutenant who competed with 
Corporal Ulrich for the appointment of Postmaster at Wilmington — but 
it was the one who sent Denny Farrell to Long Beach for special duty 
and on the same evening appeared at the P. O. to confer with the Post- 
mistress and to offer his services in the arduous task of preventing a 
congestion (of soldiers) at the stamp window. 

The Postmistress was leaving for Long Beach when he arrived (just 
ahead of Frank) and she announced that the appointment had already 
been bestowed upon a black-haired private whose eyebrows meet 
attractively over his nose. 

You should have seen "C" bring home the bacon at Camp Meade in 
the regimental field-meet, with our cracked drill team; why, we had the 
umpires so completely bamboozled with the snap of it all, that Corporal 
Hargrave presented arms and made two pretty about-faces while still at 
present and got away with it. We sure had them dazzled. 

Corporal Rebenstorf, who hails from Elgin, Illinois, took a furlough 
to the Sucker State, with the intention of becoming a benedict. When 
he arrived, he found the other party on the knee of a sailor, so Count Von 
Rebenstorf surrendered all rights in the fair damsel to the Naval Reserve. 



Spicy Spasms 153 

We wonder how it feels to write your name on a powder magazine at 
Curtis Bay and then have to buy paint and paint the magazine. 
Ask Schmalsle — he knows. 

Smoky Joe Collins says his home State, West Virginia, is rolling coun- 
try, and from what we have seen of it, he is right. 

You could plant potatoes on one hill and the following day find them 
on the next. 

We hope Big Russell will get back on the Portland, Oregon, police 
force; we might want to take the city by surprise and it is nice to be in 
with the cops. 

We can't figure out how they dared to keep John Murphy in the 
States while the war was on, with the dangerous weapon he carries. 

When John starts to smoke that pipe, it's gas! Test for gas! Keep 
your mask on in this case though and see if the weapon is unsheathed and 
burning. 

Haughton, the champion goat-getter know-it-all, got into an argu- 
ment with Pap Perkins as to whether or not the Star-Spangled Banner 
had always been a national anthem. The argument finally wound up in 
a bet of five dollars, which they placed upon a bunk and then proceeded to 
consult a IVorld's Almanac. When the decision was reached it was 
found that a neutral had won the bet. Which proves that it doesn't 
always take a book to win a bet. 

Gwee and Fook are the only two men in the company who come into 
the Orderly Room and don't try to read everything in sight. 

While training Minamoto for a model "dog-robber," Sergeant Cooper 
sent him to the kitchen one evening with a request to Sergeant Hughes 
for a pail of beer. Sergeant Hughes absent-mindedly told Minamoto to 
go somewhere, and, as our little Jap thought it would be too long a journey 
for one evening, he took the next best alternative and called on Sergeant 
White in the Supply Room. All was serene from there on and he very 
promptly turned up at the Orderly Room presenting Cooper with the 
Supply Sergeant's respects and a bucket of saddle soap. A scuttle of 
suds was his alibi and he had the Top "stood off." 



154 History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 

Corporal Morrison ought to make good at running guns or booze into 
the United States when he leaves the 63rd, if he hasn't lost his knack for 
slipping by the guards since he left Camp Meade — Camp Meade was 
pickin's for him during the "flu" quarantine. 

While at Wilmington, the Baldwin brothers spent most of their off- 
guard time in the sardine cannery; it was impossible to determine whether 
they were sardine packers or chicken inspectors — maybe both. 

Private Peche (pronounced Pehshay) claimed, before he was trans- 
ferred to the 72nd Infantry, that the Coast League wanted him to pitch 
for them; but "C" Company already had first claim on him — he had been 
detailed as water-boy for the company team. 

Of course, this doesn't prove anything but it does show how easily 
soldiers adapt themselves (and their feet) to circumstances. Abe Math- 
ews loaned his very best Sunday-go-to-meetin' pair of shoes to a Lieuten- 
ant who is said to be a descendant of the Father of our Country; Abe 
understood that he was lending the shoes to be worn during the trip 
between Frisco and Camp Meade but evidently the Lieutenant considered 
the transaction in the manner of a gift — at any rate Abe is still minus the 
"kicks." 




' As You Were ' 
155 



THE PLACE FOR KAISER BILL 

'Bout every one has had his say 
As to where to put that Hun: 
The one that started for Paree, 
But went back on the run. 

To make it clear to one and all, 
I shall try to put you wiser: 
'Tis no one more nor less 
Than Butcher Bill, the Kaiser. 

Some on a lonely isle would place him. 
And there, day by day, 
In solitude and loneliness 
He would slowly pass away. 

Some to hell would send him. 
And on hot coals make him dance, 
With naught to drink but mustard gas 
That burned the fields of France. 

Now give me your attention. 
And every one I'll tell: 
The place I have in mind: 
Would be better far than hell. 

For this is my suggestion, 
And it's good, 1 think, indeed: 
Just ship him to the U. S. A. 
And intern him at Camp Meade. 



156 



Company **D" 

COMPANY "D" was organized at the Presidio of San 
Francisco, California, June i, 1917, the personnel con- 
sisting of First Lieutenant M. H. Quesenberry and 
forty-nine enHsted men from the old 12th U. S. Infantry. 
These men were recruited at Jefferson Barracks, Missouri, 
and had seen service on the Mexican border and were well 
qualified for the job of breaking in recruits. Part of the first 
work these men were called on to do was teaching eighteen 
recruits the ups and downs of the Springfield rifle at the Fort 
Barry Rifle Range, where target practice was an important 
part of the training. 

In the latter part of 1917 several oflftcers joined the com- 
pany and helped with the work of whipping the men into 
fighting shape. Lieutenant Winfield took command of the 
company when Captain Quesenberry was transferred to the 
Machine Gun Company. During this time, the enlisted 
personnel reached a total of two hundred and five men, 
being volunteers from every State west of the Mississippi 
River. 

On the first of February, 1918, Lieutenant Winfield left 
with Company "D," for Garfield, Utah, for guard duty in 
that State and Idaho. 

Lieutenant Lathrop was sent to Grace, Idaho, with twenty- 
nine enlisted men to relieve the National Guard stationed 
there. The National Guard outfit had considerable trouble, 
and several members were temporarily disabled in mix-ups with 

157 



158 History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 

I. W. W.'s and Pro-Germans. The officer in command had 
just received a high-power rifle bullet through his hat from an 
I. W. W. This was stopped as soon as the 63rd Regulars of 
Company "D" took charge of the place. 

Guard duty was performed on the property of the Utah 
Power and Light Company which consisted of a large dam 
one-half mile north of Grace, and the fifty thousand horse- 
power electric plant seven miles southwest of Grace. 

Eleven enlisted men under a sergeant were sent to Toole, 
Utah, to guard the copper mines at that place and to put down 
activities on the part of the I. W. W. striking miners. 

Nine enlisted men under a sergeant were sent to Bingham 
to guard the tunnels and the property of the Bingham and 
Garfield Railroad. 

Guards were sent daily to Magna and Arthur, Utah, to 
protect the smelters at those places from the headquarters in 
Garfield. 

A well remembered detail of the stay at Garfield was the 
capture of a husky bear cub which two small boys had cornered 
in a deserted building. The bear had deserted the National 
Guards, not being fond of their company, and they had been 
unable to locate him on their departure. The whole force 
turned out to capture him with all available rope and baling 
wire in camp as well as garden rakes and other ofi"ensive 
weapons. Sergeant George Anderson slipped a rope around 
his body, all pulled, and the bear was led to the company 
barracks. He was appointed company mascot on the spot 
and was a favorite of every member of Company **D"; it 
was with deep regret that we were forced to leave him with the 
Cooks' and Bakers' School when we left on our trip to Camp 
Meade. Efforts are now being made by the company to 
locate and get our friend back to the best home he ever had. 

It was on March 3, 1918, that the Company entrained at 
Garfield for the Presidio of San Francisco, California, a pro- 



>>. _^ 


^ 






_i^HH 






t . Ji5 




First Lieutenant 
Clarence L. O'Neil 



Captain 
Leslie T. Lathrop 




Second Lieutenant 
John F. Farley 




Second Lieutenant 
James A. Kehoe 



159 



Company "D" i6i 

cedure which the community, especially the girls, deeply 
regretted, as the people had formed a deep affection for the 
boys of the detachment. At this time Captain Charles N. 
Stephens took command of the company. 

The long-heralded move to an Eastern cantonment took 
place on August 12, 19 18, and there was joy in the heart of 
each man as every one felt positive that before many weeks 
passed they would be chasing the Boche out of France and far 
over the border of his own country. 

Among the first things started at Camp Meade were further 
exercises fitting the men for the target range, as we had only 
eight days in which to fit the company for the range. We 
had orders to proceed to Camp Meade Rifle Range on August 
28, 1918, and left on our two-hour hike with heavy packs over 
a dusty road at 8:00 a. m. on that day. How the boys missed 
the cool California climate on this memorable hike ! And it was 
about this time they really began to see the serious side of 
war. By the time tents were up and garbage dumps dug, all 
were ready for '' slum," and bed, and it is safe to say that no 
feather bed ever felt more comfortable than the hard earth 
old Dame Nature provided for them that night. The firing 
at the range was of high standard and the regiment had more 
"bull's-eyes" to its credit than any other organization. 

The boys were allowed to celebrate Sunday, September ist, 
as they wished, and improved the chance to satisfy their 
longing for fruit by visiting the neighboring orchards and 
helping themselves to all the peaches and apples they could 
find. One lonely farmer-soldier actually tied up a poor lone 
cow and calmly took her calf's supper away from her. (The 
mystery still remains as to who milked the cow.) We were 
punished for this by being confined to the camp by our Com- 
manding Officer and the heavens by a rainstorm in the middle 
of the night, which sent the boys out of their tents with what 
bedclothes they could grab before they floated away. They 



1 62 History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 

then went to the woods in the hope of finding a dry spot under 
some tree where they could finish the night. 

We returned to Camp Meade on September 6th, where we 
stayed for two days and then left for Glenburne, Maryland, 
where we finished our record course. When the results were 
figured, it was found there were five experts and twenty-seven 
sharpshooters in the company. This was a splendid showing 
for recruits who had never had a military rifle in their hands. 
This record was probably due to the fact that most of them 
were ex-cowboys and trappers and raised with a rifle. 

After returning from rifle practice forty-seven men were 
transferred to Company *'D," and Lieutenant Lathrop was 
given a well-earned captaincy and took command of Company 

One of the best-remembered as well as the saddest details 
of the stay at Camp Meade was the visit of influenza to 
the camp. After the quarantine was lifted the regiment had 
its final review and prepared to leave for the other side, but 
the armistice was signed and we were cheated out of our chance 
to get to France, but we gave a demonstration of our feelings 
on the subject by staying inside while the rest of the camp went 
wildly celebrating ''peace." The next day the news came 
that the war was still on and the boys went on a jubilee parade 
with the regimental band leading them. There was a period 
of anxious waiting and wondering what was to become of us, 
but the training did not diminish, as it was thought we might 
still have a chance to go across. 

All our hopes were dashed when we were marched to the 
train, on the morning of January 17, 1919, and entrained for 
Curtis Bay, Ordnance Depot, to guard powder magazines there. 
The guard has been heavy and weather conditions not so 
favorable as the **Pure Air Westener" has been used to, but 
the men have shown splendid spirit in their duty at this place. 

During the entire existence of the company a marked 




Remember God's Coimtry? 

163 





Can You Forget This? 
164 



Company "D ' 165 

respect for the officers has been exhibited by the enHsted men 
at all times, and the officers in turn have always shown a helpful 
and friendly spirit toward ever}^ man in the company. Each 
member of Company "D" repeatedly congratulated himself 
on being a member of the company, and a careful investigation 
of the conditions of any company or organization in the 
military service would fail to reveal a more loyal and more 
harmonious atmosphere than that prevailing throughout 
Company '*D." 





ONE 




£> -a 




A - "^"^ 









f^-' <<j> 

W^^'^ 


^( 


t^-=^^ 


-i 


-^^S^ 


^/^ 


^^'' 








^. 




T 


^^ 


'^, 


r 


S^ 


^ 


1 


.^ 


^ 


^ 


1.. 



M.R A'>*^ 


ci^^y^ 


^3^ 1 




~W^^' 




rMi"! 



Winning the War " 



l66 



w^^ 








IT «= 







-^Ml.7.tn; 




^i'BtlllJi^Sl 






■^ -»■ *_ X T 1 _r^ "E- - 



— — r> - 



MSfek*li'fe^©jJt^idk^vii?Eai^i'iS»J 




— ^ -r -r- -r 



^M^ 







ir 



,. ,)IU 






kr- 



!S0xf'E;w/^ 



¥m^^ft >V^/>«^ aaniiwr /*W/V4(4 '0^«« S^MfTW^ ^/M>/-^«t ^«/-.«^«. A'4^r^»» 



<«/^0f/ O'/if^y <^»^m>tMmn fi^ffr 



Second Battalion, 
Sixty-third U. S. Infantry 



167 




Major H. H. Walker 





First Lieutenant 
Garth B. Haddock 



169 



Captian 
Francis W. Kernan 



Company **E" 

FROM GOLDEN GATE TO HELL GATE 

"Out where the handclasp's a little stronger, 
Out where the smile dwells a little longer, 
That's where the West begins. 
Where there's more of singing and less of sighing, 
Where there's more of giving and less of buying, 
And a man makes friends without half trying, 
That's where the West begins." 

OUT of the West came Company "E" — easy to pro- 
nounce, and easy to manage (we have this straight 
from the Company Commander) — a motley crew of 
poets, peasants, and piano tuners. Though traveling they 
knew not whither, the eyes of all were lighted with a stern 
resolve to falter not "Till it's over over There." 




THE STUFF WE'RIT MADE Fl^OfT " 
171 



172 History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 

The expression was somewhat heightened by the fact that 
for months a deep-throated throng, Croxton's Canaries, had 
been shouting this refrain, and proclaiming to the skies that 
the sentiments expressed therein were true. Ye gods, can 
it be possible that after painstaking vocal efforts to such tunes 
as Over There, Marseillaise, and So Long, that brave assemblage 
should have come to this? 

What! Company **E" with night sticks? What an ab- 
surdity! That sterling collection of musketeers, that bold 
band of adventurers, that noble aggregation of cutthroats, 
that courageous bunch of prune pickers, assigned to an ignoble 
duty? Impossible! That most excellent subdivision of the 
finest regiment in the U. S. A. flatfooting in New York? 
Alas, our friends, 'tis all too true! 

Nothing now is left but the fondest recollections. Com- 
pany "E, " alphabetically the first company of the second 
battalion, and actually the foremost organization of the entire 
regiment. What a flood of remembrances! 

The engagements in which this unit participated naturally 
come first to our minds: 

The Free-Lunch Counter-Attacks, San Francisco — 191 7. 
The Engagements at Monterey, California — April-June, 1918. 
The Eastern Drive, along a 3,000-mile front, Presidio to Camp 
Meade. 

The Lafayette Campaign: 
The Encounter with The Cow. 
The Skirmish in the Orchard. 
The Attack of Influenza. 
The Sortie of the Chestnut Pickers. 

(in which Sergeant Svenska Brodin and Barber Yiddish Mullen 
won the D. S. C.) 
The Brush in the Baltimore Smoke Screen. 
The Fall of 1918. 

Although Company "E" emerged victorious from the 
conflict, great was the number that fell by the wayside. 





First Lieutenant 
George W. Young, Jr. 



First Lieutenant 
Francis C. Lewis 




Captain 
Richard M. Winfield 




Second Lieutenant 
Frank H. Tyson 




First Lieutenant 
Reuben E. Halston 



173 



Company "E" 175 

Among the casuals were: 

Captain Napoleon W. Riley — Missing in Avoirdupois. 
First Lieutenant Albert C. Newell — Submarined. 
First Lieutenant Arthur P. Kitson — Captured by the Bolsheviki. 
Second Lieutenant W. H. Budd Leitch — Delivered to the Moving- 
picture Industry as a Hostage. 
Sergeant Max Hyams — Bobtailed. 

Sergeant Otis O. McCrory — Loaned to the Camouflage Section. 
Corporal Ralph W. Hornaday — Commissioned. 
Corporal Jay G. Turner — Automatics got Him. 
Private Charles S. Bouck — Firemen's Burlesque. 
Private, First Class, Frank Howard — Too Much "Spell of the Yukon." 
Private Jung Wah — Chop Suey or Hop? 

AN UNFINISHED MANUSCRIPT 

Though the losses were great, many remain whose faces grace the 
festive board upon the sounding of chow call. What they will do in the 
future, they know not. If favored by the fortunes of war, they care not. 
About their discharges, they think not 

(Editor's Note: This manuscript was unfinished, the author being 
stricken down most suddenly after having written the foregoing. It is 
highly probable that he had a conscience.) 

UNDERSTAND THAT? 

Captain Winfield is the official and actual commander of the com- 
pany. No one has ventured to ask where he hails from, but we are 
willing to bet our hobnailed shoes that he was raised in the tall and un- 
cut. He is greatly admired by all who know him for the hearty manner 
in which he approves of applications for furloughs, discharges, etc. 

HATES HIMSELF 

Lieutenant Lewis, always punctually present on the drill ground, 
admits that several States claim the honor of being his permanent resid- 
ing place. His decision has been finally made in favor of the State of 
Oregon. (He isn't going back.) It is rumored that several heiresses 
are dogging his footsteps, and that he may shortly be lost to the company. 



176 History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 

UNABRIDGED 

A compendium of useless information, Lieutenant Halston is the 
only bachelor officer of the company. He stands ready and willing at all 
times to instruct the organization in range-finding — an accomplishment 
which will be of great value to tobacco users in later years locating the 
postmaster's stove at Scappoose, Oregon. 

DOUBLE TIME! MARCH! 

Always slow and methodical, Lieutenant Young approves of double- 
timing and strenuous exercising, if desired by the individuals concerned. 
Although slouchy and not too military in appearance, he is tolerated for 
the reason that many a dirty blouse covers an honest heart. 

THE CURSE OF THE RED CROSS NURSE 

Lieutenant Tyson, a confirmed woman-hater, and one of the old- 
timers, desires nothing so much as to be left alone to work out his own 
salvation. He assumes a fatherly attitude toward all with whom he 
converses. 

A RARE CASE 

To those who are not so very well versed in Army matters, it appears 
that First Sergeant Shanks has seen service in every country but Ireland. 
He has never been known, however, to repeat bugle calls on his whistle, 
when the probability was great that the windjammer had not been heard. 

STRICTLY BUSINESS 

Sergeant Lepski resigned his position as first sergeant because of 
the increase in pay on the non-commissioned staff. No, Clarence, the 
high-sounding title had nothing whatever to do with it. 

CALL AGAIN 

Albertini's, that little department ftore around the corner from 
the Orderly room, carries a fine assortment of everything required by the 
average soldier, but the service is rotten. It has been said that customers 
are sometimes required to go there several times before being waited upon. 




Coast to Coast 
177 




'"''^m ^ 




Oh, What Sights! 



Company "E 179 

THEY'VE BEEN THERE 

Although not having participated in the strenuous battles in the 
Western Presidios, it is nevertheless understood that Sergeants Scully and 
Chapman saw a little service "somewhere in France." The report that 
they assisted the marine press agents has not been confirmed nor denied. 
Both of these young men are very reticent about their doings, and are 
willing to let the general impression stand that "a. thin line of forest- 
green-covered heroes saved Paris." Having observed this action from a 
couple of funk holes occupied by the entire division (exclusive of the 
Marine Brigade), these sergeants were promised a lot of medals and things, 
and were sent to the Eleventh Division to teach us the modern way of 
settling difficulties. When the Kaiser heard this he quit, leaving our 
gold-stripers without the commissions and knickknacks promised them. 

EXTRACT 

John Nyman, occasional sergeant, has declared his intention of 
joining the Army of Occupation in the event that his "buddie," John 
Barleycorn, leaves these shores on July the first. He states that he has 
the approval of the Custodian of the Mill on this proposed transfer. 

THEATRICAL NOTES 

Life in the "E" Company barracks has been one continual round 
of pleasure, due to the untiring efforts of Lieutenant Gray, our master 
of ceremonies, in pre-war days this charming officer rose from a menial 
position in the orchestra pit to the flies by his untiring efforts. Availing 
himself of the talent in the company, many are the entertainments 
which have been put on under his personal supervision. Among the 
vaudeville artists indebted to the "Loot" for his advice and suggestions, 
appear the following now famous names: 

Agnes — ASHBURN and ANDERSON — Annie 
Renderin-g sentimental songs of the Long Ago 

Babe BANTA and BURKE — Billie 

Comediennes Extraordinary 

Cupid — COREY and CORRIERI — Cutie 

in a scorching skit entitled "The Scout and the Skate." 

Ignatz — GALLAGHER and MURPHY — Abie 
Yiddish Yodelers in "A Yonkers Yubilee" 



i8o History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 

NOT WHAT HE EXPECTED 

Company Commander: "Lockett, what do you think of a soldier 
who continually dodges duty and 'gets away with it?'" 
Dee: I think he's a wonder, sir. 

EG-G-G-SCUSE, BL-L-L-EASE 

Vat vill ve do vidout Helman, da gembler?????????????????????????? 

NAUGHTY! NAUGHTY! 

Corporal Boyd's only contribution to the Regimental Book is the 
following: 

All good men love their wives, but so good have I grown 
That I love other men's wives as well as I love my own. 

HEARD AT THE GUARDHOUSE 

Nyman's orderly: "Number one, one prisoner." 

Number one: " Corporal of the Guard, one case of lemon extract." 

Corporal of the Guard: " Pour him in." 

THE EIGHTEENTH AMENDMENT 

"Leather-legs" will be much more popular with this organization 
after July the first. Their bars, y'know, " Buddie," Their Bars! 

MY GENERAL ORDERS 

1. To accept my discharge, take all government property in view, 
and beat it for home. 

2. To accept my discharge in a military manner, keeping always on 
the alert and observing that it is not revoked before 1 get out of sight or 
hearing. 

3. To take the fastest train out of here and not stop at any military 
posts on my way home. 

4. To repeat all the things that the censor cut out of my letters to 
the folks at home. 

5. To receive, believe, and pass on to my children all that 1 have 
acquired, and all that I may acquire in future years, statements that 
agree with General Sherman's idea of war. 



Company "E" i8i 

6. To never quit civilian life after being properly relieved from 
service. 

7. To talk to no one about reenlisting. 

8. In case of the presence of the recruiting officer, to give the alarm. 

9. When the girls are at home, to allow no soldiers or military 
persons on or near my premises. 

10. In cases not covered by instructions, to claim exemption. 

11. To salute all officers who aided me in obtaining my discharge, 
salute all Budweiser, brandy, and whisky not cased. 

12. To be especially watchful at night, and during the hours for 
challenging to challenge all persons and to allow no one to pass without 
first buying me a drink. 

A STACK OF WHEATS 

When Greek meets Greek, they usually start a restaurant. May we 
not meet many of our brothers at the establishment in Portland owned, 
operated, and controlled by Cournavos and Nissirios. 

FARROW'S EXPERIENCE 

It is his first run on the Provost Guard. With a nice, little red band 
upon his arm displaying the mysterious letters " P G," and armed with a 
pistol full of bullets, the sergeant is ready to assist in the taming of New 
York. His men are similarly tagged, dressed, and armed. 

Without any trouble they arrive at the Grand Central Terminal. 
Almost anyone can get there without trouble, but few can make it without 
a nickel, as these heroes have done. 

The men are quickly dispatched on their beats, but the sergeant, 
as becoming a "non com," remains in the station. Alas, he is rapidly 
forgetting that this place boasts a station master, who alone is boss there- 
in. Our veteran suddenly believes himself to be responsible for the ad- 
ministration of this monstrous edifice, and why should he not? Has he 
not been in charge of quarters a thousand times? 

A tour of inspection follows, as is becoming a man who attends to his 
duties properly. And what is found? On the third floor, where the 
Red Cross holds sway, hundreds of soldiers and sailors are in the arms of 
Morpheus, dreaming of discharges and of home, perhaps. Brilliant lights 
are shining on the happy faces of the peaceful sleepers. 

"Such an outrage," exclaims the sergeant, dashing for the switch- 
board which controls the electric current. The station is plunged in 



1 82 History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 

darkness. Confusion reigns. Again the lights are turned on, and, dis- 
gusted, the proud wearer of the badge of authority returns to the room set 
aside for the exclusive use of the sergeant and his men. 

The sergeant's motto for years has been, " Keep everything at all 
times as though for inspection." 

"Look here," he shouts to the colored porters who are taking things 
easy near by, " I want this place cleaned up, and cleaned at once." 

Hesitatingly they start to obey, overawed by the menacing gun, when 
another sergeant enters the room, saying: " You can't give them orders, 
they aren't in the Army, y'know." 

"Oh," exclaims the sergeant, upon whom the truth is beginning to 
dawn, " What kind of a job is this, anyway?" 




RATHER 

Stepanek: "What did Foister say to Mullen that gave him such a 
rise?" 

Hauke: " He called him a hog." 

Stepanek: "The H you say?" 

Hauke: "Yes, he said that if the mess table were a trough, Mullen 
would have both feet in it." 

CANT BE HELPED 

By actual count, two hundred and ninety-two poems, good, bad, and 
indifferent, were submitted for publication in the "E" Company section. 
For want of space, but two can be printed, which have to do with subjects 
most dear to the hearts of all, K. P. and P. G. 

One has evidently been stolen, and the other is manifestly rotten, but 
some mention must be made of the two forms of duty so relished by the 
members of this organization. 



Company "E" i«3 

"K. p." 

Oh, Kitchen Police is the duty that creases 

A lot of new lines in your brow, 
It keeps a guy hustling when detailed for rustling 

The daily allowance of chow; 
The murphies I'm peeling have set my mind reeling, 

I've done seven billion and three, 
When I get away from this job, I'll be gray from 

K. P. 

But there's no escaping from scrubbing and scraping 

The pans and the pots and the plates. 
And bringing in fuel and ladling out gruel, 

And paring the onions by crates; 
My nerves are all shaken from smelling the bacon, 

The coffee, the beans, and the tea, 

My hunger's departed, who was it that started 
K. P.? 

I thought I'd be fighting the Germans, and righting 

The wrongs that the papers portrayed. 
And here I am wearing an apron, and bearing 

The task of a scullery maid; 
Why, drilling is easy compared to the greasy. 

Hard labor they've handed to me. 
This cleaning of fishes and juggling of dishes, 

K. P.! 



PROVOST GUARD 

'Twas a grand life, a great life, 

A full-of-pep-and-thrills life. 

When you hit the Infantry. 

Now there's lots of strife, with many a knife 

For the bird who left his home and wife 

To pound the streets 

And miss his eats 

On the new N. Y. P. G. 



1 84 History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 

It's a tough job, a rough job, 

It's not a collar-and-cuff job. 

So far as you can see. 

There's a hard mob, with many a gob, 

Which'll call you nineteen kinds of a slob 

if you're only a sub, 

Yet you carry the club 

Of the new N. Y. P. G. 

It's a whisky soak, a frisky soak, 
A wine-and-beer-and-rickey soak, 
Who on your rounds you'll see. 
There's many a bloke who'd take a poke 
At the man who's making all the smoke 
In pinching the jag 
And reading his tag 
For the new N. Y. P. G. 

It's a queer game, a stiff game, 

It's not a hit-and-run game. 

Whatever that may be. 

It brings no fame, but it hands you the name 

Of a gink who thought that the war'd be tame. 

If you never got full 

And walked like a bull 

With the new N. Y. P. G. 



Company "F" 

THE history of Company "F" in general is but the 
repetition of the regimental history, — the same hard 
work, the same disappointments. 

Company "F'' was organized June i, 19 17, in the North 
Cantonment, Presidio of San Francisco, Cahfornia, by the 
transfer of non-commissioned officers and privates, first class, 
from Company "F, " 12th Infantry. Recruits were received 
from that time on in varying numbers and very soon the 
company boasted of at least three squads to turn out for daily 
drill, the total strength of the company being forty-nine men, 
commanded by Captain C. A. Donaldson (now Lieutenant- 
Colonel). The close-order drill was accomplished on the sand 
lots, the former location of several World's Fair buildings, and 
bayonet drill as well as grenade training on the beach just 
off the barracks. The commissioned and non-commissioned 
officers of the company took a special course in bayonet train- 
ing under Major Koehler, Master of the Sword, of West 
Point. 

In February, 1918, "F" Company, along with the rest of 
the regiment, moved to the brick barracks in the main post. 
The garrison guard was then taken over and to all appearances 
the Regiment was slated for a long stay. Detachments were 
sent to Oakland and Lompoc for guard duty. 

The regiment under the guiding hand of Colonel Croxton 
took up the art of singing and it is believed that this had more 
to do eventually in holding up the spirits of the men than 

185 



i86 History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 

anything else. Our daily prayer was for recruits that we might 
start their training for a crack at the Kaiser, and it was a 
happy group of commissioned and non-commissioned officers 
that reported to Captain Allan Pendleton who was designated 
to command all recruits to be received in June. These recruits 
arrived on schedule time and the hard work of making soldiers 
out of them was begun. To avoid repeating the history of 
the Regiment we will pass over this part with the statement 
that the recruits turned over to "F" Company surely showed 
the results of the hard work. 

The usual routine of the infantry soldier's existence fol- 
lowed until that happy day when we received our orders to 
proceed to Camp Meade, Maryland, to become a part of the 
nth Division. August 12th finally came around and Com- 
pany " F " was assigned to the fourth section for transportation. 
Leaving the Presidio about 10 o'clock, we marched down to 
the train. 




Company '*F" 187 

The fourth section arrived at Camp Meade on August 19, 
1918, at about 7.30 a.m. and our work was one continual 
strain, until we received the good, but disheartening, news 
of the signing of the armistice. The regiment looked upon 
this as a sad blow to an ambition of delivering a kick at the 
Kaiser and autocracy, but its spirit never died. 

Company "F" left Camp Meade on January 17, 1919, 
to take over the Exterior Guard of Camp Holabird, Mary- 
land, a motor storage camp of the Motor Transport Corps, 
relieving the U. S. Guards upon arrival there, about three 
o'clock, the same day. Lieutenant Spalding was the first 
officer of the day. The following morning found the Guard- 
house full of wrapped leggings, and silk hat cords, as the 
men of Company **F*' had enforced uniform regulations 
to the letter. Company "F" was told that Camp Holabird 
was not a military camp; the information was unnecessary 
as the company had come to this conclusion some hours 
previously. The guard was otherwise uneventful, the men 
performing their duty in the proper manner. 

During our stay there Captain Gilmore L. Hayman 
received his discharge and was relieved by Captain P. A. Helm- 
bold. On April 11, 1919, Company *'F" received telegraphic 
instructions to send one officer and twenty-four enlisted men 
to Pig Point, Virginia, for guard duty, the rest of the com- 
pany going to Curtis Bay Ordnance Depot, joining the ist 
Battalion for guard duty. 

Company "F" has always contributed her part to athletics, 
furnishing two men for the victorious football team of the 22nd 
Infantry Brigade, on Thanksgiving Day, 1918, also furnishing 
the best pitcher in the regiment for the baseball team. After 
a talk on reenlistment on April 19th, given by one of the 
company officers, over twenty-five men applied for reenlist- 
ment, including seven non-commissioned officers, which in 
itself speaks well for the morale of the company. 



1 88 History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 

Following the departure of the ist Battalion, 63rd Infantry, 
for Madison Barracks, New York, the company was again 
united and ordered to take over the Provost Guard for the 
vicinity of Baltimore, Captain Helmbold being appointed 
provost marshal. 

The company is unanimous in its decision that the follow- 
ing piece, as it appeared in a New York paper, by Stewart 
Emery, applies to several in their midst: 

THE BABY BONES 

Most A. E. F.'s they get their clothes by goin' on their knees 
Hand-shakin' sergeants of supply and sayin' "sir" an' "please." 
They mangays slum an' monkey meat an' suchlike tiddybits 
An' only by a miracle find seconds in their kits, 
But me, 1 dress in snappy serge, as cocky as a loot; 
1 drink red vin at seven francs an' eat six plats an' fruit. 
I'm just a buck at thirty beans a-crunchin' furrin stones. 
Yet still 1 always got the jack — I'm wicked with the bones. 
1 make a wide display of wealth, an' when I'm faded strong 
1 cuddle 'em inside my fist an' sing my little song: 

Bones, bones, bones, — you been mighty good to me! 
Bones, bones, bones — you been drink and food to me. 
Hello, seven, friend eleven — comin' out — attention, dice! 
I've throwed some very useful hands in dizzy Alabam' 
For pretty green an' yellow notes, the kale of Uncle Sam. 
I've rolled 'em right for ten-case bills inside a transport's hold 
An' seen 'em spin for shillin' bits on Blighty's bumpy mold. 
At Hecken, on the Alsace front, Fontaine, an' Soppe le Howt 
They useter bring me francs as fast as France could turn 'em out. 
They gave nine straight nachrals, kid, way back at Germonville, 
An' come for Phoebe an' Big Dick that time on Dead Man's Hill. 
An' waitin' for the Argonne jam, while we heard bullets hiss, 
I busted the battalion, 'cause 1 talked to 'em like this: 

Bones, bones, bones — babies, hear yo' popper's plea! 

Bones, bones, bones — don't you snake eye out on me! 

Hello, seven, friend eleven, show to me yo' sunny side! 

Weep an' read 'em ! Hit 'em once, bones, an' 1 let the whole works ride. 



Sicotte's Stew 189 



SICOTTE'S STEW 

"F" Company has got a man 

That claims to be a cook; 
Sicotte is the name that's written 

On the Muster Book. 
And Sicotte has a Bunkie 

That the men have all dubbed "Shine' 
The two cook up an awful mess 

But none of it for mine. 
When these two mix a batch of dough, 

They tramp it with their feet, 
And the bread from such a process 

Is, of course, unfit to eat. 
You ought to see them build a stew! 

There is nothing they won't use, 
And we force this in our stomachs 
That we're taught not to abuse: 
And their coffee, Lord Almighty, man, 

It surely is a "Fizz." 
A big reward is offered to the one 

That proves it is. 
Their hash and beans and roster pork 

Would make an Angel weep 
And if you eat too much of it 
You'll take your long, last sleep. 
But good is sure to come of it, 
So, Captain, let them stay, — 
For we are looking forward 
To the coming of the day 
When we meet the Huns in battle 
In the trenches "Over There." 
We will be so much more ferocious 

Than a wounded Grizzly Bear. 
For, after eating what they cook, 

I tell you, Uncle Sam, 
We'd fight the whole Hun army 

And never care a Damn; 
But the most successful plan would be 
To send these two cooks o'er 



190 



History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 

And have them place a mess they've cooked 
Where the Huns would find it shore 

An hour thereafter spread broadcast 

^^ The tidings glad and true: 

"The German nation is no more. 
They ate Sicotte's stew." 




YOU TELL 'EM, MASCARO 



Company "G" 

ON June I, 1917, when the 12th Infantry, at the Presidio 
of San Fiancisco, CaHfornia, was divided into three 
parts, one part being christened the 63rd Infantry 
Company "G," of the 63rd, became a reaHty. 

Eventually the entire regiment becoming so well disci- 
plined, so well trained, and so perfectly organized, every other 
Company, so engrossed in its own organization, undoubtedly 
acclaims itself the "best company in the regiment." We 
have watched with pride this Esprit de Corps^ in other 
Companies; sometimes it almost rivaled our own, and we 
commend them most highly upon their splendid achievement, 
but, to use a familiar slang expression, "They've all got a 
Daddy." As Company "G" has always been about eight 
laps ahead of the entire procession, our company had a 
most perfect start, and has always maintained its pace. 

Captain W. S. Faulkner, the only officer transferred from 
Company "G," of the 12th Infantry, became the first com- 
pany commander. With Captain Faulkner were transferred 
some of the best non-commissioned officers and men of the 
same organization. 

Many of the men, by this time, who came in as recruits 
only a short time before, had changed from pale-faced, hollow- 
chested lads, into ruddy, healthy, erect, manly soldiers. The 
transition was wonderful. They seemed to grasp so quickly 
the meaning of it all, and were eager to forge ahead. They 
were soldiers all, and their achievements remarkable. 

191 



192 History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 

Up to the spring of 1918, recruits were turned into soldiers, 
and the regular routine of daily drill and guard duty was 
performed. On February 22d a detachment of eighteen 
men was sent to Lompoc, California, under Lieutenant Roach, 
of the U. S. Guards, for the purpose of guarding the bean 
warehouses in that vicinity. The rest of the company was 
doing garrison duty at the Presidio, and guard duty on the 
outskirts of the city. The Lompoc detachment had no 
trouble of any sort while there, and reported, when they 
returned, that they had eaten more beans in that short length 
of time than they ever thought grew for the Army. However, 
when they came back, they found Company "G" nicely 
quartered in the brick barracks on the Main Post, the Com- 
pany having moved up from the "Flats" the latter part of 
February. 

The organization was steadily growing, and on April 30th 
there were one hundred and twenty-six men on the roster. 
Intensive training had begun, drill hours had become longer, 
and all were eager for the opportunity to go ** across." 

Reserve Officers' Training Camps were opening up for 
men in the service, all over the United States, and quite a 
number of the enlisted personnel in Company "G" took 
advantage of the opportunity. Some who gained their 
commissions distinguished themselves on the "other 
side." 

In the Summer of 1918, First Lieutenant Robert E. McGill, 
returned from Fort Sill, Oklahoma, as a bayonet instructor, 
was promoted to the grade of captain, and became our com- 
pany commander. 

About this time an amusing incident happened. There 
was a private in the company, Histune Nakaya, from the 
"Land of the Setting Sun." Nakaya was born in Japan and 
was not a citizen of the United States. An order came from 
Washington to give such men honorable discharge and Nakaya, 




Rf^^H 




B 




Hf 




^^^1 


H^^ . 


^ 


^*B 


'^> 




' 


K 


i 




i <\ 


iiiiiiiiiJI* 


■r ^^K7 1 



Second Lieutenant 
Leonard W. Hartigan 



F^rst Lieutenant 
ChesleyJF. Jenness 




First Lieutenant 
TuUy C. Gamer 





Second Lieutenant 
Benjamin Knight 



Second Lieutenant 
Alvin O. Bloedom 



193 





"The President's Own" 

•94 



Company ''G" 195 

much to his disappointment, was discharged. Now this 
Japanese boy had absorbed the miUtary spirit so thoroughly 
that, in spite of his difficulty in writing and speaking English, 
he had become a first-class soldier. To make a long story short, 
and not understanding quite well, he refused to be discharged, 
and continued living in the barracks. Everything possible 
was done to obtain permission for him to remain in the service, 
but no, it could not be, so on Friday a sergeant was sent down 
to put him on the train, and send him back to Portland, 
Oregon. The sergeant came back and reported that he had 
seen him off. Saturday morning, while inspecting the rear 
rank, the captain came to a man spotlessly uniformed, but 
with no rifle. Looking up he saw ex-Private Histune Nakaya. 
"Why, Nakaya," he said: "I thought you had gone." 
"Yes-s-sir," he replied, "but I come back, I lak bery much 
soldier military, I go the France, I fight Hun." But 'twas no 
use, all our efforts were in vain. Several letters were received 
from him afterward, he even wrote to his father in Japan to 
help him, but he never rejoined. We are reproducing one of 
his letters here: 



" Dear Captain sir 

You must excuse my not answering from you letter sooner but 1 was 
awffly gland (glad) and surprise to see your kind message. How are you 
getting along since 1 left Co? G sir. You want me about my uniform 
but 1 sent up already at Co. G. Presidio of san Francisco Cal. so that 
preace you asht for addrese sir preace. 1 am very gland to inform your 
concerning my present position, that 1 was working lumber mill of port- 
land city. I con not tell you exackly but I hop may be come back in Co. 
of old nest when I have agriement of my fathers who live in Japan. And 
when are you go to the France, and you come back in peace happiness, 
it is 1 waiting supplications in the portland sir. And but 1 suppose this 
year I am no retearn in the Japan, and I some time is sande letter for you 
sir. 1 lake bery much soldier military. 

Histune Nakaya, 

86 N. loth St., Portland, Ore. 



196 History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 

Then the eventful day arrived, August 12, 1918. The 
63rd Infantry was leaving San Francisco. There were no 
A. W. O. L.'s that morning. In our minds will always remain 
the pleasant memory of our trip across the continent. Much 
has been said of our early days at Camp Meade, of the 
discomforts incident to our sojourn on the rifle range, on 
which we will not dwell. 

The 72nd Infantry was formed at Camp Meade, and we 
transferred a group of forty men, including some of our finest 
non-commissioned officers, to say nothing of a nice little por- 
tion of our goodly Company Fund, to Company "G" of the 
infant prodigy. We hated to lose these men, but to tell the 
truth, the Captain thought that he, too, might be transferred, 
and he was merely "playin' safe." 

Intensive training was begun in earnest, hardships were 
endured, and hard knocks went by unnoticed. All were so 
eager, and so desirous of helping on the ''other side." At 
ba3/onet practice, one day, Private Harry Richards, in his 
enthusiasm, broke his leg, and was sent to the Base Hospital. 
Richards, much to the disappointment of all, never rejoined 
the company. When the ''influenza epidemic" came, this 
company lost only two men: Private Ansel Sartwell, spoken 
of above, and Private John R. Provensal. Both were fine 
men, patriotic to the core, and their loss was deeply regretted. 

Then came the anxiety for the word to go "over." The 
influenza epidemic had delayed it once, and shortly after all 
our hopes were blasted with the signing of the armistice. The 
Captain was instructed to get the company together and tell 
them that as yet our sailing date had not been changed, and 
that there was still a great probability of going. Those were 
heavy minutes. 

Shortly after Christmas, Company "G" was selected, and 
ordered to Washington, for guard duty in the nation's Capital. 

Quartered in East Potomac Park, with comfortable beauti- 



Company ''G" 197 

ful surroundings, we are peacefully awaiting the time when 
men who were drafted, or enhsted for the period of the emer- 
gency, are released and allowed to return to their homes. 
When these men do go, new faces will appear, but it will be 
the breaking up of the happiest, finest, truest lot of men the 
army has ever known. 



"The Sailing Date" 

It is said that a good soldier follows blindly, and executes 
his orders, whatever they may be. We need but refer to the 
willing belief in rumors to prove that our rank and file never 
pretended to sit at the table where plans are mapped out. 

The nth of November found us falling in somersaults from 
heights that we took months to climb. The worst of it all 
was that we could no longer believe in rumors of going across. 
However, Cradic, the incredulous, sat back on his bunk, all 
smiles, evidently satisfied with the anticipation of a future 
campaign. That same afternoon, our Captain delivered his 
famous nth of November speech. Its gist: To hold our- 
selves in readiness and that "the sailing date had never been 
changed," in spite of the armistice, which meant nothing so 
long as peace was not signed. Immediately afterwards Cradic, 
as presiding officer, started recuperating from the deadening 
effects of the armistice. At once he set to work, holding 
meetings, and issuing statements that spread with lightning 
rapidity. I need not mention their place of meeting as I 
presume it is well known. Other companies were no doubt 
affected; our company, only, due to the exceptional talents 
of Cradic, earned the reputation of being extreme. As I write 
this brief, I am full of regret that so brave an outfit, owing 
to some delay, failed to appear on the actual field of battle. 

Once more inspired by prospects of being a deciding factor 



198 History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 

in the great world war, we started ambling from one adventure 
to another. No matter how great our achievements, we always 
longed for more and were never satisfied till we reached our 
goal. 

The last week in February, 1919, has, in the climax of our 
activity, seen the crowning glory of our ambition: (i) On 
Monday morning we were started for Germany to join the 
Army of Occupation where we were to help preserve order and 
keep the Huns from starting anew. (2) Tuesday morning, 
orders were slightly changed. It was explained that there was 
hardly enough work for us in Germany, and that to prevent a 
misunderstanding with Japan, Uncle Sam had decided to 
send the best-drilled regiment to the Philippines. (3) Wed- 
nesday, due to news of the Bolshevik movement, spreading 
throughout Europe, former orders were withdrawn and new 
ones hastily given, with the result that the same afternoon we 
were to embark for Siberia, where we were to operate against 
the Bolsheviki. (4) Thursday we, those of us who survived 
the coldest night of our stay at Camp Meade, still suffering 
from its chilling effect, woke up to embrace warmly the latest 
news which stared us in our faces when we opened our eyes. 
We were to remain in the good, old U. S. A. — in Washington, 
D. C. or San Francisco — till we demobilized. 

So, unlike the last days of Pompeii, we, when reading these 
lines, will appreciate the God-given gift of certain individuals 
and ever be thankful for their enlivening and filling with ex- 
citement a time that, othenvise, would have been tedious. 




Flashes of Humor and Near Humor 199 

FLASHES OF HUMOR AND NEAR HUMOR 
(At the expense of, and with apologies to, our comrades) 

Favorite expressions of "G" Company Sergeants: 

Sergeant Duke: "There's no damn necessity of this whatsoever." 

Sergeant Gray: " Don't look hard. I'm as hard as the ^ ^ ^ 
next one." . "^ 

Sergeant Makar. " He's the lunatickest guy 1 ever 
seen." 

Sergeant Marland: "Dress up! What in 'ell ye think 
this is, a bloody snake goin' across the bloomin' prairie?" 

Sergeant Dixon. " Dress up in ranks, you're running 
'round like a bunch o' sheep." 

Sergeant Davis : " Where do you get that stuff? " 

Sergeant Marland: "Snap out of it. What in 'ell yez % 
waitin' for, a special invitation?" ^^'"Js^-dough-'''' 

boys"? 

Private Kelley (to Lieutenant Hartigan, who had just missed ten 
shots at the rifle range). " Did the Lieutenant get that message?" 

Lieutenant Hartigan: "What message, Kelley." 

Private Kelley: "I'm not good at receiving, sir, but they've been 
wigwagging to the Lieutenant from the butts." 

Private Newcomb: "Turn out the guard, two officers." 
"Why is Nepstead not like a cat?" "The cat came back." 

Ullrich, in the pits: "Have they quit shooting?" 
Sergeant Marland: "Stick your bloomin' 'ead up and see." 

Sergeant Jordan, inspecting Kochoshek's new hat: "That won't fit 
you, Tony, it's round, it ought to have four corners on it." 

Inspecting Officer, noticing that Private Petrlak had no toothbrush 
in equipment: "Why haven't you a toothbrush?" 

Petrlak: "Sir, I used my toothbrush to p'lice my rifle wit'." 

Joe Radasski, being relieved: "Same orders, same post, Jack." 

March 22, 1919. A big day in Foley's life. The first time in his ten 
months of Army career, at inspections, that Foley's rifle was not taken 
by the inspecting officer. Perhaps Lieutenant Jenness wanted to keep 
his hands clean. 



200 History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 

Company "G" Record Holders: 

Eggs. Sergeant Gray, First place, seven minutes; Sergeant Duke, 
Second place, six minutes. 

Snorers: Corporal Nicoll, First place; Mechanic Drury, Second place. 

Sounders Off. Corporal George Waters, First place. 

A.W.O.L. First place, M. A. Quinn. Tie for Second place: Revenue 
Officer Ponton and William A. Schier. 

Terry Roche, to Classen, in the mess hall: "If eatin' was a sport 
instead of a habit, you'd hold the world's record, and get your picture in 
the papers." 

Chimienti, drilling the squad : " Lefta by one, march." 

Chimienti, on the rifle range, cleaning four guns for officers: "Steal a 
two tomate, cleana four gun, pretty soon cleana whole company gun." 

Lieutenant Hartigan: "What kind of a tree is that, Sergeant, with 
the long beans on it?" 

Sergeant Dinty Moore: "That's a locust tree, sir." 

Lieutenant Hartigan: "Gee, 1 thought it was a grasshopper bush." 

Sentry on No. i : "Turn out the guard. Commanding Officer." 
Sergeant Makar (then Corporal of Guard) : " Turn him in." Where- 
upon Corporal Makar squares himself by bawling out the sentry. 

Teddy Rakiewicz, to George Waters (who has just been made cor- 
poral) : " Hello, George!" 

George Waters: " Don't call me Gawge, mah Gawd, don't you know 
ahm corporal now?" 

Lieutenant Hartigan: "Do you always stammer like that?" 
Private Tinsen: "N-n-n-nuh-no S-s-sir, o-oo-oo-only wh-wh-when 
1 t-t-t-tuh-t-talk." 

First Sergeant Duke, at retreat, calling a fatigue detail: 
"O'Dowd." O'Dowd, "Here." 

"Petrlak." Petrlak, " YOH." 

"Utsler." Utsler, anticipating the detail, "Woodpile." 

Harley M. Murph>', to First Sergeant: "Do I have to take out 
naturalization papers?" 

First Sergeant: "What country were you born in?" 
Harley M. Murphy: "West Virginia." 



Flashes of Humor and Near Humor 201 

Pay night at the Presidio, Kylo comes in, lit up like a church, and takes 
Foley's bunk. Foley, coming in to take a nap before reveille, " Has he 
got my bunk, or have 1 got 'em again?" 

Corporal Waters, coming in from the butts at the range: " Looks like 
every time it rains I have to be in the butts." 

Private Rhoades, as his foot slipped in a mudhole: "April showers 
bring May flowers. Corporal." 

Corporal Waters: "Yes, but Ah didn't come out heah to pick 
flowers." 

Captain McGill, to Pilenzo: " What kind of a rifle is that you have?" 
Pilenzo, saluting: "Yes-ss-sir, it's a Spring fever, SSS-Sir." 

Sentry, at Camp Meade: "Halt, who's there?" 
New recruit: "You wouldn't know me, Sentry, if 1 told you, I've 
just been here two days." 

Lieutenant Garner, at the Rifle Range, was trying out a rifle to correct 
sight setting, he was shooting at Target No. 5, he fired, and missed, and 
just as they waved the red flag, a red flag waved in front of target No. 4, 
and also No. 6. "Good Lord," exclaimed the Lieutenant, " 1 missed all 
three of them." 

"What in the world is the matter with your face, Nicoll, it looks like 
a war map." " Is that so, " replied the corporal, " maybe it does, Carney 
was just describing the Chateau-Thierry drive while he was shaving me." 

Michele Pilenzo, soldierlike in manner, came into the Orderly room 
and executed a very snappy salute: "Sir, Private Pilenz has permish 
from the top sarge to speak to the Cap." "Where did you come from, 
Pilenzo? " asked the Captain. " Schenec, " was the prompt reply. " Why 
is it that you always leave off the last syllable of your words, Pilenzo?" 
queried the Captain. " It's just a hab," was the answer. 

Do you remember, when: 

"On the Rifle Range it was reported that Private Harley M. Murphy 
shot a cow? Trying to hit 'the bull'. He was not to blame though, as 
Ridgate had just used the rifle and had gotten it into a bad habit of never 
shooting straight. The barrel must have been bent. Anyway, what the 
deuce was that cow out there for? 



202 History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 

"After all had been instructed that neither officers or enlisted men 
were allowed to leave the Glenburnie Range, Privates Petrlak and O'Dowd 
met a 'G' Co. officer in Baltimore, and prevented an embarrassing 
situation by 'seeing the officer first.' Does this remind you of the 
time when Private Hog, under arrest in quarters at Camp Meade, met 
Captain McGill in Baltimore? Hog, however, did not see the Captain 
first. 

"When Terry Roche came out to stand reveille, armed with his 
knife, fork, and spoon? 

"When Jim Quinn awoke in the 'M. P.' squad room and looked for 
bars on the window? 

"When the Lieutenant milled the platoon around half an hour to 
bring them into line 'uninverted'? 

"When the armistice was signed and we heard thsit famous 'eleventh 
of November speech?' 

" When they were all out of step but Jesse L. Baker? 

"When 'G' Co., at ease, was picked by the reviewing officers to be 
served as 'plums' to Washington, D. C?" 




K-' 



^J^^. 



V^r^lf^ffPvW*^)' ^ mmmmmii»'' 



f^ar^fe«^««i*^-^^^s^^Ts,^^ ■ ^ ^ 






eW ' it'',i'^"r'^ 




fflffPWiWf fi^WffMffliWWff^ ?^ft?fWil«i»f"'<p'w** 



Formal Guard Mount and Parade 



J03 



Company " H " 

AT the time of its organization, the strength of Company 
*'H" was one officer, Captain Claremont A. Donald- 
son, and forty-seven enHsted men transferred from 
Company ''H" 12th U. S. Infantry. Company "H" was 
quartered with Company "H," 12th Infantry, in the old 
Exposition cowsheds for two weeks after its formation, and 
then moved to the new wooden barracks in the North Canton- 
ment along the old Exposition Marina. It is interesting to 
note that at the present writing fifteen of the forty-seven en- 
listed men originally assigned to Company '' H, " 63rd Infantry, 
are still members of the company. 

During the month of July, 1917, Company "H" gained 
considerably in strength, acquiring thirty-seven recruits from 
Fort McDowell, California, and five other enlisted men by 
transfer from other sources, among them Sergeant George 
Gibson, transferred from Company *'H," 8th Infantry, who 
was appointed first sergeant immediately upon his assignment 
to the company, and who remained with the company in that 
capacity until his discharge November 24, 1917, to accept a 
commission as second lieutenant. Aviation Section, Signal 
Corps, in which arm of the service he now holds the rank of 
captain. During July and August, 19 17, forty recruits, 
Company "H," received their supplementary target practice 
on the rifle range at Fort Barry, California. 

From the time of its organization until August 12, 1917, 
Captain Donaldson was the only officer assigned to Company 

205 



2o6 History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 

"H." On August 12, 1917, Second Lieutenant Anthony B. 
Jesky was assigned to the company, and on August 29, 1917, 
Second Lieutenant Thomas S. Morrison and Second Lieuten- 
ant Errol E. Crouter were attached for duty. Lieutenant 
Jesky served with the company as a second and first lieuten- 
ant until July 29, 1918. Lieutenant Morrison was trans- 
ferred to Headquarters Company December 5, 1917, and 
Lieutenant Crouter was transferred to Machine Gun Company 
April 2, 1918. From this time on Company "H" suffered 
from no dearth of officers. In March, 1918, at a time when 
there were nine officers serving with the company and only 
from four to seven privates for duty, a certain officer defined 
a company as *'a small body of enlisted men entirely sur- 
rounded by oflicers." 

During September, 19 17, Company "H'* lost four ser- 
geants, three corporals, and two privates by transfer to the 
88th Division, National Army, Camp Dodge, Iowa, and 
seven privates by other transfers, mostly within the regiment, 
and gained seven recruits from Fort McDowell. 

First Lieutenant Neal C. Johnson joined Company "H'* 
September 25, 1917, taking command of the company Novem- 
ber I, 1917, on the promotion of Captain Donaldson to major, 
and has been in command since that date, accepting a com- 
mission as captain March 29, 1918. Captain Donaldson has 
since been promoted to lieutenant-colonel. 

During the months of October, November, and December, 
1917, there was little change in the enlisted personnel of the 
company besides the loss of First Sergeant Gibson by dis- 
charge, but on December 17, 1917, Company "H" gained 
four new officers, two first lieutenants, Harry A. White 
and Stanley I. Robinson, and two second lieutenants, Gregory 
S. Powell and Oliver R. Clark. Lieutenant White has been 
with the company continuously since this date. 

The first part of 191 8 saw the split up of the 63 rd Infantry 



Company "H" 207 

into detachments for guard duty in various parts of California 
and Utah, and on January 15, 1918, Company "H" suffered 
its first loss from this source, when nine privates were trans- 
ferred to Company "A" to go to San Diego, Cal. On 
February 13, 1918, Company "H" sent a detail of four non- 
commissioned officers and twenty privates to the Moore Ship- 
building Co., Oakland, Cal., to do guard duty. This detail did 
not return to the organization until July 22, 1918, when it was 
relieved by a detachment, U. S. Guards. February 21, 1918, 
eight privates. Company "H," were sent to Lompoc, Cal., to 
guard bean warehouses. This detachment returned to the 
Presidio of San Francisco on May 11, 1918. The spring of 
19 1 8 was the darkest period in the history of the company. 
It was during this period that it was at its lowest ebb numeri- 
cally since July, 1917, its enlisted personnel numbering but 
sixty-six during parts of February and March, thirty-two of 
whom were not present with the company at Presidio, but 
were on detached service. It did not seem possible that the 
regiment would ever be together again, and hopes for overseas 
service grew faint. 

Second Lieutenant H. Alston Deas joined Company "H" 
February 6, 1918, and was promoted to first lieutenant 
March 13, 1918. Lieutenant Deas was in charge of the 63rd 
Infantry guard details, stationed at Oakland and Alameda for 
the purpose of guarding shipyards, from March 20, 1918, until 
their relief, on July 22, 1918. This officer has been assigned 
to Company "H" since March i, 1918. Second Lieutenants 
Basil W. Crowley and James W. Swallen were attached to the 
company March 11, 1918. Lieutenant Crowley was trans- 
ferred to 72nd Infantry October 24, 191 8, and Lieutenant 
Swallen was transferred to Company "K," 63rd Infantry, 
July 29, 1918. 

From March to June, 1918, Company **H" gradually grew 
stronger numerically. Enlisted men who had completed their 



2o8 History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 

three years' tour of service in China or the PhiHppine Islands 
were assigned, other men were received through transfer from 
various sources, and twenty-three recruits were assigned to 
the company May 14th, so that on May 31, 1918, the strength 
of the company was nine officers and ninety-seven enlisted 
men. It is worthy of mention that the company owes a great 
deal of its strength to the enlisted men it received during this 
period. Three of the five sergeants assigned to the company 
during this time have since become commissioned officers. 

During this period an intensive program of training was 
carried out through difficulties, the regiment being weak in 
numbers and the post guard and fatigue becoming a heavy 
burden on account of the departure of the 12th and 62nd 
regiments of Infantry from the Presidio to Camp Fremont, 
Cal., on January 2, 1918. However, scouting, sniping, 
bayonet, and gas schools were attended by officers and men, 
combat problems were worked out on the Presidio golf links, 
and twenty enlisted men of Company "H" received instruc- 
tion on the Rifle Range at Fort Barry, Cal., from June 8 to 
18,1918. 

The period from June i, 1918, to the time of departure of 
the regiment from the Presidio of San Francisco on August 
12, 1918, was an extremely busy one. On June 15, 1918, 
one hundred and forty-five drafted and enlisted recruits were 
assigned to the company. The company at this time contained 
two hundred and fifty enlisted men and was filled to war 
strength for the first time, and every efi'ort was made to whip 
these recruits into condition before the move, which everyone 
felt must come soon. July 22, 1918, saw the last of "H" 
detachments brought back and the company together again. 
First Lieutenant Garth B. Haddock was transferred to the 
company from Company "K" June 29, 1918. 

On July 15, 1918, a detachment, 63rd Infantry, composed 
of three officers and one hundred and fifty enlisted men, was 



Company " H " 209 

sent, under emergency order, Western Department, from Pre- 
sidio of San Francisco, Cal., to Bethlehem Shipbuilding Co., 
Alameda, Cal., to prevent injury to government property by 
the striking shipyard workers. Company "H" furnished the 
commanding officer. Captain Johnson, one other officer, Lieu- 
tenant Clark, the first sergeant, and seventeen other enlisted 
men for this detail. Captain Johnson and most of this de- 
tachment returned to the Presidio the following day, July i6th, 
the trouble at the shipyard having quickly subsided. 

The 63rd Infantry left Presidio of San Francisco, Cal., 
for Camp Meade, Md., on August 12, 1918. It had been 
stationed at Presidio for more than fourteen months, never 
having left this post since its organization. Company "H" 
had occupied three different sets of quarters in the post, having 
moved from the wooden barracks in the North Cantonment 
to the brick barracks on February 25, 19 18, later moving from 
one set of quarters in the brick barracks to another, and 
finally moving to wooden quarters in the East Cantonment 
on June 27, 191 8, which quarters it occupied until the time of 
its departure from the post. 

The trip from San Francisco, Cal., to Camp Meade, Md., 
was an interesting one, but uneventful. Company "H" 
boarded the train at the Third and Townsend Street Depot, 
at 2.30 P.M., August 12, 1918, and with Company '*G" occu- 
pied the 5th Section. The men were in fine spirits to think 
they were going to get somewhere at last and accomplish 
something. They had two chances to bathe on their way 
east, once in the Great Salt Lake and once in the Y. M. C. A. 
pool at St. Louis, Mo. Their bath in the Great Salt Lake 
was an unusual one. The train stopped along the edge of the 
lake, the men poured out of the cars into the lake, splashed 
around for about fifteen minutes and re-boarded the train. 
The 5th Section arrived in Camp Meade at about 11.30 a.m. 

August 19, 19 1 8. Five officers and two hundred and nineteen 

14 



210 History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 

enlisted men made the trip with Company "H," Lieutenant 
Oliver R. Clark being on detached service at Camp Dix, N. J,, 
and twenty-four enlisted men having been left behind at the 
Presidio either sick in the Letterman General Hospital or 
measles suspects attached to the U. S, Guards. Of these 
twenty-four enlisted men twenty later rejoined the company 
at Camp Meade. 

Upon its arrival at Camp Meade, Md., the regiment was 
assigned to the nth Division, and the real intensive training 
began. From that date until the signing of the armistice the 
sole thought of everyone in Company "H" was preparation 
for overseas service. Along with the intensive training came 
the continuous readjustment and reorganization caused by 
transfers to new organizations and the weeding out of material 
unfit for overseas service. First Sergeant Thomas and Ser- 
geants Wolfe and Mueller were discharged September 9, 191 8, 
to accept commissions as second lieutenants of Infantry. Of- 
ficers and men of the company attended schools of various 
kinds: grenade, bayonet, automatic rifle, gas, and intelligence 
schools. From August 28th to September 6th the company 
had target practice on the Camp Meade Rifle Range. From 
September 12th to 15th the company finished up its course of 
firing on the Glenburnie Range. September 6, 1918, three 
sergeants, seven corporals, and thirty privates were transferred 
to Company "H," 72nd Infantry, to form a nucleus around 
which this new company should be built. On September 9, 
191 8, forty recruits were transferred from the 154th Depot 
Brigade, and these men received their target practice on the 
Glenburnie Range from October 23rd to 31st. 

The company was not weakened by the influenza epidemic 
that was rife in Camp Meade during September and October, 
and the intensive training was continued without a let-up, 
Company "H" lost one man by death at this time. Private 
John \y. Snyder, who succumbed to the influenza on October 



Company **H" 211 

II, 1918. This is the only loss by death that Company 
"H'* has suffered since its organization. Second Lieutenant 
William K. Howell was assigned to the company November 
8, 1918. 

Besides the various schools attended by individual officers 
and men, the company as a whole went through a sort of 
continuous school during this period; besides the weekly com- 
bat problems in which the regiment took part, the company 
had daily combat problems of its own. The company as a 
whole had instruction in the throwing of live hand grenades ; 
it also had gas instruction, and on November 7, 1918, 
passed through the gas house by platoons, and almost all the 
men of the company had actual practice in the use of the auto- 
matic rifle. The new combat formations were learned by the 
company, and in these it reached a high state of proficiency. 
During this period the company was twice complimented for 
its efficiency, once by the officers composing the French Mis- 
sion, and once by Lieutenant-Colonel Hunt, General Staff, who 
was laying down methods of intensive training at that time. 

On November 9, 1918, the day of the nth Division review, 
Company "H" was at the very highest stages of efliciency. 
All the overseas equipment had been issued, and everything 
was ready for overseas service. On November nth, however, 
the armistice was signed, and its chances for overseas service 
ruined. 

During the period of the war the company furnished from 
its enlisted ranks five officers, four of whom, Fred Y. Thomas, 
Jasper N. Wolfe, Jr., Mathew E. Schubert, and Erwin J. 
Mueller, were commissioned in the Infantry, and one, George 
Gibson, was commissioned in the Aviation Section of the Signal 
Corps. One of these officers. Second Lieutenant Erwin J. 
Mueller, is now assigned to and on duty with Company "H." 

On December 21, 1918, an exchange was made between 
Company "H" and Company **I," 63rd Infantry, forty pri- 



212 History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 

vates being transferred to Company "I" for the purpose of 
doing provost guard duty in New York City, and forty privates 
being transferred from Company **I" to replace them. 

Company "H" left Camp Meade, Maryland, January 23, 
1919, to go to Wilmington, Delaware, to do provost guard duty 
in the city of Wilmington, and to guard a large amount of 
Russian ammunition seized by the British Government after 
the downfall of the Imperial Russian Government. Attached 
to the company were six enlisted men, Medical Corps, 63 rd 
Infantry, and upon its arrival at Wilmington First Lieutenant 
Will M. Majors, M. C, and First Lieutenant Frank P. Wal- 
thour, Dental Corps, and six more enlisted men. Medical 
Department, were also attached to the organization. Lieuten- 
ant Walthour has since been transferred to Fort Terry, New 
York. 

When the company first arrived in Wilmington, Delaware, 
it was necessary for a large proportion of it to be on duty as 
provost guards, but by the efficient duty performed by the 
provost guard all offenders were checked up and the company 
was soon able to dispense with a great number of these provost 
guard posts, and handle the situation by occasional patrols. 

The strength of Company "H," 63rd Infantry, at this 
writing is 6 officers and 209 enlisted men. One officer. Medi- 
cal Corps, 12 enlisted men, Medical Department, and 3 
recruits are at present attached to the company. 

EPISODES IN THE LIVES OF GREAT AMERICANS 
NUMBER 1 

THE STORY OF A CAREER 

Ssh! The curtain rises! 

Willis Narrowmind was born in a little cabin on Pollywog Creek in 
the mountains of Tennessee. Unspoiled by civilization, he became a 
strong boy. His playmates were the cat, the chickens, and Gypsee, the 




213 



214 History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 

little pig. Woof-woof, the big Ozark chipmunk hound, was a constant 
companion, and protected the lad from the hungry Tennessee squirrels. 

Willis received his education at the log schoolhouse on Buzzard 
Ridge. At the early age of sixteen, he graduated from the fifth grade, 
He stood first in his class. The other pupil was absent most of the term, 
but gave Willis a hard race for first honors. 

Willis had read of steam engines, autos, and such contraptions, so he 
decided to view them with his own eyes. He packed his belongings in a 
red bandana, grasped his grandfather's squirrel rifle, and journeyed forth. 
As he was leaving the old homestead. Gypsee, now grown into a husky pig, 
trotted up with afi"ectionate grunts. Willis couldn't part with his old 
playmate, and Gypsee was permitted to follow. 

Willis had many adventures in the city. One day he tried to use the 
squirrel rifle on a conductor who refused to let Gypsee ride on the car. 
The rifle was taken away, and Gypsee was sold to pay the fine. Broken- 
hearted, the poor lad pawned the red handkerchief to buy a bowl of soup, 
which he tried to eat with a fork. 

Then he enlisted. After several months, his genius was quickly 
recognized, and he became a corporal. But advancement did not come 
rapidly enough, so Willis promoted himself to be sergeant. If let alone 
he might have become a self-made captain by now. But, alas ! Narrow- 
mind was busted! 

But true ability can't be kept down. Many men said Willis looked 
better as K. P. than as corporal. During the trip across the country he 
polished the officers' shoes with tender care. So once again he gained 
the corporal's chevrons. He became popular by treating the men with 
the same kindness he used to show to Gypsee and Woof-woof. His 
beautiful face and graceful dancing have broken many a girl's heart. His 
virtues are many, and include wisdom, a tailor-made suit, gentle manners, 
and a love for perfume. 

Willis often dreams of boyhood days. Once again he is an innocent 
lad, fishing on the banks of Pollywog Creek. Gypsee is by his side, and 
gazes trustfully up at him. The hens are scratching for worms for bait, 
while one fluffy little chick sits on the tip of the pole, ready to warn Willis 
of the approach of a fish. Woof-woof crouches nearby, ready for any 
daring squirrel. The dream fades — Willis rises with a sigh, and goes to 
borrow some eau-de-cologne. 





M^'^A 



'.'.1 t' 






1? - 
/ 



mmx^:- 



,CS{*- 






~ii 



4r» -!^ 






I- 






o 



^ 



'4^ 



4: 



W^ ' "'•r' ' WM HNpin^i^Mj 






V 



iri ., ^ 



^^^JTtj: ^ . r^ ■:'^* ^ L-]^T t 







Third Battalion 
Sixty-Third U. S. Infantry 



215 




Major Leland S. Hobbs 



^■. 




^Lm 


_.! 


M 


r 


^ 


kil 



Second Lieutenant 
William E. Field 




Major 

Elmer E. E. Swanton 

Q.M.C. 




2l8 



The New York Detachmeni 

A CERTAIN Division which had been "Over There'* was 
to parade in the metropoHs. It had assisted materially 
in the making of history, and a holiday had been pro- 
claimed that all might satisfy their curiosity and fulfill their 
desires in reviewing this organization. Dense throngs filled 
the streets, and through the crowd moved a mere handful of 
soldiers. They wore no decorations for gallantry in action, 
no chevrons denoting service. Their only badge was a bras- 
sard of red, worn upon the left arm of each, inscribed with the 
letters"?. G." 

Shrilly a voice rose high above the clamor of the mob. 
"Who won the war?" it asked, and answered in the same 
breath, "The P. G's!" Women laughed and jeered. A 
hundred wounded soldiers hooted and cat-called from a grand- 
stand near by. Soldiers, sailors, civilians — all who heard — 
hissed and denounced these men as only the rabble can. If 
they but knew the truth, not a person that jibed and taunted 
that day but would suffer pangs of regret for the act, and 

Does the soldier live who, upon seeing one of his comrades 
wearing the red brassard of the Provost Guard, has not formed 
an opinion or voiced some sentiment concerning the individual 
observed — his dress, his bearing, his character, his courage, 
or the necessity for his presence? Has that detailed unfortu- 
nate carrying the symbol of authority ever been looked upon 
by a more favored member of the military establishment 
impersonally ? Probably not. 

219 



220 History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 

If you were an officer or enlisted man complying to the best 
of your knowledge and ability with the maze of regulations 
governing your dress and deportment, there is a likelihood 
that you gazed upon the provost guardsman as a necessary 
evil. You may have determined to tolerate him. You cer- 
tainly made no decision to look upon him with favor. 

On the other hand, if you were violating a military order 
and knew it, you did what? 

Feeling that you had sufficient rank, you decided to brazen 
the thing out. You assumed a proud, defiant, haughty look. 
When addressed by the P. G. concerning your dereliction, in 
all probability you registered amazement, made a few caustic 
comments, and reprimanded the man severely for his manner 
of approach. If you *'got away with it," you were not 
corrected nor humiliated. Heaven forbid! You had merely 
performed satisfactorily (to yourself at least) a disagreeable 
dut>. 

Your shoulder ornaments being nil, and not having the 
moral support of numbers, when possible you quickly evaded 
the representative of law and order. If you were one of a 
group, all guilty of an act or omission, you alone know the 
individual course you took. 

It can only be said that in any event your feeling toward 
the P. G. was one of resentment rather than of appreciation, 
of displeasure rather than of indulgence. 

But those men taunted that day — who were they.^ What 
had they done.^ Enlisted long before a war with Germany was 
ever dreamed of, or in the early summer of 1917, in a combat- 
ant branch of the service; choosing at that time the Regular 
Army because it seemed to promise the quickest chance of 
active service; training, marching, drilling, shooting for an 
interminable period; chafing at the inaction in guarding 
bridges, docks, and railroads for an aeon of time; assigned fi- 
nally to a division, a part of which went overseas, themselves 



Company "H" 221 

under orders for sailing; commanded from the outset by an 
officer of over thirty years' service whose initiative, energy, 
and ability have seldom been equalled; commended repeatedly 
by their Divisional Commander for their discipline, their ex- 
cellence at maneuvers, and their willingness to serve under 
all conditions; accredited by officers of the General Staff the 
finest infantry organization in the United States; and, their 
hopes of being ''in at the finish" shattered by the signing of 
the armistice, chosen for their knowledge and their tact, as 
well as for their stature and physical abilities, to become the 
military representatives of law and order in the largest city in 
the world — such, in short, is the history of those men of the 
New York Detachment of the 63rd Infantry. 

That they did not falter that day, that they have never 
deviated from the course laid out for them, is due primarily 
to their loyalty, and in a large part to their splendid discipline. 

We will never appreciate fully the individual longing, the 
intense desire, the continued uncertainty, the fervent wish 
denied, as experienced by each of these true Americans. Few 
can understand their final resignation to perform well an igno- 
minious duty. Let a little praise be given those to whom so 
much credit is due. 



222 History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 



WAR DEPARTMENT 

Office of the Chief of Ordnance 

Washington 

May 6, 1919. 

From: The Acting Chief of Ordnance 

To: The Adjutant-General of the Army. 

Subject: Exemplary Conduct of Troops — 63rd Infantry. 

1. On April 12th, 1 requested that one hundred enlisted men and ap- 
propriate officers be detailed to Lieutenant-Colonel E. J. W. Ragsdaleat 
Van Cortlandt Park, New York City, for the purpose of assisting in 
the demonstration of Trench Warfare Materiel, as a part of the Victory 
Loan Activities. In accordance with your instructions, Captain Witcher, 
with one officer and one hundred enlisted men of the 63rd Infantry, 
reported. This organization came from the command of Major L. S. 
Hobbs at Camp Astoria. 

2. The conduct of this organization was so exemplary that it has 
become more than a matter of casual comment among the officers of this 
department encamped at Van Cortlandt Park. 1 understand Captain 
Witcher and his command encamped with little apparent difficulty, and 
that the camp compared most favorably with that of the other organi- 
zations present. 1 have been further informed that the officers and 
enlisted men worked arduously and prolonged hours, but nevertheless 
cheerfully. It has been further brought to my attention that the disci- 
pline was of a high order, the officers and enlisted men being smart in the 
execution of military etiquette, and evincing other signs of a well-disci- 
plined and thoroughly competent command. The preparations and 
actual demonstrations of the materiel in mimic battle under the most try- 
ing conditions called for the display of soldierly qualities. The fact that 
Private Newman, though injured severely during the firing of a 3" Trench 
Mortar, continued to operate his piece until relieved by his non-com- 
missioned officer, and then proceeded to the ambulance without attracting 
attention or making any display, and that the program was carried out 
without the least confusion or noticeable irregularity, reflects great credit 
upon the command. 

The Ordnance Department appreciates that the demonstration of 
its materiel could not have been entrusted to more competent troops, and 



Company "H" 223 

it is suggested that the sentiment of this Department be conveyed to 
Major L. S. Hobbs, Camp Astoria, Long Island, N. Y. 

W. S. Pierce, 
Brig.-Gen., Ord. Dept., U. S. A., Acting 
Chief of Ordnance. 

1ST. Ind. 

War Department, A. G. O. May 9, 191 9. Through the Commanding 
General, Eastern Department, Governor's Island, Nev/ York, to the 
Commanding Officer, 63rd Infantry, East Potomac Park, Washington, 

D. C. 

JPT 

2ND. Ind. 

Hq. Eastern Department, May 12, 1919. To Commanding Officer, 
63rd Infantry, East Potomac Park, Washington, D. C. 

P. R. M. 

3RD Ind. 

Hq. 63rd Infantry, East Potomac Park, Washington, D. C, May 14, 
1919. To Major L. S. Hobbs, 63rd Infantry, Astoria Cantonment, 
Astoria, L. I., N.Y. 

1. The Regimental Commander desires to express to Major Hobbs, 
Captain Witcher and to the officers and enlisted men of the 63rd Infantry 
who took part in the demonstration mentioned in the foregoing letter his 
high appreciation of the conduct and work of these officers and men. It 
is a matter of great pride of the undersigned to receive such letters as the 
above, and it indicates great work has been accomplished by the com- 
manding officer, 3rd Battalion, and by the officers and enlisted men 
under him. 

2. It is requested that the letter of the Acting Chief of Ordnance be 
read to the men of your command, and that copies of this letter be fur- 
nished Captain Witcher. 

Chas. J. Nelson, 
Colonel, 63rd Infantry, Conid'g. 



224 History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 



HEADQUARTERS 3RD BATTALION, 63RD INFANTRY, 
ASTORIA CANTONMENT, ASTORIA, LONG ISLAND, N. Y., 

May 19th, 1919. 

From: The Commanding Officer, 3rd Battalion, 63rd Infantry. 
To: The Detachment, 63rd Infantry, detailed to Ordnance 

Department for Demonstration Purposes at Van Cort- 

landt Park. 
Subject: Report of Chief of Ordnance. 

1. The attached letter, which will be read to you, speaks for itself. 
As I wrote to the Commanding Officer, 63rd Infantry, I think much of the 
commendation being given to me should go to Captain Witcher, Lieuten- 
ant Purvis, and the selected men from each of the five companies sta- 
tioned here. I have been fortunate in having dependable, ambitious 
officers, and loyal, reliable men in this battalion, and with such a com- 
bination an officer should be expected to secure results. 

2. The praise from the Chief of Ordnance should be very gratifying 
to all men and officers of this battalion, particularly the participants at 
the demonstration of the Trench Mortar and Trench Warfare Materiel at 
Van Cortlandt Park, New York City, during the Victory Loan cele- 
bration. 

3. Let us not forget, however, that we cannot live on past reputations. 
We must at all times endeavor to keep up the efficiency credited to us in 
the past, and as new members come in, officers and men must see that 
they are made to be good substitutes in every particular for those men 
whom we are losing. 

L. S. HOBBS, 

Major, 6)rd Infantry. 





♦.^>* T-i 



1^ ' - * ' i--*"*i' — ' ^■->— -♦i— *«-^' '""""" i'&Sf 




¥vffJLl 




ts 



'Yimca" and His "Ath-a-letes" 

225 




First Lieutenant 
Edward D. J. Coughlan 



Captain 
Walter A. Mack 



Second Lieutenant 
Harry Boissonnault 



226 



Company "I" 

COMPANY '*I " has had rather an eventful career, and 
as some of the "boys" express it, a "jinx" career, 
considering the fact that it is one of the units of the 
Regular Army which did not see overseas service. 

Organized and trained at the Presidio, Company "I" 
crossed the continent, disembarking at Camp Meade, Maryland, 
where the company was put through more intensive training 
and given its overseas equipment. Preparations were then 
made for transfer to a port of embarkation only to be halted by 
the signing of the armistice on November ii, 1918, almost on 
the eve of its departure. 

That in a nut-shell is the story of Company " I. " It is the 
story of the organization of a military unit not unlike the 
hundreds of other units formed for Uncle Sam's army. There 
were weeks of intensive training followed by keen disappoint- 
ment, when after the work of preparation, injected with every 
ounce of "pep" possessed by the officers and men, they were 
unable to go "across" and take part in the big adventure. 

Like other stories this one would not be complete without 
an historical review of the company from the date of its organi- 
zation to the present time. This history, briefly told, gives 
some of the more interesting events of the company's activities 
and of the members of the company. 

From the date of its organization until May 15, 1918, there 
was little excitement in Company " I. " Things then began to 
happen, for it was on that date that the first contingent of 125 

227 



22 8 History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 

drafted men — they were green fellows then — were assigned to 
the company. 

Under the careful guidance and instruction of the regulars, 
work was started of molding the round-shouldered rookies 
into trained infantrymen. Perseverance, patience, and hard 
work on the part of the instructors soon had their effect. 

One bright morning, when the dawn of day had hardly 
broken, word was received at headquarters, for which the com- 
pany had so long been waiting. "Pack up" was the order 
issued. An epidemic of curiosity followed. 

"Where are we going.?" "Does this mean overseas at 
last.?" and "Which way are we going.?" were some of the 
questions passed from man to man in the unit. The questions 
went unanswered, for a policy of veiled secrecy was in vogue. 
The immediate future of the company was then in doubt until 
the day the men boarded the train when word leaked out that 
the destination was Camp Meade, Maryland. More credence 
was given this rumor when the huge locomotives that were to 
pull the trains bearing the fighting men were headed toward 
the rising sun. 

As our section made innumerable stops on its eastern flight, 
the men and non-coms in the first thirteen coaches were royally 
received by the Red Cross and other war welfare workers along 
the route. They were treated to hot coffee, doughnuts, fried 
cakes, chocolates, and cigarettes, but for some unaccountable 
reason, the fourteenth coach, the officers' car, was entirely 
ignored. During the first number of stops the matter was not 
given much attention, but as the train was nearing the Mis- 
souri state line the officers decided that an investigation might 
bring forth some valuable information. The next stop brought 
forth a sleuth from car No. 14, who mingled among the welfare 
workers on the station platform, and later among the men in 
the fore part of the train, and as the train pulled out reported 
his findings to the commanding officer. 



Company ''!" 229 

"Why, sir, those fellows up front have been telhng the wel- 
fare workers and other girls that the last car is the quarantine 
car, and that no one is permitted to go near," was the report. 

At St. Louis, Missouri, on August 17th, Company " I," with 
Company "K" in reserve, assaulted the Central Y. M. C. A., 
and after a short skirmish, which resulted without a single casu- 
alty, captured the objective. It was a busy two hours the 
boys spent in the pool and the baths, relaxing from the hard 
trip. 

On the evening of August 19th, just one week after the 
departure from the Presidio, Section 6 pulled into Camp Aleade. 
The first night at Camp Meade was spent, by the men and 
officers alike, hunting the soft side of the boards (floor). It 
was the end of a hard journey, and the boys were wondering 
what next. 

The following few weeks was filled with hard work, inten- 
sive training, and wild excitement, for the company was pre- 
paring for the big adventure. The fellows buckled down to 
the grindstone, and labored with a spirit which won commenda- 
tion from the officers. 

September 29th was the day the announcement was made 
of the quarantine for an indefinite period. All hopes which 
had been entertained for immediate service overseas were 
dispelled, and *' General Gloom" took command of the com- 
pany for the few days that followed. This soon subsided, and 
the men again became interested in the training. 

Almost on the eve of the departure for France and the field 
of action, the Boches, defeated on all fronts, threw up their 
hands, crying " Kamerad," signed the armistice. 

It was a moment of keen disappointment to the officers and 
men. The celebration of joy which was enacted by other units 
was not in evidence around Company "I" quarters, but, in- 
stead, expressions of regret were displayed by the men, that 
their efforts were to result in naught. It seemed impossible 



230 History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 

to the men, and many could not be convinced until the official 
order was received at headquarters from the War Department 
to the effect that the Germans had signed the armistice. Like 
good American soldiers, however, they remained at their work 
and did the best they could, knowing that their chances of 
helping crush the enemy had departed. 

A short time after the signing of the armistice a revision of 
schedule for training was ordered, and a general relaxation was 
brought about, which was gratefully received by the men of 
the company. 

Much pleasure was derived from the many rumors which 
were in circulation after the signing of the armistice as to 
what disjx)sition was to be made of the company. One day 
*' Dame Rumor" had it that the company was to be sent to 
Siberia for duty, the next day it was to be sent back West, and 
on succeeding days, first to one place and then another. Fi- 
nally an order was received from the War Department convey- 
ing the information that the 63rd Infantry had been placed at 
the disposal of the Eastern Department. This dispelled all 
rumors as regarded the much-looked-for trip back across the 
continent to the Pacific Coast. Information was received one 
morning to the effect that the 63rd Infantry was to be split up 
into detachments and sent to various cities along the Atlantic sea- 
board for duty. Company " I " was one of the first companies 
selected for duty, and the place designated New York City. 

A detachment of three officers and one hundred men from 
Company " I " with Company " K" comprised the first contin- 
gent to leave for the new duty in New York City, leaving 
Camp Meade on the morning of December 23, 1918. 

The detachments were placed on duty as provost guard, re- 
lieving the 9th Battalion, U. S. Guards, who were mustered out 
of service. Company " I " remained on duty until March ist, at 
which time the major part of the company was transferred to 
Astoria Cantonment, Astoria, Long Island, owing to the 



Company " I " 231 

crowded conditions at Pearl and Park streets. A small 
detachment of special duty men and r\venn,--seven men of the 
Mobile Patrol remained at Pearl and Park streets. 

An order was received from Headquarters Eastern Depart- 
ment directing t^.\enr\- men from Company "I" in command 
of First Lieutenant Pur\-is, to proceed to Van Cortlandt Park 
for the purpose of making necessary* arrangements for a 
demonstration in connection with the ordnance equipment 
which had been designed and manufactured for the purpose 
of dri\'ing Fritzie back across the Rhine, but which, due to 
the signing of the armistice, did not get into action, much 
to the satisfaction of Fritzie. Had the hostilities been pro- 
longed, the use of the new instruments of war to be used by 
the Yanks would have meant a perpetual nightmare for the 
Boches. 



232 History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 

COMPANY "1" IN SPORTS 

Company " 1 " was not only one of the most active, but one of the most 
successful units in the athletic world at Camp Meade and at other stations 
where it has been. The company had teams organized in almost every 
branch of athletics before the trip eastward, and won some contests at the 
Presidio and while en route across the continent. 

A CHAMPIONSHIP BASEBALL TEAM 

The baseball team is perhaps the strongest diamond aggregation in the 
63rd I nf antry, and has shown its supremacy over a number of other army 
units outside of the 63rd Infantry. Included among the players were 
several big league and college stars, the best known of whom was " Big 
Bill" James, who was the hero and individual star during the World's 
series in 1914, then the wonder of the pitching staff of Manager Stallings' 
Boston Braves. The team played fifteen games within the regiment 
during the season at Camp Meade without a defeat. After the close of 
the regular schedule it played an all-star outfit picked from the remain- 
ing companies in the regiment and lost by the score of 5 to 4. 

VOLLEY BALL 

The volley ball team copped the regimental pennant in 1918. 

Few games were played at the Presidio, but after moving eastward the 
outfit started its string of victories, which won the title. Championship 
honors were also taken in the Midway league, Sergeant Eckard handling 
the team. 

BASKETBALL 

Basketball did not prove so interesting to the men of the company 
and few games were played at Camp Meade. However, a strong 
quintet was organized after the company was transferred to New York. 
Company " I" was represented by five men on the regimental basketball 
squad, among them Captain W. A. Mack. 

On the track Company " 1 " also showed its caliber, the company win- 
ning the grav>' in all regimental and brigade meets. 

FOOTBALL 

Company " I " did not contribute a large number of men to the 22nd 
Infantry Brigade football team, but what it did contribute was re- 




The Regimental "Champs" 
233 




These are "The Hard Boys" 




Such Things Happen 
234 



Company "I" 



235 



sponsible for the points that won the game from the 21st Infantry 
Brigade on Thanksgiving day 1918. 

It was through the individual playing of Captain Mack of Company 
"I" that the victory was won. Captain Mack as fullback made the 
gains and carried the ball over for two touchdowns, kicking three goals. 
He also made the forward pass to Lieutenant Young as quarterback who 
made a successful catch and through a clear field carried the ball over for 
the third touchdown. Fifteen of the twenty-one points were registered 
by Captain Mack. He did brilliant work both on the offensive and 
defensive and was the individual star of the game. 



The success in the athletic field by Company " 1 " is largely due to the 
efforts and interest taken by First Lieutenant Donald B. Rice and 
Sergeant Homer W. Eckard. Sergeant Eck- 
ard's interest in the games and his ability as 
a player and coach resulted in his being elected 
manager of all the different teams. He was a 
member of the regimental committee on ath- 
letics. Lieutenant Rice was the regimental 
director of athletics. 

A FIGHTER AND A WRESTLER 

Included among Company "I's" many 
athletes is George Murphy, middle-weight 
champion on the Pacific Coast during the year 
preceding his entrance into the service, also 
Megas Panagiotakis, Greek wrestler, who has 
not as yet been defeated. He gave a few 
exhibitions during his stay with the company, 
tackle him. Without arms Panagiotakis could have picked up a few of 
the Boches and thrown them back across the Rhine. 




Not many men cared to 



236 History of the 63rd U. S. Infantr} 

MISCELLANY 

SOME SPEECH 

The only reason we are not giving Captain Mack's opening speech 
when taking command of Company "I" is because our typewriter isn't 
equipped to portray expressive adjectives by means of asterisks. 

GEO. Washington's traits 

Sergeant Mabry has frequently been entertained by the captain in 
his private office answering the many queries with a line trying to sub- 
stantiate his innocence in numerous accusations which were brought to his 
attention. On this particular occasion the patience of the Captain 
seemed to be to the point of exhaustion when Sergeant Mabry spoke up 
and said, " If the Captain wants me to lie, I'll lie." 

THE TIME, PLEASE? 

Louis Grafer, mechanic extraordinary, possesses one of the largest 
assortments of watches of any man in the service, bar none. Some very 
interesting popular models, valuable only as antiques considering the 
peculiarities of movements, etc. They range from the two-bit Ingersoll 
to the dollar seventy-eight Swiss movement. When requested for the 
exact time, Grafer usually replies, "Just four minutes for four." 

ACCOMMODATING TO THE EXTREME 

First Lieutenant A. C. Purvis is one of the most accommodating officers 
during parades ever observed. His handling of certain elements of the 
crowd is indeed very meritorious, especiall)' during the recent parade of 
the 27th Division in New York City, when the popular lieutenant went to 
the trouble of climbing fourteen flights of stairs, not even disturbing the 
elevator man, and securing two chairs for young ladies. No trouble at 
all, I'm sure. Vote unanimous. Some fairies. 

EVERY SATURDAY A.M. 

Quotation from Captain Mack. "There will be a lecture immedi- 
ately after inspection on the use of the new Enfield rifie as a barabell 
baton, Indian club, and boomerang." 



Company " I " 237 



INSPECTIONS 

The greatest of all inspections was the one conducted by Captain 
Strohmeyer of the Canteen when on the trip across the continent. He 
didn't find what he was looking for. 

NOTHING UP HIS SLEEVE 

Lieutenant A. C. Purvis, prior to his entrance into the service, had not 
been much of hand at cards. Desiring to be one of the boys, it was neces- 
sary for him to learn the games which were being played by the officers. 
It is understood that his first lesson, and a very short one, cost him only 
ten dollars, during which he tried to slick the officers by counting four 
aces as two pair. 

DON JUAN FROM SEATTLE 

Lieutenant Harry Boissonnault is probably one of the best-known 
officers now that promenades on the " Rialto" in New York City. He 
may be seen nightly with that winning smile of his, standing in front of 
the Tokio with a swagger stick in one hand and a cigarette in the other. 
Ye Gods! how those Broadway damsels do love to get a smile from our 
Harry as they pass by. 

NO ARGUMENT 

When the Army outclasses the Navy, was the subject of a controversy 
between Captain Strohmeyer and an officer of the Navy during a base- 
ball game between Company " I " and a team from the Mare Island Navy 
Yard at San Francisco. The argument was the result of a decision 
rendered by the Umps in favor of Company "I." They were both 
able to walk back to their respective stations. 

WHEN A FELLA NEEDS A FRIEND 

When Captain Mack bet twenty simoleons with Lieutenant Purvis 
on the relay team of Company " K." Why tell you? You know who 
got the money. 

When the government neglected putting cavalry re-enforcements on 
breeches and it becomes necessary to wear an overcoat on a real warm 
day. 



238 History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 



THIRSTY r 

While on the range at Camp Meade, Red Wilhs was heard to remark, 
"it wasn't the milking the cow that worried me, it was the amount I 
drank." 

CARRYING OUT ORDERS 

A certain private in the company was on guard duty at the Reservoir 
at the Presidio one night, dark as pitch. Lieutenant White was officer 
of the day and in making his rounds approached this particular sentry 
and was ordered to halt with the customary challenge, "Who goes there?" 
The answer was given, "Officer of the day." The sentry did not order 
the officer to advance to be recognized, and after several moments Lieuten- 
ant White proceeded further towards the sentry, who again ordered him 
to halt. After another long interval Lieutenant White called to the 
sentry and asked him what he was supposed to do when anyone attempted 
to cross his post, and the sentry immediately replied, " 1 halt him once, 
I halt him twice, and the third time I chute" (shoot). 

WAS HE RIGHT ? 

During the course of instruction on guard duty which included con- 
sideration of possible incidents in France, the following question was 
asked a recruit: "If you happened to be a sentry and were approached 
by General Pershing and you requested him to advance to be recognized, 
how would you recognize him?" Without a bit of hesitation the recruit 
replied, " 1 know him personally." 

NEW year's eve a BACK NUMBER 

Upon the lifting of the quarantine at Camp Meade for the flu a 
certain number of men from the company, on pass, proceeded to Baltimore 
to celebrate the occasion. Quite a crowd had assembled at a certain spot 
in the city where the attention of other members of the company on pass 
was directed to learn the cause of the assemblage. They found one mem- 
ber of the company standing on a box singing the French National 
Anthem and the other members of the selected ring were passing through 
the crowd demanding that all hats be lifted during the singing. 

Later a member of the Baltimore Traffic Squad was detailed, after a 
complaint was received at Headquarters, to ascertain the cause of street- 



Company ''I" 239 

car traffic being held up. Investigation revealed the fact that the same 
men who had been entertaining themselves by causing pedestrians to lift 
their bonnets were engaged in a little sociable game of "craps" out in the 
middle of the street-car tracks, and refused to permit any cars that might 
wish to pass to disturb them. 

AND STILL THEY FALL 

A conversation overheard between one of Brooklyn's beauties and a 
member of Company " \" : 

" Before you joined the army out in the West, did you ride bucking 
bronchos and wear clothes like Bill Hart?" "You did?" "Oh! you 
great big splendid thing." 

WEIGHED AND FOUND WANTING 

Captain W. A. Mack, a man of strong constitution, up to the time 
of the epidemic of flu at Camp Meade had never known what sickness 
was, and infrequent talks to the men in his company was known to make 
the remark, "those who can't stand the gaff, the strenuous training being 
instituted in his company, could transfer to some other company." 
Strange as it may seem, every man in the company stood the gaff, and Cap- 
tain Mack was the very first man to fall victim to the flu, and upon his 
return to the company, after a stretch of several days, he was served with 
the statement made by the men to the effect that if he couldn't stand the 
gaff he could transfer to another company where the training was not 
quite so strenuous. He had no come-back. 

AFTERNOON EXERCISE 

Rest position assumed by the office staff of Company " 1," en bloc, 
heels together, toes up, hands folded over breast without the numbers. 
Sergeant Sheehy being instructor in the exercises. Certainly not on 
the floor, when so many bunks are around! 

PAY-DAY STILL FAR OFF 

What's the idea of the company commander walking down Broadway 
late in the evening with a fair one, raining as it never did before, when 
the Black & Whites are still operating? 



240 History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 



FAMOUS SAYINGS 

Use \our head and don't mark time like a chorus girl. 

For the love of seven seconds to stack those guns. 

Dependents inherited and acquired for the purpose of securing a 
discharge. 

FAMOUS SONGS 

Lieutenant Purvis, Can You Tame the Wild, IVild Women? 
Laddie Bauer, Oh, Susie, Wont You Behave ? 
Sergeant Cook, Drink to Me Only with Thine Eyes. 
Jonas Aspiund, In the Valley oj the Moon. 

Lieutenant Coughlan, when acting in the capacity of officer of the 
guard, Where Are My Wandering Boys To-Night? 

Captain Mack, Just as Long as They Have Red Hair, I'm Satisfied. 



FAMOUS JOKES 



Camp Meade Laundry. 
W. B. & A. Railroad. 



FAMOUS COME-BACKS 



The dime central returned to Lieutenant Purvis, being unable to get 
his party, with instruction to go out and buy a malted milk for himself. 



Company "K" 

IN the month of May, 1917, the 12th Infantry, stationed at 
Nogales, Arizona, moved to the Presidio of San Francisco, 
California, and immediately upon arrival was split up into 
the 1 2th, 62nd, and 63rd Infantry regiments. Members of 
Company "K" of that old institution will remember the 
wonderings and anxieties as to the organization they would 
**draw," and as they look back they all see that they "drew 
right." 

We had a good nucleus to start with, but very few officers, 
and we lost many of the best non-commissioned officers to 
provide officer material for the new National Army — and good 
material it was. A good company is always a reflection upon 
the company commander among the officers, but among the 
men the "Top Sergeant" is the man upon whom the respon- 
sibility as to the caliber of the company rests. First Sergeant 
Charles B. Wagner, transferred from the 12th Infantry, started 
the company off in the right direction, but left shortly after 
its formation, and has advanced, through merit, to the grade 
of captaincy. Sergeant George Tilford was appointed First 
Sergeant, but his untimely death left the company without a 
competent, experienced "non-com" to take his place. 

About this time, a detachment of non-commissioned officers 
arrived from the Philippines, and among them Company " K" 
found exactly what she wanted in the person of Sergeant Wil- 
liam E. Field, from the 8th Infantry. From that date to this 
there need be no hesitation in saying that "K" Company has 
16 241 



H^ History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 

had the best working non-commissioned staff of any company 
in the regiment. It was a wonderful asset to the company 
commander, and in a few months after its formation, that 
company equaled its mother from which it sprang, and the 
present record speaks for itself. The company commander 
had been more or less accustomed to seeing companies with 
only one officer with them, so there was no trouble in running 
along, but the different phases of company duties received 
better and more personal supervision upon the advent of 
officers from the various training camps. The company roster 
shows these officers with the time of their arrival, and they 
entered into their duties with a zeal that was refreshing to 
observe, caught the spirit of company pride and competition, 
and kept themselves and the men under them in a mood to 
keep ''our" company where it belonged. 

From a period of living in the "cow-sheds," we soon went 
over to the cantonment, built on the flats along San Francisco 
Bay, formerly occupied by the Panama-Pacific Exposition; 
i.e., the flats, not the buildings. Here the regiment was taken 
over by Colonel R. C. Croxton, and under a schedule of inten- 
sive training, good progress could be noticed. For a period 
the men stepped out of their element and tried to learn French 
in two months, and many amusing snatches of conversation 
could be heard in the barracks. Grenade fighters, bayonet- 
fighters, and best of all, good fighting dough-boys were pro- 
duced from those days on the flats, and even when we were 
"promoted" up into the brick barracks, and had a roof over 
our heads that didn't leak, we were not discouraged, thinking 
all the while that a regiment in such a state of preparedness 
would certainly get across; that when it did, the 3rd Battalion 
would be the first to the front line, and of that battalion. 
Company " K" would be the first up in the advanced trenches. 
And so it would have been. 

We thought we saw our hopes realized when we took the 



Company "K" 243 

long jaunt across the continent to Camp Meade, Maryland. 
There we literally sweat blood and were brought to a high 
state of efficiency. Members of this company were in the 
"model company" under Captain Paul, and later under our 
present company commander. Captain Witcher, which re- 
ceived such praise from the French instructors and officials of 
the camp. Always the "non-coms" were leaders in their 
specialties, whether it was bayonet, rifle, grenade or handling 
a platoon. The company had passed through three hands — 
Captain L. S. Hobbs, Captain (then Lieutenant) Stanley A. 
Thomson, and Captain William V. Witcher. Each tried to 
keep the company where it belonged, and Captain Witcher 
"swore by it," and only waited for the opportunity to prove its 
worth. 

Then suddenly the bottom fell out of everything on Nov- 
ember II, 1918. Good for the world and mankind was the 
armistice, but how it did hit us between the eyes, we of the 
regular regiment who had traveled from one coast to the other 
to get a good wallop at the Huns ! And it seemed for days as if 
"Finis" was written on the pages of our endeavors. But, let 
us get some gratification in the statement of Colonel Croxton 
when he said, "They (meaning the men of the regiment) took 
it like a bunch of men — never a whimper, nothing but silence, 
and not a lot of jubilation displayed like a lot of damn fools 
I heard." 

The "scrap" over, as the days went by, the eyes of many 
began to turn toward Western homes, and the hearts of many 
longed to go back, called by innumerable ties. And then 
another move. This time to the city of white lights, the 
"big" city of New York. "I" and "K" Companies moved 
out first, and each one of us had a chance to know New York, 
from the ground floor. We believe we helped to make the 
name of the 63rd Infantry a thing to be respected while we 
were on provost guard duty in New York City. 



244 History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 

Where we shall go from this work, many of us do not know. 
But whether we go into civilian life, or whether we are sent to 
another organization, all of us will look back to our days with 
this good old company as a graduate looks back to his Alma 
Mater. It was not all pleasure, it was not all sorrow, but we 
came forward like men, and as such we tried to play our parts. 
And although there is little satisfaction when outsiders think 
of it and tell us about it, deep down in our hearts we know how 
true the old saying is: They Also Serve Who Only Stand 
AND Wait; and how often it takes as much courage to do that 
as to go forward to glory with the zest of the battle, and the 
feeling of security in numbers sustaining us. We are proud 
of our company, proud of our regiment, and glad that we had 
the opportunity to be with Company " K," 63rd Infantry. 




First Lieutenant 
Clinton L. Markley 






■%m 


1 

¥ 


r 

4 


X^ 




-.fj 


r 


^ 


^ 


^^^^Wi 


r 



Captain 
William V. Witcher, Jr. 




First Lieutenant 
Kenneth B. Gunn 




First Lieutenant 
Laurence E. McDonald 



Second Lieutenant 
William M. Hutchins 



245 




i?mH ,h. fell I 




TiTirirBrirF 

L 1^1 J» • ] 





Murphy's Midgets 

246 



The Model Company 

ON September 9, 191 8, at Camp Meade, the following 
officers were detailed to select suitable material from 
'*K" and "L" Companies with which to form what 
came to be known as the Model Company: Captain Mallett, 
from the French Army; Lieutenant Rice, ''L" Company; 
Lieutenant Clark, "L" Company; Lieutenant Clarkston, "M" 
Company; Lieutenant Boissonnault, *'K" Company. 

After having selected two hundred men from "K" and 
" L " Companies, the work began in earnest. Due to the inten- 
sity of purpose and the untiring efforts of Captain Mallett 
and his able lieutenants, plus the eager enthusiasm and spirited 
determination that has marked the men of the 63 rd since its 
formation, the Model Company reached a degree of perfection 
and efficiency that was the pride of our regiment and the envy 
of others. 

To our able and worthy Colonel, R. C. Croxton, do we owe 
much for our success, for he instilled in us the spirit of team- 
work and a strong desire to make good. He always showed a 
keen interest in the Model Company. 

For a number of weeks the Model Company confined 
itself chiefly to intensive training in the French formations- 
methods of attack and defense that had been weighed in the 
balance of the Great War and had been found the least wanting. 

On September 25, 1918, after having our preliminary in- 
struction, a simulated attack was held for the field and staff 
officers. The advance was made over a shell-hole area with 

247 



248 History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 

live grenades, both hand and rifle, and automatics, under a 
light and heavy barrage. 

At various times the Model Company would demonstrate 
the method of taking up the different formations and the 
manner of deployment to the other companies of the regiment. 

On October 28, 1918, under Major Dashvvood, another 
problem was held. This was a combination of artillery and 
infantry weapons, machine guns and trench mortars. 

October 30, 1918, the '*big show" was staged. During 
this problem the Model Company was under command of 
Lieutenants Rice and Plank. Just after the zero hours the 
advance began. The artillery, machine guns, one pounders, 
and trench mortars laid down a plain barrage, a box bar- 
rage, and a creeping barrage. The infantry advanced with the 
barrage and finally captured the objective. 

This problem was witnessed by officers and men of the 
division, as well as statesmen, representatives of the press, 
and other civilians. General Carter, from Divisional Head- 
quarters, sent praise to the participants for the smoothness 
and effectiveness with which the problem w^as worked out. 

November 6, 1918, the Model Platoon from *'K" Com- 
pany demonstrated a few problems, of which moving pictures 
were taken for the war college. 

We will always look back on our time in the Model Com- 
pany with pride, satisfaction and benefit — proud to have been 
in the company, satisfied to know we made good and benefited 
by the lessons it taught us, lessons that, if heeded, will be of 
inestimable value in later life — namely, the advantage of 
determination, training and team-work, of meeting present day 
obstacles with present day methods, of bringing about a desired 
effect, or arriving at a desired goal, by applying definite and 
prearranged methods at the most strategical points, allowing 
neither time, tide, environment, surroundings, or set-backs sway 
us from accomplishing our goal. 



The Model Company 249 



Headquarters, iith Division, 
Camp Mead, Maryland. 
October 31st, 19 1 8. 

From: Acting Chief of Staff, 

To: Commanding Officer, 63rd Infantry, Camp Meade, Md. 

Subject: Commendation of Rifle Company, 63rd Infantry. 

I. The Commanding General watched with pleasure the perform- 
ance of the rifle company of the 63rd Infantry, commanded by Captain 
Witcher, at the problem of the 30th instant. He desires that this com- 
pany be informed of his appreciation of the efficient manner in which it 
carried out the difficult problem of attack. This also was commented 
on most favorably by Major Dashwood of the British Mission. 

H. T. Bull 
Colonel, U.S.A. 

1st Ind. 

Hq., 63rd Inf., Camp Meade, Md., Nov. i, 1918. To Platoon Com- 
mander, 4th Platoon, Model Co., 63rd Inf. (Thru C. O. Co. K). RE- 
FERRED. 

By order of Colonel Croxton: 

W. P. Woods 
Captain Sr Adjutant, 6)rd Inf. 



250 History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 

BITS FROM BROADWAY— AND ELSEWHERE 

"Men," spoke up a sergeant to a crowd of rookies at Angel Island, 
" 1 want six expert mechanics to do some work." In the twinkling of an 
eye six men responded, eagerly telling of their ability, each trying to out- 
do the other, it seemed. "Yes, men," went on the sergeant, "I believe 
you. You all look like expert mechanics. Over there are your tools," 
nodding at three wheelbarrows, three picks and three shovels. An for 
two days the}- wheeled dirt. Thereafter they were not so " expert." 

We must hand it to little Bohn. He doesn't believe in seconds, for he 
was first "in" in Angel Island, and first "out" in New York. 

Shortly after doffing our "civies" and donning our O. D.'s at Angel 
Island, a sergeant called us together and requested that all college gradu- 
ates step forward, as he had urgent need of men of this calibre. With 
eager enthusiasm a score stepped forth, the remainder bewailing their 
lack of education along the higher lines. These college men, they thought, 
would get "soft" jobs, possibly nothing but paper work. The sergeant 
showered them with verbal nosegays for their above-the-average ability. 
"Now, men," he concluded, "report at once to the kitchen officer; he 
wants you to clean sinks and empty slop cans." 

We're here to make the boys behave who'd like to be so tough, 
For when they bump the 63rd they find the road is rough. 

Jones re-enlisted, saying that that was the only way he knew of get- 
ting home for some time yet. 

Speaking of names, I wonder if it wouldn't be a passing proposition* 
after they are discharged, for Ham and Lam to start a Butcher shop? 
Likewise, Shipp should form a partnership with Skon and sail the briny 
deep. As a fruit merchant Lemons should Dodge the Winter, and look 
Sharp or he'll come to a Short stop. The five Jones' consider Rust-ing 
in their Houses for a Long time. 

A certain corporal in " K " Company, while taking a bath, found a very 
pretty necktie neatly wrapped around his neck, and exclaimed, " Ha! the 
mystery is solved. I lost that while at Angel Island." 



Bits from Broadway— and Elsewhere 251 



The other day Private Jones was smoking a cigarette while on duty. 
which prompted the sergeant to ask him what he was doing, to which 
Jones repHed : " Four years, and I've only got two of them in." 

If his gun should " Rust," would Hugh Boyle, and if he didn't, do you 
suppose old " Esil Wood?" 

(Time: Supper. Place: Provost Guard Kitchen.) 

Prisoner: Is that all you got for supper? (indicating Hamburgers). 

Cook: Well, you wait a minute 
and I'll fry you some eggs. 

Prisoner: Howlong will 1 have 
to wait? 

Cook: Say, where are you from? 

Prisoner (rather hard-boiled): 
I belong to the Regular Army. 

Cook: You're eating regular 
army chow now. 

Prisoner: Regular Army Hell! 
They're P. G.'s! 

First P. G. " You'd better stay 
out of that saloon. Didn't you see 
the notice on the bulletin board?" 

Second P. G.: "Oh, that's all 
right. I can't read." 

Corporal Ham says he can't 
tell as yet whether it's better to 
love one little girl a lot or a lot 
of little girls a little. 

It has been said that no one in the Army can get anything without in- 
fluence. Don't believe it. 1 haven't one iota of influence, and I've gotten 
" K. P.," sore feet, extra duty, fatigue, and one call down after another. 

A buck private doing Provost Guard duty in New York City returned 
one evening from a certain Italian district, and before retiring, he thusly 
did lament: 

"Would that some bright inventive man 

Would patent, make, and sell 
A garlic with a garlic taste, 
But with a violet smell!" 




2^2 History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 

"AS YOU WERE AND SNAP INTO IT" 

During a recent convention of officers of the American Army, in 
which Captain Witcher was in attendance, one of the captain's superior 
officers ordered him to make the necessary arrangement for a display of 
pyrotechnics in connection with the firing of some of "Fritzie's Night- 
mare" of the American Artillery at Victory Camp. The captain's mind 
was somewhere in Brooklyn at the time the order was being voiced, and 
catching only the drift of it he replied, " Yes, sir, I'll have the prophylactic 
stations all ready, sir." 

"Lieutenant Gunn isn't here just now, but we expect him most any 
moment; won't you leave your number?" is one of the most frequent 
outbursts of the switchboard operators at Headquarters. 

Sergeant to recruit, handing him a new rifle: "Now, Sonny, that is 
your own rifle. Take good care of it and clean it often. It's your best 
friend." 

"Wall," says the rookie, " 1 don't much like the idea of cleaning my 
very best friends." 

A non-com's ode to his rifle — a poem in four words: 

Dust 
Rust 
Cussed 
Bust 

" Picking 'em out. Son?" asked the general of a Yank, busily engaged 
in picking cooties from the seams of his shirt. 

"No, sir. General, I'm taking 'em as they come." 

What do you do? 1 do army paper work; 1 roll twenty a day, keep 
the business end hot, and am lit up most all of the time. 

Private House says her silence was thunderous ! 

New York wouldn't be so bad if they would move it out in Oregon. 
Whatja say, Webfoots? 

Love is but a fleeting passion, oft the fact but not the fashion. 

An officer, crossing the parade ground, called back a recruit who had 
failed to salute him. Pointing to his leggings, he said, "Don't you see 



Jokes 253 

those?" The recruit looked at the leather leggings and then at his own 
canvas ones, and said, "Gee, you're a lucky guy. Look what they 
handed me!" 

(At Bronx Park Zoo). 

Informative Old Gentleman: " You see, that bird with the long bill? 
That is a stork." 

A bored P. G: "You don't say so! An' me thinkin' all the time it 
was a canary!" 

Corporal McArthur can carry a good jag a long way, but no wonder. 
(Six foot three.) 

A few days after the company arrived in New York, Private Kun 
was seen walking around the quarters with his mouth all bandaged up. 
Some of the fellows, becoming curious, asked the doctor what was the 
matter with him. The doctor informed them that the roof of Private 
Kun's mouth had been sunburned from gazing at high buildings. 

Won't someone kindly donate a large, heavy night-stick to Sergeant 
McGraw? He can't seem to find one large enough to knock 'em dead 
with. 

Now that the "flu" has flew, and the battle is battled, we would like 
to have our discharges. 

Since having to drill, the company barber has lost his line, so the 
gentleman cow lies quietly in the shade. 

A soldier's notion of Hades is a place where every man but himself 
is a second lieutenant (he knows they all go there), where he has to go out 
on saluting details every day, and where he is either drilling, doing guard, 
or K. P., or getting ready for inspection all the rest of the time. It would 
be a heluva place, wouldn't it? 

Schnupp and Booze went up the hill to fetch a pail of beer, 
Schnupp came down and wore a frown, and Booze was angry too; 
They both were sore because no more good Lager could they buy, 
So down the hill came Schnupp and Booze, because the town was dry. 



254 History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 

First P. G. : " My wife objects because it's such a long trip from the 
barracks and that I get there so late. What would you do, get a new 
barracks?" 

Second P. G.: "Naw, get a new wife." 

If you want }our face measured for a shave, see Evans, " K" Com- 
pany barber. He guarantees that you will have a " fit " before he is done 
with you. 

A colonel, while walking down the street, passed a colored recruit who 
failed to salute him. He called him back and said, "Don't you salute 
your superior officers when you see them?" The recruit replied, "1 
didn't know you-all was a officer." The colonel said, "Look at these 
ornaments on my shoulder straps, and the next time you see an officer 1 
want you to salute him." The recruit walked a little farther down the 
street and passed a second lieutenant without saluting. The lieutenant 
called him back and said, " Don't you salute your superior officers when 
you see them?" The recruit looked at his straps and replied, "You 
ain't no officer, you ain't got no chicken on your shoulders." 

Our human bean pole. Lefty Loo, has issued a statement to all the 
world to the effect that he doesn't mind his legs being used as ramrods,but 
damned if he's going to wash socks for any fool to use as gun rags. 

The argument still waxes hot between the two parties as to whether 
the company barber outranks the company, or vice versa. 

Pickings: A poem which becomes quite popular just a short time 
before pay-day. 

Break, break, break, on thy cold gray stones, O sea! 

You may break for a thousand ages, but you will never be broke like me. 

Did you ever drop into the Oregon Club during one of their vaudeville 
entertainments? If you haven't, try and do that sometime. Hear 
Private Dustier of our compan>' featuring "Till We Eat Again." It's 
splendid. 

Private N. E. Lee says his ancestor, Robert E. Lee, was in the army 
to fight, but he is in just for the rest. I wonder where he gets that word? 

Miracle of miracles! Shades of the mess sergeant! We had ham and 
eggs for breakfast this morning! 



Jokes 



-':)5 



Corporal Tucker's luck with the " bones" stands out very prominently 
in " K" Battery. One would think his color is all wrong to hear him talk 
to 'em. 

Corporal Ferguson's pool playing is just like playing with the cat; it's 
all scratches. 

As an oasis in the desert is to the weary traveler, so is the Oregon 
Club, 425 Seventh Avenue, New York City, to most men of this organi- 
zation. Here we can read the papers from home, meet people from home, 
find entertainment, write letters, often procure tickets to the best theaters 
in the city, and are always welcome to real "eats" — all without charge, 
which is an innovation for clubs of this kind. The club has come to be 
known as "home," for the western spirit permeates the atmosphere at all 
times. The spirit that prompted the opening of the club and the untiring 
efforts of those who keep things running smoothly, however, are even 
more appreciated by the boys than the material things of which we are 
the recipients. 



256 History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 



JULY FIRST 

"What are the bugles blowing for?" said soldier on parade. 
"Sure, they're hanging Johnny Barley in the morning." 
"What are they hanging Johnny for?" said soldier on parade. 
"Why, a G. M. C. convened and they've forsworn him. 
Oh, he laid for the captain and put him to sleep, 
And the sergeant went down when he quaffed him too deep, 
And the corporals, alas! have their stripes still to keep — 
And he didn't give 'em no warning!" 

Tho' it ain't what he done to the orf cers, 
Nor half of the non-coms he led, 
But he's always been friends with the private. 
So they're hanging him up till he's dead. 

"Why do the men all bow their heads?" said soldier on parade, 

"Sure, it breaks their hearts to see his spirit(s) leaving." 

"What makes the dim light the sad sun sheds?" said soldier on parade. 

"Sure, it blurs it's eyes to see so much of grieving, 

Sure, it ain't what he didn't that lost him the race, 

For it stands on the records he won a first place. 

But the orf'cers and non-coms were tough ones to face — 

And he hadn't a chance of retrieving." 

Tho' it ain't what he done to the orf'cers. 
Nor half of the non-coms he led, 
But he's always been friends with the private. 
So they're hanging him up till he's dead!" 




/ \ 



Company *'L' 




COMPANY "L," 63rd Infantry, was organized June i, 
1917, at the Presidio of San Francisco, California, by 
transferring one-third of the strength 
of Company "L" of the 12th Infantry as a 
nucleus. These men were selected by choos- 
ing every third man as they stood on the 
roster. The result of this selection was that 
forty-nine men one foggy morning, on the 
old Exposition Grounds below the Presidio, 
were informed that they now constituted Company "L" of 
the 63 rd Infantry. Little did they dream of the growth 
and development which was to follow that simple an- 
nouncement. Second Lieutenant I. C. Avery, late of the 
Machine Gun Company of the 12th was designated as the 
first company commander. The orderly room consisting of a 
condemned pyramidal tent, was organized in the court yard of 
the old " cow-sheds." Sergeant George Mendel was appointed 
first sergeant, the order promoting him was the 
first company order issued in the new organiza- 
tion. 

On June 15, 1917, Captain George C. Lewis 
took over the company. Lieutenant Avery 
returning to the Machine Gun Company of 
the regiment. 

Drill and the usual garrison duties obtained until July 21st, 
when the first increase occurred, forty-two recruits being 
17 257 




258 History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 

assigned, and the company from this time on was kept busy- 
assimilating the new material. This was a more or less dis- 
couraging period through which not only Company "L" but 
the entire regiment passed, caused by a lack of officers and the 
serious losses incurred from the non-commissioned officers 
being transferred to National Army units. A great many of 
these men were also commissioned. However, by November 
2, 1917, when Captain W. S. Paul took over the company, it 
showed the effects of the tireless efforts expended on it by 
Captain Lewis. 

From this time on intensive training was practised and 
more recruits were absorbed, forty-one joining us on the 
24th of March and 146 on June 8th. The latter recruits were 
the first of the inducted men coming mostly from California 
and the Northwest, and were of the type which formed the bulk 
of our regiment throughout the emergency. 

On the 1 2th of August came the great day when we started, 
with high hopes, for Camp Meade, Maryland, and as we 
thought, for France. After a most interesting and enjoyable 
trip of six days the company arrived and was assigned quarters 
in one of the largest mobilization camps in the country. The 
regiment was assigned to the 22nd Brigade, nth (La Fayette) 
Division. 

Lieutenant J. W. Edwards took command of the com- 
pany when Captain Paul was sent overseas with our advance 
party, where we hoped soon to follow. November 11, 1918, 
that fateful day, shattered all hopes of active service, but great 
praise must be granted the organization for the manner in 
which it upheld its high ideals of discipline and morale. There 
was very slight, if any, evidence of the discouragement which 
was so generally felt. 

On November 27th Captain Alan Pendleton took over the 
company, and was succeeded by Captain L C. Avery on 
January 13, 1919. 




1 







First Lieutenant 
Jonathan W. Edwards 




First Lieutenant 
Elijah G. Arnold 




Second Lieutenant 
Harold L. Green 




Captain 
Irving C. Avery 




First Lieutenant 
Roy T. Rouse 




^ 



First Lieutenant 
Oliver R. Clark 



259 







Who Won the War? 

260 



Company "L* 



261 



The last chapter in the history of the organization occurred 
on January 20th, when we left for New York to do provost 
guard work at that import- 
ant demobilization center, 
having been selected from 
all the available regiments 
in the East for this more 
or less unpleasant duty. 
However, the company has 
been accomplishing all the 
tasks set before it with the 
same energy which typified 
it when it was the ''Model Company" at Camp Meade, 
Maryland. 

At the present time a great many of the emergency men 
have left us, with the others soon to follow. Their spirit and 
manliness will always remain in the memories of the old and 
new " regs," who will keep up the tradition of the old company 
in the years of service to come. 




RANGE — ING 




FOR OUR WEAKER BROTHER. 



262 



History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 




sri^G^ff^ 



AN AFFIDAVIT SUBMITTED FOR DISCHARGE, CLAIMING 

DEPENDENTS 



Haymow County 
Affidavit City ^ ^^ 

We the undersigned depose and say that we is acquainted to Pvt. 
Buggs, of Affidavitt City, Oregon, son of Mr. Josua Buggs, of the same 
place. Pvt. Buggs is now a member of Co. "L" 63rd Infantry and 
we is all proud of the part that he has taken to help lick the Huns. Now 
that the War is over his poor father is in big need of his presents at home. 
We have knowed Pvt. Buggs for the past 13 months and know that he is 
badley needed at home; that the above Mr. Buggs, father of his son, Pvt. 
Buggs, is only worth about 70 or $80,000.00, and that the above men- 
tioned Mr. Buggs' wife, Mrs. Eliza Buggs, mother of Pvt. Buggs died 
some twelve years ago; making it necessary for the above mentioned, Mr. 
Buggs to do his own kooking and house work. Also that the afore- 
mentioned Mr. Joss Buggs, father of Pvt. Buggs, has a large ranch, 
consistin of 30 acres of land, 4 acres in wheat, 6 acres in sagebrush and the 
rest in rocks and stump land. That the above Mr. Buggs has a large 
heard of stock on said ranch, consisting of i bronco, i jackass, 3 goats, a 
pig and a dog. That it is of the greatest importance for the above said 
Pvt. Buggs be realeased from the service, in order that he may be able to 
come to the assistence of his poor father, Mr. Buggs, and give him the 
necessary help in keeping up the ranch as the entire neiyborhood is 
dependent on the aforesaid stock for their supply of fresh milk. If the 
said Pvt. Buggs is immedeately released from the Army he will be able 
to help his poor father and bring releef to the community of Affidavitt 



The Bull's Eye 



263 



city. We, the whole neiyborhood are praying and have been praying 
that the Honorable Sir, Pvt. Buggs' Company Commander will grant us 
this blessing, and send our hero home to us. 

Signed Bill Perkins 
Signed Hank Brown 

• Swored to me and under my hand is 

stamped my seel 

Signed Jim Blankhead 
Noterry Public for Haymow County, 
State of Oregon. 








THE BULL'S EYE 

Shooting one day at 200 

From a pose that would break 
your back. 
My gun was wabbling madly, 

As I took up the trigger's slack. 
I hardly knew where 1 was shoot- 
ing, 

Or what I was shooting at; 
But I banged "away with "Old Betsy" 

And the bullet struck with a spat. 
It kicked up the sand and the pebbles, 

And the target dropped from sight. 
And 1 nearly fell off the rampart 

When the disc that they showed was white 
1 have sought and still seek vainly, 

And will while I am yet alive 
To find where I aimed on that target. 

When I got that count of five. 
It may be some time in the future. 

When I've had more time to train 
And I've gotten more used to "Old Betsy" 

That I'll hit that bull's eye again. 




264 History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 



Wtu/ X'VVLA X\, 




DE BUGLE CALLS 

De bugle bane calling a purpose for, an' dots ve, 
Materials should bane collecting for a Saxty-tree. 
Ve ha' scorn fine startings froom da 12th infantry, 
Da east, nort' und sout', bane calling dar best, 
Und ve skall rig oop soomting froom de vest. 
Doo lumber-yack, humstader, und vild buckaroo, 
De bugle now bane calling for yoo. 



Coom oot froom de teamber und dawn froom de slope. 
Trow avay yoor axe, und lay dawn yoor rope. 
Und vould et pe asking to motch of faremers now, 
To unheech yoor horses, und hang oop yoor plow? 
Ve need moor mechanics und plenta cooks in our 

crew, 
Soom foighting pugs, und prune-peekers too. 



Gather >oo all und coom lak de storem, 
Trad' yoor auld rags for de bright uniform, 
Doo skall ha' a strat barrel raffle, I told no fake. 
Get a pair of No. 14 shoes und de pargain is 

make. 
Yaw, 1 tank already de colors bane unfurled, 
Beckening de model regiment oof de vorld. 







Charlie Morrow wants to know the first symptoms of love. He says 
he has something breaking out on his back now. 

Private Stratton does not like New York City, because every time you 
went into the "Sub" you came up at a different place. 

The regimental supply sergeant had to put in a requisition for mat- 
tresses and sheets, because the Oregon boys could not stand the smell of 
the old straw ticks; it made them homesick. 

The regimental yell: " Did my 'Affies' come yet?" 

Vincent DePasquale, the well-known barber of Company "L," is 
sporting white collars these days and great havoc is being wrought 
amongst the damsels of Long Island City. 



Jokes 



26=; 



Conversation between Mechanic Berg and Private Border 
while on pass and trying to get a room in a Baltimore 
Hotel. 

Mechanic Berg to Clerk: " What price rooms have you?" 

Clerk: "Nine ($9.00) per." 

Border whispers to Berg: "Too d much." 

Berg: "H — 1, ^9.00 is nothing for a soldier. Give us 
the key." 

It is rumored that Berg is still working to pay for the 
room. 




LITTLE .NAPOL- 
EON GREE.V " 
BALLIXG THEM 
OUT 



No more sobbing. 
Orderly Room. 



Beales is discharged. This means rest for the 



1964A. D. "Whatdidyou 
do after the great war, Grandpa 
Hughes?" 

(With a growl): "I spent 
the rest of my life trying to get 
my discharge." 

Private White does not 
think that the tepees of New 
York resemble those of the 
Nez Perce in anyway what- 
soever. 



"How yuh gona keep 'em down on the farm after they've seen New 
York." That is the question. 



The eternal question, "How do you spell AFFIDAVIT?" 

Longfellow could take a worthless piece of paper and 
write a poem on it and make it worth $65,000.00. 
that's genius. 

There are some men that can write a few words on a 
piece of paper and make it worth a million dollars. 
that's capital. 

The United States can take an ounce and a quarter of 
gold and make it worth twenty dollars. 
that's money. 





AFTER THE 

" BATTLB OF 

ASTORIA" 



266 History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 

A mechanic can take material worth ^5.00 and make it into watch 
springs worth one thousand dollars. 

that's skill. 

There is a man in Paris that can take a .50c. piece of canvas, paint a 
picture on it, and make it worth $1,000,000. 

that's art. 

A woman can purchase a hat for $3.00 but prefers paying $27.00 for it. 
that's foolishness. 

A ditch digger handles several tons of earth for $2.50 a day. 

that's labor. 

You can get a sack of tobacco for loc. 

that's bull. 

The author of this could write a check for $9,000,000.00, but it wouldn't 
be worth a d — m cent. 

that's tough. 

There are some people who will tell you there are better outfits than 
the 63rd Infantry. 

that's nerve. 



The Uniform 267 

THE UNIFORM 

We are not ashamed of the uniform, 
And if you are a friend 
You will never say against it 
Any word that will offend. 
It has covered honored bodies 
And by heroes has been worn 
Since the days of the old Republic, 
When the Stars and Stripes were born. 

Uniforms have many patterns, 

Some are khaki, some are blue, 

And the men who chose to wear them 

Are of many patterns too. 

Some are sons of wealthy parents, 

Some are college graduates, 

Some have many manly virtues, 

Some are simply reprobates, 

Men of all kinds when drinking 
Misbehave, act rough and swear. 
Drunken soldiers or civilians 
Are disgusting anywhere. 
So grant us your forbearance. 
We'll appreciate it more 
Than a lot of noise and cheering 
When we are leaving for a war. 

We have sat with you in public, 
We have smelt your whiskey breath. 
Heard remarks insane and silly, 
Nearly boring us to death. 
Still we offered no objections 
When in theaters we met, 
And you think you should exclude us 
When attended by your set. 

When we meet you out in public, 
On the streets or anywhere, 
We don't merit sneering glances 
Nor a patronizing stare. 



268 History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 

For we are of an honored calling, 
Which our garments plainly show. 
You may be thief or parson, 
How on earth are we to know? 

So drop your proud and haughty bearing 
And your egotistic pride, 
Get acquainted with a soldier 
And the heart and soul inside. 
Test and try to analyze him, 
Criticize him thru and thru, 
And you will very likely find him 
Just as good a man as you. 




\ 




A FOREWORD (NOT OF THE MARCH VARIETY) 

TO the officers and enlisted men of Company "M" who 
have proven by their loyalty, by their adherence to 
respect and courtesy, by their eagerness to comply with 
suggestions and orders, by their devotion to discipline, and by 
their ever-present keenness to do their best under all circum- 
stances, that they are worthy of the reputation they have 
gained, the company commander desires in these few words to 
express his appreciation of their efforts in his behalf. 




Company "M" 

FROM God's Country to Hell (Gate). 
"Well, I'll be d— d, if it isn't my old Buddie. Where 
have you been all this time.'' I thought that you 
were in the 12th Infantry." 

"Hello, yourself, you big stiff, it sure is a devil of a time 
since I last saw you." 

"I was with the 12th until June, 1917, when forty-nine of 
us were transferred to 'M' Company of the 63rd." 

"I'll bet that you hated to leave the 12th." 

"We sure did, and such a mess we got into you cannot 
imagine. Lieutenant Stevens was our first company com- 
mander, and he sure did have his trouble in getting things to 
running smoothly. D — d discouraging at first, for he was 
the only officer present until Lieutenant Clarkston was as- 
signed. Do you remember him, Jake.'*" 

" Remember who ^. " 

"Lieutenant Clarkston. He is an old timer. Was a ser- 
geant for quite a spell until commissioned. He is a regular 
fellow and easy to get along with. He and the C. O. had to 
work like the devil to get started, and just about the time 
that things were running somewhat smoothly the company 
commander was relieved and Lieutenant Odhner took com- 
mand. Then things sure went from bad to worse for a while. 
During this time we picked up a couple of more officers from 
the Training Camp — Lieutenants Gunn and Owens. If you 
are as well known as you say you are in 'Frisco, you must 

270 



Company ''M" 271 

remember Lieutenant Gunn. One of those sort of fellows, 
when he gets a-going, that he has nothing on his mind but his 
cap and a few light ones. To show you. One day during the 
session of the Special Court of which he was a member, and 
the accused a member of 'M' Company, Lieutenant Gunn was 
challenged on the ground that he was prejudiced to a drinking 
man. 'Absolutely absurd,' said Lieutenant Gunn. And any- 
one knowing him knows that it is the truth." 

"I should say I do remember him by reputation. Go on 
with your story; perhaps I know some more of your outfit." 

"Our second company commander stayed with us until 
about Thanksgiving, when he was relieved by Lieutenant 
Stromeyer. There is a man for you all right. Easy going, but, 
man, look out for him when he gets a raving fit. In one of 
these fits he would lock everyone in the mess hall and appear 
in person armed with a baseball bat and give a little talk, end- 
ing up by saying, 'Anyone of you blankety blank birds who 
thinks he can pull anything oflF on me let him come outside 
and I'll show him who is going to run the country.' He only 
stayed until Christmas, when the real old soldiering began. 
About this time the Second Training Camp closed and we 
got a bunch of officers. Captain Oberlander and Lieutenants 
George, Plank, Connely, and a few shave-tails — Lieutenant 
Matson, Lymans, Van Tuyl, Leitch. The last wasn't the stick- 
ing kind, however, for he didn't remain long in the company 
with the new C. O. And believe me, man, under the new com- 
pany commander we began to step around." 

"What did you say his name was?" 

"Captain Oberlander, formerly of Fort McDowell. Do 
you know him.?" 

"Know him.? Damned well. Go on with your story." 

"From that time on, as I said before, the work began in 
earnest, but it was d — d discouraging with so few men and our 
being so far from the scene of action in France. However, 



'212 History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 

these days we were kept busy learning to sing the Star Spangled 
Banner and a few of the old masterpieces Hke Over There, etc. 
Review every morning after the singing fete. In June we had 
the first good hunch of business, when the regiment received 
two thousand recruits, all big brutes, six feet two, more or less, 
and our company filled up to full strength. Then the instruc- 
tion began in earnest, for our company commander had learned 
by experience how to handle recruits, and from that time on 
'M' Company became first in everything except in appearing 
on the roster. Busy, that was me all over, but it was worth it, 
for in July orders came to move us to Camp Meade, the camp 
where our division was to be formed; and there we went in all 
our glory. Ever been to Camp Meade.? No, you say. Well, 
keep away, for there is nothing there but heat and an occasional 
train on the W. B. & A. Railroad. We had hardly struck this 
camp until we were shoved out on to a swamp, what is called a 
range, in polite society. Speaking of smells, well, your old 
town of Chicago isn't in it. Hot as the devil and with most of 
them sick, it sure was a mess. But it took more than this to 
kill the spirit of those Western birds. We were so d — d good 
that forty men were taken from each company to form the 
72nd Infantry which was just being formed. It was hard to 
see the boys separated, but what the devil did we care when 
they were in the adjoining regiment; and, better still, word had 
come that we were to be sent overseas very shortly. Some 
time I'll tell you." 

"Any more new oflPicers picked up?" 

"Yes, a day or two after we left the range, Captain Ober- 
landerwas relieved and Captain Thomson was assigned, and he 
has remained to date. Back to the old line again. Things 
were swimming along and everyone rejoicing at the arrival of 
our junior officer. Lieutenant Brack, the hero of the ladies of 
Baltimore. You know him of course. One of the 'Why-girls- 
leave-home' sort of fellows. But the good thing didn't last 





First Lieutenant 
Alexander Clarkston 



First Lieutenant 
Evan C. Dresser 




Captain 
Stanley A. Thomson 




Second Lieutenant 
Lawrence J. Brack 

iS 




First Lieutenant 
Clyde H. Plank 



273 




No Offense, "Gobs"! 
274 



a A/T" 



Company "M 



275 



long, for the epidemic broke out in camp and we w ere (juaran- 
tined, but we didn't lose a man in the company, although it 
spoiled our chances of getting over, for we stuck under quaran- 
tine for six or seven weeks. You should have seen the bunch 
rave. We were just getting our pep, and hopes raised again 
when the d — d armistice was signed, and then our chance went 
up in smoke. One felt like going over the hill in not getting 
over, but we heard some good rumors to the effect that we 
were to do provost guard duty in the big city, and finally we 
got to New York. Provost duty isn't what a soldier like you 
and me likes, but the side issues are all to the mustard. And 
have you seen the abundance of wild women.? Oh, boy. 
The saddest part of it all is that these days we are beginning to 
lose most of our old buddies, and the organization is beginning 
to look like it did in the old cow-shed days. 

"What do I think of *M' Company, you say.? Well, let 
me tell you. Everyone that know^s anything will tell you 
that the 63 rd is the best regiment in the service, and everyone 
in the regiment will tell you that the 3rd Battalion is the best in 
the regiment, and everyone in the 3rd Battalion will tell you 
that *M' Company is the best company in the battalion, so 
being the best company of the best battalion of the best regi- 
ment, it must be the best company in the service." 




276 History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 




WHAT ABOUT THIS, "SARGE?" 

Remember, "Top," the tough week-end in Balti- 
more, when the motherly old lady said, " My poor 
hero, where were you wounded?" 

GONE, BUT NOT FORGOTTEN 

Upon leaving Camp Meade, our company com- 
mander was heard sadly humming that old refrain, 
Where is My Wandering Boy To-Night? 

THE THRIFTY "LOOT" 

One rainy day our company "Vet" dropped into a shoe-shining 
parlor. In a jocular manner, he addressed the bootblack, saying, 
"Buddy, I'll bet a dime you can't put a shine on these shoes." The 
boy took the bet and won, but not until he had consumed thirty-five 
cents worth of shoe polish. Clever? That's you all over, Alex . 

AND STILL THEY "RE-UP" 

During a game of football, in which Captain Thomson was partici- 
pating, Private Lee sounded off, " You big stiff, I'll get you yet." " Boy, 
page Shorty Lee. You'll probably find him in the kitchen." 

WHAT'S THE RANGE? 

Many complaints were heard on the rifle range because the sanitary 
engineer had constructed the latrines too close to the kitchens and sleep- 
ing quarters. After a few days' shooting, many "kicks" were made 
that the latrines had not been placed in every tent. 

DO YOU BELIEVE IN SIGNS? 

A Y. M. C. A. announcement: "To-night will be shown Mary Pick- 
ford in three parts. (Poor Mary.) 

NEXT 

Definition of " M" Company's barber: A brilliant conversationalist, 
who occasionally cuts hair. 



Company Jokes 



277 




CAUSE FOR ALARM 

Private Craven, while on patrol duty in 
town, chanced to meet a charming maiden. 
"What is your name?" she asked. 
"Craven, ma'am," he shyly answered. 
"Cravin' for what?" was her reply. 

COME AND GET IT 

There's something in the kitchen that the cat 

refused to eat; 
There's something in the kitchen that's a 

mystery hard to beat. 
We'll eat again to-morrow, boys, so come — 

come — come. 
What do we love, but seldom get? Slum! 

Slum! SLUM!!! 

A P. G.'S LAMENT 



Once I was happy and contented. 1 loved my chow and army beans, 
but — ^when it comes to doing P. G. in front of CHILD'S, and you've got 
to watch the cook throwing those hot cakes; and you dig in your pocket 
and feel your wealth — one dime; and pay-day is twenty-eight days off; 
and when, after doing about five hours' duty, some kind soul comes along 
and says, "Here's 'four bits.' Run in and get a 'hot dog.' " Oh-h-h-h, 
boy, ain't it a gr-r-r-rand and glor-r-r-rious feeling???? Yes, Buddy, it 
must be, but you can't prove it by me. 

A FEW OF THE PASSING SHOWS 



The Quickc'sl vay 

lo rise from the vankc :- 

^ke an, elevaloi 



Tiger Tiger 

Somebody's Sweetheart 

Oh! My Dear 

The Grand Old Man 

Up in Mable's Room 

Please Get Married 

Lightning 

Friendly Enemies 

Daddies 

Good Morning, Judge 



Sgt. Bill 

Stewart 

Royal Nelson 

Sgt. Keezer 

Bugler Goodman 

Rhinehardt 

Ostrom 

Sgts. Richmond & Welch 

Sgt. Lawson 

Rutherford 



278 History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 

OUTSIDE 

Sergeant Cronin stepped into the Post Exchange Barber Shop, say- 
ing, " I want to get fixed up so my girl won't know me." 

"Try Barber Mullen of 'E' Company," replied the tonsorial artist 
addressed, "and he'll fix you so that no one will know you." 

SOME SOLDIER 

For the benefit of those men whose memory fails them occasionally 
we make mention of the little fellow we once had in the company named 
Johnson, alias " Shorty." He was a good little fellow and a hard worker, 
but he lacked common sense and brains. 

Shorty graduated from the recruit class, and was drilling with the 
company for the first time. Lieutenant Plank was in command, and 
Shorty, being the smallest man, was placed at the extreme left of the 
company. The lieutenant gave the command, "Take interval — to the 
left — March." Shorty, of course, was the first man to step off, and away 
he went. After the company returned to quarters, a report of squads 
was taken, and Shorty was found missing. 

Days passed into weeks. Shorty was reported as a deserter, and then 
the mystery was solved. A letter was received from "somewhere in 
Virginia," reading as follows: 

' Deer Captun 
" 1 rite thees few lines to tell yew that my only sun George passt 
threw here this mornin but he woodnt even stop for his own muther. I 
askt him wy and he sed that his ofcer told him to take inturvul as he 
hadnt hurd no order to halt an so hes still goin. So plees Captun tell him 
tu halt an showt it so so lowd he can heer it in Virginia an then hell be 
neer hoam 

' fathefully 

"Maria Johnson" 

HIS PROBABLE ACTION 

" 1 notice a good deal in the papers about our soldiers taking up 
farming when they return from overseas," musingly said honest farmer 
Hornbeak. "So, probably, by this time next year I'll be deferentially 
saying, "Pardon me. Colonel, but the dinner horn has just blown," or a 
trifle more briskly, "Captain, them hogs is out again," or yelling in no 
uncertain tones, " Lieutenant, dad-durn your ornery picture, do you want 
to lay abed all day?" 



Company Jokes 279 

We are boys of the 63rd, and came here from the West, 
We joined the army to fight the Huns, and be honored Hke the rest, 
We wanted to show our Uncle Sam that we were made of his best, 
But still we're drilling on. 

63rd got disappointed, 63rd got disappointed, 
63rd got disappointed, but still we're drilling on. 

Now they issue us white chevrons to wear upon our coat. 
To show the boys who went across, that we never saw a boat. 
And all that we can say is, "Yes, the flu made us the goat," 
But still we're drilling on. 

We tried so hard to go across, and pull our little stunt. 
But now we've been deprived of a good old German hunt; 
We done our bit by a marking time here on the Maryland front. 
But still we're drilling on. 

We drilled in sand, we drilled in mud, we drilled in rain and snow, 
We drilled in all the roughest weather, down to twenty-two below. 
But when the armistice was signed they said we could not go. 
But still we're drilling on. 

So now we're going to New York to do some provost guard; 
We've got to keep the burglars out of some rich man's back yard. 
If we ever get a crack at him we're going to hit him hard. 
And then go drilling on. 

Well-known Army Call — Mess Call. 

What has always puzzled me is why they don't play Mess Call to the 
tune of Hearts and Flowers (Livers). Can you taste it? 

Who in the hell wants a yearly review, just to see the faces of some 
guys you know you'd like to be (just once), and you look up their address 
and find they live in Oregon and you're in New York? 

They tell me Sergeant Welch is going into the laundry business when 
he gets into "civies." Atta boy, Sarg, you ought to know how to "welch 
'em" by this time, f Dr we've changed laundries as often as we've changed 
clothes. 



28o History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 

Voice on Times Square: "Chinatown and the Bowery, $\ the 
round trip. Six stops in Chinatown. Visit the slums for a dollar, 
boy." 

Voice from the 63rd: "Wha' do you mean, pay a dollar to see the 
slums? Why, we got it all over you. We not only see the slums, but we 
eat 'em three times a day and get a dollar for doing it." 

On Saturday morning inspection Sergeant Lawson noticed one of 
the men, Private Cooley, without his belt. Knowing that Cooley ought 
to have known better, he " bawled" him out and told him to report to the 
Supply Sergeant, draw a new belt and have it charged up to him, finish- 
ing up with this remark, addressing the whole company, " In future you 
men are going to be more careful with your equipment, and anyone 
losing their equipment will be made an example of and severely dealt 
with." Turning to Private Cooley he said, "Where is your belt," and 
Private Cooley replied, " I loaned it to you at the last inspection." 
Whereupon Sergeant Lawson thought silence the better part of valor, 
kept quiet and took it "cooley." 

Small child to Mother: "Mother, what does the red band mean 

with P. G. on the soldiers' arms?" 

Mother: "Why., dear, they're advertising Procter and Gamble's 

Soap." 

Child: "And why do they walk in pairs?" 

Mother: "They are out to Protect Girls and act as a Peoples' Guide." 

Child: " But they don't need a club, do they?" 

Mother: "Oh, yes, they need those to Produce Graft." 

Child: "P. G. means a lot of things, doesn't it, mother?" 

Mother: "Yes, dear, but you are too young to know what P. G. 

really means." 

I suppose most people have heard of the play or read about Brewster's 
MilUons. Brewster the plumber is in no way related to the millionaire, 
but we have a sergeant in the outfit who acted the part of a millionaire 
the other night, but he had no intention of doing so. Sergeant Kuehl 
was down town the other evening "blowing in" a couple of friends. 
After receiving their hats and coats from the hat-girl, he gave her a dollar 
and hung around for his change. She wasn't that kind of a girl, and no 
change was forthcoming. Next time you go downtown to eat, Sergeant, 
don't forget the small change. 



Company Jokes 281 

I hope none of the boys who used to sign up every two hours on the 
post will forget its new name. I believe "overseas Williams" christened 
it the "Snorting Pole" because he grunted every time his nose went 
near it. 

While writing all these jokes about the different boys, don't let us 
forget to mention our worthy Y. M. C. A. secretary. We all appreciate 
your good work, Brother Lyon, and the way you have tried to make life 
in the cantonment at least bearable. It is always a good feeling to know 
that we have a secretary whom we can " re-Lyon." Good Luck, Yumka. 

Out from 'Frisco's golden west 

Amidst a cheering throng, 
Came the pride of California's best 

To keep the East from going wrong. 

From 'Frisco they were jumped to Meade 

And trained like soldiers bold, 
But Kaiser Bill pulled in his steed, 

And now that story's old. 

Bound for France, hearts filled with glee. 

They little knew their fate, 
For they are doing duty as P. G.'s 

And help to keep the soldiers straight. 

And then we thought we'd soon be home 

And rumors were flying fast. 
But when we got our news to roam 

We knew our fate at last. 

So here we are out in the East, 

And we are likely to remain 
Until all the boys from overseas 

Are back in the old domain. 

We only hope it won't be long. 

For we, too, want to be home, 
And when once we are where we belong 

We surely will no longer roam. 



282 History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 

In the year of 191 7 news reached the Pacific Coast of the conflict of 
nations and the precipitation of the United States into the World War. 
Immediately the sturdy lads of the West rushed to the recruiting officers 
before the draft could get them, and the 63rd Infantry was formed. 
Boys from the hills and the logging camps flocked into the army, and the 
farmer boys heard the call and joined in too. "Good-bye maw; good- 
bye, paw," that was the wail of Private Brokaw, who was broke all of 
the time, but he was a Goodman. He used to Musa-way his time in the 
Brass-field, but it was too Tinney for him, so he packed his Box and 
joined the 63rd. There he found lots of reading matter; Collins' weekly 
and Leslie's magazine, along with Wagner's dictionary and Smith's ency- 
clopedia; but like a cunning old Fox he began to Hatch out a plan for 
getting discharged, and the Craven was so strong that he soon had a Vol- 
ley of friends, and with the aid of a Carpenter he filed his affi-Davies. Four 
months have gone since the Armistice was signed, and Brokaw is still 
Private Brokaw in the 63rd. Now they are in New York City and mus- 
taches have become popular. "Overseas" Williams, alias Homer C, got 
jealous of Billson's misplaced eyebrow, and he was ordered to Schaff-er off , 
but he still maintained a stiff upper lip and replied: "According to Law- 
son, nothing doing; that's a new Brand-in-burg Astoria." 

Private Yutz: "There's only one thing that 1 dislike about this 
army job." 

Private Hutz: "What's that?" 

Private Yutz: "No matter how many times I go A. W. O. L. or 
pester the captain for a discharge, I can't get him mad enough to fire me." 

You don't have to go down to New York City to be "patted" on the 
head and made sick by a Black Jack. Just go on sick report in Astoria, 
that's all. 















^ ''^'--^^;»'^^-^>t 



^*^i^^ 













\\:tx^^ :^„. iy\. ij-^. .r*,<* ,i:.<.i;.i-' »-' -i* 



mmwwfi 








^H'-''-^iM'fV' i'''~^( 









r 








:^?»»a:: 



»^^ 







*vt^rfJU fi 















f 



U'/. 






kTK* 






. 



IFn flDemodam 

Busser Edwin J., 2d Lt. 
Chew, George B., 2d Lt. 

Aadland, Thomas M. 
Adams, John A. 
Boggiano, John 
Brunson, Willie M, 
Dent, Charley W. 
Dorsey, Walter J. 
Ferris, Frank H. 
Frozer, Archibald W. 
Garbedian, Ben 
Hohe, Richard 
Kelly, Walter L. 
Kerns, Eugene J. 
Lambert, James E. 
McCall, Harley G. 
McCard, Vernon 
Mischke, August B. 
Nielsen, Peter L. 
Ott, Carl F. 
Pratt, John W. 
Provensal, John A. 
Reichel, George 
Romero, Albert 
Sartwell, Ansel 
Snyder, John W. 
Toohey, Daniel P. 
Wood, Charles E. 

283 



Rosters 



285 



Regimental Staff 



COLONELS 

CROXTON, RICHARD C, NELSON, CHARLES J., 

Lambs Club, N. Y. City. U. S. A. 

LIEUTENANT-COLONEL 
BISSELL, HARRY H., U. S. A. 

CAPTAINS 

WOODS, WILLIAM P., PAUL, W. STEWART 

U.S.A. 
OBERLANDER, THEODORE A., KERNAN, FRANCIS W. 

63rd U. S. Infantry, Madison Barracks, N. Y. 



287 



Headquarters Company 

CAPTAIN 
HORTON, ROBERT D. 

FIRST LIEUTENANTS 
CLEMENSON, WENDELL L. PIERSON., ARTHUR F. 

SECOND LIEUTENANTS 
SCOTT, PAUL E. CONLEY, WILLIAM 

WALTERS, JOHN MACIEJEWSKI, WALLACE A. 

REGIMENTAL SERGEANTS MAJOR 

SCHWECHTEN, WILLIAM, GRIFFETH, LESLIE A., 

U. S. Army Quinton, Okla. 

LINDQUIST, WALTER F., 24 Lighthouse Ave., Santa Cruz, Calif. 

BATTALION SERGEANTS MAJOR 

FORD, CLARENCE C, LEPSKI, WILLIAM, 

Douglas, Ariz. 375 E. Kinney St., Newark, New Jersey, 

LINDSEY, WILLIAM A., BARBEE, SIM W., Jr., 

5310 Monte Vista St., Los Angeles, Calif. 5001 Budlong Ave., Los Angeles, Calif. 
COOPER, ARTHUR C, 3304 N. California Ave., Chicago, 111. 

FIRST SERGEANT (DRUM MAJOR) 

BALL, HARRY C, U. S. Army 

ASSISTANT BAND LEADER 
CLAGG, CHARLES E,, 1221 Solano Ave., V^allejo, Calif. 

SERGEANT BUGLERS 
BRADLEY, HARRY R., BOGUE, FRANK E. 

U. S. Army. New Haven, Conn. 

COLOR SERGEANTS 

KOESTNER, HENRY J., SWANSTROM, CHARLES R., 

U. S. Army. U. S. Army. 

288 



Headquarters Company 



289 



SUPPLY SERGEANT 
ROBERTS, WALTER C, 422 So. H St., Porterville, Calif. 

MESS SERGEANT 
KELLY, WILLIAM T., 415 No. 54th St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

STABLE SERGEANT 

SMITH, JACK, Portland, Ore. 



BAND SERGEANTS 



RIEKE, OTTO F., 

Ironton, Mo. 
HEYWORTH, ALBERT E., 

Franklin & Mulberry Sts., Hagerstown, Md. 



COOK. CHARLES W., 

Peoria, 111. 
PEMBLETON, LEE A., 

Gay lord, Kans. 



SERGEANTS 



DEVANY, CHARLES L., 

1748 Tilghman St., Philadelphia, Pa. 
FREDLEY, THEODORE R., 

845 Fairview Ave., Butler, Pa. 
CONRAD, EDIE, 

113 2nd St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 
MANLEY, JOSEPH L., 

56 Oxford St., Wilkes Barre, Pa. 
ROSENBAUM, JAMES J., 

U. S. Army. 
THIES, WALTER C, 

1317 Valleio St., San Francisco, Cal. 
MAY, WALTER S., 

203 Shasta St., Roseville, Cal. 
WALDRON, PHILLIP M., Jr., 

U. S. Army. 
LINDSEY, WILLIAM A., 

5310 Monte Vista St., Los Angeles, 
Cal. 
DENEND, EARL C, 

623 E. 4th St., Long Beach, Cal. 

PYLE, JOHN 



EVERITT, FRED, 

484 36th St., Oakland, Cal. 
KEETON, CHARLIE J., 

Silverton, Ore. 
O'CONNELL, CHARLES, 

Box 133 Coronado, Cal. 
THATCHER, JOHN T., 

302 Sacramento St., Portland, Ore. 
RANSDELL, CHARLES W., 

Lakeport, Cal. 
WIMBERLY, LESTER L., 

Drain, Ore. 
CRONIN, WALTER M., 

U. S. Army 
GUILFORD, FRANK M. 

c/o Cal. Assc. Raisin Co., Fresno, 

Cal. 
HEATON, HARRY C, 

715 1 6th St., Bay City, Mich. 
DUFFY, LESLIE F., 

1773 Page St., San Francisco, Cal. 
S., U. S. Army. 



BAND CORPORALS 



HARTLEY, GEORGE, 

U. S. Army 
SWILLING, JOHN W., 

229 Commercial St., Engewood Cal. 



SUND, EMIL E., 

Petrolia, Cal. 
SALVAGNO, TONY, 

East 14th St. 
Vancouver Wash. 



290 History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 



CORPORALS 



JOHxVSTOXE, ROBERT R., 
DENINE, SAM D., 

Wallace, Idaho. 
JAFFE, BORRIS, 
MILLER, GEORGE F., 

2829 Calumet Ave., Chicago, 111. 
SCHAARMANN, FRED W., 

1536 N. Western Ave., Los Angeles, 
Cal. 
AGNEW, PARKE D., 

Billings, Montana. 
BARNES, WILLARD F., 

836 L St., Fresno, Cal. 
KENNEDY, ROBERT H., 

Ruskie, Scotland. 
SHARP, ERNEST E., 

134 S. Thomas St., Los Angeles, Cal. 
CLARK, JAMES A., 

Warsaw, Mo. 
FITZGERALD, HUSTON, 

Petersburg, 111. 
MOON, RICHARD L., 
OSINIVSKY, NORMAN, 

U. S. Army. 
SUTHERLAND, JAMES G., 

Lorane, Ore. 
RUSSEL, ARTHUR B., 

1225 Derry St., Harrisburg, Pa. 
ROBINSON, GEORGE H., 

1742 Oregon St., Berkeley, Cal. 
COX, WILLARD E., 

R. F. D. I, McMinnville, Ore. 
EVERETT, BURT N., 

1966 Burge St., Portland, Ore. 
GERMANY, CHARLES E., 

530 r3th St., Corvallis, Ore. 



GIBSON, THOMAS F., 

Red Springs, N. C. 
KERNS, IRVING, 

Needles, Cal. 
ZINSER, FRANCIS H., 

Route I, Salem, Ore. 
COADY, EDWARD A., 

305 Warren Ave., Baltimore, Md. 
GAIL, DEWEY H., 

258 S. 2nd St., Sawtelle, Cal. 
O'CONNORS, FRANK E., 

Dunsmuir, Cal. 
SCONYERS, WALTER H., 

504 M St., N. W. Washington, D. C. 
YOUNGBERG, JOHN J., 

4424 W. Morgan St., Seattle, Wash. 
WEBER, CHARLES H. 

Glouster, O. 
HEMBREE, ALBERT F., 

83 N. 2ist St., Portland, Ore. 
GLASS, WILBUR O., 

Grand Junction, Col. 
SPENCER, FRANK H., 

900 8th St., The Dalles, Ore. 
WOOD, REUBEN G., 

1505 W. 3rd St., Sedalia, Mo. 
HUGHES, RICHARD G., 

367 E. 7th St. N. Portland, Ore. 
LEVY, EDGAR, 

Demopolis, Ala. 
LAMBERT, JOHN A., 

1025 Market St., Oakland, Cal. 
RAITZYK, SAMUEL 

1209 E. Monument St., Baltimore, Md. 
LAMBERT, NORMAN E., 

II 5th St., N. W. Washington, D. C. 



CORPORAL BUGLER 

JOHNSTON, LYLE, Wabash, Minn. 



COOKS 



GALL, GEORGE T., 

Pennsboro, W. Va. 
GOODWIN, JOHN F., 

U. S. Army. 
MARTIN, CHRIS, 

5 no 40th Ave., Oakland, Cal. 



MATSCHINER, JACOB, 
27 E. I2th St., Portland, Ore. 

ROSVALL, CHARLES E. J., 
U. S. Army. 

VOSS, FRANK, 
Gen. Delivery, San Francisco, Cal. 



DOCHTER, ALLEN B., Salladasburg, Pa. 

HORSESHOER 

SERSTAD, ANTON, U. S. Army 



Headquarters Company 



291 



MECHANICS 
JONES, CLARENCE L., 

380 W. 47th Place, Los Angeles, Cal. 
PEER, WALTER P., 

Riverdale Cal. 



PETERSON, ROGER, 
Power, Mont. 

SCHMIEDING, BERNARD A. 

U. S. Army. 



CAMP, THAYER E. 
216 I2th St., S. W. 
D. C. 

GANNON, GEORGE A. 

1329 94th Ave., Elmhurst, Oakland, 
Cal. 
GOETTEL, FRED 

ion 1st St., N. Syracuse, N. Y. 



MUSICIANS— FIRST CLASS 

KITE, ROY, 
Washington, Redding, Cal. 

PEMBLETON, LEE A. 
U. S. Army. 

SCHRIMSHER, PAUL H. 

5998 Mission St., San Francisco, Cal. 
THOMPSON, JAMES W. 

Pinole, Cal. 



MUSICIANS 

ACKERMAN, PULVER D., 

Stanton, Neb. 
BLACKW^ELL, PAUL R., 

Warren, Ind. 
EMRICK, WALTER D., 

Chula Vista, Cal. 
HERBERG, MILTON A., 

Eau Claire, Wis., c/o Theater. 
HODGSON, DORMAN B., 

1737 S. Sutter St., Stockton, Cal 
LELAND, CLARENCE, 

Westboro, Mass. 



—SECOND CLASS 

LOZANO, SIMON M., 

Box 492, Tracy, Cal. 
McCLINTOCK, WILLIAM B., 

15 1 6 Hanover St., Baltimore, Md. 
RICKE, RICHARD E., 

Doon, Lowa. 
SALVAGNO, TONY, 

East 14th St., Vancouver, Wash. 
STALTER, VERN L. B., 

517 Fountain Ave., Pacific Grove, Cal. 
ZUBERENY, JOSEPH, 

812 Orchard St., Portage, Pa. 



MUSICIANS— THIRD CLASS 



BARTELME, ANDREW M., 

822 Divisadoro St., San Francisco, Cal. 
CALDWELL, GEORGE L. H., 

410 Wasco St., Portland, Ore. 
CAP, JAROSLAV, 

4824 Byron St., Chicago, 111. 
CASEBEER, LLOYD, 

803 N. Main St., Ashland, Oregon. 
CLARK, MANSEL G., 

3142 Pine St., Eureka, Cal. 
COLLINS, NELSON W., 

Stevenson, Cal. 
DUNBAR, WALTER E., 

Laurens, Otsego Co., N. Y. 
ELMER JOHN A., 

Moab, Utah. 
JUNGE, WILLIAM F., 

Anaheim, Cal. 
LANGILA, ANDREW T. 

Knappa, Ore. 
LANTINEN, OTTO, 

U. S. Army. 



LEDFORD, HUGH, 

Kansas City, Mo. 
MASSEI, ASCHILLE, 

832 Alabama St., San Francisco, Cal. 
MITCHELL, ROBERT A., 

Broadview, Mont. 
OLSON, OLAF R., 

North Powder, Ore. 
PANTALEONI, VITTORIO, 

832 Alabama St., San Francisco, Cal. 
PIPER, CLARENCE E., 

50 Union St., Virginia City, Nev. 
RILEY, HERBERT, 

Bohemian Club, San Francisco, Cal. 
SHAW, EVERETT H., 

Rippey, la. 
WALTON, ROBERT R., 

121 N. 5th St., Upper Sandusky, Ohio. 
WELCH, JAMES R., 

817 17th St., Ensley, Ala. 
WHITE, LEE W., 

Rock Falls, la. 



292 History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 



PRIVATES- 
AITKEN, DOUGLAS, 

Prescott, Ariz. 
AMIDON, WILLIAM R., 

Reno, Nev. 
ARCHDEACON, JAMES L., 

R. F. D. 2, Medford, Ore. 
BOWERS, JACOB P., 

508 S. Main St., Muncy, Pa. 
CANTWELL, GEORGE P., 

328 loth St., Portland, Ore. 
COLIP, FRED M., 

505 Amer. Bank Bldg., Seattle, Wash. 
COOPER, ANSEL A., 

Box 163, Yerington, Nev. 
DAVIS, LESTER, 

North Plains, Ore. 
DYE, HENRY, 

Barton, Md. 
ENDRES, GROVER C, 

Brookrville, Pa. 
ENNIS, JOSEPH F., 

1220 Estudillo St., Martinez, Cal. 
FINCH, RALPH D., 

108 Shaver St., Portland, Ore. 
FOICE, HARRY, 

Athens, Ga. 

GARRETT, RAYMOND, 

Wardensville, W. Va. 
GARSON, JAMES, 

840 S. Liberty St., Salem, Ore. 

GLANCY, WILLIAM, 
Bakertown, Pa. 

GODCHAUX, MAYER, 

3815 Carondelet St., New Orleans, La. 
GOMEZ, JOSE, 

Tularosa, N. Mex. 

HAMILTON, PRESLEY A., 

716 Parker Ave., Braddock, Pa. 
HANSEN, HARRY F., 

1515 Gough St., San Francisco, Cal. 
HANSON, FREEMAN H., 

10 13 6th St., International Falls 
Minn. 
HARRISON, HERBERT E., 

12 15 S. Carey St., Baltimore, Md. 

HAYES, MICHAEL J., 
88 14th St., Troy, N. Y. 

HAYNES, LEE V., 

2532 San Pablo Ave., Oakland, Cal. 
HENNING, CLAYTON H., 

Umatilla, Ore. 



FIRST CLASS 

HEVERLY, DOYLE, P., 

Beech Creek, Pa. 
JENNE, ALBERT E., 

1820 E. Flander St., Portland, Ore. 
JONES, IRA E., 

Tangent, Ore. 
JUHNKE, ORVILLE, 

304 N. Jersey St., Portland, Ore. 
JUNTTI, EDWARD G., 

402 Kensington Ave., Astoria, Ore. 
KALLENBERGER, FREDERICK D. 

4809 38th St., San Diego, Cal. 
KANARD, CHARLEY, 

Andrews, Ore. 
KIRBY, FRANK J. 

Box 14 R. 4, Tiffin, O. 
KRONE, KLARENCE F., 

1444 3rd Ave., Oakland, Cal. 
LOY, QUONG K., 

1036 High St., San Francisco, Cal. 
LURA, PETER W., 

Lovelocks, Nev. 
LYNCH, CHARLES B., 

ID Perry St., Charlestown, S. C. 
McKENZIE, WILLIAM M., 

Borden Shaft, Md. 
MAHAR, PATRICK F., 

Box 67, Grandview, Wash. 
MARCHETTI, VICTOR J. 

Box 127, Sutter Creek, Cal. 
MARTIN, RALPH B., 

Hubbard, Ore. 
MILES, ROY A., 

Cimeron, Col. 
MILES, WILLIAM C, 

322 E. 4th St., Albany, N. Y. 
MOREHOUSE, WARREN D., 

Glasgow, Montana. 
NELSON, NICOLAI K., 

1803 Franklin Ave., Astoria, Ore. 
NICHOLS, RALPH, 

285 E. Morrison St., Portland, Ore. 
' OSBORN, ROY R., 

2515 Stanislaw St., Fresno, Cal. 
PALMERTON, CLAUDE R., 

665 Sherrett Ave., Portland, Ore. 
PEDRONI, ABBANDIO, 

460 Vallejo St., San Francisco, Cal. 
ROBINSON, ROBERT, 

1407 F. Ave., Douglas, Ariz. 
SCHEFFER, RAMALDOW, 

Reedley, Cal. 



Headquarters Company 



293 



PRIVATES— FIRST 

SCHOFIELD, RAY W., 
La Grande, Ore. 

SCOTT, GEORGE M., 

1840 McPhierson St., North Bend, 
Ore. 

SHEA, HOWARD R., 

1818 Lincoln St., Wilmington, Del. 

SIMONS, JASPER, 
Box 763, Eugene, Ore. 

SMITH, HAROLD A., 

122 W. Lanvale St., Baltimore, Md. 

SPJUT, HARRY, 

Marine on St. Croix, Minn. 

STOCK, FREDERICK J., 

Sumner, Ore. 
TANNEHILL, JOHN W., 

R. 6, Box 97, Jonesboro, Ark. 

THOMAS, BENJAMIN, 
Frostburg, Md. 



CLASS {Continued) 

TRETHEWEY, ERNEST W., 

700 W. Elm St., Lodi, Cal. 
VANDERWALL, RICHARD, 

661 Clarendon St., Portland, Ore. 
WALTERS, FRED H., 

1022 Buckingham St., Toledo, O. 
WALTERS, ROY, 

820 Motor Place, Seattle, Wash. 
WATKINS, LEWIS E., 

Mucca, Ariz. 
WELCH, BARNEY, 

Meeker, Col. 
WILLIAMS, WILKINS, 

Pendleton, Ore. 
WILSON, JOHN S., 

641 S. Main St., Akron, O. 
WILTON, WILLIAM R., 

701 Flatbush, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
WITTENBERG, ALBERT G., 

707 Vandever Ave., Wilmington, Del. 



PRIVATES 



BRADLEY, MILLARD F., 

Frostburg, Md. 
CAHILL, GEORGE C, 

19 Calhoun St., Mays Landing, N. J. 
CLARK, ERNEST, 

347 W. 141st St., N. Y. City. 
CLEVELAND, FRANCIS E., 

545 Washington St., Portland, Ore. 
CLICKMAN, EARL, 

Altamont, N. Y. 
CRUSAN, SAMUEL H., 

133 Home St., Pittsburg, Pa. 

DANTINI, WILLIAM, 

65 Bridge St., Amsterdam, N. Y. 

DAREE, EMERY, 

Belvedere, Pa. 
DEAVER, GEORGE L., 

North River Mills, W. Va. 

DE HAVEN, EPHRAIM, 
Ganotown, W. Va. 

DEMENT, WILLIAM, 

304 S. 14th St., Baltimore, Md. 

DORNON, CHARLES, 
Ripley, W. Va. 

ENGLEKEN, RUDOLPH C, 
1905 2nd Ave., Spokane, Wash. 

EZERNITSKY, SOL. 
360 St. Ann's Ave., N. Y. 



FIELDS, ROBERT, 

Lebanon, Va. 
FINN, WILLIAM F., 

1425 7th Ave., Watervliet, N. Y. 
FOLTZ, GUSTAVE, 

414 N. Broadway, Gloucester City, 
N.J. 
FOUTZ, WILLIAM F., 

Midland, Maryland 
FROST, CHARLES A., 

Tuxedo, N. Y. 
GALO, LOUIS P., 

220 White Ave., Astoria, N. Y. 
GAREAU, WILFRED A., 

29 High St., Green Island, N. Y. 
GARRETT, ARTHUR H., 

Coatsville, Pa. 
GARRISON, JAMES H., 

R. F. D. I, Box 36, Westernport, Md. 
GEORGE, WILLIAM H., 

Kline, W. Va. 
GILLESPIE, WALTER C, 

94 Chapin St., Canandaigua, N. Y. 
GINORDI, ANGELO, 

331 Pine St., Schenectady, N. Y. 
GOARCH, JAMES F., 

1609 2nd Ave., Watervliet, N. Y. 
GOULD, WILLIAM P., 

124 Park St., San Francisco, Cal. 



294 History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 



PRIVATES 

GREGG, CHARLES H., 

3005 Walnut St., AIcKeesport, Pa. 
GREEN WALT, FRANK R., 

Purgitsville, W. Va. 
HARMEYER, EDWARD L., 

1812 W. Pratt St., Baltimore, Md. 
HARMON, EDWARD H., 

633 N. 2nd St., Martinsburg, W. Va. 
HENDERLLNG, ALBERT, 

Cornelius, Ore. 
JAMES, WALTER S., 

66 Halleck St., Youngstown, Ohio. 
JOHNSON, CHARLES E., 

Bend, Ore. 
JOHNSON, CLAYTON E., 

Scappose, Ore. 
JOHNSTON, WILLL^M J., 

29 High St., Trenton, N. J. 
KELLEY, JOSEPH L., 

Wellersburg, Pa. 
KENNEDY, DAVID D., 

122 E. 25th St., Baltimore, Md. 
LAMP, JOHN H., 

418 Green St., Baltimore, Md. 
LAWS, JAMES H., 

Greenfield, Cal. 
LEENAN, WALTER, 

Greenfield, Cal. 
LEGEER, JOHN, 

Vale Summit, Md. 
LOWE, ELMER A., 

Westlake, Ore. 



(Continued) 

LUX, LOUIS, 

McMinnville, Ore. 
McFALL, EARLJ., 

Klamath Falls, Ore. 
MOFFATT, WILLIAM, 

Lonaconing, Md. 
NELSON, MARK H., 

6438 Newgard Ave., Chicago, 111. 
OLSON, ARTHUR H., 

Cascadia, Ore. 
PEDERSON, JOHNNIE, 

Eugene, Ore. 
PLUMMER, CHARLES E., 

R. F. D. 2, Box 2, Norfolk, Va. 
SANDVIK, VICTOR C, 

Eckhart Mines, Md. 
SCHRAMM, WILLIAM M., 

Frostburg, Md. 
SCHUMM, GEORGE L., 

4628 Fillmore St., Pittsburg, Pa. 
STROING, HENRY C, 

Red BluflF, Cal. 
• SULLIVAN, GEORGE W., 

2019 Homewood Ave., Baltimore, Md. 
TEDROW, JEWEL G., 

Veneta, Ore. 
WATTS, FRED. C, 

Eugene, Ore. 
WELLS, WALTER L., 

Owensmouth, Cal. 
WILSON, ROBERT W., 

287 N. 17th St., Portland, Ore. 



Machine Gun Company 

CAPTAINS 
PENDLETON, ALAN. HYDE, FREDERICK W. 

FIRST LIEUTENANTS 
LERCH, ARCHER L. STEPHENS, SAMUEL W. 

SECOND LIEUTENANTS 
CHANDLER, CYRIL C. O'CONNELL, FRANCIS A. 

FIRST SERGEANTS 

MEYERS, HENRY L. MENDEL, GEORGE, 

EKLOF, ARVID H. 323 York Ave., Paterson. New Jersey. 

TWISDALE, BERNARD J., Roanoke Rapids, North Carolina. 

MESS SERGEANTS 

PETERSON, CHARLES. MURPHY, JAMES, 

Park Ridge, New 
Jersey. 

SUPPLY SERGEANTS 

SUTTON, TOM. PLEASANTON, NORMAN S. 

TREWETT, OSCAR M., 119 E. Park St., Ontario, California. 

STABLE SERGEANTS 

AMBORD, ALBION. JOHNSON, LONIE, 

Huntington, West 
Virginia. 
BEARDEN, TOM, Biggers, Arkansas. 

SERGEANTS 

CHRISLU, GUS, FABRETTI, JOE, 

325 E. Weber St., Stockton, California. 294 N. Market St., San Jos6, Cal. 

DAVIS, FRANK S., GRAYSON, WILLIAM N. 

1308 6th St., Berkeley, California. HENDERSON, JAMES W., 

DENNIS, HUGH A. Campbell, Missouri. 

ELDERKIN, ANDREW C. JOHNSTON, WILFORD. 

295 



296 History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 



JONES, JOHN P., 

235 E 34th St., Portland, Oregon. 

LENZLEY, HERMAN J. 

MOBLEY, HARLAN, 
Selleck, Washington. 

PARKS, ROY E., 

Route "A," Santa Clara, California. 

PLACE, EARL J., 
Chicago, Illinois. 



RODDY, JOHN, 

3008 Throop St., Chicago, Illinois. 
SCHENKEL, ALBERT R., 

Route 7, Stockton, California. 
SIMON, MAX, 

510 S. Warren St., Trenton, New Jersey. 
SIMOND, REYNOLDS J. 
SUWALSKI, MICHAEL. 
WEIMAN, ANDREW J., 

Buffalo, New York. 



CORPORALS 



BAKER, EARL L., 

R. F. D. No. 4, Neodesha, Kansas. 
BORSIAN, OSCAR, 

874 32nd St., Milwaukee, Wisconsin. 
CARNEY, THOS. J. 
CARMEN, ERWIN. 
CHENEY, EVERETT W. 
COLLINS, CLARENCE A. 
CORY, CLYDE E., 

R. F. D. No. 5, Salem, Oregon. 
DAVIS, WILLIAM N., 

338 N. Main St., Memphis, Tenn. 
DYCHE,JESSEJ., 

loth Floor Broadway Bldg. c/o Elli- 
son-White, Portland, Ore. 
DYKSTRA, CHARLES S., 

Heppner, Oregon. 
EDWARDS, GEORGE T., 

1868 Allesandro St., Los Angeles, Cal. 
FAUBION, LAWRENCE A., 

280 Larrabee St., Portland, Oregon. 
GEPPERT, FRED F., 

491 E. 47th St., N., Portland, Oregon. 
HALD, EDWIN C, 

iiii H St., Lincoln, Nebraska. 
HANNS, STEPHEN J., 

Coburg, Oregon. 



HAYNES, WALTER S., 

c/o Capitol Bldg., Richmond, Virginia, 

JOHNSON, MARTIN, 
Bredbyn, Sweden. 

JONES, HARRY L., 

Gen. Delivery, Portland, Oregon, 
MOTIEJUNAS, ADOLPH. 
PORTER, JESSE C, 

Auburn, Washington. 

POUND, JOHN L., 
Aztec, N. Mexico. 

PUCKETT, LEE, 

Imboden, Arkansas. 
PUTNAM, HORTON, 

R. F. D. No. 3, Snyder, Oklahoma. 

RADEMACHER, VALENTINE, N. 
220 Pierce St., San Francisco, Cal. 

SANDERS, FRANK W., 

Campbellsville, Kentucky. 

SCHMOLINSKY, EDWARD, 

SHOOK, JOHN. 

STEWART, ERNEST, 
San Francisco, California. 

TOLSMA, JOHN. 

WHITE, FRED L. 



SADDLER 
EDWARDS, ROBERT 



COOKS 



BOND, JAMES E., 

41 Brooklyn St., Cleveland, Ohio. 
CAMP, LAWRENCE. 
GRAY, WILLIAM. 
SCHULTZ, DANIEL G., 

Gen. Delivery, Philadelphia, Penn. 



WELTON, WILL A., 
McGregor, Iowa. 

JAMEAN, JAMES M., 
Haines, Oregon. 

FOGLESONG, JESSE C, 
1000 E St., Lawton, Okla. 



Machine Gun Company 



297 



HORSESHOER 

CAUDILL, JEFF, Wooten, Kentucky. 

MECHANICS 

STUBBLEFIELD, JESSE L., JEHAN, FRANCIS, 

Bakersfield, California. 56 Gregory St., New Haven, Conn. 

SAUERVEIN, GEORGE, Columbia City, Oregon 



CAMERON, VERNON F. 
PRITCHARD, GUY. 



BUGLERS 



JOHNSTON, LYLE, 

Wabasha, Minnesota. 
CORNISH, WALTER C, 
c/o Mrs. Staples, 12th 
and Mission, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. 



PRIVATES 



ANDERSON, HENRY L. 
APPLEWHITE, GUY. 
ARCHER, GEORGE P., 

Box 746, Taft, Calif. 
AURBACH, HARRY, 

192 N. 22nd St., Portland, Oregon 
BELL, DANA C. 
BINGHAM, EDWARD, 

Union, Oregon. 
BLAZEK, WENCIL, 

4046 Tacoma Ave., S. Portland, Ore. 
BOLLENBAUGH, D. C, 

Canyonville, Oregon. 
BOLLENBAUGH, RALPH, 

Canyonville, Oregon. 
BOWDERN, HARRY G. 
BRAISTED, WILLIAM F. 
BRESKO, VICTOR, 

R. F. D. No. 2, Woodburn, Oregon. 
BROWN, DANIEL B. 
BYRNE, JAMES B., 

422 San Rafael St., Portland, Oregon. 
CALLEN, LeROY, 

Williams, California. 
CAMBOURI, MANUEL, 

Afando St., Aegean Sea, Rhodes, Italy. 
CASTEEL, JOSEPH P., 

Temple, Texas. 
CHILDERS, RALPH V., 

2000 Mariposa Ave., Los Angeles, Cal. 
CHILSON, BENJAMIN, 

Vida, Oregon. 
CLARK, GEORGE W., 

976 Sherman St., Portland, Oregon. 



CLAVER, PAUL R. 
COOK, WILLIAM. 
CRAVEN, WHITSON B., 

386 S. Ohio Ave., Columbus, Ohio. 
CUNHA, ERNEST, 

1675 15th St., Oakland, California. 
DANE, HARRY O. 
DAVIS, ALVA J., 

R. F. D. No. 3, Sherwood, Oregon. 
DAVIS, BENJAMIN. 
DEMASTERS, LEMUEL. 

Salem, Oregon. 
DOUGLAS, EDWARD H., 

Rickreal, Oregon. 
DUFFY, LESLIE, 

1238 E. Flora St., Stockton, Calif. 
EHMKE, ALFRED J. F., 

12 15 Waldron Ave., Winona, Min- 
nesota. 
FALTUS, CHARLES, 

Scio, Oregon. 
FERRY, SAM, 

329 E. 8th St., Portland, Oregon. 

FLEMING, WELLS. 

GAGE, WILLIAM A. 
Cloverdale, Oregon. 

GAGEN, LEONARD H., 

637 Myers St., Portland, Ore". 
GARDNER, EARL N. 

GESKE, ERNEST J., 
Manawa, Wisconsin. 

GOSSETT, ANDREW J., 

4104 E. 64th St., Portland, Oregon. 



298 History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 



PRIVATES 

GRUBBS, ELMER W., 

Enterprise, Calif. 
HANEY, DONALD P. 
HAMNETT, HARRY C, 

1029 Garfield Ave., Portland, Oregon. 
HASKELL, CHESTER M., 

R. F. D., No. 2, Portland, Oregon. 
HATFIELD, HENRY A. 
HENTRICHS, GEORGE E., 

134 S. Downing St., Piqua, Ohio. 
HERFI, CHARLIE, 

Hamilton City, California. 
HINES, JOSEPH A., 

253 Hedges St., Tiffin, Ohio. 
HOBBS, HOWARD A., 

Marriotsville, Maryland. 
HOLLENBECK, ELMER I., 

21 10 9th St., Berkeley, California. 
HOLZAPFEL, FRED. 
HUGHES, JOHN M. 
HUTCHESON, RAY R., 

1905 Auburn Ave., Cincinnati, Ohio. 
JOHNSON, DUDLEY W., 

Neodesha, Kansas. 
JOHNSON, HUYSON, 

47 E. Baltimore St., Detroit, Michigan. 
JOHNSON, JOHN A., 

R. F. D. No. 4, Gresham, Oregon. 
JOHNSON, JOHN L., 

Pendleton, Oregon. 
JOLLY, ROLAND W., 

572 Maple St., Portland, Oregon, 
KEMP, WILSON. 
KENT, JOHN, 

275 Turk St., San Francisco, Calif. 
KIMBALL, GEORGE L. 
KIRKPATRICK, WILLIAM. 
LAMBERT, EDWARD A., 

St. Helens, Oregon. 
LANDRETH, ERNEST L., 

622 >^ Elm St., Greensboro, North 
Carolina. 
LANE, FRANK, 

Three Springs, Pennsylvania. 
LANGAN, WILLIAM. 
LARSON, OSCAR S., 

Brothers, Oregon. 

LaTOUR, FREDERICK E., 

404 6th St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 

LAUENROTH, HERMAN, 

138 Jefferson St., Brooklyn, New York. 



(Continued) 

LAWRENCE, JOHN W., 

2903 East Orleans St., Baltimore, Md. 
LESER, JOSEPH J., 

1518 Nicollet Ave., Minneapolis, Minn. 
LEWIS, FRANK M., 

312 S. Raleigh St., Martinsburg, West 
Va. 
LINGLEBACH, FRANK J., 

R. F. D. No. I, Est^cada, Oregon. 
LINZ, INNOCENT J., 

3509 Foster Ave., Baltimore, Md. 
LINZ, JOHN, 

3509 Foster Ave., Baltimore, Md. 
LITERSKI, ANTON C, 

507 S. Lakewood Ave., Baltimore, Md. 
LOEFFLER, CHRISTIAN F., 

2509 Foster Ave., Baltimore, Md. 
LOHR, WILLIAM. 
LUNN, JOHN M., 

Joy, Illinois. 
LYNCH, JOHN F., 

West Point, New York. 
McCABE, MICHAEL A., 

30 4th St., Haverstraw, New York. 

mccullough, george h. 
McDonald, frank j., 

825 N. Howard St., Baltimore, Md. 

Mcdonald, george e., 

Merrill, Michigan. 

McELVANY, WELLES W., 

705 E. Fort Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

McGETTIGAN, JOHN, 

1207 E. 9th St., Eddystone, Penn- 
sylvania. 

McGovern, peter J., 

301 Taylor St., New Castle, Penn- 
sylvania. 
McGRATH, BERNARD, 

Colliers, Conception Bay, Newfound- 
land. 

Mckinley, norval c, 

150 W. 122nd St., New York, New 
York. 

mcmann, henry D., 

327 Benyz St., Frederick, Maryland. 

McMANUS, WILLIAM, 

Main St., Mt. Kisco, New York. 

McNUTT, WILLARD, 

R. F. D. No. 4, Portland, Indiana. 

MADISON, ALBERT, 
Hadley, New York. 



Machine Gun Company 



299 



PRIVATES 

MAHAN, GEORGE, 

Trenton, New Jersey. 
MAHAR, JEREMIAH P., 

121 25th St., Watervliet, New York. 
MANNION, JOHN J., 

71 A Portola Ave., San Francisco, Calif. 
MARKELL, BERNARD, 

Baltimore, Maryland. 
MARKIN, ORLEN M., 

R. F. D. No. 2 Box 45, Milton, West 
Virginia. 
MARSHALL, GEORGE P., 

737 9th St., N. W. Washington, D. C. 
MARTIN, JOSEPH, 

Camas, Washington. 
MATHEWS, HARRY H., 

1018 Mission St., San Francisco, Calif. 
MEADOWS, ARVEL B. 
MILLER, BERNARD N., 

R. F. D. No. 2, Woodbum, Oregon. 
MILLS, JOHN R., 

1312 State St., Salem, Oregon. 
MOORHEAD, HENRY W., 

International Falls, Minnesota. 
NAVONI, JAMES A., 

R. F. D. No. 3, Napa, California. 
NEAL EDGAR. 
NORTON, ARTHUR T., 

272 Farralones St., San Francisco, 
Calif. 
O'NEILL, WILLIAM N., 

1 65 1 Mkt. St., San Francisco, Calif. 
PARKS, ELFONZO R., 

Route A, Box 262, Santa Clara, Calif. 
PAYNE, MATT, 

Mitchell, Oregon. 
PETTERSON, VICTOR M. 
PHELAN, JAMES A., 

Menominee, Michigan. 
PIERCE, PERCY H. 
POWERS, EDWIN W., Jr., 

Salem, Oregon. 

PURSELL, CHESTER R.. 
Ruch, Oregon. 

RADDONT, ERICK R., 

20 Monroe St., San Francisco, Calif. 

ROBB, HARRY C. 

ROGERS, DAVID W., 

Ashland, Nebraska. 
SATTERLEE, PAUL E. 

427 W. 2nd Ave., Flint, Michigan. 



(Continued) 

SAULSER, EDWARD L. 
SCHAFFENBERG, HANS H., 

Sherwood, Oregon. 
SCHMITT, EDWIN A., 

Columbus, Nebraska. 
SCHOPPERT, PETER, 

R. F. D. No. I, Clackamas, Oregon. 
SCHROEDER, LEONARD G. A., 

514 Flint St., Portland, Oregon. 
SEIFFERT, EMIL F., 

R. F. D. No. 2, Hillsboro, Oregon. 
SHANKLIN, CLARENCE F. 
SINCLAIR, GLEN E. 
SLOPER, GUY R., 

Pendleton, Oregon. 
SMITH, CECIL L., 

Dallas, Oregon. 
SMITH, HUBERT A., 

Rogue River, Oregon. 
STARK, ALBERT, 

R. F. D. No. 2, Portland, Oregon. 
STEVENSON, ROBERT. 
STINNETT, FRED W., 

R. F. D. No. 2, Dallas, Oregon. 
STOVALL, ROBERT A., 

541 W. Main St., Ontario, Calif. 
SUDBROCK, VIRGIL E., 

La Grande, Oregon. 
SULLIVAN, JOSEPH. 
SWIFT, JUDSON F. 
TAUB, WILLIAM, 

600 E. Baltimore St., Baltimore, Md. 
TURNER, BYRON, 

Rising Star, Texas. 
UPMEYER, THEO. 

Harrisburg, Oregon. 
VEIRRA, JOHN, Jr., 

San Jose, California. 
VOGL, LEON A., 

Marcola, Oregon. 
VOLLE, REUBEN W., 

Heppner, Oregon. 
WAGNER, EDWARD C. 
WAGNER, EARL E., 

3620 Central Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

WALDEN, OLIVER S., 

R. F. D. No. 2, Medford, Oregon. 

WATSON, JOHN H. 

WAYNE, PAUL T., 

1940 Lovelace Ave., Los Angeles, 
Cahf. 



300 History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 



WEIDMAN, BERYL, 

Camas, Washington. 

WEITMAN, HUGH F., 

Aumsville, Oregon. 
WELLMAN, LEO J., 

Scotts Mills, Oregon. 
WELLS, EARL L., 

Blitzen, Oregon. 
WHEELER, MANUEL L. 
WHITE, DON C, 

Stella, Washington. 



PRIVATES {Continued) 

WIDMER, FRANK. 
WILLIAMS, MACK D., 

Grove Springs, Missouri. 
WILSON, ROBERT, 

1 1 79 30th St., Oakland, California. 
WILTON, LAWRENCE G., 

Wheeler, Oregon. 
WRIGHT, THOMAS F., 

206 Hickory St., Carterville, Illinois. 
YASSENOFF, DAVE, 

13 Jones St., Dayton, Ohio. 



Supply Company 



CLARK, HOWARD J. 



CAPTAINS 



FIRST LIEUTENANTS 



CLIFFORD, RAYMOND W. 
CONWAY, WILLIAM L. 



SHREVE, ARCHIE C. 



VESTAL, MARION P. 



WAYTE, HAROLD C. 
HARRIS, FISHER S. 



MADDEN, JAMES H. 
LINDQUIST, FRED C. 



SECOND LIEUTENANTS 



REINKIN, ERNEST J. 



THOMASON, VICTOR. 
GERMER, WILL H. 



ENLISTED MEN 



ANDERSON, ANDY, 

U. S. Army. 
ANDERSON, ERNEST, 

1344 Lawrence St., Eugene, Oregon. 
ANDERSON, FRANK E., 

Canby, Oregon. 

ANDERSON, OSCAR, 
U. S. Army. 

ANDERSON, WILLIAM, 

28 K St., Sacramento, California. 

ARAGON, MARIANO. 
Albuquerque. New Mexico. 

AUE, EARL R., 
U. S. Army. 

AUGUSTSON, GUST A., 
U. S. Army. 

BACIGALUPI, GIOVANNI, 

1325 San Bruno Ave., San Francisco. 
Calif. 

BARDEZBANIAN, SIMON M., 
304 E St.. Fresno, California. 

BARNETT JOHN W., 
Elmore City, Okla. 



BATTAGLIA DIEGO. 

Hawthorne & Union Ave., Portland, 
Oregon. 
BEESON, RICHARD W., 

Coburg, Ore. 

BELLOTTI, ELIGIO, 
Metropolitan, Calif. 

BIERNE, JOHN, 

U. S. Army. 

BISHOP, AUGUSTUS H., 
Westwood, California. 

BISHOP, JOE, 
U. S. Army. 

BLACK, ARTHUR C, 

San Francisco, Calif. 
BLACKMER, CHARLES P., 

19 Wilton St., Springfield, Mass. 

BLANTON, MARION, 

R. F. D. No. 3, Eugene, Ore. 

BLATT, SAM, 
239 West Ave., Kankakee, 111. 

BOMMEN, PAUL C, 
U. S. Affmy. 



301 



302 History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 



BOUCHER. JOHN J., 

Denver, Colorado. 
BORGOGNI, VINCENZO, 

407 Market St., Portland, Oregon. 
BOROUGH, SEDLEY F., 

Wilderville, Ore. 
BROWN, ARTHUR E., 

851 Monroe St., Red Bluflf, Calif. 
BOYD. ALEXANDER, 

U. S. Army. 
BUFFO, ANTONIO, 

U. S. Army. 
BULL, GEORGE W., 

U. S. Army. 
BUNTON, OSCAR M., 

U. S. Army. 
BURNETT, EUGENE R., 

Orland, Glenn Co., Cal. 
BUSS, FRED. 

Canary, Oregon. 
CALDWELL, GEORGE W., 

114 West 1st Ave., North, Roseburg, 
Oregon. 
CAVAGNERO, TILLO, 

530 13th St., Modesto, California. 
CERMAK, LOUIS, 

1053 E. 49th Place, Los Angeles, Calif. 
CHENKOVICH, TONY, 

East Helena, Montana. 
CHRISTESEN, LAWRENCE, 

4331 Prairie Ave., Chicago, 111. 
CHRISTENSON, ALVIN S., 

856 Ogden Ave., Bend, Oregon. 
CHRISTOPHER, HENRY N., 

41 1 Harrison St., Portland, Oregon. 
CLAUSON, LARS J., 

U. S. Army. 
CLOUD, WILLIAM L., 

2519 Lombard St., San Francisco, 
Cahf. 

COCHRAN, WILFRED H., 

Holley, Oregon. 
COLE, ALVA W. 

U. S. Army. 
COLE, EDWARD C, 

Las Molinos, Calif. 
CONARTY, THEODORE J., 

Sparks, Nevada. 
COOK, LEMMIE R., 

Butte Falls, Oregon. 
COSTA, MANUEL F., 

San Jose, Calif. 



ENLISTED MEN (Continued) 

CRASE, FRANK E., 



U. S. Army. 
CRAWLEY, LEE R., 

San Francisco, Calif. 
CURTIS, EARL H., 

426 3rd St., Yuma Arizona. 
CUSHMAN, WILLIAM E., 

Trail, Jackson Co., Oregon. 
DARNER, SETH A., 

U. S. Army. 
DAVIS, ELMER. 

Independence, Oregon. 
DAVIS, WESLEY C, 

Ceres, Stanislaus Co., California. 
DAY, CHARLES W., 

Dinuba, Calif. 
DeJONG, JOHN, 

166 3rd St., San Francisco, Calif. 
DeLONG, VIRGIL G., 

Portland, Oregon. 
DEVENCENZI, LUIGI, 

70 Gilbert St., San Francisco, Calif. 
DEVLIN, MARK F., 

441 Madrid St., San Francisco, Calif. 
DITTMAN, HENRY W., 

28 Alvarado St., San Francisco, Calif. 
DIVINE, CHARLES W., 

3315 Viola St., Oakland, Calif. 
DRIGGARS, JOHN B., 

New Wilson, Okla. 
ECKSTEIN, HENRY W., 

158 No. Curley St., Baltimore, Mary- 
land. 
EDMUNDS, ARTHUR J., 

U. S. Army. 
EDWARDS, JASPER V., 

Condon, Oregon. 
EFKIEWICZ, ANDROW, 

U. S. Army. 
ELLERBE, NORMAN M., 

1 1 13 2 1st St. Winston-Salem, N. C. 
ELLIS JACK, 

423 North 3rd St., Birmingham, Ala. 
ELLISON, EARL, 

U. S. Army. 
EMERALD, DOMINGO B. 
EVANS, ARTHUR E. J., 

U. S. Army. 
EVERHART, JOHN W., 

300 Baker St., San Francisco, Calif. 
FARLEY, ROY, 

121 Locust St., San ]os6, California, 



Supply Company 



303 



ENLISTED MEN {Continued) 

FINLEY, HARRY H., 

329 So. Grant St., San Francisco, Calif 
FREEMAN, GEORGE H., 

2721 Bush St., San Francisco Calif., 



FRENCH, CHESTER, 

U. S. Army. 
FRICKS, FRANK, 

U. S. Army. 
FROST, ALBERT, 

Coupeville, Washington. 
GALLAGHER, PATRICK, 

Lompoc, Santa Barbara, Calif. 
CANS, JOHANNES W. 

U. S. Army. 
GARBARINI, PETE 

U. S. Army. 
GILL, NICHOLAS, 

Boring, Maryland. 
GILLILAND, EDWARD L., 

2524 Charlestown St., Matoon III. 
GILROY, JOHN L., 

U. S. Army. 
GOODMAN, HARVEY J., 

2047 5th St., Portsmouth, Ohio. 
GORREIN, HARRY B., 

U. S. Army. 
GOSTLIN, JOHN H., 

U. S. Army. 
GOTELLI, BOB, 

201 Ellsworth St., San Francisco, Calif. 
COVER, CARL, 

Palma Sola, Fla. 
COVER, GILBERT, 

U. S. Army. 
GRABOWSKI, PETER P., 

U. S. Army, 
GRANDON, HAROLD, 

U. S. Army. 
GRAYMAN, GEORGE H., 

U. S. Army. 
GREGORY, BONNIE H., 

U. S. Army. 
GREGORY, CLYDE W., 

Maxwell, California. 
GRENSLER, HARRY R., 

U. S. Army. 
GRIFFIN, TROY E., 

U. S. Army. 

GRIFFON, JOHN EVERETT, 
U. S. Army. 

GRIMM, ERNEST J., 
U. S. Army. 



GUIST, EARL H., 

U. S. Army. 
HAGEDORN, FLOYD A., 

U. S. Army. 
HAMMACK, ROY E. R. R., 

No. I Perris, Calif. 
HANDLE, GEORGE F., 

U. S. Army. 
HARDESTY, ERNEST B., 

U. S. Army. 
HELMS, WILLIAM J., 

Elkton, Oregon. 
HERRINGTON, LOU I., 

U. S. Army. 
HILDEBRANDT, JAMES L., 

Baltimore, Md. 
HINAULT, RAOUL, 

U. S. Army. 
HIXENBAUGH, JOHN M., 

Grafton, West Virginia. 
HOFFMAN, OLIN H., 

3203 North Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 
HOLLIS, CLARENCE W., 

U. S. Army. 
HOLMES, CARROLL E., 

50 So. Arlington Ave., Baltimore, Md. 
HOLMES, CHARLES E., 

181 1 Barclay St., Baltimore, Md. 
HOUSEMAN, RALPH B., 

U. S. Army. 
HULBERT, HOWARD, 

330 9th St., Troy, New York. 
HURLEY, JAMES L., 

527 Amethyst St., Los Angeles, Calif. 
HYET, FRANK M., 

1 134 Eoff St., WheeHng, W. Va. 
INGRAM, THOMAS M., 

Romace, W. Va. 
INMAN, HUGH, 

R. F. D. No. 7, Sweetwater, Tenn. 
INSKEEP, WILLIAM W., 

U. S. Army. 
JOBB, JOE L., 

Peell, Washington. 
JOHNSON, ELBERT H., 

Swan, Oregon. 
JOHNSON, FRANK M., 

U. S. Army. 

JOHNSON, LAWRENCE E., 
U. S. Army. 

JOHNSON, SAMUEL, 
U. S. Army. 



304 History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 



ENLISTED 

KAMIN.ABE, 

620 East 4th St., Chester, Pa. 
KAST, FRANCIS H. 

U. S. Army. 
KELLY, EDWARD, 

309 27th St., W., Baltimore, Md. 
KERSTEN, JOSEPH F., 

U. S. Army. 
KING, HARVEY A., 

728 East Preston St., Baltimore, Md. 
KING. JOHN T., 

735 South Lucerne St., Baltimore, Md 
KING, OSCAR R., 

U. S. Army. 
KLNjG, WALTER, 

1903 So. Kedzie Ave., Chicago, III. 
KING, WARREN, 

U. S. Army. 
KINNUNEN, EMANUEL, 

U. S. Army. 
KIRACOFE, JESSE R., 

U. S. Army. 
KLEEMAN, CHARLES W., 

41 N. Court, Redding, California. 
KOLB, WILLIAM B., 

1525 Bank St., Baltimore, Md. 
KOLBECHER, JOSEPH C, 

U. S. Army. 

KOHNHORST, WILLIAM F., 

Washington, D. C. 
LAGOMARSINO, LOUIS, 

437 Utah St., San Francisco, Calif. 
LAM, GUY, 

U. S. Army. 
LAMP, SIMMIE D., 

Mellin, W. Va. 
LASSIG, LOUIS, 

U. S. Army. 
LAURIN, ALBERT, 

583 Vienna St., San Francisco, Calif. 
LEE, BENJAMIN F., 

U. S. Army. 
LEE, CLARENCE E., 

Lompoc, California, 

LONG, HENRY H., 

R. R. No. 2, Ornogo, Missouri. 
LUBER, FRANK M., 

Union Morrell Park, Halethorpe, Md. 
LUCERO, FRANK P., 

U. S. Army. 
LUSBY, WILLIAM, 

Corinth, Ky. 



MEN (Continued) 

McCANDLESS, GEORGE M., 
Eagle Harbor, Washington. 

McCartney, charley a., 

Solvang, California. 
McDERMOTT, JOHN P., 

U. S. Army. 
McLEOD, JOHN J., 

1437 McAllister St., San Francisco 
CaHf. 

MARBACH, EMIL, 

U. S. Army. 
MATROW, HENRY J., 

R. F. D. No. 2, Junction City, Kan. 
MELVILLE, DAVID M., 

Gold Beach, Oregon. 
MEYERS, JAMES W., 

U. S. Army. 
MICHENER, LAWRENCE W., 

Home Valley, Calif, 
MOLINARI, LOUIS A., 

2021 15th St., San Francisco, Calif. 
NEWMAN, WALTER E., 

Sierraville, California. 
NICHOL, JOHN M., 

1296 S. Main St., Chico, Calif. 
O'CONNOR, JAMES J., 

109 Pierce Avenue San Jos6, Cali- 
fornia. 
OLIVER, BEN R., 

2749 Union St., San Francisco, Calif. 
OLIVER, RICHARD E., 

Suisun, Solano Co., Calif. 
ONTIVEROS, ROMAN, 

Santa Maria, California, 
ORTEGA, TOM M., 

M. V. R. Box 443, Oxnard, Calif. 
OVIEDA, LONYES, 

727 Bond Ave., Santa Barbara, 
Calif. 

PARDEE, SAMUEL, 
U. S. Army. 

PAYTON, GUY W., 
San Francisco, Calif. 

PECK, EVERETT, 
U. S. Army. 

PECK, RAYMOND A., 
U. S. Army. 

PLACE, GEORGE, 

301 Lower Terrace St., San Francisco, 
Calif. 

POILES, DOSS, 
U. S. Army. 



Supply Company 



305 



ENLISTED MEN (CoDtmued) 



PORTER, DAVID D., 

96 S. 8th St., Kenmore, Ohio. 
POUNCEY, KIRBY C, 

U. S. Army. 
POWERS, WILLIAM I., 

West B. Street, Grants Pass, Ore. 
REYNOLDS, JOHN P., 

Cedarville, Calif. 
ROBLES, JOED., 

42 Yale St., Santa Paula, California. 
ROBITCH, CHARLES C, 

Star Route, Hemlock, Oregon. 
ROGOWSKI, BEN 

McAdoo, Pa. 
SCHUSTER, CHARLES H.. 

Fresno Hotel, Fresno, California. 
SHARRY, PATRICK, 

829 Erie St., Havre De Grace, Md. 
SHIPMAN, ROBERT C, 

Nogales, Arizona. 
SLATER, CLAUD M., 

Colonial Hotel, Taft, California. 
SMITH, WALLACE D., 

Escondido, California. 
SNIDER, GEORGE C, 

Campbell, Missouri. 
SRONCE, ROBERT W., 

U. S. Army. 
STALLINGS, CLAUD B., 

U. S. Army. 
STANIULIS, SIMON J., 

3339 Union Ave., Chicago, 111. 
STANLEY, FLOYD L., 

Mayger, Oregon. 
STELMER, ANTHONY. 

Du Boise, 111. 
STEPHENS, BUNYAN, 

Dinuba, California. 
SULLIVAN, WALTER L., 



244 Mangels 
Calif. 



Ave., San Francisco, 



TERRELL, ERNEST, 

U. S. Army. 
TERRY, SETH W., 

30 Sycamore, St., 
Calif. 

TERRY, WILBUR I., 
LaSalle, Colorado. 

THOMAS, GLENN O., 
U. S. Army. 



San Francisco, 



TINGER, ERNEST, 

U. S. Army. 
TORTORA. ANGELO. 

Farantum. Pa. 
TOZZI, GEREMIA, 

Box 287, Lincoln, California. 
TRULSON, CHARLIE E., 

U. S. Army. 
VARELAS, PETER N., 

243 West 36th St.. New York. 
VIRGILIO, PIETRO, 

Bitrieto, Italy. 
VOGEL, GEORGE, 

845 Belt Ave., Baltimore, Md. 
WATSON, SAMUEL J., 

Atwater, California. 
WELLS, ROLLIE A., 

Owensmouth, California. 
WELLS, TONY. 

Onyx, California. 
WEIGERT, ALBERT, 

U. S. Army. 
WEST, NELCE, 

U. S. Army. 
WICKS, WILLIAM C, 

U. S. Army. 
WILLIAMS, JAMES T., 

Carriville, Calif. 
WINKLER, GEORGE, 

366 Park St., San Francisco, Calif. 
WISE, RAY F., 

Ironside. Oregon. 
WOLFSKILL, CLARENCE C, 

Suisun, California. 
WOOD, STEPHEN A., 

U. S. Army. 
WORTHINGTON, HUGH S., 

U. S. Army. 
WORTMAN, GEORGE, 

Phoenix, Arizona. 
YOUNG, OSCAR M., 

Haynes, Oregon. 
YELLAND, CHARLES R., 

301 S. Grant, Stockton, California. 
YUHA, FRANK J., 

San Francisco, Cal. 
ZUERN, ALFRED G., 

U. S. Army. 
ZURRO, JOSEPH, 

218 Hopkins St., Jersey City, N. J. 



Medical Department 



DALTON. E. C. 
Portland, Ore. 



MAJORS 



BAIRD, THOMPSON M., Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 



CLAY, H. E., 
Salem, Ore. 



REEVES, A. KARL, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

MERTZ, EZRA F., 
Colfax, Washington. 



CRAWFORD, WILLIAM S., 

Fort Lawn, S. C. 
HARDY, IRVING R., 

192 Bay St., Taunton, Mass. 
COMBS, MASON, 

Pineville, Ky. 
HALL, EUGENE, 

El Paso, Texas. 
MALCOM, ROBERT, 

New York, N. Y. 
MOE, CHESTER C, 

Chicago, 111. 
BUSHLEY, LOUISE., 

New York, N. Y. 
DUFFY, MAURICE J., 

New York, N. Y. 



CAPTAINS 

COLLINS, FRANK H. 

.San Diego, Cal. 
HEWSON, JAMES S., 

374 Avon Ave., New- 
ark, N. J. 

LIEUTENANTS 

SLATTERY, FRANCIS J., 
New York, N. Y. 

MURPHY, FRANK A., 

4th Fruit St., Taunton, Mass. 

MOORE, THOMAS F., 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

STANLEY, CHARLES C, 
Charlotteville, N. Y. 

DUNN, LAWRENCE J., 
New York, N. Y. 

WAYMAN, LEON H., 
Charlotteville, N. Y. 

BROWNE, JUDSON F., 

1037 N. Goodman St., Rochester, 
N. Y. 



CHAPLAINS 

DUNHAM, J. H., OGEL, MELVIN V. 

2109 G. St., N. W., Wash., D. C. New York, N. Y., 

DESMOND, DANIEL P., Boston, Mass. 



SERGEANTS 



LEGAN, WILLIAM, 
223 East 7th St., Bloomsburg, Pcnn. 



MIELKE, HARRY, 
Milwaukee, Wis. 



306 



Medical Department 



307 



SERGEANTS- 



SANFORD, TAY A., 

Richmond, Calif. 
TOBIN, WILLIAM, 

Brooklyn N. Y. 
MARDORFF, WILLIAM T., 

9th Paca St., Cumberland, Md. 



-{Continued) 

MAGNER, MICHAEL, 

New York, N. Y. 
WILSON, ROSS C. 

Woodland, Calif. 
DILLON, CORNELIUS S. 

Eugene, Oregon. 



CORPORALS 



WILLIAMS, LAWRENCE B., 
122 Winthrop St., Taunton, Mass. 



DeJORIE, VICTOR F. 
25 Morningside Ave. 
New York City. 



PRIVATES— FIRST CLASS 



BOGOESS, WILLIAM A., 

Union, Utah. 
BOLTON, STERLING A., 

205 >2 Morrison St., Portland, Oregon. 
BRANSON, GORDON, 

Manning, Iowa. 
BROWN, HARRY H., 

Newton, Kan. 
CADLE, ELVIS L., 

Weed, Calif. 
DELLA VALL, JOSEPH, 

155 South 5th St., West Salt Lake City, 
Utah. 
DILLARD, LOUIS A., 

Portland, Oregon. 
ERIN, EDWARD A., 

Newton, Kansas. 
FLAKE, HUGHE, 

Fresno, CaHf. 
GARRISON, CLARENCE C, 

Circleville, Ohio. 
GAYLORD, GEORGE A., 

Portland^ Oregon. 
HARRIS, EMMANUEL, 

San Francisco, Calif. 



HENDERSON. ELMER E. 

Forkville, Ala. 
KAH, OSCAR F., 

Portsmouth, Ohio. 
MARTIN, JAMES A., 

R. F. D., Box 260, Sacramento, 
Calif. 
MILLER, CLARENCE A., 

Portland, Oregon. 
MOSS, FRED H., 

Defiance, Ohio. 
NUBER, EDWIN J., 

879 Linewood Ave., Columbus, Ohio. 
PERRY, ALFRED J., 

Oakland, Calif. 
PRESTON, JOHN C, 

Glasgow, Scotland. 
TRAVERS, EDWARD, 

North Woodbury, Conn. 
WALLACH, JACOB, 

New York City. 
WEISBERG, SAMUEL H., 

Revere, Mass. 
YOUNG, CECIL G., 

Salem, Mass. 



PRIVATES 



AMMOROSIA, JOHN, 

New York City. 
AUSTIN, MATHEW A., 

Varian, Cal. 
BAKER, GEORGE. 

Lincoln, Neb. 
BARRON, GORDON A. 

Inken, Idaho. 
BERKLAND, EDHAR, 

Lincoln, Neb, 



BRIGHT, DAVID T., 
Troy, Tenn. 

BRUSS, OTTO, 

R. R. No. 6, Sta. C, 
waukee. Wis. 

BRYANT, JAMES, 
Jersey City, N. J. 

BYINGTON, LOUIS F., 
Pocotallo, Idaho, 



Box 280 B, Mil- 



308 



History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 



EVANS, ROSCOE D. 

Petaluma, Calif. 
FRAME, ARCHIE J., 

EI Centre Calif. 
GANNON, GEORGE D., 

Lincoln, Neb. 
HAIRSTON, WILLIAxM C, 

Isala, Miss. 
HOBSON, HENRY, 

Portland, Oregon. 
HOUT, OTIS, 

Cincinnati, Ohio. 
KLINGER, OLIVER H., 

New York City, 
LEIGHTEN, BEN C, 

New York, N. Y. 
LESCHINSKY, MICHAEL, 

Old Forge, Pa. 
LYONS, JAMES S., 

Astoria, L. I., N. Y. 
McCOY, JOSEPH A., 

New York City. 
McDANIEL, VANCE J. 

Portsmouth, Ohio. 
McKIN, ARTHUR W. 

Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. 
MAGSON, EDWARD, 

New York City. 
MILES, ROBERT E., 

Portland, Oregon. 

MIX, STANLEY, 

New York City, 
MULLER, GEORGE, 

Milwaukee, Wis. 



PRIVATES {Continued) 

MURPHY, THOMAS J., 

Urbana, Ohio. 
NEACE, HARVEY, 

Hutchinson, Kans 
NUBER, EDWIN J., 

Columbus, Ohio. 
O'DONNELL, WILLIAM P., 

Upper Sandusky, Ohio. 
OLIVER, EARL M., 

Salt Lake City, Utah 
PAEG, LEON G., 

Portland, Oregon. 
PAULUS, LAWRENCE W., 

Columbus, Ohio. 
PETTAY, EMERY, 

Carrilton, Ohio. 
PICKARD, JOSEPH A., 

Columbus, O. 
PRESCH, MARION W., 

Portsmouth, Ohio. 
PRETTY, ALBERT W., 

Carrilton Ohio. 
ROBERTS, BADEN P., 

Plymouth, Pa. 
SCOTT, EMMETT W., 

San Francisco, Calif. 
TILSON, JOHN, 

Palo Alto, Calif. 
WARD, MICHAEL J., 

New York City 
WEBBER. FRANK, 

Los Angeles, Calif. 
WOODCOCK, HARRY, 

200 W. 83rd St., New York City. 



First Battalion Staft 

MAJOR 

BLACK, WALTER E. 

FIRST LIEUTENANT 
KITSON, ALFRED P. 

SECOND LIEUTENANT 
HAAS, EDGAR M. 



309 



Company "A' 



CAPTAINS 

DALY, LEO J. BEASLEY, OSCAR H., 

Boston, Mass. Washington, D. C. 

BINGHAM, WILSON G., Washington, D. C. 

FIRST LIEUTENANTS 

TOURTILLOTT, RAYMOND R., MACY, LORENZO D., 

Lindsay, CaHfornia. 373 4th St., New York City, N. Y. 

McCARY, HENRY D., Santa Barbara, Calif. 

SECOND LIEUTENANT 

RILEY, DON, Sabetha, Kansas. 

FIRST SERGEANT 

KLEIN, HENRY T., Newark, New Jersey. 

SUPPLY SERGEANT 

MURRIN, GEORGE R., San Francisco, CaUf. 

MESS SERGEANT 
WEBER, CHARLES H., San Francisco, Calif. 



SERGEANTS 



McFARLIN.ABNER, 

McAlester, Oklahoma, 
HALDEMAN, ALBERT E., 

Topeka, Kansas. 
HOLLAND, CHARLES W., 

Sacramento, Kentucky. 
PALMER. ARTHUR W., 

Buffalo, New York. 
KLUMPP, JOHN 

Baltimore Maryland. 
MARTIN, RAYxMOND C, 

San Francisco, Calif. 



SKEWIS, JOHN H., 

Pittsburg, Pa. 
KELLY, JAMES, 

Leavenworth, Kansas. 
VANDEVER, FRANK A., 

St. Louis, Missouri. 

ABNER, WILLIE, 
Burning Springs, Ky. 

VEST, ADRA J., 
Decatur, Illinois. 

LEPPER, JAMES, 

Waterbury, Connecticut. 



310 



Company ''A 



311 



MARTIN, WILLIAM L., 

Fresno Calif. 
CRUM, WARREN R., 

Tangier, Ind^iana. 
HENDERSON, EARL J., 

Stockton, Calif. 
ROBERTS, WILLIE E., 

RoUen, Tennessee, 
CURRAN, JOHN W., 

Bardstown, Kentucky. 
LARUE, JOSEPH L., 

Central Falls, Rhode Island. 
TILLEY, ALVA L., 

Pittsburg, Kansas. 
JOHNSON, ALBERT H., 

Chicago, Illinois. 
SLACK, CARROL L., 

San Antonio, Tex. 



CORPORALS 

PAULK, GUY W., 

Nixon, Tennessee. 
OLDHAM, HAYSC, 

Whittier, Calif. 
PLUMMER, HERBERT J., 

Fresno, Calif. 
GREBE, JOHN 

Pottstown Pa. 
SMITH, WALTER H. 

Monroe, Tennessee. 
SPERAW, FRANK D., 

San Francisco, Calif. 
McWHORTER, GEORGE F. 

Brentwood. Calif. 
BARTINI, LEODATO, 

Custioli, Italy. 
YUZBA, FRANK J., 

Florence, Michigan. 



MECHANICS 

MILLSAP, ISAAC N., MAHONEY, MICHAEL J., 

Oak, Calif. San Francisco, Calif. 

CERMAK, WILLIAM, Chicago, 111. 



COOKS 



WENTWORTH, FRED R., 

Topeka: Kansas. 
SNOW, GRANT H., 

Price, Utah. 



BRUCKERT, WILLIAM A. 

Columbus, Ohio. 
ALEVIJOS, GEORGE, 

San Francisco, Calif. 



BUGLERS 



BROWN, JOHN R., 

Hickman, Kentucky. 



DAWES, AMOS F., 

Pittsville, Wisconsin. 



PRIVATES— FIRST CLASS 



ADAMS, WILLIAM W., 

Winston Salem, N. Carolina. 
ALVES, JOEM., 

San Francisco, Calif. 
ANDERSON, ELIJAH, 

Boma, Tennessee. 
BACHMANN, FRED, 

Hamilton, Ohio. 
BALDE, EMIL, 

Chicago, Illinois. 
BAYER, CHRISTIAN I., 

Burlington, Iowa. 
BRANLEY, ALVAH J., 

Greenvile, Calif. 



BROCK, JOSEPH S., 

San Francisco, Calif. 
BUEZELIN, LEON. 

Oakland, California. 
CABLE, SAM, 

Chicago, Illinois. 
CARDELLI, EMILIO, 

San Francisco, Calif. 
COLLINS, RAYMOND P., 

Phoenix, Arizona. 
CRANDALL, GEORGE H., 

San Diego, Calif. 
ENGLE, LEEE., 

Buttonwillow, Calif. 



312 History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 



PRIVATES- 
FERE, JOHN J., 

San Francisco, Calif. 
FOX, LAURENCE L., 
Los Alivos, Calif. 

FROST, GEORGE L., 

Richmond, Calif. 
GEAiMBERTONE, DAMIANO. 

San Francisco, Calif. 
GRATTAROLA, EDGAR. 

Oakland, Calif. 
GUST, JACK, 

Provo, Utah. 
HARBAUGH, CLARENCE C, 

Ono, Pa. 

HLNKLE, LLOYDA., 

National City, Calif. 
HOSTETTER, EDWARD J., 
Freewater, Oregon. 

KAVANAUGH, CHARLES V., 

San Francisco, Calif. 
KERR, WALTER H., 

San Jos^, Calif. 
KIESSENBECK, WILL, 

Law en, Oregon. 
KOVACEVICH, JANDRE, 

Nievic, Servia. 
LO BELLO, DOMINICK, 

Los Angeles, Calif. 
LOLAS, CHRIST, 

Grevna, Greece. 



-FIRST CLASS (Coottaued) 

LUNDGREN, HENRY, 

Donner, CaHf. 
MALAMED, ZESE, 

Chicago, 111. 
MARKS, IRA E., 

Imnaha, Oregon. 
AIARQUARDT, JOHN F., 

Minneapolis, Minnesota. 

PAPPAKONSTANTINOU, VASILIOS 
E., 

San Francisco, Calif. 

PIEKORSKI, ANTONI, 
Chicago, 111. 

PLEISCH, WALTER E., 
Anderson, Calif. 

PROKLESEK, JOHN, 
Chicago, 111. 

RICKERT, EDWIN G., 
Youngstown, Ohio. 

ROE, WILLIAM, 
Mackay, Idaho. 

RUSSEL, FREDERICK, 
Chico, Calif. 

SCHNEIDER, AUGUST, Jr., 
San Francisco, Calif. 

THOMPSON, MILLARD, 
Pasco, Washington 

VASSILOPULOS, ANTONIO, 
Pyrgos, Greece. 



ADAMS, EARLO., 
Portland, Oregon. 

ALSOS, STEEN, 
Astoria, Oregon. 

BAXCHERO, ARTURO, 

San Francisco, Calif. 

BJORSETH, KNUT, 
San Francisco, Calif. 

BROWN, HARRY C, 
San Francisco, Cal. 

CATLIN, WILLIAM C, 

Carpinteria, Calif. 

CHRISTENSON, EDWARD, 
Oregon City, Oregon. 

COENEN, ANTHONY, Jr., 
Tucson, Arizona. 

CORDONA, MICHAEL, 
Ahuntas, Porto Rico. 



PRIVATES 

DESILAS, NICK, 
Zanda, Greece. 

DILLABOUGH, WILLIAM E., 
Fresno, Calif. 

DIMETRACOPULOS, THEODORE, 

Tacoma, Washington. 

DONNELLY, GEORGE, 
Santa Ynes, Calif. 

ECKER, CARL, 
San Francisco, Calif. 

EDSON, INGVALD, 
Astoria, Oregon. 

ESTOCHAK, JOHN, 
Emaus, Penn. 

FARRAND, WILLIAM, 
Pittsburg, Pa. 

FINSTAD, HANS, 
Enterprise, Oregon. 



Company "A" 



313 



PRIVATES 

FLECK, JOHN, 

Fresno, Calif. 
FLOCCHINI, EMILIO, 

Avenone, Italy. 
GIACALONE, JOSEPH, 

Chicago, 111. 
HANSEN, ALFRED J., 

Oneida, Washington. 
HARTMAN, WILLIAM B., 

Duluth, Minn. 
HESSELBART, CHARLES R., 

Toledo, Ohio. 
HOPWOOD, CLYDE C, 

Santa Barbara, Calif. 
HOWSER, RAYMOND F., 

Frankfort, Ohio. 
IRVIN, LUTHER, 

Baker, Oregon. 
JONES, HARRY R., 

Cincinnati, Ohio. 
KACHO, ALEX., 

Chicago, lU. 
KEARNS, LAWRENCE E., 

Dayton, Ohio. 
KEELEY, MAURICE N., 

Baltimore, Maryland. 
KOSMOPULOS, KONSTANTINOS, 

Baliago, Greece. 
LEE, LEO R., 

Watsonville, Calif. 
LEHMAN, GEORGE W., 

San Francisco, Calif. 
LEOARDI, JACK. 

New York City, N. Y. 
LESKINEN, DAVID, 

Fort Bragg, Calif. 
LEVIN, JACOB, 

Chicago, 111. 
MARSHAL, JOHN, 

Noble, Kentucky. 
MARTIN, EDWARD L., 

Evajisville, Indiana. 
MARTIN, JOSEPH, 

Redding, Calif. 
McAfee, EMERY C, 

Tacoma, Washington. 
McCOY, JAMES L., 

Jewell, Oregon. 

MONROE, PETER, 

International Falls, Minn. 

O'BRIEN, WILLIS M,, 

Mountain Air, New Mexico. 



(Contlaued) 

O'CONNOR, ALFRED, 
San Francisco, Calif. 

PARRISH, JAMESA., 

Myrtle Point, Oregon. 

PAUCHON, LEONE., 
San Francisco, Calif. 

PECK, FLOYD F., 
Reedley, Calif. 

PENN, PAUL, 

San Francisco Calif. 

PETERSON, CHARLES E., 
Portland, Oregon. 

PHOTOS, DANA., 

San Francisco, Calif. 

PORTELLO, EDWARD F., 
San Francisco, Calif. 

POULIDIS, JAMES P., 
Hoquiam, Washington. 

PRITCHETT, DEWEY G., 
Colton, Calif. 

RONCO, ANDREW, 

San Francisco, Calif. 

SANTIAGO, LOUIS, 
San Francisco, Calif. 

SCOTT, CHARLES A., 

Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. 

SKOU, NIELS C, 
Astoria, Oregon. 

SMITH, JOHN C, Jr., 
Hay ward, Calif. 

SMITH, MILTON H., 
Woodsboro, Indiana. 

STA^ITON, SIDNEY L., 
Springfield, Illinois. 

STRAIT, EDGAR E., 
Ukiah, Calif. 

TARANTOLA, CARLO, 
Reddie, Calif. 

TERRIAN, VICTOR J., 

Abrams, Wisconsin. 

TOMASELLO, LOUIS, 
San Francisco, Calif. 

TRUDRUNG, HARRY, 

San Francisco, Calif. 

WILSON, FRANK, 
Girard, Kansas. 

WOJDON, JOZEP, 
Chicago, Illinois. 



314 History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 



TRANSFERRED 



PVT. GEORGE J. HALPER. 
SGT. MICHAEL GUDGEON. 
CPL. McCLELLAN W. GULLETT. 
PVT. CHARLES M. CAREY. 
PVT. RAMALDOW SCHEFFER. 
CPL. ANTHON LUKAS. 
PVT. NED ANDERSON, 

Silver Point, Tennessee. 
PVT. GEORGE BAES, 

109 E. B. St., Ontario, Calif. 
PVT. DON HUGHES. 
CPL. ERNEST R. SCHAYER, 

1206 5th Ave., New York City, N. Y. 
PVT. LOUIS PAPPADATOS. 
PVT. CLARENCE AUBERT, 

Ripon, California. 
PVT. WILLIAM E., BOGGS, 

West Indianapolis, Indiana. 
SGT. JOSEPH R. BRIGHTBRIDGE, 

Stratford, Connecticut. 
PVT. BURTON L. MIDDLETON, 

161 1 Milan Avenue, South Pasadena, 
Calif. 
PVT. SIMEON B. NATHON. 
SGT. TATE MILLER. 
PVT. DAVID G. THOMPSON, 

Gean, Nevada. 
SGT. HERBERT JENKINS. 
PVT. ROY C. WARRICK. 
PVT. CLARENCE J. ROSS, 

San Diego, California. 
CPL. ARTHUR J. THIBADEAU, 

159 Mason St., Fall River, Mass. 
PVT. JOSE C. FOUvSTINO, Jr. 
PVT. PIETRO BIGLIORI. 
PVT. WONG TIN FOOK, 

Dupont St., San Francisco, Calif. 

PVT. FRANK LEVENBERG. 

PVT. JOSEPH WARING. 

PVT. ALBERT EDWARDS. 

PVT. CHRIS LIAPIS. 

PVT. ARTHUR W. REIDEL. 

PVT. JOSEPH NEZGODA, 

2434 Whipple St., Chicago, Illinois. 

PVT. RAY N. RUSSELL, 
Penningto Gap, Virginia. 

PVT. ALVA M. CROWLEY, 
Rockland, Idaho. 

PVT. DANIEL R. FRANKLIN. 



PVT. WILLIAM WEISERT, 

2482 W. 5th St., Cleveland, Ohio. 
SGT. PETER WALSH. 
PVT. JESSE E. BLAKE. 
PVT. SAMUEL FALBO. 

1408 Black Ave., Racine, Wisconsin. 
PVT. PAUL R. CLAVER. 
CPL. ALBERT E. HUDSON. 
CPL. WILLIAM M. BORDEN. 
PVT. RUSSELL W. PAY. 
SGT. PATRICK H. SHANAHAN. 
PVT. ISADOR BERKOWITZ. 
CPL. JOHN SUGRUE. 
CPL. EARL CORWIN, 

404 Park PL, Spokane, Washington. 
SGT. ARVEL J. MONGER, 

Rockwood, Tennessee. 
CPL. PETER C. VALENTINE, 

San Bruno, California. 
FIRST SGT. WILLIAM E. THOMP- 
SON, 

Bront, Texas. 
PVT. JOHN R. DAVIS, 

Bessemer, Michigan. 
SGT. WADE H. Le GRAND. 
PVT. LEONARD J. HODGINS. 
PVT. ARLO FRANCO. 

PVT. LYMAN G. CRANTON, 

20 Bungalow Avenue, San Rafael, 
Calif. 

PVT. JAMES E. BENNETT. 

PVT. F. W. GUSTAVE MEYERS. 

PVT. NELSON W., COLLINS. 

PVT. JOHN RIELLY. 

PVT. ROLLIN B. FARR. 

PVT. JOSEPH McLAIN. 

PVT. ARTHUR S. HOIRUP. 

PVT. WONG ON CHING, 
Hong-kong, China. 

PVT. NICOLAS LANZILLOTTA. 
PVT. JAMES A. SHORT. 
PVT. WILLIAM J. WILLIS. 
PVT. JOHN A. GIDEON, 
Knobnoster, Missouri. 

PVT. DAVID G. THOMSON. 

PVT. GEORGE E. WARREN. 

Ashtabula, Ohio. 

PVT. CHESTER R. DARLING. 



Company *'A" 



315 



TRANSFERRED 

SGT. LUTON L. HEMETER, 

1 64 1 Sutter St., San Francisco, Calif. 
CPL. ELMER GLOSS, 

148 S. 2nd St., Salt Lake, Utah. 
CPL. HARRY RUDOLPH, 

Elizabeth Avenue, Elizabeth, New Jer- 
sey, 
SGT. JOSEPH V. GRAHAM, 

R. R. 14, Bonneville, Indiana. 
SGT. DAYTON LUNNON, 

Piedmont, Oklahoma. 
CPL. WARREN B. JOHNSON, 

White Springs, Florida. 
PVT. ABE KRASNITSKY. 
PVT. EVERETT RANDALL. 
PVT. IVER SKRIDEN, 
PVT. JOSEPH F. VARHANIK, 

1915 Blue Island Avenue, Blue Island, 
111. 
PVT. TRACY AMMONS, 

Oswego, 111. 
PVT. ANTONIO COURTIS. 
PVT. SIMO D. SIMAKIS. 
PVT. WELTON R. BURCH, 

Cape Girardeau, Missouri. 
PVT. WILLIS N. BLOOD. 
PVT. CHARLES EISSENGER, 

Wishek, North Dakota. 
PVT. TONY WASSILEVITCH, 

Ceulowzna, Russia. 
PVT. WILLIAM R. GRAFF. 
PVT. JOHN LOUISENNA. 
PVT. OSCAR L. LAAKONEN, 

Michigamrae, Michigan. 

PVT. CYRUS H. HOLDEN, 

Salina, Utah. 

PVT. CLARENCE W. VALENTO. 

PVT. BENJAMIN I. McFARLANE. 

PVT. JOHN W. BROOKS. 

PVT. EDDIE L. CORNUTT. 

PVT. HARLEY L. PIERSON, 
Brevard, N. C. 

PVT. ALFRED A. BOURDAIS, 
Saint Tuen Tez, Eirtz, France. 

PVT. ANGELO MELCHIORI, 
Thurbe'r, Texas. 

PVT. CARLO FRIZZA, 

195 Jackson St., San Francisco, Calif. 

PVT. THORNTON L. PALMER, 
285 Fourth St., Portland, Oregon. 



(Continued) 

CPL. JULIUS AARONSON, 

327 Broons St., New York City, N. Y. 
CPL. WILLIAM C. REED, 

P. O. Box 95, Rupert, Idaho. 
CPL. CLYDE B. MITCHELL. 
PVT. CHARLIE R. BEARD, 

P. O. Box 24, Dana, Indiana. 
PVT. GEORGE H. BAILIFF, 

Sebastopol. California. 
PVT. THOMAS A. DOYLE, 

2449 Sycamore St., Milwaukee, Wis. 
PVT. LAWRENCE LARKIN, 

512 North Street, Saint Paul, Minn. 
PVT. PAUL WIGLER. 
PVT. WILLIAM J. CALDWELL. 
PVT. WILLIAM KREMAS, 

1928 Folsom St., San Francisco, Cal. 
PVT. KARA M. CROWLEY, 

Rockland, Idaho. 
PVT. LOUIS WERBER, 

Vallejo, California. 
PVT. THEODORE BANGAS. 
PVT. GEORGE LIEBEN. 
PVT. JESSE H. RUBENSTEIN. 
PVT. CLARENCE E. PIPER. 

50 Union St., Virginia City, Nevada. 

PVT. EVERETT W. CHENEY, 

253 South Virginia St., Reno, Nevada. 

PVT. WILLIAM R. AMIDON, 
136 East 8th St., Reno, Nevada. 

CPL. RAYMOND C. DEATON, 

Bancroft, Idaho. 

PVT. FRED REISMAN, 
San Jose, California. 

PVT. JOSEPH A. STREETER, 
Clayton, Iowa. 

PVT. FREEMAN H. HANSON, 
International Falls, Minnesota. 

CPL. JAMES SAVAGE, 

254 Rich St., San Francisco, Calif. 

PVT. NICOLAS C. MADES, 

2709 Haddan Ave., Chicago, Illinois. 

PVT. PETER M. DeGEORGE, 

136 Courtland St., Tarrytown, N. Y. 

PVT. JAMES HAYES, 

2410 Howard St., San Francisco, Calif. 

PVT. JOHN NARVAIS, 

116 Utah St., Los Angeles, Calif. 
PVT. KENNETH CAMPBELL, 

Blockburg, California. 



3i6 History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 



PVT. JOHN J. BOOS, 

Banks, Oregon. 
PVT. THOMAS HERDA, 

201 Alankota Ave., Chicago, Illinois. 
PVT. FRANK G. HOUCK, 

713 N. Howard St., Baltimore; Md. 
PVT. ARTHUR L. RICHARDSON, 

R. F. D. No. 2, Olean, New York. 

PVT. EDDIE P. SCOTT, 

R. R. No. 4, Glasgow, Kentucky. 

PVT. GERHART A. FREYTAG, 

240 Stockton St., San Francisco, Calif. 
PVT. RALPH W. SMITH, 

5017 Latone St., Seattle, Washington. 
PVT. ALEX. B. GREER, 

Easley, South Carolina. 

PVT. PATRICK T. McINENNEY, 

819 Altgold St., Chicago, Illinois. 
PVT. JOSEPH C. R. SPITLER, 
Coming, California. 

PVT. CHARLES E. DAVIS, 

10 West 115th St., New York City 
N. Y. 

PVT. ALVIN R. FEGER, 
Snohomish, Washington. 

PVT. ANGELO SOTO, 
Salinas, California. 

PVT. LUKE A. BERRY, 
20 E. Sisson Court, Bayonne, 
Jersey. 



TRANSFERRED {Continued) 

PVT. CYRIL SPINDLER, 

821 4th St., Milwaukee, Wisconsin, 
PVT. BAYARD A. HOOPES, 

New Castle, Delaware. 
PVT. EMILE LERNO, 

P. O. Box 284, Fresno, California. 
PVT. NOAH WADE, 

Reichert, Oklahoma. 
PVT. LOWELL S. CRAFTS. 

Bishop, California. 
SGT. GLEN W. TRINDAL, 

R. F. D. No. 2, Eau Claire, Wisconsin. 
SGT. ALFRED V. RAUSCH, 

25 S. Eldorado Street, Stockton, Calif. 
PVT. STEPHEN W. ATHERTON, 

2124 California St., San Francisco, 
Calif. 
PVT. GEORGE V. CARLISLE, 

1 74 1 Crenshaw Boulevard, Los Angeles, 
Cal. 
PVT. ROBERT A. DUNCAN, 

375 Le.xington Ave., San Francisco, 
Calif. 
PVT. ADAM BLOSSE, 

Newman, Illinois. 
PVT. JOSEPH A. DEMERS. 
PVT. ARNOLD FRIED. 
PVT. EDDIE L. CORNUTT, 

Arkadelphia, Arkansas. 
PVT. WILLIAM DAHLENBERG, 

Stoughton St., Urbana, Illinois. 



New 



DISCHARGED 



GPL. HARRY P. HENDERSON, 

Cochran, Indiana. 
PVT. CHARLES CRISFIELD, 

Battle Creek, Michigan. 
PVT. CLIFFORD T. ALFORD, 

874 Pizmo St., San Luis Obispo, Calif. 
PVT. ANDERSON B. YORK, 

Garrison, Kentucky. 
PVT. FRANK LEMANSKI, 

Menominee, Michigan. 
PVT. ISAAC E. SARKELA, 

Siikajoki, Oulunlani, Finland. 
CPL. GEORGE L. SPROUL, 

22 E. Yanonilli St., Santa Barbara, 
Calif. 
PVT. JAN SCHAAFSMA, 

Czaar Peterstraat, Zaandam, Holland. 
PVT. ALBERT W. ASK, 

Astoria, Oregon. 



PVT. CARL R. BENGTSSON, 

Wyoxtolp, Sweden. 
PVT. FRANZ A. L. MATTSON, 
415 Buchanan St., San Francisco, 
Calif. 

PVT. PAUL C. L. HELN, 

Freewater, Oregon. 
PVT. CHARLES E. COLVIN, 

419 E. I2th St., Los Angeles, Calif. 
PVT. SALVADOR PIAZZA, 

179 Bank St.. San Francisco, Calif. 
PVT. JAMES MONROE, 

148 Forrest St., Atlanta, Georgia. 
PVT. CARL W. SARAJARVI, 

R. F. D. No. I, Astoria, Oregon. 
CPL. PAUL E. SPEER, 

4221 Montgomery St.. Oakland, Calif. 
PVT. GEORGE W. NEABEACK, 

The Dalles, Oregon. 



Company **A" 317 

DISCHARGED {Continued) 

CPL, JOHN C. GREEN, BUG. GIU.SEPPE ASPESI, 

Oskaloosa Iowa. 39 Carr St., San Francisco, Calif. 

PVT. JOHN A. IWINSKI. pvT. MATTEO BELLUOMINI, 

CPL. HARRY M. STROUP, R. P. D. No. i, Box 74, Healdsburg, 

Baltimore, IMaryland. Calif. 

FURLOUGHED TO THE REGULAR ARMY RESERVE 

PVT. ABRAHAM ROSENTHAL, CPL. STEPHEN CSUKAS, 

2421 South Franklin St., Philadelphia, Pa. 1920 University Ave., Berkeley, Calif. 



Company "B" 



CAPTAINS 

PENDERGRAST, GRADY H., SHAW, JOHN C, 

U. S. Army. U. S. Army. 

FIRST LIEUTENANTS 

LEARD, FRANK J., TROLINGER, WILLIAM P., 

2430 B. St., San Diego, Calif. Washington, D. C. 

POWELL, RALPH E., SLAUGHTER, R. N., 

Los Angeles, Calif. U. S. Army. 

SECOND LIEUTENANTS 

STRONG, WILLIAM P., HAMPTON, WALTER M. 

Baltimore, Md. Ogden, Utah. 

FIRST SERGEANT 

MADDEN, JONATHAN, Evarts, Kentucky. 

SUPPLY SERGEANT 

GILL, WALTER A., Heyburn, Idaho. 

MESS SERGEANT 
HARRINGTON, CARL, 2733 California Street, San Francisco, California. 

DUTY SERGEANTS 

HULBE, HENRY W., WHITE, FRANK, 

McNears, California. 126 Oliver and Yonkers Avenue, Yon- 

BUSCH, WILLIAM, kers, N. Y. 

Prairieton, Indiana. PHELAN, FLOYD, 

DAVIS, ASA G., Edwards, Missouri. 

56 Broadway Avenue San Jos^, Cali- sUTTON CURTIS I 

r-/-^T T Tx'c T7r)-cT-> T c/° Foley Amusement Co., Oakland, 

UULibiiNb, rKh/JJ L., Calif 

Juneau Avenue, Milwaukee Wis. 

GEORGE, CLARENCE H., CHASE, ROBERT C, 

Santa Ana, California. R- F- D. No. 4, Grand Rapids, Mich. 

WARD, CLIFFORD F., LeVALLEY, ARTHUR J., 

East Church Street, Salesburg, Mary- 320 Haight Street, San Francisco, 

land. Calif. 

318 



<<r)" 



Company "B 



319 



CORPORALS 



LANGSTAFF, CLIFFORD A., 

Fresno, California. 
BRUSSO, GEORGE A., 

122 High Street, New Britian, Conn. 

PARKER, HARRY J., 

325 Sutter Street, San Francisco, Calif. 

COUSINS, HAROLD A., 

885 N. Winter Street, Salem, Oregon. 

MORSE, ELBRIDGE G., 
Ocean Side, California. 

HASELTON, EMERY, 

1902 Poe Street, Sacramento, Calif. 

DAHLGREN. ALBIX G., 

Bessemer, Michigan. 

AMOS, HERMAN, 

866 E. Hoyt Street, Portland, Oregon. 

ABRAMS, JAMES S., 
Superior, Arizona. 

KING, WALTER S., 
Lick Falls, Kentucky, 

PEPA, FRED, 

244 E. 28th Street Los Angeles Cali- 
fornia. 



McLEAN, LOUIS N., 

Crow Agency, Montana. 
ALEXANDER, RAY F., 

381 N. 26th Street, Portland, Oregon, 
YOUNG, HARRY R., 

2521 Peralta Avenue, Oakland, Cali- 
fornia. 
McTIMMONDS, EARL L., 

Star Route No. 2, Lebanon, Oregon. 
GAINES, FRANK R., 

40 East Broadway Street, Butte, 
Montana. 
HARDER, FRANK G., 

590 East 1 8th Street, Portland, Oregon. 
SIMS, LOUIS S., 

Jotebo, Okla. 
MONTGOMERY, GEORGE, 

Marshfield. Oregon. 
SHEEHAN, FRANK J., 

Harney County, Burns, Oregon. 
CUNNINGHAM, R. F., 

R. F. D.; Hartline, Washington. 
JACKSON, MOSES S., 

211 1st Street, Raymond, Washington. 



MECHANICS 

KUHN, WILLARD E., McCULLAH, WILLIAM E., 

1412 Maple Avenue, Zanesville, Ohio. Greenville, 111. 

COOKS 

BUSWELL, WILLIAM H., HACINSKI, BEN, 

R. R. No. 2, Chico, California. 962 Alva Street, Portland, Oregon. 

GOODWIN, ROBERT, SHUEY, FRED, 

Company "B," 63rd Infantr>', U. S. A. Mayetta, Kansas 

BUGLERS 

REDUILH, JULES A., STANTON, ROBERT T., 

818 Pacific vStreet, San Francisco, Calif. Pocahontas, Tenn. 



PRIVATES— FIRST CLASS 



BORDENAVE, JEAN, 

511 19th Avenue, San Francisco, 
California. 
CRISTANI. PEDRO, 

Bishop, Inyo County, California. 
DAVIS, ROSCOET., 

Derby, Oregon. 
DEWEY, BILLIE, 

Crescent City, California. 



DUSSLER, CHARLEY, 

1517 8th Street, Niagara Falls, N. Y. 

FIGONE, TONI S., 

1302 9th St., Alameda, Cahfornia. 

GALBRAITH, KING L., 

395 Jessop Street, Portland, Oregon. 

GOODRICK, JAMES J., 
Wilson, Wyoming. 



320 History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 



PRIVATES— FIRST 

HEXDRIXON, ROY, 

2037 W. Superior Street, Chicago, 

JEFFERS, SHERMAN, 

4th and High Streets, Eugene, Oregon, 
JEFFERIES, LIGE AL, 

Company "B," 63rd Infantry, U. S. 
Army. 

JOHNSTON, M. J., 

1615 5th Street, San Diego, California. 
JONES, INIGO, 

Richfield, California. 
KNOLL, ABRAHAM, 

302 Wayne Avenue, Cincinnati, Ohio. 
LARKIN, LLOYD, 

R. F. D. No. 4, Salem, Oregon. 
LASSERE, VICTOR, 

727 S. nth Street, San Jos^, Cali- 
fornia. 
LAWSON, WILLIAM, 

Appleby, Texas. 
LINTON, ANDREW, 

R. F. D. No. 2, Bo.x 45, Shelton Wash- 
ington. 

McINTYRE, DWIGHT M., 

Colton, Cal. 
McKINNEY, DANIELS H., 

Ponder, Texas. 
MERRITT, ROY I., 

Sheridan, Ore. 
MOORE, C. A., 

Route A, Box 29, Orville, Cal. 
MORELAND, THOMAS, 

Co. "B" 63rd Inf., U. S. A. 
MYERS, EDWARD C, 

1 188 Alabam'a St., San Francisco, Cal. 



CLASS (Continued) 

NERUTCHAS, GEORGE, 

Gen. Del., Winnemucca, Nevada. 
ORBEK.JOHNH., 

Roland St., Edgerton, Wisconsin. 
PARKER, H. O., 

Athena, Oregon. 
PEARSON, JOHN, 

Wellston. Okla. 

PETERSON, E. F., 

Sheridan, Oregon. 

PLASKETT, J. H., 
King City, Cal. 

RASPBERRY, LEvSLIE C, 
Angels Camp, Cal. 

RAY, ROBERT, 

Palmdale, Cal. 
RUCCIO, FRANK, 

753 Orizaba Ave., Madison, Pa. 
RUSSELL, HUGH H., 

Long Beach, Cal. 

SELVERA, GEULHEME R., 
25 Oak Grove, San Franisco, Cal. 

TOM, ABRAHAM, 
Grand Round, Oregon. 

TONOLE, JOE, 

Liberty St., Lodi, N. J. 

VIEGA, MANUEL C, 
Sant^ Cruz, Cal. 

WALTZ, HERMAN N., 
St. Paul, Oregon. 

WRISLEY, ELMER G., 

Astaubula, Ohio. 

YBARRA, LUIS B., 
Santa Margarita, Cal. 



PRIVATES 



ANDERSON, JULIUS, 

878 W. 28th St., Oakland, Cal. 

ASHFIELD, JESSIE W., 
Enumclaw, Wash. 

BAKER, LOUIS, 

144 S. Central Ave., c/o W. M. Norman, 
Aledford, Oregon. 
BELL, DAVID A., 

Athena, Ore. 

BERMUDEZ, DIEGO N., 

543 Lagona St., Santa Barbara, Cal. 

BRADLEY, LOUIS H., 
Memphis Tenn. 



BROUGHTON, JAMES E., 

409 Columbus Ave., Jackson, Mich. 

BULL, VERNON T., 

Patapsco, Md. 

CARLING, HJAMER B., 
El Cerito, Cal. 

CARRICO, GEORGE E., 

R. F. D. No. I, Warrenton, Mo. 

COSTELLO, JOHNT., 

1030 Highland St., Portland, Ore. 

D'ANNA, SAMUEL, 
408 E. BlufT St., Baltimore, Md. 



<( r> " 



Company **B 



321 



PRIVATES— 

DUPRAT, LOUIS, 

Pendleton, Ore. 
DURKIN, MILTIN E., 

2619 Folsom St., San Francisco, Cal. 
DYKE, HENRY A., 

10 Burnett St., New^ark, N. J. 
FAGERSTROM, NILES O., 

443 Niagara Ave., Astoria, Ore. 
GRAHAM, ALBERT W., 

Paradise, Ore. 
GRANSTROM, ALBIN, 

North Bend, Ore. 
GRANT, JAMES, 

R. F. D. Box 29, Valverda, Cal. 

GUMMERMAN, MAX, 
Enterprise, Ore. 

HARP, JESSIE, 
Holdman, Oreg. 

HARRIS, EPHRIAM, 
Gen. Del., Hinkley, Cal. 

HUPFIELD, GILBERT, 
Altadena, Cal. 

JENKINS, CHARLES R., 

Gloucester, N. J. 

JOHNSON, CHARLES A., 

R. F. D. No. I, Macleay, Ore. 
KIMMERLE, FRD. G., 

Co. "B" 63rd Inf., U. S. Army. 

KINK, FRANK G., 
307 Seamel St., Marietta, O. 

KIRBACH, MORRIS W., 
539 Ohio St., Vallejo, Cal. 

KOHLMORGAN, LOUIS, 

204 Washington St., Portland Ore. 

KRANER, CHARLES E., 

285 Wrexham Ave., Columbus, Ohio. 

LANE, CHARLES J., 

241 8th St., San Francisco, Cal. 

LEONARD, HARRY, 

206 Stiner St., San Francisco, Cal. 
LUCK, WM. L., 

No. I East 30th St., Portland, Ore. 

LUKOSICK, JOHN, 

Lansing, Mich. 

MAAS, HENRY C, 
Tangent, Oreg. 

MADRID, SOLOMON, 
Old Albuquerque, N. Mex. 

MAKINSTER, CHARLES, 
Tillamook, Ore. 



{Continued) 

MALLONI, JOHN, 

Marburg Avenue, Hyde Park, Cincin- 
nati, Ohio. 
MANIATIS, CHARLES, 

1800 S. Wabash Avenue, Chicago, 111. 
MANZULLI, GIUSEPPE, 

Pilot Rock, Oregon. 
MATTSON, DAVID A., 

435 E. 45th Street, Portland, Oregon. 
MAZZINI, JOE E., 

25 Taylor Street, San Rafael, Cali- 
fornia. 
McKEE, CARL, 

Lake County, Plush, Oregon. 
MISELMAN, SAM, 

1 123 S. Troy St., Chicago, III. 
MOORE, C. L., 

General Delivery, Senora, California. 
OLSON, ROY, 

Mendo County, Willits, California, 
PETERSON, G. H., 

Bagby, California. 
PHILLIPS, WILLIAM, 

Sullivan County, Harr, Tenn. 
POTRZEBSKI, IGNACY, 

1424 Cleaver, Street, Chicago, 111. 
RADMACHER, EDWIN H., 

728 Pacific Street, Portland, Ore. 
RIORDAN, JAMES M., 

Iselton, Sacramento County, Cali- 
fornia. 
ROBBERDING, JOHN H., 

Co. "B" 63rd Infantry, U. S. Army. 
ROBERTS, HORACE M., 

Route 3, Box 21, Silverton, Oregon. 
ROBSON, GLENN A., 

83 East i6th Street, Portland, Ore. 
RUMPAKIS, GEORGE, 

Raineer, Oregon. 
SAVAGE, JOHN, 

Lake View, Lake County, Oregon. 
SEPULVEDA, JOHN B., 

171 N. 8th Street, San Jos6, Cali- 
fornia. 
SILER, THOMAS W., 

Tonkawa, Okla. 

SMART, ANDREW C, 

411 Montgomery Street, Portland, Ore. 

SWAIN, WM., 
Folsom, California. 

TAYLOR, WILLIAM H., 

Alsea, Vinten County, Oregon. 



322 History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 



PRIVATES {Continued) 



TELLO, JOHNG., 

i486 5th Street, Oakland, California. 

TOCCALINI GIOVANNI, 
San Deria, Vigavia, Italy. 

TULLY, THOMAS J., 

122K E.. 49th Street, Los Angeles, 
Calif. 



WALTON, CLAUDE, 

Izel, Oregon. 
WHIPPLE, HOMER L., 

Co. "B" 63rd Infantry, U. S. Army. 
WILLIAMS, JOE, 

60 Fait Avenue, Los Gatos, Calif. 
WITZEL, HOWARD E., 

R. F. D. 39, Box I, Harmony, Penn. 



MEN LOST FROM THIS COMPANY THROUGH DIS- 
CHARGE, TRANSFER, ETC. 



STILES HUGH W. 

Pomona, California. 
HODGES, JOHN, 

R. F. D. No. I, Oroville, Oregon. 
HOER, GEORGE H., 

427 East Avenue, Perth Amboy, N. J. 
HARMON, BERTIE F., 

Grant's Pass, Oregon. 
VACHTER, MARTIN, Jr., 

Gerv-ais, Oregon. 
NEATHAMER, JOHN J., 

Rogue River, Oregon. 
CERULLI, JOSEPH, 

P. O. Box 140, Fort Lee, N. J. 
WONG, FONG, 

900 Stockton Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
TONEY, PHILLIP H., 

Lodi, California. 
CURTIS, NEAL, 

Moroni, Sanpete County, Utah. 
ROHNER, JAMES R., 

Baker, Oregon. 
REYNOLDS, ROY, 

19 Oak and 7th Streets, Tamarack Lo- 
cation, Calumet, Mich. 
WHITE, OLIVER G., 

Buell, Oregon. 
HEWETT, RAYMOND H., 

60 Bedford Street, Cumberland, Mary- 
land. 



RASMUSSEN, EDWARD J., 

1458 Newcastle Street, Portland, Ore. 

MILBURN, THOMAS, 

Mariposa, California. 

SMITH, FOREST W., 
Monrovia, California. 

McCOY, LUTHER V., 

Livingston, Wis. 

VATH, JOSEPH v., 

653 9th Avenue New York, N. Y.. 
DOUGAN, ELMER, 

3125 Divisadero Street, San Francisco, 
Cal. 

KLINE, HENRY A., 

504 N. Florence Street, Springfield, 
Cal. 

OLIVER, W. W., 

American Falls, Idaho. 

BARRON, A. J., 

523 Machet Avenue, Indianapolis, Ind. 

ELLIGET, RUSSELL A., 
Corcoran, California. 

MARTIN, J. F., 

1 154 "I" Street, Fresno, California. 

YOUNG, OSCAR M. 
Pendleton, Oregon. 

ELDRIGE, GEORGE W., 

617 Campbell Street, Nashville, Tenn. 



Company "C" 



BENDEL, C. STOCKMAR 
BANKHEAD, HENRY M. 



CAPTAINS 



HARRISON, JOHN H. 
McMURRAY, THOMAS L. 



THEODORE L. WESSELS 
EUGENE E. PRATT 
PAUL F. KEYSER 
HAYS MATSON 



FIRST LIEUTENANTS 

FREDERICK C. PHELPS 
ALBERT C. NEWELL 
CHESTER A. FEE 
MARTIN MILLER 

SAMUEL W. STEVENS 



TULLEY, EDGAR J. 



SECOND LIEUTENANTS 

TURNER, HAROLD L. 
BARNARD, JUSTINE.. 



KEENAN, FRANK J. 
REED, BERT. 



FIRST SERGEANTS 

PETERS, HENRY J. 
YOCUM, HOWARD I. 

219^4 Harrison St., Zanesville, Ohio. 



HUTCHISON, WILLIAM R. 



SUPPLY SERGEANTS 



KITTLESON, ALFRED, 
Manvel. N. D. 



MESS SERGEANT 
HUGHES, GEO. P., Curtis Bay, Md. 



SERGEANTS 



WHITE, JOHNS., 

U. S. Army. 
RYAN, JOSEPH. 
McCARVILLE, JOHN 
CARR, JOSEPH 
HIGGINS, JAMES J. 



MARSHALL, DEWEY 
HILL, LYMAN W. 
SCHWAB, FRED, 

1369 Yale Ave., Canton, Ohio. 
LIPSEY, THEO. 
HACKER, JOHN. 



323 



324 History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 



TOMECHKO, JOHN M. 
MILLER, HARRY C, 
Brooklyn, Wis. 

AIcKENDRICK, JAMES. 

SWENSON, LEANORD, 
Bonilla, vS. Dak. 

XORREGARD, PETER P. 
Elv, Nev. 



SERGEANTS (Continued) 

MATTHEWS, ABE, 

405 Grand St., N.Y. 
SCHAUB, GROVER C. 

1 134 N. Jefferson Ave., Indianapolis, 
Ind. 
PERKINS, JAMES, 

Harpin, Mont. 
COLLINS, HUBERT R., 

141 Pleasant St., Hinton, W. Va. 
THOMPSON, WILLIAM W. 



CORPORALS 



WALKER, FELIX J. 
ROGERS, VERN. 
DARCE, WESLEY R. 
SCHMERFELD, CHRISTOPHER. 
CHROMEY, EDWARD. 
FARRIS, HOMER D. 
BENACK, HOMER. 
McCLUxNG, ARGO. 

Delay, william. 
parmer, joe. 
cypher, william l. 

SMITH, SEYxMOUR J., 

HARGRAVE, NEALE., 
Route No. 5, Dike, Te.x. 

PARENT, ALBERT J. 

KELLEY, ROBERT M. 

WENDT, FRED. 

FARRELL, DENNIS M., 

NIRVA, JOHN W., 

122 E. Pine St., Ironwood, Mich. 

BURGH, EDWARD J., 

3215 W. 1 8th St., Los Angeles, Cal. 

COPPIN, GEO. 

WILSON, JOHN j;, 
Pelham, Ga. 

GLEASON, WILLIAM J., 
Elkader, Iowa. 

KOKOTOVICH, MIKE, 

X383 Minna St., San Francisco, Cal. 

MEYER, CHAS. 

ULRICH, FRANK. 

REBENSTORF, OTTO H. 
835 Oak St., Elgin, 111. 



ROBERTS. EDWARD A. 

STRIGHT, CYRIL L., 

3730 Sacramento St., San Francisco, 
Cal. 

MARTIN, FRAxNKC, 

532 Dale Ave., Roanoke, Va. 

HUROWITZ, JACK, 

New York City. 

SMALE, VINCENT M., 
2610 E St., San Diego, Cal. 

WALK, ERNEST 

PETERS, CHAS. F., 

757 Capp St., San Francisco, Cal. 

BAXTER, PIERCE H., 

41 1 >^ Crawford Ave., Augusta, Ga. 

RAY, ALBERT S., 

ERM, JOHN D., 

118 Tamarack St., Ironwood Mich. 

LOZINTO, JOSEPH R., 
Geyserville, Cal. 

MORRISON, ROY E., 

155 W. 31st St., Los Angeles, Cal. 

McKINNISS, ROBERT R., 

1 148 East Center St., Marion, Ohio. 

AUSBROOKS, JOHN B. 

HUGHES, WALTER D., 

1641 Lombard St., San Francisco Cal. 

FALLIS, ARTHUR T., 

514 S. Praid St. Muncie, Ind. 

HUGHES, FRANCIS W., 
Oakland, Cal. 

HASTINGS, SAM. 

RECORDS, WILSON K. 

KEEGAN, THOS. E. 

HALE, KINGSLEY. 



Company ''C" 



^25 



COOKS 



ARMSTRONG, ALTON T. 
BURKE, JOHN W., 
Santa Rosa, Cal, 



DUBSKY, SIEGFRIED, 
562 Grand Ave., Chicaj3;o 111. 

PONG, JEUNG C. 
Menio Park, Cal. 



MECHANICS 



JONES, GEO. P. R., 

3834 West St., Oakland, Cal. 
PATKINS, FRANK, 

Waterbur}^, Conn. 



HORTON, CHARLES C, 
Santa Clara, Cal. 



SAMUELS, HARLAN A. 
Eureka, Cal. 
VASSUER, C. L., 
Palma, Kentucky. 



BUGLERS 



SHOEMAKER, WILSON, 
Covington Ind. 



PRIVATES 

ALVES, WILLIAM M., 

Oakland, Cal. 
ASMUSSEN; EJNAR T. 
BALDWIN, HAROLD M., 

Wailuku, Maui, T. H. 
BALDWIN, HERBERT D., 

Wailuku, Maui, T. H. 
BALES, WILLIAM H., 

Salt Lake City, Utah. 
BATES, RALPH. 
BENSON, CHARLES J. 
BENSON, O. J. 

55 Marengo Park, Springfield, Mass. 
BROWN, EDWARD A. 
BUTLER, HORACE W. 
CALLISON, ELMER. 
CATCHING, JOEL P., 

Auburn, Cal. 
CLIFTON, ALEX. C. 
COLE, JOSEPH. 
DICKENSON, RAYMOND C. 
DYKES, TONY R. 
EMERZIAN, GRANT, 

Parlier, Cal. 
FEGO, PETER, 

146 East 129th St., New York City, 
N. Y. 
FELT, FRED W., 

Anaconda, Mont. 
GARCIA, PONSIANO. 
GRUND. ERVIN J. 
HARI,EMIL, 

167 East 40th St., Portland, Ore. 



—FIRST CLASS 

HARRISON AUBREY H., 

Querrado, N. Mex. 
HOFFMAN, JACOB. 
HUMISTON, P. G., 

619 South 4th St., Aurora, 111. 
HUNISTON, ARTHUR D., 

619 South 4th St., Aurora, 111. 
JOHAM, PETER. 
KELLEY, FREDERICK, 

3125 Webster St., Oakland Cal. 
KEMNER, WILLIAM. 
KIRCHEN, CHARLES J. 
KOHLER, CHARLES. 
KOSINSKI, NICK. 
KOSKEY, F. O. 
LAFF, CHRISTIE E. 
LESS, IRVING. 
LESTER, WILLIAM P., 

339 San ]os6 Ave., San Francisco, Cal. 
LUBALSKY, JULIUS S. 
MADDEN, LAWRENCE. 

MARTIN, EDGAR C, 
Cottonwood, Cal. 

Mcdonald, clyde p., 

HoUister, Cal. 
McVEY, WILLIAM C. 

MEIS, CHARLES, 
El Centro, Cal. 

MONGA, JOSEPH, 
Kennett, Cal. 

MYERS, JOHNS. 

NICHOLS, JAMES B. 



3^6 History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 



PRIVATES— FIRST 

NIX, THOMAS R., 
El Centre, Cal. 

OHENKOWSKI, ALEXANDER, 

Amsterdam, N. Y. 

PEREZ, FRANK, 

Sacramento, Cal. 
RAPPA, JOE. 
RYSER, JOHN. 
SCHAFFER, MAHLON K. 
SCHMALSLE, EDWARD, 

Miles City, Mont. 
SERF, JOHN. 
SHARP, JOSEPH L. 

SPAGNOLETTI, COSIMO, 

Bessmer, Mich. 
SPINNER, SYLVESTER. 
SMITH, JAY E., 

122 1 McCadden Place, Hollywood, 
Cal. 

STENSON, ALEXANDER D., 



CLASS {Continued) 

STRACHAN, WILLIAM A., 

1331 Dolores St., San Francisco, Cal. 
THEIL, EDWARD W. 
TOBENAS, EUGENIC. 
TRONSON, CLAUS, 

Clenham, S. D. 
TRUDEAU, HAROLD R. 
VAUGHAN, HARRY H. 
VEJAR, LORANDO, 

Pomona, Cal. 
WALKER, JAMES H., 

Oroville, Cal. 
WEBER, EARL M. 
WEISSBERGER, HERBERT P., 

188 St. Nichols Ave, New York 

City, N. Y. 
WHITMAN, FLOY E. 
WRIGHT, GEORGE F. 
ZEMA, HENRY, 

Fresno, Cal. 



PRIVATES 



ALTHEIMER, JEROME E. 
BARBIS, ANDREW. 
BARKER, GLENN A. 
BARRY, HARRY J. 
BARRY, JOHN. 
BELLINI, GIAVANAI. 
BERTOLOTTI, ATTILIO. 
BIGGI, STEVE. 
BOYLE, JOSEPH R. 

BRADFORD, ALBERT E., 

Orosi, Cal. 
BURNS, RAYMOND L. 
CAPEN, EDWARD A. 
CARPIGNANO, CIROLAMO. 
CASSAT, CHARLES P. 
CAVE, HARRY A., 

Eureka, Cal. 
CERVETTO, ANDREW. 
CETKOVICH. NICKOLO. 
CHIAMEXTO, EUGENIO. 
COHEN, SOLOMAN. 
CORAL, ABRAHAM. 
COX, CHARLES E. 
DAHL, ANDREW. 
DARLING, DAVID. 
DENNISON, HERBERT. 



DONAHEY, JAMES. 
DONAHUE, ANDREW. 
DELLAROCCA, JOSEPH. 
EBERHARD, WALTER C. 
EICHEL, FLOYD L. 
FARRON, PAUL. 
FAUSTINO, RAZZI D. 
FERNANDEZ, GEORGE L., 

140 Fair Oak St., San Francisco, CaL 
FEUM, CHEUNG. 
FEY, IRVIN T. 
FITZPATRICK, DAN. 
FONTANO, MICHELE. 
FOOK, JUNG. 
GAiMBETTI, VICTOR. 
GARRLSON, HOLLIE. 
GIAVARRAS, GUST. 
GIBSON, CLARENCE L. 
GROSSMAN, PAUL. 
GWEE, GEE Y. 
HALL, GORDON. 
HAMILL, CHARLES H. 
HAND, FRANK L. 
HARRIS, WILLIAM E. 
HARTJE, RICHARD J. 
HASKELL. FRED G. 



a /->'> 



Company ''C 



327 



HAUGHTON, LEWIS F. 
HEAGNEY, MICHAEL. 
HEIM, LOWELL M. 
HENSHALL, HENRY. 
HOMOLKA, FRANK. 
KAYMEYER, CONRAD L. 
LAMB, PARKE B. 
LANGFORD, ALFRED. 
LEONARD, EDWARD. 
LINSKEY, HARRY H. 
LORD, BRUCE C, 

Edon, Ohio. 
McCARTY, NORRIS. 

McLaughlin, frank p. 
mahu, james, 
maloney, bertram, 
mangos, harris. 
martens, hans, 
mews, kurt. 
minamonto, kiichi. 
mitchell, taylor, 
morosco, samuel v. 
murphy, john j. 
murphy, william w. 
nama, sinjh. 
orth, joseph, 
peloquin, roland. 



PRIVATES— ( Coflf/xiuet/ ) 

PAPASOTERIOU, JOHN S. 
PAULOS, GUST. 
POMA, ANSELMO. 
PYLAND, VADIE. 
RESCH, STEPHEN. 
RINEHOLD, WALTER D. 
RIVERS, FRANK A. 
ROBLES, ANDREW. 
ROBSON, HOMER. 
ROSSOTTI, STEPHANO. 
RUDINICA , MIHO P. 
SEVERT, THERON C. 
SHELTON, ALBERT. 
THURSTON, MEREDITH. 
TOMOVICH, SAM R. 
TRIANTAFELLOW, MIKE. 
TRIETMAN, DAVID. 
WALLING, ROY. 
WALSH, WALTER. 
WEED, NELSON D. 
WESTGATE, HARRY C. 
WETTLESON, OLEY. 
WILMOT, CHARLES. 
WILSMAN, CARL J. 
WOLFE, ALBERT A. 
WONG, FAY. 
ZAGORC, FRANK. 



Company " D 



LATHROP, LESLIE T. 
Hugo, Minn. 



PECK, CLARENCE R. 

Seattle, Wash. 
O'NEIL, CLARENCE, 
Baltimore, Aid. 



KEHOE, JAMESA., 
Maysville, Ky. 



CAPTAINS 

STEVENS, CHARLES N. 

FIRST LIEUTENANTS 

MORTON, WILLIAM, 
Frederick, Md. 

CLARK, EDWARD H., 
San Francisco, Calif. 

SECOND LIEUTENANTS 

FARLEY, JOHN H., 
Lowell, Mass. 
SHRIVER, ZANY. 



FIRST SERGEANT 

SCHARTAU, HERMAN H., Junction City, Kan. 

MESS SERGEANT 
FUHRKEN, EDWARD J., Washington, Kan. 

SUPPLY SERGEANT 
ABARRATEGUI, DOMINGO, Vale, Ore. 



MORGAN, PATRICK J., 

Philadelphia, Pa. 
HANNER, PIARRY L., 

Cross Forks, Pa. 
STONIS, STANLEY, 

Chicago, Illinois. 
HOWARD, JOHN, 

U. S. Army. 
POYTHRESS, HARRY A., 

Los Angeles, Calif. 

BARNETT, 



SERGEANTS 

DONAHUE, lAMES M. 

Coal Dale, Pa. 
CAMPBELL, ALEXANDER C, 

Amatilla, Oregon. 
ANDERSON, GEORGE E., 

Westfield, New Jersey. 
MINNEY, ROY T., 

McGregor, Iowa. 
WADSWORTH, JOSEPH, 

Kalispell, Montana. 
JAMESA., Fresno, Calif. 
328 



<<r^»' 



Company ''D 



329 



CORPORALS 



LOCKRIDGE, CLARENCE C. 

Loveland, Colo. 
BENT, CRAWFORD H., 

Los Angeles, Calif. ^ 

KOVACAVICH, TONNE, 

Bessemer, Michigan. 
SCOVEL, EUGENE, 

New York City, N. Y. 
CUNNINGHAM, FELIX A., 

Morgan Hill, Calif. 
FOXEN, ALEX. G., 

Los Angeles, Calif. 
HALL, WILLIAM, 

Avoca, Kentucky. 
HEADLEY, JAMES C, 

Kingman, Ariz. 
MARTIN, ADOLPH, 

Banning, Calif. 
PARSON, JAMES, 

Olive Hall, Kentucky, 
WILDER, HENRY, 

Palo Alto, Calif. 
DALE, ALEXANDER, 

U. S. Army. 
WILLIAMS, LESLIE M., 

Bell, Calif. 
LANGDON, JAMESL, 

Grass Valley, Calif. 



SANDGREN, DAVE A., 

Hoquiam, Washington. 
ELMORE, ROY C, 

Detroit, Michigan. 
CHUTNICUT, MARIANO, 

Escondido, Calif. 
GARLAND, WILLIAM D., 

Spokane, Washington. 
SIERASKI, JOHN, 

Hurley, Wisconsin. 
PITNER, HENRY, 

Chicago, Illinois. 
ALEXAKIS, GUST G., 

Santa Paula, Calif. 
DOWNING, ALVA, 

Dinuba, Calif, 
GORDON, ABRAHAM, 

Los Angeles, Calif. 
POHLE, ELMER B., 

Los Angeles, Calif. 
BUCKLEY, JERMIAH F., 

Pittsburg, Calif. 
JENSEN, CHRISTEN, 

Meridan, Idaho. 
JOHNSON, ALEX. S., 

Long Beach, Calif. 
BROWN, ASA L., 

Wendel, Calif 



PILGRIM, WILLIAM B., 
San Francisco, Calif. 

PRICHARD, WILLIAM, 
Sacramento, Calif. 



COOKS 



WEBBER, JOSEPH, 

Sacramento, California. 
TAKENOUCHI, SIN CHI, 
Yuma, Arizona. 



HALL, HARRY, 

Glasgow, Montana. 
HERMAN, ULYSSES S., 
Walla Walla, Washington. 



MECHANICS 



LINNAMAN, LEO R., 
San Francisco, Calif. 

RIORDAN, HARRY P. 
Chicago, Illinois. 



BUGLERS 



ECHEVERRIA, JOSE, 
Ybay, Florida. 



WARRICK, ROY C, 
El Paso, Illinois. 



PRIVATES— FIRST CLASS 



ANDERSON, CHESTER H., 

Gerome, Arizona. 
BARTEL, STANLEY, 

Chicago, Illinois. 



BUCHANAN LORENZO, 
Bakersville, North Carolina, 

CLARKE, CLYDE L., 
Wilton Junction, Iowa. 



330 History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 



PRIVATES 
COLLET, W., 

COLLET, WILLIAM C, 
Eureka, California. 

CORNETTE, WILLIAM P., 
Greenville, Ky. 

FIALA, JOHN, 

Chicago, Illinois. 

GLADIS, JOHNG., 

Bakersfield, Calif. 
HOCKING, ROBERT G., 

Ironwood, Mich. 
HOLLENTHANER, JOSEPH, 

Chicago, 111. 

JENSEN, LESLIE R.. 
Beaver, Ore. 

JONES, EDGAR C, 

Sacramento, Calif. 
JORGENSEN, INVALD, 
San Francisco, Calif. 

LUCE,REXFORD N., 

Clarksdale, Ariz. 
McGOVERN, CHARLES J., 

San Francisco, Calif. 
MOBERG, GEORGE, 

Twin Fail, Idaho. 
MOODY, WALTER A., 

Sheridan, Wyoming. 
MOORE, ALLAN, 

Los Angeles, Calif. 
OLSON, NELS J., 

Weed, Cahf. 



ALLEN, JASPER C, 

Richfield, Calif. 
ANDERvSON, ROBERT M. 

Bennett, Idaho. 
ANDERSON, ROGER W., 

Filer, Idaho. 
ASKREN, ROY T., 

Minneapolis, Minn. 
BASSETT, FRANCIS M., 

Wasco, Calif. 
BEERS, CARL W., 

Spokane, Wash. 
BEN, POON, 

San Francisco, Calif. 
BENEDETTI, TULLIO, 

Los Angeles, Calif. 
BERGERO, GIOBATTA, 

San Francisco, Calif. 



-FIRST CLASS— (Continued) 

PICKA, FRANK, 

Chicago, 111. 
PILE, CHESTER D., 

Globe, Ariz. 
POGUE, JOHN J., 

Bulah, Ore. 
PRICE, FR^^NKG., 

Moscow, Idaho. 
RASSMUSSEN, HARRY J., 

Clontif, Minn. 
RODRIQUEZ, ZACARIAS, 

Ignacio, Colo. 
RYAN, EARL, 

Livingston, Montana. 
SCHLUCKEBIER, GEORGE M., 

Sacramento, Calif. 
SPENHOFF, FREDERICK, 

Fresno, Calif. 
STENERSON, EUGENE, 

San Francisco, Calif. 
TAYLOR, JOHN H., 

Washington, D. C. 
TUTON, NELSON D., 

Tulare, Calif. 
VERGULAK, ELIAS, 

Chicago, 111. 
VUKOVICH, GEORGE, 

Midas, Nevada. 
WALLACE, JOSEPH T., 

Flagstaff, Ariz. 

WALTERS, GEORGE, 
Fullerton, Calif, 

PRIVATES 

BIDOU, JOSEPH, 

San Jose, Calif. 
BOND, GEORGE, 

Colusa, Calif. 
BORLA, CHARLES, 

Guadalupe, Calif. 
BOSWELL, ALBERT, 

Little Shasta, Calif. 
BREWSAUGH, OMER T., 

Newport, Ky. 
BROWN, MARION C, 

San Francisco, Calif. 
CALAPRICE, ROCCO, 

Los Angeles, Cahf. 
CHRISTENSEN, ANTONE P., 

San Francisco, Calif. 
CIZEK, CHARLES, 

Manitewac, Wis. 



Company ''D" 



331 



PRIVATES— (Conf/nue</) 



CORTAZZI, HERMAN F., 

San Josd, Calif. 
CUBBON, WILLIAM, 

Seattle, Wash. 
DAHLEN, FREDERICK W., 

Walla Walla, Wash. 
DANZER, ERNEST, 

Jordan Valley, Ore. 
DINGLE, JAMES, 

Cusson, Minn. 
DREW, ALBERT B. C, 

Gillette, Wyo. 
ELLIS, RICHARD D., 

Turlot, Calif. 
FACKLER, ORVILLE F., 

Pamena, Calif. 
FRAI, STANISLAW, 

Chicago, 111. 
GARCIA, EUSEBIO, 

Miama, Ariz. 
GIANFRANCESCO, PETRO, 

New Castle, Wash. 
GRABOWY, JOSEPH, 

Chicago, 111. 
GRAY, RICHARD, 

Rogerson, Idaho. 
GREENBURG, BENJAMIN, 

San Francisco, Calif. 
GROSZ, GEORGE, 

Los Angeles, Calif. 
HACKSELL, JOHN, 

Ramsay, Mich. 
HENDRICHSEN, IVER, 

Seattle, Wash. 
HENSLEE, LEO R.. 

Portland, Ore. 
HINER, FRANK, 

Lemon Cove, Calif. 
HOFFMAN, PAUL, 

Emmett, Idaho. 
HUGHES, ARCHIE, 

Teyone; Okla. 
HUSHNER, JACK, 

Los Angeles, Calif. 
HYDE, HARRY, 

Prescott, Ariz. 
INNIS, EMMETT F., 

Cresswell, Ore. 
IRBY, CLAUDE., 

Las Vegas, Nevada. 
IVERSEN, IVER, 

Hoquiam, Wash. 



JOHANSEN, JOHN, 

Seattle, Wash. 
LANDUYT, ADOLPH, 

Alpine, Wash. 
LEONG, GONG F., 

Oakland, Calif. 
LOHR, GEORGE, 

Los Angeles, Calif. 
LUDWIG, ALLAN, 

Dola, Ohio. 
MACAIRE, GEORGE, 

Delta, Utah. 
MANTHEY, EDWARD A., 

Cincinnati, Ohio. 
MAXWELL, FRANK, 

Eureka, Calif. 
MAYO, CLAYTON, 

Chelan, Wash. 

McCarthy, john a., 

Hawthorne. Nev. 
McCONNELL, HUBERT E., 

New Cornerston, Ohio. 
McDERMOTT, CHARLES, Jr. 

San Francisco, Calif. 

McDonald, robert e., 

Cadisonville, Ohio. 

mcgee, manly L., 

Columbus, Ohio. 
McKENNA, WILLIAM, 

Yreka, Calif. 
McNICOL, PHILIP. 

Salem, Ohio. 
MILLER, GLEN, 

San Francisco, Calif. 
MILLS, WILLIAM, 

Chico, Calif. 
MISSIRIS, NICHOLAS, 

San Francisco, Calif. 
MORGAN, JIM, 

Tuscaloosa, Alaska. 
NEILSEN, PETER L., 

Tolleson, Ariz. 
O'NEIL, JOHN, Jr., 

Coach eila, Calif. 
OSTERGARD, HARRY, 

Hoquiam, Wash. 
PADDEN, WILLIAM, 

St. Paul, Minn. 
PANTEL, JESS, 

Los Angeles, Calif. 
PIRAINO, JOSEPH, 

Baltimore, Md. 



332 History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 



PRIVATES— (CoflfiflueJ) 



PRETTI, LARRY, 

Oakland, Calif. 
PRINCE, DELL, 

Austin, Nev. 
PUCKETT, ROY, 

Antelope, Ore. 
RIDER, JESS, 

Walker, Calif. 
ROLSING, JOHN, 

Newark. New Jerse)'. 
ROSSI, GUSTAVE, 

San Francisco, Calif. 
ROUNDTREE, JOSEPH, 

Paulina, Ore. 
SACKERiMAN, WALTER, 

Baltimore, Md. 
SAUL, SIMON, 

Atlantic City, N. J. 
SCAHILL, PATRICK, 

Old Forge, Pa. 

SCALETTL JOSEPH, 
Tracy, Calif. 

SETH, ELDRED, 

Kalispell, Mont. 
SILVA, J., 

Berkley, Calif. 
SINGH, SHER, 

Orville, Calif. 

ZAHAROPULOS. 



SREBNIK, BORUCH, 

Baltimore, Md. 
TERRELL, ERNEST, 

Los Angeles, Calif. 
THAMAKAS, WILLIAM, 

Salt Lake City; Utah. 
ULBERG, CHRISTOPHER, 

Olinda, Calif. 

VANDOROS, STEFANOS, 

San Francisco, Calif. 
VARALLO, ATTALIO, 

Walnut Creek, Calif. 
WARDLAW, ROBERT, 

San Francisco, Calif. 
WASSMAN, CHARLES F., 

San Francisco, Cal. 
WENEZKY, BENNE, 

Los Angeles, Cal. 
WHITE, JOHN, 

Los Angeles, Calif. 
WILLOX, ALEXANDER C, 

San Francisco, Calif. 
WING, LAW, 

San Francisco, Calif. 
WINKLER, CHARLES, 

San Francisco, Cal. 
WON, WONG S., 

San Francisco, Calif, 
SAM, Phoenix, Ariz. 



MEN TRANSFERRED OUT OF REGIMENT. ADDRESSES UNKNOWN 



MILESTONE, LEROY. 
HANLEY, DANIEL. 



SERGEANTS 

BRACK, LAWRENCE. 
SMALL, HARRY. 



BECK, GEORGE. 
MAUR, JOHN. 
RYCROFT, JOHN. 
CASTO, JONATHAN. 



CORPORALS 

RAGLAN, GEORGE. 
BRADFORD, EUGENE. 
LAYMON, FREDERICK. 
O'NEIL, JOHN. 
HOOD, HAROLD D. 



COOK 

ROSS, CHARLES E. 



BUGLER 

SADLER, CLYDE N. 



Company "D 



333 



ALCEZIOUS JAMES. 
ALEXAKIS, STEALANOS. 
ARNEST, ROY. 
ATTALIO, VISCINSO. 
BAKER, HARRY J. 
BEHONIK, JOHN. 
BLAIR, JOSEPH. 
BONDE, J. C. 
BRAY, ROY. 
BUREN, AGUSTA W. T. 
CASTLE, MICHAEL. 
COCKERAL, CHARLES. 
CRAMER, JOSEPH. 
DUNLAP, WILFORD. 
DURAN, WILLIAM. 
FLICKENGER, GEORGE. 
FLINT, CHARLES. 
FITSGERALD, JAMES B. 
GALLOWAY, WILLIAM. 
GOME, RICHARD. 
GRABOWSKY, P. 
GREYSIK, EDWARD. 
GRIM, EMERY. 
HAINES. FRANK. 
HILL, WILLIAM. 
HINES, JOHN. 
HOLLSINGER, HENRY. 
INGRAM, GRANT. 



PRIVATES 

JONES, PERRY. 
KING, CHARLES. 
KINZE RUDOLPH. 
LEAIRD, BLAKE. 
LINNEHAN, WILLIAM E. 
LITTMAN, PHILIP. 
MAJORS, JAMES L. 
MARRIAFIELD, RALPH E. 
McDERMOTT, CHARLES, Jr. 
McFARLAND, CLARENCE. 
MOREHEAD, OTHO. 
NAGEN, LEE F. 
O'BRIEN, WILLIAM. 
OPAPSKY, FRANK. 
OVERTON, DOLLIVER N. 
PADGET, GEORGE. 
PEWITT, TALMA L. 
RUIZ, MANUAL. 
RUMMELSBURG, LEE A. 
SABO, JOHN. 
SCHON, WILLIAM. 
SHERIDAN, LESTER E. 
SMURR, FLOYD. 
vSANDERS, EUGENE T. 
SCHOLL, JOHN W. 
SPIKRE, JESS C. 
STOFFERS. CARL R. 
WILLIAMS, CARLTON W. 
ZARES, JOHN. 



Second Battalion Staff 



MAJOR 
WALKER, H. H. 



334 



Com 



pany 



CAPTAIN 

WINFIELD, R. M., 159 Oak Street, Clarksburg, West Virginia. 

FIRST LIEUTENANTS 

LEWIS, F. C, HALSTOx\, R. E., 

805 State Street, Hood River, Oregon. 2021 Leavenworth St., Omaha, Nebr. 

YOUNG. G. W., Jr., 25 West 51st Street, New York City. 



SECOND LIEUTENANTS 



TYSON, F. H., 

Middletown, Delaware. 



LEITCH, W. H. BUDD, 

Washington, D. C. 



FIRST SERGEANT 

LEPSKI, WILLIAM, 375 E. Kinney St., Newark, New Jersey. 

SUPPLY SERGEANT 

SHANKS, CHARLES, 430 East Catherine St., Louisville, Kentucky. 



MESS SERGEANTS 



NYMAN, JOHN 

100 W. 1 2th Place, Chicago 111. 
LEPSKI, WILLIAM, 

375 E. Kinney St., Newark, New 
Jersey. 
SHANKS, CHARLES, 

430 East Catherine St., Louisville, 
Kentucky. 
NYMAN, JOHN, 

100 W. I2th Place, Chicago, 111. 
HALLBERG, EDWARD L., 

Hallock, Minnesota. 
HENDLEY, THEOT., 

St. Louis, Missouri. 
CHAPMAN, THOMAS J., 

United States Army. 
SCULLY, EDWARD L., 

Chicago, 111. 



BRODIN, MANNE, 

San Francisco, California. 

MULLEN, JAMES V., 
Rochester, New York. 

BARNES, ERNEST J., 

Cor. Franklin & Whiting Sts., El 
Segundo, California. 

FARROW, ROBERT S., 

San Francisco, California. 

CUMMINGS, CLEVELAND, 
Korbel, California. 

JOHNSON, GUY R., 

Arcade Hotel, San Francisco, Cali- 
fornia. 

TELFORD, EDWARD T., 

428 5th Ave., Santa Barbara, Cali- 
fornia. 



335 



336 History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 



CORPORALS 



COREY, BEx\ P., 

156 Yukon St., San Francisco, Calif. 

FAHY, WILLIAM G., 

117 Precita Ave., San Francisco, Calif. 

FRANKLIN, JAMES, 
Boston, Massachusetts. 

HALL, HENRY F., 

San Francisco, California. 

HARRINGTON, GEORGE A., 

Crane California. 

MAHAR, ROBERT I., 
Rockland, Idaho. 

HALAKIN, CONSTANTINE, 
Chicago, 111. 

OFUKANY, ANDREW, 

Chicago, 111. 
CORRIERI, JOHN, 

HiUsboro, Oregon. 

COSTELLO, JAMES J., 

2075 East Madison St., Portland, 
Oregon. 

FOISTER, ROBERT P., 

Rufus, Oregon. 

MEWHITTER, MAX, 
Otis, Oregon. 

SCHOLES, CHARLES E. 

lone, Oregon. 
SKOG, JULIUS C, 

R. F. D.. No. I. Sherwood, Oregon. 
TECKER, RAYMOND W. 

Roland Hotel, Portland, Oregon. 



TOLKE, CHRIS P., 

Yamhill, Oregon. 
ARMBRUSTER, ROBERT W., 

126 Columbia St., Cumberland, Mary- 
land. 
HUBBARD, MILES F.. 

Williamsburg, Virginia. 
BERTRAM, OTTO L., 

Dayton, Oregon. 
BOYD, LESLIE K., 

Fresno, Calif. 
DEVENNIA, EDGAR A., 

162 Dakota St., Portland, Oregon. 
FORETTE, EDWIN, 

Almsville, Oregon. 
GRUBB, MERLE, 

Sherwood Oregon. 
KOWALSKI, ANTONE, 

370 Baldwin St., W. Portland, Oregon. 
SHWARTS, PETER, 

193 North 22nd St., Portland, Oregon. 
STEGEMAN, KARL W., 

730 Roosevelt St., Portland, Oregon. 
SHWARTS, PETER, 

193 North 22nd St., Portland, Oregon. 
WACHOTA, JOHN, 

Chicago, 111. 
BECK, De FOREST, 

4 Rivington St., New York, N. Y. 
BILEK, EDWARD. 
CAVAGNARO, CHARLES P. 
CONNELLY, JOSEPH L. 



COOKS 



BROOKS, LOUIS, 

McLeinsboro, 111. 
FABER, JOHN P., 

245 E. Broadway, Portland, Oregon. 



GARIS, WILLIAM M., 

Newton, North Carolina. 
PANGARES, STELIOS K., 

422 Morrison St., Portland, Oregon. 



MECHANICS 



ALBERTINI, JOSEPH, 

287 Market St., Portland, Oregon. 
HAUKE, JOHN O., 

323 Lyon St., Albany, Oregon. 



HOLSCHUH, HERMAN, 

1242 Roosevelt Ave., Salt Lake City, Utah. 
STEPANEK, FRANK, 

Sacramento, California. 



BUGLERS— FIRST CLASS 



DELOSE, CLEM J., 
R. F. D. No. 5, San Jos6, Calif. 



MASON, TROY F., 

2212 Sutter St., San Francisco, Calif. 



Company "E 



337 



PRIVATES- 
ANDERSON, NELS G., 
Hillsdale, Oregon. 

BANTA.SOLOMAN A., 
Marcola, Oregon. 

BECKMAN, EDWARD P., 
R. F. D. No. 2 Milwaukee, Oregon. 

BERGMAN, JOHN H., 

146 North 14th St., Portland, Oregon. 

BOYCE, MILTON, 
Winlock, Oregon. 

BROWN, EDWARD O., 

R. F. D. No. I, Independence, Oregon. 

BROWN, JAMES, 
44 North 1st St., Portland, Oregon. 

CARANIS, PETER G., 

Firth, Idaho. 

CHLADEK, FRANK, Jr., 
Lebanon, Oregon. 

CHRISTENSEN, RUPERT, 

R. F. D. No. 3, McMinnvillc, Oregon. 

COLE, HERBERT W., 

1625 Haven St., Portland, Oregon. 

COURTNEY, CHARLES M., 

139 North Hair, Baltimore, Maryland. 

CUMMINGS, JAMES J., 
63 6th St., Portland, Oregon. 

DUGWYLER, LEE, 

ID E. 7th St., N., Portland, Oregon. 

DUTTON, JOSEPH M., . 
Salem, Oregon. 

EBERLE, CHARLES J., 

1 185 E. Madison St., Portland, Oregon. 

ENNIS.WORDEN, 
228 E. 20th St., Portland, Oregon. 

EVINGTON, GEORGE W., 

1520 Sanchez St., San Francisco, 
California. 

FELSHER, JOHN F., 

449 loth St., Portland, Oregon. 

FOLMSBEE, VIVIAN, 
Salado, Oregon. 

GANSLE, ROBERT W., 
Halsey, Oregon. 

GILBERT, EDWARD J., 
Yamhill, Oregon. 

GRAND, PETER, 

784 Kelly St., Portland, Oregon. 

GRAY, FRANK, 

22>^ North 20th St., Portland, Oregon. 



FIRST CLASS 

HARRIS, HARRY H., 
Drain, Oregon. 

HELM AN, NATHAN, 

208 1 6th St., Portland, Oregon. 

HILBERG, ANDREW, 

1706 North Main St., Los Angeles, 
California. 

HILL, MAX O., 
Sublimity, Oregon. 

KELLEY. JOHN J., 
Lone Rock, Oregon. 

KOSEN, HENRY W., 
Portland, Oregon. 

LATIMER, ANDREW C, 

Route 6, Box 146, vSalem, Oregon. 

LEIS, ANTHONYS., 
Beaverton, Oregon. 

MERLAND, JOIINT., 

540 Republic St., Cincinnati, Ohio. 

MILLER, OTTO J., 

509 Locust Ave., Zanesville, Ohio. 

MITCHELL, WARREN B. 
1615 5th St., Portland, Oregon. 

MORRISSY, EDWARD S. 
Alder Street Dock, Portland, Oregon. 

MUESSIG, PAULJ., 

859 Milwaukee St., Portland, Oregon. 

MURPHY, HENRY R., 

Mesaba, Minnesota. 

O'CONNELL, THOMAS A., 

414 S. Leavitt St., Portland, Oregon. 

PICKRELL, LEEK., 

914 Chenevert St., Hughston, Texas. 

PITTS, LAWRENCE B. 

588 Rural St., Portland, Oregon. 

RODRIGUES, JOSEC, 

Oswego, Oregon. 
SLAUGHTER, LeROY T., 

Ono, California. 
SMITH, FRANK E., 

Park Place, Oregon. 

SPITZER, JOSEPH J., 
Eagle Point, Oregon. 

ULLRICH, EARL L., 
Silverton, Oregon. 

WARE, AUGUST, 
Licking, Missouri. 

WEBER, JOHN A.. 
Bend, Oregon. 



338 



History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 



PRIVATES 



AMES, HENRY C, 

Lebanon, Oregon. 
BAGGENSTOSS, ALBERT, 

Bynum, Montana. 
BARBEE, SIM W. 
BARREIO, JOHN, 

652;^ 5th St., Portland, Oregon. 
BAXTER, EARL E. 

5231 68th S. E., Portland, Oregon. 
BEAUREGARD, ALVIN E., 

541 Washington, St., Keene, New 
Hampshire. 
BECKER, EVERETT L., 

R. F. D., Salt Point, New York. 
BECKER, JOSEPH, 

Loma Vista, Oregon. 
BELLISON, NORMAN L., 

Route 2, Monrovia, Maryland. 
BIBLE, ALSTON D., 

Box 16, Flintstone, Maryland. 
BIBLE, GRANT J., 

Flintstone, Maryland. 
BIBLE, OTIS S., 

Flintstone, Maryland. 

BRONSERT, HENRY W., 

421 North 2 1st Street, Portland, 
Oregon. 

BROOKS, GLENN W., 
Jordon Valley, Oregon. 

BROWN, WILFRED, 

R. F. D. No. 2, Box II, Schuylerville, 
New York. 

BURKE, JOHN W., 
409 West 56th St., Los Angeles, Cali- 
fornia. 

BURT, GEORGE E., 

552 4th St., Troy, New York. 

BUTLER, WILLIAM W., 
Canary, Oregon. 

CAMPBELL, LAWRENCE W., 
Gilmore, Maryland. 

CASTER, JOHN D., 
Eagle Point, Oregon. 

CHANEY, RUSSELL P., 
Little Orleans, Maryland. 

CHEN, ADAM J., 

Blue Ridge Summit, Pennsylvania. 

COMERFORD, EDWARD F., 

327 loth Ave., New York, New York. 

CRISP, GEORGE E., 

R. F. D. No. I McMmnviUe, Oregon. 



DAVIS, WALTER L., 

R. 3, Sherwood, Oregon. 
DILLION, JOHN, 

Portland, Oregon. 
DIXON, FOREST L., 

511 North 2 1st St., Portland, Oregon. 
DONNELLY;, JAMES F., 

23 Reservoir St.. Cohoes, New York. 
DU BOIS, ARTHUR J., 

29 West St., Green Island, New York. 
EDWARDS, GEORGE L., 

R. D. No. I, Northville, New York. 
ERICKSON, AFFO, 

625 Washington St., Portland, Oregon. 
ERICKSON, RUBEN, 

St. Helens, Oregon. 
ESMOND, JOHN E., 

222 Oak St., Palmer Falls, New York. 
FAZZONE, ANTHONY, 

P. O. Box 675, Schenectady, New York. 
FINDLATER, JOHN G., 

Hillsbor*o, Washington. 
FRANK, CHARLES A., 

Stay ton, Oregon. 

FULLER, ERNEST B., 

124 Delaware St., Bend, Oregon. 
GALLAGHER, MARTIN, 

452 Bergen St., Brooklyn, New York. 
GARMAN, JOHN H., 

London, Oregon. 
GORMAN, EDWARD G., 

41 Cutter St., Waltham, Mass. 
GOSSARD, GEORGE E., 

Dickerson, Marj'land. 
GRAY, ROBERT W., 

R. F. D. No. 2- Gaithersburg, Mary- 
land. 
HARDEN, WILBERT J., 

Eckhart Mines, Maryland. 
HENCKEL, WILLIAM H., 

Zhilman, Maryland. 
HOUSE, HOWARD A., 

Parker, Oregon. 
HUNGER, ALVIN, 

Manning, Oregon. 

JACKSON, VARNUM, 

1202 McCrum Ave., Portland, Oregon. 

JENSEN, LAURITS, 

88 West Prescott St., Portland, Ore- 
gon. 
JOHNSON, OTTO, 

Kerry, Oregon. 



(< 17 " 



Company "E 



339 



PRIVATES— ( Contm ued) 



KARN, GEORGE C, 

Burkitsville, Oregon. 
KEITH, FRANCIS M., 

Reedisport, Oregon. 
KELLER, FRANK A., 

15 Cory Block, Great Falls, Montana. 
KERWOOD, EARL J., 

Ballston Lake, New York. 
KINNE. CHESTER C, 

R. F. D. No. 4, McMinnville, Oregon. 
KIRKPATRICK, DARRELL, 

Eureka, California. 
KNAPP, DUDLEY G., 

Forest Grove, Oregon. 
KOWITZ, WILLIE H., 

Crabtree, Oregon. 
KUMP, CHARLES W., 

R. F. D. No. 2, Emmitsburg, Mary- 
land. 
LANMAN, PERRY E., 

Summerville, Oregon. 
LARDON, NOAH R., 

R. 7, Salem, Oregon. 
LEE, GLENN E., 

R. F. D. No. 3, Silverton, Oregon. 
LETTENMAIER, WALTER H. A., 

Route, I Hubbard, Oregon. 
LEWIS, GUY C, 

R. F. D. No. 5, Smithsville, Maryland. 
LOCKETT, DEE, 

250 E. 1st St., Los Angeles, Calif. 
LUY, FREDERICK L., 

Wellan, Oregon. 
MACNEILL, JOHN, 

Glascoe, Montana. 
MALSAM, JOHN J., 

R. F. D. No. 5, Oregon City, Oregon. 
MARTIN, CLARENCE M., 

Box 234, R. 3, Salem, Oregon. 
McQUINN, ELMER, 

Winlock, Oregon. 
MINK, HERMAN, 

163 Hedges Ave., Mansfield, Ohio. 

WOOLDRIDGE, HARRY, R. 



MONTE CRISTO, OLIVER U., 

Wheeler, Oregon. 
MORIN, HENRY B., 

Warrenton, Oregon. 
MULLIN, ROYL., 

Hillsboro, Oregon. 
O'BRIEN, WILLIAM J., 

569 Overton St., Portland, Oregon. 
PEARSON, OSCAR J., 

512 Alder St., Portland, Oregon. 
PUTERBAUGH, GEORGE C, 

Box 305, McMinnville, Oregon. 
RASMUSSEN, NORRIS, 

Wasco, Oregon. 
RICHES, LELAND W, 

Turner, Oregon. 
ROOT, DIXIE, 

Gold Beach, Oregon. 
ROY, WINSTON O., 

566 First St., Portland, Oregon. 
RUSSELL, STANLEY W., 

Corralitos, California. 
SHINN, KENNETH F., 

Monterey California. 
SIGURDSON, OLIVER, 

Bader Hotel, Portland, Oregon. 
STEPHENSON, MILTON T., 

Mitchell, Oregon. 
TEELING, GUYE., 

219 West Tyler Street, Portland, 
Oregon. 
TOW, CLINTON S., 

Brewster, Minnesota. 
VAN BIBBER, GILBERT H., 

Salem, Oregon. 
WALTON, MAURICE H., 

R. 3, Newburg, Oregon. 
WATSON, FRANK L., 

Fossil, Oregon. 
WILLIAMS, ELMER J., 

R. F. D. No. 4, HilLsboro, Oregon. 
WILSON, SAMUEL R., 

Ardmore, Oklahoma. 
F. D. No. 2, Albany, Oregon. 



TRANSFERRED TO COMPANY "E," 72nd INFANTRY 



SERGEANTS 



McCRORY, OTIS O., 

Kosciusko, Mississippi. 



FLEMING, JOSEPH C, 
Rockey Ford, Colorado. 



HYAMS, MAX, New York, N. Y. 



340 History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 



BEALL, LINTON T., 

Sweetwater, Texas. 
CLARK, WILLIAM M., 

Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. 
FRANK, HOWARD R., 

Harrisburg, Penn. 



CORPORALS 



JOSEPHSON CYRIL, 
Copper Canyon, Colorado. 

LOTTA, JOHN, 
Rochester, Nevada. 

TANDLE, AMBROSE, 
Wolf Creek, Montana. 



STEPHENS, ODIE, Pocahontas, Ark. 



PRIVATES— FIRST CLASS 



CHENEY, JOHNSTON M., 

5203 South J Street, Tacoma, Wash. 
FATURUS JAMES, 

251 Adam St., Portland, Oregon. 
HARP, ALVA C, 

Route 7, Salem, Oregon. 
JOHNSON, EMIL, 

151 K 6th St., Portland, Oregon. 
LEE, CHESTER E., 

Marion, Oregon. 



LORENZEN, LAMICK S., 

Dayton, Oregon. 
MAYER, MANNIE E., 

1 180 East Caruthers, Portland, Oregon. 
MULLIGAN, EDWARD, 

Heppner, Oregon. 
OULLIS, JOHNG., 

519K W'illiams Ave., Portland, Oregon. 
WATKINS, FOUNT F., 

Fossil, Oregon. 



PRIVATES 



AMATO, GIUSEPPE 

531 East 1 8th St., Portland, Oregon. 
BAIN, JAMES, 

HedgesviUe, Montana. 

BRATTON, JOHNH., 
WaUowa, Oregon. 

DANNA, ANTONIO, 
675 Brooklyn St., Portland, Oregon. 

DUHALME, JOSEPH J., 
902 Syracuse St., Portland, Oregon. 

EINEN, MAGNUS, 
Arizona Street, Bend, Oregon. 

FREDENBERG, JAMES L., 
Marcola, Oregon. 

GRIFFITH, CLYDE R., 
Langlois, Oregon. 

HENDERSON, WALTER, 

559 Valencia St., San Francisco, Cal. 
KARAMANOS, BASSILIOS, 

307K Burnside St., Portland, Oregon. 



KILLIN, LLOYD T., 

6th & Willamette Sts.; Newberg, 
Oregon. 

KOTZMAN, CHARLES N., 

Bend, Oregon. 
PAGNA, CASARE, 

240 Second St., Portland, Oregon. 
RICHARD, EMERY F., 

Harrisburg, Oregon. 
SCHMITT, ALVIN L., 

Sublimity, Oregon. 

SHERMAN, FRANK O., 

Wedderburn, Oregon. 
SPENCER, WILLIAM, 

Mulligan, Oregon. 
TEGLIA, VALENTE, 

48 E. Caruthers St., Portland, Oregon. 
WHITE, HOMER, 

Monmouth, Oregon. 

ZIMMERMAN, ALFRED W., 
Sheridan, Oregon. 



TRANSFERRED 



COOK 

COURNAVOS, GEORGE C. 430 E. Mill St., Portland, Oregon. 



HT? »' 



Company "E 



341 



CORPORAL 

DOBSON, HARRY J., _ HORNADAY, RALPH W., 

818 May St., Hood Rover, Oregon. 270^^ 4th St., Portland, Oregon. 

GUISTI, CLENN, TURNER, JAY G., 

Corte Madera Ave., Mill Valley, Calif. 1540 Van Houten St., Portland, Oregon. 



PRIVATES- 

ASHBURN, THOMAS E., 

Lone Rock, Oregon. 
CHRISTENSER, JAMES, 

West Lake, Oregon. 
ECKERT, ELMER F., 

47 E. 29th St., N. Portland, Oregon. 
EVANS, RALPH G., 

Del Monte, Calif. 



-FIRST CLASS 

HOWARD, FRANK, 

176 3rd St., San Francisco, Cal. 
KRIEGER, JOHN O., 

Fossil, Oregon. 
MAHONEY, WILLIAM J., 

Yamhill, Oregon. 
SELLERS WILLIAM D., 

Hermiston, Oregon. 



PRIVATES 



ALIPERTE, FRANCESCO, 

Oakmont, West Virginia. 
BARRET, JAMES, 

143 Ferry St., Troy, N. Y. 
BARTLETT, CARLH., 

Villa St. Clara, Portland, Oregon. 
BENJAMIN, ELI, 

137 Hoosac St., Troy, N. Y. 
BJORNSTADT, JOHN, 

407 E. Watson St., Lewiston, Mont. 

BOUCK, CHARLES S., 

433 Van Vost St., Schenectady, N. Y. 
BOWEN, CLARENCE D., 

R. F. D. No. 2, Otsego, New York. 
COOLEY, BENJAMIN W., 

1601 E. i6th St., Portland, Oregon. 
DARBY, MARION D., 

Bay City, Oregon. 
DIETZ, CHARLES P., 

1316 N. New Kirk St., Philadelphia, 
Penn. 
EGERER, ANDREW, 

719 East Polk St., Portland, Oregon. 
FREIBERGER, PETER C, 

829 Vancouver St., Portland, Oregon. 
FRIETAS, JOSEPH J., 

No. 2 Hamilton St., Hartford, Conn. 
GODSKESEN, CHRISTIAN H., 

539 Mississippi Ave., Portland, Oregon. 
HASSON, BEN., 

28o>i Park St., Portland, Oregon. 
HERRERA, RAMON, 

Mesilla, New Mexico. 
HUBL, GUSTAF., 

Toledo, Oregon. 



HUGHES, JOSEPH E., 

Klamath Falls, Oregon. 
JEWITT, CLAUDY, 

Heppner, Oregon. 
JOHNSON, THORG A., 

Mabel, Oregon. 
KAHL, SOLOMON A., 

559 Ladd Ave., Portland, Oregon. 
KESSLER, LEONARD L., 

Lebanon, Oregon. 
KINYON, IRA, 

Anderson, Calif. 
KUMPULA, ELI, 

St. Helens, Oregon. 
LESLIE, RICHARD F., 

Alder Hotel, Portland, Oregon. 
LIVENGOOD, GROVER C, 

R. F. D. No. 2, Newberg, Oregon. 
MANNIX, JAMESP., 

Route No. I, Box 338 Santa Rosa, 
Calif. 
MASTERS, JOHN L., 

Route No. I, Kirby, Oregon. 
MILLER, FOSTER C, 

492 S. 7th St., Upper Sandusky, Ohio. 
OSARD, PETER R., 

Jacksonville, Oregon. 
PASINI, ARTHUR, 

Troutdale, Oregon. 
RAPPE, HERBERT, 

225 Main St., Watsonville, Calif. 
RYDBERG, AXEL W., 

2720 Hamilton St., Omaha, Nebr. 
SCHMIEDEBERG, WILLIAM F., 

Rex Hotel, Santa Barbara, Calif. 



342 History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 

PRIVATES— (CoflfZnoec/) n^ 

SEREDUK, KUSMA, SULLIVAN, JOHN. 

229 Hooker St., Portland, Oregon. 433 Larabee St., Portland, Oregon. 

STRIEFF, ALBRACHT, TORRES, SARAFIN B., 

R. I, Box 47, Hilsdale, Oregon. Belen, New Mexico. 

WAH, JUNG M., De Moy Hotel, Portland, Oregon. 

TRANSFERRED TO OFFICERS TRAINING SCHOOLS 

SERGEANT 
RUBY, CHARLES E., Rochester, New York. 

CORPORALS 

COLE, HARRIS A., HOGG, JOHN G., 

Nogales, Ariz. R. F. D. No. 2, Salem, Oregon. 

GUSTAFSON, ALBERT, KETTLEBERG, EDWARD H., 

Hotel Orrington, Manchester, New 367 .Sacramento St., Portland, Oregon. 
Hampshire. 

SULT, MICHAEL C, 744K E. Ankeny St., Portland, Oregon. 

PRIVATES— FIRST CLASS 
BENTLEY, KENNETH W., McDOUGAL, WALTER, 

389 Taylor St., Portland, Oregon. 830 S. 12th St., vSalem, Oregon. 

PRIVATES 

BELDEN, THOMAS M., EDMINSTER, ALBERT F., 

16 Clifton Place, Danbury, Conn. Clarendon, Virginia. 

BENNETT, WILLIAM M., HAYDEN, KENNETH H., 

Burns, Oregon. Toledo, Oregon. 

BLOSER, ROBERT E., MILLER, CHARLES F., 

2001 i6th St., N. W., Washington, 224 East King St., Lancaster, Ohio. 

^- C- WILSON, ROBERT A., 
CASE, CHESTER H., 34 East i6th St., N., Portland, Ore- 

Y. M. C. A., Oakland, Calif. gon. 

FURLOUGHED 

SERGEANT 
SAUNDERS, MANUEL T., 450 Linden Ave., San Francisco, Cal. 

PRIVATES 
BURNS, ROBERT H., SCHWARTZ, ADAM, Jr., 

92 Thompson St., New Haven, Conn. 49 Morris St., Portland, Oregon. 

DISCHARGED 

CORPORAL 
STEM, CLARENCE G., R. F. D., McMinnvUe, Oregon. 



<<T7 " 



Company "E 



343 



COOK 

NISSIRIOS, NICK, 410 Hawthorne Ave, Portland, Oregon. 

PRIVATES— FIRST CLASS 
PALMBLAD, PAUL, PIENDL, VERNON M., 

846 Sandy Boulevard, Portland, Oregon. Kansas Ave. & Hill St., Bend, Oregon. 

PRIVATES 



ALLEN, CLAUD R., 

Hotel Lennox, Portland, Oregon. 
BURRUS, RUSSELL M., 

Banks, Oregon. 
DOWNS, HUGHSTON E., 

R. D. No. 2, Germantown, Seneca, 
Maryland. 
DRAPER, JOHN A., 

Smithsburg, Maryland. 
GETSON, HENRY J., 

Carginsville, Maryland. 
KARAM, JOE N., 

Aroyo Mvd., Nogales, Ariz. 



MEGERT, ERNEST, 
Hillsdale, Oregon. 

MOESTA, WALTER C, 

455 Considine Ave., Cincinnati, Ohio. 

MORIN, JEAN, 

32 Hart St., Cohoes, New York. 

NICHOLSON, ALEX., 
Chapman, Oregon. 

RICHMOND, ALLEN E., 

265X 5th St., Portland, Oregon. 

SINGLEMAN, EDWARD J., 

1 199 Detroit St., Portland, Oregon. 



Com 



pany 



«p»» 



p. A. HELMBOLD, 



CAPTAINS 

GILMORE L. HAYMAN. 



FIRST LIEUTENANTS 

DONALD P. SPAULDING, THADDEUS C. KNIGHT, 

MYLES W. WARD. 



SECOND LIEUTENANTS 



HOWARD F. McCAiNDLESS, 
HERBERT L. JENESS, 



LANCE E. GOWAN, 
IRWIN J. MUELLER. 



FIRST SERGEANT 

DUFFY, JOSEPH S., U. S. Army. 

SUPPLY SERGEANT 
CROWLEY, ALVA M., Rockland, Idaho. 

MESS SERGEANT 
LUNDQUIST, AGART H., Glendale, Ore. 



SERGEANTS 



WOOD, LEVY G., 

San Francisco, Cal. 
MUSK, FLOYD, 

Berea, Ohio. 

GUCHIK, RIDOLPH J., 

Chicago, 111. 
TOOLEY, LEO, 

Proctorville, Ohio. 
SIMONS, LEWIS, 

Truckee, Cal. 

BOYER, WILLIAM H. T., 
Joliet, 111. 



ROBERTS, THEODORE 

Escanaba, Mich. 

YOST, CHARLES G. 

LEONARD, ELBA L., 
Granger, Ind. 

DEERING, ROY B., 
Harrisburg, 111. 

ROBERTS, EDWARD C, 
Chicago, 111. 

SCHAEFER, WESLEY C, 
Vashon, Wash. 



344 



<< T7" 



Company "F 



345 



CORPORALS 



BETTS, WILLIAM G., 

Santa Monica, Calif. 
LIEBOLD, JOHN G., 

Victorville., Cal. 
MacDONALD, WILLIAM A., 

516 O'Farrel St., San Francisco, Cal. 
ROSS, HECTOR, 

San Francisco, Cal. 
ROMERO, JOHN M., 

San Francisco, Cal. 
SWEENEY, PETE, 

Sacramento, Cal. 
DONOHOO, VIRGIL H., 

3336 Piatt St., Fresno, Cal. 
HEGEMAN, JOE H., 

Pasadena, Cal. 
QUIDOR, WILLIAM B., 

139 1 Goodf allow Ave., St. Louis, Mo. 
CURTIS, WILLIAM A., 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 
GRAHAM, THOMAS, 

Reno, Nev. 
MURPHY, ARTHUR T., 

Reno, Nev. 
MALLORY, GUYON E., 

Los Angeles, Cal. 

DRACK, HERMAN M., 132 



MORELOCK, LEONARD R., 

183 East 79th St., Portland, Oregon. 
BECKEN, SILAS J., 

R. F. D. No. I, Hillsboro, Oregon. 
BEAN, GEORGE M. G., 

Keeler, Calif. 
LANGON, OMAHA A., 

San Francisco, Cal. 
HARRIS, CHARLES B., 

San Francisco, Cal. 
HOLLRICH, BUDD, 

302 i2th St., Caldwell, Idaho. 
ROBINSON, CLYDE R., 

513 E. 3d St., Anaconda, Mont. 
TUCKER, ELMER W., 

Klamath Falls, Ore. 
McCAULEY, RUSSELL, W., 

676 Wasco St., Portland, Ore. 
WALLS, JOSEPH C, 

149 Balback St., San Jos6, Cal. 
WARE, WILLIE L., 

San Francisco, Cal. 
WEYER, CHRISTOPHER J., 

Mahoney, Penn. 
MOORE, FARMER D., 

GaUup, N. M. 
N. 2ist St., Portland, Oregon. 



COOKS 

DEMAS, JAMES, HOFFMAN, JOSEPH, 

128 K. St., Sacramento, Cal. Butte, Mont. 

MINO, GIACOMO, Rockaway Beach, N. Y. 



BOURDAGES, LOUIS, 

Bisbee, Arizona. 
KLAVIK, THOMAS, 
Chicago, 111. 



MECHANICS 



SISK, THOMAS M., 

O'Neals, Cal. 
STEEN, HENRY, 

Vashon, Wash. 



BUGLERS 



MASCARO, RALF M. 

832 East Main St., Stockton, Cal. 



STRUVE, JARVIS C, 

Jamestown, N. D. 



PRIVATES— FIRST CLASS 



ANDERSON, ALFRED W., 

Tillamook, Ore. 
BETTEGA, LUISI, 

Knightsen, Cal. 



BETZER, JAY C, 

Chandler, Okla. 
BROWN, LEONARD M., 

Anlauf, Ore. 



34^ History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 



PRIVATES— FIRST 

BURTON, HERBERT E., 

103K "J" St., Sacramento, Cal. 
CALLAWAY, ETHAN V., 

651 8th Ave., Eugene, Ore. 
CARTER, RANSOM B., 

Rogue River, Ore. 
EVANS, CLAUDE L., 

Long Beach, CaL 
FANNING, JOSEPH B., 

Stockton, CaL 
FOWLES, BRADFORD, 

Banks, Ore. 
GENTRY, ALBERT L., 

Lebanon, Ore. 
HAM, WILEY C, 

341 High St., Eugene Ore. 
HAMMOND, DAWSON V., 

R. F. D. No. I, New Market, Md. 
HAYNES, FRANK W., 

R. R. No. 6, Box 134, Salem, Ore. 

HORTON, RAE G., 
Klamath Falls, Ore. 

JAQUES, MANUEL, 
Eureka, Cal. 

KERNS, HAROLD C, 

174 No. Washington St., Eugene, Ore. 

LARGHI, CHARLES, 
Corcoran, Cal. 

LOPEZ, PETE, 
Bly, Ore. 

MANSUR, JAMES B., 
Rujada, Ore. 

MISSIO, ANGELO, 
Yreka, Cal. 

MOEBIUS, HERMAN, 
Pendleton, Ore. 

MOOZAKIS, TOM, 
North Bend, Ore. 

MORTON, FRED A., 

163 West Dakota St., Denver, Col. 



CLASS (Contiaued) 

MYERS, STEPHEN, 

Gates, Ore. 
O'CONNOR, JUSTIN J., 

132K Union Ave., Portland, Ore. 
OLDS, JOHN, 

R. F. D., No. 2, Beaverton, Ore. 
OLIVER, JOHN J., 

Redwood City, Cal. 
OLSON, OSWALD W., 

Springfield, Ore. 
PATE, THOMAS B., 

85 4th St., San Francisco, Cal. 
PETERSON, GUNNAR A., 

Silverton, Ore. 
POIDL, FRANK, 

Chicago, 111. 
PORTA, ANGELO, 

San Francisco, Cal. 
SCHOLL, ERNEST L., 

Sweet Home, Ore. 
SHIELDS, WILLIAM C, 

Cottonwood, Cal. 
SICCA, CARLO, 

1627 Wallace Ave., San Francisco, Cal. 
SJOGREN, ABLE, 

545 Hood St., Portland Ore. 
STEFANI, AMEDO, 

2455 Lombard St., San Francisco, Cal. 

STEWART, EDWARD L., 

Boulder Creek, Cal. 
STONE, WILLIAM, 

San Luis, Obispo, Cal. 
TRAIN, MARION B. 
VERBIEvST, CORNELLS G. B.. 

Redding, Cal. 
VINER, JAMES, 

Stockton, Cal. 
VITALE, ANTHONY, 

San Francisco, Cal. 
WILLIAMS, RALPH A., 

R. F. D. No. 2, Corvallis, Ore. 



PRIVATES 



ABEL, JESSE, 

2302 N. 1 8th St., Philadelphia, Pa. 
ABRAHAMS, RUDOLPH, 

812 E. 33d St., Lorain, Ohio. 
ARTURI, LUBERTO, 

Portland, Ore. 
BARTOLOxMEO, SICCARDI, 

427 W. 36th St., New York, N. Y. 



BENAMATI, ROMEO, 

14 Wilson St., Mechanicsville, N. Y. 
BENNETT, DELBERT, 

Wendling, Oregon. 
BETTES, ROBERT, 

Silver Springs, Md. 
BIAGGINI, NAZZARENOTI, 

310 W. 26th St., New York, N. Y. 



li 17" 



Company '*F 



347 



PRIVATES 

BIASE, JOHN, 

408 Warren St., Schenectady, N. Y. 
CHAMBERLAIN. ARTHUR. 
CHAPIN, FRANK W., 

Waldport, Oregon. 
CHASE, MARVIN L., 

Eugene, Oregon. 
CLARK, JAY, 

Monmouth, Oregon. 
COSGROVE, SAMUEL, 

Frostburg, Md. 
DAVIS, THOMAS E., 

Barton, Md. 
DEAN, JOSEPH A., 

Frostburg, Md. 
DUBLE, WILLIAM M., 

Graceham, Md. 
EDWARDS, OTIS D., 

Tillamook, Ore. 
ENGLE, WILLIAM N., 

Eckart, Md. 
ENKELIS, NATE, 

630 ist St., Portland, Ore. 
FALKENHAGEN, JOHN C, 

268 3d St., Portland, Ore. 

GAFFERY, MICHAEL J., 

San Francisco, Cal. 
GARDNER, ADAM, 

Waterford, N. Y. 
GEORGE, ATHANASSIOS, 

409 Main St., Hartford, Conn. 
GIRTON, FRED R., 

3663 Ash St., Astoria, Ore. 
GLACKEN, JOSEPH, 

Emmitsburg, Md. 

GRAHAM, DONALD, 
Portland, Ore. 

HARLAN, PAUL, 
Lucia, Cal. 

HAYES, WILLIAM J., 

683 Broadway St., WatervHet, N. Y. 

HIGGINS, JOSEPH F., 
Vale Summit, Md. 

HILL, BOB T., 
Los Angeles, Cal. 

HINES, EDWARD F., 
Green Island, N. Y. 

HOLMES, WILLIAM H., 
214 King St., Oneonta, N. Y. 

HORTON, JEAN E., 
Rogue River, Oregon. 



{Continued) 

HOVER, ARTHUR J., 

Central Point, Oregon. 
lABORNI, VINCENZO, 

716 Cattill St., Schnectady, N. Y. 
lORDANEDES, ARHAGELOS, 

Tonopah, Nev. 
JONES, JAMES H., 

New Market, Md. 
KENNESTON, GEORGE W., 

557 8th St., Watervhet, N. Y. 
KING, CARL W., 

Clarksburg, Md. 
KINNA, GUY B., 

Frederick, Md. 
KOKKAS, DOMETRIOS, 

12 N. 4th St., Portland, Ore. 
KOOGLER, RUBEN, 

Waldport, Ore. 
LADOSE, VEDOR, 

315 Myrtle St., Oakland, Cal. 
LEE, WILL B., 

Los Angeles, Cal. 
LOAR, JOSEPH R,, 

Midland, Md. 
LOCHNER, JOHN L., 

Lonaconing, Md. 
LOYNES, JOHN F., 

Forest Grove, Ore. 
LULL, ALVIN W., 

1 134 Jefferson St., Hillsboro, Ore. 
LYNCH, JOHN W., 

131 1 N. Luzerne Ave., Baltimore, Md. 
LYON, CARL O., 

Scio, Oregon. 
MACE, PETER W., 

404 8th Ave., New York, N. Y. 
MARANI, BENAMINO, 

Mammoth, Cal. 
MARINETTO, PIETRO, 

275 Baker St., Portland, Ore. 
MARRA, JOHN W., 

Cohoes, N. Y. 
MARSHALL, EDWARD, 

Garibaldi, Ore. 
MARTOCCHIO, HENRY, 

10 Kilbourn St., Hartford* Conn. 
MARZELO, ANGELO, 

Haives Cave, N. Y. 
MAY, JAMES, 

80 E. 57th St., Portland, Ore. 
McCLANAHAN, OVAL, 

1200 W. 2d St., Medford, Ore. 



348 History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 



PRIVATES 

McCUISTIOX, JAMES E., 

1 1 18 9th St., Hood River, Ore. 
MENEAR, LLOYD, 

Foster, Oregon. 
MESIANO, DOMENICO, 

2365 Hoflfman St., New York, N. Y. 
MOLLICONE, PIETRO, 

no Romyn St., Schenectady, N. Y. 
MOORE, DANIEL, 

1033 W. Freeman St., Pocatello, Idaho. 
MOORE, JAMES R., 

535 Liberty St., Penn Yan, N. Y. 
MORAN, WILLIAM G., 

San Francisco, Cal. 
MOROSKO, JOHN, 

Zanesville, Ohio. 
MOYNIHAN, JOHN H., 

South Glens Falls, N. Y. 
MUELLER, ADOLPH G., 

Stayton, Ore. 
MURPHY, FRANCIS D., 

Corinth, N. Y. 
MURPHY, JOHN T., 

4 Burton Ave., Boston, Mass. 
MUSHKAT, SIMON, 

801 4K St. S. W., Washington, D. C. 
NELSON, FRED, 

314 East 6th St., Portland, Ore. 
NEMEE, JOHN, 

1445 E. Lafayette St., Stockton, Cal. 
NOFFSINGER, THOMAS M., 

Mapleton, Ore. 
ODEN, NELSON, 

Rogue River, Ore. 
OLIVERIO, CARMINE, 

459 E. 32d St., Portland, Ore. 
PASTTRIONO, TOMASCO, 

184 Mill St., Portland, Ore. 
PENROD, EARL, 

313 Grant St., Pequa, Ohio. 
POWELL, CHARLIE, 

Berlin, Ore. 
QUIRING, DAVID, 

Dallas, Ore. 
RAKIS, NICK, 

Poplar, Mont. 



{Continued) 

REED, ROBERT V., 

Spray, Ore. 
REPPAS, CHRIST J., 

Umatilla, Ore. 
RIDOLIFI, CHARLES, 

Stratford, Cal. 
RIPPAS, PETE, 

Neverstil, Ore. 
RITZDORF, EDWARD A., 

San Francisco, Cal. 
SANDELL, CARL F., 

Klamath Falls, Ore. 
SANDROSKY, SIMON 

Portland, Ore. 
SAX, JOHN F., 

Rose Lodge, Ore. 
SCOVELL, HERSCHEL, 

Nehalem, Ore. 
SELLER, EDWIN G., 

Mabton, Wash. 
SICOTTE, LEON, 

Minneapolis, Minn. 
SPARKS, DAVID A., 

Woodburn, Ore. 
SPENCER, CHARLES. 
SYVERSON, HERBERT S. 

Beaverton, Ore. 

TAYLOR, HARRY, 
Coburg, Ore. 

TRUMMER ABRAHAM, 
Hillsboro, Ore. 

VANDERDONCKT, RAMEY A., 
Taft, Cal. 

VIAU, MOSES, 
Bend, Ore 

WALLER, EVERETT C, 
R. F. D. No. I, Albany, Ore. 

WALTERS, CLYDE, 

610 No. Riverside Ave., Medford, Ore. 

WANNER, KARL, 
Gervais, Ore. 

WEST, WILLIE R., 
Terrebonne, Ore. 

WOLOSUK, ROMAN, 

Schenectady, N. Y. 



KELLY, MARK. 



FORMER ENLISTED MEN OF CO. " F,» 63d INFANTRY 

(Address Unknown.) 

FIRST SERGEANTS 

CHAIPEL, CLIFFORD L. 



«I?" 



Company "F 



349 



WAZNIAK, STANLEY. 

SHEEHY, JOHN. 
FINNEY, RUSSELL. 

DAVIS, EDGAR J. 
HOLDREN, JOHN H. 
LOWTHER, JOHN H. 
KENDALL, JAMES M. 
WEBER, ANTON. 
STEVENSON. ROBERT. 



adams, george c. 
alaxanian, a. 
anderson, nels g. 
arata, louis l. 
archer, frank b. 
basye, john r. 
black, robert, 
brignolo, g. 
brignolo, germano. 
brooks, lewis, 
burrus, russell m. 
butler, william w. 
cain, frederick b. 
caranis, peter g. 
carmak, carl, 
caster, john d. 
chamtness, george, 
clark, thomas p. 
cook, harrison, 
craford, willard e. 
curry, thomas r. 
darby, marion b. 
davis, walter l. 
deGeorge, peter N. 

DOLAN, A. 

EDWARDS, TAMES T. 
ELLER, H. H. 



MESS SERGEANT 

JOHNSON, CHARLES D. 

SUPPLY SERGEANTS 

FRANCIS, FRANK. 
SERGEANTS 

BURNS, EDWARD. 
HICKS, WILLIAM F. 

CORPORALS 

CANTRILL, RUBE. 
WILSON, WILLIAM S. 
PERKINS, JAMES H. 
FARRIS, HOMER D. 
STUMPF, ANDREW A. 
HUNTER. 
CASH, ALVIN B. 

BUGLER 

PRICHARD, GUY J. 
PRIVATES 

FARRELL, DENNIS E. 
FINDLATER, JOHN D. 
FORRETTE, OLIVER A. 
FRANK, HOWARD R. 
GALLAWAY, THOMAS F. 
RGAMAN, JOHN H. 
GETSON, HENRY J. 
GOKEY, FRED. 
GORDON, JAMES E. 
GRINDSTEAD, ROY E. 
GUZZETA, SAM. 
HALEY, VERNON H. 
HAMMOND, CHARLES D. 
HARBOUGH, CHARLES. 
HARDEN, WILBER J. 
HARDISTY, HUEY A. 
HAWK, WILSON V. 
HENCKEL, WILLIAM H. 
HENERIXSON, ROY. 
HIGGINS, THOMAS W. 
HILL, MAX O. 
HILTABIDEL, CHARLES F 
HIOURES, PETER S. 
HOUSE, HOWARD A. 
HUMPHREYS, HARRY. 
HUNGER, ALVIN. 
JAMES, WALTER. 



350 History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 



PRIVATES 
JEHAN, FRANCIS. 
JOHNS, ARTHUR B. 
JOHNSON, GEORGE. 
JOHNSON, GUY R. 
KARN, GEORGE C. 
KERNS, EUGENE J. 
KERWOOD, EARL J. 
KIRKPATRICK, DARRELL. 
KLINGER, OLIVER H. 
KNAPP, DUDLEY C. 
KNOTT, HARRY. 
KOKINOS, K. 
KOWITZ, WILLIE H. 
KUMP, CHARLES W. 
KVINGE, THEODORE G. 
LAPIER, EARL H. 
LARDEN, NOAH. 
LETTENMAIER, WALTER H. A. 
LEVIN, JACOB. 
LEWIS, GUY C. 
LEWIS, JOHN E. 
LOCKABEY, CHARLES. 
LONG, JAMES R. 
LOPEZ, FRANK. 
LOTTA, JOHN. 
MacDONALD, ROBERT R. 

mahar, robert i. 
maxNDEni, mike, 
mangone, joe f. 
mannix james p. 

MARKOE, THURBE A. 
MILLER, CHRISTEN M. 
MILLER, MARVIN M. 
MONTE CRISTO, OLIVER U. 
MOREHOUSE, DANIEL H. 
MOORE, CHARLES H. 
MORIN, JEAN. 
MORSE, EARL H. 
MURPHY, HENRY R. 
McCAULEY, IRA L. 
McINTYRE, JOSEPH E. 
McNEIL, JOHN. 
OARD, PETER R. 
OLSEN, NILS N. 
OTT, CARL R. 
PAGE, LEO G. 

WRIGHT 



{Continued) 

PALMER, THORNTON E. 
PARKER, HARRY J. 
PAYTON, GUTY W. 
PELOQUIN, ROLLAND P. 
PILLIAN, GARLAND L. 
PLYMPTON, PERCY P. 
RAPPE, HERBERT. 
REGALIA, PHILIP. 
REISNAN, FRED. 
RENNIE, CHARLES. 
RICH, LEWIS H. 
RICHES, LELAND W. 
RISHEL, DAVID B. 
ROBERTS, FRANK. 
RODNESS, HAROLD A. 
ROGERS, MANUEL. 
SANDERS, FRANK W. 
SEPULVEDA, JOSEPH. 
SERA, NAZZARENO. 
SHANKLIN, CLERANCE T. 
SHINN, KENNETH. 
SLOAN, LESTER B. 
SMITH, FRANK B. 
STAFFORD, CHESTER W. 
STANTON, SIDNEY L. 
STASZAK, FRANK. 
STILLMAKER, OTTO. 
TERRELL, ERNEST. 
TILLETT, JAMES. 
TOLOSANO, GIUSEPPE. 
TOW, CLINTON S. 
TWOOMEY, JOHN M. 
VAN BIBBER, GILBERT H. 
VAN WIE, FRANCIS H. 
VASSILOPULOS, ANTONIO. 
WACHOTA, JOHN. 
WAGER, JOHN T. 
WASH, STEPHEN. 
WHITE, LEE W. 
WHITE, MUNSEY. 
WHITEMAN, WILLIAM M. 
WILSON, SAMUEL R. 
WILSON, WILLIAM S. 
WIRES, WILLIAM M. 
WOODRUFF, ROY S. 
WOOD, WILLIE E. 
RAY E. 



Company "G" 



CAPTAINS 

FAULKNER, W. S., GERMAN, LESTER, 

U. S. Army. U. S. Army. 

McGILL, ROBERT E., 1058 So. Hope St., Los Angeles, CaL 

FIRST LIEUTENANTS 

BAIRD, ARTHUR R. JENNESS, CHESLEY F., 

c/o Cleveland Tractor Co., Cleveland, O. 
DUDLEY, FRANK. KEYSER, PAUL F. 

Salt Lake City, Utah. 
GARNER, TULLY C, WARNER, JOSEPH, 

Stoneleigh Court, Washington, D. C. Alcatraz, Cal, 

HOWARD, GRAEME K.,62d Infantry. 

SECOND LIEUTENANTS 

BLOEDORN, ALVIN O., HARTIGAN, LEONARD W., 

Torrington, Goshen County, Wyo. P. S. and T. Division, U. S. Army, 

BOYCE, JAMES A., Washington, D. C. 

Stanton and Mermaid Ave., Chestnut KNIGHT, BENJAMIN, 

Hill, Philadelphia, Pa. Stockton, Cal. 

COWGILL, ELVYN S., SMITH, HOWARD L., 

Lawrence, Kansas. Helena, Montana. 

SNYDER, SYDNEY W. Huntley Apartments, Los Angeles, Cal. 

ENLISTED MEN 

ADAMS, THOMAS J. BATTAIV, WILLIAM. 

ADAMS. WALTER. BECK, CHARLES L., 

AMICK, ROWELL ^002 East 24th St., N. Portland, Ore. 

1818 Filbert Street, San Francisco, Cal. BEIGLEY, PARKS C, 

ANDERSON, EDWARD W. BERG, ADOLPH B., 

ANDERSON, RUDOLPH A. 764 Missouri Ave., Portland, Ore. 

ARMSTRONG, HERBERT N., BERKE, PETER R., 

Route "A" Gresham, Ore. Gresham, Ore. 

ASHER, ABRAHAM, BESS, HENRY, 

BACKMAN, EMIL, 63d U. S. Infantry. 

4418 Howe St., Oakland, Cal. BLAKE, WILLIAM P., 

BAKER, JESSE S. c/o Standard Oil Co., Portland, Ore. 

BARTINI, LEODATO. BLAZER, HARRY. 

351 



352 History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 



ENLISTED 

BLOSSE, ADAM. 
BODAH, ROY I., 

P. O. Box 74, Richland, Ore. 
BOSWELL, LEONARD, 

274 N. 2ist St., Portland, Ore. 
BOTHE, REINHOLD, 

San Francisco, Cal. 
BOURGEOISE, EUGENE, 

Troutdale, Ore. 
BROWN, LEE H. 
BUCKLEY, JOHN A., 

1 153 Woodward Ave., Portland, Ore. 
BUELOW, FRANK R., 

788 Williams Ave., Portland, Ore. 
CAMPBELL, CLARENCE A. 
CAPLIN, ISADORE H., 

Cherry St., Portland, Ore. 
CARLISLE, GEORGE V. 
CARNEY, EDWARD W., 

278 Cook Ave., Portland, Ore. 
CARROLL, HARVEY G. 
CARTWRIGHT, CLIFTON P., 

1326 North Ave., Baltimore, Md. 
CERMAK, WILLIAM. 
CHAxNCEY, JOE L., 

Gold Butte, Mont. 
CHENEY, EVERETT W. 
CHIMIENTI, FRANK, 

405 E. Market St., Portland, Ore. 
CHYLEK, FRED. 
CLASSEN, HENRY S., 

93 N. Sixth St., Portland, Ore. 
CLOUD, WILLIAM L., 

2519 Lombard St., San Francisco, Cal 
CONNER, LESLIE L. 
CONNOLLY, NED, 

Burns, Harney Co., Ore. 
CORNUTT, EDDIE L. 
COZAKOS, PANAGIOTAS, 

129 Russell St., Portland, Ore. 

CRADIC, FRED, 

R. F. D. No. I, Piedmont, Mo. 
CRASE, FRANK E. 

CUNNINGHAM, JOHN W., 
c/o William Boyce, Baker, Ore. 

CURTISS, WILLIAM. 

GUSHING, INDOSTIN B., 

494 vSixth St., San Francisco, Cal. 

DAMRON, HOWARD L., 

U. S. Army. Sgt. 63d Infantry, 



MEN (Coadnued) 

D'ANGELES, UMBERTO, 

537 N. W. Front St., New Bedford, 
Mass. 
DANIELS, HILBERT. 
DANLEY, JOSEPH W., 

P. O. Box 164, Halsey, Ore. 
DAVIS, FRED E., 

Mount Pulaski, 111. 
DAVIS, STEWART D., 

621 Leo Ave., Portland, Ore. 
DAVIS, WALTER L. 
DALY, JOHN A. 
DENOVAN, EARL E. 
DINSDALE, ALDICE O. 
DIXON, LAWRENCE, 
3 13 1 Mersington Ave., Kansas City, 
Mo. 
DOBBINS, THOMAS. 
DOUGHERTY, WALTER. 
DO WENS, WALTER N., 

Cottage Grove, Ore. 
DRURY, WALTER E., 

Coburg, Ore. 
DUNBAR, LAWRENCE. 
DUNHAM, FRANK, 

Panama City, Rep. of Panama. 
DUKE, CHARLES A., 

Pennsylvania College, Gettysburg, Pa. 
DYSERT, FRAZIER L., 

Roseburg, Ore. 
ELLIS, HAROLD S., 

741 Hoyt St., Portland, Ore. 
FAWVER, HENRY F., 

Portland, Ore. 
FAZZALORI, SALVATORO, 

Portland, Ore. 
FEARING, EDWARD A., 

22 E. 53d Street, Portland, Ore. 
FESCHNER, JOHN. 
PINLEY, GUY B., 

Coquille, Ore. 
FLINT, HERBERT E., 

Portland, Ore. 
FLOCCHINI, EMILIO. 
FOLEY, DONALD, 

766 Cleveland Ave., Portland, Ore. 
FRANCIS, ALFRED G. 
FREDEN, CHARLES E., 

218 E. Ashley Place, San Antonio, Tex. 
FREDERICK, HARRY, 
West Pullman, 111. 



Company "G" 



353 



ENLISTED 

FRIES, FRANK H., 

Sail Francisco, Cal. 
GALVIN, JOHN T. 
GEIRY, THOMAS C, 
GIBSON, ROBERT L., 

Box 731, Globe, Gila Co., Ariz. 
GILBERT, ARTHUR. 
GILLESPIE, LEE R., 

Aira Long, Santa Rosa, Cal. 
GLOVER, RALPH, 

Mexico, Mo. 
GORDNER, FRANK, 

Hawthorne Ave., Portland, Ore. 
GRAY, LOUIS B., 

543 Waterloo Street, Detroit, Mich. 
GREENSTRAND, WILLIAM. 
GRIFFIN, TROY E., 
GRIFFITH, LESLIE A., 

63d U. S. Infantry. 
GRONDAHL, SIGURD, 

E. 65th and Division Sts., Portland, O 
GRUBAUGH, WILLIAM P. 
HANNA, SAMUEL, 

6360 Foster Road, Portland, Ore. 
HANSON, FREEMAN H. 
HALL, HENRY F. 
HARRINGTON, GEORGE A. 
HARRIS, WILLIAM L., 

Nipinnawasee, Cal. 
HARRYMAN, JOHN W. 
HASSINGER, HARRY C, 

18 N. Grant Street, Lewistown, Pa 
HAWES, DURLAND M. 
HAWTHORN, JAMES F. 
HELMS, AUTHIA W. 
HENKE, DANIEL M., 

Kenwood, Sonoma Co., Cal. 
HICKS, WILLIAM P., 

Jordan Valley. Ore. 
HILDRETH, CHARLES F., 

McFarland, Kern Co., Cal. 
HOOKER, JESS C. 
HOWARD, CLAUDE H. 
HUNTSMAN, ANSEL, 

P. O. Box 5, Fillmore, Utah. 
HURLBURT, EMMETT, 

149 Ashland Ave., Ocean Park, Cal 
HUTCHISON, BALLARD, 

Norden, Neb. 
HYAMS. MAX. 



MEN (Contiaued) 

ILOG, AL B., 

61 Capp St., San Francisco, Cal. 
INMAN, HUGH. 
IVERSON, OLAF M., 

882 ist Street, Portland, Ore. 
JAMES, RALPH L., 

R. F. D. No. 6, Pendleton, Ore. 
JERMAN, HARLAN W., 

Salem, Ore. 
JOHNSON, JABEZ L., 

Portland, Ore. 
JOHNSON, JOHN A. 
JONES, MARNEY, 

Matoon, 111. 
JORDAN, HERBERT, 

575 Main Street, Portland, Ore. 
KACKER, GEORGE E., 

Oakland, Cal. 
KALMBACH, JESSE N., 

Palmer Junction, Ore. 
re. KELLER, HOWARD S., 

Ontario, Ore. 
KELLEY, EARL S., 

Henderson, Kansas. 
KIDD, WILLIAM H. 
KILBRIDGE, WILLIAM I., 

378 Liberty St., Newburgh, N. Y. 
KNAPP, CHARLEY J., 

Marion, Iowa. 
KNOWLES, HAROLD B. 
KOSHOSHEK, TONY, 

2469 Lombard St., San Francisco, 
Cal. 
KRIZ, JAMES H. 
KROPP, ALFRED W., 

Hurley, New Mexico. 
KUISMANEN, MATTI, 

828 Missouri Ave., Portland, Ore. 
KUKASHUK, MIKE. 
KYLO, AXEL, 

Wilsonville, Ore. 
LACURE, DAVID O. 
LANSING, JAMES H. 

LARSEN, SOFUS, 
Portland, Oregon. 

LAUDERBACK, LEONARD R., 
R. R. "A," Gresham, Ore. 

LAVINE, WILLIAM E. 

LERNO, EMIL. 

LEHMAN, CLARENCE A. 



354 History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 



ENLISTED MEN {Continued) 



LEWIS, AARON, 

Fort ^lason, Cal. 
LEWIS, ALVIN, 

Crow, Ore. 
LEWIS, WILLIAM H., 

Bellflower, Cal. 
LEOXARDI, JACK. 
LICHTENSTEIN, DAVID. 
LOPEZ, ANTONIO. 
LURIE, OSCAR. 
LUDVIKSEN, JOHN, 

Silverton, Ore. 
LUSBY, WILLIAM. 
LYNCH, JOHN P., 

34 Casiet St., Waterbury, Conn. 
MacINNES, JOHN L., 

217 Cherry St., Portland, Ore. 
MAKAR, JOHN F., 

514 Lenn Ave., Johnstown, Pa. 
MAINERI, BARTOLOMEO, 

San Francisco, Cal. 
MANKIN, JOSEPH E., 

324 Sill St., Chrisman, 111. 
MARLAND, WILLIAM, 

Cy'o California Golf Club, San Francisco, 
Cal. 
MARRIOTT, LOREN C, 

Soda Springs, Idaho. 
MASSER, ASCHILLE. 
MATTES, JOSEPH. 
MAXEY, ROBERT, 

Ono, Shasta Co., Cal. 
MAZIORKA, ALBERT. 
MAZZA, ANTONICO, 

2015 Morris Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 
McCARTY, WILLIE, 

Baterburg, S. C. 
McCONE, JAMES, 

Fairmont Hotel, San Francisco, Cal. 

McDonald, robert e., 

Rodondo Beach, Cal. 

McINTYRE, PATRICK J. 

McKENNA, ARTHUR K., 

1 121 Treat Ave., San Francisco, Cal. 

MEI, ANTONIO, 

262 E. 30th St., New York City, N. Y. 

MEIER, ALBIN, 
Hamilton, Ohio. 

MERZ, EMIL. 

MEYER, ERNEST. 



MIGLINO, NICOLA D., 

1814 S. Camas Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 
MIKUNDO, STANISLAW 
MILEK, ADAM, 

2 Cross Street, South Troy, N. Y. 
MILLER, ARTHUR A., 

Box 249, Norfolk, Neb. 
MILLER, CLARENCE A., 

Portland, Ore. 
MILLER, FRANK H. 
MILLER HENRY C, 

Blooming Grove, Pa. 
MILLER, MARVIN M., 

Montoya, New Mexico 
MILES, ROBERT E. 

Portland, Ore. 
MINTZER, WILLIAM. 
MOEHLE, CHARLES F., 

708 South Ave., Schenectady, N. Y. 
MOLINAS, JOSEPH. 
MOLINARO, GIUSEPPE, 

United States Hotel, Front St., Portland, 
Ore. 
MONACO, ANTONIO, 

Harlowton, Mont. 
MONKIEVICZ, CHARLES, 

330 Popular St. Shenandoah, Pa. 
MONOHAN, JOHN P., 

63 Far Oak Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
MONTI, LUIGI, 

355 Ansine Ave., Schenectady, N. Y. 
MONTAGUE, ROBERT C, 

Baltimore, Md. 
MOORE, FRITZ G., 

Portland, Maine. 
MORGAN, MILTON P., 

1809 West St., Oakland, Cal. 
MORROW, VITOR. 
MUNRO, JAMES F. 
MURPHY, HARLEY M., 

Burley Springs, W. Va. 
MURPHY, FRANCIS G., 

Mathilda Ave., Sunnyvale, Cal. 
MURREY, ROY W. 

2567 Bush Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
MURTAUGH, HARRY, 

434 Mercer Ave., Decatur, Ind. 

MUSSO, PEDEL S., 
Bowman, Cal. 

MOOMAW, CLEVE V., 
Cumberland, Md. 



Company "G 



355 



McGAVOCK, DANIEL E., 

Webster, N. Y., or Bonita, Cal. 
NAKAYA, HISTUNE, 

86 N. loth St., Portland, Ore. 
NATHAN, LOUIS, 

2088 Bond St. Baltimore,, Md. 
NELKE, JOHN P., 

2532 Foster Road, Baltimore, Md. 
NEPSTAD, LARS. 
NEWCOMB, ROMIE J. 

433 South Robinson St., Baltimore, Md, 
NEWMAN, WILLIAM P. 
NICHOLSON, ALPHONSO D. 
NICOLARDI, GIUSEPPE, 

133 Romyn St., Schenectady, N. Y. 
OBLANDER, EDWARD C, 

c/o Lyric Theater, Portland, Ore. 
O'DONNELL, HUGH A., 

East Mauch Chunk, Pa. 
O'DOWD, PAUL, 

150 E. 97th St., New York City, N. Y. 

OGDEN, CLIFFORD S., 

58 Central Ave., Waterbury, Conn. 
O'KEEFFE, EDWIN H., 

Ill E. Grace St., Richmond, Va. 
OLDHAM, JOHN H. 

Beaumont, Tex. 

OLIO, CARMELO, 

311 So. 8th Street, Reading, Pa. 
OLNEY, CLANT C, 

Arivaco, Arizona. 
OLSSON, ELVING A., 

3335 24th Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
ORSINI, PETE, 

517 Main Street, FoUansbec, W. Va. 
OSFIELD, WILLIAM W., 

428 Sacramento Street, Portland, Ore. 
OSTLUND, WERNER O., 

263 Carl Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
OSTROM, ALFRED, 

136 Washington St., Gosam, Ohio. 

OSTROM, CARL G., 

649 E. 52d Street, Portland, Ore. 
OTTAVIANO, SETAFINO, 

236 7th Ave., Waterbilt, N. Y. 

OTTO, SAMUEL, 

286 Sherman St., Passaic, N. J. 

OWEN, HARRY. 

PAINTER, LEE, 

Heppner, Ore. 
PANTALEONI, VITTORIO. 



ENLISTED MEN (Continued) 

PARKS, ELFONZO. 



PARKS, FLOYD B., 

512 N. Pulaski Street, Baltimore, Md. 
PARKS, FRANK. 

PARKS, ROY E. 
PARSONS, LEROY. 
PATTERSON, ESTEL, 

808 Front St., Portland, Ore. 
PATTERvSON, HERBERT J., 

Martha, W. Va. 
PAUL, JOSEPH, 

2341 Lubeck Street, Chicago, 111. 
PEARSON, THEODORE, 

544 Overton Street, Portland, Ore. 
PEDERSEN, PEDER R., 

Gresham, Ore. 
PERRY, SPENCER. 
PETRAK, STEVE, 

118 Lawrence St., Middletown, Pa. 
PETRLAK, OLDRICH R., 

Carlton Ave. and Watson St., East 
Islip, L. I., N. Y. 
PETRELLI, ADAMO, 

Redding, Shasta Co., Cal. 
PETROWSKI, FRANK, 

412 Arlington St., Shenandoah, Pa. 
PEYTON, McKINLEY, 

Milton, W. Va. 
PILENZO, MICHELE, 

145 Bomyn St., Schenectady, N. Y. 
PINCHEFSKY, JACOB, 

2117 E. Monument St., Baltimore, Md. 

PINKOWSKI, THEODORE. 

PIPER, CLARENCE E. 

POILES, DOSS. 

POLO, FRANK, 

1437 Farnot Street, Philadtelphia, Pa. 

PONTON, NELSON B., 
Frederick, Md. 

POPOVITCH, MARKO. 

PULLEY, ORA M., 
Hubbard, Ore. 

PUTTEN, WALTER V., 

2605 Steiner St., San Francisco, Cal. 

QUINN, JAMES E., 
Shamokin, Pa. 

QUINN, MARTIN A., 

705 Forrest Street, Baltimore, Md. 

RADASSKI, JACOB, 

123 Dector Street, Trenton, N. J. 



356 History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 



Los Angeles, 



RAGUSA, PAOLO, 

437 S. Center St., Schenectad}^ N. Y 
RAKIEWICZ, TEDDY, 

4 Florence Ave., Evan.ston, 111. 
RECORDS, ROBERT E., 

1114K E. 2 1 St Street, 
Cal. 

REDDING, CHARLES A., 

Coffeen, 111. 
REED, ANTWINE L., 

Blachly, Lane Co., Ore. 
REED, CHARLES, 

R. F. D. I, Homer City, Pa. 
REEVES, RAYMOND, 

Manassas, Va. 

REYNOLDS, ARCHIE, 

Grant's Pass, Ore. 
RHINEVAULT, ASA A., 

Eugene, Ore. 

RHOADES, EDWARD W., 

Dauphin, Pa. 
RICE, ASHBY L., 

209 Walnut Ave., Covington, Va. 
RICHARDS, HARRY, 

157 Pike Street, Middletown, Pa. 
RICHTER, JOHN R., 

2 1 51 Loth Street, Cincinnati, Ohio. 
RIDER, CHARLES E., 

1318 Marshall St., Benwood, W. Va. 
RIDGATE, THOMAS H., JR., 

Corcoran Street, Washington, D. C. 
RINDERLE, HARRY, 

Pine Street, Gallipolis, Ohio. 
RIZOR, GEORGE A., 

Durkee, Ore. 
ROBERTS, JOSEPH R. 

1309 Howard Ave., Burlington, Cal. 
ROBERTS, RUSSELL S., 

Luck and Vine Sts., Zanesville, Ohio, 
ROCHE, TERRY, 

5240 May Street, Chicago, 111. 

ROGERS, WILLIAM L., 
Milton, W. Va. 

ROSE, ROLLA. 

ROSENBAUM, JAMES J. 

ROSSER, ROBERT, 
Lynchburg, Va. 

ROTOXDO, FRANCESCO, 
280 Fifth Street, Portland, Ore. 

RULEY, WILLIAM B., 
Barboursville, W. Va. 



ENLISTED MEN {Continued) 

RUSH, MELVIN, 

722 N. 5th Street, Martins Ferry, Ohio. 
RUSCHENBERG, ALEXANDER, 
Alcatraz, Cal. 

RUSSELL, LLOYD L., 

325 Green Street, Baltimore, Md. 
RUSSELL, RAY, 

Trowbridge, 111. 
RYAN, JOHN J., 

439 Pioneer Street, Cincinnati, Ohio. 
SAFTENBERG, MAX. 
SANTANGELO, FRANK, 

519 East Street, Baltimore, Md. 
SARTORI, HARRY, 

San Luis Obispo, Cal. 
SATER, PAUL, 

708 Maxwell Ave., Spokane, Wash. 
SAYRE, RONALD E., 

Route I, Cottage Villa, W. Va. 
SAYSSET, ACHILLES, 

1224 Ninth Ave., Oakland, Cal. 
SCHELLER, GEORGE W., 

2325 E. Fayette Street, Baltimore, Md. 

SCHIER, WILLIAM A., 

1 1 13 Riverside Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

SCHMALGEMEYER, FREDERICK, 
1610 Clarkson St., Baltimore, Md. 

SCHMITT, FRED J., 

1258 N. 29th Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

SCHNEIDER, ALBERT A., 

704 W. King Street, Martinsburg, W. 
Va. 
SCHOBER, FRANK. 

SCHOETTLE, HUGO P., 

2410 Talbot Ave., Indianapolis, Ind. 

SCHOICHET, ELIAS, 

326 E. i02d St., New York, N. Y. 
SCHUBERT, EMIL. 

SCHULTZ, CHARLES R., 
17th U. S. Infantry. 

SCHULZE, EDWIN P., 

566 Market Street, Portland, Ore. 

SCHWARTZ, JULIUS, 

911 Whitlock Ave., Bronx Co., New 
York City, N. Y. 

SCHWECHTEN, WILLIAM, 

Sgt., 63d Infantry. 

SCONYERS, WALTER H. 
SCOTT, PIARRYA. 
SCOTT, JOHN A. 



Company "G 



357 



ENLISTED MEN (Continued) 



SCOTT, JOHN A., 

La Grande, Ore. 
SEGHERS, JOSEPH P. 
SENDLEBACK, ALOYSIUS J., 

17th U. S. Infantry. (915 Isabella St., 
Newport, Ky.) 
SEPULVEDA, WILLIAM M., 
SHANE, FRED P., 

254 E. 63d Street N., Portland, Ore. 
SHAW, EVERETT H. 
SHERWOOD, NORMAN. 
SHOFF, GEORGE E. 
SHUTTS, RALPH, 

17th U. S. Infantry. 
SIGMAN, CHARLES, 

645 Washington Street, Eugene, Ore. 
SKILES, SIMON P., 

17th U. S. Infantry. 
SLETTO, HENRY, 

Fergus Falls, Minn. 
SMITH, BERNARD, 

Stockton, Cal. 
SMITH, DUDLEY E., 

218 Pine Street, Monterey, Cal. 
SMITH, FRANK, 

Box 18, Crockett, Cal. 
SMITH, HAROLD. 
SMITH, HIKO, 

R. F. D. I, Parkersburg, Iowa. 
SOLUM, OLAI, 

Silverton, Ore. 
SPIVEY, FURMAN. 
SNYDER, FRANCIS M., 

Lowe II, Lane Co., Ore. 
STEINHAUER, HAROLD, 

848 nth Street, Portland, Ore. 
STELZER, PAUL, 

Stockton, Cal. 

STOMER, BENJAMIN W., 
Aurora, Ore. 

STOUT, CAREY C, 

STRAIT, ELBERT W. 

STURDEVANT, HERBERT H., 
29 E. Kilpatrick Street, Portland, Ore. 

SULLENS, ROBERT D., 

SWANSON, AXEL N., 

207K N. i8th Street, Portland, Ore. 
SWINKOSKI, FRED V., 

1625 Polk St., San Francisco, Cal. 

THIBODEAU, ARTHUR J. 



THOMSON, DAVID G., 

Gean, Nevada. 
THOMSON, STANLEY A., 

Eugene, Oregon. 
TIMSON, JOSEPH E. 
TOMME, GUSTAAF, 

Lompoc, Cal. 
TOPEL, FRANK, 

Riverside, Cal. 
TRAIL, RUFUS R., 

Oakville, Wash. 
ULLRICH, FRED J., 

Burbank, Wash. 
UTSLER, DONALD E., 

747 E. Broadway, Long Beach, Cal. 
VALENTINE, BRUNO, 

347 nth Street, Portland, Ore. 
VALK, HENRY R., 

Hollywood, Cal. 
VAN DONINCK, AUGUST, 

P. O. Box 201, Gresham, Ore. 
VAN HOAREN, JEROME A., 

Ichteghem, West Flanders, Belgium. 
VEAYO, JOSEPH F., 

34 Spring Street, Bangor, Maine. 
VOLGAMORE, THOMAS O., 

Silverton, Ore. 
WALKER, JOHN, 

393 Stanton Street, Portland, Ore. 
WALLACE, GEORGE J., 

17th U. S. Infantry. 

WALTERS, AUGUSTUS N. 

WALTERS, FREEMAN W., 
624 West Street, Oakland, Cal. 

WALSH, JAMES M., 

Valley Center, San Diego Co., Cal. 

WALSH, JOSEPH C. B., 

242 Fourth Ave., San Francisco, Cal. 

WARRICK, ROY C. 

WATERS, FRANK R., 

165 Mills Ave., Memphis, Tenn. 

WATKINS, ROY E. 

WATSON, JOHN, 
R. R. 3, Eugene, Ore. 

WEBER, CHRIS R. 

WEIGANDT, GEORGE. 

WEIMERT, ROSCOE E., 
San Francisco, Cal. 

WEINSHENK, CHARLES, JR., 

704 Market Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



358 



History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 



WENZEL, WILLIAM, 

331 E. 36th Street, New York City, 
N. Y. 



WELSH, WILLIAM M., 
Eureka, Cal. 

WEST, OSCAR, 
Alexander, Maine. 

WHEELER, ALFRED F., 
Presidio of S. F., Cal. 

WHEELER, BYRL. 

WHEELER, GRANT E., 

1 701 "O" Street, Sacramento, Cal 

WILLIAMS, HUBBARD, 
Blackstone, Va. 



ENLISTED MEN (Continued) 

WILSON, JOSEPH D., 

Rufus, Ore. 
WOODCOCK, CARL, 

Malheur, Ore. 
WRIGHT, MARTIN W., 

112 E. 75th St. N., Portland, Ore. 
WYMAN, RALPH W., 

Gen. Del., Aberdeen, Wash. 
YORK, ROY. 
ZACCHEO, GIUSEPPE, 

San Francisco, Cal. 
ZAJEBAL, ADOLF, 

3257 West 26th St., Chicago, 111. 
ZOPPI, ALFRED M., 

Petaluma, Cal. 



Company "H" 

CAPTAIN 
JOHNSON, NEAL C, Los Angeles, Cal. 

FIRST LIEUTENANTS 

DBAS, H. ALSTON, HADDOCK, GARTH B., 

San Francisco CaL San Francisco, Cal. 

WHITE, HARRY A., Tacoma, Wash. 

SECOND LIEUTENANTS 

MUELLER, ERWIN J. HOWELL, WILLIAM K., 

Chicago, 111. Lumberton, N. C. 

FIRST SERGEANT 

RUSH, BENJAMIN, Bakersfield, Cal. 

SUPPLY SERGEANT 

CHANEY, OLLIE R., Dogwood, Mo. 

MESS SERGEANT 
ELDRIDGE, JOHN, San Francisco, Cal. 

SERGEANTS 

WARRICK, THOMAS C, MASON, PATRICK J., 

U. S. Army. Seattle, Wash. 

ALLYN, ROYAL B., GOSLINE, ROBERT, 

Ewing, Ind. Richview, 111. 

HAWRALA, JOSEPH, PACKER, MALCOM, 

Cleveland, Ohio. Payette, Idaho. 

SOMERSON, MORRIS, FEELEY, FRED, 

Philadelphia.. Pa. Prairie du Chien, Wis. 

MEEKER, ROBERT, BESS, HENRY, 

Fisher, Ark. Vallejo, Cal. 

NARRAMORE, GILLIS, Harriman, Tenn. 

359 



36o History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 



LEPAPE, EDWARD A., 
Sonora, Cal. 

SMOLASESYK, WLADYSLAW, 
Chicago, 111. 

AYLESWORTH, GEORGE O., 

Sacramento, Cal. 
COPE, ROY P., 

Elgin, Ore. 

O'MEARA, THOMAS F., 

Junction City, Kan. 
BLUMHAGEN, HENRY, 

Hoboken, N. J. 
EBERHARDT, JOHN, 

Monessen, Pa. 

BARTHELSON, HAROLD C, 

Los Angeles, Cal. 
FISHER, GUY H., 

San Francisco, Cal. 
RUSH, HIRAAI S., 

Suisun, Cal. 

SMALLEY, HAROLD A., 

Mt. Auburn, Iowa. 
SCHAFFER, HARRY W., 

San Francisco, Cal. 
SMITH, PEARL R., 

U. S. Army. 

VASCIK, GEORGE, 
Ford City, Pa. 

KREVITZ, 



CORPORALS 

DESMOND, ARGYLE L., 

Los Angeles, Cal. 
SUTER, JOHN, 

Seattle, Wash. 
KILDA, APOLINAROS, 

Chicago, 111. 
REY, MOSES B., 

Berkeley, Cal. 
STEFFAN, LOUIS, 

Canton, O. 
CHAPMAN, ALFRED L., 

Condon, Ore. 
EPPERSON, JACK, 

Moody, Tex. 
BURKHALTER, JOHN E., 

Dallas, Ore. 
CONKLIN, HAROLD R., 

San Diego, Cal. 
FITZGERALD, MAURICE W. 

San Luis, Obispo, Cal. 
FLEMING, GEORGE R., 

Oklahoma City, Okla. 
GARNER, GLENN C, 

Homer, N. Y. 
KENNEDY, RALPH C, 

Martel , O. 
KEILY, EDWARD J., 

Sugar Pine, Cal. 
STEPHEN, Benicia, Cal. 



BELLAND, JOE H., 

Stambaugh, Mich. 
GOODMAN, ROY, 
Oakland, Ore. 



COOKS 



MATTES, JOSEPH, 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 
PAILLEFER, HERBERT A., 

San Francisco, Cal. 



MECHANICS 



ANDRYSEK, FRANK, 

Chicago, 111. 
JOHNSON, CHRISTIAN W., 

San Francisco, Cal. 



SEIBEL, WAYNE E., 
Defiance, O. 

WEST, JAMES D., 
Coquille, Ore. 



BUGLER— FIRST CLASS 
HIRSCH, DAVID, Jersey City, N. J. 



BUGLER 

FATA, STEVE, Filbert, Pa. 



<<TJ'» 



Company **H 



361 



PRIVATES- 

REGGER, JOHN T., 
Bangor, Mich. 

BRETT, GEORGE M., 
Korbel, Gal. 

BRINNON, RALPH A., 
Wilmington, Cal. 

BROWN, HAROLD M. 
Portland Ore. 

BUSCHMANN, ELLIS U., 
Chico, Cal. 

CASAL, JAMES, 
Oakland, Cal. 

CATCHING, CLARENCE M., 
Pendleton, Ore. 

CHAPMAN, JOSEPH B., 
Gate City, 111. 

COFFEY, HENRY H., 
Hammond, Ore. 

COPELAND, HIRAM W., 
Los Angeles, Cal. 

DELETER, MACK, 
San Francisco, Cal. 

ELLIS, FLOYD I., 
Octave, Ariz. 

FISHER, CHARLES F., 
Bend, Ore. 

FRY, CLARENCE, 
Phoenix, Ore. 

GETMAN, CHARLES S., 
Bly, Ore. 

GONZALES, ANTONIO C, 
Los Angeles, Cal. 

HERMAN, WILLIAM F., 
Selma, Ore. 

HOLMES, ROBERT H., 
Central Point, Ore. 

JENSEN, JENS C, 

Whiteson, Ore. 
JOHNSON, CHRISTIAN, 

Point Terrace, Ore. 
KOCH, WILLIAM C. H., 

Ferryville, Wis. 
LAMB, ASA C, 

Roseburg, Ore. 
LANG, JOSEPH L., 

Sublimity, Ore. 
LEHRBERGER, SAMUEL J., 

Mountain View, Cal. 
LUCAS, ROY E., 

Kokomo, Ind. 



-FIRST CLASS 

McCALLISTER, ROBERT E. 
Kirby, Ore. 

McGOWAN, WALTER F., 
Richmond, Cal. 

METCALF, JOHN B., 
Albany, Ore. 

MILLER, JOE, 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

MILLER, LORY, 
Leland, Ore. 

MURPHY, PATRICK T., 
Legrande, Ore. 

NASH, MONIE, 
San Francisco, Cal. 

NELSON, GEHN S., 
Fairview, Ore. 

NILSEN, MARTIN L., 
Astoria, Ore. 

OBRIST, ALVIN R., 
Albany, Ore. 

POTTER, EDWARD C, 

Emmett, Idaho. 

SAYRE, STANLEY G., 
Trimble, O. 

SAYRE, VERN H., 
Trimble, O. 

SCHNEIDER, ARTHUR J., 
Los Angeles, Cal. 

SCHWING, RUDOLPH, 
Cincinnati, O. 

SILVERIA, JOE, 
San Juan, Cal. 

STREAMER, MELVIN E., 
Saskatchewan, Can. 

SULLIVAN, HAROLD N., 
Carlisle, Iowa. 

TANGEN, BENJAMIN, 

Reno, Wash. 
THOMAS, LLOYD H., 

Stanfield, Ore. 
TREBELL, HARRY J., 

San Francisco, Cal. 
TRENGOVE, WILLIAM J., 

San Andreas, Cal. 
USTICK, JOY A., 

Modesto, Cal. 
UTZINGER, HENRY, JR., 

Denver, Col. 
WILLIAMS, LOUIS, 

Schurz, Nev. 



362 



History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 



PRIVATES— FIRST CLASS (Continued) 

WILMOTH, THEODORE, WLAHOVICH, RADUN M., 

Fresno, Cal. Portland, Ore. 

WOOD,. LUTHER D., Berne, N. Y. 



PRIVATES 



ANERES, STEVAN, 

Los Angeles, Cal. 
BARKLEY, WATSOX C, 

Klamath Falls, Ore. 
BECKNELL, ROY H., 

Hanford, Cal. 
BOLAND, PETER, 

Ely, Nev. 
BOWIE, PHILIP R., 

San Francisco, Cal. 
CARBONE, CUSTER, 

New York, N. Y. 
CARLOS, WALTER, 

San Francisco, Cal. 
CAVAGNARO, ANGELO A., 

Mariposa, Cal. 
CHAxMBERLAIN, LOUIS M., 

Oakland, Cal. 
CHARLTON, JOHN, 

San Francisco, Cal. 
CONRAD, SHERMAN R., 

Springfield, Ore. 
COTTON, CHARLES J., 

Grants Pass, Ore. 
CUMMINGS, LUKE V., 

Elk Garden, W. Va. 
DAMRON, BIRD, 

Breading, W. Va. 
DAVIS, WILLIAM M., 

Carrysville, O. 
DOVE, WILLIAM T. 

Danville, Va. 
DUGAN, MATTHEW E., 

San Francisco, Cal. 
FAZIOLA, NICK, 

Irwin, Pa. 
FINFROCK, ROBERT W., 

Mountain View, Cal. 
FISHER, FRANK, 

U. S. Army. 
FREEMAN, ROBERT B., 

Seattle, Wash. 
GATTUSO, ANDREA, 

Paulsboro, N. J. 
GERSTENBERGER, CHARLES, 

Lincoln, Neb. 



GLENNAN, FRANCIS P., 

Woodbine, Md. 
GOMES, JOHN, 

San Francisco, Cal. 
GRIGSBY, WILLIAM, 

Central Point, Ore. 
GUNNING, THOMAS W., 

San Francisco, Cal. 
HELPER, DAVID I., 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 
HILL, PHILIP, 

Anacorte, Wash. 
HUNT, LESTER O., 

Ash wood. Ore. 
KEIL, WILLIAM F., 

Aurora, Ore. 
KLEMMICK, JOHN, 

Baltimore, Md. 
LANDREBE, ELMER G., 

Richmond, Cal. 
LENSTROM, EDWARD, 

Dallas, Ore. 
LOVE, LENARD, 

San Luis, Obispo, Cal. 
LUCHETTE, FRANCESCO, 

San Francisco, Cal. 
MANGIANTINI, SILVIO, 

Portland, Ore. 
MARTINEZ, ANGELO B., 

Pleasanton, Cal. 
McCOY, JOHN W., 

Oakland, Cal. 
McMILLIN, LEWIS E., 

Crabtree, Ore. 
METTIE, JOSEPH L., 

Ukiah, Ore. 
MICHAEL, EMIL O., 

Willits, Cal. 
MIKKELSON, CARL, 

Gervais, Ore. 
MILLSPAUGH, VOLNEY S., 

Carleton, Ore. 
MINTHORN, WILBUR, 

Pendleton, Ore. 
OLSON, ALFRED E., 

Los Angeles, Cal. 



UTTM 



Company "H 



363 



PRIVATES 



O'NEIL, MIKE J., 

Los Angeles, Cal. 
OSBORNE LLOYD, 

Portland, Ore. 
PACHECO, JOHN J., 

Oakland Cal. 
PAOLA, TONEY, 

Gaston, Ore. 
PAPAYIANOPOULOS, VLASIOS, 

Flagstaflf, Ariz. 
PARSICK, JULIUS P., 

Newark, N. J. 
PEACOCK, JESSE C, 

Seymour, Ind. 
PENNINGTON, PARIS A., 

Sacramento, Cal. 
PETERSEN, RICHARD H., 

Ash, Ore. 
PETERSON, ELMER J., 

Fresno, Cal. 
PHILLIPS, BERRY, 

Areata, Cal. 
PIENOVI, FEDERICO, 

Milwaukee, Ore. 
PLANT, CALVIN, 

Salem, Ore. 
PORTER, ALBERT, 

Fresno, Cal. 
REDDICK, WILLIAM J., 

Downs, Kan. 
REISER, GEORGE, 

Sherwood, Ore. 
RILEY, EUGENE, 

Waterbury, Conn. 
RUNNER, KENNETH, 

Salem, Ore. 
SCHMITT, EDWARD, 

Columbus, O. 
SCHWABEL, CHARLES E., 

Upper Sandusky, O. 
SHEFFER, RAYMOND A., 

Washington, D. C. 
SHEPPARD, ROBERT O., 

Hoods Mill, Md. 
SIEGEL, HARRY, 

New York, N. Y. 
SIMMONS, ERNIE I., 

Sugar Grove, W. Va. 
SINGER, ARTHUR E., 

Cincinnati, O. 
SKINNER, JOHN F., 

Indian Head, Md. 



(Coatiaued) 

SKYTEN, GUSTAV, 

Miami, Ariz. 
SMITH, CARL. 

Kentland, Ind. 
SMITH, RALPH J., 

Vaneta, Ore. 
STAMATELOPOULOS, ALKIBIADES, 

Klamath Falls, Ore. 
SWEARS, JAY, 

West Day, N. Y. 
TANNACONE, JOSEPH, 

WatervHet, N. Y, 
TEACHMAN, WILLIAM N., 

Florida, N. Y. 
TILTON, ELMER, 

Gallipolis, O. 
TORMOLLAN, HARRY J., 

Baltimore, Md. 
TRENHAM, DEWEY H., 

Talcottville, N. Y. 
TURSHIANO, GIUSEPPE, 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 
VAN BUSKIRK, HOWARD J., 

Troy, N. Y. 
VAN DAM, GEORGE E., 

Los Angeles, Cal. 
VAN DEUSEN, WILLIAM, 

Maryland, N. Y. 
VAN SICKLE, JOHN J., 

Valley Cottage, N. Y. 
VAN VORST, GEORGE H., 

Ballston Lake, N. Y. 
VARGO, JOSEPH, 

Rillton, Pa. 
WALKER, JOHN D., 

Carlson, Ore. 
WALTON, ALFRED J., 

Oakland, Cal. 
WARNER, CHARLIE A., 

Circleville, W. Va. 
WATKINS, ROBERT L., 

Taiban, N. M. 
WATKINS, ROY B., 

Comstock, Ore. 
WEISSENFELS, ANTON J., 

Harney, Ore. 
WHITLOW, CLARENCE C, 

Pomona, Cal. 
WILLIAMS, HARRISON, 

Crescent City, Cal. 
WILSON, CLAUDE, 

Jones Springs, W, Va. 



3^4 History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 

PRIVATES {Continued) 

WILSON, JOHN J., YOUNGBLOOD, HARVEY 

New York, N. Y. Berkeley Springs, W. Va. 

WILSON, LEVI S., ZAMERZLA, OTTO, 

Sicklerville, N. Y. Chicago, 111. 

WINDHAM, PERCY, ZICCARDI, TONY C, 

Florence, S. C. Portland, Ore. 

WOLLENWEBER, ARTHUR, ZIMMERMAN, JACOB, 

Baltimore, Md. San Jacinto, Cal. 



Third Battalion Staff 

MAJOR 

HOBBS, LELAND S. 

FIRST LIEUTENANT 
CLARK, OLIVER R. 

SECOND LIEUTENANT 

FIELD, WILLIAM E. 



365 



ut'> 



Company "I 



CAPTAIN 

MACK, WALTER A., 27 Underwood St., Springfield, Mass. 

FIRST LIEUTENANTS 

PURVIS, ARTHUR C, COUGHLAN, EDWARD D. J., 

Atlantic Highlands, N. J. Mankato, Minn. 

SECOND LIEUTENANT 

BOISSONNAULT, HARRY, 2310 Colby Ave., Everett, Washington. 

FIRST SERGEANT 

SHEEHY, JOHN, United States Army. 

MESS SERGEANT 
CHAMBERS, JAMES, Red Line, Ohio. 

SUPPLY SERGEANT 
COOK, CHESTER H., Pioche, Nev. 

SERGEANTS 

HERRON, CHARLES E., NEEL, REEDES L., 

1509 East Main Street, Columbus, O. Security, Texas. 

FLAHERTY, GUY J., DEASY, HARRY A., 

Marquette, Mich. 108 Athol Street, East Oakland, Cal. 

ECKARD, HOMER W., ENGLAND, HENRY T., 

San Francisco, Cal. 262 Dolores Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

SHORT, CHARLEY M., CARLETON, WILLIAM A., 

Cherry Valley, Ark. 645 47th St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

HANKS, MINARD, PENALUNA, EDWARD, 

Ft. Bidwell, Cal. San Francisco, Cal. 
HARLAN, JACKSON O., Fresno, California. 

CORPORALS 

HARRIS, THOMAS L., LYNCH, CHARLEY A., 

Casseta, Ga. Neosho Rapids, Kan. 

366 



Company "I 



367 



CORPORALS 



LASALLE, JACK, 

Walhalla, North Dakota. 
McCOY, PERCY, 

433 Riverdale Drive, Glendate, Cal. 
SILAGIE, GUSTAV, 

Elizabethport, N. J. 
McQUARRIE, GEO. G., 

Fullerton, Cal. 
ASPLUND, JONAS A. S. 

Kenwood, Cal. 
THOMAS, EDWIN F., 

1009 Pecon Street, Helena, Ark. 
CLARK, JOHN, 

Williamsburg, N. Y. 
GANNAI, JOSEPH, 

860 Sherman St., Santa Clara, Cal. 
CHITWOOD, ALFRED T., 

Baviek, Mo. 
TIXIERA, MANUEL, 

1460 Louso St., Honolulu, T. H. 
MUIR, HARRY H., 

West Fall, Ore. 
SHELDON, CHARLES C, 

Lovelock, Nev. 
AXON, MILBURN E., 

Grenwall, Pa. 



(Contioued) 

TORBIC, SAVA, 

II Carey Street, Youngstown, Ohio. 
COLLINS, JOHN F., 

6335 Kimbark Ave., Chicago, 111. 
VAN DEVEER, EDGAR, E., 

Forest City, Mo. 
SILVERIA, JOSEPH D., 

Modesto, Cal. 
VANTASSEL, GRANVILLE A., 

Ontario, Ore. 
WONACOTT, ELEY V., 

Willits, Cal. 
ALLEN, JACK, 

Fresno, Cal. 
RUIZ, RAYMOND J., 

206 Winham St., Salinas, Cal. 
SCOTT, WITFIELD S., 

940 Chalker St., Akron, Ohio. 
ESPENALL, ALPHONSE, 

Gervais, Ore. 
TAPLIN, LLOYD R., 

93 George Street, Green Island, N. Y. 
WEBER, EDWARD G. H., 

Baker, Ore. 
STILES, JESSE E., 

Rutland, Ohio. 



BONDELIER, PAUL, 
Lima Grove, Ind. 

BROWN, VICTOR A., 
Wilmington Park, Cal. 



BAUER, LADDIE, 

2642 W. i8th Place, Chicago, III. 



COOKS 

HOWARD, CHARLES, 

Covington, Ky. 
POQUETTE, RAY A., 

Spalding, Mich. 

MECHANICS 

GRAFER, LOUIS, 

4406 Twelfth Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y. 



BEM, PETER F., 
Sunnyvale, Cal. 



BUGLERS 



HOLLAND, HARRY F., 
Dutch Flat, Cal. 



PRIVATES— FIRST CLASS 



AGUILAR, ARTURO R., 

808 Webster Street, Oakland, Cal. 
ALBAN, STEFANO, 

San Francisco, Cal. 
BUENAVENTURA, ELISIO, 

San Francisco, Cal. 
CLAIR, CHARLES L., 

1245 Main Street, Los Angeles, Cal. 



COLETTO, TONY, 
630 Montgomery St., San Francisco, Cal. 

DAVIS, JOHN R., 

Greely, Mich. 
DOOLY, JOHN L., 

Parlier, Calf. 
EDWARDS, JOSEPH, 

Areola, 111. 



368 



History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 



PRIVATES— FIRST 

ELLINGWOOD, ARCHIE C, 

Ferndale, Cal. 
FARLEY, BURDETTE, 

R. F. D. No. 3, Portland, Ore. 
HAAS, WILLIAM, 

1726 Woodall St., Baltimore, Md. 
HANDROOS, AXEL A., 

San Francisco, Cal. 
INCIONG, PACIANO N., 

San Francisco, Cal. 
JOHNSON, FR.\NK O., 

732 Trent Avenue, San Francisco, Cal. 
JOHNSON, WILLIAM, 

Hedgesville, Montana. 
KEARNEY, WILLIAM, 

322 Connecticut St., San Francisco, Cal. 
KELIHER, JOHN T., 

Memphis, Tenn. 
LANG, EDWARD, 

79 Putnam Street, San Francisco. 
LARKIN, FRANK, 

3445 Market Street, Oakland, Cal. 
LYMAN, EARNEST W., 

Sparta, Ore. 

MARTIN, WISEMAN E., 

Maples, Mo. 
MAYHEW, WALTER E., 

Westwood, Cal. 
MOLLE, LOUIS V., 

718 East i6th St., Los Angeles, Cal. 
MORLEY, ELBERT R., 

Butler, Tenn. 

NEWMAN, RALPH E., 

Sierraville, Cal. 
NICHOLSON, GEO., 

Nevada City, Cal. 

PANAGIOTAKIS, MEGAS, 

39 North Hunter Street, Stockton, Cal. 
PROWSE, JOHN L., 

Idaho Springs, Colorado. 
PYLE, ROBERT, 

Baylea, Cal. 

RAGLAND, BENJAMIN A., 
Girard, Ariz. 

RIPLEY, LEO H., 

John Day, Ore. 
ROBERTSON, RALPH, 

Parma, Idaho. 



CLASS (Continued) 

ROSE, SYLVESTER, 

Ironside, Ore. 
RUDD, WALTER W., 

Halfway, Ore. 
SCHLICHTING, FRED, 

Brush Prairie, Wash. 
SCHULTZ, JAY R., 

Battle Ground, Wash. 
SCOGGIN, SHIRLEY S., 

Fossil, Ore. 
SHAFFER, DAVID, 

Elk, Cal. 
SHEEHAN, DANIEL J., 

1560 Seventh Avenue, Watervliet, N. Y. 
SHELTON, MARVEL J., 

Walhier City, Ore. 
SMITH, ELIAS, 

North Powder, Ore. 
SMITH, JOHN, 

Redwood Street, Fort Bragg, Cal. 
SMITH, LEROY, 

Vemonia, Ore. 
SMITH, WILBUR, 

Jenera, Ohio. 
STEVENSON, J., 

2640 North Third Street, Baker, Ore. 
STROHM, ALBERT F., 

Joseph, Ore. 
SULLIVAN, VIRGIL L., 

Green River, Wyo. 
SVENSON, PER H. 

Point Richmond, Cal. 
TROUTWINE, FRED W., 

McDermitt, Ore. 
UNDERWOOD, HERBERT, 

2501 Seneca Street, St. Joseph, Mo. 
WARD, FRANK H., 

22 Lelac Street, New Haven, Ct. 
WEINBERG, NATT. 

371 Spencer Ave., San Jose, Cal. 
WOLFE, PAUL, 

Harvey, North Dakota. 
WOOD, GEORGE, 

Lakeview, Ore. 
WOOD, GEORGE H., 

Emmons, Pa. 

WORSLEY, CLARENCE T., 
Modesto, Cal. 



PRIVATES 



ADELMAN, RAYMOND J., 
Taft, Cal. 



ARMATAS, FRANK, 
Aryos, Greece. 



a T" 



Company "I 



369 



PRIVATES 

ASHLEY, STANLEY T., 

Glenshaw, Pa. 
BASIM, VER, 

Marysville, Cal. 
BRENDEL, GEORGE, 

4 Rosekarns Ave., Laurelville, Md. 
BRESSEM, JOHN V., 

1271 California Street, Frisco, Cal. 
BROWN, A. L., 

Hemlock, Ore. 
BROWN, W. A., 

Chicago, 111. 
BUSTARD, JOHN, 

Moline, 111. 
CLEVELAND, CLARENCE, 

Chico, Cal. 
COSTAIN, FRED F., 

Grants Pass, Ore. 
DOWNEY, JERRY J., 

Eureka, Utah. 
EAGEN, JOHN F., 

57 Second Street, Amsterdam, N. Y. 
ERB, JAKE, 

Albany, Ore. 
ERICKSON, THURSTON H., 

65 East 1 6th Street, Portland, Ore. 
FINLEY, WILLIAM J., 

Julesburg, Col. 
GRAYBEAL, CARL B., 

West Jefferson, N. C. 
HALL, FRANK B., 

2260 Santa Clara Ave.. Alameda, Cal. 
HARRY, ALVA, 

Sitkum, Ore. 
HAUSKEN, MANDIUS, 

1647 Harrison Street, Astoria, Ore. 
HESLIN, PATRICK, 

Golconda, Nev. 
HOLMAN, JOHN A., 

Lacomb, Ore. 
HUDSON, HOWARD J., 

205 Wadsworth Street, Lynchburg, Va, 
HUNTER FRANCIS J., 

Crockett, Cal. 
JONES, ARTHUR, 

Klamath Falls, Ore. 
JAMES, WALTER L., 

Brownsville, Ore. 
MABRY, LOUIE B., 

vSylvatus, Va. 
MARCH, MILO B., 

5044 West Huron Street,' Chicago, 111. 

24 



{Continued) 

MEYER, HARRY T., 

2345 Grove Street, Baker, Ore. 
MILLER, GAIL C, 

Blitzen, Ore. 
MORROW, JOHN, 

Butte, Montana. 
MULLER, ADOLPH, 

Crockett, Cal. 
MUNDELL, ROY I., 

I07>^ North Warren Ave., East Sagi- 
naw, Mich. 
NELSON, GUY, 

Galena, Ore. 
NELSON, ROBERT, 

Ontario, Ore. 
NICHOLSON, ORE., 

Mendocino, Cal. 
NISBET, HENRY W., 

409 Laguna Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
O'BRIEN, PATRICK, 

Crockett, Cal. 
PFEFFERKORN, GUSTAL F., 

Woodland, Idaho. 
PHILLIPS, RICHARD C, 

Baker, Ore. 
REDICK, VERNER R., 

White Pine, Ore. 
REHM, ARTHUR H., 

Ontario, Ore. 
RICHARDSON, FLOYD C, 

Ontario, Ore. 
ROSS, WILBUR D., 

Bovina, Texas. 
RUNNING, HANS, 

Elgin, Ore. 
SHADE, MICHAEL, 

150 West Main Street, Norristown, Pa. 
SHAFFSTALL, CHARLES, 

559 Main Street, Marion, Ohio. 
SHAW, ROY A., 

22i}4 Mutual Street, Toronto, Out. 
SHELBY, JAMES E., 

1720 Hopkins Street, Oakland, Cal. 
SHELTON, RAYMOND M., 

1617 East 14th Street, Denver, Col. 
SIPE, WALTER J., 

528 North Spring Street, Middletown, 
Pa. 

SIVON, CHARLES A., 
Ravenna, Ohio. 

STORK, HENRY P., 

1831 "C" Street, Butte, Montana. 



370 History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 



TALIFERRO, WILLIAM, 

Leon, Kan. 
TAYLOR, JOHN D., 

Malin, Ore. 
THROE, RAYMOND W., 

Joseph, Ore. 
TIGHE, ENOS F., 

Eureka, Cal. 
TUCKER, WILLIAM B., 

Prairie City, Ore. 
WALKER, HALL, 

Norristown, Pa. 
WELCH, BENNIE F., 

Proedsten, Wash. 



PRIVATES (Continued) 

WHITELEY, ALBERT, 

3235 North "A" Street, Philadelphia, 
Pa. 

WICKHAM, DUDLEIGH R., 

324 Veeder Ave., Schenectady, N. Y. 

WITTE, FREDERICK, 
Central Point, Ore. 

WOOD, ISAAC, 

207 North 1 8th St., Portland, Ore. 

WYANT, RAYMOND, 
Bandon, Ore. 

ZOLLINGER, CHARLES, 

921 Ramona Street, Palo Alto, Cal. 



TETON, FRANK. 
UNDERWOOD, FLOYD. 
CIACURA, HENRY. 
FLEMKE, ALBERT. 
WINTOR, MICHAEL G., 



SERGEANTS TRANSFERRED 

WEBB, FRED L., 
TEMPLETON, LEE. 
HICKS, EDWARD R. 
MEYERS, JOHN. 
TROMBLY, FRED. 



KINNEAR, JOSEPH D. 
MURPHY, GEORGE. 
DARTER, WALTER W., 
BISHOP, OSCAR. 
HEDRICK, LUTHER E. 



CORPORALS 

SWARTZ, HOWARD. 
DELLINGER, ROY. 
COLEMAN, WILLIAM. 
JAMES, WILLIAM L. 
TRAIN, FREDERICK L. 
VAN KENLEN, JOHN J. 



PRIVATES— FIRST CLASS 



BABECKI, JOE W. 
DENNY, EARL T. 
DONLON, PATRICK R. 
FEROUT, JOSEPHUS. 
HAMBLIN, ALBERT C. 



JENSON, FRANK F. 
REYNOLDS, OSCAR F. 
SHAFER, PAUL C. 
SIJDOR, JAMES L., 
THOMPSON, NOAH B. 



BOUSE, LUTHER J. 
BRADISH, LEE E. 
COOL, HAROLD. 
FOSTER, WILY S. 
FONTECCHIO, JAMES. 
HAYDEN, EDWARD F. 
LARUE, EDWIN W. 
LEACH, FRANK W. 
McALONE, JAMES A. 



PRIVATES 

MAY, CLYDE E. 
MAZZONI, DANIELL. 
MORRIS, JESSE M. 
MYERS, JOHN T. 
OLIVA, ALBERT. 
PECK, TRACY O. 
POTTER, MONROE. 
RAPCZYNSKI, WILLIAM. 
SUSSMAN, ARTIE. 



Company '4" 



371 



WESTENSKOW, WILFRED. 
SNYDER, CHARLES J. 
HORNUNG, ALBERT T. 
LAFAYETTE, WILLIAM E. 
MILLER, ANDREW L. 
MISSAKIAN, HAGOP. 
PARMELEE, HORATIO M. 
RAGALDO, BERNARDINO. 
ROSSI, SAM. 



PRIVATES (CoatJaued) 

WONG, WAY. 
WORLEY, JAMES F. 
COOK, CON. 
DICKIE, RAY. 
HYMAN, IRWIN. 
TOLLE, ALVRY P. 
WADE, LEWIS L. 
WATSON, ARTHUR. 
WICKERT, LOUIE. 



DISCHARGED 



COLE, JAMES F., 

Seattle, Wash. 
EASTON, MILTON H., 

521 C Street, Oxnard, Cal. 
FRALEY, WILLIAM H., 

Davenport, Nebr. 
HORTON, JAMES B., 

196 Valley Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
ISOM, JAMES E., 

c/o F. C. Barnes Lake Bay, Alaska. 
JONES, PHILLIP R., 

Box 48, Albuquerque, New Mexico. 
MASTERSON, FRED F., 

Richland, Ore. 
MIDDLEBUSHER, FRANK L., 

Centralia, Wash. 
MOLLER, WILLIAM P., 

836 Bath Street, Santa Barbara, Cal. 
PLATT, DON E., 

c/o Mrs. Don E. Piatt, Ontario, Ore. 
ROSS, WILLIAM, 

Plevna, Mo. 
RUIZ, WILLIAM J., 

206 Winham St., Salinas, Cal. 
SCHAEFFER, EARL A., 

Wallowa, Ore. 
SCROGGINS. THOMAS B., 

Long Creek, Ore. 
SENSEL, CLARENCE H., 

1390 East Taylor St., Portland, Ore. 

ZIEGLER, WILLIAM, 1201 



SHERWOOD, CLARENCE E., 

Little Town, Col. 
SILLS, GUY E. 

Cove, Ore. 
SMITH, CARL C, 

R. F. D. No. 2, Latty, Ohio. 
SNYDER, GREELY, 

R. R. No. 6, Bryan, Ohio. 
STANTON, CLARENCE O., 

337 Franklin Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
TANCREDI, NICK, 

1025 North 1st St., Albuquerque, N. M. 
TANLER, JULIUS A., 

Long Creek, Ore. 
THOMPSON, JOHN C, 

La Grande, Ore. 
TURNER, JOHN A., 

R. F. D. No. 3, Weiser, Idaho. 
WARD, FERRIS E., 

Halsey, Ore. 
WILLIAMS, FORREST G., 

807 East Jackson St., Medford, Ore. 
WILLIAMS, TRUMAN L., 

Barnes Corners, New York. 
WYNKOOP, DERWOOD C, 

711 State Street, Erie, Pa. 
YANTIS, JOHN T., 

Ontario, Ore. 
ZERBA, FORREST L., 

Athena, Ore. 
"D" Avenue, La Grande, Ore. 



FURLOUGHED 



COOK, FRED R. HATHAWAY, 

Crystal City, Mo. 
SERGEANT DEWITT E. WARNER. 



SERGEANT ARTHUR SMITH, 

3312 "M" Street, N. W., Washington, 
D. C. 



Company **K" 

CAPTAIN 

WITCHER, W. v., Jr., Commanding. 

first lieutenants 

Mcdonald, laurence e. gunn, kenneth b. 

markley, c. l. 

second lieutenants 
swallen, james w. fleming, joseph c. 

first sergeant 

MURPHY, BERT L., Clovis, Calif. 

MESS SERGEANT 
HOUSTON, ARNOLD, Kiowa, Kansas. 

SUPPLY SERGEANT 

NICOLDS, RICHARD W., San Francisco, Calif. 



SERGEANTS 



MATTHEWS, THOMAS G., 

Nashville, Tenn. 
McINTOSH, CLINTON, 

Calla, Kentucky. 
WHALEN, MARTIN M., 

Brattlcboro, Vermont. 
MOORE, HOWARD, 

Fairview, W. Va. 

MONTGOMERY, JAMES D., 

Owensboro, Ky. 

HENDRICKS, EARL, 
Dallas, Texas. 



LIKOZWSKI, JOSEPH, 

Cleveland, Ohio. 
WINTER, FRANK J., 

Prairie City, 111. 
McCARTY, JOHN, 

Marshall, 111. 
MARTENSEN, ARTHUR W., 

Chicago, 111. 
McGRAW, JOSEPH M., 

Youngstown, Ohio. 
OSTERMAN, GEORGE, 

Dayton, Ohio. 



SWAREN, OLIVER C, 
San Francisco, Calif. 



CORPORALS 



BRADLEY, JOHN N., 
Maysville, Ky. 



372 



«T^" 



Company "K 



373 



WOZxMIAK, LEO, 

Milwaukee, Wis. 
WOODS, CHARLES, 

San Francisco, Calif. 
McCAULLEY, GALEN G., 

Sacramento, Calif. 
DALLAHITE, JAMES D., 

Fresno, Calif. 
PETERSON, PALMER, 

Ironwood, Mich. 
COOK, WALTER G., 

Terarkana, Ark. 
RUTHERFORD, CLYDE A., 

Santa Cruz, Calif, 
CALERGHIS, AUGUST, 

Skyros, Greece 
HARKINS, JOHN, 

Des Moines, Iowa. 
DONOVAN, AUGUSTIN, 

Marysville, Calif. 
COURNOYER, EXILIOUS N., 

Providence, Rhode Island. 
DAVIS, ISADORE E., 

San Francisco, Calif. 
FISHER, GEORGE W., 

Oakland, Calif, 
McARTHUR, LAURENCE W., 

Hay ward, Calif. 
TWADDLE, JAMES C, 

San Francisco, Calif. 
PIERCE, GEORGE W., 

Pendleton, Oregon. 

DAHLGREEN, CARL 



CORPORALS {Continued) 

HALL, FRANK E., 



Laytonville, Calif. 
MIGNOLA, SILVIA, 

Alameda, Calif. 
JONES, RALPH O., 

La Grande, Oregon. 
ANDERSON, HOMER A., 

Cherry Valley, Ark. 
ADAMS, JAMES L., 

Ranier, Oregon. 
ZOLLNER, PAUL P., 

Mount Angel, Oregon, 

Mccarty, roscoe, 

West Fall, Oregon. 
DOMM, VICTOR C, 

Eagle Creek, Oregon. 
FURGESON, JOHN R., 

Willows, Calif. 
RUST, VIRGIL R., 

Dillard, Oregon. 
HAM, ERNEST R., 

Portland, Oregon. 
MACY, JAMES A., 

Sparta, Oregon. 
TUCKER, WILLIAM T., 

Orland, Calif. 
WAGNER, CHARLES M., 

Corvalles, Oregon. 
MOWRY, WILLIAM S., 

Portland, Oregon. 
JONES, ADELBERT L., 

San Francisco, Calif. 
A., New York, N. Y. 



COOKS 



BROWN, ALFRED L., 

New York, N. Y. 
BARRICK, MALDEN F., 

Corvalles, Oregon. 



LALANTONIS, JAMES J., 

Oakland, Calif. 
RAO, WILLIAM G., 

Oakland, Calif. 



BAILEY, ROBERT B., 

San Francisco, Calif. 
BORMAN, NOEL, 
Owensboro, Kentucky, 



MECHANICS 

ST. CLAIR, GURDON B. 

Hobart, Oklahoma. 
WALTER, CHARLES, 

Cincinnati, Ohio. 



EVANS, LEWIS E. 



BUGLERS 



GIBSON, CHARLES S., 
Spokane, Washington. 



374 History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 



PRIVATES— FIRST CLASS 



BERRY, LUKE A., 

Bayonne, New Jersey. 
BOENTGEN, CARL, 

Astoria, Oregon. 
BOHN, CHARLES L., 

The Dalles, Oregon. 
BONNEY, ARCHIE E., 

Colton, Oregon. 
BOYLE, HUGH, 

Astoria, Oregon. 
BRANDON, EDWARD L., 

Willington, Nevada. 
BRENNON, PATRICK, 

Woodbum, Oregon. 
BUDILOVSKY, CHARLES, 

Chicago, Illinois. 
DAVIS, CHARLES E., 

New York, N. Y. 
DAVIS, EMERALD A., 

Doeville, Tenn. 
DAY, LACY W., 

Oregon City, Oregon. 
DODGE, IRVING, 

Portland, Oregon. 
DUNN, OLONZO A., 

Prairie City, Oregon. 
ELGIN, CLARENCE B., 

Oakland, Calif. 
FEDORIGA, FELIX, 

Chicago, 111. 

FEGER, ALVIN R., 

Snohomish, Washington. 
FISHER, THEO. M., 
La Grande, Oregon. 

FITZGERALD, JAMES D., 

La Grande, Oregon. 
FOSTER, FREDDIE E., 

Joseph, Oregon. 
FOSTER, ROSCOE K.. 

Neverstill, Oregon. 
FOX, JOHN, 

San Francisco, Calif. 
GABIOLA, YGNAICIO, 

San Francisco, Calif. 
GARDINER, CLAUDE W., 

Echo, Oregon. 
GARDNER, H. M., 

Rockford, Wash. 
GATES, SPERRY L., 

Gadley, Texas. 
GRAY, JOHN, 

La Grande, Oregon. 



HARRIS, GUY L., 

Oil Fields, Calif. 
HARTZMAN, VICTOR V., 

Ethel, Wash. 
HAYDEN, WALTEN, JR., 

Empira, Oregon. 
HENNING, OTTO H., 

Arpin, Wisconsin. 
HICKERSON, GEORGE C. 

Durkee, Oregon. 
HOFFMAN, vSULLIVAN F. 

Copper Field, Oregon. 
HOUSES, WALTER J., 

Upland, Calif. 
HUNSAKER, CECIL H., 

Turner, Oregon. 
HYLTON, LEE, 

New Plymouth, Idaho. 
IGNACIO, GERVAIS, 

New York, N. Y. 
JENNE, HORACE M., 

Santa Cruz, Calif. 
JOHNSON, WESLY S., 

Pasadena, Calif. 
JONES, CHARLES A., 

Albany, Oregon. 
JONES, LOYAL F., 

Goble, Oregon. 
JONES, LYNN J., 

Albany, Oregon. 
JORGENSON, CARL A., 

Tucson, Ariz. 
KAPLINSKI, JOHN, 

Detroit, Mich. 
KEKONI, JOHN, 

Borgo, Finland. 
KING, MARTIN, 

San Francisco, Calif. 
KUHN, PETER, 

Fresno, Calif. 
LAM, RAYMOND A., 

Quinald, Oklahoma. 
LARSON, NELS E., 

Astoria, Oregon. 
LEW, HUGO L., 

Salt Lake City, Utah. 
LONG, CALVIN A., 

Enterprise, Oregon. 
McCONNELL, RUE J., 

Goshon, California. 
MICKLE, CHARLES H., 

Portland, Oregon. 



<<T^" 



Company *'K 



375 



NEELY, HAROLD, 

Oregori City, Oregon. 
OLSEN, ARTHUR V., 

Astoria, Oregon. 

TINDALL, SAM A., 



SHIPP, HARRY E., 
Pendelton, Oregon. 

vSOTO, ANGELO, 
Salinas, Calif. 

The Dalles, Oregon. 



PRIVATES 



ANDREWS, WILLIAM E., 

Wasco, Oregon. 
BECK, ROY S., 

Enterprise, Oregon. 
BRODERICK, MILES, 

Midland, Maryland. 

BOOS, JOHN, 

Banks, Oregon. 
CAMPBELL, KENNETH L., 

Bleecheburg, Calif. 
COOPER, JESSE R., 

MaUin, W. Va. 
DAMKOWSKI, WLADISLAW, 

Natrona, Pa. 
DAVIDSON, ARTHUR E., 

Molalla, Oregon. 
DAVIS, WALTER, 

Baltimore, Maryland. 
DeGEORGE, RENTER M., 

Tarry town, N. Y. 
DIESTLER, HERBERT, 

Oshkosh, Wis. 
DUNCAN, ROBERT A., 

San Francisco, Calif. 
EDWARDS, BURL, 

Long Creek, Oregon. 
EICHELBURGER, WILLIAM, 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 
ELLIOTT, DAVID P., 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 
ESCH, FREDERICK, 

New York, N. Y. 
FREYTAG, GERHART A., 

San Francisco, Calif. 
GARDNER, LAURENCE L., 

Rickrand, Oregon. 
GEKELER, JAMES L., 

Elgin, Oregon. 
GIRARDIN, LAWRENCE S., 

Turner, Oregon. 
GORDON, ROSCOE A., 

New Bridge, Oregon. 
GREER, ALEX B., 

Easley, S. Car. 
GRIFFIN, CHARLEY H., 

Milton, Oregon. 



GUY, HARRY L., 

Columbus, Wash. 
HAEFER, HERMAN F., 

Cove, Oregon. 

HALL, LAWRENCE C, 

Silvan, Kansas. 

AHZELWANDER, HERMAN H., 

Boring, Oregon. 
HAWKINS, JOHN, 

Chaplin, Ark. 
HAYES, JAMES, 

San Francisco, Calif. 
HEIDE, HARRIS F., 

Pittsburgh, Penna. 

HERDA, THOMAS, 
Chicago, 111. 

HEMINGER, JASPER A., 

Junction City, Kansas. 
HILL, HARRY V., 

Berkely Springs, W. Va. 
HILLIARD, EARL W., 

Dayton, Ohio. 
HOLZAPFEL, WALTER, 

Tangent, Oregon. 
HOOPES, BAYARD A., 

Hockessin, Delaware. 
HOUCK, JAMES E., 

Baltimore, Md. 
HUTCHINSON, SAMUEL A., 

Garden Grove, Calif. 

JARVIS, JOHN, 

Evansville, Indiana. 
JONES, HOWARD E., 

Pittsburgh, Penna. 
KAIFUS, RUDOLPH, 

New York, N. Y. 
KERN, WILLIAM N., 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 
KIGGINS, JAMES C, 

Estachaga, Oregon. 
KOLIAS, JAMES, 

Dendra, Greece. 
LAIRD, ROBERT A., 

St. Baker, Oregon. 
LARSON, CARL F., 

Molalla, Oregon. 



37^ History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 



PRIVATES (Continued) 



LARSON, HENRY, 

Burns, Oregon. 
LEACH, MATT L., 

Woodhull, New York. 
LEE, WAYNE E., 

Creston, Montana. 
LEMONS, ALBERT, 

Mt. Vernon, Oregon. 
LERNO, EMILE, 

Fresno, Calif. 
LOCKWOOD, GEORGE W., 

Jennings, Oklahoma. 
McINERNY, PATRICK, 

Chicago, 111. 

MADES, NICOLAS C, 

Chicago, 111. 
MARTIN, DWIGHT, 

Highland, Calif. 
MILLS, JOHN E., 

Gerv'ais, Oregon. 
MOLLESTON, TREVE, 

Verona, Penna. 
MORRISON, HERBERT K., 

Roland Park, Maryland. 
NARVAIS, JOHN, 

Los Angeles, Calif. 

PHILLIPS, THOMAS B., 
Fall City, Oregon. 

RICHARDSON, ARTHUR L., 

Olean, New York. 
ROUSCH, GEORGE T., 

Avalon, Penna. 
SAVAGE, JAMES, 

San Francisco, Calif. 

WELLS, ORVILLE G., 



SCHNUPP, EDWIN C, 

Pittsburgh, Penna. 

SCHOTH, WILLIAM A., 
Oregon City, Oregon. 

SCOTT, EDDIE P., 

Glasgow, Kentucky. 
SHARP, ARCHIE M., 

Homestead, Penna. 
SHORT, ARTHUR W., 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 
SIGWALD, ROBERT M., 

Baltimore, Mar>'land. 
SLIPPER, LEONARD R., 

Pittsburgh, Penna. 
SMITH, RALPH W., 

Seattle, Washington. 
SPINDLER, CYRIL, 

Milwaukee, Wis. 
SPITLER, JOSEPH C. R., 

Corning, Calif. 
STEVENS, HAROLD, 

Pittsburgh, Penna. 
STOLE, PIUS B., 

Carnegie, Penna. 
STOUGHTON, WILLIAM, 

Logan, Ohio. 
TELFER, CLYDE A., 

Ashwood, Oregon. 
VANCE, FLOYD J., 

Reynoldsburg, Ohio. 
VIDT, SYLVESTER E., 

Glenshaw, Penna. 
WALTERS, ROY R., 

Gaston, Oregon. 
Independence, Oregon. 



MESS SERGEANT 

SMITH, HENRY, San Francisco, Calif. 



PRIVATES 



BENEDETTO, JAMES D., 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 

BRENNEISON, CLEMENT J., 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 
COHEN, NATHAN S., 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 
CIRINCIONE, JOSEPH H., 

East New York, N. Y. 



DeFELICE, NICK, 
Port Morris, N. J. 

GRIES, LOUIS A., 
Glendale, Long Island. 

HEINZ, AUGUST H., 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 

KALTER, SAMUEL, 
New York City, N. Y. 



Company ''K" 



377 



KLEIN, HENRY T. 

Newark, N. J. 
LASKY, JOSEPH, 

New York City, N. 
LOUX, FRANK E., 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 



ROTONDO, JOSEPH, 
Port Ewen, New York. 

SANTE, JOSEPH, 
New York City, N. Y. 

SILVIA, JOHN, 
Fall River, Mass. 



ompany L 

CAPTAIN 
AVERY, IRVING C. 

FIRST LIEUTENANTS 
EDWARDS, JONATHAN W. ARNOLD, ELIJAH G. 

ROUSE, ROY T. CLARK, OLIVER R. 

SECOND LIEUTENANT 
GREEN, HAROLD L. 

FIRST SERGEANT 

ROGAN, JOHN, 443 W. 48th St., New York City. 

SUPPLY SERGEANT 

STANTON, JOHN R., Co. "L," 63d Infantry. 

MESS SERGEANT 
WEISS, HENRY, 145 Elm St., Long Island City, N. Y. 

SERGEANTS 

BORK, PAUL, CUTLER, ROBERT E., 

1920 Wilmot Ave., Chicago, 111. Sheridan, Wyoming. 

TOURIGNY, OSCAR, AMONINO, ANTHONY B., 

St. Tite, P. Q., Canada. 535 Park St., Negaumee, Michigan. 

DAVIS, RALPH, PORTER, EDGAR A., 

5530 Easton Ave., St. Louis, Mo. Wapato, R. F. D. No. 2, Washington. 

WALKER, ARTHUR L., SCHNEIDAU, GUSTAF, 

Waverly, Washington. Plush, Oregon. 

CORPORALS 

ERICKSON, CHARLES F., PEARL, LAWRENCE, 
757 A. Mina St., San Francisco, Calif. Carson Cit}', Nev. 

MANES, LESLIE D., SIMPSON, PRESLY E., 
169 Walnut St., Memphis, Tenn. Exeter, Calif. 

WINGARD, WILLIAM H., BINGHAM, FRANK T., 

3440 Iowa Ave., Fresno, Calif. 134 W. 5th St., Los Angeles, Cahf. 

378 



(( T " 



Company "L 



379 



CORPORALS 

DUNKELBERGER, HOWARD, 

22 Spruce St., Lockport, N. Y. 
AGIDIUS, ALBERT P., 

The Dalles, Oregon. 
ANCLAM, ALFRED B., 

Bailey Harbor, Wis. 
BLISS, FREDERICK R., 

Rose Hill, 111. 
DOTY, JASPER, 

308 S. 2d St., Yakima, Washington. 

GILBRETH, ROBERT, 
The Dalles, Oregon. 

TREMBLE, RICHARD D., 

21 1 1 Pine St., San Francisco, Calif. 

ACORD, ALFRED N., 
Boonsville, Texas. 

ROGERS, TRUMAN L., 

515 Blain St., Pendleton, Oregon. 

TAYLOR, RAY M 



(Continued) 

HUGHES, ADAM, 

Vilas, North Carolina. 
ADAMS, OSWALD, 

3528 19th St., San Francisco, Calif. 
STEVENS, CHARLES P., 

227 S. Oliver St., Los Angeles, Calif. 
VOLLE, JOHN R., 

R. F. D. No. 3, Heppner, Oregon. 
HA WORTH, JAMES, 

Athena, Oregon. 
SMITH, JAMES F. 
O'NEIL, CHARLES. 
ROBERTS, GEORGE H. 
SCHRIBER, WILLIAM H. 
WELCH, LEO E., 

192 W. Thornton St., Akron, Ohio. 
ANTRIM, ROLAND, 

Wenona, 111. 
, Heppner, Oregon. 



BAKER, CHARLES H., 

West Newton, Indiana. 
JORGENSEN, ANDREW, 
Shelly, Idaho. 



COOKS 



LOWE, HENRY C, 
Shawneetown, 111. 

McDEVITT, JOSEPH, 
Co. "L" 63d Infantry. 



MECHANICS 



WILLETT, FRED H., 

2939 Pine Ave., Berkeley, Calif. 
COATS, JAMES S., 

Rufus, Oregon. 



BERG, HILMER, 

126 Sixth St., Astoria, Oregon. 
LENEVE, RALPH, 

Bandon, Oregon. 



BUGLER— FIRST CLASS 

VOHS, HAROLD, Estacada, Oregon. 



PRIVATES— FIRST CLASS 



ANDERSON, JOHN A., 

St. Helens, Oregon. 
BECKNER, FRANK L., 

172 8th St., Astoria, Oregon. 
BIGELOW, LLOYD, 

Molalla, Oregon. 
BORDER, CORWIN C, 

North Delta, Colorado. 
deHERTEL, EDWARD J., 

2474 San Brum Ave., San Francisco, 
Calif. 
DOUGHERTY, FRANK H., 

Ashland, Oregon. 



DOWNEY, EDWARD, 

137 Missula Ave., Butte, Mont. 

GAGLIASSO, JOHN, 
Cupertino, Calif. 

HOFFMAN, ALEXANDER, 

Fresno, Calif. 

HOGG, OSCAR, 

804 Main St., Oregon City, Oregon. 

HARKIN, EVERD, 
Lowden, Washington. 

KRAEFT, HERBERT E., 

R. R. No. 2, Oregon City, Oregon. 



38o History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 



PRIVATES— FIRST 

LaROCHE, WALTER R., 
641 38th St., Bellaire, Ohio. 

LONGHORN, MILTON L., 
Hermiston, Oregon. 

MONGONE, JOE F., 

709 Castelar St., Los Angeles, Calif. 

MONROY, PHILLIP, 1 169 S. Main St., 
Pomona, Calif. 

MORROW, CHARLES W., 
Acton, Calif. 

PATRICE, JOSEPH G., 
Azoez Island, Portugal. 

PECHE, EDWARD J., 

1273 Rhode Island St., San Francisco, 
Calif. 

PROWSE, ALBERT M., 

2288 Geary St., San Francisco, Calif. 
REID, JOHN, 

Grass Valley, Oregon. 



CLASS (Contiaued) 

RUSSELL, ROBERT W., 

327 Ankeny St., Portland, Oregon. 
RUST, WALTER N., 

Dillard, Oregon. 
ROSENCRANTZ, EUGENE H., 

464 Park St., Portland, Oregon. 
SCHNEIDER, OTTO G., 

Myrtle Point, Oregon. 
SHANER, WESLEY, 

466 Commercial St., Astoria, Oregon. 
SCHULTZ, FRANK J., 

3125 W. 31st St., Cleveland, Ohio. 
SMITH, JOHN W., 

Elkton, Kentucky. 
STOKES, GEORGE W., 

Spokane, Washington. 
SWERENGEN, ROY W., 

Reeds Port, Oregon. 
VALDEZ, JULIO, 

729 Chapala St., San Barbara, Calif. 



PRIVATES 



ADKIXS, WALTER R., 

46 Farren Ave., San Francisco, Calif. 
ALIRE, JUAN J., 

Petoca, New Mexico. 
AMBROSE, JAMES E., 

2106 Blair Ave., St. Louis, Mo. 
ANDERSON, PETER, 

R. F. D. No. 2, Centerville, Washington. 
ASTON, ZENO, 

Garces, Arizona. 
BAIRD, VICTOR J., 

Oakland, Oregon. 
BALDOCK, JAMES, 

Baker City, Oregon. 
BALDWIN, ROY M., 

348 Valeria St., Fresno, Calif. 
BENTEKAS, ETHYEMIOS, 

13 N. nth St., Portland, Oregon. 
BAXTER, HARRY C, 

Sutton, West Virginia. 
BEALES, THOMAS J., 

Hotel Carlton, Turk St., San Francisco, 
Calif. 
BEER, HAROLD D., 

225 Harold Ave., San Francisco, Calif. 
BENSON, GEORGE M., 

Astoria, Oregon. 
BLACK, WILLIAM L., 

3066 Hull Ave., New York City. 



BLUHM, GOTFRED, 

Oregon City, Oregon. 
BOBZIN, GORGON H., 

121 W. 91st St., Los Angeles. Calif. 
BOESE, FRED, 

Boring, Oregon. 
BREWER, GUY M., 

Coquille, Oregon. 
BREWSAUGH, BERT E., 

Cotter, Mo. 
BURNS, WILLIAM E., 

1505 William St., Baltimore, Md. 

CARR, MILFORD A., 
Rockhall, Maryland. 

CHRISMAN, WILLIAM L., 
Rufus, Oregon. 

COE, JESSE, 

San Luis, Obispo, Calif. 

CRAWFORD, CLARENCE, 

Col ton, Calif. 

CZECHOWSKI, JOHN M., 

12 Sherman St., Passaic, New Jersey. 

DePASQUALE, VINCENT, 
936 Asquith St., Baltimore, Md. 

DODGE, HARRY, 

vSycamore vSt., Santa Cruz, Calif. 

DOERING, ORA, 
Tillamook, Oregon. 



Company *'L" 



3«i 



PRIVATES 

DORSEY, WILLIAM C, 

3376 22d St., San Francisco, Calif. 

EDWARDS, JOHN H., 
Phoenix, Oregon. 

ELLISON, HENRY, 

609 E. 30th St., Tacoma, Washington. 
PETTY, FREDERICK E., 

Bend, Oregon. 
FINCK, HENRY, 

Delmar, Iowa. 
FLANDERS, ELMER, 

Bandon, Oregon. 
FALKAR, CRIS, 

3010 Webster St., San Francisco, Calif. 
FROST, ROBERT H., 

132 N. Thurman St., Sheridan, Wyo. 
GIBSON, GROVER C, 

Post, Oregon. 
GILBRETH, HAROLD H., 

Southerlin, Oregon. 
GRISEL, ELBERT T., 

Lakeview, Oregon. 
HANCOCK, EMERY T., 

Spencer, Indiana. 
HOLSHUE, CLARENCE A., 

Helena, Mont. 
HORN, CLARENCE W., 

Pilot Rock, Oregon. 
JIANOCOPULOS, CHRIS, 

7 S. Eldorado St., Stockton, Calif. 
JOHNSON, RAY E., 

Rainier, Oregon. 
KARJALA, JOHN, 

Centerville, Washington. 
KILROY, JAMES F., 

58 Fremont St., Lowell, Mass. 
KING, NORRIS L., 

Pocomoke City, Md. 
KLAUS, ALFRED, 

Oregon City, Oregon. 
KROHN, FRANK, 

330 15th St., Toledo, Ohio. 
LAMPHIEAR, HILTON B., 

610 James St., Seattle, Washington. 
LEWIS, CHARLES J., 

17 Winfield Ave., San Francisco, Calif. 
LINS, WILLIE H., 

George, Oregon. 
LOOS, RAY J., 

664 Vine St., Coshocton, Ohio. 
McLEAN, DUNCAN, 

Lakeview, Oregon. 



(Continued) 

McMULLIN, WALTER R., 

1 66 1 Octavia St., San Francisco, Calif. 
MICHELS, HENRY C, 

Mt. Angel, Oregon. 
MYERS, CLAUDE S., 

460 Casteo St., San Francisco, Calif. 
NOAKES, CLAUDE, 

2021 Minor N. St., Seattle, Washington. 
OADES, ALPHA E., 

Boyd, Oregon. 
OLESON, MIKE A., 

1 2th and Marshall Apts., Portland, 
Oregon. 

PARKER, HARRISON L., 

Fernhill, Oregon. 

PATTERSON, GEORGE E., 

239 W. King St., Tulare, Calif. 
PEEK, ERNEST H., 

Boles, Idaho. 
PHILLIPS, EUGENE, 

Falls City, Oregon. 
REHBERG, RAY C, 

Albee, Oregon. 
REID, EDWIN W., 

265 E. 3d St., N. Portland, Oregon. 
RAMBERG, ALBERT, 

Mt. Angel, Oregon. 
RICE, HOWARD E., 

Condon, Oregon. 
RICHARDSON, CRIS C, 

127 S. Grape St., Medford, Oregon. 
ROWEN, YUDA, 

406 30th St., San Francisco, Calif. 
SCHLEITER, HILBERT, 

321 1 W. 44th St., Cleveland, Ohio. 

SCHNEE, GUS J., 
Mt. Angel, Oregon. 

vSPRAGUE, GUSSIE S., 
Freewater, Oregon. 

vSTOCKWELL, LESTER G., 

4602 loth Ave., S. Seattle, Washington. 

STARR, PETER M., 

R. No. 2, Corvallis, Oregon. 

STRACK, WALTER, 

Cranberry Ave., Hazleton, Penn. 

SYLVESTER, RALPH C, 
Pendleton, Oregon. 

TALBERT, JOHN W., 

Independence, Kansas. 
TIMMERMAN, WILLIAM H., 

Helix, Oregon. 



382 History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 



PRIVATES 

TRACY, GEORGE H., 

R. No. 3, Estacada, Oregon. 
THOMPSON, EARL L., 

Newport, Minn. 

THOMPSON, JOSEPH, 

124 Fernhill Ave., Detroit, Michigan. 
VON REIGEN, MARTIN, 

Hotel Rhein, Seattle, Washington. 
WARD, WILLIAM A., 

22 Lilac St., New Haven, Conn. 
WARNE, CLARENCE M., 

1 1 25 Pine St., Zanesville, Ohio. 
WARREN, NEIL C, 

702 W. Vine St., Lima, Ohio. 



(Continued) 

WATKINS, JAMES H., 

Hereford, Oregon. 
WAUGH, WORTHY, 

Bladen, Ohio. 
WESTRUP, JOHN, 

4191 26th St., San Francisco, Calif. 
WHITE, CLARENCE L., 

Pedro, Ohio. 
WHITE, LEWIS L., 

Leipsic, Ohio. 
WHITE, JAMES, 

Lapivai, Idaho. 
WILSON, JOHN E., 

Deal Island, Md. 



ROSTER OF FORMER OFFICERS, COMPANY " L," 63d INFANTRY 
LEWIS, GEORGE 



CAPTAIN 

PAUL, W. STEWART. 
PENDLETON, ALAN 



McGILL, ROBERT 
CASEY, JOHN. 
LEONARD. 



RHODES. 
KEECH, DANA E. 
PECK. 



FIRST LIEUTENANTS 

IMUS, CLINT 
CLARK, E. J. 
HIRSCH, STEVEN J. 

SECOND LIEUTENANTS 
LZICAR. 

BOEHME, HARRY. 
SHRIVER, Z. J. 



FOLLOWING MEN OF CO. "L," 63d INFANTRY, DISCHARGED TO ACCEPT 

COMMISSION 

FIRST SERGEANT 

WATSON, ROBERT, Commissioned Second Lieutenant. 

SERGEANT 
HOWELL, WILLIAM K., Commissioned Second Lieutenant. 

FOLLOWING MEN OF CO. "L" TRANSFERRED TO OFFICERS' TRAINING 

CAMPS 



FEE, THOMAS DENT, 

Kammerer, Wyoming. 
JAMES, EDWARD 



SERGEANTS 

HANNA, FORREST A. 
HARRIS, CHARLEY E., 
Barstowe, Calif. 
STARR, WHITNEY 



Company "L 



383 



CORPORALS 



BAKER, CHESTER O., 

820 Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles, Calif. 
COLLINS, HAROLD L., 

Los Angeles, Calif. 
GRIFFITHS, CLARENCE 



LORD, FRANCIS D., 
Los Angeles, Calif. 

REHBERG, FRANK, 
Pendleton, Oregon. 

ROBINSON, GUY H., 
Roseburg, Oregon. 



PRIVATES— FIRST CLASS 

GILBERT, REXFORD L., LETTENMAIER, WILLIAM F., 

Los Angeles, Calif. Oregon City, Oregon. 

WESTERGREN, RICHARD A., Seattle, Washington. 

ROSTER OF MEN TRANSFERRED FROM CO. " L," 63d INFANTRY, TO CO. " L," 
72D INFANTRY, CAMP MEADE, MD. 

FIRST SERGEANT 

HOWELL, WILLIAM K., 

SUPPLY SERGEANT 
WILLIAMSON, OLLIE F. 

SERGEANT 
SPRAGGINS, VICTOR M. 



LEA, CHARLES A. 
PHILLIPS, EDWARD C. 
WESTOFF, CLARENCE C. 



CORPORALS 

WINN, RICHARD J., Jr. 
BEVINS, RILEY 
KUBAT, LOUIS. 
HARRIS, TRUMAN T. 



COOK 

SIMPSON, PAUL 



BRADLEY, EDWIN L. 
ERASER, EDWARD J. 
FRITTER, RALPH L. 
GORMAN, MICHAEL, 

Glen wood Springs, Colorado 
MALLO, FRANK R. 



PRIVATES— FIRST CLASS 

MILLIEN, FRANCIS D., 
N. Yakima, Washington. 

OLIVERA, EPHIFINIO, 

OWENS, WALTER E., 
Pendleton, Oregon. 

WINDELL, OLE G. 



ANDERSON, ANDROS, 

Yerington, Nevada. 
BEAL, JOHN H. 



PRIVATES 

BENITEZ, ANTONIO, 

Los Angeles, Calif. 
BOEHMER, AUGUST. 



384 History of the 63 rd U. S. Infantry 



PRIVATES {Contiaued) 



BOHANNON, DELBERT, 

Riverside, Calif. 

BRANDEL, EDWIN, 
Albany, Oregon. 

CENTERS, ALFRED, 
Coquille, Oregon. 

CRAWFORD, ARTHUR W 
Los Angeles., Calif. 

DALTON, JOHN, 

DAVIS, willia:m W., 

Coquille, Oregon. 

DEXTER, JACOB, 

Heppner, Oregon. 

GAUNT, ERVIE H., 
The Dalles, Oregon. 



JACOBSON, MARTIN, 

Seattle, Wash. 
LUCHT, FRED W., JR. 

Oregon City, Oregon. 
MARTIN, ERNEST, 

Oregon City, Oregon. 
RICE, CHESTER O., 

The Dalles, Oregon. 
STALEY, CHAS. E., 

Roseburg, Oregon. 
VOLPP, EMIL A., 

Oregon City, Oregon. 
WALSH, CLEO M., 

Prineville, Oregon. 
WINSLOW, CLYDE, 

Susanville, Oregon. 



FORMER MEMBERS OF CO. " L," 63d INFANTRY, DISCHARGED OR TRANS- 
FERRED TO OTHER ORGANIZATIONS 

FIRST SERGEANT 

CODY, ROY W., 1661 Octavia St., San Francisco, Calif. 

MESS SERGEANT 
MANHEIM, HERMAN. 



BERSHIR, WILLIAM. 
GOFFRIER, WILLIAM C. 
HOMEN, WILLIAM, 

Oakland, Calif. 
STONE, MARION. 



SERGEANTS 

KOHLER, LOUIS R., 

Rochester, New York. 
MARINER, GEORGE W. 
vSEYMOUR, GEORGE E., 

San Francisco Calif. 



CORPORALS 



ANDERSON, ARTHUR A., 

214 Duane St., Astoria, Oregon. 
CARLSON, ROBERT L., 

Raymond, Washington. 
EDWARDS, STANLEY E., 

Ashley, Pa. 
GALLIER, EDMUND W., 

Bandon, Oregon. 

SHICK, JOHN P., 



GARN, ARTHUR A., 
Douglas, Alaska. 

JOHNSTON, WILFORD. 
KEEGAN, THOMAS E. 

PETERSON, HUGO, 

Aurora Lo. Iron Wood, Michigan. 
REDDISH, HUBERT F. 
Athena, Oregon. 



COOK 

FOGLESONG, JESS C. 



MECHANIC 
COLOVIC, LOZO. 



<< T " 



Company ''L 



385 



MOORE, JOHN J., 
Gen. Del., St. Louis, Mo. 



BUGLER 

TRUMAN, DAVID. 



ADAMS, WILLIAM F. 
AZUMA, ZENSAKU. 
BAZNEK, JOHN. 
BEACH, HOMER, 

Corvallis, Oregon. 
BRIGGS, MAURICE E., 

Milwaukee, Oregon. 
COLLINS, CLARENCE. 
HERSHEY, HAROLD L., 

Los Angeles, Calif. 
HUBBARD, ROLAND H. 

Bethesda, Kentucky. 
JEFFRIES, LIGE M. 
JONES, OREN T., 

Prineville, Oregon. 
LAWRIN, ALBERT R. 



PRIVATES— FIRST CLASS 

LEAKER, ERNIE H., 

1023 West Broadway, Toledo, Ohio. 
LeBARSE, JOSEPH, 

Oakland, Calif. 
MISELMAN, SAM. 
MULLER, FRANK, 

Monterey, Calif. 
PALM, EINAR M., 

San Francisco, Calif. 
RUCCIO, FRANK. 
SOBAY, JOHN. 
STRATTON, CLARENCE A., 

St. Maries, Idaho. 

TAUSSIG, HUGO. 

WELSCH, GEORGE A., 

64 N. Rebecca St., Youngstown, Ohio. 



PRIVATES 



ABREGO, RAYMOND S. 
ANDREONI, GUIDO, 

San Francisco, Calif. 
ALVES, WILLIAM M., 

San Francisco, Calif. 
APPERSON, ALBERT R., 

Enterprise, Oregon. 
BARTUCCA, FRANK. 
BURROWS, BENNIE F., 

Yuma, Colorado. 
CARLSON, GEORGE F., 

Astoria, Oregon. 
CARTER, ARTHUR W., 

Molalla, Oregon. 
CASTEEL, JOSEPH F. 
CAUDILL, CALVIN C. 
CLARK, RUSSELL, A., 

Boise, Idaho. 
COBLE, FRANK. 
CURRY, THOMAS J., 

Coquille, Oregon. 
DANIELS, HENRY G., 

Roseburg, Oregon. 
DOYLE, FRED D. 
DUNBAR, LAWRENCE. 
PRAKI, IVARIA, 

Astoria, Oregon. 



FROST, ALBERT, 

Alaska. 
FOSTER, ETHELBERT. 
GARIBALDI, PETERO, 

San Francisco, Calif. 
GIBBS, OREN, 

Ukiah, Oregon. 
GILROY, JOHN L. 
GRANT, JAMES. 
GRIPFIS, WALLACE H., 

St. Helens, Oregon. 
HARRIS, JAMES L., 

Moody, Texas. 
HATFIELD, HENRY A. 
HELLER, JOSEPH, 

Chicago, 111. 
HINKLE, LLOYD A. 
HINKLE, VIRGIL V., 

Roseburg, Oregon. 
HOFFMAN, GILBERT, 

LaCrosse, Wis. 
JACKSON, HENRY, 

McAUiance, Calif. 
JUNGE, WILLIAM F., 

Fullerton, Calif. 
KELLY, GEORGE E., 

Astoria, Oregon. 



386 



History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 



PRIVATES 

KOSIXSKI, NICK. 
LAMPI, WAINO O., 

Astoria, Oregon. 
LARRENCE, WILLIS R. 
LEONARD, HARRY. 
LEUTHOLD, JOHN G., 

Coquille, Oregon. 
LEUDERALBERT, ALBERT J., 

2234 Gilbert Ave., Cincinnati, Ohio. 
LOFTIS, CLARENCE, 

Lakeview, Oregon. 
LONG, CHARLES B. 
MARCHETTI, VICTOR J. 
MARZ, AUGUST B. 
MASON, EUGENE, 

Woodlake, Calif. 
McCURRY, GETER. 
McKINNEY, DANIEL H. 
McMILLIN, HAYES, 

Astoria, Oregon. 
MILLER, WILLIAM V., 

49 Astor St., Astoria, Oregon. 
MILLS, JOHN E., 

Roseburg, Oregon. 
MON, TOM, 

Portland, Oregon. 
MORRIS, FRED, 

Milan, Missouri. 
MURPHY, ROBERT G. 
MURPHY, JAMES. 



{Continued) 

NEWERKLA, JOSEPH, 

2437 L. Spauldin Ave., Chicago, 111. 
O'NEIL, JAMES. 
REGINATTO, ANGELO, 

St. Helens, Oregon. 
REMMERS, WALTER. 
RICHARDSON, HENRY L., 

Burns, Oregon. 
ROUSINOS, ANTONIO. 

Astoria, Oregon. 
ROVELES, MASEDONO. 

Ogden, Utah. 
SHARP, CURTIS V., 

3506 E. 1st St., Spokane, Wash. 
SMITH, LOUIS v., 

Los Angeles, Calif. 
STERNS, RALPH C, 

1641 E. Park St., Portland, Oregon. 
STEPHENS, BUNYON, 

Visalia, Calif. 
STOCK, CLARENCE P., 

Coquille, Oregon. 
STUBBLEFIELD, JESSIE L. 
THORNHAVEN, ANDREW A., 

Coquille, Oregon. 
TROZELLE, PAUL C, 

Roseburg, Oregon. 
WEBER, FREDERICK C, 

Youngstown, Ohio. 
WEHINGER, ALBERT O., 

Fremont, Ohio. 



Company ''M' 



CAPTAIN 

THOMSON, STANLEY A., Menio Park, Cal. 



DRESSER, EVAN C 



FIRST LIEUTENANTS 

PLANK, CLYDE H., 
919 Lewis Ave., Emporia, Kan. 
CLARKSTON, ALEXANDER, Burning Springs, Ky. 



SECOND LIEUTENANTS 
BRACK, LAWRENCE J., 235 Belgrade Ave., Boston, Mass. 

FIRST SERGEANT 

LAWSON, WILLIAM, Elk VaUey, Tenn. 

MESS SERGEANT 
BROKENSHIRE, SAMUEL, Ironwood, Mich. 

SUPPLY SERGEANT 

RICHMOND, JOHN C, 412 1 South Wall Street, Los Angeles, Cal. 



ROTH, FRANK A., 

4428 Norfolk Ave., St. Louis, Mo. 
KUEHL, ALBERT F., 

R. P. D. No. 3, Box 95, Waupaca, Wis. 
WELCH, GEORGE C, 

209 Curry Street, Ironwood, Mich. 
LESLIE, LESTER A., 

Santa Barbara, Cal. 
RELIPHORD, MARK W., 

Bloomington, 111. 



SERGEANTS 

MORANO, SALVADOR, 

3040 Pierce Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
MITZNER, ALBERT W., 

Marion, Ore. 
DAVIS, CHARLES E., 

Union, Ore. 
COLLIER, HERBERT L., 

Los Angeles, Cal. 
BECKER, EUGENE H., 

Summerville, Ore. 
JONES, GUY C. 



CORPORALS 



PHIN, HENRY H., 

Norway, South Carolina. 



BROWN, CHARLES A., 
Jordan Valley, Ore. 



387 



388 



History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 



CORPORAL 

OSORIO, ABELARDO C, 

315 South Philip Street, Hanford, Cal. 

CROWLEY, ALVAH L., 

908 "C" Street, La Grande, Ore. 

FUSCO, JOHN, 

2020 Taylor Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

WADDELL, JAMES F., 
Shedd, Ore. 

MYERS, EARL B., 
Dj'erville, Cal. 

HOFFMAX, BURREL E., 
Riverside, Ore. 

JAMES, WILLL'^M H., ' 

Moro, Ore. 

BEHNER, HOWARD B., 
Halfway, Ore. 

PATCHEN, ROY D., 
Drain, Ore. 

OLIVER, JOSEPH, 

2344 Post Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

BIDDLE, EMMETT S., 
Crane, Ore. 



(Continued) 

WILCOX, WILLIS L., 

263 W. ist. South, Salt Lake City, 
Utah. 
McNABB, FAY L., 

lone. Ore. 
SHELDON, ARCHIE E., 

297 E. 39th Street, Portland, Ore. 
BRANDENBURG, JOSIAH H., 

223 E. Third Street, Frederick, Md. 
STAROOK, ELMER. 
SULLIVAN, TIMOTHY. 
TREUBERT, GEORGE J. 
HEBERT, ROLAND L., 

1204 E. Main Street, Portland, Ore. 
SCHAFFER, AUSTIN H., 

586 E. Martin Street, Roxborough, 
Phila., Pa. 
GANONG, ALONZO, 

Lancaster, Cal. 
VODVARKA, JOHN, 

2021 West 51st Street, Chicago, 111. 
INGHAM, RICHARD H. 
PARKER, HARRY H. 



HASKELL, MARKS A., 

Niles, Cal. 
SPURLIN, JAMES, 

Mattoon, 111. 



COOKS 



UTLEY, OWEN S., 
St. Louis, Mo. 

ZINN, JOHN R., 
St. Louis, Mo. 



BENSON, ALFRED, 
Bakersfield, Cal. 



MECHANICS 

BROAN, THOMAS G., 

1007 E. 49th Street, Los Angeles, Cal. 
GLOVER, FLOYD H., Chico, Cal. 



GOODMAN, HARRY A., 
San Luis, Obispo, Cal. 



BUGLERS 



STINSON, ELMER F. 
Jackson, Ga. 



PRIVATES— FIRST CLASS 



ANDERSON, OSCAR, 

500 E. Couch Street, Portland, Ore. 
BOTOPULOS, GEORGE, 

151 K Porter Street, Portland, Ore. 
BARBER, WILLIAM H., 

Elgin, Ore. 
BRASSFIELD, HARRY M., 

Dallas, Ore. 
BROKAW, WILLIAM B., 

Halfway, Ore. 



BROWN, HAYDEN H., 

925 Geary Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
CAMBY, ALBERT, 

New York, N. Y. 
CARPENTER, LLOYD C, 

Elgin, Ore. 
CHEVALIER, ELMER, 

Issaquah, Wash. 
COCHRAN, REANOUS J., 

Parkersburg, Ore. 



<< A/r" 



Company '*M 



389 



PRIVATES— FIRST CLASS {Conliaued) 



CONNER, OLIVER G., 

Payette, Idaho. 
COOPER, ISAAC, 

Condon, Ore. 
EBBESEN, JOHN J., 

Blaine, Ore. 
FOX, HARRY H., 

1 514 Westlake Ave., Seattle, Wash. 
GILLICK, JAMES T., 

Auburn, Cal. 
GROSS, JOHN, 

Yoncalla, Ore. 
HATCH, ERNEST J., 

Gooseberry, Ore. 
HAYNES, WALTER S., 

Richmond, Va. 
HOLLAND, RAY, 

Condon, Ore. 
HUNT, BASIL T., 

1421 W. Grandview Blvd., Detroit, 
Mich. 
HUTZ, HARRY L., 

884 West Street, Hollister, Cal. 
lOANIDES, SOTORIOS, 

Indianapolis, Ind. 
JONES, ROBERT W., 

2096 Harvard Bldg., Los Angeles, Cal. 
JORGENSEN, MARTIN, 

Blackfoot, Idaho. 

KACHIAI, BEN P., 

4 E. Weber Street, Stockton, Cal. 

KIPER, PIETR, 

203 S. Ann Street, Baltimore, Md. 

KOBERSTEIN, WACLAW, 
Rainier, Ore. 

McBRIDE, HAROLD R., 
29th and Grant Streets, Terre Haute, 
Ind. 



MILES, ORRIN W., 

Uhrichsville, Ohio. 
NAGL, WILLIAM C, 

R. F. D. No. 3, Oregon City, Ore. 
ORMAN, EARL B., 

P. O. Box, 1331, Phoenix, Ariz. 
RHINEHART, GEORGE S., 

Monroe, Wash. 
RIVERA, ERNEST W., 

San Luis, Obispo, Cal. 
SMITH, JOSEPH E., 

999 E. loth Street, Portland, Ore. 
STAMPER, GLENN M., 

Highland, Cal. 
STEPHEN, HOMER R., 

Condon, Ore. 
STORRS, WILLIAM, 

Happy Camp, Cal. 
STROBECH, ALFRED L., 

Rosebud, Mont. 
THOMPSON, KENNETH J., 

Prineville, Ore. 
VALENTINE, LAURENCE E., 

Ruth, N. M. 
VALENZUELA, FRANK, 

921 Eureka Street, Bakersfield, Cal. 
VENABLE, NORMAN, 

Springerton, 111. 
WAGNER, JAY R., 

Enterprise, Ore. 
WHITE, ALONZO H., 

Ceres, Wash. 
WILLIAMS, MACK D., 

Lamb, Mo. 
WILLIAMS, WILKINS, 

Pendleton, Ore. 
WYATT, JAMES R., 

Vallejo, Cal. 



ACALEY, ALBERT A., 

Atolia, Cal. 
ALAMOS, ANTON S., 

58 Jackson Street, San Francisco, 
ALLEN, CHARLES W., 

R. F. D. No. 2, Hood River, Ore. 
ANDERSON, ANDY, 

21 N. 9th Street, Portland, Ore. 
AQUISTAPACE, JIM, 

Little Shasta, Cal. 



PRIVATES 

ARNOLD, EDWIN T., 

Piedmont, Wyoming. 
BARBOUN, ARCHIE S., 
Cal. 1214 N. 4th Street, Portland, Ore. 

BARTON, ARTHUR, 

Elgin, Ore. 
BARTON, OSCAR S., 

Enterprise, Ore. 
BEKKERS, ANTON G., 

Elgin, Ore. 



390 History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 



PRIVATES 

BILLSON, JOHN M. T., 

Minetto, N. Y. 

BLACK, ROBERT 
BOURBOXXAISE, FRANK, 

412 W. First Ave., Flint, Mich. 
BOX, WILLIAM G., 

Cornucopia, Ore. 
BREWSTER, GEORGE W., 

82 Orchard Street, Summit, N. J. 
BRIGATI, EUGENIO, 

Boulder Creek, Cal. 
BROWN, ARTHUR L., 

Freewater, Ore. 
BROWN, RAY, 

Prairie, Idaho. 
CHASE, SALMON P., 

1769 E. 22d Street, Los Angeles, Cal. 
CHASE, WILLIAM F., 

Silverton, Ore. 
COCHRAN, ARCHIE, 

The Dalles, Ore. 
COLEMAN, SIDNEY R., 

Dee, Ore. 
COOLEY, IRA L., 

Huntington, Ore. 
COTTER, JOHN H., 

Flagstaff, Ariz. 
COVELL, ARTHUR B., 

San Luis, Obispo, Cal. 

CRAVEN, WHITSON B., 

386 S. Ohio Ave., Columbus, Ohio. 

CUSHMAN, VERNON V., 
Cushman, Ore. 

DAVIS , WILLIAM P., 
Izee, Ore. 

DELANES, GEORGE J., 

1736 1 2th Street, Oakland, Cal. 

DEMASTERS, LEMUEL E., 
792 Montana Ave., Portland, Ore. 

EARNSHAW, GEORGE A., 

4923 Duffield Street, Frankford, Phila., 
Pa. 

ECKER, RALPH O., 
Corvallis, Ore. 

FANNING, JOHN B., 

R. F. D. No. 3, Spokane, Wash. 

FAUCETT, HAROLD D., 
P. O. Box 186, Phoenix, Ariz. 

FILPOT, WALTER C, 
South i22>2 Madison Street, Spokane, 
Wash. 



{Continued) 

FINELL, CARL E., 

Bandon, Ore. 
FOUSEK, JOSEPH, 

3334 W. 23d Street, Chicago, 111. 
GAGE, WILLIAM A., 

Cloverdale, Ore. 
GAVIATI, ERNEST, 

466 Greenwich Street, San Francisco, 
Cal. 
GIOVANNINI, HARRY, 

1 73 1 Stockton Street, San Francisco, 
Cal. 
GRANET, BENJAMIN N. 
GROSS, EDWARD J. 
HILL, WALTER W., 

Garibaldi, Ore. 
HODGES, WILLIAM S., 

410 7th Ave., Yuma, Ariz. 
HYATT, ELZIE S. 
HYLAND, LAWRENCE, 

1037 E. 14th Street, N., Portland, Ore. 
JAMES, LANTA, 

Frametown, W. Va. 
JONES, ROSCOE H., 

North Plains, Ore. 
KENT, JOHN v., 

275 Turk Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
KIERNAN, CHRISTOPHER, 

44 S. 5th Street, Highlandtown, Balti- 
more Co., Md. 
KILPATRICK, RAYMOND H. 
KINGSTON, WALTER B., 

278 Carl Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
KOBRINKSY, SAMUEL G., 

316 S. Reese Street, Phila., Pa. 

LEASY, MATHEW T., 
Suplee, Ore. 

LEE, IRA, 
Boise, Idaho. 

LOVELL, WALTER E., 

Zanesville, Ohio. 

MAYS, HOMER E., 

1043 Third Street, Hillsboro, Ore. 

MOVER, CARL D., 
Luray, Va. 

MUSA, RICHARD, 
Flagtown, N. J. 

NELSON, ANDREW K., 
San Francisco, Cal. 

NELSON, ROYAL R., 
616 Jackson Street, Pendleton, Ore. 



a A/r" 



Company ''M 



391 



PRIVATES 

NIGKERSON, JAMES A., 

Chicago, Cal. 
O'GRADY, GUS 

Ferris, Cal. 
ORESCH, HANS P., 

Tygh, Ore. 
OSTROM, CARL G., 

649 E. 52d Street, North, Portland, Ore. 
PAPAS, JOHN, 

133 Powell Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
PERRY, HENRY A., 

195 Lexington Ave., San Francisco, Cal. 
PHILBIN, JAMES, 

Olney, Ore. 
PIENDZICH, TONY, 

19 Franklin Ave., Harrison, N. J. 
POLLAK, JOHN, 

4752 South Loomis Street, Chicago, 111. 
PORTER, JESSE C, 

4000 47th Ave., S. E. Portland, Ore. 
PRENTISS, HUBERT E., 

347 S. Los Angeles Street, Los Angeles, 
Cal. 
RICKARD, EARL, 

Condon, Ore. 
RUTHERFORD, JAMES D., 

El Centro, Cal. 
SCHONLEBER, RICHARD T., 

52 Commerce Street, Trenton, N. J. 
SIMON, ROY G., 

864 First Street, Hillsboro, Ore. 

SMITH, CLYDE J., 

29 and 3 1 W. 5th Street, Greenville, S. C. 

SMITH, HENRY F. 

909 West Fayette St., Baltimore, Md. 



(Continued) 

SMULLIN, ROBERT L. 

22 4th Street, Frankland, Pa. 
SNOW, LORENZO, 

318 S. 6th E. Street, Salt Lake City, 
Utah. 
STARR, GEORGE B., 

Antelope, Ore. 
STRICKER, AUGUST, 

1 137 William Street, Baltimore, Md. 
STUART, GEORGE E., 

R. F. D. No. I, The Dalles, Ore. 
STUMBAUGH, ALFRED S., 

Inmaha, Ore. 
TORNITSKY, JOHN G., 

Uledi, Pa. 
TINNEY, GROVER, 

R. F. D. No. I, Bellingham, Wash. 
TUCKER, ROSCOE M. 

Los Angeles, Cal. 
VOLLE, REUBEN W. 

Heppner, Ore. 
WARD, ALBERT, 

2378 Maple Ave., Salem, Ore. 
WEISERT, WILLIAM, 

2482 W. 5th Street, Cleveland, Ohio. 
WILKINS, PAUL C, 

Mandon, N. D 
WILLIAMS, HOMER C, 

St. Marys, W. Va. 
WRANGHAM, CHARLES B., 

Garden Valley, Idaho. 
YURKONIS, WILLIAM 
YUTZ, WILLIAM C, 

Butte,Mont. 
ZIMMERMAN, WILLIAM J. 



THE FOLLOWING MEN WERE TRANSFERRED TO THE 72d INFANTRY 



DYER, JAMES H., 

Modesto, Cal. 
WEBER, HOWARD E., 

Ross, Cal. 
BLAYLOCK, OTTO, 

Summit Park, Joliet, 111. 
BILL, WILLIAM. 



SERGEANTS 

DENIAL, JOHN T. 
COMSTOCK, HARVEY L. 
DeCHESNE, LIONEL R. 
KELLY, CHESTER A. 
KEEZER, AVERY M. 
VOGT, JOHN. 



CORPORALS 



YOUNKER, HARVEY, 

1 155^ So. Broadway, Los Angeles, Cal. 



HANSELMAN, ARTHUR, 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 



392 History of the 63rd U. S. Infantry 



CORPORALS 

HAMESBERGER, FRED, 

Tucson, Ariz. 

CALLERO, ENRICO M., 

1024 Greenwich St., San Francisco, Cal. 

BLOCH, MARIE J., 

1036 East 17th St., North, Portland, Ore. 

CARESWELL, ATHOL B., 
420 W. 2d St., Los Angeles, Cal. 



{Continued) 

TAYLOR, GLENN H., 

221 W. Washington St.,Roseburg, Ore. 
GODFREY, GAYLORD G. 
RODGERS, JOHN D. 
BROWN, FRED. 
BOAK, GEORGE E. 
LAKE, MILTON J. 
CLINGAN, LOUIS M. 



COOK 

McSWEEN, DONALD. 



PRIVATES- 
BUCHANAN, WALTER E. 
CERMAK, CARL, 

2014 S. nth Street, St. Louis, Mo. 
COLEMAN, JOHN R., 

463 Fair Oaks Street, San Francisco, 
Cal. 

HAINES, HENRY S., 

1630 Page Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
KELSAY, CHARLES L., 

Lamonta, Ore. 
KENISON, WILLIAM D. 

Garden City, Kan. 



-FIRST CLASS 

McKENNA, FRANK H., 

131 W. 6th Street, Mansfield, Ohio. 

MARTIAL, JULES J., 

905 Pike Street, Seattle, Wash. 

MORGAN, LOVIL P., 

506 Vineyard Ave., Madera, Cal. 

PYZEK, ADAM, 

2338 Albany Ave., Chicago, 111. 

TRYTA, VACLAV. 

WICKS, ERNEST M., 
Minneapolis, Minn. 



PRIVATES 



ANDREWS, ROBERT L., 
Yoncalla, Ore. 

AUSTIN, JASON L., 

895 Third Street, Detroit, Mich. 

BARBER, HOMER H., 
Burno, Ore. 

BARRETT, CHARLES D. 
BOWMAN, LESTER A., 

Mineral, Idaho. 
BOYER, PETER, 

Sacramento, Cal. 
BRITTAIN, CHESTER H., 

Tygh Valley, Ore. 

BROWN, DARRELL. 

BROWN, EARL, 

2510 "B" Street, Selma, Cal. 

BROWN, WILLIAM P. 

BUCHANAN, RAYMOND D. 

BURDETT, JOSEPH M., 
Joseph, Ore. 

BURROWS, RAY A. 



CANZONO, GABRIELE 
CARTMILL, LESTER A., 

Baker, Ore. 
CASTALLANI, PIETRO. 
CHIEJO, TONY 
CHRISTIANSON, CHARLES C. 
COSINI, GIANI 
COY, ALEXANDER. 
DARE, RICHARD E., 

Phoenix, Ariz. 
DeHART, IRVIN. 
DeHULSTER, JOSEPH 
DUNLAP, WILLIAM E. 
FARRAND, ROBERT E., 

620 Monterey Street, HoUister, Cal. 
GADDI, AMERICO. 
GARGUILO, GENNARO. 
GEE, OWYANG Y. 
GREGG, JOHN T. 
HAMMOND, FRANK M., 

Oakland, Ore. 



Company "M*' 



393 



PRIVATES 

KILE, EDGAR F., 

Parkdale, Ore. 
LANGLEY, SALWYN G. 
O'NEAL, CHARLES L. 
QUAPPE, FREDERICK G. C, 

Reedsport, Ore. 

REAMY, ROBERT L. 

SANDOZ, VICTOR, 

The Dalles, Ore. 
SEIF, LEON L. 
SHEAR, CHESTER R., 

1 155 Leavenworth Street, San Francisco, 
Cal. 

SHORT, BENJAMIN H. 

SILVA, JOSEPH M. 



(Continued) 

STEVENS, GEORGE A. 
TAMBELLINI, PAOLO 
TAYLOR, ALBERT N., 

Condon, Ore. 
THOMAS, GEORGE H. 
THORNBURG, NATHAN L. 
THURBER, EARL C. 
TURNER, PERCY M., 

San Antonio, Texas. 
VELASQUEZ, LUCAS. 
WALSH, WILLIAM B. 
WILCOX, LESTER A. 
WITT, FREDERICK. 
WOODMAN LAURENCE C. 
ZHAROFF, PHILIP E. 



yf^-p, ^ 



4 9^¥^ 




UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARY 

Los Angeles 
This book is DUE on the last date stamped below. 



1 1 198 



Form L9-100m-9,'52(A3105)444 



.^70.33 



U.S. knxr 



^ 



^ 



63d A history of 
_A5 the SLXt/-. 



3 11 




58 00679 8234 



1?20 



third t;,3, 
infantry 



UC SOUTHERN REGIONAL LIBRARY FACILITY 

'i|l||||ll|lll||ll|i|iiii||iii|l|niii|i||i|iii|ii^^ 



AA 000 977 145 2 



D 

570.33 
63d 
A5 
1920 



V 



w^.