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Full text of "Important events of the century : containing historical synopsis of the important events since the discovery of America"

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ST. PAUL, - MINN. 



.A.1TID- 



;ffo..A,^l 



GENERAL 




105 Madison Street, 



Our facilities for Book Manufacturing in all its depart- 
ments are unsurpassed. Authors and publishers intending to 
have work done in our line will consult their own interest by 
getting our prices before making contracts elsewhere. 

The attention of Binders is called to our unusual facili- 
ties for the manufacture and stamping of Cases and Edo-e 
Gilding for the Trade. Correspondence respectfully solicited. 



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ADVERTISEMENTS. 



SINGER LATEST IMPl^OVRD FAMILY SR\VI\G \lACniSE8. 




RKTAIL. PRICES. 



BUEDICK HOFSE 

(Opposite Exposition Building.) 

Corner Wabash Ave. and Adams St., CHICAGO- 

Strictly First-Class S2perdajHoiiS3. 

Has Passenger Elevator, and all Modern Improve- 
ments. J. A. DE WITT, Manager. 



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I give with eat-h machine 1 TuclJinarker. 1 Euffler, 
IQuilter, 4 Hemmers. 1 Dress- Binder, 1 FootHem- 
mer 1 BraidPr. 6 Bobb ns. 13 Needle-".! Thumb-Screw 
J Guider. 1 Extra Needle Plae. 1 Oil Can. 1 Screw- 
driver. 1 Bottle Oi), 1 Check Spring, 1 Feed-<«prin?. 
1 Wrench, 1 Instruction Book, and Warrant the Ma- 
chine one year. 

N. P. LARSEN, 360 E, Division St., Chicago. 



. H. WALKER. 
IN ei.ASS. 



C. B. CURTI S. W. H. WISWELL. 



Manufacturers and Jobbers in 



Enjlisb ani 

American /^^^-^^ 
Fickles, 
CIiow Chow, 
Tomato Catsup, 
Table Sauce, ""^^ 

Write for Price List. 




IX BULK. 



FicUes, 
Chow Chow, 
Tomato Catsup, 
Fine Vinegars, 

CHICAGO, ILL. 
Faclorv, McHenrv. Illinois. 




i 




Every man who owns a Horse should hare a pair of 

Furlong's Fatent Foot Coolers ani Espmlers, 

Which remove all fever from the feet and keep them In a clean, moist and healthy condition absolutely 
prevent ng corns, contracted feet, qua ter cracks and scratches. The moist sponge is held securely on 
the bottom of the font, keeping'the frog in a hea'thv, natural condition. They can I'e used for a stutHng 
boot, and do not cost one-fourth a« mnch as the leather boot. The cuts represent the Holder and Sponge 
on :ind ofl'the foot. The hest horsemen of the country heartily endorse it as one of the most humane and 
valaable inventions of the day. Horses' feet have been restored from an unsound condition to a sound 
one in thrse weeks. It surprises everyone. For sile by Harness Makers and dealers in Turf goods. 
Single pa. rs sent to any address npon receipt of price, $1.50 per pair. In ordering, send diimcterof 
hoof measured across the bottom of the foot. I have a valuable Sponge Liniment for bid feet which I 
will forward with the Cooler at $1.00 per quart bottle. Send for descriptive circular t^■ith list of testi- 
monials from the leading horsemen and veterinary surgeons of the country. E. B. DRJlPEB, 193 E. 
Washington Street, CHICAGO, ILL. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



J. H. H A VERLY 



I»H.C>r»MEiTOI=L 



o 

4-1 

o 



o 




Cor. Monroe & Dearborn Sts,, CHICAGO, ILL. 



Seating capacity greater than that of any other Theater in this country, and one of the most successful. 

Also Proprietor of 

Haverly's Minstrels, 

One of the largest and Most Famous Organisations in the WorlJ. 

H, CLAPHA M, Manager. 






OFFICE IN ADELPHI THEATER. 



C. E. BLiAXCHETT. 
J. W. BL.AI!$D£L.li. 



Manasrer Buffalo Bill Combination. 








— ^o@<x- MiMfiiiLM a'a'a( giKi^i& llssigiaiBiia'a^M - 




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Ladies' and Gents' Wigs made to order 
A full lineolPAKIS WAVES, Braids. 
Frizetrs. etc. Dark and blond hair- 
wash for tale. Send for price list. 

160 & 162 Wabash Ave., Cor. Monroe. 

CHICAGO, ILLS, 

Country orders will receive prompt and careful 
attention. 



IMPORTER OF 



FRENCH HAIR GOODS! 

—ALSO— 

French Crepes 



And WAVES of 

Every description. 

Complete Stock at J 
liowest Prices. 

Goods sent C. O. D. 

109 State St., 

CHICAGO, ILLS. 




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ADVEETISEMENTS, 



THE LATEST AND BEST! 

Tan Active Apnts f anlei in CYcry State In tlie Union. 



El 



SUST 



TUf 



ie'±S' 1- 




Jb'iS' Si' 

Conceded by all to h». the most Perfect and Practical Gate ever offered to the Public. Equally adapted to 
either Board or Picket Gates. As it sustains itself io opening and closing without lilting or carrying, 
itcan be operated with ease by thesniallest lad, and while it possesses all the advantnges claimed for 
higher-priced L'ates, its cheapne^^s and simplicity of con-tniction brings it within the reach of all. 

The following is extracted from the sueciflcation forming a part of the Letters Patent No. I;i9,702, 
as issncd liy the United States Patent Office, July 23. 1872: 

Fig. 1 is a front view of the gate partially opened, showing its attachment to an ordinary fence. 
Pig. 2 is a bsck view of the gale drawn back on its supporting frame to the center, showing its eleva- 
tion aliove the ground when in position to be rotated or turned upon its hinges. 

To the heel post is hinged or pivoted a rotating post. B, through the upper part of which is an 
elongated slot or mortise. In the low^rpart of this slot or mortise is secured one end of a supporting 
bar, C, the other end extending to the center of the s'ate, is fastened between th'- ends of a brace, D, 
(extending from the lower pirt of the rotating post, B.) and a short bracket, E, Fig. 1, foiming with 
said post and bar the triangular supporting the frame to sustain the gate in its vertical position while 
beiugopened and closed. 

In the central part of the slot or mortise, and also between the projecting ends of the brace, D, 
and brack t, E, nre friction rollers— upon which, and secured to the cross-cleats on the back part of the 
gate is an oblique sustaining bar, F, the projecting end of which passes under a strap or its equivalent 
on the latch post, making the fastening to the gate when cl >sed. The front end of the gaie can be 
elevated for the passage of small stock and secured to its place by passing the projecting end of the sus- 
taining bar between the upper hoards of the fence and putting a pin through it into the atch post. 

To open the gate slide it back on the friction rollers to its center, as shown in Fig. 2. the obliquity 
of the snsuiining bar elevating it sufficiently to clear all ordinary obstructions, (as snow, rough and 
frozen groun'i, a hill side, grass, grain, &c .) then rotate it together with its supporting frame ninety 
degrees (or one-fourth way round) Should the gate, while in this position, be In the way of passing 
with a wide load, the peculiar mode of hinging allows it to rotate nearly half way round; the gate is then 
elid forward as in shutting and placed entirely out of the way. 

For further information address the Patentee, 

D. D. WISELL, ForfWayne, Ind. 



IMPORTANT 

EVENTS OF THE CENTURY: 





CONTAINING 

HISTORICAL SYNOPSIS OF THE IMPORTANT EVENTS SINCE THE 
DISCOVERY OF AMERICA. 

ILLUSTRATIONS AND DESCRIPTIONS 



GREAT CENTENNIAL EIHIBITION 

AT PHILADELPHIA; 

PLACES OF REVOLUTIONARY FAME, PUBLIC BUILDINGS IN PRINCIPAL 
CITIES, SKETCHES AND ILLUSTRATIONS OF THE PRESIDENTS; 
ALSO, A CLASSIFIED AND ALPHABETICALLY AR- 
RANGED LIST OF A LARGE NUMBER OF 
LEADING BUSINESS HOUSES, GIV- 
ING THE DATE OF THE ES- 
TABLISHMENT OF 
MANY FIRMS. 



NEW YORK: 

PUBLISHED BY THE UNITED STATES CENTRAL PUBLISHING COMPANY, 

171 AKD 173 GREENWICH STREET. 
1877. 

BENSON & EIPPEY, Managers. 



Copyright January, 1876, by A. T. Senson & J. Rippey. 



AD VE RTISEM ENTS. 



Cotton Batting Company, 

C. LAUBMAYER, Prop., 

NOS. 373 AND 375 NORTH AVENUE, 

cmcAOo, ILL. 

HIGHEST PREMIUM AWARDED AT OmOINNATI EXPOSITION. 

ESTABLISHED IK" 1850. 

EXCELSIOR WRITING FLOIDS, 

Gmlnl Cm Ms, Firt MMMi 

J.J. Bvitler's Record Fluid being chemically pure, it is absolutely permanent, time 
having no efiect on it except to make it blacker. It will stand as long as the paper holds 
together on which it is written , It is very fluid, flowing smoothly and evenly, and having 
a ceep color makes a richer mark, and gives much better satisfaction when first written 
with than the lijht, pale Inks of foreign make. 

J. J. Butler's Excelsior School Ink has attained a celebrated reputation, and the 
steadily increasing demand for it is undoubted evidence that people are getting disgusted 
with the worthless logwood mixtures called common Black Ink, that get thick, stringy, 
and fade out in a little while. Butler's Excelsior School Ink is made from best quality ot 
nut galls and indigo. The greatest care is taken in its preparation, and being chemically 
pure, it is absolutely permanent, will not thicken or deposit sediment, and can be used to 
the last drop. 

J. J. Butler's La Belle Violet Ink is growing rapidly in favor, and is pronounced by 
those that use it to be far superior to any Violet Ink manufactured. It is a rich purple 
shade, and gives a good copy in letter-press. 

J. J. Butler's Non-Eiasive Blue Ink resists acids, and will not corrode the pen. 

FRANK A. WOODMANSEE, Sole Proprietor, 

34 & 36 Sycamore Street, CmOiraATI, 0. 

" FAT CONTRIBOTOR'S PAPER." 
CINCINNATI SATURDAY NIGHT. 

Best liiterary and Family Paper in the West. 

TWO DOLLARS PER YEAR IN ADVANCE. 

Post Paid by the publisfiers, For Sale by all News Dealers . 

The SATUPDAY NIGHT is an eight page paper, of forty-ei?ht columns, independent as to poli- 
tics, and devoted to choice re.Hriincr matter for the HOME CIRCLE: including pleasant stories, well 
selected miscellany, poetry, humorous sketches by the '• Fat Contributor," literary essays, dramatic 
news and criticisms, household recipes, etc., etc. Specimen copies sent free. 

A. MI]VER OKI$$\%'OIiD, Editor and Proprietor. 

Office, Boom 84, Johnston Building, Cincinnati Ohio, P O. Box 1385. 



CONTENTS. 



Business Classifications. 

PAOE. 

i?ffi&-ii;d.^---::::::--:.v.:v::::::::.:| 

A^'N ARBOK,Mich 280 

ATCHISON, Kas 411 

AURORA, I1I.-V-- ■■• ii^ 

BATTLE CREEK, Mich ^72 

BAY CITY, Mich lou 

BELLEVILLE, 111 240 

BELVIDERB,I11 455 

BELOIT,Wis 4h4 

BERLIN, Wis........ ^0 

BLOOMINGTON, 111 24" 

BURLINGTON. la f,'^ 

CAMBRIDGE CITY, Ind 2ob 

CEDAR RAPIDS, Iowa 4.30 

CEDAR FALLS, Iowa 4« 

CHAMPAIGN, 111 228 

CHICAGO, 111 46o 

CLINTON, Iowa 4l.i 

COUNCIL BLUFFS, Iowa 452 

DANVILLE. 111. 192 

DAVENPORT, Iowa a48 

DECATUR,111 ••• 23h 

DES MOINES, Iowa 400 

DIXON, 111 .f58 

DUBUQUE. Iowa ,.••■ ^"'^ 

EAST SAGINAW, Mich 167 

EAU CLAIRE, Wis 2.5 

ELGIN, 111 22o 

ELKHART, Ind 2b2 

EVANSVILLB, Ind 137 

EVANSTON, 111 233 

PLINT.Mich 462 

FOND DULAC, Wis 249 

FORT HOWARD. Wis 2T5 

FORT MADISON , Iowa 4b3 

FORT WAYNE. lud 121 

FREEPORT, 111 4(3 5 

FULTON. Ill 412 

GALENA.Ill 3il 

GALESBURG, 111 422 

GALVA, 111.....' 456 

GRAND RAPIDS, Mich 329 

GRAND HAVEN, Mich 287 

GREEN BAY, Wis 272 

HANNIBAL,Mo 421 

HASTINGS, Minn 374 

HUNTINGTON. Ind.. 260 

INDIANAPOLIS, Ind 75 

IONIA. Mich. 282 

IOWA CITY. Iowa 201 

JACKSONVILLE, 111 418 

JACKSON. Mich 153 

JANESVILLE, Wis 97 

JEFFERSON, CITY, Mo 398 

JOLIET, 111 190 

KALAMAZOO. Mich. 217 

KANKAKEE, 111 232 

KANSAS CITY, Mo 305 

KENOSHA, WIS 200 

KEOKUK, Iowa 383 

KEWANEE, 111 456 

KOKOMO, Ind 354 

LA CROSSE, Wis 332 

LAFAYETTE, Ind 305 

LANSING, Mich 284 

LA PORTE. Ind 2E2 

LASALLE,I11 426 

LAWRENCE. Kas 357 

LEAVENWORTH, Kas 402 

LEXINGTON. Mo 360 

LINCOLN, Neb... 453 

LOGAN SPORT, Ind 21.3 

LYONS. Iowa 412 

MADISON, Wis 376 

MARSHALL, Mich 272 

MENASHA,Wia 274 

MENDOTA, 111 459 

MICHIGAN CITY, Ind 268 

MILWAUKEE, Wis 318 

MINNEAPOLIS, Minn 338 

MISHAWAKA, Ind 268 

MOLINE, 111 343 

MONMOUTH, 111 196 



Jtasiness Classifications. 

PAGE. 

MORRIS. Ill 427 

MUNCIE, Ind 258 

MUSKEGON , Mich 286 

MUSCATINE. Iowa 352 

NEBRASKA CITY, Neb 420 

NEENAH, Wis 275 

NILES, Mich 267 

OMAHA,Neb 446 

0SHK0SH,Wi8 ' 290 

OTTAWA, 111 , 190 

OTTUMWA, Iowa 462 

PEKIN, 111 42:1 

PEORIA, III 413 

PERU, Ind 270 

PERU, 111 426 

PLYMOUTH, Ind ii68 

PRINCETON, 111 459 

QUINCY, 111 436 

RACINE, Wis ■ 278 

RED WIN(i, Minn 3ti8 

RICHMOND, Ind 175 

RIPON.Wi-^ 245 

ROCK FALLS, 111 458 

ROCKPO RD, 111 ; 462 

ROCK ISLAND, 111 346 

ROCH STER, Ind 271 

ROCHESTER, Minn... 372 

RUSHVILLE, Ind 261 

SAGINAW CITY, Mich 174 

SEDALIA. Mo 296 

SHELBYVILLE. Ind a57 

SHEBOYGAN, Wis 342 

SOUTH BEND. Ind 262 

SPRINGFIELD, 111 391 

STERLING, ILL 456 

ST. LOUIS, Mo 15 

ST. JOSEPH, Mo 396 

ST. PAUL, Minn 376 

TERRE HAUTE, Ind 106 

TOPEKA,Kau 410 

WATERLOO, Iowa 433 

WATERTOWN, Wis 395 

WAUKEGAN,I11 194 

WEST BAY CITY, Mich 166 

WEST KANSAS CITY, Mo 314 

WINONA, Minn 380 

UKBANA.lll 226 

YPSILANTI, Mich 305 

£stablislinient of Business Houses. 

BAYCITY,Mich 164 

CHICAGO, 111 492 

DUBUQUE, Iowa 368 

BAST SAGINAW, Mich 172 

EVANSVILLR, Ind 152 

FONDDU LAC. Wis 352 

GRAND KAPIDS, Mich 337 

INDIANAPOLIS, Ind 104 

JACKSON. Mirh 158 

JEFFERSON City, Mo 302 

KANSAS CITY, Mo 314 

MILWAUKEE, Wis :!-28 

OMAHA, Neb 452 

PKOKIA, 111 418 

QUINCY, 111 416 

ROCKFORD, 111 463 

SAGINAW, Mich 175 

ST.JOSEPH.Mo 403 

ST. LOUIS, Mo 74 

TERRE HAUTE Ind 131 

WEST BAY CITY, Mich 167 

Miscellaneous. 

CHRONOLOGY OP HEROES OF THE RE- 
VOLUTION AND THE WAR OF 1812.... 361 

FICTITIOUS NAMES OF STATES, CITIES, 
NOTED PERSONS, &c 383 

IMPORTANT EVENTS IM THE U. S 15 

IMPOliTANT EVENTS SINCE THE CHRIS- 
TIAN E HA 433 

IMPORTANT INVENTIONS AND IM- 
PROVEMENTS 350 & 377 

SKETCHES AND ILLUSTRATIONS OP 
THE PRESIDKNTS 301 



INDEX TO ILLUSTRATIONS. 



Centennial Bnildings. 

PAGE. 

AGRICULTURAL HALL aSl 

ARKANSAS STATE BUILDING 285 

ART EXHIBITION UALL 89 

BIKDS-EYE VIEW CENTENNIAL 

GROUNDS, I'hiladeli.hia, Pa 397 

CALIFORNIA STATE BUILDING 163 

CANADA LUMBER BUILDING 359 

CARRIAGE BUILDING 'iSb 

CATHOLIC TOTAL ABSTINENCE FOUN- 
TAIN 241 

CONNECTICUT STATE BUILDING 215 

DELAWARE STATE BUILDING 317 

DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC COMFORT.. .. 431 
ENGLISH COMMISSIONERS' BUILDING.. 303 

ENGLISH STAFF QUARlERS 129 

FRENCH RESTAURANT 479 

GERMAN KMPIliE BUILDING 3tj ! 

GLASS BUILDING 327 

HALL OF PHOTOGRAPHIC ART ASS'N. . . . 143 

HORTICULTURAL HALL 2rt5 

ILLINOIS STATE BUILDING 385 

INDIANA STATE BUILDING 69 

IOWA STATE BUILDING 203 

JAPANESE COMMISSIONERS' BUILDING 177 

JUDGES' HALL 185 

KANSAS & COLORADO STATE BUILDING 179 

Machinery HALL a49 

MAI- KXHIBiriON HALL 37.5 

MARYLAND ST \TE BUILDING. . ' " ' 28;i 

MASSACHUSETTS STATE BUILDING. "" 219 
MICHIGAN STATE BUILDING .. 341 

MISSISSIPPI STATE BUILDING '." " 315 

MISSOURI STATE BUILDING .. 463 

>EW HAMPSHIRE STATE BUILDING 247 

NEW JKRSEY STATE BUILDING "391 

NEWSPAPER BUILDING '■■ 047 

NEW YORK STATE BUILDING 2)7 

OHIO STATE BUILDING 283 

PHOTOGRAPHIC STUDIO 263 

PENNSYLVANIA COM'RS' BUILDING 2!5 

RHODE ISLAND STATE BUILDING "■ 285 

SHOE AND LEATHER BUILDING 425 

SPANISH COMMISSIONERS' BUILDING "" 291 
SWEDISH SCHOOL HOUSE "'on 

U. S. GOVERNMENT BUILDING. 379 

U.S HOSPITAL S.W 

VERMONl' STATE BUILDING. 303 

W. VIIIGINIA STATE KUILDING 4S 

WISCONSIN STATE BUILDING iQi 

WOMAN'S PAVILLION '.'." ""[ll]] 243 

Miseellaneoas Illastrations. 

Rattle monument. Baltimore, Md . 159 

^R\TTLE SQUARE CHUR(;iI, Boston. Mass: 353 
BRIDGE bi;tweeu N KW YORK & UROOKLY'N 97 
BUNKEIt HILL MONUMENT. Charlestovvn, 367 
CARPENTERS' HaI.L, Philadelphia, Pa 259 

CASINO CENTRAL PARK, New Y'ork ■269 

CHAM BE R OF COMM ERCK, (Uiica-o. 11] 443 

CHAMKER OF COMMERCE, PeoriS. Ill 311 

CHAMBER OF COMMERCE, St. Louis Mo ■ S3 
CUIC.^GO WATER WORKS ... ^'^^"■•- •" 

CITY HALL, Baltimore. Md.. 1^ 

CITY HALL, Boston, Mass vtq 

CITY HALL, Cleveland, O.... t^k 

CITY HALL, Detroit. Mich.... ito 

CITY HALi., Louisville, Ky.. . \ai 

CITY HALL, New York...: . qt 

CITY HALL, Philadelphia. Pa oQ? 

CITY Hall, Pittsburgh. Pa.... il\ 

pJtv S^^r^ &MARI&T HOUSE, sV." Joseph, 293 

CITY HALL, St. Louis. Mo at 

COURT HOnsE, Bay Cily, Mich 2>7 

COURTHOUSE, BI.)omin<;ton, 111 ^4^ 

COURTHOUSE, Chicago 111. 4?? 

COURTHOUSE, Cleveland, O.. T>t 

COURTHOUSE, Danville, III.. i^i 

COURT HOUSE & CITY HALL, Indianapolis" 61 
COTTRT HUUSE, Leavensworth, Kan ' 281 

COURT HOUSE, Madison, Wis 319 



Miscellaneous Illustrations. 

PAGE. 

COURT HOUSE, Milwaulcee, Wis 4 15 

COURT HO USE, Peoria, 111 28a 

C'URT HOUSE, Pittsburgh, Pa 85 

COURTHOUSE, Quiiicy III 307 

COURT HOUSE, St. Joseph, Mo 823 

COURTHOUSE, St. Louis, Mo 37 

EXPOSITION BUILDING, Chicago, III 487 

FANEUIL, UALL. Boston, Mass .353 

FOUNTAIN PARK. SheboygdU, Wis 251 

FORT INDUSTRY BLOCK, Toledo, 279 

HOME OF WASHINGTON'S ANCESTORS 219 
ILLINOIS&ST. I.UUIS RAILROAD BRIDGE 
ACR'^SS THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER .. 27 

ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY, Uibana, III 229 

INDEPENDENCE BELL. Philadelphia, Pa. 12) 
INDEPENDENCE HALL, Philadelphia, Pa. 101 
INTERIOR VIEW OF INDEPENDENCE 

HALL, Philadelphia, Pa 49 

INTERIOR VIEW uF MOODY & SANKEY 

TABERNACLE, Chicago, 111 199 

KANSAS CITY IN 1855 398 

LAKE VIEWOF ERIE, Pa 447 

LINCOLN MONUMENT, Springfield, 111.... 187 

MADISON, WIS., (Birds-E\e View) 77 

MASONIC HALL, St. Louis, Mo 65 

MASONIC TEMPLE, Cincinnati, 407 

MASONIC TEMPLE, N. Y 297 

MASONIC TEMl'LE, Philadelphia 399 

MERCHANTS' EXCHANGE BUILDING, 

Kansas City, Mo 169 

MERCANTILE LIBRARY, St. Louis, Mo... 25 
MISSOURI RIVER BEND, Kansa-^ City. Mo. 2:il 
MT. VERNON, HOME OF WASHINGTON. 13X 

NORMAL SCHOOL, Terra Haute 163 

OLD ELM, Boston Common, Bo.ston, Mass.. . 273 

OPERA HOUSE, Detroit, Mich 1.55 

OPERA HOUSE, Evansville, Ind V£i 

OPERA nous K, Terra Haute, Ind 113 

OPERA HOUSE (TOOTLES), St. Joseph,Mo. 299 

PATENT OFFICE, Washington, D. C 409 

PENN'S TREATY WITH THE INDIANS... 117 

PERRY'S FLAG SHIP LAWRENCE 237 

POST OFFICE, Boston, Mass 339 

POST OFFICE, Chicago, HI 429 

POST OFFICE, Cincinnati, 291 

POST OFFICE, Cleveland, 413 

POSTOFFICE, Covington, Ky 317 

POST OFFICE, Grand Rapids, Mich 109 

POST OFFICE, Indianapolis. Ind 147 

POST OFFICE, Milwaukee, Wis 165 

POST OFFICE, New Y'ork 2.55 

POSTOFFICE, Philadelphia 119 

POSTOFFICE, St. Louis, Mo 21 

POSTOFFICE DEPARTMENT,Wa8hington, 459 

PUBLIC LIBRARY, Deroit, Mich .... 155 

SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION, Washing- 
ton, D. C : 55 

STATE CAPITOL, Columbus, O 1,59 

STATE CAPITOL, Harrisburgh, Pa 207 

STATE CAPITOL, Indianapolis, Ind 57 

STATE CAPITOL, Jefferson City, Mo 339 

STATE CAPITOL. Lansng, Mien 2,59 

STATE CAPITOL, Madison. Wis 173 

STATE CAPITOL, Spiingtield, HI 211 

STATE CAPITOL, West Virginia 31.i 

ST. LOUIS UNIVERSITY, St. Louis, Mo.... 53 
STOCK EXCHANGE, Kansas Cltv, Mo . ... 451 
SUSPENSION BRIDGE BETWEEN CIN- 
CINNATI AND COVINGTON 147 

TUNNELVIEW. Chicago, III 471 

UNION MARKET, St Louis, Mo 45 

UNION I'ACIFIC DEPOT, Council Bluffs, la 371 
UNITED STATES CAPITOL. Washington, 439 
UNITED STATES MINT, Philadelphia^ .... 263 
VANCE BLOCK, Indianapolis, Indf. T.J 

WASHING roN ELM. Camhrid.e, Mass ."... 381 
WASHINGTON'S HEADQUARTERS AT 

" VALLEY FORGE. .../: 105 

WASHIN(;T0N'S Monument, Baltimore". ! 159 
WASHINGTON WHEN TOOK COMMAND 
OF TILE CONTINENTAL ARMY 17 



INDEX TO ADVERTISEMENTS. 



PAGE. 

Agricnltnral Implements. 

DES MOINES PLOW C >., De< Moines, la.. . .?93 

PERKINS H. f^.&Co., Chicago, 111 417 

KU.VISEY L. M. &Co., St. Louis, Mo 116 

SHELDON. S.L. Madison, Wis 173 

TAYLOK, MACK & SMITH, Chicago 17 

Aiunsements. 

A"nKLPni THEATRE, Chicauo, 111 2 

TIVOLI VAUDEVILLE THEATUE, 

St. Louis, Mo.... 64 

Arcliitects. 

ENOS V. B. & SON. Indianapolis. Ind 147 

LANDGUTII A. S. Milwaulvce, Wis 431 

KOBINSON & BARNABY, Grand Rapids, 

Mich 108 

SLICER, W. C, St. Louis, Mo 33 

Attorneys at Lia^v. 

McFARL.4ND. DANIEL, Peoria, 111 310 

WARRICK, JAMES W.. Indianapolis, Ind. . . 73 

Baking Powders. 

JUDD & DERRICK, Grand Rapids. Mich 108 

WOODUUFF JAMBS E., Quincy, 111 307 

Banks and Bankers. 

LAWRENCE SAVINGS BANK, Lawrence, 

Kan 179 

KNOX JOHN D. &C0., Topelia, Kan... 179 

Barbed Wire Fence. 

ADAM MANUFACTHRING CO.. Joliet, 111.. 3-35 

DII.LMAN & STEVENS, Joli.-t, 111 327 

JOLIET WIRE FENCE CO , Joliet, III 101 

Battei'y Belt. 

WITHERELL & KIRKHAM. Niles, Mich.... 183 
Billiard Parlors. 

FRIEDRICnS HERMAN, Peoria, 111 388 

Bill Posters. 

HOLLBY JOEL & SONS, Bloomington, 111... 138 

Blacksmiths. 

HURTUBISB A., Saginaw City, Mich 340 

Boiler Manufacturers. 

CLIFF & SON, Terrc Haute, Ind 113 

EVINSTON J. W., Milwaukee, Wis 434 

FULTON BOILER WORKS, Richmond, lud. 80 

Bolt ^Vorks, 

ROCKFORD BOLT WORKS, Rockford, 111. ... 470 

Book Bindei*.^. 

DAVIS & BRO. Fort Wavue. Ind 434 

DONOnUE &HENNEBERRY, Ij.side front 

Cover 

LUSKD. W., Surhigfleld HI ".'.'.'.'.'. 210 

ROKKER U. W., Springfield, 111 210 

Boots and Slioes. 

BARNEY M. D., St. Louis. Mo 65 

REDDEN A., St. Louis, Mo 129 

Bottlers. 

JOE UGER JACOB, Springfield, 111 186 



TAOB 

Brass Foiindry. 

INDIANAPOLIS BRASS FOUNDRY,Indian- 

apolis, Ind 60 

Bre^very. 

GEISE C, Council Bluflfs, Iowa 370 

Burial Cases and Caskets. 
POWERS & WALKER, Grand Rapids, Mich.. 109 

Business Colle:^es. 
CRESCENT CITY CO.MVIERCIAL COL- 
LEGE, Evansville, lud 49 

CURTISS & HYDE, Miuueiipolis, Minn 138 

JONES' CO-VIVIEROIAL COLLEiiE, 

St. Louis, Mo 125 

NORTHWESTERN BUSINESS COLLEGE, 

Madison, Wis 77 

PARSONS W.B , Kalamazoo, Mich 154 

Butchers' and Mechanics' Tools. 

DARMICKE BROS., Chicigo, 111 375 

DAEMICKE L. C, Chicago, 111 367 

Butter Package. 

FINNEGAN A. J., Minneapolis, iMinn 154 

Carriages and Wagons. 

BLACK & BACKUS. I'dianipolis, lad 60 

BLOOM HENRY, Des Moines, Iowa 389 

GALE GEO. H., Jacksou, Mich 258 

GIDDINGS.IOHN W., Danvi.le. HI I:i8 

NEU.MEISTER A., Rocklora, 111 4rO 

WOOD, ARraUR, Grand R.pids, Mich 108 

Carriage Springs. 

CURTIS H.M. & CO., Yp/,ilanti, Mich 183 

Carriage and W^agon Material. 
STEVENS ifc GARRIGUES, Leaveusworth, 

Kan 281 

Cash Register. 

HOOD, H. P., Indianapolis, Ind 73 

China, Cf lass & QueensAvare , 

BERGUNDTHAL C, Indianapolis, Ind 63 

WARREN JAMES M., Evausville, Ind 69 

Chromos & Picture Frames. 
NATIONAL ART AND CHROMO COM- 

P.\NY, St. Louis Mo 29 

DURKEE ALBERT, Chicago, 111 431 

Cigar Boxes. 

BERNS F.'G., Indianapolis, lud 146 

HARTMANN & SUHR, Milwaukee, Wis 165 

Clairvoyant. 

WITHEFORD, DR., Chica.'o, 111 119 

Coffee <& Tea Pots. 

DEWALD, M. J. Chicago, 111 443 

Commission Merchants. 
BLAKE, JACKSON & QUINIUS, 

Indianapolis, Ind 68 

LAWRENCE, A. V, Imlianapolis. Ind 6j 

ODONOGHUE. WILLIAM. St. Joseph. Mo.. 293 
SULLIVAN. JOHN E., Indianapolis, Ind.... 116 

TIVY & PURCELL. t>t. Lonis, Mo 28 

WALSH BROS., St. Louis, Mo.... 21 

WILLIS, JOHN Q., Omaha, Neb 277 



10 



INDEX. 



TAGE. 

Confectionery. 

FOUTS, H. J. St. Louis, Mo 24 

MIESSEN, J., Indianapolis, Ind 340 

Conservatory of Music. 
YOUNG LADIES' ATHEN.EUM, 

Jacksonville, 111 186 

Contractors and Buildei'S . 

KROEGER.B. H., Evansville, Ind 122 

OWENS, G. C, DesMoinea, Iowa 370 

Cotton Batting. 
EXCELSIOR COTTON BATTING CO., 

St, Louis, Mo 6 

Driven AVells. 

KOUSE, R. R., Indianapolis, Ind 81 

Druggists. 

COLEMAN, J. R., St. Louis, Mo 52 

DONNELL MANUFACTURING CO., 

St. Louis, Mo 36 

Dry Croods. 

HODGES, D. H., Indianapolis, Ind 421 

MILLER BROS., Evansville, Ind 123 

Dyeing and Scouring. 

PEEL, GEORGE W., Lawrence, Kas 230 

Eclectic Heater. 
SERVOSS, NORTHEN & CO., Chicago, 111.. 428 

Electric Manufacturing Company. 
ST. LOUIS ELECTRIC MANUFACTURING 

CO 438 

Edge Tools. 
RICHMOND EDGE TOOL MANUFACTUR- 
ING CO., Richmond, Ind 80 

Engine Builders. 

NICOL, BURR & CO., Peoria, 111 289 

Engravers. 

BENZ & RICHES, St. Louis, Mo 73 

CHANDLER. H. C. Indianapolis, Ind 72 

HARRIS, J. G. &. CO., St. Louis, Mo 28 

REED, W. A. &C0., Grand Rapids, Mich.... 154 

STILLMAN & CO., Cincinnati, Ohio 384 

Fancy Cabinet Ware. 

FURBISH, F. L.. Grand Rapids, Mich 258 

WENTER, F. , Chicago, 111 258 

Fancy Ooods. 

GRIFFITH, H. G., Springfield, 111 392 

Flanging Flue-Iiole Maeliine. 

REAGAN, E., Indianapolis, Ind 112 

Flavoring Extract. 

DAVIS' FLAVORING EXTRACTS 97 

Foot Power Machinery 

BARNES, W. F., & JOHN, Rockford 435 

Fruits and Produce. 
BLAKE, JACKSON & QUINIUS, 

Indianapolis, Ind 68 

LAWRENCE, A. v., Indianapolis, Ind 68 

SULLIVAN, JOHN E., Indianapolis, Ind. ... 116 

Furs. 
LEWARK, JOSEPH, Indianapolis, Ind 56 

Furniture. 

BARSALOUXN., Chicago, 111 443 

BEEMER BROS, Chicago, 111 388 

BOURKEULICK. Chicago. Ill 425 

GOODWINS INVALID BEDSTEAD, 

St. Louis. Mo 176 

RICHTER HERMAN, Chicago, 111 177 

RICKE S. & CO., Chicago, 111 385 

Oalvanic Belt. 

PULVERMACHER GALVANIC CO., 

Cincinnati, 378 

€ialvanized Iron Cornice. 

KLUGELG.L., Danville, 111 138 

fixate Manufacturers. 
WISELL, D. D., Ft. Wayne, Ind 4 



PAGK. 

Oents Furnishing Croods. 

McELRATH A., St. Louis, Mo 64 

Glove Manufacturer. 

JENSEN H., Chicago, 111 379 

Groceries. 
DONNELL MANUFACTURING CO.. 

St. Louis, Mo 36 

HALL & BAN I'A, Council Bluffs, Iowa 371 

HULMAN & COX, Terre Haute, Ind 162 

KELLER ROB r., Indianapolis, Ind . 61 

LIGHTHOLDER JAMES, St. Louis, Mo ... . 28 

NISBETTT P. & CO., Alton, III 210 

THORNBURGH J. McC. & Co., St. Louis, Mo. 37 
Orocers' Specialties. 

WALSH BROS., St. Louis, Mo 21 

Ciunsmith. 

ABE AUGUSTUS, St. Louis, Mo 28 

Hair Goods. 

BOYCE MRS. E. L., Fort Wayne, Ind 57 

GRIFFITH, H. G., Spriugfielfl, 111 392 

HALL, J., Chicago, 111., Center of Calendar... 
THOME. M., Chicago, 111., Center of Calendar 
Hardware. 

CAYLOR J.. Indianapolis, Ind 424 

EBERBACK C, Ann Arbor, Mich 154 

DAEMICKE BROS., Chicago 111 375 

BOSS, J AS. A., Indianapolis, Ind 146 

TYRING H. E. Chicago, 111 454 

Harness and Saddles. 

BROWN L. G., Grand Rapids, Mich 183 

HOLTHAUS AUGUST, St. Louis, Mo 36 

OPPERGELT PH., Saginaw City, Mich 89 

Hat and Bonnet Bleachers. 

MURPHY & WADE, Springfield, 111 392 

Hides and lieathei*. 

BECHAM JOHN, Des Moines Iowa 388 

HASELTINE, W.M. B., St. Louis, Mo 40 

Heaters, Ranges and Furnaces. 
MANNING JOHN N. & CO., Chicago. 111. ... 424 
SERVOSS, NORTHEN <fc CO., Chicago, 111.. 428 
WATSON GEO. H. & CO., Chicago, 111 454 

Horse Hoof Cooler and Expander. 

DRAPER E. B., Chicago, 111 1 

Horse Hoof Pai'ing Maeliine. 

SCHAEFER G. W., St, Louis, No 438 

Horse Protectoz*. 

PETER'S HORSE PROTECTOR, Chicago, 241 
Horse Shoes. 

HURTUBISE A., Saginaw Cltv, Mich 340 

O'NEILL P. H., St. Louis, Mo 438 

SCHAEFER G. W., St. Louis, Mo 438 

Hotels. 

BARNUM'S HOTEL, Kansas City, Mo 450 

BARRETT HOUSE, Burlington, Iowa 354 

BIGGS HOUSE, Council Bluffs, Iowa 370 

BRYANT HOUSE, Council Bluffs, Iowa 370 

BURDICK HOUsE, Chicago, 111.. 1 

CIRCLE HOUSE, Indianapolis, Ind 73 

DOWNING HOUSE. Oskaloo^a, Iowa 279 

GOODWIN HOUSE, Beloit, Wis 470 

GRAND HOTEL, Indianapolis, Ind 81 

GRAND CENTRALHOTEL, Omaha, Neb... 345 

HURST'S HOTEL, St. Louis, Mo 64 

LITTLE'S HOTEL, Indianapolis, Ind 61 

MKRCHANTS' HOTEL, Winona, Minn 162 

METROPOLITAN HOTEL, Council Bluffs, 

Iowa 371 

OGDEN HOUSE. Council Bluffs, Iowa 371 

PACIFIC HOUSE, Council Blufls, Iowa 371 

PEABODY HOUSE, Bau Claire, Wis 264 

ST. JAMES HOTEL, Kansas City, Mo 168 

THE PALISADE HOTEL, Kansas City, Mo.. 230 

UNION HOTEL, Galesburg, 111 573 

House Furnishing Goods. 

BOURKE, ULICK, Chicago, 111 425 

Hydraulic Motor. 
TUERK BROS., Chicago, 111 431 



IJNDEX. 



U 



PAGE. 

Ink Manufacturers. 

.ROKKER, H. W., Sprinsfleld, 111 310 

WOOt)MANSEE, FRAMK A., Cincinnati.... 6 

Invalid Bed Manufacturer. 

GOODWIN'S INVALID BEDSTEAD, 

St. Louis, Mo 176 

Iron IVorks. 

GARRETT, McDOWELL & CO., 

St. Louis, Mo 28 

GENESEE IRON WORKS, Flint, Midi 258 

Insurance. 

COREY & GRIFFIN. Omaha, Neb 269 

GRUBB, PAXTON & CO., Indianapolis, Ind. 56 
HAMLIN & BROWN, Miuneapolis, Minn. . . . 135 

HOWELL, SAM'L J., Omaha, Neb 269 

THE FRANKLIN LIFE INSURANCE CO., 

Indianapolis, Ind 57 

Knitting: Machines. 

KALAMAZOO KNITTING CO., 

Kalamazoo, Mich 154 

Iiitliographers. 

BIRD & MICKLE, Jackson, Mich 258 

Iiive Stock Commission. 

IRWIN, ALLEN & CO., Kansas City, Mo... . 450 
KINGSBERY & HOLMSLEY, 

Kansas City, Mo 450 

WHITE & HOLMES, Kansas City, Mo 450 

Iiivery and Sale Stables. 

GALE, GEO. H., Jackson, Mich 258 

KOLYER <fc KERR, Indianapolis, Ind 72 

Machinery. 
KERRICK & WINEGARDNER, 

Indianapolis, Ind 349 

MANNING, JOHN N. & CO., Chicago, 111... 424 

STRANG, A. L., Omaha, Neb 281 

Machinists. 
KLEINSTEUBER, C. F., Milwaukee, Wis... 434 

NICOL, BURR & CO, Peoria, 111 289 

REAGANS, E., Indianapolis, Ind 112 

Manufactui'er's Agent. 

THORNBQRGH, J. McC.& CO., St. Lous, Mo 37 

Map Publishei-s. 

BIRD & MICKLE, Jackson, Mich 2c8 

Marble W^orks. 

BROWER, H. O., Danville, 111 138 

DAVIS & CAMP, Davenport, lovfa 203 

MOORE, W. B., Bloomington, 111 138 

NEAYER, C. L., Council Bluffs, Iowa 451 

Medical Institute. 

ACADEMY OF MEDICINE, St. Joseph, Mo. 322 

LAFAYETTE EYE, EAR & THROAT DIS- 
PENSARY, Lafayette, Ind 117 

MEDICAL HEALING INSTITUTE, 

Chicago, 111 105 

MEDICAL AND SURGICAL INSTITUTE, 
Grand Rapids, Mich 109 

PIERCE & GREEN, DRS., Kansas City 392 

Millinery. 

ATKINSON, A., Omaha, Neb 331 

LEWANDOVSKA, MME, St. Lonis, Mo 25 

WALKER, JOSEPH, Bloomington, 111 345 

Mineral Spring Water. 

B.ERTCHY & THAYER, Sheboygan, Wis. ... 251 
Music Dealer. 

BARROWS, CHAS. S., Jacksonville, 111 194 

Newspapers. 

CINCINNATI SATURDAY NIGHT 6 

ILLINOIS STATE GAZETTE, 

. ^pringfield, 111 210 

THE INVENTOR'S SCIENTIFIC & COM- 
MERCIAL WORLD, Indianapolis, Ind. . . 354 

Xon-Explosive Fluid. 

BEATTIE, A. F.,St. Louis, Mo 40 



PAGB. 

Oils & Grease. 

CROZIER. G. W., Indianapolis, Ind 182 

WINSLOW, N. N., Bloomington, 111 344 

Opium Cure. 
COLLINS. DR. S. B, LaPorte, Ind 88 

Painters. 

DAUER, CH\S. W., Indianapolis, Ind 81 

Paper Dealers. 

SAWYER, P. O. & CO., St. Louis, Mo 41 

Paper Hangings. 

FITCH, B. F., Chicago, 111 397 

Patent Agency. 

EMPIRE PATENT AGENCY, St. Louis, Mo. 408 

Patent Solicitors. 

KNIGHT BROS. St. Louis, Mo 408 

LOTZ,WM. U., Chicago, 111 408 

Pattern & Model Makers. 

KUPSCH, A., St. Louis, Mo 409 

Photographers. 

C ADMAN, A. W., Jacksonville, 111 186 

JOSLIN&PHILLIPS.Diinville, HI 138 

PIETZ, H., Springfield, 111 442 

PENDEGRAST, Indianapolis, Ind 112 

Physicians. 

AIKIN'S REMEDIAL INSTITUTE, Grand 

Rapids, Mich 96 

BISHOP. GALEN E., St. Joseph, Mo 322 

CARLTON. DR., Chicago, 111 199 

DECKER, DR. H. G., Chicago, 111 143 

OLIN, DR. A. C, Chicago, 111 199 

PARSONS, E., Kewanee. Ill 288 

PEIRO, F. L., Chicago, 111 399 

SMALL, A. E., Chicago, 111 187 

VONTAGEN, CHAS. H., Chicago, 111 187 

Pickle Manufacturers. 

WISWELL, W..H. & CO., Chicago, 111 .1 

Planing Mills. 

HERSCHBERGER, JOHN, Peoria, 111 288 

CAPITOL CITY PLANING MILL CO , Indi- 
anapolis, Ind 60 

MEYERS, JACOB & BRO., Evansville, Ind.. 122 

Plaster Company. 
GRAND RAPIi'S PLASTER CO., Grand Rap- 
ids, Mich 341 

Plasterers. 

MoCARTY, J. C. & G. VOGT, Chicago, 111. . . 177 

Plow Manufacturers. 
DES MOINES PLOW CO., Des Moines, Iowa. 393 

Plumbers and Oasfttters. 
RUMSEY, L. M. & CO., St. Louis, Mo 116 

Printers— Book and Job. 

BLAKELY & BROWN. Chicago, 111 493 

DAVIS & BRO , Fort Wayne, Ind 424 

ROKKER, H. W., Springfield, 111 210 

Pump Manufacturers. 

COMSTOCK, A. S., Indianapolis, Ind 68 

MES-<INGEK, PROSEUS & CO., Ligansport, 80 

RUMSEY, L. M. & CO., St. Louis, Mo 116 

SPRINGER, THAYER & CO., Rockford. 111.. 447 

STRANG, A. L., Omaha, Neb 281 

Railroadsw 
HANNIBAL & ST. JO-EPH RAILROAD.... 292 
CHICAGO, BURLINGTON AND QUINCY 

RAILROAD 416 

INDIANAPOLIS, PERU & CHICAGO RAIL- 
ROAD 202 

Kaisers and Movers of Buildings. 
BAUMHARD & SHEELER, Indianapolis, 

Ind 56 

Real Kstate. 
HAMLIN & BROWN, Minneapolis, Minn. ... 135 

NOHL, F., St. Louis, Mo 32 

WEBSTER, ED. H, Kansas City, Mo 450 



12 



INDEX. 



PAGE. 

Reapers and MoT^ers. 

PERKINS, H. C.& CO., Chicago, 111 417 

Restaurants. 

ENGLISH KTTCriEN, The, St. Louis, Mo. .. 36 

MA I SON S.. Sr. Loiiif , Mo 44 

MILLER'S REST.\URANT, Athison, Kan.. 179 

SPUAGUE & BUTLEK, St. Louis, Mo 4.") 

THE 'SAINT DENIS," St. Loiiits, Mo 24 

VIENNA GARDEN AND RESTAUUANT, 

Kansas City, Mo. 169 

Regalia Manufacturer. 

BUSH, JOHN A., Peoria, Ills 310 

Renovating "^Vorks. 

FLINT & COOK, Chicago, 111 265 

Rlieuiuatic Hospital. 

MELLEN, DR. M., Oehlvo-h, Wis 374 

Roofing. 

KLUGELG. L., Danville, 111 138 

Saloons. 
HENRY'S FIFTH ST. SALOON. St.Lonia,Mo 85 
MUEHLHAUSEN C HAS., St. Louis, Mo.... 41 

Sasli. Doors and Rlinds. 

HERSCHBEKGERJOIIN, Peoria, 111 388 

Sa\v Manufacturer. 

CURTIS & COMPANY, St. Louis, Mo, 40 

Scales. 
HITCHCOCK, S. S., Dos Moines, Iowa .. .. 370 

Schools and Colleges. 

ACADEMY OF ST. FRANCIS. Council Bluffs, 
Iowa 370 

ILLINOIS FEMALE COLLEGE, Jackson- 
ville, 111 195 

JACKSONVILLE FEMALE ACADEMY, 
Jacksonville, 111 186 

ST. LOUIS UNIVERSITY. St. Louir>, Mo.... 53 

ST. MAHY'S ACADEMIC INSTITURE, St. 
Mai-y's of the Woods Ind 134 

Scrool Salving and Turning. 

CASE, F. F., St Joseph, Mo 299 

Seed Dealer. 

FOOTE, J. A., Terra Haute, Ind 113 

Sewing Machines. 

LARSEN. N. P., Chicago. HI 1 

THE NEW AMERICAN SEWING MACH- 
INE, Omaha,Neb 230 

WRlGUr, S. A., Sedaha, Mo 3?? 

Shirt Mannfactni'ers. 

DEYO, A. II , East Saginaw, Mich 340 

McELllATH, A,St. Louis, Mo b4 

Show Case Manufacturers, 

CLAES. C. & CO., St. Louis, Mo 44 

LUTKE, R. G., Peoria, 111 288 

Silver AVare. 

DURGIN, F. A., St., Louis, Mo 20 

Soap and Candles. 

WINSLOW, N. N., Bloomington. HI 344 

Spectacles. 

WOLF, JOSEPH, Chicago. Ill 454 

Spice Mills. 

VERRIER. E. v., St. Louis, Mo 41 

Stamps and Stencils. 

HARRIS, J. G.& Co., St. Louis, Mo 28 

KLEINSTEUBER, C. F. , Milwaukee, Wis... 4J4 

Steamboats. 

EAGLE PACKET CO 133 

GRAND REPUBMC, (plys but. St. Louis, 

Memphis »nd N. Orleans) 93 

KE'KUK & NORTHERN LINE PACKET 

CO 198 

Steam Heating Apparatus. 
MANNING, J.N. & CO., Chicago ... 424 



Stoves & Tinware. 

BERTHOLD, II. & TROSSIN. Omaha, Neb. 

DAE.V1ICKE, L. C. Chicago, 111 

ENSvUNGER. S. P, Ues Moines, Iowa 

TYRING, 11. E, Chicago, III 

SERVOSS, NORTllEN & CO.. Chicago, 111. 

Stove Polish. 
SKINNER, WM. A.&CO., St, Louis, Mo... 

Tailors. 
BUETOW& SCHRAEGER, Milwaukee, Wis 

• ORBETT, JOHN. Ripon. Wis 

G AI'Z, ALOIS, Quincy, HI 

IIEINKt, Frank. Chicago, 111 

NELSON, M. J.,Chicag.., Ill 

PARKES, WM. St. Louis, Mo 

TEA.LI,, 11. N. Jackson, Mich 

ZAL LEE, JOHN, St. Louis, Mo 

Tape AVorni Cure. 

BIGGS, W. L., Council Bluffs, Iowa 

Tea Dealers. 
FITZHUGH, L. M. & CO., Indianapoli?, Ind 
Tobacco & Cigars. 

ANDREWS, L. M., Chicago, 1\ 

FITZHUGH, L. M. & f'O.. Indianapolis, Ind. 
MEYER, CHHISTIAN, Indianapolis. Ind... 
PEKER'S TOB.\CCO WORKS, St. Louis. 

Mo 

RAUCU, J. & BRO , Indianapolis, Ind 

Trunk Manufacturers. 

BROWN L. G.. Grand Rapids, Mich 

GLENN, J. E., Chicago, HI 

WEIL & SON, Evausville, Ind 

Truss Manufacturers. 

HOWE TRUSS CO., Council Bluffs, Iowa... 
Turkish Baths. 

ADAMS, G. F., M. D , St Louis, Mo 

WRIGHT. MR. & Mrs., Galcsburg, 111 

Undertakers. 

nURFEE. ALLEN, Grand Rapids, Mich 

vANCE, W. B., Peoria, 111 

Upholsterer. 

HAASE, CONRAD, Evansville, Ind 

Vinegar & Pickles. 

GROSS, G. J , Chicigo, 111 

MEYER, JOHN O Chicago, 111 

MISSISSIPPI VALLEY VINEGAR 

WORKS, Dubuque, Iowa 

NORTH WBSTEkN VINEGAR WOrtKS, 

Dubuque, Iowa 

WISWELi.. W. II. & CO., Chicago, IH 

ZOTT & GILMOrfE. St. Louis, Mo 

^Vatchmakers and Je^velers. 
IIERSH FIELD. R. N., Leavenworth, Kansas. 

KNIGHTS, C. U. &CO , Chicigo, 111 

REBER, G. F., Indianapolis, Ind 

^Vater Heaters and Filters. 

GARSTANG, RICHARD, St. Louis, Mo 

Wall Paper and Shades. 

FITCH, B F, Chicago, 111 

^Vhite licad Manufacturers. 

BOUCHER, LEON & CO , St. Louis, Mo 

Wind Mills . 
SPRINGER, THA YR & CO., Rockford, 111. . . . 

^Vines and Ijiquors. 

HULMAN & FAIRBANKS, Terre Haute, Ind 
Wire ^Vorks. 

LOCKWOOD & LYMAN, Rockford, 111 

SMI'l'lI, E. & CO., Chicago, 111 

VAN EPS, U. R., Peoria, 111 

^Vood Carpet. 

DUNFEE, J., Chicago, III 

^Vood IrVorker. 

CASE, F. F., St. Joseph, Mo 

WOODRUFF, JA8. E., Quincy, 111 , . . 



312 
367 
4)0 
4->4 
4.:8 



.319 

191 

231 

442 

143 

3i 

97 

53 

370 



. 340 

423 

, 310 

148 

' 100 
. 146 

. 183 

. 443 

113 

371 

20 
273 



108 
311 



379 



443 
454 



243 



243 

1 

64 



173 
438 
80 

20 

397 

20 

447 

163 

470 
4.i5 
310 

423 

299 
307 




TBI CENTBE 



ST. LOUIS. 



AMUSEMENTS, 

esherTvarTeties, 

114 I«. Fifth St., St. Lonis, Mo. 

Open every night with a First-class Com- 
pany. 

J. E. ESHER, - - - Prop. 

IVOLI VAUDEVILLE THEATRE, 110 & 112 
N. 5th St. Rod. Kornbbrger, Prop. 

ANNUNCIATORS. 

HEISLER, CHAS., Hotel, House and Elevator 
ANNUNCIATORS, 309 Choiuean ave. 

ARCHITECTS AND SUPERINTENDENTS, 

GRABLE, A., Architect and Superintendent, 315 
Olive street. 

IRCHNER, H.W., Architect & Superintendent. 
Granite hlk, Fourth and Market sts, room 507. 
AURICE, JNO. H., Architect and Builder, 111 
N. Seventh street. 



M 



PAULY, P. J. Jr., Architect and Contracting 
Agent, Fourth and Franklin ave. 



S 



LICER, W. C, A.rchitect and Superintendent, 
720 Chestnut st, room 16. 



James Stewart, 
architect, 

Rooms 38 and 39 Dr. McLean's JBlocJe, 
K. K. Cor. Fourth and Market Sts., 

ST. L.OXJIS, Js/LO. 

ARTISTS' MATERIAL. 

LOHMANN, WM., ARTISTS' and Architects' 
Drawing MATERIALS, 116 S. Fourth St. 

ATTORNEYS AT LAW. 

'lmrDncuH¥ell7JR7~ 
ATTORNEY AT LAW, 

213 N. Third Street, 

ST LOUIS. 

ALL, CJEO. W., Attorney at Law, 
209 Chestnut street. 

WAKEFIELD, A, B., Attorney at Law, Grand 
Opera House, Market st. 



1493. 

Oct. 13. — Christopher Cohimbus discovers 
America. Columbus was born at Genoa, Italy, 
in 1435, and died neglected and in obscuritv at 
Valladolid on the 20t'h of May, 15U6. His body 
was buried in a convent, from whicli it was after- 
ward taken to St. Domingo, and subsequently 
to Havana, in Cuba, where it now remains. 
1497. 

North America first discovered by Sabas- 
tiau Cabot, a Venetian, in the service of Eng' 
land. 

lol3. 

John Ponce de Leon, a Spanish soldier, dis- 
covered and named Florida, from its being dis- 
covered on Easter day, or feast of flowers. 
1513. 

Balboa, a Spaniard, crossed the Isthmus of 
Darien, and from the summit of the Andes, 
discovered the Pacific Ocean. 
1517. 

First patent for importing negroes to America 
granted by Spain. 

1519-31. 

Cortez, a Spaniard, conquered Mexico. 
1530. 

Magellan sailed round South America, dis- 
covered the southwest passage, and circum- 
navigated the globe. 

1535. 

Hops first used in malt liquors in England. 

Tobacco first discovered by the Spaniards, 
near the town of Tobasco, in Mexico. It was 
introduced into England, from Virginia, by Mr. 
Lane, in 1536. 

1538. 

P. de Xarvaez, with 400 men, lands in Flor- 
ida, and attempts the conquest of the country. 
He is defeated by the natives. 
1539. 

The name of Protestant igiven to those wlio 
protested against the Church of Eome jat the 
Diet of Spires in Germany. 
1535. 

Cartier, a Frenchman, first attempts a settle- 
ment in Canada. 

1539. 

Ferdinand de Soto, a Spaniard, landed in 
Florida, with 1,200 men, in search of gold. He 
penetrated into the country and discovered the 
Mississippi river in 1541. 

Pins wer.' fii>t used in England by Cathrine 
Howard, Queen of Henry VIII. 
1563. 

Ribault, with a colony of French Protest- 
ants, began a settlement an the Edisto. It was 
abandoned. 



16 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



St. Louis — Contimced. 


St. Louis — Continued. 


AUCTION GOODS. 

"DAULDING, W. F., Dealer in Auction Goods, 

X 1616 Broadway. 

AWNINGS. 

T>IPPE, CHAS., Manufacturer of AWNINGS, 
\\t Tarpaulins, etc., Ill and 113 Chestnut st. 

BAKERY, 

T EWIS, CHAS. & CO., Bread, Crackers, Biscuits, 
JU and Steamboat Supplies, 712 & 714 Morgan et. 


BITTERS. 
Manufacturer of 

VEGETABLE BITTERS. 

WHOLESALE & RETAIL, 

3201 Broadway, ST. LOUIS, MO. 


BANKERS. 

T' OKiERrG^ H-'* BUO., Banker? and Exchange 
X^ Dealers, Cor. Pino and Second sts. 


BLACKSMITH, 

TT^ISCHER, F., Blacksmith, and Mnfr.of Stone- 
X" cutters' & Quarrymasons' Tools, 1308 Carr st. 


BARBERS, 

Tf UEHNER, C, Hair Dressing Saloon, 

JlV 503 Morgan street. 

"PHILLIPS, GEORGE, Shaving and Bathing Sa- 
X loon, 117 Walnut st. 

H. ZEIDLER, 

imm & HAIR-DRESSINd 

S^LOOInT , 
SHAMPOOING AND HAIR-COTTIN&. 

123 OLirm STREET. 


BLANK BOOK MANUFACTURERS. 

TT^EIM & PAULI, Blank Book Manufacturers and 
IV Bookbinders, 314 Olive st. 


"l/fORITZ, CHARLES, Bookbinder and Blank 
iVX Book Manufacturer, 302 N. Main st. 

BOARDING HOUSE. 

MRS. W. WRiaHT, 
TABLE BOARD A SPECIALTY, 

823 WASHINGTON AV. 


BARBERS' CHAIRS. 

ggY^Y AMD & BRO!^ 

Manufacturers and Dealers in 

DENTAL & BARBERS' FURNITURE, 

Sttrtfeous' Jtectiniiiff rf iid Easy Cliaii-s 

107 $. 8EC0SD STREET, 
Bet. Walnut and Elm Sts., ST. LOUIS. 


BOOKS AND STATIONERY. 
Estnhlisneil, 1S61. 

kmm Baptist Pilicatioi 

SOCIETY, 

209 N. 6th St., St. Louis, Mo. 

A General Theolosical and 


^"Send for Illustrated Catalogue. ,=„^^ 


SUNDAY SCHOOL SUPPLY STORE, 


BASE BALL GOODS. 

G. MeMANUS' 


LEWIS E. KLINE, Agent. 

TURGENS, ED., Bookseller, Stationer, News 

f J Dealer, etc., 711 Morgan st. 


EMPORIUM FOR 

:!ase Ball, Bjmasim I Cricket Soods, 

320 NORTH SIXTH ST., 
&»t. 31jc»-u.±(9y - IVEo. 


TOHNSON & MILES, Booksellers and Publish- 
tf ers, 602 N. Fourth St., St. Louis. 


BOOKBINDERS' STOCK. 

{^ RIFFIN, H., & SONS, Binders' Materials and 
VJT Machinery, 304 N. Main st. 

BOOT AND SHOE FACTORY. 


BASKET MAKER. 

\TOORE, D. D., Basket Maker, 1530 Franklin 
ilA avenue. 


T7XCELSI0R SHOE FACTORY, Morris, Canning 
XL/ & Clinton, props., 303 Christy av. 


TDEDDEN, A., Mnfr. of and Wholesale Dealer in 
Xt English Shoes and Boots, 802 N. Fifth st. 


BELL-HANGERS. 

TT AMILTON & COOKE, Electric Bell-Hangers, 607 
XI Market st. 


D. A. TO^WNE, 

Manufacturer of Ladies', Misses' and 


BIRDS AND CAGES. 

SINGISG BIRDS, fARROTS AND MON- 
KEYS AND I-ET ANIMALS. 

Bird Seed, and Mnfr. of Best Mocking-Bird Food. 
AL^OCST BOflNE 16 S. 5tli St. $$t. Louis. 


Children's 

423 & 425 N. FIFTH ST., 

ST. LOUIS, MO. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



17 




l¥^ashi]is;ton when he took Coininand of the Army.— This pic- 
ture is supposed to illustrate how Washington appeared when he took command of the 
army, under the Old Elm, at Cambridge, Mass., June 3, 1775. 



'T.Z^"2"ILjO:Ee'S 



One, Two aii Foir-Horse Sweep Powers 




=- For running Corn Shellers, 
jz Fannins; Mills, Feed Mills, 

Feed Cutters, Cider Mills. 

(Trinds^tones, ( ircular and 

Drag Saws, Pumps, Cinirns, 

Lathes, ifcc, 

The Cheapest, Best & Sim- 
_ plest Power Invented. 

g Easilj' set up and quickly 
moved at pleasure. 
Can be placed in a build- 
ing or against it, with pul- 
ley of Power on the inside; 
or be set up independent of 
building. 

g Light One-Horse Power $40 
^ Heavy Oae-Horse Power 50 

g Two-Horse Power 75 

m= Four-Horse 100 

Different sized Pulleys are 
furnished without " extra 
charge, so that purchasers 
can attach to anv machine. 



Taylor, Mack & Smith, 189 ZaSalle St. Chicago. 

DEALERS IN AGRICULTURIAL, IMPLEMENTS. 



18 



IMPOKTANT EVENTS OF THE CENTURY. 



1563. 

Potatoes first brought to England from 
America, by Hawkins, and introduced into 
Ireland in the year 1586, bj- Sir Walter 
Raleigh. 

1573. 

Modern masks and mutfs, fans, false hair for 
women, were devised by the harlots of Italy, and 
brought to England from France. 

1584. 

Sir "Walter Raleigh obtains a patent for 
making discoveries. Amidas and Barlow, in 
command of two ships, by order of Raleigh, 
landed on Woconan and Roanoke. The countrv 
was taken possession of for the crown of Eng- 
land and named Virginia, in honor of the 
virgin Queen. 

1585. 

Sir Richard Grenville was sent with seven 
vessels and 107 men to settle Virginia. They 
settled at Roanoke in charge of Governor Lane, 
but returned to England the following year. 
1586. 

Sir Grenville left a second colony at Roanake, 
which was destroyed by the Indians. 
1587. 

A third colony of 115 persons, under Gov. 
White, was left "at Roanoke. Gov. White re- 
turned to England for supplies and additional 
number of colonists, but when he arrived at 
Roanoke, three years after he found no Eng- 
lishman. It was evident they had been slain 
by the Indians or perished from hunger. The 
last adventurers were disheartened, and Gov. 
White returned to England. 

Virginia Dare born— the first child of Christ- 
ian parents born in the United States. 
1603. 

Bartholomew Gosnald sailed to America, 
named Cape Cod, 'discovered Martha's Vine- 
yard and the adjacent islands : built a fort and 
store-house, but returned to England the same 
year. 

1607. 

Captain Newport arrived in Virginia, and 
began the first permanent British settlement 
in North America, at Jamestown, Virginia. 
1608. 

Chesapeake Bay first explored by Captain 
John Smith. 

Canada settled by the French. Quebec 
founded .July 3d. 

John Laydon married to Ann Burras — the 
first christian marriage in Virginia, and in the 
United States. 

1610. 

Cai)t. Henry Hudson, an Englishman, in the 
service of the Dutch, discovers the Manhattan, 
now Hudson river. 

Starving time in Virginia — of nearly 500 
colonists, all perished butsixtyin thecoiirseof 
six months. 

1611. 

Champlain, a Frenchman, discovered the 
lake which now bears his name. 
161S. 

Rolfe, an Englishman, married Pocahontas, 
daughter of Powhattan, the Indian Kin"-. 

New York settled by the Dutch. The'~island 
where Xew York city now stands was pur- 
chased from the Manhattan Indians for ,|24. 



St. Louis — Continued. 



BOOTS AND SHOES, 



HAND MADE 

BOOTS, SHOES, AND GAITERS, 

1104 OLIVE ST., ST. LOUIS, MO. 
Importer of French Leathers 

^p~All work guaranteed as represented. 

RNOLD, H., Manufacturer and Dealerin Boots 
and Shoes, 2:306 Broadway. 



A 



B 



ARNEY, M. v., Manfger's Agt., and Wholesale 
Dealer in Boots & Shoes, 618 Washington ave. 



B 



ATHG.4.TE, J., Manufacturer and Dealer in 
Boots and Shoes, 419 Franklin ave. 



B 



UTTERWORTH, J., Fashionable Boot & Shoe 
3Iaker, 316 N. Eighth st. 



CLARK, THOMAS., Boots and Shoes, 
822 Market street. 



D 



lEJfSTB.iCH, WM., Boston Boot and Shoe 
Store, 1272 8. Fifth St., cor. Rutger. 



D 



H 



TERR, ADOLPH, Manufacturer of Fashiona- 
ble Boots and Shoes, 623 Market st. 
RISCH, GEORGE, Boots and Shoes, 
306 Walnut street. 

G ARSON, HENRY, Boots and Shoes, 
1612 Broadway. 

ECHLER, FRED., Boots and Shoes, 

^ .322 Walnut street. 

UXKER, FREll^., Manufacturer and Dealer in 
fj Boots and Shoes, 704 Market St. 

JOHN LEAHY, 

BOOT AND SHOE MAKER, 

1003 ^^. Fifth Street, 

ST. XjOxtis, nvno., 

INVISIBLE Rt:PAIKING XEATLV DONE. 

LIEBIG, GEO. P., Manufacturer of Boots and 
Shoes, 7 S. Sixth st. 

ARRET, Y., Manufacturer Custom Made Boots 
and Shoes, 1524 Broadway. 



M 



M 
M 



ARLOW, CH.4.S., Fashionable Boot and Shoe 
Maker, 213 S. Seventh st. 

UNK. J. W., Manufacturer and Dealer in 
Fashionable Boots and Shoes, 708 Market st. 



H. H. NIEWOEHNER, 

—DEALER IN— 

Boots and Shoes^ 

S23 O'FALLOK ST. 

HATS, CAPS, AND FURS, 

823 O'rALLON ST. 

SCHENK, JOHN C, Boots and Shoes, 
1819 Market street. 

('HNEII)ER. .JOHN, Dealer in Boots and Shoes, 

2110 Canuidelet ave. 



t'HNEIDER, JI., Boots and Shoes, 

1106 Market street. 
C HOENEPAUCK, G. H., Manufacturer and Deal- 
er in Boots & Shoes, 1107 Wash st. Repairing. 



VOGT, CHAS. A CO.. Dealers in Boots & Shoe.' 
312 N. Fourth st. 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OF THE CENTURY. 



19 



St. Louis — Cotitmued. 



BEASS FOUNDERIES^ 

ESSMEK, FRED., New Patent Self-Venting 
Beer Faucet, 513 Market st. 



M 



MORE, JONES & CO., BRASS FOUNDRY and 
Metals, 1608 N. Eighth 8t. 

BROKER. 

BARCLAY, D. ROBERT, Loans and Negotia- 
tions, 223 Pine st. 

BRUSHES, 

J. S. COSTELLO, 

Manufacturer of 

SuDcrior Paint, Varnisli, Sasli, WMte Wasli, 

WHITENERS' AND PLASTERS' 

BRUSHES. 

1005 & 10052 N. Fifth St. 

BRUSHES OF ALL KINDS MADE TO ORDER. 

Established 1847. 



F. J. LAITNER&SON, 

MANUFACTURERS AKD IMPORTERS OF 

All kinds of Steel Goods on hand. 
105 S. Second St., - - ST. LOUIS. 

BUSINESS EDUCATION. 

Young men and toys specially prepared for busi- 
ness by an experienced accountant 
and first-class penman. 

BUSINESS COLLE&E AND COUNTM ROOMS, 

S. W. COR. 9th <t FRANKLIN AVE. 

S. J. GRIER & SON. 

OBSERVE THE PLACE— 900 FRANKLIN AV. 

ONES' COMMERCIAL COLLEGE, 

Cor. Olive and Eleventh et. 

^ ^ BUTTER, CHEESE, AND EG&S. 

TIVY & PURCELL, BUTTE R^^^HEESE^ 
EGGS, ETC., 424 N. Second st. 

CANNED GOODS. 
Wholesale Dealers in 



Fancy Groceries, Fruits, Etc., 

503 N. Second Street. 

HOFMANN BROS., Butter, Cheese, CANNED 
GOODS, Dried Fruits, etc., 305 N. Second st. 

^^^^^^RPENTERS AND BUILDERS. 

wmThTgajetney, 
Carpenter and Builder, 

1 IO6 & 1 108 Market St. 



Jobbing Promptly Attended to. 



1«14. 

The Dutch h)uilt a fort at Manhattan (near 
New York. J 

Captain Smith made a fishing voyage to the 
northern part of America. Made a chart of 
the coast, which he presented to Prince Charles, 
who named the country New England. 

Settlements commenced by the Dutch at 
Manhattan, now New York, at Albany, and in 
New Jersey. 

1616. 
Capt. Dermer was the first Eng;lishman who 
sailed throug-h Lonof Island sound. 

Tobacco first cultivated by the English set- 
tlers in Virginia. 

1617. 
Pocahontas died in England, aged 22. 

1618. 
A great pestilence destroyed most of the In- 
dians from Narragansett to Penobscot. 
1619. 
Twenty thousand pounds of tobacco exported 
from Virginia to England. 
1630. 
Plymouth settlers arrived at Plymouth 
Mass., December 22d. 

Slavery first introduced into Colonies by the 
Captain of a Dutch vessel, who sold 20 negroes 
at Jamestown, Va. 

1631. 
Edward Winslow and Susannah "White mar- 
ried — the first Christian marriage in New Eng- 
land. 

1633. 
The Indians massacred 349 of the Virginia 
colonists, March 22d. 

1633. 
First settlement of New Hampshire, at Do- 
ver, and at Little Harbor. 

George Sandys, of Virginia, translated 
Ovid's Metamorphosis — the first literary pro- 
duction of the English colonists in America. 
1634. 
The first cattle brought into New England by 
Edward Winslow, agent for the Plymouth col- 
ony. 

1637. 

Delaware and Pennsylvania settled by the 
Swedes and Fins. 

1639. 

African slaves first brought into Virginia by 
a Dutch ship and sold to colonists. 

Peregrine White, the first English child born 
in New England. 

1630. 

Charleston, Boston, Watertown and Dorches- 
ter settled by Gov. Winthrop. 

Jltily. — First house built in Boston. 

Gov. Winthrop first abolished the custom of 
drinking health-;. 

John Billington executed for murder — the 
first execution in Plymouth Colony. 

16S3. 

Magistrates of the colon}- of Massachusetts 
first chosen by the freeman in the colony. 

The magistrates of Massachusetts ordered 
that no tobacco should be used publicly. 

The general court at Plymouth passed an act 
that whoever should refuse the office of Gov- 
ernor should pay a fine of £20, unless he was 
chosen two years successively. 



20 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



Esta-Tolisliea. iSSS. 



EIstaTolisliOia. 1S5S- 



MANUFACTURER OF 



Sterling Silver Ware 

and Fine Electro Plate 

From new, elegant and artistic designs. The only House in the West making a specialty 

of this class of goods. 

No. 305 North 7tli Street, Cor. of Olive, 

ST. IjOTJIs, nvno. 






311 N. 7th St, bet Olive & Locust 

GEO. F. ADAMS, M. D., Supt. 

This is one of the finest Baths in the Country. 

MOUND CITY WHITE LEAD AND COLOR WORKS. 



LEON BOUCHER & CO., 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



IM 



4ifii ilPiTifillill 



COLORS, ZINC, PAINTS, 

AND DEALERS IN 

Varnishes, Window Glass, Bruslies, Paints, Oils and Naval Stores, 
Nos. 704 & 706 North Second Street, 

ST. I-,OTJIS. 

RICHARD GARSTANG'S 

PATENT FEED 



Th ■ most thorough Purifier of Feed Water for Steam Boilers 
before the public. 

The only Double Acting Heater and also the only Heater supplied 
with a thorough Surface and Sediment Blower in the Market. 

PATENTED JUNE 33, 1874. 

Manufactured hy BICHARD GARSTANG, 
m 1 245 to 1 255 S. Second St., ST. LOUIS, MO. 






ADVERTISEMENTS. 



21 




ALEXANDER B. WALSH. 



DAVID T. WALSH. 



W M 



-DEALERS IN- 

Grocers' Specialties, 



-jPi^lSTJD— 



GENERAL COMMISSION MERCHANTS, 

No.'219 North Second Street, St. Louis. 



22 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OF THE CENTURY. 



1033. 

Virginia enacted laws for the suppression of 
religious sectaries. 

Messrs. Cotton, Hooker and Stone, three em- 
inent ministers, arrived at Boston, from Eng- 
land. 

A specimen of rye first brought into the 
Court of Massachusetts as the first fruit of 
English grain. 

The Dutch erect a fort on Connecticut river, 
in the present town of Hartford. 

The Plymouth people erect a trading house, 
in the present town of Windsor, Conn. 
16S4i. 

Roger Williams, minister, of Salem, ban- 
ished on account of his religious tenets. 

First merchant's shop in Boston opened. 

Great storm of wind and rain in New Eng- 
land; the tide rose twenty feet perpendicularly 
August 15. 

1636. 

The Desire, a ship of 120 tons, built at Mar- 
blehead — the first American ship that made a 
voyage to England. 

'the first court in Connecticut held April 26. 
1<{37. 

War with the Pequots in Connecticut: their 
fort taken by surprise and destroyed, May 26. 

Ann Hutchinson holds lectures in Massa- 
chusetts for the propagation of her peculiar 
religious sentiments. She gains many adher- 
ents. 

A Synod convened at Newtown, Mass., the 
first Synod held in America; they condemn 
eighty-two erroneous opinions which had been 
propagated in New England. 
1<$38. 

Two tremendous storms in August and De- 
cember ; the tide rose fourteen feet above the 
spring tide, at Narragansett, and flowed twice 
in six hours. 

The ancient and honorable artillery company 
formed at Boston. 

Three Englishmen executed by the govern- 
ment of Plymouth colonj', for the murder of 
an Indian. 

First general election in Hartford, Conn. 
John Hayes first Governor. 

First Baptist Church in America formed at 
Providence, R. I. 

Severe tempest and rain. Connecticut river 
rose twenty feet above the meadows, in March. 

House of Assembly established in Maryland. 
1640. 

The general court of Massachusetts prohib- 
ited the use of tobacco. 

1041. 

Dutch trading house on the Delaware taken 
by the Swedes. 

Severe winter; Boston and Chesapeake bays 
frozen; Boston bay passable for carts, horses, 
&c., for five weeks. 

1642. 

The Dutch fort at Hartford seized by the in- 
habitants of Connecticut. 

Indian war in Maryland. 

The New England ministers invited to at- 
tend the assembly of divines at Westminster, 
England, but they declined. 

First commencement at Harvard College; 
nine candidates took the degree of A. B. 



St. Louis — Cotitinued. 



CARPENTERS AND BUILDERS. 

PITCHER, HENKY. Carpenter and Builder, 517 
and 519 S. Sixth st. 

ILSON &, BRUNSON, Contractors and Build- 
ers, 1003 M rgan st. 



w 



CARRIAGE MANUFACTURERS. 

C"~OSiOlX7jTp^ M ajrufScturer^TCa^^ 
Buggies, 606 and 608 Cass ave. ^ 

Established 1863. 

Successor to JOST & YEAKEL. 

Carriage Muilder^ 

1330 i& 1338 S. Second St. 

Op. Lafayette Bank. ST. LOUIS. 

C'AULIFF, WM., B. & BRO., Manufacturers 
of Buiigies aud Wagons, 2414 Franklin ave. 



M 



CHAIR MANUFACTURERS. 

HELLER & HOFFMAN, Chair Manufacturers 
Cor. Eighth and Howard sts. 



M 



CHINA, GLASS, AND QUEENSWARE, 

ISSOURI GLASS CO., Queensware, Glassware, 
Lamp Stock, etc., 217 and 219 N. Main st. 



WELLS, RODNEY D. & CO., China, Glass and 
Queensware, etc., 516 N. Main st. 

CLOTHING-WHOLESALE. 
Manufacturer of Men's, Boys' and Children's 

d-iOTHziisra-, 

Oak Hall Building, «t04 N. Fourtli !«t. 

ACK & CO., Manufacturers of Clothing, 717 
IVX aud 719 Washington av. 



J. & L. SEASONaOOD & CO., 
Manufacturers of Clothing, 

IMPORTERS AND JOBBERS OF WOOLENS, 

S. W. Cor. 5th & St. Charles Sts-, 
ST. LOUIS, MO. 

Cincinnati House, S. W. Cor. Third and Vine Sts. 

STAHL. L.. & CO., Manufacturers of Clothing, 
Shirts, Drawers and Overalls, 913 N. 4th st. 
HITE & ROSENTHAL, Mnfrs. and Jobbers of 
Men's Clothing, 707 Washington av. 

COAL AND WOOD, 

GODFREY, WM., Wholesale and Retail Dealer 
in Wood and Coal, 1829 N. Ninth st 

STRATHMANN, A., Dealer in Wood and Coal, 
809, 811 and 813 Carr St., bet. 8th and 9th sts. 

COFFEE BROKERS. 

BILLINGS, A. W., Merchandise Broker in Cof- 
fee. Sugar & Syrups, cor. Second & Vine sts. 

Manufacturers' Agents and 

Merchandise Brokers, 

501 N, Second St., ST. LOUIS. 

COMMISSION MERCHANTS^ 

BROEDER & xMILLER, Commission Merchants, 
930 and 932 Broadway, St. Louis. 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OF THE CENTURY. 



23 



St. Louis — Continued. 



COMMISSION MERCHANTS. 

wSlSSSTbeard, 

FRUIT AND PRODUCE 

COMMISSION MERCHANT, 

900 BROADWAY, 

Cor. Cherry, ST. LOUIS. 

A. B. BOWMAN & CO., 

Dealers in Foreign and Domestic 

GEEEN & DRIED FRUITS, 

Produce Commission Merchants, 
325 N. MAIN ST., - ST. LOUIS. 

M. D. BURNES, 

General Dealer in 

Frmltf PifocHm^a* ate* 

COMMISSION MERCHANT, 
1009 BROADWAY, ST. LOUIS, MO. 

All Orders i^TOmptly attended to. 



F 



iLINT. H. TV. & CO., General Commission Mer- 
chan ts, 823 Broadway. 

GERBER, SIGNAIGO k BRO. 

(Successors to V. Gerber & Son), 
FRUIT AND GENERAL 

COMMISSION MERCHANTS, 

818 BROADV^AY. 
Michael McGuirk, 

DEALER IN 

1230 BROADWAY, 
ST- LOUIS. 

LOUIS HAKE & SON, 

Commission & Produce Merchants, 

And Dealers in Provisions. 

827 Broadway, opp. Cherry St., and 824 N. Fourth St. 

HEIL, JOS., & CO.j Commission Merchants and 
Dealers in Fruit & Prodnce, 926 Broadway. 

OLLISTER, E. T., & CO., Commission Mer- 

chants, 805 Broadway. 

ACOBSON, S., & CO., Hides, Wool and Furs, 

and Commission Merchants, 1027 Broadway. 

All? & ELBRECHT, Commission Merchants. 

Consignments solicited. 1014 Broadway. 



K 



KEISKER BROS., Commission Agents and Mill 
Agents, 110.5 and 1107 Broadway. 

NEHANS, H. W., & SONS, Commission Mer- 
chants, 1022 Broadway. 



M 



OSS, CHAS. & CO., Commission and Produce 

Merchants, 22 N. Second st. 



Union of the colonies of Plymouth, Massa- 
chusetts, Connecticut and New Haven for mu- 
tual defense. 

1645. 

Action between a New England ship and an 
Irish man-of-war. 

Battle fought between the Dutch and In- 
dians, near the confines of Connecticut; great 
numbers slain on both sides. 
164«. 

The Friends or Quakers first came to Massa- 
chusetts; laws passed against them; four exe- 
cuted in 1659. 

i64r. 

First influenza mentioned in the annals of 
America. 

Legislature of Massachusetts passed an act 
against the Jesuits. 

First general assembly of Rhode Island. 
1648. 

Laws of Massachusetts first printed. 

Margaret Jones of Charlestown, Mass., exe- 
cuted for witchcraft. 

The ''Cambridge Platform" and the "West- 
minster Confession of Faith" received by 
most of the New England churches. The Con- 
gregational church and its pastor ordered to 
depart from Virginia by the Governor of that 
colony. 

1649. 

The government of Massachusetts, with the 
assistants, signed a declaration against men's 
wearing long hair, as unscriptural. 
1650. 
Constitution of Maryland established. 

1651. 
The Legislature of Massachusetts passed 
laws against extravagance in dress. 
1653. 
The province of Maine taken under the pro- 
tection of Massachusetts. 

The first mint for coining money in New 
England erected. 

1654. 
The Dutch drive the Swedes from the Dela- 
ware. 

Col. Wood, of Virginia, sent a company of 
men to explore the countrv of Ohio. 
1657. 
Disputes concerning baptism in New Eng- 
land. 

1658. 
Earthquake in New England. 

16SO. 
At this time the colonies of Virginia, New 
England and Maryland, were supposed to con- 
tain no more than 80,000 inhabitants. 
1681. 
Society for propagating the gospel among the 
Indians of New Eno;land, incorporated by 
Charles II. 

1663. 
Charter of Connecticut granted by King 
Charles II. 

The Legislature of Massachusetts appointed 
two licensers of the press. 

The assembly of ilaryland established a 
mint in that colonv. 



24 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 




Special attention given to Balls and Parties. 

Wo. 317 WORTH FIFTH STREET, 

SAIIVT LOUIS. 

H. J. FOUTS, Proprietor. 



w^. &.. 



d^^©^ Ss ©©/@ 



HUNGARIAN SIF-SHINING STOVE POLISH 

The oitly Polish that can he itsetl with satisfnctioit to all irithout lahof ur the use of a 
bi-ush. SMMIlfJES MMIEN A.PPL,MED. 

A child ten years of age can Polish a Stove to a brilliant gloss equally as well as a grown person. 
We guarantee all we represent. Pull instructions for using on every box. 

In no branch of manufacture, perhaps, is there such a difterence in the goods produc- 
ed as in the manufacture of Stove Polish. The art (for it is an art) of Polishing Stoves is 
one that has ahvavs been considered verj laborious and fatigueing to the performer. It 
has at last been brought to perfection in as much so that all labor and fatigue is entirely 
dispensed with. We are well aware there is such a thing as cheap Stove Polish, or in 
other words, that which does not claim to be of any great excellence. This is in a great 
measui-e attributable to the fact that the few concerns which are prepared to manufacture 
the finest qualities are so far in advance of those making the cheaper goods that any at- 
tempt at competition on the part of the latter Avould be futile, and consequently they con- 
tent themselves by making the cheap article for the poorer class of trade. But such has 
been the improvement of our establishment that we can manufacture a superior class of 
goods and sell them as low as common good-; can be sold which are manufactured by the 
common concerns. Our establishment, which is located at No. 1103 Morgan Street, man- 
ulactures and deals exclusi^■ely in The Hungarian Self Shining Stove Polish (the only 
genuine article in the market). Our firm first became established in Philadelphia in 1S72. 
In consequence of the demand for our goods becoming so extensive throughout the West, 
we determined to establish a Manufactory and Depot in the city ot St. Louis, through 
which to facilitate the supply demanded in the West. The beauty of our Polish is, no 
brush is required and no mixing, as it is applied with any woolen cloth and is used from 
the box it comes in. It will take ofl" all grease and rust. It is more durable than any other. 
Saves labor. Will not burn oft". It is free from all odor, and makes no dust. Will pro- 
duce a brilliant Polish in less than five minutes time. Like all good articles put on the 
market, our Polish has imitations; therefore we caution the public. Buy none other but 
that having the signature on everv box of tlie sole manufacturers (as there is none genu- 
ine without it). WM. A. SKINNER & CO., 1103 Morgan St., St. Louis, Mo. 



advp:rtisements. 



25 




Mercantile liibrary, St. liOais, llo.— Situated on the corner of Locust 
and Fifth Streets. The lot cost in 1 85 1 $25,000. The cost of the building was estimated 
at $70,000, but amounted to considerable more when completed, was in part provided 
for bv a loan and in part by contributions among Avhich was the generous gift of $20,000 
by Mr. Henry D. Bacon. The total number of volumes in the library is upwards of 
42,000. Much credit is due Mr. John N. Dyer, who has held the position as Actuary and 
Librarian since 1S62. 

MZZiZ.ZITSZl'7 J°L2TD DZISSS LiJLZIZXTG- 



Mme. LEV/ANDOVSKA'S 
FASHIONABLE 

Millinery and Dress Making Emporium, 

3-23 N. FIFTH STBEET, under Mercantile Library Hall, St. Louis, Mo. 

Is constantly receiving the latest importations in Elegant and Select Millinerv Goods, 
including the choicest novelties— PATTERN HATS and BONNETS of exquisite taste, 
art and Deauty. FLOWERS and BRIDAL WREATHS in perfect imitation of nature; 
also, hat and bonnet trimmings in all the new shades of color. Ornaments and Osb'ich 
plumes in superb variety. Beautiful House, Street, Party and Bridal suits made in the 
latest Parisian styles, and equal to the most fastidious in taste. An elegant assortment of 
human hair, also the Demorest reliable patterns. Prices Moderate. Orders by mail 
will receive prompt attention. 



26 



IMPORTANT EVKNTS OF THE CENTURY, 



1663. 

Great earthquake in Canada and New Eng- 
land. 

1664. 

Elliott's Indian Bible printed at Cambridge, 
Mass., the first Bible printed in America. 

A large comet seen in New England. 

New York and Albany taken from the Dutch. 
1665. 

Sir J. Yeamans settled on the southern 
banks of Cape Fear river, with a colony from 
Barbadoes. 

New Haven and Connecticut united into one 
colony. 

At this time the militia of Massachusetts 
consisted of 4,400 men. 

The government of Rhode Island passed a 
law to outlaw Quakers for refusing to bear 
arms. 

1666. 

The buccanneers of America began their de- 
predations in the West Indies. 
1669. 

War between New York Indians and the Mo- 
hawks. 

1673. 

Laws of Connecticut printed; every family 
ordered to have a law book. 
1673. 
New England contained at this time about 
120,000 inhabitants. 

New York- and New Netherlands taken by the 
Dutch — they were restored to the English the 
next year. 

1675. 

King Phillip's war commenced; action at 
Swanzey; Brookfield and Deertield burnt; Cap- 
tain Lathrop, with 80 men, surprised by In- 
dians and almost every man slain. 

Governor Winslow, with 1,000 men, attacked 
the Naragansetts (the allies of Phillip) in 
their fort; the fort destroyed and their country 
ravaged. December. 

Virginia contained at this time about 50,000 
inhabitants. 

1676. 

Lancaster burnt ; Captain Pierce and his 
company slain ; Capt. Wadsworth and about 
fifty of his men killed. Falls fight — the In- 
dians surprised in the night — they lost 300 
men, women and children. May 18 ; Hatfield 
and Hadley attacked — King Philip killed, Au- 
gust 12 — which ends the war. 

Bacon's insurrection in Virginia. James- 
town burnt. 

1677. 

Insurrection in Carolina ; the insurgents ex- 
ercised authority for two years in that colony. 
1680. 

New Hampshire separated from Massachus- 
setts. The first assembly met at Portsmouth. 

Great comet seen in New England ; it occa- 
sioned much alarm. 

1683. 

William Penn held a treaty with the In- 
dians. 

M. de la Salle descended the ^Mississippi to 
its mouth, took possession of the country in 
the name of Louis XIV, the French King, and 
named the country Louisiana. 



St. Louis — Continued. 



COMMISSION MERCHANTS, 

A . L A N D A U^^O., 

COMMISSION MERCHANTS, 

And Dealers in 

Hides, Furs, Wool, Etc., 

1013 & 1015 Broadway, 

ST. tOUIS, MO. 

a. H. LITTLE, 

GENERAL COMMISSION MERCHANT, 

And Wholesale Dealer in 
CRAyBEKRIES. SVTTER. BEANS, PRO- 
VISIONS AND DRIED FRUITS, 

111 & 113 Pine St, 
(Bet. Main and Second Sts,) ST. LOUIS. 



REHBEIN, H. A. & CO., Produce Commission 
Merohanis, 105 N. Main st. 

SMITH & SAMUELS, 

PRODUCE AND GENERAL 

COMMISSION MERCHANTS, 

701 BROADWAY, cor B oadway & Bridge Sq., 

ST. LOUIS. 

Citif References : Bank of St. Louis, Senter & 
Co., liodson & Woods, Ex-Gov. E. O. Stanard. 

TEINBERG, H., Commission Merchant, Dealer 
in Butler, Cheese. Eggs, etc., 930 Bro dway. 
T'^IVY & PURCELL, General Commission Mer- 
X chants, 424 N. Second 6t. 

Z¥LLE^"R0THERS, General Commission and 
Produce Merchants, 922 and 924 Broadway. 

CONFECTIONERIES. 

ADAM, P., Confectionery, Ladies' Restaurant 
and lee Cream Saloon, 414 Market st. 



F 



OUTS, H. J., Confectioner, 



317 N. Fifth St. 



Mrs. Josephine Gremore, 
COITFECTIOITEIIY, 

AND NOTION STORE, 

823 MORGAW STREET, 



KENNEY, L., Confectionery, Ice Cream and 
Oyster Depot, 71-3 Chouteau ave. 



LEONHARD, C. A., Confectionery, Ladies' Res- 
taurant and Ice Cream Saloon, 320 Market st. 



MARANESI, CHAS., Confectioner, original Mfr. 
of Pure Home-made Candies, 110 S. 4th st. 



CORKS. 



NICHOLAS JOST, 

Manufacturer and Importer of 



24 SOUTH SECOND ST. 

All kinds of Machine and Hand-Cut Corks. 

Corkwood, Imported Metallic Caps, &c. 

Under Barnum's Hotel, ST. LOUIS, MO. 

U. S. Regulation Life Preservers. 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OF THE CENTURY, 



27 



St- Louis — Continued. 



OOSTUMER. 
XiyOESE, CHAS., Costumer, 



501 S. Fifth St. 



OOUNTET PRODUCE. 

ANDERSON, E. & CO., Apples, Butter, Eggs and 
Country Produce, 119 N. Second st. 



M 



CRACKER MANUFACTURER. 

ANEWAL, LANGE & CO., Steam Cracker Man- 
ufacturers, Cor. Sixth and Cass ave. 



CUTLERY AND GRINDERS. 

CHARLESBROCH, 

717 OLIVE ST,, ST. LOUIS, 

Manufacturer, and Dealer in 

AND STEAM GRINDING IN GENERAL. 
Always on hand a large assortment of Table an d 
Pocket Cutlery, Fancy Hardware, Kazors of the 
best makers, Razor Strops and Hones, Revolvers 
and Pistole, French Cook Knives, great variety of 
Fancy Articles. Patent Shears ground and set. 
Cutlery repaired. Country Orders attended to. 

FRIEDMANN & LAUTERJUNG, 

A. J. JORDAN, Sole Agent. 

Manufacturers of CUTLERY, 

Eleclric Razors, and Electric Shears, 

• 91 Chambers and 73 Reade Sts., New York. 
4L23 N. FIFTH ST., ST. LOUIS. 

Stea m Gri nding. 

AUGUST KERN, 

912 N. Sixth Street, St. Louis. 

All kinds of Knives and Razors kept on hand, 
best article only. Hollow Ground Razors, and all 
kinds of heavy and light work done at short no- 
tice. Orders from outside the city will receive 
prompt attention. 

DENTISTS, 

Centennial Dental Rooms. 




A Beautiful Set of Gum Teeth, only $5 00 
Teeth extracted and an upper or low- 
er set of S. S. "White's Gum Teeth on 

Rubber 9 00 

Pure Gold Fillings and \varranted .. . 1 50 

liargest Size Platina Fillings 1 00 

Largest Silver Fillings, only 75 

Extracting -without Fain, -with Gas 

only 35 

Extracting without Gas, only 35 

All work warranted as contracted for or 
Money Refunded. 

Be sure yon Get iFsFrfASHINfiTON AVE. 

Sign of the Golden Tooth. 

GREENE, C. R., Dentist, 
403 Christy avenue. 



16N3. 

The Governor of Virn^inia ordered that no 
printing press should be used in that colony, 
" on any occasion whatever." 

First Episcopal Society formed in Boston. 

Port Royal, Carolina, broken up by the 
Spaniards from St. Augustine. 
1687. 

Charter of Connecticut hid from Andros, in 
a hollow oak, and saved. 

M. de la Salle, the discoverer of Louisiana, 
killed by his own men in mutiny. 
1«88. 

New York and the Jerseys added to the jur- 
isdiction of New England. 

Andros appointed Captain-General and Vice- 
Admiral over the whole. 

Opposition to Andros' administration in Mas- 
sachusetts. 

1689. 

"Williams and Mary proclaimed in the colo- 
nies. Andros is siezed and sent a prisoner to 
England. 

1690. 

Bills of credit issued by the government of 
Massachusetts, the first ever issued in the 
American colonies. 

A body of French and Indians from Mon- 
treal burn Schnectady, and massacre the in- 
habitants, February 8. 

Port Royal taken by Sir William Phipps ; he 
makes an expedition against Quebec, but is un- 
successful. 

1691. 

Major Schuyler, with a party of Mohawks, at- 
tacks the French settlements on Lake Cham- 
plain. 

The Assembly of Virginia obtain of the 
crown the charter of "William and Mary Col- 
lege, so named from the English sovereigns. 

1693. 

Nineteen persons executed for witchcraft in 
Massachusetts. 

Edmund Andros, the tyrant of New England, 
made governor of Virginia. 

Sir "William Phillips arrived as governor of 
Massachusetts under the new charter. 

16941. 

Legislature of Massachusetts caused the 
names of drunkards, in several towns, to be 
posted up in public houses, and imposed a fine 
for giving them entertainment. 

169S. 

Seat of government in Virginia removed to 
Williamsburg, the streets of which were laid 
out in the form of a W, in honor of the reign- 
ing King of England, William. 

1699. 

Assembly of Maryland removed to Aunapo- 

1700. 

Legislature of New York made a law to hang 
everv Papish priest who should come into the 
the province. 

Two hundred and sixty-two thousand inhabi- 
tants in the American colonies at the beginning 
of this centurv. 

Carolina infested with pirates. 



lis 



28 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



W. N. TIVY. 



JOHN PURCEI.L,. 



'TirsT'^r c*3 3f»tj3FIOe:IjIj, 



Butter, Cheese and General Commission Merchants, 

4*4 ]VORTa SECOND STREET, ST. L.OUIS, 

Henry Ames <& Co., Pork Pks. I Fonrtli National Bank. { IVm. Barr & Co., Dry Ooods. 
Fatli, Etrald & Co., Com. | Hon. £. O. Stannard. | And St. Louis Merchants generally, 

tt^-COXSIOSfMEWTS OF ABOVE ABTICtES SOI-ICITE».=Sa 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALER IN 

Staple and Fancy Groceries, Wines and Liquors, 

Mo. 612 N. Foum St. M No. 611 N. TMri St., (Opp. Briie) St. Louis. 

G-oods delivered to all parts of the City, East St. Louis, Railroad 
Depots and Steamboat Landings free of charge. 

J. G. HARRIS & CO., 



Snccessors to 
Habris, Hughes & Co. 



cvc- 



Proprietors of 
St. Louis Stamp Co. 




"v,, 



^ ENGRAVERS ^ 

STAMPfBRAND 

^^ CUTTERS. ^' 



^^vV' 




Ribbon Stamps. Seal Presses. 

41(> and 418 N. Second Street, St. Lonis, Mo. 
WOOD exghaving ix all its branches. 

It^^Send for Illustrated Catalogue and Price List. 

CARRETT, Mcdowell & co., 



Northeast Corner Fourth and Washington Avenue, 

SAINT LOUIS. 

.A.XJGtTJSTXTS AJ^^i, 





-DEALER IN ALL KINDS OP- 
Onns, Pistols, and Amnnition, 

11*9 X. 5TH ST.. (XEAR BIDDIiE ST.) ST. LOUIS. 
Repairing Ntatly Done on Short Kotlce. 



ADVERTISKMENTS. 



29 



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30 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OF THE CP^NTURY. 



Gov. Moore's expedition against the Span- 
iards at St. Augustine — it proves a failure. 

First issue of paper currency in Carolina. 

First Episcopal church in New Jersey and 
Rhode Island. 

1703. 

The Church of England established bv law 
in Carolina. 

1704. 

First newspaper in America published in 
Boston called the Boston News Letter. 

Deerfield burnt and most of its inhabitants 
carried captive by the French and Indians. 

iro6. 

The Spaniards and French invade Carolina — 
they are defeated. 

iro7. 

The New England troops make an unsuccess- 
ful expedition against Port Royal. 

1708. 

Haverhill surprised by the French and In- 
dians. 

1709. 

First issuing of paper money currency in 
New York, New Jersey and Connecticut. 
17 lO. 

Twenty-seven hundred Palotines, from Ger- 
many, arrived and settled in New York and 
Pennsylvania. 

1711. 

Expedition against Quebec — failed by the 
loss of transports in the St. Lawrence. 
1713. 

War with the Tuscaroras in North Carolina 
— they are defeated. 

1715. 

A general conspirancy against the Carolinas 
by the Yemasees, Cherokees and other tribes. 
Governor Craven attacks and defeats them in 
their own camp. 

1717. 

Greatest snow-storm ever known in this 
country, February. 

Yale College removed from Saybrook to New 
Haven. 

Bellamy, a pirate, wrecked with his fleet on 
Cape Cod. 

1718. 

William Penn, the founder of Pennsylvania, 
Jied in England, aged 74. 

1719. 

First Presbyterian Church in New York 
founded. 

Lotteries suppressed by the Legislature of 
Massachussetts. 

Pensacola taken by the French from the 
Spaniards. 

1731. 

First innoculation for the small-pox, in 
America, at Boston. 

1733. 

Twenty-six pirates executed at Newport, R. I. 

Paper currency in Pennsylvania first issued. 

First settlement in Vermont. 
1734. 

Trenton, N. J., founded by William Trent. 

The sect of Dunkers about this time took its 
rise in Pennsylvania. 



St. 'L.ovis— Cotitiiiued. 



DENTISTS. 

UBERT, J. H., Zahnarzt Dentist, S. E. cor. 
Fourth and Market sts. 

DESI&NER, 



H 



ZIMMEBJIANN, FRANK, Designer, Office, Gran- 
ite Block, Room 510 Fourth and Market sts. 

DRUGGISTS, 

ARNABD H. C, Druggist, 

Cor. Rock Road and Glendale ave. 



B 



DESHLEK BEESON, 

APOTHECARY aid DRUG&IST, 

COR. SIXTH AND CHESTNUT STS. 



Agent for Liebig's Liquid Extract of Beef 
and Tonic Invigorator. 

OLEMAN, JOHN B., Druggist, 

Cor. Ninth and Christy ave. 

WM. H. CRAWFORD, 
DRUGGIST. 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL. 
SOO JVASMtlSOTOX A.VESVE. 

OTTO D'AMOUR. 

N, W, Cor, Broadway and Chambers St. 

ONNELL MF'« CO., Grocers' and Druggists' 
Sundries, 316 X. Main st. 



D 



[70ER(;, HENRY, Druggist and Pharmacist, N . 
D W. cor. .Seventh and Spruce sts. 



H 



.iRRIS, E. N., Druggist and Apothecary, 

3139 Easton avenue. 



K 



OCH, H., Druggist, N. E. cor. N. Market and 
Broadway, under Mound City Hotel. 



]\/rEYER BROS., Wholesale Druggists, 

iVl 6,8, 10 and 12 N. Second St. 

MURISON'S Catarrh and Bronchial Cigarettes 
area sure cure, and give perfect satisfaction. 
PAULEY, F. C, Lion Drug dtore, Easton and 
Campton avenues. 

OBINSON & SQUIRE. Drugs, Medicines, Per- 
fumeries, etc., 416 Olive st. 
EBER, A. H. (Agt.) Wholesale Druggist, 221 
N. Second st. 



w 



^XrEBSTER, M. R & CO., Druggists, 
TT Eleventh and CI 



Chestnut sts. 



c 

H 



DRY GOODS, 

RAWFORD, D. & CO., Dry Goods, 416 to 420 

Franklin ave. 



ARIJRAVE. .!., DRY GOODS, Hosiery, No- 
tions, etc., 520 and 522 Elm st. 



SCHUBERT, H., DRY GOODS, Ladies' and 
Gents' Furnishing Goods. 1515 Wash st. 

J. H. TIEMEYER & CO., 

Staple & Fancy Dry &oo4s Dealers. 

415 FRANKLIN AVENUE, 



DYEING AND SCOURING, 

SCHWARZ, .lOS., Steam Dveing and Scouring 
._ Establishment, 13 S. Sixth st. 



IMPORTAOT EVENTS OF THE CENTURY. 



31 



St. Louis — Continued. 



DYEIN& AND SCOURIN&. 

Steam Dye House 

704 Morgan Street. 

Between Seventh and Eighth sts. 



All kinds of Ladies' and Gents' Goods dyed and 
cleaned. 



Eiropean Cleiical Bye Worts, 

610 MORGAN STREET, 

Four doors fiom S. W. cor. Sixth St., op. Union 
Market. 

Special Attention Paid to Silk and Fancy Dyeing, 

Also Gents' ClothingDyed, Cleaned and Repaired 
at the lowest rates. Orders by Mail promptly 
attended to. Goods called for and deliv- 
ered to all parts of the city. Has had 
27 years' experience in Europe. 

A. M. NORDFELPT. 

DyeiflE and Immi EiBBomni, 

1428 Franklin Avenue. 

Gentlemen who desire their clothin? Cleaned, 
Dyed, Repaired and Altered to the Latest Fash- 
ion, will And it to their advantage to give us a call, 

DYER, CLEANER AND SCOURER, 

CENTUAl, J>VE TVORR-S. 

914 WASHINGTON AVE. 

ELEOTEIC MACHINERY, 

ErArFROECKMAN, 

Manufacturer of 

Electric & Teleirapli MacMieri, 

MATHEMATICAL AND PflY>ICAL INSTROMENTS. 

904 N. FOURTH ST., 

ELEOTEIC PEN, 

oTooTo 

Or more Copies from a single 
writing 

ELECTRIC PEm 

Agency, 118 N. Second St., 

ST. LOUIS, MO. 

EMPLOYMENT OFFICES, 

leinaleEiiiployiiieflUpncy 

8 N. SEVENTH ST. 

If not in, inquire at Mr. Meyers', 621 Market St. 



1735. 

First newspaper printed in Xew York, by 
William Bradford. 

1787. 

Great earthquake in New Eng^land, Oct. 29. 
1738. 

Drought and hurricane in Carolina ^ yellow 
fever in Charleston. 

i7:to. 

The Natchez Indians extirpated by the 
French. 

I7a3. 

Corn and tobacco made a legal tender in 
Maryland. Corn at 20 pence per bushel, and 
tobacco at one penny per pound. 
1733. 
First Masonic lodge held in Boston. 

1737. 
Earthquake in New Jersey. 

1738. 
College at Princeton, N. J., founded. 

1740. 
Hard winter : severe cold. 
General Oglethorp with 2,000 men makes an 
unsuccessful expedition against St. Augus- 
tine. 

1741. 
The Moravians, or United Brethren, began 
the settlement of Bethlehem, Pa. 

Four white persons executed ; thirteen ne- 
groes burnt, eighteen hanged, and great num- 
bers transported, for a conspiracy to burn the 
city of New York. 
Expedition against Cuba. 
1743. 
Spanish expedition against Georgia — failed. 

1746. 
French expedition under Duke D'Anville, 
which threatened New England, failed by 
means of storms, sickness in the fleet, etc. 
1747. 
Saratoga village destroyed and the inhabit- 
ants massacred by the French and Indians. 
1749. 
Severe drought in New England; causes 
great distress; some of the inhabitants sent 
to England for hay. 

1750. 
Massachusetts enacts a law against theatri- 
cal entertainments. 

1753. 
New style introduced into Britain and Amer- 
ica — September 2d, reckoned 14th. 

Charleston, S. C., laid under water by a 
tempest. 

1754. 
Colonel Washington, with 400 men in Fort 
Necessity, surrendered to the French July 4. 
1755. 
Expedition against Nova Scotia — the French 
are subdued, the inhabitants brought away and 
dispersed among the colonies. ' 

General Braddock defeated by the French 
and Indians, July 9. 

Great earthqiiakes in North America. 

1756. 
Oswego taken by the French under Jlont- 
calm. 



32 ADVERTISEMENTS. 



W. C. SLICER, 

Architect & Superintendent, 

s. E. COR. Eighth & chestnut sts., 

Room No. 16, upstairs. ST. LOUIS. 

I have opened an office at the above place, where I am prepared to furnish Plans, 
Specifications, and Superintend all kinds of buildings, such as 

Ptthlie Btiildings, Churches, 

Stores, Warehouses, Divellings, 

Country Houses, Stables, Etc, 

I will also state that I can make arrangements to build for parties owning the ground, 
on one-third cash, balance in one and two vears, at 8 per cent. 

W. C^. eiil^MM, 

Architect and Superintendent. 




^ 



!S$ ^^"i!S5^" wimwRsms 



Real Estate Agent 

NOTARY PUBLIC AND CONVEYANCER, 
No, d07 Walnut Street, 



WM. PARKES, 

TAILOR k DRAPER, 

Latest Styles made in the most correctly 
Fashionable Tnanner, 

The very best work guaranteed at reasonably low rates. 
Bei. Seventh and Eighth Sts. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



33 




34 



IMPORTANT EVEKTS OF THE CENTURY. 



1757. 

Fort William Henry capitulated to the 
French, and many of the garrison massacred 
by the Indians. 

1758. 

Louisburg taken by the British. 

Gen. Abercrombie defeated at Ticonderoga 
with great loss; Lord Howe killed. 

Fort du Quesne abandoned by the French 
and taken by the English and 'named Pitts- 
burgh, Nov. 25. 

1759. 

Niagara taken by the English; Gen. Pri- 
deaux killed. 

Battle of Quebec; Gen. Wolf, the English 
commander, and Montcalm, the French com- 
mander, killed; the French defeated and Que- 
bec taken. September. 

Lotteries granted by the Legislature of Mas- 
sachusetts for the benefit of Public Works. 
1760. 

Montreal capitulated to the English Septem- 
ber, and Canada is subdued. 
1763. 

Severest drought ever known in America, no 
rain from May to September. 
17641. 

Spanish potatoes introduced into New Eng- 
land. 

1765. 

Marcli 8.— Stump act passed, which de- 
clared that no legal insti-ument of writing 
should be valid unless it bore a British stamp. 
The feelings of the people were so intense 
against this act, that in several cities mobs and 
violence ensued. The stamps were seized and 
burned, and the distributors, who were ap- 
pointed by the Crown to sell them, were in- 
sulted and despised on the street, and, when 
the law was to take effect, there were no ofh- 
cia'.s with courage enough to enforce it. 
1766. 

Marcli 18. — Stamp act repealed. In 
London this was an occasion of great rejoicing; 
and in America bonfires and illuminations at- 
tested the feelings of the masses of the peo- 
ple. 

June. — Mutiny act. British troops sent 
to America, and an act passed by Parliament 
providing for their partial subsistence on the 
colonies. The appearance of these troops in 
New York, and the order to feed and shelter 
them, occasioned violent outbreaks of the peo- 
ple in that city, and burning indignation all 
over the land. 

1767. 

June 29. — A tax imposed upon tea, glass, 
paper, painters' colors, etc., and a bill passed 
forbidding the New York Assembly to legislate 
until it should comply with the mutiny act of 
1766. The peo])le boldly resisted tliese acts of 
oppression. Circulars were issued to the As- 
semblies from Massachusetts asking their co- 
operation in obtaining a redress of grievances. 
The Governor of Massachusetts, in the King's 
name, was instructed to command the Assem- 
bly to rescind its actions, but in June, 1768, it 
unanimously voted not to rescind. 
1768. 

Jan. 90. — Petition of the ^lassachusetts 
Assembly to the King of England, against 
the late" tax on trade in the American colo- 
nies. 



St. Louis — Continued. 



EMPLOYMENT OFFICE, 

BASS, A,, Female Employment Office, BlTChest- 
nut St. 

ENGRAVERS. " 




m ALHTS "V BRANCHES.' 



418 N. 2nd St., 



-"J 
SAINT LOUIS. 



MEYER & I LUG 
St enGi I Cutters 

ENGRAVERS 

& STAMP MANUFACTURERS 
124 N .SECOND ST. 
ST. LOUIS. MO. 



CHAS. STUBENRAUCH, 

Umt EngraTer & Die Sinler, 

We make Steel Seals with Solid C'op2}er 
Coiinterdies, which will last a lifetime, the ex- 
tra charge being 25 per cent. 

Also tastefully engrave 
Dies, and Coin Medals, and Badges for So- 
cieties, Lodges and Clubs, Dating 
Stamps, Bank Stamps, 
Wax Seals, Steel Stamps, Burning Brands and 
Name Plates, in the best style and at low rates. 

213 MARKET ST., 

ST. LOUIS, MO. 



E 



FANCY GOODS AND NOTIONS, 

TANS, M. & CO., Jobbers of Hosiery, Fancy 
Goods and Notions, 917 N. Fifth st. 



H. H Hh.bS, 

Jobber in 

nxroTioisrs, 
Gents' rurnishing Goods, Etc., 

1131 NORTH FIFTH ST. 

Who esale Dealers in 

Fancy G-oods, Notions, 

619 NORTH FIFTH STREET. 



FIRE ARMS, 



FOLSOM, H. & CO.. Shot Guns, R 
munition, 620 and 622 N. Main 



Rifles and Am- 

st. 



IMPORTANT P:VENTS OF THE CENTURY. 



35 



St. Louis — Continued. 



FIRE ALARM. 

HEISLER, CHAS., Manufacturer of City Fire 
Alarms, 309 Chouteau ave. 



B 



FLOUR AND FEED, 

AUR & REGEL, Flour Merchants and Millers' 
Agents, 833 Broadway and 828 N. Fourth st. 



BERNARD «fe CO., 

(Formerly Switzer & Co.) 



AND 
COMMISSION MERCHANTS, 

211 N. Second St., St. Louis, Mo. 

URR, CHAS. P. & CO., Flour Dealers, 119 and 
131 N. Main st. 



B 



M 



ETER & STIPP, Wholesale and Retail Dealers 
in Flour and Feed, 1110 Cass ave. 



SCHWARTZ, H., Dealer in Flour and Feed, S. E. 
cor. Fourteenth st. and Cass ave. 

FLUID COOKING STOVE. 

Little Giant" 



GANAHL, F. J., Manufacturer 
Cook Stove, 209 S. Fifth st. 



FURNITURE. 

CLARKE, THOS. J., New & Second-hand Furni- 
ture, Tinware & Crockery, 1528 Franklin av. 



G 



REAVES. A., Dealer in New and Second-hand 
Furniture, Stove», etc., 806 N. Seventh st. 




SMITH'S 

IMPROVED SUSPENSION SPRINfi, 

For Sale by the Furniture trade, and by 

J. G. SMITH & Co., 821 N. 2d st., St. Louis. 

Manufacturers of all kinds of 
Mattresses, Spring Beds, Woven "Wire Mat- 
tresses and Iron Beds. 

Special attention given to furnishing Public 
Institutions. The very best inducements given 
to the Furniture trade. 

St. George's Furniture House, 

HOUSEHOLD & OFFICE FURNITURE. 

(Building known as St. George's Church), 
703. 70.5, 707 AJil) 709 LOCUST ST. 

St. Louis Furniture Repairing Co. 

J. W. PECKINttTON, PROP., 

I 17 and 119 N. Seventh St., 
Cabinet Making <0 Upholsterinf/. 

Packing and Shipping to all parts of United 
States. 



First Methodist church in America built in 
New York. 

May. — Commissioners of Customs, to col- 
lect duties, arrive in Boston. They are re- 
garded with much contempt, and it was diffi- 
cult to restrain the excitable portion of the 
population from committing personal violence. 

June. — Arrival of sloop Liberty, at Ho.s- 
ton, belonging to John Hancock (one of the 
signers of the Declaration of Independence), 
with a cargo of iladeira wine. The Commis- 
sioners demanded duties. It was refused, and 
they seized the vessel. The news spread over 
Boston, and the people resolved on resistance. 
The Commissioners w'ere assailed by a mob, 
their houses damaged; and they were obliged 
to seek safety in Castle William, a small for- 
tress about 3 miles S. E. from Boston. 

Sept. Sy. — British troops land in Bos- 
ton, 700 strong, and with drums beating and 
colors flying, they marched to the Common. 
1769. 

Jan. 2C — British Parliament passes a 
bill requiring the arrest of offenders against 
the government to be sent to England for 
trial. 

Dartmouth College, New^ Hampshire, re- 
ceived its charter. It w"as named from the Earl 
of Dartmouth, its benefactor. 

American Philosophical Society, at Philadel- 
phia, founded. 

1770. 

March 5. — Boston Massacre. A rope- 
maker quarreled with a soldier ( March 2 ^, and 
struck him. From this a fight ensued between 
several soldiers and rope-makers, in which the 
latter were beaten. A few evenings after- 
ward (ilarch 5), about 700 excited inhabitants 
assembled in the streets for the purj;ohe of at- 
tacking the soldiers. A sentinel was attacked 
near the Custom House, when Captain Preston, 
commander of the guard, went to hi.s rescue, 
with eight armed men. Irritated and assailed 
by the mob, the soldiers fired upon the ciHzens, 
killed three and dangerously woniu'.ed five. 
The mob instantly retreated, when al'i the bells 
of the city rang an alarm, and in less tLan an 
hour several thousand exasperated citizens 
were on the streets. Gov. Hutchinson assured 
the people that justice would be d.ine io the 
morning, and thus prevented further blood- 
shed. Capt. Preston and six of his men were 
tried and acquitted by a Boston jury. Two 
other soldiers were found guilty of manslaugh- 
ter, and the troops were removed to Castle 
William. 

AjJi'll 12. — All duties except on tea re- 
pealed. 

Sept. SO. — George Whitefield, founder of 
the Calviuistic Methodists, died, aged 56 
vears. 

1771. 

Regulators formed in North Carolina to re- 
sist British taxation and oppression. In 1768 
the people of North Carolina were taxed $75,- 
000 by Gov. Tryon to build him a house at 
Newbern. 

May 16. — The Regulators subdued and 
dispersed by Gov. Tryon, after hanging six of 
the leaders. 

1772. 

June 9. — Destruction of the British 
armed schooner (iaspe. This vessel was sta- 
tioned in Xarragansett Bay tc) assist the Com- 



36 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



The English Kitchen 



^ w S?S^' w 



C>l 



cd 

>^ 
as 

-^ 

"to 



CD 

Number 105 N 




Fifth Street, 



ST. LOUIS. 



JEftijnre Tonic Bitters^ 

lledicinal Blackberry Brandy, 
Etherial Arnica Zinanient, 

Flavoring Extracts & Essences, 
Mucilage, Tnhs, Wash Blue, Sec, 

DONNELL MANUFACTURING CO., 

GltOCERS .«• DBXGGISTS' 
SPECIALTIES. 



316 North Main St., St. Louis. 
AUGUST HOI^THiLUS. 

Mamifactnrer of and Dealer iu 

Saddlery, 
Harness, 
Collars, &c. 

lo4r5 Broadway, 

HT. LOUIS, >xo. 

|^=Send by mail for Price List. 




ADVERTISEMENTS. 



37 




Court House, St. T^OUis, Mo.— Is situated on the square bounded by Fourth, 
Fifth, Chestnut and Market Streets. The building was commenced in 1826 to the original 
structure additions were made in 1S39, and the building, as it now appears was not com- 
pleted until 1862. The design of the edifice, which is modeled after the form of a Greek 
cross, includes an iron dome of fine proportions from the summit of the dome to which 
ascends an iron staircase, one gains a magnificent view far up and down the river, over 
church spires, parks, gardens, &c. 



J. 



McC. THORNBURGH £ CO., 

Manufacturers, 

MANUFACTURERS' AGENTS, 



-AND DEALERS IN- 



Grocers' Sundries, 

202 & 204. N. Second St., St. Louis, Mo. 

JLvrarded First Fremi-um 



?jpp 



f . tons Mil, 1174, mm mi ISfi. 



'1 

ESTABLISHED, 1 ST^3. 



38 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OF THE CENTURY. 



missioners of Customs to enforce the revenue 
laws. The commander insisted that American 
naviojators should lower their colors when they 
passed his vessel, in token of obedience, and, 
for refusino;, a Providence schooner was chased 
until she grounded on a low sandy point; and 
on the same night 64 armed men went down 
from Providence in boats, captured the people 
on board the Gaspe and burned the vessel. 
1773. 

I>ec. 16. — Tea thrown overboard in Bos- 
ton harbor. It was a cold night and the citi- 
zens were just returning from several spirited 
meetings held at Faneuil Hall, when a party of 
about sixty persons, some disguised as In- 
dians, boarded two vessels in the harbor, tore 
open the hatches, and, in the course of two 
hours, 342 chests of tea were broken open, and 
their contents cast into the water. 

Daniel Boone settles in Kentucky. 
177A. 

The Shakers first arrived from England; 
they settled near Albany, N. Y. 

]TIa.i*cli 7. — Boston port bill passed, or- 
dering the port of Boston to be closed against 
all commercial transactions whatever, and the 
removal of the Custom House, Courts of Jus- 
tice, and other public offices to Salem. 

ITlarcSi 3S. — A bill passed Parliament 
empowering Sheriffs appointed by the Crown, 
to select juries instead of leaving the power 
with the people. It prohibited all town meet- 
ings and other gatherings. It provided for the 
appointment of the councils, judges, justices 
of the peace, etc., by the Crown or its Repre- 
sentatives. 

April. — Tea thrown overboard in New 
York Harbor. 

Sept. S. — First Continentar Congress as- 
sembled in Carpenter's Hall, Philadelphia, in 
which all the States were represented except 
Georgia. 

I>ec. So. — British tea ship forbidden to 
land at Philadelphia. The Shakers first ar- 
rived from England; they settled near Albany, 
N. Y. 

1775. 

April 19. — Battle of Lexington. Major 
Pitcairn, in command of 800 British troops, 
was sent by Gen. Gage to destroy some ammu- 
nition and stores at Concord, but when he 
reached Lexington, a few miles from Concord, 
he was met by eighty determined minute men. 
Pitcairn rode forth and shouted : ''Disperse ! 
disperse, you rebels ! Down with your arms 
and disperse !" They refused to obey, and he 
ordered his men to fire, killing eight citizens 
and wounding several. This was the first 
blood of the Revolution. The British then 
pushed on and destroyed the stores at Concord; 
but they were so harrassed and annoyed by 
the minute men on their way that by the time 
they returned back to Bunker Hill they had 
lost in killed and wounded 273 men. 

IWEay lO. — Capture of Ticonderoga. Cols. 
Ethan Allen and Benedict Arnold, with a small 
company of volunteers, surprised this fortress. 
As Allen rushed into the sally-port, a sentinel 
snapped his gun at him and fled. Making his 
way to the commanders quarters, in a voice of 
thunder ordered him to surrender. ''By whose 
authority?" exclaimed the officer. "In the 
name of the great Jehovah and the Continen- 
tal Congress !" shouted Allen. No resistance 
was attempted. Large stores o f cannon and 



St. Louis — Continued. 



GENTS' FURNISHING GOODS. 



M 



'ELRATH. A., Dealer In Gents' Furnishing 
Goods, 509 N. Sixth St. 



GLASS CUTTER, 

GZiASS CT7TT&B., 

Flat Glass for Vestibule Doors and Cars. Gas 
and Kerosene Globes. Beveling. Odd work Cut 
to Order. 

715 S. SIXTH ST., ST. LOUIS. 

GLASS SIGNS, 

Glass Signs, 

DRUGGISTS' & BARBERS' LABELS, 

315 OLIVE STREET, 



GLASS WORKS. 

T. LOUIS GLASS WORKS, J. K. Cummings, 
Prop., 2301 to 3315 Broadway. EstM, 1847. 



S 



GRAIN ELEVATORS. 

FREEMAN, E. B. & CO., Grain Elevators, 514 
Olive St. 

GROCERS, WHOLESALE. 

R. L. Blllingsley, J. H. Garth, Hannibal, Mo. 

BILLINGSLEY & CO., 



R. L. 



WHOLESALE 



C3r roc ers, 

513 & 515 NORTH SECOND ST., 
Bet. Vine S t. & Was hington Ave. bT. LOUIS. 

USCHMAN, C. L. & CO., Wholesale Grocers, 

832 Broadway. 
A VJErr. DDARD & CO., Wholesale Grocers, 

522 iuid .524 X. Second st. 



N 



O 



BEAR, W. F., Wholesale Grocers, 511 N. Sec- 
ond St. 



HIELDS, JOHN & CO., Wholesale Grocers an 

Commission Merchants, 117 N. Second st. 
PAUNHORST^A HACKMAN7^'^h7:)legale Staple 

and Fancy Groceries, 802 N. Second st. 



GROCERIES. 

LTHAGE, F. W., Dealer in Groceries and No- 
ticms, inOBiddle st. 

ECKJER, G. H., Dealer in Staple and Fancy 
Groreries and Wines, 1101 and 1103 Wash st. 

ERKLEY,' M. H^Dealer in Staple and Fancy 
Groceries, 2300 Wash st. 



A 
B 



B 



RANDES. WM., Dealer in Staple and Fancy 
Groceries, S. W. cor. Ninth and Biddle sts. 

lJESCHER,^VVMrH., Dealer in Groceries, Wines 
and Liquors. 900 O'Fallon st. ^^^ 

DEALER IN GROCERIES, 

Provisions, and Commission Merchant, 
No. 221 South Third Street. 

KAISER, J, H. &"C6., Wholesale Dealers in 
Groceries, Tobaccos, etc., 801 & 803 Wash st. 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OF THE CENTURY. 



Z9 



St. Louis — Continued. 



GEOOERIES, 

KINDEBMANN, H. H., Fancy and Staple Gro- 
ceries, 1116 Carr st, cor. Twelfth St. 



K 



OBES, FRANCIS J. & CO., Fancy GROCERIES, 
Oranges, Lemons, etc , 320 N. Second st. 



LIGHTHOLDER, JAMES, Staple and Fancy Gro- 
ceries, 61-2 N. Fourth st. Established 1866. 



M 



cCOBMICK, J. & SON, Dealers in Staple and 
and Fancy Groceries, 922 Cass ave. 



O 



TTO, GEORGE H., Dealer in Groceries, 
1701 Wash street. 

PETERS, H., Staple and Fancy Groceries, S. W. 
cor. Twenty-first and Wash sts. 
OWERS, W. M., Staple and Fancy Groceries, 

Wines and Liquors, 1027 Morgan st. 

TJIGLEY, JAS. T., Staple and Fancy Groceries, 
Wines and Liquors, 801 Morgan st. 



a- 1^ o o E Sj, 

MERCHANT, 

S. E, & S, W. Cor, Seventh and Hickory Sts., 
ST. LOUIS. 

JOHN H. SHEPHERD, 

Successor to JAMES FORTUNE, 
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 



684 BROADWAY, COR, CHRISTY AVE. 

First cor. N. of Bridge. 

TUMPF, LOUIS, Groceries, Mfr Homemade 
Preserves, S. E. cor. Eleventh and Morgan sts. 

q^HORNBURGH, J. McC. & CO., Manufacturers, 
X. Agents and Grocers, 400 & 402 N. Second st. 
URTON, W. C, GROCER and Commission 
Merchant, 605 Walnut st. 



S 



w 



ALSH BROS., Manufacturers, Agents, Gro, 
cers' Specialties, 219 N. Second st. 



w 



AELLE, C, Groceries and Prov sions, 

1228 N. Eighth street. 



^GUNS^^PISTOLS, ETC, 

ABE AUGUSTUS, Guns, Pistols, and Ammuni- 
tion, 1129 N. Fifth st. 

vj. IP. G:H]:vn:vn:Ei^, 

Manufacturer, Importer and Dealer in 

Guns, Rifles, 

PISTOLS, AMMUNITION, ETC. 

Only Manufacturer of the Hawken Mountain Eifle, 

704 N. Third Street. 

N. B.— Repairing promptly attended to with 
neatness and despatch. 

HAIR DEALERS AND DRESSERS. 

S16 H'asliington Aveiiue, 

Makes a Specialty of all kinds of Hair Jewelry. 

ORDON, MRS. BLANCHrTHXlR^^WORKER; 

and Dress Maker, m^Yz S. Fifth st. 



1775. 

ammunition were captured by the Americans, 
without the los.s of a single man. 

^lay. — First Declaration of Independence. 
The people of North Carolina assembled in 
convention at Charlotte, and by a scries of re- 
solutions absolved their allegiance from the 
British Crown, organized a local government 
and made provisions for military defense, vir- 
tually declaring themselves free and independ- 
ent. This declaration of independence was- 
made about 13 months previous to the general 
declaration made by the Continental Congress. 

June 15. — George Washington appointed 
Commander-in-Chief of the Continental army, 
and took personal command at Cambridge, 
JIass., on the 3d of July. 

•luiie 17. — Battle of Bunker Hill. Gen- 
eral Howe and Pigot, in command of 3,000 Bri- 
tish troops, assisted by a heavy fire from ships 
of war, and a battery on Copp's Hill, attacked 
the redoubt at the foot of Breed's Hill, where 
lay 1,500 Americans awaiting their approach. 
Gen. Prescott ordered his men to aim at the 
waistband of the British and to pick off their 
officers, whose fine clothes would distinguish 
them; and when the British column was within 
ten rods of the redoubt he shouted FIRE ! The 
British were repulsed and fell back in confu- 
sion, but were soon rallied for a second attack, 
and were again repulsed and scattered in all 
directions. Howe now was reinforced by Gen. 
Clinton, the fugitives rallied and they rushed 
up to the redoubt in the face of a galling fire. 
For ten minutes the battle raged fearfully, 
when the ammunition of the Americans be- 
came exhausted and the firing ceased. The 
British then scaled the bank and compelled 
the Americans to retreat, while they fought 
fearfully with clubbed muskets. The British 
took possession of Bunker Hill and fortified it, 
but withal could claim no great victory. The 
American loss from killed, wounded, and pris- 
oners was about 450 men; while the loss of the 
British from the same cause w'as about 1,100. 
This was the first real battle of the Revolution 
and lasted about two hours. 

June 17. — The first man killed at the 
battle of Bunker Hill was named Pollard, from 
Billerica. He was struck by a cannon ball 
from the battle ship Somerset. 

Sept. 35.— Colonel Ethan Allen, with 80 
men, attacked the British garrison at Montreal, 
under Gen. Prescott. Allen was defeated, and 
he was made prisoner and sent to England in 
irons. 

3fov. 13. — Montreal surrendered to the 
Americans under Gen. Montgomery. 

I>ec. S51. — Americans assault Quebec and 
are repulsed. Gen. Montgomery was killed, 
and Colonel Arnold was wounded. The com- 
mand then devolved upon Capt. Morgan, whose 
expert riflemen, with Lamb's artillery, forced 
their way into the lower town; but, after sever- 
al hours' contest, he was obliged to surrender. 

Peyton Randolph, first President of Congress, 
died, aged 52. 

The first line of post-oflfices established; Dr. 
Franklin appointed postmaster. 

Bills of credit, known as Continental money, 
issued by Congress. 

Kentucky first settled by whites, near Lexing- 
ton. 

During this year Continental money depre- 
ciated so nuich that a hundred paper dollars 
were hardly equivalent to one dollar in silver. 



40 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



66 



CURTIS $c COMPANY, 

Sawlanufactirers 



-DEALEKS IN- 

Files, ManMs, Frencli BaM Saws, k. 

SOLE MANUFACTUREES OF 

Loctafll'sPateDtSloMCircilarSaw. 

811 & 813 N. SECOND ST., 

St. Louis, Mo. 

Question of the Hour." 

How 





It has been done, and can be done again by 
luircliasing a State or County interest in this 
tiuid, in connection witli the Burners and Cook 
St ive. Tlie purchase of a Coun'y gives you the ex- 
clusive right to sell the goods. It makes a 
safe, beautiful light, requires no cliimneys and 
no wick to trim. For removing grease or paint, 
cleaning kid gloves, destroying bugs, roaches, 
&c., it is unsurpassed in the world ; it will pene- 
trate to places you cannot introduce other ma- 
terial. Address 

A. F. BEATTIE, 

Jobber of Oil, Fliiii], Summer Stoves and Lamp Goods, 

802 Washington Are., St. Louis, Mo. 

AGENTS WANTED. 



ESTABLISHED 1849. 

WM. B. HASELTINE, 



-DEALER IN- 



Hides, Leather, Tanners' Oil, 



--A-KTID 



Shoemakers' Findings^ 

71] HORTH IAIN STREET, One Blocl( atoye tlie Briip, ST. LODIS, fflO. 



THE HIGHEST MARKET PRICE PAID FOR HIDES. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



41 




City Hall, St. Louis, Mo.— Is situated on Eleventh Street, between Chestnut 
and Market Streets. The st ucture is a plain three-stcrj brick building, which is only 
calculated for a temporary quarters for the city government. At some not far future day a 
more magniiicent structure than this, no doubt, will be designed for a City Hall. 



F.O,SAraR&CO, 

WHOLESALE 




211 N, SGCOlfl SI 

Depol Of eiolie Envelope Co., 
St. Louis, Mo. 



Cash Paid for Rags. 



E. Y. YERRIER 



PROPMETOE, OF THE 

&Moi(lCitjSpi 

Manufacturer and Wholesale Dealer in 




Mistari Cream of Tartar, 

Roasted and 

Ground Coffee. 

414 North Second Street, 
St. Louis, Mo. 



42 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OF THE CENTURY. 



1775. 

About $200,000,000 of Continental currency 


St. Louis — Continued. 


was now in circulation. 

1776. 

•Fan. 1. — The Union flag^ was unfurled at 
Cambridge by Gen. Washington. This flag 
was composed of thirteen alternate red and 
white stripes, differing only from the present 
one by having on the blue corner a horizontal 
and perpendicular bar. Among the various 
flags borne by military companies was one 
from the men of Culpepper count}', Ya., bear- 
ing the significant device of a rattlesnake, and 
the injunction : Don't tread on me! It is said 
to the opposer : Don't tread on me; I have dan- 
gerous fangs ! 

British burned Norfolk. 

At that time Norfolk contained a population 
of 6,000, and the loss bv the conflagration was 
about $1,500,000. 

iVIafclt. — Silas Deane appointed to solicit 
aid for the Colonies, and succeeded in obtain- 
ing 1,500 muskets from France, and promises 
of men and money. 


HAIE DEALERS AND DEESSEES. 
importer of 

Millinery, Hmnan Hair & Fancy Notions. 

Combings or Tangled Hair Straightened, and 
made into any Style. 

616 jPKAxiii/ijr AVE., ST. rouis. 


M. PETERSON, 

Established, 1866. 

Manufactm-er and Wholesale Dealer in 

HMR AND FANCY GOODS, 

AND IMPORTER OF HUMAN HAIR, 
N. E. Cor. Fourth and Washington Avenne. 

ST. LOUIS, MO. 


]flarcS» 17. — British evacuate Boston, 
numbering 7,000 soldiers, 4,000 seamen, and 
1,500 families of loj'alists. Sailed for Halifax 
that day. 

June 18. — Evacuation of Canada by the 
Americans. 

JTiiue 28. — Fort Sullivan, at Charleston 
Harbor, attacked by land water, by the British, 
and, after a contest lasting ten hours, the Bri- 
tish were repulsed, with a loss of 225 killed 
and wounded, while the garrison suffered a 
loss of only 2 killed and 22 wounded. 

July i. — Congress declared the thirteen 
United States free and independent. [Follow- 
ing this declaration, the statue of George III., 
in New York, was taken down, and the kad, of 
which it was composed, was converted into 
musket balls.] 

July 8. — Declaration of Independence 
read to the people by John Nixon, from the 
Observatory State House yard, Philadelphia. 


HAME MANUFAOTUEEES. 

TT7HERRY, JOHN & CO., St. Louis Hame Co., 
TT Mfg'e Hames, etc., Eighth & Howard sts. 

HAEDWAEE, 

T INCK & HESS, Hardware and Hoop Iron, 2123 
Xj Carondelet ave. 

HAENESS AND SADDLES. 

MANUFACTURER AND BEALER IN 

SADDLES, HARNESS, 

COLLARS, BRIDLES, ETC., 

1001 X. Fifth St., St. lionis. 

All orders promptly attended to. Repairing done 
at short notice. 


Aug^. 37. — Battle of Long Island, in 
which 5,000 Americans were defeated by 10,- 
000 British, under command of Cornwallis, 
Gowanus and Clinton. About 500 Americans 
were killed and wounded, and 1,100 made pris- 
oners. The British loss in killed, wounded and 
prisoners, was 367. 

Aug'. 39. — Washington, under cover of a 
heavy fog, silently retreated from Long Island 
to New York. [During the night a woman liv- 
ing near the present Fulton Ferry, where the 
Americans embarked, sent her negro servant 
to inform the British of the movement. The 


TTESSE, L., Manufacturer of Harness and Col- 
JCl )ars, 1411 Cass ave. 


TTOLTHAUS, A., Harness, Saddles, Collars, etc., 
±1 1545 Broadway. 

QUMMERHAUSER, CHAS., Harness Maker and 
lO Shoe Repairing, 304 Walnut st. 

It. H. TOENISKOETTEU, 

Mfr, and Dealer in. 

Saddles, Harness, Whips, Trunks, Etc, Etc. 

3813 &3815 Broadway, Cor, Bremen Ave. 


negro fell into the hands of the Hessians. 
They could not understand a word of his lan- 
guage, and detained him until so late in the 
morning that his information was of no avail.] 

i^ept. 1. — Captain Nathan Hale, of Con- 
necticut, was captured and executed as a sp}' 
by order of Sir William Howe. 

Sept. 15. — New York City evacuated by 
the Americans, and taken possession of by the 
British. 

Sept. 31. — A fire broke out in a small 
groggery near the foot of Broad street, N. V., 
and about 500 buildings were destroyed. The 
British charged the fire upon the Americans, 
but it was proven to be purely accidental. 

Oct. 11-13.— Battle on Lake Champlain. 
Retreat of Washington over the Hudson and 
across the Jerseys to Pennsylvania. 

Oct. 38. — A severe engagement was 


HATS, CAPS, ETC, WHOLESALE. 

WMEIMB i BllMMMB, 

Wholesale Dealers in 

Hats, Caps, Straw Goods, 

LADIES' TRIMMED HATS, GLOVES, ETC., 

606 Washington Ave., 

Op. Linden Hotel. 


HATS AND CAPS. 

T7ALK, JOSEPH, Hatter, 

JD 318 Market street. 
f\ OETTLER, M., Hats, Caps and Furs, 1260 S. 
Vjr Fifth St. Established 1853. 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OF THE CENTURY. 



43 



St. Louis — Continued. 



HATS AKD CAPS. 

KLEV0R5, H., Dealer In Hats, Caps, Furs and 
Straw Goods, 1533 Franklin ave. 

S. F. SILENCE, 

Wholesale and Retail Manufacturer of 

Mi Silk, Soft, Stiff& Cassiraere 

TT ,/V •X" ]S 

At$0 KNtOHT'S TEMPUAR OaAPEAVX, 

Hats retailed at wholesale prices. Old hats reno- 
vated. 
7i4 Ziociist St., ST. LOUIS. 



M 



HOMEOPATHIC PHAEMACT, 

UNSON & CO.'S Western Homoeopathic Phar- 
macy, 411 Locust St. 



HORSE-HOOF PAEING MACHINE, 

SCHAEFER, GEO. W., Horse-Hoof Paring Ma- 
chine, 616 N. Sixth St. 

HOESE-SHOEES, 

BLTHOLDER, J. B., Horse-shoer and Farrier, 
2717 Fi-anklin ave. 

cCOY, HUGH, Practical Horse-shoer, ai4 S. 
Third st. 



M 



LORENZEN, C. H., Practical Horse-shoer, 
1418 Cass avenue. 



O 



'NEILL, P. H., Horse-shoer, 



1007 BroadwaJ^ 



SCHAEFER, GEO. W., Horse-shoeing and Manu- 
facturer, fil6 N. Sixth St. 



HOTELS. 



Allefmania House, 



614 MARKET STREET, ST, LOUIS. 

Between Sixth and Seventh Sts. 



Best Accommodations for Travelers and Boarders. 



B 



ARJfUM'S HOTEL, cor. Walnut and Second 
street. L. A. Pratt, Prop. 



Broadway Hotel 



ST. LOUIS, MO. 

EVERETT HOUSE, 
Fourth St., bet. Locust and Olive. 

URST'S European Hotel and Restaurant, 
Fourth and Locust sts. 

LACLEDE HOTEL, 
Chestnut St., bet. Fifth and Sixth sts. 

LINDELL HOTEL, 
Washington ave ., cor. Sixth st. 

ONROE HOUSE, 600 & 603 Market st. Rooms 
50 cents and upwards. W. C.Hall, Prop. 



H 



M 



PLANTERS' HOTEL, 
Fourth St., bet. Pine and Chestnut sts. 

T. CLAIR HOTEL, cor. Third and Market sts. 

W. R. Nevin & Co. 



S 



177«. 

fouo^ht at White Plain.s, at which the Ameri- 
cans were driven from their position. Losses 
about equal — not more than 300 in killed, 
wounded and prisoners. 

j^ov. 3«.— The British, 5,000 strong, cap- 
ture Fort Washington, located between 181st 
and 186th streets, N. Y. In this engagement, 
the British lost more than 1,000 men, while the 
American loss in killed and wounded did not 
exceed 100. More than 2,000 Americans were 
made prisoners of war. [Nothing could ex- 
ceed the horrors of those made prisoners. The 
sugar-houses of New York, being large, were 
used for the prisons, and therein scores suf- 
fered and died. But the most terrible scenes 
occurred on board several old hulks, which 
were anchored in the waters around New York, 
and used for prisoners. Of them, the Jersey 
was the most famous for the sufferings it con- 
tained, and brutality of its officers. From 
these vessels, anchored near the present Navy 
Yard at Brooklyn, almost 11,000 victims were 
carried ashore, during the war, and buried in 
shallow graves in the sand. Their remains 
were gathered in 1808, and put in a vault sit- 
uated near the termination of Front street, 
at Hudson avenue, Brooklyn.] 

I>ec'. 8. — The British squadron, defeated 
at Fort Sullivan, sailed into Narragansett Baj', 
and took possession of Ehode Island. 

l>ec. 13. — Congress, alarmed at the ap- 
proach of the British to Philadelphia, ad- 
journed to meet in Baltimore on the 20th inst. 

l>ec. 14:. — Gen. Lee, while quartered in a 
small tavern at Baskingridge, New Jersey, re- 
mote from his troops, was surrounded and 
taken prisoner by English cavalry. 

l>ec. 35. — Washington crosses the Dela- 
ware. 

l>ec. 36.— Battle of Trenton. Rahl, the 
Hessian commander, was engaged at card- 
playing and wine-drinking, when a negro gave 
him a note from a Tory, warning him of the 
approach of the Americans. Being deeply in- 
terested in the game, and excited by wine, he 
thrust the note unopened into his pocket. By 
neglecting to read this note, he was taken 
completely by surprise, and a little after sun- 
rise, and while rallying his troops in the streets 
of Trenton, he fell mortally wounded. Be- 
twetween 40 and 50 of the Hessians were 
killed and mortally wounded, and more than 
1,000, with arms, ammunition and stores, were 
made prisoners. 

1777. 

Ja.li. Jt. — Battle of Princeton. Washing- 
ton attacks the reserves of Cornwallis in sight 
of Princeton, and just as the tide of battle 
was going in his favor, Cornwallis was aroused 
by the distant booming of cannon, and has- 
tened to the assistance of his reserves. The 
Americans, who had not slept, nor scarcely 
tasted food, for thirty-six hours, were com- 
pelled, as the heat of the first battle was over, 
to contest with fresh troops or fly. Washing- 
ton choose to fly, and when Cornwallis entered 
Princeton, not a '' rebel " was found. 

Jan. 7. — Americans attacked a party of 
Hessians, near Eli/.abethport, New Jersey, and 
killed between forty and fifty, and drove the 
remainder back to Staten Island. 

^larcli. 1. — British were driven entirely 
out of the State of New Jersey, except New 
Brunswick and Amboy. 

March 33. — British make a descent to 
destroy American stores at Peekskill, N. Y., 



44 



ADVERTISEMFNTS. 



<Ohj.s» WmwrnrnmAwmwisi^^m ^AEtO©H« 




OQ 



Cor, Third & Jlarkef Sfs,. ST. LO UIS, 3IO. 

MATSON'S^ 

RESTAURANT, 

No. 504 N. eth Street, 



Miuloi Avni mil SI. GMmi Ml 

ST. LOUIS, MO. 



All the delicacies of the season. Commutation Tickets issued. 

C. CLAES & CO., laiiiifacturers of Show Cases anl Store Fixtures. 




'■"''iJ, April i'ru7]7rT 

204 Market Street, St. Louis, Mo. 



AD V KKTISEMEiSITS. 



45 




UXION .MAKKEl', ST. L(JLiS, MO, 



ESTABLISHED 186}i. 




716 5f. Fifth St., St. liouis, Mo. 

OPEN DAT AND NIGHT. 



331 Olive St., St. liOnis, Mo. 

OPEN DAT AND NIGHT. 



46 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OF THE CENTURY. 



1777. 

but the Americans perceiving that defense 
would be futik', set fire to the stores and re- 
tired to the hills in the rear, while the British 
returned to New York the same evening:. 

April 86. — Danburj, Conn., was burned 
by order of Governor Tryon, destroyino: a 
large quantity of stores belonging to Ameri- 
cans, and cruelly treating the inhabitants. 

]flay S3. — Col. !Meigs attacked a British 
provision post at Sag Harbor, Long Island, 
and burned a dozen vessels, the store houses 
and contents, and secured ninety prisoners 
"without losing a man. 

JTiiiie. — Congress resolved that the flag 
should carry as many stars and stripes as 
there were States. This resulted at last in a 
cumbrous flag with twenty stars and twenty 
stripes. 

June 1-4. — Adoption of the American flag 
by Congress. 

June SSO. — British evacuate S^ew Jersey. 

July 5. — Burgoyne, with an armv 10,000 
strong, invested Fort Ticonderoga. I'he fort 
was garrisoned by about three thousand Amer- 
icans under Gen. St. Clair. Owing to the im- 
mense advantage gained by the British, in 
planting a cannon on Mount Defiance, a hill 
750 feet in height, the Americans were de- 
feated and dispersed with a loss of a little over 
300 in killed, wounded and missing; the Brit- 
ish loss was reported at 183. 

July 37. — Murder of Miss McCrea. 

JitlV lO. — Col. \Villiam Barton, with a 
company of picked men, crossed Narragansett 
Bay in whale boats, in the midst of the Eng- 
lish fleet, and captured Gen. Prescott, while in 
bed, and carried him to Providence. 

July J81. — Lafayette commissioned by 
Congress JIajor-General. 

Aug', it. — Lafayette introduced to Wash- 
ington at a ])ublic dinner. 

Aug'. l<i. — A party of marauders from 
Burgoync's ami}' were defeated at Pennington 
by the New Hampshire malitia under com- 
mand of Col. Stark. On the same evening, 
another party from Burgoyne's army were de- 
feated by a Continental force, under Col. Seth 
^Varner. The British lost by these expedi- 
tions almost 1,000 men, while the Americans 
lost but 100 men and as many wounded. 

Sept. H. — Battle of Brandywine. Gen. 
Howe, in command of 16,000 British troops, 
manoeuvres to take Philadelphia. Washing- 
ton, with an army of 11,000, determines to de- 
fend the city, and takes a position at Chad's 
Ford, on the Brandywine. A portion of the 
British army succeed in getting in his rear, 
and he is compelled to retreat to Chester, and 
on September 12th to Philadelphia. American 
loss in killed, wounded, and prisoners, 1,200; 
British loss, near 800. During the enga^- 
ment, Lafayette was wounded in the leg. He 
was conveyed to Bethlehem, Pa., where the 
Moravian Bisters nursed him during his con- 
finement. 

Sept. lO. — A severe but indecisive en- 
gagement was fought at Bemis' Heights, be- 
tween the forces under General Burgoyne and 
General Gates. The number of Americans en- 
gaged in this battle was about 2,500 ; that of 
the British about 3,000. American loss in 
killed, wounded and missing, 319 ; British loss, 
about 500. [Bemis' Heights is about 4 miles 
north of the valley of Still Water, and 25 
miles north of Albany. 

Sept. 2*. — General Wayne was surprised 



St. Loris — Continued. 



HOTELS. 



T. fflAEES ITEL 



I :o:| 



S. E. Cor. Seyeiitli anil Morpn Sts., 

ST. XjOTJIS, imio. 



(Board per- day ^ - - $1.30 
(Board per iveek, - $4 to $6 

T. B. RAYMOND, Proprietor. 

ST. NICHOLAS HOTEL, 
817 to 8'J3 N. Fourth street. 

ICE CHESTS, 

wmMimiTimm, 

Manufacturers of the 
—AND FAMILY— 

store and Bar-room Fixtures, Counters etc., 
15-J8 & 1530 BROADWAJT. 

^^^NSURANCE AGENTS, 

I>AKER, JAMES E., Universal Life Ins. Co., of 
) N. Y., McLean's Block, Fourth & Market sts. 

it03 X. Secoiifl St., St. JCottis. 

All loses adjusted and paid by the Agent at St. Louis. 



G 



IRON DEALERS, 

ARRETT, Mcdowell & CO., PIs: iron, 

602 N. Fourth street. 



JAPANNER. 

CHAS. D^'^mTtH,JR., 

PLAIN AND ORNAMENTAL 

Japaier 01 Ti, Wood, anfl Iroi 

Sewing Machines, and all Kinds of Japanned Ware. 

Tin for Signs a Specialty. 
215!/2 CHESTNUT STREET, 2iid Floor. 

LAUNDRIES, 
Established 1876. 



SiFfflif ®iFi f uraiip, 



K^^CTHDMY, 



MB MQrggn ^tUitf ii. l§USj Mq, 



IMPORTANT EVEJSITS OF THE CENTURY. 



47 



St- Louis — Contintied. 



LAUNDRIES, 

I'^MMEEICH, CHAS. B., Domestic Steam Laun- 
A dry, 25 S. Sixth st. 

UNION STEAM LAUNDRY, 818 Morgan street. 
W. M. Bblseb, Prop. 

LADIES' DRESS TRIMMINGS, 

SCHACHT & BRO., Manufacturers, and Dealers 
in Ladies Dress Trimmings, 326 Market St. 



LEATHER AND FINDINGS- 

WMrBTHA^ELTriSrE, 

717 K. MAIN ST., ST. LOUIS, 
Dealer in Hides, Leather, Tanner's Oil, Shoe 
makers' Findings, etc. The highest market price 
paid for Hides. Established 1849. 

Importer and Dealer in LEATHER and FIND- 
INGS, BOOT, SHOE, and GAITER UPPERS, 
1619 Carondelet Ave. 

LIVERY STABLES, 

GRAY, C. W., Livery Stable, 
613 and 615 Christy avenue. 
ELSEY, L. E., Liverv and Sale Stables, 914 & 
916 Pine st. H. W. Hanley, Manager. 

LOOKING-GLASSES AND PICTURE-FRAMES. 

BEY & KAHN, Looking-glasses, Mouldings, 
Window-glass, etc., llO N. Second st. 



D 



M 
E 



ONDS, W., Looking-glasses and Picture- 
frames, 11 N. Seventh st. 

YTHLIC'KI, A., Importer and Dealer in Look- 
ing-glasses, etc., 911 N. Fourih st. 



STANBERY, IRA Jr., General Agent National 
Art and Chromo Co.. 807 Washington ave. 

LUMBER DEALERS, 
Pine, Poplar, Walnut, Oak and Ash 

Lumber, Shingles, Lath, 

FLOORING, SIDING, SASH, DOORS, &C., 
Office and Yard, 1320 Jackson Street, 

Branch Yards, 2007 Carondelet Avenue, 

MACHINISTS, 

Central Iron Works, 

GEO. J. FRITZ, 

Uanufacturers of Steam Enginss, Doctors, 

And Machinery in General. 

Special attention given to Repairing. Send for 

Catalogue and Price List. 
2026&2028 S. THIRD, Cor. JACKSON ST. 

John T. Demoss, Pres't. W. L. C. Brey, Sec'y. ■ 

A. K. HALTE3IAN & CO., 

Manufacturers of 

Steam Engines k MiH Supplies, 

Wood Work for Flouring Mills, 

IRON WORK IN GENERAL, 

1610 & 1611 S. 3d St., aud 510 k 512 Cairoll St. 

4 



1777. 

by a party of British and Hessians under Gen- 
eral Gray, near Paoli Tavern, Chester county, 
Pa., and lost 300 men of his party. The bodies 
of 53 Americans, found on the field next 
morning, were interred in one broad grave, 
and 40 years afterwards, the Republican Ar- 
tillerist, of Chester county, erected a neat 
marble monument over them. 

Sept. 36. — The British, under Hovre, 
march to Philadelphia without opposition. 

Sept. 37. — Congress fled from Philadel- 
phia to Lancaster, Pa. 

Sept. SO. — Congress assembled in York, 
Pa., and continued in session there until the 
following summer. 

Oct. 4. — Battle of Germantown. Wash- 
ingtown attacked the British at Germantown, 
and caused the enemy to make a hasty retreat. 
Lieut. Col. Musgrave, in the retreat, in order 
to avoid the bayonets of his pursuers, took 
refuge in a stone house. This, together with 
a heavy fog, occasioned many mistakes among 
the Americans ; and after a severe action, they 
were obliged to retreat with the loss of about 
1,000 men in killed and wounded ; while the 
British loss was about 800 killed and wounded. 

Oct. 7. — Battle of Saratoga. Another 
battle was fought between Burgoyne and 
Gates on the same ground occupied September 
19th, and, after a severe struggle, Burgoyne 
was compelled to foil back to the heights of 
Saratoga, leaving the Americans in possession 
of the field. 

Oct. 13. — Kingston, N. Y., burned. Gen- 
eral Clinton, who was to reinforce Burgoyne at 
Saratoga, sends marauding parties through 
the country, and burns Kingston. Being in- 
formed of Burgoyne's surrender, he retreats to 
New York. — [While the American forces were 
re-gathering, a man from the British army 
was arrested on suspicion of being a spy. He 
was |seen to swallow something. An emetic 
brought it up, and it was discovered to be a 
hollow silver bullet, containing a dispatcli 
from Clinton to Burgoyne written on thin 
paper. That bullet is yet in the family of 
George Clinton, who was the first Republican 
Governor of New York.] 

Oct. 17. — Burgoyne surrenders his whole 
army, numbering 5,791, to Gen. Gates, at Sar- 
atoga, N. Y. 

Oct. 23. — Fort Mercer, on the Delaware 
river, was attacked by 2,000 Hessian grena- 
diers, under Count Donop, and were repulsed 
by a garrison of 500 men, under Lieut. Col. 
Green. Hessians' loss, 400. Donop was terri- 
bly wounded, and was taken to the house of a 
Quaker near by, where he died. He was 
buried beneath the fort. [A few years ago his 
bones were disinterred and his skull was taken 
possession of by a New Jersey physician.] 

]\ov. 9. — Howe's army goes into winter 
quarters at Philadelphia. 

I\ov. 16. — American garrison abandon 
Fort Mifflin, and two days after, British ships 
sail up to Philadelphia. 

Dec. A. — Gen. Howe marched out to at- 
tack W^ashington, expecting to take him by 
surprise, but a Quaker lady of Philadelphia, 
who had overheard British officers talking 
about this enterprise at her house, gave Wash- 
ington timely information, and he was too well 
prepared for Howe to fear his menauces. Af- 
ter some skirmishes, in which several Ameri- 
cans were lost, Howe returned to Philadelphia. 

Dec. 11. — Washington goes into winter 



48 



ADVEETISEMENTSi 



St. Louis — Continued. 



MACHINISTS. 

G1 ARSTAXG, R., Manufacturer of Steam Boilers, 
)r 1245 to 1255 S. Second st. 

MACHINEEY AND MILL SUPPLIES, 

CORBY, F. P. & CO., Railway Equipments and 
Machinery Supplies, 709 N. Second st.- 



M 



MANTJFACTUKERS' AGENT S.^^^^^ 

ORE & CO., Asents and Jobbers in Nails, 
Virginia Tobacco, 415 and 417 N. Second st. 



MAEBLEIZEK, 

KEADER, C. H., Marbleizer and Enameller of 
Grates. 817 Pine st. 



MARBLE WORKS, 



GEO. NORDMAN, 

—Manufacturer of and Dealer in— 

Italian and American MARBLE, 

Monuments, Gravestones, Tablets, Ac, 

S23 N. MARKET ST., ST. LOUIS, 3IO. 

OSEBROUGH, R. L. SONS, Marble Works, 1421 
Broadway. 



R 



MARBLE Vv^ORKS, 

Monuments, Mantles and Grates, 

Manufacturers of every description of 

SLAB WORK, TILING. ETC., 

1119 OLIVE STREET, 

ST. LOUIS, MO. 

MATTRESS MANUFACTURERS, 

KAISER & MUELLER, ^lanufacturers of Mat- 
tresses and Bedding, 114 Market st. 



B 



MEAT MARKETS, 

USCHMANN, H., Dealer in Fresh and Salt Meat, 
2736 Franklin ave. 



D 



RAUUE. CHAS.. Dealer in all kinds of Meat 

and Vetretables, 3119 Easton ave. 

ifZPATIilCK. MICHAEL, Daily Meat Market, 

14)6 N\_Ei-lith st^ 

TTURGENTJOHN, Meat Market, 



613 Walnut St. 



M 

S 



OERSCHEL & OELLERMANN, Fresh and Salt 

Meats, 117 N. Se venth st. 

CHAEFFER7J7rT>ailv Meat Market, 600 Wash 
St. Established, 1877. 



I MITH, A. G., Meat Market, 



823 Walnut st. 



ZEIGLER, A., Meat and Vegetable Market, 814 
N. Eighth St. 

MILL PICKS. ^ 

James J. McCabe, 

Manufacturer and Dreiser of 
819 SOUTH THIRD ST., 

Cor. Lombard, ST . LO U 1 S. 



St. Louis — Cotitinued. 



MILLINERY, "WHOLESALE. 

WEISELS, J. & CO., Wholesale Millinery, 704 
N. Fifth St. 

MILLINERY AND DRESSMAKING. 

CLARK, MRS., Fashionable Millinery, 
1917 Broadwa y. 

LEWANDOVSKA'S, MME., Millinery and Dress- 
making Emporium, 323 N. Fifth st. 

MRS. A. Mcdonald, 

FasMoiiaMe Dress i\i Cloak Ming, 

929 NORTH FIFTH ST., 
ST. LOUIS. 



MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS. 

LEBRUN, N., Manufacturer and Dealer in Mu- 
sical Instruments, 907 S. Fifth st. 



NEWSPAPERS, 

OT. LOUIS DAILY AND WEEKLY JOURNAL, 

O Wolcott & Home Co., pu^'s.. Ill N. Fifth st. 

NEWSDEALERS AND BOOKSELLERS. 

IXON, W. T., Book, Nevirs and Stationery 
Dealer, cor. Ninth st. and Washington ave. 



N 



R 



EGAN, STEPHEN, Nevsrs-stand, Cigars and To- 
bacco, c, HI. and St. Louis Bridge (west end). 



JOHN A. STICKFORT & CO., 

Wholesale and Retail 

Newsdealers and Booksellers, 

yO NORTH FOURTH ST., 

0pp. the Courthouse, ST. LOUIS, MO. 

Orders from the country promptly attended to. 

NON-EXPLOSIVE FLUID. 

BEATTIE, A. F., prop. Beattie's Non-Explosive 
(Crescent Fluid, 802 Washington ave. 



OILS. 
TITAXWELL, E, & CO., Oils, 



719 N. Main st. 



PAINTERS, 

HUGO BARTELS, 

FRESCO, HOUSE AND SIGN 

PAIITTEB., 

SIGNS OF EVERY UFSCRII^TION. 

313 MARKET ST. 



E 



VANS, J. W., House and Sign Painter, 1811 N. 

Ninth ft. 



HERTWIG. G.. Carriage and Wagon Painter, 
2431 Franklin ave. 



H 



UNN, .JOHN, House and bign Painter, 519 St. 
Charles st. 



M 



'GINNESS & RUDOLPH, House, Sign and Or- 
namental Painter, 214 N. Seventh st. 



PHILLIPPS & PRASSE, Carriage Painters, 2204 
Broadway. 



ai)vi;i;tisi-3ii:xts. 



49 




CRESCENT flllTY rt03IMERCIAL ftOLLEGE, 

OR. MAO Ui& FIRST, UEYANSYILLE, yOD. 

Life ScholarsMii $30. P. S.-Seni 25cts. M stainD for Jrst lessons in sliort lianJ. 



50 



IMFoRTxVNT EVENTS OF THE CENTURY, 



1777. 

quarters at Valley Forge. This was a gloomy 
winter for the "Patriot arniv. Continental 
money was so depreciated in value that an of- 
ficer's pay would not keep him "in clothes. 
The men were camped in cold comfortless 
huts, with little food or clothing. Barefooted, 
they left on the frozen ground their tracks in 
blood. Few had blankets, and straw could not 
be obtained. Soldiers, weak from hunger and 
benumbed by cold, slept on the bare earth, 
with no change of clothing and no suitable 
food ; sickness soon followed, and with no medi- 
cine to adniiaister to their comi)laints, many 
found relief from their sufferings in death. 

I>oe. 16. — Independence of the United 
States acknowledged by France. 

I>ec. 18. — Constitution of North Carolina 
adopted. 

During this year Vermont was claimed by 
both New Yorkand New Hampshire, as a part 
of their territory, but the people met in con- 
vention and proclaimed themselves free, inde- 
pendent, and separate States. After purchas- 
ing the claims of New York, for $30,000, Ver- 
mont was admitted into the Union, February 
18, 1791. 

1778. 
Fe1>. 6. — Treaty of alliance was formed 
with France, by which the French and Ameri- 
cans became united against the British Gov- 
ernment. 

Marcli aO.— American Commissioners 
were received at the Court of France as the 
representatives of a sister nation; an event 
which was considered in Europe, at that time, 
as the most important which had occurred in 
the annals of America since its first discovery 
by Columbus. 

May 7.— Salutes were fired by the army 
at Valley Forge, in honor of the event of the 
treaty of alliance with France, and, by order of 
Washington, shouts and huzzas were pro- 
claimed'for the King of France. 

Jiiaae Is. — Howe's army evacuate Phila- 
delphia, and retreat towards"New York. 

June as.— The battle of Monmouth was 
fought on a Sabbath day. It was one of the 
most sultry ever known when the two armies 
met in conflict, which raged from 9 A. M. until 
dark. Many Soldiers on both sides fell from 
the excessive heat of the day, and when night 
came they were glad to rest. The British were 
commanded by Gen. Clintonand the Americans 
by Washington. The Americans intended to 
renew the fight on the morning of the 29th. 
but found the enemy's camp deserted. The 
British left about 300" killed on the field of bat- 
tle, and a large number of sick and wounded. 
American loss in killed, wounded, and missing, 
228. Many of the missing returned to the 
army, and the killed was less than 70. 

•iiilr 5. — Massacre of Wyoming. About 
l,tj00 Indians and Tories, under command of 
Butler and Brant, appeared on the banks of the 
Susquehanna, and compelled two of the forts 
nearest to the frontier to surrender to them. 
The savages spared the women and childi'en, 
but butchered the rest of their prisoners with- 
out exception. They then surrounded Fort 
Kino-ston, and to dismay the garrison, hurled 
into'^the place 200 scalps still reeking with 
blood. The garrison was overpowered by the 
savages, and compelled to surrender. The 
prisoners, composed of men, women, and chil- 
dren were then enclosed in ho\ises and bar- 
racks, which were set on fire, and the miserable 



St. Louis - Contmtied. 



w 



PAINTERS. 

ILSOJf, L. R., House and Sign Painter, 1015 
Locust St. 



PAINTS AND OILS. 

BARSTOW & WHITELAW, Oils, Paints, Naval 
Stores, Heavy Drugs, etc., 617 N. Second St. 



B 



OrCHER, LEO>' &. CO., Paints, Oils, Varnishes, 

etc., 704 and 706 N . Second st. 



PARTRIDGE. GEO. & CO., Railway, Machinery, 
Burning Oils and Paints, 712 N. Main st. 

PAPER COLLAR CO. 

MERCHANTS' PAPER COLLAR COMPANY, 
Isaac Swope, prop., 121 N. Main st. 

PAPER DEALERS. 

RAHAM, H. B. & BRO., St. Louis Paper Ware- 

house, 113 N. Second st. 

AWYER, F. 0. & CO., Wholesale Paper Dealers 
209 and 211 N. Second st. 



S 



PAPER-HANGERS. 

J. J. RYAN &^^RO., 

Plain and Decoratiye Paper-liangers, 

And Dealers in 
Paper-Hangings and Windoiv Shades, 

1111 ]VJOI«GA>^ ST., 

ST. LOUIS, MO, 



PATENT SOLICITORS 
T3RYAN, J. E., Patent Agency, 



602 N. Fourth st. 



KNIGHT BROS., Patent Solicitors, 
317 Olive St. 



PATTERN AND MODEL MAKERS. 



K 



UPSCH, A,, Pattern and Model Maker, Illinois 

St Louis Bridge (west approach). 



LORD, SIMEON. Pattern and Model Maker, 821 
N. Second st. 

E. SPANGENBERG & COS 

Machine, Pattern and Model Shon, 

And Manufacturers of Patented Articles, 
ILLINOIS it- ST. LOUIS BRIDGE BLD'G, 

TRAWBRIDGE, D., Pattern and Model Maker, 
Illinois and St. Louis Bridge, west end. 

PATENT INVALID BEDSTEAD. 

NIDELET, S. L. & J. C. & CO., Invalid Bed- 
stead, 927 N. Fifth st. 

PHOTOGRAPHERS. 

I^hFTnenue^gaiZery^ 

N. W. cor. Seventlr and Franklin Ave. 

ALL STYLES OE PICTURES TAKEN IN 

CLOUDT OR CLEAR WEATHER. 

Promenade Pictures a Specialty. Copying and 

Enlarging to any size and tinished in Crayon, 

India Ink. Oil or Water Colors. Pictures 

of Deceased Persons taken. 

Negatives preserved. J. A. SEIBEBT. 



IMPORTANT Events of the century. 



51 



St. Louis — Continued. 



PHOTOGRAPHERS. 

BEiraCKE, ROB., Photographer, S. 
Fourth and Market sts. 



E. corner 



B 



OEHL * KOENIG, Photograph and Art Gallery, 

■07 N. Fourth st. 



CRAMER, (JROSS & CO., Photographers and Art 
Gallery, 1001 S. Fifth st. 

PHYSICIANS. 

B AXEMAN, THOMAS, Physician and Surgeon. 
Chronic Diseases a Specialty. 621 N. 5th st. 
OU«EAY, C. I., Homoeopathic Physician, 410 

Washington ave. 
AUGHN, DR. R. A., Office, 53.3 Chestnut st. 
Hours, 8 to 11 A.M., 2 to 4 P. M, 7 to 9 P.M. 

PIANOS AND ORGANS. 

HOLTZ, C, Pianos, Organs bought, sold or ex- 
changed, 1513 Franklin ave. 

PLUMBERS AND GAS FITTERS, 

PLUMBER & GAS FITTER 

Manufacturer of Gallagher's Patent 

Hydrant & Three-Way Fire Plug, 

1133 N. FIFTH ST., ST. LOUIS. 

CHIES, J., Plumber and Gas Fitter, 2001 Frank- 
lin ave. 

POWDER. 

LAFLIN& RANDTOWDER CO., Mnfrs. Sporting, 
Mining and Blasting Powder, 218 N. 2d st. 

' PRINTERS, 

THE HOBART MNFG. A PRINTING CO., Alex. J. 
Brand, Jr., General Agent, 615 Chestnut st. 

PRODUCE AND FRUITS. 

HORSTMAN & CALDWELL, Dealers in all kinds 
of Produce and Fruiis, 811 Broadway, 

PROPRIETARY MEDICINES. 

THE DR. HARTER MEDICINE CO., Proprietary 
Medicines, 213 N. Main st. 

PUMP MANUFACTURERS. 

RUMSEY, L. M. & CO., Pump Manufacturers, 811 
N. Main st. 

RAILROAD TICKETS, 

MANTZ & CO., Railroad Tickets bought and 
sold, 508 Chestnut st. 

REAL ESTATE AGENTS. 

HonsGjReil Estate &FinaiiCialA£eflts, 

COLLECTORS OF RENT, &c., 

215 N. Eighth St^ St. Louis, Mo. 

Particular attention paid to Collecting Retits and 
Negoiialing Loans on Real Estate security. 



N 



OHL, F., Real Estate and Notary Public, 503 
Market St. 



1778. 

wretches were soon consumed by the flames. 
The whole Wyoming valley, consisting of eight 
towns on the Susquehanna, suffered the same 
destruction of life and propei'ty, and none es- 
caped but a few women and children, and these 
dispersed and wandered about through the for- 
ests without food and without clothes until 
starved to death. 

•Filly 8. — Count D'Estaing, of the French 
navy, arrives in the Delaware with a large 
fleet, causing Howe to retreat with his vessels 
to the watei s of Aniboy or Raritan bay. 

Aug. 'i'i, — Count D'Estaing sailed out of 
Newport harbor, Rhode Island, to engage the 
British fleet in command of Howe, but a ter- 
rible storm arose and disabled both fleets, and 
the French squadron returned to Newport and 
sailed to Boston for repairs. [Very old people 
of Rhode [Island used to speak of this gale as 
the great storm. So violent was the wind that 
it brought spray from the oeean a mile distant, 
and incrusted Ihe windows of the town with 
salt.] 

Aug. 39.— Battle of Quaker Hill, Rhode 
Island, in which the Americans lost 30 killed 
and 172 wounded and missing. British loss 
about 220. 

^cpt. 83. — Paul Jones' naval battle. The 
engagement lasted from seven in the morning 
until ten at night. The contest was fierce and 
desperate. Paul Jones, in command of the 
American flotilla, finding the enemy's guns 
longer than his, brought his ships so close, un- 
til the muzzles of his guns came in contact 
with those of the enemy. The mag'azine of the 
British ship Serapisblew up, set tire to the ves- 
sel and communicated the flames to Jones' ves- 
sel. In the midst of this the American frigate 
Alliance came up, and mistaking her partner, 
fired a broadside into the vessel of Jones: but 
soon discovered her mistake and turned her 
guns upon the enemy. The British crew were 
aU killed or wounded, the Serapis on fire, (tut 
tie flames were afterward subdued) and the 
f.-igate Countess of Scarborough captured by 
the Americans. Paul Jones came otf victori- 
ous. His vessel ( the Goodman Richard) was 
so badly crippled that it soon sunk; and of the 
crew of 365, only 68 were left alive. Jones, af- 
ter this victory, wandered with his unmanage- 
able vessel for some time, and at length, on 
the 6th of October found his way into the wa- 
ters of the Texel. 

3fov. 11. — Cherry Valley, New York, at- 
tacked by Indians and Tories. Many of the 
people were killed and carried into captivity, 
and for an area of a hundred miles around the 
village, desolation, ruin, and destruction pre- 
vailed for months. 

Dec. 39. — Savannah captured. General 
Howe, the Ajnerican officer, defended the city 
with about l.OOO men, while he was attacked 
by Col. Campbell of the British forces with 2,- 
O'>0 veterans. Through the treachery of a ne- 
gro, Campbell was informed of a private path 
U) the right of the Americans, through which 
his troops marched and gained the rear of 
Howe's army. Howe finding himself attacked 
in front and rear ordered a retreat, pursued by 
the enemy. The Americans lost 100 killed, 38 
officers aiid 415 privates made prisoners. The 
whole loss of the British was I kiHed and 19 
wounded. 

1779. 

Jan. 9. — Fort Sunbury, about 28 miles 



52 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 





Joliu Zallee, 

(Successor to JOHN G. SHELTON,) 

MERCHANT TAILOR 

3fO. «00 OI.ITE |S»TREET, ST. I.OVTIS, MO, 



P 



Premium Awarded at Paris L'Exposition Universelle, 1867, & at Vienna, 1873, 

FOR FINEST MADE SUIT OF GENTS' CLOTHING. 

The oldest Merchant Tailoring Establishment in St. 1 -ouis, 
established in 1834, when St. Louis contained 
^^N only 4,000 inhabitants. 

^ Orders solicited from Gentlemen in distant localities. 
M-end measure taken by your tailor, and give your weighty^ 
and height and photograph if convenient 

Bilious Colic, Bilious Diarrhcea, Neuralgia, 
Rheumatism, Catarrh or Fresh Cold, and Be- 
rangements of the System Generally- 






.J. R. Coleman, Apothecary, 9tli and Christy av. 

Dear Sir: 1 have examined your "Anti-nilious 
Bitters and Liver Corrective," and consider it the 
best preparation of its kind ever offered to the 
public for those complaints for which you recom- 
mend it. I consider it a mild ami safe medicine. 
JOHN J. O'BEIEN, M. D., 

March 20, 1875. Sutter av., St Louis Co. 



THB GREAT FAMILY BEMEDT OF THE AGE 

For Diseases of the Liver, Blood, Stomach 

It has no equal. 

Contains no Aloes. 

No Alcohol, 

— AND IS NOT A STIMULANT — 

A prompt and efficient remedy for Bilioustiess, 
Derangement of the Liver, Constipation nf the 
Bowels, Headache, Dysjiepsia, Boils, Pimples, 



St. Louis. January 18, 1875. 
J. R. Coleman. Apothecary, ftth and Christy av. 

I have used your Anti-bilious Bitters, and take 
pleasure in recommending it as the best family 
uiedlcine for all deran>iements of the system. 

Yours truly, BEN J. K. TYLER, M. D, 



I have used Coleman's Anti-bilious Bitters, and 
it has •Ave.t. me satisfaction. 

LEVIN H. BAKER. 
St._ Louis, Sept. 23, 1875. 



J. E. Coleman, St Louis. 

I think vour Bitters has done more good toward, 
the healthy condition of our country than all 
other patent medicines combined. 
Y'ours very respectfully. 

FRANCIS H. ULLRICH. 
Alton, 111., Sept. 8, 1874. Apothecary. 



r»x-ep£ii-ort 1>^ J. K. COLE^XATV, 

CHEMIST & DRUGGIST, 

N. W. Cor. 9th St., and Christy Ave,, ^ HP Yjf)) FTTQ 

and S. E. Cor. 4th and Christy Ave. /O' -A e JUW IUA^,> 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



53 




ST. LOUIS UXIVERSITY, ST. LOUIS. MO. 



ST. LOUIS UNIVERSITY, 

Corner Ninth and Washington Ayenue, 

ST. LOTJIS, Is/LO. 



This Literary Institution, under the direction of the Jesuit Fathers, was 
established in 1839, in what was then the neighborhood of St. Louis, but is now 
at the very heart of the city. It is situated a few blocics from the Union Depot, 
only two blocks from the Lindell Hotel, and it is, consequently, of easy ac- 
cess to parents and students who come from a distance. Though in the cen- 
ter of a large city, the College enjoys to a certain extent the advantages of 
the country, its play-ground being so spacious as to afford ample room for 
out-door exercise. The College possesses a villa or country seat, easily 
reached by street cars, where the students may spend their weekly holy 
days and summer vacation. 

The St. Louis University by its charter, granted in 1832, has the power 
to confer degrees and academical honors in all the learned professions, but 
for many years past it has limited itself to the Classical and Commercial 
branches of a thorough education. 

There are two distinct courses of study, the Classical and the Commer- 
cial. French and German are optional in either course, and form no extra 
charge. 

For further particulars, address 

President St. Louis University, St. Louis, Mo. 



54 



IMPORTANT EVEKTS OF THE CENTURY, 



1779. 

southward from Savannah, captured by the 
British. 

Fel». 14.— "While a band of Tories, under 
Col. Boyd, were on their march to join the Roy- 
al troops, and desolating: the Carolina frontier, 
they were attacked by Colonel Pickens, at the 
head of a body of militia. Boyd and 70 of his 
men were killed, and 75 made prisoners. Pick- 
ens lost 38. 

]?lai*<*li JJ. — General Ashe, in command of 
near 2,000 Americans at Brier creek, about 40 
miles below Augusta, Ga., was surprised by 
Gen. Prevost and lost almost his entire army 


St. Louis- — Continued. 


RESTAURANTS, 

J. BICKELL'S 

RfistairaiilaM Coffee HoDSB, 

615 MORG-AN ST. 


by death, captivity, and disappearance. Aboiit 
150 killed and drowned, 80 made prisoners, and 
a large number who were dispei'sed, did not 
take up arms again for several months. 

March 11. — General Prevost, command- 
ing the British forces, demands the surrender 
of Charleston, but, receiving a prompt refusal, 
he spent the remainder of the day in preparing 
for an assault. That night was a fearful one 
for the citizens, for they expected to be greeted 
at dawn with bursting bomb-shells and red-hot 
cannon balls. But Prevost had been informed 
of the approach of Lincoln, and at midnight 
retreated to Savannah. 

Jtlarc-Ii 36. — Governor Tryon went with 
1,500 British regulars and Hessians to destroy 
some salt works at Horseneck, N. Y., and 
attack an American detachment under General 
Putman at Greenwich. The Americans were 
dispersed, but Putnam rallied his troops at 
Stamford, pursued the British on their return 
to New York the same evening, capturing a lot 
of plunder and 38 prisoners. 

May 9. — Sir George Collier entered Hamp- 
ton Roads with a small fleet, bearing General 
Matthews with land troops, and from thence 
they carried destruction and desolation on both 
sides of Elizabeth river, from the Roads to Nor- 
folk and Portsmouth. 

June SO. — The British were attacked at 
Stone Ferry, 10 miles southwest from Charles- 
ton, by a part of Lincoln's army, but after a 
ievere engagement, and the loss of almost 300 
men in killed and wounded, they repulsed the 


IV/TATSON. S., Restaurant, 

iVl 504 N. Sixth St. 

ly/TABKET ST. RESTAURANT, 812 Market st., 

iVl AugUPt Schreeck, prop. 

■OANDOLPH, D. S., prop, of the English Kitchen, 

XL 105 N. Fifth St. 

OCHAFER, WM., Restaurant, 

lO N. Third st. 

§. 11. 

Apollo Theater 

RESTAURANT& SALOON 

S. E. cor. Fourth and Poplar sts., 
ST. LOTJIS, - - ISKO. 

O PRAGUE & BUTLER, Restaurants, 716 N. Fifth 
kJ St., and 321 Olive st. 

RUBBER STAMPS, 

Q T. LOUIS RUBBER STAMP CO., Mnfr. rf Ribbon 
O and Hand t-tamps, 414 Washington ave. 

SADDLERY HARDWARE. 

T>URKS & WEONAN, Saddlery and Saddlery Hard- 
_D ware, 509 N. Main st. 


1\yrARSHEL. JAMES H., Saddlery and Sa^Jdiery 
ItJ. Hardware, 412 N. Main St. 
1\TEYER, BANNERMAN & CO.. Saddlery and Sad- 
iVJL dlery Hardware, 418 N. Main st. 


Americans, whose loss was greater. 

July. A. — Collier's vessels conveyed Gov- 
Tryon and 2,500 troops to the shores of Con- 
necticut, where they plundered New Haven 
and laid East Haven", Fairfield, and Norwalk in 
ashes, and cruelly treated the defenseless in- 
habitants. This destruction was completed 
from the 4th to the 12th of July. 

July 15. — Stony Point, 40 miles north of 
New York on the Hudson, captured by (ieneral 
Wayne. Wayne attacked the fort in the rear 
with ball and bayonet at two separate points. 


SALOONS, 

Jos. Apprederis, 

ColMliia House ani Saloon. 

1448 BROADWAY, 

St. LoTiissi. 


in the face of a heavy cannonade from the gar- 
rison. Wayne, though wounded in the head 
wrote to Washington, '' The fort and garrison, 
with Col. Johnson, are ours." The British loss 
in killed, wounded, and prisoners, about 600 ; 
the loss of Americans was 15 killed and 83 
wounded. 

July 19. — Major Henry Lee surprised the 
British garrison at Paulus Hook ( now Jersey 
City) opposite New York, and killed thirty 
soldiers and took one hundcred and sixty 
prisoners. 

Oct. 9. A combined assault by the Ameri- 


"POELLINO, CASPAR, Wine and Beer Saloon, 
X> 1701 S. Seventh st. 

CHARLES J. BREMER'S 

Wine & Beer Saloon, 

Fine Liquors & Cigars always on hand. 

S14: MARKET STREET, 

SX. X.OTJIS, 3VEO, 


cans and French was commenced on the British 
works around Savanah, by General Lincoln 
and Count D'Estaing, and after five hours hard 
fighting there was a truce for the purpose of 


/CABINET SALOON, N. E. cor. Sixth and Elm 
\J sts. John & Charley, Proprietors. 
T7^RDER,iA., Wine and Beer Saloon, 
JlI^ 2207 Franklin avenue. 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OF THE CENTURY. 



55 



St. Louis — Continued. 



SALOONS. 

PETERrCLE VER' S 

BANK SALOON, 

211 N. THIRD ST., Op. Post Office. 

Choice Liquors and Mixed Drinks a Specialty. 

Finest Imported Cigars, and Ice Cool Beer on 

draught. Warm Meals and Coffee served at 

all hours. 

^^JB -A. n. ,=^^ 

Choice Wines and Liquors Always on Hand. 

306 & 308 N. Fourth St. 

L. T. HART.1IA\, (Formerly of John Bonfletl's.) PROP. 

WINE & BEER SALOON, 

1 34'^ BK^O^DAV AY, 

S. W. cor. Mullanphy st., 
ST. ZOUIS, MO. 

CHARLES FOLEY, 

WINE and BEER SALOON, 




St. S^oms^ jilo. 

FLO RAL HALL, 



&1&## 



-JOHN BOECHER, Proprietor, 



700 S. FOURTH ST., ST. LOUIS. 

R. B. GINOCHIO, 

Wine and Beer Saloon. 

Choice Wines, Liquors A: Cigars always 
on hand. 

220 S. FOURTH STREET. 

ITTERMANN, FEKD., Wine and Beer Saloon, 
S. W. cor. Fourteenth a nd Wash sts. 

AQUETTE & LKAJIAN, Prop's Olympic Thea 
tre Salo on, 1 11 S. Fifth st. 

ATJSMANNT^HNrWiue and Beer Saloon, 

14.34 Broadway. 



H 
H 



H 



ENRY'S SALOON, 108 N. Fifth street. 

Theodore Brueggestradt, Prop. 



buryinof the dead. Nearly 1,000 of the French 
and Americans had been killed and wounded. 
A renewal of the assault was proposed by 
General Lincoln, but he was compelled to give 
up the idea when he felt sure of victory, on ac- 
count of the opposition of the French Com- 
mander. 

Oct. 35. — British troops evacuate Rhode 
Island, leavmp: liehind them all their heavy 
artillery and a large quantity of stores. 

irso. 

Ifliirdei- of ^Irs. Cald^vell. — While 
the British were plundering through the State 
of New Jersey, in the vicinity of Elizabeth- 
town, they came upon the residence of Rev. 
Mr. Caldwell. Mrs. Caldwell was sitting on 
the bed with her little child by the hand, and 
her nurse, with her infant babe by her side, 
when she was instantly shot dead by an un- 
feeling British soldier, who had come around to 
an unguarded part of the house, with an evi- 
dent design to perpetrate the deed. Her mur- 
derer was never punished. 

April 14- — General Tarleton, command- 
ing" the British, defeated Col. Huger on the 
head-waters of the Cooper river, near Charles- 
ton, S. C, and killed 25 Americans. 

]flay 6. — A party under Col. White, of 
New Jersey, were routed at a ferry on the 
Santee, with a loss of about thirty in killed, 
wounded, and prisoners. 

May 13. — Surrender of Charleston. After 
three days of heavy cannonade from two hun- 
dred guiis, and all night long the bursting of 
destructive bombshells, and at one time a fire 
in five different places, the city of Charleston 
was surrendered to the British, under Gen. 
Clinton. Gen. Lincoln and his troops, with a 
number of citizens, were made prisoners of 
war. Altogether the captives amounted to be- 
tween 5,000 and 6,000, and four hundred pieces 
of cannon. 

[Among the American detachments which 
hastened towards Charleston to assist Lincoln, 
and retreated when they heard of his fall, was 
that of Col. Buford, commanding 400 infantry 
and a small troop of cavalry, with two field 
pieces. He retreated, and when near the Wax- 
how Creek, some 60 miles further north, he was 
overtaken and supprised by Tarleton. They 
gave no quarters, but massacred or maimed the 
larger portion of Buford's command. His loss 
in killed, wounded, and prisoners was 313. He 
also lost his artillery, ammunition, and bag- 
gage.] 

;flay 19. — Dark days. Darkness com- 
menced between the hours of 10 and 11 A. M., 
and continued until the middle of the next 
night. Its extent was from Falmouth, Maine, 
to New Jersey. The darkness was so great in 
some part of' Massachusetts, New Hampshire, 
Maine, Rhode Island and Connecticut, that 
persons were unable to see to read, or manage 
their domestic business, without lighting can- 
dles, and everything bore the appearance and 
gloom of night. 

•f itne 7. — British take possession of Eliza- 
bethtown and burn Connecticut farms. 

June 13. — Clinton, comnumding British 
forces, endeavors to draw Washington into a 
general battle or to capture his stores at Mor- 
ristown, but fails in both. 

•Fiine 33. — In a skirmish at Spi'ingfield, 
N. J., the British were defeated by the Ameri- 
cans under Gen. Greene. After setting fire to 



56 



ADVERTI&EMKNTS. 



Conrad Bau«iiari>, 
Cor. Market and Miss. Sts.. Indianapolis, Ind. 



Harvey Shetei-er, 
No. vOr Abe deen St., Chicaaro, 111. 



fiAlSERfiNOMOVERS^O™^ 

'^DIANAPOLIS, 11^' 




Ttie uiid .M--<ii;nu(l wi.-ih to iufonu tlie public that we are prepared to U.iise, Lower, and M 
Brick and Stone Buildings of any size, in any part of the country accessible by rail or water. W® 
possess advantages superior to our competitors in shipping tools. Indianapolis being a great railroad 
center, by which we can reach all parts of the country with less expense, in consequenc ■ we are able to 
reduce first cost. We have successfully completed several difflcult jobs fjr the following parties, to 
whom we refer : 



Johnston & Co.. Cor. Meridian and Maryland streets. 



MUEP 

Hervey Bates, Res. corner Home avenue and Dela 

Rev. S. T. Gilleit, 1 8 Massachusetts avenue. 

Edwin May. Rooms 5 and 6 Glenn Block. 

T>. Gibson & Co., Millers. 

Deloss Root, Iron Founder, 200 Pennsylania street. 

Smith A Hannaman, Virginia avenue. 

And others too nuirierons to mention 



Chief Marshali Benner, Chicago Fire Department. 

D. E. Eddy, 53 North Clark street. 

C. E. Holmes, 69 Clinton street, for whom we lowered two Brick 

Stores, No. 663 and 670 State street. 
Mr. F. Moulton, with Carson, Pirie, Scott & Co., corner Madison 

and Franklin streets. 
S. J. Toy, Secretary Commercial Bureau, '2-2 Major Block. 
Jas. L. Campbell, Alderman Thirteenth W^ard. 



HEADQUARTERS FOR INSURANCE. 



GRUBS, PAXTON & CO., 




29 and 31 Circle Street, INDIAN A POLIS IND. 

Over $40,000,000 Represented! 

Firms having large lines of Insurance are solicited to place control of it with us. Insurance 
furnished on all insurable interests, at all desirable points throughout the West. Orders by mail receive 
prompt attention. You will find it to your interest to seud orders to the office direct. Correspondence 
solicited. 

JOSEPHMLEWARK, 

Dealer in all kinds of 

Muskrat, Opossum, Raccoon, Red Fox, G-rey Fox, House 
Cat, Wild Cat, Skunk, Sheep Pelts, 

TaiNlL AND OTTER. 

(Highest Market Price paid for Purs.) 

No. 14 W. PEARL STREET, INDIANAPOLIS, IND. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 




STATE CAPITAL, INDIANAPOLIS, IND. 



MISSE.L.BOYCE 

15 Calhoun Street, 

Over Graff's Jewelry Store, 



FORT WAYNE. 



INDIANA. 



MANUFACTURER OF AND DEALER IN 

FIIVE 

HAIR GOODS, 

Switches, Curls, Frizzettes, 

And Invisible Fronts 

Tor Young and Old Ladies, made to order. 
^" Special attention paid to Theatrical Work. 

Combings rooted, and made up in the 
most approved manner. War- 
ranted to give satisfaction. 

Hair Dressing for J1'eddi//o-s and Parties. 
N. B. Human Hair Bought and Sold. 



1 FraiHii life 



mSURmOE COMPANY. 

INDIANAPOLIS, IND. 

Tie only Home Company In tie Stale. 

Its best iriends are among the principal 

business men of Indianapolis — men 

who know it best. Its funds loaned 

only to policy holders. 

A. D. LYNCH, President. 

A.G. PETTIBONE, Vice-President. 
L. G, HAY, Secretary. 

\V. E.HARVEY, Actuary. 

FREDERICK BAGGS, Treasurer 



58 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OF THE CENTURY. 



17NO. 

the village, the enemy retreated, and passed 
over to Staten Island. 

*f uly 10.--A powerful French fleet, under 
Admiral Ternay, arrives at Newport, Rhode Is- 
land^ bearino^ 6,000 troops, under the Count de 
Rochambeau. This had a tendency to resti-ain 
Clinton from any further advances towards en- 
ticing: Washinofton to tight. 

Aug^. C — Battle of Camden. After a des- 
perate struggle with an overwhelming force, 
the Americans, under command of Gen. Gates, 
were defeated and routed with a loss of killed, 
wounded and prisoners, of about 1,000 men, 
besides all of their artillery and ammunition 
and a portion of their baggage and stores. 
The British loss was 325. Among the Ameri- 
can officers killed was Baron de Kalb, whose 
remains yet lie under a monument at Cam- 
den. 

Sept. "4. — Benedict Arnold's treason dis- 
covered. 

Sept. 3S. — Major Andre was captured by 
three militiamen named John Paulding, David 
Williams, and Isaac Van Wart. 

Oct. 3. — Major John Andre, an adjutant 
general in the British army, was hanged 
as a spy at Tappan, on the Hudson river, New 
York. 

Oct. y. — Battle of King's Mountain, South 
Carolina. This was a severe engagement, in 
which the British were defeated with a loss of 
300 men in killed and wounded, and the death 
of Major Patrick Ferguson, their conmiander. 
The spoils of victory, which cost the Ameri- 
cans only 20 men, were 800 prisoners and 1,500 
stand of arms. 

i^ov. 5jO. — Gen. Sumter engages the Bri- 
tish general Tarleton at Blackstocks's planta- 
tion jn the Tyger river, in a Union district. 
The British were repulsed with a loss in killed 
and rt'ounded of about 300. The American loss 
was only 3 killed and 5 wounded. Sumter was 
among the latter, and he was detained from 
the tield for several months, by his wounds. 
1781. 

Murder of Mr. Caldwell (husband of Mrs. 
Caldwell, killed in 1780). Mr. Caldwell was 
escorting a lady from New York, up town, in 
Elizabethtown. She was cariying a small 
bundle tied up in her handkerchief, when a 
British sentinel said the bundle must be seized 
for the State. Mr. Caldwell immediately left 
the lady, saying he would deliver the bundle to 
the commanding officer, who was present; and, 
as he stepped forward to do so, another soldier 
told him to stop, which he immediately did. 
The soldier without further provocation shot 
him dead on the spot. The villian who mur- 
dered him was seized and executed. 

•Iiiu. 1. Mutiny of Pennsylvania Line. 

The pay of officers and men of the Continental 
army had been so long in arrears, and money 
askd for in vain, that tinally 1.300 troops of the 
Pennsylvania Line left the camp at Morristown, 
with the avowed determination of marching 
to Philadelphia, and in person, demand justice 
of the National Legislature. When the muti- 
neers reached Princeton they were met by 
British emissaries from New York, who came 
to seduce them by bribes to enter the King's 
service. Indignant at the implied suspicion of 
their patriotism, the insui-gents seized the 
spies and delivered them to Gen. Wayne for 
punishment. When Gen. Wayne, who was 
sent by Washington to bring the insurgents 
back, first placed himself befoi-e the insurgents 



St. Louis — Contmued. 



SALOONS. 

Robert Hilbert, 

WINE and BEER SALOON, 

313 3X.4.KIi:ET ST., 

ST. LOUIS, MO. 

SALOON, 

No. 412 OLIVE STREET, 

ST. LOUIS, - - 3XO. 

11. inj>X>XEIlT, 

Boarding House and Saloon, 

TOQUEL & MOTTE, Wine and Beer Saloon, 319 
O S. Seventh st. 

KLEINE, F., Wine and Beer Saloon, 
720 Broadway. 

CHAS. E. KOERNER, 

Fine Old Bourbon Whisky, 

( SRinOE SALOON,) 

GOG 1>T. Tim^ID ST. 

ANG, P., Wine and Beer Saloon, 2413 Frank- 
lin ave. 

FI?EI>. loehh. 

Liquors, Ohampagne Wines 

—AND — 

IMPORTED CIGARS, 

110 N, Thu-d Street, and 1 N, Mam Street. 
Op. Main Entrance Merchants' Exchange. 

MERCHANTS' SALOON, 

702 BROADWAY, 

ST. LOUIS. 



WM, T. CALVERT, Prop'r, 
PAUL OBEROFELD, 



& 



126 OLIVE STREET, 



IMPORTANT KVENTS OF THE CENTL'KY, 



59 



St. Louis — Co7itinue.d. 



SALOONS, 

MUEHLHAUSEN, CHAS., Saloon, 
Cor. Third and Market sts. 



NAEHAR, E. H., Saloon and Billiard Hall, 717 
Morgan st. 

FRED. POHLMANN, 
WINE, BEER, 

—AND— 

IiZQXrOZl SJLZiOOlT, 

S. E. Cor. Fifth cC CJiHsty Ave., 

St. Xjovixis. 

CHOCH, CHAS. T., Wine and Liquor Saloon, 
cor. Seventh and Rutger ste. 



CHULZE. FRED., Wine and Lager Beer Saloon. 

216 Market st. 
ICKIiNtJER. JOHN, Wine and Beer Saloon, S. 

W. cor. Morgan and Third sts. 

"Wine a^ud. Beer Saloon, 

Choice Cigars and Liquors always in stock. 
162G Bt'OUftzvay. 

SALT DEALERS. 

PRIESMEYER, W.'H., Dealer in Coarse, Fine and 
Dairy SALT, 1003 and 1013 Carr st. 

SASH, DOOES AND BLINDS, 

GRAl'E, JAMES & SON, Manufacturer of Sash, 
Doors, Blinds, etc., 107 S. Seventh st. 

HAFNER, JOS., Wholesale Dealer in SASH, 
DOORS, BLINDS, and Glazed Windows, 
Moulding and Building Paper, 604 S. Seventh St., 
St. Louis, Mo. 

SAUSAGE MANUFAOTUEEE, 

Cincinnati Steam Sansage Manufactory. 

FIRST PREMIUM. 
GiS A- 617 S Scconil St. 

SAW MANTJPACTUEEES, 

CURTIS & CO., Saw Manufacturers, 
811 and 813 N. Second street. 

SCALES. 

PEARSON, A. B., Improved Shallow Pit, Wag- 
on. Stock and Floor Scales, 218 S. Second st. 

SCHOOL. 

ST. LOUIS UNIVERSITY, 
Christy ave., bet. Ninth and Tenth sts. 

SEWING MACHINES. 

WHEELER & WILSON Sewing Machine Co., 
Fitch & Moore, City Agents, 415 N. Fifth st. 

SHOW-CASE MANUPACTUEEE. 

CLAES, C. & CO., Show-Case Manufacturers, 
204 Market st. 

SIGN MANUPACTUEEE. 

UNION SIGN WORKS, Alex. S. Mann, Propri- 
etor. Manufacturer of Signs of every dis- 
cription. Attractive Glass Si<;ns, and Engraved 
Metal Signs a Specialty. 412 Locust st. 



with loaded pistols, they ])ut their bayonets to 
his breast, and said : " We love and respect 
you, but if you fire you are a dead man. We 
are not going to the enemy ; on the contrary, if 
they were now to come out, you should see us 
tight under your orders with as much alacrity 
as ever." They were met also by a deputation 
from Congress, who relieved their wants, and 
gave them such satisfactory guarantees for the 
future, that they returned to their duty. 

•Va.li. — The Bank of North America, the 
first ever established in the United States, 
about this time came into existence in Phila- 
delphia. It was under the charge of Kobert 
Morris, to whose superintendence Congress had 
intrusted the public Treasury. 

Jan. 5. — Benedict Arnold, traitor, now in 
the employ of the British, penetrates up the 
James river, and destroys a large quantity of 
public and private stores at Kichmond. [Great 
efforts were made to seize Arnold. Sergeant 
Champs, one of Major Lee's dragoons, went in 
disguise to New York, enlisted in a corpse over 
which Arnold had command, and had almost 
consummated a plan for abducting him to the 
.Jersey shore, when the traitor was ordered to 
the Southern e.xpedition. Instead of carrying 
Arnold off", Champs, himself, was taken to Vir- 
ginia with the corps in which he had enlisted. 
There he escaped and joined Lee in the Caro- 
linas.] 
•Tan. 17. — Defeat of the British at Cowpens, 
S. C, by Gen. Morgan. The enemy lost near 
;^00 men in killed and wounded, 500 were made 
prisoners, and a large quantit}- of arms, am- 
munition, and stores were captured. 

•fan. IS. — A mutiny occurred among a 
portion of the Jersey line, at Pompton. W^ash- 
ington sent General Robert Howe, with 500 
men, to suppress it, and, after hanging two of 
the ringleaders, the remainder quietly sub- 
mitted. 

March 15.— Battle of Guilford. N. C. 
The Americans were repulsed and the Brit- 
ish were left masters of the field, though 
the victory so completely shattered Cornwallis' 
army that it was almost as destructive to him 
as a defeat. American loss, in killed and 
wounded, about 400, besides almost 1,000 who 
deserted to their homes. The loss of the Bri- 
tish was over 600, including Lieut. -Col. Web- 
ster, one of the most efficient officers in the 
British army. 

April iiS. — Battle near Camden, S. C. 
While Gen. Greene was breakfasting at a 
spring on the eastern slope of Hobkirk's Hill, 
S. C, and while some of his men were clean- 
ing their guns, and others washing their 
clothes, they were surprised and defeated by 
the British, under Rawdon. American loss in 
killed, wounded and missing, 2G6 men. The 
British lost 258. Greene conducted his retreat 
so well, that he carried away all his artillery 
and baggage, with 50 British prisoners. 

]flay lO. — Gen. Rawdon, alarmed at the 
prospective increase in Greene's army, set fire 
to Camden, and retreats to Nelson's t'erry, on 
the Santee. 

•Tunc -4. — Gen. Tarleton, in command of 
a British maurauding party, captured seven 
members of the Virginia Legislature. Gov. 
Jefferson narrowly escaped capture by fleeing 
from his house to the mountains. 

•Tnnc S. — Surrender of Augusta, Ga., to 
the Americans, under Gen. Lee, after a siege 
of eleven davs. American loss 51 in killed 



60 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



J. B. MANY, President. 



J. L. AVERY, Secretary and Treasurer. 



C. J. MANY, Superintendent. 



Planing Mill Company, 



>Janxifactiirers of* 



Doors, Sasli, BliMs, Stairs, Stair EaillBi, Baliislers, Posts, &c. 

AND DEALERS IN 

LTjnvnBiEi^, L^^TH, shzxh^oxjIes, etc., 

3 1 7 to 327 Massachusetts Ave., Indianapolis, Ind. 



€HAS. H. BLACK. 



VICTOR M. BACKUS. 



BIiiAGK & BACKUS, 



MANUEACTURERS OF- 




Carriages and Buggies, 

OF EVEEY STYLE AND DESCRIPTION, 
Nos. 36, 38 and 44 East Maryland Street, INDIANAPOLIS. 

An Illustrated Catalogue 'containing all the latest styles and prices furnished gratis 

on application. 

H. STACEY, Proprietor. .JOHN SCHNEIDEU, Superintendent. 

i2sriDi^f^:LT..f^:E=»oiL.is 

BRASS FOUNDRY, 

106 & 108 South Delaware, Corner Georgia Street, 

MAMIFACTURERS OF ALL KINDS OF 

BRASS CASTINGS 

For MacMnists, Plumbers, Steam and G-as Fitters. 

Ita.ilroa.cl Cai- aiacl ]VJachi)ie I5i-asses a Specialty. Also 
M!a,iixvfactxix-ers of*S§ta.cey's ATitoiiia.tic Gas Bvii-nei-. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



61 



I 




Court House and City Hall, Indianapolis, Ind.— It is built in 
the modern French Renaissance style of Architecture, situated on the public square, bound- 
ed by Washington, Market, Delaware and Alabama Sts. The building is 2'jS teet in 
length, 137 feet in breadth, S6 feet in heighth and 235 feet to the apex of the main tower. 
The two end pavilions are 124 feet and 96 feet to the apex of the roof The building is 
constructed of drab limestone from Ellettsville, Monroe Co., Ind., while the columns are ot 
polished Scotch Granite. The building is the only one of the kind in the state. In the 
tower is a clock with four dials, ten feet in diameter, and will be illuminated and regulated 
by electricity, which can be seen for miles. 



1877. 



1877. 




Cor. New Jersey &Wasliiiigton Sts. 
mojANAPOLts, :nd. 

The Old Reliable Hostelrie 

Has been thoroughly renovated throughout, with 
comfoi table and airy beds, and a table well sup- 
plied with all the choicest edibles of the season, 
equal to the best hotels of the country— all for the 
living price of $l.'-i3 per day. 

No better establisliment can be desired. 
JOSEVH FITZGERALD, Ptop'r. 
Joseph Wright, Clerk. 



ROBERT KELLER, 

125 East Washington Street, 
ISDtANAPOUS, mo. 

Importer of and Dealer in Fine 



Frencli Mustard, 
Holland Herrings, 
Kuss. Sardines, 
Germ. Prunes, Pears 
Farina, Pease, ete. 
etc. 



S'wiss. liimberger 
Holland & .Sap Sago, 

CHEESE. 
Olive Oil.TableSauce 
Catsup, Chow Cliow, 
etc. 



62 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OF THE CENTURY. 



1781. 

and wouided. British loss 52 killed, and 334 
(inchuling wounded ) were made prisoners. 

Sept. <». — Arnold lands at the nu)uth of 
the Thames, attacks Fort Trumbull, and burns 
New London (his native town), Connecticut. 
Another division of this expedition went up on 
the east side of the Thames, attacked Fort 
Griswold, at Groton, and after Col. Ledyard 
had surrendered it, he, and almost every man 
in the fort were cruelly murdered or badlv 
wounded. 

Sept. 8.— Battle of Eutaw Springs, S. C. 
This was a severe battle, which resulted in the 
British being driven from their camp by Gen. 
Greene. But while the Americans were scat- 
tered among the tents of the enemy, indulging 
in drinking and plundering, the British unex- 
pectedly renewed the battle, and, after a 
bloody conflict of about four hours, the Amer- 
icans were obliged to give way. That night, 
the British retreated to Charleston, and the 
next dax', Greene took possession of the battle- 
field. American loss in killed, wounded and 
missing, 555. British loss, 693. 

Oct. 19. — Surrender of Cornwallis at 
Yorktown. For ten days, the Americans kept 
up a heavy cannonade upon the British works 
at Yorktown, and hurled red-hot balls among 
the English shipping, and burned several ves- 
sels. Cornwallis, despairing of receiving any 
aid, and perceiving his fortifications crumb- 
ling one by one under the terrible storm of 
iron from a hundred heavy cannon, attempted 
to escape by crossing to Gloucester, break 
through the French troops stationed there, 
and, by forced marches, reach New York. 
When the van of his troops embarked on York 
River, a storm arose as fearful and as sudden 
as a summer tornado, disbursed the boats, 
compelled many to put back, and the attempt 
was abandoned. Cornwallis surrendered 7,000 
British soldiers to Washington, and his ship- 
ping and seamen into the hands of DeGrasse. 

Oct. 'H. — Congress, and the loyal people 
throughout the United States, join in render- 
ing thanks to <lod for the great victory at 
Yorktown — the surrender of Cornwallis. 
1783. 

First English Bible printed in America by 
Robert Aiken, of Philadelphia. 

British flee from Wilmington, N. C, at the 
approach of Gen. St. Clair. 

Clinton and his ai'my blockaded in New York 
by Washington. 

i^larcli -1. — British House of Commons 
resolve to end the war. 

April 8.— The United States vessel, Hy- 
der Ally, carrying only sixteen guns, captui'ed 
by the British ship, General Monk, with twen- 
ty-nine guns. 

jTIiiy 3. — George Washington indignantly 
refused to be made king. 

I^Isiy. — Arrival of Sir Guy Carleton to 
treat for peace. 

•July 11. — British evacuate Savannah in 
accordance wi h a resolve of ih ' Br t ^h Ho.ise 
of Commons to end the war and cea>.- l.o>tili- 
ties. 

First war ship constructed in the United 
States at Portsmouth. N. H. 

Oct. 8. — Independence of the United 
States acknowledged by Holland. 

I^'ov. JSO. — A provisional treaty acknowl- 
edging the independence of the United States 
signed by England, at Paris. 

William IV., son of George III., came to the 



St. Louis — Conihiued. 



SILVER PLATERS, 

URGIN, F. A., Sterling Silverwaer, 

303 N. Seventh street. 



D 
E 



AXON & GREEN, SILVER PLATERS, Mfs 

Carriage & Sadalery Hardware, 305 N. 7th st. 



P ELTON BROS., & CO., SILVER PLATED and 
Britannia Ware Mlg's, 717 S. Sixth st. 

SPICE MILLS. 

YERRIER, E. T.. Western and Mound City 
Spice Mills. 414 N. Second st. 

STAIR BUILDERS. 

FISHER, JAS. A., Stair Builder, 1430 N. Eighth 
St. Country orders promptly attended to. 

IT'RANTZ, W. H., STAIR BUILDER. Rails, 
' Newels and Balusters constantly on hand. 
Country orders a specialty. Send for Price List, 
Second and Mound sts., St. Louis, Mo. 

ASSFURTHER, EDW. J., Stair Builder. 1430 
N. Eighth St. Country orders promptly at- 

tended to. 

EES, JOHN B., Stair Builder, 1433 N. Eighth 
St. Stairs neatly finished andorders prompt- 
ly attended to. 

STEAMBOATS. 

EAGLE PACKET CO., Wharf, Boat foot of Vine 
street. 

GRAND REPUBLIC, 
W. H. Thobwegen, Commander. 

EOKl K NORTHERN LINE PACKET CO., W. F. 

Davidson, Pres.; P.S.Davidson, General 
Supt. ; F. L. Johnston, Sec. 

STEREOTYPERS AND ELECTROTYPERS. 

Strassbiirger & Dracli, 

STEREOTYPERS 

—AND- 

ELECTROTYPERS, 

N, W. Cor. Chestnut and Second Sts. 
STOCK DEALERS. 

W. p. WALTON & CO., 

Live Stock Coiiiiiiissioii Mercliaits, 

UNION STOCK YARDS, St. Louis. Office 
No. 17. NATIONAL STOCK YARDS, 

East St. Louis, 111. 

Live Stock Agents Keokuk and Northern Line 
of Packets. All communications should be ad- 
dressed to main office. Union Stock Yards. We 
will sell stock at any yard in the city, or East St. 
Louis. 



A 



STOVES, RANGES AND TINWARE. 

LLEN, J. B., Dealer in New and Second Hand 

Stoves, etc.. 805 N. Seventh st. 



OLTE, FRED.. Wholesale and Retail Dealer in 

St. Louis Mfg'd Stoves, etc.. 1310 Broadway. 
LUTHARDT. J. G., STOVES, TINWARE and 

Plumbing Goods, 20:i N. Twelfth st. 



' REYLING, D.. Dealer in Stoves, Tinware. 2437 

.. Franklin ave. 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OF THE CENTURY. 



63 



St. Louis — Cotttinned. 



STOVES, EANGES AND TINWARE^ 
Manufacturer, and Wholesale Dealer in 



Tin, Stamped c& Japan Ware. 
506 N, Main Street. 

Bet. Washington avenue and Vine street. 



N 



ISCHWITZ, P., Dealer in Stoves and Tinware, 
1408 Carondelet ave. Established 1853. 



ROCKWELL, E., Dealer in Stoves and Tinware, 
2331 Franklin ave. 



N. M. SIMONDS, 

Manufacturer of 

Pateit Hotel aid Family 

RA.lSrOES, 

Broilers, Carving Tables, Coffee Urns, Laundry 
Stoves, etc. Send for circular. 

ELCKER, F. & CO., Dealers in Stoves and 
Tinware, 16 S. Third st. 



w 



STOVE POLISH. 

KINNER, WM. A. & CO., Hungarian Stove Pol- 
ish, 1103 Morgan st. 



S 



TAILORS. 

BENJAMIN, M., Merchant Tai'or, and Dealer in 
Gents' Furnishing Goods, 710 Market st. 

Henry Camien, 
Dyeing, Cleaning and Repairing 

Done in the best manner, 

414 Morgan Street. 

ENEKE, FRED., Merchant Tailor, 

705 Morgan street. 
OHNSON, J. I., Tailor, 
Residence, 1115 Wash street. 

H. KONERT, 

Ta^ilor, 

914 Market Street. 



i®~PERFECT FIT WARRANTED. ^.^J 

LORENZEN, M., Merchant Tailor, 
113 Vine street. 



928 N. Sixth Street. 



Cleaning, Dyeing and^Repairing. 
5 



1783. 

United States as a midshipman, in a fleet sent 
over to conquer us as a rebellious colony. An 
attempt was made to capture him while his 
vessel was lying off New York, but the scheme 
failed. 

l>ec. 14. — British evacuate Charleston, 
S. C. 

17S3. 

mMstn.. — Bank of North America opened in 

Philadelphia. 

Jun. 19. — Society of Cincinnatus formed 
by many of the officers of the Continental 
army at Newberg, N. Y., for the purpose of 
promoting cordial friendship, and refreshing 
the memory, by frequent reunions, of the great 
struggles they had passed through. 

Slavery abolished in Massachusetts. 

•Va.li. 30. — French and English Commis- 
sioners sign a treaty of peace. 

S^ept. 3. — A definite treaty of peace 
signed at Paris, and England acknowledged 
the independence of the United States ; al- 
lowed ample boundaries extending northward 
to the great lakes, and westward to the Mis- 
sissippi. 

I\ov. 3. — Continental army disbanded and 
return to their homes. Of the two hundred 
and thirty thousand Continental soldiers, and 
the fifty-six thousand malitia, who bore arms 
during the war, scarcely any survive at the 
present day. Great Britain sent to America 
during the'war 112,584 troops for the laud ser- 
vice, and more than 22,000 seamen. Of this 
host, not one is known to be living. One of 
them (John Battin ) died in the city of New 
York, June, 1852, at the age of 100 years and 4 
months. 

i\ov. 35. — British evacuate Nevr York, 
and on the same day, General Knox entered 
the city with a small remnant of the Conti- 
nental army, and took possession of the city. 
Before evening, the last British soldier passed 
from the shores of America. 

l>ec. -4. — Washington takes an afl!ectionate 
farewell with his officers at New York. 

l>ec. 33. — Washington, in the city of An- 
napolis, Maryland, resigns his commission in 
the army. 

During the war, the English employed 
to aid them in the subjection of the 
country over 11,000 Indians, whose mode of 
warfare was to take scalps, not prisoners, and 
to massacre women and children. As an evi- 
dence of this fact, Captain Gerrish, of the New 
England malitia, captured on the frontier of 
Canada eight packages of scalps, properly 
cured and dried, which were to be sent to Eng- 
land as a gfesent from the Seneca Indians to 
George III. The packages contained 43 scalps 
of soldiers, 297 of farmers, 88 of women, 190 of 
boys, 211 of girls, 22 of infants, and 122 as- 
sorted, making a total of 973 scalps. 
1784. 

First voyage of an American ship to China 
from New York. 

New Y'ork Chamber of Commerce founded. 

JTan. 4. — Treaty of Paris ratified by Con- 
gress. 

1785. 

John Adams, first American Ambassador to 
England, has an audience with the King. 

First Federal Congress organized in York. 

First instance of instrumental music m the 
Congregational churches at Boston. 



64: 



ADYERTISEM KNTS. 



ON THE EUROPEAN PLAN 



Cor. 4tli and Locnst Sts., ST. LOUIS, MO. 




J, H. HXJin-SSO?^ I»x-o:K:>i:-±otoi-- 



GLOBE VINEGAR AND PICKLE WORKS. 

AMMIX ZOTT. ^"~ ir. C. GILMORE. 

Manufacturers of all kinds of 

\/ Jl i^ Ic-i C-S" .^c^ JbrCi - 

Packers of Sourkrout, Plain and Mixed Pickles, Chow Chow. Spiced Pigs Feet, Tongues, Tripe, Bologne 

and Ham Sausase. A specialty made of the manufacture of Knglish Malt Vinegar and Barsaloux'.jj 

[Jl Globe Table Sauce. No. '207 NORTH MAIN STRKET. ST. LOl'IS, 5lO. 5 




Men's Fine Furnishing* Goods^ 

No. 509 North. 6th Street, ST. LOUIS. 

TIVOLI VAUDEVILLE THEATRE, 

IW S1 12111. Fifth Street, ST. LOU IS, H/IO. 

Open every Evening. Matinee every Saturday afternoon. First- 
Class Talent always in reserve. New Stars "Weekly. 

RUDOLPH KORNBERGER, Proprietor. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



65 




MASONIC HALL, ST. LOUIS, MO. 



M. D* BARNEY, (General Agant ana wholesale Dealer in BOOTS AND SHOES, 

Janesville Shoe ML'f g Co. — Women's, Misses' and Children's'Macliine 
and cable sewed and pe.^ged custom work. Janesville, Wis. E. D. Mull in & Co., 

Celebrated Philadelphia Children's Fine Shoes, Slippers, &c. Philadelphia, Pa. 
Janieis J. Evans, Celebrated Rochester Men's Women's and Misses' Fine Boots 
and Shoes, Rochester' New York. 

618 WASHINGTON AVENUE, Opp. Lindel Hotel, ISt- Louis. 



Q6 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OF THE CENTURY. 



17 *C. 
Jan. 35.— Universalist church founded 
in Boston. 

Shay's insurrection in Massachusetts. 
Heavy taxes, decay of trade, and debts due 
from individuals to each other, were the pri- 
mary cause of the insurrection. Daniel Shay, 
at the head of 1,100 malcontents, threatened 
the peace of the State by attemptinp^ to intim- 
idate the courts. He approached Sprmj^field 
for the purpose of taking possession ot the 
barracks, when he was met by the malitia un- 
der Gen. Sheyhard. The artillery was leveled 
at the malcontents, and three were killed and 
one wounded. They then dispersed, taking 
refuge in the neighboring States. 
1787. 
May as.— The first cotton mill in the 
United States was built at Beverly, Mass. A 
convention to amend articles of confederation, 
composed of all the States, except Rhode 
Island, met in Philadelphia. 

Jliily.— Northwestern territory, embracing 
the present States of Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, 
Michigan and Wisconsin, established. 

July SO.— James Whittaker, first Shaker 
preacher, died at Enfield, Conn., aged 36 years. 
" Elder Whittaker " may be considered the 
John Wesley of America'n Shakers. 

Sept. 3!*>.— The Constitution of the United 
States submitted to Congress and that body 
sent copies of it to the several legislatures, 
and it was ratified by the States in the follow- 
in"- order, Delaware, Dec. 7, 1787; Pennsyl- 
yania, Dec. 12, 1787; New Jersey, Dec. 18, 1787; 
Georgia, Jan. 2, 1788; Connecticut, Jan. 9, 
1788;'' Massachusetts, Feb. 6, 1788; Maryland, 
April 28, 1788; South Carolina, May 23, 1< 88; 
New Hampshire, June 12, 1788; Virginia, June 
26, 1788; New York, July 26, 1788; North Caro- 
lina, Nov. 21, 1789; Rhode Island, May 29, 
1790. 

1788. 
Quakers of Philadelphia emancipate their 
slaves. Cotton first planted in Georgia, by R. 
Leake. "The Doctor Riot" in New York, as it 
was called, originated from some indiscreet ex- 
posure of portions of a human body. The 
doctoi-s were mobbed and their houses in- 
vaded. 

April 7.— Marietta, Ohio, founded; the 
first white settldmcnt within the limits of the 
present State of Ohio. 

1789. 
Marc'U 4.— The old Continental Congress 
expired and Federal Constitution ratified by 
the requisite number of States, and becomes 
the organic law of the Republic. 

Marcli 11.— Philadelphia incorporated a 

April 6.— Washington elected President 
of the United States, by the unanimous vote 
of the electors, and John Adams was made 
Vice-President. Washington on his way to 
the inauguration, from Mount Vernon, was 
o-reeted wUh ovations from the people through- 
out the whole country. 

April SO.- Washino;ton was inaaigurated 
first President of the United States. He ap- 
peared on the street gallery of the old City 
Hall, corner of Wall and Broad streets. New 
York, and there, in the presence of a large 
concourse of people, the oath of office was ad- 
ministered to him by Chancellor Livingstone. 

i^ept. 39.— First Congress adjourned after 
a session of almost six months in New York. 



St. Louis — Continued. 



TAILORS. 

JOHN A. NIES. 



S14^ 3IAIIKET STREET, 

Established 1S52. 

ARKES, WM., Merchant Tailor, "" 
720 Olive Btreet. 

ZALLEE, JOHN C, Merchant Tailor, 
606 Olive street. 

TEAS, COPPEES, ETC. 

FORBES BROS.. & CO., Wholesale TEAS. 
506 N. Second street. 
REIBELL, G.. Wholesale and Retail Dealer in 
Teas and C'oft'ees, 2413 Broadway. 

TELEGRAPH MACHINERY, 

HEISLER, CHAS., Telegraph Machinery, Insu- 
lated Wires and Supplies. 309 ' houteaa ave. 

TIN AND SHEET IRON WORK, 

RAATZ & BRO., Manufacturers of COPPER, 
TIN & SHEET IRON Ware, 2114 Broadway. 



K 



POCOCK. J. H., Mfr TIN CANS, Iron Tanks, 
& Iron-clad Milk Cans, 113 to 119 Cherry 8t. 

TOBACCO AND CIGARS. 

BRANT, S., Cigar Factory, 
2425 Franklin avenue. 

LIZZIE A. BUCKEY, 

4301/2 N. SIXTH STREET, 

THE CHEAPEST 

CIGAR STORE 

IN THE CITY. 
Fiagros, 3 for 10 cents. Try it and see. , 

AUBERD, WM., Dealer in Cigars and Tobacco, 
1526 Broadway. 



D 



DIETERICH, L. A. Dealer in Tobaccos, Cigars 
and snufl", 814 Franklin ave. 



F 



R.iHM H., Manufacturer, and Dealer in Ha- 
vana and Domestic Cigars, SOO'/i Market st. 



T. J. GUNDRICH, 

Cigar and Tobacco 

MANUFACTURER, 
803 Movfjan Street, St. Louis, 

WM. KUPFERLE, 

(Successor to R. W. DURKAN,) 
— Wholesale and Retail Dealer in — 

Cigars and Tobacco, 
125 Olive street. 

ST, LOUIS, MO. 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OF THE CENTURY. 



67 



St. Louis — Continued. 



TOBACCO AND CIGARS, 

HTNES, GEO. A. & CO., Wholesale Dealers in 
Imported Key West and Domestic Cigars, 
309 N. Fifth St. 

KAUB, E. & CO., Retail Dealers in Cigars and 
Tobaccos, 421 Walnut st. 

AVm. Miestemaelvei-, 

Manufacturer, and Dealer in 
IMPORTED AND DOMESTIC 

115 N, Fifth St,, and 1110 Market St. 
Est. 1858. St. Lonis, Mo. 

MICHAEL HEIN, 

Manufacturer, and Dealer in 

Iiortei ant Domestic Ciprs, 

SMOKERS' ARTICLES, ETC., 

1204 Broadway, St. Louis. 

EPER CHRISTIAN, Tobacco Works. 
Cor. Main and Mor gan sts. 

PUSCH, C, Mfr and Dealer in Havana and Do- 
mestic Cigars, 1414 M arket et. 

M. Rabinowich, 

Only Manufacturer, and Retail Dealer of 

* FUTURE GREAT' 

STRAIGHT, PURE HAVANA FILLER 

5 CENT CIGAR, 

Sold only at 

804 Washington Avenue. 

CHARLES REHFELDT, 

ilanufacturer, and Dealer in 

HAVANA AND DOMESTIC 

914 Broadway. 



Op. Franklin ave. 



Est. 1873. 



Lucas Scliottmueller, 

Manufacturer, and Dealer in 

CIGARS A^D TOBACCO, 

Bet. Wash and Carr sts. 

PILKEB, A., Wholesale and Retail Dealer in 
Cigars and Tobacco. 803 N . Fourth St. 

STERNE, MAX, Wholesale Tobacco, Cigars, 
Pipes, etc., 116 N. Second St. 

Importer of Cigars, 

111 N. FIFTBl street. 



1789. 

Convention oi r^'^coDal clergy in Philadelphia; 
the first Episcopal convention in America. 

Dr. Carrol, of Maryland, con.secrated bishop of 
the Roman Catholic Church — the first Catholic 
biwhop in the United States. 
1790. 
From a report of the Register of the Treas- 
ury at this date, the entire cost of the war for 
independence was estimated at .$130,000,000, ex- 
clusive of the vast sums lost by individuals. 
The Treasury paymants amounted to $93,000,- 
000; the foreign debt amounted to .$8,000,000, 
and the domestic debt, due chiefly to officers 
and soldiers of the Revolution, was more than 
§30,000,000. 

Gen. Harmer, with a strong force, penetrates 
the country north of Cincinnati and destroys 
Indian villages and crops. 

District of Columbia ceded to the United 
States by ^Maryland and Virginia. 

A United States ship circumnavigated the 
globe. 

April 17. — Death of Benjamin Franklin, 
aged 84 j-ears. 

]^Iay 39. — Rhode Island adopts the Con- 
stitution, being the last of the thirteen original 
States to do so. 

Aug'. 12. — Congress adjourns to New 
York, and December 6th meets in Philadel- 
phia. 

Oct. 33. — Near the present city of Fort 
Wayne, Indiana, Gen. Harmer, in an engage- 
ment with the Indians, was defeated with con- 
siderable loss. 

Captain Robert Grey in the ship "Columbia," 
comi>leted the first American voyage around 
the globe. 

1791. 
The first census of the inhabitants of the 
United States was completed this year. The 
population of all sexes and color was 3,929,- 
000. The number of slaves was 695,000. 

3fov. -1. — Gen. St. Clair, while in camp 
near the northei'n line of Darke county, Ohio, 
was surprised and defeated by the Indians, 
with a loss of about six hundred men. 

Vermont admitted as a State. City of 
Washington founded. First bale of cotton ex- 
ported to England since the Revolution. 

June 31. — Philadelphia and Lancashire 
Turnpike Company chartered. Road opened 
in 1795 — the first turnpike in the United 
States. 

City -" Washington laid out. 

1793. 
The first mint went into operation in Phila- 
de' -d. and remained the sole issuer of coin 
lie United States until 1835, when a branch 
.,as established in each of the States of Geor- 
gia, North Carolina and Louisiana. 

'^'■'"'■v fever in Philadelphia. It commenced 
. August, and lasted until about the 9th 
01 November, during which time 4,000 persons 
died out of a population of 60,000 : as many as 
119 dying in a single day. More than one-half 
of the houses were closed, and about one-third 
of the inhabitants fled the city. The streets 
were almost entirely deserted, except by a few 
persons who were in quest of a physician, a 
nurse, a bleeder, or the men who bury the 
dead. 

John Hancock, Roger Sherman and John 
Manly died this year. 

«Iiiiie 1. — Kentucky admitted into the 
Union. 



68 advertiskmp:nts. 



C. Bergundthal, 

GLASS & QUEENSWARE 



Bar Glassware a Specialty. 

6S nxr. Illinois Street, 



A. S. CpMSTOCK, 



MANUP^ACTURER OF THE 




Gexiuixie Durbozi Fuznp, 

197 & 199 S. Meridian St., miANArOUS, IND, 

A. V. LAWRENCE, 

GENERAL 

Commission Merchant, 

173 W. WASHIN GTON ST., In dianapolis, Ind. 

Dealer in Fruits, Vegetables, and Shipper of Western Pro- 
duce. Eggs, Butter, Poultry and Game a Specialty. 

All Oi-clex's 3r*i-omi>tl3' IFilled. 

JOHN G. BLAKE, THOMAS B. JACKSON, JOHN G. QUINIUS. 

Firm of Van Camp & Jackson. 

Blake, Jackson & Quinius, 

Successors to G. C. Van Camp & Sou, and Prathcr & Blake, 

WHOLESALE FRUIT, PRODUCE, AND 

General Commission Merchants, 

Fruit, Produce, Poultry, Game, Hide?, Feathers, etc., a specialty. 

75 W, WASHINGTON STREET, Indianapolis, Ind. 

( John C, New, Vice Pres. Fi: st National Bank, Indianapolis. 
References. - Aquilla Jones, Sr., Pres. Indianapolis Rolling Mill Co. 
( Merrill, Hubbard iS: Co., Booksellers and Stationers. 
Consignments and Correspondence Solicited. Prompt Returns Guaranteed. 



advp:rtisements. 



69 




Indiana !!$tate Building;, Centennial/Exposii ion, Philadelphia. 

— This building is constructed of a combination of wood and other building materials, a 
frame of wood being the support of the building and roof, to which an outer wall of brick, 
stone, terra-cotta, iron and coal can be attached. The assembly hall is a grand auditorium 
for miscellaneous gatherings. It is in the forni of an irregular cross, 55 feet at its longest 
angle, and has about 1,400 feet of floor. From the level of the ceilings of the side rooms it 
is spanned by a truss-arched roof at a height of 24 feet above the center of the hall. It is 
lighted by the rotunda above, and an ornamental fountain plays in the center below. On 
the walls are 200 tablets, of which number, 92 are used by the counties of the State for the 
general statistics of each county, and the remainder are given to individuals or firms. The 
entire cost of the building was $10,000. 

JAMES M. VTARREN, 

DIKECT IMPOETER OF 

QUEENSWARE, CHINA 

]^0. 118 FIRST ST. - EYAjNSYILLE, IjVD. 



70 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OF THE CENTUEY. 



1793. 

Erection of the Capitol at Washington com- 
menced. 

Lehigh, Pa., coal mines discovered. 

Cotton gin invented by Eli Whitney. 

Iflay 30. — The " "Democratic Society " 
formed. First introduction of the word into 
American politics. 

Whisky insurrection in Pennsylvania. A 
law was passed in 1791, which imposed duties 
on domestic distilled liquors, and when officers 
of the Government were sent to enforce it 
among the Dutch inhabitants of western Penn- 
sylvania, they were resisted by the people in 
arms. The insurrection soon became general 
in all the western counties, and in the vicinity 
of Pittsburgh many outrages were committed. 
Buildings were burned, mails were robbed, and 
Government officers were insulted and abused. 
It was thought that the insvirgents at one time 
numbered 7,000. The President ordered a 
large body of malitia, under Gen. Henrj' Lee, 
to the scene of these troubles, and the insur- 
rectionists were dispersed and obedience to the 
laws enforced. 

Congress appropriates seven hundred thou- 
sand dollars for the purpose of organizing a 
navy. This was the first movement of the 
United States in establishing a navy. 

Fel>. — Bank of United States incorporated 
with a capital of $10,000,000. Prior to this, 
the whole banking capital in the United 
States was only .'^2,000,000, invested in the 
Bank of North America, at Philadelphia: the 
Bank of New York, in New York City ; and the 
Bank of Massachusetts, in Boston. 

April 19. — John Jay was appointed by 
the United States envoy extraordinary to the 
British Court, to adjust all complaints gi-ow- 
ing out of the Kevolutionary war, such as the 
British violating the treaty of September 3, 
1783, by holding military posts on the fron- 
tiers ; that British emissaries incited the In- 
dians to hostilities ; that no indemnification 
had been made for plantations plundered and 
negroes sold into the West Indies at the close 
of the war ; and also to remonstrate to the 
English government against capturing neutral 
vessels and impressing our seamen into their 
service. 

1795. 

I^ov. 28. — A treaty of peace was made 
with the Dey of Algiers, by which an annual 
tribute was given by the United States, for the 
redemption of captives. Between the years 
1785 and 1793, the Algerine pirates captured 
.and carried into Algiers fifteen American ves- 
sels, and made 180 officers and seamen slaves 
of the most revolting kind. By I his treaty the 
United States agrees to pay $800,000 for cap- 
tives then alive, and in addition, to make the 
Dey, or governor, a present of a frigate worth 
$100,000. An annual tribute of .f23,000, in 
maritime stores, was also paid. This was 
complied with until the breaking out of the 
war of 1812. 

June 24. — A treaty, concluded by Mr. 
Jay, with the British government, was rati- 
fied by the Senate. This treaty was not very 
satisfactory. It provided for the collection of 
debts here by British creditors, which had 
been contracted before the revolution, but pro- 
cured no redress for those who lost negroes. It 
secured indemnity for unlawful captures on the 



St. Louis — Continued. 



TOOLS. 

ATH, T. H., Dealer in New and Second-hand 
Tools, 1436 Broadway. 



B 



TURKISH BATHS. 

ADAMS, GEO. P., Turkish Baths, 
311 N. Seventh st. 

TURNING SHOP. 

Established 1864. 



North St. Louis Turning Sliop, 

-AND— 

Furniture Manufactory, 

H. KBIEGSHAUSER & CO., 

3Sl'i N. Ninth Street. 

Stone Cutters' Mallets, Stair Ballupters and Newel 

Posts always on hand. All kinds of turning 

done on the shortest notice. All orders 

promptly filled. 

UPHOLSTERERS, 

CCRELl & FRA?iCOIS, Upholsterers and Repair- 
ers, 117 and 119 S, Seve nth st. 

OHRNMEL, L., UPHOlTSTKRER, Mattresses 

and Bedding, 1917 Franklin ave. 
RUSE, C. F., Practical Upholsterer, 

1213 Olive street. 



K 
K 



J. A. MADDEN & CO., 

Cabinet Makers M Upholsterers, 

Leave orders to have your 

Furniture, Mattresses, Bedding, etc., etc., 
Cleaned, Upholstered and Repaired. 
713 MORGAN STREET. 
^acking and Shipping at shortest notice. 



WM. AVARMBOLD, 

Upholsterer, 

Mf'r, Wholesale and Retail Dealer in 

Hair, Moss, SJiuck and Spring Mattresses, 

2607 FRANKLIN AVE. 

VINEGAR AND PICKLES, 

ZOTT & GILMORE, Vinegar and Pickles, 
207 N. Main st. 



WATCHES, CLOCKS AND JEWELRY. 

RAWE, H. C, Dealer in Fine Jewelry, Watch- 
es, Clocks, etc., 82" N. Fourth st. 



G 



Fred. Herkstroeter, 

Dealer in 

Watches, Jewelry, Guns, 

IPISTOXjS, &0-, 
1009 Cass Avenue. 

Between loth and nth sts. 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OE THE CENTURY. 



71 



St. Louis — Continued. 



WATCHES, CLOCKS AND JEWELRY. 
R,. J-.A.E<3-£lIl]Sd:.A.IsriSr Sc CO, 

Practical Watch Makers, 

218 N, FOUETH STREET, 



kinds of Watch Repairing done at very 
low prices, and on short notice. 

Dealer in 

Watches, Jewelry and Optical Goods, 

306 N. Fourth Street. 

Under Everett House. 

Watches & Jewelry Skillfully and Promptly 
Repaired. 



K 



0BTK.4.MP, E. H., Watch-maker and Jeweler, 
514 Franklin ave. 



M 



AUCH, H., Watch-maker and Jeweler, 407 
Franklin ave., and 3201 S. Seventh st. 



S 



TUDLER, J. P., Dealer in Watches and Clocks, 
2033 Franklin ave. 



WHITENERS. 

Chas. Hall & Co., 

"^TsT'Ib-iterLers 

—AND GENERAL - 

To"b"bers. 

930 N. SIXTH STREET. 

Bet. Franklin ave., and Wash st. 



PRETABOIB, SAMUEL & CO., Whiteners and 
Plasterers, N. E, cor. Sixth and Spruce sts. 



WILLOW WARE. 

Manufacturer, Wholesale and Retail Dealer in 
PLAIN AND ORNAMENTAL 

WILLOW WARE, 

OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS, 

714 & 7 16 Market Street. 

WINDOW GLASS. 

VOIGT, EDWARir&"cor~WlNI)Ow"GLA^ 
Paints, Dye-stuffs, etc., 323 N. Main st. 

WINES AND LIQUORS, 

HUBER, J. G. & CO., California Wines and 
Brandies, 212 S. Fourth st. 

STERN, SOL. & CO., Win ■« and Liquors, Cased 
Cigars a specialty, 203 N. Main st. 



1795. 

seas and the evacuation of the forts on the 
frontier. 

Aug'. 3. — Commissioners of the United 
States meet the Indian chiefs of western tribes 
at Greenville, Ohio, and conclude a treaty of 
peace, by which the United States obtains a 
large tract of land in the present States of 
Micliigan and Indiana. 

Yellow fever pestilence in New York. 

1796. 

June. — Tennessee admitted into the Uni- 
ted States, making the number of States in the 
Union sixteen. 

Louis Phillippe, King of France, arrived in 
Philadelphia. He makes a tour through the 
country; returns again to tlie United States 
in 1800, thence to France, and dies in England 
in 1848. 

Credit of the Government re-established, 
and all disputes with foreign powers, except 
France, adjusted. 

Sept. 17. — Washington issued his fare- 
well address. 

1797. 

John Adams inaugurated President of the 
United States; Thomas Jefferson, Vice-Presi- 
dent-. 

]^lay 15. — An extra session of Congress 
was convened to consider our relations with 
France. Our government had been insulted by 
the French minister here, the American minis- 
ter ordered to leave' France, and the French 
authorized depredations upon our commerce. 
Three envoys, appointed by Congress to pro- 
ceed to France to adjust difficulties, were re- 
fused an audience unless they would pay a tri- 
bute to the Frencli treasury, and, upon refusal, 
were ordered out of the country. 

j\ov. — Congress convened, and prepara- 
tions were made for war with France. 
179S. 

Alien and sedition laws adopted by the Uni- 
ted States. The first authorized the President 
to expel from the country any person not a 
citizen, who should be suspected of conspiring 
against the Republic. The sedition law au- 
thorized the suppression of publications calcu- 
lated to weaken the authority of the govern- 
ment. 

jflay. — Quite a large standing army was 
authorized by Congress, and in July Washing- 
ton was appointed its Commander-in-Chief. 
The army was never summoned to the field. 
1799. 

Ja.u. — Lafayette returns to France. 

relj.— Hostilities commenced on the ocean 
between the United States and France, and the 
U. S. frigate Constellation captures the French 
frigate L'Insurgente. 

Tel*. 3<S. — Three commissioners proceed 
to France to negotiate for peace. When they 
arrived in France they found the government 
in the hands of Napoleon Bonaparte. He 
promptly received the commissioners, con- 
cluded a treaty of peace September 30, 1800, 
and gave such assurances of friendly relations 
that the provincial army of the United States 
was disbanded. 

I>ec. 1-1. — Washington died at Mount 
Vernon, at the age of sixty-eight years. At 
the recommendation of Congress, the wearing 
of crape on the left arm for thirty days, was 
pretty generally complied with. 



72 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



RIPLEY'S 

Casti Besister, 



For Recordinsr 



CASHSALES 

Saves 

TIME AND MONEY! 

Is simple and Practical. 




Does away witli paper slips, 

And is a 

PROTECTIOS 

against mistakes and discrep- 
ancies in retail cash 
accounts. 

H. P. HOOD 

Sole Manufacturer, 
INDIAJfAPOLIS, IND. 

Send for Circular. 



KOLYER & KERR'S 




Livery, Sale & Feed Stables 

103 &' 202 W. WasJiingtoii St,,Indianwpolis. 

Boarding a Specialty. Horses and Buggies Bouglit and Sold. Give us a call. 



MACHINERY 

LABELS 

PORTRAITS 

POSTERS 

Lc.&c. 









RESIGNS 

^AND — 

ESTIMATES 

I! 
CHEERFULLY 

AND PROMPTLY 

FURNISHED. j\ 



W^^im^m^^ 







ADVERTISEMENTS. 



73 




JAS. W.WARRICK, 

Mtirief at Law, 



UOOIM ^J^. 



VANCE BLOCK, INDiANAPOLIS, IND 



VANCE BLOCK, 

Indianapolis. 



Geo. Rhodius, Proprietor. F. Lindner, E. Kitz, A. Orsbach, Clerks 

On the European Plcin. 




No. 15 iNoriJi Meridan JSt., Indianapolis, Ind. 

The Circle House is centrally situated in the midst of the business portion of Indianapolis, and 
close to the Union Depot. The Rooms are fine, large and mvy. 

THE SAMPLE ROOMS, for Merchants to display their Goods, are the finest of any Hotel in the 
West. A First-class REST A URA.NT is attached to the Hotel, where Meals are served up at all hours 
of the day. The rates are regulated by the Bill of Fare. A First-class BARBER SHOB is connected 
with this Hotel, where Hotanrt Cold Baths may be taken. 

The English, German and French ll,angiiages are spoken by the Clerks, and the Traveling 
Public are well accommodated and served. 

REGULAR RATES TO SUIT THE TIMES, $2.00 PER DAT. 

WOOD AND SEAL ENGRAVERS 

JSTo. 118 W, Third St,, St. Louis, 3Io. 



74: 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OF THE CENTURY. 



ISOO. 

Fel>. 1.— The U. S. frigate Constellation 
had an action with the French frigate La Ven- 
geance, but escaped capture, after a loss of 160 
men killed and wounded. 

Removal of the Capitol from Philadelphia to 
Washington. 

A second census was taken, and the popula- 
tion of the Union was found to be 5,319,762, an 
increase of 1,400,000 in ten years. The revenue, 
which amounted to !i;4,771,000 in 1790, now 
amounted to |13, 000,000. 

Tlie inoculation of the kine pock introduced 
into America by Professor Waterhouse of 
Cambridge, Mass. 

1801. 

Eepeal of the act imposing internal duties. 
The enforcement of this law is what caused the 
whisky insurrection in Western Pennsjdvania 
in 1794. 

j^Iarcli 4:. — Thomas Jefferson inaugurated 
President of the United States, and Aaron 
Burr Vice-President. When the electors 
counted the votes Jefferson and Burr had an 
equal number. According to the provisions of 
the Constitution the vote was then transferred 
to the House of Representatives. Mr. Jeffer- 
son was finally chosen President after 35 ballots, 
and Burr proclaimed Vice-President. 

June lO. — Tripoli declares war against 
the United States. Prior to the declaration of 
war ( 1800 ) Capt. Bainbridge arrived at Algiers, 
in the frigate George Washington. The Dey 
demanded the use of his vessel to carry an am- 
bassador to Constantinople. Bainbridge re- 
monstrated, when the Dey haughtily observed : 
"You pay me tribute, by which you become 
my slaves, and therefore I have a right to 
order you as I think proper." Bainbridge was 
obliged to comply, for the castle guns would 
not allow him to pass out of the harbor. 
1803. 

April. — Ohio admitted as a State, with a 
population of 72,000. 

Yellow fever ravages in Philadelphia. 

Merino sheep introduced into the United 
States by Mr. Livingston and General Hum- 
phreys. 

Military academy founded at West Point, on 
the Hudson. 

180». 

Com. Preble sent to humble the Algeriiie 
pirates. After bringing the Emperor of Moroc- 
co to terms, his squadron proceeded to Tripoli. 
One of his vessels ( the Philadelphia ) struck 
on a rock while reconnoitering, and was cap- 
tured by the Tripolitans. The officers were 
treated as prisoners, but the crew were made 
slaves. 

April. — Louisiana purchased of France 
for .$15,000,000, and divided into Territory of 
New Orleans and the District of Louisiana. It 
contained a mixed population of about 85,000, 
and 40,000 slaves at this time. 

Jerome Bonaparte, nineteen years of 
age, arrived in New York. He visits Balti- 
more, falls in love there with a Miss Patterson 
and marries her. In 1805 he returns to France, 
leaving his wife to follow. The Emperor for- 
bids her to enter France, and had the marriage 
annulled by the French Council. Jerome then 
married the daughter of the King of Wurtem- 
berg, and six days after was made King of 
Westphalia. 

Louisiana purchased from the French gov- 
ernment for fifteen million dollars. 




When Established. 



ABE, A., Gunsmith, 1869. 

BARNEY, M. V., Boots and Shoes, 1873. 

BEATTIE, A. F., Crescent Fluid, 1875. 

BERNARD & CO., Flour and Commis- 
sion Merchants, 1837. 

BOUCHER, LEON & CO., Paints and 
Oils, 1867. 

BRYAN, J. E., Patent Agency, 1877. 

CURTIS & CO., Saw Manufacturers, 1854^ 

DURGIN, F. A., Silverware, 1853. 

FRITZ, GEO. J., Iron Works, 1872. 

GALLAGHER, J. P., Plumber, 1859. 

GARRETT, M'DOWELL & CO., Pig 
Iron, 1868. 

GARSTANG, R., Boiler Mf r, 1863. 

GIBBS, J. S. & CO., Canned Goods, 1872, 

HACKMANN, JOHN F., Saddles and 
Harness, 1874. 

HARRIS, J. G. & CO., Engravers, 1868. 

HASELTINE, W. B., Leather and Find- 
ings, 1849. 

JAEGERMANN, R. & CO., Watch-mak- 
ers, 1871. 

JONES' COMMERCIAL COLLEGE, 
1841. 

JOSEPH, M., Jeweler, 1874. 

JOST, N., Corks, 1872. 

KOHLER, J. L., Employment Agency, 
1869. 

LAITNER, F. J. & SON, Brushes, 1847. 

LEWANDOVSKA, MME., Millinery. 
1855. 

M'CABE, JAMES J., Mill Picks, 1862. 

M'CANN&CO., Carriage Mf'rs, 1876. 

M'ELRATH, A., Gents' Furnishing Goods, 
1872. 

RANDOLPH, D. S., English Kitchen, 
1861. 

REDDEN, A., Boots ana Shoes, 1875. 

SAWYER, F.O. & CO., Wliolesale Paper, 
1859. 

SCHAEFER, GEO. W., Horse-shoer, 1861. 

SLICER, W. C, Architect, 1870. 

SPRAGUE & BUTLER, Restaurant, ] 862. 

STANBltRY, IRA. JR , Agt. Cromos, 1875 

ST. LOUIS UNIVERSITY, 1829. 

THORNBURGH, J. M'C, & CO., Gro. 
cers' Sundries, 1878. 

TIVY & PURCELL, Gen'l Commission 
Merchants, 1856. 

VERRIER, E. v., Spice Mills, 1841. 

WALSH BROS.,Grocers' Specialties, 1877. 

WATKINS & GILLILA.ND, Hats and 
Caps, 1877. 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OF THE CENTUKY. 



75 



INDIANAPOLIS. 

ABSTRACTS OF TITLE. 

WM. C. ANDERSON, 
ABSTRACTS OF TITLE, 

TO 

Eeal Estate in Marion Co., Ind. 

Moore's Block, 

86 E. Market St.JNDIANAPOLIS, IND. 



AGEIOULTUEAL IMPLEMENTS, 



P 



REEB, H. J., Agricultural Implements, 177 E. 
Washington st. 



ARCHITECTS. 

Bohlen & Both, 

BRANDON BLOCK, 

INDIANAPOLIS, IND. 

R. M. GOSBY^ 



ROOM 65, TANCE BLOCK, 

Indianapolis, Ind. 

NOS, B. V. & SON, Architects, 33 and 34 Tal- 
bott's block. 



E 



I. HODGSON, 
ARCHITECT, 

INDIANAPOLIS, - IND. 

Established, 1856. 

EDWIN MAY, 

ARCHITECT I SHPERINTESDENT, 

Plans furnished for 

lUre-proof Court Houses, " May's Patent 

Jail," Residences, Stores, School 

Buildings, Churches, &c.. 

Office, 5 and 6 Glenn's Block. 



B 



ASSESSOR. 

ROUSE, D. W., Township Assessor, office in 
in Court House. 



ATTORNEYS AT LAW. 

COULON, CHAS., Attorney and Counselor at 
Law, Notary Public, 27'^ S. Delawar e st 
OWNEY, A. C. Sl sons, Attorneys at Law, 
Washington and Meriaian ets. 



1804. 

Fel*. 3. — Lieut. Decatur, with only 76 men. 
sails into the harbor of Tripoli, boards the 
Philadelphia, killed and drove into the .sea all 
the Tripolitans defending her, set fire to the 
ves.se4, and returned to the American squadron 
without losing a man. 

•Filly 13. — Alexander Hamilton killed in a 
duel by Aaron Burr. The difficulty grew out 
of a political quarrel. Burr had been informed 
of some remarks made by Hamilton in public, 
derogatory to his character, and he demanded 
a retraction. Hamilton considered his demand 
unreasonable, and refused compliance. Burr 
challenged him to fight, and Hamilton reluct- 
antly met him on the west side of the Hudson, 
near Hoboken, N. J., where they fought with 
pistols. Hamilton discharged his \veapon in 
the air, but Burr took fatal aim, and his antag- 
onist fell. Hamilton died the next day. 

Brown University, R. I., established. 

A large fire occurred in New York on Wall, 
Front, and Water streets. Forty or fifty houses 
were destroyed. 

1S05. 

The Pennsylvania Acadamy of Fine Arts 
founded. 

Michigan created into a Territory. 

cFiiiie 3. — The Pasha of Tripoli makes 
terms of peace. 

Yellow fever pestilence in New^ York. 
1806. 

Caiise of "War in 1S13. — England 
insists upon continuing the right to search 
American vessels for suspected deserters from 
the British navy. American seamen were 
thus forced into the British service, under the 
pretense that they were deserters. The British 
in persisting in this outrage upon American 
seamen brought on the war of 1812. 

Xreason of Burr. — During the sum- 
mer of this year Aaron Burr organized military 
expeditions in the west, and the secrecy with 
which he carried on his operations, led the gov- 
ernment to suspect that he designed to dis- 
member the Union, and establish an independ- 
ent empire west of the AUeghenies, with him- 
self at the head. 

1S07. 

Fel). — Aaron Burr arrested on the Tombig- 
bee river, in the State of Alabama, on the 
charge of treason. He was tried at Richmond, 
Ya., but the testimony showed that his proba- 
ble design was an invasion of Mexican prov- 
inces, and then to establish an independent 
government. He \vas acquitted. 

«Jiiuo 'Z'i. — The Chesapeake fired upon by 
the British frigate Leopard. The British de- 
manded four seamen from the commander of 
the Chesapeake, claiming them as deserters 
from the British ship Melampus. Commodore 
Barron, not suspecting danger, and unprepared 
for an attack, surreJiderud the Chesapeake 
after losing three men killed and eighteen 
wounded. 

•Tilly. — Proclamation issued ordering all 
British armed vessels to leave the waters of 
the United States, and forbidding any to enter 
until full satisfaction is given for the outrage 
on the United States frigate Chesapeake, and 
security against future aggressions should bo 
made. 

)I\ov. 11. — British in council issue anord,.-r 
prohibiting neutral nations trading with France, 
excepting upon paying a tribute to Great 
Britain ; and France retaliates by issuing a 



76 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



Indianapolis — Continued. 



ATTOENEYS AT LAW, ^ ^ 

J. KOSS DUBBS, 

Attorney & Counselor 

AT LAV/, 
Room 8, Fletcher & Sharp's Bank Bl'g, 

Cor. Pennsylvania I Washington Sis., 

INDIANAPOLIS. IND. 



GREEN A PEARSON, Lawj^ers, Room 4, ^tna 
Builclins, 17 N. Pennsylvauia St. _ 

K 



ELLOtlG. JUSTIN A., Attorney at Law, 201/2 N. 

Do 1 aw are st. 

ABMELEE A NORTON, Attorneys at Law, Room 
17, HubbarcVs block. 

S. L. ROWAN, 

Autliorized 

U. S. CLAIM ATTORNEY, 

56 W. Wasliinffton Street, 

INDIANAPOLIS, IND. 

ARRICK, JAMES W., Attorney at Law, Room 

28, Vance block. 

ARTIFICIAL LIMBS, ^ _____ 

Artificial Limbs and Braces for Deformities. 






f^^iSSUmgrni 



w 



/m/ANAPOLISjtNDi 



173 EAST AVASHINOTON ST. 

Circulars sent free. 



B 



BAG MANUPACTUREKS, 

UTIjER, E. Y. k CO., Paper Bag Manufacturers, 
315 E . Washington St. 



BAKING POWDER, 
^^"^^ciiuRCHMAN & CO., 

Mnfrs. of Imperial Baking Powder, 

Flavoring Extracts, Cream of Tartar, &c. 
Esfd.1875. .W S. PENNSYLVANIA ST. 



B 



BARBERS. 
ECKER, CHAS. T., Barber Shop, 



Indianapolis — Continued. 



BARBERS. 

CIRCLE HOUSE BARBER SHOP, Brand & Harms, 
props., 19 N. Meridian st. 

ARRIS. THOS. F., Barber and Hairdresser, 315 
Indiana ave. 



H 



ILL, J. T. T., Barber Shop, 



36 Indiana ave. 



THE ENTERPRISE SHAVING & HAIRDRESSING 
Saloon. H. Jaeckel, prop.. 84 Mass. ave. 
ATTERSON,G. C, Barber Shop, 
410 Indiana ave. 

SUESS BROTHERS, 

loS E. Washington Street. 

Ladies' and Children's Hair Shampooed and 
cut in the latest style at the shop or their resi- 
dence. The Hair can be saved in straight and 
separate braids, and without loss in length. 

TURNER, A.. Shaving and Hiiirdressing Saloon, 
51 Kentucky ave. Established, 1835. 

BILL POSTERS, 
HAUBISON ,& ABRAMS^ 

CITY BILL POSTERS, 

Large stands in all prominent parts of city. 
Oli'li'IC'E, tfottmnl Jiiiildiiif/, InclianwpoUs. 

Orders sent by mail or express to our address, 
promptly attended tc. 

BLACKSMITHS AND H0RSESH0ERS,5 

Blacksmithing, Horseshoeing 

Plow & Wagon Repairing, Manufacturing, &c,, 

Est'd 1864. 32 S. Tennessee St. 

G. W. VAN ANTV/ERP, 

Horseshoeing^ Shop I 

302 E, Washington St,, Indianapolis, Ind, 
Established, 1862. 



w 



OOD, CHAS. T. & CO., Blacksmithing and 
Horseshoeing, 281 W. Washington st. 



BOARDING HOUSES, 

EVEL, MRS. SARAH, Boarding House, 271 W. 
Washington st. 



B 



MORGAN, MRS. SADIE M., Day Boarding House, 
167 W. Washington st. 

BOILER MANUPACTURER, 



R 



EAGAN, E., Boiler Manufacturer, 365 W. Wash- 
ington St. 



13 Indiana ave. 



BOOKS AND STATIONERY. 



B 



ARTH & PRESTON. Stationery, Periodicals, Ci- 
gars, Tobacco and K:iuit8,10 W. Louisiana st. 



GOLDHAUSEN, FRANZ, German Bookseller and 
News Agent, 195 E. Washington st. 

BOOTS AND SHOES. 

CAMPLIN, DARROW & CO., Whole ale Boots 
and Shoes, 78 S. Meridian st. Est'd 1873. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



77 



We constantly keep 




on hand the celehi^ated 



''H. M. WILMOT GOLD AND STEEL PENS," 

Which for Flexibility, Durability, Smoothness of Action, and Proper Shape, are not excelled by any other 



Pen mannfactured, For Price List, etc, address, WILMOT, DEMTN& & BOYD, Madison, Wis, 




MADISON — Capital of fki State of J T/sri? ;/?/«, and County seat of Dane Co. The 
city is pleasantly situated on an isthmus about three-fourths of a mile -vide, betzveen lakes Men- 
data and Alonona., in the centre of a broad valley., surrounded by lieights from -vltich it can he 
seen at a distance of several miles. Lake Mendota lies norfhv.'est of the totvn, is six miles 
long', and four miles xvide, ivitJi clean, gravelly shores, and a depth sujficient for steamboat nav- 
igation ( estimated at about 60 feet). 



78 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OF THE CENTURY. 



1807. 

decree December 17. forbidding all trade with 
England or her colonies, and authorizing- the 
confiscation of any vessel found in French ports 
which had submitted to English search, or paid 
the exacted tribute. These retaliating war 
measures between England and France almost 
destroyed American shipping trade abroad. 

I>ec. 23. — Congress decreed an embargo, 
which detained all vessels, American and 
foreign, in our ports, and ordered American 
vessels home immediately, that the seamen 
might be trained for war. 

The first steamboat built in the world by 
Kobert Fulton, in New York. It was named 
"Clermont," and made its first trip during this 
year from New York to Albany. 
180S. 

Jan. 1. — The importation of African slaves 
into the United States, prohibited by Congress. 

Commodore Barron, of the Chesapeake, tried 
and sentenced to be suspended for five years, on 
account of surrendering his vessel to the Brit- 
ish in 1807. 

1809. 

:^Iai*cli 1. — Congress repeals the embargo 
on shipping, and at the same time passes a law 
forbidding all commercial intercourse with 
England and France until their obnoxious re- 
strictions on commerce shall be ren ed. 

jflavcli 4:. — James Madison augurated 
President of the United Statc^ nd George 
Clinton as Vice-President. 

General Harrison concludes a treaty with 
the Miami Indians, by which the United States 
gets possession of a large tract of land on both 
sides of the Wabash. 

1810. 

Third census of the United States. Popula- 
tion, 7,239,814. 

Marcli 33. — France issued a decree which 
declared eveiy American vessel which had 
entered French ports since March, 1810, or that 
might thereafter enter, as forfeited, and au- 
thorized the sale of the same, together with the 
cargoes, and money to be placed in the French 
treasury. Bonaparte justified this decree on 
the plea that it was made in retaliation for the 
American decree of non-intercourse. 

j^lay. — Congress offers to resume commer- 
cial relations with either France or England, 
or both, on condition that they repeal their ob- 
noxious orders and decrees before March 3, 
1811. France feigned compliance, and the 
United States resumed commercial intercourse 
with that nation. But American vessels con- 
tinued to be siezed by French cruisers, and on 
March, 1811, Napoleon declared the obnoxious 
laws to still exist, and America thereafter 
ceased intercourse with that nation. 
1811. 

April 16. — Engagement between the 
American frigate, President, Commodore Rog- 
ers commanding, and the British sloop-of-war. 
Little Belt, Captain Bingham. The Little 
Belt was preying upon American merchantmen 
when hailed by Rogers, of the President, and 
received a cannon shot in reply. A brief ac- 
tion ensued, when Captain Bingham, after los- 
ing eleven men killed and twenty-one wound- 
ed^ gave a satisfactory answer to Rogers. At 
this time, the American navy numbered only 
twelve large vessels of war ; the British near 
nine hundred. 

Ulay 1J>.— A fire broke out near the corner 



Indianapolis — Contmued. 



BOOTS AND SHOES, 
J. W. Strong. George Schopp. 

^^^ CO-OPERATIVE 

FASHIONABLE 




Boot and Shoe Makers, 

42 W. Maryland St., Indianapolis. 

Repairing neatly and promptly done. 

WM I. FISHER, 

Custom 

BOOT AND SHOE MAKER, 

15 MASSACHUSETTS AVE., 

Indianapolis, - Indiana. 
W. I. Fisher, formerly with Joseph Wert. 

J. FOX, 

Fashionable 

BOOT AND SHOE MAKER, 

Repairing a Specialty. Established 1873. 

H 



M 



ART, C. H., Mf 'r Boots and Shoes. 411 Indiana 

ave. All work warranted. 
UFT, WM. Manufacturer of Boots and Shoes, 

i 2(i4 W. Washington st. 

IliLER. W. >V., Dealer in Boots and Shoes, 
Wasliingtou and Illinois sts. 

M. J. Murphy, 

—PRACTICAL— 

Boot and Shoe Maker, 

59 INDIANA AVENUE. 

Established 1871. 

J. D. ITelsoxx, 

Manufacturer of 
LADIES' AND GENTS' FASHIONABLE 

Boots, Shoes and Gaiters, 

Lasts made to order, a specialty. 

21 Oircl© S»tr©©t. 

OLAN, EDWARD, Boot and Shoe Store, 

23 Indiana ave. 



N 



N 



UGUE, A., Boot and Shoe Maker, and Dealer 
in Cigars, 114 Illinois st. 



L. PETERSON, 

Manufacturer of 

First-Class BOOTS 

AND SHOES TO ORDER, 




13 Madison Avenue. 

Satisfaction Guaranteed. 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OF THE CENTURY. 



79 



Iniiianapolis — Continued. 



BOOTS AND SHOES, 
CHULTE, JOHN, Custom Boot and Shoe Maker, 



SCHU 
28S 



283 E. Washington st. 



UPDEORAFF, GEO. W., Boot and Shoe Maker, 
235 E. Washington st. 



w 



ALTER, \VM., Manufacturer of Boots and 
Shoes, 30 Kentucky av. All work warranted. 



w 
w 



EBB, GEO., Auction and Commissidn Mer 
chant in Boots & Shoes, 61 S. Meridian st. 

EHLE, LUCAS, Manufacturer, and Dealer in 
Boots and Shoes, 194 E. Washington st. 



BRASS FOUNDERS AND FINISHERS. 

I"ln)IANAPOLIslBBASS FOUNDRY, 106 and 108 S. 
Delf.ware st. H. Stacet, Prop. 
EUBACHER, L., BRASS FOUNDER and Fin- 
isher, 90 E. Georgia st. 

Rudolph Droessler, 

Brass Finisher, 



9G S. DELAWARE ST., 

Indianapolis. 

BUTTER, EGGSANDPRODUCE^^^ 

JONES, G. E., Dealer in Butter, Eggs, and Poul- 
try, 24 Indiana ave. 
TUART BROS., Dealers in Butter and Eggs, 37 
IM ass, ave. Cash paid for Country Produce. 



S 



CAR-WHEEL MANUFACTURERS, 

Thomas May & Co. 

Manufacturers of the Standard 

—AND LOCOMOTIVE— 

Spoke Engine Truck Wheels a Specialty. 
Cor, Tenth and Sheldon Sts, 

CARPET DEALERS. 

HAWKES, P. C, Manufacturer, and Dea'er in 
Rag and Listing Ca rpets. 9014 Mass. Ave. 

OFFMAN & HUTCHINSON, Manufaliturers and 
Dealers in Carpets, 14 E. Washington s t. 

CARPENTERS AND BUILDERS, 

CHAMBERL.AIN, J. H., Contractor and Builder, 
2;i3 N. Noble St. Est. 1857. 



FULTON & VANCE, Plain & Fancy Fly-Screens 
for Doors and Windows, 241 & 243 Mass. ave. 



JINKINS, .JOHN, CAKPENTKR and Cabinet 
Maker, 26 E. South st. 

Thomas Richards, 

CONTRACTOE . 



-AND- 



BUILDER, 



129 E. Maryland Street, 

Est. 1835. 



1^11. 

of Chatham and Duane street.s, N. Y., and de- 
stroyed nuaily one hnntlrcd buildings on both 
sides of Cliatiiam street. 

IVov. 11.— Battle of Tippecanoe. At four 
o'clock in the morning, the Indians attacked 
the American camp, commanded by Gen. Har- 
ri.son, but after a bloodj battle, lasting until 
dawn, the Indians were repulsed. The battle 
of Tippecanoe was one of the most desperate 
ever fought with the Indians, and the loss was 
heavy on both sides. 

The British government declare the attack 
on the Chesapeake to have been unauthorized, 
and promised pecuniary aid to the families of 
those who were killed. 

I>ec. 37.— Burning of the Theatre at 
Richmond, Va. There were about 600 persons 
in the audience whenthe fire was first discov- 
ered. There was but one door for egress, and 
men, women and children were pressing upon 
each other to get out, while the flames were 
surging upon those behind. It is supposed 
there were 61 persons burned to death. 

During this year, British orders for 
searching American vessels and impressing 
American seamen were rigorously enforced : 
insult after insult was offered the American 
flag, and the British press insolenth- boasted 
that th,' United States "could not be kicked 
into a W'. '' A continuation of these outrages 
brought 'he war of 1812. 
1813. 

Tfar of 1813. — Congress passed an 
act empowering the President to enlist 25,- 
000 men, accept 50,000 volunteers, and to call 
out 100,000 militia. Henry Dearborn appointed 
commander-in-chief. 

British Government declared the whole 
American coast to be in a state of block- 
ade, except that of the New England States. 
The apparent sympathy of these States with 
Great Britain caused the enemies of our coun- 
try to think that they would secede from the 
Union ; but, as the war progressed, it proved 
that their patriotism was was too stroog to ad- 
mit of such a catastrophe. 

June. — Mob in Baltimore. A newspaper, 
called the Federal Bei^tihlican , was destroyed 
by a mob for uttering sentiments of censure 
on the conduct of the Government. Shortly 
after this ati'air, the paper made its appearance 
again, containing severe allusions to the 
mayor, police, and people of Baltimore for the 
depredations that had been committed upon 
the establishment. The office was again 
mobbed, and during the frequent discharge of 
muskets, Dr. Gale was killed, when the party 
in the office were finally escorted by the mili- 
tary to the county jail for protection against 
further violence. Shortly after dark, the mob 
assembled at the jail, carried the mayor away 
by force, and compelled the turnkey to open 
the door. General Lingan was killed : eleven 
were beaten and mangled with such weapons 
as stones, bludgeons, sledge-hammers, etc.. 
and thrown as dead into one pile. Mr. Han- 
son, editor of the paper, fainting from re- 
peated wovinds, was carried away by a gentle- 
man of opposite political sentiments, at the 
risk of his life. Xo effectual inquiry was ever 
made into this violation of the law, and the 
guilty escaped punishment. 

First house in Rochester, N. Y., built. 

April 8. — Louisiana admitted as a State. 

JLpvil 13. — Death of George Clinton, 
Vice-President of the United States. 



80 ADVERTISEMENTS. 



Watch Maker and Jeweler, 

AND DEALER IN 

Watches, Clocks, Jewelry and Spectacles. 

Special attention given to all -work done. All G-oods sold 
Engraved free of charge. 

RICHMOKD EDGE TOOL MANUFACTURING COMPANY. 






MANUFACTUREKS OF THE CELEBRATED 

RICHIXEOND ZSDGK TOOXaS 

One Square West of Union Depot, EICHMOND, IND, 

Repairing promptly attended to. SPECIALTIES— Axes, Hatchets, Butchers' and R. R. Tools. 

FULTON BOILER WORKS, 

ESTABLISHED 1876, 

JEHHY COVmiG, Proprietor. 

(Late Foreman Boiler Maker of Robinson IVlachine Works.) 

Nortli of Union Depot, RICHMOND, IND, 
Steam Boilers of every Description, 

Lard Tanks and Coolers, Smoke Stacks and Brichings, Plate Iron 
Work of all Kinds. Second-Hand Boilers bought and 
sold. Repairing promptly attended to, 
at hard-pan prices. 

Estimates furnished on application. Send for Circular. 

J. B. MESSINGER. R. A. PROSEUS. J.A.HERMAN. 

MESSINGER, PROSEUS, & CO., 

EST^A-BHilSHEID 186S. 

Manufacturers and Wholesale and Retail Dealers in the 

Improved Stone Cylinder Pump, 




Porcelain Lined and llie Old style Wood Pmd. Well and Drain Pije Fnrnisned to Order. 

Factory, Cor. Elm and Diiret Sts., LOOANSPORT, IND. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



81 




Iiicliaiiapolis, Incl. 

t! B^wightman. IT?. IB_A_!i^ jBIE^ c5c OO. 

The only Hotel in the City with Passenger Elevator and all Modern Improvements. 
Rates reduced to $3.00 per day. Extra for Rooms with Bath. 

House, Sign and Ornamental 



Paper Mm, Decorating, Calsominiiii,Wall 
Tinting, (Training, Slazing, Varnislilni, k. 

No. 127 ^ast Maryland Street, 

IIIfDIAlTAPOIilS. 



R. R. ROUSE, 

Iif eitor of Iiroyei Dmei Wells, 

And Agent for all Kinds of 

Well, Cistej'fh, Lift and Force Pumps, Tubing 
Filter Points, and all Improved 
Tools for Well Drivers, 
^^ Steam Fittings, Rubber Hose and Packing, Niag- 
ara Steam Pumps and Engines. 

STRATA VIEW OF DRIVEN WELL. Storc, No. 19 W. MaTjIanil St., iDdianapolis, Ind. 





82 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OF THE CENTURY. 



June 4. — War with England. A bill de- 
claring war to exist between the United States 
and Great Britain, passed the House of Repre- 
sentatives, by a vote of 79 to 49. On the 17th, 
it passed the Senate br a vote of 19 to 13, and 
on that day it received the signature of the 
President. He issued his war manifesto two 
days afterward, 

July 13. — Gen. Hull crosses the Detroit 
river to attack Fort Maiden. He encamped at 
Sandwich, and by this fatal delay, lost every 
advantage which an immediate attack might 
have secured 

July 17. — Fort Mackinaw, one of the 
strongest posts of the United States, was sur- 
prised and captured by an allied force of Brit- 
ish and Indians. 

Ang^. 5. — Maj. Van Home, while escorting 
a supply party to camp, was defeated by some 
British and Indians, near Brownstown, on the 
Huron river. 

Aug'. 7. — Gen. Hull retires from Canada 
and takes his post at Detroit. 

Aug'. 13. — The Essex, Captain Porter, 
captures the Alert, the first vessel taken from 
the British during that war. 

Aug'. IC — Hull surrenders Detroit to the 
British. The English were commanded by 
Brock, consisting of 700 troops and 600 In- 
dians. 

Aug:. 1®- — U. S. frigate. Constitution, 
Commodore Isaac Hull, captures the British 
frigate, Guerriere. The contest lasted about 
forty minutes when the commander of the 
Guerriere surrendered his vessel, which was so 
■completely wrecked that she was burned. The 
Constitution suffered little damage and was 
ready for action the following daj'. 

Sept. lO — Perry's victory on Lake Erie. 

Oct. 13. — Queenstown Heights on the Can- 
ada frontier, captured by 225 Americans un- 
der command of Col. Van Renselear. Van 
Renselear was wounded at the landing, and 
Capt. Wood took command and success- 
fully assaulted and took possession of the 
Heights. 

Oct. 13 —Gen. Brock, with 600 British 
troops, from Fort George, attempted to regain 
the battery at Queenstown Heights but was re- 
pulsed and Brock was killed. In the meantime 
Gen Stephen Van Renselear was using his ut- 
most endeavors to send reinforcements, but 
only 1,000 undiciplined troops could be induced 
to cross the river. These were attacked by 
fresh troops from Fort George and nearly ail 
killed or made prisoners, while at least 1,500 of 
their companions in arms cowardly refused to 
cross to their aid. 

Oct. 1*. — U. S. sloop-of-war, Wasp, Capt. 
Jones, captures the British brig Frolic, after a 
very severe conflict for three-quarters of an 
hour. Only three officers and one seaman, of 
84 of the crew of the Frolic remained unhurt. 
The Wasp lost only ten men. The same after- 
noon the British ship Poictiers, carrying 74 
guns, captured the Wasp. 

Oct. 33.— The frigate United States, Com- 
modore Decatur, captures the British frigate 
Macedonia. The fight lasted near two hours. 
The British lost more than 100 in killed and 
wounded, and Decatur lost only five killed and 
seven wounded. The frigate United States 
was very little injured. 

During this year, it is estimated that up- 
wards of 50 British armed vessels and 250 
merchantmen, with an aggregate of more than 



I NDi ANAPOLis — Conh'jiued. 



CARRIAGE AND WAGON MAKERS. 



B 
B 



LACK & BACKUS, Carriages and Spring Wag- 
ons, 36, 38 and 44 E. Maryland St. 

REMEKMAS, F. & CO., Carriages and Farm 
Wagons, 86 and 88 E . New York st. Est. 1862. 



D 



REW & W.ADDELL, Carriages, Buggies and 
Phaetons, 123 and 125 N. Delaware st. 



Fred. Gessert, 

Manufacturer of 

CARRIAGES & WAGOJfS, 

AND 

BLACKSMITHING. 

333 Madison Avenne. 

Prompt atteutior to Repairing and General Job- 
bing. Horse-shoeing promptly done. Est. 1854. 

HELPER. A. A., Carriages. Buggies and Spring 
Wagons, 26-30 Tennessee st. 
SCHWEIKLE. & PRANGE, Manufacturers of Car- 
riages & Wagons, 424 & 426 E. Washington st. 

Carl S. "Welilizig, 
BLACKSMITH 

—AND— 

WAGON-MAKER, 

336 S. DELA WARE STREET. 

Particular attention paid to Horse-shoeing, and 
General Jobbing and Repairing. Est. 1857. 



H 



CASH REGISTER. 

OOD. H. P., Manufacturer CASH REGISTER 

and Novelties, 84 W. Market st. 



CHINA, GLASS AND CROCKERY. 

iUNDTHAL, CHARLES 

ware, 68 N. Illinois st. 



BERGU3VDTHAL, CHARLES, Glass and Queens- 
ware, 68 N. Illinois st. 
OLLWEG & REESE, China, Glass, and Queens- 
ware, 96 and 98 S. Meridian st. Est. 18C8. 



CIGAR-BOX MANUFACTORY. 

1, F. G., M£ 

E. Morris st. 



BERNS, F. G., Manufacturer of Cigar Boxes, 247 
E. Morris st. 

CLOTHING. 

THE WHEN CLOTHING STORE, 
5 and 6 Bates Block, N. Penna. st. 

COMMISSION MERCHANTS. 

BLAKE, J.ACKS0N&(JUINIUS, Commission Mer- 
chants, 75ancn7vV^_VVas)^ 

B' UDD, J. R. & CO., Commission Merchants in 
Butter, Eggs, etc., 25 W. Pearl st. Est. 1869. 

C03IING0RE & CO., 

Wholesale Dealers in 

Feathers, Rags, Beeswax &. Produce. 
Commission Mercliants, 

31 W. MARYLAND STREET. 

AWRENCE. A. V., General Commission Mer- 
chaut, 173 W. Washington st. 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OF THE CENTURY. 



83 



Indianapolis — Continued. 



COMMISSION MERCHANTS. 

Poor & Bliebel, 



s 



72 S. Delaware St. 

Established, 1870. 

AEIVAT, H. J., Oat Meal, Pearl Barley and 
Wheat Flour, etc., 163 Mass. ave. 



ULLIA'AN, JOHN E., Produce and Commission 

Merchant, 23 Circle et. 
TEBUPrHENRY & SON, Commission Merchants 

in Fruits, Vegetables & Produce, 32 S. Del. St. 



Samuel Woodruff, 



BUTTER, EGGS, POULTRY, GAME, ETC., 
131 Wasaclixi setts Ave. 

Correspondence Solicited. All Letters of Enquiry 
promptly answered. 

' CONCERT SALOONS. 

jOHrrHrGRUENERT\ 

Billiard and Concert Hall, 

Choice Wines, Liquors and Cigars, 

as East Washington Street, 

INDIANAPOLIS, IND. 

Cily Garden Varieties ! 

156 E. Washington St. 

INDIANAPOLIS. 

JACOB CRONE, Prop. 

*** First-class Entertainment Every Evening. 

' CONPECTIONERS, 

Bidivell's Trade-murk. 




" Fatlier, I can't tell a lie." 

Bidwell's Wild Cherry Cough Candy! 
25 Cents a Box, 

Is perfectly harmless, contains no drugs, and will 
cure a Night Cough in ten minutes. 

Eetail Department, 42 N. Pennsylvania St. 

Opposite Post Office. "' 

lESSEN, .JULIUS, Wholesale and Retail Con- 
fectlonery, 180 Virginia ave. 
HANNAN, MRS. L. S., News Depot, Dealer in 
Tobacco and Cigars, 119 Massachusetts ave. 



M 

S 



.3,000 prisoners, and a vast amount of booty, 
were captured by the Aiiiei'icans. 

l>oc. SJJ). — Coinn)odore IJainbridge, com- 
manded the frigate Constitution, after three 
hours figliting, captured the British frigate 
Java, oft" .San Salvador. The Java had 400 
men on board, of whom almost 200 were killed 
er wounded, and she was so badly crippled that 
Bainbridge, finding her incapable of floating, 
burned her three days after the action. The 
Constitution was very little damaged. 

"^ 1813. 

Ja.n. ly. — The Briti.sh frigate Narcissus 
captured the United States schooner Viper. 

of a,n. 23. — Americans defeated at French- 
town, about25 miles south of Detroit. A com- 
bined force, under Proctor, of 1,500 British and 
Indians, fell upon the American camp, com- 
manded by Gen. Winchester, at dawn. After 
a severe tiattle and heavy loss on both sides, 
W^inchester, who was made prisoner by the In- 
dians, surrendered his trooi)s on condition that 
ample protection should be'ffiven. Proctor, 
fearing the approach of Harrison, immediately 
marched for Maiden, leaving the sick and 
wounded Americans behind, who were after- 
wards murdered and scalped by the Indians. 

Fel>. 23. — Ogdensburg, N. Y., taken by 
the British. 

Fel). 3-4. — United States sloop-of-war. 
Hornet, Capt. Lawrence, engages the British 
brig. Peacock, off" the mouth of Demara river, 
Soiith America. The Peacock surrendered 
after a conflict of fifteen minutes, and a few 
moments afterward she sunk, carr}'ing down 
with her nine British seamen and tliree Amer- 
icans. The loss of the Peacock in killed and 
wounded was 37; of the Hornet only 5. 

April 35. — Mobile taken by a body of the 
American army. 

April 37. — Americans capture York (now 
Toronto). The Americans landed about two 
miles west of the British works, and in the face 
of a galling fire from regulars and Indians, 
under Gen. Sheaffe, drove them back to their 
fortifications. The British retreated from the 
fort, but laid a train of wet powder to the maga- 
zine, and set fire to it, and while Gen. Pike, 
was pressing forward, the fort blew up, causing 
great destruction of life among the Americans. 
Gen. Pike was mortally wounded, but he lived 
long enough to know that the American flag 
floated in triumph over the fort at Toronto. 
Gen. Sheaff'e escaped with the principal part of 
the troops, but lost all his baggage, books, 
papers, and a large aminint of public property. 

^lay 3. — British repulsed at Fort San- 
dusky, Ohio. The garrison of the fort con- 
sisted of 150 young men, commanded by Major 
Croghan, was assaulted by 600 regulars and 
800 Indians, under Gen. Proctor. The British 
recoiled, panic-stricken, and fled in confusion, 
leaving 150 of their killed and wounded. 
American loss, 1 man killed and 7 wounded, 

]^Iay 5$. — Havre de Grace. 5Id., burned by 
the British blockading squadron. 

]fl.ay. — Unsuccessful seige of Fort Meigs, 
on the Maumee river, by the British. Gen. 
Clay, commanding 1,200 men, arrived with re- 
inforcements for the fort and dispersed the en- 
emy, but imprudently pursuing the fugitives, 
was surrounded and captured. Proctor re- 
turned to the siege, but his Indian allies under 
Tecumseh, becoming impatient, deserted him, 
and the siege was abandoned. 



84 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



Indianapolis — Continued. 



COPPERSMITH. 

Established 1868. 
Witt. LANGSENKAltfP, 

COPPERSMITH. 

And IManufactnrer of all kinds of 
COPPER WORK FOR BREWERS. DISTILLERS, CON- 
FECTIONERS, HOTELS AND DYE WORKS, 
Soda FoiiutttiJiS, Generators and Apparatus on 
hand. 
96 S. DELAWARE ST. 

OOENICE WOEKS, 

KLUGEL & HINKLEY, Indianapolis Cornice 
Works, 198 S. Pennsylvania st. 

CRADLE AND SCYTHE SNATHS, 

Manufacturer of 

1l 



NORTH 



5 

Etc., Etc. 

INDIANAPOLIS, 



ID. 



CUTLERS AND GRINDERS, 

HTKN'ECHfy 
Dealer in Cutlery^ 

All kinds of 

Crrinding anoL Repairing of Edge Tools, 
99 EAST WASHINGTON ST. 

PISCATOB, AUGUST, Steam Grinding Estab- 
lishment, Delaware and Georgia sts. 

DENTIST. 

SUTHERLAND, W. H., Dentist. Laughing Gas 
used. Established 1865. 70 N. Illinois st. 

DIAMOND SETTER. 

L. SCHAFER, 

DimTMond Setter 

And Manufacturing Jeweler, 

83 1-2 E. WASHINGTON ST., Second Floor. 

REPAlRtNO NEATUY DONE. 

DRUGGISTS, 

CARTER & FLETCHER, Drugs and Medicines, 
300 Massacbuseits ave. 

VT. M. IXJULC'S 

PHARMACY, 

82 MASSACHUSETTS AVE., 



Indianapolis — Continued. 



DRUGGISTS. 

POWELL & ALLEN, Druggists, cor. Illinois and 
Market sts. 

TRAUB, GEO. F. & CO., Apothecaries, 252 W. 
Washington st. 



B 



DRY GOODS. 

YRAN, CORNELIUS & CO., Wholesale Dry 
Goods and Notions, 101-105 S. Meridian st. 



HODGES, D. J., Dry Goods, Notions and Fancy 
Goods, 298 Massachusetts ave. 

DYEING AND SCOURING, 

cIn^cTnnatFi "^^ 

D^EM,CLEMIlfB&Il£7AIIUN& BOUSE 

31 EAST CIRCLE ST., 

INDIANAPOLIS, - - - IND. 



e^^PrescrJptions a Specialty. 



Will. Goebler, Prop. 

All work warranted and done in the best manner. 
EDGE TOOL MANUFACTURER, 

Manufacturer of Edge Tools, 

Such as Planing, Carriage Maker's and 
Sliingle Knives, Moulding IJits, Car- 
penter's and Cooper's Tools, 

Mill Picks and Axes made and repaired in the 
best manner. All work warranted. 

FACTORY, 191 South Meridian St. 

ELECTROTYPE FOUNDRY. ^ 






NEW JOUENAL BUILDING. 

Ketcham & Wanamaker Pkoprietoks. 
Entrance on Circle Street. 

ELECTRICITY. ~ 

Electricity for Medical Use. 

Rooms at 31 Kentucky Ayenue. 

GUARANTEED TO CURE CHILLS & FEVER. 

It cures Rheumatism, Toothache, Headache, 
Neuralgia, and all diseases arising from Nervous- 
ness, Skin Diseases, etc. 

ENGINEERS AND SURVEYORS, ~ 

FATOUT, H. B., County Surveyor and Civil En- 
gineer, New Court House. 

OSBROOK, D. B. & J. A., Civil Engineers, Room 
16, Hubbard block. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



85 









Court House, Pittsburgh, Pa.— This is a handsome building, situated at the 
corner of Fifth Avenue and Grant Street. It is built of solid stone, with a columned por- 
tico, surmounted with a dome. 

Fifth Street Henry's Free Lunch, 

108 W. fifth: ST., near Chestnut, ST. LOUIS, 3IO. 

ITS MMI MWAMTA^MS, 




SOUP. 

Wlialeboiie. Lampwick. Cork. Sponge. 

PISH. 
Blind Herring. Eed Herring. Cross-eyed Herring. 

COLO DISHES. 
Broken Ice. Ice Berg. Raw Ice. • Cold Ice. 

BOAST. 
CMckens 48 years old. Scared Crow. Goose. 

(SAME. 

Tiger. Smut. Old Maid. Don Pedro. Seven Out. 

Pitch. Keno. Euchre. Pool. Poker. Casino. 

TONGUE. 

Vinegar Sanse. Molher-in-Law Tongue. 

Son-in-Law's Sass. 

tENTREES. 

Spider Toes. Locusts on the Half Shell. 

Raked Chignons. Horse Blankets, Fricaaeed. 

Hair Pins on Toast. 

VEUETABUES. 

Tight Boot Corns. Hard Corns. Soft Corns. 

Corn Cobs. 

PA8TBY. 
Leather Pies, with Buckles. Sponge Pies, Cut 
Bias. Sawdust Pudding, a la Pine Sauce. « 

OBSEBTS. 

Yeast Cakes. Door Jam. Grind-Stone Ice Cream. 

PBUtTS, NUTS, ETC. 

Hog's Foot Gum Drops. Raw Onions. 

Boiled Acorns . Horse Chestnuts. Osage Oranges. 

itautos. 

Mississippi River Water. St. Louis Water. 

Salt Water. Soda Water. Harfi Water. 

Soft Water. N-Ice Water. Congress Water. 



THE HENRY SALOON, in the most respectful part of the city, 
has been refitted for the accommodation of the citizens and 
traveling public. 

On entering the Saloon, each gentleman will be asked how he 
likes the location, and if be says Henry's Saioon ought to have 
been placed somewhere else, the location will be immediately 
changed. The most comfortable seat in the room for each gent; 
daily papers •'rom all parts of the country ; piano and telegraph In 
each corner of the Saloon ; drinks e\ ery minute if required ; conse- 
quently no time lost; waiters of every nationality and color if de- 
sired ; every waiter furnished with a libretto button-hole bouquet, fuii 
dress suit of ball tablers and his hair parted in the middle. Every 
patron of Henky*s Saloon will have the best seat and the best waiter 
in the Saloon. 

Any gent not getting his drinks red hot or ice cold as desired or 
experiencing a delay often secoirds after giving his order will please 
mention the fact to the proprietor, and the bar-keepers and waitere 
will be blown from the mouth of a cannon in front of Henry's Sa- 
loon at once. 

A discreet porter who belongs to the Masons, Odd Fellows, Sons of 
Malt.a, Knisrhts of Pythias and Ku Klux, and who was never known 
to tell the truth or the tune of the day, has been employed to carry 
Milk Punches, Hot Toddies and Lemonades to the Ladies in any 
part of the town. 

The bar-keeper has been carefully selected to please everybody, 
and can lead in song, play draw poker, shake or drinks at any hour 
of the day or nignt^ pl.ay billiards, good walLzer, can dance the Ger- 
man, and make a fourth at euchre, r.-peat the Beecher trial from 
memory, is a good judge of horses, and as a railroad reference, is far 
superior to Appleton's or any other man's guide, will flirt with any 
young lady and not mind' being cuttodeath when "Pa comes 
around " and dont mind being damned any more than the ^ll«issippi 
river, can wait on forty guests at once, and eive every gentleman the 
best drink in the house, and answer all questions in Greek, Hebrew, 
Choctow, Sionx, Lish, German, or any polite language at the same 
moment without turning a hair. Dogs allowed to lie on the Brus- 
sels carpet or in the w(b)ine room. 

Gentlemen can drink, smoke, swear, chew 2um, gamble, tell shady 
stories, stare at strangers, or any innocent amusement common in 
saloons. 

The proprietor will alw.ays be happy to hear that some other sa- 
loon is the best in the country. 

Special attention given to p.arties who can give information as to 
how nicely and differently things are set up arother places. 



This Card, is good for the best flrinfc at 

the bar on payment of the 

7isiial j>»'ice. 

IHSOBgH SHUSESESTUDT, 

108 K. Fifth St., near Chestnut, 
St. Louis, 3Xo. 



86 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OF THE CENTURY. 



1813. 

Illay 37. — Fort George, on the western 
shore of Niafjara river, near its mouth, surren- 
dered to the Americans. 

3Iay 23). — British repulsed at Sackett's 
Harbor. Sir George Prevost and 1,000 sol- 
diers landed in the face of a severe fire from 
some regulars stationed there. Gen. Brown, 
commander, rallied the malitia, and their i-apid 
gathering so alarmed Prevost, that he hastily 
re-embarked, leaving almost the whole of his 
wounded behind. 

Jituel. — ^'Don't give vptheship !" Capt. 
Lawrence, now in command of the frigate 
Chesapeake encountered the British frigate 
Shannon, about 30 miles from Boston. A furi- 
ous action commenced which lasted only fifteen 
minutes. In that short time the Chesapeake 
lost 48 killed and 98 wounded; the Shannon 23 
killed and 56 wounded. Lawrence, with his 
second officer in command, Ludlow, were among 
the slain at the beginning of the action; and, 
when Lawrence was carried below, he issued 
those brave and ever memorable words : "Don't 
give up the ship." During the contest the two 
vessels became entangled, and the British 
boarded the Chesapeake, and, after a desperate 
hand-to-hand struggle, hoisted theBritish flag. 
The remains of Lawrence, together with Lud- 
low's, were carried to Halifax and buried with 
the honors of war. 

<Juiie <». — British attack American camp 
at Stony Creek, Canada West, and were re- 
pulsed. It was very dark, and in the confusion 
both of the American generals (Chandler and 
Winder) were made prisoners. Ameri- 
can loss in killed, wounded and missing, 154. 

June 'Hi. — Admiral Cockburn defeated at 
Craney Island. 

•JiEiie. — Gen. Dearborn, on account of ill- 
health, retires from commander-in-chief of 
tlie army, and is succeeded by General Wil- 
kinson. 

Alts'. 14. — British sloop-of-war Pelican 
cai)tures the American brig Argus. 

Aug". S80. — Fort Jlimms, on the Alabama 
river, sui'prised and captuivd by a large 
body of Indians, under Tecumseh, who 
massacred about 300 men, women, and chil- 
dren. 

Sept. 5. — British brig Boxer, Captain 
Blythe, encounters American brig Enter])rise, 
Lieut. Burrows, and after an engagement of 
forty minutes, off the coast of Maine, the Box- 
er surrendered. Both conunanders were slain, 
and their bodies were buried in one grave at 
Portland. 

Sept. lO. — Perry's victory on Lake Erie. 
The carnage of this engagementj was very 
great. The Lawrence, Ferry's flag ship, w as 
soon disabled and became unmanageable, hav- 
ing all her crew, except four or five, killed or 
wounded. Perry then left her, in an open 
boat, and hoisted his flag on the Niagara. 
With this vessel he passed through the ene 
inv's line, pourinj? broadsides right and left at 
half pistol-shot distance. The American loss. 
27 killed and 96 wounded. The British lost 
about 200 in killed and wounded, and 000 i)ris- 
oners. The British were commanded by Com- 
modore Barclay. 

Sept. 39.— Detroit evacuated by Proctor, 
and taken possession of by the Americans. 

Oct. 5. — Battle of the Thames in Canada. 
Gen. Harrison, with 3,500 men, overtook Proc- 
tor in his retreat from Detroit, about SO miles 
from that city. A desperate battle ensued. 



Indianapolis — Continued. 



FANCY GOODS AND NOTIONS, 

S. CROMBACH, 
Cheap Notions & Fancy Goods, 

50 INDIANA AVENUE, 

Corner Tennessee St. 



B 



OOTH. WJI., Manufacturer of Stockings, Shirts 

and Drawers, 145 N. Delaware et. 
PDYCKErfEKRY & STEELE, White Goods, 
Laces, etc, SIS Broadway, N.Y. Represented 
by Geiger, Finney & Co., 112'/4 S. Meridian st. 



FLOUR AND FEED, 

HARTMANN & CO.. Flour, Feed and General 
Commission, 216 S. Meridian St. 

Edmund B. Noel. WoodNoel. 

NOEL BRO:=)., 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

FLOUR, MEAL AND FEED, 

Brands, AVhite Kose & Neiv Process, 

47 & 49 North Tennessee St., 

Corner Market. 

City Agt's for CJiToson's Celebrated Flour 

HOADES, H. C, Flour and Feed Store, 254 
Massachusetts ave. 

EST~ENirFEED STOKE, Catt & Co., props., 
263 W. Washington St. 



w 



FURNITURE, 

'CLAIN, J. A., New and Second-hand Farni- 
ture, 83 E. Washington st. 



M 



B 
B 
B 



^ROCERS^ 

ARCKDALL, D., Staple and Fancy Groceries, 

255 W. Washington st. 
ROWN, J. G., Groceries and Provisions, 300 N. 

New Jersey st. 
URNSrWJLrGroceries and Provisions, 206 W. 

v^ alnut St. 



D 
K 



AVIS, J. E., Tea and Grocery Store, 169 E. 

Washington st. 
ELI.ER, ROBERT, Grocery and Provision 

Dealer, 125 E. Washington st. 



MALEY, JAS., Groceries and Provisions, 366 W. 
Washington st. 



o 



WSLEY, W. A. & SON. Staple and Fancy Gro- 
ceries, 300 W. Washington st. 



s 



YFERS, M'BRIDE & COOK, Wholesale Grocers 

131 S. Meridian st. 



" ROLLING MILL GROCERY." 

• C. WATERMAN, 

Dealer in 

Groceries, Flour and Feed, 

Cor, South and Tennessee Sts. 

ZIMMER. PETER, Groceries, Provisions ana 
Saloon, 299 S. Delaware st. 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OF THE CENTURY. 



87 



Indianapolis — Continued. 



HARDWARE AND CUTLERY, 

CATLOR, J., Hardware and Cutlery, 
296 Massachusetts avenue. 



H 



ANSON, VAN CAMP & CO., Hardware, Cut- 
lery and Iron, Steel, etc., 80 S. Meridian st. 



E 



OSS, JAMES A., Hardware and Cutlery, 179 In- 
diana ave. 

HARNESS AND SADDLES, 



ARNHOLTER, H., Harness & 'Saddles, Bridles, 
Collars, whips, etc., 578 Virginia ave. 
ETTY, A. H., Dealer in Saddles and Harness, 
248 W. Washington St. 

vJ. IMI. HITJIPFEIE^, 

(MANAGER,) 
Manufacturer, and Dealer in 

HARIS^ESS and SADDLES, 

23 S. Meridian Street. 

Established 1862. 

M. E. KING &CO., 

Manufacturers, and Dealers in 

Harness, Saddles, Etc., Etc. 

231 MASS. AVENUE, 

Repairing promptly attended to. 

F. M. ROTTj_EH, 

Manufacturer, and Dealer in 

Sarness, Saddles and Horse Clolhin^i 

All work warranted. 

18 N. DJELAWARJE STREET. 

CHULTZ, H. C, Harne»8 and Saddlery, 15 S. 
Meridian st. Est. 1873. 



S 



HATS AND CAPS, 

REYNOLDS, C. E., Hats, Caps and Men's Fur- 
nishing Goods, 196 E. Washington st. 

HOTELS, 

broadwaTIouse, 

3S WEST GEORGIA STREET, ' 

One Block N. of Union Depot, 

J. C. Clawson, Proprietor. 

^^This house has boen renovated and newly 
furnished throughout. Good Sample rooms, and 
rates reasonable. 

CARNEY HOUSE, 272 W. Maryland st. Est. 1865. 
J. R. Carney, Prop. 

CIRCLE HOUSE, European Plan. 15 N. Merid- 
ian St. Geo. Rodius, Prop. 

GRAND HOTEL, cor. Illinois and Maryland sts., 
T. Baker & Co.," Prop's. 

LITTLE'S HOTEL, New Jersey and Washington 
sts. J. Fitzgerald, Prop. 

'KAY, SAMUEL, HOTEL and Restaurant, 6 
and 8 Louisiana st. 



M 



181S. 

Tecum.seh was slain, and his followers, who 
foug-ht furiously, broke and Hed. Almost the 
whole of Proctor's command were killed or 
made j)risoners, and the General himself nar- 
rowly escaped with a few of his cavalry. 

3iov. J8. — Gen. Coffee, with 900 men, sur- 
rounds an Indian camp near where the village 
of Jacksonville, Benton county, Alabama, now 
stands, and killed 200 of them. Not a warrior 
escaped. 

^"ov. 5. — Americans again invade Canada, 
7,000 strong, with the intention of co-operating 
with about 4,000 troops under Hampton, in an 
attack on Montreal. 

^fov. 11.— Battle of Chrysler's Field, 
about ninety miles above ^Montreal, on the St. 
Lawrence river. This battle was fought by a 
detachment under General Brown, who was 
sent to disperse the British at Williamsburg, 
and cover the descent of boats carrying Amer- 
ican troops on the St. Lawrence. Americans 
lost more than 300 men in killed and wounded, 
and the British about 200. 

l>ec. lO. — General 3IcClure, commanding 
at Fort George, burnt the Canadian village of 
Newark, and two days after was compelled by 
the British to abandon the fort. 

I>ec. lO. — Fort Niagara captured by a 
strong force of British and Indians, and, in re- 
taliation for the burning of Newark, set fire 
and destroyed Youngstown, Lewistown, Man- 
chester (now Niagara Falls), and the Tuscoro- 
ra Indian village, in Niagara county. 

Dec. SO. — Buffalo and the little village of 
Black Rock laid in ashes, and a large amount 
of public and private property destroyed. 

The remains of Captain James Lawrence, 
who died from wounds received on board of 
the United States frigate, Chesapeake, in 1813, 
were removed from Halifax and interred in 
Trinity church yard, N. Y., with imposing 
ceremony. 

Power loom introduced in the United 
States. 

During the spring and summer Admiral 
Cockburn, with a small squadron, carried on a 
distressing warfare on the coast between Dela- 
ware Bay and Charleston. The shipping in 
the Delaware was destroyed, and Lewistown 
cannonaded; Frenchtown, Havre de Grace, 
Georgetown, and Frederickstown, on the Ches- 
apeake, were plundered and burned. 
181A. 

^lavcli Sy. — General Jackson attacked 
and defeated the Indians at the Great Horse- 
Shoe Bend, on the Tallapoosa river. The In- 
dians had assembled there, in a fortified camp, 
1,000 warriors strong, with their women and 
children, determined to make a desperate de- 
fense. They fought bravely, and almost 600 
of their warriors were killed, as they refused 
to surrender. Only two or three were made 
prisoners, with about 300 women and children. 
Among those who bowed in submission was 
Weathersford, their greatest leader. He ap- 
peared suddenly before Jackson, in his tent, 
and standing erect said : "I am in your power: 
do with me what you please. I have done the 
white people all the harm I could. I have 
fought them bravely. ^ly warriors are all 
gone now, and I can do no more. When there 
was a chance for success I never asked for 
peace. There is none now, and I ask for it for 
the remnant of my nation." 

]W.arcIi3S. — United States frigate Essex, 



88 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 




©©©© 

Testimonials of Persons 



Send for Magazine and Test 
of Time Mailed Free. 



I REFER TO A FEW OUT OF THE MANY HUN- 
DREDS WHOM I HAVE CURED. 



ILLINOIS, 

Mary A. Badfirpr, Waukegau, March 9th, 1873. 

J. Ed. Clark. Grayville, Oct. STth. 1873. 

S. P. GniD, Jiick^onvilie, Nuv, 29 h, 1872. 

Charles Green, Tallula, January 8th, 1877. 

Am} S. GrrpD, Dwight, December 26 h, 1876. 

Genrpe C. Howe, Kmxville. 

Mrs. L. D. Hitchcock. Ottawa, October 10. 1872. 

S.H. JilP" n,Fieeport, May 29ih, 1872. 

Tboma« Mohp, Grayv.lle. August 20th, 1872. 

H. N. StoddJird, Jollet, May 3d, 187^. 

Wm. Sanderson, Prophetstown, Dec. 5th, 1872. 

TIItGINIA. 
James M. Brown. M. D., Suffolk. 
C. H. Williams, Portcmoulh, Sept. 6th, 1875. 

MISaOVBI. 
John Donaldson, Ironton, Nov. 11th, 1872. 
John B. Howard, M. D., St. Joseph, Jan. 20,1870. 
E. H. Spalding, Kansas City, Sept. 6th, 1874. 

OHIO. 
Jacob Ambrosier, Sulphur Springs, April 24, 1874- 
Jennie D. Bracken, Jersey, Jan. 2d. 1877. 
B. B. DePeystrr, Kent, Jan. 20ih. 1874. 
Wm. Sheffl.^ld, Napoleon, Dec. 10th, 1874. 
J. J. Will. Piqua, Oct. 28th, 1875. 

FENNS XL TA NIA. 
Mrs. H. S. Brown. Facloryville, S.pt. 8th, 1873. 
Mrs. E. A. Hamilton, Brookland, May 19th, 1875. 

MISSISSII'I'I. 
W. L. Towner, Lake Station, Nov. 2lst, 1872. 

RHODE ISLAND. 
Elisha C. Clarke, Kingston, Feb. 1st, 1874. 

ICAXSAS. 
Mrs. J. F. Cummings, Topeka. 



NORTH CAROLINA. 

James W. Davis, Mount Airy. 
James Hatsell, Mount Airy. 

CANADA. 
John Darling, Wallaceburg. 

MICHIGAN. 
Joseph C. Darrow, Adrian, April 18th, 1869. 
Carlie Edson, Hart, Dec. 15th, 1873. 
Daniel Munger, Grass Lake, Oct., 29th, 1875. 

CALIFORNIA. 
Mrs. George Hobson, San Jose, Nov. 6th, 1875. 
R. F. Scott, San Francisco, Oct. 4th, 1872. 

LOUIISIANA. 
Jacob Hardy, Cotile Linding, Red River, Feb. 4, 74. 

TENNESSEE. 
W. Y. C. Hannum, Marysville, Nov. 10th, 1872. 
J.R. Leonard, Jalapa. 
H. Zellner, Brentwood, April lOth, 1874. 

ARKANSAS. 
3. R. Henry, M. D., Noark, Jan. 30th, 1677. 

INDIANA. 
T. M. Endicott, Shelbyville, Jan. 31st, 1874. 
James Hart, Greensburg, Feb. 6th, 1873. 
Luman Jones, Marietta, Nov. 28ih, 1872. 
D. J. Jackson, Renuselaer, July, 30 h, 1873. 
John McL'iin, Union Mills, June 1st, 1875. 
Robert McNeil, Pierceton, Nov. 7th, 1873. 
Harriet Townslev, Crawfordsville, Jan. 20th, 1874. 
T. M. Worthington, Lafayette, Dec. 20th, 1876. 

GEORGIA. 
MollieE. Duke.^Franklin, Jan. 20th, 1875. 
J. T. Allen, Carr's Station, Jan. 7th, 1877. 

WISCONSIN. 

D. M. Loy, Depere. 

Sophronia Palmer, Evansville, April 8th, 1874. 

TEXAS. 

H. D. Phillips, Atlanta, Feb. 29th, 1876. 
W. A. Tuttle, Canton, November 18th, 1875. 
IOWA. 

B. B. Reynolds, De Soto. 

L. S. Spitler, Danville, June 3d, 1876. 

Joseph Coler, Nashua, February 21si, 1874. 

VERMONT. 
Lorenzo Fassett, West Enosburgh, May 25th, '76. 
James Whitney, Bristol, January 1st, 1876. 
H. Williams, Wallingford, Feb. 10th, 1873. 

INDIA N TE BRITOR Y. 
James S. Price, Tahlequah, July 25th, 1873. 
WEST VIRGINIA. 

A. G. Pickett, Parkersburg, July 25th, 1876. 

NEW YORK. 
Chas. Beardsley, New Berlin, Jan. 28th, 1873. 
Julia A. Caster, Rochester, Aug. 6th, 1874. 
Nash Dyke. West Bangor, April 30th, 1874. 
R.C. Hall,Groton. 

David McClure, Frankliusville, Dec. 30th, 1875. 
Mrs. Levi McNall, Allegany, Dec. 29th, 1876. 
Mrs. M. M. Smith. Albion, July 8lh, 1875. 
Marcus P. Norton, Troy, Jan. lOih, 1874. 

CONNECTIC UT. 
J. B. Blair, 28 Crown St., New Haven, Dec. 9, '74. 

KENTUCKY. 
Susan A. Bibb, Greensburg. Jan. 6th, 1877. 

MASS AC H USETTS. 
Joseph Cooper, Braytonville, March 2d, 1873. 
ALARAMA. 

B. P. Cannon, Marion, October 26th, 1874. 

J. W. Morland. Brush Creek, Sept. 6th, 1875. 

ADDRESS 

LAPORTE, IND. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



89 




90 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OF THE CENTURY. 



1814. 

Captain Porter, was captured in the harbor of 
Valparaiso, by the British frigate Phoebe, and 
sloop-of-war Cherub. It was a desperate bat- 
tle, the Essex loosing 154: men killed and 
wounded. Captain Porter, in acknowledging 
the defeat to the Secretary of the Navy, says : 
"We have been unfortunate but not dis- 
graced." 

April 31. — The United States sloop-of- 
war Frolic was captured by the British frigate 
Orpheus and schooner Shelbourne. 

April 39.— The Peacock captured the 
British brig Epervier, ofi' the coast of Florida. 

3Iay 3. — Battle of Oswego. A British 
squadron, carrying 3,000 men, attacked Os- 
wego, by land and water. The town was de- 
fended by about 300 men, under Captain Mitch- 
ell, and a small flotilla, under Captain Wool- 
sey. They defended the place for two days, 
when they were compelled to yield to superior 
force. The British loss was 235 men in killed 
and wounded; the Americans lost 69. The ob- 
ject of the British in this expedition was to de- 
stroy or capture a large quantity of stores at 
Oswego Falls, but the determined resistance 
they met with caused them to abandon the 
project. 

•luly 3. — Generals Scott and Ripley cross 
the Niagara river into Canada, and capture 
Fort Erie. 

Jwly 5. — Battle of Chippewa. General 
Brown met the British in the open fields at 
Chippewa, and repulsed the enemy with a loss 
of about 500 men ; American loss, about 300. 
The British retreated to Burlington Heights, 
where they were reinforced by troops under 
Lieut. -Gen. Drummond, who assumed com- 
mand. 

July 33.— Battle of Niagara Falls. The 
British force, under Drummond, was about 
one-third greater than Brown's. The battle 
commenced at sunset, and ended at midnight, 
when the Americans had lost 858 men in killed 
and wounded, and the British 878. The Amer- 
icans were left in possession of the field, but 
were unable to carry away anv of the spoils 
which they had captured. "Generals Scott and 
Brown were wounded. The Americans retired 
to Fort Erie, where General Gaines took chief 
command. 

Aug-. »-14.— Com. Hardy makes an un- 
successful attack on Stonington. 

Aug. 15. — Gen. Drummond, in command 
of 5.000 British, made an assault on Fort Erie, 
but was repulsed with a loss of almost 1,000 
men. 

Aug-. 34.— Battle of Bladensburg. Cap- 
ture of Washington, burning of the White 
House, and other public and private buildings. 
Ross, the British commander, first attacked 
Gen. Winder andCom. Barnev at Bladensburg, 
in command of 3,000 undisciplined militia, sea- 
men and marines. The militia fled, and the 
marines and seamen were made prisoners. 
Ross was in command of 5,000 men. He then 
pushed on to Washington, completed his de- 
struction there, and retreated to his shipping 
on the 29th of August. In these exploits the 
British loss in killed, wounded and by deser- 
tion, was almost 1,000 men; that of the Ameri- 
cans, about 100 killed and wounded, and 20 
prisoners. The President and his Cabinet 
were at Bladensburg when the British ap- 
proached, bat returned to the city when the con- 
flict began, and narrowly escaped capture. 

!§ept. 11.— Battle of Plattsburgh. The 



Indianapolis — Continued. 



HOTELS. 

meridianIouse, 

106 & lOS X. Meridian St., 

Fumishil^ni UnfumisMi M@@ms, 

DAY BOARDING, $4 PER WEEK. 
Transient guests accommodated. 

Single Meals 25 cents. 
Est. 1876. Mrs. A. J. SHELLEY, 

St. Nicholas Hotel. 

And Restaurcui t. 

Kept on the European Plan. Meals at all hours, 

day or night, ibr 25 cents. Lodging, 25 to 50 

cents. This hotel is on the cor. Meridian 

and Louisiana sts., op. N. E. cor. 

Union Depot. 



J. LONG, 



Proprietor. 



B 



HOUSE RAISERS AND MOVERS, 

AUMHARD & SHEELKR, Raisers and Movers 
of Buildings, Market and Mississippi sts^ 



JOHN S. MILLIKAN, 

RAISE, LOWER, AND MOVE 

Brick or Frame Houses 

ACCESSIBLD BY LAND OR WATER, 

In City or Country. Safes and Heavy Machinery 
Moved with care. 

255 S. Tenneesee Street. 



M 



INSURANCE, 

TN A fTRE iS si' RANGE Cd7, Room T," "Mink 
Building, 19 and 21 N. Penn^a St. 



rcxxx: 




li Lile Ins. 



Hartford, Conn. 



V 




L C. BURT, General Agent, 

Indianapolis, Ind. 

Life Assurance Society of the United States, 
jao Broa€licay. X. r. 

D. B. SHIDELER, Gen. Agt. Rooms 1 <& 2 Vajen 
block, 66 N. Pennsylvania Street. 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OF THE CENTURY. 



91 



Indianapolis — Continued. 



INSURANCE, 

Berhliire Life Insurance Compaiy, 

Pittsfield, Massachusetts. 

INCORPORATED 1851. 

JAMES GREENE, Gen. Agt. 
10 Martindale's Block, 

HE FRANKLIN LIFE INSURANCE CO., Ken- 
tucky ave., and flliuois st. 

GRIFFITH, W. C, Manager Miua. Life Ins. Co., 
Room 4, ^tna Building, 17 N. Penn'a st. 
RUBB, PAXTON & CO., Insurance Agents, 

and Ad justers, 23 and 31 Circle st. 

IFE ASSOCIATION OF AMERICA, A. C. Hart- 
well, Secretary. 34 E. Market st. 

LEATHER BELTING, 

HIDE, LEATHER AND BELTING CO., 125 S. 
Meridian st. G. W. Sniper, Manager. 

LEATHER AND FINDING, 

lETZ & REISSNER, Hides, LEATHER, OILS, 
and FINDINGS, 21 and 23 S. Delaware st. 



D 



LINEN GOODS, 



O'DONNELL, P., Irish and Scotch Linens, 50 S. 
Tennessee st. Est. 1865. 



D 



LIVERY AND SALE STABLES, 

REW, JOHN A., Livery and Boarding Stables, 
Circle st. Established 1863. 



IT^AUCETT, WM., & CO., Proprietors Empire Liv- 
' ery and Sale Stables, 72 W. Market st. 

OLLINGSWORTH, ZEPH, Livery, Feed and 

Boarding Stable, 277 W. Washington st. 
OLYER & KERR, Livery and Sale Stables, 163 
and 202 W. Washington st. 

LONG, M.,Livery, Feed and Sale Stable, 13 Cir- 
cle street. 

LOAN OFFICE. 

DUCAS, ED., Capitol Loan Office. Money ad- 
vanced on all articles of value, 115 W. Wash- 
ington street. 

MATHEMATICAL INSTRUMENTS, 

BILLING, A., Mfr Mathematical Instruments, 
Delaware and Georgia sts. 

MEAT MARKET, ' 

NUETZEL, JOHN, Fresh and Salt Meats, and 
."ausage, 319 W. Washington st . 

HOMPSON, W. K.,J Dealer in Fresh and Salt 
Meats, 170 Indiana ave. 

OLLMER, D. G., Meat Store, Chas. H. Zollner, 
Clerk, 290 W. Washington et. 

MERCHANDISE BROKER, 

RETMER, GEORGE, Merchandise Broker, 
70 N. Illinois street. 

MINCE MEAT, 

DANVERS, C. F., Mince Meat and Fruit Butter, 
74'/2 N. Delaware et. « 

ZH OIL DEALER, 

CROZIER, G. W., Lubricating and Carbon Oils, 
212 S. Meridian st. 



Briti.sh, 14,000 strong, in command of Prevost, 
marched to Platsburg:, where, in conjunction 
w'th the navy, a battle en.sued. The Ameri- 
cans, 1,500 strong, commanded by Gen. Ma- 
comb, and a large body of militia, under Gen. 
Mooers, retired to the south side of the Sara- 
nac. The land forces fought until dark, and 
every attempt of the Britisli to cross the Sara- 
nac was bravely resisted. In the evening, 
Prevost retreated, leaving his sick and wound- 
ed, and a large quantity of military stores, be- 
hind liim. The British loss, from the 6th to 
the 11th of September, in killed, wounded, and 
deserted, w"as about 2,500 ; that of the Ameri- 
cans, 121. 

Sept. 11. — McDonough's victory on Lake 
Champlain. After an engagement of two 
hours and forty minutes, the Britisli fleet, un- 
der Com, Downie, surrendered. The Ameri- 
cans lost in killed and wounded 110; the Brit- 
ish 194, among whom was Commodore Downie, 
whose remains lie under a monument atPlatts- 
burg. 

Sept. 13. — The British make an unsuccess- 
ful attack on Baltimore, were Gen. Smitli was 
in command. Ross, with 8,000 British troops, 
was pressing forward, when he was met by 
Gen. Strieker; a slight skirmish ensues, in 
wliich Gen. Ross is killed. He is succeeded in 
command by Col. Brooke. A battle now com- 
menced, which lasted an hour and a quarter, 
when the Americans fell back towards the city. 
Both parties slept on their arms that night. 
On the following morning the British advanced 
as if to attack the city. In the meantime a 
bombardment had been kept upon the fort, 
whose garrison, under command of JIajor 
Armisted, made a gallant defense. No less 
than 1,500 shells were thrown. On the morn- 
ing of the 14th tlie British re-embarked, and 
silently witlidrew from tlie city. It is estima- 
ted tliat the enemy lost between six and seven 
hundred in these engagements. 

Sept. 13. — Key composes "The Star Span- 
gled Banner." 

Sept. 15. — British attack Fort Bower (now 
Fort Morgan) at the entrance to Mobile Bay. 
They are repulsed by Major Lawrence, with 
the loss of one ship and many men. 

Sept. VTf, — A successful sortie was made 
from Fort Erie, and the advanced works of the 
besiegers desti-oyed and the enemy driven to- 
ward Chippewa. Gen. Drummond then retired 
to Fort George, on the northwestern shore of 
the Niagara river, near its month. 

Oct. 29. — First steam war vessel was 
launched, and named The Fulton. 

Nov. 5. — Americans abandon and destroy 
Fort Erie, cross the river and go into winter 
quarters at Buffalo, Black Rock, and Bata- 
via. 

:^oy. 7.— Gen. Jackson, with 2,000 Tennes- 
see militia and some Choctaw warriors, stormed 
Pensacola, Fla., drove the British to their 
shipping, and finally from the haibor, and 
made the Governor beg for mercy and surren- 
der the town and all its military works uncon- 
ditionally. Jackson then returned to Mobile. 

Dec. 3. — Gen. Jackson arrives at New Or- 
leans and declares martial law. 

Dec 14. — British capture a flotilla of 
American gun-boats in Lake Borgne. The at- 
tack was made by the enemy in about forty 
barges, conveying 1,200 men. American loss 
in killed and wounded about 40; the British 
about 300, 



92 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



Indianapolis — Contmued. 



OYSTERS AND FISH, 

IRWIN, J. L., Oysters, Fnut, Fish, and Game, 
218 B. Washington st. ^__ 

0"YSTBPI IDB^A-XjEI?,. 

J. SCHAFFNER S 



I OYSTER BAY, 



60 E. Washington Street. 

PAINTERS, 

BAUGHMIX, J. A., CARR[A.GE PAINTER and 
Trimmer, 36 S. Pennsylvania at. 

X- \r. © o o IS , 

THE SIG:V I».4^I>S^TER, 

N. E. cor. Washington and Meridian Sts. 
Janner and Ornamental work a specialty. 



D 



AUEB, CHARLES W., House and Sign Painter, 
137 E. Maryland st. 



D 



RAKE & GLOVER, "The Inimitable" Sign 
Writers, 40 W. Maryland st. 



FRANK FERTIG, 

Honse, Sip ai Fresco Painter, 

24: S. Meridian Street. 

W. T. Kennedy, 

Banner, Glass and Ornamental Work a Specialty. 
S. E. cor. Washington & Meridian Sts. 

J. M. SINDLINGER, 

House, Sign, 

— AND— 

Ornamental Painter, 



23 N. Delaivare Street. 

Est. 1863. INDIANAPOLIS. 

PHOTOGRAPHERS, 

C\LARK, D. R., Vance Block Photographic Art 
J Gallery, Virginia ave., and Washington st. 

GallBry of Mmn\i 

22, 24, 26 and 28 E. Washington St. 

Entrance 34i4. 

ENDERGAST, W.fJ.. Photographer, 

212 E. Washington street. 



Indianapolis — Continued. 



PHOTOGRAPHERS, 

POTTER, W. H., Photographer, op. Hotel Bates, 
Illinois and Washington sts. 

ALTER, W. H., Photographer, 
6i and 68 N. Pennsylvania st. 



c 

D 
F 



PHYSICIANS. 

■lORLISS, DR. C. T. Homoeopathist, 5 Miller's 
Block, Illinois and Market sts. 
I'FF, DR. 0.. Cronic, Virulent and Special 
Diseases, 39 Kentucky ave. 



ARR, DR. H. G., Physician, 30 ane 32 Hubbard 

Block, Washington & Meridian sts. Est. 1858. 

(of INDIANA AVENUE,) 

Has now opened an Office at 306 Virginia 
Avenue, 

A No. 1 Chronic Physician, and warrants a cure 
very cheap. Piles, $3 to $10. Other cures very 
cheap: aiso Fever and Ague. Seventy-five cents 
for traveling trade east of the Union Depot. Three 
squares is the street-car line, direct to the office, 
— five cents. 

ICKERILL, GEO. W., M. D., Office 66 W. Mar- 

ket St. 

OETZER, MADAME GEORGE, ASTROLO- 

GlrST and never-failing healing Medium, 

118 N. Illinois St. ^_^^ 

YOUART, JOHN M., M. D., Surgeon, 
62 N. Illinois street. 

___^^^^^IOTURE FRAMES, 

KIEL, C, Superintendent Moulding and PIC- 
TURE FRAME CO., 600 to 606 Madison ave. 

~^^ PLANING MILL. 

pAPITOL CITY PLANING MILlTcCKT^iT^o 
v,^ 327 Massachusetts ave., 

PLATER, GOLD, SILVER, ETC, " 

ELECTRO GOLD, 

Silver and Nickel Plater, 

10 W. MARKET STREET. 

PRINTERS, 

BUTTERFIELD BROS., Practical Job Printers, 
Room 'i, 36 W. Washington st. 2d Floor. 

PROPRIETORY MEDICINES. 

ROHER'S NEW REMEDY, For the Throat and 
Lungs, 347 S. Meridian st. Mrs. E. Roher, 
and J. P. Beeler, Proprietors. 

PUBLISHERS, 

DOUGLASS, ROBERT, Publisher, and Whole- 
sale Dealer in Subscription Books, N. B. 
cor. Washington and Meridian sts. 



T 



ILFORD, S. E. & CO., Publishers of Inaianap- 
olis City Directory, Circle and Meridian sts. 



PUMP MANUFACTURER. 

^^^^, STEPHEN, Wooder 
Pumps, 70 W. M:arket st. 



-piDDLE, STEPHEN, Wooden, Iron and Chain 

OMSTOCK, A. S., Genuine Dnrbon Pump, 197 

and 199 8. M eridian st^ 

VANS. A., & CO., Wooden, Iron and Chain 
Pumps, 3 Massachusetts ave. 



E 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



93 




City Hall, Xew Yorlc. — Constructed of white marble, 216 feet long and 105 
feet wide. Commenced m 1803, and was eight years in building, and for many years was 
the most elegant structure in America. The tower surmounting the edifice formerly con- 
tained a bell weighing 9,000 pounds, and was removed several years ago. 

St. Louis to New Orleans. 

Memphis to New Orleans. 



The Largest and Finest Steamboat on the Mississippi 



liver. 




'W. H. THORWEaEN, Commander, 

Plies regularly in the trade from Memphis to New Orleans during the Cotton Season, 
from October ist to March ist, leaving Memphis on every alt mate \Vednesday, and New 
Orleans every alternate Friday. Also, regular packet from St. Louis to New Orleans, 
March ist to August ist, leaving St. Louis every third Saturday, and New Orleans every 
third Tuesday. 

The boat is 3.50 feet long and 100 feet wide, and has a cabin 300 feet long, 30 feet wide and 18 feet 
high; has 50 stateroome. and accommodations for 150 cabin passengers. She has capacity for 4000 tons 
of freight, and has carried 8210 Bales of Cotton— the largest amount ever taken on one boat to New Or- 
leans; and can store 12,000 Bales Uncompress.>d Cotton. Two fine Bridal Chambers (extra large), and 
every convenience to be found the same as at home. Every modern improvement for safety— fire es- 
capee, fire extiuyuishers, etc., etc., andis the Fastest Steamer in the St. Louis and New Orleans trade. 

Post Office address, Steamer Grand Republic, St. Lioais, Memphis, New Orleans. 



94 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OF THE CENTURY. 



1814. 

l>ec. 15.— Hartford Convention. This 
convention consisted of delegates from Massa- 
chusetts, Connecticut, and Rhode Island, and 
two members from New Hampshire, and one 
from Vermont. These last were appointed at 
countv meetin2:s. The object of the conven- 
tion was opposition to the war, and a threaten 
of secession of the New England States, but 
failed to amount to anything. ,•,... 

I>ec. 2J5. — Gen. Jackson attacked, in the 
nio-ht, about 2,400 of the enemy, on the Missis- 
sippi, 9 miles below New Orleans. After killing 
or wounding 400 of the British he withdrew. 
The American loss was about 100. 

Dec 34.— Treaty of peace between the 
United States and (>reat Britain, signed at 
Ghent. The articles of the treaty chiefly re- 
lated to the disputes respecting boundaries, for 
the determination of which it was agreed that 
commissioners should be reciprocally ap- 
pointed. 1 i. .• 

Gen. Wilkinson repulsed on Canada frontier 
and superseded by Gen. Izard. 

Hull tried for cowardice and treason at 
Albany, N. Y., for the surrender of Detroit. He 
was found guiltv of cowardice and sentenced to 
be shot, but was afterward pardoned by the 
President. 

The Wasp, Capt. Blakely, made a successful 
cruise, but after capturing thirteen prizes dis- 
appeared and was never heard of again. 
Probably lost in a storm. 

1815. 

.Ian. 8, Battle of >'e>v Orleans. 

— Gen. Jackson, in command of 6,000 militia, 
concentrated his forces about four miles below 
the city within a line of entrenchments a mile 
long, e.xtending from the river far into the 
swamp. He was attacked in this position by 
12,000 British, under command of Gen. Packen- 
ham. As the British approached, a terrible 
cannonade was opened from the American 
batteries, yet they continued to advance until 
within rifle range, when volley after volley of 
deadly storm of lead poured into the ranks of 
the invaders. The British column soon 
wavered. Gen. Packenham fell, and the entire 
British armv fled in dismay, leaving 700 dead, 
and more than 1,000 wounded on the field. The 
Americans were so safely entrenched that 
they lost onlv 7 killed and 6 wounded. 

Joseph Bonaparte, brother of the Emperor, 
came to the United States as Cc.unt de Sur- 
villiers, and purchased 1,500 acres of land in 
Bordentown, N. J., and settled down to the life 
of an opulent gentleman. In 18:',0 he returned 
to France, and died in Florence in 1844 

Feb. 18. — Peace proclaimed by the Presi- 
dent of the United States, and a day of thanks- 
giving to the Almighty was observed through- 
out the Union. 

Fel>. 30. — The Constitution, Commodore 
Stewart, had a severe action with the Brit- 
ish frigate Cyane and sloop-of-war Levant, and 
captured both. 

Fel). 2-4. — Robert Fulton, inventor of 
steam navigation, died in New Nork, aged 
fiftv vears. 

April. — ilassacre of American prisoners at 
Dartmoor, England. 

April lO.— The United States Bank re- 
chartered for twenty years, with a capital of 
$35,000,000. The existence of the bank expired 
with this character in 1836. 
N April 17. — Commodore Decatur cap- 



Indianapolis — Continued. 



RAW HIDES AND FURS. 

BAUGHER, F. W., Hides, Tallow, Furs and 
Buffalo Robes, 16 W. Pearl st. 

EWARK, JOSEPH, Dealer in Raw Furs, 
14 W. Pearl street. 

REAL ESTATE, 

ARDEN, J., Real Estate Broker, 
lay^ N. Delaware street. 

BREEDLOVE, T. J., Real Estate Agent, 
17^2 W. Washington st. 

J. B. Cleveland & Co., 

Real Estate ail IisMceBrote, 

CHARLES F. CLEVELAND; Notary PaDliC, 

76 jE. Market Street, 

'CLELLAN, JOHN, Real Estate & Rental Agt., 
Loans Negotiated. Notary Public, iZVi E. 

W ashington st. 

AILORS, H. C. Real Estate and Loan Broker, 

34 E. Washington st. 



s 



E. H. Sabin. 



M. Sabin. 



SJLBZXT (fis CO., 

Real Estate anl Loai Broiers, 

2%, W. WASHINGTON ST. 

Room No. 2. 

City property, Lands, and Farms bought, 

sold and exchanged. 

TROBLE, JOHN, Dealer in Real Estate, Room 1, 
83'/4 E. Washington st. Negotiates Loans, 
buys and sells Real Estate, Rents Houses, etc. 

JOHN M. TODD & CO., 
BUOISEXIS, 

24>^ E. WASHINGTON ST. 

Sell and Negotiate Real Estate. Specialties. — 
Negotiating the sale of Stocks and Personal In- 
terests, and organizing Manufacturing and Mining 
Corporations. 



RECORDER, 

DARNELL, CAL. F., Recorder Marion County, 
office in Court House. 



E 



REGALIA AND SOCIETY GOODS. 

EEVES, J. N. D., Manf'r of Regalia and Soci- 
ety Goods, 10 N. Pennsylvania st. 

RESTAURANTS, 



Oyster House ani Resiaiirait, 

79 S. ILLINOIS ST., 

JOHN C. GUISET, Prop. 

OLLADAY, J. G., Dining, Oyster and Lunch 
Rooms, 14 N. Delaware st. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



95 



Indi ANAPOLis — Continued. 



KESTAURANTS. 

MOZART^ALL, 

RESTAURANT, SALOON AND 
BILLIARDS. 

Public Hall Rented for Amusements. 
JOHN GBOSCH, ProjiHetor, 

(Bst'd 1867.) 37 and 39 S. Delaware St. 

PEARCE, E. J., Restaurant and Lunch Boom, 
73 N. Delaware st. 

TROWS 

RESTAURANT, 

25 ^. ILIilXOIS ST., 

Established 1873. INDIANAPOLIS. 

EINBERGER, H., Restaurant and Saloon, 10, 
12 and 14 W. Louisiana St. 

ROOFING MATERIAL, 

Established 1864. 

SIMS & SMITHER, 

Manufacturers and Dealers in 

Roofing and Sheathing Felt, 

Pitch., Naptlia, Dead Oil, Paving Cement 
and Rosiu. 

OFFICE, 169 W. MARYLAND ST. 

SALOONS, 

BENDER, TOBIAS, Wine and Beer Saloon, 191 
E. Washingtou st. 

"THE STORE." 

(SALOON.) 

G-EO. M. BLAKE, Prop., 

10 WEST PEARL ST. 

Established 1876. 

UENNAGEL, FRED, Saloon and Boarding 
House, 145 E. Washington st. 

COBLE, GEO., JR., Saloon, 156 and 2R4 W. 
Washington st. 

OLEMAN, HENRY, Wine and Beer Saloon, 131 
W. Washington st. 

ITY HALL EXCHANGE, 176 E. Washington St., 
Nessler & Walter. Props. 



C 



80 HOUSE OF LORDS. 80 

mi WASHIN5IJN STREET, 

Established 1863. 
The Best Imported and Domestic 

Wines, Liquors & Cigars. 

Lunch from 9 to 12 A.M. and 9 to II P.M. 



tures two Algerine ves.sel.s and six hundred 
prisonei'.s. 

•litiie J80. — The Dey of Algiers signs a 
treaty of i)eace, agreeing to restore all Ameri- 
can prisonei's to libeity, pay indeninit}- for all 
property destroyed, and to relinquish all claims 
of ti'ibute from the United States. 

«9uly. — Commodore Decatur demanded and 
received ,i;46,000 from the Bashaw of Tunis, in 
payment for American vessels he allowed the 
English to capture in his harbor. A demand of 
$25,000 and restoration of prisoners was made 
upon the Bashaw of Tripoli, which was com- 
plied with. This cruise to the Mediterranean 
gave full security to American commerce in 
those seas, and left the United States at peace. 

Sept. 9. — John Singleton Copley, Ameri- 
can historical painter, died, aged 78 years. 
1816. 

Bank of the United States, with a capital of 
thirty-five millions of dollars, incorporated in 
April. 

The first pugilistic encounter between trained 
men occurred in the United States between 
.Jacob Hyer (father of Tom Hyerj and Tom 
Beasley. The match was declared a draw. 

Extremely cold season, hickory wood selling 
in New York for %2'i per cord, and oak 
for %lb. There was frost every month of the 
year. 

The Republican party in New York city 
adopts, for the first time, the title of Demo- 
crats. 

l>ec. — Indiana admitted into the union of 
States. 

1817. 

United States suppresses two piratical slave 
dealing establishments, one at the mouth of 
the St. ilary, Florida, and the other at Galves- 
ton, Texas. 

Trouble with the Seminole Creek Indians 
and runaway negroes, who commenced mur- 
derous depredations upon the frontier settle- 
ments of Georgia and the Alabama terri- 
tory. General Gaines sent to suppress these 
outrages. 

]^lui'cli 4. — James Jlonroe inaugurated 
President at Congress Hall, Washington city, 
the capitol having been destroj-ed by the Brit- 
ish. 

•Tilly -1. — Ground was broken for the Erie 
canal. 

July 8. — Remains of General Montgom- 
ery, after resting 42 years at Quebec, were 
brought to the city" of New York and 
placed in a monument in front of St. Paul's 
church. 

3fov. — United States troops take possession 
of Amelia Island, the rendezvous of the pirates 
on the Florida coast. 

1818. 

The present flag was established by law — 
thirteen stripes and as many stars as" States, 
arranged in a circle on a blue ground, a star 
being added on the Fourth "of July after 
the admission of a new State. Andon the 
whole it is a very graceful and picturesque 
standard. 

Provision is mrde for the support of the 
surviving soldiers of the Revolution and their 
families. 

American citizens are accorded by Great 
Britian a share in the Newfoundland fisher- 
I ies. 



Grand Rapids 

Business Center 




EEAD THIS! HEALTH POE YOU! 

Wliat is Wealth, or Fame, or Life — wittiout Healtll, 



Dr. Aikin's Remedial Institxitc 



Ss'^ 91 OttaWS Sti B®=P^a''rlor fof LadTe"f a 
/sf- rooms for the convenience of all different patients. 



For the cure of 

w Eye, Ear, Throat, Lung, Nervous, Chronic, and 
Surgical Diseases. 

The Doctor's location is most eligible, central, 

and convenient, at 

r^ till ^^.^^n. O^- Opposite (above) Rathbun House, 

0/ IVIOnrOe Oli opposUe (below) Aiarich-s Bank, and 

a few doors from the Union Ticket Office, with an entrance at 

(Hall extending through the Block.) 

" • , ^ .. ^^^ separate 

_y . . . , w,■^_..-, . ^,^ ■Vy"'aNy \ iv.^.1.^ ,>^. V... ■ -..■ ~- patients. Those from 

Can al-st. ^1 '^ / S^ Qfc/y abroad should come at once to the office on arriving in the city, 

I r I I M '^y^C^ C^^/ and arrange treatment before other business. 

I sweet's ^ IstN.B'k .,_-^'^^^-^'«**^^ Office Hours, from 9 00 a. m. to 4 p. m. Sundays, 10 to 2. 

Most families have one or more with life embittered by needless sufFering— seldom free from pain, always 
conscious of diseases or disability. Yet they can be cured by the skilful Specialist. 

fi®"Established here in extensive practice since 1869 (at St. Louis in_'6s; San Francisco during '73), enjoying 
a wide and merited reputation as a most successful Physician, and having thorough qualifications, insight and 
aptness for the Healing Art, with a complete supply of instruments, appliances, and all the best means and 
remedies known to the Profession, a constant succession of cures still attends Dr. Aikin's practice, and conse- 
quently the number of his patients is ever on the increase. 

The well knozvn Specialist, now permanently located i?i Grand Rapids, Mich. His Improved Rc.tnedies and 
Treatment have -made him Celebrated for his Extraordinary Success. All classes of Patients Treated with 
Equal care aud Skill. Hundreds attest the Great Efficacy of the Treatment. Hearing and Sight Restored. 
Lung, Throat, and other Chronic Diseases cured; and Broken Down constitutions built up and Reinvigorated. 
Serious, complicated Diseases, thai for Ulany i'ears Resisted tlie Treatvie7it of l\umerous PSiysicians, are 
Speedily cured by Dr. Aikin. 

j^.iDOOTOT?. TO h:j^"v:e3 if^ith iisr. 

A lady writes to Dr. Aikin : ' ' 1 am so soon and easily well by your tn atment that mv faith in you is un- 
bounded, and shall recommend you to all my friends as a most reliable physician." " Must ha\ e help, or die, 
or go insane I concluded," writes a man of 26, in poor health for years, who, after a short treatment by Dr. 
Aikin, further states : " Your remedies are having a remarkable effect. I can sleep better, am gaining flesh, 
and my health is improving in all respects." Dr. Aikin has given the pubbc sufficient evidence to convince the 
most skeptical and incredulous that his method of treatment is peculiarly successful in every department of his 
Great Specialties, especially such cases as have defied the skill of other and justly celebrated physicians; No 
ONE SHOULD DESPAIR that is afflicted with seemingly incurable disease, but cherish a hope of being relieved oi 
suffering, if not entirely cured , by his experienced skill and care. 

BLinsrnDisrEss ! iDEiJ^iPiiTEiss n 

All Diseases and Affections of the Eye and Ear successfully treated by mild remedies. Cross Eyes Straight- 
ened. Artificial Eyes inserted that look natural. No pain. 

o^^T-A.:r.i^h:, GOisrsTJ.nyni^Tio:^". 

Asthma, Bronchitis, and all Throat and Lung Complaints (which, in this country, are the greatest ene- 
mies to Health and Life,) when change of climate and all else fails, are cured by Dr. Aikin's Improved Inhaler 
and Constitutional Restorative Treatment. 

LINGERIlSrG- OR CHRONTC, AISTID STJRGICAJL. DTSKASES. 

Scrofula, Rheumatism, Dyspepsia, Piles, Goitre, Dropsy, Gravel, Constipation, Tape-Worm, Liver Dis- 
eases, Cancers, Tumors, p'istula. Hare Lip, Club-Foot, etc., remedied by the most approved methods. 
Qj._Qi.. .ii _ p] l_ _, Stammering, and Impediments in speech that daily and hourly ve.v and mortify, and 
Ol~OlU LLtJi 1 1 1& J make one alaughing-stock through life, permanently cured by a scientific, rational and 
practical method — the cause removed, andcure permanent and positive. 

1A rvT UC Married or single, confidently consult the Doctor on any delicate derangement of health, as he 
^/l lyl JCvO » 's doubtless the most skilful Ladies' Physician in the World. Do not suffer from Pain, Weak- 
ness, Whites, Ulceration, Suppression, or other diseases, and drag out a miserable life when you can be certain 
of easy, safe, and speedy cure in any case by applying to Dk. Aikin. 

Stirpiculture — few, healthy children, or none. Trusses, Supporters, Preventatives, Syringes, etc., supplied. 
EI-*IIjT<j!PS"i", Palsy, Chorea or St. Vitus Dance, Neuralgia, etc., cured where other means fail, 
GENTI^KIMErsr! "V'OUlVi^, ]MlU>OL,E---V<^EO &; OL.I3 IMETSr. 
Suffering the sad effects on body and mind of Self-Abuse, E.xcesses, Disease, or Detect, whatever read or doc- 
tored in vain, let not despair or false modesty be your ruin, but call, or send at once. 8£§°"The only sure, ra- 
tional lasting cure for Spermatorrhoea, Seminal Weakness, Nervous Debility, Impotence, etc. No quackery or 
deception. Friendly advice and reliable aid. It is well known th.u Di . A. always effects a cure. His treatment 
includes All — you need never look elsewhere. Those aoout to marry should not fail to consult him. 

SURE, quickest; and mild remedies for all private diseases or old symptoms. Gleet, Syphilis, Strictures, 
Defects, Phimosis, Hydrocele, Varicocele, etc., radiLally cured. No mercury used. Private Rooms. No "getting 
prescriptions." Travelers promptly supplied. While many innocent victims suffer the terrible effects of certain 
diseases neglected or badly treated by physicians in general (they should not be intrusted with these cases,) 
it is right andproper to use plain terms that the indiscrete or unfortunate may know where to get help, and no 
offense can be taken by pure minded persons — See Titus I-15. 

CONElDKlNrTI AL.' 
Every patient (either sex) may freely state all particulars of their case to Dr. Aikin, either in person or by 
letter, reposing to his trust any delicate personal, or family matter, and can always rely upon the strictest con- 
fidence and secrecy. SIB'DR. AIKI N guarantees better , safer treatment [and for less fnoney) in all Special 
Cases than can be had elsr-i'here. He is easily accessible from all points. 

Th.e !M.ost Difiicialt (Jases Ssolicited.. — Consultation Free. Terms Always Reasonable 
Come prepared to arrange needful, thorough treatment. Satisfaction Guaranteed To All. Medicines Fur- 
nished. Patients, visited, in city, or any distance, in serious cases. 

Life is too Sliort to be HVTiseralDle.— If YOU have any serious, obstinate disease or annoying- symptoms, no mat- 
ter how discouraged or how often disappointed, stop useless doctoring and dosing and apply to the Doctor. Sutferers for years or a life- 
time he cured in a few weeks. All the afflicted who come to him will find the aid they seek. 

Cured, at , Home. —Persons at a distance may be cured at home by addressing letter to Dr. Aikin. stating case, symptom-;, 
length of time the disease has continued, and have medicine promptly forwarded, free from damage and curiosity, to any part of the 
country, with full and plain directions for use, by enclosing Sio in registered letter. P. O. order, or Express. 

Call, or address N. J . A 1 Kl N, M. D., 87 Monroe tet.. Grand Rapids 

Remeinber, Dr. Aikin is the onlf qualified, experienced, reliable Specialist he 
-choicest remedi"" '" ' j..--- - — -.•- .... 



,_ , . -. -- treats liis patients fmnnrablv, gives 

, is a rcjjular graduate in medicine, universally owned the most successful and Is the right physic " 



Mich. 

)iy, 

sician to en.ploy. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 




98 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OF THE CENTUEY. 



1818. 

General Jackson pursues the Indians into 
Florida, takes Pensacola and banishes the 
Spanish authorities and troops. At St. JIark 
he captured Alexander Arbutlinot and Robert 
C. Ambrister, who were tried and found guilty 
of being he principal emissaries among the 
southern Indians, inciting them to hostilities. 
They were both executed. 
1819. 

Florida ceded bv Spain to the United 
States. 

Steamer named the Savannah first crossed 
the Atlantic. 

First lodge of Odd Fellows opened in the 
United States. 

Territory of Arkansas formed 

A-Ug'. iiS. — Commodore Perry dies in the 
West Indies. 

I>ec. — Alabama admitted as a State. 
1830. 

Napoleon Murat, nephew of Napoleon I., ar- 
rived in the United States. He was of a scien- 
tific turn of mind, and took great interest in 
our educational institutions. He married a 
grand niece of George Washington, and died 
in Tallahassee, in 1847. 

Fourth census of the United States. Popu- 
lation 9,638,190. National debt, $89,987,427. 

Maine admitted as a State. 

James Jlonroe re-elected President. 

First mariner's church erected in New 
York. 

Iflarch 92. — Stephen Decatur, an Amer- 
ican Naval officer, was killed in a duel with 
Commodore Barron. 

1891. 

j^-iig. SI. — Missouri admitted as a State, 
with the famous ''compromise," under which it 
was resolved that m future no slave State 
should be erected north of the northern bound- 
ary of Arkansas. 

"streets of Baltimore lighted with gas. 
1899. 

Conspiracy of the blacks at Charleston, S. 
C The blacks of Charleston had arranged an 
e.xtensive plot for the indiscriminate massacre 
of the whites on the night of the IGth of June. 
This information was conveyed to the Govern- 
or, who had the citj' patrolled on that night 
with a large military force. The conspirators 
finding this the case, no revolt was attempted. 
About 131 of the conspirators were afterwards 
arrested; 35 of them were executed; 51 acquit- 
ted, and the rest were sentenced to be trans- 
ported. 

j^larcli lO. — The independence of the 
South American Government acknowledged by 
the United States. 

Piracy in the West Indies suppressed by the 
United States. 

Boston, JIass., incorporated as a city. 

x^larolt 8. — United States acknowledges 
the independence of South America. 

Oct. S. — Treaty with Columbia. 
1893. 

President Monroe promulgates the doctrine 
that the United States ought to resist the ex- 
tension of foreign dominion or influence upon 
the American continent. 

1894. 

Air^g". 15. — Lafavette re-visits the United 

States. 



Indianapolis — Continued. 



SALOONS, 

KISTJCEB, FRED M., Wine and Beer Saloon, 168 
W. Washington st. 

LOUIS LANG, 

And Dealer in 

BOTTLED GOODS tC CIGAMS, 

24 N. DELAWARE STREET. 
Established 1857. 



M 



ATZ, .JOHN & SON, Saloon, 286 W. Washing 
ton St. 



M 



'ANDREWS, W., Saloon, 

251 W.Washington St. 



M 



'BRIDE, DANIEL, Saloon, 283 W. Washing- 
ton St. 



"lyi'NELIS, P. H., Saloon, 



14.3 W. Washington st. 



Established 1872. 

JOHN NORTON, 
FAB3IEB'S SALOON 

Choice Wines, Liquors and Cigars 

Coustautlv on hand. 

161 WEST WASHINGTON STREET. 

J. O'LEARY, 

Concert Hall, 

WINES, LIQUORS & CIGARS 

17 N. ILLINOIS ST., Opp. Hotel Bates. 
Established 1863. 



o 



riNN, J. p., Saloon, 



298 W. Washington st. 



HERBERT REINHOLD, 
WINE & BEER SALOON, 

Cor. Illinois Street and Indiana Ave. 



HAMROCK SALOON, M. Crosby, prop., 139 S. 

Illinois St. 

STEFFAN, W3I., Saloon and Boarding House, 
323 W. Washington st. 

ACHTSTETTERTTOHN, Wine and Beer Sa- 
loon, 439 W. Washington st. 



s 



w 



SAW WORKS. 

INDIANAPOLIS SAW WORKS, T. Farley, prop., 
189 S. Meridian st. 

SCALES. 

Agent for the sale of the 

9 SOUTH ALABAMA ST. 
All kinds of Scales repaired, 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OF THE CENTURY. 



99 



Indianapolis — Continued. 



SCALES. 

GALLUP, WM. P., Agent Fairbanks' Standard 
Scales, 26 S. Meridian st. 

' SCREW-PLATES, 

lErjTCHAPlN^ 

Manufacturer of 

Taps and Dies of every description 

And of Superior Quality, as the Teetli are Tem- 
pered and Bodies left Untempered. 

90 EAST GEORGIA STREET. 



S' 



^E WINGMACHINES , 

TEPHEXS, R. E., Sewing Machine Agent 
Machines Repaired. 19 Massachusetts ave. 



SHIRT MANUFACTURERS, 

COOK, C. H., Shirt Mnfr. Perfect Fit and Low- 
est Prices. 60 N. Illinois st. 
RAUMAN, MRS. M., City Shirt Mnf'y, and 
Masquerade Costumes for Rent. 108 S. 111. st. 



INDIANAPOLIS 

CUSTOM SHIRT FACTORY, 




36 EAST OHIO ST. 



SHOOTING GALLERY, 

ONA, G. L., The Flying Bird Shooting Gallery. 
109 S. Illinois st. 



B 



C 



STENCILS AND STAMPS. 

OX, CHARLES H., Seal Engraver, Stencils, 
Stamps, etc , 27 S. Meridian st. 



STOVES AND TINWARE, 

HOOVER, J. J., Mnfr. and Dealer in Stoves and 
Tinware, 453 S. Delaware st. 



M 



YERS, JOHN A., Stoves and Tinware, 157 W. 
Washington st. 



1^25. 

l^larcli 4. — John Qnincy Adams inaugur- 
ated President. 

Civil war threatened in Georgia. The Fed- 
eral Government, in consideration of Georgia 
releasing her claims to portions of the Missis- 
sippi territory, agreed to purchase for that 
State Indian lands within the borders of Geor- 
gia. The Indians refused to sell their lands, 
and the Government of Georgia was about to 
drive them out, when the Federal Government 
interfered on behalf of the Indians. The In- 
dians finally removed to the wilderness of Mis- 
sissippi. 

Napoleon Lucien Charles, nephew of Xa- 
poleon I., came to America and married a Yan- 
kee school-mistress. lie went to France in 
1848, and receieved the title of Prince of the 
Imperial Family. 

Erie Canal completed. It was one of the 
most stupendous important public improve- 
ments, at that time, ever undertaken in the 
United States. 

Corner-stone of Bunker Hill ilonument laid 
by Lafaj'ette. 

Lafayette leaves for France in the frigate 
Brandywine. 

1836. 

Anti-Mason party and ilorgan execitemenl. 
William ^lorgan, of AVcstern New York, an- 
nouced his intention to publish a book, in 
which the secrets of Masonry were to be dis- 
closed. He was suddenly seized at Canan- 
daigua, one evening, placed in a carriage, and 
was never hoard of afterward. Some Free 
JIasons were charged with his murder, and 
the report of an investigating committee ap- 
pointed by the Legislature of Yew York con- 
firmed the suspicion. An Anti-Mason party 
was formed, and in 1831 an Anti-Masonic con- 
vention was held in Philadelphia, which nom- 
inated William Wirt, of Virginia, for Presi- 
dent of the United States. Although the 
party polled a large vote, it soon afterward 
disappeared. 

fi'''<'H>. 125. — American Temperance Society 
instituted at Boston. 

Jfaily -1. — Death of John Adams and 
Thomas Jeft'erson, almost at the same hour. 
They were both members of the committee 
who had framed the Declaration of Indejiend- 
'ice; both signed it; both had been Foreign 
.linisters: both had been Vice-Presidents and 
vhjn Presidents of the United States. To- 
gether with their death, it was a singular coin- 
cidence. 

1837. 

A national convention was held in Harris- 
burg, Pa., to discuss the subject of protective 
tariti's. Only four of the slave States sent 
delegates. They memorialized Congress for 
an increase of duties on woolen and cotton fab- 
rics. 

The first railroad built in the United States 
from Quincy, Mass., used with horses. 

1838. 

j^Iay. — Congress passes a tariff bill impos- 
ing heavy duties on British goods. It is de- 
nounced by the Southern people as oppressive 
and unconstitutional. 

The title of "Democrats' adopted generally 
by the Republican party. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



"^W'f^ 






m:::^s 



riit 



w$ 



I M W W.-K 1 






MB^r^'^ ' 









^ P ^.^l 






IpF^r? wl 



jg-jL-Lfeajj^TQi 



f "W^ t7WftfW3e^ 



Bf^JjH V* 






BPl I^E ti' fS r S ^ 

Milt ^' l^ n [f ^ 

ff IF ff [T P' ^ n \\ 

CF rf T' ^^ 'T f[^ ^ 

S Tf S F il'^'^ 




.ice. 



721, 723, 725 & 727 North Main Street St Louis, Mo. 



S^ ■f. 



=c p > 




PICK. 



h3 






A U VERTISEMENTS. 



101 




INDEPENDENCE HALL, PHILADELPHIA. 



H. B. ScuTT, President J. R. Ashley, Secretary. \V. S, Brooks, Treasurer. 

JOLIET WIRE FENCE CO 




Manufacturers of the Original and justly Celebrated Four-pointed 

Steel Barbed Cable Fence VTire, 

CHEAP, DURABIiE AWD EFFICIENT. 

A Sure Cure for Breachej Stock. More than twenty thousand miles no\y in use, and 
pronounced by all who haye tested it, "The greatest improvement of the age." 



102 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OF THE CENTURY. 



IWavch. -4. — Inauouration of General An- 
drew Jackson as President, and John C. Cal- 
houn as Vice-President. 

cfiiue -4. — United States steam frigate 
Fulton blown up at New York; between 30 and 
40 persons killed. 

JLus'. 8. — The first locomotive engine run 
upon a railroad track was the Stourbridge 
Lion, on the Delaware and Hudson Canal Com- 
pany's railroad, at Honesdale. 

First American locomotive built by Peter 
Cooper, and run on the Baltimore & Ohio rail- 
road. 

Treaty with the Ottoman Porte. 

Working-man's party originated in New York 
city. 

Fifth census of the United States — popula- 
tion 12,866,020. 

•Fan. 6. — Daniel Webster made his great 
speech in the United States Senate in answer 
to Mr. Hayne, of Soutli Carolina. 

jflaV '-£7. — President Jackson vetoes the 
Maysvi'Ue Road bill. 

Oct. •>. — The President issued a proclama- 
tion declaring the jxirts of the United States 
open to British vessels from the AVest Indies. 
1831- 

Juiie lO. — King of the Netherlands ren- 
ders his decision on the boundary question be- 
tween Maine and the British possessions. Re- 
jected by both parties, and question settled in 
1842 by the treaty of Washington. 

Jii'ly 4:. — James Monroe dies. 

Sept. 21, 33, 3;S.— Riots in Providence, 
R. I. Five sailors started out for a cruise, and 
when they arrived at the foot of Olney's lane, 
about 8 o'clock in the evening, they met six or 
seven steamboat men, who said they had a row 
with the darkies, and asked the sailors to go 
up and aid them. Thisparty, greatly increased, 
proceeded up the lane, where they were re- 
ceived with stones thrown from the houses of 
the blacks. Stones were then thrown by the 
crowd against the houses. During the melee 
the darkies fired upon them, killing one man 
and wounding two others. As soon as it was 
discovered the following day that that a white 
man was killed by the blacks, it occasioned 
great excitement, and a mob assembled, when 
the Sherill' arrested seven and committed them 
to jail, but in three er four instances the mob 
made a rescue. On the 23d the mob renewed 
their attack at Snowtown, stoning and destroy- 
ing houses. The military were called out to 
preserve order, but were met with defiance 
from the mob. Stones were hurled at them 
with such force by the mob, as to split the 
socks of several muskets, and, as a matter of 
self-protection they were compelled to fire. 
Four of the rioters were killed and the mob 
dispersed. A conunittee of the citizens of 
Providence appointed to investigate the mat- 
ter were unanimous in tlieir opinion that the 
infantry was justified in firing, and that ^it was 
strictly in defense of their lives. 

Insurrection and massacre in Southampton 
county, Va. In August about sixty or seventy 
slaves rose upon the white inhabitants and 
massacred fifty-five men, women, and chil- 
dren. ■ „ ,. , 

Oct. 13. — Anderson, an English vocalist, 
was driven from the stage of the Park theatre, 
New York, for disrespectful remarks concem- 
ins: the United States. 



Indianapolis — Continued. 



STOVES AMD TINWARE, 

W. F. KIKKWOOD.Vl 
Till Slioi);aii(liStoye Store, 

Manufacturer of Sheet Iron &;_Copper-ware. 

Also Prompt Attention Given to Ont-door 

Work and Job Work of all kinds. 

176 INDIANA AVENUE. 

M. B. MOORE, 

Dealer in 

Harcltvare, Stoves, 

133- VIRGINIA AVENUE. 

Special attention paid to Roofing, Spouting, Re- 
pairing, and all kinds of Job Work. 

SURGICAL APPLIANCES, 

DAVIS &LINGENFELTER, Surgical Appliances 
and Apparatus for Physical Deformities, 195 
S. Illinois. 

TAILORS, 

COOPER, H., Custom Tailor, 
11 Indiana ave. 

GILMORE, A. C, West End Tailor Shop, 
270 W. Washington st. 

170 E. Washington Street. 



K 



ELLY, P., Merchant Tailor, 



193 S. Illinois St. 



LEADLEY, WILLIAM, Custom Tailor, 7714 N. 
Delaware St. 



M 

N 



UELLER, L., Union Dye House and Custom 

_Tailor, 62 S. Il linois St. 

ILIUSrCHARL^S, Mei chant Tailor, 188 S. Ill- 
inois St. Est. 1865. 



T. R. PORTER, 

MERCHANT TAILOR, 

24>^ W. WASHINGTON ST. 

Next door to Trade Palace. 

OSENBERG, JOHN, Merchant Tailor, IlatsT 
Caps and Furnishing Goods, 198 E. Wash- 
ington St. 

JOSEPH STAUB, 

MERCHANT TAILOR, 

No. 2 Odd Fellows' Hall, 

WASHINGTON ST. 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OF THE CENTURY. 



103 



IndianapOli s — Continued. 



TAILORS, 

STMERS, A. F., Tailor, 
31 S. Meridian st. Est. 1875. 

60 N. Illinois Street. 

ILKINSON, J., Tailor. Reasonable Terms; 
all work warranted, 64 W. Market st. 



TEAS AND COFFEES. 

H. B. m'CUNE. J. T. M'cUNE. 

lVi:oC?-u.xxe vSa SioxL, 

TEAS, COFFEES & SUGARS 

100 N. Illinois St. 330 E. Washington St. 

53 N. Washington Street. 

^^^^^^^^^TELEGRAPH COMPANY. 

BUTLER, M. D., Manager Western Union Tele- 
graph Co , 11 S. Meridian st. 

TOBACCO AND CIGARS. 

H. J. T. Arbvithnot, 

Dealer in 

Cigars, Tobacco and Pipes, 

54: KentucJxy Avenue. 

EHRENDT, ALBERT, Havana and Domestic 
Cigars, 138 S. Illinois st. 

Clemens Back, 

Manufacturer and Wholesale and Retail 
Dealer in 

Cigars, Tobacco, Pipes, &c., 

209 E.WASHINGTON ST. 

T. C. CLIFTOIsT, 

Dealer in 

Fine Cigars, Tobacco, etc., 

157 E. Washington St. 

ONAHUE, THOS., Cigars and Tobacco, Whole- 
sale and Retail, 11 Massachusetts ave. 



D 



FITZHUGH, L. M, & CO., Dealers in Teas, To- 
baccos, and Cigars, 66 S. Meridian st. 



H 



AUG, CHARLES, Cigars and Tobacco, 

151 E. Washington St. 



Maas & Kiemeyer, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

CIGARS AND TOBACCO, 

141 E. WASHINGTON ST. 



M 



EYER, C, Cigars. Mfr of Cigars, Wholesale 
and Retail, 26 Indiana ave. 



18S3. 

Congress passes a bill rechartering the Uni- 
ted States Bank, but on July 10 Jackson vetoes 
the bill, and the charter expired, by limitation, 
in 1836. 

The tariff act of 1828 produces discontent 
among the Southern States, and .South Caroli- 
na declares it null and void, and threatens to 
resist the collection of duties in the port of 
Charleston with arms, and secede from the 
Union if the government persists in enforcing 
the law. 

Ifilsick Ha,>vl*: 'War.— After several 
skirmishes the Indians were driven from Illi- 
nois to beyond the Mississippi. Black Hawk 
Avas captured and taken to Washington City, 
and there to impress his mind with the 
strength of the nation he had foolishly made 
war with, he was conducted through several of 
the Eastern States. This ended the Black Hawk 
war. 

The Morse system of electro-magnetic tele- 
graphy invented. 

Cliolera in tlie l\ S. — The epidemic 
first appeared in New York, June 27. The 
number of deaths from the 1st of July to the 
middle of October, when the pestilence ceased, 
is reported at 4,000. During this timethepop- 
ulation was reduced from 225,000, bv removals, 
to 140,000. The ratio of deaths to cases was 1 
to 2, and the greatest number of dying in one 
day was 311, on the 21st of July." The first 
case appeared in Philadelphia, July oth, and 
the number of cases to September 13 was 
2,314; the number of deaths 935. In Baltimore 
the number of deaths to September 29, 710: in 
Xorfolk, to September 11, 400: in Cincinnati, 
from ilay 1 to August 7, 1833,307; in Xashville, 
from March 27 to July 12, 27 whites and 50 
blacks. The disease appeared in New Orleans 
October 27, 1832, and raged with great severity 
among the blacks, occasioning a pecuniary loss 
to slave owners of nearly four million dol- 
lars. 

B>ec. 10. — President Jackson issues a 
proclamation denying the right of any State 
to nullify any act of the Federal Government, 
and warned the people of South Carolina that 
the laws of the United States would be strictly 
enforced by military power, if necessary, and 
South Carolina was obliged to yield. 

Fel>. 13.— Tariff dispute settled by the 
passage of a bill, introduced by Henry Clay, 
which provided for a gradual reduction of the 
obnoxious duties during the succeeding ten 
years. 

]^Iai*cli 4. — President •Jackson inaugura- 
ted for a second term. 

Oct. 41. — Political riots in Philadelphia. 

The President removes the public funds 
($10,000,000) from the Bank of the United 
States. The effect produced was sudden and 
widespread commercial distress, paralyzing the 
whole business of the country. 

Opponents of Andrew Jackson first call 
themselves the Whig party. 
1S341. 

Cholera again rages in New York. 

The President sent General W^iley Thompson 
to Florida to prepare for a forcible removal of 
the Seminole Indians if necessary. The tone 
and manner of Osceola displeased Thompson, 
and he put him in irons and in prison for a day. 
The chief feigned penitence, and was released, 
but his wounded pride called for revenge, and 



104 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



Indianapolis — Coniinned. 


Indianapolis — Continuud. 


TOBACCO AND CIGAES, 

T> AUCH & BBO., Manufacturers and Dealers in 
XL Tobacco and Cigars, 160 and 162 Indiana ave. 
"QEINKEN, HENRY, Mfr and Dealer in Cigars 
Xi and Tobacco, '290 E. Washington st. 

QTEFFEN, ANDREW, Manufacturer and Dealer 
lO in Cigars and Tobacco, 224 E. Washington St. 

TRUNKS AND BAGS. 

OHILLING, R. W., Trunks and Treveling Bags, 
O 39 S. Illinois St. 


WINES AND LIQUOES. 

"KT- TSr. ELLIOTT, 

Wholesale Dealer in 

KENTUCKY WHISKIES, 

Oifice, 23 S. Tennessee St. 

Established 1877. 


UNDERTAKEES. 

Undertaker, 

And Wholesale and Retail Dealer in 

METALIC BURIAL CASES, CASKETS AND 

WOODEN COFFINS, and Undertakers' 

Goods Generally. 

66 W. Maryland St., Second Door W. of Illinois St. 
Established 1876. 


WOOD ENGEAVEES. 

/^HANDLER, H. C, WoodEngraverT""^"^"""^ 
\J 28/2 E. Market St. 

WOOD TUENEE, 

XjOTJIS icot.ib. 

Plain and Ornamental 

JOB TURNER, 

23 E. SOUTH STREET. 
Between Pennsylvania & Meridian Sts. 


TTERRMANN, F. J. & SON., Undertakers, 

JIL 26 S. Delaware st. Est. 1854. 

TD ENIHAN, LONG & HEDGES, Undertakers, Me- 

S\i talic Burial Cases, Caskets aud Wooden Cof- 
fins, 15 Circle st. 


WOOD WOEKING MACHINEEY. 


WATCHES, CLOCKS AND JEWELEY, 

/^ REINER, LOUIS, Watchmaker and Jeweler, 

VT 190 W. Washinstoust. 


TT^ERRICK & WINEGARDNER, Wood Working 
JV Machinery, 63 & 65 W, Maryland st. 


TTEINRICH, CHARLES, Watchmaker and Jew- 
_tl eler, 195 E. Washington st. 
T>EBER, G. F., Watchmaker and Jeweler, 34 
XX Virginia ave. 


INDIANAPOLIS, IND. 

BUSINESS HOUSES 


TX70LVERT0N & CONNOR, Watchmakers, 316 

VV E. Washington st. 

WELL DEIVEES, 


When Established. 


"POUSE, R., Drive Wells, 

XL 19 W^. Meridian st. 

WINES AND LIQUOES, 

T) AAS, JACOB, Choice Liquors, Wines and Ci- 

XJ gars, 234 S. Delaware st. 

"DRINKMEYER, J. C. & CO., Wholesale Dealers 
XJ in Kentucky Whiskies, 43-45 N. Tennessee st. 

California Wiie Honsfi. 

Thomas J. Barlow, Prop. 

22 No Delaware St. 

Established 1867. 


BAUMHARD & SHEELER, House Mov- 
ers, 1876. 

BERGUNDTHAL, Glass and Queeus- 
ware, 1876. 

BERNS, F. G., Cigar Boxes, 1875. 

BLACK & BACKUS, Carriage Mf s, 1871. 

BLAKE, JACKSON & QUINIUS, Com- 
mission Merchants, 186J. 

BRADFORD, C, Solicitor of Patents, 1876. 

CAPITOL CITY PLAINING MILL, 
1873. 

CAYLOR, J., HardM-are, 1876. 

CHARTER OAK LIFE INS. CO., 1850. 


csAFZiT <& cons, 

Importers aud Wholesale Dealers in 

Fancy Groceries, 

Fine Whiskies, 

IMPORTED WINES, LIQUORS & CIGARS. 

30 & 32 N. ILLIxNOIS ST. 
Est. 1875. Capt, A. S, STEWAET, Manager. 


CIRCLE HOUSE, 1857. 

COMSTOCK, A. S., Durbon Pump, 1830. 

CROZIER, G. W.. Oils, 1876. 

ENOS, B. V. & SON., Architects, 1865. 

FITZHUGH, L. M. & CO., Teas, 1873. 

THE FRANKLIN LIFE INS. CO., 1866. 

GRAND HOTEL, 1875. 

GRUBB, PAXTON & CO., Ins. 1869. 

HODGES, E. J., Dry Goods, 1876. 



advp:rtisements. 



105 




WASHINGTON S HEADQUARTERS, VALLEY FORGE. 



The MedicalHealing Institute 

CLAIEyOYMT, lAGlTIC PHYSICIAN, 'Pr05rletor. 

288 W. Madison St., Chicago, Ills. 

Prof. Gray has had a varied experience in the Healing Art for twenty-eight years, 
followed by a reco d of the most remarkable success, having the Oift of Healing by 
the Magnetic I^ile Force, or "Laying on of hands." He seldom fails to give the 
most speedy and permanent relief in the most obstinate cases of all classes of diseases and 
pains, without the use of medicine. Incurable Cases (so-called) solicited. 



106 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OE THE CENTURY. 



fearfully did he pursue if the following year. 
McCormick's reaper patented. 

July 12. — Xegro riots in Philadelphia. 

Democrats first called the the "Locofoco" 
party. 

I>ec. 16. — A very disastrous fire occurred 
in Xew York, destroying 674 buildings in the 
lower part of the city. Loss estimated at .$20,- 
000,000. , 

War with Seminole Indians, led by Osceola, 
in Florida. 

I>co. 3S. — While Major Dade was march- 
ing at the head of 100 men for the relief <f 
Fort Draue, in the interior of Florida, he was 
attacked, killed, and all but four of his attach- 
ment massacred. On the same day, and only 
a few hours before, with a small war party, 
Osceola killed General Thompson and five of 
his friends who were dining at a store a few 
3'ards from Fort King. Osceola scalped Gen- 
eral Thompson with his own hands, and thus 
enjoyed the revenge for the indignity he had 
suflered in 1834. 

1836. 

]^larcli 39. — Pennsylvania newly incor- 
porates the Bank of the tJnited States. 

•Tune l.>. — Arkansas admitted as a State. 

National debt paid off. 

Charles Louis Napoleon, the late Emperor 
of the French, was banished to the United 
States for attempting to gain the throne of his 
uncle, the First Consul, by revolutionary 
means. He landed at Norfolk, in JIarch, 1827, 
and then came to New York, where he re- 
mained until May, when he sailed for Switzer- 
land to see his dying mother. 

The Creek Indians aid the Seminoles in 
their war. They attack mail carriers, stages, 
steamboats, and finally villages in Georgia 
and Alabama, until thousands of white people 
were fleeing for their lives from place to place. 
The Creeks were finally subdued by Genera! 
Scott, and several thousand of them were re- 
moved to beyond the ilississippi. 

i^ser. 

I^IsaJ'C'lB ^. — ?'Iartin Van Buren inaugura- 
ted President, and Richard M. Johnson, of 
Kentucky, Vice-President. 

The banks suspend specie payment, and a 
general panic prevails in business circles. 
During the months of March and April the 
failures in New York alone amounted (o more 
than $200,000,000. The effect of these failures 
, was felt all over the Union, and credit and con- 
fidence destroyed. 

Mai'cli 6. — Osceola and several chiefs ap- 
peared in General .Jessup's camp, and signed a 
treaty of peace, and guaranteed instant de- 
partiire of the Indians to their new home be- 
yond the Mississippi. Osceola during the sum- 
mer broke this treaty, and hostilities were 
again resumed. 

Oct. 31. — Osceola, with several chiefs and 
70 warriors, appeared the second time in Jes- 
sup's camp, under the protection of a flag. 
They were seized and confined. Osceola was 
sent to Charleston, where he died of a fever, 
while confined in Fort Jloultrie. 

June 35. — ]\Iichigan admitted as a State. 

Sept. -1. — An extra session of Congress 
was convened to devise measures to relieve the 
financial embarrassments of the country, and 
after a session of 42 days it did but little, ex- 



Indianapolis — Contimied. 



LEADING BUSINESS HOUSES, 

HOODTHTp^NoveM^ 
INDIxlNAPOLIS BRASS FOUNDRY, 

1876. 
KERRICK & WINEGARDNER, Wood 

Working Machinery, 1874. 
LAWRENCE, A. V., Commission Mer- 

cliant, 1857. 
LEW ARK, JOSEPH, Fur Dealer, 1837. 
MIESSEN, ,J., Confectioner, 1874. 
ME\ ER, CHRISTIAN, Cigar Mf r, 1873. 
PENDERGRAST, .J. W., Pliotograplier, 

1875. 
ROUCH, .J. & BRO., Cigars and Tobacco, 

1870. 
REAGAN, E., Boiler Maker, 1876. 
REBER, G. F., Jeweler, 1876. 
ROSS, JAMES A , Hardware, 1874. 
ROUSE, R. R , Driven Wells, 1868. 
STUART BROS , Commission Merchants, 

1876. 
SULLIVAN, JOHN E., Commission 

Merchant, ]876. 
WASON, J. A., Carriage Painter, 1870. 



TERRE HAUTE, IND. 

AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS. 
Dealer in all kinds of 

TERRE HAUTE, IND. 



Terre Haute Implement Co., 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in all kinds of 

Machinery of all kinds Stored and Transferred at 

Reasonable Kates. 

SO SOUTH THII2I> ST. 

E. R. CRITES, Secretary. 

AGUE CURE. 



ST^ 



THE SPEI&S OF LIFE, 

Liver Regulator and Blood 
Purifier. 

Thousands of People have found permanent 
Health by the use of it. 



JULES HOURIET, Prop. 

MANUFACTURED 

Cor. Third & Walnut Sts., 

TERRE HAUTE. 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OF A CENTUKY, 



107 



Terre Haute — Continued. 
ARTESIAN BATHS, 

ftOaiilTPoorofliloai ; or 

ARTESIAN BATHS 

Kecommended by the Highest Medical Author- 
ities as Wonderfully Efficacious in 
Rheumatic CompJaints aod all Diseases of the i^kin. 
The Most Powerful Alterative Bath known. . 
KIVER, between WALNUT and POPLAR STS. 

MILLER & CONANT, Props 



H 



ATTOENETS AT LAW, 
AVEHS, B. F., Attorney at Law, 



5031/2 Main at. 



ATTOEIEYa,tLAW 

Cor. MAIN AND FOURTH STS. 

TERRE HAUTE, IND. 

ROYSE, fJRIMES & ROYSE, Attorneys at Law, 
Real Estate and Loan Brokers, 503 Main st. 

HARVEY D. SCOTT, 



MMm^^mmj 



L;E.W'J 



Terre Hante? Vigo Co., Iiicl. 

General Collecting Agent for Claims in Western 
Indiana and Eastern Illinois. 

BAKERS AND CONFECTIONERS, 

Crackers, Bread, Cake and Candy, 

128 and 130 Lafayette St. Goods delivered Free 
of Charge. Established 1866. 

JBahery, Confectionery <€■ Notions, 

1142 MAIN STREET. 

JOHN H. CHAPMAN & CO., 

BAKERY & DINING ROOM, 

124 & 126 SOUTH FOURTH ST. 



s 



BARBERS. 

PENGLER, PHILLIP, Barber and Hairdresser, 
649 Main St. 



V 



w 



OftES, HENRY, Hairdresser and fcjhaving Sa- 
loon, 649 Main st. 

ELDLLE, GEO., Barber and Hairdresser, 28 

N. Third St. 



BLACKSMITHS AND HORSESHOERS, 

BURNETT & WATSON, for Horseshoeing and 
General Blacksmithiug. Cherry St., north 
side, bet. Third and Fourth. Will guarantee to 
cure by Shoeing: 

Corns, (Juarter Cracks, Hoof Bound, Contraction 
of the Heel, and Interfering. 



K 



IDD & NICHOLSON, Horseshoeing and Gen- 
eral Blacksmithiug, 231 N. Fourth st. 



w 



ELLS, GEO., Blacksmithing and Horseshoe- 
ing, cor. Seventh & Lafayette sts. Est. 1872. 



1»»7 

cept the pas.sage of a bill authorizing the i.s.sue 
of Treasury notes not to exceed the amount of 
ten million dollars. 

Revolutionary movements in Canada, and 
many Americans assist the insurgents. The 
steamboat Carolina was set fire by the British, 
near Schlosser, east of Niagara, on United 
States territory, and she went over the great 
cataract in full blaze. 

IVov. 7.— Riot at Alton, 111.; E. P. Loveioy 
killed. ^ 

Dec. 35.— Col. Taylor (afterward Gen. 
Taylor and President of the United States), in 
command of 600 troops, repulsed a large body 
of Indians on the northern border of Macaco 
Lake, sometimes called Big Water Lake. 

April 18. — Destructive fire in Charleston, 

S. C. 

Proclamation by the President against Amer- 
ican citizens aiding the Canadians. 

The steamship Sirius, the first to make the 
western transatlantic passage, arrives at New 
York from Cork, Ireland, and is followed, on 
the same day, by the Great Western, from 
Bristol, England. 

The Wilkes exploring expedition to the 
South Sea sailed. 

18S9. 

A treaty was made which appeared to ter- 
minate the Indian war, but murder and robber- 
ies continued, and it was not until 1842 that 
peace was finally secured. This war lasted 
seven years, and cost the United States many 
valuable lives, and millions of treasure. 

Another financial panic, and in October 
banks suspend specie payment. 

isio. 

July 4L. — The Sub-Treasury bill becomes 
a law. This bill established an independent 
treasury for the safe keeping of the public 
funds, and their entire and total separation 
from banking institutions. 

P'li'i'oad riots in P'li'n'lnl^hia. 

St. Mary's Academic Institute, St. Mary's of 
the Woods, Vigo Co., Indiana, founded by the 
Sisters of Providence, from Kuille, in France. 
1841. 

Feb. 4.— United States Band failed and 
other banks suspended specie ])ayment. 

Marcli -1. — William Henry Harrison in- 
augurated President, and died April 4th. 

April 6. — John Tyler, Vice-President, 
was inaugurated President. 

Aug'. O. — Sub-Treasury act repealed and 
a general bankruptcy bill passed. 

Oct. 14. — Alexander MacLeod implicated 
in the burning of the Caroline in 1837, tried 
for murder and arson at Utica, N. Y., and ac- 
quitted. 

Nov. and Dec. — Affair of the United 
States brig, Creole, which leads to a dispute 
with England. This vessel, an American, was 
on her voyage to New Orleans with a cargo of 
slaves; they mutinied, murdered the owner, 
wounded the captain, and compelled the crew 
to take the ship to Nassua, New Providence, 
where the Governor, considering them as pas- 
sengers, allowed them, against the protest of 
the American consul, to go at liberty. 
1843. 

Return of the United States exploring expe- 
dition from the great Southern ocean. The 



108 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



JUDD^ DERRICK, 



MA5J1JFACTUBERS OF 



Magic Baking Powder, 

No, 28 South Division Street, 

GRAND RAPIDS, MICH. 









ROBINSON & BARNABY, 

Itficts ai SisrinteMfiits, 

GRAND RAPIDS, MICH. 

Designs and Specifications prepared for 
Churches, School and County Buildings, Hotels 
and Residences. Interior finish of Stores and 
Banks a specialty. Full size details supplied 
in all cases. Established I860. 



-F3«=B^T^ A -i=eT .Trga-mn-r-> 1871. 

Furnishing; Undertaker, 




No. I03 Ottawa Street, GRAND RAPIDS, MICHIGAN. 




Manufacturer of 



CarriaiBs, Sleilis, 

PIj-iTFOUM: 

SPRING BUGGIES 

— AND— 

Market Wagons. 
37 WATERLOO ST., 

GRAND RAPIDS, Mich. 
i^= Send for cuts and pi ices. ^,^1 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



10^ 




POST OFFICE, GRAND RAPIDS, MICH. 



MEDICAL Al SIGIGAL INSTITUTE. 




2 9 Monroe Street, Grand Rapids, Mich., 

Manufacturers of Stephenson's Patent Trusses, Support- 
ers, Artificial Limbs and Surgical Appliances for Deform- 
ities of the Spine, Hips, Knees, Ankles and Feet. 



All those afflicted will do well to call at this Institute. 



W.M. H. POWERS. 



JOS. H. WALKER. 



POWERS & WALKER, 

WHOLESALE MANUFACTURERS OF 




Office aM Factory, 83, 84, 85, 86, 81 anJ 88 Soutli Front Street, 



110 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OF THE CENTURY. 



1843. 

expedition made a voyage of about 90.000 
miles, equal to almost four times the circum- 
ference of the globe. 

The Croton aqueduct, which convej's water 
from Croton river, in Westchester county, in 
the city of New York, a distance of forty 
miles, was completed. 

Prince de Joinville, of France, brother-in- 
law of Dom Pedro, of Brazil, arrived in New 
York. 

Aug-.— Treaty defining the boundaries be- 
tween the United States and the British Amer- 
ican possessions and for suppressing the slave 
trade, and for giving up fugitive criminals, 
signed at "Washington. 

Aug'. 1.— Abolition riots in Philadelphia. 


Terre Haute — Continued. 


BOILER MANUFACTURERS, 

/^LIPF & SON, Boiler Manufacturers, Fh-st St., 
\j bet. Walnut and Poplar. 

BOOKBINDERS. 

T ANGFORD, M. F. & CO., The Bartlett Bindery, 
JU 52410 Main St. 

BOOTS AND SHOES, 

w. H. greinerTFco^ 
Hoosier Shoe Store, 

COR. FOURTH & OHIO STS. 


1843. 

•Tail. 11. — "Weavers' Riots" in Phila- 
delphia. 

IV'to. 38.— A gun on board the steamship 
Princeton, while on an excursion on the Poto- 
mac bursted, killing Abel P. Upshur, Secretary 


T7RESEE. JOHN, Mnf'r Boots and Shoes, 911 
\2 Chestnut st. 

J. G. K R ETZ, 

Manufacturer of 

BOOTS cSc SHIOIES, 

47-2 N. FOURTH STREET. 


of State, and Mr. Gilmer, Secretary ot the 
Navy, and several other distinguished gen- 
tlenien. The President and many ladies were 
on board. Among the killed was Mr. Gardiner, 
of the State of New York, whose daughter the 


J. P. MATHENY, 

Boot and Slioe Maker, 

807/2 MAIN STREET. 


President soon afterwards married. 

Suppression of threatened insurrection in 
Rhode Island, known as the Dorr Rebellion. 
Thomas Dorr was elected Governor by the 
'•Suffrage party," and the " Law and Order " 
party chose Samuel W. King. Dorr was finally 
arrested, tried, and convicted of treason, and 
sentenced to imprisonment for life. He was 
afterwards released, but deprived of all the 
civil rights of a citizen, and finally these dis- 
abilities were removed. 

June ».— Washington Allston, painter, 
born in South Carolina, died at Cambridge, 
Mass., aged 64 years. 

Nov.'lO.—' John Trumbull, painter, born in 
Connecticut, died in New York, aged 87. 

18-14. 

April 13. — The Texans conclude a treaty 
with the United States for the annexation of 
Texas to the Union. 

June 35. — Joseph Smith, founder of Mor- 


JOHX R. MII.I.ER, 

Manufacturer of Boots and Shoes. 

23 NORTH FOURTH ST. 


T^AYLOR, (JEO. A., Mufr of Boots and Shoes, 

± 937 Poplar st. 

"TTT ATKINS, A., Mnfr of Boots and Shoes, 937 

VV Poplar t.t. 

BREWERS, 

Established 1856. 

Cor. POPLAH S ninth STS. 

No. 1 Lager Beer constantly on hand. 
All Orders from abroad promptly attended to. 


monism, died, aged .39 years. 

July tt. — The United States recognizes the 
independence of the Sandwich Islands. 

Treaty of commerce with China. 

May aud. July.— Riots and Catholic 
churches burned in Philadelphia. 

'May 37. — Anti-Rent riots in New York. 
The tenants on some of the old "patroon" 
estates had refused to pay rent. It consisted of 
only " a few bushels of wheat, three or four fat 
fowls, and a day's work with horses and wagon, 
')ei' year." The anti-renters considered it 
illegal, and, disguised as Indians, tarred and 
feathered those tenants who paid their rents, 
and even killed officers who served warrants 
u])on them. The disturbances were finally 
sui)pressed by the military. 

Telegraphic communication established be- 
tween Baltimore and Washington. 
1845. 

March 1. — The Republic of Texas ad- 
mitted into the Union. 

Marcli 3. — Florida and Iowa admitted as 
States. 


BUILDER. 

WIllMM EMEimM, 

GONTRACTOE & BUILDER 

SHOP, 125 OHIO ST., 

Bet. First and Second Streets, first door west of 
Pence's Drug Store. 


CABINET MAKER. 

T^RICHE, CHARLES, Cabinet Maker, Walnut St., 

L bet. Fifth and Sixth. 

CARRIAGE MANUPACTURER, 
FRED L. MEYER, 

Carriage Mamifactiirer k General BlacksinitliiDg, 

COR. FIFTH AND CHERRY STS. 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OF THE CENTURY. 



Ill 



Terre Haute — Continued. 



CHINA, GLASS AND OEOOKERT, 

RICHARDSON, H. S. & CO., China, Glass and 
Queensware, 318 Main st. 



H 



COAL AND WOOD. 

ix()N7j-» Coal. Wood, Lime, etc., at crossing 
of 5tli St. and Indianapolis & St. Louis R.R. 



COMMISSION MERCHANT. 

JOS. H. BRIGGS, 
Produce S Commission Merchant 

And Dealer in Hides, Pelts, Rags, Butter, Eggs, 
&c., cor. of Fourth and Cherry sts. 

DENTISTS. 



iifiif, 



DENTAL ROOMS, 

523 1-2 MAIN STREET, NEAR SIXTH. 



INCOLN, DR. C. 0., Dentist, 



681V4 Main st. 



DRESSMAKERS, 
THE MISSES BELSER, 

Fasliionahle Dress and Cloak 
Makers, 

63414 MAIN STREET. 
MRS. KESTER, FASHIONABLE 

DEESS AND CLOAK MAKEE, 

6421/2 MAIN STREET. 

Mrs. Oosley & Miss Jones, 

Fashionable Dress and Cloak 

Makers, 

9201/2 MAIN STREET. 

DRUGGISTS. 

Established 1871. 
BUNTIN & ARMSTRONG, 

Druggists, Manufacturing Pharmacists 

And Dealers in Surgical Instruments, 

No. 600. Cor. Main & Sixth. 

ROVES & LOWRY, Druggists, Perfumery, etc., 
T cor. Third and Main sts. 



G 



GULICK db BE BUY, 

Wholesale Druggists, 

COR. FOURTH & MAIN STS. 



M 



'GREW, W. E. & CO., Druggists and Pharma- 
cists, cor. Third and Waluut sts. 



O ALE, ED. T., Druggist, 



131 Lafayette st. 



FANCY GOODS. 

FECKHEIMER, I., Ladies' Popular Fancy Ba- 
zar, -ZO Fourth St. Established 1870. 

FLOUR AND PEED. 

BAKER, JOHN, Dealer in Fiour, F^eedfandTpro^ 
duce, 101-3 Main st. 



B 



URNS, PHILIP, tlour and Feed Store, cor. 
Third and Poplar s's. 



JVIarcIi 4. — James K. Fo'k iuaugvuated 
President. 

Treaty with Great Britain fixing the ncrth- 
westorn boundary, by which it was settled that 
Oregon was a part of the territory of the 
United States by right of first discovery. 

^lai'cli 6. — Mexican minister protests 
against the admission of Texas into the Union 
and demanded hi.s passport. 

A|>i-il 10. — Great fire at Pittsburgh, burn- 
ing over a space of 56 acres, entailing a loss of 
property of over five millions of dollars. 

vluly — The President, aware of the bostle 
feelings of the Mexicans, sent Gen. Taylor, 
with a force of 1,500, for the defence of Texas. 
At the same time a squadron, under com- 
mand of Commodore Connor, sailed for the 
Gulf of Mexico, to protect American interests 
there. 

cVitly l.J>. — Great fire between Broadway, 
Exchange place. Broad and Stone streets, New 
York. Loss, $5,000,000. 

The Mexican government, by continued dep- 
redations upon American vessels and the con- 
fiscation of the property of the Americans 
within her border, brought on a crisis that re- 
quired a settlement. The United States re- 
monstrated, but the Mexicans continued their 
depredations, until the amount appropriated 
by them reached more than $6,000,000. The 
Mexican government finall}- acknowledged the 
debt, and agreed to pay it in installments of 
$300,000 each. Only three of the installments 
were paid, and the Mexican goveinment re- 
fused to decide whether she would pay the re- 
mainder. 

April 3J:, War T*ifli ]^Iexico. — 

First blood of the war shed. Gen. Tay- 
lor, being iaformed that the Mexicans were 
crossing the Rio Grande, above his en- 
campment, sent Capt. Thornton, with 60 dra- 
goons, to reconnoitre. They were sui'prised 
and captured. Sixteen Americans were killed, 
and Capt. Thorntoa escaped by an extracrdi- 
nary leap oft' his horse. 

May «5.— Fort B.-own, on the Kio Grande, 
attacked by the Mexicans. After suffering a 
bombardment of 160 hours, the garrison was 
relieved, and the Mexicans trembled for the 
safety of Matanioras. Major Brown (in whose 
honor the fort was named) was mortally 
wounded. 

May 8.— Battle of Palo AUo. Gen. Tay- 
lor, with a little over 2,000 troops, met, in bat- 
tle array, 6,000 Mexicans, under Gen. Arista. 
For five hours, a hot contest was niaintained, 
when the Mexicans gave way and fled. Amer- 
ican loss ID killed and wounded, 63. Among 
:he wounded was Capt. Page, of Maine, who 
afterwards died on the 12th of July; and Major 
Ringgold, commander of Flying Artillery, who 
«tied four days afterward. The Mexicans lost 
about 600. 

May O. — Battle of Resaca de la Palma. 
This was a short and bloody conflict, but the 
Americans were again victorious. American 
loss la killed and wo.unded, 110: Jlexican loss 
was at least 1,000. Gen. La Yega and IOC men 
were made prisoners. This was the second 
battle of the war fought between Gen. Tavlor 
and Gen. Arista. Arista saved himself by soli- 
tary flight, and made his way alone across the 
Rio Grande. 

May la.— Before the battle of Palo AUo 



112 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



WM. CLIFF. 



[Established 1865.] 



oxjIft- dfe sorer 



—JflAAUFACTURJERS OF- 



HENRY CLIFF. 

9 



immWl STATIONARY AND MARINE BOILERS, 

Tubular and Cylinder, Iron Tanks, Smoke Stacks, Breeching, Sheet 
Iron Work, Etc. Particular attention paid to all kinds of Jail Work. 

Shop on First St., bet. Walnut & Poplar, Terre Haute, Ind. 

REPAIRING done in the most siibstintial manner at short notice, and as liberal in price as any estab- 
lishment in the State. Orders solicited and punctually attended to. 



REAGAN'S PAT. for FLANGING FLUE-HOLES in BOILER HEADS. 



W 



-^w 



,^ 




THIS INVENTION re ates to a device by which to turn a Flange to the Flue Holes in Boiler Heads, 
and consists in a cone shaped Die, the base of which is of the size of the external diameter of the Flue, 

This Flanging device is used in the following manner: The Boiler-head H having been pierced with 
suitable holes, and heated to a workable temperature, is laid upon trestles or other supports, and is 
prevented from being turned in operating the device, by inserting a pin throu h one of the Flue-holes 
into the support below. The Bracket, with the Screw hanging therein by the Nut F in Lever G. is then 
set over the hole to be flanged, and the Die attached to the lower end of the Screw from below the 
Boiler-head. By turning the Lever G, the Screw C and Die Bare drawn upward ; the Die forces up and 
forms the Flange i around the hole in the Boiler-head. 

THIS MACHIXE I» CliAlMEO TO BE TBE BEST IX VISE, 

And will illustrate it« own merits by trial. 

After the Iron is Hot, the Flue can be formed for General Use in the space of Two IVlinutes. 

Machines, and State, County and Shop Rights, for Sale by EDWARD REAGAN, PATENTEE. 

All coinimiuications should be addressed to EDWARD RE.\(3AX, 132 S. Tenneisee St., Indianapolis, Ind. Factory, 365 W. Washington St. 

J. W. PENDERGAST, 
LANDSCAPE AND PORTRAIT PHOTOGRAPHER, 

ALL KINDS OF 

Viewing and Copying promptly attended to. 

A Full Assortment ol" Stereoscopic Views ol" the Principal Streets and Business Blocks o 

this City. Also Birds' Eye Views taken from the New Court House 

steeple, 175 to 200 feet high, giving a good View of the 

City, always for sale at Gallery, 

212 WEST WASHINGTON ST., INDIANAPOLIS, IND. 

A Liberal Discount to Dealers and Agents. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



113 




Opera House, Terre Haute, Ind- — Was built in iS69-'7o. The building is 
located on the corner of Fourth and Main streets ; is So feet front by 148 feet in depth, and 
cost exclusive of the ground $140,000. It has a seating capacity of 1,400; and a stage com- 
plete, in machinery and scenery. It ranks as one of the most elegant, convenient and 
comfortable houses in the country. 



J. A. FOOTS, 

IJIPORTER AND DEALER IN 

SEEDS 

AND 

Horticultural Goods, 

No. 512 laiD-st, Terre Haite,M. 



ESTABLISHED IN ih66. 

The only complete Seed S'.ore in the State. 
RELIABLE SEEDS SOLD. 

Accurate information as to relative value 
of varieties. 

New varieties introduced from year to 

year. 

> ■♦» < 

Seed Catalogue issued in January. 

Bulb " " September. 

Fancy Goods " " April. 

It^" Catalogues free to all applicants. .^^ 




L. ffEIL & 



TRUNK 



Manufacturers, 



--A-nsriD- 




No. 321 Upper 1st St., 

EVANSVILLE, IND. 

All kinds of Trunks and Sam- 
ple cases made to order. 



114 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OF THE CENTURY. 



and Resaca de Palma were known iu the 
United States, Congress authorized the Presi- 
dent to raise 50,000 volunteers, and appropri- 
ated $10,000,000 towards carrying on the war. 

Jflay IS. — Gen. Taylor drives the Mexican 
troops from Matamoras and takes possession of 
the town. 

Itlay SO.— Gen. Taylor, as a reward for 
his skill and bravery, breveted Major-General. 

«liily. — Americans in California declare 
themselves independent, and place Gen. Fre- 
mont at the head of their aflfairs. 

.Billy 7.— Commodore Sloat bombards and 
takes possession of the city of Monterey. 

July 9. — Commodore Montgomery takes 
possession of San Francisco. 

Au§'. 15. — Col. Fremont and Cfemmodore 
Stockton take possession of Los Angeles, Cali- 
fornia. 

Aug'. IS. — Gen. Kearney takes possession 
of Santa Fe, the capital of New Mexico. The 
Governor and 4.000 Mexican troops fled at 
his approach, and the people, numbering about 
6,000, quietly submitted. 

Aug'. 33. — Annexation of New Mexico to 
the United States. 

Sept. 31. — Gen. Taylor, now in command 
■of 6,000 men, commenced the siege of Mon- 
terey. The city was defended by Gen. Ampu- 
dia, and 9,000 troops. The conflict lasted four 
days, a part of the time within the streets of 
the city, where the carnage was fearful. Am- 
pudia surrendered. American loss in killed, 
wounded and missing, 561. The number lost 
by the Mexicans was never ascertained, but it 
was supposed to be more than 1,000. 

October. — Tobasco and Tuspiu captured 
by Com. Perry. 

I\ov. 14. — Tampico surrenders to Com. 
Conner. 

i^ov. 15. — Gen. Worth took possossion of 
Saltillo, capital of Coahuila. 

Dec. 33. — Col. Doniphan, in command of 
1,000 Missouri volunteers, while on his march 
to Chihuahua to join Gen. Wool, met a large 
force of Mexicans at Braceti, in the valley of 
the Rio del Norte, under Gen. l^once de Leon. 
He sent a black flag to Doniphan with the mes- 
sage, "We will neither ask nor give quarters." 
The Mexicans then advanced and tired three 
rounds. The Missourians fell upon their faces, 
and the enemy, supposing them to be all dead, 
rushed forward for plunder. The Americans 
suddenly arose, and delivering a deadly fire 
from their rifles, killed 200 Mexicans and dis- 
persed the remainder in confusion. 

Dec. 3J>. — G6n. Taylor took possession of 
Victoria, capital of Taniaupilas. 
1847. 

Jan. 19. — A revolt in Mexico against the 
United States government; Gov. 15ent and 
many other Americans murdered at Fernando 
de Taos, and massacres occurred in other 
portions of the country. 

Ten thousand Mormons from Illinois, under 
the leadership of Bringham Young, entered 
Desert, now called Utah, and founded Salt 
Lake city. 

Jan. 33. — Col. Price, with .350 men, de- 
feated the insurgents at Canada, and finally 
dispersed them at the mountain gorge called 
the Pass of Embudo. 

Feb. 33.— Battle of Buena Vista. Gen. 
Taylor's forces at this battle were only 5,000, 
while that of the enemy under Santa Anna, 



Terre Haute — Continued. 



FLOUR AND FEED. 

ATS &. CUMMINGS, Flour and Feed Store, cor. 
Third and Ciierrj^ sts. 

PLOURINa MILLS. 



THOMPSON, R. L., Merchant Mills. Cash paid 
for Wheat. Poplar and First sts. 



M 



F 



PURNITURE, 

ISHER, J. R., Dealer in Furniture, etc., 106 S. 

Fourth Et. 

— Dealers in New and Second-hand — 

FURNITURE AND STOVES, 

10;i N. Fourth st. Upholstering done to order. 

UENNJS~»1JLLI IAN, 

Second-hand Furniture, Stoves, 

Clothing, etc. Cash paid for all kinds. 
104 NORTH FuUKTH ST. 

W. P. WILSON, 

* Dealer in 

New & Second-hand Furniture & Stoves, 

29 NORTH FOURTH ST. 
GROCERIES, 

3F" «- fn i 1 y C3r r o o © r , 

N. W. Coiner Third and Park sts. Est. 1865. 

YERS BROS., Dealers in Groceries, 111 S. 
Fonith St. 



B 



ECKHOFF A ZIMMERMAN, Groceries and l^ro- 
visious, 208 S. Fourth St. 



iU^tto : Not to bt^ IJiKlersold. 

WYN & NAYLOR, (successors to B. H. Alvey,) 
Cash Dealers in Choice 

Teas, Groceries & Provisions, 

121 N. 4th St. Highest prices paid for Produce, &c. 
ULMAfi & COX, Wholesale Grocers and Li- 
quor Dealers, cor Fifth and Main sts. 



G 



H 



PATTON BROTHERS, 
Dealers in 

Fancy and Staple Groceries, 

Fre-h Meat, Vegetables, etc., 
116 South Foi rth St., bet. Ohio and Walnut. 



A. & 



E. REIMAN, 

Deilers in 



Provisions, Groceries, Flour 

AND BUILDING MATERIAL, 

Delphi and Greencastle Lime, Newark and Mich- 
igan Plaster, Lath, Fire Brick, Fire Clay, 
Plastering Hair, Etc., 

MAIN STREET, 

Bet. Eighth and Ninth. 

S HALEY, F. W. * CO., Groceries and Provisions, 
cor. Eighth and Poplar sts. 

HARNESS AND SADDLES. 

P. H. KADEL, MANUFACTURER OF 

HarflEss, Saddles. Collars, Trnnts, Valises, &c. 

Main St., near Ninth, South side. 
Repairing promptly attended to. 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OF THE CENTURY. 



115 



Terre Haute — Continued. 
HAENESS AND SADDLES. 

Manufacturer of and 
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 

Dealer ii Herness i\i SaMles, 

29 S. SECOND ST. 



S 



HATS, CAPS AND FURS. 

IKES, JOHN H., Dealer in Hats, Caps, Furs 
and Straw Goods. 



JLOTELS.. 

felbeciThouse. 

HERMAN SCHERRER, PROP., 
COR. FIFTH AND CHERRY STS. 

"new bronson house, 

DAVID BRONSON, - - Proprietor. 

COR. TENTH & SPRUCE STS. 

Newly furnished throughout and First-Class in 
every appointment. Nearest Hotel to both De- 
pots. Free Bus to Guests to and from all Trains. 

TERMS, S2.00 PER DAT. Nearest Hotel to 
Union Depot. 

INSURANCE. 

HAVENS & FARIS, General Insurance Agents, 
f 0:^54 Main st. 

JEWELRY AND SILVER WARE. 

TRASK, 0., Jewelry, Silver Ware, etc., 
618 Main st. 

LIVERY AND SALE STABLES. 

nTBTAMOLDT™ 

Li?firy & Boarflii StaWe, 

209 & 211 



•d S%, 



TERRE HAUTE. 



J. H. HOLMES, 
Livery and Boarclhig Stable, 

1126 & 1128 Main st-, bet. Eleventh & Twelfih. 

LIVERY AND COMMISSION 
SJLZiS STiLBIiSS. 

Horses, etc., Bought and Sold. 

The Best Rigs for Hire in the City. 

AUCTION SALES EVERY SATURDAY, AT 2 P.M. 

FOUTS i& HUNTER, Props., 

123 & 125 S. THIRD STREET. 



1»4I7. 

numbered 20,000. The Jle.xican General, as- 
suring Gen. 1 ajlor that lie was surrounded, 
ordered him to surrender within an hour. Tay- 
lor refused, and both armies prepared for bat- 
tle. It was a desperate and bloody battle, 
commencing at sunrise and lasting until sun- 
set, but finally the Mexicans fled in confusion, 
leaving their dead and wounded behind, and 
the Americans were left masters of the field. 
Americans lost 267 killed, 456 wounded, and 23 
missing The Mexicans lost almost 2,000. 
They left 500 of their comrades dead on the 
field. 

Fel>. 8. — Gen. Kearney proclaimed the 
annexation of California to the United 
States. 

Fel>. 33. — Captain Webster, with a small 
party of Americans, drove Gen. Minon, with 
800 cavalry, out of SatHlo. 

FeU 3!^.— Col. t'oniphan, when within 18 
miles from Chihuahua, was met by 4,000 Mex- 
icans. These he completely routed, losing in 
killed and wounded only 18 men, while the 
Mexicans lost about 600. He then pressed for- 
ward to the city, entered it in triumjjh, and 
raised the American flag upon its citadel 
( March 2) amidst a population of 40,000, and 
took possession of the province in the name of 
government. 

Mai-cli 3?'.— Surrender of Vera Cruz and 
Castle of San Juan de Ulloa to Gen. Scott and 
Com. Perry, with 5,000 prisoners and 500 
pieces of artillery. The Americans lost 47 
killed, and about the same number wounded. 
It is supposed 1.000 Mexicans were killed, 
and a great number of them wounded. 
During the siege it is estimated that 6,700 shot 
• and shell were thrown by the American bat- 
teries, weighing in the aggregate more than 
4,000 pounds. 

April 18.— Battle of Cerro Gordo. This 
place was defended by Santa Anna, and 12,000 
Mexicans, in a strongly fortified position, and 
many pieces of cannon. Gen. Scott, with 8,000 
Americans, assaulted the enemy, and drove the 
Jlexicans from their position. Santa Anna 
himself narrowly escaped capture by fleeing 
upon a mule taken from his carriage. !More 
than 1,000 Mexicans were killed or wounded, 
and 3,000 made prisoners. Americans lost in 
killed and wounded 431. 

April 31. — Battle of Churubusco. Gen. 
Scott advanced on Churubusco. where Santa 
Anna was in command of the main body of the 
Mexican army. The enemy were defeated, 
and Santa Anna abandoned the field and fled 
to the City of Mexico. This defeat of the 
Jlexicans was the final destruction of an army 
30,000 strong, by another about one-third its 
strength in number. Full 4,000 of the Mexi- 
cans were killed or wounded, 3,000 made pris- 
oners, and 30 pieces of cannon taken. Ameri- 
cans lost in killed and wounded about 1,100. 

April 33. — Gen. Worth takes possession 
of the castle of Perote. This was considered 
one of the strongest fortresses in Mexico, yet 
it was surrendered without resistance. Fit'ty- 
four pieces of cannon and mortars were cap- 
tured here, and a large quantity of munitions 
of war. \ 

!^lay 15. — Americans take possession of 
the city of Pueblo, a city of 80,000 inhabi- 
tants, without opposition. 

Aitg°. 31. — Gen. Scott was now wnthin 
three miles of the city of Mexico, when Santa 
Anna sent a flag of truce, asking for an armis- 



116 



ADVEKTISEMENTS. 




(0 



a 



o'oaif 









FORSZCXT <Si DOMSSTZC FZIT7ZTS, 

2 3 - oi:ei.c:;xj:e: &'nt.:Ei^s'r - a 3 

INDIANAPOLIS, IND. 



ADVKRTISEMp;XTS. 



117 




Eye,EariThroat Dispensary. 

DB, A. BURKE, 

The Surgeon of this establishment, was formerly first assistant to the celebrated oculist» 
Professor L. Von Wecker, and acted in the same capacity in the Throat Dispensary of 
Professor Chas. Fauvel, the highest authority in Europe, on all Catarrhal and Lung Com- 
plaints. These titles on the public opinion, are all certified by the American Embassy 
from Pahs, and can be seen in the Doctor's Oflice. Address, 

101 Main St,, La Faj/ette, Ind. 



118 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



Terre Haute — Continued. 


Terre Haute — Continued. 


LIVEKT AND SALE STABLES. 
C. P. STAUB, Proprietor of 

Livery, Sale and Feed Stable, 

N. Third St., bet. Main and Cherry. Proprietor 
and Author of Staub'g Complete Horse Farrier. 


OYSTERS AND PISH. 

Fulton Oyster k Fish Market, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealer in and 


MACHINIST, 

J. A. PEABODY, 

Patentee and Manufactnrer of Peabody's 


Shipper of 

Can and Bulk Oysters, and Fresh Fish 

OF ALL KINDS. 


luiproyei Rotary lortlsini lacMne, 


Poultry and Game Depot, 617 and 619 E. Main St. 


Model Maker and Machinist, 
Etab. 1S65. 1119 N. Second St. 


PAINTERS. 


MAEBLE WORKS, 

City Marble 1U7orks, 


HOUSE & SIGN PAINTER, 

501 Ohio St. 


Mannfacturer and Dealer in 

American ni Italiai larWe, 


Calhoun Bros., 

CARRIAGE PAINTERS, 

1311 E. Main St. 


AND SCOTCH GRANITE, 

Monuments, Tomb Stones, Urns, Vases, 

Garden Fissures and Statuary . 

SHOP— On Third St., bet. Ohio & Walnut. 

One Door South St. Charles Hotel. 


JACKSOIlf & AUBLE. 

House & Sign Painters 

No. 25 S. Sixth St., Opp. P. 0. 


MARBLE WORKS. 

Barnett, Palmer & Swift, 


"IX/TANN, CHAS, H„ House and Sign Painter, 

iVl 126 North Fifth St. 


Importers and Dealers in 

Eose aM dray Scotcl firaaite, 

And Italian Marble Monnraents, Tombs, Head 
Stones, Vaults, Mantels, etc.. 
East Main St , bet. TweKth and Tliir eenth Sts,, 
All work warranted to give Satisfaction. 

MILLINERY. 


■]\/rANNI]VG,W. H., Carriage and Sign PAINTER, 
iVl Cor Fifih and Cherry Sts. 

OTUCKISCH & WOLFE, House and Sign Pain 
ters and Paper Hanging, 7 Ohio St. 

PRINTERS, 

"DUPE & WHITAKER, The Gem^olT^rinting 
XV Office, Fences Block. 


Dealer in Millineiy, Fancy Goods, Em- 
broideries, Laces, and Vaj-iety Goods, 


PRODUCE DEALERS. 

T) AISLER& WINTEBSTEIN, Produce, Vegetables, 

\J Fiuitsetc, 653 Main St. 


Stamping done to order. 

IS S. FOURTH ST. 


RESTAURANT, 


10 S. FOURTH STREET. 

Work done to order. 


C. H. ROUSER'S 
No. 610 Main St., N. Side. Open day and nignt. 


X LI.nERY, and Ladies' Furnishing Goods, 
324 Main st. 


RUSTIC WORK. 


NOTARY PUBLIC, 

E. MONTGOMERY, 

JI©«aiFf f ttMIt, 

AND GENERAL AGENT. 

Office with H. D. SCOTT, Esq., Attorney. 

51714 South side Main, bet. 5th and 6th Sts. 

Established 1876. 


Manufacturers and Dealers in all kinds of 

TAKV BICH0R7 RUSTIC WOEH, CHAIUS, 

Settees, Flower Stands, Hanging Baskets, &c. 
Cor, 7th and Poplar sts. 


SALOONS, 
JOHN F. O'REILLY, 

Wine and Beer Saloon, 

12 N. SECOND ST. 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OF THE CENTURY, 



119 




MATERIALIZING MEDIUM 

231 W. Madison St., Chicago, 111. 

Pablic seances every eveaing, private consultations daily. Spirit voices are heard, names given, 
spirit hands, faces and lull forms are seen and recognized, also messages written out by spirit hands, 
full name signed, &c., IN THE LIGHT. 



120 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OF THE CENTURY. 



tice, preparatory to negotiations for peace. It 


Terre Haute — Continued. 


was granted, but the propositions of the Lnited 
States were spurned and scorned, and Santa 
Anna treacherously violated the armistice by 
strengthening the defenses of the city. 

Aug-. ai.~Battle of Contreras. General 
Smith attacked the Mexicans at sunrise, and, 
after a brief and sanguinary conflict, the 
Americans were victorious. Eighty otlicers 
and 2,000 private soldiers were made prisoners, 
and thirty-three pieces of artillery were cap- 
tured. The Mexican force engaged was 6,000, 
under General Valencia. 


ALOONS, 

Delmonico Billiard Hall, 

WINE & BEER SALOON, 

FINE WINES, LIQUORS AND 

CIGARS. 

Julius Blumenberg, Prop.. 

Main St., bet. Sixth and Seventh. 


{!>»ept. >«(.— Battle of El Molinos del Rev. 
About 4,000 Americans attacked 14,000 Mexi- 
cans, under Santa Anna, near Chapultepec. 
The Americans were first repulsed with great 
slaughter, but, returning to the attack, they 
fought desperately for an hour, and drove the 
Mexicans from their position. B( th armies 
suffered dreadfully. The Mexicans lost about 
1,000 dead on the field, and the Americans about 
800.- 

i^ept. 13.— Battle of Chapultepec. This 
was the last place to be defended outside the 
suburbs of the City of Mexico. The Ameri- 
cans, under Gen. Scott, made a furious assault 
and routed the enemy with great slaughter, 
and unfurled the Stars and Stripes over the 
shattered castle of Chapultepec. The Mexi- 
cans fled to the city, pursued by Gen. Quit- 


O IBLEY, W. W., Wine and Beer Saloon, 13 S. 

O Fifth St. 

ROBERT HIGDON, 
CONCERT HALL, 

Also 

WHOLESALE & RETAIL DEALER IN LIQUORS 

24 NORTH SECOND ST. 


SAUSAGE MANUFACTURER, 
GEORGE H. WOLF, 

Sutchsr and Steam Sausage Manufacturer. 

27 N. FOURTH ST., bet. Main & Cherry sts. 


man to its very gates. That nighl Santa Anna 
and his army, with the officers of government, 
fled the doomed city. 

Sept. 1-1. — American army, in command 
of Gen. Scott, enter the City of Mexico with- 
out resistance. 

1848. 

]^Iay 39. — Wisconsin admitted as a State, 

tJen.'Scott superseded in Mexico by Gen. Wil- 
liam 0. Butler. 

July -l. — Peace proclaimed between the 
United States and Jlexico. By this treaty, the 
United States came into possession of Califor- 
nia and New Mexico. The treaty stipulated 
the evacuation of Mexico bj' the American 
army within three months; the payment of $3,- 
000,000 in hand and $12,000,000, in four annual 
installments, by the United States to Mexico, 
for the territory acquired by conquest; and, 
in addition, to assume debts due to certain cit- 
izens of the United States to the amount of 
P,.500,000, it also fixed boundaries. 

The corner-stone of the Washington Monu- 
ment was laid in the national capital. 

•July. — News of the discovery of gold in 
California reached the States. 

Po'stal convention between the United States 
and Great Britain. 

Mormons ( founded by Joseph Smith in 1827) 
settle near Great Salt Lake, Utah. 

Sept. 9. — Large fire in Albany, N. Y. 

l>ee. 8. — First deposit of California gold 
in mint. 

184». 

Mai'Cli 4. — " Wilmot I'roviso "passed by 
Congress. 

l^Iavcli !*• — Gen. Zachary Taylor inau- 


SEED DEALER. 

T?OOTE, A. J., Seed Merchant, 

-T 512 Main St. 


SEWING MACHINES, 
BRANCH OFFICE OFTHE~^""'^'~^ 

HOWE SEWING MACHINE CO., 

320 Main st , bet. Third and Fourth sts. 

T. D. OLIN, AGENT. 


STOVES AND TINWARE, 

^^^hTpT to w n l e y X^ar™ 

STOVES, TINWARE 

House Purnishlng Goods, Main st., bet. 4th & 5th. 


TOBACCO AND CIGARS, 

QEEMAJf, C. H., Manufacturer of and Dealer in 
Cigars and Tobacco, 643 Main st. 

HENRY C. UCHTMAN, 
Manufacturer of and Dealer in 

Foreifjn and Domestic Cigars, 

Also the Best Brands of Chewing and Smoking 
Tobaccos, 177 Main St.. bet. Sixth & Seventh. 

CHARLES WEIDEL, 

Manufacturer of 

Cigars aiifl Dealer in ToMcco. 

1 9 so UTH FO URTH ST., 


Furnishes Cigars to Secretary of Navj. 


gurated President. 

May 15. — <!reat fire in St. Louis, Mo. 

Mai-cli aO to Sept. 8.— Philadelphia 
depleted by cholera. 

June 15. — James K. Polk dies. 

Aug'. 11. — The President of the United 
States publishes a proclamation against the 


WALL PAPER AND SHADES, 

J. W. ROBERTS, Dealer in 

WALL PAPER, WINDOW SHADES, 

Paints, Glass, Oils, Varnishes, etc., 
825 MAIN STREET. 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OF THE CENTURY. 



121 



Terre Haute — Continued. 

WINES AND LIQUORS, 

ALEXANDER & CO., Wholesale Dealers in Li- 
quors, Cigars. O ysters, etc., fU5 Main st. 
OHNSON, E. W., Wholesale Dealer in Liquors, 
Cigars, etc., 613 Main st. 

Terre Haute Business Houses. 

WHEN ESTABLISHED. 



BARNETT, PALMER & SWIFT, Mar. 

ble Works, 1867. 
CLIFF & SON, Boiler Manufacturers, 

i86v 
FOOTE, A. J., Seed Merchant, 1866. 
HULMAN & COX, Grocers and Liquors, 

1S50. 
MAYER, A., Brewery, i8=;6. 



FORT WAYNE, IND. 



ARCHITECTS. 

TOLAN, T. J. & SON, Architects. Court Houses 
and Jails a specialty. Armory Hall. 

G-eo. Trenam, 



1 6O West Main St. 

Residence : 163 West Main St, 



ATTORNEYS AT LAW. 

B"TTTMGEB7"^jrR77ProsecuHng^iitom^ 
Judicial Oircuit, N. W. Cor. Calhoun & Main. 

Law and Collection Offices. 



17 E. MAIN ST. 



Collections made in all parts of the United States, 
and Canada. 



H 



OAGL.AND, JOHN R., Attorney at Law and 
Justice of the Peace, VlVi. E- Main St. 



JENISON, WM. T., Attorney and Counselor at 
Law, over First National Bank. 

TAYLOR & MORRIS. Attorneys at Law, 34 East 
Bery St. 

WILKINSON & GRAHAM, Attorne};s at Law and 
Notaries Public, N. W. cor. Main & Calhoun. 

BARBERS, 

KINSEY, J. J., American House Shaving aud 
Hair Dressing Saloon, 17 W. Columbia St. 



D 



BOOK BINDERS. 

AVIS & BRO., Book Binders and Blank Book 

Manufacturers, 78 and 80 Clinton St. 



maraudino: expedition of General Lopez to 
Cuba. Notwithstandinj): this proclamation, 
Lopez landed OOIJ men at Cuba, and after a 
short stru>;gle took the town of Cardenas from 
the Spaniards. 

Fearful rage of the cholera in New York: 
5,071 died from the disease. 

Sept. 1. — California adopts a Constitution 
excluding slavery from the territory. 

Treaty with England for a transit way across 
the Isthmus of Uanama. 

Immense immigration of gold-seekers to 
California. 

Seventh census of the United States; popu- 
lation, 2,3,191,074. 

Violent debates between the Pro-slavery and 
Free-soil parties in Congress, over the pro- 
posed admission of California. 

9l.tircEL JSl. — .John C. Calhoun dies. 

April 1!>.— The Bulwer-Clayton treaty 
between England and the United States, rela- 
tive to the establishment of a communication 
by ship canal between the Atlantic and Pacific 
Oceans, Avas signed at Washington, April 19, 
and ratifications were exchanged there July 4, 
1850. 

May ly. — Gen. Lopez conducts another 
marauding expedition against Cuba for the 
purpose of annexing that Island to the United 
States, but is repulsed at Cardenas by the 
Spanish authorities. 

Msiy. — The Grinnell expedition, in search 
of Sir John Franklin, leaves New York. 

Territory of Utah organized. 

July j>.— President Taylor dies. 

Great fire in Philadelphia. 

JTiily 10.— Vice-President, Millard Fill- 
niors, assumes the Presidency. 

Aug'. 15. — Admission of California into 
the United States. 

Sept. S>. — Passage of Henry Clay's Om- 
nibus Bill; one of the stipulaitons of "this bill 
was the abolishing of slavery in the District 
of Columbia, and a law providing for the ar- 
rest, in the northern or free States, and return 
to their masters, of all slaves who should es- 
cape from bondage. 

Sept. 18. — Fugitive Slave Bill passed by 
Congress. This bill imposed a fine of p,00"0 
and six months' imprisonment on any person 
harboring fugitive slaves, or aiding in their es- 
cape. Repealed June 13th, 1874. 

I80I. 

•Fan- Sy. — John James Audubon, Amer- 
ican naturalist, died, aged 71 years. 

J?lay S. — A ''Southern Rights" convention 
assembles at Charleston, S. C. 

Resolutions passed for a dissolution of the 
Union. 

Survey of the coast of the United States 
completed. 

j^lay 3. — Great fire in San Francisco. 

Letter postage reduced to three cents to all 
parts of the United States, excepting Califor- 
nia and the Pacific Territories. 

Minnesota purchased from the Upper Sioux 
Indians, for ."^SOS.OOO, to be given when they 
should reach their reservation in Upper ^linne-- 
sota, and .')!C8.000 a year for fifty years. By 
this purchase the Government came in posses- 
sion of 21,000.000 acres of land. 

United States piu'chases a large tract of land 
from the Lower Sioux, paying $225,000 down, 



122 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



SOUTHERN PLANING MILL. 



JACOB MEYERS $< BRO., 




Manufacturers, Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 
Alili KIXDS OF BUIIiDIXCJ MATERIALS, 

Cor. Water and Ooodsell Streets, EYAXSYILLE, YSD. 

All orders promptly filled. Send for Price List. 




B. HL. SIB.OBGSII, 
CONTRACTOK A^B BUILDER O STONE WORK. 

steam Mill and Yard: COR. EDGAR AND PENNSYLVANIA STREETS, EVANSVILLE, IND. 

All kinds of Stone Work for Buildings, Fences, &c., done to order. 
All orders from a distance promptly attended to. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



12? 




'^'^^ .BMSA 



Opera House, JEvansville, Ind.— Was built in the year 1 868, at a cost 
exclusive of ground, of $126,000. Has a frontage of 50 feet, and is 130 feet deep bv about 
50 feet high. Is built of pressed brick with .sand stone front. The entrance is unusually 
broad, with wide stairway to second story diverging from box office on either side to the 
main hall. It is the only strictly first-class place of amusement in the city, and has been 
lately eritirely remoddled, refitted and enlarged with 666 elegant folding opera chairs. The 
family circle and gallery will accommodate 600, making a total seating capacity of 1266. 



MILLEE BEO.'S 

THREE STORES 

113, 115,221aDniI Mail St., Eras*!. 

The largeist retail bnsiness in our line in the State. 

General Dry (roods, 

Silks & Fine Goods a Specialty. 

Best quality at lowest prices. 



12i 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



Fort Wayne — Coyitinued. 



BOARDING HOUSE, 

josepeTlangard, 

Proprietor 

French Boarding House, 

And Dealer in 

Wines, Liquors and Cigars- 
No. 70 Columbia St. 

BOOTS AND SHOES, 

FOKTRIED, LOUIS, Manufacturer of Boots and 
Shoes, 33 W. JViain st. 

HUSER, L. P., Boot and Shoe Maker. 
178 Broadway. 

CAKNAHAN, HANIVA & CO., Wholesale dealers 
' in Boots and shoes, 30 & 3i E. Main st. 

CARRIAGE AND WAGON MANUFACTURERS, 
JOHN BAKER, 

Old Fort Carriage Works, 

16 & 18 Lafayette st. 

Manufacturer of 

CARRIAGES, WAGONS, ETC., 

Also a line Stock of Lis^ht Harness kept 
on hand, or made to order. 

Corner of West Main and Fulton Sts. 

Fred. Rolsener, 

WAS3N m SUES? ENUrACIUSEK, 

102 WEST MAIN ST. 
STANLEY & BIEBER, 

CARRIAGE MANUFACTURERS 

106 West Main St. 
Manufacturer of 

Carriages, Buggies and Spring Wagons, 

11 East Jefferson St. 
~ CLOTHING, 

IRdSnGErTsTf^, Clothing:. 

53 E. Main & 33 Calhoun Sts. 

^I'^HIEM, E. J. G. & BKO., Merchant Tailors and 
X Clothiers, 37 E. Columbia St. 

COMMERCIAL COLLEGE, 
""'^^^ FORT WfAYME 

COMMERCIAL COLLEGE. 
— (ANDj- 
Institute of Penmanship, 

THOS. POWERS, Principal. 
Cor. E. Main & Court Sts. 



Fort Wayne — Continued. 



CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC, 

Conservatory of Music, 

INCORPORATED, 1871. 
For Catalogue and particulars, address, 

C. F. W. MEYER, Principal. 



DENTIST, 
T OAG, G. W., Dentist, 



7 W. Columbia St. 



DRY GOODS. 



GEO. DWALD & CO., 

Wholesale and Retail dealers in 



No. I COLUMBIA ST. 



DYERS AND SCOURERS, 



B. A. LEWIS, 



CITY DYE HOUSE 

59 W. Water St. 
ESTABLISHED, 1S51. 

Goods received and returned by express. 



lERMANN, M., Renovating, 



I^IERJ 



43 W. Water ht. 



EXPRESS COMPANIES, 

UNITED STATES EXPRESS ,C0., C. L, Smith, 
Agt , 38 E. Main st. 

FURNITURE AND UPHOLSTERING, 
IF". BJ^TJS, 



Furniture made to order. Repairing 

neatly done. Furniture repaired 

and varnished. Chairs caned, 

NO. 143 CALHOUN STREET. 

GRIEBEL'A SON., manufacturers of all kinds of 
lurniture, 44 E, Main St. 

H. TEGEDER tC CO., 

Manufacturers of and dealers in all kinds of 



Repairing Promptly done. 

212 CALHOUN ST. 



ADVEKTISEMENTS. 



125 



w 7^ ^ ^ W 

^^^^ WBEK. .^^^^ 

■ *■ lhecour.„„n,x,m.n W 

T .«otMtUco,i,e,n.-tw.»r. roron. T ^ 

^_> pmplelo dis.ol.. the politi ^^ 

%^ culU.,d awiacb hancoo ^^K. 

J^^ n.itolth em with inothT B^ 



• 



separate 
to which 
e and of 



they nhould declare the 



richl,: 



THE PUKSUIT OP HAPPINESS. -THAT TO SECURE THESE lilOHTS. 00VEKNUENT3 

are instituted amon^ men, deriving tlieii- ju»t powers from tlie consent 

OF THE GOVERNED. —THAT WHENEVER ANY lOUM OE GOVERNMENT BECOMES 

PROCLAIM LIBERTY THROUGHOUT ALL THE LAND TO ALL 

DESTRUCTIVE OP THESE ENDS. IT IS THE RIOHT OF THE PEOPLE TO ALTER OE 

to iibolish it, unil to institute a ueiv Government, hijing its fuundiitiun on 

such priDciuleB. and organizing its powera in such form, as to tliem sliall seem most likely to effect their 
SAFETY AND HAPP1NE3S.-PRUDENCE. INDEED. WILL DICTATE THAT GOVERN 

ments long estublislied, sliould not be chnnged fur iigbt and transient 

CAUSES: A(4D, ACCORDINGLY, ALL EXPERIENCE H.VTH SHOWN, THAT MANlilND ARE 

BY ORDER OF THE ASSEMBLY OF THE PROVINCE OF PENNS 

MORE DISPOSED TO SUFFER. WHILE EVILS ARE SUFFERABLE, THAN TO RIGHT THEM 

selves by abolishing the forms to which thej are accustomed. But, when a 

■ or abua,^9 and usurpatio ' ... 



r guards for t 



i thci 



. is the 



t off such Go' 



Such hi . _ 

:ty which conpuil AHA strains them to alter theii foi mer s 
The history of the pre ^ n I U/A U" ,^,,1 i,i„g of G„„( Britain is a iii 
I and uaurpations, all IiaT lun/^/^l I'l "ng.in direct ohject, the establishmt 
over these Stales. To pro •" Uv.'^LI ■ I ve this, let facts be suhniitted to i 
efuaed his assent to laws the most wholesome and necesfir.ry for the public good.- 
rernors to p.-ws laws of immediate and pres-sing importanoe, unless suspended 
upended, he has utterly neglected 
for the accommodation of large districts of peopli 



I as.sent sh 



1 the Legislal 



luld rolinquish the right of Repn . 

tyrants only. —He has cnl led together legisiati 
the depository of theirpublic records, for the Bole puiposc of fal 
" -- repeatedly, for opposi 



right inestimable 



Bthei 



o them, and for 
aifovtable, and die 



rights of the people.— He hasrefu 



I afVer such dissolui 









:omhine'i, w!thothei 



caa.R.of tlie benefits of t 

system of English Laws 

ae to render it at once un 

our charters, abulishing o 

own Leeislaturea. rni detbi 

ment here, by tJeclaring us o\ 

towns, and destroyed the lives o 



iiluftble laws, nnd 
elTcs invet^ted with 
■otettion, and wag 



: the military independent of, and superior to, the civil power 
■ foreign to our Constitution, and unacknowl edged by our laws 
)rqiiartcrinB large bodies of armed troops among us.— For protect 
■s which thev shouhl .".ommit on the inhabitants of those btiitia 
;n? taxes on'ue without our consent.— For depriving os. in many 
:ond seas to be tried for pretended offences.— For abolifhing the fret 
ng therein an arbitrar>- oovcrnmrnt, nnd enlarging its boundariet'.E 
lucing the same absolute rule into tl.ese Colonies, — For taking nw 
fundamentally, the powers of oui 



* 



' against us. — He has plun<!eied o 
insporting large armies of foreign 
>f cruelty and perfidy scarcely par 



-He has abdicattd Govern 



ludependei 






-s. and c( 



the inhabit 



—In every stage of these oppressii 



lands. — He has excited domestic intu 
■ages, whose known rule of warfare if 
tioned for redress in the most humble 



to be the ruler of 
by their legislature to extend an unwarrantable iurisdiction over ui 

He have appealed to their native justice and ma:;na 

drcd. to disavow these usurpations, which would inevitably interrup^t our 
sangu.nity -\\'o must, therefore, acquir.soo in the necessity which denoun 
ineniJs. — Ue. therefore, the Representatives of the United 'States of Amer 
TLTpE OF OUR INTENTION^, DO. IN THE NAME. AND BY THE ?. 

and declare, that these United Colonies are, and of riu^hl 

1 to the British Crown, and that all political connection between tl 
I btate8,they have full power to levy war.conclude peace, con tr at 



tion to our British brethren.— W<. have warnedthem.from time to timi 
We have reminded them of the^ circumstances of our emigration 

niniity, and we have conjured tlieni, by the ties of'< 



• common fciu 



and correspondei 



t been deaf t 
t hold the rest of mankind, 
ed.ajipeitiing to the Supreme Judge c 



• of .i 






.... in Oennral ConsreRS a.sspmbled, appealing to the Supreme Judge of the Worid for ihc 
UTHOBITV OF THE GOOD PEOPLE OF THESE COLONIES. SOLEMNLY TLCLISH 
ought to he. Free and Independent States; that thev are absolved from 

■ ■ "■ -" ■ ,ndouEhttobe. totally dissolve-i: and that, as Free and 



alii a 



r of r 



establish < 



and to do all other t 



ich Independent i 



htdo. And 



rL 



INDEPENDENCE BELL,. - The bell, originally cast in England in 1751. at a cost of one hun- 
dred pounds sterling, was ordered to be of 2,000 pounds weight. Before it was properly hung it was 
cracked by a stroke of the clapper to try the sound, and was recast by Paris & Stow of Philadelphia. It 
was hung again in June, 17.53. It contains the following inscription : "By order of the assembly of the 
Province of Pennsylvania, for the Slate House in the City of Philadelphia, 1752;"' also, "Proclaim Lib- 
erty throughout all the land, and unto all the inhabitants thereof." The most important event connected 
with the bell is, that it rang to proclaim the birth of a nation, and the freedom of the American people 
from British oppression. It was broken in ringing. 



JONES' COMMERCIAL COLLEGE 

309 North Fifth St., St Louis, tl^issouri. 

This Institution is one of the oldest of its kind in the United States. It maintains a 
a full Board of Teachers throughout the year, and Young Gentlemen can register them- 
selves as Students at any time they may clioose. For Circulars call at the office as above, 
or address, JOXATHAX JOJIfES, St. liOnis, Mo. 



126 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OF THE CENTURY. 



and an annual payment of IfSO.OOO a year for 
fifty years. 

Steamer Cleopatra seized by the United 
States authorities in New York, on suspi- 
cion of preparing; to invade Cuba, and many 
respectable gentlemen arrested on the same 
charge. 

Louis Kossuth, the Hungarian patriot, ar- 
rives in New York. 

July 4. — President laid the corner-stone 
for additional buildings to the National Capi- 
tol. 

Aug'iist,. — Lopez's second expedition to 
Cuba. He sailed from New Orleans with about 
480 men. He left Colonel Crittenden, with 100 
men, on the northern coast of Cuba, who were 
captured, carried to Havana, and on the 16th 
wore shot. Lopez and six of his followers 
were captured and executed on the 1st of Sep- 
tember. 

Oct.— Return of the Grinnell expedition 
from the search of Sir John Franklin, without 
accomplishing its object. 

I>ec. 34. — Capitol at Washington partly 
destroyed by fire. 

United States expedition to Japan, under 
command of Commodore Perry, a brother of 
the hero of Lake Erie. 

June 30.— Henry Clay dies in Washing- 
ton, aged 75 years. 

Oct. 3-4-— Daniel Webster dies. 

j^ov. — Spanish authorities at Havana re- 
fuse to receive the United States mails and 
passengers from the American steamship 
Cresent City, plying between New York and 
New Orleans. 

England and France propose a treaty with 
the United States, binding the latter to dis- 
dain "now and forever hereafter all intention 
to obtain possessi(m of the island of Cuba," 
and "to discountenance all such attempts to 
that effect on the part of any power or individ- 
ual whatever." The treaty was rejected by 
the United States. 

1853. 

March 2.— Washington territory created 
out of the northern part of Oregon. 

Illsircli 4. — Franklin Pearce inaugurated 
President. 

May. — Second expedition leaves in search 
of Sir John Franklin, under the command of 
Dr. E.K. Kane. 

Four vessels, under Captain Ringgold, leave 
on an exploring expedition to the Northern 
Pacific Ocean. 

Four expeditions start to explore as many 
different routes for a railway to the Pacific 
coast. One under Capt. Gunnison was at- 
tacked by the Indians, and Gunnison and sev- 
eral of liis party were killed. 
■ July 3. — Cap*. Ligraham upholds the 
rights of American citizenship. Martin 
Kaszta, while in business at Smyrna, was 
seized by order of the Austrian consul, and 
taken on beard of an Austrian brig as a rebel 
refugee, notwithstanding he had proclaimed 
allegiance to the United States. Capt. Ingra- 
ham claimed Koszta as an American citizen, 
and on the refusal of the Austrian authoritios 
to give up the prisoner, Ingraham cleared his 
vessel for action, and threatened to fire on the 
brig, if he was not delivered up within a given 
time. The Austrians yielded, and Koszta was 
placed in the custody qf the French consul to 



Fort Wayne — Covii/iued. 



GATE MANTJFACTUREE. 

34 Calhoun st 



T\/'ISELL, D. D., Patent Gate, 



GROCERS, 

BLEEKMAN, J. & CO., Staple and Fancy Grocer- 
ies, 25 W. Columbia st. Established 1877. 



D 



IDIEK, J. C, Established 1865. Groceries 
and Provisions, 66 E. Columbia st. 



MILLER, W, H. & CO., Groceries, Crockery, 
Glassware and Provisions, 24 Harrison st. 

JOHN BAAB, 

Pork Packer and Dealer in Groceries and Provisions, 

iS E. COLUMBIA ST. 
1^" Established 1850. 

GUN AND LOCKSMITH. 

Practical Gimsmilli, 

El 



LI 



odisiiiilli and Ip'ef. 

Dealer in 

Cutlery, Guns, Eevolvers, Gun Materials, 
Etc., Etc., 

Manuiacturer of 

Breech-Loading Guns k Rifles. 

Stencil-cutting done to order a specialty. 

58 East Main 8t. 

HARNESS AND SADDLES. 

KUNTZ, G. H., Mnf'r of Harness, and Dealer in 
Saddles, Collars, &c.. Main & Harrison sts. 

HORSE DEALER. 

Dealer in 

Will Buy at all times for Eastern and 
Southern Market. 

19 W. Columbia St., Fort Wayne. 

HORSE COLLAR MANUFACTURERS. 
(Established 1867,) 

A.. KACINE, 

—Manufacturer of — 

HOMSE CQLLAMS 

Of all kinds. Also Patentee and Manufacturer 

of ihe COMBINED PAD & COLLAR FASTENER, 

Cor. FIRST and CAS.S STS., North Side. 

Orders solicited and promptly filled. 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OF TUB CENTURY. 



127 



Fort Wayne — Continuud. 



HORSE COLLAE MANUFAOTUREES. 
Wholesale Manufacturer of 

ir,Tr.. ft. ii!>£;i 



Shop, 36 North Cass Street, 

Near Saginaw Depot, Corner of Alley. 
HOESESHOEES. 

EbTToGlRfYr 
Practical Horseshoer, 

Cor. Harrison and Pearl Sts. 

Shoeing for all Diseases of Horses'' Feet, such as 

Corns, Contracted. Feet, Quitters, Sand 
Cracks, Etc., 

Will be attended to by the most scientific work- 
men, and executed with neatness and des- 
patch, on the most improved princi- 
ples of Veterinary practice. 

Advice given on Proper Treatment of all 
Diseases of Horses' Feet. 

Residence, or, Harrison & Pea rl Sts. 

~ A. VIZARD, 

PRACTICAL 

94 E. Columbia %t. 

Established 1870. 
HOTELS. 

THE GRAND HOTEL, J. H. BuckieTprop^Tco^ 
lumbia and Harrison sts. 



H 



EDEKIN HOUSE, A. Freeman, prop., 



25 Barr St. 



MAYER HOUSE, Dr. J. M. Rhoads, prop., Cal- 
houn and Vlain sts. 

THE ROBINSON HOUSE, 

JAS. H. ROBINSON, Prop., 

The Brst $2.00 per day House in the State. 

Central, Commodious & Attractive. 

Cor. Harrison and Columbia Sts. 

HUMAN HAIR DEALERS. 

BALDWIN, MISS ANNIE, Ladies' Hair Dresser, 
30 E Columbia ^t. 

OYCE, 3IISS E. S., Ladies' Hair Dresser, 15 
Calhoun st. 



B 



LAUNDRY. 
KELSEY & CO., 

CENTRAL CITY LAUNDRY, 

All work done t > Order. Lace and fine work a 
specially. 114 W. Wayne st. 



r.-.vait the action of the respective govern- 
ni .'nt.s. He was finally given up to the United 
8;ate.s. 

July \4L. — "Crystal Palace," or "World's 
Fair, in New York, was formally opened for 
the rccep'idu of visitcr.s. 

Oct. — The fishery question settled by mu- 
tual concession of Great Britain and the Uni- 
ted States. 

1854. 

Fel>. 38. — Seizure of the American 
steamship Black Warrior in the harbor of Ha- 
vana. 

]^lii.i*clt 7. — Homestead bill passed, which 
provides that any free white male citizen, 
or one who may have declared his inten- 
tions to become one previous to the pas- 
sage of this act, might select 160 acres 
of land on the public domain, and on 
proof being given that he had occupied and 
cultivated it for five years, he might receive a 
title to it, in fee, without being required to pay 
anything for it. 

iflsircli O. — Ostend Conference — a confer- 
ence held by American ministers in Eui'ope, 
recommending the purchase of Cuba by the 
United States, and also asserted the right to 
take Cuba by force, if Spain refused to sell. 

ITIai'di Ul. — Commercial treaty with 
Ja )an concluded by Com. Perry. 

May.— Passage of the Kansas-Nebraska 
bill, which created those two territories, and 
L'ft the people f)f every territory, on becoming 
a State, free to adopt or exclude the institution 
of slavery. A few days after the passage of 
the bill a riot occurred in Boston over the 
arrest of a fugitive slave. A deputy marshal 
was shot dead. United States troops from Rhode 
Island and the local militia were called out to 
sustain the government. The fugitive slave 
was finally returned to his master in Virginia 
without further violence. 

<>Biiiic 7.— Reciprocity treaty between 
Great Britain and the United States repect- 
ing international trade, fisheries, etc. 

July 15J. — Bombardment of Grey town. 
Central America, by a United States man- 
of-war, in retaliation of an insult offered to the 
American consul by the Spaniards. 

Col. I'remont and party exploring the Rocky 
Mountains. They sull'ered terribly. For forty- 
five days they fod on mules meat, which from 
want of food could go no further, and were 
killed and eaten, every particle even to llie 
entrails. They were met and relieved by an- 
other party 19 h of February. 

Death of J. Harrington, last survivor of the 
battle of Lexington. 

1855. 

Gen. Harney chastises the Sioux Indians. 

Serious troubles in Kansas over the slavery 
question. 

Will. Walker, an adventurer from California, 
with an army of filibusters, takes possession i f 
Nicaraugua and establishes a government 
thore. 

Dispute with England over enlistment of 
soldiers for Crimean war. The British minis- 
Ilm- at Washington and the British consuls at 
New York and Cincinnati dismissed by the 
United States for sancti ning the enlistments. 

June 28. — Railroad from Panama to As- 
pinwall open(>d. 

l>eo. 'Hi. — British Arctic vessel Resolute 



128 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



Young and Middle-aired men and women prepared for liusiness. 




Address CURTISS & HYDE, MINNEAPOLIS, MiNN. Box 299. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



129 




Sng^Iish Htaif (Quarters, Centennial Exposition, Philadel- 
phiia. — The Staff Quarters, which has an area of 1,200 feet, is used as the residence of 
the Staff of the British portion of the exhibition. The building is of the picturesque half- 
timber style of architecture, so much in vogue during the sixteenth century. 



Manufacturer and Wholesale Dealer in 



Men's Fine Boots and Shoes, 

802 K. Fifth St,, St.Lonis, Mo. 




The English Walking Shoe, 

A dirt Excluder, and perfectly Water 
Tight to the top. 




The Alexis, 



A Perfect Fitting Shoe, and Warranted in every 
respect. 



ESTABLISHED IN 1875. 
With more than twenty years' previous experience in th • management of the larg- 
est manufactories in the United States. 

All orders promptly filled, whether large or small. 



130 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OF THE CENTURY. 



found and brought to New London by an Ameri- 
can whaler. 

1856 

Fel>. 3.— X. P. Banks, Jr., of Massachu- 
setts, elected Speaker of the House of Repre- 
sentatives of the United States, after a contest 
of nine weeks, by a plurality of votes. 

May 33.— Senator Sumner, of Massa- 
ehussetts, assaulted by Preston S. Brooks, of 
South Carolina. The former was so severely 
injured that he could not resume his seat iii 
the Senate for three years. 

May 3JBi.— The' British envoy to the 
United States ordered to quit Washington. 

June 34.— The President of the United 
States recognizes the filibuster, General 
Walker, as President of Nicaraugua. 

3iov. -4. — James Buchanan, the pro-slavery 
candidate, elected President of the United 
States, after a close contest with Colonel Fre- 
mont, the anti-slavery candidate. 
1837. 

Jan. 4:. — Kansas rejects the Lecompton 
Constitution. 

William Walker driven out of Nicaraugua 
by the Costa Ricans and Nicarauguans. 

Feb. 13.— George Peabody donates $300,- 
000 to establish a free literaiy and scientific 
institute at Baltimore. 

Mareli -1. — James Buchanan inaugur- 
ated President and John C. Breckinridge Vice- 
President. 

Mai'cli G.— The Dred Scott decision de- 
livered by Chief Justice Taney. Dred Scott 
and his wife were slaves belonging to a sur- 
geon in the army. They were taken by him 
from a slave State into a territory "where 
slavery was forever prohibited, aiid they 
claimed their freedom by the act of their mas- 
ter, on the ground thot he had taken them into 
free territory. The decision of the court was 
against their claims, and they were continued 
slaves. 

Aug'. 34. — Beginning of financial panic, 
which culminates in an almost entire suspen- 
sion of the banks. 

Sept. 8.— Loss of the Central America 
and 430 lives, off Cape May. 

Sept. 3.S. — Commencement of great re- 
ligious revivals in the United States. 

Oee. 8.— Father Theobald Matthew died, 
aged 67. He was better known as Father 
Matthew, Apostle of Temj)erance. He was a 
Koman Catholic, born in Ireland, and arrived 
at New York June 2'J, 1849. He was received 
by the Board of Aldermen, and introduced and 
welcomed by an address from Wm. E. Dodge 
and .^Lxyor WoodhuU. He was escorted 
through the city by a large procession. 

Commercial failures this year amount to 
5,123. Liabilities, .$291,757,000. 
1858. 

Feb. 14.— United States army defeats 
the Mormons in an engagement at Eco Can- 
.'ians. 

Marcb 38.— Nicaraugua places herself 
un ler the protection of the United States. 

iVay 3J{.— Minnesota admitted as a 
State 

JUkV. — President Monroe's remains were 
removed from New York city to Richmond. 
Virginia. 

Aug-, a,.— Kansas again rejects the Le- 
compton Constitution. 



Fort Wayne — Cotttifiued. 



LEATHER AND FINDINGS. 

FREIBURGER, S. & BRO., Dealers in Leather 
and Findings, 24 E. Main st. 

LIME MANUFACTURER. 

Manufacturer of WHITE LIME, PLASTER, Etc., 
3 HARRISON ST. 

LIVERY AND SALE STABLE. 

FLETCHER, J. P., Livery, Feed and Sale Stable, 
32 Barr St. 

LUMBER DEALERS. 

HOFFMAN BROS., 

Manufacturers of 

BLACK WALNUT LUMBER 

200 WEST MAIN ST. 

MARBLE WORKS. 
Established A. D. 1847. 

Under hill & Congdon, 
MoEumeiital, (jrayestoiie, Marlle, 

AND GRANITE WORKS, 

74 & 76 W. MAIN ST. 

W. C. YOUNG, 

Practical 



Will furnish all kinds of Cemetery Work at re- 
duced prices. Ttiose wishing anyttiing It. my line 
will find it to their advantage to give me a call be- 
fore purchasing Pine Carving and Sculptor Work 
a specialty. Office and Shop, 171 W. Washington 
St., near Broadway. 

MATTRESS MANUFACTURER. 

B ECKEL, P. H., Manufacturer of Spring Mat- 
tresses and Lounges, 31 Court st. 



MILLINERY AND DRESSMAKING. 

MRS. J. SCHEFFER, 

Established 1876, 

Millinery and Dressmaking, 

20 CLINTON STREET. 

LETCHER, MRS. M. A,, Dressmaker, 

65 E. Main st. 

. MINERAL WATER MANUFACTURERS. 

^HTBARGUS^^iiBBE, 

(Successors to J. Laurent & Son,) Dealers in 
FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC 

WINES AND LIQUORS, 

And Manufacturers of 

MINERAl. WATER & GINGER ALE, 

29 iS- 31 BABB ST BEET. 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OF THE CENTURY. 



131 



Fort Wayne — Continued. 



NEWSPAPERS. 

FORT WAYNE MORNING GAZETTE, 
85 W. Main st. 

ORT WAYNE WEEKLY JOURNAL, C. Purbank 
Co., props., Court et., over Post Office. 



F 



F 



ORT WAYNE DAILY NEWS, 

Page, Taylor & Co., props. 



OYSTERS AND FISH. 

HASKELL, W., Oysters, Pish, Game, etc., 65 E. 
Columbia et. Established 1865. 

L. E. K'KEE, 

Dealer in 

OYSTERS, FISH & GAME, 

Also Butter, Eggs & Poultry, 
152 CALHOUN ST. 



PAPER BOX MANUFACTURERS. 

DAVIS & BRO., Wood and Paper Box Manufac- 
turers, 78 and 80 Clinton st. 



PIANOS AND ORGANS. 

T^irX^OR BROS., 

Dealers in the 

Hallett, Davis & Co. and Schomaker 

Also the STERLING ORGAN, 

15 WEST WAYNE STREET. 



PHOTOGRAPHERS. 
^HOAFF,J. A^^PliotographeiC 



7 W. Columbia st. 



CARL SOMMER, 

PHOTOGRAPHER, 

30 CAI.HOUX STREET, 

FORT WAYNE, IND. 

C. E. WALLIN, 

The Leading Photographer, 

Sole Proprietor of the CARBON PROCESS 
for this State. 

18 WEST BERRY ST. 



buoadtztay 

PHOTP-O* 9sAL,L,EMW 

E. W. POSTON, Proprietor. 

108 NEAR REMMEL'S BLOCK, BROADWAY. 



1858. 
Aug. S. — Atlantic telegraph cable laid. 
President Buchanan's message to Queen 
Victoria sent on the 16th, but cable proves a 
failure. 

1859. 

Oregon admitted as a State. 

June 35. — Commodore Tatnall, of U. S. 
navy, in Cliinese waters, makes his famous ut- 
terance : "Blood is thicker than water." 

•Fuly -4. — A. H. Stephens, of Georgia, ad- 
vocates the formation of a Southern Confed- 
eracy. 

Nov. 28. — Death of Washington Irving, 
American novelist and historical writer. 

Oct. IT. — A negro insurrection breaks out 
at Harper's Ferry. John Brown, with a score 
of followers, crossed the Potomac at Harper's 
Ferry and entered Virginia, where he incited 
the slaves to take up arms against their mas- 
ters. After a short time, Brown was captured 
and tried for treason, found guilty, he bore his 
misfortune with the greatest composure, and 
when asked upon the scalTold to give a sign 
when he was ready, he answered, "I am ahvajs 
ready." He died in the midst of slaves and 
slave owners — his countrymen — and now no 
countryman of his can look at his place of 
execution and call himself a slave owner or a 

Oct.— J. Y. Slidell, U. S. Minister to France, 
died at Paris. 

j^ov. — Gen. Scott sent to protect American 
interests in San Juan. 

l>ea.tlis iu tlie U. S. tliis Year.— 
George W. Doane, Episcopal bishop of Kew 
Jersey, poet, etc., aged 60 years. Rufus Choate 
jurist, advocate, and Senator, aged 60 years. 
Horace Mann, statesman and educationist, aged 
63 years. 

I860. 

Eighth census of the United States; popula- 
tion, 31,443,332. 

Fel>. 1.— Pennington, of New Jersey, 
elected Speaker of the House of Representa- 
tives, after balloting nearly two months. 

From February; 1820, to this year, there ar- 
rived in the United States from foreign coun- 
tries, 5,062,414 emigrants. 

marcli Sy. — Japanese Embassy, first to 
leave Japan, arrive at San Iranciscc. Re- 
ceived at Washington, D. C, by President 
Buchanan, and afterward have public recep- 
tions in Baltimore, Philadelphia, and New 
York, departing from the latter city in the fri- 
gate Niagara, June 29. 

Iflayi 17. — Abraham Lincoln nominated 
for President at Chicago, by the Republi- 
cans. 

June 38.— Steamship Great Eastern first 
arrives at New York. 

July 7. — Dr. Hayes' arctic expedition sails 
from Boston. 

Aug. 33. — A Democratic Convention as- 
sembled in Charleston, S. C, tc secure the 
election of Stephen A. Douglass, President of 
the U. S. 

Sept. 31. — Prince of Wales arrives at De- 
troit visiting the United States, and subse- 
quently goes to Philadelphia, New York, Bos- 
ton, and many of the western cities, embark- 
ing for home "October 20, at Portland, Me. 

I\ov. <S. — Abraham Lincoln, of Illinois, 
and Hannibal Hamlin, of Maine, elected Presi- 



132 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



Fort Wayne — Continued. 



PHYSICIANS. 

T. J. DILL, M.D., 

Practice limited to 

DISEASES OF THE EYE AND EAR, 

20 WKST BERRY STREET. 

A. GOERIZ, M. D„ 

Office, 30 Columbia St., repidence, cor. Lafayette 

and LaSalle sts. 

Makes all Acute and Chronic Diseases a Specialty,. 

Also all manner of Delicate and Private Dis- 
eases, treated with success and privacy. 
Long practice enables him to do jus- 
tice to all who may entrust them- 
selves to his care. Those who cannot come 
themselves may send a vial of urine with a de- 
scription of their disease. 

r^ KEEN, MRS. M. F., Physician. 



VT 



139 W. Main St. 



T.S. VIRGIL, 



Physician and Surgeon, 



Also, Electric and other baths given, at 



70 & 72 HARRINOX STREET. 

PLUMBER AND GAS FITTER, 

OGEDEN, ROBERT, Plumber and Gas Fitter, 
125 Calhoun st. 

REAL ESTATE AND INSURANCE. 
ISAAC D'ISAY, 



Land Agent Missouri, Kansas and 
Texas R. R., 

FORT WAYNE, IND. 

FISHER & TONS, Insurance, Real Estate and 
Loan Agency, 32 E Berry St. 

JONES, L. M., Real Estate Agent, 
26 Court St. 

RESTAURANTS. 
Don't fail to stop at the 

Fort Wtyaf Hcoit. 

JOS. WILK ISDN, Pro. 

$1 per day. T^o better to be had in the city. Give 

me a call. Meals at all hours for 25 cts. 

Good clean beds and tables. 

SSS Callioxiia Sti*eet. 

P. G. Toiiii^hins, 

Mm\\\ k GfliifBctioiery, 

Warm meals at all hours. 

278 CALHOUN ST. 



Fort Wayne — Continned. 



SALOONS. 



ATLANTIC GARDEN, 

28 Columbia St. 
PETER ZIEGLER, Proprietor. 

The finest and most elegantly appointed Saloon 

in the West. Best Cincinnati lager Beer, 

Liquors, Cigars, etc., etc. 

BON " TON " Wine and Billiards, R. McDonnald, 
Prop., 35 E. Main St. 

BRIEL, FRED., Billiard Saloon. Wines and Liq- 
uors, 19 W. Columbia St. 

F. X. GOODMAN, 

Choicest wines and Liquors constantly 
on hand. 



KABISCH, JULIUS, Wine and Beer Saloon, 13 
W. Main. 

A. LAZZAKINI, 

European 

Restaurant & Saloon, 

Meals and Lodging, twenty-five cents. 
First-class in every respect. 

NO. 74 EAST COLUMBIA STREET, 

Ii. M. NEUENSCHWANDER, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealer in 

SCHWmER&lIMBDR&ER CHEESE 

also, Wine and Beer Saloon, 
40 COLXJIMBIA SX. 



S 



TOTZ, ULRICH, Wine, Beer and Billiard Rooms, 

21 aijd23 E. Main St. 



CTRODEL, M., Union Saloon, 



10 E. Berry st. 



SEWING MACHINES. 
The World Keno^^'ned 

Howe Sewing Machines, 

Are the oldest established of any in the world, 
they being the first Sewing Machines ever made, 
and having been manufactured continuously un- 
der the supervision of the original inventor, Ellas 
Howe, Jr , since their first introduction in 1845. 
Every Machine is fully warranted and satisfaction 
guaranteed in every case. Kemington & Holcomb, 
19 Court St., General Agents for Allen Co. 

STOVES AND TINWARE. 

METSKER, S. R. & CO., Stoves, TinwareTsecond 
hand.goods, etc., 61 E. Main st. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



133 




Iflonnt Vernon Home of Washington.— Is situated about sixteen 
miles down the Potomac from Washington, D. C. The mansion fronts the river. The 
center was built bj Lawrence Washington, half brother of the President, from whom he 
inherited the estate. The more modern portions were constructed bj the General. Here 
are deposited the remains of George and Martha Washington. The Ladies' Mt. Vernon 
Association own the mansion and contiguous ground. Their endeavor is to restore them 
to the same condition thev were in during the life of Washington. 



J. R. WILLIAMS, Pres. HENET LETHE, Gen. Snpt. G. W. HILL, Sec'y J. M. EABEL,Gen. Agt. 



EAGLE PACKET CO 

SI. Louis, Madison, Alton, Jersey, Forta^e leSiou:; and Braflon. 

Daily Packet—Champion of the Waters, 



HENRY LETHE, 

Master. 




Leaves from Wliarf Boat foot of Vine, at Three o'clock p. m 



y. MOREHEAD, 
Ed. YOrNG,Crks. 



Steamers ISpread Eagle, Eagle, Grey Eagle, Eittle Eagle, liittle 
Eagle Xo. 2 and Barges. DeSmet. 

Steamer Eagle, J. R. Williams, Master, Daily Packet, between Quincv and Keokuk, land- 
ing at all intermediate points. Steamer Little Eagle and Barges, Wm. Lejhe, jSIaster, 
doing general towing and jobbing business between Keokuk and St. Louis,' with head- 
quarters at Quincy. Steamer Grey Eagle, D. M. Monis, Master, Dailv Packet between 
Peoria and Henry, touching at Spring Bay, Chilicothe and Lacon on Illinois River. 

J. A. Bruner, A^eiit, Alton, III. Hunter B. Jenkins, A^ent, 
Office: Wl%arf Boat, foot of Vine Street, St. Louis. 

Company's Gen'l Office at Quincy, III.--H. Leyhe, Supt. 



134 



ADVERTISEMKNTS. 




ST. MARY'S OF THE WOODS, VIGO CO., IND. 



This noble Institution was founded in 1840, bj the Sisters of Providence, from Ruille 
in France. The little band which undertook the arduous task of opening an educational 
establishmant in the Western wilds of Indiana, was composed of six Sisters, includmg 
Mother Theodore, the foundress, whose name is held in veneration by all who had the 
happiness of knowing her. Many and great were the difficulties to be overcome in a 
new and uncivilized country, in which the resources were f jw, the language, customs, and 
manners entirely strange. But the zealous laborers, aided by those who came to join in 
the good work, struggled on, and before the lapse of many years, St. Mary's Institute 
attained the well-earned reputation of being a first-class Academy. The present Academic 
building is pronounced, by all who visit it, to ba one of the finest in the United States. It 
is located four miles west of Terre Haute, near the Indianapolis & St. Louis R. R. It is 
spacious, well ventilated, convenient, and furnished with all modern improvements. It is 
liberally supplied with philosophical and astronomical apparatus, charts, globes, and every - 
thing conducive to the attainment of knowledge. The pupils have access to a w.ll-filled 
library of choice and standard works. Every facility is aff irded for attaining proficiency 
in music, painting in oil and water colors, etc. Special attention is paid to forming the 
morals and manners of the pup'.ls. Simplicity of dress is enforced by rule. The extensive 
grounds surrounding the institute, are beautifully laid out, and offer every inducement to 
the young ladies to engage in healthful exercises. 

Parents may rest assured that pupils placed under the Sisters' care, receive all the at- 
tention that kindness can suggest. 
For further information, address 

Sister SiJLp>ex-ior, 

VIGO CO., INDIANA. 



m 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



135 



W 3 




136 



IMPOKTANT EVENTS OF THE CENTURY. 



1S60. 

dent and Vice-President of the United States, 
by the votes of all the northern States except 
New Jersey, which chose 4 electors for Doug- 
las and 3 for Lincoln. 

This election is made the pretext for rebel- 
lion and secession of the cotton States. 

I\ov. 7.— The news of Mr. Lincoln's elec- 
tion received at Charleston, South Carolina, 
with cheers for a Southern Confederacy. The 
"Palmetto Flag" hoisted on the vessels in the 
harbor. 

]^ov. J>. — An attempt to seize the arms at 
Fort Moultrie. 

I\'ov. lO, — A bill was introduced into the 
South Carolina Legislature to raise and equip 
10,000 men. The Legislature also ordered 
the election of a convention, to consider the 
question of secession. Jas. Chester, United 
States Senator from South Carolina, re- 
signed. 

]\ov. 11. — Senator Hammond, of South 
Carolina, resigned. 

Nov. l^' — Georgia Legislature appropria- 
ted !i!l,000.000 to arm the State. Major Ander- 
son sent to Fort Moultrie to relieve Colonel 
Gardner. 

Dec. 18. — United States Senate rejects 
the "Crittenden compromise," settling 
the differenec between the North and the 
South. 

Dec. 30. — South Carolina secedes from 
the Union. 

I>ec. 36. — General Anderson evacuates 
Fort Eoultrie, Charleston, and occupies Fort 
Sumter. 

'I>ec. 30.~President Buchanon declines to 
receive delegates from South Carolina. 

I>esitli«^ tliis Yeav.— Samuel G. Good- 
rich, "Peter Parley," author, aged C7 years. 
Chauncey A. Goodrich, scholar and divine, 
aged 70 years. Theodore Parker, Unitarian 
cfergyman and author, aged 50 years. J. Ad- 
dison Alexander, theologian and commentator, 
aged 51. 

The Ci!i-eat Rebellion, Dec. 1.— 
Florida I^egislature ordered the election of a 
convention. Great secession meeting ^n 
Memphis. 

Dec. ».— Congress met. The President 
denied the right of a State to secede, and as- 
serted the right of the general government to 
coerce a seceding State. 

Dec. 1©.— Howell Cobb, Secretary of the 
Treasury, resigned. Senator Clay, of Alabama, 
resigned. 

18<>1. 

Jan. 33. — Georgia members of Congress 
resigned. 

.Ia.n. 34. — The Confederates siezed the 
United States arsenal at Augusta Georgia. 

•Ian. 36. — The Louisiana Legislature 
passed secession ordinance bv a vote of 113 to 
17. 

Jan. SO.— North Carolina Legislature 
submitted the convention question to the peo- 
ple. This was the first instance of the will of 
the people being consulted in regard to the 
question of secession. 

P The revenue cutters, Cass, at Mobile, and 
McLelland, at New Orleans, surrendered to the 
Confederate authorities. 



Fort Wayne — Continued. 



c 



TAILOES. 
LARK, JOS. M., Merchani Tailor, 



34E. Berry St. 



JOHNRABUS, 

ITasliIonalble IMLerchant 



lAia 




f 



61 Wells St., (Bloomlngdale.) 



S 



CHMALZ, CHAS., Tailoring and Kepairing of all 

kinds, 108 Harrison St. 



TOBACCO AND OIGAES. 



C 



ARL, JOHN, Wholesale and Retail dealer in 
Tobacco and Cigars, 39 CalDoun st. 



C. NEWCOMER, 

S»..^^3VEX>XjiX3 X1003VE, 

NO. 280 CALHOUN STREET, 

Where you can buy 

Cigars, Tobacco and Nose Paint. 

WEBER, FRED, Wholesale and Retail dealer in 
Cigars & Tobacco, Calhoun & Maumee sts. 

UMBRELLAS AND PAEASOLS. 

Thos. Miller, 
Umbrella Manufacturer, 



Umbrellas and Parasols repaired on short no- 
tice and at low rates. 



1 7^4 Callioxin Street. 

UNDEETAKEE, 

Charles Fink. 



CRAIN, BREED & CO'S 

BURIAL CASES OF THE LATEST IMPROVED STYLE. 

All kinds of wooden cases, also, Shrouds and 

Shrouding. Hearses and carriages at short 
notice, and on the most reasonable terms. 

55 W. MAIN STREET. 
WATCHES, CLOCKS AND JEWELET. 

GAAPS, J. E. & CO., Watches, Clocks and Jewelry, 
) Fort Wayne. 

MATER. GEO. J. E.. Watchmaker and Jeweler, 
19 E. Main. 



IMPOKTANT EVENTS OF THE CENTURY, 



137 



EVANSVILLE, IND. 

AECHITEOTS, 
J. K. FRICK & CO., 

Architects & Superintendents, 

320 Upper First st. 

H. MURSINNA, 

3 Chandler's Building, cor. First and Locust. 

OOD & M'KENNON, Architects, Room 3, 
Chandler's Building. 

ATTOKNEYS AT LAW. 

GARVIN, THOS. E., Attorney at Law, 314 Upper 
Third st. 

S. E. SMITH, 

ATTORNEY AT LAW, 

328 UPPER THIRD ST. 

C. H. WESSELER, 
ATTORNEY AT LAW, 

AND NOTARY PUBLIC, 

OFFICE WITH WFSSELER & BUSS, 
MEAL ESTATE AGENTS, 

326 1-2 Upper Third St. 

BAG MANTJFAOTUREE. 

"livANSviiS^Hb M i^^yISilI^ 

Established 1876. 

J. B, HARRISON, 

Manufacturer of Hominy, Meal, Grits, Bur- 
lap Bags, Cotton Flour Sacks, Salt Sacks, 

And Dealer in Seamless Grain and Gunny Bags, 
314 Upper Water St., Evansville, Itid. 

' BAKEEIES. 

ArwTBENTzi 
Bakery and Confectionery, 

523 Main st. Established lb76. 

HRIST, A. & W., Steam Bakery, 325 Main and 
315 Fourth sts. 

DOESCHEK, CHRIST, Confectioner and Fancy 
Cake Baker, 306 8d St., bet. Main & Locust. 

FRED HOFMANN, 

BAKERY ^ COMFECTIOMERY, 

424 Upper Fourth st. Established 1865. 

OETTGER, FERDINAND, New York Bakery 

and ' onfecti- nery, 6ii9 Main st. 

JACOB SCHMITZ, 

BAKERY AND CONFECTIONERY, 

704 Fifth street. 

STADLEB, FRED, Bakery, cor. Fourth ave. and 
Delaware st. 



1861. 

Fel>. 1. — Texas Convention passed an or- 
dinance of secession by a vote of I6G to 7, to 
be submitted to the people. 

The Louisiana authorities seized the Mint 
and Custom House at New Orleans. 

Fel). A. — Delegates from the seceded 
States met at Montgomery, Alabama, to or- 
ganize a Confederate government. 

Peace Congress met at Washington; ex- 
President Tyler was chosen President. A 
stormy session soon followed, accomplishing 
no good result. 

Feb. 8.— The United States arsenal at 
Little Rock surrendered to Arkansas. 

Feb. 9.— Jefferson Davis and A. H. Stev- 
ens were elected Provisional President and 
Vice-President of the Southern Confederacy. 

Feb. 13.— The electoral vote counted. 
Abraham Lincoln received 180 votes; Stephen 
A. Douglas, 12; John C. Breckenridge, 72; and 
John Bell, 39. 

Feb. 19.— Fort Kearney, Kansas, seized 
by the Confederates. 

Feb. 33.— Gen. Twiggs surrendered Gov- 
ernment property in Texas, valued at $1,200,- 
000, to the Confederacy. 

March 1.— Gen. Twiggs expelled from the 
army. 

March 4. — Inauguration of Lincoln, 
President of the United States. 

The ordinance of secession passed by the 
Texas Convention, and submitted to the peo- 
ple, having been adopted by a majority of 
40,000, the Convention declared the State out 
of the Union. 

March 5. — Gen. Beauregard took com- 
mand of the troops at Charleston. 

March 6. — Fort Brown on the Rio 
Grande, was surrendered by special agree- 
ment. The Federal troops evacuated the fort 
and sailed lor Key West and Tortugas. 

March 38. — Vote of Louisiana on seces- 
sion made public. For secession, 20,448; 
against, 17,926. 

March 30.— Mississippi Convention rat- 
ified the Confederate Constitution by a vote of 
78 to 70. 

April 3. — South Carolina Convention rati- 
fied the Confederate Constitution by a vote of 
114 to 16. 

April. V. — All intercourse between Fort 
Sumter and Charleston stopped by order of 
Beauregard. 

The steamer Atlantic sailed from ISew lork 
with troops and supplies. 

April 13.— Bombardment of Fort Sumter 
commenced by the Confederates. 

April 13. — The bombardment of Fort 
Sumter .continued; early in the day the offi- 
cers' quarters were fired by a shell; by noon 
most of the wood work was on fire; Sumter's 
fire was almost silenced when Gen. Wigfall 
came with a flag of truce, and arrangements 
were made for evacuating the fort. 

April 14. — Major Anderson and his men 
sailed for New York. 

April 15.— The President issued a proc- 
lamation commanding all persons in arms 
ao-ainst the United States to disperse within 
twenty davs; also calling for 75,000 volunteers. 
The New York Legislature authorized the rais- 



138 ADVERTISEMENTS. 



josijiiKr ets i»ia:iiLiX-ii»s, 

PHOTOGRAPHERS 

85 S. W. Cor. Public Square, 



M inufiCturerof 



Carriages c& Buggies, 

High Street, near Main, DANVILLE. ILL. 



South of Puplic Square _ . . . - DANVILiLE, ILL. 

REU SCOTCH GRANITE MADE A SPECIALTY OF. 

His prices are such that he is receiving many o ders from adjoining counties for this most excellent 

and durable material. 

Western Union Cornice Contractor 

Manufacturer and Dealer in 
Galvanised Ti'on Cornices, Slate and Tin Roofing, and Sheet Metal Work in all its Brandies, 

Work done in any part of the United States. Designs for Cornices made to Order. 
Cor. Main & Walnut _ _ _ _ DANVILLE, ILL. 

croEi.. holXjEIT & soisrs, 

THE ONLY CITY 

BILL POSTERS, 

Owners of all the Boards in the City. 

Have the Exclusive Right of the City, andonly Licensed 

Bill Posters. 

205 West Front Street, Opposite New Post Office. 

^"^l'ld^\IsTP(5!^Btr8Su'.^'^°[ BLOOMINGTON, ILL. 

~~ W. B. MOORE, 



MANUFACTURER AND DEALER IN 



Mantles, Grates, Hearths, Shelving, Etc. 

BiQMS WQik iumisMi £§i Semiinf 1§U &M MaiMiMgs. 
311 West Washington St. BLOOMINGT, ILL 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OF THE CENTURY. 



139 




140 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OF THE CENTURY. 



1861. 

ing of !f3, 000,000 for their equipment and sup- 
port. 

Api-il 16. — The Governors of Kentucky, 
Virginia, Tennessee, and Missouri, refused to 
furnish troops under the President's ploclama- 
tion. The Confederate Government called for 
32,000 men. 

Api'il ly. — Virginia Convention adopted 
secession ordinance in secret session by a vote 
of 60 to 53, to be submitted to the people on 
the fourth Thursday in May. Forces were 
sent to seize the U. S. arsenel at Harper's 
Ferry, and the Gosport Navy Yard. 

Jeti'erson Davis issued a proclamation offer- 
ing letters of marque and reprisal to all who 
wished to engage in privateering. 

April 18.— U. S. arsenal at Harper's Fer- 
ry destroyed by Lieut. Jones to prevent its 
falling into the hands of the enemy. Colonel 
Coke, with 400 men of the 2oth Pennsylvania 
regiment arrived in Washington. These were 
the tirst troops to enter the city for its de- 
fense. 

Api-il 1».— Steamer Star of the West 
seized by the Confederates at Indianola, 
Texas. 

The 6th Massachusetts regiment, while pass- 
ing through Baltimore, was attacked by a mob; 
two soldiers were killed. The troops tired up- 
on the mob, killing 11 and wounding many. 
President Lincoln issued a proclamation die- 
claring the ports of South Carolina, Florida, 
Georgia, Mississippi, Louisiana and Texas in a 
state of blockade. 

Apvil 30.— The U. S. arsenal at Liberty, 
Mo., seized by the secessionists, and the arms 
distributed among the surrounding counties. 
The Gosport Navy Yard destroyed by General 
McCauley, to keep it from the Confederates; 
the war vessels Delaware, Pennsj'lvania, Col- 
umbia, Germantown, Merrimac, Raritan, Dol- 
phin, and United States were scuttled and set 
on fire; the Cumberland was towed out. 

The 4th ^Massachusetts regiment arrived at 
Fortress Monroe. 

April 31. — Federal Government took 
possession of the Philadelphia and Baltimore 
Railroad. Senator Andrew .Johnson of Ten- 
nessee mobbed at Lynchburg, Virginia. 
Harper's Ferry arsenal burned by its garri- 
son. 

April 33.— U. S. arsenal at Fayetteville, 
N. C, seized by the Confederates. "Arkansas 
seized the arsenal at Napoleon. 

April 14. — Fort Smith, Arkansas, seized 
by the Confederates under Senator Boland. 

April 35. — Major Libby surrendered 450 
U. S. troops to the Confederate Colonel Van 
Dorn, at Saluria, Texas. 

Governor Letcher proclaims Virginiaa mem- 
ber of the Southei'n Cenfedei'acy. 

April 37.— The blockade extended to the 
ports of North Carolina and Virginia. All 
officers of the army were required to take the 
oath of allegiance. 

April 3».— The Maryland House of Dele- 
gates voted against secession, 63 to 13. 

May 1.— North Carolina Legislature 
passed a bill calling a State Convention to 
meet on the 20th of ^May. The Legislature of 
Tennessee passed an act' in secret session, au- 
thorizing the Governor to form a league with 
the Southern Confederacy. 



EvANSViLLE— Contiiiued. 



BARBERS, 

HENRY KOHL, 

imm I HAIRDRESSINS SAIOON 

—ALSO — 

SHAMPOOING & HAIRCUTTING, 

Second St., bet. Main & Sycamore. 

CHMIDT, ALBERT P., Barber Shop. Also Mu- 
sic furnished for Balls and Parties. 104 Up- 
per Water st. 

BOARDING HOUSE. 

LADIES' BOARDINd HOUSE, 

26 LOWER 'THIRD ST. 

BOOKBINDERS, 
MEYER & RAHM^ ^^~" 

BINDERS, PAPER BOX 

And Blank Book Manf rg, SlOVs Upper First st. 
BOOKSELLER. 

PRINCE, .JOSEPH, Bookseller and Picture 
Frames, 207 Upper Fourth st. 

BOOTS AND SHOES, 
Manufacturer of 

COSTOM MADE BOOTS AND SHOES, 

2 LOWER THIRD ST, 

CRONBACH, MARCUS, Boots and Shoes, 711 
Main st. Eftablisbed 1850. 

ELBERT, CHAS., Manufacturer of Boots and 
Shoes, 708 Main^t^ 

STEPHEN ENZ, 
Mauufacliirer Fine Boots and Shoes, 

306 Third Street. 

Fred. W. Harnislifeger, 

Manufacturer of 

®©fl;te *- 

I20 LOCUST STREET. 

Bet. First and Second. 

AST, JOHN, Boots and Shoes. 

108 Upper Water st. 

LOUIS LOETZERICH, 

Manufacturer of Pasliionable Boots & Shoes 

All work warranted. 31«i Upper Second st. 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OF THE CENTURY. 



141 



EvANSViLLE — Continued. 



BOOTS AND SHOES. 

SCHENTRUP, HENKICH, Boots and Shoes, 426 
Upper Fourth St. 



S 



MAGNUS SIEGEL. 

Manufacturer of 

Boots and Shoes, 

All Work Warranted. 

114 Locust St., bet First and Second. 

CHMIDT, FRANK A., Custom Boots and Shoes, 
104 Upper Water st. 




THALMUELLER, EMIL, Boots and Shoes, 
Locust St. 



117 



H. L. WITTMER, 

Manufacturer Boots and Shoes, 

812 MAIN STREET. 

BOTTLERS, 
AUMILLER&NEU, keep constantly on hand a 

Large, Supply of Evansville XX Ale, 

Also Madison XX Ale and Porter, 
18 HIGH STREET. 

BERNARDIN, A. &. CO., Mnufacturers^oFOinger 
Ale, Sellers Water, etc., 712 and 714 Main St. 

IZZ BREWERY. 

COOK & RICE, dj^BreweryT"^"'""^^""""" 
214 Seventh st. 

BUILDERS. 

L E HNHARD^ & EARL , 

Contractors and Builders, 

Manufacturers and Dealers in 

DOOItS, SASH, BLIKJiS AND ALL KINDS 

OF BUILDING MATERIAL. 

Stairs and Hand Railing a Specialty. 

Planing Mill, cor. €anal and 6th Sts. 



H 



CANDIES. TOTS, ETC. 

ASSLER, JOHN, Candies, Toys, 
Fruits, etc., 308 Upper First st. 



Foreign 



^ARRIAGE AND WAGON MANUFACTURERS. 
Manufacturer of 

Carriages & Spring Wagons 

Family Carriages, Open & Top Buggies, 

STJLKIIES, ETC., 

Manufactory, cor. Second Aye. and Ingle St. 

BECKER & BRO., Manufacturers of 

Wagons & Steamboat Blacksmiths, 

816 Pennsylvania street. 

Established lb5,5. 

EAGLE CARRIAGE WORKS. 

F. HAMMERSTEIN, 

Manufacturer of 

FIRST-CLASS CARRIAGES, 

BUGGIES, SPRING WAGONS, &c., 
C«r. 4th k Locast Sts. None but tbe best workmen employed. 



President Lincoln called for 42,000 three years 
voaniteer.s; 22,000 troops for the regular army, 
and 18,000 seamen. 

]?ln,y -4. — Gen. McClellan placed in com- 
mand of the department of Ohio, comprising 
the States of Ohio, Indiana and Illinois. 

!!^Isiy <>. — Gen. Butler took possession of 
the Relay House, Maryland. 

]^Iay 6. — Arkansas Convention passed an 
ordinance of secession, by a vote of 09 to 1. 
Tennessee Legislature adopted secession ordi- 
nance in secret session, to be submitted to a 
vote of the people. 

]^Ia,y 11.— Blockade of Charleston, S. C, 
established by the steamer Niagara. 

j^lay 13. — Queen Victoria's proclamation 
of "neutrality" in the American conflict. 

Iflay 16. — General Scott ordered the forti- 
fication of Arlington Eights. 

j^lsiy IS. — ^lilitary Department af Virgi- 
nia created, comprising Eastern Virginia, 
North and South Carolina; headquarters at 
Fortress Monroe; commander, General Butler. 

May SO. — Telegraphic dispatches were 
seized throughout the North by order of the 
Government. North Carolina secession ordi- 
nance adopted. Governor Magoffin proclaimed 
the neutrality of Kentucky. 

JWlay 31. — Tennessee secedes. 

May 22. — Fortifications of Ship Island de- 
stroyed to keep them from the enemy. 

May 21:. — Thirteen thousand troops 
crossed the Potomac into Virginia. Alexan- 
dria occupied by Federal troops. Colonel Ells- 
worth shot by Jackson; the murderer was in- 
stantly killed. Arlington Heights occupied by 
Union troops. 

May 26.— The port of New Orleans was 
blockaded by the sloop-of-wor Brooklyn. All 
postal service in the seceded States suspended. 

July 1. — Lieut. Tompkins, with 47 men, 
attacks the Confederates at Fairfax Court 
House,'killing Capt. Marr and several others. 
Union loss, two killed. 

The steamers Freebon and Anacosta en- 
gaged the batteries at Aquia Creek the second 
time. 

June 3.— Col. Kelly defeated the Confed- 
erates at Phillippi, Va., 'killing 15; Col. Kelly 
was severely wounded. 

Hon. S. A. Douglass) died in Chicago. Born 
at Brandon, Vt., April 23, 1813. 

Gen. Beauregard arrived and assumed com- 
mand of the Confederate forces at Manassas 
Junction, Va. 

June lO.— Battle of Big Bethel. Three 
regiments of Union troops, under the command 
of General Pierce, were defeated with a loss of 
sixteen killed, among them Major Winthrop, 
and forty one wounded. 

Neutrality in the American conflict pro- 
claimed by Napoleon III. 

June IJ:. — Confederates evacuated Har- 
per's Ferry after destroying all availab'e pro- 
perty. 

June 15. — Brig Perry arrived at New 
York with the privateer Savannah. 

June 17. — Wheeling Convention unani- 
mously declared Western Virginia independ- 
ent of the Confederate portion of the tetate. 
Greneral Lvon defeated the Confederates at 



142 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



EvANSviLLE — Conthiued. 



OAEKIAGE AED WAGON MANUPACTURERS. 

CARRIAGE BUILDERS, 

MANUrACTORY : 

Cor. Sycamore & Fifth Sts. 

CARRIAGE HARDWARE. 

BABCOciTXviELE, 

WHOLESALE OAREIAGE HAEDWAEE, 

Trimmin2s and Pancv Horse Goods, 
210 NORTH FIRST ST. 

CHINA, GLASS AND CROOKERT, 

ICHENHAUSER, LOUIS, Lamps, Glassware, etc., 
7 Ui per First st. 

WARREN, JAS. M., China and Glassware, 118 
First St. 

CIGAR-BOX MANUPAOTURER, 

J. A. SPALDING, ^^^"^ 

Cigar-Bos Manufacturer, 

And Dealer In Cigar-Box Labels and Nails, 
409 EIGHTH STREET. 

COAL DEALER, 

INGLE, MORRIS & CO., Coal Dealers, 2OO14 Up- 
per Water st. 

COMMERCIAL COLLEGE. 

CRESCENT CITY COMMERCIAL COLLEGE, G. 
W. Rank, Pr nc'pal, cor First and Main sts. 

CUTLER AND GRINDER. 

BORRER, AUG., Cutlery, and Razor Concaving, 
331 Locust St. 

DENTIST. 



222 1-2 MAIN street; 

Over the People's Savings Bank. 

All Operations in our "Si>ecialty" will re- 
ceive Prompt, Careful unci Suc- 
cessful Attention. 



B 



DRUGGISTS. 
EARD, JAS. A., Druggist, 



720 Ingle st. 



L. W. DEUSNER, 

Cor. Second and Sycamore Sts. 
PURE DRUGS AND CHEMICALS, 

Paints, Oils, Perfumery, Window Glass. Patent 

Medicines and a full line of Druggists' Fancy 

Goods. Prescriptions tilled at all 

hours, day orui.:ht. 



EvANsviLLE — Continued. 



E 



J^PMEIER, W. F., Prescription Druggist, 12S 
Upper Third St., cor. Sycamore. 



DRUGGISTS. 

HUT,C.H., DRUGGIST and APOTHECARY, 
Dealer in Drugs, Chemicals, Dye Stuffs, 
Fine Perfumery, Brushes and Toilet Articles. 
Prescriptions Carefully Compounded, at all 
hours, day or Night. 
COR. SIXTH AND OAK STREETS. 

WM. WEBER, 
Pharmacist & Dealer in Drugs, Medicines, 

Etc., Cor. Main and Seventh Sts. Est. 1871. 

DRY GOODS, 

JAQUESS, BRO. & CO., 

Wholesale Dealers in Dry Goods and Notions, 

HON. First street. 



M 



ILLER BROS., General Dry Goods, 113 and 

115, 2:il and 717 Main St. 



Miller, Gardner & Co., 

WHOLESALE 

DRY GOODS & NOTIONS 

114 Upper First St. 

DYE WORKS. 

WILLIAMS, W. W., Steam Dye works, 
229 Locust St. 

ENGINEERS AND SURVEYORS. 

BATEMAN, CHAS. B., Civil Engineer and Sur- 
veyor, 200'^ Upper Water St. 

Jas. D. Saunders, Sr., 

CIVIL ENGINEER 

AND 

412 UPPER 3d ST, 

PLORIST. 

CARMODY, J. D. & CO., Floral Gem Bouquets, 
Decorations, etc.. Water & Chestnut sts. 

GROCERS. 

ALTHEIDE, AUGUST, Groceries, 
Cor. 8th & Mulberry sts. 

JOEST, N. & J., Established 1874, Fancy and 
Staple Groceries, 621 Upper 6th st. 

WM. KOELLING, 

Dealer in Staple & Fancy 



NO. 138, 

Corner Third Avenue and Pennsylvania Street. 

KOESTER & KORFP, Wholesale Grocers, 
Eighth St. bet. Chestnut & Cherry -sts. 




ADVERTISEMENTS. 



143 



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IMPORTANT EVENTS OF THE CENTURY. 



1861. 

Booneville, Mo., with a loss of about 30 killed 
and 50 wounded; Union loss, 2 killed and 9 
wounded. 

June 30. — General McClellan assumed 
command in person of the army in Western 
Virginia. 

June 33. — Forty-eight locomotives be- 
longing to the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, 
valued at $400,000, were destroyed by the Con- 
federates. 

■June 24. — The United States gunboat 
Pawnee attacked the Confederate battery at 
Mathias Point. A spy arrested at Washing- 
ton, with full details of the number of troojis 
and batteries, and best plan of attack on the 
city. 

June 26. — The President acknowledged 
the Wheeling government of Virginia. 

June 27. — The steamers Pawnee, Reso- 
lute, and Freeborn made a second attack on 
the Confederate battery at Mathias Point; Cap- 
tain Ward, comnumding the Federal force, was 
killed. 

June 29. — The Confederate privateer, 
Sumter, escaped from New Orleans. The 
Confederates made a dash at Harper's Ferry, 
desti'oying several boats and a railroad 
bridge. 

July.— First AVar Loan of the United 
States Government, .$250,000,000. 

July 2. — General Patterson defeated the 
Confederates at Falling Water, Va.; Union 
loss, 3 killed and 10 wounded. 

July -1. — Congress met in extra session. 

July 5. — Battle of Carthage, Mo. Con- 
federates were commanded by Governor Jack- 
son; the Federal troops, numbering 1,500, by 
Col Sigel. Colonel Sigel retreated to Spring- 
field. Union loss, 14 killed and 31 wounded. 

July 6. — General Fremont appointed to 
the command of the Western Department, con- 
sisting of the State of Illinois and the States 
and territories west of the Mississippi and 
east of the Rocky Mountains. Headquarters 
at St. Louis. 

July lO- — Skirmishes at Laurel Hill, 
Viruinia; Confederate defeated. Union loss, 
2 killed and 2 wounded. 

July 11.— J. Jl. Mason and R. M. Hunter, 
of Va.;*T. L. Clingham and Thomas Bragg, of 
North Carolina; L. T. Wigfall and J. U. 
Hemphill, of Te.xas; C. B. Mitchell ond W. K. 
Sebastian, of Arkansas, and 0. A. S. Nichol- 
son, of Tennessee, expelled from the United 
States Senate. 

July 12.— Battle of Rich Mountain. The 
Federal troops, under command by Colonel 
Rosecrans, defeated the enemy under Colonel 
Pegram. Confederate loss, 'l50 killed and 
wounded, and 800 prisoners. 

July 13. — The Confederates, under Gen- 
eral Garnett, were defeated at Garrick's Ford, 
Viro-inia. The Confederate General Garnett 
was'^ killed. Union loss, 2 killed and 10 
wounded. 

Battle of Screytown, Va. The Federals un- 
der Colonel Lowe were defeated with a loss of 
9 killed and 40 wounded and missing. 

'July 16. — Tilgram, a negro, killed three 
of a Confederate prize crew on the S. J. War- 
ring, and brought the vessel into New York. 



EvANSViLLE — Co7itim(ed. 



GROCERS. 

Schleiisker & Woeliler, 

Retail Dealers in 





S 



COR. Sth & CHESTNUT STS. 

CHWEITZER, P., Fancy Groceries, 

Cor. Sth & Powell sts. 



VIELE, STOCKWELL & CO., Wholesale Grocers. 
Cor. 1st & Sycamore Sts. 

H. A. WENDT & CO., 

Dealers in 

GROCERIES AND DRY GOODS, 

800 E. Pennsylvania St. 

GUN AND LOCKSMITHS, 

EJIIG, NIC, Locksmith and Bell-hanger, 
Cor. 6th & Main sts. 

GUSTAVE HOSSE, 

Gun and Locksmith, 

Manufacturer and Grinder of 

CUTLERY AND EDGE TOOLS. 

303 Ingle St. 

3?»H:iLir» itnxjG^, 

Manufacturer of 

Cutlery, Snrpal Mrmnents ani 

TOOLS OF ANY KIND. 

GUN AND LOCKSMITH AND GRINDER, 

124 Locust St. 

HAIR DEALER AND DRESSER, 
Miss. B. Scherer, 

LADIES' HAIR DRESSER, 

And manufacturer of 

Switches, Front Braids, Piifl's, Curls, Frizzes, etc. 

311 UPPER SECOND ST. 

HARDWARE, 

BOETTICHER, KELLOftG & CO., General Hard- 
ware, 122 Upper First St. 

PIERSON & ROCK, General Hardware. 
11 Upper First st. 

SONNTAfi, GEO. S. & CO., General Hardware, 123 
& 125 Upper First st. 



HOES AND MILL PICKS, 

5IITH, J. C. & 3. G., Hoee and Mill Picks, Fac- 
tory, foot of Bayless st. 



S 



HORSESHOEING. 

RAYMOND, C.W., Shoeing Shop, 
Cor. Fourth & Locust sts. 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OF THE CENTURY. 



145 



EvANSViLLE — Continued. 



HOTEL, 
Cor. 1st & Locust Sts., 

J. W. BOICOURT,Proprietor, 

Evaiisville, Ind., 

CHOICE 

Sample Rooms For Commercial Agents. 



IRON AND SLATE MANTLES, 

^ranufacturer and dealer in 
ENAMSLED and MARBELIZED 

Iron and Slate Mantles, 

ENAMELED GRATES, ETC., 

613 Upper Seventh Street. 

JUSTICES OF THE PEACE, 

BURKE, PATRICK, Justice of the Peace, 
206 Locust St. 



D 



AY, SAM., Justice of the Peace, 

Cor. Locust & 3d st. 



^LEATHEE AND FINDINGS, 

KERTH, THOMAS, Leather and Findings, 
219 Main st. 

^^^^ LIME AND CEMENT. ~ 

Edgar D. Mills. George W. Mills. 

LIZZ.Z.S BROS., 

•< (Successors to Lockhart & Co.) 
DEALERS IN 

LIHE, CEMENT, m m flACTEK, 

409 Sth St,, bet, Locust and Walnut, 



___LiyEE,YAND BOAEDING STABLE. 
CAVEXDER & JOXEsT 

Liverf, Sale aid Boarfliig StaWe, 

408 & 410 UPPER SECOND ST., 

Bet. Locust and Walnut. 



MEAT MAEKETS, 

EMRK'H, W., Meats and Vegetables, 
Cor. 5th & Chestnut sts. 



S 



C'HNIEP, A. AGO., Meat Market & Sausage .Fac- 
tory, 9th & Division and cor. 4th & Main sts. 



President Lincoln authorized to call out the 
militia and accept the .service.s of 500,000 men. 

.July 18.— Fio-ht at Blackburn Ford. The 
Federal troops under command of General 
Tyler made the attack, but after three hours' 
fighting were ordered back to Centerville; their 
loss was 19 killed and 64 wounded and miss- 
ing. 

The department of Maryland created, and 
Gen. John A. Di.x placed in command; head- 
quarters at Baltimore. 

July 19. — Gen. Banks superseded Gen- 
eral Patterson; headquarters in the field. 

July SO. — The Confederate Congress 
met at Richmond. 

July ^31.— Battle of Bull Run. The 
army of the Potamac, about 45,000 strong, un- 
der command of Brigadier General McDowell, 
which left Weshington July 17, attacked the 
Confederates, about equal in numbers, at 
Manassas, Va., where they occupied a strong 
position. The chances were at first in favor 
of the Federals, but the Confederates receiv- 
ing- large reinforcements under General John- 
son, the scale was turned. Panic seized upon 
the Union troops, and they commenced a dis- 
orderly retreat towards Washington. The 
Union loss was, 481 killed, 1,011 wounded, 1,216 
missing. Confederate loss, as reported by 
General Beauregard, 269 killed and 1,843 
wounded. 

July 33. — General McClelland took com- 
mand of the army of the Potomac. 

Three-months volunteers began to return 
home. 

Aug'. 1. — The Confederates retreated from 
Harper's Ferry to Leesburg. 

Aug,'. 3. — General Lyon defeated the Con- 
federates at Dug Spring, Missouri. Union 
loss, 8 killed and 30 wounded. 

The vessels engaged in a contraband trade 
with the Confederates of Virginia and North 
Carolina were destroyed in Pocomoke Sound. 

Aug'. 3. — Congress passed a bill for rais- 
ing $20,000,000 by direct taxation, and the 
Confiscation bill. 

Aug. 5. — Commodore Alden bombarded 
Galveston, Texas. 

Aug. 6. — The extra session of Congress 
closed. 

Aug. T. — The village of Hampton, Virgi- 
nia, destroyed by the Confederates. The priva- 
teer York burned by the United States gun- 
boat Union; crew taken prisoners. 

Aug'. lO. — Gen. Lyon with 5,000 troops 
attacked a Confederate force double that of his 
own at Wilson Creek, near Springfield. Mo. 
After a hard fight of six hours. Gen. Lyon be- 
ing killed, the Union troops under the com- 
mand of Col. Sigel and Maj. Sturgis, retired 
to Springfield. 

Aug. 13. — President Lincoln appointed 
the 30th of September as a fast day. 

Aug 14. — General Fremont declared mar- 
tial law in St. Louis. 

Aug. 16. — Gen. Wool took command at 
Fortress Monroe. 

President Lincoln interdicts all commercial 
relations with the seceded States. 

Aug. 36.— The 7th Ohio regiment. 90;) 
strong, were surprised at Summerville, Vir^i- 



146 ADVERTISEMENTS. 



J. RAUCH & BRO., 

MANUFACTURERS AND JOBBERS OF 

160 Indiana Avenue, INDIANAPOLIS, IND. 




Fine Cut, Plug and Smoking Tobaccos a Specialty. Also, 
Manufacturers of the Two Brothers Cigars. 



Manufacturer and Wholesale and Retail Dealer in 



LMJim«t^l 



CIGARS £TOBACCO 



INDIANAPOLIS, IND. 



F. G. BERNS, 

MANUFACTURER OF ALL KINDS OF 

CIGAR BOXES 

I give my Work Personal Attention and G-iiar- 
antee every Satisfaction. Factory, 

247 East Morris Street, - - INDIANAPOLIS, IND, 

Established 1S76. 



DEALER IN 



Hardware, Cutlery, Doors, 

Sash, Blinds, Nails, Glass, Edge Tools, 

Etc., Etc., Etc. 

179 INDIANA AVENUE, 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



147 




Post Office and Custom House, Indianapolis, Ind. 



E6. ^\r. :E];i:xos dte Son, 

ARCHITECTS. [Established 1865. 

Superintendents of the above building. Kooms 33 and 34 Talbot's Block, 

Cov. TENNSYI^VANI A and MABKET STREETS. - - INTHANAPOIjIS, IND 




l!$aspeiisioii Bridge between Cincinnati & Covington. — The bridge 
connecting Cincinnati and Covington, was constructed by John A. Roebling, at a cost oi 
$1,800,000. The distance between the towers is 1,057 ^'^^t, and inckiding approaches, it is 
2,252 Jeet in length and 36 feet in width. The towers are 200 feet in height, with the turrets 
230. The main cables are a foot in diameter and contain 10,360 wn-es, weighing 16,300 
pounds. The bridge is 103 feet above low water mark. It was opened to the public on the 
1st of January, 1867. 



14:8 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OF THE CENTURY. 



nia, but fought their way out with a loss of 
six officers. The Hatteras expedition sailed. 

Aug'. 39.— Capture of Forts Hatteras and 
Clark, N. C; Confederate loss about 1,000; 
Federal loss none. 

Sept. 1.— Fight at Boonville, Yirginia; the 
Confederates were defeated and the town de- 
stroyed. Union loss six wounded. 

Sept. 6. — Gen. Grant took possession of 
Paducah, Ky. 

Sept. lO. — Gen. Rosecrans with 4,500 
troops attacked the Confederates under Floyd 
near Carnifex Ferry. After several hours' 


EvANSviLLE — Continued. 


MEAT MARKETS.. 
Proprietors of 

Meat aM VeietafilB Marlet 

5 LOWER THIRD ST. 

Established 1872. 


TTtTEIL, THEODORE, Meat Market, Poultry and 
VV Vegetables, 713 Main St. 


fightino-, darkness put an end to the contest. 
During the fight Floyd retreated, burning the 
bridge over Gauley river. 

Sept. 11.— President Lincoln modified 
General Fremont's emancipation proclama- 
tion. 

Sept. 13.— Fight at Cheat Mountain. Col. 
J. A. Washington, proprietor of Mount Ver- 
non. Avas killed. Union loss, 9 killed and 12 


MILLIHEET AND DRESS MAKINO. 

-pvUNLEVT, MRS. M. J., Millinery, 

\J 510 Main st. 

J. E. DUTCHER, 

Straw and Fancy Goods, 

.506 MAIN ST. 


wounded. 

Sept. 18. — Maryland legislature closed by 
provost marshal; secession members sent to 
Fort McHenry. 

Sept. 31. — John C. Breckenridge fled 
from Frankfort, Ky., and joined the confeder- 
ates. Gen. Lane 'defeated a confederate force 
at Papinsville, Missouri. Federal loss, 17 
killed. 

Sept. 33. — Capture of Lexington, Missou- 
ri, by the Confederates after a siege of four 
months. 

Oct. 3. — Gen. Reynolds made an armed 
reconnoissance of the enemy's position at 
Greenbrier. The Confederates evacuated Lex- 
ington, Mo. 

Oct. 5.— The steamer Monticello shelled 


MRS. S. E. ELLISON, 

Fashionable 

iviiiL.niiiisrj±!±:^ 

-(.AND)- 

Dressmaker? 

112;^ MAIN ST., OVER M. LYON. 


CHWEMKER, MRS. & BAUR, MISS L., Millin 
ery and Notions, 50C Main st. 

MRS J. G. SEESSENQUT, 

Millinery & Hair Goods. 

WIGS MADE TO ORDER. 
120 Main St. 


the Confederates at Chicamacomico, under 
Barlow and di'ove them to their boats. 

Oct. 7.— The Confederate iron-clad steam- 
er Merrimac made its first appearance within 
sight of Fortress Monroe. 

Oct. O. — Confederates made an attack on 
Santa Rosa Island, but were defeated. Union 
loss was 13 killed and 21 wounded. 

Col. Gearv, with 400 Pennsylvania troops, 
crossed the 'Potomac at Harper's Ferry and 
captured 21,000 bushels of wheat. 

Oct. 11.— Confederate steamer Theodore 
escaped from Charleston, S. C, with Mason 
and Slidell on board. 

Oct. 31.— Fight at Frederi-cktown, Mis- 
souri. The Confederates defeated. Union 
loss, 6 killed and about 60 wounded. 

Battle of Ball's Bluff. Union forces com- 
manded bv Col. Baker. Gen. Stone failed to 
"cross the 'Potomac to his support, and after a 
severe fight, in which Col. Baker was killed, 
the Federals retreated. Union loss was, 223 
killed, 266 wounded and 455 prisoners, includ- 
ing 100 wounded. 

Gen. Zollicoffer, with 6,000 Confederates, at- 
tacked the Unionists at Camp Wild Cat, Lau- 
rel county, Ky., and was repulsed. Union 
loss, 4 killed and 21 wounded. 

Oct. 33.— Skirmish at Buffalo Mills, ]\Io. 
Confederates lost 17 killed and 90 prisoners. 
■^Oct. 35.— General Kelly defeated the en- 
emy at Romney, Virginia. 


NOTIONS. 

r^ RUHN, A., Hoisery, White Goods, Notions and 
VT Gents' Furnishing Goods, 417 Main st. 

PAINTS AND OILS. 

"OURBANK & JOHNSON, Paints, Oils, Window 
J3 Glass, etc . 14 Main st. 

PAINTERS. 

-piCHARDSON, .1. v., House and Sign Painter, 
JAj 204 Upper 4th st. 

FRESCO, HOUSE AND SIGN PAINTEE, 

118 NORTH FOURTH STREET. 

Established 1862. 


PAPER DEALER. 
JOHN WYMOND, 

Wholesale Stationery, 

BAGS, WRAPPING PAPERS, WALLPAPER, ETC. 


PHYSICIANS. 

17 HRMAN, DR. E. J., Homeopathist, 

Hj Office, 323 Upper 2d st. 

"PILOTO, MADAME, Astrologist and Clairvoyant 

X Physician, Locust & 3d sts. 

-pOLLAHD, DR. W. S., Office, 312H Upper 3d St., 

X also, U. S. Pension Examiner. 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OF THE CENTURY. 



140 



EvANSViLLE — Continued. 



PLANING MILL. 

YERS, JACOB&^Mwi^laning Mill and Lum- 
ber, 301 Lower Water St. 



M 



PRINTER, 

ROVES, THOS, J., Book & Job Printer. 

312 Upper let St. 



G 



PROPRIETORY MEDICINES. 



A 



KIN, G. L. & CO., Proprietory Medicines, 16 
Upper Ist St. 



PUMP MANUFACTURERS, 
Manufacturers of the 

Improved Rubber Bucket, Wood & Iron 

PUMPS, 

511 & 513 FOURTH ST. 

RESTAURANT, 

JEWELL, R. C, Grand Central Dining Rooms, 
319 Upper 1st st. 

saloons! 

John Albecker. 

Proprietor of 

-(AND)— 

Pleasure G!-ard,eix, 

408 Upper Sd St, bet. Locust and Walnut. 

Agent for Aurora Lager Beer. 

GREEN, WM., Proprietor Katie Saloon, Choice 
Liquors and Pine Cigars, 302 Upper Water St. 

LORENZ, GEORGE, Rhine & French Wines, 
etc.. Cor. 2d & Division sts. 

Robert Lohse, 

WINES, LIQOORS, CI&ARS 

And Lager Beer, 

318 UPPER SECOND STREET. 



P. N, Jarvis &. Son, 

PPOPRIETORS, 
118 Upper Water Street. 

RUHL, CHAS., Saloon, Best Wines, Liquors and 
Cigars, 312 Upper Second st. 

C. SIHLEK, 

fines, Lipors, Ciprs, Etc., 

CINCINNATI BEER. 

S 1 1 XJpper Seconcl Street. 



Oct. 3«. — Gallant charge of JIaj. Zagonyi, 
with 150 of Fremont'.s body guai'd, on a large 
force of Confederates near Springfield, Mo. 
The enemy was routed with a loss of 100 killed 
and 27 prisoners. 

Gen. Lane captured a Confederate transpor- 
tation train near Butler, Mo. 

Oct. 90. — The second naval expedition, 
consisting]of 80 vessels and 15,000 men, sailed 
from Fortress Monroe. The naval force was 
commanded by Commodore Dupowt; the land 
forces were commanded by Gen. Sherman. 

I\ov. 1. — General Scott resigned as com- 
mander-in-chief of the armies of the United 
States. Gen. McClellan was appointed in his 
place. 

Gen. Benham defeated the Confederates at 
Gauley Bridge, Ya. 

i^ov. 3. — Gen. Hunter superseded Gen. 
Fremont in the command of the Western de- 
pai'tment. 

The Confederate schooner, Bermuda, ran the 
blockade at Savannah. 

]\ov. y. — The naval and military forces 
under command of Commodore Dupout and 
Gen. Sherman, captured Forts Walker and 
Beauregard at Port Royal entrance. They also 
took possession of the town of Beaufort and 
Hilton Island. The Union loss was 8 killed 
and 25 wounded. 

Gen. Grant, with a force of 2,800, attacked a 
Confederate camp at Belmont, Mo., driving the 
enemy out, destroj'ing the camp and taking a 
quantity of arms; but, reinforcements arriving 
at Columbus, the Federals were compelled to 
retreat; their loss was 84 killed, 288 wounded 
and 235 missing. 

I\ov. 11. — Gu3'andotte, Ya., burned by the 
Unionists. 

Gen. Halleck takes command of the western 
department. 

IVov. 15.— The U. S. frigate San Jacinto, 
Capt. Wilkes, arrived at Fortress Monroe with 
Mason and Slidell, the confederate commission- 
ers to Europe, taken from the British mail 
steamer Trent, Nov. 8. 

3fov. IS. — Confederate Congress met. 

I>"ov. 31. — The U. S. vessel Santee cap- 
tured the privateer Ro^yal Yacht, ofl' Galves- 
ton, Texas. 

3fov. 33. — Fort Pickens and the United 
Slates war vessels Niagara and Colorado 
bombarded the confederate fortifications at 
Fensacola. 

Port of Warrenton burnt. 

r¥ov. 87. — Gen. McClellan directed the 
observance of the Sabbath in all the camps of 
the U. S. army. 

I\ov. 30. — Lord Lyons, the British minis- 
ter at Washington, receives instructions from 
Earl Russel to leave America within seven 
days, unless the United States government 
consent to the unconditional liberation of 
Messrs. Mason and Slidell. 

Jefferson Davis elected President of the 
Confederate States. 

Dec. 3. — Congress met. 

Dec. -4. — John C. Breckenridge expelled 
from tae United States Senate. 

Dec. 5. — Engagement between the confed- 
erbte gunboats and Federal vessels at Cape 
Hatteras. According to the reports of Secre- 



150 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



EvANSViLLE — Continued. 



SALOONS, 

PETERROESNER 




'imm mm 

AND 

Cor. Iiisrle St. & Second Ave 



WM. WEIDNER, 

Proprietor of Sportsman Hall, 

SalcjOcii StBcBitaOTaiii 

Cor. Third and Sycamore Sts. 
Formerly Prop, of Prescott House, St. Louis, Mo. 

JOHB^ WIEGAND, 

Wine and Lager Beer Saloon, 

301 £ast Pennsylvania St. 



EvANSViLLE. — Contimied. 



K 



SEWING MACHINES. 

OHL, B., Howe Machine. 

Office, 304 Upper Second St. 



T. IE. IMIJ^I^TIIsr, 

Manufacturer of Cripple Apparatus. A.11 kinds of 

Sewing Machine Repairing, 

413 liOcust St., bet. Fourtli and Fifth Sts. 

STONE WORKS, 

KROEGER, B. H., Contractor and' Builder in 
Stone Work, Cor. Edgar & Pennsylvania sts. 

FRANZ R. CADEN, 

Successor to Alhaker & Caden, 
Proprietor of the 

EMPIRE STONE WORKS, 

:No lOO ripper Fourth St. 

Stone Fronts and other elaborate work executed 
according to Drawings and Specitications. 

__^___ !5SII^^ -^^^ TINWARE, 

Blemker, Tillman & Co., 

EXCELSIOR 

STOVE WORKS, 

Wholesale Manufacturers of 

Stoves, Castings, Hollow-Ware. Mantles. Grates, 

Tin- Ware, and Dealers in Tinners' Stock. 

Sample Room, No. 213 Second Street. 



LISS, J. L., STOVES AND TINWARE, 

121 Locust Street. 



B 



Efaisville Foiirj Association, 

Wholesale Manufacturers of 

HOL,LOW-WARE, 

House Fronts, Grates and Tin- Ware 

Office, Warerooms and Foundry, 
Corner Kead and Pennsylvania Sts. 



STOVES AND TINWARE, 

FELDHACKEF&^SAliD 

Manufacturers and Dealers in 

Tin, CoDuer, StetlroD yapaonei fare 



Established, 1853. 



No. 411 Main Street. 



s 



CHMITT, AUGUST, Stoves, Tinware, House 
Furnishing Goods, 605 Main Street- 



TAILORS, 
T>OLEN, The Tailor, 



211 Locust Street. 



E 



LIKOFER, FRIED, Tailor, 



119 Locust Street. 



E.G. MEYER, 

No, 731 Main Street, 

Bet. Seventh and Eighth Sts. 

CHAS. SCHERER, 

317 Sycamore St., bet. Third and Fourth. 



CHMITS, G. H., Merchant Tailor, and Dealer in 
Dry Goods, 100 Upper Third Street. 



s 



J. H. SCHRICHTE, 

TAILOR. 

Fine Custom Work, 

124 MAIN STREET. 






213 Seventh Street. 



JOSEPH THORBECKE, 

JfJet'cliaiit Tailof ami Denier in Ctetits' 
Ftirnistiing Goods, 

427 Main Street, bet. Fourth and Fifth sts. 

TOBACCO AND CIGARS, 

KESTNER & HEYDEN, Manufacturers of and 
Dealers in Tobacco & Cigars, 100 Upper 8th st. 

TRUNKS AND VALISES. 
Manufacturer of 

Factory and Salesroom, 



No. 21 Main Street, 

A Fine Assortment of Traveling Bags Constantly 
on hand. Repairing done on Short notice. 

EIL, L. & SON, Trunks, Valises, etc., 

331 Upper First Street . 



w 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



151 




City Hall, Baltimore, Md.~The corner stone of this building was laid October 
i8th, 1867. It is one of the most elegant structures in the United States, occupying the 
entire square on which it is erected. The length of the building is 239 feet, the width 149 
feet, covering an area including pavements, of 50,500 feet. It is built of stone, marble and 
iron. It is four stories high, the entire height from the base to the finial being 250 feet. 




City Hall, Pittsburg, l*a. — The building fronts on Smithfield Street, near 
Fifth Avenue facing eastward. The corner stone Avas laid May 5th, 1S69. A leaden box 
was enclosed in the corner stone, containing the following : copies of the Pittsburg Daily 
of May 5th, 1869, copy of the City Code, Map of Pittsburg, 1S75, Map of Pittsburg, 1869, 
Report of Board of Trade, giving statistics of the city, Paper containing names of all city 
officials, Paper containing names of members ot the building commission and the builders. 
Specimens of United States Currency. The building has a frontage of 120 feet and is 110 
feet deep, the main walls are 72 feet high, the extreme height of the tower is 175 feet, with 
a large clock in the observatory. On the 23d day of May, 1872, the building was dedicated 
with appropriate ceremonies, and the city government thereupon took permanent posses- 
sion. The total cost of the building and grounds 1600,579.00. 



152 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OF THE CENTURY. 



1861. 

taries of "War and 'Savy the Union forces num- 
bered 640,537 volunteers, 20,3;-54 i-egular sol- 
diers, and 22,000 seamen. 

Dec. 9. — The Confederate Congress passed 
a bill admitting Kentucky into the Southern 
Confederacy. 

Freestone Point, Ya., shelled by the National 
gunboats and captured. 

Dec. 13. — Engagement at Camp Alleghe- 
ny, Ya., in which Gen. Milroy defeated the 
confederates under Col. Johnson. Union loss, 
21 killed and 107 wounded. 

Dec. 17.— Fight at Munfordsyille, Ky. 
Lrawn battle. Union loss, 10 killed and 17 
wounded. 

General Pope captured 360 secessionists at 
Osceola, Mo. 

Dec. 18. — Gen. Pope captured 1,300 con- 
federates, a number of horses and wagons, and 
1,000 stand of arms at Milford, ilo. Union 
loss, 2 killed and 17 wounded. Stone fleet 
sunk in Charleston harbor. 

Dec. 90.— Battle of Drainsville, Ya., in 
which the confederates wore defeated by the 
Union troops under Gen. McCall. Union loss, 
7 killed and 01 wounded. 

Dec. 'Hi. — Troops despatched to Canada 
by the British goyernment as a precaution 
against aggression by theU. S. 

Dec. 30. — The New York banks suspend 
cash payments. 

1863. 

Jan. 1.— Mason and Slidell left Fort War- 
ren for England in the British steamer Ri- 
iialdo. 

JTan. 4. — Gen. ^Milroy defeated the con- 
federates at Huntersyille, Ya., and captured 
§80,000 worth of stores. 

•fail. 7. — Confederates defeated at Rom 
ney. 

«Ia,n. 8. — Gen. Palmer defeated the Con- 
federates at Silver Creek, Mo. Union loss, 4 
killed and 18 wounded. 

•Ia.li. lO. — Col. Garfield defeated the con- 
federates under Humphrey Marshall at Pres- 
tonburg, Ky. 

•Van. 11. — The Burnside expedition sailed 
from Fortress Monre. Naval engagement on 
the Mississippi between the Union steamers 
Essex and St. Louis, and four Confederate 
boats; the latter were compelled to seek pro- 
tection under the batteries at Columbus. 

Simeon Cameron resigned his position as 
Secretary of War, and E. M. Stanton was ap- 
pointed in his place. 

•Tan. 19.— Battle of Mill Spring, Ky. 
This battle was fought between 3,000 Union 
troops under Gen. Schoep and Confederates 
under Gen. ZoUicoffer. The enemy were de- 
feated and Gen. ZoUicoffer killed. Union loss, 
39 killed and 127 wounded. 

Feb. 3. — The Federal government decided 
that the crews of the captured privateers were 
to be considered as prisoners of war. 

Fell. S. — Jesse D. Bright expelled from the 
U. S. Senate. 

Fell. 6. — Commodore Foote with 7 gun- 
boats attacked Fort Henry on the Tennessee 
river. The Confederate commander Geneia! 
Tilghman made an unconditional surrender. 



EvAXSviLLE. — Contijiued. 



UNDERTAKERS, 

SCHAEFEB, JOS., Undertaker, 
11 Lower Fifth St. 

Undertaker and Dealer in Metallic Cases, Caskets, 

and Walnut Cofflus. 

No. 425 MAIN STREET. 



UPHOLSTERER, 

A.VSE, COSRAD, Upholsterer, 
719 Main St., bet. Seventh and Eighth. 

WATCHES, CLOCKS AND JEWELRY, 

ARTES, (.'HAS. F., Watches, Jewelry, etc., liO 
Main st. 
TTO, C. H., Jewelry and Gold Pens, 

210 Locust St. 



H 



O 



W 



ADE, CHARLES, Watchmaker and Jeweler, 
210 Locust St. Established 1832. 



WINES AND LIQUORS, 
David Heimann. Abraham Heimann. 

DAYID HEIMANN & SON., 

Wholesale Dealers In 

Llpors, Fine Kentucky WMskies, 

BRANDIE.S, WIXBS, ETC., 

22 SYCAMORE STREET. 

HIO VALLEY WINE CO., F. W. Cook, Pres.; 
A. Bernardiu, Sup't. OiHce, S14 Upper 
Seventh st. 

MUSCO COX, 

Wines and Liquors, 

214 Locust Street. 

WOOLENS. 

H. Brommelhaus. H. Feldmann. 

H. Brommelhaus & Co., Importers & Jobbers of 

Poreign and Domestic Woolens, 

105 Upper First street. 



WOOLEN MILLS. 



ETA>SVILLE WOOLEN 
Lemcke, 339 Main st. 



MILLS, Henke & 



EVAMILLE LEADING BUSINESS HOUSES, 

WHEN ESTABLISHED. 



ALTHOFF, F., Carriage Manufacturer, 
1874. 

BAER, D., Trunks and Valises, 1863. 

BOYD & BRICKLEY, Ai-cliitects, 18.59. 

ELLISON, MRS. S. E., Milliner, 187.1 

HAiVSE, CONRAD, Upliolsterer, 1860. 

HAMMERSTEIN, F., Carriage Manufac- 
turer, 185o. 

HARNISHFEGER, FRED. W., Boots 
and Shoes, '1874. 

HEIMANN, DAYID & SON, Wholesale 
Liquors, 1876. 

KROEGER, B. H., Contractor, 1868. 

KRUG, PHILIP, Locksmith, 1857. 



IMPOKTANT EVENTS OF THE CENTURY. 



153 



EVANSVILLE. — Continued. 



LEADING BUSINESS HOUSES. 

LEHNHARD & EARL, Builders, 1872. 
MEYER, E. C, Merchant Tailor, 1867. 
MILLER, GARDNER & CO., Dry Goods, 

1864. 
MILLS BROS., Lime and Cement, 1866. 
SCHLENSKER & WOEHLER, Grocer- 

ies, 1873. 
SCHRICHTE, J. H., Merchant Tailor, 

1849. 
SMITH, R., Undertaker, 1865. 
WEIL L. & SONS, Trunks, 1875. 



JACKSON, MICH. 

AETISTS. 

ROBISON & WALLACE, Portrait Artists, cor. 
Main and Mechanic sts. Est. 1870. 

ATTORNEYS AT LAW, 

GEO. F. ANDERSON, 

Attorney wi CoEselor at Law. 

Collections Promptly Made. 
Office, 214 Main Street. 



B 



LISS, A. A., Attorney at Law, 



201 Main st. 



G 



OULD, JAMES, Attorney at Law. Collections 
made in all parts of the state. 230 Main st. 



J. C. LOWELL, 

ATTORIEYatLAW 

Real Estate, Loan and Insurance 
Agent, 

214 MAIN STREET. 

THOMAS A.WILSON, 

Office, 313 Main Street. 

Special Attention given to Collections. 

BARBER. 

^'TLOfiTALFltEDs'Bar'berand^T^^ 
Main st. 

BREWERY. 
G. FREY, Proprietor of 

Jackson Brewery and Bottler of Frey's 
Celebrated Lag-er Beer, 

Cor. Park and Water Sts. 



1863. 

Feb. 8. — Gen. Burnside captured six forts 
on Roanoke Island, takiu(f about 3,000 small 
arms and destroying all llie Confederate fleet 
except two vessels. Union loss was 60 killed 
and 212 wounded. 2,500 prisoner.s and a large 
quantity of ammunition were captured. 

Fel>. lO.— Elizabeth City, N. C. surren- 
dered to Gon. Burdside. The Federal g-un- 
boals ascended the Tennessee river as far as 
Florence, Ala., capturing three and destroying 
six Confederate boats. 

Fel». 13. — Gen. Curtis took possession of 
Springfield, Mo. 

Fel>. lA.— Com. Foote attacked Fort Don- 
elson with the gunboats, but was compelled to 
withdraw. 

Feb. 15. — The attack on Fort Donelson 
renewed by the land forces under Gen. Grant, 
numbering 40,000. 

Bowling Green evacuated^by the Confeder- 
ates. 

Fel>. 16. — Gen. Buckner made an uncon- 
ditional surrender of Fort Donelson and the 
troops under his command. Between 12,000 
and 15,000 prisoners, 40 cannon, and a large 
amount of stores were captured. Union loss 
was 321 killed, 1,046 wounded, and 150 missing. 

Skirmish at Independence, Mo. 

Feb. 31.— Desperate fight at Fort Craig, 
New Mexico, between the Union troops under 
Col. Canby, and the Texans. The Federals 
were defeated with a loss of 62 killed and 162 
wounded. 

Feb. 33. — Jefferson Davis inaugurated 
President and A. H. Stephens Vice-President 
of the Southern Confederacy. 

Feb. 34. — Nashville, Tenn., occupied by 
the Union troops. 

Feb. 37.— Columbus evacuated by tthe 
Confederates. 

MarcU 1.— Fight at Pittsburg Landing 
between two Union gunboats and a Confeder- 
ate battery. 

Marcb 4.— Brunswick, Ga., Fort Clinch, 
Fernandini, and St. Mary's, Fla., were cap- 
tured by Com. Dupont. 

Andrew Johnson appointed military gov- 
ernor of Tennessee. 

Pike's Opera House, Cincinnati, destroyed 
by fire. 

Marcli 6. — President Lincoln proposes a 
plan of pecuniary assistance for the emancipa- 
tion of the slaves in such States as should 
adopt an abolition policy. 

Mai-cb 8.— Battle of Pea Ridge. Total 
defeat of the enemy. Union loss was 212 
killed and 920 wounded. The Confederate 
steamers, Merrimac, Jamestown and York- 
town, attacked the Federal fleet at Hampton 
Roads, destroying the Cumberland and Con- 
gress, and damaging several other vessels. 

jflarcb 9. — Battle between the Confeder- 
ate iron-clad, Merrimac, and the Federal float- 
ing battery, Monitor; the former compelled to 
retire. This — the first contest between iron- 
clads which the world had ever seen — was 
studied by the naval departments of all civil- 
ized powers, and a reaction took place against 
wooden vessels. 

i^Iavch 11. — Gen. McClellan took com- 
mand of the army of the Potomac; Gen Fre- 



154 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 




BXJJs;iIVESS COLLEGE 

Writing & Telegraph Institute 

KALAMAZOO, MICB. 

Send for Jonrnal. Agents wanted to sell our Copy 

Slips of Business and Ornamental Penmanship. 

Send 50 cents for sample set. 



Esta-lblislied 187^4. 



Kalamazoo Knitting Co. 



Manufacturers of the Celebrated 



WITH DOUBLE HEELS AND TOES. 

Kalamazoo, Mich. 



Established 1S76.] 



o. :e3:o:e:xi.:o.^oxx, 

DEALER IX 



Coal, Iron, Nails, Glass, Cntleiy, Felloes, Hubs and Spokes. 
Manufacturer of Tin, Slieet Iron and Coi)per Ware. 

23 and 25 MAIN STREET, ANN ARBOK, MICH. 

DESIGNERSiENGRAVERS 

OIsT ^ATOOID. 

^Satisfaction al>vtxy« Gixai-aiiteecl. 

25 CANAL STREET, GRAND RAPIDS, MICH. 

AIR TIGHT 

BUTTER PACEAKE 

Is warranted to keep 

Butter Sweet and Fresh 

FOR YEARS. 

A. J. FINNEGAN, 

570 Hennepin Ave., 

MiAXEAPOivis, Mix:sr. 

Patentee and Manufacturer. 

Send for Circular. 




ADVERTISEMENTS. 



155 




Public Liibrary, Detroit, Mich. — Is situated on Central Park. The construc- 
tion of this building was commenced in April, 1S75, and completed in November, 1S76. It 
has a front of 95 feet, with a rear of 100 feet, 60 feet of which is the Library proper. It is 
built of iron, glass, brick and stone, with iron trusses supporting glass roof. It has capacity 
for 200,000 yolumes, arranged in 20 alcoves, 12 feet square and 14 feet high. The buildin'o- 
is 61 feet to top of main cornice, 116 feet to top of dome, and 150 feet to top of figure. Cost 
of Library room, $135,020; when complete, will cost $175,000. Designed and superintend- 
ed bj Henry T. Brush, architect, Detroit, Mich. 




Opera Honse, Detroit, Michigan.— Was buiU in the vear 1S69, at a cost ot 
$203,000. It is 160 feet high, with a Iront ot 100 feet, extending back 156 feet. The first 
story has an iron front, and the lobby is built entirely of brik. Its seating capacity is 2,003. 



156 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OF THE CENTURY. 



1863. 

mont, of the Mountain department; Gen. Hal- 
leck, of the department of the Mississippi. 

Manassas occupied by Union troops. 

Itla-rcli 13. — Com. Dupont took possess- 
ion of Jacksonville, Fla. 

The Confederates driven from their works at 
Paris, Tenn. 

itlarcli 13. — The Confederates evacuated 
their works at New Madrid, ilo., in such haste 
as to leave 25 pieces of artillery and a laro^e 
quantity of military stores valued at $1,000,- 
000. 

l^Iarcli 14. — Gen. Burnside attacked the 
Confederates in their fortification at Xewbern, 
N. C. After a fig'ht of four hours, the enemy 
retreated, leaving a large quantity of ammu- 
nition, provisions and stores in the hands of 
the victors. The Union loss was 91 killed and 
466 wounded. 

]tla,rcli 16. — Commodore Foote com- 
menced the attack on Island No. 10. Confed- 
federates defeated at Cumberland Mountain, 
Ky. 

Jflarcli 18. — Confederate fortifications at 
Acquia Creek evacuated. 

Confedei'ates defeated at Salem, Ark. 

Marcli 3».— Battle of Winchester, Va. 
The Confederates were defeated and retreated 
to StrasburjT, leaving their dead and wounded 
upon the field. The Union loss was 103 killed 
and 466 wounded. 

IflarcSi 38.— Fight at Pigeon Ranch, 
between j.iHlO Union troops under Col. Hough 
and 1,100 Texans. The battle was a drawn 
one. 

April 6.— Battle of Shiloh. The Confed- 
erates under Gens. Johnson and Beauregard 
attacked Gen. Grant's army at Pittsburgh 
Landing. The Union forces were driven back 
to the river and a number of prisoners cap- 
tured. 

April 7. — The battle of Shiloh renewed. 
Gen. Buell arrived during the night with rein- 
forcements. The battle lasted throughout the 
day with varied success, but the Confederates 
were finally defeated and driven to their forti- 
fications at Corinth. The Federal loss was 
1,614 killed, 7,721 wounded, and 3.956 missing. 
The Confederate Gen. Johnson was killed. 

April 8.— Island No. 10 captured; 5,000 
prisoners, 100 siege guns, 24 pieces field 
artillery, 5,000 stands of small arms, 2,000 
hogsheads of sugar, and a large quantity of 
clothing, tents, and ammunition. 

April 11. — Fort Pulaski, commanding the 
entrance to Savannah, surrendered after a 
bombardment of thirty hours. Gen. Mitchell 
occupied Huntsville, Ala., taking 200 prisoners, 
15 locomotives and a large number of cars. 
Congress passed the bill abolishing slavery in 
the District of Columbia. 

April 13.— Gen. Mitchell captured 2,000 
prisoners at Cliattanooga. 

April 18.— The Confederates attacked 
Gen. Smith's division at Yorktown, but were 
repulsed. 

April 19.— Fight between Gen. Burn- 
side's troops and the enemv near Elizabeth 
City, N. C. The latter were defeated. Union 
loss, 11 killed. Gen. Reno, with 2,000 Union 
troops, defeated the enemy at Camden, N. C. 

April 35. — Com. Farragut arrived at 



Jackson. — Continued. 



BLACKSMITHS AND HORSESHOERS, 

TIFT & WESLEY, Blacksmiths and Horse- 
shoers, Cortland St. 



BOOTS AND SHOES. 

WARREN, 

Shoes, 214 Main st. 



TTATCH & WARREN, Dealers in Boots and 



^OTTJJN&WOEKS^ 

CONKLIN BOTTLING WORKS, D. M. Conklin 
prop., 12 Pearl st. 

BROOM FACTORY, 

JACKSON CITY BROOM FACTORY, Manufactu- 
rer of Extra Family, Store, Mill, Railway, 
Boat and Brewery 

Brooms and Whisks, 

39 Cortland St. JOHN F. MACK. 



CABINET MAKER, 



E 



ATON, F., Cabinet Maker. Furniture Repair- 
ed and Varnished. 26 Pearl st. 



CARRIAGES AND WAGONS. 

TAC^OBnilEBERr 

Carriage and Wagon Maker, 

Cor. Cortland and Mill Streets. 

OPPS, C. N., Carriage Maker and Blacksmith, 
Mechanic st, 

FOGfJ, L. B., Carriage Making and Repairing, 
11 Pearl Street. 

CARRIAGE TOPS. 
Manufacturer of 



mtm 

AND ALL KINDS OF 

Carriage Trimmings at Bottoiu Prices, 
at No. 11 PEARIi ST 

CIGAR MANUFACTURER. 

I7^BERBACH, WM., Cigar Manufacturer, 
Id Established, 1874. 121 Mechanic Street. 

CIGAR BOX FACTORY. 

^wrF7STEYENS^& CO., 

JACKSON CITY 

Steam Cigar Box Factory, 

And Manufacturers of all kinds of Boxes, 

Cor. Cliuton and Jackson Sts. 

New Brands, Labels, Edsings. Tacfes, 

etc.. constantly on hand. 

COAL AND WOOD. " 

in rtMiriS., Dealers in Coal ai — .. 

Cor. Main Street and M. C. R. R. Crossing. 



OJIITH BROS., Dealers in CoaJ^ and Wood. 

CONTRACTORS AND BUILDERS^ 

DIAMOND, GEORGE, Contractor and Builder. 
100 Mechanic Street. 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OF THE CENTURY. 



157 



Jackson. — Continued. 



D 



DENTIST, 

ORBANCE, W. H., Dentist, 

254 Main Street, Jacljson. 



DYER AND SOOUEEE. 

DONALDSON, JOHN, Steam Dyer and Scourer, 
Established, 1862. 102 Mechanic Street. 

GEOOEEIES, 

HOBART, C. D. A CO., Grocers and Dealers in 
Foreign and Domestic Goods, 260 Main st. 
ENNEDT, F. A., General Groceries^ 

Cor. Pearl and Jackson sts . 

AYNE, C. W., Groceries and Provisions, 

161 Mechanic street. 
HEABEB, R., Groceries and Provisions. 

Jackson and Cortland streets. 



S 



GUNS AND SPOETING GOODS, 

LINDERMAN, LOUIS, Dealer in Guns, Pistols 
and Rifles, 127 Mechanic street. 

GEO. A. SMITH, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealer in 

&ii,Ainimitioii&Sporti!i£&ools 

All Repairing done in the best possible man- 
ner. Guns bored to shoot close and 
hard and warranted every time. 
Store 35 Mill St., opp. Keystone Block. 

X. B.— Anv deicription of Gun, citlier Breetli-Lo.ading or Rifle, 
furnished on the shortest notice .ind at lowest prices. 



H 



HOTELS. 

IBBARD HOUSE, Jackson, Mich., 

J. M. Bradley, Proprietor. 



H 



UBD HOUSE, 



Smith & Hurd, Proprietors. 



LAUNDET, 

8 HEABEB, A. 31., Jackson Steam Laundry, 50 
Cortland st. 



LITHOGEAPHEES, 

IBD&MICKLE, Lithographers and Map Pub- 
'ishers, cor. Maine & Mechanic sts. 



B 



LIVEET AND SALE STABLE. 



G 



ALE GEO. H., Livery & Sale Stables, 

Mechanic St., opp. Post Oflice. 



MAOHINSTS, 

DENNIS, E. & CO., Founders and Machinists and 
Machinery Supplies, 48 Jackson st. 

MEAT MAEKET. 

S. M, Svans, 

Proprietor 



lABllT 



\z<j & 131 MECHANIC ST. 

Jackson, - - Midi. 



MEDICAL INSTITUTES. 

BAIBD. DB, A. H., Medical Dispensary and In- 
stitute, 223 Main St., up stairs. 



New Orleans, and took possession of the city. 
Fort Macon, Georg'ia, surrendered after a bom- 
bardment of eleven hours. Gen. C. F. Smith, 
died at Savannah, Tennessee. 

Api-iiaH.— Forts Jackson and St. Philip 
surrendered. 

April 39.— Gen. Mitchell defeated the 
Confederates at Bridgeport, Ala. 

May 3.— The Confederates evacuated 
Yorktown, Jamestown, and Mulberry and 
Gloucester islands, leaving ammunition, camp 
equipage, and 100 guns behind. 

:^lay 5.— Battle of Williamsburgh, Va. 
The Union troops were commanded by Gens. 
Hancock and Hooker. The Confederates were 
defeated, and retreated in the night towards 
Richmond. 

:^Iay 7.— Battle of "West Point, Va. Gens. 
Franklin and Sedgwick, with a force of 20,000 
men, were attacked by Gen. Lee. The Con- 
federates were defeated. Union loss about 300 
killed and wounded. 

:^lar S.— Gen. Milroy attacked the enemj 
at McD'owell's, Va. After a fight of five hours 
he was forced to withdraw. 

:yiay ».— The Confederates evacuated Pen- 
sacola,'and destroyed the Navy Yard. 

::^Iay 10.— The Federal forces took posses- 
sion of'Xorfolk, Va. Gosport Navy Yard de- 
stroyed by the Confedeartes. Gunboat fight on 
the "Mississippi, near Fort Wright; the Con- 
federates were repulsed, losing two vessels. 

:?Iay 11.— The Confederates blow up their 
iron-clad Jlerrimac, to prevetit its capture by 
the enemy. 

:»Iay 13.— Natchez, Miss., surrendered to 
Com. F'arragut. 

rtlay IC— The Union Gunboats repulsed at 
Fort Darling. 

]!»Iay 17. — Confedeates driven across the 
Chickahominy, at Bottom Bridge. 

May 33. — Confederates defeated at Lewis- 
burg, Va. 

May 3-1:. — Col. Kenley, commanding the 
Federal troops at Front Royal, Va., was at- 
tacked by large force of the enemy and defeated 
with a heavy loss. 

May 35. — General Banks defeated at 
Winchester, Virginia, and driven across the 
Potomac. 

May 37.— Confederates defeated at Han- 
over, Virginia. Union loss, 35 killed and 220 
wounded. 

May 39.— Confederates evacuated Corinth, 
Miss. 

May 31. — The Confederates under Gener- 
al Johnson attacked the left wing of the Army 
of the Potomac, commanded by General Ca- 
sey, at Fair Oaks. Union forces were driven 
back. 

Corinth taken. 

June 1.— Battle of Fair Oaks was renewed. 
Confederates repulsed. Union loss, 890 killed, 
and 4,844 wounded. 

.rune 6.— After a naval battle, Memphis 
surrendered to the Union troops. 

June N.— Battle of Cross Keys. Va., be- 
tween Gen. Fremont's army and the Confeder- 
ate army, commanded by Gen. Jackson. The 
latter were defeated. 



158 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



Jackson. — Cotitinued. 



MEDICAL INSTITUTES, 

Dr. A. BeLafayette Angell, 
MEDICAL INSTITUTE 

AND 

RUPTURE or HERNIA CURE, 

Also manufacturer of the Excelsior Elastic 
Trusses, Abdominal Supporters, etc. 

PAINTERS, 

BUTCHER, E., General House Painting and Pa- 
pering, Mectianic & Cortland sts. 

John H. Reimers, 

AND 

100 Mechanic st. 

ROOT, ORWILL, Sign Writer and Scenic Paint- 
er, Mill St. 

WEST END PAINT SHOP. 

F- L. Hlnarragar, 

Practical 

Graining, Kalsomining and General Painting, 
280 MAIN ST., DOWN STAIRS. 



Geo M. Wright, 

HOUSE & SIGN PAINTER, 

Rear of 85 Jackson Street. 
Graining and Glazing, Store and Oflice Paint- 
ing, Signs and Banners, Kalsomining and Paper 
Hanging. 



H 



PAPER DEALER, 

UNT^ ED W A Rb'S.7 Paper D'ealer; 

32 Cortland st. 



PATENT AGENCY. 



The Only Reliable 

II&HIGAN PATENT A&ENCY. 



W. G. Gilbert, 

Eng'r and Dr'htsman. 



James Hammill, 
Attorney at Law. 
Drawings, Specifications and Assignments. We 
also prepare and file Caveats, procure Design Pat- 
ents, Tra'le-marks and Ke-issues. We have no 
Sub-Agents, but do our business direct with the 

Commissioner of Patents. 
Office. ii39 Mnin St., Up Stair/». 

PORK PACKER. 

CAKL DETTMANN", 

I* o I" 15. - 3E* a. o Is. o x» , 

Wholesale and Retail dealer in Fresh, Salt 

and Smoked Meats and Lard, 

202 MAIN ST. 



PHYSICIANS, 

CALVERT, W. J., M. D,, Homeopathic Phyei- 
ciap and Surgeon, 296 Main st. 



Jackson. — Co?itinued. 



PilYSICIANS, 

IBSON, W. A., M. D., Homeopathic Physician 
and Surgeon, Main & Jackson sts. 



G 



A. S. GREGORY, M. D., 

Eclectic Physician and Surgeon 



Removes and cures Cancers and Tumors (in all 
curable cases,) without the kuife or loss of blood, 
with little pain and no debility of the system. 
The treatment consists in the use of Chemical 
Cancer Andidotes. Specific in character, efficient 
in action and superior to all other methods now 
in use. Throat and Lung difficu ties and Nasal 
Catarrh successfully treated with the most ap- 
proved system of medicated inhalations. Rheu- 
matism and Hemorrhoids or Piles readily yield to 
Dr G.'s new system of treatment. Office, 198 
Main st , Jackson, Michigan. Address, with 
stamp, A. S GREGORY, M. D. 

PRINTER. 

REYNOLDS' SPECIALTY PRINTING HOUSE. 

Letter, Note and Bill Heads, Statements, 

Blanks, Envelopes, Cards, &c., &c., 

Printed and promptly delivered to 

any part of the United States 

or Canadas, 

AT WONDERFULLY LOW PRICES. 

Send Set i^tamp for Circular and liberal terms to Agents. 

198 MAIN ST. 

RESTAURANT, 

RUST, F. W., Reform Club Restaurant and Sa- 
loon, 165 Mechanic st. 

ROOFER, 

Tlios. McGraw. 

SLATE & METAL ROOFER, 

And Manufacturer of Galvanized 
Iron Cornice Window Caps, Chimneys, Etc, Etc.. 

Also dealer in Slating, Nails, Felt and Zinc. 
P. O. BOX 445, JACKSON, MICH. 

TAILORS, 



^EALL, H. N., Merchant Tailor, 



ilO Main st. 



JACOB WEIS, 

Mew Garments made to order. Clothing Clean- 
ed and Repaired. 
KEYSTONE BLOCK, MILL STREET. 

WATCHES AND JEWELRY, 

CHILD, W, W., Watches, Jewelry, Solid Silver, 
French Clocks, Bronzes, etc , iiTti Main st. 

Jachoii, Mich., BBsiiess Houses, 

WHEN EJ!iTABI.I!SHED. 



ANDERSON, GEO. F., Attorney, 1S74. 
ANGELL, DR. A. DeLAFAYETTE, 

1S71. 
BIRD & MICKLE, Lithographers, 1S71. 
DETTMANN, CARL, Meat Market, 1S65. 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OF THE CENTUKY. 



159 





Washington Alonnuient, Bal- 
timore, Md. — The corner stone was 
laid on the 4th of July, 1815, and the Statue, 
representing Washington resigning his com- 
mission, was placed in position October 19, 
1S29. The Monument is a graceful Doric 
Column, built of white marble. The base is 
50 fait square and 24 feet high, and the 
column is 164 feet in height. The whole 
structure rises to an elevation of over 280 
feet above tide-water. 



Battle Monnnient, Baltimore, 
Ufcl. — This Monument stands on Calvert 
street, between Fayette and Lexington 
streets. It was erected in honor of the 
memories of the heroes who fell at the bat- 
tle of North Point, September 12, 1814. 
The corner-stone was laid in 1S15, and 
the expenses were defrayed by individual 
subscription. 




STATE CAPITOL, COLUMBUS, O. 
11 



160 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OF THE CENTURY, 



1863. 

June O.-The United States Senate de- 
crees the abolition of slavery iu all the terri- 
tories of the Union. 

June Itt. — Fif;ht on James Island, near 
Charleston, S. C. Federals defeated. 

June 17. — Col. Fitch destroyed a Confed- 
erate battery at St. Charles, Arli. 125 were 
killed by an explosion on one of the Federal 
gunboats. 

June 18. — Usion troops occupied Cum- 
berland (i;\\t. 

June 5iO. — General Pope assigned to the 
command of the Army of Virginia. Com- 
mencement of the six days' tight before Rich- 
mond. The Confederates attacked ]\IcClellan's 
right wing- at Mechanicsville. Battle unde- 
cided. 

June 27. — Bombai'dment of Vicksbui-g 
commenced. Gen. Fremont relieved of his 
command. 

Battle before Richmond renewed; the Feder- 
als were driven back: loss heavy on both sides. 

White House evacuated by the Union troops. 

June 38. — Incessant fighting all day be- 
tween the right wing of the Union army on the 
Chickahominy, and the left wing of the Con- 
federates: the enemy were repulsed. In the 
evening the Unionists were ordered to fall 
back. 

June 3f>. — Battle before Richmond re- 
newed by an attack (m the Union forces at 
Peach Orchard: the Confederates were di-iven 
back, but late in the evening made another at- 
tack at Savage's Station. The fight continued 
antil nine at night. The wounded fell into the 
hands of the enemy. 

June »0.-Battle of White Oak Swamp; 
heavy loss on botli sides. 

July 1.— Battle of ilalvern Hill, and last 
of the Richmond battles. The Coufedei-ates 
were repulsed at every point. 

The Union loss during the six days' fighting 
before Richmond was 1,501 killed, 7,701 wf)und- 
ed and 5,958 missing. 

President Lincoln calls for 300,000 addition- 
al volunteers. 

July 11. --Gen. Halleck ap])ointed com- 
mander of all the land forces of the United 
States. 

July 13. — Fight at Murfreesboro, Tenn.: 
Union ti'oo])s surrendered. 

General Morgan captured Lebanon, Ken- 
tvicky, burned part of the town and robbed the 
bank. 

July 17. — President Lincoln sanctions a 
bill contiscating the i)ropertyand emancipating 
the slaves of all [)ers(ms wlio shall continue in 
arms against the Union for 60 daj's. 

•inly lO. --Severe skirmish at Memjihis, 
Tennessee; Union loss, 6 killed and 32 wound- 
ed. 

July 31.— John S. Phelps appointed mil- 
itary (iovernorof Arkansas. 

July 33. — The siege of Vicksburg aban- 
doned. 

July 88. — Confederates defeated at 
More's Hill, Mo. 

Aug:. 3.- -The Confederate General Jeff 
Thompson defeated near Mem])his, Tennessee. 

General Halleck ordered (Jen. McClellan to 
evacuate the Peninsula of Va. 



EvANSViLLE. — Continued. 



LEADING BUSINESS HOUSES, 

EVANS, E. M , iN?eat Market, i860. 
FREY, G., Brewer, 186^. 
LOWELL, J. C, Real Estate, 1S68. 
McGRAW, THOS., Roofer, 1876. 
MICHIGAN PATENT AGENCY, 1S59. 
REYNOLDS, JOHN, Printer, 1S76. 
SHURRAGER,F. L., Si^n Writer, 1870. 
SMITH, GEO. A., Gunsrnith, 1876. 
STEVENS, W. F. & CO., Ci^ar Boxes, 
1876. . ^ , 

TEALL, H. N., Merchant Tailor, 1872. 
WILSON, THOS. A., Attorney, 1866. 
WRIGI-IT, GEO. M., Painter, 1S69. 



BAY CITY, MICH. 

AECHITECTS, 

^nLEVERMTA? PRATT, 

Architect and Superintendent, 

OFFICE, 

Room No. 5, Bank Bl'g, Center St, 



ATTORNEYS AT LAW. 

COLLINS & STODDABI 

and Counselors, Watson block. 



HOLMES, COLLINS & STODDARD, Attorneys 
andC " '" " ■ ■ 

WILSON & WEADOCK, 

Attorneys, Counselors and Solicitors. 

Proctors in Admiralty, S and 4 Watson Block. 
BAEBERS, 

CORWINS, W. S., Barber Shop, 110 Water st. 
EstabU-hedl869. 

H. E. SUSAND & CO., 

CENTER ST. & 315 WATER ST., 
BAY CITY, AIICH. 

BOTTLING WORKS, _____ 

NETTi PAFrrENFELDERT 

Proprietors of the 

Bavarian Laier-Beer Bottling 

V^^ORKS, 
CORNER WATER & SEVENTH. 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OF THE CENTURY. 



161 



Bay City — Continued. 



BREWERY. 

BAY CITY BREWERY. 
C. E. YOUNG 

Celebrated Lager Beer. 

Cor. Water & Twenty-second Sts. 

CARRIAGE AND WAGON MANUEACTURERS, 

HANDBICKS &. M'DONALD, Carriage Makers 
and General Blacksmiths, Harrison & 33d sts. 

HEMBLING'S CARRIAGE WORKS. All kinds 
of BUGGIES AND CUTTERS made to 
order. 

Horseshoeing & Jobbing a Specialty. 

THIRD STREET. 

O'BUZEIT BROS., 
Wagon & Carriage Makers, 

AND 

Saginaw St., bet. 2nd & 3rd. 

Established 1873. 

DENTIST, 

MAXON, C. W., DentistT""^™^™^^'"^'^^^ 
Opera House block. 

DRUGGISTS, 

Established 1865. 

JOHNSON, LEWIS & CO., 

Dealers in Groceries & Provisions, Drugs & Medicines, 

Water st., bet. Thirtieth and Thirty-iirst sts. 

LORANGER & CHAPIN, 

IDH.TJC5-C3rISTS, 

211 Third street. Prescriptions carefully com- 
pounded, day or night. 



F 



FORCE PUMP MANUFACTURER, 

URMAN, L., Force Pump Manufacturer, Eighth 
and Water sts. Established 1876. 



GROCERIES^ 

ASHLEY, A. J., Groceries and Provisions, Wa- 
ter St., bet. 22d and asd sts. Est. 1873. 

D. BAUMGARTEN, 

Dealer in 

Staple and Fancy Groceries, 

Provisions, Foreign & Domestic Fruits, 
CENTER STREET, COR. ADAMS. 

GUNS AND SPORTING GOODS. 

BASCOM, H. C, Guns. Ammunition, Sporting 
Apparatus and Fishing Tackle. 



^ug;. 4. — The Secretary of War ordered 
a draft of 300,000 men. The Confederate ram 
Arkansas destroyed by her crew. 

Aug'. 5. --Gen. Robert McCook murdered 
by the Confederates while wounded and riding 
in an ambulance. The Confederate General J, 
C. Breckenridge made an unsuccessful attack 
on Baton Rouge, La. 

Aug;. 9. — Confederates under Gen. Jackson 
attack General Banks at Cedar Mountain. The 
contest was short but severe. General Banks 
held his position, while the enemy fell back 
two miles and did not renew the fight. 

Aug'. 16. — Gen. McClellan evacuated 
Harrison's Landing. 

Au^. lO. — Gen. "Wright placed in com- 
mand of the department of the Ohio. 

Aug'. 35. — Confederates made an unsuc- 
cessful attack on Fort Donelson. 

Aug-. 3©.— The Confederate General 
Ewell drove the Union troops from Manas- 
sas. 

Aug:. 39.— Battle of Gainsville or Grove- 
ton, Va. The Battle was opened by General 
Sigel early in the morning. Gens. Reno and 
Kearney arrived with reinforcements. The 
fight continued until 6 p. M., when the enemy 
retired. 

Au^. 30.— Battle of Richmond, Ky. Union 
troops under General Manson defeated, with a 
loss of about 200 killed, 700 wounded, and 2,000 
prisoners. Confederates defeated at Bolivar, 
Tenn. 

Aug-. 30.— Second battle of Bull Run. 
The Federal forces under General Pope de- 
feated. 

Sept. 1.— Fight at Britton's Lane, Tenn. 
Confederates retired, leaving their dead on the 
field. Union loss, 5 killed, 78 wounded, and 92 
missing. 

Fight at Chantilly, Va. The Union troops 
were commanded by Gens. Hooker, Reno and 
Kearney. The Confederates retired, leaving 
their dead and wounded on the field. This was 
the last fight in which General Pope's army 
was engaged. 

Sept. 3. — Gen. McClellan appomted to the 
command of the troops for the defense of 
Washington. 

Sept. 5.— Confederates began crossing the 
Potomac into Maryland. 

Sept. 7. — General Banks assigned to the 
command of the fortifications in and around 
Washington. General McClellan took the 
field at the head of the Army of the Poto- 
mac. 

Sept. 13.— Fight at Middletown, Mary- 
land. Union loss, 80 killed and wounded. 

Sept. l-l.- Gen. McClellan overtook the 
eneni}^ at South Mountain, Md. A general en- 
gagement took place. The fight was severe, 
and the loss heavy on both sides, the Unionists 
losing 443 killed and 1,806 wounded. Gen. 
Reno was among the killed. The Confederates 
retreated towards the Potomac. 

Sept. 15.— Harper's Ferrv surrendered 
after two days' fighting, to the enemv, with all 
the garrison, consisting of 8,000 men". 

Sept. ly.— Battle of Anteitam,Md. This 
battle was fought on Antietam creek, near 
Sharpsburg; it began early in the morning and 



162 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



HULMAN & COX, 

olesale Grocers 




— : AND :— 



LIQUOR DEALERS. 

TERRE HAUTE, IND. 



HERMAN HULMAX. 



CRAWFORD FAIRBANKS. 



Mwlman & Fmrhank^ 



DISTILLERS OF 



and Phoenix Bourbon and White Corn Whiskies, 

OFFICE : 

COR. MAIN AND FIFTH STREETS, 

TErSHE HAXJTE. 




J. SCHWEITZER, Pro. 

^^^Tsii Ilot.'l is iiiiA' anl elegantly farnisheJ throughout, and Is tirst-class ia every particular. 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OF THE CENTURY. 



163 




California State Building, Centennial Exposition, Philadelphia.— The building is rather 
different in structure from the other State Centennial buildings on the ground. It is constructed en- 
tirely of wood, with an oval roof surmounted with a dome. The interior of the building is sealed with 
^nished lumber from California, and inlaid with fancy colored woods from the same state, altogether 
making it present a very handsome appearance inside as well as outside. 




XOR.M.\L Sl HOOT , TERRE HAUTE. 



164 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



Bay City. — Continued. 



HOTELS, 

EVERETT HOUSE, A.J. Gilson, prop., Harri- 
son and Thii-ty-second sts. Est. 1875. 

]l\lm. Ferris & Son, Props, 

$1.50 PER DAY. 

602 WASHINGTON STREET. 

M — 



OULTON HOUSE, Peter Van Horn, prop.. 
Fourth and Saginaw sts. Establislied 1876. 



Portland House 

FRANK LEFEVRE, Prop., 

Cor. First & "Washington Sts. 

Travelers Stopping at tliis House will receive 
Courteous Attention. 

CHIIVDEHETTE HOUSE, John Schindehette, 
prop., Fourth and Saginaw sts. 

LIVERY STABLES, 

HANLIN, JOHN, Livery and Sale Stable, Fourth 
and Washington sts. Established 1870. 

MEAT MARKETS, 

-LO U I g ^^"^YchT" 

Wholesale and Retail Dealer in 

FRESH&8ALTED MEATS 

Particular Atteution Given to Supplying Boats. 
112 & 114 CENTER ST. 

GEO. W. MAXSFIELD, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealer in 




Mand ]m^^ Sal lei 

HAMS, SAUSAGES, ETC., 
Taylor and Rose Block. 

COR. T HIRD & W.4SHI>GT0> STS. 

FREd7 SIMON, 

Dealer in Fresh and Salted 

OF ALL KINDS. 

MANUFACTURER OF ALL KINDS OF SAUSAGES. 

Dried, Smoked, Spiced and Corned Beef 
constantly on hand. 

CENTER ST„ neit to tue Opera House Block. 



Bay City. — Conh'nued. 



PAINTERS. 

A. BAUMBACH k CO., 

Carriage, Sign & Ornamental 

PAINTERS, 

Cor. Eighth and Water Sts. 



PHOTOGRAPHER, 
r^OLBURN, E. J., Photographer, 



Griswold block. 



PLUMBERS AND GAS TITTERS. 

JOHTlrmNGERT"™" 

PLUMBER, GAS AMD STEAI FITTER 

COPPERSMITH, 

AND HEAVY SHEET IRON WORK, 

117 WATER STREET 

ULLIA'AN & FINN, Plumbers, Steam and Gas 
Fitters, Center st. 



S 



SAWS. 

williaSFward, 
Saw Kepairer & Furnisher 

All kinds of Mill Saws Gummed and Straight- 
ened, and made good as new. 
^Agent for American Saw Company— 
302 SOUTH "WATER ST. 

All Or.Iers promptly filled. When sending; Circular Saws, it is neces- 
sary to mark the Log Side of the Saw or send 
instructions in regard to it. 

TAILORS -MERCHANT. 

o^cta^ius^oucherT^^^ 

Custom Tailor. Fancy Jttyei- and Clotlies 
Cleaner, 

Water Street, opp. Grow Bros. 
W. E. TEALL, 

The Boss $5.00 Pants. 118 Water Street. 

E.4.LL, W. H., Merchant Tailoi, 

Harrison st-, bet. 33d and 34th sts. 

TOBACOO AND CIGARS. 

H. schindehetteT"^^ 

Dealer in Wines, Liquor, Ale, Lager, Pipes, To- 
bacco and Cigars, 
No. 115 ^Vater Street. 

Bay City, licli., Businuss Hoises. 

WHEN ESTABLISHED. 



BAUMBACH, A. & CO., Painters, 1877. 
BAUMGARTEN, D.. Groceries, 1869. 
BAY CITY BREWERY, 1872. 
BERTCH. LOUIS, Meat Market, 1868. 
MANSFIELD, GEO. W., Meat Market, 
1872. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



165 




POST OFFICE. MILWAUKEE. 



LOUIS L. HARTMANN. 



HENRY SUHK. 



HARTMANN tc SUHR, 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



CIGAR BOXES, 

Lalels, Edgings, Brands, 

LACES, TRIMMINGS, COLORED PAPER, &c. 



M ®1#^^ 



m^ mm)®i 



f) 



MILWrAUKEE^ 



IVISGONSIN. 



166 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OF THE CENTURY. 



1862. 

continued until evening. Armies each num- 
bering 100.000 men. During the night the Con- 
federates retreated, leaving 3,500 prisoners, 
39 stands of colors and 13 guns in the hands of 
the victors. The Union loss was 2,010 killed, 
9,416 wounded and 1,043 missing. Confeder- 
ate loss, 14,000. 

Cumberland Gap evacuated by the Federals. 

Sept. 18. — The Confederates recrossed 
tde Potomac into Virginia, having been in 
Maryland two weeks. Evacuated Harper's 
Ferry. 

Sept. lO. — Gen. Rosecrans commenced an 
attack on the Confederate forces at luka. Miss. 
Confederates evacuated the place during the 
night. The Union loss was 135 killed and 527 
wounded. 

Sept. 31. — Gen. McCook recaptured Mun- 
fordsville, Ky. 

President Lincoln's Emancipation Proclama- 
tion issued. 

Sept. 2.>. — Habeas corpus suspended by 
the United States Government. 

Sept. 37.— Fight at Augusta, Ky. The 
Union garrison 120 strong surrendered after a 
gallant defense. 

Sept. 30. — Gen. Nelson was shot by Gen. 
Jeff. C. Davis, at Louisville, Ky. 

Oct. ■*.— Battle of Corinth, Miss. The 
Confederates were defeated with heavy loss. 
The Union loss was 315 killed and 1,802 
wounded. 

Oct. 6. — Confederates attacked Gen. 
Palmer's brigade at Lavergne, Tenn., but were 
defeated. 

Oct. 8.— Battle of Perryville, Ky. The 
advance of Buell's army was attacked at Per- 
rj'ville, Ky., by a superior force of the enemy 
under Gens. Jackson and Terrel. The Con- 
federates retreated during the night. Union 
loss was over 3,000 killed and wounded. 

Oct. lO. — The [Confederate cavalry under 
Gen. Stuart entered Chambersburg, Pa., and 
captured a quantity of small arms and cloth- 
ing. 

Oct. 18.— The Confederate, Gen. Morgan, 
occupied Lexington, Kj'. 

Oct. 19. — The Confederate, Gen. Forrest, 
defeated near Gallatin, Tenn. 

Oct. 33. — Confederate salt works in Flor- 
ida destroyed. 

Gen. Blunt defeated the Confederates at 
Maysville, Ark., capturing all their artillery. 

Fight at Pocotaligo, S. C. 

Oct. 38. — Gen. Herron defeated the Con- 
federates near Fayettville, Ark. 

Oct. JSO. — Gen. Rosecrans assumed com- 
mand of the army of the Cumberland. 

Gen. Mitchell died at Port Royal, S. C. 

l^ov. 5. — Gen. McClellan relieved of the 
command of the army of the Potomac, and 
Gen. Burnside succeeds him. 

l^ov. 11. — Gen. Ransom defeated the Con- 
federates under Woodward, near Garretsburg, 
Ky. 

]^ov. 16. — President Lincoln enjoined on 
the United States forces the orderly observ- 
ance of the Sabbath. 

]^ov. 17. — A cavalry fight took pleace 
near Kingston, N. C. 



Bay City. — Continued. 



LEADING BUSINESS HOUSES, 

NETT & PARTE NFELDERT^ottling 

Works, 1874, 
O'BRIEN BROS., Carriage Makers, 1872. 
PORTLAND HOUSE, 18T4. 
PRATT, LEVERETT A., Arcliitect, 1872. 
SIMON, FRED., Meat Market, 1863. 
STYNINGER, JOHN, Plumber, 1870, 
WARD, William, saw Maker, 1863. 



WEST BAY CITY, NIICH. 

BILLIARD HALL AND RESTAURANT. 

JOHN GARy1toKEl7^ 

And Restaorant, 

Midland St., near Linn. 

CARRIAGE MAKERS. 

PAJOT, J. J. & CO., Carriage Makers and Black- 
smiths, River street. 

DRUGGISTS. 

AVIS, JOHN, Druggist, 

Linn street, West Bay City. 



D 



J. T. Travers, 

PRACTICAL 

DRUGGIST and CHEMIST, 

Cor. liinn and John Streets. 

A full line oi Drugs, Medicines and Toilet Arti- 
cles of every description always on hand. 

GROCERIES, 

DEALER IN 

Groceries and Provisions, 

Game, Oysters and Fresh Fish, 
TEAS A SPECIALTY. 

West Bay City. 



HOTEL. 



w 



ELLS HOUSE, 



A. Well6, Proprietor. 



LIVERY STABLES. 

Ijiivery Stable 

Fine Carriages. Rates reasonable. 
Stable: West Side of Linn Street. 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OF THE CENTURY. 



16T 



West Bay City. — Continued. 



LIVERY STABLES, 

Proprietor Green's Livery, Boarding and Sale 

Stable. First Class Horses and 

Carriages at all hours. 

Linn Street, Worth of Midland. 
MEAT MARKET. 

Wholesale and Retail Dealer in all kinds of 



s 



Lard, Sausages, etc., 



PAINTER. 

MITH, E. C, House and Sign Painter, 
Established. 1870. River Street. 



D 



PERFUMERY, 

AVIES, JOHN, Extracts and Toilet Articles. 
Linn Street. 



WATCHMAKER AND JEWELER. 
PRACTICAL 

Watchmaker & Jeweler, 

And Dealer in Watches, Clocks & Jewelry, 
Repairing promptly attended to. All work war- 
ranted. Terms cash. 
Linn Street, opposite Wells House. 

West Say City, Michigan, Business Kouses, 

WHEN ESTABLISHED. 



BEHMLANDER, J. A., Meat Market, 

1S73. 
DAVIS, JOHN, Druggist, 1S68. 
GREEN, R., Grocer, 1877. 
GREEN, W. M., Livery Stable, 1868. 
RICH, R. H., Liverv Stable, 1869. 
SWART, S., Jeweler, 1S69, 
TR AVERS, J. T., Druggist, 1876. 



EAST SAGINAW, MICH. 



V 



ARCHITECT. 

B "U b E 



Cor. Emerson and Franklin Sts., 

Plans furnished for Buildings of every descrip- 
tion, and satisfaction guaranteed. 



1863. 

Nov. 33. — All political State prisoner.s re- 
leased. 

Nov. 38.— Battle of Crane Hill, Ark. The 
Union army, numbering 1,000 men, was com- 
manded by Gen. Blunt. The Confederates 
were defeated with a heavy loss, and retreated 
to Van Buren. 

I>ec. O. — Gen. Banks' expedition sailed 
for New Orleans. 

I>ec. y. — Battle of Prarie Grove, Ark. 
The Union army was commanded by Gens. 
Blunt and Herron. The Confederates were de- 
feated with heavy loss and retired during the 
night. 

I>ec. 11. — The city of Fredrick sburg 
bombarded by the Union troops, under cover 
of which they crossed the Rappahannock. 

Dec. 13. — Battle of Fredericksburgh, Va. 
Confederate works were attacked by the Union 
troops in three divisions, under Sumner, 
Hooker and Franklin, who were repulsed. 
Federals lost 1,512 killed, 6,000 wounded and 
100 prisoners. 

Dec. W. — Gen. Banks superseded Gen. 
Bvitler at New Orleans. 

I>ec. IC — Gen. Burnside's army removed 
to the north side of the Rappahannock. Gen. 
Foster defeated the Confederates at White 
Hall, N. C. 

I>ec. ly. — The Union troops occupied 
Baton Rouge, La. 

Gen. Foster defeated the Confederates at 
Goldsboro, N. C, destroying the railroad 
bridge. 

l>ec. 19. — The Confederates recaptured 
Holly Springs, Miss., taking the garrison pris- 
oners. 

Dec. 33. — The Confederates repulsed by 
by Gen. Sigel at Dumphries, Va. 

Dec. 37. — Gen. Sherman attacked the ad- 
vance works of the enemy about 6 miles from 
Vicksburg, at the same the gunboats attacked 
the Confederate batteries on Haines' BluflF. 

Dec. 38. — Second attack on Vicksburg. 
The Federals drove the Confederates from the 
first and second lines of defense and advanced 
to within two and a half miles of Vicksburg. 

Gen. Blunt entered Van Buren, Ark., cap- 
turing four steamboats laden with provisions. 

Dec. 3».— The Confederates attacked 
Gen. Sherman with their whole force, and 
drove him back to the first line of defense. 

Dec. 31. — Battle of Mvu-freesboro, or 
Stone River. The Union army, numbering 
45,000 men under Gen. Rosecrans. Gen. 5Ic- 
Cook's division was driven back four miles and 
lost 26 guns, but reinforcements being sent 
from the left and centre, the enemy was in 
turn repulsed and the lost ground regained. 

West Virginia admitted into the Union as a 
State. 

Dentlitii iit tlie IT. S. in 1863.— Cor- 
nelius C. Felton, scholar and critic, President 
of Harvard University, aged 55 years. Theo- 
dore Frelinghuysen, statesman, aged 75 years. 
1863. 

Jan. 1. — Gen. Sullivan defeated the Con- 
federates under Van Dorn, at Hunt's Cross 
Roads, near Lexington, Tenn. The Union 
garrison and the steamer Harriet Lane cap- 
tured at Galveston, Texas. 



168 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 




ADVERTISEMENTS. 



169 




JTIENNA GARDEN 

RESTAURANT, 

S. "^27, Cor. Missouri Ave. <& IZ^alnut St. 

Meals can be had at all Hours. Travelers and Transient ^'isitors can find the Best ot 
entertainment here. Boarding by the Day or Week. 



§mM C'mmH- Mwiif WsiMsdgfgndigiurdgyMvQnlnff bf i Full M^sd, 



170 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OF THE CENTURY. 



1863. 

The Westfield destroyed to keep it from 
falling into the hands of the enemy. Commo- 
dore Renshaw perished with his vessel. 

President Lincoln publishes a proclamation 
confirming his manifesto of Sept. 22, 1862, and 
declares all the slaves in the Confederate 
States free, and under the military protection 
of the United States. 

Jan. 3.— Since the hard battle of Dec. 31, 
fighting had been going on between the two ar- 
mies at Murfrecsboro. On the night of Jan. .3, 
the rebels commenced their retreat. The fol- 
lowing is the official statement of the Union 
loss at the battle of Stone river: killed, 1,997, 
wounded, 6,425, and 3,550 missing. 


East Saginaw. — Continued. 


BAKER AND OONFEOTIONER. 

TAEISLER, A., Baker and Confectionery, Jeffer- 
\J son St., near Tuscola. Established 1873. 

BARBER, 

Rolbiiison's Barber Shop 

For Good and Quick Work at Reasonable 
Prices. 
ME KEEPS FIVE FIRST-CLASS WORK- 
MEN ALWAYS ON HAND. 

314 Genesee Ave. 


The Federal army withdrew from before 
Vicksburg. The Union loss in the second at- 
tack on Vicksburg was about 600 killed, 1,500 
wounded, and 1,000 missing. 

Jan. lO.— Battle of Arkansas Post. The 
attack was commenced Saturday night by the 
Mississippi squadron under Admiral Porter. 
On the following day, the Irnd forces under 
Gen. McClernand joined tn the fight, and be- 
fore night all the fortifications were taken. 
About 7,000 prisoners and a large quantity of 
ammunition was captured. The Union loss 
was about 200 killed and wounded. 

Jan. 20. — The Morning Light and Ve- 
locity, blockading Sabine City, Texas, were 
both captured by the Confederates. 

•Ian. 23. — Third attack on Vicksburg. 
After the capture of Ai'kansas Post, Gen. Mc- 
Clernard returned to Vicksburg and resumed 
the siege of that place. 

Jan. 38.— Gen. Burnside relieved of the 
command of the army of the Potomac, and 
Gen. Hooker appointed in his place. 

Gens. Sumner and Franklin relieved from 


BOOTS AND SHOES. 

]\/rEKGER, M., Dealer in Boots and Shoes, Jeffer- 
irJL son st., bet. Genesee & Tuscola. Est. '63. 

CARRIAGE MAKERS. 

TTOFF & BINGHAM, BLACKSMITHS AND 

Xl WAGON MAKERS, and Manufacturers of 

Hurd & Puller's Celebrated Centenuial 

Wagon, 

East Saginaw, Mich. Box 1100. 


TTOUGHTON, W. S., Carriage Maker, cor. Ger- 
JDL man and Franklin sts. Established 1871. 

COMMISSION MERCHANT, 

S P E N C E R B A RC L Ay7 

COMMISSION MERCHANT, 

PORK & BEEF PACKER, 

And Curer of Extra Sugar Cured Hams, 

204 & 206 NORTH WATER ST. 


duty in the army of the Potomac. 

Jan. 31.— The Confederate General Pry- 
or made an attack on the Union troops, under 
Gen. Peck, at Blackwator, Va. The Confeder- 
ates were repulsed. 

Felj. 2.— The Federal ram Queen of the 
West ran the blockade at Vicksburg, but 
was captured a few davs after by the Confed- 


DENTIST. 

TX7HITING, L. C, Dentist, 
VV 11 Hess block. 

DRUGGISTS, 

"DRUSKE, R.. Dealer in Drugs, Medicines, Per- 
Sj funiery, etc., Jefferson st. and Genesee ave. 


erates. 

r«'l>. 27. — The Confederate steamer Nash- 
ville, while attempting to run the blockade, got 
aground near Fort McAllister and was de- 
stroyed by the blockading fleet. 

March 7.— Gen. Minty attacked a Con- 
federate cavalry force at Unionville, Tenn., 
capturing their wagons, horses, and tents, and 
about 00 prisoners. 

j^Iarcli 9. — A band of Confederate caval- 
ry passed through the Lhiion lines, entered 
Fairfax, Va., and captured Gen. Stoughton 
and a few privates. 

Itlai'cli 17. — Two hundred cavalry under 
conmumd of Geneial Averill crossed the Rap- 
pahannock near Kelly's Ford, where but a sin- 
gle horseman could cross at once, and in the 
face of a most terrible fire from sharpshooters 
charged the Confederates in their entrench- 
ments, killing or capturing nearly the whole 
force. They then encountered Stuart's caval- 


"pvAA'IS, T. W., Drugs, Medicines, Perfumery 
J-J and Patent Medicines, S. Saginaw. 

M. B. Liddell. W. S. Jones. 

LIDDELL & JONES, 

nDr-u.g'g^ists, 

POTTER STREET, 

Opposite F. and P. M. Depot. 

NATIONAL DRU& STORE. 

G. 8. LEYERER, 

PROPRIETOR, 

Cor. Park and Lapeer Sts. 


Ty, and after a desperate hand-to-hand encoun- 
ter for five hours, routed them with great 
slaughter, capturing 80 prisoners. 
ITIarcIi 20.— John Morgan with 4,000 men 


DRY GOODS, 

/^'DONNELL, J., Dry Goods, Boots, Shoes, Hats, 
yj Caps, Groceries, Hardware, &c., S. Saginaw. 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OF THE CENTURY. 



171 



East Saginaw. — Continued. 
GROCERIES. 

PEl^R BAIJM^S 

drocery Store and Meat Market, 

Cor. Washington Ave. k Hoyt St. 

A full assortment of Choice Groceries and Fam- 
ily Supplies. Also all kinds of Fresh and Salt 
Meats constantly on hand, and for sale cheap for 
cash. Established 1870. 

' HARDWARE AND TINWARE, 

E. JOCHEN & BRO., Dealers in 

HARDWARE, TINWARE & STOVES 

Mnf'rs of Tin, Copper and Sheet Iron Ware, 

S. SAGINAW. 



D 



HORSESHOERS. 

OLLIVER, C. A., Practical Horseshoer, Frank- 
lin and German sts. Established 1867. 



MOXLET, E., PRACTICAL AND FANCY 
HORSESHOER, corner of Cass and Ger- 
man sts. I received 

TB.E FIRST PRE3ITUM FOR THE BEST 

SHOD HORSE A^T THE MICHIGAN 

STATE FAIR. Established 1873. 

HOTELS, 

S¥BMJS 

LEV/ B. CLARK, 

PROPRIETOR. 
$3.00 PER DAY. 

EAST SAGINAW, MICH. 

LLOYD HOOSE. 

NEWKIRK &, LLOYD, Prop's, 



LAUNDRY, 

ROBERT SMITH, 

JEFFERSON ST., 

Between Genesee Ave. and Tuscola Sts., 

£ast Saginaw, - - Mich, 



B 



MEAT MARKETS, 

AUM, W. Y., Dealer in all kinds of Fresh 
"'eats, Genesee and Webster sts. 



JACOB MEIER, 

Dealer in 

FRESH & SALT MEATS, 

And Manufacturer of 
Pork, Ham, Frankfort, L,iver and 

408 GENESEE AVE. 



1N03. 

was totally defeated near Milton, Tenn., by 
Col. Hall with 1,400 mounted men. 

The negro brigade took Jack.sonville, Flor- 
ida. 

Major General Burnside appointed to com- 
mand the department of the Oliio. 

l^lsii'cli 23.- -Confederates under Clark 
captured Mt. Sterling, Ky. 

April 6.— Gen. ilitchell, with .300 cavalry, 
dashed into a Confederate camp near Xashville, 
on a sabre charge, capturing o, killing lo, and 
capturing all their tents, arms, horses, and 
equipments. 

April 7. — Attack on Charleston. The 
Federal fleet was composed of nine iron-clad 
vessels under the command of Commodore 
Dupont. The fight began in the afternoon of 
April 7, and lasted about two hours. The 
Keokuk was so badly damaged that she sunk 
in a few hours. Several other vessels were 
temporarily disabled. The fleet was then 
withdrawn. 

April lO.— Gen. Van Dorn's forces at- 
tacked Gen. Granger at Franklin, Tenn., and 
were driven back with loss. 

April 17.— Gen. Banks' command left Ba- 
ton Rouge, fought three battles, two on land 
and one on Grand Lake, capturing 2,000 prison- 
ers. Our loss was 700. 

Six vessels of Porter's fleet ran by the Con- 
federate batteries at Vicksburg. 

April 18. — Fayetteville, Ark., attacked 
by 3,000 Confederates with four pieces of ar- 
tillery; Union forces numbered but 2,000. The 
Confederates were repulsed. Our loss was 5 
killed and 17 wounded. 

April 33. — The ram. Queen of the West, 
was captured in Grand Lake with Capt. Fuller 
and all her officers and crew, numbering 90. 

April 30. — Col. Mulligan repulsed by the 
Confederates at Fairmont, West Va., and the 
B. ct 0. R. R. bridges blown up at Fairmont 
and Cheat river. 

Miiy 1. — Gen. Carter w-ith 5,000 men at- 
tacked the Confederate forces at Monticello, 
under Pegram, driving them from the field. 

Battle of Port Gibson, Gen. Grant defeated 
Gen. Bowen, with a loss of 1,550 men and 5 
pieces of artillery. 

Ulay 2. — On the morning of the 17th of 
April. 1863, the 6th and 7th Illinois cavalry, 
900 strong, under command of Col. Grierson, 
of the 6th Illinois, set out from Lagrange, 
Tenn., marched through the center of Missis- 
sippi, destroying as they went railroads, 
bridges and stores of all kinds belonging to 
the Confederates, in immense quantities. 
They reached Baton Rouge, La., on the even- 
ing of the 2nd of May. They had traveled 
nearly 800 miles in 16 days. At several points 
the enemy made great attempts to capture 
them, but' failed. They brought into Baton 
Rouge over 1,000 horses and a large number of 
cattle; 500 negroes followed them. 

yiay 3.— Battle of Fredericksburg. The 
second attempt to capture the Confederate for- 
tifications at Fredericksburg, Va., was made 
by the army of the Potomac under Gen. 
Hooker, and failed. Severe skirmishing took 
place on Friday and Saturday, May 1 and 2, 
but the main battle was fought on Sunday, 
May 3, resulting in the defeat of the Federal 
troops. In the meantime Gen. Sedgwick had 



172 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



East Saginaw. — Contijiued. 



PAINTERS. 



DOBSON & HARTZELL. Painters, Kalsomining, 
Graining. Glazing, Paper-hanging, etc., etc., 
130 Cass St. 

PIANO-FORTE PEDAL ATTACHMENT, 

"^Piano-Forte Peflal AttacMneiit, 

L. 0. WHITING, Sole Prop., 

— — 
This enables children to ui^e the Piano Pedal 
with the same ease and facility as grown persons. 

PHOTOGRAPHERS. 

^ GOODRIDGE BROS^ 

Practical, Aiew J^ General Business 

PHOTOGRAPHER:; 



Largest First-Floor Gallery in the State. 

Established 1863. 

MACOMBER, A. D., Boston Gem Gallery, 316 
Genesee st. Established 1873. 

PHYSICIAN, 

SFsloSImMEWRHmAffsE 

This medicine is undoubtedly one of the most 
valuable discoveries of the age. Having been a 
sufferer for ten vears with that most distressing 
of all diseases, RHEUMATISM, which baffled all 
the efforts of the most skillful physicians, and af- 
ter using many remedies, and spending hundreds 
of dollars without the least benefit, I at last con- 
cluded that as I had some botanical knowledge, 
I would try and see if I could not find a remedy 
somewhere in nature's vast garden, in which I be- 
lieve there is a remedy for every disease that man 
is heir to. After many experiments, and many 
failures, at last success crowned my efforts; I 
found the cure for which I had so long been 
searching. After using this remedy I was restored 
from a deformed cripple on crutches to perfect 
health. Since then nearly seventeen years have 
passed, and I have known no such thing as Rheu- 
matism. I have furnished this remedy in hun- 
dreds of cases since my own cure, and not one has 
failed to receive a cure that have used the medi- 
cine according to directions. I do not blame the 
public for being skeptical about medical adver- 
tisements in general, but would say to all those 
who are afflicted with Rheumatism, no matter in 
what form, you can be soundly cured. If you 
want testimonials I can furnish the address of re- 
liable parties who are ready and willing to testify 
to the truths contained in this card. This medi- 
cine is to be had only of 
W. B. (jRESS, 129 N. Washington St., East Saginaw, Mich. 

PLUMBERS. 

CANNON, J. C. & CO., Plumbers, Gas and Steam 
Fitters, Cass St., bet. Genesee and German. 

SHIRT MANUFACTURER. 

DEYO, A. H., Manf'r of French Yoke Dress and 
Night Shirts, Collars, Cuffs, etc, Washing- 
ton St. 



East Saginaw. — Contimied. 
____ STOVES AND TINWARE. 

john"el?weki\ 

STOVES, TINWABE, 

Galvanized Iron Cornices, Eoofing, 

Spouting and all kinds of Job Work done to 
order. 

GENESEE & WEBSTER STS. 

TAILORS, MERCHANT. 

BOERGERT & KOSANKE. Merchant TailorsTjef- 
fersou St. Established 187-3. 

h. heinlein, 
3j:ekcii^v>t tailok, 

305 LAPEER ST. 

CHARLES MATTHAEY, 

MERCHANT TAILOR, 

On Tuscola St,, bet. Franklin k Cass Sts. 

ALl. KIJSUS OF OEXTLEMEN'S CLOXS 
CUT AND 3IADE TO ORDER. 

Also Ladies' Sacks and Cloaks cut and made to 
order by the Latest Style. 

ELGIN, KASPAR, Tailor. Imported and Do- 
mestic Cloths, Cassimeres and Vestings. 

UPHOLSTERER. 

Charles Fuerslenau, 



And Manufacturer Lambrequins. 

Upholster AVork, Curtain Hanging and 

Carpet Laying of all kinds done to order. 

Robinson Block, Genesee Ave. 



B 



WATCHMAKER AND JEWELER, 

ROWN, GEORGE, Watchmaker and Jeweler, 
Jetterson St., near Genesee. 



wines, beer and liquors, 
IiTI^einleinT™'^ 

Billiard Hall and Bowling Alley, 307 Lapeer St. 

'BRIEN, M., Wholesale and Retail Dealer in 
Wines, Liquors and Cigars, 103 Cass st. 

East Saginaw, licli., Business Honses 

WHEX £!!!iTABIiIISH£I>. 

BUDE, V , Architect, 1850. 
DEYO, A. H., Shirt Manufacturer, 1S67. 
GRESS, W. B., Rheumatism Cure, 1S60. 
LEYERER, G. S., Druggist, 1875. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



173 




State Capitol, Madison, "Wis.— The building is a beautiful stone structure 
standing on an eminence 70 feet above the level of the lakes, in the centre of a public park 
of 14 acres, and contains the very valuable State Historical Library, the State Library, and 
collections of the Academy of Science, Arts and Letters. (Its cost was $500,000.) 

S.L.SHELDON, 

DEALER IN 

Meadow King Mowers, 

LEADER AND LITTLE CHIEFTAIN REAPERS, 
All Standard Threshing Machines, 



SULKY RAKES 



-AND ALL KINDS OF- 






tmmmw 

XiZJLSZSOXT, -SrZSCOXTSZXT. 



174 



IMHORTANT EVENTS OF A CENTURY. 



1863. 

crossed the Rappahannock and occupied Fred- 
ericksburg. He too was defeated and com- 
pelled to retire to the northern bank of the 
river. Hooker's army recrossed the river on 
the night of May 5. The loss on each side 
was about 15,000 killed, wounded and prison- 
ers. "Stonewall" Jackson mortallv wounded. 

While the fight was going on near Freder- 
icksburg, Gen. Stoneman, with a large cavalrv 
force, crossed the Rapidan east of Orang'e 
Court House, and made a bold and partially 
successful raid into the enemy's country. 

Wlay 8.— Col. Streight's command of 1,700 
Bien captured by Forrest's cavalrv, two miles 
from Cedar Bluff, Ga., after severe" fighting. 

The Confederate general, Van Dorn, killed 
by Dr. Peters in Manny county, Tenn. 

May 9.— Col. Jacobs routed a guerrilla 
force near Horse Shoe Bend on the Cumber- 
land river. 

May lO.— The Confederate general, 
Stonewall (;Thos. J.) Jackson, died at Rich- 
mond, Va., of wounds and pnuemonia. 

May 13.— Gen. McPherson attacked Ray- 
mond, Miss., and took the town after a hard 
fight. 

May 13.— Grant defeated Joseph F. John- 
ston and captured Jackson, Miss., with 7 can- 
non and large quantities of niilitarv stores, 
besides 400 prisoners. The State capitol was 
destroyed by fire. 

May 15 — Battle of Baker's Creek, Miss. 
The Confederate army under Gen. Pemberton. 
and the_ Union forces under Gen. Grant, 
About 25,000 men were engaged upon each 
side. The Confederates met with a disastrous 
defeat, losing 2,600 in killed and wounded, 
2,00 men prisoners, and 29 pieces of artillerv. 

May 17.— Battle of Big Black River. 
Grant agam attacked Pomberton, and defeated 
hmi with a total loss of 2,600 men and 17 can- 
non. 

May 18.— Investment of Vicksburg bv 
the Federals under Gen. Grant and Admiral 
Porter. 

May 35.— Confederate navy yard de- 
stroyed at Yazoo City. 

May 27.— Gen. Banks commences the 
siege of the forts at Po^■t Hudson, Miss. 

Jiiue 1.— Gen. Hunter removed from the 
command of the dejiartment of the Soutli. 
Gen. Gilinore succeeds him. 

June 11 — Forrest, with 5,000 cavalrv 
and two batteries •f artillery, attacked the 
Union cavalry at Triune, Teiin., under com- 
mand of Col. R. B. Mitchell. The Confeder- 
eiat.'s were defeated. 

JTanc 14.— Gen. Ewell defeated Gen. 
Jlilroy at Winchester, Va.. with a loss of 2.0UU 
men, and drove him to Harper's Ferrv. 

•Sane 17.— The ram Atlanta captured off 
the coast of South Carolina, after a brief fight, 
by the Weehawken, commanded by Capt. John 
Rodgers. 

A division of our cavalrv under Col. Kil- 
patrick encountered Gen. Fitzhugh Lee's cav- 
alry brigade near Aldie, Va., and a desperate 
hand-to-hand encounter followed, endino- in a 
hasty retreat of the Confederate forces; 100 
prisoners were captui-ed. 

Jftine 31.- Gen. McClernard removed bv 
Grant, and Gen Ord succeeds him. 



SAGINAW CITY, MICH. 

ARCHITECT. 
FRED W. HOLLISTER, 

Office, Jerome Block, Court St. Est. 1869. 



ATTORNEYS AT LAW. 

4.RK, 'JVM. A., Law and Collection Office, 
Newell block. 

OOD, N. S., Attorney at Law and Solicitor 
in Chancery, Court st. 



N 



BAZAAR, 

EW YORK NINETY-NINE CENT BAZAAR, T. 

Goldsmith, prop., Wisner block. 



BOOKBINDERS. 

fTbusch &^6T 

Plain and Fancy 

BOOKBINDSRS 

— AND— 

BLASK BOOK MANUFACTURERS, 

E. C. Newell's Block, 

Bet. Court and Adams. 
CARRIAGE MANUFACTORY, 



WM. D. LEWIS, 
Carriage 3Ianultictory, 

New Work, Light and Heavy, made to 
order. Repairing done promptly. 

DENTISTS, 

Beech Block, Court St., 

Bet. Hamilton and Washington Streets. 

MORGAN, W. P., D.M.D., Dentist, Washington 
St., near Court. Established 1871. 

druggists! 

^' WILLfAM^MOLL, 

Dealer in 

Drugs, Medicines Perfumery 

Pure Wines and Liquors for Medicinal LTses. 

Cor. of Court & Hamilton Sts. 

Branch Store cor. of Washington St. Si Cros.s Road. 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OF THE CENTURY. 



175 



Saginaw City — Continued. 



DRUGQISTS. 



Dealer in 



Drugs, Medicines, Cliemicals, 

PEErUMERT & PATENT MEDICINES, 
HAMILTON STREET. 

JA.Y SMITH, 

Dealer in 

Drugs^ Medicines 

PAINTS, OILS, 

Pure Wines and Liquors for Medicinal Use. 



HARNESS, SADDLES, TRUNKS, ETC. 



PFERGELT, PH., Harness, Saddles, Trunks, 
Collars, etc., Ha milton and Cross sts. 

ICHARDSON, J. W., Harness, Saddles, Bridles, 
Whips, Collars, etc., Hamilton st. 

HORSESHOER AND BLACKSMITH. 

URTUBISE, ALEX., Champion Horseshoer, 
& Blacksmith, cor. Hamilton & Mackinaw. 



O 



H 



LIVERY STABLES. 

ARTIN, J. S., Livery and Sale Stables, Adams 
St., bet. Washington and Hamilton sts. 

LOG INSPECTOR. 



M 



YANCE, H., Log Inspector, Court St., bet. Ham- 
ilton and Washington sts. 



SAfilMf, MICH, BUSINESS HOUSES 

WHExNT ESTABLISHED. 



HURTUBISE, ALEX., Horseshoer, 1872. 

LEWIS, WM. D., Ca' riage Manufacturer, 
1869. 

MOLL, WM., Druggist, 1863. 

OPFERGELT, PH., Harness and Sad- 
dles, 1S62. 

RINGLER, E., Druggist, 1S67. 

SMITH, J., Druggist, i8c;2. 



RICHMOND, IND. 



AaRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS. 

MITCHELL, W. M., with Briggs & CoZ " 

Richmond, Ind. 

ATTORNEYS AT LAW. 

CHIPMAN, D. C, Attorney at Law and Notary 
Public, Rooms 2 &4 Odd Fellow's Bldg. 

FOX, H. C, Attorney at Law, 
2?6 Main st. 
12 



1863. 

June 33.— Battle of Big Black River, 
Missouri. Confederates under Johnston at- 
tacked Osterhaus' division and were defeated 
with great slaughter. 

•I line 3<>. — Another fight at Liberty Gap. 

between a Confederate division under Clay- 
borne, and Willicli, Wilder and Carter's bri- 
gades- The Confederates fled in disorder. 

June 2fi.— Rear Admiral Foote died in 
New York City. 

•June 3S>. — Gen. Hooker was relieved of 
his Command of the army of the Potomac at 
his own request, and Geu. Meade succeeded 
him. 

•Vuly 1. — Battle of Gettysburg, Penn. 
Gen. Meade attacked the Confederates near 
Gettysburg, and after a three days' battle 
drove them from the field, leaving 6,000 killed 
and wounded in our hands. Meade took 20,000 
prisoners. ^laj. Gen. Reynolds, commanding 
the first corps of the Union army, was killed. 

Missouri passed the Ordinance of Emanci- 
pation. 

Rosecrans drove Bragg from TuUahoma. 

•Inly -4. — Gen. Prentice defeated the Con- 
federates under Holmes, at Helena, Ark. 

The siege of Vicksburg by the Union army 
under Gen. Grant commenced May 18th and 
was pressed forward with vigor entil July 4th, 
when Pemberton surredered to Gen. Grant 27,- 
000 prisoners, 132 cannon and 50,000 stand of 
arms. 

July S. — In the month of May Gen. Banks 
invested Port Hudson. Two grand attacks 
were made by land and water on the 27th of 
May and 14th of June, in which portions of the 
enemy's works were taken. At last, on the 
8th of July, the commander. Major General 
Gardiner, surrendered with 7,000 prisoners, 60 
cannon, and 10,000 stands of arms to General 
Banks. 

Morgan's raid into Indiana and Ohio; crossed 
the river into Harrison county, Ind., and 
marched rapidly through the southern part of 
the State into Ohio, committing numerous 
depredations. On the 18th he iost his artillery 
and 1,300 prisoners. With a mere fragment of 
his command he retreated to Columbiana 
county, Ohio, where on the 20th he sur- 
rendered to Gen. Shackleford. 

July 13-16. — Riots take place in New 
York, Boston, and other Union cities, in con- 
sequence of the enforcement of a conscription 
decree. 

July 13, 14, IS. — Draft riots in New 
York city. Mobs had possession of the city 
for three days. Offices where the draft was 
going on were demolished, and the buildings 
were burned. The mob directed their fury par- 
ticularly against negroes, several of whom 
were murdered. The colored orphan asylum on 
Fifth Avenue was pillaged and burnt down. Col- 
lisions between the mob and military fre- 
quently occurred. Many persons were killed 
during the prevalence of the riot. The city 
paid above .'^1,500,000 as indemnity for losses 
that occurred during the riot. 

July 17. — Gen Sherman attacked Jack- 
son, Miss., routed Johnston and occu])ied the 
city. Large stores were captured, and also 40 
locomotives, and all the rolling stock of three 
railroads. Gen. Ransom captured Natchez 
with a large quantity of ammunition, 13 cai.« 



176 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



INVALID BEDSTEAD 




1 II l!i 



}WM ®P 



I® 



This bedstead is now being manufactured in St. Louis, where its intrinsic 
merits are recognized, and its superiority over any other invention of the kind 
is attested by eminent medical gentlemen who have witnessed its operation. 

By means of a small crank, which can be easily worked by any attendant, 
the patient can be placed in numerous positions without manual assistance. 
He can be turned in bed, have his sheets changed, his mattress removed and 
turned over, be placed upon a stool chair, and have his body inclined in what- 
ever posture he may desire. 

A light table, 3 feet 3 inches in length by 15 in breadth, is readily attached 
to the frame, enabling the patient to eat his food in the same posture as if in 
health, and by the turn of a small screw it can be converted into a writing- 
table or reading desk, upon which book or pamphlet can be read without tha 
discomfort of having to hold it. 

In fine, without the removal of the patient or the slightest discomfort to 
himself, the bed can be formed into a Lounge, Ordinary Chair, 
Slool Chair, or Fracture Bed, and by raising and setting aside the 
frame, which requires but a moment, it can be used as an ordinary bedstead. 

Prices range from $40.00 upward, according to style, and fin- 
ish of bed. Send for Circular. 

S. L. & J. C. NIDELET & CO., 

927 N. 5th St., iSt. Louis, Mo. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 




178 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



Established 1856. 



Established 1S6G. 



R. N.HERSHFIELD 

Successor to Hershfield & Mitchell. 



c^ 



t«J If^^f 




KMiiifactffli Jfif filer 




AXn JOBISER OF 

p, ' WATCHES, CLOCKS, MATERIALS, ETC. 

b^ LEAVENWORTH. - KANSAS 



Richmond — Continued. 



ATTORNEYS AT LAW, 

HARRIS, F. B., Counselor and Attorney at Law. 
Est. 1874, 225 Main ijt. 

POPP, JOHN H., Attorney and Notary Public, 
Richmond, Ind. 

TOH3iT c. ■\xri3:xTisi^3-E;, 
Attorney at Law and Notary PuTdHc, 

Office, Fifth & Main sts. 
References: Second National Bank, Richmond; 
■Gaar. Scott&Co. , Eichmond. 

________ ^^BAKERIES. 

BELLil«ffiR7ciffifi3ESrSouthlth'7t^ 
No. 93 

D. J. Hoeriier's 

Pearl Street 



R ICHMO ND — Continued. 



^XIW 



13 S. Pearl St. 
Established ISSg. 

MASON, JOHN, Bakery & Confectionery, 
166 Main st. 

ZELLER & CO., Steam Cracker Bakery, 
.357 & 359 Main st, 



F 



BANK, 

IRST NATIONAL BANK, J. F. Reeves, Cashier, 
Main & Franklin sts. 



BARBERS, 

BURROWS, G. W., Shavins Saloon, 
218 Ft. Wayne ave. 

Warren N. Carter, 

SHAVING AND HAIR-DRESSING PARLORS, 

Dealer in Choicest Cigars, 

265 Main St, 

SCHRAMM &. CO., Fashionable Haii-dre«seis, 
Saloon, Huntington House block. 



s 



TAUBER, ALBERT, Shaving & Hairdressing Sa- 
loon, 301 Main st. 



^^^LACKSMITHS AND HORSESHOERS. 

B ARTEL, C. A., Horseshoeing & General Joh 
Work, 43 -*. Marion st. 



BLACKSMITHS AND HORSESHQERS, 

Tie CHAMPION SHOffld SHOP 

Of Indiana. 

Diseased Feet and Track Slioein^ a 
Specialty. 

II NORTH 6th ST. 



T 



HOMAS & GORMON, Pioneer Shoeing Shop, 

lis. Fifth st, 



VETERAN SHOEING SHOP. 

Rentschler & Nischwitz, 
BLACKSMITHING, SHOEING AND GENERAL 

22 NORTH MARION STREET. 

BOILER WORKS, 

FULTON BOILER WORKS, Jerry Cowbig, Pro- 
prietor, Est. 1876, North Union Depot. 

BOOKS AND STATIONERY. 
J. H. MOORHAlSfX, 



WALL PAPER, ETC., ETC., 

ALso dealer iu 

Groceries and Provisions, 

236 & 238 MAIN ST. 
BOOTS AND SHOES, 



ABLEY, EDWARD, Manuf'r and dealer in Boots 
& Shoes, Wain st., second door from eightli. 

CUNINGHAM, J. A., Dealer in Fine Boots and 
bhoes, est. 1865, 241 Main st 

FRANK TAYLOR & CO., 
Manufacturers and dealers in 

260 MAIN ST. 

NOLTE &, OUATZ, Maufs and dealers in Boots 
& Shoes, 234 Main st. 

SCHELL, HENRY, Manufacturer of Boots and 
shoes, 199 Ft. Wayne ave 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



179 




Kansas and Colorado IState Bnilding:, Centennial Exposition, 
Philadelphia — Occupies a plot of ground 133 by 132 feet. The building is an orna- 
mental cottage, with a large circular hall in the centre. Commodious apartments radiate 
in tour directions from the central room, with numerous large private offices at their 
intersections. 



JOHN K, KANKIN, Cashier. 



p 



ENOCH HOAG, President. 

Lawrence Savings Bank 

No. 52 Massachusetts Sts,, 

Laivrence, Kansas. 

G-eneral Banking and Savings Institution. 

To:E3:i<r id. lEzisro^r dc co., 

TOPEKA, KANSAS. 

Do a General Banking Business. Interest paid on time Deposits, from 6 to 8 per cent,, according to 
time. Collections made and remitted promptly. Money loaned on Real Estate security at 10 per cent. 
Semi-annual interest, without cost to the lender. School, Township, and other 10 per cent Bonds for 
sale. Some good lands and farms for sale. Taxes paid for non-residents. Correspondence solicited, 
and satisfaction guaranteed. 

MILLER'S RESTAURANT, 

211 ComineFcial Street, 

(Opposite OTIS HOUSE.) 

ATCHISON, KA.NSAS. 

Meals, 35 cents; liOdgings, 50 cents; Transient, $1.50 per day> 



180 



IMPORTANT EVENTS ('¥ THE CENTURY. 



1S63. 

non, 2,000 head of cattle, and 4,000 hogsheads 
of sugar. A severe fight occurred on Elk 
Creek, Ark., between Gen. Blunt and the 
Confederate Gen. Cooper: the former was vic- 
torious. Union loss 40, that of the Confeder- 
ates 184. 

•July S3. — Col. Wilder of Rosecrans' ad- 
vance shelled Chattanooga. Brashear City, La., 
recaptured by the Union gunboat Sachem. 

•luly 33. — A gallant fight occurred near 
Manassas Gap, in which 800 men of Gen. 
Spinola's brigade utterly routed twice their 
number of Georgia and North Carolina troops 
with 17 cannon. 

Kentucky again invaded. Kit Carson with a 
part of the first New Mexico regiment defeated 
the Navajoe Indians in a severe fight bevond 
Fort Canby. 

July 31. — The Union forces in Kentucky, 
under fJol. Saunders, thoroughly routed the 
Confederate troops under Scott and Pegram. 
Martial law in Kentucky. 

Au^. 3. — A severe though indecisive 
cavalry fight occurred at Culpepper, Va., be- 
tween Buford and Stuart, in which 100 prison- 
ers were capturod by the Union troops. 

Aug*. 7. — President Lincoln rejects the de- 
mand for the suppression of the conscription 
in the State of New York. 

Aug. ir.— Lieut. Col. Phillips of the 9th 
Illinois Mounted Infantry attacked the Con- 
federate forces at Grenada, Miss., consisting 
of 2,000 men under command of Gen. Slimmer, 
and drove them from the place. He then de- 
stroyed all the ordnance and commissary stores, 
burnt the dejiot and machine shop, tore up the 
railroad track, and destroyed 67 locomotives 
and more than 400 cars. 

Aug. 30. — The town of Lawrence, Kan- 
sas, was surprised in the middle of the night 
by 300 guerrillas under the leadership of 
Quantrell. The town 'was set on fire and 182 
buildings burned to the ground, and .12,000,000 
worth of property destroyed. 191 persons 
were killed, many of whom were helpless wo- 
men and children; 581 were wounded, many of 
them mortally. About 80 of the murderers 
were killed. 

Aug. 33. — Gen. Blunt with 4,500 men at- 
tacked Gen. Cooper with 11,000 Confederate 
troops in the Indian Territory and compelled 
him to retreat to Red River. 

Aug. 30. — The Confederate army in Ar- 
kansas under General Price severely pushed 
by the Union forces under Gen. Steele. 

Sept. 1. — Gen. Blunt defeated the Confed- 
erate forces in Arkansas under Cooper and Co- 
bell, and captured Fort Smith. The Confeder- 
ates evacuate Little Rock. 

Sept. 4:. — Burnside occupied Knoxville, 
Tenn., and was hailed with delight by the in- 
habitants. 

Sept- 9. — General Crittenden's division of 
Rosecrans' army entered Chattanooga. 

Sept. lO. — Gen. Bnrnside cajjtured Cum- 
berland Gap with 2,000 prisoners, and 14 pieces 
of artillery under command of Major General 
Frazer. Gen. Steele took possession of Little 
Rock, Ark. 

Sept. 15. — President Lincoln suspends 
the Habeas Corpus act. 

Sept. 19. — Chickamauga. The battle 



Richmond — Coritinued. 



BREWERY, 



mil \\vm 

Casli Paid. For* Barley. 

CARRIAGE MANUFACTURERS. 

LiTRATTAN-, S. S., Carriages, 

k5 158 & 160 Ft. Wayne ave. 

We beg to inform you that we have opened a 

on South Fifth street, where we are prepared to 
build 

FIRST-CLASS CARRIAGES. 

All kinds of repairing done promptly. 

P. SCHNEIDFR&CO., 

10 & 12 S. 5th St. 

CHINA. GLASS AND CROCKERY. 

Established 1873. 

^X7"li.olesa.ls and. 22.eta.il 



French China, Glissware, Lamps, Chandeliers, 

Table Cutlery, Silver-plated Ware, Shelf Orna- 
ments, &c., 
277 MAIN STREET. 



S 



CONFECTIONERS, 

AUER, J. A., Cigar and Fruit Stand, 

Cor. 5th & Main sts. 



V 



AN SANT, R. R., Manufacturing Confectioner, 

23 N. 5th St. 



CONTRACTORS AND BUILDERS. 

KIDDER & BEETLE, Contractors and Builders- 
11th & Sassafras sts. 



CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC. 



I 






Wj 



v-v 



Musical instruction in all branches of Vocal 

and Instrumental Music. 
Send for Circular. 

AUGUST RHU, Director. 



DENTIST, 
TAT, J. W., Dentist, 



300 Main st 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OF THE CP:NTURY. 



181 



Richmond — Continued. 



DINING BOOMS. 




■JGi Main st., next door to Quaker City Bakery, 

Z. E. HINSHAW, Proprietor. 

Warm Meals at all Hoars. Gall and see Me. 

" DRTJaaiSTS. 

BOPPAET, A., Druggist, 
365 Main st. 

MULLER, B., Druggist, 
Est. 1866, cor. Main & Marion sts. 

ROSS, W. H., Druggist & Apothecarv, 
314 Main st. 



iS6:t. 



U 



DYERS AND SCOURERS. 

NDE, AUGUST, Steam Dyer, 

West of National Bridge. Est. 1861. 



EXPRESS 00. 

HYATT, D. P., Agent for United States Express 
Co., 305 Main st. 



B 



FANCY GOODS AND NOTIONS. 

ARTEL & SCHAEFER, Wholesale & retail deal- 
ers in Notions, 243 Main st. Est. 1877. 



D 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

OUGAN, I. G., Chief Fire Department, Rich- 
mond, Ind. 



FLOUR, FEED AND GRAIN. 

ILKS, G. R., Feed Store & Mills, dealer in 
Flour, Grain, Hay, &c., 10 N. 5th st. 



D 



GRIFFITH, JOHN, Est. 1875, Flour & Feed, 
175 Ft. Wayne ave . 

FLOUR, FEED AND GRAIN. 



S 



CHWEGMAN, CHRIS., Flour and Feed, 

141 S. Front st. Established 1876. 



FURNITURE. 

F.WEI^&SON, 

MANUFACTUREKS OF 

Glairs ai all kiliils of Fnrnitnre, 

163 IS. HARION ST. 

A large stock of well-made Chairs and Furniture 
of all kinds at the lowest prices. 



V 



GRAIN ELEVATOR. 

AN FRANK, H. M., Proprietor Depot Grain 
Elevator, Richmond, Ind. 



GROCERIES. 

CUTTER, HENRY, Groceries, Flour, Feed, Sugar, 
Cured Hams, &c.. Front and Mill sts. 

DOUGAN, GEO. B., Grocer, 
197 Fort Wayne Ave. 



was commenced by Gen. Bragg in the morning 
and continued all day. At night both armies 
occupied nearly the same position that they 
did in the morning. On the next day the bat- 
tle was renewed by the Confederates and lasted 
until dark. The Union army was defeated 
and driven back to Chattanooga. The Federal 
loss was about 1,800 killed, 9,500 wounded, and 
2,500 prisoners. 

Oct. 9. — Wheeler's Confederate cavalry 
defeated with considerable loss at Farming- 
ton, Tennessee, and again near Shelbyville. 

Oct. SO. — The departments of the Cum- 
berland and Mississippi were consolidated and 
placed under the command of General Grant. 

Gen. Rosecrans removed and Gen. Thompson 
appointed in his place. 

Nov. 5. — Brownsville, Texas, captured. 

]\ov. S5. — The Confederate army under 
Bragg was badly whipped near Chattanooga, 
losing about 6,000 prisoners and 52 guns. The 
Union loss was between 3,000 and 4,000 in 
killed and wounded. 

IVov. !30.^An unsuccessful attempt of 
the Confederates to carry Knoxville by 
storm. 

rVov. — The first Fenian convention assem- 
bled at Chicago. According to tradition the 
Fenians or Finians were a national militia es- 
tablished in Ireland by Fin or Fionn, the son of 
Cumbal. 

I>ec. "4. — Gen. Longstreet commenced the 
siege of Knoxville, Nov. 17th. On the 29th 
there was a severe fight, in which he was de- 
feated. This, with the defeat of Bragg at 
Chattanooga, compelled Longstreet to raise the 
siege. 

1S64. 

Fel>. 1. — President Lincoln orders a draft 
for 500,000 men. 

Fel*. 9. — A large number of prisoners, in- 
cluding Colonel Streight, escaped from Libby 
Prison, Richmond. 

Fel». 15.— Gen. W. T. Sherman with his 
command arrived at Meridan, Miss., on his 
great raid into the heart of the enemy's coun- 
try. Returned to Vicksburg with immense 
booty. 

Feb. SO. — The advance into Florida of 
the Union forces about 5,000 strong, under 
General Seymour, was repulsed near Olustee 
with a loss of 1,200. Confederate loss, about 
the same. 

Fel>. S3. — A heavy reconnoitering force 
sent out from Chattanooga by General 
Grant, met and defeated the enemy at Tunnel 
Hill. 

Fel>. — Kilpatrick and Dahlgren's raid on 
Richmond. 

^larcli 8. — Gen. Grant was formally pre- 
sented by the President with his commission 
as Lieutenant General, and on the 12th was as- 
signed to the command of the armies of the 
United States. 

March 15. — The Union forces under 
General A. J. Smith captured Fort De Rus- 
sey, Louisiana, on Red river, with 325 prison- 
ers and an immense amount of ammunition 
and stores. 

IVIarcIi S5.— About 5,000 Confederates 



182 



ADVEKTISEMENTS. 



L. G. BROWN, 

MANUFACTURER OF AND DEALER IN 

Harness, Trunks, Bags 



AVmr»S, COLLEHS, ETC. 

75 Waterloo St., - Grand Rapids, Mich. 

BETWEEN RATH BUN HOUSE AND EAGLE HOTEL. 

B®= REPAIRING PROMPTLY DOXE. =§^ 



T. P. WITHERELL. 



J. KIRKHAM. 



wi^aisi&& # siBss. 



NILES. MICHIGAN. 



Recommended b^' all the Medical Faculty for the cure of 
Epilepsy. Rheumatism, Neuralgia, Lameness in the Back and Limbs and General 
Decline of the System. Also for Female Complaints in General. 

PRIVATE CORRESPONDENCE RESPECTFULLY' SOLICITED AND 
PRO MP TL2' ATI ENDED TO. 



HENRY M. CURTIS. 




H. M. CURTIS & CO., Ypsilaiiti, Mich. 





F. P. BOGARDUS. 
Manufacturers of 
CURTIS' PAT. 

EXTS 



mini 

Springs, 

And Curtis' Pat, 

WOOD FENDERS 
FOR 

Phstons & Carriages 

Established I $70. 



G. "W. CROZIER, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealer in 

is, id Aiel 

ALSO, WINTER PRESSED PAR AF FINE AND 

CAIiBO]V OILS. 

212 South Meridian St., - Indianapolis, Ind. 




IMPORTANT EVENTS OF THE CENTURY. 



183 




New City Hall, Detroit. — The site of the new City Hall is on Campus Martius. 
The building is 200 feet long on Woodward avenue and Griswold street, and 90 feet wide 
on Fort street and Michigan avenue. It is three stories above the basement. The height 
from street to cornices at roof is 66 feet, and to the top of the tower iSo. On the several 
sides of the first section of tower, are figures representing "Justice," " Industry," " Arts," 
" Commerce " In this section is the clock, and above that the general fire alarm bell, and 
over it the lookout. The building was completed in July, 1S71. The whole cost, including 
furniture, outside improvements, etc., was about $600,000. 




City Hall, LiOUisville, Ky. — This building at present covers an area of 200 feet 
on Sixth street and 100 feet on Jefferson, but it is designed in the future to extend the front 
on Jefferson street about 150 feet, covering the space now occupied by the jail and Engine 
house, and thus complete the principal facade, wfiich it is intended shall front on Jefferson 
street, the present completed portion being that of a pavillion to the entire building. As 
it is now occupied, the building cost about $460,000. This building was commenced on 
the 14th day of August, 1870, and was completed and occupied in the early part of 1S73; 
its architecture is that of the Italian Rennaissance. 



184 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OF THE CENTUKY. 



1864. 

under Forrest captured Paducah, Ky., and fired 
the place. 

April S.— The advance of Gen. Banks' 
expedition up Ked river, under the direction of 
Gen. Stone was repulsed near Shreveport, La.; 
but on the following day our men defeated the 
enemy. Our loss was about 2,000 and the en- 
emy's the same. 

April 13. — Gen. Forrest captured Fort 
Pillow, and immediately after commenced an 
indiscriminate massacre of our wounded sol- 
diers, both colored and white, not excepting 
women and children who had taken refuge in 
the fort. 

April 33.— The Governors of Ohio. Illi- 
nois, Iowa, Wisconsin, and Indiana offer to 
raise for the general Government 85,000 men 
for one hundred days. 

April 3«. — Government accepted services 
of one-hundred-dav-men, and appropriated 
$20,000,000 for their' payment. 

Jflay 5. — Draft ordered in Massachusetts, 
New Jersey, Ohio, Minnesota, Kentucky and 
Maryland. 

Gen. Butler lands on the south side of the 
James. 

Iflay 6. — Gen. Grant crossed the Rapidan, 
and Lee fell back towards Richmond. Battle 
of the Wilderness. 

Wlay 7.— Grant still advances, driving 
Lee's forces before him. 

IW^ay 8. — Sherman occupied Dalton. 
Ulay 9. — After three days hard fighting, 
Lee's forces retreated, leaving 3,000 killed and 
10,000 wounded on the field in possession of the 
Union armj'. 

May 13.— Battle at Spottsylvania. Union 
troops victorious. They capture 4,000 prison- 
ers and 25 pieces of artillery. 

May 13.— Gen. Sheridan, with cavalry, 
reached the rear of the enemy near Hanover 
Junction, breaking two railroads, capturing 
several locomotives, and destroying Lee's depot 
for supplies at Beaver Dam, containing over 
1,000,000 rations. 

May 15. — Sherman forced Johnson to 
evacuate Resaca after two days' fighting. 
Union defeat at Newmarket, Va. 
May lO. — Nathaniel Hawthorne, Ameri- 
can novelist, died, aged 55 years. 

May 33.— Army of the Potomac flanked 
the Confederates under Lee, and forced them 
to evacuate their fortifications near Spottsyl- 
vania Court House. 

John Morgan enters Kentucky with 4,000 
men. 

May HT. — Grant crossed the Pamunkey, 
and occupied Hanovertown. 

May 38.— Battle near Dallas, Ga. 
May 30. — Gen. Grant reached Mechanics- 
ville. 

June 3. — Battle of Coal Harbor, m 
which the Confederates are routed; heavy 
loss. 

•I line 5. — Sherman flanked Johnson, and 
captured Ackworth Station. 

June 7,- General Hunter defeats the 
Confederate General Jones, near Staunton, 
Virginia. 



Richmond — Continued. 



GROCRIES. 

Meyer & Kraas, 

Staple & Fancy Groceries, 

NESTOR, THOMAS & CO., Grocers and Butter 
and Egg Packers, 179 Main st. Estab. 1855. 

TULLIDGE, ALFORD, Groceries and Provisions, 
Wines and Liquors, 179 Fort Wayne ave, 

HAIR DEALERS AND DRESSERS. 

OTJTLAND, P., Hair Dresser, 
1 South 5th St. Established 1869. 

WEAVER, JAMES N., Hair Work done to order 
in the latest styles, 5 S. 5th St. Estab. 1870 

HARNESS AND SADDLES. 

KEYS, CHARLES A., Harness Manufacturer, 
268 Main street. 

NEIREITER, C. B., Harness and Saddle Maker, 
337 Main st. Established 1876. 

WIGGINS & CO., Harness, Saddles and Bridles, 
231 Main st. Established 1830. 

HOTELS. 





S.B. MEREDITH, Proprietor, 

RICHUPyP, IND. 

/COMMERCIAL HOUSE, Chas. Peck, proprietor, 



300 Main st 



European Eotel and City Dining Rooms. 

WARM MEALS AT ALL HOURS. 

PRICES LCW. Street Cars pass the Door. 

NOBLE ST., Near Union Depot 

GILL SARVENT, Manager 

GITHENS' HOTEL, 
J. H. GITHENS, prop., Main st. 

HOTEL, GERMAN, 13, 14 & 16 South Pearl st. 
Established 1860. B. BESCHER, Prop. 



I 



wmm 

0. HUNTINGTON, Prop. 

The Ssst Hotel Accommodations in tlie City. 

Newly furnished throughout. Good sample 

rooms on the first floor. 

RATES, TWO DOLLARS PER DAT. 

REYNOLDS HOUSE, No. 131 North Fifth St., 
C. R. PERRY, Proprietor. 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OF THE CENTURY. 



185 



R ICHMOND — Continued. 



HOTELS. 

RICHMOND TEMPERANCE HOUSE, 91 North 
Front St. J. G. COLLINS, Prop. Est. 1873. 

lOE DEALER. 

268 Fort Wayne Ave., 

fftolesalG ani Retail Dealers in Ice. 

INSURANCE. 
General Fire and Life 



Kepresenting First-class Non-Board Companies. 

Xo. a JTorth 5th !St. 

LIVERY AND SALE STABLES, 

LAFLIN & BURNS, Livery, Feed and Sale Stable 
Main and Walnut sts. Established 1874. 

PICKENS, THOS., Livery, Sale and Boarding 
Stable, Nos. 1.35 <fc 137 Fifth st. 

LUMBER. 

HOPKINS & FARNHAN, Hard and Soft Wood 
Lumber, Noble st., bet. 7th & 8th. 



D 



MACHINIST. 

ILLE & McGUIRE, Fort Wayne ave. 

Machine Shop, Richmond. 



MARBLE WORKS. 

staoF&gWdler, 

Manufacturers and Dealers in 

Uarble Monmenls and loml) Stones, 

Scotch and American Granite Monuments, 

190 Fort liVayne Ave. 

Designs and plans furnished and Work executed 
In the best style of Art. 



MEAT MARKET. 

PAXSON, I. H., Avenue Meat Market, 
No. 181 Fort Wayne ave. 

MILLINERY AND DRESSMAKING. 

BROWN, MRS. E. A., Drees and Cloak Maker, 
333 Main st. 

FOULKE, LIZZIE A., Millinery Trimmer, 
237 E. Walnut st. 

WEDEKIND, JENNIE, Millinery, 
233 Main st. Established 1867. 

WEDEKIND, M. E., Millinery and Fancy Goods, 
291 Main st. 

TIGNER, MRS. M., Dress and Cloak Maker, 
369 Main st. 

ZONBRO, M. H., Dress and Cloak Making, 
12 S. Franklin et 



June 8. — Abraham Lincoln and Andrew 
Johnson nominated for President and Vice- 
President. Morgan defeated by Gen. Bur- 
bridge, near Lexington, Ky. 

JTune 13. — Gen. Hancock drove the Con- 
federates from Bottom Bridge at the point of 
the bayonet. 

June 15. — Gen. Smith attacked with a 
force of 15,000 men. 

June 16.— Battle of Lost Mountain, 
Georgia. 

June 19. — The Confederate cruiser Ala- 
bama sunk by the U. S. frigate Kearsage, in 
the English Channel. 

June 23.— Confederates attack Wright 
and Hancock, capturing three full regiments, 
after which they are repulsed. 

June '^7. — Sherman made an unsuccess- 
ful attack on the enemy's position, losing from 
1,000 to 3,000 men. 

June as.— Left wing of Grant's army 
take possession of the Weldon railroad. 

June 30.— Secretary Chase resigned, 
and Hon. Wm. P. Fessenden was appointed to 
fill the vacancy. 

July 5.— The Confederates under Early 
invade Maryland. 

July 13-15.— The Confederates under 
Gen. Forrest defeated in five diflferent battles, 
near Pontotoc, Mo. 

July 17.— The Confederate army was 
driven within the fortifications at Atlanta. 

July 30, — The enemy assaulted General 
Sherman's lines three times, but were repulsed 
each time with severe loss. General 
Averill defeated the enemy near Winchester, 
Va. 

July 23. — A great battle was fought be- 
fore Atlanta, resulting in the complete defeat 
of the Confederates. 

July 30.— A mine containing six tons of 
powder, under a Confederate fort at Peters- 
burg, exploded, destroying the fort and garri- 

Chambersburg, Penn., burned by the Con- 
federates. 

Aug^. 5.— Commodore Farragut's fleet 
passed Forts Morgan and Gaines. The Con- 
federate ram Tennessee was captured and sev- 
eral other vessels destroyed. Shortly after 
Fort Gaines surrendered and Fort Powell was 
evacuated. 

Aug. 7.— Gen. Averill defeated the enemy 
at Morefield, Va. 

Aug. 15.— The Confederate Gen. Wheeler 
repulsed at Dalton, Ga. 

Aug. 18.— The Weldon railroad seized by 
Gen. Grant. 

Aug. 33. — Fort Morgan surrendered. 

Aug. 35.— Gen. Hancock, who held the 
Weadon railroad south of Ream's Station, was 
attacked several times, but repulsed the enemy 
each time. 

Sept. 1. — Gen. Sherman defeated the ene- 
my at Jonesboro, Ga. 

Sept. 3. —The Federal troops took posses- 
sion of Atlanta. 

Sept. A. — Morgan's forces were routed at 
Greenville, Tennessee, and 100 of his men were 



186 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 




The Oldest Institution in the West 



For the Education of Young Ladies. Departments of Study include Pre- 
paratory, Collegiate, Musical, and Fine Art. 

InstructioE in all Departments Thorough and Complete, For Catalogues, or any desired information, address 

E. F. BULLARO, Principal, 

JACOB JOERCER, 

BOTTLER, and Dealer in 

Bottled Beer and Ale 



No. 617 East Monroe Street, Between 6tli and 7tli, 

(Opposite NEW POST OFFICE,) 



P 



SPRINGFIELD, ILL. 



A. W. CADMAN'S 




AND EXHIBITION ROOMS, 



Sontli Main >*»tieet, JACKSOA VII^IiE, Ilvli. 

Orders taken for Enlarged "Work of all kinds. 

ESTA-BLISHEID 1864, 

EDUCATION, MUSIC, ART, 

The Young Ladies' Athenseum 

A. UNIVERSITY FOR YOUNG UADIES, AND THE 

Illinois Conservatory of Music^ 

The Great Western College of Music, with its Art Department, offer unsurpassed 
facilities for either solid or ornamental culture. For Circulars address Jacksonville, 111. 

W. D. I$AXD£R^, Saperintendent. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



187 




LINCOLX S MONUMENT, SPRINGFIELD, ILLS. 



Ghas. H. von Tagen^ M. D. 

(Graduate 1858. Professor of Operative Surger.y.) 



OFFICE HOURS: 7 to 10 A. M., 3 to 5 P. M., and 7 to 10 P. M. 
N. B.--Availal)le at all hours of the iiiii.ht. 

Grives Special Attention to the operative branch and treatment of Surgical 
affections in general— E.w BRACING ALL THE KNOWN Specialties. After an ex- 
tended and practical experience in both Civil mid Military Service as a Collegiate and Cli)ii- 
cal Instructor and successful operator and practitioner for more than twenty years past, he 
confidently offers his services to the UNITED STATES PUBLIC IN GENERAL. 

Consul tationM and Calls will be promptly responded to, by letter or in per- 
son, at home or abroad. 

Unexceptional References as to ability and skill will be furnished when- 
ever required. Address, 

Room No. 8 Kentucky Building, No. 201 Clark St., cor. Adams, 
C? EC X C3 .A. <3r Q , IXjXji. 

At Residence, .583 Wabash Ave., At Office, Room 7, Kentucky Block, 201 S. Clark St. 

S to 9 A. M. 7 to S P. M. ID to II A. M. 2^ tO 5 P. xM. 

Having had the advantage of more than thirty-five years' experience as a Physician 
iind Surgeon, and from the fact that his present position of being the President of Hah. 
NEMAN Medical College, of Chicago, Professor of Theory and Practice of 
Medicine, brings him extensively into professional relations, DR. SMALL respectfully 
offers his services in consultation. He alVo devotes much time to 



I8S8^ 



and other 

In which he has realized satisfactory results. 



188 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OF THE CENTURY 



1864. 

captured, including his staff, and 75 of his men 
killed. General Gillem commanded the Union 
forces. 

Sept. 7. — The Confederate General John 
Morgan was killed near Greenville, Tennes- 
see. 

Sept. 7.— A force of 2,000 Confederates 
defeated at Readyvilie, Tenn. 

Sept. 19. — Gen. Sheridan gained a com- 
plete victory over the enemy in the Shenan- 
doah valley. 

Sept. 83.— Battle at Fisher's Hill; the 
Confederate army defeated. 

Sept. 88. — Gen. Grant advanced his lines 
on the north side of the James river to within 
seven miles of Richmond. The Confederates 
under Gen. Price invaded Mo. 

Oct. 5. — The Confederates attacked Alla- 
toona, Georgia, but were repulsed with a severe 
loss. 

Oct. 7.— The pirate vessel Florida cap- 
tured by the United States steamship Wach- 
usett. 

Oct. 8.- The Confederates in Shenandoah 
valley are again defeated by Sheridan. 

Oct. 1J>.— Gen. Sheridan gained his fourth 
victory over the Confederates under Early at 
Cedar creek, Va. 

Oct. 83.— The Confederate Gen. Price de- 
feated at Blue river, Mo. 

Oct. 87.— EngagemeHt at Hatcher's 
Run. 

Oct. 38.— Gen. Blunt defeated the Confed- 
ei-ates under Price at Neosho, ^lo. 

Oct. 30, — (Jen. Hood made three attacks 
on Decatur, Alabama, but was repulsed each 
time. 

Oct. 31. — Union troops recaptured Ply- 
mouth, N. C. 

^ov. 3. — The Confederate ram Albemai'le 
destroyed by Lieut. Cushing. 

J^ov. 8. — The Presidential election took 
place. Lincoln and Johns<ii received 212. 
McClellan and Pendleton twenty-one electoral 
votes. 

McClellan resigns his command in the ar- 
my . 

]^OV. 16. — Genei-al Sherman left Atlan- 
ta and began his great march to the Atlan- 
tic. 

;ifov. 30. — General Hood attacked the 
Union troops under General Schofield at 
Franklin, Tennessee, but was repulsed with 
great loss. 

|>ec. 13-— Fort McAllister captured by 
Gen. Sherman's army. 

l>ec. 16.--General Thomas defeated the 
enemy at Nashville, Tennessee, with heaw 
loss, capturing a large number ff guns and 
prisoners. 

l>ec. 30. — The Confederates under Gen. 
Bieckenridge defeated in southwestern Vir- 
ginia, and the salt works destroyed. 

Dec. 81.--Gen. Sherman entered t4)e city 
of Savannah, capturing 150 cannon, 30,000 
bales of cotton, and a large amount of muni- 
tions of v,ar. 

Dec. 8'€.--First bombardment of Fort 
Fisher. 



R ICH.MON D — Contmuiid. 



MINERAL WATEE, 
Manufacturers of 

Mineral Wafer & Vinegar, 

Also Dealers in Cider and Walker's XX Ale 
and Porter. No. 199 South Front St. 



D 



NEWSPAPERS. 

AILT AND WEEKLY INDEPENDENT, 

J. G. McKee, Editor. Fred. Maag & Co., Prop. 



D 



AILY AND WEEKLY PALLADIUM, 

Jenkinson, Cullaton & Reeves, Ed's & Pubs. 



PAINTER. 

ART, WM., House Painter and Grainer, 

No. 10 North Green st. 



H 



PHYSICIANS, 

ISHER, BENJAMIN, Magnetic Physician, 

317 Main st. 



F 



HANNBERG, DR. JULIUS, Physician, 
Richmond, Ind. 

HARRIMAN, DR. S. B., Physician and Sur- 
geon, 16 North Pearl st. Established 1846. 



PLUMBER AND GAS FITTER. 

ILHUMeerhoff, 



J 

Dealer in Gas Fixtures, and all kinds of Iron 
and Wood Pumps, Iron and Lead Pipe, Drive Wells, 
Sewer Pioe, Lightning Rods, &c. 

Nos. 7 & 9 South 6th St. 

PUMP MAKER, 

Practical Panm laUr, 

Iron Wells, Sinks and Iron Pumps, Wood Pumps, 
Wood Sinks, &c. Repairing done promptly and 
charges reasonable. 

No. 10 South 6th St., near Main. 



REAL ESTATE. 



F 



ETTA, H. H., 



Real Estate and Patent Broker 



Established 23 Years. 

Richmond Real E slate, Loan 
and General Agency. 

(t^uccessor to WILLIAM BELL,) 
Real EKtate, Loan and Insurance Agent, Notary 
Public and Conveyancer. 

S. E, Cor. Main & Fifth Sts. 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OF THE CENTURY, 



189 



Richmond — Continued. 



REAL, EST ATE, 

ircriWHAiiTi CO. 

Office, Room Ho. 1, Up stairs 
Odd Fellows Bnilding. 

TDUSSELL, J. J., Real Estate and Insurance 

XV Agent, 304 Main St. 

SALOONS, 

BESSELMAN, FRED, Wholesale and Retail Li- 
quor Store, 34 8. Marion st. 



KENNEPOHL, B. A., Wine and Beer Saloon, 18 
S. Marion st. 

LICHTENFELS, THOS. C, Wine and Beer Sa- 
loo n, 20 and •22 S. Marion st. 

ACKE & MACKE, Dealers in Wine, Beer and 
Whisky, 12 N. Marion st. 



M 



M 



OREL, EU«ENE, Wine and Beer Saloon, 187 
Main st. 



S 



TAUFER & FOKBES, Wholesale Dealers in Li- 
quors and Wines, Ft. Wa;'ne ave. & Fifth st. 



THE GROTTO PARLORS, 

Wines, Liquors and Cigars. 

365 MAIN STREET. 

DOC. J. W. IRISH, Prop. 

SEWING MACHINES, 

THOMPSON, D., Sewing Machines. Repairing 
a specialty. 291 Main st. 

STAMPS AND STENCILS. 

SMITH, W. J., General Stencil Works and Nov- 
elty Shop, 13 S. Marion st. 

STONE WORKS, 

SIMMONS, G. W., Asbestine Stone, Stone Steps, 
Window Caps and Stone Walks, 191 Fort 
Wayne ave. 

STOVES AND^INWARE. 

CHASE, J. J., Tin, Copper and Sheet Iron Ware. 
Also Kage, Metals, etc.. Lock Box 1114. 
OFFMAS, FRED, Stoves and Tinwaie, 

206 Main st. 



TAILORS. 
ly 'PHERON, NANNI H., Tailoress, 



24 Marion st. 



►ELTZ, JOHN E., Merchant Tailor, 



298 Main St. 



SCHIEFNER, T., Renovator of Clothing. Suits 
made toorder. 19 S. Marion st. 
ERNER, JOSEPH, Merchant Tailor, 

341 Main st. 

TOBACCO AND CIGARS. 

FETTA, L., MMn^~ajidnE)ealerTn"T?igaT8'"a^ 
Tobaccos, cor. Ft. Wayne ave. and Fifth st. 

HANER, J. F., Manufacturer and Wholesale 
Dealer in Cigars, 299 Main st. 



l>ec. 89.— Hood's army crossed the Ten- 
nessee river, thus ending the Tennessee cam- 
paign. 

Jan. SI. — Massachusetts ratified the Con- 
stitutional amendment. 

Jan. 8.— General Butler removed from 
the command of the army of the James, and 
succeeded by Gen. Ord. 

Ja,n. 11.— Beverly, Va., was attacked by 
a Confederate force under Gen. Rosser. The 
town and a large portion of the force defending 
it were captured. 

Jan. 13.— Edward Everett, American 
statesman and distinguished orator, died, aged 
71 years. 

Jan. 16.— Fort Fisher, near Wilming- 
ton, North Carolina, captured with all its 
equipments. 

Jan. 30.--Confederates evacuate Cor- 
inth. 

Jan. 27.— Confederate incendiaries set 
fire to the city of Savannah. 

Pel). 1.— Congress abolishes slavery in the 
United States. 

Illinois ratified the constitutional amend- 
ment. 

l-Vb. 3.— Marvland, Michigan, New York, 
and Rhode Island ratified the Constitutional 
amendment. 

Fel>. 4.— Illinois black laws repealed. 

Fel». 7.— Maine ratified the Constitutional 
amendment. 

Fel». 13.— Gen. Sherman occupied Branch- 
ville, S. C. 

Feb. 13.— Indiana ratified the Constitu- 
tional amendment. 

Fel>- 17.— Louisiana ratified the Constitu- 
tional amendment. 

Gen. Sherman's victorious columns entered 
Columbia, S. C, and burned the city. 

Fel>. 18.— Gen. Lee assumes supreme com- 
mand of the Confederate armies, and recom- 
mends arming of the blacks. 

Charleston, S. C, evacuated and taken pos- 
session of bv Gen. Gilmore. Six thousand 
bales of cotton destroved. Ammunition stored 
in the railroad depot exploded, and many lives 
were lost. Gen. Gilmore hoisted the old flag 
over Fort Sumter. 

Fel>. 19.— Fort Anderson, N. C. taken. 

Feb. 31.— Wisconsin ratified the Consti- 
tutional amendment. Fort Armstrong, N. C, 
taken. 

Feb. 33.— Confederate Congress decrees 
that the slaves shall be armed. 

Wilmington captured by General Schofield. 

Feb. 33.— Raleigh, N. C, captured. Gov- 
ernor Vance captured. 

UlarcU 3.- Gen. Sheridan fought and 
captured the Confederate, General Early, with 
1,800 men, between Staunton and Charlottes- 
ville. 

Jflareb 41. — Inauguration of Abraham 
Lincoln and Andrew Johnson as President and 
Vice-President of the United States. 

iTIarcb lO.— Gen. Bragg attacked Gen. 
Cox near Kingston, N. C, but was defeated. 



190 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



Richmond — Co7itinued. 



TOBACCO AND CIGAES. 

HARVEY, JAMES, R., Cigar Manufactory, No- 
ble St., opposite Depot. 

A. Drifmeyer. Wm. Drifmeyer. 

Established 1856. 

A. DRIFMEYER & BBC, 

Manufacturers of 

359 MAIN STREET. 

King Bee Cigar Factory, 

Manufacturer of Fine Cigar.-. 
S. M. BUCKLEY, PROPRIETOR, 

228 Main st. 

SPIEKENHIER, J., Cigar Manufacturer, Main 
and Front. 

TOOL MANUFACTURERS, 



RICHMOND EDGE TOOL CO. Estaljlished 1876. 
One square west of Depot. 

UMBRELLA MANUPACTURERS, 

SAYMAN, MRS. & SON, Umbrella Manufacturers, 
8 S. Pearl st. 

VETERINARY SURGEONS. 

COMER, VVM., Veterinary Surf^eon. Residence, 
Main St., bet. Fifteenth and Sixteenth. 
WEEKS, C. A., Veterinary Surgeon, 
Richmond, Ind. 

WATCHES, CLOCKS AND JEWELRY, 

^^^^Ta. dTckTnsonT^ 

Dea'er in 

Diamoiicls, Watclies, Clocks, Jewelry, 

sterling Silver and Plated Ware, 
306 Main St., opposite Odd Fellow's Hall. 

Watches, Clocks and JeweJry repaired and war- 
ranted. Engraving done to order. Sole Agent 
for the Celebrated Paul Breton Watch. Est. '35. 

WINES AND LIQUORS, 

S. H. LIPINSKY, Wholesale Dealer in 

PURE BOURBON WHISKIES, 

Importer of Wines and Liquors, 257 Main stieet. 

HELAN & MORMAN, Wholesale and Retail 
Liquor Dealers, 11 N. Fifth St. 



w 



WOODEN WARE. 

ETCH, GEO., Slnf'r of Patent and Staff Churns, 
Tubs and Butter Fir ins, 227 Main st. 



D 



JOLIET, ILLS. 



COAL DEALERS. 

FREY,FRANKP., Hard .t Soft Coal, Coke and 
Wood, office & yard, Scott & Washington sts. 

KING, J. <^. A., Agent for the leading varieties 
of Coal, Jefferson st. & St. Louis Rl R. Depot. 



JoLiET — Continued. 



■COAL DEALERS. 

HAFFjSER, B. & SON, Coal Coke & W^ood, 

Scott & Washington sts. 



S 



COFFEE AND SPICE MILL. 

ARNOLD & BOWEN, Joliet Steam Coffee & Spice 
Mills, Wholesale dealers in Coffees and 
Spices. Coffees roasted for the trade. Office and 
Mills: Nos. 27, 29 & 32 Bluff st. 



HORSE SHOERS. 

AGEN, H. H., Horseshoer & manfr of Stone- 
cutters' & Marble-workers' tools, 91 N.Bluff st. 



H 



TANTON, JOSEPH, Plough Repairing, Horse- 

) shoeing & General Jobbing, 27 Washington st. 



B 



MILLINERY GOODS. 

I'TLER, MRS. ELLA, Choice Millinery. 

Centennial Block. 



PAINTER. 



YOUNG, E. H., House, Sign and Ornamental 
painter, 40 Jefferson st. 

SASH, DOORS AND BLINDS. 

MASON & PLANTS, Lumber, Sash, Doors, 
Blinds, etc., Desplaines & Cass sts. 



w 



SMUTjaiLLS^ 

ALLACE EMERY STONE SUMT MILL MANU- 

facturingCo,, and Pearl Barley Mills. 



WAGONS AND CARRIAGES. 

MCMILLAN, F., Manfr and repairer of Wagonsi 
Carriages, etc., 7 Washington st. 

WIND MILLS. 



Manufacturer of 

WIND MILLS, 

And 

Earth Augers for Boring 

Wells, also. Drive-well Sup- 
plies. Send for descrip- 
tive circular and price 
lir^t. 
Addres , BOX 135, Joliet, Ills. 

WIRE FENCES- 



JOLIET WIRE FENCE CO., Manfactu's of Patent 
Barbed Wire Barbs, etc. 

''pHE ADAMS MANUF.iCTURING CO., Mannf's 

X of Barbed Cable Fence Wire. 

THE STEVENS ORIGINAL LOCKSTITCH BARB, 
«11 Steel, Fence Wire. 




w 



ATKINS, 'WM., Inventor & Manfr of Cable 
Barbed Fence,P.O. box 492,res 91 Herkiniei st. 



OTTAWA, ILLS. 



ATTORNEY AT AW. 

JOHNSTON, JAMES B., Attorney at Law, 
Office, N. W. cor. Public Sq. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



191 




WISCONSIN STATE BUILDING, CENTENNIAL EXPOSITION, PHILA, 



JOHN CORBETT, 

MERCHANT TAILOR 



EVERY VARIETY OF 



FRENCH, ENGLISH and DOMESTIC CLOTHS, 

Keft Co7istantly on Hand. 

SPECIAL ATTENTION PAID TO CUSTOM TRADE. 

A FULL STOCK OF 

GENTS' FURNISHING GOODS, HATS, CAPS, ETC. 



o le IB IE 2sr "ttnT" .^^ -2" :b3l.oo:ez, 

13 



192 



IMHOETANT EVENTS OF A CENTURY. 



1S65. 

Gen. Sherman occupied Fayetteville, N. C. 

Iflai'cli 13. — Gen. Schofield occupied 
Kingston. 

^larch 16. — Confederate Gen. Hardee 
defeated at Averysboro, N. C. 

Iflarcli ly. — Confederate Congress ad- 
journed. " sine die." 

I^larcli 19. — Confederate Gen. Johnson 
defeated at Bentonville, N. C. 

]WarcI» ai.^Goldsboro, N. C, occupied. 

Itlarcli dS. — Confederates attack Gen. 
Grant and get severely defeated. 

April 1. — Victory of Five Forks, Va. 

April 3. — Lee's lines at Petersburg car- 
ried. 

April 3. — Richmond taken. 

April 9. — Surrender of Gen. Lee and his 
whole army at Appomottox Court House, Va. 

April 13. — The Union flag hoisted at Fort 
Sumter. 

Mobile, Ala., captured. 

April 13. — Drafting and recruiting 
stopped. 

April 1-1. — President Lincoln shot by J. 
Wilkes Booth in Ford's Theatre, Washington; 
Mr. Seward and his son wounded. 

April 15. — Death of President Lincoln. 
Vice-President Johnson sworn in as President 
of the United States. 

Mr. Stanton's letter to Charles Francis Ad- 
ams, Minister to England: "Washington, 
April 15th. Sir — It has become my distress- 
mg duty to announce to you that last night his 
Excellency Abraham Lincoln was assasinated, 
about the hour of half-past ten o'clock, in his 
private box at Ford's Theatre, in this city. 
The President, about eight o'clock, accom- 
panied -Mrs. Jjincoln to the theater. Another 
lady and gentleman were with (hem in the box. 
About half-past ten, during a pause in the 
performance, the assasin entered the box, the 
door of which was unguarded, hastily ap- 
proached the President from behind, and dis- 
charged a pistol at his head. The bullet en- 
tered the back of his head and penetrated 
nearly through. The assasin then leaped from 
the box upon the stage, brandishing a large 
knife or dagger, and exclaimed, ' Sic semper 
tyrannis ! ' and escaped in the rear of the the- 
atre. Immediately upon the discharge the 
President fell to the flooi- insensible, and con- 
tinued in that state until twenty minutes past 
7 o'clock this morning, when he breathed his 
last." 

April 36. — Gen. Johnson surrendered. 

April 37. — Booth, the murderer of Pres- 
ident Lincoln, mortally wounded and captured. 

May 4.— General Dick Taylor surrenders. 

31ay lO.— Jefferson Davis captured at Ir- 
winville, "5 miles southwest of Macon, Ga., by 
the 4th Michigan cavalry, under Col. Pritch- 
ard, of Gen. Wilson's command; also, his wife, 
mother, Postmaster-General Regan, Col. Har- 
riso 1, private secretary, Col Johnson and other 
military characters. 

jflay 19.— Confederate Gov. Watts, of 
Alabama, arrested. 

May 31.— Confederate Gov. Letcher, of 
Virgiaia, arrested. 



Ottawa — Continued. 



FURNITURE. 

RUGG, GEO. H., Wholesale & retail dealer in 
Furniture, 1st door West of City Drug Store. 

BESTilIANN, F., Furniture repairing and Picture 
framing, 2 doors South of Park House. 

HARDWARE, 

COWLES & BURTISS, Hardware & House Furn- 
ishing Goods, 31 LaSalle st. 



IRON FOUNDRY. 

ENZ, J., Ottawa Ornamental Works. Fences 
a Specialty. P. O. Box, 1022. 



B 



MARBLE "WORKS. 

cINHILL, E., Marble Ornaments, Headstones,^ 
■ etc., opposite PostofHce. 



M 



MUSIC-BAND. 

ACH'S CITY BAND, Music at short notice. £. 
Bach, P. O. drawer, 1851. 

PAINTERS. 



B 



HOSSACK & CLARK, House & Sign Painters, 
Paperhanging, &c , Columbus & Jefferson sts. 



S 



PHYSICIAN, 

TOUT, J., Physician and Sureeon, over 
Kneussrs Drug Store, res. Paul & Lafayette sts. 



DANVILLE, ILLS. 

ATTORNEYS AT LAW. 

Law and Collection Office 

—OP— 

YOUNa&PENWELL, 

Collections a specialty. 
DANVILLE, _ - . ILLINOIS, 



References : Vermillion Co. Bank, First Nation- 
al Bank; Geo. Dillon, Circuit Clerk; Danville 
Banking and Trust Co. 



BARBERS. 

LUTES, JACOB, Shaving 
Rooms, 140 E. Main. 



and Hairdressing 



MILLKR, FRANK, Barber, under .Etna House, 
Vermilion st. 



BLANK BOOK MANUFACTURERS. 

ILLINOIS PRINTING CO., Blank Book Manufac- 
turers, Stationers and Book Binders. 

BOOTS AND SHOES, 

(Est. 1874.) 

rropxietors 

I 

114 Main Street, 

r>AIWILLE, ILLS. 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OF THE CENTURY. 



193 



Danville — Continued. 



DANVILLE CARRIAGE FACTORY, Wm. 
Whitehill, Proprietor, 27 W. Main St. 



GIDDINGS, J. W., Manf r of Carriages & Bug- 
gies, Hazle St. uearMain st. 



CONTRACTOES AND BUILDEES. 
DANVILLE 

Contractinc & BnililinE Coinpaiiy, 

Contractors of Brick-Work, Stone-Work, and 

Plastering; also, dealers in Lime, Hair, 

Cement and Plaster Paris. 

JOHN A. LEWIS, Superintendent. 
WEST MAIN ST. 

Eptablished 1877. 

GLASS & BURLEIGH, 

CONTRACTORS & BUILDERS, 

Co. North & Hazle sts. 



H 



K 



ANKEY, C. P., Contractor & Builder, 

W. Main st. 

CORNICE "WORKS. 

LUGEL, G. L., Western Union Cornice Con- 
tractor, Main & Walnut sts. 



DENTIST. 



D 



WIGHT, 0. R., Dentist, 



Short's Block, Main st. 



DRUGGIST. 

E. C. WINSLOW, 

Est. 1859. 
Dealer in Strictly 



Druggists' Sundries, etc., Paints, Oils, 

Glass and Brushes, 

107 Main Street, Danvi lle, Ills. 

GROCERS. 

Geo. F. Eaton & Co., 

WHOLESALE GROCERS, 

AND 

Commission Merchants, 

Opera House Block, 
DANVILLE, - - _ _ ILLINOIS. 

PIERCE, J. C, Groceries, Hardware and Agri- 
cultural Implements, Ridge Farm, Ills. 

HAIR DEALERS AND DRESSERS, 

HENRY^&^OSST^ ~"^ 

Ladies' Hali- Dressex-s. 

Hair Work of all kinds done to order. 
73 Vermilion st. 

HATTER AND FURRIER. 

MILLIS, J. H., Hatter, Furrier, Gents' Furnish- 
er, 72 Main st. 



]f£ay 34. — Grand Review of Gen. Sher- 
man's army at Wa.shington. 

Jefferson Davis indicted for treason. 

]^Iay 3tt. — Kirby Smith surrendered. 
The last armed Confederate organization has 
succumed. 

]flay S51. — Confederate Gen. Hood and 
staff surrendered. 

Cost of the War. — In the Union armies 
probably 300,000 men were killed in battle, 
or died of wounds and disease, while doubtless 
two hundred thousand more were crippled for 
life. If the Confederate armies suffered as 
heavily, the country thus lost one million able- 
bodied men. The Union debt, Jan. 1, 1866, 
was nearly $2,750,000,000. At one time, the 
daily expenses reached the sum of .$3,500,000. 
During the last year of the war, the expenses 
were greater than the entire expenditures of 
the Government from Washington to Buch- 
anan. The Confederate war debt was never 
paid, as that Government was overthrown. 

June 23. — President Johnson rescinds 
order requiring passports from all travelers 
entering the United States, and opens South- 
ern ports. 

July y. — Execvition of Payne, Atzerott, 
Harold and Mrs. Surratt, for complicity in the 
assassination of President Lincoln. 

Oct. 11. — P ardon of Alexander Stephens 
and other Southern officials. 

]\'^ov. O. — Confederate privateer Shenan- 
doah surrenders at Liverpool, having de- 
stroyed about 30 vessels; crew released. 

I^ov. lO. — Execution of Wirz, the Confed- 
erate prison-keeper, for cruelty to Union pris- 
oners. 

1866. 

•fan. 38. — Hon. Thomas Chandler dies. 

Queen Emma, widow of a former King of the 
Sandwich Islands, arrived in San Francisco, 
and after making a thorough inspection of our 
institutions and religious and educational sys- 
tems, she went to England via New Vork. 

Fel>. 19. — President vetoes Freedmen's 
Bureau bill. This bill required the Govern- 
ment to take cai-e of the emancipated slaves 
and destitute whites of the South. 

^larch IJI. — Jared Sparks, historian, 
dies. 

!!^Iai'cli 37. — President Johnson vetoes 
Civil Rights bill. This bill guaranteed the 
same rights to the negro, m every particular, 
as those enjoyed by the white man. 

April 3. — President Johnson issues a 
proclamation declaring that the insurrection 
which heretofore existed in the States of 
Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina, Vir- 
ginia, Tennessee, Alabama, Louisiana, Arkan- 
sas, Mississippi, and Florida, is at an end, and 
henceforth to be so regarded. 

April O. — Civil Rights bill passed over 
the President's veto. 

April 13. — Hon. Daniel S. Dickinson 
dies. " 

^lay 16. — President Johnson vetoes the 
admission of Colorado as a State. 

:ilay 3».— Death of General W^inlield 
Scott, aged 80 years. 

June 3.— Fort Erie, in Canada, occupied 



194 



ADVEETISEMENTS. 



CHARLES S. BARROW^S, 

DEALER IN 




TMIJBl 




MUSIC BOOKS, VIOLINS, FLUTES, GUITAES,ETC. 

STKIIVGS A SPECIALTY. 

ILLINOIS. 



JACKSONVILLE, 



CATAJ.OGUES SENT FREE ON APPLICATION. 



Danville — Continued. 



Danville — Continued. 



HOTELS. 
FINEST SAMPLE-ROOJUS in the City. 

Rates only $2 per Day. 

CENTENNIAL HOTEL. 

CRANE, McCORMACK & CO., Props. 

Cor. Main and Walnut Sts. 



S 



JUSTICE OF THE PEACE, 

TANSBURY, J. W., Justice of the Peace and 

Collecting Agent, 78 Main St. 



LIVERT^ABLES^ 

KUYKENDALL & CO., City Livery, Feed and 
Sale Stable, 33 Hazle st , near Main. 

IJiDALL & HABBESON, Livery, Sale and Feed 
Stable, W. Main St. 



MARBLE WORKS, 

B BOWER, H. 0., Marble Works, south of Pub- 
lic square. 

YEBMILION MARBLE WOBKS, H. L. Payne, 
prop., 22 Walnut st. 

MILLINER AND DRESSMAKER, 

CHENOWETH, MBS. P. S., Milliner and Dress- 
maker, 31 S. Vermilion st. Established 1876. 

NEWSPAPERS, 

DANTILLE DAILY AND WEEKLY TIMES, A. G. 
Smith, editor. 

ORGAN WORKS. 

MILLEB & SOX, Beethoven Organ Works, E, 
Main st. 

PHOTOGRAPHERS, 

F. A. HARTWELL, 

112 Main st. Established 1873. 

OSLIN & PHILLIPS, Photographers, 85, S. W. 
cor. Public square. 



SEWING MACHINES, 

AGNEW & MABTIN, Agents for No. 8 Wheeler 
& Wilson Sewing Machine. 

TOBACCO AND CIGARS, 

WOETMAN, F. H., Cigars, Tobacco and Smok- 
ers' Articles, 34 Vermilion st. 



UNDERTAKERS. 
T7"IMBALL, N. A., Undertaker, 



59 Main st. 



^ WACHMAKER AND JEWELER, 

BLANKENBUBG, AUGUST, Watchmaker and 
Jeweler, 60 Vermilion st. 



WAUKEGAN, ILLS. 



D 



BROOMS AND BRUSHES, 

ICKINSON, A. E., Manufacturer of Brooms and 
Brushes. Established 1863. 



DENTIST. 

CLABKSON, B. W., Dentist. Office over Steele's 
store. Established 1846. 

HOTEL. 
WHEN YOU GO TO WAUKEGAN, 

STOP AT THE CITY HOTEL. 

First Class. Prices Moderate. 

JOHN H. O'HARA, Proprietor. 

Good Stabling. Good Sample Room. 

KITCHEN CABINET. 
Manufacturer of the 

Celebrated Kitchen Cabinet. 

Housekeepers who have used it all concur in 
recommending it as one of the most economical, 
convenient and useful articles ever invented for 
the Kitchen. Send for Circular. 

Ml. B. SMITH, Patentee. 



ADVERTISEMENTS . 



195 




i£ii«i^oi@ wmmAt^m ootj^mm. 



.^O-A-IDDEIMIY OIF IMIXJSIO J^ISTID J^:E^T. 

A full Board of Instruction, including Primary, Preparatory, Scientific, Classical, Music, Painting, 
Drawing, German, French, Calistbenics, ^Esthetics and Etiquette. The Buildings, Board, Discipline, 
Course of Study, and Instruction in each Branch, unsurpassed in any School for Young Ladies and 
Misses in the West. Young Ladies wishing to prepare themselves for teaching in our Public Schools 
or for teaching Music, Painting and Drawing, will find rare advantages in this insitution. 
'. for Catalogue and information to 

Rev. W. F. SHORT, President. 



196 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OF THE CENTURY, 



. by a party of Fenians under Col. O'Neill, May 
31; they are defeated and O'Neill killed. 

June 7. — President Johnson issues a 
proclamation against the Fenian movement in 
the United vStates. 

Fenians from the United States make a raid 
into Canada. 

June ly. — Hon. Lewis Cass dies. 

July 13-ar.— The Atlantic Telegraph 
successfully laid between Great Britain and 
America. 

JTuly 16. — Freedmen's Bureau bill be- 
comes a law. 

July UO. — Jlajor-General Lysander Cut- 
ler dies. 

Aug'. 1-4. — National Union Convention as- 
sembles in Philadelphia wigwam. 

Sept. 1. — Southern Unionists' Convention 
assembles in Philadelphia. 

Sept. 7. — Matthias W. Baldwin, pioneer 
in American locomotives, dies. 
' Oct. 13. — "Prince" John Van Buren, son 
of Martin, dies. 

Dec. 13. — Congress passes a bill giving 
negroes the right to vote in the District of Co- 
lumbia. 

I>ec. Si6. — Major-Geueral Samuel R. Cur- 
tis dies. 

1867. 

Jan. J>. — Virginia rejects the Fourteenth 
Amendment. This amendment guaranteed 
civil rights to all, regardless of race or color. 

Jan. lO. — Congress passes a bill providing 
for " universal suffrage " in the territories. 

Jan. 3!>. — President Johnson vetoes the 
bill to admit Nebraska. 

Fel*. 6. — Delaware and Louisiana reject 
Constitutional amendment. 

Fel>. 8. — Nebraska admitted as a State. 

Fel>. 25.— Tenure of Office bill passed 
over President's veto. This bill makes the 
consent of the Senate necessary- before the 
President can remove any person from a civil 
office. 

Feb. 30. — Announced at Washington that 
Russia cedes Alaska to the United States. 

April 11. — Site conveyed to the United 
States government for post-office in New York 
city. 

Iflay 3. — Eight-hour riots in Chicago. 

Hay O. — General strike of workingmen 
throughout the States. 

]flay 13. — Jefferson Davis admitted to bail 
at Richmond, Va. 

June 3.— -Gen. Shei'idan removes Gen. 
Welles, of Louisiana, and on the 6th appoints 
B. F. Flanders, Governor. 

July 11.— Reciprocity treaty between the 
United States and the Hawaiian "islands. 

July 34.— New York States Constitu- 
tional Convention rejects the proposition of 
woman suffrage. 

July 30.— Genrral Sheridan removes 
Governor Throckmorton, of Texas. 

Aug'. 5. — Secretary Stanton is requested 
by the President to resign, but refuses. 

Aug. 13.— Stanton suspended, and Gen- 



Waukegan — Cotitittued. 



HORSESHOEING. 

UNLAY & RAFTIS, Horseshoeing and General 
Job Work, Washington st. 



D 



PAINTER. 

b.^hTmorkell, 

House, Sig'ii, Carriage and Ornamental 

Dealer in 

PAINTS, OILS, VARNISHES, PUTTT, 

GLASS, ETC., 

Shop, First Door North of Waukegan House 



PUMP MANUFACTURERS. 

L & DOUGLASS, J 

Celebrated Star Pump. 



"pOWELL & DOUGLASS, Manufacturers of the 



SICKLE GRINDER. 

The Boss Sickle Grinder- 

[TRADK-MARK PATENTED.] n'^ 

Every Farmer should Have One. 

Simplest, most durable and perfect 

Sickle Grinder in the World. A boy 

can run it. Can be changed from an 

Oscilating to a stationary Stone in a 

moment. Is the best Grindstone 

in use for all purposes. For Sale 

^by all dealers. Good Agents and 

^jSJcanvassers wanted. POWELL, 

^^ STEVENS & DOUGLAS, Wau- 

is^ kegan, Illinois. 




TAILOR. 

MERCHANT, JAMES, Merchant Tailor, Genesee 
St. Established 1877. 



MONMOUTH, ILLS. 



ATTORNEY AT LAW. 

, E 

Square. 



WILLITS, ELIAS, Attorney at Law, south side 
S 



BANK, 

IRST NATIONAL BANK, cor. Broadway and 
Public square. 



F 



BARBER, 

SCHIEBEL, M., Bathing and Hairdressing, cor. 
Main and Public square. 

GUNSMITH. 

HAYDEN, D. S., Gunsmith, 
S. Main st. 

HOTEL. 

BALDWIN HOUSE, 

ESTABLISHED 1856. 

MONMOUTH, ILLS. 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OF THE CENTURY. 



197 



Monmouth — Continued. 



MEAT MAEKET. 

G. KOBLER, 

Pioneer* ]Meat M^arket, 

S. MAIN ST., MONMOUTH, ILLS. 
PHOTOGRAPHERS. 

FOSTER, J. C. A CO., Photographers, south side 
Square. 

SEWING MACHINES, 

ALVIN M. BRUNER, General Repair Shop. 

Sewing Machine Repairing a Specialty. 

Dealer in Sewing Machines Attachments, Oils, 

Needles, Parts, etc., etc., 

First Door North of National Hotel. 



WASHING MACHINE, 

, J. I 
Broadway. 



"|V/TERR1LL, J. M., The Best Washing Machine, 



JANESVILLE, WIS. 



B 



BARBERS. 

ROWN, A., Barber and Hairdresser, 37 Mil- 
waukee St., over Davis Bros. 



RIEBE, ROB'T (successor to Wieglef), Barber 
Shop, W. Milwaukee St., over Carle's grocery. 

PALMERTER, C. N. C, Ma^ic Coal Sifter and 
Broom Holder. General Repair Shop, Frank- 

lin St. 

FURNITURE. 

M. HANSON & CO., 
Manufacturers of 

OF ALL KINDS. 



M 



HARNESS AND SADDLES, 

'ALPIN, ALEXANDER, Manufacturer of Har- 
ness, Saddles, Collars, etc., 77 N. Main st. 



INSURANCEIAND REAL ESTATE. 

WHITAKER, F., Insurance and Real Estate 
Agent, over Gazette office. 

LiyERTJTABLR 

CARTER & P.4.RKER, Livery Stable, Franklin 
St., near Corn Exchange. 

MARBLE WORKS, 

BENNETT, P. A., Monuments, Tombstones, etc., 
east side of Corn Exchange square. 



C 



PUMPS. 

ALF, E., Driven Well and Deep Well Pumps 
Franklin St. 



SALOON. 

BUCKINGHAM, W. H., Arcade Saloon, Wines, 
Liquors and Cigars, 54 Main st. 



eral Grant appointed Secretary of War ad in- 
terim. 

A.u.g'. W . — General Sheridan relieved at 
New Orleans. 

Aug. 19. — National Labor Congress meets 
at Chicago. 

Sept. 8. — President issues amnesty proc- 
lamation. 

Sept. 30. — Negro riots in Savannah, 
Georgia. 

Oct. 3.— Whisky riot in Philadelphia. 

I\ov. 3. — General Sherman announces In- 
dian war at an end. 

j\'ov. 14:. — Denmark concludes a treaty, 
ceding and selling the islands of St. Thonaas, 
San Juan, and Santa Cruz to the United 
States. 

]\ov. S3. — Jefferson Davis returns to 
Richmond, Va. 

l>ec. 7. — Resolution of Judiciary Com- 
mittee to impeach President Johnson, voted 
down in the House — 102 to 57. 
1S68. 

jra.li. 3. — Governor Flanders of Louisiana 
resigned, and Joshua Baker was appointed his 
successor by Gen. Hancock. 

JTan. 5.— United States Military Asylum 
at Augusta, Me., destroyed by fire. 

Jan. 6.— Congress met. The President 
censured in the House for removing General 
Sheridan. 

Gen. Meade assumed command of the third 
military district, consisting of Alabama, Geor- 
gia and Florida. 

House of Representatives passes bill making 
eight hours a day's work for Government la- 
borers. 

Jan. lO. — Secretary Seward announced 
to the House that 21 States had ratified the 
14th article of the amendment to the Constitu- 
tion. 

Jan. 11. — The Chinese Government ap- 
pointed Anson Burlingame, formerly United 
States Minister in Pekin, its special envoy 
to all the treaty powers, at a salary of $40,- 
000. 

Jan. 13.— The U. S. House of Represen- 
tatives passed a bill declaring that five mem- 
bers shall constitute a quorum of the Supreme 
Court, and that a concurrence of two-thirds of 
all the members shall be necessary to a deci- 
sion adverse to the validity of any law passed 
by Congress. 
" The Senate reinstates Stanton. 

Jan. 14. — The Virginia Constitutional 
Convention declared that Virginia shall for- 
ever remain in the Union and that slavery 
is forever abolished in the State. 

General Grant vacates War Office in favor of 
Secretary Stanton. 

Jan. 15. — Gen. Pope assigned to the com- 
mand of the Department of the Lakes with 
headquarters at Detroit. 

Jan. 34. — Fifty thousand American 
breech-loading rifles ordered by the Spanish 
Minister of War. 

j Jan. 39.— The President instructed Gen. 
Grant in writing not to obey any orders from 



198 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



Keokuk Northern Lin 




Daily Line of Steamers 



BETWKETV 



ST.LOUlS4ST.PAUL! 

One of the following Side-TT^ eel Passenger Steamers leaves 

St. Louis Dail> at 4:00 P. IVI. 



IiE^i"XJIl]XI]N O LEi^AEs^ 



St. Paul Daily at 9:00 A. M. 

Connecting at all intermediate points with Railroads tor all points East, 
West, North and South. 

OOLDEN EAGLE, MINNEAPOLIS, 

WAR EAOLE, DUBUQUE, 

CLINTON, NORTHWESTERN, 

ALEX. MITCHELL, MINNESOTA, 
REH WING, BELLE of La CROSSE, 



ROB ROY, 



LAKE -SUPERIOR. 



These Steamers are First-Class in every respect; are large and commodious (from 225 
to 275 feet in length ; cabins full length. Upper Decks exclusively for use of passengers. 
Rooms large and well ventilated; beds clean and comfortable. The tables are supplied at 
all times with the best the market affords. Every facility is given Excursionists to see the 
many points of interest along the route. 

Through Tickets for Sale at all Principal Points. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



1 99 




MOODY AND SANKEY T ERNACLE, CHICAGO. 



DH. JL. C. OIiZIT'S 

PRIVATE HOSPITAL, 

187 East Washington Street, CHICAG-O, ILL. 

For the cure of all Chronic and Confidential Diseases of either sex, particularly those of a 
long standing and complicated character, those having failed to find relief elsewhere 
specially invited to call or write; private board for patients at reasonable charges. 

Marriage Onide, 275 pages. Information for the young and middle-aged, a 
valuable treatise for the married and those contemplating mai-riage, everybody should get 
this book that desires to be healthy and happy in th; marriage relation. Sent to any ad- 
dress sealed on receipt of 50 cents. Address ■ •, 

.. .A.. <3r. OTLmITSO^. 



.A-KTID :Sk/LO 



HIKTES 



HABITS absolutely and speedily cured; painless and no publicity. Send two stamps for 
particulars, with book on Opium-eating and guide to health. OR. CARXiTOX, 
187 East Washington Street, CHICAOO. IL.Ii. 



200 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OF THE CENTURY. 



the War Department, unless authorized by him- 
self. 

Feb. 5, — Congress passed a bill author- 
izing the Secretary of War to employ counsel 
to defend Generals or other persons entrusted 
with reconstruction in cases brought against 
them for their acts under the reconstruction 
laws. 

Thermometer 51 degrees below zero in Wis- 
consin. 

Fel>. 13. — Another attempt to impeach 
President Johnson. 

Feb. 18. — Senate bill passed for the re- 
duction of the army. 

Feb. SO. — New Jersey Legistature with- 
•drew ratification of proposed Fourteenth Con- 
stitutional Amendment. 

Feb. 31. — The President ordered the re- 
moval of Secretary Stanton from the war 
office, and authorized Gen. Thomas to act as 
Secretary of War ad interim. Stanton de- 
cided to retain personal possession of the office 
until action in the matter be taken by the Sen- 
ate. The Senate disapproved the action of 
the President, declaring it to be unconstitu- 
tional. 

Feb. 33. — Adjutant-General Thomas ar- 
rested for violation of the tenure of office bill 
on complaint of Secretary Stanton. He is re- 
leased on $10,000 bail. 

Feb. 33. — Conclusion of a treaty between 
the North German Confederation and the 
United States, concerning the nationality of 
persons emigrating from one of the two coun- 
tries to the other. 

Feb. 3-1.— The United States House of Re- 
presentatives resolve by a vote of 126 to 47, 
that ''Andrew Johnson, President of the 
United States, be impeached of high crimes 
and misdemeanors." The President sent a 
message to the Senate vindicating his posi- 
tion. 

Feb. 3S. — The Committee of the Hovise 
appointed Boutwell, Stevens, Bingham and 
Wilson a sub-committee to take evidence and 
prepare articles of impeachment. 

The House informed the Senate and present- 
ed their action in regard to the impeachment 
•of President Johnson. 

Governor Ward, of New Jersey, vetoed reso- 
lution of Legislature withdrawing ratification 
of Fourteenth Amendment. 

The Florida Convention adopted the new 
Constitution. 

Feb. 3C — General L. Thomas discharged 
from arrest and began a suit against Secre- 
tary Stanton for false imprisonment and ma- 
licious prosecution, setting his damages at 
$150,000. 

An amendatory reconstruction bill passed 
Congress, providing, that any election in the 
Southern States should be decided by a major- 
ity of the votes actually cast. 

Marcb 3. — The Senate adopted a code of 
procedure for an impeachment trial. 

The House adopted nine articles of impeach- 
ment and appointed seven managers of the im- 
peachment trial. 

March 5. — New Jersey Senate passes 
over Gov. Ward's veto as to amendment; lower 
House does the same. 

March 6. — President Johnson summoned 



Janesville — Continued. 



STOVES, HARDWAKE, ETC. 

BENNETT, W. S. & CO., Stovee, Hardware, 
Farming Tools, etc., 17 W. Milwaukee st. 



TAILOR 

PENTON, GEORGE, Merchant Tailor, 
N. Main st. 



TOBACCO AND CIGARS. 



KNUDSON & SUCHANEK, Cigar Manufacturers 
and Tobacconists, N. Main st. 



veterinary surgeons. 

drTjTbrown^&^on, 

veterinary surgeons, 

East End Court St. Bridge. 



WAGON MAKER. 

WHIFFEN, ISAAC A., Wagon and Carriage, 
Jobbing and Repair Shop, Franklin st. 



H 



WATCHES AND CLOCKS, 

ORN, GEORGE, Watch and Clockmaker, also 
Dealer in Jewelrj', 46 Main st. 



KENOSHA, WIS. 



BOOTS AND SHOES. 
Established 1860. 

LYMAN & SON, 

Dealers in 

FINE BOOTS & SHOES, 

Cor. Main & Market JStis., 

KENOSHA. 



C. L. ELY, Dealer in 

FINE BOOTS AND SHOES 

90 MAIN ST. Established 1845. 



DRY GOODS, ETC. 
Established 1862. 

SETH DOAN, 

Dealer in 

DRY GOODS & NOTIONS, 

MAIN STREET. 



Established 1861. 

BENDT & HANSEN, 

Dealers in 

DRY GOODS, GROCEEIES, 

GLASSWARE & YANKEE NOTIONS 

KENOSHA, WIS. 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OF THE CENTURY. 



201 



Kenosha — Continued. 



DET GOODS, ETC, 

CBANET, M., Dealer in Dry Goods and Cloth- 
ing, 62 Main St. Established 1870. 

DRUGGIST. 

CLABK, H. E., Druggist, 
Main Bt. 

GENERAL STORE, 

CAMERON, D., General Store, 
Main st. 

HARDWARE, 

^'^""^^^pTbECKErT&SON, Dealers in 

Hardware, Stoves and Agricallaral Implements, 

MAIN STREET. 



c 



HOTEL, 

ITT HOTEL, T. J. Meyers, Prop., 

Market st. near Main st. 

WATCHES AND JEWELRY, 



MILLER, M. A., Dealer in Jewelry & Watches, 
Main st. 



IOWA CITY. IOWA. 



BAKERY AND CONFECTIONERY. 

VICTOR, GEO. F., Avenue Bakery, Confectionery 
& Cigars, City ave. near Dubuque st. 

BARBER. 

REESE, C, Boston Barber Shop, 
Dubuque st. near College st. 

BLACKSMITH, 

PORCH, L. D., Blacksmithing, Repairing and 
Horseshoeing, College & Capitol sts. 

~~ BOOKS AND STATIONERY. ' 

ALLIIS , WILSON & SMITH, 
Wholesale and retail dealers In 

And General Agents for Iowa City Paper Mills, 
Clinton St., opposite University. 



B 



BOOTS AND SHOES. 

RUCE & SPENCER, Manufac's of Boots & Shoes 
Repairing done, Dubuque st. near avenue. 



FLANNAGAN, JOHN S.,Manrr of Boots & S-hoes, 
Dubuque st. near College st. 

I7^RIAUF, v.. Manufacturer of Boots & Shoes, 
City Avenue near Dubuque st. 

KRAMER, JACOB, Manufac'r of Boots & Shoes, 
Dubuque st. 

LEIBROCK, D., Manufacturer of Boots & Shoes, 
College St. near Clinton st. 

CARRIAGES AND WAGONS. 

STIMMEL, D. J., Carriages, Wagons, Open & 
Top Buggies, etc.. College st. near Capitol st. 



to appear before the courts of impeachment, on 
the 18th of March. 

Iflarcli 18. — The House passed the bill to 
abolish the tax on manufacturers. 

Trial of Jeflf Davis postponed until April 
14th. 

l^larcli 13. — The President asked forty 
days' time to prepare his answer to the articles 
of impeachment. The Senate extended the 
time till March 23. 

l^Iarcli 18. — The House passed the bill 
providing that in case of the death or removal 
of the Chief Justice, the senior Associate Jus- 
tice of the Supreme Court shall perform the 
duties of Chief Justice. 

Admiral Farragut received by the Pope of 
Rome. • 

March S3.— The High Court of Impeach- 
ment opened for the trial of President Johnson. 
The President filed his answer to the articles of 
impeachment. His counsel asks for further 
delay. 

j^larcli 96. — The Senate passed the Ha- 
beas Corpus appeal bill over the President's 
veto. They also ratified the treaty with the 
North German Confederation, recognizing the 
rights of naturalized citizens. 

IWlarch 37. — The House passed the Su- 
preme Court bill over the President's veto. 

]^Iarcli 28. — A new indictment found 
against Jeff. Davis by the United States Grand 
Jury at Richmond. 

WlarcltSO. — G. A. Ashburn, a member of 
the Constitutional Convention, assassinated at 
Columbus, Ga. 

Gen. B. F. Butler of Massachusetts, opened 
in the Court of Impeachment, the prosecution 
on the part of the managers. 

April 3. — North German Parliament 
passes the naturalizationtreaty with the United 
States. 

April 4. — The case for the prosecution 
in the Court of Impeachment closed. 

General Schofield appointed Henry H. Wells 
Governor of Virginia. 

April 6. — Michigan votes against negro 
suffrage. 

April 9. — The counsel for President 
Johnson opened the argument for the defense 
in the Court of Impeachment. 

April 30. — Evidence in the impeachment 
case closed. 

April 33.— Charles Dickens left the 
United States. 

April 34:. — A treaty of peace concluded 
with the Sioux Indians. 

J^Iay 6. — Argument in the impeachment 
trial closed. 

May 31. — U. S. Grant nominated by the 
Repubricans at Chicago as candidate for 
President and Schuyler Colfax for Vice-Presi- 
dent. 

May 33. — Arrival of Chinese Embassy in 
New York. 

May 36. — Impeacnment trial concluded, 
and the President fround not guilty. 

May 30.— The Grand Army of the Re- 
public decorated with flowers the graves of the 
Union soldiers in the cemeteries throughout 
the country. 



202 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 




Iim 



— roEt — 





The Most Direct Route 

FROM INDIANAPOLIS TO 

Ft.Wayne,Toledo and Detroit, 

AND THE 

OF THE 

Shortest Line from Chicago, 

And the Only Line Running Through to Indianapolis, 
From 3Iichigan City and La Porte, 

WITHOUT CHANCE. 



Woodruff Parlor and Sleeping Cars on all Night Trains. 



F. P. WADE, Gen. Pass. & T'k't Ag't. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



203 




Iowa State Building;, Centennial £xpo!i)ition, Philadelphia.— 

Is built entirely ot wood, with portico supported by four columns. It is two stories high, 
divided olF into rooms for the reception of visitors, ladies' parlor, and the keeping of mat- 
ters of special interest to the state. It was numerously visited during the Centennial by 
persons from all parts of the country, and especially from Iowa. At the close of the Ex- 
hibition it was sold for $575 to Mr. Bower, of New Jersey', who intends removing it to his 
farm, about 10 miles from Camden, N. J. 



NATIONAL MARBLE WORKS. 224 E. THIRD ST. 






is 



iMioisr'urnycEnsrTs . 



1 834. 1 S'TT'. 

DAVZS <& CJLMF, 

Manufacturers of and Dealers in 

Marble, Slate and Iron Mantels, 

WELL TUBING, DRAIN, SE WER & CULVERT PIPES. 

Offiee, SS4 East Tliird St,, I>a.A enport. 



OEIMIEiTT I^IIF'E. 



'>^ 



< 
> 



Vi 



CEMENT PIPE WORKS, COR. FOURTH AND IOWA. 



204 



INPORTANT EVENTS OF A CENTURY. 



1S68. 

June 1. — Ex-President James Buchanan 
dies. 

June 3. — Trial of JefF. Davis again post- 
poned till November. 

June -4. — Ex-President Buchanan buried 
at Wheatland, Penn. 

June lO. — The Senate passed a bill for 
the admission of the Southern States with only 
five negative votes. 

June 13. — Reverdy Johnson confirmed 
as Minister to England. 

June IC — Governor Humphreys, of Mis- 
sissippi, removed by General McDowell, and 
General Ames appointed military governor in 
his stead. 

June 19. — The House passed the Senate 
bill, giving thanks to Secretary Stanton. 

June 30. — The House passed the bill for 
the admission of Arkansas over the President's 
veto without debate. 

June 33. — King of Belgium reviews 
United States squadron under Farragut off 
Ostend. 

June 3-1. — The Senate ratified the 
Chinese treaty. The House passed a bill for 
the immediate reorganization of the States of 
Virginia, Mississippi and Texas. 

June 35. — The Freedman's Bureau bill 
passed over the President's vote. 

July 41. — President Johnson issued a 
proclamation of general amnesty and pardon 
to all engaged in the late rebellion except 
those already indicted for treason or other 
felony. 

July 11. — Com. James P. Miller died at 
Charleston, Mass., aged 76 years. 

July 17. — The Senate passed the bill ap- 
propriating .'f?, 200, 000 in coin for the payment 
of Alaska. 

Moses Yale Beach, American journalist, for 
many years proprietor of the New York Sim, 
died, aged 68 years. 

July 31. — Congress passed a resolution 
declaring the 14th article ratified. The Senate 
passed a resolution appealing to the Turkish 
government in behalf of the Cretans. 

July 31. — President orders Secretary of 
War to withdraw military forces from South- 
ern States represented in Congress. 

July 37. — Jefferson Davis and family sail 
from Quebec for England. 

The government of Germany stopped all pros- 
ecutions against adopted citizens of America, 
of German birth. 

Aug'. 1.— General Jeff. C. Davis assigned 
to the command of the Military district of Alas- 
ka. 

Aug. 3.--Mr. Washburn indignantly de- 
nied the charge of conspiracy against President 
Lopez. 

Failure of Atlantic cable of 1866. 

Charles G. Halpine, better known as "Miles 
'Riley," died at New York, aged .39 years. 

The "first colored jury impanneled in Tenn., at 
Nashville. 

A^ig. ll.~Thaddeus Stevens, M. C. from 
Penn., died at Washington, aged 75 years. 

Gen. Gillem assumed the command of the 
department of Mississippi. 



I ow A — Contin ned. 



CLOTHIN&. 

GOLDSCHMIDT & SAWYER, Chicago One Price 
Clothing House, Clinton st. 

DENTIST, 

PEARCE, I. D., Dentist, 
Clinton st. 



GROCERIES AND PROVISIONS. 

A/TAHER, DENNIS, Groceries Provisions & Fam- 

IVJL ily Supplies, Dubuque st. near College st. 



LAUNDRY, 

SAGER, J. A., City Laundry, 
Cor. Linn st. & Iowa ave, 

MARBLE WORES. ~ 

IOWA CITY MARBLE WORKS. 

Manufacturer of 
FOREIGN & AMERICAN MARBLE, 

Clinton st., opposite Court House, 
IOWA CITY, IOWA. 

MILLER, J. U., Manf r of all kinds of Marble 
Work, College st. near Dubuque st. 



PAINTS AND OILS. 

AHANA,R. B. & CO., Paints, Oils, Glass & 
Wall Paper, Washington st. 



M 



PHRENOLOGISTS. 

MRS. M. DEUELL, 

CIjAIKVOYANT and PHBENOI.OGIST, 

BURLINGTON STREET, 
One door East of CHinton St., near Phinney House. 

D. R. S. PRYSE. 

PiosonMcal Plreioteist, 

Lecturer and Practical Delineator of Character. 

Graduated at the American Phrenological Insti- 
tute of Fowler &; Wells, N. Y., Class 68. 

The best of references. 

IOWA CITY. 

SALOONS AND RESTAURANTS. 

BATJMER, J. B., Milwaukee Lager Beer Saloon, 
lowaave., East of P. O. 



D 



EHNER, JOSEPH, Wine & Oyster Parlor, 

Washington st. 



JEWING MACHINES^ 

TAYLOR, L. G.,Agt. for Singer Sewing Machines 
& Wood's Organs, Clinton st. opp. University. 

STOVES AND TINWARE, 

Established 1867. 

WM. LOUIS & BKO., 

Dealers in 

STOVES, T I 3Sr TAT" -A. I?, E , 

And all kinds of Pumps, 
DUBUQUE STREET, NEAR AVENUE, 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OF THE CENTURY. 



205 



Iowa City — Continued. 



VINEGAR, 

HAM, D., Sells Pure Cidar Vinegar and buys 
Country Produce, Dubuque st. 

WATCHES AND JEWELRY. 

STICKLER, VAL., Watchmaker & Jeweler, 
Clinton st., opposite University. 



YPSILANTI, MICH. 



CARRIAGES AND SPRINGS. 

BEACH ISaSTSuFKM CO., 

Owners and exclusive manufacturers of the 

Beach Patent Shifting Seat Carriage Bodies, 

Also Pha?ton, Yacht, Piano and Hearse Bod- 
ies of all kinds, and Shifting Seat, Swell 
Body,Portland andSquare-box Sleighs, 
Wood-work unfinished to Carriage 
Makers. Send for price list. 
S. M. CUTCHEON, H. BATCHELDER, 

President. Secretary. 

CURTIS, H. M. & CO., Manf's of End and Side 
Bar Springs for Phtetons and Carriages. 

DRUGGIST. 

Wm. Grossman, 



Drugs, Medicines, Fine Chemicals, Fancy and 
Toilet Articles. 

r>EI*OT r>R,TJG^ STOriE. 

CROSS STREET. 



H 



HAIR WORK. 

AIR WORK MANUFACTURED AND FOR SALE 

by Jane Harris and Norah Cary, Post Block 



PHOTOGRAPHER. 

PARSONS, MRS. J. H., Photographers^ostBloclT. 
Business and Furniture for sale. 

TAILORING AND CLEANING. 
E. ELLIOTT, 

CLOTHES MADE, CLEANED AND REPAIRED, 

Huron st. opposite Freeman's Hall. 
Established 18T6. 

WINE AND BILLIARD SALOON. 

STERNBERG, DAVID, Billiards &^^ii^OBeer& 
Liquor Palace, Congress st. 



LAFAYETTE, IND. 



-^_ ^ATTORNEYS AT LAW. 

DE HART, R. P., Attorney a^Law^ 
L 



Lafayette, Ind. 



JONES & MILLER, Attomej s at Law, 
641, 



641/^ Main st. 



Alls'. 13. — Terrible earthquake in South 
America. A large number of towns in Ecua- 
dor and Peru entirely destroyed. Great damage 
done to the buildings in Quito. The loss of 
life estimated at 30,000. 

The U. S. ship Fredonia, at Arica, Peru, was 
dashed to pieces and her crew lost. The man- 
of-war Wataree was carried half a mile inland 
by a tidal wave. 

Sept. 9. — Chinese Embassy sail for Eu- 
rope. 

Sept. 18. — Gen. Hindman assassinated at 
Helena, Arkansas. 

Death of Seba Smith, author of "Major Jack 
Downing's Letters," aged 76. 

Oct. 7. — Death of Gen. Adam J. Slemmer, 
at Fort Laraniine. 

Randolph, a negro preacher and a member of 
the South Carolina Senate, assassinated at 
Cokesville. 

James Hind, member of Congress from Ar- 
kansas assassinated. 

]\'ov. 3. — Iowa and Minnesota vote in 
favor of negro suffrage, and Missouti against 
it. 

^'ov. 33. — Gen. Howard issued an order 
for the discontinuance of the Freedmen's Bu- 
reau after January 1st, except the educational 
department and the collection of money due to 
soldiers. 

Dec 35. --President Johnson issued a uni- 
versal amnesty proclamation. 

Dec. 39.--Mosby Clark, a revolutionary 
soldier, died at Richmond, Va.,at the advanced 
age of 121 years. 

I>ec. 31. — Gen. Sheridan captured the In- 
dian chiefs, Santanta and Lone Wolf. 

The U. S. House of Representatives passed 
a resolution relative to amendments to the 
naturalization laws by a vote of 125 to 32; the 
bill regulating the duties on imported copper 
and copper ores by a vote of 105 to 51; also a 
bill proxiding for the transfer of the Indian 
Bureau from the Department of the Interior to 
the War department, by 116 to 33. 

The House passed the bill repealing an act 
prohibiting the organization of militia in all 
the reconstructed States except Georgia; also 
a resolution allowing women in the govern- 
ment employ the wages of men for the same 
work 

The Senate denounced the views of Presi- 
dent Johnson on the national debt; also passed 
a resolution disapproving the President's finan- 
cial recommendations. 

The Secretary of the Navy accepted the 
transfer of League Island by the city of 
Philadelphia to the Government for a navy 
yard. 

1869. 

•Fa.li. 1. — General Grant holds a public re- 
ception in Independence Hall, Philadelphia. 

Fel>. 30. — Martial law declared in Tennes- 
see. 

Fel>. 33>36. — Congress passes Fifteenth 
Amendment. Kansas is the first State ( Feb. 
27 ), to ratify it, though imperfectly, and Dela- 
ware the first to reject it. 

j^Iarcli 35. — Pennsylvania ratifies Fif- 
teenth Amendment. 



206 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



Lafayette — Contitiued. 



^iTTORNETS^TJAW 

If: 



Collections a specialty. 7 \ TMrl St, 



BAKERY AND CONFECTIONEEY, 



K 



AHL, JOHN, (Established 1872.) Bakery and 
Confectionery, 69 Nineth st. 



J. B. Enger. 



Geo. Rogers. 



Ruger & Rogers, 

(Established 1861,) 
MAW UFACTURING 

CONFECTIONERS (Si BAKERS, 

Jobbers of fanned Goods, Fruits, Spices, 
Chei se. Nuts, &c. 

13 Xorth 5th 8r 90 Main St. 

BARBEES. 

ALDRICH, H. A., (Established 1877,) Barber, 
No. 71 N. 9th St. 

LORCHER, JOHN, Bath House and Hair Dress- 
ing Rooms, 83 Columbia st. 

TOOTLE, GENERAL, Shaving and Hair Dressing 
Saloon, No. 16 S. 5th st. 

BLACKSMITHS AND HORSE SHOEES. 

^UGH e¥ &1/v1e GNIE rT 

Plough and Wagon Manufacturers, 

mtul Mi^thmth 

AND HORSE SHOEIXO, 

No. 14 S. SECOND ST. 



J. W. FuUenlove, 

SPECIAL ATTENTION GIVEN 
TO DISEASED FEET. 



Established 1862, 



No. 3 1 SOUTH ST. 



O 



DEL & TRIES, (Established 1877,) General 
Blacksmithing and Horse Shoeing, 8 S. 8th st. 



R 



ANK, G. W., General Blacksmithing and Horse 
Shoeing, 20 S. 2nd st. Established 1851. 



BOOTS AND SHOES. 



Vif.G0M0C)[&C0. 

Manufacturers and Wholesale Dealers in 

Boots & Shoes, 

LAFAYETTE, IND. 

"VTOYES, E. H., Mamifacturer and Dealer in Boots 



and Shoes, 134 Main st. 



Lafayette — Continued. 



BUSINESS COLLEGE. 

Star Ij Business CoUep 

AND 

TEIiEGRAPH IXSTITUTE. 

P. W. Kennedy, Principal, 

Ball's Block, Columbia St. 

DENTISTS. 

FAHNESTOCK, J. W., Dentist, 
Cor. 5th &Mainets. 



M 



eCORMACK, E. A., Dentist, 



93V4 Columbia st. 



DRESS AND CLOAK MAKING, 

HASKETT, MRS. M., Dressmaker, 
12014 Columbia st. 



IL.4.TT, MRS. M., Dressmaker, 



68 N. 4th St. 



WEITZEL, MRS. J., Dress and Cloak Making, 
63 N. 6th St. 



DEUGGISTS. 

cCLURE & BROLTLLETTE, Druggists, 

81 Columbia st. 



M 



B.H.BOYDJ.D, 

BRUGGI8T 

AND HAHUrACTURIHfi CHEMIST, 

PROPRIETOR OF 

Boyd's Chloroform Elixir, 

Boyd's Ape Reiedy, Boyd's Coiigli SyroD, 



AND THE 



Meilcan Mustang Goniitioii Fowler 

6S MAIN ST., OPPOSITE ARTESIAN WELL. 

^^^^^ ^ DEY GOODS, 

GERNON, G. D., Staple and Fancy Dry Goods, 
Notions, ifec, 86 Columbia st. 

FLOEISTS, 

lASrCHAMBERr& COT 

ET-ir 



Greenhouse, cor. 6th ^^ Jforth Sts. 

Bouquets, Cut Flowers, Floral Baskets, and 
Wire Designs for Cut Flowers in every Variety, 
Greenhouse and Bedding Plants at all times. Fine 
Commercial M'ork, Wedding and Ball invitations, 
in the execution of which we are unequaled. No 
business transacted on the Sabbath, except for 
funeral occasions. 



N 



GEOCEES. 

ELSON, 0., & CO., Family Groceries and Pro- 
visions, 109 Columbia st. 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OF THE CENTURY. 



207 




14 



208 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OF THE CENTURY. 



1869. 

April 13. — Senate rejects Alabama treaty 
with Great Britain. 

^Ia,y 13. — Woman Suffrage Convention in 
New York city. 

]flay lO. — President Grant proclaims that 
there shall be no reduction in Government la- 
borers' wages because of reduction of hours. 

June 18.— Hon. Henry J. Raymond, of 
Jt". r. Times, dies. 

July 13.--Completion of Atlantic cable 
from Brest to St. Pierre; thence to Duxbury, 
Massachusetts. 

Aug:. 16. — National Labor Convention, 
Philadelphia. 

Sept. 1.— National Temperance Conven- 
tion, Chicago. 

Sept. 8.— Hon. William Pitt Fessenden, 
dies. 

Sept. lO.— Hon. John Bell dies. 

Sept. IC— Hon. John Minor Botts dies. 

Sept. 3-1.— Black Friday. 

Oct. 8.--Virginia ratifies Fourteenth and 
Fifteenth Amendments. 

Ex-Presideut Franklin Pierce dies. 

]^ov. ■!.— George Peabody dies. 

I\ov. 6.— iVdmiral Charles Stewart dies. 

T\'ov. 34.— National Woman-suffrage Con- 
vention, Cleveland, Ohio, and Henry Ward 
Beecher chosen President. 

I>ec. lO.— National Colored Labor Conven- 
tion, Washington. 
I>ec. 34.— Hon. Edwin M. Stanton dies. 

isro. 

Jan. 31.-Prince Arthur, third son of 
Queen Victoria, arrived in New York. Three 
days later he was introduced to President 
Grant by the British Minister, and was honored 
with a grand ball in the Masonic Temple in 
Washington. 

Jim. 30.— Virginia readmitted into the 
Union. 

Fel». 9.— U. S. Signal Bureau established 
by Act of Congress. 

F'<'1>. 17.— Mississippi re-admitted into 
the Union. 

reto. 33.— Hon. Anson Burlingame dies. 

Marcli 38.— Major-General George H. 
Thomas dies. 

MarelB 39.— Texas re-admitted to rep- 
resentation in Congress, thus completing the 
work of reconstruction. 

Marcli 30.— President Grant announces 
the adoption of the Fifteenth Amendment. 

July 13.— Admiral John A. Dahlgren 
dies. 

Aug:. 14.— Admiral David G. Farrao-ut 
dies. " 

Aug. 15.— National Labor Congress, Cin- 
cinnati. 

Aug;. 33.— President Grant issues a proc- 
lamation enjoining neutrality as to war be- 
tween France and Prussia. 

Aug:. 33.— Irish National Congress con- 
venes, Cincinnati. 

Oct. 4.— Second Southern Commercial 
Convention, Cincinnati. 



Lafayeyte — Contimied. 



GROCERS, 

C. PAIGE& CO., 

lEstablished 1866,) 

GrocBriBs, Floir ai FbbA, 

Cor. 9th «& Cincinnati Sts. 

RONAN, JOHN, Groceries, Provisions, Flour, 
Wines and Liquors, 188 N. 6th St. 

Wm. Schilling. John B. Ruger. 

WM. SCHILLINGS CO. 

Commission Merchants 

AND 

GROCERS, 

133 MAIN ST. Fruits, Produce, Game, &c. 

HARDWARE. 

BENNEWITZ, C, * BRO., Hardware, Stoves and 
Tinware, 177 Main st. 

E,W.StraiiDlier&CB. 

(Successors to HEATH & CO.) 

WHOLESALE 

HARDWARE 

132 Main ^ 9 N. 6th St. 

HOTELS. 

GERMANI.i HOTEL, South and iiud sts. Rates, 
$1.50 per day. J. P. Welschbillig, Prop. 



s 





L] 1 

LaFayette, Indiana. 

Proprietor. Clerks. 



LIVERY AND FEED STABLES, 

AIRD, .JAMES W., (Established 1865,) Ex- 
change, Livery and Boarding Stable, So. & 3d. 

TAYLOR, S. 0., (Established 1861.) Livery, Feed 
and Sale Stable, 63 & 65 S. 3rd st. 



B 



LOOKING GLASS AND FRAMES, 

GRIEVE, HENRY, Manufacturer of Picture 
Frames and Looking Glasses, 46 Main st. 



MEAT MARKETS. 

JST. & WM., De 
Salt Meats, 207 Main et. 



"DONNER, GUST. &WM., Dealer in Freeh and 



MUELLER, DANIEL, (Established 1865,) Union 
"±1 - 



sMeat Market, 67 N, 9th st. 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OF THE CENTURY. 



209 



Lafayette — Continued. 



MILLINERY AND DRESSMAKING, 

Miss Nellie M. Bohan, 

1 1 g Columbia St. 

No. 1 1 North 5th St, 

JORDAN & ELDRIDGE, Millinery and Fancy 
Goods, No. 9 North 5th st. 



D 



NEWSPAPERS. 

AILT AND WEEKLY DISPATCH, J. C. Dobel- 
bower, Editor and Proprietor, 5th & Main sts 



S 



UNDAT LEADER, F. E. D. McGinley & Son, 
Proprietors, 5th & Main sts. 



PAINTERS. 



Chas. A. Davis, 

(Established 1872,) 



80 Ferry Street. 

Graining, Paper Hanging and Decorating neatly 
executed at reasonable rates. 



PHOTOGRAPHERS. 
TTyRIGHT, C. C, Photographer, 



9014 Main st. 



PRINTERS AND STATIONERS. 

'PRING & ROBERTSON, (Established 1843,) 
J Wholesale and Retail Printers and Stationers. 

physicians" 

URKE, DR. A., Eye, Ear and Throat Dispensa- 
tory, 161 Main st. 



B 



^rOUNT, DR. S. T., Physician, 



No. 93 Main street. 



SALOONS, 

RILLIANT SALOON, Wm. Fitzgerald, Proprie- 
tor, 103 Columbia st. 



B 



John Lemther^ 

Wine & Beer Saloon, 

193 E. Main IStreet. 

SCHAIBLE, GEORGE, Wine, Beer and Billiard 
Hall, 87 Columbia st. 



1870. 

Oct. 13.— Death of General Robert E. 
Lee. 

Oct. 35. — Convention in Cincinnati for 
the purpose of removing the National Capital 
from Washington to some point west. 

1871. 

Jan. 1. — Cabral, the Dominican Chief, 
denounced President Grrant as the "gratuitious 
enemy " of Dominican liberty, and called upon 
all Dominicans to oppose the sale and annexa- 
tion of the island to the United States. 

aTiin. 6. — Immense meetings of Catholics 
to protest against Italian occupation of Rome, 
held in Boston, and Cleveland, Ohio. 

J»ii. 20. — Motion to strike out the word 
"male" in the section of the Fourteenth 
Amendment giving the elective franchise to 
all male citizens; defeated in the House of 
Representatives; vote, 55 to 117. 

O'Denovan Rossa and other Fenian exiles 
arrived in New York. 

•Fan. 35. — Miss Vinnie Ream's statue of 
President Lincoln unveiled in the Rotunda of 
the Capitol at Washington. 

Juii. 36. — The income tax repealed. 

•fan. 38. — Eighty persons killed by the 
explosion of the steamboat, W. R. Authur, 
near Memphis, Tenn. 

Fel>. 1. — House of Representatives abol- 
ishes the test oath. 

A destructive lire in Virginia City, Nevada; 
two men burned to death. 

Fel». 3. — The Kensington National Bank 
of Philadelphia robbed of .flOOjOOO by thieves 
disguised as policemen. 

Feb. 4.— The Adelphia Theatre in Boston 
burned. 

Feb. 5. — The Catholics of Brooklyn in 
their churches denounced Italian occupation 
of Rome. 

Feb. 18. — The town of Halena, Arkansas, 
almost destroyed by a tornado. 

General Cabral, in a letter to Vice-President 
Colfax, denounces the union of Dominica and 
Hayti 

Feb. 33. — Arrival in New York of the 
British members of the Joint High Commis- 
sion. 

Feb. 33. — A large meeting to congratu- 
late Italy on the completion of her unity held 
in Boston. 

Capt, E. S. Jenkins, Deputy Revenue Col- 
lector and U. S. Deputy Marshall, assassinated 
at New Madrid, Mo. 

^larch 3. — The'Pennsylvania coal Riots; 
Mr. Hoffman killed and his house blown up by 
miners, atMt. Carmel, Pa. 

[flarcli. 5. — Riot by Chinamen in San 
Francisco. 

;^lai"Cli 6. — Judge Bramlette shot in 
court by a negro named Tyler, at Meridian, 
Miss. A. riot occurred in the courtroom, dur- 
hig which two negroes were killed. Tyler 
having escaped from custody, was pursued and 
killed by the sheriff and posse. The sheriff 
and his men, while executing an order to dis- 
arm the negroes of the town, rere resisted, re- 
sulting in the shooting of several of the ne- 
groes. 
IHarcli 9. — Fight between whites and 



210 



ADVERTISEMENTS, 



H. W. ROKKER, 

I J Ik) 




^A.TSm 



Blank-Book Manufacturer. 

Writing and Copying Inks— all Colors, 

MY OWN MANUFACTURE. 

Express Companies are adopting our Inks in their 

principal offices. 

No. 309 South Fifth Street, SPRINGFIELD, ILLS. 






33. XV. ILiTJSIS., 

State Printer and Binder. 

Book and Job Printing, Knling and Binding, Blank- 
Books of all kinds made to order. 

618 Washington St., Springfield, 111. 




AND DEALERS IN 

Fine Teas, Coffees, Snprs, BestBraDils of Family Flour, Canned Goois, &c. 

SECOND ST., opp. CITY HALL, 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OF THE CENTURY. 



211 




'212 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OF THE CENTURY. 



negro militia near Chester, S. C; a number of 
neg^roes were killed, and the remainder were 
driven for refuo;e into a Federal camp. 

An illicit distiller named Zacharius Youno^ 
shot by U. S. Deputy Marshall Looper, near 
Pickens Court House, S. C, Looper received 
a shot in return, from the eiFects of which he 
also died. 

Wlavcli 34:. — President Grant, by proc- 
lamation; ordered certain bands of armed men 
in South Carolina to disperse within twentj- 
days. 

]?Iarcl» JIO. — Grand parade of the col- 
ored people in New York to commenierate the 
proclamation of the Fifteenth Amendment. 

Api'il 1. — The Troy Opera House, and the 
P. E. Church of the Messiah, Greene and Clare- 
mont avenues, Brooklyn, destroyed by fire. 

A-pvil 7. — The coal riots occur at Scran- 
ton, Ha.; the rioters destroy the facilities for 
working several mines, and attack the miners 
employed in them. Governor Geary called 
out the military. 

A fire in Albany destroyed the large print- 
ing establishment of Weed, Parsons & Co.: 
loss about $.300,000. 

April lO, — Grand celebration for German 
unity and the return of peace in New York. 

Wm. Marby stoned to death by rioters at 
Tivoli, Duchess county, N. Y. 

Api'ii lO. — Kleon Rangabe, Greek Min- 
ister at ^Vashington, married in New York 
City to ]\liss De Gerolt, daughter of the Prus- 
sian Minister at Washington. 

April 36. — The United States Supreme 
Court decides that the general Government 
can not tax the salaries of State officials. 

April SO. — Sharon Tyndale, Ex-Secretary 
of the State of Illinois, murdered in Spring- 
field, 111. 

April SO. — The Apache tribe of Indians 
in Arizona attacked ; 120 braves, squaws, and 
children massacred. 

The Ku-Klux-Klan destroy a newspaper 
office in Rutheifoidton, N. C, and brutally 
maltreat Mr. Justice, a prominent Radical., 

JFtiiie 12. — Fearful storm ni Galveston, 
Texas ; houses prostrated and vessels blown 
ashore or to sea and others sunk. 

JTiii&e 13. — A hurricane devasted the coast 
of Labrador, some of the settlements totally 
destroj-ed. aiul the vessels in the harbor blown 
ashore and wi-ecked ; 300 lives lost. 

June 16. — Catholic celebration on the 
completion of the twenty-fifth j-ear of the 
Pontificate of Pius IX. 

JTiine 17. — The ratification of the treaty 
of Washington exchanged in London. 

■Tune BO. — An earthquake shock felt in 
New York and vicinity. 

Jliine 31. — Corner stone of the Capitol 
laid in Albany. 

«Fii.ly 1.— Bust of Washingtou Irving un- 
veiled in Prospect Park, Brooklyn. 



con 
ton 



JwTy 4.— President Grant proclaims the 
mplete ratification of the Treaty of Washino-- 



•July lO. • Supf. Kelso issued an order 
forbidding a proposed parade of Orange socie- 
ties in New York on the 12th Jul v. 



Lafayette — Continned. 



SALOONS, 



f 

C>;i:ORO£ BOI.ICH, Prop. 

8AL00N&RE8TAURANT, 

Nos. 165 & 167 E. Main St. 




SEWING MACHINES. 

THE HOWE MACHINE CO. H. C. Brunson, 
Agent, IIV Main st. 

THE SINGER MANUFACTIBING CO, Wm. B. 
King, Manager, cor. 5th & Columbia sts. 

SODDER or YARDS. 

HEALEY, JAMES, Yards Laid with Grass Sods, 
14 Oakland Hill. 

TAILORS. 

KIRCHHOF, FRANK, Gents' Outfitter, 
130 Main st. 



w 



INDER, .1. A., Merchant Tailor, Cleaning and 
Repairing, 93 Columbia, 



TOBACCO AND CIGARS, 



F 



LFCK, J. D., (Established 1877,) Cigar Manu- 
facturer, 9th & Brown sts. 



UNDERTAKER. 
O CUDDER, C. R., Undertaker, 



110 Main st. 



WATCHES AND JEWELRY. 

Watches, Clocks, Jewelry and Silverware, 

East Side of Public Square, 

Special attention sivcn to the Kepairing and 
Regulating of Fine Watches. 

E. M. CARR, 



f 



No. 206 E. Main St. 



WINES AND LIQUORS, 

D, THOS.. Foreign and I 
quors, No. 11 Purdue's Block, 2nd st. 



A TLWARD,^ THO)^, Foreign and Domestic Li- 



GAGEN, T. F., & BRO., Straight Kentucky Sour 
Mash Whiskies, 39 S. 2nd st. 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OF THE CENTURY. 



213 



LOGANSPORT, IND. 

BAKBERS, 

jTlirLJNDSEY^ 

Shaving and Hairdressing 

MM&it it, M§M MuiMiU Mmsi. 

blacksmiths. 
' -^ kiserT&^rain^ 
Blacksmithing and General Job Shop, 

TABERTOWN. 

BOAEDING. 

TRAIN, MRS. G. W., First-CIass Boarding at 
reasonable rates, Second and Railroad sts. 



B 



BOOTS AND SHOES. 

OSTON BOOT AND SHOE STORE, 43 Fourth St., 
J. Kauffman, manager. 



MERRITT, T. C. & CO., Manufacturers of Boots 
and Shoes, V5 Sixth St. 

CARRIAGE AND WAGON MAKERS. 

BOERGER, FREDRICK, Wagon Maker, Taber- 
towD. Established 1857. 

MmWE, EMUmES, mWMAW, 

Carriap & Wapi Maifactiirers, 

SIXTH STREET, 

Opp. Forest Mills. 

Grusenmeyer k Barrett, 

And General Repair Shop, 

TABERTOWN. Established 1S62. 



C. F. HAMAKER, 

Manufacturer of 
And Light Vehicles of every description. 

(I^^Carriage Repairing a Specialty. .^^ 
THREE DOORS EAST OF MARKET ST. ON EEL ST. 



W. M. KREIDER & SON, 

CARRIAGE AND WAGON 

MANUFACTURERS, 
Oor. SIXTH & BAC£ STS. 

Established 1849. 



1871. 

Mrs. E. G. Wharton arrested in Baltimore, 
charged with having poisoned her husband, 
Col. H. W. Wharton, her son and daughter, and 
Gen. Wm. Scott Ketchum. 

July 11. — Gov. Hoffman issues a procla- 
mation giving permission and protection to all 
persons desiring to peacefully parade on the 
12th July. Supt. Kelso revokes his order of 
the 10th 'iust. 

July 13. — Orangemen riot. On the oc- 
casioi of a procession of Protestant Orange- 
men in New York, they were maliciously at- 
tacked by the Roman Catholic Irish. Threats 
of assault having been given, the Orangemen 
were protected by the military. Stones, 
pistols, and guns being discharged at the 
militia, several were killed and wounded, when 
an order was given to the soldiers to fire on the 
rioters. Five soldiers and about a hundred 
rioters were killed. 

July 13. — Mrs. Lovel killed by lightning 
while praying at the bedside of her children, 
near St. Joseph, Mo. * 

July 19.— The crew of the Atlanta Club 
of New York beat the Harvard University crew 
in a race on the Connecticut river, at Holyoke, 
Mass. 

July 33. — A powder magazine at the 
Arsenal in Washington, D. C, explodes, and 
destroys much property. 

July 35. — Thieves gag a driver of a 
wagon of the U. S. E.xpress Company, and 
rob him of $90,000 in money and bonds in St. 
Louis, Mo. 

>July 30.— The Westfield horror. The 
steamer's boiler explodes ; 40 persons killed 
outright, and 63 injured — subsequently died. 

Aug'. 13. — Religious riot in Ogdensburg, 
N. Y. : a lecturer against Catholicity assaulted 
and his hearers dispersed by the rioters. 

JLug'. 30. — Fortv buildings burned in 
Williamsport, Pa., loss, .t!225,000. 

Aug'. 31. — Dr. Helmbold attempts to com- 
mit suicide at Long Branch, N. J. 

Aug'. 37. — A piratical band of Mexicans 
attacks the American bark Brothers oft' Santa 
Anna. After some fighting, Capt. Thurston 
and crew abandon the vessel. The crew were 
subsequently picked up by the bark Harvest 
Home, which had also been attacked, but un- 
successfully, by the same band of {jirates. 

Political riots in La Messilla, New Mexico, 
7 men killed and 30 injured. 

Sept. 1. — International scull race at Hali- 
fax, N. S. ; J.H. Sadler, of England, the victor. 

Sept. 6.— The mare Goldsmith Maid trots 
a mile in 2 minutes and 17 seconds at Milwau- 
kee, Wis. 

Sept. O. — Great fire in Bloomington, 111.; 
loss .$300,000. 

Major L. Hodge, Assistant Paymaster- 
General of the United States army, declares 
himself a defaulter of the sovernment in $500,- 
000. 

Sept. 13. — Great demonstrations in New- 
York of workingmen in favor of the eight hour 
labor system. 

Sept. 1-1.— A Are destroys the Park Place 
and Columbia Hotels, and other buildings at 
Saratoga; loss, $200,00. 

Sept. IC^Pioche, Nevada, burned ; loss. 



214 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



LoGANSPORT — Continued. 


LoGANSPORT — Cofittttued. 


CARRIA&E AUD WAGON MANUFACTURERS. 
HENRY HARTMAN. 

Established 1865. 


HAIR DEALER. 

ri^URNER, MRS. KATE, all kinds of Hair A\ ..rk 
X done to order, Broadway. 


INSURANCE. 


DENTISTS, 

"OUDD, J. W., Dentist, 

XJ 85 Broadway. 

T^E HART, WILL. M., Dentist, 

\J 47 Fourth st. 


SAMUEL M'GUIRE, 

I.1FE AND FIRE INSURANCE AND 

LOAN AGENT, 

Fourth St., opp. Court House. 


A/f ANLONE, H. T., Dentist, 

iVl 44 Fourth st. 

DETECTIVE AND COLLECTING AGENCY. 


LAUNDRIES. 

X OGANSPORT CUSTOM LAUNDRY, Geo. W, 

X_^ Crump, prop., Barnett Hou^e. 


^ALLAGhS & FMNAGA^^^^ 


'T^HOMAS, LUCY, Laundry, near cor. Sixth and 
X North sts. 


DETECTIVES, 

AND COLLECTING AGENCY. 
Oflice. cor. Fourth & Broadway 

(.McTaggart's Block). 
All Business Strictly Confidential. 


LIVERY AND SALE STABLE. . 

N. E. BOIES, 
FEED & SALE STABLE, 

—ALSO — 


DRESSMAKERS. 

T3EACH, MRS. KATIE C, Dressmaker, 
XJ 61 Broadway. 
/GRAHAM, MRS. & SISTER, Dressmaking, 43 
\jr Fourth St. 


Veterinary Surgeon, 

40 SIXTH ST. Established 1847. 


MACHINIST. 

T OGANSPORT BOILER AND MACHINE WORKS^ 

JLj a. U. McAllester, prop., at Lock Foundry 
Works. 


TTURNES, MRS. M. M., Dressmaking, 

XI 43 Fourth st. 


DRUGGIST. 

Druggist and Pharmaceutist. 
L. V^. R E D D, 

51 Market St., near Bridge, 
Fine Drugs, Chemicals, Toilet Arti- 
cles, Perfumery, etc. 

Prescriptions carefully com)3oanded. Nia;ht 


1\/I ESSINGER, PROSEUS & CO., Manf rs of Stone 
iVX Cylinder Pump, Elm & Durest sts. Est. '62. 

Tl CKER & HOWE, 

GENERAL MACHINISTS 

And Manufacturers of 

Plow, Carriage and Wagon Wood Work, 

LOGANSPORT, IND. (Est. 1807.) 


Calls promptly answered. 


MEAT MARKET. 


DRY GOODS. 

"IT'ERN BROS. & CO., Staple and Fancy Dry 
XV Goods, 70 Broadway. 

FLOUR AND FEED. 

r^RONISE, C. T., Grain, Flour, Feed and Prod- 
\J uce, 53 Sixth st. Established 1873. 

GROCERIES AND PROVISIONS. 


THOS. BECKER^ 
BUTGHSR SHOP 

All kinds of Meat kept on hand. 

MARKET STREET. 


TT'RATLI, .1. G. & CO., Groceries and Provisions, 
iV 5S Sixth St. Established 1873. 


MILLINERY, 
MRS S A DILLIE & SISTER 


HARNESS AND SADDLES. 


43 Fourth St. 


Manufacturer and Dealer in 

Harness, Saddles, Collars, 

BRIDLES, WHIPS, ROBES. 

Blankets, Brushes, Fly Nets, Etc., 

Repairing promptly attended to. 


TOLLEY, MRS. H. C, Millinery and Dressmak- 
icg, 87 Broadway. 

1\/f' MAHON, .1. F., MILLINERY AND DRESS- 
IVl MAKING, 

SHROUDS, HABITS AND BURIAI.. 
ROBES OF ALE KINDS, 

Corner Fourth and Broadway. 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OF THE CENTURY. 



215 




Connecticut State Bnildini^, Centennial !Expo!^ition, Phila.— 

Is of the Dutch Colonial style; 30 feet front by 40 feet deep, with a wing 10 feet by 20. 
The lower part of the outside of the building is constructed of scollop-fashioned shingles^ 
and the upper partis lathed and plastered. A massive stone chimney protrudes from the 
roof, and the front is relieved by an old-fashioned porch. 




Swedish School House, Centennial Exposition, Philadelphia > 

This building was erected by the government of Sweden. It is composed entirely of wood, 
either polished or oiled, and was brought from Sweden prepai^ed to be put together upont 
the grounds. The most singular part of it is that is impossible, on the exterior, to dis- 
cover a nail or screw. The boards are beveled and so joined together that no seams are visi- 
ble. It is intended to keep school there during the summer; genuine Swedish youths of 
both sexes, with teachers, will be brought over for that purpose. 



216 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OF THE CENTURY. 



1S71. 

$300,000 ; during the fire gunpowder explodes 
and kills six persons. 

Sept. 1J>. — Fire iu Virginia City, Nevada ; 
loss, $75,000. 

Sept. 21. — A statue of President Lincoln 
xinveiled in Fairmount Park, Philadelphia. 

Sept. 34.— Fire in San Francisco ; $100,- 
OOO worth of property destroyed. 

Sept. 37. — Chief Justice McKean, of Utah, 
decides against Mormons serving as grand 
jurors in Federal courts. 

Gren. Joseph H. Clanton shot and killed by 
€ol. D. M. Nelson, in Knoxville, Tenn. 

Sept. SO. — Professor Wilbur unexpectedly 
•descends from his balloon and is instantly 
killed, at Paoli, Indiana. 

Oct. 3. — Brigham Young arrested by the 
United States ^larshal for ^lormon pi-oclivi- 
ties. 

Oct. 3.— Daniel H. Wells, Mayor of Salt 
Lake City, and a Mormon bishop, arrested by 
the United States Marshal for Mormon pro- 
clivities. 

Oct. 5. — A special conference of the Mor- 
mon Church held in the Xew Tabernacle in 
Salt Lake City : the Federal authorities de- 
nounced as ''tools of the devil." 

Oct. y. — The first of the great fires in Chi- 
cago breaks out ; loss, $300,000. General 
O'Neill's filibusters seize the Canadian Cus- 
tom House and Hudson Bay Post at Pembina, 
Manitoba; they are thereupon attacked by the 
United States troops, and General O'Neill and 
his men made prisoners. 

Oct. 8. — The great fire by which Chicago 
vv'as desolated breaks out at 10 o'clock at night; 
loss, .1)190,526,000. 

The great froest fires ; Peshtigo, Wis- 
consin, destroyed b}' fire, 600 of its in- 
habitants perish; Manistee, Williamsonville, 
!Menekaumee, Marinette, and Brussels, Wis., 
l)urned ; a number of inhabitants perish. 

Oct. 9. — The great Chicago fire continues 
to rage and destroy. 

Oct. lO. — An election riot between negro 
and white roughs in Philadelphia, four men 
killed and many wounded; attempt to destroy 
the Ffess newspaper office by the roughs frus- 
trated. 

Oct. 12. — President Grant summons the 
Ku-Klux-Klan of South Carolina to disband 
and deliver up their arms and amnuuiition. 

Oct. ly. — President Grant susjiends the 
writ o{ habeas corpus in nine counties of South 
Carolina. 

Oct. 3-4.— Riot in Los Angelos, Cal., a 
mob attacks the Chinese quarter, and captures 
and hangs eighteen Chinamen. 

Oct. 2<>. — A warrant is issued for the 
arrest of Wm. M. Tweed, Jas. H. Ingersoll, 
A. J. Garvey, and E. A. Woodward, at the suit 
of Attorney-General Chamberlain. 

Oct. 37.— Wm. M. Tweed arrested and 
bailed. 

Oct. 38.— Mayor D. H. Wells, ex-Attor- 
iiey-General Hoza Stout, and Wm. Kimball 
arrested on a charge of murder in Salt Lake 
City. 

IVov. 3. — City Treasurer, James T. JIarcer, 
a.nd C. T. Yerkes, banker, of Philadelphia, 



LoGANSHORT — Cotithiued. 



MILLINERY, 

missaTweasa, 




MARKET STREET. 
Log-aiispoi't, 



Ind. 



JIUSICAL INSTRUMENTS, 

BRIDGE & STANTON, dealers in all kinds of Mu- 
sical Instruments. 87 Broadway. 

NEWSPAPERS, 

IT'VENINGNEWS, 
U Z. Hunt, Editor & Proprietor. 

PRATT & CO., Publishers of Daily and Weekly 
Journal. 



PHYSICIANS, 

ALL, PROF. R. R.-M. & Ph'd— Chronic Dis- 
eases a Specialty, cor. 6th & North sts. 



H 



POWELL, ;J. Z., M. D., office and residence, 71 
Sixth street. 



REAL ESTATE. 



a. W. DO"WELL, 

Office, 78 Broadway, 

Real Estate, Collection, 

INSURANCE AND RENTAL AGENCY. 

Southern and Western Lands for Sale or Trade. 

COLLECTIONS A SPECIALTY . 

M'NARY & LEEDY, 

A ttorneys-at-Law. 

RBalEstateilismDCfiAg'ts 

70 Broadway. 
COLLECTIONS A SPECIALTY. 

TOBACCO AND CIGARS. 

SEBASTIAN BROS., Manfs of Havana, Yara and 
Connecticut Cigars, 57 Fourth St. 

"WATCHES, CLOCKS AND JEWELRY, 

CHURCH, C. H., Dealer in Fine Watches, Jew- 
elry, Silver-ware, Clocks, etc., 98 Brcadway. 
Practical Watchmaker, Jeweler and Engraver. 
All work warranted. Particular attention paid to 
repairing Fine Watches. 

C. E. GRIDLEY, 

PRACTICAL WATCH-MAKER, 

And dealer iu 

Watches, Clocks and Jewelry. 

j^™ Repairing promptly attended to. =^^ 
51 MARKET ST. 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OF A CENTURY. 



217 



LoGANSPORT — Cojitinued. 



WOOLEN MILLS, 

II^OBEST MILLS, Established 1834, Czil & Wilson 
Proprietors, Race and 6tli st. 

NASH & LaBOSE, Established, 1862, Woolen 
Mills, Tabertown. 



KALAMAZOO, MICH. 

AET SCHOOL. 

Established 1870. 

"pmiim |rt |i) 

m MAIN STREET. 



Branches taught : Portrait, Landscape and India 
Ink. Portraits finished, any size, in Oil or India 
Ink, and satisfaction guaranteed. Geo.W. Reed, 
Artist. 

______^^^^ AROHITEOT , 

LAKET, A. L., Architect, 
83 Water st. 

ATTORNEYS AT LAW. 

BBEESE & STEABNS, Attorneys & Counselors 
at Law, 100 Main st. 

B BIGGS & BUBBOWS, Law Office, 
15C Main st. Established 1860. 

BUBKE, LAWBENCE N., Attorney & Counselor 
at Law, 114 Main st. 



D 



ATIS, JAMES M., Attorney at Law & Circuit 
Court Commissioner, 21 N. Burdick st. 



MASON H. GERMAIN, 

ATTORNEY, SOLICITOR, 

AND COUNSELOR, 
14:8 Main Street, Corner Rose. 

JUDSOSi, B. F., Attorney at Law, 
21 N. Burdick st. 

HAMPDEN KELSEY, 

Established 1871. 

ATTORNEY AT lAW, 

I^a.la.iYi£izoo, jVEicli. 

Over First National Bank. 

MAT, POWEBS & DANIELS, Attorneys and 
Counselors at Law, 140 Main st. 

SEVEBESS, BOUDEMAN & TUBNEB, Attorneys at 
Law, 166 Main st. 



C WAN, W. L., Attorney at Law 

O 21 N. 



Burdick st. 



■TRUMBULL, T. D., Attorney at Law, 



122 Main st. 



BOOTS AND SHOES. 

rSBELL, HENBY, Fine Boots & Shoes. 

L 85 Main st. Established 1861. 



1871. 

arrested for defalcation and embezzlement of 
$478,000 from the city's funds. 

i\ov. o. — In the African Baptist Meeting- 
house, in Louisville, Ky., the flooring gives 
way, and eleven women and children are 
trampled to death in the panic that follows. 

i^ov. 7. — Apache Indians attack a stage 
near Wickenburg, Arizona, and kill six of its 
passengers, one of whom was F. W. Loring, the 
author. 

i^'ov. 13. — An incendiary fire destroys a 
block and a half of buildings in Chattanooga, 
Tenn. 

;;\ov. 17. — Fire in Kit Carson, Nevada, 
loss $100,000. 

]^'ov. IS. — Russian frigate Svetlana, with 
the Grand Duke on board, arrived off Sandy 
Hook late at night. 

]\'ov. 19.— Grand Dnke Alexis, son of the 
Czar of Russia, arrived in New York. His re- 
ception was of a dual character, first as an 
officer of the Russian navy, and then as the son 
of an imperial father. He was treated to an 
exciting bufi^alo hunt by Gen. Sheridan. 

j\ov. 31. — Grand civil and military recep- 
tion of the Grand Duke Alexis, of Russia, in 
New Y'ork. 

Nov. 33. — The Grand Duke Alexis arrives 
in Washington. Steamboat City of New Lou- 
don burned on the river Thames, near Nor- 
wich, Ct., seventeen lives lost. 

]\ov. 33. — Grand Duke Alexis formally re- 
ceived by President Grant. 

]^'ov. 36. — Two young ruflSans named 
Joseph Forbish and William Chenoweth, out- 
raged and murdered a child four years old at 
Mulberry Creek. Ark. They were arrested, and 
having attempted to escape while being taken 
to jail, were both shot dead by their captors. 

I\ov. 30. — Prize fight between Jim Mace 
and Joe Coburn, near New Orleans ; twelve 
rounds, occupying almost four hours, were 
fought without a decisive result. 

I>eo. 3. — Seventeen immigrants frozen to 
death in Saline county, Nebraska. 

Dec. 6. — Great fire in Hagerstown, Md. ; 
the court house and other buildings burned. 
Loss, $83,000. 

Dec. 11.— Grand Duke Alexis gives $5,000 
to the poor of New York city. 

I>ec. 1-1. — The American steamer Florida 
sails from St. Thomas, and is followed and 
overhauled by the Spanish man-of-war Yasco 
de Nunez ; but her papers being found correct, 
she was allowed to proceed on her voyage. 

I>ec. 15. — A band of negroes took posses- 
sion of Lake City, Ark., and shot three resi- 
dents whom they charged with murdering a 
negro lawyer. Wm. M. Tweed arrested on a 
charge of felony, but confined in the Metro- 
politan Hotel. 

l>ec. l*.— The Fourth National Bank of 
Philadelphia thrown out of the Clearing House, 
and placed in the hands of a receiver. 

I>ec. 31.— President Grant issues procla- 
mation abolishing discriminating duties on 
merchandize imported from Spain. 

I>ec. 33. — Tom McGehan acquitted of the 
murder of Thomas S. Myers, at Dayton, Ohio. 

l>ec. 3.>. — Outbreak of Ku-Klux at Mar- 
shall, ilissouri. 



218 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



Kalamazoo — Continued. 



BOOTS AND SHOES. 
ISAAC DeBO^V, 

Established 1874. 

Iu£aaa.\3.fa.ct-u.rer of 



UPtJ 



COR. MAIN & PORTAGE STS. 

S PRAGUE, A. P., Fine Boots & Shoes, 
79 Mam St. Established 1860. 



BUSINESS COLLEGE, 

PARSONS, W. F., Business College, 
Main & Burdick sts. 

CARRIAGE MAKERS^ 

Established 1874. 

Carriage Makers^ 

25 PORTAGE ST. 

SHIELDS, E., Mannf" r of Carriages, Wagons and 
Sleighs, Water & Edward sts. 

E. G. TIERNEY, 

Carriage Maker, 

AND 

GENERAL BLACKSMITH, 

Repairing neaily done. 
3« Pitcher St., bet. Main and Water Sts. 



CHINA, GLASS AND CROCKERY, 

COBB, T. S. & SOJf, Jobbers & retailers of 
Crockery, Glassware, Lamps, Ac, 103 Main St. 

^ CONFECTIONER, 

PELGRIM, I. C. Manf'r of Plain & Fancy Con- 
fectionery. Established 18'i3. 71 Main St. 



DENTIST, 
TTOLMES,A. J., Dentist, 



116 Main St. 



JAMES, DR. R. P., Established 1872, Dentist, 
113 Main st. 



DRUGGIST. 

ORG, ANDREW, Chemist and Druggist, 81 Main 
St. Established 1876. 



S' 



DRY GOODS, 

IGELOW, A. ^^iTDry'^G^iods aricVNotio'ns," 8 
Union Hall block. Established 1869. 



B 



Establighed 1840. 

L. L. CLARK & CO., 

Dealers in 

DRY aOODS, 

IKALAMAZOO, MICH. 

L.L.Clark. Chas. S.Clark. L.M.Lester. 



Kalamazoo — Contifiued. 



FURNITURE. 

M'KEE, JOHN, Parlor, Chamber and Common 
Furniture and Undertakers' Materials, 45 
N. Btrdick St. 

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^EOCERS; 1 

HICKS, LEWIS, Groreries, Teas, Fruits, etc., 67 \ 
Main St. Established 1871. ' 

^pROWBRIDGE & CROSBY, Wholesale and Re- 
X tail Grocers, 104 Main st. 

HARDWARE, 

DE VISSER, JOHN & CO., Hardware, Tin, Cop- J 
per and Sheet Iron Ware, 36 S. Burdick st. I 

HOTELS^ 

HsiiviERicMliafELr" 

Opposite G. K. & I. K., and near L. S. & M. S.^ 
R.R. Depots. 

FRED HOTOP, Prop. 
RATES, $l.50 PER DAY. J 



BURDICK HOUSE, H. F. Badger, prop., Kala- 
mazoo, Mich. 

CITY HOTEL. 

strictly Temperance House. 

m jr. &wmBWM &r. 

Newly Furnished and Fitted Up. Kates., 
$1.00 Per Day. 

T. B. SMITH, PROP., 

Formerly of the Eureka Hotel. 



NTERNATIONAL HOTEL, 



De Forest Davis, prop. 



INSURANCE^ 

Collecting & Loan Agency, 
Office over Amer. Express Office, 5 S. Burdick Street. 

Representing Ten First-Class Reliable Non-Board Companies. 

MACHINIST , 
BRASS FOUNDRY, 

PRACTICAL MACHINIST, 

MODEL AND TOOL MAKER, 

57 North Burdick Street. 



MARBLE WORKS. 

XCELSIOR MARBLE WORKS, Johnson & 

Peck, prop's, 83 N. Burdick st. 



E 



SWEETLAND, HUNN & SMALL, Manf'rs and Im- 
porters of Monuments, Tablets and Head- 
stones, 96 N. Burdick st. "* 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OF THE CENTURY. 



219 




The Home of Washington's Ancestors. — The Manor House, Sulgi-a\e, 
Northamptonshire, which was held of the Priory of St. Andrew, was surrendered to the 
Crown upon the dissolution of the Monasteries, and in the 30th of Henry VIII, (1529), it 
was granted to Lawrence Washington, gent of Northampton. Robert Washington, his 
son and heir, conjointly with his eldest son Lawrence sold the manor in 1610 to Lawrence 
Makepeace, gent of the Inner Temple, London. Lawrence Washington, after the sale of 
his estate, retired to Brington, where he died; and his second son, John Washington, emi- 
grated to America about the middle of the 17th century, and was grandfather of the gi-eat 
American patriot and father of his country, George Washington. — [Extract from Wm. W. 
Nellan & Co.'s History of Northamptonshire.] 




Massachusetts State Building;. Centennial Exposition, Phila 

— Built after the style of houses that were common in colonial times. The building is one 
and a half stories high, with dormer windows, and light fancy verandahs. It is 85 by 70 
feet in dimensions. The buiding was sold for $1500 to a gentleman of that State who will 
remove it to a place near Boston. , 



220 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OF A CENTURY. 



1871. 

Dec. 37. — J. D. Miner acquitted of a 
charge of counterfeiting, in the U. S. Circuit 
Court in New York city. 

I>ec. 28. — Great fire in Little Rock, Ark. ; 

loss, $100,000. 

l>ec. JSO. — Destructive fire in Monroe, La. ; 
loss, |580,000. A negro named Howard out- 
rages and attempts to murder a little girl near 
Rochester, N. Y. An intense excitement was 
created among the people by the horrible 
crime. 

1873. 

•Tsm. 3. — Brigham Young returns to Salt 
Lake City and surrenders to an indictment for 
the murder of Richard Yates ; ball is refused, 
and he is ordered into the custody of the law 
officers. 

A mob in Rochester threaten to attack the 
jail and lynch the negro Howard, charged with 
an outrage upon a little girl. The military fire 
upon them, and two men are killed. 

vFciii. -1. — The negro Howard is convicted 
in Rochester of the outrage on the little girl 
named Ochs ; sentenced to 20 years' imprison- 
ment. 

•f a,u. 6. — James Fisk, Jr., shot by Edward 
S. Stokes on the private staircase of the Grand 
Central Hotel, Xew York. 

Dr. Merryman Cole murdered by an unknown 
person in his office on Exter street, Baltimore. 

Jan. 7.— James Fisk. jr., dies of the 
wound inflicted by Edward S. Stokes. 

•Tciii. 1«.— Fire in Reading, Pa.: loss 
$250,000. 

•Jan. 17. — Benjamin Franklin's statute 
unveiled in Printing-IIouse square, Xew 
York. 

Jan. 34.— Mrs. E. G. Wharton acquitted 
of the charge of murdering General Ketchuni, 
in Annaixilis, Md. 

Jan. ai.— U. S. District Attorney Bates, 
with the permission of Attorney^General Wil- 
liams, applies for the release on bail of Mor- 
mons charged with murder. Chief Justice 
McKean refuses to grant the application. 

Fel). 10.— The Grand Jury of the Court 
of General Sessions of New Yoi'k city present 
indictments against Mayor A. 0. Hall, R. B. 
Connolly, Wm. M. Tweed, Nathaniel Sands, 
and others. 

Feb. 15.— Ex-Speaker Carter, of the 
Louisiana Legislature, and Chief of Police 
Badger, of Xew Orleans, fight a duel with 
rifles at Bay St. Louis, Mississippi. Nobody 
hurt. 

Feb. 16.— The Lowery gang of outlaws 
enter the town of Lumberton. N. C, and rob 
the sheriff's office and other places. 

Feb. 3J>. — The Japanese Embassy arrives 
in Washington. 

Mareb 3.— Judge Cardoza sustains the 
validit;v of the indictment found against Ed- 
ward S. Stokes for the murder of James 
Fisk, jr. 

Marcb 4. — President Grant receives the 
Japenese Embassy. 

Jayne's "Granite Block" in Philadelphia al- 
most destroyed by fire; loss, $478,000. 

The ship Great Republic abandoned in a 
sinking condition, off Bermuda. 



Kalamazoo — Continued. 



MEAT MAEKET, 

BARNES, WM. T., Meat Market, 6714 Main 8t. 
Established 1876. 

ICHMOJJD, J. & BRO., Meat Market, 14 N. Bur- 
dick St. Established 1877. 

MILLINERY AND DRESSMAKING. 

CAPEN, C. C, Wholesale and Retail Dealer in 
Millinery. 107 Main st. Established 1866. 

Established 1871. 

MRS. ANNA M. LUMBARD, 
DRESSMAKING, 

Rooms over Scott's Clothing Store, 
I 05 MAIN ST. 

QMITH, .IIRS. M. A., Dealer 

10 in Millinery Goods. 

ANCE, K. MRS., Dressmaker, Main and Port- 

age 8ts. Established 1871. 

MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS, 

PHILLIPS, DELOS, Manf'r of the Celebrated 
Star OrEjan, and Dealer in Musical Merchan- 
dise, 142 Main St. 

^ NEWSPAPEE^^ ^____ 

SHAKESPEARE, A. J., Publisher of the Kalama- 
zoo Gazette, 99 Main st. 

PAINTERS^ 

WALTEE GEEGG, 



Carriage and Wagon 



^1 



Cor. Water & Edwards Sts. 

Repainting of Carriages and Sleighs a Specialty. 

Terms Reasonable. Establislied 1874. 

SMITH, R. & SON, Paints and Oils, House and 
Sign Painting, 144 Main st. 



PHOTOGRAPHERS^ 

PACKARD, C. C, Photographer, 103 Main St. 
Established 1865. 

M. H. PORTER, 
Solar Printing for the Trade, 

On Paper or Canvas. 
118 Main st. Send for Circular. 

AN SICKLE'S NEW GALLERY, 108 Main st. 
Makes all the latest styles of Pictures. 

W. S. WHITE, 

ARTIST PHOTOGRAPHER, 

116 Main st. 



PHTSIOIAN. 

H.ATFIELD, DR. D. S., Homoeopathic Physician, 
office. 41 N. West St. 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OF A CENTURY. 



221 



Kalamazoo — Continued. 



PICTURE PEAMES^ 

chasT^I^Trussell, 

Manufacturer of 

Pictnre Frames &WMo¥CorDice. 

A full line of 

Pictures, Engravings and Chromos 

POST OFFICE BUILDING. 

PRINTERS. 
Established 1874. 

JAS. M. VEEITY & CO., 



STAR " JOB 



:E=^:Eei3^'i:E]:Ees, 

Cor. Main and Portage Sts., 
KALAMAZOO, - - MICH. 

SHIRT MAFQFACTURER. 

UNDERWOOD SHIRT MANUFACTORY, Manf'rs 
of Shirts, Night Shirts, Collars and Cuffs, 
29 and 31 N. Burdick st. 



SHOWCASES. 

GOODALE, J. C, Showcases and General Under- 
takers, cor. Main and Burdick sts. 

SOCIETY REGALIAS. 

FRANK HENDERSON, 

Manufacturer of 

Society Uniforms & Regalias, 

Military, rireinen and Band Equip- 
ments, 

104 DVn.A.II<T ST. 



B 



STOVES AND TINWARE, 

ROWNELL & VAN MALE, Stoves, Ranges and 
Tinware, 180 Main st. 



KAUFFER, H. P., Manufacturer of Tin and 
Sheet Iron Ware, 94 Water st. 

TAILORS. 

BASEMANN, LOUIS, Tailor. Repairing neatly 
done. 113 Main st. Est. 1866. 
ERSTENE, HERMAN, Tailorins: and Repairing 
neatly done. Main and Burdick sts. 



WINES AND LIQUORS. 

wmTT. lHiofo]pX¥RO., 
BILLIARD HALL, 

Best of Wines, Licxuors and Cigars always on 
liand. 

LILIENFIELD, D. & BRO., Wholesale Tobacco- 
nists, Importers of Wines and Liquors, llii 
Main st. 



1872. 

I^Iarcli C — Six steamboats burned at 
Cincinnati; loss, 1^200,000. 

:^Iarcli 33.— The outlaw Hildebrand shot 
dead by a police officer, in Pinckneyville, 
Illinois. 

]^Iarcl» 26. — An earthquake in Califor- 
nia. Through the valley of the Sierras, a 
chasm, varying in width, and thirty-five miles 
in length, opens in the earth. During four 
hours the earth is shaken. A large number of 
people are killed. 

^larcli SO. — A tornado throws down a 
large market-house in St. Louis. 

April S. — The Mormon Conference re- 
elects Brigham Young President of the 
Church. 

April lO. — "Lord" Gordon is arrested ia 
the Metropolitan Hotel, New York, at the suit 
of Jay Gould, on a charge of embezzling. 

Phillip Klingou Smith, of Lincoln county, 
Nevada, a former Mormon bishop, charges the 
Mormons with the "Mountain Meadow Massa- 
cre" of immigrants in 1857, and exonerates 
the Indians. 

April 11. — The boiler of the steamer 
Oceauus explodes on the ilississippi river, and 
kills 70 persons. The boiler of the tug-boat 
Davenport, on the North river, explodes and. 
kills five persons. 

April 15. — The counsel of the U. S. and 
the English arbitrators on the Alabama claims 
meet in Geneva, Switzerland. The "cases" 
are exchanged, and the British consul pre- 
sents a protest against the claims for indirect 
damages. The British authorities at Kings- 
ton, Jamaica, seize the American steamer 
Edgar Stuart as a Cuban privateer. Deadly 
encounter between outlaws and a United State's 
marshal's posse at Indian Court House, Indian 
Territory. A sheriff and seven deputy marshals 
killed, and three outlaws. 

April lO. — Indians and renegades massa- 
cre its escort, and plunder and destroy a gov- 
ernment supply train, near Howard's Wells, 
Texas. 

April 33. — A party of disguised men take 
Isaac Vaniel, an old man from his house ia 
Williamson county, 111., and hang him. 

April 341. — A mob stops a train near 
Holden, Mo., and assassinates on it Judge 
Stevenson, and Messrs. Cline and Dutro. 

April 35. — Brigham Young released on a 
writ of hebeas co?'jms. 

April 36. — The U. S. war vessel Kansas 
releases the American steamship Virginius 
from blockade by the Spanish man-of-war 
Pizarro, in the port of Aspinwall. 

April 39. — A party of five armed men 
enter the town of Columbia, Ky., and rob the 
deposit bank after killing the cashier. 

^lay 3. — Steve Lowery and Andrew" 
Strong, two " Swamp Angels," murder Capt. 
M. Wishart near Shoe Heel, North Carolina. 

]flay 3. — Niblo's Garden Theater destroyed 
by fire. The painters in New York and vicinity 
strike for the eight hour sj'stem, and are sub- 
sequently joined by the other trade societies. 

]Tlay 16. — A rain-storm floods the town of 
Easton, Kansas, and four persons are drowned. 

]Way 18. — Extensive forest fires prevail in 
the northern part^of New York State, north- 



222 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



Kalamazoo — Continued. 



"WINES AND LIQUORS, 

johiTmaloy, 

Wholesale Dealer in 

WINES.UQUORS&CIGARS 

87 MAIN STREET, 



Opp. Kalaiuazoo House. 



Est. 1874. 



WOOLEN MANUFACTURERS. 

KALAMAZOO KNITTING CO., Manors of Woolen 
Hosiery, Leegings, Gents' Scarfs and Yarns. 



KANKAKEE, ILLS. 



AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS, 

[AFFER, J. H., Agricultural Implemen 
Seeds, 43 Court St. Established 1867. 



AUCTION AND COMMISSION. 

NICHOLS, A. B., & CO., Auction and Commis- 
sion, 1 Court St. Established 186:3. 



BOOTS AND SHOES, 

GIRARD, ISRAEL, Cnstom-Made Boots and 
Shoes, West ave. Established 1873. 

MERTENS, M., Boots, Shoes, .Src, 
East ave. Established 1865. 

RICKEY, JOSEPH, Boots and Shoes, 
34 Court St. 

WHITCOMB, WM., Custom-Made Boots, Shoes 
and Gaiters, 1st Nat. Bant Bid's;. Est. 18S4. 

CARRIAGE MANUFACTURERS. 

BERGERON, NAPOLEON, Carriage Manufacturpr, 
Station st. & Schuyler ave. Established 1866. 

SCHREMPF, PHILIP, & SON, Carriage Manufac- 
turers, Station st. & Schuyler ave, Est. 1866 

DENTISTS, 

AMES, DR. AARON, Dentist, 
8 Court St. Established 1855. 

CUTLER, DR. ANDREW S., Dentist, 
Cor. Court St. & Schuyler ave. Estab. 1867. 

DRY GOODS, 



D ORION, T., Dry Goods, 
16 Court St. 



Established 1860. 



KOUDY, JOHN, Dry Goods and Notions, 
40 Court St. 



s 



WANNELL, F., & SON, Dry Goods, Carpets, 
Trunks and Wall-Paper, 30 & 33 Court st. 



FURNITURE, 

(Est abl i h edT8.57. ) 

A. BABST, 

New and Secoud-Haud 

FURNITURE 

Of every Description constantly on Hand. 
UNDERTAKING attended to. Monthly Pay- 
anents taken. West ave., Kankakee, Ills. I 
invite attention to my styles and prices. 



B 



Kankakee — Continued. 

^rdwareT 

ABST, LAWRENCE, Hardware, Cutlery and 
Agricultural Implements, 13 Eastav. Est. '69 




^OTEL. 

EXCHANGE HOTEL. 
Only First-Class House in the city. 

JUSTICES OF THE PEACE. 

COFFIN, JAMES M., Justice of the Peace, 
Collecting Agent, Knecht's Block. Est. 1868. 

DURFEE, OTIS, Justice of the Peace, 
Collecting Agent, Knecht's Block. Est. 1854. 

LIVERY AND BOARDING STABLE. 

©L/ITE^ TIM IWQj ^ 

i^ Livery, SaH Boarding Stable 

STATION ST., Rear EXCHANGE HOTEL. 
Established 1875. KANKAKEE. ILLS. 

MEAT MARKET. 

OTT, GEORGE K,, Meat Market, 
East ave. Established 1877. 

PHYSICIAN^ ____ 



Graduate of Laval University, Quebec; Licen- 
tiate of the College of Physicians and Surgeons, 
Quebec. Office Hours: Any time of day or night. 
13 Court .St., Kankakee, Ills. 

PHOTOGRAPHER. 

KNOWLTON, CHARLES, Artist Photographer. 
56 Court St. Established 1874. 



REAL ESTATE AND INSURANCE. 



D 



ALE, JOHN, Real Estate and Insurance. Taxes 
Paid for Non-residents. Established 1856. 



SALOONS. 

FENA, PETER, Saloon and Billiards, 
25 Court St. Established 1854. 

POIRIER, HONORE, Saloon and Sample Room, 
Court St., near Schuyler ave. Estab. 1871. 

RADEKE, ERNST, Proprietor Schiller Hall, 
East ave., S. E.xchange Hotel. Estab. 1875. 

• SOAP WORKS, 

sTMfoFsoJplvdMs, 

Manufacturers of 



P. O. Box 345. 



N. Harrisoa Ave., Kaakakee, Ills 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OF THE CENTURY. 



223 






w ^'V V 




224 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OF THE CENTURY. 



1873. 

eastern part of Pennsylvania, and northern 
counties of New Jersey. 

May 19.— The Jayne building on Dock 
street Philadelphia, destroyed by fire, loss 
$475,000. 

Great Roman Catholic celebration in honor 
of the convention of the Catholic benevolent 
societies, in Dayton, Ohio. 

Wlay 2J5. — Shakespeare's monument in 
Central Park unveiled. 

May 23.^A severe storm destroys life 
and property in Morgan county. Mo. 

May 37.— The balloon of Prof. Atkins de- 
scends into the Tennessee River, near Decatur, 
Alabama, and the Professor is drowned. 

May 30.— Canadian authorities sieze the 
American fishing schooner, Enola C, for 
violating the fishery laws. 

May 30. — "Decoration Day;" impressive 
honors paid to the dead soldiers" of late war. 

•Viiitc -1. — Captain Colvocoressess, of the 
United States Navy, murdered and robbed in 
Bridgeport, Conn. 

of itnc 6. — Great storm along the New 
England coast; much damage done to ship- 
ping. 

The United States Minister at Madrid de- 
mands the release of Dr. Houard. 

June 7. — A delegation of Sioux Indians, 
headed by Red Cloud, have a reception at 
Cooper Institute. 

June 8.— William fl. Bumsted, a Jersey 
city official, sentenced to State prison for nine 
months, for conspiring with others to defraud 
the city. 

An Ecclesiastical Court pronounces the 
charges of immorality not proven against the 
Rev. Dr. Huston, of Baltimore, ]\Id. 

June 9. — Comanclie Indians massacre 
the Lee family, of seven persons, near Fort 
Griffin, Texas, 

June 1«.— The London (England) Row- 
ing Club crow beats the crew (f the Atlanta 
Club, of New York, on the Thames. 

June 15.- The members of the Tribunal 
of Arbitration assemble in Geneva (Switzer- 
land) and organize; after a short session, the 
tribunal adjourns until the 17th inst. 

June 17.— The World's Peace Jubilee 
opens in Boston. 

June 18.— Mexican soldiers at Mata- 
moras lire on and arrest the American occu- 
pants of a pleasure boat, on the Rio Grand, 
between that city and Brownsville, Texas. 

The Canadian cutter, Stella Marie, siezes 
the American fishing schooner, James Bliss, 
for violating the fishery laws; the American 
flag is insulted by beiiig turned union down 
under the Dominion flag on the captured ves- 
sel. 

June 19.— The trial of Edward S. 
Stokes, for the murder of James Fisk, Jr., be- 
gun. 

June 30.— The bodies of Confederate 
soldiers killed and buried at Gettysbursr re- 
moved and conducted through Richmond,%'a., 
by a mournful procession. 

June 36.— A jury is sworn on the Stokes 
trial: District Attorney Garvin opens the case. 
>Ellis Ward beats J. J. O'Leary in a three- 



AURORA, ILLS. 



ATTOENET AT LAW. 

CLAPSADDLE, D. M., Attorney and Counselor 
at Law, No. 38 South Broadway. 

BKEWERT. 

AURORA BREWERY. Philip Bonte, Proprie- 
tor. End or Union St. 



H 



CLOTHING AND FURNISHING GOODS, 

IRSH, L., Clothing, Hats, Caps and Furnish- 
ing Goods, 13 Broadway. 



DENTISTS, 

"POBINSOIV, F.H., Surgeon Dentist. 

J\i Established 1869. West Aurora, Ills. 

WILLSON, 0. D. D. S., Surneon Dentist, 
Coulter Opera House Block. 

DRUGGISTS. 

HOLMES BROTHERS, 

SiMer Wif^e of Iron 



The World's Tonic. GERMAN OIL, for 
Rheumatism, Neuralgia, &c. 

36 MAIN ST., AURORA. II.I.S. 



PURNITURE AND BURIAL CASES. 



DENNEY BROTHERS, 

Dealers in all kinds of 
Nos. 27 & 29 Broadway, Aurora, Ills. 



GROCERIES, 

'DONNELL BROS., Staple and Fancy Groceries. 
15 Main st. hstablished 18K6. 



O 



HARDWARE, 

REISINfi & KENDALL, Hardware & Crockery, 
19ife 21 Broadway. 

LADIES' FURNISHING GOODS. 

CARPENTER, MRS. B. C, Ladies' Furnishing & 
Fancy Goods, aO Main st. Established 1867. 

LIVERY AND OMNIBUS STABLES, 

VAN VLEET, A., Livery & Omnibus S'ables, 
5, 7 & 9 N. LaSalle st. 

LOCKSMITH, 

ZIEGLER, M., Locksmith Brass Foundry* Stove 
repairer, opposite Fitch House. 

MACHINIST, 

NOVELTY MACHINE WOKKS. 

M.S. HBNDRICK, Proprietor, 
Buildfr of Stationery Engines and manfa'er of Ma- 
chine Tools. Est. 1872. Send for circuit rand 
price list. Cor. Galena & Lake sts. 



IMPOKTANT EVENTS OF THE OENTUBY. 



225 



Aurora — Continued. 


187S. 

mile scull race on Lake Quinsigamund, Mass.; 
time, 21 min. .38 sec. 

<luly 3. — Judge John H. McCunn, of the 
Supreme Court, removed from the bench by 
the Court of Impeachmeut at Albany. 

•July y. — Samuel J. Browne, an octogen- 
arian, murders a youth named Frank Schik, 
in Cincinnati, Ohio. 

•filly 8. — Absalom and Jacob Kimball 
and Alexander McLeod, who outraged and 
murdered a yonng girl named Secor, are 
taken from jail, in Celina, Ohio, by a mob, and 
Absalom Kimball and McLeod are hanged at 
the scene of their crime. 

The Cuban privateer. Pioneer, captured by 
the U. S. revenue cutter, Jloccasin, off New- 
port, R. I., and brought into that port. 


NEWSPAPER. 

THE AURORA DAILY NEWS 

Is not 

The Only Advertising Medium in the World, 

It is 
ONLY ONE OF THEM, 
And being the only daily newspaper published 
in Southern Kane County, it reaches more readers 
than can here be reached through anv other me- 
dium. SIEGMUND & HAWKINS, 

Aurora, Ills. 


PHOTOGKAPHER, 

TDRATT, D. C, Portrait & Landscape Photo- " 
JT grapher, 48 Broadway. 



PHYSICIANS, 

BRIGHAM, L. E., M. D., Physician, 
Koom 5, Opera House. 

JTJRDEN, W. E.. Inventor of the Celebrated Pain- 
less Cancer Plaster, 12 S Broadway. 

SASH, DOORS AND BLINDS. 

ALLEN & CORSAIR, Manfs & dealers in Sash, 
Doors, Blinds, &c., 4 N. LaSalle st. 



TONSORIAL ARTIST. 

ICKENSHER, H., Tonsorial Artist. 

Established 1850. 9 S. Broadway. 



F 



ELGIN, ILLS. 



ATTORNEY AT LAW. 

LOVELL, E. C, Attorney at Law. Public Admin- 
istrator of Kane Co., Keal Estate & Loans, 

BAKERY AND CONFECTIONERY' 

BENNETT, C. E., Bakery, "conftectionervX^- 
gars, 10 Douglas ave. Established 1877. 

BOOK-KEEPER. 

MANN,M., Book-keeper. Manfr of Mann's Com- 
pound Cathartic & Blood Purifier. Agents 
wanted. 

BUTTER AND CHEESE. 
WTiolesale dealers in 

Butter and Cheese, 

Salt, Factory and Dairy supplies. 
CHEESE A. SPECIALTY. 

Agents for Higgins' Liverpool Salt. Establish- 
ed 1872. 

HOAGLAND'S BLOCK. 
Reference: First National Bank, Elgin, 111. 



CAN MANUFACTORY. 

NCOMP 

Kerosene Cans. 



Tj^LGIN CAN COMPANT, Manufacturers of Elgin 



DRY GOODS, ETC. 



F 



>EHRMAN, F., Dry Goods & Groceries, 

17 Douglas ave. Established 1872. 



Two men, named Hale and Tucker, are shot 
and killed while in custosy of a sheriff's posse, 
near Dover, Arkansas; the Republican officials 
are charged with the murders for politicai ef- 
fect; an unparalleled state of anarchy and as- 
sasination results. 

-July 11. — -An earthquake shock felt on 
Long Island and in Westchester county. 

•filly 13. — Columbus and Govan Adair ex- 
ecuted in Hendersonville, North Carolina, for 
the murder of Silas Weston and three chil- 
dren. 

•filly 13. — Burglars take Charles Wesson, 
the teller of the Blackstone National Bank at 
Uxbridge, Mass., from his home at night, and 
compel him to open the bank's safe, from which 
they take $14,000. 

•filly 15. — The jury in the Stokes trial 
fail to agree on a verdict, and are discharged. 

•filly IB, — The great Longfellow and Har- 
ry Bassett race at Saratoga won by the latter; 
Longfellow is injured during the race, to which 
is attributed his defeat. 

•filly 19. — Tom Lowery, Swamp Angel 
outlaw, shot and killed by Robert Wishart, 
near Moss Neck, N. C. 

•filly 33. — Hugh Marra shoots Alderman 
Wm. McMullen, in Philadelphia. 

•filly 341. — The college boat regetta on the 
Connecticut river, won b}' the Amherst College 
crew, the Harvards second. 

•filly 39.— A riot occurs between negroes 
and whites in Savannah, Ga., and several on 
each side are injured. 

•f uly 30.— A destructive fire occurs at 
Hunter's Point, L. I.; it originates on a canal 
boat, and spreads to an oil-yard, the buildings 
thereon, and a number of ships, canal boats, 
lighters, and scows. 

•filly 31. — B. Hetzeler kills his divorced 
wife's paramour aad then commits suicide in 
Rochester, N. Y. 

Aii^. 3. — The Cuban privateer Pioneer is 
formally seized by the U. S. Marshal, at 
Newport, R. I., for violation of the neutrality 
laws. 

A.ng'. S. — Geo. H. Evans, a West Point 
graduate, shoots and kills a burglar, named 
HoegerUng, in Pittsburg, Pa. 

Aug. 9. — Newton Chandler hanged for 
rape, robbery, and arson, in Charlotte, North 
Carolina. 

Alls'. 1®* — ^'^^- Alexander, a merchant, 



226 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



Elg I N — Continued. 



DET GOODS, ETC. 

TOLT, FRED, Dry Goods & Millinery, 

20 Douglas Hve. E-ftablished 1858. 



S 



DYE WOKKS, 

EL«IN & CHICAGO STEAM DYE WORKS, Car- 
line Bros , Proprietors, 48 K ver st. 

HARNESS. SADDLERY, ETC. 

SCHROEDER, C. & CO., Hanieps, f^add^ery, Col- 
lars. Blaiikits. etc., cor. Milwaukee & River 
Bts. Establi^ht■d 1874. 



S 



COTT. E. D., IIarnes.s Saddles, Hridles & Col- 
lars, River St. Established 1869. 



SADDLER AND HARNESS MAKER. 

Cor. Brook & Division sts. 
Established 1873. 

HOTELS. 

GOOD SAMPLE ROOMS. 

Centre of the city. 
Elgin, Ills. W. F SHAW, Prop. 

LIVERY STABLES. 

SWAN & SMITH, Liverv. Feed & Sale Stables, 
Milwaukee st. Established 1875. 

PAINTER. 

fainter. Glazier, Graining, Sign-Wriling and Carriage Painting. 

Established 1871. Shop at Bierman's Agri- 

cnUni-al Works, 

RIVER ST. 

RESTAURANTS AND SAMPLE ROOMS, 

SAUFIiE ANI> BILLIARD KOOM, 

COMMERf lAL HOTEL, 
Elgin, lUininx. 

Established 1876. Geo. W. Shaw, Prop 

William Saiiinlers, 

Restaurant 

-(AND)- 

S ample Room., 



Established 187.i. 



14 Cluctiao St. 



URBANA, ILLS. 

ATTORNEY AT LAW. 

J. O. Cuiiiiiiig"liaiii, 

ATTORNEY AT LAW, 

Pa ticnlar attention given to Real iLsiate aud 
Probate mitti r. 

•> W. MAIN ST., OPP. COURT HOUSE. 

Urbaiiti, - - Ills. 



Urban A — Continued. 



BAKERY AND CONFECTIONERY. 

TIERNAN, M,, Bakery, Confectionery & Ice 
Cream Parlor, 13 Main St. 



F 



BOOKS AND STATIONERY. 

OX, 0. W., Books. Sialionery & Musical In- 
strunieuis, 1 N. Market. 



^OTS AND SHOES, 

Manufacturer of Boots anil Shoes 

11 MAIN STREET. 



DRUGGISTS. 

CUSHM AN, E. H. & CO., Drugs, Chemica , Paints, 
Oils, &c.. Cur. Main & Race sts. 

I^ZXJrsPT &c WHBLXDOISr, 

DEALEKS iN ' 

DRUGS, BOOKS, ST.VrUlMRY, WALL PAPER, AND A 

Geutral .■ ssoitment of Fancy Artitles, Sheet 
Music, etc., etc. 20 MAIN t-T. 

DRY GOODS AND NOTIONS. 
T3ILEY, N. A., Dry Goods & Notions, 



27 Main st. 



FLOUR AND FEED. 

A. W. SAINT, 

FI.OUR and FEED STORE, 

49 Main St. Established 1875. 



GROCERIES, 



rpiERNAN, E., Grocerii s. Country Produce, 



Qiieeusware. etc., 1(5 Main st. 



HARDWARE AND TINWARE. 

LE,J.S 

Main ft. 



T ITTLE,J. S., Hardware, Stoves, Tinware, etc.. 



HOTELS, 



45 & 46 West Main Street. 



UBJIANA, 



ILLS. 



Three nood Saniiile Rooms on ground floor. 
A go )d table, cl'an and airy chambers. 
I ItESfECTl'ULLV INVITE you to CALL, 
J. WILKINSON, Peopiietor. 

PENNSYLVANIA HOUSE, 

MRS. MARY PARKS, Proprietress, 
Main Street, 

Urbana, - - . . Ills. 



MILLINERY GOODS. 



/BARTER, MBS. S.L., Millinery & Fancy Goods, 



4."j filain St. 



WILCOX & THROCKMORTON, Millinery, Dress 
aud Cb>ak M<ikeis. Chaugiiig. Pressing aud 
BleachiniT done on short notice and reasonable 
tuims, 41 Main st. Established 1877. 



IMPORTANT EVP:NT8 OF THE CENTURY. 



227 




COURT HOUSE, BAY CITY, MICH. 




ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY, URBANA, ILLS. 



228 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OF THE CENTURY. 



1873. 

murdered by Mexicau bandits, near Browns- 
ville, Texas. 

Aug'. 13. — The Spanish iron-clad war- 
vessel Numancia arrives at this port, with yel- 
low fever cases on board. 

Alts'. 13.— Mace and O'Baldwin arrested 
in Baltimore, and placed bonds not to fight in 
Maryland. 

Aug. 19. — The Duke of Saxe, the son-in- 
law of the Emperor of Brazil, arrives in New 
York city. 

The Third National Bank of Baltimore is 
robbed of .$200, 000 in money and securities. 

Judge G. G. Barnard, of the Supreme Court, 
found guilty by the Court of Impeachment, at 
Albany, of high crimes and misdemeanors, re- 
moved from the bench, and declared ineligible 
ever to hold office in the State. 

Ailg. 30.— Prince Philip, of Coburg-Go- 
tha, arrives in New Torkcitj', to join his broth- 
er, the Duke of Saxe. 

Dr. Houard arrives in New York city from 
Cadiz, Spain. 

Aug*. 31. — Mace and O'Baldwin meet at 
Harmon's Creek, W. Va., to figlit a prize fight, 
but failing to agree in the choice of a referee, 
back out. 

Alls'. 34.— The P. M. S. America de- 
stroyed by fire at Yokohama, Japan; sixty lives 
and a large amount of specie lost. 

Aug. 36. — Arapahoe Indians massacre 
the guard of a government mule train, rob and 
burn the wagons, at Dry Creek, Colorado Ter- 
ritory, and end by scalping Mr. Bryant, the 
wagon mastei', while alive. 

Mrs. Charlotte Lamb is arrested at Trim- 
belle, Wis., charged with having killed her 
husband, twochikh'en, and two neighbors, with 
poison. 

Aug-. 30.— The Providence and New York 
steamer Metis run into by a schooner, on Long 
Island Sound; the Metis" soon breaks up. and 
155 persons are compelled to trust their lives 
to the few boats and such floating material as 
they can secure; only 107 persons get to the 
shore in safety. 

Sept. .1.— W. J. Sharkey, a New York 
ward i)olitician, murders Robert Dunn, at No. 
200 Hudson street. 

Sept. -4.- Billy Edwards and Arthur 
Chambers fight on Walpole Island, on the Ca- 
nadian frontier; after 26 rounds, lasting 1 hour 
35 minutes, Chambers is awarded the Victorv, 
Edwards having bitten him. 

Sept. 7.— Billy Forrester, the alleo-ed mur- 
derer of Mr. Benjamin Nathan, is arrested in 
Washington, D. C. 

Dr. Schoeppe acquitted of the charge of 
poisoning Miss Steinecke, at Carlisle, Pennsyl- 
vania. 

The Cuban steamer Virginius escapes from 
the blockade of the Spanish war vessels at 
Puerto Cabello, Venezuela. 

Sept. 14,— A riot occurs between a Grant 
and Wilson club, composed of negroes, and 
Democrats, in Pittsburgh, Pa.; several persons 
badly hurt. 

The Geneva (Switzerland) Tribunal of Ar- 
bitration on the Alabama claims awards SIG - 
250,000 to the United States. 

Sept. 81. — In a political affrav in Colum- 



Urbana — Continued. 



RESTATJEANTS, 
ROB'T BOWMAN, 

Confectionery ik Restanrant, 

47 MAIN STREET. 
Cigars & Tobacco a epecialty. Est. 1871. 

S MAIN STREET, 
VRBANA. 



TOBIAS, MRS. C„ Dining Hall. 



37 Main st. 



TAILORS- MERCHANT , 
J. H. HARTZELL, 

16 Main Street,, 
VUBANA, . - - ILLINOIS. 

H. STEWART, 

MERCHANT TAILOR, 

25 W. Main Street, 
Established 1870. Urbana, Ills. 

WATCHMAKER AND JEWELER. 

RIIET, ALBERT, Watchmaker and Jeweler, 
M:iin St. 



CHAMPAIGN, ILLS. 



ATTORNEYS AT LAW. 

GERE, GEO. W., Attorney at Law, 
21 Main st. 
ITTJIAN, G. W. M., Attorney at Law, over First 
Naiional Bank. Established 1874. 

ROLAND & KNIGHT, 

11 Main St., Champaign, Ills. 

COLLECTIONS AND REAL ESTATE LAW 
MADE A SPECIALTY. 

BAKERY AND CONPECTIONERT, 

EBBERT, JACOB, Bakery and Oonlectionery, 
53 First st. 



D 



BOARDING HOUSE. 

OYLE, JOHN, Boardin.; House and Liquors, 
Cor. Main ^nd Oak tts. 



BOOTSAND^HOES^ 

WILLIAM ROYER. Mant'r & Dealer in 

BOOTS & SSIOES, 

Neil St., three doors South ol Post Office. 

Repairinsr neatly done. 

yOGEL, CONRAD. Manfr and Dealer in Boots 
and Shoes, 84 University ave. 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OF THE CENTURY. 



229 



Champaign — Continued. 



BEOOM MANUFACTURER. 

STEAUB, E., B.oom Manufacturer, 
90 University st. 

CARPENTERS AND BUILDERS. 

FLEMI\G, JESSE, Carpenter and Joiner, Church 
St. E-tablished 185(5. 

ILLEB, B. F., Carpenter and Builder, MaiKet 
and Second stp., South. 



M 



^DENTIST. 
O HERMAN, A., Dentist, 



5t Neil St., opp. Main. 



DINING ROOMS. 
Helton's New Dining Rooms, 

E. G. HOLTON, PROP., 

Cor. Main and Fremont Sts., Champaign, Ills. 

DRESS AND CLOAKMAKING. 

COLEMAN, VINNIE, Dress and Cloakmaking, 
cor. Main and Walnut sts. 

LOUISA HARRIS, 

57 Neil street, Champaign, Ills. 
MISS S. E. LINEGAR, 

DRESS AND CLOAKMAKING, 

61 Neil street. Champaign, Ills. 
DRUGGIST. 

HUDDLESTON,R, H., M.lCPtysiSaiTand'sur- 
geoD, 4 Main St. 

DRY GOODS AND CARPETS. 

Dry G-oods, Notions & Carpets, 

Est. 1860, under Miller & Toll ; est. 1873, E. Miller. 

7 MAIN-gTREET. 

C. S. MOREHOUSE, 

"Wholesale and Retail Dealer in 

r>i'y Ooods Sijxci Carpets, 

Barrett Block. Established 1866. 
ILLIS, (J. C, Dry Goods, Millinery and No- 
tious, 11 Main st. 



w 



DYEING ESTABLISHMENTS, 

Champaign Steam Ityeing and Cleaning Eslablisiiment. 

JULIUS MUELLER, DYER, 

25 N. Walnut St., 

Silks, & Woolen Goods Dyed to any Color 

Also Cleans Gentlemen's and Ladies' Wearing 

Apparel, Shawls, Curtains, Carpets, Gloves, etc. 

All Premium Colors Warranted. 

Souder's Steam Dyeing and Reno- 
vating Establishment. 

Only Steam Dye House in the City. 
Fremont st. Established 1866. 



1878. 
bia, S. C, J. D. Caldwell is shot dead and 
Major Morgan wounded, by George Tupper. 

Sept. 33. — A terrible riot occur.s between 
Irish and negro laborers, at Patenburgh, New 
Jersey, 'one Irishman and three negroes 
killed". 

Sept. 34. — A force of U. S. cavalry, un- 
der Col. Mason, surprise a band of marauding 
Apache and Mojave Indians, in Arizona Terri- 
tory; they kill about 40 of the band. 

Sept. 36. — Ex-City Treasurer Marcer and 
Chas. F. Yerkes, convicted of embezzling the 
funds of the city of Philadelphia, pardoned by 
Governor Geary. 

Sept. SO. — Baron Steuben monument un- 
veiled at Steuben, N. Y. 

Mrs. Laura D. Fair's second trial at San 
Francisco, for the murder of Judge Crittenden, 
results in her acquittal. 

Oct. y. — A riot between white Greeley 
men and negro militiamen occvirs in Cincinna- 
ti, 0.; several persons are wounded. 

Oct. 8. — In an affray at Shreveport, La., 
Chief of Police Sherro'd and Police OflBcer 
Sheppard kill R. J. Wright, clerk of the Dis- 
trict Court of Shreveport, La., and his broth- 
er W. A. Wright; some friends of the 
Wrights immediately afterwards kill Officer 
Sheppard. 

A great part of the business section of the 
town of Sing Sing, N. Y., destroyed by fire; 
loss, about .$200,000. 

Oct. 13. — Archbishop Bailey installed as 
Primate of the Catholic Church in the United 
States, at Baltimore. 

A fire destroyed the rolling mill of the Cam- 
bria Iron Works, at Johnstown, Pa.; loss, 
$400,000. 

Oct. 14.— The Saratoga Countv Bank, at 
Waterford, New York, robbed of $500,000 in 
money and bonds, the burglars gag and bind 
the family of the cashier, and compel him, by 
threats, to disclose the secret of the bank 
vault's lock. 

Oct. 16. — The great race between Gold- 
smith Maid and Occident, at Sacramento, Cal., 
won by the former in three straight heats; best 
time, 2:20J4. 

Mr. Froude, the English historian, delivers 
his tirst lecture on the History of Ireland, in 
New York. 

Oct. 33. — Steamship Missouri, of the A. 
M. Steamship Line, burned at sea; 87 lives 
lost. 

The Emperor William, of Germany, commu- 
nicates his decision on the San Juan dispute to 
the representatives of England and the United 
States. It approves the claims of the United 
States Government. 

Nov. 3. — The monument to Sir Walter 
Scott unveiled in Central Park, N. Y. 

John Scannell shoots Thomas Donohue dead 
in Johnson's club rooms, cor. of 28th street 
and Broadway, N. Y. 

I>[ov. 6. — The mutilated remains of Abijah 
Ellis are found in two barrels floating in the 
Charles river, at Boston. 

]\ov. y. — A party of negroes in the Sixth 
ward, Baltimore, fire into a crowd of whites, 
and kill a boy and wound two other per- 
sons. 

I^'ov. 9. — The greatest fire that ever raged 



230 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



Wiv rcerben ftet§ bemii^t fein, unfern ©often in jeber ^infic^t ^ufneben^eit 
511 fiellen. 




Just opened and newly furnished with the best accommodation tor the travehng public, 
very cnnvenient to Depot. Eastern Prices — Eastern Management. 

I=»rio©, SI. 50 to $2.00 I=»or I>£i3r- 

THE PALISADE IIOTEI^ 

Corner 3(Ii, dt BlufT Sts., Kansas City. 

H. FABER, Proprietor. 



NEW YORK STEAM SCOURING AND DYE WORKS, 

'No. 174 Massachusetts St., Liawrence, Kas. 

Everv description of Silk anri Woolen Goo'ls Dyed equal to any house East, and flnishedby Cylin- 
ders. Ladies" and Gentlemen's Wearina; Xpparel Riiiovated, and made to appear as new; such as 
Crape, Brocha and Cashmere Shawls; also, Cashmere, Merino and Silk Dresses. 

d*a.i)e Slxa>vls r>yotl all Sliacles and Colox-s. 
SOII.ED GLOVES AND PLUMES CLEANED. 

C3-3E30. "V\7'- DPHEJESr^, DRx-OI^'x-- 

(^"Formerly PEEL & SONS' B ston Dye House, Cincinnati. Ohio. Established in 1842. 




Lightning ! Running ! Self-Threading I 

kliiU Of all otliers in Improyeinents. 

It is r.he liijhtest runnino ! the simplest to learn to use! the most durable! aud the best for all pur- 
poses has the most room under the arm! self threading shuttle! and never skip stitches or breaks 
thread! 

There Is no machine which i'? so easilv learned, and which combines lishtness and durability. For 
these and other reasons the American Machines is the best in which to invest your money. Sold at a 
moderate price, and on terms to 'c. within the reach of all. Warranted Fiic Years by the Company. 

liJilIVjVl^ I>Y «fc lyiAIiTIlV, Ag-ents, 

212 DOUGLASS ST., OMAHA. NEBRASKA. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



231 



cn 



CD ^ 



Q 

I] 



o 

H* 

(D 



OD 

CD 
CD 



> 
P 



31 P 

£2. Cfi 



=3- H J 



4 

oh 



p 



CO 




232 



INPOKTANT EVENTS OF THE CENTURY, 



1873. 

HI Boston breaks out early this evening, and 
continues all night. 

Bowles Brothers, the American bankers in 
Paris, France, suspend their business. 

3fov. lO.— The great fire in Boston is got 
Tinder control about 3 p. m., after having 
burned over an era of 200 acres, in the business 
center of the city ; again, at about 12 p. m. the 
flames appear near the place of origin of the 
first fire, and spread rapidly to buildings that 
had escaped them before ; an explosion of gas 
produced this second conflagration. 

r^'ov. 20.— A fire destroys Rand & Avery's 
printing establishment, No. 3 Cornhill, Boston ; 
loss, $250,000. 

Henry M. Stanley, the discoverer of Liv- 
ingstone, arrives in New York from England. 

A'ov. 21. — The great fire occurs in Galra, 
111.; loss, . 15218,000. 

A mob prevents Mrs. Fair from lecturing in 
San Francisco. 

3fov. 33. — Jay Gould makes a " corner " m 
N. W. R. R. iS. stock ; great excitement in "Wall 
street. 

The Erie Railroad Co. begins an action 
against Jay Gould for the recovery of .$9. 72C.- 
5b51 : Gould is arrested, but immediatelv after 
bailed in. V1,000,000. 

Doc. lO.— ilary Ann Foley, aHa« Maud 
^Merrill, shot by her'uncle, Robert P. Bleakley, 
at No. 10 Neils'on Place, New York. 

Dec. 11.— The Fifth Avenue Hotel New 
York fire : eleven servant girls are suffocated 
and burned to a crisp. 

l>ec. 17.— Jay Gould restores |9,000,000 
worth of propert^^'to the E. R. R. Co., for the 
sake of peace. 

Ooc. 18.— The second trial of Edward S. 
Stokes, for the murder of James Fisk, Jr., 
commenced. 

I>cc. 3-1. — Barnum's museum and circus 
destroyed by fire: loss, $1,000,000. 

A train oti the Buffalo and Pittsburg Railroad 
falls through the trestle bridge, near Prospect 
Station, N. Y.: twenty passengers are killed 
or burned to death, the wreck having taken fire. 

Andrew Strong, of Swamp Angel notoriety, 
is killed, at Eureka, N. C, by William Wilson. 
l>cc. 36. — Great storm throughout the 
country and along the coast: manj^ shipping- 
disasters result. 

The bark Kadosh wrecked in Massachusetts 
bay ; seven lives lost. 

Ship Peruvian lost on Massachusetts coast, 
and all hands, 25 in number, drowned. 

1873. 
■"•Fail. 3. — Mrs. Mary Ann Lampley mur- 
dered in her house in Baltimcu'e by Thomas R. 
HoUohan and Joshua Nicholson : the mur- 
derers executed for the deed, August 1st. 

Jan. 4. — Edward S. Stokes convicted of 
the murder of James Fisk, Jr. Sentenced to 
death .Ian. 6. 

Jan. 6. — Larson, a young Swede, brutally 
murdered by rowdies in Chicago. 

Jan. 11. — Lydia Sherman, the convicted 
murderess of her husband and several children, 
sentenced to imprisonment for life at New 
Haven. 

Jan. li>. — Burning of Edwin Forrest's 
library in Philadelphia: .$20,000 worth of 
books consumed. 



Champaign — Co7itimied. 



FARM MACHINERY. 

(Successor to Sabin Brothers,) 



O ABIN, C. J 



Dealer in 

Standard Farm Machinery, 

Wagons, Buggies, Corn Shellers, Coal, etc. 
FURNITURE. 

L. W. WALKER, 

Manufacturer of 

Insile Furnisliing for Swellings, Banks I Cfiicss 

Turning, Mouldings, Scroll 

Sawing, Stair Work, General Jobliing, 

Wholesale Furniture, 

GROCERIES. 

BOLLMAN, FREDERICK, Groceries and Provi- 
sions, 45 First st. 

HOTELS, 

CHAMPlieHMETrMep'm 

NEIL ST.. Northwest of I. B. & W. Depot, 

CHAMPAICJN, IJLLS. 

This Hotel is flrst-class in all its fittings, and 
no pains are spared for the comfort of guests. 

Good Sample Rooms for the accommodation 
of Commercial Agents. Kates Moderate. Bag- 
gage conveyed to and from all Trains. Travelers 
are invited to "stop and see me." 

HOUSE FURNISHING GOODS. 

LEWIS EMRY. 
HOUSEFURNISHING GOODS, 

34 l^^EIL. STREET. 
Repairing Clothes Wringers a Specialty. 

Q:E3:A.:M::PA.za-iNr. 

LAUNDRY. 

Steam Laundry, 

J. E. LUPTON, Proprietor, 

FREMONT STREET. 



LOAN BROKERS. 

TR 

21 Main st. 



rjURNHAM, TREVETT & MATTIS, Loan Brokers, 



LUMBER, 

M. E. LAPHAM & CO., 

Dealers in 

LUMBER. DOORS, BLINDS 

Sash, Lime, Cement, Brick, Etc., 

CHAMPAIGN, - ILLS. 

YARD, corner Market St. and University Ave. 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OF THE CENTURY 



233 



Champaign — Continued. 



MILLINERY GOODS, 

BLANCHABD, E. C, Dealer in FASHION- 
ABLE MILLINERY, RIBBONS, 
BLOWERS, FEATHERS ETC., 

AGENT FOR BUTTE KICK'S PATTERNS. 
57 Neil street. 

MISS M. HAINES, Dealer in 



39 Neil St. Mourning Goods a Specialty. 



NEWSPAPER. 




Only German Paper in the 14th Congressional 
District. JOHN BECKER, Editor & Prop. 

PAPER STOCK. 

LOCiU; & SAXTON, Paper and Paper Stock, 
Bet. Doane House & University ave. 

REAL ESTATE^ 

KEED, THOS. A., Real Estate and Loan Agent, 
5 Main St. 

TAILOR. 

Established 1873. 

WM. BOWEN, 



No. 14 MAIN" STREET, 

C]iaiii])aig;n Illis. 

TOBACCO AND CIGARS. 
SAMUEL. JKPPSTEm^ 

Manufacturer of Cigars, 

And Wholesale Dealer in Tobaccos, Pipef=, etc., 
44 MAIN ST., CHAMPAIGN & URBANA. 

_^^^^^JWAGON MANUFACTURERS. 

LIXK, LUTHER, Wagon and Hairow Manufac- 
turer, cor. Neil & Washington sts. 

JOHN W. SPALDING, 

Manufacturer of ttie 

SPALDING WAGON 

Shop on S. Neil & Walnut sts., opp. Jefferson 
& Son's Livery Stable. Estab. 1871. 

WATCHES AND JEWELRY. 

COKE, H. C, Watches, Clocks and Jewelry, 
27 Main st. 



EVANSTON, ILLS. 



JSARBER. 
O MITH, J. P., Barber, 



Davis street. 



1873. 

•Fctn. ly. — Fir.st Congregational Church 
of Chicago destroyed by fire. 

Jsin. 30. — The Modocs sanguinarily de- 
feat United States troops. 

Fcl). 3. --Murder of Grace Mabel Love, 
and suicide of the father and murderer in 
Boston. 

Fel*. 13. — Fall of a bridge into the James 
River, at Richmond ; four workmen perish, 
many injured. 

Fel>. 15.— The steamer Henry A. Jones 
burned at Calveston, Texas ; twenty-one per- 
sons perish. 

]TI.avclt 4:. — Second Inauguration of Presi- 
dent Grant. 

l^larcli 30.— Wreck of the White Star 
steamship Atlantic, off the coast of Halifax; 
700 lives lost. 

April 8. — Thirty persons drowned on 
Genesee river, Rochester. 

April 11. — Gen. Canby and Rev. Dr. 
Thomas treacherously murdered by the Modocs 
on the lava beds. 

April 15.— Deadly collision between the 
blacks and whites at Colfax, La. 

April IS. — Attack on the Modoc lava 
beds. 

April Id. — A passenger train breaks- 
through a bridge on the Stonington and Provi 
deuce road; a large number of ^passengers 
killed and wounded. 

Second battle with the Modocs. 

April 3G.— Arrest of F. L. Taintor, cash- 
ier of the Atlantic National Bank, New York, 
defaulter in the sum of .^400,000. 

April 27. — The Modocs surprise and de- 
stroy a detachment of troops. 

]!tlav lO- — The Modocs evacuate the Lava- 
Beds. 

The Mordecai and McCarty duel, Richmond, 
Va. 

Iflay 30. — Surrender of Hot-Creeks and 
Modocs to Gen. Davis. 

May 33. — General McKenzie's excursion 
into Mexico, 

Destructive tornado in Iowa. 

]?Iay 30.— The great Boston fire No. 2. 

Popular observance of Decoration Day. 

•f line 1. — Modoc Jack's surrender. 

June 3. — Mansfield Tracy Walworth shot 
to death by his son at the Sturtevant House, 
New York. 

June -1. — McDonnel, the English forger, 
put on board a steamer for England. 

June 17. — Indians attack the Northern 
Pacific surveying party; four Indians killed. 

JTune 30.— The body of Col. Wm. O'Con- 
ner Sydney cast ashore on Staten Island. 

Jnue 37. — The work of laying the new" 
Atlantic Cable completed. 

July 1. — Judge W. H. Cooley killed in a 
duel by'R. D. Rhett, Jr., at New Orleans. 

.¥nly 3. — Discovery of the body of Thomas 
JIunce, supposed to have been murdered, in 
the Schuylkill, Phila. 

July 5. — Frank Walworth, for murdering 
his father in New York, sentenced to imprison- 
ment for life. 



234 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



E VANSTON — Continued. 


Alton — Co7ti{nued. 


BOOTS AND SHOES. 

VfcKAY, E., Boots and Shoes, 

I'A Davis St. 


BAKERS AND CONFECTIONERS. 

HENRY NEERMAN, 


CROCKERY AND GLASSWARE, 

"piNUREErjTG^rCEsta^^ 

JT Crockery, Glassware, Toys, Stationery, etc. 



DENTISTS, 

■VTANSFIELD & FEEEMANJD^mi^t^™™"^'^™ 
i-'A Evanston, Illinois. 

FURNITURE. 

TREDALE, GEORGE, Furniture. 

X Uptiolsterinn, and Repairing done to Order. 

HARDWARE, 

TXriGREN, C. T., Dealer in Hardware and House 
T T Furnishing Goods. 

MEAT MARKET. 

Ti AILET & PALING, Meat Market, 

-D Davis St. 

PHOTOGRAPHER, 

TTESLER, A.. Photo. Artist. Highest award re- 

XI ceived at Worl'i's Fair, 1833, & Centennial 76 

TAILORS, 

TTAIXSTR0MriL7"^^ 

-in Merchant Tailor and Gents' Furnisher. 


Baker and Confectioner, 

And Dealer in Candies. Fruits, Nuts, &c. Also 
an Eating House attached. 

Cor. of Bell & Fourth Sts. 


BOOTS AND SHOES. 

T) ERNER & GAISER, Manufacturer of Boots and 
-D Shoes, Belle st. 

/"^ERBIG, GEO., Manufacturer of Boots and 
\jr Shoos, belle st. 

J. W. ISCHMOELLEB, 

First-Class Custom 

BOOT AND SHOE MAKER, 

2nd St., bet Market & Alby Sts. 


J. STILL, 

Manufacturer of 

Gents' Boots and Shoes. 

STATE STREET. 


rpHE EVANSTON TAILORING ASSOCIATION, 
-L Davis street. 


COMMISSION MERCHANT. 


npURNER, JOHN, 
X MerchantTailorandGents'FurnishingGoods. 


/^LDHAM, G. W., Commission Merchant and 
\J Dealer in Hides. Tallow, &c.. State st. 


ALTON, ILLS. ' 


DENTISTS. 

T) OBIDON, DR. J., Dentist, 

J\ Belle street. 




ATTORNEY AT LAW. 

"DRENHOLT, JNO. I., Attorney at Law, 

X> Third st. 


2iid Street, 0pp. City Hall, 




BAKERS AND CONFECTIONERS. 

H. JOSTING & CO. 

Confectionery and Ice Cream Saloon, 

No. 11 BELLE STREET. 


DRUGGIST. 

'Th"a¥bTrIAInT H AG E E, 

li[|ol0Siilg i|_ilail Jruggisis 

No. 11 THIRD ST., South Side. 

Proprietors and Sole Manufacturers of Perline 
Tooth Powf'er, v\ ade's Camphor Ice, Wade's Hair 
Restorer, "Favorite" Cologne. 


A. L. Daniels. Geo. A. Bayle. Wm . B. Pierce 

Heixdlall Baker j^ 

DANIELS, BAYLE & CO., 


Cracker UiscuilUactursr^ 

ALTON, ILLS. 


GROCERS, 

JOSEPH OROWE, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealer in 

Famly Groceries, ProfisMS 

FRUITS, PKODUCE, &c., 

STATE ST., Bet. Srd & ith. Goods Deiivered Free of Charge. 


BOOKSELLERS. 
(buccessiirs to M. I. Lee & Co.) 

Wholesale \ Retail Booksellers I Stationers, 

20 Third St. Paper-hangings & picture fittings. 



IMPORTANT KVENTS OF THE CENTURY. 



235 




236 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



Alton — Contimied. 



GROCERS. 

LAIK & ATWOOD, Wholesale Grocers, 

Second St., cor. Piasa. 



B 



Alton — Continued. 



SALOONS. 



NISBETT, T. P., & CO., Grocers, 
2ncl St., opposite City Hall 

GUNSMITH. 

WUERKER, F., Manf'r of and Dealer in Gn ns, 
Kifles, Pistols, State st. 

HOTEL. 

Hotel and Boarding Honse, 

THEODORE FRIES. 
Third St., bet. Piasa and State. 

Travelers and Farmers can !od.;e here cheaper 
than any other house. 

INSURANCE, 

WHIPPLE & SMILEY, 

Insurance and Real Estate Agents, 

Money to Loan. Office over First Nat. Bank. 
LIME KILNS. 

WlviTARMSfROI^ 
Wholesale and Retail Ice Dealers, 

And Proprietors of 

BLUFF LIME KILNS, 

And Dealers in 
Cement, Lime, Hair, Plaster Paris, Etc., 

LIVERY AND PEED STABLE, 

hTw^Ii ART^ 

LiTfiry aM M M\ 

STATE STREET, 

Opposite Alton National Bank. 

'■ MILLINERY, 

G OILMAN, & CO.. Dealers in Millinery 
r Goods, 12 Belle St. 



OYSTER SALOON, 

karlTbetz's 

NEW 

RESTAURANT & OYSTER SALOON, 

Choice Ice Cream, Nuts, Cigars. Tobacco, &c. 

MEALS AT ALL HOURS. 
Corner Belle and Fourth Streets. 

SALOONS, 

BRUCH & BLACKBORNE, Choicest Wines. Li- 
quors and Cigars, Second et., opp. City Hall. 



MATT, FRANCIS, Bank Saloon. Choice Liquors 
and Cigars. State st. 

1 

O 



igars 
lESSNER, PAUL, Wine and Beer Saloon, cor. 

Second and Piasa sts. 
BEN, M. F., Wine and Lagor Beer Saloon, 

No. t), Second st. 



STEINHELUER, B., Wine & Beer Saloon, 2d St., 
opposite City Hall. 

Z^ TAILORS^ 

MORITZ, H. C. G., MERCHANT TAILOR, I^ 
Dealer in Gents', Youths' and Boys' 

Clothing and Gents' Furnishing G-oods, 

THIRD ST., bet. State and Piasa. 



TANNERY. 

WILLIAMS, R. A., Manufacturer of Sheepskins 
and White Linings, Belle st. 

UNDERTAKERS. 

Undertaking Establishment, 

Keeps constantly on hand a full assortment of 
COFFINS, METALIC CASES & CASKETS, 

STATE ST., opp. Third (over Piatt & Hart's 

Livery Stable). 

Prompt attention given to carpenter vs^ork of all 

kinds, and repairing furniture. 

^ WINES AND LIQUORS. 

BASSE & GRAY, 
Dealers in Imported and Domestic 

>VI]>f ES, LIQUOJEtS, ETC 

State St. 

WAGON MAKERS. 

Manufacturer of 

Farm, Spring and Platform 

WAGONS. 

REPAIRING DONE AT LOW PRICES. 

Belle St., bet. Fourth & Fifth. 

aEORQE LUFT, 

General 

Blacksmith and Horseshoer, 

Wagons of Every Description made to 
order. 

BELLE ST. Established 1S72. 



DECATUR, ILLS. 

BARBERS. 

JAMES HOLLINGEE, 

BARBER AND HAIRDRESSER, 

Cor. E. Main St. and Old Square. 

ROGAN <fe CHAPMAN, Barbers and Hairdressers 
36 E.Main gt. 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OF THE CENTURY. 



T6l 






1 . 


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o 


a 


5- 


CL 


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rn 


tr 


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T3 


n 


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3 


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T 


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238 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OF THE • CENTURY. 



1873. 

July 8. — Michael Desmond kills his wife, 
and thL'n commits suicide, in Boston. 

July 15.— Ethclbcrt S. Mills, President 
■of the Brooklyn Trust Company, drowned at 
Coney Island. 

July 17. — The ^reat Harvard-Yale re- 
gatta, on the Connecticut; Yale the victor. 

•Titly 30. — The whalinp; ship, Raven- 
scraig, rescues Capt. Kuddington and party 
(14 in all ) from their boat in the Arctic sea, 
subsequently transferred to the whaler, Arc- 
tic. 

July 25. — Destructive fire in Baltimore. 

Delia Corcoran outraged and murdered by a 
party of negroes, on the Hudson. 

Aug'. 1. — Execution of Thomas R. Hollo- 
han, alias Whalen, and Joshua Nicholson, for 
the murder of Mrs. Lamplej' at Baltimore. 

Murder of Mrs. Schusretter by lier husband, 
and suicide of the murderer, at Philadelphia. 

Aug'. ' S. — Destructive conflagration at 
Portland, Oregon. 

Alls'. ^- — Burning of the steamboat, Wa- 
wasjct, on the Potomac; fearful loss of life. 

Aug". 13. — Two women killed instantly 
and four fatally injured by lightning, near 
Scranton, Pa. 

Aug'. U. — Sanguinary battle between the 
Pawnees and Sioux in the Republican Valley, 
reported. 

Aug;. lO. — Terrible railroad disaster on 
the Chicago and Alton Raili'oad; eleven pas- 
sengers killed and many wounded. 

Aug'. 33. — Michael C. Broderick stabs 
his son James to death, at 81 Carmine street. 
New ^'ork. 

Aug'. 25. — Railroad smash-up on the 
South Side R. R.; lifiy passengers injured. 

Sept. O, — The settlement of the Geneva 
award consummated. 

Sept. i'-2. — Assasiuafion of Gen. E. S. 
McCook by P. P. Winlermate, at Yankton, 
Dakota Territory. 

Sept. 15. — The propeller. Ironsides, foun- 
ders on Lake Michigan, with great loss of life. 

Sept. 18.— Failures on Wall street, New 
York — Jay Cooke & Co., and others. 

The Dundee whaling steamer, Arctic, arrives 
at Dundee with Capt. Buddington and rescued 
companions. 

Sept. 23.— The McCooI-Allen prize-fight, 
near St. Louis; Allen the winner in the ninth 
round. 

Sept. 36. — Inii)osing dedication of a ]\la- 
sonic temple at I'hiludelphia. 

Si'pt. 30. — Grand Masonic parade ni 
Philadelphia; over 3.000 men in line. 

Oct. 3. — Execution of the Jlodocs, Capt. 
Jack, Sconchin, Boston Charley and Black 
Jim, for the murder of Gen. Canb}- and Rev. 
Dr. Thomas, at Port Klamath, Oregon. 

First business session of the Evangelical 
Alliance held. 

Oct. -1. — Capt. Buddington and ten other 
survivors of the Polaris expedition, arrive in 
New York by the steam ship City of Antwerp. 

Gen. Ryan and seventy others embark on 
the steamer Atlas, bound for Cuba Libre. 

Oct. 7. — Edward S. Stokes put upon his 



Alton — Contuiued. 



BAKBERS. 

H. SINGLETON, 

BARBERS HAIBDBEIS^ER 

Prairie st., near corner Water. 



S 



TEWART, D., Barber and Hairdresser, Central 
Block, Merchant t. 



BOOKBINDER, 

''pOWLING. WM., Bookbinder, cor. Old square 
X and Main st. 



DENTIST. 

R. C. DvVWKlNS^ D.D.S., 

30 3ES KT T I S T, 

Corner Water st. and Park Established 1865. 
MILLINERY AND DRESSMAKING, 



DRESS AND CLOAKMAKER, 

Cor. State St. and Park. 

ELHOUSEN, M~US. L. P., Millinery and Fancy 
G ods, Post Office Bloc k, Piairie st. 

MRS. E. A. E.^SrMAN, 

Dressmaker and Milliner, 

41 Water st. 

MISS li. M. EASTON, 

DRESS AND CLOAIIAKEE, 



1 9 EAST MAIN ST. 

AMSHER, MRS, R. C, Mill nery and Fancy 
Goods, 21 Cmtral blocjt^ 

I' ETBYrMKS. A. 31., Die-<s and Cloakmaker, Cen- 
^ tral Bloclv, Mercha nt st. 

MRS. M. L. M'DONALD, 

Dealer in 

MI£«XjII\rKRY^ 

straw and Hair C^oods, 

26 MERCHANT ST. 
MUSIC TEACHER, 

MUSIC -T«^4CeEM, 

And Leader of the 

Goodman Orcliesira and Brass Band, 

39 WATER ST,,BRAMERNAN'S BLOCK. 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OF THE CENTURY. 



239 



Decatur — Contiuued. 



NEWSPAPEE. 

HEDECAtFr review, W. H. Bayne, Propri- 
etor, South side old square. 



PHOTOGKAPHERS. 

Established 1861. 

MRS. T. H. BUTI.ER. 

The Indian Lady 

Photographer. 
Copying oil Piclnres a Specialty. 

COTt. WATER ST. & PARK. 

Established 186-2. 



Mrs. J. Haws' 




oi 



AND 

GEM GAI.L.ERY. 

Enlarging:, by Solar Work, a Specialty. 

15 E. Main St., Decatur, Ills. 

IEFORGEE & PIPER, Photographers, 
J 25 Water et. 

Established 1856. 

W. C PITXER^ 

Photographic Artist, 

CopyinianlEnlariinp Specialty. 

13 WATER ST. 
PHYSICIANS. 

BUMSTEAD, DR. S. J., Occulist & Aarist, 
12 B. Main st 

CURTIS, IRA B., Occulist & Aurist, 
25 N. Main st. 

KILNKB, GEO., M. D., Occulist & Aurist. 
35 N. Main st. 

TILE AND CROCKERY. 

GILLEN, GEO., Tile & Crockery, 
53 W. Main st. 



B 



SEWING MACHINES. 

LUME, GEO. P., Agt. Singer Sewing Machines, 
26 Merchant st. 

16 



1873. 

third trial for the murder of James Fisk, Jr., 
at the Grand Central Hotel. 

Oct. 11.— The General Conference of the 
Evangelical Alliance hold their closing ses- 
sion. 

E.x-Senator Pomeroj shot and wounded by 
Ex-Congressman Conway, in Washington. 

Oct. 14.— The delegates to the Evangeli- 
cal Alliance received at the White House by 
President Grant. 

Oct. 81. — The new Foundling Asylum on 
68th street, New York, opened. 

Oct. 85. — Arrival of the sloop-of-war, 
Juniata, from her Polaris search. 

Oct. 89.— Close of third trial of Stokes, 
in the Court of Oyer and Terminer, New York; 
he is found guilty of murder in the fourth de- 
gree. 

Oct. 31. — Capture of the American steam- 
ship Virginius by the Spanish gunboat Torna- 
do, off the island of Jamaica. 

I^ov. 1. — The Virginius and her captor ar- 
rive at Santiago de Cuba. 

I^ov. -A. — The Santiago de Cuba slaughter. 
Bernabe Verona, Pedro Cespedes, Jesus del 
Sol, and Gen. Washington Kyan, captured on 
the Virginias, shot at 6 a. m. by order of Gen. 
Burrier, commanding the Spanish troops at 
Santiago de Cuba. 

Nov. 7. — Capt. Joseph Fry, an American- 
born citizen, commanding the Virginius when 
captured by the Spanish gunboat Tornado, and 
thirty-si.t of his crew, e.xecuted at Santiago de 
Cuba. Santa Rosa, an adopted American 
citizen, was among the number of these vic- 
tims. 

]\ov. 8. — Twelve more of the Cuban pa- 
triots executed at Santiago de Cuba, among 
them Franchi Alfaro, who oifered a million of 
dollars as ransom for his own and companions' 
lives. 

Nov. 8.— (1872) Capt. C. F. Hall, com- 
mander of the U. S. Polaris expedition, died at 
Polaris Bav, lat. SI" 38', long. CI" 34'. Buried 
in Polaris Bay, Nov. 11, 1872. 

Nov. 11. — Terrible boiler explosion at Har- 
lem; seven persons killed and nine wounded. 

Nov. 15. — Duncan T. Templeton shoots 
his wife, nee Miss Ida Babcock, on Eighth 
avenue, near 15th street. New York. 

Nov. IS. — The Virginius arrives at Hava- 
na from Santiago de Cuba, under escort 
of the Tornado and other Spanish war ves- 
sels. 

]%o\^. 1».— Wm. Tweed (Big Six), con- 
A'icted in the Court of Oyer and Terminer on 
204 counts, charging him with defrauding the 
City Treasury of New York. 

Wm. J. Sharkey, convicted of the murder of 
Robert S. Gunn, escapes from the tombs in New 
York. 

Fatal prize fight near Ottowa, III., between 
Jack Lewis and Jim Rogers. Lewis dies im- 
mediately after the 36th round. 

ISo'f'. 80. — Loss of the Anglo-American 
cable steamer Robert Lowe, bound for St. 
Johns, Newfoundland. Commander Tid- 
marsh and sixteen of the officers and crew 
drowned. 

Nov. 88. — The French steamer Ville de 
Havre, Captain Surmont, collides with the 



240 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



D ECATUR — Conimued. 



SEWING MACHINES. 

HUMPHREY & SON, 

Dealers in the 



Howe Sewing Machine, 

NEEDLES, OIL & ATTACHMENTS. 
ATjI, kinds of MACHINES REPAIRED 

Opp. P. O. blk., 23 N. Main st. 

BELLEVILLE, ILLS. 

BOOKSELLER. 

PITTHAN, L., Boolibinder & Bookseller, 
Belleville. 

CHINA. GLASS AND QUEENSWARE. 

T)OOEDER, A., China, Glass & Queensware, 
JA) 15E. Mainst. 



CUTTER AND GRINDER, 
OOS, JNO. ADAM, Cutter & Grinder, 



W. Main st. 



DRY GOODS, ETC. 

NEW YORK BAZAAR, Wm. Bauman, Sr., Agt., 
Notions & Dry Goods, VV. Main st. 

WILDING, J.&SON, Groceries & Dry Goods, 
207 VV. Main st. 



HATS, CAPS AND FURS. 

RIEDELL, F. C, Manufacturer and dealer in Hats, 
Caps, Furs, Gloves & Umbrellas, Main street, 
second block VVcst of public square. Sign — The 
big Hat and Glove. 



PLANING MILL. 

STORC'KA BRO., Cor. 1st North & Spring sts.. Man- 
ufacturers of bash. Doors, Blinds, Frames, 
Mouldings, Brackets, Scroll Sawing, Stair Railing. 
Balusters, etc. All kinds of Wood Turning done, 



MARBLE WORKS. 

VAUGHN & LORD, Marble & Granite Works, 
Belleville, 111. 



WINES AND LIQUORS, 

ANDEL, C. W. & CO., successors to Andel & 
Weber, RECTIFIEKS OF SPIRITS, and 
Wholesale dealers in Wines and Liquors, 222 Fast 
Main st. 



BLOOMINGTON, ILLS. 



H 



BARBERS. 

ILL, GEO. A., Barber, 

Old P. O. Stand, cor, Jefl'erson & Main sts. 



Bloomington — Cofih'fined. 

BARBERS, 

FRED KESTING, 

New Post Office Barber Shop, 

SHAVING AND HAIR CUTTING 

In the latest style. Cor. Cen're & Front fts. 

RICHARD BLUE, 

104 S. Main st. 

BOOK BINDER. 
AMOS KEMP, 

BOOK BINDER AND BLANK BOOK MANUFACTORER, 

216 & 218 N. Centre st. 



H 



BILLIARD HALL, 

AKER, FRED, Beer & Billiard Hall, 

Cor. Centre & Washington sts. 



BILL POSTERS. 

HOLLY, JOEL, & SONS, City Bill Posters, 
205 W. Front st. 

BROOM FACTORIES. 

LEWIS, W. M., Broom Factorv, 
820E. Washington St. 

WHITE, W. P., Manf'r of Brooms & Brushes, 
Bloomington, 111. 

BUSINESS COLLEGE, 

"Evergreen City" 

BUSINESS COLLEGi, 

MARQUAM & BAKER, Proprietors, 
114 S. Main St. 

CONFECTIONER, 

TIMERMAN, J. L., Confectioner & Fruiterer, 
118 S. Main st. 



CRACKER BAKERY. 

GERKEN, W. A., Cracker Bakery, 
1 



118 E. Front St. 



DENTIST, 

Dr. G. D. Sitherwood, 

DENTIST. 



J? 



OflB.ce : S. W. cor. Square. 



DRUGGISTS. 

DYSON & CO., Chemists & Pharmacists, 
Cor Main <fc Grove sts. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



241 




CATHOLIC TOTAL ABSTINANCE FOUNTAIN, PHILADELPHIA, CENTENNIAL GROUNDS. 

Peters'* Horse Protector, 

Or Elastic Patented Tug-Link for Harness, 

For Teamsters, Farmers, and Street Railway Companies. 




The advantages gained by the use of this invention may be comprised as follows : 

Firstly. That the horses breasts and shoulders will not be liable to soreness from 
the harness by any overstrain. 

Secondly. The horses will start and convey heavy loads with more ease and will 
therefore be able to do longer duty. 

Thirdly. The saving in Harness-repairs will be quite a consideration. 

Fourthly. The entire strain of the start being obviated, horses will show less ten- 
dency to baulk, and actually baulky horses will be cured by the use of the Protector. 
Peters' Patent Elastic Tug-tinks are furnished at $3.50 per pair by 

Office, 65 N. Clark St., Chicago. 

(^"AGENTS WANTED EVERYWHERE. 

^3 T^, TJ -p^ "PT^ "pr^ ^s^ ^* "^^ ^5 - 

Field, Leiter & Co., Wholesale Dry Goods, Chicago, i N. K. Fairbanks & Co., Lard & Oil Works, Chicago 
Bnsch & Brandt, Brewers, - - - •' | Chicago Fire Department, - - - " 

A. Fi8her,JSIorlhwe6tern_Flour & Peed Mills '• I North side Chicago Omnibus Line, R. Rager, " 

- " I North Chicago City Railway . - - " 



C. Gee & Bro., General Teamsters, 



242 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



MISSISSIPPI VALLEY VINEGAR WORKS. 

First Premium Awarded at Agricultural and Mechanical Exposition. 

JOHN GTmUl^^ 

Proprietor and Manufacturer of 



All kinds of Choice Vinegars, 

ALSO, DESSELDORF and FRENCH MUSTARD, 

Warranted Manufactured from Pure Brown Seed. 

FACTORY & OFFICE, 313 IOWA St., DUBUQUE, IOWA. 



Bloomington — Contiiined. 



FANCY GOODS AND NOTIONS. 

WALKER, JOSEPH, Fancy Goods & Notions, 
209 N. Main st. 

FOUNDEIES. 

N. DIEDRICH, 

Union Foundry 

AND 

MACHINE SHOP, 

Manufacturer of the 

Ruttan & Hawley Furnace, 

mi S. Center St. 



M 



HARNESS AND SADDLES, 

OORE, JJI. L., Harness, baddies, Trunks, etc., 
114 S. Main St. 



A 



HIDES AND LEATHER, 

GLE &, SONS, Hides «& Leather. 

307 S. Center St. 



S' 



HOTEL. 

TEVENS HODSE, Mrs. E. Stevens, Proprietress^ 
Cor. Main & Grove sts. 



w 



INSURANCE, 

AITE, M. C, Insurance Agent, 

Cor. Centre & Washington sts. 



H 



MARBLE WORKS. 
OLDEMAN MARBLE WORKS, 



301 S. Main st. 



M 



OGRE, W. B., Marble & Granite Worker, 

311 v\. Wai^hiijgton St. 



D 



R 



MILLINERY. 

UNHAM & HOYT, Millinery & Fancy Goods, 
lObN. Centre st, 

OBINSON, MISS M., Milliuery & Fancy Goods, 
40b N. Maiu st. 



PAYLOR, MRS. S. A., Millineiy, 



408 N. Main st. 



w 



ALKER, JOSEPH, Millinery, 



209 N. Maiu st. 



Bloomington — Continued. 



NEWSPAPERS. 

EM0CR.4.TIC NEWS, only Democratic Paper in 
the CO.. Dudley Creed, pub., 116 W. Front st. 



D 



THE WESTERN ADVANCE, A. O. Grigsby, Edi 
tor, 113 W. Front st. 

OIL MANUFACTURER. 

WINSLOW, N. N., Manf'r of Oils, E. of Main 
St., near L. B. & M. Pass. Depot. 



V 



PIANOS AND ORGANS. 

AN SCHOICK & ANDRUS, Pianos & Organs, 
Lincoln Block, cor. Main & Jeflfiirsou sts. 



PHYSICIAN. 

Dr. A. S. Burrows, 

CURAPATHIST 

Treats Diseases in every Stage, 

ACUTE OR CHRONIC; 

Strains, Sprains, Bruises, Tnsanitv, etc., with- 
out any DRUGS OR MEDICINE. 
Office and residence: 
4SO IVOIiTH 3XA.IIN ST. 



D 



SEWING MACHINES. 

ALLIBA, J. B., Sewing Machine Repair shop, 
101 E. Nortust. 



SOAP AND CANDLES. 

TINSHJW, N. N., Manfr of Soap & Candles' 
E. of Maiu st , near L. B. & M. Pass Depot. 



^ 



UNDERTAKERS. 

IT^LINSPACH & DENEEN, Undertakers. 
Cor. Oak & Market sts. 



M 



K 



AYER, AARON & CO., Uadertakers, 

P'runf St. under new P. O. 



SHEBOYGAN, WIS. 



AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS. 

OULER & SILBERZAHN, ManPs of Pat, feed 
Cutters, Cast steel & Chilled Plows. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



243 




244 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OF THE CENTURY. 



British ship Loch Earn, Capt. Robinson, and 
immediately sinks in mid-ocean, with the loss 
of 227 lives. 

"Wm. M. Tweed sentenced to twelve ^years' 
imprisonment and to pay a fine of $12,500. 

]^ov. 26.— James H. IngersoU and John 
D. Farrino;ton, convicted of defrauding the 
City Treasury of New York, and sentenced, 
Ing'ersoll to four years; Farrington in the 
Court of Oyer and' Terminer, to one year and 
six months hi the State Prison. 

IVov. SO.— The brig Mattano boarded by 
masked robbers in the Harbor, N. Y.; the cap- 
tain, T. H. Connauton, fired aland wounded; 
the watchman bound and mul!led,and thecabin 
despoiled of all the valuables belonging to the 
captain's wife and family; two of the robbers 
were subsequently sentenced, in the Court of 
General Sessions, to twenty years each at Sing 
Sing. 

Dec. 9. — Ex-congressman M. Conway in- 
dicted for assault with intent to kill Senator 
Pomeroy. 

l>ec. 11. — Double murder and suicide in 
Boston. George W. Kimball murders his 
wife and daughter and then cuts his own 
throat. 

l>ec. 12. — The Virginius towed out of the 
port of Havana for Bahia Honda, the port of 
surrender to the United States. 

Michael C. Broderick convicted of man- 
slaughter in the fourth degree, in causing the 
death of his son. 

Mob demonstration in Havana against the 
delivery of the Virginius. Captain-General 
Jovellar addresses the mob. 

The centennial anniversary of throwing the 
tea overboard in Boston Harbor celebrated 
throughout the Now England States. 

Dec. 16. — Surrender of the Virginius at 
Bahia Honda, by the Spanish steamer La Fa- 
vorita, to the United States steamer Dispatch, 
Captain Whiting. President CaslcUar con- 
veys the news in person to Minister Sickles, at 
Madrid. 

Repeal of the Bankruptcy Law in the House 
of Representatives. 

The corner-stone of the proposed bridge to 
span the Hudson at Poughkeepsie laid with ap- 
propriate ceremonies. 

Dec. 18. — One hundred and two of the 
survivors of the Virginius and Santiago de 
Cuba butchery delivered by the Spanish 
General Burrier to Commander Braine of the 
United States steamer Juniata. 

l>ec. 19. — Conviction of Henry W. Genet 
in the court of Oyer and Terminer, for fraud 
agaianst the New York city goverment. 

Dec. 21.— The First Baptist Church, cor- 
ner Nassau and Liberty streets. New York, 
destroyed by fire. 

Dec. 22. — Henry W. Genet escapes from 
Sheriff Brennan's officers at his house in Har- 
lem, and effectually evades recapture. 

The Broome Street Ryan tragedy: Nicholas 
and Mary Ryan, brother and sister, found with 
their throats cut at 204 Broome street. New 
York. 

Dec. 26. — The resignatien of the U. S. 
Minister to Spain, Gen. Sickles, officially ac- 
cepted. 



Sheboygan — Continued. 



ATTORNEY AT LAW. 



s 



UMNER, GEO. T., Attorney at Law, 

German Bank Building. 



BAKERY AND CONFECTIONERY. 

WAGNER, G. A., Bakery & Confectionery, 
8th & Niagara ets. Established 1873. 

BOOTS AND SHOES. 

KEMPP, JACOB, Boots, Shoes, Gaiters, Kuhbers, 
Slippers, etc, 8th st. 



w 



CIGARS AND TOBACCO. 

lEHN, HENRY, Manl'r and dealer in Cigars & 
Tobacco, 8th et. Established 1862 



CIGAR BOX LUMBER, 
A. Look. C. Bechlt. 

liook & Bechly, 



Manulacturers of 

CIGAR BOX lUMBER, 

And all kinds of BOXES, 

Ninth Street, Near City Park. 

CLOTHING. 

HOBERGS, J., dealer in ( lothing, Boots and 
Shoes, 8th St. & Peun avenue. 

CROCKERY AND GLASSWARE. 

DESCOMBES, L. A., Crockery, Tabic Glassware, 
Plated ware & Cutlery, 8th St. 

DENTIST, 

DUCKETT, C. H., Dentist, 
Eighth and New York ave. 



B 



DRUGGISTS, 

OCK, LOUIS & SON, Dnii^sistp, Eighth St., near 
City Park. Established 1876. 



A. MAHLENDORF, 

Dealer in 

DRUGS, PAINTS, OILS, 

Varnishes, Brushes, Window Glass, 
L,ooking-Glasses. Lamps, Mouldings, Sta- 
tionery, etc., 

EIGHTH ST., NEAR CENTRE. EST. 1864. 



PLOUR AND FEED. 

TEFFEN & JUCKEM, Wholesale and Retail 
Dealers in 

Flour, Feed and Produce. 

Green Peas and Clover 8eed a specialty. 
Sheboygan. 

FURNITURE. 

ATTOON, GEO. B., Furniture and Upholstered 
Goods, Eighth st. 



S 



M 



C. RlfiDEL, Manulacturer of 

Furniture, Coffins, Etc., and General TTn- 

fJertakers, 

Eighth St., above Beekman House. Est. 1863. 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OF THE CENTURY. 



245 



Sheboygan — Continued. 



S" 



HOMffiOPATHIC PHYSICim 

UIBK, H. D., M.D., Homceopathic Physician 
and Surgeon, Eightii st. 



HOLLOW WAEE. 

J. J. VOLLrtATH, 

Manufacturer of 

PORCELAIN LINED HOLLOf WARE, 

In Gray & White, Pump Cylinolers, etc. 

Gray Enameled Ware warranted to be durable 
for Stove use. Prices compare favorably with 
Eastern Manufactories Establisshed 1874. 
Cor. Sixth and Muron Streets. 

HOTELS. 

BEEKMAN HOUSE. $2.00 per day. Eighth St. 
Halfted «fc Slearns. prop's. 

ATIONAL HOTEL, L. KauflFus, prop., Eighth st. 
Esiabh^hedJS^ 



Mil- 



NEWHALL HOUSE, J.F. Anlisdel, prop 
waukee. 

ARK HOTEL, Fred Eslien, prop.. Eighth St., 
opp. City Park. Established 1875. 

MACHINIST. 

JENKINS, DAVID, MACHINIST and Builder of 
Zufeli & Craig's 

Patent Hub Machine and Bailey Lathe. 

Dealer in JShaitiug, Pulleys, Hangers, etc., 
Sheboygan. 



E 



MARBLE DEALEE. 

OOT, WM. M., Marble Dealer. Dealer and 
Livery Stable, 8tn St., West of Turner Hall. 



MINERAL WATERS, 

BERTSCHY & THAYER, Sheboygan Mineral Wa- 
ter, 241 Eighth St. 



PHOTOGRAPHERS. 

GBOH, G. M. & BROS, Photograph Parlors, cor. 
Eighth St. and Pennsylvania ave. 



B 



SHAVING AND BATHING SALOON. 

ACH, C, Hairdressing and Shaving Sa oon, 
Mineral Baths, Hot, Cold or Shower, 8th st. 



WINE AND BEER SALOON. 

HOBERGS, .1., Wine and Beer Saloon, Eighth 
tt. and Pennsylvania ave. 



Sheboygan Business Houses. 

WHEN ESTABLISHED. 

L^OK^^BECHL^^TcSar^oTTI^i^?^^ 

1S71. 
MAHLENDORF, Duggist, 1S64. 
VOLLRATH, J. J., Hollow Ware, 1S74. 



RIPON, WIS. 



ATTORNEYS AT LAW. 

REED, L. E., Att')rnev at Law. Money Loaning 
Collecting a specialty. Est. 1866. 



1873. 

The Virginius, in tow of the Cssipee, en route 
from Bahia Honda to New Yoik, is abandoned 
off Frying-Pan shoal.s and sinks to the bottom. 

The great strike among the engineers and 
firemen of the Pennsylvania and connecting 
railroads occurs. 

.James Gallagher, at 50 Pearl Street, Brook- 
lyn, throws his wife down stairs, and believing 
that he has killed her, fatally shoots himself. 

Jennie Griffin instantly killed, and several 
other girls injured by the falling of a floor in a 
house of ill fame, in Buffalo. 

I>ec. 27.— Seizure of the books of the mer- 
cantile firm of Jordan, Marsh & Co., at Boston. 
The firm charged vvith extensive revenue frauds 
against the government. 

I>ec. 3S. — Arrival of the steamship Juniata 
in the harbor with 102 survivors of the Vir- 
ginius from the Santiago de Cuba massacre. 

Wholesale arrest of 200 young men and girls 
in a dance-house m Grand street, New York. 

I>ec. 39. — The steamer Ossipee, the con- 
voy of the steamer Virginius from Bahia 
Honda to the sinking of the latter, arrives in 
the harbor. 

A party of roughs enter the saloon of Wm. 
Hile, a German, in Washington, and attack and 
beat his wife'. Hile fires at the party, shooting 
his wife and instantly killing her. 

De Platte, an insane spiritualist, aofed 64 
years, stabs himself to the heart at No. 4 Cort- 
iandt Street, N. Y. 

I>ec. SO.— The Emperor of Germany's gift 
of five bronze cannon to St. Matthew's Luth- 
eran German congregation arrives at Baltimore. 

Dec. 31. — The jury in the trial of JIaggie 
Jourdan, charged with aiding the escape of 
Sharkey from the Tombs, disagree. Maggie is 
admitted to bail. 

1874. 

Jan. 3. — Franenthal's Opera House, 
Wilkesbarre, destroyed by fire. | 

W. C. Durgin murdered at Brandy Station 
by a negro. 

«Ta.n. O. — Execution of Jacob Mechella 
in Jersay City, for the murder of U. S. Mar- 
shall Stephenson. 

Great fire in Broadway, New York, loss 
$100,000. 

JTan. 10. — The fugitive, Henry W. Genet, 
seen by an acquaintance in Belfast, Ireland. 

J~a.It. 11. — Seizure of an illicit distillerv 
on Barren Island by revenue officers and U. S. 
troops. 

W. W. Hazard, proprietor of the Atlantic 
House, Newport, R. I., drowns himsels in a cis- 
tern. 

■Jan. 13. — Workingmen's mass meeting 
at Tompkins Square, New York, dispersed by 
the police. 

Fatal fire in the Stiner mansion, 24 East 
60th street. New York. Mr. Jacob Stiner 
leaps from the flames to the yard and is almost 
instantly killed. Mrs. Stiner and Miss De- 
borah Stiner found dead in their apartment. 
The servant, Mary McGuire, seriously injured 
by leaping to the ground. 

Terrible conflagration in Natick, Mass. — the 
town almost utterly consumed. 

Jan. 17.— Edward Edmunds and H. N. 
^lason arrested, charged with robbery of 



246 



ADVEETISEMENTS. 



R I PON — Continued. 



DENTISTS. 

LUTHER, T. G., Dentist, Pettibone's Block. 
Eytablishe(il864 

S. R. PATTEN, 

I> :E3 lO" T I S T , 

East side of Public Square. Establislied 1875. 



DRUGGISTS. 



1866 



B. H. PHELPS & CO., 1876. 

Dealers in 

DRUt-S A^l> MEDICINES, 

Books and Stationery, opp. First Nat"l Bank. 



JDETGOODS. 

iRY, C 

18 Public Squiire. 



TITATTICE & GARY, Chicago Dry Goods Store, 

ETTIBONE, A. W., WFoiesale aud Ketail Dry 
Goods, N. E. cor. Public Square. Est. 1864. 



B 



PHOTOGRAPHERS. 

RADLEY, G. W., Pliotographer, Pettibone's 
Block. Established 1877. 

LOCkWOOD, WM. M., Photographer, East side 
of Public Square. Establithe^ 1858. 

"" REAL ESTATE AND INSURANCE. 

LTLE, W. B., Insurance, Real Estate and Loan 
B oker, Main st. Established 1871. 

TAILORS. 

M^i'e&aflit Pallor 

And Dealer in 

Gents' Furnishing Goods, 

Hats, Caps, Trunks, Valises, etc., 

45 MAIN STREET. 

CORBETT, JOHN, Merchant Tailor, 
Greenvvay Block. 

ISi^AC BROWN, 

And Dealer in 

Cloths &- Cassimeres, 

35 MAIN STREET. 

WIND MILL. 

THE HAZEN WIND MILL. Manufactured by 
S. Hdzen & Son, Ripon, Wis. Estab. 1872. 

Eipon Business Houses. 

WHEN ESTABLISHED. 

BROWN, J. E., Merchant Tailor, iS66. 
BROWN, ISAAC, Merchant Tailor, 1876. 



Ripon — Continued. 



BUSINESS HOUSES. 

CORBETT, JOHN, Merchant Tailor, 

18^9. 
PHELPS, B. H., & CO., Druggist, 1866. 



BERLIN, WIS. 



s 



ATTORNEYS ATLAW. 

ILVEB, 0. F., Attorney at Law, 

Huron St. Established 1850. 



w 



ABING & BY AN, Attornpys at Law, 

Yates' Block. Established 1875. 



BAKER AND OONPEOTIONER. 



S 



PENCEE, H., Baker and Confectioner, 

Huron at. Established 1857. 

BLACKSMITH AND CARRIAGES. 

HITCHCOCK, W., Black-mith and Carriage 
Maker, Huron et. Established 1867. 

WHEIGHTON, T. W., Blacksmith and Horse 
Sooeing, Wisconsin St. Establ'shed 1877. 



DENTIST. 

WIGHTMAN, P. B., Dentist, 
Pearl st. Established 1867. 

DRUGGISTS. ~ 

F. H. & J. R. Brown, 







NEW 


AT THE 

"CEmAL" BROS STORE, BERLIN. 



D 



ODSON, N. M., Druggist, 
Huron st. 



Established 1855. 



JDRYGOODS. 

KUETZING, F., Dry Goods, Groceries and Grass- 
ware, Huron st. Established 1874. 



M' 



FLOUR AND FEED. 

OEKIS, C. S., Flour and Feed Mill, 

Broadway. Established 1870. 

FURNITURE. 



CASE, C. I., Repairer and Finisher of Furniture, 
Market Jjquare, IS . Side. 

KLEIN, C. H., Maniifadurer and Dealer in Fur- 
niture, Huron st. E.-tablished 1856. 



s 



9HTU, J. E., All Kinds of Furniture, 

Huron st. Established 1876. 



HARNESS AND SADDLES. 

BASSETT, T. S., Harness »nd Saddle Maker, I 
14 Broadway. Established 1857. 

LOCNSBERY, GEO. W., Harness and Saddle 
Maker, Huron st. Established 1857. 



IMPORTENT EVENTS OF THE CENTURY. 



24T 




'Sew Hampshire State Building:, Centennial Exposition, 
Philadelphia. — Like the other state buildings, it is constructed ot wood, two-stories 
high with an attic. The first floor is surrounded with a portico. It is a roomy building, 
handsomely finished inside and outside. It contains all the conveniences necessary to 
make the Centennial visitors comfortable. 




^e w^pa per Buildinj;, Centennial Exposition, Philndflphia. -Tbe pavilliiD wat* t-olil for 
$520 to A, Wepsels,, Secretary of Bellevue Literary Association, to be erected Sixty-third and Vine 
streets as an institute. 



248 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OF THE CENTUKY. 



1874. 

bonds from the Treasury Department, Wash- 
injrton. 

Chang and Eng, the Siamese twins, die — the 
latter two hours after Chang— at their resi- 
dence, Mount Airey, Surrey county, N. C. 

•Ta.li. 23. — Lulu Terrence, actress, com- 
mits suicide by shooting, in San Francisco. 

Alexander D. Hamilton. Treasurer of Jer- 
sey City, absconds with !i;50,000 of the public 
money. 

.f«in. 36.— Intelligence of the death of 
Livingstone (died May 1st, 1873) received. 

.Tan. 30.— The Olympic Theatre, Phila- 
delphia, burned — two firemen killed and six 
seriously injured. 

Fel>. C— Gen Sickles takes official leave of 
the Spanish government. 

l^'el). 12. — Anniversary of the late Presi- 
dent Lincoln's birth; celebratiions in various 
parts of the country. 

Eighty-third anniversary birth-day of Pe- 
ter Cooper. He is feted by the Arcadian 
Club. 

Feb. 17. — Terrible triple murder in Hali- 
fax, Mass. — a maiden lady, Mary Buckley, and 
Thomas and Simon Sturtevant, brothers, being 
the victims. 

Fel>. 18. — Supervising Architect Mullet 
has a fisticuff encounter with Henry Kessler in 
the streets of Cincinnati. 

Fel>. lO. — John E. Simmons sentenced to 
three years and six months for the killing of 
Nicholas W. Duryea in Liberty street, New 
York. 

Fel>. 33. — Stephen Lowery, last of the 
Swamp Angels, encountered and shot by his 
pursuers. 

Fel). 38.— Ex-President Baez arrested 
in New York on a charge of false imprison- 
ment. 

I?Iarcli 7. — Reported surrender of three 
Cubans to the Spanish authorities by Captain 
Deaken of the steamship City of New York; 
two of them after reported as garrotted. 

^larcli 11. — Charles Sumner dies. 

I?larcli IJ). — The suicide of Second Lieu- 
tenant Fred. P. Ela, by jumping overboard 
from the steamer Great Republic, reported. 

Robert E. L. Patton, of Philadelphia, drowns 
himself in the surf at Cape May. 

Marcli 31. — The State prison at Charles- 
town, Mass., takes fire; workshops and other 
property valued at $50,000 destroyed. 

]TIarcli 38. — Henry Ward Beecher ac- 
quitted by the Congregational Council. 

April a. — Charles Kingsley shot dead in 
the New York picture gallery, San Francisco, 
bv one Cowden, who instantly after committed 
suicide. 

April d. — The Polar steamer, Tigress, ex- 
plodes her boiler, killing twenty-one of her 
crew, including two engineers. 

April 10. — Emil Lowenstein hanged at 
Albany for the murder of John D. Weston, one- 
armed peddler of Brooklyn. 

April 13. — Sir Lambton Lorraine arrives 
in New York by the steamer Canima, from 
Bermuda. 

April 15. — The remains of Livingstone 
arrive at Southampton. 



Berlin — Continued. 



HOTELS, 
A MEBICAN HOUSE 



H. B. Richards, Prop. 

Broadway. 



EAGLE HOTEL. Aug. Buhler, Prop., 
Huron St. Established 187Y. 

MACHINIST. 

JOHNSON, N., Machinist, 
Wisconsin st. Established 1874. 

MAEBLE WORKS. 

iOETHWESTER? MARBLE fORO. 

J. E. GRIFFITHS^, 

Munufacturer of Italian and American 

Harble Monuments, Kealstones, Tablets, Etc. 

MARKET SQUARE, Berlin, "Wis. 

Cheap as the cheapest; sroodas thebest. Stones 
carefully boxed for transportation. Orders respect- 
fully solicited. 

MEAT MAEKET. 

ELLIS, S. J., Central Meat Market, 
Huron st. Established 1861. ' 



H 



PHOTOGEAPHEES. 

OLLT, M. S., Photographer, 

Huron st. Established 1867 



T 



AYLOB, S. M., Photographer, 

U uron St. Established 1871. 



EESTAUEANT AND CONFECTIONEET. 

HATHAWAY & BELLIS, Restaurant and Con- 
fectionery, Huron st. Established 1870. 

WATCHES AND JEWELET. 

HEANET, J. M., Dealer in Watches, ' locks and 
Jewelry, Huron st. Established 1872. 

WHIP MANUFACTUEEES, 

LUTHER, J. P., Patentee and Manufacturer of 
the Berlin Solid Leather Whip, Broadway. 

Manufacturer of and Dealer in the 

Berlin Solid Lealher Whip 

AND SOLID LEATHER k BO.\E WHIP. 



ALSO, BRAIDED & ROUND LASHES. 



Berlin Business Houses, 

WHEN ESTABLISHED. 

BROWN, F. H. & J. R., Druggists, 1875.- 
GRIFFITHS, J. E., Marble, 187=;. 
MORRIS, J. N., Whip Manufacturer, 1876. 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OF THE CENTURY 



249 



FOND DU LAC. WIS. 



ATTORNEY AT LAW. 

HAMMOND, SAM H., Attorney at Law, 518 
Main st. Established 1873. 

AEOHITEOT AND SUPERINTENDENT. 

Architect & Superintendent, 

1 W. DlVl?*IOX ST. 

Plans, Specifications and Estimates for Public 
ana Piivate Edifices' carefully drawn. 

Superintendence ot Construction a Spe- 
cialty. 

" BOOKBINDING. 

BEKNAU, A., Citv Bookbindery, 463 Main st. 
Established 1866. 

" BOOTS AND SHOES. 

BOOTS & SSIOES, 

504 Main St., Darling's Block. 

PEHL, PETER, Boot and Shoemaker, 
585 Main St. 

VENNE & SCHOLIi, 

Manufacturers of and Dealers in Fine 

WELSH, W. C.&CO., Boots and Shots. Fine 
Custom Work a specialty. 556 Main st. 

CLOTHING AND FURNISHING GOODS. 

STONEHOCKER & CARNAHAN, D aUrs in 
CLOiHlNG and GENTS' FURNISHING 
GOODS, HATS, CAPS, 
BOOTS, SHOES, TRUNKS, 

And Traveling Bags. 



DRUGGISTS. 

H. B. ANDERSON & CO., 

DRUGGISTS & APOTHECARIES, 

424 Main street. 

D ELAND, A., Prescription Druggist, 5.30 Main 
M. t'-stil)lishidl877. 

I Oldest Drug House in the City. 



H. E. KENDALL, 



Dealer in 



Drugs and Druggists' Sundries 

502 MAIN ST., Darling's Block. 

KKUMIIE, FREDERICK, Apothecary. Prescrip- 
tions a specialty, 398 Main st. 



Gov. Baxter of Arkansas forcibly ejected; 
the executive chair usurj)ed by Governor ( ? J 
Brooks. 

Api'il 18. — Destructive floods along the 
Mississippi; twenty-seven plantations over- 
flowed. 

April 31. — Julius P. Mason commits sui- 
cide ia the Parker House, Boston. 

Street conflict between the Baxter and Brooks 
factions in Little Rock, Ark. 

April 33. — Horace MuUin, a young lad, 
shockingly murdered by young Edward Pomer- 
oy, at Dorchester, near Boston. 
' Sir Lambton Lorraine presented with the 
freedom of New York city. 

JUay I. — Deadly encounter between the 
Brooks and Baxter factions; nine of the Brooks 
party killed and twenty wounded. Capture ot 
Major General Churchill, commanding Baxter's 
militia. 

niay 3. — Judges of the Supreme Court 
of Arkansas seized and carried olf by Baxter- 
ites. 

Wlay 16. — The Mill River Reservoir disas- 
ter near Northampton, Mass. Fearful loss ot 
life. 

l^lay 31. — ^Marriage of Miss Nellie Grant 
to A. C. F. Sartoris. 

l^Iay 33. — Henri Rochefort, the French 
Communist, arrives in San Francisco. 

IHay 37.— The Ellsworth monument at 
Mechanicsville unveiled. 

]?Iay SO. — Henri Rochefort arrives in New 
York. 

Dedication of the Fiske monument at Brat- 
tleboro, Vt. 

June 3.— President Grant lays the cor- 
ner-stone of the American Museum of Natural 
History, Eighth avenue and 77th street, New 
York. ' 

•Tuiie 11. — Charles Anderson, a retired 
Swedish sea captain, robbed of .$15,000 worth 
of diamonds on Broadway, New York. 

June 34.-- A strawberry festival diras- 
ter; a floor in the Central Baptist Church at 
Syracuse gives away; fourteen persons killed 
and 200 injured. 

•Tune SO.— James P. Sanders, a lawyer, 
shot in the court room, Yonkers, by August 
Lachaume. 

July 1.— Coggia's comet; first appear- 
ance. 

Abduction of Charley Ross. 

July 3.— Mr. Jewell, minister to Russia, 
accepts the Posmaster-Gcneralship. 

July <!.— President Grant and family ar- 
rive at Long Branch. 

Destructive fire in Allegheny City; over one 
hundred houses destroyed. 

•July 5. — Sam. McDonald. Baltimore, the 
•'millionaire murderer," stabs his friend. 

July 13.— Blush Hollow reservoir on 
Middlefield Brook, near Chester, Mass., bursts: 
damage, .$1,000,000. 

July lA.— Disastrous fire in Chicago; 7 
persons killed, 3 steamers burned, and numer- 
ous buildings destroyed. 

July 18. — The great Saratoga regatta 
contest ; the Columbia crew the victors ; time, 



250 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



Fond Du Lac — Cojitmued. 



DYEING AND SCOURING. 

FOIJNTAIlFciT r 
Steam Dyeing & Scouring 

ESTABLISHMENT, 
HEJfRY C. DITTMAR, Prop., 

38 W. DIVISION ST., West side of Bridge. 

Silks, Woolens, Crapes and Merinos sconred 
and djed all colors in the best style. Half Cotton 
Goods Dyed plain colors. Also Gentlemen's 
Clothing, Ladies' C. oaks and Mantillas, and Kid 
Gloves cleaned and Dyed. Old Velvet made up 
likenevr. Cleaning done on short notice. 

FARM IMPLEMENTS. 

^^TJSAN, G. I., Farm Implements, Field Seeds, 
O etc., 18 E. Second st. Established 1873. 



FILE WORKS. 

fond^dF lac 
FILE VITORKS^ 

HENRY SCHERER, PROP. 

Files and Kasps of £very Description 
Re-cut. 

28 JOHNSON STREET. 



w 



ISNOM, A. & CO., Groceries and Provisions, 
Crockery, Glassware, 549 Main st. Est. '76. 



w 



YATT, ROB'T, Groceries, Provisions, 7 and 
9 Secoud St., cor. M.un st. 



HARNESS AND SADDLES. 



O 



'CONNELL, P., Harness, Saddles, Collars, Bri- 
dles. Whips & >ad(llery Hardware, 410 Main. 



S 



ULLIVAN, M. 0., Manufacturer and Dealer in 
HAHNKSS, SADDLES, COLLARS, 

:^x-lcl.leis, X1[7'lx±x:>@. 

Also Dealer in Uncle Sam's Harness Oil. 
39:i Main st. 



^OTELS^ 

OND DU LAC HOUSE, Wm. Koehrae, Prop. 
Main and Fourth sts. Established 18 0. 



F 



! 

H. SHATTUCK, PROP. 

COR. MAIN & COURT STS. 

This Hotel was recently rebuilt and newly fur- 
nished throughout. 

ISCONSIN HOUSE, M. Schumacher, prop., 
Main st. Established 1876. 



LUMBER MERCHANTS. 



H 



AMILTON 

Main st. 



& FINLEY, Lumber Merchants, 
Established 1855. 



MARBLE WORKS. 

CAMPBELL & HOLLEY, Manf'rs of Italian and 
American Monuments, 16 E. Second. Est. '67. 



Fond Du Lac — Contintiud. 



MEAT MARKETS. 

COFPMAN A SERVATIUS, Fresh and Salt Meats, 
419 Main St. Established 1871. 



M 



UBPHY, J. & C, Beef, Pork, Lard, Tallow, 
Cut Meats, etc., 8 IMvision st. 



R 



OLOFF, WM., prop, of Central Market and 
Dealer in Fresh and Salt Meats, 8 Forest St. 



D. D. TRELEVEN & CO., 

Dealers in 

FRE8H & SALT MEATS, 

L.ard, Bntter, Eg$(s, Etc. 
BEEF AND PORK PACKERS. 

COS. MAIN AND THIRD STS. 

PATENT RIGHTS. 

HAZARD, GEO. B., Real Estate and Insurance 
Agent, Patent Rights and Patent Medicines, 
Darling's Block. Agents wanted. 



D 



PHOTOaRAPHERS. 

ILLON, JOHN W., Landscape and Portrait 
Photographer, 493 Main st. Est. 1871. 



M 



OODY, H. W., Photographer, Main St., opp. 
American House. Established 1863. 



PRINTER. 

BYANT, THOS., Premium Plain and Ornate 
Printer, 492 Main st. 



B 



REAL ESTATE. 

AZARD, J. A., Real Estate and Insurance 
Agent, Darling's Block. 



H 



HOBTON&CUDWORTH, Real Estate Exch'.nge. 
Office, S. W. cor. Main & second sts . Est. '75. 

~ TAILORS. 

Fashionable 

Merchant Tailor 

And Gents' Furnisher. 

All work promptly done, and satisfaction 
guaranteed. 

315 Main St., "bet. Merrille and Eees. 

HBHAET, P. C, Merchant Tailor, 597 Main st. 
EstaDlished 1857. 

HUNDT & HABEEKOEN, 
MERCHANT TAILORS, 

Dealers in 

Ready - Made Clothing:, Hats, Caps and 

Gents' Furnishing Goods. 

No. 463 MAIN STREET. 

SCHNEIDEB, PH. H., Custom Tailor, 503 Main 
St. EstaDlished 1857. 

WEBER, JOHN, Merchant Tailor, 381 Main et. 
Established 1858. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



251 



The Pioneers of the City of 
Sheboygan, dedicated to pub- 
lic use, four acres of ground in 
^the heart of the city, wnich is 
covered with the original fores^. 
growth of evergreens. The Wa- 
ter and Park Commissioners of 
the City have erected a beauti- 
ful fountain, at a cost of 11500, 
in the centre of the Park, and 
a tasty building, 65 feet high, 
surmounted with a bronze sta- 
tue of Hebe. 

The artistic embellishments 
added to the natural growth of 
the forest, makes this one of the 
finest Parks of its size in the 
country. 





FOUNTAIN PARK, SHEBOYGAN, WIS. 




The strongest mineral water in the State. 



BERTSCHY & THAYER, 

SHEBOYGAN. 



f New York, finds 59a grains of medicinal salts in one gallon. Physicians find it cures 
■lies, Dyspepsia, Urinary Derangements, and j^ick Headache. 

The People find it contains the elements of health and produces 

soTTZsrr> -A.isrx5 i?,Eri?,ESi3:i]src3- SLEE.f>. 

B^"Send 75 cents for sample two-gallon jug. 



252 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OF THE CENTURY. 



1874. 

16 min., 42'^ sec. Wesleyans second, Cam- 
bridge third. 

July 3«.— Destructive rain-storm in 
Pittsbuiirh, l^'a. ; 200 persons drowned, hun- 
dreds of'liouses demolished. 

July 38.— Theodore Tilton arrested on a 
charge of slander against Henry Ward Beecher. 

Aug'. 1.— Lord Gordon fatally shoots him- 
self at Fort Garry, Manitoba. 

Aug'. 9. — The great Corinthian yacht race 
atNewport ; the Idler the victor of the cup. 

Aug. II.— The Collier and Edwards light 
weight fight in Brook county, West Virginia ; 
the latter the victor ; eleven rounds in twenty- 
eight minutes. 

Aug. 20.— Geo. C. Harding, editor and 
proprietor Indianapolis Herald, shoots Sol. 
Maritz;Miss Harding, seduced by Moritz, 
commits suicide. 

H. W. Burnside.brother of Gen. A. E. Burn- 
side, hangs himself in a fit of insanity at Indi- 
anpolis. 

Aug. 38.— The Trautz-Johnson great 
swimming match: Smiles, Pleasure Bay : the 
latter wins. 

Sept. ».--The River Belle, Long Branch 
steamer, burned at her pier No. 8 North River, 
Xew York. 

Sept. 4.— The town of Mokelumne Hill, 
Cal., totally destroyed by fire. 

Sept. 5.--Balloon ascent at Philadelphia; 
six ladies among the voyagers. 

Sept. 13.— Monument to General Lyon, 
killed at the battle of Wilson's Creek, inaugu- 
rated with appropriate ceremonies at St. Louis, 
Mo. 

Sept. 14.--The Kellogg riot in New Or- 
leans; eight Metropolitan police and eight 
White Leaguers killed; great number wound- 
ed. The Kellogg government temporarily 
overthrown. 

Sept. 16.— The Irish rifle team— arrival 
of the first detachment by the Scotia. 

Sept. 10.--The Granite Woolen Mills. 
Fall River, destroyed by fire; of the operatives, 
twenty were killed; injured thirty-eight, two 
fatally. 

A man named Salmond walks into the rapids 
at Niagara, and is carried over the falls. 

Sept. 34.- -A train of six cars breaks 
through a bridge on Waxahachie Creek; W. 
M. Boyd, ex-judge of the Supreme Court of 
Alabama, and an engineer, fireman, and sev- 
eral passengei's killed. 

Sept. 36.--The International rifle match 
at Creedmoor; the American team the victors. 
Lieut. Charles F. DeBorst, 71st regiment, falls 
from the cars on the return from Creedmoor, 
and is killed. 

Sept. 38.— The Lord Mayor of Dublin 
and the Irish team entertained at a banquet in 
Brooklyn. 

Oct. 1. — Army headquarters removed to 
St. Louis. 

Oct. 3.— The Benhett prize in the long 
range contest at Creedmoor won by the Irish 
team. 

Oct. 4.--A drove of Texas steers invade 
New York city: a great number of citizens se- 



FoND DtJ Lac — Continued. 



TURKISH BATHS. 

DR. jTXdaniels, 

Proprietor of the Celebrated 

TURKISH BATH EOOMS, 

Sheboygan Street, 

Near Main. 
WINES AND LIQUORS. 

NICHOLSON, J., Dealer in Wines and Liquors, 
547 Main St. 

UNDERTAKERS. 

GESSWEIN, FRED, General Furnishinc; Uunder- 
taker, 32-3 M ai n. Established 18.57. 

AEDTnG, martin, General Furniehing Under- 
taker, Sixth and Main sts. Est. 1876. 

Fond du Lac Business Houses. 

WHEN ESTABLISHED. 

ANDERSON, H. B., Druggist, 1871. 
DANIELS, DR. J. A., Bath Rooms, 1866. 
DITTMAR, HENRY C, Dye Works, 

1S74. 
DREIS, JACOB, Tailor, 1868. 
GREEN, THOS. H., Architect, 1855. 
HUNDT & H ABERKORN, Tailors, 1866. 
KENDALL, H. E., Druggist, 1S76. 
SCHERER, HENRY, File Manufacturer, 

1867. 
STONEHOCKER & CARNAHAN, 

Clothing, 1877. 
SULLIVAN, M. O., Harness, Saddles, 

1 87 1. 
TRELEVEN, D. D. & CO., Meat Market, 

1866. 
VENNE & SCHOLL, Boots and Shoes, 

1 87 1. 



LA PORTE, IND. 



ABSTRACTS OF TITLES. 

DORIAND, OEO. C.Real Estate, Insurance, Ab- 
stracts of Title, & Agt. A. T. & S. Fe R. R. 

AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS. 

Little Slant Agricultural Works. 

WANDEL BROS., Proprietors, 
Manufaciurers of the 

LITTLE GIANT SULKY PLOW, 

To wh'ch one or more common Plows can be 

attMched : also, mannfacturers of all kinds 

of Castings. All orders promptly filled. 

LA PORTE, IND. 

ATTORNEYS AT LKW. 

BLISS & VAN WIE, Attorneys at Law, 
Rooms 5 & 6 Alexander Block. 



IMPOKTANT EVENTS OF THE CENTURY. 



253 



La Porte — Cotilhiued. 



ATTORNEYS AT LAW. 

[7AREAND &TRAVEK, Attorneys at Law. 

C • Main st. 



MILLER, GEO. M., Attorney ! 
<fc luBurjnce Agent, Main 



at Law, Real Estate 

8t. 



OSBORN, CALKINS & WILE, Attorneys at Law, 
39 Indiana avenue. 

TRIPP, S. L., Lawyer, LaPorte & Chicago. 
(Office with M. Nye, Esq.) 

WEIR & RIDDLE, Attorneys at Law, 
Cor. Jefferson st. <fc Indiana ave. 



BILLIARD HALL. 

Established 1857. 
THE OLD RELIALBB 



i4LL 



HENRY ZAHRT, Proprietor, 
35 Michigan Ave. 

~~ BOTTLERS. 

L ABES, CHARLES, Manufacturer of and dealerin 
all kinds of Soda and Seltzer Water, Ginger 
Ale and Champaisn Cider. 4'.i Indiana avenue. 
All orders will receive prompt attention. 

CARRIAGE MANUFACTURERS. 

Manufacturer of 

CARRIAGES, WAGONS, SLEIGHS, 

Etc., Adams St., near E . Main st. 

WM. C. PITNER, 

Manufacturer of Carriages and Wagons, 

94 Monroe st., cor. Harrison st. 

R. J. REESE, 

Manufac'r of Carriages and Wagons, 

Cor. State & Detroit sts. 
CHAIR MANUFACTURERS. 

LA^ORTTcHAiFcMl^^ 

Manufacturers of 

Cane Seat Chairs 

Cor. Indiana ave. & Washington et. 
W. WILSON, President and Treasurer. 

^^^^^^^^^AMNGMILL. 

MICHAEL, E. & CO., Manf rs of Michael's Newly 
Improved Fanning Mill. 

FURNITURE^ 

WEIR & CDTLER, Manuf'rs and dealers in all 
kinds of Furniture, Mainst. 



1974. 

vercly hurt, some of whom .subsequently die 
fro:n their injuries. 

Oct. c5.^Fiftieth anniversary celebration 
of the 7th rep;iiiient. First annual meeting of 
the Church Congres-s of the United States. 

Oct. 13. — Negro incendiaries burn the 
court house at Waresboro, Ware Co., Ga. 

Oct. 1<I. — Major Ilany Laikyns shot and 
in.stantly killed by E. J. Maybridge, photo- 
grapher, San Francisco. 

Oct. lO. — F. T Sawyer, cashier of the 
Souhegan National Bank, Miiford, and family, 
gagged by robbers, who robbed the bank of 
.$100,000. 

Oct. 2J5. — Aleck Hamilton, the fugitive de- 
faulting treasurer of Jersey City, surrenders 
to the authorities. 

l^OV. — Kalakaua, King of the Hawaiian 
Islands, arrived in San Francisco, visited our 
chief ports, examined our industrial resources 
and capabilities, and endeavored to hasten the 
negotiations of a commercial treaty between 
his government and that of the United States. 

IVov. 1. — James Leek and wife, of St. 
Pauls, attacked in the street and murdered. 

I^ov. 7. — Miss Cushman bids farewell to 
the stage--she is crowned with laurel, and re- 
ceives a popular ovation. 

Herman Schilling brutally murdered in a 
tannery in Cincinnati, 0., and his body thrust 
into a furnace and consumed. 

]\ov. IS. — ilajor Arthur B. Leech and 
members of the Irish rifle team embark for 
home by the Russia. 

i^ov. 23. — ^Ir. McGahan, New York Her- 
ald &]}QC\a.\ correspondent, and Mr. Buckland, 
of the New York Times, seized and imprisoned 
by the Spaniards. 

Mrs. J. A. Judd, a well-kuown Parisian mil- 
liner, commits suicide at her home in Norwalk, 
Connecticut. 

i\o"V. 35. — Shock of an earthquake experi- 
enced in Massachusetts. 

Mr. Frederick G. Schneider, of Union Hill, 
N. J., commits suicide by shooting himself at 
the Grand Union Hotel. 

Nov. 27. — George Simms (colored) exe- 
cuted at Covington, Ga. 

I\ov. 2S,— J. A. McGahan, N. Y. Herald 
correspondent, set at liberty by the Spaniards. 

Nov. RO. — Mayor Havemeyer, of New 
York, seized with a sudden illness, and in a 
few moments expires in his office in the City 
Hall. 

Dec. 2. — S. C, Robinson, flour merchant, 
of 86 Broad street. New York, commits suicide 
at the Grand Pacific Hotel, Chicago. 

John D. White, Republican Congressman 
elect from Kentucky, shoots and kills Harrison 
Cockerill, at Mount Sterling, Ky. 

l>ec. 6.— Booth's Theatre, New York, sold 
for .$385,000 to Oliver Ames. 

Dec. 7. — Seven hundred armed negroes 
attack Vicksburg; some twenty-five negroes 
and several whites killed. 

Destructive fire at East New York. Eight 
houses and other property destroyed. 

Edward Madden, editor of the Merced Tri- 
bune, shot and killed by H, Granise. 

Dec. lO.— Destructive fire at Charleston, 
capital of West Virginia. 



254 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



La Porte — Continued. 



HOTEL, 



W. C. CHILDS, Proprietor, 



Relerences : Commercial Men, 



LIVERY AND FEED STABLE. 

RATHBUN, E. D. &BRO., Proprietors of LaPorte 
Livery Stable, Indiana & State sts. 



MACHINIST. 

ROOKS, JAMES N., Machine Works, Turbine 
Water Wheels, & iVlill Machinery a specialty. 



B 



PHYSICIANS. 

ARNS, C. G., M. I)., Treatment of Piles a spec- 
ially, cures warranted. Office: op. Myers h'se 



B 



COLLINS, DR. S.B., Painless Opium Antidote, 
Collius ave. Discovered in 186S. 

Geo. M. Dakin., M. D., 

a 

Also Proprietor of 

Dr. Dakin' s Improved Catarrh Eemedy. 
Send For Circular. 

LA PORTE, IND. 

IT'AHNESTOCK, C. S., M. D., Snrgeon & Homeo 
palhisl, opposite Court House. 

WHITING, S. C, M. D., Homeopathic Physician 
& burgeon, Jeflferson et. 

TOBACCO AND CIGARS, 

WALTON, WM. M., Dealer in Tobacco & Cigars, 
41 Michigan avenue, 

WINES AND LIQUORS. 

TTTICH, JOHN, Wines, Liquors & Cigars 

-■^ 8 Michigan ave. 



KOKOMO. IND. 



C 



ATTORNEYS AT LAW. 

ONN, L. M., Attorney at Law. Special attention 
iven to Collections. Walnut st. 



r^ IDEON, F. M., Attorney at Law, 



Main St. 



M 



AHAN & KIRK, Attorn oys at Law, Office: in 
.Armstrong, Pickett <& Co.'s Block. 



o 



'BRIEN, JAMES, Attorney at Law, 



Main st. 



DENTIST. 
"pLEAS, M. E. Dentist, 



Rail Road st. 



KoKOMO — Continued. 



BANRKES, 

WALKER^BANK. 

Walker, Welsh & Co., 

Banta, Real Estate &InsnraEeJlEts. 

Collections promptly made, taxes paid, rents 
collected, and reU estate soM for non-resi- 
dents. Business solicited. 

GROCERS. 

TATE & HULL, Wholesale & retail Grocers, 
40 Kail Road st. 

TITUS & CO., Groceries & Provisions, 
Rail Road et. 

HOTELS. 

Mote Wlintom, 

J. C. GILBERT, Proprietor. 

Changed hands, re-furnished and thoroughly re- 
paired. Good Sample Rooms. 



Kokomo. 



Ind. 



LINDLEY-BELL HOUSE, Mrs. S. A. Hiser, Pro- 
prietress, Walnut & Kail Road sts. 

" LIVERY AND FEED STABLE. 

HINTON & LEACH, Livery & Feed Stable, deal- 
ers in Horses, Caille & Hogs, Walnut st. 



B 



MACHINISTS. 

IRCH BROS. & CO., Stationery & Portable En- 
gines, etc., near Rail Road Junction. 



NEWSPAPER. 

KOKOMO SATURDAY TRIBUNE. Established 
ls51. T. C. Phillips & Sous, proprietors. 
The largest paper in Howird co., and twice as 
many subscribers as any other. 

PHOTOGRAPHER. 

STRODE, J. M., Photographer, 
Rail Road st. 



REAL ESTATE. 

OX, ELIHU, Real Estate Agent, negotiates 
loans & pays taxes in all W. States, Man st. 



C 



S 



TUART, W. A.. Real Estate, Life & Fire Insur- 
ance Agent, S. E. cor. Public Square. 



RESTAURANTS. 

OST, H. A., Restaurant & Confectii)nery, 

Rail lioad st. 



R 



S 



COFIELD, FRANK, Restaurant, Bakery & Con- 

lectionery. Main st. 



SEWING MACHINES. 

LAWSON, G. W., Manag-r Sinser Sewing Ma- 
chine Office, Howard Block, Main st. 



IMPOKTANT EVENTS OF THE OENTUEY. 



Jdo 




256 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OF THE CENTUKY. 



I>cc. 13.— King- Kalakaua arrives in 
Washington. 

I>«'C. 1-4.— William Mosher and Joseph 
Deuglass, the supi)osed abductors of Charlie 
Ro^r, shot and killed by the Van Brunts in the 
commission of a burglary at Bay Ridge, Long 
Island. 

Doc 15.— Serious tire in Boston: loss over 
a million. 

l>pc'. 17.— The Pacific mail steamer Japan 
destroyed by lire near Yokohama, Japan, with 
great loss of life. 

The emigrant ship, Cospatrick, while in lat. 
37 N., long. 11 W., destroyed by tire; 465 lives 
lost. 

Dec. 30.— Police Captain Isaac S. Bourne, 
of the Brooklyn police, accidentally shot and 
instantly killJd by John C. Pollock, a news- 
paper reporter. 

Dec. 33.— King Kalakaua arrives in New 
Y«rk. 

Dec. 35. — Amos Y'oung, a notorious des- 
perado, shot and instantly killed, at Chester, 
111. 

Dec. 36.— D. C. Byerley, of the Balleiin, 
New Orleans, attacks Governor Warmoth in 
the street. The latter, in self-defense, stabs 
and killes Byrle}-. 

1875. 

•San. 1. — Mutiny on board the school ship 
.Mercury; sixteen boys escaped; a boatman 
stabbed. 

•fail. -1. — Political riots ^in New Or- 
leans. 

Opening of the Tilton-Beecher case. 

.fan. 13.— Thos. E. Bramlette, ex-Gov- 
ernor of Kentucky, dies at Louisville. 

Ja,ii. 3JS. — The East river spanned by an 
ice bridge. 

JTan. 34.— St. Patrick's church, Hartford, 
Conn., destroyed by tire. 

George Paris, tax collector of New Orleans, 
shoots and kills Wm. Weeks, ex-Assistant 
Secretary of State. 

Jan. 35. — Steamer Lady of the Lake 
burned at her wharf, Norfolk, Va. 

The Cumberland M. E. Church of Philadel- 
phia destroyed by fire. 

Jan. 30.— Louis A. Grill, an ex-captain 
in the army, shoots himself in the head at 126 
East 13th street. New York. 

i-'eb. 3. — Thomas Neilson Sanderson, fa- 
miliarly known as ''Nelse Seymour," the 
comedian, dies in New York city, aged ;j9 
years. 

l-'eb. 14. — Edward Spangler, noted as 
one of the assassinators of President Lin- 
coin in 1865, dies near Baltimore, Maiyland, 
aged 55. 

Kel). 16. — The propeller E. A.Woodward, 
sunk by ice in the Sound. 

FelJ. 30.— John F. W. Thon, an ex- 
county Treasurer, commits snide at Wyan- 
dotte, Mich. 

:?Iarcli 14.— The tow-boat R. A. Bab- 
bridge sunk near Cairo; George Abies, chief 
engineer, and two others, lost. 

^larcli 15. — Archbishop McClosky per- 
conized Cardinal at Rome. 



KoKOMO — Continued. 



TOBACCO AND CIGAES. 

P^^RirEJC^-^F^^^^C^on^^ti Ice Cream, Ci- 
Kars & Tobacco. Main st. 

WINES AND LIQUOES, 

J. B. PaUKEU. W. H. II. S.*.TI.EB. 

Ji*arker &, Sayler, 

Wholesale Dealers lu 

PURE KENTUCKY WHISKIES, ^ 

"Wines, Brandies, Gin, Etc. 

Fine Sample Room Attached. 

RAIL ROAD STREET. 

John Ij. Pegraiii, 

WIIES, LIQUOES, 

Cigars and Billiards, 
RAIL IJOAD STXiEE^X. 

ILSON, A. B., Tobacco, Cigars, Flour and 
Feed, Sycamore st. 



MUNCIE. IND. 



PHOTOGRAPHER. 

PIOTOGEAPHEE. 

141 E. Main St. 
Old Pictures copied and enlarged to any size. 

PIANOS AND ORGANS. 

Prof. M. Kuechman, 

Dealer in 

PIAPS, ORGANS, 

And ail khid-! of small Instruments, Sheet 

Music,Merchandise,teacher of harmony 

vocal and instrumental music. 

128 E. MAIN ST. 

PUMP MANUFACTURER. 

GIFT, C. W., Manfr and dealer in Improved 
Wooden Pumps, 214 Jackson st. 

CAMBRIDGE CITY. IND. 



BOARDING. 

PETT yMEwTMRST^i N NljE^oardingbythed^^ 
we ek or meal, Church st. n ear de pot. 

^ ^ DRY GOODS. ^ ___ 

S^' HR0YEr7h. A^Twi^hTjohn KepTer'^Dry Goods- 
_ House, 208 Main st, 



IMPOKTANT EVENTS OF THE CiCN'l'U KV. 



267 



Cambridge City — Contiimed. 



GROOEEIES. 

^IKxiNGSrKTu., Groceries, Provisions. Queens- 
ware, (jUassware, etc., Soiitli side Main s t . 

HOTEL. 



EUROPEAN PLAN, 

WM. P. STAHR, Proprietor. 

Good sample rooms andsuperioraccommodatlons 

Main St., Cambridg-e City. 



s 



"T ACKEY,J.S., Livery, Feed, Sale & Trjlning 



MALLEY, UKO. V., Prop'r Thurman House Res- 
taurant & Dining Room, 1st door W. of Depot. 

LIVERY AND FEED'^TABLE. 

EY7X'SirLTveryrFeed7~Sale' 
Stables, Foot St., South of Main^ 

SALOON. 

OTOBAlKmrif^UNlCdearer^^ 

)0 etc.. 243 Main st. 

TAILOR. 

RUSINGERrjAtRHMtierrSa^ 
Established 1867. C ambridge City. 

TOBACOO^ANDjOIGARS^ ^ 

C'^^USTERTj^XT^Ianfr and wholesale and retail 
H dealer in Cigars anrl Smokers'' Articles. 



K 



WATCHES, CLOCKS AND JEWELRY. 

ALBrwrcirTh^e"'j^'eiXrC^alerln''Wa^^^ 
Clocks & Jewelry, 276 Main st. 



SHELBYVILLE, IND. 



ATTORNEYS AT LAW. 

ARRISOlf^MMESVAttorne^^ 
Cor. Harrison & Franltlin s ts. 

AJOR & MAJOR, Attorneys at Law, 
Bank Building, \V. Washington st. 

CARRIAGE MAKERS. 

C'TAKITHERSTM^rCarriagelll^a^T"" '""^^ 
^ Cor. Broadway & Pike sts. 

cttUIRE & JENNINGS, Carriage Makers, 

E. Washington st. 



H 



M 



CARPENTER AND BUILDER. 

S'^TPRINGMTjTSIT^JaTpeuterXB ^'" 
Cor. South and Pike sts. 

CLOTHING. 

A^lJlMAMTSW^^Cloilhieis ^-— - — 

. Cor Washington st and Public Square . 

DRY GOODS, 

A^TjixTXTACoCn^^yGoodsT^'^^^ "' " ' 
S outh Side Public Square. 

HOWARD. GEO. P.. Dry Goods, 
Cor. Harrison and P ublic Sq uare . 

FURNITURE, 

CONREY, WALLAR & DEPREZ, 
Manufacturers of 

ALL KINDS OF FUENITURE, 

E. Washington st. 



A niicdunler (uke.s place between James A. 
(;r)wanlin of the DiK^utch and Mr. A. Kulker- 
•son, of the House ot Delegates, at Uicliinond, 
Va. 

.^larcli 1«.— Steamer W. J. Lewis, from 
Vicksburg to .St. Louis, burned to tlie water's 
edge; one of the crew drowned; others miss- 
ing. 

.llarcU 1».— Tibuicio Vasquez, the ban- 
dit, liangod at San. Jose, Cal. 

Charles K. Landis (father of Vineland) 
shoots Mr. Carruth, editor of the Vineland Iti- 

i/cpeiideiit. 

April lO.— Dan Bryant, the talented ne- 
gro minstrel, dies in New York city, aged 42 

years. 

April 19. — Centennial of Concord and 
Lexington. 

April S3.— John Harper, firm of Har- 
per Bros., publishers, New York, dies, aged 
78. > > B 

April. 33. — Three steamers burned at 
the New Orleans levee; 30 women and children 
lost. 

April 34.— Daniel O'Leary, of Chicago, 
walks 115 miles in 24 hours. 

^ April 38.— Raihoad collision at the Navy 
Yard Tunnel, near Washington; several per- 
sons injured. 

April 37.— Cardinal McCloskey invested 
with the beretta in St. Patrick's Cathedral, 
N. Y. 

April 38.— O.shkosh, Wis., burned to the 

ground. 

April 38.— Mrs. Sarah G. Conway, the 
noted actress and manageress of Brooklyn 
Theatre, dies in that city, aged 41 years. 

May 1.— Archbishop Williams consecrated 
at Boston. 

.Hay 3.— Methodist church at Koekport, 
Mass., burned by an incendiary. 

May 3.--The mutiny on board the 
schooner Jeflerson Borden; the two mates 
killed. 

The steamer St. Luke collides and sinks in 
the Missouri river at St. Louis: six passeno-ers 
lost. 

May 8.— The steamship Schiller wrecked 
oti" the Scilly Isles; 311 lives lost. 

May 11.— Cohmel D. R. Anthony, editor 
of the Times, LesLVLmwovth, Kan.sas, shot bv 
Vm. Embry, editor of the Appca}. 

May 15.— The Ripley Opera House Block. 
Rutland, Vt., destroyed by fire. 

May 30.— Hon. Jesse D. Bright, ex-mem- 
ber of Congress from Indiana, died in Balti- 
more, aged 63 years. 

Gray Beard, head chief of the Cheyennes, 
killed while attempting to escape from his cap- 
tors. 

May 31.— Great fire in South Norwalk: 
loss. $150,000. 

May 3S5. The church belfry tragedy in 
Boston; Mabel H. Young murdered bv Thomas 
piper. 

May 3<S.— A house in Boston blown to 
atoms; several persons killed and wounded. 
May 37.— The French Catholic church at 



258 ADVERTISEMENTS. 



BIRD & raiGKLC, 



MAP PUBLISHERS, 

REYNOl-D'S BL.OCK, 

Cor. Main and Mechanic Sts. , - JACKSON, MIGH. 



Cutters, ^^^^^^^^^ Lumber 

WAGONS, horses', ROBES, BLANKETS, WHIPS, 

FJ^TllS/LXlSyG- TOOLS, ETC.. 

£,irMMr^^B S^^£M S'^MB^ESs, ME€M^iNW ^TmEET^ @^J». ^. #„ 

Established 1873. 

MANUFAC URKR f'F 

DF* .ia. 3>a" O "X' O -A- :^ X BT E3 ^I? 'V^r -A_ 3F8. 3E3 , 

Consii^tinj!; of Parlor Brackets, Wall Pockets, Side and Corner Brackets, Husic and Flower 
Stands, Toilet Cases, Clock Shelves. Etc. 

Factory and Salesroom, 70 & 12 ¥. ffasliiilon St, CHICAGO, ILL . 

G. C. KIMI: \LL. «. I.. DEN'llAM. R. M. WHITEHOUSE 

G E M E S EK IRQM W O R K S ! 

Manufacturers of all kinds of 

MALLEABLE IRON, GRET IRON & COMPOSITION CASTINGS, STEAM ENGIKTES, Jtc, 

FJL.T1STT, Iv^ICH. 

a.L.DENHAM. Treas. [Established 1869.] R. 31. WHITEHOUSE, Supt 

R L. FURBISH, 

Manufacturer of 

FANCY CABINET WARE, 

No. 42 & 44 Mill St., 
GRAND RAPIDS, - - - MICHIGAN. 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OF THE CENTUBY. 



259 




l^tate Capitol, Ijansing, Mich.— Cost of Building $1,350,000. Complete 
building entirely fire proot; exterior, cut stone; height of d)me 269 feet; length of building 
420 feet; centre building 212 feet deep, height of building in centre, to top of pediment, 
112 feet; height of cornice from ground on wings, 82 feet, 7 inches. 




Carpenter's Wall, Philadelphia.— The hall is situated on Chestnut street, 
a few paces east from Fourth, Philadelphia. On the 5th of September, 1774, the hrst 
Continental Congress met in this hall, and begun their deliberations, which resulted in the 
Declaration o\' Independence, July 4th, 1776. The building is owned by the Carpenters' 
Company of Philadelphia, an organization which has maintained its existence since 1724 
up to the present time. The hall was built in the year 1771. 



260 



IMPORTANT EVEKTS OF THE CENTUKY. 



1W75. 


Shelby viLLE — Continued. 


Holyoke, Mass., burned; seventv-five lives 
lost. 

jflay 38. — Paul Boyuton siwms across 
the English Channel. 

jflay 30. — Destructive incendiary fire at 
Springfield, Mass. 

•June 3. — The New York Temple of Ma- 
sonry dedicated. 

•f uuo S. — The American Rifle Team em- 
bark for Ireland. 

•lunc C. — Kaiser William confers the or- 
der of Civil Merit on George Bancroft and 
Henry \V. Longfellow. 

June 13. — The steamer Vicksburg re- 
ported lost in the ice off St. John's, New 
Brunswick, May 31st. 

The Boston express trian thrown off the 
track at 178th street. Teuton: narrow escape of 
Vice-President Wilson. 

June 13. — Seizure of the steamship Oc- 
tavia. 

Tom McGehan, of Vallandingham notoriety, 
shot and killed at Hamilton, 0. 

•Tunc 17. — The Bunker Hill Centennial 
Celebration. 

Jnne 31. — Loss of the United States 
steamer, Saranac, oft" Vancouver's Island. 

June 341. — The jury retire in the Tilton- 


HARNESS AND SADDLES. 

tTroWmNGT^V., Harness & Saddles, 

J3 South Side Public Square. 

HOTELS, 

TXblANA HOUSE, Da^nielDeprez. Proprietor, 
X Cor. Noble & Washington 8t8. 
JACKSON HOUSE, H. H. Jackson, Proprietor, 
fj North Side Public Square. 

REAL ESTATE. 

T\TILLERrw7 C^^ReaTWtate'&Tnsurance'Ageiit^ 
iVJ. Cor. Harrison & Jackson sts. 

SALOONS. 

TTpNNT, JOHN, Saloon, 

XJ Cor. Harrison st. & Broadway. 

TTvEPREZ, GEORGE, Saloon, 

\J South Side Public Sqnare. 

T OUDEN, DAVID, Saloon, 

JU East Washington st. 

lyiCHOLS, G. D., Saloon, 

1> South Harrison st, 

T3HILL1PS, I. H., Saloon, 

JT Cor. Washington & Noble sts, 

STOVES AND TINWARE, 

?TmFFWXC(]CstoveF&"'IMnwa^^ 

\J East Side Public Square. 


WINES AND LIQUORS, 


Beecher case. 

The Aldine Printing Office, Liberty straet, 
New York, destroyed by fire. 

July 5. — Disaster on the Long Island 
Southern Railroad; 11 persons killed. 

Jnly 6. — Collision between the steamer 
Isaac Bell and the tug Lumberman in Hamp- 
ton Roads; 10 lives lost. 

July 13. — Saratoga regatta. The fresh- 
man contest won by Cornell. 

July 1-4.— A portion of the City Hotel, 
Lynchburg, Va., falls; one person killed, sev- 
eral injured. 


TyriC'KUM & YANNOY, Wholesale Liquor Dealers, 
XM North Side Public ^quare. 

SII.AJ»i METZGER, 

LIQUOR DEALER, 

Sour Mash Bourbons, 

California Wines, 

Grape Brandies, Etc. 

SAMPLE ROOM ATTACHED. 

E. Washington St. 






July lo. — The Donaldson-Grimwood fa- 
tal balloon ascension from Chicago. 

July 33. — Isaac Merrit Singer, the in- 
ventor of the Singer Sewing Machine, dies in 
London, aged 64 years. 

July 37.— Duncan, Sherman & Co. sus- 
pend payment. 

July 31.— Hon. Andrew Johnson, U. S. 
Senator from Tennessee, and ex-President of 
the United Slates, dies at Carter's Depot, near 
Greenville, Tenn., aged 67. 

Aug'. 6. — An explosion at the Bridesburg 
Arsenal, Pa.; 1 killed and 19 wounded. 

Aug'. 17.— The body of Grimwood, Don- 
aldson's companion, found at Montague, Lake 
Michigan. 

Aug:. 31.— The American Rifle Team 
home. 

Aug'. 3«.— Courtney and Robinson win 
the double sculls at Saratoga. 

Aug. 37.- Mr. W. C. Ralston, President 
of the California Bank, drowned while bath- 
ing. 

Aug. 3S. — The new post-oflice. New York, 
occupied. 

Sept. 11. — Propeller Esquinox foundered 
in a storm on Lake Michigan, with 26 souls on 


HUNTINGTON. IND. 

AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS. 

PHMaS T. BAKERr 

Agent for the 

Joliiisoii Harvester, Ecliuse Tireslier, 

PORTABLE ENGINES 

And Agricultural Implements Generally, 
Established 1873. HUNTINGTON. 


T3R0YINES, J. S., Agricultural Implements and 
X Farm Machinery, Jefferson st. 

ATTORNEYS AT LAW. 

OPENCERTMsfTAUorneys^rLaw^; ■'^'■^^^ 
O Jefferson st. 

DRUGGIST. 

f^AVIES, JESSlETwlKie^airanOetaiTDrnggis^ 
JlJ Market st. 

HARNESS AND SADDLES, 

T7"0HL, JOHN, MauutaclureT'orTTiinresJ^r'^^ 
XV dies, Collars, &c., cor. Jefferson & Franklin 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OF THE CENTURY. 



261 



H UNT I NGTON — Continued. 



JOTELS^ 

MEALS AT ALL HOURS. 
Jeft'erison Nt., Huntington, 

UBBELL HOUSE. A. A. Hubbell, Prop. 
Cor. Market & Cherry sts. 

ewere Mouse. 

(Formerly NATIONAL.) 

GARDNER & COOK, Props. 

Refnrnished and Refitted. Good Accommodations 
for Drummers. 

Cor. Market & Cherry Sts., Huntington. 

JUSTICE OF THE PEACE, 

PAULLUS, P. L., Ju8tice"'oFthe^eacer 
Jefierson street. 

MILLINERY. 

MISS PATTERSON & SISTER, 



ALL WORK GUARANTEED. 

Market St., One Door East of New Bank Building. 

ADABAUGH & AGLEB, Millinery and Notions, 
Jifferson street. 

PHOTOGRAPHEE. 

RADAmtlGiniOrrPh^toirapheK 
Jefierson street. 



S 



TAILOR. 

WICK, P. i)., Me'r'chaurTaiior." " Good" fl'ti guar- 
aiiteed Market st. 



WAGON MAKERS. 

iNBYTBlacksrr 
Repairing, Franklin st. 



BEAVER, HENRY, Blacksmilhing; Jobbing and 
Repairing, Franklin st. 

JACOB SCHEERER, 
Wagon Manufacturer. 

REPAIEITsTG & NEW WORK. 

Franklin St., Huntington. 

RUSHVLLIE, IND. 

ATTORNEYS AT LAW. 
^DlGGEBTllMiFTCAUxJrney^nr^ 



16 Ruth st, 



HALL, FRANK J., Attorney at Law, 
Ruth St.. opp. Court House. 



boiird. Capt. Bain, of the schooner Onondago, 
swept overboard and lo.st. 

S<^|>t. lO. — The .steamer Zodiac, from Na.s- 
sua, burnsd at sea on the 0th inst. 

Galveston, Texas, visited by a fearful storm 
of wind and rain; the city inundated. 

Sept. 17. — The dry goods house of .Jor- 
dan, Marsh & Co., of Boston, almost destroyed 
by fire; loss nearly .$1,000,000. 

Sept. 91. — Indianola, Texas, visited by a 
cyclone and almost entirely destroyed. 

Sept. 37. — Edwin O'Baldwin, the Irish 
giant, shot by J. Cassidy, at 45 West street, 
N. Y. 

Sept. 3».— Ned O'Baldwin, the Irish giant, 
dies in New York city, aged .35. 

The earth's passage through the moon oc- 
curs. 

Oct. 4,. — Miss Josie Langmaid, school-girl 
of Suncook, N. H., murdered in the woods. 

Oct. 0-— Fire at First and South Eleventh 
streets, Brooklyn. Loss, $100,000. 

Oct. V. — American ship Mayflower, Capt. 
W. S. Herrington, founders at sea. 

Oct. 13.— John T. Huss, cashier of the 
First National Bank of Tiffin, Ohio, commits 
suicide, 

Oct. SI. — Frederick Hudson, journalist, 
thrown from his carriage by a locomotive at 
Monument street railroad crossing. Concord, 
and killed. 

Oct. 26. — The Dauntless and Mohawk 
ocean race; the Dauntless victor. 

Conflagration in Virginia City, Nev. Loss, 
$8,000,000. 

Oct. 28.— The Dauntless beats the Re- 
solute in the great ocean race from Cape 
May. 

Oct. 30. — Reported loss by fire of the 
American ship John Pascal, Capt. Tapley. 

Oct. 31.— Fire in Philadelphia; loss, $500,- 
000. 

Nov. 2. — George Schmidt, hotel proprietor 
of Annapolis, Md., shot and killed bj- William 
Barber. 

rVov. 3.— Robert Miner falls from the 
dome of the Memorial Building at Philadel- 
phia, and is killed. 

Nov. 0.--The steamer City of Waco 
burned off Galveston bar. 

Nov. 17.— John C. Johnson, a Newark al- 
derman, commits suicide by shooting. 

Nov. 23. — Hon. Henry Wilson, Vice Presi- 
dent of the United States, dies at Washington, 
D. C., aged 64 years. 

Dec. 4. — Escape of Wm. M. Tweed. 

Dec. T. — The steamship Deutschland 
wrecked on the Galloper Sands; 50 lives lost. 

Dec- 11. — The dynamite explosion at 
Bremmerhaven; 60 persons killed; the steam- 
ship Mosal injured and detained. 

1876. 

•Ian. 1. — On Staten Island the Rev. Henry 
Boehm, the venerable patriarch of the Meth- / 
odist church, dies, aged one hundred and one 
years. 

Jan. 9. — In South Boston, Dr. Samuel 



262 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



RusHViLLE — Continued. 

' ATTORNEYS AT LAW. 

EIJi^J1E^'^'^>lW0^". JRITauoiti^^^ Law and 

Real Estate A eiU, 16 Ruth st. 

OE, THOMAS, Attorney »t Law, 

Masonic Hall. Main st. 

EXTON & CAMBEBN, Attorneys at Law, 

Ruth pt., (/pp. Court House. 



S 



THOMAS & SPANN, Attorneys at Law and Solici- 
tors of Patents, 10 liuth st. 



H 



DENTIST. 

ATSrORrw.^ IK^ntieiC 

Rnth St., Melodion Block. 



HOTEL. 



;« 



Elkhart- 



-Contimied. 



1® 



F. A. CAPP, Prop: 

Gor. Ruth & Morgan Sts. 

~ TAILOR, 

McCarthy, p., Men hant Tailor, 
Ruth st , opp. Court House. 

ELKHART, IND. 

~~ DENTIST. 

uMiNsTsTM^TirDrsir™™^ 

Office, Masonic Block, Main st. 



w 



FURNITURE. 

ALLW,'C ft ASlTF^iirnitunnJearer' and Under- 
talier, Piijeon st. 



GUNS, RIFLES, &c. 

0GE]^^^J0llNrM;uiirf7(nunii^^ 
and Denier in Sportini; Goods. 



LIVERY AND SALE STABLE. 

B'^nDTrMnELDTTASTlLrP njpT^^ 
Sale and Boarding Stable. 

" MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS. 

ATTEWTIOIlf, BAICDS ! 

For Instruments Of all KMs, Music Etc. 

Address C. G. CONN, Elkhart, Ind. 

Subscribe for "TRUMPET NOTES." The only 
paper printed in the interest of Amatuer Bands. 
Send lor sample copy. Use the Elastic Rim 
Mouthpiece. 

PAPER MANUFACTURERS. 
A. Upp, Pres. J. W. Bliss, Sec. A. Work, Treas. 

ELKHART TISSUE PAPER COMPANY 

Manufacturers of 

ALL KINDS OF TISSUES. 

Copying Paper a Specialty 

ELKHART, IND. 



TTrCTCHKMrjnLTT^ 



REAL ESTATE. 

. H., Ju-tice of th( 
vpyancer. R'-al Estate and CoUectinR Agent. 

STARCH MANUFACTURERS, 

\i%im Slarcli Hanufacturin^ Company 

ELKHART, IND. 

Manufacturers of the Excelsior Gloss 
Starch. The strongest and best made. 
Excelsior Corn Starch, tor CuTnerj use, has 
no equal. For sale by all first-class Grocers. 

SOUTH BEND, IND. 

ATTORNEYS AT LAW. 

A'~'~'TM)tSXciiffim)rArU3rn^^ 
Arnold's Ab stracts of Title. 87 Washington st 
G' EORGE & PFLEGEE, Attorneys at Law, 
Post Office B'nlding. 

TONG, L. ti.. Attorney and Notary Public, 
Arnold's Block. 

BARBERS. 

L'^^'oW^X'SiTsKumgajuTHairdressi^ 
mVi Washington st. 

Bath 1\Wm "kmi & BaUressin^ Parlors 

HENRY SPETH, Proprietor. 

57 "Washington Street. 

BRACKET MANUFACTURERS. 
Wholesale Manufacturers 

BracMs, Slielves, Frames, Etc. 

Also Patent Toilet Brackets and Patent 
Album Frames. 

Factory, Cor. St. Joseph & Washington Sts. 

COAL, LIME AND PLASTER. 

LANE, H. & .1. W., Lime. Plaster. Coal, Plaster- 
ing Hair Lath, Stucco Cement. &c., 87 Main 

DENTISTS. 

CUMMINSTDTErBeuti^t; 
96 Michioran st., over Wyman's. 



M 



ILLER, R. T., Dentist, 



109 Michigan st. 



ENGRAVER ON WOOD. 

HOOVER, E. W'.T^DlPTgneF'and^lQgfaver"^ 
Wood. Arnol d 's Block. ^ 

FURNITURE. 

KNOBLOCK BROS^uriffiuf^andUphorstefed 
Goods, No. 76 Main st. 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OF THE CENTUKY. 



263 




Photographic IStudio, Centennial Exposition, Philadelphia.— 

It is a very handsome structure of wood and plaster, and is of a highly decorative style of 
architecture. It is one story high, siiuated on a terrace three feet abjve grade. The front 
portion of the building is reached by a wide stairway, and comprises a wide vestibule and 
reception-room, and on each of the latter gallery 22 feet square, for the exhibition of pho- 
tographs. There are public and private offices, dressing-rooms for ladies and gentlemen, 
and all the appurtenances of a first class photographic gallery on a large scale. 




United States Mint, Philadelphia.— Was established in 1792. The present 
beautiful building, which is pure Ionic architecture, was completed in 1S33, is situated on 
Chestnut street alDOve 13th. The Mint, besides being a great money-coining establishment, 
also contains a museum or cabinet of coins, embracing the coined " legal tenders " from the 
earliest ages up to the present period. 



264 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



J. B. PEABODY. 



GEO. W. ROBINSON. 



PEABODY & ROBIISOI, 



PROPRIETORS 



PEABODY HOUSE, 

EAU CLAIRE, WISCONSIN, 

First Class House. Comfflercial Sample Rooms Fife. M on tie GrouM Floor. 



South Bend — Contimied. 


South Bend — Continued. 


HOTELS, 

Central Hotel, 

(Late ST. JOE,) 

OPPOSITE POST OFFICE, SOUTH BEND, IND. 

New Management and Newly Furnished 
Throughout. Best Table in the City. 

Geo. Davis, Clerk. C, C, HTJLSAET, Prop. 


PHYSICLOIS. 

■pAKBOUK, 6. P., M.D., Phy^icianljfld'Surieon; 
X> office, 74 Washington st. 

DENSLOW BBOS.. 

EGLEGTIG PHYSIGIANS, 

Clairvoyant and Magnetic Healers. 

Personal Examination, $1 00 


DW16HT HOUSE 

SOUTH BEND, IND. 


When lock ot hair, with name and age is sent, 2 00 

Piles and Fistula a Specialty. No Charge 
until Cured. 

SOUTH BEND, IND. 


KNIGHT & MILLS, Proprietors. 
GRmO CENTRAL HOTEL 

114 & 116 MICHIGAN ST. 

HENRY C. KNILL, Prop. Rates, $3.00 per Day. 


TTUMPHREYS, L., M.B., Physiciau and Surgeon, 
JLJL bl Washington St. 

DR. MAURER, 

Botanic and Water Doctor. 

Chronic Diseases a specialty. 
Ofhce, 107 Michigan st. 


NATIONAL HOTEL, 

SOUTH BEND, IND., 

Near L. S. & M. S. R. R. Depot. 

W. B. WANSBROUGH, Prop. Eates, 81.50 per Day. 

Commercial Men will find Good 
AccommodHtions. 


O TURGIS, D. B., M.D., Physician and Surgeon, 

lO 13-2 Michigan st. 

SCHOOL. 

TTNIVERSITY OP N0TKe1)A.1IE, Rev. P. J. Col- 
\J oviu, C. S. C, Pres., Notre Dame, Ind. 

SLIDE-VALVE. 

W. J. Westwood, Pres. 0. S. Witherill, Treas. 
O. H. Palmar, Sec. 

Westwood' s Frictionless Slide-Valve, 


LIVERY AND SALE STABLES. 


For Locomotive, Stationary and Marine EnjJCines. 
Patented, Jau ^5, 1876. Improved, Feb 15, 1877. 


IRELAND & SON, Proprietors of 

liivery and Feed Stables, 

54 Michigan st. 

Hack line to and from all trains, or any part of 

the city. 


STOVES AND TINWAEE. 

OANUHOVELriHENRYr^t^^vJ?^^ Tuiware^and 
O Hou.^efurnishiug Goods, 77 Main st. 

TOBACCO AND CIGARS. 


REYNOLDS' 

Livery, Sale anfl Feefl Staile, 

146 MICHIGAN ST. 

Beet Turnouts in the city. 
Carriages furnished for Balls, Parties, etc. 
Prices reasonable. Geo. W^. Reynolds, Prop. 


A. baYzWy^ 

MANUFACTURER 
And Wholesale and Retail Dealer in 

TOBACCO AND CIGARS, 

8* IIAIBI STREET. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



265 




266 



IMPOKTANT EVENTS OF THE CENTUET. 



1876. 

Gridley Howe, the distinguished philanthro- 
pist, dies, aged 74 years. 

Jlan. 13. — The National Republican Com- 
mittee decide to hold their Presidential Con- 
vention at Cincinnati June 14. 

J.tn. 1-1. — A bill appropriating $29,53.3,- 
500 tor pensions passed by Congress. 

Jan. 25. — The Centennial bill appropri- 
ating !t!l,oOO,000 was passed by the House. An 
amendment to the bill provides that the money 
appropriated shall bo repaid to the United 
States before any dividends are made to stock- 
holders. 

Fel». 5. — In Cincinnati, the gallery in 
Robinson's Opera House, during a Sunday- 
school festival, gave way. Twelve lives lost, 
and between fifteen and twenty persons in- 
jured. 

l-^eb. 7.— In Brooklyn, N. Y., Rear-Admir- 
al Silas 11. Stringham,'U. S. N., dies in his 
seventy-eighth year. 

Fol>. 8,— Destructive fire on Broadway, 
New York city. Loss about $3,000,000. 

Tcb. lO,— In Annapolis, Jld., the Hon. 
Reverdy Johnson, the distinguished jurist, 
dies in his eightieth j^ear. 

Fol>. 11. — The Centennial Appropriation 
bill was passed by the Senate. The President, 
on the 16th, signed the bill with a quill from 
the wing of an American eagle shot near 
Mount Hope, Oregon. 

rcl>. 12. — Explosion in a colliery at West 
Pittsburg, Pa. Four men killed and several 
wounded. 

' Fcl>. 15.— The historic elm on Boston 
Common was blown down by a high wind Tues- 
day evening. It was above two hundred years 
old, and one of the most dearly prized land- 
marks of the city. An immense crowd of relic 
hunters have visited the place to secure 
pieces. 

Feb. 18.— In Boston, Charlotte S. Cush- 
nian, the actress, dies, aged sixty years. 

Feb. 258.— A sleeping-car was thrown 
from the track on the Harlem Railroad exten- 
sion. The car was burned, and Mr. Bissel, of 
the Sherman House, Chicago, and his son, per- 
ished in the flames. 

Marcli 1.--A bill was passed by the 
House recommending the people of the several 
States to assemble in their resj^ective counties 
or towns on the Centennial anniversaiw, and to 
cause to be delivered a historical sketch of the 
county or town from its formation, copies of 
which are to be filed in the county clerk's office 
and in the library of Congress, so that a com- 
plete record may thus be had of the progress 
of the Republic. 

Marcli 2.— Resolutions of impeachment 
against Wm. W. Belknap, Secretarv of War, 
were passed by the House, and the i^enate was 
notified of the appointment by the House of a 
committee to impeach him at the bar of the 
Senate. The ground of impeachment was the 
charge that General Belknap had profited by 
post-tradership appointments. General Bel- 
knap had already resigned his position, and 
his resignation bad been accepted bp the Pres- 
ident. 

i^arcliO. — A freight train, with a passen- 
ger car attached, fell through a bridge on the 



South Bend — Continued.. 



TOBACCO AND CIGARS. 

Dealer in Tobacco and Cigars. 

The best lirands constantly on hand. 
SOUTH BEND, IND. 

WATER PIPE. 

S^TONE AND PIPE MANUFACTURING CO., Man- 
ufacturers of 

Coiicr-ete Watei* Pipe, 

Guaranteed to stand any pressure required. 
156 Lafayette > t. 

WINES AND LIQUORS. 
WM. BENDER, Prop. 

Dealer in "Wines, Liquors and Cigars, 

115 Michigan st. 
JOHN WAGENER, Deakr in 

Wines, Liquors and. Cigars, 

71 Washington st. 

XTBBAHNS, HENRY, Wiues, Liquors and Cigars, 
J 3i Washington st. 



ANDERSON, IND. 

BLACKSMITH. 

EDWAEFMmJKS; 

HORSESHOEINS, PLOW EEPAIEIM, 

And 3Ianufacturer of Harrows. 

All kinds of Job Work done to order. 

SOUTH MAIN ST. 



M^ 



BOOTS AND SHOES. 

JADARA, P. B., Boot and IS oemaker. All 
iVX work guaranteed. S. Main st. 

CARPENTERS. 

"^ J. c^aIgSead^&^sonT"^ 
Saw Gummers and Filers, 

And Agents for the "Victor Stock Scale," 

And General Repair Shop. 

Office at the Shop, South end 
Main Street. 

Sign of Big Saw. Proprietors of the New Lan- 
caster Mill. 

CARRIAGE AND WAGON MAKERS. 

H. H. CONRA.D, 

Manufacturer of 

Spring & linniber liVagonS; 

NORTH MAIN STREET. 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OF THE CENTUKV 



26T 



Anderson — Continued. 



CAREIAGE AND WAGON MAKERS^^^^ 
T. A. Lofius. (Est. 1874.) W. P. Watkins. 

LOFTUS & WATKINS, 

Manufacturers of 

Buggies, Plaltorni I Eleplic Spring Wagons, 

Also, Lumber and Farm Wagons and Cus- 
tom Work Generally. 
ALL. WORK WARRANTED. 

SHOP, 106 AND 108 N. MAIN STKEET. 

ATH^TttEORGE, Manfr of SpTing Wagons, 
H. avy and Light Road Wagons, North of 
P. C. & St. L. R.l!. Depot. 

UINN, H. W., Carriage Makers' Msterials, 
Wond Works, Oil, &.-., 98 & 104 N. Main St. 



Q 



COAL AND LIME. 

E. cTVernon, 

Dealer in 

COAL AND JLIME, 

Lath, Shingles, Cement, Plaster of Paris, 
Fii'e-Bi'ick & White Sainl. 

Agent for the Terra Cotta and Pipe Works. 
NORTH END OF MAIN STKEET. 

GEOCEE,. 

THE CASH GROCERY 

—or— 

C. H. PRESTON 

Is the Place to Buy Good 
Goods Cheap. 

COR. BOLIVAR & MAIN STS. 

HOTEL. 

SEMCANTHODSET^HrTr^nTebl^^ 
Main St. 

LIVEEY AND SALE STABLE. 

wFiaiamson^&^uHle^ 

Proprietors ot the 
LIVERY, FEED AND SALE 



(Stable formerly occupied by Baxter & Blake,) 
SOUTH MAIN STREET. 

Horses kept at reasonable t(rms. Good accom- 
modation for Drummers. 



MACHINIST. 



HILL,.!. N., Wrought Iron Worko, Iron Railing, 
Feiicintf, etc. Shop on Benton st. 



D 



TOBACCO AND CIGAES. 

REFFEK, N. J., MauufaHin^eF^^ud^DeaTei-rn 
Cigars and Tohacco, 7 S. Main st. 



NILES. MICH. 



AGEICDLTUEAL IMPLEMENTS. 

C^LETAlTDrATX'XsirrCM^nf^^ 
in Agricultural Implements, 65 Second st. 



Baltimore and Ohio Kailioad, and 11 persoii.s 
were killed. 

iYIurcli y. — The Home for the Aged, in 
East Bro(jklyri, New York, was partly con- 
sumed by fire. Eighteen old men were burned 
to death. 

iVIa,i*cli 33. — The House passed a bill pro- 
hibiting contributions to election fund.s by offi- 
cers of the United States government and by 
Senators and Representatives in Congress. 
The second section of the bill makes punisha- 
ble by fine and imprisonment any bribery or 
intimidation with a view to influence elec- 
tions of United States officers or Congress- 
men. 

i^lai'cli SO. — The reservoir of the water 
works at Worcester, Mass., gave way, depriv- 
ing the city of water, damaging property to 
the amount of one million five hundred thou- 
sand dollars. 

April A. — The formal presentation to the 
Senate of the articles of impeachment against 
(ien. Belknap took place. On the 17th, the 
day fixed on which the process against the late 
Secretary was made returnable, Gen. Bel- 
knap's counsel interposed the plea of non-juris- 
diction. 

April lO.— In New York city, A. T 
Stewart died, aged 73 years. He was said to 
be one of the wealthiest merchants in the 
United States. 

Bill passed Congress authorizing the re- 
sumption of specie payment, which went into 
effect during the present mouth. 

April 13. — A new postal bill, relating to 
third-class matter, passed by the Senate. The 
new rate will be one cent an ounce for all pack- 
ages weighing four fjounds or under, without 
regard to the distance to which they are sent. 
The rate for transient newspapers and maga- 
zines, without regard to distance, is to be one 
cent for three ounces or fractional part thereof, 
and one cent for each two additional ounces or 
fractional part thereof. This law is to take ef- 
fect, should it be accepted by the House, ou 
the 1st of July next. 

April 15. — Arrival of Dom Pedro, Em- 
peror of Brazil; at Ne\v York. He declines a 
public ovation, and, in the habiliments of a 
private citizen, makes a tour of the United 
States. 

April 18. — President Grant vetoed the 
bill passed by Congress reducing his suc- 
cessor's salary to $25,000 per annum. 

The Gray Nuns Act of 1S75 repealed by the 
New York Legislature. The especially obnox- 
ious clause of the act was one authoi-izing the 
Superintendent of Public Instruction to issue 
a certificate of qualification as a teacher in the 
common schools to any graduate of its semin- 
aries to whom the Roman Catholic Sisterhood 
of Gray Nuns may have awarded a diploma. 

i?lay lO.— Grand opening of the Centen- 
nial Exhibition. The first official conception 
of the Centennial Exhibition was an act passed 
by Congress, March 3, 1871, creating the United 
States Centennial Commission, under whose 
supervision the exhibition was carried to a 
perfect success. On July 5th, 1873, the Secre- 
tary of State sent official notifications to the 
various foreign nations of the intended exhibi- 
tion, and of the thirty-nine nations so invited 
and notified, they not only accepted, but sent 



268 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



Nii.ES — Continued- 



BATTERY BELT. 

lh« Celebrated Battery Belt. 



\\riTHERErir& klRKHAM,_ Manufacturers of 



B 



CARRIAGE MANUFACTURER, ^ 

KOiVJi\^"^r^ii^PoiiTria2e'"and "vVagoiT^aker 
Second ft. 



CARRIAGE PAINTER. 
Q COViL, irj^^TCamagelKilnterr 



Second st. 



JDENTISTS^ 

L' OWRY," T. ' Am Den tipt, cor. 'Main' and' 'Front 
tits., over Post Office. 
I" > OVVLEY, DK. ('. R., Dentist, office, over Piu- 
\i lev's Diuic Store, 48 Main st. 



HOTEL. 



MMW 



0. M'KAY, Proprietor. 



NILES, 



MICH. 



LIVERY AND SALE STABLE, 
R. P. & W. B. BUNBURY, 

Prop's of Livery, Feed and Sale Stable, 

Cor. Second and Cedar sts. 



H 



NEWSPAPER. 

bRNToTK^lOy^TTScntToTan'd^^^ 
Niles Democrat, 48 Main st. 



MISHAWAKA, IND. 



AGRICULURAL IMPLEMENTS. 

sf .Ififfl IaMcWrIgToT, 

Manufacturers of 

?>iteel and Cast Plows, Double 
Shovel Plows, 

Cultivators, Combined Riding and Walking Cul- 
tivators, Mishawaka Feed Mills, &c., &c., 

BREWERS, 

"iDKJiT&TKAMM 

Manufacturers of 



fi 



MISHAW AKA, IND. 

HOTELS, 



Milburn House, Mishawaka, Ind. 

D. S. PEMBROKE, Prop. 
Rates, ,$2.00 per day. 



M I SHAWAK A — Continued. 



HOTELS. 

T/JOSEPfTTnnJSC'^S^OO^Ijei^^^ 
Schindler, Props., Main St., Mishawaka, Ind. 



s 



WINDMILL & AX CO. 

P. C. Perkins, Pres. J. C. Snyder, Vice-Pres. 

A. Hudson, Sec. and Treas. 

PERKINS WINDMILL & AX CO., 

Manufacturers of 

WINDMILLS, PUMPS, AXES, 

Kd};e Tool.s, Mill Picks, Stone Ham- 
mers, etc., etc., 
MISHAWAKA, IND. 



PLYMOUTH, IND. 



ATTORNEY AT LAW. 
Estate and Insurance Agent. 



M 



CARPENTER AND BUILDER. 

'CTNCETROBE^RTT^cTntectT^Ca^^ 
Joiner, E. La Porte st. 



GRAIN ELEVATOR. 

T""TirraOE^T^^-oirp'iy7no^^ 
Elevator, Wholesale Dealer in Grain, Seeds, 
etc., on Pennsylvania R .R. 

HOTEL. 

P'"""ARkM''HOUSErir.^Tjodge^T^^^ 
and from all trains. 

^^^^^^ LUMBER DEALERS. 

G. L. BRINK & SULT, 

BmBSBE® ^ W^BmmSSBS SbWMBEM 

Manf'rs of MouldinsfS, Brackets and all kinds 
of Scroll Work, Plymouth. 

PATENT MEDICINES. 

FEyER AND AGUE CURE, 

In Liquid or Pills. 

Cures the worst forms of Chills, Fevers, Dumb- 
Ague, Third-day Ague, or Fevers without Chills. 
Cures General Debility. Loss of Appetite, &c., 
&c. Pershing & Co., Manf'rs, Plymouth. 



s 



SCHOOL FURNITURE. 

IMONS, W. H^7>l!uff^-"Plymouffi~"S^ 
School Desk, Plymouth. 



^WATCHES, CLOCKS AND JEWELRY. 

)HILPOTrAri^lv?Ucir5srcTock8rJeweri^^ 
verware, Michigan s t. 

MICHIGAN CITY, IND. 



FURNITURE. 

BADER BROS., Dealers in all kinds of Furni- 
ture. Coffins a specialty. Franklin st. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



2Q9 




270 



INPORTANT EVENTS OF THE CENTURY. 



1S76. 

foods in great profusion for the international 
isplay. Foreign industries maice up three- 
fifths of the display in the Main Building, and, 
perhaps, four-fifths in the Art Department, 
and a large proportion in every other depart- 
ment. 

The President and Cabinet, the Diplomatic 
Corps, the Senate and House of Kepresenta- 
tives, together with Commissioners from every 
State in the Union, were present at the open- 
ing. Dom Pedro, the Emperor of Brazil, was 
present. 

The Army and Navy were largely repre- 
sented from the highest rank to the private in 
line. 

It is estimated that over 300,000 persons 
were on the ground, and the receipts amounted 
to $75,000. 

The following is a comparative statement of 
the space occupied by the difierent World's 
Exhibitions since 1850: 

Munich, 1850, 4.4 acres 

London, 1851, ... - 18.G " 
New York, 1854, .... 4.2 " 
Paris, 1855, .... 22.1 " 

London, 1862, . - - - - 2;5.0 '• 
Paris, 1867, ... - 31.0 '• 

London Crystal Palace, - - - 25.6 " 
Vienna, 18?4, .... 56.5 " 
Philadelphia, 1876, . - - - 60.0 " 

]^Iay 17, — Boiler explosion on the steamer 
Pat Cleburne, si.x miles below iShavvneetown, 
on the Mississippi river; nine persons killed, 
including the Captain. 

May 18. — The Greenback National Con- 
vention at Indianapolis, Ind., nominated Peter 
Cooper, of New York, for President, and Sen- 
ator Booth, of California, for Vice-President. 

May 28.— Near Cincinnati, Ohio, G. M. 
D. BIoss, one of the editors of the Cincinnati 
inquire)', was killed while walking on the 
railroad track; aged fifty years. 

May 39. — It was decided by a majority of 
8, in the United States Senate, that that body 
had jurisdiction in the Belknap impeachment 
case. 

June 16. — The National Republican Con- 
vention, at Cincinnati, nominated Governor 
Rutherford B. Hayes, of Ohio, for President of 
the United States, and the Hon. William A. 
Wheeler, of New York, for Vice-President. 

JTune 17. — B. H. Bristow resigned his 
seat in the Cabinet as Secretary of the Treas- 
ury. 

•f une 25. — Custer's disaster in his expe- 
dition against the Indians. Gen. Custer had 
been detached from Gen. Terry's, command, 
with orders to foUow the trail of the hostile 
Sioux in the direction of the Big Horn river, 
while Gen. Terry should ascend the Big Horn 
and attack the enemy in the rear. On the 
25th, Gen. Custer came suddenly upon a large 
force of Indians. Without waiting for sup- 
port, he attacked the enemy. He had twelve 
companies of cavalry. Four of these compa- 
nies had been detached under Colonel Reno to 
make an attack from the other side upon the 
enemy. Gen. Custer's force was overpowered 
and annihilated. Gen. Custer, his two brothers 
and nephew were killed. Not one of the com- 
mand escaped. Col. Reno's force \ras sur- 
rounded and sustained severe losses, but was 
finally rescued by Gen. Gibbon's command. 
The entire loss was 261 killed and 50 wounded. 



Michigan City — Continncd. 
HOTELS. 

Qrattdl ^vtlQm HataL 

Near Mich. C. R.R. Depot. 

C. NICHOLS, PROP., 

MICHIGAN CITY, - - IND. 

THIS HOVSE HAS BEEN RE-FITTED 
AND NEWLY FURNISHED. 

ST. NICHOLAS HOTEL,"" 

Micliigan City, - Indiana. 

AUG. SCHAUSTEN, PROP. 

New, Elegantly Furnislied and Centrally 
Located. Everything Eirst-Class. 

RATES $2.00 PER DAY. 

LIVEEY AND SALE STABLE, 
A. F. EARL. 

I^ivery and Feed Stable, 

Cor. Michigan and Washington Sts. 



INSURANCE. 

H"'"~Wia!«SriOKrJii^flc?or7he^^ 
surance Agent, Franklin pt. 



SASH, DOORS AND BLINDS. 

J. S. & G. C. ORR, 

Contrac'ors and Bnilderr:, Manufacturers of 

SASH, DOORS, BLINDS, ETC., ETC., 

Michigan City. 



ATTORNEYS AT LAW. 

AWlUM A^BArffiyTASimiey^^rLaw^ 
Broadwaj'. 

W. W. SULLIVAN, 

ATTOKIVEY AT LAAV. 

Special attention given to examining titles 
of real estate. Broad^yay. 



H 



K 



BOOTS AND SHOES. 

ALE^"TKi Tt^CT6<>o tsT^ hoeer^ ilat's " 

Caps, Broadway. 
OOB, JACOB, Bool and Shoemaker fme 

work a specialty. Broadway. 



1^ 7^ MSVVfLEU & SOS, Dry Goods, Groceries and 
J Notions, Broadway, opp. Odd Fellows'' Hall. 
ILOOUfcVSUIRK & CO., Hardware, Dry GoodF, 
Boots. Shoes & Clothingf, Main & Broadway. 



K 



FURNITURE, 
"fi'MTtrrlTsMsafTrTjiidcrfiito 

i ers in Furniture, 44 Broadway. ' 



GROCERIES. 

C'^^TuCHEKTX^WEIMER, Gr"oce7ie8~aii<r Provi- 
sions, 71 Broadvvaj'. ^ 

OSS BKOS., Groceiies, Qneensware, etc.. Main 
St., opp. Court House. 



R 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OF THE CENTURY. 



271 



Michigan City — Continued. 

HOTELS. 

BROADWAY HOUSE, Kirtley & Son, Prop's, 
Peru, Ind. 

NATIONAL HOTEL 

^FORMERLY KELLER HOUSE), 

AKDRE^V WEY, PROP., 

The above House has been newly refitted, and 
Guests will find in it all the comlorts of a First- 
Class House. Free Bus to and from all Trains. 



LIVEKY AND SALE STABLES. 

5K, H. I 

Broadway. 



O EAGEK, H. R. Training, Feed and Sale Stable, 

WALLACE, J. C. & B.E., Livery, Feed and Sale 
Stable, opp. National Hotel. 

PHOTOQRAPHEES. 

LAMOREAUX & LEAS, Photographers, Main 
and B'oadway. 



M 



OORE & JONES, Photographers, 



Broadway. 



EESTAURAUTS. 

PELKEY, R., Restaurant and Confectionery, 
Broadway. 



ROCHESTER, IND. 



ATTORNEYS AT LAW. 
/CALKINS, E., Attorney at Law, 



Rochester. 



HERMAN & ROWLEY, Attorneys at Law, Ma- 
sonic Building 



M 



'CLARY, T. J., Attorney at Law, 



Rochester. 



SHRYOCK & CONNER, Attorneys at Law, 
Rochester. 



S 



LICK, J. S., Attorney at Law, 



Rochester. 



HARNESS AND SADDLES. 



O 



SGOOD, 0. P., Dealer in Harness, Saddles, etc., 
Main st. 



S 



TOCKTON, G. W., Harness, Saddles, Collars, 
Whips, etc., Main st. 



HOTELS. 

CENTRAL HOUSE, R. N. Rannells, Prop. Good 
sample rooms on 1st and 2d iloors. Rorhester. 



w 



ALLACE HOUSE, R. Wallace, Prop. Good 
sample rooms on the first floor. 



MERCHANT. 

GOULD, D. S., Dry Goods, Groceries, Boots, 
Shoes, Hats, Caps, etc., Main st. 

^^^^^ PHOTOGRAPHER. 
"virOORE, lOCrfSotoS^apherT 



Main St. 



PLANING MILL. 
_^ SAMUEL BARKDOLL. 

Door, Sash and Blind Factory, 

Near Railroad Depot. 

18 



•June 37.— The Democratic National 
Convention met at Ht. Louis, and, on the 28th 
of Juno, nominated Governor Samuel J. Til- 
dun, of New York, for President, and Hon. 
Thomas A. Hendricks, of Indiana, for Vice- 
President. 

•Filly 4. — Terrific storm in Iowa. Forty- 
two persons drowned in the village of Rock- 
dale. 

Jiily •». — A bill was passed regulating^ the 
price of postage, allowing for all third-class 
mail matter, except unsealed circulars, to be 
transmitted at the rate of one cent for every 
two ounces, and one cent for eveiy additional 
two ounces. The present rate of one cent 
per ounce for all merchandise remains un- 
changed. 

•Jwly O. — Castle Garden, New York City, 
destroyed by fire. 

•Viily lO. — Burning of the propeller St. 
Clair, on Lake Superior. Seventeen passen- 
gers and ten of the crew drowned. 

•Filly 16. — Congress unanimously passed 
the Senate joint resolution for the completion 
of the Washington Monument. 

•Filly 30. — Commodore Garner's yacht 
Mohawk, was capsized in front of the Club 
House of the New York Yacht Club, off Sta- 
pleton. Commodore and Mrs. Garner, Mr. 
Frost Thome, Miss Adele Hunter and a cabin- 
boy were drowned. 

•Filly 26. — Argument in the Belknap im- 
peachment case closed. The result was a fail- 
ure to convict for a want of two-thirds maior- 
ity. 

Aug'. 1. — President Grant issued a procla- 
mation declaring Coloi-ado to be a State of the 
Union. 

Aug*. 14. — The first wire stretched across 
East River for the great suspension bridge, 
which is to connect New York and Brook- 
lyn. 

Aug. 19.— The Hon. Michael C. Kerr, 
Speaker of the House of Representatives, died, 
aged fifty years. 

Sept. 6. — The Lafayette statue was un- 
veiled in Union Square, New York city. 

Sept. 7. — William M. Tweed was arrested 
at Vigo, in Spain, where he had just arrived 
from Cuba. He was afterwards taken on board 
the U. S. steamer Franklin, and arrived in 
New York November 23d and was imniediatelr 
conveyed to Ludlow-street jail. 

Sept. 13.— Died, in Richmond, Va., Gen- 
eral Henry A. Wise, aged 70 3-ears. 

Sept. 1-1. — The international rifle match 
at Creedmoor, resulted in a victory for the 
American team by twenty-two points. In the 
contest were teams from America, Scotland, 
Ireland, Australia and Canada. The Irish 
team came out second and ih^ Scotch third. 
In a subsequent match, September 21, between 
the Irish and American teams, the latter won 
by eleven points. 

Sept. 23.— At Black Lick Station, near 
Columbus, 0., on the Pan Handle Railroad, 
four cars of an express train jumped the track 
and rolled down an embankment. Over thirty 
people were injured, four of whom were in- 
stantly killed. 

I^ept. 34. — Hell Gate, or the mine under 



272 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OF THE CENTURY. 



M 



Rochester, Ind — Continued. 

SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 
EiTRsTE^TSui'erintendenrorSdiool^^ 
Co., Rocheater. 

WATCHES, CLOCKS AND JEWELET,^^ 

fOLF^OT'C.T Watches,' Fme Tewelry, Silver- 
ware, Gold Pons, Musical Instruments, etc. 



MARSHALL, MICH. 



ATTORNEYS AT LAW, 

EEr7~W. S.r Attorney "at ~LTw.~The~ Iiaw of 

Real Estate & Chancery Practice made a 

specialty. 

RAND.iliL, IIU K., Attorney at Law, Marshall, 
Perfecting Titles to laud and foreclosing of 
Mortgages throughout the State of Michigan made 
a specialty. 



»ORTEB, WM. H., Attorney at Law, 



141 State St. 



BOOTS ANDJHOES^ 

„ , .,.. &Tr.^ Groceries, Prov 

Shoes, Urockery, etc., 78 State St. 



"DUTLERVj^*TK^pGroceVies, Provisions, Boots, 

HOTEL, 

Ij^OWLER HOUSE, Byron L sckwood, Proprietor, 
' Marshall. 



f^OBBINS, J. L., PheippnUnprovedT Hot Air 

XJ Furnaces, Tinners. 

LIVERY STABLE, ^ ^^ ^^^ 

^BD7wrHrrLrvei-y& Feed Stable. Office in 

rear of Fowlar House. 

PATENT SOLICITOR, 

— - bT fT W E L L E S , 

Solicitor of American and Foreign Patents, Civil 
and Mechanical Engineer and Draughtsman, Mar- 
shall. 



H 



SHIFTING TOPS, 

UNT, F. A., Manf'r of Leather and Shifting 
Tops and Cushions, 14 State st. 



BATTLE CREEK, 



ATTORNEYS AT LAW. 



B 



ROWlT&THO.IUS, .\ttorueys at Law, 

Main .S: Jell'ersou sts. Established 1869. 



BARBER. 

VANS, JOHN J., Tonsorial Barber, 

1 East Main st. Est ablished 185 6. 

" BOOTS AND SHOES. 
"~TEFlfTlSONritTMMf'r'&"deare"r 1^ 
fj Shoes, 10 S. Jetferson st. Established 1871. 
ARTIN, JULIUS, Boots & Shoes, repairing 
neatly done, 18 S. Jefferson st. 



M 



BUILDER, 

klTTEE, LYMAN, Jobber & Builder, Sash, 
Doors & Blinds, S. Jefferson st. 



Battle Creek, Mich — Continned. 

CONFECTIONERY. 

WEEB, C. B. & CO., Confectionery & Restau- 
rant, 31 E. Main st. Established 1873. 

~ DENTISTS. 

('""TRAVESTFCS^DeuFs^; 
T Be t. 3 and .5 W Main st. Established 1863. 

OWE, W. H., Operative Dentist, 

16 Main St. Established 1873. 



R 



E. B. IVEEKS, 



DENTIST. 

A good set of Teeth for $10. Natural Teeth 
saved by filling, at 25 or 50 per cent, less than code 
prices, 3 East Slain st. 



B 



DYEING AND SCOURING, 

RADLEY, T. J., Ladies' & Gents' garments 
neatly cleaned, dyed & press'd.at 14 S. Jef'sn st. 



HOTEL. 

B'^'mSTOL HOUSE,' Carl A. Ho'dge's', 'P'rop'rleforT ' 
Battle Creek, Mich. 

MEAT MARKET. 

M' ' rRW,'TriC''air¥ind?l)FT?esh "^^ 
Meat--, 8 S. Jefferson st. Established 1865. 

MILLINERY. 

S"~"TMErABO^X'C0.'iTr"Yr"^9ct"'St^ 
dealers in Milli n ery Goods, 5 W. Main st. 

NEWSPAPERS, 

REVIEW AND HERALD, Published by the 
Seventh Day Advcntist Publishing Assoc'ion. 

PHOTOGRAPHERS. 

C'~~RISPELIvKrP1ioti^ 
7 N. Jefferson st. Established 1873. 

.T. F. MILLER, 

Photographic Art Gallery, 

*7 East Main St. 
Every style of Picture made, old Pictures copied 
and enlarged. 



M 



PUMP MANUFACTURER, 

ILES, A., Manf'r of Wooden and Force Pumps, 

West Canal st. 



GREEN BAY. WIS. 



BOOTS AND SHOES. 

aIlbricMt a^co., 

Manufacturers and Wholesale and Retail 

129 Wasliing-ton St., cor. Cherry. 

HZHnZI HOTELS^^ 

W'^ HITTINGTON HOIISeT "H. Whittington, Pro- 
prietor. Cor. Washington & Crook sts. 



ADVEKTISEMKNTS. 



273 




THE OLD ELM, BOSTON COMMOX, BOSTON, MASS. 



Tlie XJuion Hotel, Gtilesbrir'g-. 




This truly elegant and first-class house 
which has been identified with the pro- 
gress of Galeeburg for years, is under the 
experienced and skillful management of 
Mr. C. Wormly, late of Kalamazoo, with 
" Judd " Gowdy as managing clerk. The 
whole house has been calcimined, re- 
decorated and overhauled, and is now in 
the neatest and sweetest order, new car- 
pets being laid down on all the corridors. 
The Union Hotel is not only holding its 
old reputation but is gaining new suc- 
cess under its present courteous and 
popular proprietor, who brings to his aid 
the assistance which money cannot buy, 
the refined taste ot an affectionate wife 
and mother. The immaculate whiteness 
of the linen, the neatess of the furniture 
of all the house, its freedom from dust 
and smoke, all bear evidence of superior 
management in that department, where 
woman is at home. In fact the traveling 
public will receive every accommodation 
at the Union Hotel that is combined in 
the best hotels in the United States. 



Tlio CSra-losToTi-rs: T71xonn.«e- 



THE TURKISH BATHS 



ARE GIVEN AT 

N.E. Corner of I'rairie & Simmons Sts,, - - - 



Business CoUege EiiilfJiiig. 



Traveling men can find a first-class Turkish Bath at all times for $i.oo. Those wish- 
ing treatment for all chronic diseases, can find board at a low figure at the place. The 
cure is permanent. 

Mr. & Mrs. W. A. WRIGHT, 

N. E. Cor. Prairie & Simmons Sts. Galesburg, III. 



274 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OF THE CENTUKY, 



1876. 

Hallett's Point Reef, Astoria, Long Island, was 
exploded by General Newton. 

Sept. 37. — Died, at Galveston, Texas, 
Braxton F. Bragg, Confederate General, aged 
61 years. 

Oct. 13. — Explosion of a battery of boilers 
in a nail mill at Pittsburgh, Penn. Fifteen 
men killed and a large number injured. 

Oct. 17. — President Grant issues a procla- 
mation commanding the South Carolina rifle 
jlubs to disband in three days. The same 
day the Secretary of War ordered troops to 
Columbia, S. C. to enforce the proclamation 
should it be disregarded. 

^Oct. 31.— Arrival of the whaling bark 
Florence, at San Francisco, with intelligence 
that twelve American whaling ships of the 
Arctic fleet have been wrecked in the ice, with 
immense loss of life. 

Oct. 38.— Edward S. Stokes, convicted of 
shooting James Fisk, Jr., released from Au- 
burn prison, N. Y., his term of sentence hav- 
ing expired. 

Oct. 31. — Summer's Opera House, Akron, 
Ohio, destroyed by fire, which includes Sum- 
mer's Hotel and several stores. Total loss, 
.$75,000. 

I%ov. 7.— Election of President of the 
United States. On the night of the election, 
it seemed to be pretty generally conceded by 
both parties that Governor Tilden, of New 
York, the Democratic candidate, was elected, 
but later news during the following day ren- 
dered it extremely doubtful who was chosen. 
Governor Hayes, of Ohio, was the Republican 
candidate for President. 

r>'ov. 10.--Closing of the great Centennial 
Exhibition, Philadelphia. The Exhibition was 
open 159 days. During that time the paid ad- 
missions were 8,004,325. The free admissions 
were 1,785,067. Total admissions, 9,799,392. 
The total receipts were .|3,813,749 75. Money 
received from concess' .o, .i?290,000: from per 
centages and rovalties, .$205,000; grand total, 
$4,307,749 75. the average daily total admis- 
sions were 61,568. The average daily receipts 
were $23,935 85. 

The following is a comparative statement of 
the attendance, receipts and number of days 
open of the different international exhibitions 
held since 1855: 

No. of Days 

Year. Place. Visitors. Rt^^eipts. Open. 

1801— London - 6,039.195 $2,530,000 141 
1855— Paris - - 5,102,330 040,300 200 

1862— London - 6,211,103 2,300,000 171 
1867— Paris - - 10,000,000 2,822,932 210 
1873— Vienna - 7,254,687 2,000,000 180 
1876— Philadelphia 9,799,392 3,812,749 159 

Nov. 18. — Fall of a crowded floor in the 
Opera House, Sacramento, Cal. The Peak 
family, the original Swiss Bell-ringers, Avere 
performing, and this was the opening night of 
the Opera House, when tlie floor gave way, 
killing seven persons, and four fatally injured, 
besides fifty persons were more or less seri- 
ously injured. 

rVov. 34.— The Peoria Woolen Mills, at 
Peoria, HI, destroyed by fire. Loss, .$30,000. 

Nov. 36.— Spcrry & Barnes' pork-packing 
establishment, at New Haven, Conn., destroyed 
by fire. Loss, including building, stock and 
fixtures $200,000. 



Green Bay — Co7itinued. 



GROCERIES. 

joanSesTbros., 

Wholesale & Retail 

138 WASHINGTON STREET. 
LIQUOR DEALERS, 

'^'^^DIEKirAlor&lDREYER^™ 

(Successors to Northiim & Diekraann.) 

WHOLEJiALE LIOHOR DEALERS, 

No. 109 W^ashington Street. 



s 



MILLINERY. 

PRTG iJEi MRSrS^TFashimiable Mill fn eYyi " 

Pine street. 



PHYSICIANS. 

IUM)K§rK{rH?XriTiysi«iuran3rSirf^^ 

Adams & Cherry sts. 



B 
K 



ING, DR.E. B., Physician, 

Fox Block, Washington St. 

OLMSTED & SQUIRE, 

HOMEOPATHIC PHYSICIANS, 

OJFriCE, SHAYLOK BLOCK. 

SEWING MACHINES. 

I MULLS, GEO. H., Agent for all kinds of Sewing 
Machines, Sbaylor Block. 



SOAP MANUFACTORY. 

290 & 292 WASHINGTON STREET, GREEN BAY, WIS. 

SEND FOR CIRCULAR. 



WATCHMAKERS AND JEWELERS. 

WATCHMAKER k JEWELER, 

1~3 Washington St., Green Bay, Wis. 

Established 1857. 

Dealer ii Watclies. uiocJfs and Jewelry. 

German Accordianp, Violins, Harmonicas, Spec- 
tacles, &c., 113 Washington st. All work prompt- 
Repaired and Warranted. 

WENASHfl, Wis! 

BAKERY AND CONFECTIONERY. 
RNOLDrG. M."f., Brir(?i7rConfecUonerir^ 
Ice Cream Saloon. Main st. Estab. 1872. 



BOOTS AND SHOES. 
OTILP, JAOOBTBootsTnd'shoeMakerV 



Main gt. 



DRY GOODS, GROCERIES, &c. 

Dry eoods, Groceries and Saloon, 



Established 1876. 



BROAD STREET. 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OF THE CENTURY, 



275 



NEENAH, WIS. 



DRESSMAKER. 

Cedar St.. opp. P.O. 

GROCERIES AND PROVISIONS, 

Groceries and Provisions, 

Fruits, Vegetables and Produce, 
NEENAH. WIS. 

EUDECK, EMIL, Groceries and Provisions, 

Wisconsin ave. 

RESTAURANT AND CONFECTIONERY. 

LANSING, W., City Kestaurant and Confection- 
ery, Wisconsin ave. 

FORT HOWftRD, WIS. 

FURNITURE. 

LDmBURGTATi^TjuderUik^^ 
Maaufacturer, 20 Main st. 

HARDWARE. 

ALLABURNSTSardwarei 

Main street. 

HOTELS. 

WmmESfERlHOffL 

GALLAGHER & DONOVAN, Props. 

Broadway k Hubbard Sts., Fort Howard. 



PLANING MILL. 

W^ATER STREET. 

Send for Circular C. SCHWARTZ & CO. 

EAU CLAIRE, WIS. 

BARBER. 

H'^^lxVOBSONTA^rBarbeir^TxrShav^^ 
Barstow St., North Side. 

HARDWARE, 

""charlesTaIgT" 

Dealer in 

Itttiftf, |li I jifif If e 

OPP. Gallaway House, Eaii Claire. 



HOTELS. 



RITZINGER HOUSE, 

G-EORG-E RITZING-ER, Prop. 

EAU CLAIRE STREET. 



1876. 

Dec. 4. — The bust of Horace Greeley, the 
philo.sopher and founder of the New York 
Tribune, presented to the friends of the de- 
ceased by the American printers and journal- 
ists, was unveiled at Greenwood Cemetery, 
New York, in the presence of about 1,000 peo- 
ple. 

Dec. 5. — Brooklyn Theatre, Brooklyn, N. 
Y., destroyed by fire. This was one of the 
most terrible and fatal calamities that has ever 
occurred in the United States— far exceeding 
in horrors that of the burning- fif the Rich- 
nion(Va.) Theatre, Dec. 27, 1811 (see page 
65). Over three hundred and fifty lives were 
lost, bui'ned and buried in the ruins, disfigured 

so much that but few were 1 condition to be 

recognized, so completely charred and burned 
as to be impossible to tell whether they were 
male or female, human or animal, ^lany per- 
sons vvere seriousiy injured in their efforts to 
escape from the flames by jumping out of the 
windows, ana some were killed outright. Oth- 
ers were crushed and mangled by the mad 
rush of human beings seeking egress from the 
theater by the main outlet on Washington 
street. Of the actors, two lost their lives — 
Harry S. Murdock and Claude Burroughs. 
The play was the Two OrpJians, with Miss 
Claxton as the heroine; and the fire occurred 
in the last act, and in five minutes more the 
play would have been concluded and the audi- 
ence dismissed. The fire originated from a 
piece of canvass, out of which trees are made, 
which broke from its fastenings and fell over 
the border lights near the center of the stage. 
The curtain was then lowered, took fire and 
communicated the flames to the gallery, where 
the scene of alarm was something horrible to 
contemplate. There were 405 persons in the 
gallery; and, in the theatre altogether, includ- 
ing musicians, actors, subordinates, etc., about 
1,050 persons. 

Dec. 5. — First cremation in the United 
States was performed at Washington, Pa. It 
was the body of Baron De Palm, who was born 
in Augsburg, Southern Germany, in the year 
1809. 

I>eceiiiber 13. — Ice broke on the 
Mississippi river in front of St. Louis,siak- 
ing four vessels of tlie Keokuk Packet 
Line and tliree others, besides inflicting 
great injury to other vessels. Loss sui^posed 
to be $200,000. 

-Dec. 14:. — Destructive fire at Little 
Rock, Arkansas. Loss, $200,003. 

Dec. 39. — Terrib'e railroad accident 
at Ashtabula, Ohio, over 100 lives lost. As 
the passenger train on the Lake Shore rail- 
road was crossing the iron bridge at Ashta- 
bula about 8 A. M.^ the bridge gave way, 
precipitating the cars down a" frightful 
chasm sixty feet deep into the water and 
ice. Men, women and children lost their 
lives by being crushed, burned and 
drowned; and out of 1^5 passengers and 
em">loyees but seventy were known to have 
been saved. There is no cause assigned 
for the breaking of the bridge unless from 
the effects of the extreme cold. 
18T7. 

The monopoly of sewing machines ex- 



276 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



Eau Claire — Conthmed. 



HOTELS. 

PEABODT HOUSE. Peabody & Robinson, Pro- 
pri etor, River and Gibson sts. 

EAU CLAIRE HOTEL. 

WW. XEW TOX, Prop. 

FIRST-CLASS. 

Cor. Barstow & Eau Claire Sts. 

INSURANCE, 



WM. A. TEAI^Iv, 

General Insurance Agent, 

Music Hall Block, Barstow St. 



MILLINEET AND DRESSMAKING. 
MILLINERY.FAlfCY GOODIE 

And Butterick's Paper Patterns, 

BAKSTOW STREET. 

MISS M. A. ELDERKIN, 
OMcago Millinery and Notion Store, 

BARSTOW ST. 



> HELPS, MRS. E., Dressmaking, 



Barstow st. 



PHYSICIAN. 

NOBLE, J. H., Homoeopathic Physician, Bar- 
stow St. 

EOOPING. 

P. ANDERSON, 

Roofing' & ^ieiieral Job Work, 

Cor. River and Kelsey sts. 
SALOONS AND EESTAURANTS, 

E. J. BERG, "^ " 

WINE & LIQUOR SALOON, 

Barstow St., near Broadway (North side). 

C. M. WALLER, 

Saloon tincl liestaiiraiit, 

WATER ST. 



TAILORS. 
RADENSLEBEN & SCHROEDER, 

MERCHANT TAILORS, 

Old Eau Claire House, Eau Claire. 



TOBACCO AND CIGARS. 
E . M . K R E T L (^^^^"^"^^^^ 
MUSICIAN, AND 

Manf'r and Dealer in Cigars, Tobacco, &c., 

Barstow and William sts., North side. 



S 



MADISON, WIS. 



AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS. 
HELIHJlC^^TLirrReapersT^MoweH'^n^^ 

ing Machines. ^ 



BAKERY AND CONFECTIONERY. 



H 



EiLMA^'GEO^r^IadTslni Bakery and Confec- 
tionery, cor. Main & Webster sts. Est. '73. 



BOOTS AND SHOES. 

L., Manf'r of Boo 
Established 18H7. 



DAVIDSON, D. L., Manf'r of Boots and Shoes, 
233 Main st. " 



BUSINESS COLLEGE. 

.„„,„,.„ tmLMETETIbworfiri 

son. Wis. Wilmot, DemingA Bo yd, Prop's. 

CARRIAGES AND SLEIGHS. 

rviESTlT.TH^Carriag^Makerr Webster st. 

Es tablished 1875. 

ANSON, CHRIS, Carriage and Sleigh Manf'r, 

Webster St., bet. Main and King sts^ 



H 



DRUGGIST. 

iLLnJ^'TT^ruggTrtrGroceries, Provisions, 7 
Kingst. Established 1875. 

DRY GOODS, 

17^inkirRi(^H^€T^>Cr"staiMe""^^ 
■ Goous & Millinery. Hobbms' bl' k, Pimkney st. 

" ^ FURNITURE. 



CLARK, DARWIN, Manfr and Dealer in Furni- 
ture, Upholstery^oods, &c , 215 Main st. 

GROCERIES AND PROVISIONS. 

ALWER & DEIKE, Grocefie^Ta^^Pfovisions, 

living St. Established 1876. 



w 



B 



HARNESS AND SADDLES. 

OD^ENSTI E>\H^MaijfViri^Tran^ 
dies, Webster st. Established 1855. 



BOEHMER, MALIGUS, Harness, Saddles and 
Trunks, 21 King st. Established 1876. 



MARBLE WORKS. 

iAirw:E"ivoiRKsr^ 

Main St., near Court House. 



IIJADISON MARBLE''1vORKS, Abljah Abbott, 



NEWSPAPER. 

WISCONSIN STATE JOURNAL 

Daily, Tri-Weekly and Weekly. 

MADISON, WIS. 

All kinds of Job "Work and Stereotyping 
at short notice and in good style. 



o 



OYSTERS AND FRUIT. 

PPEL, W. A., Oysters, Fruit, Game and Fish, 
213 Main st. Establisihed 1856. 



SILVERSMITH. 

GILBERSON, C, Gold and Silversmith, 214Main 
St. Established 1874. 



H 



TIN, COPPER AND SHEET IRON. 

ETL,C. W., Tin, Copper and Sheet Iron Ware, 
10 Webster st. Established 1857. 



AD\ ertjsj:ments. 



277 




^"^ ISTew York Mate Building;, Centennial liXi>o!«iition, I'liila.— 

Is 30x60 feet, with spacious square bays in each end, which extend to roof, wliile a portico 
13.6 wide extends across street front. The first floor contains two rooms one for ladies and 
one for gentlemen, with retiring and private consultation rooms, etc. In the hall a wind- 
ing stair case ascends to second floor, which contains two parlors and several private apart- 
ments. From this floor the staircase continues to attic floor, thence to the cupola. The 
interior is decorated in soft gay colors, and with its many irregular features, ranks among 
the handsomest structures of its size on the ground. 



JOHN G. WILLIS, 

GENERAL 




No. 254 Mn St., 



REFERENCES: 

CiLDWELl, Hauilton & Co., Bankers. 
A. J. Simpson, Oinnh.a National Bank. 
McCluke & SxTiTH, Steam Cr.aclser F.actory. 

Are prepared to make liberal advances on con- 
signments. Prompt attention given to consign- 
ments. Send for Price Current. 



S. A- "WRlGt^T^, 




General detiler in Sewini;: Macliiiits Needles, 
Attachments, Oil and Findings. Sole agent in 
Pettis Co. of the St. John Sewing Machines. 
Machines bought, sold end exchanged. Sewing 
machine repairing a specialty. 230 Ohio Street, 
Sedalia, Mo. 



278 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OF THE CENTUKT. 



pired this year, reducing the price of these 
machines to about one-half their original 
cost. 

The last of the troops that were left in 
the South, the result of the rebellion, were 
withdrawn this year from all the Southern 
States, and thus, virtually, these States be- 
came free for the first time since the re- 
bellion. 

JTan. 4. — Cornelius Vanderbilt died at 
his residence in New York city, aged b3 
years. He was the I'ichest man in the 
United States, his wealth beiog estimated 
at $80,000,000. He commenced life a poor 
boy and worked himself up to his great 
wealth by personal exertions. At ihe age 
of forty he commenced dealing extensive- 
ly in Railroad stocks, and in 1849 he was 
known as Commodore Vanderbiit, on ac- 
count of the great number of steamboat 
lines owned by him. At the time of his 
death he owned so much exclusively Rail- 
road stock as to be denominated the King 
of Railroads. 

Jan. 17. — House of Representatives 
ordered the arrest of the Louisiana Return- 
ing Board for refusing to furnish papers to 
the investigating committee in relation to 
the Presidenial election in Louisiana. 

Jan. 18. — The Congressional joint 
committee reported to both Houses, in the 
shape of a bill, a plan for counting the elec- 
toral vote. It makes the function of the 
Pi-esident of the Senate purely miuist' rial, 
and the two kinds of objections likely to 
be raised when the certificates are opened, 
are to be s ttled as follows : First, when 
only one set ot returns is present^-d from a 
state, any objection to their reception must 
be sustained by the concurrent vote of both 
Houses. Failing this, such return must be 
counted as the vote of the state. When two 
sets are presented, they are to be immediate- 
ly referred to a commission composed of 
five Senators, five members of the House, 
and four of the Associate Justices of the 
Supreme Court, whose names are given — 
and one otherjusticeseltcted by these f lur. 
The decision of this tribunal of fifteen is to 
be submitted to the two Houses assembled 
in joint session, and is to be final, unless 
both Houses agree to reject it. 

Jan. 25.— Senate passed the Electoral 
Bill. Yeas 47; nays 17. 

Jan. 26. — The House pa-sed the 
Electordl Bill by a vote of 191 to 96. 

Jan. 27. — Academy of Music of 
Indianapolis, Ind., destroyed by fire, involv- 
ing a loss of nearly $100"000. 

Jan. 21>. — President signed the elec- 
toral bill. The President gave the follow- 
ing reasons for signing the bill : The 
country is agitated: it needs aid; it de- 
sires peace and quiet and harmony be- 
tween all parties and sections. Its indus- 



Madison — Co?tti'jiued. 



UNDERTAKERS, 

} TWITCH, D., Undertak'-r and Manf'r of Coffins, 
' Oahkets, etc.. Main st. Established 1850. 

FRAUTCHI, CHAS., Undertaker and Dealer in 
Metallic Cases, Coffins, &c., 27 King. Est. '69. 



M 



WATCHES, CLOCKS AND JEWELRY. 

ILLER, C, Watches, Clocks an I Jewelry and 

Silver Plated Wf,re, 12 King st. Est. 1H58. 



E, WIS. 



ATTORNEYS AT LAW. 
NELSON P. BROMLEY, 

14-4 Main st. 

IT^ISH & LEE, ATTORNEYS AND COUNSEL- 
^ LOKSAlLAW. 

First National Bank, Racine; Manf'rs National 
Bank, Racine; lion. Francis Bloodgood, Register 
in Bankruptcj', Milwaukee. 

OHAS. H. SMITH, 

163 MAIN STREET, 

R A C I N E 



S 



BAKERY. 

CHOUBOC, ANDREW, Copenhagen Cake Bake- 
ry, 32 State st. 



BARBER, 

LAUER, J. W., Shaving Parlor. Ladies' and 
Children's Hair Cutting a specialty. 80 Main st. 

BILLIARD PARLOR. 



/^ASE, R. & SON, Billiard Parlor, 



163 Main et. 



BIRD STORE. 
T30BERTS, R. W., Bird Store, 



30 College ave. 



BOOKSELLER AND STATIONER, 

JAMES J KAVENAUGH, 

Bookseller,Stationerand Newsdealer. All orders 

for Catholic Books piomptly attended to; also, 

agent for all Catholic newspapers of the U. S., 

152 Main st. 

IZZn BOOTS AND SHOES, ~ 

T)l'CKINGHAM & SONS, Manfrs and dealers in 



Boots & Shoes. 140 Main st. 

TONES & WILLIAMS, Boots & Shoes, 



13 6th St. 



WELFL & KRAYNIK, 
Dealers in Boots and Shoes, Rubber Goods, etc., 
custom work done to order, and warranted to give 
satisfaction, 104 Main st. Established 1870. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



279 




£'r£n'^>l MS^' 



Fort Industry Block, Toledo, O.— Stands at the S. E. corner Summit and Monro"^ streets, front- 
ing 80 feet on the former and extending at a like width to Water street. It was built in 1843 by Richard 
Mott, who now owns it, at a cost of some $14,010, and divided into four stores. la 1874 it was raiser) by 
being screwed up, making four roomy offices in the basement, the entire building being thoroughly 
overhauled and almost rebuilt at an expense of about $20,000. 



IDO^WKTIKOrO I3COXJSE3, 




EAST SIDE SQUARE, 

The Only First-class House in the City. 



280 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



Racine — Confitiued. 



DENTIST. 

LUKES, J. C, Dentist, 
174 Main st. Established 1852. 

FANCY GOODS, 

~ MRsTHrsTcARY^ ^^~ 

Dealer in Fin«' Steel Engravings, Chromo Litho- 
graphs, Picinre Frames, Stationery, BracKets, 
Photograph Albums, Elias Howe Sewing Ma- 
chines, etc 171 Market S quare. 



B 



FURNITURE, 

WfEi^jffirfrKir'niUife^"^"'^""^"^ 

6th St., bet. Willow & Campbell sts. 



rENNINGS, W. H,, Furniture, 



129 Main st. 



GENERAL MERCHANDISE. 

E?(FELi)rj6s^''C 
chabdise, 115 Main st. 



TT'RElJDEJJFELi), JOS^^'ciothiug & Ge'neral Mer"- 



H 



GROCERIES. 

AAS, F. X., & CO., Groceries, Provisions, etc. 
6b Main st. 



H 



ANSEN, JAMES, Grocery, 



140 State st. 



M 



OHR, C. J., Grocery, 



127 State st. 



WEBER, ADOLPH, Groceries & Provisions, 
71 6th St. 

HARNESS MAKER, 

SUTHERLAND, B., Harness Maker, 
_^____ 97 Main st. 

HATS, CAPS AND FURS, 

C. BROWN, 



IM 



139 Main Street, 



^\IS. 



HOTELS, 

WASHINGTON HOUSE. 
Franlj Schmit Proprietor, Foot of Main street, 
next Hotel to Western Union Railroad Depot and 
the Steamboat landing, Rariue, Wis. Fatmers, 
Travelers and Boarders will fiud good and cheap 
Board, clean Rooms and Beds. Good stabling for 
horses. 

MILLINERY, 



"pURDICK, MRS. A. R., Millinery, etc.. 



r> 



173 Main st. 



PAINTER'S MATERIALS, 

CARRE, WM., Painter's Materials, 
Cor. State & Marquette sts. 

PAINTER, 

ASS, GEO. A., House & Sign Painter, 
Wisconsin st. near 5th st. 

PHOTOGRAPHERS, 

E. T. BILLINGS, 

•Ixot osi^^ r> to. o x». 

Cor. Main and 5th sts. 



H 



R 



APS, JOHN JR., Photographer, 



117 Main st. 



Racine — Coiitinutid 



PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON, 
DR. TEEGARDEN, 

Uclectic 

PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON, 

^07 Main Street. 

Office Hours— From 8 to 12, and 2 to 5. 

TAILORS-MERCHANT, 
F. ELMLINGEK, 

3\T e X* c 13. ^ XL -t rCa-xlox*. 

And dealer in Ready -Made Goods for Gentlemen's 
wear, 138 Main st. 



^lELD, A., Merchant Tailor, 



Cor. 4th &Main sts. 



TTETZEL, D., Merchant Tailor, 



23 6th St. 



H 



OERNEL, G., Merchant Tailor, 

College ave. head of 5th st. 



T AUF, JOSEPH, Merchant Tailor, 



59 6th St. 



RITTEB & SCH3IEISER, Merchant Tailors, 
106 Main st. 



R 



OBERTSON, C, Merchant Tailor, 



105 Main St. 



WINES AND LIQUORS. 

■TdHNSONrBrM^rWiner& Liquors, 

eJ 70 Main st. 

CHAS. ROTH, 

Wholesale Liquors & Cigars, also dealer in 
Chewing and Smoking Tobacco, Pipes, etc., 102 
Main st. 



ANN ARBOR. MICH. 



COUNTY OFFICERS. 

Resfisterof Deeds— C. H. MANLEY. 
Treasurer— MATTHEW GENSLEY. 



AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS. 

MCLAREN, S., Manl'r of and dealer in all 
of Agricultural Implements, Detroit st. 

BAKERY AND CONFECTIONERY. 

WILLIAM CASPARY, 

Bakery and Confectionery, 

ICE CREAM AND SODA WATER, 
28 East Huron St. Established 1H76, 



BOOTS AND SHOES, 



B 



RENNAN, P., Estab 1866, Manf'r and dealer in 

Boots & Shoes, 17 4th st. 



H 



CARRIAGES AND BUGGIES. 

ANDO'^wWSTERT^EsialT^l^lC'^Bugg^ 
Sleighs & Wagons, 21. 23 & 25 Detroit st. 

SCH.IIIDT, ANDREW R., Established 1867, manu- 
facturer of Carriages, Buggies, Wagons and 
Sleighs. I respectfully sotif it your patr n age and 
guarantee prices to correspond with the times. 
Shops, corner Detroit and North sts., Ann Arbor, 
Mich. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



281 




COURT HOUSE, LEAVENWORTH, KANSAS. 




Iron Axles, fifth Y¥lieels, (Spokes, Ofarliiss, AVlieelo, PIotv Steel Skeins, Axle Clips, 

Hubs, Bodies, J>iirks. Springs, Malle»I>les £tc. felloes, Seats. Drills, 

Ui'oadclotli, Top props, r.inliis, Nails. Ktc. 

I^KATK^rWORTJOC, KAXSAS, Se^]> FOR PRICE I.IST. 



DOUBLE AND SINGLE ACTING POWER AND HAND 

Pumps, Steam Pumps, Engine Trimmings, 

MINING MACHINERY, 

Belting Hose, Brass and Iron Fittings, Pipe, i^teani Packing 
at liVhoIesale and Be tail. 

HAIiLADY WIND MILLS. CHURCH AND SCHOOL BELLS. 

20S X*a,x-xa. TOO. JStx-eet,, Oxxia^lia, , :Krel3 



282 



IMPOETENT EVENTS OF THE CENTURY. 



18T7. 

tries are arre-ted, labor unemployed, capi- 
tal idle, and enterprise paralyzed by reason 
of the doubt and anx ety attending the un- 
certainty of a double claim to the Chief 
Magistracy of the United States. It wants 
to be assured that tl)e result of the election 
will be accept d without resistance from 
the supporters of the disappointed candi- 
date, and that its highest officer shall not 
hold his place with a questioned title or 
right. 

Jan. 30. — The Senate and House each 
eleded live members to serve on the Elec- 
toral Commission as follows: Senators 
Edmunds, Morton, Freelinghuyseu, Thur- 
man and Bayard, and Representatives 
Payne, Hunton, Abbott, Garfiel i and Hoar. 

Jan. 81. — The four United States 
Associate Justices to serve on the Electoral 
Tribunal— Clifford, Miller, Field and 
Strong, chose as the fifth member of the 
Tribunal Justice Joseph P. Bradley. Colo- 
rado declared a state. 

Feb. 1. — The joint convention to count 
•the electoral vnte assembled in the ha 1 of 
the House of Representatives. The vote 
of Florida was objected to, as there were 
three certificates ijresented from that state, 
and referred to the Electoral Commission. 

IPel>. O. — The Electoral Commission, 
by a vote of 8 to 7, gave the vote of Flor.da 
to Hayes and Wheeler, Judge Bradley vot- 
ing with the Republicans. 

Feb. 18. — Congress re-assembled in 
joint convention to count the electoral 
vote. When the state of Louisiana was 
reached its vote was referred to the com- 
mission, on account of the state presenting 
certificates from the Republicans and 
Democrats. 

Feb. 16. — The Commission, by a vole 
of 8 to 7, decided she Louisiana vote for 
Hayes and Wheeler. 

Feb. 15. — An attempt made to assas- 
sinate Gov. Packard, of Louisiana, while 
sitting in his room in the State House. W. 
H. Weldou, was the assassin. He claims 
to be the son of a Lutheran minister in 
Pennsylvania. 

Feb. 21. — The joint convention re- 
fused to receive the vote of O egon, on ac- 
count of two certificates frnm that state; 
but, on the 23d, the electoral tribunal de- 
cided by a vote of 8 to 7, that the vote of 
Oregon should be counted for Hayes and 
Wheeler. 

Feb. 25.— Fox's New American Thea- 
tre at Tenth and Chestnut treets, Phila- 
delphia, destroj'ed by fire. Total loss was 
about $250,000!^ It was built in 1870. 

llarcli 2. — The electoral count fin- 
ished, and Hayes and Wheeler declared 
President and Vice-President of the United 
States. 



Ann Arbor — Continued. 



DEUGGIST. 

Established in 1843. 
EBERBACH & SON, 

Dealers in 



Articles, Chemical Glassware, Apparatus and 
Reagents, Aeeuts for Tieman & Cc's Surgical In- 
struments, 13 S. Main St., Ann Arbor, Mich. 

FURNITURE. 

and BodwelFs Patent Folding Seat and Deslj, 
32 N. 4th St. 

HARDWARE. ' 

E"" "BETJBMnST^^rTtaixhf^rer^t^^ 
iSheet Ironware, 33 & 35 Main st. 

^^^^^^ARNESS AND COLLARS. 

BURKTirARDT^'jri^, E>t. 18b6, Harness & Col- 
lars, send for price list, 3 Huron st. 

HOTELS. 

First Class House. 

LIVERY AND HACK LINE. 

"'■'^"■"'^"'""""'TXTOLH^MUS; ^ 

Proprietor of 
TjIVEHY, mack, and BUS LINE, 

Cor. Main & Catherine sts. 
Established 1863. 

MARBLE WORKS. 

E'^'TSEI^ANTOC M onuTne^^ 
Stones, Detroit st. Established 1868. 



s 



NURSERY. 

MITH, R. G., Prop'r of the Celebrated Ann Ar- 
bor Nursery, West Liberty st. 



PHOTOGRAPHER. 

Established 1874. 



Mill PlotopaBlier, 

First Floor over Express Office, 

6 Huron St., Ann Arbor, Mich. 



O 



SHAVING AND BATH ROOMS. 

W~E>Co^G\,Tstu'dentrSh^^ 

ral Bath Rooms. 9 N. Main sL 

HKWCUAKT, M. C, PTop'r of the Barber Palace, 
Gregory House, Ann Arbor. 



IONIA, MICH. 



ATTORNEYS AT LAW- 

JENNINGS, L. H., Attorney at Law, 
Over First National Bank, Main st. 

ITCHEL & PI.4.TT, Attorneys at Law, 

Opp. Second National Banlt, Main st. 



M 



ATTORNEYS AT LAW. 

Over First National Bank, Main st. 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OF THE CENTURY. 



28.^ 




Ohio State Building;, Centennial £xposilion, Phila.— It is the most subsfaniial of the State 
buildings. It is built of Sandstone, furuiehed by the proprietors of the various quarries in Ohio. Some 
of tbe stones are very beautiful, and the colors are tastefully blended together. Each course of stone is 
from a different quary, and twenty-one quarries are represented in the liMe number of layers from the 
ground to the eaves. The building i-» two stories, with high roof. It is 60 feet wide and 58 feet deep, 
including the front porch. A varaudah 12 feet vvide runs on each silde and in rear of the building, that on 
the east oeing covered with a porch without columns— the other porches having supporting columns. A 
hallway 9 feet wide and 46 feet long runs through the center of the bu'.lding, on each floor, on each side of 
which are committee, reception, retiring and other suitable rooms. At a meeting of the Ohio State 
Board, a resolution was adopted donating their State building to the Philadelphia Park Commissioners. 




Maryland State Buildini?, Centennial Exposition, Phila.— Is constructed of wood, one story 
high, with an addition. It is divided off into four rooms, arranged for the convenience of visitors, Com- 
missioners from that State, and reception room for ladies. It has on exhibition a variety of memorials 
from the State of Maryland. 



t 



284 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



Ionia — Contifmed. 



S 



BANK, 

EC7)inrNATiMnrMSlCTEsteblished^^ 
Main St., Ionia. 

BILLIARD PARLOES. 

H"~^~ARLOWr^rTtt?rT^i"opneToF^lTri^ 
Sli erman House. 

EALY, WM. M., Billiards and Restaurant, 
^ Cor. Main & 3rd sts. 

' BOOKKEEPER. 

R' ITf^ING^R^"XTr7'~Bo(Xkeeperrwi^^ 
& Co., Pester street. 

BREWER, 

UMM, GEO., JR.. & CO., Brewer, 

Dexter st. Established 1867. 



S 



CARRIAGE MAKER AOT^LACKMim^ 

CARRIAGE MAKER & BLACKSMITH, 

3nd. St., Opp. Sherman House, 



H 



DRY GOODS, 

ALL BROTHERS, Dealers in Dry Goods, 

Sherman House Block, Main st. 

GUNSMITH, 



PICKETT, R. M., Gunsmith, 
2nd St., opp, Sherman House. 



HOTELS. 



lA®] 



D. W INTRO WD, Prop. 

Opposite D. Tu. & N. Depot. 

R. W. PAGE, Proprietor. 

Opposite D. & M. Depot. 



SHERMAN HOUSE. 

JOHN TOMPKINS, Prop. 
3Iain Street, 

IONIA, MICH. 



w 



MARBLE WORKS, 



HITINtJ. TKIMAN, Proprietor Rutland Mar- 
ble Workhi, ()i)p. Baptist Church. 



MEAT MARKET. 
lVIL.£iAM MARVIX, 

Dealer in all kinds of Fresh and Salt Meats, 

Hides and Pelts, 

MAIN STREET. 

PHYSICIAN. 

ALLEK, T. R., Homeopathic Physician and Sur- 
geon, No. 1 Main st. 



Ionia — Cojitinued. 



POTTERY. 

AMPHLETT, W. 0., Proprietor of Ionia Pottery, 
near D. & M. D epnt. 

WELL AUGER^ 

UNN, L. D., Proprietor Well Auije^^ 

Sherman House. 



M 



WINES AND LIQUORS, 

FRAI^K ScimiJCKER, 

Dealer in fines, Beer and Lipors, 

Cor. Main & Dexter Sts., Ionia, Midi. 

LANSING, MICH. 

BLACKSMITH, 



COOKE, H. L., City Horse Shoer and General 
Blacksmith, Michigan ave , near Bridge. 

BUSINESS COLLEGE, • 

L^^NSING BUSINESS COLLKCiE. HTpTBartlett', 
Principal. Established 18ti7. Lansing. 

CIGAR MANUFACTURER, 

Established 1874. 

HEXRY FIRTH, 

MANUFACTURER OF FINE CIGARS 

21 Michig-in Ave., Lansing. 



B^"""iSlVEE, .lOHN H.. ]>ru-s, ^redicineli'Pancy and 
Toil.-t Articl( ~- 



DRUGGIST, 

]>ru-s, .Arw 
137 Washington ave. 

EAVES-TROUGH AND TINWARE, 
RAIiCH & I.A\VRENCE, 

Manufacturers of 

Eaves-Troujliinj, Spoulinj I Tinware, 

Dealers in .Stoves, White Lime, Water 

Lime, Calcine Plaster, Etc., 

OPP. LANSING HOlT.SE, LANSING, MICH. 

^^ FURNITURE, 

F. Cams. W. Wharfleld. 

CARNS & WHARFIEIiD, 

Dealers in 

New(SiSecond-Hand Furniture. 

Mattresses & Couches of all kinds made to Order. 
Opp. Lansing House, Washington Ave., Lansing, 
Mich. Kepairing of all Kinds done on short 
notice. Established 1876. 

HARNESS AND SADDLES. 

C'^"^ANNEOj"~*nEDMMD§rTE8tabHBheir^ 
Harness, Saddle^, Trunks, 114 Washington av. 



E 



HOTEL, 

VERETT HOUSE.^^'vvTHTPackard. Prop. 

Cor. Main st. & Washington ave. 



MARBLE WORKS. 

K~^nEYESiXT&^CO^IarbleW\)rkei^^ 
ton ave., opp. Lansing House. Estab. 1877. 



IMPORTANT EVKNTS C)F THE <:RNTURY. 



285 




Rhode Island !!$tate Building, Centennial Exposition, Phila. — 

It 21 b}' 42 feet, with an addition to the rear of 6^ ft. by 19 ft, and an open porch in front 6 
feet by 14 feet. There are in liie building ladies' and gentlemen's waiting rooms, and a 
luggage room in the rear of entrance vestibule. It is built of solid timber, the frame-work 
showing on the outside. The roof is cove ed with Pennsyhania black slate. The interior 
is very plain, the rooms being sheathed with narrow boards, the ioint« running horizontally. 
The same material shows bath inside and outside. No plaster has been used. 




Arkansas State Bnildino;, Centennial Exposition. Pliila.— 

This building is a pavilion, with offices and retiring rooms, covering an area ot over 5,000 
sq uare feet. The shape of the building is octagonal ; the columns are placed in a circle, S2 
feet in diameter; the ceiling is spherical, and an octagonal dome is placed on the top of the 
roof; the top of the dome is 50 feet above the floor line. The roof consti-uction is of iron ; the 
sides of wood and glass . 



286 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OF THE CENTURY. 



1877. 

March 5« — President Hayes and Vice- 
President Wheeler inaugurated. 

March 2li- — Execution of John D. 
Lee, Mormon bishop, convicted of being 
the main instigator in the Mountain Mea- 
dows massacre in 1857. This massacre 
was one of the most atrocious fanatical re- 
ligious murders of the last thousand years. 
One hundred and fifty men, women and 
children were assaulted, and all, save sev- 
enteen infant children, were murdered. 
Lee was shot to death by a file of United 
States soldiers, on the same spot where the 
massacre was committed. Lee's allies were 
Mormons and Indians. 

April 3. — The Southwestern portion 
of Chicago was covered with water to the 
extent of nearly seven miles square. In 
some cases the water reached the first sto- 
ries, and people were obliged to make their 
way in boats. 

iipril 11. — The Southern Hotel, one 
of the largest and finest in St. Louis, de- 
stroyed by fire. The fire broke out shortly 
before two o'clock, and spread with sucli 
rapidity that in less than an hour the en- 
tire building was in ruins. The guests 
rushed from their beds frantically, but 
many were driven back to their rooms by 
the dense smoke which filled the hallways. 
Some were rescued by means of ropes and 
ladders, but others, becoming desperate, 
leaped from the upper windows and were 
instantly killed, or so badly mangled, that 
death resulted soon alter. The number 
who lost their lives was fourteen. The 
loss will probably reach $750,000. 

May 10. — Opening ceremonies of the 
Permanent Exhibition at Philadelphia, 
where over one hundred thousand persons 
asFcmbled. 

JUay 11. — The new Winnebago Coun- 
ty Court Hou^e, Rockford, 111., fell, bury- 
ing the workmen in the ruins and killing 
nine men. 

Jane 4. — Mount Carmel, 111., nearly 
destroyed by a Tornado, over 20 persons 
were killed and nearly 200 wounded, over 
half a million dollars worth of property 
destroyed. 

Jnne 14.— The bridge across the Con- 
necticut River beiween Northampton and 
Hadley, Mass., was blown down by a hur- 
ricane. Fifteen persons who had taken 
shelter there and a number of teams, went 
down in the ruins. 

June 20.— St. John, N. B., nearly 
destroyed by fire, the main portion of the 
city burned, all the public buildings and 
business houses destroyed. 15,000 people 
homeless, no household eflects were saved. 
500 acres were burned over. Many lives 
were lost. Intense suftuing among the 
people. Loss about $20,000,000. 

July 16. — The firemen and brakemen 
of the freight trains on the Baltimore and 



Lansing — Continued. 



MEAT MARKET. 
Wholesale & Retail Dealer in 

FRESH & SALT MEATS 

Dried Beef, Hams, Sausages and Poultry, 

118 WASHINGTON AVE. 

Established 1859. 

TAILOR-MERCHANT. 

fredTwright, 

MiRCHANT TAILOR, 



BUTLER BLOCK, 

Washington Ave., Lansing-, Mich. 

MUSKEGON, MICH. 



ATTORNEYS AT LAW. 



plOOK, F. W., Attorney at Law, 



87 Western ave. 



BOOTS AND SHOES. 

MITH, iJ. H., Manufacturer and Dealer in 

Boots and Shoes, 185 Pine St. 



S 



CARRIAGES. WAGONS, &c. 

ROBERT^STITTS, 

Manufacturer Buggies, Log Carts, 
Wagons, &c., 

CLAY AVE. & TERRACE ST. 

CIGARS AND TOBACCO. 

JIROCH, FRANCIS, Cigars and Smokers' Articles, 
Wholtsale and Retail, 78 Western ave. 

CLOTHES PINS. 

BRIXTON, J., Manufacturer of Clothes Pins and 
Wood Turning, Pine & Apple sts. 



CLOTHING, 
"piCK, I., Star Clothing House, 



51 Western ave. 



DRUGGISTS. 

BENNETT, J. R., & CO., Apothecaries and Drug- 
gists, Western ave. 



B 



ENSON, C, Wholesale and Retail Dealer in 
Drugs and Medicines, 73 Western ave^ 

VANDtR LINDE, CHARLESr&B^RO., Druggists 
and Chemisis, 19^ Pine St. Established 1877. 

GROCERY AND BAKERY. 

HOPSTRA, S. A., Crockery anrt Glassware, Gro 
eery and Bakery, Hopstra Block. 



TT'EMPF HOUSE. 



HOTELS. 

Barbara Kempf, Prop. 



Pirve St. 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OF THE CENTUKV. 



287 



M USKEGON — Continued. 



THE OCCIDENTAL, 

IT. A. BARNEY, Prop. 

Muskegon, Michigan. 
PHYSICIANS, 

wThTdeilap, m. »., ^ 

Confidential Physician and Surgeon. 

Will Cure Cancer, or no paj'. Twenty years 
Experience. 194 PINE STREET. 

]N. J. SLOAN, M. D., 
Physician & Surgeon 

Proprietor of 

SLOAN'S AGUE CURE, 

193 PINE ST., Muskegon Mich. 
EEAL Ef^TATE. 

WOOD, WESLEY P., Real Estate Dealer, 
Pine St. 



M 

N 



SALOON. 

AHER, M., Saloon and Restaurant and En- 
gineer, Pine St. 

EUMEISTER, GUSTAYE, Saloon, 

137 Pine street. 



STOVES AND HARDWARE. 



M 



ILLER, JOHN A., Stoves, Hardware and House 
Furnishing Goods, Western ave. 



W^INES^ANDJilQUORS^ 

KAICHEN, BEX., Imported and Domestic Wines 
and Liquors, 59 Western ave., Muskegon. 



S 



COTT, GEO. F., De.«iler in Wines and Liquors, 
Clav ave. Established 1875. 



GRAND HAVEN, MICH. 



S 



BRASS AND IRON. 

NTDEB, W. A., dealer in Brass and Iron Goods, 
57 Washington st. Established 1875. 



CARRIAGES AND WAGONS. 

HUBERT, G. & CO., Carriage & Wagon Maker, 
3d & Elliott sts. Established 1872. 



FLOUR, FEED AND GRAIN. 

Wholesale and retail dealer in 

FLOUR, FEED & GRAIN, 

59 Washington St. 



Goods delivered in the city free. 
Established 1875. 



1877. 

Ohio Railroad at Baltimore, Md., and Mar- 
tinsburg, Va., struck on account of reduc- 
tion of wages. 

.July 17. — The railroad strikers at 
Martinsburg, V., attacked and fired on a 
train. The troops returned the fire, kill- 
ing one of the rioters and wounding sev- 
eral. 

July 18. — At the request of the Gov- 
ernor of West Virginia, President Hayes 
ordered federal troops to Martinsburg, Va., 
to quell the railroad' riot. 

July 20. — The strikes on the Balti- 
more and Ohio and Pennsylvania Rail- 
roads continue, and a .strike took place on 
the Erie Railway, stopping all trains. A 
riot occurred at Baltimore, and the Sixth 
Maryland Regiment filed into the crowd, 
killing nine and wounding between forty 
and fifty. Troops were also called out in 
Pennsylvania and Ohio. 

July 21. — A conflict occurred at 
Pittsburg, Pa., between railroad- strikers 
and the military, during which a number 
of persons weie killed, including Sheriff 
Fife, and many wounded, among the num- 
ber being General Pearson. The mob 
sacked all the leading gun-stores, and late 
at night attacked the soldiers from Phila- 
delphia who had been compelled to take 
refuge in the Round House at the outer 
depot of the Pennsylvania Railroad. An- 
other riot also took place at Baltimore, 
Md., but no one was killed. President 
Hayes issued a proclamation, ordering all 
those engaged in these unlawful proceed- 
ings to desist and retire to theii homes by 
12 o'clock noon of the 22d. 

July 22. — The railroad-strikers con- 
tinue their riotou> work at Pittsburg. 
Early in the morning the mob set fire to 
and completely destroyed the round-house 
of the Pennsylvania Railroad Company, 
together with 125 first-class locomotives 
housed there, hundreds of loaded freight 
cars and other propertj^, aggregating in 
value, according to a rough estimate, $3,- 
000,000. The U-oops, who had been 
penned up in the round-house all night, 
were forced to attempt escape when the 
building was fired, and as they marched 
out hastily they were attacked by the strik- 
ers, who followed tht-m as they double- 
quicked toward the Arsenal, firing shots 
and hurling all sorts of missiles at the sol- 
diers, many of whom were badly hurt and 
others shot down and left in the streets. 
Once the militaiy turned and fired into 
their pursuers, twenty or more persons be- 
ing killed by the discharge. The com- 
mandant at the Arsenal refused to allow 
the troops admission, saying that he had 
but twenty men with him, and if he al- 
lowed them to enter he could not protect 
the place against the mob. They then 
hurried on to the bridge over the AUeghe- 



288 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



Manufacturer of all kinds of 




s 

315 HAMILTON ST. 



O-'^XT" C-^S 



3, 



PKORTA, I1.L,. 



E. PARSONS, M. D., 

Kewanee, 111. 

Treats Chronic Diseases with Vapor Baths, Turkish Vapors, Electric 
Baths, Hadfield's Equalizer, &c., and warrants a 

CURE IN ALI^ CURABLE CASES. 

MEDICINES MILD AND EFFECTUAL: DR. I" ARSONS HAS AN EXPERIENCE OP 
TWENTY-FIVE TEATS IN THEIR USE. 




Brackets, 'Window and Door Frames, 

STAIR BUILDING, STAIR RAILS, BALUSTERS, 

PACKING BOXES, ETC. 

Planing, Matching and Scroll Sawing done to Order 

704 S. Washington St,, near Chestnut St., - - PEORIA, ILL. 

HERMAN FRIEDRICHS 




1 lO &^ lis Hoxith Jeiierwon Sti-eet, PEORIA, ILI^. 

The Choicest Foreign and Domestic liVines and Liquors, and 
Cigars at the Bar, Milwaukee Lager Fresh on Draught. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



289 




"•-- Court Honse, Peoria, III. — The building ^\as begun in May, 1S76, and is to be 
completed in May, 187S It has a front of 1S4 teet by 164 feet in depth, is built of Amherst, 
Ohio, sandstone, 3 stories high, with a large dome in the centre, iron beams and brick 
arches for the floors, and is strictly fii-e-proof . It is being built by P. H. Decker, contrac- 
tor, Chicago, and superintended by W. E. Elliott. The total cost of building will be 
$250,000. 




Manufactarers of 



Flour Mill and Distillei-y Machinery, Shafting:, Pulleys and Hangers, Building 
Castings, &c. Agents for Still well's Patent Heaters and Lime Extractors . 

1^" Judson&. Gardner's Governor and Sturtevant's Blower. ==^1 

We also furnish Steam Engine Boilers, Steam Pipe and Filtings, Cocks, Valves, Steam 
Gauges, and all the requisites for the connection of Engines and Boilers complete. 

CHASE ELEVATOR MACHINERY 

Made a specialty ; and in connection with the same we furnish belting, elevator buckets 
and bolts, and all of the necessary fittings. (J^^Special attention given to repairing, 

day or night. 

Cor. of Walnut and Water Streets, ^ - - PEORIA, ILL. 



290 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



Grand Haven — Contitiued. 



G BIFFIN, H. &C0., Drugs, Medicines & Chemi- 
cals, Washington & 1st sts. Estab. 1856. 



B 



FURNITURE. 

ARNS, J., Household Furniture, Coffins, etc. 
Washiugton 8t. Established 1867. 



G 



GROCERIES, 

ALE & PFAFF, Groceries, Provisions & Crock- 
T ery Glassware, 78 Washington St. Est. 1873. 



s 



TONER, J., dealer in Groceries, Fruits & Con- 
fectionery, 95 VA'ashington St. Est. 18T2. 



MEAT MARKETS. 

VAN ALLSBUKG, A. R., dealer in Fresh Meats, 
44 Washington St. E.'tablished 1873. 



V 



ANDE, SRINE D., dealer in Fresh Meats, etc., 
93 Washington St.. Establishrd 1873. 



Y 



AN WEELDEN, G., dealer in bresh Meats, 94 
Washington st. Established 187CL 



TAILOR-MEECHANT. 



S 



ANFORD, I. P., Merchant Tailor, & dealer in 
Stationery, 47 Washington st. Est. 1859. 



WATCHMAKER. 

COPPAGE, WM., Watchmaker for the Trade, 47 
Washington st. Established 1875. 



OSHKOSH. WIS. 



ARCHITECTS. 

BELL & COLE, 
Architects and Builders, corner Pearl & Market 
streets. Stair Kailing, Newel Posts, etc., fur- 
nished. Scroll sawing done to order. 

' BAKERY AND RESTAURANT. 

HENR^" SCHMIDT, 

BAKERY and RESTAURANT, 

11 Main St. 



BARBER, 
P>LACK, ALFRED, BarberT 



Beckwith House. 



BLACKSMITH AND CARRIAGES. 
"™^~^~""'"^~^. COPtRIGALL, 

Blacksmitli and Carriage Builder, 



221 & 223 Main st, 



BOOTS AND SHOES. 

ARTA, J. S., Manfr and dealer in Boots and 
Shoes, 92 Main st. 



B 



BUSINESS COLLEGE. 

W. W. Daggett. A. A. Spencer. 

Established September, 1867. 



OSHIiOssH 



BUSINESS COLLEGE, 

Cor. Main and Church sts. 

Daggett & Spencer, OSHKOSH. 



OsHKOSH — Continued. 



CIGAR MANUFACTURERS. 

DERKSEN, H., Manf^r and dealer in Cigars, 
152 Main et. 

JOHN MESSNER, 

CIGAE MANUF AOTUEEE, 

24 Main st. 

CORSET MANUFACTORY. 

ASKEN, MRS. C. U., Corset Manf'r and Milliner, 
193 Main st. 

DRUGGISTS. ~ 

WILLIAMS & FBCEHLICH, 
M'holesale <ie. Retail 

Druggists, Paints and Varnish, 

59 Main st. 
DRY GOODS^ 
ErirmJGHES~&~CoT~ 

105 Main st. 

~IZ _FLOUR^ND FEED. 

GITTINS, JOHN, dealer in Flour and Feed, 165 
Main st. 



S 



FURNITURE. 

OPER, B. H.. dealer in Furniture & Chromos, 

37 Main st. 



THOMPSON & YOUNG, 

Furniture & Hand Kails, 

7th & Nebraska sts. 

E. J. WEISBROD, 
Manufacturer and Dealer in 

All Kind^ of Furniture, 

17 Main st. 

GROCERIES. 
JOSHUA D ALTON, "~^— ^ 

Dealers in 
GKOCEKIES AND PROVISIONS, 

178 Main st. 

OLMES, & VAN DOREN, dealers In Groceries & 

Provisions, 15 Main st. 

A. Lie HTENBERGER & CO., 

—Dealers in — 

CHOICE TEAS, GROCERIES ANII PROVISIONS, 

254 Main St. 

WEITZEL, MATHIAS, Groceries, Provisions & 
Saloon, Tenth and Kansas st. 

^^^^^^^^^RNESS AND SADDLES. 

ALLEN, A. P., Harness & Saddles, agent for El- 
gin Watch, 74 Main st. 



N 



EWMAN, JAMES, Manufacturer of Harness 

Saddles, Kansas st 



HOTELS. 

REY'S HOTEL, 308 Main St., §1 per day, $5 per 
week. Barbara Frey, Proprietress. 



F 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OF THE CENTURY. 



291 




Post Office, Custom House and Court House, Cincinnati, O, — 

Occupies one-half of the square bounded by Fifth, Sixth, Main and Walnut streets. The 
exterior walls are to be of Granite, the basement and stjlobate from the Red Granite quar- 
ries of Middlebrook, Mo. The buildmg will be 354 by 164 feet, four stories in height 
above ground, exclusive of the attics and roof stories. To complete this building will 
cost, exclusive of the site, nearly $3,000,000. 




^ipanisli Commissioners' Building, Centennial Exposition,. 
Philadelphia. — Is a handsome structure, built in an octagonal form, 50 feet in diam- 
eter. It is occupied as the headquarters of the Spanish Engineers. 



292 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



The road to wealth, happiness and prosperity, RUNS WEST, Passing through the most fertile portions of 
O E! KT T H. -A. Ij lVtIJSSOXJH.I, 

AND IS KXOWN THE AVORLD OVER AS THE OLD RELIABLE 

Hannibal and St. Joseph R. R. 



Map of the HANNIBAL & St. JOSEPH R. B. and Connections. 




When you return, Secure Tickets via tiie OLD RELIABLE H & St. JO. R. R. 



Twenty-five years ago the counties of Buchanan, Caldwell, Clinton, Linn, Livingston, 
Macon, Marion, and Shelby, through ^vhich this road passes, \vere nearly a wilderness; to- 
day, by a late census, it is discovered that the valuation oi personal and real estate in these 
eight counties, is $83,100,000. The number of acres of improved land is 844,458. The 
farms are valued at $39,812,719. The farm products foot up an aggregate of $9,216,851. 
Bushels of corn, 5,535,161; wheat, 1,065,378; oats, 1,842,990. There are 114 counties in the 
Stale. The aggregate of corn in the whole State was 66,034,075 bushels; oats, 16,578,813; 
vrheat, 14,215,926. 

By these figures it will be seen that over 1-12 of the entire corn crop is gathered from 
those counties; over i-i4. of the wheat, and over 1-9 of the oats. Hay, potatoes, and the 
orchard crop, etc., bear an equally favorable comparison, and in some arti Ls a very much 
better exhibit is made. Of the "$84,285,273 worth of live stock in the State, $9,585,286 of 
the valuation is found in those counties. In those same counties there are 811 manufac- 
turing establishments, with a capital of $2,793,880. The gross valuation of the products 
of these establishments was $8,202,286. The entire valuation of church property in the 
State was $9,909,358, $794,400 of which valuation is found in the counties traversed by the 
Hannibal & St. Joe Railroad. It would be but fair to deduct the valuation of church 
property in the city of St. Louis from the remaining portion of the State, which is $4,940,- 
270. The entire valuation outside of St. Louis county would then be $4,969,088 nearly 
1-6 of which will be found in those counties. 

Of 324,348 attendants of the schools in the one hundred and fourteen counties of the 
State, about one-tenth of the whole number is found in those counties along the line of the 
Hannibal & St. Joseph Railroad. Now deduct the school-going population' of St. 
Louis county (which would be fair,) and about one-eighth of the entire school attendance 
is found in these eight counties. 

The same growth of country is now being repeated in Kansas, Nebraska, Colorado 
and New Mexico, and the immortal Greeley had this identical route and section of country 
in mind when he breathed those stirring words of wisdom, ^'2'oung-man,ffoWest!" There- 
fore, it is but natural that parties taking this advice should desire to pass over a road that 
has done so much for a great State, (especially as it offers the best facilities) and see for 
themselves. By the Hannibal & St. Joseph R. R., through cars are run from Cleve- 
land and Toledo, and through connections made from Cincinnati and Indianapolis, via 
^uincy, to St Joe, Atchison and Kansas City, and from Chicago to Kansas City, iviihout 
cjiange. 

We are about to issue, in connection with our own, a County Map of Colorado and 
New Mexico, giving valuabL- information as regards time tables, i-outes, distances, alti- 
tudes, &c., which we will be pleased to furnish free, upon application in person or by 
letter addressed to 

J. A. S. REED, 59 Clark St.. Chicago, 111. T. PENFIELD, Gcnl Pass, and Ticket Agent. Hannibal. Mo. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



293 




... ,JSlSS^f^"t^°SS^,i^ SsrfJ - =S'ri:K^S S^5 



its tower v,^-^^ « -r--p- ^ e ^^n im^i^ 

il was completed in Jubb, 1874, at a cost of $50,OUU 



TTILLTAM O'DOIVOC^HXJIt:, 
FBriT AND PRODUCE, Batter, Eggs, Poultry, Game, &c., Ac 

Second St., south of Market Square, ST. JOSEPH, MO. 



294 



IMPOBTAiSTT EVENTS OF THE CENTURY. 



1877. 

ny at Sharpsburg, after crossing which 
they separated in squads and took to the 
woods. The civil authorities were totally 
powerless, and thieves, who took advan- 
tage of the reigu of terror, broke open and 
plundered the cars, and carried off the 
stolen goods with perfect impunity. The 
strike in Philadelphia was inaugurated at 
6 o'clork p. M., by the men abandoning 
their places. Trouble occurred at Hor- 
nellsville, N. Y., on the Erie road, the 
strikers preventing trains departing. 

July S3. — A mob of Erie Railroad 
men ancl canal men drove the men out of 
the New York Central stock-yards at Buf- 
falo, N. Y., and prevented f eight trains 
from going out. No one was injured . All 
trains were abandoned on the Cleve'and 
and Pittsburg Railroad, and the same was 
the case with the fivight trains on the Lake 
Shore and Southern Michigan road. The 
Vandalia Railroad men at Indianapolis, 
Ind., struck, as did also the Niagara di- 
vision of the Erie Road employes. Trains 
resumed running at Baltimore, and the 
excitement was subsiding. The Twenty- 
third Regiment arrived at Hornellsvilie, 
N. Y , where all was reportf d quiet. The 
New York Central men struck, and all 
freight trains were stopped. The estimat- 
ed number of killed and wounded at Pitts- 
burg was, killed 54, wounded 109 — 163. 
A vigilance committee was organized at 
Pittsburg, for the protection of property. 
The tramsmen on the Eastern roads run- 
ning out of St. Louis also struck. At 
Reading, Pa., troops tired upon rioters 
who were engaged in tearing up tracks, at 
least seven per.sons being killed and over 
thirty wounded. At Buffalo, N. Y., the 
strikers drove away about two hundred 
soldiers, a number of whom Avere pretty 
roughly handled. Citizens' organization 
ma'ntaiu'd order at Pittsburg, and quiet 
prevailed at Baltimore, Md., and Hornells- 
vilie N. Y. 

July 24. — Additional strikes took 
place in Ohio, Illinois, Pennsylvania, and 
New York ; the New York Central, Dela- 
ware and Lackawanna, and all the roads 
centering at Chicago, 111., being among 
the number. Vigilance committees and 
large bodies of police were organized in 
diffc'ent cities and towns of Pennsylvania, 
Ohio, and other states, which action had 
great effect in restoring order. 

July 25. — The strikers were joined by 
the Central New Jersey, Lehigh Valley 
and the Texas Pacific freight-men. Con- 
flicts between the mob and police took 
place in Chicago, St. Louis and San Fran- 
cisco; one man being shot and another 
dangerously wounded at the first-named 
place. President Hayes ordered to Balti- 
more and Louisville nearly all the troops 
in the South. The Erie strikers at Hor- 
nellsvilie, N. Y., surrendered to the rail_ 



OsuKOSH — Continued 



LUMBER DEALERS. 

JAMES McNAIB, 

(Successor to P. Sawyer & Son) 

LTJlMLBItill 13EAL.EI1, 

W. Main St, & River. 

C. N. PAINE & CO., 

PIXE liTMBER, 

Sash, Doors, Lath, Shingles, Pickets, &c. 

MEAT MARKET. 

UETZ, GEORGE, Fresh and Salt Meats. 
167 Main st. 



O 



NEWSPAPER, 

SHKOSH TIMES, Fernandez & Glaze, Editors 
and Proprietors. O. F. Block, Main st. 

PAINTS AND OILS. ' 

CHWALM, LOUIS, Dealer in Paints, Oils, Col- 
) ors pnd Varnishes, 18 Main st. 

PIANOS AND ORGANS. 



PERRY & B.4.RR0W, P'anos. Organs and Musi- 
cal Merchandise, 164 Main st. 

FRANK WIIiLE, 

Dealer in 

Pianos, Organs & Sheet Music, 

26 MAIN STREET. 

REAL ESTATE & LOAN BROKERS, 

COLTOJf, E. R., Attorney at Law; Agent forRea' 
Estate; Money to Loan, 55 Main st. 

0. H. HARRIS, 

Real Estate & Loan Broker, 

G oneral Agent for buying and selling property, 



RHEUMATIC HOSPITAL. 

RHEUMATIC HOSPITAL, by Dr. M. Mellen, 
35 Ceap st. 

SEWING MACHINE. 

WHEELER, W. C, Victor Sewing Machine Agt. 
Stencil Plates, 164 Main st. 

STOVES AND TINWARE. 

HASBROUCK & MONROE, Manufacturers of Tin- 
ware; Sheet Iron Work, &c. 

TAILORING, 

UANE, T. J., Tailoring and Furnishing Goods, 
111 Mam St. 



D 



TRUNKS, VALISES, &c. 



S 



CHMIT BROTHERS, Trunks, Valises, Traveling 
Bags, &c.,3U & 213 Main st. 



WINES AND LIQUORS. 
MASSE & BESNAH, 

"Wines «fe Licxnors, 

28 MAIN STREET. 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OF THE CENTURY. 



295 



WATERTOWN, WIS. 



ATTORNEYS AT LAW. 

TUTTLE A STEINER, Attorneys at Law. Col- 
lections of all kinds attended to promptly 

BLAOKSMITHING, 

AUcTKRAMPi 

Blacksmithing and Manfg. Patent Straw Cutter. 

Sixth Street. Established 1863. 

AUTNEB. B., Blacksmiihingand Carriage Mak- 
er, Sixth near Main. 



BOOTS AND SHOES. 
>OmiMlNFOlTTES,'l(ootrandrs'^^^ 



Main st. 



CONPECTIONEEY, FRUIT, ETC. 

WOODWARD & STONE, Mnfe. dealers Crackers. 
Conlectiouery, Emits, Oysters, &c, Water st 

DENTIST. 

(Established 1874 ) 

EUGENE COELDNER 



Second door East of Post Office. 

DRY GOODS. 

HABHEGGER, J., & CO., Dry Goods and Grocer- 
ies, Third st. 
OELKE, AUGUST, Dry Goods, Notions, Grocer- 
ies and Crock ry, Cole's Block. 

EBBER, JACOB, & SON, Dry Goods and Gro- 
ceries, W. Water st 

HARDWARE. 

KUSEL, D. & P., Hardware, Stoves, Iron, Steel, 
Na'ls Glass and Tinware, Main st. 

HARNESS AND SADDLES. 

TEINMANNT^vTc^rHarnesslJaE^^ 

Corner W. Water and Main st. 
AUTNER, ALBERT, Harness Maker and Sadler, 

Main St. 

HOTELS. 

WASHINGTON HOTEL, Fred Kroniz, 
Main st. 
ISCONSIN HOUSE, Louis Will'am Ki-ueger, 
Proprietor, Main and Fifth sts. Est. 1854. 

INSURANCE AGENTS, 

V^^'^'^WLKMANNTALGUSTrGenei^^^ 
Main st. 
EDEMETER, H. A. Insurance Agent. 

Main and Fourth sts. 



w 



HEELER, C. L., Insurance Agent, 

Main and Third sts. Est. 1876. 



MILLINERY. 

P" ABKEB^ 'MRS^^'MTEirDeale^ln^Fa'shionable 
Millinery, East end Ma n street Bridge. 

PAINTERS' MATERIAL. 

STRAW & MURPHY, Painting Material. 
Paper, Frames, &c. , 24 Main st. 



Wall 



PAINTERS. 

BUNTROCK, CHAS., House, Sign and Carriage 
Painter, Main and Sixth sts. Est. 1869. 



18T7. 

way officials, and those at Rochester, X- 
Y., agreed to go to work until such time 
as a conference could be had with Mr. 
Vandcrbilt. 

July 20.— Rioting took place in Chica- 
go, 111., the police and troops fighting the 
mob nearly all day. Fifteen persons were 
known to have been killed, and many 
wounded. Many of the rioters were ar- 
rested. Disturbance also took place at St. 
Louis, but no one was reported injured. 
Trains began running on the Erie Rail- 
way, the Delaware, Lnckawana and Great 
Western, Morris and Essex, and the Amer- 
ican Division of the Canada Southern 
Railroad. At San Francisco, incendiary 
fires were s'arted by the rioters, but strong 
bodies of vigilants prevented the contem- 
plated depredations or serious trouble. In 
Philadelphia, the police, in breaking up 
a disorderly meeting, became involved in 
a fight, which was desperately waged, a 
number of persons being badly hurt, and 
one bov, aged about 17, killed. 

July 2S: — Under the protection 
of troops, seven freight trains were 
sent away from Baltimore, and about 
500 cars from Cumberland over the 
Ba timore and Ohio road. Governor 
Hartranft and staff, with about 4,000 Unit- 
ed Sta es troops and militia — infantry, cav- 
alry, and artil ery — arrived at Pittsburg 
and took peaceable possession of the Penn- 
sylvania Company's territory there. At 
Johnstown a mob assailed the trains with 
missiles, some of which inflicted severe 
wounds. They likewise threw a train 
from the track, wrecking five cars, but for- 
tunately not seriously injuring an\one. A 
revised list put the number of killed during 
the rioting in Chicago at twenty-one; 
wounded, about ninety, six of whom will 
probably die. One of the killed and elev- 
en of the wounded were policemen. The 
authorities had the mob under control at 
St Louis. The strikers at Fort Wayne, 
Ind., overpowered the authorities in two 
attempts to move trains on the Pittsburg, 
Ft. Wayne and Chicago road. 

July 39 . — The seven freight trains 
which were sent westward from Baltimore, 
Md., were stopped by strikers at Keyser, 
West Va., one of them being partially 
wrecked. Another attempt to move an en- 
gine out of the yard at Fort Wayn-^, Ind., 
was frustrated. A compromise with the 
firemen and brakemen On the Pittsburg, 
Fort Wavne and Chicago road was par- 
tially effected. Troops were concentrating 
at East St. Lonis, ill., in anticipation of an 
attack upon the bridge, and General Bates 
had caused the arrest of sixty-five strikers, 
who attempted to prevent a passenger-train 
from going out ; trains were sent out on all 
the roads except the Toledo and Wabash 
Strikers in the Lackawanna, Pa., region 
desti-oyed an engine-house and other prop- 



296 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



Watertown — Co7itinued. 



PHOTOGRAPHERS. 

MAY, JOHN B., Photographic Artist, 
Main st. 

REAL ESTATE^ 

WOODWARD* WHEELER, Real Estate Agency, 
Main and Third sts. Est. 1877. 

SEWING MACHINES. 

FULLER, S. B., Agent, Singer Sewing Machines, 
Watertown, Wis. 

TAILORS. 

B RUNNER, JACOB, Merchant Tailor and dealer 
in Furnishing Goods, Main st. Est. 186R. 
IRSH, J. A. Jr., Merchant Clothier and Tailor, 
Main st. Est. 1869. 



H 



THRESHING MACHINES. 



\m FoiiMer k lacWnisi 

— Manufacturer of — 

THRESHING MACHINES, STEAM ENGINES, 

JFil'St ©-fc.s - AVATEKTOWN, WIS 

TOBACCO AND CIGARS. 

W~^'~TGGEimORNrMdS^rMDlr?rofa^^ 
Cigars and Tobacco, Pipes, &c.. Main st. 



S 



WATCHES, CLOCKS AND JEWELRY. 

ALICE, JOS,, Clocks, Watches and Jewelry, 

1 E. Main st Est. 1853. 



WAGGERHORN, A., Watchmaker and Jeweler, 
Main and First sts. Est. 1865. 

WINES AND LIQUORS. 



B 



LAIR, ADOLPHUS, Dealer in Wines and Li- 
quors, Western av. 



c 



ECH, W., Dealer in Wines and Liquors. 

Main st. 



SEDALIA. MO. 



AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS. 



B 



AKER, I. N., Agricultural Implements, Car- 
riages & Sewing Machines, COB E. Main st. 



DAVID BLOC HER, 

AGKICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS 
And Singer Sewing Machines, 

115 E. Main st. 



H 



F 



EROLD, W. W., Agricultural Implements, agt. 
for McCormick Reaper, 304-6 E. Main st. 

ATTORNEYS AT LAW. 

ELIX & BRO., Lawyers, Sedalia, Mo., 

W. L. Felix & J. D .Felix. 



CHARLES M.McCLUNG. 
Attorney at Law, Smith's Hall Building. Col- 
lections solicited and all business promptly at- 
tended to. 



Sedalia — Contimied. 



Established 1866. 
W. W. S. Snoddy. U. F. Short. 

Notary Pablic. 
SNODDY & SHORT, Sedalia, Mo., 

ATTORNEYS AT LAW. 

BAKERIES AND RESTAURANTS. 

PAUL BUHLER, 
Bakery, Restaurant & Fancy Groceries, 203 B. 
Main st. Meals 25cts. 

HEYDINGSFELDEB, J. G., Bakery & Restaurant, 
114 Main st. 

BARBERS. 
HENRY BAUER'S 

Shaving and Hair Cutting Pai-lors and 
Bath Room, Porter's Block. 

EECE, TONY, Shaving & Hair Dressing Saloon, 

•ZOWi Ohio si. 

AVAGE, JOHN, Shaving <fc Hair Dressing Sa- 
loon, 304 Ohio St. 



s 



DENTIST. 



Tj^LLIS, DR. L. 0., Dentist, 



54 Main st., np-stairs. 



DRUGGISTS. 

CLIFFORD, T. T., 107 Ohio st. Prescriptions 
compounded by a German graduate. 

OLL, CHAS. & CO., Druggists and Chemists, 

317 Ohio st. 



R 



FARMER'S MILLS. 

ZmilERMAN & HARTER, Farmer's Mills, 
W. Main st. 

FURNITURE. 

S. B. COHEnT""""""'^"'^'^^"^^ 
Second;hand Furniture bouuht, sold and re- 
paired. Chairs re cabPd.and Picture frames made 
to order. Lipholsterhig and Mattress making a 
specialty, Saii:?factioa guaranteed. E. Main st. 

GROCERS, 

S. GERYE, 
Fruits, Vegetables, Produce and Groceries, fresh 
Fish and Game, 119 E. Main et. 

W' HITNEY, WM. A., Family Groceries, 
Ohio st , bet. 6th & 7th sts. 

CHARLES YOST, 

Groceries, Provisions, Wood and Willow Ware, Fionr and Feed, 

233 Ohio St. 

HAIR DEALER AND DRESSER. 
Mrs. S. C. JOHNSON, 

Of Every Description, 
121 E. MAIN ST. 

HARDWARE. 

HcSASrwri?rC07Hardwarr&^ 

117 W. Main St. 



IMPORTANT EVEKTS OF THE CENTURY, 



297 




Oity Hall, Philadelphia. — The building is situated on Penn Square. It 
covei-s an area ot nearly 4^ acres, and consists of one building, surrounding an interior 
court yard. The north and south fronts measure 470 feet; the east and west 486 j^ feet in 
their extreme length. 




MASONIC TEMPLE, CORNER SIXTH AVE. AND 23D ST., NEW YORK. 



298 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



Sedali A — Continued. 



HOTEL. 

AMERICAN HOUSE, 

W. W. Brown. Proprietor, corner Engineer and 
Third streets. Every attention paid to the com- 
fort of guests. 

EROY HOUSE, E. Barrett, proprietor, ' 

i Cor. Ohio &6tlists. 

LINDELL HOTEL. 

J. C. Pierce, proprietor, 321 West Main street, 
Rate, $1 per day, reduction by the week. Low 
prices, good accommodations. 

EDALIA HOUSE, Chas. Wentzelmann, proprie- 
tor 211 W. Main st. 



s 



UNION HOTEL, Mrs. C. Mathews, proprietress 
Engineer st. 

INSURANCE. 

KNAPP'S INSURANUK AGENCY, 
210 Ohio St. 

JUSTICE OF THE PEACE. 

CLARK, LOGAN. Justice of the Peace & Mayor, 
211 Ohio St. 



O 



MAEBLE WORKS. 

'DONNELL, JAS. & CO., Marble Worlvs, 

14 W. Main st. 



MILLINERY AND DRESS MAKING. 
MRS. M. A. CROSS, 






M 



llllli 



Sll W. Main St. 

Shirt and Underclothing making a specialty. 



N 



ORTON, MRS. G. B., Milliner, 



118 Ohio St. 



Established 1870. 

Miss D. E. Thomas, 

Fashionable 



61 Main st. 

Bridal Trosseau a Specialty. 

~ PHOTOGRAPHER. 

LATOUR, Photographer, 
62 W. Main st. Established 1866. 

~ REAL ESTATE. 

BYLER, JAS. M., Real Estate Title, Abstract & 
Loiin Office. Established 1865. 



ROSS, W. H., Real Estate & Land Office, 
234 



234 Ohio St. 



^ALOONS^ 

HEALTH OFFICE SALOON, 

Ed. lijon, Proprietor, 

ngen House, OHIO ST. 



Sedal I A — Conh'm/ed. 



UIN, TOM, Wines, Liquors & Cigars, 15 Bali 
Pool, 12j E. Main st. 



o 



Established 1870. 

X'^IKTiE "rr Anr.T. 

Hermann Schmitt. proprietor, corner Osage and 
Main sts. Wines, Liquors and Cigars. 

PHYSICIAN. ^ 

ROGERS, JAS. S., M. D., hours, 9 to 13 a. m. and 
2 to 6 p. M., Sedalia, Mo. 

SEWING MACHINES. 

WRIGHT, S. A., Sewing Machines, 
230 Ohio St. 

TAILORS. 

BYRNE, OWEN, Merchant Tailor, 
Ohio St. 



S. C. JOHNSON, 



T-A.I 



l'J3 East Main St. 

Cleaning and Repairing neatly done. 

TELEGRAPH INSTITUTE. 

Western Telegraph Inst tute, 

J. D. Brown, Manager. Young men and Ladies 
qualified as operators ; good situations when qual- 
ified. Send for circular^ 

TOBACCO AND CIGARS. 

KOBROCK, CHAS. & BRO., Manf'rs of Cigars, 
20.{ W. Main st. 

WATCHMAKER AND JEWELER. 

L ANDES, JOHN S., Watchmaker & Jeweler, 
111 Main st. 



JEFFERSON CITY. MO. 



AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS, 
JETPBRSoiriDiTV 

Agricultural Works, 

DALLMEYER & FISCHER, Props., 

Manufacturers of 

Mowers, Keapers, (jrain Drills, 

SULKY PLOWS AND RAKES, 

109 Water st. 

ATTORNEYS AT LAW. " 

EWING, A. W^TAU^^TatLaw^ 
206 High St. 

OCKADY (late Attorney-(ien'l of Mo.) & SIL- 
VER, Madison & High sts. 



TTOUGH, A. II., Attorney at Law, 



206 High St. 



AUCTIONEERS. 
SHOWERS & WAGNER, 

General Auctioneers, Commission Merchants 
and Manufacturers' Agents, 215 E. Highst. 



ADVKKTISKMKNTS. 



299 




•JJfiHAMCS £NC 



T'ootle's Opera House, situated in the center of tlie prosperous city of St. Joseph, 
Missouri, with a population of above 30,000. This House is one of the most elegant and 
commodious theatre's in the West; has a seating capacity of 1,500, with patent folding 
chairs throughout the auditorium, and is otherwise supplied with all the modern improve- 
ments. The boxes, of which there are four, with seats for six, are superbly furnished 
and decrrated. Large, nice dressing rooms adjoin the stage, which is in width 67 
feet, and from front to rear 40 feet, the opening 35x34 feet. There is an ample supply of 
scenery, which has lately been retouched and increased. Stage furniture and a new "Stein- 
way Grand Concert Piano," has been bought for use at Concerts, &c. The house will be 
let, licensed, lighted and warmed, with the usual stage attachees, to first class combinations, 
at reasonable rates. Sharmg propositions, also, will b ^ entertained, if preferred. 

JULIUS CRONE, Agent. MILTON TOOTLE, Proprietor. 



Builder, Jobber and Superintendent of All 



Kinds of Work done in Wood, 

: SUCH AS: 

Scroll Sawing, Shaping. Slitting, Boring, Turning, &c. Show Cases? 
Desks, Table and Solid Counters, Etc., on Hand or Made to 

Order on Short Notice and Reasonable rates. 

Office and Shop 907 Francis St., and Frederick Ave. 

SAINT JOSEPH, ]VEO. 



Mm from the Co itry Solicited aiifl Este cially from Builders. 

Tootle's Opera House. I Hamilton's, cor. Fifth and Felix Sts. 

Hundley's, cor. Fourth and Felix Sts. | Senate Restaurant, cor. Fifth & EdmonJ Sts 

Earnst & Brill, Charles St. 



300 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OF THE CENTURY. 



1877. 

erty, causing a suspension of work in the 
mines. 

Joly SO. — Striking trainmen of tlie 
Lake Shore, Texas Pacific, Delaware, 
Lackawanna and Great AVestern Railroads, 
and of several lines centering at Pittsburg, 
Pa., went back to work at the reduced 
wages, the question of pay to come up for 
future discussion. Freight trains in 
large numbers were moved on the Pennsyl- 
vania and Baltimore and Ohio roads. At 
Galveston, Texas, the colored laborers 
struck. Regular trains were running on 
the Morris and Essex and New Jersey 
Central Railroads. 

July J$0. — No fresh outbreaks oc- 
curred on the railroads, and dispatches 
from various points indicated a speedy re- 
sumption of work. At Baltimore many of 
the old men were returnmg, more ofiering 
than could be made use of. 

Aog. 3. — Eight or more girls lost their 
lives by the burning of a box-factory in 
Cincinnati. — The labor war was virtually 
at an end. Freight trains were running, or 
were about to be started, on all the roads. 
The striking miners in the cal regions of 
Pennsylvania were kept quiet ])y ihe pre- 
sence of troops. The coroner's jury at 
Baltimore, Md., exonerated the Sixth Regi- 
ment from all blame for the riot. 

Aug. 1 1 . — News was i-eceived of a se- 
vere battle between General Gibbons' com- 
mand and the Nez Perces Indians, on the 
Big Hole River, M. T., Aug. 9. The soldiers 
attacked an Indian camp, which they took 
after hard fighting, but were afterwards 
driven back,Avith the loss of nearly one-half 
their force. The Indians also suttered 
greatly. Among the killed were Capt. Wil- 
liam Logan and Lieut. James H. Bradley, 
while Gen. Gibbon, Capt. Williams, and 
Lieutenants Coolidge, English and Wood- 
ruff were wounded. 

Aug. 16. — The centenary of the battle 
of Bennington, Vt., was celebrated. A pro- 
cession four miles long was witnessed by 
over sixty thousand people. Prof. Bart- 
lett delivered the oration, a poem by W. C. 
Bryant was read by Prof. Churchill, and 
speeches were made by President Hayes, 
Secretary Evai'ts and others. 

Aug. 18.— A. Gesner, E. T. Hender- 
son and E. B. Weston were arrested at Chi- 
cago, 111., charged with being members of 
an extensive gang of forgers, who during 
the past year have obtained more than 
$400,000 by means of raised checks and 
forgeries. 

Ang. 39. — Brigham Young died at 
Sajt Lake City. He had nineteen wives 
an d was considered worth $0,000,000. — 
Railroad accident on the Chicago and Rock 
Island R. R., at Four Mile Creek seven 
miles from Des Moines. Sixteen persons 
killed and many injured. 



Jefferson City — Continued. 



BANKS. 

JEFFERSON CITY BANK, 

J. S. Fleming, Prest., 

G. H. Dtjlle, Vice-PreBt., 

J T Se^rs, Cashier. 
Special attention given to collections. 
126 HIGH ST. 



A. M. DAVISON, J. G. SCHOTT, W, ft. DALLMEYER, 
President. Vice-Prest. Cashier 



Firii national Ba»k, 

Dealers in Foreign Exctiange. Capital, $75,000; 
Surplus, $18,000. 

ViG EAST HIGH ST. 

BAEBERS. 

HEIDT, WM., Barber & Hair Dresser, 
136 High St. 

ATTS & HADEN, Barbers & Hairdressers, 

206 High St. 



w 



BOOKS AND STATIONERY. 

T30MMEL, FEED, Bool^s, Stationery, Wall Pa- 
X\) per, Picture Frames, etc., 122 High St. 

BOOTS AND SHOES. 

ANTWEILER, JOHN, Boots, Shoes, Saddles and 
Harnesses, 213 High St. 



CARPENTERS AND BUILDERS. 

CHWARZOTT, HENRY, Carpenter and Builder, 
31 Madison st. 



S 



CHINA, GLASS AND QUEENSWARE. 

GOODRKrft^^RT^'^MnaT^i^T'auFQ'uee^^ 
ware, 121 High st. 

CLOTHING. 

G"<. OLDMAN, J., Clothing and Gents' Furnishing 
r Goods, 211 High st. 

CONFECTIONERY. 

McCARTEN, GEO. I., Confectionery and Ice 
Cream Saloon, 128 High st. 

DRUGGISTS. 

CITY DRUG STORE, Tennessee Matthews, M.D., 
Proprietor, 116 High st. 



DRY GOODS. 

(Established 1874.) 

nALL31EYER, CRAVEN * CO., 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

Dry Goods, Groceries and Liquors, 

208 & 210 E. HIGH ST.. Jefferson City, Mo. 

Goods sold at St. Louis prices for Cash. 

LOHMAN, L. C. & CO., Dry Goods, Groceries,. 
Hardware, etc., 102 High st. 

OBERMAYER & CO., General Dry Goods and 
Gents' Furnishing Goods, High & Madison sts 



SKETCHES OF THE PRESIDENTS. 



301 



Jefferson City — Continued. 

FURNITUEE. 

Furniture Dealers & Undertakers, 

313 MADISON STREET. 

GROCERIES. 

A. J. HOEFER, 

Dealer in 

Staple and Fancy Grooeri«'s, HTard'ware, 

farm Inipleinentn, Ktc. 

222 HIGH STREET. 

jr. CHRIST LINHARDT, 

—Dealer in— 

GROCERIES AND PROVISIONS, 

Jefl'erson, City. 



\\ 



HARDWARE. 

TffiSOrOrKrXcoirffardware^'^^ 

f cultnral Implements, 107 W. High et. 

HARNESS AND SADDLES. 

SCHMIDT JC HEISINGER) 

— Manufacturers of— 

HARNSSS, 

Saddles, Collars, Bridles, Nets, &c.. 



HOTEL. 



CITY HOTEL, 

Cor. High and Madison Sts. 

J. B. KAISER, - - Proprietor. 



Travelers are furnished with comfortable 
accommodations at reasonable rates. 

A trusty Porter at all Passenger Trains. 

LUMBER DEALERS. 

B~""'ECKERS^XBfiOOK§rLmnber^^ 
Blinds, Main and Madison sts. 



MARBLE WORKS. 

JEFFERSON CITY MARBLE WORKS, 
VICTOR ZUBER, - Prop. 

Manufacturer of and Dealer in 
Monuments, Tombs and Headstones, 

of Foreign and American Marble. 

High St., betffCfii Jefferson anil Washington, 

Orders f om a distance will receive 
prompt attention. 




MILLINERY AND DRESSMAKING^ 

"""""^ MRS. SUTER & BUCK, 

Millinery & Dressmaking, 

Alec Fancy Goods and Hairdressing, 



SKETCHES 

OF tup: 

PRESIDENTS 




(FIRST PRESIDENT. — TWO TERMS.) 
CJeovge Wasliiiig'ton was born on 
the Potomac river, in Westmoreland county, 
Virginia, February 22d, 1732, and died Decem- 
ber 14, 1799. lu 1754 he was made Lieutenant 
Colonel of the militia, and accompanied Brad- 
dock in his expedition against Fort Duquesne 
in 1755. In the same year he was made Com- 
mander-in-Chief of the military forces of the 
Colony ofVa.,andin 1787 he was unanimously 
chosen President of the Convention that met 
to frame a Constitution. He was inaugurated 
first President of the United States, April 30. 
1789; and, being re-elected, he held the oflBce 
until 1797. In 1788 and in 1792 he was again 
chosen President of the United States, but, 
conceiving it to be a dangerous pi'ecedent to 
serve more than two terms, he patriotically de- 
clined a third election. In earh- life he fol- 
lowed the occupation of an engineer. He was 
married to Miss Martha Custis, in January, 
1759. Congress unanimously elected him com- 
mander of the revolutionary forces, and he 
took active command July 2, 1775, and held su- 
preme military control throughout the Strug- 



302 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



Jefferson City — Co7itinned. 



PHYSICIANS. 

YOUNG, DR. R. E., Office 216 High street, Resi- 
deuce, 516 E. Main. 

PRINTERS, 
L. S. HITCHCOOK, 

Commercial Job Printer, 

AND ADVERTISING AGENT, 

Popp's Building, Hijjli St., Stairs at McCarlen's 
Coufectionery. Card, Bill, Letter-head and Cir. 
cular Printing made a Specialty. Give us a call_ 



REAL ESTATE. 

COX, S. W., Land Agent, Buy and Sell Lands on 
Commission. Pay Tax-s. Redeem Lands 
sold for taxes in any County in the State. Aa;ent 
Atchison, Topeka, and Santa Fe Railroad. Three 
million acres of Land fur sale on eleven years' 
credit. Send for circulars and Maps, giving full 
and reliable information about Kansas. 

STOVES AND TINWARE. 

'""^'"'^'^ fT J . MAYER, 
Dealer in 

S18 ma-H STPIBET- 



TOBACCO AND CIGARS^ 

wenijellWraub, 

Manufacturer of and Wholesale Dealer in 

A Fine Assortment of Havana and Key West 
Cigars constan.ly on hand. 

All Orders promptly attended to. 



WATCHES, CLOCKS AND JEWELRY. 

JV. ORIESHAM3IER, 

Dealer in 

Gold and Silver Watches, 

Jewelry, Silver and Plated Ware. Gold Pens and 
Holders, Spectacles, Clocks, &c. Watches, Clocks 
and Jewelry Repaired Promptly and Warranted. 



WINES AND LIQUORS. 

E. HOCHSTADT ER^ 

Dealer in Fine 

LIQUOai 



Families Supplied at Reasonable Rates. 

lao High Street, 



K 



RAUP, F., Wines Liquors and Beer, under City 
Hotel, Cor. High and Madison sts. 



Jefferson City — Continued. 

JEFFERSON CITY BUSINESS HOUSES 

WHEN ESTABLISHED. 



COX, S. W., Real Estate, 1S67. 
DALLMEYER, CRAVEN & CO., Drj 

Go ds, 1874. 
FIRST NATIONAL BANK, 1867. 
GRIESHAMMER, N., Jeweler, 1S68. 
HOCHSTADTER, E.. Liquor Dealer, 

1875- 
HOEFER, A. J., Grocery, 1871. 
JEFFERSON CITY BANK, 1874. 
MAYER, F. J., Stoves and Tinware, 1862. 
SCHMIDT & HEISTNGER, Harness and 

Saddles, 1S75. 



BURLINGTON, IOWA. 



ATTORNEYS AT LAW. 

I"~i^'EtJA¥^rSCOTT, AUom 
J^ 409 Jefferson St. 

HALL & BALDWIN, Attorneys and Counsellors 
at Law, Parson's Block. 

BAKERY. 

K"nffiSLiN(.S"TjmrHawFEy¥Bakerv^^ 
514 Jefferson et. 



G 



BARBER. 

UNNELL, S., Shaving and Hairdressing and 
Bath Rooms, 208 N. Third St. 



BOOTS AND SHOES. 

OTT; GEO., AlairirfacturerofMcCTombef's G^^^ 
Fitting Boot. 403 N. Third st. 



B 



C 



LAYTOS, A., boot and Shoe Maker, 
803 S. Main St. 

S CHAFER, MARTIN, Boot and Shoe Maker, 
205 Washington St. 



ZIM.1IER. lII-MtV, Manufacturer of Fashionable 
Boots and Shoes, 231 Division st. 



CHINA, GLASS AND QUEENSWARE. 



lERKlNS, .4,. A., China, Glas 



and t^ueensware, 
314 N. Main st. 



CIVIL ENGINEER. 

H. iVcHAPSfAN, 

Civil Engineer, 

32 1 j^ Jefferson Street. 



T^RUGGE,^ jTrir* s6N,'jBurli^^^^^ Steam Dye 



DYE HOUSE. 

& 'S0N,'TBur'li 
ouse and Tailoring, Third and Jefferson sts. 

FURNITURE. 

CHAS. BUETTMER, 

— Manufacturer and Dealer in — 

Chamber Suites, Mattresses, «fcc. Picture Frames 
of all kinds. 

5«0 JTfiFFERSOX »TRE£T. 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OF THE CENTURY. 



303 




Vermont State Building, Centennial Exposition, Philadelphia.— This building presents 
a rather odd appearance in contrast with the other buildings on the Centennial grounds. It is con- 
stnicted of wood, divided into fine large appartments for the convenience of visitors, male and female. 
The illustration above is a correct style of the architecture. 




ENGLISH commissioners' UUILDINC, CENTENNIAL EXPOSITION. IMULAnELPH I A. 

ao 



304 



SKETCHES OF THE PRESIDENTS. 



gfe for indepeudence. 

^With George Washington for our first Pres- 
ident, we began our new experiment in the 
manner of choosing rulers, taking the surest 
possible mode, as all the world then thought, 
of selecting a good man and the one best 
adapted to the position. 

Washington was left fatherless at eleven 
years of age; his education was directed by his 
mother, a woman of strong character, who 
kindly, but firmly, exacted the most implicit 
obedience. Of her Washington learned his 
first lessons of self-command. His favorite 
amusements were of a military character; he 
made soldiers of his playmates, and ofiicered 
all the mock" parades. His inherited wealth 
was great, and the antiquity of his family gave 
him high social rank. On his Potomac farms 
he had hundreds of slaves, and at his Mount 
Vernon home he was like the prince of a wide 
domain, free from dependence or restraint. He 
was fond of equipage and the appurtenances of 
high life. Although he always rode on horse- 
back, his family had a "chariot and four, "with 
"black postillions in scai-let and white livery." 
This generous style of living, added perhaps 
to his native reserve, exposed him to the 
charge of aristocratic feeling. While at his 
home, he spent much of his time in riding and 
hunting. He rose early, ate his breakfast of 
corn-cake, honey, and tea, and then rode about 
his estates. He spent his evenings with his. 
family around the blazing hearth, retiring be- 
tween nine and ten. He loved to linger at the 
table, cracking nuts and relating his adven- 
tures. In personal appearance, Washington 
was over six feet in height, robust, graceful, 
and perfectly erect. His manner was formal 
and dignified. He was more solid than bril- 
liant, and had more judgment than genius. He 
had great dread of public life, cared little for 
books, and had no library. Washington was a 
consistent christian, and a regular attendant of 
the Episcopal church, of which he was a com- 
municant. He was a firm advocate of free in- 
stitutions, but believed in a strong government 
and strictly enforced laws. As a President, he 
carefully weighed his decisions, but, his policy 
once settled, he pursued it with steadiness and 
dignity, however great might be the opposi- 
tion. As an ofiBcer, he was brave, enterpris- 
ing, and cautious. His campaigns were rarely 
startling, but they were always judicious. He 
was capable of great endurance. Calm in de- 
feat, sober in victory, commanding at all times, 
but irresistible when aroused, he exercised 
equal authority over himself and his army. 
His last illness was very brief, and his closing 
hours were marked by his usual calmness and 
dignity. "I die hard," he said, "but I am not 
afraid to go." Europe and America vied in 
tributes to his memory. Said Lord Brougham, 
"Until time shall be no more, a test of the pro- 
gress which our race has made in wisdom and 
virtue will be derived from the veneration paid 
to the immortal name of Washington." 
Washington left no children. It has been 
beautifully said, "Providence left him child- 
less that his country might call him Father." 



BuRLi NGTON — Contimied. 



LINDSTADT, JOHN P., Manufacturer of all kinds 
of Farniiure, 513 Fifth St. 

GROCERS. 

|5lKLEK^WlSZEir&l?0^rWhoiesaie^ 
-P 110 Main St. 

WEHMEIER & BKO., Groceries and Provisions, 
409 & 411 Jefferson st. 



S' 



HARNESS AND SADDLES. 

TEYHrilKOtYr^arnessr^'Sad^ 
Whips, &c., 221 Division st. 



Bridles, 



HOTELS, 

B^"^AMETFH0li§E7irXT£i?eUrProp^ 
Burlington. 

PACIFIC HOUSE, Chas. Wahl, Proprietor. 
418'/2 to 420 N. Main st. 

MAOHIIISf. 
L. THEO. FLODIN, 

Machinist, and manufacturer of Models, Burn- 
ing Brands in every style, and all kinds of light 
work in Steel, Iron, Brass, etc., 513 Jefferson st. 

medical institute. 
drTchasTIlSgeIu ' 

Medical and Surgical 

IIsTSTITTJTB. 

Devoted to the treatmant of Special and Chronic 
Diseases, Strasbismus, Hair Lip, Stricture, 'Ca- 
tarrh, Fistula, Tumors, and diseases of the Uri- 
nary and Generative Organs. Medicine sent 
throun;hout the country. llH^Mainst. 

MILLINERY AND FANCY GOODS. 

^^■^^MTss'X''~cTT5ETCiacK7'^^^^ 

Milliner and Dressmaker, and dealer in Millin- 
ery, Notions and Fancy Goods, 323 Division st. 
Hoop skirts made and repaired, and Stamping 
done to order 

« PAINTERS. 

J"^'SEF&HEINz7De«jrative"Paint^ 
^^ ^^^eiS^Jeffersonjt. 

MURPHY, E., House & Sign Painter, 
307 Washington st. 

PHYSICIAN. 

D'~"r>lsr WHl^E cKcfl^PhysiciaiT; 
413 Jefferson st. 

PUMPS. ^ 

SWAN & FOSTER, 

Manufacturers and wholesale dealers in Patent 
Elastic Rubber Bucket Chain Pumps, Copper and 
Iron Lightning Rods and Patent Roofing, 716 Jef- 
ferson St. 



D 



SALOON. 

REHER," CWRADTWiue&'Beey Saloon, 

421 Jefferson st. 



SEWING MACHINES. 

TIBBLES, C. E., dealer in all kinds of Sewing 
Machines, 405 Jefferson st. 



SHIRT MANUFACTURER. 

GRIFFIN, A. F., [Shirt manufr and Excelsior 
Steam Laundry, Vance Block. 



SKETCHES OF THE PRESIDENTS. 



805 



Burlington — Continued. 



TAILOES, 

AWKINS, JOHN, Merchant Tailor, 

N. Main St., opposite Barrett House. 



H 



KELLY ife DAILY, Merchant Tailors, Tailoring in 
all its branches, 321 N. Main st. 



KANSAS CITY, MO. 



AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS, 

BAKER, J. P., Agricultural Implements & Seeds, 
4ir Walnut st. 



ATTORNEYS AT LAW. 



A 



LLE5, SILAS P., Lawyer, 



62014 Main st. 



BROWN & WRIGHT, Attorneys at Law, 
42ii Main st. 

CAMPBELL, M., Attorney at Law, 
Cor. 5th & Main sts. 



H 



OLMES & DEAN, Attorneys at Law, 

Rooms 1 & 2, 2cl tloor, 544 Main st. 

IPSCOMB, J. H., Attorney at Law, 
Cor. 4th & Main sts. 

MARK & JOHN WILLIAMS, 

Attorneys. Prompt attention given to Collect- 
ing. Refer, by permission, to H. M. Holden, 
Prest. 1st National l^ank, Kansas City; J. V. C. 
Karnes, Prest. Com. National Bank, Knnsas City; 
J. Irving Pearce, Prest. 3d National Bank, Chica- 
go; Field, Leiter & Co., Merchants, Chicago. 

OUNG, JAMES G., Attorney at Law, Rooms 10 
& 12, Hart s Office Building, W. 4th st. 

WOB'FORD, JOHN W., Attorney at Law, 
Hart's Office Building, 4th st. 

^^^^^UOTION AND COMMISSION. 

STEPHENS, J. H. & SONS, Auction & Commis 
sion Merchants, 561 Main st. 

BARBERS. 

H. FEARMAN, 

BARBER AND HAIRDRESSER 

South Side Mo. Ave., bet. Main & Walnut sts. 

HE 0. K. BARBER SHOP, Andrews & Jordan 
proprietors, 14 W. 5th st. 

BILLIARD SALOON. 

METROPOI^AFmLLIARD^ALOOlC^oseph 
Loeffl er, prop., cor. ]5lh st. & Grand Ave. 

BLAOKSMITHING. 

LOGAN, THOMAS, Horseshoeing^^lSiacksmith- 
ing, cor. Independence Sc Sharlett aves. 

E. JENKINS, 

HORSESHOEING 

AKD GEJSTEKAL BLACKSMITHING-, 

Cor. 11th & Main sts. 

BOOKSELLERS AND STATIONERS. 

K^^^ANSAS^irYBoSiT&lJiwS^C^ 
& Stationers, 720 Main st. 

BOOTS AND SHOES. 

"DUSKJACOBTBoor&'Shonilakefr^^'^^ 
-D W, Main st. 




/^^>^(^lmij 



(SECOND PRESIDENT.) 
Jolm Adams was born in Braintree, 
Mass., October 1735, and died 1826. He grad- 
uated at Harvard College in 1755, and, aban- 
doning the idea of becoming a minister of the 
gospel, was admitted to the bar in 1758. He 
vras one of the delegates first sent to the Con- 
tinental Congress from Massachusetts. In 
1776 he was made President of th^ Board of 
War, and went to France as a Commibjioner in 
1777. He served as President of the United 
States from 1797 to 1801. He was a member 
of the first and second Congresses, and nomin- 
ated Washington as commander-in-chief. Jef- 
ferson wrote the Declaraton of Independence, 
but Adams secured its adoption in a three- 
days' debate. He was a tireless worker, and 
had the reputation of having the clearest head 
and firmest heart of any man in Congress. In 
his position as President he lost the reputation 
he had gained as Congressman. His enemies 
accused him of being a bad judge of men; of 
clinging to old unpopular notions, and of hav- 
ing little control over his temper. They also 
ridiculed his egotism, which thev declared to 
be inordinate. He lived, however, to see the 
prejudice against his administration give place 
to a more just estimate of his great worth and 
exalted integrity. As a Delegate to the Con- 
stitutional Convention, he was honored as one 
of the fathers of the republic. Adams and 
Jefferson were firm friends during the Revolu- 
lution, but political strife alieniated them. On 
their return to private life they became recon- 
ciled. They died on the same day — the fiftieth 
anniversary of American independence. Ad- 
ams' last words were, " Thomas Jeftersou still 
survives." Jefferson was, however, already 
lying dead in his Virginia home. Thus, by the 
passing away of these two remarkable men, 
was made memorable the 4th of July, 1826. 



306 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



Kansas City — Continued. 



BBITTON, JAMES,iBoot & Shoe Maker, 
E . 6th St. near Main et. 



R 



UDD & GBEGOR, Boat & Shoe Maker, 

434 Main et. 

BUFFALO EOBES AND FUKS, 




^ Manufacturer and dealer m Buffalo Robes, Fancy 
Robes, Pars. Buckskin, Pur Overcoats and Gloves, 
4 E. Levee, Kansas City, Mo. 

PHILIP OLMSTED, 




KANSAS CITY, MO., 
Manufacturer of Buffalo Robes, Fur Robes, Fur 
Ov-rcoats, Gloves and Mittens. 



CIGAR BOX MANUFACTURERS, 

iINGTON & PALM 

turers, 907 Maine st. 



PENNINGTON & PALMER, Cigar Box Manufac- 
turers, 907r ' 

^LOTHING,^^ 

Great "Western Outfitting Store, 

H. Silverman, prop., dealer in Clothing, Hats, 
Caps, Trunks, Valises, Boots, Shoes, Tents, 
Wagon Covers, etc., 9 E. Fifth street, opposite 
Market square. 

John A. Foil & Co., 

Dealers in 

CUSTOM MADE CLOTHINd, 

And btlemes's Tsrnisliiii; Coods, 

1031 Main st. bet. 10th & llth, 

Ii:A.]N AS CITY, - - 3VXO. 

i.M.i. Mmm, Mm^^. 

CONFECTIONERIES^ 

■cTyr^vTAiTiru^FiF 

Dealer in all kinds of 



Pruits, Nuts, Toys, Pancy Goods, Etc. 

Oysters and Game in Season. 



.538 MAIN ST. 



Kansas City — Continued. 



F 



lELD, S. A., Confectioner, 



803 Main St. 



KASSIMER, A., Manl'r & wholesale dealer in 
Candies, 1119 Main st. 



DAIRY. 
TDOCK SPRING DAIRY CO., 



1121 Main st. 



DENTISTS, 
X A VEINE, E. N., Dentist, 



726 Main st. 



T 



REGO, A. HOMER, Dentist, 



712 Main st. 



s 



CHELL, A. C, Dentist, 



714 Main st., iip-stairs. 



s 



TARK, J. K. & SON, Dentists, 



548 Main st. 



DTE HOUSE. 

SCHMACK, CHAS., New York Dye House, 
520 Main st. 

FISH AND OYSTERS. 

BEDGOOD, H. H., Wholesale & retail dealer in 
Fish, Ojsters, Game, etc., 117 E. 4th st. 

FLOUR AND FEED. 
Dealer in all kinds of 

N. E Cor. Main & 12th Sts. 

OSE, CHARLES, Wholesale and retail dealer in 
Feed, 904 Main st. 

GROGGER & BROTHER, 

Dealers in 

WOOD, COAL, FEED & FLOUR, 

1129 Main st. 
W. L. PEAK, 

932 Main St. 

ALSO, BOAEDINa AND FEED STABLE. 

GRAIN DEALERS. 

A. C. KEEVER & CO., 

Coramis'ion and Forwarding Merchsnts of 
Grain and Produce. Office: In Board of Trade 
Building, Kansas City. 

GROCERIES AND PROVISIONS. 

Established 1874, 

J. P. BELL & CO., 

Dealers in 




And all kinds of Game, Dressed and Live 

Poultry, Fresh Vegetables and Fruits, 

N. E. COR. WALNUT ST. & MISSOURI AVE. 

IT^OURTH STREET GROCERY, W. D. Oldham, 
^ Agent, U)9 East 4th st. 

AX, GEO. L., Groceries and Provisions, 

1201 Alain st. 



H 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



307 




Court House, i^uincy, IlllS. — Jonn S. McKean, Architect and Superintend- 
ent. Work on the foundation for this building was commenced in May, 1S76, and by the 
4th of July, 1877, the building was complete. It is 170 feet long by 105 wide, and 166 feet 
from the ground to the base of the flag-staft". The contract price for the building was 
$218,250. It is considered one of the finest buildings of its character, in the West. 



On receipt of 25 cents to pay 
postage, I will send to any ad- 
dress samples of my choice 

Flavors, Bakinj Poller, 

— AND — 

DRY HOP YEAST, 

Enough for a good baking and a 
fair trial. 




Tb«oe kabk 



"MOD LUCK." 

ASK YOUR GROCER FOR GOOD ICCK- 

I am to be found in all the 
Grocery Stores in pounds and 
yi ft) cans. I will keep any 
length of time in any climate, 
and retain my full strength. I 
have no equal in the market. 
Give me a trial and have Good 
Luck. 



l^^Ask your Grocer for Good Luck. 



T-^S. IB. TTsTOOIDiEeiUriE^, 



MANUFACTURER OF 



Good Luck Dry Hop Yeast, 

Good Lock Baking Powder, Choice Flavoring Extracts, Bluing, Aromatic Ginger Ale, &c., &c., 

303 3VEA.XXX St., <^TTI3>rO'Sr, I T i X *. 



308 



SKETCHES OF THE PRESIDENTS. 




( THIRD PRESIDENT. ) 

X'lioinaiit Jefferson was boru at 
Shadwell, Virginia, April 2d, 174.3; and died 
July 4, 1826. After graduating from William 
and Mary College, he adopted the profession of 
the law. 

" Of all the public men who have figured in 
the United States/' says Parton, "he was in- 
comparably the best scholar and the most va- 
riously accomplished man." He was a bold 
horseman, a skillful hunter, an elegant pen- 
man, a fine violinist, a brilliant talker, a supe- 
rior classical scholar, and a proficient in the 
modern languages. On account of his talent, 
he was styled " The Sage of Monticello." The 
immortal document, the Declaration of Inde- 
pendence, was, with the exception of a few 
words, entirely his work. He was an ardent 
supporter of the doctrine of State rights, and 
led the opposition to the Federalists. After he 
became President, however, he found the diffi- 
culty of administering the government upon 
that theory. " The executive authority had to 
be stretched until it cracked, to cover the pur- 
chase of Louisiana;" and he became convinced 
on other occasions that the federal govern- 
ment, to use his own expression, "must show 
its teeth." Like Washington, he was of aris- 
tocratic birth, but his principles were intensely 
democratic. He hated ceremonies and titles; 
even " Mr." was distasteful to him. These 
traits were the more remarkable to one of his 
superior birth and education, and peculiarly 
endeared him to the common people. Coming 
into power on a wave of popularity, he studi- 
ously sought to retain this favor. There were 
no more brilliant levees or courtly ceremonies 
as in the days of Washington and Adams. On 
his inauguration day, he rode down to Con- 



Kansas City — Conti'jiued. 



LOHRER, C, Staple and Fancy Groceries, 
911 Main at. 

McCORD, NAVE & CO., Wholesale Grocers, 
416 Delaware st. 

C. A. ROLLERT, 

a- IS OC IB IS -ST, 

1316 MAIN STREET. 

OSS, MIKE, Grocer, 

No. 57 First St., bet. Charlotte & Campbell. 



R 



S 



EEWALD, FRED., Dealer in Staple and Fancy 
Groceries, 205 West 5th st. 



THAIER, MRS. W., Groceries and Provisions, 
No. 11 Eant 17th st. 

WARINNER, GREGORY & CO., Wholesale Gro. 
cers, 51 & 53 Third st. 



w 



ISE, H. S., Grocer, 



No. 5 Commercial st. 



^ARDWAKE^ 

UNCANVWYETH & CO., Hardwa'rer Cutlery 
and Nails, 412 Delaware st. 



D 



^AENESS AND SADDLES. 
TLBS, WM., Saddler, 



308 Main st. 



^ATSAND^CAPS^ 

BIRD & UAWKIXIS, 

Hats, Caps, Buck Gloves, Mittens, Fancy Roves, 
Etc. A so a full line of Ladies' Trimmed Hats, at 
Wholesale only. 

310 DELAWARE STREET. 

O. C. McAViliiams. Brutus Crooke. David Russell. 

McWilliams, Crooke & Go. 

Wholesale 

Hats, Caps, Gloves, &c. 

ALSO FULL LINE STRAW GOODS. 

308 Delaware St., Kansas City, Mo. 



^OTELS^ 

BARNUM'S HOTEL, Cor. 4th & Main sts. 
b'. S. Bradbury & Co., Props. 

hotelIIdmstIdrant, 

N. W. COR. MAIN & 4TH STS., 

PETER BOYLF, ProD, Kansas City. Mo. 

Price, $1.50 per day Street Car Fare to and from 
the House free. Hot and cold Lunches at any 
time— paying only for what you get. 

AGGETT HOUSE, Cor. 6th & Walnut sts. 

L. P. Swayne, Prop. 



D 



LINDELL HOTEL, Cor. 5th & Wyandotte sts. 
J. H. Robertson, Prop. 

Main Street Hotel. 

J. P. BAUOHMAN, Prop. 

No. 416 Main St., bet. 4tii k 5lli, Kansas City, Mo. 

Terms: Per Day. $1.50; per Week, $5.00. 
Newly refitted and centrally located. 



SKETCHES OF THE PRESIDENTS. 



309 



Kansas City — Continued. 



S 



►ACIFIC HOUSE, Cor. 4th & Delaware sts. 

John Hall, Prop. 
OUTHERN HOTEL. S. J. Patton, Proprietress, 
1609 Grand ave. 



ST. JAMES HOTEL. L. C.Alexander, Prop. 
Walnut St., near Mo. ave. 

LIGHTNING EODS. 

TKAIN, H. C, & SON, Lightning Rods. 
838 Delaware st. 

LIVERY STABLES. 

AKTERr^UGEMTLTverFaiid'Sa^ 
3rd St., bet. Main & Walnut. 

LOCKSMITH AND BELL-HANGING. 

Sp RUNNER, H. J., Locksmith and Bell-Hanger, 
JJ 903 Main st. 

LUMBER DEALEE. 

NDERSOTMSlESrLumberDealerr'^^ 

1834 Grand ave. 



w 



MACHINIST; 

ITTE, AUGUST, Machine Shop and Brass 
Works, West 7th St., near Delaware. 



MARBLE WORKS. 

KISER, JOHN F., Marble Works, 
Cor. 9th & Walnut sts. 

James F. Sheehy, 

UnOADWAY, Bet. lOth & 11th Sts. 

MATTRESSES. 
Great Western Mattress Mantifactory.\ 

JOSEPH BAlIiEY, 

Mannfacturer aiid Dealer in Mattresses and Upholstery, 

MAIN ST., Bet. 11th & 13th. 



MEAT MARKET. 

INGER, JOS., Dealer in Fresh and Salt Meats, 

1707 Grand ave. 
TAMM, SAM., Dealer in Fresh and Salt Meats, 
I 1507 Grand ave. 



LAMBADER, WM., Dealer in Fresh and Salt 
Meats. 150:^ Grand ave. 

MORLET, L., Dealer in Fresh and Salt Meats, 
419 W 5th St. 

MERCHANDISE BROKER. 

GORDON, DAYID S., Merchandise Broker, 
14 W. Missouri ave. 

MILLINERY AND DRESSMAKING. 

ISRsToTiL'BARinEsr^ 

3D I^E S S 3^ -A. IC E I?. 

712 MAIN STREET. 

USTADT, R., Millinery and Fancy Goods, 

"816 Main st. 



H 



M 



UCKE, MRS. EMMA, Dress and Cloak Making 
and Millinery, 1403 Grand ave. 



Q 



UIGLET, MRS. J., Fashionable Dress and 
Cloak Making, 12th St., bet. Main & Walnut. 



S 



ACHS, MRS. R., Fashionable Milliner, 

No. 608 Main st. 



gress unattended, and, leaping from his horse, 
hitched it, and went into the chamber dressed 
in plain clothes, to read hi.s fifteen-minutes' 
inaugural. Some of the sentences of that 
short but memorable address have passed into 
proverbs. The unostentatious example thus 
set by the nation's President was wise in its 
effects. Soon the public debt was diminished, 
the army and navy reducea, and the Treasury 
replenished. A man of such marked character 
necessarily made bitter enemies, but .Jefferson 
commanded the respect of even his oj)ponents, 
while the admiration of his friends was un- 
bounded. The last seventeen j-ears of his life 
were spent at Monticello, near the place of his 
birth. By his profuse hospitality, he had, be- 
fore his death, spent his vast estates. He 
died poor in money, but rich in honor. His 
last words were, " This is the fourth day of 
July." 




^^g€t'*^ y^/Ca^*^^^' 



(FOURTH PRESIDENT. — TWO TERMS.) 

•Fames l^Iadison was born in King 
George county, Virginia, March 16, 1751, and 
died in 1836. He graduated at Princeton Col- 
lege in 1778, after which he studied law; and 
from 1809 to 1817 he was President of the Uni- 
ted States. In Congress in 1789 he became one 
of the strongest advocates of the Constitution 
and did much to secure its adoption. From his 
political principles he was obliged, though re- 
luctantly, to oppose Washington's administra- 
tion, which he did in a courteous and temper- 
ate manner. He led his party in Congress, 
where he remained till 1797. The next year 
he drafted the famous "1798-99 Resolutions," 
enunciating the doctrines of State rights, 
which, with the accompanying "'Report" in 
their defense, have been the great test-book of 
the Democratic party. He was Secretary of 



310 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



ToiE^iisr -z^. :B"crs:E3:, 




Manufacturer and Dealer in 

Ic, Odd Fell 




J 



and all other kinds ot 

REGALIA. 

K. T. and I. O. O. F. Uniforms made to order flt low fisrnres. Ban- 
ners for all societies made to order of any design. Jewels for Lofiges furnished. Write for circular. 

408 Jlaln IStreet, PEORIA, ILL. 



Peoria NoTCltj Wire Woris ! 

PEOKI.4., ILL., 

H. R. VAN EPS, 

Manufacturer of the Celebrated 

Wire-Foldinj Card Eack, Fruil Baskets 

PHOTOGRAPH RACKS, 

and other useful and ornamental 

E'Xi.^l'EX) •VT-IISE (3-OOX>S, 

The Trade. Traveling Salesmen and Country Ped 

dlers are requested to send for illustrated cata 

logue. 




(Jotfee au<t Teapot iitanil. 



®cfiiilel M©f fflrimi 



Attorziey at La^^, 



111 South Adams Street, 



Will practice in Peoria and adjoining Counties, and in the Federal and Supreme Coui'ts of 

Illinois. 

Prompt and Vigorous Attention Given to Collections. 



Refers. By special permission, to the following Eminent Firms and Citizens of Peoria, 



First National Bank, of Peoria. 

Day Bros, & Co., Wholesale & Retail Dry Goods. 

Zell & Franf-is. Disti'le s and Rectifiers. 

Peoria Tran=crint Company. 

D. J. Calligan, Wholesale and Retail Boots & Shoes 



S. H. ThoTipson & Co., Wholesale Grocers. 

Sinwpr & Wheeler. Wholesale Druggists. 

r'ol. John Warner, Mayor. 

Gen'l D. W. Maeee Postmaster. 

Howard Knowles, Collector of Internal Revenn«. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



311 




Chamber of Commerce, Peoria, III. — The erection of this building was 

completed in 1875, at a total cost of $93,000. It is built of brick, with Ohio sandstone trim- 
mings; is 61 feet wide, and 145 feet long, three stories high, with Mansard roof surmount- 
ed with a tower. It is a very h mdsome building, as the engraving shows. 



Wholesale and Retail Dealer in all Kinds of 




S02 Main St., near Post Office, Peoria, IlL 



Residence over Ware Room. 

Telegraph orders promptly attended to, day or night. 

Oldest UNDERTAKING Establishment in the city. 



312 



SKETCHES OF THE PRESIDENTS. 



State to Jefferson. After his Presidential ser- 
vices, he retired from public station. Madison's 
success was not so much the result of a great 
natural ability as of intense application and se- 
vere accuracy. His mind was strong, clear, 
and well balanced, and his meinory was won- 
derful. Like John Quincy Adams, he had laid 
up great store of learning, which he used in 
the most skillful manner. He always ex- 
hausted the subject vipon which he spoke. 
"When he had finished, nothing remained to be 
said." His private character was spotless. 
His manner was simple, modest, and uniform- 
ly courteous to his opponents. He enjoyed wit 
and humor, and told a story admirably. His 
sunny temper remained with him to the last. 
Some friends coming to visit him during his 
final illness, he sank smilingly back on his 
couch, saying, "I always talk better when I 
lie." It has been said of him, "It was his 
rare good fortune to have a whole nation for 
his friends." 




^^-<*»-»^«s-:7 



(fifth president. — TWO TERMS.) 

James Monroe was born in West- 
moreland county, Virginia, April 28, 1758, and 
died in the city of New York, July 4, 1831. lie 
filled the office of President of the United 
States from the year 1817 to 1825. As a soldier 
under General Washington he bore a brave re- 
cord, and especially distinguished himself in 
the bf/tles of Brandywine, Germantown, and 
Monmonth. Afterward he studied law, and 
entered political life. Having been sent by 
Washington as Minister to France, he showed 
such marked sympathy with that country as to 
displease the President and his cabinet, who 
were just concluding a treaty with England, 
and wished to preserve a strictly neutral pi, 
icy. He was therefore recalled. Under Jeffer- 
son, who was his warm friend, he was again 



Kansas City — Covfinued. 



MRS. A. N. TAYI.OR, 

610 MAIN STREET. 
MUSIC TEAOHEE. 

Academy of Music. Instructions given on 
Piano, Organ, and all String and Brass. In- 
struments, also Repairing of all kinds of 
Musical Instruments. 1304 Grand Ave. 



D 



NEWSPAPEE, 

AILY POST & TRIBUNE, Weekly. Westliche, 
Volkezeiilng, Wuerz & Lampe, Proprietors. 
908 Main s t. 

PAINTEES. 



BENBOW, E. M,, House, Sign and Ornamental 
Painter, No. 2 East Missouri ave. 

UOOKE'S SIGN WORKS. Chas. Brooke, Jr., 
Prop. Ilouse Painting. 5th st., near Walnut. 



B 



A. ST URGES & GO. 
Painters, Kalsominers, 

Paper-Hangers and Repairers. 

JOB WORK PROMPTLY ATTENDED TO. 

No. 1032 MAIN STREET, 

Kansas City, Mo. 



PAWN BEOKEE. 
t) AiER, S.' S.TPawu BrokerT 



424 Main st. 



PHOTOGEAPHEE. 

T>¥wlEOROS7,'^Photograi^^ 



548 Main st. 



PHYSICIANS. 
T) AKE R, H. ^ C .,'~'MrKrHomeopa th ; 



Main St. 



BOGIE, DR. M. A., 
Office, S02 Main et, Kansas City, Mo. 



pADWELL, DR. J. W., 



Office, 90-3 Main el : Residence, 1801 McGeest. 

PIERCE & GREENO, Medical and Surgical In- 
stitute, 409 Dt-laware st. 

LOAN, DR. A. B., Office, 903 Main St.; Resi- 
dence, N W. Cor. 13th & Delaware sts. 



s 



w 



ILSON, JOHN, Physician and Suryeon, 

804 Main st. 



^ PIANOS AND OEGANS. 

">0'>()VEK BRO'SHSeSerslnTianSsand'OriaD^^ 

U iW.', .M in .>-t. 



PLUMBEES AND GASFITTEES. 
FARI.EY BRO!!$. 

Fractical Flmbers, Sas I Steam Filters 

Dealers in Pumps, Brass Goods, Engine 
Trimmings, Rubber Hose, Stone, Lead and 
Iron Pipes, Gas Fixtures, Etc. 

No. SIS MAIN STREET. 

All work promptly executed and satisfaction 
guaranteed. 



SKETCHES OF TIIK PREBIDENTS 



313 



Kansas City — Contiuued. 

QHAW & BGWSHER, Plumbers and Gasfltters, 
to Cor. Ninth & Delaware ets. 

PRINTERS. 

8.D. MACDONALD, W. W. 'WATERS, PETER D. ETTJB . 

MacDonald, Waters & Etue, 

CnESClALFKINIERmTHOSIlAFBEIlS 

AND 

Blank Book Manufacturers, 

Office, 409 Delaware St. - - Kansas City, Mo. 



Blank Books with or without printed 
headings, for Corporations or Firms, fur- 
nished in the best style at St. Louis prices. 
Book and Job printing execnted with 
promptness, and forwarded bj mail without 
charge for transportation. 



S 



REAL ESTATE. 

WYGARD, JOHN P. & CO., Real Estate, Rental 
and ( ollecting Agents, 904 Main st. 



WEBSTER, ED. H., Real Estate Agent, 
603 Main st. 

RESTAURANTS AND SALOONS. 

CROWLEY & McBAE, Litt'e Church, 
< or. E. Main & Missouri ave. 
RIVINiS PARK EXCHANOE, John C. Simp- 
son. Driver, Cor. Sixteenth and Grand ave. 

KELSEY'S DINING EOOMS, 

Coi*. HFoiii'ltli «& "Wa-liiTULlt @1t@.s 
EAST SIDE MARKET SQUARE, 

MEALS AND LODGING 25 CENTS. 

This house being centrally located, is con- 
venient to all the principal business houses, 
commission merchants and street cars pass 
directly in front of the door. 

M. KELSEY, - - Proprietor. 

METB OPOLITAN 

H o t e 1 a, u d U/estaur-ani; , 

IN NELSON BLOCK, Kansas City, Mo. 
Meals at all hours, open Day and Night. JOHN 
McQUEENY, Proprietor. 

Farmers' Dining Rooms, 

115 N. SIDE MARKET SQUARE. 

O CHAEFER, PHILLIP, Saloon and Restaurant, 

(O Cor. Levee & Grand ave 

lENNA GARDEN RESTAURANT, S. W. tor- 
Missouri ave , and Walnut St., S. Caro, Prop. 

" ' SADDLERY HARDWARE. 

ASKEW, W. W. & v.. Leather and Saddlery. 
Hardware, N. E. Cor. Third and Delaware sts. 



sent to France in 1803, when he secured the 
purchase of Louisiana, lie is said to have al- 
ways taken particuiai' pride in this transac- 
tion, regarding hi.s j)art in it as among the 
most important of his public services. Soon 
after his inauguration as President, he visited 
the military posts in the north and east, with a 
view to thorough acquaintance with the capa- 
bilities of tlio countiy in the event of future 
hostilities. This tour was a great success. He 
wore a blue military coat of home-spun, light- 
colored breeches, and a cocked hat, being the 
undress uniform of a Revolutionary' officer. 
Thus was the nation reminded of his former 
military services. This, with his plain, unas- 
suming manners, completely won the hearts of 
the people, and brought an overwhelming ma- 
jority to the support of the administration. 
Monroe was a man more prudent than brilliant, 
who acted with a single eye to the welfare of 
the country. Jefferson said of him : "If his 
soul were turned inside out, not a spot could be 
found on it." Like that beloved friend, he 
died "poor in money, but rich in honor," and 
like him also, he passed away on the anniver- 
sary of the independence of the country he 
served so faithfully. 




5^ a L4JL*)*i 

( SIXTH PRESIDENT. ) 

Jolm Qitiiicy Adams was born at 
Braintree, Mass., July 11, l^BT, and died at 
Washington, February 23, 1848. He was Pres- 
ident from 1825 to 1829. 

John Q. Adams was a man of learning, of 
blam^-'ess reputation and unquestioned patri- 
otisn ^resident he was hardly mora 

successful I,.... ais father. This was, doubt- 
less, owing greatly to the fierce opposition 
which assailed him from the friends of disap- 
pointed candidates, who at once combined t» 
weaken his measures and prevent his re-elec- 
tion Their candidate was Andrew Jackson, a 



814 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



Kansas City — Continued. 



SCHOOL DESKS. 

GOOLMAN'S 

Folding School Desk, 

mm m ball seats, 

Patented, June 23, 1874. 

GOO LM AN'S 

Improved Standard Scales, 

Patented May, 23rd, 1871. - Manufactured by 

Tl GOOLMAN CO, 

Cor. Walnut & 20th Sts., 

KANSAS CITY, MO. 

^p='All kinds of castings made to order and 
scales repaired. 



SEEDS. 

T^^'RACTTH^TFJi^'MaSidner^^ 
Seeds, 41 5 Walnut st. 

SEWING MACHINES, 

AC^LM^rJ^^GTrBeaKrhTaTr^indi^^ 
ing Machines, 1030 Main St. 



M 



SHOW CASES. 

A. rT^DTACKSOIV, 

Manufacturer of all Kinds of 

Show Cases, 

A Large Assortment on Hand. 
226 Main St.. - Kansas City, Mo. 



B 



TAILORS. 

XCEK^C., Cleaning and Repairing. 
Cor Fourth and Main, under Barnum's Hotel 



Kansas City — Continued. 



N 



BOSS, 0., Merchant Tailor, Twelfth St., be- 
tween Walnut and Grand ave. 
OOK, WILLIAM, Tailor, Scouring and Repair- 
in g done neatly, 20 Mi^'sonri ave. 

T3IEKEN, JOHN W., Merchant Tail r and Ropair- 
X\> er, N. E. Cor. Ninth and Ma in sts. 

TOBACCO AND CIGARS. 



BEITMAN BROS., Manufacturers and Jobbers of 
Cigars, 1410 Grand ave. 
ISHOP, C. G. & CO., Cigars and Tobacco, 

420 Main st. 



B 



J. M. CONNOR £ CO., 

Manufacturers of 

CHOICE CIGARS, 

And dealers in all kinds of 

Cigars, Tobaccos, Pipes, Etc. 

Bet. Fifth & Missouri Ave., KANSAS CITY, MO. 



DAVIDSON, B., Dealer in Cigars and Tobacco, 
522 Delaware st. 

JELLINECK, TONY A., Cigar Maker, 
722 Main st. 



M 



ADICK, JOS., Cigar Maker, 



610 Main st. 



TRANSFER 00. 

HOFFMAN, HARRY G., With R. R. Transfer Co. 
No 14 W. Missouri ave. 

TRUNK MANUFACTURER. 

G''~''"'^ORGEriAHJISrTraiiK'Mani^ 
558 Main st 

TYPE FOUNDRY. • 

TYPK, EI.ECTROTYPES, 

CARD & PAPER CUTTERS, 

BRA$$ RUUES, LEA08, $LUC$, &0., 

Presses, Cabinets, Cases, Stands, 

Galleys, Inks. Bronzes, Roller Composition, &c. 

J. T. RETON, ... - Proprietor. 
UNDERTAKER. 

And Dealer in 

ic Burial Cases and Caskets, 

Also, Wooden Coffins of all Sizes. Embalming 
done with perfect success 

No. 914 MAIN STREET. 



WATCHES AND JEWELRY. 

HAYTER, E., Watchmaker and Jeweler, 
903'/2 Main st . 

CEEGER, HENRY R., Jeweler and Instrument 
O Maker, Missouri ave. bet. Main & Walnut. 



WINES AND LIQUORS. 

FEINE.MAN, B. A. & CO., Wholesale Liquors, 
414 Delaware st. 

YAN, JOHN, Wholesale dealer in Pure Ken- 
tucky Whiskies, 523 Main st. 



R 



KANSAS CITY BUSINESS HOUSES 

When Estahlished. 



CONNOR, J. N. & CO., Cigar Manufac- 
turers, 1875. 

FARLEY BROS., Plumbers, 1873. 

THE GOOLMAN CO., School Desk, 
1870. 

WEBSTER, ED. H., Real Estate, 1865. 



W. KANSAS CITY, MO. 

BARBERS. 

E""TmABBsrTH6MASrBarber^ " 

1224 W. Ninth St. 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OF THE CENTURY. 



315 




hi^*^^T)finSf„^f?^^'Hn*,'J^-~™^ building has a front of 40 feet with a depth of 36, two stories 
nigh. Ihe outside of the building is covered enurelv with hickory bark, interspersed with Banels laid 
m diagonal stvle. The roof is tin and the eaves are draped with hill moss from the Strte of E 'sioui 
There are 68 different varieties of wood used in the building, all from the Sta^e it renresents ft has 
SinTroor '''°^°''^' visitors, and two for ladies-one for a ladies' parlo^'Ind the other'a 




ir! /^ ?R-f^q'h^ ;:i?^fJh'''^- °'''-;"^^^*^^P'*°^ '^^* changed temporarily from Charleston to Wheel- 
1^-^t fil o , "*^ of Wheeling oflered to erect a building with ample accommodations, eivin" the nte 
fLoU.VJAJr??^ ''k"'" f 'ate would occupy it as a capitol Upon the acceptance of this generbas offer 
the cit.v erected the above building. It wa* completed in July, 1875. The bliildiucr is 200 feet in length 
each wmg being 50x112 feet. The height of the main tower is 150 feet. The buildin- cost $95 000 " ' 



316 



SKETCHES OF THE PRESIDENTS. 



man whose dashing boldness, energy and de- 
cision attracted the popular masses, and hid 
the more quiet virtues of Adams. To add to 
his perplexities, a majority of the House, and 
nearly one-half of the Senate, favored the new 
party; and his own Vice-President, John C. 
Calhoun, was also the candidate of the opposi- 
tion, and of course committed to it. To stem 
such a tide was a hopeless effort. In two 
years Adams was returned to Congress, where 
he remained until his death, over sixteen 
years afterward. Ten years of public seivice 
were thus rendered after he had passed his 
"three-score years and ten," and so great was 
his ability in "^debate at this extreme age, that 
he was called '' the old man eloquent.' Like 
his father, he was a wonderful worker, and his 
mind was a complete store-house of facts. He 
lived economically, and left a large estate. He 
was the congressional advocate of anti-slav- 
ery, and a bitter opponent of secret societies. 
His fame increased with his age, and he died a 
trusted and revered champion of popular 
rights. He was siezed with paralysis while 
occupying his seat in Congress, after which he 
lingered two days in partial unconsciousness. 
His last words were, " This is the last of earth: 
I am content. ' 




(seve:xth pkesident. — two terms.) 

Andrew Jiifltsoii was born in Wax- 
haw settlement, Xoith or South Carolina, 
March 15, 1707, and died at the Hermitage, 
near Nashville, June 8, 1845. He served as 
President of the United States from 1829 to 
1837. 

The nomination of Presidential candidates 
by "Convention," as the term is now under- 
stood and applied, dates from the year 1832. 
At the first election Jackson was nominated by 



W. Kansas City — Continued. 



WOODLAND, J. W., Barber, 
Cor. Mulberry and Union ave. 



BLACKSMITH. 

lGEMrP£T15RriSacksmitir&^^^ 

9th and Hickory. Est. 1875. 



M 



O 



'KEEFE & DE FRIES, General Blacksmiths, 

Eleventh near Liberty. 



SEISS £ VOGT, 

BLAC KS3IITHS, 

Sauta Fe and Ninth Street, 

Special Attention given to Dressing Mill Picks. 

BOARDING AND LODGING, 

P^^^JRyiSrSMTM^rBoafdandlxidgingr 
Cor. Ninth and Hickory ets. 

BOOTS AND SHOES. 
THOMAS DANLAJi, 

BOOT & SHOE MAKER, 

St. Louis Avenue near Mulberry Street. 

BOOT & SHOE MAKER. 

Mulberry bet. Ninth & St. Louis ave. 

HAKESPERE, WM., Boot and Stioe Maker, 

Cor. Twelfth and Liberty sts. 



s 



^EMENT AND PIPE CO. 

rearWoneamTpiMmaiswactB™ 

C. A. Brackett, Supt. 



P 



DRUGGIST. 

IMMSnLTTTDrug'glstr 

Cor. Ninth and Mulberry st. 



s 



B 



DRY GOODS, 

EE HIVE DRY GOODS STORE, John Lloyd, 
Proprietor, Twelfth and Liberty St. 



N. HOLZMARK, 

Dry Goods & Clothing^ 

Ninth bet. Hickory & Mulberry, 

ELEVATOR CO. 
\ DVANCE ELEVATOR CO., 



J^ 



West Kansas City, Mo. 



FLOUR AND FEED. 

mil£igan^£^cuiib y, 

Jobbers in 

Flour and Feed, 

And all descriptions of Country Produce, 
1220 UNION AVENUE, 

West Kansas City, Mo. 



M 



GROCERIES, 

ILLER, GEO., Family Grocery & Provisions 
1321 Union avenue. 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OF THE CENTURY. 



317 




Delaware State Building, Centennial Exposition, Pliila.— Is 54 by 34 feet in size, and two 
stories hiab. It is built on the Swiss Gothic style of architectnre, composed of wood entirely from the 
State of Delaware. Ii is occupied by the State Commissioners, the first floor being used as reception 
rooms, while the seronu flnor is devoted to business purposes. 




POST OFFICE, COVINGTON, KY. 



318 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



W. Kansas City — Contiymed. 



MITCHELL, MRS. D., Grocery, 
9th St.. near Bell st. 



M 



ORIABTY, J. D., Groceries & Produce, 

Cor. Bell & 9th ets. 



McMAIN & CO., 

GROCERIES, FEED and GRAIN, 

Cor. Mulberry & St. Louis sts. 

NUGENT & FINDCANE, Groceries & feed, 
153.3 W. 12th 8t. 

RUFF, GEORGE, Grocery & Restaurant, 
9th bet. Mulberry & SautaPests. 



MEAT MARKETS, 



TDURNETT, WM., Meat Market, 



JD 



9th & Mulberry sts. 



A. ROGERS, 

1408 12th St., W. Kansas City. 

MILLINERY, ETC. 
MRS. V. CUOUQUETTE, 

MILLINERY k HAIR WORK, 

West Kansas City, Mo. 



PHOTOGRAPHER, 
"DOWER, H. C, Photographer, 



1^22 Union ave. 



SALOONS AND RESTAURANTS. 

CHICAG6H0lJSfSAn)0N 

J. W. CONKLIN, Proprietor, 
1306 West Ninth street, West Kansas City. 



J.M. HEAVEY, 

csi^s .A. Xi o o 3sr n^^^^ 

Open day and ni<:ht, free lunch at sU hours. 
Cor. Twellth and Wyoming sts., W. K ansas City. 

Ml NT SALO O N , 

LAWRENCE FLOOD, Prop,, 
1196 West Ninth street. West Kansas City. 



WM. O'CONNELL, 
Cor. 9th & Wyoming sts., W. Kansas City. 



JOHN PARETTI, 



ST. JOBS EESTAURMT & SALOON, 

0pp. Union Depot, W. Kansas City. 



TIN, COPPER AND SHEETTRON.^^^^^ 
"^"TTsTnEALDT" 

JOB, IIS, COPPER m SHEET IRON SHOP, 

Cor. Mulberry st. & St. Louis ave., 
WEST KANSAS CITY. 



B 



W. Kansas City — Continued. 



TAILORS. 

ERGER7sl3*anor&^R^pairerr 

9ih St., bet. Mulberry* Santa Fe sts, 



PAULICH, L., TaiL.r <fc Repairer, 
Hickory St., bet. Union ave. & 12th st. 

TOBACCO AND CIGARS, 

CIGAR di TOBACCO MANF'R, 

811 Santa Fe st, W. Kansas City. 

AWSON, JULIUS, Manuf'r of Cigars, W. Kansas 
City, Mo. Established 1872. 

GEORGE STEINMILLER, 
Man'f of and dealer in 

CIGARS AND TOBACCOS 

Ninth street, bet. Mulberry & Santa Fe sts, 
WEST KANSAS CITY, MO. 



WATCHES AND JEWELRY^ 
O. C. SHULL, 

WATCHMAKER AND REPAIRER, 

West Kansas City. 
WELL AUGER. 

BROCKETT PATENT WELL AUGER, C. A. 
Brockett & Co.. W. Kansas City, Mo. 

MILWAUKEE. WIS. 



ATTORNEY AT LAW. 

E"~ifwTlCJ^"B'T~Altorney~arXavr^^ 
Patents, Iron Block. 



ARCHITECTS AND SUPERINTENDENTS. 
G. COLDEWE, 

ARCHITECT, 

And Superintendent, 

Opera House Block, Room 17, residence 831 6th st. 

D' AVELA.iK, WM., Architect & Practical Bnild- 
ing Superintendent, 452 E. Water st. 
AJiDGUTH, A. S., Architect, 

379 3d St. cor. State st. 



BAKERS AND CONFECTIONERS. 

ARMSTRONG, S. W., Baker & Conlectioner, 
140 Mason St. Established 1873. 



L 



ANGE, CHAS., Confectionery, 



521 E. Water 6t. 



BELL-HANGER AND LOCKSMITH. 



WM. FRANKE. 



SELL-HAESK AND tmn OF LOCKS 

47 Oneida St., 
OPPOSITE GKAND OPERA HOUSE. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



319 




COURT HOUSE, MADISOX, WIS. 



TAILORS 



423) Mast Water Blnreet. 



MILWAUKEE, 



WIS. 



31 



320 



SKETCHES OF THE PKESIDENTS. 



the Legislature of Tennessee aud other States, 
as well as by several bodies of citizens and 
Conventions, but the first regularly constitu- 
ted Convention of a party as an organized 
body, and fulfilling all the assumed functions 
of the old Congressional Caucus, met at Balti- 
more, on the 22d of May, 1832, and nominated 
Jackson aud Van Buren as the Democratic can- 
didates for President and Vice President. The 
Whig candidates, less "regularly" nominated, 
were Henry Clay and John Sergeant, of Penn- 
sylvania,who were the anti-Masonic candidates. 
The leading issue of the campaign grew out of 
the question of the re-charter of the United 
States Bank, the Whigs favoring and the Dem- 
ocrats opposing it. 

Jackson was of Scotch-Irish descent. His 
father died before he was born, and his mother 
was very poor. As a boy, Andrew was brave 
and impetuous, passionately fond of athletic 
aports, but not at all addicted to books. His 
life was crowded with excitement and adven- 
ture. At fourteen, being captured by the Brit- 
ish, he was ordered to clean the eonunander's 
boots. Showing the true American spirit in 
his refusal, he was sent to prison with a wound 
on head and arm. Here he had the small-pox, 
which kept him ill for several months. Soon 
after his mother had effected his exchange, she 
died of ship-fever while caring for the impris- 
oned Americans at Charleston. Left entirelj- 
destitute, young Jackson tried various employ- 
ments, but finally settled down to the law, and 
in 1796 was elected to Congress. His imperious 
temper and inflexible will supplied him with 
constant quarrels. Often thej' were passion- 
ate word-contests, sometimes they became 
hand-to-hand encounters, and on one occasion 
a formal duel was fought, in which he killed 
his adversary, himself laeing severely wound- 
ed. The scars he bore upon his person were 
of wounds received in private battles, some of 
which left a mark for life. Jackson first dis- 
tinguished himself as a military officer in the 
war against the Creek Indians, which he made 
a signal victory. His dashing successes in the 
war of 1812 completed his reputation, and ulti- 
mately won him the Presidency. His nomina- 
tion was at first received in many States with 
ridicule, as, whatever might be* his military 
prowess, neither his temper nor his ability 
seemed to recommend him as a statesman. 
However, his re-election proved his popular 
success as a President. His chief intellectual 
gifts were energy and intuitive judgment. He 
was thoroughly honest, intensely warm-heart- 
ed, and had an instinctive horror of debt. His 
moral courage was as great as his physical, 
and his patriotism was undoubted. He died at 
the "Hermitage," his home near Nashville, 
Tennessee. Jackson and Adams were born the 
same year, yet how different was their child- 
hood ! One born to luxury and travel, a stu- 
dent from his earliest years, and brilliantly 
educated; the other poor, hating books, and 
seeking any kind of work to escape from want. 
Yet they were destined twice to compete for 
the highest place in the nation. Adams, the 
first time barely successful, was unfortunate 
in his administration; Jackson, triumphing 
the second, was brilliant in his Presidential 
career. 



M I LWAUKEE — Conthmed. 



BASKETS AND WILLOW WAEE, 

[cinjEzTvOC^nf^randTd^^ 
) Willow Ware, 148 Reed st. 



BILLIAKD AND POOL TABLES. 

ERNST PLANER, """™ "~ 
Manufacturer of Billiard & Pool Tables, (with 
Delauy's Patent Steel Spring Cn?hion.) importer 
and dealer in Billiard Goods, Trimmings, Ivory 
Balls, Cushion and Frame Bolts, Cues, etc., 607 
Cedar St., Milwaukee. Particular attention given 
to orders in the country. 

BOTTLER OF BEER, ALE, ETC, 

W3I, BUNTROCKy 

Bottler of 

Milwaukee Lager Beer 

From Best and Schlitz Brewing Company's. 

ALE AND PORTER. 

417 and 443 East Water street, Milwaukee, Wis. 



BOILER WORKS. 

E"""'^VISTONrJV'rt\rBoilerw^ 
way & 281 & 283 Chicago st. 

BOOKSELLERS AND STATIONERY^ 

^^TSUL^ER & CO., 

289 Third street, 



German & English Periodicals promptly deliv- 
ered to any part of the city. School Books, Sta- 
tionery, etc., always on hand. We call particular 
attention to our Antiquarian Department. We 
will purchase entire Libraries, as well as single 
Volumes. 

BOOTS AND SHOES. 

(mLEBPfVSLr^Ianurr and dealerTir'Boot^ 
Shoes & Rubbers, 411 3d st. 



'CHULTZ, F., Boot & Shoe Maker, 



132 Mason st. 



BRASS FOUNDER. 

ELLEN, WM.. Brass Founder. Brass castings 
made to order, 168 Clinton st. 



M 



CARRIAGES, BUGGIES AND SLEIGHS. 



L 



ANK & HEILE, Manf'r of Carriages, Buggies & 
Sleighs, 217 Broadway & 93 Chestnut U^ 



CARRIAGE WOOD WORK. 
Manul'r of all kinds of 

wiASE m imi WOOD woe 

219 Milwaukee st. 

3Xil>vanlcee. - - Wis. 



Orders by mail promptly attended to. 

CIGAR BOXES. 

HARTMANN & SUHK, ManTr of Cigar Boxes, 
74 Biddle st. cor. Market st. 



SKETCHES (^F THE PRESIDENTS. 



321 



M 1 1, w A u K E E — Continued 

. STH.XJI»I»E3, 

Manaf'r of and dealer in 



Edgings, L'lbck Trimmings, Brands, Ribbons, 

317 & 319 Mineral street, near Reed street. 
CIVIL ENQINEERS. 

CHAS. A. VON BORCKE. " ^^^Francis Benzler. 

Ohas. A. von Borcke & Co., 

CIVIL ENGINEERS, 

Surveyors, Architects, Landscape Sarieners 

ASD DRAUGHTSMEN, 

Room 14, Opera House Building, (Oneida st.) 

>XIL\VAXJIiEE. 

Also, publishers of the New City Map of Mil- 
waukee. 



COMMISSION MERCHANTS. 

RItiGS & CARY, Commission Merchants, 
306 Broadway. Established 1874. 

__552CKERY^iNDGLASSWAE^^ 

USIIEN, W., dealer in crockery & Glassware, 
317 & 319 Chestnut St. 

HERMANN MARTIN, 

Dealer in Crockery and Glassware, 

415 Chestnut st, 
Milwaukee, - - _ Wis. 



D 



E 



DENTIST. 

>'MMKRLiNGV JOSTc^TlJentfst,' Mafer'^s "Block, 
164 & 166 Reed St. Established 1864. 



DRUGGIST. 
iPUtiiEB, FRANK W., Druggistr 



KJ 



352 Milwaukee st. 



ENGRAVERS AND LITHOGRAPHERS. 

K'""irADBERr3T"^lXk,"Lithogra^ ■ 

& Printers, 1 Spring st. Established 1867. 



M 



ARR & RICHARDS, Designers & Engravers on 
Wood, S. W. cor. E. Water & Wisconsin sts. 




Of Kvery Oescription, 

60 Oneida st, 

M:iLi;vAXJiiEE, - w^is. 



fW° Orders promptly attended to. 



B 



GUNSMITH. 

OLKENIUS, ALBERT, Ounsmilh and Dealer in 
Guns, Rifles, Pistols, 501 E. Water st. 




(EIGHTH PRESIDENT.) 

lllartin Van Biireii wa.s boru at 
Kinderhook, New York, December 5, 1782, and 
and died, at the same place, July 24, 1862. He 
studied law and was admitted to practice in 
1803; was elected President of the United 
States, and served four years, from 1837 to 
1841. He early took an interest in politics, 
and in 1818 started a new organization of the 
Democratic party in New York, his native 
State, which had the power for over twenty 
years. In 1831 he was appointed Minister to 
England, whither he went in September, but 
when the nomination came before the Senate 
in December it was rejected, on the ground 
that he had sided with England against the 
United States, on certain matters, and had 
carried party contests and their results into 
foreign negotiations. His party regarded this 
as an extreme political persecution, and the 
next year elected him to the Vice-Presidency. 
He thus became head of the Senate which a 
few months before had condemned him, and 
where he now performed his duties with " dig- 
nitv, courtesy and impartiality.'' 

As a President, Van Buren was the subject 
of much partisan censure. The country was 
passing throug a peculiar crisis, and his was a 
difficult position to till with satisfaction to all. 
That he pleased his own party is proved from 
the fact of his re-nomination in 1840 against 
Harrison. In 1844 he was once more urged by 
his friends, but failed to get a two-thirds vote 
in the convention on account of his opposition 
to the annexation of Texas. In 1848 he be- 
came a candidate of the " Free Democracy, a 
new party advocating anti-slavery principles. 
After this he retired to his estate in Kinder- 
hook. N. Y., where he died. 



322 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 




Cataract, 
Gravel, 
Hernia, 
'Trephine' 

Amputations, 

'Ovariotomy, 

Tracheototomy, 

Staphiloraphy, 

Artificial Pupil, 

Fistula-Laclirymalis, 

Cross-Eye, 




Hare-Lip, 
Clwb-Foot, 
Wry-Neck, 



Varicocele, 
Hydrocele, 
Pliyniosis, 



Enlarged Tonsils, Pistiila, 
Pterygium, 
Ectropion, 
Tumors, 
Wens, 
Anurism, 
Tarix, 



Piles, 
Cancers, 
Ulcers, 

Plastic Surgery, 
Artificial Eyes, 
And all other 



Surgical Diseases of every kind. 



!Lung and Head Diseases, 
Scrofula, 
Syphilis, 

Tubercolisis. 
Dropsy, 



Scorbutus, 
Epilepsy, 
Neuralgia, 
Paraligsis, 
Chorea, 



Ozena, &c., &c. 



Perl, ct familiarity in the use of the Stethoscope, the Laryngoscope, and Rhinoscope, 
the Ophtlialmoscope, and all other newly discovered an;i unimproved mstruments for the 
diagnosis of the diseases of chest, throat, nose, eve and other organs. 

Persons writing to me, will not forget to give their Postoffice, Town, County and State; 
and when ordering medicine by express, their express office always enclosing the old labels 
where medicine is to be repeated. 

The best tmie for surgical operations is during the temperate Spring and Fall months, 
April, May and October, and more especially for operations on the eye, as cataract, artificial 
Pupil, c^c. 

I flit up an Alterative, or remedy for Secondary and Tertiary Syphilis, called Medici- 
x.\ Americ.\n.'\, and a remedy for Sexual Debility and Spermatorrhea, etc , called. 
Know Nothing, a superior remedy. Another for Heart Diseases of valuable efficacy. — 
Any of which medicines can be sent by express in quantities of half dozen or more bottles. 

For details send to me for circular. 

GALEN E. BISHOP. M.D., 

Academy of Medicine, cok. 3D and Jule Sts., 

Establishe.! 1846. ST- tTOSSFZZ, ]^AO- 



IMPORTANT KVRKTS OF THE CENTURY. 



323 




324 



SKETCHES OF THE PRESIDENTS. 




(ninth president.) 

"William Henry Harrison was 

born in Charles City county, Virginia, Febru- 
ary 9, 1773. He entered the army in 1791, af- 
ter graduating from Hampden-Sydney Col- 
lege. After reaching the grade of Captain he 
resigned in 1797; was chosen delegate to Con- 
gress from the North-western Territory in 
1797; appointed governor of Indiana in 1801, 
and continued to 1813. He was elected Presi- 
dent of the United States in 1840, and had 
scarcely entered upon the duties of his office 
when he died at Washington, April 4, 1841. In 
1812 he distinguished himself during the war, 
especially in the battle of the Thames. His 
military reputation made him available as 
a Presidential candidate. His character was 
unimpeachable, and the chief slur cast upon 
him by his opponents was that he had lived in 
a " log cabin " with nothing to drink but "hard 
cider." His friends turned this to good ac- 
count. The campaign was noted for immense 
mass-meetings, long processions, song-singing 
and general enthusiasm. "Hard cider" be- 
came a party watch-word, and " log cabins " a 
regular feature in the popular parades. He 
was elected by a very large majority, and great 
hopes were entertained of his administration. 
Though advanced in years, he gave promise of 
endurance. But "he was beset by office-seek- 
ers; he was anxious to gratify the numerous 
friends and supporters who flocked about him; 
he gave himself incessantly to public busi- 
ness; and at the close of the month he was on 
a sick bed." His illness was of eight days' 
duration. His last words were, " The princi- 
ples of the government, I wish them carried 
out. I ask nothing more." 



M I LWAUKEE — Continued. 



HARNESS AND SADDLES. 

SCHAEFER, CHAS., Harness, Saddles, Whips, 
&c., 503 E. Water st. Estab. 1872. 

" HOTELS. 

HASS' HOTEL, (Formerly " European Hof,") 
553 & 555 East Water St., Milwaukee, Wis. 
This Hotel has been entirely renovated and travel- 
ers will find there a pleasant Home. Boarders 
taken. Good Stabling for Farmers. 
^ J. C. HASS, Prop. 

NEWHALL HOUSE. J. F. Antisdel, Prop. 
Th e most popular bouse in the city . 

INSECT POWDERS. ~ 

InfalliUs Insect and Vemin Destroyer 

is the only perfect and successful Extermin- 
ator in this country, to make clean work of 
Bedbugs, Fleas, Flies, Ants, Cockroaches, 
Mo.hs, Mosquitos, Lice on Canary Birds, 
Plants, Fowls and Animals. 205 Second 
Street. Please send for circular. 

IRON WORKS. 

UNION IRON WORKS 
BAYLEY & GREENSLADE, 

Architectural Iron Work, 

Castings of all Descriptions, Vault Doors, Roofs 
and Bridges. Cast and Wrought Iron Railings and 
Greetings, Etc. Jail and Court House work a 
specialty. 

Established 1856. MILWAUKEE. 

WEXZEIi TOEPFEB, 

Manufacturer of Iron Railings, Doors,Cells,Ianks 
SMOKE STACKS, 

Beer Coolers, Malt Kilns, Perforated Sheet 
Metals and all kinds of Iron Work, 

Nos. SO & 88 Utenomojiee St., bet. E. Water 
St. <t" Broo'In'nt) Bridgf, MHiviiitkfe, Wis. 

JULS. G. WAGNER, 

(Successor to Hornbach & Wagner,) 

ArcMifictial Iron f oris, 

516, 518 & 520 MARKET ST., MILWAUKEE, WIS. 

JEWELER-MANUFACTURER. 
E. A. II. EEIDEE, 

MannRcturliJeweleryiamoiiflSetter 

523 E. Water St., Milwaukee. 
LAUNDRY. 

OKIE]^TAI. liArWDRY, 

MKS. J. COOKMAN, Proprietress. 
197 E. WATER ST. 

Work done in first-class style. 



SKETCHES OF THE PRESIDENTS. 



325 



M I LWAUKEE — Continued. 



LETTEE CUTTER. 
CHASriirciCARKE, 

■ Flour Brands and Seals a Specialty. 82 WISCONSIN ST 

_^J[.O0KS AND HOUSE TRIMMINGS. 
Adam Loeflfelholz. Robert Durr. 

A. LOEFFELHOLZ & CO. 

Manufacturers of 

Locks, Silvsr Oicksl-Flated Bouse Trimmings 

Agents for Western Electric Burglar Alarms, 
Eleclric and Jackson's Hotel andDwelling House 
Annunciators, Electric Call Bells. Sole agents for 
J. P. WolleDsacli's Transom Lifters. 84 Mason st. 

MACHINISTS. 

THOS. CORBETT & CO. 

BUILDERS OP l'.'^ 

Steam Fire Engines, Engines and Machinery, 

Also Manufacturers of 

Corbett's Aatomatic GoverDor and Variable Cat-Off. 

1S5 & 137 FERKY ST., 
Office, 256 Lake St. MILWAUKEE, WIS. 

KLEINSTEUBER, C. F., Machinist and Engrav- 
er, 318 State st. 

MATHEMATICAL INSTRUMENTS. 

~~l\/M7rHUffMAMr 

PHILOSOPHICAL 

Malleiatical Instmnit Mater. 

Engineers' Transits, Levels, Theodolites, Com- 
passes, Galvanic Batteries, Mas^netic, Electric 
Machines, Ship Compasses and Spy Glasses Re- 
paired^ 397 EAST WATER ST. 

^^^^^^ MAP PUBLISHERS. 

Established 1846. 

S. CHAPMAX & S05f, 

MAP FlfBLISHEH^ 

12'^ & 124 Grand Ave., Upstairs. 

Maps, Show Bills, Pictures Mounted to Order, 

Maps Drafted, Estimates Made, Map 

Paper for Sale, etc., etc. 

S. Chapman. P. N. A. Chapman. 



PAINTERS. 

BIERBACH, GEO. E., Wagon and Carriage Paint- 
iug, llu Clybourn st. 

ALEX. HARPER k CO. 



GRAINING & I'ALSI MINING. 

415 Spring Street, Milwaukee. 

Wall Painting and Tinting a Specialty. 




(TENTH PRESIDENT.) 

John Xyler was born in Charles Citj 
county, Virginia, March 20, 1790, and died at 
Richmond, Va., January 17, 1862. He studied 
law, and was elected to Congress in 1816, and 
served some five years; was elected U. S. Sen- 
ator in 1827; re-elected in 1833, and was Presi- 
dent of the Peace Convention at Washington 
in 1861. 

Mr. Tyler became President upon the death 
of Mr. Harrison as his constitutional successor 
as Vice President of the United States. John 
Tyler was in early life a great admirer of 
Henry Clay, and is said to have wept with sor 
row when the whigs in convention rejected his 
favorite candidate for the Presidency, and se- 
lected Harrison. He was nominated Vice- 
President by a unanimous vote, and was a 
great favorite with his party. In the popular 
refrain, "Tippecanoe and Tyler too," the peo- 
ple sung praises to him as heartily as to Harri- 
son himself. The death of Harrison and the 
succession of Tyler, was the first instance of 
the kind in our history. 

Tyler's administration was not successful. 
He "opposed the measures of his party, and 
made free use of the veto power. His former 
political friends denounced him as a renegade, 
to which he replied that he had never pro- 
fessed to endorse the measures which he op- 
posed. The feeling increased in bitterness. 
All his cabinet, except Webster, resigned. He 
was, however, nominated by a convention com- 
posed chiefly of olfice-holders, for the next 
Presidency; he accepted, but, finding no popu- 
lar support, soon withdrew from the canvass. 
In 1861 he became the presiding oflicer of the 
peace convention in Washington. All efl^orts 
at reconciliation proving futile, he renounced 
his allegiance to the United States and fol- 
lowed the Confederate fortunes. He died in 
Richmond, where he was in attendance as a 
member of the Confederate Congress. 



326 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



Milwaukee — Contitmed. 



PATENT SOLICITOR, 

SMITH, J. B., Solicitor of Patents, 
19 I'fi s ter's Bl ock. Estab. li^56 . 

PATTERN AND MODEL MAKERS, 

Giljohann & Dietrich, 

PATTERN MAKERS, 

216 East Water St., Cor. Chicago. 

Models and Patterns made for Stoves, 
Ranges, Furnaces, Machinery Buildings, 
Etc. 

H. F. KRAFT & CO. 

Model and Paitern Maimers 

And Manufacturers of Fancy Goocls, of Silver 
and Plated Ware, Fire Gilders, Gold, Silver and 
Nickel Platers. 228 & 230 Cedar St. Manu- 
facturers of anything In fine machinery, from a 
Marine Chronometer to a two horse-power feteam 
Engine. 



F 



PHYSICIAN. 

LYnS, L YTTONTMniTr 

Office & Residence, 1.36 & 138 Grand ave 



PICTURE FRAMES, 

ERNEfi7KriianufViturer"^nOea^^ 
ture Frames, 432 Broadway. 

PHOTOGRAPHERS, 

PiTIRAPHEll 

N. W. Cor. of M 4 Chestnut Sts., (Senn's Block,) 

ROADWELL, D., Palace Photographic Studio, 

133 Mason st. 

E. H. CAXFIEI.D, 



224 & 236 GRAND AVE. 



306 GRAND AVE. 306. 

PHOTOGRAPHIC STUDIO. 

p. LENZ. Proprietor. Burnished Photographs, 
$2.00 per Dozen. Satisfaction guaranteed. 

Uallery of Art & PliotopapMc Studio, 

421 E. WATER ST., Bet. Mason & Wisconsin. 



D 



PLATER, 

AVRnO^^rGold^andTsnverHat^^ 
Gliding, 1 Grand ave. 



PLUMBER AND GASFITTER, 



O 



PAL, H. C, Plumber and Gasfitter, 



Milwaukee — Continued. 



207 Reed St. 



PRINTER-BOOK AND JOB. 

Established 1876. 

AUG. M. FIELDBERG, 

BOOK AND JOB PRINTEE; 

Nos. 164 & 166 Reed St., South Side. 
The Only Place in the City where the Scandina- 
vian Languages are executed. Translations: 
German, Swedish, ;Morwegian. 

RESTAURANT. 

H~~^'AMmM7TnrT?ranT^venue'~^eSSi^^ 
Meals at all hours, 216 Grand ave. 

SASH, DOOR AND BLINDS, 

C' 'ONWAYrwTlJ^rSash, P.lluds aucTDoorai ' 
52 to 70 Third st. Est. 1855. 

ILLEB, WM., Sash, Doors, Bliads and Orna- 
mental Wood Work, Est. 1866, 315-323 Cedar 



w 



SAW MAXER. 

M""'"TiJE"Y,"1C'N^S^av MaK^and^Repa^ 
130 Clinton st. 

STOVES, RANGES AND TINWARE. 
Manufacturer of 

Sheet Iron & Tin Plate Work, 

CONDUCTORS, GUTTERS, ROOFING, 
In all stvles and in best manner. Agent for 

DUTCH KR, YOSE & ADAMS. 

Furnaces, Stoves, Ranges, Repaired, Cleaned and 
Put Up. Refrigerators and Filters Re-Packed as 
Good as new. All work warranted. 

128 MASON STREET. 

PETER POERTNER, 

General Jobber in 

noors, mini conductors, £I& 

stoves, Tin and Sheet Iron Work. 



35 Oneida St., 



Milwaukee, Wis. 



Repairing done at short notice. Second 
Hand Stoves Bought and Sold. 

LOEBEL, (JEO. A., Dealer in Hardware, Stoves, 
&c.. 529 Chestnut st. 



TAILORS, 

DLL AND, L., Merchant T^^o'r^ Repairing neat- 
done, 381 Spring st. 



B 



BUETON & SCHRAEGER, Merchant Tailors, 
423 E. Water st. 

AUGUST FELDT. 
FASHIONABLE 



475 E.. "W"-A.TEIi STPIEET, 

[Grand Opera House Block,] 

Milwaukee, Wis. 

ANSON, N., Merchant Tailor, Clothes Cut and 
Made to Order, 186 Reed st. 



THRESHING MACHINES. 

, E. E., Manufacturer of Tl 
Brick Machines, 171 Second st. 



/~\WENS, E^.^E., Manufacturer of Threshing and 



ADVKETISEMKNTF. 



327 




GLASS BUILDIXG, CENTENNIAL EXPOSITION, PHILADELPHIA. 





OEIGINAL AND ONLY GENUINE MACHINE-MADE 




LOCK STITCH BARB, 



ALL STEKL 




IJT^J 




..J«W^ 



Light and Open Twist Provides for 

BY HEAT AND COLD. 

Both main strands and Barbs are of Bessemer steel Wire, and warranted superior to any 
Barbed Fence Wire known to tlie trade. For full particulars, address 

DILLMAN & STEVENS, 

PROPRIETORS, 



328 



SKETCHES OF THE PRESIDENTS. 




(ELEVENTH PRESIDENT.) 

«f aine$$ 14. Pollc was born in Mecklin- 
hxu-g county, North Carolina, November 2, 
1795, and died at Nashville, June 15, 1849. He 
graduated from the University of North Caro- 
lina in 1816, and studied law; was elected to 
Congress in 1825, and several terms subse- 
quently; chosen Speaker of the House, 1835 
and 1837, and Governor of Tennessee in 1839. 
Mr. Polk was very unexpectedly nominated for 
President, in Baltimore, on the 27th day of 
May, 1844. He pleased his party as a candi- 
date, and justified their fondest expectations 
as a man well worthy and well qualified to fill 
the office of Chief Magistrate of the United 
States, who surrounded himself with an able 
cabinet of counsellors. He served as Presi- 
dent from 1845 to 1849. 

Mr. Polk was one of the most conspicuous 
opposers of the administration of J. Q. Adams, 
and a warm supporter of Jackson. In 1839. 
having served fourteen years in Congress, he 
declined a re-election and was chosen Gov- 
ernor of Tennessee. His Presidential nomina- 
tion, in connection with that of George M. 
Dallas, of Pennsylvania, as Vice-President, 
had the effect of uniting the Democratic party, 
which had been disturbed by dissensions be- 
tween the friends and opponents of Martin Van 
Buren. However, the Mexican war, which in 
many States was strongly opposed, the enact- 
ment of a tariff based on a revenue principle 
instead of a protective one, and the agitation 
caused by the " Wilmot Proviso," all con- 
spired to affect his popularity before the end of 
his term. He had, however, previously pledged 
himself not to be a candidate for re-election. 
He died about three months after his retire- 
ment from office. 



M I LWAUKEE — Continued. 



Threshing Machine Works 

C. F. RAVN, Proprietor, 619 Cedar et. bet. 6tli 
and Vth, West Side, Milwaukee. Manufacturer of 
Jlilwaukee Pitts' Patent Separator and Horse 
Poweru, also Pitts' 8 and 10 Horse Power, and Cli- 
max 1,2, 4, 6, 8 and 10 Horse Powers. Mill Ma- 
chinery, Boiler and Biidge Castinss, Shafting and 
Repair Work Generally, Have all the old patterns 
of Kirby & Langworthy. 



TIN AilD SHEET IRON WOEKS 
T3 AHT E"&TidMAM^ToblTnner8^ 



41 Oneida st. 



WILLIAMS, JACOB A.Tin and Sheet Iron Work 
er, 583 E. Water st. Est. 1863. 



^OBACOO^AND^CIGAES^ 

PEIEB GOEBEL, 

Manufacturer of CIGARS and dealer in Tobacco, 
Snuff and Smokers Articles of all Kliid-.No. 55 
Oneida street, opposite Grand Opera House, Mil- 
waukee. 



TUENEE. 

JACOfillilRSCIt, 

IN WOOD, HORN, BONE, ETC. 
A nice assortment of all kinds of Briar Pipes al- 
ways on band and made to order. Billiard Balls 
Turned and Colored. Meerschaum pipes re- 
boiled. Repairing nice and cheap. 

No. 45 ONEIDA STREET, 

MILWAUKEE. 



UNDEETAKER. 

Z^"AjO)ERrMrX7P^mn?hTngTjnde^^ 
495 E. Water and 482 Eleventh sts 



VETERINAEY SUEGEON- 




306 Milwaukee St., Milwaukee. 



DR.C. C.TAYLOR, V. S., Veterinary Practitioner 
from England. For fifteen years has treated all 
diseases ot Horses and ('attle. Makes diseases of 
the feet a ^pecialty. Medicines supplied for al( 
diseases of the Horse, &c., at the Infirmary. 



WINES AND LIQUOES. 

W^'^'^'MSEOMK^'DrTnneForAlcohoran^^ 
its, 225 Reed st. Est. 1868. 

WIEE WOEKS. 

Established 1857. 

C. A. "WAPLER, 

Manufacturer of WIRE WORK, MALT KILNS, 
Muzzles and Si'ives of every d' sciption. 
SOS ^£SSSS'^f&^ SS'SJBSP, 



MILWAUKEE BUSINESS HOUSES, 

When Established. 

CANFIELD, E. H., Photographer, 1S72. 
CORBETT, THOS. M. & CO., Machin- 
ist, 1S72. 



SKETCHES OF THE I'KESIDENTS. 



329 



MiLLWAUKEE — Continued. 



EVISTON, J. W., Boiler Works, 1868. 
EXCELSIOR MANUFATURING CO. 

187-7. 
FELDT, AUGUST, Merchant Tailor, 

1873 

FIELDBERG, A. M., Book and Job 
Printer, 1876. 

FORD, D., Carriage Wood Work, 1874. 

FRANKE, WM., Bell Hanger, 1873. 

GILJOHANN & DIETRICH, Pattern 
Makers, 18715. 

GOEBEL, PETER, Cigars, 1865. 

HARPER, ALEX. cS: CO., Painters, 1845. 

HARTMANN ^ SUHR, Cigar Boxes, 
1877. 

HIRSCH, JACOB. Fancy Turner, 1874. 

HUTTMANN.WM. E., Instrument Mak- 
er, 1870. 

KLEINSTEUBER, C. F.,Machinist,i8s2. 

KRAFT, H. F. & CO., Model and Pattern. 
Makers, 1851;. 

LANDGUTH, A. S., Architect, 1864 

LEIDEL, E. A. M., Manufacturing Jewel- 
er, 1872. 

LENZ, F., Photographer, 1868. 

LINGELBACH, H., Furniture, i8s4- 

LOEFFELHOLZ, A. & CO., Lock Mak- 
ers, 1857. 

PIERCE, J. D., Tin and Sheet Iron Work- 
er, 1862. 

PLANER, ERNST, Billiard Table Manu- 
facturer, 1S69. 

POERTNER, PETER, Tin and Sheet 
Iron Worker, 1877. 

RAVN, C. F., Threshing Machines, 1868. 

STRUPPE, E., Cigar Boxes, 186S. 

TAYLOR, C. C, Veterinary Surgeon, 
1874. 

WAGNER, J. G., Iron W^orks, 1855. 



GRAND RAPIDS, MICH. 



AGEICTILTURAL IMPLEMENTS. 

Dealers in Agricultural Implements, Sewing Ma- 
chines, Field aud Garden Seeds. Manufacturers 
of Caeile'e Three-horse Equalizers. 
106 W. BRIDGE ST., & CONSTANTINE, MICH. 

W. C. l>£IVl$$ON, 

General Dealer in 

rASU IHFLEMENIS AND UACfilNEUlT, 

OFFICE AND WAREROOMS, 

90 & 92 South Division Street. 

ARCHITECTS, 

R'^^OBINSOO'^AMiBYrArchUecter"^^ 
Grand Rapids. 

GRAD¥ & WADDKLL, Architects & Superinten- 
dents of Buildings, 38 N. Ionia st. 




( TWELFTH PRESIDENT. ) 

Zachary Taylor was born in Orange 
county, Vu'ginia, November 24, 1784. He en- 
tered upon the duties of President in 1849, and 
died at the Presidential Mansion July 9, 1850, 
after an illness of five days. Soon after his 
birth his parents removed to Kentucky. His 
means of education were of the scantiest kind, 
and until he was twent3'-four years of age he 
worked on his father's plantation. Madison, 
who was a relative, and at that time Secretary 
of State, then secured for him an appointment 
in the army as lieutenant. From this he rose 
by regular and rapid degrees to a major gen- 
eralship. His triumphant battles at Palo Alto, 
Resaca de la Palma, Monterey, and Buena 
Vista, won him great applause. He was the 
popular hero of a successful war. The sol- 
diers admiringly called him " Old Rough and 
Ready." Having been offered the nomination 
for President, he published several letters de- 
fining his position as " a whig, but not an ul- 
tra-whig," and declaring that he would not be 
a party candidate or the exponent of party 
doctrines. Many of the whig leaders vio- 
lently opposed his nomination. Daniel Web- 
ster called him " an ignorant frontier colonel." 
The fact that he was a slaveholder was warmly 
urged against him. He knew nothing of civil 
affairs, and had taken so little interest in poli- 
tics that be had not voted in forty years. But 
he was nominated and elected. His nomina- 
tion caused a secession from thewhigs, result- 
ing in the formation of the free-soil party. He 
felt his want of qualificat-ons for the position, 
and sometimes expressed his regret that he 
had accepted it; yet he maintained as Presi- 
dent the popularity which had led to bis elec- 
tion, and was personally one of the most es- 
teemed who have filled that office. 



330 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



Grand Rapids — Continued. 
ATTORNEYS AT LAW. 

Beter Doran, 

ATTORNEY AT I-AAV, 

Rooms 19 & 20 Pierce's New Block. 

Bankrupt Cases and Collections a Specialty. 
Prompt action; Charges reasonable. Eeferences 
furnished when desired. 

WM. E. GROVE, GEO. W. THOMPSON. 

Established 1859. 

GROVE tC- THOMPSON, 

mmm m mmm at law, 

28 Canal Street. 



Grand Rapids — Continued. 



M 



cBBIDE, JAMES E., Attorney at Law, 

41 Monroe st- 



JOHN M. NIEHAUS, 

Attorney at Law and Notary Public, 

Boons: 10 c£- 11 PIERCE'S BLOCK. 

WM. L. STOUOHTOJy, 

Attorney and Counselor, 43 Pearl street. Practices 
in State and United States Courts. 

STUART & SWEET, Counselors at Law, 
45 Pearl st. 

WESTFALL, W. 0., Attorney at Law, 
46 Canal st. 

BAKING POWDER. 

'TuiiDXDMMrKrBakln g PoWdVrT"^ 

tl 28 S. Division st. 

BAKERS AND CONPECTIONERS. 

mmsTJOMTf^Bakef&^Jarria^^ 
56 Summit st. 

PEOPLE'S B.^^IiEtlTf, 

Henry J. Pessixk, Prop'r. 

Baker and Confectioner. 

Cream and Wedding Cakes made to Order. Or- 
namental work done. Parties Furnished at Short 
Notice. 

No. 37 W. DIVISION STREET. 
BARBER, 

George H. Wilson, 

6 \. DiTislon Street. 

BOOTS AND SHOES. 

G'^'^'^OEBEiXTJOHNTDeaTerTBrBo^^ 
64 Bridge st. 



S 



TOVEB, GEO., Dealer in Boots, Shoes and Rub- 
Ruhbers, 106 Canal st. 



WATSON, S. A., Dealer in Boots & Slices, 
34 Canal St. Est. 1875. 

BOTANIC PHYSICIAN. 

B^JRT^TwOOnJRUFF, 



itafOlB 



IliQlaii. 



Office at his Root, Bark and Herb store, 44 Cana 
Street, where for 18 years every description o 
Acute, Chronic and Private Diseases have been 
successfully treated. Strictly on Botanic Princi- 
ples. No Poison used. Over 300 Botanic Medi- 
cines constantly on hand. Counsel at office free. 

BREWERIES. 

George Brandt, 

Proprietor of 





87 S. Division St. 



FREY BROTHERS, 

Colrooi Brewery, 

Coldbrooht, near D.&M.R.R Depot. 

C. KrSTERER, 

Proprietor of 

City Brewery, 

And Dealer in Malt, Hops, &c. 

PETER WEIRICH, 

Proprietor of 

IICHI&AN BREWERY, 

296 Bridge street, 

West Side, near the G. R.& I. R. R. Depot. 
BURIAL CASES AND CASKETS. 

POWERS & WALKER, Burial (Jases and Caskets' 
83, 84. 85, 86 87 & 88 South Front st . 



CABINET WARE, 

FCRBISH, F. L., Fancy Cabinet Ware, • 
42 & 44 Mill St. 



CARPENTERS AND BUILDERS. 

MtlMWEOrXsMrCanpemerr&lBu^^ 

Ottawa & Lewis sts. 



ADVKliTISEMKNTS. 



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332 



SKETCHES OF THE PRESIDENTS. 




(thirteenth pre.sidext. ) 

lillard Fillmore, being elected 
Vice-President to President Taylor, became 
his constitutional successor, and served the 
unexpired term from 1850 to 1853. Very ex- 
citing questions arose during his term of office: 
among them the slavery question, the admis- 
sion of California into the Union as a free 
State, and the passage of the Fugitive Slave 
Law — providing for the return to their owners 
of slaves escaping to a free State. During the 
debate of these questions, for a while it seemed 
as if the Union would be rent asunder. Mr. 
Fillmore treated them with dignity, if not with 
statesmanship, till finally conciliatory meas- 
ures prevailed, and the questions were amicably 
settled. In every respect Mr. Fillmore dis- 
charged the duties of President as a conscien- 
tious, sensible man, thoroughly acquainted with 
legislative and general political principles. 

President Fillmore was born in Cayuga 
count}-, New York, Januarj^ 7, 1800, and died 
March 8, 1874. He had not a very liberal edu- 
cation, and, when young, served as an appren- 
tice to the fuller's trade. In the year 1821, he 
was admitted to the bar, and practiced law 
with success. From 1832 to 1840 he was a 
member of Congress; in 1842 he was nomin- 
ated by the Whigs of New York for Governor, 
and was defeated; and in 1856 the Native 
American party run him for President, and he 
received only the electoral vote of Maryland. 

)Upon the death of President Taylor, the es- 
tire Cabinet resigned. 



Grand Rapids — Coniinned. 



CANDY MANUFAOTUEER. 
J. W.^WRIGHT\ 

CANDY MANUFAOTUEER, 

And dealer in 

CONFECTIONERYi ICE CREAM 

3 SOUTH DIVISION ST. 



OAE^GE^AND WAGON MANUFACTURERS. 

C. E. BELKNAP,r^^^ 

Manufacturer of 

SPEIIG WAGOIS, 

Freight Trucks, Lumber Wagons, and Demo- 
crat Buggies, has facilities for doing a 
large amount of Repairing and Car- 
riage Paintine, 
GRAND RAPIDS, MICHIGAN, 
Cor. Front & First sts. 

W. p. NOEL, 

Carriage Maler aid BlacbiDitl, 



Repairing Promptly attended to. 
29 HURON ST. 



J. M. Rouse, 



C. A. Parmalee. 



J.M.R0U8E&C0., 



Manufacturers of 



WAGONS & SLEIGHS, 

36 North Division Street, 



GRAND RAPIDS, 



MICHIGAN. 



s 
w 



CHOLL, JOHN, Carriage-maker & Blacksmith, 
Furman St., near W. Bridge St. 
OOD, ARTHUR, Carriage-maker, 

.37 WateTloo St. 



CHEMIST. 

ARCTIC MANUFACTURING CO 

C. W. JENNINGS, 



I) 






AND PERFUMER, 
Office and Laboratory, 15 South Division st. 

DESIGNERS AND ENGRAVERS. 

R~'"^WD7wrArX^C6^be^rgnei¥'"&"Engrav^r8^ 
Wood, 25 Canal st. 



DRUGGIST. 

MJSu'^fVM^Drnggist & Apothecary, 

84 Canal st. & 145 W. Bridge st. 



T 



SKETCHES OF THE 1*RE8IDENT8. 



Grand Rapids — Continued. 

DTE WORKS. 
C. D. ROSE, 



4 & 6 Pearl st., and 9 S. Division at. 



Cleaning and repairing neatly done at reasonable 
Prices. 

ETLEY, WM., Steam Dye Works, 
Olmyst. Es tablished 185 6 

__^______EDQrE^ TOOLS^ 

CHASE, HAWLEY & STONE, cAx and Edge Tool 
_ Works, Mill st., N. of Brid ge. 

FANCY GOODS. 

LOETTGERTTF^TPancyG^^r&TSj^^ 
18 Canal st. Established 1866. 



FLAVOEINQ EXTRACTS. 

F'""TirvWlMExMACf§r^rw?Jenmngsr^ 
nfacturer, 15 S. Division s t. 

FLOUR, FEED AND GRAIN. 

YKEMA^FrOONnTwurTt^Td'irGr^ 
Monroe St., & 45 S. Divisioa st. Est. 18fi6. 



D 



80NKE & CO., PJour, F. ed & Grain, 
13 8. Division st. Established 1871. 



FURNITURE. 
A. A . li O B D, 

Dealer in 



m m imum mimii 

And Bouse-Furnishins Soods, 



117 MONROE ST. 



GROCERIES. 

C'^OLElBRC^^rQroceriesrProviiionrX'Mea^ 
J 5 Granville ave, 



}7»0X, S., Wholesale Grocer. 
' 17 S. Division st. 



Established 1861. 



GUN MANUFACTURER. 
CHAST^^NDBERG, 

ill Maiifietiiiij 

And dealer in all kinds of Gun Materials. 
AliL ORDERS PROMI'TLY FILLED, 

61 CANAL ST. 

HARNESS AND SADDLES. 

B" RCTwirOi^rHaTnessrSaddi^ri^ 
75 W aterloo st. 

LAPPLEY, F. J., Manf'r and dealer in Harness, 
Saddles, Collars, etc., 135 Canal st. 

L. LOUWERSE 

Manuufacturer of and dealer in 

HAENESS, TRUNKS, &c., &c., 

119 Monroe st. 




( FOURTEENTH PRE.SIDEXT. ) 

Fraiilcliit Pierce was born at Hills- 
borough, New Hampshire, on the 2.3d of Nov- 
ember, 1804, and died in 1869. He graduated 
at Bowdoin College, Maine, in 1824; studied law 
and was admitted to the bar in 1827. He was 
President from 1853 to 1857. 

Mr. Pierce had barely attained the requisite 
legal age when he was elected to the Senate. 
He found there such men as Clay, Webster, Cal- 
houn, Thomas H. Benton, and Silas Wright. 
Nathaniel Hawthorn says in his biography of 
Mr. Pierce: "With his usual tact and exqui.site 
sense of propriety, he saw it was not the time 
for him to step forward prominently on this 
highest theatre in the land. He beheld these 
great combatants doing battle before the eyes 
of the nation, and engrossing its whole regards. 
There was hardly an avenue to reputation save 
what was occupied by one or another of those 
gigantic figures." During Tyler's administra- 
tion, he resigned. When the Mexican war 
broke out, he enlisted as a volunteer, but soon 
rose to the office of brigadier-general. He dis- 
tinguished himself under General Scott, against 
whom he afterwards successfully ran for the 
Presidency, and upon wiiom, during his admin- 
istration, he conferred the title of lieutenant- 
general. On the question of slavery, Mr. Pierce 
always sided with the South, and opposed anti- 
slavery measures in every shape. In a mes- 
sage to Congress in 1856, he characterized the 
formation of a free State goverment in Kansas 
as an act of rebellion, and justified the principles 
of the Kansas and Nebraska Act. He, however, 
espoused the national cause at the opening of 
the civil war, and urged a cordial support of 
the administration at Washington. 



334 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



Grand Rapids — Continued. 



NILSON, J. P., Manf r and dealT in Harness 
Saddles, Briales, etc., 12 N. Front St., W.Side' 

HOTELS. 

7)MER(nLUrTi6MLrwrirPaneh^^ 
Lyon St. Kates, $1.50 per day. 





Peter Weber, Prop., 

142 Canal St. , GRAND RAPIDS, MICH. 




FAHILINS & LVOH, Frops. 



U. M, QUARIEL, Froprietor, 



CiT. Fulton and Ionia Streets, one block North 
of Union R. R. Depot. 

WEET'S HOTEL, Lyon & Picking, , Proprietors, 
Grand Rapids. 



S 



INKS AND BLUEIUa. 

TNKSASinSSElMrAWllcrMANWA^^ 

-*- Co., C. W. Jenuings, prop., 15 S Division st. 

JEWELEES. 

nmiki JEWELER I mmmi 

Room 8 Nellis Block, 23 Monroe st. 

WIN EM AN & YENTSCH, 
PRACTICAL JEWELERS, 

GOLD and SILVER PLATERS, 

76 Ottawa St., near Monroe. 
LEATHEE AND FINDINGS^ 

Tanners and Dealers in 

LEATHER & FilMS, 

Hides, Pelts, Wool and Furs, 
100 CANAL ST. 



PEEPUMEET. 

JENNINUS, €. W., Perfumery Manufacturer, 
15 S. Division st. 



Grand Rapids — Continued. 



LIVEET AND BOAEDING STABLES. 

G^^^njiERSLEEVETGEoTlLrLh^ 
56 Ionia st. 

Liffiry & Wki Stais, 

FRENCH I COm Froprietors, 

64 I O INI A STREET. 

PAINTEES. 

C. Hetherington, Chas. M. Ellsworth, 

(Formerly Partner, with II. M. Goebel) SignWriter 

First-Class Bouse, Sip I Ornamental Fainting 

Plain and Dpcorative Paper-Hanging, Kal.somin- 
ing. Gilding, Bronzing and Glazing. Estimates 
furnished and contracts taken on all kinds oi 
Painting. 

75 MONEOE ST., under Patten & Hinsdale's, 



B1. MORRISON, 

SIGN PAINTER 

36 CANAL STKEET, 
GRAND RAPIDS, MICH. 

PAPEE BOXES. 

Established 1872. 

T. €. PUTNAM, 

Mannfacturer of all Kinds of Paper 

6 HURON STKEET. 



PEDDLEES' SUPPLIES. 

iMf fSSTJ^T&^fo., Deal e r s i n PeddlerV^up'- 
plies, 41 S. Division st. Estab. 1871. 



PHOTOGEAPHEES. 

HUTCHINiSON'&TStYNE^I^tograiX^ 
i n India Ink and Water Colors, 75 Monroe st. 
ERRILLS, C. L., Photograph and Gem Gallery, 

72 Canal st. 

\j. V. MOrL-TOl^, 

PHOTOaH&PHIl 

Special attention given to Solar Printing 
and Trade Photographing. 

18 CANAL ST., McKeynold's Block, 



w 



YKES, WARREN, Pnotographic Gallery of 
Art, opp. Ratbbun House. 



PHYSICIANS. _ 

IKINr^I^Tr.r^nKrEylCEarrLung. Female. 
Nervous and all Chronic Diseases, 57 Monroe. 



A 



GBISWOLD, .1. B., M. I)., Pnyeician and Sv 
geon, Ottawa & Pearl sts. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



335 




OS 


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B CD 



32 



336 



SKETCHES OF THE PRESIDENTS. 




<^t^Zi^^ 



(fifteexth president.) 

James If lie liana, II was born in Frank- 
lin county, Pennsylvania, April 13, 1791, and 
died at Wheatland, June 1, 1868. He was a 
graduate of Dickinson College and was admit- 
ted to the bar in 1812. He was President from 
1857 to 1861, and was so constantl}- in office 
from 1820 up to that time that he was knov.n 
by the sobriquet of "Public Functionary." 

The " bachelor-President," as Mr. Buchanan 
was sometimes called, was sixty-six years old 
when he was called to the executive chair. 
He had just returned to his native country, af- 
ter an absence of four years as Minister to 
England, previously to that he had been well 
known in public life as Congressman, Senator, 
and as Secretary of State under President Polk. 
As Senator in Jackson's time, he heartily sup- 
ported his administration. With Van Buren, 
he warmly advocated the idea of an independent 
treasviry against the opposition of Clay, Web- 
ster, and others. Under Tyler, he was urg- 
ently in favor of the annexation of Texas, thus 
again coming in conflict with Clay and Web- 
ster. However, he cordially agreed with them 
in the compromise of 1850, and urged its favor 
upon the people. Much was hoped from his 
election, as he avowed the object of his ad- 
ministration to be " to destroy any sectional 
party, whether North or South, and to restore, 
if possible, tha't national fraternal feeling be- 
tween the different States that had existed 
during the early days of the Republic." But 
popular passion and sectional jealousy were 
too strong to yield to pleasant persuasion. 
When Mr. Buchanan's administration closed, 
the fearful conflict was close at hand. He re- 
tired to his estate in Pennsylvania, where he 
died. 



Grand Rapids — Co?ttinued. 



STEPHENSON, DR. H. C, & BRO., Medical and 
Surgical Institute, 29 Monroe St. 



PLASTER MANUFACTUREKS. 

GRAND RAPIDS PLASTER CO., Land and Cal- 
cined Plaster. Wm. Hovey, Supt. & Agent, 
16 Monroe St. 



GRANDVILLE PLASTER CO., Manufacturers of 
Calcined & Land Plaster, 100 Monroe st. Est.'72 

PLUMBERS AND GAS FITTERS. 

Practical Plumbers, Eas and Steam Pitters, 

99 OTTAWA, ST., Grand Rapids, Mich. 

SPROrt. & McGURRIir, 

Practical PMers, Steam & Gas Fitters 

And Dealers in all kinds of Plumbing and 
Gas Fitting Materials. Estimates given on 
heating Factories, Churches, Dwellings, etc. 
by Steam. 

ItiG MONROE STREET. 



D 



REAL ESTATE AND INSURANCE, 

'OOGE, L., Dealer in Real Estate, 
Office, 46 Canal st. Estab. 1851. 

S. O. KIXOSBURY, 

General Land & Tax Assent 

Established in 1850. ^ 

Will attend to the purchase, sale and exchange 
of Real Estate. Particular attention will be given 
to the payment of Taxes, purchasing Lands sold at 
Tax Sales, examlnin2Titles,reclaimingLands sold 
at Tax Sales, and will take a general supervision 
of all Lands entrusted to his charge, and Agent 
for Mobile Underwriters. 6-f CANAZ, ST. 

ILLER, H., Real Estate Dealer, 

3 N. Division st. Estah. 1869. 



M 



VAN DIENSE, JOHN H.C., Real Estate and In- 
surance Broker, Monroe & Division st. 

SALOONS AND RESTAURANTS. 

HENRY iVEIRICHr 



^-^Imt m^^ 



CHOICE CIGARS, TOBACCO AND 

ALL SMOKERS' ARTICLES. 

No. 104 Monroe St. 

HITE, ERASTUS W., Saloon and Restaurant, 
52 Summit st^ 

T. J. EVERHART, 

SAW MAKER, REPAIRER 

And Dealer in 

H. DISTON & SONS' SAWS, 

No. 45 WATERLOO ST. 

ITTS, JAMES L., Manufacturer of S .ws, 

Pearl & Campani sts- 



SKETCHES OF TIIK PRESIDENTS, 



337 



Grand Rapids — Contiuued. 



SPRING BEDS. 
E. B. Hill. Wm. H. Bennett. O. W. Horton. 

E. B. HILL & CO. 

Wholesale Manufacturers and Dealers in 

EillSiVanMenbiir^h'sFaleiilSp%Eeis 

Office & Salesroom, 109 Canal St. ; Factory, 
28 Mill Street. 

' TOBACCO AND OKJARS^ 

ID. J. iDOOi?,]sri3NrK:, 

Dealer in Cigars S^ Tobaccos, Books I Stationery 

81 31 ON ROE STREET. 



TJNDEETAKERS. 

URFEE," XrXENTP^ii^hing^iidertVke^ 

103 Ottawa st. 

FARWELL, J. H., General Furnishing Under- 
taker, 16 Pearl St. Estab. 1866. 



D 



WATCHMAKER AND JEWELER. 

I'~1>lKTfi)JnOMEMrWatSjnake^^ 
J 37 South Division st. 



WINES AND LIQUORS. 



yim' 



WM. EOHTERNAOH, 



Dealer in 

Choice Liquors & Cigars 

No. Ill MONROE STREET. 

eRUGTER, JOHN, Wholesale Liquor Dealer, 
116 Canal st. 

PULCHER, C. G., Dealer in Wines, Liquors and 
Cigars, 119 Canal st. 

WIRE WORKS. 

GKlrollpMwiREW^MS 
EDWARD RACINE, Prop. 

93 MONROE STREET. 
Manufacturer of Plain and Ornamental 

WIRE WORK 

OF EVERY DESCRIPTION. 
WOOD TURNERS. 

r^chman&^SestleyT^ 

And Manufacturers of Eureka Croquet Sets, 

Base Ball Bate, Packing Boxes, &c., 

MILL STREET. 

Grand Rapids Business Houses. 

WHEN ESTABLISHED, 
BRANDT, GEORGE, Brewery, 1S63 




c/TaloU£4f^n^ 



,^SIXTEEXTH PRESIDENT.) 

Abraliaiu ILiincoln was born in Har- 
din county, Kentucky, on the 12th of Febru- 
ary, 1809. He was elected President in 1860, 
and was re-elected in 1864, and had entered 
upon the duties of his office for the second 
time, when he was assasinated by John Wilkes 
Booth, April 14th, 1865, and died" the following 
day. 

His father was unable to read or w-'*' 
Abraham's education consisted r" _..rs 

schooling. W^hen he was e-ght y^ars old, his 
father moyed to Indiana, the tauifu fiuaiiijg- 
down the Ohio on a raft. When" nineteen 
years of age, the future President hired out as 
a hand on a tlat-boat at $10 a month, and made 
1 trip to New Orleans. On his return he ac- 
companied the family to Illinois, driving the 
cattle on the journey, and on reaching their 
destination helped them to build a cabin and 
split rails to enclose the farm. He was now in 
succession a flat-boat hand, clerk, captain of a 
company of yolunteers in the Black Hawk 
War, country store-keeper, postmaster, and 
surveyor, vet lie managed to get a knowledge 
of law by borrt)wing books at an office, before 
it closed at night, and returning them at its 
opening in the morning. On being admitted 
to the bar, he rapidly rose to distinction. At 
twenty-five he was sent to the Legislature, and 
was thrice re-elected. Turning his attention 
to politics, he soon became a leader. He was 
sent to Congress; he canvassed the State, har- 
anguing the people daily on great national 
questions; and, in 1858, he was a candidate for 
Senator, a second time, against Ste]ihen A. 
Douglass. The two rivals stumped the State 
together. The debate, unrivalled for its 
statesmanship, logic and wit, won for Lincoln 
a national reputation. He lost the election in 
the Legislature, as his party was in the minor- 
ity. After his accession to the Presidency, his 
history, like Washington's, is identified with 
that of his country. He was a tall, ungainly 
man, little versed in the refinements of soci- 
ety, but gifted by nature with great common 



338 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



Grand Rapids — Continued. 


Minneapolis — Continued. 


DENISON, W. C, Farm Implements, 

1862. 
DORAN, PETER, Attorney at Law, 

1876. 
DURFEE, ALLEN, Undertaker, 1871. 
FURBISH, F. L ., Cabinet Ware. 1874. 
GRAND RAPIDS PLASTER CO., 

1856. 
GROVE & THOMPSON, Attorneys at 

Law, 1859. 
HILL, E. B., & CO., Spring Beds, 1S71. 
HOTEL, WEBER, 1865. 
KINGSBURY, S. O., Land Agent, 1S50. 
KUSTERER, C, Brewer, 1S4S. 
LINDBERG, CHAS., Gun Manuf., 1870. 
NIEHAUS, JOHN M-, Attorney at Law, 

1876. 
MOULTON, L. v., Photographer, 1863. 
POWERS & WALKER, Wood Burial 

Cases, 18715. 
ROBINSON & BARNABY, Architects, 


CLOTHING. 
"POSTON ONE PRICE CLOTHING STORE, 

-D 2 &6 ACiidemy of Music. 
r\FSTIL, JOHN, Clothing & Gents' Furnishing 
\J Goods, 227 Washington ave. S. Est. 1877. 


confectioneries and bakeries, 
"chasTw^^Wpher^ 

CONFECTIONERY AND BAKERY, 

217 Nicollet ave. 


GA VEGAN <& O'BRIEN, 

Confectionery and Cigars, 

115 Nicollet ave. 


TTUNT, M. P., Confectionery, 

Xl 619 Washington ave. 

■VfYBEBG, NILS, Confectionery. 

l.> 216 Hennepin ave. 


186^. 
STEPHENSON, DR. H. C, & BRO., 


TD ARSON, OLIVEB, Confectionery, 

X 329 Washington ave. 


Medical Institute, 1S74. 

THE CAPPON & BERTSCH LEATH- 
ER CO., iS7v 

WEIRICH, PETER, Brewery, 1856. 

WOODRUFF, DR. E., Physician, i860. 


CONTRACTORS AND BUILDERS. 

X OA'EBIN, H. A., Wire Window & Door Screen 
J_J Maufr, Conl'or & Builder. .307 Hennepin ave. 

"PATTEESON & DUNLAP, Contractors in Brick 
X &, Stone, 310 Hennepin ave. 




DENTISTS. 


MINNEAPOLIS, MINN. 


TDOWJTOXGiaWdLDrDenTis^^ 

Jj West Falls Block. 




FANCY GOODS. 


BARBERS. 

KICOLLET HOUSE BARBER SHOP, 

LOUIS RASMUSEN, PROP , 


WORSTEDS AND EMBROIDERIES, 

Mr. & Mrs. L. E. WEITZEL, 
401 Nico'lei ave. 


12 Nicollet Block. Established 1875. 


FISH AND OYSTERS. 


OTEBBETT & LUCAS, Shaving Parlor, 

Cor. Nicollut & 2d sts. Est. 1875. 


T ONES, R. F., Dealer in Fish & Oysters, 
tJ 30i Hennepin ave. 


BILLIARDS. 

BILLIARD HALL & SAMPLE EOOM, 

205 Nicollet ave. 


FURS, 
J. BRZEZINSKY, 

immm. of fane: m 

3 Academy of Music. 






BOOTS AND SHOES. 

"VOUNG, N. J., Boots & Shoes, 

± 621 Washington ave., Sonth. 


P. F. EICHELZER, 

MANUFACTUBER AND DEALER IN IINE FURS, 

212 Nicollet ave. Established 1872. 


BTTSTN'RSS OOLLEftTI 


pUBTIS & HYDE, Business College, 

V^ Bridge Pqnare. 

BUTTER PACKAGES, 

"rMMEGAJ^XTTMrnf^orBtmerlP^^ 

X* 30 Hennepin ave. 


FURNITURE. 

A. H. EDSTEN, 
— Manufacturer and Dealer in — 

ALL KINDS OF FUENITURE, 

.303 Washington ave. south. Estab. 1870. 






CARRIAGE WORKS. 
NOVELTY CARRIAGE WORKS, 

246 Second avenue South, 

M. Roeller, Manufacturer of Carriages & Sleighs. 

Repairins promptly attended to. 

Established 1873. 


GUN MANUFACTURERS. 
BACHNER BROS., 

GUN MA^UFACTrREKS, 

And dealers in Sporting Equipments, 
206 Hennepin ave. 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OF THE CP:NTUEY. 



339 




Post Office, Boston.— The corner-stone was laid on the 16tli of October, 1871. Our sketch 
shows the post office as it is. It has a front of over two hundred feet on Devonshire street, occupying 
the whole square between Mil!j and Wa^er streets, and it is, sooner or later, to be extended to Congress 
street. The government has n-ver before owned the building in which the Boston post office was lo- 
cated. The upper stories of the new post office are occupied by the sub-treasury. The building was 
completed and occupied early in 1875. The entire cost of the government exceeded $3,000,000. 




City Hall, Boston.— The corner-stone was laid on the 2Zd of December, 1862— the anniversary oi 
thelandingof the Pilgrims at Plymouth. The amount first appropriated was $160,000, but before the 
building was occupied the actual cos was more than half a million dollars. The building was com- 
pleted and dedicated on the 18th of September. 1865. The tablet in the wall, back of the first landing, 
perpetuates in beautifully worked marble, the statement that the dedication took place on the 17th of 
September. Th's day would have been highly appropriate for the ceremony, being the two-hundredth 
and thirty-fifth annive-sary of the settlement of Boston, had it not fallen on Sunday. The ceremony 
was accordingly postponed until the following day. 



340 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



FITZHUGH. EDWIN C. THORNTON. 

Wholesale Dealer in 








66 South Meridian Street, 

INDIANAPOLIS. 



Mauufactures to Measure the Celebrated 




f PiKthl ¥©fe@ ®!Ftg: 



AND NIGHT SHIRT. 

ALSO COLLARS AND CUFFS OF ALL STYLES. 

Liiglit and Heavy Undeirwear Made to Order, 

A Perfect Fit Guararnteed. Goods sent by 
Express to any part of tlie Country. 

EAST SAGINAW, MICHIGAN. 



!,Xi;-JiL,(t 



f) 



IS MAKING THE 



mi 




\m I 




jmm 



all kinds of River Work, 

Which he sails at Wholesale ^-^^ii]!!^ ^?^!^^^^^^,^^^ ^''''''''^^:.^^^ _^-- 1^- ^ -"^~ ~ ^ or Retail for less money and 

warrants to give better satis- "^vVnT^fi <if\i ' >i iTV^ 1 faction than any other worK 

in the \ alley. 

Blacksmithing— Master of anything: that can be forged under the hammer, iron or steel. Carriages, Wa- 
gons, Sleighs and Pevys, Wholesale and Retail, Cast-Steel Pevys a specialty. All kinds of Carriage 
Work, Painting and Trimming. All work Warranted. 



Cor. Hamilton and Mackinaw Sts., 



SAGINAW CITY, MICH. 



Three Dollars will pay for a Nicer and better Cake at 

JULIUS. MIESSMAT'S 

Ornamental Cakes, Pyramids, Ice Creams, Water Ice, Jellies, Charlotte Russe, and all 
kinds of Cakes will be made to order. Particular attention paid to 

Manufacturer of Roses, Panorama Eggs and Hearts, Sugar Toys and Penny Toys, etc. 

180 VIRGINIA AVENUE, 



. ADVERTISEMENTS. 



341 




Michigan state Buildinjj, Centennial Exposition, Philadelphia.— In the absence of anyap 
propriation from tte Mate, this building was erected mainlj' through the exertions of the Michigan 
State Centennial Board and Julius Hess, the architect, at a cost of about 815.000. It is constructed en 
tirely of-Mich'ean lumber, above the foundation. The inside as well as the outside of the bu'lding is 
highly decorative. The walls and ceilings inside the building are panneled. no plastering being used, 
and the floors of several rooms are inlaid to neat patterns. 

€S^a^d ]^apid@ ^Igi.^'i©^ Qq^^'P^^.y^ 

Manufacturers and Dealers in 

LAND AND CALCINED PLASTER 

WM. HOVEY, Snpt. and Gen'l Agent. 

1 O ]>Xoiiroe St., XJp Stairs, 



342 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



Minneapolis — Continued. 



HAIR DEALERS AND DRESSERS. 

PAGE, MRS. S. A., Hairworker & Ladies' Hair- 
Diesser, 31 South 4th st. 

MADAME M. A. NICHOLS, 
Manufacturer of 



3EZ XT 3VE u^ INT 



Z3[.^\.ZX1L. 



And Ladies' Fashionable Hairdresser, 
107 Washington ave. South. Establishpd 1871. 

HATTER. 

FASRIONABLB HATTER AND FOR DEALER, 

212 Nicollet ave. Established 1873. 

MEAT MARKET. 

FLETCHER & SCHULZE, 
Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

FRESH & PACKED MEATS, 

310 Nicollet ave. Established 1875. 

MILLINERS AND DRESSMAKERS- 

F'"'BAZlElCMBSrMrFr,lFarhionaSre"'i^^ 
251 Hennepin ave. 

EGG, MBS. GEO. B., Millinery & Dressmaking, 
314 Hennepin ave. 

ONG, MISS. S. R., Dressmaking Establishment, 
430 Nicollet ave. 

NEWSPAPER, 

THE MONDAY MORNING INDEX, 

Editor and Publisher, 
243 Hennepin ave. Established 1875. 

NEWSDEALER. 

HILLIKER, A. M., Postofflce News-stand, City 
Hall Building, Stati nery, Cigars, etc . 

PHOTOGRAPHERS, 

F'"TLOlF&TW)WEB,^Phourgr^her^^^^^ 
ave., cor. 5lh st. Established 1875. 

JOHN H. OLESON, 

P H © T^ O ©1 m A '^ Jffl B Ii» 

307 Washington ave. South. Estab. 1874. 

AYMOND, J. F., Photographer, 
223 Nicollet ave. 

PHYSICIANS. 

U. D. Thomas, M. D., 

ECLECTIC, MAGNETIC 

m Mimm fbysician, 

All Diseases of the Blood and Nervous System 
uccessfully treated. Send or call for circulars. 

108 Washington ave. south, 

MINNEAPOLIS. - - - MINN. 



Minneapolis — Continued. 



BLECKEN, C. H., M. D., Eclectic Physician. 
Over Gray's Drug Store. 



MOYEB, A., M. D., Eclectic Physician, 
252 Hennepen ave. 

PAINTER, 

JOim WEINAUD, 

FRESCO and SIGN PAINTER, 

112 Washington Avenue South, 
MINNEAPOLIS. 

PIANOS AND ORGANS. 

WILLSON, GEO. H., Pianos & Organs, 
4 Academy of Music . 

PRINTERS^ 

DAVISON & HENDERSON, 

Ornamental Job Printers, 

213 Hennepin ave. Est. 1876. 

OHNSON, SJIITH & HARBISON, Printers & Lith- 
ographers, 21 2d st. south. 

LA3IB S WAY, 

PLAIN and ORNAMENTAL 

STMM JOB PRINTERS, 

Prices down to the bottom, and good work 

in ev ry ca'^e. 

105 WASHINGTON AVE. SOUTH. 

Established 1877. 

REAL ESTATE AND LOAN AGENTS. 

FINNEGAN, A. J., Real Estate, & Loan Insur- 
an ce Agent, 310 Hennepin ave. 

AMLIN & BROWN, Real Estate & Insurance, 

2d St., room 2, Center Block. 



H 



MITH, C. B., Ileal Estate & Loan Agent, 
) 242 Hennepin ave. 



STATIONERY, 
TXT'ILLIAMS, S.M., Stationery, 



224 Hennepin av. 



STENCIL WORKS. 

IOY, ELL WOOD, Stencil Works, 
J 214 Hennepin av. 



S 



TAILORS, 

HERMAN, H.;P., Merchant Tailor, 
lll'/a Washington av.. So. 

,1. IT. THOMPSON, 

MERCHANT TAILOR, 

188 HENNEPIN AVE. 
TENTS AND AWNINGS. 

Manufacturer of 
105 Washington Ave., South. Est. 1874. 



SKETCHES OF THE ]'RESIDENT«. 



343 



Minneapolis — Continued. 



TURKISH BATHS. 

ATsTERviSr, 
TURKISH BATHS, 



405 Nicollet Ave., 



Minneapolis. 



WATCHES AND JEWELRY. 

319 NICOLLET AVENUJE. 

WOOD DEALERS. 

Office, East Entrance City Hall, Dealers in all 
kinds of MILL AND HARD WOOD. We keep 
constantly on hand the largest and best stock in 
the City. Call and See Us. 



MOLINE, ILLS. 



BLACKSMITHS AND HORSESHOERS, 

AMM^MANNTBirG^enefaTTnacksr^^ 
Wagon Making, Cor. Main & Atkiiison St. 

ZEIGLER,N. B., Horseshoeing. Fancy shoeing a 
a specialty. Ly nde st. 

BOOTS AND SHOES. 

REDElMsoSTXTBooUind^hoe^Mai^^ 
Railroad av.. opp. O. & R. I. Depot. 



DRESS AND CLOAK MAKER. 



TTABBIS, 



i. A., Dress & Cloak Maker, 
Lynde near Main st. 



DRUGGISTS. 

W. G. MOBBIS, 

Dealers in 

Drugs, Medicines, Perfumeries, &.c. 

Cor. WELLS AND LYNDE STREETS. 

FLOUR AND FEED. 

EOWNTRTLirWhoPsairSrRetaUTBMw^ 
and Ship Stuffs 212 Main st. 



M 



GROCERIES. 

cDONALDVJ. XTMoTiSeGrocery, 

Cor. Madison & Illinois sts. 



S. WALKER & SON, 

Dealers in Choice Family Groceries, Stone's Pure 

Flavors, Queensware. &c. 

Cor. BASS AND WELLS STREETS. 

HARDWARE, 
(Established 1855.) 

T'momjkm D-uhh, 

Dealer in Hardware, Cutlery, Iron, Nails, Window 
Glass, &c. 117&119 Wells St. 



M 



HARNESS AND SADDLES. 
ATZENrHrcrrHarnes8"Manufacturer, 



Wells St. 



scn.se, and everywhere known a.s "Honest 
Abe." Kind, earnest, sympathetic, faithful, 
doiiu)cratic, lie was only anxious to sr-rve his 
country. His wan, fatigued face, and his bent 
form, lold of the cares he bore and the grief 
he felt. 




(seventeenth PRESIDENT.) 

Aiiclre-w •ToIiii!!>oil was born near Ra- 
leigh, North Carolina, December 29, 180S. He 
was Vice-President when Abraham Lincoln 
was assasiuated, and by his death Mr. John- 
son became the constitutional President of the 
United States. He died in 1875, while serving 
as United States Senator from Tennessee. 

When only ten years of age, Mr. Johnson 
was bound apprentice to a tailor of Raleigh. 
Never having- been a day at school in his life, 
he yet determined to secure an education. 
From a fellow-workman he learned the alpha- 
bet, and from a friend something of spelling. 
Thenceforth, after working ten or twelve hours 
per day at his trade, he spent two or three ev- 
ery night in study. In 1826, he went West to 
seek his fortune, with true filial affection car- 
rying with him his mother, who was dependent 
on his labor for support. After his marriage 
at Greenville, Tenn, he continued his studies 
under the instruction of his wife, pursuing his 
trade as before by day. His political life com- 
menced with his election as alderman. He 
was successively chosen mayor, member of the 
Legislature, Presidential elector. State Sen- 
ator, twice Governor, and for fifteen years 
United States Senator. Remaining true to the 
Union when his State seceded, his loyalty at- 
tracted general attention. A life-time Demo- 
crat, he was elected on the Republican ticket 
as Vice-President, in reward for his faithful- 
ness. Coming into office with a Republican 
Congress, it is not strange that his way was 
hedged with difficulties, and his Presidential 
career a most unhappy one. 



344 ADVERTISEMENTS. 



Central Illinois Soap, Oil aniCanJle Ms! 



ESTA^nBGCieiinHr)) 1 8 S 3 . 



N. N. WINSLOW, 

MANUFACTURER OF AND DEALER IN 

Soap, Candles ! 



LA RD AND TALLOW O ILS! 

A FULL STOCK OF 
ALWAYS ON HAND. ALSO 






OIL BLACKING 

Warranted superior to any other oil in use for HARNESS AND ALL KINDS OF LEATHER. 



ESPECIAL ATTENTION CALLED TO SOAPS, 



German Mottled, Spanish Lilly, 

And other brands, which are the best in the market. Competition defied in 
quality' of Goods and Prices. 

ORDERS FROM THE TRADE SOLICITED. 



g^^sh: x^j^iid ipoi^ 



Tallo^MT, Lard and Grease ! 

OFFICE AND SALESROOMS: 

East of Mail SlreBt, Near In L, B. & M. hmB\ M, 

BLOOiMiiisra-Ton^, iHiLiisrois. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



345 




Coni't House, at Bloom ington, Hclieaii Co., 111., was erected in 
1870, at a cost of $400,000. It is built of handsome marble; joists and dome of iron. 
Spacious halls, with marble floor, and is considered fire proof. The dimensions of this 
beautiful structure are, 90 by 120 feet, and ranks among the finest buildings m the State. 



-DEALER IN- 







No. 209 NORTH MAIN STREET, 

Directly East of Court House, Bloomiugtou, 111. 




GraDi .Central Hotel 

OMAHA, NEB. 

George Thrall, Proprietor. 



BETWEEN 



Chicago and San Francisco. 



346 



SKETCHES OF THE PKESIDENTS. 




(eighteenth president, two terms.) 

Ulysses S. CrVJiiit was born at Point 
Pleasant, Clermont county, Ohio, April 27, 
1822. He was very unwilling- to follow his 
father's trade, which was that of a tanner, 
and, at seventeen, an appointment was secured 
for him at West Point. His name having been 
wrongly registered, Grant vainly attempted to 
set the matter right, but finally accepted his 
" manifest destiny," assumed the change thus 
forced upon him, and thenceforth signed him- 
self ''Ulysses Simpson," the latter being his 
mother's family name. Two j^ears after com- 
pleting his four years' course as cadet, the Mex- 
ican war broke out, in which Grant conducted 
himself with great gallantry, receiving espe- 
cial mention and promotion. In 1847 he was 
made first-lieutenant, captain in 1853, and in 
1854 he resigned his commission, and entered 
the leather and saddlery business at (ialena, 
Illinois, in 1859, whei'e he remained until the 
opening of the war in 1861, when he immedi- 
ately offered his services in behalf of the 
Union. His modesty and diffidence delayed 
their acce]itance, and Governor Yates, of Illi- 
nois, was the first to avail himself of them. 
Grant finally took the field as Colonel of the 
Twenty-first Regiment Illinois Volunteers. In 
February, 1862, he was made a major-general, 
and commanded the armies of the Soutn-west. 
On the 12th of March, 1864, he was made lieu- 
tenant-general and put in command of all the 
armies, and took personal direction of the mil- 
itary operations in Virginia, and, on the flth of 
April, 1865, General Lee surrendered the Con- 
federate armies to him, at Appomattox Court 
House, and hostilities were ended. 

He was nominated and elected by the Repub- 
licans President of the United States in 1868, 
and re-elected by the same party in 1872, and 
is now the present incumbent. His term ex- 
pires in 1877. 



MoLiNE — Continued. 



SMITH & CASSEL, 

Dealers in Hardware, Stoves, House FurnishlEt 

Goods, Gas Fixtures & Tuoing. 

216 & 218 Main Street. 



H 



LIVERY STABLE. 

ABWOOD, H., Livery Sale & Feed Stable. 

Main St., near R dman ave. 

MEAT MARKET. 



r^ RANTZ, C. P., City Meat Market, 



214 Main st. 



PHOTOGRAPHER. 
p>EAL, CHAS-TPhotogfapherT 



124 Wells St. 



RESTAURANT. 
"piEKCE BROS.rRestaurant, 



232 Main st. 



JCAILORS^ 

LESON & LOFQUIST, Merchant Tailors, 

306'/4 Main St., near Reese Hotel. 







o 

Y 



STLUND, A., Merchant Tailor, Clothes Cleaned 

and Hats dressed, 209 Main st. 
OUNGBURG, L, J., Merchant Tailor, 

Railroad ave., opp. C. & R.I. Depot. 



WAOON MANUFACTURERS. 

MOLINE WAGON CO., 

Manufacturers of the 

Farm dt Spring Wagons, Buggies & 
Carriages. 

Near C. & R. I. Depot. 
WATCHES AND JEWELRY. 

Watches, Clocks & Jewelry 

yjro MAIN STREET. 



ROCK ISLAND, ILLS. 

ATTORNEY AT LAW. 

Attornoj I Csunselor at Law I Notary Public, 

S. W. Cor. Second ave., «& 17th st. 
BAKERY AND CONFECTIONERY. 

^^ wmTnepka, 

Bakery and Confectionery, School Books, Toys 

and Notions. 

1002 THIRD AVENUE. 



H 



BARBER. 

ABDY^ ¥.^ To'nsoriaTArtist,' 

4ih ave., near 22d st. 



SKETCHES OF THE PRESIDENTS. 



34:1 



Rock Island — Conthiued. 



OAERIAGES AND BUGGIES. 

GEORGE A. BAIN & CO., 

Manufacturers of 

LIGHT, OPEN AND TOP BUGGIES, 

Painting, Eepairing, Ac. 
i^TB &T.t JfTSitS SSJf iff. 



DEESSMAKEE. 

IpKENCH; M., ModisteT 
_• Rock Island. 

DEUGGISTS. 

Harper House Drug Store, 

Wholesale & Retail Dealer in 

Fine Drugs, Chemicals. Drugrjists 

Sundries, Paints, Oils, Paint 

Brushes, tCc. 



S' 



FANCY GOODS. 

dWHXBb7''srT]?rT^adie?"'&'^Gents^^ 
Store, 1324 Third ave. 



FLOUE AND FEED. 

Dealer in Flour, and Fefd, Baled Hay and Straw, 

Fraits and Vegetables always on Hand. 

1203 THIRD AVE, Cor. 12th ST. 

FTJENITTJEE. 
G. A. DOELLINGER, 

Parlor & Chamber Furniture, 

1506 to 1510 SECOND AVENUE. 
GEOOEEIES. 

Grocer and Commission Merchant, and Dealer in 

Fruits, Vegetables, Butter, &c. 

Cor. THIRD AVE., & FOURTEENTH ST. 

EIS, JUSTUS, Groceries & Provisions, 

17th St., near 4th ave. 



w 



GUNSMITH. 

XjCFTTtHAS^rGunSKthTanTdealeFin^ 
& Sporting Utensils, 17th st , opp. P. O. 



INSUEANOE AGENTS. 
Hayes & Cleaveland, 

GENERAL INSURANCE A&'TS, 

Office, Bengston's Block. 

LIVEEY STABLE. 
JOHN EVANS. 



18th St. bet. 1st & 2d ave. 



POTTEEY. 

H'^~^TVERSTIcKT^^~M^Ianr?~of'~Yenov^^ 
Rockingham ware, 9th st. 




[nineteenth president.] 

Rutherford B. Hayeis was born 
at Delaware, Ohio, October 4, 1822. He 
graduated at Kenyon .College, Ohio. He 
commenced the practice of law in Cincin- 
nati in his thirty fourth year, when he re- 
ceived his first official position as City So- 
licitor, which he held till the war broke 
out in li~61. Very near its opening he en- 
listed in the Twenty-third Ohio volunteers, 
and served with the regiment till he re- 
ceived the command of a brigade in 18 :4. 
His first appointment was as Major, his 
first promotion came within less than a 
year, and in September of lb63 he held a 
commission as Lieutenant-Colonel, and 
was in command of his regiment, which 
he led into tliC battle of South Mountain. 
During the battles of the Army of Potomac, 
Colonel Hayes received a severe wound in 
the arm, but remained with his regiment 
to the last, and was the first officer whose 
command established a position at South 
Mountain. Two years later he had be- 
came Brigadier-General Hayes, and was 
elected to Congress from the second Ohio 
district by the Republicans. In the fall of 
I86(j, Mr. Hayes was nominated and elect- 
ed to Congress a second time by the Re- 
publicans, but Congress had held but one 
session, when he was nominated and elect- 
ed Govenor of Ohio by the same part}'. 
During his political career, he was three 
times elected Govenor of Ohio, and twice 
a Member of Congress. A reference to the 
" Important Events" in 187(5-77, will be 
found the particulars of his election to the 
Presidency of the United States in 1877. 
Mr. Hayes took the oath oroffice on Sat- 
urday the 3d of March, and was inaugurat- 
ed President of the United States. Monday 
the 5th of March. Pending the time of the 
election and before the meeting of the 
electoral commission, the country was 
greatly agitated and seemed threatened 
with civil war, but immediitely after his 
inauguration quiet and confidence was re- 
stored and peace reigned through out the 
United States. 



348 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



Rock Island — Continued. 


Davenport — Continued. 


PUMPS, 

Manufacturers of Common Wood Pumps, 
also, Patent Porcelain Lined Pumps, 1st avenue, 
opposite St. Louis Depot. Correspondence so- 
licited. 


ABSTRACT AND CONVEYANCINa. 

mm\ ani mmmm orncE, 

230 Main st. 

B. W. QABTSIDE. 



REAL ESTATE, 
LEWIS CHRISMAN, 

REAL ESTATE & LOAN AGENCY, 

Farms and Farm Lands for sale or exchange, 
17th St., near 3d ave. 



D 



RESTAURANT. 

RUBETLnTResiaurant & Ice Cream Rooms, 

1816 2d ave. 



SAWS AND SAUSAGE STUFFERS, 

'~^~~"'~'~"'^"^^"EstabTi8hedl857.' 

D. DONALDSON, 
Manufacturer of Saws, Sausage Stuft'ers and 
Rockers, plain and corrugated iron doors and 
shutters, 4th ave., near 16th St. 

STOVES AND TINWARE. 

Dealer in Stoves, Furnaces, Ranges, 
Tinware, House-furnishing Goods, Sheet- 
iron and Copper work, 1009 3d ave. 



H 



OLDORF, Stoves & Tinware, 

4th ave., near 21st st. 



s 



AWYEB, N. B., Manfr and dealer in .Glass and 
Tinware, 1618 Ist ave. 



TAILORS, 
JOHN WOLLENHAUPT, 

1105 3d ave., near 11th st. Cloths, Cassimeres 

and Vestings, of latest styles, at Eastern 

prices, on hand. 

IMMER&STEGEM.iNJf, Merchant Tailors, 

1903 Second ave. 



UNDERTAKER. 

1iTERRnjL,'L.7Tjndeftakerr 



1504 2d ave. 



WAGON MAKERS, 

tECKFUSrBV'"&WNrrWago^n^"Shop"&"Ho78? 
shoeing, cor. 4th ave and 9th st. 



S 



WATCHES AND CLOCKS. 

CHMDTD^rWaxcirSTcJlocksrJew^ 

1805 2d ave . 



S 



DAVENPORT, IOWA. 



AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS. 

parmellTa HUKD^ ——-..-.—v^ 
Manufacturer's agents for the Archer 
Rake, and McSherry Seeder, for Iowa, 
Nebraska and Dakota, 314 Harrison st. 



ARCHITECTS. 
ipLiUSENr V. GTArchitectT 



207 W. 3d St. 



Architect and Superintendent of Building, 

N. E. COR. 3d & BRADY STS. 



ATTORNEYS AT LAW. 
CLARK & HEYWOOD, 

ATTORNEYS AND COUNSELORS 

214 main ST. 



COOK <£• BICHMAN, 

-AND- 

Couflselors at Law, 

N, W. COR. 3d & MAIN STS. 

ASH, D. B., Attorney at Law, U. S. Com. & 

Reg. in Bankruptcy, 207 Main st. . 
^TER, SAMUEL, Attorney at Law, 
Room 7, Cutter's Block, Brady st. 

TWOMEY & STUYVESANT, Attorneys at Law, 
Cor . Brady &2dsts. 

BLACKSMITHS. 

V''"nSj?m?cO"SimTffiAMrBrackBi^^ 
822 W. 2(f St. 

„™_ ^OOTSAND^SHOES. 

GRUENAU, P. H., Boots & ShoesTcustom^work 
a specialty, 408 W. 2d st. 

ATO, F. E., Centennial Boot & Shoe Shop, 

115 E. 2d St. 



P 



CEMENT PIPE WORKS. 

CAMPT^JenienTPiiHrWork 
Granite Monuments, 224 E. 3d st. 

COMMISSION MERCHANT. 

iBDm)7PrB.rConV."TkIerchM 
Barley, cor 2d ave. and Harrison st. 



r\AVIS& CAMP, Cement Pipj;Work87Marbfe'& 



COOPER STOCK. 

S'^'TEfTENlBBOS^rdealersTn^Coop^ 
528_W\^d8t. 

5i?h^ ^^^ scouring. 

augT^ebelien^s 

Iowa State Steam Dje and Cleansing 
Works and Repairing Establishment, 223 
Perry street, between 2d and 3d sts. 

ELASTIC HAND STAMP. 
Manufacturers of the Patent Improved 

ELASTIC HAND STAMP, 

128 EAST THIRD ST, 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



349 




350 



SKpyrCHES OF THE PRESIDENTS. 



Davenport — Continued. 



PURNITUKE. 

ture. ei-J Brady et. 

GROCERIES. 

HOSTMATOTjT'vTGTOCBHesrTFru^^ 
ables, 510 W. 2d et. 

TANK, B. H., Groceries, Spices, etc., 
502 Brady st. 

GUNSMITH. 

HENRY BERG, 

a-"cr3>TS25vCiTZ3: 

And dealer in Muzzle and Breech-Loading 

Siiot Guns, Biflf 8, Pistols and Sportina; 

Apparatus, 2:d0 3d St., cor. Harrison st. 



D 



HAIR WORK. 

FVINNYTRrE^RSTManrfoniairWori^ 
Hair Jewelry, 117 Main et. 



HARDWARE. 

8IEG & WILLIAMS, Iron & Heavy Hardware, 
_^ Cor 3d & Main sts. 

HARNESS AND SADDLES. 

^""""^"""'^"^""iT^rirn^LER^^"""^^ 

329 Harrison street. Manufacturer of and dealer 
in Harness, Saddles. Collars, Bridles, Whips, 
Halters, Combs, Brushes, etc. All work warran- 
ted. Uncle Sam's Harness Oil always on hand. 

HOSESHOEING. 

B^^'AMETrnPAT^THMseshoeiug^ 
325 Harr'son st, 

METROPOLITAN HORSESHOEING 
SHOP, 

303 Third st., cor. Rock Island St., 
Snyder & Shado, props. Particular attention 
paid to Diseased Feet, Interfering, Forging, Knee 
Cutting, etf. 

INSURANCE. 

NORTHWESTERN MUTUAL LIFE INS. CO., I. T. 
Mar li n, S tate agt. for Iowa and Nebra ska. 

LIVERY STABLE, 

I"?VISHER&' BfEB^ERT,12veiyr§a^e"&Fee^ 
' 209 to 213 W. 3d st. 



MARBLE WORKS. 

DAVIS & CAMP, Marble Works & Cement Pipe 
Works, 224 E. 3d st. 

MILLINERT AND DRESSMAKING. 
McCUTCHEON & SOLOMON, 

DEESS AND CLOAK MAKING, 

stamping and Machine Embroidery, 
312 PERRY ST. 

SNYDER & CURTIS, 

Millinery, Fancy Goods &Drcssnia][iii£, 

309 BRADY ST. 

PHYSICIANS. ______ 

BAKER, J. P., Physician and Surgeon, 
Cor. 3d and Brady sts. 

ANTWELL, A. W., Physician and Surgeon, 

217 Brady st. 



MPORTANT INVENTIONS 



AND 



IMPROVEMENTS! 



Achromatic Zens. — By DoUand, 1758. 

Air BraJces. — Invented by George Westing- 
house in 1869; improved by "John W. Gardiner, 
1872; by Henderson, 1872;' by Carl Fogelberg, 
1872. Prior to Westinghouse some inventions 
had been patented as air brakes in England, 
but his was the first successful and used air 
brake. 

Air Engine. — Invented by Glazebrook in 
1797; improved by Medhurst in 1799; by Erics- 
son, 1851; by Augin and Crocker, 1864; by 
Mowbray, 1864; bv Pease, 1865; by Baldwin, 
1865. 

Air Gun. — Invented by Shavr in 1849. 

Amalgamator. — Invented by Varnev, 1852; 
improved by H-ill, 1861; by Coleman, 1863; 
Wheeler, 1863; Heath, 1863; Dodge, 1864; Bro- 
die, 1864; Moore, 1865; Peck, 1865; Charles, 
1866; Staats, 1866. 

Aneroid Barometer. — Invented by Coute in 
1798. 

Apple Fearer. — Invented by Contes, 1803; 
improved by Gates in 1810; by Mitchell, 1838; 
by Priitt in'l853. 

Argand Lamp. — Invented by Amie Argand 
in 1784. 

Armor Plantinq for vessels and forts. — In- 
vented bv J. B. tiove, 1861; improved by W. 
W. Wood, 1862; bv .1. L. Jones, 1862; by Hea- 
ton, 1863; byL. D." Carpenter, 1865. 

Armstrong Gun. — Invented by Armstrong, 
1855. 

Battery Gun. — Invented bv Gatling, 1861; 
by Hardy, 1862 ; by Tavlor, 1871; by Dodge, 
1856. 

Bessemer Sted. — Invented by H. Bessemer 
in 1856, and improved bv him in 1861 and 
1862. 

Blast Furnace. — Invented by Detmold in 
1842; improved by VanUyke in 1860. 

Electro- Afag net. — Invented bv Sturgeon in 
1825. 

Beer. — Ale invented 1404 B. C; ale-booths 
set up in England 728, and laws passed for 
their regulation. Beer first introduced into 
England 1492; in Scotland as early as 1482. 
By tlie statute of James I, one full quart of the 
best beer or ale was to be sold for one penny, 
and two quarts of small beer for one penny. 

Boot Crimper. — Invented by Moore in 
1812. 

Boivs and arrows introduced in 1066. 

Breech Loading Fire Arms — Invented by 
Thornton and Hall in 1811; improved bv 
C. H. Ballard in 1851: A. A. Chassepot, 
1867. 

Breech Loading Fire Ar'ms. — Invented by 
H. Harrington in 1837; improved by I. Adams 
in 1838; by C. Sharp in 1848. 

Bread. — First made with yeast in England 
in the year 1754; the quarter loaf was sold for 



IMPORTANT INVENTIONS AND IMPROVEMENTS. 



351 



Davenport — Continued. 



E. H. UAZEN, M. D., 

SPECIALTY EYE AND EAR, 

Office at his Infirmary, cor. 6th & Brady sts. 
Established 1867. 

EEAL ESTATE A&ENTS. 

OCHS, JOHN A SONS, Real Estate Agents, ■ 
Cor. Harrison & 2nd sts. 

RESTAUEANT. 

CONKLIN, JOHN, Restaurant & Ice Cream Sa- 
loon, 109 Main st. 

SEWING MACHINES. 

E. W. ALLEIV, 

Wholesale and Retail dealer in the Wilson Shut- 
tle Sewing Machines and all kinds of needles 
and attachments. All kinds of machines 
repaired. 209 MAIN STREET. 

STOVES AND TINWARE. 

FBOSCHLE, L., Stoves and Tinware, 
219 W. Third st. 

REIMERS & BRAUCH, 

Dealers in 

Stoves and House Furnishing Goods^ 

414 W. SECOND STREET. 

TAILORS. 

FBEBERG, GUSTAV, Tailor, Cleaning and Re- 
pairing, 316 Perry. 

P. A. HALLING, 

310 PERRY STREET. 

PERRY, SAM, Merchant Tailor, Gents' Furnish- 
ing Goods. &c. , 113 Brady st. 

THODirSON & BAHLS, 

MERCHANT TAILORS, 

And Dealers in Fine Cloths, Cassimeres and Vest- 
ings. 118 East Third Street. 



TOBAOOO AND CIGARS. 

Established 1563. 
RAMMELSBERG & PRIESTER, 

Manufacturers and Wholesale Dealers in Tobac- 
cos and Cigars. 

406 West Second Street. 

TURKISH BATHS. 

"^THoSisrcrBAi^ 

TURKISH BATHS, 

Cor. Fifth & Brady Sts. 

WAGON MAKER, 

''pECHENTIN, F. J., Wagon Maker. Repairing 

JL promptly done. 814W. 2ndst. 

W ATCHM AKEB^ANDJE WELER . 

AJEWBERN, J. F., Watchmaker and Jpwler. 
l\ 107 W. 3; d St. 



about 8 cent.s; three years after, it rose to 
about 20 cents, and in March, 1800, to about .34 
cents, when new bread was forbidden, under 
the penalty of %\.2i) per loaf, if the baker sold 
it until 24 hour.s old. 

Bridije. — The first .stone one, in England, at 
Bow, near Stratford, in 1087. 

Buckles. — Invented about this time in 1680. 

CalicdS. — First made in Lancashire in 1771. 

Carte de Visite. — ( Photographic ) first made 
by M. Ferrier, in Paris, 18.07. 

Carronades. — Invented by Gen. Melville in 

1779. 

Cast Iron Plow. — Invented bv Newbold in 
1797. 

Cannon. — Invented in 1.330, and were first 
used by the English in 1346; first used in Eng- 
land in 1445; first made of iron in England in 
1547; of brass, in 1G35. Cannon first used in 
ships of war in 1539. 

Coal. — Was discovered in 1234 near New- 
castle; first dug at Newcastle by a charter 
granted the town by Henry III.; first used in 
1280 by driers, brewers, etc. In the reign of Ed- 
ward I., began to use sea-coal for fire in 1350, 
and he published a proclamation against it in 
1398 as a public nuisance. 

Chimneijs. — First introduced into buildings 
in the year of 1200. In England only in the 
kitchen, or large hall, where the family sat 
round a large stove, the funnel of which passed 
through the ceiling, 1300. 

Collodion. — Use in photography. Origin- 
ated by F. S. Archer in 1851. 

Concrete Pavement. — Invented bv Straub, 
1863; improved bv Prescott, 1872;- Bellamv, 
1875. 

Corn Sheller. — Invented by Phinney in 1815; 
improved by James in 1819. 

Cotton Gin. — Invented by Eli Whitney in 
1793. The result of the invention was the 
making of cotton the great American staple. Im- 
proved by Whipple, 1840; by Parkhurst, 1845. 

Circular Saw. — Invented bj- General Ben- 
tham, in England, in 1790; improved bv Trot- 
ter, 1804; by Brunei, 1805 and 1809. 

Curred Stereotype Plates. — Invented by 
Cowper in 1815. 

Cutting Glass hi/ Sand Blast. — Invented 
by B. C.'Telghman, 1870. 

Cut-of for Steam Engines. — Invented bv 
Sickles'inl841. 

Daguerreotype. — Definite experiments look- 
ing to the prodiiction of a picture by the action 
of light upon a sensitized surface were made 
as early as 1802, but the production of a per- 
manent picture was not accomplished until 
1838, by M. Daguerre, an optician of Paris. 
France, from whtm such pictures were named. 

Dahlgren Gun. — Invented by Admiral Dahl- 
gren, U". S. Navy, 1861, 

Pavy Lamp, for miners. — Invented by Sir 
Humphrey Davy, in 1815. 

Diving Bell. — Invented in 1838. 

Drumtnond Light (Lime Liglif]. — Invented 
by Lieut. Drummond in 1826. 

Earth Closets. — Invented by Moule & Gir- 
dlestone in 1860. 

Ebonite Hard Puhher). — Invented bj 
Charles Goodyear in 1849. 



352 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



MUSCATINE, IOWA. 

AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS, 

AETrAntr&ahT^tandard Farm MacbiueryT 
Cor. 2ud & Walnut sts. 

ATTORNEYS AT LAW. 

ATTORNEY AT LAW, 



R 



IOWA AVENUE. 



Established 1845. 



(Established 1861.) 

ALLEN BR003IHALL, 

Attorney at Law and Examiner of Titles. Has 
Complete Abstract Books. 

(Established 1857.) 

n. 31. LAMBERT 

ATTORNEY AT LAW. 

HEAL ESTATE BROKER, 



H. J. LAUDER, 



J. M. DORAN. 



LAUDER & DOR AN, 

ATTORNEYS 



MUSCATINE, IOWA. 



J. E. STEVENSON, 
Attorney at Law, will practice in Muscatine and 
Cedar counties; Examine and Furnish Abstracts 
of Titles ; and attend to Conveyancing, Pay Taxes, 
making Collections, &c. Established 1872. 

WESTERN BOUNTY AND PENSION A&ENCY. 

L. H. Washburn, 

Attorney at Law and Solicitor for Pension and 
Bounty Claimants. Send stamp for pamphlet, 
showing who are entit'ed to pensions & Bounties . 

BAKER AND ^CONFECTIONER. 

OMISWCKDESGHEL, 

Baker and Confectioner, Graham Block. Fresh 
Bread, Cakes and Pies. Ice Cream Room open at 
all reasonable hours ; Oysters in their season. Full 
stock of Fresh Confectionery— the finest in the city. 

" BLACKSMITHING. 

To'SOjCELMforleshoein'g.t^^ 
Cor. 2nd & Mulberry. Est. 1873 . 

JlCOIi ELICKER, 

General BlactsmitMng and Carriage Ironing, 

Cor. Third & Mulberry sts. Established 1870. 

FARRELL & SCHRODER, 

Manufacturer of Farm Wagons and Buggies. Horse 

Shoeing a Specialty. General Blacksmith- 

ing done, and all work warranted. 

S. W. COR. SECOND & JIULBERRY STS. 



Muscat: NE — Continued. 



MACKET & FAHEY, General Blacksmithing, 
Third St, Est. 1856. 

BLANK BOOKS. 

Dealers in Pianos, Organs, Melodeons, General 
JIusical Merchandise, Blank Books, Stationery, 
Wall Paper, Curtain Goods, Chromos, &c. Blank 
Books made to order. Magazir.es, Music, &c., 
neatly bound. Second St , near Bridge. Est. 1862. 

BOOKS AND STATIONERY. 

(Established 1863.) 

DEMOREST & COE, 

Wholesale and Retail dealers in Books and Sta- 
tionery, also Pianos and Organs, 
170 SECOND STREET. 

BOOTS AND SHOES. 

CCHlVARTZTLrTBoot'&'Shoellak ^ 

O Mulberry st. Est. 1874. 

BREWERY. ' 

MRS. MARIA EIOENMANN, 

Cor. 7TH & Mulberry Sts. Est. 1S59. 



BROOM MANUFACTURER. 

H^^^AGMmANNThENRY, Broom Manufacturer, "" 
Cor. Mulberry & 6th sts. 

CARPENTERS AND BUILDERS. 

Cor. 3rd & Cedar sts. E-^t. 1866. 

CARRIAG-ES AND BUGGIES. 

JOS. J^. AM EXT, JR., 

Manufacturer of 

Carriages, Buggies & Phaetons, 

THIRD STREET. 

LOCKERT, CHRISTIAN, Carriage and Wagon, 
Manufacturer, Mulberry st. Est. 1853. 



B 



r^ ROSCHEL & KNOWLES, Manufacturers Car- 
\jr riages, Buggies, Spring Wagons, ifec. lowaav. 

COMMISSION MERCHANTS. 

^^ J. J. tC s. b6w3iax, 

Auction and Commission Merchants and dealers 
in Dry Goods, Notions, Horses, Harness, Wag- 
ons, Buggies, Second-Hand Furniture, &c., &i-. 

SECOND ST., next door to Graham's Drug Store. 



CONFECTIONERY AND FRUITS. 

CARL, J. H., Confectionery, Oysters, <fcc , 
Mulberry St., under the Park Hou^'p. 

JAS. E. MARSHALL, 

Wholesale and Retail dealer in Confectionery, 
Foreign and Domestic Fruits, Nuts, &c., F ue 
Cigars and Tobacco. 

KAST SECOND STREET. 

DENTISTS. 

IjTll'rsV'EBXEMANT 

Dentist. Particular attention paid to the presei 

vat'on of the natural teeth. 
1S4 Second Street. Established 1B< ' 



K 



ULP, J. S., Dentist, 



145 2nd St. Est. 1857 



IMPORTANT EVENTS OF THE CENTURY. 



353 




" Feiieuil Hall, the "Cradle of L,iberty." — This buildine was presented to Boston by Peter Faneail. 
It was erected in 1743 destroyed by Are in 1761, and immediately thereafter was rebuilt by the vote of 
the town. In 1805 it was enlarged to its present size, and until 18-Ji all town meetings of Boston were 
held within its walls. The hall is 76 feet square and 28 feet high. It is never let for money, but is at 
the disposal of thepeople, whenever a sufficient number of persons, complying with certain regulations, 
ask to have it opened. By a provision in the charter of Boston, it is forbidden the sale or lease of the 
hall. 




Brattle Square Church. Boston— Was first built in 1699, was taken down in 1772^^and the bniH- 
ing just demolished, erected on the same spot, was dedicated on the 35th of July, 1773. Durirj; the 
Revolution the pastor, who was a p-itriot. was obliged to leave Boston, services were suspended and 
the British soldiers used the building as a barraclc. A cannon-ball from a battery in Cambridge, or 
from a ship of war in the Charles river, struck the church, and this memento of the glorious contest 
was after wards built into the ex'ernal wall of the church, alcove the porch. The old church was sold m 
871, and the last services was held in it July 30th. of that year. The ancient pulp't, the organ, the old 
bell, the historic cannon-ball, and some other mementoes, were reserved at the sale. A large business 
block now occupies the site of the church. 



354 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



THE iisrvEnsrTOiiS' 



Scientific & C ommercia l 



PROSPECTrS. 

The Scientific and Commercial World is 
devoted to the interests of popular science, 
the mechanic arts, manufactures, inven- 
tions, agriculture, commerce, history, and 
interspersed withhumerous matter to make 
the solid articles more digestable. It is 
valuable and instructive not only in the 
workshop and manufactory, but also in the 
household, the library and reading room, 
and as an adverti>ing medium can not be 
surpassed. 

Terms of Sabscription 



XLi 33 



One copy one year \ 

One copy six months - Post free. 

One copy four months ) 



$i.oo 
•75 
■50 

Remit by postal order, dratt or express- 
Canada subscribers must remit 25 cents 
extra to pay postage. Terms in advance. 
Address all orders to 

Wolverton & Connor, 

216 East Washington Street, 

INDIANAPOLIS, IND. 





RICHARD A. BARRET, 



Owner and Proprietor- 



STRICTLT FIRST-CLASS AS TO CUISINE, ROOMS <& APPURTENANCES 
f Five stories. Fire escapes perfect. Graduated prices — 

$3.00, $2. SO c^ S2.00 X'^lXl. ^jSl'X'. 

The favorite Hotel of Burlington. Every room is light, airy and well ventilated. 
Neiv Paint, Neiv Paper, New Management. No Runners. 
Extensively repaired, remodeled and renovated. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



355 




SSmithsonian Institution, Waishington, D. C— This building is con- 
structed of red freestone, and has numerous towers. Its length from east to west is 447 
feet, and breadth including carriage porch, 160 feet. The corner-stone was laid in 1847, 
and the building completed in 1S56. It cost $450,000. The Institution is a bequest ot 
James Smithson, an English gentlemen, who bequeathed $515,169 for the construction 
of the building. Here are deposited collections of all the exploring expeditions of the Uni- 
ted States, besides all other sorts of curiosites, which would require weeks to examine. 



Muscatine. — Continued. 



ABDMAN, JOSEPH, Dentist, 

E. 2nd St., near Bridge. Est. 1854. 



H 



DRUG&ISTS. 
OliDS^REPPERT, 

Druggists, dealers in none but strictly pure Drugs 
and Medicines. 



Cor. 2nd St., & Iowa Ave. 



Established 1877. 



^DKT&OODS^ 

OWLEKBBUs., staple and FaTrcyDryGoodsT 
Old's Block, 2nd st. 



F 



GROCERIES. 



J. W. BERRY, 

GROCERIES AND PROVISIONS, 



E. Second Street. 



Established 1873. 



MARTIN H. BITZER, 

Dealer in Groceries. Rents Property and Makes 

Collections. 
2nd St., 0pp. National Hotel. Established 1855. 

EISENHAUS, FRED., Groceries & Provisions, 
216 Second st. 

C. F. K£SSL,£R, 

Groceries and Provisions, 

Cor. Mulberry and Fifth Sts. 

ILSON, J. A., Groceries. &c., 
203 2nd st. Est. 1851. 

HARNESS AND SADDLES. 

J. H. HER WIG 

Hanufacturer of Harness, Saddles and Collars, 

EAST SECOND ST, 



Muscatine — Continued. 



HOTELS. 



nin 



J. W. rARNER, Agent, 

J. M. Van Patten, Clerk. MUSCATINE. 




Free Carriage to and from the house, also hag- 
gage free. 
COB. SECOND AND WALNDT STS. 

JAMES F. STEVENS. Proprietor, 
Corner Fourth and Mulberry streets. 

JUSTICE OF THE PEACE. 

geoTmeasox, 
JUSTICE OF THE PEACE 

145 Second st. Established 1852. 
LUMBER. 



GARLOCK, J. S., laimber. Laths, Shingles, 
Doors. Blinds, etc.. 236 Second st. 

MILLINERY AND DRESSMAKING. 

FSoM^HSilErDiressmrker " 
E. Second st. Established 1870. 

HAWLEY, MRS. G. R., Dress & Cloakmakmg, 
E. Secona St. 



D 



356 



IMPORTANT INVENTIONS AND IMPKOVEMENTS. 



Electric Z/'ghi.— Invented by Stalte & Pe- 
trie about 1846; improved by Jules Dubosq in 


Muscatine — Continued. 


1855; byM. Lerrin, 1862; by Holmes, 1858; by 
Dumus & Benoit, 1862. 

Electric Zoom. — Invented by G. Bonelli, of 
France, 1853. 

Electro-Magnetic Governor. — Invented by 


3IBS. WM. WHITE, 

MILLINERY AND NOTIONS, 

SECOND ST. 


Phelps in 1858. 

Electro-Magnetic Needle. — Invented bv 
Oersted in 1819. 

Elevated Raihcay. — Invented by Sargent in 
1825; improved by Andrew in 1861. 

Electrotype. — ^Invented by Spencer in 1837; 
improved ov Prof. Jacobs in 1838; by Robt. 


PAINTEES. 
EMIL GROSCHEL, 

CARRIAGE AND WAeOK PAINTING, 

Mulberry St., bet. 5th and 6th sts. 


Murray in 1840. 

Fairbanks' Platform Scales. — Invented by 
Thaddeus Fairbanks, 1831. 

Fairs and Markets.— 'Virat instituted in 886 
in England by Alfred. Th^ first fairs took 
their rise from wakes, wheii the number of 
people then assembled brought together a va- 
riety of traders annually on these days. From 
these holidays they were called fairs. 

Gas Meter. — Invented by H. Robinson, 1831. 

Gun Cotton. — Invented by M. Schonbein in 
1845-46. 

Gutta PercJia Manufacture. — Invented by 
Dr. Montgomery in 1843. 

Harvesters. — Invented by Palmer & Wil- 
liams, 1851; improved bv Cvrenus Wheeler in 
1852; by Densmore, 18o2: "Gove, 1859; Kirby 
1859; Mayall, 1859; Manny, 1875. 

Hats. — First made in London in 1510. 


C. KIRSCH & BRO., 
House and Sign Painters, Grainers, 
Glaziers and Paper Hangers, shop on Ce- 
dar street, between 2d and 3d sts. The 
best material at the lowest possible prices. 
Mixed" paints for sale cheap . 


PHOTOGEAPHERS. 
ALLEN it MULL, 

PRACTICAL PHOTO&RAPHERS 

E. Second St., over Burnett's Bookstore. 


J. G. EVANS, 

PHO TOGB APHE B , 

Iowa ave. Large assortment of Steroscopic 

Views of Muscatine and vicinity always 

on hand. 


HlgTi Toicers. — First high towers or steeples 
erected on churches in 1000. 

Howitzer.— \xi\enied. by Colonel Pacham in 
1822. 

Ice Making Machine. — Invented bv Carre in 
1860; inipniv'cd by David Boyle, 1872; by Mar- 
tin k Boath, 1872; by Beath, 1875. 

Illuminating Gas {manufacture £>/).— In- 
vented by L. Entros and W. Zigler in 1815; 
improved by Ward & Hall in 1821; by J. Bos- 
ton in 1831. 

India Rubher Manufacture. — Invented by 
Chaffee in 1836; improved by Charles Good- 


"pHELPS, J. P., Artistic Photographer, 

X Second st., over Post Office. 

PHYSICIANS, 

TAEANTlHrM^^hyScian"&Surgeon, cor. Second 
XJ St, & Iowa ave., entrance on ave, Est. 1861. 
T7U1LIAM, GEO. W., Physician, 
J: 194 Second st. 

nr. H. LINDNER, 

SECOND STREET, 
Two doors below National Bank. Est. 1854. 


year in 1844. 

Inhaling Ether to Prevent Pain. — Discov- 
ered by W. T. G. Morton, 1846. 

Jacquard Zoom (for weaving figured fab- 
rice).— Invented by Jacquard, of France, in 
1800. 

Knitting Machine. — Invented by Hooton in 
1776; improved by Lamb, 1865. 


Q MITH, CAL. W., Physician and Surgeon, Office, 
10 Masonic Building, 229 E. Second St. 

PLUMBERS AND GASFITTERS. 

N. BARRirXsON^ 

Plufflliers, eas anl Steam Fitters, 

E. SECOND ST., NEAR MULBERRY. 


Knives first made in England in 1563. 

Zamp for preventing explosion by fire-damp 
in coal mines, first invented in 1815. 

Zanterns first invented by King Alfred in 
890. 

Zeadeii Pipes for carrying water invented in 
1236. 

Zife-boats invented in 1802. 

Zead Pipe Machine. — Invented by T. Al- 
derson, 1804; improved by Dobbs, 1820; by 
Hague, 1822. 

Zightning Pods. — Invented by Benjamin 
Franklin, Patriot, Philosopher and Statesman, 
in 1752. 

Ziquid Meter.— Invented by Pontifex in 
1824. Improved by Fice. 


PUMPS. 

■\/r ATHIS, C. \V., Manfr and dealer in Rubber 
iVJL Bucket Chain Pumps. E. Second St. 
QMITH, B. A., Manf r & wholesale dealer in Rub- 
ber Bucket Pumps, cor. 2d & Mulberry sts. 

RESIDENCE 

/^ADLE, CORNELIUS, 

yj Front St., Block 16. 

STOVES AND TINWARE, 

■pARVIN, WM. S., Stoves, Tinware, etc., Tin 
L Roofing and Spouting, E. Second st. 

TAILORS. 
T^ELAHEN, JOHN, Tailor, 
±J 195 E. Second St. Established 1866. 



IMPORTANT INVENTIONS AND IMPROVEMENTS. 



io< 



Muscatine — Continued. 



John G. Hoehl, 

Fashionable MERCHANT Tailor, 

E. SECOND ST., NEAR BRIDGE. 
JOHN HOEHL, Jr., Cutter. 

CHOLTEN, D., Tailor, 

E, 2d St. Established 1872. 

FERDINAND KAUFMANN, 

Manufacturer of Cigars, and wholesale 
and retail dealer in Smoking and Chewing 
Tobaccos, Snuff, Pipes, and Smokers' Arti- 
cles Generally, 200 Second st. 



UNDERTAKERS. 
J. P.l^REEMAN^SON, 
Undertakers, Cabinet Job Workers, and 
dealers in Metallic and Wooden Caskets, 
Second St. , near Bridge st. Est. 1840. 

WATCHES AND JEWELRY. 

P. A. UMSTOK, 

Dealer in 

f atcles, Jewelry, Musical aM 

OPTICAL INSTRUMENTS, ETC. 

1^° Perfect Satisfaction Guaranteed. ==^^ 

E. Second Street, West side National House. 
Established 1862. 



LAWRENCE. KAS. 



ATTORNEYS AT LAW, 

CORNING, CYRUS, Attorney at Law, 
First National Bank Building. 
MERY, J. S., Attorney at Law, 

134 Massachusetts st. Established 1857. 

AW OFFICE OF ALBERT KNITTLE, City At 

torney, 95 Massachusetts st. 

PATTERSON, W. J., Attorney at Law, 
National Bank Building. Established 1875. 

BANK, 

LAWRENCE SAVINGS BANK,Enoch Hoag,Prest. 
John K. RanklTi, Cashr,52 Mass. st. 

BARBERS. 

NTHONYrMARKTFirst^clasTBa^ 
145 Warren st. 

RADLEY, E. L., Barber, 
1:M Massachusetts st. Estab. 1861. 

MITCHELL & JOHNSON, First-class Barbers, 
Under National Bank. 

HOMAS, H. H., P . T. of F., 
136 Massachusetts st. Estab. 1876- 

BLACKSMITHS. 

BLACKSMITHINQ , 

Done in the best style, at low prices, 

22 MASSA(;HUSETTS ST. 

(Established 1875.) 



locomotive.— Invented by Trevethick in 
1802. The improvements are too numerous to 
mentifju here. 

Magic Lanterns. — Invented by Roger Bacon 
in 1252. 

Marjnifying Glasses.— Invented, by Roger 
Bacon, in 1200. 

Mnnufactnre of LampIAack. — Invented by 
Mini in 1H44. 

MftaJlu; Cartridqe. — Invented by Cazalet in 
1820; improved by Roberts, 1834; by Smith & 
Wesson, 1854-60. 

Mettalic Washboards. — Invented by Rice, 

1849. ^ 

Minie Rifle. — Invented by M. Minie, an offi- 
cer in the French army, 18.33. 
J Nail Machine. — Invented by Jeremiah Wil- 
kinson in 1775; improved by Thomas Gifford in 
1790; by Ezekiel Reed, 1786; by Benj. Cochran, 
1794; by Haddock in 1870. 

Needle Gun. — Invented bv O. A. Blittkow- 
skie and F. W. Ilofrman in 1856. 

Post-mark Stamp. — Invented by M. P. Nor- 
ton in 1859. 

Paper Bag Machine. — Invented by Francis 
WoUe in 1853; improved by E. W. Goodale in 
1855; by Rice in 1857; by H. G. Armstrong in 
1860. 

Papier Mache. — Invented bv Lefevre in 
1740. 

Parlor Skates. — Invented by Plympton in 
1863; improved by Pollitt in 1870. 

Parrott Gun. — Invented by Parrott in 

1862. 

Percussion Caps.— Cdme into use between 
1820 and 1830, the inventor unknown. 

Photolithographi/. — Invented by Osborn in 
1861. 

Rifle, Repeating.— Invented by C. Sharp in 
1848; improved by G. Henry in 1852; bv Spen- 
cer, 1848. 

Planing Machine. — Invented bv Wood- 
worth in 1828; improved bj- Stover in 
1861. 

Power Loom. — Invented by Cartwright, 
1785; improved by Bigelow, 1857; by Marshall, 
1848. 

Pneumatic Railwai/. — Invented by Pinkus 
in 1834; improved by Henry in 1845. 

Puddling Furnace. — Invented by Henry 
Cort, about 1781; improved by Dank in 1875. 

Reaper. — Invented by McCormick in 1834; 
improved by Hussey in 1847; Seymour 
in 1851, and numerous subsequent invent- 
ors. 

Revolver. — Invented by Samuel Colt in 1836; 
improved by Sharp in 1850: Smith k Wesson, 
1363; E. T. Starr, 1864; A. M. White, 1875; 
Kittridge, Palmer, Joslvn, Revnolds. Wood, 
1864: Pettingill, 1859: T.'Remiugton, 1863. 

Rifle. — Invented bv Whitworth about 
1800.' 

R. R. Cars.— Invented by Knight in 1829; 
improved by Winans in 1834; bv Imlav, 
1873. 

Scenes — First introduced into theatres 1533. 

Seeding Machine. — Invented by Cahoon in 
1857: improved by Brown. 1863. 

I Stii'ing Much ine. — Invented by Thimmunier, 
a Frencliman, in 1834: improved by EliasHowe 



358 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



Lawrence — Continued. 



»K. W. S. RILEY, 

Horseshoeing and Carriage Work 

Neatly done. Veterinary surgeon. 
52 VERMONT ST. 

BOOTS AND SHOES, 




HENRY FUEL, 

BOOT 




AM SHOE MAKER. 

Custom Work made to order, repairing neatly 
done. 

No. 10 Cor. Mass. andPinkney sts. 

ENGEB, A. «., Boots & Shoes, 
82 Massachusetts St. Estab. 1870. 

CARPENTEE AND BUILDEE. 

CRAMER, B. J., Carpenter & Joiner, 
40 New Hampshire st. 

CLOTHINO, 

HOUSE, J. & CO., Wholesale & Retail Clothiers, 
79 Massachusetts st. 

TEINBERG'S(LOTHINGHOL'SE,MenV, Youths' 

& Boys' Clothing, etc., 87 Massachusetts st. 

COMMISSION MERCHANTS. 
HOWARD BROS., 

General Commission Merchants, 

And Shippers of Fruit and Produce, 
157 Massachusetts st. Established 1S76. 

CONFECTIONERS. 

MOORE BROS., 

MANUFACTUR'fl CONFECTIONERS, 

And dealers in Foreign & Domestic Fruits, 
73 Massachusetts st. Establishi d 1876. 

lEDEEMANN & SON, Confectioners. & dealers 
in Toys, 1:^9 Massachusetts st. Est. 1868. 

DENTIST. 

ILSOlCBKiniTn^enlistr'''^'^^^ 

135 Massachusetts st. Established 1871, 



w 



DRESSMAKERS, 

MRS. NORA^LDWIN. 

Emporium of Fashions. Patterns and Dressmak- 
ing Rooms, Agent for S. T. Taylor's System 
of Cuttinsc Parisipn Fashions & Styles. 

1-33 Massachusetts St. 

UFFMAN, MISS S. E. & M., Fashionable Dress- 
makers, 127 Massachusetts st Estab. 1876. 



H 



LANHAM, MRS. L., Dressmaker, 
117 Massachusetts st. Estab. 1877. 
TARKWEATHER. MRS. M. J., Dressmaker, 
135 Massachusetts st. Estab. 1871. 

DRUGGISTS, 

HESfERrETF^ragJisTanOeweleK 

59 Massachusetts st. Estab. 1875. 



Lawrence — Continued. 



HENRY KELLERMAN, 

149 Massachusetts St. Estab. 1875. 

DYER AND SCOURER. * 

P'^^EELTS^J^^^V^TDyeFand'Scourer^^ 
1842,) 147 Massachusetts st. 



H 



FURNITURE, 

ILL & MENDENHALL, Furniture Dealers and 
Undertakers, 46 & 48 Vermont st. 



GOVERNMENT OFFICER. 

N'~lcSfOT]si(mr"wKrSup^^ 
Affairs, National Bank Building. 

GROCERS^ 

CHAMBERLAIN, THOMAS, Grocer, 
17 Massachusetts st. Estab. 1875. 

/"^ ENTRY, ABRAM, Grocer and Dealer in Poultry, 
IjT 171 Massachusetts st. Estab. 1874. 

H" ENDERSON & WEBBER, Staple and Fancy 
Grocers. 4 3 Massachusetts st. Estab. 1876. 

UCKER, CHAS., Dealer in Groceries, 
171 Massachusetts st. Estab. 1873. 

GUNSMITH, 

J'^'^'TEIHCKEriCw^jSajmfYln^ 
and Muzzle-Loading Shot Guns, 74 Maes, st. 

HARNESS AND SADDLES. 

GROlJT\T7lKrC>oncorOlarM 
St., in rear of State Bank. Estab. 1877. 



HARVESTING MACHINES. 
I. N. VAX HOEISEK, 

IcCoriDick's Hanestim MacMMS, 

(ESTABLISHED 1S66,) 

160 MASSACHUSETTS ST. 

HOTELS^ 

COMMERCIAL HOTEL, Cor. New Hamshire and 
Winthropsts. SLOOperday. J. A.Tilton.Prop. 

DURFEE HOUSE 

GEO. WELLS, Proprietor. 

Price per Day, $2.00. Board by the Week at 
reduced rates. 



C3-EO- "Vv"ELI_.S, 

Public buildings a specialty. Plans and specifi- 
cations furnished on short notice. 

LIVERY AND SALE STABLE, 

THOMAS, JOEL, Hor-es and Mules Bought and 
Sold, 166 Massachusetts st. Estab. 1856. 

MARBLE WORKS. 

^^^^^ARNHAlT&^GRIGGSr^^ 

Dealers in fflarMe I Granite lonnmenls 

180 Massachusetts St. Established 1867. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



359 




Canada liumber Building', Centennial Exposition, l*lnla.— 

This building, as its name denotes, is built exclusively ot^ Canada lumber, for the special 
purpose of displaying the lumber grown in that country. Itis an open structure, supported 
by logs, within which is cut lumber, in almost every shape. In the center, as the illustra- 
tion shows, is a large log from the pine forests of Canada, some seven feet in diameter. 



Lawrence — Continued. 



^HiLINERT^ 

EMESrMRS.^ Millinery RoomsV 

133 Massachusetts st. 



O 



PAINTEES, 

AUms'^SNYSEErKintersr^GTaiBngrG^ 
ing, Paper Hanging, <fec,, Winthrop St., near 
National Bank. 



H 



R 



OHB, A., Sign Painter and Pictorial Draughts- 
man, 11 Henry st. 

PHYSICIANS. 

BDELALTDB^^ATGlTPEy^ic'aS'^ 

149 Massachuaetts st. Estab. 1849. 
OBBINS, DR. R., Proprietor Turki h Bath and 
Electro-Medical Institute, 60 Vermont st. 



D 



RESTAURANTS AND SALOONS. 

DELMONICO RESTAURANT. 

Paul Sutorins, Proprietor. No. 84 Massachu- 
setts St. Boarding by Day or Week. Strangers 
supplied with good Lodging. Established 1873. 
On the European plan. 



ȣRSON, OLOP, Bar-Room. 

153 Massachusetts st. 



Estab. 1872. 



Lawrence — Continued. 



s 

V 



RUBBER GOODS. 

AGET'iOnrX^lJ.T S fatl"''Agent?T6^^ e 
Patent Elastic kxpanaion Rubber Pump Back- 
et, I5914 Massachusetts st. Established 1875. 

AIL, T. C, Dealer in Rubber Goods. 

51 Massachusetts st. Estah. 1875. 



STOVES AND TINWARE^^^ ^ 
OSMfsr^rX',"AgenF,TMnnefrsteain Fitter 
and Plumber. 183 Massachusetts st. Est. 1869. 



w 



ATTS, SAM'L,& CO., Stoves, Tinware. &c.. 

143 Massachusetts st. 



TAILOR. 

EBEBTArrMerchant Tailor. 

134 Massachusetts st . 



Estab. 1870. 



S 



UPHOLSTER, 

mAfTOTTR^XrUpholsterr ^ ^ 

Vermont St., bet. Henry & Warren. 



VETERINARY SUEiGEON. ^^ 

HOSIER, FARIER AND BUTCHER, 

Ko. 3 K. R. Stables, Massaehnsette St. Est. 1876- 



360 



IMPORTANT INVENTIONS AND IMPROVEMENTS. 



in 1841; improved by Greenouffh, an American, 
1842; by I. M. Singer, in 18aO'; by Elias Howe, 
in 1846; by A. B. Wilson, in 1851; by Grover 
and Bakei-, 1851; by T. E. Weed, 1854; Gibbs, 
1857. Besides tliese there are on record the 
names of more than a thousand inventors of 
improvements in sewing machines. 

Shoe Pegqing Machine-. — Invented by Galla- 
hue, in 185§; improved by Standisli and Miller 
in 1854; by Wardwell, "1854; by Batchelder, 
1856; by Budlong, 1863; by Gallahue, 1853. 

Shoes — Of the present fashion first worn in 
England in 1633. 

Sleeping Cars. — Invented by T. T. Wood- 
ruff in 1856; improved by Wheeler, 1859; 
by Field and Pullman, 1865; hy Lucas, 
1875. 

Soda Water ApiJaratus. — Invented by North 
in 1775. 

Spinning Mule. — Invented by Crompton in 
1779, England. 

Square Hole Auger. — Invented by Branch 
in 1826. 

Spinning Jenny. — Invented by Hargreave, 
in 1764, England. 

Steel Gannon. — First made by A. Erupp, 
1849. 

Steamhoat. — Invented by Robert Fulton, in 
1807, and his first trip was made in August of 
that year, from New York to Albany. 

Steam Fire Engine. — Invented by Captain 
Ericsson, in 1830; and improved by him, 1842- 
43. 

Steam Hammer. — Invented by James Nas- 
myth, in 1838. 

Steam Plough. — Invented by John Fowler, 
1864. 

Steam Printing Press — Rotary. — Invented 
by Hoe, 1842; improved by G. P. Gordon, 1850; 
W. Bullock, 1867. 

Steam Planting Press — Reciprocating Bed. 
— Invented by Seth Adams, 1830. 

Stem Winding Watch. — Invented by T. 
Noel, in 1851. 

Steel P<;;i,.— Invented about 1820. 

Stereoscope. — Invented by Charles Wheat- 
stone, in 1838. 

Stereotype Printing. — Invented b}' William 
Ged, a goldsmith, of Edinburgh, Scotland, in 
1735. 

Street Sweeper. — Invented by R. A. Smith, 
in 1855. 

Talloio Candles. — First used in 1290, and 
were so great a luxury that splinters of wood 
were used for lights. There was no idea of 
wax candles in the year 1300. 

Theater Seat {to turn up> out of the way). — 
Invented by A. A. Allen, 1854. 

Telegraph — Fire Alarm. — Invented by Far- 
mer and Channing, about 1846; improved by 
John W. Gamewell, 1871; by if. G. Crane, 
1875; by H. W. Spang, 1875; by L. H. McCul- 
lough. 

Telegraph — Electro Chemical. — Invented by 
Baine, England, 1849. 

Telegraph— Electro- Magnetic. —\nxenteA by 
L. F. B. Morse, in 1837; improved bv same, 
1840; Edison (duplex), 1875. 

Telegraph— Electric JVeedle. — Invented by 
Cooke & Wheatstone, 1837, England. 



Lawrence — Continued. 



WINES AND LIQUORS. 

THEODORE HANSEN, 

Successor to Rampendahl & Hansen, Wholesale 

dealer in Fine Bourbon, and Rye Whiskies, 

California Wine Dept. 

IHo Massachussetts St., Established 1870 



LEXINGTON. MO. 

BOOTS AND SHOES, 

Fashionable 

Boot & Shoe Maker, 

Laurel St., - Lexington, Mo. 



DENTIST. 

ASSELLrJ."FrD. D. S., Surgeon Derrt is tV 

Main st. 




H 



FEMALE COLLE(JE. 

President. Lexington. 

HOTEL. 

BliOHlM 



T. S. Chandler, 



Proprietor. 



First Class Accommodations and Low Prices. 
The Family Hotel of Lexington. 
Terms, $1.60 per Day; $7 per Week. 

MEAT MARKET. 

EiLERTjOHFwirMear&TegeUblTM^ 
49 Main St. 

_^___ NEWSPAPER, 

THE LEIIN&fof INTELLIGENCER 

Official County Paper. 

Only Democratic Paper in the County. Circulation 

Larger than any other Country Paper in 

the State. Lafayette County gives 

2,500 Democratic Majority upon 

a Full Poll of the Vote. 

BOLTON, T. L., M.D.,Eclectic Physician SurgeoH, 
71 Main st. 

(Established 1851.) 

JAMES G. RUSSELL, M. D.. 

Lafayette County Physician, 

Physician and Surgeon, 

Office Hours. 



8 to 12 A. M., 
1 to 6 P.M. 



4.5 MAIX STREET. 



Y 



OUNG, G. W., Physician and Surgeon, 

Lexington, Mo. 



IMPORTANT INVENTIONS AND IMPROVEMENTS. 



3<!1 



Lexington — Continued. 



TAILOES. 



MERCHANT TAILOR, 

45 Main Street, . LEXINGTON, MO. 

pairing and Cleaning neatly done. 



GALENA, ILLS. 



ATTOENETS AT LAW. 

ROWLEY, W. R. & L. A., Attorneys at Law, Ab- 
stract & Insarance Office, Main st. Est. 1873. 

PARE, E. 0., Attorney at Law. Collections a 
Specialty, Main & Perry sts. Est. 1875. 



S 



AGRIOULTTJKAL IMPLEMENTS. 

(Establislifed 1847.) 

Manufacturer and Dealer in 

rLOWSUemCULTUmiMFLEMTS 

FRANKLIN STREET. 



Established 1877. 

JENKINS & PALMER, 

Dealers in 

FARM IMPLEMENTS 

Musical Instruments, Wind Mills, 

Pumps, &c., 

'456 MAIN ST., Opp. LOGAN HOUSE. 

PARE, J. C, Farm Machinery, Hides & Pelts, 

209 Main st. 



S 



BAKERY. 

CAILLE, GEO., Steam Bakery & Confectionery, 
159 Main St. 



BARBER, 

CHMITT, HERMAN, Tonsorial Parlor, 

Desoto House Block. Est. 1863. 



S 



BLACKSMITHING. 

P^^'ARKESTHENRiCGen^^lBiacksi^^ 
shoeing, &c., 40 Main st. 

BOOKS AND STATIONERY. 

BRIDGMAN, H. N., Dealer in Books & Station 
ery, 100 Main st. Est. 1865. 

BOOK BINDER. 

ELCE, CHAS., Book Bindery & Paper Box Man- 
nfactnrer, opp. Desoto House. 

BOOTS AND SHOES, 

HILGERT, J. P., Boots, Shoes & Gaiters, 
181 Main st. Est. 1861. 

AGLE, JOHN, Manufacturer & Dealer of Boots 
& Shoes, 140 Main st. Est. 1850. 



leUacopes. — Invented in 1549. 

Telegi'aphing Municul Noten Apparatun. — 
Invented by E. Wilson, 1860; improved br 
Gray, 1875. 

Telegraph— Printing. — Invented by R. E. 
House, in 1846: improved bv Huerhcs, in 
1856. 

ThresJdng Machine .—Yirat invented by II. 
Menzies, of Scotland, 1732. 

lorpedo /S7t«//«.— Invented bv Dr. Bushnell, 
in 1777. 

Truss i?Wt?;/^.— Invented by Price & Phil- 
lips, in 1841; by Whipple, 1841;" improved by J. 
Barnes, in 1859; improved bv F. C. LowthVop, 
1857. 

Truss— for livpf » re .—Inxcnted by Robert 
Brand, in 1771. 

Turning Irregular Forms — Machine for. — 
Invented by Blanchard, in 1820; improved bv 
Gear, 1853." 

Type Setting Machine. — Invented by Wm. 
H. Mitchell, 1854; improved bv Alden, in 
1857. 

Vaccination. — Invented by Dr. Edward 
Jenner, in 1780. 

Wood Papier. — Invented by Watts k Bur- 
gess, 1853. 

Wood Pavements. — Invented by Samuel 
Nicholson, in 1854; improved bv t)e Golver, 
1869; by Ballard, 1870; by Beidlef, 1172. 

Watches. — Said to have been invented at 
Nuremberg in 1477. 

Windotv Glass. — First made in England in 
1557. 

Zinc JVhite.— Jones, 1852. 



CHRONOLOGY 



ll[RO[SOFTII[R[VOLUIIOII 

AND THE 



N 



James Otis was born at Barnstable, 
Mass., 1725. He was the leader of the Revo- 
lutionary party in Massachusetts at the begin- 
ning. He was wounded by a British official in 
1769, and never entirely recovered. He was 
killed by lightning in 1772. 

Samuel Adams was born in Boston in 
1722. He was one of the signers of the Dec- 
laration of Independence: was afterwards Gov- 
ernor of Massachusetts, and died in 1803. It 
is also bflieved that he was one of the leaders 
of the patriots in the Boston massacre. March 
5, 1770. 

Cliarles Tliomson was born in Ire- 
land in 1730, and came to America when he was 
onlv eleven years of age. He settled in Penn- 
sylvania, and was Secretary of Congress per- 
petuallv from 1774 until tlie adoption of the 
Federal Constitution, and the organization of 
the new government|iu 17S9. He died in 1824 
at the age of 94. 



J62 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



Galena — Continued. 



CARRIAaES AND WAQONS. 

G^'^^lUMMnCI^&'t^rMiruuSctarers of Wagons, Car- 
riages & Sleighs, Frauklin et. Est. 1875. 

CLOTHING. 

COBWITH, H. P., Clothing Manufacturer, 
Mainst. Est. 1847. 

DENTIST. 
"prOWABlMOCSenUst 



129 Main st. Est. 1868. 



DRUGGISTS. 

CBAWFOKD, S. & CO., Druggists, Paints, Oils 
& Dye Stuffs, 131 Main St. Est. 1816. 

HOFFMANN, J. P., Wholesale & Retail Druggist, 
I'aints, Oils, &c., 108 Main St. 



S 



DRY &O0DS^^^___^^_^ 

MMOinTEElTJrEstriSSSrDry Goods, Notions 
& Millinery, 133 & 134 Main st. 



FURNITURE. 

AlIEBrfficTTAliLriJamiTacrurer^^ 
Furniture, 118 Main st. Est. 1842. 



S 



s 



CHEERER, ARMBEUSTER & CO., Furniture, 
Caskets & Cases, 183 Main st. Est. 1865. 



GROCERIES^^^^^ 

F^'^IESENECKER, MTT^Groceries & Provisions, 
Tobacco, Cigars, &c., 120 Main st. Est. 1865. 



H 
H 



ARRIS, JAS. M., Wholesale & Retail Grocer, 
177 Main St. Est. 1877. 



B 



ELL9IAN, J. H., Wholesale Grocer, 

130 Main st. Est. 1846. 

rOORE, JOHN, Dealer in Groceries & Provis- 
L ions, Broadway. Est. 1867. 

guns^and^cutleryT^^ 

fRKHAKb,"XXrTmporter of Guns, Cutlery, 
itc, 11:5 Main St. Est. 1852. 



HARDWARE, 



COURTAD, JOHN & BRO., Hardware, Copper and 
Sheet Iron Work, 79 Main st. 

EUSEL, JOHN A,, Hardware, Stoves,&c., Glass 
& Crockery Ware, 203 Main st. 



M 



HARNESS AND SADDLES, 

RODDWIEG, A., Harness & Saddles,, Repairing 
neatly done, 225 Main st. Est. 1874. 

HATS AND CAPS, 

BRENDEL, J. P., Hats, Ciips, Furs & Gents' Fur- 
nishing Goods. 197 Main st. 

HOTELS, 

D'^'^He SOT(nim)SErwrHriSe\^^^ 
Main st. 
AWRENCE HOTEL, John J. Ha-sig, Prop. 
Market square. Est. 1873. 

MISSISSIPPI HOUSE, Jas. Dirnberger, Prop. 
Opp. National Bank. Est. 1874. 

(Established 1872.) 



J. C. IXORAM, Prop., 

193 Main street, 

RATES - - - $1.50 per D&y. 



Galena — Continued. 



YANEUBDENrL., European Hotel, 
141 & 143 Main st. 



Est. 1874. 



HOUSEFURNISHING GOODS. 

BUTCHER, C. L., Dealer in Housefurnishing 
Goods, Main st. Est. 1870. 

LIVERY STABLE. 

COMSTOCK, S.P., Livery & Sale Stable, 
Commerce st. 

MACHINISTS, 
Established in 1855. 

FOUNDRY AND MACHINE SHOP, 

steam Engines and Machineryof all Descriptions. 
Pumps and Pump machinery a specialty. General 
repairing of machinery. All work warranted and 
work done on short notice. Foundry and Machine 
Shop on Meeker street, opposite Barrows, Taylor 
& Co.'s Mill. 





(Established 1852.) 

JOHN WESTWICK, Prop. 

Manufacturer oi STEAM ENGINES and 
all style of Iro7i Fences, Pumping- Machinery 
and Iron Milh^ for farmers, shelling and 
grinding corn . Castings of all kinds of 
Machinery in General. 

CLAUDE ST., near MEEKER. 

MILLINERY AND DRESS MAKING. 

R""TlOTOiCMRO?WirMMnei9XDre8S^ 
Notions, &c., 163 Main st. 



MARBLE WORKS. 



FRANKLIN MARBLE WORKS. 
Proprie'ors. Diagonal et. 



R. & J. Manuell, 
Established 1872. 



MEAT MARKET. 

UHNVe.^ MearMirkeU~Fre8hVnd Salt MeatV, 
2;i5 Main si. Established 1869. 



K 



NEWS DEALER. 

ENNEfTTjrKTNewrDealeK^S^ 
fectionery, Cigars, &c., 139 Main St. 

PAINTER. 

G-. & "W. ETHERLY, 

HOUSE & CARRIAGE PAINTING, 

Franklin St., near Catholic Church. Orders from 
the country will receive prompt attention. All 
work done promptly & in a workmanlike manner. 

PHOTOGRAPHERS. 

JAMES, J. E., Photographic Studio, 
Main & Perry sts. E stablis hed 1865. 

POOLEY, J. H.rArt Gallery, Oil Miniatures, &c. 
133 Main et. ____^_ 

PHYSICIANS. 

I ""T^OWLERTBrFir Physician and Surgeon, 
^ Office, 133 Main St., Galena, Ills. Est. 1860. 
LOWES, J. S., Eclectic Physician, 
Office & Residence, over Birmingham's Store 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



363 




Oerman Empire Bailding, Centennial Exposition, PJiiia.— 

It was a handsome brick, structure, containing offices for the German Commissioners, and 
a reading room where German papers were constantly kept for the convenience of visitors, 
together with facilities for receiving and writing letters. 



Galena — Continued. 



PUMPS. 

KEMPTEB, FRANK, Manufacturers of Sheet- 
Iron, Miners' Pumps, 113 Main St. Est. 1858. 



B 



BEAL ESTATE. 

RAND, ROBERT, Auctioneer and Real Estate 
Agent, 114 Main St. Established ItSO. 



JAXOONj^ 

ECKET, JOHN, Billiard Hall andS Sample 
Room, ai? Main St., Galena, Ills. 



F 



SASH, DOOR AND BLINDS. 



F 



RITZ, JOHN, Sash, Doors, Blinds, Mouldings, 
Market Square. Established 1873. 



XAELORS.^ 

BRENDEL, JOHN, & SON, Merchant Tailors, 
Main st. Established 1842. 



M 



ARS, G. H., Merchant Tailor and Gents' Fur- 
nishing Goods. 128 Main st. Estab 183t). 



H 



TOBACCO AND CIGARS. 

MMR''X~'BIESMANNrT9an?r 
' ers in Smoking Articles, .fee., 107 Main st. 



Galena — Continued. 



WATCHES, CLOCKS AND JEWELRY. 

COATSWORTH, J., & SON, Manufrs of Jewelry. 
Watches. Clocks, Musical Instruments, 147 
Main street. 

LEBRON, L. M.,& SON., Watchmakers and Jewel- 
ers, 128 Main St. Established 1851. 

SCHNEIDER, H., Manufacturing Jeweler. Watch- 
es, Clocks, &c.. 165 Main si. 



DUBUQUE, IOWA. 



AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS, 

CONRICK, E. P., Agricultural Implement.*, 
142 Locuj^t St. Ei't.-tbli^hed 1^67. 

ALE, FAHERTY * CO., Agricu tural Imple- 
ments, 225 to 229 Ma n st. Esrah. 1874. 



H 



ATTORNEYS AT LAW. 

TJLVER, JAMES C, Attorney at Law and Sili- 
citor of Patents 510 Main st. 

ENGELMAN & CHAKLKS, .^t orueys at Law. 
Main St., cor. 5th. Estao. 1S7T 



C 



361 



HEROES OF THE REVOLUTION. 



"William I*i-escott was born at Gro- 
ton. Mass.; was a colonel at the battle of Bun- 
ker Hill, and served under Gates until the sur- 
sender of Burgoyne, when he left the army. 
He died in 1795. 

Jojsepli ^Vai'reii was born at Ru.\- 
bury, Mass., in 1740. He was killed by a mus- 
ket ball at the battle of Bunker Hill, while re- 
treating, and was buried where he fell, near 
the redoubt. The tall Bunker Hill monument 
stands on the very spot where he fell, con:- 
memorates his death, as well as the patriotism 
of his countrymen. He was a physician, and 
was 35 years of age when he died. His re- 
mains now rest in St. Paul's Church, Boston. 
A statvie to his honor was inaugurated on the 
17th of June, 1857. 

I*ati*icl£ Henry was born in Hanover 
county, Virginia, in 1736. He appeared sud- 
denly in public life when almost thirty j'ears 
of age. He was an active public man during 
the Revolution, was Governor of Virginia, and 
died in 1799. 

Iticliard Scliiiylei* was born in Al- 
bany, N. Y., in 1733, a'nd died in 1804. He 
was a captain under Sir William Johnson, and 
was in active public service vintil the Revolu- 
tion. He was a general in the patriot army, 
and was a legislator after the war. 

Ricliai-cl jfloiitgoiiiery was born in 
Ireland in 1737. He was with Wolfe at Que- 
bec, in 1759; afterward married and settled in 
the State of New York. He was a general in 
the patriot army, and was killed at the battle 
of Quebec, in 1775. 

Etlian Allen was a colonel in the pa- 
triot army. He was born in Litchfield county, 
Conn. He attacked the English at Montreal, 
was defeated, taken prisoner, and sent to Eng- 
land in irons. He was never engaged in active 
military service after his capture. He died in 
Vermont, in 1799, and his remains lie in a cem- 
etery two miles from Burlington. 

CJeneral XlioinaiS) was a native of 
Plymouth, Mass., and was one of the first eight 
brigadiers appointed bj^ Congress in 1775. He 
died with the small-pox in 1776, at Chambly, 
in Canada. 

Clisirles tiee was born in Wales in 1731. 
He was a brave officer in the British army. He 
settled in Virginia in 1773, and was one of the 
first brigadiers of the Continental army. He 
was arrested and tried by a court-martial for 
disobedience of orders and disrespect to Wash- 
ington at the battle of Monmouth. He was 
found guilty, and was suspended from com- 
mand for one year. He never entered the 
army again, and died in obscurity in Philadel- 
phia, in 1782. 

'William Itloiiltvie was born in South 
Carolina in 1730, and died in 1805. He was a 
general in the Revolution, and an active officer 
until made prisoner in 1780, when for two years 
he was not allowed to bear arms. 

Ricliard Henry liee was born in 
Westmoreland county, Virginia, in 1732. He 
was much in public life, signed the Declaration 
of Independence, was a U. S. Senator, and 
died in 1794. 

•Volm Hancoolc was born at Quincy, 
Mass., in 1737. He was an early and popular 
opponent of British power, and was chosen the 
second President of Congress. He was after- 
wards Governor of Massachusetts, and died in 
1793. 



Dubuque — Continued. 



BAKERY AND CONFECTIONERY, 

C'^'^TStUffiLrMARTINrDubliOa^ 
139 Main st., Dubuque. Estab. 1852. 



M 



EULIN, A. G., Bakery and Confectionery, 

1072 Main st. Eetab. 1874. 



BARREL WORKS. 

A'f HERtONiXXTK^City^Bafrel Works,' 
248 Iowa St. Established 1867. 

BILLIARD HALLS AND SALOONS. 

B"^RE>VEM''"HErDQUASfEBSrT3flBlume^i^^ 
Prop. 531 Main st., Dubuque, la. Est. 1877. 
GRAND CENTRAL BILLIARD HALL. P. T. Wag- 
ner, Propiietor, 629 Main st. 



JAEGER, NICHOLAS, 



o 



Julian House Billiard Hall. 



BOOTS AND SHOES, 

AtGUSTIN,'~FrXrManurrandDealer in Boots 
and Shoes, 763 Main st. Estab. 1859. 



p REAT BANKRUPT SHOE STORE, 



737 Main st. 



H 



ANCOCK, ED., Dealer in Boots and Shoes, 

892 Main st. Estab. 1857 



MCLAUGHLIN, M., Manufacturer Boots and 
Shoes, 120 First St., Dubuque, Iowa. 



w 



INBERG, F., Boot and Shoe Maker, 

1072 Main st. 



BEASS FOUNDERIES, 

a:ndre\v dreeh^, 



Manufacturer of 

ISoda Water Apparatuis, 

991 to 995 WASHINGTON ST. 
Apparatus tested to 500 pounds pressure and 
warranted. Send for Circular. Estab. 1864. 

C. W. Farley. Sam'l Hatfield. 

FARLEY & HATFIELD, 

Proprietors of the 

Key City Brass Foundry, 

No. 831 CLAY ST., Bet. 8th & 9tii. 
Manufacturers of all kinds of Brass Goods. Rail- 
road Work and Brass Castini^s a specialty. Cash 
paid for old Copper, Brass, Zinc, &c. 

DUBUQUE BRASS FOUNDRY. 

O. F. HOD<jJE, 

Manufacturer and Dealer in 

Brass Goods 

Of every Description. Brass Castings made a 
Specialty. CLAY S P., bet 8tbifc9th. The high- 
est cash price paid for old Metals. 



M 



BROOMS AND BRUSHES. 

ILLER, F. A., Manufr of Brooms and Brushes. 

Fourth St., bet. Clay & White. Estab. 1871, 



CARRIAGE^NDJ?\a^GONS^ 

PARKER & KENNA, Carriage and Wagon Manu- 
tecturers, 40 Eighth st. Established 1877. 



HEROES OF THE REVOLUTION. 



365 



Dubuque — Continued. 



H 



ILL, THOS., Manufacturer of Carriages and 
Wagons, 38 Eighth St. Established 1870. 



CLOAK MAKING, 

EAGUE, J. F., Cloak Making, Clothe, Trim 
minge, Laces, <&c., 153 Main st. Estab. 1862 



B 



COMMERCIAL COLLEGE. 

ATLIE'S COMMERCIAL COLLEGE. Founded 

1858. Incorporated 1859. 7th & Main sts. Send 
for circular. 

COMMISSION MERCHANTS. ^ 

KTDER & FRY, Commission Merchants, Dealers 
in Produce, Grain and Wool, 135 Main St. 



H 



CONFECTIONERY. 

YDE, C. H., Confectionery, Cigars, Tropical 
Fruits, &c., 771 Main et. Established 1877. 



DENTIST, 

ING, J. WADE, Dentist, 
N. E. Cor. Main & 8th sts. Estab. 1863. 



K 



J)RY GOODS. ______ 

MaT^MvOLUtIW STORE, Dry Goods, No- 
tions and Job Lots, 635 Main st. D. Coni- 
gisky, Prop. Established 1877. 



ELECTRICAL HEAD BATHS. 

Ch. Vath's Electrical Head Bath. 

The only Preparation known to clear the 
Head of Dandruft", and clean the Hair 
thoroughly without injury. One application 
will relieve the most intense Headache. For 
sale by all Druggists and first-ciass Barber 
Shops. Price, 50 cents per bottle. Discount 
to the Trade. J. C. VATH, Manufacturer 
and Proprietor, 861 Main St. Estab. 1856. 

ELOUR MILLS, 

HOSEORD & WALTERS, Proprietors of Rock- 
dale Flour Mills. Established 1875. 

GROCERIES, 

B'~nECKERniENjrYr<5roceHesrP?ov^ 
Li quors, etc., 123 Main st. Estab. 1877. 
RITZ& WELSH, Teas, Staple &" Patfcv Groce- 
rles, 797 Main St., Dubuque, Est. 1876. 
EYER, H., Groceries and Provisions. 

241 Main st. Established 1852. 



M 



►ETTIBONE, B., Groceries & Provisions, 

Alain & 11th sts. Established 1863. 



w 



ESTERCAMP, B., Groceries, Teas a specialty, 
S. W. cor. Locust & 8th sts. Est. 1876. 



G 



HARNESS AND SADDLES. 

ILMORE, S., Manf 'r Saddles, Bridles, Collars, 
etc., 335 Main St., Dubuque 



PFIFFINER &, KRIEBS, Carriage Trimmers and 
flarnessmakers, 46 8th st. Est. 1876. 

HORSESHOERS. 

LAGEN & CLAIR, Horseshoers & Blacksmiths, 
532 Locust St. Established 1862. 

HOTELS. 

TREMONT HOUSE, W. W. Pyne, proprietor, 
Cor. 8th & Iowa sts. 



Cj(4'U4;rsil Putnam was born at Salem, 
Mas.s., in 1718. He was a very useful officer 
diirinfr the P'lX'iicli and Indian war, and wa.s in 
active service in the Continental army, coin- 
inencinfT witli the battle of Hunkei- Hill until 
1779, when bodily infirmity cr»in])elled him to 
retire. He died iii 1790 at the a{^e of 72. 

IVillistiii Alexander Stirling 

was a de.seeiKhuit of the Scotch Karl of Stir- 
ling. He was born in tlie city of New York in 
1726. He became attached to the patriot cause 
and served as a faithful officer during the war. 
He was made prisoner at the battle of Ltmg 
Island. He died in 1783. 

Ilitg'li ^Ii'rtM'r, a general in the Conti- 
nental ainiy, was killed at the battle of 
Princeton. He was a native of Scotland, and 
was practicing medicine in Fredericksburg, 
Ya., when the Revolution broke out. He was 
56 years of age when he died. 

ijreiieral ]^Ix'l>oiig'al was born in 
Scotland, and came lo America in early child- 
hood. He rose to the rank of major-genei'al, 
was a New York State Senator, and died in 
1786. 

IVIai-quii^ cle BLia Fayette was born 
iii France in 1757. He was an active patriot 
during the Revolution, and contributed men 
and money to the patriot cause. He was com- 
inissioned major-generrl by the Continental 
Congress Julv 31, 1777. He died in France in 
18.34, at the age of 77. 

Artlnir St. Clair was a native of 
Scotland, and came to America in May, 1755. 
He served under Wolfe, and when the Kevolu- 
lution broke out he entered the American 
army. He served as a general during the 
war," and died in 1818 at the age of 84. 

Ze1>iiloii Mwtler was born in Connec- 
ticut in 1731. Served in the Revolution as a 
colonel, and died in Wyoming in 1795. 

Baron Steiil>en came to America in 
1777, and joined the C(mtinental ariny at Yal- 
ley Forge. He was a veteran from the armies 
of Frederick the Great of Prussia. He was 
made Inspector General of the American 
army. He died in the interior of New Yoi-k in 
1795". 

Benjamin liineoln was born in 
Massachusetts in 1733. He was a farmer. He 
joined the Continental army in 1777, and rose 
rapidlv to the position of major-general. He 
died in 1810. 

Jolin Ashe was born in England in 1721, 
and came to Ainerica when a child. He was 
engaged in the Regulator war in Noith Caro- 
lina in 1771, and was a general in the Conti- 
nental army. He died of small-pox in 1781. 

Antliony "Wayne was born in Penn- 
sylvania in 1745. He was a pi-ofessional sur- 
vevor, then a provincial legislator, and be- 
came a soldier in 1775. He was very active 
during the whole war, and was successful in 
subduing the Indians in the Ohio country in 
1795. He died on his way home, at Erie, Pa., 
near the close of 1796. 

ijreorge Rogers Clarke wiis a na- 
tive of Yirginia, and was born in 1752. He 
was one of the most accomplished and useful 
officers of the Western pioneers during the 
Revolution. He died near Louisville, Kv.. in 
1848. 



366 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



Dubuque — Continued. 



Established 1856. 

IVIIililAM I.UTHEB, 

Proprietor of 

lOflL, 

229 to 243 SEVENTH ST. 

ICE COMPANY. 

OKjMFFEFLAKElcFcdTTPifche^^ 
& Co., Third (to Iowa sts. Estab. 1857. 

IKON WORKS, 

N'^lJVELfYTROFWoMsTMlnrrs'^^ 
gines, etc., 10th and Washington sts. 

IOWA IRON ^VORKS. 

Rouse, Dean & Co., 

IKON BOAT BUILDEES, 

Manufacturers of 

STEAM EN&INES, BOILERS, 

Architectural Iron Work & General Machi- 
nery. Send fori atalogue. Largest Stock 
of Patterns in the Ktate. Est. 1851. 



C. W. SCHREIBER. 



F. Strinskt. 



SCHREIBER &STRINSKY, 

Proprietors of the 

m cin m m \m\ worn, 

Builders of Portable and Stationery Engines 

and Boilers. Steamboat and Mill Work. 

Steam Filters and Machinists. Shop 

8th St , bet. Iowa and Clay sts. 

LAUNDRY. 

TviJWJQtjFiIKmnrYTT^rsth^S^ 

VJ proprietor. Established 1877. 

LINIMENT. 

0@litet's \iWimmMtm 

It is the only radical cure for Rheumatism, 
Pain in the Back, Sprains, Swellings, Bruises, 
^ervous Headacbe, Chilblains, Stomach Cramp, 
Neuralgia, Cuts, and Open Sores. Kept by all 
druggists, and manmactured by F. C, Collet, 453 
Main St., Dubuque Iowa. Price, 2octs, 50cts and 
SI. 00 pep bottle. Established 1874. 



G 



LIVERY AND SALE STABLES. 

TlBBS &13o., Livery and Sale Stable, 

"" 139 4th St. Established 



.876. 



JAGEN & SON, Livery & Sale Stable, 
J 136 4th St. Established 1861. 

WASHINOTON SALE AND LIVERY STABLE, 
O'Brien & Byene Bros., props., 129 7th st. 

MEAT MARKET. 

ILKINMsTTAMEsTBellerinTfrk^^ 
Hresh Meats, 156 5th St. Established 1874. 



w 



MILLINERY. 

/ 1ILLEAS, .UKSrilLrMiWnerjs Noiibiis,' eic.^ 7U9 
Or Main St., Dubuque. Established 1876. 



Dubuque — Continued. 



MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS. 

GABLE, L. L., Musical Instruments, 
131 8th St. Established 1877. 

PAINTERS. 

SMITH & PITSCHNER, House and Sign Painters, 
5th St., bet. Main & Iowa sts. 



PHOTOORAPHERS. 

BILBROUOH, J. E., Artistic PhotographefT"'" 
S. W. cor. Main & 8th sts. Estab. 1860. 

CUTTER, E., Photographic Studio, 
Main & 5th sts. Estab. 185:?. 

S, ROOT , 

PHOTOGRAPHER, 

MAIN & EIGHTH STREETS. 
Established 1851. 



PHYSICIANS. 

t7^0VVLER, S. M., Physician and Surgeon, 
2 15 8th St., Dnbuque. Established 1873. 

ILLAR, WM, S., Physician & Surgeon, Edin- 
burgh & Paris, 1853, Main and 8th sts. 



M 



^ANOSJLND^ORGANS^ 

AUST, J. S,, Dealer In Organs & Pianos, 1086 
Main st. Established 1875. 



F 



RESTAURANT. 

UPTON'S, SAMUEL, American Restaurant, 583 
Main st. Established 1857. 



SEWING MACHINES. 

SCOTT, ANDREW, Dealer in Sewing Machines, 
69 8th St. Established 1877. 

SPICE MILLS. 

ALDEN, H. L., Key City Spice Mills, 
Dubuque. Established 1861. 



K 



TAILORS. 

rBAt,"jOSr,"M^e?c"hanrTaU6f,'Cloak8C'at'and 
Made to order, 5.37- Main st. 



STAMMEYER, JOSEPH, Merchant Tailor & Gents' 
Furnishing Goods, 545 Main st. Est. 185>. 



TIN AND SHEJTJR^ 

AINEV'J.^C^ Tin~and'^heet Iron Worker, '846 
Main st. Established 18T3. 



"Bain: 

-t Ma 



YATES, R. G., Tin and Sheet Iron Worker, 13.; 
Main st. Established 1876. 

TOBACCO AND CIGARS. 

A^^^TjDRESTlOlTr^KnjaccoT'CigS^^^ 
Main St. Established 186 2. 

^UNGWITZ, E. A., Cigars, Tobacco & smokers" 
Articles, 299 Main st. Estab. 1865. 



G 



TUR^ISH^BATHS^ 

EE, R. S., Remedial Institute and Turkish 
baths, 970 to 932 Main st. 



VINEGAR WORKS. 

LAJMOHNTM^rTof all kinds of Choice Vin- 
egars, 313 Iowa St. 

AISER, .4.., Excelsior Vinegar WorKs, 

9th St. Estab. 1856. 



G 
K 



N 



ORTHWESTERN VINEUAK »0:iKS, Jame 

Cushing, prop.. Eagle Pt. ave. it Valerias 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



307 




Bunker-Hill Monument, Charleston, Mass.— Marks the spot where the first real battle of the 
"^jolution was fought. It is 231 feet high. The corner stone was laid by Gen. Lafayette, Jnne 17, 1825, 
and Daniel Webster delivered one of his most memorable orations on the occasion. The monument was 
completed m 1842, and was dedicated June 17, 1843, in the presence of the President of the United 
states ; nd his Cabinet. 




(The Old Stand ) 
Established 1865, 

508 STATE ST. 

(Cor. Taylor,) 
CHICAGO, ILL, 








A^'D 



From 15 to 220 Gallons. 

Headquarters for 
Butchers, Coopers, Pack- 
ers, and Ice-Makers- 
Tools and Machines, 
Stoves. Ranges. Etc. 



368 



HEROES OF THE REVOLUTION. 



•Folin Sullivan was born in Maine in 
1740. He was a delegate to the first Continen- 
tal Congress in ]774, and was one of the first 
eight brigadiers in the Continental army. He 
resigned his commission of general in 1779; 
was afterward member of Congress and Gov- 
ernor of Xew Hampshire, and died in 1795. 

*fanie!i» Clinton was born in Ulster 
county, N. Y., in 173G. He was a captain in 
tlie French and Indian war, and an active gen- 
eral in the Revolutionary arm}'. He died in 
1812. 

Jolin Pfiul Jones was born in Scot- 
land in 1747, and came to Virginia in boyhood. 
He entered the American navy in 1775, and 
served as commodore during the war. He was 
an intrepid and daring officer. He was after- 
wards rear-admiral in the Russian service. He 
died in Paris in 1782. 

•folin ISntledg"*' was born in Ireland, 
and came to South Carolina when a child, and 
was Governor of that State in 1780. After the 
Revolutionary war he was made a judge of the 
Supreme Court of the United States, and also 
chief justice of South Carolina. He died in 
1800. 

Horatio Cjrates was a native of Eng- 
land, and was educated for military life. He 
was the first adjutant-general of the Conti- 
nental army, and was made major-general in 
1776. He retired to his estate in Viiginia at 
ihe close of the war, and finally took up his 
abode in New York, where he died in 1806 at 
the age of 78 years. 

Xliomas Snniptei* was a native of 
South Carolina, and was early in the field. Ill 
health compelled him to leave the armv just 
before the close of the war in 1781. ife was 
afterward congressman and died on the high 
hills of Santee, S. C. in 1832, at 98 j'ears of age. 

Baron tie I£al1> was a native of Al- 
sace, a German province ceded to France. He 
had been in America as a secret French agent, 
abont fifteen years before. He came to America 
with Lafayette in 1777, and congress commis- 
sioned him a Major-General. He died of 
wounds received at the battle of Camden in 
1780. 

Benedict Arnoltl was a native of 
Norwich, Conn., where he was born in Janu- 
ary, 1740. He fought nobly for freedoni until 
1778, when his passions got the better of his 
judgment and conscience, and he became a trai- 
tor and joined the British army. He went to 
England after the war, and died in London, 
June 14, 1801. 

]^atlianiel <wreene was born of Qua- 
ker parents, in Rhode Island, in 1740. He was 
an anchorsmith, and was pursuing his trade 
when the Revolution broke out. lie hastened 
to Boston after the skirmish at Lexington, and 
from that time until the close of the war he 
was one of the most useful generals in the 
army. He died near Savannah in 1786, and 
wasburied in a vault in that city. His sepul- 
chre can not be identified. 

Daniel Itlorg-an was born in New 
Jersey in 1736, and was in (he humble sphere 
of a wagoner when called to the field. He had 
been a soldier under Braddock, and joined 
Washington at Cambridge in 1775, and became 
a general. He was a farmer in Virginia after 
the war. where he died in 1802. 



Dubuque — Continued. 



WINES AND LIQUORS, 

TKACT, PAUL & CO., Wholesale dealer in 
Wines & Liquors, 521 Main St. Est. 1874. 



D 



^IRE CLOTH, 

UDDY. T. C, Manf'r of Wire Cloth, Wire 
Work Riddles & Screens, 38 9th St. E8t.l869. 



DUBDQDE BUSINESS HOUSES, 



WHEN ESTABLISHED. 

DREES, A., Soda Water Apparatus, 1864. 
EUROPEAN HOTEL, 1856. 
GLAB, J., Vinegar Works, "1873. 
HODGE, O. F., Brass Goods, 1S68. 
KEY CITY BRASS FOUNDRY, 1877. 
KEY CITY IRON AND BRASS 

WORKS, 1S77. 
NORTHWESTERN VINEGAR 

WORKS, 1863. 
ROUSE, DEAN & CO., Steam Engines, 

1851. 



RED WING, MINN. 



A 
B 



BAKERYAND^CONFEOTIONERT. 

>'l>KKSON, M., Restaurant, Ice Cream Saloon 
it Confectionery, 53 Main st. 
IXBY7 T. & CO., Bakery & Confectionery, 

73 & 75 Main St. 



BARBER. 
/^BRECHT, C, Barber, 



86 Main St. 



BOOTS AND SHOES, 



H 



EFFELFIS(JER, HOWELL & CO., dealers In 

Boots & Shoes, 85 Main St. 



CARRIAGES AND WAGONS, 

E^'^naiCKSONTPETERSMTM^rManFrXoTw^ 
ons. Car riages, Sleighs,^lc., 5th & Plum sts. 

CLOTHING. 

I'^T^ENMAmJnvTciothlng'House^^ 
u in g Goods, 83 Main 3t. 

L' ~^VI, E. A., Clothing, 
80 Main st. 

OOR MAN'S FRIEND CL0THI5G STORE. 

89 Main st. 



w 



ING, J. S. AT. Jl., Clothing, Hats, Caps, 
Trunks, Gloves, Mittens, etc.. Plum st. 



COLLECTION AGENT. 

B""TlDWlN7"'^DWIGHF''M^r"Gene^^^ 
Agent, 67 Main st. 

____ DRESSMAKING. 

ISS^ONEfTTMRS^ Dress making, 
94 Main st. 

DRUGGJSTS^ 

JOHNSON BROS., Druggists, 
73 Main st. 



HEROES OF THE REVOLUTION. 



yjyj 



Red Wing — Continued. 



^ Y &OODS^ 
OIMMONS, J., Dry Goods, etc., 



82 Main Bt. 



FURNITURE. 

Manf'y, Salesrooms on Plum st. 



M 



cDONALD & KELLOOG, Furniture, 



76 Main st. 



GROCERIES. 

CARLSON &'ANi)KUS(»N, (ii^enesV P'ro VI iio'ns'; 
Flour, Feed, etc , 87 Main st. 



K 



EMPE, J. & CO., Groceries, Crockery, Flour, 
Feed, etc.. Plum st. 



LINDHOLM, A. T., Groceries, Provisions, China- 
ware, etc., 19 Plum st. 



S 



EXTON, J., Groceries & Provisions, 

3d & Plum sts. 



HARDWARE. 

BETCHEB; C H ASTXcorrHardw aYe", 
70 Main st. 

MARTINSON &. ANDERSON, Hardware, Stoves 
& Tinware, 55 Main st. 

HARNESS AND SADDLES, 

KRUGER7T^rUarnesKSaddles~&Colia^^ 
& dealer,.ln. Plum st. 

W~ UNDEBLICH, G., Harness & Collar Manf'r, 
Main st. 

WATSON, E. P., Novelty Harness Works, 
Bush St. 

HOTELS, 

pENTRAfrHOTjSC'GurKnigh^ 






Plum St. 



H 



ICKMAN HOUSE, H. Hickman, prop., 



Bush St. 



iron works 
tSensmore bros^ 



Red Wing Iron Works. 



LIVERY STABLE. 

IVr CLEAN, JOffiCLivery'Stabier 



3d St. 



PAINTS AND OILS. 

A WKTNS\'W?KrPSnt8rMr&' Waif Paper,' 

Bush St. 



H 



PHOTOGRAPHERS. 

E LLOG G^ TrBs^PhotograpSerT 

Main & Plum sts. 



K 



3VE :e3 s Si de: f£. , 

WE AIM TO PLEASE, 
RED WING, 88 Main st. 

SALOONS. 

?TEME]CKr^iTiia?dHffi'^^aioon^ "^"" 

VJT 84 Main st. 

HARTMAN, GEO., Wine & Liquor Saloon, 
Plum St. 



S 



TEEGE, K. E., Saloon, 



64 Main st. 



SASH, DOOR AND BLINDS. 
ID. C. HILL, 

Hanf'r of Sash, Doors, Blinds, Cornices, Etc 

MAIN & BLUFF STS, 



•Yoliii Ksigfer llo^'sti'd, of the Mary- 
land liiif, was horn in i'altiiiiore county in 
1702. lie went into niilitaiy .service at the 
c<iniin(.'iiccni(;nt of tlie war. He wa.s a colonel, 
and was in all the ])!incipal battles of the Uev- 
ohitioii; was chosen Governor of Maryland in 
177S, and was afterward a United States Sen- 
ator. He died in 1827. 

'Willistiii '^Vasliiiigfoii, a relative 

of the (jieneral, was horn in Stailord county, 
Va. Ho entered the army under Mercer, and 
greatly disting\nshed himself at the South a.s 
a commander of a cfU'ps c>f cavalry. Taken 
prisoner at the battle of Eutaw Spiings, he 
remained a captive until the close of the war, 
and died in Chailcston in 1810. In a personal 
combat with the British C(d(mel Tarleton, at 
the battle of the Cowpens, Washington 
wounded his antagonist in the hand. Some 
months afterward, Tarleton said, sneeringly, 
to Mrs. Willie .Jones, a witty American lady, 
" that Colonel Washington, I am told, is illit- 
erate, and can not write his own name." "Ah! 
Colonel," said Mrs. Jones, " you ought to 
know better, for you bear evidence that he can 
make his mark-." At another time he ex- 
pressed a desire to see Colonel Washington. 
Mrs. Jones' sister instantly replied, " Had you 
looked behind at the Cowpens, you might have 
had that pleasure." 

Henry Lee was born in Virginia in 1756. 
He entered the military service as a captain of 
a Virginia company in 1770, and in 1777 joined 
the Continental army. At the head of a le- 
gion, as a colonel, he performed extraordinary 
services during the war, especially in the 
South. He was afterward Governor of Vir- 
ginia, and a member of Congress. He died in 
1818. 

Andrew Pidcens was born in Penn- 
sylvania in 1739, and served as a general in the 
Revolution. In childhood he went to South 
Carolina, and was one of the first in the field 
for liberty. He died in 1817. 

Xliomas J^Iiflliii was born in Philadel- 
phia in 1744. He was a Quaker, but joined the 
patriot army in 1775, and rapidly rose to the_ 
rank of major-general. He was a member of 
Congress after the war, ane also Governor of 
Pennsylvania. He died in January, 1800. 

Joliii Jay was a descendant of a Hu- 
guenot familv, and was born in the city of New 
York in 1745. He was early in the ranks of 
active patriots, and rendered very important 
services during the Revolution. He retired 
from public life in 1801, and died in 1829. at 
the ao-e of 84 years. His residence was at 
Bedford, Westchester county. X. Y. 

William Baintoridge (^Commodore) 
was born in Xew Jersev in 1774. He was the 
captain of a merchant vessel at the age of 19, 
and entered the naval service in 1798. He was 
distinguished during the war of 1812, and died 
in 1833. 

Steplieii I>ecaf iir was born in Mary- 
land in 1779. He entered the navy at the age 
of 19. After his last cruise in the Mediter- 
ranean he superintended the building ot gun- 
boats. He rose to the rank of commodore, and 
durinc' the war of 1812 he was distinguished 
for his skill and bravery. He afterward hum- 
bled the Barbarv powers, and after returning 
home he was killed in a duel with Commodore 
Barron, in March, 1820. 



370 



ADVEKTISEMENTS. 



ACADEMY OF ST. FRANCIS. 

COUNCIL BLUFFS, IOWA. 

Conducted by the Sisters of Charity of the B V. M 



The Scholastic Year, which ie divided into two 

sessions of five months, each, begins 
THE FIRST MONDAY IN SEPTEMBER, AND 
ErIDS THE LAST WEEK IN JUNE. 
Terms — Board and Tuition, per session of five 
months, S'''5- Piano, organ, guitar, vocal music, 
painting, drawing, languages, etc., are extra. For 
prospectuses, containing further particulars, ad- 
dress 

SISTER SUPERIOR, 

St. Francis Academy, 

COUlVCIIi BlillFFS, IOWA. 



INTRACTOE k BUILDI 

Cor. Sixth and Walnut Streets, 
DES MOINES, lA. 



Constantly on Hand. 




SCALES ! 

S. S. Hitchcock's 

NEW PAIEHI, 

Mr. H. is one of the oldest scale makers in the 
world, having got up the Truss Lever Scales 33 
years ago, and made and sold the same 23 years at 
Rochester, N. Y., and Chicago, Ills. It being the 
same, that is called Fairbank's scales. Then I got 
up the Chicago scale, and sold to my partner, Wni. 
W. Nuting. Then I got up the Des Moines Scale 
Co., and sold out two years ago. Now I have got 
up a NEW PATENT, of the greatest importance. 

Which will Neither Freeze nor Get out .of Order. 
My scales have taken 246 medals, diplomas, and 
transactions over all others. In Albiny, N. Y., 
in 1850, I took diplomas, medals and transactions 
over eight manufacturers, all were there, except the 
Pittsburg scales, it not being represented. And 
there have been over 8.000 sold, of my improved 
stock or hay scales. I have got up a 

N£\ir BUSHEL BEAM. 

Improved, January, 1877, weighing 20 diflferect 

kinds of bushels, adapted to 4, 6, or 10 ton scales. 

Manufactory, 

a WEST COURT AVENUE, 3d FROM BBIDGE. 

Repairs of every description to order. Address all 
communications to, 

S. S. HITCHCOCK, 

DESMOINES, - IOWA. 



BIGGS HOUSE. 



Proprietor. 

COUNCIL BLUFFS, IOWA. 

The Best Accommodations at all times. 



Strangers will consult their best inter- 
ests, by stopping there. 



^O ^K& .AEi'F'lalOT'lgDl 



Any person, Male or Female, suffering with that 

terrible life destroyer, 
TAPE WORM, by calling on meat my residence on 



MAIN ST., 



OOUNCm BiyPFS, IOWA- 



Can have the same entirely removed from the body 
in from one to three hours. Consultation Free. 
W, L, BIGGS, 



i) 



iffi 



— Proprietor of — 





Aivr> m:alt house. 



IOWA. 



J^" Special attention given to Orders. ,,^J 



Bryant House 

Proprietor. 



IOWA. 

TERMS - - $2.00 PER DAY. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



371 




U. p. DEPOT, COUNCIL BLUFFS, IOWA. 




G. f . FUEGASON & SON, 



COUNCIL BLUm, IOWA 

(Two doors from Banks.) 

First Floors, - - - $2,S0perday 
Second and Third Floors, $2,00 per day 




i_OOP CPFORBELT. 


Mlll'il 




b^S' 


i w-^^ 



ARE YOU ? ! ! 

Why wear the old Spring man- 
KiLLtNG Truss that is daily de- 
stroying you, causing you to 
sufter from Dyspeps'ia, Par- 
alysis. General Debility, etc. 

Order at once *'Howe's Spring 
Pad Belt Truss," for the treat- 
ment and cure of Rupture or 
Heema. invented and patented 
by the Rev. Howe for his own nse. after having tried all kinds for 
twenty years. The HOWE TRUSS is endorsed by physicians all 
over the' United States, including Dr. Gregory, principal of St. Louis 
Medftal College. It has cured a' five years' rupture in five weeks. 
Send $3 for sample Truss, circulars, endorsements, etc., or 10 cents 
for our Weekly Truss Paper. We make trusses for men, women and 
children. We also manufacture the best Ffi,M.Al.E Supporter known, 
for falling of the womb, etc. Send names of ruptured friends to 

"HOW''' TRiTSS nn » 
PTBoxinO, 
FOR SALE BY AhL DRUGGISTS. 




1st and ^ud Floors, $.] per day. Upper Floors. %l per day. 

Metropolitan Hotels 

Xj. id. ia:-^\.:E^I^IS, Proprietor. 
LOWER BROADWAY. 

COUNCIL BLUFFS, IOWA. 



AGENTS WANTED. 



WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 

Srocers, Froduce and Commission Merchants, 

Butter, Eg^s, Green Fruits and Vegetables a Specialty. 
South Main Street, Council Bluffs, Iowa. 



372 



HEROES OF THE REVOLUTION. 



. Aaron Biirr was born in New Jersey in 
1756. In his twentieth yearhe joined the Con- 
tinental army, and accompanied Arnold in his 
expedition against Quebec. Ill health com- 
pelled him to leave the army in 1779, and he 
became a distinguished lawj^er and an active 
public man. He died on Staten Island, N. Y., 
in 1836. 

Robert Fiilton, the inventor and dis- 
coverer of steam navigation, was born in Penn- 
sylvania, and was a student of West, the great 
painter, for several years. He had more ge- 
nius for mechanics than for the fine arts, and he 
turned his efforts in that direction. He died 
in 1815, soon after launching a steamship-of- 
war, at the age of 50 years. 

Henry I>earl>orn was an officer of the 
Kevolution, and, in the war of 1812, was ap- 
pointed major-general and commander-in-chief 
of the armies. He was born in New Hamp- 
shire. He returned to private life in 1815, and 
died at Roxbury, near Boston, in 1829, at the 
age of 78 years. 

"%VilliaTO Hull was born in Connecticut 
in 1753. He rose to the rank of major in the 
Continental army. Though severely censured 
for his surrender of Detroit in 1812, he was a 
good man, and distinguished for his bravery. 
He was appointed governor of the Michigan 
Territory in 1805. After the close of his un- 
fortunate campaign lie never appeared in pub- 
lic life. He died, near Boston, in 1825. 

li^aac Hull was made a lieutenant in the 
navy in 1798, and in 1812 was commodore, in 
command of the United Stater frigate. Consti- 
tution. He died in Philadelphia in Fcbruarv. 
1843. 

Isaac Sliell>y was born in Maryland in 
1750. He entered military life in 1774, and 
went to Kentucky as a land surveyor in 1775. 
He engaged in the war of the Revolution, and 
was distinguished in the battle on King's 
Mountain, in October, 1780. He was made 
Governor of Kentucky in 1792, and soon after- 
ward retired to private life, from which he was 
drawn in 1813. He died in 1826. 

Janie«$ Wincliester was born in 
Maryland in 1756. He was made a brigadier 
in 1812; resigned his commission in 1815, and 
died in Tennessee in 1826. 

Grreen day was born in "Virginia in 
1756, and was made a brigadier of Kentucky 
volunteers early in 1813. He commanded at 
Fort Meigs, in 1813. He died in 1826. 

Zel»ulon j^I. I*ilce was born in 1779. 
While pressing towards the capture of York 
(Toronto), in 1813, the powder magazine of the 
fort blew up, and General Pike was mortally 
wounded. He was carried on board the flag- 
ship of Commodore Chauncey, where he died, 
witn the captured British flag under his head, 
at the age of 34 years. 

Jolm Cliancller was a native of Mas- 
sachusetts, and served as a general in the war 
of 1812. Some years after the war he was a 
United States Senator from Elaine. He died 
at Augusta, in that State, in 1844. 

Oeneral "Willcinson was born in 
Maryland in 1757, and studied medicine. He 
joined the Continental army at Cambridge, in 
1775, and continued in service duriiic the war. 
He died near the city of Mexico, in 1825, at the 
ao-e of 68 years. 



Red Wing — Conti?ined. 



SEWING MACHINES. 

P"~AUL§ON& HmMEHU AOewing^acWnesTpT- 
an os & Organs, 78 Main st. 

PRAKE, 0. M., Singer Sewing Machines, 
Bnsh St. 

TOBACCO AND CIGARS. 

J^~Hlffi«lMri1BANCIsrMpnfVorjM^^ 
67 Main st. 

RHINER, AUGUST, Manf'r of Cigars, 
Music Hall Block. 



VETERINARY SURGEON. 
rTTDRrrT! 

Stable, Bush st. 



]%TeCART, DR. T. S., Northwestern Veterinary 



ROCHESTER, MINN, 



^^JLGMCULTURALJMPLEMENTS. 

E""dGAR ATlYMESrGen'l deaieflDTFarrTMr- 
chinery, Wagons, Main & Znmbro sts. 

BAKERIES AND CONFECTIONERIES. 

OPKi^rFrATriceT^TeanTSafoo^ 
Confectionery, Main & Zumbro sts. 
ARGO, MRS. N. C, Bakery, Confectionery and 
Ice Cream, Broadway. 

BARBERS. 

ARL, CHAS., Hairdressing & Shaving Saloon, 
3d St. & Broadway. 
URRAY, J. B., Climax Barber Shop, 

Broadway near 3d st. 



E 

M 



RENSLOW, L., Shaving & Hairdressing Rooms, 
uuder Stebbins & Co.'s Hardware store. 



BLACKSMITHS AND HORSESHOERS. 

cXAMEE, JOHN, Practical Horseshoer, 
Main st. bet. College »fe 3d sts. 

S PAULDING & MADISON, Blacksmiths & Horse- 
shoers, foot of 3d st. 

AGONER & STREETER, Blacksmiths & Horse- 
shoers, 4th & Main sts. 



M 



W 



^ BOOTS AND SHOES, 

LARSMTl^BootXsiioe Maker,~ 
3i St. West of Broadway. 
EYETTE, J. C, Boot and Shoe Maker, 

Broadway, near 4th st. 



O 



CARRIAGES AND WAGONS. 

LESON & LARSON, prop's of the Northwestern 
Wagon & Carriage Works, Broad'y & 5th sts. 



CONFECTIONERY. 

/~^ OULD, WM., Ice^CreamTXJoiflSction^ryrGiga^ 
VJ" Store and Restaurant, Broadway. 

COOPER. 

EDMRRYTrO^'Coolierrm^^ 
Firkins, etc , Main st. 

DRESS AND CLOAK MAKERS- 

'XllIESrMSSES"ArEr&ljrN., Fashionable Dress 
j\. and Cloakniakers, Broadway. 



B 



ECKWITH, MISS JENNIE, Fashionable Dre.s & 
Cloakmaker, 3d st. & Broadway, * 



BENTLEY, MRS. C. C, Dress & Cloakmaker, 
Broadway. 
ANFIELD, MRS. M. E., Fashionable Dressmaker 
Masonic Block. 



HEEOES OF THE REVOLUTION. 



373 



BocHESTER — Cottttnued. 



& ChemiBts, 1 Masonic Block. 



H 



FLOUR AND FEED. 

UMASOSTXXTBloufrTFeedrGrai^^ 
Pruits, Broadway, 



FTJENITURE. 

EWrLrHTriJl)hoT8t^reF&"'E\ii^^ 
Broadway, near R. R. bridge. 



B 



O 



WEN, T. C. & CO., Purnituie dealers & Under- 
takers, College St., bet. Broadway & Main st. 



GROCERIES, 

ARBER, R., Fancy Groceries, Provisions, etc., 
Broadway. 



B 



CASHEL, J. L., staple & fancy Groceries & Pro- 
visions, Broadway. 



H 



ALL, A. M., Groceries. Crockery, Flour, Pro- 
visions, etc., Broadway. 



SEHL, WM., Groceries, Boots & Slioes, 
East side of Broadway. 
IMMERMAN, J. G. & CO., Groceries, Boots, 
Shoes, Crockery, etc., Broadway. 



HAIR DEALERS AKD DRESSERS. 



w 



ORDEN, MISS L. N., Hair Manfr and Ladies' 
Hairdresser. Masonic Block. 

HARNESS AND SADDLES, 



O PORNITZ, W. A., Harness, Saddles, Collars, 
O Whips, etc.. 3d st. & Broadway. 

HOTELS. 



EOOHESTER, MINN. 
Bath and Billiard Rooms Attached. 

Free Omnibus and Baggage Wagon to and from 
Cars. $2.00 per day. 

J. D. BRADLEY, Proprietor. 

ORTON HOUSE, P. Norton, Proprietor, 
Zumbro st. 

EMONDINO HOTEL, A. G. Remondino, propr.. 
Cor. Broadway & College st. 



C 



LIVERY STABLES. 

LARK, R. B. & SON, Railroad Sale & Livery 
Stables, Broadway, one block East of Depot. 



C 



OOK BROS., Livery & Boarding Stables, 

Cor. College st. & Broadway. 



MEAT MARKETS. 



B 



AIHLT,GEO., Butcher, Fresh & Salt Meats,etc. 
Broadway. 



►BOCTER, G. W., Fresh & Salt Meats, Poultry, 
Game, etc., Zumbro st. & Broadway. 



Broadway, bet College & 3d sts., 

r. HOMMEIL & BAD,, Fropristors. 
FRESH & SALT MEATS, 

Poultry, Fish and Game. Highest price paid 
for Cattle and Hides. 



> Cir4*it«'rsil y%riiiNtron^ wa.<i born in 
Penn.sylvania in 1758; .served in the war of the 
Revolution; was Secretary of the State of 
Pennsylvania; Minister to France in 18(J4; Sec- 
retary of War in 18i:j, and died in Duchess 
county, X. V., in 184:i. 

Cironi^rsil John CofiVe was a native 
of Vii-giiiia. He did good .service in the war 
of 1812, aiul in subsequent campaigns among 
the Indians. He died in 18154. 

J<iiiie«!> I..a>viM*iic«' was a native of 
New Jersey, and received a midshipman's war- 
rant at the age of 16. He is remembered by 
every American as the author of those brave 
words : " Don't give up the ship." On this 
occasion he was wounded while commanding 
the United States frigate Chesapeake, and the 
engagement took place in 1814. He died four 
days after receiving the wound, at the age of 
31 years. 

C^'onimodore I>avi«l Porter was 
among the most distinguished of the Ameri- 
can naval commanders. He was a resident 
Minister of the United States in Turkey, and 
died, near Constatinople, in March, 184.?. 

•f s&co1> Ilro-wn, was born in Pennsyl- 
vania in 1775. He engaged in his country's 
service in 181.3, and soon became distinguished. 
He was made major-general in 1814. He was 
commander-in-chief of the United States army 
in 1821, and held that rank and office when he 
died, in 1838. 

4jleors'o Izard was born in South Car- 
olina in 1777. He was a general, and made 
military life his profession. After the war he 
left the army. He was Governor of Arkansas 
Territory in 1825, and died at Little Rock, 
Ark., in'l828. 

Xlionias ^IcI>oiioiis:li was a native 
of Delaware, and a commodore in the navy. 
He was 28 years of age at the time of the en- 
gagement at Plattsburg. The State of New 
York gave him one thousand acres of land on 
Plattsburg Bav for his sei^vices. He died in 
1822, at the age of 39 years. 

Commodore Barney was born in 
Baltimore in 1759. He entered the naval ser- 
vice of the Revolution in 1775, and was active 
during the whole war. He bore the American 
flag t'o the French National Convention in 
1796, and entered the French service. He re- 
turned to America in 1800, and took part in the 
war of 1812, and died at Pittsburgh in 1818. 

Samuel Smith, the commander of 
Fort Mifflin in 1777, was born in Pennsylvania 
in 1752. He entered the Revolutionary army 
in 1776; served as a general in command when 
Ross attacked Baltimore in 1814: afterward 
represented Baltimore in Congress, and died 
in April, 1839. 

Henry Clay was born in Virginia in 
1772. He* became* a lawyer at Richmond, and 
at the age of 21 he established himself in his 
profession at Lexington. Ky. He first ap- 
peared in Congress, as Senator, in 1806. and 
from that period his life was chiefly devoted to 
the public service. He died in Washington 
City, while United States Senator, in 1852. 

ilenry Atkinson was a native of 
South Carolina, and entered the army as a 
captain in 1808. He was retained in the army 
after the war of 1S12, was made adjutant-gen- 
eral, and was tinallv appointed to the command 
of the Western army. He died in Jefferson 
Barracks, in June, 1842. 



374: 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 




DR. M. MELLIN, 



85 Geape Street 



0SHK08H, WIS. 



For reference and particulars send for circular. 



Rochester — Contmued. 



MILLINERY AND FANCY GOODS. 

STEWART, MRS. A. E., Millinery & Fancy Goods 
Store, Broadway. 

MUSIC TEACHER. 

LEFLEB, MRS. M. B., Music Teacher, 
Bank Block, Broadway. 

PAINTERS, 

CLARK, JOHN, Wagon, Carriage & Sign Painter, 
Broadway . 
ATE,S. H., Honse and Sign Painter, 

Broadway and 5th st. 

FANKHAUSER BROS., House Painters, Paper, 
Hangers, etc.. Main and Zumbro sts, 

^^^^^PHmCIANS. 

ALLEN & MOSSE, Homceopathic Physicians and 
^urgeons, Leland's Block. 
ARTINITZ, DR. ST. t.. Physician and Surgeon, 
Office at 13 Broadway. Established 1872. 

PUMP MANUFACTURERS, 

P '^^OLMEsT'""""""^'"^""^'^""^ 

UUr'R or FUMFS, WIND & FEED mis, 

6th St. and Broadway, ROCHESTER. 

SALOONS. 

KENNEDY, P. S., Wine, Liquor and Beer Saloon, 
Cor. Colleee st. and Broadway. 

STOVES AND TINWARE, 

"0VELir&T)\^S0"N7^Stove^ 
Worker, Broadway. 



HASTINGS, MINN. 



AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS, 

YAN SLTEE, J., Farm M^^hTn^ry^&TmpTements 
Edison's Block. 

BARBERS. 

OVERALLS, A. J., Fashionable Hairdressing and 
Shaving Parlor. 241 2d st. 



T 



AYLOR, WESLEY, Tonsorial Parlor, 



Hastiings — Continued. 



BOARDING HOUSE, 

FREAS,'J0'.,'Boai3in^House^ 
Second st. 

BOOTS AND SHOES. 

HASErNri^~BooS'&Shoes7~~~~"~^~^^ 

262 2ud St. 



T/'ALKES, P., Boots & Shoes, 



73 Vermillion st. 



LAUB, NIC, Boot & Shoe Manufacturer, 
241 2nd St., apstairs. 

DRUGGISTS, 

"X^SER^wCv^^E^^Druggi^ 



f\. 



265 2d St. 



2d & Vermillion st. 



FINCH & SON, Druggists, Pharmacists, Pure 
Wines & Liquors, 257 2nd st. 

DRY GOODS. 

E~''TM^BR6s:7&Ol]fVERri5ry^^ 
254 2nd st. 

GILLITT, H., Dry Goods, Clothing, Hats, Caps, 
Boots & Shoes, 268 2nd st. 

Z^I GROCERIES^ __^ 

DAVIS, B. F. & SONTOi-oceries & Provisions, 
2nd & Ramsey sts. 



M 



ATHER, CHAS., Groceries, 



250 2nri st. 



R 



EED, WM., B. & CO., Groceries, 



274 2nd st. 



HARDWARE, 

M~~~'cHCGHrjrR7TiarSwarepHnwar^^ 
2nd & Verm illion st. Est. 1861. 

HORSESHOERS. 

K^^ANE'^TRACYrHorseshoers^ 
Cor. 5th & Vermillion sts. 

HOTELS. 

1"7*AimER^06TEL,"And1wliio^ 
Cor. Vermilliau & 1st sts. 
EAGER, C, American House, 

224 Second st. 



LUMBER DEALER. 

[HIlCDeal 
&c., Vermilliau st. 



y\UpLEY, JOHN, Dealer in Lumber, Flour, Peed 



MACHINIST. 

WARSOP, A., Star Iron Works and General Ma- 
chinist. Lower Levee. 

MARBLE WORKS. 

KOPPESTPMER^MiSnSle'&lSfanUe^'orks^ ' 
225 2nd st. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



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370 



HKUOKS OF THE KEVOLUTION. 



Alexander Itlacomb was born in 
Detroit in 1782, and entered the army at the 
Sige of 17 years. He was made a brigadier in 
1814. In 1835 he was commander-in-chief of 
the armies of the United States, and died in 
1841. 

£(lin(iii«l v. Cisiiiies was born in Vir- 
ginia in 1777. He entered the army in 1799, 
and rose gradually until he was made major- 
general for his gallantry at Fort Erie in 1814. 
He remained in the army vintil his death, in 
1849. 

Xliomas S. «f esiip was born in Vir- 
ginia in 1778. He was a brave and useful offi- 
cer during the war of 1812, and was retained 
in the army. He was breveted major-general 
in 1828, aiid was succeeded in command in 
Florida by Colonel Zachary Taylor in 1838. He 
died in Washington Citj^ 

Daniel "WelJster was born in Salis- 
bury, New Hampshire, in 1782. He was ad- 
mitted to the bar in Boston in 1805. He com- 
menced his political career in Congress in 
1818. He was in public employment a greater 
portion of the remainder of his life, and was 
the most distinguished statesman of his time. 
He died at Marshfield, Mass., in October, 1852. 
^lajor Bi'O'WM was born in Massachu- 
setts in 1788; was in the war of 1812, and was 
promoted to major in 1843. He was wounded 
in the Mexican war by the bursting of a bom- 
shell, and died on the 9th of May, 1846. He 
was 58 years of age. 

IVilliam J. 'Wortli (General) was 
born in Columbia county, New York, in 1794; 
was a gallant soldier during the war of 1812; 
was retained in the army, and for his gallantry 
at Monterey, during the Mexican war, he was 
made a major-general, by brevet, and received 
the gift of a sword from Congress. He was of 
great service during the whole war with Mex- 
ico. He died in Texas, in May, 1849. 

•Voliit EHixi ■%Vool (General ) was a na- 
tive of New York. He entered the army in 
1812, and soon rose to the rank of lieutenant- 
colonel, for gallant conduct on Queenstown 
Heights, in 1812. He was breveted brigadier 
in 1825, and for gallant conduct at Buena 
Vista, in 1847, was breveted major-general. 

"Winfielcl Scott was born in Virginia 
in 178(5. He was admitted to law practice at 
the age of 21 years. He joined the army in 
1808, was made lieutenant-colonel in 1812, and 
passed through the war that ensued with great 
honor to himself and his company. He was 
breveted major-general in 1814, and was made 
general-in-chief of the ai'mj- in 1841. His 
successes in Mexico greatly added to his lau- 
rels, and he was considered one of the greatest 
captains of the age. He was made lieutenant- 
general in 1855. He died May 29, 1866, at 
West Point, aged 80 years. 

Stepliem W. Kearney was a native 
of New Jersey. He was a gallant soldier in 
the war of 181*2. He was breveted a brigadier 
in 1846, and major-general in December the 
same year, for gallant conduct in the Mexican 
war. He died at Vera Cruz, in October, 1848, 
at the age of 54 years. 

David E. T-wig'g's was born in Geor- 
gia in 1790. He was a major at the close of 
the war of 1812, and was retained in the army. 
He was breveted major-general after the bat- 
tle of Monterey, and for his gallantr}- there he 
received a gift of a sword from Congress. 



H ASTiNGS — Continued. 



MEAT MARKET. 
y EISZ & REIGEL, Meat Market, 



300 Second et. 



MILLINERY GOODS. 

MOORHOUSE,S.E., Millinery, Fancy & Ladies' 
Furnishing Goods, 261 2iid St. 

PHOTOGRAPHERS. 

SCOTT, ALEX. A., Photographer, 
One door west of Tremont House. 

PRINTERS. 

DUFFY & FREEMAN, Job Printers, 
Post Office Block. 

NEWSPAPER, 

HASTINGS NEW ERA. The Boss Job Office of 
Dakota County. 268 Second st. 



SALOON, 
"D EUTER, iM., Saloon, 



276 Second St. 



SEWING MACHINES. 

EELEK, JAMES M., Agent Singer isewing Ma- 
chine, It) Vermillion st. 



B 



B 



TAILORS, 

OOR^T.^MercFairtTli^Tiorr 

Ramsey St., near Foster House. 

lESELER, H., Merchant Tailor, 

46 Vermiilion at. 

COTT, P., Merchant Taiior, 

280 Second st. 



B 



WAGON MAKER. 

ECkER, !>., Wagon Builder, Blacksmith and 
Horseshoer, Vermillion <& 4th sts. 



ST. PAUL, 



BARBERS. 

LEININGER, M., Hair Dressing and Shaving Sa- 
loon, 75 Robert st. Est. 1866. 



^^IGO, M., Barber, 



113 Jackson st. 



BOOKS AND STATIONERY. 

D"'~'~"AfEmJRT,"^AMESrBook8elier&^ 
20 W. 3rd St. 

MILHAM, E. H., Books & Stationery, 
169 E. 7th St. 

BOOTS AND SHOES. 

A^^^'^SSMEGGTC^rSoot? and^slio^ ""^ ' 

95 Jackson st. 



B 



ARWISE, THOMAS, Fashionable Boot and 
Shoe Maker, 45 Robert st. 



STRUTZELL, JOHN, Boot & Shoe Manufacturer, 
49 Robert st. 

BRIDGE BUILDER. 

S~'"'~HERW6()D, GEO. VV., Bridge and Trestle Work 
Builder, &c., 80 Robart st. 

DRESSMAKING, 

C^^LARKTmtsTMrXTDressmakingr' 
\ZVi W. 3rd 8t. 



IMPORTANT INVENTIONS AND IMPROVEMENTS. 



37 



St. Paul — Continued. 



FANCY GOODS. 

UELLER, AUGUST, Fancy Goods, Zephyrs^ 
&c., 129 E. 7th St. 



M 



FUR DEALER. 

RYDER, M., Ladie?"a^id^ieS^Fur Goods, 
55 Jackson st. 

GROCERS. 

F~~'"oMAINlOrrGTOcenesrBootr&^ 
&c.,61 Robert St. 

HARVESTER MANUFACTURER. 

sTrrXuiTHlRVE's tTF w oTfs',' 

Manufacturers of the Elward Harvester, 

H. L. PILKINGTON, - - - Sec. & Treas. 

COR. FOURTH & KOBFRT STREETS. 

IRON AND STEEL, 

R"~'^TffWELL,"7oMpTirKel^^ 
Works, 6th and Robert sts. 

MARBLE WORKS. 

THOMAS BOWER, 

MARBLE & GRANITE WORKS, 

Cor. SEVENTH & CEDAR STS. 

MEAT MARKET. 

WENTWORTH, G. W. & CO., Excelsior Meat 
Market. 47 Robert st. 



PHOTOGRAPHER. 
TYMAGON,XBl^Photographerr 



71 Robert st. 



SALOONS. 

FRANK WERNER'S Place, 
120 yy. Third st. Est. 1863. 

GOTTFRIED ELBEjyS 

Salooi, Wiies, Lipors & Ciars, 

182 W. THIRD STREET. 

AUFMAN, D. F., Wine, Beer and Liquois, 

No. 77 & Res. 91 Robert st. 

SHIRT MANUFACTURER. 
SRIGGS & MERRILL, 

Troy Shirt Manufacturer, 

.» 34 Jackson Street. 

STOVES AND TINWARE. 

OlTCERSTORFT'^ROSirStOTCsrTii^^ 
Wind Mill Dealers & Manfs., 123 E. 7th st. 

TAILORS, 

/CONNOR, M., Fashionable Tailor, 






55 Robert st. 



WM. GEISENHEYNEB, 

99 W. THIRD STREET. 

METER, C. & CO., Merchant Tailors, 
115 E. 7th St. 



ADDENDA 

TO 

Important Mproyements and Inyentions. 

Automatic Oorn-Sfieller — Invented In' A. 
V. Cleland, 1874. 

Barbed Fenee — Invented first by Wm. E. 
Hunt, in the year 18G7, iraprovecl by Scutt 
& W^atkins in 1874, and by H. B. Scutt, in 
1876. 

Beach Patent Shifting Seat Carriage 
Bodies— F&tenled by S. W. Beach, in 1870. 

Cash Register — Invented by W. .1. Rip- 
ley, 1875. 

Circle Tracking Wagon — Patented .Julv 
1, 1876, by L. W. Frederick Hall. 

Combinaton Lock for drawers, etc. — Pat- 
ented 1876 or 1877. 

Combined Plum and Squares Level and 
Conformator for measuring for coats and 
vests— Invented by Fred Wright, 1877. 

Combined Pad and Colln/r Fastenei — A. 
Racine, 1875. 

Concrete Water Pipe — Invented by T. 
Millen, 1877. 

CorbetVs Automatic Variable Cut-off Oov- 
ernor^for steam engines — Invented by Thos. 
M. Corbett, 1875. 

Crescent Fluid, non-explosive — A. F. 
Beattie, 1876. 

Double-acting. Anti-freezing Force Pump 
—Invented by H. M. Wyeth, in 1876. 

Eccentric Brake (for cars of wagons; — 
Patented by W. M. Groze. 

Economical Pump Sucker — Patented Feb. 
23, 1875, and 1877, by J. M. Springer. 

Electric Clasp Switch — 1 nvented by A. 
H. Freeman, in 1871. 

Electric Burglar Alarm — Improved by 
A. H. Freeman, in 1876. 

End and Side Bar Spring— Patented and 
invented by H. M. Curtis, l876. 

Escapement for Clocks Compound Pendu- 
lum— Inyented by J. E. Wolvertou, in 1876. 

E-vce sior Hod ^Elevator — Patented June 
30, 1874, by C. Bradford. 

Fastening for Trunks (without straps or 
buckles)— Invented by C. C. Taylor, 1867. 

Glass Wheel Electric Pendulum Clock — 
Invented by ,T. E. Wolverton, in 1876. 

Horse-Hoof Paring Machine — Geo. W. 
Schaefer, 1873. 

Howe's Spring Pad Belt Trim (for the 
treatment and cure of Rupture or Hernia) 
—Patented and improved bv •' Howe Truss 
Co.," Council Blutts, Iowa, May 17, 1870, 
March 14, 1871, and March '23. 1875. 

Ink ^65?— Invented bv F. A. Redington, 
1876. 

Ink Vent— Faiented and invented by F. 
A. Redington, Feb. 15, 1876. 

Lisect Powder ^Jowf-r— Patented June 5, 
1877, bv W. T. Brummer. 

Interfering Horse Shoe (to prevent horses 
from hurting themselves) — Invented by 
Joseph Stanton. 



378 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 








The Electric Quarterly contains valuable information for invalids 
and those who suffer from Nervous, Exhausting and painful diseases.. 
It treats upon the laws of hygiene and physical culture, and shows how 
perfect bodily health and energy may be fully enjoyed by means of 

ELECTRIC BELTS AND BANDS 

THE BEST KNOWN CURATIVE AGENT. 

These highly perfected Curative Appliances supply to the body mild and continuous 
currents of Electricity, and in so effective a manner that the most stubborn and compli- 
cated diseases yield to their magnetic influence after every other plan of treatment has 
failed. They are applicable to either sex, the young and old; and although applied ex- 
ternally by the patient himself, exert a beneficiert and recuperativi influence through- 
out the entire economy. The Electric action begins at once, as soon as the Belt or Band 
is applied, and the beneficial eflTects are perceptible almost from the start. Cases regard- 
ed incurable, and of years standing, yield to their mild but wonderful influence. In 
no case can the application be attended with the least harmful effects. The action pene- 
trates every bodily organ, and thus promotes Digestion, Excretion, Nutrition and Cir- 
culation, restoring health and vigor to the debilitated constitution. 

Their many invaluable qualities and adaptation for medical purposes, obtained for 
them at once full recognition from scientists and the elite of the medical profession 
at home and abroad. 1 hey combine in the utmost degree efiiciency, comfort in applica- 
tion, and economy, and are self- applicable by ihe patient himself, for the speedy and effec- 
tual cure of Nervous, Chronic and functional Diseases. Among others, the following: 



Rheumatism, 
Neuralgia, 
Dyspepsia. 
Constipation, 
Sciatica, 
Lumbago, 
Aches and Pains, 
General Debility 
Head Troubles, 



Nervous Debility, 
Liver Complaint, 
Kidney Disease, 
Female Complabits, 
Skin Diseases, 
Nervoxisness, 
Trembling, 
Indigestion, 
Diseases of the Chest, 



Spermatorrhoea, 

Epilepsy, 

Paralysis, 

Spinal Diseases, 

Catarrh, 

Deafness, 

Nervous Com,plq^nts, 

General III- Health, 

Decline, ^c. 



T^" Descriptive Pamphlet cnid Electric Quarterly^ 
an eight-page illustrated Journal containing valu- 
able information and full particulars mailed free. 

PUt¥imMJLCHim GAl»¥JLmiO CO. 

292 Vine St., Cincinnati, O, 



AD VE RTISEM ENTS. 



379 




380 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



St. Paul — Continued. 



TOBACCO AND CIGARS, 

ItTpTleitner, 
cigars, tobacco, pipes, snuff, 

26 W. THIRD STREET. 
VINEGAR MANUFACTURERS, 

Vinegar Manufacturerst 

95 E. Seventh Street. 



WATCHMAKER AND JEWELER. 

^lAX YFixTJElLSHOFEK™ 

Jeweler and Watchmaker, 

36 Jackson Street. 



WINONA. MINN, 



BARBERS. 

Tn> lMEMEYM7v>Cc^rBarber; 



(>3 E. 3ad St. 



iCHMITT, J., Barber, 



Cor. Main & 3rd st. 



BILLIARD HALL, 

iMrMSTMiSTU^^WiardllSTrRestaur^ 
and Saloon, 55 E. Second st. 



BOOKSELLER AND STATIONERY, 

(V¥ENrFrE^rBook8elierand~NewFl)ea^ 
13 E. Third St. 

BOOTS AND SHOES. 

BARTLETT <& PIERCE, 

Ladies' and Gents' Furnishing Goods, 

BOOTS AiM> SHOES, 

COR. SECOND AND CENTER ST. 

DMMINGS & VILA, Dealers in Boots & Shoes, 
17 E. Third st. 



H 



ABEKLE, LOUIS, Boots & t^hoe^. 

Cor. Third and Lafayette sts. 



F 



LADELAND, JOHN (J., Boots and Shoes, Gloves 
and Mittens, 24 E. Second st. 



J ANSON BROS., Boots and Shoes, 
77 E. Third st. 

SCHEREB,C. JR., Boots & Shoes, 
56 E. Second st, 

SCHUMACHER, F. P., Boots and shoes, 
^^ 70 E. Second st. 

" CABINET MAKER, 

G'"'n5ETMrO\rCaMnet MrtkcK^^ 
Lafayette bet. 2nd & Srdsts. 

CLOTHING. 

A^'^^RMlSrWvCiothinirBootsai^^ 
13 E. Second st 

T^OX & FOREST, Clothing and Puinishino 



Goods, 26 E. Second st. 



CROCKERY AND GLASSWARE, 

iPTREG^RY'&lxiTri^rockerylm^^ 

VX 39 E. 2nd st. 



Winona — Conimued. 



DENTISTS, 



»ENEGRINE, J. S., Dentist, 



Cor. 2nd and Main st. 



w 



ELCH, A., Dentist, 



HE. Third st. 



DRUGGISTS. 

KENDALL, I., Drug-i and Medicines, Paints and 
Oils, 17 E. Second st. 

A. O. SEADK, 

22 East Third Street. 

EDEL, DR. H. R., Druggist and Apothecary, 
Cor. Sea)nd an d Lafayette sts, 

DRY GOODS. 

pHOAT^lLTDry^Goodsr 



Center & 3d st. 



UHEINBERGER BRO., 

DRY GOODS, NOTIO.N'S A\D FANCY 

CENTER Bet. SECOND & THIRD STS. 

IBEFOORM'SrillEinCLQimSSIOIlE, 

Dry Goods and Gents' Furnishing 

Goods, 

No. 4 Simpson Block, Second Street. 

FURNITURE, 

T^'HSRUNErAr&l^O^rKrniUire; 
42E.2d St. 

_______ GROCERIES^_______ 

CURTIS, E. FTTGrocerr"'"^'^ 
24 E. Third St., cor. Center st. 



D 



URAND, GEO. W., G rocery Clerk, 

Hubbard Block. 



G 



REENES A VILLAUNICE, Groceries, Crockery, 
Glass, Wood & Willow Ware, 52 E. 3d st. 



TT.ASKIN, GEO. E., Grocer, 



44 E. Second st. 



eROCERY AND COMMISSION HOUSE, 

G. L. HALLO WELL . 

3d St., bet. Main & Johnson. 

ATSCH, J., Grocer, 
103 W. 2d St. 

GUN MAKER, 

F"^M;STED7Tn7i^~GunTJaSeK ' 
Lafayette st., bet. 2nd & 3rd. 

HARDWARE, 

16 E. 3rd St. 



HARNESS AND SADDLES, 

Harness, Saddles, Whips, (SiC, 

COR. WALNUT & THIRD STS. 



HOTELS. 

E UBOpIeAN HOTEL 

GEORGE ROBINSON, Proprietor. 
67 East Third St. 



ADVEKTISEMKNTB. 



381 




The IVashington £liii, Cambridge, Mass.— Not fartrom the college 
grounds stands one of the famous trees of the country — the Washington Elm — the only 
known survivor of the ancient forest that originally covered this part of Cambridge. It 
was under this tree that General George Washington took command of the Continental 
army, on the morning of July 3, 1775. A neat fence surrounds this giant of the ancient 
forests, and an inscription commemorates the important event, which was the most in- 
teresting in its centuries of existence. 



Winona — Continued. 



JAMES LAW, Prop. 

COB,. JoaysoN & second sts. 

EBCHANTS' HOTEL. M. Schweitzer, Prop. 
Terms. $2.00 per day. Cor. Walnul & 2n(i sts. 



INSURANCE AGENT. 

C, Fire, Life^TuTAccide: 
Agency, 2nd, Nat Bank Building. 

JEWELRY STORE. 

ORGAN,'S."wTWatxhmSkS'anFjewe^ 

15 E. 2nd St. 



T^IXON, A. C, Fire, Life^ruTAccident Insurance 



M 



LIVERY STABLES. 

J. bTmorehead, 



LyJll!//« 



THIRD & WALNUT STS. 



O CHNEIDEB BROS., Livery, 



97 W. 2nd st. 



MILLINERY GOODS. 

t]lMYrTttBSri?r'J;nMil1Seiy~anr'^^ 
Goods, Kg. 51 E. 2Dd st. 

MUSIC