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Full text of "Journal of the ... General Conference of the United Methodist Church"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2009 



http://www.archive.org/details/journalbaltimore01unit 



DREW UNIVERSITY LIBRARY 



JOURNAL OF THE 

1984 

GENERAL CONFERENCE 

OF 

THE UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 

Volume I 



JOURNAL 

OF THE 

1984 

GENERAL CONFERENCE 

OF 

THE UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 

Volume I 



HELD AT 

BALTIMORE, MARYLAND 

May 1-11, 1984 



Edited by 

JOHN L. SCHREIBER, Journal Editor 

The General Conference of The United Methodist Church 



Bx 

.A ^3 

vol I 



CERTIFICATION 

This certifies that the following pages constitute the 
OfficialJournal of the 1984 General Conference of The United 
Methodist Church, held at Baltimore, Maryland, May 1-11, 
1984, including the Officers, Personnel, Commissions, 
Committees, Representatives on Boards and Commissions 
that acted during the Conference, or were elected by them, 
proceedings of business, communications, and other matters 
ordered printed by the General Conference. 



The General Conference Secretarv' 
The United Methodist Church 



CONTENTS 

Page 

Title Page 3 

Certification of Journal 4 

Table of Contents 5 

Commission ON The General Conference 7 

Local Washington Area Committee 8 

Council OF Bishops of The United Methodist Church 9 

The Judicial Council 11 

Officers AND Committees, 1984 General Conference 12 

Secretarial Staff 12 

Ballots and Tellers 13 

Standing Administrative Committees 17 

Interjurisdictional Committee on Episcopacy 20 

Personnel OF the General Conference 24 

Alphabetical List of Delegates and First 

Reserve Delegates 88 

Standing Legislative Committees (Membership) Ill 

Plan of Organization and Rules of Order 133 

Episcopal Address 165 

Laity Address 187 

Journal 

Tuesday, May 1, 1984, Afternoon 201 

Evening 218 

Wednesday, May 2, 1984, Morning 219 

Thursday, May 3, 1984, Morning 228 

Friday, May 4, 1984, Morning 236 

Saturday, May 5, 1984, Morning 250 

Monday, May 7, 1984, Morning 268 

Afternoon 283 

Evening 294 

Tuesday, May 8, 1984, Morning 300 

Afternoon 312 

Evening 323 

Wednesday, May 9, 1984, Morning 334 

Afternoon 351 

Evening 369 

Thursday, May 10, 1984, Morning 380 

Afternoon 395 

Evening 412 

Friday, May 11, 1984, Morning 425 

Afternoon 445 

Evening 461 



Appendix 

I. Vote on Constitutional Amendment 489 

II. Reports of Administrative Committees 491 

III. Reports TO the General Conference 507 

IV. Reports OF Standing Legislative Committees 770 

Index 1689 



HOSTS AND HOSTESSES 

Editor's Note: Addresses are as they were reported at the time of 
the 1984 General Conference. Italics denote ordained clergy. 

COMMISSION ON THE GENERAL CONFERENCE 

Chairperson: B. C. Goodwin, Jr., 1200 Old Pecos Trail, Santa Fe, NM 87501 
Vice-chairperson (Facilities): Elizabeth Watson, 3325 N.E. 29th Avenue, 

Portland, OR 97212 
Vice-chairperson (Program): Gene P. Crawford, 7995 E. 21st Street, Indianapolis, 

IN 46219 
Secretary of Commission: Barbara R. Thompson, 11215 Oak Leaf Drive, Apt. 

1902, Silver Spring, MD 20901 
General Conference Secretary: J. B. Holt, Perkins School of Theology, Southern 

Methodist University, Dallas, TX 75275 
Treasurer: Swing T. Wayland, 1200 Davis Street, Evanston, Illinois 60201 
Exec. Director/Business Mgr.: DeWayne S. Woodring, 1200 Davis Street, 

Evanston, IL 60201 

Members 

Alguire, Frances, 764 86th Place, Dovi^ners Grove, IL 60516 
Dillard, Robert L., Jr., 6624 Lakewood, Dallas, TX 75214 
Frazer, E. Eugene, 1577 Pemberton Road, Columbus, OH 43221 
Gonzales, Noe, P. 0. Box 840, Nashville, TN 37202 
Jordan, Bert, 212 Leavell Woods Drive, Jackson, MS 39212 
Kellogg, Irma A., 5387-D Salem Bond Drive, Dayton, OH 45426 
Rudisill, George W., Route 2, Box 169-B, Catawaba, NC 28609 
Smith, F. Rossing, Box 2313, Charieston WV 25328 
Stants, Nelson E., 407 Walnut Street, Irwin PA 15642 
Walker, William 0., 1376 Olive St., Eugene, OR 97212 
Webber, Frank, 149 Morning Sun Avenue, Mill Valley, CA 94941 
Wong, Samuel, 6017 Craig Street, Springfield, VA 22150 

1980-84 Committees 
Executive: B. C. Goodwin, Jr., chairperson; Geyie P. Crawford, J. B. Holt, 

Barbara R. Thompson, Elizabeth Watson, Ewing T. Wayland, DeWayne S. 

Woodring 
Facilities: Elizabeth Watson, chairperson; Robert L. Dillard, E. Eugene Frazer, 

Noe Gonzales, Bert Jordan, Irma Kellogg, Nelson E. Stants, William 0. 

Walker, DeWayne S. Woodring 
Program: Gene P. Crawford, chairperson; Frances Alguire, B. C. Goodwin, Jr. , J. 

B. Holt, F. Rossing Smith, George Rudisill, Barbara Thompson, Ewing T. 

Wayland, Frank Webber, Samuel Wong, DeWayne S. Woodring 



LOCAL COMMITTEE 
WASHINGTON AREA 

Chairperson: D. Frederick Wertz, Washington, DC 

Honorary Co-Chairpersons: Fred D. Holloway, Wilmington, DE; W. Earl Ledden, 

Gaithersburg, MD; James K. Mathews, Washington, DC 
General Chairperson: Wilson A. Shearer, Baltimore, MD 

Staffing & Equipment: 

Chairperson: Edgar F. Nicodemus, Frederick, MD 

Office of Local Committee Coordinators: Robert Powrie, Wilmington, DE; 

Clarence L. Roark, Glyndon, MD 
Convention Services Coordinator: Leslie G. Metcalf, Baltimore, MD 
Equipment Coordinator: Wilbur Penley, Baltimore, MD 
Secretarial Personnel Coordinators: Judith Berry, Wilmington, DE; Nancy Zabel, 

College Park, MD 
First Aid and Health Support Coordinator: Hilda Truesdel, Baltimore, MD 
Postal Services Coordinator: Francis Turpin, Federalsburg, MD 
Badges and Packets Coordinator: Henry K. Underwood, Silver Spring, MD 

Program: 

Chairperson: Forrest T. Stith, Suitland, MD 

Communion Service Coordinator: Kathryn B. Moore, Washington, DC 

Bishop's Reception Coordinator: Annie Thompson, Joppa, MD 

Area Event Coordinator: Carroll Yingling, Baltimore, MD 

Preaching Assignments Coordinators: Marlene L. Walters, Wilmington, DE; 

Harold G. Johnson, St., Bethesda, MD 
Conference Sunday Delegate Hosting Coordinator: Nina B. O'Neal, Washington, 

DC 
Communications Coordinator: Jan Lichtenwalter, Baltimore, MD 
Music Coordinator: Dale Kreider, Hyattsville, MD 

Hospitality: 

Chairpersons: William and Sarah Hemphill, Hockessin, DE 

Group Housing Coordinator: Delton Pickering, Baltimore, MD 

Council of Bishops Meeting Coordinator: Richard Stazesky, Wilmington, DE 

Special Luncheons and Banquets Coordinator: Judy Rife, Baltimore, MD 

Information and Message Center Coordinator: Byron Brought, Wheaton, MD 

Delegate Lounge Coordinator: Ruth Laws, Dover, DE 

Local Transportation and Tours Coordinator: Robert Manthey, Timonium, MD 

Refreshments Coordinator: Robert Paulen, Pasadena, MD 

Welcoming Coordinator: Richard Bailey, Dover, DE 



ADMINISTRATIVE AND JUDICIAL BODIES 

THE COUNCIL OF BISHOPS 
THE UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 

Officers 

President Bishop Wilbur W. Y. Choy 

rresiaeni. . . . •••••■••"• Bishop James S. Thomas 

^^^''^:::::::::::::::::::::=^^^^^^^ BisWj-esM.Auu 

Members 

Allen, L. Scott, P. 0. Box 18750, Charlotte, NC 28215 

Alton, Ralph T., 1100 West 42nd St., Indianapolis, IN 462J)8 

Ammons, Edsel A., 155 West Congress, #200, Detroit MI 48226 

Ault, James M., 223 Fourth Ave., Pittsburgh, PA lo222 

Banmira, Thomas Syla, P. 0. Box 523, FreetON^, Sierra Leone 

Barbieri:Sante Uberto, Los Ceibos 56, El Palomar, 1684 Buenos Aires, Argentina 

Bashore, George W., 566 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, MA 02215 

Blackburn, Robert M., P. 0. Box 11367, Richmond, VA 23230 

Borgen, Ole E., Sibyllegatan 18, III, 114 42 Stockholm, Sweden 

Boulton, Edwin C, 1721 South University Dr., Fargo, ND o8103 

Br^an Monk, 2641 North 49th St., Lincoln, NB 68o04 

Cannon, William R., P. 0. Box 10955, Raleigh NC 27605 

Carleton, Alsie H., 810 Momingside Place, S. E. Albuquerque, NM 87108 

Carroll, Edward G., 2235 Rogene Drive, #203, Baltimore, MD 21209 

Choy, Wilbur W. Y., P. 0. Box 467, San Francisco, C A 94101 

Clark, Roy C, 4908 Colonial Drive, #108, Columbia, SC 29203 

Clymer, Wayne K., 1019 Chestnut Street, Des Moines lA o0309 

Colaw, Emerson S., 122 West Franklin Ave., #400, Minneapolis. MN o5404 

Corson Fred P., Cornwall Manor, Cornwall, PA 17016 

Crutchfield, Finis A., 5215 South Main St., Houston, TX 77002 

de Carvalho, Emilio J. M., Caixa Postal 68, Luanda Angola 

DeWitt Jesse R., 77 West Washington St., #1806, Chicago, IL 60602 

Dixon 'Ernest T., Jr., P. 0. Box 28509, San Antomo, TX 78228 

Dodge, Ralph E., P. 0. Box 25, Dowling Park, FL 32060 

Duffey, Paul A., 4010 Dupont Circle, #264, Louisville, KY 40207 

Ferrer Comelio M., 85 West Point, Cubao, Quezon City, Philippines 

Finger, H. Ellis, Jr., P. 0. Box 11869, Knoxville, TN 37919 

Frank Eugene M., 3913 West 57th Terrace, Shawnee Mission. KS 66205 

Galloway, Paul V., P. 0. Box 3057, Baton Rouge, LA 70821 

Garrison, Edwin R., 29 Brook to Bay, Englewood, FL 33533 

Golden, Charles F., 5911 Shenandoah Ave., Los Angeles, C A 90056 

Goodrich, Robert E., Jr., 3435 Westheimer, Houston, TX 77027 

Goodson, W. Kenneth, Duke University Divimty School, Durham, NC 2770b 

Granadosin, Paul L. A., P. 0. Box 87, Baguio City Phihppines 

Grove, William B., 900 Washington St., East, Charleston WV2o301 

Handy W T , Jr., 4625 Lindell Blvd., #420, St. Louis, MO 63108 

Hardin, Paul, Jr, P. 0. Box 338, Lake Junaluska NC 2874o 

Hardt, John Wesley, 2420 North Black\\-elder. Oklahoma City, OK 73106 

Harmon, Nolan B., 998 Springdale Road, N. E., Atlanta, GA 30306 

HaHel, Armin E., Wiener Strasse 56, 8020 Dresden, East Germany 

Henley, James W., P. 0. Box 2067. Lakeland, FL 33803 

9 



10 Journal of the 198 Jf General Conference 

Hicks, Kenneth W., 723 Center St., Little Rock, AR 72201 

Hodapp, Leroy C, 501 East Capitol Ave., Springfield, IL 62701 

Holloway, Fred G., 4830 Kennett Pike, Wilmington, DE 19807 

Holier, Don W., 7725 Briar St., Prairie Village, KS 66208 

Hunt, Earl G., Jr., P. 0. Box 1747, Lakeland, FL 33802 

Kaebnick, Hermann W., 65 Woodbine Dr., Hershey, PA 17033 

Katembo, Kainda, B. P. 2061, Lubumbashi, Zaire 

Reams, Francis E., 290 Cottswold Dr., Delaware, OH 43015 

Kulah, Arthur F., P. 0. Box 1010, Monrovia, Liberia 

Ledden, W. Earl, 401 Russell Avenue, #405, Gaithersburg, MD 20877 

Loder, Dwight E., 471 East Broad Street, #1106, Columbus, OH 43215 

Lord, John Wesley, 1011 Avon Ave., Lakeland, FL 33801 

Lovem, J. Chess, 412 Lake Charles, North, Fort Worth, TX 76103 

Martin, William C, 1421 North University, #S-202, Little Rock, AR 72207 

Mathews, James K., 4120 48th Street, N. W., Washington, DC 20016 

Matthews, Marjorie S., 750 Windsor Street, #303, Sun Prairie, WI 53590 

McConnell, Calvin D., 1505 S. W. 18th Ave., Portland, OR 97201 

McDavid, Joel D., 159 Ralph McGill Blvd., N. E., Atlanta, GA 30365 

Milhouse, Paul W., 2213 N. W. 56th Terrace, Oklahoma City, OK 73112 

Minnick, C. P., Jr., P. 0. Box 931, Jackson, MS 39205 

Mondol, Shot K., 4931 Indian Trail, Saginaw, MI 48603 

Moore, Noah W., Jr., 1236 North Indiana Ave., Atlantic City, NJ 08401 

Muzorewa, Abel T., P. 0. Box 3408, Harare, Zimbabwe 

Nacpil, Emerito P., P. 0. Box 756, Manila, Philippines 

Nail, T. Otto, 2509 Wynnewood Dr., Clearwater, FL 33575 

Nichols, Roy C, 252 Bryant Ave., White Plains, NY 10605 

Oliphint, Benjamin R., 4201 West 15th St., Topeka, KS 66604 

Onema, Fama, B. P. 560, Kananga, Zaire 

Pendergrass, Edward J., P. 0. Box 2505, Lakeland, FL 33803 

Penicela, Almeida, Caixa Postal 2640, Maputo, Mozambique 

Pope, W. Kenneth, 3131 Maple Ave., Dallas, TX 75201 

Robertson, Frank L., 6 Office Park Circle, #301, Birmingham, AL 35223 

Russell, John W., P. 0. Box 8127, Dallas, TX 75205 

Sanders, Carl J., P. 0. Box 6073, Dothan, AL 36302 

Schdfer, Franz W., P. 0. Box 469, 8026 Zurich, Switzerland 

Schowengerdt, Louis W., 2500 Louisiana, N.E., #227, Albuquerque, NM 87110 

Short, Roy H., 835 Neartop Dr., Nashville, TN 37205 

Skeete, F. Herbert, P. 0. Box 820, Valley Forge, PA 19482 

Slater, 0. Eugene, 7424-9 West Northwest Highway, Dallas, TX 75225 

Sparks, W. Maynard, 5401 Cabrillo Way, Sacramento, CA 95820 

Sticher, Hermann L. , Wilhelm-Leuschner-Strasse 8, D-6 Frankfurt/ Main 1, West 

Germany 
Stokes, Mack B., 8587 South Lewis Ave., #207 Annex, Tulsa, OK 74137 
Stowe, W. McFerrin, 4123 Echo Glen, Dallas, TX 75234 
Stuart, R. Marvin, 22 Los Altos Square, Los Altos, CA 94022 
Talbert, Melvin G., 2112 Third Ave., #301, Seattle, WA 98121 
Taylor, Prince A., Jr., 193 Laurel Circle, Princeton, NJ 08540 
Thomas, James S., P. 0. Box 2800, North Canton, OH 44720 
Tuell, Jack M., P. 0. Box 6006, Pasadena, CA 91109 
Tullis, Edward L., Scarritt College, Laskey Library, Nashville, TN 37203 
Valencia, Jose L., 40 Ilagan St., San Francisco Del Monte, Quezon City, 

Philippines 
Wakadilo, Ngoy Kimba M., B. P. 459, Kamina, Zaire 
Ward, W. Ralph, Jr., 160 Woodland Dr., Convent Station, NJ 07961 
Warman, John B., 900 South Arlington Ave., Harrisburg, PA 17109-5097 



The United Methodist Church 11 

Washburn, Paul A., 413 East Parkway Dr., Wheaton, IL 60187 
Webb, Lance, 10321 Van Dyke, Dallas, TX 75218 
Werner, Hazen G., 4337 22nd Ave., North, St. Petersburg, FL 33713 
Wertz, D. Frederick, 100 Maryland Ave., N. E., Washington, DC 20002 
Wheatley, Melvin E., Jr., 2200 South University Blvd., Denver, CO 80210 
White, C. Dale, 112 West Delaware Ave., Pennington, NJ 08534 
Wicke, Lloyd C, 1370 Whiskey Creek Dr., Fort Myers, FL 33907 
Wunderlich, Friedrich, 34 Grillparzerstrasse, D-6 Frankfurt/Main, West Ger- 
many 
Yeakel, Joseph H., 3049 East Genesee St., Syracuse, NY 13224 
Zottele, Pedro R., Casilla 10222, Santiago, Chile 

JUDICIAL COUNCIL 
THE UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 

Officers 

President: Tom Matheny, P. 0. Box 221, Hammond, LA 70404 

Vice President: Florence V. Lucas, 144-07 228th Street, Rosedale, NY 11413 

Secretary: Hoover Rupert, Florida Southern College, Lakeland, FL 33802 (Sept. 

1-May 1); 221 School's Out, Epworth Heights, Ludington, MI 49431 (May 1-Aug. 

31) 

Members 

Wayne Coffin, 2420 N. Blackwelder, Oklahoma City, OK 73106 
Charles B. Copher, 3340 Lake Valley Rd. N.W., Atlanta GA 30331 
Elizabeth B. Gundlach, 326 East Main Street, Springville, NY 14141 
Alvin J. Lindgren, 1104 Duncan Avenue, Lakeland, FL 33801 
Gene E. Sease, 1400 East Hanna Ave., Indianapolis, IN 46227 
Leonard D. Slutz, 900 Tri State Bldg., Cincinnati, OH 45202 

Alternates 

Florence Freeman, 70 Montvale Rd., Weston, MA 02193 

Daniel Garcia, General Board of Global Ministries, 475 Riverside Dr., New York, 

NY 10115 
Kathryn M. Grove, 5025 North Marvine St., Philadelphia, PA 19141 
Duncan Hunter, Jr., 2108 Henry Rd., Anniston, AL 36201 
C. Ebb Munden, 2723 N. 50th St., Lincoln, NE 68504 
Thomas Reavley, 1312 Meriden Lane, Austin, TX 78703 
John Stumbo, 2222 W. 29th St., Topeka, KS 66611 
Paul Webb, 229 Peachtree Street, N.E., Atlanta, GA 30303 



OFFICERS AND COMMITTEES 

OF 

THE 1984 SESSION 

OF THE 

GENERAL CONFERENCE 

OF THE 

UNITED METHODIST 

CHURCH 



PRESIDING BISHOPS 

(In order of their presiding) 

Bishop James S. Thomas 
Bishop W. T. Handy, Jr. 
Bishop Joel D. McDavid 
Bishop Joseph H, Yeakel 
Bishop Wayne K. Clymer 
Bishop James M. Ault 
Bishop Melvin G. Talbert 
Bishop Benjamin R. Ohphint 
Bishop H. ElHs Finger, Jr. 
Bishop Edward L. Tulhs 
Bishop Leroy C. Hodapp 
Bishop Jack M. Tuell 
Bishop Roy C. Nichols 
Bishop Emerito P. Nacpil 
Bishop Ernest T. Dixon 
Bishop Jesse R. DeWitt 
Bishop Paul A. Duffey 
Bishop Marjorie S. Matthews 
Bishop Roy C. Clark 
Bishop William B. Grove 

SECRETARIAL STAFF 

(Italics denotes minister) 

General Secretary /. B. Holt (Central Texas) 

Assistant Secretary... J?o6e7^ T. Young (Western North Carolina) 

Calendar Secretary Hobart R. Hildyard (Kansas East) 

Document Secretary Hea Sun Kim (Baltimore) 

Journal Editor John L. Schreiber (Southwest Texas) 

12 



The United Methodist Church 13 

Journal Secretary F. Rossing Smith (West Virginia) 

Legislation Secretary... //arofd E. Johnson (Pacific and South- 
west) 
Petitions Secretaries... Newell P. Knudson (California-Nevada) 

Katarine Knudson (California-Nevada) 

Registrar Irma Kellogg Wallace (West Ohio) 

Roll Call Secretary Roy D. Barton (Rio Grande) 

Director, Stenographic Pool Betty Van Dyke (West Ohio) 

Chief Tellers Barbara R. Thompson (Baltimore) 

Sidney Roberts (Central Texas) 

BALLOTS AND TELLERS 

TELLERS— GROUP I 

Chief Teller: Barbara R. Thompson (Baltimore) 

SECTION A 

Section Captain: Lorene Taylor (Oregon-Idaho) 

Reserve Section Captain: George Robinson (Western North Carolina) 

Regular Tellers 

Rows 1-2-3 G. Howard Allred (Western North Carolina) 

Rows 4-5-6 Kendall Bond (New Mexico) 

Rows 7-8-9 Barbara Riddle (Florida) 

Rows 10-11-12 Robert Stevens (Pacific Northwest) 

Rows 13-14-15 John Stoneking (Kansas East) 

Rows 16-17-18 Donald Yeddo (Northern New York) 

Rows 19-20-21 Luther Henry (Central Texas) 

Rows 22-23-24 Betty Henderson (Eastern Pennsylvania) 

Rows 25-26-27 John Mathison (Alabama-West Florida) 

Rows 28-29 Ignacio Castuera (Pacific and Southwest) 

Reserve Tellers 

Rows 1-2-3 Beckey Thompson (Oklahoma Indian Missionary) 

Rows 4-5-6 Hubert Neth (Missouri West) 

Rows 7-8-9 Chester Vanderbilt (Troy) 

Rows 10-11-12 Wilson Boots (New York) 

Rows 13-14-15 John Lundy (Holston) 

Rows 16-17-18 Ruth Harper (North Carohna) 

Rows 19-20-21 Ann Pfisterer (Louisville) 

Rows 22-23-24 Stephen Dahl (Northern Illinois) 

Rows 25-26-27 Cleo Turner (Pacific and Southwest) 

Rows 28-29 John Martin (Missouri East) 

SECTION B 

Section Captain: Tal Oden (Oklahoma) 
Reserve Section Captain: Judith Gebhart (West Ohio) 

Regular Tellers 

Rows 1-2-3 Helen Taylor (Oklahoma) 

Rows 4-5-6 Vance Summers, Jr. (West Ohio) 



14 Journal of the 1984 General Conference 

Rows 7-8-9 Robert Bailey (South Carolina) 

Rows 10-11-12 Wesley Kendall (Rocky Mountain) 

Rows 13-14-15 John Hanson (Wisconsin) 

Rows 16-17-18 Richard Turner (Nebraska) 

Rows 19-20-21 Samuel Wong (Baltimore) 

Rows 22-23-24 Bonifacio Mequi, Jr. (Iowa) 

Rows 25-26-27 Twick Morrison (Mississippi) 

Rows 28-29 Elizabeth Karlsen (Denmark) 

Reserve Tellers 

Rows 1-2-3 Scott Smith (North Texas) 

Rows 4-5-6 Jim Waterfield (Northwest Texas) 

Rows 7-8-9 Rudolph Baker, Jr. (North Georgia) 

Rows 10-11-12 Doreen Bailey (Central Pennsylvania) 

Rows 13-14-15 Prenza Woods (Southwest Texas) 

Rows 16-17-18 Peggy Garrett (North Indiana) 

Rows 19-20-21 Rafael Boissen (Puerto Rico) 

Rows 22-23-24 Rebecca May (Memphis) 

Rows 25-26-27 Charles Thompson (West Virginia) 

Rows 28-29 William Appleby (North Mississippi) 

SECTION C 

Section Captain: James R. Reed (Kansas West) 
Reserve Section Captain: Clint Burleson (North Arkansas) 

Regular Tellers 

Rows 1-2-3 Wesley Crompton (Wyoming) 

Rows 4-5-6 David Zimmerman (Virginia) 

Rows 7-8-9 Robert Richards (Western Pennsylvania) 

Rows 10-11-12 Pat Callbeck Harper (Yellowstone) 

Rows 13-14-15 Robert Sweet, Jr. (Southern New England) 

Rows 16-17-18 Mareyjoyce Green (East Ohio) 

Rows 19-20-21 Ted Colescott (Minnesota) 

Rows 22-23-24 Sue Davidson (New Hampshire) 

Rows 25-26-27 Howard Daughenbaugh (Central Illinois) 

Rows 28-29 Russell Odell (Central Illinois) 

Reserve Tellers 

Rows 1-2-3 Gladys Church (West Michigan) 

Rows 4-5-6 Ross Freeman (South Georgia) 

Rows 7-8-9 Kristen Knudson (California-Nevada) 

Rows 10-11-12 Charles Ramsay (North Arkansas) 

Rows 13-14-15 Oscar Garza, IV (Rio Grande) 

Rows 16-17-18 Charles Betts (North Alabama) 

Rows 19-20-21 Wanda Eichler (Detroit) 

Rows 22-23-24 Tracy R. Arnold (Louisiana) 

Rows 25-26-27 David L. White, Jr. (South Indiana) 

Rows 28-29 Bradley Watkins (Central Illinois) 



TELLERS— GROUP II 

Chief Teller: Sidney Roberts (Central Texas) 



The United Methodist Church 



15 



SECTION A 

Section Captain: John Miles (Little Rock) 
Reserve Section Captain: Joetta Rinehart (Western North Carolina) 

Regular Tellers 

Rows 1-2-3 Edwin L. Taylor (Caribbean and Americas) 

Rows 4-5-6 Mai Gray (Missouri West) 

Rows 7-8-9 George Hunter, III (Florida) 

Rows 10-11-12 William James (New York) 

Rows 13-14-15 Barbara Driver (Kansas East) 

Rows 16-17-18 Charles H. Mercer (North Carolina) 

Rows 19-20-21 Paul Hardin (Northern New Jersey) 

Rows 22-23-24 Felton E. May (Peninsula) 

Rows 25-26-27 John Sherrer, Sr. (Alabama-West Florida) 

Rows 28-29 Ivan LaTumo (Missouri East) 

Reserve Tellers 

1.2-3 Charles Eurey (Western North Carolina) 

4-5-6 B. C. Goodu-in, Jr. (New Mexico) 

7-8-9 Jerr>' Young (Oregon-Idaho) 

10-11-12 Edivard Iwamoto (Pacific Northwest) 

13-14-15 Raymon White (Holston) 

16-17-18 Lydia Aherrera (Phillippines) 

19-20-21 William Trudeau (Alaska) 

22-23-24 Alice Litton (Kentucky) 

25-26-27 James Lawson (Pacific and Southwest) 

28-29 Lois Seifert (Pacific and Southwest) 



Rows 
Rows 
Rows 
Rows 
Rows 
Rows 
Rows 
Rows 
Rows 
Rows 



SECTION B 

Section Captain: L. T. Hicks (Oklahoma) 

Reserve Section Captain: William Stephenson (North Texas) 

Regrular Tellers 

1-2-3 Johnnie Marie Grimes (North Texas) 

4-5-6 Charles D. Whittle (Northwest Texas) 

7-8-9 James Gadsden (South Carolina) 

10-11-12 Elizabeth Howard (Rocky Mountain) 

13-14-15 Roland Scales (Texas) 

16-17-18 Don Riggin (Little Rock) 

19-20-21 Lewis Yingling (Baltimore) 

22-23-24 Don Ridenour (Iowa) 

25-26-27 Robert Kates (Mississippi) 

28-29 Paul Baddour (North Mississippi) 

Reserve Tellers 

Rows 1-2-3 Bonner Teeter (Oklahoma) 

Rows 4-5-6 C. William Swank (West Ohio) 

Rows 7-8-9 Ken Weatherford (North Georgia) 

Rows 10-11-12 Margie Mayson (Central New York) 

Rows 13-14-15 John Q. T. King (Southwest Texas) 

Rows 16-17-18 R. Sheldon Diiecker (North Indiana) 

Rows 19-20-21 Annie Thompson (Baltimore) 

Rows 22-23-24 Paul Blankenship (Memphis) 

Rows 25-26-27 Jean Beard (West Virginia) 

Rows 28-29 Finn Uth (Denmark) 



Rows 
Rows 
Rows 
Rows 
Rows 
Rows 
Rows 
Rows 
Rows 
Rows 



16 Journal of the 198Jt General Conference 

SECTION C 

Section Captain: Clifton Bullock (West Michigan) 

Reserve Section Captain: Betty Whitehurst (Virginia) 

Regular Tellers 

Rows 1-2-3 Donald Minturn (Wyoming) 

Rows 4-5-6 Robert Casey (Virginia) 

Rows 7-8-9 William Green (Western Pennsylvania) 

Rows 10-11-12 Rueben Job (South Dakota) 

Rows 13-14-15 Elsie Crickard (Kansas West) 

Rows 16-17-18 William Harvey (East Ohio) 

Rows 19-20-21 Kathleen Bellamy (North Dakota) 

Rows 22-23-24 Thomas Cloyd (Tennessee) 

Rows 25-26-27 Norman Dixon (Central Illinois) 

Rows 28-29 Jack VanStone (South Indiana) 

Reserve Tellers 

Rows 1-2-3 Ellen Brubaker (West Michigan) 

Rows 4-5-6 Ray Cox, Jr. (South Georgia) 

Rows 7-8-9 Arturo Fernandez (California-Nevada) 

Rows 10-11-12 Fred Helton (Red Bird Missionary) 

Rows 13-14-15 Carl Halvorsen (Southern New Jersey) 

Rows 16-17-18 Myrtle Gordon (North Alabama) 

Rows 19-20-21 Clifton Ives (Maine) 

Rows 22-23-24 John Porter (Louisiana) 

Rows 25-26-27 Joe Emerson (South Indiana) 

Rows 28-29 Dehght Wier (Central Illinois) 

DAILY CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE 

Roger L. Burgess Editor 

Janet R. McNish Associate Editor 

Martha S. Pilcher Managing Editor 

James Steele News/Roundup Editor 

Peggj' Huddleston Assistant Editor 

Sherrie B. Dobbs Feature Editor 

Walter Vernon Feature Editor 

Clifton Goodlett Chief Copy Editor 

Nancy B. Cunningham Copy Editor 

Frances Glenn Copy Editor 

Robert C. Goss Art Director 

John Good\\in Photographer 

Gerald Clapsaddle Index Editor 

Carl E. Thompson Business Manager 

Edward R. Carver Production Manager 

Juanita Bellenfant Circulation Manager 

Cedric Foley Distribution Manager 

Robert K. Feaster Publisher 



STANDING ADMINISTRATIVE COMMITTEES 



{Italics denote minister) 

AGENDA 

Chairperson: Asbiiry Lenox (Texas) 

Vice-chairperson: K. June Goldman (Iowa) 

Secretary: Henry C. Clay, Jr. (Mississippi) 

Members: Virgil V. Bjork (North Indiana) Calendar Committee Chairperson 

J. Melvin BrawTi (California-Nevada) 

Gene P. Crawford (South Indiana) Commission on the General 
Conference 

Mai Gray (Missouri West) 

J. Nimeju Kartwe (Liberia) 

Charles F. Kirkley (Baltimore) 

Delton H. Krueger (Minnesota) 

Rebecca May (Memphis) 

Elbert Moore (Pacific Northwest) 

CALENDAR 

Chairperson: Virgil V. Bjork (North Indiana) 
Vice-chairperson: Leon McKenzie (Pacific and Southwest) 
Secretary: Neil L. Irons (West Virginia) 
Members: Betty R. Hartje (Kentucky) 

CORRELATION AND EDITORIAL REVISION 

Chairperson: C. Faith Richardson (Southern New England) 
Vice-chairperson: Naomi Bartle (North Dakota) 
Secretary: Ronald K. Johnson (Pacific Northwest) 
Members: Bishop L. Scott Allen (Charlotte Area) 

Ronald P. Patterson (West Ohio), ex officio 

COURTESIES AND PRIVILEGES 

Chairperson: C. Vernon Bigler (Western New York) 
Vice-chairperson: Joseph B. Bethea (North Carolina) 
Secretary: May C. Chun (Pacific and Southwest) 
Members: Heinrich Bolleter (Switzerland-France) 

Zan W. Holmes (North Texas) 

Jane Schairer (Detroit) 

CREDENTIALS 

Chairperson: Tal Oden (Oklahoma) 
Vice-chairperson: Helmut Nausner (Austria Provisional) 
Secretary: Mollie M. Stewart (North Alabama) 
Members: Bnice D. Fisher (Central Pennsylvania) 

Joan T. Kelsey (West Michigan) 

Robert I. Phelps (Yellowstone) 

JOURNAL 

Chairperson: William W. Reid (Wyoming) 
Vice-chairperson: Carol J. Johns (Detroit) 

17 



18 Journal of the 198Jt General Conference 

Secretary: Granville A. Hicks (South Carolina) 
Members: Benjamin A. Justo (Northern Phihppines) 

Kristin Knudson (CaUfomia-Nevada) 

Don Strickland (Texas) 

PLAN OF ORGANIZATION AND RULES OF ORDER 

Chairperson: Frank H. Nestler (Central Illinois) 

Vice-chairperson: Susan F. Henry-Crowe (South Carolina) 

Secretary: Barbara M. Shaffer (Alaska Missionary) 

Members: Beverly J. Abbott (Maine) 

Bruce P. Blake (Kansas West) 

Jerry G. Bray, Jr. (Virginia) 

Pedro L. Ela (Middle Philippines) 

James M. Lawson (Pacific and Southwest) 

Eldon B. Mahon (Central Texas) 

Charles A. Sayre (Southern New Jersey) 

PRESIDING OFFICERS 

Chairperson: Richard W. Cain (Pacific and Southwest) 
Vice-chairperson: Marcus Fang (Wisconsin) 
Secretary: Janice K. McClary (Troy) 
Members: Arturo M. Fernandez (California-Nevada) 

Paul J. Meuschke (Western Pennsylvania) 

T. Cecil Myers (North Georgia) 

Frank A. Nichols (Iowa) 

Carolyn H. Oehler (Northern Illinois) 

Ann Rader Pfisterer (Louisville) 

Victor E. Pizarro (Puerto Rico) 

Harry Schneidereit (German Democratic Republic) 

Helen H. Slentz (California-Nevada) 

Lycurgus M. Starkey (Missouri East) 

Becky R. Thompson (Oklahoma Indian Missionary) 

Nonato U. Vengco (Philippines) 

James M. Walker (Southwest Texas) 

REFERENCE 

Co-Chairpersons: George L. Berry (North Mississippi) 

Judith G. Gebhart (West Ohio) 
Secretary: Susan M. Morrison (Baltimore) 
Members: James A. Batten (New Hampshire) 

Kathleen Bellamy (North Dakota) 

Florence E. Freeman (Southern New England) 

Pat Callbeck Harper (Yellowstone) 

/. Lloyd Knox (Florida) 

William B. Lewis (Southern Illinois) 

Allen D. Montgomery (North Alabama) 

William B. Oden (Oklahoma) 

Manfred Poll (Austria Provisional) 

Roy L Sano (California-Nevada) 

Dan E. Solomon (Southwest Texas) 

James B. M. Vincent (Sierre Leone) 

Dale Waymire (Oklahoma) 



The United Methodist Church 19 

COMMISSION ON THE GENERAL CONFERENCE 
1988 GENERAL CONFERENCE 

Chairperson: Frances M. Alguire (Northern Illinois) 
Vice-chairperson (Facilities): E. Eugene Frazer (West Ohio) 
Vice-chairperson (Program): F. Rossing Smith (West Virginia) 
Secretary: William 0. Walker (Oregon-Idaho) 
Members: 
Class of 1988: 

Frances M. Alguire (Northern Illinois) 

Robert L. Dillard, Jr. (North Texas) 

E. Eugene Frazer (West Ohio) 
George W. Rudisill (North Carolina) 

F. Rossing Smith (West Virginia) 
William 0. Walker (Oregon-Idaho) 
Samuel Wong (Baltimore) 

Class of 1992: 

Judith Craig (East Ohio) 
Delia Escareno (Rio Grande) 
Bettilou Holland (Northern New Jersey) 
Carolyn Hopkins (South Georgia) 
Paula Johnston (Rocky Mountain) 
Charles E. Lutrick (Northwest Texas) 
Arnold Madsen (Norway) 

At-large (elected by the Commission): 

Elbert Moore (Pacific Northwest) 
Carlton R. Young (East Ohio) 

Ex-offtcio: ^ 

Clifford Droke, Treasurer, General Council on Finance 

and Administration (California-Nevada) 
C. Faith Richardson, Secretary (Southern New England) 
DeWayne S. Woodring, Business Manager (East Ohio) 



INTERJURISDICTIONAL COMMITTEE 
ON EPISCOPACY, 1984-1988 
Par. 611.1. There shall be an Interjurisdictional Committee on Episcopacy 

elected by the General Conference consisting of the persons nominated by their 
Annual Conference delegations to serve on the several Jurisdictional Committees 
on Episcopacy. The committee shall meet not later than the fifth day of the 
conference session and at the time and place set for their convening by the 
president of the Council of Bishops and shall elect from their number a chairperson, 
vice-chairperson, and secretary. The function of this joint committee shall be to 
discuss the possibility of transfers of bishops across jurisdictional lines at the 
forthcoming Jurisdictional Conferences for residential and presidential responsi- 
bihties in the ensuing quadrennium. It shall elect an executive committee 
consisting of the officers named above and two ministers and two lay persons from 
the nominees to each jurisdictional committee, elected by that committee to 
conduct consultations with bishops and others interested in possible episcopal 
transfers. The executive committee shall be responsible to the interjurisdictional 
committee. 

NORTH CENTRAL JURISDICTION 

Alguire, Frances Northern lUinois 

Bellamy, Kathleen North Dakota 

Bjork, Virgil V North Indiana 

Blomquist, Paul F Detroit 

Bosomworth, E. L Southern Illinois 

Christopher, Sharon A. Brown Wisconsin 

Cook, Shirley Detroit 

Craig, Judith East Ohio 

Dilgard, Charles West Ohio 

Ewers, Duane North Dakota 

Fang, Marcus Wisconsin 

Fenstermacher , Anita North Indiana 

Forbes, J. Kenneth South Indiana 

Foster, Betty Minnesota 

Job, Rueben P South Dakota 

Jordan, Charles W Northern Illinois 

Kelsey, Joan T. (chairperson) West Michigan 

Lorch, Basil H., Jr South Indiana 

McCormack, James West Ohio 

Moore, Thomas P East Ohio 

Nettleton, James L Southern Illinois 

Nichols , Frank A Iowa 

Palmer, Miley E Central Illinois 

Rader, Sharon Z West Michigan 

Ridenour, Don Iowa 

Rushing, Vaudra M Central Illinois 

Wahlstrom, LaRayne South Dakota 

Walker, H. Thomas Minnesota 

NORTHEASTERN JURISDICTION 

Abbott, Beverly Maine 

Batten, James A New Hampshire 

Beard , Jean West Virginia 

20 



The United Methodist Church 21 

Boissen , Rafael Puerto Rico 

Boots, Wilson T New York 

Brown, Lyle Western New York 

Cherry, William T Eastern Pennsylvania 

Clendaniel, Virginia L Peninsula 

Cleveland, J. Fay Western New York 

Crompton, Wesley R Wyoming 

Daugherty, Ruth Eastern Pennsylvania 

Davidson, Sue E New Hampshire 

Ernest, Sally Western Pennsylvania 

Flinn, Thomas W., Jr Baltimore 

Fisher, Bruce D Central Pennsylvania 

Harlow, Ruth Troy 

Holland, Bettilou Northern New Jersey 

Irons, Neil L West Virginia 

Ives, S. Clifton Maine 

banning, Dean Northern New Jersey 

Lasher, William A Troy 

McCune, Robert J Central New York 

Meuschke, Paul J Western Pennsylvania 

Page, Conrad M., Jr Central Pennsylvania 

Parris, Shirley New York 

Pizarro, Victor Puerto Rico 

Shinn, Ridgway, Jr Southern New England 

Shivers, M. Russell Southern New Jersey 

Stapleton, J. Gordon Peninsula 

Stith, Forrest C Baltimore 

Summers, Kenneth T., Jr Wyoming 

Swales, William R Northern New York 

Taylor, Blaine Southern New England 

Totten, Bonnie Central New York 

Weller, William L Southern New Jersey 

Yeddo, Donald Northern New York 

SOUTH CENTRAL JURISDICTION 

Arnold, William E North Arkansas 

Bailey, H. Barry Central Texas 

Seal, Jim North Arkansas 

Bevins, C. Rex Nebraska 

Bond, Kendall New Mexico 

Carruth, Nancy Louisiana 

Dorsey, Frank Kansas East 

Dunlap, G. Alan Nebraska 

Forsman, Don New Mexico 

Garza, Oscar Rio Grande 

Harper, Charles North Texas 

Heacock, Jack D Southwest Texas 

Heam, J. Woodrow Louisiana 

Lutrick, Charles E Northwest Texas 

McReynolds, Marvin Kansas West 

Mutti, A. F Missouri West 

Oden, William B Oklahoma 

Palos, Jose A Rio Grande 

Railey, Walker L North Texas 

Riggin, Don L Little Rock 



22 Journal of the 198 Jf General Conference 

Ross, Ken Missouri East 

Roughface, Thomas, Sr Oklahoma Indian 

Speer, Aubrey B Missouri West 

Starkey, Lycurgus M Missouri East 

Strickland, Don Texas 

Stroman, Pat '... Central Texas 

Stumbo, John E. (vice-chairperson) Kansas East 

Tanner, George A Little Rock 

Thompson, Becky Oklahoma Indian 

Walker, James Southwest Texas 

Waterfield, Jim Northwest Texas 

Waymire, Dale Oklahoma 

Wilke, Richard B Kansas West 

Williams, Charles W Texas 

SOUTHEASTERN JURISDICTION 

Ash, John L., Ill Mississippi 

Bailey, William P., Jr Memphis 

Barnes, John Tennessee 

Berry, George L North Mississippi 

Bethea, Joseph B North Carolina 

Bondurant, Lil Holston 

Campbell, Foy Alabama- West Florida 

Fitzgerald, Ernest A Western North Carolina 

Furman, Frank, Jr Florida 

Gordon, Prentiss M North Mississippi 

Helton, Fred Red Bird 

Hicks, Granville A South Carolina 

Hilton, David A Red Bird 

Jones, Bevel North Georgia 

Key, William R South Georgia 

Knox, J. Lloyd Florida 

Litton, Alice Kentucky 

Logan, James Virginia 

Looney, Richard C Holston 

Lucas, Aubrey K Mississippi 

Martin, Bob North Georgia 

May, Rebecca ••• Memphis 

Morgan, Robert C North Alabama 

Norris, J. Allen, Jr North Carolina 

Peters, C. Kenneth Louisville 

Phillips, J. Taylor South Georgia 

Ravenhorst, Dorothy Virginia 

Shingler, Sara South Carolina 

Spain, Robert H Tennessee 

Stegall, Karl K Alabama-West Florida 

Stewart, Mollie M North Alabama 

Summers, James A Western North Carolina 

Sweazy, Albert W. (secretary) Kentucky 

Willen, Howard R Louisville 

WESTERN JURISDICTION 

Bleyle, Deanna Rocky Mountain 

Boe, Donna H Oregon-Idaho 

Cain, Richard W Pacific and Southwest 



The United Methodist Church 23 

Dolliver, James M Pacific Northwest 

Hammer, Pat J Pacific and Southwest 

Harper, Pat Callbeck Yellowstone 

Johnston, Paula Rocky Mountain 

McConyiell, Bruce E Oregon-Idaho 

Phelps, Robert I Yellowstone 

Shaffer, Barbara M Alaska 

Shaner, Harry E California-Nevada 

Summerour, William Franklin Pacific Northwest 

Tnideau, William Alaska 

Washington, Rosa California- Nevada 



VOTING AND RESERVE 

DELEGATES 

TO THE 

1984 GENERAL CONFERENCE 

THE UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 



The annual conferences are listed alphabetically. The names of the delegates 
appear as they were furnished by the secretaries of the respective annual 
conferences, with the names of ministerial delegates and reserves in itahcs. 
Addresses are those supplied the General Conference secretary as of the time of 
the General Conference sessions. The chairperson of the delegation is indicated by 
an asterisk (*). The number in parentheses indicates legislative committee 
assignment. 

The figure after each annual conference heading is the number of delegates in the 
delegation and is followed by the abbreviation for its jurisdiction or CC for central 
conferences. 

ALABAMA- WEST FLORIDA (14) SE 
Sec. A, Row 26, Seats 1-12 
Sec. A, Row 27, Seats 1-2 

Stegall, Karl K. (8); Minister; 2607 Aimee Drive, Montgomery, AL 36106 
Mathison, John Ed (3); Minister; P.O. Box 17060, Montgomery, AL 36117 
Spencer, Lester H. (5); Minister; 1108 W. Main St., Dothan, AL 36303 
Garrison, Langdon H., Jr. (6); Minister; P. 0. Box 248, Panama City, FL 32401 
Vickers, John E. (2); Minister; 200 E. Decatur St., Demopolis, AL 36732 
Ahhott, Clifford M. (9); Minister; P. 0. Box 2727, Pensacola, FL 32503 
Dickerson, E. Robert, III (10); Minister; 6 E. Wright St., Pensacola, FL 32501 
*Campbell, Foy (6); Manager, Funk Seeds; 3636 Farrar St., Montgomery, AL 

36105 
Jones, Sue S. (5); Homemaker; 1105 E. Samford Ave., Auburn, AL 36830 
Nevin, Edwin C. (4); College President (Retired); P.O. Box 272, Kinston, AL 

36453 
Wilson, Monza (7); Teacher/Homemaker; 108 Jasmine Dr., Ozark, AL 36360 
Curtis, Alecia (9); Student/Youth Director; Box 137, Huntingdon College, 

Montgomery, AL 36106 
Butts, R. Harold (3); Businessman; 100 Baratara Dr., Chickasaw, AL 36611 
Sherrer, John F., Sr. (1); Salesman; 137 Satterfield Dr., Selma, AL 36701 

Reserves 

Newton, Douglas C; Minister; 901 East Gadsden St., Pensacola, FL 32501 
Gaither, Billy D.; District Superintendent; 569-C Holcombe Ave., Mobile, AL 

36606 
Smith, Benjamin N.; Minister; 132 Morton Circle, Tuskegee Institute, AL 36088 
Spikes, Willow Jean; Minister; Route 3, Box 474-G, Mobile, AL 36608 
Bradley, Cecil E.; District Superintendent; P. 0. Box 69, Andalusia, AL 36420 
Willis, Pruitt; District Superintendent; 230 Plaza II, Dothan, AL 36303 
Dannelly, James P., Jr.; Minister; P. 0. Box 1290, Auburn, AL 36830 
Turner, Annie Mae; Community Developer; 213 Chunnenuggee Ave., Union 

Springs, AL 36089 

24 



The United Methodist Church 25 

Rish, William J.; Attorney/Farmer/Businessman; P. 0. Box 87, Port St. Joe, FL 

32456 
Copper, Art; (deceased) 

Moore, Vera T.; Bookkeeper; P. 0. Box 258, Bayou la Batre, AL 36509 
Jeter, Charles P.; Vice-President, Manager, Electric Corp.; 306 Lakewood Dr., 

Enterprise, AL 36330 
Stewart, Mark C; Diaconal Minister; P. 0. Box 961, Andalusia, AL 36420 
Burton, Amanda S.; Teacher (Retired); Route 3, Box 312, Eutaw, AL 35462 

ALASKA MISSIONARY (2) W 

Sec. A, Row 19, Seats 1-2 
Trudeau, William G. (5); Minister; P. 0. Box 8515, Ketchikan, AK 99901 
*Shaffer, Barbara M. (6); Administrative Manager; 1666 Patterson Street, 
Anchorage, AK 99504 

Reserves 

Pitney, Deborah; Minister; P. 0. Box 907, Nome, AK 99762 
Gotschall, Marion; Teacher; P. 0. Box 427, Juneau, AK 99802 

ANGOLA (2) CC 

Sec. A, Row 5, Seats 5-6 
Maundo, Gouveia L. (2); Seminar}' Teacher; C.P. 846, Huambo, Angola 
dos Santos, Manuel T. (8); Accountant; C.P. 68, Luanda, Angola 

Reserves 

Pascoal, Francisco; District Superintendent; C.P. 68, Luanda. Angola 
Joao, Silveira A.; C.P. 9, Malange, Angola 

AUSTRIA PROVISIONAL (2) CC 

Sec. C, Row 23, Seats 3-4 
*Nausner, Helmut (5); Superintendent; A-llOO Wien, Landgutgasse 39/8, Austria 
Poll, Manfred (5); Engineer; A-1190 Wien, Silvaraweg 11/31, Austria 

BALTIC PROVISIONAL (2) CC 

Sec. C, Row 18, Seats 1-2 
Pamamets, Olav; District Superintendent; Endla 44-1, Tallin 200006, Estonia, 

USSR 
Pajusoo, Toomas; Sur— Karja 14-2, Tallin 20001, Estonia, USSR 

BALTIMORE (22) NE 

Sec. B, Row 20, Seats 1-12 

Sec. B, Row 21, Seats 1-10 

Stith, Forrest C. (9); District Superintendent; 7202 Lois Lane, Lanham, MD 20706 

Morrison, Susan M. (6); District Superintendent; 20 Millstone Road, Randall- 

stown, MD 21133 
Zabel, Walter J. (8); Conference Secretary; 9109 St. Andrews Place, College Park, 

MD 20740 
Hutchins, Joshua (7); District Superintendent; 1710 Vamum Street NW, 

Washington, DC 20011 
Kirkley, Charles F. (5); Pastor; 10401 Armor>' Avenue. Kensington, MD 20895 
Yingling, Leu-is C. (10); Pastor; 20 Cedarwood Road, Baltimore, MD 21228 
Andrews, David H. (2); Conference Council Director; 5110 Foxville Road, 

Smithsburg, MD 21783 
Ebinger, Warren R. (3); District Superintendent; 7899 West Hills Dr., Frederick, 

MD 21701 



26 Journal of the 198^. General Conference 

Stewart, Ann R. (1); Pastoral Counselor; 7812 Green Twig Road, Bethesda, MD 20817 
Stames, Thomas C. (5); District Superintendent; 6104 Winnebago Rd., Bethesda, 

MD 20816 
Schell, Edwin A. (4); Pastor; 112 W. Conway St., Baltimore, MD 21201 
*Flinn, Thomas W., Jr. (3); Sales Marketing Manager; 3606 MacAlpine Road, 

Ellicott City, MD 21043 
Butler, Phyllis P. (9); Homemaker; Route 6, Box 130, Martinsburg, WV 25401 
Hill, William C. (3); Retired; 5811 Justina Drive, Lanham, MD 20706 
Thompson, Barbara R. (8); Administrator, U.S. Government; 11215 Oak Leaf Dr., 

Apt. 1902, Silver Spring, MD 20901 
Lavery, Barbara (1); Homemaker; 8 Tanglewood Road, Baltimore, MD 21228 
Jones, Everett R. (6); Retired Contractor; 9510 Main St., Damascus, MD 20872 
Wicklein, Helen (4); Homemaker; 1820 Cromwell Bridge Road, Baltimore, MD 

21234 
Johnson, Dorothy M. (10); Educator; 6107 Lone Oak Road, W. Bethesda, MD 20817 
Carter, Joan E. (2); Student; 4007 W. Strathmore Ave., Baltimore, MD 21215 
Wong, Samuel; U.S. Government; 6017 Craig Street, Springfield, VA 22150 
Thompson, Annie (5); Retired Teacher; 2021 Singer Road, Joppa, MD 21085 

Reserves 

Sun, Peter Y.K.; Pastor; 8304 Jeb Stuart Road, Potomac, MD 20854 
Johnson, Charles A.; Minister; 1215 Southview Road, Baltimore, MD 21218 
Birch, Bruce C; Seminary Professor; 1646 Primrose Road NW, Washington, DC 

20012 
Trotter, Frank E.; Minister; 11 Walker Avenue, Pikesville, MD 21208 
Holmes, William A.; Minister; 3311 Nebraska Ave. NW, Washington, DC 20016 
Matthews, Marcus; Minister; 3210 Betlou James PI., Baltimore, MD 21207 
Williams, Frank L.; Minister; 3801 S. Dakota Ave., NE, Washington, DC 20018 
Coveleski, Linda J.; Minister; 3939 Gamber Road, Finksburg, MD 21048 
Barger, Rebecca K.; Minister; 812 Summit Ave., Hagerstown, MD 21740 
Tyson, Kenneth A.; District Superintendent; 8 Van Lear Dr., WiUiamsport, MD 

21795 
Harper, Lyle E.; Minister; 17825 Cliffboume Ln., Rockville, MD 20855 
Cooney, Charles D.; Minister; 13837 Castle Blvd., #21, Silver Spring, MD 

20904-4906 
Zabel, Nancy H. (7); Administrative Assistant; 9109 St. Andrews PL, College 

Park, MD 20740 
Brooks, Viola S.; Retired Federal Employee; 12400 Old Fort Rd., S.E., Ft. 

Washington, MD 20744 
Hannay, John; Educator; 4920 Piney Branch Rd., NW, Washington, DC 20011 
Underwood, Harry K.; Retired Attorney; 10302 Ridgemoor Dr., Silver Spring, 

MD 20901 
Meek, Amy G.; Teacher; 16 Dogwood Circle, Frostburg, MD 21532 
King, James W. , Sr. ; Property Manager; 6567 Freetown Rd. , Columbia, MD 21044 
Dion, Ruth F.; Realtor Office Manager; 9426 Bulls Run Parkway, Bethesda, MD 

20817 
Bevan, John E.; Registrar Seminary; 4500 Massachusetts Ave, N.W., Washing- 
ton, DC 20016 
Bonnell, Dean W. ; Retired Aero-Space Engineer; 9302 St. Andrews Place, College 

Park, MD 20740 
Akers, Stanley; Banker; 118 Greenmeadow Drive, Timonium, MD 21093 
Powell, Blanche R.; Retired Principal; 3521 Lynchester Road, Baltimore, MD 

21215 
Bonnell, Jean B.; Christian Education Consultant; 9302 St. Andrews Place, 

College Park, MD 20740 



The United Methodist Church 27 

BULGARIA PROVISIONAL (2) CC 

Sec. C, Row 26, Seats 11-12 

CALIFORNIA-NEVADA (14) W 

Sec. C, Row 7, Seats 1-2 

Sec. C, Row 8, Seats 1-12 

*Shaner, Harry E. (8); Conference Treasurer; P.O. Box 467, San Francisco, CA 

94101 
Pagett, Betty S. (6); Pastor; 9 Ross Valley Rd., San Rafael, CA 94901 
Fernandez, AHuro M. (9); District Superintendent; 2320 Dana St., Berlieley, CA 

94704 
Sano, Roy I. (5); Seminary Professor; 1798 Scenic Ave., Berkeley, CA 94709 
Dew, William W. (1); District Superintendent; 850 16th St., Modesto, CA 

95354 
Cunninghayn, Donald J. (10); District Superintendent; 2869 Cohasset Rd., Chico, 

CA 95926 
Lee, Charles H. (4); Pastor; 6026 Idaho St., Oakland, CA 94608 
Washington, Rosa (5); Educator; 705 Barcelona, Da\is, CA 95616 
Slentz, Helen H. (9); Retired Educator; 1321 Singingwood Ct., Walnut Creek, CA 

94595 
Brawn, J. Melvin (1); Electronic Engineer; 1747 Dolores Dr., San Jose, CA 95125 
Knowles, Grady (2); Executive Secretary, Conference Board of Pensions; 829 

Duncan St., San Francisco, CA 94131 
LaPoint, Donna (8); Bookkeeper; 2810 Redwood Rd., Napa, CA 94558 
Knudson, Kristin (3); Student; 4031 N. Pershing Ave. , A-22, Stockton. CA 95207 
loelu, Tapuni (7); Businessman; 1799 Hyland St., Bayside, CA 95524 

Reserves* 

Moore, John V.; Pastor; 2100 "J" Street, Sacramento, CA 95816 

McCray, James, Jr.; Pastor; 1975 Post Street, San Francisco, CA 94115 

Wake, Lloyd K.; Pastor; 330 Ellis Street, San Francisco, CA 94102 

Barron, Jose 0.; Pastor; 1732 Cherokee Rd., #26, Stockton, CA 95205 

Thomas, Glenda C; Pastor; 24 N. Fifth St., San Jose, C A 95112 

Droke, Clifford; General Secretary-Elect, Genl. Council on Finance and 

Administration, 1200 Davis St., Evanston, IL 60201 
Corson, John E.; Pastor; 4600 Stockdale, Bakersfield, CA 93309 
Ralstm, Kathleen; Pastor; P.O. Box 767, Coming, CA %021 
Walker, D. Russell; Farmer; P.O. Box 505, Patterson, CA 95363 
Bameson, June R.; Retired Educator; 738 Downing Avenue, Chico, CA 95926 
Yoshina, Shizue M.; Educator; 1720 Laurentian Way, Sunnyvale, CA 94087 
Blankinship, Paul; Student; 1631 Raybum Dr., Reno, NV 89503 
Fado, David; Student; 2044 W. Los Altos, Fresno, CA 93711 
Espie, John; Development Officer; 400-A Whitehall Road, Alameda, CA 

94501 
Carroll, Kathryn; Homemaker; 2365 Ranchito Drive, Concord, CA 94520 
Perez, Ruben; Garbageman; 12530 S. Docker\', Selma, CA 93662 

CARIBBEAN AND THE AMERICAS (2) (Concordat) 

Sec. A. Row 3, Seats 11-12 
"Taylor. Edwin L. (2); Conference President; Methodist Conference Centre, 

Belmont, P.O. Box 9, St. John's, Antigua, West Indies 
Clare, Cynthia (1); Conference Vice President; Methodist Church in the Caribbean 

and the Americas, United Theological College of the West Indies, P.O. Box 136, 

Kingston 7, Jamaica, West Indies 

*Barbara B. Troxell, elected as first clergj- reserve, subsequently resigned. 



28 Journal of the 1984- General Conference 

CENTRAL ILLINOIS (18) NC 

Sec. C, Row 27, Seats 7-12 

Sec. C, Row 28, Seats 1-12 

*Nestler, Frank H. (2); District Superintendent; P.O. Box 1524 (132 S. Water St.), 

Decatur, IL 62525 
Jones, Donald J. (8); District Superintendent; 18 Forest Park West, Jacksonville, 

IL 62650 
Bamett, Vemie T. (6); Executive Director, Preacher's Aid; P.O. Box 1687 (132 S. 

Water St.), Decatur, IL 62525 
Palmer, MileyE. (1); District Superintendent; 116 N.E. Perry, Suite 211, Peoria, 

IL 61603 
Unger, E. Paul (4); Minister; 1110 E. Mumford, Urbana, IL 61801 
Clark, Terry L. (5); Minister; 401 E. Sale St., Tuscola, IL 61953 
Daughenbaugh, Howard L. (9); Conference Program Counselor; P.O. Box 2050, 

Bloomington, IL 61701 
Dings, Joyce E. (3); Minister; Box 158, Edinburg, IL 62531 
Watkins, Bradley F. (7); Minister; 3237 N. California, Peoria, IL 61603 
Gordon, Jinny (9); Homemaker; 863 Greenwood Ave., Kankakee, IL 60901 
Dixon, Norman E. (2); Teacher; 507 E. Samuel, Assumption, IL 62510 
Wilson, J. Lavon (6); Teacher; 2002 E. Kansas St., Springfield, IL 62703 
Rushing, Vaudra M. (1); Conference Program Counselor; P. 0. Box 2050, 

Bloomington, IL 61701 
Womeldorff, Porter J. (7); Utility Executive; 919 W. William St., Decatur, IL 

62522 
Bolinger, Nonie (3); Manufacturer's Representative; 612 Broadway, Shelbyville, 

IL 62565 
Downie, Gerald L. (5); Physician; 555 Schuyler Ave., Kankakee, IL 60901 
Wier, Delight B. (10); Homemaker, Author; R.R. 1, Box 181, Lacon, IL 61540 
Odell, Russell T. (4); Professor Soil Chemistry; 914 Lincolnshire Drive, 

Champaign, IL 61821 

Reserves 

Loyd, W. Harold; District Superintendent; 1112 Devonshire Drive, Champaign, 

IL 61821 
Bortell, James B.; Minister; 302 Broadway, Lincoln, IL 62650 
Nort^, /acA; 5.,- Assistant to the Bishop; 501 E. Capitol Ave., Springfield, IL 62701 
Hess, Wayne C; Minister; 712 Sixteenth Street, Moline, IL 61265 
Lawler, Larry L.; Director of Pubhc Relations; 102 Parkside Road, Normal, IL 

61761 
Jones, Cynthia A.; Minister; 3609 Briarwood, Quincy, IL 62301 
Mcintosh, Burt A.; District Superintendent; 151 Duffy Road, Galesburg, IL 61401 
Misal, Margaret S.; Minister; P. 0. Box 66, Glenarm, IL 62536 
Runyon, Arthur M.; Minister; 504 Vermillion, Danville, IL 61832 
Ghitalla, Jack P.; Bank Accounting Manager; 307 S. Prairie, Knoxville, IL 61448 
Reeves, Richard E.; Vice President, Pump Company; 425 Karen, Decatur, IL 62526 
Gantzert, Janet; Homemaker; R. R. 1, Gardner, IL 60424 
Shuman, Charles B.; Retired; Route 1, Box 16, Sullivan, IL 61951 
Ferguson, Jane A.; Director of Christian Education; 916 N. Sangamon, Gibson 

City, IL 60936 
Bussert, Martha L.; Retired Diaconal Minister; 306 N. State, Champaign, IL 

61820 
Gardner, Donovan F.; Consultant, Programs for the Aging; 417 W. Henry, 

Pontiac, IL 61764 
Diss, Daniel; Student; Owaneco, IL 62555 
Long, A. Lewis; Retired; R.R. 4, Monmouth, IL 61462 



The United Methodist Church 29 

CENTRAL NEW YORK (8) NE 

Sec. B, Row 9, Seats 9-12 

Sec. B, Row 10, Seats 9-12 

McCune, Robert J. (2); Conference Executive; 3049 E. Genesee Street, Syracuse, 

NY 13224 
Spear, James E. (5); District Superintendent; 85 Maxwell Avenue, Geneva, NY 

14456 
Mayson, Margie J. (3); Pastor; 13 Pleasant Street, Clifton Springs, NY 14432 
Love, John L. (10); Pastor; 106 Church Street, North Syracuse, NY 13212 
*Totten, Bonnie L. (6); Church Volunteer; 203 Washington Street, Fayetteville, 

NY 13066 
Mann, Robert (1); Supervisor, Crane & Hoist; 26 Bigelow Ave. , Dundee, NY 14837 
Tenney, Marj' Lou (7); Faculty, Cornell University; 1148 Coddington Road, 

Ithaca, NY 14850 
Famsworth, Alton U. (8); Educator; 5003 Wyffels Road, Canandaigua, NY 14424 

Reserves 

Oertel, R. David; District Superintendent; 711 Fassett Road, Elmira, NY 14905 
Jefferson, Milton T.; Pastor; 7753 Treadmill Circle, Liverpool, NY 13088 
Vogel, R. Richard; Pastor; 2200 Valley Drive, Syracuse, NY 13207 
Jelinek, Robert V.; Professor, SUNY; 5015 Majors Drive, Syracuse, NY 13215 
Robinson, Mary Margaret; Musician/Homemaker; RD 1, 6756 Dunlap Rd., Ovid, 

NY 14521 
Hayward, Rachel; Homemaker; 4288 Candlelight Lane, Liverpool, NY 13088 

CENTRAL PENNSYLVANIA (18) NE 

Sec. B, Row 11, Seats 7-12 

Sec. B, Row 12, Seats 1-12 

Fisher, Bnice D. (3); Conference Council Director; Room 112, 900 S. Arlington 

Ave., Harrisburg, PA 17109 
Schell, Walter M. (8); District Superintendent; 1525 Grampian Boulevard, 

Williamsport, PA 17701 
Cole, Calvin H. (7); Pastor; 302 Swan St., Harrisburg, PA 17111 
Springman, Thomas R. (1); District Superintendent; 2090 Crescent Road, York, 

PA 17403 
Webb, Thomas C. (4); Pastor; 925 McKinley St., Chambersburg, PA 17201 
Stokes, Robert P. (9); District Superintendent; 434 Ridge Ave., State College, PA 

16801 
Kinard, Norma J. (6); Pastor; R D 1, Box A23, Winfield, PA 17889 
House, Jay W. (2); Associate Director, Conference Staff; 1410 Harcourt Drive, 

Harrisburg, PA 17110 
Treese, Donald H. (5); Staff, Genl. Bd. of Higher Education and Ministry; P.O. Box 

871, Nashville, TN 37202 
Trostle, M. Brent (9); Student; 130 Valley View Rd., Mechanicsburg, PA 17055 
*Page, Conrad M. , Jr. (8); Director, Planned Giving in Conference; 451 Valley Rd., 

Etters, PA 17319 
Bailey, Doreen M. (5); Homemaker; 1237 Mayberrj' Lane, State College. PA 16801 
Haverstock, Zedna (6); Conference Treasurer; Room 119, 900 Arlington Ave., 

Harrisburg, PA 17109 
Edgar, Charles E. (7); Retired Credit Manager; 3808 Bonnyview Rd. , Harrisburg, 

PA 17109 
Miller, G. Jackson (3); Wholesale Florist; 1784 Bellemead Drive, Alloona, PA 

16602 
Hill, Judith C. (1); Department of Transportation, Washington, D.C.; 1819A North 

Street, Harrisburg, PA 17103 



30 Journal of the 198 Jf General Conference 

Sollenberger, Hildegard (10); Co-owner, Jewelry Store; R D 3, Box 224, Hanover, 

PA 17331 
Plummer, Kenneth H., Sr. (2); Contractor; 930 Leidig Drive, Chambersburg, PA 

17201 

Reserves 

Bowersox, Ronald E.; Pastor; 105 E. Main Street, Dallastown, PA 17313 

Link, Joanne M.; Pastor; 4556 Ethel St., Harrisburg, PA 17109 

Felty, Richard G.; Pastor; 821 Funston St., Williamsport, PA 17701 

Stambach, Paul E.; Pastor; 27 S. Kershaw St., York, PA 17042 

Shearer, Daniel L.; Retired, Administrative Assistant to Area Bishop; 264 

Grandview Rd., Hummelstown, PA 17036 
Ciampa, Donald J.; Pastor; 303 Grand Park Way N., Lewistown, PA 17044 
Zeisloft, James H.; District Superintendent; 2908 Union Ave., Altoona, PA 16602 
Stamm, John W.; Pastor; 300 East Irwin Avenue, State College, PA 16801 
Jacobs, Thomas H.; Pastor; 325 Maple St., Jersey Shore, PA 17740 
Zimmerman, Elwood C; District Superintendent; 708 Hilltop Dr., New 

Cumberland, PA 17070 
Close, RobeH L.; Pastor; 702 Hilltop Dr., New Cumberland, PA 17070 
Williams, Scott A.; Attorney; 506 S. Main St., Muncy, PA 17756 
Keller, Gloria D.; Postal Clerk; Box 97, Windsor, PA 17366 
Baer, Eleanor G.; Homemaker; 407 E. Main St., Shiremanstown, PA 17011 
Terry, Robert H.; College History Professor; R. D. 5, Box 228, Dillsburg, PA 

17019 
Hartranft, Patsy A.; Administrative Secretary; 9 Oakmont Rd., Harrisburg, PA 

17404 
Nolder, Deanna M.; Homemaker; 1715 Altland Ave., York, PA 17404 
Bowen, Mildred A.; Cafeteria Manager; 261 N. High St., Manchester, PA 17345 
Kneebone, Leon R.; Professor Emeritus, Consultant; 125 S. Patterson St., State 

College, PA 16801 
Close, PhylUs E.; Homemaker; 702 Hilltop Dr., New Cumberland, PA 17070 
Reigh, Mildred M.; Professor Emeritus; R. D. 2, Box 284, Tyrone, PA 16686 
Harptster, Dorothy E.; Retired Professor; 343 A. E. Burd St., Shippensburg, PA 

17257 

CENTRAL TEXAS (12) SO 
Sec. A, Row 21, Seats 1-12 
*Bailey, H. Barry (1); Pastor; 800 W. Fifth, Ft. Worth, TX 76102 
Henry, Luther W. (7); Conference Council Director; 1600 Thomas Place, Fort 

Worth, TX 76107 
Payne, Jack S.; (deceased) 

Shuler, James E. (6); District Superintendent; Box 7740, Waco, TX 76714 
Pike, Donald M. (8); Pastor; 313 N. Center, Arlington, TX 76011 
Kluck, Homer R. (4); District Superintendent; Box 965, Temple, TX 76503 
Stroman, Pat (3); Salesman; Box 7309, Waco, TX 76710 
Carroll, B. F. (Hank) (1); Controller; 3821 Wharton, Ft. Worth, TX 76133 
Barrett, Nelda (5); Associate Director, Conference Council; 1600 Thomas Place, 

Ft. Worth, TX 76107 
Bums, Marjorie (8); Retired Teacher; Box 360, Crawford, TX 76638 
Pitcock, Louis (10); Oil; Box 747, Graham, TX 76046 
Mahon, Eldon B. (2); Federal Judge; 4167 Sarita, Ft. Worth, TX 76109 

Reserves 

Roberts, Sidney (9); District Superintendent; 812 Larkspui- St., Ft. Worth, TX 76112 
Radde, Henry; Pastor; First UMC, Hurst, TX 76053 



The United Methodist Church 31 

Patison, J. Michael; District Superintendent; Box 67, Weatherford, TX 76086 
Gathings, Ervin M.; Administrative Assistant to the Bishop; Box 8127, Dallas, TX 

75205 
Dennis, H. Gordon; District Superintendent; 1500 W. 5th, Fort Worth, TX 76102 
Hill, Jane; Housewife; 1219 W. Sanford, Arlington, TX 76012 
Paustian, Donna; Housewife; 803 Live Oak Lane, Arlington, TX 76012 
Weathers, Mary; Housewife; 2710 Good Shepherd Dr., Brownwood, TX 76801 
Smith, Kenneth; Investments; 1212 Crestridge, Ennis, TX 75119 
Barnes, Ben; Real Estate Developer; Box 1965, Austin, TX 79767 

CENTRAL ZAIRE (6) CC 

Sec. A, Row 12, Seats 1-6 
OA;oA;o, Luhata (5); Pastor/Director; Wembo Nyama, B.P. 560, Kananga, Zaire 
Djundu, Lungi (4); Pastor; Wembo Nyama, B.P. 560, Kananga, Zaire 
Ashema, Mukandu (2); Pastor/Bishop's Assistant; Lodja, B.P. 560, Kananga, 

Zaire 
Onema, Ekoko (3); President of Women; B.P. 560, Kananga, Zaire 
Nyama, Luhahi A.(6); Professor; B.P. 2006, Kisangani, Zaire 
Yemba, Olenga A. (8); Dentist; B.P. 13902, Kinshasa, Zaire 

Reserves 

Kumbe, Alua; Pastor; Wembo Nyama, B.P. 560, Kananga, Zaire 
Lodi, Esena; Director of Nursing; B.P. 13902, Kinshasa, Zaire 

CZECHOSLOVAKIA (2) CC 

Sec. C, Row 11, Seats 1-2 
Sckneeberger, Vilem (6); Superintendent; JECNA 19 12000 Praha 2, Czechoslova- 
kia 
Malaa, Vlasta (3); Retired; K LuCin^m 5, 13000 Praha 3, Czechoslovakia 

Reserves 

Zdk, Vladislav; Minister; JECNA 19, 12000 Praha 2, Czechoslovakia 
Boroviekova, Blanka; Retired; Na MiCance 49, 16000 Praha 6, Czechoslovakia 

DENMARK (2) CC 

Sec. B, Row 29, Seats 7-8 
*Uth, Finn (5); Minister; Alexandragade 8, DK 5000 Odense, Denmark 
Karlsen, Elisabeth (7); Head Mistress; Borgergade 15 a, DK 8700 Horsens, 
Denmark 

Reserves 

Bjemo, Mogens; District Superintendent; Stokhusgade 2, DK 1317 Copenhagen 

K, Denmark 
Hedegaard, Anne; Journalist; Tvergade 17 B, DK 8600 Silkeborg, Denmark 

DETROIT (16) NC 

Sec. C, Row 21, Seats 1-6 

Sec. C, Row 22, Seats 1-10 

*Blomquist, Paul F. (7); Minister; 828 Lapeer Avenue, Port Huron, MI 48060 

White, Woodie W. (2); General Secretary', Genl. Comm. on Religion and Race; 100 

Marj'land N.E., Box 48, Washington, DC 20002 
Quick", William K. (5); Minister; 8000 Woodward Avenue, Detroit, MI 48202 
Laynb, Raymond R. (9); Minister; 320 W. Seventh Street, Royal Oak, MI 48067 
Ward, Robert P. (1); Minister, 1589 W. Maple, Birmingham, MI 48009 



32 Journal of the 198 J^ General Conference 

Duncan, Edward L. (3); Editor/Publisher; 316 Springbrook Avenue, Adrian, MI 

49221 
McCallum, Marvin H. (6); Minister; 12 E. Second Street, Monroe, MI 48161 
Johns, Carol J. (10); Minister; 4267 S. Two Mile Road, Bay City, MI 48706 
Cook, Shirley (7); General Manager; 806 Olive Road, Oxford, MI 48051 
Ward, Rosemary C. (9); Teacher; 3819 Providence Street, Flint, MI 48503 
Schairer, Jane (3); Homemaker; 50 N. Parker Road, Dexter, MI 48130 
Middleton, Wayne B. (8); Personnel Manager; 2050 Stanhope Road, Grosse Pte. 

Woods, MI 48236 
Stanton, Joyce B. (1); Associate Council Director; 155 W. Congress #200, Detroit, 

MI 48226 
Jewell, Mary Jane (6); Registered Nurse; 2615 Sylvan Shores Drive, Pontiac, MI 

48054 
Borradaile, Earl E. (4); Trial Judge; 601 Maxine Drive, Davison, MI 48423 
Eichler, Wanda H. (5); Teacher/writer; 7218 Geiger Road, Pigeon, MI 48755 

Reserves 

Ferguson, Juanita J.; Minister; 16400 W. Warren, Detroit, MI 48228 
McReynolds, Russell F.; Minister; 421 E. 12th Street, Flint, MI 48503 
Brooks, Laurrence C; Minister; 4680 Pine Street, Columbiaville, MI 48421 
Price, Carl E.; Minister; 310 W. Main St., Box 466, Midland, MI 48640 
Horton, Robert E. ; Assistant to Bishop; 155 W. Congress #200, Detroit, MI 48226 
Verhelst, William A.; Minister; 1301 N. Ballenger Hwy., Flint, MI 48504 
Grenfell, John N., Jr., Minister; 45201 N. Territorial, Plymouth, MI 48170 
Titus, Phylemon D.; Associate Council Director; 155 W. Congress #200, Detroit, 

MI 48226 
Karis, Harold M.; Attorney and Banker; 20 Hammond Road, Saginaw, MI 48602 
Piper, Harry; Chief Finance Officer; 1378 Oxyoke Drive, Flint, MI 48504 
Buxton, John L.; Division Manager; 1402 Lyons Avenue, Royal Oak, MI 48073 
Bank, Wayne H.; Engineer; 663 Cranbrook, Saginaw, MI 48603 
Butler, Randle R.; Diaconal Minister; 8000 Woodward Avenue, Detroit, MI 48202 
Griffith, Evelyn M.; Homemaker; 1201 S. Renaud Road, Grosse Pte. Woods, MI 

48236 
Rice, Beverly W. ; Christian Education; 47840 Jefferson, New Baltimore, MI 48047 
Klump, Ralph C; Retired; 7917 E. Ridgeville Road, Blissfield, MI 49228 

EAST OHIO (24) NC 

Sec. C, Row 16, Seats 1-12 

Sec. C, Row 17, Seats 1-12 

*Craig, Judith (10); Conference Council Director; 8800 Cleveland Ave. N.W., Box 

2800, North Canton, OH 44720 
Yoon, Kil Sarig (9); Pastor; 27 South Broad Street, Canfield, OH 44406 
Harkness, Shepherd G. (7); District Superintendent; 1610 Mentor Ave., Room lA, 

Painesville, OH 44077 
Bibbee, Kenneth E. (5); District Superintendent; 205 South Main Street, Mt. 

Vernon, OH 43050 
Cromwell, Thomas L. (2); Administrative Assistant to the Bishop; 8800 Cleveland 

Ave. N.W., Box 2800, North Canton, OH 44720 
McCartney, William A. (4); District Superintendent; 3500 Cleveland Ave. N.W., 

Canton, OH 44709 
Dailey, Charles M. (8); Credit Union Manager; 8800 Cleveland Ave. N.W., Box 

2800, North Canton, OH 44720 
Dunn, Van Bogard (1); Professor, METHESCO; 114 Griswold Street, Delaware, 

OH 43015 
O'Donyiell, Saranne P. (5); Pastor, 559 Reid Avenue, Lorain, OH 44052 



The United Methodist Church 33 

Taylor, Thomas S. (7); District Superintendent; 3000 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, 

OH 44115 
Snyder, Robert D. (3); Pastor; 3680 Manchester Road, Akron, OH 44319 
Harvey, William R. (6) District Superintendent; 125 North Ninth Street, 

Cambridge, OH 43725 t,^ t, , 

Anderson, James W. (3); Camp Coordinator; 11727 Concord-Hambden Rd., Rt. 1, 

Painesville, OH 44077 , , , ^^,,^ ^ 

Letzler, Thomas A. (8); Conference Treasurer; 8800 Cleveland Ave. NW, Box 

2800,' North Canton, OH 44720 
Althouse, Kav (7); Student; 1202 24th Street N.E., Canton, OH 44714 
Anderson, Carolyn M. (6); Associate Director Conference Council; 8800 Cleveland 

Ave. NW, Box 2800 North Canton, OH 44720 
Jenkins, Marjorie (6); Homemaker; Rt. #1, Box 551. Chester, WV 26034 
Moore, Thomas P. (2); Radio Executive; Box 789, Bucyrus, OH 44820 
Washington, Stanley (10); Postal Service; 843 Miami Avenue, Youngstown, OH 

44505 
Dunlap, Catherine (Kay) M. (5); Seminary Director Financial Aid; 502 Heritage 

Blvd., Delaware, OH 43015 
Spieth, Sharon C. (3); Homemaker; 33248 Redwood Street, Avon Lake, OH 44012 
Crouch, Edward C. (4); Attorney; 1100 Huntington Bldg., Cleveland, OH 44115 
LeSuer, Arlene (1); Homemaker; 26626 Chardon Road, Richmond Hts., OH 44143 
Green, Mareyjoyce (9); Professor, Cleveland State University; 16116 Judson 

Drive, Cleveland, OH 44128 

Reser\'es 

Weinland, William J.; District Superintendent; 345 North Market Street, 

Wooster, OH 44691 
Bums, Richard L.; Pastor; 23002 Lake Shore Blvd., Euclid, OH 44123 
George, L. Mark; District Superintendent; 410 Citizens Bank Bldg., Norwalk, OH 

44857 
Slack, Sam L.; Director, Pastoral Care and Counseling; 1201 30th Street, N.W., 

Canton, OH 44709 
Buchanan, John I. E.; District Superintendent; 30 West Front Street, 

Youngstown, OH 44503 
Zaffray, Allan H. ; District Superintendent; 251 East Mill Street, Akron, OH 44308 
Dyck, Sally; Minister; 3510 West 41st Street, Cleveland. OH 44109 
Hill, Warren C; Minister; 14035 Euclid Avenue, E. Cleveland, OH 44112 
Bra'ndyberry, Abrahain L.; District Superintendent; 103 North Market Street, 

Box 445, St. Clairsville, OH 43950 
Ury, William A.; Minister; 2051 Dodge Drive, N.W., Warren, OH 44485 
Burge, Donald A.; Minister; 641 Steubenville Avenue, Cambridge, OH 43725 
Nees, Forrest G.; Minister; 380 Mineola Avenue, Akron, OH 44320 
Bixler, V. \ed; Director of Development, Berea Children's Home; 3515 Matthes 

Avenue, Sandusk\', OH 44870 
Hilliard, Roy M.; Minister; 2521 12th Street, N.W., Canton, OH 44708 
White, Leonard; Educator (Retired); 2955 Boggs Road, Zanesville, OH 43701 
Monbarren, Thelma J.; Editor; 29 East Main Street, Box 297, Dalton. OH 44618 
Clj-mer, Bettv; Homemaker; 250 Cedarwood Drive, Lexington. OH 44904 
Lyons, Judv; Admissions Officer; 353 North Washington St., Delaware. OH 43015 
Bailey, Dorothy C; Homemaker; 606 Wesleyan Drive, Lakeside, OH 43440 
Maxwell, Cecil A.; Ice Cream Maker; 329 E. Main Street, Cardington, OH 43315 
Heeter, Man'; Secretary-; P. 0. Box 136, Newport, OH 45768 
Chase, Dottie; Homemaker; 112 Crestwood, Willard, OH 44890 
Chisholm, Patricia; Homemaker; 117 W. Main Street, Norwalk, OH 44857 
Jeffers, Sue; Director, Community Center; 305 West Lisbon, Waynesburg. OH 44688 



34 Journal of the 1984 General Conference 

Bowser, Beth A.; Diaconal Minister; 1523 Vassar Avenue, N.W., Canton, OH 

44703 
Hayes, Melvin E.; Manager; 662 Shook Road, Akron, OH 44319 
Ponzani, Joe; Dentist; P. 0. Box 241, Cadiz, OH 43907 
Glasgow, Francis M.; Retired; 3755 Martha Road, Kent, OH 44240 

EASTERN PENNSYLVANIA (16) NE 

Sec. A, Row 24, Seats 5-12 

Sec. A, Row 25, Seats 5-12 

"Cherry, William T. (9); Minister; One Buttonwood Square, 15-R, 2001 Hamilton 

St., Philadelphia, PA 19130 
Yrigoyen, Charles, Jr. (10); General Secretary, Genl. Comm. on Archives and 

Histor>- P.O. Box 127, Madison, NJ 07940 
Hassinger, Susan W. (5); District Superintendent; 872 N. Parkw^ay Rd., 

Allentown, PA 18104 
Edmonds, Claude A. (6); Minister; 2447 N. 56th St., Philadelphia, PA 19131 
Brodhead, B. Bums (4); District Superintendent; 110 Avenue C, Schuylkill Haven, 

PA 17972 
Fife, David L. (3); District Superintendent; 705 Falcon Dr. , Wyndmoor, PA 19118 
Nichols, Henry H. (7); Minister; 328 Earlham Terrace, Phildelphia PA 19144 
Myers, Stacy D., Jr. (1); Minister; 175 Ashley Road, Sinking Spring, PA 19608 
Daugherty, Ruth (6); President, Women's Divison; 1103 Whitfield Blvd., Reading, 

PA 19609 
Barto, Reta T. (2); Volunteer; 123 W. 46th St., Reading, PA 19606 
Quickel, Harold H. (8); Retired; 128 Atkins Ave., Lancaster, PA 17603 
Nicholson, Anne D. (1); Homemaker; 2336 S. Ninth St., AllentowTi, PA 18103 
Simon, Blair (9); President, Communications Firm; 139 E. Spring Ave., Ardmore, 

PA 19003 
Pratt, Jessie A. (5); Volunteer; 6101 Morris St., Apt. 113, Philadelphia, PA 19144 
Millett, William H. (7); Retired; 600 Valley Rd., A-48, Wairington, PA 18976 
Henderson, Betty A. (3); Conference Consultant; P.O. Box 820, Valley Forge, PA 

19482 

Reserves 

Palmer, Herbert E.; District Superintendent; 12 Farwood Rd., Philadelphia, PA 

19151 
Owens, Dale E. ; Conference Business Administrator/Treasurer; 78 S. Britton Rd. , 

Springfield, PA 19064 
Kroehler, Kent E.; Conference Council Director; 3406 Edge Lane, Thomdale, PA 

19372 
Harris, Robert L.; District Superintendent; 9650 Pine Rd., Philadelphia, PA 19115 
Weigel, Charles E., Jr.; Minister; 538 Wesley Road, Springfield, PA 19064 
Mamourian, J. George; District Superintendent; 1316 Sonnet Lane, West 

Chester, PA 19380 
Wrifif/i^i^o^erti/.,- District Superintendent; 1992 Park Plaza, Lancaster, PA 17601 
Johnson, Alfred; Minister; 7 Blaine Avenue, Leola, PA 17540 
Daugherty, Robert M.; District Superintendent; 1103 Whitfield Blvd., Reading, 

PA 19609 
Hagan, Theodore N.; 831 E. Rittenhouse St., Philadelphia, PA 19138 
McClurken, Alice; Homemaker; 110 Harding Ave., Hatboro, PA 19040 
Quickel, Olive; Homemaker; 128 Atkins Ave., Lancaster, PA 17603 
Price, Josephine; Homemaker; 254 E. Walnut Lane, Philadelphia, PA 19151 
English, Donald V.; 1500 Locust St., Apt. 3203, Philadelphia, PA 19102 
Harper, John R.; Retired; 7508 Brookfield Rd., Philadelphia, PA 19126 
Scheibeler, Shelly; Student; 2220 Pioneer Rd., Hatboro, PA 19040 



The United Methodist Church 35 

Ransom, John; Student: 2428 N. 17th St., Philadelphia, PA 19132 
Ortiz, Jorge; 39 Peoria Lane, Sicker\'ille, NJ 08081 

FINLAND-FINNISH PROVISIONAL (2) CC 

Sec. 9, Row 11, Seats 11-12 
*Jarvinen Pentti J. (6); Minister; Pajulahdentie 6 A 4, 70260 Kuopio 26, Finland 
Rajamaa, Iris Ch. (1); University Secretary; Punavuorenkatu2 A4, 00120 Helsinki 

12, Finland 

Reserves 

Mustonen, Antti R.; Minister; Lapintie 4 B 2, 33100 Tampere 10, Finland 
Jarvinen, Maija-Liisa; Teacher; Pajulahdenti 6 A 4, 70260 Kuopio 26, Finland 

FINXAND-SWEDISH PROVISIONAL (2) CC 

Sec. C, Row 20, Seats 1-2 
Hellsten Erik G. (6); Pastor; Apollogatan 5B33, 00100 Helsinki 10, Finland 
Lundgren, Monica (7); Homemaker; Apollogatan 5A, 00100 Helsinki 10, Finland 

Reserves 

Elfving Bjom; Pastor; Radhusgatan 36, 65100 Vasa, Finland 
Soderstrom, Caty; Kvambacksgatan lOB, 68600 Jakobstad, Finland 

FLORIDA (28) SE 

Sec. A, Row 8, Seats 5-12 

Sec. A, Row 9, Seats 5-12 

Sec. A, Row 10, Seats 1-12 
Kyiox, J. Lloyd (6); Pastor; P.O. Box 1138, St. Petersburg, FL 33731 
Bronson, Oswald P., Sr. (4); College President; 640 2nd Ave., Daytona Beach, FL 

32015 „ . T^ , J r-T 

Newman, Ernest W. (6); District Superintendent; 898 N. Boston Ave. . Deland, t L 

32720 
Fannin, Robert E. (5); Pastor; P.O. Box 539, Stuart, FL 33495 
Roughton, William W. (1); District Superintendent; P.O. Box 262o, Lakeland, t L 

OOQAC 

Bledsoe, Robert D. (10); District Superintendent; 1123 BuckA\-ood Dr. , Orlando, FL 

32806 
Jones, Jimmy S. (3); Pastor; 142 E. Jackson St., Oriando, FL 32801 
Zimmerman, Eugene M. (5); Pastor; 3120 Hendricks Ave. , Jacksonville. FL 32207 
Sofge, J. Tom, Jr. (7); District Superintendent; 2935 Washington Rd.. West Palm 

Beach, FL 33405 , t., ^ rr, ttt 

Dinsmore, A. Bradford, Jr. (3); Pastor; 13102 Lake Magdalene Blvd., Tampa, FL 

Bozeman, W. Scott (7); District Superintendent; 2942 LaSalida Way, Leesburg, 

FL 32748 
Riddle, Barbara Williams (9); Pastor; 3925 Red Bug Lake Rd., Casselberr>-, FL 

32707 
Hunter, George G., Ill (2); Dean, School of Evangelism and Worid Mission; 

Wilmore, KY 40390 
Hamilton, Charles P. (8); District Superintendent; 94o 40th Ave.. N., bt. 

Petersburg, FL 33703 . 

*Grav Ethel M. (2); Professional Volunteer; P.O. Box 36. Hastings, FL 3204o 
Furman. Frank H., Jr. (10); Insurance/Real Estate; P.O. Box 1927. Pompano. 

Beach. FL 33061 ,^ ^ c. » ,a- 

Bass, Ressie M. (10); Professional Beauty Consultant; 1310 NW 16th St.. Apt. 40 r, 

Miami, FL 33125 ,^ ,,. . „^ _,„ 

Cook, Polly L. (1); Professional Volunteer; 9000 SW 62nd Ct.. Miami. FL 331o6 



36 Journal of the 198 U General Conference 

Hunter, Ann E. (8); Secretary-Treasurer, Family Business; 736 SE 18th Ave., 

Ocala, FL 32671 
Wilcox, Barbara B. (1); Associate Conference Council Director; P.O. Box 3767, 

Lakeland, FL 33802 
Crist, Dollie W. (9); Professional Volunteer; 4 Paddock Circle, Tequesta, FL 33458 
Selph, Charles L.; Principal Elementary School; 300 Okaloosa Dr., SE, Winter 

Haven, FL 33880 
Moore, Richard V. (4); Retired College President; 248 N. Lincoln St., Davtona 

Beach, FL 32015 
Hamilton, Tom W. (5); Diaconal Minister; 4845 NE 25th Ave. , Ft. Lauderdale, FL 

33308 
Bussey, Bess M. (3); Associate Council Director; P.O. Box 3767, Lakeland, FL 

33802 
Roberts, Rodell F. (9); Professional Volunteer/Educator; P.O. Box 1783, 

Jacksonville, FL 32201 
Rowan, Jana R. (4); Student; 504 South Lake Ave., Lakeland, FL 33801 
Lively, Joe L, Jr. (7); Retired; 1105 51st St., W., Bradenton, FL 33529 

Reserves 

Gibhs, M. McCoy; District Superintendent; 6 Yorkshire Lane, Ft. Mvers, FL 

33907 
Hamish, James A.; Minister; 4851 Apopka-Vineland Road, Orlando, FL 32811 
Rowan, James C; Minister; 72 Lake Morton Drive, Lakeland, FL 33801 
Finklea, W. Ray; District Superintendent; 750 E. Waters, Tampa, FL 33604 
Martin, 0. Dean; Minister; 3536 NW 8th Avenue, Gainesville, FL 32605 
Rankin, Victor L.; Minister; 400 Biscayne Boulevard, Miami, FL 33132 
Crook, James R., Jr.; District Superintendent; Box 250, Melbourne, FL 32901 
McDonell, C. Dunvard; Area Administrative Assistant, Box 1747, Lakeland, FL 

33802 
Sweat, J. Marvin, Jr.; Minister; 1126 E. Silver Springs Boulevard, Ocala, FL 

32670 
Mitchell, Thomas G.; District Superintendent; P. 0. Box 3545, Tallahassee, FL 

32303 
Buell, Harold E.; District Superintendent; P. 0. Box 12144, Gainesville, FL 32604 
Price, Thomas J., Jr.; District Superintendent; Box 144880, Coral Gables, FL 33114 
Viera, Manuel; Minister; 5500 Columbus Road, West Palm Beach, FL 33405 
Runyon, Theodore H.; Professor; School of Theology, Emory University, Atlanta, 

GA 30322 
Dinkins, Edward L.; Executive Director, Florida United Methodist Children's 

Home; 2028 Snook Drive, Deltona, FL 32725 
Cahoon, Pamela A.; CROS Urban Ministries; 4401 Garden Ave., West Palm 

Beach, FL 33405 
Anderson, Marlene J. (6); Director Christian Education; 1890 W. SR 43, 

Longwood, FL 32750 
Counter, John A.; Market Planning Director; 3615 Horatio St.; Tampa, FL 33609 
Hatch, Leora E.; 17500 Southwest 84th Court, Miami. FL 33157 
Rodriquez, Manuel E.; Self-Employed; 6420 Appian Way, Orlando. FL 32807 
Morton, Sanford B.; Personnel Manager; 262 Southwest 63rd Avenue, Plantation, 

FL 33317 
Tenney, Tom A.; Manager, Southern Bell; 3214 Blair Drive, Palatka, FL 32077 
Bly, Allan R.; Urban Planner; 648 Seville Avenue, Coral Gables. FL 33134 
Fuster, Hilda R.; Associate Council Director, Florida Annual Conference; 3115 

Cleveland Heights Boulevard, Lakeland, FL 33803 
Goff, Hardin (Ted); Retired Telephone Company Manager; 8549 Santalia Avenue, 

Jacksonville, FL 32211 



The United Methodist Church 37 

Mitchell, Barbara M.; Diaconal Minister; 1537 Lee Avenue, Tallahassee, FL 32303 
Moxley, Jody P.; District Lay Leader; Box 1445, Titusville, FL 32781 
Pearce, Charles W. ; Chemical Sales Manager; 18345 SW 256th Street, Homestead, 

FL 33031 
Koestline, Frances G. ; University Administrator; 9950 SW 84th Street, Miami, FL 

33173 
Winebrenner, Opal; Homemaker; 5431 NW 167th Street, Opa Locka, FL 33055 
Depp, Helen A.; Homemaker; 6724 Colony Drive, South, St. Petersburg, FL 

33705 
Redstone, Ray; Retired Postmaster; 2148 33rd Avenue, Vero Beach, FL 32960 

GERMAN DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC (2) CC 

Sec. C, Row 23, Seats 5-6 
Hering, Giinter (3); Superintendent; 1034 Berlin, Gubener Str. 23, DDR 
Schneidereit, Harrj' (1); Uhrmacher-Obermeister; 1100 Berlin, Joh.-R.-Becher- 
Str. 24, DDR 

Reserves 

Riedel, Gerhard; Pastor; 9550 Zvvickau, Lessingstr. 6, DDR 

Enke, Karl-Heinz; Tierarzt; 2500 Rostock 1, An der Hasenbak 2. DDR 

GERMAN NORTHWEST (2) CC 

Sec. C, Row 23, Seats 1-2 
Sieving, Walter A. (2); District Superintendent; Koenigsallee 70, 1000 Berlin 33 

(West Germany) 
Magdowski, Axel (6); Amtsrat; Bomimer Str. 4, 1000 Berlin 31 (West Germany) 

Reserves 

Steeger, Hans-Albert; District Superintendent; Menzelshrabe 20, 4300 Essen 

(West Germany) 
Albers, Siegfried; Stellverhr. Gemeindedirektor, Up de Gast 12, 2981 Westerholt 

(West Germany) 

GERMAN SOUTH (2) CC 

Sec. C, Row 4, Seats 11-12 
Jahreiss, Ulrich (5); Superintendent; Haglenstr. 60, D-7417 Pfullingen, West 

Germany 
Fischer, Heinz P. (1); Richter; Eichenweg 2, D-7906 Blaustein, West Germany 

Reserves 

Klaiber, Walter; Direktor; Bellinostr. 35, D-7410 Reutlingen, West Germany 
Harsch, Emil; Stabiusstr. 4, D-8500 Niimberg, West Germany 

GERMAN SOUTHWEST (2) CC 

Sec. A, Row 16, Seats 7-8 
Els, Albrecht (7); Superintendent; Rother Weingartenweg 5, D-6232 Bad Soden 2, 

West Germany 
Ade, Hans (4); Academic Director; Curt-Goetz-Str. 95. D-6500 Mainz 33, West 

Germany 

Reserves 

Michelmann, Heinrich; Pastor; Maximilianstr. 28. D-7530 Pforzheim. West 

Germany 
Hennig. Manfred; Advocate; In den Wickgarten 13 a. D-6233 Kelkheim- 

Eppenhain. West Germany 



38 Journal of the 19 8^ General Conference 

GREAT BRITAIN (4) Concordat 

Sec. A, Row 17, Seats 1-2 

Row 18, Seats 1-2 

Greet, Kenneth G. (1); Secretan- of British Conference; 1 Central Buildings, 

Westminster, London SWIH 9NH, England 
Bolt, Peter: Superintendent Plymouth Circuit; Methodist Church, Overseas 

Division 25 Marj-lebone Rd., London NWI 5JR, England 
Ainger, Lois (6); Secretarv', Women's Fellowship; 1 Central Buildings, Westmin- 
ster, London SWIH 9NH, England 
Maclure, J. Stuart (4); Editor; Dulwich, London SE 21 7HN, England 

HOLSTON (18) SE 

Sec. A, Row 14, Seats 5-12 

Sec. A, Row 15, Seats 7-12 

Sec. A, Row 16, Seats 9-12 

*Looney, Richard C. (1); Minister; P.O. Box 1336, Johnson City, TN 37601 

Goodgayyie, Gordon C. (6); Minister; P.O. Box 208, Chattanooga, TN 37401 

Tiynherlake, Richard H. (5); Minister; 11020 Roane Dr., Knoxville, TN 37922 

White, Raymon E. (7); District Superintendent; P.O. Box 263, Abingdon, VA 

24210 
Lippse, Charles E. (3); District Superintendent; P.O. Box 80353, Chattanooga, TN 

37411 
Carder, Kenneth L. (8); Minister; P.O. Box 567, Oak Ridge, TN 37830 
Howard, John (J. N.) N. (9); Minister; P.O. Box 1024, Pulaski, VA 24301 
Taylor, Mary V. (10); Minister; Route 4, Box 24, Bluff City, TN 37618 
Lundy, Robert F. (4); District Superintendent; 3606 Western Ave. , Knoxville, TN 

37921 
Bondurant, Lillian K. (3); Homemaker; College Park, Radford, VA 24141 
Bailev, William P., Jr. (6); Phvsician; 1314 Woodland Ave., Johnson Citv, TN 

37601 
Laycock, Evelyn (7); Professor, Hiwassee College; Madisonville, TN 37354 
Lundv, John T. (2); Local Church Staff; 2883 Old Britian Circle, Chattanooga, TN 

37421 
Elmore, Paula B. (4); Student; Route 3, Box 385, Dandridge, TN 37725 
Gaddis, James (Jay) H. (1); Public School Superintendent; 3304 Ritchie St., 

Morristown, TN'37814 
Ensminger, J. Neal (9); Editor; 619 Madison Ave.. Athens, TN 37303 
Hicks, W. Sue (5); Conference Council Staff; P.O. Box 1178, Johnson City, TN 

37605 
McConnell, Sam P. (10); Retired; 931 Hartman Rd., Hixson, TN 37343 

Reser\'es 

Trundle, John N.; Minister; 212 Hotel Ave., Knoxville, TN 37918 
Green, James R.; Minister; 300 West Valley Drive, Bristol, VA 24201 
Schofield, Curtis R.; Minister; 6805 Standifer Gap Road. Chattanooga, TN 37421 
Baker, Ted F.; Minister; P. 0. Box 2305, Cleveland. TN 37311 
Marchbanks, Paul Y.; Minister; 114 Momingside Drive, Knoxville, TN 37915 
Ripley, John E.; Minister; 4315 Brainerd Road, Chattanooga, TN 37411 
Carter, William J.; Conference Council Staff; P. 0. Box 1178, Johnson City, TN 

37605 
Robinson, Ray E.; District Superintendent; P. 0. Box 894, Kingsport, TN 37662 
McCartt, J. Spurgeon; District Superintendent; P.O. Box 1592, Morristown, TN 

37814 
Austin, Fred L.; Minister; Church and Cheny Streets, Marion, VA 24354 



The United Methodist Church 39 

Prigmore, LaFayette T., Jr.; Corporate Executive; 908 Whitehall Rd., 3H, 

Chattanooga, TN 37405 
Shufflebarger, Emmett G.; Educational Supervisor; 206 Tenth Street, Radford, 

VA 24141 
Oliphant, George W.; Division Director; 106 Wendover Circle, Oak Ridge, TN 

37830 
Rogers, Jim; Funeral Director; 404 Laurel Avenue, South Pittsburg, TN 37380 
Stames, Paul M.; Assistant Public School Superintendent; 4004 Patton Drive, 

Chattanooga, TN 37412 
Henderson, Jean S.; Church Organist and Administrator; 1010 Beech Circle, 

Northeast, Cleveland, TN 37311 
Kincheloe, Beatrice G.; Work Director and Inspector: Raytheon; 631 Fifth Street, 

Bristol, TN 37620 
Carter, Carrie L.; Administrative Assistant, Conference Board of Pensions, 1333 

Fieldwood Drive, Knoxville, TN 37918 
Goddard, Houston M.; Judge, Court of Appeals; 108 Duncan Drive, Marj'ville, TN 

37801 
Tucker, Marj' Frances; Administrative Assistant, Wesley House; 1405 Bonita 

Drive, Knoxville, TN 37918 

HUNGARY PROVISIONAL (2) CO 

Sec. C, Row 19, Seats 1-2 

IOWA (26) NC 

Sec. B, Row 22, Seats 6-12 

Sec. B, Row 23, Seats 6-12 

Sec. B, Row 24, Seats 1-12 

Moore, Leroy W. (5); Director, Conference Council; 1019 Chestnut Street, Des 

Moines, lA 50309 
Nichols, Frank A. (6); Administrative Assistant, Area Bishop; 1019 Chestnut 

Street, Des Moines, lA 50309 
Carver, Donald L. (1); Staff, Urban Ministry; 144 Newell, Waterloo, lA 50703 
Mequi, Bonifacio B., Jr. (1); Minister; 806 13th Avenue, Coralville, lA 52241 
Campney, Arthur B.; (deceased) 

Pfaltzgraff, Richard C. (3); Minister; 2900 49th Street, Des Moines, lA 50310 
Hoover, Joan S. (4); Associate Director, Wesley Foundation; 120 North Dubuque, 

Iowa City, lA 52240 
Kennedy, Stanley C. (10); District Superintendent; 120 Zenith Drive, Council 

Bluffs, lA 51501 
Ackerson, Merlin J. (4); Minister; Box 266, Washington, lA 52353 
Garrett, C. Dendy (2); Minister; 3700 Cottage Grove Avenue, Des Moines, lA 

50311 
LaVelle, Larry D. (8); Minister; Box 28, Harlan, lA 51537 
Whitenack, Weldon A. (2); Minister; 200 West Main, Marshalltown, lA 50158 
Moore, Lester L. (7); District Superintendent; 2906 Bonnie Drive, Muscatine, lA 

52761 
*Ridenour, Don (3); Conference Lay Leader, Farmer; Keswick, lA 50136 
Brown, Rosalie; Conference UMW President, Bookkeeper; Box 8, Woodbine, lA 

51579 
Goldman, K. June (1); College Director of Church Relations; Box26L, Sioux City, 

lA 51108 
Appelgate, William (6); Construction; Box 322, Ellsworth. lA 50075 
Ale.\ander, Steve (2); Student; Box 117, Victor, I A 52347 
Carx'er, Phil (9); Musician/Composer; 2310 Hickman, #5, Des Moines, lA 50310 
Moore, Kathrj'n (7); Educator; 2828 Bennett Avenue, Des Moines, lA 50310 



40 Journal of the 198 Jf. General Conference 

Lux, William E. (3); Poultryman; Rt. 1— Box 43A, Delhi, lA 52223 
Guillermo, Artemio R. (4); P.R. Consultant; 5225 Fjord Drive, Cedar Falls, lA 

50613 
Yaggy, Mary (8); U.S. Representative on African Church Growth Committee; 

1914 40th, Des Moines, lA 50310 
Felkner, Myrtle (7); Education Assistant; Rt. 2, Centerville, lA 52544 
Terrell, Marguerite C; Homemaker/Nurse; 201 First Street, Hazelton, lA 50641 
Stephenson, Janet E. (5); Lab Technician; 322 Hickory Drive, Ames, lA 50010 

Reserves 

Young, J. Eugene (7); Minister; 723 Washington, Cedar Falls, lA 50613 

Mather, P. Boyd; Minister; 2050 University, Dubuque, lA 52001 

White, George A.; Minister; Box 27, Mt. Pleasant, lA 52641 

Allen, Nancy L.; Church Relations; Simpson College, Indianola, lA 50125 

Cotton, William D.; District Superintendent; 302 South Park, Creston, lA 

50801 
Trusheim, Rudolf; District Superintendent; 1620 North 23rd., Ft. Dodge, lA 

50501 
Bevel, Henry J.; Veteran Administration Chaplain; 30th and Euclid, Des Moines, 

lA 50310 
King, James W.; District Superintendent; 408 Bryan, Ottumwa, lA 52501 
Stout, David B.; Minister; 2622 Lincoln Way, Ames, lA 50010 
Scott, Keith L.; District Superintendent; 3428 Brandywine, Mason City, lA 50401 
Ward, Martha D.; Minister; 312 Alta Vista Avenue, Waterioo, lA 50703 
Kamm, Wayne K.; Minister; 4200 Ashworth Road, West Des Moines, lA 50265 
Goldman, Max; Minister; Box 26L, Sioux City, lA 51108 
Ellsworth, Jimmie R. (6); Director, Christian Education; 1227 Cummins Parkway, 

Des Moines, I A 50311 
Thompson, Glen D. (10); Extended Recreation Speciahst; 2009 Burnett, Ames, lA 

50010 
Mendenhall, Don; Conference Council Staff; 1019 Chestnut, Des Moines, lA 50309 
Tate, Deane; Retired; Box 342, Tipton, lA 52772 

Girton, Bruce B.; Conference Treasurer; 1019 Chestnut, Des Moines, lA 50309 
Cline, Martha S.; American Lung Association; 414 44th., Des Moines, lA 50312 
Philgreen, Duane A.; Student; 625 Walnut, Webster City, lA 50595 
Nixon, Joel; Student; 305 30th Street, Sioux City, lA 51104 
Kennedy, Esther; Homemaker; 120 Zenith Drive, Council Bluffs, lA 51501 
Kruse, Russell J.; J.L Case Company; 3102 Fair Avenue, Davenport, lA 52803 
Carney, Arlene; Homemaker; Marble Rock, lA 50653 
Shearer, Paul V.; Lawyer/Newspaper Publisher; 110 East Monroe, Washington, 

lA 52353 
Cranke, Eloise M.; Educator; 501 Mill Street, Traer, lA 50675 

KANSAS EAST (8) SO 

Sec. A, Row 14, Seats 1-4 

Sec. A, Row 15, Seats 1-4 
Dorsey, Frank L. (1); District Superintendent; P.O. Box 1002, Emporia, KS 66801 
Grabher, Jean Marie (5); District Superintendent; 4201 West 15th, Topeka, KS 

66604 
Stoneking, John D. (8); Pastor; 9138 Caenen, Lenexa, KS 66215 
Simmons, Norman (7); Pastor; 5010 Parallel, Kansas City, KS 66104 
*Stumbo, John E. (6); Lawyer; 2887 MacVicar, Topeka, KS 66611 
Wulfkuhle, Wesley (9); Farmer; Lecompton, KS 66050 
Rimes, Marjorie (2); Diaconal Minister; 5217 W. 24th, Topeka, KS 66614 
Driver, Barbara (3); Housewife; Quenomo, KS 66528 



The United Methodist Church 41 

Reserves 

Schenck, Carl; District Superintendent; 1712 Broadway, Parsons, KS 67357 
Allen, Fred A.; Staff, Genl. Bd. of Church and Society, 100 Maryland Ave., N.E., 

Washington, DC 20002 
Grant, Raymond; Minister; 4000 Drury Lane, Topeka, KS 66604 
Hayen, Leon; District Superintendent; 1621 Willow, Ottawa, KS 66067 
Garrett, Phyllis J.; Minister; 521 North Main, P.O. Box 286, Eureka, KS 

67045 
Bowyer, Amy; Student; Box 38, Cottonwood Falls, KS 66845 
Wendland, Faith; President, Women's Society; 120 West Second Avenue, Gamett, 

KS 66032 
Coffman, Floyd; District Judge; Rt. #3, Ottawa, KS 66067 
Finger, Minnie M.; Housewfe; R.R. #1, Powhattan, KS 66527 
Wheaton, Becky; Administrative Assistant; 2519 Monroe, Topeka, KS 66605 

KANSAS WEST (12) SC 
Sec. C, Row 15, Seats 1-12 
*Wilke, Richard B. (4); Minister; 330 N. Broadway, Wichita. KS 67202 
Blake, Bruce P. (9); Minister; 440 Spring Creek Dr., Derby, KS 67037 
Fogleman, C. M., Jr. (10); Minister; 903 Mellinger, Salina, KS 67401 
Crickard, Elsie J. (7); Minister; Box 256, Burrton, KS 67020 
Reed, James R. (2); Conference Council Director; 151 N. Volutsia, Wichita, KS 

67214 
Dunlap, E. Dale (5); Academic Dean, St. Paul School of Theologj-; 5123 Truman 

Road, Kansas City, MO 64127 
McReynolds, Marvin P. (3); Rancher; Route 1, Woodston, KS 67675 
Sanchez, Martha L. (6); Program Director/Hispanic and Urban Ministries; 1520 

Skyview, Wichita, KS 67212 
Gillaspie, Juanita M. (10); Homemaker; Box 28, Rozel, KS 67574 
Totten, Harold A. (8); Retired; Route 2, Box 22, Jewell, KS 66949 
Harms, Avenell (1); Conference Council Associate Director; Box 197, Towanda, 

KS 67144 
Rittgers, W. Glea (2); Retired Banker; 1828 W. 18th, All 16, Wichita, KS 67203 

Reserves 

Jones, Jon W.; Minister; 2123 Forest, Great Bend, KS 67530 

Stanton, Marshall P.; District Superintendent; Box 1791, Hutchinson, KS 

67501 
Osbom, Chester L.; Minister; 2930 East First, Wichita, KS 67214 
Martin, Carl E.; District Superintendent; 103 East 9th., Room 211, Winfield, KS 

67156 
Robbins, Richard D.; District Superintendent; 151 North Volutsia. Wichita, KS 

67214 
Bott, LeRoy A.; Minister; 115 Old Main, Newton, KS 67114 
Rowley, Edward A.; District Superintendent; 2903 Hillcrest Drive, Hays, KS 

67601 
Scheer. Dennis H.; Conference Treasurer; 151 N. Volutsia, Wichita, KS 67214 
Meier, Wilma L.; Director, Board of Global Ministries; 915 Washington Road, 

Newton, KS 67114 
Shull, Cleo B., Homemaker; Box 395, Dighton, KS 67839 
Haneke. Ralph A.; Division Manager, Waddell and Reed; R.R. 3, Box 171. Great 

Bend, KS 67530 
Smith, Jack E.; Associate Director Development; Box 787, Liberal, KS 67901 
Seyb, Nina E.; Homemaker; Box 186, Pretty Prairie, KS 67570 
Mugler, Walter F.; Farmer/Stockman; Route 1, Wakefield, KS 67487 



42 Journal of the 1984- General Conference 

KENTUCKY (8) SE 

Sec. A, Row 22, Seats 1-4 
Sec. A, Row 23, Seats 1-4 
Seamands, David A. (5); Minister/Author; P.O. Box 68, Wilmore, KY 40390 
Throckmorton, E. Ray (3); District Superintendent; 289 Edgemont Road, 

Maysville, KY 41056 
Sweazy, Albert W. (8); Conference Treasurer and Director of Fiscal Affairs.; P.O. 

Box 5107, Lexington, KY 40555 
Roberts, Adrian J. (6); Conference Council Director; P.O. Box 5107, Lexington, 

KY 40555 
*Bean, Frank D. , Sr. (1); Retired/Education; 302 Glendover Road, Lexington, KY 

40503 
Hager, Cornelius R. (4); Executive Director of Kentucky United Methodist 

Foundation; 731 N. Main Street, Nicholasville, KY 40356 
Litton, Alice E. (9); Accountant; 199 Elizaville Avenue, Flemingsburg, KY 

41041 
Hartje, Betty R. (7); Homemaker; Box 435A, Route 5, Covington, KY 41015 

Reserves 

Wood, W. Robert; District Superintendent; 3000 Belhaven Drive, Russell, KY 

41169 
Jennings, William R.; Minister; 1850 Bellefonte Drive, Lexington, KY 40503 
Russell, George L.; Minister; 412 North Upper Street, Lexington, KY 40508 
Durham, Donald W., Executive Director, Methodist Home; 3217 Saxon Drive, 

Lexington, KY 40503 
Ditto, Dale; Attorney; P.O. Box 77, Stanford, KY 40484 
Jenkins, W. T.; Hospital Development; 3820 Gladman Way, Lexington, KY 

40503 
Hager, Julie A.; Student; 113 Lorraine Court, Berea, KY 40403 
Harris, Katherine; Sales Clerk; 12097 Freestone Court, Cincinnati, Ohio 45240 

LIBERIA (2) CC 

Sec. A, Row 1, Seats 1-2 
*Kartwe, J. Nimeju (7); Pastor; 89 Ashmun Street, Box 1010, Monrovia, Liberia 
Johnson, Edvdnna P. (1); Chairperson, Council on Finance & Administration; Box 
3774 or 1628, Monrovia, Liberia 

Reserves 

Karblee, James D.; Pastor; 89 Ashmun Street, Box 1010, Monrovia, Liberia 
Grisgby, Martha J.; Teacher; P.O. Box 1010, Monrovia, Liberia 

LITTLE ROCK (8) SC 

Sec. B, Row 18, Seats 9-12 

Sec. B, Row 19, Seats 9-12 

*Tanner, George A. (9); District Superintendent; 715 Center St. #201, Little Rock, 

AR 72201 
Miles, John P. (4); Minister; 321 Pleasant Valley Dr., Little Rock, AR 72212 
Walker, John F. (5); District Superintendent; 200 No. Pine, Hope, AR 71801 
Clayton, Michael R. (8); District Superintendent; 484 Elaine Avenue N.W., 

Camden, AR 71701 
Riggin, Don L. (1); Executive Director, Arkansas Arthritis Foundation; 8600 

Evergreen, Little Rock, AR 72207 
Booth, Dale (7); Retired; 6911 Skywood Drive, Little Rock, AR 72207 
Fish, Doris (6); Housewife; 12620 Meyer Drive, Mabelvale, AR 72103 
Burton, LaVerne B. (3); Housewife; 106 Meadow Drive, Hot Springs, AR 71913 



The United Methodist Church 43 

Reserves 

Scott, James R.; Minister; 113 North Eighth, Arkadelphia, AR 71923 
Weir, Thomas E.; District Superintendent; P.O. Box 186, Arkadelphia, AR 71923 
Hays, John B.; Minister; 127 East Page, Malvern, AR 72104 
Sawyer, Beverly; Minister; 3301 Romine Road, Little Rock, AR 72204 
Wynne, Robin F.; Lawyer; 603 Center St., Fordyce, AR 71742 
Nonvood-Henson, Brenda; Medical Supervisor; Rt. 5, Box577E, Little Rock, AR 

72212 
Onstott, Ann; Area Treasurer; 18 Pontalba Drive, Little Rock, AR 72211 
Langley, Julie; Student; Rt. 4, Box 87A, Monticello, AR 71655 

LOUISIANA (12) SC 
Sec. C, Row 24, Seats 7-12 
Sec. C, Row 25, Seats 7-12 
Heam, J. Woodrow (9); Minister; P.O. Box 1349, Baton Rouge, LA 70821 
Norris, Alfred L. (5); Minister; 2722 Louisiana Avenue, New Orleans, LA 70115 
Woodland, J. Philip (1); Minister; 3350 Dalrymple, Baton Rouge, LA 70808 
Arnold, Tracy R. (2); Minister; 2727 Jackson St., Alexandria, LA 71301 
McGuire, Douglas L. (7); District Superintendent; P.O. Box 6018, Monroe, LA 

71203 
Dykes, D. L. (10); Minister; Head of Texas St., Shreveport, LA 71101 
*Carruth, Nancy M. (4); Business Woman; P.O. Box 267, Bunkie, LA 71322 
Ward, Amy G. (6); Volunteer/Homemaker; 500 Walker St., New Orleans, LA 70124 
Dew, Jack (9); Businessman; Route 4, Box 474-A, West Monroe, LA 71291 
Chrisentery, InezW. (1); Retired Educator; 1940 Tennessee St., Baton Rouge, LA 

70802 
Brumfield, Welton H., Jr. (8); Automobile Dealer; 122 S.W. Central Avenue, 

Amite, LA 70422 
Porter, John (3); Businessman; 6214 River Road, Shreveport, LA 71105 

Reserves 

Calvin, George W.C.; Minister; P.O. Box 73685, Baton Rouge, LA 70807 

Poole, James M.; Minister; 903 Broadway, Minden, LA 71055 

Vining, Kirby A.; Minister; P. 0. Box 4782, Monroe, LA 71203 

McClain, Joe W.; Minister; 1201 Metairie Drive, Metairie, LA 70005 

Branton, L. Ray; Minister; 101 Live Oak, Lafayette, LA 70503 

Reed, Kenneth R.; District Superintendent; P. 0. Box 3057, Baton Rouge, LA 

70821 
Caraway, James J. ; Conference Director Financial Affairs; P. 0. Box 3057, Baton 

Rouge, LA 70821 
Brock, Walter H. ; Engineering Professor; 3744 Ridgetop, Baton Rouge, LA 70809 
Caraway, J. Jay; Attorney; P. 0. Box 1126, Shreveport, LA 71126 
Arnold, Ernest C; Businessman; 4320 General Pershing. New Orleans, LA 70125 
Fugler, Sara S.; Secretary -Treasurer; P. 0. Box 144, Greensburg, LA 70441 
Baker, Richard H.; State Representative; 9132 Highland Gardens Road, Baton 

Rouge. LA 70811 
Finnell, Kathi B.; Christian Education; 334 Highway 190, Mandeville, LA 70448 
Taylor. Dorothy M.; Health Center Administrator; 2724 Martin L. King, Jr. 

Boulevard, New Orieans, LA 70113 

LOUISVILLE (10) SE 

Sec. A, Row 19, Seats 3-12 

Willen, Howard H. (9); District Superintendent; 1115 South Fourth St., 

Louisville, KY 40203 
McAdayyis, Emil D. (7); Minister; 2000 Douglass Blvd., Louisville, KY 40205 



44 Journal of the 1984 General Conference 

Lile, R. Kenneth (3); Pastor; 4124 Candor Ave., Louisville, KY 40216 
Henry, G. Edward (8); Pastor; 6002 Dutchmans Lane, Louisville, KY 40205 
Webster, Roy E. (10); Minister; P.O. Box 97, Elizabethtown, KY 42701 
Dixon, J. D. (1); County Extension Agent; P.O. Box 10, Hawesville, KY 

42348 
*Peters, Kenneth (5); Physician; 1911 Hurstboume Circle, Louisville, KY 40220 
Lamar, Charles L. (2) Attorney; 208 West Third Street, Owensboro, KY 42301 
Pfisterer, Ann Rader (6); Homemaker; 941 N. Main St., Henderson, KY 42420 
Woods, George C. (4); Social Worker; 4002 San Marcos Rd., Louisville, KY 

40299 

Reserves 

Rodgers, N. Alex; Pastor; 305 W. Main, Princeton, KY 42445 

Thomas, Wallace E.; District Superintendent; 1115 South Fourth Street, 

Louisville, KY 40203 
Eblen, Thomas W.; Minister; 1501 Trinity Drive, Owensboro, KY 42301 
Tichenor, Leona N.; Minister; P. 0. Box 206, Park City, KY 42160 
Howton, Agnes H.; Housewife; 512 E. Keigan St., Dawson Springs, KY 42408 
Graham, Walter A.; Semi-Retired Banker-Law^yer; P. 0. Box 97, Pembroke, KY 

42266 
Watkins, Scott; Life Insurance: Equitable Life; 200 West Broadway, Louisville, 

KY 40202 
Neill, George L.; Chartered Life Underwoiter; 10112 Radford Road, Louisville, 

KY 40223 

MAINE (2) NE 

Sec. C, Row 19, Seats 3-4 
Ives, S. Clifton (5); Minister; 20 Center St., Waterville, ME 04901 
*Abbott, Beverly J. (2); Registered Nurse; 10 Marshall St., Bath, ME 04530 

Reserves 

Hamilton, Richard M.; District Superintendent; 211 West Broadway, Bangor, 

ME 04401 
Neff, John W.; District Superintendent; RFD 2, Box 1390, Winthrop, ME 04364 
Danforth, Merrill A.; Reimbursement Officer; RFD lA Box 568, Gardiner, ME 

04345 
Swanson, F. Gilbert; Retired Actuary; 8 Channel View Road, Cape Elizabeth, ME 

04107 

MEMPHIS (10) SE 

Sec. B, Row 22, Seats 1-5 

Sec. B, Row 23, Seats 1-5 

*Bailey, William P., Jr. (1); District Superintendent; P. 0. Box 11809, Memphis, 

TN 38111 
Blankenship, Paul F. (5); Minister; 218 W. Market St., Boliver, TN 38008 
Henton, Jack H. (3); District Superintendent; 575 Lambuth Blvd., Jackson, TN 

38301 
Evans, William S. , II (10); Minister; 3090 Wood Thrush Dr. , Memphis, TN 38134 
Hilliard, David M., Jr. (4); Minister; 681 University, Memphis, TN 38107 
May, Rebecca (6); School Teacher; Box 549, Covington, TN 38019 
Brewster, Jerry (8); Dentist; 5144 Pilgrim, Memphis, TN 38116 
Bond, R. H. (2); Retired Phone Co.; Rt. 1, Dyersburg, TN 38024 
Pevahouse, Joe (9); Druggist; Box 224, Henderson, TN 38340 
Stephenson, Roy (7); Associate Director, Conference Council; 575 Lambuth Blvd., 

Jackson, TN 38301 



The United Methodist Church 45 

Reserves 

Douglass, Paul F. ; Conference Council Director; 575 Lambuth Blvd. , Jackson, TN 

38301 
Bulle, Frank H.; Minister; 5676 Stage Road, Memphis, TN 38134 
Wagley, MaHha B.; Minister; 751 North Trezevant, Memphis, TN 38112 
Dunnam, Maxie D.; Minister; 4488 Poplar Street, Memphis, TN 38117 
Bumette, Ken C; Minister; 315 East Chester Street, Jackson, TN 38301 
Williams, Dogan W.; Minister; 1083 Bell Road, Memphis, TN 38106 
Whitworth, Virginia; Librarian; 145 Sylvan Dr., Camden, TN 38320 
Carter, Eddie F. , Jr. ; SES-United States Government; 1643 Westlawn, Memphis, 

TN 38114 
Reid, Lyle; Lawyer; Box 303, Brownsville, TN 38012 
Wood, Ora; Wesley Highland Manor; 3549 Norriswood, Memphis, TN 38111 
Schneider, Cindy; Student; 1185 Perkins Terrace, Memphis, TN 38117 
Baugh, Charles; Insurance; 1216 Sunnyside, Mayfield, KY 42066 

MEXICO (2) (Concordat) 

Sec. A, Row 16, Seats 5-6 
Alvarez, Graciela D., Miravalla No. 209, Col. Portales Orienta, 03570 Mexico, 

D.F. 
Martinez, Fernando Ordaz; Carajal y de la Cueva #1106 Nte., 64000 Monterey, 

N. L., Mexico 

MIDDLE PHILIPPINES (2) CC 

Sec. C, Row 3, Seats 11-12 
Macaso, Alberto F. (7); Minister; United Methodist Church, Sto. Cristo, San 

Antonio, Nueva Ecija, Philippines 
*Ela, Pedro L. (2); Lawyer; 745 Horseshoe Drive, Sta. Rita, Olongapo City, 

Philippines 

Reserves 

Sanchez, Danilo C; Minister; 890 Rizal Ave., Olongapo City, Philippines 
Reyes, Ruben T.; Lawyer; Rm. 313 3rd Floor City Hall, Manila, Philippines 

MINDANAO (2) CC 

Sec. A, Row 7, Seats 1-2 
Manual, Andres (3); Minister; The United Methodist Church, 1 Mortola St., 

Cagayan de Oro City, Philippines 
Pableo, Librada C. (6); Teacher; University of Southern Mindanao, Kabacan, 

North Cotabato 9311, Philippines 

Reserves 

Soriano, Benjamin; Minister; The United Methodist Church, 104 CM. Recto St., 

Davao City, Philippines 
Agbisit, Andrea A.; Dentist; Spottswood Methodist Center, Kidapawan, North 

Cotabato, Philippines 

MINNESOTA (14) NC 

Sec. C, Row 20, Seats 5-12 

Sec. C, Row 21, Seats 7-12 

*Walker, H. Thomas (5); Minister; 5835 Lyndale Ave. S., Minneapohs, MN 55419 

Krueger, Delton H. (7); Minister; 8000 Portland Ave. S., Bloomington, MN 55420 

Dundas, Charles 0. (3); District Superintendent; 1529 Nottingham Dr., No. 

Mankato, MN 56001 
Purdham, Charles B. (9); Minister; 9100 Russell Ave. S., Bloomington, MN 55431 



46 Journal of the 198^ General Conference 

Peterson, ClemmetA. (8); Minister; 4th St. & 5th Ave. SW, Rochester, MN 55901 
Toschak, Patricia Martin (10); Minister; Box 119, Motley, MN 56466 
Colescott, Ted G. (4); District Superintendent; 2418 Northern Hills Ct. NE, 

Rochester, MN 55904 
Foster, Betty Jean (8); Conference Treasurer; Rm. 520, 122 W. Franklin Ave., 

Minneapolis, MN 55404 
Ball, Lee (1); Homemaker; 439 Leicester, Duluth, MN 55803 
Benjamin, JoAnn A. (6); Professional Volunteer; 210 Riverside Ave. , Park Rapids, 

MN 56470 
Kauls, Gloria H. (7); Homemaker and Volunteer; 2201 N. Rosewood Ln., 

Roseville, MN 55113 
Dowell, Jean (9); Conference Council Director; Rm. 400, 122 W. Frankhn Ave., 

Minneapolis, MN 55404 
Olson, George W. (3); Development Officer for Foundation; 4351 15th Ave. S., 

Minneapolis, MN 55407 
Miller, Maynard L. (2); Farmer; RR 3, Box 152, Slayton, MN 56172 

Reserves 

Schneider, James H.; District Superintendent; 3410 Greysolon PI., Duluth, MN 

55804 
Mahle, Kathi Austin; Associate Pastor; 5835 Lyndale Avenue South, Minneapolis, 

MN 55419 
Hanks, Stanley G.; Minister; 17805 Court Road 6, Plymouth, MN 55447 
Bailey, Robert B.; Minister; 7200 Brooklyn Boulevard, Brooklyn Center, MN 

55429 
DeVogel, Susan Harrington; Minister; 100 West 46th. Street, Minneapolis, MN 

55409 
Hinerman, C. Philip; Minister; 3400 Park Avenue, Minneapolis, MN 55407 
Biederman, Mark H.; Student; 224 2nd St. E., Tracy, MN 56175 
Boche, Beverly B.; JoumaHst; 1776 Fry Street, Falcon Heights, MN 55113 
Larson, Norma L.; Homemaker; 1861 Chardel Court, West St. Paul, MN 55118 
Roberson, David 0.; Farmer; Box 224, Zumbro Falls, MN 55991 
Tanquist, Roger B.; Director of Media; 1130 South State, Fairmont, MN 56031 
Naas, Betty; Homemaker; 6320 Post Lane, Edina, MN 55435 

MISSISSIPPI (12) SE 
Sec. B, Row 25, Seats 1-12 
Ash, John L., Ill (4); Minister; Box 956, Laurel, MS 39440 
Clay, Henry C, Jr. (1); District Superintendent; Box 303, Jackson, MS 39205 
Lee, Clay F., Jr. (10); Minister; Box 1092, Jackson, MS 39205 
Gilbert, Tommy D. (7); District Superintendent; Box 2057, Hattiesburg, MS 39401 
Kates, Robert L. (2); Minister; Box 371, Pascagoula, MS 39567 
Leggett, J. Willard, III, (3); Minister; Box 1706, Meridian, MS 39301 
*Lucas, Aubrey K. (4); College President; 3701 JamestowTi, Hattiesburg, MS 39401 
Carr, Jimmy L. (5); Diaconal Minister; Box 1092, Jackson, MS 39205 
Morrison, R. R. (Twick) (9); Homemaker/Church Volunteer; 2617 Confederate 

Ave., Vicksburg, MS 39180 
Jordan, Bert (3); Retired; 212 Leavell Woods Dr., Jackson, MS 39212 
Smith, MaudessaP. (6); Deaconess/Home Missionary; Rt. 5, Box279-A, Columbia, 

MS 39429 
Gunn, Neil (8); Retail Merchant; Box 550, Ellisville, MS 39437 

Reserves 

Loflin, Jack M.; District Superintendent; Box 629. Brookhaven, MS 39601 
Thomas, John Ed., (Ill); Minister; 53 54th Street, Gulfport, MS 39501 



The United Methodist Church 47 

Peden, Homer C; Minister; 4419 Broadmeadow, Jackson, MS 39206 
Watkins, W. W.; District Superintendent; 2004 Highland Place, Vicksburg, MS 

39180 
Woodrick, Rayford; Editor, Advocate; 339 South Ridge Drive, Ridgeland. MS 

39157 
Henry, Earnest L.; Minister; 2705 13th Street, Meridian, MS 39301 
Pace, Ken; Student; 213 Donwood PI., Hattiesburg, MS 39401 
Stauss, Barbara; Housewife; 706 Seneca, Jackson, MS 39216 
Egger, John F.; 2314 Poplar Springs Drive, Meridian, MS 39305 
Law, Ann; Court Reporter; 1105 Velma Street, Hattiesburg, MS 39401 
McBay, Paula; Social Worker; Bay Springs, MS 39422 
James, Bemice; Diaconal Minister; Route 5, Box 473, Columbia, MS 39429 

MISSOURI EAST (10) SC 
Sec. A, Row 29, Seats MO 
Starkey, Lycurgus M. (5); Pastor; 201 W. Adams, St. Louis. MO 63122 
Stein, Neil L. (1); Minister; 600 N. Bompart, St. Louis, MO 63119 
Heyward, John W., Jr. (4); Minister; 1141 Belt Ave.. St. Louis, MO 63112 
LaTumo, Ivan L. (9); District Superintendent; 810 Alta Vista, Cape Girardeau, 

MO 63701 
Adayns, Thomas B. (10); Minister; 122 E. Promenade, Mexico, MO 65265 
*Ross, Ken; Farmer; Rt. 1, Box 154, Atlanta, MO 63530 
Swofford, Ava (3); Teacher; Rt. 10, Box 30, Columbia, MO 65202 
Connelly. Brenda J. (6); Church & Community Worker; 560 Cleaniew Rd. 

Columbia, MO 65201 
Martin, John (7); Manager of Hardware Supply Co.; 902 West Baker, Kennett, MO 

63857 
McMullin, Nancy (8); Conference Treasurer; 4625 Lindell, Suite 416, St. Louis, MO 

63108 

Reserves 

Montgomery, John C; Pastor; 5000 Washington, St. Louis, MO 63108 
Moncure, Rhymes H.; Pastor; 4234 Washington, St. Louis, MO 63108 
Meyer, Mary E.; Pastor; 211 Boone Street, Troy, MO 63379 
Gordon, Robert W.; District Superintendent; P.O.' Box 776. Kirksville, MO 63501 
Laue, James H. (2); College Faculty; 7212 Westmoreland, St. Louis, MO 63130 
Outlaw, Margaret; Retired Teacher; 1301 Riegert, St. Louis. MO 63130 
Gerig, Carroll B.; Teacher; 6 Bennett Street, Flat River, MO 63601 
Epple, Jeanne V.; Homemaker; 3412 Woodrail Terrace, Columbia, MO 65201 

MISSOURI WEST (12) SC 

Sec. A, Row 6, Seats 1-12 
Mutti, A. F. (2); Minister; Box 608. Blue Springs. MO 64015 
Xeth, G. Hubert (1); Minister; 406 W. 74th, Kansas City. MO 64114 
Getting, M. Christy (5); District Superintendent; 1102 E.'28th, JopHn, MO 64801 
Neal, Cecil (10); District Superintendent; 1512 Van Brunt Blvd.. Kansas Citv, MO 

64127 
Garfield, Sharon K. (6); Minister; 909 Bales, Kansas Citv, MO 64127 
Foockle, Harry F. (7); Minister; 922 W. Republic, Springfield. MO 65807 
*Speer, Aubrey B. (8); Conference Treasurer; 1512 Van Brunt Blvd. Kansas Citv 

MO 64127 
Dickson, Frances (3); Conference Lay Leader; 7516 Englewood. Raytown. MO 

64138 
Bond, Jan (5); Conference Youth Coordinator; Route 3, Box 165, Adrian, MO 64720 
Scott, Ralph (9); Layperson; 1315 Sixth, Monett, MO 65708 



48 Journal of the 19 8 J^ General Conference 

Gray, Mai (4); Layperson; 3406 Benton, Kansas City, MO 64128 
Cox, Donna; Layperson; P.O. Box 6660, Kansas City, MO 64133 

Reserves 

Sample, Tex; Professor, St. Paul School of Theology; 5123 Truman Road, Kansas 

City, MO 64127 
Jones, Russell; Minister; 2802 Renick, St. Joseph, MO 64507 
Mines, Elroy H.; District Superintendent; 1512 Van Bi-unt Boulevard, Kansas 

City, MO 64127 
Whiteside, Leroy A.; District Superintendent; Box 1208, Warsaw, MO 65355 
O'Quinn, Bill A.; Minister; 7310 Northwest Prairie View, Kansas City, MO 64153 
Hyatt, Marie; District Superintendent; Box 687, Marshall, MO 65340 
Waller, L. Glenn (1); Layperson; Oregon, MO 64473 
Reskovac, Ann; President, United Methodist Women; 5123 Truman Road, Kansas 

City, MO 64127 
Barker, Paul; Layperson; Route 1, Box 111-A, Pleasant Hope, MO 64725 
Schaffitzel, Joe; Layperson; 2248 North Weller, Springfield, MO 65803 
Wreath, Bryan L.; Layperson; Route 5, Box 417, Kimberling City, MO 65686 
Hampton, Mary; Layperson; 3531 Bellefontaine, Kansas City, MO 64128 

MOZAMBIQUE (2) CC 

Sec. A, Row 4, Seats 11-12 
Nhatave, Angela L. (2); District Superintendent; Box 2640, Maputo, Mozambique, 

Africa 
*Bahule, Andre N. (1); Physician; Box 2640, Maputo, Mozambique, Africa 

Reserves 

Uetela, Andre; District Superintendent; Box 41, Maxixe, Mozambique, Africa 
Chamusso, Alfredo; Clerk; Box 2640, Maputo, Mozambique, Africa 

NEBRASKA (12) SC 
Sec. B, Row 17, Seats 1-12 
Bevins, C. Rex (6); Minister; 1144 M St., Lincoln, NE 68508 
Turner, Richard D. (7); District Superintendent; 711 West 5th, Suite 5, Grand 

Island, NE 68801 
Silk, Denny M. (5); Minister; 2710 14th Street, Columbus, NE 68601 
Munden, C. Ebb, III (9); Minister; 2723 No. 50th St., Lincoln, NE 68504 
Davies, Susan P. (1); Minister; Box 125, Pleasant Dale, NE 68423 
Wilmoth, Rodney E. (10); Minister; 5410 Corby, Omaha, NE 68104 
*Dunlap, G. Alan (8); Banker; Box E, Milford, NE 68405 
Lux, John E. (5); Professor, UNL; 7511 Comoy Circle, Lincoln, NE 68505 
Beezlev, Nell M. (2); Conference Treasurer; P.O. Box 4553, Lincoln, NE 68504 
Marsh,' Shirley M. (1); State Senator; 2701 South 34th, Lincoln, NE 68506 
Mohring, A. Jean (3); Bookkeeper; 5226 A Street, Omaha, NE 68106 
Kruse, Ruth W. (4); Diaconal Minister; 7064 Nicholas, Omaha, NE 68132 

Reserves 

Bailey, HowardR.; Executive Director of Ministries; P.O. Box 4553, Lincoln, NE 

68504 
Kruse, Lowen V.; Minister; 7020 Cass, Omaha, NE 68132 
Kim, John J. T.; Minister; 847 Shelton, Chadron, NE 69337 
Brewer, Carol R., Minister; 1623 Central, Kearney, NE 68847 
Elrod, Jerry D.; District Superintendent; 10842 Old Mill Road, Suite 1, Omaha, 

NE 68154 
Folkers, Robert L.; District Superintendent; 3120 Ninth, Kearney, NE 68847 



The United Methodist Church 49 

Bredthauer, Donald D.; District Superintendent; 10842 Old Mill Road, Suite #1, 

Omaha, NE 68154 
Ferris, Yvonne; Executive Director Merrick Fund; Rt. 2, Box 156, Central City, 

NE 68826 
Repair, William; Caretaker; Camp Fontanelle, Nickerson, NE 68044 
Bachenberg, Rachel; Minister; PO Box 503, York, NE 68467 
Swarthout, Elizabeth; Deaconess and Diaconal Minister; 110 West Cedar, O'Neill, 

NE 68763 
Johnson, Marshall; Student; RR #1, Arnold, NE 69120 
Fagerberg, Jeanette; Conference Director of Education & Youth Ministries; PO 

Box 4553, Lincoln, NE 68504 
Gamer, Charles; Caretaker; Route 2, Camp Comeca, Cozad, NE 69130 

NEW HAMPSHIRE (2) NE 
Sec. C, Row 23, Seats 11-12 

*Batten, James A. (7); Minister; 79 Clinton Street, Concord, NH 03301 
Davidson, Sue (6); Nurse; Box 124— Crescent St., Wilton, NH 03086 

Reserves 

Haynes, Divight S.; Conference Council Director; RFD #3 Box 36, Concord, NH 

03301 
Coons, Douglas; Teacher; 27 Harding Street, Rochester, NH 03867 

NEW MEXICO (4) SC 

Sec. A, Row 5, Seats 9-12 
*Forsman, Don L. (5); District Superintendent; 217 West 5th St., Odessa, TX 

79761 
Goodwin, B. C, Jr. (2); Minister; 1200 Old Pecos Trail, Santa Fe, NM 87501 
Mills, Vernon (7); 217 Prairieview, Clovis, NM 88101 
Bond, Kendall (8); 718 Coeur D'Alene. El Paso, TX 79922 

Reserves 

Gillingham, Leonard; District Superintendent; 1921 Janeway, Clovis, NM 88101 
Elkins, Brodace; District Superintendent; 709 Loma Linda, Southeast, Albu- 
querque, NM 87108 
Vanderpool, Harry; Minister; 1615 Copper, Northeast, Albuquerque, NM 87106 
Williayns, Rodney; Conference Council Director; 209 San Pedro, Northeast, 

Albuquerque, NM 87108 
Price, Polly; Rt. 1, Box 45, Ft. Sumner, NM 88119 
Goodwin, Richard; 1510 South Lea, Roswell, NM 88201 
Lucero, Faustina; Box 1298, Espanola, NM 87532 
Sanders, Clois; 1808 Shiriey, Northeast, Albuquerque, NM 87112 

NEW YORK (18) NE 

Sec. A, Row 12, Seats 7-12 

Sec. A, Row 13, Seats 1-12 

*Thomburg, Richard A. (10); District Superintendent; 791 Newfield Avenue, P.O. 

Box 3007, Stamford, CT 06905 
Parker, Richard S. (1); Minister; 639 W. 173 St., Apt. 11-A, New York, NY 10032 
Carrington, John E. (6); Exec. Secy., UM City Societv; 50 Ralph Road, New 

Rochelle. NY 10804 
Townsend, Patricia (5); District Superintendent; 4 Rosalind Road, Poughkeepsie, 

NY 12601 
Nugent, Randolph W.,Jr. (9); Genl. Secy., Genl. Bd. of Global Ministries; 505 La 
Guardia Place, New York, NY 10012 



50 Journal of the 198i General Conference 

Boots, Wilson T. (7); District Superintendent; 162-10 Highland Ave., Jamaica, NY 

11432 
Day, Randy R. (8); Minister; 162-02 Highland Avenue, Jamaica, NY 11432 
Lebron, Dilca (3); Hispanic Coordinator; 475 Riverside Dr., Rm 1922, New York, 

NY 10115 
James, William M. (4); Minister; 1981 Madison Ave., New York, NY 10035 
Darling, Howard H. (8); Conference Treasurer; 252 Bryant Avenue, White Plains, 

NY 10605 
Lyman, Mary Grace (1); Staff, Genl. Bd. of Global Ministries; 15 Washington PL, 

Northport, NY 11768 
Capen, Beth (6); Student; 58 Fair Street, Kingston, NY 12401 
Current, Gloster B. (4); Retired; 100-30 203 Street, Hollis, NY 11423 
Williamson, Odella B. (10); Staff, Genl. Bd. of Global Ministries; 3410 Paul Avenue, 

Bronx, NY 10468 
Brown, Gordon M. (3); Director, Resource Development; Rt. 4, Box 43, Pound 

Ridge, NY 10576 
Parris, Shirley (7); Personnel Manager; 1136 Bergen Street, Brooklyn, NY 11216 
Staubach, William T., Jr. (2); Paralegal; 120 Ancon Avenue, Pelham, NY 10803 
Haaf, Jacqueline D. (9); Nurse; 75 Clintonville Road, North Haven, CT 06473 

Reserves 

Verdin, Douglas F.; Minister; 809 Hopmeadow Street, Simsburj-, CT 06070 
Carr, John A.; Chaplain, Yale Medical Center; 225 Franklin Road, Hamden, CT 

06517 
Abel, Paul F.; Minister; 12 Hampton Road, Port Washington, NY 11050 
Cox, Carol M.; Minister; 2643 Davidson Avenue, Bronx, NY 10468 
Steinard, Walter S.; Minister; 29 Pearl Street, Kingston, NY 12401 
Vink, Harold V.W.; Minister; 2 Rottkamp Street, Valley Stream, NY 11580 
Ishi, Takayuki; Minister; 30-22 89th Street, Jackson Heights, NY 11369 
Rice, Richard J.; District Superintendent; 4111 Broadway, New York, NY 10033 
Holmes, Edward H.; District Superintendent; P.O. Box 282, Times Plaza, 

Brooklyn, NY 11217 
Cho, Young J.; Minister; 147-46 38th Avenue, Flushing, NY 11355 
Hayes, Janet; Remedial Reading Instructor; 40 Barker Avenue, White Plains, NY 

10601 
Boots, Nora Q.; Staff, Genl. Bd. of Global Ministries; 88-60 192 Street, Hollis, NY 

11423 
Engelhardt, Carolyn H.; Rehgious Educator; 205 Academy Road, Cheshire, CT 

06410 
Kirlrwood, William C; Insurance Broker; 42 Washington Avenue, Garden City, 

NY 11530 
Rice, Nancy L.; Nurse; 239 Daisy Farms Drive, Scarsdale, NY 10583 
Shaw, Kirsten M.; Student; 400 8th Street, Brooklyn, NY 11215 
Middleton, Jack D.; Fund Raising Executive; 214 Meadow Street, Naugatuck, CT 

06770 
Overton, Vivian P.; Bank Officer; 16 June Avenue, Norwalk, CT 06850 
Veatch, Laura; Homemaker; 83 North Main Street, Ellenville, NY 12428 
Eversley, JohnC; N.Y. City Transit; 875 St. Marks Avenue, Brooklyn, NY 11213 

NORTH ALABAMA (18) SE 

Sec. C, Row 18, Seats 3-12 

Sec. C, Row 19, Seats 5-12 

Morgan, Robert C. (3); Minister; P.O. Box 20150, Binningham, AL 34216 

Gauntt, Paul M. (5); District Superintendent; 909 9th Avenue West, Birmingham, 

AL 35204 



The United Methodist Church 51 

Elmore, S. Joe (9); Minister; 800 Greensboro Avenue, Tuscaloosa, AL 35401 
Parris, W. Alton (6); District Superintendent; P.O. Box 403, Roanoke, AL 

36274 
Bates, Ralph K. (3); Minister; 518 North 19th Street, Birmingham, AL 35203 
West, J. Pete, Jr. (7); District Superintendent; 8705 Camille Drive, SE, Huntsville, 

AL 35802 
Furio, V. Pete, Jr. (4); Minister; 616 Jackson Street, SE, Decatur, AL 

35601 
Moyitgomery, Allen D. (10); Minister; 415 North Seminary Street, Florence, AL 

35630 
Belts, Charles E. (4); Minister; 105 East Spring Street, Sylacauga, AL 

35150 
*Stewart, Mollie M. (1); Corporate Supervisor; P.O. Box 43, Lacey's Springs, AL 

35754 
Rhea, Clarence F. (2); Attorney; 2104 Scenic Drive, Gadsden, AL 35901 
Hamrick, Leon C. (6); Surgeon; 3656 Rockhill Road, Birmingham, AL 35223 
Brannon, William C. (5); Retired, Insurance; 608 Twin Branch Drive, 

Birmingham, AL 35226 
Self, Eddie (7); C.P.A.; P.O. Box 1212, Decatur, AL 35602 
Montgomery, Ed (8); Woodwork Business; 2001 1st Ave., Tuscaloosa, AL 35401 
Hundley, George R. (2); Self Employed Business; 402 Hughes Ave., Attalla, AL 

35954 
Branscomb, Louise (10); Physician; 1225 Greensboro Road, Birmingham, AL 

35208 
Gordon, Myrtle R. (8); Housewife; 108 Woodland Drive, Hueytown, AL 35023 

Reserves 

Friday, Belon 0.; Minister; 1105 20th Street South, Birmingham, AL 35205 
Brown, Chester E.; Conference Council Associate Director; 909 9th Avenue West, 

Birmingham, AL 35204 
Whitehead, Claude W.; Minister; 104 Gwindale Road, Gadsden, AL 35901 
{Gordon, A. Earl; District Superintendent; 709 South Norton Avenue, Sylacauga, 

AL 35150 
York, Billy L.; Minister; P.O. Box 1789, Anniston, AL 36202 
Archibald, Robert L.; Minister; 2826 Montclair Drive, Tuscaloosa, AL 35401 
Pitts, Carolyn S.; Associate Minister; 518 North 19th Street, Birmingham, AL 

35203 
Wallace, Charles R.; Conference Council Director; 909 9th Avenue West, 

Birmingham, AL 35204 
McKinney, Gordon R.; Minister; 733 Valley Street, Birmingham, AL 35226 
Howell, Jackie; Owner & Manager, Printing Firm; 2000 Hickory Lane, Fultondale, 

AL 35068 
Walker, Eva S.; Trust Investment Manager; 497 Main Street, Springville, AL 

35146 
Black, Wanda J.; Officer Manager; Route 1, Box 36, Gadsden, AL 35901 
Lewis, W. Robert, Sr.; Commerical Artist; 2415 Huntsville Road, Florence, AL 

35630 
Whitten, Polly; Homemaker; Route 6, Box 186, Florence, AL 35630 
Sanderson, L. Calvin; Chief, Security & Management Services; 1407 Mountain- 
brook Drive, Southeast, Huntsville, AL 35801 
Adams, Q.D.; Businessman; 415 Keeling Road, East Gadsden, AL 35902 
Reeves, Nina H.; Conference Council Associate Director; 909 9th Avenue West, 

Birmingham, AL 35204 
Wall, Charles W.; Administrative Vice-President. Collaterial Investment 

Company; 2228 Pinehurst Drive, Gardendale, AL 35071 



52 Journal of the 198^ General Conference 

NORTH ARKANSAS (8) SC 

Sec. C, Row 11, Seats 9-12 

Sec. C, Row 12, Seats 9-12 
Beal, Jim (9); Minister; 1610 Prince, Conway, AR 72032 
Ramsay, Charles E. (5); Minister; 923 Park, Jonesboro, AR 72401 
Burleson, Clint D. (8); Minister; 1316 Nettleton Circle, Jonesboro, AR 72401 
Carter, Earl B. (4); Minister; 715 Center, Little Rock, AR 72201 
*Amold, W. E. "Buddy" (3); Engineer; 3712 Pope, N. Little Rock, AR 72116 
Brand, Gene (7); Banker; 508 S.E. Second St., Walnut Ridge, AR 72476 
Freemyer, Pat (6); School Teacher; 106 Rose Circle, Helena, AR 72342 
Harris-Winton, Euba (1); Community Developer; P.O. Box 1136, Fort Smith, AR 
72902 

Reserves 

Lofton, J. W.; Minister; #3 Red Oak Dr., Conway, AR 72032 

Casteel, Charles; Minister; 301 South Chestnut, Morrilton, AR 72110 

Mollis, C. Waymon, Minister; P.O. Box 1139, Forrest City, AR 72335 

Orr, Bob D.; Minister; 500 East Market, Searcy, AR 72143 

Johnson, Phyllis Hall; Lawyer; 2223 W. Maple, Fayetteville, AR 72701 

Lane, James W.; Government Employee; 8 Sierra Circle, North Little Rock, AR 

72118 
Hollis, Christopher A.; Student; 428 Highland, Forrest City, AR 72335 
Barling, Nell Bruner; Housewife; P.O. Box 535, Clarksville, AR 72830 

NORTH CAROLINA (20) SE 

Section A, Row 17, Seats 3-12 

Section A, Row 18, Seats 3-12 

*Bethea, Joseph B. (7); Administrative Assistant to Bishop; P.O. Box 10955, 

Raleigh, NC 27605 
Sherman, William W., Jr. (5) District Superintendent; P.O. Box 639, 

Rockingham, NC 28379 
Harper, Ruth E. (10); Minister; 1200 McDonald Ave., Hamlet, NC 28345 
Ponder, Reginald W. (6); Minister; 1304 Western Ave., Rocky Mount, NC 27801 
Kirby, Wallace H. (2); Minister; 228 W. Edenton St., Raleigh, NC 27603 
Campbell, Dennis M. (4); Seminary Dean; Duke University, Durham, NC 27706 
Joyner, F. Belton, Jr. (3); Minister; 1108 W. Knox St., Durham, NC 27701 
Braswell, Kermit L. (8); District Superintendent; P.O. Box 1662, Elizabeth City, 

NC 27909 
Dixon, Sam W. (9); Minister; P.O. Box 36, Swepsonville, NC 27359 
Mercer, Charles H. (1); District Superintendent; 1002 W. Knox St., Durham, NC 

27701 
Norris, J. Allen (9); College President; 621 N. Main St., Louisburg, NC 

27549 
McAdams, Charles K. (8); Conference Treasurer; 6916 Fernhill Lane, Raleigh, NC 

27612 
Pearce, Richard W. (4); College President; Methodist College, Fayetteville, NC 

28301 
Vick, Catherine (1); Homemaker; 213 Dunhagen PI., Cary, NC 27511 
Cade, Ruth L. (10); Student Nurse; 5325 Maryland Dr., Fayetteville, NC 28301 
Pierce, Wade H. (6); Retired; 4419 Mockingbird Lane, Wilmington, NC 28403 
Saunders, Margaret R. (7); Church and Community Worker; Route 4, Box 724, 

Elizabeth City, NC 27909 
Gibson, J. Nelson, Jr. (2); Agriculture Business; P.O. Box 66, Gibson, NC 28343 
Collins, Ann G. (3); Homemaker; 1200 Manchester Dr., Raleigh, NC 27609 
Meares, John M., Sr. (5); Retired; 1006 Pond St., Cary, NC 27511 



The United Methodist Church 53 

Reserves 

Tyson, Vernon C; District Superintendent; 2201 Lynwood Dr., Wilmington, NC 

28403 
Cummings, Simeon F.; Minister; P.O. Box 725, Pembroke, NC 28372 
Coile, James H.; Minister; Rt. 6, Box 200, Goldsboro, NC 27530 
Presnell, William; Minister; P.O. Box 444, Maxton, NC 28364 
Hunter, JackL.; District Superintendent; 3621 Sheffield Drive, Rocky Mount, NC 

27801 
Stark, Rufiis H., II; Methodist Children's Home Administrator; 3600 Carolyn 

Drive, Raleigh, NC 27604 
Mickey, Paul A.; Associate Professor; Duke University, 2617 McDowell Road, 

Durham, NC 27705 
Smith, J. Thomas; District Superintendent; P.O. Box 10955, Raleigh, NC 27605 
Porter, Ernest R.; Conference Council Executive Director; P.O. Box 10955, 

Raleigh, NC 27605 
Crotwell, Helen G.; Minister; Rt. 2, Box 496, Wake Forest, NC 27587 
Owen, J. Malloy, III; District Superintendent; P.O. Box 2425, New Bern, NC 

28560 
Briley, Mollye H.; State Agriculture Extension Service; P.O. Box 843, 

Lumberton, NC 28358 
Lowrj', Robby; Manager, Social Security Administration; 1010-12 Fayetteville 

Rd., Rockingham, NC 28379 
Auman, Becky; Student; 371 Hillcrest Drive, Henderson, NC 27536 
Hargrove, Bruce; Retired; 1115 Kitt Place, Raleigh, NC 27610 
Reynolds, Dotsy; Volunteer; 403 North Randolph Street, Rockingham, NC 28379 
Frazier, Robert C, Sr.; Professor; 215 Grace Drive, Wilson, NC 27893 
Tumage, Roy L., Jr.; Retired; 710 East 2nd Street, Ayden, NC 28513 
Roberts, Tibbie; Real Estate Broker; 2004 Shephard Street, Morehead City, NC 

28557 
High, Carolyn T.; Antique Dealer; P.O. Box 707, Whiteville, NC 28472 
Fry, Mildred K.; Volunteer; 2701 Hazelwood Drive, Raleigh, NC 27608 
Mitchell, Ehzabeth; Student; 622 Wimbleton Drive, Raleigh, NC 27609 

NORTH DAKOTA (2) NC 

Section C, Row 20, Seats 3-4 
Ewers, Duane A. (5); Pastor; First United Methodist Church, 11th at Avenue "F", 

Bismarck, ND 58501 
Bellamy, Kathleen (2); Rt. 2, Box 109A, Drayton, ND 58225 

Reserves 

Knecht, David F.; Administrative Assistant to Bishop; 1721 S. University, Fargo, 

ND 58103 
Hammerlee, Glenn W.; Pastor; 95 Forest Avenue North, Fargo, ND 58102 
Bates, Bonnie; 315 East Turnpike, Bismarck, ND 58501 
Wagner, Ray; 2413 10th Street, North, Fargo, ND 58102 

NORTH GEORGIA (22) SE 

Section B, Row 9, Seats 1-8 

Section B, Row 10, Seats 1-8 

Section B, Row 11, Seats 1-6 
Jones, Bevel (5); Pastor; 2799 Northside Dr. N.W., Atlanta, GA 30305 
Bauman, Lawrence (8); Pastor; 1652 N. Decatur Rd. N.E., Atlanta, GA 30307 
Wilder, Gamett (5); Pastor; P.O. Box 686, Decatur, GA 30031 
Henderson, Cornelius L. (10); Pastor; 2099 Fairbum Rd. S. W. , Atlanta, GA 30331 



54 Journal of the 198 Jf. General Conference 

Sheets, Herchel H. (9); Conference Council Director; 159 Ralph McGill Blvd. N.E., 

Atlanta, GA 30365 
Thompson, James N. (1); District Superintendent; P.O. Box 13, Griffin, GA 30224 
Flanagan, Hubert (7); Pastor; 1330 Monte Sano Ave., Augusta, GA 30904 
McKoy, William A. (6); District Superintendent; P.O. Box 1188, Gainesville, GA 

30503 
Baker, Rudolph R., Jr. (4); District Superintendent; P.O. Box 243, Rome, GA 

30161 
Myers, Cecil (3); Pastor; 3180 Peachtree Rd., N.E., Atlanta, GA 30363 
Dodson, Malone (2); Pastor; 814 Mimosa Blvd., Roswell, GA 30075 
*Martin, Bob R. (2); High School Principal; 4210 Glenda Dr., College Park, GA 

30337 
Dekle, Joe (7); Retired; 2603 Flair Knoll Dr., Atlanta, GA 30345 
Gopher, Marie (1); Homemaker; 3340 Lake Valley Rd., Atlanta, GA 30331 
Lance, Bert (8); Banker; Calhoun, Georgia 30701 
Gustafson, Gus (3); Author; 212 Larcom Lane, Griffin, GA 30223 
Pickett, Elizabeth (9); Homemaker; 2737 Townley Circle, Doraville, GA 30340 
Weatherford, Ken (6); Self-Employed; 2289 Pine Point Dr., Lawrenceville, GA 

30245 
Budd, Warren (6); Salesman; P.O. Box 1408, Newnan, GA 30263 
Daniel, Mary (4); Homemaker; 127 Brannon Rd., McDonough, GA 30253 
Pattillo, Daniel (5); Investments; 912 First National Bank Building, Decatur, GA 

30030 
Hodges, Betty (10); Housewife; 3826 Salem Rd., Covington, GA 30209 

Reserves 

Williamson, D. Randall; District Superintendent; 159 Ralph McGill Blvd. N.E., 

Rm. 203, Atlanta, GA 30365 
Morris, Carolyn W.; Minister; 265 Washington Street Southwest, Atlanta, GA 

30303 
Gray, Harold; District Superintendent; 159 Ralph McGill Blvd. N.E., Rm. 205, 

Atlanta, GA 30365 
Minter, John M.; District Superintendent; 159 Ralph McGill Blvd. N.E., Rm. 205 

Atlanta, GA 30365 
Hoover, Charles £■.; District Superintendent; 1323 Arsenal Avenue, Augusta, GA 

30904 
Wilson, Charles E.; Minister; 86 Mt. Vernon Highway, N.E., Atlanta, GA 30328 
Kimhrough, Walter L.; Minister; 875 Cascade Avenue S.W., Atlanta, GA 

30311 
Epps, A.C.; Conference Council Assoc. Director; 159 Ralph McGill Blvd. N.E., 

Rm. 106, Atlanta, GA 30365 
Pierson, Marion; Minister; P.O. Box 627, Dalton, GA 30720 
Whiting, Thomas A.; District Superintendent; 159 Ralph McGill Blvd. N.E., Rm. 

205, Atlanta, GA 30365 
Bozeman, Jack; Minister; P.O. Box 1055, Newnan, GA 30264 
Brady, Hal N.; Minister; 206 Newnan Street, Carrollton, GA 30117 
Vining, Ken; Staff Superintendent Corporation; 7550 Happy Hollow Rd., 

Doraville, GA 30360 
Bridges, Russell; Insurance; 2805 Arden Road N.W., Atlanta, GA 30327 
King, Martha; Retired; 602 McCall Blvd., Rome, GA 30161 
Richardson, Eleanor; Legislator; 755 Park Lane; Decatur, GA 30033 
Cochran, Harold; High School Administrator; 4370 Bells Ferry Road, Kennesaw, 

GA 30144 
Jackson, James; Retired Minister; 1229 Calhoun Avenue, East Point, GA 30344 
Fleet, Richard; Self-Employed; 685 Kings Road, Athens, GA 30606 



The United Methodist Church 55 

Whittamore, Joe; Certified Public Accountant; 110 Holly Street, Hartwell, GA 

30643 
Adams, Laura; Director Day Care; 2359 Wheeless Road, Augusta, GA 30906 
Holt, Hugh; Retired Minister; 10 Woodland Drive N.E., Rome, GA 30161 
Blanton, Alberta; Teacher; 441 David Elder Road, Griffin, GA 30223 
Edmond, Dorothy; Secretarj- 1590 Loch Lomond Trail S.W., Atlanta, GA 30331 

NORTH INDIANA (16) NC 
Section B, Row 18, Seats 1-8 
Section B, Row 19, Seats 1-8 
Bjork, Virgil V. (5); Minister; 300 East Wayne Street, Fort Wayne, IN 46802 
Duecker, R. Sheldon (9); Minister; 219 South High Street, Muncie, IN 47305 
Jackson, Robert G. (4); Minister; P.O. Box 967, Anderson, IN 46015 
Blaising, Mark J. (8); Pastor; 2715 E. Jackson Blvd., Elkhart, IN 46516 
McLean, Roderick M. (10); Minister; 1425 Delaware Street. Gar>', IN 46407 
Dicken, John R. (6); District Superintendent; 3695 West 80 North, Kokomo, IN 

46901 
Case, Riley B. (3); District Superintendent; 1901 Hawthorne Road, Manon, IN 

46952 
Wolf, John D. (1); Pastor; 103 N. Franklin, Valparaiso, IN 46383 
*Fenstermacher, Anita Owen (1); Conference Lay Leader; 203 Clarke Blvd., 

Walkerton, IN 46574 
Garrett, Pegg>^ M. (6); Volunteer, Homemaker; 602 Cheryl Dr., Muncie, IN 47304 
Weaver, Welcome I. (4); Business; 1575 Oak St., Huntington, IN 46750 
Goldschmidt, Victor W. (9); Professor; 6617 St. Rd. 26 W, W. Lafayette, IN 47906 
Shettle, John T. (2); Superintendent of State Police; Box 155, Orestes, IN 46063 
Kaiser, Samuel M. (3); Treasurer, Chemical Firm; 1858 Dean Street, Huntington, 

IN 46750 
Grile, Lester L. (8); Retired-Superintendent of Schools; 6914 Hiltonia Drive, Fort 

Wayne, IN 46819 
Fenstermacher, Edwin A. (7); High School English Teacher; 904 Va Minor St., 

Kendallville, IN 46755 

Reserves 

Hopkins, John L.; Conference Council Director; P.O. Box 869, Marion, IN 46952 

Myers, Evelyn E.; Minister; 110 West Houston, Garrett, IN 46738 

Shickey; Dean V.; District Superintendent; 326 East Wayne Street, Fort Wayne, 

IN 46802 
Williams, J. C: Minister; 1112 South Hackley, Muncie, IN 47302 
Johnson, Charles I.; District Superintendent; P. 0. Box 1001, Logansport, IN 

46947 
White-Stevens, Jane K.; Minister; P. 0. Box 347, Middlebur>% IN 46540 
Gierhart, B. Willis; Minister; 6635 Hohman Avenue, Hammond, IN 46324 
LaSuer, Donald F.; District Superintendent; 19050 Orchard Heights Drive, South 

Bend, IN 46614 
Geible, Merrell D.; Minister; 313 South Meridian Street, Winchester, IN 47394 
Pavy, Doyle (Jack) E.; District Superintendent; Box 2300, 901 Lindberg Road, 

West Lafavette, IN 47906 
Eppley, Dean; Farmer; R. #3, Wabash, IN 46992 

Chappell, Dorothv J.; Nurse; 1603 West Fourteenth Street, Anderson, IN 46011 
Lvnch. Richard B.; Student; 1520 South Drive, Eiwood, IN 46036 
Cripe, Robert E.; Business Executive; 66083 S R 15, Goshen, IN 46526 
Keller, Kenneth L.; University Administrator; 1614 Alabama Avenue, Fort 

Wayne, IN 46805 
Pavy, Kathryn A.; Student; 901 Lindberg. West Lafayette, IN 47906 



56 Journal of the 1984, General Conference 

Burrous, Anita J.; Homemaker; R. R. 3, Peru, IN 46970 
Rund, Robert C; Administrator; 173 Reba Drive, West Lafayette, IN 47906 
Reed, Michael D.; Sales Manager; R.R. 5, Woodland Hills, Lagrange, IN 46761 
Dashiell, Rosemary; Financial Secretary; 1616 Cedar Street, Elkhart, IN 46514 

NORTH MISSISSIPPI (8) SE 

Section B, Row 28, Seats 9-12 

Section B, Row 29, Seats 9-12 

Gordon, Prentiss M. (1); Minister; Box 854, Tupelo, MS 38801 

Conoway, Merlin D. (6); District Superintendent; Box 771, Tupelo, MS 38801 

Brooks, Truman D. (10); District Superintendent; Box 686, New Albany, MS 

38652 
Appleby, William F. (7); Pastor; Box 1303, Clarksdale, MS 38614 
*Berry, George L. (9); State Extension Service; Box 959, Leland, MS 38756 
Baddour, Paul M. (4); President, Baddour Center; 4300 New Getwell Rd., 

Memphis, TN 38118 
Bailey, Joe (8); Retired Farmer; Box 257, Coffeeville, MS 38922 
Givhan, Bessie (5); Church and Community Worker; 1260 Holmes, Greenville, MS 

38701 

Reserves 

Youngblood, Rebecca C; Pastor; Hvi^. 311, Mt. Pleasant, MS 38649 
Rucker, Israeli.; S.E.J. Conference Staff; 159 Ralph McGill Blvd. , N.E. , Atlanta, 

GA 30365 
Bailey, E. Allen; Minister; Drawer 728, Starkville, MS 39759 
Price, William F.; Minister; 1001 Grand Blvd., Greenwood, MS 38930 
McAlilly, Roy D.; Minister; Box 590, Corinth, MS 38834 
Stockton, Wendall H.; Physician; 900 S. Blvd. Dr., Amory, MS 38821 
Crocket, Granville D.; Retired Businessman; 113 Sherwood Drive, Greenville, MS 

38701 
Kemp, Betty R.; Librarian; 2112 President, Tupelo, MS 38801 
Scott, William D., Ill; Administrative Associate for Mississippi Highway 

Department; 566 North Swaney Road, Holly Springs, MS 38635 
Mattox, Quinn; President of Grain and Feed Company; Box 146, Aberdeen, MS 

39730 

NORTH SHABA (2) CC 

Section A, Row 5, Seats 7-8 
Mayo, Kabila Wakubangi (1); B.P. 459 Kamina, Shaba, Rep. Zaire 
Katenga, Mbuya (2); B.P 459 Kamina, Shaba, Rep. Zaire 

Reserves 

Ntambo, Mulongo; B.P. 459 Kamina, Shaba, Rep. Zaire 

Nsenga, Yumba Makangwab; B.P. 459 Kamina, Shaba, Rep. Zaire 

NORTH TEXAS (12) SC 

Section B, Row 2, Seats 7-12 

Section B, Row 3, Seats 7-12 
Railey, Walker L. (5); Minister; 1928 Ross Avenue, Dallas, TX 75201 
Holmes, Zan W. (3); Minister; P.O. Box 7170, Dallas, TX 75209 
Farrell, Leighton K. (8); Minister; 3300 Mockingbird, Dallas, TX 75205 
Stephenson, William T. (6); District Superintendent; P.O. Box 8127, Dallas, TX 

75205 
Ogden, John (9); Minister; 534 Belt Line Rd., Richardson, TX 75080 
Renshaw, Don F. (2); District Superintendent; P.O. Box 842, Paris, TX 75460 



The United Methodist Church 57 

♦Harper, Charles (3); Architect; 4724 Old Jacksboro HW7., Wichita Falls, TX 

76302 
Matherson, Thalia (4); Assistant Principal; 6416 Forest Knoll Trail, Dallas, TX 

75232 
Dillard, R. L., Jr. (7); Lawyer; 6624 Lakewood, Dallas, TX 75214 
Thomasson, Ruth (10); Family Business; 540 E. Spring Valley, Richardson, TX 

75081 
Grimes, Johnnie Marie (6); Volunteer; 3314 Drexel Drive, Dallas, TX 75205 
Smith, Scott (1); 2361 Northridge, Carrollton, TX 75007 

Reserves 

Feemster, Ben; Minister; P.O. Box 67, Piano, TX 75474 

Dunnam, Spurgeon M., Ill; Editor, UM Reporter; P.O. Box 221076, Dallas, TX 

75222 
Chappell, Wallace E.; Minister; 9027 Midway Road, Dallas, TX 75209 
Bailey, Wilfred M.; Minister; 9998 Ferguson, Dallas, TX 75228 
Crouch, William C; Minister; Box 888, Denton, TX 76201 
Mcintosh, Kenneth B.; General Board of Global Ministries; 1928 Ross Avenue, 

Dallas, TX 75201 
Washington, William J.; Conference Council Director; 1928 Ross Avenue, Dallas, 

TX 75201 
Cardwell, Ann; Minister; Box 17089, Dallas, TX 75217 
Tarr, Margaret; Homemaker; 10542 Marquis Lane, Dallas, TX 75229 
Tunnell, Lane; Conference Council Associate Director; 1928 Ross Avenue, Dallas, 

TX 75201 
Mankey, Bobbie; Homemaker; 12107 Snow White, Dallas, TX 75234 
Ball, Bill, Jr.; Student; 3120 Bryn MauT, Dallas, TX 75225 
Boswell, George M., Jr.; Medical Doctor; 7249 Wabash Drive, Dallas, TX 75214 
Glass, Dorlis; Homemaker/Free Lance Writer; 4447 Irvin Simmons, Dallas, TX 

75229 
Coppedge, Rex; Manager, Bell & Howell; 2200 Northcrest, Piano, TX 75075 
McKnight, Rufus N.; Lawyer; 3628 Cragmont Avenue, Dallas, TX 75205 

NORTHERN ILLINOIS (16) NC 

Section A, Row 22, Seats 5-12 

Section A, Row 23, Seats 5-12 

Jordan, Charles W. (9); District Superintendent; 10051 So. Hoyne, Chicago, IL 

60643 
Chaney, David E. (3); Minister; 424 Forest, Glen Ellyn, IL 60137 
Hoke, Sandra (5); District Superintendent; 339 W. River Road, Elgin, IL 60120 
Flores, Finees (10); Editor, UM Communications; 1814 Monroe, Evanston, IL 

60202 
Reed, James M. (1); District Superintendent; 417 No. Scoville, Oak Park, IL 60302 
Holtsford, A. Philip (8); Minister; 230 Laurel Lane, DeKalb, IL 60115 
Landivehr, Arthur J. (7); Minister; 310 Church Street, Evanston, IL 60201 
Dahl, Stephen A. (6); Minister; 244 Anthony Ct., Buffalo Grove, IL 60090 
Riskedal, R. Kenneth (3); Farmer; RFD #1, Leland, IL 60531 
Nailor, Steve (2); Public Utility Employee; 285 So. Hoisington, Pecatonica, IL 

61053 
McCabe, John S. (8); Manager, Project Sales, Chicago Bridge & Iron; 9 Bailey 

Road, Naperville, IL 60565 
Staublin, Patricia; College Student; 3472 Spring Wheat, Rockford, IL 

61111 
Oehler. Carolyn H. (9); Conference Council Director; 77 W. Washington St., Suite 

1806, Chicago, IL 60602 



58 Journal of the 1984, General Conference 

Fujiu, Kiyoko K. (10); General Agency Secretariat, COSROW; 2424 Eastwood, 

Evanston, IL 60201 
*Fannings, Helen (6); Staff, Garrett-Evangelical Theol. Sem.; 7800 Merrill, 

Chicago, IL 60649 
Alguire, Frances M. (5); Registered Nurse; 764-86th Place, Downers Grove, IL 

60516 

Reserves 

Constantino, Leo; Minister; 1471 College Lane South, Wheaton, IL 60187 
Tholin, Richard D.; Faculty, Garrett-Evangelical Seminary; 824 Ridge Terrace, 

Evanston, IL 60201 
Ferguson, John C; Minister; 8230 South Crandon, Chicago, IL 60616 
Burkhart, Robert; Minister; 2829 Woodside Drive, Rockford, IL 61109 
Williams, Tallulah F.; Minister; 8600 Cregier, Chicago, IL 60617 
Velazquez, Jose, Jr.; Minister; 2348 South Sawyer Avenue, Chicago, IL 60623 
Dillard, Kay; Minister; 107 South Congress, Polo, IL 61064 
Birkhahn-Rommelfanger, Betty Jo; Minister; 8401 North Alpine Road, Rockford, 

IL 61111 
Harmon, Thomas C; Minister; 404 First Avenue, Forreston, IL 61030 
John, Emmy Lou (4); Mother and Volunteer; 411 Grand Ave., Aurora, IL 60506 
Duel, Nancy; HomemakerA^olunteer; 115 North Windsor, Arlington Heights, IL 

60004 
Henry, Dan; Owner, Design Analysis Service Company, 227 Charlotte Lane, 

Bolingbrook, IL 60439 
Howell, John B.; Retired, Veterans Administration; 6837 South Michigan; 

Chicago, IL 60637 
Rudy, Doris J.; Co-ordinator Cont. Education; 321 Greenwood, Evanston, IL 

60201 
Williams, Margaret A.; Associate Executive Director; 1117 West 127th, Apt. B-3, 

Calumet Park, IL 60643 
Vemetti, John B.; Retired Professional Engineer; 3209 South Prairie, Brookfield, 

IL 60513 
Akers, Mary; Public School Teacher; 620 Emmert Drive, Sycamore, IL 60178 
Alegria, Raul B.; Assistant General Secretary, General Board of Pensions; 4015 

Evergreen, Northbrook, IL 60052 

NORTHERN NEW JERSEY (6) NE 

Section A, Row 20, Seats 1-6 
banning, Dean A. (5); Minister; 12 Roosevelt Road, Maplewood, NJ 07040 
Lyght, Ernest S. (1); Minister; 11 Madison Ave., Montclair, NJ 07042 
Young, Betty J. (6); Minister; 1671 Kennedy Blvd., Jersey City, NJ 07305 
*Holland, Bettilou (9); Homemaker; 27 Ames Road, Morristown, NJ 07960 
Cope, Abigail J. (3) Retired Librarian; 59 Garden St., Teaneck, NJ 07666 
Hardin, Paul (4); Educator; College President, Drew University, Madison, NJ 
07940 

Reserves 

Kim, Hae-Jong; Minister; 185 6th Street, Cresskill, NJ 07626 

Grant, Robert E.; District Superintendent; 132 Meadowbrook Road, Englewood, 

NJ 07631 
Goodwin, Robert B.; Minister; 512 Lawrence Avenue, Westfield, NJ 07090 
Rich, Barbara E.; Minister; 76 DeMott Avenue, Clifton, NJ 07011 
Brown, Donald H.; Minister; 76 Congers Road, New City, NY 10956 
Walter, Jean L.; Homemaker; 529 Harrison St., South Plainfield, NJ 07080 
Bennett, Hazel; Christian Educator; 452 Godwin Avenue, Midland Park, NJ 07432 



The United Methodist Church 59 

Wills, Ginena D.; Homemaker; 133 Boonton Avenue, Kinnelon, NJ 07405 
Rivera, Marie; Homemaker; 61 Cifton Terrace, Weehawken, NJ 07087 
Lytle, John G.; Retired Insurance Executive; 61 Lyons Place, Basking Ridge, NJ 
07920 

NORTHERN NEW YORK (2) NE 

Section A, Row 16, Seats 1-2 
Swales, William R. (5); Conference Executive; 418 Washington St., Watertown, 

NY 13601 
*Yeddo, Donald (7); State Police; 21 St. Marks Ave., Malone, NY 12953 

Reserves 

Chapman, Bnice W.; District Superintendent; 43 Proctor Blvd., Utica, NY 

13501 
McCaughey, Richard C; Minister; Box 157, Gouverneur, NY 13642 
Steveyis, Carrie F.; Minister; 10 Prospect Street, Norwood, NY 13668 
Baker, James; College Professor; 611 Mill St., Watertown, NY 13601 
Porter, Ruth W.; Housewife; Dry Hill Road, Watertown, NY 13601 
Merritt, Paul E.; College Professor; 15 Leroy Street, Potsdam, NY 13676 

NORTHERN PHILIPPINES (2) CC 

Section C, Row 23, Seats 7-8 
Justo, Benjamin A. (4); District Superintendent; Velbridge Subdivision, Echague, 

Isabela 1318. Philippines 
Jimenez, Bienvinido J. (2); Lawyer; Aparri, Cagayan 1118, Philippines 

Reserves 

Ferrer, Fidel M.; District Superintendent; Tanza, Tuquegarao, Cagayan 1101, 

Philippines 
Vigilia, Justino R.; Lawyer; Bagabag, Nueva Vizcaya 1505, Philippines 

NORTHWEST PHILIPPINES (2) CC 

Section C, Row 23, Seats 9-10 
Curameng, IsaganiA. (9); Minister; United Methodist Church, No. 10 Magsaysay 

Street, San Nicholas, Pangasinan, Philippines 
Samson, Restituto F. (8); Businessman; 34 Quezon Hill Road, Baguio City, 

Philippines 

Reserves 

Cutierrez, Benjamin R.; Minister; 27 Alvear St., Lingayen. Pangasinan, 

Philippines 
Mendoza, Arsenio P.; Businessman; Pob. Sur, Sta. Maria, Ilocos Sur, Philippines 

NORTHWEST TEXAS (8) SC 

Sec. B. Row 6, Seats 5-12 
*Lntrick, Charles E., (9); Minister; P.O. Box 6, Midland, TX 79702 
Whittle, Charles D. (3): Minister; 1318 S. 2nd, Abilene, TX 79602 
Dotts, Ted (5); Minister; 1501 University; Lubbock, TX 79401 
Williams. Ira, Jr. (10); Minister; 1408 S. Jefferson, SlOO, Amarillo. TX 

79101 
Baumgardner, Robert (6); 1007 East Reppto, Brownfield. TX 79316 
Waterfield. Jim (8); Box 447, Canadian, TX 79014 
Anderson, Betty (1); 5017 15th Street; Lubbock, TX 79416 
Kim. Thomas (4); College President; Abilene, TX 79697 



60 Journal of the 198 J(. General Conference 

Reserves 

Kirk, R.L.; 1001 W. 7th, Plainview, TX 79072 

Parks, E. Bruce; Drawer 1299, Plainview, TX 79073 

Trotter, Clifford E.; 1401 South Polk Street, Amarillo, Texas 79101 

Hamblin, David; 1316 13th Street, Lubbock. TX 79401 

Mauldin, Rex L.; P.O. Box 3239, Big Spring, TX 79720 

Nixon, Harold; 15 Cobblestone, Abilene, TX 79606 

Orson, Ray; 1004 North Bryan, Lamesa, TX 79331 

Tooley, Wendell; Drawer 87, Tulia, TX 79088 

Carter, Sandy; Box 353, Sunray, TX 79086 

Sims, Janie; Box N, Petersburg, TX 79250 

NORWAY (2) CC 

Sec. A, Row 15, Seats 5-6 
Ellingsen, Knut Magne; Minister; Furulia 11, N-3900 Porsgrunn, Norway 
Sand, Einar; Doctor; Floyveien, N-4400 Flekkefjord, Norway 

Reserves 

Braaten, Per K.; District Superintendent; Bendixensv. 7, N-5032 Minde, Norway 
Jorem, Finn; Nedre Flatasvei 35, N-7079 Flatasen, Norway 

OKLAHOMA (18) SC 
Sec. B, Row 1, Seats 1-12 
Sec. B, Row 2, Seats 1-6 
*Oden, William B. (4); Pastor; 401 W. Randolph, Enid, OK 73701 
Plowman, Howard L. (6); Pastor; Box 1632, Ardmore, OK 73401 
Owen, Raymond H. (3); Pastor; Box 1136, Bartlesville, OK 74005 
Thomas, David W. (7); Pastor; 222 NW 15th, Oklahoma City, OK 73103 
Biggs, M. Mouzon, Jr. (8); Pastor; 1301 S. Boston Ave., Tulsa, OK 74119 
Severe, David L. (9); Pastor; Box 566, Ada, OK 74820 
Taylor, Helen F. (1); Pastor; 1521 NW 34th, Oklahoma City, OK 73118 
Sprouls, J. Clifton (5); District Superintendent; 1231 Kenilworth, Oklahoma City, 

OK 73114 
Teeter, Bonner E. (2); District Superintendent; 2608 Ridgeway, Ardmore OK 

73401 
Waymire, Dale (3); Business Executive; Box 617, Madill, OK 73446 
Agnew, Theodore L. (10); University Professor; 1216 N. Lincoln, Stillwater, OK 

74074 
Oden, Tal (5); Attorney; Drawer J, Altus, OK 75321 
Parker, Robert L. (1); Business Executive; Parker Drilling Co., 8 E. 3rd St., 

Tulsa, OK 74103 
Hicks, L. T. (8); Salesman; 9135 E. 116th St., S., Bixby, OK 74008 
Miller, Elizabeth (6); Home Economist; Rt 1, Box 343, Enid, OK 73701 
Page, Covey (7); Retired; 5344 E. 21st, Tulsa, OK 74114 
Needham, Ann (9); Homemaker; 401 Morford Dr., Lawton, OK 73501 
Magbee, Thurman (4); Business Executive; P.O. Box 25987, Oklahoma City, OK 

73125 

Reserves 

Fenn, Phillip J.; Pastor; Box 2067, Norman, OK 73070 
Meyer, Lester A.; Pastor; 6517 NW Grand, Oklahoma Citv, OK 73116 
Smith, William I., Jr.; Pastor; 1021 NW 37th, Oklahoma'City, OK 73118 
Thurston, Elwyn 0.; Executive Director, UM Foundation; 2420 North 
Blackwelder, Oklahoma City, OK 73106 



The United Methodist Church 61 

Featherston, R. Jack; District Superintendent; 3707 East 47th Place, Tulsa, OK 

74135 
Leveridge, Harold D.; Pastor; 2604 North May, Oklahoma City, OK 73107 
Hamilton, Argus J., Jr.; District Superintendent; 2212 Alderham, Oklahoma 

City, OK 73170 
Sewell, LeRoy; District Superintendent; Box 2524, Bartlesville, OK 74003 
Combs, Don C; Pastor; Box 814, Durant, OK 74701 
Mason, William C; Pastor; 5838 South Sheridan, Tulsa, OK 74145 
Head, Keith L.; Conference Council Associate Director; 2420 North Blackwelder, 

Oklahoma City, OK 73106 
Mitchell, Earl D.; University Professor; 3 Summit Circle, Stillwater, OK 

74074 
LaGrone, Robert H.; School Superintendent; 606 Garden Lane, McAlester, OK 

75401 
Hodges, Larrj'; Farmer-Rancher; Rt. 1, Box 3, Forgan, OK 73938 
Gilbert, Ron; Dentist; 304 "B" Street Northwest, Miami, OK 74354 
Goto, Thomas; Architect; 3716 Quapah Circle, Oklahoma City. OK 73112 
Price, Robert R.; Retired University Professor; 601 Hartwood Avenue, 

Stillwater, OK 74074 
Hickman, George L.; Independent Insurance Agent; 2009 South Dewey, 

Bartlesville, OK 74003 
Markham, Becky; Homemaker; 1912 S. 69th East Avenue, Tulsa, OK 74112 
Vanzant. Lucille; School Counselor; Box 67, Wynnewood, OK 73098 
Throckmorton, Tommy; Rancher; Rt. 1, Ringling, OK 73456 
Wavmire, Mona Mae; Life Insurance Company Executive; Box 159, Madill, OK 

73446 

OKLAHOMA INDIAN MISSIONARY (2) SC 

Sec. A, Row 1, Seats 3-4 
Roughface, Thomas (9); Recruitment; 1417 Indian Meridian, Choctaw, Okla 73020 
*Thompson, Beckey (2); Diaconal Minister; 148 N. Delaware, Tulsa, OK 74110 

Reserves 

Pinezaddleby, Robert; Minister; 400 S.W. 31st, Oklahoma City, OK 73109 
Foote, Geneva; Educator; Star Route Box 120, Lawton, OK 73501 

OREGON-IDAHO (8) W 

Sec. A, Row 7, Seats 3-10 
McConnell, Bruce E. (6); Director, Small Church Project; 3080 Powell, Eugene, 

OR 97405 
Smith, Judy (4); Staff, Genl. Bd. of Discipleship; P.O. Box 189. Nashville. TN 

37202 
Walker, William 0. (5); Minister; 1376 Olive St., Eugene, OR 97401 
Schuiebert, John (8); Minister; 2443 N.E. 20th, Portland. OR 97212 
*Boe, Donna H. (1): City Public Official; 226 S. 16th, Pocatello. ID 83201 
Colley, Carol (9); University Counselor; 745 N.W. 16th, Cor\allis. OR 97330 
Young, Jern- (3); Professor; 8850 Brj-nwood Dr., Boise, ID 83704 
Tavlor, Lorene (7); Certified Public Accountant; 3508 Darrell Dr., Medford. OR 

97501 

Reserves 

Hams, Dale C; District Superintendent; 600 State St.. Salem. OR 97301 
Whitehead, Thomas M.; Minister; 600 State St.. Salem, OR 97301 
LaHTe>!ce,/?a/p/i,- District Superintendent; 4900 N. Five Mile Rd., Boise, ID 83704 
Stewart, George; Contractor; 5494 S. Locust Grove. Meridian, ID 83642 



62 Journal of the 1984, General Conference 

Heath, Judith; Homemaker; Rt. 3, Buhl, ID 83316 

Bateman, Ann; Chr. Educ. Consultant; 595 Oregon Avenue N.E., Salem, OR 
97301 

PACIFIC NORTHWEST (10) W 

Sec. A, Row 11, Seats 1-10 
Summerour, William F. (9); Pastor; 828 Caspers St., Edmonds, WA 98020 
Swenson, Mary Ann (3); District Superintendent; 2702 Oakes Ave., Suite E, 

Everett, WA 98201 
Iwamoto, Edward T. (5); District Superintendent; 5500 N.W. Walnut Street, 

Vancouver, WA 98663 
Finkbeiner, Melvin M. (6); Pastor; Box 85596, Seattle, WA 98105 
Beyer, Rebecca Parker (7); Pastor; 2115 N. 42nd Street, Seattle, WA 98103 
*Dolliver, James M. (1); Judge; 312 N. Sherman, Olvmpia, WA 98502 
Steach, Ruth L. (2); Volunteer; 2204 Frankfort Street, Richland, WA 99352 
Moore, Elbert (10); Natural Resource Specialist; 5435-57th Ave. South, Seattle, 

WA 98118 
Stevens, Robert W. (8); Conference Treasurer; 2112 Third Ave., Suite 300, 

Seattle, WA 98121 
Barckley, Kay C. (4); Parent Educator; 6500-25th N.E. #A-1, Seattle, WA 98115 

Reserves 

Harding, Joe A.; Pastor; 1124 Stevens Drive, Richland, WA 99352 
Lawson, Norman R.; Pastor; P. 0. Box 2285, Wenatchee, WA 98801 
Boyd, C. Richard; Pastor; P. 0. Box 5003, Kent, WA 98031 
Parrish, Craig A.; Pastor; 18515-92nd N.E., Bothell, WA 98011 
Bemey, William G.; Pastor; 2201 N.E. 4th Street, Renton, WA 98056 
Gruen, Wayne T.; Transportation Planner; 2205 Lakemoor Drive, Olympia, WA 

98502 
Higgins, Walter M. ; Administrator, Home for the Aged; 26457-8th Avenue South, 

Kent, WA 98032 
Gates, James R.; Teacher; 207 North Franklin, Wenatchee, WA 98801 
Abrams, L. George; Researcher; 10424-99th Street S.W., Tacoma, WA 98498 
Shafer, Jane E. ; Word/Data Processing; 11230 Rainier Avenue South, Seattle, WA 

98178 

PACIFIC AND SOUTHWEST (22) W 

Sec. A, Row 27, Seats 3-12 

Sec. A, Row 28, Seats 1-12 

*Cain, Richard W. (5); Seminary President; 1325 N. College Ave. , Claremont, CA 

91711 
Smith, Robert (6); Minister; 5950 E. Willow Street, Long Beach, CA 90815 
Conklin, Faith (3); District Superintendent; 4075 Park Blvd. , San Diego, CA 92103 
Lawson, James (1); Minister; 3320 W. Adams, Los Angeles, CA 90018 
Trotter, Mark (3); Minister; 2111 Camino del Rio South, San Diego, CA 92108 
Zimmerman, DeWane (4); Minister; 5510 N. Central Avenue, Phoenix, AZ 

85012 
Brummet, Don (7); Minister; 15 East First Avenue, Mesa, AZ 85201 
Galvan, Elias (10); Conference Council Staff; 472 E. Colorado Blvd., Pasadena, 

CA 91109 
Kendall, Richard V. (2); District Superintendent; 20 North Michillinda, Sierra 

Madre, CA 91024 
Finkbiner, Frank (8); Minister; 400 West Duarte Rd., Arcadia, CA 91006 
Castuera, Ignacio (9); District Superintendent; 1010 S. Flower St., Los Angeles, 

CA 90015 



The United Methodist Church 63 

Hammer, Patricia (9); Insurance Claims Manager; 16541 Loire Circle, Huntington 

Beach, CA 92647 
Chun, May C. (6); Retired State Librarian; 295 Ulua Street, Honolulu, HI 96821 
Haase, Becky (10); Office Manager; 733 Portola Avenue, Glendale, CA 91206 
McKenzie, Leon (8); Sales Manager; 2350 Daladier Avenue, Rancho Paios Verdes, 

CA 90274 
Seifert, Lois (5); Christian Education Consultant; 607 Leyden Lane, Claremont 

CA 91711 
Aguilar, Cliff (6); Executive Director, Spanish American Institute; 5910 Belice 

Street, Long Beach, CA 90815 
Hayakawa, John (4); Student; 3711 Exposition Blvd. #3, Los Angeles, CA 90016 
Kirkman, John (7); Chief Administrative Officer, Leff & Stephenson Law; 23745 

Community Street, Canoga Park, CA 91304 
Coots, Patti (1); Assistant to President for Administration; 4085 Chapman Place 

Riverside, CA 92506 
Moffet, Gretta M. (2); Conference Missionary Secretary; 5925 East 21st Street, 

Tucson, AZ 85711 
Turner, Cleo (3); Management Analyst; 601 South Poinsettia, Compton, CA 90221 

Reserves 

Collett, Samuel E.; District Superintendent; 655 N. Craycroft, P.O. Box 12039 

Tucson, AZ 85732 
Mann, George; Minister; 500 East Colorado Blvd., Pasadena, CA 91101 
Tyler-Wayman, Phyllis; Minister; 6260 Tyrone Avenue, Van Nuys, CA 91401 
Stanley, Robert; Minister; 4455 East Lincoln Drive, Paradise Valley, AZ 85253 
Hsu, Leo; Minister; 825 North Hill, Los Angeles, CA 90012 
Locker, Donald; Minister; 134 North Kenwood, Glendale, CA 91206 
Saatjian, Lloyd; District Superintendent; 12741 Main, Garden Grove, CA 92640 
Harada, David; District Superintendent; 20 South Vineyard Blvd., Honolulu, HI 

96813 
Simmons, Charles; District Superintendent; 4845 Brocktop Avenue, Riverside 

CA 92506 
Kennedy, Dan; District Superintendent; 5600 Linden Avenue, Long Beach, CA 

90805 
Kesler, Robert; Minister; 1110 Kailua Road, Kailua, HI 96734 
Sapp, Donald G.; District Superintendent; 546 East Osbom Road, Phoenix AZ 

85012 
Laster, Kelly; Student; 1164 Irving, Glendale, CA 91201 
Ivey-Soto, Dan; Student; 1820 Oxford, Claremont, CA 91711 
Befu, Yoshiro, Landscape Architect; 6830 Apperson, Tujunga, CA 91042 
Parker, Peg; Journalist; 2076-230th Street, Torrance, CA 90501 
Steele, Marianna; President, M.B. Steele; 3502 East Cherry Lynn Road, Phoenix. 

AZ 85018 
Hilts, Millie; Retired Escrow Officer; 5280 Atherton Street #141, Long Beach, CA 

90815 
Truman, Ruth; Management Consultant/Author; 13751 East Philadelphia, 

Whittier, CA 90601 
Moore, Mar>' Elizabeth; Professor; 692 West 12th Street, Claremont, CA 91711 
Santillana, Teresa; Hispanic Community Developer; 6440 Paramount Blvd Pico 

Rivera, CA 90660 
Brown, Emma; Professional Volunteer; 873 Lucas Road, Palm Springs, CA 92262 
Misajon, James; Retired University Administrator; 210 Pia Place, Honolulu, HI 

96821 
Farris, Norma; Professional Volunteer; 7021 North 10th Street, Phoenix AZ 

85020 



64 Journal of the 1984- General Conference 

PENINSULA (8) NE 

Sec. A, Row 24, Seats 1-4 

Sec. A, Row 25, Seats 1-4 

Stapleton, J. Gordon (3); District Superintendent; 431 N. State St., Dover, DE 

19901 
May, Felton E. (6); Conference Council Director; 139 N. State Street, Dover, DE 

19901 
Wilkins, Edward R. (5); Pastor; 522 Trippe Avenue, Easton, MD 21601 
Hemphill, William M., Jr. (1); Pastor; P.O. Box 309, Hockessin, DE 19707 
*Clendaniel, Virginia L. (7); Homemaker; P.O. Box 125, Lincoln, DE 19960 
Hardcastle, James C. (9); School Administrator; 121 N. Kirkwood Street, Dover, 

DE 19901 
Winebrenner, Guy (4); Estimator; R.D. 1, Box 193, Harrington, DE 19952 
Powrie, Alice E. (10); Homemaker; 1211 Grinnell Road, Wilmington, DE 19803 

Reserves 

Ledbetter, Pamela G.; Pastor; 33 Elk Mills Road, Elkton, MD 21921 

Godfrey, George €.; Pastor; 140 Hazel Road, Dover, DE 19901 

Hackshaw, Ewart €.; District Superintendent; 1404 Camden Avenue, Salisbury, 

MD 21801 
Nichols, Charlotte A.; Pastor; P. 0. Box 2, Dukes Road, Girdletree, MD 21829 
Lasbury, C. Edwin; District Superintendent; 202 Alapocas Drive, Wilmington, 

DE 19803 
Brewer, Otho G.; Pastor; 1401 Camden Avenue, Salisbury, MD 21801 
Turpin, J. Francis; Farmer; R.D. #1 Box 165, Federalsburg, MD 21632 
Merrill, Josephine T.; Homemaker; Rt. 1, Box 371, Pocomoke, MD 21851 
Speake, John M.; Retired; 601-7th Avenue, Wilmington, DE 19808 
Ashton, J. Robert; Insurance Agent; 410 Atkinson Road, Wilmington, DE 19804 
Appleby, Harry V.; Retired; 1745 Bear Corbitt Road, Bear, DE 19701 
Smoker, Paul; Banker; 126 Chapel Hill Drive, Newark, DE 19711 

PHILIPPINES (2) CC 

Sec. A, Row 16, Seats 3-4 
Venggo, Nonato U. (3); District Superintendent; 900 United Nations Ave., 

Ermita, Manila, Philippines 
Aherrera, Lydia S. (6); Businesswoman; 7 Cleveland St., Greenhills, San Juan, 

Metro Manila, Philippines 

Reserves 

Cunanan, Jose (P.M.); Minister; 900 United Nations Ave., Ermita, Manila, 

Philippines 
de Leon, Francisca; Lawyer; 679 Rizal Ave., Extension Grace Park, Caloocan 

City, Philippines 

POLAND (2) CC 

Sec. C, Row 22, Seats 11-12 
*Kuczma, Adam (6); Superintendent; ul. Mokotowska 12/10, 00-561, Warsaw, 

Poland 
Benedyktowicz, Olgierd K. (10); Psychiatrist; Villa International, 1749 Clifton 

Rd., N.E., Atlanta, GA 30329 

Reserves 

Kleszczynski, Adam; Assistant Superintendent; ul. Worcella 28 m.6, 50-448, 

Wroclaw, Poland 
Dominiak, Bogumila D.; Lawyer; ul. Saska 10 m.44, Warsaw, Poland 



The United Methodist Church 65 

PUERTO RICO (2) NE 

Sec. B, Row 21, Seats 11-12 
Boissen, Rafael; Minister; Calle Leo #1760, Venus Gardens, Rio Piedras, PR 

00926 
Pizarro, Victor E. (6); Urb. Morell Cambos Figaro #3, Ponce, PR 00731 

Reserves 

Marrero, Andres; Pastor; Badajoz St. #371, Urb. Valencia, Rio Piedras, PR 00923 
Velez, Paulina; Calle Ural #1636, Rio Piedras, PR 00926 

RED BIRD MISSIONARY (2) SE 

Sec. C, Row 10, Seats 1-2 
*Hilton, David L. (6); Conference Superintendent; Red Bird Missionary' 

Conference, Beverly, KY 40913 
Helton, Fred (7); Educator; Helton Road, Calvin, KY 40813 

Reserves 

Allen, David L.; Agency Director; Henderson Settlement, Frakes, KY 40940 
Nantz, Letha; Educator; Helton, KY 40840 

RIO GRANDE (2) SC 

Sec. C, Row 14, Seats 1-2 
Palos, Jose L. (5); Conference Council Director; P.O. Box 28098, San Antonio, TX 

78284 
Garza, Oscar 0., IV (9); Electronic Technician; 701 Gibson Dr., Alice, TX 78332 

Reserves 

Martinez, Joel N.; District Superintendent; P.O. Box 28098, San Antonio, TX 

78284 
Martinez, Sam G.; Radio Announcer; 803 W. Freddy Gonzalez, Edinburg, TX 

78539 

ROCKY MOUNTAIN (10) W 

Sec. B, Row 27, Seats 1-4 

Sec. B, Row 28, Seats 1-6 

*Bleyle, Deanna M. (5); District Superintendent; 1247 Madison Avenue, 

Cheyenne, WY 82001 
Knudsen, Harold C. (2); Conference Fiscal Coordinator; 2200 South University 

Blvd., Denver, CO 80210 
Ito, Hidemi (3); Pastor; 6001 Wolff St., Arvada, CO 80003 
Kendall, Wesley W. (4); Pastor; 917 10th Avenue, Greeley, CO 80631 
Day, Samuel S. (7); Pastor; 522 White Avenue, Grand Junction, CO 81501 
Mcintosh, Danny (6); Student; 2512 South University Blvd., Denver, CO 80210 
Geis, Sally (1); Sociology Professor; 2258 South Milwaukee, Denver, CO 80210 
Dolsen, David (8); Mortuary Owner; 3503 Morris Avenue. Pueblo, CO 81008 
Johnston, Paula (9); Homemaker; 1825 Jewel Drive, Longmont, CO 80501 
Howard, Elizabeth (10); Homemaker; 1485 South Grape Street, Denver, CO 80222 

Reserves 

Messer, Donald E.; Seminary President; 2201 South University Blvd., Denver, 

CO 80210 
Murphy, Paul E.; District Superintendent; 2200 South University Blvd. , Denver, 

CO 80210 
Rush, Margaret H.; Program Coordinator; 2200 South University Blvd., Denver. 

CO 80210 



66 Journal of the 198i General Conference 

Watson, Keith E.; Minister; 104 South 4th, Sterling, CO 80751 

Curti, Josafat; Associate Program Coordinator; 2200 South University Blvd., 

Denver, CO 80210 
Sumner, Janet B.; Minister; 902 Pontiac Street, Denver, CO 80220 
Anderson, Rodney; College Vice-President; 440 33rd St., Glenwood Springs, CO 

81601 
Hatfield, Max; Retired, Business OwTier; Box 790, Pagosa Springs, CO 81147 
Bean, Robbie; Educator; 3034 Leyden, Denver, CO 80207 
Fischer, Todd; Student; 1290 Folsom, Boulder, CO 80302 
Thompson, Marjorie; Homemaker; Rt. 1, Box 226, Green, Utah 84050 
Sullivan, Fred; Retired, Military; 2502 4th Avenue, Pueblo, CO 81003 

SIERRA LEONE (2) CO 

Sec. B, Row 26, Seats 1-2 
Vincent, James B. M. (1); Minister; UMC Box 115, Kenema, Sierra Leone 
Bailor, Max A. (6); Principal; Albert Academy, Box 110, Freetown, Sierra Leone 

SOUTH CAROLINA (22) SE 

Sec. B, Row 7, Seats 1-12 
Sec. B, Row 8, Seats 3-12 
*Hicks, Granville A. (2); Minister; 401 N. Coit Street, Florence, SC 29501 
Lupo, C. J., Jr. (5); Minister; 1401 Washington Street, Columbia, SC 29201 
Gadsden, James S. (3); District Superintendent; 104 Amherst Drive, Greenwood, 

SC 29646 
Meadors, Marshall L., Jr. (6); District Superintendent; 4908 Colonial Drive, 

Columbia, SC 29203 
Morton, Ted R., Jr. (7); Executive Director, Greenwood Methodist Home; P.O. 

Box 1203, Greenwood, SC 29648 
Cannon, Ralph A. (1); Minister; 1206 Lyttleton Street, Camden, SC 29020 
Walter, Theodore H. (4); Minister; 1405 Alexander Road, Rock Hill, SC 

29730 
Henry-Crowe, Susan T. (10); Minister; Route 1, Box 76B, Irmo, SC 29063 
Johnson, H. Sam (9); Associate Director Conference Council; 4908 Colonial Dr., 

Suite 101, Columbia, SC 29203 
Corderman, Delos D. (8); Administrator, Off. of Ministerial Affairs; 205 Heritage 

Trail, Lexington, SC 29072 
Norris, Gene A. (1); Minister; P.O. Box 5055, Spartanburg, SC 29304 
Bailey, Robert W. (3); Agricultural Consultant; Route 1, Box 166, Columbia, SC 

29203 
Gramling, Polly (7); Homemaker; Gramling, SC 29348 
Hendrix, Clelia D. (9); Educational Administrator; 309 Arundel Road, Greenville, 

SC 29615 
Carter, R. F. (5); Associate Director Conference Council; 4908 Colonial Drive, 

Columbia, SC 29203 
Sims, Hugo S. (1); Real Estate Development; PO Drawer 287, Orangeburg, SC 

29115 
Shingler, Sara S. (6); Homemaker; 210 Lakewood Drive, Spartanburg, SC 

29302 
Middleton, Samuel T. (6); Retired School Administrator; 492 Palmetto Parkway, 

Orangeburg, SC 29115 
Covington, Foye J. (4); Furniture Leasing/Interior Decorator; PO Box 266, 

Norway, SC 29113 
Kent, Harr>' R. (2); Contractor; PO Box 30156, Charleston, SC 29407 
Fields, Richard E. (8); State Circuit Judge; 65 Spring Street, Charleston, SC 29403 
Jackson, J. R. (10); Book Seller; 4848 Landrum Drive, Columbia, SC 29206 



The United Methodist Church 67 

Reserves 

Ulmer, B. Susan; Associate Minister; 3407 Devine Street, Columbia, SC 29205 
Aleivine, James E.; District Superintendent; 108 Pinewood Avenue, Hartsviile, 

SC 29550 
Watson, George W.; Minister; 175 Boulevard, NE, Orangeburg, SC 29115 
Gibson, Raymond T.; District Superintendent; 1320-A Femwood Road, 

Spartanburg, SC 29302 
Taylor, Eben; Minister; PO. Box 203, Laurens, SC 29360 
Kinnett, William R.; Minister; PO. Box 608, Lancaster, SC 29720 
Reid, Williatn C; Minister; 3407 Devine Street, Columbia, SC 29205 
Hunter, James E.; Minister; 701 Cleveland Street, Greenville, SC 29601 
Duffie, George S., Jr.; District Superintendent; 222 Rutherford Street, Suite B, 

Greenville, SC 29609 
McNeill, William W.; Minister; PO Box 216, Union, SC 29379 
Harris, Carl N.; Minister; 1629 West Palmetto Street, Florence, SC 29501 
Broome, Allan R.; Retired Minister; PO Box 9485, Columbia, SC 29290 
Hipp, James C; Retail Furniture Sales; 3390 Liberty Street, Loris, SC 29569 
Rice, Spencer M.; Retired Educator; 4921 Clemson Avenue, Columbia, SC 

29206 
Watson, Michael C; Family Physician; PO. Box 528, Bamberg, SC 29003 
Robinson, Spencer J.; Retired; PO Box 96, Lancaster, SC 29720 
Burkhalter, Lois B.; Legal Secretary; 3222 Pine Belt Road, Columbia, SC 29204 
Jenkins, Elaine; Attorney; PO Box 364, John's Island, SC 29455 
Briscoe, Carolyn; College Educator; 108 East Broolcwood Drive, Clemson, SC 

29631 
Evatt, Parker; Executive Director, Alston Wilkes Society; PO Box 363, Columbia, 

SC 29202 
Arthur, Frances L; Homemaker; PO Box 120, Isle of Palms, SC 29451 
Langston, Jennifer E.; Student; 535 Central Avenue, Summerville, SC 29483 
Salley, James H.; Radio Station News Director; 571 Boulevard, NE, Orangeburg, 

SC 29115 
Cooper, Ethel T.; Retired Educator; 203 Daisy Drive, Greenville, SC 29605 

SOUTH DAKOTA (2) NC 

Sec. C, Row 11, Seats 3-4 
*Job. Rueben P. (3); World Editor, Upper Room; 1908 Grand Ave., P.O. Box 189, 

Nashville, TN 37202 
Wahlstrom, LaRayne (6); Homemaker; 819 9th Ave., Brookings, SD 57006 

Reserves 

Millard, Kent; Minister; PO Box 626, Mitchell, SD 57301 

Klarup, Don G.; Minister; 401 South Spring Avenue, Sioux Falls. SD 57104 

Fisher, Richard W.; District Superintendent; 3811 Brookside, Rapid City, SD 

57701 
Eberhart, Penny V.; Minister; 1423 North Penn Street. Aberdeen, SD 57401 
Drabek, Robert; Standard Oil; RR 3, Box 49, Winner, SD 57580 
Beddow, James; President; Dakota Weslevan Univ., Mitchell, SD 57301 
Taylor, Keith; Farmer; RR 2, Box 75, Conde, SD 57434 
Flint, Persis; Homemaker; 2708 S. 9th St., Sioux Falls, SD 57105 

SOUTH GEORGIA (14) SE 

Sec. C, Row 3, Seats 1-4 

Sec. C, Row 4, Seats 1-10 
Key, William R. (5); District Superintendent; P.O. Box 369, Dublin, GA 31021 
Hancock, C. Wilbume (7); Pastor; P.O. Box 1306, Valdosta, GA 31601 



68 Journal of the 198^ General Conference 

Freeman, G. Ross (9); Jurisdictional Council Director; 159 Ralph McGill Blvd., 

NE, Atlanta, GA 30365 
Hurdle, William H. (10); District Superintendent; 1401 Cherokee Drive, 

Waycross, GA 31501 
Daughtery, V. L. (3); Pastor; P.O. Box 149, Macon, GA 31202 
Watson, W. Hamp (1); District Superintendent; 106 Lee Blvd., Savannah, GA 

31405 
Hutcherson, Guy K. (2); District Superintendent; 4842 Wesleyan Woods Dr., 

Macon, GA 31210 
^Phillips, J. Taylor (1); Judge; P.O. Box 5086, Macon, GA 31213 
Cox, Ray, Jr. (9); Conference Staff; 119 Asbury Street, St. Simons Island, GA 

31522 
Martin, S. Walter (4); Retired Educator; 700 W. Alden Ave., Valdosta, GA 31602 
Coppedge, Helen Rhea (6); Homemaker; 211 Knoxville Street, Ft. Valley, GA 

31030 
Hopkins, Carolyn (8); Homemaker, Secretary/Treasurer Family Business; Route 

3, Cairo, GA 31728 
Lifsey, Roy (3); Retired U.S. Civil Ser\ice; 200 Crestwood Rd., Warner Robins, 

GA 31093 
Giddens, Joseph (Joe) L. (7); Transportation — Trucking; P.O. Box 1134, 

Sanders ville, GA 31082 

Reserves 

Bullington, Elick S., Jr. District Superintendent; P.O. Box 2054, Statesboro, GA 

30458 
Shirah, A. Jason; Minister; 429 Abercom Street, Savannah, GA 31401 
Holmes, Aynos 0.; Administrative Assistant to the Bishop; P.O. Box 1954, Dublin, 

GA 31021 
Houston, Laurence E., Jr.; Minister; 115 Winslow^ Drive, Thomasville, GA 31792 
McTier, William E.,Jr.; Minister; 11911 White Bluff Road, Savannah, GA 31406 
Pennell, James T.; Minister; P.O. Box 5469, Columbus, GA 31906 
Waite, Alvis A., Jr.; District Superintendent; 3434 Hilton Woods Drive, 

Columbus, GA 31906 
Sessions, Emily; Chaplain; P.O. Box 1168, Dalton, GA 30720 
Carruth, Augusta; Homemaker; 700 Island View, Brunswick, GA 31520 
Woodall, John; Manufacturer; P.O. Box 97, Woodland, GA 31836 
Guest, David M.; Farmer; Route 3, Americus, GA 31709 
McLane, H. Arthur; Attorney; P.O. Box 921, Valdosta, GA 31601 
Myers, Howard; Papermill Employee; P.O. Box 773, St. Mary's, GA 31558 
Newton, Joseph B.; Superior Court Judge; P.O. Box 1507, Waycross, GA 31501 
Parker, Eva; Housewife/Travel Representative; P.O. Box 161, Baxley, GA 31513 
Dodson, Sybil; Director-Open Door Community House; 2405 Second Avenue, 

Columbus, GA 31901 

SOUTH INDIANA (16) NC 

Sec. C, Row 26, Seats 1-10 

Sec. C, Row 27, Seats 1-6 

Forbes, James K. (2); Executive Assistant to Bishop; 7441 N. Audubon Rd., 

Indianapolis, IN 46250 
Lawson, David J. (5); Minister; 621 S. Range Line Road, Carmel, IN 46032 
Hutchinson, Charles L. (3); District Superintendent; Box 1227, Bloomington, IN 

47402 
Maxwell, Loren E. (8); Conference Staff; 2427 E. Second St.. Bloomington. IN 

47401 
Hamilton, Richard E. (1); Minister; 3703 N. Delaware, Indianapolis, IN 46205 



The United Methodist Church 69 

Phillips, Samuel B. (6); District Superintendent; 1811 Brewster Road, 

Indianapolis, IN 46260 
Katayama, Masaichi (7); District Superintendent; 6370 Brixton Lane, Indianapo- 
lis IN 46220 
Emerson, Joe G. (6); Minister; 2574 California St., Columbus, IN 47201 
*Lorch, Basil H., Jr. (2); Attorney; 1802 Crestview Drive, New Albany, IN 47150 
Alstott, Cathy (10); Real Estate Broker; 1217 Elm St., New Albany, IN 47150 
McConnell, Emery (9); Gen. Insurance Agent; 8014 East 75th St. , Indianapolis, IN 

46256 
White, David L., Jr. (3); Staff, Genl. Bd. of Discipleship; P.O. Box 621, 

Jeffersonville, IN 47131 
Marshall, Carolyn M. (7); Corporation Secretary; 204 N. Newlin St. , Veedersburg, 

IN 47987 
Thomas, John J. (4); Attorney-State Legislator; Forest Manor, P.O. Box 194, 

Brazil, IN 47834 
Reynolds, Diane L.; Student; Box 39, Seelyville, IN 47878 
VanStone, Jack N. (5); Attorney; 1301 Southfield Road, Evansville, IN 47715 

Reserves 

Ruach, Susan W. N.; Conference Staff; P.O. Box 5008, Bloomington, IN 47402 
Armstrong, Charles R.; District Superintendent; 604 Black Road, New Castle, IN 

47362 
Gentry, James E.; Conference Council Director; Box 5008, Bloomington, IN 47402 
Hunt, Robert L.; District Superintendent; 3900 Cove Road, Columbus, IN 47203 
Myers, Charles L.; Minister; 1016 Castlewood Drive, New Albany, IN 47150 
Griffith, Donald N.; Minister; 210 West Main, Greenfield, IN 46140 
Wright, Lloyd M.; Executive Director Pension Fund; 1076 Madrid Drive, 

Greenwood, IN 46142 
Crawford, Gene P.; Minister; 8117 Bromley Place, Indianapolis, IN 46219 
Holmes, Robert C; Minister; 3445 Glen Hills Drive, Richmond, IN 47374 
Ruby, Sandra (10); Teacher; 110 S. Blair, Crawfordsville, IN 47933 
Green, Dorothea S.; Executive Secretary & Accountant; 5014 North Central 

Avenue, Indianapolis, IN 46205 
Harris, Velma; Homemaker; 3118 26th Street, Columbus, IN 47201 
Nay, Richard M.; Physician; 6625 Sherman Drive, Indianapolis, IN 46220 
Bingham, Clifford H.; Retired Personnel Administator; Horrall Hills, RR. 4, 

Washington, IN 47501 
Bowman, Bob E.; Store Owmer; Box 544, New Castle, IN 47362 
Ludwig, Lois; Homemaker; 1015 Greenwood Avenue, Bloomington, IN 47401 
McFall, David M.; Facilities Director; 4259 Larkspur Trace, Indianapolis, IN 46227 
Fields, Clyde D.; Methodist Hopsital Executor; 540 Ho Hum Court, Greenwood, 

IN 46142 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS (6) NC 

Sec. A, Row 20, Seats 7-12 
Nettleton, James L. (2); Director, United Methodist Village; 1616 Cedar Street, 

Lawrenceville, IL 62439 
Souders, Robert E. (1); Pastor; 1200 Moreland, Belleville, IL 62223 
Leuris, William B. (5); District Superintendent; 1330 E. Grand, Carbondale, IL 

62901 
*Bosomworth. E. L. (3); Retired; 12 Keiffer Drive. Olney. IL 62450 
Short, Elizabeth (6); Community Developer; 718 North 80th Street, East St. 

Louis, IL 62203 
Cummins, Mariene (9); Pastor's Wife & Homemaker; 302 SE Fourth Street. 

Fairfield, IL 62837 



70 Journal of the 198 Jf General Conference 

Reserves 

Porter, RayB.; District Superintendent; 1703 North Linda Lane, Olney, IL 62450 
Hollis, Robert R.; District Superintendent; 1019 North Burtschi Street, Vandalia, 

IL 62471 
Slone, James; Minister; 1301 North Fair, Marion, IL 62959 
Smith, Robert R.; Minister; 1500 Pine, Murphysboro, IL 62966 
Sims, R. Paul; Minister; 203 E. Grove Avenue, Effingham, IL 62401 
Meek, Mary Lou; Homemaker; R.R. 4, Box 50, Lawrenceville, IL 62439 
Hasler, Freda; Homemaker; R.R. 1, Olney, IL 62450 
Phillips, Bruce; Student; 1500 Pine, Murphysboro, IL 62966 
Loucks, Hazel; Teacher; 829 St. Louis Street, Edw^ardsville, IL 62025 
Searcy, Marion; Retired; 1012 West Willow, Carbondale, IL 62901 

SOUTHERN NEW ENGLAND (10) NE 

Sec. C, Row 13, Seats 3-7 

Sec. C, Row 14, Seats 3-7 

Taylor, Blaine E. (9); District Superintendent; 53 Birchwood Drive, Holden, MA 

01520 
Edge, Caroline B. (5); Minister; 296 Washington St., Norwich, CT 06360 
DelPino, Jerome K. (7); Minister; 741 State St., Springfield, MA 01109 
Johnson, Ellis B. (10); District Superintendent; 125 Western Street, Waltham, 

MA 02154 
Thomason, Terry C; 93 Dana Rd., Reading, MA 01867 
*Sweet, Elizabeth (3); 175 Barney St., Rumford, RI 02916 
Bums, Evelyn (1); RED #1, Box 746, Norway, ME 04268 
Freeman, Florence (8); Attorney; 483 Boston Post Rd., Box 647, Weston, MA 

02193 
Allen, Elizabeth (6); 11 Skinner Rd., Ellington, CT 06029 
Grain, Dight (2); Businessman; 10 Glover Ln., Natick, MA 01760 

Reserves 

Sweet, Robert K., Jr. (4); District Superintendent; 175 Bamev St., Rumford, RI 

02916 
Rudalevige, Donald J.; Minister; 80 Mt. Auburn St., Watertown, MA 02172 
Wiborg, Richard E.; Conference Council Director, 36 Fessenden Street, Newton, 

MA 02160 
Hoover, Shirley S.; Minister; Box 944, Wellfleet, MA 02667 
Wyatt, Mary; Parole Officer; Stillwater Condominium, S. Deerfield, MA 01373 
Shinn, Ridgway, Jr.; College Professor; 22 Whittier Drive, Johnston, RI 

02919 
Kelley, Sandra L.M.; Conference Treasurer; 566 Commonwealth Ave., Rm. 1, 

Boston, MA 02215 
Johnson, Harry L.; Businessman; 41 Waverly Street, Brookline, MA 02146 

SOUTHERN NEW JERSEY (10) NE 

Sec. G, Row 13, Seats 8-12 

Sec. C, Row 14, Seats 8-12 

*Sayre, Charles A. (3); Minister; 24 South Hinchman Ave. , Haddonfield, NJ 08033 

Shivers, M. Russell (6); District Superintendent; 2 Denise Drive, Trenton, NJ 

08690 
Eiving, John L. (1); District Superintendent; 510 N. Main St., Box 619, Elmer, NJ 

08318 
Smyth, Robert K. (8); Minister; 425 Burning Tree Rd., Cherr>' Hill, NJ 08034 
Halvorsen, Carl W. (4); Minister; 533 Kings Highway, Moorestown, NJ 08057 
Weller, William L. (7); Engineer; 8542 Rudderow Ave., Pennsauken, NJ 08109 



The United Methodist Church 71 

Beppler, Ronald (2); Sales Representative; 2326 Corbett Road, Pennsauken, NJ 

08109* 
McCullough, June D. (5); Coordinator, Career Center; 26 Castle Court, 

Pemberton, NJ 08068 
Ricards, Betty P. (10); Secretary-Bookkeeper; 315 West Park Dnve, Bndgeton, 

NJ 08302 
Davison, James J. (9); Auto Dealer; 77 Dutch Lane, Freehold, NJ 07728 

Reserves 

Sadio, Sydney S.; Minister; 100 Academy Street, Hightstown, NJ 08520 
Murphy, Sandra L.; Minister; P.O. Box 116, Quinton, NJ 08072 
Finch, David M.; Minister; 13 Cardiff Road, Ocean City, NJ 08226 
Menking, Stanley J.; Associate Dean, Theological School, Drew University; 45 

Woodcliff Drive, Madison, NJ 07940 
Brogdon, Elizabeth S.; Homemaker; 133 E. MacEvoy Lane, Beach Haven, NJ 

08008 
Hann, Carol F.; Conference Staff; 89 West Main Street, Freehold NJ 07728 
Mason, William G.; Senior Field Representative State of New Jersery Division of 

Taxation; 8751 Bryn MawT Avenue, Pennsauken, NJ 08109 
Kappler, Ruth G.; Retired School Teacher; 400 Bradford Road, Cherry Hill, NJ 

08034 

SOUTHERN ZAIRE (4) CC 

Sec. A, Row 5, Seats 1-4 
Muteb, Mufind K. (9); District Superintendent; P.O. Box 450, Likasi, Zaire 
Kabamba, Kiboko (5); Pastor; P.O. Box 522, Lubumbashi, Zaire 
Samukinda, Kakoma (1); Medical Doctor; P.O. Box 2219, Lubumbashi, Zaire 
Dyese, Nkulu (1); Conference Lay Leader; P.O. Box 522, Lubumbashi, Zaire 

Reserves 

Williams, Ward; Pastor & Field Treasurer; P.O. Box 2219, Lubumbashi, Zaire 
Katembo, Kashala; Bishop's Wife; P.O. Box 2061, Lubumbashi, Zaire 

SOUTHWEST PHILIPPINES PROVISIONAL (2) CC 

Sec. C, Row 13, Seats 1-2 
Dizon, Aurora A.; Minister; The United Methodist Church, Magsaysay, 

Occidental Mindoro, Philippines 
Viduya, Francisco, Jr. (6); Businessman; San Mariano, Roxas, Oriental, Mindoro, 

Philippines 

Reserves 

Abesamis, Leodegario R.; Minister; The United Methodist Church, Magsaysay, 

Occidental Mindoro, Philippines 
Supitran, Teresita; Teacher; Roxas, Oriental Mindoro, Philippines 

SOUTHWEST TEXAS (12) SC 
Sec. B, Row 13. Seats 1-12 
Heacock, Jack D. (1); Pastor; P.O. Box 1666, Austin, TX 78767 
Woods, Prenza L. (6); Director Conference Council; P.O. Box 28098, San Antonio, 

TX 78284 
Solomon, Dan E. (7); Pastor; P.O. Box 1838, Corpus Christi, TX 78403 
Huie, Janice R. (5); Pastor; P.O. Box 178, Mason, TX 76856 
Harris, William M. (9); Pastor; 7017 Hart Lane, Austin, TX 78731 
Escamilla, Roberto (8); Pastor; 802 Catalina, San Antonio, TX 78201 
*Walker, James M. (3); Automobile Agency; 973 Jefferson Ave., Seguin, TX 78155 



72 Journal of the 1984. General Conference 

Wilshusen, Jo Anne (9); Church Worker; 326 Glenmore, Corpus Christi, TX 78412 
Jones, Albert W. (7); Retired, USAF; 9305 Castlewood Dr., Austin, TX 78745 
Sandidge, Rena (2); President, Conference United Methodist Women; P.O. 

Drawer 88, Tarpley, TX 78883 
King, John Q. T. (4); President, Huston-Tillotson College; 2400 Givens, Austin, TX 

78722 
Hand, Donald J. (10); Lawyer; 3514 Huntwick Ln., San Antonio, TX 78230 

Reserves 

May field, James L.; District Superintendent; P.O. Box 4457, Austin, TX 78765 
Pevey, Don F.; District Superintendent; P.O. Box 28098, San Antonio, TX 78284 
Gibbs, John R.; District Superintendent; 2019 Douglas Drive, San Angelo, TX 

76904 
Hooper, D. Jack; Minister; P.O. Box 6826, San Antonio, TX 78209 
Piatt, John W.; District Superintendent; 1209 Whitewing, McAllen, TX 78501 
Gilbert, John €.; District Superintendent; P.O. Box 4649, Victoria, TX 77903 
Ellis, W. (Bill) T., Jr.; Lawyer; 1902 Miller, Mission, TX 78572 
Copeland, Catherine; Public Relations Methodist Hospital; 8401 North New 

Braunfels, San Antonio, TX 78209 
Holmes, Barbara; Church Worker; 400 Brady Lane, Austin, TX 78746 
Batiste, Harold E., Jr.; Officer, United States Air Force; 709 Favradale, San 

Antonio, TX 78239 
Grimes, Effie N.; Homemaker; 1335 Schley, San Antonio, TX 78210 
McMillan; Mary M.; Homemaker; Brady Route, Box 6, Mason, TX 76856 

SWEDEN (2) CC 

Sec. C, Row 12, Seats 3-4 
Kdllstad, Torvald; Fortroligheten 5, S-412-70 Goteborg, Sweden 
Grudebom, Lars-Owe; Vellareleden 7, S-415-06, Goteborg, Sweden 

Reserves 

Ireblad, Tord; Magnus Stenbocksgatan 9, 222 24 Lund, Sweden 
Persson, Ake; Kullagatan II, 57300 Transas, Sweden 

SWITZERLAND— FRANCE (2) CC 

Sec. A, Row 7, Seats 11-12 
Bolleter, Heinrich (4); Pastor; Feldstrasse 5, CH— 8800 Thalwil, Switzerland 
Wyss, Christoph (1); Lawyer; Effingerstr. 17, CH— 3008 Bern, Svdtzerland 

Reserves 

Seitz, Robert; Superintendent; Gundeldingerstr. 161, CH — 4053 Basel, S^\^tzer- 
land 

Eschbach, Urs; Superintendent; Weyerstrasse 22, CH — 3084 Wabem, Switzer- 
land 

Welti, Erika; Teacher; Zw^ssigstrasse 6, CH — 8048 Zurich, Switzerland 

Buser, Dorothe; Secretary; Schwandelstr. 19, CH— 8800 Thalwil, Sv^tzerland 

TEN^^ESSEE (12) SE 

Sec. C, Row 24, Seats 1-6 

Sec. C, Row 25, Seats 1-6 

*Spain, Robert H. (7); Pastor; 309 Franklin Rd., Brentwood, TN 37027 

Morris, William W. (5); District Superintendent; 418 Minerva Drive, Murfrees- 

boro, TN 37130 
Crump, Edward L. (4); District Superintendent; Scarritt College, Nashville, TN 
37023 



The United Methodist Church 73 

Cloyd, Thomas H. (6); Director, Conference Council; P.O. Box 120607, Nashville, 

TN 37212 
McCord, Durward (10); Pastor; 121 Davidson Rd., Nashville, TN 37205 
Fryer, JeffW. (3); District Superintendent; P.O. Box 477, Hendersonville, TN 

37075 
Barnes, John 0. , Jr. (1); Education Administrator; 443 Haynes St. , Lewisburg, TN 

37091 
Fitts, Gladys M. (9); Housewife; 4209 Sneed Ave., Nashville, TN 37215 
Crouch, Ernest (8); State Senator, Pharmacist; 201 West Main St., McMinnville, 

TN 37110 
Fanning, Gerry T. (6); Housevdfe; Rt. 1, Box 316, Lynchburg, TN 37352 
Stewart, A. M. (3); Retired; 1120 Westwood Drive, Tullahoma, TN 37388 
Buttrey, D. Roscoe (2); Banker; Third National Bank Building, Nashville, TN 

37244 

Reserves 

Mayo, Jerry; Pastor; Box 75, Crossville, TN 38555 

Collier, Karen; College Instructor; 2413 Albion St., Nashville, TN 37209 

Collett, John; Pastor; 84 Fairways Drive, Nashville, TN 37214 

Pennell, Joe E., Jr.; Pastor; P.O. Box 12089, Nashville, TN 37212 

Walkup, Vincent; Pastor; 1751 Madison St., Clarksville, TN 37040 

Batts, Jane; Social Worker McKendree Manor; McKendree Towers, Hermitage, 

TN 37076 
Bums, Jim; Business; P.O. Box 260, Shelbyville, TN 37160 
Robinson, James; Business; 2508 Scovel St., Nashville, TN 37208 
Pride, Jean; Housewife; Rt. 1, Box 27888, Amo Rd., College Grove, TN 37046 
Smjahe, Robert 0.; Business; 3627 Hoods Hill Rd., Nashville, TN 37215 

TEXAS (22) SC 

Sec. B, Row 15, Seats 3-12 

Sec. B, Row 16, Seats 1-12 

Underwood, Walter L. (8); Minister; P.O. Box 22013, Houston, TX 77027 

Williams, Charles W. (5); District Superintendent; P.O. Box 898, Baytown, TX 

77520 
Shook, Wallace T. (3); Conference Fiscal Officer; 5215 South Main, Houston, TX 

77002 
Lenox, Asbury (4); Minister; 2803 53rd St., Galveston, TX 77550 
Randolph, W. B. (6); District Superintendent; 5215 South Main, Houston, TX 

77002 
Riley, Jaynes Lee (7); District Superintendent; P.O. Box 2382, Longview, TX 

75606 
Jones, William C. (5); District Superintendent; 5215 South Main, Houston, TX 

77002 
Sherer, Ann B. (10); Minister; 3500 Main, Texarkana, TX 75503 
Steele, Chester R. (9); District Superintendent; 5215 South Main, Houston, TX 

77002 
Scales, Roland T. (1); Minister; P.O. Box 5247, Beaumont, TX 77706 
Waters, Bob E. (2); Minister; Drawer BE, College Station, TX 77840 
♦Strickland, Don (6); Businessman; P.O. Box 1268, Liberty, TX 77575 
Morton, Hallie (2); Homemaker; 1360 Prairie, Beaumont, TX 77701 
Seals, Woodrow (5); U.S. District Judge; 1510 Lehman, Houston, TX 77018 
Goens, Ray W. (9); Physician; 7800 Fannin, Houston, TX 77054 
Gray, Vivienne N. (4); Director, Alumni Affairs, Wiley College; 700 S. Carter, 

Marshall, TX 75670 
Hooper, Wilodyne C. (6); Homemaker; Rt. 2, Box 276, Alta Loma, TX 77510 



74 Journal of the 198Jt General Conference 

Allen, Joe B. (3); Attorney; 1105 Eden Drive, Longview, TX 75601 
Brannen, Mary A. (7); Visitor Coordinator, Chamber of Commerce; 512 Gilchrist, 

College Station, TX 77840 
Werlein, Ewing (8); Attorney; 3234 First City Tower, Houston, TX 77002 
McKinstry, Sylvia (1); Retired; P.O. Box 284, Baytown, TX 77520 
Coates, Peggy (10); Homemaker; 5510 Ibis Drive, Galveston, TX 77550 

Reserves 

Parrott, Bob W.; District Superintendent; 5215 South Main, Houston, TX 77002 
Mayes, Allen M.; Staff, General Board of Pensions; 1200 Davis, Evanston, IL 60201 
Krause, Bruce E.; District Superintendent; P.O. Box 3606, Beaumont, TX 77704 
Chamness, Ben R.; Minister; 1799 Woodland Hills, Kingwood, TX 77339 
Phifer, Ernest C; Minister; 5215 South Main, Houston, TX 77002 
Fancher, W. Carroll; Minister; 431 Eldridge Road, Sugar Land, TX 77478 
Shoultz, Jack W.; Minister; 805 East Denman, Lufkin, TX 75901 
Day, K. Wayne; Minister; 5920 FM 2920, Spring, TX 77373 
Watt, Sharon M.; Minister; P.O. Box 1942, Marshall, TX 75670 
Shuemate, Roger L.; Minister; P.O. Box 3435, Port Arthur, TX 77640 
Shelton, Jack R.; Minister; P.O. Box 3846, Bryan, TX 77805 
Haygood, W. Hooper; Minister; P.O. Box 3247, Beaumont, TX 77704 
Palmer, Ruth G.; Director, Wesley Community House; 2715 Dragonwick Dr., 

Houston, TX 77045 
Compton, L. B.; Businessman; 5380 Wilshire, Beaumont, TX 77703 
Smith, W. Randolph; Attorney; 3501 First City Tower, Houston, TX 77002 
Sims, Margaret; Homemaker; P.O. Box 291, Gladewater, TX 75647 
Robinson, Jessie Mae; Homemaker; 5202 Greylog Drive, Houston, TX 77048 
Hataway, W. B.; Marine Chemist; 6215 Wilchester, Beaumont, TX 77706 
Leathers, Frank P.; Fiscal Officer, Sam Houston State University; 1609 Pin Oak 

Drive, Huntsville, TX 77340 
Waller, Morris L; Banker; 2201 Avenue South, Huntsville, TX 77340 
Rhone, Raymond; Banker; P.O. Box 2009, Tyler, TX 75710 
Biggs, Mouzon M.; Retired; Rt. 3, Box 307-lA, Carthage, TX 75633 
Dixon, Floyd E.; Retired Federal Employee; 8630 Shotwell, Houston, TX 77016 
Kolb, Weldon; Physician; 33 Perthius Farms, LaMarque, TX 77568 

TROY (8) NE 

Sec. A, Row 8, Seats 1-4 

Sec. A, Row 9, Seats 1-4 

*Lasher, William A. (3); Conference Council Director; Box 560, Saratoga Springs, 

NY 12866 
Giles, David A. (5); Pastor; 971 Rte 146, Chfton Park, NY 12065 
Trost, Robert F. (10); District Superintendent; 1 Diana PL, Troy, NY 12180 
McClary, Janice K. (7); Pastor; Box 475, West Sand Lake, NY 12196 
Harlow, Ruth A. (9); Conference Lay Leader; RD 2. Grooms Road, Rexford, NY 

12148 
Trost, Alice M. (8); Staff, Genl. Bd. of Global Ministries; 1 Diana Place, Troy, NY 

12180 
Farmer, Marilyn R. (6); United Methodist Women Conference President; 2318 

Hamburg Street, Schenectady, NY 12303 
Vanderbilt, Chester W. (2); Conference Communications Coordinator; 30 

Birchwood Avenue, Rensselaer, NY 12144 

Reserves 

Hagy, Arthur F., Jr.; Pastor; 54 Bay St., Glens Falls, NY 12801 
Perry, James M.; Pastor; 74 Aviation Road, Glens Falls, NY 12801 



The United Methodist Church 75 

Curtis, Laurence R.; Pastor; 2530 Balltown Road, Schenectady, NY 12309 
Groshans, William A.; District Superintendent; RD #2, Box 2095, Richmond 

Drive, Shelbume, VT 05482 
Archibald, Julius A. , Jr. ; College Professor; 84 Park Ave. , Plattsburgh, NY 12901 
Shene, Nancy P.; Personnel Director; 3 Drawbridge Drive, Albany, NY 12203 
Wusterbarth, Harold J.; Accountant (Retired); 395 Daniels Avenue, Schenectady, 

NY 12304 
Coghill, Henry D.; Research & Development; RD #1, Lakehill Road, Burnt Hills, 

NY 12027 

VIRGINIA (34) SE 

Sec. C, Row 5, Seats 1-12 

Sec. C, Row 6, Seats 1-12 

Sec. C, Row 7, Seats 3-10 

Logan, James C. (5); Professor, Wesley Seminary; 11152 Saffold Way, Reston, VA 

22090 
Hughes, H. Hasbrouck, Jr. (5); Minister; 4200 Gary St. Rd., Richmond, VA 23221 
Eutsler, R. Kern (3); Conference Council Director; Box 11367, Richmond, VA 

23230 
Faris, Richard B. (6); Minister; 2801 Va. Beach Blvd., Virginia Beach, VA 23452 
Via, Bernards., Jr. (7); District Superintendent; Box 11367, Richmond, VA 23230 
Newman, M. Douglas (7); District Superintendent; No. 6, Koger Ex Ctr, Ste 211, 

Norfolk, VA 23502 
Matthews, Henry M. (4); District Superintendent; Box 429, Ashland, VA 23005 
Nave, Lester D. (9); District Superintendent; Box 2372, Danville, VA 24541 
Dillard, F. Douglas, Jr. (6); Minister; 903 Forest Ave., Richmond, VA 23229 
Tate, Godfrey L.,Jr. (1); Associate Director Conference Council; 1609 Brookland 

Parkway, Richmond, VA 23227 
Casey, Robert T. (2); Minister; 3701 Lorcom Lane, Arlington, VA 22207 
Fink, Wm. Jeryl (10); District Superintendent; 4502 Starkey Rd., SW, #101, 

Roanoke, VA 24014 
Sheaffer, Lee B., Jr. (3); Minister; 1301 Collingwood Rd., Alexandria, VA 22308 
Carter, T. Eugene (4); Minister; 2330 S. Jefferson St., Roanoke, VA 24014 
CocA;e, Emmett W., Jr. (1); Minister; 7035 Quander Rd., Alexandria, VA 22307 
NeSmith, Samuel E. (2); District Superintendent; 1105 Ridgewood Rd., 

Harrisonburg, VA 22801 
Woolridge, Eugene R., Jr. (8); Minister; 207 18th St., Virginia Beach, VA 23451 
*Ravenhorst, Dorothy A. (9); Homemaker; P.O. Drawer 904, Lexington, VA 

24450 
Carpenter, Robert B., Jr. (10); Construction Executive; Box 426, Altavista, VA 

24517 
Bray, Jerry G., Jr. (2); Judge; 1020 Ohio St., Chesapeake, VA 23324 
Acey, Anne (4); Special Assistant to President Ferrum College; P.O. Box 4, 

Ferrum, VA 20488 
Billingsley, Anita (6); Homemaker; P.O. Box 160, Monterey, VA 24465 
Clarke, Lambuth M. (4); President Virginia Wesleyan College; Virginia Wesleyan 

College, Wesleyan Dr., Norfolk, VA 23502 
Douglas, Willard H., Jr. (1); Judge; 606 Edgehill Rd., Richmond, VA 23222 
Bom, Ethel (10); Homemaker; 11806 Grenadier Court, Fairfax Station, VA 22039 
Joyner, Alex (1); College Student; Rt. 1, Box 62. Orange, VA 22960 
Cooper, Mildred S. (5); Conference Staff; P.O. Box 11367, Richmond, VA 23230 
Ravenhorst, Henrj' L. (7); Architect, Professor; P.O. Drawer 904, Lexington, VA 

24450 
Zimmerman, David E. (7); Insurance; 8128 Sawmill Rd., Richmond. VA 23229 
Hart, Joseph T. (9); President Ferrum College; Ferrum, VA 24088 



76 Journal of the 198^ General Conference 

Young, Benny (3); Student; 816 Forest Hill Drive, South Hill, VA 23970 
Whitehurst, Betty (3); Homemaker and Christian Educator; P.O. Box 636, 

Hopewell, VA 23860 
Jefferson, A. G. (8); Optician; 1945 Hillsdale Rd., Lynchburg, VA 24501 
Tyrrell, Margaret (Peg) (6); Teacher; 800 Brook Hill Rd., Richmond, VA 23227 

Reserves 

Kriewald, Diedra H.; Theology Professor; Wesley Theology Sem., 4500 

Massachusetts Ave, Washington, DC 20016 
Parrish, William D., Minister; 4219 Sleepy Hollow Road, Annandale, VA 22003 
Chamberlain, Ray W., Jr.; Minister; 6105 Sherbom Lane, Springfield, VA 22152 
Carson, Joseph T. , Jr. ; District Superintendent; Box 7181, Charlottes\ille, VA 22906 
Knight, William E.; District Superintendent; Fort Early Building, Suite 101, 

Lynchburg, VA 24501 
Ridout, Edward M.; Minister; P. 0. Box 356, Vinton, VA 24179 
Thompson, Elmer A.; Associate Conference Council Director; P. 0. Box 11367, 

Richmond, VA 23230 
Walters, W. Dabney; District Superintendent; Box 268, Urbanna, VA 23175 
Holloman, James G.; District Superintendent; 5016 Dogwood Trail, Portsmouth, 

VA 23703 
Tingle, Larry 0.; Minister; 920 Maybeury Drive, Richmond, VA 23229 
Whetzel, Kenneth E.; District Superintendent; 3309 Military Drive, Falls Church, 

VA 22044 
Arrington, H. Randolph; District Superintendent; 162 Hawthorne Avenue, 

Winchester, VA 22601 
Kelly, Leontine T.; Assistant General Secretary, General Board of Discipleship; 

1908 Grand Avenue, Nashville, TN 37212 
Murphy, E. Thomas, Jr.; Minister; 3812 Craighill Street, Lynchburg, VA 24502 
Barr, John C; Chaplain, Army; McGuire VM Center, Richmond, VA 23222 
Mallard, William, Jr.; Professor, Emory University; 1656 Ridgewood Drive, NE 

Atlanta, GA 30307 
Davidson, Cheryl H.; Chaplain, Virginia Wesleyan College; 1516 Benefit Road, 

Chesapeake, VA 23322 
Vantine, Donald A.; U.S. Army, Retired; Rt. 2, Box 107A5, Boyce, VA 22620 
Coiner, J. Harry; Self-employed; P. 0. Box 4305, Roanoke, VA 24015 
Yow, Rebecca; Lay Pastor; Rt. 2, Box 418, Ringgold, VA 24586 
Walker, W. Roland; Construction Executive; Box 370, Kenbridge, VA 23944 
Bergdoll, James R.; VicePresident Development; Virginia Wesleyan College, 

Wesleyan Drive, Norfolk, VA 23502 
French, Burton L. ; Retired Agricultural Economist; 3614 Paul Street, Alexandria, 

VA 22311 
Howell, Odie R.; Retired Foreign Service; 8408 West Blvd. Drive, Alexandria, VA 

22308 
Pulliam, Mary K. ; Director Chr. Educ. ; 3336 Frontier Road, Northwest, Roanoke, 

VA 24012 
Kellam, Harold B.; Businessman; Box 777, Virginia Beach, VA 23451 
Matthews, Melodie E.; Student; 8222 Whistler Road, Richmond, VA 23227 
Baker, Sandra; Homemaker; 813 Leesville Road, Lynchburg, VA 24502 
Smith, Audrey Q.; Homemaker; 1048 McCormick Blvd., Chfton Forge, VA 24422 
Hopkins, Beth; Homemaker; 1123 Cameron Road, Alexandria, VA 22308 
Goldsmith, Stanley L; Town Manager; Rt. 1, Box 126AA, Lynchburg, VA 24571 
Vaughn, William C; Auto Dealer; Box 1078, Lynchburg, VA 24505 
True, Douglas G.; Retired Government Executive; 3807 South 6th Street, 

Arlington, VA 22204 
Compton, Patricia; Homemaker; 8423 Kalb Road, Richmond, VA 23229 



The United Methodist Church 11 

WEST MICHIGAN (10) NC 

Sec. C, Row 2, Seats 5-8 

Sec. C, Row 3, Seats 5-10 

Rader, Sharo7i Z. (2); Conference Program Coordinator; 11 Fuller, S.E., PO Box 

6247, Grand Rapids, MI 49506 
Keller, Ron L. (3); Minister; 3919 Portage Road, Kalamazoo, MI 49001 
Crawford, David L. (5); Minister; 222 Cass Street, Traverse City, MI 49684 
Bullock, Clifton V. (10); Minister; 153 North Wood Street, Battle Creek, MI 

49017 
Brubaker, Ellen A. (1); District Superintendent; 11 Fuller, S.E., PO Box 6247, 

Grand Rapids, MI 49506 
*Kelsey, Joan T. (6); Homemaker; 1879 Cahill Drive, East Lansing, MI 48823 
Comette, Dan C. (4); College Student; 6313 Angling Road, Portage, MI 49002 
Lundquist, C. David (9); Attorney at Law; 2336 Bronson Boulevard, Kalamazoo, 

MI 49008 
Church, Gladys (7); Homemaker; Route 5, 2586 128th Avenue, Allegan, MI 49010 
Shashaguay, Bernard (8); Conference Treasurer; 11 Fuller, S.E., PO Box 6247, 

Grand Rapids, MI 49506 

Reserves 

Selleck, Richard A.; Conference Council Director; 11 Fuller, S.E., PO Box 6247, 

Grand Rapids, MI 49506 
McCaw, Kenneth D.; District Superintendent; 2141 Parkview, Kalamazoo, MI 

49008 
Williams, Melvin G.; Minister; 2123 Glen Drive, Benton Harbor, MI 49022 
Houk, Royiald A.; District Superintendent; 4740 Okemos Road, PO Box 316, 

Okemos, MI 48864 
Chamberlain, C. Dow; Minister; 310 Bridge Street, Portland, MI 48875 
Fassett, Ronald M.; Minister; 11 Fuller, South East, PO Box 6247, Grand Rapids, 

MI 49506 
TafoUa, Olga G.; Homemaker; 276 Viking Drive, Battle Creek, MI 49017 
Strong, Plyna G.; Homemaker; 93576 Streeter Drive, Gravel Lake, Lawton, MI 

49065 
McRee, Edward B.; Hospital Administrator; 123 North East Street, Eaton 

Rapids, MI 48827 
Peacock, Maynard; Retired; 395 East Lincoln Road, St. Louis, MI 48880 
Brink, Doris J.; Homemaker; 199 Highfield Road, Marshall, MI 49068 
Leys, James; Retired; 761 Port Sheldon Road, Grandville, MI 49418 

WEST OHIO (34) NC 
Sec. B, Row 3, Seats 1-6 
Sec. B, Row 4, Seats 1-12 
Sec. B, Row 5, Seats 1-12 
Sec. B, Row 6, Seats 1-4 
Davis, James T. (6); District Superintendent; 205 Masonic Building, Lima, OH 

45801 
Minus, Paul M. (1); Seminary Professor; Methodist Theological School, Delaware, 

OH 43015 
Cadle, Shirley K. (5); Pastor; 2645 North Bend, Cincinnati, OH 45239 
Patterson, William G. (3); Pastor; 3440 Shroyer Road, Dayton. OH 45429 
Loveless, Charles W. (5); Pastor; 3440 Shrover Road, Kettering, OH 45429 
Chiles, Robert K. (9); Pastor; 88 North Fifth. Newark, OH 43055 
Chow, W. Jing (10); Pastor; 204 Walnut, Archbold, OH 43502 
Suynmers, Vance, Jr. (10); District Superintendent; 1011 Sandusky St., Suite P, 
Perrysburg. OH 43551 



78 Journal of the 198^ General Conference 

Ling, Carl C. (3); Conf. Council Staff; 471 East Broad St., S.1106, Columbus, OH 

43215 
Jones, Hughey L. (9); Pastor; Administrative Assistant; 471 East Broad St., 

S.1106, Columbus, OH 43215 
Sprague, C. Joseph (1); Pastor; 249 East Center St., Marion, OH 43302 
Edwards, Benjamin T. (7); District Superintendent; 47 Johnson Road, The Plains, 

OH 45780 
Armentrout, John W. (2); Pastor; 5773 Charter Oak Drive, Cincinnati, OH 45236 
Stuckey, Paul E. (8); Pastor; 3440 Shroyer Road, Kettering, OH 45429 
McCormack, James H. (8); Conference Treasurer; 471 E. Broad St., S. 1106, 

Columbus, OH 43215 
Mines, William A. (4); Pastor; 230 E. Poplar St., Sidney, OH 45365 
Fought, Floyd F. (6); Pastor; 900 Van Buren, Fostoria, OH 44830 
*Dilgard, Charles K. (6); Administrator Otterbein Home; 585 North State Route 

741, Lebanon, OH 45036 
Avey, Sue R. (6); HomemakerA^olunteer; 3040 Coker Drive, Kettering, OH 45440 
Ward, Georgiana (10); HomemakerA^olunteer; 110 West Linden Avenue, New 

Carhsle, OH 45344 
Gebhart, Judith G. (5); College Instructor; 2179 South Helenwood Drive, Dayton, 

OH 45431 
Cochran, Harold T. (3); Retired; 1625 Slater Street, Toledo, OH 43612 
Quick, Norman K. (8); Director, Council on Development; 471 East Broad Street, 

Columbus, OH 43215 
Adams, Don (3); Corporate Personnel Manager; 357 Kanawha Road, Lancaster, 

OH 43130 
Wilson, Ruth A. (9); Homemaker; 345 Big Stone Road, Beavercreek, OH 45385 
Baker, Jane (5); Buyer, Food Super.; Box 68, Worthington, OH 43085 
Young, John F. (7); Retired; 969 Hartford Street, Worthington, OH 43085 
Henderson, Mattie M. (2); Retired; 5214 Ebersole Avenue, Cincinnati, OH 45227 
Rogers, William F. (4); Retired/School Administrator; Route 6, Box 11, Lucasville, 

OH 45648 
Hurtt, Jane (2); 686 Brown's Chapel, Clarksburg, OH 43115 
DeLong, Dale F. (7); Insurance Agent; 590 Ridgewood Drive, Circleville, OH 

43113 
Kaatz, Torrey A. (4); Retired; 2144 Mellwood Court, Toledo, OH 43613 
Johnson, Thelma (1); Manager; 5915 Desmond, Cincinnati, OH 45227 
Swank, C. William (10); Executive Vice President; 35 East Chestnut, PO Box 479, 

Columbus, OH 43216 

Reserves 

Delp, W. Owen; Dist. Program Asst.; 471 E. Broad St., Columbus, OH 43215 
Graham, Joseph R.; Pastor; 5343 Hamilton Avenue, Cincinnati, OH 45224 
Shunk, Ralph K.; Conf. Council Director; 471 East Broad Street, Columbus, OH 

43215 
Kimes, R. RobeH; Pastor; 632 Vine Street, Room 400, Cincinnati, OH 45202 
Bichsel, Dale E.; Pastor; 1345 Grace Avenue, Cincinnati, OH 45208 
Frazer, E. Eugene; Pastor; 1581 Cambridge Blvd., Columbus, OH 43212 
Dewire, Norman E; Gen. Secy. , Genl. Council on Ministries; 34 West Dixon Ave. , 

Dayton, OH 45419 
Flinchbaugh, James E.; Pastor; 802 Willow Street, Celina, OH 45822 
Cooper, J. Jeannette; Assoc. Conf. Council Director; 471 E. Broad St., Columbus, 

OH 43215 
Hull, William A.; Pastor; Box 228, Ottawa, OH 45875 
Oshom, John F.; Pastor; 1215 Tiffin Avenue, Findlay, OH 45840 
Waugh, James E.; Pastor; Box 119, New Knoxville, OH 45871 



The United Methodist Church 79 

Brooks, Philip D.; Pastor; 200 East Livingston, Columbus, OH 43215 
Byler, Robert A.; Pastor; 2657 East Broad Street, Columbus, OH 43209 
Wagner, John C; Pastor; 360 Briarw^ood Drive, Trotwood. OH 45426 
Payyie, Ronald G.; Pastor; 200 West Second, Perrysburg, OH 43551 
Hard, Larry; Pastor; 685 Timberlake Drive, Westerv-ille, OH 43081 
Vand'effriff, Paul M.; Pastor; 3460 Epworth Avenue, Cincinnati, OH 45211 
Sidwell, George L.; Pastor; 107 North Walnut Street, Englewood, OH 45322 
Jeffers, Elizabeth; Homemaker; Rt. 1, Box 217, Chesterhill, OH 43728 
Johnson, Ethel, Professor; Box 630, Delaware, OH 43015 
Woods, Florence S.; Associate Director Communications; 1955 Meander Dnve, 

Columbus, OH 43229 
Miller, Harriet; Professor; 1810 Harvard Blvd., Dayton, OH 4o406 
Adams, Jane; Homemaker; 351 Taylor, Zanesville, OH 43701 
Redmond, Charles D.; Lawyer; 50 West Broad Street, Columbus, OH 43215 
Shields, Joseph W.; Funeral Director; 301 South Patterson, Forest, OH 45843 
Hadleyi Judith G.; Homemaker; 4848 Glenmina Drive, Dajton, OH 45440 
Ross, Betty J.; Bookkeeper; 1070 Griffiths, Zanesville, OH 43701 
Buck, John H.; Retired; 2306 Beecher, Findlay, OH 45840 
Carlisle, Robert; Diaconal Minister; 1581 Cambridge, Columbus, OH 43212 
Moore, John E.; Retired; 23 Kimberly Circle, Dayton, OH 45408 
Carson, Mary Beth; Student; 1333 Stockton Avenue, Kettering, OH 45409 
Grainger, Betty K.; Diaconal Minister; 2850 Oakwood Lane, Lima, OH 45806 
Dawson, RoIIo'R.; Retired; 461 Twinning Drive, Dajton, OH 45431 
Coleman, Lane D.; Student; 1336 Blairwood Avenue, Dayton, OH 45418 
Cox, Sara E.; Claims Manager; 1324 Ida Avenue, Columbus, OH 43212 
Radcliffe, Mary; Retired; 308 Northridge Road, Circleville, OH 43113 
Evans, Peg; Bookkeeper; 612 Kaspar Street, Port Clinton, OH 43452 

WEST VIRGINIA (18) NE 

Sec. B, Row 26, Seats 3-12 

Sec. B, Row 27, Seats 5-12 

Irons, Neil L. (10); District Superintendent; Box 872, Romney, WV 26757 

Crowson, Lyscum E. (6); Retired; Rt. 1, Box 249, Moorefield, W\' 26836 

Smith, Paul H. (4); District Superintendent; 34th & Broad Streets, Parkersburg, 

Wv' 26104 
Wright, Richard L. (5); Minister; 251 Worthington Drive, Bridgeport, WV 

26330 
Liotta, Ellen C. (1); District Superintendent; 624 Fairmont Avenue, Fairmont, 

WV 26554 
Davis, Homer H. (7); District Superintendent; Box 866, Charleston, WV 25323 
Waters, Dale C. (9); Minister; 1000 Juliana Street, Parkersburg, WV 26101 
Ware, Virgil H. (8); Conference Treasurer; Box 2469, Charleston, WV 25329 
Thoynpson, Charles S. (3); Minister; Box 85, Ravenswood, WV 26164 
Beard, Jean J. (3); Housewife; Rt. 1, Box 344, Westemport, MD 25162 
Dickens, Leota (7); Homemaker; 162 Parkview Drive, Keyser, WV 26726 
Young, Loretta (9); Conference Council Associate Director; 506 East Main Street, 

Ronceverte, WV 24970 
Gordon, Betty S. (1); Homemaker & Volunteer; 643 Rockbridge, Bluefield, WV 

24701 
Deel, William S. (8); Associate University Provost; 2208 Circle Drive, Milton, WV 

25541 „ ^. , 

Slaughter, Nancv W. (5); Director Of Music; Washington & Dickenson, 

Charieston, WV 25301 
Blessing, Roy E. (2); Retired Tax Practitioner; 2606 Jackson Avenue, Point 

Pleasant, WV 25550 



80 Journal of the 198 J,. General Conference 

Henderson, Herbert H. (6); Lawyer; IIIV2 Fifth Avenue, Huntington, WV 25701 
Masman, T. Todd (4); Student; P.O. Box 1334, West Virginia Wesleyan College, 
Buckhannon, WV 26201 

Reserves 

Geary, John M.; Minister; Box 499, St. Albans, WV 25177 

Godwin, Charles; Minister; 900 Washington Street, East Charleston, WV 25301 

Elmore, Harold T.; District Superintendent; Box 220, Buckhannon, WV 26201 

Smith, F. Rossing; Conference Council Director; Box 2313, Charleston, WV 25328 

Denney, James R.; District Superintendent; Box 388, Weston, WV 26452 

Risinger, Melvin S.; Minister; 219 Eleventh Street, Parkersburg, WV 26101 

Elkins, Heather M.; Minister; 38 Eighth Street, McMechen, WV 26040 

Conley, Ellis E.; Minister; Box 246, Wayne, WV 25570 

McCauley, Ronald M.; District Superintendent; 605 Northwestern Avenue, 

Beckley, WV 25801 
Mendez, John; District Superintendent; 697 Spring Garden Drive, Bluefield, WV 

24701 
Slaughter, Lorraine; Secretary Chapel Office; West Virginia Wesleyan, Buckhan- 
non, WV 26201 
Burgess, Beatrice R.; Church & Community Worker; Box 201, Kincaid, WV 25119 
Meade, Charlotte A.; Teacher; 109 High Street, Fairmont, WV 26554 
Rogers, June L.; Homemaker; 1706 23rd. Street, Parkersburg, WV 26101 
Wood, Chris A.; Student; 1410 Fifth Street, Huntington, WV 25701 
Hahn, Art; Business Owner; 909 Fairfax Drive, Morgantown, WV 26505 
Latimer, Hugh; College President; West Virginia Wesleyan, Buckhannon, WV 

26201 
Evans, T. Sterling; Diaconal Minister of Education; 2044 Lincoln Avenue, St. 

Albans, WV 25177 
Rowe, Mary E.; Student; 940 Pinehill Drive, Fairmont, WV 26554 
Miller, Sue Ann; Teacher; 300 E. Main #117, Lansing, MI 48993 

WESTERN NEW YORK (8) NE 

Sec. C, Row 11, Seats 5-8 

Sec. C, Row 12, Seats 5-8 

^Cleveland, J. Fay (6); District Superintendent; 15 Morris Lane, Jamestown, NY 

14701 
Parsons, Norman W. (5); Pastor; Main and Center Sts., East Aurora, NY 

14052 
Sweet, Leonard I. (7); Provost, Pastor; 1100 S. Goodman St., Rochester, NY 14620 
Bigler, C. Vernon (1); District Superintendent; 2 Brantwood Dr., Buffalo, NY 

14226 
Brown, Lyle C. (3); Retired; 50 W. Main St., Holcomb, NY 14469 
Merrow, Leta L. (8); Volunteer Church Worker; 110 Oliver PI., Hamburg, NY 

14075 
Barger, Jeanne D. (9); Teacher— Homemaker; 226 S. Main St. , Fairport, NY 14450 
Ostrander, Bonnie M. (2); Student; 476 Elmgrove Rd., Rochester, NY 14606 

Reserves 

Cooke, John D.; Pastor; 4115 Dewey Ave., Rochester, NY 14616 
Weeden, Theodore J.; Pastor; 1050 East Avenue, Rochester, NY 14607 
Leach, Robert B.; Pastor; 45 Delray Avenue, West Seneca, NY 14224 
Matthews, Eugene W.; Pastor; 152 Humboldt Parkway, Buffalo, NY 14214 
Gonzalez, Jose M.; Pastor; 20 Fargo Ave., Buffalo, NY 14201 
Crosby, Lorena L; Associate Dairy Equipment Dealer; Box 175, Panama, NY 
14767 



The United Methodist Church 81 

Hemstreet, Kathryn G.; Director of Christian Education; 177 Wardman Road, 

Kenmore, NY 14217 
Keiper, Nancy J.; Homemaker, Part-time Secretary; 102 East Main Street, 

Victor, NY 14564 

WESTERN NORTH CAROLINA (28) SE 

Sec. A, Row 2, Seats 1-8 

Sec. A, Row 3, Seats 1-10 

Sec. A, Row 4, Seats 1-10 

Fitzgerald, Ernest A. (3); Pastor; P.O. Box 870, Greensboro, NC 27402 

Christy, John H., Jr. (6); District Superintendent; 137 North Third St., 

Albemarle, NC 28001 
Young, H. Claude, Jr. (3); Editor, Church School Publications; P.O. Box 801, 

Nashville, TN 37202 
Stockton, Thomas B. (1); Pastor; P.O. Drawer 5289, High Point, NC 27262 
Ferree, James W. (1): District Superintendent; P.O. Box 696, Gastonia, NC 28053 
Golden, Jacob B. (2); Pastor; 27 Church St., Asheville, NC 28801 
Clinard, Hubert C. (7); Pastor; Route 1, Box 126, Stanley, NC 28134 
Langford, Thomas A. (5); Seminary Professor; Duke Divinity School, Durham, NC 

27706 
Robinson, George P. (2); Pastor; P.O. Box 608, Winston-Salem, NC 27102 
Hurley, Kara P. (5); Pastor; Route 1, Box 134, Oak Ridge, NC 27310 
Wilkinson, Larry D. (8); District Superintendent; P. 0. Box 820, Marion, NC 

28752 
McCleskey, J. Laurence (4); District Superintendent; P.O. Box 11772, Winston- 
Salem, NC 27116 
Allred, G. Howard (9); District Superintendent; P.O. Box 678, Madison, NC 27025 
Peters, James C, Sr. (10); Vice President, Publishing House; 201 Eighth Ave., 

So., Nashville, TN 37202 
♦Summers, James A. (1); State Government Official; P.O. Box 1353, Salisbury, NC 

28144 
Mallonee, Thomas L. (3); Retired; P.O. Box 147, Candler, NC 28715 
Duncan, Parker (9); Advertising Executive; 3511 Chevington Dr., Charlotte, NC 

28211 
Robbins, Ronda L. (7); Teacher; 957 South Salisbur>' St., Lexington, NC 27292 
Bailey, Wesley (9); Attorney; 707 Ransom Rd., Winston-Salem, NC 27106 
Sumner, Ted B., Jr. (8); Bank Executive; 2301 Richardson Dr., Charlotte, NC 

28211 
Rinehart, Joetta F. (6); Corporate Manager; 5 Regency Rd., Salisbury, NC 28144 
West, Maxine (4); Chemist; 149-E LaMancha Dr., Asheville, NC 28805 
Queen, Thomas (5); Director, Cherokee Mission; P.O. Box 367, Cherokee, NC 

28719 
Dalton, Mar>- H. (7); Teacher; 9000 Shallowford Rd., Lewisville, NC 27023 
Eurey. Charles W. (8); Businessman; 1010 South Aspen St. , Lincolnton, NC 28092 
DeMarcus, Jamima P. (10); Interior Designer; 510 South Main St., China Grove, 

NC 28023 
Bethea, Marv E. (6); Associate Director, Givens Estates; P.O. Box 8501, 

Asheville, NC 28814 
Dillon, 0. E. (2); Real Estate; P.O. Box 444, Kemersville, NC 27284 

Reserves 

Wright, Harold E.; Pastor; 311 Third Ave.. N.E., Hickon', NC 28601 
White, Charles D., Jr.; Pastor; 1630 Statesville Blvd., Salisbur\-, NC 28144 
Fitzgerald, Bernard R.; Pastor; P.O. Box 6161, Charlotte, NC 28207 
Young, C. Garland; Pastor; P.O. Box 838, Waynesville, NC 28786 



82 Journal of the 19 8U General Conference 

Edwards, Frayik H.; District Superintendent; P.O. Box 367, North Wilkesboro, 

NC 28659 
Marcellus, Cecil H.,Jr.; Associate Director, Conference Council; P.O. Box 18005, 

Charlotte, NC 28218 
Workman, M. Marion; District Superintendent; 319 Summit Avenue, Statesville, 

NC 28677 
Carter, Robert L., Jr.; District Superintendent; P.O. Box 18005, Charlotte, NC 

28218 
Hutchinson, Orion N., Jr.; District Superintendent; 121 West 13th Street, 

Salisbury, NC 28144 
McWhorter, John L.; District Superintendent; Greensboro College, 815 West 

Market Street, Greensboro, NC 27401 
Levns, Debbie G.; Pastor; Route 5, Box 457-D, Hickory, NC 28601 
Little, Gene H.; Pastor; 410 North Holden Road, Greensboro, NC 27410 
Gilland, Jim C; Pastor; P.O. Box 169, Statesville, NC 28677 
Murray, Jerry D.; Pastor; 4401 North Indiana Avenue, Winston-Salem, NC 27105 
Williams, Harley M.; Director, Conference Council; P.O. Box 18005, Charlotte, 

NC 28218 
Christy, Betty C; Homemaker; Route 1, Box 174, Kannapolis, NC 28081 
Henderson, Juanita T.; Homemaker; 1533 Queens Road, West, Charlotte, NC 

28207 
Tyler, Ann; Staff, Conference Council; P.O. Box 18005, Chariotte, NC 28218 
Stockton, Richard; Merchant; 2844 Fairmont Road, Winston-Salem, NC 27106 
Clapp, Sylvia L.; Registered Nurse; Route 6, Box 465-C, Greensboro, NC 27405 
Mims, L. F.; Department Store Buyer; 2925 Club Drive, Gastonia, NC 28054 
Heafner, M. Anne; Student; 921 Kingston Avenue, High Point, NC 27260 
Wooten, Kenneth C; Jeweler; Route 4, Box 674, Mooresville, NC 28115 
Edwards, William R.; Retired; 381 Hanover Arms Court, Winston-Salem, NC 

27104 
Young, Betty Ann; Education Assistant; 341 E. King St., Boone, NC 28607 
Bamhardt, Luriene G., Homemaker; 5830 Creola Road, Chariotte, NC 28211 
Kizer, Mary K.; Sales & Management; 7140 Lakeside Drive, Charlotte, NC 

28215 
Blackwell, Roberta E.; Public Administration; 2827 LaSalle Street, Chariotte, NC 

28216 
Howie, Bill F.; Retired; Route 1, Waxhaw, NC 28173 
Zinavage, Zula V.; Retired; 9 Rolling Green Drive, Waynesville, NC 28786 

WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA (22) NE 
Sec. C, Row 9, Seats 1-12 
Sec. C, Row 10, Seats 3-12 
Meuschke, Paul J. (5); District Superintendent; 430 Vista Dr., Butler, PA 16001 
Spencer, Jack E. (5); Minister; 509 Rondeau Dr., Erie, PA 16505 
Crocker, Hugh D. (6); Minister; 4887 Doverdell Dr., Pittsburgh, PA 15236 
Patterson, John D. (7); District Superintendent; 200 Bloomfield Ave., Johnstown, 

PA 15904 
Weaver, Peter D. (9); Minister; 1688 Kelton St., Pittsburgh, PA 15216 
Joiner, Donald J. (3); District Superintendent; 309 Dragon Rouge Dr., 

Greensburg, PA 15601 
Kohlhepp, Glenn B. (2); Minister; 600 Fox Dr., Pittsburgh, PA 15237 
Wright, J. Howard (1); Minister; 520 Cypress Ave., Johnstown, PA 15902 
Twigg, Aimee W. (4); Minister; Box 11, Addison, PA 15411 
McMahon, Joseph A. (10); Minister; 3006 Graham Blvd., Pittsburgh, PA 15235 
Richards, Robert F. (8); District Superintendent; 229 Evergreen Dr., Franklin, 

PA 16323 



The United Methodist Church 83 

*Bittner, Dwight M. (8); Conference Treasurer; 223 Fourth Ave., Pittsburgh, PA 

15222 
Chaffee, Paul V. (2); RD 4, Union City, PA 16438 
Blackstone, Barbara (10); Professor; RD 1, Zelienople, PA 16063 
Hershberger, George (3); Star Route, Box 79A, Scottdale, PA 15683 
Ernst, Sally (6); Nurse; 3240 Post Gate Dr., Bethel Park, PA 15102 
Gray, Eileen (7); Box 237, Dayton, PA 16222 

Stewart, Karen A. (4); Student; 282 Allegheny St., Meadville, PA 16335 
Vamer, John D. (3); Insurance Agent; 420 Oak St., Indiana , PA 15701 
Sloan, Lillian U. (5); Housewife; 205 Shackelford Dr., Monroeville, PA 15146 
Donner, James L. (9); 5467 Bondy Dr., Erie, PA 16509 
Green, William E. (1); Assistant Superintendent, Public Schools; 5456 Clarendon 

PI., Pittsburgh, PA 15206 

Reserves 

Bums, Richard M.; Minister; 120 S. Center St., Corry, PA 16407 

Schrading, Paul E.; Council Director; 223 Fourth Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15222 

Park, Ferd B.; Minister; 658 School Street, Indiana, PA 15701 

Floyd, Madge B.; Together Director; 223 Fourth Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15222 

Rhodes, Arnold A.; Minister; 311 Wyllis Street, Oil City, PA 16301 

Shaffer, Roger R.; District Superintendent; 2186 Beulah Road, Pittsburgh, PA 

15235 
Ciampa, J. Paul; District Superintendent; 5 South Park Avenue, Kane, PA 16735 
Lindberg, David H.; Minister; 116 Fairfield Drive, New Brighton, PA 15066 
Allaman, Samuel L.; District Superintendent; 117 Davis Street, Connellsville, 

PA 15425 
Jolley, Delbert E.; Retired; RD 1, Box 1030, Russell, PA 16345 
Kerr, Erwin K.; Minister; 191 East Highland Drive, McMurray, PA 15317 
Hurst, Reed J.; Minister; 2571 West 32nd Street, Erie, PA 16506 
Miller, Jaime Potter; Minister; RD 4, Box 162, Franklin, PA 16323 
Spence, Frances; 124 Pennsylvania Ave., Clairton, PA 15025 
Badger, David W.; RD 1, Box 389, New Galilee, PA 16141 
PlowTTian, Jack W.; 1025 Lakemont Drive, Pittsburgh, PA 15243 
Handy, Doris M.; 3350 McNeil Place, Pittsburgh, PA 15219 
Vogel, Margaret E.; RD 6, Box 574, Washington, PA 15301 
Richards, Allen; 2659 West Sixth Street, Erie, PA 16505 
Treece, Lillian; 414 South Winebiddle Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15224 
Van Stone, Mary F.; 609 Grandview Avenue, Clairton, PA 15025 
Peters, Richard A.; Medical Doctor; 124 West Main Street, Youngsville, PA 

16371 
Hershberger, Nyle M.; 318 Kerr Drive, Johnstown, PA 15904 
Orr, Helen; PO Box 107, Girard, PA 16417 
Blackstone, Rodney; RD 1, Zelienople, PA 16063 
Boyle, Margaret; Housewife; 178 Sara Road, St. Marys, PA 15857 

WISCONSIN (14) NC 

Sec. B, Row 14, Seats 1-12 

Sec. B, Row 15, Seats 1-2 

*Christopher, Sharon Brown (6); District Superintendent; 40 Park Lane, Fond Du 

Lac, WI 54935 
Ott, Donald A. (10); Minister; 501 Howe Street, Green Bay, WI 54301 
Saito, Perry H. (5); Minister; 1529 Wauwatosa Avenue, Wauwatosa, WI 53213 
Truitt, Richard 0. (1); District Superintendent; 2231 E. Luther Road, Janesville, 

WI 53545 
Green, Doyina Langlas (7); Minister; Box 145, Viola, WI 54664 



84 Journal of the 1984. General Conference 

Engelman, Kenneth (9); Conference Council Program Director; 750 Windsor 

Street, Sun Prairie, WI 53590 
Vincent, Alonzo E. (3); District Superintendent; 1405 Red Cloud Lane, Madison, 

WI 53704 
Fang, Marcus (4); University Professor; 1700 Church Street, Stevens Point, WI 54481 
Setterlund, Sue (6); Conference United Methodist Women President; 111 Reagles 

Street, Box 96, Arlington, WI 53911 
Roberts, Leigh (2); Psychiatrist; 7424 Deer Run Road, Cross Plains, WI 53528 
Talcott, Paul (1); Student; 320 Main Street, Fort Atkinson, WI 53538 
Hanson, John (3); Banking Officer; Route 7, Box 37, Chippewa Falls, WI 54729 
Mevis, Joyce (7); Radio Station Owner; 214 Ravine Street, Darlington, WI 53530 
Chevalier, David (8); Conference Treasurer; P.O. Box 220, Sun Prairie, WI 53590 

Reserves 

Fenner, Donald D.; Minister; 121 Wisconsin Avenue, Waukesha, WI 53186 
Talcott, H. Myron; Minister; 320 South Main Street, Fort Atkinson, WI 53538 
Bell, J. Perry; Minister; 633 Detroit Street, Sheboygan Falls, WI 53085 
Kruse, David H.; Minister; P. 0. Box 1205, Eau Claire, WI 54701 
Rannells, Thomas A.; Program Associate, Conference Staff; P. 0. Box 220, Sun 

Prairie, WI 53590 
Hair, Marilyn; Minister; 12860 West North Avenue, Brookfield, WI 53005 
Dreistadt, Henry R.; District Superintendent; 514 East Tyler Avenue, Eau Claire, 

WI 54701 
Winston, Joseph; Executive Director Neighborhood House; 128 W. Garfield, 

Milwaukee, WI 53212 
Guzman, Sue; Student; 2931 Shady Lane, Wisconsin Rapids, WI 54494 
Solderholm, Patricia; Homemaker; 2035 26th Street, Monroe, WI 53566 
Bird, Robert; Insurance Agent; 572 South Main Street, Fond du Lac, WI 54953 
Wilhelmi, Kristine; Diaconal Minister; 518 Lewis Street, Burlington, WI 53105 
Olsen, Lois; Nurse; P. 0. Box 10326, Milwaukee, WI 53210 
Beilke, Michael; Farmer; Box 96, Fairwater, WI 53931 

WYOMING (8) NE 

Sec. C, Row 1, Seats 1-4 

Sec. C, Row 2, Seats 1-4 

Crompton, Wesley R. (7); District Superintendent; RD 5 Box 303, Clarks Summit, 

PA 18411 
Reid, William W. (10); District Superintendent; 556 Charles Ave., Kingston, PA 

18704 
Johns, Charles E. (5); Pastor; 127 Church St., Moscow, PA 18444 
Gommer, Charles F., Jr. (1); Pastor; 784 Market St., Kingston, PA 18704 
*Summers, Kenneth T., Jr. (4); Sales Manager Endicott Johnson; 605 Exchange 

Ave., Endicott, NY 13760 
Kramer, Dorothy (6); Homemaker; 7 Beethoven St., Binghamton, NY 13905 
Mintum, Donald C. (8); Conference Treasurer; RD 1 Box 1152, Kirkwood, NY 

13795 
Hanson, Scott (3); Student; 500 Murray Hill Rd., Binghamton, NY 13903 

Reserves 

Germond, Robert E. ; Conference Administrator; 3 Orchard Rd. , Binghamton, NY 

13905 
Highfield, William A. ; Pastor; RD 3, Box 8, Morgan Highway, Clarks Summit, PA 

18411 
Sweet, Marilyn; Homemaker; 252 Robinson St., Binghamton, NY 13904 
Flohr, Joyce; Homemaker; RD 3, Box 165, Endicott, NY 13760 



The United Methodist Church 85 

YELLOWSTONE (2) W 

Sec. C, Row 12, Seats 1-2 
Phelps, Robert I. (5); District Superintendent; 2304 Garland, Missoula, MT 59803 
Harper, Pat Callbeck (1); Political Organizer; 301 S. Oakes, Helena, MT 59601 

Reserves 

Munson-Young, Kathy; College Chaplain; 1511 Poly Drive, Billings, MT 59102 
Adams, Allen J.; District Superintendent; 112-17th Avenue North West, Great 

Falls, MT 59404 
Zimmer, Ralph W.; University Prof.; 1307 Cherry Drive, Bozeman, MT 59715 
Hammer, Roger; Student; 3305 Swan Valley Star Route, Condon, MT 59826 

YUGOSLAVU PROVISIONAL (2) CC 

Sec. B, Row 8, Seats 1-2 

ZIMBABWE (2) CC 

Sec. B, Row 28, Seats 7-8 
Munjoma, John E. (1); Box 3408, Harare, Zimbabwe 
Mutasa, Beatrice (6); 32 Marimba Park, Harare, Zimbabwe 



NON- VOTING REPRESENTATIVES 

Affiliated Autonomous and United Churches 

EVANGELICAL METHODIST CHURCH OF 
ARGENTINA (2) 

Section A, Row 30, Seats 11-12 
Pagura, Federico J.; Bishop; Rivadavia 4044, 1205 Buenos Aires, Argentina 
Toselli, Alfredo; Felix Olmedo 441, 5000 Cordoba, Argentina 

UNITED PROTESTANT CHURCH IN 
BELGIUM (2) 

Section C, Row 29 Seats 1-2 
Pieters, Andre J.; Minister; rue du Champ de Mars, 5 B-1050-Brussels, Belgium 
Fraisse-Lheureux, Ruth; rue du Champ de Mars, 5 B-1050-Brussels, Belgium 

THE METHODIST CHURCH 
OF BRAZIL (2) 

Section A, Row 29, Seats 11-12 
Leite, Nelson Luiz Campos; Bishop; Avenida da Liberdade 659, 01503 Sao Paulo, 

SP Brazil 
Borges, Eloah Mara Perez; CP5002, 09720 Rudge Ramos, SBC, Sao Paulo, Brazil 

THE METHODIST CHURCH OF THE UNION OF BURMA (2) 

Section C, Row 29, Seats 3-4 
Shwe, U Saw; Minister; 157, Aung Chan Tha Quarter (Near the Middle School), 

Mogok, Burma 
Myat, U Tun; c/o 22, Signal Pagoda Road, Rangoon, Burma 

THE METHODIST CHURCH IN CHILE 

Section C, Row 30, Seats 9-10 
Campos, Daniel; Minister; Casilla 362, Iquique, Chile 
Wilson, Patricia; Casilla 2341, Concepcion, Chile 



86 Journal of the 198U General Conference 

THE METHODIST CHURCH OF REPUBLIC OF CHINA (2) 

Section C, Row 29, Seats 5-6 
Wu, Emmanuel; Bishop; 6F, 9 Chi Nan Road, Section 3 Taipei, Taiwan, R.O.C. 
Chien, Harry; 6F, 9 Chi Nan Road, Section 3 Taipei, Taiwan, R.O.C. 

IGLESIA EVANGELICA METODISTA DE 
COSTA RICA (2) 

Section C, Row 30, Seats 11-12 
Trinidad, Flores; Minister; Apartado 461, Tibas-1100, San Jose, Costa Rica 
Arthur, Lilliam; Apartado 8, Guadalupe 2100, San Jose, Costa Rica 

THE METHODIST CHURCH IN CUBA 

Hernandez, Antonio Ruiz; c/o Bishop Armando Rodriguez, K #502 Vedado, 

Habana, Cuba 
Fernandez, Marbelio Tamayo; c/o Bishop Armando Rodriguez, K #502 Vedado, 

Habana, Cuba 

THE METHODIST CHURCH, HONG KONG (2) 

Section C, Row 29, Seats 7-8 
Li, Ping-kwong; Minister; 36 Hennessy Road, Wan Chai, Hong Kong 
Wong, Bing-lai; Room 1004-1006, Bank of Canton Building, Des Voeux Road 
Central, Hong Kong 

THE METHODIST CHURCH IN INDIA (3) 

Section C, Row 29, Seats 9-11 
Rawate, S. M.; Minister; Methodist Church, Mecosabagh Home, Bezonbah, 

Nagpur-440 004, Maharashtra, India 
Seshappa, R.; Stanley Girls' High School, Chapel Road, Hyderabad-500 001. A.P. 

India 
Macwan, D. D.; Sophia Cottage, Wykes Compound, Fatehganj, Vadodara-390002, 

Gujarat, India 

THE METHODIST CHURCH IN INDONESIA (2) 

Section A, Row 30, Seats 6-7 
Doloksaribu, H.; Minister; Jin. Pejompongan Baru 1/16, Jakarta Pusat, 10210, 

Jakarta, Indonesia 
Sihombing, U. H.; c/o Secretary of Konperensi Agung, Jin. Hang Tuah No. 8, 

Medan North Sumatra, Indonesia 

THE METHODIST CHURCH IN KOREA (3) 

Section A, Row 30, Seats 8-10 
Pyo, Yong Eun; Minister; 156-106 Joongrion-dong, Joon-gu, Seoul, Korea 
Kang, Chi Ahn; 309-12 Mangroon-dong, Mapo-gu, Seoul, Korea 
Chung, Suk Soon; 564-19 Myonmuk-dong, Dongdaemon-gu, Seoul, Korea 

GEREJA METHODIST MALAYSIA (2) 

Section C, Row 30, Seats 1-2 
Hui, Ling Tung; Minister; Sarawak Chinese Annual Conference. P.O. Box 155, 

Sibu, Sarawak, East Malaysia 
Con, Yap Hong; c/o Tingkat 8, Wisma Methodist, Lorong Hang Jebat, Kuala 

Lumpur 05-05, Malaysia 

IGLESIA METODISTA DEL PERU 

Section C, Row 29, Seat 12 
Hollemweguer N, Juan E.; Bishop; Apartado 1386, Lima, Pem 



The United Methodist Church 87 

IGLESIA EVANGELICA METODISTA 
EX LAS ISLAS FILIPINAS (2) 

Section C, Row 30, Seats 3-4 
Castro, George F.; Bishop; 1240 General Luna Street, Ermita, Metro Manila, 

Philippines 
Trinidad, Ruben F., 102 K-9th Street, Kamias, Quezon City, Metro Manila, 

Philippines 

THE UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST IN THE 
PHILIPPINES 

Section A, Row 30, Seat 3 
Serina, M.; Bishop; P. 0. Box 718, Manila 2801, Philippines 

THE METHODIST CHURCH IN SINGAPORE (2) 

Section C, Row 30, Seats 5-6 
Thoraisingarn, E. J.; Minister; Methodist Centre, 10 Mount Sophia, Singapore 

0922 
Loh, Michael; 6 Chiltern Dr., Singapore 1335, Republic of Singapore 

IGLESIA EVANGELICA METODISTA 
EN EL URUGUAY (2) 

Section C, Row 30, Seats 7-8 
Beltrami, Jose; Minister; San Jose 1457, Montevideo, Uruguay 
Corradino, Pedro A.; San Jose 1457, Montevideo, Uruguay 



ALPHABETICAL LIST 

OF 

VOTING DELEGATES 

AND 

FIRST LAY AND CLERGY RESERVES 



Abbott, Beverly J. (2) Maine 

Abbott, Clifford M. (9) Alabama-West Florida 

Abesamis, Leodegario R. (R) Southwest Philippines Provisional 

Acey, Anne (4) Virginia 

Ackerson, Merlin J. (4) Iowa 

Adams, Don (3) West Ohio 

Adams, Thomas B. (10) Missouri East 

Ade, Hans (4) German Southwest 

Agbisit, Andrea A. (R) Mindanao 

Agnew, Theodore L. (10) Oklahoma 

Aguilar, Cliff (6) Pacific and Southwest 

Aherrera, Lydia S. (6) Philippines 

Ainger, Lois (6) Great Britain 

Albers, Siegfried (R) German Northwest 

Alexander, Steve (2) Iowa 

Alguire, Frances M. (5) Northern Illinois 

Allen, David L. (R) Red Bird Missionary 

Allen, Elizabeth (6) Southern New England 

Allen, Joe B. (3) Texas 

Allred, G. Howard (9) Western North Carolina 

Alstott, Cathy (10) South Indiana 

Althouse, Kay (7) East Ohio 

Alvarez, Graciela D Mexico 

Anderson, Betty (1) Northwest Texas 

Anderson, Carolyn M. (6) East Ohio 

Anderson, James W. (3) East Ohio 

Anderson, Marlene J. (6) Florida 

Anderson, Rodney (R) Rocky Mountain 

Andrews, David H. (2) Baltimore 

Appelgate, William (6) Iowa 

Appleby, William F. (7) North Mississippi 

Archibald, Julius A., Jr. (R) Troy 

Armentrout, John W. (2) West Ohio 

Arnold, Tracy R. (2) Louisiana 

Arnold, W. E. (3) North Arkansas 

Ash, John L., Ill (4) Mississippi 

Ashema, Mukandu (2) Central Zaire 

Avey, Sue R. (6) West Ohio 

Baddour, Paul M. (4) North Mississippi 

Bahule, Andr6 N. (1) Mozambique 

Bailey, Doreen M. (5) Central Pennsylvania 

Bailey, H. Barry (1) Central Texas 

88 



The United Methodist Church 89 

Bailey, Howard R. (R) Nebraska 

Bailey, Joe (8) North Mississippi 

Bailey, Robert W. (3) South Carolina 

Bailey, Wesley (9) Western North Carolina 

Bailey, William P., Jr. (6) Holston 

Bailey, William P., Jr. (1) Memphis 

Bailor, Max A. (6) Sierra Leone 

Baker, James (R) Northern New York 

Baker, Jane (5) West Ohio 

Baker, Rudolph R., Jr. (4) North Georgia 

Ball, Lee (1) Minnesota 

Barckley, Kay C. (4) Pacific Northwest 

Barger, Jeanne D. (9) Western New York 

Barnes, John 0., Jr. (1) Tennessee 

Bameti, Vemie T. (6) Central Illinois 

Barrett, Nelda (5) Central Texas 

Barto, Reta T. (2) Eastern Pennsylvania 

Bass, Ressie M. (10) Florida 

Bates, Bonnie (R) North Dakota 

Bates, Ralph K. (3) North Alabama 

Batten, James A. (7) New Hampshire 

Batts, Jane (R) Tennessee 

Bauman, Lawrence (8) North Georgia 

Baumgardner, Robert (6) Northwest Texas 

Beal, Jim (9) North Arkansas 

Bean, Frank D., Sr. (1) Kentucky 

Beard, Jean J. (3) West Virginia 

Beezley, Nell M. (2) Nebraska 

Bellamy, Kathleen (2) North Dakota 

Benedyktowicz, Olgierd K. (10) Poland 

Benjamin, JoAnn A. (6) Minnesota 

Beppler, Ronald (2) Southern New Jersey 

Berry, George L. (9) North Mississippi 

Bethea, Joseph B. (7) North Carolina 

Bethea, Mary E. (6) Western North Carolina 

Belts, Charles E. (4) North Alabama 

Bevins, C. Rex (6) Nebraska 

Beyer, Rebecca P. (7) Pacific Northwest 

Bibbee, Kenneth E. (5) East Ohio 

Biederman, Mark H. (R) Minnesota 

Biggs, M. Mouzon, Jr. (8) Oklahoma 

Bigler, C. Vernon (1) Western New York 

Billingsley, Anita (6) Virginia 

Bittner, Dwight M. (8) Western Pennsylvania 

Bjemo, Mogens (R) Denmark 

Bjork, Virgil V. (5) North Indiana 

Blackstone, Barbara (10) Western Pennsylvania 

Blaising, Mark J. (8) North Indiana 

Blake, Bruce P. (9) Kansas West 

Blankenship, Paul F. (5) Memphis 

Bledsoe, Robert D. (10) Florida 

Blessing, Roy E. (2) West Virginia 

Bleyle, Deanna M. (5) Rocky Mountain 

Bloynquist, Paul F. (7) Detroit 

Boe, Donna H. (1) Oregon-Idaho 



90 Journal of the 198 J,. General Conference 

Boissen, Rafael Puerto Rico 

Bolinger, Nonie (3) Central Illinois 

Bolleter, Heinrich (4) Switzerland- France 

Bolt, Peter Great Britain 

Bond, Jan (5) Missouri West 

Bond, Kendall (8) New Mexico 

Bond, R. H. (2) Memphis 

Bondurant , Lillian K. (3) Holston 

Booth, Dale (7) Little Rock 

Boots, Wilson T. (7) New York 

Bom, Ethel (10) Virginia 

Borovickova, Blanka (R) Czechoslovakia 

Borradaile, Earl E. (4) Detroit 

Bosomworth, E. L. (3) Southern Illinois 

Bowersox, Ronald E. (R) Central Pennsylvania 

Bowyer, Amy (R) Kansas East 

Bozeman, W. Scott (7) Florida 

Braaten, Per K. (R) Norway 

Brand, Gene (7) North Arkansas 

Brannen, Mary A. (7) Texas 

Brannon, William C. (5) North Alabama 

Branscomb, Louise (10) North Alabama 

Braswell, Kermit L. (8) North Carolina 

Brawn, J. Melvin (1) California-Nevada 

Bray, Jerry G., Jr. (2) Virginia 

Brewster, Jerry (8) Memphis 

Briley, Mollye H. (R) North Carolina 

Brock, Walter H. (R) Louisiana 

Brodhead, B. Bums (4) Eastern Pennsylvania 

Brogdon, Elizabeth S. (R) Southern New Jersey 

Bronson, Oswald P., Sr. (4) Florida 

Brooks, Truman D. (10) North Mississippi 

Brooks, Viola S. (R) Baltimore 

Brown, Gordon M. (3) New York 

Brown, Lyle C. (3) Western New York 

Brown, Rosalie Iowa 

Brubaker, Ellen A. (1) West Michigan 

Brumfield, Welton H., Jr. (8) Louisiana 

Brummet, Don (7) Pacific and Southwest 

Budd, Warren (6) North Georgia 

Bullington, Elick S., Jr. (R) South Georgia 

Bullock, Clifton V. (10) West Michigan 

Burleson, Clint D. (8) North Arkansas 

Bums, Evelyn (1) Southern New England 

Bums, Marjorie (8) Central Texas 

Bums, Richard M. (R) Western Pennsylvania 

Burton, LaVeme B. (3) Little Rock 

Bussey, Bess M. (3) Florida 

Butler, Phyllis P. (9) Baltimore 

Buttrey, D. Roscoe (2) Tennessee 

Butts, R. Harold (3) Alabama-West Florida 

Cade, Ruth L. (10) North Carolina 

Cadle, Shirley K. (5) West Ohio 

Cain, Richard W. (5) Pacific and Southwest 



The United Methodist Church 91 

Calvin, George W. C. (R) Louisiana 

Campbell, Dennis M. (4) North Carolina 

Campbell, Foy (6) Alabama-West Florida 

Campney, Arthur B. (deceased) Iowa 

Cannon, Ralph A. (1) South Carolina 

Capen, Beth (6) New York 

Carder, Kenneth L. (8) Holston 

Carpenter, Robert B., Jr. (10) Virginia 

Carr, Jimmy L. (5) Mississippi 

Carrington, John E. (6) New York 

Carroll, B. F. (1) Central Texas 

Carruth, Augusta (R) South Georgia 

Carruth, Nancy M. (4) • Louisiana 

Carter, Earl B. (4) North Arkansas 

Carter, Joan E. (2) Baltimore 

Carter, R. F. (5) South Carolina 

Carter, T. Eugene (4) Virginia 

Carver, Donald L. (1) Iowa 

Carver, Phil (9) Iowa 

Case, Riley B. (3) North Indiana 

Casey, Robert T. (2) Virginia 

Castnera, Ignacio (9) Pacific and Southwest 

Chaffee, Paul V. (2) Western Pennsylvania 

Chamusso, Alfredo (R) Mozambique 

Chancy, David E. (3) Northern Illinois 

Chapman, Bruce W. (R) Northern Xeic York 

Cherry, William T. (9) Eastern Pennsylvania 

Chevalier, David (8) Wisconsin 

Chiles, Robert K. (9) West Ohio 

Choiv, W. Jing (10). West Ohio 

Chrisentery, Inez W. (1) Louisiana 

Christopher, Sharon Brown (6) Wisconsin 

Christy, Betty C. (R) Western North CaroHna 

Christy, John H., Jr. (6) Western North Carolina 

Chun, May C. (6) Pacific and Southwest 

Church, Gladys (7) West Michigan 

Clare, Cynthia (1) Caribbean and the Americas 

Clark, Terry L. (5) Central Illinois 

Clarke, Lambuth M. (4) Virginia 

Clay, Henry C, Jr. (1) Mississippi 

Clayton, Michael R. (8) Little Rock 

Clendaniel, Virginia L. (7) Peninsula 

Clevelayid, J. Fay (6) Western New York 

Clinard, Hubert C. (7) Western North Carolina 

Cloyd, Thomas H. (6) Tennessee 

Coates, Peggj- ( 10) Texas 

Cochran, Harold T. (3) West Ohio 

Cocke, Emmett \V., Jr. (1) Virginia 

Cole, Calvin H. (7) Central Pennsylvania 

Colescott, Ted G. (4) Minnesota 

Collett, Samuel E. (R) Pacific and Southwest 

CoUey , Carol (9) Oregon-Idaho 

Collins, Ann G. (3) North Carolina 

Conklin, Faith (3) Pacific and Southwest 

Connellv, Brenda J. (6) Missouri East 



92 Journal of the 1984. General Conference 

Conoway, Merlin D. (6) North Mississippi 

Constantino, Leo (R) Northern Illinois 

Cook, Polly L. (1) Florida 

Cook, Shirley (7) Detroit 

Cooke, John D. (R) Western New York 

Coons, Douglas (R) New Hampshire 

Cooper, Mildred S. (5) Virginia 

Coots, Patti (1) Pacific and Southwest 

Cope, Abigail J. (3) Northern New Jersey 

Copher, Marie (1) North Georgia 

Coppedge, Helen Rhea (6) South Georgia 

Corderman, Delos D. (8) South Carolina 

Comette, Dan C. (4) •. West Michigan 

Counter, John A. (R) Florida 

Covington, Foye J. (4) South Carolina 

Cox, Donna Missouri West 

Cox, Ray, Jr. (9) South Georgia 

Craig, Judith (10) East Ohio 

Crain, Dight (2) Southern New England 

Crawford, David L. (5) West Michigan 

Crickard, Elsie J. (7) Kansas West 

Crist, Dollie W. (9) Florida 

Crocker, Hugh D. (6) Western Pennsylvania 

Crompton, Wesley R. (7) Wyoming 

Cromwell, Thomas L. (2) East Ohio 

Crouch, Edward C. (4) East Ohio 

Crouch, Ernest (8) Tennessee 

Crowson, Lyscum E. (6) West Virginia 

Crump, Edward L. (4) Tennessee 

Cummins, Marlene (9) Southern Illinois 

Cunanan, Jose P. M. (R) Philippines 

Cunningham, Donald J. (10) Cahfomia-Nevada 

Curameng, Isagani A. (9) Northwest Philippines 

Current, Gloster B. (4) New York 

Curtis, Alecia (9) Alabama-West Florida 

Dahl, Stephen A. (6) Northern Illinois 

Dailey, Charles M. (8) East Ohio 

Dalton, Mary H. (7) Western North Carolina 

Danforth, Merrill A. (R) Maine 

Daniel, Mary (4) North Georgia 

Darling, Howard H. (8) New York 

Daughenbaugh, Howard L. (9) Central Illinois 

Daugherty, Ruth (6) Eastern Pennsylvania 

Daughtery, V. L. (3) South (jeorgia 

Davidson, Sue (6) New Hampshire 

Davies , Susan P. ( 1) Nebraska 

Davis, Homer H. (7) West Virginia 

Davis, James T. (6) West Ohio 

Davison, James J. (9) Southern New Jersey 

Day, R. Randy (8) New York 

Day, Samuel S. (7) Rocky Mountain 

Deel, William S. (8) West Virginia 

Dekle, Joe (7) North Georgia 

de Leon, Francisca (R) PhiHppines 



The United Methodist Church 93 

DeLong, Dale F. (7) West Ohio 

Delp, W. Owen (R) West Ohio 

DelPino, Jerome K. (7) Southern New England 

DeMarcus, Jamima P. (10) Western North Carolina 

Dew, Jack (9) Louisiana 

Dew, William W. (1) California-Nevada 

Dicken, John R. (6) North Indiana 

Dickens, Leota (7) West Virginia 

Dickerson, E. Robert, III aO) Alabama-West Florida 

Dickson, Frances (3) Missouri West 

Dilgard, Charles K. (6) West Ohio 

Dillard, F. Douglas, Jr. (6) Virginia 

Dillard, R. L., Jr. (7) "."."." North Texas 

Dillon, 0. E. (2) Western North Carolina 

Dings, Joyce E. (3) Central Illinois 

Dinsmore, A. Bradford, Jr. (3) Florida 

Ditto, Dale(R) Z.VZZ.'.Kentucky 

Dixon, J. D. (1) Louisville 

Dixon, Norman E. (2) Central Illinois 

Dixon, Sam W. (9) North Carolina 

Dizon, Aurora A Southwest Philippines Provisional 

Djundu, Lungii4) Central Zaire 

Dodson, Malone (2) North Georgia 

Dolhver, James M. (1) Pacific Northwest 

Dolsen, David (8) Rocky Mountain 

Dominiak, Bogumila D. (R) Poland 

Donner, James L. (9) Western Pennsylvania 

Dorsey, Frank L. (1) Kansas East 

dos Santos, Manuel T. (8) Angola 

Dotts, Ted (5), Northwest Texas 

Douglas, Jr., Willard H. (1) Virginia 

Douglass, Paid F. (R) ...Memphis 

Dowell, Jean (9) Minnesota 

Downie. Gerald L. (5) Central Illinois 

Drabek, Robert (R) South Dakota 

Dnver, Barbara (3) Kansas East 

Duecker, R. Sheldon (9) '.'.'.'.'.'.".'.'.North Indiana 

Duel, Nancy (R) Northern Illinois 

Duncan, Edward L. (3) Detroit 

Duncan, Parker (9) Western 'North Carolina 

Dundas, Charles 0. (3) Minnesota 

Dunlap, Catherine M. (5) East Ohio 

Dunlap, E. Dale (5) Kansas West 

Dunlap, G. Alan (8) Nebraska 

Dunn, Van Bogard (1) East Ohio 

Dyese, Nkulu (1) Southern Zaire 

Dykes, D. L. (10) Louisiana 

Ebinger, Warren R. (3) Baltimore 

Edgar, Charles E. (7) Central Pennsvlvania 

Edge, Caroline B. (5) Southern New England 

Edmonds, Claude A. (6) Eastern Pennsvlvania 

Edwards, Benjamin T. (7) West Ohio 

Eichler, Wanda H. (5) Detroit 

Ela, Pedro L. (2) .Middle 'Philippines 



94 Journal of the 198Jt General Conference 

Elfving, Bjom (R) Finland-Swedish Provisional 

Ellingsen, Knut Magne Norway 

Ellis, W. T., Jr. (R) Southwest Texas 

Ellsworth, Jimmie R. (6) Iowa 

Elmore, Paula B. (4) Holston 

Elmore, S. Joe (9) North Alabama 

Els, Albrecht (7) German Southwest 

Emerson, Joe G. (6) South Indiana 

Engelman, Kenneth (9) Wisconsin 

Enke, Karl-Heinz (R) German Democratic Republic 

Ensminger, J. Neal (9) Holston 

Eppley, Dean (R) North Indiana 

Ernst, Sally (6) Western Pennsylvania 

Escamilla, Roberto (8) Southwest Texas 

Eurey, Charles W. (8) Western North Carolina 

Eutsler, R. Kern (3) Virginia 

Evans, William S., II (10) Memphis 

Ewers, Duane A. (5) North Dakota 

Ewing, John L. (1) Southern New Jersey 

Fang, Marcus (4) Wisconsin 

Fannin, Robert E. (5) Florida 

Fanning, Gerry T. (6) Tennessee 

Fannings, Helen (6) Northern Illinois 

Faris, Richard B. (6) Virginia 

Farmer, Marilyn R. (6) Troy 

Famsworth, Alton U. (8) Central New York 

Farrell, Leighton (8) North Texas 

Feemster, Ben (R) North Texas 

Felkner, Myrtle (7) Iowa 

Fenn, Phillip J. (R) Oklahoma 

Fenner, Donald D. (R) Wisconsin 

Fenstermacher, Anita Owen (1) North Indiana 

Fenstermacher, Edwin A. (7) North Indiana 

Ferguson , Juanita J. ( R ) Detroit 

Fernandez, Arturo M. (9) California-Nevada 

Ferree, James W. (1) Western North Carolina 

Ferrer, Fidel M. (R) Northern Philippines 

Ferris, Yvonne (R) Nebraska 

Fields, Richard E. (8) South Carolina 

Fife, David L. (3) Eastern Pennsylvania 

Fink, Wm. Jeryl (10) Virginia 

Finkbeiner, Melvin M. (6) Pacific Northwest 

Finkbiner, Frank (8) Pacific and Southwest 

Fischer, Heinz P. (1) Gei-man South 

Fish, Doris (6) Little Rock 

Fisher, Bruce D. (3) Central Pennsylvania 

Fitts, Gladys M. (9) Tennessee 

Fitzgerald, Ernest A. (3) Western North Carohna 

Flanagan, Hubert (7) North Georgia 

Flinn, Thomas W., Jr. (3) Baltimore 

Flores, Finees (10) Northern Illinois 

Fogleman, C. M., Jr. (10) Kansas West 

Foockle, Harry F. (7) Missouri West 

Foote, Geneva (R) Oklahoma Indian Missionary' 



The United Methodist Church 95 

Forbes, James K. (2) South Indiana 

Forsman, Don L. (5) New Mexico 

Foster, Betty Jean (8) Minnesota 

Fought, Floyd F. (6) West Ohio 

Freeman, Florence (8) Southern New England 

Freeman, G. Ross (9) South Georgia 

Freemyer, Pat (6) North Arkansas 

Friday, Belon 0. (R) North Alabama 

Fryer, JeffW. (3) Tennessee 

Fujiu, Kiyoko K. (10) Northern Illinois 

Furio, V. Pete, Jr. (4) North Alabama 

Furman, Frank H., Jr. (10) Florida 

Gaddis, James H. (1) Holston 

Gadsden, James S. (3) South Carolina 

Galvan, Elias (10) Pacific and Southwest 

Garfield, Sharon K. (6) Missouri West 

Garrett, C. Bendy (2) Iowa 

Garrett, Peggy M. (6) North Indiana 

Garrison, Langdon H. (6) Alabama-West Florida 

Garza, Oscar 0., IV (9) Rio Grande 

Gauntt, Paul M. (5) North Alabama 

Geary, John M. (R) West Virginia 

Gebhart, Judith G. (5) West Ohio 

Geis, Sally (1) Rocky Mountain 

Germond, Robert E. (R) Wyoming 

Ghitalla, Jack P. (R) Central Illinois 

Gibbs, M. McCoy (R) Florida 

Gibson, J. Nelson, Jr. (2) North Carolina 

Giddens, Joseph L. (7) South Georgia 

Gilbert, Tommy D. (7) Mississippi 

Giles, David A. (5) Troy 

Gillaspie, Juanita M. (10) Kansas West 

Gillingham, Leonard (R) New Mexico 

Givhan, Bessie (5) North Mississippi 

Goens, Ray W. (9) Texas 

Golden, Jacob B. (2) Western North Carolina 

Goldman, K. June (1) Iowa 

Goldschmidt, Victor W. (9) ......North Indiana 

Gommer, Charles F., Jr. (1) Wyoming 

Gonzalez, Jose M. (R) Western New York 

Goodgame, Gordon C. (6) Holston 

Goodunn, B. C, Jr. (2) New Mexico 

Gordon, Betty S. (1) West Virginia 

Gordon, Jinny (9) Central Illinois 

Gordon, Myrtle R. (8) North Alabama 

Gordon, Prentiss M. (1) North Mississippi 

Gotschall, Marion (R) Alaska Missionan- 

Grabher, Jean Mane (5) Kansas East 

Gramling, Polly (7) '.".'.'.'.'.'.".".'.'.".'.".'.'.'.' South Carolina 

Gray, Eileen (7) Western Pennsylvania 

Gray, Ethel M. (2) Florida 

Gray, Mai (4) Missouri West 

Gray, Vivienne N. (4) Texas 

Green, Donna Langlas R. (7) Wisconsin 



96 Journal of the 198 J^ General Conference 

Green, Dorothea S. (R) South Indiana 

Green, Mareyjoyce (9) East Ohio 

Green, William E. (1) Western Pennsylvania 

Greet, Kenneth (1) Great Britain 

Grile, Lester L. (8) North Indiana 

Grimes, Johnnie Marie (6) North Texas 

Grisgby , Martha J. (R) Liberia 

Grudebom, Lars-Owe Sweden 

Gruen, Wayne T. (R) Pacific Northwest 

Guillermo, Artemio R. (4) Iowa 

Gunn, Neil (8) Mississippi 

Gustafson, Gus (3) North Georgia 

Gutierrez, Benjamin R. (R) Northwest Phihppines 

Haaf, Jacqueline D. (9) New York 

Haase, Becky (10) Pacific and Southwest 

Hagan, Theodore N. (R) Eastern Pennsylvania 

Hager, Cornelius R. (4) Kentucky 

Hagy, Arthur F., Jr. (R) Troy 

Halvorsen, Carl W. (4) Southern New Jersey 

Hamilton, Charles P. (8) Florida 

Hamilton, Richard E. (1) South Indiana 

Hamilton, Richard M. (R) Maine 

Hamilton, Tom W. (5) Florida 

Hammer, Patricia (9) Pacific and Southwest 

Hamrick, Leon C. (6) North Alabama 

Hancock, C. Wilbume (7) South Georgia 

Hand, Donald J. (10) Southwest Texas 

Hanson, John (3) Wisconsin 

Hanson, Scott (3) Wyoming 

Hardcastle, James C. (9) Peninsula 

Hardin, Paul (4) Northern New Jersey 

Harding, Joe A. (R).. Pacific Northwest 

Harkness, Shepherd G. (7) East Ohio 

Harlow, Ruth A. (9) Troy 

Harms, Avenell (1) Kansas West 

Harper, Charles (3) North Texas 

Harper, Pat Callbeck (1) Yellowstone 

Harper, Ruth E. (10) North Carohna 

Harris, Dale C. (R) Oregon-Idaho 

Harris, William M. (9) Southwest Texas 

Harris-Winton, Euba (1) North Arkansas 

Harsch, Emil (R) German South 

Hart, Joseph T. (9) Virginia 

Hartje, Betty R. (7) Kentucky 

Harvey, William R. (6) East Ohio 

Hassinger, Susan W. (5) Eastern Pennsylvania 

Haverstock, Zedna (6) Central Pennsylvania 

Hayakawa, John (4) Pacific and Southwest 

Hayes, Janet (R) New York 

Haynes, Dwight S. (R) New Hampshire 

Heacock, Jack D. (1) Southwest Texas 

Heam, J. Woodrow (9) Louisiana 

Hedegaard, Anne (R) Denmark 

Hellsten, Erik G. (6) Finland-Swedish Provisional 



The United Methodist Church 97 

Helton, Fred (7) Red Bird Missionary 

Hemphill, William, Jr. (1) Peninsula 

Henderson, Betty A. (3) Eastern Pennsylvania 

Henderson, Cornelius L. (10) North Georgia 

Henderson, Herbert H. (6) West Virginia 

Henderson, Mattie M. (2) West Ohio 

Hendrix, Clelia D. (9) South Carolina 

Hennig, Manfred (R) German Southwest 

Henry, G. Edward (8) Louisville 

Henry, Luther W. (7) Central Texas 

Henry-Crowe, Susan T. (10) South Carolina 

Henton, Jack H. (3) Memphis 

Hering, Giiyiter (S) German Democratic Republic 

Hershberger, George (3) Western Pennsylvania 

Heyward, John W., Jr. (4) Missouri East 

Hicks, Granville A. (2) South Carolina 

Hicks, L. T. (8) Oklahoma 

Hicks, W. Sue (5) Holston 

Hill, Jane (R) Central Texas 

Hill, Judith C. (1) Central Pennsylvania 

Hill, William C. (3) Baltimore 

Hilliard, David M. , Jr. (4) Memphis 

Hilton, David L. (6) Red Bird Missionary 

Hines, William A. (4) West Ohio 

Hipp, James C. (R) South Carolina 

Hodges, Betty (10) North Georgia 

Hoke, Sandra (5) Northern Illinois 

Holland, Bettilou (9) Northern New Jersey 

Holmes, Zan W. (3) North Texas 

Holtsford, A. Philip (8) Northern Illinois 

Hooper, Wilodyne C. (6) Texas 

Hoover, Joan S. (4) Iowa 

Hopkins, Carolyn (8) South Georgia 

Hopkins, John L. (R) North Indiana 

Hoiise, Jay W. (2) Central Pennsylvania 

Howard, Ehzabeth (10) Rocky Mountain 

Howard, John N. (9) Holston 

Howell, Jackie (R) North Alabama 

Howton, Agnes H. (R) Louisville 

Hughes, H. Hasbrouck, Jr. (5) Virginia 

Huie, Janice R. (5) Southwest Texas 

Hundley, George R. (2) North Alabama 

Hunter, Ann E. (8) Florida 

Hunter, George G., Ill (2) Florida 

Hurdle, William H. (10) South Georgia 

Hurley, Kara P. (5) Western North Carolina 

Hurtt, Jane (2) West Ohio 

Hutcherson, Guy K. (2) South Georgia 

Hutchins, Joshua (7) Baltimore 

Hutchinson, Charles L. (3) South Indiana 

loelu, Tapuni (7) CaHfomia-Nevada 

Ireblad, Tord (R) Sweden 

Irons, Neil L. (10) West Virginia 

Ito, Hidemi (3) Rocky Mountain 



98 Journal of the 198J^ General Conference 

Ives , S. Clifton (5) Maine 

Iwamoto, Edward T. (5) Pacific Northwest 

Jackson, J. R. (10) South Carolina 

Jackson, Robert G. (4) North Indiana 

Jahreiss, Ulrich (5) German South 

James, William M. (4) New York 

Jarvinen, Maija-Liisa (R) Finland-Finnish Provisional 

Jdrvinen, Pentti J. (6) Finland-Finnish Provisional 

Jeffers, Elizabeth (R) West Ohio 

Jefferson, A. G. (8) Virginia 

Jelinek, Robert V. (R) Central New York 

Jenkins, Marjorie (6) East Ohio 

Jewell, Mary Jane (6) Detroit 

Jimenez, Bienvinido J. (2) Northern Philippines 

Joao, Silveira A. (R) Angola 

Job, Rueben P. (3) South Dakota 

John, Emmy Lou (4) Northern Illinois 

Johns, Carol /. ( 10) Detroit 

Johns, Charles E. (5) Wyoming 

Johnson, Dorothy M. (10) Baltimore 

Johnson, Edwinna P. (1) Liberia 

Johnson, Ellis B. (10) Southern New England 

Johnson, H. Sam (9) South Carolina 

Johnson, Phyllis Hall (R) North Arkansas 

Johnson, Thelma (1) West Ohio 

Johnston, Paula (9) Rocky Mountain 

Joiner, Donald J. (3) Western Pennsylvania 

Jones, Albert W. (7) Southwest Texas 

Jones, Bevel (5) North Georgia 

Jones, Donald J. (8) Central Illinois 

Jones, Everett R. (6) Baltimore 

Jones, Hughey L. (9) West Ohio 

Jones, Jimmy S. (3) Florida 

Jones, Jon W. (R) Kansas West 

Jones, Sue S. (5) Alabama-West Florida 

Jones, William C. (5) Texas 

Jordan, Bert (3) Mississippi 

Jordan, Charles W. (9) Northern Illinois 

Jorem, Finn (R) Norway 

Joyner, Alex ( 1) Virginia 

Joyner, F. Belton, Jr. (3) North Carolina 

Justo, Benjamin A. (4) Northern Philippines 

Kaatz, Torrey A. (4) West Ohio 

Kabamba, Kiboko (5) Southern Zaire 

Kaiser, Samuel M. (3) North Indiana 

Kdllstad, Torvald Sweden 

Karblee, James D. (R) Liberia 

Karls, Harold M. (R) Detroit 

Karlsen, Elisabeth (7) Denmark 

Kartwe, J. Nimeju (7) Liberia 

Katayama, Masaichi (7) South Indiana 

Katembo, Kashala (R) Southern Zaire 

Katenga, Mbuya (2) North Shaba 



The United Methodist Church 99 

Kates, Robert L. (2) Mississippi 

Kauls, Gloria H. (7) Minnesota 

Keller, Ron L. (3) West Michigan 

Kelsey, Joan T. (6) West Michigan 

Kendall, Richard V. (2) Pacific and Southwest 

Kendall, Wesley W. (4) Rocky Mountain 

Kennedy, Stanley C. (10) ■-"-^o^^ 

Kent, Harry R. (2) South Carohna 

Key, William R. (5) South Georgia 

Kim, Hae-Jong (R) Northern New Jersey 

Kim, Thomas (4) Northwest Texas 

Kinard, Norma J. (6) Central Pennsylvania 

King, John Q. T. (4) Southwest Texas 

Kirby, Wallace H. (2) North Carolina 

Kirk, R. L. (R) Northwest Texas 

Kirkley, Charles F. (5) Baltimore 

Kirkman, John (7) Pacific and Southwest 

Klaiher, Walter (R) German South 

Kleszczynski, Adam (R) •• ,^P'^"^ 

Kluck, Homer R. (4) Central Texas 

Knecht, David F. (R) North Dakota 

Knowles, Grady (2) California-Nevada 

Knox, J. Lloyd (6) .....Florida 

Knudsen, Harold C. (2) Rocky Mountam 

Knudson, Kristin (3) California-Nevada 

Kohlhepp, Glenn B. (2) Western Pennsylvania 

Kramer, Dorothy (6) Wyoming 

Kriewald, Diedra H. (R) Virginia 

Krueger, Delton H. (7) Minnesota 

Kruse, Ruth W. (4) Nebraska 

Kuczma, Adam (6) fol^"'^ 

Kumbe, Alua (R) Central Zaire 

Lamar, Charles L. (2) Louisville 

Lamb, Raymond R. (9) Detroit 

Lance, Bert (8) North Georgia 

Landwehr, AHhur J. (7) Nori:hem Illinois 

Langford, Thomas A. (5) Western Nort:h Carolina 

Lanning, Dean A. (5) Northern New Jersey 

LaPoint, Donna (8) California-Nevada 

Lasher, William A. (3) Troy 

Laster, Kelly (R) Pacific and Southwest 

LaTumo, Ivan L. (9) Missoun East 

Laue, James H. (2) Missoun East 

LaVelle, Larry D. (8) •■ ^^^'^ 

Lavery, Barbara (1) Baltimore 

Lawson, David J. (5) South Indiana 

Lawson, James (1) Pacific and Southwest 

Laycock, Evelyn (7) Holston 

Lebron, Dilca (3) New York 

Ledbetter, Pamela G. (R) Peninsula 

Lee, Charles H. (4) California-Nevada 

Lee, Clay F., Jr. (10) Mississippi 

Leggett, J. Willard, III (3) Mississippi 

Lenox, Asbury (4) Texas 



100 Journal of the 1984. General Conference 

LeSuer, Arlene (1) East Ohio 

Letzler, Thomas A. (8) East Ohio 

Lewis, William B. (5) Southern Illinois 

Lifsey, Roy (3) South Georgia 

Lile, R. Kenneth (3) Louisville 

Ling, Carl C. (3) West Ohio 

Liotta, Ellen C. (1) West Virginia 

Lippse, Charles E. (3) Holston 

Litton, Alice E. (9) Kentucky 

Lively, Joe L, Jr. (7) Florida 

Lodi, Esena (R) Central Zaire 

Loflin, Jack M. (R) Mississippi 

Lofton, J. W. (R) North Arkansas 

Logan, James C. (5) Virginia 

Looney, Richard C. (1) Holston 

Lorch, Basil H., Jr. (2) South Indiana 

Love, John L. (10) Central New York 

Loveless, Charles W. (5) West Ohio 

Loyd, W. Harold (R) Central Illinois 

Lucas, Aubrey K. (4) Mississippi 

Lundgren, Monica (7) Finland-Swedish Provisional 

Lundquist, C. David (9) West Michigan 

Lundy, John T. (2) Holston 

Lundy, Robert F. (4) Holston 

Lupo, C. J., Jr. (5) South Carolina 

Lutrick, Charles E. (9) Northwest Texas 

Lux, John E. (5) Nebraska 

Lux, William E. (3) Iowa 

Lyght, Ernest S. (1) Northern New Jersey 

Lyman, Mary Grace (1) New York 

Macaso, Alberto F. (7) Middle Philippines 

Maclure, J. Stuart (4) Great Britain 

Magbee, Thurman (4) Oklahoma 

Magdowski, Axel (6) German Northwest 

Mahon, Eldon B. (2) Central Texas 

Malac, Vlasta (3) Czechoslovakia 

Mallonee, Thomas L. (3) Western North CaroHna 

Mann, Robert (1) Central New York 

Manuel, Andres (3) Mindanao 

Marrero, Andres (R) Puerto Rico 

Marsh, Shirley M. (1) Nebraska 

Marshall, Carolyn M. (7) South Indiana 

Martin, Bob R. (2) North Georgia 

Martin, John (7) Missouri East 

Martin, S. Walter (4) South Georgia 

Martinez, Fernando Ordaz Mexico 

Martinez, Joel N. (R) Rio Grande 

Martinez, Sam G. (R) Rio Grande 

Masman, T. Todd (4) West Virginia 

Mather, P. Boyd (R) Iowa 

Matherson, Thalia (4) North Texas 

Mathison, John Ed (3) Alabama-West Florida 

Matthews, Heyiry M. (4) Virginia 

Maundo, Gouveia L. (2) Angola 



The United Methodist Church 101 

Maxwell, Loren E. (8) South Indiana 

May, Felton E. (6) Peninsula 

May, Rebecca (6) Memphis 

Mayfield, James L. (R) Southwest Texas 

Mayo, Jerry (R) Tennessee 

Mayo, Kabila Wakubangi (1) North Shaba 

Mayson, Margie J. (3) Central New York 

McAdams, Charles K. (8) North Carolina 

McAdams, Emil D. (7) Louisville 

McCabe, John S. (8) Northern Illinois 

McCallum, Marvin H. (6) Detroit 

McCartney, William A. (4) East Ohio 

McClary, Janice K. (7) Troy 

McCleskey, J. Lawrence (4) Western North Carolina 

McConnell, Bruce E. (6) Oregon-Idaho 

McConnell, Emery (9) South Indiana 

McConnell, Sam P. (10) Holston 

McCord, Durward (10) Tennessee 

McCormack, James H. (8) West Ohio 

McCullough, June D. (5) Southern New Jersey 

McCune, Robert J. (2) Central New York 

McGuire, Douglas L. (7) Louisiana 

Mcintosh, Danny (6) Rocky Mountain 

McKenzie, Leon (8) Pacific and Southwest 

McKinstry, Sylvia (1) Texas 

McKoy, William A. (6) North Georgia 

McLean, Roderick M. (10) North Indiana 

McMahon, Joseph A. (10) Western Pennsylvania 

McMullin, Nancy (8) Missouri East 

McReynolds, Marvin P. (3) Kansas West 

Meadors, Marshal L., Jr. (6) South Carolina 

Meares, John M., Sr. (5) North Carolina 

Meek, Mary Lou (R) Southern Illinois 

Mendenhall, Don (R) Iowa 

Mendoza, Arsenio P. (R) Northwest Philippines 

Mequi, Bonifacio B., Jr. (1) Iowa 

Mercer, Charles H. (1) North Carolina 

Merrow, Leta L. (8) Western New York 

Messer, Donald E. (R) Rocky Mountain 

Meuschke, Paul J. (5) Western Pennsylvania 

Mevis, Joyce (7) Wisconsin 

Michelmann, Heinrich (R) German Southwest 

Middleton, Samuel T. (6) South Carolina 

Middleton, Wayne B. (8) Detroit 

Miles, John P. (4) Little Rock 

Millard, Kent (R) South Dakota 

Miller, Elizabeth (6) Oklahoma 

Miller, G. Jackson (3) Central Pennsylvania 

Miller, Maynard L. (2) Minnesota 

Millett, William H. (7) Eastern Pennsylvania 

Mills, Vernon (7) New Mexico 

Mintum, Donald C. (8) Wyoming 

Minus, Paul M. (1) West Ohio 

Mitchell, Earl D. (R) Oklahoma 

Moffet, Gretta M. (2) Pacific and Southwest 



102 Journal of the 198 Jf General Conference 

Mohring, A. Jean (3) Nebraska 

Montgomery, Allen D. (10) North Alabama 

Montgomery, Ed (8) North Alabama 

Montgomery, John C. (R) Missouri East 

Moore, Elbert (10) Pacific Northwest 

Moore, John V. (R) California-Nevada 

Moore, Kathryn (7) Iowa 

Moore, Leroy W. (5) Iowa 

Moore, Lester L. (7) Iowa 

Moore, Richard V. (4) Florida 

Moore, Thomas P. (2) East Ohio 

Morgan, Robert C. (3) North Alabama 

Morris, William W. (5) Tennessee 

Morrison, R. R. (9) Mississippi 

Morrison, Susan M. (6) Baltimore 

Morton, Hallie (2) Texas 

Morton, Ted R., Jr. (7) South Carolina 

Munden, C. Ebb, III (9) Nebraska 

Munjoma, John E. (1) Zimbabwe 

Munson-Young, Kathy (R) Yellowstone 

Mustonen, Antti R. (R) Finland-Finnish Provisional 

Mutasa, Beatrice (6) Zimbabwe 

Muteb, Mufind K. (9) Southern Zaire 

Mutti, A. F. (2) Missouri West 

Myers, Cecil (3) North Georgia 

Myers, Stacy D., Jr. (1) Eastern Pennsylvania 

Nailor, Steve (2) Northern Illinois 

Nantz, Letha (R) Red Bird Missionary 

Nausner, Helmut (5) Austria Provisional 

Nave , Lester D. (4) Virginia 

Neal, Cecil (10) Missouri West 

Needham, Ann (9) Oklahoma 

NeSmith, Samuel E. (2) Virginia 

Nestler, Frank H. (2) Central Illinois 

Neth, G. Hubert (1) Missouri West 

Nettleton, James L. (2) Southern Illinois 

Nevin, Edwin C. (4) Alabama-West Florida 

Newman, Ernest W. (6) Florida 

Newman, M. Douglas (7) Virginia 

Newton, Douglas C. (R) Alabama-West Florida 

Nhatave, Angelo L. (2) Mozambique 

Nichols , Frank A. (6) Iowa 

Nichols, Henry H. (7) Eastern Pennsylvania 

Nicholson, Anne D. (1) Eastern Pennsylvania 

Nixon, Harold (R) Northwest Texas 

Norris, Alfred L. (5) Louisiana 

Norris, Gene A. (1) South Carolina 

Norris, J. Allen (9) North CaroHna 

Nsenga, Yumba Makangwa (R) North Shaba 

Ntambo, Mulongo (R) North Shaba 

Nugent, Randolph W., Jr. (9) New York 

Nyama, Luhahi A. (6) Central Zaire 

Odell, Russell T. (4) Central Illinois 



The United Methodist Church 103 

Oden, Tal (5) Oklahoma 

Oden, William B. (4) Oklahoma 

O'Donnell, Saranne P. (5) East Ohio 

Oehler, Carolyn H. (9) Northern Illinois 

Oertel, R. David (R) Central New York 

Oetting, M. Christy (5) Missouri West 

Ogden, John (9) North Texas 

Okoko, Luhata (5) Central Zaire 

Olson, George W. (3) Minnesota 

Onema, Ekoko (3) Central Zaire 

Ostrander, Bonnie M. (2) Western New York 

on, Donald A. (10) Wisconsin 

Outlaw, Margaret (R) Missouri East 

Owen, Raymond H. (3) Oklahoma 

Pableo, Librada C. (6) Mindanao 

Pace, Ken (R) Mississippi 

Page, Conrad M., Jr. (8) Central Pennsylvania 

Page, Covey (7) Oklahoma 

Pagett, Betty S. (6) California-Nevada 

Pajusoo, Toomas Baltic Provisional 

Palmer, Herberts. (R) Eastern Pennsylvania 

Palmer, Miley E. (1) Central Illinois 

Palmer, Ruth G. (R) Texas 

Palos, Jose L. (5) Rio Grande 

Parker, Richard S. (1) New York 

Parker, Robert L. (1) Oklahoma 

Pamamets, Olav Baltic Provisional 

Parris, Shirley (7) New York 

Parris, W. Alton (6) North Alabama 

Parrott, Bob W. (R) Texas 

Parsons, Norman W. (5) Western New York 

Pascoal, Francisco (R) Angola 

Patterson, John D. (7) Western Pennsylvania 

Patterson, William G. (3) West Ohio 

Pattillo, Daniel (5) North Georgia 

Payne, Jack S. (deceased) Central Texas 

Pearce, Richard W. (4) North Carolina 

Persson, Ake (R) Sweden 

Peters, James C, Sr (10) Western North Carolina 

Peters, Kenneth (5) Louisville 

Peterson, Clemmet A. (8) Minnesota 

Pevahouse, Joe (9) Memphis 

Pfaltzgraff, Richard C. (3) Iowa 

Pfisterer, Ann Rader (6) Louisville 

Phelps, Robert I. (5) Yellowstone 

Phillips, J. Taylor (1) South Georgia 

Phillips, Samuel B. (6) South Indiana 

Pickett, Elizabeth (9) North Georgia 

Pierce, Wade H. (6) North Carolina 

Pike, Donald M. (8) Central Texas 

Pinezaddleby, Robert (R) Oklahoma Indian Missionary 

Pitcock, Louis (10) Central Texas 

Pitney, Deborah (R) Alaska Missionan- 

Pizarro, Victor E. (6) Puerto Rico 



104 Journal of the 198 Jf General Conference 

Plowman, Howard L. (6) Oklahoma 

Plummer, Kenneth H., Sr. (2) Central Pennsylvania 

Poll, Manfred (5) Austria Provisional 

Ponder, Reginald W. (6) North Carolina 

Porter, John (3) Louisiana 

Porter, Ray B. (R) Southern Ilhnois 

Powrie, Alice E. (10) Peninsula 

Pratt, Jessie A. (5) Eastern Pennsylvania 

Price, Polly (R) New Mexico 

Prigmore, LaFayette T., Jr. (R) Holston 

Purdham, Charles B. (9) Minnesota 

Queen, Thomas (5) Western North Carolina 

Quick, Norman K. (8) West Ohio 

Quick, William K. (5) Detroit 

Quickel, Harold H. (8) Eastern Pennsylvania 

Radde, Henry (R) Central Texas 

Rader, Sharon Z. (2) West Michigan 

Railey, Walker L. (5) North Texas 

Rajamaa, Iris Ch. (1) Finland-Finnish Provisional 

Ramsay, Charles E. (5) North Arkansas 

Randolph, W. B. (6) Texas 

Ravenhorst, Dorothy A. (9) Virginia 

Ravenhorst, Henry L. (7) Virginia 

Reed, James M. (1) Northern Illinois 

Reed, James R. (2) Kansas West 

Reid, William W. (10) Wyoming 

Renshaw, Don F. (2) North Texas 

Reskovac, Ann (R) Missouri West 

Reyes, Ruben T. (R) Middle Philippines 

Reynolds, Diane L South Indiana 

Rhea, Clarence F. (2) North Alabama 

Ricards, Betty P. (10) Southern 'New Jersey 

Richards, Robert F. (8) Western Pennsylvania 

Riddle, Barbara Williams (9) Florida 

Ridenour, Don (3) Iowa 

Riedel, Gerhard (R) German Democratic Republic 

Riggin, Don L. (1) Little Rock 

Riley, James Lee (7) Texas 

Rimes, Marjorie (2) Kansas East 

Rinehart, Joetta F. (6) Western North Carolina 

Riskedal, R. Kenneth (3) Northern Hhnois 

Rittgers, W. Glea (2) Kansas West 

Robbins, Ronda L. (7) Western North Carolina 

Roberts, Adrian J. (6) Kentucky 

Roberts, Leigh (2) Wisconsin 

Roberts, Rodell F. (9) Florida 

Roberts, Sidney (9) Central Texas 

Robinson, George P. (2) Western North Carohna 

Rodgers, N. Alex (R) Louisville 

Rogers, William F. (4) West Ohio 

Ross, Ken Missouri East 

Roughface, Thomas (9) Oklahoma Indian Missionary 

Roughton, William W. (1) Florida 



The United Methodist Church 105 

Rowan, Jana R. (4) Florida 

Ruach, Susan W. N. (R) South Indiana 

Ruby, Sandra (10) South Indiana 

Rudalevige, Donald J. (R) Southern New England 

Rushing, Vaudra M. (1) Central Illinois 

Sadio, Sydney S. (R) Southern New Jersey 

Saito, Perry H. (5) Wisconsin 

Sample, Tex (R) Missouri West 

Samson, Restituto F. (8) Northwest Philippines 

Samukinda, Kakoma (1) Southern Zaire 

Sanchez, Danilo C. (R) Middle Philippines 

Sanchez, Martha L. (6) Kansas West 

Sand, Einar Norway 

Sandidge, Rena (2) Southwest Texas 

Sano, Roy I. (5) California-Nevada 

Saunders, Margaret R. (7) North Carolina 

Sayre, Charles A. (3) Southern New Jersey 

Scales, Roland T. (1) Texas 

Schairer, Jane (3) Detroit 

Scheer, Dennis H. (R) Kansas West 

Schell, Edwin A. (4) Baltimore 

Schell, Walter M. (8) Central Pennsylvania 

Schenck, Carl (R) Kansas East 

Schneeberger, Vilem (6) Czechoslovakia 

Schneider, James H. (R) Minnesota 

Schneidereit, Harry (1) German Democratic Republic 

Schiviebert, John (8) Oregon-Idaho 

Scott, James R. (R) Little Rock 

Scott, Ralph (9) Missouri West 

Seals, Woodrow (5) Texas 

Seamands, David A. (5) Kentucky 

Seifert, Lois (5) Pacific and Southwest 

Seitz, Robert (R) Sviitzerland-France 

Self, Eddie (7) North Alabama 

Selleck, Richard A. (R) West Michigan 

Selph, Charles L. (6) Florida 

Setterlund, Sue (6) Wisconsin 

Severe, David L. (9) Oklahoma 

Shaffer, Barbara M. (6) Alaska Missionary 

Shaner, Harry E. (8) California-Nevada 

Shashaguay, Bernard (8) West Michigan 

Sheaffer, Lee B., Jr. (3) Virginia 

Sheets, Herchel H. (9) North Georgia 

Sherer, Ann B. (10) Texas 

Sherman, William W., Jr. (5) North Carolina 

Sherrer, John F., Sr. (1) Alabama-West Florida 

Shettle, John T. (2) North Indiana 

Shingler, Sara S. (6) South Carolina 

Shivers, M. Russell (6) Southern New Jersey 

Shook, Wallace T. (3) Texas 

Short, Elizabeth (6) Southern Illinois 

Shuler, James E. (6) Central Texas 

Sieving, Walter A. (2) German Northwest 

Silk, Denny M. (5) Nebraska 



106 Journal of the 198 J/. General Conference 

Simmons, Norman (7) Kansas East 

Simon, Blair (9) Eastern Pennsylvania 

Sims, Hugo S. (1) South Carolina 

Slaughter, Lorraine (R) West Virginia 

Slaughter, Nancy W. (5) West Virginia 

Slentz, Helen H. (9) California-Nevada 

Sloan, Lillian U. (5) Western Pennsylvania 

Smith, Judy (4) Oregon-Idaho 

Smith, Maudessa P. (6) Mississippi 

Smith, Paul H. (4) West Virginia 

Smith, Robert (6) Pacific and Southwest 

Smith, Scott (1) North Texas 

Smyth, Robert K. (8) Southern New Jersey 

Snyder, Robert D. (3) East Ohio 

Soderstrom, Caty (R) Finland-Swedish Provisional 

Sofge, J. Tom, Jr. (7) Florida 

Sollenberger, Hildegard (10) Central Pennsylvania 

Solomon, Dan E. (7) Southwest Texas 

Soriano, Benjamin (R) Mindanao 

Souders, Robert E. (1) Southern Illinois 

Spain, Robert H. (7) Tennessee 

Spear, James E. (5) Central New York 

Speer, Aubrey B. (8) Missouri West 

Spence, Frances (R) Western Pennsylvania 

Spencer, Jack E. (5) Western Pennsylvania 

Spencer, Lester H. (5) Alabama-West Florida 

Spieth, Sharon C. (3) East Ohio 

Sprague, C. Joseph (1) West Ohio 

Springman, Thomas R. (1) Central Pennsylvania 

Sprouls, J. Clifton (5) Oklahoma 

Stanton, Joyce B. (1) Detroit 

Stapleton, J. Gordon (3) Peninsula 

Starkey, Lycurgus M. (5) Missouri East 

Stames, Thomas C. (5) Baltimore 

Staubach, William T., Jr. (2) New York 

Staublin, Patricia Northern Illinois 

Steach, Ruth L. (2) Pacific Northwest 

Steeger, Hans-Albert (R) German Northwest 

Steele, Chester R. (9) Texas 

Stegall, Karl K. (8) Alabama-West Florida 

Stein, Neil L. (1) Missouri East 

Stephenson, Janet E . (5) Iowa 

Stephenson, Roy (7) Memphis 

Stephenson, William T. (6) North Texas 

Stevens, Robert W. (8) Pacific Northwest 

Stewart, A. M. (3) Tennessee 

Stewart, Ann R. (1) Baltimore 

Stewart, George (R) Oregon-Idaho 

Stewart, Karen A. (4) Western Pennsylvania 

Stewart, MoUie M. (1) North Alabama 

Stith, Forrest C. (9) Baltimore 

Stockton, Thomas B. (1) Western North Carolina 

Stockton, Wendall H. (R) North Mississippi 

Stokes, Robert P. (9) Central Pennsylvania 

Stoneking, John D. (8) Kansas East 



The United Methodist Church 107 

Strickland, Don (6) Texas 

Stroman, Pat (3) Central Texas 

Stuckey, Paul E. (8) West Ohio 

Stumbo, John E. (6) Kansas East 

Summerour, William F. (9) Pacific Northwest 

Summers, James A. (1) Western North Carolina 

Summers, Kenneth T., Jr. (4) Wyoming 

Summers, Vance, Jr. (10) West Ohio 

Sumner, Ted B., Jr. (8) Western North Carolina 

Sun, Peter Y. K. (R) Baltimore 

Supitran, Teresita (R) Southwest Philippines Provisional 

Swales, William R. (5) Northern New York 

Swank, C. William (10) West Ohio 

Sweazy, Albert W. (8) Kentucky 

Sweet, Elizabeth (3) Southern New England 

Sweet, Leonard I. (7) Western New York 

Sweet, Marilyn (R) Wyoming 

Sweet, Robert K., Jr. (4) Southern New England 

Swenson, Mary Ann (3) Pacific Northwest 

Swofford, Ava (3) Missouri East 

Tafolla, Olga G. (R) West Michigan 

Talcott, Paul (1) Wisconsin 

Tanner, George A. (9) Little Rock 

Tarr, Margaret (R) North Texas 

Tate, Godfrey L., Jr. (1) Virginia 

Taylor, Blaine E. (9) Southern New England 

Taylor, Edunn L. (2) Caribbean and the Americas 

Taylor, Helen F. (1) Oklahoma 

Taylor, Lorene (7) Oregon-Idaho 

Taylor, Mary V. (10) Holston 

Taylor, Thomas S. (7) East Ohio 

Teeter, Bonner E. (2) Oklahoma 

Tenney, Mary Lou (7) Central New York 

Terrell, Marguerite C Iowa 

Thomas, David W. (7) Oklahoma 

Thomas, John J. (4) South Indiana 

Thomason, Terry C Southern New England 

Thomasson, Ruth (10) North Texas 

Thompson, Annie (5) Baltimore 

Thompson, Barbara R. (8) Baltimore 

Thompson, Beckey (2) Oklahoma Indian Missionary 

Thompson, Charles S. (3) West Virginia 

Thompson, Glen D. (10) Iowa 

Thompson, James N. (1) North Georgia 

Thomburg, Richard A. (10) New York 

Throckmorton, E. Ray (3) Kentucky 

Timberlake, Richard H. (5) Holston 

Toschak, Patricia Martin (10) Minnesota 

Totten, Bonnie L. (6) Central New York 

Totten, Harold A. (8) Kansas West 

Toumsend, Patricia (5) New York 

Treese, Donald H. (5) Central Pennsylvania 

Trost, Alice M. (8) Troy 

Trost, Robert F. (10) Troy 



108 Journal of the 198i General Conference 

Trostle, M. Brent (9) Central Pennsylvania 

Trotter, Mark (3) Pacific and Southwest 

Trudeau, William G. (5) Alaska Missionary 

Truitt, Richard 0. (1) Wisconsin 

Trundle, John N. (R) Holston 

Turner, Annie Mae (R) Alabama-West Florida 

Turner, Cleo (3) Pacific and Southwest 

Turner, Richard D. (7) Nebraska 

Turpin, J. Francis (R) Peninsula 

Turigg, Aimee W. (4) Western Pennsylvania 

Tyrrell, Margaret (6) Virginia 

Tyson, Vernon C. (R) North Carolina 

Uetela, Andre (R) Mozambique 

Ulmer, B. Susan (R) South Carolina 

Underwood, Walter L. (8) Texas 

linger, E. Paul (4) Central Illinois 

Uth, Finn (5) Denmark 

Vanderbilt, Chester W. (2) Troy 

VanStone, Jack N. (5) South Indiana 

Vantine, Donald A. (R) Virginia 

Vamer, John D. (3) Western Pennsylvania 

Velez, Paulina (R) Puerto Rico 

Venggo, Nonatu U. (3) Philippines 

Verdin, Douglas F. (R) New York 

Via, Bernard S., Jr. (7) Virginia 

Vick, Catharine (1) North Carolina 

Vickers, John E. (2) Alabama-West Florida 

Viduya, Francisco, Jr. (6) Southwest Philippines Provisional 

Vigilia, Justino R. (R) Northern Philippines 

Vincent, Alonzo E. (3) Wisconsin 

Vincent, James B. M. (1) Sierra Leone 

Vining, Ken (R) North Georgia 

Wahlstrom, LaRayne (6) South Dakota 

Walker, D. Russell (R) California-Nevada 

Walker, H. Thomas (5) Minnesota 

Walker, James M. (3) Southwest Texas 

Walker, John F. (5) Little Rock 

Walker, William 0. (5) Oregon-Idaho 

Waller, L. Glenn (1) Missouri West 

Walter, Jean L. (R) Northern New Jersey 

Walter, Theodore H. (4) South Carolina 

Ward, Amy G. (6) Louisiana 

Ward, Georgiana (10) West Ohio 

Ward, Robert P. (1) Detroit 

Ward, Rosemary C. (9) Detroit 

Ware, Virgil H. (8) West Virginia 

Washington, Rosa (5) California-Nevada 

Washington, Stanley (10) East Ohio 

Waterfield, Jim (8) Northwest Texas 

Waters, Bob E. (2) Texas 

Waters, Dale C. (9) West Virginia 

Watkins, Bradley F. (7) Central Illinois 



The United Methodist Church 109 

Watson, W. Hamp (1) South Georgia 

WajTTiire, Dale (3) Oklahoma 

Weatherford, Ken (6) North Georgia 

Weaver, Peter D. (9) Western Pennsylvania 

Weaver, Welcome I. (4) North Indiana 

Webb, Thomas C. (4) Central Pennsylvania 

Webster, Roy E. (10) Louisville 

Weinland, William J. (R) East Ohio 

Weller, William L. (7) Southern New Jersey 

Welti, Erika (R) Switzerland-France 

Werlein, Ewing (8) Texas 

West, J. Pete, Jr. (7) North Alabama 

West, Maxine (4) Western North Carolina 

White, David L., Jr. (3) South Indiana 

White, Leonard (R) East Ohio 

White, Raymon E. (7) Holston 

White, Woodie W. (2) Detroit 

Whitehurst, Betty (3) Virginia 

Whitenack, Weldon A. (2) Iowa 

Whittle, Charles D. (3) Northwest Texas 

Whitworth, Virginia (R) Memphis 

Wicklein, Helen (4) Baltimore 

Wier, Delight B. (10) Central Illinois 

Wilcox, Barbara B. (1) Florida 

Wilder, Gamett (5) North Georgia 

Wilke, Richard B. (4) Kansas West 

Wilkins , Edward R. (5) Peninsula 

Wilkinson, Larry D. (8) Western North Carolina 

Willen, Howard H. (9) Louisville 

Williams, Charles W. (5) Texas 

Williams, Ira, Jr. (10) Northwest Texas 

Williams, Scott A. (R) Central Pennsylvania 

Williams, Ward R Southern Zaire 

Williamson, D. Randall (R) North Georgia 

Williamson, Odella B. (10) New York 

Wilmoth, Rodney E. (10) Nebraska 

Wilshusen, Jo Anne (9) Southwest Texas 

Wilson, J. Lavon (6) Central Illinois 

Wilson, Monz^ (7) Alabama-West Florida 

Wilson, Ruth A. (9) West Ohio 

Winebrenner, Guy (4) Peninsula 

Winston, Joseph (R) Wisconsin 

Wolf, John D. (1) North Indiana 

Womeldorff, Porter J. (7) Central Illinois 

Wong, Samuel Baltimore 

Wood, W. Robert (R) Kentucky 

Woodland, J. Philip (1) Louisiana 

Woods, George C. (4) Louisville 

Woods, Prenza L. (6) Southwest Texas 

Woolridge, Eugene R., Jr. (8) Virginia 

Wright, Harold E. (R) Western North Carolina 

Wright, J. Howard (1) Western Pennsylvania 

Wright, Richard L. (5) West Virginia 

Wulfkuhle, Wesley (9) Kansas East 

Wyatt, Marj' (R) Southern New England 



110 Journal of the 1984. General Conference 

Wynne, Robin (R) Little Rock 

Wyss, Christoph (1) Switzerland-France 

Yaggy, Mary (8) Iowa 

Yeddo, Donald (7) Northern New York 

Yemba, Olenga A. (8) Central Zaire 

Yingling, Lewis C. (10) Baltimore 

Yoon, Kil Sang (9) East Ohio 

Young, Benny (3) Virginia 

Young, Betty J. (6) Northern New Jersey 

Young, H. Claude, Jr. (3) Western North Carolina 

Young, J. Eugene (7) Iowa 

Young, Jerry (3) Oregon-Idaho 

Young, John F. (7) West Ohio 

Young, Loretta (9) West Virginia 

Youngblood, Rebecca C. (R) North Mississippi 

Yrigoyen, Charles, Jr. (10) Eastern Pennsylvania 

Zabel, Nancy H. (7) Baltimore 

Zabel, Walter J. (8) Baltimore 

Zdk, Vladislav (R) Czechoslovakia 

Zimmer, Ralph W. (R) Yellowstone 

Zimmerman, David E. (7) Virginia 

Zimmerman, DeWane (4) Pacific and Southwest 

Zimmerman, Eugene M. (5) Florida 



STANDING LEGISLATIVE COMMITTEES 

No. 1 
CHURCH AND SOCIETY 

To this committee shall be referred all petitions and resolutions relating to The 
Book of Discipline, (1980), 111 70-76, 719, 738, 1201-16. 

Place of Meeting: Room 310 

Chairperson — Richard S. Parker (New York) 
Vice-chairperson — Barbara B. Wilcox (Florida) 
Secretary — Paul M. Minus (West Ohio) 

Members Conference 

Anderson, Betty Northwest Texas 

Bahule, Andre N Mozambique 

Bailey, H. Barry Central Texas 

Bailey, William P., Jr Memphis 

Ball, Lee Minnesota 

Barnes, John 0., Jr Tennessee 

Bean, Frank D., Sr Kentucky 

Bigler, C. Vernon Western New York 

Boe, Donna H Oregon-Idaho 

BrawTi, J. Melvin Cahfomia-Nevada 

Bruhaker, Ellen A West Michigan 

Bums, Evelyn Southern New England 

Cannon, Ralph A South Carolina 

Carroll, B. F Central Texas 

Carver, Donald L Iowa 

Chrisentery, Inez W Louisiana 

Clare, Cynthia Caribbean and the Americas 

Clay, Henry C, Jr Mississippi 

Cocke, Emmett W., Jr Virginia 

Cook, Polly L Florida 

Coots, Patti Pacific and Southwest 

Copher, Marie North Georgia 

Davies, Susan P Nebraska 

Dew, William W California-Nevada 

Dixon, J. D Louisville 

Dolliver, James M Pacific Northwest 

Dorsey, Frank L Kansas East 

Douglas, Willard H., Jr Virginia 

Dunn, Van Bogard East Ohio 

Dyese, Nkulu Southern Zaire 

Ewing, John L Southern New Jersey 

Fenstermacher, Anita Owen North Indiana 

Ferree, James W Western North CaroUna 

Fischer, Heinz P German South 

Gaddis, James H Holston 

111 



112 Journal of the 1984. General Conference 

Geis, Sally Rocky Mountain 

Goldman, K. June Iowa 

Gommer, Charles F., Jr Wyoming 

Gordon, Betty S West Virginia 

Gordon, Prentiss M North Mississippi 

Green, William E Western Pennsylvania 

Greet, Kenneth Great Britain 

Hamilton, Richard E South Indiana 

Harms, Avenell Kansas West 

Harper, Pat Callbeck Yellowstone 

Harris-Winton, Euba North Arkansas 

Heacock, Jack. D Southwest Texas 

Hemphill, William, Jr Peninsula 

Hill, Judith C Central Pennsylvania 

Johnson, Edwdnna P Liberia 

Johnson, Thelma West Ohio 

Joyner, Alex Virginia 

Lavery, Barbara Baltimore 

Lawson, James Pacific and Southwest 

LeSuer, Arlene East Ohio 

Liotta, Ellen C West Virginia 

Looney, Richard C Holston 

Lyght, Ernest S Northern New Jersey 

Lyman, Mary Grace New York 

Mann, Robert Central New York 

Marsh, Shirley M Nebraska 

Mayo, Kabila Wakubangi North Shaba 

McKinstry, Sylvia Texas 

Mequi , Bonifacio B., Jr Iowa 

Mercer, Charles H North Carolina 

Minus, Paul M West Ohio 

Munjoma, John E Zimbabwe 

Myers, Stacy D., Jr Eastern Pennsylvania 

Neth, G. Hubert Missouri West 

Nicholson, Anne D Eastern Pennsylvania 

Norris, Gene A South CaroHna 

Palmer, Miley E Central Illinois 

Parker, Richard S New York 

Parker, Robert L Oklahoma 

Phillips, J. Taylor South Georgia 

Rajamaa, Iris Ch Finland-Finnish Provisional 

Reed, James M Northern Ilhnois 

Riggin, Don L Little Rock 

Roughton, William W Florida 

Rushing, Vaudra M Central Illinois 

Samukinda, Kakoma Southern Zaire 

Scales, Roland T Texas 

Schneidereit, Harry German Democratic Republic 

Sherrer, John F., Sr Alabama-West Florida 

Sims, Hugo S South Carolina 

Smith, Scott North Texas 

Souders, Robert E Southern Illinois 

Sprague, C. Joseph West Ohio 

Springman, Thomas R Central Pennsylvania 

Stanton, Joyce B Detroit 



The United Methodist Church 113 

Steiyi, Neil L Missouri East 

Stewart , Ann R Baltimore 

Stewart, Mollie M North Alabama 

Stockton, Thomas B Western North Carolina 

Summers, James A Western North Carolina 

Talcott, Paul Wisconsin 

Tate, Godfrey L., Jr Virginia 

Taylor, Helen F Oklahoma 

Thompson, James N North Georgia 

Truitt, Richard Wisconsin 

Vick, Catharine North Carolina 

Vincent, James B. M Sierra Leone 

Waller, L. Glenn Missouri West 

Ward, Robert P Detroit 

Watson, W. Hamp South Georgia 

Wilcox, Barbara B Florida 

Wolf, John D North Indiana 

Woodland, J. Philip Louisiana 

Wright, J. Howard Western Pennsylvania 

Wyss, Christoph Switzerland-France 



No. 2 
CONFERENCES 



To this committee shall be referred all petitions and resolutions relating to The 
Book of Discipline, (1980), %^\ 7-15, 22-26, 36-47, 505-7, 601-35, 657-706, 734-5. 

Place of Meeting: Room 301 

Chairperson — Jerry G. Bray, Jr. (Virginia) 
Vice-chairperson— iS/iaron Z. Rader (West Michigan) 
Secretary — Wallace H. Kirby (North Carolina) 

Members Conference 

Abbott, Beverly J Maine 

Alexander, Steve Iowa 

Andrews, David H Baltimore 

Armentrout, John W West Ohio 

Arnold, Tracy R Louisiana 

Ashema, Mukandu Central Zaire 

Barto, Reta T Eastern Pennsylvania 

Beezley, Nell M Nebraska 

Bellamy, Kathleen North Dakota 

Beppler, Ronald Southern New Jersey 

Blessing, Roy E West Virginia 

Bond , R . H Memphis 

Bray, Jerrj^ G. , Jr Virginia 

Buttrey , D. Roscoe Tennessee 

Carter, Joan E Baltimore 

Casey, Robert T Virginia 

Chaffee, Paul V Western Pennsylvania 



114 Journal of the 19 8 A General Conference 

Grain, Dight Southern New England 

Cromwell, Thomas L East Ohio 

Dillon, 0. E Western North Carolina 

Dixon, Norman E Central Illinois 

Dodson, Malone North Georgia 

Ela, Pedro L Middle Philippines 

Forbes, James K South Indiana 

Garrett, C. Dendy Iowa 

Gibson, J. Nelson, Jr North Carolina 

Golden, Jacob B Western North Carolina 

Goodwin, B. C., Jr New Mexico 

Gray, Ethel M Florida 

Henderson, Mattie M West Ohio 

Hicks, Granville A South Carolina 

House, Jay W Central Pennsylvania 

Hundley, George R North Alabama 

Hunter, George G., Ill Florida 

Hurtt, Jane West Ohio 

Hutcherson, Guy K South Georgia 

Jimenez, Bienvinido J Northern Philippines 

Katenga, Mbuya North Shaba 

Kates, Robert L Mississippi 

Kendall, Richard V Pacific and Southwest 

Kent, Harry R South Carolina 

Kirby, Wallace H North Carolina 

Knowles, Grady California-Nevada 

Knudsen, Harold C Rocky Mountain 

Kohlhepp, Glenn B Western Pennsylvania 

Lamar, Charles L Louisville 

Laue, James H Missouri East 

Lorch, Basil H., Jr South Indiana 

Lundy, John T Holston 

Mahon, Eldon B Central Texas 

Martin, Bob R North Georgia 

Maundo, Gouveia L Angola 

McCune, Robert J Central New York 

Miller, Maynard L Minnesota 

Moffet, Gretta M Pacific and Southwest 

Moore, Thomas P East Ohio 

Morton, Hallie Texas 

Mutti, A. F Missouri West 

Nailor, Steve Northern Illinois 

NeSmith, Samuel E Virginia 

Nestler, Frank H Central Illinois 

Nettleton, James L Southern Illinois 

Nhatave, Angelo L Mozambique 

Ostrander, Bonnie M Western New York 

Plummer, Kenneth H., Sr Central Pennsylvania 

Rader, Sharon Z West Michigan 

Reed, James R Kansas West 

Renshaw, Don F North Texas 

Rhea, Clarence F North Alabama 

Rimes, Marjorie Kansas East 

Rittgers, W. Glea Kansas West 

Roberts, Leigh Wisconsin 



The United Methodist Church 115 

Robinson, George P Western North Carolina 

Sandidge, Rena Southwest Texas 

Shettle, John T North Indiana 

Siering, Walter A German Northwest 

Staubach, William T., Jr New York 

Steach, Ruth L Pacific Northwest 

Taylor, EdvAn L Caribbean and the Americas 

Teeter, Bonner E Oklahoma 

Thompson, Beckey Oklahoma Indian Missionary' 

Vanderbilt, Chester W Troy 

Vickers, John E Alabama-West Florida 

Waters, Bob E Texas 

White, Woodie W Detroit 

Whitenack, Weldon A Iowa 



No. 3 
DISCIPLESHIP 



To this committee shall be referred all petitions and resolutions relating to The 
Book of Discipline, (1980), ^T 3, 16, 17, 19, 67-69, 273-5, 720, 732, 736, 1301-27, 
1401-4. 

Place of Meeting: Room 309 

Chairperson — Robert C. Morgan (North Alabama) 
Vice-chairperson — Pat Stroman (Central Texas) 
Secretary — Elizabeth Sweet (Southern New England) 

Members Conference 

Adams, Don West Ohio 

Allen, Joe B Texas 

Anderson, James W East Ohio 

Arnold, W. E North Arkansas 

Bailey, Robert W South Carolina 

Bates, Ralph K North Alabama 

Beard, Jean J West Virginia 

Bolinger, Nonie Central Illinois 

Bondurant, Lillian K Holston 

Bosomworth, E. L Southern Illinois 

Brown, Gordon M New York 

Brown, Lyle C Western New York 

Burton, LaVeme B Little Rock 

Bussey, Bess M Florida 

Butts, R. Harold Alabama-West Florida 

Case, Riley B North Indiana 

Chaney, David E Northern Illinois 

Cochran, Harold T West Ohio 

Collins, Ann G North Carolina 

Conklin, Faith Pacific and Southwest 

Cope, Abigail J Northern New Jersey 

Daughtery, V. L South Georgia 



116 Journal of the 1984. General Conference 

Dickson, Frances Missouri West 

Dings, Joyce E Central Illinois 

Dinsmore, A. Bradford, Jr Florida 

Driver, Barbara Kansas East 

Duncan, Edward L Detroit 

Dundas, Charles ■ Minnesota 

Ebinger, Warren R Baltimore 

Euts ler, R. Kern Virginia 

Fife, David L Eastern Pennsylvania 

Fisher, Bruce D Central Pennsylvania 

Fitzgerald, Ernest A Western North Carolina 

Flinn, Thomas W., Jr Baltimore 

Fryer, JeffW Tennessee 

Gadsden, James S South Carolina 

Gustafson, Gus North Georgia 

Hanson, John Wisconsin 

Hanson, Scott Wyoming 

Harper, Charles North Texas 

Henderson, Betty A Eastern Pennsylvania 

Henton, Jack H Memphis 

Hering, Giinter German Democratic Republic 

Hershberger, George Western Pennsylvania 

Hill, William C Baltimore 

Holmes, Zan W North Texas 

Hutchinson, Charles L South Indiana 

/to, Hidemi Rocky Mountain 

Job, Rueben P South Dakota 

Joiner, Donald J Western Pennsylvania 

Jones, Jimmy S Florida 

Jordan, Bert Mississippi 

Joyner, F. Belton, Jr North Carolina 

Kaiser, Samuel M North Indiana 

Keller, Ron L West Michigan 

Knudson, Kristin Cahfomia-Nevada 

Lasher, William A Troy 

Lebron, Dilca New York 

Leggett, J. Willard, III Mississippi 

Lifsey, Roy South Georgia 

Lile, R. Kenneth Louisville 

Ling, Carl C West Ohio 

Lippse, Charles E Holston 

Lux, William E Iowa 

Malad, Vlasta Czechoslovakia 

Mallonee, Thomas L Western North Carolina 

Manuel, Andres Mindanao 

Mathison, John Ed Alabama-West Florida 

Mayson, Margie J Central New York 

McReynolds, Marvin P Kansas West 

Miller, G. Jackson Central Pennsylvania 

Mohring, A. Jean Nebraska 

Morgan, Robert C North Alabama 

Myers, Cecil North Georgia 

Olson, George W Minnesota 

Onema, Ekoko Central Zaire 

Owen, Raymond H Oklahoma 



The United Methodist Church 117 

Mmon Wj7/.am G^ West Ohio 

Pfaltzffi-aff, Richard C j^^^ 

Porter, John r'""- ■ 

D-. ' r^ Louisiana 

Kidenour, Don t 

Riskedai^R Kenneth .3z;;;;z;;:::;z;:;zz: Northern "iiiiS 

Sayre, Charles A Southern New Jersey 

bchairer, Jane notr«t 

Sheaffer, Lee B., Jr -^^^^f^^" 

Shook, Wallace T .'.'.'.".".'.'.".'.'.'.'.".'.'.'.'.'.'.".'.'.".".'.' xfxa^ 

Snyder, Robert D ..........'........ East OWo 

Spieth, Sharon C "' g^g^ q^^^ 

Stapleton, J. Gordon ..'.'.'.".'.'.'."..'. Peninsula 

Stewart, A. M _i'eninsula 

stroman,Pat :::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::;::: cenlTrTZ 

Sweet, Elizabeth Southern New England 

Swenson Mary Ann Pacific Northwest 

r'Hf ' rl-T: Missouri East 

rf ? w r- / West Virginia 

Throckmorton, E. Ray Kentucky 

Trotter, Mark p^.i^, and'southwest 

Turner, Cleo. p^.i^, ^^^ Southwest 

Vamer, John D. Western Pennsylvania 

Venggo Nonato U Philippines 

Vincent, Alomo E iir ■ 

]^f-.j--M ■zzz:z:z::z:::::z::£;i,;;^:^^ 

Waymire, Dale nnu 

White, David L., Jr w? h"""" 

Whitehurst, Betty South Indiana 

Young, H. Claude, Jr :::Z:ZZ::Z::::: West^ North 'CaSa 

Y°""^'J^"^ Oregon-Idaho 



No. 4 
HIGHER EDUCATION 

To this committee shall be referred all petitions and resolutions relating to The 
Book of Discipline, (1980), Uli 722, 1601-8, 1612-22, 1603-2. 

Place of Meeting: Room 321 

Chairperson— r/zeodore H. Walter (South Carolina) 
Vice-chairperson^/oan S. Hoover (Iowa) 
Secretarj^— Mai H. Gray (Missouri West) 

Aoey, Alfnr.':'" '^°'"--. . . 

Ackerson, Merlin J... virpnia 

Ade, Hans pV"- "•"^o^'a 

Ash, John L., Ill :::::::. ^^""^" southwest 



Baddour, Paul M ^!!!!^!!"!!!!!"!!!!!; N^^h 



Mississippi 
Mississippi 



118 Journal of the 198 Jf. General Conference 

Baker, Rudolph R., Jr North Georgia 

Barckley, Kay C Pacific Northwest 

Betts, Charles E North Alabama 

Bolleter, Heinrich Switzerland-France 

Borradaile, Earl E Detroit 

Brodhead, B. Bums Eastern Pennsylvania 

Bronson, Oswald P., Sr Florida 

Campbell, Dennis M North Carolina 

Carruth, Nancy M Louisiana 

Carter, Earl B North Arkansas 

Carter, T. Eugene Virginia 

Clarke, Lambuth M Virginia 

Colescott, Ted G Minnesota 

Comette, Dan C West Michigan 

Covington, Foye J South Carolina 

Crouch, Edward C East Ohio 

Crump, Edward L Tennessee 

Current, Gloster B New York 

Daniel, Mary North Georgia 

Djundu , Lungi Central Zaire 

Elmore, Paula B Holston 

Fang, Marcus Wisconsin 

Furio, V. Pete, Jr North Alabama 

Gray, Mai Missouri West 

Gray, Vivienne N Texas 

Guillermo, Artemio R Iowa 

Hager, Cornelius R Kentucky 

Halvorsen, Carl W Southern New Jersey 

Hardin, Paul Northern New Jersey 

Hayakawa, John Pacific and Southwest 

Heyward, John W., Jr Missouri East 

Hilliard, David M., Jr Memphis 

Mines, William A West Ohio 

Hoover, Joan S Iowa 

Jackson, Robert G North Indiana 

James, William M New York 

John, Emmy Lou Northern Illinois 

Justo, Benjamin A Northern Philippines 

Kaatz, Torrey A West Ohio 

Kendall, Wesley W Rocky Mountain 

Kim, Thomas Northwest Texas 

King, John Q. T Southwest Texas 

Kluck, Homer R Central Texas 

Kruse, Ruth W Nebraska 

Lee, Charles H California-Nevada 

Lenox, Asbury Texas 

Lucas, Aubrey K Mississippi 

Lundy, Robert F Holston 

Maclure, J. Stuart Great Britain 

Magbee, Thurman Oklahoma 

Martin S. Walter South Georgia 

Masman, T. Todd West Virginia 

Matherson, Thalia North Texas 

Matthews, Henry M Virginia 

McCartney, William A East Ohio 



The United Methodist Church 119 

McCleskey, J. Laurence Western North Carolina 

Miles, John P Little Rock 

Moore, Richard V Florida 

Nevin, Edwin C Alabama-West Florida 

Odell, Russell T Central Illinois 

Oden, William B Oklahoma 

Pearce, Richard W North Carolina 

Rogers, William F West Ohio 

Rowan, Jana R Florida 

Sckell, Edwin A Baltimore 

Smith, Judy Oregon-Idaho 

Smith, Paul H West Virginia 

Stewart, Karen A Western Pennsylvania 

Summers, Kenneth T., Jr Wyoming 

Sweet, Robert K., Jr Southern New England 

Thomas, John J South Indiana 

Twigg, Aimee W Western Pennsylvania 

Unger, E. Paul Centrarillinois 

Walter, Theodore H South Carolina 

Weaver, Welcome I North Indiana 

Webb, Thomas C Central Pennsylvania 

West, Maxine Western North Carolina 

Wicklein, Helen Baltimore 

Wilke, Richard B Kansas West 

Winebrenner , Guy Peninsula 

Woods, George C Louisville 

Zimmerman, DeWane Pacific and Southwest 



No. 5 
ORDAINED AND DIAGONAL MINISTRY 



To this committee shall be referred all petitions and resolutions relating to The 
Book of Discipline, (1980), «■«" 18, 50-9, 301-15, 401-53, 501-4, 508-31, 723-4, 725, 
739, 740, 1609-11, 1623-5, 1626-9. 

Place of Meeting: Room 308 

Chairperson — William K. Quick (Detroit) 
Vice-chairperson — Rosa Washington (California-Nevada) 
Secretary' — Helmut Nausner (Austria Provisional) 

Members Conference 

Alguire, Frances M Northern Illinois 

Bailey, Doreen M Central Pennsylvania 

Baker, Jane West Ohio 

Barrett, Nelda Central Texas 

Bibbee, Kenyieth E East Ohio 

Bjork, Virgil V North Indiana 

Blankenship, Paul F Memphis 

Bleyle, Deanna M Rocky Mountain 

Bond. Jan Missouri West 



120 Journal of the 198 U General Conference 

Brannon, William C North Alabama 

Cadle, Shirley K West Ohio 

Cain, Richard W Pacific and Southwest 

Carr, Jimmy L Mississippi 

Carter, R. F South Carolina 

Clark, Terry L Central Illinois 

Cooper, Mildred S Virginia 

Crawford, David L West Michigan 

Dotts, Ted Northwest Texas 

Downie, Gerald L Central Illinois 

Dunlap, Catherine M East Ohio 

Dunlap, E. Dale Kansas West 

Edge, Caroline B Southern New England 

Eichler, Wanda H Detroit 

Ewers, Duane A North Dakota 

Fannin, Robert E Florida 

Forsman, Don L New Mexico 

Gauntt, Paul M North Alabama 

Gebhart, Judith G West Ohio 

Giles, David A Troy 

Givhan, Bessie North Mississippi 

Grabher, Jean Marie Kansas East 

Hamilton, Tom W Florida 

Hassinger, Susan W Eastern Pennsylvania 

Hicks, W. Sue Holston 

Hoke, Sandra Northern Illinois 

Hughes, H. Hasbrouck, Jr Virginia 

Huie, Janice R Southwest Texas 

Hurley, Kara P Western North Carolina 

Ives, S. Clifton Maine 

Iwamoto, Edward T Pacific Northwest 

Jahreiss, Ulrich German South 

Johns, Charles E -. Wyoming 

Jones, Bevel North Georgia 

Jones, Sue S Alabama-West Florida 

Jones, William C Texas 

Kabamba, Kiboko Southern Zaire 

Key, William R South Georgia 

Kirkley, Charles F Baltimore 

Langford, Thomas A Western North Carolina 

banning. Dean A Northern New Jersey 

Lawson, David J South Indiana 

Leujis, William B Southern Illinois 

Logan, James C Virginia 

Loveless, Charles W West Ohio 

Lupo, C. J., Jr South Carolina 

Lux, John E Nebraska 

McCullough, June D Southern New Jersey 

Meares, John M., Sr North Carolina 

Meuschke, Paul J Western Pennsylvania 

Moore, Leroy W Iowa 

Morris, William W Tennessee 

Nausner, Helmut Austria Provisional 

Norris, Alfred L Louisiana 

Oden, Tal Oklahoma 



The United Methodist Church 121 

O'Donnell, Saranne P East Ohio 

Oetting, M. Christy Missouri West 

Okoko, Luhata Central Zaire 

Palos, Jose L Rio Grande 

Parsons, Norman W Western New York 

Pattillo, Daniel North Georgia 

Peters, Kenneth Louisville 

Phelps , Robert I Yellowstone 

Poll , Manfred Austria Provisional 

Pratt, Jessie A Eastern Pennsylvania 

Queen, Thomas Western North Carolina 

Quick, William K Detroit 

Railey, Walker L North Texas 

Ramsay, Charles E North Arkansas 

Saito, Perry H Wisconsin 

Sano, Roy I California-Nevada 

Seals, Woodrow Texas 

Seamands, David A Kentucky 

Seifert, Lois Pacific and Southwest 

Sherman, William W., Jr North Carolina 

Silk, Denny M Nebraska 

Slaughter, Nancy W West Virginia 

Sloan, Lillian U Western Pennsylvania 

Spear, James E Central New York 

Spencer, Jack E Western Pennsylvania 

Spencer, Lester H Alabama-West Florida 

Sprouls, J. Clifton Oklahoma 

Starkey, Lycurgus M Missouri East 

Starnes, Thomas C Baltimore 

Stephenson, Janet E Iowa 

Swales, William R Northern New York 

Thompson, Annie Baltimore 

Timberlake , Richard H Holston 

Townsend, Patricia New York 

Treese, Donald H Central Pennsylvania 

Trudeau, William G Alaska Missionary 

Uth, Finn Denmark 

VanStone, Jack N South Indiana 

Walker, H. Thomas Minnesota 

Walker, John F Little Rock 

Walker, William Oregon-Idaho 

Washington, Rosa California-Nevada 

Wilder, Gamett North Georgia 

Wilkins, Edward R Peninsula 

Williams, Charles W Texas 

Wright, Richard L West Virginia 

Zimmerman , Eugene M Florida 



No. 6 
GLOBAL MINISTRIES 

To this committee shall be referred all petitions and resolutions relating to The 
Book of Discipline, (1980), '^ 721, 731, 741, 1501-72. 



122 Journal of the 198 Jf General Conference 

Place of Meeting: Room 307 

Chairperson — C. Rex Bevins (Nebraska) 
Vice-chairperson — Ann Rader Pfisterer (Louisville) 
Secretary — Ruth Daugherty (Eastern Pennsylvania) 

Members Conference 

Aguilar, Cliff. Pacific and Southwest 

Aherrera, Lydia S Phihppines 

Ainger, Lois Great Britain 

Allen, Elizabeth Southern New England 

Anderson, Carolyn M East Ohio 

Anderson, Marlene J Florida 

Appelgate , William Iowa 

Avey, Sue R West Ohio 

Bailey, William P., Jr Holston 

Bailor, Max A Sierra Leone 

Bamett, Vemie T Central Illinois 

Baumgardner, Robert Northwest Texas 

Benjamin, JoAnn A Minnesota 

Bethea, Mary E Western North Carolina 

Bevins, C. Rex Nebraska 

Billingsley, Anita Virginia 

Budd, Warren North Georgia 

Campbell, Foy Alabama- West Florida 

Capen, Beth New York 

Carrington, John E New York 

Christopher, Sharon Brown Wisconsin 

Christy, John H., Jr Western North Carolina 

Chun, May C Pacific and Southwest 

Cleveland, J. Fay Western New York 

Cloyd, Thomas H Tennessee 

Connelly, Brenda J Missouri East 

Conoivay, Merlin D North Mississippi 

Coppedge, Helen Rhea South Georgia 

Crocker, Hugh D Western Pennsylvania 

Crowson, Lyscum E West Virginia 

Dahl, Stephen A Northern Illinois 

Daugherty, Ruth Eastern Pennsylvania 

Davidson , Sue New Hampshire 

Davis, James T West Ohio 

Dicken, John R North Indiana 

Dilgard, Charles K West Ohio 

Dillard, F. Douglas, Jr Virginia 

Edmonds, Claude A Eastern Pennsylvania 

Ellsworth, Jimmie R Iowa 

Emerson, Joe G South Indiana 

Ernst, Sally Western Pennsylvania 

Fanning, Gerry T Tennessee 

Fannings, Helen Northern Illinois 

Farts, Richard B Virginia 

Farmer, Marilyn R Troy 

Finkbeiner, Melvin M Pacific Northwest 

Fish, Doris Little Rock 

Fought, Floyd F West Ohio 



The United Methodist Church 123 

Freemyer, Pat North Arkansas 

Garfield, Sharon K Missouri West 

Garrett, Peggj- M North Indiana 

Garrison, Langdon H Alabama-West Florida 

Goodgame, Gordon C Holston 

Grimes, Johnnie Marie North Texas 

Hamrick, Leon C North Alabama 

Harvey, William R East Ohio 

Haverstock, Zedna Central Pennsylvania 

Hellsten, Erik G Finland-Swedish Provisional 

Henderson, Herbert H West Virginia 

Hilton. David L Red Bird Missionary' 

Hooper, Wilodyne C Texas 

Jdrvinen, Peniti J Finland-Finnish Provisional 

Jenkins, Marjorie East Ohio 

Jewell, Mary Jane Detroit 

Jones, Everett R Baltimore 

Kelsey, Joan T West Michigan 

Kinard, Xorma J Central Pennsylvania 

Knox, J. Lloyd Florida 

Kramer, Dorothy Wyoming 

Kuczma , Adam Poland 

Magdowski, Axel German Northwest 

May, Felton E Peninsula 

May, Rebecca.... Memphis 

McCallum, Marvin H Detroit 

McConnell, Bruce E Oregon-Idaho 

Mcintosh, Danny Rocky Mountain 

McKoy, William A North Georgia 

Meadors, Marshall L., Jr South Carolina 

Middleton, Samuel T South Carolina 

Miller, Elizabeth Oklahoma 

Morrison , Susan M Baltimore 

Mutasa, Beatrice Zimbabwe 

Newman, Ernest W Florida 

Nichols, Frank A Iowa 

Nyama, Luhahi A Central Zaire 

Pableo, Librada C Mindanao 

Pagett, Betty S California-Nevada 

Parris, W. Alton North Alabama 

Pfisterer, Ann Rader Louisville 

Phillips, Samuel B South Indiana 

Pierce, Wade H North Carolina 

Pizarro. Victor E Puerto Rico 

Plowman, Howard L Oklahoma 

Ponder, Reginald W North Carolina 

Ra ndolph , W. B Texas 

Rinehart, Joetta F Western North Carolina 

Roberts, Adria n J Kentuckv 

Sanchez, Martha L Kansas West 

Schneeberger, Vilem Czechoslovakia 

Setterlund. Sue Wisconsin 

Shaffer, Barbara M Alaska Missionar\- 

Shingler. Sara S South Carolina 

Shivers. M. Russell Southern New Jersev 



124 Journal of the 198 Jt General Conference 

Short, Elizabeth Southern Illinois 

Shuler, James E Central Texas 

Smith, Maudessa P Mississippi 

Smith, Robert Pacific and Southwest 

Stephenson, William T North Texas 

Strickland , Don Texas 

Stumbo, John E Kansas East 

Totten, Bonnie L Central New York 

Tyrrell, Margaret Virginia 

Viduya, Francisco, Jr Southwest Philippines Provisional 

Wahlstrom, LaRayne South Dakota 

Ward, Amy G Louisiana 

Weatherford , Ken North Georgia 

Wilson, J. Lavon Central Illinois 

Woods, Prenza L Southwest Texas 

Young, Betty J Northern New Jersey 



No. 7 
LOCAL CHURCH 



To this committee shall be referred all petitions and resolutions relating to The 
Book of Discipline, (1980), ""t 48-49, 101-110, 201-269, 2519-44. 

Place of Meeting: Room 323 

Chairperson — Dan E. Solom.on (Southwest Texas) 
Vice-chairperson — Joseph B. Bethea (North Carolina) 
Secretary — Carolyn M. Marshall (South Indiana) 

Members Conference 

Althouse, Kay East Ohio 

Appleby, William F : North Mississippi 

Batten, James A New Hampshire 

Bethea, Joseph B North CaroHna 

Beyer, Rebecca P Pacific Northwest 

Blomquist, Paul F Detroit 

Booth, Dale Little Rock 

Boots, Wilson T New York 

Bozeman, W. Scott Florida 

Brand, Gene North Arkansas 

Brannen, Mary A Texas 

Brummet, Don Pacific and Southwest 

Church, Gladys West Michigan 

Clendaniel, Virginia L Peninsula 

Clinard, Hubert C Western North Carolina 

Cole, Calvin H Central Pennsylvania 

Cook, Shirley Detroit 

Crickard, Elsie J Kansas West 

Crompton, Wesley R Wyoming 

Dalton, Mary H Western North Carolina 

Davis, Homer H West Virginia 



The United Methodist Church 125 

Day, Samuel S Rocky Mountain 

Dekle, Joe North Georgia 

DeLong, Dale F West Ohio 

DelPino, Jerome K Southern New England 

Dickens, Leota West Virginia 

Dillard, R. L., Jr North Texas 

Edgar, Charles E Central Pennsylvania 

Edwards, Benjamin T West Ohio 

Els, Albrecht German Southwest 

Felkner, Myrtle Iowa 

Fenstermacher, Edwin A North Indiana 

Flanagan, Hu bert North Georgia 

Foockle, Harry F Missouri West 

Giddens, Joseph L South Georgia 

Gilbert, Tommy D Mississippi 

Gramling, Polly South Carolina 

Gray, Eileen Western Pennsylvania 

Green, Donna Langlas R Wisconsin 

Hancock, C. Wilbur^e South Georgia 

Harkness, Shepherd G East Ohio 

Hartje, Betty R Kentucky 

Helton, Fred Red Bird Missionary 

Henry, Luther W Central Texas 

Hutchins, Joshua Baltimore 

loelu, Tapuni. California-Nevada 

Jones, Albert W Southwest Texas 

Karlsen, Ehsabeth Denmark 

Kartice, J. Nimeju Liberia 

Katayama, Masaichi South Indiana 

Kauls, Gloria H Minnesota 

Kirkman, John Pacific and Southwest 

Krueger, Deltvn H Minnesota 

Landwehr, Arthur J Northern Illinois 

Laycock, Evelyn Holston 

Lively, Joe I . , Jr Florida 

Lundgren, Monica Finland-Swedish Provisional 

Macaso, Alberto F Middle Philippines 

Marshall, Carolyn M South Indiana 

Martin , John Missouri East 

Mc Adams, Emil D Louisville 

McClary, Janice K Troy 

McGu ire , Douglas L Louisiana 

Mevis, Joyce Wisconsin 

Millett, William H Eastern Pennsylvania 

Mills, Vernon New Mexico 

Moore, Kathrj-n Iowa 

Moore, Lester L Iowa 

Morton, Ted /?., Jr., South Carolina 

Newman , M. Douglas Virginia 

Nichols, Henry H Eastern Pennsylvania 

Page, Covey Oklahoma 

Parris, Shirley New York 

Patterson, John D Western Pennsylvania 

Ravenhorst , Henrj- L Virginia 

Riley, James Lee Texas 



126 Journal of the 198 Jf. General Conference 

Robbins, Ronda L Western North Carolina 

Saunders, Margaret R North Carolina 

Self, Eddie North Alabama 

Simmons, Norman Kansas East 

Sofge, J. Tom, Jr Florida 

Solomon, Dan E Southwest Texas 

Spain, Robeyi H Tennessee 

Stephenson, Roy Memphis 

Sweet, Leonard I Western New York 

Taylor, Lorene Oregon-Idaho 

Taylor, Thomas S East Ohio 

Tenney, Mary Lou Central New York 

Thomas, David W Oklahoma 

Turner, Richard D Nebraska 

Via, Bernard S., Jr Virginia 

Watkins, Bradley F Central IlHnois 

Weller, William L Southern New Jersey 

West, J. Pete, Jr North Alabama 

White, Raymon E Holston 

Wilson, Monza Alabama- West Florida 

Womeldorff, Porter J Central Illinois 

Yeddo, Donald Northern New York 

Young, J. Eugene Iowa 

Young, John F West Ohio 

Zabel, Nancy H Baltimore 

Zimmerman, David E Virginia 



No. 8 
FINANCIAL ADMINISTRATION 



To this committee shall be referred all petitions and resolutions relating to The 
Book of Discipline, (1980), •:•" 20, 707-16, 726, 733, 901-12, 916-38, 1701-9, 1801-44. 

Place of Meeting: Room 319 

Chairperson — Barbara Thompson (Baltimore) 
Vice-chairperson — Walter L. Underwood (Texas) 
Secretary' — Robert W. Stevens (Pacific Northwest) 

Members Conference 

Bailey, Joe North Mississippi 

Bauman, Lawrence North Georgia 

Biggs , M. Mouzon , Jr Oklahoma 

Bittner, Dwight M Western Pennsylvania 

Blaising, Mark J North Indiana 

Bond, Kendall New Mexico 

Brasivell, Kermit L North Carolina 

Brewster, Jerrj' Memphis 

Brumfield, Welton H., Jr Louisiana 

Bu rleson , Clint D North Arkansas 



The United Methodist Church 127 

Burns, Marjorie Central Texas 

Carder, Kenneth L Holston 

Chevalier, David "!!!"!!!";!;;";;;";;;;;"! Wisconsin 

Clayton, Michael R Lj^je Rock 

Corderman, Delos D '.South Carolina 

Crouch, Ernest. Tennessee 

Dailey, Charles M East Ohio 

Darling, Howard H New York 

Day, R. Randy Z," ZZZ.'.".'.'. New York 

Deel, William S West Virginia 

Dolsen, David Rocky Mountain 

dos Santos, Manuel T Angola 

Dunlap, G. Alan Nebraska 

Escamilla, Roberto Southwest Texas 

Eurey, Charles W Western North Carolina 

Famsworth, Alton U Central New York 

Farrell Leighton North Texas 

Fields, Richard E South Carolina 

Finkbiner, Frank Pacific and Southwest 

Foster, Betty Jean Minnesota 

Freeman, Florence Southern New England 

Gordon Myrtle R North Alabama 

Gnle, Lester L North Indiana 

Gunn Neil. ...^ Mississippi 

Hamilton, Charles P Florida 

Henry, G.Edward .ZZ".'.' ■."■■.' Louisville 

2''/hb^.-oVV. Oklahoma 

Holtsford, A. Philip Northern Illinois 

Hopkins, Carolyn South Georgia 

Hunter, Ann E Florida 

Jefferson, AG Virginia 

Jones, Donald J Central Illinois 

L^"^^' ^^I^ North Georgia 

LaPoint, Donna California-Nevada 

LaVelle, Larry D lo^^ 

Letzler, Thomas A East Ohio 

.We//, Loren ^.. '.South Indiana 

JJ'o'^u'"'; ?^?^' ^ North Carolina 

McCabe, John S Northern Illinois 

McCormack, James H West Ohio 

JI*'?/?.'^' Jr^°" ".".'.'.'.".". Pacificand Southwest 

McMullm Nancy Missouri East 

5J^iir'' fxf ^■••,n- Western New York 

Middleton, Wayne B Detroit 

Mintum, Donald C .Z.'.Z.'Z Wyoming 

Montgomery Ed.. North Alabama 

Page, Conrad M., Jr Central Pennsvlvania 

Ir^' ^7\T^ ^ Minnesota 

Pike, Donald M Central Texas 

Quick, Norman K West Ohio 

Quickel Harold H Eastern Pennsvlvania 

Richards, Robert F Western Pennsylvania 

fTn V ff ^Vi^ ^ Northwest Philippines 

?J \^''fi!^ Central Pennsylvania 

Schmebert, John Oregon-Idaho 



128 Journal of the 198 Jt General Conference 

Shaner, Harry E California- Nevada 

Shashaguay, Bernard West Michigan 

Smyth, Robert K Southern New Jersey 

Speer, Aubrey B Missouri West 

Stegall, Karl K Alabama-West Florida 

Stevens, Robert W Pacific Northwest 

Sto7ieking, John D Kansas East 

Stuckey, Paul E West Ohio 

Sumner, Ted B., Jr Western North Carolina 

Sweazy, Albert W Kentucky 

Thompson, Barbara R Baltimore 

Totten, Harold A Kansas West 

Trost, Alice M Troy 

Underwood, Walter L Texas 

Ware, Virgil H West Virginia 

Waterfield , Jim Northwest Texas 

Werlein, Ewing Texas 

Wilkinson, Larry D Western North Carolina 

Woolridge, Eugene R., Jr Virginia 

Yaggy, Mary Iowa 

Yemba, Olenga A Central Zaire 

Zabel, Walter J Baltimore 



No. 9 
COUNCIL ON MINISTRIES 

To this committee shall be referred all petitions and resolutions relating to The 
Book of Discipline, (1980), n 270-2, 717-8, 737, 913-5, 1001-7. 

Place of Meeting: Room 303 

Chairperson — Carolyn H. Oehler (Northern Illinois) 
Vice-chairperson — George L. Berry (North Mississippi) 
Secretary — Forrest C. Stith (Baltimore) 

Members Conference 

Abbott, Clifford M Alabama-West Florida 

Allred, G. Howard Western North Carolina 

Bailey, Wesley Western North Carolina 

Barger, Jeanne D Western New York 

Beal, Jim North Arkansas 

Berry, George L North Mississippi 

Blake, Bruce P Kansas West 

Butler, Phyllis P Baltimore 

Carver, Phil Iowa 

Castuera, Ignacio Pacific and Southwest 

Cherry, William T Eastern Pennsylvania 

Chiles, Robert K West Ohio 

Colley, Carol Oregon-Idaho 

Cox, Ray, Jr South Georgia 

Crist, Dollie W Florida 



The United Methodist Church 129 

Cummins, Marlene Southern Illinois 

Curameng, Isagani A Northwest Philippines 

Curtis, Alecia Alabama- West Florida 

Daughenbaugh, Howard L Central Illinois 

Davison, James J Southern New Jersey 

Dew, Jack Louisiana 

Dixon, Sam W North Carolina 

Donner, James L Western Pennsylvania 

Dowell, Jean Minnesota 

Duecker, R. Sheldon North Indiana 

Duncan, Parker Western North Carolina 

Elmore, S. Joe North Alabama 

Engelman, Kenneth Wisconsin 

Ensminger, J. Neal Holston 

Fernandez, Arturo M California-Nevada 

Fitts, Gladys M Tennessee 

Freeman, G. Ross South Georgia 

Garza, Oscar 0., IV Rio Grande 

Goens, Ray W Texas 

Goldschmidt, Victor W North Indiana 

Gordon, Jinny Central Illinois 

Green, Mareyjoyce East Ohio 

Haaf, Jacquehne D New York 

Hammer, Patricia Pacific and Southwest 

Hardcastle, James C Peninsula 

Harlow, Ruth A Troy 

Harris, William M Southwest Texas 

Hart, Joseph T Virginia 

Heam, J. Woodrow Louisiana 

Hendrix, Clelia D South Carolina 

Holland, Bettilou Northern New Jersey 

Howard, John N Holston 

Johnson, H. Sam South Carolina 

Johnston, Paula Rocky Mountain 

Jones, Hughey L West Ohio 

Jordan, Charles W Northern Illinois 

Lamb, Raymond R Detroit 

LaTumo, Ivan L Missouri East 

Litton, Alice E Kentucky 

Lundquist, C. David West Michigan 

Lutrick, Charles E Northwest Texas 

McConnell, Emery South Indiana 

Morrison, R. R Mississippi 

Munden, C. Ebb, III Nebraska 

Muteb, Mufind K Southern Zaire 

Nave, Lester D Virginia 

Needham, Ann Oklahoma 

Norris, J. Allen North Carolina 

Nugent, Randolph W., Jr New York 

Oehler, Carolyn H Northern Illinois 

Ogden, John North Texas 

Pevahouse, Joe Memphis 

Pickett, Elizabeth North Georgia 

Purdham, Charles B Minnesota 

Ravenhorst, Dorothy A Virginia 



130 Journal of the 1984. General Conference 

Riddle, Barbara Williams Florida 

Roberts, Rodell F Florida 

Roberts , Sidney Central Texas 

Roughface, Thomas Oklahoma Indian Missionary 

Scott, Ralph Missouri West 

Severe, David L Oklahoma 

Sheets, Herchel H North Georgia 

Simon, Blair Eastern Pennsylvania 

Slentz, Helen H California-Nevada 

Steele, Chester R Texas 

Stith, Forrest C Baltimore 

Stokes, Robert P Central Pennsylvania 

Summerour, William F Pacific Northwest 

Tanner, George A Little Rock 

Taylor, Blaine E Southern New England 

Trostle, M. Brent Central Pennsylvania 

Ward, Rosemary C Detroit 

Waters, Dale C West Virginia 

Weaver, Peter D Western Pennsylvania 

Willen, Howard H Louisville 

Wilshusen, Jo Anne Southwest Texas 

Wilson, Ruth A West Ohio 

Wulfkuhle, Wesley Kansas East 

Yoon, Kil Sang East Ohio 

Young, Loretta West Virginia 



No. 10 
ADMINISTRATIVE ORDER AND 
INDEPENDENT COMMISSIONS 

To this committee shall be referred all petitions and resolutions relating to The 
Book of Discipline, (1980), H!! 1-2, 4-6, 21, 60-6, 727-30, 801-22, 1101-8, 1901-12, 
2001-9, 2101-8, 2401-7, 2501-18, 2545, 2601-26. 

Place of Meeting: Room 305 

Chairperson — Richard A. Thomburg (New York) 
Vice-chairperson — Cornelius L. Henderson (North Georgia) 
Secretary — Elizabeth L. Howard (Rocky Mountain) 

Members Conference 

Adams, Thomas B Missouri East 

Agnew, Theodore L Oklahoma 

Alstott , Cathy South Indiana 

Bass, Ressie M Florida 

Benedyktowicz, Olgierd K Poland 

Blackstone, Barbara Western Pennsylvania 

Bledsoe, Robert D Florida 

Bom, Ethel Virginia 

Branscomb, Louise North Alabama 

Brooks, Tnonan D North Mississippi 



The United Methodist Church 131 

Bullock, Clifton V West Michigan 

Cade, Ruth L North Carolina 

Carpenter, Robert B., Jr Virginia 

Choiv, W. Jing West Ohio 

Coates, Peggy Texas 

Craig, Judith East Ohio 

Cunningham, Donald J California-Nevada 

DeMarcus, Jamima P Western North Carolina 

Dickerson, E. Robert, HI Alabama-West Florida 

Dykes, D. L Louisiana 

Evans, William S., II Memphis 

Fink, Wm. Jeryl Virginia 

Flores, Finees Northern Illinois 

Fogleman, C M., Jr Kansas West 

Fujiu, Kiyoko K Northern Illinois 

Furman, Frank H., Jr Florida 

Galvan, Elias Pacific and Southwest 

Gillaspie, Juanita M Kansas West 

Haase, Becky Pacific and Southwest 

Hand, Donald J Southwest Texas 

Harper, Ruth E North Carolina 

Henderson, Cornelius L North Georgia 

Henry-Crowe, Susan T South Carolina 

Hodges, Betty North Georgia 

Howard, Elizabeth Rocky Mountain 

Hurdle, William H South Georgia 

Irons, Neil L West Virginia 

Jackson, J. R South Carolina 

Johns, Carol J Detroit 

Johnson, Dorothy M Baltimore 

Johnson, Ellis B Southern New England 

Kennedy, Stanley C Iowa 

Lee, Clay F., Jr Mississippi 

Love, John L Central New York 

McConnell, Sam P Holston 

McCord, Durward Tennessee 

McLean, Roderick M North Indiana 

McMahon, Joseph A Western Pennsylvania 

Montgomery, Allen D North Alabama 

Moore, Elbert Pacific Northwest 

Neal, Cecil Missouri West 

Ott, Donald A Wisconsin 

Peters, James C, Sr Western North Carolina 

Pitcock, Louis Central Texas 

PowTie, Alice E Peninsula 

Reid, William W Wyoming 

Ricards, Betty P Southern New Jersey 

Ruby, Sandra. South Indiana 

Sherer, Ann B Texas 

Sollenberger, Hildegard Central Pennsylvania 

Su m mers, Va nee. Jr West Ohio 

Swank, C. William West Ohio 

Taylor, Mary V Holston 

Thomasson, Ruth North Texas 

Thompson, Glen D Iowa 



132 Journal of the 198 Jf General Conference 

Thomhurg, Richard A New York 

Tosckak, Patricia Martin Minnesota 

Trost, Robert F Troy 

Ward, Georgiana West Ohio 

Washington, Stanley East Ohio 

Webster, Roy E Louisville 

Wier, Delight B Central Illinois 

Williams, Ira, Jr Northwest Texas 

Williamson, Odella B New York 

Wilmoth, Rodney E Nebraska 

Yingling, Levns C Baltimore 

Yrigoyen, Charles, Jr Eastern Pennsylvania 



"The Plan of Organization and Rules of Order of the 
General Conference shall be the Plan of Organization 
and Rules of Order as published in the journal of the 
preceding General Conference until they have been 
altered or modified by the action of the General 
Conference." (Discipline, 1 606) 



PLAN OF ORGANIZATION 

I. OPENING SESSION AND ORGANIZATION 

The General Conference shall assemble on the day fixed and at 
the place designated in accordance with the action taken by the 
preceding General Conference or the Commission on the General 
Conference, The Holy Communion shall be celebrated by the 
Conference, the Council of Bishops being in charge. The opening 
business session of the Conference shall be on the day and at the 
hour fixed by the Commission on the General Conference and 
shall be called to order by the bishop designated, as provided in 
the Discipline, H 15.11. 

The following order of business shall be observed: 

A. Roll Call. The roll shall be called by the Secretary of the 
General Conference in the following manner: 

(1) There shall be called the names of the bishops who have died 
since the adjournment of the preceding General Conference, and 
Hkewise the names of delegates-elect who have died. 

(2) The record of attendance shall be made in writing to the 
Secretary of the General Conference by: 

(a) The Secretary of the Council of Bishops for the bishops, 

(b) The Secretary of the Judicial Council for that body, 

(c) The General Secretary of the General Council on Ministries 
for all general and executive secretaries, and 

(d) The chairperson of each delegation for its membership. 
The chairperson shall be provided with a blank form on which 

to report in writing the attendance of its members, noting 
absentees and substitutions, which reports shall be tabulated by 
the Secretary and published in the Daily Christian Advocate. 
Any reserve seated in the place of a regular delegate shall have 
been duly elected as a resent delegate by the Annual Conference 
and shall meet the requirements set forth in the Discipline, 
^H 37-39. Delegates, including reserves, when the latter are 

133 



134 Journal of the 198 Jf General Conference 

substituted for a delegate or delegates, shall be seated in the 
order of their election, except when a reserve is seated 
temporarily, in which case the reserve shall occupy the seat of the 
delegate for whom the substitution is made. All delegates 
arriving after the opening roll call shall be reported by the 
chairperson of the delegation to the Committee on Credentials in 
order to be properly enrolled. 

(3) A majority of the whole number of delegates to the General 
Conference shall constitute a quorum for the transaction of 
business {Discipline, 11 607). 

B. Election of Secretary-Designate (Discipline, II 604). The 
Council of Bishops shall present a nomination from the clergy or 
lay membership of The tjnited Methodist Church for secretary- 
designate. Other nominations shall be permitted from the floor. 
The time of election shall be scheduled during the session by the 
Agenda Committee. The election, if there be two or more 
nominees, shall be by ballot. The secretary-designate shall 
assume the responsibilities of the office of secretary as soon after 
the adjournment of the General Conference as all work in 
connection with the session, including the preparation, printing 
and mailing of the Journal, has been completed (Discipline, 
If 605). The exact date of the transfer of responsibility to the 
secretary-designate shall be deterinined by the Commission on 
the General Conference but shall not be later than 12 months 
after the adjournment of the General Conference. 

C. Committee Nominations and Elections. The Council of 
Bishops shall appoint members for the standing administrative 
committees, and present such other nominations as are herein- 
after committed to it, for election by the General Conference. If 
any members appointed and/or nominated do not serve, the 
Council of Bishops, through its Nominating Committee, shall 
name a replacement. 

D. Miscellaneous Business. 

E. Adjournment. 

II. EPISCOPAL AND LAITY ADDRESSES 

The Quadrennial Address of the Council of Bishops shall be 
delivered early in the Conference, at such hour as determined by 
the Commission on the General Conference in consultation with 
the Council of Bishops. 

The Quadrennial Address of the Laity shall be delivered early 
in the Conference, at such hour as determined by the Commission 
on the General Conference. The Association of Conference Lay 
Leaders shall be responsible for the preparation and presentation 



The United Methodist Church 135 

of the Quadrennial Lay Address. The Association of Conference 
Lay Leaders shall enlist participation of men, women, youth, 
young adults, racial and ethnic minorities, and persons with 
handicapping conditions in the preparation and presentation of 
the address. 

III. PRESIDING OFFICERS 

The presiding officers for the several sessions of the Confer- 
ence, the opening session excepted (see I, above), shall be chosen 
from among the effective bishops in the following manner: 

The Council of Bishops shall appoint from the elected delegates 
to the General Conference at its Fall meeting next preceding the 
General Conference a Committee on Presiding Officers composed 
of one clergy and one layperson from each Jurisdiction, and one 
clergy and one layperson from among the delegates representing 
the Annual Conferences outside the United States, and four 
members-at-large. The Committee on Presiding Officers shall 
establish a continuing pool of five names of bishops from which 
group the presiding officer shall be selected by the committee. 
Each bishop shall be given reasonable notice of selection for this 
pool, but subsequent to being selected and notified shall be 
available for assignment as presiding officer at any session. The 
committee shall be free to select a bishop for more than one 
session and to change the presiding officer during a session, 
whenever it seems advisable. 

IV. SECRETARIAL STAFF 

(1) The Secretary of the General Conference elected as 
hereinbefore provided shall be responsible for all functions of the 
office in preparation for the session of the General Conference 
following that election. The Secretary shall serve until all work in 
connection with the session for which such preparation was made 
has been completed; shall keep the record of proceedings of all 
sessions of the General Conference; shall compile and edit a 
Handbook for the General Conference; and shall edit the official 
Journal of the General Conference. 

(2) The Conference shall elect, upon nomination by the 
Secretary', a Coordinator of Calendar, who shall assist the 
Committee on Calendar in presenting reports in such an order so 
as to expedite the business of the Conference, as well as in other 
responsibilities of the committee (See VII-A (2)). 

(3) The Conference shall elect, upon the nomination of the 
Secretary, such assistant secretaries from the ministry' or lay 



136 Journal of the 198 A General Conference 

membership of The United Methodist Church as it may deem 
wise. 

(4) The work of the Secretary shall be supervised by the 
Commission on the General Conference. A budget for the work of 
the Secretary shall be presented by the Commission on the 
General Conference to the General Council on Finance and 
Administration. Such budget shall be paid out of the General 
Administration Fund. 

(5) If in the interim of the quadrennial sessions of the General 
Conference the office of Secretary shall for any reason be 
vacated, the Council of Bishops shall elect a successor to serve 
until the next session. 

V. COMMISSION ON THE GENERAL CONFERENCE 

There shall be a Commission on the General Conference 
composed of one clergy and one layperson from each Jurisdiction 
and four members-at-large who shall be nominated by the Council 
of Bishops at its Fall meeting next preceding the General 
Conference and elected by the General Conference for a term of 
eight years, half of whom shall be elected by the General 
Conference each quadrennium. The Secretary of the General 
Conference, the Treasurer of the General Council on Finance and 
Administration, and the Business Manager of the General 
Conference shall also be members ex-officio but without vote. If 
vacancies occur, the Council of Bishops shall elect successors to 
serve until the next session of the General Conference and then 
nominate for election by the General Conference persons to serve 
any remainder of the term. The Commission shall elect two 
additional members-at-large for each quadrennium. 

The Council of Bishops shall designate one of its members to 
convene and organize the Commission before the adjournment of 
the General Conference. 

This Commission shall determine the place and time (within 
such hmits as may be set up by the General Conference) of the 
next General Conference and shall send an official notice to all 
elected delegates announcing specifically the opening day and 
hour of the General Conference and anticipated time of 
adjournment. It shall further advise the General Conference 
delegates in advance of all such special events and orders of the 
day, the dates and times of which have been determined prior to 
the opening of General Conference, in order that the delegates 
may have an overview of the General Conference program. The 
Commission shall make all necessary arrangements in connection 
therewith, including arrangements for the publication of the 



The United Methodist Church 137 

Daily Christian Advocate and quadrennial reports of the general 
boards and other general agencies of the church, the same to be 
pubhshed by The United Methodist Publishing House. 

The Commission shall plan the schedule for the opening day of 
the Conference. 

The Commission shall arrange for a memorial service for 
bishops, bishops' spouses, widows and widowers, delegates-elect, 
and general officers of the church who have died since the 
adjournment of the last preceding General Conference. 

The Commission shall recommend to the General Conference 
the per diem allowance to be paid to the elected delegates. 

The Commission shall issue invitations to ecumenical represen- 
tatives after consultation v^th the Council of Bishops, and shall 
arrange for their presentation to the General Conference and for 
their local entertainment during the specific period of time 
required for their presence. The term "ecumenical representa- 
tives" shall be interpreted to include only persons who have been 
duly elected by the Christian communions of which they are 
respectively members to represent the same before the General 
Conference; who present the appropriate credentials of such 
elections; and who have been invited through the Commission on 
the General Conference, after consultation with the Council of 
Bishops. All communications, credentials, and information in the 
hands of the General Conference Secretary or the Council of 
Bishops relating to ecumenical representatives shall be referred 
to the Commission. 

The Commission is authorized, if it deems it advisable, to select 
the site of the General Conference two quadrennia in advance. 

VI. PLAN OF ORGANIZATION AND RULES OF ORDER 

There shall be a Committee on Plan of Organization and Rules 
of Order of eleven members, nominated from the elected 
delegates to the General Conference by the Council of Bishops at 
its Fall meeting next preceding the General Conference and 
elected by the General Conference for a term of four years. The 
Secretary of the Conference shall be an ex-officio member and 
one of the eleven. To this committee shall be referred any 
proposed amendments to the Plan of Organization and Rules of 
Order (See Rule 38). To it may be referred any other matters 
relating to parhamentary order or procedure in the business of 
the General Conference. 

This committee shall serve as an Interim Committee between 
sessions of the General Conference and shall restudy the Plan of 
Organization and Rules of Order and, after making such needed 



138 Journal of the 1981^ General Conference 

changes and adaptations therein as in its judgment are necessary, 
shall present them to the General Conference for consideration 
and final action, same to be published in the Journal of the 
General Conference. 

The Plan of Organization and Rules of Order of the General 
Conference shall be the Plan of Organization and Rules of Order 
as published in the Journal of the preceding General Conference 
until they have been altered or modified by the action of the 
General Conference (See Discipline, K 606). 

VII. COMMITTEES 

The General Conference shall have the standing committees 
hereinafter indicated, with such functions, responsibilities, and 
hmitations respectively as are hereinafter prescribed, and such 
special committees as it may order. 

A. Standing Administrative Committees^ 

The members of the following committees shall be appointed by 
the Council of Bishops at its Fall meeting next preceding the 
General Conference. All except committee (3) shall be from the 
elected delegates to the General Conference. 

(1) AGENDA. There shall be a Committee on Agenda. 

(a) It shall be composed of eight members, at least four of 
whom shall be laypersons, to be constituted as follows: one from 
each Jurisdiction, one from Annual Conferences outside the 
United States, the chairperson of the Committee on Calendar 
when elected, and the chairperson or substitute for the Program 
Chairperson of the Program Committee of the Commission on the 
General Conference. 

(b) The Committee shall be convened by the Secretary of the 
General Conference at least the day before the opening of the 
General Conference and shall consult with the Council of Bishops, 
the Commission on the General Conference, and the Secretary of 
the General Conference concerning pending business. 

(c) Following the presentation and adoption of the report of the 
Commission on the General Conference at the opening session of 



^The Committee on Plan of Organization and Rules of Order requested and 
received authority for the Interim Committee "to deteiTnine the number and 
responsibilities of the Standing Administrative Committees for the 1988 General 
Conference" (Journal, page 420). 



The United Methodist Church 139 

the General Conference, the Committee on Agenda shall 
immediately become responsible for helping guide the order of 
business of the Conference. 

(d) To this committee shall be referred all requests for special 
orders of the day, except those requested in the report of the 
Commission on the General Conference on the first day of the 
Conference. 

(e) Proposals, questions, communications, resolutions, and 
other matters not included in the regular business of the General 
Conference shall be referred to the Committee on Agenda 
^\^thout motion or debate. This committee shall determine 
whether or not the matter presented shall be considered by the 
General Conference. Appeal from the decision of this committee 
may be presented to the Conference upon the written signature 
of twenty members of the Conference, and the item shall be 
presented to the Conference if the appeal is supported by a 
one-third vote. 

(f) The Committee on Agenda shall report to each session of the 
General Conference its recommendations concerning business 
agenda and time allocations for the various reports and business 
items, except that at all times the Committee on Calendar shall 
determine the order in which legislative committee reports shall 
be presented. Priority shall be given to calendar items as soon as 
they are available. At the last plenary session of each day, a 
tentative agenda for the next day shall be announced. 

(g) The chairperson of the Committee on Agenda in consulta- 
tion with the chairperson of the Committee on Calendar shall 
inform the presiding officer as soon as possible of the agenda 
items to be considered. 

(2) CALENDAR. The Committee on Calendar shall be 
composed of five members. None of them shall be chairperson of a 
Standing or Legislative Committee or a member or staff person 
of any general board or agency. The committee, upon advice of 
the Coordinator of Calendar (IV (2)), shall: 

(a) present calendar reports in such an order so as to expedite 
the business of the Conference, 

(b) advise the Committee on Presiding Officers as far ahead as 
is feasible of the calendar to be considered, 

(c) inform the presiding bishop of the priority status of the 
calendar, 

(d) keep an overview of calendar progress, 

(e) give priority to calendar items involving majority and 
minority reports, and 

(f) consult frequently with the legislative committee chairper- 
sons to expedite the business of the General Conference. The 



140 Journal of the WSJi. General Conference 

Secretary of the General Conference shall convene the Commit- 
tee on Calendar. 

(3) CORRELATION AND EDITORIAL REVISION. There 
shall be a committee of five known as the Committee on 
Correlation and Editorial Revision, This committee shall be 
composed of five persons not members of the General Conference 
(to take effect in 1988). The Book Editor shall be an ex-officio 
member. They shall be entitled to travel expense and per diem 
allowance, the same as the delegates. Two alternates shall be 
appointed by the Council of Bishops. The function of this 
committee shall be: 

(a) To review all proposed legislation reported in the Daily 
Christian Advocate and that presented in special reports to the 
General Conference and all legislation enacted by the General 
Conference. The Committee shall report promptly to the 
standing committees concerned, or to the General Conference as 
the situation may warrant, any and all contradictions, duplica- 
tions, and inconsistencies discovered therein. 

(b) To report to the chairpersons of the several standing 
legislative committees all changes it has made in the language of 
the reports adopted by the General Conference. 

(c) To assure that, when a calendar item approved on the 
Consent Calendar or under an omnibus vote is found to be in 
conflict with parts of another calendar item discussed and voted 
upon at a plenary session, the item discussed and voted shall 
prevail. 

(d) To edit the Discipline with the Book Editor, the Secretary 
of the General Conference, and the Publisher of The United 
Methodist Church. 

(4) COURTESIES AND PRIVILEGES. There shall be a 
committee of six composed of one representative from each 
Jurisdiction and one representative from Annual Conferences 
outside the United States, known as the Committee on 
Courtesies and Privileges, having the following duties and 
responsibihties: 

(a) To consider, as presented to it by members of the 
Conference, what said members regard as questions or matters 
of privilege, to decide whether they are such or not, and if they 
are regarded as being such, to recommend to the Conference that 
they be heard. 

(b) To consider resolutions of commendation, courtesy, appre- 
ciation, etc., submitted in writing by delegates. The committee 
may initiate similar resolutions and edit and amend those 
submitted to it. Resolutions approved by the committee shall 
be printed in the Daily Christian Advocate and brought to the 



The United Methodist Church 141 

floor if the committee considers them of unusual importance or 
urgency. 

(c) To arrange for extending courtesies of the Conference to 
any to whom they may be due, ecumenical representatives and 
official visitors excepted. 

(d) To limit its report, including the statement of the 
chairperson and the hearing of such persons as may be presented, 
to a maximum of ten minutes in any one business session. No 
person or persons shall be presented after the sixth day unless 
approved by a two-thirds vote of the Conference. 

(e) To prepare and publish in the Daily Christian Advocate, 
along with the list of the nominees for election to the Judicial 
Council, biographical sketches not to exceed 100 words in length 
for each nominee. 

(5) CREDENTIALS. There shall be a Committee on Creden- 
tials of six members, composed of one representative from each 
Jurisdiction and one representative from Annual Conferences 
outside the United States, To this Committee, the chairpersons 
of the respective annual conference delegations shall report on a 
form provided for that purpose any change in seating of 
delegates, indicating the length of time for which the change shall 
be effective. Through the Daily Christian Advocate, this 
Committee shall, in turn, report to the Conference all changes in 
seating which have been reported to it and approved by it. In the 
event of disapproval, or in connection with any other questions 
which may arise regarding the eligibility of seating any 
delegates, this Committee shall report to the General Conference 
with its recommendations. 

Any request for seating a person other than an elected delegate 
shall be submitted to the Credentials Committee for its 
consideration and recommendation. 

(6) JOURNAL. There shall be a committee of six composed of 
one representative from each Jurisdiction and one representative 
from Annual Conferences outside the United States. This 
committee shall daily examine the record of the Secretary, 
comparing it with the stenographic record, and report its findings 
to the Conference through the Daily Christian Advocate, unless 
a correction needs to be made. 

(7) PRESIDING OFFICERS. See III above. 

(8) REFERENCE. There shall be a Committee on Reference 
composed of one clergy and one lay representative from each 
Jurisdiction, one clergy and one layperson from Annual Confer- 
ences outside the United States, and four members-at-large. The 
membership on this committee shall include at least one member 
from each legislative committee. This committee shall be 



142 Journal of the 198 J,. General Conference 

convened by the Secretary of the General Conference in 
consultation with the Petitions Secretary prior to and at the seat 
of the General Conference. After ascertaining that the petitions, 
resolutions, and similar communications dealing wdth the regular 
business of the Conference meet the requirements herein 
specified, this committee shall refer the same to the appropriate 
standing administrative or legislative committees. One member 
of each legislative committee serving on this committee shall be 
designated to coordinate petitions assigned to their respective 
legislative committee. This committee shall be responsible for 
such assignment of all petitions which may be in the hands of the 
Secretary prior to the opening session, including the book of 
printed Quadrennial Reports, all reports, recommendations, and 
resolutions from general boards, general councils, standing or 
special commissions and committees, and all other communica- 
tions which shall come into the Secretary's hands after the 
convening of the General Conference, all of which shall be 
referred directly to appropriate legislative committees without 
presentation to a plenary session of the General Conference. The 
Episcopal and Laity Addresses, following their presentation to 
the General Conference, shall be referred to appropriate 
legislative committees. (H 608 of the Discipline sets forth the 
requirements and time limitations for the transmittal of petitions 
which may be received by the Petitions Secretary for considera- 
tion by the General Conference.) 

The Committee on Reference may withdraw a paper after 
having assigned it to a committee, either upon a request or upon 
its own motion. It may also withhold from reference or 
publication any document it shall deem improper, promptly 
advising the author, or authors, thereof of its action in order that 
an appeal may be made to the Conference if desired. The 
committee shall publish as promptly as possible in the Daily 
Christian Advocate lists of the communications it has referred to 
the several standing committees, identifying each by number, 
title, origin, and destination. Where the committee finds two or 
more substantially identical petitions, it may group them under 
one title and number, indicating the total number of petitions. In 
the case of a single petition signed by a number of people, the 
Committee need print only the name of the first signer with an 
indication of the total number of signers. No petitions shall be 
assigned by the Committee on Reference to any General 
Conference committee unless it comes from some organization, 
minister, or member of The United Methodist Church and also 
contains information essential to the verification of the alleged 
facts concerning its origin. 



The United Methodist Church 143 

Two copies of the petition must be sent to the Petitions 
Secretar}^ Each petition must address only one paragi'aph of the 
Discipline or one issue (Hli 608. 1-. 2). Not more than one petition 
should be presented on a single sheet of paper. 

(9) TELLERS. There shall be a committee of sixty to act as 
tellers for the purpose of reporting on count votes and ballots 
ordered by the General Conference. The tellers shall be divided 
into two groups of thirty each. Each group shall have reserve 
tellers. The Secretary of the General Conference shall appoint 
tellers and reserve tellers whose names shall be printed in the 
Daily Christian Advocate. 

B. Commission on Central Conference Affairs 

(For membership see Discipline, 11 2301.) 

To this commission shall be referred all petitions, resolutions, 
etc., relating to the Central Conferences, Autonomous Methodist 
Churches, Affiliated Autonomous Methodist Churches, Affiliated 
United Churches and concordat relationships {Discipline, Hf 26- 
34, 636-657; 2301). 

The Commission on Central Conference Affairs shall submit its 
report and any legislative proposals related to the paragraphs 
assigned to it directly to the General Conference. 

If the Commission on Central Conference Affairs has a concern 
for any paragraphs assigned to one of the legislative committees, 
the commission shall offer its recommendation to the appropriate 
legislative committee for consideration and recommendation to 
the General Conference. 

C. Standing Legislative Committees^ 

The General Conference shall have the following standing 
legislative committees, which shall consider all proposals looking 
toward new legislation or changes in the present legislation of the 
church, including all reports and recommendations from general 
boards, councils, and standing or special commissions or com- 



^The Committee on Plan of Organization and Rules of Order requested and 
received authority for the Interim Committee: (1) "to harmonize the paragraph 
numbers of the Discipline when assigning responsibility of each legislative 
committee for the 1988 General Conference in keeping with the paragraphs as 
printed in the 1984 Discipline," and (2) "to determine the number and 
responsibilities of the Standing Legislative Committees for the 1988 General 
Conference" (Journal, page 420). The paragraph numbers in this section refer to 
the 1980 Discipline. 



144 Journal of the 198 U General Conference 

mittees, and report recommendations relating thereto to the 
Conference. The term "legislative" as descriptive of the functions 
of these committees is not to be interpreted with absolute 
strictness, inasmuch as they may consider matters calculated to 
eventuate in the form of advices, resolutions, appeals, etc., as 
well as in legislation. 

Any legislative committee considering legislation affecting the 
concerns of the Commission on Central Conference Affairs shall 
consult with the commission before submitting their proposed 
legislation to the General Conference. 

(1) CHURCH AND SOCIETY. To this committee shall be 
referred all petitions, resolutions, etc., relating to the statement 
of Social Principles, social issues, and the work and concerns of 
the Board of Church and Society. {Discipline, V, 70-76, Social 
Principles; t 719, Annual Conference Board; II 738, District 
Coordinator; til 1201-16, General Board.) Possible subcommit- 
tees: 

(a) Human Welfare 

(b) Environmental Justice and Survival 

(c) Peace and World Order 

(d) Political and Human Rights 

(e) Social and Economic Justice 

(f) Structures 

(2) CONFERENCES. To this committee shall be referred all 
petitions, resolutions, etc., relating to the composition and 
activities of the General, Jurisdictional, Annual, District, and 
Missionary Conferences, Missions and Affihated Autonomous 
Churches, including the Annual and District Conference Councils 
on Ministries. {Discipline, HH 7-15, 22-6, 36-47, Constitution; 
505-7, Election and assignments. Bishops; 601-35, 657-706, 
General, Jurisdictional, Missionary, and Annual Conferences; 
734-5, District Conferences.) Possible subcommittees: 

(a) General Conference 

(b) Jurisdictional Conference 

(c) Missionary, Annual and District Conferences 

(3) DISCIPLESHIP. To this committee shall be referred all 
petitions, resolutions, etc., relating to the work and concerns of 
the Board of Discipleship, Doctrine, Doctrinal Statements, and 
the General Rules. {Discipline, HH 3, 16, 17, 19, Constitution; 
67-69, Doctrine and General Rules; 273-5, Lay Speaking; 720, 
Annual Conference Board; 732, Annual Conference CCYM; 736, 
District Lay Leaders; 1301-27, General Board; 1401-4, Youth 
Organization.) Possible subcommittees: 

(a) Evangehsm, Stewardship, and Upper Room 

(b) Laity, Leader Development, and United Methodist Men 



The United Methodist Church 145 

(c) Education and Curriculum Resources 

(d) Doctrine, Doctrinal Statements, and Worship 

(e) Family Life, NYMO, and Age Level and Family Ministries. 

(f) Administrative and Organizational Concerns 

(4) HIGHER EDUCATION. To this committee shall be 
referred all petitions, resolutions, etc., relating to the work and 
concerns of Higher Education, Campus Ministry, and Schools of 
Theology. {Discipline, n 722, Annual Conference Board; 1601-8, 
General Board; 1612-22, Division Higher Education; 1630-2,' 
Schools of Theology.) Possible subcommittees: 

(a) Schools, Colleges, and Universities 

(b) Schools of Theology 

(c) Campus Ministry 

(5) ORDAINED AND DIAGONAL MINISTRY. To this 
committee shall be referred all petitions, resolutions, etc., 
relating to the vi^ork and concerns of the ordained ministry | 
diaconal ministry, superintendency, and chaplaincy. {Discipline, 
ft 18, 50-9, Constitution; 301-15, Diaconal Ministry; 401-53 
Ordained Ministry; 501-4, 508-31, Superintendency; 723-4, An- 
nual Conference Boards; 725, Committee on Episcopacy; 739, 
District Committee on Ordained Ministry; 740, Committee on 
District Superintendency; 1609-11, Chaplains and Related Minis- 
tries; 1623-5, Division of Diaconal Ministry; 1626-9, Division of 
Ordained Ministry.) Possible subcommittees: 

(a) Ordained Ministry 

(b) Diaconal Ministry 

(c) Superintendency 

(d) Chaplains and Related Ministries 

(6) GLOBAL MINISTRIES. To this committee shall be 
referred all petitions, resolutions, etc., relating to the work and 
concerns of the Board of Global Ministries. {Discipline, ft 721, 
Annual Conference Board; 731, Annual Conference United 
Methodist Women; 741, District United Methodist Women; 
1501-72, General Board.) Possible subcommittees: 

(a) World 

(b) National 

(7) LOCAL CHURCH. To this committee shall be referred all 
petitions, resolutions, etc., relating to the organization of the 
local church and its membership, boards, councils, commissions, 
committees, etc., or relating to local church property. Other 
legislative committees considering legislation affecting the 
organization of the local church shall refer such items to this 
committee with recommendations. {Discipline, ff 48-49, Consti- 
tution; 101-110, Ministry, All Christians; 201-269, Local Church 



146 Journal of the 198 ^ General Conference 

Organization; 2519-44, Local Church Property.) Possible sub- 
committees: 

(a) Membership 

(b) Administration 

(c) Program 

(d) Property 

(8) FINANCIAL ADMINISTRATION. To this committee 
shall be referred all petitions, resolutions, etc., relating to the 
work and concerns of the Council on Finance and Administration, 
the Board of Pensions, and the Board of Pubhcation. The budget 
and any legislative proposals prepared by the General Council on 
Finance and Administration shall be submitted to this committee 
for study and review. Thereafter, when the General Council on 
Finance and Administration presents its report to the General 
Conference for action, the committee shall present its recommen- 
dations and may propose amendments. {Discipline, UK 20, 
Constitution; 707-16, Annual Conference Council on Finance and 
Administration; 726, Annual Conference Board of Pensions; 733, 
Annual Conference Disability Committee; 901-12, 916-938, 
General Council on Finance and Administration; 1701-9, General 
Board of Pensions; 1801-44, Pubhshing Interests.) Possible 
subcommittees: 

(a) Council on Finance and Administration 

(b) Pensions 

(c) Publishing Interests 

(9) COUNCIL ON MINISTRIES. To this committee shall be 
referred all petitions, resolutions, etc., relating to the work and 
concerns of the General and Jurisdictional Councils on Ministries, 
the Advance, and Special Sundays. The report and any legislative 
proposals of the General Council on Ministries shall be submitted 
to this committee for study and review. Thereafter, when the 
General Council on Ministries presents its report to the General 
Conference for action, the committee shall present its recommen- 
dations and may propose amendments. {Discipline, HII 270-2, 
Special Sundays; 717-8, Annual Conference Council on Ministries 
and Conference Advance; 737, District Council on Ministries; 
913-4, Advance; 915, Special Sundays; 1001-7, General Council on 
Ministries.) Possible subcommittees: 

(a) Council on Ministries 

(b) Advance and Special Sundays 

(c) Missional Priorities 

(10) ADMINISTRATIVE ORDER AND INDEPENDENT 
COMMISSIONS. To this committee shall be referred all 
petitions, resolutions, etc., relating to composition and structure 
of the general boards, commissions, and agencies; church 



The United Methodist Church 147 

property (other than local); and judicial administration and 
enabling acts. This shall include the structure of Archives and 
History, Christian Unity and Interreligious Concerns, Religion 
and Race, Status and Role of Women, Communications and our 
membership or relationship to the World Methodist Council, 
National Council of Churches, World Council of Churches, 
Consultation on Church Unity, American Bible Society, and 
Religion in American Life. {Discipline, HH 1, 2, 4-6, 21, 60-6, 
Constitution; 727, Annual Conference Archives and History; 728, 
Annual Conference Christian Unity and Interreligious Concerns; 
729, Annual Conference Religion and Race; 730, Annual 
Conference Commission on Status and Role of Women; 801-22, 
General Provisions; 1101-8, Commission on Communications; 
1901-12, Commission on Archives and History; 2001-7, Commis- 
sion on Christian Unity and Interreligious Concerns; 2101-8, 
Commission on Religion and Race; 2201-9, Commission on Status 
and Role of Women; 2401, World Methodist Council; 2402, 
National Council of Churches; 2403, World Council of Churches; 
2404, Consultation on Church Union; 2405, American Bible 
Society; 2406, Religion in American Life, Inc.; 2407, General 
Statement; 2501-18, Church Property: General, Conference, 
District; 2545, Trustees Church Institutions; 2601-26, Judicial 
Administration.) Possible subcommittees: 

(a) Administration and Structure of General Agencies 

(b) Ecumenical Concerns 

(c) Communications 

(d) Church Property, Judicial Administration, and Enabling 
Acts 

D. Membership of Legislative Committees 

Each delegate shall serve as a member of one of the standing 
legislative committees numbered 1 to 10. Within the annual 
conference delegation each member shall choose from the 
legislative committees 1 to 10 the committee on which to serve, 
the choice being made in order of election. Beginning with 1988, 
the clergy first elected shall be entitled to the first choice, the lay 
delegate first elected to the second choice, and thus the right of 
choice shall continue to alternate between clerical and lay 
delegates in the order of their election. For subsequent General 
Conferences, first choice shall alternate between the lay and 
clergy delegates, provided that two members of a delegation may 
not serve on any one of the above-designated standing legislative 
committees 1 to 10 unless the said delegation is represented on 
each of them. All delegations composed of ten or more members 



148 Journal of the 1984. General Conference 

shall assign all members in excess of ten according to this same 
principle of distribution. (For example, a conference with sixteen 
delegates shall have two members on each of any six of these ten 
committees and one on each of the remaining four. Similarly, a 
conference with 32 delegates shall have four members on each of 
two committees and three on each of the remaining eight. Each 
delegate may, in the order herein indicated, select any one of 
these ten committees, provided that the foregoing division of 
delegates among the committees is maintained.) Whenever a 
delegation has more than one member on a legislative committee, 
its members shall be divided as equally as possible between lay 
and clergy. Thus, if there are three members on a committee, 
they shall be two clergy and one lay or vice versa. 

If a matter is under consideration in any standing legislative 
committee which in the judgment of any annual conference 
delegation vitally affects the interests of its constituency, and if 
the said annual conference is not represented in the membership 
of said committee, then the said delegation may choose one of its 
number to represent its annual conference in the committee when 
the matter judged to be vital to the interests of this constituency 
is under consideration. Such a person shall be entitled to sit with 
the committee while this particular matter is being considered 
and shall be entitled to the floor, subject to such limitations as are 
imposed on the regular members of said committee, but shall not 
be entitled to vote. Each person seated in the General Conference 
with right to speak but not vote may submit to the Secretary of 
the General Conference a choice of a legislative committee and 
shall have the same right in that committee to speak but not to 
vote. 

E. Meeting of Committees 

(1) For Organization. All standing legislative and administra- 
tive committees shall meet for organization at such time as the 
Commission on the General Conference shall determine. A bishop 
appointed by the Council of Bishops and an assistant secretary 
appointed by the Secretary of the General Conference shall 
serve, respectively, as chairperson and secretary to effect an 
organization in each of the several standing committees, except 
where other provision is specified. The first meeting of the 
legislative committees shall be held as soon as possible following 
the first plenary session of the General Conference. The 
orientation of the committee, followed by the election of officers, 
shall be the order of business of the first meeting of the 
committee. 



The United Methodist Church 149 

(a) The election of chairperson, vice-chairperson, and secretary 
of each standing committee, both administrative and legislative, 
shall be by ballot. 

(b) The Secretary of the General Conference shall be 
responsible for arranging for a coaching meeting for all 
chairpersons, vice-chairpersons, and secretaries of legislative 
committees as soon as possible after their elections. This coaching 
shall include instruction in their duties, all procedures in the 
handling of petitions, the times of the daily deadline for 
publishing reports, and other information to expedite the work of 
the committees. The Commission on the General Conference is 
requested to arrange for a time and place for such a meeting. 

(2) Regular Meetings. The standing legislative committees 1 to 
10 inclusive shall meet for business as scheduled by the Agenda 
Committee unless otherwise ordered by the Conference, until 
their work is completed, and at such other times as the 
committees may themselves determine. 

(3) Quorum for Committee Meetings. A majority of the 
members shall constitute a quorum for the transaction of business 
in all committees. 

(4) Each legislative committee shall establish an area in which 
only voting committee members will be seated. Staff, resource 
persons, and visitors may speak only when authorized, in each 
instance by specific committee action. 

(5) Legislative committees are urged to give priority to 
significant and controversial legislation so that their reports on 
such matters may be printed as soon as possible in the Daily 
Christian Advocate and considered by the General Conference. 

(6) Minority reports should be encouraged so that differing 
views held by a significant portion of the committee may be 
carefully prepared and expressed and the issues clearly defined 
for decision by the General Conference. Adequate time should be 
given for the minority to prepare its report and every effort made 
to have the majority and minority reports printed together in the 
Daily Christian Advocate (see Rules 15, 31, 32, and 34). 

F. Function and Authority of Committees 

(1) The standing administrative committees, without specific 
instruction or direction from the Conference, shall assume 
responsibility for considering and reporting to the Conference 
upon all matters which would logically fall within their respective 
purviews, if it seems wise to do so, as these are indicated 
hereinbefore. 

(2) The standing legislative committees may not originate 



150 Journal of the 198 J^ General Conference 

business, but shall consider and report only upon that which is 
referred to them directly by the Conference or through the 
Committee on Reference, the Agenda Committee, or the 
Committee on Calendar (see Rule 29). 

VIII. PROPOSAL INVOLVING EXPENDITURE OF 
UNBUDGETED FUNDS 

When any proposal is submitted to the General Conference to 
establish an interim or continuing board, commission, or 
committee, before final action is taken by the General Conference 
estabhshing such board, commission, or committee, said proposal 
shall be referred to the General Council on Finance and 
Administration or its executive committee, with the request that 
it bring to the General Conference an estimated budget of the 
expense of operation of the proposed board, commission, or 
committee for the next quadrennium and a statement of how the 
adoption of such proposal will affect the budget or budgets for the 
existing boards, commissions, or committees as already present- 
ed by the General Council on Finance and Administration. 

When any proposal is submitted to the General Conference 
which involves the expenditure of funds not included in an 
estabhshed budget, such proposal shall be referred for advice and 
recommendation to the General Council on Finance and Admin- 
istration before final action is taken by the General Conference. 

IX. DELEGATES' EXPENSE ACCOUNTS 

(1) The report of the chairpersons of the respective annual 
conference delegations shall be the basis for settlement with 
principal and reserve delegates for their per diem allowances. 

(2) The total traveling expense including per diem shall be 
payable to the principal delegate if present and seated. If during 
the session of the Conference a reserve delegate is seated for a 
principal delegate, the principal delegate shall adjust the per 
diem with such reserve on the basis of the time served by each. 

(3) Air travel expense shall be on the basis of the most 
economical roundtrip tourist/coach air fare directly to and from 
the seat of General Conference. Special excursion and promo- 
tional fares shall be utilized whenever possible. Additional 
expenses may be allowed delegates from annual conferences 
outside the United States for arrival and departure not to exceed 
two days in either case. Unavoidable exceptions to this limitation 
of two days before and two days after General Conference, due to 
transportation schedules, must be approved by the General 



The United Methodist Church 151 

Council on Finance and Administration, The per diem expense 
allowance for all such days before and after General Conference 
shall be at the same rate as granted delegates during General 
Conference. When one or more delegates come in the same 
automobile, the owner will be allowed 20 cents per mile plus the 
cost of room and meals en route up to the established General 
Conference per diem rate. Guest passengers who are the 
principal delegates to the General Conference shall submit only 
the cost of room and meals en route up to the established General 
Conference per diem rate. Maximum use of automobiles for 
travel may not exceed 1,000 miles roundtrip for reimbursement 
purposes. If automobile travel exceeds 1,000 miles roundtrip, 
reimbursement will be based upon the most economical roundtrip 
tourist/coach air fare, or the mileage reimbursement, whichever 
is less. In all cases delegates shall report only the actual cost of 
travel. 

X. MATERIAL TO BE INCLUDED 
IN THE DISCIPLINE 

(1) No non-legislative material shall be ordered printed in the 
Discipline without first referring it to the Committee on 
Correlation and Editorial Revision for consideration and report 
to the General Conference for further consideration and final 
action. 

(2) The Book Editor, the Secretary of the General Conference, 
the Publisher of The United Methodist Church, and the 
Committee on Correlation and Editorial Revision shall be 
charged with editing the Discipline. These editors, in the 
exercise of their judgment, shall have the authority to make 
changes in phraseology as may be necessarj- to harmonize 
legislation without changing its substance. 

XI. DISTRIBUTION TO DESKS OF MEMBERS 

After the first day, only the Daily Christian Advocate shall be 
placed on the desks of the members, with additional copies for the 
first ministerial and first lay reserv^e delegate from each 
delegation. 

XII. DISTRIBUTION OF UNOFFICIAL MATERIAL 

Daily, periodic, or regular newsletters, or any special interest 
material published at General Conference by United Methodist 



152 Journal of the 198 Jf General Conference 

boards, agencies, and related United Methodist groups may be 
distributed under the following conditions: 

(1) Two copies of each publication shall be deposited in the 
office of the Commission on the General Conference in advance of 
the time of distribution. 

(2) Materials distributed should be used for information 
relative to matters that have been before or are coming before 
the General Conference and not in soliciting membership in an 
organization. 

(3) Distribution shall be at least 30 feet outside of any entrance 
door to the plenary or committee meeting rooms. 

(4) Distribution shall be done by representatives of the 
pubhshing groups. Distributors shall be in the smallest number 
capable of effecting adequate distribution to those entering. 
During distribution it is the responsibility of the distributors not 
to impede or interfere with the entrance or exit of persons or to 
hamper the general flow of pedestrian traffic. 

(5) Distributors are responsible for the disposal of unused or 
unclaimed materials. 

(6) Distributors violating these regulations will be prohibited 
from future distributions. 

XIII. REPORTS TO BE MAILED BEFORE GENERAL 
CONFERENCE 

The reports, recommendations, resolutions, and petitions of all 
councils, boards and standing administrative committees or 
special commissions or committees requiring action by the 
General Conference shall be printed in an Advance Edition of the 
Daily Christian Advocate and mailed to all delegates and to the 
first ministerial and first lay reserve delegates at least sixty days 
prior to the opening of the General Conference. If necessary to 
meet this deadUne, materials to delegates from annual confer- 
ences outside the United States shall be sent by air mail. Such 
reports shall be printed in the same size and style as the Daily 
Christian Advocate and be punched for binding. In order to 
accomplish this, the finished copy of all such reports and 
recommendations shall be submitted to the editor of the Daily 
Christian Advocate at least 120 days prior to the opening of the 
General Conference. Any such reports and recommendations not 
so submitted and not printed in an Advance Edition of the Daily 
Christian Advocate shall be received by the General Conference 
only upon the approval of three-fourths vote of the General 
Conference. The General Council on Finance and Administration 
shall be exempt from this requirement to the extent necessary to 



The United Methodist Church 153 

allow inclusion of general funds receipts information for the first 
three years of the quadrennium. The General Council on Finance 
and Administration will mail data including the third year of the 
quadrenmum and other appropriate information to delegates 
prior to convemng of the General Conference "^^^g^^es 

.ounP^ir h""^'^ recommendations, resolutions, and petitions of all 
Zr^pH t i'' '""^ 'P''^'^ commissions or committees shall be 
relerred to the appropnate legislative committees bv the 
Committee on Reference for their consideration (see VII A 8) 



RULES OF ORDER 

I. DAILY SCHEDULE 

Rule 1. Hours of Meetings 

The following shall be the daily order for the General 
Conference, Sundays excepted: 

(1) 8:30 a.m. to 9 a.m. — Devotional service under direction of 
the Council of Bishops 

(2) 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. — Conference business or committee 
meetings 

(3) 2:30 p.m. to 5 p.m. — Conference business or committee 
meetings 

(4) 7:30 p.m. — Evening programs as planned by the Commis- 
sion on the General Conference, Conference business, or 
committee meetings 

(5) Recess may be called during any plenary session at a time 
deemed appropriate by the presiding bishop. 

Rule 2. Order of Business 

After devotional service the daily sessions of the Conference 
shall be conducted as follows: 

(1) Reports of standing administrative and special committees 

(2) Agenda and calendar items 

(3) Consent calendar (See Rule 27.2) 

(4) Miscellaneous business 

n. PRESIDING OFFICERS 

Rule 3. Authority of the Chairperson 

The bishop presiding shall be the legal chairperson of the 
General Conference. 

The chairperson shall decide points of order raised by the 
members and shall rule on points of order not raised by the 
members, as the chair deems necessary to conform to these rules 
of order, subject in both cases to an appeal to the Conference by 
any member without debate, except that the chairperson and the 
appellant, in the order here named, shall each have three minutes 
for a statement in support of their respective positions. A tie vote 
in the case of appeal shall sustain the chair. Any member who 
raises a point of order shall cite by number the rule adjudged to 
have been violated. 

154 



The United Methodist Church 155 

The presiding bishop shall have the right to recess a session of 
the General Conference at any time at the chair's discretion and 
to reconvene at such time as the chair shall announce. The 
presiding bishop shall also have the right to stipulate that the 
session shall reconvene with only delegates, authorized person- 
nel, and authorized guests permitted to attend such a session 
following recess. 

Rule 4. Calling the Conference to Order 

When the chairperson stands and calls the Conference to order, 
no member shall speak, address the chair, or stand while the 
chairperson stands. 

III. RIGHTS AND DUTIES OF MEMBERS 

Rule 5. Attendance and Seating Reserves 

No member, unless hindered by sickness or otherwise from 
being present, shall be absent from the sessions of the Conference 
without permission of the Conference; and all absentees shall be 
reported by the chairpersons of the several Annual Conference 
delegations to the Committee on Credentials on a form provided 
for this purpose. A reserve delegate may be seated when the 
substitution has been reported in writing to the Committee on 
Credentials on a form provided for this purpose. If the 
Committee on Credentials finds the substitution in order, it shall 
so report in the Daily Christian Advocate as soon as practical. If 
the committee disapproves the substitution, after consultation 
with the chairperson of the delegation, it may repoil to the 
General Conference with its recommendation. 

Rule 6. Directions for Securing the Floor 

A delegate desiring to speak to the Conference shall arise in 
place, holding up the placard provided for that purpose. Unless 
raising a point of order or parliamentary^ inquirj-, the delegate 
shall not speak until given the floor. When two or more delegates 
rise simultaneously, the presiding bishop is requested to consider 
the various sections of the auditorium in rotation. The delegate 
recognized shall proceed to the nearest microphone and shall first 
announce her or his name and the name of the Annual Conference 
represented; which in turn, the bishop shall then announce to the 
Conference. 

Rule 7. Interrupting the Speaker 

No member who has the floor may be interrupted except for a 
point of order, a misrepresentation, a parliamentarj' inquirj', a 



156 Journal of the 19 8U General Conference 

point of information, or to call attention that the time has arrived 
for a special order. 

Rule 8. Speaking More Than Once; Length of Speech 

No member shall speak a second time on the same question if 
any member who has not spoken desires the floor, no more than 
twice on the same subject under the same motion, and no longer 
than three minutes unless that time shall be extended by the 
Conference. This three-minute hmit may be amended by a 
majority vote of the Conference at any time, and for any period 
of duration. 

Rule 9. Point of Order 

A delegate wishing to raise a point of order shall arise and 
address the presiding officer and say, "I rise to a point of order." 
The presiding officer shall interrupt the proceeding; if a delegate 
is speaking, that one shall immediately yield the floor. The 
presiding officer shall then direct the delegate raising the point of 
order to state the point as briefly and concisely as possible, citing 
the authority of the point, but the delegate shall not presume to 
decide the question or argue the point. 

A point of order is decided by the presiding officer without 
debate unless in doubtful cases the chair submits the question 
to the body for advice or decision. When the presiding officer 
rules on the point, debate is closed, but the decision may be 
appealed. 

Rule 10. Voting Area of Conference 

Only delegates within the area of the Conference when the vote 
is taken shall be entitled to vote. All delegates within the area at 
the time a question is put shall vote, except such as shall have 
been excused for special reasons by the Conference. 

Rule 11. Voting Procedure 

Voting shall be by a show of hands or by electronic means 
unless otherwise ordered by the Conference, provided, howev- 
er, that in elections, voting may be by written ballot. If the vote 
is in doubt after a show of hands, the chair may order a standing 
vote. 

A standing count vote may be ordered on call of any member 
supported by one-third of the members present and voting. A 
vote by secret ballot may be ordered on call of any member, 
supported by one-third of the members present and voting. 

No other business shall be in order when a vote is being taken 
or when the previous question has been called until the process 



The United Methodist Church 157 

is completed, except such as relates to the vote itself or such 
business as the chair may deem appropriate. The count shall be 
made by the Committee of Tellers as appointed and assigned by 
the Secretary of the General Conference. 

Rule 12. Division of Question 

Before a vote is taken, any delegate shall have the right to call 
for a division of any question, if it is subject to such division as the 
delegate indicates. If no delegate objects, the division shall be 
made; but if there is objection, the chair shall put the question of 
division to vote, not waiting for a second. 

IV. BUSINESS PROCEDURE 

Rule 13. Motion for Adoption of Reports Unnecessary 

Whenever a report of a committee signed by the chairperson 
and secretary' thereof shall be presented to the Conference for its 
action, it shall be deemed in proper order for consideration by the 
Conference without the formality of a motion to adopt and a 
second thereto. 

Rule 14. Required Forms for Reports, Resolutions, Motions, 
Amendments 

All resolutions and committee reports shall be prepared in 
triplicate; and motions, including amendments, shall be present- 
ed in writing. 

Rule 15. Alterations of Motions, Etc. 

When a motion is made and seconded or a resolution is 
introduced and seconded or a committee report is read or is 
published in the Daily Christian Advocate, it shall be deemed to 
be in possession of the Conference and may not be altered except 
by action of the Conference (see Rule 31). 

Rule 16. Undebatable Motions 

The following motions shall be acted upon \dthout debate: 

(1) To adjourn, when unqualified, except to adjourn the 
Conference finally 

(2) To suspend the rules 

(3) To lay on the table, except as provided in Rule 35 

(4) To take from the table 

(5) To call for the previous question 

(6) To reconsider a non-debatable motion 

(7) To limit or extend the limits of debate 

(8) To call for the orders of the day 



158 Journal of the 1984. General Conference 

Rule 17. Rights of the Main Question 

The main question may be opened to debate under the 
following motions: to adopt, to commit or refer, to substitute, to 
postpone, and to reconsider. No new motion, resolution, or 
subject shall be entertained until the one under consideration 
shall have been disposed of except as provided in Rule 11. The 
foregoing does not apply to secondary motions if otherwise 
allowable in the existing parliamentary situation. 

Rule 18. Precedence of Secondary Motions 

If any one or more of the following motions shall be made when 
one or more other motions are pending, the order of their 
precedence in relation to one another shall be the same as the 
order of their Hsting below: 

(1) To fix the time to which the Conference shall adjourn. 
(This motion is subject to amendment, or it may be laid on 
the table.) 

(2) To adjourn 

(3) To take recess 

(4) To lay on the table 

(5) To order the previous question 

(6) To limit or extend the limits of debate 

(7) To postpone to a given time 

(8) To commit or refer 

(9) To amend or to amend by substitution (one amendment 
being allowed to an amendment) 

(10) To postpone indefinitely 

Rule 19. Motion to Adjourn in Order Except: 

The motion to adjourn, when unqualified, shall be taken 
without debate and shall always be in order, except: 

(1) When a delegate has the floor 

(2) When a question is actually put or a vote is being taken and 
before it is finally decided 

(3) When the previous question has been ordered and action 
thereunder is pending 

(4) When a motion to adjourn has been lost and no business or 
debate has intervened 

(5) When the motion to fix the time to which the Conference 
shall adjourn is pending 

The foregoing does not apply to a motion for final adjournment 
of the Conference. 

Rule 20. Tabling Related Motions 

No motion which adheres to another motion or has another 
motion adhering to it can be laid on the table by itself. Such 



The United Methodist Church 159 

motions, if laid on the table, carry with them the motions to which 
they respectively adhere or which adhere to them. 

Rule 21. Previous Question 

Any member who moves the previous question (that is, that 
the vote be now taken on the motion or motions pending) shall 
also indicate to what it is intended to apply, if any secondary 
motion or motions are also pending. If said member does not so 
indicate, it shall be regarded as applying only to the immediately 
pending question. This motion shall be taken without debate and 
shall require a two-thirds vote of those present and voting for its 
adoption; if it is adopted, the vote shall be taken on the motion or 
motions to which it applies without further debate except as 
provided in Rule 35 (see also Rules 16, 23, 24). 

Rule 22. Referring Reports, etc. 

It shall be in order for the Conference to refer to a committee 
a section or part of a report or resolution which is before 
the Conference for consideration or any amendment offered 
thereto. 

Rule 23. Procedure for Amending by Substitution 

When a resolution or committee report is properly before the 
Conference for consideration and action, even if amendments 
thereto are pending, a substitute therefor may be offered by any 
member moving that the same be substituted for the report, 
resolution, or amendment under consideration. This substitute 
shall be an alternative to what is before the house. The 
Conference shall then proceed first to perfect the original report 
or resolution, including consideration and action upon any 
amendments which may be offered to it. The same perfecting 
process shall then be followed with respect to the substitute. The 
question shall then be put first on the motion to substitute, 
followed by the motion to adopt the report or resolution; 
provided, however, that the motion for the previous question 
shall not be in order on the adoption of the report or 
recommendation or on making the proposed substitution until 
opportunity has been given for at least two members to speak on 
each side of the question of substitution or adoption (also Rule 34 
for handling minority reports). 

Rule 24. Unlawful Motion After Speech 

It shall not be in order for a member immediately after 
discussing a pending question and before relinquishing the floor 
to make a motion whose adoption would limit or stop debate. 



160 Journal of the 198U General Conference 

Rule 25. Exceptions to Majority Vote 

A majority of those voting, a quorum being present, shall 
decide all questions with the following exceptions: 

(1) One-third of those present and voting shall suffice to sustain 
a call for a count vote in case the decision of the chair is doubted 
(see Rule 11). A tie vote sustains the chair (Rule 3). 

(2) A two-thirds vote shall be required to sustain a motion to 
suspend (Rule 37) or amend (Rule 38) the rules; to sustain a 
motion for the previous question (Rule 21); to set aside a special 
order; to consider a special order before the time set therefor; to 
sustain the request of the Committee on Courtesies and 
Privileges for the presentation of any person after the sixth day 
of the General Conference. 

(3) A two-thirds vote shall be required to approve a proposal 
for a constitutional amendment {Discipline, 1111 62-64). 

Rule 26. Reconsideration 

A motion to reconsider an action of the Conference shall be in 
order at any time if offered by a member who voted with, the 
prevailing side. If the motion it is proposed to reconsider is 
non-debatable, the motion to reconsider may not be debated (see 
Rule 16). 

Rule 27. Regular Calendar and Consent Calender 

(1) The Secretary shall keep a chronological record of orders of 
the day and of reports of committees (see Rule 30), which record 
shall be called the Calendar; the matters of business placed on it 
shall be considered as recommended by the Committee on 
Calendar, unless by a two-thirds vote of the Conference an item is 
taken up out of its order. 

When a committee presents a report on a given subject, as a 
part of its report it must also list the numbers of all petitions 
relating to this subject on which the committee voted non-con- 
currence. 

(2) When the action of a legislative committee has been 
unanimously adopted (all persons present and voting having 
voted for the action) on a calendar item and the item has been 
previously printed in the Daily Christian Advocate and in the 
hands of delegates for not less than 24 hours, the Calendar 
Committee shall cause the calendar numbers of such items to be 
printed in the Daily Christian Advocate under the heading 
"Consent Calendar," excepting those calendar items having 
financial imphcations (see Plan of Organization VIII). 

The Consent Calendar shall be called up daily pursuant to Rule 
2, and adoption of the Consent Calendar by vote of the Con- 



The United Methodist Church 161 

ference shall be deemed adoption of all calendar items on the 
Consent Calendar, provided however, that any delegate may 
have a calendar item removed by having such a request in the 
hands of the secretary by 3:00 p.m. of the day the calendar item 
first appears in the Daily Christian Advocate, in which case the 
item shall be removed and thereafter shall be called up in the 
regular order of business. 

V. COMMITTEES 

Rule 28. Rules of Order of Legislative Committees 

The rules of order of the General Conference, except for Rule 
35, shall be observed in meetings of standing legislative 
committees insofar as they apply. 

Rule 29. Duties and Prerogatives of Legislative Committees 

Following orientation and election of officers, as its first work, 
a committee shall evaluate its petitions, come to agreements 
regarding priority, and outline its work on the basis of those 
priorities. 

When a petition or resolution or any similar item is referred to 
one of the several standing legislative committees, it shall be 
understood that the whole question with which the paper has to 
do is referred to that committee for such action as it may deem 
wise. Committees shall report to the Conference upon all matters 
referred to them by the Conference, directly or through the 
Committee on Reference. Committee reports on resolutions, 
petitions, etc., shall cite the same, identifying them by numbers 
they bear respectively in the published reports of the Committee 
on Reference or in some other suitable manner. 

When a committee ascertains that another committee is or, in 
its judgment, should be considering a subject which the former is 
considering, it shall report the matter to the Committee on 
Reference for such adjustment as the situation may require. 

Rule 30. Legislative Committees Report to Secretary 

As quickly as material can be prepared, each secretary' of a 
standing legislative committee shall present a clearly marked 
original work copy of the committee's report, signed by the 
committee chairperson and secretary, to the Secretary' of the 
Conference. The original work copy shall be marked with the 
priority the committee places on that subject. The Secretary' of 
the Conference shall receive said reports, type them in triplicate, 
enter them into the calendar, and furnish the editor of the Daily 
Christian Advocate with one of the copies for publication. 



162 Journal of the 198U General Conference 

Committee and minority reports which propose changes in the 
Discipline shall give chapter, section, and paragraph to be 
affected and shall be prepared in the following manner: Existing 
words used as reference points shall be in quotes; words to be 
deleted shall be single-underscored; words to be added shall be 
double-underscored. In pubhcation of these reports, the Daily 
Christian Advocate shall substitute italics for single underscoring 
and boldface for double underscoring. 

Rule 31. Published Reports in Possession of Conference 

Reports submitted by the committee according to the deadline 
as announced by the Secretary of the Conference shall appear in 
the next day's Daily Christian Advocate. The report as printed in 
the Daily Christian Advocate becomes the official copy, subject 
only to grammatical or other obvious editorial changes and shall 
be regarded as in the possession of the Conference. On the day 
following its first appearance in the Daily Christian Advocate or 
any time thereafter, a report is in order for consideration at the 
pleasure of the Conference. The same rule shall apply to a report 
of a minority of any committee (see Rule 34). 

Rule 32. Preparation and Printing of Reports 

All committee reports shall be presented to the Secretary of 
the Conference on a form provided therefor and shall bear at the 
top the name of the committee, its total membership, the number 
present at the time the report was adopted, the number voting 
for and the number voting against the report, respectively, and 
the number not voting. Consent Calendar items (see Rule 27.2) 
shall be clearly marked with an identifying symbol on the report 
cover and in the Daily Christian Advocate printing, this symbol 
to be supplied by the General Conference Secretary. In addition 
to concurrence or non-concurrence, a committee may recommend 
amended action or referral to the next General Conference or to a 
board, council, commission, or committee, either for action or for 
report to the next General Conference. Reports of the standing 
legislative committees shall be printed in the Daily Christian 
Advocate at least one day before being presented for considera- 
tion by the Conference, and they shall not be read unless by its 
order. Committee reports to which minority reports are 
appended shall be printed in sequence, and so numbered. 

Rule 33. Committee Chairperson Not in Harmony with Report 

When the chairperson of a committee is not in harmony with a 
report adopted by the committee, it shall be the chairperson's 
duty to state the fact to the committee, which shall elect one of its 



The United Methodist Church 163 

members to represent it in the presentation and discussion of the 
report in the Conference; but if, in such a case, the committee 
shall fail to select a representative, the chairperson shall 
designate a member to represent the committee, and said 
representatives shall have all the rights and privileges of the 
chairperson in relation to such report. 

Rule 34. Minority Report 

Minority reports represented as substitutes for a committee 
report shall conform to Rule 31 and indicate the specific report 
number with which it relates, and the names of the members of 
the committee signing the report shall be indicated. A minority 
report shall be signed by one-tenth or by ten members of that 
committee, whichever is the lesser. 

A minority report shall be handled as a substitute for the 
report of the committee pursuant to Rule 23 as would any other 
substitute. 

A member selected by the signers of a report of a minority of a 
committee to present the same shall have the same rights and 
privileges in relation thereto which belong to the chairperson in 
the presentation of the committee report. In closing debate on the 
minority report, the member presenting the minority report shall 
speak first and the chairperson last. 

Rule 35. Speakers For and Against 

When the report of a committee is under consideration, it shall 
be the duty of the presiding officer to ascertain, when recognizing 
a member of the Conference, on which side the member proposes 
to speak; the chair shall not assign the floor to any member 
proposing to speak on the same side of the pending question as 
the speaker immediately preceding if any member desires to 
speak on the other side thereof. 

Except for undebatable motions, no report shall be adopted or 
question relating to the same decided without opportunity having 
been given for at least two speeches for and two against the said 
proposal. After three speeches for and three against, the 
question shall be put automatically. 

However, the chairperson and/or duly authorized member or 
members presenting the committee's report (and the minority 
report chairperson or representative if there be one) shall be 
entitled to speak before the vote is taken. 

This right of the chairperson and/or other member or members 
to close the debate shall prevail in like manner to a limit of three 
minutes when a vote is about to be taken on a motion to amend, to 
substitute, to postpone, to refer, or to lay on the table or any 



164 Journal of the 198 Jf General Conference 

other motion whose adoption would vitally affect the report 
under consideration (see Rule 34). 

Rule 36. Effective Date 

All legislation of the General Conference of The United 
Methodist Church shall become effective January 1 following the 
session of the General Conference at which it is enacted, unless 
otherwise specified. 

VI. SUSPENDING, AMENDING, AND SUPPLEMENTING 

Rule 37. Suspension of Rules 

The operation of any of the provisions of the Plan of 
Organization or of these Rules of Order may be suspended at any 
time by a two-thirds vote of the Conference (see Rule 25.2). 

Rule 38. Amending Rules 

The Plan of Organization and these Rules of Order may be 
amended or changed by a two-thirds vote of the Conference; 
provided the proposed change or amendment has originated in 
the Committee on Plan of Organization and Rules of Order or has 
been presented to the Conference in writing and referred to this 
committee, which committee shall report thereon not later than 
the following day (see Rule 25.2). 

Rule 39. Robert's Rules of Order, Supplemental Authority 

In any parHamentary situation not clearly covered by the Plan 
of Organization or these Rules of Order, the General Conference 
shall be governed in its action by the current edition of Robert's 
Rules of Order. 

Rule 40. Persons Without Right to Make or Second Motions 

A person seated in the Conference with the right to speak, but 
without vote, does not have the right to make a motion or second 
motions. 



THE 

EPISCOPAL 

ADDRESS 

Salutation 

Fathers and Mother, Brothers and Sisters: 

This is the first time this salutation has been used in the 
Episcopal Address to a General Conference. Heretofore it would 
have been inappropriate. Now it is proper, because in 1980 a 
woman was elected to our episcopacy, demonstrating that even in 
so venerable an institution as the church, "Time makes ancient 
good uncouth."^ 

The election of Marjorie Matthews is a watershed in ecclesiasti- 
cal history. There is no other instance in the whole of 
Christendom where a major world communion has opened its 
episcopal ranks to a woman. By divine providence The United 
Methodist Church in this way has given validity to the New 
Testament claim: "There is neither Jew nor Greek, there is 
neither bond nor free, there is neither male nor female: for ye are 
all one in Christ Jesus" (Galatians 3:28). 

The revelation of God is not static. Divine disclosure does not 
end with the last verse in the New Testament. What happened in 
the first century needs the achievements of subsequent ages, 
including the 20th century, to provide a full account of the mighty 
acts of God in history. "And these all, having obtained a good 
report through faith, received not the promise; God having 
provided some better thing for us, that they without as should not 
be made perfect" (Hebrews 11:39-40). 

In Memoriam 

Each age can take pride in its own prophets and seers. In this 
Council of Bishops our lives have been enriched and our work 
strengthened by 12 of our colleagues who, during the past 
quadrennium, have been translated from the Church Militant to 
the Church Triumphant: 
Escrivao A. Zunguze Donald H. Tippett 

Alfred J. Shaw Charles W. Brashares 



' James Russell Lowell, The Present Crisis, stanza 18. line 2. 

165 



166 Journal of the 1984 General Conference 

Mangal Singh Reuben H. Mueller 

J. Waskom Pickett Harold R. Heininger 

Richard C. Raines J. Kenneth Shamblin 

C. Ernst Sommer Gabriel Sundaram 

But to call their names is to start to count the blessings they 
have bestowed upon us, and then suddenly to stop, realizing that, 
like sands on the seashore and stars in the sky, they are too 
numerous to tally. 

OUR INSPIRATION IS FROM THE PAST 

Origin 

This General Conference is auspicious. It comes in the year of 
our 200th anniversary as a church. Though Methodism as a moral 
and spiritual movement had been in existence in England since 
1739, and in the colonies since 1766, what had been a mere col- 
lection of religious societies on both sides of the Atlantic became 
on the American continent in 1784 a new church with its own mis- 
sion and its special place in the wide economy of God's grace. 

John Wesley was, under God, its founder. He who refused to 
organize his followers into a denomination in the old world felt 
obligated, after the Revolutionary War, to provide his disciples 
with one in the new. Consequently, he gave them their doctrinal 
standards in the Apostles' Creed and an abbreviated form of the 
Thirty-Nine Articles of Religion, as well as their rites and ritual 
and ordinal, which he edited for them from the Book of Common 
Prayer. He lent them his General Rules. At the same time he 
ordained two of his lay preachers and sent them to become the 
nucleus of their ministry, while he ordained a clergyman from the 
Church of England, Dr. Thomas Coke, as their superintendent, 
made him his plenipotentiary, and designated their own Francis 
Asbury another superintendent to serve with Dr. Coke in the 
governance of the new church. 

"As our American brethren are now totally disentangled, both 
from the state and the English hierarchy, we dare not entangle 
them again, either with the one or the other," affirmed Mr. 
Wesley. "They are now at full liberty simply to follow the 
Scriptures and the primitive church. And we judge it best that 
they should stand fast in that liberty wherewith God has so 
strangely set them free."^ 



2 John Wesley, "Letter to Dr. Coke, Mr. Asburj', and Our Brethren in North 
America," Abel Stevens, History of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Eaton and 
Mains, N. Y., and Curts and Jennings, Cincinnati, Ohio, n.d.. Vol. II, p. 183. 



The United Methodist Church 167 

And stand fast in liberty our Methodist forebears did. They 
accepted the hturgy Mr. Wesley had prepared for them from the 
Book of Common Prayer, at least to the extent of using its forms 
of performing Baptism, the Lord's Supper, marriage, and 
ordination. They gladly adopted Wesley's doctrines and theology 
and recognized him as their father in the faith. But beyond this, 
they took advantage of their religious as well as political freedom. 
The polity and discipline of the church was decidedly its own. Its 
preaching and regular services of worship were spontaneous and 
free, like open country, fresh air, and running streams, adapted 
to the tastes and understanding of simple, untutored, and 
emotional people, who were reached more often through the 
heart than through the head, and who responded with their whole 
being to the Word of God. More than all else, it was democratic 
and self-determinative. It did not accept anything, even advice 
from Mr. Wesley, until it had discussed it, debated its merits and 
demerits, and then determined by majority vote whether it 
wanted it or not. The freedom that characterizes the United 
States has characterized Methodism since its inception as a 
church. 

The Christmas Conference, which met in Lovely Lane Chapel 
here in Baltimore from December 24, 1784, through January 2, 
1785, lasted only 10 days. Yet in that short time the decision to 
become a church was made, the name of the church chosen, 
episcopal government adopted, three orders of ministry estab- 
hshed, discipline and polity determined, and, above all else, 
purpose and mission conceived, and the plan of achievement 
devised and put immediately into operation. 

The conference consisted of as many of the traveling preachers 
as could be collected. There were about 60 of them. Two were 
Black: Harry Hosier and Richard Allen. All were laymen. Twelve 
of this number were made elders. Probably 15 others were made 
deacons. Dr. Thomas Coke was confirmed in the general 
superintendency to which Wesley had ordained him. And the two 
elders Wesley had ordained and sent over with him — Richard 
Whatcoat and Thomas Vasey — were gladly accepted as ministers 
in the new church. 

Francis Asbury was elected by his American brethren to the 
superintendency. On three successive days, starting with 
Christmas 1784, he was ordained deacon, elder, and superinten- 
dent respectively. Dr. Coke, acting in the capacity of the 
traditional bishop, and assisted by the two elders ordained by 
Wesley, ordained Asbury. A fourth person participated in the 
ordination and laid his hands also on the head of the first bishop 
ordained in America. That person was the venerable Philip 



168 Journal of the 198A General Conference 

William Otterbein, a Reformed minister in Baltimore, who later, 
with Martin Boehm, founded the Church of the United Brethren 
in Christ. 

This church was organized 16 years later. Its purpose was to 
serve German-speaking people of similar persuasion to the 
Methodists. Between 1803 and 1807 another German-speaking 
ecclesiastical body known as the Evangelical Association arose in 
this country under the leadership of Jacob Albright. All three 
churches — Methodist, United Brethren, and Evangelical — ^were 
grounded in the same basic theology, motivated by the same 
moral and spiritual purpose, pietistic in disposition and behavior, 
episcopally governed, and with only minor variations, alike in 
discipline and polity. 

Racial discrimination prompted Black people in Philadelphia 
and New York to organize new churches: the African Methodist 
Episcopal Church in 1816 and the African Methodist Episcopal 
Church Zion in 1820. Both were in doctrine and discipline exact 
duplicates of the mother church, so that the first two Black 
denominations ever formed were Methodist. 

The Christmas Conference at Lovely Lane Chapel in Baltimore 
gave to Christendom the Methodist Episcopal Church, the first 
national church to be organized in the new world. Its hallmark 
was the connectional system. Every charge, whether a single 
church or circuit, was inextricably bound to every other charge. 
It emphasized the unity of the whole, not the diversity of the 
parts. Therefore, its policies and programs were determined by 
what came to be a representative general conference to which all 
the annual conferences and individual congregations adhered. Its 
clergy held membership in an annual conference, not in a local 
church. Its ministers were deployed according to need, appointed 
annually by bishops, and sent to rather than called by the 
congregations they served. Its doctrines, so it believed, came by 
divine revelation, not human discovery, so they were not subject 
to the changing opinions of succeeding general conferences. This 
church rapidly emerged into the forefront of the nation and 
expanded around the world. 

Purpose 

The Methodist Episcopal Church, in its first Discipline, 
declared that God raised it up "to reform the continent and to 
spread scriptural hohness over the land." The twin foci of our 
denomination since its inception have been social involvement and 
evangelization, the reformation of society according to the ideals of 
the Kingdom of God, and the salvation of individual men and 
women through the grace of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ. 



The United Methodist Church 169 

Social Accomplishments: Impact on the Nation 

The Christmas Conference of 1784 condemned slavery and 
resolved "to extirpate this abomination from among us." 
Consequently it declared that Methodists must free their slaves 
within 12 months or withdraw from the church. Many Methodists 
did neither, and the church itself divided over the issue of slavery 
60 years later. Yet, despite the schism, Methodism as a whole 
contributed immeasurably to the abolition movement, winning 
from President Lincoln the admission that the nation would never 
have won the crusade to free the slaves if it had not been for the 
influence of the Methodist Episcopal Church. 

The 18th Amendment, making the manufacture, sale and 
consumption of alcoholic beverages illegal in the United States, 
and the 19th Amendment, extending suffrage to women, found 
their most numerous and most effective sponsors in the various 
branches of Methodism. Frances E, Willard, for example, who 
won the accolade "the incarnation of modem Methodism," was 
preeminent in both movements — prohibition and the right of 
women to vote. The United Brethren Church was the first to 
forbid its members to consume alcohol, and the Methodist 
Episcopal Church, to organize a national Board of Temperance. 
All denominations advocated temperance, but the Methodists, 
realizing that Uncle Sam was rapidly degenerating from a social 
drinker into a sot, demanded total abstinence from the consump- 
tion of alcohol. The year 1920 saw the passage of both 
amendments. In the most recent past, no other church has done 
more than the United Methodist to secure the passage of the 
Equal Rights Amendment. 

Our record in higher education is exemplary. Ours was the first 
denomination anywhere to offer women a liberal arts education. 
Wesleyan College in Macon, Ga., is the oldest college to award 
degrees to women in the entire world. Through the Freedmen's 
Aid Society, the Methodist Episcopal Church took major 
responsibility for the education of Black people after the Civil 
War. Chautauqua, started by a Methodist minister and layman 
on a camp-meeting ground, was the pioneer program in adult 
education outside college and the instigator of the first corre- 
spondence schools in this country. Today, The United Methodist 
Church supports more universities and colleges, with the largest 
student enrollment, of any denomination in America. 

We have been equal to the best of our sister denominations in 
the estabhshment of homes for orphans and other needy children 
as well as for the elderly. We have developed a network of 
hospitals throughout our conferences, some of which are among 
the best in the nation. Our church has pioneered in the advocacy 



170 Journal of the 198^ General Conference 

of prison reform and the humane treatment of criminals. The 
Goodwill Industries sprang out of the efforts of a Methodist 
pastor in Boston to give employment to the indigent. 

Our most splendid social achievements have been in the field of 
business and industrial relations. Due to our connectional system 
we have as a church been able to do more than others in settling 
strikes and improving the lot of the laborers in this country. We 
have sponsored the six-day working week, the eight-hour 
working day, the minimum wage, decent working conditions, and 
fair employment practices. The Methodist Episcopal Church 
fashioned in 1908 the first social creed in history — a landmark in 
the development of ethics for business and industry. 

Progress Within the Church 

What Methodism recommended to secular society, it sought to 
exemplify in its own denominational life. Therefore, its history 
presents a church that has always been in process of being 
renewed and reformed. 

The Methodist Protestant Church broke the hold of the clergy 
on the reins of control by according the laity equal representation 
with them in general conference. And today lay representation in 
our church is so pronounced that the formula for distribution of 
membership on most of our agencies is one-third laymen, 
one-third lay women, and one-third clergy. 

The same has been true of us in according rights to women. Our 
women, following in the footsteps of Barbara Heck, the Mother of 
American Methodism, were the first to organize a Woman's 
Home Missionary Society, which became in 1884 an official 
agency of the Methodist Episcopal Church. One of its presidents 
was Lucy Webb Hayes, at that time the First Lady of the United 
States. Women became delegates to general conference 11 years 
before the nation gave them the franchise. And today the 
Women's Division of the Board of Global Ministries is probably 
the most influential body in the whole church. 

Though the Congregationahsts ordained the first woman, the 
first denomination officially to authorize the ordination of women 
was the Church of the United Brethren in 1889. In 1956, Georgia 
Harkness did more than anyone else to achieve full clerical rights 
for women in The Methodist Church. As a result, today The 
United Methodist Church has more female ministers than 
perhaps all the other major denominations combined. 

Though the Roman Catholic Church was the first to have a 
Black person in the episcopacy in the Western Hemisphere, ours 
was the first to elect Black persons to that office with full 
responsibility over annual conferences. Today there is in the 



The United Methodist Church 171 

United States only one Black ordinary bishop in the Roman 
Catholic Church and one diocesan bishop in the Episcopal 
Church, while The United Methodist Church has eight in the 
effective relationship. At the level of decisionmaking, our 
denomination is the most completely integrated racially of any 
in America. 

In the beginning the only credentials our clergy had were their 
devotion and industry. As late as 1952, the standard route to 
conference membership and ordination was through the confer- 
ence course of study. Our theological seminaries were, at best, 
auxiliary. Financially they had to fend for themselves. They 
received less denominational support than those of any other 
major denomination. In 1968 The United Methodist Church 
established the Ministerial Education Fund, in which 2 percent of 
the operational budget of every local church is designated for 
ministerial education. As a result, we stand with the Southern 
Baptists and Roman Catholics in doing more to support the 
education of the clergy than any other denomination in America. 

From its inception the Methodist Episcopal Church has been a 
world church. Our first bishop, Thomas Coke, was an intrepid 
missionary, who died at sea on his way to India to organize the 
church there as he had in America. Of the 12 persons ordained as 
elders in 1784, three w^re sent as missionaries outside the bounds 
of the United States. A Black, John Stewart, began to evangelize 
the American Indians. In 1819 Nathan Bangs led in the 
establishment of the Methodist Missionary Society. Our first 
overseas mission was to Liberia in Africa in 1833. By 1948 we had 
conferences in 50 nations over the world. Most of these have 
become autonomous churches. 

The World Methodist Council, organized by British and 
American Methodism in 1881, is the second oldest of the world 
communions, antedating the Lutheran World Federation and the 
Baptist World Alliance by more than half a century. Our 
denomination helped to organize the Federal Council of Churches 
of Christ in America, now the National Council of Churches of 
Christ in the USA. The Methodist Episcopal Church gave it, with 
slight alterations, its own Social Creed, and its first president 
was a bishop of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. Both the 
Methodist Church and the Evangelical United Brethren Church 
were charter members of the World Council of Churches, and 
from the beginning until recently The Methodist Church has been 
its strongest financial supporter. A Methodist layman, John R. 
Mott, helped to lay the foundation of the ecumenical movement 
and was the president of its first conference in Edinburgh, 
Scotland, in 1910. 



172 Journal of the 198 Jf. General Conference 

Growth and Expansion 

What our church has done to improve society, it has been able 
to do only because of the devotion and piety of its members and 
because its membership has composed so large a segment of the 
society it has sought to change. Personal holiness, the church has 
believed, is essential to social righteousness and to the rectifica- 
tion of the nation and of the world. Thus, since its inception in 
1784, its mission has been to transform the lives of individual men 
and women and to incorporate them through Baptism and 
confirmation into its own corporate body. Growth and expansion 
have always been the hallmark of Methodism. 

In 1784 the ratio of Methodists to the population of the United 
States was only one in 213 persons. By 1926 our church reached a 
ratio of one in 17, which it maintained, with a temporary decline 
during the Depression, until 1960. Between 1800 and 1950 the 
rate of increase in the population of this country was 36.4 percent, 
while that of our church was 168.62 percent. Indeed, as late as 
1950 our growth rate was ahead of the nation's by 2.61 percent. 
Until the large inflow of immigrants from Ireland and central and 
southern Europe in the middle of the 19th century, Methodism 
was numerically the largest religious body in the United States 
and, indeed, remained the largest Protestant church until 1970. 

"It may fairly be said," affirmed Abraham Lincoln in May 1864, 
"that the Methodist Episcopal Church, not less devoted than the 
best, is by its greatest numbers the most important of all. It is by 
no fault in others that the Methodist Church sends more soldiers 
to the field, more nurses to the hospitals, and more prayers to 
heaven than any. God bless the Methodist Church."^ 

OUR DUTY IS IN THE PRESENT 

The Reformation of the World 

Today we are a world church, and our duties are commensurate 
with the needs of humanity. Our forebears sought to reform a 
continent. Their accomplishments inspire us now to essay the 
reformation of the world. 

Unless we can abolish war, the chances are there will not be 
any world left for us to reform. An all-out nuclear war would 
eradicate civilization and in all probability destroy human life 
itself. Proposals and plans to curtail nuclear developments, to 
impose a nuclear freeze, to guarantee nuclear parity between the 



3 Carl Sandburg, Abraham Lincoln: The War Years, Harcourt Brace and 
World, Inc., N. Y., 1939, Vol. Ill, p. 224. 



The United Methodist Church 173 

Soviet Union and United States are no more than palliatives. 
They do not cure the disease. All nuclear weapons possessed by 
any and every nation must simultaneously be destroyed, and 
neutral nations that do not possess such weapons must be the 
agents engaged to destroy them and to guarantee that their 
destruction is complete. 

War is malignant. And, given the disposition of governments to 
exercise military force unconscionably for purposes of expansion, 
ideological uniformity, the coercion of populations, and nationalis- 
tic prestige and power, conventional weapons are also intolera- 
ble. Christian conscience demands total disarmament by dis- 
banding armies, navies, and air forces over the face of the earth. 

The early church with one voice condemned war. The 
Augustinian and medieval doctrine of the Just War was a later 
concession by the church to secularistic society and imperial 
government which at the time were at least nominally Christian. 
When its provisions were strictly adhered to, all it did was to 
enable Christians to kill other Christians on a restricted scale and 
a bit more humanely than otherwise, but they got killed just the 
same. Under contemporary circumstances the doctrine of the 
Just War is a ridiculous anachronism. Jesus came that all might 
have life and have it more abundantly. We are the disciples of the 
Prince of Peace. He died on the cross rather than call down 
legions of angels to destroy his enemies. The church's message to 
the world is that any nation that selfishly tries to preserve its 
national existence by military means alone is bound to lose it, 
while those nations that give themselves unselfishly to the saving 
of their people and humanity will by divine grace achieve an 
exemplary place in history and become an earthly model of the 
kingdom of God. 

Just as important as the abolition of war are the universal 
respect for human rights, the freedom of persons in every nation 
and society, the safeguards of life, liberty, and the means of 
happiness to all people who inhabit the earth. The danger of 
enslavement is as terrifying as the threat of nuclear disaster. The 
inability freely to express one's thoughts, to disseminate new 
ideas, and to pursue the dictates of conscience are as oppressive 
as death itself. The domination of any portion of humanity by an 
oppressive, totalitarian regime is an evil which the church must 
resist with the same vigor and determination that it resists war. 
Blackmail of one nation by another through superior military 
force and the suppression of the citizenrj^ of a country by its own 
government are comparable to a holocaust. Jesus announced his 
mission and therefore the mission of his church: "to preach 
deliverance to the captives" and "to set at liberty them that are 



174 Journal of the 198U General Conference 

oppressed" (Luke 4:18). "Give liberty to whom liberty is due," 
proclaims John Wesley, "that is to every child of man, to every 
partaker of human nature. Let none serve you but by his own 
voluntary choice. Away with all whips, all chains, all compul- 



sion 



f"4 



It is the inalienable right of every person to security and 
well-being within the society in which that person lives. Yet 
contemporary society is victimized by crime, and human life 
appears as cheap today as it did in the most degenerate societies 
of antiquity. A thief kills with the same abandon that he or she 
steals. This is due in part to the inadequacy of our system of 
criminal justice and the brutalization of prisoners within our 
penal institutions. It is unconscionable to incarcerate with 
hardened criminals first-time young offenders and persons whose 
crimes do not involve physical injury and danger to other 
persons. Indeed, such persons should not be put in penal 
institutions at all. Rather, their sentences should be in the form of 
financial reparation to the people whom they have injured and the 
society whose laws they have violated, even if this must take the 
form of constructive work for others with no remuneration 
beyond mere subsistence to themselves. In this country it costs 
the public more money to keep a person in prison for a year than it 
does to pay a student's expenses in college. 

Every person indicted for a crime should be given a trial within 
a few weeks of indictment. Appeals after conviction should not be 
so easily obtained. Hand guns should be outlawed and plea 
bargaining only sparingly used. What justice is there in excusing 
one person for a crime in order to obtain that person's testimony 
against an accomplice in order to convict the accomplice? The 
parole system is far too lax and needs careful study and revision. 
Every precaution must be taken that a person convicted of 
premeditated murder not endanger the public again. Justice is 
the foundation of society. Even the mercy of God never subverts 
his justice. If it did, the atonement of Christ would have no 
meaning. To show mercy to a murderer and at the same time to 
do an injustice to an innocent person who becomes the murderer's 
victim is a mockery to creation and an offence to Almighty God. 

The most basic human right is the opportunity of a decent 
livelihood. Every person deserves the opportunity to acquire the 
material resources to live creatively and happily. Persons 
incapacitated beyond the point of productive labor are entitled to 



'» John Wesley, "Thoughts upon Slavery," V. 6, Works, Jackson Edition, 
Wesleyan-Methodist Book-Room, London, n.d.. Vol. XI, p. 79. 



The United Methodist Church 175 

compassionate care and to whatever satisfaction their condition 
will permit. Old age should be a season of serenity for those who 
attain it. Retirement income should be adequate to enable a 
person to maintain a reasonable standard of living. 

Unemployment and rampant inflation are twin economic evils 
that, like cancer to the human body, decimate and in the end 
destroy the body of society. Both are morally intolerable. 

Though talent and industry deserve recognition and reward 
and though property and possessions should not be denied to 
them who earn them, still gross inequities cannot be counten- 
anced by a morally responsible people. Retirement pay of several 
hundred thousand dollars for the executive of a corporation, 
when workers in that business are unemployed; and large 
government pensions equal in some instances to the highest 
salary a person received during the years of active service, when 
the social security system of the country is in jeopardy, are 
difficult to understand, much less to justify. "In cases of dire 
need," says St. Thomas Aquinas, "all things are common 
property. "= That is, the superfluous goods of the rich are to be 
shared with the poor. "Feed the man dying of hunger," the 
fathers of the church admonish, "because if you have not fed him, 
you have killed him."^ And John Wesley adds, "Treat every poor 
person as you would God Almighty should treat you!"^ 

Though the church champions the cause of the poor and 
underprivileged, it does not thereby indiscriminately condemn 
the affluent and blame them for the plight of the poor. It is 
counterproductive to try to create a guilt complex among 
prosperous people by constantly reminding them that a very 
small percentage of the world's population consumes a prepon- 
derant amount of the world's resources and goods, as if they 
deliberately cause this imbalance. It is false to assume that 
wealth is synonymous with exploitation and greed; and poverty 
with generosity and unselfishness. Saint Augustine observes that 
a person may have a lot of wealth in his possession but no avarice 
whatever in his heart, while another without any money at all 
may be consumed by covetousness. There are enough resources 
in most countries for the maintenance and well-being of their 
population. Small, overpopulated countries by industry- and 



'" Thomas Aquinas, Summa Theologica, II-II, Q. 66, A. 7. 

« Gratian, Decretum, C. 21, dist. LXXXVI. Cf. The Pastoral Constitution of the 
Church in the Modem World, Chapter III, Section 1, Division 69, Documents of 
Vatican II, edited by Walter M. Abbott and Joseph Gallagher, Gold Press, N. Y., 
1966, p. 279. 

^ cf. John Wesley, op. cit., Vol. VIII, p. 262. 



176 Journal of the 1984. General Conference 

creativity have acquired a high standard of hving, while some 
large and relatively rich countries either because of exploitation 
or mismanagement are ravaged by poverty. 

There is inherent merit in the Protestant ethic of the moral and 
spiritual value of productive and creative labor, and a direct 
historical corollary between societies that have actively espoused 
it and their prosperity. The Industrial Revolution began in Great 
Britain and reached its zenith in the United States. The United 
States has generated more wealth than any other nation. At the 
same time it has given more away in help to others than almost all 
the other nations combined. The Marshall Plan stands as a 
monument to national philanthropy, unmatched in size and 
effectiveness in all history, A vital element of Uberty is economic 
freedom. The right of a person to own and use the wealth he or 
she has honestly made, so long as the person does not abuse that 
right by despoiling others, is preferable to the ownership of all 
wealth by the state and its control and management by 
governmental bureaucrats. Certainly industry and hard work are 
indigenous to Methodism. John Wesley saved England from the 
revolution which struck France by changing the people rife for 
revolution into productive citizens. "Economic ambition, he 
believed to be a good servant but an accursed master."® Indeed, 
he describes money "as that most precious talent which contains 
all the rest" and contends that it "is unspeakably precious if we 
are wise and faithful stewards of it."^ 

The church stands above and in judgment of all economic 
systems. Its sole concern with them is that they promote the 
material welfare of all God's people. 

Every nation is inextricably bound to every other nation. The 
economy of one affects the economies of the others. Therefore, 
uncontrolled nationalism has outlived its usefulness. The times 
demand an international superstructure with the power and 
authority to legislate in behalf of the well-being of all peoples, to 
arbitrate disputes, to restrain violence, and to obliterate war. 

Personal Redemption and Righteousness 

The reformation of the world depends on the redemption of its 
inhabitants. There can never be a just and orderly society apart 
from righteous people who constitute it. We have spent much 
time deahng with social structures, debating the merits and 



® John Wesley Bready, England Before and After Wesley, Hodder and 
Stoughton, Ltd., London, n.d., p. 234. 
9 Sermon LI, "The Good Steward," I, 7, in Works, Vol. VI, p. 139. 



The United Methodist Church 111 

demerits of various political and economic systems, and attempt- 
ing by abstract, idealistic principles to reshape institutions and 
organizations, and far too little time evangelizing people, trying 
by the power of the gospel to convict them of sin, and offering 
them the gift of redemption through faith in Jesus Christ, 
whereby they obtain both a divine purpose for their lives and the 
power for its fulfillment. Our primary mission is to commend our 
Savior to them. 

People alone as individuals can be redeemed, not institutions, 
structures of society, or forms of government. These agencies, 
however, can and should be changed and improved, better to 
serve all people. Neither the United States nor the Soviet Union 
will exist in heaven. Yet we pray that many of the citizens of both 
countries vnW. Even the church has no institutional existence 
beyond time and space. Each person whom God has made must 
answer personally to God for the life that person has lived. 
Everyone hopes to hear God call him or her by name and say: 
"Well done, good and faithful servant, . . . enter thou into the 
joys of thy Lord" (Matthew 25:32). 

The church is not to be a mirror of the world but a reflection of 
heaven. Its ethics are the teachings of Jesus and not the mores of 
contemporary secular society. The basis of its message is the 
disclosure of God, not the opinions of people. It is the servant of 
God's Word revealed in the Scriptures of the Old and New 
Testament. It does not countenance as a permissive life style 
what the Bible labels as sin, nor is it to subvert the heinousness of 
sin by excusing it as an illness or minor mistake. The Bible 
affirms, "the soul that sinneth, it shall die" (Ezekiel 14:4). 

Though the church stands in judgment and condemns sin, it 
never ceases to love the sinner. Like its Lord, it is invariably 
compassionate, merciful, and forgiving. It cannot turn its back on 
any suppliant. Its doors are always open to sinners, and they are 
welcome into its fellowship. But this does not mean that it 
condones their sin and becomes a champion of their style of living 
when it is contrary to its own. It does not provide them with a 
platform to advocate a form of behavior inconsistent with its 
gospel. It accepts a person just as the person is in order for Christ 
to make him or her into what he or she ought to become. It sees 
people not as they are but as they can be. 

It is futile to try to pass judgment on a person's sexual 
predisposition or the bent of his or her inner nature. It is God who 
made us, and not we ourselves. (Psalm 100:36). In whatever way 
our nature was formed before birth, that is not our responsibility, 
and God does not hold us accountable for what we cannot help. 
Only God knows the secrets of our heart and can read our inmost 



178 Journal of the 19 8U General Conference 

thoughts. But the church must insist on moral and spiritual 
discipline. The Bible teaches that God will not permit us to be 
tempted beyond that we are able to bear (I Corinthians 10:13). 
Only in the marriage of man and woman can the church 
countenance sexual expression. When persons remain in the 
unmarried state, the church expects from them, both male and 
female, a life of chastity, continence, and celibacy. After all, our 
divine Lord himself never married, yet his hfe was without sin. 

Likewise, the church expects from married couples faithfulness 
and devotion to each other as long as they both shall live and the 
establishment of a home which is a haven of blessedness and a 
place of peace. The procreation of children and their rearing in 
the nurture and admonition of the Lord are the glory of marriage. 
Though abortion may be essential in extreme circumstances, to 
say that the fetus in a woman's womb is her own property to do 
with as she pleases and to use abortion for immoral purposes is a 
barbaric act displaying the lowest form of degeneracy. Abortion 
must never be permitted to become the means for promiscuity 
and sexual indulgence. 

The perennial purpose of the church is to lead people to Jesus, 
so that he can remake their lives like his very own. 

Renewal and Accountability 

The euphoria and optimism that marked the centennial of the 
Methodist churches in 1884 are out of place in 1984. The 
expectation then that our denominations were invincible and 
would always be in the vanguard of the march of Christendom 
toward the establishment of the Kingdom of God on earth was 
short lived. 

Inevitable progress was the dream of the 19th century. But 
that dream has been dissipated in the nightmare of the 20th 
century — ^the most war-ridden, violent, and destructive period in 
all history. To be sure, there have been more gains in scientific 
and technological knowledge in this century than in all the 
preceding centuries combined, but this knowledge is more a 
threat than it is a boon to human existence, and because of it we 
live in constant dread of annihilation. In its preoccupation with 
the material things of life, the 20th century has lost sight of the 
spiritual altogether. The eternal dimension of human nature is 
overshadowed by the temporal, so that the image of God has 
almost been erased from the countenance of his creatures. 

Likewise, The United Methodist Church, which has done so 
much to improve the material lot of people, has done far too little 
to save their souls. Since 1966 our denomination has continually 
lost members in the United States. Some years it has lost more 



The United Methodist Church 179 

than the size of a small annual conference. Indeed, the 
accumulated loss is double the entire membership of the 
Evangelical United Brethren Church at the time of union. If our 
losses continue as they have been, there will not be members left 
in the United States to implement the social programs of which 
we are so proud. Fortunately, gains in membership are taking 
place in our churches overseas, especially in Africa and Asia. For 
example, in the last decade, our churches in Zimbabwe and 
Mozambique, despite wars, rose from 5,280 members to 30,000 
and from 6,000 to 32,000, respectively; while our membership in 
Angola has jumped from 40,000 to 90,000, and in Zaire from 
100,000 to 370,000. Our offspring in Indonesia has experienced a 
30 percent growth and in Korea a 300 percent. The Evangelical 
Methodist Church in Bolivia has doubled in membership in the 
last three years. Soon we may be looking to our offspring abroad 
to send missionaries and evangelists to the western world to 
save us. 

Much of the time and energy of recent general conferences 
have been spent on internal affairs rather than on the church's 
mission to the outside world. 

Various caucuses have arisen within the church to voice their 
own concerns and promote their own interests. The church has 
not only heard and heeded them, but even funded them, so that 
they have become lobbying groups throughout the connection. 
Undue concessions to a disparity of concerns could lead to 
polarization and in time impair the unity of the church. 

The quota system, assuring proper representation to minori- 
ties, women, and young people, has enabled us to avoid structural 
discrimination and to utilize the gifts and graces of persons from 
all segments of the church. We should, however, be judicious in 
the use of it, always making it an asset by discovering and 
employing the new talent it affords, and never permitting it to 
become the tool of reverse discrimination, or an end in itself. It 
is unfortunate that even the church has found it necessary 
to establish monitoring agencies to assure justice to all its 
membership. 

We have been fortunate in the efficiency and effectiveness of 
the staffs of our boards and agencies. However, these staff 
persons must not think of themselves as so efficient that they do 
not need always to seek advice and guidance from local leadership 
in areas where they sponsor projects or are in any way involved. 
All boards and agencies must remember that they are tools of the 
denomination, designed to aid it in the performance of its mission; 
they are not intended to speak for it or to represent it to the 
outside world. No board or agency should ever be allowed to 



180 Journal of the 198^ General Conference 

become so big and powerful that it gives the appearance of being 
an autonomous entity and presumes in its policies and procedures 
to disregard the opinions and wishes of the general membership 
of the denomination. 

We support the Board of Global Ministries as the sole sending 
agency of missionaries and disapprove the organization of 
another sending agency in competition with it. However, in 
fairness to the concerns of those who feel the necessity for a 
second agency, we urge that measures be taken to assure our 
people that evangelization and evangelism are a vital part of the 
philosophy and practice of mission by the board and that its staff 
is committed to Wesleyan theology. We strongly support the 
emphasis on indigenous leadership in the church throughout 
the world. 

The benevolent monies of the church should be expended on 
causes related to the nature and life of the church and over which 
the church has some measure of control. Our boards and agencies 
should not be permitted to make grants to political causes or 
support movements based on ideologies contrary to the Christian 
faith. 

Only the General Conference can determine policy and, when 
in session, speak for the whole church. The bishops, however, are 
general superintendents of the denomination as a whole. They 
alone are charged, under the constitution, with "the general 
oversight and promotion of the temporal and spiritual interests of 
the entire church." As prophets, they should speak for God to the 
church on all questions concerning its duty. As priests and chief 
pastors, they should constantly seek its welfare. They should 
be its voice to society and the world, its ambassadors to all 
humanity. 

A strong church requires a strong ministry. Originally the 
Methodist societies depended on lay ministry, and the ministry of 
the laity always has been and always shall be a strong factor in 
the mission of the church. When Methodism was organized into a 
church in 1784, a clear and distinctive ministry was established in 
contradistinction to the general ministry of the laity. Divine 
calhng and ordination, setting certain people apart, to do the 
special work of God through fulltime service as preachers, 
prophets, priests, teachers, and evangehsts, constituted the 
official ministry of our church. Those ministers were called by 
God and recognized through their gifts and graces by the 
conference. They were not selected by the people as their 
representative ministers. A minister in the Lutheran and 
Reformed traditions is representative of the laity in the 
performance of ministerial functions. In the Methodist tradition 



The United Methodist Church 181 

the minister is representative of Jesus Christ. In the establish- 
ment of our ministry, John Wesley wrote his American offspring 
that he modeled their ministry after that of the Church of 
England, which he thought "the best constituted national church 
in the world"'" and gave to them deacons, elders, and superin- 
tendents, or bishops. 

Bishop Francis Asbury, in the last address he ever wrote for 
General Conference, and which was read posthumously as the 
Episcopal Address at the General Conference of 1816, said: "We 
are prepared, and, if called upon, to prove and demonstrate even 
in your assembly, not from uncertain Church Histories and 
testimonies, but from the pure Oracles of the New Testament- 
Three distinct ordinations, three distinct powers rising in gospel 
order by constituted degrees, one over another and under the 
government, and distinct in names, that is to say Apostles, 
Elders, and Deacons. We will enter the sanctuary of divine truth, 
here we shall stand, this is our ground."'' 

This General Conference, therefore, should do nothing to dilute 
or weaken but everything to strengthen the traditional Methodist 
concept of ministry. The laity of the church is strengthened, not 
impaired, by a distinctive ordained ministry. It is weakened 
when the lines of distinction between it and its ministers are 
erased. It is paralyzed when the duties and expectations of all the 
people of God are arrogated to a few professionals. Justice and 
service belong to laity and clergy alike, for together we are the 
servants of God. 

Our church has been ecumenical since its inception. "Our 
Lord," John Wesley wrote, "probably glances at all these 
prejudices, which different sects had against each other, and 
intimates that he would not have his followers imbibe that narrow 
spirit. Would to God this had been more highly attended to among 
the unhappy divisions and subdivisions into which the church has 
been crumbled! And that we might advance so far as cordially to 
embrace our brethren in Christ, of whatever party or denomina- 
tion they are I "'2 

Therefore, we affirm our commitment to the ecumenical cause. 
As denominations we need one another. We can do more together 
than any one of us can do alone. We expect our church to continue 



"> The utters of the Rev. John Wesley, A.M., Telford Edition, Epworth Press 
London, 1931, Vol. VII, p. 239. 

" The Journal and Letters of Francis Asbury, Potts Edition, Epworth and 
Abingdon Presses, London and Nashville, 1958, Vol. Ill, p. 532. 

'2 John Wesley, Explanatory Note on the New Testament, Epworth Press 
London, 1976 Edition, p. 35. 



182 Journal of the 1984 General Conference 

its membership in both the National and World Council of 
Churches as well as the World Methodist Council. But we dare 
not give blanket approval and endorsement to all their pro- 
nouncements and programs. We reserve the right always to 
evaluate and criticize them. We expect from them responsible 
and impartial leadership and call upon our representatives to 
such bodies to assure the same. 

Each quadrennium we get a plethora of petitions to General 
Conference. Most of them have to do with our own structure and 
organization, and come largely from boards and agencies. As a 
result our Discipline expands like a telephone book. We have 
more rules and regulations than we know how to administer. 
Perhaps it would be wise to call a moratorium on all such 
organizational proposals. Certainly the General Conference 
should act sparingly in regard to them. It should not enact into 
legislation anything that is not fully considered and debated on 
the floor of the Conference. What it does not have time properly 
to consider, it should not consider at all. 

The business of the church is not maintenance but mission, not 
the renovation of its own organization but the salvation of the 
world. 

OUR HOPE IS IN THE FUTURE 

This Bicentennial anniversary should not be made an occasion 
for Methodist triumphahsm. The most wholesome attitude we 
can take is that we possess nothing distinctive that is absolutely 
necessary for the salvation of the world. Indeed, what is 
necessary for the salvation of the world is not what we have that 
is different from what other Christian bodies possess, but rather 
what we hold in common with all of them, namely Jesus Christ, 
who alone can save sinners from their sins. "Neither is there 
salvation in any other; for there is none other name under heaven 
given among men, whereby we must be saved" (Acts 4:12). 
Therefore, our mood as a church should be one of penitence. We 
have had the opportunity to do so much. But the record shows 
that we have done far too little. 

But our mood should also be one of hope and expectancy. God 
has given to The United Methodist Church the resources to 
assure it a place in his redemptive mission as long as time shall 
last. Whether it remains an autonomous body as it now is or loses 
its denominational identity in a larger ecumenical organization, 
thereby anticipating perfect unity in Christ, its heritage is too 
precious to be lost and will always constitute one of the priceless 



The United Methodist Church 183 

treasures of Christendom. Though it is only 200 years old, the 
youngest of the major denominations, its contribution to 
humankind has been far in excess of its years. 

Experimentation 

Methodism has been the least doctrinaire of any of the major 
bodies of Christendom. Unlike its Protestant forebears, it has not 
started with abstract doctrines and theories and sought to apply 
them rigidly without regard to practical difficulties. It has always 
been willing to experiment. Faced with a perplexing problem, a 
situation of desperate human need, it has been willing to apply 
one remedy after another, until one of them has worked, and the 
problem solved. Therefore, most of its practices have emerged as 
the result of numerous experimentations. 

The itinerancy, the conferences, the connectional system, the 
use of lay preachers, the superintendency, episcopal appoint- 
ments, even the organization of the Methodist Episcopal Church 
itself were all grand experiments. They came as the result of the 
pressure of events. They were not parts of a preconceived 
ecclesiastical plan. 

The whole of Methodism arose out of the demands of practical 
life. It began as a series of divine improvisations, comparable to 
the emergence of Christianity itself as described in the New^ 
Testament. Its greatest asset, we believe, as we enter the third 
century of our history, is our church's flexibility and adaptabiUty, 
its wilhngness to improvise, to be made all things to all people 
that it might by all means save some (I Corinthians 9:22). 

Theology 

Therefore, Methodist theology is basically pragmatic. It 
eschew^s abstract thought and speculation. Though it adheres to 
reason, its reason is common sense, the assumption that religious 
thought is a guide to action and that the truth of everj' belief can 
be attested to and confirmed by its moral and spiritual 
consequences. John Wesley was the people's theologian. He 
taught Christian truth to convince, convict, and convert the 
masses. 

The single source of Methodist theology is the Bible. Reason is 
necessar>' to understand doctrine; and tradition (knowledge and 
appreciation of the past), an aid to its interpretation; while 
experience is the organ for its validation in personal life. But the 
Bible alone is its source. The Bible is not a book written bv people 
to express their own religious ideas and to describe the kind of 
Deity they would like to worship. It is God's own disclosure of 
himself, the account of his mighty acts in history, and his 



184 Journal of the 198Jf. General Conference 

directives for our salvation. It is not for us to change and modify- 
according to our preferences, but to accept and believe and try to 
live by. 

The essence of Wesleyan theology is the doctrine of salvation. 
More than any other major Protestant theologian, John Wesley 
maintains a nice balance between the all-sufficiency of divine 
grace and the necessity for responsible human freedom. Syner- 
gism is the descriptive label of the Wesleyan doctrine — salvation 
in all its stages is a process of cooperation between God and 
human beings. 

Its presupposition is that all persons are sinners and cannot 
save themselves. But even in a state of sin, God reaches out to 
them through his prevenient grace, so that no one is deprived of 
conscience, the ability to discern value, to distinguish between 
good and evil, and then to know the degrees of worth, that is, 
what is good, better, and best in the scale of existence. 

The sole foundation on which salvation rests is the atonement. 
Jesus Christ died on the cross for our sins, and not for ours only 
but for the sins of the whole world. The atonement is universal in 
its scope and in the intention of God. But it is not universal in its 
application and effectiveness. It is effective only for those who 
freely and gladly accept for themselves the benefits of Christ's 
death. 

Forgiveness and regeneration are the initial and concomitant 
acts of salvation. God forgives us our sins for Christ's sake and 
declares us to be justified, and that by grace alone. But at the 
same time he cleanses us from sin and transforms us into 
righteous and upright people. 

Sanctification is synonymous with Christian hving. The longer 
we live with God the more like him we become. Saintliness is the 
normal characteristic of the Christian. The goal of Christian 
living is entire sanctification, or Christian perfection, which 
means simply that the dominating motive of life is unselfish 
love. Our love for one another is comparable to the love of God 
for us. 

The Wesleyan emphasis is on the work of the Holy Spirit, who 
is God living with, guiding, and empowering his people. 

Ethics 

Since Christian perfection is a temporal attainment and the 
entire process of salvation is completed in this life, Wesleyan 
ethics is an ethics of self-realization. In this respect, it stands in 
contrast to the ethics of the Reformation, which is an ethics 
of aspiration. With the Reformers, forgiveness is a hfelong 
necessity; the best acts of the holiest people are tainted by sin and 



The United Methodist Church 185 

corruption; righteousness is less a reality than it is a hope; and 
salvation is attained only in heaven. 

Roman Catholicism and Eastern Orthodoxy emphasize the 
attainment of holiness in the here and now. But in order to do 
this, a person must \\ithdraw from the secular world and live a 
life of prayer and solitude and render service to others from 
outside the bounds of the normal condition of everyday life. 
Saintliness in Catholic and Orthodox tradition belongs only to the 
favored few. 

But John Wesley taught that holiness of heart and life is the 
characteristic of every Christian. One must be genuinely holy 
here on earth before one can expect to see God and live 
permanently ^\ith him in heaven. "The sanctified," Wesley says, 
shall see God "in all things here" as well as "hereafter in 
heaven".'^ 

Methodist ethics since the inception of the Methodist move- 
ment has sought to create a society conducive to holiness and to 
populate that society with holy people. "The kingdom of glory in 
heaven," Wesley affirms, "is the continuation and perfection of 
the kingdom of grace on earth"." 

Opportunity 

This General Conference, in which we remember our past, face 
our obhgations in the present, and anticipate and plan for the 
future, has a great opportunity under God for improving and 
expanding The United Methodist Church and enabling it more 
properly to fulfill the mission God has given it in the world. That 
mission is the perennial task of evangelization, of winning 
uncommitted persons, one by one, to the Christian faith, teaching 
them authoritatively what basically to believe and not to believe, 
giving them moral precepts by which to live, and nurturing them 
in spirituality and holiness, so that their goodness is exemplary, 
influential, and even captivating. Converted and transformed 
persons are the only means for the rectification of society and the 
assurance of justice, opportunity, and happiness for all God's 
people on the face of the earth. 

The future lies before us, but to possess it and serve it, we as a 
church must already have been possessed by our Lord and 
Saviour Jesus Christ, in whose name we witness, to whose life we 
conform, and by whose power we reclaim the world. 



'3 Ibid. , p. 29. 

'* "Sermon on the Mount: VI," III, 8, Wesley's Standard Sermons, Sugden 
Edition, Epworth Press, London, 1935, Vol. I, p. 439. 



186 Journal of the 1984. General Conference 

The Episcopal Address has been written by Bishop William R. 
Cannon, who was selected by the Council of Bishops. It has been 
perfected for presentation at the 1984 session of the General 
Conference after considerable preparation, including discussion 
and debate at regular meetings of the Council of Bishops. Though 
not reflecting the view of every bishop at every point, in finished 
form this address has been approved by the Council of Bishops of 
The United Methodist Church. 



THE 

LAITY 

ADDRESS 

Presented on Wednesday Morning, May 2, 1984, 
by Sue A. Guzman, Ramon C. Lopez, 
Mai H. Gray, and J. Taylor Phillips. 

I 

The United Methodist Church in its Bicentennial year finds 
Itself m need of revitalization. That challenges the laitv— and 
moves us to challenge the members of the clergy. 

We are challenged to increased participation in evangelism and 
mission activity, thus building the future on the basis of a rich 
heritage. We are challenged to respond to the growing diversity 
of our church, and the pluralism and social change in our society 
by helping to expand special ministries. We are challenged to 
break silence and to act courageously toward achieving peace in 
the world and justice in our society. 

_ We challenge The United Methodist Church and its clergy to 
join us— by opening the way for us to participate more fully in 
these activities and by equipping us more adequately to meet our 
challenges. 

Life in a living church in today's faithless world challenges the 
laity of our church to evangelism, ministry, and leadership 

Our church has experienced 200 years of histor>% years which 
have brought us new challenges and new opportunities. For 
miany decades our church membership grew faster numericallv 
than the nation's population, and this is no longer true With 
niighty words we have deplored the continuing hemorrhage of 
church membership. Now is the time to act. 

We are challenged to evangelism. This Bicentennial time 
should remind us of the concern of our first general superinten- 
dent, Bishop Francis Asbur>', and his circuit-riding colleagues. 
1 heir goal was not merely church membership. It was to proclaim 
the good news of personal salvation— salvation by repentance and 



187 



188 Journal of the 198 J^ General Conference 

acceptance of regeneration. This came through the redeeming 
grace of God incarnate in Jesus Christ, who died for our sins. 
Many of the early laity proclaimed this salvation. As local 
preachers they had a major impact on their society and culture. 
So can today's laity, if we accept the challenge to make the 1984 
Bicentennial a new beginning, rather than a brief "Pageant of 

the Past." n. « 1, u 

Our task is evangelism— free of any modifiers such as church 
school" or "personal" or "visitation" or "missional" or "pulpit" or 
"teaching." Just plain evangelism. It should be all of these 
things. And it should begin with every layperson and every 
minister asking these questions: "Am I a good person?" "Am I a 
faithful disciple?" "Is God really in my life?" 

The salvation we preach is not for the chosen, but for all. 
Proclaiming this salvation is not the mission of the few. Our 
churches will grow as they involve, with expectation, our 
laypeople. Our laity should be willing and ready to proclaim 
the faith and to serve. We should expect excellence of our mem- 

bers. 

Besides evangelizing effectively, we must meet the challenge 
to revive church membership by exerting leadership, extendmg 
churches, and practicing cooperation. 

The laity needs to be leaders with Christ as the head. Our 
boards and agencies have a vast store of skills to teach us; we 
need to utilize these resources. Our bedrock needs, however, are 
personal commitment to God and a determination to speak and 
act personally for Christ in society. Living with Christ may mean 
laypeople giving more leadership to church clubs, although not 
withdrawing their "saltiness" from civic clubs and other non- 
church groups. It vdll require of us more time working for the 
company of behevers, less to "business." It may even mean less 
time for personal recreation. 

We must minister through church extension in meetmg the 
challenge of evangelism. When churches of small membership are 
threatened or disappear, the laity can bring church renewal 
through their voices, deeds, and money helpmg new churches 

to emerge. 

We must meet the challenge through full cooperation between 
laity and clergy. Boards and agencies can and should help provide 
some of the vehicles for meeting the challenge. But if we— lay and 
clergy, male and female, old and young— first give ourselves to 
Christ, far more will happen both within and beyond our 
organizational structure. We have spoken of challenge. Some 
sports offer participants a so-called "Challenge Cup." For us that 
can be the cup of our Lord's death. That can be the cup that binds 



The United Methodist Church 189 

us together-lay and clergy, male and female, young and old 
knowledgeable and less knowledgeable. 

As the laity in the world today, moving in our church's third 
century we have the greatest opportunity in history to make 
Jesus Chnst visible through our dedication, cooperation, and 
daily living. We must work continuously and work cooperatively 
to become a church that is fully in mission to a world in need of 
God s love and God s way. 

We face this opportunity backed by a great heritage of mission 
activity. We can draw on resources of connectionalism and 
commumcation. We claim and celebrate this heritage! It is where 
we have been; it points where we are going' 

We give thanks for the struggles and the wisdom of our 
forebears; they took their responsibility for the future of the 
church senously. For 200 eventful years, United Methodists, 
both lay and clergy, have faced the challenge to establish a 
relevant community of behevers. In this Bicentennial year it is 
fitting to recall the struggles which deepened our faith and 
shaped our institutions and to identify the ministries to which 
God IS calling the laity today. 
This is where we have been: 

Participation by the laity was limited in the early days of our 
church; laypeople did not figure in the leadership structure of 
wnat was a clergy-dominated organization. But in 1830 with the 
m^^dp t"vf l^ .'^! ^''Y''' Protestant Church, our forebears 
?hurl 1 ?v! '^^P ^^^''""^ ^^' ^^'^^ ^"^0 ^^e "f^ ^"d work of the 
^.v ?1 ?f early years of the Methodist movement, lay- 

persons of the Evangelical Association and the United Brethren 
Church were not satisfied to work outside the church structure 
either bince then, men, women and youth of the laity have 
fonned organizations to involve themselves in church ministries 
Men have sought and found ways to offer their faith, speak to 
the issues of the day, and respond to the needs of persons Now 
ofSge Methodist Men they find strength in time 

Women's missionary societies go back to 1869. Laywomen have 
shared in the administration of the work, raised vast sums of 
nioney, educated children, and uplifted communities. Through 
this work, individual women have had opportunities to develop 

ZJ^'^'V^/'' rV'T^ ^"^^^^ ^" Christian humanitarian 
serMce, and develop leadership abilities. General conferences 
have consistently recognized United Methodist Women in 
organizational form through the years and especially as they 
celebrate their "Centennial Era" of more than 100 years of 
ser\*ice and organization within the church. 



190 Journal of the 198 J^ General Conference 

Youth among the laity have found openings for involvement in 
and service to the world through a variety of organizational 
structures. The Council on Youth Ministries involves youths and 
adults, on both the national and conference levels, in initiating 
and supporting plans, activities, and projects of particular 
interest to youth. 

By fully using the opportunities provided through our history 
for the laity, it is possible for the total church— clergy and laity, 
youth and adults— to share together in great ministry. 

This is where we are going: 

We are going on mission. Christ said, "Go therefore and make 
disciples of all nations." In obedience, lay women and men have 
literally become servants of the church. They have served as 
missionaries, deaconesses, educators, community workers, doc- 
tors, and nurses. We now need to evaluate what kind of servants 
we have been, and to become more alert to the means and the 
places of mission to which God is calling us. Ever growing, ever 
changing, ever under God's direction, the mission of our church 
demands our involvement, for that is how we hve out our 
covenant. 

That commitment to service and mission can be met. One 
important tool is our connectionalism. It is the church's unique 
way of sharing our resources more effectively to feed the hungry, 
clothe the naked, and show concern for those in bondage— and 
ultimately to share God's redeeming love for all people. Indeed, 
connectionalism gives us the avenue and opportunity for living 
out our racial and ethnic inclusiveness and interdependence. We 
challenge the clergy to strengthen further this unique force 
through practicing open exchange of pulpit preaching and other 
pastoral ministries at home and abroad. 

The foundation for doing these tasks is to make Jesus Christ 
the center of our lives. The future calls us to communicate this 
faith through our day-to-day activities and through the life and 
work of the church as a Christian community. 

May we be remembered by generations to come as faithful 
servants. Our rich heritage demands nothing less. It is up to us to 
make it matter to a world in need of meaning. 

II 

United Methodists' inclusiveness has helped make us a diverse 
church. Like the society around us, we are culturally plurahstic. 
We must seek unity in serving our diversity. Our challenge as laity 
is to accept and love one another as we are, and to undertake a 
variety of special ministries. We have the diversified skills to do it. 



The United Methodist Church 191 

Let us understand first just how diverse we have become- 

WJio are the United Methodists? We are a distinct community 
?^ o nni^" f ""P^^' ^^ ^'"'^''^^ ethnically and culturally as were 
the 3,000 who responded to Peter's sermon on the day of 
Pentecost. While the majority of our members are Ando- Ameri- 
cans, we include Native Americans, Asian Americans, Blacks 
Hispanics, and others. A scholar says that we have the most 
diverse membership of any religious grouping in the United 
str^en^h '' '" potentially our "greatest asset and 

Who are the United Methodists? We are a people who are equal 
amidst our diversity. We are equal before our Lord, but saved by 
the grace of God. We are equal before each other as members of 
one body of Christ. We are equal in responsibility to bring the 
good news of salvation to our sisters and brothers, whoever thev 
may be and wherever they may be found. We are equal as 
members of a nurturing and redemptive community, encouraging 
^Zh ?7 ^}^f^^^ \s well as mature church people to become 
ail that God intends them to be. 

In our equality amidst our diversity, we must be inclusive 
Inclusiveness is the mark of Christian discipleship. It is opposite 
to exclusiveness The Lord commanded us, "Go make disciples of 
au nations. Christ turns no one away. In fulfilhng God's 
command in our day, we must turn no one away. In our United 
Methodist church, all are welcome into membership and service 
^n^l! ^J^t^"^i^°"v "^ale or female, young or old, married or 
smg e, widowed or divorced, rich or poor, red or yellow. Black or 
wnite ... It is up to us to learn to accept and love one another as 



How can United Methodists promote inclusiveness in a diverse 
and changing American society? How can we do this when many 
persons are increasingly militant, sensitive, self-conscious and 
antagonistic toward one another? We can respond in John 
Wesley s way. He reached out in ministry to a forgotten minority 
of poor coal miners m England and to American Indians, to 
Moravians and others on his coming to Georgia. Today, of couke 
we face not just one minority but multi-ethnic minorities-and 
they are at our doorstep. What a broad mission field is opening in 
cou'ntr ^40"^ '''" immigrants, virtually excluded from this 
country for 40 years, now land on our shores daily-Filipinos 
Vietnamese, Koreans, Chinese, Indians, and others. SimLly' 

nZ ^WT^-!u^^ '^''^ '^""^^' fr«"^ the south-Mexico,' 
Cuba, and the Canbbean. Its immigration and high birth rates 
have made the Spanish-speaking, Hispanic population our second 
largest minonty, next to Black Americans. We must reach out 



192 Journal of the 198 J,. General Conference 

and minister to these groups — and to new ministries as they 
develop. 

So our challenge is to build upon the pluralism, the equality 
within The United Methodist Church as the great strengths they 
are. As a church we have ministered to ethnics for approximately 
200 years, and they now minister to us. We must draw on the 
experience of the last quadrennium. If we are to respond to our 
Lord's call to inclusiveness, we must create the necessary 
strategies and resources for this ministry, developing leadership 
among emerging congregations for mutual ministry. 

Let's talk specific ways we can respond to this challenge: 

We can develop new churches. Our ministry among ethnic 
groups has already resulted in new urban and rural congregations 
which are now challenging the general church. Korean congrega- 
tions in our country have increased from 19 to 50 in just seven 
years. Leaders of Asian congregations have challenged the 
general church to double its membership in the next eight years 
and establish tithing as a standard. Ethnic minorities have 
influenced increases in attendance at Sunday school and morning 
worship services. Clearly, we must continue to expand this 
fruitful ministry. We must emphasize evangelism to ethnic 
minorities and new immigrants. Existing general churches 
should share space when needed with emerging special language 
congregations and give maximum support to the training of 
clergy and laity for these ethnic congregations. 

We can develop partnership between churches. Secular 
partnerships are not new: President Eisenhower inaugurated a 
"People-to-People" program to bring about greater understand- 
ing between Americans and other peoples of the world. In many 
American cities today, a similar purpose is accomplished through 
a "sister cities" program estabUshing ties with cities abroad. We 
must not wait to initiate a "Church Partners" program to 
estabhsh partnership ties between United Methodist churches 
which are geographically isolated from ethnic groups, and ethnic 
congregations in other areas. Neither should be in isolation; we 
are a true Christian church only when we are together. There are 
other ways besides these long-term partnerships to break 
through the barriers between churches of different ethnic — or 
economic — composition. There can be exchange visits, or the 
exchange of letters and videotapes between persons and 
congregations. 

We can develop multi-ethnic leadership. Because of our 
pluralism, our denomination has a wealth of leadership (and 
potential leaders) among many groups. This leadership must be 
continuously expressed in our local congregations as well as in the 



The United Methodist Church 193 

church's boards and agencies. (This Laity Address Committee is 
united in one purpose, yet its membership includes different age 
groups and varied cultural, ethnic, and racial backgrounds.) 
Trained leadership, both lay and clergy, is needed by these 
fast-growing ethnic congregations. As an inclusive church we 
must purposefully train it so as to make full use of the human 
assets with which the Lord has blessed us. 

We can develop ministry by ethnic young adults. Young adults 
compose a disproportionately large part of the ethnic population. 
Its median age is as much as five years below that of the total 
population. This army of young adults is an untapped pool of 
talent for broad-range ministry in the church. 

We can develop open itinerancy relating to our diverse 
congregations. As ethnic clergy are trained for ministry, let us 
avoid developing ethnics for ethnics. Their service should not be 
limited to ethnic groups. We must inform our nominating and 
pastor/parish committees of the importance of inclusiveness in all 
areas of our church — starting with the local congregation. 

There are other kinds of diversity in our church than the 
ethnic. These demand that we work to develop other special 
ministries. Jesus came not to be served, but to serve. We must 
follow our Christ. 

The needs and anxieties of the aged, the unemployed, youth, 
singles, persons with handicapping conditions, and many other 
special people, call the United Methodist laity to minister to them 
more creatively, more meaningfully. We should respond — now. 
And we can. We laypeople have the kinds of diversified skills 
needed. And, "As there is diversity of talent and vocations, so 
there is a diversity of ministry." 

Our ministry to the aging must grow. The 21st century may 
well be that of an aging world population. While the aged have 
always been with us, only in the past few decades has the 
attention of nations been drawn to the social, economic, political, 
and scientific questions raised by the phenomenon of aging. Our 
own church is in a new age and a new stage in its mission, for it is 
now a graying church. Forty-three percent of The United 
Methodist Church members in the United States are now 55 
years old or older. Each conference, district, and local church will 
have to decide how to meet our emerging needs. 

At the same time, our ministry to youth and young adults must 
increase. They are our pool of leadership, and we have not 
used it. We must provide them with more effective leadership 
training. We must bring them in to participate in decision-making 
and close the vawning generational chasm between the ages of 
21 and 45. 



194 Journal of the 198 U General Conference 

Our traditional ministry to the family must be enriched and 
broadened to meet the special needs of people living in diverse 
types of relationships. We must offer singles increased oppor- 
tunities for affiliation and support. In the face of a divorce rate 
treading on the heels of the marriage statistics, we must help 
couples strengthen their marriages. To undergird this ministry, 
the Board of Discipleship's Area on Family Life must continue 
international research to promote the nurturing of today's family 
groupings. 

Our ministry must reach other areas of social concern — ^the 
unemployed, those in prison, those in military service. Our 
outreach ministry must provide services and seek justice in the 
community. Each of our churches must be a caring place — a 
nurturing center which reaches out to people in need whoever 
and wherever they are. There is much to be done, there are many 
laypeople to do it — ^if only we will. Let us follow Christ, whose 
example should become our example for action. 

Ill 

If we seek to minister to a diverse and changing society with 
diverse and newly developed ministries, we must undergird our 
action with faith and concern for the social, political, and 
economic problems facing our society. We must minister to the 
wounded and stand up against those who inflict the wounds. 
Ministry involves risking. It cannot be othenvise. As the laity of 
The United Methodist Church, we affirm the value of all people as 
equal in the sight of God. But the world does not agree; systems 
of profound injustice dominate the earth. Historically, the United 
Methodists have recognized the responsibility of all Christians to 
lead in mission toward eliminating this justice and the suffering 
that goes with it. 

Peace must be foremost in this mission, because of the 
seriousness and wide ramifications of the problem. Today, faced 
with the extreme risks of an escalating arms race and the threat 
of nuclear war, risk-taking is demanded of us. Yet many ask why 
the church has seemed so silent in the face of the economic and 
defense pohcies of our government. We should challenge this 
direction: Our defense budget is turning national plowshares into 
swords; our nation's social allocations are bringing good news to 
the rich at the expense of the poor. 

Is our silence a pause to recover our biblical roots, grope for a 
clearer vision of our direction, our purpose. and our identity 
before moving out to the forefront? Let us hope it is only that. It 
is crucial to discern correctly the signs of the times, for silence 



The United Methodist Church 195 

can be akin to betrayal. It does not come easy to move out of the 
haven of silence to protest the policies of other world powers. But 
speak out we must, drawing strength from the biblical witness, 
even in the humility of our limited understanding. 

Some of us have broken silence, have moved into the arena, 
with the nuclear freeze movement. There are other avenues for 
individual laypeople. War is incompatible with the teachings of 
Christ and would be impossible if all people were Christians and 
followed our Lord's example. The church should uphold the right 
of individuals to dissent under the constraint of conscience, 
understanding they will refrain from violence and accept the cost 
of disobedience, in actions such as refusing military' service under 
conscience. 

But our witness against war must go beyond supporting 
individuals in protest. We must be world-changers. We live in a 
bomb culture saturated with bomb thought. We are assured that 
preparing for war furthers the cause of peace, that increasing 
armaments are merely negotiating tools, that we must have a 
balance of deterrence. Another word for such bomb talk is 
doublethink. 

Are we concerned with the hungry and poor of our communi- 
ties? Our concerns, like our church, must also be global. Building 
bombs does not feed the people of developing nations, or our 
nation. Diverting resources to bombs does not bring help to the 
jobless, or to persons with handicapping conditions, or the 
elderly. Peacemaking is not something we can leave up to 
politicians to handle on the basis of business as usual. All they 
have produced are fruitless arms control treaties that trade off 
weapons like marbles and allow even more destructive ones to be 
built. We need a peace surpassing such calculations, a different 
peace for a different world predicated on changing hearts and 
minds of people. 

As a church we must recognize how violence permeates all 
elements of our society — corrupting our attitudes, or behavior, 
our language, our entertainment, our work, our play, our 
love — so that we cannot change. 

As a church, United Methodists must act as peacemakers, 
locally as well as globally. We must begin learning to use the 
skills of conflict resolution: in our personal lives, between women 
and men, among co-workers, within families, and in our schools, 
political institutions, and communities. It is in our local churches 
that mediation and peacemaking begin. They must become 
centers of discussion and learning, where ideas are exchanged 
freely and discussed frankly. We must aim to "study war no 
more." 



196 Journal of the 198Jf General Conference 

Peace, in the Christian sense, is grounded in justice. It works 
in partnership with the Christian virtues of faith and trust in God; 
hope for the future of the human family and unconditional love for 
all who live. To apply such values to our present world, to our 
national way of Ufe, involves a peaceful revolution. It demands 
the overthrow of the giant anti-trinity of materiaHsm, militarism, 
and racism entrenched deeply in this world. We must pay heed to 
the call to reassess our values, to shift from a thing-oriented 
society to a person-oriented society. This will involve bruising 
our hands as we knead and mold our inflexible status quo into a 
community of love and trust. But why cannot the laity of a 
powerful church in the richest and most powerful nation in the 
world lead the way in reordering priorities and revolutionizing 
values? Why can we not lead in pursuing peace instead of war? 

We are used to thinking of ourselves as playing the good 
Samaritan along life's highway, binding up the wounded after the 
robbers have done their dirty deed. Can we not lift our eyes to 
see that the whole road to Jericho must be transformed, so that 
men and women will no longer be constantly beaten and robbed as 
they journey on life's highway? We must not only strive to feed 
the hungry and reheve the poor — ^but work to change the 
practices, the priorities, the politics that produce hunger and 
poverty. 

We cannot do otherwise lest we be buried. Think of what has 
become of the Western nations that initiated the spirit of 
revolution that bred democracy, the principle of equality, the 
drive to self-determination for so many peoples. Comfort, 
complacency, and a proneness to adjust to injustice have left 
those nations to become reactionaries. Many oppressed peoples 
now look at them and believe only Marxism has the revolutionary 
spirit. The spread and specter of a godless world is a judgment 
against our failure to make justice real by following through on 
the revolution our founders began! 

Other tasks lie around us in the local churches. Our churches 
must be places for listening — not only to each other, but also to 
the cries of the weak and the powerless. We will not act until we 
care; we will not care until we hear; we will not hear until we start 
to listen. 

We must strive to meet the needs of those devastated by 
substance abuse — drugs and alcohol — but we must also work to 
change the social arrangements and attitudes that encourage 
drunkenness and chemical highs, and battle those who profit by 
the sale and official toleration of these drugs. 

We must seek to provide a church atmosphere free from 
prejudice and discrimination — and lend our support to eradicat- 



The United Methodist Church 197 

ing them from our society. Women, the elderly, Hispanics, 
Southeast Asians, Native Americans, and Blacks suffer all 
around us from discrimination. Our society has made progress, 
but new objects of scorn and fear arrive as we come to accept the 
old ones. We must constantly be on guard against racism, for it is 
a global problem. 

There is much to be done in the neighboring realms of peace 
and justice. It will be done only if we laypersons of The United 
Methodist Church accept our responsibilities as Christians and 
world citizens ... if we not only bind up wounds but also 
challenge the principalities and powers presiding over a demonic 
status quo in an unjust world. In a world that so desperately 
needs both peace and justice, let us reclaim our role in Christ's 
way, and labor to ensure a brighter future for our children. 

IV 

God has called Christians to be the church. We exist to continue 
the ministry of Jesus Christ in the world. The Lord's presence 
among us gives us our identity; our view of life gives us our 
understanding of our ministry. Our covenant with God has two 
clauses: blessing and responsibility. The blessing is God's 
unmerited grace; as a gift, it is easy to accept. But without the 
responsibility — our response of sacrificial, unstinted service — it 
is cheap grace, which tears down the church and clouds its 
witness. We must carry out the responsibility of ministry. But 
more attention must be paid in equipping the laity for it. 

Excellence is the expected quality of all Christian life and 
ministry: The lay ministry is no exception. The biblical message 
is clear on the matter: God's call to ministry is to all people of the 
community of faith. The covenant which binds us to God and to 
one another commits clergy and laity alike to ministry. 

No one form of ministry is "more excellent" than another. Lay 
and clergy ministries are not competitive; they are interdepen- 
dent. The clergy, for instance, equip and inspire the laity for 
church outreach. Without the training on one side, the outreach 
on the other, the church's witness would be diminished. The 
relationship of clergy and lay ministry must be marked by mutual 
appreciation and love. 

The local church is the strategic base from which Christians 
move out into the structure of society. It is there the church 
encounters the world. In order for the local church to minister to 
the needs of the community all persons within the church must be 
trained to use their gifts. Our biblical roots tell us that all persons 
have talents, and our mandate is to make, and sustain disciples 



198 Journal of the 1984 General Conference 

for servanthood in the world. We must expect church member- 
ship to mean something other than having a name on the church 
roll. Churches must develop leadership, instruct new members, 
and nourish old ones. Each church should evaluate its ministry 
periodically and ask its members to renew their membership 
vows so that a better understanding may develop within the 
church of its responsibility to the world. 

Training of the laity, involving a revitalization of faith as well 
as acquisition of knowledge and skills, has many facets. Consider 
worship, study, and stewardship. It is implicit in the laity's 
membership vows and the clergy's vows of ordination, that these 
holy habits — these spiritual disciplines — will be cultivated 
through faithful participation in all aspects of the church's 
activity. 

Nurturing members in growing faith cannot be done wholesale. 
Jesus knew this and concentrated on training the Twelve. 
Wesley, Asbury, Boehm, and Otterbein knew this: They all knew 
small groups make for the most effective training and study. So 
they organized classes and prayer groups in which the members 
studied, prayed, and counseled with one another to uphold the 
faith. Each local church, whatever its size, can and should 
develop a similar pattern. 

A faith-filled lifestyle is a living vdtness, a ministry in itself. 
Yet sometimes our lifestyles and attitudes reveal an underlying 
theology which is not Christian. For that reason, we, no less than 
the clergy, must be practical theologians. Together we must 
develop basic beliefs based on the nature and work of God; we 
must understand that practicing our faith in relationship to God is 
important. Together we must prepare ourselves for practicing 
our faith in relation to others. Today, we must learn how to apply 
that faith to the needs and issues of today's world. Christianity is 
more than a compilation of rules. Being Christian calls for a 
distinctive style of life, and it should be the most exciting way a 
person can live! Lives of service, prayer, and study reflect 
devotion to Jesus Christ and make His presence real to others. 

Bible illiteracy is a serious handicap to the church's ministry. 
For an unbelievably large percentage of people, religious educa- 
tion ends at age 11 or 12. In any other area of life people would be 
considered deprived and ignorant if their education ceased then; 
we should be shocked that it is the norm in the rehgious sphere. 
We must do something about it. In-depth study of scripture 
which confronts our personal habits and attitudes can lead us into 
joyous new experiences. Through scripture we discover how 
Jesus would have us make decisions or respond to needs. We 
must not deprive the lay members above age 12 of this resource. 



The United Methodist Church 199 

The congregation shares with the family the responsibility for 
the scriptural nurture of children. Let us revive the custom of 
family worship, in which all family members plan a time together 
for prayer, Bible reading, and discussion of scripture's applica- 
tions to life's situations. 

Now let us raise our eyes from the children to one of our 
greatest and most neglected resources, the youth and young 
adults. They are admitted into membership, promised full-rights 
and privileges, given a kiss or handshake — and then they are 
banished back into the church school class or fellowship groups. Is 
it any wonder they lose interest, cease learning from the Bible 
and totally disappear? Their time, talents, energy, and creativity 
should be at work in the church instead of being overlooked and 
wasted. They should be contributing to the church's program 
planning and decisionmaking. They, like the rest of the laity, 
should be both leaders and servants of the church. 

The church must also train laypeople to survive and witness in 
their world. Pastors and leaders in each congregation must be 
sensitive to the joys and stresses in the workaday lives of all their 
members — not overlooking homemakers and volunteer workers. 
In fact, support groups formed of persons with similar vocations 
can be both a healing ministry and a training ground for effective 
witness. 

We are not using our resources fully. Stewardship is an 
element of our faith badly in need of revitalization. Our people 
have been flooded with preaching and pamphlets on the subject, 
but the average person in the pew still does not understand that 
stewardship involves more than money, that it involves whole 
persons and their lives. We must end this misunderstanding. 
Those committed to practical discipleship will give their money 
along with themselves; we need not worry about the budget with 
them. Beginning with the children we must teach, "The earth is 
the Lord's" and that we are entrusted creatures. We must urge 
that each member pledge a specific talent for a defined period to 
ministry within the church and community. If we expect this of 
our members, our church will stand before the world as an 
example of stewardship itself— using its money, time, talents, 
and all of God's gifts carefully, fully, and efficiently for its 
mission. 

We have been drawing a hopeful picture of a church making full 
use of its laity. How will the church prepare the laity for its role of 
being the church in the world? The answer is rooted in the 
training ministry of the local church. This training has two 
purposes: first, to develop skills for specific leadership roles; 
second, to equip the laity for ministry in the secular world. We 



200 Journal of the 1984. General Conference 

must keep in mind that the laity being equipped and the clergy 
who equip them are interdependent in providing the church with 
outreach. The church must question itself: 

"Has the church been faithful in helping those of us called laity 
to perceive ourselves as ministers?" 

"Is the laity made to feel that their ministry is as important as 
that of the ordained ministry?" 

The church has not yet fully carried out its task because it has 
never really decided what it wants the laity to do outside of a 
caretaking role in the church. It is high time the decision is 
made — so that churches may be faithful stewards, making full use 
of the diverse talents of their laypeople. 

Conclusion 

We call on the church to cease playing little games and accept 
the mantle of discipleship our faith places upon us, recognizing 
full well that our mission is not to restructure government or to 
be a social institution, but it is to bring people to a realization of 
and association with God Almighty by becoming Christians in the 
true sense of the word and not merely proclaimers of a faith 
without substance or spirit. 

The time is now. The mission is clear. The goal is attainable. 
And God's people are ready. 

Amen. 



JOURNAL 

OF THE 

1984 GENERAL CONFERENCE 

FIRST DAY, TUESDAY, MAY 1, 1984 

AFTERNOON SESSION 

Holy Communion 

The Eucharistic Liturgy of Lima was prepared for the plenary session of the 
Faith and Order Commission of the World Council of Churches in Lima and was 
used there for the first time on January 15, 1982. It was also celebrated at the Sixth 
Assembly of the World Council of Churches in Vancouver in 1983. The liturgy was 
adapted for use in this General Conference. 

Liturgists were Bishop James M. Ault, secretary of the Council of Bishops; 
Bishop George W. Bashore, chairperson of the worship committee of the Council; 
and Bishop Wilbur W. Y. Choy, immediate past president of the Council. 

Bishop Marjorie S. Matthews was the preacher of the homily. 

Bishop James S. Thomas, president of the Council, was the main celebrant. The 
bishops of the Church concelebrated the Sacrament and distributed the elements to 
the servers. 

Dr. Ruth Daugherty, president of the Women's Division, and Mr. Kenneth 
Weatherford, president of The United Methodist Men, presented the elements on 
behalf of the Church. 

Leading in the music for this service were Dr. Dale Krider, organist (Organist 
and Choirmaster, First United Methodist Church, Hyattsville, Maryland); The 
Foundry Choir, Foundry United Methodist Church, Washington, D. C, Dr. 
Eileen M. Guenther, Minister of Music; Dr. Carlton R. Young, Director of Music 
for The General Conference (Professor of Church Music, Candler School of 
Theology, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia). 



THE LORD'S SUPPER 

EUCHARISTIC LITURGY OF LIMA 

ADAPTED FOR 

THE 1984 GENERAL CONFERENCE OF 

THE UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 

Liturgy of Entrance 

Processional (All Stand) 
Call to Worship 
Leader: Rejoice, heavenly powersi Sing choirs of angels! 

Exult, all creation around God's thronel 
People: Jesus Christ is riseni 

Sound the trumpet of salvation! 
Leader: Rejoice, earth, in shining splendor, 

Radiant in the brightness of your Ruler! 

201 



202 Journal of the 198^ General Conference 

People: Christ has conquered! Glory fills you! 
Darkness vanishes forever! 

Leader: Rejoice, holy Church! Exult in glory! 

The risen Savior shines upon you! 
People: Let this place resound with joy, 

echoing the mighty song of all God's people! 

*HjTnn "Easter People, Raise Your Voices" Regent Square: descant, Roy 
Guenther 

Easter people, raise your voices, sounds of heav'n in earth should ring. 
Christ has brought us heaven's choices, heav'nly music, let it ring. 
Alleluia! Alleluia! Easter people, let us sing. 

Fear of death can no more stop us, from our pressing here below. 
For our Lord has now empow'red us to triumph over ev'ry foe. 
Alleluia! Alleluia! On to vict'ry now we go. 

Ev'ry day to us is Easter, with its Resurrection song. 

When in trouble move the faster to our God who rights the wrong. 

Alleluia! Alleluia! See the pow'r of heav'nly throngs. 

William James 

^Greeting 
L: The grace of Jesus Christ, 

the love of God, 

and the communion of the Holy Spirit 

be with you all. 
P: And also with you. 

Confession (all sit) 

L: Let us humbly confess our sins in the presence of our God. 

P: Most merciful God, we confess that we are in bondage to sin and 
cannot free ourselves. We have sinned against you in thought, word 
and deed, by what we have done and by what we have left undone. 
We have not loved you with our whole heart: we have not loved our 
neighbors as ourselves. For the sake of your son, Jesus Christ, have 
mercy on us. Forgive us, renew us, and lead us, so that we may 
delight in your will and walk in your ways, to the glory of your holy 
name. Amen. 

Absolution 

L: Almighty God gave Jesus Christ to die for us and for the sake of Christ 
forgives us all our sins. As a called and ordained minister of the Church 
and by the authority of Jesus Christ, I therefore declare to you the 
entire forgiveness of all your sins, in the name of our loving, eternal 
Parent, and of Jesus Christ and of the Holy Spirit. 

P: Amen. 

Kyrie Litany 
L: That we may be enabled to maintain the unity of the Spirit in the bond 
of peace and together confess that there is only one Body and one 
Spirit, only one Lord, one faith, one baptism, let us prav to the Lord. 

(Eph. 4:3-5) 



The United Methodist Church 203 

P: Lord, have mercy. 

L: That we may soon attain to visible communion in the Body of Christ, by 
breaking the bread and blessing the cup around the same table, let us 
pray to the Lord. (I Cor. 10:16, 17) 

P: Lord, have mercy. 

L: That, reconciled to God through Christ, we may be enabled to recognize 
each other's ministries and be united in the ministry of reconciliation, 
let us pray to the Lord. 

P: Lord, have mercy. 

*Gloria Gloria in excelsis Deo, French Carol 

Gloria in excelsis Deo. 

Liturgy of the Word 

Collect 
L: Let us pray: Lord God, gracious and merciful, you anointed your 

beloved Son with the Holy Spirit at his baptism in the Jordan, and you 
consecrated him prophet, priest and king: pour out your Spirit on us 
again that we may be faithful to our baptismal calling, ardently desire 
the communion of Christ's body and blood, and serve the poor of your 
people and all who need our love, through Jesus Christ, your Son, our 
Lord, who lives and reigns with you, in the unity of the Holy Spirit, 
ever one God, world without end. Amen. 

First Lesson Isaiah 42:6-9 

Gradual Hymn "Fill Us With Your Love" Ghana Melody 

(Refrain, all sing) Jesu, Jesu, fill us with your love, 
show us how to serve 
the neighbors we have from you. 

All: Kneels at the feet of his friends, 
silently washes their feet, 
Master who acts as a slave to them, (refrain) 

Choir: Neighbors are rich and poor, 
neighbors are black and white, 
neighbors are near and far away, (refrain) 

Men: These are the ones we should serve, 
these are the ones we should love. 
All are neighbors to us and you. (refrain) 

Women: Loving puts us on our knees, 

serving as though we are slaves, 

this is the way we should live with you. (refrain) 

All: Kneel at the feet of our friends, 
silently washing their feet, 
this is the way we should live with you. (refrain) 

John 13:3-5 

Ghana Hymn, trans, by Tom Colvin 



204 Journal of the 198 J). General Conference 

Second Lesson Psalms 148:1-14 

*Alleluia (sung) 

Choir: Alleluia, 
People: Alleluia, 
Choir: Alleluia, 
People: Alleluia, 
Choir: Alleluia, 
People: Alleluia, 
Choir: Lord, to whom shall we go? 

You have the words of eternal life, 
(repeat Alleluia). 

*Gospel Luke 19:32-42 
L: The Gospel of the Lord. 
P: Praise be to thee, O Christ. 

Homily "For This Time" 

Silence 

Intercessions 
L: In faith let us pray to God our Creator, Redeemer and Sustainer. 
P: Lord, have mercy. 
L: For the Church of God throughout all the world, let us invoke the 

Spirit. 
P: Lord, have mercy. 
L: For the leaders of the nations, that they may establish and defend 

justice and peace, let us pray for the wisdom of God. 
P: Lord, have mercy. 
L: For those who suffer oppression or violence, let us invoke the power of 

the Deliverer. 
P: Lord, have mercy. 
L: That the churches may discover again their visible unity in the one 

baptism which incorporates them in Christ, let us pray for the love of 

Christ. 
P: Lord, have mercy. 
L: That The United Methodist Church may attain faithfulness in worship 

and witness, let us pray for the strength of Christ. 
P: Lord, have mercy. 
L: That our churches may recognize and enhance each other's ministries, 

and serve together in love, let us pray for the peace of Christ. 
P: Lord, have mercy. 
L: Into your hands, trustworthy God, we commend all for whom we 

pray, relying upon your mercy; through your Son, Jesus Christ, our 

Lord. 
P: Amen. 

Liturgy of the Eucharist 

Offertory: 
L: As people of the Covenant — forgiven and reconciled — let us offer 
ourselves and our gifts to God. 



The United Methodist Church 205 

Anthem "I Was Glad When They Said Unto Me" C. Hubert H. Parry 

I was glad when they said unto me, we will go into the house of the Lord. 
Our feet shall stand in thy gates, Jerusalem. 
Jerusalem is builded as a city that is at unity in itself. 
pray for the peace of Jerusalem, they shall prosper that love thee. 
Peace be within thy walls, and plenteousness within thy palaces. 

Psalm 122:1-3, 6, 7 

*Presentation Hymn "Jesus, Lover Of My Soul" Aberystwyth: descant, Roy 
Guenther 

Jesus, lover of my soul, let me to thy bosom fly, 
While the nearer waters roll, while the tempest still is high: 
Hide me, O my Savior, hide, till the storm of life is past; 
Safe into the haven guide; O receive my soul at last! 

Other refuge have I none; hangs my helpless soul on thee; 
Leave, ah! leave me not alone, still support and comfort me. 
All my trust on thee is stayed; all my help from thee I bring; 
Cover my defenseless head with the shadow of thy wing. 

Thou, Christ, art all I want; more than all in thee I find: 
Raise the fallen, cheer the faint, heal the sick, and lead the blind. 
Just and holy is thy name; I am all unrighteousness; 
False and full of sin I am; thou art full of truth and grace. 

Plenteous grace with thee is found, grace to cover all my sin; 
Let the healing streams abound; make and keep me pure within. 
Thou of life the fountain art; freely let me take of thee: 
Spring thou up within my heart; rise to all eternity. 

Charles Wesley 

* Preparation 
L: Blessed are you, Lord God of the universe, you are the giver of this 

bread, fruit of the earth and of human labor, let it become the bread of 

life. 
P: Blessed be God, now and forever! 
L: Blessed are you, Lord God of the universe, you are the giver of this 

wine, fruit of the vine and of human labor, let it become the wine of 

your eternal realm. 
P: Blessed be God, now and forever! 
L: As the grain once scattered in the fields and the grapes once dispersed 

on the hillside are now reunited on this table in bread and wine, so, 

loving God, may your whole Church soon be gathered together from the 

comers of the earth into one company of the faithful. 
P: Maranatha! Come, Lord Jesus! 

*Dialogue 
L: The Lord be with you. 
P: And also with you. 
L: Lift up your hearts. 
P: We lift them to the Lord. 
L: Let us give thanks to the Lord our God. 
P: It is right to give God thanks and praise. 



206 Journal of the 19 8U General Conference 

*Preface 

L: Truly it is right and good to glorify you, at all times and in all places, 
to offer you our thanksgiving Lord, Holy One, Almighty and 
Everlasting God. Through your living Word you created all things, and 
pronounced them good. You made human beings in your own image, to 
share your life and reflect your glory. When the time had fully come, 
you gave Christ to us as the Way, the Truth and the Life. He accepted 
baptism and consecration as your Servant to announce the good news to 
the poor. At the last supper Christ bequeathed to us the eucharist, that 
we should celebrate the memorial of the cross and resurrection, and 
receive his presence as food. Wherefore, Lord, with the angels and all 
the saints, we proclaim and sing your glory: 

Sanctus (sung) 

Ho-Iy, ho-ly, ho-ly, Lord; God of power and might: 
heav-en and earth are full of your glo-ry, Ho- 
san-na in the highest. Bless-ed is the one who 
comes in the name of the Lord; Ho-san-na in the 
high-est. 

Epiclesis (All Sit) 

L: God, Ruler of the universe, you are holy and your glory is beyond 
measure. Upon your eucharist send the life-giving Spirit, who spoke by 
Moses and the prophets, who overshadowed the virgin Mary vdth grace, 
who descended upon Jesus in the river Jordan and upon the apostles on 
the day of Pentecost. May the outpouring of this Spirit of Fire 
transfigure this thanksgiving meal that this bread and wine may become 
for us the body and blood of Christ. 

P: Come, Holy Spirit! 

Institution 

L: May this Creator Spirit accomplish the words of your beloved Son, who, 
in the night in which he was betrayed, took bread, and when he had 
given thanks to you, broke it and gave it to his disciples, saying: Take, 
eat: this is my body, which is given for you. Do this for the 
remembrance of me. After supper he took the cup and when he had 
given thanks, he gave it to them and said: Drink this, all of you: this is 
my blood of the new covenant, which is shed for you and for many for 
the forgiveness of sins. Do this for the remembrance of me. Great is the 
mystery of faith. 

P: Your death, Lord Jesus, we proclaim! 
Your resurrection we celebrate! 
Your coming in glory we await! 

Anamnesis 

L: Wherefore, Lord, we celebrate today the memorial of our redemption: 
we recall the birth and life of your Son among us, his baptism by John, 
his last meal with the apostles, his death on the cross: we proclaim 
Christ's resurrection and ascension in glory, where as our Great High 
Priest he ever intercedes for all people; and we look for his coming at 
the last. United in Christ's priesthood, we present to you this memorial: 
Remember the sacrifice of your Son and grant to people everywhere the 
benefits of Christ's redemptive work. 

P: Maranatha, the Lord comes! 



The United Methodist Church 207 

Conclusion 
L: Through Christ, with Christ, in Christ, all honor and glorj' is yours, 

Almighty God, in the unity of the Holy Spirit, now and forever. 
P: Amen. 

The Lord's Prayer 
L: United by one baptism in the same Holy Spirit and the same Body of 

Christ, we pray as God's sons and daughters: 
P: Our Father, .... 

The Peace 

L: Lord Jesus Christ, you told your apostles: Peace I leave with you, my 
peace I give to you. Look not on our sins but on the faith of your 
Church; in order that your will be done, grant us always this peace and 
guide us toward the perfect unity of your Reign forever. 

P: Amen. 

L: The peace of the Lord be with you always. 

P: And also with you. 

The Breaking of the Bread 
L: The bread which we break is the communion of the Body of Christ; the 
cup of blessing for which we give thanks is the communion in the Blood 
of Christ. 

Lamb of God Alec Wyton 

Lamb of God, that takest away the sins of the world, have mercy upon 
us . . . grant us thy peace. 

Communion 

*Thanksgiving Prayer 

L: In peace let us pray to the Lord. 

P: O most loving God, our God, we give you thanks for uniting us by 
baptism in the body of Christ and for filling us with joy in the 
Eucharist. Grant that we may glorify you by giving ourselves to 
others. Help us to treasure all the signs of reconciliation you have 
given us, and send us forth offering generously those same signs to a 
world longing for wholeness and peace. Now that we have tasted of 
the banquet you have prepared for us in the world to come, may we 
all one day share together the inheritance of the saints in the life of 
your heavenly city, through Jesus Christ, our Lord, who lives and 
reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit, ever one God, world 
without end. Amen. 

*Doxology Musical setting of Old 100th, 

Ralph Vaughan Williams 

Praise God, from whom all blessings flow; 
Praise God, all creatures here below; 
Praise God above, ye heavenly host; 
Praise Father, Son and Holy Ghost. Amen. 

*Benediction 

"■Recessional (you are requested to remain in place as the Council of Bishops 
recess) 



208 Journal of the 19 8 U General Conference 

Opening Business Session 

The 1984 session of the General Conference of The United 
Methodist Church convened in the Baltimore Civic Center in 
Baltimore, Maryland, Tuesday, May 1, 1984, following the 
Service of Holy Communion, Presiding was Bishop James S. 
Thomas (Ohio East Area). 

Bishop Thomas: During this year there will be many occasions when United 
Methodists will be celebrating the Bicentennial. It is, therefore, a high moment to 
call to order this Bicentennial General Conference of The United Methodist 
Church. For the first order of business, that being the organization of the General 
Conference, I call upon the Secretary, Dr. J. B. Holt. 

Roll Call^F. B. Holt, Secretary 

Dr. Holt reported that, while registration was continuing, it 
was clear that a quorum was present. He gave instructions to 
delegation chairpersons for the completion of the roll call. He 
then read the names of bishops who had died since the 
adjournment of the 1980 General Conference: Escrivao A. 
Zunguze, October 26, 1980; Alfred J. Shaw, February 5, 1981; 
Mangal Singh, April 6, 1981; J. Waskom Pickett, August 17, 1981; 
Richard C. Raines, September 21, 1981; C. Ernst Sommer, 
November 7, 1981; Donald H. Tippett, March 10, 1982; Charles 
W. Brashares, June 23, 1982; Rueben H. Mueller, July 6, 1982; 
Harold R. Heininger, February 3, 1983; J. Kenneth Shamblin, 
October 3, 1983; Gabriel Sundaram, March 17, 1984. Dr. Holt 
reported that two delegates elected to this General Conference 
had died since their election: Arthur Campney (Iowa) and Jack 
Payne (Central Texas). 

Bishop Thomas offered a prayer in remembrance of the 
Bishops and delegates who had died. 

Commission on the General Conference 

The Chair called on B. C. Goodwin, Jr. (Chairperson, 
Commission on the General Conference) for the report of the 
commission. 

Mr. Goodwin: Bishop Thomas, it is my pleasure on behalf of the members of the 
Commission on the General Conference to greet the delegates, officials and visitors 
attending this historic 1984 session of General Conference. Two hundred years ago 
this year, as we have already heard, and will hear many times these next ten days, 
a small group of less than 100 Methodist circuit riders gathered at Lovely Lane 
Meeting House, here in Baltimore, not far from our meeting place today, for the 
Christmas Conference, at which time the Methodist Episcopal Church was 
formally organized. Since that time we have experienced numerous divisions, 
reunions and mergers, and today 1,000 lay and clergy delegates from around the 
world gather in Baltimore as United Methodists for this session of General 



The United Methodist Church 209 

Conference. Our commission is charged with the responsibility of determining 
the time and place of the General Conference and of making all the necessary 
arrangements for its session. The membership of the commission and also the 
membership of the local committee is listed on page A-4 of your Advance Editions 
Workbook. These persons have spent countless hours during the past four years 
preparing for your arrival. Each one deserves our deepest appreciation. Later in 
the week we will present the Commission on the General Conference and also the 
Local Committee for recognition. Dr. Wilson A. Shearer has served as general 
chairperson of the Local Committee. Bishop D. Frederick Wertz, our host bishop 
and chairperson of the Local Committee, viill bring official greetings to us at this 
time. Bishop Wertz. 

Greetings from Host Bishop 

Bishop D. Frederick Wertz: Welcome to Baltimore! This is a great city. If the 
mayor were here he would tell you that. He has helped to make it so. And I hope 
you will find it so while you are here. In behalf of more than 300,000 United 
Methodist people and more than 1,500 congregations I extend to you a special 
greeting because you are in United Methodist countrj-. Barratt's Chapel, Lovely 
Lane, Strawbridge House, Old Otterbein— names redolent with the perfume of 
history. And I hope you will be sensitive to that as you walk the streets of this city 
and travel across the Washington Area. The names of Francis Asbury and Thomas 
Coke, Philip Otterbein, Jacob Albright, Martin Boehm, and Robert Straw- 
bridge— those names echo the music of Methodism in America. And we're here to 
celebrate the bicentennial. What better place to hold the bicentennial General 
Conference of The United Methodist Church than in Methodist country'! So what 
more shall I say? "Seeing that we are compassed about with so great a cloud of 
witnesses, let us lay aside everj^ weight and the sins that so easily beset us, and let 
us run with patience the race that is set before us, looking unto Jesus, the author 
and finisher of our faith, who for the joy that was set before him endured the cross, 
despising the shame, and was set dowTi at the right hand of the throne of God." 
Welcome I 

Commission on the General Conference (Report Resumed) 

Mr. Goodwin continued with the report of the Commission by 
reporting a change in the sequence of reports in this session, in 
order to place the report of the Interim Committee on Plan of 
Organization and Rules of Order earlier in the session. He also 
reported that a second production of the bicentennial program 
had been scheduled for Sunday, May 6, at 3 p.m., because of 
heavy demand for tickets. 

He asked that future requests for the setting of Orders of the 
Day be directed to the Committee on Agenda. 

Mr. Goodwin reported that the seating plan for delegates is 
determined by lot by the commission's executive committee and 
asked that the plan be approved as printed in the Advance 
Edition A of the Daily Christian Advocate. 

He reported the selection of Roger L. Burgess as editor of the 
Daily Christian Advocate and Carlton R. Young as director of 
music for the General Conference. 



210 Journal of the 1984. General Conference 

Per Diem Allowance 

Mr. Goodwin reported the commission's recommendation that 
the delegates' per diem allowance be set at $43,00 per day for the 
days said delegate is in attendance at the sessions of the 
Conference. Ignacio Castuera (Pacific and Southwest) asked if 
delegates from the Western Jurisdiction, because of the distance 
they had to travel, were eligible for an extra day's allowance 
before the opening or after the close of the Conference. 

DeWayne Woodring (General Conference Business Manager): The expenses 
for prior to Tuesday, May 1, are placed upon your expense voucher. That includes 
your transportation, your lodging, if it is used, and expenses are reimbursed up to 
the approved per diem. This appHes not only to Western Jurisdiction or the 
Western region delegates, but it can apply to any delegates that have had to come 
in here the day before. 

The recommendation for the amount of the per diem allowance 
was approved by vote of the Conference. 

Commission Report (Continued) 

Mr. Goodwin reported that the commission was recommending 
two offerings: the Communion offering, which, by action of the 
Council of Bishops, was to be directed to the United Methodist 
Committee on Relief for tornado relief in the United States; and 
the offering for marshals and pages, to be received Wednesday, 
May 9. The recommendation was approved. 

Mr. Goodwin announced times and places for afternoon 
worship and devotional services to be held during the days the 
Conference was in session. 

He then announced that, by action of the Commission, the 1988 
General Conference would be held April 26 through May 6 at the 
Convention Center in St. Louis, Missouri. 

Appreciation was expressed for the work of DeWayne 
Woodring (General Conference Business Manager) and Barbara 
Main, for all of their work in preparing for this Conference. Mr. 
Woodring announced that, for the first time at a General 
Conference, simultaneous translation service for elected dele- 
gates in plenary sessions and worship services was available in 
French, German, Spanish, Portuguese, Korean, and Chinese. He 
also announced that signers were available in a specified section 
of the arena for persons requiring sign language. Finally, he 
explained the operation of the timing system which would be in 
use during plenary sessions to time delegates' speeches in debate. 

Mr. Goodwin called on Swing T. Wayland (General Confer- 
ence Treasurer) and expressed appreciation on behalf of the 
Commission for Dr. Wayland's service as treasurer. Dr. 



The United Methodist Church 211 

Wayland gave instructions and information regarding the filing 
of travel expense vouchers and the issuance of checks. 

Proclamation from the Mayor of Baltimore 

Mr. Goodmn called on Leslie Metcalf, representing Mayor 
William Donald Schaefer of the City of Baltimore, for presenta- 
tion of a proclamation issued by the mayor. 

Dr. Leslie Metcalf: Dr. Goodwin, Bishop Thomas, bishops, and delegates of the 
Bicentennial Conference of The United Methodist Church, Mayor Schaefer was 
unable to be with us because of prior commitments. However, his presence is felt 
with a lot of things he has done for our Conference throughout the past few days. 
He has prepared this proclamation that he has asked me to bring to you this 
afternoon. 



PROCLAMATION 

BY 

MAYOR WILLIAM DONALD SCHAEFER 

DESIGNATING MAY Ml, 1984 

AS 

"THE UNITED METHODIST BICENTENNIAL 

CONFERENCE DAYS" 

IN BALTIMORE 

WHEREAS, The United Methodist Church is celebrating its Bicentennial 
Anniversary by conducting its General Conference in Baltimore City; and 

WHEREAS, delegates from throughout the United States and from many 
foreign nations will be attending this Bicentennial Conference; and 

WHEREAS, Baltimore was the location of the first Conference of the Methodist 
Church in 1784 at the Lovely Lane Methodist Church which was located in what is 
now known as the Inner Harbor Area of Baltimore City; and 

WHEREAS, Francis Asbury was consecrated as the first Bishop of the 
Methodist Church in the United States at that 1784 Conference which is referred to 
as the Christmas Conference of the Methodist Church; and 

WHEREAS, the predecessors of the present day United Methodist Church, the 
former Evangelical United Brethren Church and the Methodist Church, have been 
an integral part of the religious and spiritual community of Baltimore for the past 
two hundred years; 

NOW, THEREFORE, I, WILLIAM DONALD SCHAEFER, MAYOR OF 
THE CITY OF BALTIMORE, do hereby proclaim May 1-11, 1984 as "THE 
UNITED METHODIST BICENTENNIAL CONFERENCE DAYS" IN BAL- 
TIMORE, and encourage the people of Baltimore to give full recognition to this 
significant event in the spiritual life of the Citv of Baltimore. 

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand and cause the Great 
Seal of the City of Baltimore to be affixed this first day of May, in the year of Our 
Lord, one thousand nine hundred and eighty-four. 

This I will present to the presiding bishop at this time. 



212 Journal of the 198Jf General Conference 

Presentation of Bicentennial Bell 

Mr. Goodwin then called on Bishop Wilbur W. Y. Choy, 
president of the Council of Bishops, for presentation of a 
bicentennial bell. 

Bishop Choy: It is my pleasure and privilege on behalf of the Council of Bishops 
to present to the General Conference the bicentennial bell number 1968. 
Undoubtedly during these weeks as we meet together here, there will be sounds 
like the tolling of the bell, for we are human beings — sinful. And there will be acts of 
contrition for which we will express our sorrow. But it may more often peal out the 
joyous sounds of God's grace, reminding us that we have been freed by the power of 
the resurrected Christ. I'm going to ring the bell now, so hold your ears. 

The ringing of the bell was greeted with applause. 

Mr. Goodwin: Thank you, Bishop Choy, for ringing the bell, for had you not rung 
it, I planned to. Back prior to our United Methodist ancestors coming to the eastern 
shores of this country, Spanish Christians were estabHshing Roman Catholic 
churches in northern New Mexico. It is interesting to note that as you read the 
history, the brief history of some of those early Catholic parishes, about the 
significance of the bell, that they indicated a number of baptized Christians, and 
then in the little paragraph, there would always be a statement about the bell 
whether they had a bell or no bell, and in one instance they said they had a bell with 
no clapper, and I did not want us to be receiving a bell without a clapper. And may 
I say as I conclude this report and in response to the presentation, my prayer is that 
this bell may peal out the good news of Jesus Christ in such a moving, powerful way 
that scriptural hohness may indeed be spread throughout the world by the people 
called United Methodists in the name of the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit. 
Amen. Thank you, sir. 

Committee on Agenda 

The Chair called on Asbury Lenox (Texas) for a report from the 
Committee on Agenda. Mr. Lenox stated the committee's 
approval of the change in the sequence of reports for this session 
as recommended earlier by the Commission on the General 
Conference. The change in the agenda was approved by vote of 
the Conference. 

Interim Committee on Plan of Organization and Rules of 
Order 

The Chair called on Thomas L. Cromwell (East Ohio), 
chairperson of the Interim Committee on Plan of Organization 
and Rules of Order for the presentation of the report. 

Plan of Organization (see pages 133-153) 

Mr. Cromwell called attention to the Advance Edition B of the 
Daily Christian Advocate, which contained the committee's 
proposed changes in the Plan of Organization and Rules of Order, 
along with an introductory statement describing the major 



The United Methodist Church 213 

changes being proposed. He noted that changes in the Plan of 
Organization and Rules of Order would require a two-thirds vote 
of the Conference. 

Mr. Cromwell explained that proposed amendments to Plan of 
Organization I, II, III, IV, V, and VI did not represent 
significant changes. They were as follows: 

1. In Plan of Organization I,C, delete the words "present 
nominations or" before "appoint members," and insert the word 
"present" before "such other nominations." Add a new second 
sentence: "If any members appointed and/or nominated do not 
serve, the Council of Bishops, through its Nominating Commit- 
tee, shall name a replacement." 

2. In Plan of Organization I, add two new lettered headings: 
"D. Miscellaneous Business 

"E. Adjournment" 

3. In Plan of Organization III, the first sentence in the second 
paragraph, delete "at the opening session nominate for election 
by the Conference," and substitute "appoint from the elected 
delegates to the General Conference at its Fall meeting next 
preceding the General Conference." 

4. In Plan of Organization V, the first sentence, after 
"nominated by the Council of Bishops," insert "at its Fall meeting 
next preceding the General Conference." In the last sentence in 
the third paragraph, delete "a book of," and substitute "the Daily 
Christian Advocate and." Revise the second part of the first 
sentence of the seventh paragraph to read: ". . . and shall arrange 
for their presentation to the General Conference and for their 
local entertainment during the specific period of time required for 
their presence." Delete the eighth paragraph in its entirety 
("Insofar as possible, the Commission shall plan the presentation 
of such ecumenical representatives during the first week of the 
General Conference.") 

5. Renumber Plan of Organization VI, A, (7) to be a separate 
section VI, with the title, "Plan of Organization and Rules of 
Order." Renumber subsequent sections accordingly. Amend the 
first sentence of the new VI to read: "There shall be a Committee 
on Plan of Organization and Rules of Order of eleven members, 
nominated from the elected delegates to the General Conference 
by the Council of Bishops at its Fall meeting next preceding the 
General Conference and elected by the General Conference for a 
term of four years." 

The amendments were adopted (see pages 133-138). 
Mr. Cromwell presented changes proposed by the Committee 
to new Section VII, Committees. 

6. Following the heading, "A. Standing Administrative Com- 



214 Journal of the 1984 General Conference 

mittees," insert two new sentences as follows: "The members of 
the following committees shall be appointed by the Council of 
Bishops at its Fall meeting next preceding the General 
Conference. All except committee (3) Correlation and Editorial 
Revision shall be from the elected delegates to the General 
Conference." 

Delete language relating to the time and method of members' 
selection from individual committee paragraphs. 

7. Increase the membership of the Committee on Calendar 
from "four" to "five." 

8. Increase the membership of the Committee on Correlation 
and Editorial Revision from "four" to "five," effective in 1988. 
The amendment was adopted (see page 140). 

9. Decrease the membership of the Committee on Courtesies 
and Privileges from "sixteen" to "six," and specify that there be 
one member from each jurisdiction and one from the annual 
conferences outside the United States. 

The amendments were adopted (see page 140). 

10. Decrease the membership of the Committees on Creden- 
tials and Journal from "seven" to "six" each, and specify that each 
committee include one member from each of the jurisdictions and 
one from annual conferences outside the United States. The 
amendments were adopted in separate votes on each committee 
(see page 141). 

11. In Section VII, A, (8) as renumbered, amend the first two 
sentences of the last paragraph to read as follows: "Two copies of 
the petition must be sent to the Petitions Secretary. Each 
petition must address only one paragraph of the Discipline or one 
issue (Pars. 607. 1-. 2)." The amendment was adopted (see page 
143). 

Committee on Calendar — ^Appointment of Additional Member 

Mr. Cromwell asked that Bishop James Ault, secretary of the 
Council of Bishops, be recognized to announce the appointment of 
the additional member authorized for the Committee on Calen- 
dar. Bishop Ault announced that the Council of Bishops was 
appointing Ira Williams, Jr. (Northwest Texas) to the com- 
mittee. 

Plan of Organization — Committee Report Resumed 

Mr. Cromwell resumed his presentation of amendments 
proposed by the Committee. 

12. Insert a new "B. Commission on Central Conference 
Affairs" in new Section VII, and reletter B as C. The new 
subsection was adopted (see page 143). 



The United Methodist Church 215 

13. In new Section VII, C (Standing Legislative Committees), 
add a new paragraph to the introductory' material defining the 
relationship between legislative committees and the Commission 
on Central Conference Affairs. The amendment was adopted (see 
page 144). 

14. Mr. Cromwell reported that, under authority granted by 
the 1980 General Conference, the Interim Committee on Plan of 
Organization and Rules of Order had revised the list and 
assignments of the Standing Legislative Committees, and that 
this section did not need General Conference action (see pages 
144-147). 

15. In new section VII, D (Membership of Legislative Com- 
mittees), the beginning of the third sentence, delete "For the first 
General Conference after 1976," and substitute "Beginning with 
1988." 

16. In new section VII,E,(1), delete the last sentence and 
substitute the following new sentence: "The orientation of the 
committee, followed by the election of officers, shall be the order 
of business of the first meeting of the committee." 

Dan Macwan (Methodist Church in India) asked a question 
regarding availability of the Advance Edition of the Daily 
Christian Advocate for the delegates from India. The Chair 
asked that copies be provided. 

Woodrow Seals (Texas) asked a question about the imbalance 
between clergy and lay members in the Legislative Committee on 
Ordained and Diaconal Ministry-. Mr. Cromwell replied that that 
was possible under the rule governing the manner in which 
delegates make committee selections. Mr. Seals suggested that 
the result of the process was unfair, and that it should be 
corrected before the legislative committees convened. Mr. 
Cromwell and the Secretary- explained the difficulty involved in 
making new assignments to legislative committees. 

Mr. Seals moved that the person who is to chair the Conference 
for the evening session reassign a sufficient number of clergy 
delegates from Legislative Committee No. 5 to other legislative 
committees to create a balance between clergy and non-clergy 
delegates on Committee No. 5. The Chair ruled the motion out of 
order on the grounds that no presiding officer would have 
authority to make legislative committee assignments. 

John Stumbo (Kansas East) raised a point of order, that the 
process for designating membership on committees was a rules 
question, and that the Conference would have the authority, if it 
so desired, to waive the iiiles in keeping with Judge Seals' 
motion. The Chair restated his view that the motion would grant 
too much authority to a presiding officer. 



216 Journal of the 198 Jf General Conference 

Thomas P. Moore (East Ohio) moved that conference delega- 
tions which have more than one clergy member on the Committee 
on Ordained and Diaconal Ministry adjust their membership on 
legislative committees such that only one clergy from a 
conference would be on that committee. Gamett Wilder (North 
Georgia) spoke against the motion. Mr. Cromwell spoke against 
it on behalf of the committee, and the motion was defeated. 

17. In the Plan of Organization, IX. (Delegates' Expense 
Accounts), item (2), insert the words "including per diem" after 
"traveling expense" in the first sentence, and substitute "per 
diem" for "travel expense" in the second sentence. In item (3) 
substitute "20 cents per mile" for "15 cents per mile"; in the 
sentence before the last sentence, substitute "or the mileage 
reimbursement, whichever is less" for "rather than mileage." The 
amendments were adopted (see pages 150-151). 

18. Mr. Cromwell presented a new section XII, entitled 
"Distribution of Unofficial Material." Shirley Marsh (Nebraska) 
asked a question; Mr. Cromwell answered. 

John Stumbo (Kansas East) asked about the meaning of the 
phrase "related groups" in the first sentence; Mr. Cromwell 
responded. Mr. Stumbo moved to amend the phrase to read 
"related United Methodist groups." Mr. Cromwell indicated a 
wilhngness to accept the amendment, and it was adopted. Plan of 
Organization XII was adopted (see pages 151-152). 

19. In Plan of Organization XIII, insert two new sentences at 
the end of the first paragraph, in order to give the General 
Council on Finance and Administration a limited exemption from 
the deadlines contained in the paragraph, to allow for more 
complete financial reports to the General Conference. The 
amendment was adopted (see pages 152-153). 

Mr. Cromwell suggested that the committee report be 
interrupted, since changes in the Plan of Organization were 
complete, and there was insufficient time to complete the report 
on the Rules of Order. Harry E. Shaner (California-Nevada) 
moved that proposed changes in the Rules of Order be referred to 
the Committee on Conferences; he spoke in support of his motion. 
Mr. Cromwell spoke against it, and the motion was defeated. 

Committee on Agenda 

Asbury Lenox (Texas), reporting for the Committee on 
Agenda, recommended that the report of the Ministry Study 
Committee be scheduled for presentation and referral at the 
Wednesday morning session. The recommendation was adopted. 
Thomas L. Cromwell (East Ohio) pointed out that, under the 
Plan of Organization, such a report would be referred directly to a 



The United Methodist Church 217 

legislative committee without prior presentation to a plenary 
session of the Conference. The Chair declared that the recom- 
mendation was not in order, and Mr. Lenox withdrew it 

Don Riggin (Little Rock) stated that he had voted in favor of 
the recommendation and moved reconsideration. The motion to 
reconsider was adopted, and the action setting an order of the day 
was rescinded. 

Announcement of Secretarial Staff Members 

J. B. Holt (Secretary) made an announcement regarding the 
orgamzational meetings of the legislative committees. He then 
announced the names of persons chosen to serve on the 
secretarial staff (see pages 12-13). 

Recess 

Conrad M. Page, Jr. (Central Pennsylvania) asked a question; 
the Secretary responded. The Chair declared the Conference to 
be in recess until the evening session. 



FIRST DAY, TUESDAY, MAY 1, 1984 
EVENING SESSION 

Opening , ,. ^, , 

The General Conference of The United Methodist Church 
convened in the evening session of Tuesday, May 1, 1984, at 7:45 
p m in the Civic Center Arena, Baltimore, Maryland, with 
Bishop James S. Thomas (Ohio East Area) presiding. Following a 
hymn session led by Dr. Carlton Young, Bishop Thomas called 
the session to order. 

Episcopal Address 

Bishop William R. Cannon (Raleigh Area) presented the 
Episcopal Address (see page 165). 

Committee on Presiding Officers 

Richard W. Cain (Pacific and Southwest), on behalt ot the 
Committee on Presiding Officers, reported that Bishop W T. 
Handy, Jr. (Missouri Area) would preside at the Wednesday 
morning session. 

Adjournment 

There being no further business to come before this session, 
the Chair declared the session adjourned. 



218 



SECOND DAY, WEDNESDAY, MAY 2 1984 
MORNING SESSION 

Opening 

The General Conference of The United Methodist Church 
convened in the morning session of Wednesday, Mav 2, 1984 at 

Bisho'nW'H'^"/ "i^n^^..^^^^^ B^^^^--^' Mainland with 
Bishop W. T. Handy, Jr. (Missouri Area) presiding. 

Worship 

sur^'hvfhpP?Yf"^"?'n^' Conference heard choral selections 
sung by the Pfeiffer College Concert Choir, Richard H. Brewer 
conductor, and Lee Northcutt and Susan Diller, accompanists ' 
l-ollowing an opemng prayer the Conference joined in the 
smging of the hymn, "Christ Whose Glory Fills the Skies " 
Special music included the anthem, 'The True Use of Music" 
(Alice Parker, with a Charles Wesley text), with Jonathan Setzer 
as accompanist, and a solo by Lila Ammons. The scripture was 
from Phihppians 2:1-18 and Matthew 18:1-4. Bishop Edsel A 
nZlif '' rf ¥" ^T^ P^^"^^^^ ^he sermon, "On Christian 
Cro™ " ^ ^''""^ ^'"''' "^^^ "^^^" ^ ^'''''^^^' ^^^ Wondrous 

Quadrennial Address of the Laity 

The Chair called on J. Taylor Phillips, representing the 
Association of Conference Lay Leaders. Mr'. Phillips expfained 
that the Association had the responsibility of establishing a 
representative committee of lay persons to draft and present the 
Quadrennial Address of the Laity. He introduced Sue A. Guzman 
Wisconsin Ramon C. Lopez (Rio Grande), and Mai H. Gray 

(s^e pTge ^87)' ' '^'"^ ^'^ ^^''^^^ ^""^^^'^ '^' ^^"^'^'^ 

Committee on Journal 

William W Reid (Wyoming), chairperson, reported that the 
andSJnd'iM h''''"'T'^ V\' ^^^"^^^ipt of the Tuesday session 
Conference. "' ' ''^''' '''^' '"'"^''"^ ^•'' ''^^" "^^^^ 

Committee on Agenda 

(se^'nar4q?f T "'"''h "^^"'^^ °" ^^alf of the committee 
(.bee page 4yi). ihe agenda was adopted. 



219 



220 Journal of the 198 J^ General Conference 

Committee on Plan of Organization and Rules of Order 
(see pages 154-164) 

Thomas L. Cromwell (East Ohio) resumed the report with the 
presentation of proposed changes in the Rules of Order, as 

"" l^'^Add a new section (3) to Rule 2, Order of Business. The 
addition would be a reference to the Consent Calendar. Since the 
rule governing the Consent Calendar would be considered later m 
the report, Mr. Cromwell stated that the action on that rule 
would constitute action on this change as well. 

2 Amend Rule 3 by changing the time limit for statements 
from five minutes to three minutes. The amendment was adopted 

(see page 154). _ ,i i i, ^„ 

Mr Cromwell observed that, in relation to all rules changes, 
the Chair's ruling on adoption signified adoption by at least a 

two-thirds vote of the Conference. . , „ ^ «u i, 

3 Amend Rule 7 by substituting "point of order for breach 

of order"; by inserting "a parliamentary inquiry, a point ot 
information" after "misrepresentation"; and by deleting or to 
raise a very urgent question of high privilege" from the end of 
the rule. The amendment was adopted (see pages 155-15b). 

4 Amend Rule 8 to reduce the time limit on speeches from tour 
minutes to three minutes, and by deleting the phrase, "except as 
provided in Rule 37," at the end of the first sentence. The 
amendments were adopted (see page 156). . „• v 

5. Delete Rule 9, previously entitled "Question of High 
Privilege"; substitute a new Rule 9 entitled "Point of Order. The 
deletion and substitution were adopted (see page 156). 

6 Amend Rule 11 as follows: (1) at the end of the first 
sentence, add "provided, however, that in elections, voting may 
be by written ballot. If the vote is in doubt after a show of hands, 
the chair may order a standing vote." (2) In the second sentence 
substitute "A" for "an 'aye' or 'nay' " and reverse the sequence ot 
the second and third sentences. (3) In the fourth sentence, 
substitute "such business as the chair may deem appropriate tor 
"that which can be appropriately fitted into the time while 
waiting for the report of the secretaries on a count vote on an 
'aye' or 'nay' vote." The amendments were adopted (see pages 

156 157 ) 

7 Delete Rule 13, entitled "Vote by Orders." Mr. Cromwell 
moved that the rule be deleted, provided the Committee on 
Conferences recommends the deletion of Par. 608 m the 
Disciplme. John Stumbo (Kansas East) suggested that the 
motion should be that Rule 13 be deleted, provided the General 



The United Methodist Church 221 

Conference approves the deletion of Par. 608. Mr. Cromwell 
agreed, and the motion was adopted. 

8. Amend Rule 28 (renumbered as 27) by numbering the 

existmg rule as (1) and by adding a section (2) dealing with a 

Consent Calendar." Mr. Cromwell recommended that the 

committee report as printed in Advance Edition B of the DaUv 

Christian Advocate be amended by adding the following to the 

end of the new paragraph: "excepting those calendar items 

having financial implications (see Plan of Organization VIII) " 

Don Riggin (Little Rock) raised a point of order, that there 

were recommended changes in Rules 13, 14, 16, and 25 which had 

not been presented for Conference action. Mr. Cromwell replied 

that It was his intention to present those under one blanket 

motion for approval at the end of the report 

C David Lundquist (West Michigan) moved to amend the 
addition presented by Mr. Cromwell by adding "and proposals 
lor new church programs as defined in Par. 803 10 of the 
Discipline.- He spoke in support of his amendment; Mr 
Cromwell opposed it. Mr. Lundquist's amendment was defeated 
Barbara Thompson (Baltimore) asked how abstentions would 
affect whether an item could be included on the consent calendar. 
Mr. Cromwell replied that abstentions would not prevent an item 
trom being included on the consent calendar 

Paul J. Meuschke (Western Pennsylvania) moved to amend 
the new section of the rule by inserting "and in the hands of the 

Sf f" ?^^'^ P''''^°,?'^^' P""^^^ ^" the D^^^y Christian 
Advocate. Mr. Cromwell accepted the amendment 

Mercurio Senna (United Church of Christ of the Philippines) 
asked whether persons representing affiliated churches had the 
nght to vote; the Chair replied that they had voice but not vote. 

160 16ir^" ' ^"^ "^''' ^"^^ ^^ '''^''^ ^^^^P^^'^ ^'^^ P^^^^ 

9. Amend Rule 36 (renumbered as 34) in the following ways- 

1) change the title from "Presentation of Report of Minority" to 

Minonty Report. (2) Add two new paragraphs at the beginning 

of the rule setting forth provisions governing the preparation and 

Z^:Z^'T^'l'^''r''' '^P^^^- ^^^ ^" the first sentence of old 
Rule 36 delete the cross-reference to Rule 33; substitute 
committee report" for "regular (majority) report"; and delete "of 
the committee, except that such member may not present said 
minonty repoit as a replacement until the m'ajoritv report h^s 
been presented and perfected" from the end of the sentence 
Richard C.Looney (Holston) opposed the amendment because 

t^Z^ .'^'■^''''' "^ ""^-^^^th ^^' t^^'e"t>' "^^"^bers of a 
committee to sign a minority report, whereas the old rule 



222 Journal of the 198U General Conference 

required one-tenth or ten members of the committee. Ignacio 
Castuera (Pacific and Southwest) asked whether an amendment 
to the committee report was required to restore the lower 
number of persons required to support a minority report; the 
Chair rephed that defeating the committee proposal would have 
the same effect. Woodrow Seals (Texas) spoke against the 
committee amendment. 

Mary Grace Lyman (New York) asked a question about the 
effect of defeating the committee's amendment. In the interest of 
preserving other portions of the committee recommendation, Mr. 
Cromwell changed the committee report to require one-tenth of a 
legislative committee's membership or ten members as the 
number required to support a minority report. With this change, 
the committee amendments were adopted (see page 163). 

10. Amend Rule 37 (renumbered as 35) in the followmg ways: 
(1) At the end of the first sentence in the second paragraph, 
delete "provided that right is claimed before the chairperson or 
duly authorized member representing the committee's report or 
the minority report, if there be such, is presented to close the 
debate." (2) Add a new second sentence to the second paragraph 
providing for debate to be ended automatically after three 
speeches for and three against. (3) At the beginning of the third 
paragraph, delete "When all have spoken who desire to do so, or 
when (and after) the previous question has been ordered" and 
substitute "However." (4) In the same sentence, insert "chair- 
person or representative" after "minority report." (5) In the last 
paragraph, change the time limit on speeches from five to three 
minutes; add a cross-reference to Rule 34; and delete "provided, 
that this five-minute limit shall not apply to a motion to substitute 
a minority report (see Rule 33) for a regular (majority) report of a 
committee" from the end of the paragraph. 

Edward L. Duncan (Detroit) moved to amend the committee 
recommendation to allow four speeches for and four against a 
proposal before debate is automatically closed. He spoke in 
support of his amendment. Shirley Marsh (Nebraska) opposed it. 
William M. James (New York) spoke against both the committee 
recommendation and Mr. Duncan's amendment. CJmrles E. 
Edgar (Central Pennsylvania) spoke in support of the committee 
recommendation. Mr. Cromwell made the final statement on 
behalf of the committee. Mr. Duncan's amendment was defeated. 
Porter J. Womeldorff (Central Ilhnois) moved to amend the 
rule by adding the sentence, "The presiding officer will attempt 
to insure that motions of amendment are heard prior to any 
automatic cessation of debate." He spoke in support of his 
amendment. Victor W. Goldschmidt (North Indiana) asked 



The United Methodist Church 223 

whether, when amendments are offered after some debate on a 
mam motion had occurred, there would be opportunity for three 
speeches for and three against the amendment. Mr. Cromwell 
rephed that there would. Mr. Cromwell spoke against Mr 
Womeldorffs amendment, and it was defeated. 

Augusta Carruth (South Georgia) asked a question- Mr 
Cromwell answered. ' 

Dormld L. Carver (Iowa) moved that the committee recom- 
mendation be amended by deleting the sentence providing for 
automatic closure of debate after three speeches for and three 
agamst a proposal. He spoke in favor of his motion to delete. Don 
L. Riggin (Little Rock) asked a question about procedure; the 
Chair responded. Rebecca Parker Beyer (Pacific Northwest) 
sought to speak in support of deletion, but the Chair ruled that a 
speech agamst it was needed. Donald J. Rudalevige (Southern 
New England) raised a point of order, that the motion to delete 
was out of order, because the Conference had not yet voted to add 
the sentence to the rules. The Chair ruled that the sentence was 
before the Conference as a recommendation of the committee 
and that a motion to delete it from the committee's report was in 
order. Mr. Rudalevige challenged the rule of the Chair, but the 
Chair s ruling was sustained by vote of the Conference 

Ms. Beyer spoke in favor of the motion to delete. Donald J 
Cunningham (California-Nevada) asked whether the rule would 
apply only to plenary sessions or to committee sessions as well 
Mr. Cromwell replied that it applied only to the plenary sessions. 
J. Howard Wnght (Western Pennsylvania) moved the previous 
question on all before the Conference. June D. McCullough 
(Southern New Jersey) raised a point of order that, according to 
Rule 28, the rules of the General Conference do apply to 
legislative committee sessions; Mr. Cromwell agreed. Gamett 
Wilder spoke in favor of the deletion. Mr. Cromwell made a final 
statement for the committee recommendation. The motion to 
delete was defeated. 

William G. Trudeau (Alaska Missionary) moved to amend the 
same sentence which had been under discussion to read as 
follows: "In General Conference plenary sessions, after three 
speeches for and three against, a vote to close discussion and to 
seek a vote on the question shall be taken automatically." 

Don Riggin (Little Rock) raised a point of order, that a motion 
tor the previous question was before the Conference. The Chair 
stated that he had not put the motion to a vote and would allow 
consideration of Mr. Trudeau's motion. Mr. Trudeau spoke in 
support of his amendment. It was defeated. 
The previous question motion was put to a vote and was 



224 Journal of the 1984. General Conference 

adopted. The committee recommendations for amending new 
Rule 35 were adopted (see pages 163-164). 

Melvin M. Finkbeiner (Pacific Northwest) requested a count 
vote. The request was put to a vote and was not supported. 

Rules of Order — Final Action 

Mr. Cromwell moved adoption of the complete report of the 
Interim Committee on Plan of Organization and Rules of Order, 
including all amendments which were accepted or voted by the 
Conference. Lester L. Moore (Iowa) sought to introduce a motion 
of referral; the Chair asked him to delay the motion until action on 
the report was completed. 

Ray W. Goens (Texas) moved to amend Rule 16 to read as 
follows: "All resolutions shall be presented to the plenary prior to 
72 hours before the scheduled adjournment of (General Confer- 
ence." He spoke in support of his motion. The Chair pointed out 
that the committee recommendation was to delete Rule 16. Mr, 
Goens replied that the intent of his amendment was that the rule 
he had proposed would replace the old rule which was being 
deleted. Richard S. Parker (New York) spoke against Mr. Goens' 
amendment. Mr. Cromwell also opposed it. The amendment was 
defeated. 

Harry E. Shaner (California-Nevada) moved to amend Rule 30 
(renumbered as 28) by inserting "except for Rule 35" after 
"General Conference." He spoke in support of his amendment. 
The Chair asked a question; Mr. Shaner answered. John E. 
Stumbo (Kansas East) sought to speak in favor of the 
amendment, but the Chair stated that a speech against was 
needed. Leigh Roberts (Wisconsin) spoke against it, Mr. Stumbo 
spoke for it. 

Robert J. McCune (Central New York) asked whether a 
legislative committee would have the right to suspend a rule 
adopted by the full General Conference. The Chair rephed that 
they would under the rules being adopted. Mr. Cromwell 
opposed the amendment on behalf of the committee. The 
amendment was adopted (see page 161). 

By vote of the Conference, Rule 28, as amended, was accepted 
into the motion to adopt the report of the Committee in its 
entirety. The report of the Interim Committee on Plan of 
Organization, as amended, was then adopted in its entirety (see 
pages 154-164). 

(Editor's note: The Plan of Organization and Rules of Order 
reflects all changes recommended by the Committee and/or 
adopted by the Conference, including those which were a part of 



The United Methodist Church 225 

the Committee's printed report but which were not presented 
individually for Conference action.) 

Election of New Committee on Plan of Organization and 
Rules of Order 

Mr. Cromwell pointed out that the Conference had not yet 
elected the new Committee on Plan of Organization and Rules of 
Order. Bishop James M. Ault, Secretary of the Council of 
Bishops, presented the Council's nominations; he asked that the 
name of Roy J. Grogan (Central Texas) be substituted for that of 
G. Alan Dunlap in the list as printed. The committee was elected 
by vote of the Conference (see page 18). 

Motion to Refer 

Lester L. Moore (Iowa) moved to refer to the Committee on 
Plan of Organization and Rules of Order a request that that 
Committee consider a change in the selection of legislative 
committee membership by assigning the office of the Secretary of 
the General Conference the responsibility of assigning such 
membership on a random basis, with care that the committees be 
equal in size and representation of lay and clergy members. The 
Committee shall report its recommendation to the 1984 Confer- 
ence. He spoke in support of his motion of referral. 

Victor W. Goldschmidt (North Indiana) moved a substitute, 
that the Committee on Plan of Organization and Rules of Order 
review procedures for assigning membership on legislative 
committees to provide for better lay-clergy balance in the 1988 
committees, and that consideration also be given to procedures to 
increase the ratio of nonmembers to members and staff of the 
corresponding general agencies in the legislative committees. 

C. David Lundquist (West Michigan) spoke in opposition to 
both the substitute and the main motion. Janet E. Stephenson 
(Iowa) opposed the substitute and supported Mr. Moore's 
motion. Rodney E. Wilmoth (Nebraska) asked a question about 
the substitute; Mr. Goldschmidt answered. Mr. Cromwell, on 
behalf of the committee, opposed both the substitute and the 
main motion; he referred to the difficulty the newly elected 
committee would have in perfecting a plan in time for this General 
Conference to consider it. 

Reginald W. Ponder (North Carolina) moved that both the 
original and the substitute be referred to the Legislative 
Committee on Conferences. The Chair ruled that the motion was 
out of order, because General Conference niles require that 
matters relating to the rules be referred to the Committee on 
Plan of Organization and Rules of Order. Robert K. Sweet, Jr. 



226 Journal of the 198^ General Conference 

(Southern New England) sought to speak for the substitute, but 
the Chair ruled that the requisite number of speeches had been 
made and that the Conference should proceed to vote. 

The substitute was defeated. Mr. Moore asked Mr. Cromwell a 
question, and Mr. Cromwell replied. Torrey A. Kaatz asked to 
have the amendment read, and the Secretary read it. The motion 
to refer was defeated. 

Committee on Courtesies and Privileges 

C. Vernon Bigler (Western New York), chairman of the 
committee, called on Mrs. Eunice Jones Mathews for a 
presentation. 

Mr. Bigler: Mrs. Mathews, I am presenting you to this conference to make a 
presentation which only you can make. I will not take from you the joy of this 
moment. I will not tell your story, except to say for the benefit of some of the 
delegates who may not know, that you are the daughter of a man who touched many 
of our lives and led us into the present with the Lord Jesus — one of our church's 
greatest missionaries and evangehsts, Dr. E. Stanley Jones. And it is that family 
tie which brings you to this moment, and so, Mrs. Mathews, will you please make 
your presentation for us and tell us your story? 

Mrs. Mathews: First of all, let me express appreciation for being granted a few 
moments of your attention. I shall be brief. About sixty years ago my late father 
wrote a book which has been a landmark in world missions and evangehsm. It has 
been published in more than fifty languages and has been a transforming influence 
in the lives of thousands of people across the whole world. It has been used as a 
textbook in seminaries, even including Roman Catholic ones, for the training of 
missionaries for service in India and elsewhere. The book is called "Christ of the 
Indian Road." Many have regarded it as my father's best book, and it certainly is 
his best-known one. The manuscript is beautifully written in his own handwriting. 

I recall as a little girl how I saw him writing on it as he sat in his cottage in Iowa on 
a bluff overlooking the Mississippi River. This was during one of our furloughs from 
India to the United States. For many years we thought the manuscript was 
irretrievably lost. Dihgent search failed to uncover it. About fifteen months ago, 
however, it suddenly surfaced under somewhat remarkable circumstances. I 
determined that, if it were desired, it should be given to the archives of The United 
Methodist Church. 

I give it in this fashion, wrapped in India silk, an Asian custom for presenting 
something of value. The Japanese call it "Fu Ro Shiki." It is appropriate to present 
it at this General Conference for Baltimore was his hometown. It was near this city, 
just a century ago, 1884, when our church was 100 years old, that my father was 
bom. I am sure he would be delighted, and I will say he is delighted, that this 
manuscript is being placed in the archives of the church he so greatly loved and 
endeavored to serve faithfully, as he witnessed to Jesus Christ as Lord and 
Saviour, along every road throughout the whole world where men and women have 
pursued their pilgrimage. Thank you. 

Bishop L. Scott Allen, as chairman of the General Commission 
on Archives and History, expressed appreciation for Mrs. 
Mathews' gift to the Church and asked that there be a motion to 
authorize its acceptance. Mr. Bigler moved to suspend the rules 



The United Methodist Church 227 

to enable Bishop Allen to make such a motion; the rules were 
suspended. 

Bishop Allen moved that the manuscript be received with 
genuine appreciation, and that the General Conference direct 
that it be deposited with the General Commission on Archives 
and History. The motion was adopted. 

Joseph B. Bethea (North Carolina) was presented for a matter 
of privilege. Mr. Bethea moved that the Conference "join the 
delegation from the North Carolina Conference in expressing 
deep and abiding appreciation to Bishop William R. Cannon for 
his leadership in United Methodism, world Methodism, and world 
Christianity, and for the preparation and delivery of a magnifi- 
cent and timely Episcopal Address; and that the matters 
presented in the Address be referred to the appropriate 
committees of this General Conference for action and implemen- 
tation." The motion was adopted. 

Committee on Agenda 

K. June Goldman (Iowa) vice-chairwoman of the Committee on 
Agenda, moved that, following announcements, the session be 
adjourned, and the legislative committees meet at 1 p.m. The 
motion was adopted. 

Matter of Privilege 

Roberto Escamilla (Southwest Texas) presented the following 
resolution: "That this General Conference go on record recogniz- 
ing the timeless and significant spiritual legacy of the late Dr. E. 
Stanley Jones to The United Methodist Church, and in this year 
as we celebrate the 100th anniversary of his birth, that we 
commit ourselves anew to the task of the total evangelization of 
the world." The resolution was adopted. 

Announcements and Closing 

Virgil V. Bjork (North Indiana) made an announcement. C. 
Vernon Bigler (Western New York) announced that he had been 
told that former bishop Bennie Warner (Liberia) was at the 
Conference. He asked the Conference to greet him, but he was 
not present. The Secretary made announcements. 

Tracy R. Arnold (Louisiana) moved to reconsider the meeting 
time set for the afternoon legislative committee sessions. The 
motion to reconsider was adopted. Mr. Arnold moved that the 
time be set at 1:30 p.m., and the motion was adopted. 

Bishop 0. Eugene Slater (Retired) led the Conference in 
prayer, and the session was adjourned. 



THIRD DAY, THURSDAY, MAY 3, 1984 
MORNING SESSION 

Opening 

The General Conference of The United Methodist Church 
convened in the morning session of Thursday, May 3, 1984, at 
8:30 a.m. in the Civic Center Arena, Baltimore, Marj^land, with 
Bishop Joel D. McDavid (Atlanta Area) presiding. 

Worship Service 

As the Conference gathered, choral selections were sung by 
the British Methodist Youth Choir under the direction of Martin 
Ellis. John Eubank was the organist. May Chun and Robert 
Smith served as liturgists for the service. 

Following the Call to Worship, the hymn, "God Whose Love is 
Reigning O'er Us," (text written by Wilham Boyd Grove) was 
sung. The Conference joined in a unison prayer by St. Patrick. 
The Anthem was "Ascendit Deus," by Peter PhilHps. Following 
the reading from the Gospel (Matthew 5:38-48), the devotional 
sermon was preached by Bishop Jack M. Tuell (Los Angeles 
Area). "God of Love and God of Power" was sung as the closing 
hymn, followed by the benediction. 

The Chair thanked the British Methodist Youth Choir for their 
participation and pointed out that the Choir had paid its own way 
to the site of this General Conference. 

Committee on Journal 

Granville Hicks (South Carolina), secretaiy of the Committee 
on Journal, reported that, in accordance with the rules of the 
Conference, subsequent reports would be through the Daily 
Christian Advocate. 

Committee on Presiding Officers 

Richard W. Cain (Pacific and Southwest), chainnan of the 
Committee, reported that the committee had chosen Bishop 
Joseph H. Yeakel (New York West Area) to preside at the Friday 
morning plenary session. 

Committee on Agenda 

Charles F. Kirkley (Baltimore), reporting on behalf of the 
committee, moved the adoption of the agenda as printed in the 
Daily Christian Advocate. C. Rex Bevins (Nebraska) asked a 
question about an agenda item for "Nominations" which had been 

228 



The United Methodist Church 229 

on Tuesday's agenda, but which had not taken place. Mr. Kirkley 
reported that those nominations had been postponed until the 
Friday session. The agenda was adopted (see page 492). 

Mr. Kirkley moved that the rules be suspended to permit 
consideration of a recommendation from the Legislative Com- 
mittee on Church and Society which had not been printed the 
requisite 24 hours in advance of this session. The motion was 
adopted. 

Legislative Committee on Church and Society 

Richard S. Parker (New York), chairman of the legislative 
committee, read the following resolution which had been adopted 
by the committee for presentation to the Conference: 
"Resolved, that the General Conference ask the Council of 
Bishops to name a delegation of eight persons to participate in 
the May 5, 1984, noon March for Justice in Greensboro, North 
Carolina. One person will be designated as a spokesperson to 
give the United Methodist witness against racial violence." 
Mr. Parker stated that there was also a minority report. He 
called on James Lawson (Pacific and Southwest) to sei've as 
presenter for the majority report. 

Mr. Lawson: Many of you will know that in 1979 in the streets of Greensboro, 
N.C. , five persons in the process of a demonstration were shot down, and that since 
that time there have been two major trials — one a trial for murder in 1980 in which 
an all white jury acquitted the six accused; and then again in 1984, just recently, a 
trial charging the violation of civil rights of the murdered persons also resulted in 
an acquittal. As a consequence of all of that, of course, there is much outrage 
because this incident took place before literally 100 witnesses and video tapes from 
a variety of television stations and the like. But more importantly it represented in 
a sense the climax of the emerging racial ethnic violence in the United States 
perpetrated by the KKK. 

We must, of course, acknowledge that this does not simply happen in the state of 
North Carolina. It happens in my own state, California, where we've had temples 
desecrated, crosses burned, and, in fact, even black persons who have been shot at 
and shot and wounded by again, at least to the best of our information and 
knowledge, essentially persons who call themselves KKK and/or members of the 
Nazi Party. 

In Greensboro, N.C. , itself, a number of people have issued a call for a march on 
May 5, to at least say that there is a real need for the persons of good will to assert 
themselves and to assert a witness for brotherhood and sisterhood in our countrj', 
and the end of all forms of violence perpetrated against any parties in our land. Mr. 
Louis Brandon is a member of the NAACP; Rev. Leeland Jenkins, Rev. John 
Moore, who is a United Methodist pastor, Dr. John Erwin, who is vice-president of 
the NAACP, have been joined by the working Committee on Racial Justice, by the 
National Council of Churches, by the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, 
both of which are asking that a variety of denominational groups across the country 
join the march on May 5, which is. of course, this Saturday. 

We, of the Church and Society Committee, felt that this was a witness, 
extraordinarj', no doubt, but not unprecedented. For in the midst of the General 



230 Journal of the 198 Jf General Conference 

Conference of 1980 you will recall, as many of us overwhelmingly felt, because of 
the efforts of reconciliation of the Iranian hostages of our country on the part of a 
number of United Methodists, we should join that effort to see if we could not speak 
prophetically and compassionately to that situation, and we did. We invite the 
General Conference to do the same thing for this matter of the "march for justice" 
on May. 5. 

Finally, may I just simply quote, then, from the Charlotte, N.C., 06serrer in an 
editorial of April 18 of this year: "The 'not guilty' verdicts in two exhaustive trials 
also mean that although five persons were shot to death on a public street in broad 
daylight before more than 100 witnesses and with TV cameras rolling, no one has 
been convicted of any crime. Whatever the reason, the result is outrageous. The 
implicit message the system has sent forth, that no one was really murdered, that 
no one's rights were really violated, stands in shocking contrast to the bloody 
events recorded on video tape that day. Until the verdict and reality are reconciled, 
justice has not been done." 

Many of us in The United Methodist Church insist that we have come a long way 
in our land. That, in certain respects, is true. But if we are under the guidance of 
the risen Christ, we will also know that we have a long way yet to go. We 
respectfully submit this resolution as a way again, of our General Conference 
simply, in this hour, making again another witness to the need for reconciliation 
and justice in every state and every hamlet for every man and for every woman and 
every child. 

J. Kenneth Forbes (South Indiana) asked about the financing of 
the delegation's expenses, if the resolution were to be adopted. 
Mr. Parker replied that the committee had not addressed that 
issue, but that, if approved by the General Conference, this 
would presumably be a General Conference expense. The Chair 
ruled that, if approved, a reference to the General Council on 
Finance and Administration would be in order. Mr. Forbes 
moved that, if adopted, the action on this matter be so referred, 
and the motion of referral was adopted. 

James A. Summers (Western North Carolina) sought to 
introduce a substitute for the committee report. The Chair asked 
if the substitute w^as the same as the minority report. Mr. Parker 
expressed willingness to have the minority report pi'esented at 
this time; but the Chair ruled that only the perfecting of the 
committee report was in order and that a substitute for the entire 
report would not be in order until later. 

James H. Laue (Missouri East) asked a question about the 
wording of the report; the Chair responded. Charles H. Mercer 
(North Carolina) moved to amend the majority report by 
inserting the words "to be chosen from the two General 
Conference delegations from North Carohna" after "eight." He 
spoke in support of his amendment; it was defeated. 

Minority Report 

Thomas L. Cromwell (East Ohio) raised a point of order, that 
the rules call for presentation of the minority report before 



The United Methodist Church 231 

perfecting the majority report. The Chair ruled that he was 
correct and called for the presentation of the minority report. 
Mr. Parker called on Thomas B. Stockton (Western North 
Carolina) for the presentation, 

Mr. Stockton: The background of this is that two and one-half years ago the 
Communist Workers Party planned a "death to the Klan" rally in Greensboro. The 
group of Klan members and members of the Nazi Party came to the site of the 
march and shots were fired from both sides. Five Communist Workers Party 
participants were killed, one black and four whites. A tremendous tragedy took 
place in that five persons were killed and that no one was convicted for these 
deaths. We deplore extremism and violence and continually seek to overcome the 
feelings and the activities of racism and violence. Therefore, we feel that the most 
effective means of dealing with the issue is for this General Conference to go on 
record in opposition to groups that promote philosophies or activities of violence 
without participating in marches with questionable support and organization. 

We have discussed this with several people in Greensboro. A & T University, a 
predominantly black university, is having graduation exercises tomorrow. They 
fear that this will interfere with graduation exercises. We ask who are the 
sponsors. The march permit is in the name of one of the men whom Jim Lawson 
named, who previously provided his store for meetings of the Communist Workers 
Party. One of the sponsors indicated that a request has been made to the National 
Council of Churches for participation, but as of 12 last night no word has come for 
that to sponsor this — that the National Council of Churches was participating. 

As a church, we take risk. We are very unsure of these dramatics of this march on 
Saturday. We are very unclear who the sponsors are; who may be involved in it. We 
don't want our church to be embarrassed or barriers to be set up to those of us in 
North Carolina who are working to eliminate the extremist view's and activities of 
the Klan. 

He read the minority report as follows: "We decrj' all types of 
violence. We are troubled by the activities of the extremist 
groups such as the Ku Klux Klan, the Nazi party and the 
Communist party as evidenced in the recent confrontation in 
Greensboro, North Carolina, 

"We are disturbed that death resulted with no guilt having 
been established in the courts. We call upon all United 
Methodists to reaffirm our opposition to those principles that 
motivate any organizations that espouse hatred and the violation 
of human rights. We believe that the strong promotion of 
Christian values of love, nonviolence and human dignity is most 
effective in dealing with this specific issue. Therefore, we object 
to formal participation in this particular march, the motives and 
the results of which are so unclear." In response to a question 
from the Chair, Mr. Stockton explained that the purpose of the 
minority report was to go on record in opposition to extremism 
and violence, and that no delegation be sent to the march. 

Perfecting of Committee Report 

James A. Summers (Western North Carolina) moved that the 
following be substituted for the committee report: "The Western 



232 Journal of the 1984. General Conference 

North Carolina Conference and the North Carohna Conference 
delegations have unanimously declared that we deplore any 
extremism which manifests itself in acts of violence, such as some 
of the activities of the Ku Klux Klan, the Communist Workers 
Party, and the American Nazi Party; therefore, we respectfully 
request that the General Conference not send a delegation to the 
rally in Greensboro, North Carolina, on May 5, 1984." 

C. Vernon Bigler (Western New York) raised a point of order, 
that the substitute was equivalent to the negative of the com- 
mittee report and as such was not in order. The Chair ruled that 
no one had sought the floor to speak or to amend the committee 
report, and that on that basis Mr. Summers was in order. 

L. E. Crowson (West Virginia) asked a question about the 
wording of the minority report; Mr. Stockton read a portion of 
it in response. 

At the request of the Chair, Mr. Stockton clarified what the 
sponsors of the minority report intended as the effect of their 
report, if adopted. Richard 0. Truitt (Wisconsin) spoke against 
the minority report and in support of the committee report. At 
the request of Don Riggin (Little Rock), Mr. Stockton read the 
full text of the minority report. James W. Ferree (Western North 
Carolina) spoke in support of the minority report. 

William K. Quick (Detroit) moved to suspend the rules for the 
purpose of granting the privilege of the floor to Bishop L. Scott 
Allen (Charlotte Area) and Bishop WilHam R. Cannon (Raleigh 
Area). The motion was adopted. 

Bishop Allen: Mr. Chairman and members of the Conference. We United 
Methodists in the state of North Carolina have been laboring with other Christian 
denominations on this atrocious matter that happened in our community with a 
great deal of concern, seeking to proclaim the Christian witness in this and all other 
occasions of violence and atrocious crime. Our people in North Carolina who are 
United Methodists are deeply committed to the stance of The United Methodist 
Church in these matters. We have sought to exert the influence of the church, 
recognizing the fact that this was a regrettable incident. 

It seems to me that as we look at all the ramifications that are involved, we find 
ourselves in a no- win situation, and you're dealing with several principles that are 
inherent in the American way of life. We expect that we resort to the court's 
judicial system in matters of this nature, expecting that justice and equity will be 
achieved. However, we are committed also to the principle of civil disobedience 
whenever an individual feels that justice has not been done, the corresponding 
principle of being able to make a witness or to not accept , as a matter of conscience 
the decisions of the courts, also with the pledge and the commitment that we are 
willing to take the consequences. I don't know, Mr. Chairman and members of the 
Conference, if sending a delegation to North Carolina in this march, because of 
some of the political overtones of which I have been informed — I have been on the 
phone all of this morning and last night, talking with leaders of the church there, 
both in the business community and in the religious community, and I have some 
doubts as to whether or not The United Methodist Church, through its action. 



The United Methodist Church 233 

would cause values to be accrued that would offset the unhealthy image that would 
be committed and presented by The United Methodist Church in Western North 
Carolina and the North Carolina Conferences. I think that there is a better way to 
make our witness known. 

Bishop Cannon: Greensboro is in the Western North Carolina Conference 
though the state of North Carolina belongs to Methodism and our sister 
denominations. Since the court has rendered a verdict, this might be interpreted as 
a protest against our judicial system. 

There's a thin line of demarcation between democracy and anarchy, and as long 
as we have a viable democracy we have to work with it, even though at times it 
seems to be undemocratic. Since we know so little about the organization of this 
march and the forces that sponsor it, it would, in my humble opinion, be injudicious 
for this church to sponsor something that it knows nothing about. Therefore I 
support the position of the two delegations from North Carolina. I understand they 
are unanimous in their judgment. They are our people. They are the elected 
representatives of this church to this body, able and distinguished, every one, and 
naturally, I support wholeheartedly the position of my colleague, Bishop L Scott 
Allen. 

William 0. Walker (Oregon-Idaho) moved that the time 
allotted for this agenda item be extended until action on it was 
completed. The motion was adopted. Mr. Walker spoke against 
the minority report and in support of the committee report. 
Arthur J. Landwehr (Northern Illinois) asked whether it was 
established that the Communist Workers Party was participating 
in the march. Mr. Stockton replied that one of the problems for 
the minority report sponsors was that it was unclear what 
mvolvement, if any, the Communist Workers Party had in the 
march. Mr. Landwehr tried to speak; /. Fay Cleveland (Western 
New York) raised a point of order, that Mr. Landwehr should not 
make a speech after being recognized only for a question. The 
Chair ruled that Mr. Landwehr's speech would not be in order. 

C. Joseph Sprague (West Ohio) asked a question about the 
mmonty report; the Chair ruled that the question was not 
relevant to the issue of whether or not the minoritv report should 
be adopted. William W. Roughton (Florida)"^ asked if an 
amendment to the minority report would be in order; the Chair 
replied that it would not. Mr. Roughton spoke in support of the 
minority report. 

J. Melvin Brawn (California-Nevada) sought to move the 
previous question, but the Chair ruled that another speech 
agamst the minority report was required before debate could be 
closed. John L. Love (Central New York) asked if a motion to 
refer would be in order; the Chair ruled that it was not. Reta T. 
Barto (Eastern Pennsylvania) asked a question about the 
sponsorship of the march; Mr. Lawson answered. 

C. David Lundquist (West Michigan) moved to suspend Rule 
35 to permit the introduction of a motion for the previous 



234 Journal of the 198 Jt General Conference 

question. John E. Stumbo (Kansas East) asked a parliamentary 
question; the Chair responded. The motion to suspend the rule 
was defeated. Ignacio Casteura (Pacific and Southwest) urged 
that more speeches against the minority report be allowed, in 
view of the statements made by Bishops Allen and Cannon. John 
Schwiehert (Oregon-Idaho) spoke against the minority report. 

Final Action on Participation in Greensboro March for 
Justice 

The Chair called for final statements from the presenters of the 
minority report and the committee report. 

Mr. Stockton: Our concern is that we are seeking to be deliverers and 
proclaimers of the gospel in a place where we would not desire barriers to be 
erected to the effectiveness of our dealing with violence and extremism. We are 
seeking to be disciples of Christ. Someone asked how do we carrj' this out if we do 
not go to the march. This is the daily activity of the church in North CaroHna: to 
seek to deal effectively for Jesus Christ in this area. 

Mr. Stockton, as presenter of the minority report, asked for 
the privilege of deleting the last sentence; the Chair asked that he 
read it as he wished to have it. Mr. Stockton read the text as 
follows: "We decry all types of violence. We are troubled by the 
activities of extremist groups such as the Ku Klux Klan, the Nazi 
Party and the Communist Party as evidenced in the recent 
confrontation in Greensboro, N.C. We are disturbed that death 
resulted with no guilt having been estabhshed in the courts. We 
call upon all United Methodists to reaffirm our opposition to those 
principles that motivate any organization that espouses hatred 
and the violation of human rights. We believe that the strong 
promotion of Christian values of love, nonviolence and human 
dignity is more effective in dealing with this specific issue." 

Mr. Lawson: Bishop and sisters and brothers of The United Methodist Church in 
the General Conference, whenever the church is called upon to make a witness, I 
am sure personally as a pastor of a congregation for 24 years that there are rarely 
opportunities of witness that do not cause anguish, and w'hen that witness which w'e 
must make, again and again in a variety of ways, is not simply in the daily work of 
the local church, the daily work of the district or conference; but, as they say a 
gentle, loving word of the necessity of a society, but on one hand say "No" to 
violence and fear and "Yes" to the possibilities of justice and reconciliation, the 
anguish may in fact be deepened. This is to be a non- violent march. It is a gentle 
witness. We must recall that on Palm Sunday there was a verj' questionable march 
into the city of Jerusalem by an itinerant rabbi from Nazareth. That march indeed 
created great acclaim, but also grave consequences. I am not tiying to suggest that 
the march on May 5 would be any less risky, but if we are not simply to say nice 
words, but from time to time join our sisters and brothers ecumenically, join our 
brothers and sisters in a community who also share anguish, at times we have to 
move, seeking to make our witness visible and being concerned most of all to 



The United Methodist Church 235 

whether or not we are seeking to be faithful to the Christ in a given situation in a 
given time. 

We of the legislative committee would urge that the minority report not be 
adopted, and that the majority motion that we propose to you be accepted. 

By vote of the Conference, the minority report was substituted 
for the committee report, and the report, as substituted, was 
then adopted. 

Edwinna P. Johnson (Liberia) asked if delegates from her 
Conference had voting rights; the Chair rephed that they did. 

Committee on Courtesies and Privileges 

C. Vernon Bigler (Westeni New York), chairman of the 
committee, announced that a delegate to this Conference, A. W. 
(Bert) Jones (Southwest Texas) was a direct descendant of 
Freeborn Garrettson, The Conference greeted Col. Jones with 
applause. 

Mr. Bigler asked that the Conference recognize former bishop 
Bennie Warner; he was greeted with applause. 

Committee on Calendar 

Virgil V. Bjork (North Indiana), chairman of the committee, 
moved that Rule 31 be suspended for the May 4 plenary session. 
He explained that the Committees on Calendar and Agenda had 
been in consultation with legislative committee chairpersons and 
expected substantive reports to be printed in the May 4 Daily 
Christian Advocate, but that these could only be considered if 
Rule 31 was suspended for that day's session. The motion to 
suspend the rules was adopted. 

Closing 

Walker L. Railey (North Texas) moved that the Commission 
on the General Conference be instructed to provide some forni of 
visible identification for alternate delegates to the 1984 General 
Conference, and that this be implemented immediately. He spoke 
in support of his motion, and it was adopted. 

The Secretary' made announcements. Bishop McDavid ex- 
pressed appi'eciation to Bishops Ault and Tullis for their 
assistance while he was presiding. Bishop Carl J. Sanders 
(Retired) led the Conference in the benediction. 



FOURTH DAY, FRIDAY, MAY 4, 1984 
MORNING SESSION 

Opening 

The General Conference of The United Methodist Church 
convened in the morning session of Friday, May 4, 1984, at 8:30 
a.m. in the Civic Center Arena, Baltimore, Maiyland, with 
Bishop Joseph H. Yeakel (New York West Area) presiding. 

Worship Service 

Choral music before and during the service was provided by 
Alabanza, the choir of the Northeastern Jurisdiction Association 
of the Hispanic United Methodist Church, with Jeremias A. 
Rojas as coordinator; the organist was Ralph Jacobus. The 
liturgist was Lydia Aherrera (Philippines). Following the singing 
of the hymn, "How Great Thou Art," the Conference joined in a 
responsive prayer. The anthem was entitled, "Mi Testimonio." 
Mrs. Socorro (jranadosin sang a solo entitled, "God Smiled At 
Me." The sermon, "The Power of the Resurrection," was 
preached by Bishop Emerito P. Nacpil (Manila Area), based on 
the scripture text from Philippians 3:2-11. Following another 
responsive prayer, the Conference joined in the singing of the 
hymn, "Thine Is the Glory." 

The Chair expressed the appreciation of the Conference to 
Bishop Nacpil, Mrs. Aherrera, Mrs. Granadosin, and the Choir. 

Committee on Agenda 

Henry C. Clay, Jr. (Mississippi), secretarj^ of the Committee 
on Agenda, reported the Committee's recommendation that the 
printed agenda be amended by deleting the time for reports of the 
General Council on Ministries and going directly to consideration 
of calendar items. The agenda, as amended, was adopted (see 
page 492). 

Committee on Calendar 

Virgil V. Bjork (North Indiana), chairman of the Committee, 
introduced the following motion: "Requests for the removal of a 
consent item shall be in the hands of the Secretary by 3 p.m. of 
the day the calendar item first appears in the Daily Christian 
Advocate." He spoke in support of the motion. It was adopted. 

Mr. Bjork reported that legislative committee reports from the 
Committee on Financial Administration would be considered 
first, and, if time permitted, reports of the Committee on Church 
and Society would follow. He called on Barbara R. Thompson 

236 



The United Methodist Church 237 

(Baltimore), chairwoman of the Financial Administration com- 
mittee, for presentation of reports. 

The Chair made a statement to the Conference explaining the 
rules governing limitation of debate and the consideration of 
committee reports with related minority reports. 

Legislative Committee on Financial Administration, Report 
No. 1, Calendar Nos. 3-4 

Barbara Thompson (Baltimore) noted that the report, dealing 
with limitations on the percentage increase in general fund 
apportionments, consisted of a committee report and a minority 
report. Larry D. Wilkinson (Western North Carolina) presented 
the committee report, which called for a limit of 22% in the 
mcrease of 1985-88 general fund apportionments over the 1981-84 
general fund apportionments. David Dolsen (Rocky Mountain) 
presented the minority report, which would set the limit on the 
percentage increase at 26%. 

Report No. 1— Perfection of Committee Report 

The Chair called for consideration of any amendments to the 
committee report. Melvin M. Finkbeiner (Pacific Northwest) 
moved to amend the committee report to allow for an increase of 
approximately 32%, as originally recommended by the General 
Council on Finance and Administration. Mr. Finkbeiner spoke in 
support of his amendment. Betty Jean Foster (Minnesota) spoke 
against it. Richxird A. Thomburg (New York) supported it. 

KarlK. Stegall (Alabama- West Florida): This piece of legislation is one of the 
niost important that will come before this General Conference. All across this great 
church of ours, our people back home are waiting to see if we are going to act 
responsibly as a general church in our fiscal affairs. We are being asked at General 
Conference to only do what we are doing in our local churches, districts 
conferences, and jurisdictions. That is to limit our budgetary' increases to be 
reasonable and challenging. I represent one of fifteen annual conferences whose 
councils on finance and administration have petitioned this General Conference to 
place a 5 percent cap per year or 20 percent over the next four years. Since we will 
pay a projected 89 percent of the apportioned general church funds for this 
quadrennium, a 22 percent increase over the next four years in the apportioned 
amount will actually amount to a 31 percent increase, if all of our churches would 
pay their apportionment in full. A 22 percent increase offers a very worthy eoal to 
our great church in which only seven of 73 annual conferences are presently paying 

lZ.TT\''nt''r ^'";'f ^'^*'" apportionment, and whose membership 
increased only .009. It would appear to me that any larger increase would only be 
counterproductive and break the spirit of our people. 

I plead with you to keep in mind this morning that we of the general church are 
being asked here today to do what we asked our local churches, districts 
conferences, and jurisdictions to do, and that is to tighten our belts, to prioritize' 
and to be reasonable in our requests. I would remind you also that we of the General 
Conference mandate that the Worid Service apportionment in each annual 



238 Journal of the 198U General Conference 

conference be apportioned with conference benevolences as one single item. Many 
of our annual conferences, seeking to get our houses in order while conducting 
special campaigns for pensions, new church development, and church institutions, 
are recommending no or little increases in conference benevolences for next year. 
So how can we go back home from this General Conference and explain to them, if 
we do not hold the line on our general church apportionments? To pass this motion, 
to put a cap at 22 percent instead of 25 percent over the next four years will send a 
positive message all across our great church that we are acting responsibly and we 
anticipate 100 percent acceptance. Thank you. 

Douglas L. McGuire (Louisiana): Mr. Chairman, I also want our Conference to 
act responsibly. I will be embarrassed to go back home and not feel that I have 
encouraged that sort of action. I rise in support of the amendment to return to the 
32 percent increase of askings over the next quadrennium. I do that in the light of 
the fact that my conference last year paid 97 percent of all of its askings, but I am 
under no illusion that if we reduce the askings that other conferences will pay 100 
percent. It simply does not follow. 

The second thing is that our people are prioritizing, but the prioritizing I see is 
not encouraging. In the Episcopal Address, we heard the figure of 2 percent of the 
income of United Methodists having been given last year. I don't think it is too 
much to ask that we increase that. I recently conducted a charge conference in my 
district in which the people were bemoaning a $169 item for something or other. I 
listened until they finished and simply observed that I could hear them more clearly 
had I not seen a Cadillac and two Lincoln Continentals out front when I came in. I 
rise in support of this amendment. 

Robert K. Smyth (Southern New Jersey) opposed the amend- 
ment and supported the committee report. The Chair announced 
that the required number of speeches for and against the 
amendment had been heard. Mr. Wilkinson made the final 
statement against the amendment on behalf of the committee, 
and the amendment was defeated. 

Thomas P. Moore (East Ohio) moved that the report be 
amended to provide that the 26% limit be applied equally to 
administrative and benevolence budgets. The Chair ruled that 
the amendment was not in order while perfecting the committee 
report, since the 26% figure was a part of the minority report. 
Mr. Moore then moved an amendment to provide that the 22% 
limit specified in the committee report be applied equally to 
administrative and benevolence budgets. He spoke in support of 
the amendment, and it was adopted. 

J. J. Caraway (Louisiana) moved to amend the committee 
report by adding the following to the end of it: ". . . unless the 
national economy returns to double-digit inflation. If double-digit 
inflation occurs, the General Council on Finance and Adminis- 
tration will have authority by a majority vote to increase all 
apportionments by 2% on an annual basis as soon as possible." 
He spoke in support of the amendment. Mr. Wilkinson asked a 
question; Mr. Caraway answered. The amendment was de- 
feated. 



The United Methodist Church 239 

Report No. 1 — Perfection of Minority Report 

The Chair called for the consideration of any amendments 
related to the minority report. Thomas P. Moore (East Ohio) 
moved that the minority report be amended to provide that the 
26% limitation be applied equally to administrative and benevo- 
lence budgets. Dan E. Solomon (Southwest Texas) spoke against 
the amendment. Carolyn Oehler (Northern Illinois) asked a 
question about the intent of the amendment; Mr. Moore 
answered. David Dolsen (Rocky Mountain), representing the 
sponsors of the minority report, made a comment about the 
amendment. The amendment was defeated. 

Julius A. Archibald, Jr. (Troy) moved to amend the minority 
report such that the increase in administrative funds would be 
limited to 22%, and the increase in benevolence funds would be 
limited to 32%. Donald C. Mintum (Wyoming) asked for 
clarification as to which funds would be considered administrative 
and which were benevolence funds. The Chair called on Ewing T. 
Wayland (General Secretary, General Council on Finance and 
Administration) for a reply. 

Dr. Wayland: I am not sure that I can give a clear, direct answer to the question. 
I fully appreciate the intent implied in this motion. There are administrative costs 
in even the benevolent budget. There are certain administrative costs within the 
World Service, our basic benevolent budget. There are more, of course, benevolent 
items in the World Service budget than administrative. I would assume for 
purposes of our discussion at the moment that the General Administration Fund is 
largely an administrative budget. The Interdenominational Cooperation Fund is 
largely an administrative budget. On the other hand, the Temporary General Aid 
Fund is certainly a missional type budget. Obviously the Missional Priority Fund is 
basically program and has absolute minimum of administrative cost. I would 
assume on the other hand that the Episcopal Fund is an administrative fund. This 
about covers the waterfront on the funds, the general funds which the church now 
has. There are a couple of new funds that are being proposed by GCFA, and I would 
assume that you would interpret each of those are essentially administrative 
in nature. 

Thomas Kim (Northwest Texas) spoke against the amendment. 
E. Dale Dunlap (Kansas West) asked a question; Dr. Wayland 
responded. Charles E, Edgar (Central Pennsylvania) made an 
observation about the listing of funds in one of the printed 
reports. Blaine E. Taylor (Southern New England) spoke in 
favor of the amendment. Paul Hardin (Northern New Jersey) 
opposed it. 

James Lawson (Pacific and Southwest) asked again to have 
information about which funds were considered administrative 
and which were benevolences. 

Dr. Wayland: What we have in each one of the general funds is a certain amount 
of administration. Some of them are totally administrative, and some are mostly 



240 Journal of the 198 Jf General Conference 

missional. And to go down these funds, one by one, and specifically indicate which 
is missional in nature and which is administrative in nature, in my judgment, is 
asking the impossible. 

I certainly understand what you are trying to get at. And working with these 
funds and knowing what happens to the money, as the money is expended in each 
one of these funds, I must say again that there is a little of both in some of them. 
There is a great deal in administration costs in some. Some of them are practically 
or totally missional in nature. If you take the general Advance specials, for 
example, they are totally missional, as I understand them. But, I am sorry to say, I 
am not in a position to indicate to you which of these funds are solely missional, or 
which of them are solely administrative. And I don't know what else to say. I'd like 
to be of help, but I can't. But that's about where I would come out. 

L. E. Crowson (West Virginia) sought to introduce a motion of 
referral; the Chair replied that the motion was not in order until 
both the committee and minority reports had been perfected. 

Lester L. Moore (Iowa) moved to amend the amendment by 
adding to it the following: "For the purposes of this action the 
following items will be considered as administrative budgets: 
General Administration, the Episcopal Fund, the Interdenomina- 
tional Cooperation Fund, the Telecommunications Fund, and the 
Archives Building Fund." He spoke in support of his amendment. 

Donald A. Ott (Wisconsin): I'm remindingmyself of where we are in this matter. 
It seems to me from a half hour ago that we are hkely, before we finish, to be 
putting some percentage cap on which will require from all of our agencies, which 
we control and are part of, some determinations within their owti decision-making 
and budgets, as to how the funds that are given to them are used. I find this a futile 
exercise to determine on the floor of the Conference what is programmatic. 

Speaker after speaker have indicated the difficulty of doing so administratively. 
I find myself on this additional amendment not even in agreement with these basic 
determinations that Mr. Moore from Iowa indicates are administrative. I would 
certainly not want to put my bishop or any other bishop in the category of being a 
totally administrative person. Our bishops are programmatic. They are missional. 
They are reaching out for us. It seems to me that we need to defeat this 
amendment, all attempts to divide administrative and programmatic and place in 
the hands of our agencies, where it properly belongs, the determination of how we 
wall use the money that we commit to them. 

The Chair noted that the time for an order of the day was at 
hand. Paul Hardin (Northern New Jersey) made a clarifying com- 
ment about Mr. Moore's amendment. Mr. Moore's amendment 
was defeated. Mr. Archibald's amendment was then defeated. 

L. E. Crowson (West Virginia) moved that both the committee 
report and the minority report be referred back to the committee 
of origin. He spoke in support of his motion; it was defeated. 

Recess 

The Chair made a statement about the nominations from the 
Council of Bishops which were to be presented following the 



The United Methodist Church 241 

recess. Since the time established in the agenda had been 
reached, the Chair declared the Conference to be in recess. 

Nominations from Council of Bishops 

Following the recess the Chair called the Conference to order 
and called on Bishop Ault, secretary of the Council of Bishops, to 
present nominations on behalf of the Council. Bishop Ault 
presented nominations for Episcopal Members of the general 
program boards as follows: 

General Board of Church and Society: Jesse R. DeWitt, 
William B. Grove, Armin E. Hartel, C. P. Minnick, Jr., Abel T. 
Muzorewa, and three new bishops, one each from the South 
Central, Southeastern and Western Jurisdictions. 

General Board of Discipleship: George W. Bashore, Paul L. A. 
Granadosin, Calvin D. McConnell, Hermann L. Sticher, and 
three new bishops, one each from the North Central, South 
Central, and Southeastern Jurisdictions. 

General Board of Global Ministries: Edsel A. Ammons, James 
M. Ault, Roy C. Clark, Kenneth W. Hicks, Leroy C. Hodapp, 
Emerito P. Nacpil, C. Dale White, and two new bishops, one each 
from the South Central and Western Jurisdictions. 

General Board of Higher Education and Ministry: Emerson S. 
Colaw, Emilio J. M. DeCarvalho, W. T. Handy, Jr., Earl G. 
Hunt, Jr., Arthur F. Kulah, F. Herbert Skeete, Jack M. Tuell, 
and one new bishop from the North Central Jurisdiction. 

Bishop Ault then presented nominations for membership on 
the General Council on Finance and Administration as follows: 
episcopal members, nominated by the Council of Bishops — Ro- 
bert M. Blackburn, John Russell, Joseph H. Yeakel; at-large 
members, nominated by the Council of Bishops — Lolita S. Bacon 
(Northern Illinois), Joseph T. Carson, Jr. (Virginia), Scott G. 
Farrell (North Texas), J. Kenneth Forbes (South Indiana), 
Florence E. Freeman (Southern New England), Oscar 0. Garza, 
IV (Rio Grande), Alvirita W. Little (Pacific Northwest), George 
W. Oliphant (Holston), and Cynthia A. Raski (Central Pennsyl- 
vania); and jurisdictional members, nominated by the respective 
jurisdictional Colleges of Bishops, as follows: North Central — 
Garland K. Carver (Iowa), Joyce E. Dings (Central Illinois), 
Evelyn M. Griffith (Detroit), James H. McCormack (West Ohio), 
Marie F. Mull (East Ohio), Albert L. Nienaber (Minnesota); 
Northeastern — Dwight M. Bittner (Western Pennsylvania), E. 
Wendell Eskew (West Virginia), Duncan P. McCallum (Southei'n 
New Jersey), Leta L. Merrow (Western New York), Dale E. 
Owens (Eastern Pennsylvania), Annie Thompson (Baltimore); 
South Central — James J. Caraway (Louisiana), G. Alan Dunlap 



242 Journal of the 1984^ General Conference 

(Nebraska), Ron Gilbert (Oklahoma), Nancy McMullin (Missouri 
East), Ann Onstott (Little Rock), Kelly Williams (Texas); 
Southeastern — R. Harold Butts (Alabama-West Florida), Merlin 
D. Conoway (North Mississippi), Ethel M, Gray (Florida), Grace 
Grissom (Tennessee), Theodore B. Sumner, Jr. (Western North 
Carolina), Albert W. Sweazy (Kentucky); Western — Josie G. Bain 
(Pacific and Southwest), Kathryn D. Carroll (Cahfornia-Nevada), 
David H. Dolsen (Rocky Mountain), Frank Finkbiner (Pacific 
and Southwest), Howard B. Somers (Oregon-Idaho), Lloyd K. 
Wake (Cahfornia-Nevada). 

Nominations for that portion of the membership of the General 
Board of Pensions to be elected by the General Conference were 
presented as follows: George Azumano, Anita Billingsley, Madge 
B. Floyd, Donna Green, George L. Neill, and Mona M. Waymire. 

Bishop Ault then presented the nominations for that portion of 
the membership of the General Commission on Archives and 
History to be elected by the General Conference: Thomas J. 
Bickerton, Natty G. Baranda, Charles W. Brockwell, Jr., Ondina 
Santos Gonzalez, Richard P. Heitzenrater, Linda Johnson, Major 
J. Jones, Rosemary S. Keller, Eunice J. Mathews, Annette C. 
Nail, Darrell L. Reick, Robert W. Sledge, and Warren Smith. 

Nominations for persons to serve as the Class of 1992 in the 
membership of the Commission on the General Conference were 
then presented: Judith Craig, Delia Escareno, Pattilou Holland, 
Carolyn Hopkins, Paula Johnston, Charles E. Lutrick, and 
Arnold Madsen. 

James McCormack (West Ohio) moved that all of those 
nominated by the Council of Bishops be elected by the General 
Conference. In response to a question the Chair clarified that no 
nominations for the Judicial Council or the University Senate 
were before the Conference at this time. Mr. McCormack's 
motion was adopted, and the persons nominated by the Council of 
Bishops were declared elected. 

Bishop Ault stated that one of the persons previously nominated 
and elected to membership on the Committee on Plan of 
Organization and Rules of Order did not qualify. The Chair asked , 
if the Conference would reconsider its earher action electing the 
members of that committee, and it was reconsidered. Bishop Ault 
reported the nomination of Eldon B. Mahon to replace Roy J. 
Grogan. Mr. Mahon was elected by vote of the Conference. 

Request for Judicial Council Decision 

The Chair asked Bishop Ault to present nominations for 
membership on the Judicial Council. C. David Lundquist (West 



The United Methodist Church 243 

Michigan) moved the General Conference "petition the Judicial 
Council for a declaratory decision under Par. 2615 as to the 
constitutionality, meanings, application, or effect of the 1980 
General Conference action, adopting the report of the Commis- 
sion on Central Conference Affairs, making it mandatory that one 
member of the Judicial Council shall be elected from the Central 
Conferences; further, that the Commission on Central Confer- 
ence Affairs be a party to the declaratory decision proceedings 
before the Judicial Council, and further that the nominations 
required in election of the Judicial Council be scheduled by the 
Agenda Committee as soon as practical after the decision of the 
Judicial Council." 

Mr. Lundquist spoke in support of his motion. C. Rex Bevins 
(Nebraska) asked a question, and the Chair explained that 
neither nominations nor balloting for Judicial Council members 
would proceed if the motion passed. Mr. Bevins spoke against the 
motion; Mr. Lundquist responded. The motion was put to a vote, 
and the Chair ruled that it did receive the one-fifth vote required 
to sustain a request for a declaratory decision. 

University Senate 

Bishop Ault presented nominations from the Council of Bishops 
for membership on the University Senate. Theodore H. Walter 
(South Carolina) moved that these nominations be delayed 
pending General Conference action on a report from the 
Legislative Committee on Higher Education which would affect 
University Senate membership. The motion was adopted. 

Legislative Committee on Financial Administration Report 
No. 1 — Consideration Resumed 

The Chair explained the parliamentary situation as it existed 
prior to the recess. C. Ebb Munden (Nebraska) attempted to 
introduce a motion, but the Chair ruled that the Conference was 
in the process of perfecting the minority report, and his motion 
was not in order at this time. Robert F. Trost (Troy) moved to 
amend the minority report by substituting "the year 1984" for 
"the 1981-84 quadrennium" as the base from which apportion- 
ment increases would be calculated. He spoke in support of his 
amendment. William A. McCartney (East Ohio) asked a question 
about the amendment; the Chair responded. Don Riggin (Little 
Rock) asked a question, and the Chair answered. William W. 
Reid (Wyoming) asked a question about the annual increases that 
would result from the various options being considered; the Chair 
answered. Thomxis L. Cromwell (East Ohio) clarified the effect of 



244 Journal of the 198 J^ General Conference 

the minority report. Pat Stroman (Central Texas) asked for 
clarification on Mr. Trost's amendment; the Chair answered. 

Richard C. Looney (Holston) asked what the quadrennial 
increase in apportionments would be if the amendment were 
adopted. Barbara R. Thompson (Baltimore) asked that Eimng T. 
Wayland (General Secretary, General Council on Finance and 
Administration) be granted the privilege of the floor. Dr. 
Wayland stated his understanding of the effect of the amend- 
ment. Mr. Trost's amendment was defeated. 

John P. Miles (Little Rock) moved the previous question on 
the perfection of the minority report. The motion was adopted. 
The Chair called for debate on the minority report. 

Roberto Escamilla (Southwest Texas): I am speaking for the minority report. 
Last night in the evening news, someone reported about all of the money that the 
United Methodist people are spending here in Baltimore. Eating and buying all 
kinds of things and how the hotel owners and others are smiling all the way to the 
bank. We are talking about a theological issue. We are talking about stewardship. 
That word needs to be heard. The minority report is an attempt to bring about 
reconciliation in management terms, a win, win conflict resolution stance. I believe 
that the committee struggled. I was a member of the committee. We had input 
from clergy, from the district superintendents, from conference treasurers, from 
local church pastors. I am a local church pastor. I understand what it means to pay 
100 percent every year. I also understand the trouble of the agencies. I have been 
there. I know the dilemma of trying to cut programs which make a difference in our 
connection. 

So it is an issue of stewardship that the world may not understand, but that we 
understand. But it is also an issue of vision into the future. We have been 
challenged to go into the third century of Methodism, responding to the demands of 
our time. I believe we can do it. I believe that God's people, the people of God, 
gather in worship, exercising stewardship in those offering plates on the 
mornings — not like the electronic church in the mail, but as a worship experience. I 
believe that we can do it. I encourage you, indeed invite you, to support the 
minority report. 

John L. Buxton (Detroit): I would speak against the minority report. We can do 
a lot of things with percentages and we are voting on this minority report which 
says that the budget should be limited to a 26 percent increase over the 1981-84 
quadrennium budget. That in actuality is a 41 percent increase in dollars if we 
really expect to pay this new quadrennium budget. A 41 percent increase in dollars 
over what we were paying in the present quadrennium. And we need to keep that 
in perspective. That is the first point. The second point — we have heard already 
today that only seven conferences paid only 100 percent of their apportionments. I 
think each of us, before we vote, need to examine the ethics of voting for a budget 
when we in our own conferences haven't been able to fulfill the budgets that we 
have already been maintaining. So I would urge a vote against the minority report 
that proclaims, that claims only to be a 26 percent increase, when in fact it is a 41 
percent increase. 

Rebecca Parker Beyer (Pacific Northwest): I wish to speak in favor of the 
minority report. I believe that how we vote on this has everything to do with what 
we really believe about the purpose and the mission of the church. I go crazy when 
I hear people talking about how we can't do it. I wonder if we want to change our 
theme song from "Love so amazing, so divine, demands my life, my soul, my all," to 



The United Methodist Church 2A5 

"Love so amazing, so divine, demands that I not give any more than I gave last 
year." Or do we want to change our motto to "Do all the good you can, in all the 
ways you can, in all the places you can, as long as you ever can," to be "as long as it 
is in reasonalsle limits." Do we believe in a God who has dealt with us within 
reasonable limits? Do not we believe in a God who has dealt with us with irrational, 
ridiculous generosity? We talk about our fear that our church is dying. It is when 
we act like dead people who are reluctant to do something. Do we not believe in a 
God who has the power to raise the dead? If God can raise Jesus from the dead, 
cannot we raise our giving to a limit of above what we have given in the last year? 
Let us please remember not our fears but those in our own traditions who have 
given courageously and beyond, beyond what we think is humanly possible. Let us 
remain in fellowship with those early circuit riders who gave of themselves so 
completely that they died in their early thirties. Let us remember those in our own 
traditions such as Dean and Elsie Freudenberger who set aside 50 percent of their 
income to help those in need and live in voluntary simplicity. Let us remember the 
poor and the suffering of this world to whom we desire, we desire to be in ministry. 
Thank you. 

/. Fay Cleveland (Western New York) asked a question for 
clarification; David Dolsen (Rocky Mountain) answered, 

Donald M. Pike (Central Texas): It is my privilege to speak on behalf of a 
conference which can claim something few can on this floor — of a hundred percent 
payment of all general apportionments within the last 20 to 25 years. We have 
heard some impassioned pleas by persons whose conferences have paid as low as 81 
percent, and I contend that if God is going to work some miracles that he can do it 
among some conferences that pay as low as 63 percent. One of the things that we 
are facing in our conference, for example, and our budget has already been put 
together for 1985, and if everything is passed that this General Conference is 
considering then our budget will go up 25 percent. Now on top of that we have 
coming to us a request from the jurisdiction for six million dollars over a four-year 
period. In addition to that, we have it under consideration, a capital funds program, 
that could range as high as five million dollars on behalf of pensions and church 
growth and development. That church growth and development money will go to 
buy approximately 12 new church sites that our conference desperately needs to be 
able to deal with the growth that is before us. If we are really interested in saving 
souls for Jesus Christ, then we need to be able to buy those church sites and be able 
to put those churches in place and fund them in such a way that we can reach the 
people that are coming to us. I hope that you will defeat this minority report. 

Janice R. Huie (Southwest Texas) spoke in favor of the 
minority report, John Kirkman (Pacific and Southwest) asked for 
information about the dollar amounts related to the various 
percentage increase limits under discussion, 

Ewing T. Wayland (General Council on Finance and Administration): The 26 
percent increase would call for an amount of dollar increase over what the '84 figure 
is, for the quadrennium, of $72,168,376. The 22 percent would call for a dollar 
increase of $61,065,566. If you are interested in how much the difference would be 
in the decrease from the recommendations which are coming from GCFA, the 
decrease on the 26 percent would be $15,441,688. The decrease on the 22 percent 
would be $26,554,478. Now all of these, the earlier figures that I gave you, are all on 
a quadrennial basis, those are not annual figures. I trust this was the information 
that John Kirkman was asking for. 



246 Journal of the 198 Jt General Conference 

John 0. Barnes, Jr. (Tennessee) spoke against the minority 
report. The Chair stated that the number of speeches called for 
under the rules had been heard, and that the final statements by 
representatives of the minority report and the committee report 
were now in order. 

David Dolsen (Rocky Mountain): As I've listened to the echoes that have come 
back during the debate I do hear some of those voices saying that they do want an 
apportionment limit. If you decide today that a limit is wise, this minority report 
speaks to one issue. And that is, if you are going below 26 percent of 
apportionments for the quadrennium, you are delivering a message, and let's look 
at that message. Each of you in this room has been responsible, or a part, in a local 
church in developing their budget. We've heard that expressed in the debate 
today. Historically, due to the fact that we have received what local churches are 
wiUing to spend on themselves, we see that this increase averages approximately 
11 percent a year. GCFA's recommendation to you was approximately 8 percent a 
year. The minority report is 6 percent a year and the committee's report is 5 
percent a year. You also heard a number of people indicate on the floor that the 
majority's report hardly keeps up with inflation. You basically will be asking the 
general church, if you adopt the committee's report of 22 percent, to keep their 
spending at about half of what you are willing for the local churches to go after. 
Also, one of the echoes that I've been hearing is that there is a concern for some of 
the benevolences — evangelism, missions, and other programs before this church. 
Our General Conference will be acting on those. It'll be the message that you wish 
to send. If we adopt the report for 26 percent, you essentially will be having a status 
quo position with some additional funding. There is nothing that would historically 
document that if we were to lower or hold the line on the budget, that those 
conferences that are not now paying would pay a higher percent in the future. So 
we cannot assume that we will be receiving 41 percent. Therefore, what we have, if 
we adopt the majority report of 22 percent, will be taking a step as we enter the 
next 100 years of this church's history. We urge the adoption of the minority report 
at 26 percent so that we may enter into this new 100 years at least on an even basis 
and adopting some new programs. 

Larry D. Wilkinson (Western North Carohna): We appreciate this splendid 
debate that we have heard on this issue this morning. This is the democratic 
process in motion, and we commend you for it and we are proud to be a part of this. 
The fact is, we are not cutting any existing budgets to anyone. We are establishing 
reasonable increases over existing budgets for the next quadrennium. We would 
not limit the giving of any person for any Annual Conference. There are 
innumerable additional avenues to continue to affirm our mission and our ministry 
in addition to our general budget. An increase of $61 million for the next 
quadrennium represented by the 22 percent ceiling is no insignificant fund. I 
represent the Western North Carolina Annual Conference which has paid and 
continues to pay 100 percent to the General Conference apportionment. We, in 
Western North Carolina, love our church at all levels. I challenge you, my fellow 
delegates, to claim your ownership in the connectional ministries of our church so 
vital to the cause of Christ and his Kingdom. Our goal is 100 percent acceptances 
and 100 percent payment by all 73 annual conferences. I challenge you to accept 
your ownership of our ministries, not only by accepting this, but by paying this. I 
believe that the 22 percent is a more realistic and reasonable figure to take to our 
churches. Therefore I recommend the defeat of the minority report and the 
acceptance of the majority report. 



The United Methodist Church 247 

The Chair put the minority report to a vote and ruled that it 
was adopted. A. Bradford Dinsmore, Jr. (Florida) called for a 
count vote, and the request was supported by the required 
one-third vote. The Secretary gave instructions for taking the 
vote, and the vote was taken. When the vote counts had been 
tallied the Chair reported that the minority report had been 
adopted by a vote of 546 for, 419 against, and that it was thereby 
substituted for the committee report. 

Legislative Committee on Financial Administration Report 
No. 1 — Final Action 

The Chair explained that the Conference was now ready for 
final action on the report as substituted. Edward L. Duncan 
(Detroit) asked about the effect of a negative vote on the report 
as substituted. The Chair explained that a negative vote on the 
report as now before the Conference would mean that there 
would be no ceiling placed on apportioned budget recommenda- 
tions. The report, as substituted, was put to a vote and was 
adopted (see page 1442). 

The Chair explained that, under the rules of the Conference, 
the report was now referred to the General Council on Finance 
and Administration. 

Announcements 

The Secretary made announcements. Bishop James S. Thomas 
made an announcement. Virgil V. Bjork (North Indiana) made an 
announcement regarding the process of lifting items from the 
Consent Calendar. He then introduced the members of the 
Committee on Calendar: Leon McKenzie (Pacific and Southwest), 
vice-chairperson; Neil L. Irons (West Virginia), secretary; and 
Ira Williams, Jr. (Northwest Texas). 

Committee on Courtesies and Privileges 

The Chair called on C. Vernon Bigler (Western New York), 
chairperson. Mr. Bigler called on Joseph B. Bethea (North 
Carolina) for presentation of the report. Mr. Bethea presented 
three persons with matters of privilege to bring before the 
Conference. 

Lillian K. Bondurant (Holston): Bishop Yeakel, I was hoping that I would have 
an opportunity to say this yesterday, but the pressing issues of the morning made it 
impossible. However, although we are a day late, this is no less sincere. Members 
of the 1984 General Conference, I would move that this Bicentennial Conference, 
meeting on this day in the city of Baltimore, join the delegation from Holston in an 
expression of deep appreciation of the 1984 Laity Address and to each of its 
participants. We would further request that in so far as it is possible, the 



248 Journal of the 198 Ji. General Conference 

Committee on Reference refer to the appropriate legislative committees the 
portions that need to be addressed. 

The motion was adopted. 

Thomas W. Flinn, Jr. (Baltimore) announced that congratula- 
tions were in order for Bishop D. Frederick Wertz on the birth of 
a new grandson. 

James A. Summers (Western North Carolina) announced that 
it was Bishop L. Scott Allen's birthday and led the Conference in 
singing "happy birthday" to Bishop Allen. 

Mr. Bigler read a message of greeting from Amos S. Creswell, 
president of The Methodist Church in Great Britain. 

Mr. Bigler: He writes, "Dear Brothers in Christ: It is with great joy that I send 
greetings from the British Conference to our loved ones across the Atlantic. I am so 
sorry that I was not apprised of the date of your conference in time to change my 
personal diary and be with you. Nevertheless, I have great joy as the successor of 
John Wesley in sending you all the love and all the warmth and all the prayers and 
all the fellowship of this Conference. In these days we all need to be reminded that 
we are followers of Jesus. I think it is not without importance that the Charles 
Wesley who sang, 'Happy if vidth my latest breath I might but gasp his name,' did in 
fact write that marvelous verse in an age of weariness and extreme fatigue, and it 
concludes, 'Jesus, my only hope thou art, strength of my failing flesh and heart. Oh, 
could I match one smile from thee and drop into eternity.' 

"In my presidential year, I have underhned yet again the message the world 
needs is that Jesus Christ, the way of God, the truth about God, and the life which 
God gives, is indeed our Lord. Every blessing upon you." And it is signed: "Amos 
S. Creswell." 

Committee on Presiding Officers 

Richard W. Cain (Pacific and Southwest) reported that the 
committee had chosen Bishop Wayne K. Clymer (Iowa Area) to 
preside at the Saturday morning plenary session. 

Referral to Judicial Council 

Vilem Schneeberger (Czechoslovakia) presented a request for a 
declaratory decision of the Judicial Council on behalf of the 
Commission on Central Conference Affairs. 

Mr. Schneeberger: It reads as follows: Since the Commission on Central 
Conference Affairs is charged with matters pertaining to the Central Conferences, 
and Annual Conferences therein (!! 2301), and since the manner by which the 
number of Annual Conferences within a Central Conference is determined, and 
who grants such authorization, is not clear, the Commission on Central Conference 
Affairs recommends that the General Conference request a declaratory decision as 
follows: 

Are the restrictions in Par. 636. 1, where it says that the General Conference by a 
two-thirds vote shall determine those borders, and Par. 638.11 where again the 
General Conference determines the borders, are they in conflict with the 
Constitution, where the jurisdictional or central conferences are authorized to 
decide about their borders? 



The United Methodist Church 249 

I move that the General Conference make a request to the Judicial Council in this 
matter. 

The motion received the required one-fifth vote of the 
Conference, and the matter was referred to the Judicial Council. 

Closing 

Bishop Yeakel: Is Mr. R. H. Bond of the Memphis delegation present? Will he 
stand? R. H. "Red" Bond. Brother Bond has taken it upon himself to call to the 
attention of the Council of Bishops and the Judicial Council, that miniaturization 
did not begin with the technological age, it began with Asbury who had a miniature 
gavel in his saddlebags, and he has made for each one of us a personal replica, 
identical to the Asbury gavel, and has presented it to us. His bishop suggested at 
one of the sessions that we might use it as the gavel of the day. I have had that 
privilege, and if you will come dovra, sir, I would like to give this gavel back to you 
as a token of this session of the General Conference. 

Bishop Paul A. Washburn (retired) pronounced the benedic- 
tion, and the session was adjourned. 



FIFTH DAY, SATURDAY, MAY 5, 1984 
MORNING SESSION 

Opening 

The General Conference of The United Methodist Church 
convened in the morning session of Saturday, May 5, 1984 at 8:30 
a.m. in the Civic Center Arena, Baltimore, Maiyland, with 
Bishop Wayne K. Clymer (Iowa Area) presiding. 

Devotional Service 

The worship service was under the leadership of Bishop Finis 
A. Crutchfield (Houston Area), with Charles W. Williams 
(Texas) serving as hturgist; choral music was by the Philander 
Smith College Choir, Little Rock, Arkansas, Dr. David L. 
Walker, Director, and John Eubank, Organist. 

Following the Call to Worship, the Conference joined in the 
singing of the hymn, "Praise the Lord Who Reigns Above." A 
prayer and the anthem followed. The hymn, "Come Let Us Who 
in Christ Beheve," was sung. Bishop Crutchfield preached the 
devotional sermon, which was followed by the singing of the 
hymn, "How Happy Every Child of Grace," and the benediction. 

Committee on Agenda 

J. Melvin Brawn (California-Nevada) called attention to the 
printed report of the committee in the Daily Christian Advocate. 
On behalf of the committee, he recommended that the agenda be 
amended by the addition of a report from the Judicial Council, 
followed by nominations for Judicial Council membership. The 
committee further recommended that legislative committees 
meet at 2:30 p.m. Sunday, May 6, as needed to complete their 
work. 

Mr. Brawn moved that the rules be suspended to peraiit the 
distribution of a pastoral letter from the Council of Bishops 
dealing with allegations made by Reader's Digest magazine and 
the "60-Minutes" television show in relation to the National 
Council of the Churches of Christ in the U.S.A. and the World 
Council of Churches. The motion was adopted. 

Mr. Brawn moved the adoption of the committee report, and it 
was adopted (see page 492). 

Judicial Council Decision No. 540 

The Chair called attention to Judicial Council Decision No. 540, 
dealing with the constitutionality of mandating the election of a 

250 



The United Methodist Church 251 

member of the Judicial Council from the Central Conferences, as 
printed in the Daily Christian Advocate. He explained that the 
decision was printed for the information of the Conference and 
required no Conference action. 

Nominations for Judicial Council Membership 

Bishop James M. Ault, Secretary of the Council of Bishops, 
presented that Council's nominations for membership on the 
Judicial Council, as follows: Joe E. Covington (Missouri East), 
James M. Dolliver (Pacific Northwest), Willard H. Douglas, Jr. 
(Virginia), Florence E. Freeman (Southern New England), 
Elizabeth B. Gundlach (Western New York), Byron Hayes 
(Pacific and Southwest), Alvin J. Lindgren (Wisconsin), John V. 
Moore (California-Nevada), Donna F. Mortonstout (Louisville), 
Crisolito Pascual (Philippines), Thomas M. Reavley (Southwest 
Texas), Terrj- Sanford (North Carolina), Gene E. Sease (Western 
Pennsylvania), Albert W. Sweazy (Kentucky), and H. Myron 
Talcott (Wisconsin). 

Gladys M. Fitts (Tennessee) asked a question; Bishop Ault 
answered. The Chair called for nominations from the floor. 

Frank A. Nichols (Iowa) nominated P. Boyd Mather (Iowa). 
Oscar 0. Garza, IV (Rio Grande) nominated Clifford B. Aguilar 
(Pacific and Southwest). William 0. Walker (Oregon-Idaho) 
nominated Thomas Whitehead (Oregon-Idaho). C. Rex Bevins 
(Nebraska) nominated C. Ebb Munden (Nebraska). John F. 
Walker (Little Rock) nominated John B. Hays (Little Rock). 
Richard B. Wilke (Kansas West) nominated E. Dale Dunlap 
(Kansas West). William K. Quick (Detroit) nominated Robert P. 
Ward (Detroit). William A. McCartney (East Ohio) nominated 
Thomas P. Moore (East Ohio). Richard V. Moore (Florida) 
nominated Charles P. Hamilton (Florida). /. Gordon Stapleton 
(Peninsula) nominated William M. Hemphill, Jr. (Peninsula), 
John E. Vickers (Alabama- West Florida) nominated Foy Camp- 
bell (Alabama- West Florida). 

J. Fay Cleveland (Western New York) asked whether a motion 
to close nominations would be in order; the Chair naled that it 
would not. Dale Waymire (Oklahoma) nominated J. Taylor Phillips 
(South Georgia). Dorothy M. Johnson (Baltimore) nominated 
Su^an M. Morrison (Baltimore). Durward McCord (Tennessee) 
nominated Robert H. Spain (Tennessee). Bevel Jones (North 
Georgia) nominated Gamett Wilder (North Georgia). Dale Booth 
(Little Rock) nominated Don L. Riggin (Little Rock). 

The Chair gave instructions to those who had made nomina- 
tions regarding the submission of nominees' biographical 
sketches for publication in the Daily Christiaii Advocate. 



252 Journal of the 1984^ General Conference 

Participation of Non-English-Speaking Delegates 

Carol Colley (Oregon-Idaho) noted that, while interpreters had 
been provided for delegates who spoke languages other than 
English, votes were often being taken so quickly that those 
delegates often did not have a chance to hear the translation of an 
issue before the opportunity to participate in the vote had passed. 
The Chair expressed appreciation for this expression of concern, 

Wesley Works Project 

Robert Feaster (President, United Methodist Pubhshing 
House) called attention to the pubhcation of Volume I of John 
Wesley's Sermons as an appropriate opportunity to honor the 
scholar whose work was making the five-volume set of sermons 
possible; he called on Ronald Patterson (Book Editor) for a 
presentation. Mr. Patterson explained that the Wesley Works 
Project had begun twenty-five years earlier, with funding from 
the theological schools of Boston University, Drew, Duke, 
Candler, and Perkins, along with the General Board of Higher 
Education and Ministry. He called on James Kirby (Dean, 
Perkins School of Theology), chairman of the Wesley Works 
Board of Directors, to assist in the presentation. Dr. Kirby 
expressed appreciation to Abingdon Press for their cooperation 
in the furtherance of the project. 

Mr. Patterson: This has been a personal privilege, as well as a professional one, 
because it has allowed me to work with some of my owti heroes of the faith, allowed 
me to work with two scholars who are not only eminent scholars but church 
statesmen as well. I would like Dr. Frank Baker to join me, please, for a 
presentation. Dr. Baker came to the United States in 1960 to begin this project, 
and he has devoted nearly all of his scholarly life to this endeavor. Dr. Baker, on 
behalf of the United Methodist Publishing House and Abingdon Press, I am 
pleased to present you with this leather-bound first edition copy of John Wesley's 
Sermons. 

Dr. Baker: Mr. Chairman, Dr. Patterson, it has been a great joy to see the new 
launching of this project, first from the Oxford University Press, but now with the 
Abingdon Press. I want to pay a very warm and very sincere tribute in saying that 
all of the editorial processes have been marked by real enthusiasm as well as skill, 
and I am so happy that it is now in the hands of the very capable Abingdon Press, 
and I congratulate them as well as thank them. 

Mr. Patterson presented Ewing Werlein, chairman of the 
General Board of Publication. 

Mr. Werlein: Thank you, Ron. I'd like to have Dr. Albert Outler join me at this 
moment. You know this project, that these volumes were in troubled waters with 
the former publisher and about to go under for the third time when it was brought 
to the attention of the Board of Publication by one of its members. Dr. Charles Neal 
of the North Texas Conference. The Board of Publication was of one mind that this 
significant work on the sermons of John Wesley, whose sermons are so important 



The United Methodist Church 253 

to the doctrines of United Methodists, edited and commented on by one of the most 
significant Christian United Methodistsof our century, Dr. Albert Outler, should 
not be lost to the church. And we encouraged and expressed our desire that the 
United Methodist Publishing House do everything it could to volunteer to see to 
the publication of these volumes. 

What a happy day this is for us. And what a special pleasure for me to be able to 
present this leather-bound first edition volume to him whose lifetime of work and 
scholarship and devotion are so abundantly evidenced within its covers. 
Distinguished teacher, renowned historian, and scholar, renowned theologian, and 
minister of the gospel of Jesus, Dr. Albert Outler. 

Dr. Outler: Mr. Chairman, Mr. Werlein, friends in Christ, this is a great day in a 
great cause that I know some of you thought might never come, including me 
sometimes. The cause is a more careful study of John Wesley's sermons and their 
sources. As a summation of his distinctive thought and teaching, as a contemporary 
resource for doctrine and ecumenical dialogue, that it has happened is due in very 
large part to the heroic efforts of the Abingdon Press to get it ready in time, to the 
United Methodist Publishing House for undertaking the venture, to our friends in 
the Council of Bishops for urging the work and to our friends in the Board of 
Publication, and to all of them my thanks and I think the thanks of the whole church 
and of all friends of the study of tradition as part of our resources. What a great 
augury it would be for our third centurj' if we headed into it with companionship 
with Wesley and his sermons. Thank you all very much, indeed. 

General Council on Ministries 

The Chair called for the report of the General Council on 
Ministries. By vote of the Conference, Bishop Dwight E. Loder, 
president of the Council, was given the privilege of the floor for 
this and subsequent sessions of the Conference when the General 
Council on Ministries was presenting reports. 

General Council on Ministries Report No. 6 

Bishop Loder introduced the report, entitled "Resolution on 
the Missional Priority for the 1985-88 Quadrennium— The 
Church Alive: An Inclusive Church for a Just Society'"; he called 
on Bruce P. Blake (Kansas West) for presentation of the report. 

Mr. Blake called attention to the definition of a "missional 
priority," as found in the Book of Discipline , and summarized the 
contents of the printed report (see page 581). He then explained 
the rationale for the proposal. 

.Mr. Blake: I simply want to make a short statement to you in summan,- of our 
proposal, speaking to you about our title. The first thing in the title is that we are 
talking about our purpose as persons in mission. Our purpose is to be involved in 
enabling a just society. That's at the end of the title. That's central to what we are 
about. The GCOM is committed to the reality in our age that if we are to penetrate 
our society, that must be done through local congregations, literally as mission 
outposts of our denomination, and central to our proposal is that there be one new 
justice ministry- in everj- local congregation of our denomination each year. That is 
a missional impact that we believe has not been experienced since the birth of our 
church in 1968. 



254 Journal of the 1984- General Conference 

The second part of our title is the central part of it, and that is talking about our 
nature. Our nature is an inclusive church for that just society. We are continuing a 
tradition in this priority and that is from 1976 until 1980, the priority of "Ethnic 
Minority Local Church" was one of three in our denomination. In this past 
quadrennium, it is the priority of our denomination, and we are proposing that we 
continue that tradition, the strengthening of the ethnic minority local church, and 
enabling it in new ways will become the heart of the priority. For The United 
Methodist Church has no option but to be inclusive of ethnic concerns. Our future, 
both in terms of growth and depth of understanding and implementation of our 
mission, hinges on our continued commitment to inclusiveness, right at the heart of 
our denomination's missional priority, and that is the reason that we are proposing 
that 50 percent of all funds in this priority be committed to that cause which is at the 
heart of all of us. 

Finally, I would refer to the first part of our priority — the label that it has gained 
in the last few months. That has to do with our strategy, our strategy in mission 
that every church might be alive. We believe that what makes a denomination alive 
is for every local congregation to be ahve. What makes a local congregation alive is 
for it to be in mission to its world, as well as in ministry to its members. We have 
identified three categories of churches to be alive, which includes every local 
church. Every existing congregation will be involved in this priority by creating a 
new justice ministry every year and by fulfilling this responsibility of the 
apportionment. 

Among those existing congregations, there is a second category of churches that 
are identified by districts who are in special need of revitalization. They will be 
involved through this revitalization process. Finally, there is a new category of 
churches, and that is new congregations, and in this priority we are saying as we 
develop new congregations, that immediately, they be in mission by creating a new 
justice ministry in each new year of their existence. 

All of you know that we started out the quadrennium with three planning 
streams in our denomination. The 1980 General Conference approved the report 
from the Bicentennial Committee, calling for major funding and programmatic 
emphasis and new church development. The 1980 General Conference approved 
the New Church Development Task Force concept, to work intentionally in this 
quadrennium to bring to this General Conference an understanding that the future 
of our denomination must include new church development. And the Discipline 
authorizes the GCOM to propose a missional priority. We discovered two years ago 
that these three groups were talking about the same concept and concern and new 
direction for the church, and this direction was tapped from each of these streams; 
and we bring these together to you as a single comprehensive priority, with single 
intentionality, that indeed, we might have a just society, that that be done through 
an inclusive church. And the way to do that is for every church in our denomination 
to be involved and alive. We have had a great deal of research take place, and we 
discovered in the last four years that one of the criticisms of former priorities was 
that every church did not have a chance to be involved directly, and participate in 
the work of the missional priority. We believe our proposal enables that to happen. 

I would answer one question and then close. It has been said that all of this can be 
done without this program. That is true with every program in the church. The 
question is. Will it be done? The missional priority for the last eight years has 
altered the will of The United Methodist Church, and we believe this 
recommendation will again alter the will of The United Methodist Church, and that 
is what prioritizing is all about. I urge you to adopt "The Church Alive" as the 
missional priority, and in so doing I cannot and will not speak against strengthening 
and developing the ethnic minority local church. The unit of which I am a part in the 
GCOM has invested eight years in enabling that missional priority to have first 
claim and attention in our denomination. Rather, I choose in support of that cause 



The United Methodist Church 255 

to speak for "The Church Alive," for it does not break from the past. It's a program 
to expand and build upon, and fulfill our present priority. This priority prescribes 
that the mission of the local church is the reason why a local church exists, for 
ministry to each other is not enough. Every local church must realize that the world 
is our parish, rather than the understanding that the parish is our world. That is 
what an inclusive church for a just society is all about. I present this priority to you 
for your approval. Thank you very much for this opportunity. 

Legislative Committee on Council on Ministries Report No. 1, 
Calendar No. 17 

Carolyn H. Oehler (Northern Illinois), chairwoman of the 
legislative committee, presented the report, which recommended 
concurrence with the report of the General Council on Ministries. 
She called attention to a minority report from the legislative 
committee. The Chair made a statement about the procedure for 
considering the reports. 

James Lawson (Pacific and Southwest) raised two points of 
order: first, as to whether the report had been thoroughly 
debated and perfected in the legislative committee and, if not, 
whether it was properly before the Conference; secondly, 
whether the provisions of Section VII of the report were in 
harmony with Pars. 1005-1006 of the Book of Discipline. 

Ms. Oehler made a statement about the procedure followed in 
the legislative committee; the Chair ruled that consideration of 
the report was in order. He then ruled that, under Par. 1006. 17 of 
the 1980 BooA; of Discipline, the recommendation of the General 
Council on Ministries was in order. 

Committee on Council on Ministries Report No. 1 (Minority 
Report), Calendar No. 216 

The Chair called for presentation of the minority report. 
Ignacio Castuera (Pacific and Southwest) made a brief introduc- 
tory statement. He called on Roy I. Sana (California-Nevada) to 
present the report. 

Mr. Sano: Bishop Clymer and members of the Conference. I come before you as 
a product of missionary effort from predecessor denominations. I grew up in a 
Christian home, because of evangelistic visitation by an immigrant from Japan 
who was hired by the National Division of The Methodist Church. He was 
converted in Japan because of the missionary outreach of the predecessor agency of 
the World Division. When they were threatening to send us to the camps in World 
War II, it was Frank H. Smith, a superintendent of the Japanese work, who 
appeared at legislative committee after legislative committee entertaining the idea 
of whether 120.000 people should be incarcerated without due process of law. He 
was a minority voice who lost out. We went to the camps. He visited us and 
continued his ministry', and on an early hour in 1943, Frank Smith was found 
suffering a heart attack in a train station in Wyoming, where he had just visited us 
in his pastoral visit. 



256 Journal of the 19 8U General Conference 

The story could go on and on of Mrs. Smith, a missionary to Japan, who came 
back on one of the last ships before the war began, who chose to live with us in the 
camps and become my teacher, rather than to find another job in the outside 
community. I think gestures like that made me aware that I could trust others. I 
owe her my salvation and an eventual call into the ministrj'. I am a product of the 
missional outreach of the church. I speak therefore with great feeling and 
commitment to the continued missional outreach of our denomination. 

We bring before you the report that appears in Calendar \o. 0216 with the 
feeling that we are presenting before you an unfinished task. We recognize that 
from quadrennium 1976, 1977 to 1980, in 1981-1984, we have seen the emergence of 
some structures emerging in our conferences. We have seen the training of 
leadership to address the issues. We have seen the budding of programs to cope 
with the challenge, but we feel that the operational style of the denomination as a 
whole is not yet sufficiently perv^aded with the posture that the priority tried to 
inculcate. Hearts and minds, structures and personnel, programs and projects are 
not yet adequate enough for the missional challenge that this priority attempts to 
propose. I think it is best for us to reflect on the meaning of the missional priority, 
and I will call your attention to it in Calendar No. 0216; and, since you have not had 
it long, I want to draw upon that report for this presentation. 

First of all, let us characterize mission. For mission is to cross various barriers 
and to bring to the surface the presence and the activity of the divine in that midst. 
We came into existence as a denomination because those who were marginalized in 
their society reached across the barriers, geographic, class, and racial, and they 
brought in existence groups that were eventually banded together in our 
denomination. 

They were able to do that because others have done likewise. Across the English 
Channel, across the Alps, across the Mediterranean basin, and out of Palestine, w^e 
are here because of the missional outreach of our forebears. And we are reminded 
also of the ministry of Jesus, who w'as known to work among his people to release 
the creative and redemptive presence of God. But more than that was 
remembered, because of the saving work of God released beyond the confines that 
his own religious traditions had done best, and so w^e read in the records of the work 
of God turned loose among women, among Gentiles, among Samaritans, persons 
with handicapped conditions, the poor. It is important for us to ask what is our 
emerging role in which we are to be missional. There are four characteristics called 
to your attention in the document. 

First of all, it is a growing diversity of our nation. You see before you in the 
document the statistical summaries of the great diversification that is growing in 
our own society. Whereas the Whites have grown in the decade of the '70s by 5.8 
percent, Blacks grew by 17.3 percent, Hispanics by 61 percent. Native Americans 
by 71.8 percent, Pacific and Asian Americans by 100.27 percent, and others grew 
by over a thousand, more than ten-fold. 

While the population is approximately 83 percent or more White, what we have 
seen in our denomination is to continue our ethnic profile that is essentially 95 
percent White. We have a lot of catching up to do. 

But internationally, the difference is even more startling, for the United Nations 
figures state that people that are called third world, the people of color, 
represented 75 percent of the human family in 1980, and by the year 2030 will 
become 87 percent of the human family. And if we are to call ourselves a world or a 
global church, we face an enormous, monumental missional challenge to reflect the 
wholeness of God within our fellow'ship. 

Second, there is the ferment that is abroad, primarily among people of color first 
to notice, attempting to rectifj^ the exploitation and the oppression, the 
manipulation and the management that they have experienced through the 
decades and centuries. And that ferment is also reflected within our own land, from 



The United Methodist Church 257 

the 1960's most particularly, in our public consciousness. And while others joined 
them, this group nevertheless reflects the most dramatic brunt of the issues in 
housing and education, in employment and income distribution, and in cultural 
outlets and opportunities for spiritual development. 

It is out of the growing diversity of the human family and also the ferment that 
we see expressed within the church itself. As has been known for several years, 
Walbert Biihlen has spoken of "the three thirds" that the church faces as it enters 
the third millenium and as we as a denomination enter the third centurj'. The 
"three thirds" according to Walbert Biihlen, the missionary historian and former 
missionary' in Africa, is that as we enter the third millenium, we are facing a time 
when third world people will assume leadership of the world church. By the year 
2000 we are told they will outnumber the Christians of North America and Europe. 
These third world Christians in the third millenium we are told are likely to create 
a third church, beyond the second church that has dominated Christianity in the 
second millenium, and gave us a global community, and then, beyond the first 
church which is associated with Eastern Orthodoxy, that dominated Christianity in 
the first millenium. We live at that type of historic juncture, and if the church is to 
continue to move with God's creative and redemptive work, it must be able to 
engage in that emerging reality. 

Finally, I believe we can all say, despite the tests to our visions of faith, that God 
is active in these developments of the emerging world. Therefore, the church must 
enter into that emerging reality and be a pilgrim people. As we celebrate our 
historic past. United Methodism will be tempted to repeat medieval Christianity, 
repeat it for the word "pilgrim" progressively meant to go back and do homage to 
God's manifestation in the past. Some place in the 17th century or so our Protestant 
forebears recovered a wholly different meaning of that word, such as John 
Bunyan's Pilgrim's Progress, into the future. They are not simply into the past. 
While we celebrate our past, we must recover that heritage, not only to pay 
homage and thank God for those manifestations of divine presence, but to look 
forward to new manifestations of the divine presence. And how can we do so? We 
are proposing under seven areas of emphases, as you can see them on page 
312 — the goals of witness, discipleship, liturgy, outreach, leadership, structures 
and facilities. We are proposing that the missional priority of 1981-84 will be more 
sensitive to the learnings during our past quadrennium. In these seven areas we 
have attempted, in a manual that was mailed to you before General Conference, we 
have attempted in detail to incorporate greater sensitivity to women's issues, and 
number two to justice issues, number three, to global dimensions, and number four 
to emphasize more the possibilities of mutuality in mission. We recognize that the 
missional priority has suffered a stereotype that we have found difficult to break. If 
I may put it into somewhat crass terms, it looked as if racial minorites were asking 
for Play-Doh to go off and do their own thing. I would suspect that that is the feeling 
that was widespread through our church. 

We are looking for a way how we may recover mutuality in mission as we enter 
into the third centurj- of our denomination and the third millenium of Christendom. 

Mr. Sano summarized the provisions of the minority report. 

Consideration of Proposed Amendments to the Committee 
Report 

C. Joseph Sprague (West Ohio) moved as a substitute for the 
committee report that "25 percent of all monies generated for a 
missional priority in the coming quadrennium be designated for 
projects which address issues related to peace with justice; that 



258 Journal of the 19 8^ General Conference 

25 percent of all monies designated for a missional priority in the 
coming quadrennium be designated for projects which address 
issues related to poverty and economic justice; and that 25 
percent of all monies generated for a missional priority for the 
coming quadrennium be designated for a continuation of the 
Ethnic Minority Local Church, being implemented as envisioned 
in and through the Ethnic Minority Local Church priority. The 
division of this money shall be 50 percent to be used by the 
general church and 50 percent to be used by annual confer- 
ences ..." Mr. Sprague spoke in support of his substitute. 

Woodrow Seals (Texas) spoke against the substitute. Caroline 
B. Edge (Southern New England) noted that Mr. Sprague's 
substitute accounted for only 75% of the proposed fund; Mr. 
Sprague replied that the General Conference would be able to 
designate the remaining 25% as it acted on his proposal. 
Mareyjoyce Green (East Ohio) asked how programs would be 
developed under Mr. Sprague's proposal; he replied that it was 
his assumption that the general church, annual conferences, and 
local churches already have structures working in these areas of 
ministry, and that the funds which would become available would 
enable intentional ministries which were already under way to 
continue. 

Recess 

The Chair observed that the time scheduled for recess had been 
reached and announced that the Conference would be in recess 
for twenty minutes. 

Consent Calendar 

The Chair called on Virgil V. Bjork (North Indiana) for the 
report of the Committee on Calendar. Mr. Bjork directed the 
Conference's attention to the first consent calendar, as printed in 
the previous day's Daily Christian Advocate; he asked that 
Calendar No. 0043 be deleted from the printed hst. He moved the 
adoption of the remaining items in accordance with the rules 
governing the consent calendar, and the motion was adopted (see 
page 495). 

Mr. Bjork then called attention to Consent Calendar No. 2, as 
printed in the current day's Daily Christian Advocate and asked 
that it be corrected as follows: delete Calendar Nos. 108, 119, 198; 
add Calendar Nos. 143, 147, 173, 179, 189. He explained that this 
consent calendar would be called up for Conference action at a 
later session. 

Mr. Bjork moved that the time be extended to permit the 



The United Methodist Church 259 

Committee on Council on Ministries to complete its report. The 
motion was adopted. 

Matter of Privilege — Rules Interpretation 

The Chair recognized Bishop Joseph H. Yeakel (New York 
West Area) for a matter of privilege. Bishop Yeakel explained 
that, while presiding the previous day, he had ruled that a 
minority report which simply negated the committee report was 
in order. He had since realized that he was in error and wanted to 
correct that statement; for a minority report to be in order, it 
must be substantively different from the committee report and 
not simply a negation of it. 

Committee on Council on Ministries Report No. 1— Consider- 
ation Resumed 

The Chair summarized the parliamentary situation as it had 
existed prior to the recess and called for resumption of 
consideration of the proposed substitute for the committee 
report. Charles E. Lippse (Holston) asked the Chair to rule 
whether the substitute was properly before the Conference, in 
view of the fact that it did not account for 100% of the proposed 
funds. The Chair ruled that Mr. Sprague's substitute was in 
order. 

Edward L. Duncan (Detroit) moved to amend the substitute 
by means of the following distribution of funds: 50% for the 
Ethnic Minority Local Church priority, 30% for revitalization of 
local churches, and 20% for the development of local church 
ministries of social justice. He further explained that, under his 
proposal, the provisions of the minority report would govern the 
Ethnic Minority Local Church funds. Mr. Duncan spoke in 
support of his amendment. Charles W. Eurey (Western North 
Carolina) spoke against the substitute and the amendment, in 
favor of the committee report. Mr. Duncan's amendment was 
defeated. 

Caroline B. Edge (Southern New England) moved to amend 
Mr. Sprague's substitute by changing the 25% for the Ethnic 
Minority Local Church to 75% and by deleting the 25% for 
Poverty and Economic Justice. She spoke in support of her 
amendment. Peter D. Weaver (Western Pennsylvania) spoke 
against the substitute and the amendment, in favor of the 
minority report. Ms. Edge's amendment was defeated. Mr. 
Sprague's substitute was then put to a vote and was defeated. 
The Chair explained that the Conference was still in the 
process of perfecting the committee report. Don F. Renshaw 



260 Journal of the 19 8 If General Conference 

(North Texas) moved to amend the committee report to provide 
for up to 75% of the fund receipts to be retained and reported by 
annual conferences. Mr. Renshaw spoke in support of his 
amendment. William W. Reid (Wyoming) spoke against it. Bruce 
P. Blake (Kansas West) made a final statement on behalf of the 
committee in opposition to the amendment. The amendment was 
defeated. 

Wilson F. Boots (New York) moved to amend the majority 
report, section V, item 7, by substituting "three-fourths" for 
"one-half" as the proportion of new churches which would be 
racial and ethnic minority congregations. He spoke in support of 
his amendment. James L. Mayfield (Southwest Texas) asked a 
question; Mr. Boots answered. Bob E. Waters (Texas) spoke 
against the amendment and in favor of the committee report. Ann 
Needham (Oklahoma) supported the amendment. William K. 
Quick (Detroit) asked a question about the number of new 
churches started during the current quadrennium. Hae-Jong 
Kim (Northern New Jersey) reported that 60-70 new Korean 
churches had been established during the quadrennium, Mr. 
Blake cited figures from a General Council on Ministries report 
showing that there had been 190 new churches during 1977-1980, 
57 in 1980, and 64 in 1981. Torrey A. Kaatz (West Ohio) spoke 
against the amendment. The amendment was defeated. 

Richard D. Tholin (Northern Illinois) moved to amend the 
committee report, section V, by adding a new item 3, as follows: 
"General program agencies, annual conferences, and local 
churches shall continue to participate in the Africa Church 
Growth and Development program." Subsequent items in section 
V would be renumbered. 

Mr. Tholin: As I look through this program to bring the church alive, there is in 
it very little of a global dimension. And yet we all know that the Holy Spirit is 
working through churches around the world, bringing them alive in a way that all of 
us wish could happen in the United States and in the places where we work and live. 
That's where the Spirit is working. And we need, if we are going to come alive, the 
leaven and the empowering that will come through being in contact with those 
brothers and sisters in those nations around the world. In the past quadrennium we 
have had an emphasis on the Africa Church Growlh and Development Program, 
which has begun to take hold, and those who have participated in it have found that 
as they have come in contact with the church of Africa they have been invigorated 
and brought to new life. It is a program where we share with churches who are 
more evangelical and evangelistic than almost all of those of us who call ourselves 
evangelical in this country. It is more deeply and at risk involved in the social 
witness in its own nation, more deeply than most of us who call ourselves social 
activists in this country, and yet it is one church that holds these together in the 
power of the Spirit. We need that spirit. This is a suggestion that will keep the 
possibility of that dialogue, of that encounter, alive in this program. It is not a 
funding proposal. It is a program proposal. And I trust it will be a matter which 



The United Methodist Church 261 

would not be controversial among us, but one which would invigorate all of us. 
Thank you. 

Porter J. Womeldorff (Central Illinois) asked a question; Mr. 
Tholin answered. David L. Severe (Oklahoma) spoke in support 
of the amendment; it was adopted. 

Robert J. McCune (Central New York) moved to amend the 
committee report, section VI, item 3, by inserting the words "and 
world peace" after "social justice." The amendment was adopted. 
George W. C. Calvin (Louisiana) moved to amend the 
committee report, section VII, the portions containing provisions 
for the chairperson, date of organization, amenability, and 
reporting of conference Missional Priority Committees, by 
changing "will" to "shall" in four places. He spoke in support of 
the amendment; it was adopted. 

Harold E. Wright (Western North Carohna) moved to amend 

the committee report by adding the following at the end of section 

I: 

"Further, the sections of the minority report on 'Clarifying Our 

Mission,' 'Establishing Our Priority in Mission,' and the seven 

goals of witness, discipleship, liturgy, outreach, leadership, 

structure, and facilities shall be normative in formulating and 

structuring this missional priority at every section affecting 

the task of developing and strengthening racial and ethnic 

minority congregations and all other ethnic minority programs 

referred to in this report." 

He spoke in support of his amendment. Mr. Blake expressed the 

view that the material to which the amendment referred 

belonged more properly in an operational manual than in a 

legislative document. The amendment was defeated. 

Sharon Z. Rader (West Michigan) moved to amend the 
committee report, section VII, the third paragraph, by deleting, 
"The General Council on Ministries shall be responsible for the 
following," and by substituting: "A Missional Priority Coordinat- 
ing Committee shall be created. The Missionary' Priority 
Coordinating Committee shall:". Following item 7 in that 
paragraph, the following would be added: 
"The Missional Priority Coordinating Committee shall be 
composed of the following: representatives from the General 
Council on Ministries, two persons; from the general boards, 
one staff member and one member from each of the four 
boards, which would equal eight people; from the General 
Commission on Religion and Race, one staff member and one 
member of the Commission; from the General Commission on 
the Status and Role of Women, one staff and one member: from 



262 Journal of the 198 Jf General Conference 

United Methodist Communications, two persons; from the 
national ethnic minority caucuses, two each from each of the 
four caucuses; from the language conferences — that is, Oklaho- 
ma Indian Missionary Conference, Puerto Rico, and the Rio 
Grande Conferences — ^three persons; and five to seven at- 
large. All of these selections should be made with due 
consideration for gender and inclusive racial representation so 
that the Missional Priority Coordinating Committee can itself 
embody mutuality in mission of the total church. The General 
Council on Ministries shall convene the committee no later than 
September 1, 1984." 
She spoke in support of her amendment. Robert F. Trost (Troy) 
asked Ms. Rader if she would be wilHng to accept a provision 
guaranteeing equal representation between lay and clergy; Ms. 
Rader accepted the provision as part of her amendment. George 
G. Hunter (Florida) spoke against the amendment; Stanley C. 
Kennedy (Iowa) supported it. Ray W. Goens (Texas) opposed it. 
James M. Dolliver (Pacific Northwest) moved the previous 
question on the consideration of the committee report. The Chair 
ruled that that would require a suspension of the rules; Mr. 
Dolliver moved the suspension of the rules. The rules were 
suspended by the required two-thirds vote. 

The Chair called for a statement from a representative of the 
committee in relation to Ms. Rader's amendment. Mr. Blake 
spoke for the committee in opposition to the amendment. The 
amendment was defeated. 

Committee on Council on Ministries Report No. 1 (Minority 
Report) — Consideration of Amendments 

The Chair called for the perfecting of the minority report. 
Ernest Crouch (Tennessee) sought to move the previous question 
on all before the Conference; the Chair ruled that his motion was 
not in order. 

Lester D. Nave (Virginia) moved to amend the minority report, 
the second paragraph, by substituting $5,000,000 for $7,000,000 
as the annual amount of the apportioned benevolence. P. Boyd 
Mather (Iowa) spoke against the amendment. The amendment 
was defeated. 

C. David Lundquist (West Michigan) moved to amend the 
minority report, the section on "Funding," as follows: 

(1) Following the introductory- sentence, insert a new para- 
graph to read: "Prior claim — There shall be a prior claim allocated 
for promotion through United Methodist Communications. The 
promotion, program, and budget shall be approved annually by 
the General Council on Ministries." 



The United Methodist Church 263 

(2) In the section on "Distribution," item 1, substitute "50 
percent" for "30 percent." Change "may be retained" to "shall be 
retained." Change the second sentence to read: "This shall be 
administered by the conference Council on Ministries in consul- 
tation with the conference Missional Priority Committee or other 
appropriate body within the conference, provided such body is 
representative of racial and ethnic minority persons." 

(3) In the section on "Distribution," item 2, substitute "The 
balance" for "A minimum of 70 percent." 

(4) At the end of the section on "Distribution," insert new items 
3 and 4 as follows: 

"3. General agencies and annual conferences will allocate all 
1985-88 missional priority funds by no later than April 30, 1989, 
for expenditure by December 31, 1989, and none of these funds 
shall be placed in resen'es or permanent endowments. 
"4. All income earned from missional priority funds will be 
considered as additional monies belonging to such fund, and 
those earned will only be used for the purpose for which the 
fund was estabhshed." 
Mr. Lundquist spoke in support of the amendment. It was 
accepted by the representative of the minority report, but there 
was objection from the floor to its acceptance. William W. Reid 
(Wyoming) spoke against increasing the annual conference share 
from 30% to 50% . The amendment was adopted by vote of the 
Conference, 

John F. Walker (Little Rock) moved to suspend the rules in 
order to go directly to final statements by representatives of the 
committee and minority reports and the vote. The motion was 
adopted by the required two-thirds majority. 

Committee on Council on Ministries Report No. 1, Calendar 
Nos. 17, 216— Final Action 

The Chair recognized Ignacio Castuera (Pacific and South- 
west) for the final statement in behalf of the minority report. 

Mr. Castuera: "Entreat me not to leave you or turn back from following you, for 
whither thou goest I will go and whither thou dwellest, I will dwell. Your people 
shall be my people and your God my God." These words, which were spoken by 
Ruth, are not so much a love storj- but the storj- of the primal mother of all migrant 
and all ethnic minorities. If I were still a Roman Catholic I would pray to her that 
she would plead to God that all of you would adopt this minority report. And in 
doing so I would be praying for all of you, for all of us are migrants. The only 
difference between you and us other migrants is the length of the line we trace to 
our first migrant ancestor in this countrj' and the width of the body of water that 
ancestor crossed. 

Bishop Cannon in his Episcopal Address referred to the magnificent and 
meteoric growth of Christianity in the third world. There is a third world in the 



264 Journal of the 198 Jf General Conference 

United States and it is also within The United Methodist Church. And I urge you to 
help us continue that growth by continuing this "Ethnic Minority Local Church" as 
the priority for 1985-88. 

We are celebrating the 122nd anniversary of the victory of puebla, Cinco de 
Mayo. On that day an ill-clad, ill- fed, ill-prepared army of persons defeated the 
cream of the crop of France. It was a great military' victorj'. I call you for a great 
victory of the Spirit on this Cinco de Mayo, 1984. And I come back to my mother, 
Ruth, whose story ended not in the Book of Ruth, but rather is picked up by 
Matthew where he points quite well that she was the ancestress of Jesus, the one 
we call the Christ. And I call upon my mother and your mother to guide us, to 
empower us, to plead for us, that we too may be a completely inclusive church. I 
urge your vote for the minority report. 

The Chair then recognized Bruce Blake for the final statement 
in behalf of the committee report. 

Mr. Blake: It is a good position to be in to be able to say that all you have heard is 
all that we are about. I'd like to point out just quickly the significant differences in 
the choices you have before you. First of all in the Coordinating Committee, a 
proposal of the minority report: can we afford such duplication? Secondly, is it wise 
to allocate $4.9 million of additional monies to general agencies, compared to $2.3 
million in our proposal, when the total World Service dollars for those agencies is 
$24.5 million at the proposed level? Thirdly, is it wise not to answer the severe 
criticism we have heard for the last eight years, and that is, that non-ethnic 
minority local churches are essentially omitted, in a sense that they become an 
agent for funding, and only one out of 32 of the program components in the minority 
report refers specifically to non-ethnic congregations. 

We are dealing with a critical need; I don't know of anything in our w'orld that is 
needed any more than for everj' local church to be in mission, because as I 
understand the world and the church, that which is local is felt, be it mission or 
anjthing else. We're not talking about a mall, we're talking about a verj' clear and 
intentional, purposeful movement that can be, and I believe will be, supported by 
this denomination. 

We present this priority as a significant thrust into the future. Nothing is going 
to disappear. Nothing will be lost . It puts our desire for inclusiveness at the heart of 
the future of our denomination. In 1980, I personally urged you to continue the 
support of the EMLC. Now I urge you to adopt "The Church Alive," that places 
this concern at the heart of something greater, rather than to be continued as a 
separate programmatic entity in the church. 

The Chair called for the vote on the substitution of the minority 
report for the committee report. Barbara Williams Riddle 
(Florida) asked whether it would be possible to debate the 
reports; the Chair explained that the Conference had voted to 
suspend the rules to move directly to the vote. Fred A. Allen 
(Kansas East) asked whether he could move reconsideration in 
order to give opportunity for debate and amendments. The Chair 
ruled that that would be out of order at this time. Mr. Allen 
asked whether a motion for reconsideration would be in order 
after the vote, and the Chair replied that it would. 

The vote to substitute the minority report for the committee 



The United Methodist Church 265 

report was taken, and the Chair ruled that it was defeated. J. 
Rhett Jackson (South Carolina) requested a count vote, and the 
call for a count vote was sustained by the Conference. The 
Secretary gave instructions for the taking of the vote. The Chair 
asked if the Conference would extend the time to complete the 
action, and the time was extended. 

The Chair announced the vote but ruled it invalid because the 
number of votes reported exceeded the number of delegates. 

John P. Miles (Little Rock) moved that the vote be by ballot, 
and the motion was sustained by the required one-third vote of 
the Conference. Jinny Gordon (Central Illinois) moved that the 
vote be postponed until the next session, but the Chair ruled that 
the motion was not in order. 

John E. Stumbo (Kansas East) asked a question about the time 
that would be required to count the ballots; the Chair replied that 
the time had been extended to complete the vote. 

Sydney S. Sadio (Southern New Jersey) asked for clarification 
as to who was entitled to vote. The Chair gave instructions. 
William C. Brannon (North Alabama) made a clarifying comment 
about the voting procedure. William K. Quick (Detroit) made a 
suggestion about the voting process, but the Chair replied that 
the ballots were already being collected. 

Announcements 

The Chair called for concluding business while the ballots were 
being counted. The Secretary-, Bishop James S. Thomas (Ohio 
East Area), and Bishop D. Frederick Wertz (Washington Area) 
each made announcements. 

Committee on Courtesies and Privileges 

C. Vernon Bigler (Western New York), chairman of the 
committee, called on Jane Schairer (Detroit), committee mem- 
ber, for courtesy presentations. Ms. Schairer presented William 
K. Quick (Detroit) for the first presentation. Mr. Quick 
described two commemorative items available as a part of the 
bicentennial observance. 

Mr. Quick: One is a replica of the Enoch Wood bust of Wesley, for which Weslev 
sat in 1784. ■' 

The other is a new creation by the man who has been the sculptor for the other 
commemorative pieces for the Bicentennial. His mother was a home missionary of 
the Methodists m the Cumberland Mountains of Virginia in the 1920's; his father a 
Methodist minister for 40 years; his brother, a Methodist minister; his maternal 
grandfather, a Methodist minister. He comes from the Central Illinois Conference 
a talented man whose work many of you have already seen and purchased. We want 
to recogriize John McClarey, sculptor and dedicated United Methodist layman for 
a special presentation to the bishop who has chaired our Bicentennial Committee 



266 Journal of the 198 J^ General Conference 

Bishop Frederick Wertz. Bishop Wertz, if you will come to the podium, we wish to 
present to you John McClarey's work, and sir, the prototype of the 3-inch bronze 
medallion for the Bicentennial, the official medallion. This is the prototype. There 
were 1,984 produced, numbered. This one, sir, is without number, so you have the 
only one of its kind, and we are happy as a Bicentennial Committee to make this 
special presentation to you with our deep appreciation for your leadership during 
these four years of planning for this event. 

Mr. McClarey: Thank you. Bishop Wertz, this city brings to mind great heroes, 
and the great American Bicentennial brings to mind great heroes, nonetheless 
heroes of the faith. Sculpture is one of the many mediums through which storj' can 
be told, and I am glad to share in that storytelling with a gift of a frontier preacher 
to Drew University. 

Bishop Wertz: I am sure you would want me to say on behalf of The United 
Methodist Church to Mr. John McClarey, a very genuine word of appreciation and 
respect of the artistry and the remarkable contribution which he has made to this 
bicentennial and which his entire family has made to the Methodist tradition in 
America. 

You will be interested to know that the committee, I think, has raised over 
$100,000 to support the bicentennial program of The United Methodist Church 
through the sale of commemoratives, and you will continue to support that in the 
days ahead. Thank you very much. 

Mr. Bigler called on Hae-Jong Kim (Northern New Jersey) for 
presentation of a resolution recognizing the centennial of the 
Korean Methodist Church. 

Mr. Kim: I have a complimentary' resolution to make. Bishop Suh and the 
Korean Methodist delegation grace us with their presence at this General 
Conference. "Whereas in this bicentennial year of United Methodism, the Korean 
Methodist Church is celebrating the centennial of its mission; whereas today the 
Korean Methodist Church has become the second largest community in the world 
being next to The United Methodist Church, with membership of 900,000 (it is the 
fastest growing church in the world); whereas that church came into being as a 
direct result of our Methodist mission work begun 100 years ago, indeed the bread 
of life cast away over the seas 100 years ago has now returned to us a hundred-fold, 
a thousand-fold, yes, even 900 thousand-fold; and whereas today with the increase 
of Korean immigrant population in this country, the Korean Methodist Church has 
contributed to the development almost of 200 new American Korean congregations 
within The United Methodist Church in the last 15 years, and through them has 
given us exciting growth, vitality of evangelistic faith, and a new vision for mission; 
Therefore, Be It Resolved, that this bicentennial General Conference meeting in 
this historic city of Baltimore go on record welcoming and rejoicing their presence 
among us, celebrating with them the joy of their 100th anniversary^ and forming 
together the partnership in mission for the future, and for the result that this 
General Conference send a warmest message of commendation and thanksgiving to 
the centennial celebration, which is going to take place in June of this year in Seoul, 
Korea." I submit this. 

The resolution was adopted unanimously. 

Bishop James S. Thomas (Ohio East Area), president of the 
Council of Bishops, was presented with a copy of an ecumenical 
hymnal prepared by the Korean Methodist Church as a part of 
their centennial celebration. Bishop Thomas expressed apprecia- 



The United Methodist Church 267 

tion for the gift on behalf of the Council of Bishops and the 
General Conference. Bishop Byung Choo Suh, President of the 
Korean Methodist Church, made a brief statement celebrating 
both the centennial of his own church and the bicentennial of 
Methodism in America. 

Mr. Bigler extended greetings to other guests who were 
present. 

Torrey A. Kaatz (West Ohio) asked a question about a meeting 
of the Interjurisdictional Committee on Episcopacy; the Secre- 
tary answered. Richard 0. Truitt made an additional comment 
about the date when the new Interjurisdictional Committee 
would assume its responsibilities. Virgil Bjork (North Indiana) 
made a clarifying statement about an item included on the 
consent calendar. 

Committee on Presiding Officers 

Richard W. Cain (Pacific and Southwest) reported that the 
committee had chosen Bishop James Ault (Pittsburgh Area) to 
preside at the Monday morning plenary session. 

Report on Ballot— Committee on Council on Ministries 
Report No. 1 

The Chair reported that the Conference, by a vote of 538-431, 
had substituted the minority report (Calendar No. 216) for the 
committee report. The Conference then adopted the report as 
substituted (see pages 1513-1523). 

Closing 

Bishop Clymer thanked the Conference for its work. The 
session was closed with a prayer by Bishop Ralph E. Dodge 
(Retired). 



SIXTH DAY, MONDAY, MAY 7, 1984 
MORNING SESSION 

Opening 

The General Conference of The United Methodist Church 
convened in the morning session of Monday, May 7, 1984, at 8:30 
a.m. in the Civic Center Arena, Baltimore, Maryland, with 
Bishop James M. Ault (Pittsburgh Area) presiding. 

Worship Service 

As the Conference gathered, special music was presented by 
members of the Shenandoah Brass Quintet, consisting of Edward 
Cooper and James Ruffaner (trumpets), David Cottrell (horn), 
Susan Page (trombone), and Andrew Famham (tuba). Donna 
Gullstrand was the soprano soloist, and James H. Laster, 
accompanist. The organist for the service was Jane L. Martin. 
The service was led by Bishop Franz W. Schaefer (Central and 
Southern Europe Central Conference). 

Following the Call to Worship and Invocation, the hymn, "Sing 
Praise to God Who Reigns Above," was sung. The scripture 
reading was from Matthew 7:24-25; 8:23-26. Ms. Gullstrand sang 
"Laudamus te," from Mozart's "Mass in C Minor." Bishop 
Schaefer preached the devotional sermon, entitled, "Built Upon 
the Rock — Sheltered in the Storm." Following a prayer, the 
Conference sang the hymn, "0 Thou, To Whose All-Searching 
Sight," which was followed by the benediction. 

The Chair expressed appreciation to Bishop Schaefer and to 
the Shenandoah Brass Quintet for their leadership in the service 
of worship. 

Committee on Agenda 

Ashury Lenox (Texas), chairman of the committee, presented 
the report, and the agenda was adopted as printed (see page 493). 

Committee on Calendar — Consent Calendar No. 2 

Virgil V. Bjork (North Indiana) presented Consent Calendar 
No. 2 and reported that, based on requests received. Calendar 
Nos. 0066, 0111, and 0189 were being lifted from the calendar. He 
moved adoption of Consent Calendar No. 2 as revised. 

Becky Haase (Pacific and Southwest) sought to present a 
correction to the Committee on Administrative Order Report No. 
28 (Calendar No. 146), as printed in the Daily Christian 
Advocate. The Chair ruled that the deadline for lifting items from 

268 



The United Methodist Church 269 

this consent calendar had passed, and that a suspension of the 
iTales would be necessary. Ms. Haase moved that the rules be 
suspended, but the motion was defeated. Edwin A. Schell 
(Baltimore) and Richard A. Thomburg (New York) reported that 
the Committee on Administrative Order had voted unanimously 
for "concurrence" on Calendar No. 146, and the Chair iiiled that if 
the error was a printing error, it should be corrected. 

Consent Calendar No. 2 was adopted (see page 495). 

Mr. Bjork called on William K. Quick (Detroit), chairman of 
the Legislative Committee on Ordained and Diaconal Ministry, 
for presentation of reports. 

Committee on Ordained and Diaconal Ministry Report No. 1, 
Calendar Nos. 15-16 

Mr. Quick identified Calendar Nos. 15 and 16 as the committee 
report and the minority report, respectively, on recommenda- 
tions of the Ministry Study Committee. He called on James C. 
Logan (Virginia) for presentation of the committee report. 

Calendar No. 15 — Committee Report 

After giving background information and paying tribute to the 
work of the Study Committee, Mr. Logan outlined the reasons 
for the legislative committee's recommendation of nonconcur- 
rence with the Study Committee report. 

Mr. Logan: (1) What is the relationship between the sacrament of baptism and 
the act of ordination? Is baptism, as a sacrament, understood to incorporate us into 
the Body of Christ and at the same time to commission all baptized Christians to a 
ministry in the life of the world and for the sake of that world for which God so 
loved? And is ordination, then, a particular act within the church in which certain 
people are ordained to the ministry of certain functions within the hfe of that 
church? What is the relationship between baptism and ordination? And 
specifically, the majority asks this question, does the report inflate the category' of 
permanent diaconate to the point of conflating it with the baptism of all Christians 
in the general ministry of the church? 

(2) What is the nature and the function of general ministry of all baptized 
Christians? And what is the nature and function of an ordained deacon? We 
desperately need in this church of ours a clearly articulated theology of the laity, or 
else our church will languish in its fulfillment of its mission. 

(3) The use of the term "representative ministry" in the report raises questions 
such as these: representative of whom? representative of Christ? representative of 
the general ministry of all baptized Christians? representative of whom and 
representative to whom? These questions demand a serious analytical examination 
of the terminology of representation and a clear, unambiguous answer. 

(4) This leads us to the question behind all of the previously mentioned ones. 
What do we as United Methodists believe about the nature of ordination? Does the 
church ordain? Does Christ, through the Holy Spirit, ordain through and in the 
context of the church? And we cannot have it both ways. 

This is not the problem exclusively of the study report. Our history has been an 
ambiguous one, and time is now catching up with us, and we must clarify the 



270 Journal of the 198^ General Conference 

meaning of ordination for the sake of our owti self- understanding as a church, and 
for the sake of integrity in our engagement in ecumenical dialogue with other 
churches. 

(5) Why call for the elimination of the dual orders of deacon and elder and make it 
a single order of elder to word, sacrament, and order? Recognizing that some of our 
antecedent traditions have practiced only one ordination to word, sacrament, and 
order, while other traditions have practiced dual ordination, there are profound 
theological nuances and differences which cannot be dismissed by simply referring 
to deacons' ordination in our present as transition. Deacons' ordination is to 
servanthood with the unreserved response on the part of the person ordained to be 
a servant to the world and to the One who came to be served. Elders' ordination, on 
the other hand, is to word, sacrament, and order. Without deacons' ordination we 
may lose the prophetic dimension of ministry, and its elders' orders become 
priestly without the balance of the prophetic. Is not dual ordination, then, 
accumulative rather than transitional? The issue is more complex and needs 
further study before we hastily take an action that may have serious consequences 
in the shaping and the practice of ministry, in the search for a fuller understanding 
of ministry in this church of ours. 

(6) If ordination is to facilitate mission, why does the report call for one order to 
itinerate, and not both orders to do so? Historically, we have understood itineracy 
to be the most effective means of fulfilling our call to mission as United Methodists, 
and if this is good for one order, why should it not be good for all orders of 
ordination? 

(7) Why have our Methodist sisters and brothers in other parts of the world been 
left out of these considerations? This is not the problem of the study committee, but 
have we not by structuring the matter in the manner in which we have, committed 
the mistake of omission on a matter which can have a profound impact upon their 
church life in their country? It seems as if the question has been treated as an 
American issue without consultation with Methodists in other parts of the world 
and Methodist bodies in our own country. The United Methodist Church is not an 
American church, but it is a world church. And likewise. The United Methodist 
Church is not the only Methodist church in this country. In all fairness, there needs 
to be that kind of consultation, not only because it is appropriate, but because it is 
utterly necessary. 

And finally, (8) if we were to accept the report of the study committee as presented, 
how have we answered the initial cries for equity and justice articulated by diaconal 
ministers across our church? What will be the status of those already consecrated 
diaconal ministers who do not fit the definition of deacon given in the report? Are we 
simply to forget these persons and their original questions? One diaconal minister 
remarked, "We asked for rights, and we got orders as an answer." 

In closing, we dare not treat the study report lightly, nor take its 
recommendation without serious, critical engagement. If we are true to the 
traditions of our church, which we have celebrated with such pageantry in these 
days, we must face the fact that if we treat lightly or without serious deliberation 
the issues of mission and ministry, we may indeed find ourselves as a church 
forfeiting our birthright. The issue is precisely that serious for us as a world 
church, and for that reason we vote nonconcurrence, with sincere appreciation for 
what the committee has achieved and for the distance it has brought us. We are not 
yet home. And for this reason we recommend, through further legislation that will 
come later, a study commission to be appointed by the Council of Bishops and 
accountable to the General Conference of 1988. Thank you. 

Calendar No. 16 — Minority Report 

Mr. Quick called for presentation of the minority report. The 
Chair expressed the view that, because the minority report 



The United Methodist Church 271 

differed only in its recommendation and not in content from the 
committee report, it was not properly before the Conference as a 
minority report. 

E. Dale Dunlap (Kansas West) moved the suspension of the 
rules for the purpose of allowing presentation of the minority 
report. The motion was adopted by the required two-thirds vote 
on a standing vote of the Conference. 

Following a statement regarding the background of the 
Ministry Study Committee report and historical background of 
the present understanding of orders of ministry, Mr. Dunlap 
characterized the recommendations of the report. 

Mr. Dunlap: As I suggested, the proposal provides for two non-hierarchical 
forms of representative ministry— within the people of God, the general ministry 
the laity. Some are called by God to representative ministry, whom the church 
acknowledges, validates, authorizes for a special ftinction. They are representa- 
tives of Chnst and of the whole church in exemplifying and embodying and 
empowenng the gospel and witness of the laity and the general ministry of all 
Christians. They represent to the church its own identity and mission in Jesus 
Lhnst. 

Professor Geoffrey Wainwright has reminded us that special or ordained 
ministry that is representative ministry, brings the multifaceted ministry of the 
whole church to sharp focus— I apologize to the interpreters for I must slow 
down— bring the multifaceted ministry of the whole church to sharp focus or 
concentrated expression in such a way that all Christians must be stimulated and 
able to exercise the church's ministry. Focus indicates that special or ordained 
ministrjMs not exclusive ministry. In fact, laity has done officially everything that 
an elder does— preaching, governing, even sacraments in the case of the licensed 
local pastor who is a layperson. But focus is distinctive, and this is confirmed bv the 
concept of representative. 

The special character of the ordained ministry consists precisely in its being an 
efficacious sign in the fiirtherance of the divine purpose, both in the church and in 
the world, to which the church bears witness and to which it ministers 
Kepresentative ministry is certainly and emphatically not substitutionarv It is not 
a substitute for the ministry for the laity, but it is of the nature of modeling 
supervising, shepherding, enabling, empowering. Representative ministrv and 
ordination may have different intention. It does not involve a function It does 
involve a fimction, but all does not fall into one calling. We've grown to think of it 
narrowly as limited to pastoral, which limitation has not always been characteristic 
in the history of the Christian church. 

Elders will continue in their present definition and role, which includes 
leadership in witness and service beyond the congregation in the local community 
and to the ends of the earth. There is no giving up of ministry of service and justice 
Llders are representative to and of the whole church— generalists in the best and 
to the fullest sense of that word. 

The creative thrust of this proposal is the permanent diaconate. It provides a 
recovering of the historic ministry of deacons. The deacon represents to the church 
specifically, but not exclusively, its calling as a servant in the world. It needs to be 
understood clearly that this permanent diaconate is not simplv a new name and 
place for diaconal ministers, and that it has nothing whatsoever to do with justice 
issues for diaconal ministers, although that is an issue that demands attention. 

borne diaconal ministers may feel God's call to the permanent diaconate but 
would have to move through all of the qualifying process leading to that ordination 



272 Journal of the 1984 General Conference 

To provide special, not exclusive, for modeling diaconal ministry of all Christians, 
the deacon would seek a place of service in the same way in which members of the 
church do, not with guaranteed appointment. What other mode is so consonant 
with and like unto that of the laity? The church's missional response to a new 
cultural situation that is not easily or sufficiently addressed by an itinerancy that 
has increasingly become limited in its mobility and requiring guaranteed support 
may be creatively and fruitfully complemented and enhanced with a form of 
ministry that is ordained, but is not itinerant in the traditional sense but in a new 
way, one that is always under the appointment of the bishop upon recommendation 
of the annual conference division of deacons and the approval of the cabinet to 
ministries that are affirmed through this process as fulfilling the mission and the 
ministry of the church. 

One of the most important aspects of this proposal is the promise that it holds for 
evangelism. In the remainder of this century and the twenty-first century, we are 
going to see a population that will be more mobile and rootless than it is now. It is a 
fact that the largest portion are not in our churches and are not going to be finding 
their way to our churches. If we are to minister to and to evangelize them, we will 
have to go where they are and minister to them in non-traditional ways. If we are to 
humanize the structure of our society and bring the gospel of Jesus Christ to bear 
redemptively upon them, we are going to have to be in intentional ministry within 
those arenas. 

The permanent diaconate is just the kind of representative ministry that can 
model and help enable the laity in this same ministry in the places where they work 
and live. This proposal is thoroughly consistent with our ecumenical conversations 
and commitments, with both the WCC Faith and Order document, "Baptism, 
Eucharist and Ministry," and the work of the Consultation on Church Union as 
expressed in the "Quest of the Church of Christ Uniting." 

One of John Wesley's consuming passions was Christian unity, and we have here 
an opportunity to provide significant ecumenical leadership in this direction. It is in 
accord with our Wesleyan heritage. Reason and experience often freed John 
Wesley to discard traditions and forms that no longer enabled what, in eariier 
times, they were intended to ensure. 

As Jeanne Audrey Powers has reminded us, "Wesley's own understanding of 
ministry led him at times to provide for needs of leadership in ways that were 
startUng to his friends." Whether it was by his insistence that lay persons be 
allowed to proclaim the gospel — and I would suggest that the permanent diaconate 
in our proposal is in many ways the relative of Wesley's use of those lay pastors — or 
his setting apart persons intended for superintendency in a colonial world deprived 
of ministerial leadership, he acted for the sake of the church's leadership, service, 
and mission. 

Our mission and reason for being is to spread scriptural holiness across the land, 
and our way has always been to do those things, make those adaptations, and 
innovate those means that will further that mission. The pragmatic theology that 
Bishop Cannon so insightfully identified and applauded in the Episcopal 
Address — a holy pragmatism, I would add — ^this is one of the distinctive marks and 
important ingredients of our heritage and tradition. This proposal is something 
new that reaches back further into scripture and tradition than anything we now 
have. It is, I dare to suggest, one of those things once cast down that are being 
raised up, things that were old being made new, to borrow from Dr. Outler's 
sermon yesterday morning in Lovely Lane Church. The Holy Spirit has always 
prompted new responses to new challenges of mission and service in the world as 
situations are altered. 

Here is offered an ordering of our ministry that will amplify the church's mission 
in the world at a time when the need is desperate. Let us embrace this opportunity 
to move into our third centurj' of mission with a ministry, a ministry of all 



The United Methodist Church 273 

Christians and its representative ministry, equipped to spread scriptural holiness 
throughout not just the land but the whole world. 

Mr. Dunlap then moved the adoption of the minority report as 
a substitute for the committee report. The Chair stated that it 
was his understanding that the rules had been suspended to hear 
the interpretation of the Ministry Study Committee report, but 
not to recognize Calendar No. 16 as a proper minority report. He 
stated his understanding that what was before the Conference 
was "debating the report of the committee on nonconcurrence in 
keeping wath our rules and Robert's Rules of Order, and . . . 
[determining] in that debate whether you sustain the committee 
in its vote of nonconcurrence . . , ." 

Questions and comments about the parliamentary situation 
were stated by Mr. Dunlap, Don L. Riggin (Little Rock), P. 
Boyd Mather (Iowa), Thomas L. Cromwell (East Ohio), John E. 
Stumbo (Kansas East), Richard 0. Truitt (Wisconsin), Reginald 
W. Ponder (North Carolina), Walker L. Railey (North Texas), 
and John P. Miles (Little Rock). The Chair called for debate on 
the legislative committee's recommendation, for the purpose of 
determining the wishes of the Conference with respect to the 
report of the Ministry Study Committee. 

Committee on Ordained and Diaconal Ministry Report No. 
1 — Debate 

JohnF. Walker (Little Rock) spoke in support of the legislative 
committee recommendation of nonconcurrence. 

Mr. Walker: There are several reasons why I would be in support of this. Let me 
just enumerate them: (1) The report lacks theological clarity. Such an important 
change should be based on a clear understanding of ordained ministry. (2) An order 
of deacon, based on service, undermines the ministry' of all Christians, since our 
baptism sets us apart to service. A United Methodist Christian promises to uphold 
the church by service. (3) It is not sensitive to The United Methodist Church 
outside the United States. (4) Creating a non-itinerating conference relation 
changes the nature of the annual conference relations and episcopal responsibility. 
Such a radical change needs more consideration. (5) It seems to violate our 
Constitution. (6) The report is inadequate as to what would constitute a permanent 
order of deacon. (7) Adoption of the report could short-circuit ecumenical 
discussion. (8) Ordination is not the proper way to recognize distinguished lay 
persons who serve the church. 

Janet E. Stephenson (Iowa) spoke against it and in support of 
the Ministry Study Committee report. David J. Lawson (South 
Indiana) supported the legislative committee recommendation. 
Tex Sample (Missouri West) opposed it. Blaine E. Taylor 
(Southern New England) spoke in favor of the legislative 



274 Journal of the 198^ General Conference 

committee report. Kay C. Barckley (Pacific Northwest) spoke 
against it. 

Ms. Barckley: I come before you as a deaconess and as one who is called to the 
representative ministry. I would like to make two points. 

First, the holistic concept of ministry is what the church needs and what is best 
for the church today. As a servant in Christian community, we are called to 
minister to and for each other, a reciprocal horizontal relationship, not a 
hierarchical relationship. The permanent diaconate vdll extend the ministry of our 
church towards the vision of what we are capable of doing to be in ministry and 
mission in the world. 

Secondly, the future of our church is before us now. The church of the future 
must change its ministry to the changing needs of its members and churches. Dr. 
Neal Fisher has stated, "We wll find our survival in our transformation, in our 
thinking and acting." More study without instituting a holistic concept of ministry 
will only serve to stagnate the church. 

In conclusion, the ministry study calls and challenges you and me to confront and 
meet the needs of the church now and in the future through the permanent 
diaconates. Our Christ and Wesley proclaimed the new age calling for our 
transformation. I call you to risk and meet the challenge for transformation in 
ministry, maintaining a vision of what can be. Thank you. I urge your defeat of the 
report. 

Calendar No. 15 — Final Action 

The Chair stated that, three speeches for and three against 
having been given, the rules called for an immediate vote on the 
question. Woodrow Seals (Texas) moved to suspend the rules to 
permit additional debate; the motion to suspend the rules was 
defeated. 

Robert E. Fannin (Florida) asked a question; Mr. Dunlap 
answered. Mr. Quick called on Mr. Logan for a final statement on 
behalf of the legislative committee. P. Boyd Mather (Iowa) 
sought to introduce a motion to postpone consideration of the 
report; the Chair ruled that such a motion was not in order at 
this time. Mr. Logan made the statement for the legislative 
committee. 

The Chair noted that the time scheduled for recess had been 
reached; the time was extended by vote of the Conference to 
allow for completion of action on Calendar No. 15. 

Jimmy L. Carr (Mississippi) called for a written ballot; the call 
for a written ballot was put to a vote and was not sustained. 
Mareyjoyce Green (East Ohio) asked a question; the Chair 
answered. Committee on Ordained and Diaconal Ministry Report 
No. 1 was put to a vote and was adopted, thereby approving the 
recommendation of nonconcurrence (see page 1201). 

Recess 

The Secretary made announcements, and the Chair declared 
the Conference to be in recess until 10:50 a.m. 



The United Methodist Church 275 

Committee on Calendar 

Following the recess, the Chair recognized Mr. Bjork, 
chairman of the Committee on Calendar. Mr. Bjork called for 
consideration of reports from the Legislative Committee on 
Church and Society. 

Appreciation for Ministry Study Committee 

Paul J. Meuschke (Western Pennsylvania) moved that the 
Conference express its deep appreciation to the Ministry Study 
Committee and to Mr. Dunlap for having led the Conference in 
the preceding debate; the Chair stated that the Conference's 
applause expressed its approval of the motion. 

Motion to Suspend Rules 

A. Fritz Mutti (Missouri West) moved to suspend the rules for 
the remainder of this General Conference to allow for only one 
speech for and one against any motions to amend or substitute. 
The motion was defeated. 

Legislative Committee on Church and Society 

Richard S. Parker (New York), chairman of the legislative 
committee, called on C. Joseph Sprague (West Ohio) for 
presentation of reports. The Chair made a statement clarifying 
the rules governing consideration of reports to which minority 
reports are appended. 

Committee on Church and Society Report No. 4, Calendar 
Nos. 61-62 

Mr. Sprague explained that, in this instance, he would 
represent the minority report; he called on Richard C. Looney 
(Holston) to present the committee report, which called for 
retention of existing Social Principles language dealing with the 
practice of homosexuality (Par. 71F). 

Mr. Looney: I represent for you the majority report, which in essence asks for 
the retention of the present statements in the Discipline. We ask for this because 
we think it is an honest attempt to be balanced, in compassion, and in judgment. We 
are seeking to be sensitive to the sacred worth of persons. We are also seeking to 
understand that there are certain practices that we do not condone. While love for 
persons is always unconditional, approval of behavior is not. As we look at this 
issue, we need to understand clearly the context in which we live. The statement 
presently in the Discipline has been there for twelve years. It may or may not be 
the most famous or infamous statement in the Discipline. 

If we delete this statement, whatever our intentions, we need to be aware of the 
message we may be sending. The message may be that we do condone and we do 
find the practice compatible with Christian teaching. I leave to your judgment the 
effect of that message upon large numbers of United Methodists who take, very 
seriously, the quadrilateral under which we work, with its strong emphasis upon 



276 Journal of the 198 Jf. General Conference 

the primacy of Scripture. I have no intention this morning of engaging in 
prooftexting. But I think a fair reading of the Scripture will indicate that it is, the 
practice of homosexuality, is condemned and in no place is there a hint of 
commendation. 

Sometimes attempts are made to depict St. Paul as some sort of lone voice on this 
issue. We need to remember that Paul took to the Jerusalem fathers his doctrine in 
teaching and asked them to affirm or not affirm his position. And you will find in the 
account of that Jerusalem conference that one of the items they affirmed was a 
reference to sexual practice. It's inconceivable that someone who felt as clearly as 
he did would not have broached the subject of our sexual involvement vdth the 
Jerusalem fathers. It's difficult to believe that for 1,950 years, thereabout, we have 
had Scriptures that only now we can understand the clear intent. It has also been a 
clear ruling or understanding of the church fathers, or classical Christianity, that 
this is a proper interpretation. 

One of the major issues that keeps surfacing in this Conference is the fact that we 
are a global church. A very eloquent statement was made on Saturday about the 
exciting growth in Africa. And a very clear statement was made that the Afi-ican 
church is more evangelical and more involved in social action. I have, myself, been 
privileged on a short-term mission to visit two African countries. It is my clear 
impression that the hint that we would accept this practice as normative would be, 
and I do not want to use any extreme words, but, in my opinion, would be 
disastrous. I have in my possession a paper from an African pastor whose 
leadership I respect and you would respect if you knew him. I have talked at length 
with North American missionaries and with others, and I feel that we must weigh 
the impact of this on a church that in other areas takes very seriously the vdtness of 
the Scriptures. I simply ask you to retain the present statement as an honest 
attempt to be very sensitive to the human rights of persons, but also very sensitive 
to the right of the church to make judgments about appropriate sexual behavior. 

Mr. Sprague: We offer these words to you because we believe that they are full 
of graceful hospitality. We base this on a well-considered and long-considered 
approach to the Wesleyan quadrilateral. Unfortunately, as this debate has 
unfolded in the life of the church, Scripture has been used most inappropriately. 
That is. Scripture has been treated as if it were a cafeteria line down which folks 
would go and select from that line those particular items which seemed to serve 
them well. 

A case in point. Would any who would extract certain teachings of Paul 
concerning this matter, would any who would do that in The United Methodist 
Church, also extract and stand with Paul when he suggests that slaves should be 
obedient to their masters, when waves should submit to their husbands, and when, 
of all things, women should be quiet in the churches? 

Scripture is not a cafeteria line. Holy Scripture is a composite feast which reveals 
the mighty works of God as attested by the community of faith. As Christians, we 
believe that that attestation came full circle in Jesus the Christ, and surely even a 
cursory reading of Holy Scripture would suggest that the God revealed in Jesus 
was always to be found with the ridiculed and rejected, with the outcasts of the 
society. On the basis of Holy Scripture we submit to you this new language, 
because we do believe that it is a petition of graceful hospitality. 

Now, some would suggest that tradition is unbroken concerning the church's 
position on this matter. I would suggest to you that that is a very myopic reading of 
church history. I shall not take the time now to bore you with many details, but I 
would refer you to a very current book wrritten by Bishop John Shelby Spong, 
Episcopal bishop of the diocese of Newark in these United States. In essence what 
he says is that there was a long period in the church's history when homosexuality, 
if not normative, was understood to be not deviant behavior but simply a sexual 
orientation of Christian people. 



The United Methodist Church 277 

But even more importantly than what Bishop Spong and others have said, is the 
fact that underneath church history there is a longstanding tradition which the 
Hebrews identified with the word anaweiyri. That tradition suggests that the 
people of faith are always to be open to, graciously hospitable toward the people of 
the earth, the poor, the dispossessed, the disinherited. I would suggest to you that 
there is no more ridiculed and rejected group of people in our society today. They 
are the anaweim, and because that is true tradition clearly suggests the position of 
graceful hospitality. 

Now reason demands a question to which no one has the definitive answer. 
Namely, what is the cause of homosexuality? Is it genetically produced, or is it a 
derived, learned behavior? If there are ten of us, there are ten different opinions as 
to where scientific data seem to point concerning that question. My ten-year deep 
study of this matter suggests, but only suggests, that the data seem to lean toward 
the understanding that homosexuality is genetically caused, that it is inherent and 
not derived behavior. This being the case, as I believe it is, though I cannot speak 
definitively, as no one else can, this being the case, then do you see that another 
person's homosexuality is no less Christian than my heterosexuality? The question 
is how do we behave out of that which is given? And I would submit to you that even 
in the bond of heterosexual marriage, that the holy union intended there is possible 
only when the transcendent dimension of Almighty God is present. 

Experience. Many of us have many experiences which would speak to this 
position of graceftil hospitality. I could tell you about helping a gay church 
Christians, how they move from the smelly confines of a gay bar to a United 
Methodist church which gave them sanctuary in order that they could worship in 
the name of Jesus. I could tell you about one of the more conservative pastors in our 
conference who called during Lent and said, "Let's have lunch. My son has said he 
IS homosexual, but I know he is Christian. He reads his Bible daily. He prays every 
day, and he lives it out. And I have always believed that it was sinful. Tell me what 
I can do." 

I saw that boy's mother a few days before we left for annual conference and 
I asked her how things were going. She simply said, "He's still our boy. He's 
no different than before he announced who he is, and we love him iust the 
same." 

I could tell you about those, but the final experience I want to share, and with 
this 1 11 close, is this. (Obviously, the names are changed to protect the innocent ) 
Their names are Sally and Judy. I was called to make hospital calls on Judy Judy 
was in mid-hfe. She literally was dying an inch at a time as her body was being 
whittled away because of a complexity of diseases. I learned upon visitation that 
she and Sally had lived together, in a holy union in my opinion, for 27 years Judy 
was in the hospital for fourteen months. Sally maintained the home, worked on an 
assembly hne, and never, save one day, failed to make her hospital visitation the 
one day she was flat with the virus. Most days in the midst of her schedule she 
visited twice. On many occasions the three of us were in the room together 

I simply want to say this about those times together. As a pastor and as a 
practicing theologian I can say to you that the joy and peace, the fidelity and care 
present between those persons in that hospital room was that which this person 
does not, and will never, find incompatible with Christian teaching. In 22 years of 
ministry I have seen very few heterosexual marriages which had the depth of iov 
and commitment that Sally and Judy enjoyed. 

Hence, we who offer the minority report offer it to you because we think it is that 
of graceful hospitality, that about which Henri Nouwen has been pleading with the 
church to transform the arid desert of hostility into a fertile oasis of hospitality 
where enemies can become friends. We present it believing it is that, but believine 
a^so that it is full of the truth of God, the ftillness of which is still being revealed unto 
all of us. 



278 Journal of the 1984. General Conference 

Perfecting the Committee Report — Calendar No. 61 

Gerald L. Downie (Central Illinois) sought to speak in support 
of the committee report, but the Chair ruled that only proposed 
amendments to it were in order at this time. 

William A. McCartney (East Ohio) moved to amend the 
committee report by adding a new paragraph to the end of Par. 
71F, to read as follows: "We commit ourselves to be in ministry 
with all persons regardless of sexual orientation, seeking to 
support and enable the search for healing grace for all through a 
relationship with God." He spoke in support of his amendment. 
Edward L. Duncan (Detroit) moved to postpone action on this 
report until after the Conference had acted on the issue of 
ordination of homosexual persons; he spoke in support of his 
motion. Mr. Parker spoke on behalf of the legislative committee 
in opposition to the motion to postpone. Mr. Duncan's motion 
was defeated. 

Victor W. Goldschmidt (North Indiana) asked a question about 
the report; Mr. Looney answered. Wayne B. Middleton (Detroit) 
moved to amend the amendment by substituting "to" for "with" in 
the phrase, "in ministry with all persons. ..." He spoke in 
support of his amendment. Merlin J. Ackerson (Iowa) opposed it. 
Mr. Middleton's amendment was defeated. 

Scott A. Williams (Central Pennsylvania) spoke against Mr. 
McCartney's amendment. Mr. Looney made the final statement 
in behalf of the committee report against the amendment. Mr. 
McCartney's amendment was defeated. 

Victor Goldschmidt (North Indiana) sought to introduce an 
amendment to the committee report, but Mr. Parker explained 
that Mr. Goldschmidt's amendment was already incorporated in 
the committee report. 

J. Howard Wright (Western Pennsylvania) moved to amend 
the committee report by deleting the words, "and consider this 
practice incompatible with Christian teaching," from Par. 71F. 
He spoke in support of his amendment. Harry R. Kent (South 
Carolina) spoke against it. Emmett W. Cocke, Jr. (Virginia) 
spoke in favor of it. William W. Roughton (Florida) opposed it. 

Donald M. Pike (Central Texas) moved the previous question 
on all before the Conference. The Chair ruled that the previous 
question motion was only in order in relation to Mr. Wright's 
amendment. It was adopted. Mr. Wright's amendment was put to 
a vote and was defeated. 

Dight Grain (Southern New England) asked a question about 
the content of the committee report; Mr. Parker answered. 
Bonifacio B. Mequi, Jr. (Iowa) moved to amend the sentence Mr. 
Wright had sought to delete by changing it to read: "... and we 



The United Methodist Church 279 

do not condone any sexual practice we consider incompatible with 
Christian teaching." He spoke in support of his amendment. 
Stacy D. Myers, Jr. (Eastern Pennsylvania) opposed it. Sally 
Geis (Rocky Mountain) spoke for it. George A. Tanner (Little 
Rock) moved to suspend the rules to permit an immediate vote on 
the amendment, and the rules were suspended by vote of the 
Conference. Robert E. Fannin (Florida) asked that the Confer- 
ence be sensitive to the need for adequate time for translations 
for non-English speaking delegates. Mr. Looney made a final 
statement on behalf of the committee against the amendment. 
The amendment was defeated. 

Kabila Wakubangi Mayo (North Shaba) made a speech 
opposing the acceptance of homosexual persons in the Church. 
Pat Callbeck Harper (Yellowstone) moved to amend the 
committee report by adding the following paragraph to the end of 
it: "We recognize the polarity in our church and society on issues 
of human sexuality. We, therefore, hold each other accountable 
as Christians to be in continuing dialogue on the varied personal 
concerns, medical information, and Scriptural interpretations of 
all persons." She spoke in support of her amendment. V. L. 
Daughtery (South Georgia) spoke against it. Walker Railey 
(North Texas) spoke in favor of it. Heinz P. Fischer (German 
South) opposed it. William M. James (New York) supported it. 

Mark J. Blaising (North Indiana) moved to amend Ms. 
Callbeck's amendment by adding the following at the beginning of 
it: "We do not condone the practices of homosexuality, sexual 
abuse, or sexual infidelity within the marriage relationship, and 
consider these practices as being incompatible with Christian 
teaching." He spoke in support of his amendment. L. E. Crowson 
(West Virginia) sought to move the previous question, but the 
Chair ruled the motion out of order at this time. Jack D. Heacock 
(Southwest Texas) spoke against Mr. Blaising's amendment. 
Leighton Farrell (North Texas) moved to suspend the rules to 
permit a vote on Mr. Blaising's and Ms. Harper's amendments. 
The rules were suspended by vote of the Conference. 

Mr. Blaising's amendment was put to a vote and was defeated. 
Ms. Harper's amendment was then put to a vote and was also 
defeated. 

June D. McCullough (Southern New Jersey) asked for 
clarification as to what was before the Conference under 
Calendar No. 61. Mr. Parker replied that all of Par. 71F, with 
the amendment printed in Calendar No. 61, was before the 
Conference, in the judgment of the legislative committee. 

Thomas L. Cromwell (East Ohio) moved to suspend the rules 
in order to further restrict debate on amendments. The Chair 



280 Journal of the 198 Jf. General Conference 

ruled that his motion was not in order because the Conference 
had defeated what was substantially the same motion earlier in 
the session. 

Perfecting of the Minority Report — Calendar No. 62 

Boh E. Waters (Texas) moved the previous question. The Chair 
declared that the Conference was ready to move to the perfecting 
of the minority report. Robert K. Smyth (Southern New Jersey) 
asked a question; Mr. Parker answered. Oscar 0. Garza, IV (Rio 
Grande) made a procedural motion, but the Chair ruled that the 
Conference was already moving in the direction suggested by Mr. 
Garza's motion. 

Susan P. Davies (Nebraska) moved to amend the minority 
report by adding the words, "without assuming a condoning or 
condemning attitude," after the word, "orientation." She spoke in 
support of her motion. 

The Chair observed that the time for an order of the day had 
been reached and asked if the Conference wished to extend the 
time to complete action on this report. The Conference voted to 
extend the time. June McCullough (Southern New Jersey) 
requested a count vote, but the call for a count vote was not 
sustained by the Conference. 

Benny Young (Virginia) moved to suspend the rules in order to 
declare the minority report perfected. James H. Coile (North 
Carolina) asked the Chair to rule the minority report out of order. 
The Chair ruled that the minority report was properly before the 
Conference. Rodney E. Wilmoth (Nebraska) raised a point of 
order, that the motion to suspend the rules was out of order, 
because Ms. Davies' amendment had not been put to a vote. The 
Chair ruled that, if the rules were suspended, Ms. Davies' 
amendment would be put to a vote before the minority report was 
declared perfected. The motion to suspend the rules was voted by 
the Conference by the necessary two-thirds majority. 

Ms. Davies' amendment was put to a vote and was defeated. 
The Chair called for debate on the minority report. Bob E. 
Waters (Texas) moved to suspend the rules in order to move 
directly to a vote on the minority report and the committee 
report. Robert K. Sweet, Jr. (Southern New England) asked a 
question; the Chair answered. Arthur F. Hagy, Jr. (Troy) asked 
a question about the motion before the Conference; the Chair 
answered. The motion to suspend the rules to proceed directly to 
the vote was adopted by the required two-thirds vote. 

Committee on Church and Society Report No. 4 — Final Action 

Don L. Riggin (Little Rock) moved that the vote be by ballot; 



The United Methodist Church 281 

the motion was defeated. Paul Hardin (Northern New Jersey) 
asked a question; the Chair answered. 

C. Joseph Sprague (West Ohio) made the final statement in 
support of the minority report. Mr. Looney made the final 
statement on behalf of the committee. Ignacio Castuera (Pacific 
and Southwest) requested a count vote on the minority report; 
the call for a count vote was not sustained by the Conference. 

The minority report was put to a vote and was defeated. The 
committee report (Calendar No. 61) was adopted (see page 772). 

Committee on Calendar 

Virgil V. Bjork reminded committee chairpersons that calen- 
dar items recommending funding needed to come before the 
Conference no later than Tuesday. 

Committee on Presiding Officers 

Richard W. Cain reported the committee's recommendations 
for presiding officers as follows: Monday afternoon, Bishop 
Melvin G. Talbert (Seattle Area); Monday evening, Bishop 
Benjamin R. Oliphint (Kansas Area); Tuesday morning, Bishop 
H. ElUs Finger (Holston Area). 

Committee on Courtesies and Privileges 

C Vernon Bigler called on Heinrich Bolleter (Switzerland- 
France) for a presentation. Mr. Bolleter observed that the 
delegates from Estonia (the Baltic Provisional Conference) had 
not gained permission to leave the U.S.S.R. to attend the 
Conference, but had sent their greetings and prayers. Mr. Bigler 
asked that greetings be sent to the Baltic Provisional Conference, 
and the General Conference voted that they be sent. 

Mr. Bigler called on Don Ridenour (Iowa) for a matter of 
privilege. Mr. Ridenour asked that the Conference recognize the 
fortieth anniversary of Heifer Project International, Little Rock. 

Mr. Bigler then asked that Marcus Fang (Wisconsin) be 
recognized for a presentation. 

Mr. Fang: The Methodist Church in Malaysia is celebrating its centennial this 
year. That is the conference from where I came. A delegation of 38 Methodist 
church leaders are here to attend this bicentennial celebration. It is my pleasure to 
present the leader of the delegation so he can greet us briefly. Now, some former 
missionaries are in this room and in the galleries. I would like to invite all those who 
have been involved in some fashion with the Methodist Church in Malaysia to stand 
as Bishop C. N. Fang speaks. Please welcome my eldest brother, Bishop Fang of 
Malaysia. Thank you, he's on the stage. 

Bishop C. A'. Fang: Bishop Chairman, beloved fathers and mothers, brothers 
and sisters in Christ. It is my great pleasure to bring you warmest greetings and 
heartiest congratulations from all Methodist people in Malaysia on your 



282 Journal of the 1984. General Conference 

bicentennial celebration. Since The United Methodist Church in the United States 
of America and its predecessors is our mother church, we feel that we can claim a 
share in the past 100 years of your historj\ That is why we have arranged a goodwill 
tour of 38 Malaysian Methodists, including five General Conference officers, to 
attend your celebrations here in Baltimore. 

We want to thank The United Methodist Church for founding and nurturing the 
Methodist Church in Malaysia and for sending missionaries and financial support 
over the years. We cannot forget the labor of love, and your interest and concern. 
Today the church is self-supporting and is growing steadily as we are also in the 
midst of preparations for the first centennial celebration which will begin in 
conjunction with our General Conference, meeting December 9-16 this year, and 
lasting long into 1985. We cordially invite you all to visit us and celebrate with us. 
And if any one of you are ever in our part of the world, we will be most happy to 
receive you as our honored guests. We are only two hours away from Bangkok, 
Thailand, and only three hours from Hong Kong. You are all welcome to our shores. 

Now, to show our appreciation to you for receiving us and giving us this 
opportunity to learn from you, we would like to present to you a small gift and some 
church publications as souvenirs and information. May God's richest blessings 
continue to be with us all. Thank you. 

The Chair expressed gratitude for the gifts on behalf of the 
General Conference. 

Robert Smyth (Southern New Jersey) asked the Conference to 
express appreciation to the Bicentennial Committee and all of 
those who had worked on the special bicentennial program 
presented on Sunday. The Conference responded with applause. 

Mr. Bigler asked that the Conference recognize two pastors in 
the visitors' section who had come to the General Conference on 
horseback from Kansas. The Conference recognized them with 
applause. 

Closing 

The Secretary made announcements. Bishop Prince A. Taylor, 
Jr. (Retired) offered a closing prayer, and the session was 
adjourned. 



SIXTH DAY, MONDAY, MAY 7, 1984 
AFTERNOON SESSION 

Opening 

The Genei-al Conference of The United Methodist Church 
nTTn tl"" ^^^".^?^^^^°" session of Monday, May 7, 1984, at 2:30 

Procedural Motions 

Churles D White Jr. (Western North Carolina) moved that 
for the remainder of the General Conference, a portion of Rule 6 
be suspended such that the Chair would no longer have to repeat 
the name and annual conference of persons recognized before 
they address the Conference. The motion was defeated 

I komas L Cromwell (East Ohio) moved to amend the rules for 
the remamder of this General Conference in two wavs: (?^ on all 
amendmen s, there would be one speech for and one speech 

a^^hen tr?^'.'^^ ^l^^^"^"^ ^^ '^^ ^^--^"- chaiYpTrson 
and then the vote; (2) wherever three minutes appears in the 

rules, It would be changed to two minutes. He spokeTn support of 
his motion, and it was adopted. 

Withdrawal from Judicial Council Ballot 

..nfi, J^^''^'''*/^'"'P' ^^^""^^ ^^^'^^^ requested that his name be 
membe^^^^^^^^ consideration in the balloting for Judicial Council 

General Council on Ministries Reports 

The Chair called on Bishop Dwight E. Loder for presentation 
of reports from the General Council on Ministries. '^''^" 

?hXicalL^^^^^^^^^ ^"^ ^^^^^ - «•»'•'-' -d 

Bishop Loder introduced Carolyn H. Oehler (Northern Illinois) 
for presentation of General Council on Ministries Report No 9 

(s"r6r62'7r" ^" '^'"^^^ ^"^' Theolo^calLnguage''' 
Torrey A Kaatz (West Ohio) moved that during plenan- 
sessions as issues are discussed there be no applause or othS 
demonstrations; he spoke in support of his motion John E 

283 



284 Journal of the 19 8 U General Conference 

Stumbo (Kansas East) added that, if adopted, persons in the 
balconies also be requested to abide by the same rule. The motion 
was adopted. 

Ms. Oehler summarized the contents and recommendations 
found in the report as printed in Advance Edition D of the Daily 
Christian Advocate. 

Legislative Committee on Council on Ministries Report No. 
12, Calendar No. 232 

S. Joe Elmore (North Alabama) presented the legislative 
committee report, consisting of proposed revisions to General 
Council on Ministries Report No. 9. Mr. Elmore moved the 
suspension of the rules to permit consideration of the report, 
which had been printed less than the required twenty-four hours; 
the rule was suspended. 

Mr. Elmore presented the committee's amendments to the 
GCOM report, including certain editorial changes which were not 
printed in the committee report. Jim Beal (North Arkansas) 
asked a procedural question; the Chair responded. 

Edward L. Duncan (Detroit) moved to amend the fourth 
recommendation by adding the following sentence to it: "The 
language of historic hymns may be retained as necessar}\" He 
spoke in support of his amendment. Kenneth Greet (Great 
Britain) supported the amendment. Susan W. Hassinger (East- 
em Pennsylvania) spoke against it. Mr. Elmore dechned the 
opportunity to make a final statement on behalf of the committee. 
The amendment was adopted. 

Peter D. Weaver (Western Pennsylvania) moved to amend the 
GCOM report by inserting a new" paragraph immediately before 
the last paragraph: 

"This study is not meant to discourage the use of language 

such as 'Lord,' 'King,' or 'Father' when appropriate. It is rather 

meant to encourage our understanding of such words in 

non-sexist ways, to encourage our usage of such language in 

sensitive ways, and to encourage the development and use of 

additional words to enrich our expressions concerning God." 

He spoke in support of his amendment. Phil Carver (Iowa) 

opposed it. The Chair called for the final statement by the 

committee chairperson. Jinny Gordon (Central Illinois) raised a 

point of order, that there had been no speech in favor of the 

amendment from the floor. The Chair ruled that the speech by 

Mr. Weaver counted as the speech in favor allowed by the rules as 

amended at the beginning of this session. Ms. Oehler made the 

final statement against the amendment. It was defeated. 

Jim Beal (North Arkansas) moved to amend the report by 



The United Methodist Church 285 

deleting the last four recommendations; he spoke in support of his 
amendment. Betty Anderson (Northwest Texas) spoke against 
It. Ms. Oehler made the final statement on behalf of GCOM and in 
opposition to the amendment. The amendment was defeated 

Dennis M. Campbell (North Carolina) moved to amend Section 
IV of the report, in a sentence affirming the use of the word 

father in the Lord's Prayer, by adding "and in the trinitarian 
baptismal formula" as an additional setting in which the use of 

Father" would be affirmed. 

^ni^'"' ^v T-^f'^L^ ^^''^''•^ ^^^^ ^^'^ '■^P^'^ '" ^^^ ^'^" d«"e- I appreciate the care 
unth which Its been vvTitten and the references to important studies on this 
question. I think that the Trinitarian baptismal formula falls into exactly the same 
ca egory as the use of Father in the Lord's Prayer, and I believe this for the 
follounng reasons^ This has been the baptismal formula from the beginning of the 
church s life, f The United Methodist Church were to issue this report to its 
constituency, I believe it would be taken by both clergy and laity as having some 
force of instruction and I think that instruction would be wTong on this matter Itis 
not acceptable in the baptismal formula to use other language than that which is the 
language of the church from its beginning 

Rebecca Parker Beyer (Pacific Northwest): I wish to speak against this 
amendment. The Trinitarian formula took three or four hundred yearsTo develop 
and Itself IS an expression of the church's desire to acknowledge that God comes to 
us in many forms. I believe the real tradition that the Trinity represents is our 
classical understanding that we know God in many forms. The Trinitarian formula 
IS the one that is most important for us to learn to expand and make more 

J^^rT^^ i'Vu''^^' ^ '^^"^ '^^' ^^^'^ ^^^ '^ '•«"^^'" faithful to the early 
church we should be ^.^lllng to make the expression of the pluralistic way that God 

same rodTh t .v,'""^^ and pluralistic, and so I desire to baptize in the name of the 
same God that the eariy Christians were baptized, the God who cannot be captured 
by any single word or three words. The Trinitarian formula probably is not 
adequate to represent the full nature of God. 

The amendment was adopted. 

J. D. Vamer (Western Pennsylvania) moved to amend Section 
IV of the report, the next to last paragraph (dealing ^^ith 
language refemng to the Holy Spirit) by deleting all except the 
first and last sentences of the paragraph. He spoke in support of 
his amendment. Ms. Oehler spoke against it. The amendment 
was defeated. 

Riley B Case (North Indiana) moved to amend the report bv 

f ;l f ^,^^.^^5^'''^ paragraphs in Section III. He spoke in favoV 

of the deletion. Igmicio Castuera (Pacific and Southwest) spoke 

against it. Ms. Oehler made the final statement on behalf of 

GCOM against the amendment. The amendment was defeated. 

Victor W.Goldschmidt (North Indiana) moved to amend 
bection IV, the paragraph beginning, "The third option . . " bv 
revising the first sentence to read as follows: "Regarding the 
third option, we recognize that not using a pronoun may for some 



286 Journal of the 198jk General Conference 

limit the personhood of God; in fact, the names of God are 
numberless." Ms. Oehler spoke against the amendment; it was 
defeated. 

Roy I. Sano (Cahfomia-Nevada) moved the previous question 
on the perfecting of the report. The previous question motion was 
adopted, and the Chair declared that the report, as amended, was 
open for debate. 

William T. Cherry (Eastern Pennsylvania): Mr. Chairman and members of the 
conference, I think no one of us who has attended General Conference can deny the 
importance of language or that it does not reveal who, in fact, we are. Language, as 
the report says, conveys for us the structure of reality; we in fact think verbally; 
therefore, what we do vdth this is exceedingly important. I would appeal to this 
body that, simply because of the importance of the language we use, that we 
consider those whose minds we are wanting to change, whose reality structure we 
feel needs broadening and grovi^th. 

For two reasons, therefore, I would hope we would accept the report as 
amended. First, as we promulgate the cause of inclusive language we must be 
exceedingly sensitive to those whose minds we would change. Secondly, there is 
reason to proceed with care on such radical changes as are implied in the underlying 
assumptions of the report. We dare not be uncaring of those in our home 
conferences who will be upset by what we are about to do. I plead with this body to 
be sensitive to them, to invite their growth along with us. Please let us consider the 
report as amended positively. 

Jinny Gordon (Central Illinois): I speak against the report at this point, and I am 
very sorry to do this. I came today prepared to accept the report, if we could have 
added some word to take home to the hundreds of petitions and letters and calls 
that have said to us, "We are not ready to be threatened by the loss of the words 
'Father, Son, Lord and King.'" As has been said, the report is delicately and timely 
written. At this point, in this room, we know that, but many of the people who have 
read these reports have not agreed with that, though they have seen the words, 
and the threat of this across the church is absolutely frightening to me. I must say 
one other thing, and that is the beautiful word "inclusive" has been used many 
times this week, but my friends, if this report is voted in the affirmative, we send a 
word very strongly back home that we have excluded many, many of our very 
faithful members. Thank you. 

C. Ehh Munden (Nebraska) spoke in favor of the report. 
Stacy D. Myers (Eastern Pennsylvania) opposed it. 

Ressie Bass (Florida): This is a very serious and very important matter before us 
now, and I think many of us realize that, from what has been said, it is very clear 
that it is. I think, I don't think, but I know, for me the report in its present text is as 
it should be. After I sat and looked and listened and participated in last evening's 
celebration of what Methodism has meant and does, in fact, mean to many of us, and 
as I have sat through sessions today thus far, and reflect on all of that and the 
implications of actions that we are taking today in the name of Christ and 
Christianity, a lot of things come to mind. 

The issue of inclusive language is crucial. Many of us are tired oi being excluded. 
We must be sensitive to the issue. Do we dare leave this place at the end of this 
General Conference entering into the third century viath business as usual? To not 
accept this report is not unity vdthin The United Methodist Church. It is, in fact 



The United Methodist Church 287 

alienation and self-aberration. I, as a woman, and as a black woman feel a verv 
keen sense of the importance of inclusive language ^ 

yame* R Scott (Little Rock): I believe that the purpose of the General 
Conference ,s to seek to lead the church, but when we get so far ahead of the church 
we do not lead, we hinder. We have not done our homework. I^aduateS^^^^^^^ 
semmarythirtpears ago. I have not done my homework in teachinfour pToplf^^^^ 
veo' ma ters that we are concerned with here, and we cover up that faUure bv s^ch 
a resolu ,on^ I believe that we ought to have more time to t^each our people the 
basics of what is represented. All of these petitions is simply recoSe that 
peop e do not understand what the Bible is. how it has been written^ whft tt 
about in terms of language, but we must go back and do our homework if we are to 

tySttcfu^^''^'^'^ 

prlffr?"" ^'''^'''''.^ (P^^ific and Southwest) suggested an 
editorial change m the sixth recommendation, which was 
accepted by the committee. James H. Coile (North Carolina) 
asked a question; the Chair responded ^aroiina; 

Ms Oehler made the final statement in support of the report as 
amended It was put to a vote, and the Chair ruled thaUt was 
adopted (see pages 612-627, 1526) 

Ch^Hntlh^Tf ^^^"^' ^"'^^ re^nesied a count vote. The 
Chair put the call for a count vote to a vote, and it was not 
sustained. Ed^na P. Johnson (Liberia) asked a qu st7on the 

SaTedTnon'';.'''?.^''' ''• ^^^^^^ ^^^^'^^^ ^'^^^ -boufa 
m^t T i^^\ ^^^ ^^^'^ answered. Victor W. Goldschmidt 
(North Indiana) responded further to Ms. Johnson's questir 

SoT^T."!" ^?"";^',«" Ministries Report No. 16, Calendar 
.V ^^r-Jelevision/Telecommunications Ministry 

Ms Oehler moved the suspension of the rules to permit 

Zt^dThr ^^^^^r^P^^' '"^ '' ^^^ ^-^ ^^^^ '' had nofbTen 

Cmotion waTaX^eT"' ^''"^ " ^'™" ^'^'^^ ''''''''' 

She explained that the committee report recommended 

adoption of a report printed in Advance Edition H of tZ^a^ 

Ft- ""^.t^'nl"'^ "Television/Telecommunications Ministi^- 
Equipping the Church for Ministry in the Information Age "She 
outlined bnefly the contents and recommendations found In the 
report (see pages 755-765, 1528) 

John S. McCabe (Northern Illinois) asked whether the report 
had been considered by the Legislative Committee on FinanciS 
Administration; Ms. Oehler replied that it had not Mr Mc(:abe 
moved to refer it to that committee. Barbara R Thompson 
(Bal imore) raised a point of order that, under the rules 7?he 
refe^e^^^^^^^ involving budgetary matters were to be 

referred to the General Council on Finance and Administration, 



288 Journal of the 198 Jf. General Conference 

rather than to the legislative committee. The Chair ruled that the 
point of order was well taken and that the motion to refer was not 
in order. 

Juanita M. Gillaspie (Kansas West) asked whether the $4.8 
miUion per year requested in this report would have to fit wdthin 
the apportioned fund ceiling voted earlier by the Conference; the 
Chair rephed that it would. 

C. Wilbume Hancock (South Georgia) asked a question; the 
Chair responded. Mr. Hancock moved the referral of the report 
until the General Council on Finance and Administration had 
made its report. The Chair replied that, until the Conference 
acted, there was nothing to refer. Mr. Hancock then moved that 
the report be tabled until the Council made its report. The motion 
to table was defeated. 

J. Kenneth Forbes (South Indiana) asked whether it was not 
commonly understood that a question of financial import was to 
be automatically referred to GCFA before final action; the Chair 
rephed that that was understood. 

Elias Galvan (Pacific and Southwest) moved that the $4.8 
million requested for telecommunications be expressly excluded 
from the ceiling on apportioned funds previously voted by the 
Conference. He spoke in support of his motion. Joe Pevahouse 
(Memphis) asked if he was correct in the belief that $2.4 milhon 
for this fund was in the GCFA budget before the ceiling was 
voted; Ms. Oehler confirmed that that was correct. Donald M. 
Pike (Central Texas) made a comment about the relationship 
between the fund request and the ceiling on apportioned funds. 
William C. Jones (Texas) spoke against the amendment. The 
amendment was defeated. 

Charles W. Eurey (Western North Carolina) moved to amend 
the report by substituting $2.4 million as the funding request. He 
spoke in support of his amendment. Porter Womeldorff (Central 
Illinois) asked whether the intent of Mr. Eurey's amendment was 
that the $2.4 milHon be entirely for general church funding, or 
whether it was to be split between the general church and the 
annual conferences. Mr. Eurey replied that it was his intent that 
the $2.4 million be for general church funding. David L. Severe 
(Oklahoma) opposed the amendment. 

C. David Lundquist (West Michigan) moved to amend Mr. 
Eurey's amendment such that 75% of the amount be allocated to 
the general agencies and 25% to the annual conferences. He spoke 
in support of his amendment. Bob E. Waters (Texas) spoke 
against it. Ignacio Castuera (Pacific and Southwest) urged that 
financial matters be set aside until the essence of the report had 
been debated. The Chair ruled that the amendments were 



The United Methodist Church 289 

properly before the Conference. Mr. Lundquist's amendment 
was defeated. 

Jack D. Heacock moved to amend Mr. Eurey's motion to 
provide for a 50-50 split between the general church and the 
annual conference in the allocation of this fund's receipts. 
Douglas L. McGuire (Louisiana) reported that, in arriving at its 
recommendation, it was the thinking of the GCFA that the annual 
conferences themselves were in the best position to determine 
the amount of funds they could use wisely for this purpose, and 
that they were free to raise whatever amounts they chose 
without it being included in a general church fund. Ms. Oehler 
asked that Charles Cappleman (President, United Methodist 
Communications) be granted the privilege of the floor for the final 
statement on behalf of the committee in relation to this 
amendment. The request was approved. 

Mr. Cappleman: Thank you for the opportunity of speaking about the merits of 
the program. I appreciate that. United Methodist Communications has made a 
concerted effort to find out the will of the church, as to whether the will of the 
church is to have some sort of a telecommunications ministry. This was done in 
several forms with a questionnaire to interested people across the church. We 
received 1,205 responses which indicated the church was interested in having a 
television and radio ministry of some form. 

A consultation was held with theologians, about 60 persons from all levels of the 
church, was held in Atlanta, Georgia, in February of 1983. The overwhelming 
response was that the church wishes a television/telecommunications ministry, and 
the preference was for a 50/50 split between the annual conferences and the general 
church. The emphasis was decidedly on assisting the local churches and the annual 
conferences to reach out into the communities around the church and bringing 
people into the church, not the setting up of a separate ministry, but the bringing of 
non-church people into our existing churches for nurture, for instruction and all of 
the other benefits that we enjoy as Christians. We favor that 50/50 partnership at 
whatever level of financing the General Conference wishes us to work. Thank you. 

A. Fritz Mutti (Missouri West) asked whether Mr. Heacock's 
amendment required action, since the report already provided for 
a 50/50 split. The Chair replied that, in light of Mr. Eurey's 
statement about the intent of his amendment, it would be best for 
the Conference to express itself about the division of funds. Mr. 
Eurey expressed willingness to accept Mr. Heacock's amend- 
ment, but the Chair ruled that the Conference should make the 
decision. /. Kenneth Forbes (South Indiana) asked a question; 
the Chair answered; Mr. Heacock's amendment was adopted. 

Spurgeon Dunnam (North Texas) asked whether the Confer- 
ence's decision at this point as to the amount of funding would be 
final, or whether GCFA could still recommend a different 
amount. The Chair replied that the action at this time was for 
referral to GCFA, and that that Council could then recommend 



290 Journal of the IBS^^ General Conference 

the same figure or another. Mr. Eurey's amendment was then 
adopted, as amended. 

Richard B. Wilke (Kansas West) sought to speak in favor of the 
report, but the Chair ruled that the Conference was still in the 
process of perfecting it. John P. Miles (Little Rock) moved the 
previous question on the perfecting of the report; the motion was 
adopted. 

Blair Simon (Eastern Pennsylvania) spoke in favor of the 
report. 

Mr. Wilke: I am very pleased about the proposal. I don't want to speak on any 
financial matters because I tend to be a bit conservative on those, but I am excited 
that the television, radio, mass communications ministry could help the whole 
church. I am pleased that we have the 50 percent in the local areas, and those areas 
that do not have a structure will be challenged to move in the areas they have never 
been before. When the Holy Spirit came at Pentecost, the people spoke in the 
various languages of the world. The one language of the world that everybody 
speaks today is television. It is the most inclusive language of the world, from the 
tiniest huts to the greatest mansions. I'm very excited about this proposal and 
whatever funds go with it. I believe the general church will be forced to be creative 
and the local church and the local conferences will become creative. Thank you. 

David Giles (Troy): I rise to express great doubts about this program and its 
evangelistic value. We are a person-connected denomination, and I believe that we 
could not carry on a program of electronic evangelism under our present 
denominational thrust. I know there are many values in seeing people 
electronically, but we are in the business of trying to be personal and reaching 
people on this level. I think we are struggling with a great financial problem. 
Certainly individuals and individual congregations have this option and this 
opportunity. I think if we are going into television ministry, we'll have to get a TV 
personality, and I am afraid that would take us away from our connectional system. 

Parker Duncan (Western North Carolina) spoke in support of 
the report. Paul F. Blankenship (Memphis) asked whether his 
assumption was correct, that the $2.4 milhon being requested 
was for each of the four years of the quadrennium. The Chair 
verified that that was correct. William G. Trudeau (Alaska 
Missionary) spoke against the report. 

Victor W. Goldschmidt (North Indiana) asked Mr. Cappleman 
what commitments beyond 1988 were involved if the report was 
adopted. The Chair stated that the rule of the Church was that 
the General Conference could decide only for one quadrennium, 
and that commitments beyond that would be for future General 
Conferences to decide. Mr. Cappleman responded further. 

Ms. Oehler requested that Bishop Paul Duffey be granted the 
privilege of the floor to make the final statement in support of the 
report. The request was approved. 

Bishop Duffey: Thank you. Bishop, and members of the conference. We are 
happy that you have affirmed basically the program which is before you in your 
proceedings thus far, and that really is the critical matter before us just now. We 



The United Methodist Church 291 

have been affirmed in the report in every stage through the GCOM and through the 
GCFA and the due process of bringing the matter before the General Conference. 
It has been affirmed broadly in every area where we have discussed it and sought 
guidance and assistance. The United Methodist Church is in telecommunications. 
We are grateful for what is being done in the annual conferences, local church, and 
in the jurisdictions, as well. It is our intent to enhance that ministry by servicing 
the local churches and servicing the regional or jurisdictional bodies of the annual 
conference levels as well to the very best of our ability. The program which has 
been proposed will enable that to the degree that we are able to finance it. You have 
acted now to give guidance to the committee, to the GCFA, as it brings back a 
financial proposal for this body, and whatever the final decision is, both as to the 
amount and in the way in which that amount will be distributed will be yet 
determined by your future actions. We are asking that you affirm the program, the 
basic thrust of the program, and then we will do all that we can do within that 
framework with the dollars that become available. Quite obviously, the field is so 
wide, the potential is so great, that we could vote a tremendously large budget and 
still have opportunity ahead of us. To the degree that you are committed to 
telecommunications, a comprehensive ministry, in enhancing everj- other ministry 
of the church, in taking care of every part of the church in its thrust and promotion 
to the degree that we finance it, we hope that you will affirm the program and 
handle the finance at the proper time. 

The report was adopted and referred to the General Council on 
Finance and Administration under the rules of the Conference 
(see pages 755-765, 1528). 

Legislative Committee on Administrative Order 

Mr. Bjork (Committee on Calendar) called on Richard A. 
Thomhurg (New York), chairperson of the legislative committee, 
for presentation of a report. 

Motion to Reconsider 

Becky Haase (Pacific and Southwest) moved to reconsider an 
earlier action establishing a rule of the Conference according to 
which requests for removal of items from the consent calendar 
had to be received by 3:00 p.m. of the day they were printed. She 
spoke in support of her motion. The motion was defeated. 

Committee on Administrative Order Report No. 8, Calendar 
No. 125 

Mr. Thomhurg presented the report, dealing with support of a 
women's and ethnic history project (see page 1589). He explained 
that it included a request for funding in the amount of $75,000 per 
year, and would therefore be referred to the General Council on 
Finance and Administration, if approved by the Conference. 

Mr. Thomhurg: Let me give you a little background on it. This is a project that 
has been considered and passed by the 1976-1980 General Conference. It has 
received overwhelming support in our individual legislative committees. It started 



292 Journal of the 198 Jt General Conference 

actually in 1978 with a special gi-ant that came out of a special fund from GCOM. It 
was continued in 1980, but the Women's Historj' Project was hampered by lack of 
funds. If we fail to pass it now, a significant majority of our members' history will 
not be recovered. That's what the Women's and Ethnic Historj' Project is all about. 
It is to help us compile for the church-at-large, for conferences, for local churches, a 
rich resource recovery of what our history is. 

Now it seems to me that we have had an awful lot of speeches that have talked 
about our failure to understand the contribution of women, of ethnic persons to the 
richness of our history from the very beginning. The Ethnic Histoiy Project 
actually started just this quadrennium with a special grant. In 1984, yet to come, is 
a consultation on ethnic history. We have yet to prepare the kind of brochures that 
the Women's History Project has. We hope that those kinds of brochures wall be 
prepared. 

As part of our effort to make The United Methodist Church a truly inclusive 
church, we need to learn and celebrate the contribution of women and ethnic 
communities. There's been so much that has been spoken without adequate 
information. There are a lot of other points that we could make. The petition has 
come from the Commission on the Status and Role of Women and a number of 
individual annual conference commissions. I think it is the will of this body and so. 
Brother Bishop, I would move at this time that we support the Administrative 
Order Committee on concurrence in this calendar item, with refeiTal, if it is passed. 

Kiyoko Fujiu (Northern Illinois) spoke in support of the report. 
The report was adopted and referred to the General Council on 
Finance and Administration under the rules of the Conference 
(see pages 578, 1589). 

Resolution Regarding Litany of the Rainbow, United 
Methodist Logo 

P. Boyd Mather (Iowa) introduced the follo\dng resolution: 

WHEREAS the General Conference of The United Method- 
ist Church deeply appreciates the spirit and symbolism found 
in the celebration entitled "Festival 200," it is fitting that 
significant expressions of our faith shaped by that celebration 
might be preserved for our ongoing edification in the third 
centuiy of United Methodism. And whereas one of the most 
significant liturgical moments of the celebration is the litany of 
our being "All Colors of the Rainbow," adopting the scriptural 
sign of covenant and hope between God and the people of God 
to the church of which we are members. 

THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that the General 
Conference refer the Litany of the Rainbow to the Division of 
Worship of the Board of Discipleship for possible inclusion in 
the official alternate services of worship. 

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that the General Confer- 
ence refer to the Committee on Administrative Order the 
recommendation that The United Methodist Church consider a 
logo in which a rainbow of ethnic colors be added to the official 
United Methodist symbol for official alternate use as we move 



The United Methodist Church 293 

into the third century. The purpose of this action would be to 
add to the symbols of the cross, which indicates the church's 
center in the cross of Christ, and of the flame, which points to 
the empowerment of the church's life by the Holy Spirit, the 
rainbow which will signify the covenant of hope through which 
God gathers all peoples into the household of God. The general 
concept of the symbol, which would need to be perfected by 
graphic artists, consists of The United Methodist symbol with a 
rainbow of red, black, white, yellow, and brown intertwined 
among the flame and the cross. 
The resolution was adopted. 

Closing 

The Secretary' made announcements. Bishop Talbert called on 
Bishop W. Maynard Sparks (Retired), who pronounced the 
benediction. 



SIXTH DAY, MONDAY, MAY 7, 1984 
EVENING SESSION 

Opening 

The General Conference of The United Methodist Church 
convened in the evening session of Monday, May 7, 1984, at 7:30 
p.m. in the Civic Center Arena, Baltimore, Maryland, with 
Bishop Benjamin R. Oliphint (Kansas Area) presiding. Following 
the singing of the hymn, "The Church's One Foundation," Bishop 
Oliphint led the Conference in prayer. 

Committee on Calendar 

Virgil V. Bjork (North Indiana), reporting on behalf of the 
Calendar Committee, moved the suspension of the rules to 
permit the consideration of Legislative Committee on Higher 
Education Report No. 21, Calendar No. 293. The rules were 
suspended by vote of the Conference. He then called for reports 
from the Legislative Committee on Church and Society. 

Committee on Church and Society Report No. 13, Calendar 
No. 121 

Richard S. Parker (New York), chairperson of the committee, 
called for consideration of Report No. 13, Calendar No. 121, 
which dealt with Par. 71G in the Social Principles, on the subject 
of abortion (see pages 778-779). He introduced C. Joseph Sprague 
(West Ohio) who presented the report. 

Ray W. Goens (Texas) moved to amend the report by adding to 
the end of Par. 71G the following: "However, we consider abor- 
tion on demand to be morally wrong." He spoke in support of his 
amendment. Richard 0. Truitt (Wisconsin) spoke against it. Mr. 
Spragtie made the final statement on behalf of the committee. 

Mr. Sprague: I, too, would oppose the amendment because, in the first place, it 
is redundant. That which is suggested in the amendment is already obvious in the 
body of the statement. The language is also at least — let me say it this way, it also 
has a tendency to be inflammatory. What is suggested by the amendment is already 
covered in the paragraph. The committee believes as I do that this is a marvelous 
pastoral statement. I know of no statement in Christendom on this particular issue 
that is as strong, as workable, as solid as this one, and because of that I do, on behalf 
of the committee, oppose the amendment. 

The amendment was defeated. 

Wayne B. Middleton (Detroit) moved to amend Par. 71G by 
adding the following to the end of it: "Adoption should be 

294 



The United Methodist Church 295 

considered as a viable alternative to abortion." He spoke in favor 
of his amendment. Odella B. Williamson (New York) spoke 
against it. 

Mr. Sprague: I, too, would oppose the amendment on the behalf of the 
committee, not because I'm in any sense of the word in opposition to adoptive 
procedures. I surely would hope that we would streamline and strengthen our 
adoption procedure in the life and ministry of the church. It just does not seem 
though, that such a statement fits at this particular place in Social Principles. I am 
opposed to the amendment. 

The amendment was defeated. 

Thomas C. Webb (Central Pennsylvania) moved to amend Par. 
71G, by inserting the following after the sentence which ends, 
". , . abortion under proper medical procedures": "But we abhor 
the present trend within secular society to turn to abortion as a 
first, rather than a last, resort to the problem of unwanted 
pregnancy. Therefore ..." 

Mr. Sprague: I also oppose that amendment in the sense that it adds nothing to 
that which is intended here. It is simply additional commentary, albeit important 
commentary, and really has no place in my opinion in the Social Principles. When 
you have a committee as diversified as our committee that could come to the kind of 
agreement to which our committee came on this language, I have a hard time 
imagining any other body being able to perfect it any further. 

The amendment was defeated. 

Emmy Lou John (Northern Illinois) moved the previous 
question on all before the Conference; the previous question 
motion was adopted. Report No. 13 was adopted (see page 778). 

Report No. 5, Calendar Nos. 63-64 

Mr. Parker called for consideration of the committee and 
minority reports related to Report No. 5. J. Fay Cleveland 
(Western New York) raised a point of order, that the mles had 
been suspended to permit consideration of a Higher Education 
committee report, and that the Conference should proceed to deal 
with that report. The Chair ruled that he was correct. 

Committee on Higher Education Report No. 21, Calendar 
No. 293 

Ted H. Walter (South Carolina), chairperson of the legislative 
committee, explained that the report dealt with the composition 
of the University Senate (see page 1192). He spoke in support of 
the report. Charles B. Purdham (Minnesota) asked a question 
about the effective date of the legislation contained in the report; 
Mr. Walter explained that it needed to be effective immediately 



296 Journal of the 1984. General Conference 

so that this General Conference could proceed to elect the 
members for which it was responsible. The report was adopted. 

Committee on Church and Society Report No. 5, Calendar 
Nos. 63-64 

Mr. Sprague introduced the committee report, dealing with a 
proposed new Par. 72H entitled, "Rights of Homosexual 
Persons" (see pages 773-774). W. Hamp Watson (South Georgia) 
presented the minority report, which was an alternate paragraph 
on the same subject (see page 774). He presented some changes 
to the report as printed and explained the rationale for the 
report. 

K. June Goldman (Iowa) moved to amend the second paragraph 
of the committee report by deleting the first sentence, and by 
changing the word "further" to "therefore" in the second 
sentence. She spoke in support of her amendment. Rebecca 
Parker Beyer (Pacific Northwest) spoke against it. Mr. Sprague 
spoke against it on behalf of the committee. The amendment was 
defeated. 

Richard H. Timberlake (Holston) moved to amend the 
committee report by substituting the following for the first 
sentence of the second paragraph: "While The United Methodist 
Church understands the practice of homosexuality to be 
incompatible with Christian teaching (Par. 71F), we have 
consistently demanded that the human and civil rights of persons 
of homosexual orientation be ensured. We call for legal sanctions 
against discrimination." He spoke in support of the amendment. 
William W. Reid (Wyoming) opposed it. Mr. Sprague made a 
final statement against it on behalf of the committee. The 
amendment was defeated. 

Don L. Riggin (Little Rock) moved to suspend the rules and 
call the previous question. The motion to suspend the rules was 
adopted, and the Chair called for the perfecting of the minority 
report. 

Barbara Williams Riddle (Florida) asked that for the 
remainder of the Conference amendments be read before being 
put to a vote. Stacy Myers (Eastern Pennsylvania) asked a 
question about the minority report; Mr. Watson responded. Mr. 
Myers suggested waiting until after consideration of the report 
deahng with homosexual clergy before completing action on this 
report. 

The Chair ascertained that no one wished to offer an 
amendment to the minority report and called for debate on it. 
Robert L. Parker (Oklahoma) supported the minority report. 
William W. Dew (California-Nevada) spoke against it. 



The United Methodist Church 297 

In response to a request by Bonifacio Mequi (Iowa), Mr. 
Watson read the minority report as he had corrected it. Warren 
Budd (North Georgia) urged the defeat of both the minority 
report and the committee report. Mr. Watson made a final 
statement in support of the minority report. Mr. Sprague made a 
final statement against the minority report. The minority report 
was defeated. 

The Chair called for debate on the committee report. Donald J. 
Hand (Southwest Texas) opposed the report. John E. Stumbo 
(Kansas East) asked whether the committee report would 
"entitle an ordained pastor to pursue legal action against the 
Church for his or her loss of employment due to sexual 
orientation, if, in fact, other aspects of the Church Discipline . . . 
prohibited the ordination and assignment of homosexual pastors 
as ordained people?" Mr. Sprague replied that, according to his 
understanding, it would not. Thomas Kim (Northwest Texas) 
attempted to ask a question, but the Chair ruled that he was 
debating. Mr. Kim asked whether the committee report could be 
viewed as a step toward accepting ordination of homosexual 
people; Mr. Sprague replied that it had nothing to do with 
ordination. 

Tex Sample (Missouri West) spoke in favor of the committee 
report. Roy E. Blessing (West Virginia) spoke against it. James 
Lawson (Pacific and Southwest) supported it. James N. 
Thompson (North Georgia) opposed it. Paul Hardin (Northern 
New Jersey) expressed the view that, if another section of the 
Discipline was more specific about the ordination of homosexual 
persons, the courts would not view the language of this report as 
having to do with that issue. Gouveia Maundo (Angola) spoke 
against the report. 

D. Roscoe Buttrey (Tennessee) asked a question; Mr. Hardin 
responded. Mr. Sprague made the final statement in support of 
the committee report. The report was defeated. E. Dale 
Dunlap (Kansas West) requested a count vote. The call for a 
count vote was put to a vote of the Conference, but it was not 
supported. 

Committee on Church and Society Report No. 6, Calendar 
No. 65 

Richard S. Parker (New York) explained that the report 
contained the committee's recommendation of nonconcurrence on 
a number of petitions having to do with homosexuality and/or 
human sexuality, on the grounds that the material obtained in the 
petitions was already covered in other committee reports. The 
report was adopted (see pages 774-775). 



298 Journal of the 19 8U General Conference 

Report No. 7, Calendar No. 66 

Mr. Parker explained that the report dealt with petitions 
requesting placement of a prohibition of the ordination of 
homosexual persons in the Social Principles; it had been the 
committee's judgment that this issue was being dealt with in 
another committee, and that the Social Principles was not the 
place to deal with matters related to ordination. Donald J. Hand 
(Southwest Texas) requested that the report include a statement 
as to the reason for the nonconcurrence recommendation. Mr. 
Parker expressed willingness in principle to accept the sugges- 
tion, and Mr. Hand was asked to put it in the form of a motion. 

Mr. Hand moved to include in the report the statement that 
"we do not concur for the reason that this subject is not properly 
dealt with in the Statement of Social Principles, that there are 
other petitions which deal with the subject in the right place in 
the Discipline, and that these other petitions will be considered 
by this body at the appropriate time." Mr. Parker accepted the 
statement for inclusion in the report, and the report was adopted 
(see page 775). 

Report No. 15, Calendar No. 217 

Mr. Parker called on Jack D. Heacock (Southwest Texas) for 
presentation of the report, on the subject of military service (see 
pages 779-780). Mr. Heacock explained that the report dealt with 
amendments to Par. 74G in the Social Principles. 

James M. Dolhver (Pacific Northwest) moved to amend the 
report by inserting the words "therefore" and "in peacetime" in 
the first sentence of the second paragraph, so that the sentence 
would read: "We therefore reject national policies of enforced 
military service in peacetime as incompatible with the gospel." 
John 0. Barnes, Jr. (Tennessee) spoke in support of the 
amendment. 

Emmett W. Cocke, Jr. (Virginia): I'm opposed to the amendment, because if we 
insert the words "peacetime" back into the resolution it undermines the idea of 
conscientious objection. There would be no point in having the resolution at all. We 
need to endorse conscientious objection as one of the alternatives that we might 
conscientiously make, as well as in the petition of the majority report, indicating 
that military service may be a conscientious choice. So I hope that we do defeat the 
motion so that conscientious objection is a realistic alternative. 

Mr. Heacock expressed opposition to the amendment on behalf of 
the committee. The amendment was defeated. 

Robert K. Sweet, Jr. (Southern New England) moved to amend 
the report by adding the following sentence: "We further urge all 
persons who choose conscientiously not to cooperate with the 
Selective Service system to register their decisions with the 



The United Methodist Church 299 

General Board of Church and Society." He spoke in support of his 
amendment. Charles W. Eurey (Western North Carolina) asked 
a question; Mr. Heacock and James Lawson (Pacific and 
Southwest) answered. Bonifacio Mequi (Iowa) asked how the 
language of the report would apply to persons in nations other 
than the United States; Mr. Heacock repHed briefly. C. Vernon 
Bigler (Western New York) expressed the view that military 
service is a universal problem, and that the report would be 
relevant in all nations. Kay Althouse (East Ohio) added that 
Central Conferences have authority to adapt provisions of the 
Discipline to their own situations. L. E. Crowson (West Virginia) 
spoke against the amendment. Mr. Heacock opposed the 
amendment on behalf of the committee. The amendment was 
defeated. 

Dan C. Cornette (West Michigan) moved to amend the report 
by substituting "young adults" for "youth" in two places; Mr. 
Heacock accepted the amendment for the committee. 

Alex Joyner (Virginia) moved to amend the first sentence of 
the last paragraph by adding "or alternate service" to the end of 
the sentence. He spoke in support of his amendment, noting that 
these words had been included in the paragraph as proposed by 
the General Board of Church and Society, but had been deleted 
by the legislative committee. Mr. Parker spoke against the 
amendment on behalf of the committee. The amendment was 
defeated. 

Dight Grain (Southern New England) moved to suspend the 
rules in order to vote the previous question on all before the 
Conference; the rules were suspended and the previous question 
was ordered. Mr. Heacock made the final statement in support of 
the report, and it was adopted (see page 779). 

Closing 

The Secretary made announcements. Bishop Paul V. Galloway 
(Louisiana Area) pronounced the benediction, and the session 
was adjourned. 



SEVENTH DAY, TUESDAY, MAY 8, 1984 
MORNING SESSION 

Opening 

The General Conference of The United Methodist Church 
convened in the morning session of Tuesday, May 8, 1984, at 8:30 
a.m. in the Civic Center Arena, Baltimore, Maryland, with 
Bishop H. Elhs Finger, Jr. (Holston Area) presiding. 

Worship Service 

The worship service was under the leadership of Bishop Joseph 
H. Yeakel (New York West Area), Ehzabeth Gundlach (Member, 
Judicial Council), who served as liturgist, and Mary Kathleen 
Bennett, organist. Special music was provided by the Jubilate 
Choir, sponsored by the Board of Discipleship of the Pacific 
Northwest Annual Conference, under the direction of Dr. 
Thomas E. Richardson, with Donna Bixon Blomquist as its 
organist. 

Following the Call to Worship and Invocation, the hymn, 
"Make Me a Captive, Lord," was sung. The Conference joined in 
"The Korean Creed." The anthem was "A Prayer for Passing 
On," by Jane Marshall. Bishop Yeakel preached the devotional 
sermon, entitled, "The Vision: To the Glory of God." The service 
was closed with the singing of the hymn, "This Is My Song," and 
the benediction. 

Committee on Agenda 

The report was presented by Elbert Moore (Pacific North- 
west). On behalf of the committee, he asked that the printed 
agenda be amended to provide for a report from the General 
Council on Ministries at 7:35 p.m., with calendar items to follow 
at 8:05 p.m. The agenda was adopted as amended (see page 493). 

Question Regarding Report on Conference Action 

Ralph Scott (Missouri West) inquired about the accuracy of the 
report of an action the previous day, as printed in the Daily 
Christian Advocate. The Secretary suggested that the question 
be referred to the Committee on Journal. 

Judicial Council Elections — Ballot No. 1 

The Secretary give instructions for the taking of the first ballot 
for membership on the Judicial Council. Gloster B. Current (New 

300 



The United Methodist Church 301 

York) asked whether it would be possible to have the nominees 
introduced to the Conference before voting; James M. Walker 
(Southwest Texas) pointed out that not all of those nominated 
were present at the Conference. George A. Tanner (Little Rock) 
asked a question; the Chair answered. 

The Chair, in response to the question raised by Mr. Scott (see 
above), pointed out that the reference cited by Mr. Scott was 
from a news story in the Daily Christian Advocate, and was not a 
part of the record of the Conference. 

John Porter (Louisiana) asked a question about the ballot; the 
Chair answered. 

Dennis M. Campbell (North CaroUna) commented about Mr. 
Scott's inquiry, stating the view that the information printed in 
the Daily Christian Advocate news story needed to be corrected 
by the editors, regardless of whether it was part of the official 
record, to assure that correct information about the Conference's 
actions is disseminated to the Church. William W. Reid 
(Wyoming), chairperson of the Committee on Journal, noted that 
his committee was responsible only for the daily proceedings 
material in the Daily Christian Advocate; he asked that any 
corrections to that material be reported to the Secretary's office. 

Norman K. Quick (West Ohio) asked a question about voting 
procedures; the Chair stated that voting for more than the 
number of persons to be elected in a given category' would 
invalidate a laallot, but that voting for fewer would not invalidate 
it. 

Jinny Gordon (Central Illinois) asked an additional question 
about correcting the Daily Christian Advocate; the Chair 
answered. 

The Chair declared the ballot closed. 

Committee on Calendar 

Virgil V. Bjork (North Indiana), chairperson of the committee, 
directed the Conference's attention to Consent Calendar No. 3 
and to the listing of items to be removed from it, as printed in the 
Daily Christian Advocate. He noted that Calendar Nos. 186, 198, 
and 256 were automatically removed, because they involved 
constitutional amendments. He moved the approval of Consent 
Calendar No. 3, excluding the items removed from it. The motion 
was adopted (see page 495). 

Mr. Bjork then called attention to the printing of Consent 
Calendar No. 4, and asked that Calendar Nos. 638 and 776 be 
added to it. He reported the committee's recommendation that 
legislative committee reports dealing with funding be the agenda 
for this session, and that reports be heard from the Committees 



302 Journal of the 198^ General Conference 

on Council on Ministries, Ordained and Diaconal Ministry, 
Higher Education, Discipleship, and Church and Society. 

Legislative Committee on Council on Ministries Report No. 
55, Calendar No. 817 

Carolyn H. Oehler (Northern Illinois), chairperson of the 
committee, moved to suspend the rules to permit consideration of 
the report, inasmuch as it had not been printed and in delegates' 
hands the required length of time. The motion was adopted. 

Ms. Oehler introduced the report, which provided for the 
establishment of a commission to study the mission of The United 
Methodist Church (see page 1549). Blaine E. Taylor (Southern 
New England) spoke in support of the report. 

Walker L. Railey (North Texas) asked whether there had been 
any dialogue between this legislative committee and the 
Committee on Ordained and Diaconal Ministry, which was also 
recommending creation of a study commission; Ms. Oehler 
replied that there had not. Mr. Railey moved to postpone debate 
on this issue until the other legislative committee presented its 
report. James C. Logan (Virginia) spoke against postponement. 
Charles K. Dilgard (West Ohio) spoke in favor of it. Wanda 
Eichler (Detroit) noted that the report related to the ministry 
study had been placed on the Consent Calendar; the Chair replied 
that, if funding was involved, it could not be placed on the 
Consent Calendar. The motion to postpone was defeated. 

Lycurgus M. Starkey (Missouri East) moved to amend the 
report by including a requirement that the Commission member- 
ship include four clergy and four lay persons from local churches. 
He spoke in support of his amendment. Gerald L. Downie 
(Central Illinois) suggested that the Commission membership 
should also include persons from outside the United States. E. 
Dale Dunlap (Kansas West) observed that the committee report 
did not specify any categories of membership. Carolyn Oehler, 
speaking for the committee, supported the principle of the 
amendment, but expressed concern that it might not be specific 
enough to accomplish the intended purpose. The amendment was 
adopted. 

Arturo M. Fernandez (California-Nevada) moved to amend the 
report by adding "and two autonomous churches from Latin 
America" after "participation from a Central Conference mission 
receiving church" in the membership provisions. He spoke in 
support of his amendment. Edwin A. Schell (Baltimore) moved to 
amend the amendment by deleting the words "from Latin 
America." Wilson T. Boots (New York) spoke against Mr. 
Schell's amendment; John M. Meares (North Carolina) supported 



The United Methodist Church 303 

it. Charles A. Sayre (Southern New Jersey) sought to speak, but 
the Chair ruled that, under the rule limiting speeches on 
amendments to one on each side, as adopted earlier by the 
Conference, it was time to put Mr. ScheU's amendment to a vote. 
The amendment to the amendment was adopted. 

Bonifacio Mequi, Jr. (Iowa) sought to propose an amendment 
to the report, but the Chair ruled that he was not in order until 
action on Mr. Fernandez's amendment was completed. 

Mr. Sayre spoke against Mr. Fernandez's amendment. The 
amendment was defeated. 

Mr. Mequi moved to amend the last two sentences of the fourth 
paragraph to read: "In despair the American culture is turning 
inwards. Christ calls the church in the United States to new 
visions and new initiatives for the sake of the world God loves." 
He spoke in support of his amendment. Bonnie L. Totten (Central 
New York) moved to substitute "United States culture" for 
"American culture"; Mr. Mequi accepted the change as part of his 
amendment. 

Carol Colley (Oregon-Idaho) moved a substitute for the 
amendment, which would delete the first of the two sentences. 
She spoke in support of her substitute. No one asked to speak 
against it, and Ms. Colley's substitute was adopted. The 
amendment as substituted was then adopted. 

Porter J. Womeldorff (Central Illinois) asked a question; Ms. 
Oehler answered. David E. Chaney (Northern Illinois) moved 
the previous question on the perfecting of the report, in order to 
move to debating it. The previous question motion was adopted. 

Roy Sana (California-Nevada): I am, on the whole, in favor of the thrust of this 
proposal, having been at the bicentennial consultation of the theological task of the 
Wesleyan tradition where the proposal galvanized those of us who were there and 
gave us a sense of direction when the suggestion was made. I think it is very 
important, however, that it is seen as a very specialized proposal. For example, the 
composition, I don't think as we are seeing amendments proposed, I think it 
reflects a rather narrow focus ethnically. Theologically, I think it is that we would 
see the mission in terms related to ministries. I think this study is going to be seen 
in isolation and will not be related to the reordering of ministries that we also have 
before us. We need a mechanism to relate this study to other studies and to inform 
it by ecumenical discussions on mission. I therefore, unfortunately, feel I must 
oppose this motion, though the central thrust at certain points has a real appeal to 
me. 

James Logan (Virginia): I rise to speak in favor of this motion, and to make a 
confession before this Conference that the wording in the original proposal is at 
least partially mine. The confession being made, I agree with what Roy Sano has 
just said. The focus upon church and mission of church in this motion was intended 
to focus upon The United Methodist Church. And the question that is before us, the 
question that is before us, I believe, is profoundly, that by the middle of this 
century The United Methodist Church began a process that has continued to this 
ver>' moment of the loss of a common sense of mission, which is, indeed, the mission 



304 Journal of the 198^ General Conference 

of God, and the church participates in that mission. When that common sense of 
mission is lost, the people perish for want of a vision. And I would like to think this 
morning that there are those in our tradition — because we were conceived in 
mission, we were bom in mission, we were in mission before we were ever a 
church — and I would hke to think this morning that those people such as Wesley 
and Otterbein, Isabella Thobum, Mary McLeod Bethune, and others, John R. 
Mott, are looking down upon this crowd and sajang to us this morning, "These are 
still our children. They have not forgotten who they are and whose they are." Let's 
get on with the mission that God has called us to in His world. 

Polly Gramling (South Carolina) asked if there was an estimate 
of the cost of the proposed Commission; Ms. Oehler replied that 
the rule of thumb in use in estimating study committee costs was 
$600 per person per meeting. 

Melvin M. Finkbeiner (Pacific Northwest) spoke against the 
report. Johnnie Marie Grimes (North Texas) spoke in favor of it. 
Nancy M. Carruth (Louisiana) opposed it. Calvin H. Cole 
(Central Pennsylvania) called attention to a report from the 
Legislative Committee on Global Ministries, which called for a 
study of "World Mission Today" in each annual conference. He 
moved to table the present report until that report was 
presented. The motion to table was defeated. Ivan L. La Tumo 
(Missouri East) asked a question; the Chair responded. 

Ms. Oehler made a final statement in support of the report on 
behalf of the committee, and it was adopted. She then moved 
referralto the General Council on Finance and Administration; 
the motion to refer was adopted (see pages 578, 1549-1551). 

Nominations — University Senate 

Bishop James M. Ault (Secretary, Council of Bishops) 
presented the Council's nominations for membership on the 
University Senate, as follows: 

Chief executive officers of United Methodist-related educa- 
tional institutions (6): Frederick E. Blumer, Harry W. Gilmer, 
Thomas Kim, G. Benjamin Lantz, Donald E. Messer, and Gael 
Swing. 

Holding other positions relevant to academic or financial affairs 
or church relationships (6): Sally Geis, Patti Coots, Ethel 
Johnson, Webb G. Pomeroy, J. Robert Nelson, and Grant S. 
Shockley. 

The Chair called for nominations from the floor. Robert C. 
Morgan (North Alabama) nominated Neal Berte (chief executive 
officer). 

Bishop Ault gave the names of the four persons appointed by 
the Council of Bishops to the University Senate, in order for the 
Conference to know that they did not need to be nominated in this 



The United Methodist Church 305 

process: Marjorie Engleman, Hugh Latimer, Jim L. Waits, and 
Jerald C. Walker. 

Donald J. Hand (Southwest Texas) nominated John Silber 
(chief executive officer). John Ogden (North Texas) nominated 
Leroy T. Howe (other relevant position). Arthur J. Landwehr 
(Northern Illinois) nominated Neal F. Fisher (chief executive 
officer). Nancy Carruth (Louisiana) nominated Donald A. Webb 
(chief executive officer). Frank Furman (Florida) nominated 
Oswald P. Bronson (chief executive officer). Prenza L. Woods 
(Southwest Texas) nominated John T. King (chief executive 
officer). Howard L. Dau^henbaugh (Central Illinois) nominated 
Robert G. Stephens (chief executive officer). Wallace H. Kirby 
(North Carolina) nominated Dennis M. Campbell (other relevant 
position). 

Charles 0. Dundas (Minnesota) moved that the nominations be 
closed, and the motion was adopted. It was announced that 
Oswald P. Bronson had served on the University Senate for the 
previous eight years and was not eligible for renomination. 
Bonnie Totten (Central New York) asked a question about the 
nominations from the Council of Bishops; Bishop Ault responded. 
June D. McCullough (Southern New Jersey) made a request 
related to the printing of the names of nominees in the Daily 
Christian Advocate. 

Recess 

Following announcements by the Secretary, the Chair declared 
the Conference to be in recess for twenty minutes. 

Daily Christian Advocate Correction 

Ralph Scott (Missouri West) reported that he had been in 
conversation with Roger Burgess (Editor, Daily Christian 
Advocate) regarding the news story which had been questioned 
earlier in the session (see above, page 300), and had been assured 
that a correct statement would be printed in the next edition. He 
expressed appreciation to Mr. Burgess. 

Committee on Ordained and Diaconal Ministry Report No. 6, 
Calendar No. 323 

William K. Quick (Detroit), chairperson of the legislative 
committee, presented the report, which called for the establish- 
ment of a Commission for the Study of the Ministrj^ (see page 
1209). Kay C. Barckley (Pacific Northwest) moved to amend the 
provisions for the commission's membership by substituting the 
following for the phrase, "10 laypersons not employed in church 
or church-related positions": "five of whom shall be from the 



306 Journal of the 198 Jt General Conference 

category of deaconesses, home missionaries, and church and 
community workers, and five laypersons not employed in church 
or church-related positions." She spoke in support of her 
amendment. 

June D. McCullough (Southern New Jersey) moved to amend 
Ms. Barckley's amendment by changing the numbers to "three" 
and "seven," respectively. She spoke in favor of her amendment. 
Mr. Quick spoke in opposition to the amendment, on behalf of the 
committee. Nancy W. Slaughter (West Virginia) asked a question 
about the amendment; Ms. McCullough answered. 

J. Kenneth Forbes (South Indiana) asked a question about the 
funding of the proposed commission; the Chair repHed that, if 
adopted, the report would be referred to the General Council on 
Finance and Administration for consideration of the funding 
issues. Mr. Forbes asked if the committee had a cost estimate; 
Mr. Quick replied that it did not. 

Mr. Forbes moved that the report be referred to the General 
Board of Higher Education and Ministry for study during the 
next quadrennium. Gordon C. Goodgame (Holston) spoke against 
the motion to refer. Mr. Quick opposed it on behalf of the 
committee. The motion to refer was defeated. 

Mr. Goodgame moved that the Conference postpone action on 
the report and instruct the chairpersons of the Legislative 
Committees on Councils on Ministries, Ordained and Diaconal 
Ministry, and Global Ministries "to meet and seek coordination of 
the various commissions and task forces being called to study the 
mission and ministry of the church and present a uniform 
proposal to this body." He spoke in support of his motion. 
Lycurgus M. Starkey (Missouri East) spoke against it, Mr. 
Forbes asked a question, but the Chair ruled that his question 
was in the nature of debate. Mr. Quick made a statement for the 
committee in opposition to postponement. The motion to 
postpone was defeated. 

Mr. Quick then made the final statement for the committee in 
opposition to both Ms. McCullough's and Ms. Barckley's 
amendments. Both amendments were defeated in separate votes. 

Sharon Brown Christopher (Wisconsin) moved to amend the 
second paragraph, following "five faculty members from United 
Methodist seminaries," by inserting, "at least one representative 
appointed by the General Commission on Christian Unity and 
Interreligious Concerns." She spoke in support of her amend- 
ment. Arthur J. Landwehr (Northern Illinois) asked if Ms. 
Christopher would accept the word "through" in place of "by." 
Mr. Quick, on behalf of the committee, accepted the amendment 
in the form suggested by Mr. Landwehr. 



The United Methodist Church 307 

H. Myron Talcott (Wisconsin) moved to amend the second 
sentence of the first full paragraph by adding the words, "by 
clerg>^ and laity in the church and world." Elizabeth Sweet 
(Southern New England) spoke against the amendment. 

John P. Miles (Little Rock) moved to suspend the rules in 
order to call for the previous question on all before the 
Conference. The motion was adopted. Helmut Nausner (Austria 
Provisional) made the final statement against Mr. Talcott's 
amendment on behalf of the committee. The amendment was 
defeated. 

E. Dale Dunlap (Kansas West) made the committee's final 
statement in support of the report. The report was adopted and 
referred to the General Council on Finance and Administration 
(see pages 578, 1209-1210). 

Legislative Committee on Higher Education — Resolutions on 
Black Colleges and the Black College Fund 

Theodore H. Walter (South Carolina), chairperson of the 
legislative committee, called attention to two resolutions printed 
on pages H-69 — H-70 of the Advance Edition of the Daily 
Christian Advocate. He reported that the committee was 
recommending that the dollar amounts be changed to those 
recommended by the General Council on Finance and Adminis- 
tration, and that the resolutions then be adopted and referred to 
GCFA. The recommendation was adopted (see pages 509-511, 
559-561). 

Legislative Committee on Discipleship Report No. 39, Calen- 
dar No. 485 

Robert C. Morgan (North Alabama), chairperson of the 
legislative committee, presented the report, which would 
authorize the establishment of a Hymnal Revision Committee 
(see page 1139). Edward L. Duncan (Detroit) presented a report 
on the hjTnnal study which had been authorized by the 1980 
General Conference, the results of which were printed on pages 
E-84 — E-86 of the Advance Edition of the Daily Christian 
Advocate. At the suggestion of the Chair, the Conference voted 
to suspend the rules to permit consideration of the report, 
inasmuch as it had not been in the hands of delegates for the 
length of time specified in the rules. 

Mr. Morgan explained that since the time the report was 
submitted for printing, there had been additional conversations 
with representatives of the General Board of Discipleship, the 
General Council on Finance and Administration, and the United 
Methodist Publishing House about ways to reduce the size of the 



308 Journal of the 198 Jf General Conference 

committee and thereby reduce the cost of the committee's work. 
Based on those conversations, he presented changes in the 
membership and cost estimates as they would now differ from the 
report as printed in the Daily Christian Advocate. 

Charles E. Lippse (Holston) moved that the legislative 
committee report and the report on the preparatory study be 
referred to the General Board of Discipleship, and that the Board 
of Discipleship and the General Council on Finance and 
Administration come to the 1988 General Conference with a 
proposal for a hymnal revision committee. He spoke in support of 
his motion. Henry C. Clay, Jr. (Mississippi) opposed it. Mr. 
Morgan spoke on behalf of the committee against the referral. 
The motion to refer was defeated. 

Charles H. Lee (California-Nevada) expressed concern that the 
reduced size of the committee might not allow for adequate 
representation of ethnic minority persons. Mr. Morgan replied 
that the committee as he had outlined it would include 20% ethnic 
minorities. 

William G. Trudeau (Alaska Missionary) moved to delete the 
sentence recommended by the committee ("The Hymnal Com- 
mittee shall be instructed to respect the language of traditional 
hymns as contained in the 1964-66 United Methodist hymnal"), 
and to substitute the following: "The language of historic hymns 
may be retained as necessary." He spoke in support of his 
amendment. LaVerne B. Burton (Little Rock) spoke against it 
and in favor of the committee's language. Yvonne Ferris 
(Nebraska) asked a question about an action of the Conference on 
a different report deahng with a similar issue. The Chair replied 
that this was a different report, and the Conference could act as it 
wished on it. C. David Lundquist (West Michigan) asked a 
question about the meaning of the committee's language; Mr. 
Morgan answered. Mr. Lundquist sought to offer a substitute for 
Mr. Trudeau' s amendment, but the Chair observed that the time 
set for an order of the day had been reached, and that it would be 
necessary to interrupt consideration of this report. 

Presentation of Ecumenical Delegates 

Gene P. Crawford (Commission on the General Conference) 
welcomed the ecumenical delegates and introduced them to the 
Conference: 
Genna Rae McNeil, American Baptist Church 
Bishop E. Harold Jansen, American Lutheran Church 
Ruth G. Crutchley, Baltimore Yearly Meeting of the Religious 

Society of Friends 
Narka K. Ryan, Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) 



The United Methodist Church 309 

Wayne L. Harting, Church of God (Anderson, Indiana) 

B. Edgar Johnson, Church of the Nazarene 

Gerald F. Moede, Consultation on Church Union 

The Right Reverend A. Theodore Eastman, Bishop Coadjutor 

of the Diocese of Maryland 
The Very Reverend Constantine Mounias, Greek Orthodox 

Diocese of North and South America 
Thomas A. Prinz, Lutheran Church in America 
Archbishop WilHam D. Borders, Diocese of Baltimore of the 

Roman Catholic Church 
Leonard V. Kalkwarf, Reformed Church in America 
Charles Locklear, United Church of Christ 
J. D. Abbott, Wesleyan Church 
Sylvia Ross Talbot, World Council of Churches 
Clyde R. Shallenberger, Church of the Brethren 
Maxine G. Garrett, Moravian Church 
James Hamilton, National Council of Churches 
Marion C. Bascom, Sr., National Council of Community 

Churches 
Carroll D. Jenkins, Presbyterian Church (USA) 
The Reverend Father Myron Manzuk, Orthodox Church in 

America 
Mr. Crawford called on B. Edgar Johnson to greet the 
Conference on behalf of all of the ecumenical delegates. 

Mr. Johnson: It is an honor to bring greetings on behalf of the ecumenical 
representatives, for we are aware of several significant things that seem to 
characterize the United Methodists and are important elements of your experience 
and of this General Conference. I think one that I have become very aware of is the 
importance of and respect for your pluralism. It's expressed in so many ways about 
so many issues. 

I will say that I am reminded in this of the story that is told of a Texas ranch that 
had something for everybody, that is, a horse for everybody — for fat people, fat 
horses; for lean people, lean horses; for slow people, slow horses; for fast people, 
fast horses; and for inexperienced people, horses that had never been ridden. But 
we are all aware of and grateful for your warm ecumenical spirit and gracious 
openness to those of us from other Christian backgrounds and traditions. The 
significance of the bicentennial in America does not escape our notice. Methodism 
has been in America 10 percent of the entire Christian era. Methodism has been in 
America all but eight years of our national independence. 

Theodore Roosevelt, I beheve it was, recognizing the parallel life of the nation 
and Methodism, identified Methodists as the indigenous American church, and 
whether the term is accurate or not. The United Methodist Church in all its 
precedent bodies did grow up with the nation. It was a frontier church, and the 
styhzed circuit rider as the bicentennial logo is truly a fitting identification. As the 
nation moved westward expanding geograpically and adding population, in 
countless places Methodism shaped the community. It gave leadership to 
education, to business, to industry, and to government. 

And in this year of bicentennial celebration we understand Methodism in the 



310 Journal of the 198 Jf General Conference 

context of its spiritual genius as well. Your great heritage is through you a part of 
the heritage of all Christian life in America. 

Looking back across the Christian era landscape, there is a range of mountain 
peaks, persons standing high above the plains and hills: Francis of Assisi, 
Augustine, Martin Luther, John Calvin, Knox. And John Wesley and Francis 
Asbury are in that high range. If we are to know Methodism, we must know your 
founder, Wesley. John Wesley was an evangelist. His passion was for the souls of 
men, but Wesley would not subscribe to the notion that we change society simply 
by multiplying conversions. Indeed, Wesley was a social reformer, and Greene in 
his book on "Wesley, The Social Reformer," an old book, long out of print, I beheve, 
does describe, however, Wesley's concern in the social scene in his day, for he cried 
out against injustices in the prisons of his day. He later made an avocation of 
medicine as he realized adequate health care was a luxury unavailable to the poor. 
It's interesting that the book most pubhshed by Wesley in that day was a primitive 
book on medicine, and although some of the remedies are hardly passing the 
American Medical Association, yet it was interesting that he had this deep concern. 

He started schools for the poor. He established a poor house — a home for 
indigent widows in London — and he stayed in his place when he was in London. He 
solicited money from the wealthy to help the poor to become self-sufficient and 
translated Christian classics to help the poor and teach them in literacy. His 
sermons were not vmtten in an ivory tower. They were a part of his struggle to 
reach people forgotten by the churches of his day. 

These sermons and his theology of love were framed on horseback and preached 
in the open fields, at factory gates and inside prisons to the poor and the sick and the 
illiterate. But to understand your founder and Methodism, we must not only know 
him as an evangelist and as a social reformer, but Wesley's movement was a lay 
movement. His army of lay preachers recaptured the Biblical idea of universal 
ministry for believers. His faith in everyday religion, the Holy Club, the 
methodical devotional life and religious habits — all were a part of Methodism. 

If we understand Methodism, we must also understand that there are children of 
Wesley and children of Methodism, as Wilham Booth and the Salvation Army, as 
Otterbein and Albright, as Roberts and Reece and Warner and Brazee, and maybe 
scores of others. These are a part of the great tradition and heritage of Wesley and 
of this church. We know you have not come to Baltimore, your place of American 
roots, for a United Methodist family reunion to bathe in nostalgia, which Webster 
says is "a longing for something far away or long ago." Ideally, your reflection on 
your denominational heritage in this time of special jubilee vdll be not merely a 
sentimental stirring of cold ashes where the glory of holy fires once dazzled eyes 
and hearts, but a rebirth of denominational purpose. We pray that it may be a kind 
of deliberate denominational trip to an altar where your forebearers and church 
founders were blessed of the Spirit, in a way that united them in holy purpose and 
commitment to march everywhere in our world with the message of God's 
redeeming love in Christ Jesus, our Lord. United Methodists, we salute you. 
March on to victory in your tricentennial. 

Bishop Finger responded on behalf of the Conference. 

Committee on Presiding Officers 

Richard Cain (Pacific and Southwest) reported that the 
committee had chosen the following bishops to preside at the 
Conference plenary sessions: Tuesday afternoon, Bishop Edward 
L. Tullis (Nashville Area); Tuesday evening, Bishop Leroy C. 
Hodapp (Illinois Area); Wednesday morning, Bishop Jack M. 
Tuell (Los Angeles Area). 



The United Methodist Church 311 

Committee on Courtesies and Privileges 

C. Vernon Bigler (Western New York) reporting on behalf of 
the committee, announced that the senior bishop in The United 
Methodist Church, Bishop W. Earl Ledden, was present for the 
session. Bishop Ledden was greeted with applause. 

Joseph B. Bethea (North Carolina) announced that greetings 
had been received from Bishop and Mrs. Fred P. Corson, and 
from the Angola Annual Conference; he asked that they be 
entered in the record as follows: 

"I regret a fall temporarily incapacitates both Mrs. Corson 
and me and prevents our attendance at General Conference. 
We send our love to all and pray that this historical session of 
General Conference will restore our church, ourselves, and 
our people to the heights of spiritual life and service 
preached by John Wesley, Francis Asbury, and our early 
Methodists and brothers. Please pray for the Corsons. We 
are progressing and as real Methodists, hope to be restored 
to this Traveling Connection. 

Grace and Peace I 

Fred P. and Frances Corson" 

"The Angola Annual Conference sends warmest greetings, 
militantly in solidarity with your objectives and ideals! 
Hoping for your success in lifting up the good name of Jesus 
Christ and in the expansion of the gospel of peace in the 
world, we continue to pray to God for you. 

Fraternal Greetings, 
Angola Annual Conference" 

Mr. Bigler called on May C. Chun (Pacific and Southwest) for a 
presentation. Ms. Chun presented Carol Mattheson Cox as the 
first woman chosen to preach an entire series for any denomina- 
tion on the Protestant Hour, and Leontine T. C. Kelly as the first 
woman to preach on the National Radio Pulpit in its sixty-one 
year history. The Conference greeted them with applause. 

Closing 

The Secretary made announcements. Bishop W. Kenneth 
Goodson (Retired) gave the benediction, and the session was 
adjourned. 



SEVENTH DAY, TUESDAY, MAY 8, 1984 
AFTERNOON SESSION 

Opening 

The General Conference of The United Methodist Church 
convened in the afternoon session of Tuesday, May 8, 1984, at 
2:30 p.m. in the Civic Center Arena, Baltimore, Maryland, with 
Bishop Edward L. Tullis (Nashville Area) presiding. Following 
the singing of a hymn, Bishop John B. Warman (Harrisburg 
Area) led in an opening prayer. 

Matter of Privilege 

Kathy Munson-Young (California-Nevada) was recognized for 
a matter of privilege. 

Ms. Munson-Young: I would like to bring a report to the delegation about the 
trip to the demonstration at Greensboro. 

Bishop Tullis: This would appear to be in order as a matter of privilege. We'll be 
glad to hear you. 

Ms. Munson-Young: Thank you. In light of the time that was spent discussing 
the issue on the floor of the Conference, those of us who participated in the 
demonstration feel compelled to share this report with you. 

On Nov. 5, 1979, five people were shot and killed at an anti-Klan demonstration 
in Greensboro, N.C. On April 15, 1984, nine Klansmen and Nazis were acquitted of 
federal civil rights charges and freed for the second time by the courts for their 
involvement in the shootings. On May 5, 1984, 300 to 400 people, including 28 
United Methodists who were in attendance at this General Conference, walked in a 
peaceful procession through the quiet, sunny streets of Greensboro to protest the 
killings, to protest the miscarriage of justice in the acquittals, to protest growing 
racial violence in North Carolina and other parts of our country, and to 
demonstrate unity with and concern for the people of Greensboro who are our 
brothers and sisters. They are our brothers and sisters because God made us that 
way. 

The group of United Methodists who boarded a bus in the early morning hours on 
Saturday included representatives from MARCHA, Black Methodists for Church 
Renewal, National Federation of Asian- American United Methodists, Methodist 
Federation for Social Action, Affirmation, United Methodists for Gay and Lesbian 
Concerns, United Methodist National Women's Caucus. The delegation also 
included a conference council staff person, a conference council director, and 
students from five seminaries. The Native American Indian Caucus was unable to 
send a representative but provided financial support. Our group was diverse, and 
the crowd responded appreciatively to our rainbow presence. United Methodists 
sponsoring the demonstration included MARCHA . . . 

Bishop Tullis: Kathy, you've exhausted your time. Do you want to make just a 
closing sentence? 

Ms. Munson-Young: Yes. I would. Thank you. I would just like to say that 
petitions calling for congressional hearings on racist violence are in the hands of 
members of all of the caucuses that I just named, and I invite you to find a petition 
and sign it and join us. Thank you. 

312 



The United Methodist Church 313 

Report on Judicial Council Ballot 

The Chair read the results of the first ballot for membership on 
the Judicial Council, as follows: ballots cast, 957; invalid ballots, 
17; valid ballots, 940; needed for election, 471. There were no 
elections, lay or clerical. The results of the lay ballot were as 
follows: Elizabeth Gundlach, 406; James M. Dolliver, 356; Terry 
Sanford, 351; Florence E. Freeman, 239; Willard H. Douglas, 
234; Foy C. Campbell, 209; Thomas M. Reavley, 179; Crisolito 
Pascual, 174; Don L. Riggin, 164; Thomas P. Moore, 162; Clifford 
B. Aguilar, 150; Joe E. Covington, 107; Byron Hayes, Jr., 57. The 
results of the clergy ballot were as follows: Albert W. Sweazy, 
240; Gene E. Sease, 200; C. Ebb Munden, 178; E. Dale Dunlap, 
172; Susan M. Morrison, 163; Alvin J. Lindgren, 162; Robert H. 
Spain, 147; Donna T. Mortonstout, 124; John V. Moore, 87; 
Garnett M. Wilder, 87; Thomas M. Whitehead, 65; P. Boyd 
Mather, 53; Robert P. Ward, 45; William Hemphill, 44; Charles 
P. Hamilton, 39; H. Myron Talcott, 39; John B. Hays, 33. 

Second Ballot for Judicial Council Membership 

Robert K. Sweet, Jr. (Southern New England) asked a question 
about the number of black candidates for membership on the 
Judicial Council; the Chair replied that he could not answer the 
question, and that the rules called for the election to proceed 
without discussion or comment. The Secretary gave instructions 
for the taking of the second ballot. 

Shirley M. Marsh (Nebraska) asked a question about the 
invahd ballots reported from the first ballot; the Chair and the 
Secretary answered. Bob R. Martin (North Georgia) made a sug- 
gestion as to the method to be used in marking the ballots, and the 
method he suggested was approved by vote of the Conference. 

William Hemphill, Jr. (Peninsula) asked a question about the 
ballot; the Chair answered. John P. Miles (Little Rock) made a 
comment about the ballot distribution process; the Secretar}^ 
responded. 

After ascertaining that all of the ballots had been collected, the 
Chair declared the ballot closed. 

Commission on Central Conference Affairs 

The Chair asked if the Conference would grant the privilege of 
the floor to Bishop Ole E. Borgen (Northern Europe Central 
Conference), chairperson of the Commission on Central Confer- 
ence Affairs. It was granted by vote of the Conference. Bishop 
Borgen asked all of the delegates from annual conferences in 
Central Conferences to stand and be recognized, and they were 
greeted with applause. 



314 Journal of the 198 Jf General Conference 

Report No. 27 

Bishop Borgen called on Adam Kuczma (Poland) for presenta- 
tion of the report. Mr. Kuczma explained that the Commission 
was recommending nonconcurrence because the authority re- 
quested in the petition was already granted in Par. 638.9 of the 
1980 Discipline; the report was adopted (see page 520). 

Report No. 28 

Max A. Bailor (Sierra Leone) presented the report, on the 
subject of powers of Central Conferences. The committee 
recommendation was for nonconcurrence, and the report was 
adopted (see page 520). 

Request for Additional Information 

James H. Laue (Missouri East) asked if additional information 
could be given about the contents of the petitions with which the 
Conference was being asked to nonconcur in these reports. 
Bishop Borgen explained that the petition addressed in Report 
No. 27 requested authority for Central Conferences to organize 
Committees on Episcopacy. The petition addressed in Report 
No. 28 requested authority to use other systems for the salary 
plans in annual conferences in Central Conferences. In both 
cases, it was the Commission's judgment that the authority 
requested already existed in Par. 638.9 of the 1980 Book of 
Discipline, and the Commission had thus recommended non- 
concurrence with the petitions. 

Report No. 29 

Bishop Borgen explained that the report dealt with a proposed 
constitutional amendment which would extend to other Christian 
communions the opportunity to enter into concordat agreements 
with The United Methodist Church, similar to those which were 
already possible with autonomous Methodist churches. He noted 
that the Legislative Committee on Conferences had also 
discussed this proposal, and that both that committee and this 
Commission were recommending nonconcurrence. 

Leigh Roberts (Wisconsin): This is an important issue and I believe should not 
pass by the General Conference without noting it and seriously considering it. This 
particular matter comes from the General Commission on Christian Unity and 
Interrehgious Concerns. What it calls for is making it possible, if the amendment 
were passed and the Constitution so altered, it would make it possible for The 
United Methodist Church and its General Conference to seat representatives of 
other Christian communions at this Conference with voice and vote. And, 
correspondingly, the seating of United Methodists at the corresponding highest 
body of those specific conferences. 

There has been legislation proposed at a number of points in the Discipline by 
the General Commission, namely legislation for the annual conference, legislation 



The United Methodist Church 315 

that might permit membership in general agencies. It appears to me that we 
should, as a General Conference, in the light of our ecumenical movement, of our 
participation in COCU, to move forward by adopting the particular legislation 
Any concordat that was reached would still require approval bv a subsequent 
General Conference, and the specifics could be acted on at that time. I would move 
Its adoption. 

Boh E. Waters (Texas) spoke in support of the Commission's 
recommendation. C. Vernon Bigler (Western New York) spoke 
against it. Kay Althouse (East Ohio) supported it. L. Carroll 
Yingling (Baltimore) opposed it. RobeH F. Lundy (Holston) 
spoke in favor of it. 

Bishop Borgen: We strongly affirm our ecumenical relationships. That is not the 
question at stake here. It is a question of how we practice this. It was the feeling of 
the Commission on Central Conference Affairs that this was not the proper wav of 
strengthemng our relationships. In our ecumenical relationships we will find that 
as a denomination we should have a strong identitv in order to have something to 
contribute to the ecumenical fellowship, and as a deliberate body, passing 
^gislation that has no effect whatsoever on such possible members of the General 
Conference, we find that this is in a sense not quite as meaningful as we would like 
for our relationships wth the other denominations and churches to be. And we feel 
that with the good leadership we have in our ecumenical affairs, other and better 
ways could be devised which would lead us into closer fellowship with the other 
churches. And therefore, we strongly recommend that you support our vote of 
nonconcurrence. 

The Commission's nonconcurrence recommendation was ap- 
proved (see page 520). 

Report No. 13 

Bishop Borgen presented the report, consisting of a recommen- 
dation of nonconcurrence on an "enabHng act for autonomous 
affiliated structure and request to become an affiliated autono- 
mous church." 

Bishop Borgen: There has been passed around some information which is at the 
best not complete and also faulty. The first is namelv this— we are not discussing 
autonomy or not autonomy for the Philippines. The question is whether the proper 
petition from the proper authorities in the Philippines has been filed with the 
General Conference. The Philippines Conference asked for an enabling act in 1972 
and did not use it. They requested a renewed enabling act in 1976 and didn't use it. 
bo in 1980 nothing happened at all at this General Conference. There was no report 
no request for renewal on the enabling act. As of today the Commission on Central 
Conference Affairs and the General Conference have received no communication 
whatsoever from the Central Conference as such in the Philippines. And since thi. 
autonomy concerns not one annual conference within the Central Conference but 
concerns the whole Central Conference, that will be the proper bodv to submit such 
a request. I repeat, nobody in the Central Conference has submitted such 
information or request to us. 

Furthermore, there have been serious questions raised about the validitv of the 
%otes, and 1 have received correspondence from persons in the Philippines who 



316 Journal of the 19 8 U General Conference 

point out in detail that there has been inaccurate voting, more members voting 
than there were members in the conference. In one conference all deacons and 
deaconesses and whatever have you have voted, and as a result, this person 
seriously questioned the validity of the ballot. Now some of these were taken one 
more time, and as far as I have been able to ascertain, these were done and 
performed in the proper way. 

But then there is a problem also with that. At least one of the conferences voted 
after the enabling act for the quadrennium 1976-80 expired, namely, in 1981. So 
there is a question also of the validity of these second votes. Furthermore the 
Discipline, if you have it before you, you can look up 11649. In it it states the 
procedure. They have attempted to fulfill what is in the first paragraph before 
number 1. For they have received no correspondence or records of any kind of 
information indicating that points 1, 2 and 4 having been completed. Therefore, for 
these reasons and perhaps more, we found that we could not be very 
obligated — not to receive this and discuss the merits of the proposition since for all 
these reasons, it was improperly before us and that was the reason for the 
nonconcurrence. 

You are not voting against autonomy. We are not recommending autonomy or 
not, but we find that we do not have a proper legal petition and request from the 
central conference before us and therefore this action. 

Leo Constantino (Northern Illinois) moved "that the 1984 
General Conference receive the vote of approval by the 
Philippines Central Conference and the ratification votes of the 
six annual conferences in compliance with Par. 649 of the 1980 
Discipline, and for the Philippines Central Conference to proceed 
to fulfill the requirements in Par. 649.1, .2, and .3, for final 
approval by the 1988 General Conference upon completion of the 
disciplinary provisions." He spoke in support of his motion. It was 
agreed that his motion would be treated as a substitute for the 
Commission report. 

Lydia S. Aherrera (Phihppines): This is an item for information. Bishop and 
members of the General Conference. The Philippine delegates from the Philippine 
Central Conference support Report No. 13 of the General Conference Commission 
on Central Conference Affairs. We propose nonconcurrence through a petition for 
affiliated autonomy by one annual conference for the entire Philippine Central 
Conference. 

Our reasons for supporting nonconcurrence are as follows: (1) The 1980 session of 
the Philippine Central Conference did not ask for affiliated autonomy nor did it 
send any such request to this General Conference in Baltimore. One annual 
conference may have requested affiliated autonomy in its 1983 session for the 
entire Philippine Central Conference, and such a request was received by the 
General Conference's Commission on Central Conference Affairs. We believe that 
such a request from one annual conference presuming to speak for the other five 
annual conferences and for an entire Central Conference, is highly irregular to say 
the least. 

(2) We understood that the Philippine Central Conference voted for affiliated 
autonomy in 1976; however, the vote by the annual conference that is ratifying this 
motion came under legal question. Tliey were declared virtually invalid by the 
coordinating council of the Central Conference by the duly authorized — not to act 
on behalf of the Central Conference between its sessions. When it requested the 
annual conference to take another ratifying vote, the second ratifying vote was not 



The United Methodist Church 317 

completed by the annual conferences at the time the enabling act expired in 1981 
We urge you, brothers and sisters, of the General Conference to be patient and 
let us not do anythmg here that will divide our church in the Philippines. 

R. Randy Day (New York) sought to speak in favor of the 
substitute, but the Chair ruled that one speech on each side had 
been heard, and that, under the rule adopted by the Conference 
It should be put to a vote. Vilem Schneeberger (Czechoslovakia) 
asked for clarification as to the source of the two petitions 
addressed by the report. Bishop Borgen replied that one was 
signed by two individuals and the other was from one of the six 
annual conferences in the Philippines Central Conference The 
substitute was defeated. 

/. Fay Cleveland (Western New York) spoke in favor of the 
Commission's recommendation. John SchwieheH (Oregon-Idaho) 
sought to introduce a motion of referral to the Judicial Council 
but the Chair ruled that the motion would not be in order until the 
Conference had acted on the report. John P. Miles (Little Rock) 
moved the previous question, and the motion was adopted. The 
Commission's recommendation of nonconcurrence was adopted 
(see page 516). ^ 

Mr. SchwieheH moved "that the General Conference direct the 
Judicial Council to conduct a full judicial inquiry into the dispute 
over votes relating to the autonomy for the Philippines United 
Methodist Church and to certify its findings to the parties 
involved in the dispute." The Chair ruled that the issue was a 
matter for the Central Conference to resolve, and that Mr 
bchwiebert's motion was not in order. 

Question Regarding Report No. 8 

In relation to Report No. 8, which was included on the Consent 
Calendar, Victor W. Goldschmidt (North Indiana) asked whether 
there was a provision for the Council of Bishops, to whom the 
petitions were referred, to report back to the 1988 General 
Conference. Bishop Borgen reported that there was no specific 
provision for that in the report. 

Committee on Discipleship Report No. 39— Consideration 
Resumed 

The Chair called for resumption of the consideration of 
Committee on Discipleship Report No. 39 (authorization of a 
hymnal revision committee), which had been intermpted by an 
order of the day in the morning session (see pages 307-308). 

Appeal on a Ruling of the Chair 

Ignacio Castuera (Pacific and Southwest) appealed the Chair's 
i-uling that Mr. Schwiebert's motion of referral to the Judicial 



318 Journal of the 198 J^ General Conference 

Council was out of order (see above). The ruling of the Chair was 
sustained by vote of the Conference. 

Committee on Discipleship Report No. 39 

The Secretary explained the parliamentary situation existing 
at the time the consideration of the report was interrupted. C. 
David Lundquist (West Michigan) moved, as a substitute for Mr. 
Tmdeau's amendment, the following: "The hymnal committee 
shall be instructed to respect the language of traditional hymns 
contained in the present United Methodist hymnal, but may also 
include alternate texts for the same hymn tunes in instances 
determined by the committee." He spoke in support of his 
substitute. 

Judy Smith (Oregon-Idaho) spoke against the substitute and in 
favor of Mr. Tmdeau's amendment. Mr. Morgan sought to 
accept the substitute on behalf of the committee, but the Chair 
ruled that the Conference should decide. Howard L. Daughen- 
baugh (Central Illinois) asked a question. The Chair ruled that 
the question was in the nature of debate and was not in order. Mr. 
Lundquist's substitute was put to a vote and was adopted as the 
substitute for Mr. Tmdeau's amendment. 

Frank L. Dorsey (Kansas East) sought to introduce an 
amendment, but the Chair ruled that the Conference was still in 
the process of voting on the inclusion of Mr. Lundquist's 
substitute in the report. The substitute was adopted. 

Julius A. Archibald, Jr. (Troy) moved to amend Mr. Lund- 
quist's language as just adopted by substituting "hymns, acts of 
praise, and other aids for the ordering of worship" for "hymns." 
He spoke in support of his amendment. 

Benny Young (Virginia) moved to suspend the rules in order to 
declare the report perfected and proceed to the debate. The 
motion was adopted by the required two-thirds vote. Douglas F. 
Verdin (New York) sought to introduce a substitute, but the 
Chair ruled that it would not be in order because of the adoption 
of Mr. Young's motion. Mr. Archibald's amendment was 
defeated. 

The Chair called for debate on the report as a whole. Porter J. 
Womeldorff (Central Illinois) spoke in support of the report, but 
asked that the committee also give consideration to inclusion of a 
youth section in the hymnal. Peggy Coates (Texas) spoke against 
the report. A. Philip Holtsford (Northern Illinois) asked a 
question about the content of the proposed hymnal; the Chair 
responded. Thelma Johnson (West Ohio) supported the report. 
Roy I. Sano (California-Nevada) asked a question regarding 
worship materials to be included in the hymnal. Mr. Morgan 



The United Methodist Church 319 

explained that the contents of the hymnal would be recommended 
by the committee which would be authorized by this report, and 
those recommendations would be before the 1988 General 
Conference for final action. Lamrence Bauman (North Georgia) 
spoke against the report. Jo Anne Wilshusen (Southwest Texas) 
spoke m favor of it. Ken Weatherford (North Georgia) asked a 
question; the Chair responded. At the request of Lowen V. Kruse 
(Nebraska), the Secretary read a portion of the report as 
amended. 

Mr. Morgan made the final statement on behalf of the 
committee in support of the report. The report was adopted and 
then was referred to the General Council on Finance and 
Admmistration in keeping with the rules of the Conference (see 
pages 1139-1142). 

Committee on Discipleship Report No. 60, Calendar No 578 

Mr. Morgan called on Mark Trotter (Pacific and Southwest) for 
presentation of the report, which would authorize the Council of 
Bishops to constitute a "committee on our theological task" (see 
page 1158). 

Mr. Trotter: The committee recommends to the General Conference that the 
Council of Bishops constitute a committee on the theological task representative of 
the whole church to prepare a new statement that will reflect the needs of the 
church and report to the 1988 General Conference. It further recommends that 
upon passage of the above this matter be referred to GCFA for funding The deluge 
of petitions received by our subcommittee was aimed at amending 'm Section 3 in 
the Discipline, entitled "Our Theological Task." Section 3 is not a creed as' it 
seemed to have been interpreted by so many people in the church, nor is it a 
theological manifesto as such. Therefore it does not take amending verv graciouslv 
nor as a contextual statement we felt should it be amended. It stands on its own as 
a statement of where the church was in its theological dialogue in 1972— an attempt 
at consensus at that time, not on the belief of all Methodists, but on how Methodists 
do theology based on our tradition. 

We feel that the time has properly come in 1984 to continue that conversation on 
our theological task, our unique way of doing theolog>' as Methodist Christians. We 
believe that we find ourselves in a situation in the church today as evidenced in 
large part by the flood of petitions that came to us. numbering in the hundreds 
taced wnth new questions, or at least new ways of asking old questions dealing 
primarily with these three issues found in thai theological statement- 

1) the significance and proper use of the so-called Methodist quadrilateral- 2) the 
proper understanding of the catholic spirit, which is often spoken of today as 
pluralism; and 3) the contribution that United Methodism can make to\he 
ecumenical-theological conversation. We believe that such a revised statement for 
the 1988 Discipline would help focus our mission as a church, would be a practical 
resource in sanctification for all United Methodists, and the appropriate continuing 
theolo ^° '"^^^'"^ ^""^ reformulate its understanding of how to do 

Louise Branscomb (North Alabama) asked whether the 
legislative committee intended for the Council of Bishops to be 



320 Journal of the 198 Jf General Conference 

the committee or to select a committee; Mr. Trotter replied that 
the committee intended the latter. 

/, Kenneth Forbes (South Indiana) moved to amend the report 
such that the task would be assigned to the Council of Bishops, 
with no charge upon the Church. He spoke in support of his 
amendment. H. Myron Talcott (Wisconsin) spoke against it. 
Mr. Trotter opposed the amendment on behalf of the committee. 
The amendment was defeated. 

Roberto Escamilla (Southwest Texas) moved to amend the 
first sentence of the report, following the words "needs of the 
church," by adding "define the scope of our Wesleyan tradition in 
the context of our contemporary world." He spoke in support of 
his amendment. Mr. Trotter expressed willingness to accept it on 
behalf of the committee but the Chair stated that it should be 
voted by the Conference. The amendment was adopted. 

Jack N. VanStone (South Indiana) moved to refer the report to 
a study commission approved earher by the Conference. He 
spoke in support of the referral. Charles 0. Dundas (Minnesota) 
spoke against it. The motion to refer was defeated. 

John P. Miles (Little Rock) moved to suspend the mles and 
order the previous question on all before the Conference. The 
motion was adopted. Mr. Trotter made the final statement in 
support of the report. The report was adopted (see page 1158). 

Procedural Matters 

Ernest Crouch (Tennessee) requested that a calendar listing 
the reports to be considered at Wednesday's session be prepared 
and placed before the delegates at this evening's session. Virgil 
Bjork, on behalf of the Committee on Calendar, explained the 
difficulties that would be involved in doing that. 

Ray Cox, Jr. (South Georgia) asked when a specific report 
might be considered; Mr. Bjork answered. 

Rules Suspensions 

Don L. Riggin (Little Rock) moved to suspend Rule 6, in order to 
delete the requirement that the presiding officer repeat the names 
of delegates after they are recognized; the motion was defeated. 

John D. Varner (Western Pennsylvania) moved to suspend the 
rules such that opening statements introducing reports would be 
limited to five minutes. The motion to suspend the rules was 
adopted. The five-minute limitation on statements introducing 
reports was then also adopted. 

Motion Regarding Agenda 

John T. King (Southwest Texas) moved to instmct the 
Committee on Agenda to revise the agenda for Thursday and 



The United Methodist Church ^ 321 

Friday by setting the time for the worship service at 8 a.m. and 
for the morning plenaiy sessions at 8:30 a.m. He spoke in support 
of his motion. Asbury Lenox, on behalf of the Committee on 
Agenda, reported that the committee was already planning to 
extend the afternoon sessions beginning on Wednesday. Torrey 
A. Kaatz (West Ohio) asked a question; the Chair responded. Mr. 
King's motion was adopted. 

Receiving of Reports 

Riley B. Case (North Indiana): Point of clarification. I was a little bit concerned 
in the last discussion over the interpretation that was being given to the Inclusive 
Language Study Report and the implications for that, not only for the hymnal but 
for the church. Is it not helpful for us to realize the difference between adopting a 
report and receiving a report? Is it not so that when we have received the report, 
nothing is directed? Nothing is mandated. Rather, there is a study that is placed 
before us that we might be sensitive to inclusive language. Therefore, even though 
I was one who argued against that report, I am willing to work with it and study it. 
But I am trying to urge those of the people of the churches that are in my district, 
and others that I know, to make that distinction. We received a report, and I think 
that's greatly different from adopting a report. 

Legislative Committee on Church and Society — Report on 
Conciliation Ministries 

Richard S. Parker (New York), chairperson of the legislative 
committee, moved the suspension of the rules in order to report 
the committee's recommendation on a resolution printed on page 
H-U of the Advance Edition of the Daily Christian Advocate, 
entitled "Conciliation Ministries." The committee was recom- 
mending concurrence, but its report had not yet been printed. 

Judith C. Hill (Central Pennsylvania) presented the report, 
including some editorial corrections to the report as printed. 

Gladys M. Fitts (Tennessee) asked a question; the Chair 
answered. J. Kenneth Forbes (South Indiana) moved that the 
resolution be referred to the General Board of Church and 
Society. He spoke in support of his motion. Bradley F. Watkins 
(Central Illinois) spoke against it. Mr. Parker, speaking on behalf 
of the committee, opposed referral. The motion to refer was 
adopted (see pages 893-896). 

Mr. Parker reported that the committee had two other items 
involving funding, but they were not printed and were too 
complicated to read to the Conference. 

Closing 

Norman Simmons (Kansas East) asked a question about the 
funding of the study commissions established by the Conference. 
Ewing T. Wayland (General Secretary, General Council on 



322 ^ Journal of the 1984. General Conference 

Finance and Administration) responded. L. E. Crowson (West 
Virginia) asked a question about a specific legislative committee 
report. Mr. Bjork (Committee on Calendar) and Carolyn Oehler 
(Northern Illinois) answered. 

The Secretary made announcements. Bishop Wakadilo (Africa 
Central Conference) gave the benediction and the session was 



adjourned. 



SEVENTH DAY, TUESDAY, MAY 8, 1984 
EVENING SESSION 

Opening 

The General Conference of The United Methodist Church 
convened in the evening session of Tuesday, May 8, 1984, at 7:30 
p.m. in the Civic Center Arena, Baltimore, Maryland, with 
Bishop Leroy C. Hodapp (Illinois Area) presiding. Following the 
singing of a hymn, the Conference was led in an opening prayer 
by Bishop Emilio deCarvalho (Africa Central Conference). 

Report on Second Ballot for Judicial Council Membership 

The Chair reported the results of the second ballot for Judicial 
Council membership as follows: ballots cast, 947; invalid ballots, 
17; valid ballots, 930; needed to elect, 466. On the lay ballot, 
Elizabeth Gundlach received 523 votes and was elected. The 
remainder of the lay ballot was reported as follows: James M. 
DoUiver, 429; Terry Sanford, 409; Willard H. Douglas, Jr., 357; 
Florence E. Freeman, 210; Foy C. Campbell, 176; Crisolito 
Pascual, 129; Thomas M. Reavley, 124; Clifford B. Aguilar, 111; 
Don L. Riggin, 95; Thomas P. Moore, 79; Joe E. Covington, 23; 
Byron Hayes, Jr., 17. 

On the clergy ballot there were no elections; the results were 
as follows: Albert W. Sweazy, 375; Gene E. Sease, 252; C. Ebb 
Munden, 217; Susan M. Morrison, 186; E. Dale Dunlap, 177; 
Robert H. Spain, 136; Donna T. Mortonstout, 110; Alvin J. 
Lindgren, 105; Garnett M. Wilder, 65; John V. Moore, 49; 
P. Boyd Mather, 32; William Hemphill, 25; Thomas Whitehead, 
25; Robert P. Ward, 22; Charles P. Hamilton, 19; John B. 
Hays, 17. 

Third Ballot for Judicial Council Membership 

The Secretary gave instructions for the taking of the ballot. 
Charles P. Hamilton (Florida) asked to withdraw his name from 
consideration. David E. Chaney (Northern Illinois) sought 
recognition for a matter of privilege, but the Chair asked that it 
be held until the balloting was completed. When the ballots had 
been collected, the Chair declared the ballot closed. 

Mr. Chaney made a statement asking that the distinction 
between ordained and unordained persons be denoted by use of 
the terms "clergy" and "lay," rather than "ministers" and "lay 
persons," since all in the Church are in a mutual ministr>\ 

323 



324 Journal of the 198 U General Conference 

General Council on Ministries Report No. 11 (see page 649) 

The Chair called on Bishop Dwight E. Loder, president of the 
General Council on Ministries, for reports from that Council. 
Bishop Loder introduced Report No. 11, "Resolution on the 
Bicentennial Committee," and requested that the privilege of the 
floor be granted to Bishop D. Frederick Wertz for presentation of 
the report; it was granted by vote of the Conference. 

Bishop Wertz: Bishop Hodapp, my dear friends, thank you for the opportunity 
to come once again and talk to you about the bicentennial. The United Methodist 
Church has been interested in preparations for the bicentennial since 1976. At that 
time the General Conference established a Planning Commission. It reported to 
the General Conference in 1980 at which time a Bicentennial Commission was 
estabHshed, and we are in the act of celebrating the Bicentennial of Methodism in 
America. 

We have a grand history, and we are claiming the past. We have been doing that 
in a variety of ways across the church, and we have done it in some verj' specific 
ways here in Baltimore at this General Conference. It is a noble tradition and we 
are part of an endless line of splendor. But we are also celebrating our present, and 
in that condition clear across the church there have been observances of varieties of 
kinds, some of them purely United Methodist, but some of them pan-Methodist, 
involving other Methodist bodies as well as The United Methodist Church. 

And you have been a part of that. You have been helping it to happen in your own 
annual conferences, in your own local churches, and there have been some 
resources prepared to help you do that — resources like "From the Word Go," a 
motion picture film prepared in cooperation with the Bicentennial Commission and 
funded in cooperation with the program agencies of the church. There has been a 
study book prepared as well, and you will want to give special attention to that 
study book in your own local situation as you share in the celebration of this 
bicentennial. We have also been concerned about challenging the future, and in 
some of the actions which have taken place right here in this General Conference, 
you have made the commitment of United Methodist people to the future — a 
commitment to extend the Kingdom in terms of our evangelistic thrust, a 
commitment to be engaged in ministries of social action and concern in every local 
congregation across the land and around the world, in the commitment of our funds 
in order that the Word might be proclaimed and the gospel heard all over the earth. 
So we've been engaged in claiming the past, celebrating the present and 
challenging the future. 

Bishop Wertz called attention to the report as printed in the 
Advance Edition of the Daily Christian Advocate; he noted that 
recommendation #2 as originally printed was no longer before 
the Conference because of earlier action on the missional 
priority. 

Legislative Committee on Council on Ministries Report No. 9, 
Calendar No. 229 

Carolyn H. Oehler (Northern Illinois), chairperson of the 
committee, presented the report, consisting of the legislative 



The United Methodist Church 325 

committee's recommendation for concurrence with GCOM Re- 
port No. 11. The report was adopted (see pages 649, 1525). 

General Council on Ministries Report No. 51 

Bishop Loder called on Norman E. Demire (West Ohio), 
General Secretary of GCOM, for presentation of the report, 
which dealt with the Pan-Methodist Bicentennial (see page 696). 
Mr. Dewire outlined the contents of the report as printed. 

Committee on Council on Ministries Report No. 25, Calendar 
No. 442 

Ms. Oehler presented the legislative committee report, which 
recommended concurrence with GCOM Report No. 51. Jack 
Meadors (South Carolina) asked about the estimated cost of the 
proposed Pan-Methodist Commission. 

Mr. Dewire: The Commission will be created by the Councils of Bishops of the 
respective denominations. At this point there has been no budget drawTi for that 
purpose. We cannot answer the question about the cost. Each of the General 
Conferences of the five denominations are asked to pass this resolution, and then 
through the Council of Bishops, they will develop the plan and the membership of 
the commission and submit a budget back to the denominations. 

The report was adopted (see page 1531). 

Ms. Oehler moved that Calendar Nos. 229 and 442, as adopted, 
be referred to the General Council on Finance and Administra- 
tion for recommendations related to their financial implications. 
The motion was adopted. 

J. Kenneth Forbes (South Indiana), citing Plan of Organization 
VIII, raised a point of order, claiming that the Conference had 
acted improperly in approving General Council on Ministries 
Report No. 51. The Chair ruled that the action referring the 
report to GCFA met the requirements of the rules. 

Reginald W. Ponder (North Carolina), observing that Ms. 
Oehler, in her oral presentation of the report, had stated that the 
committee recommendation was to "receive" the report, asked 
the Chair to explain the difference between receiving a report 
and concurrence with it. The Chair replied that, in his judgment, 
the report had been referred to GCFA with the understanding 
that the Conference concurred in it. 

General Council on Ministries Report No. 18 

Wesley Wulfkuhle (Kansas East) presented the report, 
consisting of the Council's recommendations related to special 
days (see page 678). 



326 Journal of the 198^ General Conference 

Committee on Council on Ministries Report No. 15, Calendar 
No. 432 

Ms. Oehler presented the legislative committee report, which 
contained revisions to the GCOM report which would add World 
Order Sunday as a fifth special Sunday vvath offering, the offering 
to be used for support of Peace with Justice ministries. She 
presented an additional amendment to the legislative committee 
report, substituting the phrase, "and after promotional expenses 
have been deducted shall be distributed," for the words "for 
distribution" in the last sentence of the additions proposed by 
the committee. 

Blaine E. Taylor (Southern New England) spoke in support of 
the addition of World Order Sunday. There being no ftirther 
debate, the legislative committee amendments were put to a vote 
and were adopted. 

C. Ebb Munden made the final statement in support of the 
report on behalf of the General Council on Ministries. The report 
was adopted and referred to the General Council on Finance and 
Administration (see pages 565, 1527). 

General Council on Ministries Report No. 38 

Bishop Loder explained that this was a report on the Task 
Force on Hispanic Language Resources (see page 691). He noted 
that the related legislative committee report had not yet been 
printed, and that a motion to suspend the rules would therefore 
be necessary. Bruce P. Blake (Kansas West) moved the 
suspension of the rules, and the motion was adopted. Mr. Blake 
presented the content of the GCOM report as printed, explaining 
that the GCOM proposal was to continue the work of the task 
force within the work and the budget of the Council. 

Committee on Council on Ministries Report No. 128, Calendar 
No. 939 

Forrest C. Stith (Baltimore) presented the legislative commit- 
tee report; he explained that, when printed, it would recommend 
concurrence with the GCOM report and the addition of a 
resolution directing GCOM to coordinate the task force, with 
membership from GCOM, the Rio Grande and Puerto Rico 
Annual Conferences, MARCHA (the National Hispanic United 
Methodist Caucus), and representatives from the general 
program agencies. 

Mr. Blake: I would like to raise the issue concerning cost effectiveness. We 
believe we've been effective for six years in working on this task. We know that 
increased membership can increase effectiveness. But the GCOM does not concur 
with the amendment because we are not sure it is cost effective to add additional 



The United Methodist Church 327 

members to this task. And so our proposal is without the additional members that 
the amendment is calling for. We do not believe it is necessary to accomplish the 
task. 

Roberto Escamilla (Southwest Texas) spoke in support of the 
legislative committee amendment and also urged that there be 
consultation with Hispanics in Latin America, in order to 
facilitate sharing of resources. Mr. Stith made a final statement 
on behalf of the legislative committee, in support of its 
amendment to the GCOM report. 

Paul Talcott (Wisconsin) asked a question about the procedure 
being followed; the Chair explained that the mles provide for the 
two general councils to report directly to the Conference, with 
any legislative committee recommendations being treated as 
amendments. 

Mr. Blake made a final statement against the committee 
amendment, on behalf of GCOM. Oscar 0. Garza, IV (Rio 
Grande) asked a question about the Hispanic membership of 
GCOM; Mr. Blake answered. The legislative committee amend- 
ment was defeated. General Council on Ministries Report No. 38 
was then adopted (see pages 691, 1582). 

Reginald W. Ponder (North Carolina): Bishop, I'd like for you to interpret the 
vote we just took. The motion was made to receive, and as I understand Robert's 
Rules of Order, a motion to receive neither gives concurrence or nonconcurrence to 
a matter. It just puts it before the house. 

Bishop Loder stated that the recommendation was for 
concurrence with the recommendation of GCOM, in order that 
the report be received and referred to the General Council on 
Finance and Administration. The Chair ruled that the vote 
signified that the Conference favored the report, but that its 
action was not final until the Conference heard and acted on the 
recommendation from GCFA. Mr. Ponder requested that 
henceforth presenters ask the Conference to concur or noncon- 
cur, not to "receive" a report. Bishop Loder pointed out that, 
since the Conference defeated the legislative committee amend- 
ment, there was no need for this report to be referred to GCFA. 

General Council on Ministries Report No. 8 

Mr. Dewire presented the report, entitled "Resolution and 
Report from the Infant Formula Task Force" (see pages 581-612). 
After reviewing the content of the report, he asked that the 
privilege of the floor be gi*anted to J. Philip Wogaynan, who had 
chaired the task force; it was granted by vote of the Conference. 



328 Journal of the 1984. General Conference 

Mr. Wogaman explained that the legislative committee would 
recommend amendments to Resolution A in the report, and that 
the task force was in agreement with those amendments. 

Mr. Wogaman: The important change to which I referred is the suspension of 
the Nestle boycott by the International Nestle Boycott Committee and by the 
General Board of Church and Society and the General Board of Global Ministries. 
This event means that we can all celebrate an important accomplishment together 
and put the confrontations of the past behind us. In its amended form the proposed 
resolution on Infant Formula seeks to do that. In light of the accomplishments of 
the past quadrennium we believe it appropriate now for our own task force to be 
terminated, making this one of the few times in United Methodist history when 
anything of that sort has occurred. At the same time there is need for follow 
through with the Nestle Company and with the three American companies, and 
especially with the three American companies, which at this moment lag somewhat 
behind the accomplishments of Nestle. 

We believe this work should now pass to the General Board of Church and 
Society vdth the request that it establish a new task force keeping faith with the 
process set in motion by the 1980 General Conference. Earlier we had suggested a 
more elaborate transition since the General Board of Church and Society at that 
time was still engaged in the Nestle boycott. That problem is largely gone now 
since the Board has suspended that boycott. We are unanimous in our belief that 
the transition should occur immediately. 

There is one further point, however, which should be dravra to your attention. If 
the General Board of Church and Society or General Board of Global Ministries 
should wish to reinstate the boycott, which would be possible, if the Nestle 
Company should turn its back upon the commitment, we think it only fair to the 
large body of United Methodists who have supported our work and our 
recommendations to require that such a decision should be reviewed by the 
organization to which we reported during the quadrennium, the GCOM. Even a 
fully legitimate decision to reinstate the Nestle boycott could otherwise be 
regarded by many people within and beyond the church as a kind of betrayal of the 
process undertaken through the past quadrennium. On the other hand, such a 
decision, if necessary, and if ratified by the GCOM, would then carry the moral 
weight of the whole church. 

We do not propose that as a requirement for any other kind of action related to 
other companies or other situations. It is specifically limited to this one case. 

Respecting the other resolution dealing with boycotts themselves, we feel it is 
time for the church to formulate with great care, and involving as many people as 
possible throughout the church, a discussion of the situations requiring use of the 
extreme measure of the economic boycott. And so we are proposing that 
resolution, noting that that resolution also will constitute the working guidelines 
for the church through this quadrennium. And for that reason we have felt that 
economic boycotts should be marked off as last resort kinds of measures. 

Now, my friends, it is sometimes risky and sometimes a pretentious thing for the 
church to venture into social controversy. We can be wrong about many things, and 
even when we are right the world will be quick to sense it if our spirit is not that of 
our Lord. But if there is one thing our experience over the past four years 
underscores, it is that the world of commerce and politics and social conflict 
urgently needs the ministry of the church. Uniquely among the world's institutions 
we can speak the word of judgment and the word of reconciliation in such a way that 
the two are truly one. When that word is spoken out of the integrity of our faith, 
and out of responsible grappling with facts, we can help create new and 
constructive possibilities. When the church acts with knowledge and with integrity 



The United Methodist Church 329 

in addressing the great issues of the day, it earns the respect and sometimes the 
allegiance of those who are caught up in the world's struggles. 

When the gospel is thus made relevant to the currents of the age, the church is 
engaged in a very important form of evangelism. We ask your support of these 
resolutions and their implementation, not because the Infant Formula issue is the 
only issue facing humanity or because it is the most important one, but because we 
can, by bringing this work to successful completion, help to model what can be done 
in other areas, giving further hope to people who want to believe that there is a 
force in this world that can help bring justice and reconciliation from beyond this 
world. Thank you. 

Committee on Council on Ministries Report No. 10, Calendar 
No. 230 

Ms. Oehler presented the report, consisting of legislative 
committee amendments to the GCOM report (see page 1526). 
Donald J. Cunningham (California-Nevada) asked a question as 
to the meaning of the first amendment proposed by the legislative 
committee; Ms. Oehler responded. Robert F. Trost (Troy) 
suggested an editorial change, and Ms. Oehler accepted it. The 
amendments proposed by the legislative committee were adopt- 
ed. 

Juanita M. Gillaspie (Kansas West) asked a question about the 
time alloted presenters of reports; the Chair answered. K. June 
Goldman (Iowa) made a suggestion regarding the preparation of a 
condensed version of the report. 

James Lawson (Pacific and Southwest): I want to raise a number of cautions: (1) 
As a member of the 1980 General Conference I voted against the creation of this 
task force and the interference in a boycott without having done, in the first 
instance, thorough preparation in the light of the many denominations and annual 
conferences that found it necessary to begin to move. As one who has some 
awareness of the whole history of nonviolent struggle, that, in my own judgment, 
was a demerit and not a merit. (2) I want to raise the caution that the issue for the 
boycott ought to be a whole understanding of nonviolent action and theology and 
thought, for a boycott is but one instrument of nonviolent action, and that that 
theme of nonviolent awareness ought to clearly be a part of any effort to even think 
about any sort of boycott, and finally (3) I want to insist that, according to the 
Children's Defense Fund of Washington, D.C., 17 million children in the first year 
of life will die in this year of 1984 because of malnutrition and hunger. We must not 
pat ourselves on the back too much about having effectively dealt with a huge 
corporate structure, and we must be aware of the fact that we will need to watch, 
for the children are still dying in the world today. 

John P. Miles (Little Rock) moved that the rules be suspended 
for the purpose of ordering the previous question; the motion was 
adopted. P. Boyd Mather (Iowa) asked about the constitutionali- 
ty of a provision in the report as amended which would give the 
(General Council on Ministries authority over any attempt by 
another general agency to reinstate the Nestle boycott. The 



330 Journal of the 1984^ General Conference 

Chair ruled that, if adopted by the General Conference, the 
provision would stand unless overruled by the Judicial Council. 
General Council on Ministries Report No. 8 was adopted as 
amended. Bishop Loder expressed appreciation to Dr. Wogaman 
and other Infant Formula Task Force members who were 
present: Mildred Randall, Paul Minus, Ignacio Castuera, Bishop 
Dale White, and Norman Deurire. Ms. Oehler moved referral to 
the General Council on Finance and Administration, and the 
report was referred. 

World Order Sunday Offering for 1984 

Richard 0. Truitt (Wisconsin) moved that, in accord with the 
action of the General Conference to receive a special offering on 
World Order Sunday during 1985-1988, annual conferences be 
encouraged to promote such an offering in 1984. He spoke in 
support of his motion, and it was adopted. 

Procedural Motion 

James W, Anderson (East Ohio) moved to amend the rules such 
that, when a report is presented on the floor and there are no 
speeches against the report, the presenter of the report not be 
given the opportunity to speak. He spoke in support of his 
motion, and it was adopted by the required two-thirds majority. 

Matter of Privilege 

As a matter of privilege, Don L. Riggin (Little Rock) requested 
and was granted time to read the following letter into the record: 

DeWayne Woodring 

Chair, General Conference Committee, 1984 

Dear Mr. Woodring: 

As a person with handicapping conditions, it has come to my attention through a 
variety of personal and relational incidents that more detail and concern needs to be 
shown toward the General Conference experiences of persons with handicapping 
conditions. Much has been done to make the Baltimore experience a positive one for 
persons with handicapping conditions; however, attention to the following would 
enable them to be fully integrated into our future experiences. 

Having served on past General Conference site teams, I would suggest that: 

1) a "walk through" of all facilities with General Conference committees and local 
committees be conducted in the early planning stages with persons of varying 
handicapping conditions (include some pages, ushers, etc.). 

2) proper parking facilities for those driving to General Conference — local 
delegates or visitors with handicapping conditions. 

3) wheelchairs available for those unable to walk long distances. 

4) adequate seating for those with handicapping conditions in an accessible and 
safe area (safety for those in wheelchairs is a major need; bishops and their wives 
should be included in this concern). 



The United Methodist Church 331 

5) properly trained volunteers to assist persons with handicapping conditions as 
they move from place to place (training is important to prevent injurj' from 
improper handling). 

6) information be made available in all prior literature stating procedures for 
reserving wheelchairs, routes that are barrier- free for moving from location to 
location; also information and signs for providing assistance to persons with 
handicapping conditions should be visible for visitors and others who will not 
receive preliminary notices (a list of accessible restaurants would be helpful). 

7) proper transportation be made available for attending various conference 
activities that are off site. 

Please, help create an accessible environment for this minority group within the 
general church. General Conference should encourage delegates to, upon their 
return home, become advocates for the full integration of persons with 
handicapping conditions into the life of the local church. The General Conference as 
the incarnation of The United Methodist Church should model the type of behavior 
and consideration that is right and just. In doing such, it will encourage those with 
handicapping conditions to give of themselves to further the grov^th of the local and 
general church. May we pledge ourselves to take the journey that Christ took. 
Yours in Christ, Rheta Cohen-Stacy, member. General Board of Church and 
Society. 

Legislative Committee on Financial Administration Report 
No. 13, Calendar No. 374 

Mr. Bjork called for reports from the Legislative Committee 
on Financial Administration, Barbara R. Thompson (Baltimore), 
chairperson. Ms. Thompson called on Conrad M. Page, Jr. 
(Central Pennsylvania), for presentation of the report. Mr. Page 
explained that the report was a recommendation for nonconcur- 
rence with petitions calling for the investment of pension funds in 
the United Methodist Development Fund. 

Mr. Page: There are four petitions involved. They relate to investment of 
pension funds in the United Methodist Development Fund. By way of explanation 
for those who are not aware, the General Board of Pensions is a trustee of funds 
belonging to a host of lay employees as well as about 50,000 active and retired 
clergy persons and their families. Our committee overwhelmingly felt that the 
ethical and fiduciary responsibility of the General Board of Pensions is to produce 
maximum benefits to the pension program participants and their beneficiaries. 

The report was adopted (see page 1469). 

Report No. 20, Calendar No. 381 

Mr. Page explained that this was also a recommendation for 
nonconcurrence with petitions related to the investment of 
pension funds in various kinds of projects. The report was 
adopted (see page 1477). 

Report No. 19, Calendar No. 380 

Mr. Page stated that this report also recommended noncon- 
currence with four petitions asking the General Conference to 



332 Journal of the 1984- General Conference 

direct certain actions regarding investment of pension funds by 
the General Board of Pensions. Paul Talcott (Wisconsin) asked 
for more specific information regarding the content of the 
petitions. 

Mr. Page: On Calendar No. 0380, as I say, there are four petitions involved. 
Two of them, I believe, are identical and have to do with the investment policies of 
the General Board of Pensions. Two of them, I beheve, would change the wording 
of 111704, . . . from "encouraging the investments in certain institutions, 
companies, etc." to "requiring the investments . . . ." Two of them would make 
mandatory the investment statement there. Another refers to the Discipline, the 
same paragraph, I believe, in the Discipline and indicates that persons should have 
the freedom to determine in their own right whether they wish to participate in the 
pensions program of The United Methodist Church. They would base this on the 
investment policies of the General Board of Pensions. The last one would have to do 
with, would direct the General Board of Pensions to withdraw all funds invested in 
corporations directly involved in design or manufacture of nuclear weapons and/or 
nuclear weapons systems and would direct that this be completed by January 1, 
1985, and withdrawal be monitored by a duly authorized group from either the 
General Board of Global Ministries, the General Board of Church and Society, or 
the General Commission on Christian Unity and Interreligious Concerns. 

Beth Capen (New York) spoke against the committee's 
recommendation of nonconcurrence. The report was adopted (see 
page 1477). 

Referral to Commission on the General Conference 

John F. Walker (Little Rock) moved that the letter written by 
Rheta Cohen-Stacy, as read into the record earlier in the session 
by Don Riggin (see above), be forwarded to the Commission on 
the General Conference. The motion was adopted. 

Report No. 41, Calendar No. 402 

Ms. Thompson presented the report, explaining that it 
recommended nonconcurrence with petitions containing requests 
for disciplinary changes to enable various ways by which local 
churches or annual conferences may designate the extent to 
which their World Service apportionment would be distributed to 
general agencies. The report was adopted (see page 1485). 

Report No. 5, Calendar No. 149 

Ms. Thompson explained that the report was a recommenda- 
tion for nonconcurrence with petitions calling for changes in Par. 
906.13. The report was adopted (see page 1444). 

Questions Regarding Reports 

Lester L. Moore (Iowa) noted that Report No. 41 as printed 
called for "nonconcurrence with the petitions and the following 



The United Methodist Church 333 

substitute for the petitions"; he asked for clarification as to 
whether, in adopting the report, the Conference had concurred 
with the substitute printed in the report. Ms. Thompson 
explained that the Conference had voted nonconcurrence both 
with the petitions and with the substitute. 

In relation to Report No. 5, Lycurgus M. Starkey (Missouri 
East) asked for clarification as to the action taken. The Chair 
replied that the Conference had voted not to change the 
Discipline. 

Committee on Calendar — Consent Calendar Amendment 

Mr. Bjork asked if the Conference was willing to extend the 
time by one-half hour. J. R. Jackson (South Carolina) pointed out 
that there were legislative committees which w^ere planning to 
meet. Mr. Bjork moved the extension of the time. Charles W. 
Eurey (Western North Carolina) spoke against the motion. 

Donald J. Cunningham (California-Nevada) moved that the 
session be adjourned. Elizabeth Sweet (Southern New England) 
asked a question; the Chair answered. The motion to adjourn the 
session was adopted. 

Mr. Bjork moved that all calendar items receiving one 
dissenting vote be placed on the Consent Calendar, and that the 
process for lifting these items remain as specified in Rule 27. 
Charles E. Ramsay (North Arkansas) asked a question; Mr. 
Bjork answered. The motion was adopted. William G. Tnideau 
(Alaska Missionary) raised a point of order, that Mr. Bjork's 
motion and the vote on it came after the adoption of a motion to 
adjourn the session. The Chair asked if the Conference would 
vote to make its action in order, and it was so voted. 

Closing 

Bishop Edwin R. Garrison (Retired) gave the benediction, and 
the session was adjourned. 



EIGHTH DAY, WEDNESDAY, MAY 9, 1984 
MORNING SESSION 

Opening 

The General Conference of The United Methodist Church 
convened in the morning session of Wednesday, May 9, 1984, at 
8:30 a.m. in the Civic Center Arena, Baltimore, Maryland, wath 
Bishop Jack M. Tuell (Los Angeles Area) presiding. 

Devotional Service 

The worship service was conducted under the leadership of 
Bishop Federico J. Pagura (Evangehcal Methodist Church in 
Argentina), with Bishop Sante U. Barbieri (Retired) serving as 
liturgist. Special music before and during the service was 
provided by The Miracles, a choir from the Baddour Memorial 
Center, Senatobia, Mississippi, under the direction of Sybil 
Roberts Canon. Helen Gulden was the organist. 

The service was opened with a responsive Call to Worship, 
followed by the singing of the hymn, "Joyful, Joyful, We Adore 
Thee." A responsive morning prayer followed, and the choir sang 
an anthem. The Scripture was Isa. 32:1-8, 16-17; Matt. 12:14-21. 
Bishop Pagura preached the devotional sermon, entitled, "Be- 
hold, A King, My Servant." The Conference joined in an 
Affirmation of Faith in litany form, followed by the singing of the 
hymn, "Father Eternal, Ruler of Creation," and the benediction. 

Bishop Tuell expressed appreciation to The Miracles. 

Greetings from Latin American Bishops 

The Chair asked if the Conference would grant the privilege of 
the floor to hear a greeting from the bishops of the autonomous 
Methodist churches of Latin America. It was granted by vote of 
the Conference. Bishop Pagura introduced Bishop Rolando 
Villena (Evangelical Methodist Church of Bohvia), who brought 
the greeting, which was translated as follows: 

Bishop Villena: As bishops representing the autonomous churches that make up 
the Council of Evangelical Methodist Churches of Latin America, CIEMAL, we 
would like to reach out to all of you with a warm greeting of peace. This is a great 
historic occasion that has brought us together; it is historic because we Latin 
American Methodists are seeing the confirmation of the faith proclaimed by 
pioneer missionaries of The United Methodist Church that has brought forth much 
fruit for our Lord Jesus Christ. Cherished sisters and brothers, we feel that we are 
a part of the rich history of the last 100 years in which you were the protagonists of 
a dynamic and growing Methodism on our own and other continents. During this 

334 



The United Methodist Church 335 

time, the churches of Mexico, Brazil, Chile, Argentina, and Cuba have celebrated 
their centennial of Methodist witness. Most recently as we have walked the trail of 
our own autonomy, our churches have felt you to be very close in support, 
encouragement, and prayer, through the General Board of Global Ministries. And 
it is important we express our profound gratitude and appreciation. At this time we 
wish to make our homage to the bicentennial of The United Methodist Church with 
a presentation of this scepter of the Hila Goda, or Indian Chieftain, to this great 
assembly by means of the president of the conference. This 201-year-old scepter, 
one of the kind still used by the community leaders of the Quechua and Aymara 
cultures of Bolivia, Peru, and Ecuador, represents for those in authority the 
symbol of unity on the basis of work, integrity, and honesty. We hope that you will 
accept this as a symbol that we will continue in brotherhood and fellowship, seeking 
faithfulness together to the gospel of Jesus Christ and discovering together the 
prophetic witness of the Wesleyan tradition for our time. We pledge to continue to 
pray and labor to sustain and strengthen our unity so that by that witness which we 
share with all Christians throughout the world w-e can respond to the challenge of 
Jesus Christ that all may be one in order that the world may believe. 
Congratulations sisters and brothers of The United Methodist Church in this 
bicentennial, congratulations Methodists of the entire world. 

Bishop Tuell accepted the gift "with much thankfulness on the 
part of all United Methodist people." Bishop Villena spoke words 
of appreciation to the General Board of Global Ministries for their 
role in providing translators, who made full participation of 
non-English-speaking persons possible in this General Confer- 
ence. 

Committee on Agenda 

Delton H. Krueger (Minnesota) presented the report; he moved 
adoption of the agenda as printed, and it was adopted (see page 
493). He announced the committee's tentative plan to devote the 
Thursday morning session to reports of the General Council on 
Finance and Administration. 

Procedural Questions and Motions 

Charles E. Ramsay (North Arkansas) asked a question about 
the Consent Calendar; Virgil Bjork responded on behalf of the 
Calendar Committee. 

Frank L. Dorsey (Kansas East) moved that Bishop Pagura's 
sermon be printed in the Daily Christian Advocate. The motion 
was adopted. C. W. Hancock (South Georgia) asked a question 
about the availability of the Episcopal and Laity Addresses; the 
Secretary' responded. 

Bonnie Totten (Central New York) noted a name correction for 
the Hst of members on the Interjurisdictional Committee on 
Episcopacy; the Chair asked that such corrections be directed to 
the Secretary's office. 

Foy Campbell (Alabama-West Florida) asked a question about 
the seating of reserve delegates; the Secretary responded. 



336 Journal of the 198^ General Conference 

Shepherd G. Harkness (East Ohio) sought to introduce a motion; 
the Chair ruled that it was not in order at this time. 

Jim Beal (North Arkansas) asked the Chair to clarify the 
difference between receiving and adopting a report; the Chair 
responded. John F. Walker sought to move referral of the 
question to the Judicial Council, but the Chair suggested that he 
bring his motion at a later time, when it was more carefully 
framed. 

Ballot for University Senate Membership — Declared Invalid 

The Secretary gave instructions for the marking of the ballots. 
Jack D. Heacock (Southwest Texas) asked a question; the 
Secretary responded. William M. Harris (Southwest Texas) 
suggested that the fact that the ballot identified who were 
nominated by the Council of Bishops and who were nominated 
from the floor was prejudicial. John E. Stumbo (Kansas East) 
moved that the taking of the ballot be deferred until: (1) the ballot 
was re-prepared without indicating the source of the nomina- 
tions, and (2) there was clarification as to the number to be 
elected. After examining a copy of the ballot, the Chair ruled it 
invahd. 

Thomas L. Cromwell (East Ohio) made reference to a previous 
action of the Conference on the composition of the University 
Senate. Theodore H. Walter (South Carolina) read from that 
action, clarifying the number of persons to be elected by the 
General Conference — four persons, two of whom were to be chief 
executives of United Methodist-related higher education institu- 
tions and two who were in other relevant positions in such 
institutions. 

Paul J. Meuschke (Western Pennsylvania) asked a question 
about the effective date of the legislation Mr. Walter had cited; 
the reply was that it had been voted to be effective immediately. 
Gamett Wilder (North Georgia) requested that the Conference 
be permitted to proceed with the taking of the ballot; the Chair 
repeated his ruHng that the ballot, as printed, was invalid. Mr. 
Wilder appealed the ruling of the Chair, but the Conference 
sustained the Chair. 

Committee on Calendar 

Virgil V. Bjork, chairperson of the committee, directed the 
Conference's attention to Consent Calendar No. 5, as printed in 
the Daily Christian Advocate. He asked that Calendar No. 986 
be added to it, and that Calendar No. 1089 be deleted from it. 

Mr. Bjork then moved the adoption of Consent Calendar No. 4, 
as amended by the deletions which were listed with the printing 



The United Methodist Church 337 

of Consent Calendar No. 5. The motion was adopted (see paee 
495). ^ ^ 

Mr. Bjork outlined the committee's plans to call for reports in 
the mornmg session from the Legislative Committees on 
Ordamed and Diaconal Ministries, Global Ministries, and Disci- 
pleship; and in the afternoon session from the General Council on 
Mmistries and Legislative Committee on Church and Society. 

Committee on Ordained and Diaconal Ministry Report No 16 
Calendar Nos. 510-512 * ' 

William K. Quick (Detroit) introduced the report, which dealt 
with standards for ordination, explaining that there was a 
committee report, followed by two minority reports, designated 
?9i^ iS?m^ ^^P'^'^ ^ ^""^ Minority Report B (see pages 

Report No. 16— Presentation of Committee Report 

Mr. Quick: The heart of the Methodist reformation led by Wesley was the 
doctrine of salvation by faith in Christ alone. The Methodist movement had its t^^•in 
foc.-the conversion of persons and the transformation of society which 
incidentally is in the right order. "What was God's design in raising up the 
Methodists?" Mr. Wesley asks. Not to form any new sect, butTo reform th^e nation 
especially the church and to spread scriptural holiness across the land; to reform 
the nation through a transformation of persons, and out of that transformation 
came a morality which flowed from the faith of people. Our Social Principles are a 
prayerfial and thoughtful effort to speak to our contemporary world on human 
issues from a sound biblical and theological foundation as United Methodists The 
bocial Principles are intended to be instructive and persuasive and call us all to a 
prayerftil, earnest dialogue of faith and practice. Within the nurturing community 
of the church all persons are important. "God sent His Son into the world, not to 
condenin the world, but that the world through Him might be saved " 

Our Social Principles on the issue before us affirms the sanctity of the marriage 
covenant expressed in love mutual support, personal commitment and shared 
fidelity between a man and a woman (p. 89 of the Discipline). It affirms the 
integrity of single persons, it recognizes sexuality as a gift of God, and calls all 
persons to disciplines that lead to the fulfillment in the stewardship of that gift The 
bocial Principles acknowledges that men and women are sexual beings whether 
or not they are married. Sex between a man and a woman is only to be confirmed in 
the marriage bond. But our Discipline states (H 402, p. 180) there are persons 
vnthin the mmistrj- of the baptized who are called of God and set apart^brthe 

rhH^inl^^^ '^?f ^T i^^^^d^cy- o"e agrees for the sake of the mission of Jesus 
Chnst in the world and the most effective witness to the Christian gospel and in 
consideration of the influence as ministers, to make a complete dedication of 
themselves to he highest ideals of the Christian life as set forth in " 67 to 76 of our 

nprinL^Th^t ' ^""^ -^^ ^^^l^""^ ^^^^ ^° ^"^^^^'^^ responsible self control bv 
personal habits conducive to bodily health, mental and emotional maturity. And 
that at this very point, the words "fidelity in marriage" and "celibacv in singleness" 



338 Journal of the 1984. General Conference 

As a church, we have sought to elevate the standards of moral and social 
responsibility of ministers consistent with the highest ideals of the Christian life, 
and for more than 200 years candidates for ordination have been asked Wesley's 
questions, including, "Have they a clear sound understanding, right judgment in 
the things of God, a just conception of salvation by faith? In H 422 the Discipline 
says, "Only those elected to full membership who are of unquestionable moral 
character and genuine piety, sound in the fundamental doctrines of Christianity 
and faithful to the discharge of their duties." 

Now, these are significant concerns all across the church, this thing on the 
matter of standards for ministry. It was evidenced by the fact that we received 
over a thousand petitions, including some from 45 of the 73 annual conferences, who 
spoke to these concerns. They were speaking with different approaches. Some with 
strong prohibitive language, others supporting the so-called seven last words. The 
legislative committee wrestled with these petitions and brings concurrence to the 
one which establishes fidelity in marriage and celibacy in singleness as a standard. 
This was advocated by the General Board of Higher Education and Ministry as well 
as the annual conferences and the other petitions. 

Report No. 16 — Presentation of Minority Report A 

The Chair called on William 0. Walker (Oregon-Idaho) for 
presentation of Minority Report A; Mr. Walker asked John V. 
Moore (California-Nevada) to make the initial presentation. 

Mr. Moore: Bishop Tuell, sisters and brothers. I identify with all of you who have 
some difficulty with this choice before us today, for we sense the tension. We feel 
the claim of the gospel to be inclusive. At the same time we take seriously the 
discipline of the covenant community of which we are a part. We affirm the dignity 
of all human beings and the justice rights of all human beings. At the same time we 
cherish the unity of the church. We hold fast to the tradition, honoring, respecting, 
appropriating it. At the same time we would harken to the leading of the Spirit. 

The minority report proposes substituting faithfulness and constancy in all 
relationships for the report of the committee. The criticism, one criticism of this 
proposal is that it is general. We affirm that its strength is in its character, for if it is 
general, it is general in the same sense that Wesley's questions are general. "Are 
you going on to perfection?" "Do you expect to be made perfect in love in this Hfe?" 
"Do you expect and are you resolved to devote yourself wholly to the work of God?" 
The other proposals sound less like Wesley's questions and more like chargeable 
offenses. 

Second, all of these proposals are redundant in one sense for the questions will be 
asked, if the legislation is enacted, as many as three times. If takingthis vow once is 
not enough, why are three times enough? And each time repeating it diminishes the 
strength of the affirmation of the vow. In second place, in relation to redundancy, 
this Minority Report A eliminates the redundancy of the marriage vows. We don't 
know of any marriage service within our tradition which does not regard as 
essential and at the heart of that service the vows of fidelity. Barbara and I would 
regard it as ridiculous if anyone suggested that anything could be added to the vows 
which we took 40 years ago. I'm sure those looking forward to marriage and those 
who have been married but four years would feel the same. 

Third, I want to speak of tradition — ^two dimensions, more than that. There are 
two dimensions of tradition; one is that body of inherited teachings and practices 
which we respect and deal with. But the other part of our tradition is the way in 
which the community has dealt with the inherited teachings and those practices. 
We beg the question if we simply speak of Christian teachings or tradition without 
looking at the way in which the community has lived in relationship to that. For 



The United Methodist Church 339 

example, Christian teachings change. They are not immutable. We take the 
commandment of the Scriptures to be fruitful and multiply, but the community 
living in relationship to that has radically revised that as it has revised so many 
others. 

Finally the most important thing that perhaps I can say is that we are members 
of a covenant community. Minority Report B doesn't take seriously the 
Constitution of our church, which separates the responsibility and authority of 
annual conferences for determining standards, and the authority and responsibility 
for bishops who shall appoint all of the ministers. Heterosexuality does not equal 
faithfulness. Homosexuality does not equal unfaithfulnness. Celibacy may be an 
expression of faithfulness, but it certainly is not synonymous with faithfulness. 
Constancy and faithfulness in all of life is what is called for. 

We of the Minority Report A reaffirm the process by which we make decisions of 
evaluating the characters of our pastors, ministers. Secondly, we take seriously 
our Constitution and the authority and responsibility which it grants. And finally 
Minority Report A reaffirms the decisions of the General Conference of 1976 and 
1980. 

Report No. 16 — Presentation of Minority Report B 

The Chair called on David A. Seamands (Kentucky) for 
presentation of Minority Report B. 

Mr. Seamands: Minority Report B is only asking us to do what we thought we 
had done at the 1980 General Conference. In the footnotes — extensive 
footnotes — which directly relate the Social Principles to homosexuality and 
ordination, there is no question but that the moral intention of the 1980 General 
Conference was to prohibit the ordination and therefore by implication the 
appointment of practicing homosexuals. Then you ask why was specific language 
avoided? Read the lengthy debate we had in 1980 and you will find that the main 
reason given because we were assured and reassured that we are a connectional 
system, a covenant family of brothers and sisters who can trust one another and, 
since we understand the moral intention of the footnotes, we do not need any 
specific list. Now we face a completely unprecedented situation. The connectional 
system was broken, deliberately, intentionally, and with nationwide publicity at 
the highest ecclesiastical level. This resulted in a case, a referral and a decision by 
the Judicial Council to the effect that, while the Social Principles and footnotes are 
important guiding principles, they are not legally binding. They may be normative 
but they are not legislative. 

So as the Discipline now stands, says the Judicial Council, there is nothing to 
prevent the ordination or appointment of practicing homosexuals. The fact of the 
matter is as it stands now there are millions of United Methodists who have the 
feeling that unless we do take specific legislation, we are saying that we approve of 
the ordination and appointment of homosexual clergy. Now the issue before us is 
clear. The issue is not our ministry of proclaiming God's unconditional love and 
grace to all persons. That is clear throughout the Discipline and Social Principles, 
but nowhere in Scripture does God's acceptance of all persons mean God's approval 
of all practices. There are a thousand-and-one ways for the church to say, "God 
loves you and I love you" but lowering moral standards for its ordained clergy is not 
one of those ways. 

The only issue before us is, "Does the Church have the right to set specific moral 
standards for its ordained clergy?" The New Testament tells us we not only have 
the right but the obligation to do so. That is the real issue before us. The other issue 
is keeping faith with our people. There are 907 petitions which have one common 
denominator, "Please give us specific langauge." Hundreds of them are from 



340 Journal of the 1984 General Conference 

individuals, the grass roots; hundreds of them from groups hke administrative 
boards and charge conferences and councils on ministries. There are 30 from entire 
annual conferences. Friends, this is not just a call from the grass roots. It is a shout 
from the whole forest of the church. They are pleading for a certain sound from the 
General Conference trumpet and the seven last words do not give us a certain 
sound, because there is no definition of either celibacy or marriage in the legislative 
body of the Discipline. And I submit to you that in our committees and from this 
very platform we have heard some fearful and wonderful definitions of holy union 
and marriage. 

The language we have proposed cannot be misunderstood or misrepresented. 
"Self-avowed" prevents any witch hunts or keyhole investigations or ambushes by 
Falwell's raiders. The word "practicing" precludes any punitive or prohibitory 
restraints to ordination. It says nothing about sexual orientation. In consistency 
with the Social Principles it refers only to the practice of homosexuality which we 
have declared incompatible with Christian teaching. These are precise words and 
that's exactly what we need. We need precision. Let us say what we mean. Let us 
mean what we say and give a certain sound to the people of The United Methodist 
Church. Thank you. 

Perfecting of Committee Report 

The Chair called for the perfecting of the committee report. 
Robert I. Phelps (Yellowstone) moved to amend Par. 404 of the 
committee report, the subparagraph deahng with "The Certified 
Candidate," by substituting a new subsection (e) to read as 
follows: "(e) agree for the sake of the mission of Jesus Christ in 
the world and the most effective witness to the Christian gospel, 
and in consideration of their influence as ministers who grateftilly 
celebrate their identities as sexual beings, to dedicate themselves 
to bodily behavior that clearly witnesses to the new life Jesus has 
given us all, and to this end agree to exercise responsible 
self-control by personal habits conducive to bodily health, mental 
and emotional maturity, mutual affirmation of others, fidelity in 
marriage and celibacy in singleness, social responsibility, and 
growth in grace and the knowledge and the love of God." 

Mr. Phelps: This General Conference is proving itself to be committed to 
legislating on clergy's sexual morality, in nonjudgmental, nonpunitive language. 
Nevertheless, the incorporation of the term "celibacy" here inevitably carries with 
it the age-old implication of the church that in some ways sex equals sin and that the 
denial of human sexual expression is a superior moral state. I submit that it is this 
very denial of our sexual identity that is the root cause of much of the church's 
confusion about human sexuality today. I invite, indeed I plead with you my 
friends, to incorporate language that commits The United Methodist Church to a 
rediscovery of celibacy within a context that (a) celebrates under God our sexual 
identities; (b) witnesses to the new life of the Kingdom that Jesus has inaugurated; 
and (c) encourages sexual relationships only within the context of mutual 
affirmation. 

Benny Young (Virginia) moved to suspend the rules and move 
directly to debate of the issue; the motion was defeated. Charles 



The United Methodist Church 341 

F. Kirkley (Baltimore) spoke on behalf of the committee against 
Mr. Phelps' amendment. 

Mr. Kirkley: In our opposition to this motion to delete or change, I would remind 
you agam that we are not voting on the matter of heterosexualitv or 
homosexuahty-we are voting on qualifications for ministry, and this particular 
deletion would violate the basic premise that is before us. Remember, please the 
context of the paragraph that was read regarding witness, ministry, effectiveness 
I remind you of this-that a lawyer can be an effective professional and at the same 
time not practice fidelity in marriage or even engage in unnatural sex acts. A 
physicists work is not necessarily impaired by his or her moral conduct The 
butcher, the baker, the candlestick maker may lack marital fidelity or practice 
homosexuality and still do excellent work. But a clergyperson's influence is so 
closely associated with his or her moral stance as to make one and the same the 
matter of his faithfiilness and his conduct. When a United Methodist clergvoerson 
violates the moral principles, the image of the church is damaged or tarnished, and 
the ministry of Chnst is besmirched. This is too big a price to pay for individual 
permissiveness. We are the followers of one who said, deny self for the larger 
purpose of discipleship. It is in this spirit I oppose deletion. 

The Secretary read the amendment; it was defeated 

Emmett W. Cocke, Jr. (Virginia) moved to amend the footnote 
to Far. 404 by addmg the following sentence to it: "Tests for 
personal habits shall not be applied retroactively or for persons 
after ordmation." He spoke in support of his amendment. Mr 
Quick spoke against it on behalf of the committee The 
amendment was defeated. Amy Bowyer (Kansas East) requested 
that amendments be read before being put to a vote 

Durward McCord (Tennessee) moved to amend the' report by 
substitutmg "spmtual responsibility between male and female in 
smgleness" for "celibacy in singleness." He spoke in support of his 
amendment. William M. James (New York) spoke against it 
Ihe Secretary read the amendment; it was defeated 

Richxird L. Wnght (West Virginia) asked a question about the 
mtended meaning of the word "celibacy" in the report. 

dZ'' ^it' ?' T"^ yib^cy, " and I hope I can go back to my high school Latin 
days, comes from the Latm "caelebatis" which means the condition of being 

rTZT.'. ^f '^' ^'^"^'•'" '^'^' U"'^^^ Church of Canada, and bishop, I 3 
remind the delegates we are not as a committee bringing in definitions with this 

requested, is abstinence from gemtal sexual activity between two persons." 

Mr Wright moved to amend the report by adding an additional 
footnote to Par. 404 to contain the definition of "celibacy" as given 
^'Jr^-r^9. ■ "^ ^P°^^ ^" support of the amendment. 

1 he Chair called attention to the fact that the time scheduled 
tor the recess was at hand. James M. Walker (Southwest Texas) 
moved to extend the time until all action on Report No 16 was 



342 Journal of the 198Jt General Conference 

completed. The motion was defeated. L. E. Crowson (West 
Virginia) asked a question; the Chair responded. 

Bob R. Martin (North Georgia) moved that the nales be 
suspended, and that immediately after the vote on the pending 
amendment the committee report be declared perfected. The 
motion was adopted. Mr. Wright's amendment was put to a vote 
and was defeated. 

Recess 

The Chair declared the Conference to be in recess. 

Question Regarding Committee on Ordained and Diaconal 
Ministry Report No. 16 

Betty Whitehurst (Virginia) asked about the purpose of the 
footnote to Par. 404 repeating the same language as was included 
in the body of the paragraph; Mr. Quick responded. Ms. 
Whitehurst sought to introduce an amendment; the Chair ruled 
that, under the terms of Mr. Martin's amendment as adopted just 
prior to the recess, no more amendments to the committee report 
could be considered. 

Report on Third Ballot for Judicial Council Members 

The Chair read the results of the third ballot for Judicial 
Council members as follows: ballots cast, 930; invalid ballots, 7; 
valid ballots, 923; needed to elect, 462. On the clergy side, Albert 
W. Sweazy (Kentucky) received 472 votes, and was elected. On 
the lay side, James M. Dolliver (Pacific Northwest) received 464 
votes and was elected. 

The remaining results of the ballot were read as follows: 
clergy— Gene Sease, 321; C. Ebb Munden, 260; Susan M. 
Morrison, 208; E. Dale Dunlap, 154; Robert H. Spain, 118; Donna 
T. Mortonstout, 66; Alvin J. Lindgren, 53; Garnett M. Wilder, 44; 
John V. Moore, 39; Robert Paul Ward, 18; P. Boyd Mather, 17; 
William Hemphill, 15; John B. Hays, 10; Thomas M. Whitehead, 
9; H. Myron Talcott, 7; Charles P. Hamilton, 5; lay— Terry 
Sanford, 403; Willard H. Douglas, Jr., 356; Florence E. Freeman, 
151; Foy C. Campbell, 119; Crisolito Pascual, 78; Clifford B. 
Aguilar, 70; Don L. Riggin, 51; Thomas M. Reavley, 50; Thomas 
P. Moore, 27; Joe E. Covington, 14; Byron Hayes, Jr., 7. 

Fourth Ballot for Judicial Council Members 

The Secretary gave instructions for the taking of the ballot. E. 
Dale Dunlap (Kansas West) asked to have his name withdrawn 
from consideration in the balloting. Clint D. Burleson (North 
Arkansas) moved that the counting of this ballot be delayed until 



The United Methodist Church 343 

action on the reports on ordination standards before the 
Conference was completed. The motion was adopted. When the 
ballots had been collected, the Chair declared the ballot closed. 

Procedural Motions 

Margie J. Mayson (Central New York) moved to suspend the 
rules such that only three amendments per report would be 
permitted in the process of perfecting reports. The motion was 
defeated. Steve Alexander (Iowa) asked a question about the 
motion; the Chair responded. 

Bob R. Martin (North Georgia) moved to suspend the mles and 
declare both Minority Report A and Minority Report B on the 
standards for ordination issue perfected, in order to proceed to 
the debate. The motion was adopted, and the Chair called for 
debate on Minority Report B. 

Report No. 16, Minority Report B — Debate and Vote 

William W. Morris (Tennessee): Bishop Tuell and members of the General 
Conference, the proposed Minority Report B is an effort to speak to the necessity of 
moral standards regardless of one's status in life. If you are married, fidelity is 
encouraged. If you are single, celibacy is suggested. In regard to homosexuality 
the proposed legislation is not intended to deny anyone their civil rights or civil 
liberties. Nor is it intended to exclude anyone from the family of God. But our faith 
demands that we not be vindictive, but rather we be fair, just, and compassionate. 

However, ordination is not an inalienable right, nor is it something we are 
entitled to because of our humanity. Instead, it is a right bestowed upon those who 
are called by the church. Ordination is a validation of that call, and therefore the 
church has the authority to determine whom it shall ordain. The proposed 
legislation simply acknowledges this fact. It would also give district committees 
and annual conference boards of ordained ministry the legislation necessarj' to deal 
with this concern. In light of this, I would only request that you support the 
Minority Report B. 

William 0. Walker (Oregon-Idaho) asked a question about 
procedure; the Chair answered. Hildegard Sollenberger (Central 
Pennsylvania) requested that speakers speak more slowly for the 
benefit of the interpreters. 

Roy I. Sa/io (California-Nevada): I rise to oppose the amendment, or excuse me, 
Minority Report B. I have no question about the intentions of those offering 
Minority Report B. They are offering us a way of exercising the power of the two 
keys; namely, the power to bind and the power to loose, as in Matthew 16:19. They 
are also trjnng to embody the dual emphasis in our denominational tradition which 
tries to proclaim God's grace as well as moral ideals. While I would affirm the 
soundness of these dual emphases from Scripture and tradition, I believe their 
proposal is more likely to mislead us in these days, when a flood of letters call us 
back to scribal religion and Pharisaic piety. I would submit that under such 
circumstances as we find ourselves today, Jesus was more intent on bridling or 
binding the scribes and Pharisees. By contrast, he turned loose those who 



344 Journal of the 19 8 U General Conference 

apparently crossed over or transgressed the boundaries which were drawn 
apparently in the created order. In his day, Jesus released in no uncertain terms 
salvation through the Samaritans who epitomized transgressors of the boundaries. 
The followers, like Paul, did not ask the converts to change their identity. Hence, 
they did not ask for circumcision, a major battle in the early church. I would submit 
these are the biblical analogies to guide us today. 

John N. Howard (Holston) spoke in favor of Minority Report 
B; Ignacio Castuera (Pacific and Southwest) spoke against it. 
Richard H. Timberlake (Holston) asked the Chair to rule 
whether Minority Report B was a proper substitute for the 
committee report, inasmuch as the two reports dealt with 
different paragraphs of the Discipline and would not therefore be 
mutually exclusive. The Chair ruled that it was a proper 
substitute since the reports dealt with the same issue. L. E. 
Crowson (West Virginia) spoke in support of the minority report. 
Sally Geis (Rocky Mountain) asked a question about procedure; 
the Chair answered. Carol M. Cox (New York) spoke against 
Minority Report B. 

Richard A. Thomburg (New York) moved that the vote on 
Minority Report B be by written ballot. The motion did not 
receive the required one-third vote. David E. Chaney (Northern 
Illinois) moved to suspend the rules in order to extend the debate 
on this minority report by three additional speeches on each side. 
The motion was defeated. 

Bonner E. Teeter (Oklahoma) asked whether, under the 
language of Minority Report B, "a self-avowed homosexual who 
is not a practicing homosexual (could) be entitled to ordination." 
The Chair ruled that the question was in the nature of debate, but 
that the presenter of the report could respond to it in his final 
statement if he chose to do so. 

Mr. Seamands: Yes, they could, because this does not address the question of 
orientation. We're talking only about practice and behavior, the same as the Social 
Principles. 

I want to say that this petition that I have presented is basically the petition vdth 
a one-word editorial change which was sent by the Southeastern Jurisdiction 
Association of Conference Boards of Ministry. We keep debating, as if footnotes 
and Social Principles on imprecise language is still an option. It is not an option with 
us, and I remind those who contend that we do not want laundry lists, that it is a 
matter of spirit, that those are the people who broke the spirit of this and then 
appealed to the law to sustain their breaking of the spirit. Finally, I would say, 
specific language is necessary to preserve the heart-genius of United Methodism, 
and that's our connectional system. I think if there's any place we need to stay 
together as sisters and brothers it is in regard to the moral standards for our 
ordained clergy. If we continue in our present direction, I think it may soon be said 
of us, "There is no United Methodist Church, there are only United Methodist 
conferences, and each one does what is right in its own eyes." Friends, let us be 
precise, let's say what we mean and mean what we say. Let our "yes" be "yes" and 



The United Methodist Church 345 

our "no" be "no. " We believe that the purity of our ministry, the unity of our system 
and the mtegnty of our church depend upon it. 

Mr. Quick: Bishop, and members of the Conference. We hope that you will 
sustain the legislative committee and the majority report. We wrestled with these 
petitions, and by a vote of 79 to 22 we bring to you these seven words and we see 
this as a traditional Christian moral standard to be applied consistently but not 
legahstically to all clergy, whether married or unmarried. It is therefore inclusive 
and that is the intent, not to single out or aim at any particular group. The majoritv 
report IS a positive statement about what the church would say is a behavioral 
norm. The seven-word addition can be understood properly only when it is read 
with the paragraph in which it would be placed. This statement is consistent with 
our Social Principles. We rejected prohibitive language because the list of 
prohibitions can be endless. As United Methodists, in our standards for ministry 
we wsh to speak of those attributes we want in a minister rather than those we 
don t want. 

The Chair called for the vote on Minority Report B. Douglas F 
Verdin (New York), Riclmrd D. Tholin (Northern Illinois) C 
David Lundquist (West Michigan), June D. McCullough (South- 
em New Jersey), and Rich<ird 0. Truitt (Wisconsin) asked 
questions about the procedure being followed and when Minority 
Keport A would be debated in that process. The Chair ruled that 
If voted as a substitute in this vote, the next debate and vote 
would be between the two minority reports, followed by a vote 
between the surviving minority report, if any, and the committee 
report. His ruling was sustained by vote of the Conference 

Minonty Report B was put to a vote, and the Chair ruled that it 
was defeated. Gamett Wilder (North Georgia) called for a count 
vote, and the request for a count vote was sustained by the 
required one-third vote of the Conference. The Secretarv gave 
instructions for the taking of the vote. Charles L. Lamar 
luT^""^:^ ^^^^"^ ^ question; the Chair responded. Durward 
McCord (Tennessee) moved that the recording of abstentions be 
permitted. John E. Stumbo (Kansas East) asked a question- the 
Chair answered. The motion to allow the recording of abstentions 
was defeated. When the votes had been counted, the Chair 
announced that Minority Report B had been defeated by a vote of 
496 against, 474 for. 

Report No. 16, Minority Report A— Debate and Vote 

C. Joseph Sprague (West Ohio) spoke in support of Minority 
Report A. Terry L. Clark (Central lUinois) opposed it. 

Mr. Clark: I speak in opposition to Minority Report A. The Church's histon- of 
theolo^ in reprd to sexuality has been inadequate and negative. Our premise has 
been Thou shalt not." The confusion abounds in the church about sexual ty 1? 
va^s SThpT'-';' ""r"''- ^''^' ^""'- ^'' "^"^^ ^^^'''' ^he confusion of sexual 
n he g tuf S ChriT""" ^"' righteousness in all human relationships 



346 Journal of the 198^ General Conference 

What does it mean to be male? What does it mean to be female? What does it 
mean to be single, faithful in relationships? What does it mean to be married and 
faithful in relationships? In this area of sexuality a direction has been lifted up to 
us — a direction specifically in regards to the standards for ordained ministry. 
These seven first lively words will move us out of this quagmire. The Minority 
Report A does not. It is too general; it says nothing. The committee's 
recommendation before us is positive, it's wholistic, sensitive and in keeping with 
the gospel. I ask for your support for the committee's majority report. Calendar 
No. 0510, because of both its specificity and because of its Christlike spirit. With 
the adoption of this our church will take a positive step forward for the sake of Jesus 
Christ, and for his church throughout the world. 

Ellen A. Brubaker (West Michigan): Brothers and sisters in Christ, isn't it a 
curious thing that our Savior came walking through the hills and valleys and met 
men and women and said to them simply, "Follow me." He, too, had a laundry hst 
for what constituted ministry. Follow me in feeding the hungry, freeing the 
oppressed, visiting those in prison, giving the cup of water to one who is thirsty. 
How even stranger it is that He managed to ask this without asking disciplinary 
questions. This same Christ came to us with the human face of God, and He never 
sold out. He lived in utter integrity and was faithful and constant in all relationships 
each day of His life. It is to that ministry we are all called — ordained and 
laypersons — and so it seems to me that Minority Report A is the spirit of the Christ 
who calls us to go and do likewise. 

G. Howard Allred (Western North Carolina) directed a 
question to the presenter of Minority Report A as follows: "If 
Minority A is passed, does this mean that a homosexual or lesbian 
person who is faithful and constant in that gay relationship may 
serve as an ordained clergy person in our connection?" The Chair 
ruled that Mr. Walker would have opportunity to respond to the 
question in his closing statement on behalf of Minority Report A. 

John T. King (Southwest Texas) moved to suspend the iniles in 
order to proceed to vote without further debate on the entire 
matter before the Conference. The motion did not receive the 
required two-thirds vote. 

Ernest Crouch (Tennessee) moved for a written ballot on 
Minority Report B. John E. Stumbo (Kansas East) raised a point 
of order, that that would require reconsideration of the 
completed action on Minority Report B. Mr. Crouch sought to 
move reconsideration, but when the Chair ascertained that he 
had voted on the losing side, he ruled the motion out of order. 
Sam P. McConnell (Holston) requested a recount on Minority 
Report B, but the Chair ruled that that would not be in order at 
this time. 

John F. Walker (Little Rock) spoke against Minority Report 
A. Ann Ross Stewart (Baltimore) spoke in support of it. Luhata 
Okoko (Central Zaire) spoke against it. There having been three 
speeches for and three speeches against Minority Report A, the 
Chair called for the final statements by representatives of the 
minority and committee reports. 



The United Methodist Church 347 

Mr. Walker: Bishop Tuell, before you start counting I owe a response directly, I 
think, to the gentleman. The answer, I believe, lies at the annual conference level 
to make that decision. 

Bishop Tuell and other dear friends in Christ, this seems like deja vu. Four years 
have gone very quickly for some, very slowly for others. You know that I certainly 
would much rather be spending our valuable human time facing the most pressing 
theological and social issue of all time — life or death — all living and human survival 
in this nuclear age. But we have been put to this moment, and we must address this 
question of our sexual orientation and predisposition, God-given. 

Last Friday morning we prayed in our morning worship of God, "Our 
commission is from you. You have chosen us. You have sent us." And this 
legislation to which now we have arrived is about our Christian calling, both 
general and representative, lay and clergy. This is about our common mission as 
persons who have been saved by grace through faith. It is about our being chosen 
by God and to be the proclaimers of God's love. 

We are a covenant company. A covenant company surrounds us both at the local 
church level and at the annual conference level. To test our gifts and graces. That's 
the purpose of this legislation on ordination issues. I pledge you unity of spirit, 
covenant in servanthood, solidarity in our diversity, but I cannot pledge to undo 
what God has given us. For God's sake and for all the world's, let us get on with our 
mission. 

Mr. Quick: Bishop and friends, I hope you will defeat this minority report. We 
believe we need a General Conference position on this issue for the whole church. 
I'm not in opposition to the spirit of this minority report. The language is verj' nice, 
but it reminds me of a kimono. It covers everything and touches nothing. It 
certainly doesn't address the issue before us. It does the opposite. It obscures the 
issue, and that issue is touching United Methodists everywhere. The minority 
report doesn't come to grips with the problem that we are facing, and I remind you 
of the words of our Lord Himself, "Not everyone who calls me Lord, Lord, will 
enter the Kingdom of Heaven, but only those who do the will of my Father who is in 
Heaven." 

Patricia Townsend (New York) moved for a written ballot on 
Minority Report A. The motion was defeated. Kiyoko K. Fujiu 
(Northern Illinois) objected to the manner of Mr. Quick's 
reference to the kimono in his statement. 

Gladys Fitts (Tennessee) raised a question about the iTile 
requiring delegates to stand in their places to be recognized, in 
view of the increasing number of persons with handicapping 
conditions who were being chosen as delegates; the Chair stated 
that her concern would be automatically referred to the 
Commission on the General Conference. 

Stacy D. Myers, Jr. (Eastern Pennsylvania) moved to suspend 
the lilies to permit introduction of a substitute for all before the 
Conference. The motion was defeated. 

Minority Report A was put to a vote and was defeated. 

Report No. 16, Committee Report — Debate and Vote 

The Chair called for debate on the committee report. 

Donna Langlas Green (Wisconsin): This is a speech against the committee 
report. For the past eight years our conference Board of Ordained Ministr\- has 



348 Journal of the 19 8U General Conference 

diligently worked in developing questions to ask candidates for deacons and elders 
ordinations. These questions are rooted in the standards, qualifications, and 
requirements, as stated in the 1980 Discipline. The current standards, 
quahfications, and requirements enable a wholistic and thorough assessment 
process. I believe that adding the words "fidelity in marriage" and "celibacy in 
singleness" establish legalistic criteria which evaluates sexuality as a singularly 
important criterion for assessing the whole of Christian life. If these words are 
added, there is the potential of seriously skewing the wholistic perspective we have 
been using. I hope we will vote against the addition of these words to our 
standards, qualifications, and requirements for ordained ministry. 

The Chair observed that the Conference would need to extend 
the time if it wished to proceed with consideration of this report. 
It was voted to extend the time to complete action on the report. 

Robert E. Fannin (Florida): It is central to our thinking and consideration that 
we understand the fact that we are speaking about qualifications and standards for 
ministry — not a statement aimed at any particular group. Qualifications and 
standards for ministry. This is in keeping with our task and responsibility as 
General Conference and church. It is very necessary that in a mobile, changing 
world, such as we now experience, that standards be stated and observed. The 
movement of persons and ideas require that the Discipline give strong guidelines 
to the local church, to the annual conferences, and to the greater United Methodist 
Church. The rationale and necessity of such a statement is manifold, but three are 
basic. 

One, these are standards which are in keeping with the physical, psychological, 
and spiritual standards necessary for a person to be effective in the ordained 
ministry of The United Methodist Church. Two, it is needed in terms of 
workability. Someone mentioned that no annual conference knowingly would 
admit to a relationship any person that did not practice fidelity in marriage and 
ceUbacy in singleness. I do not know the exact number, but I would say that there 
are few knowingly with this knowledge. It is, however, my experience and the 
experience of my colleagues across the world that to make a judgment in this area 
of concern, based only on local understanding, causes confusion, both to the church 
and those seeking to serve in The United Methodist Church. Three, it is in keeping 
with our Social Principles. I urge you to support the committee report. 

Robert K. Smyth (Southern New Jersey) moved to suspend the 
rules in order to proceed directly to the closing statement and the 
vote. The motion was put to a vote and was ruled to have been 
adopted; Paul V. Chaffee (Western Pennsylvania) objected that 
Mr. Smyth had sought recognition for a point of order and then 
had proceeded to introduce a motion, and that the action to 
suspend the rules should therefore be ruled out of order. The 
Chair agreed, and the rules were not suspended. 

Shirley Parris (New York) spoke against the committee report. 
LaVerne B. Burton (Little Rock) supported it. Wilson T. Boots 
(New York) opposed it. John T. King (Southwest Texas) moved 
to extend the time, but the Chair stated that that had already 
been done. Susan T. Henry-Crowe (South Carolina) asked 
whether defeat of the report would leave the Discipline 



The United Methodist Church 349 

unchanged; the Chair repHed that it would. Karl K. Stegall 
(Alabama- West Florida) spoke in favor of the committee report. 
Stephen A. Dahl (Northern Illinois) called for a division of the 
question in order to vote separately on the phrases "celibacy in 
singleness" and "fidelity in marriage." There was objection to the 
division, and the call for it was not sustained by vote of the 
Conference. 

Mr. Quick: Bishop and friends, it isn't society's confusion, but in this General 
Conference our church's position and the standards for those who wish to be set 
apart for ministry'. Let's bring it into sharp focus, that principle issue. We are 
called upon to distinguish properly between the issue of human and civil rights to 
which all persons are entitled, regardless of their sexual preference, and the more 
specific matter of the church setting standards for the pastors. 

A person called and set apart for ministry is not a status to which one is 
automatically entitled, and questions asked of those seeking ordination regarding 
faith and commitment are right. And in the spirit of that layperson from Little 
Rock, the people's poet said, "I'd rather see a sermon than hear one any day. I'd 
rather you would walk with me than merely show the way. For the eye's a better 
pupil and more willing than the ear. Fine counsel is confusing and examples always 
clear, and the best of all the preachers are the ones who live their creeds. For to see 
the good in action is what everybody needs. I can soon learn how to do it, if you'll let 
me see it done. I can watch your life in action, but your tongue too fast may run." I 
hope you will support the majority report. 

Kil Sang Yoon (East Ohio) asked a question, but the Chair 
ruled that it was not germane. The committee report was adopted 
(see pages 412, 1215). 

Request for Judicial Council Decision 

Patricia Townsend (New York) moved that the Conference 
direct two questions to the Judicial Council: (1) "who indeed does 
have the ability to establish the criteria in matters of ministerial 
character and conduct"; and (2) "who will define the meanings of 
the words 'fidelity' and 'celibacy.' " She spoke in favor of the 
referral. L. E. Crowson (West Virginia) sought to introduce 
another motion, but Dale F. DeLong (West Ohio) raised a point of 
order, that the time had been extended only for the vote on the 
report. The Chair ruled that the point was well taken and that 
neither Ms. Townsend' s nor Mr. Crowson' s motions were in 
order. 

Mr. Quick apologized for his use of the word "kimono" in his 
closing statement on Minority Report A. 

Committee on Presiding Officers 

Richard W. Cain (Pacific and Southwest) reported on behalf of 
the committee that the following bishops had been chosen to 
preside over subsequent Conference sessions: Wednesday after- 



350 Journal of the 198 U General Conference 

noon, Bishop Roy C. Nichols (New York Area); Wednesday 
evening, Bishop Emerito P. Nacpil (Philippines Central Confer- 
ence); Thursday morning. Bishop Ernest T. Dixon, Jr. (San 
Antonio Area). 

Closing 

The Secretary made announcements. Bishop Francis E. 
Kearns (East Ohio) offered the closing prayer, and the session 
was adjourned. 



EIGHTH DAY, WEDNESDAY, MAY 9, 1984 
AFTERNOON SESSION 

Opening 

The General Conference of The United Methodist Church 
convened in the afternoon session of Wednesday, May 9, 1984, at 
2 p.m. in the Civic Center Arena, Baltimore, Maryland, with 
Bishop Roy C. Nichols (New York Area) presiding. Bishop Nolan 
B. Harmon (Retired) led the Conference in an opening prayer. 

Committee on Courtesies and Privileges 

C. Vernon Bigler (Western New York), chairperson of the 
committee called on B. C. Goodwin (New Mexico) as chairperson 
of the Commission on the General Conference to present the 
members of that Commission. 

Mr. Goodwin: Mrs. Elizabeth Watson, vice chairperson of facilities is unable to 
be with us at this Conference because of illness in her family; Dr. Gene Crawford, 
vice chairperson of the Program Committee, Dr. Crawford; Barbara Thompson, 
who is secretary of the commission; Frances Alguire, a member of our Commission; 
William Walker; Robert Dillard; Eugene Frazer; Noe Gonzales; I believe Dr. 
Gonzales is involved with responsibilities at the worship service, he was here 
earlier this morning; Bert Jordan; Irma Kellogg, who has served on the 
Commission, had to leave and is unable to be with us this afternoon; George 
Rudisill; Rossing Smith; Nelson Stants; Frank Webber; Samuel Wong is also 
unable to be present. 

In addition to these members of the Commission, the following persons serve as 
ex-officio: J. B. Holt, our General Conference secretary; Ewing Wayland, 
treasurer; DeWayne Woodring, our executive director-business manager. One 
other person who is not a member of the Commission but who serves on our 
Program Committee of the Commission, Bishop John Warman, we want to 
recognize and thank for his support and participation these past four years. Bishop, 
sisters and brothers in Christ, it's my pleasure to present to you these persons who 
are members of our commission and who have worked these four years preparing 
for the Conference. 

The Conference responded with applause. Mr. Goodwin then 
called on Wilson Shearer, general chairperson of the Local 
Committee, to present members of that committee. 

Mr. Shearer: Bishop Nichols, members of the Conference. If everj' person in the 
Washington Area, the Baltimore and Peninsula Conferences, who has helped to 
entertain the Conference were here this afternoon, each delegate would probably 
have at least one hostess or host standing by your side. Since all these people are 
not here, we are pleased to introduce some of our Local Committee members as 
they are represented here. 

Quite a few of our committee could not be present at this time due to other 

351 



352 Journal of the WSJ,. General Conference 

commitments, and quite honestly we had more members of our committee here 
before the noontime recess than we do now. Some of them had to leave, but I'll 
introduce those that we do have here. 

First, I'd like to present my wife, Marilyn, who has been my office secretary, my 
private consultant, and consoler. Next, I'd like to introduce the treasurer of our 
committee, the Rev. Harold Lanman. The chairperson of our group of 
subcommittees on staffing and equipment is Mr. Edgar Nicodemus. The 
coordinator of the office of the Local Committee here at the Civic Center has been 
Mr. Robert Powrie. His cohort is unable to be here; he is out on an errand. One of 
the coordinators of our secretarial personnel committee has been Nancy Zabel who 
is also a delegate from the Baltimore Conference. Is Hilda back? I don't see her . . . 
from the first aid room. Francis Turpin has been the coordinator of our postal 
services. He's also a delegate, I believe, so if you're out there somewhere, Francis, 
come on up. The chairperson of the program group of subcommittees is Dr. Forrest 
Stith, also a delegate from the Baltimore Conference. The coordinator of the 
Bishop's Reception Committee, the affair held on Monday night at the Convention 
Center, is Annie Thompson. Annie, are you sitting with the delegation? All right, 
apparently not. The coordinator for the area event, the concert at the symphony 
hall, is Dr. Carroll Yinghng, also a delegate, but I don't see him in the room at the 
present time. I'm not doing so well, am I? Where is he? Come on up, Carroll. I think 
the house would certainly want to see you. Here he comes. The co-chairpersons of 
our hospitality subcommittee are the Rev. and Mrs. Hemphill. The only other 
member that I see is Dr. Ruth Laws who has been the coordinator of our delegate 
lounges. Will you come. Dr. Laws. 

The Conference again showed its appreciation with applause. 

Mr. Bigler called on Li Ping-Kwong (Methodist Church of 
Hong Kong) for a presentation. On behalf of his conference, he 
presented a gift and announced that his Church would be 
celebrating its 100th anniversary in November, 1984. Bishop 
Nichols accepted the gift on behalf of the Conference and 
expressed congratulations to the Hong Kong Church for its 
centennial observance. 

Committee on Calendar 

Virgil V. Bjork (North Indiana), chairperson of the committee, 
announced that the committee proposed allocating one-half hour 
for reports of the General Council on Ministries, followed by 
reports of the Legislative Committee on Church and Society 
having to do with Central America, and then by a report from the 
Legislative Committee on Global Ministries on alternate mis- 
sions-sending agencies. 

Ballot for University Senate Membership 

The Secretary gave instructions for the ballot for membership 
on the University Senate. When it was learned that the ballots 
had not yet been distributed, the Chair called for reports from the 
General Council on Ministries. 



The United Methodist Church 353 

General Council on Ministries Report No. 17 — Special 
Programs 

Norman E. Dewire (West Ohio), GCOM general secretary, 
reported that, taking into account reports already considered and 
reports which had been adopted by way of the Consent Calendar, 
two GCOM reports remained for presentation to the Conference. 
He called on Bruce P. Blake (Kansas West) for presentation of 
Report No. 17, entitled "Resolution on Special Programs for the 
1985-88 Quadrennium" (see page 678). Mr. Blake stated that the 
report recommended that there be no special programs during 
the quadrennium. 

Legislative Committee on Council on Ministries Report 
No. 77, Calendar No. 888 

Carolyn H. Oehler (Northern Illinois), chairperson of the 
legislative committee, presented the committee's recommenda- 
tion of concurrence with the GCOM report. 

David L. Severe (Oklahoma) moved to amend the report with 
the follo\\ing addition: "However, to emphasize the global 
dimensions of our church, the Africa Church Growth and 
Development Program shall be continued as a part of the Ethnic 
Minority Local Church Missional Priority." He explained that, in 
action on the missional priority earlier in the Conference, there 
had been no opportunity to offer it as an amendment to the 
minority report which was finally adopted. Richard D. Tholin 
(Northern Illinois) moved to amend the amendment by adding, 
"without any funding from missional priority funds." Mr. Severe 
accepted the amendment as part of his motion. 

Bonnie L. Totten (Central New York) asked if it would be 
possible to hear from an African delegate in relation to this 
amendment. 

Max A. Bailor (Sierra Leone): Mr. Chairman, I'm happy that you reminded us 
that this body voted strongly to support this. I'd just Hke to add a bit here and to 
plead with members of the Conference, honestly and sincerely, to support this 
program, to have it in view. For all that it has achieved in the past four years, four 
years is inadequate and certainly not enough to see the effects of a program like this 
one. I would think it would be a disservice to the church if it is not continued. In this 
Conference we have no less than eight African bishops who can testify to the 
validity of such a program. I would like to plead with you not to drop it at this point 
and time, but to have it before you and continue with it. This is our plea, and I am 
speaking, I think, on behalf of that group, the African continent. 

Kil Sang Yoon (East Ohio) spoke affiiTning the importance of 
the Africa Church Growth and Development Program, but also 
expressing concern about attaching it to the missional priority 
report, so as not to dilute the impact of the single missional 



354 Journal of the 198Jt. General Conference 

priority. The Secretary read the amendment. Ms. Oehler stated 
that the legislative committee would not find the amendment to 
be in conflict with the recommendation for no special programs, 
since the funding for it is through the general Advance special 
program. 

Leigh Roberts (Wisconsin) suggested the necessity for sus- 
pending the rules, since the legislative committee report had 
been printed less than the required twenty-four hours. The rules 
were suspended by vote of the Conference. The amendment was 
adopted, and the report was adopted as amended (see pages 678, 
1559). 

Ballot for University Senate Membership 

The Chair asked that delegates complete their ballots for 
University Senate membership. When all of the ballots had been 
collected, he declared the ballot closed. 

Request for Judicial Council Decision 

C. Wilbume Hancock (South Georgia) moved that the 
Conference "urgently and respectfully . . . request the Judicial 
Council for a declaratory judgment while we are in session as to 
whether or not the language 'fidelity in marriage and celibacy in 
singleness' which has been adopted prohibits the ordination and 
appointment of a self-avowed practicing homosexual person" (see 
above, pages 337-349). John E. Stumbo (Kansas East) moved to 
amend the reference to include a question as to what the words 
"fidelity" and "celibacy" mean in the legislation, and by whom 
they are to be defined. On inquiry from the Chair, Mr. Hancock 
replied that he would not accept the amendment as part of his 
motion. The amendment was defeated. 

L. E. Crowson (West Virginia) moved as a substitute "that the 
action of the General Conference on calendar items 510, 511, and 
512, which deal with new Par. 404.5 and also the footnote to Par. 
404 where the words 'fidelity in marriage and celibacy in 
singleness' also occur, shall be referred to the Judicial Council for 
a declaratory decision as to whether the words in our action are 
such as to preclude the ordination and appointment of self- 
avowed and practicing homosexuals in our church." Mr. Hancock 
accepted the substitute wording in place of the language of his 
motion, and it was adopted. 

General Council on Ministries Report No. 31 — New Church 
Development 

Mr. Dewire called on Charles W. Jordan (Northern Illinois) for 
presentation of GCOM Report No. 31, "Report on a National 



The United Methodist Church 355 

Strategy for New Church Development" (see page 689). Mr. 
Jordan outlined the contents of the report and noted that, 
because of a previous action of this General Conference, item 1 
under the heading "Observations and Concerns" should be 
deleted from the printed report. 

Committee on Council on Ministries Report No. 37, Calendar 
No. 799 

Ms. Oehler presented the legislative committee recommenda- 
tion for adoption of the GCOM report, and it was adopted (see 
pages 689, 1535). 

Questions Regarding GCOM Report No. 10 

John Porter (Louisiana) ascertained from Mr. Dewire that 
action on all GCOM reports was complete, except those for which 
the corresponding legislative committee reports were on the 
Consent Calendar. Mr. Porter inquired about Report No. 10. 

Mr. Porter: And the question is regarding this report, and maybe it had 
consensus, was the accountability of the GCOM to the General Conference. If you 
will look at D-58 (Advance Edition of the Daily Christian Advocate), it says the 
task force completed its work, May, 1983. The GCOM voted to approve the 
guidelines for submission to the 1984 General Conference. Therefore, it 
recommended to the 1984 General Conference that the guidelines for eliminating 
racism, ageism, handicappism, and sexism for the United Methodist resource 
material be approved by the General Conference and commended for use 
throughout the church. It also recommended that the United Methodist Publishing 
House publish and distribute these guidelines. 

I would call to your attention this material has been published in July of 1983. At 
the bottom of the first page it says, "They are now available for use throughout The 
United Methodist Church." I wrote the General Council. I had a reply, and it said 
that it would be referred to this body for perfection. Admittedly it had been 
distributed in their letter already without concurrence from this body or vote in 
approval by this body. They are distributing an imperfect piece of material 
according to their letter. My question is, and I do not disagree with the content or 
the intent, but should that action have been taken by this body prior to 
distribution? 

Mr. Dewire: Yes. Bishop Nichols, the 1980 General Conference adopted a set of 
guidelines on the elimination of racism, ageism, and sexism from United Methodist 
Church resource materials, remanding those back to the GCOM for perfection and 
the addition of material eliminating handicappism from curriculum material. When 
the GCOM finished its work in preparation for the General Conference, a set goes 
to the delegates so that you would have ample opportunity to study them and not 
simply see them scrunched into Advance DC A. The Report No. 10 from the GCOM 
at this moment appears on the Consent Calendar, is what we are told. 

Mr. Porter: Although it happened in 1980, that does not make it correct to do 
that. The GCOM needs to be accountable to this body before putting literature out, 
and that is my point, and I think they need to be censured for it. 



356 Journal of the 198U General Conference 

Question on Legislative Committee on Council on Ministries 
Report No. 83, Calendar No. 894 

Pat Freemyer (North Arkansas) called attention to the report 
as printed, asked if there had been action on it, and pointed out 
that the reference should be corrected as being to the conference 
Council on Ministries, rather than the general council. Ms. Oehler 
replied that, while action on GCOM reports was complete, there 
were still a number of reports of the Legislative Committee on 
Council on Ministries to be presented; she agreed with Ms. 
Freemyer's correction. 

Motion on Printing of Nominations 

Clemmet A. Peterson (Minnesota) moved that hereafter, when 
a list of nominees for any position is printed in the Daily 
Christian Advocate, that no designation of sex, race, or age be 
included. He spoke in support of his motion. The motion was 
defeated. 

Motion Regarding Printing of Recommendations to General 
Conference 

Barbara Williams Riddle (Florida) moved that, for future 
General Conferences, all material and recommendations from the 
general agencies be publicized and printed only in the Daily 
Christian Advocate, The Interpreter, Newscope, or the United 
Methodist Reporter. She spoke in support of her motion. Richard 
0. Truitt (Wisconsin) moved to amend the motion by deleting 
reference to the United Methodist Reporter, since it is not 
published by a church agency. The Chair remarked that 
removing its name from the list could not prevent the Reporter 
from pubhshing anything it chose to publish. Ms. Riddle accepted 
the amendment. The motion was defeated. 

Statement by GCOM President 

Bishop Dwight E. Loder, president of the General Council on 
Ministries, asked for the opportunity to make a statement about 
that Council's distribution of the "Guidelines for Eliminating 
Racism, Ageism, Handicappism and Sexism from United Meth- 
odist Resource Materials." 

Bishop Loder: Mr. Chairman, at a moment of high privilege, I think there has 
been a misconception abroad just in the last few moments about the action of the 
GCOM, which needs to be repeated in the words of Ned Dewre. That is that the 
material that was put together was put together as an answer to a mandate of the 
1980 General Conference given to the General Council on Ministries. It was not 
distributed to the churches. As with all of the boards and agencies, that material 
was put into the hands only of the delegates ahead of this General Conference for 



The United Methodist Church 357 

their information so they could be acquainted with it. It was not an effort to put this 
material in motion in the church until it has been approved by this General 
Conference, and no such action was ever taken by the GCOM. I appreciate the fact 
that that question was asked or that that assertion was made so that we could bring 
this word of illumination. Thank you very much. 

Mr. Porter: The gentleman stated, it was only sent to the delegates. May I read 
a letter that was sent to the delegates. 

"Have been commended and sent directly to the general agencies, district 

superintendents, CCOM directors and annual conference communicators and 

editors. Dated Oct. 3, from the GCOM." 
In addition to that on Oct. 26 when I received a reply . . . 

Bishop Nichols: Let me ask you a question, sir. 

Mr. Porter: Yes, sir. 

Bishop Nichols: What do you want the General Conference to do? 

Mr. Porter: I want them to be aware that this was not just sent to the delegates. 
This has been distributed throughout the church; the gentleman said "just to the 
delegates." This is incorrect and one other question. My question was not 
answered. Is the GCOM accountable to this body? And I ask that question. 

Bishop Nichols: Of course, the Chair can answer that. 

Bishop Loder: And so can I, and I am delighted to be called a gentleman any time 
under any circumstances. And I would say to you, yes, of course, it was sent to the 
delegates of this body and to persons who would, by the action of this body, need to 
understand the nature of the recommendations in the local church. It was not 
circulated as an accomplished fact. It was circulated as a proposal that would be 
made to the General Conference. I am sorry for this misunderstanding. 

Mr. Porter moved that the General Conference instruct the 
General Council on Ministries that they are responsible to the 
General Conference, and they should not distribute material 
other than to the General Conference delegates prior to General 
Conference action. The motion was defeated. 

Legislative Committee on Church and Society Report No. 33, 
Calendar No. 822 

Richard S. Parker (New York), chairperson of the legislative 
committee, called on Jack D. Heacock (Southwest Texas) for 
presentation of the report, on the subject "Concern for Human 
Rights in Central America" (see pages 814-819). He presented 
editorial corrections to the printed report and called for its 
adoption. Beatrice R. Burgess (West Virginia) called attention to 
another printing error. 

Victor W. Goldschmidt (North Indiana) moved to amend the 
original subsection III, g, by adding at the beginning the words, 
"While realizing the legal implications, ..." He spoke in support 
of his amendment; Mr. Heacock accepted it on behalf of the 
committee. 

Helen Rhea Coppedge (South Georgia) moved to amend section 
III by inserting a new subsection d, and relettering the 
subsections which followed. The new "d" would read as follows: 
"Provide that exchanges of curriculum material and whenever 



358 Journal of the 19 8U General Conference 

possible exchanges of visitors between United States and Central 
American churches should be inclusive of various theological and 
political philosophies, so that our peoples may better understand 
the diversity of the viewpoints that exist within our commun- 
ions." Mr. Heacock accepted the amendment on behalf of the 
committee. 

Donald J. Hand (Southwest Texas) moved to amend the report 
by deleting everything beginning with the words, "In Nicaragua, 
in 1983 . . . ," and substituting the following: "We call upon the 
government of the United States to continue its efforts to bring 
peace and stability to Central America, particularly those efforts 
which have led to a massive and impressive curtailment of 
suffering and death experienced in recent years: the successful 
implementation of land reform, the estabhshment of freely 
elected governments in most of those countries in which the U.S. 
government has influence, such as Costa Rica, Honduras, and, 
most recently. El Salvador. We appreciate and encourage these 
governmental efforts to bring freedom, prosperity, and peace to 
all of Central America." 

Mr. Hand: The committee recommendation contains negative references to 
U.S. governmental activities from groups in Nicaragua, Guatemala, and 
Honduras. There is no effort to maintain balance. The majority of the citizens in 
these countries speak affirmatively of the U.S. influence. They were not heard in 
the report. Interestingly, Bishop Rivera y Damas is quoted in a violence statement 
criticizing extremists of both the left and the right. The report refers to the 
announcement of elections by the Nicaraguan government. They have not been 
held. On the other hand, governmental elections have been completed in El 
Salvador just recently. In a briefing by State Department personnel in April of last 
month, I learned that the guerrillas in that area have public relations offices in 36 
countries of the world, and they have produced much misinformation which has 
been picked up in the media. The U.S. was the first government to offer aid to the 
Sandinistas. Within six weeks after the first planeload of wheat landed, they 
established a training center for guerillas from El Salvador. Russia has more 
advisors in Central America than anyone else. They are also the largest amis 
suppHer. ApollbytheU.S. inCentral America shows that the U.S. has the highest 
approval rating of all countries. On the other hand, Nicaragua, Cuba, and USSR 
are viewed as the most threatening. 

Ignacio Castuera (Pacific and Southwest): Within the Los Angeles District 
alone, where I have the honor and privilege of serving, we have 250,000 Salvadoran 
refugees; 60,000 Guatemalan refiigees. We get firsthand news — not from any 
agencies nor from any embassies or any offices of the patriotic movement or 
guerilla movement. We get them from and through the churches. The reason why 
we are so far ahead on the Central America issue, as compared to the Vietnam 
issue, is that nobody spoke Vietnamese in this country when we were involved in 
that other war. But there are 30,000,000 people in the U.S. who speak Spanish, 
many of them within The United Methodist Church. We are getting our 
information through the churches. We are trying to support Christians in Central 
America, and what we're asking for here is not necessarily the victory of 
extremists but support of the efforts of the Contadora movement. I urge the defeat 
of this amendment. 



The United Methodist Church 359 

Mr. Heacock made the final statement against the amendment 
on behalf of the committee. The amendment was defeated. 

K. June Goldman (Iowa) moved to amend the report by adding 
the following to Section II: "The United States cannot unilat- 
erally end the violence in Central America if other governments 
such as Cuba, Nicaragua, and the Soviet Union continue to assist 
the insurgents who engage in acts of economic sabotage, acts of 
assassination, kidnapping, and warfare." She spoke in support of 
her amendment. Shirley M. Marsh (Nebraska) spoke against it. 
Mr. Heacock opposed it on behalf of the committee. The 
amendment was defeated. 

George W. Calvin (Louisiana) sought to introduce an amend- 
ment. It was pointed out that the sentence Mr. Calvin wished to 
amend was from a quotation used by the committee, and the 
amendment was withdrawn. 

James H. Laue (Missouri East) moved to amend subsection I, 
b, by adding the following to the end of it: "and become a willing 
participant in the peace negotiation process being conducted by 
the Contadora group." Mr. Heacock accepted the amendment on 
behalf of the committee. 

Bob R. Martin (North Georgia) moved to suspend the rules, 
declare the report perfected, and proceed to the vote on the 
report. The motion was adopted. Mr. Heacock sought to gain 
permission for Bishop Federico J. Pagura (Evangelical Methodist 
Church of Argentina) to give the closing statement on behalf of 
the committee. The Chair ruled that the suspension of the mles 
did not permit the introduction of additional speakers. The report 
was adopted (see pages 814-819). 

Recess 

The Secretary made announcements. The Chair declared the 
Conference to be in recess for fifteen minutes. 

Appreciation for Hospitality 

Emmy Lou John (Northern Illinois) expressed appreciation on 
behalf of the Conference to those from the Washington Area who 
had provided and served refreshments during recesses through- 
out the Conference. 

Transmittal of Statement on Central America 

Victor W. Goldschmidt (North Indiana) moved that the 
Secretary- arrange for the immediate and respectful transfer of 
the Central America statement (as approved just prior to the 
recess) to President Reagan. The motion was adopted. 



360 Journal of the 198 Jf. General Conference 

Legislative Committee on Global Ministries 

The Chair called on C. Rex Bevins (Nebraska) for presentation 
of reports from the Global Ministries committee. 

Report No. 26, Calendar No. 329 

Mr. Bevins presented the report, consisting of a recommenda- 
tion for referral of petitions on an alternate mission society to the 
General Board of Global Ministries and the Council of Bishops, 
with an accompanying resolution. 

Mr. Bevins: I want to take a moment now to describe the process that we used in 
considering these two petitions in this sensitive issue in our legislative committee. 
We decided to deal with it in the committee as a whole. We invited two persons to 
serve as resource persons to our legislative group, Peggy Billings, who is the 
deputy general secretary for the World Division of the General Board of Global 
Ministries, and the Rev. H. T. Maclin, who happens to be the executive for The 
Mission Society for United Methodists. Both of them made presentations. The 
debate in the committee was representative of the many diverse opinions of that 
committee; it was thorough. 

We were assured that the purpose in the program of the Board of Global 
Ministries does and will continue to proclaim the word in places and among peoples 
where it has not been heard or heeded. We believe that the board will be faithful to 
that mandate. But we are convinced that, as good as these programs of evangelism 
and witness may be, they can be made stronger, and they can be strengthened. 
And so we want the Board of Global Ministries to be in dialogue with those in the 
church who have proposed new directions for re-directions in more programs. 

There is much to be learned about how the mission can best be carried out, but 
there is also much to be sacrificed if our witness to unity throughout the world is 
compromised by competitive efforts of another mission unit within our 
denomination. So we welcome the readiness of the bishops in mediating the 
differences in mission philosophy and practice that prevail in our church today. The 
founders of the new Mission Society within our denominational family indicate to us 
that they are not seeking our recognition, but they obviously want our attention. 
The resolution is to provide an arena in which they can be heard. We are assured 
that they will be heard by the bishops, the leaders of the whole church, and by the 
Board of Global Ministries leaders of the duly established mission agency of The 
United Methodist Church. 

We anticipate an open and creative process of consultation between parties who 
share a common commitment to further extend the witness of the kingdom of God. 
What a day of rejoicing awaits when the doubt and the suspicion that have inhibited 
the great witness of this church in recent years can be laid aside. We would settle 
for nothing less in the recommendation put forward in this calendar item. I move 
concurrence with Calendar No. 0329. 

Kenneth H. Plummer, Sr. (Central Pennsylvania) moved to 
amend the resolution as follows: (1) substitute "Be it resolved 
that we implement the clear direction of the Episcopal Address to 
the 1984 General Conference as it states" for "Whereas the 
Episcopal Address to the 1984 General Conference states"; and 
(2) substitute "therefore the" for "Be it therefore resolved that." 
Mr. Bevins explained that Mr. Plummer's amendment repre- 



The United Methodist Church 361 

sented what a number of members of the legislative committee 
believed had been adopted there, but he was not in a position to 
accept it. Mr. Plummer spoke in support of the amendment, and 
it was adopted. The report was then adopted as amended (see 
pages 1293-1294). 

Request for Referral to Judicial Council 

E. Dale Dunlap (Kansas West) raised a question about the use 
of the name "United Methodist" by an agency which is not an 
official church agency, in this instance "The Mission Society for 
United Methodists." The Chair replied that that would require a 
determination by the Judicial Council. Mr. Dunlap moved to 
refer the matter to the Judicial Council, but the Chair suggested 
that he prepare a carefully worded motion of referral and bring it 
to the (!;onference later. 

James E. Shuler (Central Texas) made a comment about the 
number of unofficial caucuses and organizations using the United 
Methodist name. David A. Seamands (Kentucky) expressed a 
concern about the wording of a possible referral to the Judicial 
Council, and the Chair suggested that he confer directly with Mr. 
Dunlap about it. 

Report No. 25, Calendar No. 119 

Mr. Bevins presented the report, explaining that it recom- 
mended nonconcurrence with petitions calling for approval of The 
Mission Society for United Methodists as an alternative mis- 
sions-sending agency of The United Methodist Church. The 
nonconcurrence recommendation was adopted (see page 1293). 

Restructure of General Board of Global Ministries 

Mr. Bevins explained that the legislative committee reports 
which would follow were related to the internal restructuring of 
the General Board of Global Ministries. 

Mr. Bevins: I want to make an opening statement about the restructure of the 
General Board of Global Ministries which will provide the foundations for some 
actions which will now follow. The General Board of Global Ministries has fulfilled 
the mandate of the 1980 General Conference by completing a process to achieve 
flexibility in administration and structure during the 1981-84 quadrennium. The 
report, found on pp. D-88 to 91 in the Advance DC A details the historj\ process, 
goals, and elements of this planning process which led to our restructure. The 
GCOM served as consultants to the process and gave unanimous endorsement to 
the final plan. 

The major results of the restructure are a greater sense of coherence for our 
richly diverse mission program and a higher level of accountability in its 
administration. The plan of organization emphasizes unity and hopefulness mthin 
the Board. It affirms a principle role for directors as the policy makers, first, for the 



362 Journal of the 198^ General Conference 

Board as a whole, and then its program divisions, program departments, and 
committees. 

The restructure has substantially reduced the Board's organizational structure. 
Six divisions, two work units, and five standing committees have been reduced to 
three program divisions, four program departments, and three standing 
committees. Most restructure efforts require new terminologj\ We have tried to 
keep this to a minimum , but you will be working wdth some of that new terminology 
as we will be introducing some future calendar items to you. Others will be brought 
by the Committee on Administrative Order. 

Most importantly, however, the new plan of organization viill permit new 
program emphases. A new program department on Mission Personnel Resources 
will give greater visibility to the important role of recruiting and training persons 
for missions, including short-term volunteers. The plan also emphasizes the 
importance of mission education. The Mission Education and Cultivation program 
holds responsibility for developing mission education among constituencies in 
conferences, but also for directors of the Board, who are now called upon to assume 
a greater role in interpreting mission needs and programs. The Health and Welfare 
Department vdll continue to relate to annual conference agencies, but will also take 
responsibility for defining new models for health delivery services and advocacy. 
The UMCOR Program Department continues its long time service in areas of relief 
and redevelopment. But we will also assume initiatives in addressing such mission 
issues as long-term poverty and economic development. 

The office of the general secretary provides a visible center for the Board. The 
general secretary has been given new authorization in matters of finance, 
personnel, and program development. New initiatives in constituency and 
conference relations have been assigned to that office. The new plan of organization 
was fully implemented in the Spring, 1983, meeting of the Board. The annual 
meeting held in October, 1983, was the first full meeting under the new structures. 
Early evaluation of the efforts of reorganization show very positive results. There 
is confidence among directors of the Board that the new structure holds high 
potential for making the General Board of Global Ministries more responsive to its 
mission mandates and to its administrative tasks and to the constituencies that we 
have here in the United States and overseas. 

Mr. Bevins asked that Judith Craig (East Ohio) be allowed to 
speak as a part of his opening statement. Ms. Craig made a 
statement expressing the General Council on Ministries' support 
for the proposed restructure plan. 

Committee on Global Ministries Report No. 142, Calendar 
No. 679 

Mr. Bevins presented the report, consisting of a recommenda- 
tion of concurrence with proposed legislation related to the 
composition of the Health and Welfare Ministries Department. 
The report was adopted (see page 1352). 

Report No. 143, Calendar No. 680 

Mr. Bevins explained that the report recommended noncon- 
currence with a petition which would have been in contradiction 
to the action on Report No. 142. The report was adopted (see 
pages 1352-1353). 



The United Methodist Church 363 

Report No. 145, Calendar No. 682 

Mr. Bevins explained that the report consisted of proposed 
legislation related to the United Methodist Association of Health 
and Welfare Ministries. 

Ivan L. LaTumo (Missouri East) asked for additional 
information about the reasons for the proposed changes. 

Mr. Bevins: The Board of Global Ministries and also the Health and Welfare 
Program Department struggled long and hard with the issue and its relationship 
with the National Association of Health and Welfare Ministries, and whether 
this organization should continue to be listed in the Discipline with the full 
explanation that you find there. The first recommendation was that it should be 
taken out of the Discipline, and this was in part a response from the GCOM to 
start removing some of the agencies that have a relationship to The United 
Methodist Church but are not officially a part of this General Conference and 
amenable to this General Conference. And so on that basis the first 
recommendation was to remove that paragraph entirely. After consultation and 
strong cases made in the legislative committee, and recognizing that other such 
agencies were not being removed from the Discipline, as the board had been led 
to believe they would be, it seemed like we were discriminating against this one 
agency itself. The case was strongly made and supported that we should at least 
have this reference in the Discipline until all of these agencies could come under 
study during the next quadrennium. 

C. Vernon Bigler (Western New York) spoke in support of the 
report. It was adopted (see page 1353). 

Report on Third Ballot for Judicial Council Membership 

The Chair reported the results of the third ballot for Judicial 
Council membership as follows: clergy, 967 ballots cast, 484 
needed for election; there was no election. Those receiving 
votes: Gene E. Sease, 380; C. Ebb Munden, 218; Susan 
Morrison, 185; Robert H. Spain, 93; Donna Mortonstout, 19; 
John V. Moore, 16; Garnett Marion Wilder, 14; Alvin J. 
Lindgren, 13; Robert P. Ward, 9; Dale Dunlap, 6; William 
Hemphill, 4; John B, Hays, 3; and the remainder are under 3. 
The lay ballot: 966 ballots cast, 484 needed for election; there 
was no election. Those receiving votes: Willard H. Douglas, 
428; Terry Sanford, 362; Florence Freeman, 60; Foy Campbell, 
43; Crisolito Pascual, 32; Clifford D. Aguilar, 17; Don Riggin, 
10; Thomas M. Reavley, 9; Thomas P. Moore, 3; the remainder 
less than 3. 

Susan M. Morrison (Baltimore) asked that her name be 
withdrawn from consideration in subsequent ballots. Harry E. 
Shaner (California-Nevada) reported that John V. Moore 
(California-Nevada) had asked to withdraw. Garnett Wilder 
(North Georgia) and Clifford Aguilar (Pacific and Southwest) 
asked that their names be withdrawn. 



364 Journal of the 198 Jf. General Conference 

Fourth Ballot for Judicial Council Membership 

The Secretary gave instructions for the taking of the ballot. 
Stanley Washington (East Ohio) moved that, in reporting future 
ballots, the Chair cease calling the names of those who receive 
fewer than 100 votes. The motion was adopted. When all of 
the ballots had been collected, the Chair declared the ballot 
closed. 

Legislative Committee on Global Ministries Report No. 89, 
Calendar No. 626 

Mr. Bevins presented the report, explaining that it was a 
recommendation for nonconcurrence with a request to change the 
name of the Department of Health and Welfare Ministries. The 
report was adopted (see page 1328). 

Report No. 11, Calendar No. 54 

Mr. Bevins presented the report, consisting of a recommenda- 
tion to amend one of the responsibilities of the General Board of 
Global Ministries as stated in Par. 1502. 10 of the 1980 Discipline. 
The report was adopted (see page 1287). 

Committee on Calendar 

Mr. Bjork called on Robert C. Morgan (North Alabama), 
chairperson of the Legislative Committee on Discipleship, for the 
presentation of reports. He also announced that all items having 
to do with finance that were listed on the Consent Calendar had 
been automatically removed. 

Legislative Committee on Discipleship Report No. 125, 
Calendar No. 1119 

Mr. Morgan explained that the report contained committee 
recommendations related to the National Youth Ministry Organi- 
zation (NYMO), and that there was a minority report related to it 
(see pages 1182-1183). The Chair observed that, since the report 
was printed in this day's Daily Christian Advocate, it would be 
necessary to suspend the rules to consider it; the rules were 
suspended by vote of the Conference. 

Mr. Morgan explained that the committee did not concur with 
new legislation as proposed by the General Board of Discipleship 
for NYMO, but was instead recommending retention of the 
existing Pars. 1401-1404, with some amendments; it also was 
recommending that NYMO and the Board of Discipleship work 
together to prepare legislation governing their relationship to 
present to the 1988 General Conference. 



The United Methodist Church 365 

Report No. 125 (Minority Report), Calendar No. 1120 

Kristin Knudson (California-Nevada) presented the minority 
report (see page 1182), consisting of a recommendation for 
creation of a study committee on the Church's national youth 
ministry. After presenting some editorial changes in the report 
as printed, she explained the background and the purpose of the 
report. 

Ms. Knudson: Let me preface this by saying that I am a concerned lay person, 
not a youth. There are only three youth here as voting delegates, none of whom 
were able to serve on the Committee on Discipleship. I am a young adult, age 22, 
who serves as an adult worker with youth. I have never served on the national 
steering committee and have attended only one national convocation as an 
alternate for our conference youth coordinator. I would also call your attention to 
11262.2 of the Discipline where it states that youth are full members of the church 
and have all rights and responsibilities of church membership. 

To explain the rationale behind this proposal, this is the work of the age level and 
family ministries task group as a compromise for the many proposals received 
about the future of youth ministry. The question is, why do we need a study? One, 
youth ministry has never been seriously looked at in our church. We have never 
taken the time to really find out what our vision is. Bishop Yeakel reminded us 
yesterday that we have the opportunity to shape and direct the vision of the 
church. Two, we need to have a goal in mind. At the moment we have two groups 
who are in part both responsible for national youth ministry, yet it is unclear who 
should do what. Three, we need to answer the whys. 

Recently there was a survey done on the religious life of younger adolescents. 
United Methodist young people are less likely to pray, less likely to talk with their 
parents about religious life. Why is that? Hopefully, we can find it out. There has 
been much concern about funding anything at this conference. How much vAW the 
study cost? The good news is that while the NYMO does receive a portion of its 
funding from the General Conference fund, it receives even more from the Youth 
Service Fund, the youth's own mission fund raised by the young people of our 
church. In the last two years giving is up over 38 percent, and the youth have 
donated over one half million dollars in the last year alone. 

According to Dr. Ezra Earl Jones, the general secretary of the Board of 
Discipleship, there is no issue we can't work on in good faith, if we have the same 
vision in mind. I agree wholeheartedly with that statement, but right now the 
vision is cloudy. We need to examine it carefully. 

Members of the General Conference, you have before you a splendid 
opportunity. The opportunity of designing the present and the future of our 
denomination is in your hands. The church should always be in the process of study 
and re-evaluation. Without it, we would never learn anything or even dare to try 
something new. To ask two groups to iron out their differences vnthout any form or 
structure is folly. But take these two groups, provide a vehicle and a means of 
study, and there can be agreement and direction, and results. We need that unity of 
purpose. In order to find that unity we must examine where we are going and how 
we are going to get there. A statesman reminds us young people, the world is 
yours. Right now it's yours and mine to share, but in the final analysis it's yours. I 
urge your adoption of the minority report. 

Calendar No. 1119 — Perfecting of the Committee Report 

The Chair called for the perfecting of the committee report. 
Harry R. Kent (South Carolina) asked a question about the 



366 Journal of the 1984- General Conference 

content of the amendments to Pars. 1401-1404 being recom- 
mended by the committee. Mr. Morgan explained that they were 
the same amendments as printed with Report No. 124, Calendar 
No. 1118. At the Chair's request, Mr. Morgan and Ms. Knudson 
briefly restated the difference between the committee report and 
the minority report. 

Kent Millard (South Dakota) asked whether any youth had 
been involved in the development of the legislative committee 
report; Mr. Morgan replied that they had. Kay Althouse (East 
Ohio) disagreed, stating that young adults had been involved, but 
not youth. Charles 0. Dundas (Minnesota) made an additional 
comment about the distinction between the two reports. Jack H. 
Henton (Memphis) observed that, even though they were not 
members of the legislative committee, there were youth who had 
been present at its sessions and who had been allowed to speak 
and provide input. The Chair asked if the Conference was willing 
to consider the committee report to have been perfected, and it 
was voted to proceed to the perfecting of the minority report. 

Calendar No. 1120 — Perfecting the Minority Report 

Ken Pace (Mississippi) moved to amend the minority report by 
adding the following to the fourth paragraph: "Additional 
racial/ethnic minority youth shall be added as needed to ensure 
that all four racial/ethnic minority groups are represented by 
youth. These youth shall be selected upon recommendation from 
their respective caucuses." Ms. Knudson accepted the amend- 
ment as part of the minority report. 

Warren Budd (North Georgia) moved to amend the minority 
report by substituting the legislation recommended by the 
General Board of Discipleship for it. The Chair ruled that that 
was not a proper substitute for the minority report. 

M. Brent Trostle (Central Pennsylvania) moved to amend the 
beginning of the sentence regarding funding to read as follows: 
"Funding for this study shall not exceed $15,000 per year, to be 
shared equally by NYMO and the General Board of Discipleship 
..." Danny Mcintosh (Rocky Mountain) spoke in support of the 
amendment. The amendment was adopted. 

Charles E. Edgar (Central Pennsylvania) asked for clarifica- 
tion whether it was the intent of the minority report sponsors for 
a General Council on Ministries representative to chair the study 
committee; Ms. Knudson rephed that it was. 

Karen A. Stewart (Western Pennsylvania) moved to amend 
the third paragraph by adding the following sentence to the end 
of it: "Each board, agency, and council that currently has 
representation on the National Youth Ministry Organization 



The United Methodist Church 367 

Steering Committee (Par. 1402) may at their own expense send a 
representative to the study committee if they desire." The 
amendment was adopted. 

George Calvin (Louisiana) moved to amend the first sentence 
of the fourth paragraph to read as follows: "Of the fifteen voting 
members, there shall be at least one racial/ethnic minority from 
each of the five jurisdictions." He spoke in support of the 
amendment. Scott Hanson (Wyoming) asked whether the 
amendment would remove the guarantee of representation from 
each of the four recognized racial/ethnic minorities; Mr. Calvin 
replied that that was not the intent. The amendment was 
adopted. 

Steve Alexander (Iowa) moved to suspend the rules m order to 
declare the minority report perfected and to proceed to the 
debate. The motion was adopted. 

Debate on Minority Report 

Amy Bowyer (Kansas East) spoke in favor of the minority 
report. 

Mary Ann Swenson (Pacific Northwest): I wish to speak in opposition to the 
minority report and in favor of the majority report. The original legislation that 
was developed by the Board of Discipleship was calling for movement forward m a 
comprehensive direction in youth ministry and new programming and new 
movements and new desires in youth ministry in our general church. The Board of 
Discipleship and NYMO were not able to agree on how to do that. And, thereby, 
some of the processes that we have before us. If we adopted the minority report, 
we would be expecting then the energy and the effort of our staff, both in youth 
ministry and in discipleship, to divert all of their attention to this study. The 
structures already exist for them to get their act together and work together. And 
so I would urge that we as a general church ask them within their existing 
structures to use their efforts and emphasis to help us in youth ministry and 
continue to develop new programs and not to spend the time and energj' on 
establishing a new study. My position is that the structures already exist. 

Kelly Laster (Pacific and Southwest): I'm standing in front of you as one of the 
few voting youth. And I am also a member of the National Youth Ministry 
Organization. I would like to say that the structure that the Board of Discipleship 
has, they do not work with the National Youth Ministry Organization in developing 
the report in the first place. Therefore, obviously, a complete report cannot be 
made. We can't study something if the boards are not willing to work together. The 
Board of Discipleship did not go through the National Youth Ministry 
Organization. We had no voice in this, and so I plead v^ith you to vote for the 
minority report to allow youth to have a voice in their future and the future of this 
church. 

Warren Budd (North Georgia): I come to you as a dedicated youth worker from a 
church of 1,000 members. It involves over 160 kids in its youth program. We sent 
over six of our kids to missions last summer. We raised $15,000 for missions. We do 
a Bible study every Wednesday night that averages over 60 kids. I think I have the 
proper credentials to speak about the direction of Youth Ministries in The United 
Methodist Church. Group magazine last month reported that for the last 19 years 
we have lost membership in youth ministry. The facts are that this article also 



368 Journal of the 1984. General Conference 

reported that between age 13 and 21, 90 percent of the people that accept Jesus 
Christ do so in these age groups, and if they are lost in this age group, they are lost 
generally. The fact is that the youth of United Methodism, the vast hundreds of 
thousands of youths are crying for services from the church. Youth w^orkers are 
crying for services from the church. Town and country workers cannot be served 
because there is no clear direction from the church. It is a shame that the Board of 
Discipleship legislation could not have passed, because we are going to wait four 
years either way this thing goes. If you're in the ninth grade now, by the time you 
are out of high school they will have gotten around to deciding on what they are 
going to do about youth ministries. The preferable report is the majority report, 
because at least they can get together and get on with the business of ministering to 
the youth that are not being helped in our great church. 

Mark H. Biederman (Minnesota) spoke in support of the minority 
report. /. Gordon Stapleton (Peninsula) spoke against it. 

Report No. 125 — Final Statements and Vote 

Douglas F. Verdin (New York) made the final statement on 
behalf of the sponsors of the minority report. William A. Lasher 
made the final statement for the committee report. 

The minority report was put to a vote and was approved as a 
substitute for the committee report. 

Riley B. Case (North Indiana) moved that the legislation 
originally proposed by the General Board of Discipleship be 
substituted for everything before the Conference. He spoke in 
support of his substitute. Edward L. Duncan (Detroit) raised a 
point of order, that the substitute was not in order at this point in 
the process. The Chair ruled that the Conference could consider 
the substitute. Becky Auman (North Carolina) spoke against the 
substitute. The substitute was defeated. 

The minority report, as substituted, was then adopted (see 
pages 1182-1183). 

Closing 

The Secretary made announcements. Bishop Lloyd C. Wicke 
(Retired) offered the closing prayer, and the session was 
adjourned. 



EIGHTH DAY, WEDNESDAY, MAY 9, 1984 
EVENING SESSION 

Opening 

The General Conference of The United Methodist Church 
convened in the evening session of Wednesday, May 9, 1984, at 
7:30 p.m. in the Civic Center Arena, Baltimore, Maryland, with 
Bishop Emerito P. Nacpil (Manila Area) presiding. Bishop Armin 
E. Hartel (Central Conference in the German Democratic 
Republic) led in an opening prayer. 

Committee on Agenda 

Delton H. Krueger (Minnesota) made the report, calhng special 
attention to an earlier starting time Thursday morning and a time 
set aside to receive an offering for the pages and marshals during 
the Thursday morning session. 

Committee on Calendar 

Virgil V. Bjork (North Indiana) reported that the committee 
planned to call for reports from the legislative committees on 
Council on Ministries, Conferences, and Local Church during this 
session. 

Report on University Senate Ballot 

The Secretary read the results of the ballot for membership on 
the University Senate as follows: valid ballots, 955; invalid 
ballots, 0; he stated that there was no election and read the names 
of persons receiving votes: chief executive officers: Frederick 
Blumer, 133; Harry Gilmer, 137; Thomas K. Kim, 376; E. 
Benjamin Lantz, 85; Donald Messer, 118; Gael Swing, 77; Neal 
Berte, 87; John Silber, 71; Neal Fisher, 340; Donald Webb, 73; 
John Q. Taylor King, 334; Robert G. Stevens, 41; other 
administrative officers: Sally Geis, 236; Patti Coots, 164; Ethel 
Johnson, 380; Webb Pomeroy, 98; J. Robert Nelson, 164; Grant S. 
Shockley, 469; Leroy Howe, 133; Dennis M. Campbell, 230. 

William A. McCaHney (East Ohio) pointed out that the 
legislation governing this election did not require a majority vote, 
but instead required only a plurality for election. The Chair asked 
the Secretary to determine who had been elected on this basis 
and to report back to the Conference later in the session. 

Legislative Committee on Council on Ministries 

Carolyn H. Oehler (Northern Illinois), chairperson of the 
committee, moved the suspension of the mles to permit 

369 



370 Journal of the 198 Jt, General Conference 

consideration of two reports which had been printed less than the 
required twenty-four hours; the motion was adopted. 

Report No. 89, Calendar No. 900 

Ms. Oehler presented changes in the printed report, which 
proposed establishment of a task force on older adult ministries 
(see page 1562), as follows: 

(1) Add an additional "whereas" clause to read, "Whereas, in 
recognition of the increasing older population which varies 
in different countries and cultures and in preparation of a 
global relationship already underway in the General Board 
of Global Ministries;" 

(2) In item 2, following "United Methodist Church," add "in 
the USA and Puerto Rico and to establish program 
priorities for these ministries at all levels of The United 
Methodist Church with emphasis on the local church." 

(3) Amend item 5 to read as follows: "The Task Force on Older 
Adult Ministries shall be accountable to the General 
Council on Ministries, which shall coordinate the work of 
the task force with the various general agencies and annual 
conferences. The task force shall make its final report 
through the General Council on Ministries to the 1988 
General Conference, at which time the task force shall be 
terminated." 

(4) In item 6, substitute "28" for "29" and "Jurisdictional 
College of Bishops" for "Jurisdictional Conference." Be- 
ginning after the provision for an episcopal member, 
substitute the following for the remainder of item 6: "A 
staff representative of the Health and Welfare Ministries 
Program Department of the General Board of Global 
Ministries and a staff representative of age level and family 
ministries of the General Board of Discipleship shall 
function as program resource staff for the task force. The 
task force may request other general agency staff to assist 
with its work. The General Council on Ministries shall 
provide staff for administrative purposes." 

In connection with item 8, Ms. Oehler reported that the 
required funding would probably be about $60,000 per year, but 
that if adopted, the report would need to be referred to the 
General Council on Finance and Administration for its recom- 
mendation. 

Oscar 0. Garza, IV (Rio Grande) moved to amend item 6, 
following "College of Bishops," by adding "at least one of whom 
shall be an ethnic minority person of the four ethnic minority 



The United Methodist Church 371 

groups." Ms. Oehler accepted the amendment on behalf of the 
committee. 

Clelia D. Hendrix (South Carolina) moved to amend item 2, 
following "local church," by adding "on older women, and on 
ethnic minority older persons." 

Ms. Hendrix: Just recently I participated in compiling a report for a group for 
the Aging Council — State Aging Council in South Carolina. In the research for this 
report I found these significant facts that I would like to share with the Conference. 
The majority of the older adults that we found were women. Older women are 
among the poorest of the poor and the poorest of this group was among the ethnic 
minorities. The last item I'd like to share is that many older women live alone and in 
fear of being assaulted even in their own homes. Therefore, I would like to put 
special stress on programs that are developed for women and particularly ethnic 
women. 

Bonifacio B. Mequi, Jr. (Iowa) asked whether the report 
provided for representation on the task force from Central 
Conferences; the Chair replied that it did not. Mr. Mequi sought 
to introduce an amendment, but the Chair ruled that it would be 
necessary to act on Ms. Hendrix's amendment before other 
amendments would be in order. Ms. Hendrix's amendment was 
adopted. 

Charles E. Ramsay (North Arkansas) spoke against the report 
in its entirety. William H. Millett (Eastern Pennsylvania) 
supported it. 

Mr. Millett: I would urge you to read and understand the facts and implications 
of the first part of this petition. The United Methodist Church is getting old. The 
average age of the people in the world around us is increasing at a rapid rate and the 
age of our denomination is increasing even more rapidly. We who are older adults 
want to have a voice in determining our own destiny within the church. We want to 
be part of the new and exciting things that are happening. We don't want to be a 
separate group, or a pressure group. Rather, we want to be part of the 
decision-making process. We want retired clergy and retired laypeople to continue 
to be involved as members of our denominational boards, our annual conferences, 
and our local churches. Their maturity of viewpoint, their judgment, and their 
experience are valuable assets we cannot afford to discard or ignore. You young 
people who are between 50 and 55 years of age better pay attention to this, lest you 
become disenfranchised within the next 10 years. We older adults want significant 
opportunities for service. We want opportunities for continuing education. We 
want opportunities to contribute as participants in new and vital ministries of the 
church. When merited, we want to be included in key leadership positions of our 
great denomination. We want less fluff and more substance. We believe there are 
important and urgent ministries that fall within the legitimate areas of 
responsibility for each of our key boards. They do need to be coordinated. Older 
adults do need to have a voice. 

A. Bradford Dinsmore, Jr. (Florida) moved to table the report 
until such time as the revised committee report could be printed 
in the Daily Christian Advocate. The motion was defeated. 



372 Journal of the 198^ General Conference 

Heinz P. Fischer (German South) asked why the task force's 
work was restricted only to older adult concerns in the United 
States and Puerto Rico. Ms. Oehler replied that the impetus for 
formation of a task force had grown out of a National Consultation 
of Older Adults in The United Methodist Church. 

James H. McCormack (West Ohio) moved to amend the report 
by substituting the following for item 8: "The funding for this task 
force will be provided from the General Board of Global 
Ministries and the General Board of Discipleship receipts coming 
from the World Service Fund." He spoke in support of his 
amendment. Ms. Oehler spoke against it. Thomas W. Flinn, Jr. 
(Baltimore) asked a question; Ms. Oehler answered. The 
amendment was adopted. 

Thomas Kim (Northwest Texas) moved to amend item 1 by 
changing the task force's name to "Task Force on Older Adult 
Ministries in the U.S.A., Puerto Rico, and Other Parts of the 
World." He spoke in support of his amendment. 

Patricia Hammer (Pacific and Southwest): As the chairperson of the 
subcommittee that dealt with this petition, I would like to speak against that 
amendment. It was our understanding that through the Board of Global Ministries 
there were already some programs that were under way that would deal with this. 
We felt that it was impossible to handle the whole gamut within the four-year 
period of the task force. And you will note that part of the petition states that the 
task force will be ended with the 1988 General Conference. The amendment that 
Carolyn gave you that deals with the increasing problem that's at the bottom, it's 
now the last "Whereas," we felt would handle that for this short period of time. So, 
therefore, I appeal to you that through the Board of Global Ministries some of those 
programs have already begun. 

The amendment was defeated. 

Lester D. Nave (Virginia) moved the previous question, but the 
Chair ruled that the motion was not in order, because the 
required number of speeches for and against the report had not 
been heard. 

V". L. Daughtery (South Georgia) asked for clarification 
regarding the estimated cost; Ms. Oehler answered that the 
estimate was for $60,000 for each of the four years of the 
quadrennium. 

Francis Alguire (Northern Ilhnois) moved to amend item 6 by 
adding the following: "Membership on the task force shall include 
at least one representative from our Central Conferences." 
Torrey A. Kaatz (West Ohio) raised a point of order, but the 
Chair ruled that the amendment was properly before the Confer- 
ence. Ms. Oehler spoke against the amendment. It was defeated. 

The Chair asked if the Conference was ready to suspend the 
rules to proceed to a vote on the report, and it was voted by the 



The United Methodist Church 373 

Conference to suspend the rules. The report was adopted as 
amended (see pages 1562-1564), 

Report on Fourth Ballot for Judicial Council Membership 

The Secretary reported the results of the fourth ballot for 
membership on the Judicial Council as follows: valid ballots, 953; 
invalid ballots, 3; needed to elect, 477. On the lay ballot, Willard 
Douglas was elected with 570 votes, and on the clergy ballot. 
Gene F. Sease was elected with 513 votes. 

Tracy R. Arnold (Louisiana) asked for the remainder of the 
ballot results to be read in preparation for the balloting for 
reserve members on Thursday morning. Shirley Marsh (Nebras- 
ka) pointed out that the Conference had ordered that only the 
names of those receiving 100 or more votes be read. Paul V. 
Chaffee (Western Pennsylvania) asked about the status of 
persons who had withdrawn from earlier ballots in relation to the 
ballot for alternate members. The Secretary rephed that their 
names would be reinstated on the ballot for alternate members. 

Report on Ballot for University Senate Membership 

The Secretary reported that the following persons were 
elected to the University Senate by plurality vote: Grant S. 
Shockley, Ethel Johnson, Thomas Kim, and Neal Fisher. 
William T. Stephenson (North Texas) asked a question about the 
vote count; Betty Whitehurst (Virginia) and the Secretary 
answered, confirming that the persons listed above had been 
elected. 

Request for Judicial Council Decision 

John F. Walker (Little Rock): I would call for a Judicial Council ruling on 
Calendar No. 0232, Report No. CM012, Petition No. CM-DS1328. This is Report 
No. 9 of the General Council on Ministries. We voted concurrence to the GCOM 
recommendation that we receive the report. According to Robert's Rules of Order, 
"to receive a report is to have it presented to the body. It does not imply acceptance 
or adoption" (Article 9, 1 53-54 of Robert's Rules of Order). To receive a report is to 
have it read or presented to the body. The question is whether it is appropriate for 
the General Conference to direct action that seems to be based on the report having 
been approved, as recommendations 4, 5, and 6 seem to do. 

I believe to act on a report as though it were approved is inconsistent with our 
action of having received the report, and I ask that the General Conference request 
the Judicial Council for a ruling to be brought to the General Conference. 

C. David Lundquist (West Michigan) spoke against the motion. 
Leigh Roberts (Wisconsin) expressed the view that the request 
for a decision was not needed, because the action had been for 
concurrence and receipt of the report. The motion to request a 



374 Journal of the 198^ General Conference 

decision was put to a vote, and the Chair ruled that it was 
defeated because it did not receive a majority vote. 

Lester L. Moore (Iowa) cited Par. 2607 of the 1980 Discipline as 
evidence that only a one-fifth vote was required; the Chair 
observed that the language cited by Mr. Moore referred to 
requests for ruhngs on constitutional matters, and that this was 
not a constitutional issue. 

Status of Reports Referred to General Council on Finance and 
Administration 

Gamett Wilder (North Georgia) moved that all reports which 
had been sent to the General Council on Finance and Adminis- 
tration for further consideration, either by concurrence or 
reception, be considered concurrences. The motion was adopted. 

Judicial Council Referral — ^Additional Discussion 

John F. Walker (Little Rock) cited Par. 2609 of the 1980 
Discipline as evidence that his motion to request a Judicial 
Council decision (see above) required only a one-third vote for 
approval. The Chair ruled that he was correct. C. David 
Lundquist (West Michigan) raised a point of order, that the 
provisions of Par. 2615 should apply, and that a majority vote was 
required. The Chair reaffirmed his ruling that Par. 2609 applied, 
and that a one-third vote was sufficient. 

Clifton V. Bullock (West Michigan) asked a question regarding 
the action on Mr. Wilder's motion; the Secretary answered. The 
Chair stated that he was now ruling that the request for a 
declaratory decision was approved. 

Legislative Committee on Conferences Report No. 16, Calen- 
dar No. 186 

Jerry G. Bray, Jr. (Virginia) chairperson of the committee, 
presented the report, on the subject "Definition of Powers of the 
General Conference" (see page 956). Mr. Bray summarized the 
contents of the report and gave background information 
regarding it. P. Boyd Mather (Iowa) asked whether this should 
be considered as a constitutional issue, rather than as a simple 
discipHnary change. Mr. Bray replied that it was the judgment of 
the committee that the manner in which they were recommend- 
ing it was preferable. 

Bienvinido J. Jimenez (Philippines) asked a question; Mr. Bray 
responded. Mr. Jimenez spoke in opposition to the report. John 
P. Miles (Little Rock) moved to suspend the rules in order to 
proceed to the vote on this report. The motion to suspend the 



The United Methodist Church 375 

rules was adopted; the report was then adopted by vote of the 
Conference (see pages 956-957). 

Report No. 82, Calendar No. 541 

Mr. Bray called on J. Kenneth Forbes (South Indiana) for 
presentation of the report, dealing with the Jurisdictional 
Committee on the Episcopacy (see page 977). Mr. Forbes 
presented two corrections to the printed report: (1) change the 
last portion of the first paragraph of proposed Par. 622.1 to read, 
"... elected by the Jurisdictional Conference upon nomination of 
their respective Annual Conference delegations." (2) In the last 
phrase in the proposed legislation, change "elect" to "nominate." 

Marcus Fang (Wisconsin) asked a question; Mr. Forbes 
answered. Mr. Fang moved to amend the last paragraph by 
deleting "or in the event that a member on the Jurisdictional 
Committee on Episcopacy is not reelected by the Annual 
Conference as a delegate to the Jurisdictional Conference." He 
spoke in support of his amendment. Robert J. McCune (Central 
New York) opposed it. 

William W. Roughton (Florida) asked who would elect the 
person to fill a vacancy, if the Annual Conference delegation could 
only nominate. Mr. Forbes replied that the election would be 
by the succeeding Jurisdictional Conference when it met, but 
that the person nominated would serve as nominee until that 
time. 

Richard 0. Truitt (Wisconsin) asked whether the proposed 
legislation would preclude persons who were elected by a 
Jurisdictional Conference from serving through the following 
Jurisdictional Conference if they were not again elected as a 
delegate to the next General Conference. 

Mr. Forbes: This piece of legislation relative to change is probably one of the 
most liberal pieces of legislation you will ever face. It allows change at the whim of 
the delegation. It provides almost any kind of contingency that can occur. It allows 
the delegation to use its own powers to determine its own membership at the given 
jurisdictional conference at whichever jurisdictional conference it may direct. I 
don't think you can get any more liberal than that. 

Lawrence Bauman (North Georgia) asked a question; Mr. 
Forbes answered. 

Mr. Fang's amendment was put to a vote and was defeated. 

Robert T. Casey (Virginia) moved to amend the legislation by 
adding a new last sentence to read as follows: "That person may 
begin to serve on the committee as a nominee until the 
Jurisdictional Conference can elect." Mr. Foi'bes accepted the 
amendment on behalf of the committee. 



376 Journal of the 198 Jf General Conference 

Don L. Riggin (Little Rock) moved to amend the last 
paragraph by deleting the words, "or for other reasons that the 
Annual Conference delegation may determine." The amendment 
was defeated. 

Bob R. Martin (North Georgia) moved to suspend the rules in 
order to vote on the report. The motion was adopted. Report No. 
82 was then adopted (see pages 977-978). 

Report No. 49; Calendar Nos. 281, 548 

Mr. Forbes explained that the committee report (Calendar No. 
281) was a recommendation of nonconcurrence with a petition 
calling for lay members of the annual conference to be able to vote 
on matters related to ordination and the ordained ministry (see 
page 967). 

Presentation of Minority Report — Calendar No. 548 

Leigh Roberts (Wisconsin) presented the minority report, 
consisting of a proposed constitutional amendment and other 
disciphnary changes removing restrictions on voting rights of lay 
members of annual conferences (see pages 967-969). 

Mr. Roberts: Bishop Nacpil and members of the Conference, a portion of this is a 
constitutional matter and a portion of it is contained within other disciplinary 
paragraphs. Historically in The United Methodist Church clergy performed the 
function of doing the business for General Conferences and Annual Conferences. It 
was only after an extended period of time that privileges were extended from 
laymen to women and now to youth, ethnic minorities and others. Nonetheless, 
over time specific matters have been reserved at the level of the annual conference 
solely to clergy. Those matters are not limited at the General Conference to clergy; 
in fact , we acted upon a matter today dealing with the requirements we would place 
in relation to clergy and their ordination. Similarly, at the level of the local church 
laity are very active in relation to all matters pertaining to clergy. With respect to 
dealing with our bishops as a Jurisdictional Committee on Episcopacy, in the varied 
kinds of actions that are done including pastoral care, including making decisions 
regarding those clergy, in terms of making the decision even regarding the 
retirement due to disability of those clergy, matters of sick leave related to those 
clergy, are all matters that laity and clergy participate in equally as we deal with 
episcopal leaders. At the level of the local church the evaluation of clergy, matters 
concerning the assignment of clergy, performing pastoral kinds of functions with 
our clergy, making recommendations about clergy, prospective clergy in terms of 
their ehgibility and suitability for moving into the process to become ordained, all 
of those functions are matters in which laity are involved in the local church. 

It seems ironic that only at one level in the church, the annual conference, the 
laity are not involved, and the request in this minority petition is for the 
involvement at several levels. In particular, in H 37, the constitutional paragraph 
which prohibits the participation in voting of laity with respect to clergy matters as 
they pertain to ordination, matters of character, and the relationship of clergy to 
the annual conference, laity are not permitted to be involved, and this petition calls 
for an involvement of laity in such matters. In terms of the 700 paragraphs that are 
proposed, the proposal calls for a participation of laity in the board of ordained 
ministry in the annual conference by giving laity, a limited number of laity, a voice, 



The United Methodist Church 377 

no vote, but a voice in terms of those matters. It would take a constitutional change 
first to permit a vote. But it is proposed that they could serve in terms of voice. It is 
also proposed that the executive session of the annual conference be eliminated to 
permit following what H 701.4 says, and that is, "That laity shall participate in all 
deliberations of the annual conference." This would enable that, but it would still 
require a step by a subsequent General Conference in order to give laity a vote on 
such matters. I, therefore, propose as a substitute these four specific changes for 
the giving laity voice, membership on the board of ordained ministrj', and changing 
the constitution in the direction of not restricting laity from acting on the particular 
matters related to clergy. 

Perfecting the Minority Report 

P. Boyd Mather (Iowa) moved to amend the minority report, 
the proposed amendment to Par. 723.1, by deleting the words, 
"with voice but not vote." He spoke in support of his amendment. 
V. Pete Furio, Jr. (North Alabama) sought to introduce another 
amendment, but the Chair ruled that it could not be considered 
until action on Mr. Mather's amendment was completed. Harry 
R. Kent (South Carolina) explained that the provision Mr. 
Mather sought to delete was included because voting rights for 
lay persons on conference boards of Ordained Ministry could not 
be granted until the process of amending the Constitution was 
completed. The amendment was defeated. 

Debate on Minority Report 

Bruce P. Blake (Kansas West): I speak in our annual conference from some 
unique background, I think, on this. First of all, for several years we have invited 
lay observers on the Board of Ordained Ministry, one from each district. They are 
observers, and I have chaired that Board for eight years. We also have a custom in 
our annual conference of having an annual executive session of the annual 
conference in which only full members of the annual conference are present. Leigh 
Roberts in his opening statement said that laity have the right to vote on these 
matters at every other level of the church, except for the annual conference. I think 
that is very simply because ordained full members of the annual conference hold 
our membership at the annual conference. That is what sets the annual conference 
apart constitutionally and historically in these matters for the ordained clergy. 

We have had administrative location matters in our annual conference. We have 
had other matters of sensitive nature to be dealt with in the executive session. It 
really seems like to me those who have taken the vows of ordination, have 
answered the questions that are involved only for ordained full members of the 
annual conference, should deal with the issues that are complex, personal, and 
involved, only in the ordained matters of our church. 

I feel exclusive as I say that, but as I have experienced our annual conference, I 
feel the laity of the annual conference appreciate those of us who are ordained 
dealing with others who are ordained in the context exclusively of what it means to 
be ordained. 

Reta T. Barto (Eastern Pennsylvania): I am speaking for the minority report. 
The reason the ministers had exclusive vote originally was that they were the only 
persons in the Conference. That has changed as we all well know. Therefore, I 
believe that now that we have equal representation on the conference floor, we 
need to have equal responsibility in the duties. We now feel that we are 
interdependent, as we learned through the Laity Address the other day, that both 



378 Journal of the 198 Jf General Conference 

clergy and laity need each other. Actually, the lay experience with the variety of 
living with and loving a variety of pastors gives us some judgments that might be a 
Httle bit better than their brothers and sisters in the clergy. Also, let us not forget 
that we are very sensitive, too, to all the problems of our pastors and of other 
clergy. It is true, too, that the lay members should know what is going on. Frankly, 
friends, I think our concern is to be of worth and value to the ordained clergy or to 
any pastor we have. John Wesley recommended that we ask our clergy, "Are you 
going on to perfection." 

Don L. Forsman (New Mexico) spoke against the minority 
report. Frank H. Nestler (Central Illinois) asked a question 
about Par. 701.4 as proposed in the minority report. Mr. Roberts 
explained that the proposal was to change only what could 
constitutionally be changed pending approval of a constitutional 
amendment, with the hope that full voting rights could be enacted 
at the next General Conference. Lester L. Moore (Iowa) 
supported the minority report. 

Reginald W. Ponder (North Carolina) moved to suspend the 
rules in order to vote on the minority report. The motion was 
adopted. The Chair proposed voting first on the non-constitu- 
tional portions of the report; then, if those were adopted, a second 
vote would be taken on the proposed constitutional amendment. 
P. Boyd Mather (Iowa) asked a question; the Chair answered. 
Paul J. Meuschke (Western Pennsylvania) raised a point of 
order, that this vote was whether to substitute the minority 
report, and that the requirement for a two-thirds vote on the 
constitutional amendment would only come into play on the final 
adoption. The Chair ruled that Mr. Meuschke was correct. 

Blaine E. Taylor (Southern New England) moved to divide the 
minority report so as to vote separately on each of the proposed 
amendments contained in it. He began to speak in support of his 
motion. John 0. Barnes, Jr. (Tennessee) raised a point of order, 
that the Conference had suspended the rules to proceed to the 
vote. The Chair ruled that he was correct. Rodney E. Wilmoth 
(Nebraska) sought to speak against the motion to divide the 
question. Thomas P. Moore (East Ohio) raised a point of order, 
that the Conference should vote immediately on the minority 
report, and that Mr. Taylor could seek a division of the question 
on the final vote. Mr. Roberts gave the final statement for the 
minority report. Mr. Forbes made the final statement for the 
committee. 

The minority report was put to a vote, and it was defeated. The 
Chair observed that the scheduled adjournment time had been 
reached, and the Conference voted to extend the time to complete 
action on this report. E. Paul linger (Central lUinois) called for a 
count vote on the minority report, but the call for the count vote 
was not sustained by the Conference. 



The United Methodist Church 379 

William G. Trudeau (Alaska Missionary) moved to refer the 
matter to the newly established Ministiy Study Committee; he 
spoke in support of his motion. The motion to refer was defeated. 

Report No. 49 — Final Action 

Mr. Forbes moved to suspend the rules and proceed directly to 
the final vote on the committee report. Oscar 0. Garza IV (Rio 
Grande) asked a procedural question; the Chair answered. The 
motion to suspend the rules was adopted. Report No. 49 
(Calendar No. 281) was adopted (see page 967). 

Committee on Plan of Organization and Rules of Order 

Frank H. Nestler (Central Illinois) moved the suspension of 
the imles to permit the Committee on Plan of Organization and 
Rules of Order to distribute some materials to delegates' desks on 
Thursday. The motion was adopted. 

Consent Calendar 

Richard A. Thomhurg (New York) moved that all calendar 
items which had received only two negative votes be placed on 
the Consent Calendar, and that such items could be removed 
from it in the same manner as previously determined. The motion 
was adopted. 

Closing 

The Secretary made announcements. Julius A. Archibald, Jr. 
(Troy) moved that the report sent earlier to the President also be 
sent to members of Congress. The motion was defeated. 

Bishop Jose L. Valencia (Retired) dismissed the Conference 
with prayer, and the session was adjourned. 



NINTH DAY, THURSDAY, MAY 10, 1984 
MORNING SESSION 

Opening 

The General Conference of The United Methodist Church 
convened in the morning session of Thursday, May 10, 1984, at 
8:00 a.m. in the Civic Center Arena, Baltimore, Maryland, with 
Bishop Ernest T. Dixon (San Antonio Area) presiding. 

Devotional Service 

The worship service was led by Bishop Arthur Kulah (Liberia), 
liturgist, and Bishop Thomas Bangura (Sierra Leone), preaching. 
Robert K. Holder was the organist. 

Special music was provided by the Korean American Ministers' 
Chorale of the Northeastern Jurisdiction, under the direction of 
Moon Ho Kim; Sung-Sook Lee was soloist, and Mrs. Ok-Wha 
Rhee was organist for the chorale. 

Following the call to worship, the hymn "God of Grace and God 
of Glory" was sung. The Conference participated in a litany, 
"Trust in the Lord," from Psalm 37. The Scripture was Genesis 
37:12-20. Following a prayer and an anthem. Bishop Bangura 
preached the devotional sermon, entitled "What Is Your Dream." 
The service was closed with the singing of "A Charge To Keep," 
followed by the benediction. 

Committee on Agenda 

Mai Gray (Missouri West) presented the report. On behalf of 
the committee, she moved to amend the printed report by 
extending the evening session until 10:30 p.m., and by substitut- 
ing the Council of Bishops' nomination of a Secretary-Designate 
in place of reports from the General Council on Ministries at 7:45 
p.m. The agenda was adopted as amended (see page 494). 

Matter of Privilege — Baltimore Declaration 

Wilson T. Boots (New York) was recognized for a matter of 

privilege. 

Mr. Boots: In the midst of our Bicentennial Celebration and in keeping with the 
Episcopal Address, we wish to offer the Baltimore Declaration in reaffirmation of 
our Wesleyan heritage and as a call to commitment and action as we move into the 
third century. Hundreds of delegates from all five jurisdictions have already signed 
and affirmed this declaration which states in part: 

"As United Methodists, through our baptism into Jesus Christ and our 
commitment to serve God through The United Methodist Church, we have bound 
ourselves into a covenant community of connectional responsibility in ministry to 
the whole world. We have committed ourselves to mutual accountability 
throughout our connection in solidarity with the whole Christian community. This 

380 



The United Methodist Church 381 

accountability and responsibility to discipleship includes the general boards and 
agencies of our church, the seminaries, other Methodist-related institutions, the 
annual conferences, the Council of Bishops, each local church, and every person 
bearing United Methodist identity. We affirm and celebrate our United Methodist 
tradition and believe that we are called to challenge and support one another with 
clarity of vision and strength of purpose during this bicentennial epic in our life 
together in Christ." 

This declaration lifts up the need to preach and practice an evangelistic ministry 
which is biblically oriented and wholistic, an approach to individuals in society, to 
reconfirm our commitment to work toward racial justice and inclusiveness, to 
address the grim reality of hunger in America and the world, to call for renewed 
efforts toward achieving a nuclear freeze and arms limitation and to accentuate 
basic education. We request that this declaration be placed in the Daily Christian 
Advocate and be referred to the Council of Bishops and the General Council on 
Ministries for study and implementation. 

William A. Mines (West Ohio) raised a point of order, that the 
resolution was new business; the Chair supported his point of 
order. Gloster B. Current (New York) moved to suspend the 
rules to permit consideration of the Declaration; the motion was 
adopted. Mr. Boots' motion was adopted. 

Matter of Privilege — Tribute to George Outen 

John D. Wolf (North Indiana) was recognized for a matter of 
privilege. 

Mr. Wolf: Thank you. Bishop. Since the 1980 session of General Conference 
The United Methodist Church has lost the services of Dr. George Outen, general 
secretary of the General Board of Church and Society from 1976-1980. Dr. Outen 
was an eloquent communicator of the gospel who brought holy fire, a perceptive 
mind, a needed marriage between the personal and social gospel, was an able 
administrator with a sensitivity to personal relationships and to the needs of the 
church. We thank God for his life. I move that this memorial be communicated to 
his family and further that the Commission on the General Conference shall give 
recognition to deceased general secretaries and members of the Judicial Council as 
well as deceased bishops in the opening sessions of the General Conference. Thank 
you. 

The motion was adopted. 

Referral to General Council on Finance and Administration 

E. Dale Dunlap (Kansas West): I move that Calendar No, 329, the portion 
referring to The Mission Society for United Methodists be referred to the General 
Council on Finance and Administration which, according to *'907.4 of the 
Discipline, has responsibility to safeguard and protect the interests and rights of 
The United Methodist Church, for appropriate action with regard to this group or 
any unofficial group using the names Methodist, Methodists, United Methodist or 
United Methodists, for the purpose of protecting the corporate name and interest 
of The United Methodist Church, from improper use by unofficial or unauthorized 
persons or organizations. I move its adoption. 

The motion for referral was adopted. 



382 Journal of the 198 Jf. General Conference 

Report of the General Council on Finance and Administration 

The Chair called for reports from the General Council on 
Finance and Administration (GCFA). Bishop James S. Thomas 
(Ohio East Area), president of the Council, requested the 
privilege of the floor for presentation of the reports. The request 
was granted by vote of the Conference. 

Bishop Thomas outhned the process followed by the Council in 
the preparation of its budget recommendations. He also present- 
ed to the Conference Ewing T. Way land, retiring general 
secretary of GCFA, and Clifford Broke, general-secretary elect. 
They were greeted with applause. 

Bishop Thomas then called on Bishop Joseph H. Yeakel (New 
York West Area) to give direction in the presentation of specific 
reports; Bishop Yeakel was granted the privilege of the floor by 
vote of the Conference. 

Bishop Yeakel explained the relationship between the Coun- 
cil's original recommendations, as printed in Advance Edition C 
of the Daily Christian Advocate, and subsequently printed 
recommendations which GCFA was now making in response to a 
26% limit voted earlier in the Conference on increases in general 
apportioned funds. He summarized the annual dollar amount 
totals and the year-to-year increases in apportioned fund totals as 
printed in the new recommendations. He further reminded the 
Conference that, under the rules, following the presentation of 
each of the Council's reports, the Legislative Committee on 
Financial Administration would present its recommendations in 
relation to that report. 

Report No. 1 — ^World Service Fund 

Bishop Yeakel called on J. Clair Jarvis (West Virginia) for 
presentation of GCFA Report No. 1, containing the Council's 
recommendations on the World Service Fund (see pages 
523-531). 

Mr. Jarvis: Bishop Thomas and Bishop Yeakel have presented to you a bit of 
background information, considerable background information in fact, concerning 
the budget building process through which we have gone. They have reminded you 
that more than two years ago we started this process by studying the needs, 
listening to the hopes and dreams of agencies, reviewing the stewardship record of 
local churches, consulting with economic advisers, and working with the General 
Council on Ministries in arriving at the quadrennial budget which we now present 
to you for your consideration and response. Many of you will recall that in the 
course of the two years that we mailed out questionnaires to nearly 3,000 persons, 
representing executives, bishops, district superintendents, a cross-section of the 
pastors of local churches, heads of agencies, etc. , to see how they feel about the new 
budget for the next quadrennium. 

As we hstened and reviewed the responses and then followed with care the 
findings of the Committee to Study Funding Patterns, which we of GCFA shared 



The United Methodist Church 383 

in, we heard the general church saying to us that the World Service Fund should 
have high priority, that the World Service Fund should be increased substantially. 
That no new funds should be proposed. That apportionments should be on a 
graduated basis. And that there was a broad need for better interpretation and 
communication. 

We have worked with the General Council on Ministries, the program agencies, 
and representatives of special programs to determine what their projected needs 
may be. We have tried to be sensitive and responsive to needs at every level. Every 
item in the budget that we present to you represents some level of agreement 
between GCFA and GCOM. 

We believed that the 31-plus percent increase in apportionments was 
reasonable, challenging, needed, and attainable. By your action, however, the 26 
percent cap was placed, and you thought otherwise. So now we come to you with a 
budgetary proposal within the limits of the 26 percent. With three exceptions, all 
agencies have shared in the reduction. Those exceptions are the American Bible 
Society, the Three University-College Fund, and Project Equality. 

. . . Your attention is called to the Telecommunications Fund, which is placed in 
the World Service budget. The reason for that is twofold. One is that at the point of 
the promotion costs it will save $300,000 in promotion costs for it to be placed there, 
and it has been our experience that there is a better payoff in response to the World 
Service Fund than if it is a single line, self-standing item. So it is reflected 
there. 

. . . Your attention is called to the 1984 General Conference Contingency Fund, 
near the bottom of the World Service budget report. That represented the 
$300,000 annual cut, sharing, which these above agencies are asked to make in 
order to place that fund there. We place it there for this reason. There are always 
requests that come to GCFA for special funding, and a number of those have come 
to us, and we are prepared at the proper time to deal with those. Those would come 
from this $300,000 1984 General Conference Contingency Fund. And then, if that 
fund is not exhausted, then it will be added to the World Service Contingency Fund 
and will serve as a reservoir for the use of GCFA in responding to emergency needs 
that always occur during the course of the quadrennium. 

The budget, therefore, is before you. We will try to respond to any inquiries that 
you may have. You will need to keep in mind that, if there are changes that you 
propose, that you have two options. One is to increase the 26 percent cap, or the 
other is to take the amount from funds that we are proposing here from line item 
funds. And if such proposals are made, then we would be interested in your 
indicating to us where you think the cut should be made. Now, Mr. Chairman, the 
matter is before us. 

Legislative Committee on Financial Administration Report 
No. 67, Calendar No. 1088 

Barbara R. Thompson (Baltimore), chairperson of the legisla- 
tive committee, called on David Dolsen (Rocky Mountain) for 
presentation of the legislative committee recommendations. Mr. 
Dolsen explained that the legislative committee was recommend- 
ing an amendment to GCFA Report No. 1 whereby 50% of 
on-ratio receipts for the telecommunications line item would be 
returned to the annual conferences making the payments (see 
pages 529 [note 4], 1502). 

Johnnie Marie Grimes (North Texas) sought to introduce an 
amendment to the GCFA report, but the Chair ruled that only 



384 Journal of the 1984 General Conference 

amendments related to the legislative committee amendment 
were in order at this time. 

W. E. Arnold (North Arkansas) asked a question about the 
percentage increase in the revised GCFA recommendations as 
related to the limit voted by the Conference. Bishop Yeakel 
responded and asked Mr. Dolsen to give more detailed figures. 

Mr. Dolsen: The total dollars for the last quadrennium that were apportioned 
was $277,890, 196. The total dollars apportioned for the quadrennium as presented 
are $350,008,091 which represents a 25.95 percent increase. 

Richard B. Wilke (Kansas West) spoke in support of the 
legislative committee amendment. James J. Caraway (Louisi- 
ana) asked a question about the World Service Fund total in 
relation to the inclusion of the telecommunications line item in it. 
Spurgeon Dunnam (North Texas) raised a point of order, that 
the question was not relevant to the issue under discussion; 
following additional clarification by Mr. Caraway, the Chair 
ruled that the question was in order. 

Bishop Yeakel: Mr. Chairman, you will recall that the telecommunications 
originally asked for $4.8 million, divided half and half between the conferences 
and the General Commission. The GCFA recommendation was $2.4 million 
without division. You adopted the other day and sent to us a $2.4 million item 
with the recommendation that it be split between the Commission and the 
conferences fifty/fifty. In our attempt to respond to the cap you placed on the 
entire program of general church funding, we have proposed that the 
telecommunications be placed within World Service as a line item that will 
average $1 million a year over the quadrennium. It is a graduated item so it isn't 
$1 million level each year. It is our judgment in the Council that all of that money 
ought to go to the Commission, and that where annual conferences desire to 
have their own funding, they can in conference benevolences put such a figure 
in. The figure that you need to be talking about is a figure of $1 million. It is not 
an increase above the proposed askings that we had originally developed. It 
does appear in the final totals, including the General Conference Contingency 
Fund that Dr. Jarvis spoke to, and that you have already asked for allocations 
out of It does appear as a line item of the same total number of dollars for the 
entire fund, but the distribution is quite different. 

Richard 0. Truitt (Wisconsin) asked why Ms. Grimes was not 
being recognized for presentation of her amendment; the Chair 
replied that Ms. Grimes had stated that she did not wish to speak 
in relation to the amendment proposed by the legislative 
committee. 

Margaret H. Rush (Rocky Mountain) moved to amend the 
legislative committee amendment to read as follows: "The first 
two years of the quadrennium all funds shall go to United 
Methodist Communications. The last two years of the quadren- 
nium the funds shall be divided 50-50 between United Methodist 



The United Methodist Church 385 

Communications and the annual conferences." She spoke in 
support of her amendment. 

Edwin A. Schell (Baltimore) asked the Chair to rule whether 
consideration of the legislative committee recommendation 
required reconsideration of an earlier action of the Conference. 
The Chair ruled that no reconsideration was required. Ray Cox, 
Jr. (South Georgia) asked a question about the legislative 
committee report; the Chair replied that the matter about which 
he asked was now properly before the Conference for its decision. 

Gloster B. Current (New York) spoke against Ms. Rush's 
amendment. Spurgeon Dunnam (North Texas) sought to 
introduce another amendment, but the Chair ruled that no other 
amendments would be in order until action on Ms. Rush's 
amendment was completed. Ms. Thompson gave an additional 
response to Mr. Cox's question. The Secretary read Ms. Rush's 
amendment; it was defeated. 

Michael R. Clayton (Little Rock) moved to amend the 
legislative committee report such that the telecommunications 
line item would be removed from the World Service Fund and 
established as a separate apportionment. He spoke in support of 
his amendment. L. E. Crowson (West Virginia) asked a question; 
Mr. Jarvis answered. Norman K. Quick (West Ohio) spoke 
against Mr. Clayton's amendment. Mr. Jarvis made the final 
statement in opposition to Mr. Clayton's amendment; it was 
defeated. 

Torrey Kaatz (West Ohio) observed that Mr. Jarvis was not a 
member of the Conference and moved that he be granted the 
privilege of the floor; the motion was adopted. 

Spurgeon Dunnam (North Texas) moved to amend the 
legislative committee amendment, such that the portion following 
the words "telecommunications line item" would read as follows: 
"vdll be returned on request of the conferences making the 
payment, beginning in the third year of the 1985-88 quadren- 
nium." He spoke in support of his amendment. 

Harold E. Wright (Western North Carolina) moved to suspend 
the rules and move directly to vote on all before the Conference in 
Calendar No. 1088. The motion was adopted. Paul J. Meuschke 
(Western Pennsylvania) expressed concern that, because Calen- 
dar No. 1088 referred to all of GCFA Report No. 1, the 
suspension of the rules precluded any further amendments or 
discussion related to sections of that report not addressed by the 
legislative committee amendment. 

Ms. Thompson waived the right for a final statement on behalf 
of the legislative committee. Barbara Blackstone (Western 
Pennsylvania) asked a question about Mr. Dunnam's amend- 



386 Journal of the 1984 General Conference 

ment; Mr. Dunnam answered. Charles L. Lamar (Louisville) 
addressed a request to the Chair in relation to recognition of 
delegates. 

Richard B. Wilke (Kansas West) moved to divide the question 
such that there would be a separate vote on the matter of the 
conferences requesting the return of funds; the motion to divide 
was defeated. The Secretary read Mr. Dunnam' s amendment, 
and it was defeated. 

Mr. Jarvis made a final statement on behalf of GCFA, against 
the legislative committee amendment. The amendment, as 
contained in Calendar No. 1088, was put to a vote and was 
adopted (see page 529, note 4). 

World Service Fund Report — Additional Amendments 

Johnnie Marie Grimes (North Texas) moved to amend the 
World Service Fund budget by re-routing funds within the 
budget such that the telecommunications line item would be 
$1,000,000 for 1985, with appropriate increases in the remaining 
years of the quadrennium. She spoke in support of her 
amendment. 

Thomas P. Moore (East Ohio) moved to amend the amendment 
to set the first year's amount at $1,200,000, vvith annual increases 
of $500,000 per year. He spoke in support of his amendment. /. 
Tom Sofge, Jr. (Florida) spoke against it. Mr. Jarvis made the 
final statement against Mr. Moore's amendment on behalf of 
GCFA. Wayne B. Middleton (Detroit) asked a question about the 
effect of the amendment on the World Service Fund total; Mr. 
Jarvis rephed that it would be increased $3.8 million over the 
quadrennium. Parker Duncan (Western North Carolina) objected 
that Ms. Grimes' amendment was to reallocate funds within the 
total, and that that should apply to Mr. Moore's amendment as 
well. The Secretary read Mr. Moore's amendment, and it was 
defeated. 

R. Fletcher Carter (South Carolina) spoke against Ms. Grimes' 
amendment. Mr. Jarvis made a final statement on behalf of 
GCFA, indicating his understanding that the amendment would 
set the telecommunications line item at $1,000,000 per year and 
would not change the quadrennial totals for the World Service 
Fund. James H. McCormack (West Ohio) asked about the 
meaning of "appropriate increases" in Ms. Grimes' amendment. 
Bishop Yeakel explained the effect on annual fund totals of an 
increase to $1,000,000 per year for telecommunications. Gladys 
Fitts (Tennessee) sought to introduce an amendment to the 
amendment, but the Chair ruled that the Conference was at the 
point of voting on Ms. Grimes' amendment, and that no other 



The United Methodist Church 387 

amendments were in order. James Lee Riley (Texas) asked Ms. 
Grimes to clarify whether her amendment was for a reallocation 
of funds with no increase in the total, and also what she had 
meant by annual increases. Ms. Grimes replied that a level 
amount of $1,000,000 per year for telecommunications would be 
acceptable to her. The amendment was defeated. 

Recess 

The Chair noted that the time set for recess had been reached 
and declared the Conference to be in recess. 

Clarification on Action on Baltimore Declaration 

The Chair made a clarifying statement on the earlier action on 
the Baltimore Declaration, explaining that the Conference had 
not voted approval of the Declaration, but only that it be referred 
to the Council of Bishops and the General Council on Ministries, 
and that it be printed in the Daily Christian Advocate. 

Ballot for Judicial Council Alternate Members 

The Secretary gave instructions for the taking of the ballot for 
alternate members of the Judicial Council. John V. Moore 
(California-Nevada) asked that his name be withdrawn from 
consideration. J. Taylor Phillips (South Georgia) and Foy 
Campbell (Alabama- West Florida) asked that their names also be 
withdrawn. Paul V. Chaffee (Western Pennsylvania) asked a 
question; the Secretary answered. Nancy M. Carruth (Louisiana) 
asked a question about the number to be elected; the Secretary 
answered. When all of the ballots had been collected, the Chair 
declared the ballot closed. 

GCFA Report No. 1 — World Service Fund (Consideration 
Resumed) 

Becky Haase (Pacific and Southwest) asked a question about 
the Conference's action on Calendar No. 1088 as it related to the 
GCFA report; Bishop Yeakel answered. John S. McCabe 
(Northern Illinois) asked about the GCFA World Service Fund 
recommendations in relation to the limit set by the Conference on 
apportioned general fund increases; Bishop Yeakel answered. 

Gladys M. Fitts (Tennessee) moved to amend the Woi'ld 
Service Fund budget by increasing the amount for telecommuni- 
cations by $2 million per year, and by decreasing the amount for 
the General Board of Global Ministries by $2 million per year. 
She spoke in support of her motion. Arthur F. Hagy, Jr. (Troy) 
raised a point of order, that in voting on Calendar No. 1088, the 
Conference completed action on the telecommunications line 



388 Journal of the 198i General Conference 

item, and that further amendments related to it were out of 
order. The Chair ruled that the amendment was in order. Cleha 
D. Hendrix (South Carolina) spoke against Ms. Fitts' amend- 
ment. Mr. Jarvis spoke against it on behalf of GCFA. The 
Secretary read the amendment, and it was defeated. 

C. David Lundquist (West Michigan) moved the suspension of 
the rule requiring two speeches on each side of an issue, in order 
to be able to move the previous question on GCFA Report No. 1. 
The motion to suspend the rules was adopted. Mr. Lundquist 
then moved the previous question on Report No. 1, and the 
previous question was adopted. 

Robert D. Bledsoe (Florida), Donald M. Pike (Central Texas), 
J. Howard Wright (Western Pennsylvania), and Ivan L. 
LaTumo (Missouri East) asked questions about the GCFA 
recommendations on the various funds as they related to previous 
actions, and especially to the 26% limit on apportioned general 
fund increases. Mr. Jarvis and Bishop Yeakel answered, 
referring to reports as printed in the Daily Christian Advocate to 
show the amounts by which each fund had been reduced in the 
Council's recommendations. 

Report No. 1, the World Service Fund, was put to a vote and 
was adopted (see pages 523-531). 

GCFA Report No. 21— Funding Requests, 1984 General 
Conference Contingency Fund 

Mr. Jarvis presented the report and observed that the rules 
would need to be suspended to consider it, since it had not been 
printed and before the Conference for the length of time required 
by the rules. The rules were suspended by vote of the 
Conference. Mr. Jarvis explained that the report contained 
GCFA recommendations in response to several specific funding 
requests which had been voted by the Conference and referred to 
GCFA. The report was adopted (see page 578). 

Report No. 2 — Apportionment Formula 

Mr. Jarvis presented the report, explaining that it contained 
the Council's recommendations related to the formula used in 
determining general fund apportionments to the annual confer- 
ences (see pages 532-534). 

Committee on Financial Administration Report No. 68, 
Calendar No. 1089 

Mr. Dolsen presented the report, consisting of the legislative 
committee recommendation for adoption of GCFA Report No. 2; 
the report was adopted (see pages 532, 1503). 



The United Methodist Church 389 

Report No. a— Episcopal Fund „ ... ^u rr ^ ^ 

Bishop Yeakel called on Leighton Farrell (North Texas) for 
presentation of the report (see pages 534-547). Mr. Farrell called 
attention to the report as printed in Advance Edition C of the 
Daily Chnstian Advocate, and to revisions which had been 
printed subsequently. He gave particular attention to explaining 
changes proposed by the Council in the area of bishops' housing 
and the recommendations regarding bishops' salaries. 

Committee on Financial Administration Report No. 69, 
Calendar No. 1090 ^ , , ... 

Mr. Dolsen presented the report, consisting of the legislative 
committee's recommendation of concurrence with GCFA Report 
No. 3 (see page 1503). 

Harry E. Shaner (California-Nevada) moved to amend the 
GCFA repori:, Section I,B,2, by adding the following: "The area 
may purchase, rent, or provide a housing allowance." He spoke in 
support of his amendment. Mr. Farrell spoke against it on behalf 
of the Council. The amendment was defeated. 

Carolyn B. Edge (Southern New England) referred to section 
I B 2g, which provided that bishops who were already living in 
houses' they own could continue to do so for another four years, if 
their assignment did not change; she asked if the Council would 
be willing to change "four years" to "eight years," if the General 
Conference adopted other legislation which allowed bishops to 
remain in the same assignment for a longer period of time. Mr. 
Farrell stated that the Council would accept that change if new 
legislation governing the maximum length of assignment to an 
episcopal area was approved. t d o^ 

James J. Caraway (Louisiana) moved to amend section l,B^d 
of the report, the second sentence, to begin, "It is recommended 
that the committee be composed of the following. . . ." He spoke 
in support of his amendment. Mr. Farrell accepted it on behalt ot 
the Council. He noted that there was also disciplinary legislation 
which should be amended in the same fashion. 

Donald A. Ott (Wisconsin) moved to amend section I,B,2c by 
deleting the last sentence and substituting the following: "The 
method for calculating the cost of episcopal housing shall be 
determined by the General Council on Finance and Administra- 
tion " He spoke in support of his amendment. Robert J. McCune 
(Central New York) asked a question about the effect of the 
proposed amendment; Mr. Ott answered. Mr. Farrell declined 
the opportunity to make a final statement against the amend- 
ment. The amendment was defeated. 
The report was adopted (see pages 534,1503). 



390 Journal of the 198^ General Conference 

GCFA Report No. 4 — Ministerial Education Fund 

Bishop Yeakel called on Harold H. Quickel (Eastern Pennsyl- 
vania) for presentation of the report. Mr. Quickel reviewed 
briefly the Council's recommendations related to the Ministerial 
Education Fund (see pages 547-550), with special attention to the 
proposed revision in the apportionment base. 

Committee on Financial Administration Report No. 70, 
Calendar No. 1091 

Mr. Dolsen presented the report, which contained the 
legislative committee's recommendation for concurrence with 
GCFA Report No. 4 (see page 1503). Leigh Roberts (Wisconsin) 
asked a question about the use of Ministerial Education Fund 
monies for recruitment and education of ministers other than 
ordained clergy. Mr. Quickel replied that funds could be used for 
diaconal ministers. 

The report was adopted (see pages 547, 1503). 

GCFA Report No. 5 — Temporary General Aid Fund 

Mr. Quickel presented the report, consisting of the Council's 
recommendations related to the Temporary General Aid Fund 
(see pages 550-552). 

Committee on Financial Administration Report No. 71, 
Calendar No. 1092 

Mr. Dolsen presented the report, consisting of the legislative 
committee's recommendation to concur with GCFA Report No. 
5. The report was adopted (see pages 550, 1503-1504). 

GCFA Report No. 6 — General Administration Fund 

Bishop Yeakel called on Evelyn Griffith (Detroit) for presen- 
tation of this report and Report No. 7. He noted that the 
Conference would need to grant Ms. Griffith the privilege of the 
floor, and it was granted by vote of the Conference. Ms. Griffith 
presented the report, containing the Council's recommendations 
related to the General Administration Fund (see pages 552-556). 

Committee on Financial Administration Report No. 72, 
Calendar No. 1093 

Mr. Dolsen reported that the legislative committee recom- 
mended concurrence with GCFA Report No. 6. Rhett Jackson 
(South Carolina) pointed out an editorial correction to be made in 
the legislative committee report. The report was adopted (see 
pages 552, 1504). 



The United Methodist Church 391 

GCFA Report No. 7 — Interdenominational Cooperation Fund 

Ms. Griffith presented the Council's printed report, containing 
recommendations related to the Interdenominational Coopera- 
tion Fund (see pages 556-559). 

Committee on Financial Administration Report No. 73, 
Calendar No. 1094 

Mr. Dolsen reported that the legislative committee recom- 
mended concurrence with GCFA Report No. 7. DonL. Forsman 
(New Mexico) moved to amend the report by setting the total for 
the fund at $1,150,000 each year. He spoke in support of his 
amendment. John T. King (Southwest Texas) spoke against it. 
Bishop Yeakel made the final statement against the amendment 
on behalf of the Council. The Secretary read the amendment; it 
was defeated. The report was adopted (see pages 556, 1504). 

GCFA Report No. 8— Black College Fund 

Mr. Quickel presented the report, summarizing background 
information and current recommendations for the Black College 
Fund, in amounts totalling $33,093,288 for the four years of the 
1985-88 quadrennium (see pages 559-561). 

Committee on Financial Administration Report No. 74, 
Calendar No. 1095 

Mr. Dolsen reported that the legislative committee recom- 
mended concurrence with GCFA Report No. 8. Don L. Riggin 
(Little Rock) moved to amend the report by restoring amounts 
originally recommended by GCFA, as printed in Advance Edition 
C of the Daily Christian Advocate, totalling $34,021,288 for the 
four years of the quadrennium. Mr. Riggin spoke briefly in 
support of his amendment. Mr. Quickel spoke on behalf of the 
Council in opposition to the amendment. The amendment was 
defeated. The report was adopted (see pages 559, 1504). 

GCFA Report No. 9— Missional Priority Fund 

Mr. Jat^s outlined the Council's recommendations related to 
the Missional Priority Fund, as revised to reflect earlier General 
Conference action on the 1985-88 missional priority (see pages 
561-562). 

Committee on Financial Administration Report No. 75, 
Calendar No. 1096 

Mr. Dolsen reported that the legislative committee recom- 
mended concurrence with GCFA Report No. 9 (see page 1504). 
Victor M. Goldschmidt (North Indiana) moved to amend the 



392 Journal of the 1984 General Conference 

second paragraph under section 2c) of the report to read as 
follows: "No general board may use more than 10% of its 
Missional Priority Fund receipts for all related travel not 
included in 2a) and for salaries and support of staff for 
administrative purposes." Mr. Goldschmidt spoke in support of 
his amendment. Zan W. Holmes (North Texas) asked a question; 
Mr. Goldschmidt answered. Carolyn Oehler (Northern Illinois) 
spoke against the amendment. Mr. Jarvis made a final statement 
on behalf of the Council against the amendment. The amendment 
was defeated. 

Jose L. Palos (Rio Grande) moved to amend the first sentence 
of section 2c) of the report to read as follows: "An amount not to 
exceed $900,000 shall be a prior claim for promotion of the fund, 
prorated in a descending amount during the quadrennium as the 
GCFA may determine." He spoke in support of his amendment. 
Stacy D. Myers, Jr. (Eastern Pennsylvania) spoke against it. Mr. 
Jarvis spoke against it on behalf of the Council. The amendment 
was defeated. 

Peter D. Weaver (Western Pennsylvania) moved to amend the 
report by substituting $7,000,000 as the annual amount to be 
apportioned for the fund. He spoke in support of his amendment. 
/. Gordon Stapleton (Peninsula) spoke against it. Mr. Jarvis 
spoke against it on behalf of the Council. The amendment was 
defeated. The report was adopted (see pages 561-562, 1504). 

GCFA Report No. 10 

Bishop Yeakel noted that the Council's original Report No. 10 
dealt with telecommunications, and since this matter had been 
dealt with elsewhere, it would be proper for the report to be 
removed from the agenda. The Conference voted to remove the 
report from its agenda. 

Order of the Day — Offering for Marshals and Pages 

The Chair noted that the time scheduled for orders of the day 
had been reached. He reported that during the Conference 
delegates had been assisted by 160 marshals and pages from 35 
states and the District of Columbia and from 55 annual 
conferences. He asked that the Conference express its apprecia- 
tion to them both by applause and by means of an offering which 
would be divided among them. 

Order of the Day — Presentation of Bishops' Spouses 

At the Chair's request. Bishop James S. Thomas directed the 
Conference's attention to the section in which bishops' spouses 
were seated. The Conference greeted them with applause. 



The United Methodist Church 393 

Motion Regarding Marshals and Pages 

Zan W. Holmes (North Texas) moved that, as additional 
recognition of the marshals and pages, their names be printed in 
the Daily Christian Advocate. The motion was adopted. 

Motion to Suspend the Rules 

Lycurgus M. Starkey (Missouri East) moved to suspend the 
rules to allow the distribution of two welcome favors of the 1988 
General Conference in St. Louis at delegates' tables on Friday 
morning, May 11. The motion was adopted. 

Committee on Presiding Officers 

Richard W. Cain (Pacific and Southwest), chairperson of the 
committee, reported that the Committee on Presiding Officers 
had selected the following bishops to preside at the remaining 
plenary sessions of the Conference: Thursday afternoon. Bishop 
Jesse R. DeWitt (Chicago Area); Thursday evening. Bishop Paul 
A. Duffey (Louisville Area); Friday morning. Bishop Marjorie S. 
Matthews (Wisconsin Area); Friday afternoon. Bishop Roy C. 
Clark (Columbia Area); and Friday evening, Bishop William B. 
Grove (West Virginia Area). 

Committee on Courtesies and Privileges 

C. Vernon Bigler (Western New York), chairperson of the 
committee, called on Sue Davidson (New Hampshire) for a 
matter of privilege. 

Ms. Davidson: Be it resolved that the General Conference extend to Bishop 
Abel Muzorewa of Zimbabwe our deep regret because of his absence from this 
Conference and recognize his actions of conscience in behalf of freedom for the 
people of Zimbabwe. 

The resolution was adopted. 

Mr. Bigler called attention to a section in which visitors from 
the National Association of Korean American Methodist 
Churches were seated. The Conference greeted them with 
applause. ^ 

Request for Communication to House of Representatives 

Frank L. Dorsey (Kansas East): Bishop, yesterday this conference took action 
on Central America. Today the House of Representatives will discuss funding for 
Central America. The House is expected to vote in favor of continuing aid to El 
Salvador but not to the Contras working against the government of Nicaragua. If 
you'd refer to that report, and then if you would call the office of the 
representatives from your district, giving information on the action of the General 
Conference and expressing your opinion, it would be very helpful. 



394 Journal of the 198 Jf General Conference 

Closing 

The Secretary made announcements. Bishop Edward J. 
Pendergrass (Retired) offered a closing prayer, and the session 
was adjourned. 



NINTH DAY, THURSDAY, MAY 10, 1984 
AFTERNOON SESSION 

Opening 

The General Conference of The United Methodist Church 
convened in the afternoon session of Thursday, May 10, 1984, at 
2:30 p.m. in the Civic Center Arena, Baltimore, Maryland, with 
Bishop Jesse R. DeWitt (Chicago Area) presiding. Following the 
singing of a hymn, the Conference was led in prayer by Bishop W. 
Ralph Ward, Jr. (Retired). 

The Chair outlined the schedule of reports to be considered 
during the session: completion of reports from the General 
Council on Finance and Administration, followed by reports from 
the legislative committees on Local Church, Higher Education, 
and Global Ministries. 

Announcement of Emergency Appeal for Domestic Disaster 
Relief 

Bishop Wayne K. Clymer (Iowa Area) called on Norma 
Kehrberg (Associate General Secretary, United Methodist 
Committee on Relief) for an announcement regarding a special 
appeal which had just been approved by the Council of Bishops 
and the General Council on Finance and Administration. Ms. 
Kehrberg reported that the appeal was for funds for domestic 
disaster relief, to assist in areas which had been stiiick by 
tornadoes and flooding during the past two weeks. 

Motion Regarding Missional Priority 

Faustina Lucero (New Mexico) sought to introduce a motion 
related to implementation of the missional priority in the local 
church. The Chair suggested that the motion be held until the 
Legislative Committee on the Local Church reported, later in the 
session. 

GCFA Report No. 11 — Archives Building 

Bishop Yeakel called on Mr. Jarvis for presentation of Report 
No. 11, dealing with financial recommendations related to the 
Archives Building. He presented the recommendation, a resolu- 
tion giving Drew University authority to conduct a capital funds 
campaign for the United Methodist Archives and History Center 
(see pages 562-563). Paul Hardin (Northern New Jersey), 
president of Drew University, spoke in support of the report, 
noting that it was a substitute for an earlier recommendation by 
GCFA which would have established a separate apportioned fund 
for this purpose. 

395 



396 Journal of the 198U General Conference 

Committee on Financial Administration Report No. 77, 
Calendar No. 1098 

Mr, Dolsen reported that the legislative committee recom- 
mended concurrence with GCFA Report No. 11 (see page 1505). 
Bishop Yeakel reported that the Council of Bishops had also 
taken action in support of the proposed capital funds campaign. 
The report was adopted (see pages 562, 1505). 

GCFA Report No. 12— Special Days With Offerings 

Bishop Yeakel called attention to the fact that a revision to 
Report No. 12 had been printed in this day's Daily Christian 
Advocate, and that it would therefore be necessary to suspend 
the rules to permit its consideration. The rules were suspended 
by vote of the Conference. He called on Evelyn Griffith for 
presentation of the report. 

Ms. Griffith presented the report, calling attention to the 
addition of World Order Sunday as a fifth special day with 
offering, in keeping with an earher action of the Conference (see 
pages 563-566). 

Committee on Financial Administration Report No. 34, 
Calendar No. 395 

Mr. Dolsen reported that the legislative committee recom- 
mended concurrence with GCFA Report No. 12 (see page 1483). 

C. Joseph Sprague (West Ohio) moved to amend the GCFA 
Report No. 14 by changing the amount recommended for 
promotion of World Order Sunday from $53,000 to $35,000 per 
year. He spoke in support of his motion. Theodore H. Walter 
(South Carolina) asked a question; the Chair answered. William 
W. Dew (Cahfornia-Nevada) raised a point of order, that the 
amendment referred to Report No. 14, which was not before the 
Conference at this time. The Chair ruled that the amendment was 
in order, because it related to World Order Sunday, which was 
included in Report No. 12. 

J. Kenneth Forbes (South Indiana) moved the suspension of the 
rules in order to proceed to the vote on this matter. The motion 
was adopted. The amendment was put to a vote, and the Chair 
declared that it was adopted. Bishop Yeakel stated that there had 
been no opportunity given for a final statement against the 
amendment on behalf of the Council. The Chair apologized, but 
ruled that it was too late, since the vote had already been taken. 
The report was put to a vote and was declared to have been 
adopted as amended. 

Don L. Riggin (Little Rock) identified himself as having voted 
for the report and moved reconsideration for the purpose of 



The United Methodist Church 397 

hearing a final statement from Bishop Yeakel; the motion to 
reconsider was adopted. Bishop Yeakel spoke for the Council in 
opposition to Mr. Sprague's amendment, and it was defeated. 
The report was then put to a vote and was adopted (see pages 
563, 1483). 



GCFA Report No. 13— World Service Special Gifts Fund 

Mr. Jarvis presented the report, consisting of recommenda- 
tions related to the revamping of the World Service Special Gifts 
program as a channel for designated giving to programs of 
agencies not eligible for participation in the general Advance 
program (see pages 566-570). 

Committee on Financial Administration Report No. 21, 
Calendar No. 382 

Mr. Dolsen reported the legislative committee's recommenda- 
tion for concurrence with GCFA Report No. 13 (see page 1477). 
The report was adopted. 

GCFA Report No. 14 — Program and Benevolence Interpreta- 
tion Budget 

Mr. Jarvis presented the report, consisting of recommenda- 
tions as to the amounts which could be charged against the 
several general funds for promotion costs by the Division of 
Program and Benevolence Interpretation (see pages 570-572). 

Committee on Financial Administration Report No. 78, 
Calendar No. 1099 

Mr. Dolsen presented the legislative committee's recommenda- 
tion of concurrence with GCFA Report No. 14. The report was 
adopted (see pages 570, 1505). 

GCFA Report No. 15 

Mr. Jarvis presented the report, consisting of a series of 
recommendations related to the implementation of General 
Conference actions on general fund budgets (see pages 573-575). 

Committee on Financial Administration Report No. 79, 
Calendar No. 1100 

Mr. Dolsen reported the legislative committee's recommenda- 
tion of concurrence with GCFA Report No. 15. The report was 
adopted (see pages 573, 1505-1506). 



398 Journal of the 198 Jf General Conference 

GCFA Report No. 16 

Bishop Yeakel explained that the report consisted of an 
accounting of the Council's responses to a series of specific 
assignments referred to it by the 1980 General Conference (see 
pages 575-576). 



Committee on Financial Administration Report No. 39, 
Calendar No. 400 

Mr. Dolsen reported the legislative committee's recommenda- 
tion of concurrence with GCFA Report No. 16. The report was 
adopted (see pages 575, 1485). 

GCFA Report No. 17 — Lovely Lane Chapel Special Appeal 

Mr. Jarvis presented the report, consisting of a recommenda- 
tion for authorization of continuation through December, 1986, of 
a special appeal for funds to restore Lovely Lane Chapel, 
Baltimore, Maryland. At his suggestion, Emora T. Brannan, 
pastor of Lovely Lane United Methodist Church, was granted 
the privilege of the floor by vote of the Conference. Mr. Brannan 
reported briefly on the results of the appeal thus far and spoke in 
support of the report. 

Thomas W. Flinn, Jr. (Baltimore) was recognized and yielded 
the floor to H. Barry Bailey (Central Texas). Mr. Bailey moved 
to amend the report to allow for a special offering to be received 
on Christmas Eve, December 24, for the restoration of Lovely 
Lane Chapel. James H. Coile (North Carolina) moved to amend 
the amendment by inserting the words, "or other appropriate 
time," following the date. He spoke in support of his amendment. 
Mr. Jarvis waived the opportunity to speak on behalf of the 
Council. Mr. Coile's amendment was adopted. 

George W. Calvin (Louisiana) asked whether the intent was to 
receive an offering in one year only or in more than one year; Mr. 
Bailey stated that his intention was to receive it this year only. 
H. Myron Talcott (Wisconsin) spoke against Mr. Bailey's 
amendment. The amendment was adopted. 

The report was adopted as amended (see page 576). 



GCFA Report No. 18 — Pacific Homes Litigation 

Bishop Yeakel presented the report, consisting of a report 
from the Council on the outcome of litigation related to Pacific 
Homes (see page 576). He requested that Bishop Jack M. Tuell 
(Los Angeles Area) be granted the privilege of the floor, and it 
was granted by vote of the Conference. 



The United Methodist Church 399 

Bishop Tuell: The report is accurate so there is no need to say anything further 
about it. Let me make a couple of statements regarding the current developments. 

There is a new board in place at Pacific Homes. The fiscal projections which have 
been made are being realized and in fact are ahead of schedule in their work. The 
funds ensure that no person shall have to leave the homes because of financial 
exigency. It is in place and is guaranteeing that. I want to call your attention to this 
fact, and I am not sure everyone understands— the $21 million settlement is 
actually in the nature of a loan, and assuming the accomplishment of certain fiscal 
objectives, that is to be repaid. If the schedule goes as it is projected, we look 
fon\^ard toward the end of this decade, around 1990-92 for the repayment of that 
which would in turn, of course, be distributed pro rata among all the various annual 
conferences, the General Board of Global Ministries, the General Council on 
Finance and Administration and the Pacific and Southwest Conference, which 
originally provided the funds. I hope personally to be able to see that through. 

Two messages come out of the Pacific Homes. The reason people, I believe, do 
not give more in our churches— that is one of the things we learned— it's not that 
they do not have the resources to do it, it is motivation always that provides 
the key. 

And the second thing is that meeting an exceedingly impossible challenge can be 
the occasion for lifting the spirit of a Conference. To illustrate that, this 
Conference, which raised something over $11 million dollars three years ago, right 
now has launched a new campaign and is in the process of raising $11 million dollars 
for the advancing of the program of the church in pensions, in new churches and in 
camping. So while I do not want to suggest that we become defendants in litigation 
in order to lift the spirit of our conferences, I will suggest that even in the most 
difficult circumstances God's spirit can lead us to accomplishments which none of us 
could ever imagine might have happened . So I want to thank everyone , everyone of 
you who had some part in some way in helping the Pacific and Southwest 
Conference meet this particular obligation. We thank you and we wish every 
blessing on you. Thank you very much. 

Committee on Financial Administration Report No. 58, 
Calendar No. 877 

Mr. Dolsen reported the legislative committee's recommenda- 
tion of concurrence with GCFA Report No. 18. The report was 
adopted (see page 1496), 

GCFA Report No. 19— Churches' Center for Theology and 
Public Policy 

Douglas L. McGuire (Louisiana) presented the report, con- 
sisting of recommendations growing out of evaluation of the 
Churches' Center for Theology and Public Policy, as conducted 
jointly by the General Council on Ministries and the General 
Council on Finance and Administration (see pages 576-578). 

Committee on Financial Administration Report No. 26, 
Calendar No. 387 

Mr. Dolsen reported the legislative committee's recommenda- 
tion for adoption of GCFA Report No. 19. The report was 
adopted (see pages 576, 1481). 



400 Journal of the 1984. General Conference 

GCFA Report No. 20 — Television Presence and Ministry 
Campaign Results 

Bishop Yeakel presented the report, which was an accounting 
of the results of the campaign for the "Television Presence and 
Ministry" progi^am adopted by the 1980 General Conference (see 
page 578). The report was adopted. 

GCFA Report No. 22— New Hymnal Funding 

Bishop Yeakel pointed out that this report, dealing with 
funding for the development of a new hymnal, had been printed in 
this day's Daily Christian Advocate, and it would be necessary to 
suspend the rules to consider it. The rules were suspended. 
Bishop Yeakel presented the report, and it was adopted (see 
pages 578-579). 

Committee on Conferences Report No. 115, Calendar No. 575 

Bishop Yeakel requested that the rules be suspended for one 
additional matter; they were suspended by vote of the Confer- 
ence. Mr. Dolsen moved reconsideration of Consent Calendar No. 
4 for the single purpose of making legislation contained in 
Committee on Conferences Report No. 115 effective immediately 
upon adjournment of the General Conference. Reconsideration 
was adopted. Mr. Dolsen then moved that the legislation be made 
effective immediately upon adjournment of the General Confer- 
ence; the motion was adopted. 

General Council on Finance and Administration Report 
Concluded 

Bishop Thomas expressed appreciation on behalf of the Council 
to the (Conference for its response, courtesy, and commitment 
during consideration of the Council's reports. 

Report on First Ballot for Alternate Members of the Judicial 
Council 

The Secretary reported the results of the first ballot for 
alternate members of the Judicial Council, as follows: total ballots 
cast, 872; invalid ballots, 16; valid ballots, 856; needed to elect, 
429. Clergy elected were Susan M. Morrison wdth 492 votes, and 
E. Dale Dunlap with 455 votes. Laypersons elected were Terry 
Sanford with 778 votes, Crisolito Pascual with 530 votes, and Don 
L. Riggin with 478 votes. 

He read the names and vote totals for others who received 
more than 100 votes, as follows: clergy: Robert H. Spain, 343; 
Donna T. Mortonstout, 267; Alvin J. Lindgren, 253; Garnett M. 
Wilder, 181; P. Boyd Mather, 122; lay: CHfford B. Aguilar, 412; 



The United Methodist Church 401 

Thomas M. Reavley, 395; Joe E. Covington, 392; Byron Hayes, 
Jr., 261. 

Second Ballot for Alternate Members of the Judicial Council 

The Secretary gave instructions for the taking of a second 
ballot. J. Howard Wright (Western Pennsylvania) and Torrey 
Kaatz (West Ohio) asked questions; the Secretary answered. 
Bienvinido J. Jimenez (Northern Philippines) asked a question; 
the Chair answered. 

When the ballots had been collected, the Chair declared the 
ballot closed. 

Recess 

The Chair observed that the time scheduled for recess had been 
reached and declared the Conference to be in recess for fifteen 
minutes. 

Committee on Calendar 

Virgil V. Bjork (North Indiana), chairperson of the Committee 
on Calendar moved adoption of Consent Calendar No. 5, as 
amended by the deletions listed with Consent Calendar No. 6. 
William S. Evans, II (Memphis) sought to ask a question, but the 
Chair ruled that, unless it related to the motion before the 
Conference, it was not in order at this time. The motion on 
Consent Calendar No. 5 was adopted (see page 495). 

Mr. Bjork reported briefly on the amount of work yet 
remaining before the Conference and called for reports from the 
Legislative Committee on the Local Church. 

Judicial Council Decision Regarding Ordained Ministry 
Standards 

Mr. Evans asked if the Chair could give information in 
response to a rumor that was circulating, to the effect that a 
Judicial Council decision had been released, related to the 
referral on the legislation governing ordination standards (see 
page 354). Robert Young (Secretarial Staff) reported that the 
decision was available and could be read at any time. The Chair 
asked that it be read. 

Mr. Young: The General Conference asked for a declaratorj' decision whether 
ordination and appointment of self-avowed and practicing homosexuals is 
precluded by amendment of •:'"404, 414, 420, 423 and 431 of the Discipline. The 
decision includes a Digest, Statement of Facts, Analysis of the Situation, and a 
Rendering of the Decision which is as follows: "Neither ordination nor appointment 
of self-avowed, practicing homosexuals is necessarily precluded by the words 
"fidelity in marriage and celibacy in singleness" as added to •"•"404, 414, 420 and 431 



402 Journal of the 198 A General Conference 

of the Discipline. The annual conferences have the authority to decide whether 
candidates for ordination meet the disciphnary requirements." Bishop, the 
decision is signed by Tom Matheny, president; Hoover Rupert, secretary, of the 
Judicial Council. 

C. Wilbume Hancock (South Georgia) moved that the 
Conference make a consideration of this report a matter of 
business in the evening session. The Chair stated that it was not 
clear what Mr. Hancock meant by "this report," and that, in any 
event, a Judicial Council decision was not a matter for 
consideration or action by the Conference. 

L. E. Crowson (West Virginia) raised a point of order, that the 
subject could not be discussed without a motion to reconsider the 
Conference's earher action. He identified himself as having voted 
for Calendar No. 510 (Committee on Ordained and Diaconal 
Ministry Report No. 16) and moved reconsideration, and that the 
reconsideration be set for 7:30 p.m. today. The Chair clarified the 
fact that reconsideration required only a majority vote. Don L. 
Forsman (New Mexico) asked what was included in the 
reconsideration motion, and the Chair answered that it applied to 
Calendar No. 510. William M. James (New York) spoke in 
opposition to the motion to reconsider. 

Ivan L. LaTumo (Missouri East) raised a point of order, that 
Mr. Crowson had been recognized for a point of order and had 
proceeded to offer a motion. The Chair ruled that, because the 
point of order was related to the need to reconsider and had been 
sustained, Mr. Crowson's motion was in order. Bob R. Martin 
(North Georgia) moved to suspend the rules in order to move 
immediately to the vote on reconsideration; the motion to 
suspend the rules was adopted. Mr. Crowson' s motion for 
reconsideration was then adopted. 

Paul Hardin (Northern New Jersey) asked if it would be 
possible for delegates to have before them at the evening 
session the full text of the Judicial Council decision. The 
Secretary replied that every effort would be made to make it 
available. 

Mr. James called for a count vote on the motion to reconsider, 
but his call was not supported by the Conference. Donald L. 
Carver (Iowa) again asked whether the reconsideration appHed 
only to Calendar No. 510 and not to Nos. 511-512. The Chair 
affirmed that the motion referred only to Calendar No. 510, 
Thomas L. Cromwell (East Ohio) asked whether the Chair was 
ruhng that the call for a count vote had not been supported by a 
one-third vote of the Conference, and the Chair confirmed his 
ruling that it had not received the required one-third vote. 



The United Methodist Church 403 

Legislative Committee on Local Church 

Dan E. Solomon (Southwest Texas), chairperson of the 
committee, expressed appreciation to Joseph B. Bethea (North 
Carohna), vicechairman, and Carolyn M. Marshall (South 
Indiana), secretary, for their leadership in the work of the 
committee. 

Report No. 10, Calendar No. 14 

Mr. Solomon presented the report, which recommended 
deletion of Par. 246 (1980 Discipline) and substitution of a new 
Par. 246 containing provisions related to the Charge Conference 
(see page 1369). James H. Coile (North Carolina) moved to 
amend proposed Par. 246.6 by inserting the words "and voting" 
after "The members present ..." He spoke in support of his 
amendment; Mr. Solomon waived the opportunity to make a final 
statement for the committee. The amendment was adopted. 

Charles B. Purdham (Minnesota) moved that, wherever the 
terms "Administrative Board" and "Administrative Council" 
appear in sequence, that "Administrative Board" be listed first. 

J. Gordon Stapleton (Peninsula): Mr. Chairman and members of the 
Conference, the reason that this was restructured through the General Board of 
Discipleship was that a large number of small membership churches that we have in 
this denomination, and the previous wording that was in the 1980 Discipline would 
give the impression that the Administrative Council is in some way a second class 
citizen to the Administrative Board. For that reason, we restructured this 
legislation. We put the Administrative Council first, and I urge the body to leave it 
that way. Thank you. 

Mr. Solomon waived the opportunity for a final statement. The 
amendment was defeated. 
Report No. 10 was adopted (see pages 1369-1370). 

Report No. 70, Calendar No. 409 

Mr. Solomon presented the report, which recommended 
deletion of Par. 247 (1980 Discipline) and substitution of a new 
paragraph dealing with the powers and duties of the Charge 
Conference (see pages 1394-1397). He stated that he was aware of 
one amendment which members of the committee were willing 
for the Conference to decide. Leonard I. Sweet (Western New 
York) moved to amend the first phrase in proposed Par. 247.5 by 
changing "may" to "shall," so that it would read, "The Charge 
Conference shall elect a church historian ..." He spoke in 
support of his amendment. Mr. Solomon waived the opportunity 
to make a final statement. The amendment was defeated. 

Donald J. Cunningham (California-Nevada) moved to amend 
the last portion of proposed Par. 247.3 by adding a reference to 



404 Journal of the 1984, General Conference 

the electing of officers, as follows: "receive reports, adopt 
objectives and goals recommended by the Administrative 
Council or Administrative Board which are in keeping with the 
objectives of The United Methodist Church, and elect officers 
and others to lead the congregation in fulfilling those objec- 
tives." He spoke in support of his amendment. John M. Meares, 
Sr. (North Carolina) spoke against it. Mr. Solomon spoke 
against it on behalf of the committee, pointing out that the 
Charge Conference responsibility for electing officers was 
covered in another paragraph being recommended by the 
committee. The amendment was defeated. 

John Porter (Louisiana) moved to amend the last sentence of 
proposed Par. 247.7 by inserting the words "the same," so that it 
would read: "It is recommended that no officer serve more than 
three consecutive years in the same office." He spoke in support 
of his amendment. Mr. Solomon expressed willingness for the 
Conference to adopt the amendment, and it was adopted. 

John P. Miles (Little Rock) moved to suspend the rules in 
order to be able to vote on the report. The motion to suspend the 
rules was adopted. Report No. 70 was adopted as amended (see 
pages 1394-1397). 

Report No. 86, Calendar No. 588 

Mr. Solomon explained that the report recommended the 
addition of a sentence to Par. 250.2, further defining the 
interpretive role of lay members of the Annual Conference. The 
report was adopted (see page 1402). 

Report No. 19, Calendar No. 164 

Mr. Solomon explained that the report recommended amend- 
ing Par. 257 by including "status and role of women" in the hst of 
work area chairpersons comprising the basic membership of the 
Council on Ministries. The report was adopted (see page 1374). 

Report No. 116, Calendar No. 756 

Mr. Solomon presented the report, consisting of a recommen- 
dation for an additional amendment to Par. 257, to assure the 
inclusion of two older adult members of the local church Council 
on Ministries. Leon McKenzie (Pacific and Southwest) called 
attention to an editorial change needed in printing the subject of 
the report; Mr. Solomon accepted the correction. 

Don L. Forsman (New Mexico) suggested that this might be an 
appropriate time to consider the amendment Ms. Lucero had 
sought to offer earlier in the session (see above, page 395). Mr. 
Solomon agreed that that would be appropriate. 



The United Methodist Church 405 

The Chair called for the vote on the report, and it was adopted 
(see page 1412). 

Motion Regarding Local Church Missional Priority Chair- 
person 

Faustina Lucero (New Mexico) moved that a missional priority 
chairperson be designated in each Charge Conference to receive 
materials and promote the specific priority in each local church 
throughout the quadrennium; that that person be named to the 
Council on Ministries, if not already a member thereof; and, 
further, that this position be listed in the Discipline in the 
paragraphs indicating membership of the local church Council on 
Ministries. 

Mr. Solomon: The statement that the chair wants to make is such that I would 
trust that this body would understand that there is no lack of enthusiasm for 
supporting the Ethnic Minority Local Church Missional Priority when I make the 
statement. 

The committee had this exact petition before it and voted 84 to nonconcurrence 
on the petition. Once again, not because the substance of the matter was not 
important, but simply the conviction of the committee was that as the Missional 
Priority is established and as it is referred both to the annual conference and the 
local church, the expectation of the committee, and I would think, of the entire 
General Conference, would be that those linkages that must exist for effective 
implementation of the Missional Priority will be identified and their job definition 
will be clearly described. The concern of the committee was that we simply not 
continue to load up the officer list in the local church, each time we have concerns. 
Albeit, however important those concerns may be, the feeling of the committee 
was that already in place in our churches are people who are fully capable and ready 
to give leadership in this area. 

The motion was defeated. 

Report No. 12, Calendar No. 157 

Mr. Solomon explained that the report was a recommendation 
for concurrence with the addition of the status and role of women 
to the listing of work areas in Par. 259. The report was adopted 
(see page 1370). 

Report No. 14, Calendar No. 159 

Mr. Solomon presented the report, which recommended 
addition of a new Par. 260.8 defining the responsibilities of the 
work area chairperson of the status and role of women. LaVeme 
B. Burton (Little Rock) spoke in opposition to the report. Kiyoko 
K. Fujiu (Northern Illinois) spoke in support of it. Mr. Solomon 
supported it on behalf of the committee. The report was adopted 
(see page 1371). 



406 Journal of the 1984- General Conference 

Report No. 35, Calendar No. 219 

Mr. Solomon presented the report, consisting of recommended 
revisions to provisions governing the Committee on Nominations 
and Personnel (Par. 266.1), along with editorial changes in other 
portions of Par. 266. Leigh Roberts (Wisconsin) asked a question; 
the Chair answered. 

Eddie Self (North Alabama) moved to amend the first 
paragraph of proposed Par. 266. 1 by amending the last sentence 
to provide for the possibility of the lay leader being chairperson, 
and by adding an additional sentence; the last two sentences of 
the first paragraph would then read: "The pastor or lay leader 
shall serve as chairperson, as determined by the committee. The 
committee shall not meet without the knowledge and consent of 
the pastor." He spoke in support of his amendment. 

Lester L. Moore (Iowa) moved as a substitute, that the first 
paragraph of proposed Par. 266. 1 be amended by deleting the 
sentence, "The pastor shall be the chairperson." He spoke in 
support of his amendment. 

Porter Womeldorff (Central Illinois): We have discussed this at length in 1976, 
1980, and 1984. The tension that we find ourselves in is, on the one hand, all of the 
points that have been raised in favor of this substitute, and on the other hand, the 
responsibihty that rests with the local pastor for enabling ministry in the local 
church. A pastor cannot discharge that responsibility given an ineffective 
Committee on Nominations and Personnel; therefore, it remains crucial in my 
opinion as a layperson that the pastor or a most responsible layperson fill this role. 
I can accept the amendment, but not the substitute to the amendment. I urge you 
to vote against the substitute. 

Mr. Solomon spoke against the substitute on behalf of the 
committee. The substitute was defeated. 

Jack E. Spencer (Western Pennsylvania) moved to amend the 
amendment by deleting the words, "as determined by the 
committee," and by substituting "elected by the Charge 
Conference upon nomination of the nominating committee." 
James H. Coile (North Carolina) moved to suspend the rules and 
proceed to the vote on the amendments. The motion was adopted. 
Mr. Solomon made the final statement against Mr. Spencer's 
amendment on behalf of the committee. The Secretary read the 
amendment to the amendment, and it was defeated. Mr. Selfs 
amendment was then put to a vote and was defeated. 

P. Boyd Mather (Iowa) asked a question; Mr. Solomon 
answered. Mr. Mather moved to amend proposed Par. 266.3 by 
deleting "the chairperson of the Administrative Council or the 
chairperson of the Administrative Board and the Council on 
Ministries, the chairperson of the Council on Ministries," and 
substituting "the chairpersons of the Administrative Board and 



The United Methodist Church 407 

the Council on Ministries, or the chairperson of the Administra- 
tive Council." Mr. Solomon stated his willingness to accept the 
amendment, and it was adopted. 

Charles Harper (North Texas) moved to amend the last 
sentence of the first paragraph of proposed Par. 266.1 to read, 
"The pastor may be the chairperson." Clifton Bullock (West 
Michigan) raised a point of order, that the Conference was under 
the previous question; the Chair replied that Mr. Coile's previous 
question motion applied only to the amendments before the 
(IJonference at the time the rules were suspended, not to the 
report as a whole. Mr. Harper spoke in support of his 
amendment. Oscar 0. Garza IV (Rio Grande) moved to suspend 
the rules in order to vote on all before the Conference. The 
motion was adopted. The amendment was put to a vote and was 
defeated. The report was adopted (see pages 1382-1385). 

Report No. 100, Calendar No. 602 

Mr. Solomon presented the report, consisting of an amend- 
ment to Par. 255. 3f) which would define the relationship between 
clergy compensation and provisions for clergy housing (see page 
1407). 

Mr. Solomon: The committee concurred with the petition that came to us from 
the Council of Bishops and calls for the inclusion of language which you find in the 
boldface type at the ending of 11255.3. 

I would like to try to describe something of that which is involved as I understand 
it in this particular issue, and would want to represent a keen concern on the part of 
our legislative committee to be sensitive and to recognize that there is a justice 
issue involved in this as it relates to those persons who are clergy couples. If a 
pastor and spouse, with the spouse not being also ordained, were to move to a 
parsonage that had a great amount of room, and they needed only a small amount, it 
would be considered inappropriate for them to rent out that part of the parsonage 
that they are not using, and pocket the additional income. If a clergy couple move to 
an appointment where there are two parsonages provided and they choose to live in 
the same parsonage, then it would be assumed that, if the local church rented out 
the parsonage, there would not be compensation which would be given to the clergy 
couple. 

The justice issue and the concern comes more particularly at that point where a 
clergj' couple moves to an appointment in which a parsonage is provided in one of 
those appointments and a housing allowance is given in the other. If through the 
years that housing allowance has been quite large for varied and valid reasons, and 
then it's lost entirely to that clergy couple, their compensation might be adversely 
affected. And the committee is sensitive to that. Nevertheless, there needs to be a 
clear word stated for guidance of annual conferences and cabinets in a definition as 
to the relationship of housing and compensation. 

The committee is recommending the addition of these words as you find them 
listed here, but would certainly want to go on record, and have it as a part of the 
proceedings of this Conference, that it would be assumed, yea, even expected, that 
wherever those situations occur in the life of clerg>' couples, where one would be in 
a parsonage and one would be appointed to a place with a housing allowance, that 



408 Journal of the 198 Jf General Conference 

there be clear discussion, negotiation, and mutually accepted understandings of 
the amount of the resources that would be available to that clergy couple prior to 
the finalization of that appointment. Having said all of that, the committee 
recommends the addition of these words. 

Ellen C. Liotta (West Virginia) moved to amend the committee 
report by substituting the following for all of the committee's 
proposed amendment: "Housing or housing allowance set by the 
Administrative Board is to be considered as part of a full-time 
pastor's compensation. This legislation is to go into effect 
immediately." 

Ms. Liotta: When Frances Willard and other sisters were voted to be delegates 
to an earher General Conference, they were not permitted to occupy their rightful 
seats. The majority of the delegates probably agreed with this action against 
women. Now we do not. When many women and ethnics wished to enter 
seminaries and/or pursue ordination, they were refused, and the majority of church 
members agreed with that discrimination. Now we do not. When clergy women 
married clergy men and thus became part of a clergy couple, for a number of years 
they were told, by the majority in our church, that only one person in a family could 
receive pension benefits, even if both were full-time pastors. Now we do not have 
such a policy. Now this legislation is before us, which would deny one member in a 
clergy couple, both of whom are full-time pastors, a right to their total salary 
package, which has always been defined in practice as including housing or a 
housing allowance. We cannot allow this injustice to become church law. I urge you 
to vote against this policy and say in the face of proposed injustice, "Now we 
won't." 

Gamett Wilder (North Georgia) spoke against the substitute. 
Mr. Solomon waived the opportunity to make a final statement 
on behalf of the committee in relation to the substitute. Harold C. 
Knudsen (Rocky Mountain) asked a question; Mr. Solomon 
responded. The Secretary read the substitute. It was defeated. 
Bob R. Martin (North Georgia) moved to suspend the rules and 
proceed to vote on the report. The motion was adopted. Report 
No. 100 was adopted (see pages 1407-1408). 

Referral to Judicial Council 

William H. Millett (Eastern Pennsylvania) moved to refer the 
Conference action as just completed on Calendar No. 602 to the 
Judicial Council for a declaratory decision. 

Mr. Millett: I am citing two previous Judicial Council decisions. Decision 317, 
"Clergy cannot be discriminated against on the basis of marital status." Decision 
510, "A member of a clergy couple may not be deprived of a housing allowance even 
though the other member of the clergy couple has access to a parsonage." I think 
this justifies reference of this action we have just taken to the Judicial Council for a 
declaratory decision. 

The motion was adopted. 



The United Methodist Church 409 

Report No. 137, Calendar No. 777 

Mr. Solomon presented the report, consisting of a recommen- 
dation to amend Par. 262.6 so as to require a United Methodist 
Men organization in each local church, charge, or parish (see page 
1418). Roy Lifsey (South Georgia) spoke in support of the report. 
Rhett Jackson (South Carolina) spoke against it. The report was 
defeated. 

Report No. 141, Calendar No. 781 

Mr. Solomon explained that the report would amend Par. 
266.3b by adding a requirement that local church treasurers be 
bonded. The report was adopted (see page 1420). 

Report No. 174, Calendar No. 965 

Mr. Solomon presented the report, consisting of the commit- 
tee's recommendation to amend Par. 206.3 by adding a definition 
of an "ecumenical parish." The report was adopted (see page 
1430). 

Report No. 55, Calendar No. 267 

Mr. Solomon presented the report, which consisted of 
proposed additions to Par, 207, deahng with ministry in 
transitional communities. The report was adopted (see page 
1391). 

Report No. 27, Calendar No. 172 

Mr. Solomon explained that the report was a recommendation 
to amend Par. 2519 so as to require that local church Boards of 
Trustees include at least one-third lay women in their member- 
ship; he noted a correction to be made in the printed report. E. L. 
Bosomworth (Southern Illinois) spoke against the report. Tex 
Sample (Missouri West) moved to suspend the rules in order to 
proceed to the vote on the report. The motion was adopted. The 
report was put to a vote and was adopted (see page 1378). 

Time Extended 

The Chair noted that the time set for adjournment of the 
session had been reached, and that there were three more reports 
the Committee on the Local Church was ready to present. It was 
voted to extend the time to complete action on the reports. 

Report No. 31, Calendar No. 176 

Mr. Solomon explained that the report would amend Par. 
2541.2 such that papers of abandoned or discontinued churches 
would be deposited with conference Commissions on Archives 
and History. The report was adopted (see page 1379). 



410 Journal of the 1984. General Conference 

Report No. 191, Calendar No. 982 

Mr. Solomon explained that the report consisted of recom- 
mended amendments to Pars. 2532-2533 which would extend 
procedures followed in the sale or transfer of local church 
property to long-term leasing of such property. The report was 
adopted (see pages 1437-1438). 

Report No. 177, Calendar No. 968 

Mr. Solomon explained that the report would amend Par. 227 
so as to exclude affiliate or associate members of local churches 
from holding offices which would give them membership on the 
Administrative Board or Council (see page 1430). Lester L. 
Moore (Iowa) moved to amend the report by deleting the 
amendment recommended by the committee. He spoke in 
support of his amendment. Thelma Johnson (West Ohio) spoke 
against it. 

Mr. Solomon: The legislative committee would point out to the Conference that 
in 11253 of the Discipline is the requirement that all persons who are members of the 
Administrative Board shall be members of the local church. There is a good reason 
for that. In decisions that are made by the Admiinistrative Board, many of which 
have legal implications, those decisions need to be made by persons who are 
actually holding full membership in the local church. This is not to say that we ought 
to lessen our initiative to involve associate and affiliate members in our 
congregation in as full a way as possible, but to recognize these two limitations, and 
I feel and the committee does, they should be respected. 

The amendment was defeated. The report was adopted (see 
pages 1430-1431). 

Matter of Privilege 

Virgil V. Bjork (North Indiana) was recognized for a matter of 
privilege. 

Mr. Bjork: With profound gratitude for his prophetic voice, with continuing 
appreciation of the creative leadership he gave us and the church universal, and 
with love that transcends events and distance, we of the Indiana Area respectfully 
request that this General Conference send gi-eetings to James Armstrong and to 
his family, assuring them of our prayers that healing may be experienced. 

The request was approved by vote of the Conference. 

Concluding Business and Closing 

Mary Grace Lyman (New York) moved to set an order of the 
day for 8 p.m. to hear reports from the Legislative Committee on 
Higher Education. Mr. Bjork, chairperson of the Committee on 
Calendar, spoke against the motion. A point of order was raised, 
that the time had been extended only for completion of reports 



The United Methodist Church 411 

from the Committee on the Local Church; Ms. Lyman's motion 
was i-uled out of order. 

P. Boyd Mather (Iowa) asked a question about one of the 
reports of the Committee on the Local Church; Mr. Solomon 
responded. 

The Secretary made announcements, and the Conference was 
led in a closing prayer by Bishop W. McFerrin Stowe (Retired). 
The session was adjourned. 



NINTH DAY, THURSDAY, MAY 10, 1984 
EVENING SESSION 

Opening 

The General Conference of The United Methodist Church 
convened in the evening session of Thursday, May 10, 1984, at 
7:30 p.m., with Bishop Paul A. Duffey (Louisville Area) 
presiding. Bishop W. Kenneth Goodson (Retired) led in an 
opening prayer. 

Procedural Motions Related to Consideration of Calendar 
No. 510 

Based on the action during the afternoon session (see above, 
page 402), the Conference was under an order of the day for 
reconsideration of Legislative Committee on Ordained and 
Diaconal Ministry Report No. 16 (Calendar No. 510). Don L. 
Riggin moved that Rule 8 be suspended in order to limit the 
speech on any amendment to one minute. The motion was 
defeated. 

John Schwiehert (Oregon-Idaho): I move that the rules be suspended as 
necessary so that the following process may be observed in the consideration of 
Calendar No. 0510. First, after the motion has been perfected, 30 minutes shall be 
allowed on this item. Second, alternating speeches for and against shall be allowed 
within the time limit, and without interruption for further motions or 
parliamentary inquiries. Third, at the end of 30 minutes, ballots shall be 
distributed to all voting delegates. Fourth, after ballots are in the hands of 
delegates, a prayerful silence will be maintained during or after which delegates 
may mark their ballots. Fifth, the presiding officer will break the silence by 
offering prayer for the healing of the church, after which the ballots will be 
collected for counting. 

Mr. Schwiebert spoke in support of his motion. 

Jerry G. Bray, Jr. (Virginia) asked a question about time 
hmitations on individual speeches under Mr. Schwiebert's motion. 
The Chair and Mr. Young (Assistant Secretary) expressed the 
view that any regular rules not changed specifically in Mr. 
Schwiebert's motion would remain in effect. 

Lester L. Moore (Iowa) moved as a substitute that further 
consideration of Calendar No. 510 be postponed until the rest of 
the legislative items had been presented to the General 
Conference. The Chair ruled that, because of the Conference 
action to reconsider the item, Mr. Moore's motion was out of 
order, 

James W. Anderson (East Ohio) moved to amend the motion 
such that, after perfecting the report, the Conference would 
move directly to the vote without any debate. At the request of 

412 



The United Methodist Church 413 

C. David Lundquist (West Michigan), the Secretary' read the 
motion and the amendment. Mr. Anderson's