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Full text of "The North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA)"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada - Agriculture et Agroalimentaire Canada 



http://www.archive.org/details/northamericanfreOOcana 



The North American Free Trade Agreement 

(NAFTA) 



Removing obstacles to trade 

• The North American Free Trade Agreement 
(NAFTA), which took effect on January 1, 1994, 
eliminated most barriers to trade and investment 
- including most tariffs on agricultural goods - 
between Canada, the United States and Mexico. 

• The growth, which has been far more rapid than 
the growth in exports to countries outside North 
America, has led to changes in the trading 
patterns between the partners, and has resulted 
in a more integrated, North American 
marketplace. 



U.S. MM 

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19000 - 

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7000 - 
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Year 



Total U.S. - Canada Trade 




Total Canada - Mexico Trade 



~i i 1 1 1 1 1 r 

N <P ^ N «P N «P N # ^ # # £> 



i r~ 



Canada-U.S. trade has grown from $10 to $19 billion, Canada- 
Mexico trade has increased from $263 to $816 million, and 
U.S. -Mexico trade has grown from $6 to $1 3 billion. 



1*1 



The North American marketplace 

• NAFTA created a continental marketplace of more 
than 420 million consumers for North American 
farm and food products. U.S. agricultural exports 
to Canada and Mexico exploded after 1993 - 
increasing by 78%- while U.S. exports to the rest 
of the world grew by only 9%. 

• At the same time, U.S. agricultural imports from 
Canada and Mexico increased at more than 
double the rate of imports from the rest of the 
world. This trade is essential to the agricultural 
sectors of each country. 



Encouraging positive synergy 

• North American trade is not just about making 
products available where they have not been 
available before - it is also about increasing 
consumer choices. While producers benefit from 
selling products to the much broader North 
American market, consumers also benefit from 
having more choices in the types of products 
available. 

• In addition, freer trade has encouraged each 
country to use their agricultural resources more 
efficiently. Each NAFTA partner has developed 
areas of specialized production, and has 
strengthened its ability to withstand the adverse 
effects of weather-related emergencies or local 
economic downturns. 

For more information 

For details about NAFTA and the trading 
relationship between Canada and the United 
States, visit our Web site at 
http://www.agr.gc.ca/itpd- 
dpci/english/country/ usadvocacy _e.htm 

All figures are in U.S. dollars 



Cat. No. A22-360/3-2003E 
ISBN 0-662-35595-4 
AAFC No. 2230E 



CAL/BCA OTTAWA K1A OC5 



630.4 

C212 
P 2230 
2003 
c. 3 



Agriculture and 
Agri-Food Canada 



Agriculture et 
Agroalimentaire Canada 




Canada 



11256 



1*1 



Agriculture Canadian Agriculture Library 

Canada Bibliotheque canadienne de I'agriculture 

Ottawa K1 A 0C5 



FEB "^ 



2004 



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