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IIKI'ABTMKNT 0» "PHR INTERIOU / /. 

UNITED STATES (J I':(1LfXJ IC AL SL'UVEY / 1 , 

CHAKI.IM 1>. WALCDTT. IliBECTOK ( / , 



THE 



ORIGIN OF CERTAIN PLACE NAM! 



THE UNITED STATES 



( Socoud Edition ) 



HENRY GAN^'I*:TT 




WASUINdTON 

O V K K S M K N T P K I N T I N (i 1) F F I C 8} 








*<; 



CONTENTS 



PlAgC. 

I A'ttor of transmittal 5 

I ntrtMliirtion 7 

AcknowliHl^iiuMitR 7 

Authorities 10 

Tho names ami their oripn 15 

3 



LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL. 



Department of the Interior, 

United States Gfx)lo(ucal Survey, 

Wa^/ii7i(/tf>f)^ D. C, Janu(n*y 2^ 1905, 

Sir: I tninsmit herewith a bulletin on the origin of place names in 

the United States. This is a second edition of Bulletin No. 197. 

The material has been compiled from various sources, printed and 

manuscript, as set forth in the introduction. I think this work will 

be of great interest as emljodying nuich local and general history. 

Very respectfully, 

Henry Gannett, 

Geo(j7*apher. 
Hon. Charles D. Walcott, 

Dire<'tcn* United States Geological Sto^oei/. 

5 



THE ORIGIN OF CERTAIN PLACE NAMES IN THE 

UNITED STATES. 



By Henry Gannett. 



INTRODUCTION. 

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS. 

During the compilation of this work a large correspondence was 
carried on with State and local historical societies, State, county, and 
township officers, and individuals in all parts of the country for the 
pui*pose of obtaining information concerning the subject in hand. 
The greatest interest was shown and much work done by correspond- 
ents, who have thus contributed very largely to the work. Much val- 
ua])le material was collected in this way which otherwise would have 
been unavailable. 

Among my correspondents, special thanks are due to the following 
persons and organizations: 

Thomas M. Owen, Department of Archives and History, Montgom- 
ery, Ahibama, for valuable references. 

Major G. E. Bailey, of San Francisco, California, for extensive 
information concerning the Spanish nomenclature of sevei"al hundred 
towns in California. 

C. M. Drake, of Eureka, California, for information concerning 
names in Monterey and Humboldt counties. 

The Bureau of American Ethnology, to which I am especially 
indebted, not only for much information concerning Indian names, but 
for guidance, advice, and suggestions in obtaining sources of informa- 
tion. Indeed, most of the information concerning the meaning of 
Indian names is derived, either directly or indirectly, from this source, 
and all names of Indian origin have been verified and corrected by 
officers of this Bureau. 

William N. Byers, of Denver, Colorado, for additions to and cor- 
rections of county names. 

Mrs. J. V. Calver, Washington, District of Columbia, who has 
furnished valuable and extensive information concerning hundreds of 
place names in all the States of the Union. 

Robert C. Rockwell, Pittstield, Massachusetts, for additions to and 
corrections of Connecticut and Massachusetts place names. 

7 



8 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull.258w 

Otis Ashmore, Georgia Historical Society, Savannah, Georgia, for 
revising list of counties. 

C. J. Bassett, Secretary of State, Boise, Idaho, for revising and 
adding to list of counties. 

Charles Evans, Chicago Historical Society, who sent a compre- 
hensive list embracing most of the important names in his State. 

William R. Sandham, Wyoming, Illinois, superintendent of schools, 
Stark County, 1882-1898, for much valuable information concerning 
the nomenclature of several hundred cities and towns, and corrections 
of county names in the State of Illinois. 

J. P. Dunn, Indiana Historical Society, Indianapolis, Indiana, for 
additions to and corrections of county names. 

M. W. Davis, State Historical Society, Iowa City, Iowa, for much 
valuable information about his State. All of the information con- 
cerning town names in this State was received from him. 

George W. Martin, Kansas State Historical Society, for much val- 
uable material concerning the place names of his State. In addition 
to the list of counties, he also sent a great deal of material concerning 
town names, in which was included information furnished by Mrs. 
N. R. Calver. 

Mrs. Jennie C. Morton, Kentucky Historical Society, Frankfort, 
Kentucky, for additions to and revisions of names of counties. 

William Beer, Howaixl Memorial Libi-ary, New Orleans, Louisiana, 
for helpful references and suggestions. 

Gmce King, Louisiana Historical Society, New Orleans, Louisiana, 
for additions to and corrections of parish names. 

Francis E. Sparks, Maryland Historical Society, Baltimore, Mary- 
land, for valuable information regarding names of counties. 

George Francis Dow, Secretary, The Essex Institute, Salem, Massa- 
chusetts, for additions to and corrections of Massacrhusetts town names. 

Samuel A. Green, Massachusetts Historical Society, Boston, Massa- 
chusetts, for references which proved of great assistance in compiling 
information concerning the State. 

Charles J. Taylor, Great Barrington, Massachusetts, for nomencla- 
ture of towns and physical features in Mtissachusetts. 

H. F. Keith, Mount Washington, Massachusetts, for information 
regarding the meanings of names in the Berkshire Hills. 

George K. Holmes, Department of Agriculture, Washington, Dis- 
trict of Columbia, for valuable information concerning physical fea- 
tures in the Berksh ires, and additions to place names in Massachusetts, 
New York, and Connecticut. 

C. M. Burton, Michigan Historical Society, Detroit, Michigan, for 
assistance in collecting information. Mr. Burton went to much trouble 
to get information concerning the names of towns in his State, which 
resulted in adding much material to that branch of the work. 



OANNETT.l INTRO CKJCrriON. 9 

Warren Uphain, Secretary The Minnesota Historical Society, for a 
revision of the complete list of Minnesota county names. 

Franklin L. Riley, Mississippi Historical Society, University, Mis- 
sissippi, for information concerning town names in his State. 

G. C. Broadhead, Columbia, Missouri, for additions to the list of 
Missouri names. 

Miss Marjory Dawson, Missouri Historical Society, St. Louis, Mis- 
souri, for a largfe amount of information concerning Missouri names. 

Mary C. Gardner, Helena Public Library, Helena, Montana, for 
numerous additions to the list of town names in Montana. 

Mrs. Laura E. Howey, Montana Historical Library, Helena, Mon- 
tana, for data concerning county and town names in the State. 

Eugene Howell, by A. W. Morris, Deputy, Department of State, 
Carson, Nevada, for correcting list of names of counties. 

C. W. Ernst, Boston, Massachusetts, for information concerning 
names in New England. 

N. F. Carter, New Hampshire Historical Society, for valuable 
references. 

William Nelson, New Jersey Historical Society, Paterson, New Jer- 
sey, for references, revision of names of counties, and a valuable list 
of town names. 

J. W. Reynolds, Secretary of New Mexico, for corrections of and 
additions to list of counties. 

F. J. H. Merrill, Historical and Art Society, Albany, New York, 
for names of towns in the State. 

E. Tuttle, Long Island Historical Society, Brooklyn, New York, for 
list of town names. 

William Strunk, jr., Ithaca, New York, for corrections of trans- 
lations. 

Edwin Baylies, LL.D., Johnstown, New York, for translations of 
German and Indian names in New York. 

Julius Schoonmaker, Kingston, New York, for great assistance con- 
cerning town names. 

Robert H. Kelly, New York Historical Society, for additions to and 
corrections of county names. 

Kemp P. Battle, Department of History, University of North Caro- 
lina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, for complete list of town names. 

E. F. Porter, Secretary of State, Bismarck, North Dakota, for many 
additions to list of counties. Nearly all the information concerning 
county names in this State was furnished b}^ him. 

H. C. Hawkins, Cleveland, Ohio, for valuable additions to the list 
of Ohio city and town names. 

Bishop J. M. Levering, President Moravian Historical Society, Beth- 
lehem, Pennsylvania, for much valuable information concerning the 
names of towns in Pennsylvania. 



10 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bill. 256. 

John W. Jordan, Historical Society of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania, for much valuable aid. Names of counties, towns, and 
natural features were sent by him. 

A large amount of material has ])een drawn from manuscript books 
compiled by Mr. Watkins, of Beaver, Pennsylvania. 

Clarence S. Brigham, Rhode Island Historical Society, for numerous 
references concerning names in his State. 

A. S. Salley, South Carolina Historical Societ}', Cliarleston, South 
Carolina, for much material of value in connection with the State 
names. Complete lists of county and town names were sent by him, 
also information concerning his State not otherwise available. 

Doane Robinson, Department of History, Sioux Falls, South Dakota, 
for names of counties and many town names. 

Charles P. Garrison, Texas Historical Society, Austin, Texas, for 
list of town names. 

Mrs. E. W. Parker, for county names in Texas. Through her cour- 
tesy and kindness were obtained the origins of nearly all the count}' 
names of that State. 

Joseph A. De Boer, Vermont Historical Society, Montpolier, Ver- 
mont, for list of county and town names. 

John M. Comstock, Chelsea, Vermont, for list of town names in 
Orange County. 

Virginia Historical Society, for corrected list of names of counties. 

Iklward N. Fuller, Washington Historical Society, Tacoma, Wash- 
ington, for references and other assistance. 

J. P. Hale, Historical and Antiquarian Societ}-, Charleston, West 
Virginia, for material in the shape of county and town lists. 

Joseph Barry, Harpers Ferry, West Virginia, for information relat- 
ing to towns in that State. 

Hu Maxwell; Treiusurer, Tmns-Allegheny Historical Society, Mor- 
gantown, W^est Virginia, for additions to lists of counties, towns, and 
natural features in West Virginia. 

R. G. Thwaites, State Historical Society of Wisconsin, Madison, 
Wisconsin, for much material, valuable suggestions, and references, 
especially in the way of putting me into communication with other 
sources of information. 

In addition to the above, many courteous and useful letters have 
been received from count}^ clerks, treasurers, and other Stiite and 
county officials, all of whom have shown interest and have furnished 
all the material in their power. 

AUTHORITIES. 

Information was obtained from the following books, two and throe 
authorities being quoted in cases where differing opinions exist con- 
cerning origins: 



INTBODDCTION. 



INDIAN NAMES. 



The Aboriginal Ka«n o( Srirtli Anifricji, liy Saiuiiel (.i. Drake; tifto^ntli edition, 
reviHeil by Prof. H. L. WilHanis. 

The Aiiwrican Indian, by £]ijah M. Huine?, 1888. 

Lengiio of the IroquoiB, by L. II. Morgiin, 1857. 

Indian Local Nainee, with their Interprelutioiu), by 8. <i. Boyd, 1885. 

Algonquin Series, by W. W. Tooker. 

The Story of the Indian, by Geoi^ llini Grinnell. 

The Kiouan Tribes of th*; East, by James Mooiiey: Bulletin ■22 of Ihe Bnreau iif 
.\nwriiMii Ethnology. 

Indian LinguiBtk Familiea of America North of Mexico, by J. W. Powell: Seventh 
Annual Rtport of the Bareau of .\merii-an Ethnology, pp. 1-1-12. 

The Ghiwt-dancf Religion and the Sioux Outbreak of 1890, by JanieK Moonpy; 
Fonrtt*nth Annual Keiwrt of the Bureau of Araerii'an Ethnology, pp. 841-1110. 

Calendar History of the Kiowa Indians, by Jainea Mooney: Seventeenth Annual 
Report of the Bureau of American Ethnology, pp. 129-445. 

Tribes of the Extreme Northwest, by W. 11. Dall: CoDtribaliona to North Ameri- 
can Ethnology, Vol. I. 

Vocabularies of Tribes of the Extreme Northwest, by W. H. Dall: Contributions 
to North American EthnoloRy, Vol. I, pp. 121-lKl. 

CheR.kee Nation of Indians, by Charles C. Royce: Fifth Annual Report of the 
Bnreau of American Ethnology, pp, l^l-I^TH. 

The Menomini Indiana, by W. J. HoSmon; Fourtfenth Annual Re[iort. of the 
Bureau of American Ethnology, pp. 3-328. 

Klamath Indians of SoDthwestem Oregon, by Allwrt Samuel Galscbel; Contribii- 
tions to North American Ethnology, Vol. 11, 1890. 

The Seminole Indians of Floriila, by Clay MacOsoIey: Fifth Annnal Report of the 
Bureau of Ethnology, pp. 4tl9-531. 

Tril>e8 of California, by Stephen Powers; Contributions to Ameriean Etiinotogy, 
Vol. III. 

Dakota' English Dictiogary, by Stephen R. Riggs: ContribittJons to North American 
Ethnol<«y, Vol. VII. 

Painunkey Indians of Virginia, by JobnChtrland Pollard: Bulletin 1 7 of the Bureau 
of American Ethnology, 

Trihea of Western Wnshington, by George Gibbs; Contributions to North Ameri- 
can Ethnology, Vol. I, jip, 157-341. 

INDIVIDOAL STATES. 



nistory of Alalmuia, Georgia, and Mipsiesippi, by Albert Jnmcs Pickett. 



A Journal of Travels into the Arkansas Territory, by Thomas Nutlalls, 1821, 
Some Old French Plat* Names in the State of ArkansHs, by John C. Brenner. 



History of the State of California, by John Frost. 
History of the Slate of California, by Miguel Venegaa. 

Report of Exploring Expedition lo Oregon and California, 1643-44. by John Charles 
Fremont; Senate Doc, Twenty-eighth Congress, second aeasion. 
lory ol Or^on and California, by Robert Greenhow, 1845. 




12 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bitll.2ML 



CX>NNBCTICUT. 



Gazetteer of Connecticat and Rhode Iflland, by J. C. Pease and J. M. Niles, 1819. 
In<lian Names of Places in Connecticut, by J. H. Trnmbull. 
Connecticut Uistorical Collections, by J. W. Barber, 1849. 



FLORIDA. 



Gazetteer of Florida, by Adiel Sherwood. 

Handbook of Florida, by Cliarles Ledyard Norton, 1890. 



GEORGIA. 



Gazetteer of Geoi^ia, by Adiel Sherwood, 1829. 
History of Georgia, by William Bacon Stevens. 
History of Alabama, Georgia, and Mississippi, by Albert James Pickett. 

INDIANA. 

Indiana Grazetteer or Topographical Dictionary, published by E. Chamberlain^ 1849. 
History of Indiana to 1856, by John B. Dillon, 1859. 
Indiana, by J. P. Dunn. 

KENTUCKY. 

Historical Sketches of Kentucky, by Lewis Collins, 1848. 

LOUISIANA. 

A Description of Louisiana, by Father Louis Hennepin, Translated from the Edition 
of 1083, and Compiled with Nouvelle D^couverte, the La Salle Documents, and Other 
Contemporaneous Papers, by John Gilmary Shea, 1880. 

MAINE. 

History of Maine to 1842, by George J. Vamey, 1873. 

Gazetteer of Maine, by N. E. Hay ward. 

History of Maine, 1602-1820, by W. D. Williamson, 1^32. 

Collections of the Maine Historical Society, 1847-1859. (In seven volumes. ) 

MASSACirUSETTS. 

Gazetteer of the State of Massachusetts, by Rev. Elias Nason, 1874. 

Historical Collections Relating to Every Town in Massachusetts, by John Warner 
Barber, 1846. 

Gazetteer of Massachunetts, by J. Hayward, 1847. 

The Indian Names of Boston and Their Meaning, by Eben Norton Hosford: New 
England Historical and Genealogical Register, Vol. XL, 1886, pp. 94-103. 

Massachusetts Historical Society Proceedings, Vol. XII, 1873. 

MICHIGAN. 

Grazetteer of Michigan, by John T. Blois, 1840. 

Memorials of a Half Century in Michigan and the Lake Region, by Bela Hubbard. 

MISSISSIPPI. 

A History of Mississippi from the Discovery of the Great River by Hernando de 
Soto, Including the Earliest Settlements Made by the French under Iberville to the 
Death of Jefferson, by Robert Lowry and W^illiam H. McCaidle. 

Miwissippi River, by Henry R. Schoolcraft 

History of Alabama, Georgia, and Mississippi, by Albert James Pickett. 



QANNETT.] INTRODUCTION. 13 

NEW HAMPSHIRE. 

Grazetteer of New Hampshire, by Alonzo J. Fogg. 

New Hampshire State Papers. 

New Hampshire Town Papers. 

Manual of the Court of New Hampshire. 

Gazetteer of New Hampshire, by J. Hayward, 1849. 

Gazetteer of New Hampshire, by J. Farmer and J. B. Moore, 1823. 

NEW JEBSET. 

Gazetteer of New Jersey, by Thomas F. Gordon, 1834. 
Historical Collections of New Jersey, by J. W. Barber and H. Howe. 
Indian Names in New Jersey, by T. Gordon: Historical Collections of the State of 
New Jersey, 1844, p. 512. 

NEW MEXICX). 

Historical Sketches of New Mexico, by I^ Baron Bradford Prince, 1883. 
Doniphan's Expedition, by John T. Hughes, 1849. 

NEW YORK. 

History of the State of New York, 1609-1664, by John Romeyn Brodhead. 

Gazetteer of New York, by Thomas F. Grordon, 1836. 

Gazetteer of New York, by Horatio Grates Spafford, 1813. 

New York State Register, by Orville Luther HoUey, 1843. 

History of Lewis County, 1860. 

History of St. Lawrence and Franklin Counties, by Franklin B. Hough. 

New York State Register, by John Distumell, 1858. 

Historical Collections of New York, 1524-1845, by J. W. Barber and H. Howe, 1845. 

History of the Late Province of New York to 1732, by W. Smith, 1757. 

OHIO. 

Gazetteer of Ohio, by John Kilboum, 1821. 
Pioneer History of Ohio, by S. P. Hildreth. 

Biographical and Historical Memoirs of the Early Pioneer Settlers of Ohio, by 
S. P. Hildreth. 
Historical Collectionsof Ohio, by Henry Howe. (Three volumes in two) : 1889, 189^. 
Ohio Gazetteer, by Warren Jenkins, 1837. 

OREGON. 

History of Oregon, by Hubert Howe Bancroft, 1886. 

Report of the Exploring Expedition to Oregon and North California, 1843-44, 1 y 
John Charles Fremont: Senate Doc., Twenty-eighth Congress, second session. 

History of Oregon and California, by Robert Greenhow, 1845. 

Oregon; the Struggle for Possession^ by William Barrows, 1884. 

Mountains of Oregon, by W. G. Steel. 

Tribes of Western Washington and Northwestern Oregon, by George Gibbs: Con- 
tributions to North American Ethnology, Vol. I, 1877, pp. 157-241. 

PENNSYLVANIA. 

Historical Collections of Pennsylvania (1680-1778); by S. Day, 1843. 
History of Pennsylvania to 1776, by Thomas F. Gordon, 1829. 

RHODE ISLAND. 

Gazetteer of Rhode Island, by Pease and Niles. 

Rhode Island Historical Society Proceedings, 1886-87, pp. 42-5t 



14 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 25a 

Indian Names of Places in Rhode Island, by (J. Parsons, 1861. 

Grazetteer of Connecticut and Rhode Island, by J. C. Pease and J. M. Niles, 1819. 

SOUTH CAROLINA. 

Historical Collections of Soath Carolina, by B. R. Carroll, 1836. 

Documents Connected with the HiHtory of South Carolina, by P. C. J. Weeton. 

Collections of the South Carolina Historical Society, Vols. I-V, 1857-1897. 

TENNESSEE. 

History of Tennessee; the Making of a State, by James Phelan. 

UTAH. 

Exploration and Survey of the Valley of the Great Salt Lake of Utah, by Howard 
Stansbury: Senate Ex. Doc. No. 3, special session, March, 1851. 

VERMONT. 

Vermont Historical Gazetteer, by A. B. Hemenway, 1867-1871. 

VIRGINIA. 

Historical Collections of Virj?inia: Virginia Historical Society publications. 
History of Virginia to 1754, by W. H. Brockenbrough: History of Virginia, by 
Joseph Martin, 1835. 

WASHINGTON. 

Tribes of Western Washington and Northwestern Oregon, by George Gibbs: Con- 
tribution to North American Ethnology, Vol. I, 1877, pp. 157-241. 
History of Washington, by Elwood Evans. 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

Canoe Voyage up the Minnay Sotor, l)y George William Featherstonehaugh. 

Astoria, by Washington Irving. 

Henry-Thompson Journals, by Elliot Coues. 

The Expeditions of Zebulon Montgomery Pike, by Elliot Coues. (Three volume**, 
1895. ) 

History of the Expedition under Lewis and Clark, by Elliot Coues, Philadelphia 
American Philosophical So<.'iety, pp. 17-33, 1S93. 

Account of an Expe^lition from Pittsburg to the Rocky Mountains under the Com- 
mand of Maj. Stephen H. Ix)ng. Compiled by Edwin James. (Three volumeH, 1 823. ) 

Narrative of an Expedition to the Source of St. Peters River, I^ke Winnei^eek, 
Lake of the Woods, etc., under the Command of Stephen H. Ix)ng, by William H. 
Keating. (Two volumes, 1825.) 

The Adventures of Captain Bonneville, or Scenes beyond the Rocky Mountains and 
the Far West, by Washingt^m Irving, 1850. 

YellowHtone Park, !)y H. M. Chittenden. 

Geographicul Names as Monuments of History: Transactions of the Oneida Histor- 
ical Society, No. 5, 1889-1892. 

Report of Reconnaissance of Northwestern Wyoming, Including the Yellowstone 
Park, in 1873, by William A. Jones, 1875. 

Exploration of the Colorado River of the West, by J. W. Powell, 1875. 

Report upon the Colorailo River of the West, by Joseph C. Ives: Senate Doc, 
Thirty-sixth Congress. 

Excursion to the Grand Cafion of the Colorado, by W. M. Davis. 

Colorado Exploring Expetlition, by Joseph C. Ives: War Department, Oliice 
Explorations and Surveys, pp. 31-42, 1859. 



THE NAMES AND TUEIR ORIGIN. 



Aaronsburg; town in Center County, Pennsylvania, named for Aaron Levy, who 

laid it out in 1786. 
Abahtacook; creek in Maine, branch of the Matamiscontis River. An Indian word 

meaning ** stream that nins parallel with a big river." 
Abajo; mountains in Utah. A Spanish word meaning **low." 
Abanako ; village in Van Wert County, Ohio, named from an Indian tribe. The 

word means "the east land." 
Abaquage ; pond near the source of Little River, Connecticut. An Indian word 

meaning "flaggy meadow." 
Abbeville ; county, and town m same county, in South Carolina, settled and named 

by immigrants from France, for the French town of that name. 
Abbot ; town in Piscataquis County, Maine, named for Prof. John Abbot, treasurer 

of Bowdoin College. 
Abbotsford ; village in St. Clair County, Michigan, named from the home of Sir 

Walter Scott. 
Abbott; village in Arapahoe County, Colorado, named for Albert F. Abbott, who 

platted it. 
Abbottstown ; town in Adams County, Pennsylvania, named for John Abbott, who 

laid it out in 1753. 
Aberdeen ; city in Monroe County, Mississippi, town in Moore County, North Caro- 
lina, and numerous other places, named from the city in Scotland. 
Abert; lake in Oregon, named for Col. J. J. Abert, topographical engineer, United 

States Arm v. 
Abiathar ; peak in Yellowstone Park, Wyoming, name<l for Charles Abiathar Whit**, 

of the United States Geological Survey. 
Abilene ; city in Dickinson County, Kansas, and village in Charlotte County, VIt- 

ginia, named from the province of ancient Syria. The word means "grassy 

plain." 
Abilene ; city in Taylor County, Texas, named from the city in Kansas. 
Abingdon; city in Knox County, Illinois, named from Abingdon, Maryland, the 

birth place of one of its founders. 
Abingdon; village in Harford County, Maryland, town in Washington County, Vir- 
ginia, and several other places, named generally from the borough in Berkshire, 

England. 
Abington; town in Plymouth County, Massachusetts, and several other places, 

named from the parish of Cambridgeshire, England. 
Ableman; village in Sauk County, Wisconsin, named for Col. S. V. R. Ableman, 

who settled there in 1851. 
Abocadneticook; (rreek in Maine, a branch of the Penobscot River. An Indian 

word meaning *' stream narrowed by the mountains." 
Aboljackarmegas; creek in Maine, a branch of the Penobscot River, at the foot of 

Mount Katahdin. An Indian word meaning *'bare" or **bold." 

15 



16 PT.ACK NAHKS IN THK UNITKD STArES. imqj^H 

Atarigada; bill in Waterbury, Cuiinn'linLit, liaviiiij! on its mde a <lee|i I'avcm-lfke 
cliff called tbe " tmlian Hoiih;," hence theimme, whii;li is a Spanish word mean- 
ing "'Hheller'' Of "biding place." 

Absaroka; mtiKV cif nioiinlains in WyiiminK. namoil fnini the native name of the 
Crow Imlians. (.irinnell nays the word reiere to some kind of a Innl, poeeilily 



I" 

^^H AcBibonack; harbor in Long iHland. An Indian woril inuaniui; "ruot plai^," 

i applied to tlie barlxir from the mi-aduwa near, where the Indians found roots 

whieh they prilled. 

I Acadia; pariah in Louitiiana, and villages in Aroastook County, Mainf, and Le« 
County, Virginia, named from Auvtia, tbe original name of Nova Heotia. The 
word is the French form of tbe Imlian word akddi, " wliere there is," " where 
there are," "where are found," 
Acama; town in Son Di^o County, Cahforniu. Froni the S|iantsh, meaning 
"place of ro|>oBe." 
Acampo; village, in San Joa<|uin C-ounty, California. A Spunisb wr.rr! meaning 
■' portion of common given to herds for pasture." 
Accomac; county, and village in same county, in Virfrinia. An Indian word which 
seems to mean " on the other aide." 
Aceqiiia; village in Douglas Conn ty, Colorado. AHpaniBli word mcuiiing "canal" 
or "channel." 
Acerico; town in Sonoma County, California. A Spanish word meaning "pin 
cushion" or "sTnall pillow." 
Aceyedan; creek in Iowa. An Indian word, doubtfully aud to mean " plauD of 
weeping." 
Ackerman; town in Choctaw County, Mississippi, named for a landowner. 
/ AcUey; town in Hardin County, Iowa, laid out in lSfi7 by J. W. Ai'kley, 
I * Acme; village in Grand Traverse County, Michigan. A Greek word meanliiK 

^^H "summit" 

^^^h Acolito; town in San Diego County, California. The Spanish form of "acolyte." 
^^^B Aoom; town in Humboldt County, California, named From tbe oak trees in the 
^^^P vicinity, conspicuous in a pine district. 

^^^1 Acquackanonk; township in Passaic County, New Jersey. An Indian word mean- 
^^H in^' " when' piun blocks were made (or pro(;nreil) for [wunding corn." 

^^B Acqneliadongonock; point in Maine, An Indian word said to mean " smoked 
^^^ lisb point." 

Acton; station in Los Angeles County, California, and town in York County, Maine, 

named from Acton, Maseacliusetts. 
Acton; town in Middlesex County, Massachusetts, named from tbe town in Middle- 

Hex C'oiinty, England. 
Acushnet; town and river in Bristol County, Massachusetts. Tbenanieof anlndUn 

villt^ which oixnipied a part of tbe site uf tbe present city of New Bedford. 
AcTOrth; town in Sullivan County, New Hampsliire, named in honor of I 

Ac worth. 
Ada; county in Idaho, named for tbe eldest (laughter of H. C. Riggs. 
Ada; town in Kent County, Michigan, named for the daughter of Sidney 8mltt 
Ada; village in Norman Connty, Minnesota, named for the daughter of W. " 

Fisher, a railroad official. 
(Adair; con n ties in low B, Kentucky, and Missouri; 

^ AdalrviUe; town in Logan County, Kentucky. Named for Ocn. John Adair, gov 
I emor of Kentucky. 

Adams; county in Colorado, nameil for Alva Adams, a former governor of the State. 

Adams; counties in Illinois, Indiana, and Wisconsin, named for fresidont Jobn 

CJuiucy Adams. 






I 



SmMwn.] PLACK NAMES IN THK UNITED STATES. 

Adams; i.'ouatiee in Iowa and Miinissippi; |ieak of tlie White Mountains in New 
IlanipsliiRi; village in Herkimer County and town in JeSerson 0)unty, New 
York; wunty in Ohio; point at the mouth of the Coluiuhia Biver in Oregon; 
county in Penueylvania; and county unil mountain in Wafhington; iiameii for 
President John Adama. 

Adama; town in Berkshire County, MaMarhu^'tts, named for Samuel Adams. 

Adamg; villafce in (.iage County, Nelinuka, iiumeil For an early settler, J. O. Adiime. 

Adams; town in Robertnon County. Tenneesee, named for the owner of the town 
ailo, Reuben Adams. 

Adams, J. 4.; |«ak in New Uainpehire, named for President .Inhn Qniney Adar 

Adamaboro; village in Caas County, Indiana, named for George K. Adams, iU 
fnijiider. 

iAdamabur^; borough in Westnio re land County, Pennsylvania; 
Adamstown; borou;?ti in Lanoister County, Pennsylvania, Saiil to liavo lieen 
nami^l for President John Ailanis. 
Addison; towns in Washington (^lunty, Maine, and Steulten County, New York, 

towiii'hip iu Somerset County, Pen iisy Ivan lit, and L-ounty, and t<iwn in same 

ixiiinty, in Vermont, nameil (or the Enjflitih writer, Joeeph Addison. 
Addlaon; town iu Webster County, West Virginia, naineil for Addison Stcljtnghlin, 

a prominent lawyer. 
Adel; town in Dallas County, Iowa. So named from its filiiation on a dell of North 

Raccoon River; lonnerly written Adell. 
Adelante; |M)St-of(iee in Najiu Connty, Cnlifornia. A Spiiiii^li word iiieanlni; 

"forward," "onward." 
Adena; town in Jefferson County, Ohio, nanieil for the bome or eriuntry seati>f the 

late Governor Worthington, of Ohio, which was in Ross County. The wonl 

ineane "paradise." 
Adirondacks; village in Warren Comity, and inonntainn, in New York. Derived 

from the Cauienga (Mohawk) Iroquois language, in which the original form is 

r/itlrdnlilkt, meaning "lark eaters." 
Admiraltjr; inlet in Wnshiugtun name<l by Vancouver, the English ex|ilorer, tor 

incnmt>eDt in the Admiralty. 
Adobe; station in Kern County, California. A Spnnish wonl meaning! a "sun- 
dried brick." 
Adrian; city in Lenawee County, Miuhigan, named for tlie Roman Ktn|X!ror . 

Hadrian or Adrian. 
Advance; village in Boone County, Indiana, named In nnttL'i[>Hti[in i>f the Midland 

Railroad {>a»iing tlimngh the region. 
.Stna Hot Springs; village and springs in Najui County, California, nunied from 

Mount jEtna in Sicily. 
Afton; town in Union County, Iowa, laid out in 1K54 and named by Mrs. Baker, 

wife of one of the proprietorp, from the little river in Scotland immortalizeil by 

Burns. Many other places bear the same name. 
A^amenticus; mountain in York County, Maine. An Indian wonl uu'ttning "on 

the other side of the river." 
Agassiz; mountains in Arizona and New Hampshire, nniiieii for Lnui:< J. R. AgHRsiz, 

the Swiss naturalist. 
Agate; bay in Luke Su|)erior, Michigan, and crcfk in Yellowst/ine Park, sn miined 

from the agatea found in them. 
Agavam; river, and town in Ilamp'len County, in MhsshcIiu setts. An Indian 

word meaning "lowland," "marsh," or "meadow." 
Agency; town in Waiiello County, Iowa, and village in Buchanan County, Mi&- 
which were formerly Indian ageticies. 
Bull. 258—0) 2 




18 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 258. 

AgvLBL Oaliente; village in Maricopa County, Arizona, and township in San Diego 
County, and village in Sonoma County, California, so name<l from the hot 
springs. A Spanish phrase meaning "hot water." 

Ag^a de Vida; town and springs in Alameda County, California. A Spanish 
phrase meaning ** water of life.*' 

A^ua Dulce; creek in Texas. A Spanish word meaning ** sweet water.*' 

AgVLA Fria; valley in Yavapai County, and river in Arizona, village in Mariposa 
County, California, and peak and village in Santa Fe County, New Mexico. A 
Spanish phrase meaning **cold water." 

Agua Hedionda; town in San Diego County, California, nanuHl from the sulphur 
springs. A Spanish phrase meaning *' stinking water." 

Ag^a Tibia; town in San Diego County, California. A S{>ani8h phrase, translated 
as '* flute water." 

Ahiki; eastern tributary of the Chattahoochee River, Georgia. An Indian word, 
ahi-ikij meaning ** sweet potato mother." 

Aiken; county, and town in same county, in South Carolina, name<l for William 
Aiken, governor of the State in 1844-1846. 

Aikin; landing and swamp in Chesterfield County, Virginia, named for the late 
owner, Albert Aikin. 

Ainswortli; town in Washington County, Iowa, name<l for D. II. Ainsworth, a 
civil engineer. 

Ainsworth; station on the Union Pacific Railroad in Franklin County, Washing- 
ton, named for J. C. Ainsworth, a prominent western railroad man. 

Aitkin; county, and township and village in same county, in Minnesota, named 
for Samuel Aiken or Aitken, an old trapper and fur dealer. 

Ajax; villages in Nevada and Santa Barbara counties, California, nanie<l for the 
Greek hero of Homer's Iliad. 

Akron; town in Washington County, Colorado, and village in Erie County, New 
York, named from the city in Ohio. 

Akron; city in Summit County, Ohio, which occupies the highest ground in the 
northern part of the State, and several other places so named on account of their 
elevation. A Greek word meaning ** summit" or " peak." 

Alabama; settlement in Fresno County, gulch in Inyo County, mine in Placer 
County, and township in Sacramento County, California, named from the State. 
Alabama; State of the Union and a river in that State; 

Alabama City; town in Etowah County, Alabama, named for an Indian tribe. 
Gatschet gives the meaning as "burnt clearing." Haines, in his "American 
Indian," gives "thicket clearer." 

Alabaster; mount in Arkansas whose summit is composed of alabaster. 

Alabaster; town in Eldorado County, California, named from the gypsum deposits 
in the vicinity. 

Alabaster; post-oflBce in Iosco County, Michigan, so named from its quarry of gyp- 
sum and manufactory of calcined plaster. 

Alachua; county, and town in same county, in Florida. An Indian word, the mean- 
ing of which is variously interpreted as nlachua savanna j "grassy, marshy plain." 
The name is of the Creek or Maskoki language. 

Alamance; county and creek in North Carolina. The word is said to have l)een 
given by Germans, from Allamanca, who settled in the valley of the creek, which 
received the name first. Some authorities say it is of Indian origin. 

Alameda; village in Clarke County, Alabama, county, and city in same county, in 
California, and town in Bernalillo County, New Mexico. A Spanish word, 
meaning "poplar grove," or, in the ordinary use of the word, a "promenade." 

Alamitos; town in Santa Clara County, and beach in Los Angeles County, Cali- 
fornia. A Spanish word meaning "little poplars." 



T.l 



PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATK8. 



19 



Alamo; poet-officeinContraCrwtaCounty, California, and many other places, named 

from tlie old fort in Texas, wbich was bo called from a, (rrove ot Cottonwood 

trees. A Spanish word meaning " poplar" or "cuttonwood." 
AlamoK*>''do: citj in Otero County, New Mexico. A Spanish word meaning "large 

jMiplar" fir "large Cottonwood." 
Alamoosook; pond in Hancock County, Maine, near Orland. An Indian word 

mejininK "little dog place." 
Alamosa; town in C-onejoa Comity and stream In Colnnulo. The stream w*as named 

by the early Hpanieh esplorers, t)ie (own taking its name from Ihe etreain. 

Spanish word, meiining "shaded with eliiia," though collonwood is thi- acti 

growth. 
Alaq.ua; river and town in Walton County, Florida. An Indian woni meaning 

"sweet gum." 
Alaska; Territory of the United Slat<:8. Poesiblv from the Esquimaux word 

AlahOiak, peninsula. 
Albany; township and village in Whiteside County, Illinois, eonnty in Wyoming, 

and many other places, named from Ihe city in New York. 
Albany; county, and city in same county, in New York, named for the Duke of 

York, whose Scotch title was "DukeofAlliany," afterwanis Jameellof Kngland. 
Albemarle; town in Stanly County and sound in North Carolina, and county in 

Virginia, nanied for Gen. George Monk, Earl of Albemarle, one of the original 

proprietors. 
Alberhill; railroad station ami mine In Riverside County, California, nanje<l for the 

ownent, Alliersanil Hill, 
Albert Lea; lake in Freehoni County, Minnesota, named (or Lieut. Albert M. Lea, 

who explored the "Blackhawk Purchase" and published an account of his 



which it 



.■ity 1 



1 County, Minaeeota, hetween two lakes, (rom o 



M Manliull County, Alabama, named for the first settler, 

V a part of Portland, Oregon, nanied for the wife of Judge Page, 



Albertville; lowr 
Albiua; village, a 

of Portland. 
Albion; town in Kenneliec County, Maine, and many cither places named from the 

ancient name of England. 
Albioa Hille: village in Nevada County, California, the name being auggeeled by 

the whit« bluffs. 
Albuquerqae; city in Bernalillo County, New Mexico, named for the Spanish Duke 

of Alhuijueniue, who visileil this spot in 1703-1710. From the Latin, ijaerriiii 

idbttn, meaning "white oak." 
Alburg; town in Grand Isle County, Vermont, named for Gen. Ira Allen, one of 

the original grantees. 
Alcalde; town in Fresno County, Calilomia, A Spanish wonL meaning "judge." 
Alcatroz; island and [•oel'.olliiK in San Francisco County, California. A Spanish 

word, meaning "peliiain." 
Alcona; county, and post-ofiiee in rain jc county, in Michigan. .\i\ In'lian (oriii, 

manufactured by Si'lmotcratt, meaning " unknown." 
Alcorn; (Munty in Miasiseippi, named for James L. Aic-orn, g<)vemor of the Ktate in 

1870-71. 

Hardin County, Iowa, named for Henry Alden, who settled there 



Alden; town 

in 1S54. 
Alden; town 

mother. 
jUderaon; town in 

Bioneer settler 



Erie County, New York, nameil by one of its citizens for his wife's 
Monroe County, West Virgima, named for Bev. John Aldereon, 




20 PLACE NAMli:8 IN THE UNITED STATES. [FULL.2fieL 

Aldie; town in Loudoun CJounty, Vii^inia, named from the village in Italy. 
Aledo; city in Mercer County, Illinois, named by the first settler from Aledo in 

Spain. 
Aleutian; islands in the Pacific Ocean. A derivation of the Russian word aUaviy 

meaning **bald rock.*' 
Alexander; county in Illinois, named for Dr. William M. Alexander, a pioneer. 
Alexander; village in Morgan County, Illinois, named for John T. Alexander, a 

prominent landowner. 
Alexander; village in Genesee County, New York, named for Alexander Rea, first 

settler and State senator. 
Alexander; county in North Carolina, named for several prominent citi2sens: Wil- 
liam J. Alexander, State solicitor; Grov. Nathaniel Alexander, and J. McNitt 

Alexander, secretary of the Mecklenburg Congress. 
Alexander ; lake in Connecticut, name<l for Nell Alexander, who was owner of a 

large tra<»t in the town of Killingly, Connecticut. 
Alexandria; town in Rapides Parish, Louisiana, named for Alexander Futton, one 

of the original proprietors, and a l)enefactor of the town. 
Alexandria; township and village in Douglas County, Minnesota, named for Alex- 
ander Kincaid, a pioneer settler. 
Alexandria; village in Thayer County, Nebraska, named for 8. J. Alexander, sec- 
retary of state. 
Alexandria; town in Jefferson County, New York; named for Alexander Le Ray, 

son of J. D. Le Ray, who fell in a duel in 1836. 
Alexandria; county, and city in same county, in Virginia, named for a prominent 

family of early settlers. 
Alexandria Bay; bay and village in Jefferson County, New York; named for Alex- 
ander Le Ray. 
Alexis; village in Warren County, Illinois, named for the crown prince of Russia at 

the time it was founded. 
Alford; town in Berkshire County, Massachusetts, named for Hon. John Alford, of 

Charlestown. 
Alfordsville; village in Daviess County, Indiana, named for Janicu? Alford, who built 

the first house. 
Alfred; towns in York County, Maine, and Allegheny County, New York, named for 

King Alfred the Great, of England. 
Algansee; township and i)08t-office in Branch County, Michigan. An Indian form 

manufactured by Schoolcraft, from Ojibwa roots, and intended to signify 
"Algonquin lake." 
Alger; county in Michigan, and village in Hardin County, Ohio, name<l for Hon. 

Russell A. Alger, Secretary of War during President McKinley's administration. 
Algodones; villages in San Diego County, California, and Sandoval County, New 

Mexico. A Spanish word, meaning "cotton plants." 
Algoma; city in Kewaunee County, Wisconsin, and places in t^everal other States. 

An Indian word formed by Schoolcraft from Algonquin and goma^ meaning 

"Algonquin waters." 
Algona; city in Kossuth County, Iowa, and post-oflice in Jefferson County, New 

York. An Indian word, i)robably meaning the same as Algoma^ "Algonquin 

waters." 
Algonac; village in St. Clair County, Michigan. An Indian derivative, manufac- 

tureil by Schoolcraft, compounded from Algonquin and nuke, meaning "land of 

the Algons." 
Algonquin; village in McHenry County, Illinois, nameil by Samuel F/lwards, an 

early settler, from a vessel on which he had served. 



PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED HTATE8. 



21 



Alg-oitqvdii; p(«l-i)IB[«!< iii Franklin Oounl.y, New York, and t^rrull County, Ohio, 

numei] from a jimrainerit lodiim tribe. The won) M.'emit to nicoii " (people) on 

the other skle," or "eel-sprinK plaii'," 
AlhttmbTB; po«t-oQice in Los Angelee County, California, viiiage in MailiHoa Coon^, 

lllluoii^, and six other places, named from the palace in SiiaJn. 
Aliqii^pa; boroagh in Beaver County, Penneylvaniu, nanjed for a. Dc-tttware Indian 

womim. Snid lo mean "hat," and also spelled AUegrippiiB in early pericHl. 
Aliso; villt^^ in Orange and San Bemantino counties, California. A S^ianieh word 

meaning "alder tree." 
Alkali; creek in Montana, so named from the alkaline quality of tlie water. 
Allagaali; prinapal hranch of St. Johns River, and plantation and post-office in 

Aroostook County, Maine. An Indian vroni meaning "bark cabin lake." The 

Indians had a hunting camp near the headwaters of the river, hence the name. 
Allamakea; wmnty in Iowa. The Iowa Historical Society says it was named for 

Allen Makee, an Indian trader. 

IAUeg-aa; I'ounty, anil vill^:e in game county in Michigan; 
Allegany: county in Maryland, county, and town in Cattaraugus Comity, New 
Yurk, an-l fiost-office in Coiis County, Oregon; 
Alleghany; counties in North Carolina and Virginia; 
Alleghenj; county, city in same county, and river in Pennsylvania, and uioun- 
tainf in the eastern United States. A corruption of the Delaware Indian name 
fur the Allegheny and Ohio rivers, the meaning of the ntune being lost. 
Alleghany; village and raining canip in Sierra County, California, named by early 

Bcttleni from Alleghany, Pennsylvania. 
AUemauda; town in Bt. Charles Parish, Lauisiana, situated on Bayou dcs Atle- 

niandi?, "bayou of the Germans." 
Allen; county in Indiana, named for Col. William Allen, of Kentucky. 
AUen; county in Kansas, named for William Allen, United Slates Senator from 

Ohio, 1837-1849. 
Alles; counties in Kentucky and Ohio, naraixl fur Col. John Allen, who (ell at the 

hattle of Raisin River, in llie war of 1812. 
Allen; townchip in Northampton County, Peunsylvania, named fur William Allen, 

<if Pennsylvania, at one tiuie chief justice of the pnivince. 
Allendale; village in Wabash County, Illinois, nanieil (or a tailroail contractor. 
Allendale; t'.'wn in Barnwell County, South Carolina, named for the Allen family, 

prominent in that district. 
Allenhill; (loalroSice in Ontario County, New York, i 

one of the lirst settlers. 
Allenstown; town in Merrimack County, New Hampshire, name<l for Samuel Allen, 

to whoMt children the gmnt was uiade in 1722. 
Allentown; borough in Monmouth County, New Jersey, and city in Lehigh 
County, Pennsylvania, named for William Allen, of Pennsylvania, at one time 
chief justice of the province. 
Allerton; village iti Vermilion County, tllinois, nameil forSamuel Alterton, founder 

and extensive land owner. 
AUJAnce; city in Stark County, Ohio, so named Itecause of its location midway tb« 

towns of Freedom and Mount Union, and also as the imion of two raiiroade. 
Alligator; river au<l swamp In North Caroliua, so named because of the numerous 

Allin; town in McLean County, lllinoii', named (or James Allin, n pioneer. 
Allowsy; tiiwiL-ihip iJi Salmii County, and creek in New Jeriiey, naitieil For amtident 
Indian chief. 



leil (or Natlialiiel Allen, 



22 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [»inLL.m 

Allred; oonnty in North Dakota, named for L. J. AUred, member of the territorial 

oooncil. 
Alltun; pond in Connecticut, named for a Qninebaug captain. The word signifies 

"dog" in the local Indian dialect. 
Alms; town in Santa Clara County, California. From the Spanish, meaning "spirit 

of man." 
Alms; town in Park County, Colorado, named by Mr. James, a merchant, for hie 

wife. 
Alms; township and village in Marion County, Illinois, city in Wabaunsee Coonty, 

Kansas, and village in Gratiot County, Michigan, named from the battlefield in 

the Crimea, where the allied French, English, and Turkish troops triumphed 

over Russia, September 20, 1854. 
Alms; city in Harlan County, Nebraska, named for the daughter of one of the first 

settlers. 
Aim ad en; township in Santa Clara County, California, containing mines of mercury. 

These mines are named from the quicksilver mines in Spain. 
Almond; town in San Diego County, California, so named because of the almond 

orchards in the vicinity. 
Almont; village in Lapeer County, Michigan, named for the Mexican general, 

Almonte. 
Alpena; county, and city in same county, in Michigan, and village in Jerauld County, 

South Dakota. An Indian form manufactured by Schoolcraft from Algonquin, 

and jenaisee, bird, in the Ojibwa language. 
Alpha; village in Nevada County, California, and township and village in Henry 

County, Illinois, named from the first letter of the Greek alphabet, signifying 

"the beginning.'* 
Alpine; county in California, so named because of its mountainous surface, being 

traversed by the Sierra Nevada. Many places in the United States bear this 

name in reference to their elevation. 
Alts; village in Placer County, California; town in Buena Vista County, Iowa, and 

post-office and mining camp in Salt Lake County, Utah. A Latin word meaning 

**high." Many other places bear this name with reference to their elevation. 
Alts; village in Peoria County, Illinois, situated on the highest point between Peoria 

and Kock Island. 
Altadena; town in Los Angeles County, California, named with reference to its 

elevation. 
Altamont; post village in Alameda County, California, town in Effingham County, 

Illinois, situated on the highest point between St. Louis and Terre Haute, and 

post-office in Garrett County, Maryland. A Spanish phrase meaning *'high 

mountain.*' 
AltaviUe; villages in Calaveras and Del Norte counties, California, named from their 

elevation. 
Alts Vista; village in Wabaunsee County, Kansas, so named by Rock iHland Rail- 
road officials because that road crosses the watershed between the Kansas an<l 

Neosho rivers at this point. 
Alton; village in Humboldt County, California, named from the city in lUinoiH. 

Many other places are named from the same. 
Alton; city in Madison County, Illinois, named by Rufus Easton, the founder, for 

his son. 
Alton; town in Belknap County, New Hampshire, named from the town in England. 
Altoona; town in Polk County, Iowa, situated at the highest elevation between the 

Des Moines and Mississippi rivers; and city in Blair County, Pennsylvania, so 

named because of its high situation in the Allegheny Mountains. A derivative 

of the Latin word (iltus, meaning **high.'* 



oAHKKrr] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 23 

Altoona: city in Wilson County, Kaiieae, named froni the city in Peonsylnuiia. 
Alto Fobb; villas iu Union Connty, Illinois, sitnstfd at & iiott'h or paw in the a 

riiifjc of the Ozark oplitt; h«nec thu name, "high pass." 
AlturOE; town in Alodoc County. dLliforoia, so nameil from its monnl^nH. A 

i^paniah word nieanin);; "summits ot mauntains." 
Alum; ('re«k in Yellowstone Park. A (;hanicI«riBtu' name, as the wat«r is a strong 

folution of alum. 
Aivarado; t*iwn in Alameda County, California, named lor Joan V. AjTarado, 

Mexican governor of California. 
Alvarado; city iu Johnson County, TexHS, namei] from the tuwn in Mexico. 
Alviso; township in SantA Clara C-oiuity, California, named for an old Spanish 

Alvord; lake in Oregon, nameil for Gen. ftenjamin Franklin Alvord, who was sta- 
tioiieil thereat one time. 

I Amador; coimty and valley iu California-, 
Amador Oity; city in Auiador County, California, Named for Joseph M. Ama 
fiu'iiierly manager of the property of tlie niinsion of San Jose. 
Amakalli; tributary of Flint River, Missiesipiii. A Cherokee ward nieuning "1 

hlintf wul«r." 
Amalthea; villain in Franklin County, Ohio, named for the nurse of Jupiter. 
Amargtisa; river in Inyo County, California, running through deposits of soda, 

Imrun. and salt. From tlie fipaiiitth meaning "hitter water." 
Ambajeejua; lake, and falls in the Penobscot River, in Maine. An Xndian word, 

referring to the two large, ruond rouks in the lake, one on top of the other. 
Atnbc^emackomas; fall in the Penobscot River, Maine. An Indian word, an 

ing "little cross pond." 
Ambler; borough in Montgomery County, Pennsylvania, named (or the Ambler 

(ajnily. of which Joseph Ambler, who settled there in 1723, was a member. 
Amboy; towns in I«e County, Illinois, and Miami County, Indiana, and many 

other phu-ee. An Indian word, meaning "hollow indde," "like a bowl." 
Ambroae; cr»?i>k in RaN-alli County, Montana, named for an early settler. 
Amelia; county, and town in nune county, in Virginia, named for the Princess 

Anictia, yon ngest daughter of George II of England. 
Amenia; town in Ihitchess County, New York, named by an early scholar of the 

State, who also nam«<) the Slate of Vermont. A Latin word, meaning "pleas- 
ant," "delightful," "lovely.'' Prof. Jules Marpow atlributea the name lo the 

Amerriques tril>e of Indians i[i eastern Nicaragua. 
America; the Western Hemisphere, named for Amerigo Vespucci, bometimes spelled 

Ainericus Vespucius, who touched the South American coast somewhere near 

Surinam in 1499. The name was first used in 1509, and Hret appeared on a map 

made in Frankfort, Germany, in 1520. 
American; river in California, so called by the Spanish, Rio de los Atnericanos, 

because most of the Americans entering Calilomia at the time the Bpaniards 

rule<l tliere, came down that river. 
Amea; city in Story C'ounty, Iowa, named for Oakes Ames. 
Amea; posi-otlice in Montgomery County, New York, named for Fisher Ames. 
Amesbury; town in Essex County, Massachusetts, named from the English town. 
Amethyst : mountain in Yellowstone Park, Wyoming, so named by the United 8tat«B 

<.ieul<j);i<'Ml Survey, from the crystalline amethysls formerly abmidant on its 

Amethyst: creek in Yellowstone Park, Wyoming, so named by the United States 

('ni"lii]|,'icnl Survey because it Hows from Aniethysl Mountain. 
Amherat: ii>wn in llani'iirk Coimty, Maine, named from the town in New Ilamp- 



24 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 368. 

Axnlierst; towns in Hamp^liire County, Massachusetts, and Hillsboro County, New 

Hampshire, and county in Virginia, named for Lortl Amheret. 
Axnicalola; town in Dawson County, Georgia. A Cherokee Indian word, naeaniDg 

** tumbling water'* or "rolling water." 
Amite; town in Tangipahoa Parish, Louisiana, and county in Mississippi, named 

from the river. 
Amite; river in Mississippi and Louisiana. Corrupted from the French amiii^^ 

meaning "friendship," so calletl by the early settlers from the friendly reception 

given them by the Indians. 
Amity; town in Yamhill C'Ounty, Oregon, so named as a result of the settlement of 

a neighborhood contention regarding the location of aschoolhouse in IS49. The 

schoolhouse was named first and later the town. 
Ammonoosue; river in New Hampshire. An Indian word, interpreted by some to 

mean "stony fish place;" by others, "fish story river." 
Amo; towns in El Paso County, Colorado, Hendricks County, Indiana, and Cotton- 
wood County, Minnesota. An Indian word, meaning "l)ee." 
Amphitheater; creek in Yellowstone Park, named by the United States Geological 

Survey, from the form of a valley near its mouth. 
Amsterdam; city in Montgomery County, New York, name<l by Emanuel K 

De Graff, an early settler, from Amsterdam, Holland. Several places in the 

United States are named from the city in New York. 
Anaconda; township and city in Deerlodge County, Montana, named for the Ana- 
conda Company. 
Anacostia; village in the District of Columbia, named from an Indian tribe, from 

Anacostan, latinized form of Nacoc^htank, a fonner Indian settlement of the 

vicinity. 
Anada; town in Trinity County, California. From the Spanish, meaning **to 

nothing," signifying "down to l>ed-rock." 
Anaheim; township and town in Orange Coimty California. Named for Anna 

Fischer, the first child lx)rn in the settlement, and heim, the German word 

for "home." 
Anamosa; city in Jones County, Iowa. A corruption of the name of a Sauk Indian 

woman distinguished in the Bhu^k Hawk war, and refers to a litter of puppies 

or young foxes with eyes not yet oi)en. 
Anastasia; island ^off the coast of Florida, named by the early S{)anish explorers 

St. Anastasia, for a saint of the Catholic Church. 
Ancona; town in Livingston County, Illinois, name<l from the city in Italy. 
Andalusia; town in Covington County, Alabama, and villages in Randolph County, 

Georgia, Rock Island County, Illinois, and Bucks County, Pennsylvania, named 

from the ancient division of Spain. 
Anderson; village in Mendocino County, California, named by settlers from Ander- 
son County in Kentucky. 
Anderson; city in Ma<li8on County, Indiana. The name is the English translation 

of a Delaware Indian chief. 
Anderson; county in Kansas, name<l for Joseph C. Anderson, member of the first 

Territorial legislature of Kansas. 
Anderson; county in Kentucky, named for Richard C. Anderson, a former member 

of Congress. 
Anderson; county, and city in same county, in South Carolina, na!m*d for Col. Rob- 
ert Anderson, Revolutionary soldier. 
Anderson; county in Teimessee, named for Joseph Anderson, Comptroller of the 

United States Treasury under President James Madison. 
Anderson; county in Texas, named for Kenneth L. Anderson, vice-president of the 

Republic of Texas. 



OANHETT-] PLACE NAMES IN THK ITNITED STATES. 

Anderson: inland in Puget Sound, Washington, named for the surgeon of tbe ship 

HiKiiliiiiirii. who (iied just before its disciivery. 
Andersonburg; village- iu Perry Comity, Pennsylvaaia, nonied for the oriKinal 

Andersonville: village iu Smiiter Ojuiily, <Jeo:^iB, niLiiietl for the original [iru- 

Andee: town in Delaware Connty, New York, nuiuoil from the inountiuns of South 
Ameriwi, Ijecaiwe of ite niountaioous character. 

Andover; towns in EsHex County, MaeaiuJiuHetts, and WindHOr County, Vermont, 
named from the town in England. 

Andrew; county in Missouri, named for Andrew B. Hughes, of Clay County, who 
first publicly iiroposed the "Platte purchase." 

Andrewa; comity in Texas, name<l for the only wan killed in a two days' skim 
with the Mexicans near San Antonia, in 1835. 

AndroBCDg'^in; county in Maine, and river in Maine and New Hampshire. 

Indian word first given to the river, from the trWie Aiiiiinujutilliviik, who foniierly 
lived on its tituikB. The authorities |^ve the meaning "fii<hinK place for ale- 
wives," or "fish spearing." 

An^lica; town iu Allegany County, New York, named fur Mm. Angelica Church, 
daughter of Gen. Philip Scoyler. 

AngelinOi: river and connty in Texa«. Tbe name isadiminuUveof "angel." One 
authority Buggeste that the county may have been named for Joaf Angel Cabaso, 
the Spanish prjeat in charge of the district early in the nineteenth century. 

Aa^l Island; in San Francisco Bay. Marin County, and posL-olfice on tbe island. 
Named fora rjiiiier who settled tliere in 184S. 

Angels; town in Calavenw County, California, named for Henry Angel, who dis- 
covered gold in that vicinity in 1848. 

Asglesea; borough in Cape May County, New Jersey, named from the town it 

Anita; village in Butte County, California, and tiiwn in Cass County, Iowa. The 

Sfimiish form of "httle Ann." 
Aniwa; village in Shawano County, Wisconsin. Corruption of aji Inihan word, 

anhi'i, meaning "thow," a Chippewa pretix sign ilyiug superiority. 
Ann; cape, eastern estremily of Etwex County, Massachusetts, named for Que 

Anne, wife of James I of England. 
Anna; city In Union County. Illinois, named for Mrs. Anna Davie, wife of the 

owner of the land. 
Annapolis; city in Anne Anindel County, Maryland, named in honor of Ijueea 

Anne, of Plngland, 1702-1714. 
Ann Arbor; city in Washtenaw County, Michigan. The first part of tbe name 

given in honor of tlie wives of the two early settlers, Allen and Rumaey; the 

latter part refem to the grovelike appearance of the site. 
Annawan; township and village in Henry County, Illinois, nanieil by its'founder 

for a Mai«<achuNetts Indian chief, 
Anne Arundel; eouuty in Maryland, named in honor of i^dy Anne Arundel, ' 

o( CeciliuB Calvert, t^cond I*ni Baltimore. 
Annisquam; village iu ICsaex (^xuity, MaHsachusetta, and lake, hay, and rive 

New Hampshire. An Indian word meaning "nick summit" or "point ol 

Anniston; city in Cnihoun Cjiunty. Alalwma, nameii for Annie, wife of Col. Alfreil 

L. Tyler. 
Aniirrille; town in Oneida Comity, New York, uame.1 fur the wile of J. W. UIik. 

Held, first settler. 




26 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 258. 

Anoka; village in Caas Coanty, Indiana, coanty, and city in same county, in Minne- 
sota, and village in Broome County, New York. An Indian word meaning *'on 

both sides." 
Anaon; county in North Carolina, named for Admiral Anson, British navy, who 

purchased land in the State. 
Anaon; town in Jones County, Texas, named for Anson Jones, first president of the 

Texas Republic. 
Anaonia; city in New Haven County, Connecticut, named for Anson G. Phelps, 

senior partner of the firm of Phelps, Dotlge & Co., which established the place. 
AnaonviUe; town in Anson County, North Carolina, named for Admiral Anson of 

the British navy, who built the town. 
Anated; town in Fayette County, West Virginia, named for Professor Ansted, the 

English geologist, who reported on a tract of coal land there and had an interest 

in it. 
Antelope; township in Mono County and town in Sacramento County, Califomia, 

and many other places; generally named from the antelope of the plains. 
Antelope; county in Nebraska, named at the suggestion of Mr. Leander Gerrard, ia 

commemoration of the killing and eating of an antelope during the parsoit of 

some Indians. 
Antero; mount in the Sawatch Range, Colorado, named for a prominent Ute Indian. 
Anthony; city in Harper County, Kansas, named for Governor George T. Anthony. 
Anthony's Nose; promontory on the IIudHon River, New York, said by Irving to 

have been named so in reference to Anthony Van Corlear's nose; Lossing says, 

*' Anthony de Hooges, secretary of Rensselaer wick, had an enormous nose, and 

the promontory was named in honor of that feature." 
Antigo; city in I.»anglade County, Wisconsin. The name is taken from the Indian 

word neequee-untlgO'Sebi, antigo meaning ** evergreen." 
Antioch; town in Contra Costa County, California, village in Lake County, Illinois, 

and many other places, named from the city in Syria. 
Antrim; county in Michigan, and town in Guernsey County, Ohio, named by early 

Irish settlers from the town in Ireland. Many other places are named from the 

same. 
Antwerp; town in Jefferson County, New York, built by a comimny which was 

formed in Holland, who nameil the new i)lace from the city in Belgium. 
Antwerp; village in Paulding County, Ohio, named from the town in Now York. 
Apache; county and pass in Arizona, village in Huerfano County, Colonulo, and 

town in C-addo County, Oklahoma, named from the Indian triln*. The word is 

of Pima or Pajago Indian origin and signifies *' alien," i. e., "enemy." 
Apalachee; river and post-office in Morgan County, GiKjrgia. From the Hichiti 

Indian word, meaning "on the other side" (of a stream), or it may be derived 

from apabitchiokli, **i)eople on the other side." 
Apalachicola; river and city in Franklin County, Florida, A Hichiti Indian word, 

signifying "people on the other side." 
Apex; village in San Diego County, California, nameil with reference to its situation 

in the mountains. 
Apex; village in Wake County, North Carolina, so named because it is the highest 

point between Raleigh and Deep rivers. 
Apollo; borough in Aniistrong County, Pennsylvania, named for the classical god. 
Apopka; tow^n in Orange county, Florida. The name derived from the Indian word 

tsalopopkofuUcfiee, meaning "catfish eating creek." 
Apostles; group of islands in Lake Superior, so calle<l by the early Jesuits, under 

the impression that they numbered twelve. 
Appalachia; village in Wise County, Virginia, Name derivtMl fn»m Appalftrhian. 



I PLACE NAMKS IN THE UNITED STATES. 27 

Appalachian; general appellation of the mountain system in the Boutheaet«m part 
of Niirtli Auierii';). ^xteniliug under varioUH niuuee from Maine south westward 
to the northern part of Alabama. The name was given by the Spaniards under 
De 8oto, who derived it from tlie name of a neighboring tribe, the Apalachl. 
Brinlon holdaitB radical to be the miucogeeapala, "great Bca," or "great ocean," 
and that apatachc is a compound of this word with tlie Muscogee personal parti- 
ciple "rlii," and meana "thoBeby the sea." 

Appasooae; (bounty in Iowh, and village in Douglaa County, Kansas. An Indian 
wonl said to mean "a chief when a child." The nnnie of a chief of the Sacs 
and Foxe«. The word ie a diininutive form, but probably has no re/erenfe to 

Apple; sinaU stream in northern Illiniiis, so nameil on nccoimt of the crab-apple 

orchards in the vicinity. 
Applebachville; village in Bucks Coanty, Pennsylvania, iiumtil (or Cjen. Paul 

Applebach and his brother Ueury. 
Applegnte: town in Jackson County, Oregon, uanie<l (or an early settler. 
Apple River; township and vill^ie in Jo Davieas County, IllinoiH, nameil from ita 

location on Apple River. 
Appleton: town in Knox County, Maine, named (or Nathauiel Appleton, one of 

the original proprietors. 
Appleton: village in Cape Uimrdean County, Missouri, situated on Apple Creek; 

heuce the name. 
Appleton; city in Outj^mie County, WiBronsin. nameil for Samuel Appleton, one 

of the founders of Lawrence University, located at that place. 
Appleton City: township and city In StiintOlair County, Missouri, named for Wil- 
liam H. Appleton, of New York. 
Applinip; county, and town in Columbia County, in Georgia, named for Col. I}an 

Appliug. 
Appomattox; river, and county in Virginia. An Indian word meaning "tobacco 

plant country." 
Apricot; village in Monterey County, California, named from the apricot orchards 

in the vicinity. 
Aptokisic; \illage in lake Coanty, Illinois. An Indian word meaning "half liay." 

or "sun at meridian." 
Apukwa; lake in Wisconsin. An Indian wonl of uncertain meaning. 
Apulia; village in Onondaga County, New York, named from the ancient province 

o( wmtliem Italy. 
Aqnaachicola; creek, and village in Carlwn County, in Pennsylvania. An Indian 

worr! meaning "where we fish with the bush net." 
Aquebogue; village in Suffolk Oount.v, New York, An Indian woni meaning "at 

the vnd of a small pond," 
Aransas; c<'iunty in Texas, nameil from the river which flows into Amnsaa Harbor, 

through the county. 
Arapahoe; county in Colorado; town in Furnas County, Nebraska; post-office in 

Pamlico County, North Carolina, and town in Custer County, Oklahoma. The 

name is that of a noted Indian tribe, and signiQes "traders." 
Arastraville; mining camp in Tuolumne County, California, named from the ara»- 

Inm, primitive mUls used nn free-milling gold ores, am-d by the early Mexicans. 
Arbuckle; lown in Oilusa County, Culifoniia, named for the founder of the t< 
Arbuckle; mountains in Chickasaw Nation, Indian Territory, named from Fort 

Arbuckle, which was named for Brevet Brig. Gen. Matthew Arbuckle, who 

fought in the Mexican war. 
Areata; town in lIumlK>ldt Coimty, California. An Indian word meaning "sunny 

spot." 



i 



■ 

J 



38 PLACK SAiras m thb mriD statbi. [■fu.m. 



Ardi Beach: rilbuee in fhwogt CVmiitT, CUifomiiy amied fraoi the nalmal aiSm 

in the Wifi? in the iMtAn. 
Afchdsle; u>wn in Bandtilfih Coantr, North Ouolina, named for John ArrMmlf, a 

lord proprietor and goTcmor of CuoILul 
Archer: oriontv in Texft^. 

Archer Citj: village in Archer Coontj, named for Dr. Biandi T. Archer, promi- 
nent in the earlv «Ure of the State. 
Archuleta: conntv in Colond^i, named for J. 31. Archnleta. head of one of the old 

.Sponieh famili€« of Nev Mexico. 
Areola; t/>vnj*hip and citr in Dooglaa Coontr, niinois, named from the andent 

tovn in Italv. 
Arctic; village in San Bernardino OxintT. California, so called dmaiTeiy from its 

I'i^ation in the Mojave d«9«rt. 
Arden; Ufwn in Bum-oiolje Coonty. North Carolina, named from the Forest of 

Anlen, in ShakofjeareV play *'Aa Yen Like It." 
Arenac; Ciunty, and vilb^re in same coanty. in Michigan. An Indian word, ouh, 

*' earth '* or *' land/' crini[Kiunde<l with the Latin woid artma. The name wae 

€ynu*T'\ by .Schfy^lcraft and a [Arty of early explorers. 
ArenzriUe; villain in Cat» Oiunty. Illinoi«, named for Francis A. Arena;, pioneer 

and founder. 
Arequa; irulch in Colorado, name<l for a man named Beqna. 
Ar^enta: villa^reH in Beaverln-ad County. Montana, and Salt LakeCoimiy, Utah, so 

nairKr^l Ufcaa«4e of near-by silver mines. From the Latin ar^mficai, meaning 

"Hilver.' 
Arn^entine; r'ity in Wyandotte County, Kansas, fo named from the Latin atyaUumf 

*'hilv»fr," a HmelUfr Uring the first industry there. 
Ar^onia; '-ity in Sumner County, Kansan, named from the ship Argo, in which 

JaH;n Kaiiiy] Vt (>>lchiri in rjuert of the ''golden fleece.'' 
Arfi^oa; t/iwn in Marshall County, Indiana, named from the town in Greece. 
Argnello; villaiff* in Santa liarliara County, California. A S|ianii§h term meaning 

*'\iU'k of hi-alth." 
Argnaville; viliaife in S^rhoharie C^junty, New York, nameil for it« principal paper, 

tbi; Albany ArgUH. 
Ar^le; townH in Walton County, Florida, and Winnebago County, Illinois, settled 

by H^'ot^'b, and nam<f<l by them from the city in Scotland. 
Ar^le; town in WaHbin^on County, New York, nameil for the Duke of Argyle in 

Arietta; Uiwn in Hamilton (>>unty, New York, name<l for the wife of Renflselaer 
Van K4;nnHi'la4T. 

Arikaroe; river, and villagi? in Araftahoe County, in Colorado, named from the 
Indian trilx?. The word n?fer8 to **bom.'* 

Arisona; Territory of tbe Unit^nl Staten. The word probably means arid zone or 
di'wrt, but Mowry dainiH that tbe name is Aztec, from arizumay signifying '* sil- 
ver Iwiiring." 

Arkadelphia; t^iwn in ('lark County, Arkanssf*. The word is compounded of tbe 
abbreviation of /irJb^inif/Mand tbe Greek wonl culelphuSf ** brother.** 

Arkanaoa; State of tbe Tnion, (Mumty, and township in same county, and river in 
Hnid HtaU*, and city in (>>wley County, Kansas. Marquette and other French 
explorern wroU; tbe word Alkaiuku and Akanisea, from the Indian tril)e lati^r 
known hm (^uapaw. Tbe meaning of the name is unknown, but it is of Algon- 
(juiii origin and biis no c^mmH'tion with tbe F'fench arc^ as has been asserted. 

Armiida; town In Kivernide (/ounty, (/ulifomia, and village in Macomb County, 
Michigan. A Spanish word, nuuming ''fleet,'* "sciuadron.'* 



QANNBTT.] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 29 

Armagh; borough and town in Indiana County, Penn8>'Iyania, named from the 

Irish town. 
Armonk; village in Westchester County, New York. An Indian wortl meaning 

"fishing place." 
Annourdale; formerly a village, now a station in Kansas City, Kansas, named for 

the Armour brothers, bankers and pork packers. 
Armstrong; county in Pennsylvania, named for Gen. John Armstrong, of Pennsyl- 
vania, who commanded the expedition against the Indians at Kittanning in 1756. 
Armstrong; county in South Dakota, named for Moses K. Armstrong, Congressman 

and legislator, 1870. 
Armstrong; county in Texas, named for a pioneer of the State. 
Arnolds; creek in Ohio County, Indiana, named for Colonel Arnold, of the Revo- 
lutionary war. 
Aromos; town in San Benito County, California. A Spanish word meaning 

"perfumes.'* 
Aroostook; river and county in Maine. An Indian word meaning "good river," 

or "clear of obstruction." 
Arrow; lake in Minnesota, so called from the name given by the early French 

explorers, lac auxfleches, "lake of the arrows." 
Arrowhead; hot springs in southern California, named from a huge discoloration 

on the slopes of a mountain north of San Bernardino, which takes the form of 

an Indian arrowhead. 
Arrow Rock; village in Saline County, Missouri, built upon a spot where the 

Indians formerly resorted for arrowheads, because of the suitability of the rock 

for that purpose. 
Arrowsmith; town in McLean County, Illinois, named for Daniel Arrowsmith, its 

founder. 

{Arroyo; villages in Elk County, Pennsylvania, and Cameron County, Texas; 
Arroyo Grande; town in San Luis Obispo County, California. A Spanish word 
meaning "creek" or "ri^nllet," and "grande — large." 

Arroyo Hondo; village in Taos County, New Mexico, which takes its name from a 
near-by creek. A Spanish name meaning "deep creek." 

Arroyo Seco; village in Monterey County, California. From the Spanish mean- 
ing "dry creek." 

Artesia; village in Los Angeles County, California, and town in Lowndes County, 
Mississippi, named from artesian wells. 

Arthur; village in Moultrie County, Illinois, named for Arthur Hervey, brother of 
the founder. 

Asbury Park; borough and city in Monmouth County, New Jersey, named for 
Francis Asbury, the pioneer bishop of Methodism in America. Several towns 
in the southern States bear his name. 

Ascension; parish in Louisiana, named by the early French settlers from the fes- 
tival of the Ascension. 

Asoutney; mountain in Vermont. An Indian word meaning "fire mountain," 
from its having l)een burned over. It is also said to signify "three brothers," 
and is supposed to refer to three singular valleys which run down the western 
slope of the mountain. 

Ascutneyville; village in Windsor County, Vermont, named from Ascutney 
Mountain. 

Ashbee; harbor in Virginia, named for Solomon Ash bee. 

Ashbumham; town in Worcester County, Massachusetts, named for John, second 
earl of Ashbumham. 

Ashbyburg; village in Hopkins County, Kentucky, named for Gen. Stephen 
Ashby. 



80 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull.2S& 

Ash«; cotinty in North Carolina; 

AslMboro; Umn in Ashe County. Named for Samuel Ashe, goTemor of the State, 
I71»5-I798. 

Ash^rsrille; village in Clay County, Indiana, named for John Asher, its foonder. 
Ashflat; villaKi^ in Sharii County, Arkansas, named from a prairie apon which tbe 

t/iwn in mtuat4»<l, in t^rly <iayH surrounded by ash timber. 
Ashford; viIlaK<^ in FI«nry County, Alalxama, named for Thonun Ashfoxd, or his 

mm, VnH\vr\vk A. Anhfoni. 

▲shkum; villa«i» in Iroquois County, Illinois. An Indian word meaning "more 
and nion»." 

Ashland; <rity in Clark County, Kansas; townn in Middlesex County, MasBRchnaettB, 

lUmUyn County, Mississippi, and lioone County, Missouri; village in Saonden 

C^Mmty, Nebraska; town in (Jn^ene County, New York; county, and town in 

name county, in Ohio; lK)n)ugh in Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania; cx>nntyiii 

WiM<'onHin; and many other cities, towns, and villages; named for the home(^ 

Henry (Jlay in Kentucky. 
Aahland; city in I^)y<l County, Kentucky, »o named, ai-cording to Henry Clay, from 

the ash timlKT which alx)undeil in the vicinity. His home was also called 

** Ashland.'' 
Ashley; comity in Arkansas, naine<l for Senator Chester Ashley. 
Ashley; city in Washinj^ton County, Illinois, named for Colonel Ashley, of the 

Illinois Central Railroad. 
Ashley; villaKe in Gratiot County, Michijran, name<l for H. W. Ashley, general 

manaf?(T of the Ann Arl)or liiiilroad, which paf^es through the village. 
Ashley; town in Pike County, Mii?8ouri, named for Gen. \V. H. Ashley, lieutenant 

governor 1821-1824. 
Ashley; river in South Carolina which unites with the Cooper, both named for the 

¥j&r\ of Shaftc^sbury, Lord Anthony Ashley Co<)j)er, one of the original proprietore. 
Ashley; lake in Utah, named for its discoverer, W. H. Ashley, a St. Louis fur 

trader. 
Ashley Falls; village in the town of Shefheld, Berkshire County, Massacthnsetts; 
Ashley Mountain; mountain in the town of Salisbury, Litchfield County, Con- 
necticut. Named for Brig, or Maj. Gen. John Ashley, of the Revolutionary war. 
Ashmore; township and village in Coles County, Illinois, named for the founder, 

Hezikiah J. Ashmore. 
Ashowugh; island off the coast of Connecticut, near New London. An Indian 

word meaning "halfway place," or ** place between." 
Ashtabula; village in Barnes County, North Dakota, named from the (rity in Ohio. 
Ashtabula; county, city in same county, and river, in Ohio. An Indian word 

meaning ''fish river." 
Ashton; city in Spink County, South Dakota, so named because of the heavy growth 

of ash timber. 
Ashuelot; river, and village in Cheshire Coimty, in New Hampshire. An Indian 

word meaning "collection of many waters." 
Asotin; county in Washington; a Nez Perce Indian word, meaning "et^l cret»k." 
Aspen; town in IMtkin County, Colorado, which takes its name from a near-by 

mountain. Quaking Asp. 
Aspetuc; river and hill in New Milfonl, Connetrticut. An Indian word, meaning 

"a height." 
Asproom; mountain in Connecticut. An Indian word, meaning "high," "lofty." 
Assaria; city in Saline County, Kansas, name<l from a church which was built by 

Swedish Lutherans j)reviou8 to the incorporation of the place. The word means 

**In God is our help." 



GANNETT.] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 31 

Assawa; lake near the sources of the Mississippi. An Indian word, meaning ** perch 
lake." 

Assawaznpset; ]>ond in Middleboro, Massachusetts. An Indian word, meaning 
"white stone.'* 

Aflsawog; river in Connecticut. An Indian word, meaning "place l)etween,*' or 
"halfway place." 

ABsinniboine; fort and military reservation in Choteau County, Montana, named 
from a tribe of Indians. The name signifies "stone Ixjilers," and is said to have 
lK»en given to them because of the singular manner they had of boiling their meat 
by dropping heated ntones into the water in which the meat is placed until it is 
cooked. According to another authority, it signifies "stone Sioux," from amut 
"stone," and bunnag^ "boilers" or *^ roaster," the Ojibwa name for the Sioux. 

Aflsiscunk; creek in Burlington County, New Jersey. An Indian word, meaning 
"muddy," or "dirty." 

Assumption; township and village in Christian County, Illinois, named by its 
founder from Assumption in Canada. 

Assumption; parish in Ix)uisiana, named in honor of the festival of the assumption 
of the Virgin Mary. 

Astoria; town in Fulton County, Illinois; villages in Wright County, Missouri, 
Queens County, New York, and Deuel County, South Dakota, named for the 
Astor family, of New York. 

Astoria; city in Clatsop County, Oregon, named for the founder, John Jacob Astor, 
who established a fur-trading station there in early days. 

Asuncion; village in San Luis Obispo County, California. A Spanish word, mean- 
ing "elevation to a higher dignity." 

Aswaguscawadic; branch of the Mattawamkeag River, Maine. An Indian word, 
meaning "place where one is compelled to drag his canoe through a stream." 

Atalla; town in Etowah County, Alabama. A corruption of a Cherokee word, mean- 
ing "mountain" or "highland." 

Atascadero; village in San Luis Obispo County, CaHfomia. A Spanish word, mean- 
ing "quagmire" or "obstruction." 

Atascosa; county, and village in Bexar County, Texas. A Spanish word, meaning 
"boggy" or "miry." 

Atchafalaya; bayou of Red River, Louisiana. A Choctaw Indian word, meaning 
"long river." 

Atchison; county, and city in same county, in Kansas, and county in Missouri, 
nameil for David R. Atchison, United States Senator from Missouri. 

Aten; village in Ce<iar County, Nebraska, named for John A ten, a State senator. 

Athens; cities in Clarke County, Georgia, and Menard County, Illinois; villages in 
Claiborne Parish, Louisiana, and Greene County, New York; county in Ohio; 
borough and township in Bradford County, Pennsylvania; and many other 
cities, towns, and villages. Named from the capital city of Greece. 

Athol; town in Worcester County, Massachusetts, said to have been named for 
James Murrav, second Duke of Athol. 

Atisowil; creek in Washington, emptying into Willapa Harbor. An Indian word, 
meaning * * bear river. ' ' 

Atkins; bay at the mouth of Kennebec River, Maine, named for an early land- 
owner. 

Atkins; peak in Yellowstone Park, named by the United States Geological Sur\'ey, 
for John D. C. Atkins, Indian commissioner. 

Atkinson; township and village in Henry County, Illinois, named for its founder, 
Charles Atkinson. 

Atkinson; town in Piscataquis County, Maine, named for Judge Atkinson, a prom- 
inent resident 



82 PLACK NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. iBTLLft 

Atkinson; township and town in Holt County, Nebraska, named for Ool. John 

Atkinflon, of Tk*iro\t, Michigan. 
Atkinaon; town in K<K!kingham C>)unty, New Hampehire, named for TheodoR 

Atkinson, a lanrc lan«l)ioMer. 
Atkinaonville; villa^ in Owen County, Indiana, named for Stephen AtkinsoD. 
Atlanta; township and city in Lopin County, Illinois, named ^m the city inlTeotfiv- 
Atlanta; city in Fulton (-ounty, Gcoiyia, so named to designate its relationship to 

the Atlantic ()(!t*iin, by nutans of a railway nmning to the coast. 
Atlantic; ocean, naniinl from the Greek word, meaning *'the oea beyond Moont 

Atla*«." 

{Atlantic; (bounty in Nrw Jerm?y; 
Atlantic Oity; crity in Atlantic County, New Jersey; named from the ocean. 
Atlantic; (*reek in YellowHtone Park, naniLHl Ikhausc it flows from Two-Ocean Tm 

down the slope* toward tlu^ Atlantic 0<*t»an. 
Atlantic Highlands; borough in Monmouth CTounty, New Jersey, so named from 

itfl nituation, which ov<Tlo<)ks the ofwin. 
Atoka; town in CluK'taw Nation, Indian T«irritory. An Indian word, meaning **in 

another place," or '*to another place." 
Attala; county in MiHHl.ssippi; 
Attalaville; villa^* in Attala county. Name<l for AOdn, the heroine of an Indian 

romance, by Chateaubriand. 
Attapulgus; village in Decatur County, (nnirgia. An Indian word, meanini^ "bor 

inp holef» into w(Xm1 to make a fire.'* 
Attica; city in Fountain County, Indiana; villaj?e in Wyoming Coimty, New York, 

and many other j>laceH, nanuMl from the ancient divinion in Greece. 
Attitahf, ]K^ak of the White Mountains in New Hampshire. An Indian word, mean- 
ing **bluelH.TrieH." 
Attleboro; town in BriHtol County, Ma«.«achu«'tt«, named from the town in 

England. 
Atwater; village in Kandiyohi (Vmnty, Minnesota, prolwbly named for Isaac 

At water, earlv wttler of St. Paul. 
Atwater; town in Portage County, Ohio, nanusl for Caj)t. Caleb Atwater, an early 

purveyor in the Western Reserve. 
Atwood; village in Piatt County, Illinois, namcnl from its location at the edge of 

the woo<l8 
Atwood; city in KawliuH County, Kannjis, named for Attwoo<l Matheny, a son of 

the founder, J. M. Matheny. 
Aubrey; valley in Arizona, named for an army officer. 
Auburn; (dty in Placer County, California, name<l by settlers from the city m New 

York. 

{Auburn; city in Cayuga County, New York; and many other places; 
Aubumdale; village in Newt(»n, MidiUescx County, Massachusetts. Namwi with 
refer€»nce to Auburn in (ioldsmith's jxjem, **Tlie I)eserte<l Village.*' 
Audrain; county in Missouri, named for Col. James K. Audrain, who ditnl while 

serving as memlxT of the Missouri U*gislature, 181^2. 
Audubon; mount in Colorado, county in Iowa, and village in lk?(^ker County, Min- 
nesota, name<l for the celebrate<i ornithologist, John James Audul)on. Many 
other pla<!i»s >)ear his name. 
Aughwick; tributary of the Juniata River, Pennsylvania. An Indian word, mean- 

ing "overgrown with brush.'* 
Auglaize; river in Missouri, and river and county in Ohio. A French phrase, mean- 
ing *'at the clay " or "at the loam," used descriptively. 
Augusta; (rity in Richmond County, Gttorgia, st^ttUnl during the reign of King 
George II of England, and named for the royal princess Augusta. 



GANNETT] VLACK NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 33 

Augusta; townsliipand village in Hancock County, IllinolK, nameil from the city in 

Georgia, the home of the first settlers. 
Augusta; city in Butler County, Kansas, named for the wife of C. N. James, a 

trader. 
Augusta; city in Kennebec County, Maine, and county in Virginia, naixied for 

Augusta of Saxe-Gotha, wife of Frederick, Prince of Wales. 
Auraria; town in Lumpkin County, Georgia, surrounded by a hilly country con- 
taining valuable gold mines. A I^atin word, meaning **gold town." 
Aurelius; town in Cayuga County, New York, named for the Roman enii>eror. 
Aurora; city in Dearborn County, Indiana, named for the association which laid it 

out. 
Aurora; township in Portage County, Ohio, named for the daughter of Amos Spaf- 

foni, a surveyor of the Connecticut Ijand Company. 
Aurora; county in South Dakota and in many other places, named from the I^tin 

word, meaning **morning,*' **dawn,** ''east." 
Ausable; river, and town in Clinton County, New York. A French word, meaning 

** sandy," or **at the sand." 
Austin; town in Lonoke County, Arkansas, and (bounty and city in Travis County, 

Texas, named for Stephen Fuller Austin, the first man to establish a permanent 

American colony in Texas. 
Austin; suburb of Chicago, Illinois, named for Henry VV. Austin, its founder. 
Austin; city in Mower County, Minnesota, named for Horace Austin, governor in 

1870-1874. 
Austin; town in Tunica County, Mississippi, named for Colonel Austin, on whose 

plantation the town was built. 
Aufitinburg; town in Ashtabula County, Ohio, named for Judge Austin, an early 

settler. 
Autauga; county in Alabama; 

Autaugaville; town in Autauga County, Alabama. From an Indian word said to 
mean "land of plenty." 
Autryville; town in Sampson County, North Carolina, named for a member of the 

State legislature. 
Auxvasse; village in Callaway C/ouaty, Missouri, name<l from the French word 

. fvrww', meaning ** muddy." 
Ava; town in Oneida County, New York, named from the city in Burma. 
Avalon; town in Livingston County, Missouri, name<l from the town in France. 

Several other places l)ear this name. 
Avena; village in Inyo County, California. A Spanish word, meaning *'oat8." 
Avenal; town in San Luis Obispo County, California. A Spanish term, meaning 

"field sown with oats." 
Avery; gores in Essex and Franklin counties, Vermont, name<i for the original 

grantee, Samuel Avery. 
Averyville; village in Peoria County, Illinois, nameil from the Avery Manufactur- 
ing Company, whose plant is located in the village. 
Avoca; town in Steuben County, New York, named by Sophia White, a resident, 

in allusion to Thomas Moore's poem, ** Sweet Vale of Avoca." 
Avon; village in Fulton County, Illinois, name<l from the village in New York. 
Avon; village in' Livingston County, New York, also many other places, name<l 

from the river in England, \\]ym which Shakespeare's home was situate^l. 
Avoyelles; parish in Ix>uisiana, namtHl from an Indian tribe. 
Axtell; city in Marshall County, Kansas, named for Dr. Jesse Axtell, an officer of 

the St. Joseph and Grand Island liailway. 
Ayer; town in Middlesex County, Massachusetts, named for Dr. James C. Ayer, who 

partially donated the town hall. 

Bull. 258—05 3 



34 PLACE NAMKS IN THE UNITED STATES. Ibull.25«l 

Ayish; liayoii in Texai*, naiiUMi from an Indian tril)e. 

Ayr; village in Adams County, Ni?bra.yka, name<l for Doctor Ayr, of Iowa, a rail- 
road director. 
Ayrshire; town in Palo Alto County, Iowa, naminl from the town in Scotland. 
Azalia; village in liartholomew (Jounty, Indiana, named for the flower. 
Aztec; village in San Juan ( -ounty, New Mexico, name<l for one of the native tribesof 

Mexico. The word is »iid to mean *' place of the heron." Other interpretations 

give ** white," or '^j^hallow land where vapora arise/' Humboldt inTes "land 

of flamingoes." The word azcatl means '*ant," but Buschinann 8a3r8 that this 

wonl has no connection with the name of the trilw. 
Babruly; creek in Missouri. The wonl is a corniption of the French bois bruUj 

"burnt woo<l." 
Babylon; village in Suffolk County, New York, name<l from the ancient city in Asia. 
Baca; county in Colorado, name<l for a pn)minent Mexican family of Trinidad, 

Colorado. 
Bache; mount in California, name<l for A. I). I^che, su|>erintendent of the OoaBt 

and Geodetic Survev. 
Baconhill; village in Saratoga C^junty, New York, named for £))eneser Bacon, a 

tavern kecjier in early days. 
Bad; river in Michigan, named by the Dakota Indians, inakfHiuthicha, *'bad river." 
Badaxe; river in Wis<*oiisin, and village in Huron County, Michigan. 
Baden; -borough in Heaver C'ounty, Pennsylvania, and several other places in the 

United Stat<^, named from the German state. 
Badger; town in Tulare County, California, named by settlers from Wisconsin, the 

"Badger State.'' 
Badger; creeks in Iowa, Yellowstone Park, and many other places, so named from 

the presence of that animal. 
Badlands; term applied to a region in South Dakota. It is said that the old 

fn^ich voyageurs descrilKxl the region as ^* maufnises terres pour (rat^TKr," 

meaning that it was a dilfurult country to travel through; from this the term has 

lieen carelessly shortene<l and translated into the present misnomer. 
Bagdad; town in San liernardino County, California, named from the city in Asiatic 

Turkey. 
Baggers; {>oint on Indian River, Florida, name<l for the owner, John Baggers. 
Bailey; town in Sha*<tii County, California; 
Baileys Ferry; village in Stanislaus County, California. Name<l for Capt. G. 

Bailey, United States Army. 
Bailey; comity in Texas, namiHl for one of the men who fell at the Alamo, March 6 

\KM\. His first name is worn off the stone monument, which is the only record 

left of his career. 
Baileyville; village in Stephenson County, Illinois, named for O. Bailey, an early 

st»ttler. 
Bainbridge; towns in Decutur County, Gw>rgia, and Chenango County, New York, 

and village in Ross County, Ohio. Nanunl for Commander William Bainbridge, 

of the war of 1812 and the war with Tripoli. 
Baird; town in Sunflower County, Mississippi, naniinl for the man who owned the 

land upon which the town is built. 
Baker; county in Florida, nameil for James M. Baker, judge of the fourth judicial 

district of the State. 
Baker; county in (itiorgia, name<l for Col. John liaker, an officer in the war of the 

Revolution. 
Baker; county in Oregon; * 

Baker City; city in Baker County, Ori'gon. Name<l for £dward Dickinson Baker, 
officer in the Union Army, and senator from Oregon. 



T) 



PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 



35 



;iplorer, Vancoi 



i lieutenant 



.,.,»hi, 



iianieil tor Captain Baker, i 



Baker; mimnt in Waaliini^dEi, nanieil liy the e 

Bakers; river in Graftou Connty, New llai 

tioldier of tbe Indian wara. 
Bakersfleld; city in Kem County, California, iiatneil lor Col. Thomas Balttr. 
Bakersfleld; town in Franklin County, Vermont, named for Joseph Baker, who 

owned the land in 1789. 
Bakers Killa; village in Warren County, New York, named for the owner. 
Bakereville; town in Mitchell County, North Carolina, named for a prominent 

resident. 
Bakersville; town in Coshocton County, Ohio, named for John Baker, who laid it 

out in 1848. 
Baku; village in Sonoma County, California, situated in the petj-oleum district, and 

named fmm the oil Selds of Baku, in Russia. 
Bald Ea^le: village in Nevada County, California, named from theeaglea in the 

siemw ill the vicinity. 
Bald Eagle; valley, ureek. and village in York County, Penneylvania, named for 

the noted Seneca <'hief, Bald Euifle. 
Baldwia; county in Ataliama, and county, and town in Haberaham County, in 

lieorgia, named for Abraham Baldwin, United States Senator from Ueorgia. 
Baldwin; town in Jackson County, Iowa, named for Judge Baldwin. 
Bald-win; city in Douglas County, Kansas, named for John Baldwin, o( Berea, Ohio. 
Baldwin; town in Cimiberland County, Maine, named for i«ammi Baldwin, one 

of the proprietors. 
Baldwin; village in LakeCounty, Michigan, named for Governor Baldwin, of Mich- 

i)ian. 
Baldwin; town in Chemong Connty. New York, named from Baldwin Creek, whieh 

wa^ named (or leaac, Walter, and ThumaK Baldwin, early settlors at the mouth 

of the creek. 
Baldwin; village in St. Croii County, Wiwoiiein, named for D. A. Baldwin, an early 

settler. 
BaldwiiuviUe; village in Onondaga County, New York, named for Dr. Jonas 0. 

Baldwin, its founder. 
Boldwyn; town in Lee County, Mississippi, named for a. landowner. 
Balize; pilot town at the northeaiit pass at the mouth of the Mississippi in Plaque- 
-miucs Parish, Louisiana, the name of which coniea from the French word Miir, 

" stake," " beacon," the most of thf hiiwewt being built on piles. 
Ballard: inunty in Kentucky, named for Capt. Blanil Ballard, an ofJicer in the war 

of 1 812. 
Ballena; village in San Dit^ County, California. A Spanish word meaning 

" whale," and given the settlement because of a whale being stranded on the 

beach. 
Ballentine; poRt-ofU(« in Lexington County, South Carolina, named for a resident 

family. 
Balleton; town in Saratoga County, New York. 
BallHton Spa; village in Saratoga County, New York, named for Rev. Eliphalet 

Ball, au early settler. "Spa" was added iu refereu(« to the medidnal springe, 

from the celebrated watering place in Belgium. 
Baltimore; i-ounty and city in Maryland, and town in Windsor County, Vermont; 

named lor Cecilius Calvert, Lord Baltimore, who settled the Maryland province 

in 1635. A Celtic word, meaning " large town." 
Bamberg; enunty, and ti;iwn in same county, in South Carolina, named for a family 
rominent in tbe recent history of the Btate. 




36 PLACK NAMKS IN THE UNITED STATES. [BULuaSK 

Bandera; ('r>unty, and town in Kaine county, in Texa«, named from a pass in the 
State. The wonl in Spanish, meaning " flag.** 

Bangor; village in Butte County, California, nanie<l from the city in Maine. 

Bangor; rity in PenolMscot County, Maine, name<l by the Rev. 8eth Noble, its rep- 
reHentative in legislature, from an ol<l f>8alm tqne. 

Bangor; Ix^rough in Northampton County, Pennsylvania, and village in LaCroflw 
County, Wisconsin, name<1 from the town in Wales because of the Welsh set- 
tlers in thesi* places. 

Bangs; mount in Arizona, namiMl for James K. Bangs, clerk upon the King Survey. 

(Banks; county in (ieorgia; 
Banksville; village in Hanks CV>unty, <ieorgia. Nameil for Dr. Richard Banks. 
Banner; village in Wells County, Indiana, named for a newspaper, the Blnffton 

Banner. 
Banner; county in Nebraska, so namiMl iKHrauseit was considered the banner countj 

of the State when name<l. 
Bannock; county and iK'uk in Idaho, town in Ik'averhead County, Montana, and 

peak in Yellowstone Park, namiHl fiom a trilx' of Indians. This tribe inhabitol 

the country soutliwest of Yelowstone Park, finally settling on a reservation in 

southern Maho. Some authorities give the derivation from bannaP Jui "eoatfa- 

ern pe<»ple." 
Bantam; river, and village in Litchfield County, Connecticut. The name is derived 

from the Indian word penntumf **he prays," or "he is praying." 
Baptist Hill; village in Ontario County, New York, named from a Baptist church 

erected there at an early date. 
Baraboo; city in Sauk County, Wisconsin, named for Jean Baribault, a French 

settler. An article written by Julia A. Uipham claims that the Bariboo River 

was name<l for Captain Haralx.'ar\', who was with Morgan's expedition against 

the ln<lians and wintered at the mouth of the stream. The statement is credited 

to John De la Kond, whosettk^l near Fort Winnebago in 1S28. Kond was living 

on the banks of the Baraboo Kiver, with his Winnebago wife, in 1873. 
Baraga; county, and village in same county, in Michigan, name<l for Bishop Friedrich 

Baraga, a missionary among the Indians of the Lakt^ SuiK*rior region. 
Baranof; one of the Alexander Islands, Alaska, nanuMl for the man who for a long 

time manag<'<l the affairs of the Russian- American Company. 
Barataria; Imy, and j>ost-oHi<'e in Jefferson Parish, l^msiana. The name is derived 

from an old French word, meaning "deceit." 
Barber; crei^k in l]undM)ldt County, California, named for a settler. 
Barber; county in Kansas, named for Thomas W. BarlK»r, FrtHJ State martyr. 
Barbour; county in Alabama, namcHi for James Barbour, governor of Virginia, and 

Secretary of War under John Quincy Adauis. 
Barbour; county in West Virginia; 
Barboursville; town in (/alH^lI County, West Virginia, and several other towns in 

the Southern States. Named for Philip P. Barlnmr, an early governor of Virginia. 
Barcelona; village in Tulan* County, California, named from the seai)ort town in 

Spain. 
Bardolph; village in McDonough County, Illinois, namiHl for William H. Banlolpl^ 

one of the founders. 
Bardstown; city in Nelson County, Kentucky, named ft>r David Baird, one of the 

original proprietors. 
Bardwell; village in llain]>shire County, Ma.**sji(busetts, named for the Bardwell 

family, early and prominent resitlents. 
Bargersville ; village in Johnson County, Indiana, name<l for Jefferson Barger. 
Bar Harbor; village in Hancot^k County, Mount Desert Island, Maine, so named 

from a sandv Ivar, visible only at low tide. 



ossNBTT.l PLACE NAMKS IN THE HNITED STATES. 3( 

Baring'; town in WashinBton County, Miuti«, saiil 1" Ix' iiaiin'.l fur tlic Bnriini 

(fiiiiily, (Tlelinitwl Imiikcmiif L<n»ion, Kiitrlnnti. 
Barker; town in Bnmino (Vmnty, New Yorit, nauieil fur .luliii Harkir, llif tirsl 

BtMllcr. 
Barlow; t«wn in Cltipkaimis Coiintv, Oregon, namiMl fur J<>liii I., iiarlow , mi oarly 

Barlow; peak in Yell'iwstiHie Park, naineil l)y the Uiiileil Rtntes Gpologiial Siin'ey 

tor Capt. J. W. Barlnw, Engineer Curp!", Uiiittd f-tatea Amiy. 
Barnard; tiIIb^ in Siflkiyou County, ('Hlifomia, named from Bamanl, Vennunt. 
Barnard; town in Windeor County, \'eniiont, named for Francis Barnard, a grantee. 
Barnegat; inlet, and village in OiHsaii C'Ounty, in New Jersey. A Dutch name, 

^iven 1m- Henry Hndson, meaning "breaker's inlet." 
Barnes; city in Waiihinginn C^ounty, Kansaa, named Cor A. S. Bamee, a publisher 

i)f I'nited States history. 
BarnsB; lounty in North Dakota, named for Hon. A. H. Barnes, early Territorial 

jiKige. 
Bameaville: t'lwn in Pike Countv, Georgia, named tor Gideon Barnea, the first 

^(■tt!,-r. 

Barnesville; village in Belmont Connty OLio, named for a family of early setlleni. 
Barnet; t'twn in Caledonia County, Vennoiil, said to lie nani»l from the towi 

Knifliind IroTJi wliieli the Hn(^e>'U>nl of ^^<.1B Stevenx, an early rettler, eniigmled. 
BaroBtable; county, ami town in mnie cimnty, in MassaohuHetlH, named from the 

FicajHjrt in England. 
Barnum; town in Arapahoe County, Colorado, named for P, T. Barnum, who ow 

a largo trai't of land there. 
Bamum; town in Carlton C'ounty, Minnesota, named for a paymaster of the St. Paul 

and Ihiluth Kallroad. 
Barnwell; (^JU^ty, and town in Bnmi; county, in South C-ariillna, named for a distin- 

guitihed family of the l^tate, 
Baronette; pejik in YellowHtone Park, named for " Yeliowstinie Jatk," C. D. Bar- 

onette, a famous gcont. 
Barraqne; township in JeSereon County, Arkansas, named for a Frcnihuian, 

Monsieur Barnwiue, wlio lived near the .^rkaii.saK River. 
Barre; town in Wort'ester County, MBsnaehiiiwtte, named fnr Col. l^iiai' Barre, (he 

friend of Ameriea in the British Parliament, 
Barr«; towns in Orleann County, New York, ami Washington County, Vermont, 

nameil from the town in MaHRieliiieetti'. 
Barren; island in the Hudiion River. The name is ilerive<l from the Dutch word 

>ieeren, "ht-ara," which wae applied to the ialand by the early DnUUi settlers. 
Barren; county in Kentucky, in the Carhnniferous limestone region, The name is 

supposed to have been siven in reference to this formation, though tile soil is in 

reality fertile. 
Barrin^on; town in Bristol Connty, Rhode Island, prolialjly named for Sir John 

Barringliin, dissenter, who dieil in 1734, though by some it is thought to liave 

reif ived its name from some of the early scltlers who came from the parish of 

Barrington in Somemetxhire, England. 
Barron; county, and city in same county, in Wisconsin, nanicl for Jndge Henry D. 

liarrnn, of that State. 
Barry; township and city in Rke County, Illinois. FirKt named Barre, from the 

town in Vermont, and changed to Barry by the Poat-OfBce Department, 
Barry; county in Michigan, name<l for William T. Barry, postmaster-general under 

President Jackson, 
Brry; county in Miasouri, nameil fur C^mmiiHlure John Harry. 




38 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 258. 

Bartholomew; t-^ounty in Indiana, named for Gen. Joseph Bartlioloniew, United 

States Senator from that State. 
Baxtlett; town in Carroll County, New Hampshire, named for Governor Josiah 

Bartlett, 1792-1794. 
Barton; coonty in Kansas, named for Clara Barton, founder of the Re<l Cross Soci- 
ety in America. 
Barton; county in Missouri, named for David Barton, member of Congress from 

Missouri. 
Barton; town in Orieans County, Vermont, named for William Barton, a Revolu- 
tionary general and principal proprietor. 
Bartow; county, and town in Jefferson County, in Geoi^, named for Gen. F. S. 

Bartow, killed at the battle of Manassas. 
Basalt; peak which gives name to a town in Ragle County, Colorado, named from 

the summit rock. 
Base Line; village in San Bernardino County, California, situated on the base line 

of the Unite<l States land surveys. 
Bashbish; stream and deep gorge in the Taghkanic Mountains, Berkshire County, 

Massachusetts, named for an Indian squaw, Bess, who lived near the source of 

the stream. 
Bashes Kil; creek in Orange County, New York, named for Bashe, an Indian 

woman. 
Basin; village in Kern County, California, so named because of the shape of the 

plain in which it is located. 
Baskahegan; river and lake in Maine. An Indian word meaning '* branch stream 

which turns down." 
Baskingridge; village in Somerset County, New Jersey, where it is said animals 

resorted in chilly weather to bask in the milder air. 
Basswood; island in Lake Superior, one of the Apostles, a translation of wigohi- 

miniss, the Indian name for the island. 
Bastrop; town in Morehouse Parish, Louisiana, and county, and town in same 

county, in Texas, named for Baron de Bastrop, a Mexican, who was a commis- 
sioner of Texas to extend land titles, in 1823. 
Batata; village in Merced County, California. A Spanish word meaning ''sweet 

potato.** 
Batavia; village in Solano County, California, named from Batavia in Illinois. 
Batavia; township and city in Kane County, Illinois, named from the town in New 

York. 
Batavia; town in Genesee County, New York, named for the Batavian Republic, 

which name was applied to Holland by the French after its conquest in 1795. 

Seven other places in the United States bear this name. 
Batchelders; grant in Oxford County, Maine, named for the original grantee, Josiah 

Batchelder. 
Bates; county in Missouri, named for Gov. Frederick Bates, who died in 1825 while 

in office. 
Batesburg; town in I^exington County, South Carolina, named for a family of that 

State. 
Batesville; city in Independence County, Arkansas, name<l for James Wmxlson 

Bates. 
Batesville; village in Noble County, Ohio, named for Rev. Timothy Bates, a Meth- 
odist preacher. 
Bath; county in Kentucky, village in Rensselaer County, New York, and county in 

Vii^inia, so named because of the medical springs. 
Bath; city in Sagadahoc County, Maine, and borough in Northampton County, 

Pennsylvania, named from the city in England. 



GANNKTT.] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 39 

Bath; town in Steuben County, New York, naiiieil for l-jidy Henrietta, Countess of 

Bath, daughter of Sir William Pultney. 
Bath Alum Spring; village in Bath County, Virginia, so called from the medicinal 

springs situated there. 
Bath Springs; town in Decatur County, Tennessee, so name<l Injcause of the medic- 
inal springs within its limits. 
Baton Rouge; city in East Baton Rouge Parish, lx)uisiana. It is a French name, 

meanin&r "red staff" or "red stick,'* given l^cauhe of a tall cypress tree which 

stood upon the spot where it was first settled. Some authorities say that the 

name is derived from the name of an Indian chief, whose name translated into 

French was Baton Rouge. Still another theory ascribes the name to the fact 

that a massacre by the Indians took place upon the sjwt upon the arrival of the 

first settlers. 
Battenkill; creek, tributary to the Hudson River, calleil originally Bartholomew's 

Kill, for an early settler, Bartholomew Van Hogeboom, who wa*< usually called 

Bart or Bat. 
Battleboro; town in Nash County, North Carolina, nameil for James S. and Joseph 

Battle, railroad contractors. 
Battle Greek; city and creek in Calhoun County, Michigan, so calletl because a 

battle was fought upon the banks of the creek. 
Battle Ground; creek in Illinois, so called from a battle fought on its banks between 

the Cahokia and Kaskaskia Indians in 1782. 
Battle Ground; town in Tippecanoe County, Indiana, named in commemoration 

of the battle of Tippecanoe. 
Battlement; mesa in western Colorado, so name<l by Hayden because of its shape. 
Bavaria; village in Saline County, Kansa.^, named from one of the divisions of 

Germany. 
Baxter; county in Arkansas, named for Elisha Baxter, twice governor of the State. 
Baxter Springs; city in Cherokee County, Kansas, named for A. Baxter, the first 

settler. There are also si)rings in the vicinity. 
Bay; town in Sonoma County, California, situated on the edge of San Francisco Bay. 
Bay; county in Michigan, named from its situation on Saginaw Bay. 
Bayard; town in Grant County, West Virginia, named for Senator Bayard. 
Bayboro; town in Pamlico County, North Carolina, so named from its situation on 

Pamlico Sound. 
Bay City; city in Bay County, Michigan, so named from its situation on^ Saginaw 

Bay. 
Bayfield; county, and village in same county, in Wisconsin, named for Rear- Admiral 

H. D. Bayfield, who surveyed the Great Lakes. 
Bayhead; borough in Ocean County, New Jersey. The name is descriptive of its 

geographical position at the head of Barnegat Bay. 
Baylis; village in Pike County, Illinois, named for a railroad official. 
Baylor; county in Texas, named for Henry W. Baylor, who fell at Dawson's mas- 
sacre in 1842. 
Bay of Noquet; bay in Michigan, named from an Indian tribe. The word seems 

to refer to ''otters." 
Bayou; village in Li^^ngston County, Kentucky. The word is used frequently in 

the Southern States, being a Choctaw term to denote a small sluggish stream. 
Bayou Boeuf; creek in Louisiana. A French name meaning ''buffalo creek." 
Bayou Ohetimaches; creek in Louisiana, named for an Indian of the vicinity. The 

name is Choctaw and means "those who possess cooking vessels.'' 
Bayou des Buttes; creek of Louisiana, named by the French "bayou of the 

mounds," from the mounds found along its course. 
Bayou HufQpower; creek in Louisiana, named for an old settler. 



40 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [BrLi,.2S8. 

« 

Bayou Sal^; creek emptying into Cote Blanche Bay, liouiniana. A French name 

meaning "»alt Imou** or "salt creek.'* 
Bay St. Louis; city in Hancock County, Miasiffnppi, named for Ixinifl XI of France, 

and situateil on a l)ay, hence the prefix. 
Bay Spring'; town in Tishomingo County, Mississippi, named for the home of Rob- 
ert Lowery in the same county. 
Beacon; town in Mahaska County, Iowa, named for Lord Beaconsfield. 
Beadle; county in South Dakota, named for W. H. H. Beadle, superintendent of 

puhlic instruction in 1884. 
Bear; creek in Missouri, sometimes called Loose Creek, probably from a careless 

corruption of the French, Tourse, "the bear.*' 
Bear; creek in Yellowstone park named from a hairless cub found there by a party 

of explorers. This name is applied to numerous places in the United States, 

from the presence of the animal at the time of naming. 
Beardstown; city in Cass County, Illinois, named for Thomas Beard, the foander. 
Bear Lake; county in Idaho, nanie<l from Bear Lake. 
Bear Lake; village in Manistee County, Michigan, so named l)ecanse of a fancied 

resemblance l^etween the outline of the village limits and a sleeping bear. 
Beatrice; village in Humb(/ldt County, California, named for the wife of an early 

settler. 
Beatrice; city in Gage County, Nebraska, named for the daughter of Judge Kinney, 

one of the earliest settlers in the State, and who assiste<i in locating the town site. 
Beattie; city in Marshall County, Kansas, named for A. Beattie, mayor of 8t. 

Joseph, Missouri, in 1870. 
Beattyville; town in Lee County, Kentucky, named for Samuel Beatty, one of the 

first settlers. 
Beaufort; county, and town in Carteret County, in North Carolina, named for the 

Duke of Beaufort, a lord proprietor. 
Beaufort; county, and town in same c6unty, in South Carolina, said by some anthor- 

ities to be named for the Duke of Beaufort, but other authorities claim that the 

name was given by the French Protestants, who took refuge there from Lord 

Berkeley, giving the name of the town in Anjou, France. 
Beauregard; town in Copiah County, Mississippi, named for Gen. Pierre Gostave 

Toutant Beauregard, Confederate Army. 
Beaver; crounty in Oklahoma, county, and borough in same county, in Pennsylvania, 

county in Utah, and twenty post-offices, and numerous creeks, lakes, and other 

natural features in the United States. It was a<lopted by the Indians as a per- 
sonal as well as tribal name, because of the widespread presence of the animal. 
Beaver; lake in Indiana, calleil by the Indians, sagayiganuhnickyugy **lake of 

beavers. ' ' 
Beaverdam; city in Dodge County, Wisconsin, creek in Yellowstone Park, Wyo- 
ming, and numerous iM»st -offices, so called from an ol)stacle placed in streams by 

lieavers. 
Beaverhead; county in Montana, named from a rock in the county shapeii like a 

beaver's head. 
Bechler; creek in Yellowstone Park, named by the United States Geological Survey 

for (nistavus R. Bechler, topographer, with the Hayden Survey. 
Bechtelsville; borough in Berks County, Pennsylvania, named for the family of 

which Judge O. P. Bechtel is a prominent meml>er. 
Becker; (;ounty, and town in Sherburne County, in Minnesota, name<l for (len. 

(leorge L. Becker, who was one of the leading men of the State at the time. 
Beckley; village in Raleigh County, West Virginia, named for Gen. Alfred Beckley, 

an early settler. 



QANNKTT.] PLACH NAMES m TH« tTNtTED STATES. 41 

Beckwith; butte and town in Plumas County , California, and mountain in Colorado, 
named for Lieutenant Beckwith, of the Pacific' Railroa<l Exploring Expedition. 

Bedford; town in Middlesex County, MagsacthueetUi, named for Wriothealey RuBsell, 
Duke of Bedford. 

Bedford; town in Westchester County , New York, named for Bedfordshire, Eng^land. 

Bedford; county, and borough in same county, in Pennsylvania, said by some to be* 
named from the county in England; by others it is thought that the name was 
given in honor of the Dukes of Bedford. 

Bedford; county, and village in same county, in Tennessee, named for Thomas Bed- 
ford. 
Bedford; county in Virginia; 

Bedford City; town in Bedforrl County, Virginia. Named for John, Duke of Bed- 
ford. 

Bedloe; island in New York Harbor, nameil for Isaac Bedlow, its first proprietor. 

Bee; county in Texas, named for Bernard E. Bee, minister to Mexico in 1830. 

Beebe; town in White County, Arkansas, said to have been named for Roswell Beebe, 
an early settler. 

Beech; there are six post-offices named Beech in the country and thirty-six with vari- 
ous suffixes, the name being applied because of the widespread ocirurrence of 
this tree. ' 

Beech Greek; creek and borough in Clint4>n County, Pennsylvania. A translation 
of the Indian name schauveminsch-hanmi. 

Beecher City; village in Effingham County, Illinois, named for Charles A. Beecher, 
a railway solicitor. 

Ifteechy; cape in Alaska, named for Capt. F. W. Beechy, the navigator. 

Beekxnan; village in Dutchess County, New York, named for Henry Beekman, who 
owned a grant there in 1703. 

Beekznanton; town in Clinton County, New York, named for William Beekman, 
one of the original grantees. 

Bekuennesee; rapids in the Menominee River, Wisconsin. An Indian word, mean- 
ing ** smoky falls." 

Belair; post villages in Richmond County, Georgia, and Plaquemines Parish, Louisi- 
ana, town in Harford County, Maryland, and village in Lancaster County, South 
Carolina. A French phrase, meaning **goo<l air." 

Belchertown ; town in Hampshire County, Massachusetts, named for Jonathan 
Belcher, one of the original grantees and one time governor of Massachusetts. 

Belen; town in Quitman County, Mi88i8sii)pi, named from the battle ground upon 
which Col. John A. Quitman fought during the Mexican war. 

Belew; town in Jefferson County, Missouri, named for Silas Belew, who owned 
property in the vicinity. 

Belfast; city in Waldo County, Maine, named by James Miller, an early settler, 
from his native city in Ireland. Numerous other places in the country bear this 
name. 

Belknap; township and village in Johnson County, Illinois, named for a prominent 
railroad man. 

Belknap; county in New Hampshire. The origin of this name is in doubt, but by 
some the county is thought to have been named for Jeremy Belknap, who wrote 
a history of the State. 

Belknap; mount in Utah, named for William Worth Belknap, secretary of war 
. under President Grant. 

Bell; county in Kentucky, named for Josh Bell. 

Bell; county in Texas, named for P. H. Bell, governor of the State in 1849-1857. 

Bellaire; city in Belmont County, Ohio, named for the town of Belair in Maryland. 



42 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull.25«. 

Bellavista; town in Shasta County, California. A Spanish phrase, meaning "beau- 
tiful view/' 
Belle; a French word meaning "beautiful,'* of frequent occurrence in the country, 

there being seventy-eight ixwt-offices which have this name in combination with 
'descriptive suffixes. 
Belief ontaine; city in Logan County, Ohio, so named because of the beautiful 

springs in the neigh l>orhood. 
Belleville; township and city in St. Clair County, Illinois. The name was sug- 
gested by John Hay, a French Canadian, prominent in the early days of the 

State. 
Belleville; city in Republic County, Kansas, named for Ara})elle, wife of A. B. 

Tutton, president of the town-site company. 
Belleville; village in Jefferson County, New York, named from the village in Wis- 
consin. 
Belleville; village in Dane County, Wisconsin, named by the first settler, John 

Frederick, from his native village in Canada. 
Bellevue; village in Sonoma County, California; a French term meaning "beautiful 

view.'* 
Bellevue; township and city in Jackson County, Iowa, named for John D. Bell, the 

first settler. 
Bellflower; township and village in McLean County, Illinois, so named by the 

early settlers from the fields of l>ell-8hai)ed flowers. 
Bellingham; town in Norfolk County, Massachusetts, named for Governor Richard 

Bellingham. 
Bellinghazn; bay in Washington, named by Vancouver, the explorer, probably for 

Sir Henry Bellingham, who was knighted in 1796. 
Bellmont; village in Franklin County, New York, named for William Bell, an early 

proprietor. 
Bellows Falls; village in Windham County, Vermont, narae<l for Col. Benjamin 

Bellows, an early settler and founder of Walpole. 
Bell Spring; mountain in Humboldt County, California, so named by an early 

explorer, who found a cow bell in a spring on the mountain. 
Bellwood; village in Butler County, Nebraska, named for D. J. Bell, its proprietor 

and patron. 
Belmont; village in San Mateo County, California, and Allegany County, New York, 

named for its pleasing situation in the hills; translation from the French, **fine 

mountain.'* 
Belmont; towns in Mississippi County, Missouri, and Belknap County, New Hamp- 
shire, named for August Belmont, of New York. 
Belmont; county, and village in name county, in Ohio, named for an early settler. 

Howe says it is named in reference to its hilly surface; French, *' fine mountain." 
Belmont; village in Lafayette County, Wisconsin, named for three mounds within 

its limits, which the early French travelers calletl ** Belles Monies.*' 
Beloit; city in Rock County, Wisconsin. A coined name selected by a committee, 

to whom it was suggested by the name Detroit. 
Beloit; city in Mitchell County, Kansas, named for the city in Wisconsin. 
Belpr^; town in Washingtim County, Ohio, named from the French, meaning 

** beautiful prairie,'* from its situation on a pniirie. 
Belton; town in Anderson County, South Carolina, named for a prominent family. 
Belton; city in Bell County, Texas, named for Governor P. H. Bell. 
Beltrami; county, and village in same county, in Minnesota, named for Count C. C. 

Beltrami, an Italian, with Major Long's exploring expedition into the Northwest 



GANNETT] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 43 

Belvedere; town in Marin County, California. From the Italian, meaning]? "l)eau- 
tiful sight." 

Belvidere; township and city in Boone County, Illinois, named by one of the 
founders for his native place in Canada. 

Belzoni; town in Washington County, Mississippi, named for an Italian, Giamhattuta 
Belsoni, a celebrated archaeologist. 

Bement; township and village in I'iatt County, Illinois, named for a United States 
surveyor. 

Bexnis Heights; village in Saratoga County, New York, named for Jonathan Bemis, 
innkeeper there during the Revolution. ^ ,^ 

Benedicta; town in Aroostook County, Maine, named for Bishop Benedicta Fen- 
wick, who was an early proprietor. 

Benhur; village in Mariposa County, California, named for the character in Gen. 
Wallace's novel. 

Benicia; city in Solano County, California, named by General Vallejo for his wife. 

Benita; village in Kern County, California. A Spanish word meaning **nun." 

Ben Lomond; post-offices in Sevier County, Arkansas, Santa Cruz County, Cali- 
fornia, Issaquena County, Mississippi, and Mason County, West Vii^ginia; named 
from the lake in Scotland. 

Bennett; town in Cedar County, Iowa, named for Chet Bennett, a railroad man. 

Bennett; point in Maryland, named for Richanl Bennett. 

Bennett; town in i^ancaster County, Nebraska, named for a resident. 

Bennett Creek; village in Nansemond County, Vii^^inia, named for Richard Bennett, 
governor in 1G52-1656. 

Bennetts; wells on the westerly border of Death Valley, Inyo County, California, 
named for the Bennett party of immigrants, most of whom perished in the neigh- 
borhood in 1852. 

Bennettsville; town in Marlboro County, South Carolina, named for a family 
prominent in the State. 

Bennington; town in Ilillsboro County, New Hampshire, and county, and town- 
ship, and town in same county in \'ermont, named for Governor Benning 
Wentworth, of New Hampshire. 

Benson; town in Johnston County, North Carolina, named for a prominent citizen. 

Benson; county in North Dakota, nameil for Hon. B. W. Benson, member of the 
State legislature and banker, of Valley City, North Dakota. 

Benson; town in Rutland County, Vermont, said by some to have been named for 
Judge Egbert Benson, one of the original proprietors. The Vermont Historical 
Society says that it was named by James Meacham, a proprietor, for a Revolu- 
tionary officer. 

Bent; county in Colorado, named for William Bent, first United States governor of 
New Mexico. 

Benton; counties in Arkansas, Indiana, and Iowa; village in Marshall County, 
Kentucky; town in Bossier Parish, Louisiana; county, and township and vil- 
lage in Carver County, in Minnesota; counties in Mississippi and Missouri; town 
in Grafton County, New Hampshire; and counties in Oregon and Tennessee; 
named for Senator Thomas H. Benton, of Missouri. Thirty other cities, towns, 
and villages bear this name, most of them in honor of the same man. 

Benton; town in Yates County, New York, named for Caleb Benton, the first settler. 

Bentonia; town in Yazoo County, Mississippi, named for the maiden name of Mrs. 
Hal Green, a resident. 

Benwood; city in Marshall County, West Virginia, named for Benjamin Latrobe, 
an engineer on the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad. 

); county in Michigan. Probably named from the town of Benzonia, which 
was fomided and named before the county. There are some, however, who think 



44 PLACE NAMK8 IN THE UNITED STATES. imvu^X^ 

the name a corruption fn)m lift^ie River and Point, which were origiiially cidled 
Au.r IWs SricH, a Fn'nch f«»nn nieanin>r "at the snouts of the sawfish." 

Benzonia; villa^* in Benzie (Vmnty, Michigan, named from the Uebrew, meaning 
"sons of li}2:ht,'* by the Rev. J. B. Walker, mem)>er of a company formed to 
found a college where }K)or students could be educated; the college was built 
upon the spot where the village now stands. 

Beowawe; post-ofiice in Eureka County, Nevada, said to be from an Indian word 
meaning "gate,'' so name<l from the pei*uliar shape of the hills at this pointy 
which given the effect of an open gateway up the valley to the canyon beyond. 

Berea; towns in Adair County, Iowa, Madison County, Kentucky, and CajAhoga 
County, Ohio, named from the ancient city in Macedonia. 

Berenda; town in Madera County, California. A Spanish word meaning "ante- 
lope,** so applied because the country was overrun with antelope. 

Beresford; lake in Iilorida, named for an early English proprietor. 

Berg; village in Sutter County, California, so named from its location in the moun- 
tains. From the Gerinan, meaning "mountain.'* 

Bergen; county in New Jersey, named from Beiigen Point. 

Bergen Point; post village of Hudson County, New Jersey, named by colonists 
from Bergen, Norway. 

Bergholtz; village in Niagara County, New York, named for the town in Pm^sia. 

Bering; sea and strait lying U^tween Alaska and Asia, named for the Dutch navi- 
gator, Ivan Ivanovitch Bering. 

Berkeley; city in Alameda County, California, named for Dean Berkley, Bishop 
of Cloyne. 

Berkeley; county in South C'arolina, name<i for John Lord Berkeley, one of the 

original i)roprietors. 
Berkeley; county in West Virginia; 

Berkeley Springy; town in Morgan County, West Virginia. Named for William 
Berkeley, governor of Virginia in 1642. 

Berkley; town in Bristol County, Massachusetts, probably named for Dean Berk- 
ley, Bishop of Cloyne, though some authorities say for James and William 
Berkley, meinl)er8 of the Privy Council. 

Berkley; town in Norfolk County, Virginia, named for a prominent family of land 
holders. 

Berks; county in Pennsylvania, named from the county of Berks in England. 

Berkshire; county in Massachusetts, named from Berkshire, England. Several 
towns in the conntrv are nameil from the same. 

Berlin; thirty-w»von iKJst-olfices in the United States l)ear the name of the city in 
Gcriuanv. 

Bermuda; vinagi»s in Conecuh County, Alabama, Gwinnett County, Georgia, 
Natch itochcH Parish, Louisiana, Marion County, South Carolina, and Knox 
County, Tcnncs«K^?; nanie<l from the group of islands in the Atlantic Ocean 
which were nanKnl for tlie S{)anish discoverer, Juan Bermudez. 

Bern; towns in Adams County, In<liana, and Albany County, New York; 

Bemville; borough in Berks County, Pennsylvania. Named from the town of 
Bern in Svvitz<Tland. 

Bemal; suburb of San Francis<*o, California. A Spanish word nieaning *' vernal," 
"gretMi." 

Bernalillo; county in New Mexico, named from the town on the Rio Grande. A 
Spanisli-Christian name, meaning '* little Bernal." 

Bernalillo; town in Sandoval County, New Mexico, settle<l by descendents of 
Benial Diaz del C'astillo, who was assotriated with Cortez in the conquest of 
Mexico. 



GANNETT.] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 45 

Bernardo; township and village in San Diego County, California. From the Span- 
ish, relating to the Bernardine religious order. 

Bemardstown; town in Franklin County, Massachusetts, named for the British 
governor, Sir Francis Bernard. 

Berrien; county in Georgia, and county, and township in same county, in Michigan, 
named for John McPherson Berrien, attorney-general of the United States in 
1829. 

Berry; creek in Idaho, so named by Captain Clark, the explorer, l)ecause he sub- 
sisted entirely on berries at that place. 

Berry; village in Harrison County, Kentucky, named for a man who had a station 
there called Berry's station. 

Berr3rville; town in Carroll County, Arkansas, named for James H. Berry, governor 
of the State. 

Berthoud; village in Larimer County, Colorado, named for E. L. Berthoud, chief 
engineer of the Union Pacific Railroad. 

Bertie; county in North Carolina, named for James and Henry Bertie, in whom 
the proprietary rights of the Earl of Clarendon reste<l. 

Berwick; town in York County, Maine, named from the town in P^ngland, Berwick- 
upon-Tweed. 

Berwick; borough in Columbia County, Pennsylvania, nanied from the county in 
Scotland. 

Bessemer; town in Jefferson County, Alabama, city in Gogebic County, Michigan, 
town in Gaston County, North Carolina, and several other places; named for 
Sir Henry Bessemer, who invented the process of reducing iron ore. 

Bethaldo; village in Madison County, Illinois. Changed from Bethel to distinguish 
it from another post-office of that name. 

Bethany; village in Lancaster County, Nebraska, borough in Wayne County, Penn- 
sylvania, and many other places bear the name of the village in Palestine. 

Bethel; town in Fairfield County, Connecticut, and many other places, named 
directly or indirectly from Bethel in Palestine. 

Bethesda; post-ofiice in Montgomery County, Maryland, and several other places, 
named from the pool in Jerusalem. 

Bethlehem; borough in Northampton County, Pennsylvania, originally a Moravian 
settlement, nanied on Christmas Day, 1741, from the birthplace of Christ in 
Judea. Twelve other places in the Union l>ear the same name. 

Betsie; river, point, and town, in Michigan, a corruption of the French name given 
to the river in early days, aux bees sciesy meaning *'at the snouts of the sawfish.** 

Beulah; post-ofiice in Crawford County, Kansas, and many towns and villages bear 
this Scriptural name. 

Beverly; city in Essex County, Massachusetts, and many towns and villages bear 
this name, probably derived from Beverly, in Yorkshire, England. 

Beverly; township and city in Burlington County, New Jersey, so named by the 
first settlers, who found the coimtry overrun with beavers. 

Beverly; town in Randolph County, West Virginia, doubtless named for William 
Beverly, the original grantee of Beverly manor. 

Bevier; village in Muhlenberg County, Kentucky, and city in Macon County, Mis- 
souri, named for Col. Robert Bevier, of Kentucky. 

Bexar; villages in Marion County, Alabama; Fulton County, Arkansas, and Lauder- 
dale County, Tennessee, and county, and village in same county, in Texas, named 
for the Duke of Bexar, a Spanish nobleman. 

Bibb; counties in Alabama and (leorgia, named for Dr. William Wyatt Bibb, mem- 
ber of Congress from Georgia. 

Bicknell; village in Knox County, Indiana, name<l for John BickneU. 



46 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 258. 

Biddeford; city in York County, Maine, nanied from the })]ace in England whence 

some of the early settlers einigratiMl. 
Bienville; i>aritfh, and town in name parish, in Ivouisiana, named for (iovemor Jean 

Baptiste I^emoine Bienville, son of the French explorer who accompanied I a 

Salle on his expedition. 
Big Bar; post-office and mining; si'ttlement in Trinity County, California, nanieil for 

the rich and extensive bars of placer gravel. 
Big Blackfoot; river in the Rocky Mountains, Montana, the name of which is 

derived from the Blackfeet Indian trilie. 
Big Blue; creek in Missouri, which was formerly called Bluewater Creek, the name 

being derived from its French name, riviP.re <le Veau hleue. 
Bigbone; village in Boone County, Kentucky, so named from the numbers of bones 

of mastodons discovered in the vicinity. 
Big Dry; creek in Montana, so named by Lewis and Clark, because it was dry 

when they reached it. 
Big Oravois; creek in Missouri. A French name meaning " rubbish.'' 
Biggsville; village in Henderson County, Illinois, named for Thomas Biggs, who 

built the first mill. 
Bighorn; river in Montana, tributary to the Yellowstone River, so named from the 

Rocky Mountain sheep, fre({uently called '*big horn.'' Its Indian (Dakota) 

name was papatunkau^ meaning *' big head." 
Bighorn; county in Wyoming, named from the range of mountains, which took 

their name from the sheep which were found in them. The Indian ( Abearoka) 

name of the inoimtains was ahmhttij meaning ^*big head." 
Bigler; lake in California, named for John Bigler, governor of the State. 
Big Muddy; creek in Missouri; the name is translated from that given it by the 

early French, grande r'mhre raseusCf "great muddy river." 
Big Palm Springs; village in San Diego County, California, nametl for the desert 

palms or giant yuccas in the vicinity. 
Big Rapids; city in Mecosta County, Michigan, so nameil from rapids in the Mus- 
kegon River. 
Big Sioux; river in Minnesota and South Dakota, named from the Indian tribe. 
Big Spring; town in Meade County, Kentucky, so named fn)in a Fpring which rises 

near the middle of the town. There are fifteen other places in the country that 

bear this name l)ecrause of the presence of nprings. 
Bigstone; county in Minnei<<>ta, which takes its name from a river, which was 

doubtless nameil desiTiptively. 
Big Timber; town in Sweet Gratw County, Montana, so named from a stream which 

rises in the Crazy Mountains and fl<>WB into the Yellowstone River at a point 

opposite the town. This stream was calie<l the Big Timber for years before the 

town was settled. 
Bigtooth; creek in (^*nter Ccmnty, Pennnylvania, a translation of the Indian name 

of the creek, mnngiplx'ntk^ "place where big teeth are found." 
Big Tree; village in KrieC'ounty, New York, so called from the Indian village which 

fonnerly occupieil tlie site, iUonxLUflaga^ "big tree." 
Big Trees; village in Calaveras County, California, so named from a grove of about 

ninety enormous trees of the genus StyiKna. 
Bigwood; river in Idaho, the name of which is derived from the name given by the 

early French traders, brnsc or hoim\ "woody;" so culled lx?cause of its wooded 

banks. 
Bijou; town in Eldorado County, California. A French word meaning a "jewel." 
Bijou; hills in South Dakota, named for an early French hunter. 
Bijou Hills; village in Brule County, South Dakota, named from the hills. 



GANNETT.] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 47 

Billerica; town in Middlesex County, Massachusetto, named from the town in Essex, 
England. 

Billing^; city in Yellowstone County, Montana, named for Parmley Billings, son of 
the first president of the Northern Pacific Railroad. 

Billingrs; county in North Dakota, named for Frederick Billings,, at one time presi- 
dent of the Northern Pacific Railroad. 

Billing^port; town in Gloucester County, New Jersey, named for an English mer- 
chant, Eclward Bylling. 

Billing^on Sea; pond in Plymouth, Massachusetts, named for the discoverer, Billing- 
ton, one of the Mayflower passengers, who reported it as an inland sea. 

Bill Williams; mountain in Arizona, named for a guide and trapper. 

Bilozi; Imy, and city in Harrison County, in Mississippi. An Indian tribe of this 
name inhabited this part of the country. The name is of Choctaw origin, vari- 
ously rendered as referring to "worthless" or *' terrapin. *' 

Biltmore; town in Buncombe County, North Carolina, named by George Vander- 
bilt from the last part of his name, with the Gaelic mdr, "great." 

Bingham; county in Idaho, named by Governor Bunn for his friend. Congressman 
Bingham, of Pennsylvania. 

Bingham; town in Somerset County, Maine, named for William Bingham, a large 
landowner in early days. 

Binghamton; city in Broome County, New York, named for William Bingham, of 
Philadelphia, a benefactor of the town. 

Birch; nineteen post-offices, besides many natural features, bear this name, either 
alone or with suffixes, generally indicating the presence of the tree. 

Bird; city in Cheyenne County, Kansas, named for its founder, Benjamin Bird. 

Birdsall; town in Allegany County, New York, named for Judge John Birdsall. 

Birdsboro; borough in Berks County, Pennsylvania, named for William Bird, who 
in 1740 bought the tract on which the town now stands. 

Birmingham; twelve places in the country, named from the manufacturing town in 
England. 

Bismarck; cities in St. Francois County, Missouri, and Burleigh County, North 
Dakota, and many other places, named for Prince Otto von Bismarck of Germany. 

Bison; peaks in Colorado and Yellowstone Park, named for their shape. 

Bitterwater; town in San Benito County, California, named from the bitter mineral 
springs in the vicinity. 

Bitterwater; branch of Grand River, Utah, so named from the character of the 
water. 

Bituma; village in Ventura County, California, named from the asphalt beds in the 
neigh lx)rhood. 

Blackbird; town in Ilolt County, Nebraska, named for the great warrior and chief 
of the Omaha Indians, WoHhingnsahlm^ meiming ** blackbird." 

Black Butte; village in Siskiyou County, California, named froui an extinct vol- 
canic cone. 

Black Creek; town in Wilson County, North Carolina, named from a creek of dark 
water. 

Black Diamond; town in Contra Costa County, California, so namcKl from its coal 
mines. 

Blackfoot; peak, and village in Bingham County, in Idaho, named from the Black- 
feet Indian tril>o. 

Blackford; county, and village in Jaspar County, Indiana, named for Isaac Black- 
ford, judge of the supreme court of Indiana. 

Blackhawk; town in Gilpin County, Colorado, name<l from one of the earliest min- 
ing companies. 



48 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. (bull. 258. 

Blackhawk; county, an<l villagt' in Davis County, in Iowa, named for a noted chief 

of tlie Sac and Fox Indiann. 
Blackhawk; town in Carroll County, MinHiKsippi, naine<i for a Choctaw Indian chief. 
Black Hills; mountain ran^ in South IHikota, («lle<l by the early French traders 

c6f€ noirfy ** black hillw,'* from the character of the timber which grows on them, 

pving a dark appearance. 
Blackiston; villa)^ in Kent County, Delaware, named for one of the original pro- 

prietr)r» of larjje tract« of land in the county. 
Blacklick; creek in Pennsylvania, called by the Indians uaeskahoni, "lick of 

))lackish txjlor." 
Blackmore; mount in Montana, name<l for the English ethnologist, William Black- 
more, of Ix)ndon. 
Black Mountain; town in San Diego County, California, named from the black 

volcanic ro<;ks. 
Black Mountain; range in North Carolina, so named from the dark-green foliage of 

the l)alsani fir which covers the top and sides. 
Black Mountain; town in Buncond)e County, North Carolina, named from the 

mountain towering al)ove it. 
Black River; village in Jefferson County, New York, name<l from a river the waters 

of which are the color of sherry. 
Black Biver Falls; city in Jackson County, Wisixinsin, named from the Mia of 

Black River, near which it is situate<l. 
Blacksburg; town in Cherokee County, South Carolina, named for a prominent 

family in the neighborhood. 
Blackatone; village in Livingston County, Illinois, named for Timothy B. Black- 
stone, a prominent railroad official. 
Blackstone; river, and town in Worcester County, in Massachusetts, named for 

William Hiackstone, the first settler in Ik)8ton. 
Black Warrior; river in Alabama, a translation of the Cho<*taw Indian word 

timcaloom. 
Blackwells; island in I'^t River, New York, name<l for the Black well family, who 

owned it for one hundred vears. 
Bladen; county in North Carolina; 

Bladenboro; town in Bladeii County. Nanunl for Martin Bladen, one of the lord 
commissioners of trjulcs and plantations. 

Bladensburg; t<jwn in Prince (jicr)rgc County, Maryland, nanieil for Gov. Thomas 

Bladen. 
Blain; l)orough in Perry County, Pennsylvania, named for James Blain, the war^ 

rantet^ of the land ui>on which it waslniilt. 
Blaine; mountain in Colorado, county in Maho, town in Aroostook County, Maine, 

counties in Nebraska and Oklahoma, and many other places, named for James 

G. Blaine. 
Blair; countv in Pennsvlvania, named for John Blair. 
Blair; city in Washington County, Nebraska; 
Blairstown; town in Benton County, Iowa; 
Blairstown; towns in Henry County, Missouri, and Warren County, New Jersey. 

Named for John I. ITlair, of New Jersey. 
Blairsville; borough and town in Indiana Comity, Pennsylvania, named for John 

Blair, a prominent n^sidcnt of Blairs (iap. 
Blakely; town in Early County, (icorjria, named for Captain Hlakcly, naval officer. 
Blakiston; island in the Potomac River, named ff>r Nehetiiiali Hlakiston, collector 

of customs. 
Blalock; village in Gilliam County, Oregon, named for Dr. Hlalock, an (>arly settler. 



oANNtrrr] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 49 

Blanca; peak in the Sierra Blanca, Colorado, so named from the white rocks on its 
summit. 

Blanchard; town in Piscataquis County, Maine, named for one of the early pro- 
prietors, Charles Blanchard. 

Blanco; cape on the coast of Oregon, discovered by Martin de Aguilar, the Spanisli 
explorer, who named it. A Spanish word meaning ** white." 

Blanco; county in Texas, named from the Rio Blanco, '^ white river." 

Bland; county in Virginia, said to have been named for Richard Bland, of Revolu- 
tionary fame. 

Blandford; town in Hampden County, Massachusetts, named for the Duke of Marl- 
borough, w^hose second title was Marquis of Blandford. 

Blandinsville; township and village in McDonough County, Illinois, named for 
Joseph L. Blandin, first settler and owner of the land. 

Blandville; town in Ballard County, Kentucky, named for Capt. Bland Ballard. 

Bledsoe; county in Tennessee, named for Jesse Bledsoe, United States Senator. 

Bleecker; village in Fulton County, New York, named for Rutger Bleecker, an early 
patentee. 

Blennerhassett; island in the Ohio River, named for Herman Blennerhassett, who 
was accused of complicity with Aaron Burr. 

Blissfield; village in Lenawee County, Michigan, named for Henry Bliss, an early 
settler, upon whose homestead the village is built. 

Block; island off the coast of Rhode Island, named for Adrien Block, the Dutch 
discoverer. 

Blocksburg; town in Humboldt County, California, name<l for Ben Blockburger, 
the founder. 

Bloods; village in Steuben County, New York, named for Calvin Blootl. 

Bloomer; Wllage in Chippewa County, Wisconsin, named probably for a Galena 
merchant. 

Bloomfield; city in Stoddard County, Missouri, naine<l from the field of flowers 
which grew there when the place was founded. 

Bloomfield; town in Essex County, New Jersey, name<l for Governor Joseph 
Bloomfield of that State. 

Blooming^on; township and city in McLean County, Illinois, named fn>m Bloom- 
ing Grove, so called from its profusion of wild flowers. 

Blooming^on; township and city in Monroe County, Indiana, named for an early 
settler, Philip Bloom. 

Bloomsburg; town in Columbia County, Pennsylvania, named for Samuel Bloom, 
county commissioner of Northumberland Coimty. 

BloBsburg; borough in Tioga County, Pennsylvania, named for Aaron Bloss, who 
settled there in 1806. 

Blount; county in Alabama, name<l for Willie Blount, governor of Tennessee in 
1809-1815. 

Blount; county in Tennessee, named for William Blount, governor in 1790-1796. 

Blountsville; village in Henry County, Indiana, named for Andrew Blount, its 
founder. 

Blowing Rock; town in W^atauga County, North Carolina, named from a cliff 

where the wind blows upward. 
Blue Earth; county and river in ^linnesota; 

Blue Earth City; township and city in Faribault County, Minnesota, so named 
because of the bluish hue of the earth, due to the presence of copper. 

Bluefield; city in Mercer County, West Virginia, named from the bluegrass valley 
in which it is situated. 

Bull. 268-05 k 



50 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 25ft. 

Blue Grass; villages in Fulton County, Indiana, Scott County, Iowa, Knox County, 

Tennessee, and Russell County, Virginia, naine<l from a variety of grass which 

grows in Kentucky. 
Blue Hill; village in Webster County, Nebraska, so named because of the bluish 

atmosphere surrounding the hill on which the village is located. 
Blue Hills; range of hills in Massachusetts, which are said to have given name to 

the State, the Indian name Masmshusetta meaning *' great hills." 
Blue Island; village in Cook County, Illinois, so name<l because when viewed from 

a distance by the early settlers it appeared like an island covered with blue 

flowers. 
Blue Mound; township in Macon County, Illinois, named from its proximity to a 

hill covered with blue flowers. 
Blue Mounds; village in Dane County, Wisconsin, named from mounds which 

appear bluish from a distance. 
Blue Mountain; town in Tippah County, Mississippi, named from a large bluish 

hill near the site. 
Blue Ridge; the most eastern of the principal ridges of the Appalachian chain of 

mountains, so calle<l from the hue which frequently envelope its distant summits. 
Blue Springs; town in Union County, Mississippi, named from springs with water 

of bluish hue. 
Bluffs; village in Scott County, Illinois, so named from its location on the side of 

high bluffs. 
BlufPton; city in Wells County, Indiana, so named on account of the high bluffs 

which once surrounded the town. 
Blunt; village in Hughes County, South Dakota, named for the chief engineer of 

the Chicago and North Western Railn)ad, Arthur E. Blunt. 
Blunts; reef on the coast of California, named for Captain Blunt, of the Hudson Bay 

Company. 
Blyville; village in Knox County, Nebraska, named for George W. Bly, early settler. 
Boardman; mountain in Franklin County, Maine, named for Herbert Boardman, 

who settled at its base in 1795. 
Boardman; town in ColumbiLs County, North Carolina, name<l for a pioneer Baptist 

preacher. 
Boardman; township and village in Mahoning County, Ohio, named for the original 

proprietor, Frederick Boardman. 
Boca; post-office in Nevada County, California, at the mouth of the Truckee River. 

A Spanish word, meaning "mouth." 
Bodega; township in Sonoma County, California. A Spanisli word meaning ** wine- 
vault." 
Bodie; island in North Carolina, name<l for Hon. N. W. Boddie, of Nashville, North 

Carolina. j 

Bodock; creek in .Vrkansas, corrupted from the French, fH}is fVan^Si species of wood. 
Boeme; village in Kendall County, Texas, named for the German writer, Louis 

Boerne. 
Bogota; borough in Bergen County, ^ew Jersey, named for the South American 

citv. 
Bogrue Chitto; town antl creek in Lincoln County, Mississippi. An Indian name 

meaning *'l>ig creek." 
Bohemia; villages in F^scambia Oiunty, Florida, Suffolk Crumty, New York, and 

Douglas County, Oregon, naine<l from the province in Austria- Hungary. 
Bois Brule; township in Perry County an<l creek in C-ole County, Missouri. A 

French name meaning "Imrnt forest." 
Bois d'Arc; village in (ireene County, Missouri, *'lx)wwoo<l," the French name of 

the Osage orange from which the Indians procured wood for their bows. 



GANNETT] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 51 

Bois de Sioux; tributary of the Red River, North Dakota. A French name mean- 
ing "Sioux forest.*' 
Boise; county, and city in Ada County, in Idaho, situated on Boise River. A French 

word meaning '* woody," given by the early French traders because of the trees 

upon the banks of the river. 
Bolinas; bay, and town in Marin County, in California. A Spanish word meaning 

''whale.'" 
Bolivar; county, and village in same county, in Mississippi, city in Polk County, 

Missouri, town in Allegany County, New York, town in Hardeman County, 

Tennessee, town in Jefferson County, West Virginia, and four other places; 

named for Gen. Simon Bolivar. 
Bollinger; county in Missouri, named for Maj. George F. Bollinger, an early settler. 
Bolsa; village in Orange County, California. A Spanish word meaning ''purse." 
Bolton; town in Worcester County, Massachusetts, named for Charles Powlet, third 

Duke of Bolton. 
Bolton; town in Hinds County, Mississippi, named for a man interested in building 

a railroad from Vicksburg to Jackson. 
Bombay; town in Franklin County, New York, named by Mr. Hogan, an early 

settler, from Bombay, India. 
Bonair; towns in Howard County, Iowa, and White County, Tennessee, and village 

in Chesterfield County, Virginia. A French name, meaning "gootl air." 
Bonanza; village in Klamath County, Or^on, and seven other places in the country. 

A Spanish word meaning "prosperity." 
Bonaparte; town in Van Buren County, Iowa, and village in Lewis County, New 

York, named for Napoleon Bonaparte. 
Bonaqua; town in Hickman County, Tennessee, so called because it is situated near 

mineral springs. A Latin name, meaning "good water." 
Bond; county in Illinois, named for Shadrack Bond, first governor of the State, 

1818-1822. 
Bondurant; town in Polk County, Iowa, named for A. C. Bondurant. 
Bonfield; village in Kankakee County, Illinois, named for Thomas Bonfield, a 

prominent railroad official. 
Bonham; town in Fannin County, Texas, named for Col. J. B. Bonham, who died 

in the Alamo in 1836. 
Bonhomme; island in the Missouri River, in South Dakota, named for Jacques Bon 

Homme, the Frenchman's " Uncle Sam." 
Bonhomme; county in South Dakota, named from the island in the Missouri River. 
Bonita; point in California, and village in Ottertail County, Minnesota. A Spanish 

word, meaning "pretty," "graceful." 
Bonner; town in Missoula County, Montana, named for E. T. Bonner, of Missoula, 

Montana. 
Bonner Springs; city in Wyandotte County, Kansas, named for Robert Bonner, 

horseman, and editor of the New York Ledger. 
Bonneterre; town in St. Francois County, Missouri. A French name, meaning 

"good earth." The name was given by early French settlers to a mine which 

contained lead. 
Bonneville; mounts in Nevada and Wyoming, and a village in Multnomah County, 

Oregon, named for Capt. B. L. E. Bonneville, early explorer in the Northwest. 
Bonpas; creek and town in Richland County, Illinois, named from the prairie which 

is now called Pompare, but which was name<l by the early French, bon pas, 

meaning "good walk." 
Bonpland; lake in California and mount in Nevada, named for Aime Bonpland, the 

French botanist. 



52 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 2S8. 

Bon Secours; triang^ilar projection on t))c &u*i side of Mobile Bay, and poet-oiflce 
in Baldwin County, Alalmma. A French name, meaning "good succor," 

Book; plateau in Colorado; so name<l from iX^ shape. 

'Boon; town in WVxford C<:)unty, Michigan; 

Boone; counties in Arkansas, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Miasouri, and Nebraska, 
town in Watauga County, North Carolina, and county in West Vii^ginia. Named 
for Daniel Boone; his name appears with different suffixes in many parts of 
the country. 

Boone; county, city in same county, and creek in Iowa, named for* Captain Boone, 
United States dragoons, who captured Des Moines Valley above Coon Forks. 

Boone; creek in Yellowstone Park, named for Robert Withrow, who called himself 
** Daniel Boone the second." 

TBoonesboro; town in Howard County , Missouri ; ' 

iBoone Station; village in Fayette County, Kentucky. Named for Daniel Boone. 

Booneville; town in Prentiss County, Mississippi, named for Reuben H. Boone, 
who settled there in 1836. 

Boonton; town in Morris County, New Jersey, named for Thomas Boone, its colo- 
nial governor in 1760. 

Boonville; town in Warrick County, Indiana. Some authorities say that it received 
its name in honor of Daniel Boone, while Conklin says it was named for Hatli£fe 
Boone, second governor of the State, who laid out the town. 

Boonville; towns in Cooper County, Missouri, and Yadkin County, North Oarolina, 
named for Daniel Boone. 

Boonville; village in Oneida County, New York, named for Gerrit Boon, agent of 
the Holland l^and Coiufiany, who made the first settlement. 

Boothbay; town in Lincoln County, Maine, named from the town in England. 

Borate; village in San Bernardino County, California, named from the extensive 
veins of colemanite (Iwrate of lime). 

Borax; lake in California, the waters of which contain borax in solution. 

Bordeaux; town in Ablxjville County, South Carolina, named from the city in 
France. 

Borden; towns in Madera County, California, and county and village in Colorado 
County, Texas, named for Gail Borden, member of the consultation of 1833, col- 
lector of customs at Galveston in 1837, editor and financier. 

Bordentown; city in Burlington County, New Jersey, named for Joseph Borden, its 
founder. 

Borgne; lake in Ijouisiana. A French word, meaning "one-eyed," hence some- 
thing "<lefcctive," given to the lake by the French because they did not con- 
sider it a lake, but rather a buy, as it had the appearance of being separated from 
the f*ea by numerous islands. 

Borodino; village in Onondaga County, New York, named from the town in Raasia. 

Boscawen; town in Merrimac County, New Hampshire, named for Admiral Edward 
Boscawen. 

Boscobel; city in Grant County, Wisconsin, named from a place in Shropshire, Eng- 
land. 

Bosque; county and river in Texas. A French an<l Portuguese word, meaning 
** wood," "forest," applied to the comitry because of the forest*? of oak and cedar. 

Bosqueville; village in McLennan County, Texas; so named Ijecause near Boaque 
River. 

Bossier; parish, and village in same j)ansh, in lx)uisiana, named for (leneral Bossier, 
a celebrate<l duelist. 

Bostic; town in Rutherford County, North Carolina, named for (ieorge T. Bostic. 

Boston; city in Suffolk County, Ma-ssaclnisetts. By some authorities the name is 
said to have been given in honor of John Cotton, vicar of St. Bodolph's church 



OANNETT.] PLACE NAME8 EST THE UNITED STATES. 53 

in BoHton, Lincolnshire, England, and one of the first clergymen in the Ameri- 
can Boston. Others say it was named before the arrival of John Cotton, for 
three prominent colonists from Boston, England. -Sixteen places in the country 
have taken their names from the Massachusetts city. 

Botetourt; county in Virginia, named for Norbome Berkeley, Lord de Botetourt, 
royal governor of Virginia in 1768. 

Bottineau; county, and town in same county, in North Dakota, named for Pierre 
Bottineau, one of the early settlers of the Red River Valley. 

Bouckville; village in Madison County, New York, named for Governor William C. 
Bouck. 

Bouff; creek in Chicot County, Arkansas. A corruption of the French bayou aux 
boeufs, * * cattle creek. * * 

Boulder; cK)unty, and city in same county, in Colorado, named from the huge boul- 
ders found in the county. 

Boundbrook; borough in Somerset County, New Jersey, named from a creek empty- 
ing into the Raritan River, which was the northern boundary of the grant made 
to Governor Carteret. It is now part of the boundary between Middlesex and 
Somerset counties. 

Bouquet; river in Essex County, New York; said to be named from the flowers 
upon its banks. Some authorities think it is derived from the French, baquet, 
** trough." 

Bourbeuse; river in Missouri. A name applied to the river by the early French 
traders, meaning ** miry.'* 

Bourbon; town in Marshall County, Indiana, and counties in Kansas and Kentucky, 
besides several small places, named for the royal family of France. 

Bovina; town in Delaware County, New York; from the Latin, because of its fitness 
for grazing. 

Bow; creek in Nebraska, named by the early French petit arc, '* little bow." 

Bow; town in Merrimack County, New Hampshire, so named from a bend in the 
river within the town limits. 

Bowdoinham; town in Sagadahoc County, Maine. Some authorities say it was 
named for James Bowdoin, governor of Massachusetts in 1785-86, while Vamey 
claims that it was named for William Bowdoin, of Boston. 

Bowen; town in Jones County, Iowa, named for Hugh Bowen. 

Bowerbank; plantation in Piscataquis County, Maine, named for a London mer- 
chant, the first owner. 

Bowie; town in Prince George County, Maryland, named for Governor Oden Bowie. 

Bowie; county, and village in Montague County, in Texas, named for James Bowie, 
Indian and Mexican fighter, the inventor of the bowie knife, who was killed at 
the Alamo. 

Bowling Green; the name of seven places in the country. The word is said to be 
derived from a term denoting ornamental gardening, or a plat of turf for bowling. 
The name is found in Yorkshire, England. 

Bowman; village in Fleming County, Kentucky, name<l for Col. Abram Bowtnan, 
first settler. 

Bowman; county in North Dakota, named for E. M. Bowman, a member of the 
Territorial legislature in 1883. 

Bowman; town in Orangeburg County, South Carolina, named for the Fleming 
family, of Orangeburg. 

Boxbutte; county, and town in same county, in Nebraska, name<l from a butte in 
the county. 

Boxelder; county in Utah and (Ti»t»k in Montana, also nix other plart^s in the coun- 
try, named from the tree. 



54 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull.2W. 

Boxford; town in Essex County, Massachusetts, probably named from the town in 

Suffolk, England. 
Boyd; county, and village in Harrison County, in Kentucky, named for Linn Boyd, 

statesman, of Tennessee, one time lieutenant-governor of Kentucky. 
Boyd; county in Nebraska, named for James E. Boyd, governor of the State in 

1891-93. 
Boyd Tavern; village in Albemarle County, Virginia, named for a family who kept 

a tavern there many years ago. 
Boyerton; borough in Berks County, Pennsylvania, named, for the Boyer family, 

early settlers. 
Boyle; county in Kentucky, named for John Boyle, chief justice of the State. 
BoyUton; town in Worcester County, Massachusetts, named for a resident family 

of Boston. 
BoyUton; town in Oswego County, New York, named for Thomas Boylston. 
Bozeman; city in Gallatin County, Montana, named for J. M. Bozeman, an early 

trapper. • 

Bozrahville; town in New London County, Connecticut, named from the ancient 

town in Syria. 
Braceville; township and village in Grundy County, Illinois, first called Braysville, 

for an early settler. 
Braceville; township in Trumbull County, Ohio, named for Jonathan Brace, an 

early settler. 
Bracken; county in Kentucky, named for two creeks. Big and Little Bracken, which 

were named for William Bracken, a pioneer hunter. 
Brackettville; town in Kinney County, Texas, named for Oscar B. Brackett, a 
• prominent resident. 

Bracks; butte in California, named for an old settler. 
Braddock; borough in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, named from the battlefield 

where General Brad'dock was defeated by the French and Indians. 
Braddys; pond in Portage County, Ohio, named for Capt. Samuel Brady. 
Bradford; county in Florida, named for Captain Bradford, who was killed in battle 

on an island in western Florida. 
Bradford; village in Stark County, Illinois, named for Bradford S. Foster, one of ita 

principal founders. 
Bradford; village, now a part of Haverhill, Essex County, Massachusetts, named 

from the town in Yorkshire, England. 
Bradford; town in Merrimack County, New Hampshire, and village in Orange 

County, Vermont, named from the village in Massachusetts. 
Bradford; town in Steuben County, New York, named for General Bradford. 
Bradford; county, and city in McKean County, in Pennsylvania, named for William 

Bradford, 1755-1795, Attorney -General of the United States. 
Bradfordsville; town in Marion County, Kentucky, named for Peter Bratlford, the 

first settler. 
Bradley; county in Arkansas, named for Capt. Hugh Bratlley. 
Bradley; village in Tazewell County, Illinois, named for the Bradley Manufacturing 

Company located there. 
Bradley; town in Greenwoo<l County, South Carolina, namcMl for a family of the 

State. 
Bradley; county in Tennessee. The origin of the name is in doubt; Judge P. B. 

Mayfield, of Cleveland, Tennessee, says it was prol)al)ly nameii for a school- 
teacher. 
Bradley Beach; lx)rough in Monmouth County, New Jersey, named for the origi- 
nal owner, James A. Bra<lley. 



GANNKTT.] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED 8TATE8. 55 

Bradys Bend; town in Armstrong County, Pennsylvania, named for Capt. Samuel 
Brady, the notefl Indian tighter. 

Braidwood; city in Will County, Illinois, named for James Braidwood, who devel- 
oped coal mines in the vicinity. 

Brainerd; city in Butler County, Kansas, named for E. B. Brainerd, who owned a 
farm upon which part of the city is built. 

Brainerd; city in Crow Wing County, Minnesota, named for David Brainerd, a cele- 
brated missionary to the Indians. 

Braintree; town in Norfolk County, Massachusetts, named from the town in Essex, 
England. 

Braintree; town in Orange County, Vermont, named from the town in Massachu- 
setts, where many of the early grantees resided. 

Bramwell; town in Mercer County, West Virginia, named for an English engineer 
and coal operator who lived in the town. 

Branch; county, and township in Mason County, in Michigan, named for John 
Branch, secretary of the navy under President Jackson. ' 

Branchport; town in Yates County, New York, which derives its name from its 
position on one of the branches of Crooked Lake. 

Branchville; borough in Sussex Comity, New Jersey, named for the branch or river 
known as Long Branch. 

Branchville; town in Orangeburg County, South Carolina, named from the forks of 
the two branches of the South Carolina Railroad. 

Brandenburg; town in Meade County, Kentucky, named from a province in Prussia. 

Brandon; town in Rankin County, Mississippi, named for Gerard C. Brandon, 
governor in 1828-32. 

Brandon; town in Rutland County, Vermont. A corruption of *' burnt town,** from 
the circumstance of the burning of the settlement by Indians in 1777. 

Brandt; lake and town in Erie County, New York, named for Col. Joseph Brandt, 
a Mohawk chief. 

Brandywine; creek in Pennsylvania. According to a tradition, the name is derived 
from the occasion of a vessel laden with brantavein (brandy), which was lost in 
its waters. Other authorities derive it from Andrew Braindwine, who owned 
lands near its mouth in early days. A third theory is that the slough near 
Downingtown discharged its muddy waters into the creek, tinging it the color of 
brandy. A celebrated battle was fought there, which accounts for the name 
being given to eight places in in the country. 

Branford; town in New Haven County, Connecticut, named from the town of 
Brentford, England. 

Brasher; town in St. l^wrence County, New York, named for Philip Brasher, part 
owner. 

BrasBua; lake of Moose River, Maine, said to be named for an Indian chief. The 
word is said to signify ** frank.** 

Brattleboro; town in Windham County, Vermont, name<l for Col. William Brattle, 
a citizen of Boston. 

Braxton; county in West Virginia, named for Carter Braxton, a signer of the Decla- 
ration of Independence. 

Braysville; village in Owen County, Indiana, named for its founder. 

Brazil; city in Clay County, Indiana, named from the country in South America. 

Brazoria; county, and town in same county, in Texa^j. The old municipality of 
Brazoria, founded under the Mexican rule, was named from the Brazos River. 

Brazos; river and county in Texas. A Franciscan monk named the neighboring 
stream — now the Colorado— -Brazo* de Dios^ **arm of God.*' The Mexicans 
confused the two rivers and called the Colorado the Brazos, and vice versa, and 
so the nameu stand to-day. 



56 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 2a. 

Breakabeen; village in Schoharie County, New York, named from the German 

word for tlie niHh<« which jrrew uiK>n the l»ankt< of the creek. 
Breathitt; county in Kentucky, naiuiHl for John Breathitt, former governor of the 

State. 
Breckenridge; town in Summit County, Colorado, and city in Caldwell Ck>iinty, 

Missouri, named for John C. Breckinridge, vice-president of the United Statee. 
Breckinridge; county in Kentucky, namo<l for John Breckinridge, a Kentacky 

Htatennian. 
Breedsville; village in Van Buren County, Michigan, named for Silaa Breed, an early 

settler. 
Breese; village in Clinton County, Illinois, named for Lieutenant-Governor Sidney 

Breese. 
Bremer; county in Iowa, named for Fre<lrika Bremer, the Swedish authoress, who 

spent some time in that region in 1850. 
Brentwood; town in Contra Costa County, California, named from the town in 

New Hampshire. 
Brentwood; town in Rockingham County, New Hampshire, incorporated as Brint- 

wood; proliably named from a place in England. 
Brevard; county in Florida, named for Doctor Brevard, author of the Mecklen- 
burg Declaration of Indcj)endence. 
Brevard; town in Transylvania County, North Carolina, named for Ephraim J. 

Brevard, a Revolutionary patriot. 
Brewer; mount in California, named for Prof. W. H. Brewer. 
Brewer; city in Penobscot County, Maine, named for Col. John Brewer, a first settler. 
Brewer; strait of Staten Island, New York, discovered by Brewer in 1643. 
Brewster; town in Barnstable County, Massachusetts, named for Elder William 

Brewster, one of the first settlers in Plymouth colony. 
Brewster; village in Putnam County, New York, probably named after James and 

Walter F. Brewster, who at one time owned the tract of land comprising the 

village. 
Brewster; county in Texas, named for H. P. Brewster, private secretary to Samuel' 

Houston. 
Briceland; village in Humboldt County, California, named for a resident. 
Bridal Veil; falls in Yosemite 'Valley, California, and falls on a branch of the 

Columbia River, Oregon. A descriptive name. 
Bridal Veil; village in Multnomah County, Oregon, named for the falls. 
Bridge; creek in Yellowstone Park, named from a natural bridge of trachyte over it. 
Bridgeport; city in Ji'airfield County, Connecticut, also of numerous other places, 

usually so called from a bridge in or near the place. The suffixes "ton," 

"town,** "water,'* and "ville" are also used frequently. 
Bridgeport; township and town in Lawrence County, Illinois, first called The 

Bridge, from a bridge spanning a stream at that point. 
Bridger; peak, village in Carbon County, and river in Montana, lake in Yellow- 
stone Park, and pass in the Rocky Mountains, named for Maj. James Bridger, a 

noted guide. 
Bridgeton; city in Cumberland County, New Jersey. Corrupted from bridge town, 

so name<l l)ecause of its location by the bridge over the old fording place on the 

Cohansev River. 
Bridgewater; town in Plymouth County, Massachusetts, named for the Duke of 

Bridgewater. Nason says the name was derived from a town in Somersetshire, 

England. 
Bridgton; town in Cumberland County, Maine, named for an early settler. Moody 

Bridges. 



OANNBTT.] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 57 

Brienaburg; village in Marsliall County, Kentucky, nanu^l for Juiiu'h Brien, meiii- 
ber of the legislature. 

Brigham; city in Boxelder County, Utah, named for Brigliam Young. 

Bright Angel; creek in Arizona, so named because of the clearness of its waters. 

Brighton; township and village in Macoupin County, Illinois, named by settlers 
from Brighton (a part of Boston), Massachusetts. Many other places also bear 
this name, being named either directly or indirectly from Brighton in England. 

Briscoe; county in Texas, named for Andrew Briscoe, a San Jacinto veteran. 

Bristol; town in Lincoln County, Maine, county in Massachusetts, town in Ontario 
County, New York, village in Bucks County, Pennsylvania, county, and city in 
same county, in Rhode Island, town in Sullivan County, Tennessee, and city in 
Harrison County, West Virginia; named from the town in England. 

Bristol; town in Kenosha County, Wisconsin, named for Rev. Ira Bristol, an early 
settler. 

Britton; village in Marshall County, South Dakota, named for Col. Isaac Britton. 

Broad; mountain ridge in Pennsylvania which has a broad tableland almont desti- 
tute of trees. 

Broadalbin; town in Fulton County, New York, named from a place in Scotland. 

Broadhead; town in Rockcastle County, Kentucky, named for a resident. 

Broadlands; village in Champaign County, Illinois, so called from a farm of the 
same name, containing a thousand acres. 

Broadtop; mountain in Bedford and Huntingdon counties, Pennsylvania; a descrip- 
tive name. 

Broadwater, county in Montana, named for Col. Charles Broadwater. 

Brock; village in Nemaha County, Nebraska, named for a resident. 

Brockport; village in Monroe County, New York, named for Hiel Brock way, an 
early settler. 

Brockton; city in Plymouth County, Massachusetts, named for an old resident 
family. 

Brocton; village in Edgar County, Illinois, named from Brockton, Massachusetts. 

Brodhead; city in Oreen County, Wisconsin, named for Edward Brodhead, a promi- 
nent resident. 

Brokenstraw; village in Chautauqua County, New York, and creek in Warren 
County, Pennsylvania. A translation of the Indian word degnsijmohdyahgah. 

Bronco; village in Nevada County, California. A Spanish word meaning "rough" 
or *' coarse." 

Bronson; village in Bourbon County, Kansas, named for Ira D. Bronson, of Fort 
Scott 
Bronx; river in Westchester County, New York; 
Bronxdale; village in Westchester County, New York; 

Bronzville; village in Westchester County , New York. Named for Jonas or JacM)!) 
Bronck, an early settler. 

Brook; many places in the country bear this name, mostly tlescriptive of the situa- 
tion upon some stream. The word is used with various suffixes, such as " ville," 
"vale," "view,'* "wood," etc. 

Brooke; county in West Virginia, nameil for Robert Brooke, governor of the State 
of Virginia in 1794-1796. 

Brookfleld; township and city in Linn County, Missouri, named for John W. 
Brooks, of Boston, a prominent railroad otficial. 

Brookfleld; town in Orange County, Vermont, so calleil, according to tradition, 
because of the number of brooks in the r^ion in early days. 

Brooking^; county in South Dakota, name<l for Wilmot W. Brookings, a legislator. 

Brookland; town in I^exington County, South Carolina, crossed by several small 
streams. 



58 PLACE NAMES IN THE T7NITED 8TATSB. Ibtll^ 

Brookline; town in Norfolk County, MnmarhiuettH. The name is said to ))ea mod- 

ili<'aiii)n nf HnNiklyn. S»ni(* authoritu^H Hay, however, that the name wat* gives 

Um'hii»«' of u Hnmll crtH^k ninnin^ thnm^h the place. 
Brooklyn; township in Schnyler County, lUinoifs town in Poweehiek Couoty, 

Iowa, and villageH in Jiu>kM)n County, Michigan, and Perry Cocmtyr MiaEsLmppi, 

nanHMl from Hrooklvn, New York. 
Brooklyn: part of New York City; a ct^rniption of the Duttrh name BreurktliK 

from a villa^re in the provinci^ (A CtnH'ht, MoUaiid. The name Bigniliei) *' broken 

up huxl" or •'marshy land.*' 
Brooks; county in Georgia, name<i for lYeston L. Brooks. 
Brooks: town in Waldo County, Maine, named for Governor Brooks, of Mam- 

rlniHctts. 
Brooks Grove; vilhipe in Livingnton County, New York, named for Micah Brooks. 
Brooksville; town in N<>xuIkh* Comity, MiHsiHBippi, named for a resident family. 
Brookville; town in Fnmklin County, Indiana, named for Jetiise Brook Thomas, the 

original i>roprietor. 
Brookville; town in liracken County, Kentucky, named for I)a\id Brooks. 
Broome; coimty in New York; 
Broome Center: villa>r«* in S«-liohari(» County, New York. Named for TJeutenant- 

< Jovernor John Hrfwune. 
Brown: <'onnties in Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, and Wisconsin, named for Maj. G«i. 

Jacol) lirown, commander in chief, I 'nittnl States Army, 1821-1828. 
Brown; <-onnty in Kansas, named forO. II. Hrowne, meml)er of the first Territnriil 

lejrislatnre. 
Brown; county in Minnesota, namiMi for Jo«e[)h R. Hrown, a member of the council 

in 18.55. 
Brown; county in Nel)ra.»*ka, name<l for two mendiers of the committee who reported 

the bill for the organiziition of the county. 
Brown; c(»unty in South Dakota, namnl for Alfred Brown, a legislator in 1879. 
Brown: count v in Texas, named for Ilenrv S. Brown, an old settler. 
Brownfield; town in Oxfonl C<»unty, Maine, named for Caj)t. Ilenr}' Young Brown, 

to whom the site was jjrantiHl. 
Brownington; town in Orleans County, Vermont, named for Timothy and Daniel 

Brown, to whom part of the land wa-s originally j^rantinl. 
Browns; villajje in I^>lward County, Illinois, name<l for L. J. Bix)wn, the principal 

landowner. 
fBrownstown; town in Jackwm County, Indiana; 

IBrownsville; town in Kdmonson County, Kentucky. Naminl for Gen. Jacob Brown. 
Brownsville; horou^h in Fayette (-ounty, Pennsylvania, named for the Brown 

brothers, Thomas and Basil, early settlers. 
Brownsville; city in Cameron County, Texas, named for Major Brown, who was 

kille<l there at the U'^innin^ of the war with Mexico. 
Browntown: villajre in (Jreen (Vmnty, Wis<-onsin, name<1 for William (i. Brown, an 

«'arlv settler. 
Brownville; town in Piscataquis County, Maine, naintnl for Deacon Francis Hrown 

an early resident. 
Brownville; city in Nemaha ( -ounty, Nebraska, namwl for the tlrst settler, Kiohard 

Brown, who went then^ from Holt County, Missouri. 
Brownville; town in Jefferson County, New York, named for John Brown, an early 

settler, father of ( Jeneral Brown. 
Brownwood; city in Texas, named for Henry S. Brown, an old settler. 
Bruceton Mills: town in Prestcm County, West Virginia, named for an early prom- 
inent settler. 



OANNETT.] PLACE NAMES IN THE tlNITED STATES. 59 

Bruceville; village in Knox County, Indiana, named for William Brnc**, the former 
owner of the land. 

Brule; town in Keith County, Nebraska, county in South Dakota, and town in 
Douglas County, Wisconsin, and several other placres, named for a tribe of 
Indians. The word means *' burnt," and the tribe, the Brule Sioux, were said 
to have acquired the name from having l)een C4iught in a prairie fire and being 
badly burneti about the thighs. 

Brunson; town in Hampton County, South Carolina, named for a prominent family. 

Brunswick; town in Cumberland County, Maine, named for the house of Bruns- 
wick, to which the reigning King of (ireat Britain, William III, belonged. 

Brunswick; city in Chariton County, Missouri, named for Brunswick Terrace in 
England, the fonner home of the founder, James Keyte. 

Brunswick; counties in North Carolina and Virginia, named for the duchy in 
Germanv. 

Brush; creek in Pennsylvania. From the Indian word, achweeky meaning '* bushy" 
or "overgrown with brush." 

Brushland; village in Delaware County, New York, name<l for Alexander Brush, 
first settler and proprietor. 

Brushton; village in Franklin County, New York, name<i for Henry N. ^Brush, 
an extensive property owner. 

Brutus; town in Cayuga County, New York, named by the State land board of New 
York, which gave names of celebrated Romans to townships in the military tract 
in central New York. Village in Clay County, Kentucky, town in Emmet 
County, Michigan, and village in Pittsylvania County, Virginia, also bear this 
name. 

Bryan; county in Georgia, named for Jonathan Bryan, one of the founders of the 
State. 

Bryan; village in Williams County, Ohio, named for John A. Bryan, a former audi- 
tor of the State. 

Bryan; city in Brazos County, Texas, named for Moses Austin Bryan. 

Bryn Mawr; village in Montgomery County, Pennsylvania, named from the town in 
Wales. 

Bryson; town in Swain County, North Carolina, named for T. D. Bryson, member 
of the legislature, and owner of the town site. 

Buchanan; counties in Iowa, Missouri, and Virginia, and several other places in the 
country, named for IVesident James Buchanan. 

Buchanan; town in Botetourt County, Virginia, named for Col. John Buchanan, 
pioneer and Indian fighter of Augusta County. 

Buck Creek; village in Greene County, Indiana, so named because a buck api^eared 
each returning season on the banks of a near-by creek. 

Buckeye; township in Shasta County, California, named by settlers from Ohio, the 
Buckeye State. 

Buckeye; post-offices in Rapides Parish, Ix)uisiana, Mississippi County, Missouri, 
and several towns and villages. The word is applieil to a species of horse chest- 
nut which grows on river banks in western Pennsylvania, Ohio, and Michigan, 
the fruit resembling the eye of a buck. 

Buckfield; town in Oxford County, Maine, named for Abijah Bucks, one of the first 
settlers. 

Buckhannon; river and town in Upshur County, West Virginia. An Indian name 
said to mean ** brick river." 

guckingham; county in Virginia; 
ucks; county in Pennsylvania. Name<l from Buckinghamshire, England. 
Bucks Bridge; village in St. Lawrence County, New York, named for Isaac Buck, 
an early settler. 



60 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 25ft. 

Buckskin; village in Park (^onnt\% ColonuJo, named for Joseph Higji^nbottomY 

*' Biirkskin Jot»." 
Bucksport; town in llunilx)l(lt County, California, named for I)avi<l Buck, who laid 

it out in 1851. 
Bucksport; town in Hancock County, Maine, named for Col. Jonathan Backa, of 

Haverhill, an early settler. 
Bucoda; village in Thurston County, Washington, named by taking the first part 

of the names of three men, Buckley, Collier, and Davis. 
Bucyrus; city in Craw^ford County, Ohio, named by Col. James Kilboame. The 

daughters of Samuel Norton, who live there, say that Colonel Kilboume's fsYonte 

character was Cyrus, King of Persia, to which *'bu" was prefixed, referring to 

the beautiful country. An old citizen, F. Adams, says that it was named by 

Colonel Kilbourne from Busiris in ancient Egypt. 
Buda; village in Bureau County, Hlinois, named from Buda in Austria. 
Buel; village in Montgomery County, New York, named for Jease Buel, of Albany. 
Buell; lake, partly in the town of Great Barrington, Berkshire County, Maasachu- 

settH, nanuxl for Samuel Buell, a neighboring resident, who saved three girls 

from drowning. 
Buena Vista; county in Iowa, city in Rockbridge County, Virginia, and twenty 

f)ther places in the country. The name of the field upon which Greneral Taylor 

won his victory, and doubtless given in some cases for patriotic reasons, but the 

majority of places are named descriptively. Spanish words, meaning ''beautiful 

view." 
Buffalo; county in Nebraska, city in Erie County, New York, conntieB in South 

Dakota and Wisconsin, and numerous creeks, rivers, towns, and villages, usually 

so named because of the former presence of the buffalo. 
Bullards Bar; town in Yul>a County, California, named for an old settler. 

{Bullitt; county in Kentucky; 
Bullittsville; town in Boone County, Kentucky. Named for Alexander Scott 
Bullitt. 
f Bulloch; county in Georgia; 
BuUochville; village in Meriwether County, Georgia. Named for Archibald Bul- 
loch, one of the most eminent men of his time. 
Bullock; county, and village in Crenshaw County, in Alabama, named for E. O. Bul- 
lock, of that State. 
Bulltown; village in Braxton County, West Viiiginia. Named for an Indian called 
Bull, w^ho was imprisoned for taking part in Pontiac's conspiracy, and was mur- 
dered in 1773 by Jesse Hughes and John Hacker. • 
Bunceton; city in Cooper County, Missouri, named for Harvey Bunce, of the county. 
Buncombe; county in North Carolina and several places in the Southern States, 

named for Col. Edward Buncombe, of the Continental Anny. 
Bunker Hill; city in Macoupin County, Illinois, and eleven other places, named for 

the famous l)attle of the Revolution. 
Bunker "BAH; eminence in Charlestown (Boston), Massachusetts, the scene of con- 
flict !)etween the American and British forces, June 17, 1775. 
Bunsen; jx'uk in Yelk)W8tone Park, named by the United States Cieological Survey 

for the eminent chemist and i)hysicist, Rol)ert Wilhelm Bunsen. 
Burden; city in Cowley (-ounty, Kansas, named for Robert F. Bunlen, a leading 

member of the town comf>any. 
Bureau; county, and town in same county, in Illinois, named for a French trader, 
Pierre de Beuro, who establishetl a trading post upon a creek which first bore 
his name. 
Burgaw; village in Pender County, North (^arolina, named for a resident family. 



GANNETT] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 61 

Burke; county in Georgia, and towns in Franklin CJounty, New York, and Caledonia 
CJonnty, Vermont, named for Edmund Burke, the English statesman. 

Burke; county in North Carolina, named for Thomas Burke, governor of North 
Carolina in 1781-82. 

Burleigh; county and creek in North Dakota, named for Walter A. Burleigh, an 
early settler, and delegate to Congress. 

Burleson; county, and village in Johnson County, in Texas, named for Edwani Bur- 
leson, Indian fighter, and vice-president of the Republic of Texas under Presi'i- 
dent Houston, 1841. 

Burlingame; town in San Mateo C6nnty, California, nameii from Burlingame in 
England. 

Burlingame; city in Osage County, Kansas, named for Am^on Burlingame, minister 
to China. 

Burlington; city in Des Moines County, Iowa, town in Coffey County, Kansas, and 
village in Calhoun County, Michigan, named from the city in Vermont, 

Burlington; county, and city in same county, in New Jersey, named from Briling- 
ton (commonly pronounced Burlington), England. 

Burlington; city in Chittenden County, Vermont, named for the Burling family, 
of New York. 

Burlington; city in Racine County, Wisconsin, named from Burlington Flats in 
New York. 

Burnet; county, and town in same county, in Texas, nameil for David (t. Burnet, 
twice governor of the State. 

Burnett; town in Antelope County, Nebraska, named for the first superintendent of 
the Sioux City and Pacific Railroad. 

Burnett; county in Wisconsin, named for Thomas P. Burnett, an early legislator of 
the State. 

Bumside; river and island in Georgia, named for an early settler. 

Bumsville; village in Bartholomew County, Indiana, named for Brice Burns, its 
founder. 

Bumsville; town in Yancey County, North Carolina, named for Otway Burns, cap- 
tain of the privateer Snapdragon, 

Burr; creek in Humboldt County, California, named for early settlers. 

Burrillville; town in Providence County, Rhode Island, named for Hon. James 
Burrill, jr., attorney-general of the State. 

Burr Oak; city in Jewell County, Kansas, and village in St. Joseph County, Michi- 
gan, named from the species of tree common to l)oth sectionp. 

Burrs Mills; village in Jefferson County, New York, named for John Burr and 
Sons, mill owners. 

Burrton; city in Harvey County, Kansas, named for I. T. Burr, vice-president of 
the Atchison, Topeka and Santa F^ Railroad. 

Burt; town in Kossuth County, Iowa, named for the president of the Union Pacific 
Railroad. 

Burt; county in Nebraska, named for Francis Burt, governor of the Territory in 1854. 

Bushkill; two creeks, and village, in Pike County, Pennsylvania. A Dutch word 
meaning "bushy stream." 

Bushnell; township and city in McDonough County, Illinois, named for N. Bush- 
neil, president of the first railroad in that part of the State. 

Bushy; creek in western Pennsylvania. A translation of th^ Indian word achemek. 

Buskirk Bridge; village in Washington County, New York, named for Martin 
Van Buskirk. 

Busti; town in Chautauqua County, New York, named for Paul Busti, of the Hoi- 
land Land Company. 






62 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 258. 

Butler; county in Alabama, nanitMl for Capt. William Butler, of that State. 

Butler; village in Montgomery County, Illinois, named for Butler Seward, a first 
settler. 

Butler; county in Iowa, and city in Bates County, Missouri, named for William O. 
Butler, of Kentucky, a general in the Mexican war. 

Butler; county in Kansias, name<l for Andrew P. Butler, United States Senator from 
South Carolina in 1846-1857. 

Butler; counties in Kentucky, Ohio, and Pennsylvania, named for Gen. Richard 
Butler, who fell at St. Clair's defeat. 

Butler; county in Mipsouri, named for a member of President Jackson's Cabinet 

Butler; county in Nebraska, named for David Butler, first governor of the State. 

Butte; County in California, named from Marysville Buttes. A French word mean- 
ing "small knoir* or *' small hill." 

Butte; city in Silverbow County, Montana, named from a bare butte overlooking 
the place. 

Butte; county in South Dakota, so named from buttes, prominent features in the 
county. 

Butte des Morts; town in Winnebago County, Wisconsin. French words mean- 
ing "hill of the dead," so calUnl by the early explorers from the native graves 
found there. 

Butterfly; village in Madera County, California. A translation of the Mexican 
name Mariposa. 

Butter Hill; an eminence on the Hudson River, so called from its resemblance to a 
huge lump of butter. 

Butts; county in Georgia, named in honor of Capt. Samuel Butts, an officer in the 
war of 1812. 

Buttzville; town in Ransom County, North Dakota, name<l for a resident. 

Buxton; town in York County, Maine, named from the native place of Rev. Paul 
Coffin, the first minister. 

Buxton; village in Washington County, Oregon, named for Henry Buxton, an early 
settler. 

Buzzards Bay; village in Barnstable County, and bay in Massachusetts, named for 
a small hawk very abundant on the coast. 

Byers; town in Arapahoe County and mount in Colorado, named for W. N. Byers, 
of Denver. 

Byhalia; town in Marshall County, Mississippi. An Indian word meaning "stand- 
ing white oaks." 

Bynumville; town in Chariton County, Missouri, named for Dr. Joseph Bynum, an 
early settler. 

Byron; town in Houston County, Georgia, and Genesee County, New York, named 
for Lord Byron. Eighteen other places bear this name, all of which were prob- 
ably named for the English poet. 

Cabarrus; county in North Carolina, named for Stephen Cabarrus, speaker of the 
house of commons in that State. 

Cabazon; station on the Southern Pacific Railroad in Riverside County, California. 
A Spanish word, tranhilated as "shirt collar" or '*tax gatherer." 

Cabell; county in West Virginia, named for William Cabell, governor of Virginia in 
1805-1808. 

Cable; village in Mercer County, Illinois, named for Ransom R. Cable, railway 
manager. 

Cabot; town in Washington County, Vermont, named for Miss Cal)ot, a descendant 
of Sebastian Cabot. 

Cache; county, village in same county, and streams and valley in northeastern Utah. 



GANNETT.] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 63 

A French worri meaning "hiding i)lace," probably ai)plie<l localise of certain 
things having l)een hidden there by early explorers and travelers. 

Cache la Poudre; creek in Colorado, named from the French, meaning '^jn^wder 
hiding place." 

Cacheville; village in Yolo County, California. So named by early settlers who 
were in the habit of hiding their supplies at this point. 

Cactus; village in San Diego County, California, so named from the abundance of 
cacti in the vicinity. 

Caddo; town in Choctaw Nation, Indian Territory, parish and lake in Louisiana, 
county in Oklahoma, village in Stephens County, Texas, and several small 
places; named from a former important tribe of eastern Texas and western 
Louisiana. 

Cadillac; city in Wexford County, Michigan, named for Ia Motte (or La Mothe) 
Cadillac, who established a fort on the Detroit River in 1701. 

Cadiz; township and village in Harrison County, Ohio, named from the city in 
Spain. Six other small places in the country are so called. 

Cadott; village in Chippewa County, Wisconsin, named for an half-briH^l Indian, 
Baptiste Cadotte, who lived near the falls which first bore his name. 

Caernarvon; townships in Pennsylvania, named from the town in Wales. 

Cahto; creek and village in Mendocino County, California, an Indian word, mean- 
ing "fish." 

Cahuilla; valley and village in Riverside County, Galifomia, named from an Indian 
tribe. The word is said to mean ** master." 

Caillou; lake and bayou in Louisiana. A French word meaning **j>ebble" or "flint 
stone." 

Ca Ira; town in Cumberland County, Virginia. A French expression used in a 
famous revolutionary song, meaning " it shall go on." 

Cairo; fourteen places in the country bear the name of the capital of Egypt. 

Cijon; town in San Bernardino County, California, and pass in the Sierra Madre 
range. A Spanish word meaning "box." 

Calabasas; township in Los Angeles County, California. A S]>anish word mean- 
ing "pumpkins." 

Calais; city in Washington County, Maine, and town in Washington County, Ver- 
mont, named from Calais in France. 

Calamine; town in Sharp County, Arkansas, named from the 7.inc mines, calamina, 
meaning the native siliceous oxide of zinc. 

Calapooya; mountains in Oregon, named from an Indian tribe. 

Calaveras; river and county in California, so called from the numbers of skulls 
found in the vicinity, supposed to be the remains of a bloody battle among the 
Indians. The word is Spanish, meaning "skull." 

Calcutta; villages in Columbiana County, Ohio, and Pleasants County, West Vir- 
ginia, named from the city in India. 

Caldwell; city in Sumner County, Kansas, named for Alexander Caldwell, of 
Leavenworth, United States Senator. 

Caldwell; counties in Kentucky and Missouri, named for Gen. John Caldwell, 
formerly lieutenant-governor of Kentucky. 

Caldwell; parish in Louisiana, named for Matthew Caldwell, of North Carolina, a 
noted frontiersman. 

Caldwell; borough in Essex County, New Jersey, named for Rev. James Caldwell, 
a patriotic clergyman of the Revolution. 

Caldwell; town in Warren County, New York, named for Gen. James ('aldwell, 
patentee. 

Caldwell; county in North Carolina, named for Dr. Joseph Caldwell, first president 
of the State University. 



64 PLACK NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 256. 

Caldwell; village in Noble County, Ohio, named for Joseph and Samuel Caldwell, 
to whom the land belonged. 

Caldwell; coanty, and town in Burleson Ck)unty, Texas, named for Matthew Cald- 
well, an old settler and colonel of a Texas regiment in 1841. 

Caledonia; village in Livingston County, New York, county in Vermont, and six- 
teen other places in the country, nameil from the ancient name of Scotland. 

Calexico; town in San Diego County, California, so named from its location on the 
boundary between California and Mexico. 

Calfee; creek in Yellow^stone Park, named for H. H. Calfee, a photographer of 
note. 

Calhoun; counties in Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Geoiigia, Illinois, Iowa, Michi- 
gan, Mississippi, Texas, and West Virginia, also many «mall places, named for 
John C. Calhoun, of South Carolina, vice-president in 1825-1833. 

Calhoun; town in McLean County, Kentucky, named for Judge John Calhonn. 

Calhoun; village in Washington County, Nebraska, so named because situated on 
the site of Fort Calhoun. 

Calhoun Falls; town in Abbeville County, South Carolina, named for a prominent 
family. 

Calico; mountain range in California, so named from the variegated colors of the 
rocks. 

Caliente; towns in Kern and Sonoma counties, California. The Spanish form for 
**hot," '* vehement." 

Califa; village in Madeira County, California. The Spanish form of ''caliph" or 
"successor." 

California; State of the Union. This name was applied by Cortez to the bay and 
country, which he supposed to be an island. The name is that of an island in 
an old Spanish romance, where a great abundance of precious stones were found. 
Eight post-offices bear this name. 

Callahan; county in Texas; named for James M. Callahan, a 8ur\'ivor of the massa- 
cre of 1836. 

Callaway; county, and village in same county, in Missouri, and several other places; 
named for Capt. James ('allaway, grandson of Daniel Boone. 

Callensbiirg; borough in Clarion County, Pennsylvania, named for Hugh Gallen, 
its founder. 

Callicoon; town in Sullivan County, New York. The wonl is said to signify "turkey" 
in both Dutch and Indian languages. The Dutch word for "turkey," however, 
is spelled kaikoen. 

Calloway; county in Kentucky; named for Col. Richard Calloway. 

Caloosa; river, and village in I>ee County, Florida; named for an Indian tribe. 

Calumet; river in Illinois and Indiana, county, and village in Fond du Lac County, 
in Wisconsin, and seven other places in the country. A Canadian corruption of 
the French, chaleinel^ which liU»rally means "little reed," but which, in its 
cornipted form, refers to the "pipe of peace," used by the Indians to ratify 
treaties. Haines derives the word from valamo, "honey wood." Other author- 
ities say that the name was originally "/Y«nam<Vit" or *^ kennomic.'* 

Calvary; town in Fond du Lac County, Wisconsin, and seven other places in the 
country, named from the hill near Jerusalem. 

Calvert; county, and post village in Cecil County, in Maryland, named for Cecil Cal- 
vert, Lord Baltimore. Eight other places are so named, doubtless, directly or 
indirectly for the same. 

Calvert; town in Robertson County, Texas, name<l for Robert Calvert, an early 
settler. 

Camano; island in Puget Sound, Washington, which takes its name from a canal 
uameii for Don Jacinto Camano. 



GANNETT.] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 66 

Camarillo; town in Ventura County, California. A Spanish word meaning ''small 



room." 



[Camas; villages in Fremont County, Idaho; Missoula County, Montana; and Clarke 

County, Washin^n; 
I Camas Valley; village in Douglas County, Or^on. The Indian name of a small 

onion which grows in those States. 
Cambria; county in Pennsylvania named from the ancient name of Wales. The 

word means 'Mand of mountains." 
Cambria; village in Columbia County, Wisconsin, probably so named because of 

the Welsh settlers. 
Cambridge; township and village in Henry County, Illinois, named from the city 

in Massachusetts, the home of eeversl of the founders. 
Cambridge; city in Middlesex County, Massachusetts, named from the English 

university town, after the general court decided to establish a college there. 

Twenty-two other places bear the name of the English town, two having the 

suffix **port" and one "springs." 
Cambridge; township and city in Guernsey County, Ohio, named from the town in 

Maryland, each being situated on a Wills Creek. 
Camden; city in Ouachita County, Arkansas, named from the city in South Carolina. 
Camden; county in Georgia, town in Knox County, Maine, county and city in same 

county in New Jersey, village in Oneida County, New York, county and village 

in same county in North Carolina, and town in Kershaw County, South Carolina; 

named for Chief Justice Pratt, Earl of Camden, a friend of the colonies during 

the Revolution. 
Camden; county in Missouri, named from Camden County, North Carolina. 
Camden; village in Preble County, Ohio, named from the city in New Jersey. 
Camels Hump; peak in the Green Mountains, Vermont, so named from its resem- 
blance to the hump of a camel. 
Cameron; parish, and town in same parish, in Louisiana, county, and village in same 

county, in Pennsylvania, and town in Marshall County, West Virginia, named 

for Simon Cameron. 
Cameron; city in Clinton County, Missouri, named for Judge Elisha Cameron, of 

Clay County, Missouri. 
Cameron; town in Steuben County, New York, named for Dugald Cameron, agent 

for the Pultney estate. 
Cameron; town in Monroe County, North Carolina, named for a prominent family 

in the county. 
Cameron; town in Orangeburg County, South Carolina, named for J. Don Cameron, 

United States Senator from Pennsvlvania. 
Cameron; county, and city in Milam County, in Texas, named for Ervin or Erving 

Cameron, who fell in the expedition against Meir. 
Camillns; village in Onondaga County, New York, built within the State Land 

Board limits, and named by members of the board for the Roman magistrate. 
Camp; county in Texas, named for J. L. Camp, prominent lawyer. 
Campbell; county in Georgia, named for Col. Duncan G. Campbell, of the State 

legislature. 
Campbell; county in Kentucky, named for John Campbell, of the State senate. 
Campbell; county in Steuben County, New York, named for the Campbell family, 

early settlers. 
Campbell; county, and village in same county, in South Dakota, named for Gen. C. 

T. Campbell, pioneer. 
Campbell; county in Tennessee, named for Col. Arthur Campbell. 
Campbell; county in Virginia, named for Gen. William Campbell, an officer of the 

American Revolution. 

Bidl.258— 05 5 



66 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 256. 

OampbellBville; city in Taylor County, Kentucky, named for Adam Campbell, the 
first settler. 

Campello; town in Plymouth County, Massachusetts. An Indian word meaning 
** cedar tree.'* 

Camp Grant; town and fort in Humboldt County, Califomia, named for Gen. XJ. S. 
Grant. 

Camp Grove; village in Marshall County, Illinois, named from its location on a 
favorite camping ground of emigrants on their journey westward. 

Camp Hill; l)orough in Cumberland County, Pennsylvania, so named because the 
seat of a soldiers* orphan school. 

Camp Knox; village in Green County, Kentucky, named from a camp of Col. James 
Knox and 22 men, in 1770. 

Campo; town in 8an Diego County, California. A Spanish word meaning "field** 
or "plain.** 

Campo Seco; town in Calaveras County, California, so named from the general 
character of its surroundings. A Spanish name meaning "dry plain." 

Camp Point; township and village in Adams County, Illinois, so named from its 
location on an Indian i>am])ing ground. 

Campton; town in (inifton County, New Hamjwhire, so called because the first sur- 
veyors of the nite built a tramp on the present town site. 

Canaan; town in Litchfield County, Conneticut, and fourteen other towns and 
villagef, given the name of the " Promised l^nd'* of the Israelites. 

Canada; villagcH in Marion County, Kansas, Pike County, Kentucky, and Muskegon 
County, Michigan, named from the Dominion of Canada. Authorities diiKeras 
to the derivation of this name. Father Hennepin says the Spaniards were the 
original discoverers of the country, but ui)on landing they were disappointed in 
the general appearance and cxpres8e<l their feelings by saying, // capa di 
nada, "Cape nothing.*' Sir John Barlow Kays the Portuguese, who first ascended 
the St. Lawrence, believing it to be a pa^isage to the Indian sea, expressed their 
disappointment when they discoverwi their mistake by saying Canada^ 
** Nothing here." This the natives are said to have remembered and repeated 
to the KurojK»ans who arrived later, who thought it must be the name of the 
country. Dr. Shea says the Spanish derivation is fictitious. Some think it was 
namcHl for the first man to plant a colony of French in the country. Monsieur 
Cana. Charlevoix says the word originated with the Iroquois Indians, kanaia, or 
kmnidoy ** a collection of huts," "a village,'* "a town,*' which the early explorers 
mistook for the name of the country. Other etymologies propose the two 
Indian words, Aaw, "a mouth," and ada^ "a country,** hence "the mouth of 
the country," originally applie<l to the mouth of the St. Lawrence. There is a 
resi)ectable authority that the name was first applied to the river. Lescarbot 
telLs U8 that the Gasperians and Indians who dwelt on the lx)rder8 of the bay of 
Chaleur called themnelves (htindaquca; that the word meant "province" or "coun- 
try." Sweetser says that the word came from the Indian caughnaicaugh, "the 
village of the rapids. '* Brant, the Indian chieftain, who translated the gospel into 
his own language, used the word canada for '* village.** Another authority gives 
it as derived from canada del osoSy meaning ** bear's pass,** and this was used, per- 
haps a century ago, by Spanish priests as an equivalent of **paas" or "gap." 

Canadawa; creek in Chautauqua County, New York. An Indian word, meaning 
"running through the hemlocks.'* 

Canadian; town in Choctaw Nation, Indian Territory, county in Oklahoma, river 
traversing both Territories, and village in Hemphill C-ounty, Texas. A Spanish 
word, diminutive of canyon, meaning "steep-sided gorge.'* 

Canajoharie; town in Montgomery County, New York. This name was originally 
given to a deep hole of foaming water at the foot of one of the falls in Canajo* 



OANSETT.l PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 67 

harie Creek. An Indian word meaning "kettle that washes itself," or "kettle- 
shapetl hole in a rock/* Morgan says the meaning is "washing the basin." 

Canal; town in Venango County, Pennsylvania, so named because traversed by the 
Franklin Canal. 

Canal de Haro; canal in Washington, named for the Spanish explorer, Lopez de 
Haro. 

Canal Dover; village in Tuscarawas County, Ohio, situated on the Ohio Canal and 
np.med from the city in New Jersey. 

Canal Lewisville; town in Coshocton County, Ohio, name<i for T. B. Lewis, who 
founded it. 

Canandai^ua; village in Lenawee County, Michigan, and lake and town in Ontario 
County, New York. An Indian wonl, the deriviation of which is in dispute. 
Morgan gives canandarffuay "place selected for settlement," "chosen sjK)t;" 
Haines, "town set off," while another theory is that it is corrupted from the 
Seneca Indian, genundeaahgunh, "great hill people," so called from a large hill 
near the lake. 

Canaseragra; village in Allegany County, New York. From an Indian word, kana- 
mtctigay "several strings of bea<l8 with a string lying across." 

Canastota; villages in Ma<lison County, New York, and M(»Cook County, South 
Dakota. An Indian wonl, kniMey or kmietoUiy "pine tree standing alone." The 
New York village t^K)k its name from a cluster of pines that united their 
branches over the cn»ek which passes through the town. 

Canavaral; cape, and village in Brevard County, in Florida. A Spanish word mean- 
ing "cane plantation." 

Canby; town in Moiloc County, California, and city in Clackamas County, Oregon, 
named for General Canl)y, United States Army, who was treacherously mur- 
dered by Modoc Indians. 

Candelaria; ixjst-offices in Esmeralda County, Nevada, and Presidio County, Texas. 
The Mexican name for a species of branching cactus. 

Candia; town in Rockingham County, New Hampshire, named from the island in 
the Mediterranean where Governor Wentworth was once a prisoner. 

Caneadea; town in Allegany County, New York. An Indian word meaning 
"where the heavens rt»8t \i\yow the earth." 

Caney; city in Montgomery County, Kansas, villages in Morgan County, Kentucky, 
Vernon Parish, Louisiana, and Matagorda County, Texas, besides several other 
email places. This word is frequently used aloneand with the suffixes "branch," 
"spring," and "ville," in the Southern States, and refers to the cane which 
covers vast tracrts of country in the alluvial bottx^ms. 

Canfield; village in Mahoning County, Ohio, named for one of the original proprie- 
tors, Jonathan Canfield. 

Canisteo; river and town in Steuben County, New York. An Indian word mean- 
ing "board on the water." 

Cankapoja; lake at the head of Vermilion River, South Dakota. An Indian word 
meaning "light woo<l." 

Cannelburg; town in Daviess County, Indiana, named for the Buckeye Cannel Coal 
Company. 

Cannelton; city in Perry County, Indiana, village in Beaver County, Pennsylvania, 
and town in Kanawha County, West Virginia, named from the beds of cannel 
coal in the vicinity. 

Cannon; river in Minnesota. The name is a corruption of the name given by the 
early French, riviere aux canots, "river of the canoes." 

Cannon; county in Tennessee, named for Newton Cannon, governor of the State in 
1835-39. 

Canxumball; river in North Dakota, a translation of the French name, U bouleL 



68 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 268. 

Cannon Falls; village in Goodhue County, Minnesota, named from the river. 

Cannonsburg; town in Kent County, Michigan, named for Le Grand Cannon, of 
Troy, New York. 

Cannonsville; village in Delaware County, New York, named for Benjamin Can- 
non, early owner. 

Canoeridge; village in Indiana County, Pennsylvania, so named because it is situ- 
ated on the highest point on the west branch of the Susquehanna River to which 
a canoe could be pushed. 

Canoga; village in Seneca County, New York, named from a lai^ spring which 
affords permanent motive power for two mills. An Indian word meaning **oil 
floating on the water." 

Canon; a name given by the Spaniards to narrow mountain gorges or deep ravines. 
Various places, sometimes spelled cafion, others canyon, named from their prox- 
imity to gorges; such as Canyon ville, Oregon, and Canyon, Colorado. A Spanish 
word meaning "tube," or "funnel." 

Canon de TJgalde; pass in Texas named for a Mexican general. 

Canonicut; island in Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island, named for Canonicus, an 
Indian chief of the Narragansett tribe, a friend of Roger Williams. 

Canonsburg; town in Washington County, Pennsylvania, laid out by and named 
for Col. John Cannon. 

Canoochee; river, and village in Emanuel County, in Georgia. An Indian word said 
to be derived from ikanodshi, "graves are there." 

Cantara; town in Siskiyou County, California. A Spanish word meaning a "large- 
mouthed pitcher." 

Canterbury; town in Windham County, Connecticut, and villages in Kent County, 
Delaware, Merrimack County, New Hampshire, and Mingo County, West Vir- 
ginia, named from the English city. 

Canton; numerous places in the country, which derive their name, either directly 
or indirectly, from the city in China.' 

Cantrall; village in Sangamon County, Illinois, named for its founder. 

Capac; town in St. Clair County, Michigan, named for Manco Capac, the first 
emperor or chief of the Peruvian empire. The word, manco, is said to mean 
"chief." 

Cape Elizabeth; town in Cumberland County, Maine, named from the cape, which 
was named for Queen Elizabeth of England. 

Cape Girardeau; county, and city in same county, in Missouri, named for Sieur 
Girardot, of Kaskaskia. 

Cape Horn; station on the Central Pacific Railroad in Placer County, California. 
A difficult curve and grade, and spoken of as "rounding Cape Horn," after the 
South American cape. 

Capell; mountain and fort in California, named for an officer. 

Cape May; county, and city in same county, in New Jersey, named from the cape 
named for Cornells Jacobse May, a navigator in the employ of the Dutch West 
Indian Company. 

Cape Vincent; town in Jefferson County, New York, named for Vincent, son of 
L<^ Ray de Chaumont. 

Capitan; village in Santa Barbara County, California. The Spanish form for 
"captain" or "leader." 

Capitol; peak in Colorado, so named from its form. 

Carancahua; village in Jackson County, Texas, named for the Karankawa tribe of 
Indians. 

Carbon; a name of frequent occurrence in the country, given to indicate the pres- 
ence of coal deposits. Counties in Montana, Pennsylvania, Utah, and Wyoming 
are so called. Various suffixes, such as '*dale," "hill," etc., are also used. 



OAMNWT.l PLACE NAME8 IN THE UNITED STATE8. 69 

Carbon Cliff; village in Rock Island County, Illinois, named from its location on a 
hillside and its proximity to coal mines. 

Cardiff; villages in Jefferson County, Alabama, Garfield County, Colorado, and 
Onondaga County, New York, named from the city in Wales. 

Cardington; township and village in Morrow County, Ohio, so named because the 
carding machine was the introduction of the fir»t industry in the village. 

Cardwell; village in Dunklin County, MisHouri, named for Frank Cardwell, of Para- 
gould, Arkansas. 

Carencro; town in Lafayette Parish, Louisiana, so named because large flocks of 
buzzards roosted in the cypress trees common in that neighborhood. A Creole 
word, meaning "buzzanl." 

Carey; village in Wyandot County, Ohio, named for Judge John Carey, a prominent 
resident. 

Carillo; village in Sonoma County, California. A Spanish word, meaning "be- 
loved." 

Carlinville; city in Macoupin County, lUinoiB, named for Thomas Carlin, governor 
of the State in 1834-42. 

Carlisle; county in Kentucky, named for John G. Carlisle, secretary of the treasury 
under President Cleveland. 

Carlisle; town in Middleec»x County, Massachusetts, named, according to Whitmore, 
for Charles Howard, Earl of Carlisle. Other authorities say it was named from 
the town in Scotland. 

Carlisle; borough in Cumberland County, Pennsylvania, named from the town in 
England. 

Carlisle; town in Union County, South Carolina, named for a prominent family. 

Carlsbad; town and health resort in San Di^o County, California, named from the 
town and springs in Bohemia. 

Carlstadt; borough in Bergen County, New Jersey, named by early German settlers 
from the town in Croatia. 

Carlton; county, and tor^n in same county, in Minnesota, named for Reuben B. 
Carlton, one of the first settlers and proprietors of Fond du I>ac, at the head of 
navigation on the St. Louis River. 

Carlton; town in Ravalli County, Montana, named for Robert Carlton, the owner 
of the land on which the town is located. 

Carlyle; township and city in Clinton County, Illinois, named for Thomas Carlyle 
by English colonists. 

Carmel; town in Penobscot County, Maine, and several other small places, named 
from the mountain in Palestine. 

Carmi; township and city in White County, Illinois, named by the settlers for the 
fourth son of Reuben. 

Oamadero; station on the Southern Pacific Railroad in Santa Clara County, Cali- 
fornia. A Spanish term, meaning ''bait maker.'* 

Carnegie; borough in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, named for Andrew Carnegie. 

Camesville; town in Franklin County, Georgia, named for Col. T. P. Carnes, sr. 

Caro; village in Tuscola County, Michigan, a fanciful name given by its founder, 
W. E. Sherman. 

Carolina; two States of the Union, North Carolina and South Carolina. Near the 
middle of the sixteenth century, Jean Ribault visited the region and named it 
Carolina, in honor of his king, Charles IX of France, but the name never came 
into general use and soon disappeared. About 1628 this name was applied defi- 
nitely to that part of the country lying between Virginia and Florida, having 
been given in honor of Charles I of England. In an old manuscript, now in 
London, the following may be found : * * 1629-30, Feb. 10. The A ttomey-General 
18 prayed to grant by Patent 2 Degrees in Carolina," etc. In 1663 the name was 



70 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES, [bull. 256. 

definitely applieil to the province fjranted to proprietors by Charles II of Enjf- 

land. This province wa8 uanie<l in honor of the reigning king, and thus the old 

name given in honor of Charlefl I was retained. 
Caroline; county in Maryland, named in honor of Caroline Calvert, daughter oi 

Charles, Fifth Ixird Baltimore. 
Caroline; county in Virginia, named for the wife of George II. 
Carondelet; village in St. Ix>uis County, Missouri, named for Baron Carondelet 

Spanish commander-in-chief and governor of Louisiana in 1791. 
Carp; river and railroad station in Marquette County, Michigan. A translation of 

the Indian name literally meaning "big carp river.'* 
Carpentaria; village in Santa Barbara County, California. The Spanish form for 

** carpenter shop." 
Carringi^on; island in Great Salt Lake, Utah, named for a member of an exploring 

party. 
Carringrton; island in Yellowstone Lake, Yellowst/)ne Park, named for Campbell 

Carrington. 
Carrituck; plantation in Somerset County, Maine. An Indian word meaning 

** place where the water forms a semicircle around the land." 
Carrizo; village and creek in San Diego County, California. A Spanish word 

meaning ** common reed grass." 
Carroll; counties in Arkansas, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Mary- 
land, Mississippi, Missouri, New Hampshire, Ohio, and Virginia, and several 

small places, named for Charles Carroll, of Carrollton, Maryland. 
Carroll; county in Tennessee, named for William Carroll, governor in 1821-27. 
Carrollton; township in Carroll County, Arkansas; town in Carroll County, Georgia; 

cities in Carroll County, Iowa, and Carroll County, Kentucky; village in Carroll 

County, Maryland; town in Carroll County, Mississippi; city in Carroll County, 

Missouri; and village in Carroll County, Ohio; named from the estate of Charles 

Carroll. 
Carrollton; town in Cattaraugus County, New York, named for G. Carroll, an 

original proj)rietor. 
Carrying Place; plantation in Somerset County, Maine, so name<l because the 

Indians had to carrv their canoes from one waterwav to another en route to 

Canada. 

{Carson; pass, lake, river, and valley in Nevada, and peak in Utah; 
Carson City; city in Ornisby ('ounty, Nevada. Named for Christopher, or Kit 
Carson, the lUx'ky Mountain guitle. 
Carson; county in Texas, named for S. P. Carson, si^cretary of state under David G. 

Burnet. 
Carter; county, and village in same county, in Kentucky, named for William G. 

Carter, a meml)er of the State senate. 
Carter; county in Missouri, naine<l for Zimri C-arter, an early settler. 
Carter; county, and village in same county, in Tennesst'e, named for Gen. Landon 

Carter. 
Carteret; county in North C'an^lina, named for Sir George Carteret, one of the pro- 
prietors. 
Cartersville; city in Bartow County, Georgia, named for Col. F. Carter, of Mil- 

ledgeville. 
Carterville; city in Williamson County, Illinois, named for I^ban (^arter, the first 

st'ttler and discoverer of coal in the vicinitv. 
Carthage; city in Jasper County, Missouri; village in Jefferson County, New York; 

and many other places; named from the ancient city in Africa. 
Caruthersville; city in IVmiscot County, Missouri, named for Hon. Samuctl 

Caruthers, of Madison County. 



GAitNETT.] 1>LACE NAMES iN THfi UNITED STATES. 71 

Carver; town in Plymouth County, Massachusetts, named for John Carver, first 
governor of Plymouth colony. 

Carver; county, and town in same county, in Minnesota, named for Capt. Jonathan 
Carver, who, in 1766-67, traveled from Boston to the Minnesota River, and 
wintered amonji; the Sioux near the site of New Ulm, Minnesota. 

Cary; village in Wake County, North Carolina, named for the temperance lecturer 
of Ohio. 

Cary Station; village in McHenry County, Illinois, named for one of its founders. 

Caryville; town, in Genesee County, New York, named for Col. Alfred Cary, early 
settler. 

Casa Blanca; villages in Kiverside County, California, and Goliad County, Texas. 
A Spanish phrase meaning "white house." 

Cascade; county in Montana, so named because it contains the great falls of the Mis- 
souri River. 

Cascade; chain of mountains in Oregon and Washington, so called from the cascades 
in the Columbia River breaking through the range. 

Cascade Locks; town in Wasco County, Oregon, situated at the locks built at the 
cascades in the Columbia River. 

Casco; bay and town in Cumberland County, Maine. From an Indian word mean- 
ing, according to some authorities, "resting place," or "crane bay." 

Casetas; village in Ventura County, California. A Spanish word meaning 

"cottages." 
Casey; county in Kentucky; 

Caseyville; town in Union County, Kentucky. Named for Col. William Casey, a 
pioneer of the State. 

Caseyville; township and village in St. Clair County, Illinois, named for Lieutenant- 
Governor Badock Casey, member of Congress from Illinois in 1833. 

Cash City; town in Clark County, Kansas, named for its founder. Cash Henderson. 

Casliie; river in North Carolina, named for an Indian chief. 

Cashion; town in Kingfisher County, Oklahoma, named for Roy Cashion, a Rough 
Rider in the Spanish- American war, and the only one of the Oklahoma contin- 
gent killed in the charge up San Juan hill. 

Cass; counties in Illinois, Indiana, and Iowa; county and river in Michigan; county 
and lake in Minnesota; county in Nebraska; and county and village in same 
county in Texas; named for Gen. Lewis Cass, governor of Michigan in 1820. 

Cass; county in North Dakota, nameii for Gen. George W. Cass, director of the 
Northern Pacific Railroad. 

Cassadaga; lake, creek, and village in Chautauqua C/Ounty, New York. An Indian 
word, meaning "under the rocks." 

Casselton; town in Ca.«s County, North Dakota, named for Gen. George W. Cass, 
director of the Northern Pacific Railroad. 

Cassia; county and creek in Idaho. A corrupted form of the name of an early French 

settler. 
Cass Lake; village in Cass C/Ounty, Minnesota; 
Cassopolis; village in Cass County, Michigan; 

Cassville; village in Grant County, Wisconsin. Named for Gen. Lewis Cass, gov- 
ernor of Michigan in 1820. 

Castalia; town in Erie County, Ohio, named from the ancient fountain at the foot 
of Mount Parnassus in Phoi*is. 

Castile; town in Wyoming County, New York, named from the ancient kingdom 
of Spain. ' 

Castine;' town in Hancock County, Maine, named for Baron de St. Castine, a French 
nobleman, by whom it was settled. 

Castle; peak in the Sierra Nevada, California, so named from its conical shape. 



72 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [buluSSS. 

Castle; peak in Elk Mountains, Colorado, named from its castellated summit 

Castle; island in the Iludnon River, New York, so trailed from a stockade built by 
the Dutch as a protection from the Indians. 

Castle Bock; towns in Douglas County, Colorado, and Grant County, Wisconsin, 
nanie<l from the (Castle Rooks. 

Castle Bock; town in Summit County, Utah, so called from a vast rock which bears 
a res<?mblan(« to a ruined castle. 

Castleton; village in Stark County, Illinois, named for Dr. Alfred Castle, who was 
instrumental in intnxlucing a railroad into the settlement. 

Castleton; villagti in RensselacT County, New York, named from an ancient Indian 
castle on the adjacent hills. 

Castleton; town in Rutland (.'ounty, Vermont, named for one of the original pro- 
prietors. 

Castor; bayou in I^uisiana, and river in Missouri, so named because .of the preva- 
lence of beavers. From the Greek, kaMor^ meaning ** beaver." 
(Castro; county in Tt^xas; 
Castroville; town in Medina County, Texas. Named for Henri Castro, who settled 
r>00 immigrants in Texas under Government contract between 1842 and 1845. 

Caswell; county in North Carolina, named for Richani Caswell, governor of the 
State in 1777-1779. 

Catahoula; lake and parish in Louisiana, named for an extinct Indian tribe. 

Cataract; village in Owen County, Indiana, so named on account of the falls in the 
river near. 

Cataraque; river in New York. An Indian word meaning "fort in the water," 
the early name of Lake Ontario. 

Catasauqua; creek and borough in I^high County, Pennsylvania. A Delaware 
Indian word, a corruption of gottoshackij '*the earth thirsts for rain," or 
** parched land." 

Catawba; river in North Carolina and South Carolina; county, and town in same 
county, in North Carolina; village in Clark County, Ohio; town in Roanoke 
County, Vii>rinia; town in Marion County, West Virginia; island in Lake Erie; 
and several other places; named from the Indian tribe. The word maybe from 
the Choctaw, katajm^ meaning "cutoff," "separated." 

Catawissa; branch of the Susquehanna River, and lx>rough and township in Colum- 
bia County, Pennsylvania. A corruption of the Indian word gcUtawiti, "grow- 
ing fat," though some authorities say the name signiOes "clear water." 

Cathaneu; river of Maine. An Indian word meaning "l)ent," or "crooked." 

Catharine; town in Schuyler County, New York, name<l for Catharine Montour, 
the wife of an Indian sachem. 

Cathedral; peak in the Sierra Nevada, in Mariposa County, California, so named 
from its resemblance to a spire. 

Catheys; creek in Humboldt County, California, named for an old settler. 

Cathlamet; point and town in Wahkiakum County, Washington, named from the 
Indian tribe, Kathlamet. 

Cathlapootle; river in Washington, named for the Cathlapotle Indian tribe. 

Catlettsb\irg; city in Boyd County, Kentucky, named for Horatio Catlett, one of 
the first settlers. 

Catlin; township and village in Vermilion County, Illinois, named for J. M. Catlin, 
a railroad official. 

Cato; town in Cayuga County, New York, named by the State land board in honor 
of the distinguished Roman. 

Catoctin; stream in Virginia tributary to the Potomac River, An Indian word 
meaning "great village." 



i 



GANNETT.] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 73 

Catskill; creek, mountains, and town in Greene County, New York. The moun- 
tains were called katshenjs by the Dutch, from the number of wild-cats found in 
them, and the creek, which flows from the mountains, was called KaterskiUj 
"tomcata* creek." 

Cattaraugus; county, village in same county, and creek in New York. An Indian 
word meaning ** bad smelling shore." 

Caucomgomoc; lake in Maine. A corruption of an Indian word, meaning ''big 
gull lake." 

Ca.ugw&geL; creek in Erie County, New York. A corruption of the Indian gag- 
waga, "creek of the Cat nation." 

Causton; bluff in Georgia, named for Thomas Causton. 

Ca^nlier; county, and town in Pembina County , in North Dakota, nameil for Charles 
Cavalier, one of the old settlers in the Lower Re<l River Valley. 

Cave in Rock; village in Hardin County, Illinois, named from a cave in a rocky 
bluff on the Ohio River. 

Cawanesque; branch of the Chemung River, in New York. An Indian word 
meaning "at the long island." 

Cawanshanock; creek in Armstrong County, Pennsylvania. An Indian word 
derived from gaimin^chhamif, ** green briar stream." 

Cawker; city in Mitchell County, Kansas, named for E. H. Cawker. 

Cayadutta; creek in Fulton County, New York; stated by Beauchamp to mean 
"stone standing out of the water." The origin is thought by Baylies to be 
purely conjectural. The most noticeable feature to which the name could apply 
was a large rock in midstream below some beautiful falls. 

Cayncos; town in San Luis Obispo County, California. A Spanish word meaning 
" small fishing boats." 

Cayugra; county, village in same county, and lake in New York. An Indian word, 
the derivation of which is in dispute. The generally accepted theory is that it 
means "long lake," having been originally applied to the lake, which is 38 
miles long and from 1 to 3 J miles wide. Morgan derives it from gireugiirhf 
" the mucky land," while others say that it signifies "canoes pulled out of the 
water." One of Iroquois tribes was so called. Six small places in the country 
bear this name. 

CayxiBe; village in Umatilla County, Oregon, named from an Indian tribe. 

Casadero; village in Sonoma County, California. A Spanish term meaning "place 
for pursuing game." 

Caasenovia; township in Woodford County, Illinois, and villages in Pipestone County, 
Minnesota, and Richland County, Wisconsin, named for the town in New York. 

Caasenovia; lake and town in Madison County, New York, named by its founder. 
Col. John. Linklaen, for Theophilus Cazenove, general agent of the Holland 
Land Company. 

{Cecil; county in Maryland; 
Cecilton; town in Cecil County, Maryland, named for Cecil Calvert, second Lord 
Baltimore. 
Cedar; this word, with various suffixes, forms the name of numerous features 
throughout the country. Counties in Iowa, Missouri, and Nebraska, 153 post- 
offices, with or without suffixes, and numerous rivers, creeks, etc., bear the name, 
referring to the presence of the tree in the vicinity. 
Cedar Keys; town in Levy County, Florida, named from a group of islands in the 

harbor. 
Celeron; island near Detroit, Michigan, named for Sieur Celeron, commandant at 

Detroit in early days. 
Celina; village in Mercer County, Ohio, named from Salina in New York; the 
orthography was changed to avoid confusion. 



74 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. Tbull. 266. 

Center; town in Sharp County, Arkansafi, and county in Pennsylvania, so named 

because of their geographical siUiation. One hundred and fifty places in the 

country' bear this name, alone or with various prefixes. 
Center Hcirbor; town in Belknap County, New Hampshire, named for one of the 

first settlers, Col. Joseph Senter. 
Central; town in Pickens County, South Carolina, so named because of its geograph- 
ical situation. Twenty-eight other places, with and without suffixes, are so called. 
Central City; town in Gilpin County, Colorado, so named because it was originally 

the center of several mining camps. 
Central City; town in Huntington County, West Virginia, so named because it is 

nearly halfway between Guyandotte and Catlettsburg. 
Centralia; township and city in Marion County, Illinois, so named' by the Illinois 

Central Railroad from its location at the junction of the main line and the 

Chicago line. 
Central Lake; village in Antrim County, Michigan, situated on a lake which is in 

the center of a chain of lakes and rivers in the county. 
Ceredo; village in Wayne County, West Virginia, so named by its founder because 

of the bountiful harvest of com upon its site. The name is derived from Ceres, 

the goddess of corn and harvests. 
Cerrillos; town in Santa F^ County, New Mexico. A Spanish word meaning ** little 

eminences,*' or "little hills." 
Cerritos; village in Los Angeles County, California. A Spanish word meaning 

'Mittle hills." 
Cerro Colorado; a conical hill of reddish color in Colorado. The name was given 

bv the Mexicans, and means "red hill." 
Cerro Gordo; village in Piatt County, Illinois, county in Iowa, and village in 

Columbus County, North Carolina, name<l from the Mexican battlefield. The 

words mean 'Marge (around) hill." 
Ceylon; village in Erie County, Ohio, and five other places, named from the island 

off the coast of India. 
Chadboum; town in Columbus County, North Carolina, named for a prominent 

business man of Wilmington, North Carolina. 
Chadds Ford; village in Chester County, Pennsylvania, named for the proprietor, 

Francis Chadsey. 
Chadron; city in Dawes County, Nebraska, named for an old French squawman. 
Chadwick; village in Carroll County, Illinois, named for'an engineer who was con- 
nected with the building of the first railroad through that section. 
Chafifee; county in Colorado, named for JeroTie B. Chafft»e, United States Senator. 
Chaffin; bluff in Virginia, named for the family who owned it. 
Chagrin; river in Ohio. Two different theories obtain in regard to this name, one 

l>eing that a party of surveyors under Harvey Rice, so name<l it because of their 

disappointment at finding that they were not following the course of the Cuya- 
hoga River. Howe says that it is named from the Indian word shagritif which 

is said to mean " clear." 
Chagrin Falls; village in Cuyahoga C-ounty, Ohio, named from the river. 
Chamberlain; lake in Maine, nanieil for an old settler. 
Chamberlain; city in Brule County, South Dakota, named for Selah Chamberlain, 

a director of the Chicago, Milwaukee and Saint Paul Railroad. 
Chambers; county in Alabama, named for Senator Henry C. Chambers of that 

State. 
Chambers; county in Texas, named for Thomas J. Chambers, major-general in the 

Texas revolution. 
Chambersburg*; township in Pike County, Illinois, named for a family of first 

settlers. 



OAiWKTT.) PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 75 

Clianibersbiir^; town in Franklin County, Pennsylvania, named for a Scotchman 

who founded it, Benjamin Chambers. 
Chainpaig:n; county, and city in same county, in Illinois, named from thp county in 

Ohio. 
Cliampaig:n; county in Ohio, so named from the general character of the country. 

From the French, champ j meaning "fields," and plains, "flat.** 
Champion; town in Jefferson County, New York, and township in Trumbull 

County, Ohio, named for Gen. Henry Champion, of Connecticut. 
Champlain; lake, and town in Clinton County, in New York, named for the discov- 
erer of the lake, Samuel de Champlain, a French naval officer, who explored 

that country in 1609. 
Chancellorsville; village in Spottsylvania County, Vii^^inia, named for a family in 

the neighborhood. 
Chandeleur; bay and islands on the coast of Louisiana, so named because they were 

discovered on Candlemas or Chandeleur day. 
Chandlersville; village in Muskingum County, Ohio, named for Samuel Chandler. 
Chandlerville; village in Case County, Illinois, named for Dr. Charles Chandler, 

its founder. 
Chaney; creek in Mississippi, named for Robert Chaney, an early settler in Perry 

County. 
Cbanhassan; river in Minnesota and North Dakota. An Indian word meaning 

**pale bark wood,'* or ** sugar tree." 
dianhassen; village in Carver . County, Minnesota. An Indian word meaning 

**firestone." 
Cbankie ; creek in South Dakota. Coues says it is clipped from ischehkanakasahtapahj 
** breech clout." Haines gives chanka^ "firestone," so named from a very hard rock 

of vitrified sandstone found near its mouth. 
Cbanlers; purchase in Coos County, New Hampshire, named for Jeremiah Chanler, 

an early owner. 
Chanopa; lake in Minnesota. A Sioux Indian word meaning ''two wood." 
Cbansliayapi; river in Minnesota. A Sioux Indian word meaning "redwood," 

or "post painted red." 
Chanute; city in Neosho County, Kansas, named for O. Chanute, civil engineer 

with the Leavenworth, I-Awrence and Galveston Railroad. 
Chapa; river in Minne^<ota. An Indian word meaning *'l)eaver." 
Chapel Hill; town in Orange Comity, North Carolina, named from a colonial chapel 

of the Church of England, built on a hill. 
Chapin; village in Morgan County, Illinois, named for its founders, Charles and 

Horace Chapin. 
Chapin; town in Lexington County, South Carolina, named for a family of that name. 
Chapman; borough in Northampton County, Pennsylvania, named for William 

Chapman, who owned slate quarries there. 
Chappaqua; town in Westchester County, New York. An Indian word meaning 

edible root of some kind. 
Chappaquiddick; island in Dukes County, Massachusetts. From an Indian word, 

cheppiaquidnet ** separated island." So calle<i because separated from Marthas 

Vineyard by a narrow strait. 
Chapparal; village in Butte County, California. From the Spanish, meaning a 

*' plantation of evergreen oaks." 
Chardon; village in Geauga Comity, Ohio, named for a proprietor, Peter Chardon 

Brooks. 
Chariton; township and city in Lucas County, Iowa, and county, river, and town in 

Putnam County, Missouri. The origin of the name is in doubt. The most gen- 
erally accepted theory is that it was given by the early French, but that the 



76 PLACE KAME8 IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 256 

original form of the word has been lost, hence the translation is impossible. 

Some per^onn say that there was a French trader who had his agency near the 

mouth of the river, whose name was similar. 
Charlemont; town in Franklin County, Massachusetts, named for the Elarl of 

Charlemont. 
Charles; county in Maryland, name<i in honor of Charles Calvert, son of Cecilius 

Calvert, second Ix>rd Baltimore. 
rCharles; river in Massachusetts, and point in Northampton County, Vii^nia; 
tCharles City; county in Virginia. Named for Charles I of England. 
Charles City; township and city in Floyd County, Iowa, named by Kelley St. Charles 

for his son. 
Charles Mix; county in South Dakota, name<l for a pioneer citizen. 
Charleston; townslii]> and city in Coles Ck)unty, Illinois, named for Charles Morton, 

one of the founders. 
Charleston; town in Penol)scot C'ounty, Maine, named for an early settler, Charles 

Vaughan. 
Charleston; town in Tallahatchie County, Mississippi, named from Charleston, 

South Carolina. 
Charleston; county, and city in same county, in South Carolina. The city was 

named first and was originally called Charles Town, in honor of Charles II of 

England. 
Charleston; city in Kanawha County, West Virginia, named for Charles Clendman, 

father of George Clendman, the founder. 
Charlestown; ])art of Boston, Massachusetts, named for Charles I of England. 
Charlestown; town in Sullivan C'Ounty, New Hampshire, named for Sir Charles 

Knowles. 
Charlestown; town in Washington County, Rhode Island, named either for King 

Charles II of England, or for Charles E<lward, the pretender. 
Charles Town; town in Jefferson County, West Virginia, name<l for the brother of 

George Washington, Charles Washington, who owned the land upon which the 

town was Imilt. 
Charlevoix; county, and village in same county, in Michigan, named for Pere Fran- 
cis X. Charlevoix, a missionary and historian. 
Charley Apopka; creek in Florida. A corruption of the Indian word, tsahpopho- 

katchcfj ** catfish eating creek.'* 
Charloe; village in Paulding County, Ohio, named for an Ottawa Indian chief. 
Charlotte; county in Virginia, and village in Monroe County, New York, named for 

Charlotte Augusta, Princess of Wales. 
Charlotte; city in Mec^klenburg County, North Carolina, named for the wife of 

George III of England. 
Charlottesville; city in Albemarle County, Virginia, named for Charlotte Augusta, 

Princess of Wales. 
Charlton; county, and village in same county, in Georgia, nameii for Robert M. 

Charlton, poet, and United States St^nator in 1852. 
Charlton; town in Worcester County, Massachusetts, named for Sir Francis Charl- 
ton, gentleman of the i)rivy chamber in 1755. 
Chartiers; two creeks, and townships in Allegheny and Washington counties, Penn- 
sylvania, name<l for Peter Chartiers, a noted half-breed spy and Indian hunter. 
Chase; county in Kansas, named for Salmon P. Chase, secretary of the treasury 

under President Lincoln. 
Chase; county in Nebraska named for a former mayor of Omaha. 
Chaska; city in Carver County, Minnesota. A Sioux Indian name for a first-bom 

son. 



GANNBTT.] PLACE NAMES IN THE XTNTTED STATES. 77 

Chateausray; river, lake, and village in Franklin County, New York, named from 
the town in France. The name was applied to a seigniory created in 1673, and 
was applied to the river which traversed it, and the appellation naturally fol- 
lowed the stream to its source. 

Chatham; county in Georgia, towns in Bamstahle County Massachusetts, and 
Carroll County, New Hampshire; borough in Morris County, New Jersey; vil- 
lage in Columbia County, New York, county in North Carolina, and many other 
places, named for William Pitt, Earl of Chatham. 

Chatsworth; township and town in Livingston County, Illinois, named from the 
country home of the Duke of Devonshire, England. 

Chattahoochee; river, county, and village in Fulton County, Georgia, and town in 
Gadsden County, Florida; a Creek Indian word meaning ** painted stone.** 

Chatixnont; village in Jefferson County, New York, named for Le Ray de Cahumont, 
an early proprietor. 

Chautauqua; county in Kansas; county, lake, and town in same county, in New 
York. An Indian word which has been the subject of much controversy. 
Webster says it is a corruption of a word which means ** foggy place.** Another 
derivation gives the meaning as *' bag tied in the middle,*' referring to the shape 
of the lake. It is also said to mean ''place where a child was washed away.** 
Dr. Peter Wilson, an educated Seneca, says it is literally ** where the fish was 
taken out.** Other meanings given are ** place of easy death,'* and "place 
where one was lost.'* 

Chaves; county in New Mexico, named for Mariano Chaves, governor in 1836. 

Cheanill; chain of hills in Oregon. An Indian word meaning ''bald hills.*' 

Cheat; river in West Virginia, so called because of the variableness of the volume of 
water. 

Cheatham; county in Tennessee, name for Benjamin Cheatham, a Confederate 
general. 

Chebanse; town in Iroquois County, Illinois, named for an Indian chief. The word 
means "little duck." • . 

Chebea^e Island; village in Cumberland County, Maine. The name is probably 
derived from cheheeg, "great waters,'* or "wide exiyanse of water.** 

Cheboygan; river, country, and city in same county, in Michigan. An Indian word 
variously interpreted. Haines says it is composcni of two wordn, chey "great,** 
and poygarif "pipe.** Another derivation gives the meaning, "the river that 
comes out of the ground.** The Michigan Historical Society gives chabwegauj a 
place of ore." 

Checaque; river in Iowa. An Indian word meaning "skunk.*' 

Chectemunda; creek in Montgomery County, New York. An Indian word mean- 
ing "twin sister.** 

Cheektowaga; town in Erie County, New York. Derived from the Indian words 
juk do waah geh, "place of the crab apple tree." 

Cheesechankamuck; eastern branch of Farmington River, Connecticut. An Indian 
word meaning "great fishing place at the weir." 

Cheetiery Sopochnie; chain of volcanic mountains in the Aleutian Islands. Indian 
words meaning "four mountains." 

Chefimcte; river in Louisiana. An Indian word meaning "chinkapin.** 

Chehalis; river, county, and city in Lewis (>>unty, in Washington, named from an 
Indian tribe. The word means "sand*' or "inlanders." 

Chehtanbeh; river in Minnesota. An Indian word meaning "sparrow hawk*s 
nest" 

Chelan; county and lake in Washington. An Indian word meaning "deep water** 
or "big water." 



78 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bcll.25& 

Chelmsford; town in Middlesex County, Massachusetts, named from the English 
town. 

Chelsea; city in Suffolk County, Massachusetts, named from the English town. 

Chelsea; t^^wns in Washtenaw County, Michigan, and Orange County, Vermont; 
indirectly name<i from the town in England. 

Chemawa; village in Marion County, Oregon. An Indian word said to mean 
**our old home.'* 

^Chemehuevis; valley in Arizona, named from a tribe of Indians. 

Chemung; river, county, and town in same county, in New York. An Indian 
word, meaning *' big horn" or ** big horn in the water." The river was so 
named from the tradition of a huge foHsil tusk, supposed to be of some prehistoric 
monster, having l)een found in the l>ank of the river. 

Chenango; river, county, and town in Broome County, in New York. An Indian 
word meaning "bull thietleH." 

Ch§ne; bayou in ]x>uiHiana. A French word meaning **oak." 

Cheney; creek in Huml)oldt County, California, named for an old settler. 

Cheney; city in St^lgwick C-ounty, Kansas, named for P. B. Cheney, stockholder of 
the AU'hison, Toi>eka and Santa Fe Railroad. 

Cheney; town in Sj)<)kane County, Washington, named for Benjamin P. Cheney, 
of Boston, one <>f the originators of the Northern Pacific Kailroa<^l. 

Chenoa; township and city in MclA^an County, Illinois. From the Indian wonl 
*'c/irHo/m," meaning '* white dove." 

Chepachet; river, and village in Providence C-ounty, in Khoile Island, and village in 
Herkimer (/ounty, New York. An Indian word meaning ** where the stream 
divides," or ''place of sejmration." 

Chepultepec; t<jwn in Blount County, Alabama. An Aztec Indian wonl meaning 
** grasshopper mountiun." 

Cheputnaticook; lake in Maine. An Indian word meaning ^*greathill lake." 

Cheraw; town in Chesterfield County, South Carolina, named from the Sara or 
Cheraw Indian trilxi. 

Cherokee; county, and town in C'Oll>ert County, in Alalmma; township in Benton 
County, Arkansas; village in Butte County, California; county, and village in 
same county, in Georgia; county, and city in same county, in Iowa; nation in 
Indian Territory; county, and city in Crawford County, in Kansas; villages in 
Lawrence County, Kentu(!ky, and Lowndes County, Mississippi; county, and 
village in Swain County, in North Carolina; post-oflfice in Woods County, Okla- 
homa; county, and jmst-otfice in Spartanburg County, in South Carolina; village 
in Liuiderdale County, Tennessee; county, and village in San Saba County, in 
Texas; and vilhige in Marathon County, Wisconsin; named for an Indian tribe. 
The meaning is uncertain. 

Cherry; county in Nebraska, named for Lieutenant Cherry, United States Army. 

Cherry Creek; town and creek in Chautauqua County, New York, named by Joshua 
Bentley, jr., a surveyor who found the center of the town to be on a small island 
in a stream <m which was a small cherry tree. 

Cherryvale; city in Montgomery County, Kansas, in the valley of Cherry Creek. 
The name "Cherry" occurs fre<iuently with and without suflixes, generally 
referring to the i)resence of the tree. 

Chesaning; village in Saginaw County, Michigan. An Indian wr)rd meaning **big 
rock," the name having been given because of a large rw.k near the place. 

Chesapeake; bay in Maryland which gives name to several places in the country. 
An Indian name variously explained, but which seems to be a contraction of the 
Delaware name hitshishicapeaky "great salty bay." 

Cheshire; towns in New Haven County, Connecticut, and Berkshire County, Massa- 
chusetts; township in All^jan County, Michigan; county in New Hampshire; 



GAiwErr.] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 79 

and villages in Ontario County, New York, and Gallia County, Ohio, named 
from the county in England. 

Chester; city in Randolph County, Illinois, and town in Hampden County, Massa- 
chusetts, named from the city in England. 

Chester; county in Pennsylvania, named by George Pearson, a friend of William 
Penn, in honor of the native place of Penn. 

Chester; county, and town in same county, in South Carolina, named from Chester 
County, Pennsylvania. 

Chester; county in Tennessee, named for Robert I. Chester, an old settler. 

Chesterfield; town in Hampshire County, Massachusetts, and counties in South 
Carolina and Virginia, named for Philip Dormer Stanhope, fourth Earl of Ches- 
terfield. 

Chesterfield; county in North Carolina, named from the town in Derbyshire, Eng- 
land. 

Chesterville; village in Albany County, New York, named for Rev. John Chester, 
of Albany. 

Chestnut; twenty-seven post-ofiices and many natural features bear this name, indi- 
cating the presence of the tree. 

Chesiincook; lake and town in IMscataquis County, Maine. An Indian word which, 
according to Judge Potter, means "goose place." Thoreau gives, ** place where 
many streams empty.'* Haines says that it signifies ** great goose place.** 

Chetimaches; lake in Louisiana, which is alno known as Grand I^ke, the name of 
an Indian tribe; the word is from the Choctaw language and means, " they pos- 
sess cooking vessels.** 

Chetopa; city in Labette County, Kansas. An Indian word meaning "four houses,** 
the town having been built on the site of four houses occupied by the wives of 
an Osage chief. 

Chewaukan; marsh in Oregon. An Indian word meaning " water potato.** 

Cheyenne; county and mountain in Colorado, county in Kansas, county and river 
in Nebraska, city in Laramie County, Wyoming, and a number of other places, 
named for the Indian tribe. The Cheyennes call themselves DzUzistas, The 
popular name is a corruption of the name given them by the Sioux, and said to 
signify "aliens.** 

Chicacoznico; creek on the eastern shore of Maryland. An Indian word meaning 
"place where turkeys are plenty." 

Chicag^o; city and river in Illinois. The Ojibwa Indian form, she-ka^-ong, signifies 
"wild onion place,'* from a root form implying a "bad smell.** 

Chichester; town in Merrimack County, New Hampshire, and village in Ulster 
County, New York, named from the city in England. 

Chickahominy; river in Virginia, which acconling to De Vere is named from the 
Indian word, checahavihiendj "land of much grain," so called because it flows 
through fertile lowlands. Heckewelder, with doubtful authority, says that it 
is corrupted from Tswhikene-mahoni, "lick frequented by turkeys." 

Chickies; creek and village in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. The name is 
derived from the Indian, chiki^v<ilm\go^ meaning "place of crabs." Hecke- 
welder says the meaning is " place of crawfish," and Sener states it is a corrup- 
tion of chickesalunga. 

Chickisalnnga; creek in Pennsylvania. An Indian word derived from chickiswa- 
lunga, "place of crawfish,** or "place of crab fish.** 

Chickomuxen; creek in Maryland. An Indian word meaning " fishing place at a 
weir.** 

Ohickwolnepy; creek in New Hampshire. An Indian word meaning "near great 
pond," 



80 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bxjll.2W. 

Chico; township and city in Butte County, California. A Spanish word meaning 

*Mittle." 
Chicomico; creek in Connecticut. An Indian derivatiom from she or chCf ''great/' 

and komuk, or comacoy ** house," or "incloeed place." 
Chicopee; river, falls, and city in Hampden County, in Mafisachusetts. An Indian 

word, meaning ** cedar tree,*' or "birch-bark place." 
Chicora; town in lierkeley County, South Carolina. From an Indian word, ywcAi- 

kere, meaning **yuchi are there,* or "yuchi over there.** 
Chicot; county in Arkansas and creek m New York. A French word meaning 

*' wood;*' a term also applied to a stub or broken piece of wood. 
Childress; county; and town in same county, in Texas, named for Geoiige C. Chil- 
dress, author of the Texas declaration of independence. 
Chillicothe; city in Peoria County, Illinois, towns in Wapello County, Iowa, and 

Livingston County, Missouri, and city in Ross County, Ohio, named from a 

Shawnee subtribe. The correct Shawnee form signifies " man made perfect** 

(Gatschet. ) 
Chillisquaque; creek and village in Northumberland County, Pennsylvania. A 

Delaware Indian word meaning ** place of snowbirds.** 
Chilmark; town in Dukes County, Massachusetts, named from the town in England. 
Chilson; lake and village in Essex County, New York, named for a family of early 

settlers. 
Chilton; county, and village in Clarke County, in Alabama, named for William P. 

Chilton, of that State. 
Chilton; city in Calumet County, Wisconsin, named Chillington, from the home of 

an early settler, Chillington Hall, England, but the county clerk in recording 

the name, omitted the second syllable, hence Chilton. 
Chimney Bock; town in Rutherford County, North Carolina, named from nearby 

cliffs, which l^ear a likeness to colossal chimneys. 
Chinook; village in Pacific County, Washington, named from a tribe of Indians. 
Chinquapin; town in Duplin County, North Carolina. The name is the Indian 

name for **nut,** or "small chestnut.*' 
Chippewa; county and river in Michigan, and counties in Minnesota and Wisconsin; 
Chippewa Falls; city in Chip^iewa County, W^isconsin. Named from a noted Indian 

tribe. The proi)er Indian form is Ojibwa. 
Chisago; county and lake in Minnesota, name<i by W. H. C. Folsom, from two 

Ojibwa Indian words, kichiy "large," and mga, "fair'* or "lovely.** 
Chissesessick; rivers in Virginia and Georgia. An Indian word meaning ''place of 

blue birds." 
Chittenango; creek and village in Madison County, New York. Moi^gan says it is 

an Indian won!, meaning " where the sun shines out; " other authorities trans- 
late it "waters divide and run into." 
Chittenden; county in Wmiont, named for Thomas Chittenden, governor of the 

State hi 17^K)-97. 
Chittenden; peak in Yellowstone Park, named for George B. Chittenden. 
Chivington; village in Kiowa County, Colorado, near the battle ground where 

Colonel Chivington massacred the Cheyenne Indians in 1864. 
Chocorua; peak in the White Mountains, New Hampshire, said to be named for a 

prophet-chief of the Socoki Indians, who, being pursued to this lofty peak by a 

white hunter, leaped over the precipice and met his death. 
Choctawhatchee; bay and river in Florida. An Indian word meaning ''river of 

the Choctaws." 
Chohwajica; lake in Minnesota. An Indian word meaning "willow." 
Chokin; lake in Minnesota. An Indian word meaning " place of roasting,** the lake 



OANNETT.] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 81 

probably having been so named because the Dakota Indians roasted the teep- 
winna root, which they used for food, on the shore of the lake. 

Chokio; village in Stevens County, Minnesota. An Indian word meaning "middle.** 

Chokoloskee; town in Lee County, Florida. The name is derived from the Indian 
word, chokoUakQf meaning **red houses.** 

Choteau; county, and township in Teton County, in Montana, and county in South 
Dakota, named for the Chouteau family, two brothers of which, Auguste and 
Pierre, founded St. Louis. 

Cliouptyataiika; lake in Minnesota. An Indian word meaning ''big dry wood.** 

Chowan; river and county in North Carolina, named from the Chowanoke Indian 
tribe. The word is a variant of the Algonquian «orMtin, ** south.** One author- 
ity derives the word from sowan-ohkej "south country.'* 

Chzistian; county in Kentucky, named for Col. William Christian, an officer of the 
Revolution. 

GhrlBtian; counties in Illinois and Missouri, named from the county in Kentucky. 

Ghristiana; creek, and village in Newcastle County, in Delaware, and borough in Lan- 
caster County, Pennsylvania, named for the King and Queen of Sweden, Christian 
and Christiana. 

Ghristiaiisburg; town in Montgomery County, Virginia, named for a first settler. 

Ohristnian; city in Edgar County, Illinois, named for MathiasChristman, its founder. 

Ghromite; village in Shasta County , California, named from the chrome iron mines. 

Olxuctaniuida; stream in Montgomery County, New York. An Indian word mean- 
ing "twin sisters.*' 

diiila; village in Livingston County, Missouri; 

Cliulafinnee; town in Cleburne County, Alabama; 

Chulalioma; town in Marshall County, Mississippi. From a Choctaw Indian word 
meaning "red fox.** 

Chuluota; town in Orange County, Florida. An Indian word meaning "beautiful 



view.** 



Ghurchill; county in Nevada, which takes its name from Fort Churchill, named for 

an officer of the United States Army. 
COmrchville; village in Monroe County, New York, named for Samuel Church, a 

pioneer settler. 
Oibolo; river and village in Guadalupe County, Texas. A Spanish word meaning 

"buffalo." 
Oicero; town in Onondaga County, New York, named by the State land board for 

the celebrated Roman. 
Oienega; station in Los Angeles County, California, and mining locality in Yavapai 

County, Arizona. A Spanish word meaning "marsh.** 
Oixnarron; river in Oklahoma and Indian Territory, city in Gray County, Kansas, 

and village in Colfax County, New Mexico. A Spanish word meaning "wild,** 

"unruly.** 
OinciTiTiati; city in Hamilton County, Ohio, laid out and named by Col. Israel Lud- 
low, from an organization of officers formed after the Revolutionary war and 

named in honor of Cincinnatus, the Roman patriot. 
Oicinnatus; town in Cortland County, New York, named by the State land board, 

for the celebrated Roman patriot. 
Cinnabar; village in Trinity County, California, named from the quicksilver mines. 
Cinnabar; mountain just north of Yellowstone Park, named from its rocks, which 

are colored red by iron, which was mistaken for cinnabar. 
Cinnaminson; town in Burlington County, New Jersey. The name is derived from 

the Indian, cinnaj or sinne, "stone,** and mona, or minna. "island,** hence "stone 

island place.*' 

BulL258— 06 6 



82 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. tBCLL.2Sa 

Circleville; village in Pickaway County, Ohio, so named from the circular In<iian 

mounds in the neijjhborhood. 
disco; town in Eastland County, Texas, named for John J. Cisco, a prominent 

resident. 
Cisco; many places in the United States bear this name. An Indian word meaning 

a kind of trout of an oily nature. 
Cissna Park; village in Iroquois County, Illinois, named for William Cissna, one of 

its founders. 
Citra; town in Marion County, Florida; 
Citrona; village in Yolo County, California; 
Citrus; town in Inyo County, California, and county in Florida. From ri/rtw, a 

small genus of trees of the orange family; so named because of the abundance 

of orange groves in these regions. 
Clackamas; county, village in same county, and river in Oregon, named from an 

Indian tril)e. 
Claiborne; parish in Louisiana and counties in Mississippi and Tennessee, named 

for William C. C. Claiborne, governor of Mississippi Territory and of Louisiana 

as a Territory and a State. 
Clallam; county in Washington, named from an Indian tribe. 
Clancey ; creek, and town in Jefferson County, in Montana, named forjudge Clancey, 

a prospector and mining promoter of an early day. 
Clanton; town in Chilton County, Alabama, named for General Clanton, a Confed- 
erate general. 
Clapper; town in Monroe County, Missouri, named for Henry Clapper, who was 

instrumental in bringing a railroad into the place. 
Clare; county, and city in tsanie county, in Michigan. The origin of the name is in 

doubt, but the Michigan Historical Society says that it is probably named from 

County Clare in Ireland. 
Claremont; town in Los Angeles County, California, named from the town in New 

Hampshire. 
Claremont; town in Sullivan County, New Hampshire, named from the country 

seat of Lord Clive, an English general. 
Clarence; city in Shelby County, Missouri, named for a son of John Duff, an early 

settler. 
Clarendon; county, and town in same county, in South Carolina, named for Edward, 

Earl of Clarendon. 
Claxinda; city in Page County, Iowa, named for Clartnda Buck, a niece of the 

founder. 
Clarion; river in Pennsylvania. A French term, meaning ** clear.'* The name may 

have l)een suggested by the noise made by the river, sounding like the distant 

note of the clarion. Said by some to have been called govmnsch^ "briar stream." 
Clarion; county, and borough in same county in Pennsylvania, named from the 

river. 
Clark; county in Arkansas, named for Governor William Clark. 
Clark; peak in California, named for Fred Clark, a topographer. 
Clark; counties in Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, and Ohio, name<l for Cren. Geoi*ge 

Rogers Clark, who captured Vincennes. 
Clark; county in Kansas, named for Capt. Charles F. Clarke, United States Volun- 
teers, who died at Memphis December 10, 18B2. 
Clark; county in Missouri, named for Capt. William Clark, of the Lewis and Clark 

expedition. 
Clark; creek in Nebraaka, named for Dr. M. H. C'lark, first member of the Terri- 
torial council from Dixige County. 
Clark; county in South Dakota, named for Newton Clark, legislator in 1873, 



GANNETT.] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 83 

Clark; county in Wisconsin, named for A. W. Clark, early settler. 
Clarke; county in Alabama, named for Governor John Clarke of Georgia, 
Clarke; county in Georgia, named for Gen. Elijah Clarke, officer of the Revolution. 
Clarke; county in Iowa, named for James Clarke, governor of the State in 1846. 
Clarke; county in Mississippi, named for Joshua G. Clarke, first chancellor of the 

State. 
Clarke; county in Virginia, named for Gen. George Rogers Clarke. 
Clarke; county in Washington, and river in Montana, named for Capt William 

Clark, of the Lewis and Clark expedition. 
Clarke City; village in Kankakee County, Illinois, named for the man who opened 

the first coal mine in the vicinity. 
Clarkfork; town in Kootenai County, Idaho, named for Capt. William Clark, of the 

Lewis and Clark expedition. 
Clarkia; village in Kootenai County, Idaho, named for Capt. William Clark, of the 

Lewis and Clark expedition. 
Clarks; village in Merrick County, Nebraska, named for S. H. H. Clark, superin- 
tendent of the Union Pacific Railroad. 
Clarksburg; town in Berkshire County, Massachusetts, named for three brothers 

who were among the first settlers. 
Clarksburg; town in Harrison County, West Virginia. Some authorities claim 

that it was named for Capt. W^illiam Clark, of the Lewis and Clark expedition, 

while others maintain that it was named for a pioneer. 
Clarksdale; town in Coahoma County, Mississippi, named for Captain Clark, 

brother-in-law of Governor Alcorn. 
Clarkson; town in Monroe County, New York, named for General Clarkson, a lai^ge 

landowner. 

{Clarkston; village in Asotin County, Washington; 
Clarksville; city in Pike County, Missouri. Named for Capt. William Clark, of 
the Lewis and Clark expedition. 

Clarksville; town in Habersham County, Georgia, named for Gen. John Clarke, 
governor of Geor^a. 

Clarksville; town in Hamilton County, Indiana, and city in Montgomery County, 
Tennessee, named for Gen. George Rogers Clark, who captured Vincennes. 

Clarksville; town in Coos County, New Hampshire, named for Benjamin Clark. 

Clarkton; town in Dunklin County, Missouri, named for Henry E. Clark, an early 
contractor. 

Clatskanie; town in Columbia County, Oregon, named from the Indian tribe, Tlat- 
skanai. 

Grlatsop; county in Oregon, named for an Indian tribe. 

Claverack; town in Columbia County, New York, from the Dutch, klaver-akker, 
"clover field,'* said by some to have been so called from the immense fields of 
clover which abounded there at the time of its settlement. Another opinion is 
that it is of Dutch origin, the first part of the word meaning ** opening** or "side 
goiige,** the latter part being a division of the river which the Dutch skippers 
referred to; the Hudson was divided into 13 "rarX*«** or *'reaches.^^ 

Clay; counties in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, and Kansas; town 
in Webster County, Kentucky; counties in Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, 
North Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, and West Virginia; mount in 
New Hampshire; and many small places; named for Henry Clay. The county 
in Nebraska was doubtless named for him also. 

Clay; county in Arkansas, named for John M. Clayton, State senator. 

Clay; county in Iowa, named for Henry Clay, jr., who fell at the battle of Buena 
Vista. 

Clay; county in Kentucky, named for Gen. Green Clay. 



84 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES, [bull. 258. 

Clay City; village in Clay County, Illinois, and town in Clay County, Indiana, 

named for Henry Clay. 
Claymont; village in Newcastle County, Delaware, named from the character of the 

soil. 
Clayton; town in Contra Costa County, California, named from Clayton, Miasouri. 
Clayton; town in Kent County, Delaware, named for Thomas Clayton, or his son, 

Col. Joshua Clayton. 
Clayton; county, and town in Rabun County, in (Jeorgia, named for Augustin Smith 

Clayton. 
Clayton; township and village in Adams County, Illinois, named for Henry Clay. 
Clayton; village in St. Louis County, Missouri, named for Ralph Clayton. 
Clayton; county in Iowa, town in Jefferson County, New York, and town in John- 
ston County, North Carolina, named for John M. Clayton, Senator from Dela- 
ware. 
Claytonville; town in Brown County, Kansas, named for Powell Clayton, United 

States Senator from Arkansas. 
Clear Creek; county in Colorado, so called because it is drained by Clear Creek, an 

affluent of the South Platte. 
Clearfield; creek in Cambria County, Pennsylvania, named from the clearings 

along its banks. 
Clearfield; county, and borough in same county, in Pennsylvania, named from the 

creek. 
Clear Lake; village in Polk County, Wisconsin, situated on a lake of that name. 

A descriptive name. 
Clearwater; descriptive name given to a river in Idaho and to many smaller streams 

in the country, which in turn have given names to twelve post-offices. 
Clearwater; county and river in Minnesota. The name is a direct translation of 

the Ojibwa word, descriptive of the river. 
Cleburne; counties in Alabama and Arkansas, and town in Johnson County, Texas, 

nanie<l for Gen. Patrick Cleburne. 
Clermont; county in Ohio, name probably derived from Clermont, France. 
Clermont; village in Columbia county. New York, named by Chancellor Living- 
ston, a friend of Fulton, for the first American steamboat. 
Cleveland; counties in Arkansas and Oklahoma, named for President Grover 

Cleveland. 
Cleveland; village in Oswego County, New York, named for James Cleveland, 

an early settler. 
Cleveland; county, and village in Rowan County, in North Carolina, named for Col. 

Benjamin Cleveland. 
Cleveland; city in Cuyahoga County, Ohio, named for Gen. Moses Cleveland, of 

the Connecticut Land Company, who surveyed it. 
Cleveland; town in Bradley County, Tennessee, named for John Cleveland, who 

went there from North Carolina. 
Clifford; village in Lapeer County, Michigan, named for Clifford Lyman, the first 

child bom in the settlement. 
Clifton; village in Iroquois County, Illinois, named from the Clifton Hotel in 

Chicago. 
Clifton; village in Greene County, Ohio, named from the cliffs which bound the 

river at that point. 
Clifton Springrs; village in Ontario County, New York, so named because of the 

cliffs and springs in the neighborhood. 
Climax; village in Kalamazoo County, Michigan, so called l)ecau8e when Daniel B. 

Eldred first visited the township he said, "This cape the climax.'* 



OANNETT.] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 85 

Olinch; county in Geor^a, and river in Virginia and Tennt»8see, named for Gen. 

Doncan L. Clinch. 
Olin^maiiB Dome; peak in Great Smoky Mountains, North Carolina, named for 

United States Senator Thomas L. Clingman, who determined ita altitude. 
Clinton; town in Jones County, Georgia; county, and city in Dewitt County, in 

Illinois; counties in Indiana, Iowa, and Kentucky; towns in Worcester County, 

Massachusetts, and Henry County, Missouri; county in Michigan; towns in 

Passaic County, New Jersey, and Rock County, Wisconsin; named for DeW^itt 

Clinton, governor of New York and projector of the Erie Canal. 
Clinton; county in Missouri; county, town in Dutchess County, and village in Oneida 

County, New York; and county in Ohio; named for (reorge Clinton, governor of 

New York. 
Clinton; town in Hunterdon County, New Jersey, named for the Clinton family of 

New York. 
Clinton; county in Pennsylvania, supposed to have been named for Gen. Henry 

Clinton. 
Clintonville; village in New Haven County, Connecticut, named for the family of 

Clinton. 
Clockville; village in Madison County, New York, nameil for John Klock, the 

original grantee. 
Cloquet; town in Carlton County, Minnesota, so name<l from the mills there. A 

French word, meaning ** sound of the mill." 
Cloud; county in Kansas, name<i for William F. C^loud, colonel of the Second Regi- 
ment of Kansas. 
Cloverdale; township and town in Sonoma County, California, so named l)ecause 

of the rich growth of clover in the valley in which the town is locate<i. 
Clymer; village in Cass County, Indiana, named for George Clymer, its founder. 
Clymer; town in Chautauqua County, New York, named for George Clymer, a 

signer of the Declaration of Independence. 
Coahoma; county, and town in same county, in Mississippi. A Choctaw Indian 

word meaning **red panther." 

{Coal City; city in Grundy County, Illinois; 
Coal Valley; township and village in I^ck Island County, Illinois. Named from 
coal mines in the vicinity. 
Coarsegrold; mining town in Madera County, California, so named because of the 

gold nu^ets found in its placer mines. 
Coast; range of mountains in Oregon, so name<i because lying parallel with the 

Pacific coast. 
Coatsburg; village in Adams County, Illinois, named for Robert Coats, one of the 

founders. 
Coatesville; borough in Chester County, Pennsylvania, named for Moses Coates, 

one of the early settlers. 
Cobalt; village in Middlesex County, Connecticut, so named from mines of cobalt 

in the neighborhood. 
Cobb; county in Georgia, name<l for Thomas W. Cobb, United States Senator from 

that State. 
CobbOflseecontee; river and lake in Maine. An Indian word, meaning ** place 

wheire sturgeon are taken." 
Cobden; village in Union Coimty, Illinois, named for Ric^hard Cobden. 
Cobleakill; creek and town in Schoharie County, New York, named for Cobel, an 

early mill owner. 
Cobfloook; arm of Passamaquoddy Bay, Maine. Hubbanl derives it from the name 

of the Indian tribe Passamaquoddy, which he says signifies ''faUs" or ''rough 



86 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 258. 

water." Other derivations are kabassak-hige, ''sturgeon-catching place," and 
"small, muddy stream." 

Cocalico; creek in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. Corrupted from achgookwaUco^ 
"where snakes gather in holes." 

Cochecalechee; tributary of the Chattahoochee, m Greoigia. An Indian word 
meaning "broken arrow." 

Cocheco; river in New Hampshire. An Indian word meaning "rapid " or " violent" 

Cochecton; town in Sullivan County, New York. An Indian word meaning, 
according to Haines, "low ground;" others say "finished small harbor." 

Cochise; county in Arizona, named for the chief of the Chiricahua Apache Indians, 
an enemy of all civilization. 

Cochituate; village in Middlesex County, Massachusetts. An Indian word mean- 
ing "land on rapid streams." 

Cochran; county in Texas, named for a man who fell at the Alamo. 

Cocke; county in Tennessee, named for Gen. William Cocke, United States Senator 
from that State in 1796-97 and 1799-1805. 

Cock Robin; island in California, settled by a man named Robin, who, because of 
his bragging of his fighting qualities, was nicknamed "Cock Robin," 

Coconino; county in Arizona, named from a tribe of Indians. 

Cocoosing; creeks in Connecticut and Pennsylvania. An Indian word meaning 
"owl place." 

Cod; cape in Massachusetts, which received its name from Bartholomew Gosnold, 
who caught many codfish there. 

Codington; county in South Dakota, nameil for Rev. R. B. Codington, legislator 
in 1875. 

Codomices; creek in California. Derived from the Spanish codomiZf "quail." 

Codorus; creek in York County, Peimsylvania. An Indian word said to mean 
"rapid water." 

Coeur; village in Trinity County, California, named from its location in the heart 
of the mountains. A French word meaning "heart." 

Coeur d'Alene; lake and town in Kootenai Coimty, Idaho; named from a tribe of 
Indians. A French phrase, meaning "needle hearts" or "awl hearts." Some 
authorities say that this name was given to these Indians because the expres- 
sion was used by a chief of the tribe to denote his opinion of the Canadian trap- 
pers' meanness. Rev. M. Eells says that the name was given to the tribe by 
members of the Hudson Bay Company, because of their sharpness in trade. 

Coeyman; town in Albany County, New York, named for the patentee, Barent 
Peterse Coeymans. 
Coffee; counties in Alabama, Georgia, and Tennessee; 

Coffeeville; town in Yalobusha County, Mississippi. Named for Gen. JohnCofiee, 
noted Indian fighter. 

Coffee; creek in Humboldt County, California, named from the circumstance of a 
sack of coffee having been spille<i into it. 

Coffeen; village in Montgomery County, Illinois, named for Gustavus Coffeen, one 

of the founders. 
Coffey; county in Kansas; 

Coffeyville; city in Montgomery County, Kansas. Namedfor A. M. Coffey, mem- 
ber of the first Kansas Territorial legislature. 

Cohasset; town in Norfolk County, Mai^sachusetts. An Indian word, said by some 
to mean "fishing promontory," "place of pines," or "young pine trees." 

Cohocton; town in Steuben County, New York. From an Indian word cohocUi^ 
"steam rising in a black-alder swamp with overhanging trees," or "trees in 
water." 



GANNETT.] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 87 

Cohoes; city in Albany County, New York, named from CJohoes falls. An Indian 
word, meaning ** shipwrecked canoe;" also said to signify "great bendings." 

Ck>kato; village in Wright County, Minnesota. An Indian word meaning "at tl\e 
middle." 

Coke; county, and village in Wood County, in Texas, named for Richard Coke, gov- 
ernor of and United States Senator from Texas. 

Cokesbiiry; town in Greenwood County, South Carolina. A combination of the 
names of two bishops of the Methodist Episcopal Church, Thomas Coke and 
Francis Asbury. 

Colbert; county in Alabama, named for George and Levi Colbert. 

Colby; city in Thomas County, Kansas, named for J. R. Colby, one of the old 
settlers. 

Colby; city in Clark and Marathon counties, Wisconsin, named for Charles Colby, 
president of the Wisconsin Central Railroad. 

Colchester; borough in New London County, Connecticut, and other places in the 
country, named from the town in England. 

Colchester; township and city in McDonough County, Illinois, first called Chester, 
"Col" being prefixed to distinguish it from Chester in Randolph County. 

Colchester; town in Delaware County, New York, named from Colchester, Con- 
necticut. 

Colden; town in Erie County, New York, named for Cadwalader D. Colden, of the 
State senate. 

Cold Spring; town in Cape May County, New Jersey, and many small places in the 
country; named from springs near. 

Coldwater; city in Comanche County, Kansas, named from the city in Michigan. 

Coldwater; city in Branch County, Michigan, and town in Tate County, Missis- 
sippi, named from streams. The name is applied descriptively. 

Cole; county in Missouri, named for Capt. Stephen Cole, an Indian fighter. 

Colebrook; town in Coos County, New Hampshire, named for Sir George Cole- 
brook, original grantee. 

Coleman; county, and town in same county, in Texas, named for R. M. Coleman^ 
captain of the first company of Texas rangers. 

Colerain; town in Bertie County, North Carolina, named from the town in Ireland. 

Coleraine; town in Franklin County, Massachusetts. The origin of the name is in 
doubt, but Gabriel Hanger was created Baron Coleraine in 1761, the date of the 
naming of the town. 

Coles; county in Illinois, named for Edward Cole, governor of the State in 1823-1826. 

Colesville; town in Broome County, New York, named for Nathaniel Cole, one of 
the first settlers. 

Colfax; towns in McLean County, Illinois, Clinton County, Indiana, Grant Parish, 
Louisiana, and Bay County, Michigan; counties in Nebraska and New Mexico; 
and town in Whitman County, Washington; named for Schuyler Colfax, Vice- 
President under President Grant. 

Collar Back; ridge of limestone in the Catskill Mountains, New York. A corrup- 
tion of the Dutch name Kalkberg^ meaning "lime hill." 

CoUeg^ville; borough in Montgomery County, Pennsylvania, seat of Ursinus Col- 
lege. 

Colleton; county in South Carolina, named for Sir John Colleton, one of the eight 
original proprietors of Carolina. 

CoUettsville; town in Caldwell County, North Carolina, named for a family resi- 
dent there. 

Collin; county in Texas, named for Collin McKinney, an early settler. 

Collingsworth; county in Texas, named for Judge James Collingsworth, secretary 
of state of the republic in 1836. 



88 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 258. 

CoUinsville; city in Madison County, Illinois, settled by four brothers named Col- 
lins, from Litchfield, Connecticut. 

CollinsviUe; town in Dundy County, Nebraska, named for Moses Collins, an early 
settler. 

CoUinsville; village in I^ewis County, New York, named for Homer Collins. 

Collis; village in Fresno County, California, named for Collis P. Huntington, presi- 
dent of the Southern Pacific Railroad. 

Coloma; town in Eldorado County, California, named from an Indian tribe. 

Colony; city in Anderson County, Kansas, named for a colony from Ohio and 

Indiana, which settled in the neighborhood. 
Colorado; State of the Union, river in Texas, and river in Utah and Arizona; 
Colorado City; town in El Paso County, Colorado; 

Colorado Springps; city in El Paso County, Colorado. A Spanish word meaning 
** ruddy" or "blood red;" in a secondary sense, "colored." 

Colorado; county in Texas, named from the river. 

Colquitt; county, and town in Miller County, in Greorgia, named for Walter T. Col- 
quitt, United States Senator. 

Colter; peak in Yellowstone Park, named for John Colter, a guide with the Lewis 
and Clark expedition. 

Colton; town in St. I^wrence County, New York, named for Jesse Colton Higley, 
an earlv settler. 

Colton; township and city in San Bernardino County, California, named for Col. 
David Colton, an early and prominent citizen. 

Coltsneck; town in Monmouth County, New Jersey. The name i» probably derived 
from an innkeeper's sign upon which was printed tho old seal of New Jersey — a 
horse's head with a wreath around the neck. 

Columbia; counties in Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, New York, Oregon, Pennsyl- 
vania, Washington, and Wisconnin, and river in Oregon and Washington. The 
river was named by Captain Gray for the vessel in which he entered its mouth. 

rColumbiana; county, and village in same county, in Ohio; 

j Columbus; county in North Carolina, and 26 places in the country. Named for 

I Christopher Columbus. 

Columbus Grove; village in Putnam County, Ohio, so named by the first settlers 
from the citv of Columbu*?. 

Colusa; county, and town in same county, in California, named from the Korusi 
tribe of Indians. 

Colville; town in Stevens County, Washington, named from the old Hudson Bay 
Company's fort near the Columbia River. 

Colwich; city in Sedgwick County, Kansas. The name is a compound of Colorado 
and Wichita, with reference to the Colorado and Wichita Railroad. 

Comal; county in Texas which takes its name from the river. A Spanish word 
meaning **flat earthen pan." 

Comanche; counties in Kansas, Oklahoma, and Texas, nameil from the Indian tribe. 

Cometa; village in San Joaquin County, California. The Spanish form of "comet." 

Commack; village in Suffolk County, New York. From an Indian word, vnnne- 
comacy ** beautiful place." 

Commencement; bay in Washington, named by Vancouver, because he thought it 
the beginning of the arm of an inlet. 

Commerce; village in Scott County, Missouri, so named because it was a trading 
post as early as 1803. 

Communipaw; village in Bergen County, New Jersey, named for the original grantee, 
Michael Pauw, director of the Dutch West India Company. The word is of 
Indian origin. 



OANNBTT.] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 89 

Como; town in Park County, Colorado, so named by the early miners lxH»nHe of a 
lake in the neighborhood, referring to Lake Como, Italy. 

Oomo; town in Panola County, Mississippi, named from a highland pond u}X)n the 
place of Dr. G .G. Tate, who settled it. 

Coxnpton; village in Lee County, Illinois, named for Joel Compton, its founder. 

Comstock; famous silver and lead l)earing lode in Nevada, named for Henry Page 
Comstock. 

Conant; creek in Yellowstone Park, named for Al Conant, who nearly lost his life 
in it. 

Concho; county and river in Texas. A Spanish word meaning a "shell." 

Concord; towns in Contra Costa County, California, and Essex County, Vermont, 
named from the town in Massachusetts. 

Concord; town in Middlesex County, Massachusetts, so ralle<l either from the Chris- 
tian concord among the first company, or "from the peaceful manner of its 
acquisition,'' it having been purchased from the Indians. 

Concord; city in Cabarrus County, North Carolina, name<l from the battle of Concord. 

Concordia; city in Cloud County, Kansas, named so because there was a contro- 
versy for years over a permanent seat of county government, which was finally 
settled with unanimity. 

Cone; peak in Siskiyou County, California, so named l)ecau8e of its regular conical 
shape. 

Conecnli; county and river in Alabama, from the Creek Indian word caiKtta, mean- 
ing "crooked," probably given with reference to the winding course of the 
river. 

Conedo^winit; stream in Pennsylvania. An Indian word meaning " for a long 
way nothing but bends." 

Conejo; town in Fresno County, California. 

Conejoe; county, and town in same county, in Colorado, named from the Rio de los 
Conejos. A Spanish term meaning "rabbit," and applied to these localities on 
account of the great numbere of these animals. 

Conemaugh; river and town in Cambria County, Pennsylvania. An Indian word 
meaning * * otter creek. ' ' 

Conequonessing; creek in Pennsylvania. A Delaware Indian word meaning "for 
a long time straight." 

Conesto^; creek and village in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, named from an 
Indian tribe. The word is interpreted to mean "great maize land," or "crooked 
stream." 

Conesns; lake and town in Uvingston County, New York. The name is derived 
from the Indian word (janeasosy "place of many berries," or, according to Mor- 
gan, " place of nanny-berries." 

Oonewago; creek and village in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. An Indian word 
meaning " long reach," or " long strip." 

Conewang^; river in New York. The name is deriveil from the Indian word gan- 
owtmgOf "rapids," or, according to some other authorities, "they have been 
gone a long time." 

Coney; island at the extremity of Long Island, New York, which is said by some to 
have been so named because of the numbers of rabbits there. Another theory 
ascribes it to the winds having driven the sand into truncated cones. It appears, 
however, to have been originally called CongUy which suggests another derivation. 

Confluence; borough in Somerset County, Pennsylvania, so named because situated 
near the confluence of three streams. 

Congaree; river, and town in Richmond County, in South Carolina, named from a 
tribe of Indians. 



90 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATICS. [bull. 258 

ConkUn; town in Broome County, New York, named for Jadge John <IJonklin. 
Conly; creek in Huml)oldt County, California, named for an old settler. 
Conneaut; townships in Crawford and Erie counties, Pennsylvania, and village and 

creek in Ashtabula County, Ohio; 
Conneaut Lake; borough in Crawford Coonty, Pennsylvania; 
Conneautville; borough in Crawford County, Pennsylvania. Heckewelder says it 

is a corruption of the Indian, gunniate, meaning 'Mt is a long time since they 

are gone." According to other authorities it is a Seneca Indian word, signify- 
ing "many fish." A third authority gives "snow place." 
Connecticut; State of the Union and river in New England. An Indian name, 

derived from qnonoktacut, meaning, according to some authorities "river whose 

water is driven in waves by tides or winds. ' ' Haines says, * * land on the long tidal 

river. ' ' Other interpretations are, * * on long river, " " long river, * ' and * ' the long 

(without end) river." 
Connellsville; borough in Fayette County, Pennsylvania, named for Zachariah 

Council, who laid it out. 
Connersville; city in Fayette County, Indiana, named for John Conner, who laid 

out the place in 1817. 
Connersville; village in Harrison County, Kentucky, named for Lewis Conner. 
Conness; mount in California, named for John Conness, Senator- from Galifomia in 

1863-1869. 
Cononodaw; creek in Pennsylvania. The name is corrupted from the Indian word 

ffunniaday " he tarries long." 
Conoquenessin^; borough in Butler County, Pennsylvania. The name is corrupted 

from the Delaware Indian word gunachquene* sink, meaning "for a long way 

straight." 
Conoy; creek and village in I^ncaster County, Pennsylvania. A corruption of a 

tribal name, said to mean "long." 
Conquest; town in Cayuga County, New York, so name<l to commemorate the con- 
quest achieved by those who favored a division of the old town of Cato. 
Conshohocken; borough in Montgomery County, Pennsylvania. An Indian word 

meaning "pleasant valley." 
Constable; village in Franklin County, New York, named for William Constable, 

agent and part proprietor. 
Constableville; village in Lewis County, New York, named for William Gonsta- 

able, son of the original proprietor. 
Constantine; township and village in Saint Joseph County, Michigan, named for 

the Roman emperor. 
Constitution; island in the Hudson River, New York, named from the fort. 
Contoocook; river in New Hampshire. An Indian word meaning "crow river." 
Contra Costa; county in California. A Spanish term meaning "coast oppodte 

another." 
Converse; county in Wyoming, probably name<i for A. R. Converse, territorial 

treasurer. 
Conway; county, and town in Faulkner County, in Arkansas, named for Henry W. 

Conway, Territorial delegate in Congress. 
Conway; town in Franklin County, Massachusetts, named for Henry Seymour 

Conway, secretary of state of P^ngland. Some authorities claim that the name 

was derived from the town in Wales. 
Conway; town in Horry County, South Carolina, named for Gen. Robert Conway, 

an early resident. 
Cook; inlet of the Pacific Ocean on the coast of Alaska, named for Captain Cook, the 

navigator. 
Cook; county in Illinois, named for Danied P. Cook, member of Congress. 



OANUETT.l PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 91 

Cook; county in Minnesota, named for Maj. Michael Cook, who was killed in the 

civil war. 
Cooke; county in Texas, named for William G. Cooke, captain of New Orleans 

Grays at the storming of Bexar. 
Cooksburg; village in Albany County, New York, named for Thomas B. Cookj an 

early landholder. 
Coolidg«; city in Hamilton County, Kansas, named for Thomas Jefferson Coolidge, 

former president of the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railroad. 
Cooper; township in Washington County, Maine, named for Gen. John Cooper, an 

early and esteemed settler. 
Cooper; county in Missouri, named for Capt. Sanshell Cooper, an early settler. 
Cooper; river in South Carolina, named for the Earl of Shaftsbury, Lord Ashley 

Cooper, one of the proprietors. 
Cooper; point in Washington, named for a man who took up a claim there, which 

he afterwards deserted. 
Coopersburg; village in Lehigh County, Pennsylvania, named for a family of early 

settlers. 
Cooperstown; village in Otsego County, New York, named for the father of James 

Fenimore Cooper. 
Cooperstown; borough in Venango County, Pennsylvania, named for its founder, 

William Cooper. 
Cooperstown; town in Robertson County, Tennessee, so named because a great 

many l)arrels were made there for the Red River mills. 
Coopersville; village in Clinton County, New York, named for Ebenezer Cooper, a 

mill owner. 

{Coos; county in New Hampshire; 
Coos; bay, river, and county in Oregon. An Indian word meanmg/* plac« of pines.'' 
Coosa; river and county in Alabama, named from a tribe of Indians, the Kusa. 
Coosawhatchie; river, and town in Beaufort County, in South Carolina. An Indian 

word meaning '* river of the Coosas," a former Indian tribe. 
Cope; town in Arapahoe County, Colorado, named for Jonathan Cope, who laid 

it out. 
Cope; town in Orangeburg County, South Carolina, named for J. Martin Cope, its 

founder. 
Copemish; village in Manistee County, Michigan. An Indian w^ord meaning ^' beech 

tree." 
Copenlia^n; village in Lewis County, New York, named from the city in Denmark. 

iCopiali; county in Mississippi; 
Copiah Creek; village in Copiah County, Mississippi. An Indian word meaning 
* * calling panther. " 

Coplay; creek and borough in Lehigh County, Pennsylvania. An Indian word 
meaning *'that which runs evenly" or ** fine-running stream." 

Copley; township in Summit County, Ohio, named for the wife of Gardner Green, 
a land proprietor. 

Copper; harbor in Michigan, so called from the copper mines near. 

Copperopolis; town in Calaveras County, California, named from the extensive cop- 
per mines in the vicinity. 

Coqnille; river and town in Coos County, in Oregon. A French word meaning 
"shell." 

Coralville; town in Johnson County, Iowa, so named from the coral formation under- 
lying the town. 

Coram; village in Suffolk County, New York, named for an Indian chief. 

Coraopolis; borough in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, named for Cora Watson, 
the wife of one of the proprietors. 



92 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [BrLi-2S8. 

Corapechen; rreek in Maryland. An Indian word said to mean ''fierce-mnning 

stream.*' 
Corbett; post-office in Multnomah County, Oregon, named for H. W. Corbett, 

United vStates Senator from the State. 
Corbin; town in Jefferson County, Montana, named for Daniel Corbin, at one time 

a resident of Helena, afterwards of New York. 
Corcoran; mount in California, named for W. W. Corcoran, of Washington, D. C. 
Cordero; villajre in San Diego County, California. A Spanish word meaning *' lamb." 
Cordova; thirteen places in the country, name<l from the city in Spain. 
Corfu; village in Genesee County, New York, name<l for the ancient city of the 

Ionian Islands. 
Corinna; town in Penobscot County, Maine, named fur the Greek poetess of Bceotia. 
Corinth; city in Alcorn County, Mississippi, named from the ancient city in Greece. 
Cork; villagt»s in Butts CV)unty, Georgia, Fulton County, New York, Ashtabula 

County, Ohio, and Tyler County, West Virginia; named from the city in Ireland. 
Cornelius; town in Wjushington County, Oregon, named for Col. T. R. Cornelius, 

volunteer in Cay use war. 
Cornell; village in Livingston County, Illinois, named for a family of first settlers. 
Cornell; mount in New York, named for Ezra Cornell, founder of Cornell University. 
Comettsville; village in Daviess County, Indiana, named for Myer and Samuel 

Cornett, who laid it out. 
Coming; town in Adams County, Iowa, and cities in Steuben County, New York, 

and Nemaha County, Nebraska, named for Erastus Coming. 
Complanter; township in Venango County and Indian reservation in Warren 

County, Pennsylvania, named for a Seneca Indian chief. 
Comville; town in Somerset County, Maine, so named from an unusually good 

yield of corn. 
Coronaca; town in Greenwoo<i County, South Carolina, which derived its name from 

the plantation of Joseph Salvador, a wealthy Jewish landowner of Charleston. 
Coronado; cities in San Diego County, California, and Wichita County, Kansas, 

named for the Spanish explorer, Francisco Viisquez de Coronado. 
Corpus Christi; city in Nueces County, and bay in Texas, named with reference 

to a festival of the Roman Catholic Church. 
Corral; village in Santa Barbara County, California. A Spanish word meaning 

* Enclosure** or ** cattle pen." 
Correction ville; town in Woodbur>' County, Iowa, situated on a correction line. 
Corry; city in Erie County, Pennsylvania, named for a former owner, Hiram Corry. 
Corsica; borough in Jefferson County, Pennsylvania, named from the island in the 

Mediterranean Sea. 
Corsicana; city in Navarro County, Texas, namtni for the wife of Navarro, a Mexi- 
can, who owned a large tract of land in the county. 
Corson; inlet in New Jersey, named for a family who live<l north of the inlet. 
Corte Madera; tc^wn in Marin County, California. A Spanish phrase, meaning 

** felled timber.'' 
Cortina; village in Colusa County, California. A Spanish word meaning "cur- 
tain" or "veil." 
Cortland; city in Republic County, Kansas, name<l from the city in New York. 
Cortland; county, and city in same county, in New York; 
Cortlandt; town in Westchester County, New York. Nameil for Pierre Van Gort- 

landt. 

Coninna; city in Shiawassee County, Michigan, named from the city in Spain. 
Corvallis; town in Ravalli County, Montana, named from and settled by people 

from Corvallis, Or^on. 



GANNETT.] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 93 

Corvallis; city in Benton County, Or^on. The name is formed of two Spanish 

words, meaning "heart of valley," so named from its situation in Willamette 

Valley. 
Corvette; ledge in Maryland, so named because a French corvette went ashore on 

the ledge. 
Corwin; village in Warren County, Ohio, named for Thomas Corwin, governor of 

the State. 
Cory; village in Clay County, Indiana, named for a resident of Terre Haute. 
OoryeU; county, and village in same county, in Texas, named for James Coryell, a 

large landowner. 
Coahocton; county, and village in same county, in Ohio, named from the Delaware 

Indian town of Ooshocking, The word means, according to some authorities, 

* * habitation of owls. * ' Heckewelder gives * * union of waters. ' ' Others say * * fin- 
ished small harbor." 
Goesatot; river in Arkansas, supposed to be a corruption of the French word casse- 

UU, "tomahawk." 
Ooflsaynna; lake and village in Washington County, New York. An Indian word, 

Baid to signify "lake at our pointe." 
Costilla; county in Colorado, named from the Costilla estate, which extends into 

Taoe County, New Mexico. 
Cosumne; town in Sacramento County, California, named from a tribe of Indians. 

The word means "salmon." 
Cota; town in San Diego County, California. A Spanish word meaning "coat of 

mail." 
Cdte Blanche; bay in Louisiana. French words meaning "white shore." 
Cotta^ City; town in Dukes County, Ma^ieachusette. A summer resort, so named 

from the many cottages along the shore. 
Cottle; county in Texas, named for G. W. Cottle, who fell at the Alamo. 
CottleviUe; town in St. Charles County, Missouri, named for Lorenzo Cottle, an 

early settler. 
Cotton Plant; town in Dunklin County, Missouri, distinguished by fields of grow- 
ing cotton. 
Cottonwood; county and river in Minnesota, a translation of. the Dakota (Sioux) 

name, given on account of the abundance of the cotton wood tree. 
Cottonwood Falls; city in Chase County, Kansas, situated at a fall or rapid of Cot- 
tonwood Creek; hence the name. 
Cottrell; key in Florida, named for Jeremiah Cottrell, first keeper of the light-house 

on the island. 
Coulter; village in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, named for Eli Coulter, an early 

settler. 
Coulter; creek in Yellowstone Park, named for John M. Coulter, botanist with the 

Hayden expedition. 
CoulterviUe; town in Randolph County, Illinois, named for its founder, James B. 

Coulter. 
Council Blufb; city in Pottawattamie County, Iowa, so called from a council held 

near there by Lewis and Clark with the Indians. 
Council Grove; city in Morris County, Kansas, so named from a treaty which was 

effected with the Osage Indians in a grove at that place. 
CoupeviUe; village in Island County, Washington, named for a navigator. Captain 

Coupe. 
Coventry; towns in Tolland County, Connecticut, Chenango County, New York, 

Kent County, Rhode Island, and Orleans County, Vermont, named from the 

town in England. 



94 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. r»rLi.25a. 

Covington; county in Ala1)aina, citiw in Ne^ion County, C^eorgia, and Kenton 

County, Kentucky, c<junty in Minnissippi, ami town in Wyoming County, ?rt-w 

York, name^l for (Jen. I^eoiuinl CV)vinn:ton, ili8tinguu*hed at Fort Recovery, 1794. 
Cow; island in the Mi8!<r>uri River in Kansafi, from the old name given by the 

French, Isle *U' mrhe^ *'iHle of the cow,** from the buffalo found there. 
Cowanesque; creek in Potter County, Peunnylvania. An Indian word meaning 

**overgn>wn with briarn.'* 
Cowanshannock; crei*k in Pennsylvania. A Delaware Indian word, ga^rianrh- 

hannfy *'gnMfn briar ntream.'* 
Cowautacuck; creek in Connecticut. An Indian word meaning "pine woodland.*' 
Cowen; mount in Montana, naiiuni for the annistant t^ecretary of the interior. 
Cowen; town in Welwter County, Wej«t Virginia, named for the president of the 

Baltimore an<l Ohio Railn>ad. 
Coweta; county in Creorgia, named from a former important Creek town about the 

present pite c»f Columbus, (la. 
Cowhocton; river in New York. An Imlian wonl meaning "log in the water." 
Cowles; town in Webster County, Nebraska, name<l for W. D. Cowles, a railroad man. 
Cowley; county in Kansas, namcil for Matthew Cowley, first lieutenant Company 

I, Ninth Kaunas Voluntt*er Regiment. 
Cowlitz; county and river in Washington, namcHi from the Indian tribe of the same 

name. 
Cowpens; village in Spartanburg County, South Carolina, made famons by a battle 

fought there during the Revolution. It received its name from an early cattle 

corral. 
Cox; Ijar in California, nameil for an old settler. 
Cox; creek in P'lori<la, name<l for a man who Iive<l on its banks. 
Coxsackie; town in Gn-cne County, New York. The name is derived from the 

Indian kuk^ *'to cut,** and ankfy **earth,'* dc»scriptive of the ridge cut by the 

waten* of the Hudson. Another theory derives the name from an Indian word 

meaning; "hcjoting of owls." 
Coyote; village in Santa (lura County, California, and town in Rio Arriba County, 

New Mexico. From the Mexican roj/ittl, "prairie wolf." 
Cozad; town in Dawson County, Nebraska, named for the original owner of the site, 

John J. Cozad. 
Crab Graas; creek in P'loriila, so calle<l from a sj^KMes of grass plentiful along its 

banks. 
Crabtree; town in Linn C^mnty, ()rty<m, name<l ft)r John J. Crabtree, an early 

si»ttler. 
Craftonville; town in San Hernanlino County, California, named for its founder, 

(ieorgc* Craft. 
Craftsbury; town in Orleans County, Vermont, name<l for Kbenezer Crafts, one of 

the original grantiH.»s. 
Craig; village in Koutt County, Colorado, name<l for Rev. Bayartl Craig, of Denver. 
Craig; county and creek in Virjjjinia, named for a prominent family of Augusta 

Countv. 
Craig; pass in Yellowstone Park, Wyoming, named for Mre. Ida Craig Wilcox, the 

first tourist to cross the i>a.«s. 
Craighead; county in Arkansas, named tor Thomas B. Craighead, of the State senate^ 
Cranberry; islands in Hanco<k County, Maine, named from a marsh of cranber- 
ries on th(» largest island. 
Cranberry Isles; town in llancoi-k County, Maine, name<l from the islands. 
Crane; county in Texas, named for William Carey Cnine, a lUiptist minister. 
Cranesville; village in Erie County, Pennsylvania, named for its founder. Fowler 

C-rane. 



GANNETT] PLACE NAMES IN THE ONITED STATES. 95 

Cranston; town in Providence County, Rhode Island, named for Samuel Cranston, 

governor of the State for nearly thirty years. 
Crater; town in Mono County, California, named from its location near extinct 

volcanoes. 
Crater; buttes in Idaho, so named from their volcanic origin. 
Crater; lake in Oregon, so named because it occupies the crater of a former volcano. 
Craven; county in North Carolina, named for William, Earl of Craven, a lord 

proprietor. 
Crawford; county in Arkansas, county, and city in Oglethorpe County, in Georgia, 

and counties in Illinois, Iowa, Missouri, and Wisconsin, named for William H. 

Crawford, secretary of the treasury under President Monroe. 
Crawford; county in Kansas, named for Samuel J. Crawford, colonel Second Kansas 

Regiment, and governor in 1865-69. 
Crawford; counties in Indiana, Michigan, Ohio, and Pennsylvania, named for Col. 

William Crawford, who was captured by Indians and burned at the stake at 

Sandusky, Ohio, in 1782. 
Crawford; town in Lowndes County, Mississippi, named for Rev. Crawford, a Bap- 
tist preacher. 
Crawford; purchase in Coos County, New Hampshire, named for the original 

owner, Ethan A. Crawford. 

{Crawford House; village in Coos County, New Hampshire; 
Crawford Notch; gap in White Mountains, New Hampshire. Named from the 
purchase. 

Crawfordsville; city in Indiana, named for William H. Crawford, secretary of the 
treasury under President Monroe. 

Crawfordsville; town in Linn County, Oi*egon, named for George F. Crawford, an 
earley settler. 

Crawfordville; town in Taliaferro County, Georgia, named from William H. Craw- 
ford, secretary of the treasury under President Monroe. 

Creal Springs; city in Williamson County, Illinois, named for the founder. 

Creede; city in Mineral County, Colorado, named for a miner who made rich dis- 
coveries of gold in the region. 

Creek; nation in Indian Territory, occupied by the Creek tribe of Indians. It is 
said that the English gave the name to the tribe because the country formerly 
inhabited by them in Alabama and Colorado was full of creeks. 

Creighton; township and town in Knox County, Nebraska, named for Edward 
Creighton, of Omaha. 

Crenshaw; county in Alabama, named for Anderson Crenshaw, of that State. 

Cresco; city in Howard County, Iowa. From the Latin, signifying **I grow." 

Cresskill; borough in Bergen County, New Jersey, named from a creek abounding 
in water cress. The word kil is Dutch for ** stream.*' 
Cresson; village in Cambria County, Pennsylvania; 

Cressona; borough in Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania. Named for Elliott Cres- 
son, a Philadelphia merchant. 

Crested Butte; town in Gunnison County, Colorado, named for a conical, gray peak 
which dominates the valley. The mountain derives its name from its shape. 

Crestline; village in Crawford County, Ohio, so called because it occupies the crest 
line of the middle elevation of the State. 

Creston; town in San Luis Obispo County, California, named from its location on 
the crest of a ridge. 

Creston; village in Ogle County, Illinois, named from its location on the highest 
point of land between Chicago and the Mississippi River. 

Creston; city in Union County, Iowa, so named because it was the highest point on 
the Chicago, Burlington and Quincy Railroad. 



{ 



96 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull.», 

Crestone; mountain in Colonuio, named from ite Rhape. 

Creswell; town in Wai-hington County, North Carolina, named for Pnetmahter- 

General Creswell. 
Cr^ve Coeiir; village in St. LouIh County, MiflHOuri, named for an early French fort. 

The name means? "heart breaking." 
Crittenden; county in Arkansa^^, named for Roljert Crittenden, territorial governor. 
Crittenden; comity, and tr»wn in Grant County, in Kentucky, named for John J. 

Crittenden, governor of and United States Senator from that State. 
Crockett; county in Tennessee, and county, and town in Houi^n County, in Texa?, 

namwl for C'ol. David Crockett, celebrated frontier Indian fighter, who fell at 

the Alamo. 
Croghan; town in I^win County, New York, named for Col. George Croghan 
Cronly; town in ColumbuH County, North C/arolina, named for the former owner of 

the i*ite. 
Crook; town in Ix)gan County, Colorado, and counties in Oregon and Wyoming, 

named for (Jen. Ge<jrge H. Crook, the Indian fighter. 
Crooked; creek in Pennnylvania, name<l from the old Indian name, tvoak-hanne, 

"crookcil stream." 
Crookston; township and city in Polk County, Minnesota, named for Col. William 

Crooks, an old settler. 
Crosby; county in Texas, named for Stephen Crosby, prominent citixen. 
Crosman; valley in Nevada, named for Col. G. H. Cronman. 
Cross; county in Arkansa^^, name<l for Judge Edward CrosH, a pioneer. 
Crossville; village in White County, Illinois, named for a family of firrt; settlers. 
Crosswicks; t/)wn in Burlington County, New Jersey. A corruption of the Indian 

crowirft'A'^tojf/, *' houst^ of sej)aration." 
Croswell; villajre in Sanilat! County, Michigan, named for Governor Oroswell. 
Crothersville; town, in Ja(;k8on County, Indiana, named for Doctor Crothers. 
Croton; village in Newaygo County, Michigan, named from the town in New York. 
Croton; river in New York, named for an Indian chief whose name was Kenoteiij 

Knoten, or Xotott,, meaning "the wind." 
Croton Falls; town in WesU-hester County, New York, named from Croton River. 
Crow; river in Minnesota. A literal translation of the Indian name, Andaig. 
Crowley; village in Polk County, Ori^gon, named for Solomon K. Crowley, an early 

settler. 
Crown Point; town in I^ssex County, New York. From. the original French name, 

point ail rhevaiurfy **{>oint of the hair (or scalp)," l>ecau8e it is said the French 

and Indians sent out "scaljHug j>arties" from this place. 
Crow Wing; river in Minnesota, called by the Indians kayaugetveguan, meaning 

"crow's feather." 
Crow Wing; county, and village in same county, in Minnesota, named froni the 

river. 
Croydon; town in Sullivan County, New Hampshire, named from the town in Sur- 
rey, Phigland. 
Crugers; village in Westchester County, New York, named for Col. John P. Gmger. 
Crum Elbow; village in Dutchess County, New York, the name of which was given, 

it is Siiid, from a sudden bend in the Hudson River at that place. 
Cuba; city in Fulton County, Illinois, named from the island of Cuba. 
Cucharas; riverand village in Huerfano County, Colorado. A Spanish word mean- 
ing "spoon brf)ok." 
Cudahy; village in Milwaukee County, Wisconsin, named for the Cudahy brothen, 

who own a pork-packing establishment there. 
Cuddeback; town in Humboldt County, California, named for an old settler. 



PLACE NAMES IN THE ITNITED STATES. 97 

Hha)>e nud I'olor, r-paiiJHli 
I meaning "hiile," "Bkiii," 
A SpauWi Hr.Til meaning 
illofCe in l.ini'oln Comity, Mi»«ouri. A Freueh word meaning 
ri A lulwHiK. nunied for General John G. 



T-] 



Cuemo Verde; mountain in ColDrailo, lunued for 

words meaniii)j; "ijrpen hiini." 
Ouero; town in Dewitt C'-ounty, Teiaw. A S]Binisli \ 

Cueata; villagti in San l.niHUbispii Omnty, (.iHlidini 



Oullmaii; coimty, mid city ii 

CulliiiHii, of that State. 
Culloden; village in Monroe County, (JeoiKia, named tnr Williani Culloden, c 

the tiiTt uettlerB in tiie uiunly. 
Cullom; \illagein i.iviiigeton County, Illinois, nameft Tor Mhelby M. CuJbm, United 

Hlate." Senalor from that Hlale. 
CiUpeper; coiuity, anil town in naiiie county, in Virginia, named tor Lord Thomas 

CiitiiepiT, Hovernor in IbTH-HO. 
Ciunberlajid; i^lHJids off the coast of l.ieorgia, county and river in Kentucky, dty 

in All^:any County and inountainH in Maryland, countiea in New Jersey and 

Nonh Carolina, and town in Provident^ County, Rhode Island, named for ths 

Dnke of Cumberland, the victor of Culloden. 
Cumberland; county in Illinois, named from the Cumlierlani! road, which w 

jectcd to pasH throuj^h it. 
Cumberland; counties in Maine, I'cnnHylvunia. and Virninia, namwl from thii 

county in Kngland, 
Cumberland; city in Alle^ny (.'ounty, Maryland, nametl from and built on the 

site of old Fort Ouml^irland, erectwl during the French and Indian ware. The 

foit waa named lor (he Duku of Ciinilierlnnd. 
Cumberland; county In Tenneteee, named frinn the mountainH. 
Cumberland; dty in Barron Coimly, Wisconsin, riamed from the city in Marylanil. 
Cuming; c'ninty, and town in same connty, in Nebraeka, named for T. B. Cuming, 

K-\rn>:r of Ihe Tenit-^irv in 1854-*5. 
Gumming; town in Foraytli County, Georgia, named for Co\. Williani Cumminji;, 

'if Ati);iisla, Georgia. 
Ctimmingtou; town in Hampshire County, Magsachusette, namerl for C'ol. .lohn 

(.'iimmiiiKS, the former owner. 
CuixuninsviUe; villt^ in Wheeler C^oonty, Nebraska, nauied for J. P. Cummings, 

.■cmiily clerk. 
Cum minav ilia; village in Hamilton County, Uhio, named for David Cummins, an 

Cuudjr; liarbor and leilge in Maine, named for a family who settled there at an early 



i, naiueii ffir Dr. Jolin F. C'uniLinK- 
iifaninu "drawirii.- h Hi'jne nliile 



ilate. 
Cunningbftm; town in Chariton County, Misi 

hani, of Brunswick, Mir^oiiri. 
Cupauptic; lake in Miiini-. .\n linliHri hm 

Ashing. ' ' 
Currie; village in Murray ('ounty, Miun€«tita, named from the [larish In Si^itland. 
Curry; county In Or^;on, named f(>r (ieorge L. Curry, governor of the Territory ia 

1856-lH5fl. 
Ourrytown; village in Monlf^mery County, Sew York, named for William Curry, 

paten I**. 
Curryrille; town in Pike County, MImoutI, named for Perry Curry, who laid out 

the town. 
Curtin; village in [>auphin County. Pennsylvania, named tor theCurtiu family, of 

which Governor .\. <;. ('nrtin was a member. 
Bull. ■2.V 



98 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED 8TATE8. [full. 25k 

Curtisville; village in St4)ckbri(lge, BerkHhirt' County, Maaaachcifletts, named for 
Klnathan ('nrtin, a net tier of 1712. 

Curwensville; borough in C-learlieUl County, Pennnylvaiiia, named for John Gar- 
wen, of Montgomery County. 

Gushing; town in Knox County, Maine, nauKni for Thomas Cusbing, lieutenant- 
govenior of Ma-snacliusett^. 

CuBseta; town in Chanil>er8 County, Alal)ania, and village in Chattahoochee County, 
(leorgia, nanie<l from a fonner Creek Indian town. Meaning unknown. 

Custer; county in Colorado; iTmnty, and town in same county, in Idaho; county and 
creek in Montana; county, and township in same county, in Nebraska; county, 
an<l village in lieaver County, in Oklahoma; county, and township and city in 
name county, in South Dakota; and neveral other plat^es; named for Gen. George 
A. Custer, who wa*< kilkni bv Indians in 1876 on the banks of Rosebud River. 

Cuthbert; town in Randolph ('ounty, Georgia, named for Col. J. A. Cuthbert, 
member of Congress. 

Cutler; town in Washington ('ounty, Maine, name<i for an early proprietor, Joseph 
(Uitler, of NewburyjKJrt, Massachusetts. 

Cuttawa; town in Lyon County, Kentucky, name<l from the old Indian name of the 
Kentucky River, KulUura. 

Cuttingsville; village in Rutlan<l County, Vermont, named for one of the first 
settlers. 

Cuttyhunk; island in Buzzards Bay. A contraction of the Indian word potxruUjh- 
hunkiimtok'j ** thing that lies out in the water." 
Cuyahoga; river and county in Ohio; 

Cuyahoga Falls; village in Smnmit County, Ohio, situated at falls on the Cayahogs 
River. The name is said by some t<» Iw tlerivetl from cai/o/ccr^, "crooked," but 
Atwater derives it from rui/fthotjnu-ukj "lake river." Another authority gives 
rarrihofja, meaning *' news carrier." 

Cuylerville; town in Livingston (^oimty. New York, name<l for W. T. Cayler, an 
early settlor. 

Cynthiana; city in Harrison County, Kentucky, name<i for the two daughters of 
the original j»roj)rietors, ('ynthia and Anna Harris. 

Cypress; island in Washington; so named by Vancouver's i»arty, from the abun- 
dance of that species of tree on the island. 

Cyr; plantation in Aroostook County, Maine, name<l for a family numerous in tliat 

8e<'tion. 
Dade; county, and city in Pas<'o County, in Florida, and counties in Georgia and 

Missouri; 
Dadeville; town in TallajKjosa County, Alabama. Named for Maj. Francis L. I)ade^ 
of the Seminole war. 

Daggett; pond in Maine, named for an early settler. 

Daggett; town in San Bernanlino County, California, namwl fmm the town in 
Indiana. 

Daggett; village in Owen Co\mty, Imliana, nameil for Charles Daggett, a prominent 
resident. 

Dagsboro; town in Sussex County, Delaware, name<l for Sir John Dagworthy. 

Dahlonega; towns in Lumpkin County, (Georgia, and Wapello County, Iowa. 
From a Cherokee Indian word signifying "yellow," referring to the gold for- 
merly inine<l in upper ( ileorgia. 

Dakota; States of the Uni(jn — North Dakota and South Dakota, ami counties in 
Minnesota and Nebraska, and several small places, named for the Indian tribe. 
The Indian form is Ijakota^ Xakoia or Dakota^ a<'(ording to the dialect, signify- 
ing "allies," the c(mimon name of the confederattMi Sioux tribes. 

Dale; county in Alabama, nameil for Gen. Samuel Dale of that State. 



OANNBTT] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 99 

Dallam; county in Texas, name<l for JameH W. Dallam, the lawyer who made the 

first digest of Texas laws. 
Dallas; county in Alabama, named for A. J. Dallas, Secretary of the Treasury under 

President Madison. 
Dallas; counties in Arkansas, Iowa, and Missouri; town in Gaston County, North 

Carolina, and county, an<i town in same county, in Texas; 
Dallas Center; town in Dallas County, Iowa. Named for George M. Dallas, Vice- 
President under President Polk. 
Dalles; city in Wasco County, Oregon, named from the dalles on the Columbia 

River. 
Dalles; the name given by the Hudson Bay Comjmny to deep chasms in rocks 

forming a narrow passage for rivers. A French word meaning ** flagstone,*' 

**slab," also a "spout for water" or "trough." The most famous dalles are on 

the Columbia River, Oregon. 
Dalmatia; town in Northumberland County, Pennsylvania, named from the titular 

kingdom of Austria. 
Dalton; towns in Whitfield County, G^rgia, and Berkshire County, Massachusetts, 

named for Gen. Tristram Dalton, speaker of the house of representatives of 

Massachusetts. 
Dalton; village in Chariton County, Missouri, named for William Dalton. 
Dalton; town in Coos County, New Hampshire, named for Hon. Tristram Dalton, 

a grantee. 
Daly; mountain in Colorado, named for Judge Charles P. Daly, formerly president 

of the American Geographical Society. 
Daly; county in Montana, named for Marcus Daly. 
Damariscotta; river, and town in Lincoln County, in Maine. An Indian name 

meaning "alewife place" or "river of little fishes." 
Damascus; town in Placer County, California, and thirteen other towns and villages, 

named from the ancient city in Syria. 
Dana; village in Lasalle County, Illinois, named for a railroad official. 
Dana; town in Worcester County, Massachusetts, named for the family of which 

Chief Justice Francis Dana was a member. 
Danbuxy; city in Fairfield County, Connecticut, and several other places, named 

from the town in Essex, England. 
Danby; town in Rutland Coimty, Verrnont, named from Dan by, England. 
Dandrids^e; town in Jefferson County, Tennessee, named for the maiden name of 

the wife of George Washington, Mrs. Martha Custis, nee Dandridge. 
Dane; county, and village in same county, in Wisconsin, named for Nathan Dane, 

an American jurist and a mcnibcr of Congress. 
Danforth; township and village in InKjuois County, Illinois, name^l for Geoi^ge M. 

Danforth, its founder. 
Danielson; borough in Windham County, Connecticut, name<i for (Jen. James Dan- 

ielson, the builder of the first house in tlie settlement. 
Danielsville; town in Madison County, Gef>rgia, named for Gen. Allsn Daniel. 
Dannebrog; village in Howanl County, Nebraska, wttled by Danes from Milwaukee, 

Wisconsin. 
Dannemora; town in Clinton County, New York, naine<l from the celebrated iron 

r^on in Sweden. 
Dansville; town in Steuben County, and village in Livingston County, New York, 

named for Daniel P. Faulkner, who laid out the village. 
Danube; town in Herkimer County, New York, named from the river in Austria. 
Danvers; townshi]> and village in McLean County, Illinois, named from the town 

in Mateachosetts. 



100 PLACE NAME8 IN THE UNITED STATES. [■TLi.aHL 

Danvers: town in Kn^iex (^onnty, MaHsachosetts, said to have received its name 

from t\w KsLr\ D'Anvern, but Naw>n ways it received its name in honor of Sir 

Danvt'rs ()s}K>rn, jrovemor of New York in 1753. 
Danville: village in In^irhani County, Michigan, named for Daniel L. Cro»aman, a 

rwidcMit. 
Danville; town^hij) and city in Vermilion Coimty, Illinois, named for Dan Beck- 

with, an Indian trader, who donated a part of the town fdte. 
Danville; town in IIendri<kH County, Indiana, named for Daniel Balen, proprietor. 
Danville; city in Boyle County, Kentucky, named for its founder Walker Daniel. 
Danville; village in Montgomery County, Missouri, built on land which fonnerly 

l>elonjfe<l to Daniel M. Boone, Hon of Daniel Boone. 
Danville; lM)n)U>;)i in Montour County, Pennsylvania, named for Cren. Daniel 

Montj^omery, an early settler. 
Danville; town in Caledonia Coimty, Vermont, named for the distingniahed FivdcIi 

admiral, D'Anville. 
Danville; city in Pitt><ylvania County, Virjjrinia, so named l)ecause situated on the 

the river Dan. 
Darby; borougli in Delaware County, PenuHylvania, named from Derby, England. 

whence inanv of the earlv wettlers came. 
Darbyville; village in Hckaway (-oiuity, Ohio, nameil for a Wyandotte Indian 

chief. 
Dare; county in Virginia namwl for Virginia Dare, the first white child bom in the 

New World, 1587. 
Darke; county in Ohio; 
Darkesville; town in Berkeley County, West Virginia. Named for Gen. William 

Dark(», an oflicer of the K<nolution. 
Darlington; lK>n)U>i;h in lU'aver County, Pennsylvania, named for 8. P. Darlington, 

a merchant of Pittsburg. 
Darlington; county, an<l village in same county, in S<.mth Carolina. The origin of 

the name is not known, but may have been given in honor of Colonel Darlington, 

a Kevolutionarv leader. 
Darlington; <>ity in l^ifayette County, Wi8cx)nHin, naine<i for Joshua Darlington, a 

prominent resident. 
Dartford; village in (ireen I>ake County, Wisconsin, named for the first settler. 
Dartmouth; town in Bristol County, Massachusetts, named, aci*ording to Whitmorp, 

from the sea]>ort in Devonshire, England; other authorities give William, Eari 

(»f Dartmouth. 
Dartmouth; college in Hanover, <Jrafton County, New Hampshire, founded by and 

named for William, F^rl of Dartmouth. 
Darwin; town in Inyo Coimty, California, and village in Clark County, Illinois, 

named for Charles Darwin, the English naturalist. 
Darysaw; viUajre and township in Gnmt County, Arkansas. A (irruption of the 

Frt'uch, ih'H rnfMf'nfU'y '* of the stream leti*.** 
Dauphin; county in Pennsylvania, named for the Dauphin of France, son of 

I^mis XVI. 
Davenport; city in Scott County, Iowa, name<I for Colonel Davenport, an early 

settler. 
Davenport; village in Thayer County, Nebraska, named fnmi Davenport, Iowa. 
Davenport; town in Delaware County, New York, named for John Davenport, an 

earlv settler. 
David City; city in Butler County, Nebraska, nameil for David Butler, first governor 

of the State. 



GAiWBTTl PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED 8TATE8. 101 

DavidBon; town in Boulder County, Colorado, named for Col. William A. Davidson, 
president of the Davidson Coal and Iron Mining Company^ which platted the 
town. 

Davidson; village in Josephine County, Oregon, named for Elijah B. Davidson, an 
early settler. 

{ Davidson; counties in North Carolina and Tennessee; 
Davidson College; town in Mecklenburg County, North Carolina. Name<l for 
Gen. William Davidson, an oflScer of the Revohition. 
Davie; county in North Carolina, nameil for Gen. William R. Davie, jrovenior in 

1798-99. 
Daviess; counties in Indiana, Kentucky, and Missouri, named for Col. Joseph 

Daviess, who fell at the battle of Tippecanoe. 
Davis; creek in Humboldt County, California, nameil for an old settler. 
Davis; village in Stephenson County, Illinois, named for oneof its founders, 8. J. Davis. 
Davis; county, and town in Decatur County, Iowa, named for Garrett Davis, mem- 
ber of Congress. 
Davis; county in Utah, named for Capt. Daniel Davis, a first settler, and captain of 

the first body of mounted rangers organized in the county. 
Davis; town in Tucker County, West Virginia, named for Senator H. G. Davis. 
Davison; county in South Dakota, named for Henry C. Davison, the first settler in 

the county. 
Davitte; village in Polk County, Georgia, named for the original proprietor, .1. S. 

Davitte. 
Dawes; county in Nebraska, name<l for James W. Dawes, former governor of the 

State. 
Dawson; county in Georgia, named for William C. Dawson, Unite<l Stat^a Senat^)r 

from that State. 
Dawson; township in McLean County, Illinois, named for John Wells Dawson, a 

pioneer. 
Dawson; village in Sangamon County, Illinois, nameil for Bert Dawson, one of its 

founders. 
Dawson; county in Montana, named for Andrew Dawson, of the American Fur 

Company. 
Dawson; village in Richardson County, Nebraska, name<l for Joshua Dawson, an 

early settler. 
Dawson; county in Texas, named for Nicholas Dawson, who led the forces at the 

battle of Salado, in 1836. 
Dawsonville; town in Dawson County, Georgia, named for William C Dawson, 

United States Senator from that State. 
Day; county in Oklahoma. The counties in Oklahoma were originally named from 

the letters of the alphabet; later, names were given which began with the letter 

corresponding to the one by which the county had been known. 
Day; county in South Dakota, named for Merritt H. Day, legislator. 
Dayansville; village in Lewis County, New York, named for Charles Dayan, who 

founded it in 1826. 
Dayton; town in York County, Maine, name<l for a prominent politician. 
Dayton; city in Montgomery County, Ohio, named for Jonathan Dayton, one of 

the original proprietors. 
Dayton; city in Rhea County, Tennessee, named from the city in Ohio. 
Dayton; city in Columbia County, Washington, namiMl for Jesse N. Day, an early 

proprietor. 
Daytona; town in Volusia County, Florida, name<l for W. T. Day, of Ohio. 
X>ead; mountain in Nevada, so called l>ecauseitwa8suppose<l by the Mohave Indians 

to be the abode of departed spirits. 



102 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull.&. 

Deadmans; island in San Pedro Bay, Uw Angeles County, California, sappoeed to 
be an Indian burial ground, Ikhiuiw* of tlie skeletons found in excavating. 

Deadwood; town in Trinity Ct)unty, California, and city in l^wrent^ County, South 
Dakota, named from adjacent forestall of dead timber. 

Deaf Smith; county in Texa*!, namiMl lor P^rastus Smith, Indian an<l Mexican 
figbter and scout, so calUnl because his bearing was imiierfect. 

Deal; island in Maryland. The name is corrupte<i from the old name, I)(»vil« Island. 

{Deal; ))orougb in Monmouth County, New Jersey; 
Deal Beach; iH)st-otfi<'C^ in Monmouth County, New Jersey. Namtni from I>wil, 
England. 
Deal Island; villag^^ in Somerset County, Maryland, named from the island. 
Deansville; village in Oneida County, New York, named for Thomas Dean, agent 

of the Brothertown Indians. 
Dearborn; county in Indiana, t4)wn in Wayne Ckmnty, Michigan, river in Montana, 

and mount in South Carolina, named for Gen. Henry Dearborn, Secretar>' of 

War under President Thomas Jefferson. 
Death; valley in Inyo County, CaUfomia, so calle<l t»ecause of the death of a party 

of immigrants from thirst and starvation. A gloomy tract of desert, 159 fet»t 

l)elow «»a level. 
Debloia; town in Washington County, Maine, nanie<l for Tliomas Amory Deblois, 

a bank j)resident. 
Decatur; (counties in Georgia, Indiana, Iowa, and Kansas; towns in Newton County, 

Mississippi, and Otsego County, New York, and many other plac^es; named for 

ComuKxlore Stephen Dwatur. 
Deckertown; borough in Sussex County, New Jersey, namixl for a family numemiu 

in the neighborhoo<!. 
Decorah; city in Winneshiek County, Iowa, namcHl for Jkhere, meaning ** spoon," 

a Winnebago chief. Another authority gives the orthography as JJecorie, 
Dedham; town in Hancock County, Plaint*, named from the Massachusetts town. 
Dedham; town in Norfolk County, Massachusetts, named from the parish in Eng- 
land. 
Deep; river in North Carolina. A tnmslation of the Indian name mppomUt, **deep 

river." 
Deep River; town in Poweshiek County, Iowa, named irom a creek near. 
Deerfield; descriptive name given to many i)laces. The town in Rockingham 

County, New IIami>shire, was so mnne<l iK'causti when the petition for a town 

was landing Mr. Batcliel(l(*r killed a divr, and uj>on j>resenting it to Governor 

Went worth obtained the? act and name. 
Deerfield; township in Portage County, Ohio, named from I>eerfield Valley, in 

Massachusetts. 
Deering; town in IIill8lx)ro County, New IIami>shire, named by Governor Benning 

Wentworth for the maiden name of his wife. 
Deer Isle; town in Hancock (.\)unty, Maine, name<i from three islamls upon which 

deer wert? very abundant. 
Deerlodge; county, and town in l*owell County, in ^lontana, named from a salt lick 

where deer came in droves. 
Defiance; county, and city in same ctmnty, in Ohio, named from a fort erected 

bv (Jen. Anthonv Wavne in detiancc of the Hritish and Indians. 

• • • 

De'Funiak Springs; celebrated ri*sort in Walton County, Florida, named for a 

resident of Nashville. 
Dehesa; town in San Diego County, California. A Spanish word meaning ^'pasture 

land." 
Dekalb; township and city in Dekalb County, Illinois, nanuHl from the county. 



OANNBTT] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 108 

I>ekalb; coanties in Alabama, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Missouri, and Tennessee, 
and numerous places in the country, named for Baron De Kalb, who fell at the 
battle of Camden. 

De Lacy; creek in Yellowstone Park, named for William \V. De Lacy, the first 
white man known to have passed along the valley. 

De La Mar; town in Shasta County, California. From the Spanish, meaning '*by 
the sea.'* 

Delancey; village in Delaware County, New York, named for James De I-ancey, an 
early patentee. 

De Land; town in Volusia County, Florida, named fi)r II. A. De I^and, a manu- 
facturer of Fairport, New York, who founded it. 

Delano; town in Kern County, California, and mountains in Montana and Utah, 
named for Columbus Delano, Secretary of the Interior under President Grant. 

Delavan; township and city in Tazewell County, Illinois, and city in Walworth 
County, Wisconsin, named for E. C. Delavan, a temperance advocate of Albany, 
New York. 

Delaware; State of the Union, river, and counties in Indiana, Iowa, New York, 
Ohio, and Pennsylvania, named for Lord de la Warr, governor and first captain- 
general of Virginia. Many small places also bear this name. A tribe of Indians 
was known by this name, and in the case of the county in Indiana, the name 
was given because this tribe had villages within the boundaries of the county. 

{Deleon; town in Comanche County, Texas; 
Deleon Spring; town in Volusia County, Florida. Named for Ponce de I^eon. 
Delg^ada; point in California, named for an old Spanish explorer. 
Delhi; village in Delaware County, New York, named from the city in India. 

Several other places bear this name. 
Dellenbaugh; mount in Arizona, named for F. S. Dellenbaugh, the artist, by the 

Powell survey. 
Delmar; town on the border between Delaware and Maryland, named from the first 

syllables of the name of each State. 
Del Konte; city in Monterey County, California. A Spanish phrase meaning ''of 

the mountain.'' 
Del Norte; county in California, situated in tiie northwest comer of the State. 

Spanish words, meaning '*of the north." 
Del Norte; town in Rio Grande County, Colorado, named from the river Rio (irande 

del Norte, "grand river of the north.'* 
Delphi; town in Carroll County, Indiana, and village in Onondaga County, New 

York, named for the ancient town in Phocis. 
Delphos; city in Allen County, Ohio, and several other places named from the 

classicai Delphos of Greece. 
Del Key; town in Fresno County, California. A Spanish phrase meaning "of the 

king." 
Del Hio; town in Valverde County, Texas, named from its situation on Rio Grande. 

Spanish words, meaning "of the river." 
Delrosa; town in San Bernardino County, California. A S|)anish phrase meaning 

"of the rose." 
Delsur; town in Los Angeles County, California. A Spanish phrase meaning " of 

the south. " 
Delta; town in Shasta County, California, and counties in Michigan and Texas, so 

named because triangular in shape. 
Delta; coanty in Colorado, named from a delta of arable land at the mouth of the 

Uncompabgre River, where it flows into (lunnison River. 
De Lus; township in San Diego County, California. From the Spanish, meaning 

"the light," "inspiration." 



104 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [buli.25K 

Demopolis; city in Marengo County, Alabama. A Greek word meaning "city of 

the people.'* 
Benbigrh; tr)wn in Warwick County, Viri^^nia, named from the connty in Walt?:. 
Denison; city in Crawford (bounty, Iowa, named for J. W. DeniHon; who laid it 

out. 
Denison; city in < rrayson C-ounty, Texa^i, riottled by perBonfl from the north, an<i 

proluibly named for liev. (-. \V. Deinson of early antlHlavery fame. 
Denmark; town in I^win County, New York, named from the kingdom in F^urope. 
Denmark; town in Band^er^ (bounty, South Carolina, named for B. A. Denujark. a 

railroad dire('t4)r. 
Denning; town in IJlnter (.ounty, New York, named for William H. Denning, a for- 
mer proprietor. 
Dennis; villas in BaniHtable C-ounty, MawMu^husette, named for itf^ ArRt mini^tter, 

Rev. Joniah Dermis. 
Dennison; villa^j^e in Tuflearawaf* (bounty, Ohio, named, probably, for Gov. William 

DenniK)n. 
Dennya; river in Maine, named for an Indian hunter. 

Dennysville; town in Wat^hington County, Maine, named from Dennya River. 
Dent; county in Mi^Houri, name<i for Lewis Dent, early resident. 
Denton; town in Caroline County, Maryland, name<l for Sir Robert Eden, gov- 
ernor of the province in 176t>-1776. It was first called Eden Town, from which 

it was Hhortene<l to the pre.sent form. 
Denton; river, county, and city in same county in Texas, named for Gapt. John B. 

Denton, who whh kille<l in battle with the Indians. 
Denver; county, and city in Arai>ahcH^ County, in Colorado, named for James W. 

Denver, a former governor of Kansas. Many towns and villages take their name 

from the citv. 
Depauville; village in Jefferson County, New York, named for Francis Depau, a 

large i)roprietor. 
Depere; city in Brown (Vmnty, Wisconsin, so named liecause situated on Rapides* 

des Peres. 
Depew; village in Krie County, New York, named for Chauncey M. Depew, United 

States Senator. 
Depeyster; town in St. I^awnmce County, New York, named for Frederick Depey- 

ster, member of a celel)rate<l New York fandlv. 
Deposit; village in Delaware and BnKtnie counties. New York, so named l)e<tiU8eit 

was formerly a place of dei>osit for lundH^r, 
Deptford; township in (Tlou(*ester County, New Jersey, nameil from a port in 

Kngland. 
Depue; village and cri^'k in Burcmu County, Illinois, namiHl for De Pue, an early 

Frt»nch trader. 
Derby; city in New Haven County, Connecticut, and town in Orleans Connty, Ver- 
mont, nami^l fn>m the town and county in Kngland. Many other places also 

lK»ar this name, given either directly or indirertly from the same. 
Derrick City; village in McKean County, Pennsylvania, so name<l from the great 

nnnilM*rs of derricks which mark the oil wells in the vicinity. 
Derry; town in Rockingham County, New Hampshire, and l)orough in Montour 

C\)unty, Pennsylvania; also one or two small places. Named from the town in 

Ireland, nnw calh*<l Londonderrv. 
Deruyter; village in Madison County, Nt»w York, name<l for Adnnral De Ruyter,of 

the Dutch navy. 
Descanso; town in San Diego County, California. From the Spanish, meaning "rest 

from labor." 



GANNETT.] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 105 

I>e8chutes; river, and village in Sherman CJounty, in Oregon. From the early 
French name ritiere des chxUes, meaning ** river of the falls." 

Desha; county in Arkannan, named for Captain Ben Desha, a prominent citizen of 
the State. 

De Sxnet; town in Kootenai County, Idaho, and village in Kingnbur}' County, South 
Dakota, named for Peter John De Smet, a Jesuit missionary. 

Des Moines; river, county, and city in Polk County, in Iowa. This name is thought 
to have been derived fn)m the Indian word mikonamj, meaning *'road." This 
name was applie<l by the Indians in the form of mohigoim^ which the French 
shorttMieil into ?«oi«, calling the river *'ririere des mointt.'^ Finally, the name 
became associated with the Trappist monks, and the river by a spurious 
etym<>logy was calle<l **/« riviere des moinesy^* **the river of the monks." 

De Soto; village in Sumter County, (Georgia; county in Florida; township and vil- 
lage in Jackson County, Illinois; parish in Louisiana; county in Mississippi; and 
twelve other places, named for Hernando de Soto, the discoverer of the Missis- 
sippi River, 

DesPlaines; river and village in Cook County, Illinois. Derived from the presence 
of a s|)ecies of maple calle<l by the French **;)/<n*/w." 

Destruction; island on the northwest coast of North America, so named b€»cause of 
the massacre of a l)oat crew upon this coast. 

Detour; village in Chippewa County, Michigan, so name<l from its jx)sition, it being 
necessarv to make a detour in order to reach it. 

Detroit; township an<l town in Pike County, Illinois, namenl from Detroit, Michigan. 

Detroit; river, and city in Wayne County, in Michigan. A French word, meaning 
**strait," or *' narrow passage," given to the river by the early French explorers 
l)ecause it is a short, narrow river connecting Lake St. Clair with T^ke Erie. 

Deuel; county in Nebraska, name<l for Harry P. Deuel, superintendent of theT^nion 
Pa^'ific Railroad. 

Deuel; county in South Dakota, named for Jacob Deuel, a legislator in 1862. 

Devils; lake in Sauk County, Wisconsin, so named because it is situated in a deep 
chasm with no visible inlet or outlet. 

Devils Lake; village in Sauk County, Wisconsin, name<l from the lake. 

Devine; town in Me<lina County, Texas, named for Hon. Thomas J. Devine, an old 
resident of San Antonio. 

Devoe; creek in Arkansas, so (^lle<l from the name given by the early French, 
de reaUy ** of calf." 

Dewey; county in Oklahoma, named for Admiral (ieorge Dewey. A nimil)er of 
towns also bear his name. 

Dewey; county in South Dakota, named for William P. Dewey, surveyor-general 
in 1873. 

Dewitt; coimty,an<l village in same county, in Illinois, township and city in Clinton 
County, Iowa, and town in Carroll County, Missouri, named for De Witt Clinton, 
former governor of New Y<jrk. 

De'witt; town in Onondaga County, New York, named for Moses De Witt, an early 
settler. 

Dewitt; county in Texas, namcnl for (xreen De Witt, a colonizer who settle*! fam- 
ilies at Gonzales in 1827. 

'; city in Cowley County, Kansas, name<l for a trotting horse of Rol)ert Bon- 
ner, of New York. 

•; town in Penobscot County, Maine, named for Judge Samuel Dexter, candi- 
date for governor of Massachusetts in 1816. 

Dexter; village in Washtenaw County, Michigan, nameil for Samuel W. Dexter, who 
settled there in 1829. 



106 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. rBiLu2St<. 

Dexter; village in .Fefferwui County, New York, named for 8. Newton Dexter, a 

prominent NuHint'HH man of \VhiteHl>«)n». 
D*Hanis; town in Meilina County, Texas, named for Count von IVHanifi, who 

foun<led the town alM.)ut 1S45. 
Diamond; vilhig(> in (rrun<ly County, illinoiH, named from it« location iii tiieueuter 

of the " lUack Diamond *' coal ilintrict. 
Diana; town in I^'win C'ounty, New York, nami^l for the Roman godilees 
Dickens; county in Texas, nameil for J. Diekenn, who fell at the Alamo. 
Dickenson; county in Virjrinia, nami*<l for William J. Diekenflon of the State. 
Dickey; county, an<l village in l^imoure County, in North Dakota, named for Hod. 

George Dickey, mcmlH*r of the legislature. 
Dickey; river in Washington. The name w derive<l from the Indian name, lUrkoh- 

dorktemler. 
Dickinson; counties in Iowa and Kansas, named for Daniel S. Dickinson, United 

8tat<»s Senator from New York in 1844. 
Dickinson; county in Michigan, naminl for Don M. Dickinson, postmaster-genend 

under President Cleveland. 
Dickinson; t^)wn in Htark C?ounty, North Dakota, named for W. S. Dickinson, of 

Malone, New York, who founde<l it. 
Dickinson; county in Viiyinia, nanuMl for a pn>minent member of the legislature. 
Dicksburg^; village in Knox County, Indiana, named for Thomas Dick, former 

owner of the ground. 
Dickson; crunity, and town in same county, in Tennessee, named for William Dickson. 
Die All; island in California, so named iKH^ause all the Indians on the island <Iie«l. 
Digrhton; city in I^ne County, Kansas, naniiHl for Dick Deighton, a surveyor. 
Digrbton; vilhige in Hristol County, Massac*husetts, named for Frances Dighton, 

wife of Richard Williams, one of the first settlers. 
Diller; village in Jefferson County, Nebraska, name<l for H. H. Diller, an early 

settler. 
Dillon; city in B<»averhead County, Montana, namwl for Sydney Dillon, railroatl 

president. 
Dillon; town in Marion County, Soutli Carolina, named for a prominent family. 
Dillsboro; tt)wn in l)carlM>rn County, Indiana, named for Gen. James Dill, an early 

settler. 
Dillsboro; town in Jackson County, North (Carolina, name<l f«>r Oeon?e W. Dill, an 

earlv settler. 
Dimmick; township and village in I..asalle County, Illinois, named foran early settler. 
Dimmit; county in Texas, name<l for Philip Dimmit, one of the earliest settlers in 

the State. 
Dinwiddie; county, and town in same (bounty, in Virginia, named for Robert Din- 
widdle, lieut<.^nant-governor of the State in 1 752-1 75S. 
Dirty Devil; creek in Arizona, so name<l by Major Powell during his first trip down 

the canyon of I lie Colonido, l>ecause of the nuiddiness of its waters. 
Disappointment; cape at the mouth of the Columbia River, Washington, so named 

by John ^leares, the lOnglish navigator, who thought no river existed in the 

region. 
Dismal; swamp in Virginia and North Carolina, so namiNl iKH'ause of its dismal 

appearance, <lue to the dense fori»st of juni}K*r, cypnrss, ct-c., which cover it. 
District of Columbia. S«h» iohmthin. 
Dix; mount and town in Schuyler County, N<'w York, nametl for Gen. John A. 

Dix, Cnited States Senator. 
Dixmont; town in Penolwot County, Maine, name^l for Dr. Klijah Dix, of Boeton. 
Dixmont; village in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, nanunl for Miss Dorothea 

Dix. American philanthropist. 



GANNETT.] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 107 

I>ixon; town in Solano County, California, nanie<l for Tiiomas Dixon, a pioneer 
settler. 

Dixon; city in Lee County, IIHuoIh, named for John Dixon, the founder. 

I>ixon; town in Webster County, Kentucky, named for Hon. Archibald Dixon. 

Dixville; town in Coos County, New Hampshire, named for Col. Tunothy Dix, first 
settler. 

Doane; mount in Yellowstone Park, named for Lieut. Gustavus C. Doane, United 
States Army, who commandefi the military es<»ort of an expe<lition in 1870. 

Dobbins; t<jwn in Yuba County, California, named for a settler. 

Dobbs Ferry; village in Westchester County, New York, name<l for a Swe<le wiio 
owned a ferry. 

Dobson; town in Surry C-ounty, North Carolina, named for W. P. Dol)8on, State 
senator. 

Doctorto'wn; town in Wayne County, Georgia, built upon the sit* of an old Indian 
settlement, which was the abode of a great ** medicine man." 

Doddridg^e; county in West Virginia, named for Philip Do<ldridge, a distinguishe<l 
statesman of western Virginia. 

Dodg^e; county in Georgia, named for W. E. Dodge, of New York, who, with W. P. 
Eastman, presented a court-house to the county. See EaMman, 

Dodgre; city in Ford County, Kansas, on the site of old Fort Dodge, and counties in 
Minnesota and Wisconsin, named for Gen. Henry Dodge, governor of Wisconsin 
Territory, and later United States Senator from Wisconsin. 

Dodge; county in Nebraska, named for Augustus Cajsar Dodge, United States Sen- 
ator from Iowa. 
I Dodge Center; village in Dodge County, Minnesota; 
Dodgeville; city in Iowa County, Wisconsin. Named ior Gen. Henry Do<lge, gov- 
ernor of Wisconsin Territory. 

Dolores; county in Colorado, nameil froth the Rio Dolores. A Spanish word, mean- 
ing **grief," which has a special significance among the Spanianls, !;eing one of 
the titles of the Virgin Mary. 

Dolph; village in Tillamook County, Oregon, named for J. N. Dolph, Unite<l States 
Senator. 

Dominguez; creek in Colorado, namcnl for a Spanish priest, who was one of the 
early explorers in this region. 

Domke; mountain, lake, and creek in Chelan County, in Washington, named for the 
first settler in the vicinity. 

Dona Ana; county, and town in same county, in New Mexico. A Spanish name 
meaning* 'Madam Anna," and probably given in honor of some Spanish matron. 

Donaldsonville; town in Ascension Parish, I^>uisiana, named for William Donald- 
son. 

Donderberg; mountain in New York, on the Hudson. A Dutch word, meaning 
"thunder mountain," so (railed by the early Dutch settlers l)ecause of the fre- 
quent thunder storms in its vicinity. 

Donegal; borough and township in Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania, named 
from the town in Ireland. 

Dongola; village in Union County, Illinois, named by the founder from Dongola in 
Africa. 

Doniphan; county, and city in same county, in Kansas, city in Ripley County, Mis- 
souri, and village in Hall County, Nebraska, name<l for Col. Alexander William 
Doniphan, a distinguished western soldier. 

Donley; county in Texas named for Stockton P. Donley, justice of the supreme 
court of the State. 

Donnaha; post-office in Forsyth County, North Carolina, named for the last chief 
of the Sanras. 



108 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [BCLLlSfe 

Donner; laki* in Nevmla County, California, named for a leader of a party of imiui- 

grants, nearly all of whom ])eriHheil from starvation. 
Dooly; county in (.Teorgia name<l for Col. John Dooly, an officer in the Revolution. 
Doon; towns in Sierra County, California, and Lyon County, Iowa, named from the 

river in Scotland. 
Door; county in Wiwonnin, so nanie<l l>eoaiiBe of itH proximity t(» ** Death*H Door," 

entnincv t^) (JretMi liiiv. 
Doran; villa^- in (*4>leH C^mnty, lllinoin, name<l forS. A. Doran, aneighlxirin^ laud- 
owner. 
Dorchester; county in ^laryland, named for the Karl of Don^heoter, whom Scharf 

savs was a family friend of the Calvert**. 
Dorchester; part of lioston, MaMHairhuHettH, named from the town in England. 
Dorchester; county in South Carolina, nanuni from the town in MasRaohuHette. 
Dormansville; village in .Ul>any C^nmty, New York, named for Daniel Dormao, 

former inn and ntore keejier. 
Dorrance; l)oroug:h in Luzerne County, Pennsylvania, named for a family of early 

Hettlern. 
Dosoris; village in Queens County, New York. The name is a contraction of ''doi 

ujrorix^^' "dowry of a wife,*' the projxjrty having come to the first settler through 

his wife. 
Dos PalmOS ; town in Riverside County, California, named from the giant N'uoca 

palms which grow near the spring. A Spanish phrase, meaning "two palms.*' 
Dos Palos; town in Merced County^ (/alifomia. A Spanish phrase meaning **two 

tiinlHTH." 
Dos Pueblos; town in Santa Harlmra ('ounty, Califoniia. A Spanish phrase mean- 
ing *' two towns." 
Dossett: village in Anderson County, Tennt^set^ named for the owner of the pro]^ 

ertv, Jacob Doasett. 
Dougherty; (Vnnity in (reorgia, naminl for Charles Dougherty. 
Dougherty; townshij> in Cerro (lordo County, Iowa, named for Daniel Dougherty, 

one of the prr>niinent resident**. 
Douglas; (*ounties in Colorado, (reorgia, Illinois, Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri, 

Xcvada, South Dakota, and Wistronsin, and ])rol>ahly the counties in Nebraska, 

Oregon, and Wa.^'hington; nanie<l for Stephen A. Douglas, of Illinois. 
Douglas; creek in Colorado, named for Chief Douglas, of the White River Utes. 
Douglas; town in Worcester County, Massac'liusettt*, named for Dr. William 

Dougla.^, of Boston, author of a hist<»ry of New England. 
Douglas; mount in Montana, name<l for R. M. Douglas, of the United States 

(leologiiail Survey. 
Douglas City; township in Trinity County, California, named for Stephen A. 

Douglas, oi Illinois. 
Douglass: city in Butler County, Kansas, named for Joseph Douglass, by whom it 

was laid out. 
Dover; cities in Kent County, Delaware, and Strafford County, New Hampshire, 

and town in Morris County, New Jer»»y, named fn)m the town in England. 
Dowagiac; river, and city in Cass C^)uuty, in Michigan. An Indian word meanii^ 

"fishing river." 
Downers Grove; township and village in Dupiige C'Ounty, Illinois, named for 

Pien-e Dt)wner, who locate<l there in 18.'U). 
Downieville; town in Sierra County, California, named for a pioneer. 
Downing^own; honmgh in Chester Co uity, Tennsylvania, named for Thomas 

Downing. 
Downs; town in Mclean County. Illinois, nanieil for I^wson Downs, a pioneer 

settler. 



OANNBTT.) PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 109 

I>own8; city in Osborne County, Kansas, named for William F. Downs, of Atchison. 
Downsville; village in Delaware County, New York, situated on Downs Creek. 

Both are named for Abel Downs, who had a tannery there. 
Dows; town in Wright County, Iowa, named for a railroad contractor. 
Doylestown; borough in Bucks County, Pennsylvania, named for William Doyle, 

an early settler. 
I>racut; town in Middlesex County, MaHsachiisetts, named from the home of the 

Vamum family, in Wales. 
I>rake8; bay in California, named for Sir Francis Drake, the navigator. 
Drakesville; town in Davis County, Iowa, named for John A. Drake, who laid it 

out. 
Drayton; town in Dooly County, Georgia, uameil for Colonel Drayton, of South 

Carolina. 
I>re8den; fifteen places in the country bear the name of the city in Clermany. 
Drew; county in Arkansas, named for Thomas S. Drew, governor in 1844-1848. 
Drew; village in Sunflower County, Mississippi, named for a railroad man. 

{Drewry; bluff on James River, Virginia; 
Drewry Bluff; post-oflSce in Chesterfield County, Virginia. Named for Maj. 
Augustus Drewry. 
Druxnxnond; lake in the center of Dismal Swamp in Virginia, named for William 

Drummond, former governor of North Carolina. Another authority says that 

it was named for a hunter who discovered it 
Dryden; town in Tompkins County, New York, named for the poet, John Dryden. 
Dry Tortugas; ten small islands off the coast of Florida. The name wa^ given 

from the lack of springs and abundance of sea turtles. Tbrtugas is a Spanish 

word meaning "tortoises.** 
Duane; town in Franklin County, New York, named for James Duane, pmprietor 

and first settler. 
Duanesbur^; town in Schenectady County, New York. French says that it was 

named for James Duane, the principal proprietor. Gordon says it was named 

for Judge Duane. 
Dublin; city in Laurens County, Georgia, named from the city in Ireland. Several 

other places are named from the same. 
Dubois; township and village in Washington County, Illinois, nauie<l for Jesse K. 

Du Bois, State auditor of public accounts, 1856-1864. 
Dubois; county in Indiana, named for Toussaint Dubois, who had charge of the 

guides and spies in the Tippecanoe campaign. 
Dubois; borough in Pennsylvania, named for its founder, John Dubois. 
Dubuque; county, and city in same county, in Iowa, named for a Fremth trader, 

Julien Dubuque. 
Duck Hill; town in Montgomery County, Mississippi, named from a hill near the 

town where ducks were plentiful in early days. 
Dudley; town in Kings County, California, named from the town in Massachusetts. 
Dudley; town in Worcester County, Massachusetts, named for two l)rother8, Paul 

and William Dudley, who were among the first proprietors. 
Dufur; village in Wasco County, Oregon, name<l for an old settler. 
Dukes; county in Massachusetts, so named because it was under the government of 

the Duke of York, afterwards James II. 
Duluth; city in St Louis County, Minnesota, named for Sieur Daniel Graysolon 

Dulath, a French traveler. 
Dnizura; town in San Diego County, California. A Spanish word meaning "gen- 
tleness," "forbearance." 
Dumfries; town in Prince William County, Virginia, named from the town in 

Scotland. 



110 PLACE NAMES IN THE TJNITED 8TATB8. [Bru-a 

Diunmer: town in (\m»s (\>nnty. New Hampehire; 

Diunmerston; town in Windham C-oanty, Vermont. Named for William Dnm- 
tner, HtMitrnant-^^venior of Vermont and acting governor of Maffiachuftettjs 

17L':;-17:^). 

Dumont; village in (MearCnt^k (^)unt\^ (V>lonulo, named for John >I. DimKnit.a 

niin<* o|K'nitor. 
Dunbar; village in Ot(K' Connty, N'ehraska, named for John Ihinhar, a laiye Un<i- 

fjwner. 
Dunbar; ]M)ron^li in Fayette (Nmnty, PennHvlvania, nameil for Col. John IhmlMr. 

who coniniandtMi an Kn^Hsh foree at thin point and wan defeated by the Frenrb 

and Indiana. 
Dunbar; village in MarlUiro Connty, South Carolina, named for a family in the 

neijrldx»rho«)d. 

Dunbarton: town in Merrinuu- County, New* Hampshire, named by Archilml«I 

Stark, <»ne of the lirst pmprietors, wh(» emigrated from Dimliarton, Scotland. 
Duncan; village in Stark (.-ounty, Illinois, name<l for James Henr}' Duncan, Unite*] 

States (\»n^n'^sman from MaHsachiist^tts, 184JJ-1853. 
Duncan; town in l^>Iivar (N>unty, Mi^m^sippi, named for a leailing citizen. 
Duncan Falls; town in Muskingum County, Ohio, named for a trailer, >Uji>r 

Duncan. 
Duncannon; Ixiron^h in Perry (!7ounty, Pennnylvania, named from the t(»wn in 

Wexfonl, ln*land. 
Duncombe; town in Wei »*tcr County. Iowa, nanio<l for Hon. J. F. DuncoinU*. 
Dundaff; iKiron^h in SuHiuehanna County, PenuHylvania, named from the town in 

Wales. 
Dundee; township in Kane County, Illinoifl, nanuMl from the village in New York. 
Dundee; villajre in Yat<»s Comity, New York, named from the town in 8it>tlaii(i. 

A numlHT f)f other places also lM*ar this name. 
Dundy; county in Nehraska, nameil forjudge Klmer S. Dundy. 
Dungeness; town in Clallam County, Washington. This name was given to a low 

point of hunl in the coimty hy Vancouver, In'cause of its resemblance to I>nn- 

^enesM in the r»riti?*h channel, and Hul>se<iuently applie<l to the town. 
Dunkirk; city in (*hautau<]ua County, New York, named indirectly from the town 

in France. 
Dunklin; c<»unty in Missoiiri, named f<»r Daniel Dunklin, g«)venior of Missouri in 

ls;;2-is:]H. 

Dunlap; villap' in INoria County, Illinois, nanie<l f(»rAlva Dunlap, proimnent land- 
owner. 

Dunlap; town in Harrison County, Iowa, nam<Ml for the mijH'rintendent of tlie Chi- 
i-aL^o aiul Northwestern Hailwav. 

Dunlap; city in Morris County, Kanwui, namtnl for Jos(*ph Dunlap, a trailer among 
the Indians nn<l founder nf the town. 

Dunlapsville; town in Cnion County, Indiana, laid out hyJohn Dimlap, <me of the 
lirst settlers. 

Dunmore; lake in Vermont, namiMl by the F^irl of Dunmore, who wmleil into it and 
formally christeiie<l it for himself. 

Dunmore; town in INM-ahontas Cmuity, West Vir^rinia, nameil for John (Lord) Dun- 
more, governor of Vin^'inia, 1772-177t>. 

Dunn; town in Ilarnet C^Mmty, North Carolina, nain«*<l for a resident. 

Dunn; county in North Dakota, name<l for John \\ Duim, a pioneer (»f the State in 
1S71. 

Dunn; ctjunty in Wi.^consin, named iar Charles Dunn, first chief justice of the 
Territory. 



GANNETT] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. Ill 

I>uiin8ville; town in Albany County, New York, uamecl for Christopher Dunn, 

the original owner. 
I>iinraven; peak in Yellowstone Park, Wyoming, named for the Earl of Dunraven. 
I>un8table; town in Middlesex County, Massaehusettfi. The history of the town 

states that it was named for the mother of one of the petitioners, Mary Tyng, 

but there is no record of her maiden name or birthplace, There is, however, 

record of a large family by the name of Long, who came from Dunstable, Eng- 
land, in 1635. This fact gives direct connection, and it is probable that the 

t<3wn took its name from the English town. 
3>upage; county in Illinois, named from the river. 
3>upag'e; river in Illinois, named for a French Indian, Du Page or I)e Page, who had 

his headquarters on the river before 1800. 
I>iiplixi; county in North Carolina, named for Lord Duplin, or Dupplin, of the Ixmrd 

of trade. 
3>uquesne; borough in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, name<l from old Fort 

Duqnesne, which was named for a (iistinguLshed French officer. 
IHiquoixi; city in Perry County, Illinois, said to have Ijeen named for an Indian 

chief of the Kaskaskia tribe. 
I>urand; village in Winnebago County, Illinois, name<l for H. S. Durand, a promi- 
nent railroad official. 
I>urand; village in Shiawassee County, Michigan, named for Cieorge H. Durand, of 

Flint, Michigan, member of Congress. 
I>urand; city in Pepin County, Wisconsin, named for Miles Durand Prindle, an 

early settler. 
I>ura]igo; city in La Plata Coimty, Colorado, named for a resident Spanish family. 
Durant; town in Cedar County, Iowa, named for Thomas Durant. 
I>ura]it8; neck of land in Perquimans County, North Carolina, granted to George 

Durant in 1662. 
Durham; town in Butte County, California, named from the town in Maine. 
I>urlia]n; town in Middlesex County, Connecticut, named from the town in England. 
I>urliani; town in Androscoggin County, Maine, named from the former residenc^e 

of the royal family, by early settlers. 
Durham; county, and town in same county, in North Carolina, named for Dr. 

Bartholomew Durham, owner of the town site. 
Doahore; borough in Sullivan County, Pennsylvania, named for its founder, the 

name being a corruption of Dupetit-Thouars. 
Duaton; island in New Hampshire, named for an early settler. 
Dutchess; county in New York, nameil for Mary of Modena, Duchess of York. 

Previous to the appearance of Johnson's Dictionary the title was spelled with 

a **t;*' hence the name of the county is so spelled. 
Dutton; mount in Utah, named by Major Powell for Maj. C. E. Dutton. 
Duval; county in Florida, named for William P. Duval, Territorial governor in 

1822-1834. 
Duval; county in Texas, named for the Duval family, prominent in the State. One 

member. Burr H. Duval, fell in Fannin's massacre. 
Duwamish; river in Washington, named from the Duwamish tril>e of Indians. 
Duxbury ; town in Plymouth County, Massachusetts, settled by Miles Standish. It 

is said to have received its name from the seat of the Standish family in England, 

Duxbury Hall. 
Dwi^ht; township and village in Livingston County, Illinois, named for Henry A. 

Dwight, junior, a benefactor of the town. 
Dwig^ht; village in Hampshire County, Massachusetts, namcni for the Dwight family, 

prominent early settlers. 



1 1 2 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED 8TATEB. 



Bi : ■ . r* 



Dycusburg; \'illa^'e in C^rittcnden (Vmnty, Kentucky, named for William E. iKnt. 

its fnniulor. 
jDyer; r<)unty in Tenni^hMH*; 

jDyersburg; <ity in l)yt»r Connty, Tenneflsee. Named for Col. Henry Dyer, wb-i 
' ffll at tin* liatth* nf Ni-w Orleans. 

Dyersville; town in l)nlin({ne ( 'onnty, Iowa, name<l for a former owner, Janie* Dyvr. 
Dyerville; tnwn in MunilHjIdt Connty, California, named for a net tier. 
Dysart; town in Tama Coiinty, Iowa, name<l from the town in Sc-otland. 
Eagle; this wnnl, filhcr alonoor with suftixt^, fonns the name of HI pi>st-<^ffiti* in 

thf Tnit*'*! States- -in many ca^es so calle<l bet-anHe of the former pres^mf of tti* 

l»ir<l. 
Eagle; rounty in C<»loradn. Hall's History jjiven the origin as from the riwrott^ii: 

name flowiim thmn^rh this county. 
Eagle Pass; town in Maverick Cojuity, Texas, s*> named because the <t>ntonr«.»f l-he 

hills through whi<-li the Kio (irande flows })ore a fancied reeemhlaniv to thf 

(»ntstretehe<l win^s of an ea^le. 
Eagle River; village in Keweenaw (Vninty, Michijjran, nanierl from the Indian 

iiiKjis'nnnihi, meaning '•<'a^U*." 
Earl Park: town in Benton Connty, Indiana, laid out by Adamn Karl and A. 1). Raul- 
Earlville; town in Delaware County, Iowa, named for it«i first ft«ettler, <i. M. F-arl. 
Earlville; villajrr in Madison Connty, New York, named for Jona^ Earl, c^mt 

rornrnis.^inni'r. 
Early; ronnty in ( ief)r^ia, name<l in honor of Peter h^arly, governor of the Stat** in 

ISI.S. 
Easley; town in Pirkens Connty, South Carolina, named for General I'^lev, a proui* 

inent Sonth Carolinian. 
East Baton Rouge; j)arish in I/niisiana. See Baton Rouge, 
East Bend; town in Yadkin County, North Carolina, named from the Iwnd in th? 

Yadkin liiver at that point. 
East Brady; horongh in Clarion County, Pennsylvania, on the Allegheny River. 

east of Hradys bend. 
East Bridgewater; town in Plymouth C<»nnty, Massachosetti^, name<l from the 

oritrinal name of I>rorkton, Massachusi'tts, which first received the name of 

i^ridp'water in honor of a celehrated Kn^rlish duke. 
East Carroll; i)arish in Louisiana, named in honor of Charles Carroll of Carrf»llton. 
East Fallowlield; townships in Crawford and Washinjfton I'ounties, Penntsylvania, 

said to be named for l^incelot Fallowlield, one of the first purchasers of land 

fn^m William Penn. 
East Feliciana; parish in Louisiana. A Spanish word meaning **donie." 
East Greenbush; t(»wn in Rensselaer Coimty, New York, named by the Dutch, A'"/ 

(jrocn Ao.sv//, meaning "^reen l)ush," because of the pine woods near, which 

were continually j^rreen. 
East Greenwich; town in Kent County, Rhode Islan<l, nameil from the manor of 

Kii>t (ireenwich in Kent Connty, Kngland. 
Eastham; town in Barnstable ('ounty, Massachusetts, name<1 from its extreme 

eastern sitnation in tin* countv. 
Eastland; county, and town in same comity, in Texas, named for M. \V. Eastland. 
Eastman; town in l>odge County, (ieorjria. name<l for W. P. Flastman, who, with 

W. K. hodi^e, ]»resented the county with a conrt house. 
Easton; town in Talbot County, Maryland, eo named IxL'caiise of its location east- 

erlv of St. Michaels. 
Easton; city in Northampton Coimty, Pennsylvania, nameil from the estate of an 

Englisli nobleman, lx)rd Pomphret. 



^Hmrt.) 



PLAGE NAMES IN THE UNITED 9TATK8. 



113 



Saston Ceater; vilts^ in BriHtol County, MaiwachuRetts, jM-rhnpe ii 

of Hon. John F-aston, governor of Rhoile Islttnii. 
Bast Fepperell; town in Midilli'sex Couiily, Masaichiiselts, named (or Sir Willimii 

Pepjieretl, who iTiminiincleil an army hi ttie exjiedition aminst Louiaburg, Cape 

Sastport; rity in Washington County, Maine, Dri^inally i-aXleii Moose lelfuid, hut 

later incorporated under its present name in honor o/ being the most eastern 

city in the IhiiCed Stales. 
Eaat Hiver; a body of water at New York, properly a strait connecting Long Island 

Sound with New York Bay; called n river no doubt from the river-like action of 

itK tides; the nameieused todiBtingiiisb it from North River, thai Is, the Hudson. 
Xaatwood; village in Onondaga County, New York, a suburb of Syracuse, and named 

from its easterly direction from that plac 
Saton; town in Weld County, Colorado, named for Benjamin H. Katon and Aaron 

J. Eaton, of the Baton Milling and Elevator Company. 
Eaton; county in Michigan, nan)e<l for John 11. Kuton, Secretary of War under 

President Jackson. 
Baton; town in Madison County, New York, and villt^^ in Preble County, Ohio, 

named for Gen. William Eaton, of MaeBac^hufletts, a Revolutionary offii«r and 

commander of the United States military forces in Tripoli. 
Eaton Kapids; town in Eaton County, Michigan, ro naiiie<l on account of the rapids 

in Grand Kiver. 
Batonton; city in Putnam Coimty, Georgia, named for (ien. William Eaton. 
Eatontowa; township in Monmouth County, New Jersey, named for an old settler. 
Eau Olaire; river In Michiiian. The name Ih French and Hgnllles "clear water," 
Eau Olaire; county, and city in «ame county, in Wisconsin, nBme<l from the river in 

Michigan. 
Eau Qalle; river and town in Ihmn County, Wisconnin. From the French, mean- 
ing "bitter water." 
Eau Pleine; riverandtown in Portage County. Wisconsin. French wonis meaning 

"full water," or "stock river." 
Bbeeme; mountain and gonte in I'lscataquis ('ounty. Maine, An Indian word, 

meaning " where they get high-bush cranlterries." 
Ebenecook; village in Lincoln County, Maine. A corruption of the Indian, 

alfiiiiiut, meaning "bread pla**," or according to another authority, "high- 
bush cranberry place." 
Bbenezer; town in Kolnies (.'ounty, MiHsiseippi. nanie<l by the early iwCtlera from 

the old Jewish city. 
Ebeneburg; boniugh in tlambria County, Pennsylvania, laid out by the Bev. Kees 

[,loy(l, and nanieil by him for his eldest son. Eben. 
Echaconnee; creek in Georgia. An Indian word meaning "beaver stream," 
Echaconnee; town in Bibb County, Georgia, named from tlie creek on which il is 

locateil. 
Echo; canyon in the Wasatch Mountains of Ctali; a descriptive name. 
Echo; peak in Yellowstone Park, Wyoming, so named because of its remarkable 

Echo Canjron; town in Summit ('ounty, Utah, named from the ivnyon. 

Echo Kountain; summer refiort in Loe Angetee County, CMifornia. aame<l from 

the reverberating echo. 
EchoU; county in Georgia, named for Robert M, Echols. 
Eckley: town in Yuma County, Colorado, said to tx^ so named for Anioa Ecklee, 

catUe foreman for J, W. Bowles. 
Ball. 25S- 



114 PLACE NAMK8 IN THE UNITED STATES. [eru- 2:^^. 

Ecola; creek and suinnier resrui; in ("latsop CVmnty, Oregon, m naineii by Captain 

Clark, fn>ni endn, a Chinook Indian word meaning ** whale," because a whale 

was washtnl up on the whore. 
Economy; townj^liip in Beaver C«iunty, Pennsylvania, established in 1825 by a Har- 

monint wnnety, and nanie<l to indicate the principles of their gtivemnient and 

their liabitj4 of living. 
Ecore Fabre; ntreani in Arkansaj^. The name in derived from the French wonl 

erore, meaning ''nhore," "bank," or **l)luff," and Fabre, a proper name. 
Ecorse; river in Michigan, from the French worti icorre, meaning "bark," so 

named on account of the birch and other kinds of bark found on its bankn. 
Ecorse; tow^n in Wayne (.-ounty, Michigan, named from the river of the same name. 
Ector; county in Texas, named fr»r Matthew Ector, Confederate commander and 

judge. 
Edding^on; town in Penobs<^t County, Maine, named for Colonel Eddy, a pnimi- 

nent settler. 
Eddy; county in New Mexico, named in honor of C. B. Eddy, a prominent citizen. 
Eddy; county in North Dakota, name<l for one of the early linkers of Fargr*. 
Eddyville; town in WaiKillo County, Iowa, named for J. P. Eddy, who established 

a post there at an early day. 
Eddyville; city in Lyon County, Kentucky, so named for the lai^ eddies in the 

Cumberland River at this i>oint. 
Edelstein; village in Peoria Omnty, Illinois, named for a railroad official. 
Eden; town in Hancock C'ounty, Maine, named prolmbly for Richard Eden, an early 

English author. 
Eden; town in C<mcho County, Texas, name<l for Fred P/le, who owned the land. 
Edenton; town in Chriwan County, North Carolina, name<i for Charles Eden, gov- 
ernor of the State in 1714-1722. 
Edenvale; ti^wn in Santa Clara County, Califoniia, named with reference Uy the 

Garden of l^^len, l)ecause of the Iwauty and fertility of the place. 
Edg^ar; county in Illinois, nameil for (ien. John Edgar, an early and distinguished 

pioneer of the State. 
Edgecomb; town in Lincoln Cov.nty, Maine, name<l for Lonl Edgecombe, a friend 

of the American colonies. 
Edgecombe; county in North Carf>lina, name<l for Richard, Baron of Mount Edge- 
combe, of the l)oanl of trade. 
Edgefield; county, and town in same county, in South Carolina, named, as Simms 

Hupi)08es, liecause of the geographical situation at the e<lge of the State. There 

is also a supposition that the county derives its name from the fact that it bor- 
ders on an older coimtv. 
Edgerton; city in Johnson County, Kansas, name<l for the chief engineer of the 

At<'hison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railroad. 
Edgerton; village in Williams County, Ohio, named for Alfred P. Edgerton. 
Edgerton; city in Rock County, Wisconsin, prolxably named for E. W. Edgerton, 

an earlv settler. 
Edgewood; town in Ethngham ( -ounty, Illinois, named from its location near the 

e<lge of the forest. 
Edina; city in Knox County, Missouri. A poetical name given to Edinburgh. 
Edinburg; post-office in Leake County, Mississippi, and several other places bear 

the name of the citv in Scotland. 
Edinburg; township in Portage County, Ohio, named for l^wis Eddy, a resident 

It was fonnerly called Eddysburg. 
lEdiaon; village in Morrow County, Ohio; 
Edison Park; village in Cook County, Illinois. Name<l for Thomas A. Edison, 

the inventor. 



GANNETT.] PLACE NANE8 IN THE UNITED STATES. 115 

Edisto; rivor and islaiKi in South Carolina, named from an Indian tribe. 
Edxneston; town in Ot8i»go County, New York, named for Robert Edmeston, an 

early pioneer. 
Edmonson; county of Kentucky, named for Capt. Jack I^Mmonson, who fell at the 

battle of Raisin River. 
Edmunds; county in South Dakota, named in honor of Newton Edmunds, governor 

in 1863. 
Edna; city in Labette County, Kansas, named in 1876 for a child, E<lna (iragery. 
Edwards; county in Illinois, named for Ninian Edwards, governor of Illinois Terri- 
tory in 1809. 
Edwards; county in Kansas*, name<l for W. C. Edwards, of Hutchinson, first settler, 

who t<M>k active jmrt in it*< organization. 
Edwards; town in Hinds C-ounty, Mi8siH8ii)pi, nanie<l for Dick Fxlwanls, owner and 

proprietor of the Edwartis Iloui^e, Jackson, Mississippi. 
Edwards; town in St. Lawrence County, New York, named for E<iwanl McCormack, 

brother of the founder. 
Edwards; t^Urn in Beaufort County, North Can)lina, namtnl for a prominent family 

of the neighborhotni. 
Edwards; county in Texas, named for Harden Edwards, who established, under 

grant from the Mexican (Jovernment, a colony at Nacogdoches in 1825. 
Edwardsport; village in Knox County, Indiana, named for Edwards Wilkins. 
Edwardsville; city in Madison County, Illinois, named for Ninian Edwards, Terri- 
torial governor in 1809. 
Edwardsville; village in St. Lawrence County, New York, named for Jonathan S. 

Edwards, the first ix)stmast<*r. 
Eel; river in California, named frDm the Indian word irishosky **eel river," so called 

l)etau8e of its winding course. 
Eel; river in Indiana, callefl by the Indians xhoamaquey ' 'sHppery fish. ' ' The Indiana 

State Historical Geology, 1882, gives the Indian name as ke'iva-be-gwinn-maigf 

and the meaning **snakc-fi8h-river.*' 
Effingham; county in Georgia, name<l for Lord Efiingham. 
Effingham; county in Illinois. The origin of the name is in doubt. It has been 

stated that the c<ninty was named for (ien. Edward Efiingham, a surveyor, or it 

may have been nauuMl for I^)rd Efiingham, an officer in the British army, who 

resigned his commission rather than fight against the American colonies in their 

struggle for liberty. 
Effingham; city in Atchisi^ai County, Kansas, named for Efiingham Nichols, of 

Boston, a promoter of the Central Branch, Union Pa*-itic Railroad. 
Egbertsville; village in Ri(;hmond County, New York, name<l for James Egberts- 

ville, a former resident. 
Egg Harbor; tf»wnshii), and city in Atlantic County, New Jersey, bonlering on the 

ocean and Great Egg Harl)or Bay. It was so calleil because of the number of 

gull's eggs found near the bay. 
Egrremont; town in Berkshire County, Massachusetts, supposed to have received its 

name from Charles Wyndham, FArl of Egremont, who was secretary of state in 

1671. 
Egypt; fourteen places of the Unite<i States are named from the ancient country in 

Africa, the Hebrew expression for *'the land of oppression." 
Ehrenberg; town in Yiima County, Arizona, founded in 1856 by Hennan Ehren- 

berg. 
Ehrhardt; town in Bamberg County, 8outh Carolina, named for a prominent 

family. 
Elba; there are sixteen places of this name in the United States, most of which 

were named from the island in the Mediterranean. 



116 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [biill.2». 

Elbert; county and i>t»ak in (>>lorado, named for Samuel W. Elbert, governor of the 

Territory in 1873-74. 
Elbert; county in (Georgia; 
Elberton; city in Elbert. County, Georgia. Named for Samuel Elbert, formerly a 

governor of the State. 
Elbow; lake in Maine, ho called Iwcaune of itn shape. 
Elbridg^e; town in Onondaga (.-ounty, New York, probably named after Pllbrvige 

Gerry, a nigner of the Dwtlaration of Independence. 
El Cajon; township in San Diego County, California. A Spanish phrase meaning 

"the 1k)x," often applied to high-walle<i canyons. 
El Campo; t^)wn in Marin County^ California. A Spanish phra8e meaning "the 

flat country." 
El Capitan; cliff in the Yonemite Valley, California. The name is Spanish, meaning 

"the captain." 
El Casco; village in KiverHide County, California. A Spanish word meaning "the 

cranium." 
El Chorro; village in San Luis OhisfM) County, California. A descriptive S])anish 

name, meaning "thegui*hing water." 
Eldena; village in Lee County, Illinois, named for the wife of the founder. 
Eldora; city in Hardin County, Iowa; 

Eldorado; county in California, the iirst in which gold was discovered, city in But- 
ler County, Kan^ai^, and many other places. From the Spanish, meaning "the 

gilded." 
Eldorado; city in Saline County, Illinois, originally nameil for two settlers, Elder 

and Reed, but the spelling wa.s afterwards changed to its present form. 
Eldred; township and borough in McKean County, Pennsylvania, named for Judge 

Nathaniel H. Eldred. 
Electric; peak in Yellowstone Park, named by Henry Ciannett, United States geog- 
rapher, on account of a severe electrical storm em^ountered there. 
Eleroy; village in Stephenson County, Illinois, named for E. Leroy, son of Hiram 

Jones, a first settler. 
Eleven Mile; creek in (Jeneset* County, New York, so calle<l because it c>Y>8ses the 

Buffalo road eleven miles from Buffalo. 
Elgin; city in Kane County, Illinois, named for the Earl of Elgin. Another author- 
ity states that the name is transferred from the city in S(.*otland. 
EliBeo; town in V'^entura County, California. The Spanish form of Elijah. 
Elizabeth; caf)e in Maine, and group of islands in Massa<'husetts, named in honor of 

(^ueen Elizal)eth of England. This word, either alone or with suffixes, forms 

the nam(»s of 25 places in the United Staters, most of which were so named. 
Elizabeth; city in l^nion County, New Jersey, named for the wife of Lord Carteret. 
Elizabeth; borough in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, named by the founder, 

Stephen Bayanl, for his wife. 
Elizabeth; town in Wirt County, West Virginia, name<l for Elizal)eth, the wife of 

David Beauchamp. 
Elizabeth City; county in Virginia, and town in Pas4|Uotank County, North Carolina, 

named for Queen Elizal)t*th of England. 
Elizabeth town; town in Bartholomew County, Indiana, named for P^lizabeth 

Branham, the wife of the foimder. 
Elizabethtown; citv in Hardin Coimtv, Kentuckv, named for the wife of Col. John 

Hanlin, for whom the county was named. 
Elizabethtown; town in Bladen County, North Carolina, named for the wife of 

Lord Carteret, Elizalxjth. 



OANNKT.] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 117 

Elk; coanties in Kansas and Pennsylvania. This word, either alone or as a prefix, 

forms the name of 63 places in the United States, most of them doubtless given 

on account of the presence of elk. 
Elk Falls; town in Elk County, Kansas, receives its name from a waterfall in Elk 

River, near the site of the town. 
Elk Garden; town in Mineral County, West Virginia, so named by Senator Davis, 

because of the former abundance of elk. 
Elkhart; county, and city in same county, in Indiana, which take their name from 

the river. 
Elkhart; village in Sheboygan County, Wisconsin, named from the lake, which at 

this point resembles an elk's heart. 
Elkhom; village in Douglas County, Nebraska, named from the river. 
Elkhom; city in Walworth County, Wisconsin. ThiH city is named from the prairie, 

Elkhom, which was named thus by Samuel F. Phoenix in July, 1836, when he 

found an elk's horn upon a tree. 
Elkins; town in Randolph County, West Virginia, named for Senator S. B. Elkins. 
Elko; county in Nevada. The origin of this name is not certain, for according to 

some it is an Indian word, and according to others was so named on account of 

the abundance of elk. 
EUen; mountain in Utah, named by J. W. Powell, United States Geological Survey, 

for the wife of A. H. Thompson, also of the (Geological Survey. 
EUenburgr; town in Clinton County, New York, named for the daughter of John R. 

Murray, of New York, the principal owner of township 5 of the military tract. 
Ellendale; village in Sussex County, Delaware, named for the wife of Dr. J. S. 

Prettyman, who laid it out. 
Ellendale; township and city in Dickey County, North Dakota, named for the wife 

of 8. S. Merrill. 
Ellensburg; city in Kittitas County, Washington, named for the wife of the original 

founder. 
EUery; town in Chautauqua County, New York, named for William Ellery, a signer 

of the Declaration of Independence. 
EUicott; city in Howard and Baltimore counties, Maryland, first settled and named 

by the brothers Andrew and John Ellicott. 

{Ellicott; town in Chautauqua County, New York; 
Ellicottville; village in Cattaraugus County, New York. Named for Joseph Elli- 
cott, of the Holland Land Company. 
Ellijay; town in Gilmer County, Georgia. From a Cherokee Indian name, meaning 

"new ground." 
BUinwood; city in Barton County, Kansas, named for Col. John R. Ellinwood, 

engineer, Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railroad. 
Elliott; county in Kentucky, named for Judge John M. Elliott. 
SUiottsville; village in Richmond County, New York, named for Dr. Samuel M. 

Elliott 
EUia; county, and city in same county, in Kansas, named in honor of George Ellis, 

first lieutenant, Twelfth Kansas Infantry. 
Ellis; county in Texas, named for Richard Ellis, president pro tempore of the first 

Senate of the Republic. 
EUisburg^; town in Jefferson County New York, which derives its name from 

Lyman Ellis, of Troy, New York, who settled there as a proprietor in 1797. 
Ellisville; township and village in Fulton County, Illinois, named for I^evi D. Ellis, 

its founder. 
EUisville; town in Jones County, Mississippi, nameil for Powhatan Ellis, member 

of the supreme court and United States Senator. 



118 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED 8TATES. [bhi ->, 

Ellsworth; town in Hamilton (.'ounty, Iowa, named for a banker at Iowa Falls^. 
Ellsworth; county, and city in same county, in Kansas, name<l from the fort, KUs- 

worth, which in turn was named for Lieut. Allen Ellsworth. 
Ellsworth; city in Hancock County, Maine, named for Oliver Ellsworth, one of thi- 

delegates U) the National C-onstitutional Convention. 
Elm; this word, with the suffixes "hurst," "wood," "dale," "hall," "jfrovo,' 

"creek," "city," "bury," "branch," forms the name of 29 places in the 

Unite<l States, in most cases given on ac(M>unt of the presence of this spei'ies of 

tr€»e in the vicinitv. 
Elma; village in Erie County, New York, named for a large elm tree which staiuls 

near the village. 
Elxnira; t4^>wnship in Solano County, California, and township and village in Stark 

County, Illinois, named from Elmira, Xew York. 
Elmira; city in Chenmng County, New York, said to have Ikmju named for Ehiiira 

Teall, daughter of Nathan Teall, a tavern k(»e|>er. 
El Monte; township in Los Angeles County, California. A S|)anish phrast^ mean- 
ing "the mountain." 
Elmore; county in Alabama, named for John A. Elmore, of the Stati'. 
Elmore; county in Idaho, named for a celebrated mine in the county. 
Elmore; village and town in I^moille C-ounty, Vermont, nameil for the original 

grant4»e. Col. Samuel Elmore. 
Elmsford; village in Westch(»ster County, New Yf>rk, so mamed because r>f the elm 

trees in the vicinity. 
Elon College; town in Alamamx" County, North Carolina, name<l, ]>rol»ahle, for 

Judge Elon. 
El Paso; county in Colorado. The name is given with reference to the Utt» Pa**, 

which is within the limits of the county; 
El Paso; county, and city in same county, in Texas, which take their name from 

the presentre of a pass — that of the Rio (irande. The name is Spanish, and 

means "the pass," "the gap," or "the passage." 
El Paso; township and city in Woodford County, Illinois, so nameil from the pa*v- 

ing or crossing of two railroads. 
El Pinal; village in San Joaquin County, California. A Spanish phrase meaning 

"the grove of ]>ines." 
Elreno; city in (.^anadian County, Oklahoma. A Sjmnish name meaning "tlit* 

reindeer." 
Elrio; j)oHt-ottice in Ventura Crmnty, California. A S|>anish name meaning "the 

river." 
El nobles; town in Mendocino (/ounty, Caliform'a. A S{)anish phrase meaning 

"the oaks." 
Elsie; village in Clinton County, Michigan, named for Mi.»*s Elsie TillotHon, the 

daughter of an early i)ioneer. 
Elsie; tx)wn in Perkins County, Nel)ra*«ka, nanie<l for the daughter of C. E. Perkins. 
Elsinore; township and city in River>*ide County, California. Corruption of the 

Spanish el seHor, meaning "the gentleman," a large partof the laml U])on which 

the city is built having l)ei»n owned by a <l(m. 
El Toro; villagi^ in Orange C^junty, ( 'alifornia. A Spanish phrase meaning **thebull." 
El Verano; village in Sonoma County, California. A Spanish phra^ meaning 

"the summer." 
Elwin; village in Macon (bounty, Illinois, a rombination of the namt^ of the founders, 

ElmwofKl ami Martin. 
Elyria; city in Lorain County, Ohio, name<l for lleman Ely, who owned 12,500 

acres of land around the falls of Hlack liiver. "Ria" was suggested by the 

Greek name Illy ria. 



OANNBTT.] PLACE NAMES IN TBE UNITED STATES. 119 

Bmanuel; connty in Georgia, named for David Eiiianuel, at one time president of 

the Georgia senate. 
Emaua; borough in Lehigh County, Pennsylvania, named by the Moravians in 

memory of the little village in Palestine. 
Exnbarcadero; village in Sonoma County, California. A Spanish word meaning 

"harbor" or "port." 
Bmbarrass; river and village in Wauixaca County, Wimx)n8in. A French word 

meaning 'obstruction." 
Emerick; village in Madison County, Nebraska, named for John Rmerick, an early 

settler. 
Emery; village in Macon County, Llinois, named for Charles F. Kmery, a neigh- 
boring landowner. 
Emery; county in Utah, named for George W. Emery, governor in 1875-1880. 
Emigrrant Gap; town in Placer County, California, named from the pass in the 

Sierra Nevada through which the pioneers of 1849 entered the State. 
Eminence; city in Henry County, Kentucky, so named because of its situation on 

the highest point of land between Louisville and Lexington. 
Emlenton; borough in Venango County, Pennsylvania, named for Emlen, the wife 

of Joseph M. Fox, one of the original proprietors. 
Emma; mountain in Arizona, named by Maj. J. W. Powell, of the United States 

Geological Survey, for his wife, Emma. 
Enunet; county in Iowa, and county, and village in Saint Clair County, in Michigan; 
Emmetsbur^; city in Palo Alto County, Iowa. Nameil for the Irish patriot, 

Robert W. Emmet. 
Emmitsburg; town in Frederick County, Maryland, named for VV^illiam Emmitt, 

its founder. 
Emmons; mountains in Colorado and Utah, name<l forS. F. Emmons, the geologist. 
Emmons; mountain in New York, named for Ebenezer Emmons, geologist. 
Emmons; county in North Dakota, name<l for James A. Emmons, a pioneer steam- 
boat man and merchant of Bismarck. 
Emory; town in Washington County, Virginia, named from Emory and Henry 

College, which is situated there and which receiveil part of its name from Bishop 

Emory. 
Empire; city in Cherokee County, Kansas, so name<l by the founder, S. L. Cheney, 

on account of the Umn topping a ridge. 

(Emporia; city in Lyrm County, Kansas; 
Emporium; borough in Cameron County, Pennsylvania. A Ijitin wonl meaning 
** center of trade." 

; village in Tallai)oosa County, Alalmma. A Creek Indian word mean- 
ing ''shell medal." 

cinal; village in Santa Clura County, California. A Sfmnish wonl meaning "for- 
est of evergreen oak." 
Bncinitas; township in San Diego County, California. A Spanish word meaning 

"little oaks." 
Enfield; town in Hampshire County, Massachusetts, named, aircording to Dr. J. (i. 

Holland, for Robert Field. 
Enfield; towns in Grafton County, New Hampshire, and in Halifax County, North 

Carolina, named from the l)irth place of John Wesley in England. 
Sngelmann; canyon and peak in Colorado, named for the lx)tanist 
Ens^lewood; city in Bergen County, New Jersey, named from the English *'wood 

ingle," a woody nook or comer. 
Eng^limd; village in Marshall County, Minnesota, name<l for its first postmaster. 
is; city in Ellis County, Texas, named for Cornelius Ennis, of Houston, a prom- 
inent railroad official. 



120 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNlTlfiD STATES. fBuu-aw 

Enno; t4jwn in Wake (Jounty, North Carolina, named for an Indian tribe. 

Enon; villa^' in Clark County, Ohio, named from the river in Palestine where John 

baptized the people. 
Bnoree; river in »*^)nth Carolina, named for an Indian tribe. 
BnoBbur^; town in Franklin County, Vermont, named for Roger Knos, to whom 

the land ^ay originally grante<l. 
Enterprise; towns in Clarke County, Missiamppi, and Wallowa County, Oregon, 

and many other towns and villages, so named to denote the policy of their 

inhabitants. 

{Ephrata; town in I Jtncaster County, Pennsylvania; 
Ephratah; town in Fulton County, New York. Named from the ancient city of 
Palestine. 

Eppes; creek, and island in the James River, in Charles City County, Virginia, named 
for an early owner of the pn>perty. 

Epping; town in Rockingham County, New Hampehire, named from the town in 
Essex, England. 

Epsom; village in Daviess County, Indiana, so named because of "a well near by 
which contains water much resembling epsom salts in taste. 

Epsom; town in Merrimack County, New Hampshire, named from the town in Sur- 
rey, England. 

Epworth; town in Dubuque County, Iowa, named from the town in Lincolnshire, 
England. 

Equinunk; villages in Delaware County, New York, and Wayne County, Pennsyl- 
vania. An Indian word, meaning ** place where clothing is distributed." 

Erath; county in Texas, namt^l for an earler settler and Indian fighter, George B. 
Erath. 

Erie; one of the Great Lakes, draine<l by the St. LawTence. From erie, erike, or 
eriya^ meaning ''wildcat,'* the name of an ancient tribe on its borders conquered 
by the Inxjuoin. 

Erie; township and village in Whit^^side County, Illinois, named from the county 
in New York. 

Erie; city in Neosho County, Kansas, nanie<l frf)m a small lake near by of that 
name. 

iErie; counties in Now York ami Ohio, and county, and city in same county, in 
Pennsylvania; 
Erieville; village in Madison County, New York. Name<l from the lake. 
Erin; the name of nuincrons towns and villages in the Uniteil States, named from 

the ancient name of Ireland. 
Errol; town in Coos County, New Hampshire, named from the parish in Scotland. 
Erskine: village in Pa.*5saic County, New Jersey, named from the parish in Scotland. 
Erving; town in Franklin County, Massachusetts, named for the man who owned 

"Ervings (irant," in early days. 
Erwin; town in Steul>i»n County, New York, name<l for Col. Arthur Erwin, of Penn- 
sylvania. 
Escambia; river in Alabama and Florida. Pr(»l)ably derived from the Spanish, 

camb'uir^ meaning ** barter" or **ex<-hange." 
Escambia; counties in Alabama and Florida, named from the river traversing both 

States. 
Escanaba; river, and city in Delta County, in Michigan. According to Hainee it is 

an Indan wonl meaning **flat rock," but according to other authorities it means 

a ** young male quadrupe<l." 
Eschscholtz; inlet of Kotzebue Sound, Alaska, named for J. F. Eschscholtz, the 

naturalist 



GANNETT.] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 121 

Eflcoheag; town in Kent County, Rhode Island. An Indian word, supposed to 

mean ** origin of three rivers." 
EBCondido; city in San Diego County, California. A Spanish word meaning 

** hidden treasure." 
Esculapia; watering place in Lewis County, Kentucky, named for the god of the 

me<lical art — Esculapius. 
Sskridge; city in Wabaunsee County, Kansas, named for C. V. Eskridge, the first 

purchaser of a town lot. 
Bakutassis; stream in Piscataquis County, Maine. An Indian word meaning '*small 

trout" 
SskweskwewacUo; mountain in Maine. An Indian word meaning "she-bear 

mountain." 
Bsmeralda; post village in Calaveras County, California, mining camp in Idaho, 

and county in Nevada. The Spanish term for "emerald," the places ])eing so 

named on a(*count of the presence of this gem. 
Ssopus; stream in New York. A difference of opinion exists as to whether the 

Indian tribe of this name took the name from the river or whether the river was 

named for the tribe. Schoolcraft gives ^^seepus** or **se€pUj*^ "river," as the 

word nearest like it in the Indian language. 
Esparto; village in Yolo County, California. A Spanish word meaning "feather 

grass. *' 
Esperance; town in Schoharie County, New York. A French word meaning 

"hope." 
EspinOBO; towns in Monterey and Solano counties, California. A Spanish word 

meaning * * thorny. ' * 
;; township in Stark County, Illinois, named for Isaac 6. Essex, the first white 

settler in the county. 
;; counties in Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, Vermont, and Virginia, 

named from the English county of Essex. 
Essezville; village in Bay County, Michigan, named for an early settler, Ransom 

Essex. 
Estaboga; town in Talladega County, Alabama. An Indian word meaning " where 

people reside." 
Estherville; city in Emmet County, Iowa, named for Esther A. Ridley, wife of one 

of the original proprietors. 
Estill; county, and town in Madison County, in Kentucky, named for Capt. James 

Eetill, an Indian fighter. 
Estill; town in Howard County, Missouri, named for Col. John R. Estill. 
Estrado; town in Monterey County, California. A Spanish word meaning "guest 

chamber." 
Estrella; town in San Luis Obispo County, California. A Spanish word meaning 

"star." 
Ethel; town in Attala County, Mississippi, named for the daughter of Capt S. 6. 

McConnico. 
Etna; many places in the United States are named from the celebrated volcano in 

Sicily. 
Etowah; county in Alabama, and river in Georgia. A Cherokee Indian corruption, 

meaning unknown. 
Etruria; township in Halifax County, North Carolina, named from the division of 

ancient Italy. 
Eucalyptus; town in San Joaquin County, California, so named from the prevailing 

species of trees. 
Euclid; village in Onondaga County, New York, and town in Cuyahoga County, 

OhiOi and named for the celebrated geometer of Alexandria. 



122 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [ecll.2>. 

Budora; city in Dou&:la8 ( ouiity, KanHan, named for the daughter of Ptocal Fi<ih. 
Bufaula; t(»wn in Harhuur County, Alabama; named from a former noted Creek 

Indian town ( Yufala) of that vicinity; nieaninf^ unknown. 
Bugene; (*ity in Uine County, Oregon, named for Eugene F. Skinner, its first settler. 
Bulalia; towni'liip in Potter County, Pennsylvania, named for the first child horn 

within itH limits. 
Bureka; citii*H in Humboldt County, California, Woodford County, Illinois, and 

(ireenwrKj*! County, Kansas, and (*ounty in Nevada. A Greek expression miwi- 

ing *'I havi* found it.'* 
Bustis; town in I^ke C'ounty, Florida, named for Gen. Henr>' U Euatis. 
Bustis; town in Franklin C^mnty, Maine, named for Charles L. Kustis, an early 

l)roprietor. 
Butaw; town in < Jreonc County, Ala1)ama. 
Butaw Spring; sniall utilucnt of the Santee River in South Carolina. According to 

<7ats<-het it is nanie<l fnini the Indian tribe, also known as etitt^aiv, or from iiauv, 

"pine tree." 
Butawville; town in B4'rkcley C-ounty, South Carolina, named from the famous 

Kutaw Spring. 
Bvangeline: townshi]) in Charlevoix County, Michigan, named for the heroine of 

Ijongfellow's iKK'in. 
Brans; town in Weld Coimty. (-olorado, named for John E\'ans, a former governor 

of ( 'olonido. 
Bvans; town in Kr'w. County, New York, name<l for David E. E>'ans, agent of the 

Holland l^nd C/Oin]>any. 
Bransburg; village in Cosli(»cton County, Ohio, named for Isaac Evans, who laid 

it out. 
Bvans Mills; village in Jefferscm County, New York, named for Ethni Evans, a 

resident mill owner. 
Bvanston; town in C<K)k County, Illinois, and city in Uinta County, Wyoming, 

nanuMl for John Kvans, a former governor of Colorado. 
Bvansville: city in Vanderburg ('ounty, Indiana, named for Gen. Robert Evani*, 

who laid it out. 
Bvansville; city in Rock C^umty, Wisi'onsin, named for Calvin Evans, a first settler. 
Bvart; town^hi]) and village in ()sciH)la County, Michigan, named for Frank Evart, 

a pioneer. 
Bvarts; mountain in Yellowstone Park, name<l for Tniman C. Evarts. 
Bvening Shade; town in Shar]) County, Arkansas, so name<l from the density of 

shade ciist by the tall pine tinilHT on an adjacent hill. 
Bverett; city in Middlesex County, Massachusetts, and town in Bedford County, 

Pennsylvania, named for Kdward Everett, of Massachusetts. 
Bveretts; town in Martin County. North Carolina, named for a resident family. 
Bwing; village in Cole County, Missouri, name<l from citizen living near by. 
Bwings; creek in Missouri. Kwing is j)robably a contraction of **E. Wing,'* which 

designated this creek ujK)n an early map. 
Bzcelsior; towns in Sonoma and Sierra counties, California. A Latin word mean- 
ing "ever u])wanl." 
Bzcelsior Springs; city in Clay County, Missouri, named frtmi the medicinal 

si)rings. 
Bzeter; town in Si'ott County, Illinois, named from Kxeter, New Hampshire, the 

former home of its founders. 
Bzeter; towns in Rockingham County, New Hampshire, and Washington County, 

Rhcxie Island, and twelve other j»hutes, nauHMl from Exeter in England. 
Byota; villag<' in Olmstead County, Minnesota. From a Sioux Indian word, tyotoit, 

meaning **greatest," **mo8t.' 



»» 



GANSETT.J PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 123 

Fabius; river in Missouri and town in Onondaga County, New York, named for the 

celebrated Roman consul. The town was named by the State land board of 

New York. 
Factory; hill in Yellowstone Park, Wyoming, covered with geysers and hot springs, 

so named because of the noise and steam proceeding from them, resembling in 

this respect an active factory town. 
Fair; a name used with various suffixes, such as '* brook," "land,** *'i)ort," etc., to 

indicate an attractive appearance. 
Fairbank; township in Sullivan County, Indiana, name<l for General Fairbanks. 
Fairbury; city in Jefferson County, Nebraska, named by an early st'ttler, Mr. 

McDonell, for his home, Fairbury, Illinois. 
Faircbild; creek in Park County, Colorado, nam^l for A. Fairchild, a prosi)ector. 
Fairfax; county, and town in same county, in Virginia, name<l for Lord Fairfax, 

grandson of Lord Culpeper. 
Fairfield; county, and town in same county, in Connecticut, town in Somerset 

County, Maine, and counties in Ohio and South Carolina, so named from the 

beauty of their fields. 
Fairmont; city in Marion County, West Virginia, so named for its situation on a 

hill. 
Fairplay; town in Park County, Colorado, established by gold miners who named 

it as a living reproof to their "grab-all" neighbors. 
Fairport; village in Monroe County, New York, so named for its i)leasing hn'ation 

on the Erie Canal. 
Faison; town in Duplin County, North Carolina, named for a prominent family. 
Falkner; island in Long Island Sound, New Haven County, Connei'ticut. Nameil 

by the discoverer, Capt. Adrien Block, Valcken Eylandt (Falcon Island), of 

which the present appellation is a corruption. 
Fall; river in Massachusetts, so named because it is only about 2 miles in length and 

falls about 140 feet in a half mile. 
Fall Kiver; city in Bristol County, Massachusetts, situated on the Fall River. 
Fall River; county in South Dakota, named fn)m the river. A literal translation 

of the Indian name. 
Fallowfield; township in Washington County, Pennsylvania, nameil for Lancelot 

Fallowfield, one of the first pun^hasers of the land frrmi William Penn. 
Falls; county in Texas, named from the falls in Brazos Rivor. 
Falls Church; town in Fairfax County, Virginia, wi nameil In^causeof the Episcopal 

church established there. 
Fallston; borough in Beaver C'Ounty, Pennsylvania, named from the falls in Beaver 

River. 
Falls Village; village in Litchfield County, Connecticut, named from the falls in 

the Housatonic River. 
Falmouth; towns in Cumberland County, Maine, and Barnstable County, Massa- 
chusetts, named from the seaport, town in C<)rnwall. 
Famoso; town in Kern County, California. A Spanish word meaning ** famous,'* 

or ** celebrated.'* 
Fannin; county in Georgia, and county, and village in (ioliad County, inTexaa, named 

for Col. James W. Fannin, of North Carolina, who fought in the Texan war. 
Farallone; group of small islands on the coast of California, named by the early 

Spanish explorers. The wonl faraiton means "needle," or "small, i>ointe<l 

island." 
Fargo; city in Cass County, North Dakota, named for one of the memljers of the 

Wells, Fargo Express Company. Several other places bear his name. 

t; county, and city in Rice County, in Minnesota, named for John Baptiste 

Faribault, a settler and French fur trader among the Sioux Indians. 



124 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 



f 

^^^M PKiina: town in Fayetti' ('oiiiit<,'. IllinolH, named fnmi iUi location in ilie whml- 

^^^H growing diBtrit't. 

^^^H forley: town in Dubuque County, Iowa, nanied for the HuperiuteDdent of the Sioux 

^^m City Kailrottd. 

^^^1 Fanner; name applied to many miall plareH, either with or without millixefl, indio 

^^^1 ative of rnral <»>mlitioni< and app«imni.-e. 

^^^B Fanneraville; village in Collin County, TexaH. Ad parly settler Mt apart a square 

^^^1 [liece of land aa a gathprinti place for farmera from the Burrouuding t'ountn'. 

^^^V which tiquare forma the nucleiui of the exjating village. 

^^^ Famungton; town in San Joaquin County, California; an agrirultural iliBtritt. eo 
lirfignaleit ■<> dixtingniMh it from the mining r^on§. 
FarmingUiii: town and river in llartfonl County, Connection t, nan)e<i fniin a plat-e 

f in Kngiand. 

^^H Farmingtou; township and <-ity in Fulton County, Illinois, and town in Ontano 

^^H County. New York, nanieil from Farminglon, Connecticut. 

^^H Farmingtou; village in Dakland County, Michigan, named from Farmington, New 

' Fanningloii; town in Strafford County, New Hampshire, ho named because of its 

uniiHuiil arlaplahility to farming purponeei. 
I Farnliam; villi^:e in Erie County, New Vork. named (or Le Roy Famham. the firel 

^H merchant. 

^^^b Famham; town in Richmond County, Virginia, named from the town in Surrey, 

^^r Farragut; town in Fremont County, Iowa, named for Admiral Farragul. 
I FcurandsTille; village in Clinton County, Pennsylvania, luiil out by anil named for 

William P. Farrand, of Philadeli>hia. 
Farrar; town in Ekigei'onibe County, North Carolina, named for a wealthy citixeo. 
Farwell; village in Clare County, Michigan, Diune<l for Samuel B. Farwell, au officer 
of the old Flint and Fere Marquette Railroad. 

{Faalk; county in Bouth Dakota; 
FauUtton; IjtwnHhip and city In Faulk County. Named (or Andrew J, Faulklho, 
the second governor of Dakota Territori'. 
Faulkner; county, and village in same county, In ArbmsiiM, name<l Eur Sandy Fnulk- 
ner, the real " Arkansas Traveller." 

(Fauquier; i-oiinty in \'irgiuia; 
Fauquier Springv; village in Fauquier C-ounty. Nameii tor Francis Fauquier, 
governor of (he Slate. 

FauBSe Riviere; village in Louisiana, so called liecause it is situated on wliat Wis 
formerly the l:>ed of the Mississippi River. Many years ago the river war« 
through an isthmus and left its former bed dry for a distance of almut 30 miles. 
A French name, meaning "false river." 

FauBtburg; village in South Carolina, named for the Gntt settler. 

Fayette; rountiea in Alabama, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana. Iowa, Kentucky, Ohio, 
Pennsylvania, Tenuesi^e, Texas, und West Virginia, and many places through- 
out the country, named for the Marquis de la Fayette. Tlie name i!< aim used 
with suthses, such as " ville" and "i-orner." 

Fear; cape and river in North Carolina. Sir Richanl Grenville narrowly escaped 
being wrecked near the cape, in consequence of which he tti> nameil it. 

Feather; river in California A tmr^slation of the early Spanish name, jilumat. 

February; village in Wasliington County, Tennessee, named for a resident of the 

Federal; name given to »teveral places in the country, in reference to the n 
form of government. 



i 




•UW«rT,l PLACK NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 125 

FederaUbvirg: rillage in Caroline County. Maryltuid, eo namiK) becauBe settled by 

jierwin? Initii the Northern Stab«. 
Felix; U-Hrishiiw in (inmciy counties. Illinois ami Iowb, named for Felix Graiidy, 

f?enalor fiuni Tennessee. 
Fella; point in Maryland named for the puri'haHer, a ship I'srpenter. William Fell. 
FeltB Hills; village in Jeffereon County, New York, named tor John Felt, on early 

proprietor. 
Fence; riverain Wieconain and Michigan. A tranelation o£ the Indian word "m'Urh- 

igiin," reterrinR to a wooden fenre constructed near its banks by the ludians tor 

eatchinK deer. 
Fenner; towiiR in San Bernardino County, California, and Madison County, New 

York, named for (Jovernor Fenner, of Rhode lelond. 
FenniinorB; village in Grant County, Wiaconain, named for a Buttler who diaap- 

jieared rlurlng the Black Hawk war. 
Fennville: village in Allegan County, Michigan, named for a lumberman, Elam 

Fenner, who founded the villaKe. 
Fenton; villas in iieneeee County, Michigan, named (nr Colonel Fenton, who 

owned a large tract of land on the present site. 
FentonTtlle ; village in Chautauqua County, New York, named for Rcniien P^ton 

Fenton, governor of the State in 1865-18611. 
Fentress; county in Tennessee, named for James Fentress, member of a commission 

app<>inte<l to Sz upon a place for the seat of justice for Shelby County. 

{Fergus; county in Montana: 
Fergus Falls; city in Ottertail County, Illinois. Named for John Fergus, a pioneer 
..f the West. 
FerguBonville; village in I>elaware County. Sew York, nanieil lor the FerjtoBon 

bnithcD", who were larycly engaged in business there. 
Fermanagh; township In Juniata County, Pennsylvania, named from the i^ounty in 

Ireland. 
Fern; town in Shasta County, California, named froui its location in the fern district 

of the Siskiyou Range. 
Fern; name used with various suffixes, generally given Wiaiuic of the preweni* of 

the plant. Eighteen places bear this name, some with suffixes, such as "dale,'' 

"bank," and "ridge." 
Femandina; city in Nassau County, Florida, named for a SpanianI, Fernandez. 
Ferrisburg; town in Addison County, Vermont, named for Benjamin Ferris, who 

applied for a charter in 1762. 
Ferry; iwunty in Washington, named for Elisha P. Ferry, governor of the Territory. 
Fetterman; town in Taylor County, West Virginia, named for a resident of Pitts- 

butg, Pennsylvania, who owned the land. 
Forer; river in Illinois, nameil by the early French, In rii'lirr. ik f'rvt, "the river 

of the bean," beca>iee of Ihe immense quantity of wild lieans upon its banks. 

The name was corrupted to ,ri^iT«, "fever," which gave rise to the impression 

that the place was imhcaithy. 
Fidalgo; island and village in Skagit County, Washington, and harbor iu Alaska, 

named for the Spanish explorer. 
Fields Iianding; village in Humlnldt County, California, named for a settler. 
Fifty Eight; village in Orangeburg County, South Carolina, named so liecause it is 

68 miles from Charleston. 
Fillmore; mount in California, named for a naval officer. 
Fillmore; counties in Minnesota and Nebraska, and many plaices in the country 

named for Millard Fillmore, President of the Unite<l Stales. 
mimore; station in Wyoming, named for a superintendent of the Southern Pacilic 






126 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bfllW. 

FinccuBtle; town in Botetourt County, Virgfinia, and several other places directly 

or indinH'tly named for (jovernor Lord Dunmore and his son George, Lord 

FincaHtle. 
Findlay; city in Hanco<'k County, Ohio, named from Fort Findlay, built by CoL 

Jamen Findlay, of (Mncinnati. 
Findley ; township in Allejjheny County, Pennsylvania, named for William Findley, 

governor of the State in 1817-1820. 
Fine; town in .St. Lawrence County, New York, named for John Fine, the principal 

proprietor. 
Finney; (bounty in Kaunas, name<l for David W. Finney, lieutenant-governor in 

1881-1885. * 
Fire; hill in HunilK)ldt C/Ounty, California, so named because in early days it was 

use*! as a station fn)ni which to signal with fire. 
Fire; creek in Missouri, originally called Fire-prairie Creek, because of the fires that 

swept over the j»rairies. 
Firehole; river in Yellowstone Park, Wyoming. The word "hole" was used hy 

the early explon'rs to designate <lepre8sions among the mountains, while the firrt 

part of the name refers to the remarkable g(.»yser region from which the river 

Hows. 
Fisher; county, and village in same county, in Texas, named for 8. Rhodes Fisher, 

secretarv ()f the navv in Houston's cabinets 
Fishkill; town, irreek, plains, and mountains in Dutchess County, New York, 

named ])V the earlv Dutch settlers, HsrhhiU, **fi8h creek." 
Fitch; stream in Stark County, Illinois, named for Geoige Fitch, an early settler on 

its iKinks. 
Fitchburg; city in Worcester County, Massachusetts, named for John Fitch, one of 

the (!onnnittce that procured the act of iucrorporation. 
Fitchville; township in Huron County, Ohio, named for Colonel Fitch. 
Fithian; village in Vermilion County, Illinois, nameil for Dr. William Fithian. 
Fitzwilliam; town in Cheshire County, New Ham[)shire, named for the Earl of 

Fitzwilliani. 
Five Comers; village in Miami County, Indiana, so named because it is at the junc- 
tion of sevenil roads. 
Flackville; village in 8t. I^wrence County, New York, named for John P. Flack, 

first postmaster. 
Flagstafif; town in C^Konino County, Arizona, named from a pole set hy a party of 

immigrants who cam])ed near and cele]>rated the Fourth of July. 
Flag>Btafif; plantation in Somerset County, Maine, so named ))ecause Benedict Arnold 

encamped here on his (.Quebec exi^erlition and erected a fiagstaff. 
Flambeau; river and lakes in Wisconsin, so called l^ecause of the practice of using 

torches to C4it<*h fish at night. 
Flambeau; town in Gates C-ounty, Wisconsin, named from the river of the same 

name. 
Flatbush; i>art of Brooklyn, New York, so name<l from woods tliat grew on flat 

countrv. 
Flathead; lake, county, and river in Montana, named from an Indian tribe. The 

name originated with the early settlers who called several different tribes of 

Indians hy this name on account of their custom of flattening the heads of 

infants by fastening a pie<*e of hoard or a i)ad of grass upon the forehead. After 

this had Ix'en worn several months it caused a flat appearance of the head. 
Flatonia; city in Fayette County, Texas, named for F. W. Flato, a first settler. 
Flattery; promontory in Washington, so nair)«Hi by Captain Cook, **in token of an 

improvement in our proei)ects." 



GANNETT.) PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 127 

Flavel; stimmer resort in Clateop County, Oregon, naineil for a prtiniinent resident 
of Astoria. 

Fleming; town in Cayuga County, New York, nanieil ft>r Cien. George Fleming, an 
old resident. 
Fleming; county in Kentucky; 

Flemingsburg; town in Fleming County. Name<i for Col. John Fleming, an early 
settler in the State. 

Flint; river in Georgia; a translation of the Indian word thnmatuMkHj als^) Itmoto, 
** flint." 

Flint; city in (ienesee County and river in Michigan; callwl by the Indians, /xitz-on- 
nuk-eningy ** river of the flint/* 

Flirt; lake in Florida, named for a Government schooner. 

Flora; city in Clay County, Illinois, named for Flora Whittleby, daughter of the 
founder. 

Flora; town in Madison County, Mississi[)()i, named by W. B. Jones for his wife. 

Floral Park; village in Nassau County, New York, so named l>ecause of the abun- 
dance of flowers. 

Florence; city in Laudenlale County, Alabama, village in Hampshire (.k)unty, 
Massachusetts, and town in Oneida County, New York, name<l from the city 
in Italy. 

Florence; city in Marion County, Kansas, named for Miss Florence Crawford, of 
Topeka. 

Florence; town in Ravalli County, Montana, named for Florence Abbott Ham- 
mond, wife of A. B. Hammon<I, of Missoula. 

Florence; village in Douglas Coimty, Nebraska, nameil for Miss Florence Kilboum. 

Florence; county, and township and town in same county, in South Carolina, named 
for the daughter of Gen. W. W. Hardlee. 

Florence; county in Wisconsin, named for the Florence Mining Company. 

Floree; creek in Idaho, named from the flowers on its banks. 

Florida; State of the Union, named by Ponce de Leon, the florid or flowery land. 
He chose this name for two reasons: First, l)ec*ause the country presented a 
pleasant aspect; and, second, because he landed on the festival which the Span- 
iards call Pascua de Flores, or Pascua Florida, "Feast of flowers," which corre- 
sponds to Palm Sunday. The second reason is generally considered to have more 
weight 

Florissant; town in El Paso County, Colorado, named by Judge James Castello from 
hie old home in Missouri. 

Florissant; city in St. Louis County, Missouri, named from the flowery valley in 
which it is situated. 

Flowing Well; town in San Diego County, California, nameil ir<m\ the artesian 
wells osed for irrigating purposes. 

Floyd; county in Georgia, named for Gen. John Floy<l, at one time member of Con- 
gress from that State. 

Floyd; county in Indiana, said by some authorities to have been named for Col. 
John Floyd, while others claim that it was named for Davis Floyd. 

Floyd; coonty, town in same county, and river in Iowa, named for Sergt. Charles 
Floyd, of the Lewis and Clarke exploring party. 

Floyd; ooonty in Kentucky, named for Col. John Floyd, an officer of the Revolution. 

Floyd; town in Oneida County, New York, named for William Floyci^ a signer of 
the Dedaiadon of Independence. 

Floyd; coimty in Texas, named for Dolfln Floyd, who fell at the Alamo. 

Floyd; coonty, and town in same county in Virginia, named for Gov. John Floyd. 

Floyds; creek in Adair County, Missouri, named for an early settler who came from 
Kentucky. 



128 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. Ibull.2515. 

Flushing; town in Queens County, New York, now a part of New York City, callwi 

by tlie early Dutch ^ttlers, ** VliMfengen^** of which the present name is a cor- 
ruption. Some authorities claim that the early settlers came from Flushing, 

Holland. 
Fluvanna; county in Virginia, named from a river which was named for Queen 

Anne, of England. 
Fly; ptream, and swamp of 12,000 acres, in Fulton County, New York. From rlaii, 

meaning a **(*hannel of water," a name given by the Dutch settlers, from the 

fact that the region is land at certain seasons and water at other time^. The 

name waw cornipted by the Scotch, Dutch, and Irish settlers to the present form. 
Foard; county in Texas, named for Robert L. Foard. 
Folsom; )X)st-office in Sacramento County, California, laid out on a ranch formeriy 

owned by the Folsom family. 
Folsom; |)eak in Yellowstone Park, named for David E. Folsom, leader of an expedi- 
tion in 1869. 
Fonda; village in Montgomery County, New York, named for Douw Fomla. 
Fond du Lac; town in St. Ix)uis C^)unty, Minnesota, and county, and city in same 

county, in Wisconsin, so named l)ecause of their situation. A French phrase, 

meaning **cnd of the lake." 
Fontaine-qui-Bouille; creek in Colorado, so named because its head is a spring of 

water highly aerated. A French phrase, '* fountain which boils.** 
Fontana; city in Miami County, Kansas, named from a spring a mile west of the 

town site. 
Fontanelle; town in Adair County, Iowa, and creek in Wyoming, named for a 

trap])er in the employ of the American Fur Company. 
Ford; comity in Illinois, named for Thomas Ford, governor of the State in 1842-184<). 
Ford; county, and city in same county, in Kansas, named for James H. Ford, 

coUmel of Second Colora<lo Cavalry. 
Ford; village in Holt ('ounty, Nebraska, named for an early settler. 
Forellen; |)eak in Yellowstone Park, Wyoming. A German word meaning 

"trout." 
Forest; counties in Pennsylvania and Wis<'onsin, so named from the forests within 

their limits. The name occurs, either alone or with suffixes, as the name of 

ninety places in the country. 
Forrest; town in St. Francis C'ounty, Arkansas, named for Gen. N. B. Forrest, who 

built the first house there. 
Forsyth; county, and city in Monnie County, in Georgia, named for Governor John 

Forsvth. 
Forsyth; villugt^ in Mairon County, Illinois, named for Robert Forsyth, a railroad 

ofticial. 
Forsyth; county in North Carolina, named for Major Forsyth, a distinguished officer 

of the State, killed in the war of 1812. 
Fort Ann; village in Washington County, New York, named from an old fortifica- 

Xuiii built in 1756, during the wars with the Fnmch. 
Fort Atkinson; city in Jefferson County, Wisconsin, nameil for (ien. Henry Atkii.- 

son, who comman(U'<l a st<wkade there during the Black Hawk war. 
Fort Bend; county in Texas, named from a fort on Brazos River. 
Fort Benton; town in Choteau County, Montana, on the site of an old fort which 

was named for Thomas H. Benton, of Missouri. 
Fort Collins; city in I primer County, Colorado, named for Col. W. T. Collins of 

the Kleventh Ohio VolunttH»r Infantry. 
Fort Covington; village in Franklin County, New York, named for Gen. Leonard 

Covington. 



OAltNETT.] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 129 



Fort Crook; village in Sarpy County, Nebraska, named from a fort which was 

named for Gen. George Crook. 
Fort Dade; village in Hernando County, Florida, so name<l because situated near 

the spot where Major Dade and companions perished while defending them- 
selves against a party of Seminoles. 
Fort Dod^; city in Webster County, Iowa, named for Senator Dodge, of Wisconsin. 
Fort Edward; town in Washington County, New York, named from an old fort 

built in 1709, named in honor of Edward, Duke of York. 
Fort Fairfield; town in Aroostook County, Maine, named for an old fort which 

took its name from John Fairfield, who was governor of Maine for many years. 
Fort Fetterman; village in Albany County, Wyoming, named for Lieut. Col. W. J. 

Fetterman, killed by the Indians in 1866. 
Fort Qaines; town in Clay County, Georgia, name<l for Gen. E. P. Gaines. 
Fort Gratiot; township in St. Clair County, Michigan, named for (Teneral Gratiot, 

U. S. Army, who, as an engineer, laid out the fort. 
Fort Hall; part of an Indian reservation in Bingham County, Idaho, named from a 

fort which was built by Capt. N. J. Wyeth and named for one of his partners. 
Fort Hamilton; village in Kings County, now a part of New York City, named for 

Alexander Hamilton. 
Fort Kent; town in Aroostook County, Maine, named from a fort which was named 

for Governor Edward Kent, of Maine. 
Fort Keogh; village in Custer County, Montana, named from a fort which took its 

name from Captain Keogh, who fell with (Teneral Custer. 
Fort Klamath; town in Klamath County, Oregon, nameil from an Indian tril>e. 
Fort Leavenworth; town in I^ieavenworth County, Kansas, name<l for Gen. Henry 

Leavenworth, who erected the fort. 
Fort Lemhi; precinct and fort in Lemhi County, Idaho. The fort was built for 

protection against the Indians by the early Mormon settlers. The name, mean- 
ing "land,'* is taken from the Book of Mormon. 
Fort Logan; town in Meagher County, Montana, named for Captain Logan, killed 

in battle of the Big Hole. 
Fort Lupton; town in Weld County, Colorado, named for an early settler on Adobe 

Creek in 1840. 
Fort Madison; city in Lee County, Iowa, named for James Madison, President of 

the United States. 
Fort Monroe; United States school of artillery and arsenal on Hampton Roads, 

Elizabeth City County, Virginia, named for James Monroe, fifth President of 

the United States. 
Fort Morgan; town in Morgan County, Colorado, name<l for Col. C. A. Morgan. 
Fort Motte; town in Orangeburg County, South Carolina, so named because situ- 
ated upon the site of Motte's house, which was fortified by the British during 

the Revolution. 
Fort Myers; town in Lee County, Florida, first a military post, named for Capt. 

Abraham C. Myers. 
Fort Pierre; village in Stanley County, South Dakota, named for Pierre Choteau. 
Fort Plain; village in Montgomery County, New York, named from an old fortress 

erected on a plain at the junction of the Mohawk and Osquaga rivers. 
Fort Recovery; village in Mercer County, Ohio, named from an old fort built by 

General Wayne. 
Fort Scott; dty in Bourbon County, Kansas, named for Gen. Winfield Scott. 
Fort Sheridan; village in Lake County, Illinois, named from the military post near, 

which was named for Gen. P. H. Sheridan. 

BalL 



130 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 288. 

Fort Smith; town in Sebastian County, Arkansas, named for a fort boilt under the 

direction of Gen. Pereifer F. Smith, for whom it was named. 
Fortuna; town in Humboldt County, California. The Spanish form of ** fortune.*' 
Fort Wayne; city in Allen County, Indiana, named from a fort built by Lieutenant- 
Colonel Hamtramck in 1794, named for Gen. Anthony Wayne. 
Fort Worth; city in Tarrant County, Texas, named for General Worth, prominent 

in the Mexican war. 
Fortyfort; borough in Luzerne County, Pennsylvania, named from the old fort of 

Revolutionary days. 
Foster; county in North Dakota, named for Hon. George I. Foster, a pioneer, 

prominent in the Territorial legislature. 
Foster; town in Providence County, Rhode Island, named for Theodore Foster, 

United States Senator from that State. 
Fosterburg; township and village in Madison County, Illinois, named for Oliver 

Foster, who made the first land entr>' in the vicinity. 
Fostoria; city in Senica County, Ohio, named for Governor Charles Foster. 
Fountain; name given to many places, mostly because of Springs. 
Fountain; county in Indiana, named for Major Fountain, of Kentucky, killed at the 

battle of Maumee in 1790. 
Four Oaks; town in Johnston County, North Carolina, named from four great oaks 

near. 
Fowler; village in Clinton County, Michigan, named for John N. Fowler. 
Fowler; town in St. Lawrence County, New York, named for Theodocius Fowler, 

former proprietor. 
Fowler; township in Trumbull County, Ohio, named for Samuel Fowler, a land 

proprietor. 
Fowlerville; village in Livingston County, Michigan, named for Ralph Fowler, the 

first settler. 
Fowlerville; village in Livingston County, New York, named for Wells Fowler, 

the first settler. 
Fozburg; village in Clarion County, Pennsylvania, named for the original pro- 
prietor, H. M. Fox. 
Fox ChcuBe; substation in Philadelphia, nameil from an old race course and fox 

chase frequented many years ago by citizens of Philadelphia. 
Fozcroft; town in Piscataquis County, Maine, named for Col. Joseph E. Foxeroft, of 

New Gloucester, an early proprietor. 
Fox Lake; village in Do<lge County, Wisconsin, named from the Indian name of 

the Lake, hash a rac ah tah^ *'fox.'* 
Frackville; borough in Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania, named for Daniel Frack, 

one of the original settlern. 
Framboise; island in the Missouri River. A French wonl meaning ** raspberry." 
Framingham; town in Middlesex County, Massachusetts. The name is evidently 

a corruption of Framlingham, Suffolk County, England. 
Francestown; town in HilLsboro County, New Hampshire, named for the wife of 

Governor Benning Wentworth, whose maiden name was Frances Deering.' 
Franceville; town in El Paso County, Colorado, named for Hon. Matt France, of 

Colorado Springs. 
Franceway; creek in Grant County, Arkansas. The name is a corruption of the 

name Francois, given by the early French. 
Francis; creek in Humboldt County, California, named for a settler. 
Franconia; town in Grafton County, New Hampshire, named from the Duchy in 

Germany. 
Frank; island in Yellowstone Park, Wyoming, named for the brother of Henry W. 

Elliott, of the Hayden expedition. 



GANNCTT.] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 131 

Frankford; station in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, named by a land company which 
organized at Frankfort-on-the-Main in Germany, and which purchased the land 
upon which German town and other suburbs now stand. 

Frankfort; city in Clinton County, Indiana, named for the city in Kentucky. 

Frankfort; city in Marshall County, Kansas. The origin of the name is in dispute; 
one authority says it was named for Frank Schmidt, of Marysville, owner of the 
site, and another states the name was transferred from Frankfort-on-the-Main. 

Frankfort; city in Franklin Coimty, Kentucky, named for one of aband of pioneers, 
who alone succeeded in fording the Kentucky River, and was killed by Indians 
on reaching the opposite bank. 

Frankfort; village in Herkimer County, New York, named for Lawrence Frank, an 
early settler. 

Franklin; counties in Alabama, Arkansas, Florida; county, and town in Heard 
County, in Georgia; counties in Illinois and Indiana; county, and town in Lee 
County, in Iowa; county in Kansas; county, and city in Simpson County, in Ken- 
tucky; parish in Louisiana; county, and town in Hancock County, in Maine; 
county, and town in Norfolk County, in Massachusetts; counties in Mississippi 
and Missouri; county, and town in same county, in Nebraska; county, and 
village in Delaware County, in New York; county, and town in Macon County, 
in North Carolina; county in Ohio; county, and boroughs in Cambria and 
Venango counties, Pennsylvania; counties in Tennessee, Vermont, V^irginia, and 
Washington; and mountain in New Hampshire; named for Benjamin Franklin. 
Many other places throughout the country bear his name. 

Franklin; town in Delaware County, New York, named for Temple Franklin. 

Franklin; county in Texas, named forB. C. Franklin, first judge of the district court 
of the republic. 

Frankfltown; village in Blair County, Pennsylvania, named for Stephen Franks, a 
German trader. 

Franktown; town in Douglas County, Colorado, nameil for Hon. J. Frank Gard- 
ner, an early resident. 

village in Macomb County, Michigan, named for a lawyer from Detroit, 
Michigan. 

creek in IIuml)ol(lt County, California, named for an early settler. 
village in Delaware County, New York, named for Hugh Frazer, an early 
X)atentee. 

Frederic; town in Crawford County, Michigan, named for Frederick Barker, a 
pioneer. 

Frederica; town in Glynn County, Georgia, named for Fre<ierick, Prince of Wales. 

Frederick; county in Maryland, named for Frederick, son of Charles, Fifth Lord 
Baltimore. It may have been given also in reference to Frederick, Prince of 
Wales. 

{Frederick; county in Virginia; 
Frederickaburg; city in Spottsylvania County, Virginia. Named for Frederick, 
Prince of Wales. 
Fredericktown; city in Madison County, Missouri, named for George Frederick 

Bollinger, a former member of the State legislature. 
Fredonia; city in Wilson County, Kansas, named for Fredonia, New York. 
Fredonia; village in Chautauqua County, New York. The name was devised to 

signify ''land of freedom," and proposed as a name for the United States. 
Freeborn; county, and township in same county, in Minnesota, namtMl for William 

Freeborn, a member of the council in 1855. 
Freehold; town in Monmouth County, New Jersey, originally a freehold. 
Freelaadsville' village in Knox County, Indiana, named for Dr. John F. Freeland. 



132 PLACE NAMK8 IN THE UNITED STATES. [rollSK 

Freeman; town in Knmklin (>>nnty, Maine, named for Samael Freeman, of Fort- 
land, Maine. 
Freemansburg; lK>n)u^'h in Nnrt ham [>tnn County, Pennsylvania, named for Jacob 

FretMnan. 
Freeo; rivek in Arkun^u^. A t'orniption of the Spanisli word /no, **cold.*' 
Freeport; town in (-unilK'rlund County, Maim*, tuo named because it was intended 

tliat it should 1h* a irt'v iH»rt. The naminl in found frequently in the country, 

^'nerally havinp In^en jriven in the ppirit of lil)erty. 
Freeport; townnhip and city in Ste]>hi>nHon County, Illinois. The name was firft 

appliiMl to the home of an early s(>ttler Ikkausc of his hospitality, and clung to 

the settlement. 
Freestone; county in Texas, so named from the character of the soil. 
Freetown; town in Hristol County, Maj^sachunetts, (ulled by the original Kettlen 

FriH^'manV l^ind. 
Fremont; <'ounty and i>itHH in Colorado; counties in Idaho and Iowa; town in Rock- 
ingham C«>nnty, New IIami)Hhire; town in Steulvn County, New York; city in 
Samlusky County, Ohio; island in Utah; county and jieak of the Wind River 
Mountains, Wyoming; and many other places; 
Fremontville; town in Ventura County, California. Named for Gen. John C. Fre- 
mont. 
French; river in Massiiehus^'tts, so name<l fn»m a settlement of French ProtestaDtf 

in the town of < >xfonl. 
French Broad; river in North Carolina, so nanuHl l)ecause the country west of the 

Blue Hid}j;e was held by th(> Fn-nch, according to some authorities. Others hokl 

that the river wiw namiMl hy a i»arty of hunters for their captain, whoee name 

was French. The latter part of the name is U8e<l desi'riptively. 
Frenchburg; t(»wn in Menifee^ County, Kentucky, named forjudge Richard French, 

])rominent ]M)litician. 
French Camp; town in Choctaw County, Mississippi, so named from an old settle- 
ment made hv Fn'nch. 
Frenchman; Imy on the coast of Maine, s(» nanuHl 1)ecaiise a settlement was rruuie 

here bv Frenchmen. 
Frenchs Mills; village in AUuiny County, New York, named for Abel French, who 

owneil a factorv there. 
Fresno; ronnty, eity in same county, ami river in California, so named from the 

heavy jxrowtli of nsli trees; the Spanish form for **ash tree." 
Friar Point; town in Coahoma County, Missis8i[)pi, nanieil for an old woodchopper, 

an earlv settler. 
Friedensville; village in I^dii^h County, Pennsylvania, named for an old Dutdi 

church, Fiwlnksk'n'rht', meaning "|)eace church.** 
Friend; villa^^> in Saline County. Nebraska, named for C. £. Friend, the original 

owner of the town site. 

{Frio; county in Texas; 
Friotown; village in Fri<) County, Texai». A Si»ani8h word, meaning "cold." 
Frontier; county in Nebntska, so named iKHtiuse it was on the frontier at the time 

of its naming. 
Front Royal; town in Warren County, Virginia, llrst known as Royal Oak, named 
for an immensi' tn>e ^rowin<r in the common. Front Royal originated from the 
circumstan<'(M)f a colonid, wIh), l>iH.'omin); confuHcnl in his commands, ordered 
his rejriment to "front the royal." 
Frostburg; town in Alle^^'any County, Maryland, name<1 for a family w*ho owned 
the land. 
Fruita; t^jwn in Mesji County, Colorado; 

Frnito ; town i n ( i len n ( N )unty, California. Named from tlieir location in laxge fruit- 
growing districts. 



OANNETT.l PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 133 

Fnistum; mount in Colorado, nameii from its nhape. 

Fiyburg; town in North Dakota, named for General Fry, Unite<l States Army. 

Fryebur^; town in Oxford County, Maine, named for it« founder, Gen. Joseph 

Frye, a veteran officer of the French wars, who received a grant of land in Maine 

as a reward for his services. 
Fulford; village in Eagle County, Colorado, named for A. H. Fulford, a pioneer. 
FuUerton; city in Nance County, Nebraska, named for Randall Fuller, early 

stockman. 
Fulton; county in Arkansas, name<l for William Savin Fulton, governor of the 

Territory. 
Fulton; counties in Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky; county, and villages in 

Montgomery and Oswego Counties, in New York, and county in Pennsylvania, 

named for Robert Fulton. His name has been given to numerous places 

throughout the country. 
Fulton; city in Bourbon County, Kansas, named from Fulton, Illinois. 
Funk; town in Phelps County, Nebraska, named for P. C. Funk. 
Funkstown; town in Washington County, Maryland, named for Jacob Funk, original 

proprietor. 
Furnas; county in Nebraska, named for Robert W. Furnas, governor in 1873-1875. 
Gabilan; mountain ridge, spur of the coast range in California. A Spanish word 

meaning *' sparrow hawk.*' 
Gadsden; town in Etowah County, Alabama, and county in Florida, named for 

James Gadsden, the American statesman. 
Gaffiiey; city in Cherokee County, South Carolina, named for a family in the State. 
Gage; county in Nebraska, named for a Methodist minister. 
Gag^town; village in Tuscola County, Michigan, named for James Gage, the first 

settler. 
Gaines; town in Orleans County, New York, namtil for Gen. E. P. Gaines. 
Gkdnes; county in Texas, named for James Gaines, who fought in the war for Texan 

independence. 
Gkdnesville; city in Alachua County, Florida, towns in Hall County, Georgia, and 

Wyoming County, New York, an<l city in Cooke County, Texas, named for Gen. 

E. P. Gaines. 
Galatia; township and village in Saline County, lllinoin, nameil for An>ert <Tallatin. 
Galen; town in Wayne County, New York, named by the State land l>oard for 

Claudius Galenus, an illustrious physician of antiquity. 
Galena; cities in Jo Daviess County, Illinois, and Cherokee^ County, Kansas, and 

mount in Colorado, named from the lead ore found in the several vicinities. 
Galesbur^; city in Knox County, Illinois, named for Rev. George W. Gale, the 

founder. 
Galesbur^; village in Kalamazoo County, Michigan, named for Gen. L. (tale, early 

settler. 
GalesviUe; village in Trempealeau County, Wisconsin, nameil for Hon. George 

Gale, who laid it out 
Gallatin; counties in Illinois and Kentucky; county and river in Montana; towns 

in Columbia County, New York, Copiah County, Mississippi, and Sumner 

County, Tennessee; named for Albert Gallatin, Sei^retary of the Treasury under 

President Thomas Jefferson. 
Gallaway; town in Fayette County, Tennessee, named for (Jovernor Gal la way. 
Gallia; county in Ohio, settled in 1790 by a colony of Frenchmen, and named by 

them from the Latin appellation of France. 
Gallinas; river in New Mexico. A S))ani8h wonl, gallhiaf "hen," ustni figuratively 

to denote a coward. 
GallipolLi; dty in Gallia County, Ohio, so namtnl because settled by French. 



134 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull.25& 

Gallitzin; borough in Cambria County, Pennsylvania, named for its foander, Prince 

Demetrius Auguatiiie (iallitzin. 
Gallman; town in Copiah C'ounty, MiKsissippi, named for a leading citizen. 
Galloo; islands in Lake Ontario, Jefferson County, New York, named for an old 

resident. 
Galton; village in Douglas County, Illinois, named for a railroad stockholder. 
Galva; townshif) and town in Henry County, Illinois, named by Olaf Johnson, 

from Gefle, his home in Sweden, and Anglicized to the present form. 
Galva; city in McPherson County, Kansas, named by Mrs. J. E. Doyle for her old 

home in Illinoin. 
Galveston; county, and city in same county, in Texas, named for Don JO06 Galvez, 

Spanish viceroy of Texas; in 1797 proclaimed king by the people of Mexico. 
Galway; village in Saratoga County, New York, named from the county in Ireland. 
Gambier; village in Knox County, Ohio, named for Lord James Gambler, a British 

admiral, a lx?ncfactor of Kenyon College, located there. 
Gannett; station on the ITnion Pacific Railroad in Nebraska, named for J. W. Gan- 
nett, auditor of the road. 
Gans; town in Humboldt County, California, named for a settler. 
Gansevoort; village in Saratoga County, New York, named for Col. Peter Ganse- 

voort, who located there soon after the war. 
Garberville; town in HumlK)ldt County, California, named for J. C. Grarber. 
Garden; thirty places in the coimtry bear this name, used descriptively, either with 

or without Hutfixes. 
Garden of the Gods; locality near Pikes Peak, Colorado. Lewis N. Tappan and 

three others went from Denver to select a site for a town. They stood upon a 

ro(*ky prominence and exclaimed, "A fit garden for the gods," hence the name. 
Gardiner; city in Kennelwc County, Maine, named for Sylvester Gardiner, one of 

the proprietors of the old I*lymouth patent. 
Gardiner; town in Ulster County, New York, named for Addison Gardiner, formerly 

lieutenant -jrovernor. 
Gardiner; river in Yellowstone Park, proliably named for an old trapper who was 

a companion of Joseph Me(»k. 
Gardiners; island lying east of Ix>ng Island, named for the first settler, Lyon Gar- 
diner, a Scotchman. 
Gardner; village in Grundy County, Illinois, named for Henry C. Gardner, its 

founder. 
Gardner; city in Johnson County, Kansiis, named for Henry J. (vardner, governor 

of Massachusetts in 1S55. 
Gardner; town in Worcester County, Massachusi'tts, named for Col. Thos. Gardner, 

who fell at the battle of Bunker Hill. 
Garfield; town in Humboldt (bounty, California, nanwHl for the son of Gilbert 

Garfield, a settler. 
Garfield; county and mountain in Colorado; mountain in Idaho; town in Lasalle 

C/Ounty, Illinois; town in Pawnee County, Kansas; plantation in Aroostook 

County, Maine; county in Nebraska; borough in Bergen County, New Jersey; 

town in Mahoning County, Ohio; county in Oklahoma; town in ClackamaB 

County, Oregon; an<l countie^s in Utah and Washingttm; named for President 

James A. ( iarlield. His name is also l>orne by many other places in thecountry. 
Garfield; lake in the town of Monterey, Berkshire County, Massachusetts, named 

for a resident familv. 
Garland; county in Arkansas, nameil for A. H. (larland, governor of the State in 1874. 
Garland; town in Penobscot County, Maine, named for Joseph Garland, the first 

settler. 



GANNETT.] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED 8TATE8. 186 

Garnett; city in Anderson County, Kansas, named for W. A. Gamett, of Louisville, 

Kentucky. 
Gturrard; county in Kentucky, named for Col. James Garrard, governor of the State 

in 1796. 
Garrett; city in Dekalb County, Indiana, county in Maryland, and borough in 

Somerset County, Pennsylvania, named for John W. Garrett, president of the 

Baltimore and Ohio Railroad. 
Garrettsville; township and village in Portage County, Ohio, named for Col. John 

Garrett, its founder. 
Garrison; village in Nacogdoches County, Texas, named for Z. B. Garrison, an 

early settler, although the name was probably also given in reference to others 

of that name in the first settlement. 
Garysburg; town in Northampton County, North Carolina, named for Roderick B. 

Gary. 
Garza; county in Texas, named for the family of that name of which Governor 

Garza, who founded San Antonio, was a member. 
Gasconade; river and county in Missouri. The name is from Oa»con, an inhabitant 

of Gascony, and was applied by the early French. 
Gasport; village in Niagara County, New York, so named from springs which emit 

an inflammable gas. 
Gaston; camp in Nevada County, California, named for a military commander. 
Gaston; county in North Carolina, named for William Gaston, a judge of the 

supreme court of the State. 
Gaston; town in Lexington County, South Carolina, named for the Gaston family. 
Gastonia; town in Gaston County, North Carolina, named for William Gaston, a 

judge of the supreme court of the State. 
Gates; town in Monroe County, New York, and county in North Carolina; 
Gatesville; town in Gates County, North Carolina. Named for Gen. Horatio Gates, 

Revolutionary commander. 
Gkttes; county in Wisconsin, named for J. L. Gates of the Gates Land Company. 
Gktviota; town in Santa Barbara County, California, a Spanish word meaning *'sea 

gull." 
Gay Head; headland and town in Dukes County, Massachusetts, so named from 

the brilliant colors of the cliffs. 
Gaylesville; town in Cherokee County, Alabama, named for George W. Gayle, a 

prominent politician of the State. 
Gktylord; city in Smith County, Kansas, named for C. E. Gaylord, of Marshall 

County. 
Gktylord; village in Otsego County, Michigan, named for an attorney of the Michi- 
gan Central Railroad. 
Gayoso; village in Pemiscot County, Missouri, named for Governor Don Manuel 

Grayoso de Lemoe. 
Geary; county, and town in Doniphan County, in Kansas, named for John W. 

Geary, governor of the Territory in 1856-57. 
Geau^; county in Ohio. The name is thought by some to have been derived from 

the same source as Cuyahoga; others say it is derived from the Indian word 

theauga-npe meaning ** raccoon river,'* a name originally applied to Grand 

River. Haines says that it was the name of a chief of one of the Six Nations. 

Still another theory derives it from cageauga^ *'dogs around the fire." 
Geddes; town in Onondaga County, New York, named for James Geddes, the first 

settler. 
Genesee; coonty, river, and town in Wyoming County, in New York, and county in 

Michigan, besides several other small places, named from the Indian, nceaning 

"ahining valley'* or "beautiful valley." 



136 PLAC^E NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 254 

Geneseo; citicfl in Henry (Vmnly, Illinois, and Rice County, Kansas, and town in 

Livinp^ton County, New York, on the <jenet»ee River. The name is a modifica- 
tion of < tenet?ee. 
Geneva; county, and town in same county, in Alabama, and city and town in Ontario 

county, Xew York, and twenty other places, the name having been transfeneJ 

from the citv in Switzerland. 
Geneva; townHhi[> and city in Kane County, Illinois, and township and village in 

AHhtabula County, Ohio, nauHHl fnnn the city in New York. 
Genoa; town^ihip and villaf^re in Dekalb County, Illinois, named from the town in 

New York. 
Genoa; town in Cayn^^a County, New York, and fourteen other places bear the 

name of the citv in Italv. 
Gentry; county, and town in same county, in Missouri, named for CoL Kichani 

(rentry, killwl at the battle of OktHH^-hobee, Florida. 
Georg:e; lake in ea.*»tern New York, named for (ieorge II of England. 
Georgetown; town in Clear Creek County, Colorado, named for Oeorge GriflBtb, 

clerk of the court. 
Georgetown; town in Sus.se x County, Delaware, named for Commissioner Geoiiie 

Mitchell, a prominent resident. 
Georgetown; formerly a city, now a i)art of the District of Columbia, named for 

Cfcorge Boone, an Knglishman who purchased several tracts of land in the 

neighbcjrhofMl. 
Georgetown; village in Vermilion County, Illinois, named for George Haworth, pon 

of the founder. 
Georgetown; village in Brown County, Indiana, named for Geoi^ Grove, ita 

founder. 
Georgetown; towns in Kldora<lo County, California, and Scott County, Kentucky, 

name<l for President (ieorge Washimrton. 
Georgetown; town in Sagadahoc County, Maine, and county, and city in same 

county, in South Carolina, named for (ieorge 1, King of Kngland. 
Georgetown; town in Kssex C\>unty, Man.'iachu^ttH, thought to be named from 

(ieorge IValxMly, a l^indon banker, who built a memorial church and endowed 

a public library. 
Georgetown; (county, and city in same county, in South Carolina, named for King 

Cieorge III, of Kngland. 
Georgetown; town in Williamson County, Texa», said to have been named for 

George (rlasscock, an early s<*ttler. 
Georgia; State of the I'nioii, named by and for King (ieorge II, of England. 
Georgia; strait Ix'twi'en Washington and Vancouver Island, named for Greorge III, 

King of Kngland. 
German; town in Chenango County, New York, nameil for Gen. Obadiah German, 

the original proprietor. 
German Flats; towti in llerkiiuiT County, New York, named so from the German 

settlers on the Mohawk Flats. 
GermcLnton; village in Stokes County, North Carolina, settled by Germans. 
G^rry; town in Chautauqua County, New Y^'ork, named fi)r Elbridge Gerry, a signer 

of the Declaration of 1 ndei>endence. 
Gervais; town in Marion County, Oregon, named for Joseph Gervais, a pioneer. 
Gethsemane; town in Nelson County, Kentucky, nameil for the garden at the foot 

of the >h>unt of Olives. 
Gettysburg; lK)rough iii Adams County, Pennsylvania, named for James Gettys, 

who laid it out. 
Geuda; city in Sunnier County, Kansas, named from the miueral springs near. 



OANSETT] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATE8. 137 

{Gibbon; river and hill in Yellowstone Park and village in Umatilla County, Oregon; 
Qibbonsville; town in Lemhi County, Idaho. Named for Gen. John Gibbon, 
United States Army. 
Gibraltar; villages in Wayne County, Michigan, Union County, North Carolina, 

and Berks County, Pennsylvania, named from the city in Si>ain. 
Gibson; county in Indiana, named for John Gibson, secretary and acting governor 

of Indiana Territory in 1811-1813. 
Gibson; county, and town in same county, in Tennessee, named for Col. Thomas 

Gibson. 
Gibson City; city in Ford County, Illinois, named by the founder for his wife's 

family. 
Gibsonville; town in Guilford County, North Carolina, named for a prominent 

resident. 
Gifford; village in Champaign County, Illinois, named for its founder, B. F. Gif- 

ford. 
GHLla; county in Arizona and river of Arizona and New Mexico. The name is said 

to be of Spanish origin, but the meaning is lost. 
Gilberton; borough in Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania, named for John Gilbert, 

who owned coal mines there. 
Gilboa; towns in Schoharie County, New York, and Putnam County, Ohio, named 

from the mountain in Palestine. The name means *' bubbling fountain.*' 
Gildehouse; village in Franklin County, Missouri, named for a family who first 

settled there. 
Gilead; town in Oxford County, Maine, named from the large l)alm of gilead tree 

standing in the middle of the town. The name means "strong," "rocky." 
Giles; village in Brown County, Nebraska, naineil for the tirst ix)8tmaster, Giles 

Mead. 
Giles; county in Vii^nia, named for William Branch Giles, governor of the State 

in 1827-1830. The county in Tennessee was probably named for the same. 
Gilford; town in Belknap County, New Ilampshin*, named for 8. S. Gilman, who 

made the first settlements there. 
Gill; town in Franklin County, Massai'husetts, named for Moses Gill, one time lien- 
tenant-governor of the State. 
Gillespie; township and village in Macoupin (-ounty, Illinois, named for Judge 

Joseph Gillespie. 
Gillespie; county in Texas, name<l for R()l)ert A. Gillespie, who fell at the battle of 

Monterey. 
Gilliam; village in Saline County, Missouri, nanieil for a farmer residing in the 

neighborhood. 
Gilliam; county in Oregon, namtnl for Col. Cornelius Gilliam, member of the vol- 
unteers of Willamette Valley. 
Gilman; town in Eagle County, Colorado, named for II. M. Gilman, a prominent 

resident 
Gilman; city in Inxjuois County, Illinois, nameil for Sanniel Gihnan, a prominent 

railroad man. 
Gilman; town in Marshall County, Iowa, nameil for a railroad contractor. 
Gtilman; town in Hamilton County, New York, named for John M. Gilman, an 

early settler, from New Hampshire. 
Gilmanton; town in Belknap County, New Ham|)shire, named for the former owners 

of the site. 
Gilmer; county in Georgia, named for George P. Gilmer, governor of the State in 

1830. 
Gilmer; county in West Virginia, named for Thomas W. Gilmer, a member of Con- 
from Viiginia. 



138 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [BrLL2V^ 

Gilpin; county and mountain in Colorado, named for William Gilpin, the fii>t Ter- 

rit^mal governor. 
Gilroy; township an<l city in Siinta C-lara County, California, named for an oH 

trapiKT and guide. 
Gilsum; town in Chef«hire County, New Ham{)8hire, named for the first proprietors, 

(iin)ert and Sumner. 
Girard; township and <'ity in Macoupin County, Illinois; village in Trumbull 

C'ounty, Ohio, and borough in Erie County, Pennsylvania; 
Girardville; lH>rougli in S<huylkill County, Pennsylvania, and several other towns 

and villages. Named for Stephen (Jirard, at one time the wealthiest man in the 

rnite<l States. 

Girard; city in Crawfonl County, Kansas, named from the l>orough in Pennsylvania. 
Gladstone; village in llen<lerson County, Illinois; city in Delta County, Michipin, 

and town in Stark County, North Dakota, named for the English ntatesinaiu 

William E. (iladstone. 
Gladwin; county, and city in same county, in Michigan, named for Maj. Henrj- (dad- 
win, in command at Detroit at the time of Pontiac*s conspiracy. 
Glasco; city in Cloud County, Kansas, name<i from the city in Scotland, and ppelle<l 

hy the first |><)stmaster **<ila.<co." 
Glascock; county in (Jeorgia, iiame<l for Thomas (ilasco(;k, an ofhcer of the war of 

1812. 
Glasford; village in IVoria ( 'ounty, Illinois, nanuMl for Thomas Glaspford, its founder. 
Glasgow; city in Barren County, Kentucky, and sc»veral other places, name<i fmm 

the city in Scotland. 
Glassboro; town in (lloucester C/ounty, New Jersey, named from its glass factories. 
Glasscock; county in Te.xa.**, named for (I(M)rge W. (ilasscock, who took part in the 

storming of San Antonio. 
Glastonbury; town in Hartford County, Connecticut, named from the town in 

Englauil. 
Glazypool; momitain and creek in Arkansas. A corruption of the French name 

fjlai'icd J'nnl, " Paul's clay pit." 
Glen; two hundred and tiftv-.^ix places in the coimtry l)ear this name alone or with 

sutlixes. In the majority of cases the word is U8e<l descriptively, but in a few 

cases it is a proper name. 
Glen; t<»wn in Montg<»mery County, New York, name<l for Jacob Glen, a prominent 

citizen. 
Glencoe; township and village in .\IcLeod County, Minnesota; the name is taken 

from Scott's writings. 
Glenn; county in California, nanuMl for Hugh J. (ilenn, a prominent resident of 

the county. 
Glenn Springs; town in Spartanhurg County, South Carolina, named from afamoos 

s[>ring owiuhI liy the (Jlcim family. 
Glens Falls; village in Warren County, New York, named hy and for John Glenn. 
Glenville; town in Schenectady County, New York, named from the manor of 

Sandir Leenderste (ilen, which formerly occuj»ied the site. 
Glenwood; townshij) and city in Mills County, Iowa, named for a Presbyterian 

minister, (ilenn Wood. 
Glenwood Springs; town in (Jarfield County, Colorado, named from the city in 

Iowa and the famous hot springs in the neigh horhood. 
Glidden; town in Carroll County, Iowa, named for a manufacturer of barbed wire. 
Gloucester; city in P><sex County, Massachusetts, and counties in New Jersey and 

Virginia; 
Gloucester City; city in Camden County, New Jersey. Named from Gloucester- 
shire, England. 



QANNETT] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 139 

Olover; town in Orleans County, Vermont, named for Gen. John Glover, of Marble- 
head, a principal proprietor. 
Oloversville; city in Fulton County, New York, named from its glove factories. 
Olyxm; county in Greorgia, named for John Glynn, an English lawyer and warm 

friend of the American colonies. 
Gnadenliutten; village in Tuscarawas County, Ohio, settled by Moravian mission- 
aries. A German word meaning "sacred hut*' or "log tabernacle." 
Ooddard; city in Sedgwick County, Kansas, name<l for J. F. Goddard, general 

manager of the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railroad. 
Godfrey; township and village in Madison County, Illinois, named for Capt. Ben- 
jamin Godfrey, who founded a seminary in 1837. 
Goff; city in Nemaha County, Kansas, named for Edward II. Goff of the Union 

Pacific Railroad. 
Gofbtown; town in Hillsboro County, New Hampshire, named for Col. John Goffe. 
Gogebic; county and lake in Michigan. An Indian word, according to some author- 
ities, a contraction of agqjebiCy meaning ** rocky," or "rocky shore;" others say 

it is from gogebing^ "dividing lake." 
Golconda; city in Pope County, Illinois, and town in Humboldt County, Nevada, 

named from the city in India. 
Gold; a name of frequent occurrence throughout the country. It appears with 

numerous suffixes and in most cases was given to denote the presence of the 

metal. 
Qolden; city in Jefferson County, Colorado, named from the Golden Gate; 
Qolden Gate; narrow pass in the mountains in Jefferson County, Colorado, which 

at the time of naming led to the principal gold mines of the State. 
Golden Gate; bay in California, named by Colonel Fremont, before the discovery 

of gold in the country, because of the brilliant effect of the setting sun on the 

cliffs and hills. 
Gold Point; town in Martin County, North Carolina, named from the gold leaf 

tobacco. 
Goldflboro; township and city in Wayne County, North Carolina, name<l for M. T. 

Goldsboro, of Maryland. 
Goldthwaite; town in Mills County, Texas, named for a man prominent in the 

organization of a railroad running into the town. 
Goleta; town in Santa Barbara County, California. A Spanish word meaning 

"schooner." 
Goliad; county in Texas, named by making an anagram of the name, "Hidalgo," 

the Mexican revolutionary hero. 
Gonzales; county in Texas, named for Raphael Gonzales, at one time provisional 

governor of the State. 
Goochland; county in Virginia, named for William Gooch, lieutenant-governor of 

Virginia m 1727-1749. 
Goodhue; county, and village in same county, in Minnesota, named for James M. 

Goodhue, the first journalist of the Territory, who founded the Pioneer, of 

St. Paul, in 1849. 
Goodland; town in Newton County, Indiana, so name<l because of the rich character 

of the soil. 
Goodman; town in Holmes County, Mississippi, named for the first president of the 

Mississippi Central Railroad. 
Goose; river in Maine, named from a pond at the source, so called by an early settler 

from a wild-goose nest which he found on a rock on the bank of the pond. 
Goosld; lake in Florida, named for an old settler, a Pole. 
Gorda; town in Monterey County, California. A Spanish word meaning "fat,'' 

"fiiUrled." 



140 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. (bulls* 

Gordon; county in Georgia, named for William W. Gordon, first president of the 

Central Railroad of Georgia. 
Oordonsville; town in Orange County, Vii^nia, named for its founder, Nathaniel 

Gordon. 
Gore; pas8 in Colorado, named for a gunsmith of Denver. 
Gorham; town in Cumberland County, Maine. Some authorities say it was named 

for Col. Shubael Gorham, one of the original proprietors, but Whitmore says 

that it waH named for Capt. John Gorham, an early proprietor. 
Gorham; town in Coos County, New Hampshire, named for Captain Grorham, who 

was in the Narragansett fight. 
Gorham; town in Ontario County, New York, named for Nathaniel Gorham. 
Gorman; township in Ottertail County, Minnesota, named for Willis A. Gorman^ 

fonner governor of the State. 
Goshen; township in Stark County, Illinois, named from Goshen, Ohio. 
Goshen; city in Elkhart County, Indiana, village in Orange County, New York, 

and township and village in Tuscarawas County, Ohio, named from the ** Land 

of Goshen.*' The name is found in many parts of the country, applied as a 

synonym of fruitfulness and fertility. 
Gosiute; peak and lake in Nevada, named for an Indian tribe. 
Gosnold; town in Dukes County, Massachusetts, settled by Bartholomew Gosnold. 
Gosper; county in Nebraska, named for John J. Gosper, secretary of state. 
Gothic; mountains in the Adirondacks, New York, and Elk Mountains, Colorado, 

so named because of pinnacles resembling gothic architecture. 
Gouldsboro; town in Hancocrk County, Maine, named for Robert Gould, one of the 

original proprietors. 
Gouvemeur; town in St. Lawrence County, New York, named for Gouvemear 

Morris, an American statesman. 
Govan; town in Bamberg County, South Carolina, nameil for a family prominent 

in South Carrdina history. 
Gove; county, and city in same county, in Kansius, named for Grenville L. Gove, 

captain in the Eleventh Kansas Regiment. 
Governors; i.slaiKl in B()8ton Harbor, Massac hu><etts, name<i for Governor Winthrop, 

to whose des<*endanb* it still Ix^longs. 
Governors; island in New York HarlKir, named for Governor Van Twiller, who 

owne<l it at an early date. 
Gowanda; village in Cattaraugus County, New York. An Indian word meaning 

"town among the hills by the water side." 
Grafton; village in Poj>e County, Illinois, namwl from the town in Massachusetts, 

the native place of the first settler. 
Grafton; town in Worcester County, Massachust»tts, name<l for Charles Fiti-Roy, 

Duke of Grafton. 
Grafton; county, and town in same county, in New Hampshire, named for Augustus 

Henry Fitz-Roy, Duke of Grafton. 
Grafton; city in Taylor County, West Virginia, so named by the Baltimore and Ohio 

Railroad, because they grafttn.! a branch from this point to Wheeling. 
Graham; county in Kansas, named for John L. Graham, captain of the Eighth 

Kansas Regiment. 
Graham; county, and town in Alamance County, North Carolina, named for Senator 

William A. Graham, secretary of the navy under President Fillmore. 
Graham; city in Young County, Texas, named for one of two brothers, who owned 

salt works near where the town was built. 
Grahamsville; village in Sullivan County, New York, named for Lieutenant Gra- 
ham, who was killed by Indians near the site of the village. 
Grahamton; town in Meade County, Kentucky, named for an early pioneer. 



OANNBTT.l PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 141 

Grahamville; town in Beaufort County, South Carolina, name<l for the founder. 

Grain^r; county in Tennessee, named for Mary Grainger. 

Granby; town in Hampshire County, Massachusetts, said to have been named for 

John, Marquis of Granby. 
Granby; town in Essex County, Vermont, name<l for Earl Granby, in 1761. 
Grand; county in Colorado, named from Grand Lake, the source of Grand River. 
Grand Coteau; town in St. Landry Parish, Louisiana, so named because of its posi- 
tion. A French name meaning '* great hill." 
Grand Forks; county, and city in same county, in North Dakota, which take their 

name from the junction of the Red River of the North with Re<l Lake River. 
Grand Haven; city in Ottawa County, Michigan, so named bocaum; it is situated on 

the best harbor on the eastern shore of I^ke Michigan. 
Grand Island; city in Hall County, Nebraska, on Platte River, which is divided 

into two channels at that point by an island nearly 50 miles long. 
Grand Isle; town in Aroostook County, Maine, name<l from an island in the river 

at that point. 
Grand Isle; county, and village in same county, in Vermont, nanie<lfrom an island 

in Lake Champlain, now called S<mth Hero. The i»arly Fn»nch called it Grand 

Isle. 
Grand Junction; city in Mesa County, CoU)ra<lo, ho nanie<l l)ecause of iti^ location 

. at the junction of the Gunnison and (irand rivers. 
Grand Junction; town in Greene County, Iowa, so name<l from its position at the 

junction of the Keokuk and Des Moines and the Chicago and Northwestern 

railroads. 
Grand Lake Stream; plantation in Washington County, Maine, nametl from a lake 

in the northern part of the State. 
Grand Ledg^; city in Eaton County, Michigan, so named because of the rock ledges 

along the Grand River in the vicinity. 
Grand Itapids; cities in Kent Coimty, Michigan, and \Voo<l Coimty, Wisconsin, 

named from rapids and falls in the Grand and Wisconsin rivers. 
Grand Sonde; river and valley in Oregon. A French name meaning ''great 

round.** It was applied by the early French trappers to the valley because of 

its circular shape. 
Grand Tower; city in Jackson County, Illinois, name<l from a high rocky island in 

• ' the Mississippi River, which resembles a tower. 
Grand Traverse; county in Michigan, named from (irand Traverse Bay. 
Granite; county in Montana, named from a moimtain which contains the celebrated 

Granite Mountain silver mine. 
Granite Falls; city in Yellow Medicine County, Minnesota, loc^ateil at falls in 

Minnesota River, so named because of the presence of immense masses of granite 

rock. 
Graniteville; village in Iron County, Mii^niri, named for a quarry near, considered 

one of the most remarkable in the world. 
Grant; military poet in Arizona, county in Arkansas; town in Humboldt "County, 

Galifomia; town in Montgomery County, Iowa; county in Kansas; parish in 

Louisiana; county in Minnesota; county, and village in Perkins County, Nebraska; 

counties in New Mexico, Oklahoma, Oregon, South Dakota, and West Virginia; 

and many snuill places throughout the country; name<l for Gen. U. S. Grant. 
Grant; coonty in Indiana, named for Samuel and Moses Grant, of Kentucky, killed 

in battle with the Indians. 
Grant; county in Kentucky. According to John McGee it was named for Col. John 

Grant, an early settler, but according to J. Worthing McCann, the county was 

named for Samuel Grant 



142 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [mjLL.2» 

Grant; river and county in Wisconsin, named for a trapper who had a cabin on the 

river bank. 
Grantsdale; town in Ravalli Ck)unty, Montana, named for H. H. Grant, land owner, 

who built the first flour mill and kept the first store. 
Grantsville; town in Calhoun County, West Vii^nia, named for Gren. U. S. Grant. 
Granville; township and village in Putnam County, Illinois, and township and vil- 
lage in Licking County, Ohio, named from the town in Massachusetts. 
Granville; towns in Hampden County, Massachusetts, and AVashington County, 

Now York, and county in North Carolina, named for John Carteret, Earl of 

Granville. 
Grass; river in St. Lawrence CV)unty, New York, from the name given it by the 

early French, la grasse ririerey meaning **the fertile river." 
Grass Valley; townnhip and city in Nevada County, California, named from a val- 
ley covennl with grass. 
Gratiot; county in Michigan, nanie<i for Capt. Charles Gratiot, United States Army, 

who constnicted Fort Gratiot in 1814. 
Gratiot; village in Lafayette County, Wisconsin, named for Col. Henry Gratiot, an 

Indian agent. '\ > 

Grattan; township in Kent County, Michigan, named for the Irish orator. /« • ^*'' 
Gratz; borough in Dauphin County, Pennsylvania, named from the PwiBsiau town. 
Graves; county in Kentucky, named for Capt. Benjamin Graves, who fell at the 

battle of Rai.sin River. 
Gravesend; village in Kings County, New York, now a part of New York City. 

named by persons from Gravesend, England. 
Gravette; town in Benton County, Arkansas, named for E. T. Gravette. 
Gray; county in Kansa.<«, named for Alfred Gray, secretary of the Kansas State 

board of agriculture in 1873-1880. 
Gray; town in Cumberland C'ounty, Maine, said to have been named for Thomai< 

(iray, one of the pro])rietor8. 
Gray; county in Texas, named for Peter W. (^ray, a prominent lawyer of Houston. 
Grayling; town in Crawfonl County, Michigan, nameii from the fish for which the 

An Sable River wa.«i famous. 
Graymount; town in Colorado near the foot of Gray's Peak; hence the name. 
Grays; peak in Colorado, named by Doctor Parry for Dr. Asa Gray, botanist. 
Grays; harbor in Washington, name<l for the discoverer, Capt. Robert Gray, of 

Boston. 
Grayson; counties in Kentucky and Virginia, named for Col. Wiliam Grajrson, 

United States Senator from Virginia. 
Grayson; town in Carter County, Kentucky, named for Col. Robert Grayson. 
Grayson; county in Texas, name<l for Peter W. Grayson, attorney-general of the 

Texas Republic in 1836. 
Graysville; village in Sullivan County, Indiana, named for Joe Gray, its founder. 
Graysville; village in Herkimer County, New York, named for Latham Gray, a 

resident. 
Grayville; township and city in White County, Illinois, named for Jamee Gray, 

who laid out the town in 1828. 
Great Barrin^on; town in Berkshire County, Massachusetts, named for Lord 

Barrington. "Great" was prefixed to distinguish it from Barrington, Rhode 

Island, which town was formerly considered as possibly being within the limits 

of Massachusetts. 
Great Basin; an area of territory in Utah whose waters do not reach the sea; hence 

the name. 
Great Bend; city in Barton County, Kansas, which takes its name from a bend in 

the Arkansas River south of the site. 



SANNETT] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 143 

Great Bend; borough in Susquehanna County, Pennsylvania, named from a bend 
in the Susquehanna River at that point. 

Great Black; river in Maine, which takes its name from the Indian designation 
chimkazaootookf meaning "big black stream." 

G^reat Butte des Morts; lake in Wisconsin, so called from neighboring mounds, 
said to contain the bodies of Indians slain in battle. A French phrase, meaning 
**hillofthedead." 

Great Falls; city in Cascade County, Montana, named from the falls in the Mis- 
souri River, near the city. 

Great Quabbin; mountain in Massachusetts, nameil for a celebratinl Indian sachem. 
The word is supposed to mean **many waters.'* 

Great Salt; lake in Utah, named from the salinity of its waters. 

Great Sinabar; creek in Missouri. A corruption of the old French name chenal ax^ 
harre, meaning ** channel to the bar." 

Greeley; city in Weld County, Colorado; county, and city, in Anderson County, 
Kansas, and county in Nebraska, named for Horace Grt»eley. 

Greeley; village in Holt County, Nebraska, named for Peter Greeley. 

Green; descriptive word found frequently with and without various suffixes. The 
river in Wyoming and Utah was so called from the green shale through which 
it flows. 

Green; river rising in the Wind River range of the Rocky Mountains, formerly 
kno^^-n as jx/po agie, words of the Crow dialect, meaning ** head of river." 

Green; mountains in Vermont, so named from their forests of evei^green trees. 

Green; counties in Kentucky and Wisconsin, named for Gen. Nathaniel Greene. 

Green Bay; city in Brown County, Wisconsin, named from the bay which was 
called by the early French la grande huicy "the large bay," which was cx)r- 
rupted into the present name. Other authorities claim that the name was occa- 
sioned from the deep greenish hue of the water of the bay. 

Greenbrier; county in West Virginia, named from the river, which was so called 
by Col. John Lewis. 

Greenbush; town in Rensselaer County, New York; a translation of the original 
Dutch name groen boschj from the pine wootls which originally covered the flats. 

Greencastle; city in Putnam County, Indiana, named from the town in Ireland. 

Green Cove Springs; town in Clay County, Florida, named from a large sulphur 
spring, supposed by some to l)e the ** fountain of youth " of Spanish and Indian 
legends. 

Greene; counties in Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa; town in Androscoggin County, 
Maine; counties in Mississippi, Missouri, and New York, and village in Che- 
nango County, New York; counties in North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Ten- 
nessee, and Vii^nia; named for Gen. Nathaniel Greene, Revolutionary soldier. 

Greene; town in Butler County, Iowa, named for Judge George Green of Linn 
County. 

fGreenesville; county in Virginia; 
Ghreeneville; town in Greene County, Tennessee. Named for Gen. Nathaniel Greene. 

Greenfield; town in Adair County, Iowa, named from the town in Massachusetts. 

Ghreenfield; town in Franklin County, Massachusetts, which derives its name fn>m 
the river which intersects it. Before its incorporation as a town the settlement 
was known as ** Green River District." 

Greenfield; village in Highland County, Ohio, so named from its general appear- 
ance. 

Green Island; town in Albany County, New York, so named because situated on 
an island of that name in Hudson River. 

Green Lake; county in Wisconsin, named from a lake which was called so from the 
color of its waters. 



144 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull.2». 

Greenleaf; city in Waj^liington County, Kansas, named for the treasurer of the 

Union Pacific Railroad, A. W. Greenleaf. 
Greenport; village in Suffolk County, New York, so named for the green hill slop- 
ing to the bay. 
Greensboro; town in Hale County, Ala})ama, named for Gen. Nathaniel Greene, a 

Revolutionary celebrity. 
Greensburg; city in Kiowa County, Kansas, named for Col. D. R. Green. 
Greensburg:; town in Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania, named for Gen. 

Nathaniel Greene. 
Greenup; \nllage in Cunil)erland County, Illinois, named for William Greenup, first 

clerk of the Illinois Territorial legislature. 
Greenup; county, and town in same county, in Kentucky, named for Christopher 

(Jreenup, governor of the State in 1804-1808. 
Greenville; city in Butler County, Alabama, so named by early settlers from the 

town in South Carolina. 
Greenville; city in I^nd County, Illinois, named from the town in North Carolina. 
Greenville; city in Muhlenl^erg County, Kentucky, town in Pitt County, North 

Carolina, and city in Mercer County, Pennsylvania, named for Gen. Nathaniel 

(Jrecne. 
Greenville; city in Mont^'alni C>>unty, Michigan, named for John Green, one of 

the firnt settlers. 
Greenville; town in Washington County, Mississippi, named for the first settler. 
Greenville; county, and city in same county, in South Carolina, named from the 

physical appi^aranc^. The name was first given to the city and from that appUed 

to the couiitv. 
Greenwich; towns in Fairfield County, Connecticut, and Hampshire County, Massa- 
chusetts, and village in Washington County, New York, named from Greenwich 

in England. 
Greenwood; town in Sebastian County, Arkansas, named for Moses Greenwood, a 

I>rominent merchant of early days. 
Greenwood; county in Kansas, named for Alfred B. Greenwood, CommiaBioner of 

Indian Affairs in 1859-60. 
Greenwood; city in Leflore County, Mississippi, named for Greenwood Leflore, a 

noted Choctaw Indian chief. 
Greenwood; village in Cass County, Nebraska, named for an early settler, J. S. 

Green. 
Greenwood; county in South C'arolina, <lescriptively named. 
Greer; county in Oklahoma, named for John A. Greer, governor of Texas in 1849- 

1853. 
Greer; town in Greenville County, South Carolina, named for a resident family. 
Greg:g:; county in Texas, named for a prominent citizen. John Gregg, killed in the 

civil war. 
Gregory; county in South Dakota, named for J. Shaw Gregory, legislator. 
Greig; town in Lewis County, New York, named for the late John Greig, of 

Canandaigua. 
Grelder Hollow; a deep cleft in the east side of the Taghkanic Mountains, in the 

town of Egremont, Berkshire County, Massachusetts, named for John van Grelder, 

a Dutchman, who lived in the hollow. 
Grenada; county, and town in same county, in Mississippi, named from the Spanish 

province. 
Grenola; city in KIk County, Kansas, name<l by compounding the first part of the 

name of two rival towns in the neighborhood — Greenfield and Kanola. 
Greylock; momitain in Berkshire County, Massachusetts, named from its hoary 

aspect in winter. Greylock is the highest elevation in the State. 




PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 145 

Oridley; township nml lown in MrLeus County, Illinoia, nmned for Aaabel Gridley, 

State senator, I8S0-I854. 
Qriffin; cily in ."^jialiiing County, Georgia, naniLwl for Gen. I.. L. GrifHn. 

fGrifton; town in Pitt Coant)-, North Carolina; 
Qriftoii Comers; village in Delaware County, New York. Named for the Griftoa 

Grig^; county in North Dakota, named for Hon. Alexander Griggt<, a pioneer of 
Grand Forks, ineml>er of the conBtitutional convention of North Dakota. 

GrigKarUle; township and city in Pike County, lUinoia, named for its founder, 
Bichartl Gri^s. 

Orimea; town in Colutia County, California, nameii for the man who fonnded it 

Orimea; town in Polk County, Iowa, named for Senator Grimes. 

OrimeB; eounty in Texan, named for Jeeee Gricuea, member of tlio council of pro- 
visional government, 

Grimealand; town in Pitt County, North Carolina, named for i.ien. Bryan (Jrimes. 

Orisnell; city in Poweshiek County, Iowa, named for Hon. W. li. Grinncll, a 
citii'.en. 

Orirwold; town in New London County, Conneetiuut, nameil for Roger Griewold, 
governor of the Slate in 1811. 

Oriswold; town in Caee County, Iowa, named (or J. N. A. Griswold, a prominent 
railroad official. 

Oiizaly; peak in Colorado, named by a party of scientists from an adventure with 
a griizly bear. 

Gross; fioint in Maine on the Fenobecot River, named for the first settler, Zacliariah 

G-rosedale; village in Cook County, Illinois, named for E. A. GroBS, one of its 
founders. 

OroBse lale; village in Wayne County, Michigan, which takes its name from an 
island in Detroit River, which was called by the early French groue itit, 
"great iaie." 

Qrossepoiiiti town in Wayne County, Michigan, so named from a large point which 
proiel^ts into Lake St. Clair, named by the French gromf jmvie, " great point." 

Oroevenor; mount in Arizona, named for H. C. Groavenor, who was killed there 
in \mi. 

Oroton; town in Middlenex County, Maffincliusetta, named from the place in Eng- 
land owned by the bmily of Dcane Winthrop, whose name headed the petition 
for the grant. 

Oroton; village in Tompkins County, New York, named Ironi the town in Massa- 
chusetts. 

Ororelond; town in Essex County, Ma«eachusetts. The origin of the name la 
obsaire, but the name is believed to have been suggested by attraclive groves 
in the neigh borliooil. 

Grover; viUi^ in Cleveland County, North Carolina, and lown in Dorchester 
County, South Carolina, named for President Grover Cleveland. 

Orubb*; village in Newcastle County, Delaware, named for the early owner, John 

IGruadj'; counties in Illinois, Iowa, Missouri, and Tennessee; 
Onuidy Center; town in Grundy County, Iowa. Named for Felis Gmndy, 
T'nited States Senator from Tennessee. 
Guadalupe; county in New Mexico, and river, county, and town in Victoria 
County, Texas, named for Don Felix Victoria, first President of Mexico, known 
as "(iundalupe Victoria." The name ia of Arabic origin. 
Ouemaej: county in Ohio, named by emigrants from tbe island of Guemsey in the 
English channel. 
BulL 258—05 10 





146 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. {bvll.^ 

Guero; mount in Colorado, named for a Ute Indian. 

Guilford; borough in New Haven County, Connecticut, named from the town in 

England. 
Guilford; county in North Carolina, named for the Earl of Guilford, father of Lord 

North. 
Guinda; town in Yolo County, California. A Spanish word meaning ** cherry." 
Gulfport; town in Harrison County, Mississippi, so named by W. H. Hardy because 

of its situation. 
Gulpha; creek in Hot Springs, Arkansas. The name is a corruption of Cal&t, a 

proper name, probably belonging to an early settler. 
Gunnison; county, town in same county, mountain, and river in Colorado, and 

island in Great Salt Lake, Utah, named for Capt. J. W. Gunnison, an early 

explorer. 
Gurnet; point at the entrance to Plymouth Harbor, Massachusetts, named from the 

gurnet, a sea fish. 
Guthrie; creek in Humboldt County, California, named for an early settler. 
GKithrie; county in Iowa, named for Capt. Edwin B. Guthrie. 
Guthrie; town in Callaway County, Missouri, named for Guthrie brothers, early 

settlers. 
Guthrie Center; town in(iuthrie County, Iowa, named for Capt Edwin B. Guthrie. 
Guttenburg; city in Clayton County, Iowa, and town in Hudson County, New 

Jersey, named for the inventor of printing. 
GKiyandot; town in Cabell County and river in West Virginia; the French form of 

Wyandotte, the name of the tribe of Indians. 
Guyot; mounts? in Colorado, New Hampshire, and Tennessee, named for Arnold 

Guyot, the geojijrapher. 
Gwinnett; county in Georgia, name^l for Button Gwinnett, a signer of the Declara- 

, tion of Indei)endence. 
Gypaum; town in San Bernardino County, California, named from the gypsum 

deposit*?. 
Habersham; county in Georgia, nameil for Col. Joseph Habersham, speaker of the 

general assembly of Georgia in 1785. 
Hacienda; town in Santa Clara County, California. A Spanish word meaning 

** estate." 
Hackensack; town in Bergen County, New Jersey. An Indian word; authorities 

differ as to its meaning, the many versions being "hook mouth," ^'stream that 

unites with another on low ground," "on low ground," "land of the big snake." 
Hackers; creek in Lewis and Harrison counties, AVest Virginia. Named for John 

Hacker, an Indian scout. 
Hackettstown; town in Warren County, New Jersey, named for Samuel Hackett, 

a large landowner. 
Hackneyville; town in Tallapoosa County, Alal>ama, namcnl from the suburb in 

London. 
Haddonfield; borough in Camden County, New Jersey, named for Elizabeth Haddou. 
Hadley; mountain and town in Humboldt County, California, named for an early 

settler. 
Hadley; town in Hampshire County, Mai?sa(husett^, named from the parish in 

Essex, England. 
Hadlyme; town in New Ix)ndon County, Connecticut. The name is formed of a 

combination of the names of the two townships in which it is located — Haddam 

and Lyme. 
Hagerstown; city in Washington County, Maryland, named for a German, Jonathan 

Hager, one of the original proprietors. 



Hague; precinct in Alachim C'.iunty, Floriila, nml t<iwii in Warren Ctiiinly, New 

York, nuineil from tlit- I'ily in Holland. 
Hagite; pevk in Colorado, named for Arnold Hapii.- of the Uniheti Stiili?< Ceologii-al 

iHwhn; {>tiak in Colorado; 
Habn Peak; villfl«e iu Eoutt County, Colorado. Nameil (or .Uw llalin, iin i>arly 
selller, 
Hailey: precinol in Blaine County, Idaho, nainol forita founder, Hon. John llailc-y, 

of Boise City. 
Haineaville; village in Holt County, Nehraaka, named (or S. S. Hainee, an early 

f*tl!er. 
Halcott: town in Greene Oiunly, New York, named for (Ji'orge W. Haleott, slieritf. 
Haldane; village in Ogle County, Illinois, nsineil tor .\li>iander Haldane, the first 

rail roar! agent. 
Hale; rouDty in .Alabama, named for Stephen F. Hale, prominent in the State. 
aale: viUafv in Carroll County, MiBsouri, named for John P. Hale, of (■arrollton. 
Sale; county in Texas, named for I.ieut, J. C. Hale, of the Confederate army. 
Hale Eddy; village in I>elaware County, New York, named (or a family of early 

pelllere. 
Half Dome; mountain of granite in California, on the walls of the Yowmite Valley, 

so niiiiifd b^HMUs' it has the B[ipeiiraiite of a half dome. 
Hal&noon; lay in California, f>o named from its crescent shajie. 
Halfmoon; town in SaralO|[H County. New York, so nameil from a frescent-nhaped 

piece of land between the Hud»>n and the Mohawk. 
Halibut; island off thu coa«t of Alaska, bo named on account of the large number of 

halilmt found there. 
Halifax: town iu Plyinoutli County, Mai>»ivhut)ette, county In North C-arolina, town 

in Windham County, Vennont, and nmnty in Virginia, named (or (Jeorge Mon- 
tague, Earl of Halifax. 
Hall; county in (.Jeorgin, naintvl for I>r. Lyman Hall, a signer of the Declaration of 

Indepenilenee. 
Hall; county in Nebraska, named for Augustus Hall, former Congressman from Iowa. 
Hall; county in Texas, named for an early settler and captain in the war of inde- 
pendence, Warren O. C. flail. 
Halletts Oove; part of New York City, fonnerly a viilt^re in Queens County, New 

York, which received iti" name from the original patentee. 
Hallowell; city in Kennebec Connty, Maine, named for Benjamin Hallowell. a 

large proprietor in the Kennebec patent. 
Hallatead; borough in Susquehanna Counly, Pennsylvania, named for William I''. 

Hallstead, general managerof the Delaware, I..Bckawanna an<l WeHtem Railroa<l. 
Hallsville; village i[i Mi>nlgoniery County, Sew York, named for Capt. Robert 

Hall. 
Ealsejrville; village in Tompkins County, New York, named (or the first settler, 

Nicholl llalsey. 
Halatead; city in Harvey C«unty, Kansas, named (orlhe ioumalist, Murat Halatead, 
Hajnblen; county in Tcune^eee, named for Hezekiah Haititilen, 
Hamburg; towns in Erie County, New York, luirl Aiken County, Si)ath Carolina, 

and twenty other places, named from the city iu (lerinany. 
Hamersville; village in Brown County, Ohio, named forfiett. Thomas Lyon Hamer. 
Hamiltou; countiesin Florida, Illinois, Indiajia, and Kansas; town in Kssex County, 

MassachuBetta; counties in New York. Ohio, ami Tcnnespee; probably the county 

in Nebraska; and many cities, towns, and villages; named for the Htateonmn, 

Alexander Hamilton. 




148 I»LACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull.i!5«. 

Hamilton; town in HarriB County, Cieoi>aa> named for General Hamilton, governor 
of South Carolina. 

Hamilton; city in Hancock County, Illinois, named for Artois Hamilton, a first 
settler. 

Hamilton; county in Iowa, named for William W. Hamilton, president of the sen- 
ate in 1857. 

Hamilton; county in Texas, named for James Hamilton, of South Carolina, a £>ym- 
imthizer and heli>er of Texas in its war. 

Hamlet; village in Richmond County, North Carolina, named for its founder. 

Hamlin; city in Brown County, Kansas, plantation in Aroostook County, Maine, 
county in South Dakota, and several other places, named for Hannibal Hamlin. 

Hammond; villa^' in Piatt County, Illinois, named for Charles Groodrich Ham- 
mond, mil way manager. 

Hammond; city in Lake County, Indiana, named for Abram Hammond, twelth 
governor, 18(KMil. 

Hammond; town in rn>H]ue County, Michigan, named for Stephen Hammond. 

Hammond; town in St. Law n^nce County, New York, named for Abijah Hammond, 
an early [)roprietor. 

Hammonton; town in Atlantic County, New Jersey, named for a family of former 
rt^sidents. 

Hammonville; town in Hart County, Kentucky, named for a resident, 

Hampden; county, and town in siune county, in Massachusetts, and town in Penob- 
8<'ot Comity, Maine, named for the English patriot, John Hampden. 

Hampshire; counties in Massac^husetts and West Virginia, named from the county 
in England. 

Hampstead; village in Carroll County, Maryland; town in Rockingham County, 
Now llami^sliire; and villages in Pender County, North Carolina, and King 
(Jeorge County, Virginia, naine<l from the parish in England. 

Hampton; town in Rockingham County, New Hampshire, and twenty-five other 
places, directly or indirectly named from the parish in Middlesex, England. 

Hampton; county, and town in same county, in South Carolina, named for Gen. 
Wade Hampton. 

Hamptonburg; town in Orange County, New York, named from the birthplace^ 
Wolverhampton — of William Bull, the first settler. 

Hampton Roads; Virginia; a channel between Chesapeake Bay and the estuary of 
James River. Scene of the naval Imttle between the Monitor and Merrimac^ 
March 9, 18(52. 

Hancock; counties in Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, and Kentucky; county, and 
town in same county, in Maine; town in Berkshire County, Massachusetts; county 
in Mississippi; mountain in New Ilampshirt^; town in Delaware County, New 
York; and counties in Ohio, Tennc»fisee, and Westt Virginia; named for John Han- 
cock, a signer of the Declaration of Indei>endence. Many other places in the 
('nit«Hl States are named for the same man. 

Hancock; mount in Yellowstone Park, named for Gen. Winfield Scott Hancock. 

Hand; county in South Dakota, named for Cieorge A. Hand, Territorial secretary in 
1880. 

Handsboro; town in Harrison County, Mississippi, named for a northern man who 
established a foundry there l)efore the v\\\\ war. 

Hanford; city in Kings County, California, named for one of the earliest settlers. 

Hang:ing: Rock; village in Lawrence County, Ohio, named from the presence of a 
cliff at the back of the town. 

Hang^mans; creek in Washington, tributary of the Spokane River, so named because 
a number of Indians were hanged on its bank. 



la; townsbip in Henry County, Illinoin, named for Rev. Philip Ilaimo, ii fl 

eettler. 
TfntiTiB; reef and IhIuiuI in Texas, protnlily named [or Cajilaiii Ilaniia, I'apbiiii iif 

the Lcoiiidm, in 1837. 
Haxuuicroie; creek in New York, isid Ui have I)een named by Ihe Dulj-li hnimt- 

traai, meaning "cock-crowing creek," from Itie legend that a rooster li<mteil 

down thiB creek on a cake of ice. 
rwawtiitittl- town in (htwegii County, New York, named liy the Stale land luunJ, 
I lieing sitiiuted in the military Irai't f^ven tii the KMrviving xoUlien; of ihe 
1 Revolution; 

iHannibal: city in Marion County, ^^il»^ouri. Namcl (or the Cartliaiiinian (general. 
Hanover; city in Washin^ii County, Kanaafl, town in Plymoutli t'ouuty, Mai«a- 

chusetU, cuunly in VJrpnia, and eeveral other places, named for the Duke of 

Hanover, afterwards (ieorge I of England, or from the Pruiwian province and 

city belonging to liim. 
Hansford; county in Texas, named for John H. Hansford, wlio was a judge and 

lawyer there during the days o[ the Republic. 
Hanson; county in South Dakota, named (or Joseph R. Haneon, clerk of the first 

legiNlitiure. 
Happy Camp; town in Biskiyou County, «> called by ininets in the early days of 

proHjierity. 
Haralaon; county, and village in Coweta Connty, in lieorgia, named (or Qen. Hugh 

A. Haralaon, [onner congressman from that Stale. 
HaxbeBon; village in SuHsei Omnty, Delaware, named for Harbeeon Hickman, a 

large landowner. 
Harbine; village in Thayer County, Nebraska, named for C-ol. John llarbine. 
Hardeman; county in Texas, named for two hrotlieta, Bailey and T. J. Hardeman, 

prominent citizens in the days of the Republic; and a county in Tenneawe, 

named for one of the brothers, Col. T, J. Hanleman. 
Hardenburg; town in Ulster County, Hew York, named for Johannes Hardenburg, 

an early patentee in Delaware and Sullivan co<mtiee. 
Hardin; county, and village in Calhoun County, in Illinois; counties in Iowa, Ken- 
tacky, Ohio, and Tennessee, and several towns and villages, named for Col. John 

J. Hardin, who was killed in the Mexican war. 
Hardin; city in Ray County, Missouri, named for Gov. Charles H. Hardin, 1875- 

1877. 
Hardin; county in Texas, named for the family of William Hardin, of Lilierty. 
Hardin Factory; towci in Gaston Connty, North Carolina, nanieil for the builder 

of the factory. 
Hardinaburg; town in Breckiiiritlge Connty. Kentucky, naiiietl fur ('apt William 

Hanlin, a pioneer. 
Hardwick; town in Worcester County, Massachusetts, named for Pliilip Yorke, 

Lord llardwicke, a member of tlie privy council. 
Hardy; town in Sharp County, Arkansas, named for a railroad official. 
Hardy; county in West Virginia, named for Samuel Hardy, a niemlwr of Congress 

from Virginia in 1784. 
Hardy Station; town in Grenada County, Mississippi, named hy tlie railroad com- 
pany fur Richard Hardy, the owuer of the land upon which the de]iot was built. 
Harford; county, and village in same county. In Maryland, nau>ed (or Henry Har- 
ford, the natural son of Lord Baltimore, the sistii, and proprietor at the time o[ 

the Revolution. 
Harlan; cily in Shelby County, lowu, named for Senator Harlan. 
Harlan; village in Smith County, Kan«u<. nanie<l for John C. Uarlun, oue of the 

first settlers. 



150 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [vulu^SA. 

Harlan; county, and town in 8ame county, in Kentucky, named for Maj. Silaa Harlan. 
Harlan; county in Nebraska, named for James Harlan, secretary of the interior, 

1865-66. 
Harlem; part of New York City and the channel which extends northward from 

Hell Ciate, connectin>< with the Hudson, named from the town in Holland. 
HarlejTville; town in Dorchester County, South Carolina, named for a resident 

family. 
Harman; village in Arapahoe County, Colorado, named for I^ B. Harman, its 

founder. 
Harmer; township and village in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, named for the 

Hon. Harmer Denny. 
Harmony; lx)rough in Butler County, Pennsylvania, named by a colony of Ger- 
mans to indicate tho i)rinciple of itiji organization. 
Harnett; county in North Carolina, named for Cornelius Harnett, an American 

statesman. 
Harney; county, city in same county, and lake in Oregon, named for General 

Harney. 
Harper; county in Kansas, named far Marion Harper, first sergeant Company £, 

Second Kaiisiis Regiment. 
Harpers Ferry; town in Jefferson County, West Virginia, named for Robert Har- 
per, who settle<l there in 17IM and established a ferry. 
Harpersfleld; town in Delaware County, New York, named for Joseph Harper, an 

original patentee. 
Harpersfleld; t(3wnship in Ashtabula County, Ohio, named from the town in New 

York. 
Harperville; village in S<!ott County, Mississippi, nameil for G. W. Harper, an old 

resident. 
Harpswell; town in Cuml)erlan(l County, Maine, prolmbly named from the town in 

England. 
Harrellsville; town in Hertford County, North Carolina, named for a fonner resi- 

deiit. 
Harriet; lake in Minnt^sota, named for the wife of Colonel Leavenworth. 
Harrietstown; town in Franklin County, New York, named for the wife of Jamee 

Duane. 
Harrietta; village in Wexford County, Michigan, a combination of the names of the 

manager of the Ann .\rbor liailroad, Harry, and that of his wife, Henrietta. 
Harrington; Ujwn in Kent C^ounty, Delaware, named for the Hon. Samuel M. Har- 
rington, at one time chancellor of the State. 
Harris; town in Humboldt County, California, named for an early settler. 
Harris; county in ( Jeorgia, named for Charles Harris, a prominent lawyer and jadge. 
Harris; county in Texas, named for John R. Harris, who erected the first steam 

sawmill in Texas (1829). 
Harrisburg; townshij) and city in Saline County, Illinois, named for a family of first 

settlers. 
Harrisburg; town in I^wis County, New York, named for Richard Harrison, of 

New York. 
Harrisburg*; city in Dauphin County, Pennsylvania, named for John Harris, the 

original proprietor. 
Harrison; counties in Indiana, Iowa, and Mississippi; town in Gloucester County, 

New Jersey, and twenty other places, name<l for President William Henry Har^ 

rison. 
Harrison; counties in Kentucky and West Virginia, name<l for Col. Benjamin Har- 

son, father of William Henry Harrison. 



PLACE NAMES IN THE I'NITED STATES. 151 

Harriuii: U»»ii in CuTiiherlaiul Ciimity, Maim", nameil fnr Hnrriaoii Gray OUb, of 

Boeton. 
Sarriaon; toim in Tallahatchie County, Mies' iHaipiii, nanie<] for Janice T. Harrison, 

a prominent lawyer. 
Harriaon; I'ounty, and i-ity In Caas Comity in Misieoiiri, named [or Albert (i. Har- 

riHon, of Callaway Coanty. member of Coiigrew in 183H. 
HiHTisoii; town in Waitfliester County, New York, named for John Harrison. 
Harrison; county in Texa^i, named for an early pioneer. 
Harrisonburg; village in CatahouliL Parii^h, LouieianiL, aniJ Uiwn in Rockingham 

CiiiiDly, Virfcinia, named for the Hurrisuiu of Virginia. 
HarriBville; town in Cheehire County, New Hampshire, named for Milan Harris, 

who established a mill there. 
HarriaTiUe; town iu l«wie Connty, New York, named for Fodket Harris, the first 

littler. 

Harrisville; village in Medina County, Ohio, named for Joseph Harris, a pioneer. 
HarriBville: town in Riti^hie County, West Virginia, named for Gen. ThomM 

Harris 
Harrodsburg; city in Mercer County, Kentucky, named for Col. James Harrod, 

who built the first cabin. 
Haxt; ccinuty In (leoi^a, nametl for Nani^y Hart, the celebrated Georgia heroine ot 

the Revolution. 
Hart; county in Kentucky, named for Nathaniel Hart, an officer of the War ot 1812. 
Hart; township and village in Oceana County, Michigan. The name waa originally 

" Heart," to nlgni/y the center of the county. 
Hart; river and lake in Yellowstone Park, named for Hart Hunney, an old hunter. 

Others say it whs named "Heart" from its shai>e. 
Hartford; county, and city in same county, in Connecticut, and twenty other diiee, 

tnwn?, and villages, the name being transferred from England. 

! Hartford, city in Lyou County. Kansas, lownahip in Trumbull County, Ohio, town 
in \Viiiil;<i>r County, Vermont, anil village in MaDon County, West Virginia; 
Hartford City; city in Blackford County, Indiana Named from the city in Con- 
Hartley; county in Texas, named for 0. C. and R. K. Hartley, ilialinguisfaed mem- 
bers of Ihe bar in the days of (he Texas revolution, 

Hartag^ove; township in Ashtabula County, Uhlo, named for Richard Hart, of 
Connecticut. 

HartariUe; town in Bartholomew County, Indiana, name<l for Gideon B. Hart, a 
pioneer. 

Hartaville; lonTi In T>arllngt<:in County. South Carolina, nameil fur a resident family. 

Bartwick; tt)wn in Utsego County, New York, nametl for Christopher Hartwick, 
[Mitenl**. 

Harvard; mountain In Colorado, and city in McHenry County, Illinois, named 
from the university. 

Harvard; university in Cambridge, Middlesex County, and town in Worcester 
County, MassachueettB. Named for the Rev. John Harvard, who founded the 

Harvey; county in Kansas, nameil for James M. Harvey, captain Company G, Tenth 

Kansas Regiment, governor, and United States Senator. 
Harwich; town in Barnstable County, Massachusetla, named from the seaport in 

Essex County, England. 
Harwinton; town in Liti'hfield County, Connecticut. The name is formed from 

Hartfonl and Windsor, of which it originally comprised two half townships. 
Hasbrouch Heighta; borough in Bergen T'ounty, New Jereey, named for Mr. Has- 

brouck, the principal owner of ll\e !an<l ii[>f)ii which tbe borough is located. 




152 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [BULum. 

Hasenclever; village in Herkimer County, New York, named for a German who 
receive<l a grant of laud there. 

Haskell; county in KauHaH, named for Dudley C. Haskell, a former member of 
Congress. 

Haskell; county in Texan, named for Charles Haskell, of Tenneesee. 

Hasting; (;ity in I^rry County, Michigan, named for Eurotas P. HastingB, for- 
merly auditor-general of the State. 

Hasting; city in Dakota County, Minnesota, named for Henry Hastings Sibley, 
one of the pn^prietorn. 

Hastings; city in Adams County, Nebraska, named for Col. T. D. Hastings, who 
was instrumental in introducing a railroad through the town. 

Hatboro; l)orough in Montgomery County, Pennsylvania, so named becaoseof its 
extensive hat factories. 

Hatchocliubee; town in Russell County, Alabama. A combination of the Creek 
Indian words hatchie^ "creek,'* and chubfta, "halfway," "the middle." 

Hatcliie; river in Tennessee. An Indian wonl meaning "small river." 

Hatfield; town in Ham])6hire ("ounty, Massachusetts, named from the town in 
England. 

Hatteras; township and cape in Dare County, North Carolina, named for a tribe of 
Indians. 

Hattiesburg; town in Perry County, Mississippi, named for the wife of Capt W. 
H. Hardy, its founder. 

Havana; townnhip and city in Mason County, Illinois, named from the city in Cuba. 

Havensville; city in Pottawatomie County, Kansas, named for Faol £. Havens, of 
Leavenworth. 

Haverford; township in Delaware County, Penm^ylvania, named from the town in 
Wales. 

Haverhill; city in Essex County, Massiirhusetts, named from the town in England. 

Haverhill; town in Grafton County, New Hampshire, named from the town in 
Massachust^tts. 

Haverstraw; town in Rockland County, New York, named by the early Dutch 
haverstrooy meaning **oata tstraw." 

Havilah; town in Kern County, C*alifornia, named from the Bible, the word mean- 
ing "land of gold.'* 

Havilandsville; village in Harrison County, Kentucky, named for Kobert Havi- 
land. 

Havre de Grace; town in Harford County, Maryland. A French phrase meaning 
"harbor of grace." Probably named from the French seaport, Havre, formerly 
known as Havre de Grace. 

Haw; river, and town in Alaljama County, in North Carolina, named from the Indian 
tribe Sissipahaw. 

HawesviUe; city in Hancock County, Kentucky, named for Richard Hawes. 

Hawkeye; town in Fayette County, Iowa, named for a noted Indian chief. 

Hawkins; county in Tennessee, named for Benjamin Hawkins, United States Sen- 
ator from North Carolina. 

Hawkinsville; town in Pulaski County, Georgia, named for Col. Benjamin Haw- 
kins, Indian agent. 

Hawks Nest; town in Fayette County, West Virginia, named from a cliff on New 
River. 

Hawley; town in Franklin County, Massachusetts, named for Joseph Hawley, of 
Northampton. 

Hawthorne; borough in Passaic County, New Jersey, named for Nathaniel Haw- 
thorne. 



QANNCTT.] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED MATES. 153 

Hayden; town in Grand County, Colorado; mountain in the Grand Teton Range in 

Wyoming, and valley in Yellowstone Park, Wyoming; 
Hayden Hill; village in Lassen County, California. Named for Dr. Ferdinand V. 

Hayden, the geologist 
Haydensville; village in Hampshire County, Massachusetts, named for Joel Hayden, 

its founder. 
Hayes; village in Douglas County, Illinois, named for Samuel Jarvis Hayes, a rail- 
road official. 
Hayes; county in Nebraska and mount in New Hampshire, named for President 

Knther^ord B. Haves. 
Hayesville; town in Clay County, North Carolina, named for George W. Hayes, 

State senator. 
; city in Ellis County, Kansas, named for Gen. William Hays, United States 

Army. 
; county in Texas, named for John C. Hays, colonel in the Texan service in 

the war between Mexico and the United States. 
Hay Springs; village in Sheridan County, Nebraska, so named because of the vast 

quantities of hay cut in the valley just east of the springs. 
Hayward; town in Sawyer County, Wisconsin, named for Anthony J. Hayward, 

its founder. 
Haywards; town in Alameda County, California, name<l for an early settler. 
Haywood: county in North Carolina, named for John Haywood, State treasurer. 
Haywood; county in Tennessee, named for Judge John Haywood, author of a his- 
tory of Tennessee. 
Hazardville; village in Hartford County, Connecticut, named for Colonel Hazard, 

owner of powder works. 
Hazelton; city in Barber County, Kansas, named for its founder. Rev. J. H. 

Hazelton. 
Haslehnrst; town in Copiah County, Mississippi, named for Col. Geoi^e H. Hazle- 

huret 
Haslerigg; village in Boone County, Indiana, named for IL G. Hazlerigg, its founder. 
Haaleton; city in Luzerne County, Pennsylvania, so named from the great abund- 
ance of hazel bushes. 
Healdsbnrg; city in Sonoma County, California, named for Col. Harmon Heald, an 

early settler. 

Springes; village in Bath County, Virginia, named for the thermal mineral 

springs, situated there. 

; county in Geoi^gia, named for Stephen Heard, an officer of the American 

Revolution. 
Heath; town in Franklin County, Massachusetts, named for Gen. William M. Heath. 
Heatli Springs; town in Lancaster County, South Carolina, named for a finn of 

capitalistB, Heath & Springs. 
Heber; city in Wasatch County, Utah, named for Heber C. Kimball, a leiider of the 

Mormons. 
Helnron; twenty-five cities, towns, and \dllages in the United States bear the name 

of the ancient city in Palestine. 
Heceta; village in Lane County, Oregon, probably named for the early explorer, 

Oapt Bruno de Heceta. 
Hector; town in Schuyler County, New York, named for the character in the Iliail. 
; peak in Yellowstone Park, named for Cornelius Hedges. 
; town in Keokuk County, Iowa, named for General Hedrick. 
Heidelberg; name of several places in the United States settled by colonists from 

Heidelbeig in Germany. 



154 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [BrLL.25el 

Helderberg; plateau in New York, so named l)ecaiise of the line proope<'t from it. 
A Dutch word meaning "dear mountain." 

Helena; city in I^ewis and Clark County, Montana. Opinions differ as to the origin 
of the name, for by some it is 8uppo8e<i to l)e named for Helen of Troy, but, 
according to the Helena Historical Direi'tory of 1879, it was name<l by John 
S<jmcrville, of Miimesota, St. Helena, from the resemblance in its location to that 
of the original St. Helena. It was then voted to drop the prefix Saint. 

Helena; village in St. I^awrence County, New York, named for the daughter of 
Joseph IMtciiirn, of New York. 

Helicon; village in Winston County, Alabama, namtnj from the ancient mountain 
in Boeotia. 

Hellertown; borough in Northamptiui County, Pennsylvania, named for a family 
of early settlers. 

Hellgate; river in Montana, name<l by Father de Smet parte de Venfer^ meaning 
"gate of hell," Ix^cause by way of the river the Blackfc^et Indians reacheti the 
settlers. 

Hell Gate; narrow j)ass in F^st River, New York. A Dutch word hellegai^ the 
translation of which is "bright strait," or "clear ojjening." The Anglicized 
form wiu<? applie<l to the pass as l)eing appropriate on account of whirlpools which 
made navigation at tliat point dangerous. 

Hell Roaring; creek in Yellowstone Park, so nametl !)y a i>roe})ecting party, one of 
whom descril)ed the creek as a "hell roarer." 

Helvetia; village in Randolph County, \V(^t Virginia, settled by Swiss, and hy 
them given the ancient name of Switzerland. Post-villages in Pima County, 
Arizona, and Clearfield County, Pennsylvania, also l)ear this name. 

Hemlock; lake in New York. A translation of the Indian word onehda. 

Hemphill; county in Texan, named for John Hemphill, former Congressman from 
Texas. 

Hempstead; county in Arkansa'^, named for Edward Hempstead, first delegate to 
Congn^ss from Missouri Territory. 

Hempstead; towns in Nassau County, New York, and Waller County, Texas, 
namtnl by early setters from Heniel-Iiempstcad in England. 

Henderson; c<uinty and river in Illintus; county, and city in same county, in Ken- 
tucky, and county, and village in ('hester County, Tennessee, named for Col. 
Richard Henderson, of Kentucky. 

Henderson; town in Wexford County, Michigan, named for its first settler. 

Henderson; vilhige in York County, N<'braska, naineil for David Henderson, one of 
its first settlers. 

Henderson; town in Jefferson County, New York, name<l for William Henderson, 
a proprietor. 

Henderson; county in North Car(>Iina, named for Chief Justice Ixionard Henderson. 

Henderson; county in Texas, named for James Pinckney Henderson, foreign min- 
ister in the days of the n»public; its first governor. 

Henderson; village in Miison (-ounty, West Virginia, name<i for a family of early 
settlers. 

Hendersonville; town in Hen<lerson County, North Carolina, named for Chief 
Justice Ix'onard Henderson. 

Hendricks; comity in Indiana, named for William Hendricks, one of the early gov- 
ernors of the State. 

Hendrix; village in Mid^'an County, Illinois, named for John Hendrix, the first 
settler in the county. 

Henlopen; cape on the coast of Delaware. Derived from the Dutch words hin 
liHjp or iiiloj}eiif meaning to **ran in." 



i 



OANKETT.) 1*LACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 155 

Hennepin; county in Minnesota, and village in Putnam County, Illinois, named for 

Louis Hennepin, a Franciscan missionary, explorer, and author. 
Hennessey; city in Kingfisher County, Oklahoma, named for Pat Hennessey, an 

Indian fighter, who was killed upon the ground which later became the town 

site. 
Henniker; town in Merrimat^k County, New Hampshire, nameil for John Henni- 

ker, esq., a merchant of Ix>ndon. 
Henrico; county in Virginia, named for the Prince of Walcn, son of James 1. 
Henrietta; town in Monroe County, New York, named for Henrietta l^ura. Count- 
ess of Bath. 
Henrietta; town in Rutherford County, North Carolina, name<l for the wife of S. B. 

Ttoner. 
Henry; counties in Alabama, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Missouri, and 

Ohio; county and mountain in Tennessee, and county in Virginia, nameil for 

Patrick Henry, of Virginia. 
Henry; lake in Idaho, and fork of Snake River, nanunl for one of the partners of the 

Northwest Fur Company. 

'; township and city in Marshall County, Illinois, nameil for Gen. James D. 

Henry, a prominent leader in the Black Hawk war. 

'; county in Iowa, named for Gen. Henry Dodge, governor of the Territory of 

Wisconsin. 

'; cape on coast of Virginia, named for the Prince of Wales, son of James I. 
Henson; town in Hinsdale County, Colorado, named from the creek, which was 

named for any early settler. 
Hepburn; town in Page County, Iowa, named for Congressman Hepburn. 
Hepler; city in Crawford County, Kansas, named for B. F. Hepler, of Fort Scott. 
Hercnlaneum; village in Jefferson County, Missouri, named from the ancient 

Roman city. 

>n; city in Dickinson County, Kansas, name<I for M. D. Heringtoii,- its 

founder. 

•; county in New York, named for Gen. Nicholas Herkimer, a German, 

one of the patentees. 
Herman; village in Washington County, Nebraska, named for Samuel Herman, con- 
ductor on the Omaha and Northwestern Railroad. 
Hermann; town in Gasconade County, Missouri, settled by Germans, and named by 

them for their countryman, who fought so bravely at the time of the Roman 

invasion. 
Hermitage; town in Hickory County, Missouri, name<l from the residence of Andrew 

Jackson. 
Hermon, village in St. Lawrence County, New York, nameti from the mountain in 

Syria. 
Hermosa; town in San Bernardino County, and beach in Los Angeles County, 

California, descriptively named. A Spanish word, meaning "beautiful." 
Hernando; county in Florida and city in De Soto County, Mississippi, named for 

Hernando De Soto, discoverer of the Mississippi River. 
Hersey; village in Nobles County, Minnesota, nameil for (general Hersey, of Maine, 

largely interested in the then Territory. 
Hertford; county, and town in Perquimans County, in North Carolina, named for 

Conway, Marquis of Hertford. 
Hettinger; county in North Dakota, named for an early settler. 
Heavelton; village in St. I^wrence County, New York, named for Ja<*ob Van 

Heavel. 

\; point in Penobscot Bay, Maine, name<l for its first settler, Paola Ilewes. 



156 PLACE NAMK8 IN THE TTNTTED 8TATB8. [bitll.2S8. 

Heyworth; village in Mclean County, lUinoiR, named for Lawrence Hey worth, a 

railroad stockholder. 
Hiawatha; city in Brown County, Kansaii), named for the hero of Longfelloi»''8 

IK)eui. 
Hibemia; villages in Clay County, Florida, Morris County, New Jersey, and Dutch- 
ess County, New York, l)earing the ancient Latin name of Ireland. 
Hickman; county, and city in Fulton County, Kentut^ky, named for Capt. Plaseluil 

Hickman. 
Hickman; county in Tennessee, name<l for Edmund Hickman. 
Hickory; town in Newton County, Mi.ssi^«ippi, county in Missouri, and town in 

Catawl)a County, North Carolina, named for President Andrew Jackson — Old 

Hickory. This name alone or with suttixes is bonie by 46 places in the United 

States. 
Hickory Flats; town in Benton County, Mississippi, named for a near-by hickory 

grove. 
Hicks; island at entrance to Napeague Bay, Ix)ng Island, New York, named for the 

owner. 
Hicksville; village in (iueens County, New York, named for Charles Hicks, the 

Quaker reformer. 
Hicksville; village in Defiance County, Ohio, named for Henry W. Hicks, who was 

one of the founders. 
Hidalgo; county in Texas, said to be named for Hidalgo y Costilla, a prie«?t, and 

leader in Mexican war of independence. 
Higgrctnnm; village in Middlesex County, Connecticut. A corruption of the Indian 

w^ord tomheijau'Ompakuty meaning **at the tomahawk rock." 
Higgrinsport; village in Brown County, Ohio, named for Col. Robert Higgins, who 

laid it out. 
Higginsville; city in I^fayette County, Missouri, named for Harvey J. Higginfl, 

who originally owned the land upon which the city is built 
Highbridge; borough in Hunterdon County, New Jersey, named for its remarkable 

railroad bridge. 
Highgate; town in Franklin County, Vermont, named from the chapelry in Mid- 

dle>*ex, England. 
Highland; city in Doniphin County, Kansas, and counties in Ohio and Viiginia, so 

named on account of the high location. 
Highlands; Injrough in Monmouth County, New Jersey, adjacent to the Atlantic 

Highlands, and taking it.s name therefrom. 
Highlands; broken hills on the Hudson River, New York. The name is derived 

from ho(jelan(fy or hooijUtml^ meaning "highland," originally given bytheDuti^h. 
Highlands; town in Mason County, North Carolina, so named because it is the 

highest village ea.^t of the Mississippi. 
High Point; village in Guilford County, North Carf)lina, so named because it is the 

highest i)oint on the North Carolina Railroad. 
Hightower; village in Forsyth County, Georgia, on the Etowah River. The name 

is a corruption of the name of the river. 
Hightstown; borough in Mercer County, New Jersey, named for the Hight family. 
Hildebran; village in Burke County, North Carolina, named for Pope Gregory VII. 
Hilgard; mountain in Utah, named for J. E. Hilgard, formerly superintendent 

United States Coast and Geodetic Survey. 
Hill; city in Graham County, Kansas, named for W. R. Hill, who located the town. 
Hill; town in Merrimack County, New Hampshire, named for Isaac Hill, governor, 

1836-1839. 
Hill; county in Texas, so named because of the range of hills extending through the 

easterly part. Another authority contends it was named for Cieorge W. Hill. 



QANKKTT.J PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 157 

Hillbum; town in Rockland County, New York, originally named Woodbum, 

changed in 1882 to Uillburn in order not to conflict with apost-oflice of the same 

name in that State. Both names are descriptive. 
Hillers; mountain in Utah, naineci for John II. Ilillers, photographer. 
Hillsboro; countiee in Florida and New Hampshire, and tow^n in Orange County, 

North Carolina, named for the I'^rl of Hillsborough. 
Hillsboro; township and city in Montgomery County, Illinois, named from its loca- 
tion on hills. 
Hillsboro; city in Marion County, Kansas, named for a former mayor, John G. 

Hill. 
Hillsboro; township and city in Traill County, North Dakota, named for James 

Hill, a prominent railroad oflicial. 
Hillsboro; city in Hill County, Texas, named from the county. 
Hillsboro; town in Loudoun County, Virginia, named for its location in a gap of a 

short hill range. 
Hillsboro; village in Vernon County, Wisconsin, named for the Hillsboro brothers, 

who made the first claim within the town. 
Hillsdale; county in Michigan, so named because of its rolling surface — hills and 

valleys. 
HUtonhead; village in Beaufort County, North Carolina, said to have been named 

for the captain of the ship in which Colonel Sayle came over to make discoveries. 
Hinckley; lake, and village in Oneida County, New York, named for a resident 

family. 
Hinds; county in Mississippi, named for Gen. Thomas Hinds, former Congressman 

from that State. 
Hinesbnrg; town in Chittenden County, Vermont, named for an original pro- 
prietor, Abel Hines. 
Hinesville; town in Liberty County, Georgia, named for Charlton Hines, esquire. 
Hing^ham; town in Plymouth County, Massachusetts, named from the town in 

England. 
Hinsdale; county in Colorado, named for Lieutenant-Governor George A. Hinsdale. 
Hinsdale; village in Dupage County, Illinois, named for H. W. Hinsdale, a promi- 
nent railroad man, and from the town of Hinsdale, New York. 
Hinsdale; town in Berkshire County, Massachusetts, named for Rev. Theodore 

Hinsdale. 
Hinsdale; town in Cheshire County, New Hampshire, named for Col. Ebenezer 

Hinsdale, one of its principal inhabitants. 
Hinton; city in Summers County, West Vii^inia, named for the former owner of 

the town site. 
Hippocrass; island in Maine, probably so named by seamen, the word meaning 

"spiced wine." 
Hiram; town in Oxford County, Maine, and township in Portage County, Ohio, 

named for Hiram, King of Tyre, 1014 B. C. The name means "nobly bom." 
Hitchcock; county in Nebraska, named for Phineas W. Hitchcock, senator from 

Nebraska. 
Hoback; peak and river in Wyoming, named for an early trapper with the Missouri 

For Company. 
Hobart; town in Wexford County, Michigan, named for the first settler. 
Hobart; town in Delaware County, New York, named for Bishop Hobart, of New 

Jersey. 
Hobgood; town in Halifax County, North Carolina, named for the principal of the 

Qzloxd Female Seminary. 



158 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [btllS*. 

Hoboken; city in Hudson County, New Jersey. Derived from the Indian word 

hojXM'atfy meaning *' tobacco pipe," or "pij)e country." 
Hockanum; river and village in Hartfoni County, Connecticut. An Indian word, 

meaning **hook-shaj)ed," or *'hook;" so named because of the change in the 

course of the river at thia point. 
Hockendaqua; stream in Northampton County, Pennsylvania. A Delaware Indian 

word, meaning "searching for land." 
Hockessin; village in Newcastle County, Delaware. An Indian word meaning 

"good bark;" applie<l to this locality on account of the good quality of white 

oak found there. 
Hocking; river and county in Ohio. Derived from the Delaware Indian word 

hockhork, "gourd" or "l)ottle," and m^, meaning "place;" so called because at 

this point the river suddenly assumes the shape of a bottle. 
Hockley; county in Texas, named for G. W. Hockley, prominent in the Texan 

revolution. 
Hodgdon; town in Aroostook County, Maine, named for the proprietor, John 

Hodgdon. 
Hodgeman; county in Kansas, name<l for Amos Hodgeman, captain Company H, 

Seventh Kansa*». 
Hodgensville; town in Larue County, Kentucky, named for Robert Hodgen. 
Hodges; ledge of rock in Massachusett<), namcni for Isaac Hodges. 
Hodges; town in Greenwood County, South Carolina, named for a resident family. 
Hoffinan; mount in California, name<l for Charles F. Hoffman, State geological 

survey. 
Hoffinan; village in Richmond County, North Carolina, named for a resident family. 
Hoffinans Ferry; village in Schenectady County, New York, named for John 

Hoffman, owner of a ferry. 
Hog Creek; village in Allen County, Ohio, named from a stream with the Indian 

name, koftkox^pt', meaning "hog river." 
Hohenlinden; village in Chickasaw County, Missouri, named from the village in 

Bavaria. 
Holiokus; town in Bergen County, New Jersey, said to be derived from the Indian" 

word ho-hobx, meaning "a shout," or "some kind of a tree bark." 
Hoisington; city in Barton County, Kansas, named for A. J. Hoisington, of Great 

Bend. 
Hokah; village in Houston County, Minnesota, named from the river. An Indian 

word meaning "horn." 
Hokaman; lakes in Minnesota. An Indian word meaning "where herons set" 
Holbrook; town in Norfolk County, Massachusetts, named for Elisha Holbrook, a 

prominent citizen. 
Holden; town in Worcester County, Massachusetts, named for the Hon. Samuel 

Holden, one of the directors of the Bank of England. 
Holden; city in Johnson County, Missouri, named for Major Nathaniel Holden, 

prominent in the history of the county. 
Holdemess; town in Grafton County, New Hampshire, named from the district in 

Yorkshire, England. 
Holdridge; town in Phelps County, Nebraska, named for G. W. Holdridge, super- 
intendent Burlington and Missouri River Railway. 
Holgate; stream in northern Illinois, named for James Holgate, the first judge of 

Stark County. 
Holland; village in Dubois County, Indiana, and city in Ottawa County, Michigan, 

named by early settlers from the country of Euroi)e. 
Hollandale; town in Washington County, Mississippi, named for Dr. Holland, whose 

plantation the town site now occupies. 



GANNBTT.] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 159 

Holland Patent; village in Oneida County, New York, natne<i for Henry, I/)ni 

Holland, patentee. 
Holley; village in Orleans County, New York, nanieil for Byron Ilolley, one of the 

first canal coinmisdioners. 
Holliday; town in Johnson County, Kansas, nanie<l for Cyrus K. Holliday, of 

Topeka. 
Holliday; village in Monroe County, Missouri, named for Samuel Hollitlay, of St. 

Louis. 
Holliday sbnrg; borough in Blair County, Pennsylvania, named for William and 

Adam Ilollidav, the first settlers. 
Hollis; towm in Hillsboro County, New Hampshire, named for Thomas Hollis, a 

benefactor of Har\'ard Collegt*; or, according to Togg, for the Duke of Newcastle. 
Hollister; town in San Benito County, California, named for Col. W. W. Hollister, 

an early settler. 
Hollister; town in Middlos<»x County, Massachusetts, named for Thomas Hollis, of 

London, a patron of Harvani ColU»ge. 
Holly; township and village in Oakland County, Michigan, nameil from Holly 

Beach in New Jersev. 

m 

Holly Beacli; borough in Cajw May County, New Jersey, name<l for a beach within 
its precincts where holly is supiM)sed to have lHH»n found abundantly. 

Holly Spring; city in Marshall County, Mississippi, and village in Wake County, 
North Carolina, so named on account of the prevalence of these two features. 

Holmes; county in Mississippi, name<l for David Holmes, governor of the Territory 
and State, 180»-1817. 

Holmes; county in Ohio, named for Major Holmes, an officer of the W^ar of 1812. 

Holmes; mountain Utah and Yellowstone Park, Wyoming, named for the geologist, 
W. H. Holmes. 

Holmesville; village in Gagf? County, Nebraska, named for L. M. Holmes, its 
founder. 

Holmesville; village in Holmes County, Ohio, i)ame<l for Major Holmes. 

Holston; branch of the Tennessee River, named, acconling to Haywood, for its 
discoverer. 

Holt; county in Missouri, nameii for Davi<l Rice Holt, memU'r of the State legis- 
lature. 

Holt; town in Clay County, Missouri, named for Jerry Holt, upon whose land the 
town was established. 

Holton; city in Jackson County, Kansas, namtnl for Hon. Edward Hoi ton. 

Holts Summit; village in Callaway County, Missouri, name<l for Timothy Holt. 

Holy Cross; mountain peak in Colorado, so named for a (tross of snow upon its east- 
ern face. 

Holyoke; town in Phillips County, Colorado, named from the city in Massachusetts. 

Holyoke; city in Hampden County, Massiichusetts, named for Rev. E<lward Hol- 
yoke, an early president of Harvard College. 

Holyoke; mountain in Hampden County, Massachusetts, named about 1<>50 for 
Elizur Holyoke, father of Rev. Edward Holyoke. 

Homer; village in Cortland County, New York, and sixti»en other places l)eiir the 
name of the Greek poet. 

Homestead; borough in Allegheny CVjunty, Pennsylvania. Nametl for the company 
by which the town was laid out. 

Homosassa; town in Citrus County, Florida. A Seminole Indian word, the meaning 
differing according to different authorities, two versions lx?ing '* river of fishes " 
and "pepper ridge." 

Honda; town in Santa Barbara County, California. A Spanish word meaning 



160 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bcll.25». 

Honesdale; l>on.nigh in Wayne County, Pennsylvania, named for Philip Dale, a 
j>atron of the Delaware and Hudson Canal Company. 

{Honeoy^; lake in Ontario County, New York; 
Honeoye Falls; village in Monroe County, New York. From the Iroqaois, haye- 
nyehj meaning *'a finger lying.'* 
Honey Grove; city in Fannin County, Texas, so named by explorers, who, encamp- 
ing in the wood, found large quantities of honey in the trees. 
Honolulu; name transferred from the city in Hawaii to a village in Craven County, 

North Carolina, meaning "fair haven," from lumOt "harbor," and lulu, 

"smooth," ''quiet." 
Hood; river and mountain in Oregon and a canal in Washington, named for Alex- 
ander Arthur Hood, afterwards Ix)rd Brinport> 
Hood; county in Texas, named for Gen. John B. Hood, a frontiersman. 
Hookerton; town in Greene County, North Carolina, named for a prominent citizen. 
Hookstown; borough in Beaver County, Pennsylvania, named for Matthias Hook, 

an early resident. 
Hookton; village in Humboldt County, California, named for Major Hook. 
Hoopa; town and valley in Humboldt County, California, named for the Hoopt 

Indians, a tribe on the lower Trinity River. 
Hoopeston; city in Vennilion County, Illinois, named for its founder, Thomas 

Hoopes. 
Hoosac; river in Massachusetts, New York, and Vermont Derived from the 

Mohican Indian, wu<ljoo, meaning "mountain," and abic, "rock." 
Hoosick; town in Renssalaer County, New York, named from the river. 
Hoover; village in Cass County, Indiana, nameil for Riley Hoover, its founder. 
Hopatcong; lake in New Jersey. An Indian name meaning "stone over water," 

l)ecause of an artificial causeway of stone which connected an island of the lake 

with the shore. 
Hope; t4)wn in Hem])stead County, Arkansas, named for the daughter of J. M. 

Ix)Ughlx)rough. 
Hope; town in Bartholomew County, Indiana, so named by its Moravian settlers as 

a monmnent to the sentiment which caused them to emigrate there. 
Hopedale; township and village in Tazewell County, Illinois. The name ifl 

descriptive of the lo(!ation and the sentiment that inspired the founders. 
Hopedale; town in Worcester County, Massachusetts, named by a community 

known as "The Dale" (now defunct) to which "hope" was prefixed as an 

expression of their sentiment as to the welfare of the settlement. 
Hopewell; ]x)rough in Mercer County, New Jersey, named according to the Puritan 

system of nomenclature, the place having been settle<l early in the eighteenth 

century by families from Long Island, formerly from Connecticut. 
Hopkins; county in Kentucky, named for Samuel Hopkins, a Revolutionary ofScer. 
Hopkins; county in Texas, named for a pioneer family. 
Hopkinsville; city in Christian County, Kentucky, named for Gen. Samuel Hopkins, 

a Revolutionary officer. 
Hopkinton; town in Middlesex County, Massachusetts, named for Edward Hopkins, 

early governor and patron of Harvard College. 
Hopkinton; town in Merrimack County, New Hampshire, named from the town in 

Massachusetts. 
Hopkinton; town in St. Lawrence County, New York, named for Roswell Hopkins, 

the first settler. 
Hopkinton; town in Washington County, Rhode Island, said to have been named 

for Stephen Hopkins, governor. 
Hoppeny; creek in Pennsylvania. An Indian word meaning **wbQTQ tbe wild 

potato grows." 



^KNKTT.] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED 8TATE8. 161 

Coppog:ae; village in Suffolk County, Long Island, New York. A corruption (^ 

the original Indian nanie winganhappagxie, meaning ''sweet water.'' 
[oquiazn; river and city in Chehalis County, Washington. From the Indian 

ho-qui-umptsey meaning "hungry for wood;'* the river being so called on account 

of the great amount of driftwood at its mouth. 
[orace; city in Greeley County, Kansas, named for Horace Greeley. 
Coricon; town in Warren County, New York, and lake and city in Dodge County, 

Wisconsin; an Indian derivation of unknown meaning. 
Comby; town in Steuben County, New York, named for John Hornby, an early 

English landholder. 
Comellsville; city in Steuben County, New York, named for its first settler, Geoiige 

Homell. 
Comersville; village in Dunklin County, Missouri, named for William H. Homer, 

its founder. 
Corry; county in Sout!i Carolina, named for Gen. Peter Horry. 
[orse; creek, a branch of Green River in Wyoming, which, at the time of receiving 

its name was the grazing ground of a herd of wild horses. 
CorselieadB; town in Chemung County, New York, so named because at this point, 

during an expedition against the Indians, General Sullivan caused his pack 

horses to be killed and the heads piled up. 
[orton; city in Brown County, Kansas, named for Chief Justice A. H. Horton. 
Cortonville; village in Outagamie County, Wisconsin, named for its founder. 
[osenBack; creek in Pennsylvania. A German word meaning ''breeches pocket," 

and so called by a hunter who became bewildered in ita valley. 
[osenBack; village in Lehigh County, Pennsylvania, named from the creek. 
Cospital Creek; stream in Vermont, so named because of the hospital built upon 

its banks by General Gates. 
Cot Spring; county in Arkansas, so named for the famous springs formerly within 

its limits. 
[cmsrbs; neck of land in Quincy, Norfolk County, Massachusetts, named for AUerton 

Hough, one of the original settlers of Boston and a large landowner. 
[cmsrbton; county in Michigan, named for Douglas Houghton, formerly State 

geologist 
[oulton; town in Aroostook County, Maine, named for an early settler, Joseph 

Houlton. 
[oansfield; town in Jefferson County, New York, named for Ezra Hounsfield, early 

proprietor. 
[oasatonic; river in Massachusetts and Connecticut. From the Indian words 

wussiy "beyond," and adene^ "mountain," meaning "beyond the mountain." 

According to other authorities, from the Indian words tmssa, "proud," alorif 

"stream," and icky from azhuhicy meaning "rocks," the whole meaning "proud 

river flowing through the rocks." 
[oaeatonic; village in Berkshire County, Massachusetts, named from the river. 
[ouseville; village in Lewis County, New York, named for its founder, Eleazer 

House. 
[ouBton; county in Alabama, named for Gov. K. L. Houston of the State. 
[ouston; village in Kent County, Delaware, named for John W. Houston. 
[ouston; county in Georgia, named for John Houston, an early governor. 
[ouston; county in Minnesota; cities in Chickasaw County, Mississippi, and Texas 

County, Missouri; county in Tennessee; and county, and city in Harris County, 

in Texas; and several other places; named generally for Gen. Samuel Houston, 

president of the Texas republic, and later United States Senator from the State 

of Texas, 
[oustonia; village in Pettis County, Missouri, named for Gen. Samuel Houston. 

Boll. 258—05 11 



162 PLACE NAMKS IN THE UNITED STATES. [btllSk 

Houtzdale; lK>rou^h in Clearfield County, Pennsylvania, named for Dr. Daniel 

II out/., who ownc<i the land upon which the town is boilt. 
Hovenweep; cn'ck in Mineral County, Colorado. An Indian word meaning 

"dtf^ertiMl vallev." 
Howard; county in Arkansas, named for James Howard, State senator. 
Howard; (•ountit*H in Indiana and Iowa, named for Gen. T. A. Howard, of Indiant. 
Howard; eity in Klk County, Kansas, named for Gen. O. O. Howard. 
Howard; county in Maryland, naminl for Gen. John Eager Howard, of Kevolutiun- 

ary fame. 
Howard; county in MiHHOuri, named for Gen. Benjamin Howard, an early governor. 
How£ird ; (bounty in NebraHka. Opinions differ as to whether this county was named 

for (leii. (). <). Howanl or Howard Paul, son of an earlv settler. 
Howard; county in Texas, nameil for Volney Howard, United Stattss CongreesmazL 
Howe; creek in llumlH)ldt County, California, named for an early settler. 
Howell; town in Vanderburju^ County, Indiana, named for Capt Lee Howell, a local 

railroad man. 
Howell; township and village in Livingston County, Michigan, named for Thomts 

N. Howell, of Canandaigua, New York. 
Howell; trounty in Missouri, namcNi for an early settler. 
Howell; town in Momnouth County, New Jersey, probably named for Richanl 

Howell, an early governor. 
Howell; town in Marion County, Oregon, named for an early settler. 
Howe's Cave; cave in S<>hi^barie County, New York, six miles east of Cobleskill, 

from which a »^trong current of cold air issues. Named for Lester Howe, wbn 

first explore<l its nresses. 
Hoxie; city in Sheridan (Vmnty, Kansiis, named for H. M. Hozic, general mansf^er 

of the Missouri Pacific Kailroad. 
Hoyt; mount in Wyoming, nanuHl for Hon. John W. Hoyt, formerly governor of 

Wyominjr. 
Hubbard; cnunty in Minncsotii, name<l for Gen. Lucius F. Hubbard, governor of 

tl;e State, 1SS2-H7. 
Hubbard; village in Dakota County, Nel)ra.ska, named for Jadge A. W. Hubbard. 

{Hubbcirdston; town in Wonvster (-onnty, Massachusetts; 
Hubbardton; t(»wn in Uutland (*ounty, Vermont. Named for Tliomas Hubboni, 
of r»ostf)n, one of its charter citizens. 
Hudson; tciw nslii]> and town in Mcl.<can County, Illinois, named from Hutlson, New 

York, tin* lirmii' nf its founders. 
Hudson; t^iwn in Middhsi>x County, Massachusetts, named for the Hon. Charles 

Hudson, horn in the town. 
Hudson: township and village in Ix^nawect County, Michigan, named for Dr. Daniel 

Hudson, one of the first landowners in the township. 
Hudson; county in New .fersey, and river in and city in Columbia Comity, in New 

York, named for Henry Hudson, the duk'overtT. 
Hudson; village in Summit ( 'onnty, Ohio, name<1 for David Hudson, an early settler. 
Huerfano; county, town in \i<\\\\v county, river, and canyon in Colorado, named 

from an isolated mountain in the river valley. A Spanish word noeaning 

"orphan." 
Hughes; <'ounty in Scnith Dakota, namtnl in honor of Alexander Hnghes, legislator, 

1 871). 
Hughes; river in \V(;st Virginia, a trilmtary of the Little Kanawha, named for Jesee 

Hughes, an Indian fight^T. 
Hughesville; town in Gilpin County, Ctilonido, named for Patrick Hughes, upon 

whose ranch the town is located. 



OANNBTT.] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 163 

Hug^ton; city in Stevens County, Kannai^, named for Victor Hugo, "ton" l)eing 

added to j)revent conflict with Hugo, Colorado. 
Hulberton; village in Orleans County, New York, named for Hulbert, a former 

resident 
Hull; town in Sioux County, Iowa, named for John Hull. 

Hull; town in Plymouth County, Massachusetts, named from the town in England. 
Humboldt; counties in California and Iowa, city in Allen County, Kansas, county 

and river in Nevada, and nine other places, named for the geographer. Baron 

Alexander von Humboldt. 
Hume; village«in Edgar County, Illinois, named for £. W. Hume, its founder. 
Hummelstown; borough in Dauphin County, Pennsylvania, named for Frederick 

Hummel, by whom it was laid out. 
Humphrey; ])eak of the San Francisco Mountains in Arizona, and mount ui Yel- 
lowstone Park, named for Gen. A. A. Humphreys, Chief of Engineers, United 

States Army. 
Humphrey; town in Cattaraugus County, New York, named for Charles Humphrey, 

speaker of the assembly when the town was founded. 
Humphreys; county in Tennessee, named for Parry W. Humphreys. 
Humphrey sville; village in New Haven County, Connecticut, named for the Hon. 

David Humphreys. 
Humptulips; river in Chehalis County, Washington. An Indian word meaning 

"chilly region.'* 
Hu2inewell; city in Sumner County, Kansas, and city in Shelby County, Missouri, 

named for H. H. Hunnewell, of Boston. 
Huxmiwell; point at the mouth of the Kennebec River, Maine, named for a former 

resident of the vicinity. 
Hunt; county in Texas, named for Memucan Hunt, at one time minister from the 

Republic of Texas. 
Hunter; town in Greene County, New York, name<l for John Hunter, a ])roprietor. 
Hunterdon; county in New Jersey, named for Governor Robert Hunter, of New 

York. 
Huntersville; town in Mecklenburg County, North Carolina, named for a promi- 
nent citizen. 
Huntereville; village in Pocrahontas County, West Virginia, so called because the 

site was originally occupied by himters' cabins. 
Huntingburg; city in Dubois County, Indiana, so name<i because the neighborhood 

.was originally known as an excellent hunting field. 
Huntingdon; county, and town in same county, in Pennsylvania. The town was 

named for Selena, Countess of Huntingdon, and the county was named from the 

town. 
Huntingdon; town in Carroll County, Tennessee, named for Memucan Hunt, whose 

heirs donated the land for its site. 
Huntington; county in Indiana, named for Samuel Huntington, of Connecticut, a 

signer of the Declaration of Independence. 
Huntington; town in Hampshire County, Massachusetts, named for Charles P. 

Huntington, of Northampton. 
Huntington; town in Baker County, Oregon, named for J. B. Huntington, upon 

whose ranch the town was built. 
Huntington; city in Cabell County, West Virginia, named for C. P. Huntington, 

of the Chesapeake and Ohio Railway. 
Huntley; village in McHenry County, Illinois, named for one of its founders. 
Huntsburg; township in Geauga County, Ohio, named for Dr. Kben Hunt, a land 

proprietor. 



164 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 258. 

Huntsville; town in Madison County, Alabama, named for John Hunt, its firBt 
settler. 

Huntsville; city in Randolph County, MisBOuri, named for David Hunt, of Ken- 
tucky, the first settler. 

Huntsville; town in Walker County, Texas, named from the town in Alabama. 

Hurley; town in Ulster County, New York, named for the Lovelace fan/ who 
were liarons Hurley, of Ireland. 

Hurley; town in Iron County, Wisconsin, named for M. A. Hurley, of «/ausaa, 
Wist^onsin. 

Huron; one of the Great I^kes of North America. Opinions differ as to the classi- 
fication of the name, whether French or Indian, and to its meaninji^. According 
to most authorities, it is a corruption of the French word huref given a tribe of 
Indians by the French, the word meaning "wild boar," on account of their 
unkempt api>earance. 

Huron; city in Atchison County, Kansas, county in Michigan, and city in Beadle 
County, South Dakota, named for the Huron Indians. 

Huron; county, and village in Erie County, Ohio, named from the lake. 

Hustisford; village in Dodge County, Wisconsin, named for John Hustis, an early 
settler. 

Hutchinson; city in Keno County, Kansas, named for C. C. Hutchinson, its founder. 

Hutchinson; village in Mcleod County, Minnesota, named for the Hutchinson 
brothers, its founders. 

Hutchinson; county in South Dakota, name<i for John Hutchinson, first Territorial 
secretary. 

Hutchinson; county in Texas, named for Anderson Hutchinson, a prominent citi- 
zen in the days of the Republic. 

Huttonsville; village in Randolph County, West Vii^ginia, named for Jonathan 
Ilutton, the first settler. 

Hyannis; town in Barnstable County, Massachusetts, named for the Indian sachem, 
llianna. 

Hyde; county in North Carolina, named for £dward Hyde, governor during colonial 
days. 

Hyde; county in South Dakota, named for James Hyde, a member of the legislature 
in 1 873. 

Hyde Park; town in Norfolk County, Massachusetts, and Dutchess County, New 
York, named from Hyde Park, Ix)ndon. 

Hyde Park; town in Lamoille County, Vermont, named for Jedediah Hyde, an 
early settler. 

Hydesville; town in Humlx)ldt County, California, named for an early settler. 

Hyndman; i>eak in Idaho, name<i for an old resident of the vicinity. 

Iberia; ])arish in Louisiana, named from the ancient name of Spain. 

Iberville; parish in Louisiana, named for Pierre le Moyne Iberville, a Canadian 
naval commander, who built the first fort on the Mississippi River. 

Ibex; town in San Bernardino County, California, named from the circumstance of 
the finding of a pair of horns of the Rocky Mountain goat by early settlers. 

Ichoconnaugh; creek in Georgia. A Creek Indian wonl meaning "deer trap." 

Icy; cai>e in Alaska, so name<l l)ecause of the ice along the coast at this point 

Ida; county in Iowa, named by the pioneers from the mountain in Greece, thereby 
linking the new Stat(» with the ancient civilization. 

Idaho; State of the Union and county in same State. An Indian word of unknown 
meaning. 

Iliff; town in Logan County, Colormlo, name<l for John W. Iliff, a Colorado cattle 
king, near whose ranch the town is located. 



GANNETT.] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 165 

nion; village in Herkimer County, New York, named from the place mentioned in 

Homer's poem. 
Illinois; State of the Union and river in same State. Named from the Illini Indians, 

who inhabited the region, the name meaning *' men." 
niiopolis; township and village in Sangamon County, Illinois. A name coined 

from Illinois and po/i«, meaning "city." 
niyria; village in Fayette County, Iowa, named from the ancient kingdom of 

Austria. 
Ixnlay City; village in Lapeer County, Michigan, named for Judge Imlay, of New 

York, who owned a mill in the township. 
Independence; county in Arkansas, city in Montgomery County, Kansas; and 

twenty-six cities, towns, and villages l)ear this name in commemoration of the 

Declaration of Independence. 
Indiana; State of the Union; prolmbly so named because of the purchase from the 

Indians of that tract of land lying along the Ohio River; by another authority 

said to have been named from the Indian tribes who settled in western 

Pennsylvania. 
Indiana; county in Pennsylvania, named from the general appellation of the Indian 

tribes. 
Indian Cattle; village in Herkimer County, New York, named from the Indian 

fort, part of a chain of defenses which guarded the approach to Canada. 
Indio; town in Riverside County, California. The Si)anLsh form of "Indian." 
Industry; town in Franklin County, Maine, so nameil on account of the industrious 

character of the people. 
Ingalls; town in Payne County, Oklahoma, named for the senator from Kansas. 
Ingham; county in Michigan, named for Samuel D. Ingham, Secretary of the Treas- 
ury under President Jackson. 
Ingold; village in Sampson County, North Carolina, named for a resident family. 
Inkpa; tributary of the Minnesota River. An Indian word, eeiik-pa, or piahj mean- 
ing "end" or "point." 
Inman; city in McPherson County, Kansas, named for Maj. Henry Inman. 
Inman; station in Holt County, Nebraska, named for W. H. Inman, an early settler. 
Inman; town in Spartanburg County, South Carolina, named for a resident family. 
Interlaken; city in Putnam County, Florida, named from a town in Switzerland. 
Inverness; township in Chelwygan County, Michigan, named from the city in 

Scotland, meaning "mouth of Ness." 
Invemry; village in Sevier County, Utah, named from the town in Scotland. 
lola; city in Allen County, Kansas, name<l for the wife of J. F. Colbom. 
Ionia; county in Michigan, and twelve other places, the name being transferred 

from Greece. 
Iosco; county in Michigan. An Indian derivative, manufactured by Scho<jlcraft, 

meaning "water of light," or "shining water." 
Iowa; State of the Union, county and river in same State, and county in Wisconsin. 

The name is derived from the name of an Indian tribe, meaning "sleepy ones," 

or "<lrow8y ones." 
Iowa Falls; city in Hanlin County, Iowa, named from the falls in the river. 
Ipswich; town in Essex County, Massachusetts, and township and village in 

Edmunds County, South Dakota, named from the capital city of Suffolk, England. 

{Ira; town in Rutland County, Vennont; 
Irasbnrg; town in Orleans County, V^ennont. Probably named for Ira Allen, a 
grantee. 
Iredell; county in North Carolina, named for James Iredell, judge of the Supreme 
Goort 



Irion; county in Texas, namtx] tnr an (»rly settler. 

Iron; counties in Michigan, Mi)<BOuri, I'lxli, and WiBContdn, ho named od account uI 

the i^reat amount of iron ore found within their limits. 
Irondequoit; ton-n in Monroe County, New York. An Indian word which, »at»i- 

inn: to 8ome aut>)oritiea, means "place where the wares gasp and ilie," and 

according to others, "bay." 
Iron Kountain; <;ity in Dickinson County, MichlKan. iTf^ iron-ore mines bdng 

diecuvercil in tlie Menominee r&age; a oettleinent grew U]> Broiiiid thorn, lirnn 



1 Idwrenoe Coi 



, Ohio. The i 



I, named from the rivei 
and lllinoiR, and t.iv 

I named from a ItHtUe i 
which the former w 



s contracted from "in» 

which flowB tiirough it, 
n in Kingnbiiry C'-unntf, 8omli 
n its banks lietween the Inxjnni 
•re defeated. Prom the fnnow 
I have md," 



k 



the name. 
Iron ton; city i 

Iroquoia; county in Illinoi 
Iroqaoia; river in Imliaru 

Dakota. The river in e 

and Illinois Imliane, ii 

Iroquois Indian Confederacy. The woid ie said to be from hiro, 

and koue, a vocable, which espreawHl joy or borrow, according 

with which it in prononnced. 
Irrine; town in Eutill Coimly, Kentucky, nHined for CaiI. William Irvine. 

i Irving; city in Marshall County. KanHSs; 
Irviugton; townahip and village in AVashineton Coanty, Iltinoiti, town in Eaci 
County, New Jersey, and villnpe in \Ventchenter County. New York. Nan*! 
for Washington Irving. 
Irwin; village in Guntiinon County, Colorado, namcil for Richanl Irwin, a noleJ 

ilrwin; county in Georgia; 

(Irwinton; town in Wilkinaon County, Georgia, Nanie<t for (Jen. Jared Irwin, lu- 

I mer governor of the Stale. 

Irwin; borough in Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania. Named for John Irwta, 

who owned the land upon which the town is builL 
Isa; lake in Yellowatune Park, named for Mii« Isabel Jelke, of Cincinna,ti. 
Ismh; branch of St. Jones Creek, Delaware, named for Isaac Webb, hd early asttler. 
laabella; county in Michigan, named for the daughter of John Hurst, who wa« Q» 

first white child l>orn within its limils. 
laanti; county in Minnesota, namei! from the Sioux Indian word ijmfl, "knife." 

applied to the eastern division of the Sions tribe formerly occapying that Kgim 
lahawooa; town in Bighorn County, Wyoming. An Indian word nietming- " niwh 

cascara." 
lahpeming; township anil city in Marquette County, Micliigan. An Ojibwa Iniliu 

word meaning "heaven" or "high u])," 
Inland; wninty in Washington, h<i name<l l)ecaUB« it i« composed entirely of jelan-k 
laland Falls; town in Aroostook County, Maine, so named on account of an iataoil 

which is midway of the stream at the verge of the falls. 
Island nine; village on Isle Royale, Michigan, so named because of a copper lubr 

Island Pond; village in Essex Otunty, Vermont, so named liecausc of an ialaoil in 

the center of a little lake l>etwe«n the spurs of the monntainB, 
Isle au Chene; island in Ijikc Soporior, Wisconsin; oneof the Apontle Islands. 4 

Fraiich phrase meaning "islam! of the oak." 
Isle au Haul; island at the entrant* to Penobscot Bay, Maine, composed ot U^ 

steep cliffs. A French plirsRc meaning "island of the height." 
lale auHaut; town in Hancock (^'ounty, Maine, named from the island, 
lale Iiamotte; town in Lirand Iple County, \'ermnnt, named for a French ofB<n. 

fji Mottc 




GANHETT.] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 1C7 

Isle of Wig^ht; county in Virginia, named from the island in the English Channel. 
Islesboro; township in Waldo County, Maine, so named because it consists of a long 

narrow island in Penobscot Bav. 
Islinirton; village in Norfolk County, Massachusetts, named from the parish in 

England. 
Islip; town in Suffolk County, New York, named from the parish in England. 
Israels; stream in Cooe County, New Hampshire, named for a noted trapper, Israel 

G lines. 
Issaquena; county in Mississippi. An Indian word meaning '^deer river.'' 
Istachatta; town in Hernando County, Florida. A Seminole Indian word meaning 

*'man snake." 
Italian; mountain peak in Colorado, so named because at a distance it displays the 

national colors of Italy — red, white, and green. 
Itasca; village in Dupage County, Illinois, named from the lake in Minnesota. 
Itasca; county and lake in Minnesota. An alleged Indian form, coineil by School- 
craft, based upon the Ojibwa totoshj a *' woman's breast." 
Itawamba; county in Mississippi, said to have been named for the daughter of a 

Chickasaw Indian chief. 
Ithaca; village in Gratiot County, Michigan, and city in Tompkins County, New 

York, and named for one of the Ionian Islands, supposed to be the one celebrated 

in the Homeric poems as the Kingdom of Ulysses. 
Ivanhoe; town in Lake County, Illinois, and several other places, named from Scott's 

novel. 

county in Arkansas, named for George Izard, former governor. 

tributary of the Minnesota River. A Sioux Indian word, meaning *' white 

stone." 
Jacinto; towns in Glenn County, California, and Alcorn County, Mississippi. A 

Spanish word meaning ** hyacinth." 
Jack; county in Texas; 
Jacksboro; town in Jack County, Texas. Named for William Houston and Patrick 

Jack, brothers, early settlers and prominent citizens in the days of the republic. 
Jackson; counties in Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, 

and Kentucky; parish in Louisiana; counties in Michigan, Mississippi, and Mis- 
souri; town in Carroll County, New Hampshire; county in North Carolina; 

county, and city in same county, in Ohio; counties in Oregon, Tennessee, Texas, 

West Vii^nia, and Wisconsin; and many other places, named for Gen. Andrew 

Jackson. 
Jackson; mountain in the Sawatch Range in Colorado, named for the photographer, 

W. H. Jackson. 
Jackson; county in Georgia, named for Gen. James Jackson, United States Senator 

from that State. 
Jackson; town in Waldo County, Maine, named for Henry Jackson, a contemporary 

of Colonel Knox in the Revolution. 
Jackson; county, and city in same county, in Minnesota, nameil for Henry Jackson, 

the first merchant of Saint Paul. 
Jackson; river in western Virginia, named for the first settler on its banks. 
Jackson; lake in Wyoming, named for David Jackson, a noteil mountaineer. 
Jacksonville; city in Morgan County, Illinois, nameil for a prominent colored 

preacher. 
Jacksonville; town in Randolph County, Missouri, and village in Onslow County, 

North Carolina, named for Gen. Andrew Jackson. 
Jacoby; creek in Humboldt County, California, name<l for an e^irly settler. 
Jafflray; town in Cheshire County, and southern point of oiitram^ to Portsmouth 

Harbor, New Hampehire, named for George Jaffray, one of the original proprie- 

ion, and later a chief justice of the State. 



^B 168 

^^^^K TiiliiTiiii; 
^^^ jRinaicn 



168 plack namks in the united statka. 



t 



town inSantttBorlicira County, California. From the 8i>ani)ih j'Jmn, in 

Ing "pack saddle." 

.; town in Queens Connty, New York. An Indian word meaning, aerori- 
authorities, "(-ountry alKiundiog in springs;" according to othpi^, 

"land ot water and wood." 
Tamas; peak in Colorado, named for the hotanlHt. 
James; county in Tennessee, named for Jease J. James. 
James; river in Virginia, named lor Jamee 1 of ICn^lond. 

Jameaburg'; borough in Middlesex County, New Jerwy, named for a resident lumW 
James City; (bounty in Virginia, named fortlie firet Enf^lish settlement, Juneskiwii. 
JamestowTt; town in Roone County, Indiana, nanietl for Jaiiiee Mattock, its rouodtf, 
Jamestown: city iu Cloud Connty, KanHan, named for James P. Pomeroy, <il dw 

Central Brunch I'tiion Pacific Railroad. 
Jamestown; city in Chautau(|ua County, New York, named for Jatnee PcndoiM 

an early settlur. 
Jamestown; village in Greene County, Ohio, named for James Brawder, a fini 

aettler. 
Jamestown; tiwn in Newport County, Rhode Island, named for the Duke ot York 

and AHmny, later JaiiieH II of F:nKland. 
Jamestown; town in James City County, Virginia, named for King James I. ud 

the tirat English settlement in America. 
Jamesville; village in Onondaga County, New York, named for James De Witt 
Jamesville; town in Martin Comity, North Carolina, named for a prominent ciii«Hi. 
jBoesrille; town in Lasaen County, California, and city in Rock County, Wiicm- 

sin, named tor Henry P. Janee, of Wiaconein. 
JanesvUle; town in Bremer County, Iowa, named for the wife of John T. Banvi, 

its founder. 
jBia; ceeek in Colorado. A Spanish word, literally "rock rose," bnt in coanedi'n 

with the creek meaning "willow bruah.'' 
Jarrolds; %illaKe in Went Virginia, named tor a resident family. 
Jasonville; %'illage in Greene County, Indiana, nained for Jason Rogerm, one of IIe 

founders. 
Jasper; county, and town in PickensCounty, in Georgia; countips in Illinois, Indiaiu. 

Iowa, Mississippi, and Misaouri; town in Steuben County, New York; county in 

Texas; andmany other places; named for Senrt- William Jasper, of Fort Honltric 

(S. C.) fame, who waH killed in the siege of Savannah. 
Java; town in Wyoming County, New York, named from the island in the MiU' 

Archipelago. A Molay wonl meaning "the land ot nntmegs." 
Jayj county in Indiana, towns in Franklin County, Maine, Essex County, S*» 

York, and Orltams County, Vermont, named for Hon. John Jay, an eminHit 

statesman, proprietor, and early governor oi New York. 
Jeddo; village in Orleans County, New York, and borough in Luzerne County, 

Pennsylvania, named from the capital of Japan, the old name ot Tokyo. 
Jeff Davis; county in Texas, named for Jeffernon Davis. 
Jefifanon; comities in Arkansas, Ciilorado, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana. Iowa, RonMb 

and Kentucky; parish in Louisiana; counties in Missisippi, Miasoiiri, and Hnti- 

tana; town in Coos County, and peak of the White Mountains, in Now IIaiu|>- 

ehire; county in New York; mount in Or^on; counties in Pennsylvania, Tea- 

neesee, Washington, West Virginia, and Wisconsin; prolialily the coiintiM 'm 

Alabama, Floriila, Nebraska, and (Ihin; and many towns nnd villages: luunat 

for President Thomas Jefferson. 
Jefibraon; town in Ashe County, North Carolina, named for a prominent citiieD- 
Jefftreoo; county in TexB8, named for Jefferson Beuumont, an early eetUer mbI 

prominent citineu. 



OANKKTT.] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 169 

Jekyl; island in Georgia, named for Sir Joseph Jekyl. 

Jenkintown; borough in Montgomery County, Pennsylvania, named for William 

Jenkins, early settler. 
'Jennings; county in Indiana, named for Jonathan Jennings, first governor of the 

State. 
Jenny; lake in Yellowstone Park, Wyoming, named for the Shoshone wife of Rich- 
ard Leigh. 
Jenny Lind; town in Calaveras County, California, named for the Swedish song- 
stress. 
Jerauld; county in South Dakota, named for H. J. Jerauld, legislator. 
Jericho; town in Chittenden County, Vermont, named from the ancient city in 

P^estine. 
Jerome; town in Bladen County, North Carolina, named for a prominent citizen. 
Jeromeville, village in Ashland County, Ohio, named for John Baptiste Jerome, a 

French trader. 
Jersey; county in Illinois, named from the State of New Jersey. 
Jersey City; city in Hudson County, New Jersey, originally called the **city of 

Jersey," named from one of the channel islands of England. 
Jersey Shore; town in Lycoming County, Pennsylvania, named by the first settlers 

for their native State — New Jersey. 
Jerseyville; city in Jersey County, Illinois, named from the State of New Jersey. 
Jerusalem; towns in Lake County, California, and Yates County, New York, 

named from the ancient city of Jerusalem. A Hebrew name meaning '* founda- 
tion of peace.'* 
Jessamine; county and creek in Kentucky, named for Jessamine Douglass, the 

daughter of an early settler. 
Jessup; village in Antelope County, Nebraska, named for ex-Governor Jessup, of 

Iowa. 
Jesup; town in Buchanan County, Iowa, named for Morris K. Jesup, of New York. 
Jetmore; city in Hodgeman County, Kansas, named for Col. A. B. Jetmore, of 

Topeka. 
Jewell; county, and city in same county, in Kansas, named for Lieut. Col. Lewis 

R. Jewell, Sixth Kansas Cavalry. 
Jewett; town in Greene County, New York, named for Freeborn G. Jewett, justice 

of the supreme court. 
Jewett; village in Harrison County, Ohio, named for T. M. Jewett, former president 

of the Pittsburg, Cincinnati and St. Louis Bailroad. 
Jo Daviess; county in Illinois, named for Col. Joseph Hamilton Daviess, of 

Kentucky, killed in the battle of Tippecanoe. 
Joe Gee; hill in Orange County, New York, named for the last Indian who had his 

cabin on the hill 
Joes; brook near Walden, Vermont, named for Captain Joe, a friendly Indian of 

the St Francis tribe. 
Johannesburg:; mining town in Kern County, California, named from the city in 

South Africa. 
John Day; river, and town in Grant County, in Oregon, named for a member of 

Hunt's Astoria overland expedition. 
Johns; creek in Humboldt County, California, named for an early settler. 
Johnsburg:; town in Warren County, New York, named for John Thurman, an 

early settler. 
Johnson; county in Arkansas, named for Judge Benjamin Johnson. 
Johnson; county in Georgia, named for Governor H. V. Johnson. 
Johnson; county in Indiana, named for John Johnson, judge of the supreme court 

of the State. 



170 PLACE NAMES IN THE USl 



nixlf-rKu'liud ■ 



Johtuon; coiiQlies in Illinois, Kt-ntnoky, MisenuH, aad NeLiraska, naniPilfM 

Jolinniin, vice-president of the [JniUHl StaU*. 
JohuBOn; i-ouiity in luwa. named for Andrew JolinBon. 
Johaaon; lounty in Kuoiiati, luimeil for Rev. Thomas Johnson, 

Johnaon; city in Stniiton Connty, Kansas, named for Col. Alexsuider S. Jqhn«m,ci 

Jobneon: viUnf^e In NeDiaha Connty, NebrBHka, named for Julius A. Johnaou.Ian 

Johnson; iiiuiily in Tennessee, named for Samuel JoLnson. 

Johnson; county in Texas, namod for M. O. JohueuD, a member of tiie Tru) 

Johnson; town in Ijimoille County, Vermont, named for the proprietor, WilliamS. 

.h.himm. 
Johnson; county in Wyoming, named for E. P. Johnson, il member of thelc^^b- 

tun.' Ill the time of the organization of the county. 
Johnson City; town in Washington CTounty. Tennessee, muned for nn CNrly !«IUer. 
Johnsons; rreek in New York, iwmed for Sir William Johnaon, who encamped m 

il!' UmkM when on liis way to Fort Niagara. 
Johnsonville; town in Humphreys County, Tonnesaee, named for Andrew Jnhnnft. 
Johnston; town in Kliu'le Island, named for Augoetus J. Johnston, attiimey-gvu 

Johnston; |>iu<h in Utah, named for (ien. A. S. Johnston. 

Johnstone; county in North Carolina, named torGBbriel Johnston, governor. 

Johnstown; city in Fulton County, New York, named for ita founder, Sir Willim 

Johnstown; city, and liorougli in Cambria Connty, in PennsylTiinia, tuuned tmm 
early settler, Joseph JahnH or Yabns. 

Joliet; township and city in Will County, Illinoia, first called Juliet, for JalJK 
Campbell, daughter of the founder. By an act of the Illinois General Asm- 
bty the nami; was changed to Joliet, the name of the explorer. 

Jones; i-ounty in Ueo)i;ia, named for James Jones, member of Congrvss froni UnI 

Jones; niunly in Iowa, named (or George W. Jonee, United States Senator fpini 

tlmt State. 
Jones; <«unty in Mittsisstppi, naini^ for Commoilore John Pan! Jones. 
Jones; connty in North Camlina, named for William Jones, a North Ctaraliot 

ftatesinan. 
Jones; <yinnty in TeKas, named for Anson Jones, one of the first Senalon! in IJip 

Uiiitnl States Congress tn)m Tc«aa. 
Jones; creek in Yelliiwstijne Park, Wyoniinf;, named ftpr I'^l. W. A. Jone^ Unilol 

States Army, its first explonT. 
Jonesboro; township and city in Craighead County, Arkansas, nan)e<I for Benalot 

William A. Jones. 
Jonesboro; city in Union County, Illinois, named for Doctor Jonea, a promioMil 

Jonesboro; town in Washington ("onnly, Maine, named tor John C. Jonee, one*' 

the original jiroprietors. 
Jonesboro; town in Wasliinglon Connty. Tennessee, nameil for William Jonce,* 

N'lrlli Carolinian xtatcsman. 
Jonosburg; town in Montgomery County, Missouri, named for tlie first settler. 
Jonesport; town in Washington County, Maine, named for John C. Jones. OMCl 

the original proprietors. 




OANNETT.] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 171 

Jonesville; town in Bartholomew County, Indiana, name<l for Benjamin Jones, its 

founder. 
Jonesville; village in Hillsdale County, Michigan, named for an early settler. 
Jonesville; town in Union County, South Carolina, named for a resident family. 
Poplin; city in Jasper County, Missouri, named from Joplin Creek, which was 

named for Rev. H. G. Joplin, who lived on its banks. 
Joppa; post-offices in Cullman County, Alabama, and Harford County, Maryland, 

and several t^)wns and villages, the name being transferre<l from the ancient city 

in I^lestine. A Hebrew word meaning ** beauty." 
Jordan; villages in New London County, Connecticut, and Onondaga County, New 

York, stream in Utah, and 25 other places, the name l)eing transferred from the 

river in Palestine. A Hebrew wonl meaning "descender." 
Joseph; peak in Yellowstone Park, named for the famous Nez Perc^, Chief Joseph. 
Josephine; county in Oregon, named for Josephine Rollins, the daughter of the 

discoverer of the first gold in that county. 
Juab; county in Utah, nam(Hl for a friendly Indian of the region. 
Juan de Fuca; strait separating Washington from Vancouver Island, named for a 

Greek navigator in the Spanish service, who explored it. 
Judith; river in Montana, named for Miss Hancock, of Fincastle, Virginia. 
Judsonia; town in White County, Arkansas, nameil for Rev. Adoniram Judson, a 

Baptist missionary. 
Juhelville; village in Jefferson County, New York, name<l for Madame Juhel, a 

relative of the Le Ray family. 
Julesburgr; town in Seilgwick County, Colorado, said to be named for Jules Benard, 

a frontiersman. 
Julien; township in Dubuque County, Iowa, name<l for Julien Dubuque, the French 

trader for whom the county was named. 
Junction; city in Geary County, Kansas, so named because it is near the junction 

of the Republican and Smoky Hill rivers. 
Junction; borough in Hunterdon County, New Jersey, so named because it is situ- 

ate<l at the junction of two railroads. 
Junction; butte in Yellowstone Park, Wyoming, so nameil lH»cause it is at the 

junction of the Yellowstone and Lamar rivers. 
June; mountain in the town of Great Barrington, Berkshire County, Massa<^hu8ett«, 

named for Benjamin June, who lived on the mountain. 
Juneau; city in Alaska, named for Joseph Juneau, a gold prospector of 185L 
Juneau; county, and city in Dodge County, in Wisconsin, name<l for the founder of 

Milwaukee. 
Juniata; county, river, and township in Perry County, in Pennsylvania; 
Juniataville; village in Fayette County, Pennsylvania. From an Indian word 

which means "they stay long,** or, according to another derivation, *' beyond 

the great bend." 
Junius; town in Seneca County, New York, named by the State land l)oard for 

Junius, of the classics. 
Kahoka; city in Clark County, Missouri. Set* Cnhokia. 

B^aibab; plateau in Arizona. An Indian word meaning '* mountain lying down." 
Kalama; town in Cowlitz County, Washington, probably name<l from the Indian, 

okala kalama^ meaning "goose." 
Kalamazoo; county, city in same county, and river in Michigan. Acconling to one 

authority the name is deriveil from the Indian word, negilcanamnzo, meaning 

"ottertail." **Beautiful water," "Ikh ling water," and "stones likeotters" are 

other translations. 
Kalispel]; city in Flathead County, Montana, named for an Indian tribe. 



172 PLACE NAME8 IN THE UNITED STATES. twLL.fi8. 

Kamas; town in Summit County, Utah. The Indian name for Oanuissia escuUnkit 

the root of which is ufleil as food by the Indians of the Pacific coast. 
Xamrar; town in Hamilton County, Iowa, named for Senator Kamrar. 
Kanab; town, creek, and plateau in Kane County, Utah. A Ute Indian word, 

meaning "willow/* 
Kanabec; county in Minnesota. An Indian word, meaning "snake." The usual 

Ojibway word given by these Indians to the Snake River flowing throngh the 

county. 
Kandiyohi; county, and town in same county in Minnesota. From the -Sionx 

Indian hwdi, meaning "buffalo fish," and ohij "arrive in." 
Kane; county in Illinois, nanunl for Rlias Kent Kane, United States Senator from 

lllinoiH, 1824-18,35. 
Kane; town in McKean County, Pennsylvania, named for a resident family. 

Cane; county in Utah; 
[EZaneville; town in Kane County, Illinois. Named for Gen. Thomas L. Kane, of 

Philadelphia. 
Kanopolis; city in KllHworth County, Kansas. The name is a combination of Kansas 

and C^intropolifl, Ellsworth l>eing the central county of the State. 

F ansae; State of the Union, river in same State, and nation in Oklahoma; 
ansae City; citit^ in Wyandotte County, Kansas, and Jackson County, Missouri. 
Niumnl for an Indian tril)e. 
Kaolin; village in Chester County, Pennsylvania, so named because of the larjse 

deiM>sit8 of kartlin. 
Kappa; village in Woiwlford County, Illinois, named from the Kappa Indians. 
Karnes; county in Texan, nanuHl for Henry Karnes, an early settler and Indian 

fightiT. 
Karsaootuk; stream in northern Maine. An Indian word meaning "black river," 

or "pine stream." 
Kaskaskia; town in Randolph County, Illinois, and river in the same State. An 

In<lian wonl of unknown meaning, the name of a tribe of Illinois Indians. 
Kasota; village in I^esueur County, Minnesota. An Indian wonl meaning "cleared," 

"cleannl off," or "sky clear from clouds." 
KasBOn; villagi^ in Diwlge County, Minnesota. An Indian word meaning "to use 

up." 
Katahdin; mountain in Maine. An Indian word meaning, according to different 

authorites, " highest land," "big mountain," "chief mountain." 
Katchenaha; lake in Florida. An Indian word meaning "turkey lake." 
Katellen; village in Northampton County, Pennsylvania, named for Kate Ellen 

Hrodhead. 
Katonah; village in Westdu^sttT County, New York, named for an Indian chief. 

The wor<l means "sick I v." 
Kaufman; county, and city in same county, in Texas, named for David S. Kaufman, 

a former congressman. 
Kaukauna; city in Ontagjmiie County, Wisconsin. An Indian word, which, accord- 
ing to diffen^nt authorities, means "i)ortage," "long i)ortage," "place where 

pickerel an* caught," "plac(» of pike." 
Kay; county in Oklahoma, formerly written "K," alphabetically lettered. 
Kearney; county, and city in Buffalo County, in Nebraska, and town in Hndson 

County, New Jersey, named for (Jen. Philip Kearny. 
Kearney; city in Clay County, Missouri, named for Gen. Stephen W. Kearny. 
Kearny; coimty in Kansas, name<l for Gen. Philip Kearny. 
Kearsarge; mountain in New Hampshire. An Indian word meaning "peaked 

mountain," or kooiras^ "pointe<l mountain," "highest place;" another au- 
thority gives "proud" or "selfish." 



GANNBTT.] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. l73 



i; dty in Cheshire County, New Hampshire, named for Sir Benjamin Keene. 

Keeseville; village in Essex County, New York, named for its founder, Richard 
j!veese» 

Keith; county in Nebraska, named for John Keith, of North Platte, Nebraska. 

Keithsburg^; township, and city in Mercer County, Illinois, named for an early 
settler. 

Kelleys Island; township, and village in Erie County, Ohio, named from an island 
in Lake Erie, which was owned by Datus and Irad Kelly. 

KMlogrg; town in Jasper County, Iowa, named for an early settler. 

•; county in Mississippi, named for Col. Reuben Kemper, an American sol- 
dier in the Florida and Mexican w^ars. 

>r City; town in Victoria County, Texas, named for Captain Kemi)er. 

KenaxLBville; town in Duplin County, North Carolina, named for Hon. James 
Kenan, member of Congress. 

Kendall; county in Illinois, and town in Orleans County, New York, named for 
Hon. Amos Kendall, Postmaster-General of the United States, 1835-1840. 

Kendall; county in Texas, named for George W. Kendall, a prominent citizen. 

Kendallville; city in Noble County, Indiana, named for Amos Kendall, Postmaster- 
General under President Jackson. 

Kenduskeag; town and river in Penol)scot County, Maine. An Indian word mean- 
ing ** little eel river,'* or "place for taking salmon.'' 

Kenly; town in Johnston County, North Carolina, named for a prominent railroad 
official. 

Kennard; town in Washington County, Nebraska, named for Hon. Thomas P. 
Kennard, Secretary of State, 1867. 

Kennebec; county and river in Maine; the word is said to mean *'long lake." 

[Kennebunk; town in York County, Maine; 

\Kennebunkport; town in York County, Maine. An Indian name, said to mean 

1 "long water place." 

Kenner; city in Jefferson County,* Louisiana, named for Duncan F. Kenner, an 
eminent lawyer of that State. 

Kennett Square; borough in Chester County, Pennsylvania, named from the vil- 
lage of Kennett, Wiltshire, England. 

Kenney; village in Dewitt County, Illinois, named for Moses Kenney, its founder. 

Kenosha; county, and city in same county, in Wisconsin. An Indian word meaning 
'*fish," ;*pickerel," "pike." 

Kenoza; lake in Essex County, Massachusetts. An Indian word meaning "pick- 
erel." 

Kenaingrton; town in Rockingham County, New Hampshire, named from the 
parish in England. 

Kent; counties in Delaware, Maryland, and Rhode Island, named from the county 
of Kent in England. 

Kent; county in Michigan, named for Chancellor Kent of New York. 

Kent; town in Putnam County, New York, named for a family of early settlers. 

Kent; village in Portage County, Ohio, named for a family of extensive real-estate 
holders. 

Kent; county in Texas, named for R. Kent, an early settler. 

Kentland; town in Newton County, Indiana, named for A. J. Kent, who laid out 
the town. 

Kenton; county in Kentucky and city in Hardin Comity, Ohio, named for Gen. 
Simon Kenton, pioneer of Kentucky. 

Kentucky; State of the Union. An Indian word of uncertain meaning. 

Kentwood; town in Tangipahoa Parish, Louisiana, named for a local merchant, 
Ajnacker Kent 



174 PLA(^E NAMES IN THE UNITED 8TATB8. [bull. 258. 

Keokuk; c:ounty, and city in Lee County, in Iowa, named for an Indian chief, the 

wonl meaning "running fox" or ** watchful fox." 
Keosauqua; town in Van Buren county, Iowa. An Indian word meaning "great 

bend," so named for a bend in the Des Moines River. 
Keota; U)wn in Keokuk, County, Iowa. An Indian word meaning either "gone to 

visit" or "the fire is gone out." 
Kern; county, city in same county, and river in California, named for three brothers. 
Eemersville; town in Forsyth County, North Carolina, named for a prominent 

citizen. 

I Kerr; county in Texas; 
Kerrville; town in Kerr C^junty, Texas. Named for James Kerr, a prominent early 
settler. 
Kershaw; county, and t<jwn in Lancaster County, in South Carolina, named for the 

Kershaw family, early settlers. 
Keshena; town in Shawano County, Wis(x>nsin, named for an TnHiim chief, the 

word meaning "swift flying." 
Keswick; town in Shasta County, California, named by English mine owners from 

the city in England. 
Ketchum; ])recinct in Blaine County, Idaho, named for David Ketchum, a pioneer 

settler. 
Ketten Chow; valley in California. An Indian name meaning "cammas valley." 
Kewanee; township and tdty in Henry County, Illinois. An Indian word, same as 

keiiKiinui'. 
Kewaskum; village in Washington County, Wisconsin, named for an old Indian 

chief, the wonl meaning "returning tra<'k." 
Kewaunee; county, city in same county, and river in Wistronsin. An Indian word 

meaning "prairie hen" or "wild duck;" or, according to another authority, 

"to go around." 
Keweenaw; county in Michigan; the vicinity was so named by the Indians l>ecause 

of (he point of land which projects into I^ke Superior; the word means "canoe 

carried hack," "carrying ])lace," hence, a portage. 
Keyapaha; county and river in Nebraska. A Sioux Indian wonl meaning " turtle 

hills. 
Keyser; town in Moore County, North Carolina, named for a prominent citizen. 
Keyser; t<jwn in Mineral County, West Virginia, named for an officer of the Balti- 
more and Ohio Railroad. 
Keystone; towns in Wells County, Indiana, and Dickey County, North Dakota, 

named by its Pennsylvania settlers for the Keystone State. 
Keytesville; city in Chariton County, Missouri, named for Rev. Keyte, an early 

settler. 
Key West; city on Thompsons Island, or Bone Key, Monroe County, Florida, 

named for iti* loaition on one of the most westerly keys. Bone Key is a trans- 
lation of the Spanish, cai/o hueso^ meaning "bone reef," so named because of 

the bones found upon the island. 
Kezar; village in Gunnison C/Ounty, Colorado, named for Gardner H. Kezar. 
Kezar; ponds in Oxford County, Maine, named for an old hunter. 
Khartoum; town in San Bernardino County, nameil from the city in Egypt 
Kickapoo; town in Pc»oria County, Illinois, township in Leavenworth Ck>unty, 

Kansa-y, town in Anderson County, Texas, and river in Wisconsin, named from 

an Indian tril>e. 
Kidder; village in Caldwell County, Missouri, named from the Kidder Land Com- 

])any, of Boston, who laid out the town. 
Kidder; county in North Dakota, named for Hon. Jefferson P. Kidder, prominent 

in tlie State's political affairs. 



OANNBTT.I PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 175 

Kidron; town in Ck)weta CJounty, Georgia, named from the brook near Jerusalem. 
Kilboiim City; village in Columbia County, Wisconsin, named for Byron Kilboum, 
a pioneer. 

{Kilbuck; town in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania; 
Killbuck; town in Wayne County, Ohio. Name^l for a chief of the Delaware Indians. 
Kildare; township in Juneau County, Wisconsin, named from the town in Ireland. 
Kilkenny; village in Ixisueur Coimty, Minnesota, named from the town in Ireland. 
Xillin^worth; town in Middlesex County, Connecticut, intended by its Scotch 
settlers to be nametl Kenil worth, but, by the mistake of the clerk of the c^urt, 
named as above. 
Kilmarnock; town in Ijancaster County, Virginia, named from the tow^n in Scotland. 
Kimball; county in Nebraska, named for John P. Kiml>all. 

Kimball; township and city in Brule County, South Dakota, named for F. W. Kim- 
ball, chief engineer of the Chicago, Milwaukee and Saint Paul llailroad. 
Kimble; county in Texas, named for George C. Kimble, an early settler. 
Kimbolton; village in (xuernpey County, Ohio, name<l from the town in England. 
Kincaid; city in Anderson County, Kansas, nameii for Robert Kincaid, of Mound 

City. 
Kinderhook; town in Columbia County, New York. The Anglicized form of 
kinder hoeck, the name given the plac« by Henry Hudson, meaning ** children's 
point,'' on account of the many Indian children. 
i; mountain in Maine. An Indian word, meaning *Miigh bluff.'' 
:; peak in Humboldt County, California, named for Captain Kuig, of the United 
States Anny. 
•; county in Texas, named for William King, a prominent citizen. 
'; county in Washington, named for William Rufus King, former Vice-President 
of the United States. 

and dueen; county in Virginia, founded in 16U1, and named for William and 
Mary, of England. 
Kingfisher; county in Oklahoma; so nanie<l on account of the great number of 
birds of this species which live on the banks of Kingiisher Creek within the 
county. 
King George; county in Virginia, namiHi for King George I of England. 
Kingman; county, and city in same county, in Kansas, named for Chief Justice S. 

A. Kingman. 
Kingman; town in Penobscot County, Maine, nam(Hi for R. S. Kingman. 

l; pass in Yellowstone Park, named for Lieut. 1). C. Kingman, United 
States Army. 
\; peak in Humboldt County, California, named for Captain King. 
\; county in New York, name<l for the Stuart dynasty. 
Kingsbury; plantation in Piscatacjuis County, Maine, named for Hon. Sanford 

Kingsbury, of Gardiner. 
Kingsbury; county in South Dakota, named for C. W. Kingsbury, an early legislator. 
Slingsley; town in Plymouth County, Iowa, named for Hon. J. T. Kingsley, a 

prominent railroad official. 
Kingsley; village in Grand Traverse County, Michigan, named for Judson Kings- 
ley, who gave the site for the railway depot. . 

l; town in Barton County, Georgia, named for J. P. King, of Augusta. 
i; town in Plymouth County, Massachusetts, named for Evelyn Pierre- 
pont, first Duke of Kingston. 
Slingston; village in Tusi'ola County, Michigan, named for two families, King and 
Kingsbury. 

l; city in Caldwell County, Missouri, named for an early governor, Austin 
A. King. 



176 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [BrLL.25«. 

Kingston; city in Ulster (bounty, New York, named from the city in England. 
Kingstree; town in Williamsburg Ck)nnty, South Carolina; so named because of the 

presents of a large pine tree on the bank of Black River. 
Kingsville; village in Johnson County, Missouri, named for Gen. William M. King, 

who l()cate<i it. 
King William; county in Virginia, founded in 1701, and named for William III of 

England. 
Kinmans; pond in Huml>oldt County, California, named for Seth Kinman, an early 

settler. 
Kinmundy; township and city in Marion County, Illinois, named from Kinmundy 

in Scotland. 
Kinney; county in Texas, named for an early settler, H. L. Kinney. 
Kinnikinnick; village in Rose County, Ohio. An Indian word meaning a mixture 

of t<)bai!co and re<l willow bark. 
Kinaale; village in Westmoreland County, Virginia, named from the town in 

Ireland. 
Kinsey; vnHik in Humboldt County, California, named for an early settler. 
Kinsley; city in Edwanls County, Kansas, named for W. E. W. Kinsley, of Boston, 

Mansachvit^etts. 
Kinsman; township in Trumbull County, Ohio, named for a pioneer family. 
Kinston; town in Lenoir County, North Carolina, named for King George Hi of 

P^ngland. 
Kinzua; creek in Central Pennsylvania, meaning, according to S. M. Sener, '*they 

gobble," referring to the wild turkeys that congregated on its banks. 
Kiowa; county and river in Colorado, county, and city in Barber County, in Kansas, 

and county in Oklahoma. Named from the Kiowa Indian tribe. The meaning 

of the word is unknown. 
Kirkland; town in Oneida County, New York, named for Rev. Samuel Kirkland. 
Kirklin; town in Clinton County, In<iiana, naineil for Nathan Kirk, its founder. 
Kirklin; town in Clinton County, New York, named for Martin Kirk, proprietor. 
Kirksville; city in Adair County, Missouri, named for Jesse Kirk. 
Kirkwood; village in Newcastle County, Delaware, and township in Belmont 

County, Ohio, nanie<l for Maj. Rol)ert Kirkwood, a Revolutionary officer. 
Kirkwood; town in 8t. Louis County, Missouri, named for the first chief engineer 

of the Missfjuri Pacific liailway. 
Kirtland; tcjwnship in Mahoning County, Ohio, named for Judge Tumhand 

Kirtland. 
Kirwin; city in Phillips County, Kansas, named for Col. John Kirwin, of the Rc^ 

ular Army. 
S^ishacolquillas; cre(;k, and village in Mifiiin County, Pennsylvania, named for a 

Delaware Indian chief; the meaning is said to be *'the snakes are already in 

their dens." 
Kishwaukee; river and town in Winnebago County, Illinois. An Indian word 

which means "sycamore tree." 
Kiskiminitas; township in Armstrong County, Pennsylvania. A Delaware Indian 

word meaning " make daylight." 
Kisnop; creek in Berkshire County, Massachusetts, and the outlet of Twin Lakes in 

Salisbury, Connecticut, named for John Sconnoup, an early Dutch settler, of 

whot?e name Kisnop is a corruption. 
Kit Carson; county, and town in Cheyenne County, in Colorado, named for the 

Rocky Mountain guide. 
Kitsap; county in Washington, named for Kitsap, a former noted Indian chief of 

that region. 



GANNETT.J PLACB NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 177 

Kittanning; borough in Armstrong County, IVnnHylvonia, locateil on the nite of an 

Indian village. The name is corrupted from the Delaware Indian kiihanne, 

meaning "greatest river/* 
Kittatinny; range of hills in eastern Pennsylvania and Virginia. A Delaware 

Indian word meaning '* endless hills." 
Kittitas; county in Washington, named from an Indian settlement on the banks of 

the Yakima River. The wonl means "shoaP* in the Yakima language. 
Xittrell; town in Vance County, North Carolina, named for a prominent rt»sident. 
Kittson; county in Minnesota, named for Norman W. Kitson, a leading pioneer of 

the State. 
fKlamath; river in California, lake and county in On^gon; 

iXlamath Falls; town in Klamath Comity, Oregt)n; named for the Indian tribe. 
Klej Grang^e; town in Worcester County, Maryland; the name is a combination of 

the first letters of the names of the daughters of J. W. Drexel, of New York — 

Kate, Louise, Emma, and Josephine. 
Klickitat; county in Washington, named from a tribe of Indians, the name signify- 
ing "beyond." 
Kline; town in Barnwell County, South Carolina, nameil for a resident. 
Kneeland; prairie in Humboldt County, ('aliforniu, name<i for an early settler. 
Knife; river in North Dakota, the original French name l)eing couteaUy meaning 

** knife." 
Knightstown; town in Henry County, Indiana, named for J(mathan Knight, United 

States engineer. 
Knightsville; town in Clay County, In<liana, name<l for A. W. Knight, its founder. 
Knott; county in Kentucky, named for Proctor Knott. 

Knowersville; town in Albany County, New York, named for the Knower family. 
Knox; counties in Illinois, Indiana, an<l Kentucky, county, and town in Waldo 

County, in Maine, and counties in Missouri, Nebraska, Ohio, Tennessee, and Texas. 
Knoxville; village in Crawford County, Georgia; town in Allmny County, New 

York, and city in Knox County, Tennessee; named for Gen. Henry Knox. 
Knoxville; town in Franklin C-ounty, Mississippi, named by the first settlers from 

the city in Tennessee. 
Knoxville; village in Madison County, New York, named for Herman Knox, an 

early resident. 
Knoxville; village in Steuben County, New York, and ])orough in Allegheny 

County, Pennsylvania, nameil for Chief Justice John Knox, of the supreme comt. 
Konkapot; creek, rising in Berkshire County, Ma«:sacrhusetts, named for Capt. John 

Konkapot, chief of the Stockbridge In<liaiis, alK)ut 1720. 
Kooskia; town in Idaho County, Idaho, named from the Clearwater River, whose 

Nez Perc6 Indian name, ilo()«/:o<w»l*^<', means ** small water" or "small stream." 
Korbel; town in Humlwldt County, California, iiame<l for an early settler. 
Kortright; town in Delaware County, New York, named for I^a wrench Kortright, 

a patentee. 
Kosciusko; county in Indiana and town in Attala County, Mississippi, name<l for 

Tadeusz Kosciusko, a Polish patriot. 
Koshkonong; village in Oregon County, Missouri, and lake, creek, and town in 

Rock County, Wisconsin. An Indian word of doubtful meaning, possibly refer- 
ring to kaahkoshf a hog. 
Kossuth; county in Iowa, plantation in Washington County, Maine, town in Alcorn 

County, Mississippi, and village in Auglaize County, Ohio, named for Louis 

Kossuth, the Hungarian patriot. 
Kotsebue; sound of Alaska, named for its discoverer, the Russian navigator, Otto 

von Kotsebue. 

Boll. 258-05 12 



178 PLACK NAMKrt IN THE UNITED 8TATE8. [wiJ-iV. 

XreiBcherville; vilhip' in Kirhinoiid County, New York, named for B. Kn'U*cher. 
Xrenitzin; (ive inlandn in the Aleutian Archipelago, nauied for the navigator who 

fiFHt diwovereil thoni. 
Kubbakwana; lake at tlii^ houh'cs of the MisHiaBippi. An Indian word meaning; 

**ri*st in the iwith." 
Kutztown; lM)rou);h in IWrks County, Pennsylvania, named for George Kutz, who 

laid out the town. 
Kwichluak; an arm of the Yukon River in Alaska. An Indian word nieaniuj! 

**erooked river.*' 
Labaddie; villaj^e in Fmnklin County, Minnouri, named for a citizen of Saint Louis. 
La Bajada; town in New Mexico, on the n»ad from Santa Fe, which at thi» pijint 

niakef? a rai>i«l deKttnt. It wa^ ho name^i by the Siianish on this account, the 

name meaning "(letHvut," «>r "lan<ling." 
Labette; (uiunty, and town&hip in »auie county, in Kamns. French words m(>aiiin»; 

•*the JKvt." 
Labonte; en-ek and t<»wn in CK)n verse County, Wyoming, named for La Bonte, an 

early Fn^nch trapiK^r. 
Laceyville; village* in Ilarrihion County, Ohio, named for Maj. John S. Lai-ey. 
Lackawanna; county and river in Penm^vlvania. A Delaware Indian word mean- 

in>? "stn»am that forks." 
Lackawannock; mountain, and townshix) in Mercer County, Pennsylvania, nanieil 

Irom the I^ickawanna Kiver, with the suthx signifying "at the river fork-" 
Lackawaxen; township in Pike County, Pennsylvania, at the confluence of the 

I^u'kawanna and l)(>laware rivers, and on this account given the Indian name, 

which means " when* the roads fork." 
La Clede; townshii) in Fayette County, Illinois. 
Laclede; county, and town in Linn County, in Missouri. Named for Pierre Lai'leile 

Li^rneste, founder of St. 1/mis. 
Lacon; township and city in Marshall County, Illinois, named from Laconiain 

( ireece. 
Laconia; city in rH*lkna]>(.<»unty, New Ham(i8hins nanu^i from a portion of (rreea'. 
La Conner; town in Ska^itt County, Washington, named for J. J. Connor, an early 

settler. 
La Costa; town in San l)i(>^o County, California. A Spanish phrase, meaning ''the 

coast." 
Lac qui Parle; county, lake, and river in Minnesota. A French name meaniof: 

•'lake that s|K»aks.'' Tnmslated from the Dakota (Sioux). Probably suggested 

by the echoes from the bluffs ])ordering the lake. 
La Crosse; county, and city in Kune county, in Wisc*onsin. A French name given 

the town l>ecaus<» In'fore its settlement tlie ground was a favorite place for ball 

playing with the Indians, the ^me iHMng i>alle<l by the French la cront. 
Lac Traverse; lake in Minnesota. A Frenvh phrasc>, meaning "across the lake." 
Lacygne; <ity in Linn County, Kansas, name<l from the river Marais des Cygnes. 

A French name meaninjf "the swan." 
Laddonia; city in Audrain (*ounty, Missouri, nanK^I for Amos Ladd, an early 

si'ttlcr. 
Ladrillo; town in San Dityo County, California. A Sjianish word meaning "brick." 
Ladys Creek; stream in Missouri, nameMl for William La<ly. 
La Fave; stream in Perry County, Arkansiis, name<l for a French family, La Few, 

who lived at its m<»uth. 
Lafayette; counties in Arkansas and Florida; parish in I^uisiana; conntiee in Mis- 
sissippi and Missouri; mountain in New Hampshire; town in Yamhill County, 

()rej:on; county in Wi.s'onsin; and many towns and ^illages; named for Marquis 

de l^fayette, who ser\'ed in the American Army during the Revolutionary war. 



GANNETT.] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 179 

liaflin; l)oroiigh in Luzerne County, Pennsylvania, probably named for Laflin, of the 

firm of Laflin & Rand, powder manufacturers. 
I«afoiirche; parish in Louisiana, named for the Bayou La Fourche, which intersects 

it. The name is French, meaning ** the fork.'* 
li'A^les; stream in Bradley Ck)unty, Arkansas, corrupted from the French Vaigle, 

meaning '*the eagle.'' 
I«a Graciosa; town in Santa Barbara County, California. A Spanish phrase, mean- 
ing "the graceful." 

i; county in Indiana, and towns in Dutchess County, New York, and 
Lenoir County, North Carolina, named for the home of Lafayette, near Paris. 
le; stream in Arkansas; a French name meaning '* the crane." 
I«ag^una; station in Sonoma County, California. A S|)anish word meaning 'Hake." 
I«asru2iita; town in Inyo County, California. A Spanish word meaning 'Mittle 

lake." 
I«a Harpe; township and city in Hancock County, Illinois, named for Bemanl de 
la Harpe, who led an exploring party in the southern Mississippi Valley about 
1720. 
I«a Honda; town in San Mateo County, California. A Spanish term meaning '^ the 

sling." 
liaingsburg; village in Shiawassee County, Michigan, named for Doctor Laing, an 

early settler and founder of the village. 
I«aird8ville; village in Oneida County, New York, named for Samuel I^ird, an early 
settler. 

Junta; town in Otero County, Colorado, at the junction of two railroads; a 
Spanish name meaning "the junction" or ** the meeting." 
i; counties in California, Colorado, Florida, Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Min- 
nesota, Ohio, Oregon, South Dakota, and Tennessee. The name alone and with 
various suffixes is borne by more than two hundred cities, towns, and villages, 
being generally used descriptively. 

i; city in Columbia County, Florida, so named on account of its location near 
ten lakes. 

Ann; village and lake in Benzie County, Michigan, named for the wife of the 
first settler, A. P. Wheelock. 
I«ake Charles; town and lake in Calcasieu Parisli, Louisiana, named for Charles 
Salleir, the first settler on the shores of the lake. 
City; city in Calhoun County, Iowa, name<l from a lake near by. 
Forest; city in Lake County, Illinois, name<i from its location. 
Geneva; city in Walworth County, Wisconsin, so nameti because of the resem- 
blance in its geographical situation to Geneva, New York. 

Helen; village in Volusia County, Florida, named for the (laughter of its 
founder, H. A. De Land. 
Linden; village in Houghton County, Micliigan, named for un early settler. 
Mills; town and village in Jefferson County, Wisconsin, so name<l because 
situated on Rock Lake, which is the source of power for saw and grist mills. 

Odessa; township and village in Ionia County, Michigan, nameil from the 
city in Russia. 

of the Woods; lake in Minnes<jta. Originally called Inc des hois by the 
French, " lake of the woo<ls," because of the heavily woodeil islands in the lake. 
JjskeviUe; village in the town of Salisbur>', Connecticut, near and overlooking Lake 

Wononscopomus, whence the name. 
Jjskeville; town in Plymouth County, Massachusetts, so named l)e(!au8e a great i)or- 
tion of the township is occupied by a chain of lakes. 
l; dty in Kearny County, Kansas, named for David L. Lakin, of Topeka. 



180 PLA(^K NAMKS IN THE UNITED STATES. [BrLuii\ 

Ijamanda; town in Ji<>s Aii^olt'H County, California. A Spanifi^h name meaning '*the 

Lamar; crmnty in Ala])ania, towni^ in Prowers County , Colorado, and Benton County 

Missis'^ippi, city in Barton County, Miflsouri, and river in Yellowstone Park, 

Wyonjinj?, naniiKl for L. C^. C. Lamar, Secretary of the Interior. 
Lamar; town in Darlin^on County, South Carolina, named for a resident family. 
Lamar; c^)unty in Texan, named for Mirabeau B. Lamar, a prominent Texas gtates^ 

man. 
Lamartine; town in Fonddu LacCounty, Wisconsin, named forthe French historian. 
Lamb; c(^>unty in Texas, named for Lieutenant Lamb. 
Lambertville; city in Hunterdon County, New Jersey, named for John Lambert, 

an early settler. 
La Mesa; town in San Diego County, California. A Spanish phrase meaning '*tbe 

j)lain." 
La Mirada; town in 1^)8 Angeles County, California. A Spanish name meaiiing 

'* the transient vi**w." 
La Moille; township an<l village in Bureau County, Illinois, named from Lamoille 

Valley in Vermont. 
Lamoille; county and river in Vermont; the name is probably a mistaken rendition 

of I^i Mouette, the name originally given the river by Champlain. 
Lamoine; town in Hanco<*k County, Maine, named for an early French resident 
La Motte; island in I^ike Champlain, New York, named for Capt. Pierre Siearde 

la Motte, who hnilt a fort on the island. 
Lamoure; county in North Dakot^i, name<l for Hon. Judson Lamoure, an early settler 

an<l a i)rominent man in Territorial iKjlities. 
Lampasas; county, town in same county, and creek in Texas. A Spanish word 

meiining "water lily." 
Lampeter; village in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, named from the town in 

Wales. 
Lamy; village in Sant<^ Fe County, New Mexico, named for Archbishop Lamy. 
Lana; stn*am in Vermont, named for General Wool, United States Army, lam 

iH'ing \Aii\n for "wool." 
Lanark; city in Carroll Count v, lllinrus, namiMl from the town in Scotland. 
Lancaster; town in Los Angeles County, California, named from the city in 

Pennsylvania. 
Lancaster; city in (larnird County, Kentucky, nauieil from and laid out after the 

j)lan of I^incast<*r, Pennsylvania. 
Lancaster; counties in Nebraska, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, and Virginia, and 

22 cities, towns, and villagers; the name is transferred from the county in 

England. 
Landaff; town in (irafton County, New Hampshire, namtnl from the town in Walts. 
Landenberg; town in ChestiT (-onnty, Pennsylvania, named for Martin Landen- 

JHTger, a mill operator and large real estate owner. 
Lander; county in Nevada, named for < Jen. F. \V. Lander. 
Landisburg; borough in Perry County, Pennsylvania, named for James Landis, its 

founder. 
Landrum; t< )wn in Spartan) >urg ('ounty. South Carolina, nauied for a resident family. 
Lane; county in Kansas, named for James H. l^ine. Senator from that State. 
Lane; county in Oregon, name<l for Joseph I.ane, twice governor of the Territory. 
Lanesboro; town in Berkshin' County, Massachusetts, named for James Lane, Vis- 
count Lanes]>o rough. 
Lanesboro; 1)orough in Susijuehanna County, Pennsylvania, named for Martin Lane, 

an early settler. 



OANNCTT.] PLACK NAMES IN THE TTNIT?:D STATES. 181 



Ion; town in Sullivan County, New Hampshire, named for Governor John 
Langdon. 
Jjangford; mountain in Yellowstone Park, named for the first superintendent of the 
park, Nathaniel Pitt Langford. 

{JMUghonxe; >)oroqgh in Bucks County, Pennsylvania; 
I«ans:home Manor; borough in Bucks County, Pennsylvania. Named for Jere- 
miah I^nghonie, an early settler and prominent in State politics. 
lianglade; county in Wisconsin, nameil for the first white settler in the State. 
I/An^uille; stream and township in Arkansas. French words meaning ''the eel.'' 
I«anier; town in Bryan County, Georgia, named for Clement Lanier. 
T#aTiBiTigbnrg; town in Rensselaer County, New York, named for Abraham Lan- 
sing, its founder. 

Panza; town in San Luis Obispo County, California. A Spanish name meaning 

•'the belly.'' 

Patera; town in Santa Barbara County, California. A Spanish phrase meaning 

"the goblet." 

'; county, and city in same county, in Michigan. A corruption of the French 

lapirrrey meaning "the flint." 
I<apile; stream, and town in Union County, Arkansas. French words meaning 

"the pier." 

Pita; town in San Diego County, California. A Spanish name meaning "the 

agave " or " the aloe," a common desert plant. 

Plata; county in Colonwio, whi<rh contains the Sierra I^a Plata, and river in the 

same State. A Spanish name meaning "mountain of silver." 

Playa; village in Santa Bar))ara County, California. A Si)anish word meaning 

"shore" or "strand," and given to this village on account of its location on the 

Pacific coast. 
I<apompique; branch of the Aroostook Kiver, Maine. An Indian word meaning 

"rope stream." 
I<aporte; county in Indiana. A French name meaning "the door" or "the oi)en- 

ing" between two stretches of forest connecting two prairies. 
I<aporte; borough in Sullivan County, Pennsylvania, named for a French family 

who were large land owners. 
Preaa; town in San Diego County, California. A Spanish phrase meaning "the 

prize." 
Punta; town in San Diego County, California. A Spanish phrase meaning " the 

point" 
Xiapwai; town in Nez Perces County, Idaho. An Indian word meaning "place of 

division," or "boundary." 
Irfuramie; village in Shelby County, and river in Ohio, named for Peter I^aramie, a 

French Canadian trader. 
Iiaramie; county, and city an<l peak in Albany County, in Wyoming, and river in 

Colorado and Wyoming, name<l for Jacciues I^ramie, a French fur trader. 
lAredo; city in Webb County, Texaa, name<l from the seaport town in Spain. 
liaribee; town in Humboldt County, California, named for an early settler. 
Xiarimer; county in Colorado, named for (len. William Larimer, an early pioneer 

in Colorado and Nebraska. 
Larimore; township and city in (^rand Forks County, North Dakota, name<l for 

N. G. Larimore, a proprietor. 
Iiamed; dty in Pawnee County, Kansas, named for Gen. B. F. I^rned. 
Xia Roeha; town in San Diego County, California. From tlieSjianish la rocn^ mean- 
ing "the bluff." 
Xtarrabee; town in Cherokee County, Iowa, named for Governor William I^rral)ee. 
Xiama; ooonty in Kentucky, name<l for John La Rue, an early settler. 



182 PLACE NAMES IN THE ryiTKD STATES. l*^-^ 



La« A^ilac; tovin in San Benito County, Callfomim. A Spanich n^xne vniwwtz 

*• till* <'ajrl<*H." 
Las AK^iites; town in Sun I^nito County. CalifomuL A Sp«zii«h phrase mesniiK 

"Hm- miyts." 
Lftflallo; coiiiity, and city in naim^ crmnty. in lUinoiii: vilbMet* in NiagaftrB Coonty. Nev 

York, arnl <i»nnty in T4?xaH, naniiMl for Rene Robert Cavalier, Sieur •ie La>allt-. 
Lan Animas; connty, and town in Kent County, in Colorado. A <*ontnu-tiMn of the 

nami' ori^rinally ^iv<Mi the river by the SpanianL*, W rio tU Ifw nniufjjt jKnl'tof, 

"the rJMTof th(* loHt Honls/* l>ecanHe, traditionally, a Spanii^h re^nnient un its 

way to I'loriila wa>< lost in the river. 
Lfis CrucDs; t<*wn in Santa Barl)ar<i County, California. A Spanish phrase meanine 

"lh«* rroHH'H," a ti-rni fn*<|nently applieil to eenieteriee. 
LfiN Oalliniis; town in .Marin Ciuinty, California. A Spanish name meaning '*tbe 

hll.H." 

La«N(i<;kH: |»4>ak in IIiiinlK>ldt C'ounty, California, nameil for an Indian chieL 
LfiMM4iii; county aixl |H'ak in California, nanic^l for Peter Laapen, an early explnrer. 
Last ChancHi; mining town in IMaeer County, California, so nameil by minei^ who 

iiii'l Imjmi iiiifortnnat** in finding '^jwiy trravel.** 
LfiH Vn^aH; riiy in San Mi^iel County, New Mexico. A Spanish name meaning 

"ihr iil.'iin-." or "the nieadowH," and jriven this city on account of its situation 

in thi* inidnt of a fertile nieiultjw. 
Laifih, rniNity in Idaho, said Ity r>ne authority to be an Indian woni meaninf; 

" ;in ^■l•^'^-ion." 

Lfiirohe; l.ofnii'^di in Westmoreland Connty, PennpyUTinia, name<l for Benjamin H. 

l.atrolM', jr., a dif'tin^^niwhed enjrineer and architect. 
Lfiiiii; town in Marion Cmnity, Soiith Carolina, namc<l for a prominent family. 
Liiiiiinore; tnwn in ( 'h-veland Connty, North Carolina, named for a prominent 

I*' idiMll. 

Lfitty; villjit'e in PnnMiri)/ Connty, Ohio, name<i for the first settler, Judj?e A. S. 

I. Ill I y 
IwMifletrliLlo; rnnnty in Ala]»arna, (Mnnity, and town in same county, in Mississippi, 

ioid rnnntv \i\ i'einie^siM*, nanu'«l for Col. James Laudeniale. 
LiiuKhory; ri\«r and Inwn in Ohio Connty, Indiana, so name<l from the massaiTe 

• il (':i|.l;iMi Lan-'liery's eoin|)any ])y tlu* Indians. 
LiHU^hin^f KJMh Pond; point in Schoolcmft County, Michipran, so named from the 

lndi:ui nione, :l lininnj hnfihl, meaning? " lau^hinjT whito finh." 
Laurfi, vill;i}'«' in Kimit Connty, Ne])raska, nanitHl for tlie wife of the first settler, 

wlinr nsnnc \\',\> I'lslep nr Kntop. 
Liiund; rnnntv in Kentucky, and town in Jones County, Mississippi, so name«l on 

aeeonni «»l tin- dense lanrel thickets j;i(>win}; within their limits. 
LfiurenM, ronnly in Oenr;ji;i, nain(<l for Col. John I^nirens, of South Carolina, the 

{'•iiyaid nt' tiie Aini'iican licvolntion. 
LaurnnM; mnnty. :in<l town in Hnin*' connty, in South (^arolina, name<l for Col. Henry 

Lanren^' and lii>- son, Jnhn. 
LfiuMaiine; ^^lwn^^llip in Carhon County, Pennsylvania, named from the town in 

S\\ il/erliind. 
Lava; Hlalinn in S.in llernMnlino C«»unty, California, naine<l from the volcanic 

deponits that coviT tlu" Mohave desert in the vicinity. 
Lavaca; river, connty, and hay in Texas. A corruption of the name Us rachei, 

\!\\v\\ the river hy the S|>anish explorer, La Salle, on account of tbenumberof 

huffalo found there, hx nirha* nu'aninjj; "the cows." 
Lavallotte; city in Ocean County, Ni'W .h'rsey, named for a resident family. 
Lawrence; c(>nnti(*s in AIa]>aina, Arkansas, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Mississippii 

Miwouri, Oiiio, Pennsylvania, and Tennessee, and many other places, name<i for 



OANNKTT.J PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 183 

Capt. James Lawrence, of the battle with the British on Lake Erie in tlie war 

of 1812. 
I«awrance; creek in Humboldt County, California, named for an early settler. 
I«amrence; city in Douglas County, Kansas, named for Amos Lawrence, of Boston. 
I«awrence; city in Essex County, Massachusetts, named for Hon. Abbott Lawrence, 

of Boston. 
I«awrence: county in South Dakota, name<l for John Lawrence, a former member of 

State legislature. 
I«awrencebiirg; city in Dearborn County, Indiana, name<l for the wife of Captain 

Vance, whose maiden name was Lawrence. 

II«awrencebiirg; town in Lawrence County, Tennessee; 
I«awrenceville; town in Gwinnett County, Georgia, and city in Lawrence County, 
Illinois. Named for Capt. James Lawrence. 
I«aw8on; village in Clear Creek County, Colorado, named for Alexander I^wson, 

keeper of a wayside inn. 
I«awton; village in Van Buren County, Michigan, named for Nathaniel Lawton, who 

donated the right of way to the Michigan Central Railroad. 
Xead; city in Lawrence County, South Dakota; 
I<ead Hill; town in Davidson County, North Carolina; 

I<eadville; city in Lake County, Colorado. So named on account of the species of 
ore found within their limits. 
I^eadbetter; point in Shoalwater Bay, Washington, named for Lieutenant Lead- 
Ijetter, United States Army. 
I«eake; county in Mississippi; 
I^eakesviUe; town in Greene "County, Mississippi. Named for the Hon. Walter 

Leake, an early governor of the State. 
i^eaksville; village in Rockingham County, North Carolina, named for a prominent 

resident. 
I^eakton; village in Newton County, Georgia, named for the man who kept the 

village store in early times. 
lieavenworth; town in Crawford County, Indiana, named for the proprietors, 

S. M. and Z. Leavenworth, 
lieavenworth; county, and city in same county, in Kansas, named for Gen. Henry 

Leavenworth, for whom Fort Leavenworth is named. 
liObanon; city in Marion County, Kentucky, village in Warren County, Ohio, and 
town in Wilson County, Tennessee, so name<l becaiise of the abundance of cedar 
trees. A Semitic woni, meaning ** whitish.'* 
liebanon; county, and city in same county, in Pennsylvania. This name, either 
alone or with suffixes, is borne by many places in the Unite<l States, being trans- 
ferred from the mountain in Palestine. 
liObo; city in Coffey County, Kansas, named for an early settler. 
liOboeuf ; township in Erie County, Pennsylvania, named from the creek which was 
so named by the French on account of tlie number of buffalo found upon its 
banks. 
Zte Claire; town in Scott County, Iowa, name<l for Antoine Le Clair, the French 

founder of Davenport. 
I«ecompton; city in Douglas County, Kansas, named for Judge D. S. Lecompte, 

chief justice of the Territory. 
lioconte; mountain in Tennessee, nameti for Joseph IxHionte, a geologist. 
Iiedyard; town in New London County, Connecticut, nanie<l for Col. William I^- 

yard, of the State militia. 
I«edyard; town in Cayuga County, New York, namoil for Benjuniin IxHlyard, agent 
for the disposal of the lands of the miliUiry tract. 



[Eru. ». 



1^4 I'l.ArK NAMK? IX THE TXITED 8TATKS. 

Lee: ronnti^ in Alal«„.a. Arkan«i.=. FK.ri.U. Kentacky. Miammppi, South (an, 
l.r.a ai,.l T.-xa-. na.n-l i.,r k.,l*rt K. Lee. comnumder of the anniw of the 

Lee: rouiitiH^ in *,*^,nria an-l Illinois, named for Gen. Richard Henr\- Lee of the 

H<-v'/luiiori. 

Lee: towri- in li*rkrhire County. Masaaihnsette. and Oneida County, New York, 
narjiwl fur <i*'U, (']ijirU'< Ia-v. «»f M&^sachuwtte. 

Lee; county in Ir;wa, nainf-*! fur a inemljer of the New York land company \Jbanv 
N«w York. *—"-• - 

Lee; county in Vir.fiijia. named f«.r Henry I^ee, a former governor of the State. 
Leechburg; U^rou^di in Annstrong County. Pennsylvania, named for Da\nd Leech. 
Leech Lake; lak«- in Minnes^»ta. A tran.«lation of the Indian name, which luetitf 
"j»la^'<* of iwH'|)i-«." 

Leeds; town in IIatni»«hin* County, MaAsachusettf^ and 15 other places h»ear the 

nam** of the niannfar:turin*r town in Yorkshire, England. 
Leelanau; rounty in Michijran. An Indian word, meaning "delight of life." 
jLeesburg; town in I/»ii«loim County, Viorinia; 
iLeesville; t/.wn in I^-xinjrton County, S»uth Carolina. Named for the I.«efaniih', 

of \ ir;rinia. 
Leflore; rounty in MiH.«is>ifi|»i, nanu^l f«»r (ireenwooil I.ieflore. 
Left Hand; <r4<'k iti BouMor County, Colorado, nameil for a chief of the Aramho 

Iii'lians, Htill liviuL' in VM\4. 
Lehi; <ity in I'tah Ci»unty, I'tali, nanip<l for a character in the book of Monnon. 
Lehigh; town in Cliortaw .Vati<»n, I lulian Territory. A coal mining district narnt=»l 

from tln-ronnty in I'cnnsylvania. 
Lehigh; riv<'ran«l coutity in IN'unsylvania; 
Lehighton; Ixirouirli in Carlxin County, I'rnnpylvania. Named by the Delawan^ 

Indian", hrjunnnkinh, "when; there arc fork.**," of which the present name isa 

rorruption. 
LeiceMter; town in \Von-cst«T County, Mas«ichnsetti«, named for Robert Dudley, 

I'!arl of \A-\i'i'y\t'v. 
L«ji(r«Ht«jr; town in Livinjrston County, N<*w York, named for Leicester Phelps, scin 

of ,\w\\H' <)liv<T I'ln-lps, 
Leidy; njountjiinn in Ctah and Wyoming, name<i for the paleontologist^ Joseph 

I^'idy. 
Leigh; township in I'rincc K<lwanl and Amelia counties, VMi^nia, named for the 

I^•i^'ll family of V'iri:ini:i. 
Leigh; lak<' in Yellowstone Park, namc<l for Rii^hard I-^igh, ** Beaver Dick," hunter 

and j/iii<le in the'I'eton Mountainn. 
LoipBic; villa^M's in Kent County, Delaware, and Putnam County, Ohio, named fnmi 

tin- eit V in Saxon v. 
LeitchlUdd; town in (Jrayson County, Kentucky, named for Maj. David Leitch. 
Lfdimd; villatre in hi Salle County, Illinois, nanuMl for Fxlwin S. Iceland. 
Lo Mhfh; eity in Plymouth County, Iowa. The name is comi>osed of the initials of 

(lie ladies who accompanied its founder on his first visit to the spot. 
Lemhi; county in hlaho, nanuMi from Fort I^'udii, which was erected by the Mor- 

moiiH for prote<tion a^'aiust the Indians. The name is taken from the Book of 

Mormon, meaning "land.*' 
Lomon; town in Los A nvrdes County, California, named from the lemon on»hards 

in (lie district. 
Luniont; township and villaj^'c in Cook Comity, Illinois, name<] from its elevatetl 

Iocati«»n. 
Lonii; town in Stephenson County, Illinois, named from the Plain of Lena in tlie 

iHM'iii of Fin^al by Ossian. 



GANNBTT.] PLACK NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 185 

lienape; villages in Leavenworth County, Kansas, and Chester County Pennsylva- 
nia. The name is the proper name of the Delaware Indians, and means '^ origi- 
nal people," or "first people." 

liOnawee; county in Michigan. The Shawnee Indian word for "Indian." 

lienoir; county, and town in Caldwell County, in North Carolina, named for Gen. 
William Lenoir, a Revolutionary officer. 

lienora; city in Norton County, Kansas, named for Mrs. Leonora Hauser. 

I^enox; town in Berkshire County, Massachusetts, the family name of the Duke of 
Richmond, who was secretary of state at the time. 

lieozninster; town in Worcester County, Massachusetts, named from the town in 
Hertfordshire, England. 

I«eon; county in Florida, and city in Butler County, Kansas, named for Ponce de 
Leon. 

I«eon; county Jn Texas, named for Alonzo de Leon, a Spanish captain and builder 
of missions in Texas. 

I<eonard; village in Oakland County, Michigan, named for Leonard Rowland. 

Iteonardville; city in Riley County, Kansas, named for Leonard T. Smith, an officer 
of the Kansas Central Railroad. 

I«eonard Wood; county in New Mexico, named for Maj. Gen. I..eonard Wood, 
United States Army. 

I«eopold; town in Perry County, Indiana, named for I..eopold, King of the Belgians. 

I<eoti, city in Wichita County, Kansas, named for a white girl captured by the 
Indians, the name meaning "prairie flower." 

I<e Bay; town in Jefferson County, New York, named for Mr. Le Ray Chaumont. 

liO Baysville; borough in Bradford County, Pennsylvania, named for Vincent I^e 
Ray, the son of a large landowner. 

I<erdo; town in Kern County, California. A Spanish word meaning "slow" or 
"dull." 

I<e Roy; town in Osceola County, Michigan, named for an Indian chief who lived 
near the town. 

lioroy; town in Genesee County, New York, named for Herman Le Roy, a large 
proprietor. 

I«e8 Chdneauz; strait in Mackinaw County, Michigan. A French phrase meaning 
" the little oaks." 

Ijeslie; county in Kentucky, named for Governor Preston H. Leslie. 

Iieaueur; .county, and borough in same county, in Minnesota, name<l for Pierre 
Charles Le Sueur, an explorer, who was on the upper Mississippi River, 1683- 
1701. 

liOtcher; county in Kentucky, named for Robert P. I^tcher, former governor of the 
State. 

Iietitz; borough in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, name<l by the Moravian foun- 
ders from the barony in Bohemia. 

lieverett; town in Franklin County, Massachusetts, name<l for Sir John Leverett, 
colonial governor. 

I«evy; county in Florida, named for a prominent politician. 

liowiedale; town in Lexington County, South Carolina, named for a member of a 
prominent resident family. 
is; creek in Colorado, named for a pioneer ranch owner. 

\; comities in Kentucky, Missouri, Tennessee, and Wai»hington, named for Meri- 
wether Lewis, 
is; county in New York, named for Morgan I^wis, former governor of the State. 

IfCwis; county in West Virginia, named for Col. Charles Lewis. 

is and Olark; county in Montana, and river in Clatsop County, Oregon, 
named for Oapt. Meriwether Lewis and Capt William Clark, of the Lewis and 
OaA expedition. 



186 PLACK NAMK8 IN THE UNITED STATES. [PULL.23^ 

Lewisberry; ])oroujjh in York County, PennHylvania, named for the LeviB family, 

of which Dr. Ellis lie win whh a member. 
Lewisboro; town in WeHtchester County, New York, named for John Lewij>, a 

pruminent rc»8i(lent. 
Lewisburg; town in (iret^nhrier County, WeHt Virf^ia, named for Ramnel Lewis. 
Lewis Fork; southern branch of Columbia Kiver, in Idaho, named for Meriwether 

I/CWiH. 

Lewiston; townyliip in Trinity County, California, name<l from the city in Maine. 
Lewiston; city in Nez Perce County, Idaho, named for Meriwether Ix^wip, of the 

U^wirt and Clark exi»e<lition. 
Lewiston; city in Androsco^r^n County, Maine, named for the founders, the Lewb 

faniilii^. 
Lewiston; village in Niagara County, New York, name<l for Moi>i^n Lewis, former 

governor of the State. 
Lewiston; town in iVrtie County, North Carolina, named for a prominent re*«ident 
Lewistown; township and city in Fulton Cotmty, Illinois, named for Lewis Row, 

son of the founder. 
Lewistown; town in Ix)gnn County, Ohio, name<l for Capt. John Lewis, a noted 

Sliawmn* chief. 
Lexington; town in Mid<llesex County, Massachusetts, named from the parish of 

f^^xington, Kngland. 
Lexing^ton; county in South Carolina, and twenty-seven other places, most of them 

having U'en named in connnemoration of the Revolutionary battle. 
Leyden; towns in Franklin County, Massachus(>tts, and Lewis County, New Yoik, 

named from the tr>wn in the Netherlands, the refuge of the Pilgrim Fathen 

prior to their emigration to America. 
Liberal; cities in Sewanl County, Kansas, and Barton County, Missouri, so named 

to charac^terize the ideas of the jHHjple. 
Liberty; (-(ninties in Florida and (Jeorgia, city in Montgomery County, Kansas, and 

county in Texas, nann»<l from the sentiment of the American people. 
Liberty Center; vilUige in Wells County, Indiana, so named because it is located 

in the center of Lil)erty Township. 
Licking; county in Ohio, so name<l l)ecaus<> the deer and elk found the saline 

deposits of the Licking River a favorite fc.H'ding ground. 
Ligonier; city in Nol)le County, In<Hana, nanuH.! fnmi the borough in Pennsylvania. 
Ligonier; l)<»rough in Westmoreland Coimty, Pennsylvania, named for Sir John 

Ligonier, Lonl Viscount of Knniskillen. 
Lilesville; town in Anson County, North ("arolina, named for a menrhant of the 

plac(». 
Lilling^on; town in Harnett County, and village in Pender County, North Carolina, 

named for Col. .John A. Lillington, of the Revolution. 
Lily; l»ay and township in Piscata(|uis County, Maine, so named on account of the 

luxuriant growth r»f lilies. 
Lime; lake in Cat t a ningus County, New York, a tn\nslation of the Indian name, 

ft'ranKumndo, mea<ling 'Mime lake.** 
Limerick; village in Bureau County, Illinois, name<l for Geoi^ Limerick, an early 

st»ttler. 
Limerick; t«)wn in York County, Maine, and township in Montgomery County, 

Pennsylvania, named from Limeri»'k in Ireland. 
Limesprings; town in Ilowanl County, Iowa, so name<l from the springs in the 

rocks. 
Limestone; county in Alabuma, village in Cattaraugus County, New York, and 

county in Texa.«, so named Iwcause of the nature of the rock found within their 

limits. 



GANNETT] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 187 

lancklaen; town in Chenango County, New York, nameil for John Linekla*»n, an 
early proprietor of the* townnhip. 

liincoln; county in Arkansas; county and mountain in Colorado; counties in Idaho 
and Knnpaf^; parish in Louisiana; counties in Minnesota and Mississippi; county, 
and city in Lau(raster County, Nebraska; county in Nevada; mountain in New 
Hampshire; counties in New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Oregon; town in l*rovi- 
dence County, Rhmle Island; and counties in South Dakota, Washington, West 
Virginia, and Wist'onsin; namiHl for President Abraham Lincoln. 

lancoln; counties in (leorgia, Kentucky, Missouri, North Carolina, and Tennessee, 
named for Gen. Benjamin Lincoln, an otlicer of the Revoluti(m. 

lancoln; town in Middlesex County, Massachusetts, named for the ninth Earl of 
Lincoln. 

lancoln; county in Maine, named from Lincolnshire, England. 

lancoln; town in Penol)scot County, Maine, name<l for (iovernor Enoch Lincoln. 

Ilancolnton; towns in Lincoln County, (ieorgia, and Lin<»oln County, North 
Carolina; 
lancolnviUe; town in Waldo County, Maine. Name<l for Gen. Benjamin Lincoln, 
an officer of the Revolution. 
lancolnville; town in Berkeley County, South Carolina, nameil for President Abra- 
ham Lincoln, 
landa Rosa; towns in San Diego and Uiversi<le counties, California, in the flower 

districts. A Spanish phnise, meaning *' pretty rose.** 
landa Vista; township in San Diego County, California. A S(>anish phrase, mean- 
ing *' beautiful view.'* 
landley; town in Steulwn County, New York, named for Col. Eleazar Lindley. 
landsay; creek iu IIumlx)l<lt County, California, name<l for an early settler. 
landsborg; city in McPherson County, Kansas, so named because the first syllable 
of the namesof many of the early settlers was " linds,** the *'lK)rg** being added, 
which in Swedish means ** castle.'* 
lane Port; town in Stewart County, Tennessee, so named bei'ause it is situate<i 
on the Cumberland River and on the line l)etween the States of Kentucky and 
Tennessee. 
lann; mountain in California; counties in Iowa and Kansas; county, and villager in 



Osage County, Missouri, and county in Oregon ; 
lanneus; city in Linn County, Missouri. Nameil for Hon. Lewis F. Linn, United 

States Senator from Missouri. 
lanton; city in Greene County, Indiana, name<l for a resident of Terre Haute. 
lanwood; city in Leavenwortli County, Kansas, and village in Butler County, 

Nebraska, so namc*d on account of the a])im(lance of linden trees. 
lapscomb; county in Te^as, nameil for Abner iJpscomb, a prominent early resi- 
dent, and associate justice of the supreme court. 
Xiisbon; town in St. Lawrence County, New York, and 21 other towns and villages 

bear the name of the city in Portugal. 
liisbon; city in Ransom County, North Dakota, nanunl from the town in New York. 
liisle; towns in Dupage County, Illinois, and Broonie County, New York, named 

from the city in France. 
latchfield; county in Connecticut and town in Herkimer County, New York, nameil 

from the city in England. 
latchfield; city in Montgomery County, Illinois, named for K. B. Litchfield, one of 

its foanders. 
liititz; borough in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, nameil from the barony of 

Lititz in Bohemia. 
Uttle; village in Holt County, Nebraska, named for L. B. Little. 



188 PLACE NAMES IN THE ITNITED STATES. [bplljSS. 

Little Beaver; stroain on the bounc1ar>' 1)etween Pennsylvania and Ohio; traa^la- 

lion of the Delaware Indian name, Uingawochke. 
Little Ferry; 1>of(jii^)i in Rergeu County, New Jersey, so named on account of the 

ferry at Overi>«*k Cn»ek. 
Little Mountain; town in New)>erry County, South Carolina, so named liecaoseit 

w Hituateil near Little Mountain. 
Little Biver; county in Arkansafi, named from the river which forms itn northern 

!x)undary. 
Little Rock; city in Pulaski County, Arkansas, so named becanse it is built upon a 

lied of rock. 
Little Sioux; river in Iowa. A translation of the name originally given it by the 

Fn*nch, jtetite riri^re des Siotir. 
Little Tabeau; river in MiKsouri; the name is a corruption of the original Frenrh 

name, ttrre f^'uu^ **lK?antifnl land." 
Littleton; town in Arapalioe County, Colorado, named for Richard S. Little. 
Littleton; town in Middlesex County, Massachusetts, named for Geoi^ge Littleton, 

a niendMT of the British Parliament. 
Littleton; town in (irafton County, New Hampshire, named for Col. Moses Little. 
Live Oak; county in Tex:ut, namtKl from the abundance of this species of oak. 
Livermore; t4^>wn in AlanuMla County, California, named for a pioneer settler who 

owneil the jrn-ater part of the valley. 
Livermore; town in .Vndrow'ojjjrin County, Maine, named for Deacon Elijah Liver- 
more, an early nettler. 
Livermore; town in (irafton County, New Ilampsliire, named for a prominent re?- 

ident faniilv. 
Liverpool; village in ()non<la«ra 0)unty, New York, and township in Medina 

C^ninty, Ohio, and neven other towns and villages, named from the city in 

England. 
Livingston; counties in Illinois, Michigan, and Missouri, named for Edward Living- 

Hton, He<Tetary of state un<ler I*re«ident Jackson. 
Livingston; county in Kentucky, parish in Louisiana, and county in New York, 

named for RoU^rt R. Livingston, a prominent |X)litician. 
Livingston; city in Park County, Montana, named for Crawford Livingston, one 

of the proprietors of the town site. 
Livingston; t^iwn in ()rangel)urg County, South Carolina, named for a prominent 

resident familv. 
Livonia; townships in Wayne County, Michigan, and Livingston Gonnty, New York, 

naFne<l from a province of Russia. 
Lizard; river in Iowa; the name is a translation of the Indian name, watnaia- 

jiOinjHih^ '* river with lizanls.** 
Llagas; iK>st-otIi(!e in Santa Clani (/ounty, California. A Spanish name meaning 

"wounds," a term fre<juently applie<l to the crucifixion. 
Llano; t4)wns in I^os Angeh^s and Sonoma counties, California, named from their 

lociition on level ground. A Si)anish word meaning "plain." 
Llano; county an<l river in Texas, so calliKl Ixrause of the level character of the 

land. 
Llano Estacado; an elevate<l plateau in northwest Texas and New Mexico; Span- 
ish words meaning "stake<l i)lain," applic^l to this )>lateau on account of the 

stake-like boles of the yucca plant which grows there. 
Loachapoka; town in Macon County, Alalmma. An Indian word meaning "here 

terrapins are kilknl." 
Locke; town in Cayuga County, New York, name<l for the philosopher, John Locke. 
Lock Haven; city in Clinton County, Pennsylvania, so named because of the two 

locks au<l a safe harbor near it. 



CiNxsTTj PLACK NAMK« IN THE rNITKD STATES. 

Iiockport; hiwoship and villatie in Will Oiitnty, IlIinoiK, iiuni-d liir ita location at 

tlie prind|«1 locks of the Illinois and Michigan canal. 
IiOclcport; village Iii I^ourche I'arieh, Louisiana, so nameii bet^uae it wat! 

favorite Iyin);-iip (ilao'e for the river 1>oats. 
Lockport; city in Niamra County, New York, so named for theduulile tier oF locks 

at tliia point. 
IiOda; township and viliage in Iroquois C!)ounty, Illinois, nametl from Ucwiiin's poeju, 

Cttth-Iyxla. 
Ziodi; Ixirough and township in Bergen CViunty, New Jereey, t«wn in Colambis 

County, Wisi'onain, and several other places, named from the city in Italy. 
IiO^ftn; mountain In Arizona and counties in Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, North 

Dakrita, and Oklahoma, naini'd for Gen. John A. I»gan. 
Iiopan; ci>unty in Arkaneai^, named for James I>tti^n, u pioneer settler. 
XiOgan; county in Illinois, named forjudge Samuel T. Lc^an, for several years a law 

partner of Abraham Lincoln. 
ZiOpaa; counties in Kentucky and Ohio, named for Gen. Benjamin Loie^an, a pioneer. 
IiOgau; creek in Nebraska, village in Hocking County, Ohio, and city in Cache 

County, Utah, named for Logan Fontanelle, a friendly Indian chief. 
XjOEBII: county in We«t Virginia, named for Logan, an Indian chief of the Mingo 

tribe. 
IfOg'ansport; city in Can County, Indiaua, named for Captain Lo)(an, a Shawnee 

Indian ''hicf, nephew of Teeumseh. 
Loleta; (own in Humlxildt County, California. The Mexican cr>ltoi)uial term for 

" Mary of ttie Sorrows." Another anthorily slalea it is of Indian firigin, mean- 
ing "pleasant place." 
IiOlo; town in Missoula Criunty, Montana, meanini;. in the Nez I'erci^ language, 

"muddy water." 
Iioma londa; town in San Bernardino County, Califonila. A Spanish phroiu! mean- 
ing " boundary hill," marking a comer in the old Spanish land grant. 
IiOnaconing'; village in All^;any County, Maryland. A Delaware Indian wonl 

nii'aning "where many waters meet." 
Lotus Prieta; village in Santa Cruz Coonty, California. A Spanish [ihrase mean- 

ing " dark-coloreil hillock." 
Iioma Vieta; town in Los Angeles County, California. A i^panish phrase meaning 

"vii'u irom a hill in the midst of a plain." 
IiombardTille; village in St«rk County, IliinoiB, named for the Lombard family, 

itji founders, and part owners of the site. 
XaOmitas; town in Napa County, California. A descripljve S])aiiiah name meaning 

"link- hills." 

Iiondon: villo^ in Madison County, Ohio, and ten other places, tieing directly or 
indirectly named from tlie city in England. 

IiOndonderry; Idwhb in Kucklngham County, New Hampshire, and Windham 
County, Vermont, 8<) named in compliment to Rev. Matthew Gork, who dis- 
tinguished himself in the defense of Londonderry. Ireland. 

IioaaBock; villa^ in Richland C<iunty, Wisconsin, so named on account of the 
reniarknble mound of sandstone situated near the town. 

IiOne Tree; town in Johnson County, Iowa, named for a single tree which stands in 
the pmirie. 

Iitmg Branch; celebrated watering place in Sew Jersey, taking its name from a 
hrani h of South Shrewsbury River. 

Iiong Island; island on the Atlantic coast, part of the State of New York. An 
.\nglii.'ization of the Dutch name. Lange Eylnndl. 

IfODEmeadow; town in Hampden Couniy, MasaAohusetts, so named on account of 
i ■ the presence of a long meadow within the township. 




190 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [BrLi.2«L 

liOn^mont; town in lioiilder County, Colorado. A combination of the nanieof the 

(liscovenT of I^>n^ Peak and the French montj "mountain.*' 
liOngton; city in Elk County, Kannas, named from the town in England. 
Long«; i>eiik in Colonido, nanicMl for Capt. Stephen D. Long. 
Long Tom; stream in the Willamette Valley; the name is a corruption of the Indian 

word, luiuj-tiim-ler. 
liOngview; town in (ireirj^ County, Texaw, so named because of the extensive vii-w 

afforde<l by a hill. 
liOnoke; county in Arkan^sas. Said V)y one authority to bean Indian word nu^an- 

in^ ''the people," hut a<'cordinj|: to another authority it was so named onaco>unt 

of the presence of a lone oak tree which stood near its present site. 
Lonsdale; villa^t* in Providence County, Rho<ie Island, named from the divipion in 

Knj^land. 
Lookout; town in MihIoc County, California, so named from the extensive view. 
Lookout; ca|>es in North Carolina and Or(*g(m, so named because of the dangen^of 

navipition at th»*se j>oinbJ. 
Lookout; mountain in Tenne«HH', so named on account of the extensive prosspect 

from its summit. 
Loose; creek in Osiijre County, Missouri. Corrupted from VOurs. 
Lorain; county in Ohio, nanuMl from i>oraine in France. 
Lordstown; township in Trumbull County, Ohio, named for a Lord family of tlie 

State. 
Loretto; U^rou^jh in Cambria County, Pennsylvania, named from the city in Italy. 
Los Alamos; town in Kern C(^)unty, California. A Spanish name meaning **tbe 

poplars." 
Los Alisos; town in l^)s Anjreh^s County, California. A Spanish phrase meaning 

"tlir aider trees," a descriptive name. 
Los Angeles; county, and city in the same county, in California. A Spanish name 

mcanin;^ "tlu^ angels." 
Los Banos; lualtli resort in Merced County, Califorina. A Spanish name meaning 

"tlie baths." 
Los Berros; town in San Luis ObisjM> County, California. From the Spanish mean- 
ing "till' water cresses." 
Los Gatos; city in Santa Clara County, C'alifornia. A Spanish name meaning "the 

cats," and doubtless applied to the city lx?cause of the presence of wild-catb in 

the country. 
Los Laureles; town in Monterey County, California. A Spanish name, descriptively 

applied, meaning "the laurels." 
Los Medanos; town in Contra CoBta County, California. A Spanish name meaning 

"the san<l dunes on the seashore." 
Los Nietos; township in Los Angeles Ojunty, California. A Spanish term meaning; 

"the grandchildren." 
Los Olivos; villa)j:e in Santa Har])ara County, California. A Spanish term meaning 

"tlieoliv(>s." 
Los Pinos; river in Col(»rado. A Spanish name meaning **the pines." 
Lost; riv<'r in Wiisbington County. Indiana, which for several miles is lost in a 

subterranean <'hannel. 
Lostant; village in Lasalle County, Illinois, named for the Countess of Lostant, 

wife of the French minister to tin* United States about 1860. 
Lost River; stream in Hardin County, We.'^t Virginia, which flows through a cave 

in a mountain and on the other side is known as the Caj)on River. 
Lett; town iu Falls County, Texas, named for a prominent citizen. 
Loudon; town in Merrimac County, New Hampshire, named for the Earl of 

Xx)udon. 



GANNETT.] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES: 191 

I«oudon; county in Tennessee, nanie<l from Fort Loudon. 

I«oudonville; village in Ashland County, Ohio, named for James Loudon Priest, 

one of the original surveyors. 
I^oudoun; county in V'irginia, named for the Earl of Loudon. 
I^ouisa; county in Iowa, named for Louisa Massey. 
ItfOuisa; county, and town in the same county, in Virginia, named for the daughter 

of George II. 
ItfOuisburg:; town in Franklin County, North Carolina, nameil for the fortress. 
I^ouisiana; State of the Union, named for Louis XIV of France. 
I^ouisiana; city in Pike County, Missouri, named from Louisiana Territory, of which 

it was a j)art when founde<l. 
I^ouisville; township and village in Clay County, Illinois, name<l for a family of 

settlers name<l Lewis, the change in orthography having been ma<le by mistake. 
I«ouisville; city in Pottawatomie Comity, Kansas, named for Louis Wilson, the son 

of the original preemptor of the town site. 
I«oui8ville; city in Jefferson County, Kentucky, named for Louis XVI of France. 
I^oiiisville; town in Winston County, Mississippi, name<l for Col. Louis Winston, a 

prominent early settler. 
liOup; county in Nebraska, named for the tribe of Pawnee Ix)ups. 
liOve; toyfn in De Soto County, Mississippi, named for Colonel I^ve. 
I^oveland; village in Larimer County, Colorado, named for Hon. W. A. H. I-*ove- 

land. 
ItfOvewell; mountain and pond in New Hampshire, named for Capt. John Lovewell, 

the hero of a fight with the Indians. 
Xaoviag; county in Texas, named for Oliver Ix)ving, an early pioneer. 
ItfOvin^ton; township and village in Moultrie County, Illinois, named for Andrew 

Love, the first postmaster. 
I«owell; military post in Arizona, named for Gen. C. R. I^owell. 
ItfOwell; town in Penobscot County, Maine, name<i for Lowell Hayden, the first 

person bom within its limits. 
ItfOwell; plantation in Franklin County, Maine, city in Middlesex County, Massa- 
chusetts, village in Kent County, Michigan, and town in Gaston County, North 

Carolina, named for Francis Calx)t Lowell, of Boston. 
I«ow Freight; stream in Clark County, Arkansas. The name is a corruption of the 

original French name, VemifroUf, meaning "the cold water." 
ItfOwndes; counties in Alabama, Georgia, and Mississippi, named for William Jones 

Lowndes, member of Congrt^ss from South Carolina. 
I«ownde8viIle; town in Abbeville County, South Carolina, named for the Lowndes 

family, prominent in that State. 
ItfOwville; town in I^wis County, New York, nameil for Nic^holas Low. 
liOyalhanna; stream and township in Westmoreland County, Peimsylvania. The 

name is a corruption of the Delaware Indian word laweel-hannay meaning 

** middle stream." 
I«oyal80ck; branch of the Sust^uehanna River, and township in Lycoming County, 

Pennsylvania. A corruption of the Delaware Indian, lairi-safjuik^ meaning 

"middle creek." 
I«oyd8ville; town in Belmot County, Ohio, name<l for a Welsh family. 
I«ubbock; county in Texas, named for Tom Lubl)ock, a colonel in the civil war. 
I«uca8; county, and town in same county, in Iowa, and county in Ohio, named for 

Robert Lucas, governor of Ohio and first governor of Iowa Territory. 
liuce; county in Michigan, named for Governor Cyrus G. Luce. 
I«uceme; town in Kern County, California, so named from the luxurious growths 

of alfalfa (lucerne) in the district. 



192 PLACE NAMK8 IN THE UNITED STATES. [bvll^s^. 

jliuceme; town in Coluinhiana (!)oiinty, Ohio; 

iLucemeville; villa^o in Knox County, Ohio. Named from the lake in Switzerland. 

liudington; city in Manon County, Michigan, named for Janiee Ludington, of 

Milwauktv. 
Ludlow; township an<l village in Champaign Coonty, Illinois, named for Thomaa 

\V. Ln«llow, a railroa<l incori)orator. 
Ludlow; town in Kenton County, Kentucky, named for Israel Ludlow, a prominent 

pioneer. 
Ludlow; town in HainjKlen County, Massachusetts, named from the town in Shrop- 
shire, Kiigland. 
Lugenberl; county in Soutli Dakota, uamcHl for Major Lugenberl, of the rejjular 

army, who was Htatione<l at Fort Randall in territorial days. 
Luling; town in Caldwell County, Texas, named for Charles Luling, of Boston, 

MjL«sachu.setts. 
Lumberton; town in I*earl River County, Mississippi, so named on accoimtof its 

princi|>al industry. 
Lumpkin; county, and town in Stewart County, in Georgia, named for Wils«on 

Luni|)kin, an (»arly jrovernor. 
Luna; county in New Mexico, named for a prominent resident family. 
Lunenburg; towns in WorcesttT County, Massachusetts, and Essex County, Ver- 
mont, named for the Duke of Luneburg, George II of England. 
Lunenburg; county in Virjrinia, named for the n>yal family. The Anglicized form 

of Lun<d)urjr, one of the titles of (k»orge I, as Duke of Bunswick-Lunebuig. 
Luray; town in l*a<:e County, Virginia, a i^orrujition of lareine. 
Lutesville; vilhi«^e in HoUinjrer County, Missouri, named for its founder, Eli Lute?. 
Luther; village in Lake County, Michigan, named for William A. Luther, an early 

si'ttlcr. 
Luthersburg; villaj^e in Clearfield County, Pennsylvania, named for W. H. Luther, 

an old resident. 
Luverne; township and village in Rock County, Minnesota, named for the daughter 

of one (»f the propriet^)rs of the tf)wn site. 
Luzerne; county, ami Ix^rough in same county, in Pennsylvania, nanie<l for Cheva- 
lier del la Luzerne, former minister from France to the United States. 
Lycoming; branch of Susipiehanna River, and county, and town in same county in 

Pennsylvania. A Delaware Imlian wonl meaning "sandy stream." 
Lyell; riKmnt^iin in California, named for the English geologist, Sir Charles Lyell. 
Lykens; hnrmi^di in l)auj)hin County, Pennsylvania; a corruption of the name of 

the man for whom it was named — Andrew Lyoan. 
Lyman; town in York (-ounty, Elaine, naminl for Theodore Lyman, of Boston. 
Lyman; town in (irafton County, New Hampshire, named for Daniel Lyman, one 

<»f tli(* early proprietors. 
Lyman; county in South Dakota, nanuMi for W. P. Lyman, legislator and soldier. 
Lyme; tnwns in New London County, Connecticut, Grafton County, New Hami>- 

shire, an<l Jefferson County, New York, named either directly or indirectly from 

the borough of Lynu>- Regis, England. 
Lynchburg; city in Camplu'll County, Virghiia, named for a rich settler and offifer 

of the Revolution. 
Lynchtown; township in Oxfonl County, Maine, name<i for the owner of Lj-nch*? 

mills. 
Lyndeboro; town in Hillshoro County, New llamj)8hire, named for Benjamin 

Lynd(», a large landowner, 
Lyndon; city in Osage County, Kansas, named from the town in Caledonia County, 

Vermont. 



fJANNFnr] PLACE NAMK8 IN THK UNITED STATES. 193 

Liyiidon; town in Caletlonia County; 
Ltyndon Center; village in Caknlonia County; 

Iljyiidonville; villaire in Caleilonia County, Vermont. Nametl for Ji»i<iah Lyndon, 
son of an t'urly proprietor. 
I«ynn; city in K^Hsex County, Massaehusettji, name<l for Lynn-Rejfi», England. 
I«yiin; county in Texa.«, named for G. W. Lynn, an early settler. 
I«yiinfield; town in Essex County, Massachusetts. It was originally the West 

Parish of Lynn and bore the name of Lynn End, and was incorporated in 1814 

as Lynn field. 
I«yiinville; U)wn in Jasper County, Iowa, so named on account of the proximity of 

a Iwu^swood gn)ve. 
Ijynxville; village in Crawfonl County, Wisconsin, named for the steamer Lt^jr, 

which brought the Government surveyors to the place. 
I«yon; counties in Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, and Nevada, name<l for Gen. Nathaniel 

lA'on. United States Arm v. 
I«yon; county in Kentucky, named for Col. Crittenden Lyon. 
LyoDs; city in Rice County, Kansas, nameil for Truman J. Lyon, the owner of the 

town site. 
I«yon8; village in Burt County, Nebraska, nametl for Waldo Lyon, an t^rly resident 
liyons; town in Wayne County, New York, named from the city in France. 
Ijyonsdale; village in Lewis County, New York, named for its first settler, Calen 

Lvon. 
liysander; town in Onondaga County, New York, nameil for the Spartan general. 
McAdenville; town in Gaston County, North Carolina, named for Hon. R. Y. 

McAden, s()eaker of the House of Representatives. 
McArthiir; village in Vinton County, Ohio, named for Gen. Duncan McArthur, an 

otticer in the Indian wars. 
McBride; village in Montcalm County, Michigan, named for an early settler. 
McClellandville; village in Newcastle County, Delaware, named for William 

MeClelland, an early settler. 
McColl; town in Marlboro County, South Carolina, named for D. D. McColl, a cajv- 

italist. 
McComb; town in Pike County, Mississippi, named for a former owner of the Mis- 
sissippi Central Railroad. 
McCozmellsbiirg:; Ijorough in Fulton County, Pennsylvania, named for its founder. 
McConnellstown; village in Huntingdon County, Pennsylvania, named for its 

founder. 
McConnelsville; village in Moiyan County, Ohio, named for Robert MtH>)nnel. 
McCook; city in Redwillow County, Nebraska, named for Gen. Alexamler McCook, 

of I.«avenworth, Kansas. 
McCook; county in South Dakota, named for Edwin S. McCook, of Ohio, distin- 
guished in the Civil war. 
McCool; town in Attala County, Mississippi, name<l for Hon. James F. Mc*Co<)l. 
McCracken; city in Rush County, Kansas, named for William McCracken, of New 

York City, an official of the Missouri Pacific Railway. 
McCracken; county in Kentucky, named for Capt. Virgil McCracken. 
McCulloch; county in Texas, named for Benjamin McCulloch, a brigadier-general 

in the Confederate army. 
McCune; city in Crawford County, Kansas, named for Isaac McCune, its founder. 
McDonald; county in Missouri, named for Sergeant McDonald, of South Carolina. 
McDonoufirb; village in Newcastle County, Delaware, town in Henry Counry, 

GeoTigia, county in Illinois, and town in Chenango County, New York, named 

Bull. 258—05 13 



for the Amerii'iiM tmviil nlfiwr ut lliu War •>! IS12, Cotiitriuddrc ThooM 

McDonouRh. 
lCcI}oweU: county in North CArolina. named for tht^ two t^nenilK, Jnivph mi 

CharleN McDnwell, of Revolutionary lame. 
HcBowell; town in Highland County, Vii^nia, anil iHinnly in Wivl Vir^nia.Hud 

tn have lieen named lor Jaiiieti Mi'Dowell, [orinf r gavernnr of Virjpiila. 
Kcl>uffia; county in <Jleorgift, named for George McDuffl», an uirljr jtovmMit ot 

8oiith CarcillnM. 
KcFarlftn; town in Anivin County, North Carolina, named for a prominent riliten. 
HcOrawville; villas in Allejcany County. Sew York, named in honor til a Ht. 

Mrtiraw. who ow ned fOdmderable property. 
HcOregor: i-lty in Clayton County, Iowa, named for an t«rly proprietor, Alesudcr 

KcHenryi county in Illinoic, named for lien. William MpHenry, a prominent offi- 
cer in the Black Hawk war. 

KcHenry; township and vJllutfe in McHenry County, Illinoif, named from the 
TOunty. 

HcHenrjr; fort near Baltimore, Maryland, naineil for Jain<t< Mcllenrj, srervbtrjii 
war under President* Waphinpton and AdamB. 

UcHemy; county in North Dakota, named for Hon. JamL>s McHenry, aii tmiij 

Hcllhaney: villain- in Munri>e Onintv. Penn^^vlvHnin, naniLMl for Tlioiiias ft 

McTlhaney. 
Hclntoali: county in (ieorKia, naiiiLHl for Ihi.- McInlo»li family, nienibeni o[ nhirli 

accompanied Oglethonie in his firpt expedition into the State. 
HcIntOBh; county in North Dakota, named for Hon. E. U. Mclnt(»h, a memhariri 

the Territorial leftif latnre. 
HcEean; county in Pennsylvania, name*! for Thoniaa McKean, an early p^vemor, 

and a Hgnerof the Declaration of Independence. 
HcEee; town in .lacknon Cuuuty, Kentucky, tianie<l for Jiid^ (ieni^ff R. MtrKm 
XcEeeaport; cily in Alli^heny County, Pennsylvania, namixl for Daviii AlrJiw, 

who kept a terry. 
KcKenzie; county in North fliikota, named for Ali-xnnder McKeazie, a ! 

politician. 
McEinlejr; county in New Mexico, name<l for Pnvident William McKinley. 
KcSinnefi city in Collin County, Texaia, named for Collin MeKinney, a pia 

tettler. 
■cLaurin; village in Perry Connty, Miwissippi, named for General Mi-Laiirin. lip* 

president of the Gulf and Ship IbIbikI Kailroad. 

inty in Illinois, named for John McLean, ITuited Stales Seuatiir, \Ki- 



L 



villas in Mclx<a:i County, llllnoi)*, natne<l from tlie oonnty. 
county in Kentucky, named lor Judge Aliiey McLean. 

XdLeui; county in North Dakota, nanied for Hon. John R. Mcl^^eaii, a promlnml 
State politician. 

KcIieaaaboTO; township and city in tlamiltiin County, Illinoia, nainod for Dr. Wil- 
liam McLean, the first aettler. 

Hcliennaii: county in Texa", named for Neil Mi-I#nnan. 

UcLeod; county in Minnesota, name<i for Hon. Martin Mcl^eod, prenidpnt of Ite 
State council. 

Kcliouthi city in Jetfervon C'ounty, Kansas, named [or thp owner of the town iv 

XcKeclieii; town in Marshall County, West Virtnnin, named for a forni«r reN(l«it 

KcUinsville: city in Ynmhill Connty, Oregon, nanied from the town in TeoneMK 
the native place of an early BCttler. 



GANNBiT.] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 195 

(MdCmn; county in Tennessee; 
McMinnville; town' in Warren County, TennoHsee. Named for Gen. Joseph 
McMinn, an early governor. 
McMullen; county in Texas, named for John McMullen, a colonizer of western 

Texas. 
McNairy; county in Tennessee, named for Judge John McNairy. 
McNeils; island in Washington, nameil for the captain of a steamer of the Hudson 

Bay Company. 
Mcpherson; county, and town in same county, in Kansas, and counties in Nehraska 

and South Dakota, named for Maj. (ien. James B. McPherson. 
Mabbettsville; village in Dutc'hess County, New York, named for James Mabbett, 
the former proprietor. 
Macedon; town in Wayne County, New York; 

Macedonia; village in Hamilton County, Illinois, township and town in Pottawat- 
tamie County, Iowa, and nine other places. The name is transferred from the 
ancient Macedonia of the Greeks. 
Machado; town in Los Angeles County, California. A Spanish word meaning 

•* hatchet.'^ 
Machhanna; the largest of the three streams which, united, form the liehigh River. 
A Delaware Indian word meaning **the largest stream." 

{Machias; river and town in Washington County, Maine; 
Machiasport; town in Washington County, Maine. From the Indian wonl 
machisaeSf ''had small falls.'' 
Machig^amic; river in northern Wisconsin, so called because it flows from the lake 

bearing the Indian name, mitchigamic, meaning *' large lake." 
Macintire; mountain in the Adirondacks, named for an iron si)eculator of the region. 
Mackinac; county, and town in same county, in Michigan. Derived from the Ojibwa 

Indian word michilimackinaCy meaning "b»land of the great turtle,'* or in other 

dialects, ''island of the giant fairies." 
Mackinaw; township and town in Tazewell County, Illinois. An Indian word 

meaning "turtle." See ^fackit^ac. 
Macksville; city in Stafford County, Kansas, name<l for George Mack, the first 

postmaster in the county. 
Maclenny; town in Baker County, Florida, naineil for H. C. I»IacClenny, its founder. 
Macomb; township and city in McDonough County, Illinois, county in Michigan, 

and town in St. Lawrence County, New York, named for Gen. Alexander 

Macomb of the War of 1812. 
Macon; county in Alabama; county, and city in Bibb County, in Georgia; county, 

and village in same county, in Illinois; city in NoxuV)ee County, Mississippi; 

county, and city in same cqunty, in Missouri; county, and city in Warren 

County, in North Carolina; and county in Tennessee; nameil for Gen. Nathaniel 

Macon, United States Senator from North Carolina, 181(>-1826. 
Macoupin; comity and creek in Illinois, so name<i by the Indians because the white 

potato, signified by the name, w^as found abundantly along the banks of the 

creek. 
Macnn^e; borough in Lehigh County, Pennsylvania. An Indian name meaning 

"the feeding place of bears." 
Madawaaka; branches of the St. John and Aroostook rivers in Maine, and town in 

Aroostook County. An Indian word meaning "porcupine place," or, "where 

one river enters another." 
Madden; creek in Humboldt County, California, named for Captain Madden. 
Madera; county, and town in same county, in California. A Spanish word meaning 

"lumber;" the county having been formed from a part of Fresno County after 



IIM) I»LA('K NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. fBiii^iV. 

file bniMin;; of \hv t4>\vn of Minlora, it was named from the town, which waf^a 

himlMT (vnler. 
Madison; coiinticH in A]al>ama, Arkansas, and Florida; county, and city in Morgan 

County, in ( Jcorj^ia; nmntics in Illinois, Indiana, and Iowa; township and city in 

<in'cnw(MMl County, Kansas; county in Kentucky; parish in I^nisiana; town in 

Somerset County, Maine; counties in Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, and 

Nehniska; town in Carrf>ll County, New Hampshire; countien in New York, 

Nortli Caroliua, Ohio, Tennessee, Texas, and Virjnnia; city in Dane County, 

Wisconsin; an<l iH»ak in the White Mountains; named for President Jamw 

Ma<lison. 
Madison; <ity in I^ike C-ounty, South Dakota, nameil from the city in Wisconsin, 

])eeaMse. of its j>roxirninity to several lakes. 
Madrone; town in Santa Clara County, California. From madrfffta, an ever>:reen 

tree of northern Cahfornia. 
Magalloway; river in New IIani[)8hire. An Indian worti meaning ** large tail." 
Magataukamde; lake in Minnesota. An Indian word meaning "swan lake.** 
Magnolia; town in Kent County, Delaware*, and twenty-five other towns and vil- 

lajres, Ix'in}; jreiK^rally named, directly or indirectly, for Dr. Pierre Magnol, for 

whom the spe«ies of ma«rnolia tree was named. 
Mag-offin; county in Kentucky, name<l for IVriah Magoffin, a fonner governor. 
Magothy; river in Maryhunl. An Indian word meaning ''small plain devoid of 

timber." 
Mahanoy; mountain and river tributary to the Susquehanna, Schuylkill C^junty, 

Pennyslvania; 
Mahanoy City; borouph in Scliuylkill County, Pennsylvania. From theDelawan* 
Indian innlnmi, *'a lick," a survival of the expression to <lescribe saline 
(lej)osits wln're deer con^n^jrate. 
Mahantango; branch of the Sus<iuehanna River, Pennsylvania. A Delaware Indian 

wonl meaning '" wbere we had plenty of meat Uy eat.** 
Mahaska; jonnty in Iowa, named for a chief of the lowas. 
Mahomet; villa«:e in Cliampaipi County, Illinois, named for the founder of the 

Mohammedan reli^;ion. 
Mahon; villa<:e in Marshall County, Mississippi, named for John Mahon. 
Mahoning; <-ounty and river in etistern Ohio. From the Delaware Indian wonl 

iii'thonin/:, meaning "there a lick," applied to many pla^^ea of saline dejKjsits. 
Mahtowa; town in (^uiton County, Minnesota, named from the Indian word meaii- 

in^jj "^'rass lands." 
Maiden Rock; villa^^' in Tierce County, Wisconsin, named for liie rock, famous in 

Indian iejjreiids, from which it is said an Indian maiden leai)ed to escape mar- 

ii:i«ji' u illi a warrior of another triln*. 
Maidstone; town in Kssex County, V(»rmont, namcnl from the town in Kent, 

Knjrland. 
Maine; State of the Cnion, said to be nanu^l for the private estate of Henrietta 

Maria, in Maine, a province of France; or, according to another authority, so 

calh-d lu'canse the lishermen of the islands along the coast refernnl to the main- 

larul as the ma in, and in some early documents it was 8j)elled Mmm. 
Makage; western tril)utary of the Minnesota River. From an Indian wortl, mahufi^ 

meanin«r "brown earth." 
Makanda; township and village in Jackson County, Illinois, named for an Indian 

chief. 
Makiapier; i»ond in New Jersey. An Indian word meaning "water of a reddish 

color." 
Malade; river and village in Oneida County, Idaho. A French word meaning 

"sick" or "infirm." 



GANNETT.) PLAOK NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 197 

Kalag^a; towns in Gloucester County, New Jersey, and Monroe County, Ohio, nameil 

from Malaga in Spain. 
Malcom; town in Poweshiek County, Iowa, named for an early Scotch settler. 
Maiden; city in Middlesex County, Massachusetts, name<l from the borough of 

Maldon in England. 
Malheur; river and county in Oregon. A French word meaning "misfortune." 
Malmaison; village in Pittsylvania County, Virginia, named for a chateau in France. 
Malta; towns in Saratoga County, New York, and Morgan County, Oliio, name<l 

from the island in the Mediterranean St»a. 
Malvern; town in Hot Spring County, Arkansas, named from Malvern Hill in 

Virginia. 

I Malvern; towns in Emanuel County, Georgia, and Carroll County, Ohio, mid 
bon^ugh in Chester County, Pennsylvania; 
Malvern Hill; watering place in Henrico County, Virginia. Named, <lirectly or 
indirectly, from the watering place in England. 

Mamajuda; island in the Detroit River, Michigan, name<l for an Indian squaw. 

Mamakating; town in Sullivan County, New York, named for an Indian chief. 

Mamaroneck; town in VVestcht^ster County, New York, named for an Indian vh'wf. 

Mammoth; cave in Kentucky, so named on account of its great size. 

Manada; stream in Dauphin County, Pennsylvania. An Indian word meaning 
** island." 

Manahan; stream in York County, Pennsylvania. An Indian word meaning 
"where liquor has been drunk." 

Manahawkin; town in Ocean County and creek in New Jersey. An Indian name 
meaning "good com land," and applie<l to this section on account of the pro- 
ductiveness of the land. 

Manalapan; river in New Jersey. An Indian word meaning "good bread" or 
**good country." 

Manan; islands on the coast of Maine. The Indian word for island. 

Manasquan; village in Monmouth County, New Jersey. An Indian woni, origin- 
ally wammiuan, meaning a "point" or "top." 

Manatawny; branch of the S<»huylkill River in Pennsylvania. Deprived from the 
Delaware Indian word nieiihalUinlnk^ "here we <lrank " (liquor). 

Manatee; county, town in same county, and river in Florida, so nanuHl l)e(rause the 
sea cow or manatee is foun<l on the coast. 

Manaticut; river in Massachusetts, named from the Indian, and probably meaning 
"place of observation." 

Manato-Kikewe; stream in Wisconsin. An Indian wonl meaning "stooping spirit 



river." 



Manayunk; substation of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. A Delaware Indian won! 

meaning " place where we drank." 
Mancebona; village in Antrim County, Michigan, nam(Ml for the youngest daughter 

of Perrig Andress, the first settler. 
Manchester; city in Delaware County, Iowa. From "Chcsterman," the nanu? of 

the original proprietor. 
Manchester; town in Essex County, Massachusetts; city in IIillsl>oro County, New 

Hampshire; village in Ontario County, New York, and town in Chesterlield 

County, Virginia; named from the city in P^ngland. 
Mandan; city in Morton County, North Dakota, named for the Indian trilx*. 
Mandarin; town in Duval County, Florida, so named l>ecause its (thief orange crop 

is of this species. 
Mandeville; town in St. Tammany ]*arish, Ix)uisiana, name<l for Mandeville de 

Marigny, a desctMidant of the French oliicer of the first coloniziition. 



198 PLAOK NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [BrLL.2&*. 

Manhasset; fnnncrly a village in Queenn County, New York, and now a part of 

Now York City. An Indian name meaning "at the little island. " 
Manhattan; an island in Now York. An Indian word variously said to refer to 

*' island " or "place of drunkenness.** 
Manheim; towns in Hfrkiiner County, New Y'ork, and Lancaster County, Pennsyl- 
vania, nauKMl from thv town in (iennanv. 
Manidowish; rivt*r in Wisconsin. An Indian won! meaning "evil spirit." 
Manistee; county, city in s;une county, and river in Michigan. An Indian word 

meaning "vcnnilion river." or, aceonling to other authoriticss, "lost river," or 

''island in the river." 
Manistique; township an<l villa^ in Schoolcraft County, Michigan. An Indian 

word with the same meaning? as Manistee. 
Manito; township and villajje in Mason County, Illinois; 
Manitou; town in El l*a-«o County, Coloratio, county in Michigan, and river in 

Wisconsin. An Algonquian In<lian term applied to any object of reverence, 

meaning literally "spirit." 
lllanitowoc; county, and city in same county, in Wisconsin. An Indian word 

nieaninjx "spirit land." 
Mankato; <iti(s in Jewell County, Kansas, and Blue Earth County, Minnesota. 

An Indian word nioanin;; "hule," or, niort* properly, "green earth.** 
Mankisitah-Wakpa; river in South Dakota, strongly impregnated with white slime; 

hence j^iven this name hy the Indians, it meaning "cloudy river.*' 
Manlius; town in Oik »nda^a County, New Y^'ork, named for a Roman general. 
Manly; villajre in Moore County, North Carolina, named for Governor Charles 

Manly. 
Manning; town in Carroll County, Iowa, nametl for a merchant of the place. 
Manning; town in Clarendon County, South Carolina, named for the Manning 

family, j>roniinent in South Carolina history. 
Mannsville; village in Jefferson County, New York, named for Col. H. B. Mann. 
Mannussing; island in Lon^ Island Sound. From an Indian wood, munnohmu 

nieaiiiiijr " island." 
Mansfield ; t« >wii in Holland Count v, Connecticut, named for Moses Mansfield, mavor 

of New Haven. 
Manslield; villa^'e in Piatt County, Illinois, named for Gen. John Mansfield, an 

ollirer in the civil war. 
Mansfield; town in IJristol County, Massiichusetts, namiHl for William Murray, Earl 

of Manslield. 
Mansfield; <ity in Hichlan<l Comity, Ohio, named for Col. Jared MansQcld, at one 

time surveyor-trmeral, I'n i ted Stat e.s. 
Mansfield; Utwn in Tio^'a County, Pennsylvania, nameil for Asa Mann, original 

owner of the land. 
Manson; town in Calhoun County, Iowa, named for a resident. 
Manteno; villa^'e in Kankakee (^junty, Illinois. Possi hi y a corruption of the Indian 

word inn n if (HI, meaning "s[>irit." 
Manteo; town in l>are County, North Carolina, named for an Indian chief of Roa- 
noke Island in ir)Sr>. 
Manton; vil!a»re in Michigan, named for the first white wittier, Geoi^ Manton. 
Mantua; towns in (Jloucester County, New Jersey, and Portage County, Ohio, 

named from the town in Itiily. 
Manuelito; station in McKiniey County, New Mexico, named for a former chief of 

the Navajos. A Spanish word meaning "little Manuel.** 
Manzana; town in I^)S Angeles (-ounty, California. A Spanish word meaning 

"apple." 



GANNETT.] PLACK NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 199 

XCanzanita; towns in Marin, San Diego, and Tehama connties, California, named 

from the extensive growths of manzanita brush. 
Kaple Forest; town in Crawford County, Michigan, so named because of* its beau- 
tiful forests of ma[>le trees. 
Maquon; town in Knox County, Illinois. This name was given William Penn by 

the Indians because in his treaty with them on the banks of the Delaware he 

useil a quill pen, this woni with them signifying **quiir' or ** feather.'* 
Marais; town in Orange County, Missouri. French word meaning ** swamp" or 

'* marsh." 
Marais des Cy^nes; river in Wabaunsee County, Kansas. A French phrase 

meaning '* swans* marsh.*' 
Marathon; town in Cortland County, New York, and county in Wisconsin, named 

from the battlefield in Greece. 
Marblehead; town in Essex County, Massachusetts, so named because of the i)or- 

phyry-colored rocrks along the shore. 
Marcellus; towns in Cass County, Michigan, and Onondaga County, New York, 

nameil for the illustrious Roman, M. Claadius Marcellus. 
Marcus Hook; borough in Delaware County, Pennsylvania, named for, but a cor- 
ruption of the name of, an Indian chief, Maarte, who lived in that section. 
'; town in Oneida County, and mountain, in New York, named for a former 

governor, William L. Marcy. 
i; island in San Pablo Bay, California, said to be so named on account of a wild 

mare which formerly inhabited the island. 
Marengo; county in Alabama, and cities in McHenry County, Illinois, and Iowa 

County, Iowa, named from the battlefield of Italy. 
Margraretsville; town in Northampton County, North Carolina, named for Mrs. 

Mai^ret Ridley. 
Margaretville; village in Delaware County, New York, named for the owner of the 

land, Margaret Lewis, the daughter of Governor Morgan I^wis. 
Marias; river in Montana, named for Miss Maria Wood. 

Mariaville; town in Hancock County, Maine, nameil for the daughter of Mr. Bing- 
ham, a large land owner. 
Mariaville; town in Schenectady County, New York, named for the daughter of 

James Duane. 
Maricopa; county in Arizona, and town in Kern County, California, named from 

an Indian tribe. 
Marie Saline, township in Ashley County, Arkansas. From the French, marais 

saline^ meaning "salt marsh.** 
Maries; county, and city in same county, in Missouri, named for the Big and Little 

Marios rivers, which name is of French origin. 
Marietta; city in Washington County, Ohio, nanuxl for Queen Marie Antoinette of 

France. 
Marietta; town in I^ncaster County, Pennsylvania, named for the wives of the two 

proprietors. 
Maiilla; town in Erie County, New York, named for Mrs. Manila Rogers, of Alden. 
Marin; county in California, named for the ceiebrate<l chief of the Lecatnit, or 

Likatuit, tribe. 
Marine; village in Ma<iison County, Illinois, so named because settled by several 

sea captains from the east. 
Marine; village in Washington County, Minnesota, named for the Marine Lumber 

Company of Delaware and Vermont, which settled the village. 
Marine Oity; city in St. Clair County, Michigan, so named because of its location 

on the St. Clair River. 



200 1»LACR NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. tBiLL.i.s^ 

Marinette; county in Wijaoonsin, named for the daughter of an Indian chief, Mari- 
nette Jiu-obH, the name heing a composite of the names Marie and Antoinette. 
Marion; counties in Alabama and Arkansas; fort in Hamilton County, Floriiia; 

countiehi in (n^irgia, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Mississippi, Mi^ 

Honri, Ohio, an<l Oregon; county, and town in Marion County, in South Carolina: 

and conntieH in Tennesst^e, Texas, and West Virginia; 
Marionville; city in I^wrence County, Missouri. Named for Gen. Francis Marion. 
Mariposa; river, county, and town in same county in California, named for a flower 

which grows abundantly there. A Spanish word, meaning "butterfly.'* 
Markleville; t4)wn in Madison County, Indiana, named for John Markle, who laid 

it out. 
Marlboro; city in Middlew^x County, Massachusetts, county in South Carolina, and 

ten other places; some are named from the town in Wilts County, England, and 

others for the Duke of Marlboro. 
Marlin; town in Falls ( 'ounty, Texas, named for one of the first settlers. 
Marlinton; village in Pocahontas County, West Virginia, named for an early settler. 
Marlow; town in Cheshire County, New Hampshire, named from the borough in 

Knglan<l. 
Marmiton; stream in Missouri. From the French word, marmUon, **s<!ullion,*' 

from marmite, "pot" or "kettle.'* 
Maroa; t^)wnshij> and city in Macon County, Illinois, named from an Indian trilH-. 
Maroon; jK^ak in the Klk Mountains, Colorado, so named on account of the i>ecnli:ir 

color of the sandstone. 
Marquam; village in Clackania.^ County, Oregon, name<l for P. A. Marquam, an old 

resident of Portland. 
Marquette; city in McPhersijn C^ounty, Kansas, county, city in same county, and 

river in Michigan, county, and town in Green I^ke County, Wisconsin, nanu^l 

for the Jesuit ^lissionary Jacipies Marquette. 
Marseilles; city in La**iille County, Illinois, and village in Wyandot County, Ohi(», 

named from the city in France. 
Marshall; county in Alabama, county, and city in Clark County, in Illinois, ct^unties 

in Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Mississippi, Tennessee, and West Virginia, nanieil 

for John Marshall, Ciiief Justice of the United States. 
Marshall; town in BouI«ler County, Colorado, nameil for Joseph M. Marshall, who 

discovered coal in that section. 
Marshall; county in Kansiis, nanunl for Francis J. Marshall, memlier of the first 

Territorial legislature. 
Marshall; county, and village in the same county, in Minnesota, named for Gen. 

William R. Marshall, governor of the State, 18Ht>-1870. 
Marshall; <'()unty in South Dakota, named for Thonuis F. Marshall, Congressman 

from North Hakota. 
Marshallton; vilhige in Newcastle County, Delaware, nanuHl for John Marshall, 

who started the first rolling mill. 
Marshalltown; city in Marshall County, Iowa, named for Chief Justice John 

Mai*shall. 
Marshfield; town in Plymouth County, Massachusetts, so named <m accrount of its 

situation. 
Marshfield; city in Welwter (^junty, Missouri, name<l for the home of Daniel 

Webster. 
Marshfield; town in Washington County, Vermont, named for Capt Isaat! Marsh, 

who j)urchase<l the town site from the Indians. 
Marshfield; city in Woo<l ('ounty, Wisconsin, name<l for J. J. Marsh, of New York, 

who owned the greater part of the t^)wn. Another authority attributes the name 

U) large areas of marshy land in the vi<*inity. 



uANNETT.j i^laci-: Names in thk united stages. 201 

Mfkrtlias Vineyard; island comprising Dukes County, Massachusetts. Martha is 
said to be a corruption of Martin, the name of a friend of the discoverer, Vine- 
yard being added on account of the abundance of wild grapes on the island. 

Martin; counties in Indiana and Kentucky, named for Col. John P. Martin. 

Martin; county in Minnesota, named for Henry Martin, an early settler. 

Martin; town in Claiborne County, Mississippi, named for Gen. W. T. Martin, of 
Natchez, Mississippi. 

Martin; county in North Carolina, named for colonial governor, Josiah Martin. 

Martin; county in Texas, named for Wyly Martin, an early settler. 

Martinez; town in Contra Costa County, California, named, for a prominent Spanish 
settler. 

Martins; creek in Humboldt County, California, named for an early settler. 

Martins; location In Coos County, New Hampshire, granted to Thomas Martin, 1773. 

Martinsbnrg; village in Dixon County, Nebraska, named for Jonathan Martin, its 
first settler. 

Martinsbnrg; borough in Blair County Pennsylvania, named for its founder. 

Martinsbnrg; town in Berkeley County, West Virginia, named for Col. Tom Martin, 
a nephew of Lord Fairfax, a wealthy landowner. 

Martins Ferry; city in Belmont County, Ohio, named for the family who estab- 
lished the ferrv. 

Martinsville; city in Morgan County, Indiana, nameil for the oldest of the locating 
commissioners, John Martin. 

Martinsville; xillage in Harrison County, Missouri, named for Zadoc Martin, a 
miller. 

Martinsville; town in Spartanburg County, South Carolina, named for the founder. 

Martinsville; town in Henry County, Vii^inia, named for Col. Joe Martin, original 
owner of the town site. 

Marvine; mountains in Colorado and Utah, named for the geologist, A. R. Marvine. 

Mary; bay in Yellowstone Lake, Yellowstone Park, named for Miss Mary Force. 

Mary; lake in Yellowstone Park, name<l for Miss Mary Clark. 

Maryland; one of the thirteen original States, named for Henrietta Maria, wife of 
Charles I, of England. 

Marysville; township and city in Yuba County, California, named for Mrs. Marj' 
Covilland, one of the founders. 

Marysville; city in Marshall County, Kansas, named for the wife of Francis J Mar- 
shall, for whom the county was nameil. 

Marysville; town in I^ewis and Clark County, Montana, name<l by Thomas Cruse 
for his mother. 

Marysville; village in Union County, Ohio, nameil for the daughter of the original 
proprietor. 

Mascoutah; city in St. Clair County, Illinois. An Indian word meaning **prairie," 
or '* grassy plain.** 

Mas^ek-Hanna; stream in Pennsylvania; a Delaware Indian word meaning 
*' stream flowing through swampy ground.*' 

Mashamoquet; stream in Connecticut. An Indian word meaning '^ near the great 

mountain,'* or, according to another authority, **at the great fishing i)lace.** 
Mashapaug; village in Tolland County, Connecticut; 

Mashpee; town in Barnstable County, Massachusetts. From an Indian word, 
moHhapavgf meaning either ''standing water,*' or "great iK)nd.*' 

Maskegon; river in Michigan. An Indian word meaning ** swamp," or **l)og.'* 

Mason; village in Effingham County, Illinois, name<l for Roswell B. Mason, chief 
engineer Illinois Centml Railroad. 

Mason; county in Illinois, named from Mason County, Kentucky, the birthplace of 
many of the early settlers. 



1 



202 PLACK NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [BriLiV 

Mason; river in northern Illinoin, tributary to the Iliinoifl River, name<i for 
William Mason, an earlv settler. 

m 

Mason; Nayoii in Chicot County, Kaunas, named for the early proprietor, the Mar- 

(Luis of Maifion Uouj;e. 
Mason; county in Kentucky, named for George Mason, an intimate friend of Geiw 

Washington. 
Mason; county in Michijpiu, nanie<l for Stevens T. Mason, the last Territ<»rial p>v- 

crnor and first State jrnveruor. 
Mason; town in IlillslHjro County, New Hampshire, named for John Miison, tlw 

founder of the colony. 
Mason; county in Texas, nanunl for Captain Mason, United States Army. 
Mason; county in Washington, named for Charles H. Mason, the first State 8een*tar}-. 
Mason; county in West Virj^inia, named for George Mason, governor of the State. 
Mason; cn»ek in Yellowstone Park, name<l for Maj. Julius W. Mason, Unit«^l 

States Army. 
Mason City; townsliip an<l city in Mason County, Illinois, nameil from the county. 
Masonville; town in l)elawan» County, New York, named for Rev. John M. Ma5«»n. 

of New York. 
Massabesic; village in llill8l)oro County, New Hampehire. An Imliau wonl mean- 
ing " place at a ^Tcat river." 
Massac; county in Illinois and fort on the Ohio River, named for Monsieur Mas- 

siac, the French minister of marine during the French and Indian war. 
Mayfield; city in (Jraves County, Kentucky, nanietl for John Mayiield, who lost his 

life hy dn>wuin^ in the creek near the city. 
Maynard; town in Mi«ldlesex County, Ma.sHachu£^tts, nameil for the foiimlerof the 

woolen mills in the town. 
Massachaug*; pond in Khode Island. An Indian word meaning ** place where 

rushes jjjrow." 
Massachusetts; on(> of the thirtiH'n original States. An Indian word meaning 

" near the ^Teat hills." 
Massapeag; viila^'ein New lx)ndon (^>unty,Connei*ticut. An Indian word meaning 

" ^reat water land." 
Massena; villa;:e in St. liawrence County, New York, named for Ajidre Maseena, a 

marshal of France. 
Massillon; city in Stark County, Ohio, nanuMl for Jean BaptiHte Massillon, a cele- 
brated French divine. 
Masten; villaire in Kent County, l)elaware, nanietl for William Maston, an early 

settler. 
Masthope; town in Pike County, Pennsylvania. A corniption of the IXilaware 

Indian nmsjuipi meaning " heads of ;;las8." 
Matag-oodus; trihut-ary of tlu? Penobscot Kiver in Maine. An Indian wonl meaning 

" mea<low j^round." 
Matagorda; county, and villajre in same county, in Texas. A Spanish wonl meaning 

"thick brush." 
Matamoras; village in Pike County, Pennsylvania. A Spaninh wonl meaning 

'* Moor slayer." 
Matanaucook; branch of the Penoi)scot Kiver, in Maine. An Imlian wonl meaning 

'* j)lace (»f bad lan<ls." 
Matawan; town in Monmouth C(>untv, New Jer>Hn'. An Indian wonl to which 

various meaning are a.^cri bed, amonj; them ** magician," "charmed skin," '*it 

arrives in a lak(,'." 
Mathews; county in Virginia, named for (Jen. Thonnis Mathews, an officer of the 

Ih'volution. 



OANNETT] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED ftTATE8. 203 

ICatoaca; village in Chesterfield County, Virginia. The original name of the 

Indian princess, Pocahontas, for whom it is named. 
Hattahnmkeag; lake in Maine. An Indian word meaning *'sand creek pond.*' 
Xattapan; station in Boston, Massachusetts. An Indian word meaning '* sitting- 
down place." 
Xattapoisett; town in Plymouth County, Massachusetts. An Indian word given 
various meanings, **at the great rivulet," ** place of rest," ** unfavorable for 
the passage or shelter of canoes." 
k. Kattaponi; river in Vii^nia. A corruption of the Indian form mattapament, of 

unknown meaning. 
; Mattawamkea^; river, and town in Penobscot County, Maine. An Indian word 
1, meaning **down a stream which empties into the main river." 
i. Matteawan; stream and village in Dutchess County, New York, which in early 
-J days was noted for its peltrie, hence the Indian name meaning "good fur," or 

"enchanted skin." 
i Katthews; town in Mecklenburg County, North Carolina, named for a prominent 
i resident. 

Kattison; village in Cook County, Illinois, named for George Joel Aldrich Mattison, 

governor of the State, 1853-1857. 
Kattituck; village in Suffolk County, New York. An Indian word meaning "place 

without wood," or " land not wooded." 
Kattoon; city in Coles County, Illinois, named for William Mattoon, a landowner. 
Kauch Chunk; borough and river in Carbon County, Pennsylvania. From the 

Indian, machk, meaning "l)ear," and t^cAtmib, "mountain." 
Kauxnee; village in Lucas County, Ohio. Another form of the tribal name Miami. 
Kaurepas; lake in Louisiana, named for Frederic Phillipeaux, Count of Maurepas. 
.iiriee; stream in New Jersey, named for the stadtholder of the United Dutch 
provinces, Maurice, Count of Nassau and Prince of Orange. 
; county in Tennessee, named for Abram Maury. 
; island in Washington, named for a naval officer. 
Kauston; city in Juneau County, Wisconsin, named for Gen. M. M. Maughs, former 

proprietor of the original village. 
Kauvaises Terres; tract on the White River, in North Dakota. A French name 

meaning "bad lands." 
Kaverick; county in Texas named for Sanmel A. Maverick, a prominent early 

settler. 
Kazatawny ; stream in I^rksCounty, Pennsylvania. From a Delaware Indian word, 
macJmt'haniuiy meaning "bear's path stream." 

; town in Colusa County, California, name<l for its founder. 
; cape on the southern extremity of New Jersey, named for .Cornelius Jacobson 
May, a Dutch navigator of the West Indian Company. 
Kayaimi; lake in Florida. An Indian word meaning " very large water." 
Kayersville; town in Issaquena County, Mississippi, named for David Meyers, a 

large landowner. 
Kayesville; town in Sumter County, South Carolina, named for the Mayes family, 

prominent in the county. 
Kayodan; village in Rockingham County, North Carolina. A combination of the 

name of a prominent resident of Richmond, Virginia, and of the river Dan. 
Kays; creek in Michigan, named for Judge May. 

Kays Landing; town in Atlantic County, New Jersey, name<l for Cornelius Jacob- 
son May, a Dutch navigator of the West Indian Company. 
Kaysville; city in Mason County, Kentucky, named for the original proprietor, 

John May. 
Kaysville; village in Jones County, North Carolina, named for a prominent citizen. 



'Jl»4 PLA« E NAMES IX THE CXlTtD 3TAT1». l?^ '- -> 

Mayville. -.i.-u*^ ::. T:L*»^'la C«>anty. Miohigmn, and Chautauqua roiiniy. Nt-w 
MayviUe. .\ry ::. Iw-:jv- ^'..r.nty. Wisomsin. named for "Uncle" May, an eaiiy 



:on * \\ : ::. • rrir.-iy * ..rmty. HiiD«»U. An Indian name meaning: " wt^l," refer- 

r r.j : .i -i*- :»^ » :.i- h zrv-w al<>ne a stivam near the town. 
Xeade. ;.- :-.k ir. I \a,':. . •^•;:nty. an«l t-ity in ^«ame coanty in Kansas, and muiity in 

^- :*:. I»-jk 'i. r.a:.-»'l f-r«itrn. «fet>n!*'C. M«uie. 
Xeade. • ::.*> ::. Kr-r.:u' ky. ruiiiitr<l fi<r Capt. James Meaiie. 
Meadville. :■.*:. ::: Krdr/tliri County. ML^i^^ippi, named for Cowles Meade, uteiXiod 

<*■• r*-:ary • :" ;:.♦• T-rr::. ►ry. 
Xeadville ::v ir. Cniw:". i^i O-imtv. IVnn«vh-ania, nauie<l f«»r Gen. Ihiviil Mea«L 

Xea^her: •■ -ir.Ty ir. M-rii^-a. namni for Tien. Thomas Francis Meairher. a Slate 

Xeander Creek: stiva::. ir; tht- Mah«inint; Vallev. Ohio, so named bv the s«ur\Y\or 

Xeares: • a:-- ::. Wii-hinjt.-n. iiauit^l f«»r the explorer. John Meares. 

Xebane: : a:. ::. A!:i:iidr.iv CV»unty. Nv»rth Carolina, naineil for Gen. Alexaij<irr 

Xecca: !-\v:. ::. Tr:::/*-!:!; 0»r.nty, Ohio. naine«l for the capital of Arabia. 
Mechanicsburg-: vi!'.;i::»- in { 'h;iiu{iaii!n Coanty. < >hio. so nanieil because of the kr^ir 

]'«r.-»-:i:ajt- : ::.«•• r;an:^> in the |»i*pulati«»n. 
Mecklenburg: • ••a\:U-> in N«»nh Can>lina antl Vii>nnia, nanieil for the (jut^nof 

< f*- rj./ 1 1 1. < har.Mttr « •; Mei.'kU*iihun:. 
Medary: :-',\:. in lir- -^.kiiijs (\»unty. S«MUh Dakota, nameil for Samuel Mcdary. 

;.: N^r:. r •■: Kan-^is Tfrriii»ry. 
Medtield. t.'Wii \i\ N..ri.«lk ('»»unty. Ma^t^ohusetts. A contraction of its orig^iiul 

i.a*:.»- ••: >ha.i'>writ'M. jiwn it on aci-ount of the beautiful meadows. 
Media: '-'r ".jii in IVlawari* (V»iinty. IVnnrJylvaiiia, si> named be<*ause of it:? ly<.-j. 

ti'.:. ::. thr .viitrr «il \]\v »'i«?iiity. 
Mediap'ilis: t'wii in In- M.'inr> <'«'iinty. Iowa, s«"» nanie«l because it is half way 

i'-tutt-:. r.iirii::i:t"n and Wa>hinirtt»ii. 
Medina. i "ir.ty. aii«l t.»\v i-ship and villain- in s;Mne oiinnty. in Ohio, name«l from the 

« i*y in Ani'-ia. 
Medina: .'lunJy and riv»r in Tfx:^^, nanit*<l fnr a Mexittin-Spanianl, I*. Medina, ao 

♦Mrly >«tti«T. 
Medo: \ ill;i::i' in VA'w Karth Oiunty. Minn^'St)ta. The Indian name for a ixn-ii which 

in app«'aiani«' and ta-^tr rr^«-nd»K*s the sw^n*t {»otato. 
Medora: town in riillimrs (oiinty. Xnrth Ihikota, iianieil for the wife i»f the Man^ois 

Meeker: town in Char (n'tk County, Colorado, naiiu^l for N. C. Meeker, of the 

N«-u York Trihunt*. 
Meeker; connty in Miinu>ota, naintd for Ilradley B. MtH.'ker, asstH'iate justice i>f the 

snj»nMn» iirt, ls4'.»-lN.'>i». 

Meherrin; riv«-r in Vir^'inia. An Indian wonl moaning •*i«land," the name of a 

triU* of tliat n^rion. 
Meigs; j^-ak in Colorado, naini'd for(n»n. M. C. Meip». 
Meigs; rountics in nldo and Trnnessct*. nanu'd for Cnl. Return J. Meigs. 
Melones; town in Cahiv«'ras Connty, California. A S|kiinish name meaning '^elm- 

ons, ' rli'scriptivoly applicil. 
Melrose; < ity in Mid^llescx County, Mas^ulnisetts, nanuMl by William Bople, a 

ri'sidrnt, from tlw iMiroii^rh in Scotland. 
Melvem; <ity in Osa^'e County, Kan.sis, nanuMl from the .Malvern Hills in Knglaiul 



GANNETT.) PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 205 

Kemaloose; island in the Columbia River, near The Dallen, Or^2^)n, from a Chinook 
Indian word meaning "dead," so named Ixraiise it was an Indian burial place. 
* Xempliis; city in Scotland County, Missouri, named from the city in Egypt. 

Kemphis; city in Shelby County, Tennessee, so named because situated upon the 
^ river in a manner very similar to the city in Egypt. 

llexiiphreinagrog; lake in Vermont. An Indian word said to mean "beautiful 
". water," "lake of abundance." 

Xenard; county in Illinois, named for Pierre Menard, first lieu tenant-go venior of 
the State. 
f Xenard; county in Texas, nameil for M. B. Menard, a prominent early settler. 

JKenasha; city in Winnebago County, Wisconsin. An Indian word meaning 
» "thorn," or "island." 

■ JKendhain; town in Mason County, New Jersey, named from the town in England. 
I' Xendocino; county, and cajH* in Humboldt County, in California, named for Don 

Antonia de Mendoza, the vicerov of Mexico. 
rj Xendon; township and village in Adams County, Illinois, named from Mendon, 
j Massachusetts. 

Xendon; town in Worcester County, Massachusetts, named from the town of Mend- 
[ ham, England. 

[-. Xendota; township and city in Lasalle County, Illinois. From an Indian word 
r meaning the junction of two trails, and applied to the settlement on account of 

1 the crossing of two railroads. 

Xendota; village in Dakota County, Minnesota. An Indian word meaning "the 
, mouth of a river." 

Xendoza; village in Caldwell County, Texas, nameil for Don Antonio de Mendoza, 

the viceroy of Mexico. 
Xenifee; county in Kentucky, named for Richanl H. Menifee. 
Xenoken; town in Shawnee County, Kansas. An Indian word meaning "it grows 

well," "good growing place," "fortunate." 
Xenozninee; town in Jo Daviess County, Illinois, river, county, and city in same 
county in Michigan, and city in Dunn County, Wisconsin. The name of an 
Indian tribe, the word referring to the wild rice which grew abundantly in those 
regions. 
Kentor; township and village in Lake County, Ohio, named for Mentor, the coun- 
selor of Telemachus. 
Kentz; town in Cayuga County, New York, named from the city in Germany. 
Kequon; river and township in Ozaukee County, Wisconsin. An Indian name 
meaning "ladle," and given to the river because of a bend in the river resembling 
a paddle. 
Keramec; river in Missouri. A corniption of the Indian name which signifies 

"catfish river." 
Merced; county, and city in same county in California. A Spanish word meaning 
"mercy." 



•; counties in Illinois, Kentucky, Missouri, New Jersey, Ohio, Pennsylvania, 

and West Virginia, named for Gen. Hugh Mercer, of the Revolution. 
Mercer; county in North Dakota, named for William Henry Harrison Mercer, an 

early pioneer and ranchman. 
Mercersburg; borough in Franklin County, Pennsylvania, named for Gen. Hugh 

Mercer. 
Kerchantville; borough in Camden County, New Jersey, named for the Merchant 

family. 
Meredith; town in Belknap County, New Hampshire, named for a British nobleman. 
Meredith; town in Delaware County, New York, named for Samuel Meredith, of 

Pennsylvania. 



Hersdosia; town in Morgan County, Illinois. A Freni'b name, rorraptnl Inni 
iiuirniii tt'iHiier. meaning "willow inilrah." Anothi^r anlhorily givi* ■ 
"lake," ami 'fhrni, the ntuae of a French prirat living in the vii-inity. 

Meriwether; oiiirily in (.ieorgia, naminl For Dit\i<l Mc>riwelht>r, {uniit-r niemlifrrj 
C'ctiiirtiw Imni ilmjrgia 

Uerom; town in Sullivan Comity, Imliana, named for the watore nt Marm ii 
Pul(«tiiie. 

HerriU; Hty in Lincoln Connty, WisconHin, Ramol fiirS. S. Merrill irf tliv Wiir 
(Teiitial Railroad Company. 

IHerrimac: town in Etwex County, MaHenchuKtU), river in New Hampciliiri 
Massac hiisett«, and village in Bauk County, WiM^nsin; 
Herrima^k: c.iunty, anil town in Hillslioro County, in New Hampshire. Fnxutk 
Initian, meaning "sturgeon," or "ewift water." 
Kesa; cunnty in Colorado, from the 8pani>ih "mpsa," table, )i«ni-e a lablr-bml * 

ISeaa Orande; township in San Diego County, California ASpanisli phraKiwD. 

iiij" "itrcat til l>le- land." 
Mesa Inclinodo: plateau in we«lem Colorailo. The name is Spaniali and h 

i-Biit ••{ 111.- ^\t>\ie. <>C tlif mena. 
Heaboppen; iilrimm in PennHvlvania. A Delaware Indian namt> meaning "()n 

Ix-ailx," and given this stream becalm? of the Imrt^T of trinkets made apunlfe 

Keaick; tjiwn In Wexford County, Michigan, named for its Brat pettlMr. 
Uesilla; towns in Butt« Cimnty, California, and Dona .\na County. New Menn 

A SpHnish wonl meaning " little table-ltind." 
Heskaakeeaeebunk; branch of the Mattwamkeaf! River. Maine. .\ii Indiui mul 

meaning " little Mpruue brook." 
Hesongo; stream in Maryland. An Indian word meaning "where we killed dor' 
Uesopotamia; lowiwldp in Trumlmli County, Ohio, mtuatetl )>etw*.-en two Htm 

and nanuil from Mesopotamia in Asia, which lies l>ctwe<?ii the Tlgti* ui 

Enphratet<; from the lircek, signifying literally "between the ri 
Hesquita; village in Dallas County, Texas. The Spanish name for a tne of lb 

IwUHt family. 
Hetamora; village in Woodford County, lltinois, named for the Indian ckid • 

was the hero of Kiwin Forrest's play- 
Ketcalfe; county in Kentucky, named for Tliomos Metcalfe, art early 

the State. 
Hetea; villi^^ in C^sss County, Indiana, named for Puttawattoiuic, aii Indian ctoii 

or [lOBsibly from mcdii or aitla, which nieana "prophet" or "prieet," 
Methuen; town in Eeeex County, MaE«a('buselti>. probably nainetl for lj>id 1W 

Methucn by Uovemor Diiniraer. 
Ketucben; borough in Middlesex County, New Jersey, namei! for the chief of li» 

Ran tans. 
Katropolia; city in Mamac County, Illinois. Tln^ nanie is expressive ;f the 

of the founders. 
Kets; township in Presque Isle County, Michigan, and nine other places ti«ar th 

name of the town in <iermany. 
Kaxia; town in Limestone County, Texas, named from Mexico. 
Kexico; city in Audrain County, Missouri. Named from the i-ounlry which ■■• 

to be derived from the Azt*c word, MfTilili, the name of a tutelary diviailf. t« 

according to another authority meaning the "habitation of the got) of war." 
Ke^reri coimty in tiouth Dakota, named for Fred Meyer, civil engineer and hi' 

surveyor. 




GANNETT.] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 207 

Meyersdale; borough in Somerset County, Pennsylvania, nameil for an (*arly 

settler. 
Miami; river and city in Dade County, Florida; county in Indiana; town in Ottawa 

Ret«ervation, Indian Territory; county in KauBas; city in Saline County, Mit»- 

wniri; and river and county in Ohio. The name of a notetl Indian trilx^; the 

meaning of the won! ia uncertain. 
MianuB; village and river in Fairfield County, Connet^ticut, A corruption of the 

name of the Indian chief Mnynnno^ meaning **he who gatherH together." 
Micanopy; town in Alachua County, Florida, named for a chief of the Seminole 

IntiiauH, whose name wgnilies ** chief of chiefs.** 
Michigtunxne; village in Marionette County, Michigan. An Indian won! meaning 

** large lake." 
Michigr&n; State of the Union and one of the Great I^akes. An Indian word, naid 

by eK)me to mean ** big lake;*' by others, '* place for catching fish." 
Middleboro; town in Plvmouth Countv, MasBachusett.s so named l)iH*ausc» it was 

flituate<l lietween the Pilgrim settlement at Plymouth and the village of the 

Indian sachem, Massasoit, near Bristol, Rhode Island. 
Middleburg; town in Vance County, North Carolina, so named iK'cause it is the 

middle |K>int lx»tween two rivers. 
Middleburg; town in I^udoun County, Virginia, so name<l l)ecause of its lo<*ation 

midway between Upperville, in Fauquier County, an<i Aldie, in I>)udoun C>)unty. 
Middlebiiry; town in Addison County, Vermont, so nameil Ix^causc it was the cen- 
tral of three towns surveve*! simultaneouslv. 

• » 

Middlefield; township in (ieauga County, Ohio, named from its a^ntral Im^ation 

between Warren and Painesville. 
Kiddlegrove; town in Monrot^ County, Missouri, so namwi l>ecause it is midway 

between the Big Muddy an<l Mississippi rivers. 
Middleport; village? in Niagara County, New York, so named on account of its sit- 
uation on the canal halfway l>etween Albion and IxK'kport. 
Middleport; village in Meigs County, Ohio, so nameil IxM'ause of its hx'ation on the 

Ohio River, midway betwet»n Pitt«burg, Pennsylvania, and Cincinnati. 
Middlesex; counties in Conne<'ticut, Massa<'husett*<, an<l New Jersey; town in 

Yates County, New York; township in CumlK»rlan<l County, Pennsylvania; 

town in Washington County, Vermont; and county in Virginia; gem^rally nanxMl 

from the county in P^ngland. 
Middleton; town in F>;sex County, Massachusetts. Incori>orated in 1728, from 

parts of Salem, Topsfield, Boxford, and Andover, and sai<l to have l)ecn so 

named because of its (vntral location lH»twct»n thase t4)wns. 
Middletown; town in Newcastle County, Delaware, sr> named iKH^ause of iti? loca- 
tion midway between Bunker Hill, Marvlan<I, and Odessa. 
Middletown; city in Butler County, Ohio, situate<l midway between Cincinnati 

and Dayton; hence the name. 
Midland; county in Michigan, so namt^d l>ecause of its situation in the east-central 

portion of the southern i)eninsula. 
Midland; county in Texas, named for its location midway Iwtween Fort Worth an<l 

El Paso. 
Midlothian; town in Chest:*rfield County, Virginia, named frrmi the county in 

Scotland. 

{Mifflin; county in Pennsylvania; 
Mifflinburg; town in Union County, Pennsylvania. Named for General Mifilin, 
once governor of the State. 
Xilam; county in Texas, name<l for Benjamin R. Milam, an early settler and distin- 
gnisbed Indian fighter. 



208 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bill2^s 

Milan; town in Dutchess County, New York, and sixteen other towns and villages. 
The name is transferred from Milan in Italy. 

Milbum; town in Ballard County, Kentucky, named for William Milbum. 
Miles; city in Jackson County, Iowa, named for the man who laid it out. 
Milesburg; liorough in Center County, Pennsylvania, named for its founder, CV»1, 

Samuel Miles. 
Miles City; city in Custer County, Montana, nameil for Gen. Nelson A. Miles. 
Milestown; station in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, nameil for Col. Samuel Miles, 

a Revolutionary celebrity. 
Milford; towns in New Haven County, Connecticut, and Hillsboro County, New 

Hampshire, named from the town in England. 
Milford; town in Kent County, Delaware, so name<l because of the numerous mills 

in and near the town. 
Milford; town in Worcester County, Massachusetts, so named on account of the 

many mills erecteii ujwn Mill River. 
Milk; river in Montana, so named l>ecau8e of its whitish appearance. 
Mill; creek in Cuyahoga County, Ohio, so named because the first grihtmili in 

northern Ohio was built upon its bank. 
Millard; county in Utah, named for Millard Fillmore. 

Millard; village in Douglas County, Nebraska, named for Ezra Millard, its founder. 
Millbank; city in Grant county, South Dakota, named for Jeremiah Millbank, a 

director of the Chicago, Milw^aukee and Saint Paul Railroad. 
Millbury; town in Worcester County, Massachusetts, so named because the Black- 
stone River at this point is the site of many mills. 
Milledgeville; city in Georgia, named for John Milledge, an early governor of the 

State. 
Millelacs; lake and county in Minnesota. From the French, **mille ^io»," meaning 

"thousaml lakes." 
Miller; county in Arkansas, named for James Miller, former governor of the State. 
Miller; county in Georgia, named for a distinguished citizen of the State, Andrew 

J. Miller.* 
Miller; county in Missouri, named for John Miller, a former governor. 
Miller; village in Knox County, Nebraska, named for the first settler, Ca])t, J. M. 

Miller. 
Miller; township and city in Hand County, South Dakota, named for the founder, 

Ilenrv Miller. 
Miller; creek in Yellowstone Park, named for an early pioneer. 
Millerplace; village in Suffolk County, New York, named for Andrew Miller, the 

Hon of an early pioneer of Easthampton. 
Millersburg*; town in Callaway County, Missouri, named for Thomas Miller, an 

early s(?ttler. 
Millersburg; village in Holmes County, Ohio, named for Charles Miller, its founder. 
Millersburg; l>orough in Dauphin County, Pennsylvania, named for Daniel Miller, 

its founder. 
Millerstown; borough in Perry County, Pennsylvania, named for its founder, 

David Miller. 
Mlllorton; town in Dutchess County, New York, named from Samuel G. Miller, one 

of the contractors an<l builders of the extension of the New York and Harlem 

Railroad from Dover Plains to Chatham. 
Millinocket; lake on the Penobscot River, Maine. An Indian word meaning 

" place full of islands.*' 
Mill River; village in the town of New Marlboro, Berkshire County, Maaaachosetts, 

so named from a mill on the Konkapot River — Mill-on-the-River. 
Mills; county in Iowa, named for Major Mills, of the State. 



GAJWETT.J PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 209 

Mills; connty in Texas, namiHl for John S. Mills, prominent in law and politii*8 of 

the State. 
Millsfield; town in Coos County, New Hampshire, named for Sir Thomas Mills. 
Millstone; borough in Somerset County, New .lersey, prol)ably so named for the 

st^^ne found there which is suitable for milling purposes. 
Milltown; borough in Middlesex County, New Jersey, so named because of the 

numl)er of mills located there. 
Milo; township in Bureau County, Illinois, nameii fn>m Milo, New York. 
Milo; towns in Piscataquis County, Maine, and Yates County, New York, nameil from 

the island of Milo, in the (Jrecian Archipelago. 
Milpitas; town in Santa Clara County, California. A Spanish word meaning 

** meadow.*' 
Milton; county in Georgia, name<l for Homer V. Milton. 
Milton; town in Norfolk County, Massachusetts, so nanie<l l)ecau8eof the number of 

mills operating on the NeiK>nset River at that |>oint. 
Milton; town in Ulster County, New York; village in Caswell County, North Caro- 
lina; towns in Northumberland County, Pennsylvania, Chittenden County, Ver- 
mont, and Cal)ell County, West Virginia; name<l for John Milton, the [)oet. 
MiltonvaJe; city in Cloud County, Kansas, named for Milton Tootle, of St. Jo8e[)h, 

the former owner of the town site. 
Milwaukee; county, and city in same county, in Wisconsin; the name is said to 

have been derived from the Indian wortl mUiokt'f which means **gt)CMl earth" 

or **good country.** 
Mimbres; river and mountains in New Mexico. A Spanish word meaning 

** willows.** 
Minden; city in Kearney Comity, Nebraska, namtnl from the city in (Germany. 
Mine; river in Missouri. A contraction of the original French name, riviere a la 

mine. 
Miner; county in South Dakota, name<i for Capt. Nelson Miner an<l Mr. Ephriam 

Miner, who were memlxjrs of the legislature which created the county. 
[Mineral; counties in Colorado and Win^t Virginia; 
I Mineral Point; village in Washingtrm County, Missouri, and city in Iowa County, 

Wisconsin. So named lx»cause of the abundance of ore in those regions. 
Mineral; township and village in Bureau County, Illinois, name<i from its i(K>atic>n 

in the coal-producing region. 
Minersville; borough in Schuylkill C^ounty, Pennsylvania, so nanu^I Ikhuiusc it is 

the center of the coal fields. 
Minerva; towns in Essex County, New York, and Stiirk County, Ohio, naiiie<l for 

the goddess of wis<Iom. 
Ming^; village in Jefferson County, Ohio, an<l county in West Virginia, named for 

an Indian trilw; the name is said to signify "spring ix'ople." 
Min^ Kun; creek in Kan(lol[)ii County, West Virginia, name<l for an en(*anipment 

of Mingo Indians on its banks. 
Minier; village in Tazewell County, Illinois, named for (t. W. Minier, its founder. 
Minisink; town in Orange County, New York. An Indian name meaning "at the 

little island.** 
Minneapolis; cities in Ottawa County, Kansas, and Hennepin County, Minnesota. 

A combination of the Inrlian word minni^ ** water," and the (Jreek, jxtliiK, mean- 
ing "city.** 
Minnehaha; falls in Hennepin County, Minnesota, and county in South Dakota. 

A Sioux Indian word meaning " laughing water." 
Minneiska; stream and village in Wabasha County, Minnesota. \x\ Indian word 

meaning ** clear water." 

Bull. 258—05 14 



210 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bill.:&n 

Minnequa; villa^rt* in Hradfonl County, Pennsylvania. An Indian worti meaning 

"to<lrink." 
Minnesota; Stat*' of the I'nion, and a river tributary to the Mississippi. A Sioux 

Indian word meaning "<'lou<ly water" or *'Hky-tinted water." 
Minnetonka; lake in Miiniet«ota. A Sioux Indian name signifying; **hi^wat^r." 
Minnewaukan; iH)st villnpe in Jienson County, North Dakota. Sioux Indian woni 

meaning "spirit watt-r." 
Minnicotta: lake in Minnesota. An Indian wonl meaning **warm water.'- 
Minniwakan; lakr in North Hakota. An Indian word meaning **i^pirit water." 
Minooka; village in <irnndy C<»nnty, Illinois. An Indian word meaning *'ma]»K' 

forest" (►r "go<Kl t*artli." 
Minor: rreek in IInin}H>l(lt County, CaHfornia, named for Isaac Minor. 
Minot: town in Androsroggin County, Maine, named forjudge Minot, a menilierftf 

the general fourt. 
Minto; village in Mari<»n County, ()rt^<»n, named for John Minto, an early [>iom"*^r. 
Minturn: village in Madera County, California, named for Jonas Minturn, an uM 

svttler. 
Mirabile: town in CaMwell County, Missouri. A I^tin wortl meaning "won- 
derful." 
Miraflores; tnwn in Orange County, California. A S[)anish name, translatt^l as 

'*l)eho]<l the liowers." 
Miramar; town in San I>iego County, (California. A Si)anish plirast* meaninL' 

" Ih'IioM the sea." 
Mishawaka; town in St. Jos**]>h County, Indiana, pn>l>ably namtMl for the Indian 

chief, Mixhiniinibi. The name means "swift water," or **re<l earth." 
Mispan; hran«'h of the Delaware River. An Indian word meaning **raee<K>n." 
Missaukee; county in Michigan, ])roba})ly named from the Indian triln?, Miyif- 

stvitjii, \\\\\v\\ means "jn'oplc of tlie wide-mouth river." 
Missionary; n«lgc cxten«ling along the northeast In^nlerof Georgia, so ealle* I InH^ibe 

a Presbyterian Church mission was esta}>lished there at an early date. 
Missisquoi; riv«'r in Vermont. An Indian wonl meaning **big woman." 
Mississinewa; river in Imliana. An Indian wonl meaning **river of grt^at stom*?.*' 
Mississippi: State of the Cnicm, counties in Arkansas and Missrmri, and the largivt 

river in the Cnite*! States. An Indian word meaning "great river," or *'gath- 

ering in ot all the waters," and "an almost en<lles8 river 8pn»ad out." 
Missoula; county, city in same county, and river in Montana. The name is sai<l to 

have the same nu'aninj; as Missouri, "nmddy water." 
Missouri; State of the Cnion, and one of the largest rivers. An Indian trilial name 

said to mean "nniddv water." 
Mitchell; town in L<»s Anjieles Conntv, California, namcHl from the eountv in Texas. 
Mitchell; town in Kagle County, Colonido, named for (Jeorge R. Mitchell, a note«l 

resi<lent of (lilpin County. 
Mitchell; county in < Georgia, nanuMl for I>avi<l Hradie Mitehell, governor (»f the 

State in earlv <lavs. 
Mitchell; town in Lawrence County, Indiana, nanunl for (len. (). W. Mitchell, who 

lcM'ate<l the Ohio and Mississippi Railroad. 
Mitchell; county, and town in same county, in Iowa, namcnl for John Mitchell, thf 

Irish j>atriot. 
Mitchell; county in Kansas, name«l for Gen. William I). Mitcrhell. 
Mitchell; county in North Carolina, named for Klisha Mitchell. 
Mitchell; town in Wheeler County, Oregon, named for Senator John H. Mitchell. 
Mitchell; county in Texas, name<l for the brothers A. iui<l li. Miti'hell, ]>rominent 

Texans of early days. 



GAKNETT.] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 211 

Mitchells; peak in North Carolina, nanK^l for Elinlm Mitchell, who lo^<t hin life 

while making a survey of it. 
Mitchellville; town in Polk Comity, Iowa, named for Thoma^s Mitchell. 
Mitchigazni; lake in northern Wipconnin. An Indian word meaning 'Mar^' lake.'' 
Mobeetie; town in Wheeler County, Texat«. From a Comanche Indian word mean- 
ing "walnut." 
Moberly; city in Ran<iolph County, Misnouri, named for Col. William E. Moberly, 

of Brunswick. 
Mobile; county, city in same county, river, and hay in Alalnima, name<l from 

Mauhila^ an ancient Indian town npon the river. 
Mobjsck; hay in Maryland. The name is supposeil to 1h* a comijition of an Indian 

word. 
Moccasin; village in Effingham County, Illinois. The Indian name for a i«hoe or 

covering for the foot. 
Mocksville; town in Davie County, North Carolina, named f<>r tlie former owner of 

the land. 
Modena; villages in Stark County, Illinois, and Ulster County, New York, named 

from the city in Italy. 
Modesto; dty in Stanislaus County, California. A Spanish won! metining *'mcMl- 

est" 
Modoc; county in California, and towns in Ilandolph County, Indiana, and E<lgi>- 

field County, South Carolina, an<i nine other places, so calltMl from the M<m1oc 

Indians of California. Their name in its original form si^ities ** southerners." 
Moffat; town in Saguache County, (>)U)nulo, named for I). H. Moffat, late president 

of the Denver and Rio (irrande Kailroad. 
Mo^llon; plateau in Arizona and range of mountains in New Mexico. A Spanish 

word meaning ** hanger-on," "parasite." 
Mohave; county in Arizona, desert Ix^low sea level in southeastern California, and 

town in Kern County, California, name<l from a trilx; of Indians named 

Hamunkh-habij meaning 'Hhree hills." 
Mohawk; river, township, and village in Herkimer County, New York, nameil 

from the Mohawk tribe, the name signifying "eater of live meat," referring to a 

bear. 
Mohican; town and river in Ashland County, Ohio, nanuMl for tlie Indian trilx*, 

the word meaning **wolf." 
Moira; town in Franklin County, New York, namiMl for the Ksir\ of Moira. 
Mokane; village in Callaway County, Missouri, on the Missouri, Kansas, and Eastern 

Bailroad, the name l^eing a combination of [)ortions of these names. 
Mokeliimne; river in California. A corruption (»f the Indian Wakalumniy the name 

of a river. 
Mokena; village in Will County, Illinois. An Indian word meaning *' turtle." 
Moline; township, and city in Rock Islaml County, Illinois, and many other i)laces. 

A Spanish word, sometimes written molino, meaning **mill." 
Molunkus, river and plantation in Aroostock County, Maine. An Indian wonl 

meaning *' short stretch of high land on a small stream." 
Monadnock; mountain in New Hampshire. From the Indian m'uu, meaning *' sur- 
passing," adn^ "mountain," and ock^ ** place" — place of the surpassing (unex- 
celled) mountain. 
Monaghan; township in York County, Pennsylvania, name<l from tlie <'ounty in 

Ireland. 
Mondamin; town in Harrison County, Iowa. An Indian word meaning "corn." 
»; village in Will County, Illinois, nametl for the wife of an Indian tnider, 

Joseph Bailes, the name being the Indian corruption of the English l>aptismal 

nam A rkf IMarv 



212 I'LACE NAMK8 IN THE UNITED STATES. [bvu^sA 

Monett; township an<l i-ity in liarry County, Missouri, nanunl for the general pai*- 

sen^er a^ent o( the New York Central Railroad. 
Monhegaji; iHland in Lincoln County, Maine. An Indian word meaning *^ grand 

i}<land." 
Moniteau; county and creek in MisRmri, 8o named by the Indians Inx^use of the 

paintctl ligure nf a man upon a roi'k in the vicinity, the word in their language 

niciining ''spirit." 
Monks Corner; town in Ik»rkeley County, South Carolina, named for Thomas Monk, 

a prominent colonial sc»ttler. 
Monmouth; townsliip and city in Warren County, Illinois, and town in Kennel)ec 

County, Maine, name<l from the Revolutionary battle of Monmouth, June 2f<, 

177S. * 
Monmouth; county in New Jersey, nametl from Monmouthshire, England. 
Mono; cuinity and lake in California. A Spanish word meaning **monkey.*' 
Monocacy; river in Maryland, an<l creek in Pennsylvania. An Indian word 

nieaninj^ "stream containing many large l>end8." 
Monona; county in Iowa. The name is of Indian origin, meaning unknown. 
Monongah; town in Marion County, West Virginia. An abbreviated combination 

of tlie names of Monongahela (River) and Monongalia (County). 
Monongahela; town in Washington County, Pennsylvania, and river in West Vir- 
ginia and Pennsylvania. A corruption of the Delaware Indian word mcncaiufjf- 

hi/fd, meaning "river with the sliding banks." 
Monongalia; county in West Virginia. A latinized form of the Indian word 

mommifdhcla, meaning the ''falling in river bank.'* 
Monroe; counties in Alabama, Arkansas, and Florida; county, and city in Walton 

County, in (ieorgia; counties in Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, and Kentucky; town in 

Waldo (-ounty, Maine; c«)unties in Michigan, Mississippi, Missouri, New York, 

Ohio, Pennsylvania, and Tennessee; fort at Old Point Comfort, Virginia; coiuitiw 

in West Virginia and Wis<'onsin; i>eak of the White Mountains, New Hami>- 

sliire; also many other cities, towns, and villages; named for President Jauies 

^lonroe. 
Monroe City; town in Knox County, Indiana, named for Monroe Alton, its founder. 
Monroeville; villajre in Salem County, New Jersey, named for 8. T. Monroe, a 

minister of an early church. 
Monrovia; city in Los Angeles County, California, named for Maj. W. N. Monroe, 

one of the founders. 
Monrovia; village in Morgan County, Indiana, the name l)eing a variation of the 

name of the townshij) in which it is located. 
Monsey ; village in Rockland ( 'ounty. New York. A corrujrtion of the Indian tribal 

name ?/////>/, meaning "wolf." 
Monson; town in Ilamj>den County, Mas.sachusett«, named for John, the sei*ond 

J^ord Monson. 
Montague; town in Franklin County, MiiRsachusettiii, named for Capt. AVilliam 

Montague. 
Montague; town in I^ewis County, New York, nan»ed for tlie daughter of H. B. 

lMerrej)ont. 
Montague; county in Texas, named for Daniel Montague. 
Montana; State of the Union. A I^tin word meaning *' mountainous region," and 

applicable to this State on account of the nature of its topography. 
Montauk; headland at the extrenie eastern point of Long Island, New York. A 

corruption of the Indian inirwauinirkit, meaning "island place," or **in the 

island country." By an«>ther authority said to mean '*8pirit" or **8pirit tree," 
Montcalm; county in Mi(thigan, named for (leneral Montcalm. 



OANNETT.) PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 213 

Xontclair; town in Essex County, New Jersey. A French name meaning ''cle^r 

mountain." 
Montebello; town in Los Angeles County, California. A Spanish phrase meaning 

** beautiful mountain." 
Monte Diablo; mountain in California. A Spanish name meaning '^ mountain of 

the devil." 
Xonterey; county, and city in the same County, in California, named for Count de 

Monterey, viceroy of Mexico. A Sfmnish name meaning ** mountain of the 

king." 
Xonterey; town in Berkshire County, Massachusetts, named for the liattle of the 

Mexican war. 
Xontevideo; village in Chippewa County, Minnesota, meaning "I see the moun- 
tain," referring to the coteau. 
Xonte Vista; town in Rio Grande County, Colorado. From the Spanish, meaning 

''mountain view." 
Monteziuna; county, and town in Summit County, in Colorado, name<l for tlie 

Emperor of Mexico. 
Xontgomery; counties in Arkansas, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Ken- 
tucky, Maryland, Mississippi, and Missouri; county, and village in Orange County, 

in New York; counties in North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, ami Virginia; 

and many cities and towns; namtnl for Gen. Richard Montgomery, who was kille<l 

in the assault on Quebec. 
Xont^omery; county in Alabama, name<l for Lieut. Lemuel P. Montgomery, of 

Montgomery, Alabama. 
Xontgromery; town in Daviess County, Indiana, name<l for Valentine B. Montgom- 
ery, its founder. 
Xont^omery; county in Tennessee, named for Col. John Montgomery. 
Xontgromery; county in Texas, named for Gen. James Montgomery. 
Xonticello; town in Jasper County, CJeorgia, township and city in Piatt County, 

Illinois, town in Lawrence County, Mississippi, village in Sullivan County, New 

York, and many other places; named from the home of President Jefferson in 

Albemarle County, Virginia. 
Xontmorency; county in Michigan, named for Lord Montmorencty. 
Xontoiir; county, ridge, and borough in Lycoming Comity, Pennsylvania, named 

for Madame Montour, an early French settler from Ciuebe<\ 
Xontpelier; city in AVashington County, Vermoht, named from the city in France. 
Xontrio; town in Sonoma County, California. From the Spanish, meaning "river 

mountain." 
Xontrose; county, and town in same county, in Colorado, name<l from Sir Walter 

Scott's legend of "Montrose." 
Xontrose; village in Genesee County, New York, named from the town in Scotlan<l. 
Xontrose; borough in Susquehanna County, Pennsylvania, namcnl for Dr. Robert 

H. Rose. Another authority claims it was name<l from Montrose in Scotland. 
Xoniunent; mountain in Berkshire County, Massachusetts, nameil from a conical 

pile of quartz stones on the southern slo[)e. It is of Indian origin, but traditions 

regarding it vary, one l>eing to the effect that the monument marks the grave of 

the first sachem who dietl in the region. 
Xoodus; village in Middlesex County, Connecticut. A contraction of the Indian 

machemoodus, meaning "place of noises." 
Xoody; county in South Dakota, named for Gideon G. Moody, United States Senator. 
Xooers; town and village in Clinton County, New York, named for Gen. Benjamin 

Mooers. 
Xoore; county in North Carolina, nam(Hl for Alfred M(X)re, an associate justice of 

the United States. 



214 PLAC'K NAMEft IN THE UNITED STATES. (bfllA. 

Moore; coniity in Tennos.«i<»o, nariie<l for Gen. William Moore, a prominent member 

nf tlic j^cnoral asscnil)!}' ol \ho State. 
Moore; <'niinty in T('xa>i, iiaine<l for ¥,. W. Moore, commodore of the Texas navy. 
Moorefield; town in Hardy County, West Virginia, named for Conrad Moore. 
Mooresville; town in Morjran County, Indiana, named for Samuel Moore, ifc? 

founder. 
Mooresville; town in Livinjrston County, Missouri, named for its founder, W. B. 

Moore. 
Moorhead; city in Clay County, Minntfjota, named for Gen. J. K. Moorheail, of 

Pitlshur^, Pennsylvania. 
Moorhead; town in CnHt<T C^junty, Montana, nameil for W. G. Moorehea<l of the 

Nortliern I'arilie Railroad. 
Moosabec; Ii;zlit-honse on tlie coast of Maine. An Indian word meaning *' bald 

jMMid place." 
Moose; ri v«t and plantation in Soniers(»t CVmnty, Maine. A corruption of the Imiisn 

word ninnsna, " wood eaters." 
Moose; stream in Tennsylvania. l)erive<l from the Indian word chinklacawo')iie, 

FneaninLT "it alni<Ht joins," an<l a]>plical)Ie to this river because there is a lion»e- 

slioc ImmkI in it where tiie extremities almost meet. 
Moosetookmeguntic; lake in Maine. An Indian won! meaning "where the hunt- 
ers watch the moos(» at nijrht." 
Moosup; river and villa<r<' in Windham County, Connecticut, named for the Indian 

sachem Mntissup. 
Mora; c<tunty in New Mexico. The Spani.sh name for raspberries. 
Moraga; town in Contra (•o.'*ta County, California. A Spanish wonl moaning 

'"lumdlc made by <:lejiners." 
Moran; city in Allen County, Kansiis, nanunl for Daniel Com yan Moran, a capitalist. 
Moran; mountain in the T«*ton Ilanjre, Wyonnng, nameil for Thomas Moran, the 

artist. 
Moravia; town in Cayu«,'a County, New York, name<l from the province in Austria. 
Moreau; riv«r in Missouri. A Freneli word signifying ''extremely well." 
Moreau: town in Saratojra County, New Y4>rk, named for Marshall Moreau, of 

I'' ranee. 
Morehead; town in Rowan County, Kentucky, named for Gov. James T. Morehejul 
Morehead; town in Carteret County, North Carolina, nameil for John M. Morehead, 

former <j'>vernor (tf tlie State. 
Morehouse; parish in Louisiana, named for tluMuan who obtained the grant from 

l>inon liastrop, I7<)4. 
Morehouse; town in Hamilton C(>nnty, New York, named for the first settler. 
Morena; town in San Die^/o County, California. A Spanish wonl meaning "brown 

bread." 
Morenci; villa^re in K<'naweeC«)unty. Michigan. The name is contract^l from Mont- 

m<»renci. 
Moreno; township in Kiverside County, California. A Spanish word meaning 

" brownish" or "swarthy." 
Moresville; village in Delaware County, New Yr>rk, named for the first settler. 
Morgan; counties in Alabama, (reor;ria, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Missouri, Ohio, 

Tennessi'c, and West \'ir*rinia. named for (Jen. Daniel Morgan, an officer in the 

Jtev<dntion. 
Morgan; county in Colorado, named for Col. (^hristopher A. Morgan, of the Colo- 

ra<lo \'olunttM'i*s. 
Morgan; county in Utah, named lor. I. Morjjjan (i rant, one of the earliest settlers in 

the county. 



<;annktt.J place NAMKS IN THK UNITED 8TATES. 215 

Morgan: town in Orleans County, Vormoiit, iianie<l for John Moi^^an, an original 

proprietor. 
Morganfirld; i-ity in Union County, Konturky; 
Morganton; town in Burke County, North Carolina. Name<l for Gen. Daniel 

Morjran, an olficer of the Revolution. 
Morgan Park; village in Cook County, Illinois, naine<l for William M. Morgan, the 

first Rattler. 
Morgantown; town in Monongalia County, West Virginia, name<l for (ien. Zaoquell 

Morgan, the original owner of the land. 
Morganville; city in Clay County, Kansiis, naniwl for itiji founder, Ebenezer Morgan. 
Moriah; peak of the White Mountains, New Hain[>8hire, an<l township in Essex 

Couirty, New York, named from the <listrict in Palestine. 
Morocojo; town in Monterey County, California. From the Sjianish, Moro^ mean- 
ing ** Moor," and rojo, '*crippUHl." 
Morrill; eity in Brown County, Kansas, named for (Jov. E. N. Morrill. 
Morrill; town in Waldo (Vmnty, Maine, name<l for Anson P. Morrill, former gover- 
nor of the State. 
Morrillton; eity in Conway ( 'ounty, Arkansai«, name<l for the early piomvrs, E. J. 

and (teorge H. Morrill. 
Morris; town in Litchfield County, Conneeti<»ut, name<l for James Morris, academy 

princijial. 
Morris; township and <'ity in <irundy County, Illinois, name<l for Isaac P. Morris, 

of Quincy, canal <'ommisHioner. 
Morris; county in Kansas, named for Thomas Morris, rnite<l States Senator from 

(Jhio. 
Morris; t^jwnship and village in Stevens County, Minnesota, nameil for C'harles A. 

F. M(>rris, civil engineer. 
Morris; countv in New Jersev, nameil for Ix^wis Morris. 
Morris; county in Texas, name<l for W. W. M(»rris. 
Morrison; town in Jefferson County, Colorado, named from the Morrison Stone and 

Lime Company, 
^^orrison; city in Whitt^side County, Illinois, named for Charles Morrison, of New 

York City*. 
Morrison; countv in Minnesota, nanuMl for William Morrison, an early Scotch fur 

tnuler, and the lirst white man to visit the sources of the Mississippi River. 
Morristown; a t')wn in Morris County, New Jersey, name<l for Lewis Morris, an 

Americiui statesman. 
Morristown; village in St. I-awrcnce County, New York, named for the principal 

proi>rietor. 
Morristown; town in Ihunblen County, Tennt^sset*, named for several brothers 

prominent in the affairs of the town. 
Morrisville; village in Miulison County, New York, namcnl for a family of early 

settlers. 
Morrisville; village in Wake County, North Corolina, nanuMl for the owner of the 

land. 
Morrisville; l)orough in Bucks County, Pennsylvania, named for Rol)ert Morris, 

the financier, who formerlv resided there. 
Monro; town in San Luis Obispo County, California, named from aca-sti^llatwl island 

rock at the mouth of the bay. A S]»anish word meaning ''castle." 
Morrow; county in Oregon, and t^>wn in Nez Penvs C-ounty, Idaho, named for 

Gen. Henry A. Morrow. 
Morrow; county, and village in Warn*n County, in Ohio, name<l for ( iovernor Jere- 
miah Morrow. 



216 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [BriLiT*, 

Morton; township an(i village in Tazewell CJounty, Illinoifl, named for Man'us Mor- 
ton, governor of MasHacluwetts, 1840-1843. 
Morton; count ien in Kanna^^ and North Dakota, named for Oliver P. Morton, United 

States SiMiator fron» Indiana. 
Morton; vilhige in S<'ott County, Miflsinsippi, given the maiden name of the wife of 

Col. E. W. Tavlor. 
Morven; t4»wn in Annon County, North Carolina, named from the mountain in 

Scotiaiid. 
Moscow; t4»wn in Somerset County, Maine, and twenty-five other places, name<i 

from the <'ity in Russia. 
Moshannon; cnn^k in Pennsylvania. A cr)rruption of a Delaware Indian word 

ineiuiing ''elk en»ek." 
Mosinee; vilhige in Marathon County, Wisconsin. Derived from the Indian woni 

meaning "moose." 
Motley; county in Texas, namo<l for Dr. William Motley, afiignerof the I>e<»larati«m 

of In(lepen<lence. 
Moulton; town in Appanoose* County, Iowa, naine<i for an engineer on the Chicago, 

Burlington and C^uincy liailroad. 
Moultonboro; town in Carroll County, New Ilampehire, name<l for Col. Jonathan 

Moulton, ont^ of the first settlers. 
Moultrie; county in Illinois, and fortification on Sullivan Island, in Charleston 

Ilarl)or, South Carolina; 
Moultrieville; town in Charleston County, South Carolina. Namwl for (ten. 

William Moultrie, of Kevolutionarv fame. 
Mound; city in Liim County, ritlge in M<^Pherson County, and valley in Laliette 

C« unity. Kansjis, so named on account of the tojwgraphy of the country. 
Mound Bayou; town in Holivar County, Mississippi, named for the Indian mounds 

on the ])ayon. 
Mound City; city in Pula<ki C'ounty, Illinois, name<i fmm Indian mounds in the 

vi4'inity. 
Moundsville; city in Marshall County, Wt»st Virginia, soname<l l)ecaii8e the largii»t 

mound of the mound l>uilders is situated here. 
Mount Calvin; mountain in the Adiron<lacks in R«sex County, New York, named 

for Vcrplanck Calvin, lor several y*'arssuj>erintendentof the Adirondack 8ur\'ey. 
Mount Carmel; city in Wabash County, lllin()is, and seventeen other placet*, U^ar 

the name of the mountain in Palestine. 
Mount Carroll; townshij) and city in Carroll C-ounty, Illinois, named for Charles 

Carroll, of Carrollton, Maryland. 
Mount Clemens; city in ^Iacond> C'ounty, Michigan, name<l for Judge Christian 

Clemens, its founder. 
Mount Gilead; town in Montgomery County, North Carolina, named from a conn- 
try church. 
Mount Gilead; villag(» in ^lorrow County, Ohio, named for the town in North 

Carolina. 
Mount Holly; town in Burlingti»n (^>unty, Xew Jersey, named for an eminem* 

covered with holly trees. 
Mount Hopkins; in the town of Williamstown, Berkshire County, Massachusetts, 

named for the Kev. Dr. Mark Hopkins, for many years president of Williams 

College. 
Mount Horeb; in the town of Tyringham, Berkshire County, Massachusettp, so 

called hy the Shak(»rs, who, in the eightivnth century, used the summit for 

relii'ious observances, after the manner of lioreh in Arabia. 
Mount Morris; township an<l village in Ogle ('ounty, Illinois, name<1 forT. A. Mor- 
ris, a bishoj» of the MetlKnlist Kpi.**copal Church, 1S:J6-1874. 



GANNETT.) l^LAC^ ^AMICS M THK tTNltEI> 8TATK9. 217 

Mount Morris; town in Livingston County, New York, named for Mr. Thomas 

Morris, of Philadelphia. 
Mount Peter; knob of blue dolomite in the villag:e of Great Barrington, Berkshire 

County, Massachusetts, name<l for Peter Ingereol, an early inhabitant, who 

owned it. 
Mount Pleasant; township and borough in Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania, 

HO named l)eoause of its pleasing location. 
Mount Pulaski; township and city in Logan County, Illinois, named for the Revo- 
lutionary general. Count Ihilaski, who was killed in the siege of Savannah in 

1779. 
Mount Race; one of the higher summits of the Taghkanic Mountains, in the town 

of Mount AVashington, Berkshire County, Massachusetts. Named for William 

Race, a resident of the western slope of the mountain. 
Mount Ri^a; extreme southern point of the Taghkanic Mountains in Litchfield 

County, Connecticut, and town in Dutchess County, New York, named from 

Mount Rhigi in Switzerland. 
Mount Sterling; township and town in Brown County, Illinois, so named by the 

early settlers because they considered it a valuable location for a town. 
Mount Sterling; city in Montgomery County, Kentucky, named from the city in 

Scotland, and ** mount" because of the numerous mounds in the vicinity. 
Mount Tom; town in Ham))6hire County, Massachusetts, named for Rowland 

Thomas. 
Mount Vernon; residence of Gen. George Washington, on the Potomac River, Vir- 
ginia. Named in honor of Admiral Edward Vernon, of the British navy, by 

I^wis Washington, who willed the estate to his brother, George Washington. 
Mount Vernon; to^^nship and city in Jefferson County, Illinois, city in Lawrence 

County, Missouri, and many other places, named generally from the home of 

Ge^)rge Washington. 
Mount Weston; situateil in the town of Dal ton, Berkshire County, Massachusetts, 

and named for the Hon. Bynin Weston, a resident, and lieutenant-governor of 

the Stat<\ 
Movestar; stream in Illinois. A comiption of the French mautHiiffe ierre, **bad 

land." 
Moweaqua; village in Shelby County, Illinois, named from the Indian, which is 

given the various meanings of "weeping woman," "wolf woman," "woman of 

the wolf totem." 
Mower; county in Minnesota, named for J. E. Mower, a meml>er of the Council. 
Muhlenberg; county in Kentucky, named for Gen. J. P. (J. Muhlenberg, an officer 

of the Revolutionary war. 
Muir; village in Ionia County, Michigan, named for W. K. Muir, superintendent of 

the Detroit and Mackinac Railway. 
Mullan; town in Shoshone County, Idaho, named for Lieut. John Mullan. 
Mullins; town in Marion County, South Carolina, name<l for the Mullin family, 

prominent in that country. 
Multnomah; county in Oregon. An Indian word, meaning "down river." 
Mulvane; city in Sumner County, Kansas, named for John R. Mulvane, of Topeka, 

Kansas. 
Muncie; village in Vermihon County, Illinois, and city in Delaware County, 

Indiana. The name of a subtribe of the Delaware Indians formerly residing in 

Central Indiana. It is said to refer to an "island." 
Muncy; town in Lycoming County, Pennsylvania, a corniption oi the Indian tribal 

name M%n»i, meaning "wolf." 
Mundy; township in Genesee County, Michigan, naincnl for P^lward Mundy, former 

lieutenant-governor of the State. 



218 PLArE NAMES IX THE UNITED STATES. (bull > 

Munfordville; town in Hart County. Kentnrky. named for Richanl I. Munlonl, a 

i<irin»r i»p»prift »r. 
Munising: \illa;^* in Ali!vr rouiity. Michi^n. From an Indian wonl ifiignif \ in); 

•at tlir littlt- i-lan*!."' 
Munnsville: villas*? in Madi.'^>n County. New York, named for A.sa Muim, the tiist 

.-ti»n*k»fi«fr in tht* plaiv. 
Munson: ti»\wis!iip in <M*aiiira County, Ohio, namc^l from the proprietor's* reeidencc 

in M^'n-M.n, Ma-'*sa<hn?it*tt.*. 
Murder: rret-k in < irnt-K-*' County. New York, so nameil lieoause the IxKiy of a man 

\vh«» WiL*^ snpjMisi**! til have l»een niunliTe*! wan found in the Htreani. 
Murfreesboro: ritv in Kntlivrfonl Countv. Tenne««ee, and town in Hertford Countv. 

Noith Carolina, naint^l for Col. Hanly Murfree, an officer of the Revolution. 
Murphy: township in Calavera?? County, Cahfomia, named for the miner wliodi?- 

<*ii\t*riMi ^n\t\ in tht* vicinity. 
Murphy: t«twn in Cherokei* County, North Dakota, named for A. D. Murphy, a 

jn«lirt* •»[ thi* >uiK*rior fourt. 
Murphysboro: t<twn.sliip. an<l city in Jackson County, in Illinois, name<l for William 

C. Murphy, one of the coniini.<'><ioners who lcx'ate<l the county peat. 
Murray: county in (TiH>n:ia, nauie<l for Thonia.** \V. Murray, former meml>er ot the 

I^L'islatnrc. 
Murray: pn-cin<t in Shoshone County, Idaho, name<l for a miner who ownetl tlie 

lan«l upon \vhi«h the town is huilt, jrivinjr away many lots to encoura^re [jcople 

to settle there. 
Murray: city in Callaway County, Kentucky, nameil for Hon. John L. Murray, 

ineniber of Conjrress. 
Murray: county in Minnesota, nanie<l for Hon. W. P. Murray, a memlx*rof theTtT- 

ritorial le<:is!ature, an<l pioneer of St. Paul. 
Murrayville: vilhiL'e in Mor^xan County, Illinois, named for it« founder, Samuel 

Murray. 
Murrieta: town in Riverside County, California, named for a fonner proprietor of 

a lar^e tra«t of land. .1. .Murrieta. 
Muscackituck: river in Indiana. An Indian word meaning **])oud river,'* and si» 

naiiM'd hecanse of the many stagnant ponds alon^ it« course. 
Muscatine; county, and city in same county, in Iowa, probably derived from the 

Indian and meaning; "<lweller in the prairie." 
Muscle Shoals: s<'ries of rapids in the Tennesstv River in northern Alabama, s*» 

namiMl because of the trreat nundn-r of mu.'-'sels foun<l there. 
Muscoda: villa<:e in ( Jran*! County, Kansiis. An Indian word meaning ** prairie," 

or "^'ra.'^sy i)lain.'' 
Muscogee; county in (ieor^ia and town in Cnvk Nation, Indian Territory, name«l 

for the tribes of Indians of the Creek confederacy. The name posnibly meaiu< 

"swamj)," or "open marshy land." 
Musconetcong; river in New Jersey. Indian word meaning ** rapid stream." 
Muscotah: city in Atchison County, Kansas. An Indian wonl meaning "beauti- 
ful i)niirie," or ''prairie of fire." 
Music: cliff in the Rocky Mountains, Arizona, so named by the expedition }>artyof 

the Colorado iH'cause of the sou^inn^ of the wind about the cliffs. 
Muskeego: lake, river, and townslnj) in Waukesha County, Wisc'onsin. Fn»m an 

(Jjibwa Indian wonl meaning "swamp." 
Muskegon: c«)unty, and city in same county, in Michijran. An Ojibwa Indian wonl 

mcanint: "swamp." 
Musketo: creek in Mahoning N'allev. Ohio, so named by the surveyors on m'count 

of the overwhelminir numU'r of mos«|uit(H's encountered there. 



OANNETT.l PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 219 

Muskingum; river and county in Ohio. A Delaware Indian wonl meaning 
**nu>OHe-(»ye river," so c^IUhI iKH'Uusci ol the numlx»r of moose and elk which 
inhal)it4Ml the country. 

Musquacook; chain of lakes in Maine. An Indian word meaning *'birch-l>ark 
place." 

Mustang; stream in Texas. A Spanish name for the wild horse, herds of wild 
horst^ having been abundant in Texas at an early date. 

Muttonville; village in Ontario County, New York, so named because of the estab- 
lishment of a tallow chandlery. 

Myerstown; village in Lebanon County, Pennsylvania, nameil for its founder, Isaac 
Mvere. 

Xyrtle; village in Union County, Mississippi, so called because of the abundance of 
myrtle trees in the vicinity. 

Xystic; river an<l village in New London County, Connecticut, and river in Massa- 
chusetts. From the Indian mf/w, ** great," and tuk, "tidal river;" hence, "the 
great river." 

Nacimiento; town in San Luis Obispo County, California. A Spanish wonl mean- 
ing "nativity." 

Nacio; town in Contra Costa County, California. From the Spanish meaning 
"lam bom." 

Naco^oches; county in Texas, name<i from the former inliabitants, a subtribe of 
the Caddo Indians. 

Nahant; town and watering place in Essex County, Massachusetts. An Indian 
wonl meaning "at the |>oint," or "two things unite<l," the latter translation 
applying to the two islands connect chI by a narrow lx»ach. Johnson states that 
the name originated in Nahonton, the name of the Indian chief. Nason gives 
the origin from nahanto^ meaning "twin islands." 

Nahma; town in Delta County, Michigan, on the Sturge«>n River. The Indian 
name for sturgeon. 

Naiwa; tributary of the Mississippi. An Indian word meaning "copper snake 



river." 



Namekagon; lake in Wisconsin. DeriviKl from the Indian nnnma, "sturgeon," 

signifying "place where sturgin^ns are plentiful." 
Nameless; town in I^urens County, (k^^rgia. So named from the fact that in a 

list of several humlred names submitted to the iM)st-of!ice authorities not one 

was found satisfactory'. 
Nameoki; town in Madison County, Illinois. An Indian wonl meaning "fishing 

place," or "place of lish." 
Nance; county in Nebraska, name<l for Albinus Nance. 
Nansemond; river and county in Virginia. Said to Ik^ <lerived from the Indian 

nennfchimendy "whence we fled,' or " when<'e we wert* driven off." 
Nantahala; rivers in C Georgia, and Macon County, North Carolina. A corru[)te<l 

Cherokee name, signifying "middle sun," "noon sun." 
Nanticoke; river in Delaware, town in Broome County, New York, and Iwrough 

in Luzerne C^)unty and mountain in Pennsylvania, namcnl from the Indian tritn^ 

The wonl means "ti<le-water i>eople." 
Nantucket; island an<] county in Massachusetts. This name apiH*are<l upon the 

maps in 1630 as AV/Zwito, and some authoriti(»s state that it is derivcMl from an 

Indian won! meaning "far away;" others say that its present form is a direct 

derivation of the Indian nnntwky which n»eans that the sjmdy, sterile soil 

tempted no one. 
Napa; coimty, and city in sanu» <*ounty, in California. Said to 1r* an Indian wonl 

meaning "city," or *' house." 



^M 220 

^^^ Naolei 



PLACE NAMES IN THK t'NITED STATES. 



ml llnlario County, New York, i 



I til fui Kapi^Hn 



Haporville; Uiwnahipainl I'ily in DiifKisi- Coiiiily, lllinoui, luunecl for Jwvpb X«{*(, 

1nuni\vT. 
NapUs; towns in Scoll Cuunty, lllin 

from Naples in Italy. 
N&poleon; townitliip and TillaK*- id I 

Bonagiarte, the (.'cirxinnn grneml. 
NftTKi^o: town in Tiilare Connty, California. A tlipanixh won! mfSDine "wwft 

Sarka; city in R«|>nh1ican County, KnneaH, naniEnl for the ilan^hler of a nilnad 

oiUinal. Till! name ia of Intlian derivation. 
KajrragauBett; aiiTiiiner rmort in Wasliington County, Rhoi]<^ Idanil. An Anplio- 

zatiiin of tlie Indian naniu of a tribe, which in their lan^ia^ nicans "pmpkn 

the jKiMil." 
Haah; county in North Carolina, named for Gen. Francif Na^h. 
NnaliotA: town in Wankewha County, Wiwnnnin. An Imlian won! wliicta, iDlb 

Al^niguin and Dakula lanRiiagee, means, n?«qi«'tively, "thi? twins,'" or "kkfe 

up Huioke." 
ira«liu&; town in Chii'kassw Count)', Iowa, named from the city in New [Um|MiuK 
HMhun; city in Ilillslxjru C-onnty, New Hampshire. An Indian wont mcwuiif 

"land l)etween." 
Ifaahvilla; township ami i-ity in WaehinKton County, Illinois. nanie<d froni tbriii; 

in Tenneasee. 
Naahville; village in Barry County, Michigan, named for K. W. Na-^h. whn laiJi« 

the Michifcan Central Kaiiniad throu);h the town. 
Nashville; town in Naeh Oninty, Nortli Carolina, and several other towni, lunW 

for tien. Francis Naah. 
Nashville; tiiwn in llolnier) County, Ohio, prolmbly named for Jui]^ Simon NKh. 
Nashville; city in Pavidson County, Tenneasec, nunie<l for Almfr Nanh. nl oi 

fjioveruor of North Carolina. Acoording to another authority it was named lif 

tien. Francis Nash. 
Haaaau; counties in Florida and Now York, and several t^wns in lUfferetit !!i 

named from the Duchy ol Naaeau in (iermany. 
Hatchaug; river in Connet'ticut. Derive<l from an Indian wortl im^inlR!! " 

lietween," or " in the middle." 
Natick; town in Middleaux County, MaBBaiihuBettH. An Iniliaji won! ma 

"ploeo of hills." 

Hativldad; town in Monterey C«unty, California. The Spanish form of "udivity." 
Natrona; eounty in Wyoming. Derived from tht' Sjianish, atUnm, meaning "n 

<arb(inate of sofla," and given thin county becauneof tliesi)ring8of thiHcharvWT 

within its Uniils. 
Naubuc; town in Hartford County, Conneetient. It issnid loho ncurrupiionoflbf 

Indian, ujiniii, "tiooiied," or "overflowed." 
NauKcttuck; rivt-r, ami borough in New Haven County, in Conneetient. .\utbnritkt 

differ an to the meaning of itn Indian origin, ^ivln^ lioth "ono ire<c" and " 

of the river." 
Nanvoo; city in Hancock County, Illinois, named in obedienee ti> a "revi-lali 

made to .loseph Smith, one of its Mormon founders. 
Navajo; county, and town in Apache County, in Arizona, nameil for the Indian trtlr. 

who are said to have been 80 named by the Spaniards, the word tneaiiing n kioJ 

of clanp knife, and as applied to the trilw sipufying " knife- whetting ]teo|>lt^" 
Navarre; village in IHItark County, Dhio. nameil from the province in Spain. 
Navarro; county in Texas, named for Jose Antonio Navarm, a Mexii&o by )an^ J 

but a prominent Texas citizen. ' 



GANNETT] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 221 

Kavesink; village in Monmouth County, New Jersey. An Indian word meaning 

**high land Ixjtween waters.*' 
Kavidad; village in Jackson County, Texa^i. A Si^anish word meaning ** Christmas 

Dav." 
Kayattpoint; village in Bristol County, Rhode Island. Probably a corruption of 

the Indian, nayaiuj, meaning ''jwint" or "comer.** 
Nazareth; borough in Northampton County, Pennsylvania, settled by Moravians, 

and by them named from the town in Galilee of Palestine. 
Nebo; mountain in the Wasatch Range, Utah, and fourteen towns and villages, the 

name being transferred from the mount in Palestine. 
Nebraska; State of the Union, and river in Iowa and Missouri. A Sioux Indian 

word meaning "shallow water** or "broad water.** 
Necedah; village in Juneau County, AVisconsin. A corruption of the Ojibwa Indian 

mssida^ "let there be three of us.** 
Needham; town in Norfolk County, Massachusetta, named from the town in 

England. 
Needles; peaks of the Mojave Mountains in California, so named on account of 

their peculiarly sharp and slender outlines. Township hi San Bemanlino 

County, California. 
Neenah; town in Westmoreland County, Virginia, and city in Winnebago County, 

Wisconsin. The name is deriveii from an Indian word meaning "water.** 
Negaunee; city in Marquette County, Michigan. An Indian word meaning 

"first,** "ahead,** "he goes before;** an effort to translate the English word 

"pioneer.** 
Neillsville; city in Clark County, Wisconsin, named for a family of early settlers. 
Neli^h; city in Antelo|)e County, Nebraska, named for Hon. John D. Neligh. 
Nelson; counties in Kentucky and Virginia, named for Thomas Nelson, governor 

of Virginia in 1781. 
Nelson; village in Nuckolls County, Nebraska, nameil for C. Nelson Wheeler, who 

owned the town site. 
Nelson; county in North Dakota, named for Hon. N. E. Nelson, a prominent pio- 
neer settler. 
Nelsonville; town in Putnam County, New York, named for Elisha Nelson, who 

built the first house in the settlement. 
Nema; town in Santa Clara County, California. A Spanish word meaning "letter 

seal." 
Nemaha; counties in Kansas and Nebraska. An Indian word meaning "muddy 

water." 
Nennescah; river in Kansas. An Indian wonl meaning "good river.** 
Neodesha; city in Wilson County, Kansas, at the junction of the Fall and Venligris 

rivers, and for this reason given the Indian name which njeans "meeting of the 

waters.** 
Neogra; village in Cumberland County, Illinois. An Indian word meaning "place 

of the Deity.** 
Neosho; river and county in Kansas and vMy in Newton County, Missouri; 
Neosho Falls; city in Woodson County, Kansas. An Indian word meaning "clear 

cold water.** 
Nepaug; small stream in Connecticut. An Indian woni meaning "waters** or 

"fresh pond.** 
Nephi; city in Juab County, Utah, named for the youngest son of I^ehi, a character 

of the Book of Mormon. 
NeiKmset; township and village in Bureau County, Illinois, named from Neponset, 

Maasacbusetta. 



Neponset; xutiebitinii nf Boston ami river in eaelem MnamchUBetbi. An IdiEu 

wiinl iiieniiini; " lie walke in hie sleep." 
Neptune City; lioruntEh in Monmouth County, New Jera^y, sit iinpiul ImauK Bt lU 

l<'inti>in on the Ben»iirle. 
Nesbitt; t.iwn in De Soto County, MisiiB)>ippi, named for par)>' si^tllt^ra. 
Nescopeck; I'Kvk and tM>rough in Lnxernt? County, Punnsylvani*. A IVUow 

lii'lian woril meaning "dark, deep, and still water." 
Heebejniny; tilri'Hiu in Burke Connty, K-nntiylvaniiL A l>elaw«rt? Intliaii ixinl 

imMLiing "stream formed by thet-onfiuenteot two hranrhes." 

INeshaniiock; Hiream, aiiit Tiling' in Mcix^r County, I'cnn^yUvnia; 
Neshannock Falls; village in Ijiwremv County, Pennsylvania. \ IVlmn' 
IniiiMM wcrii tiivaninit "two adjoining Btreatns" or "streams tiiakiii^ "nn hj 
lliiivini; lojii'llier." 
Neahoba; coiiiily in Mieeiaiippi. An Indian word innuitnt; "^rsy wntf." 
Nesowadnetaunk; etreum and mountBins in Maine. Ad Indian nanir uuwnw 

"stixuiMi amonii the mountainB." 
Nesquehonlng': stream and viUajie in Carbon Comity, I'ennsiylvania. A IXiUwn 

Indian word meaning "black lick." 
NesB: county, and city in same comity, in Khmsuh, [laintil (nr Corjil, N'oah V. Ktn, 

of ihe Seventh Kaneae Cavalry. 
Neaaelroad; villa^'e in Jui'kson County, Wi«tVir]dnia,n)iin(>i{ lorllielinitpwtinMK 
Nettle Carrier; i'r««k and village in Overton County, Tenui;*«f, named (or aCbov' 

ki'c Indian nf loral notv. 
Nettleton; towns in Lee County. Mit«itwippi, and Caldwell Connlv. Mjeemii 

nanu'l for a former vice-president of tlie Kansas City, Mempliisand Birmin^uEi 

ttailroRd. 
Nevada; rotate of the Union, ix>untie8 in Arkaniaas and California, and mouni^nid 

tlie wes'lern eoasL A Siiatiish wonl meaning "snow-cla^l," "snowy Uaii" 

orip^iiially applied to the snow-eappeil mounl^na. 
Nevada; Utwnnhii) and city in Story County. lown, so named \)y eeltlere fiunitln 

Slate ii[ Nevada. 
Neveriink; river in New Jersey. 
New; villattc in On m to County, IVii 

ti|>i1i!<, Indiana. 
New Albany; township and city in Floyd County, Indi 

New York. 
New Almaden; town in Santa Clara County. California, enntainiu); the mutt t» 

diir-livo ijuii'kiiilver mine in the Unite<l Slates. Nameil froai the i|uicka]n< 

mines of Almaden in Spain. A Spanish word meaning "mine" or "niinptiL" 
Newark; town in Newcastle County, IX'lanare, and cities in Eaaen Countv. .\Ft 

Jer>ey, and Licking County, Ohio, named from the town in England. 
Newark; village in Wayno County, New York, named hy early settlers from li» 

eity in New Jersey. 
Newaygo; county, and village in same county, in Michigan, namtHl for an luilm 

chief. The name is said to mean "mui:h water." 
New Bedford; city iii Bristol County, Msnsachueetls. The name of tbo owwr ^ 

til,' Uiwn (tile was RuswU, the family name of the Duke of Bedford. 
Newbem; city in Craven County, North Carolina, named from the town of Bemu 

Irtwitxerland. 
Newberry; mountain in California, named for Captain Newberry, 
Newberry; lillage in Lnce County, Michigan, named for John A. Newberrv, ttirk- 

holiler in the Detroit, Hackinae and Klan^uette Railroad. 
IJewberry; township in Miami County, Ohio, probably named by n settler fnia 

Newbury port, MasHuzhnsi^tCs. 



nied from Albujb 




4NNrrT.] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 223 

Towberry; county, and town in same county, in South Can)lina, said to have been 

named for a prominent resident family, or, according to another authority, for 

a captain in Sumter's State troops. 
Tew Boston; township and city in Mercer County, Illinois, name<i from the city 

in Massachusetts. 
Tew Braunfels; city in Comal County, Texas, named from the town in Prussia. 
Te'w Bremen; village in Auglaize County, Ohio, name<1 from the city in Germany. 
re"w Brighton; borough in Beaver County, Pennsylvania, named from the city in 

England. 
re"w Brunswick; city in Middlesex County, New Jersey, incorporated in the time 

of and named for King (leorge II, of the House of Brunswick. 
Te'wburg; city in Orange County, New York, named from the town in Scotland. 
Newbury; town in Kssex County, Massachusetts; 
Ne"wbnryx)ort; city in Essex County, Massachusetts, originally a part of Newbury. 

Named from the town in England. 
Newcastle; county in Delaware, and twenty cities and towns in the Unite<l States, 

generally so called from the town in England or for the Duke of Newcastle. 
Newcastle; city in Lawrence County, Pennsylvania, named from the city in 

England. 
lew Comerstown; village in Tusi«rawas County, Ohio. A translation of the name 

of the Delaware Indian chief Nelmoawes, meaning **King Newcomer.*' 
Tew Eg:ypt; village in Ocean County, New Jersey, named from Egypt in Africa 

because of the extensive corn fields in the vicinity. 
fewfane; town in Windham County, Vermont, said to have l)een named for 

Thomas Fane, one of the **men of Kent.*' 
lew Florence; city in Montgomery County, Missouri, named for the daughter of 

E. A. Lewis, an early settler, and given the prefix to distinguish it from another 

town of the same name in the State. 
Tow Geneva; village in Fayette County, Pennsylvania, named from the principal 

city of Switzerland. 
%ew GKiinea; neighlx)rhood in the town of Sheffield, Berkshire County, Massachu- 
setts, so named because of a settlement of several hundred negroes who escaped 

from bondage in New York State. 
few Hamburg; village in Scott County, Missouri, named from the city in Germany. 
Tew Hampshire; State of the Union, named from the county in England. 
few Hanover; county in North Carolina, named from the Duchy of Germany. 
Tew Harmony; town in Posey County, Indiana, settletl by the ** Harmonists," and 

named for that sect. 
few Haven; county, and city in same county, in Connecticut, settled by parties 

from Boston, who calle<l it a "new haven." 
few Haven; town in Addison County, Vermont, name<l from the city in Connecticut. 
few Iberia; town in Iberia Parish, Louisiana, given the ancient name of Spain. 
fewicarg^t; river in Alaska. An Indian word meaning "frog river." 
few Jersey; State of the Union; originally a grant to Sir George Carteret, who 

named it for his home on the Isle of Jersey, off the coast of England. 
few Kent; county in Virginia, and island in Chesapeake Bay, named from the 

county in England. 
few Hartford; town in Litchfield County, Connecticut, settled by people from 

Hartford. 
few Lezin^ton; village in Perry County, Ohio, named from the town in Massa- 
chusetts, 
few London; county, and city in same county, in Connecticut, and town in Stanly 

County, North Carolina, named from London in England. 




PLACE NAMES IN THK tiNITKD 8TATKS. 



named fmni Hem lyvubn 



I XTew iMndon: dly in WaiiiHua Coaiily, Wi 

OounecticLit, hy an early settler. 
[ Sew Hadrid; (.-ounty, and city hi mmv county, in SliaBoori. The laiid tne or^mlti 
a Krant to Uen. George Morgan trotu tjpoin, and tras naniMl by Mm Inini » 
principal city. 
Newmarket; town in Roi^kiu^Iiani C'ounty, Ni*w HatDpshitv, nan>«>l (rnni tbtdtj 

ill Knjtiand. 
Hew Varlboro; town in Bcrkshi to County, MaB3at'huwtt«, natiieil fmni Uittalf n 

Jliclfltfwx (.Vmnty. 
New Mexico: Torrttciry iif tbe Union, named from the country nf Mv.xiiv. 

I Newman; city in Cciweta County, Georgia; 
Newmanville; villap? in Alacliiu County, Florida. Named for llwi. Daniel Sff 
iiinri, an oHicvr in the Seminole n-ar. 
New Orleans; I'iiy in OrleanK parish, Ijouisiajia, named from Ih^ citv in FtvKe. 
New Fbtladelphis; city in Tuwarawax Coiiuly, Ohio, named by its liiiin'ier, )(te 

Kiii«>ly. fniLii ilii- .'ily in Pennsylvania. 
Newport; Uiwna in Herkimer County, New York, and CartiTt-t Conntj-, Surtl 

Carolina, and county in Rhode lelanil, named Irom the t-ity in Rhode leliiiil. 
Newport; borough In I'erry County, Pennaylvania, bo named at tlie tinM of tb 

u[)enin)2: of tlie Pennsylvania canal, aa being a new port for ehipping. 
Newport, city in New{Hirt County, Rhode Island, so nametl by a i«rty of fvtlkfl 

from Portsmontli, who mlle'l it a "new port." 
Newport News; city in Warwick County, Virginia, named for Cupt. Chrisbipho 

New|X)rl and Captain (or Sir William) Newfv. 
New Bichmond; village in Olennont County, Ohio, naine<l from the Hty in Vir^inii 
New Richmond; city in St. Cniix County, Wiscon^, named for RicJiiiinuil Dii. 



Jlder 



1 Weetchet 



, New York, nameil from the dtj a 



NewBochelle; city 

Newry; towns in Troup County, (Jeorgiu, and Oxfonl Cotinty, Maine, lo«iu>hipiD 

Freelmrn C-onnty, Minnesota, borough in Blair County, Pennsvlvania, and io« 

in Vernon County, Wieconsin, named either directly or indirectlv from the torn 

in Ireland. 
New Smjnma; town in Orange County, Florida, named from the native platccilliU 

wife of Dr. Andrew Tnrnhull, a colonist. 
Newton; county in Arkaiiaax, named for Isaac Newton, who spoke in oppoMtinDM 

Becemion at tbe meeting in Little Rock, in ISttl. 
Newton; county, and town in Baker CHiuitly, in Gt^orgia, city in Jasper Oxuiiy, 

Illinoia, and counties in Indiana, Miwu)uri, and Texas, named for 8er^ Jolii 

Mewlon, of the Revolutionary war. 
Vewton; city in Harvey County, Kansas, nurjied from the city in Itfaagclin^etta. 
Newton; city in Middlesex Countv, Massac liuaetts, originally a part of C^mlirvt^ 

and wlien separated called "new town," afterwards contracts! to Newton. 
Newton; county in Miiviraippi, named for Sir Isaac Newton. 
New Ulm; city in Brown County, Minneaota, named by inimigranifi from thai 

native city of Ulm, Germany. 
New York; State of the Union, and county in same State, nanieil for the Dafcetl 

York, the original grantee. 
Nea Peroe; county, and town ui same county, in Idaho, and river in YeUowMM 

T^rk, named for a tribe of Indiana, who were so trailed by the French aettkn 

the phraae meaning " pierced nose." 
Niagara; county in New York and river between I^ke Erie and I^ke Ontario. M 

Iroquois Indian word meaning "acroea the ueck," or "at the neck. 





©ANKBIT.] PLACE NAMKS IN THE UNITED STATES. 225 



Falls; city in Niagara County, New York, named from the celebrated falls 

on the Niagara River. 
Hiantic; river, village, and bay in New London County in Connecticut. An Indian 

word meaning **at the point of land on a tidal river.'' 
Vicholas; county in Kentucky, named for Col. George Nicholas, a Revolutionary 

officer. 
Vicholas; county in West Virginia, named for an early governor, W. C. Nicholas. 
Vicholas; village in Wasco C9unty, Oregon, named for an early settler. 
Vicholasville; city in Jetsamine County, Kentucky, named for Col. George Nich- 
olas, a Revolutionary officer. 
Vicholville; village in St. Lawrence County, New York, named for E. S. Nichols, 

an agent of the proprietor. 
Vickerson; city in Nickerson County, Kansas, named for Thomas Nickerson, an 

officer of the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railroad. 
VicoUet; county, and village in same county, in Minnesota, named for Joseph Nicho- 
las Nicollet, a French explorer, and cartographer. 
Vicomanchee; very dark stream in Washington. An Indian word meaning 

"shadowy water." 
Vigger Baby Hill; mining camp in Dolores County, Colorado, so named because 

of the large amount of black oxide of manganese found in the outcrop. 
Vilaks; mountain in Oregon. Derived from the Indian word, nilakshi meaning 

"daybreak." 
Vinety-siz; town in Greenwood County, South Carolina, so named because it was 

96 miles from the Cherokee Indian trading town of Keowee. 
Vinevah; township in Johnson County, Indiana, and six other places, bear the 

name of the ancient capital of Assyria. 
Viobrara; river, and village in Knox County, in Nebraska. An Indian word mean- 
ing "broad water," or "running water." 
Vippenose; creek and valley in Pennsylvania. An Indian word meaning "like 

summer," or "where cold does not penetrate." 
Nishxiabotna; river in Iowa, and village in Atchison County, Missouri. An Indian 

word meaning "canoe-making river." 
Viskayuna; town in Schenectady County, New York. An Indian word meaning 

"extensive com flats." 
Nitro; town in Contra Costa County, California, named from the nitroglycerin 

works within its limits. 
Niwot; village in Boulder County, Colorado. The Indian name for Left Hand 

Creek. 
Noank; village in New London County, Connecticut. Derived from the Indian 

word, naynngt "point of land." 
Noble; county in Indiana, named for Noah Noble, an early governor. 
Noble; county in Ohio, named for James Noble, an early settler. 
Noble; county in Oklahoma, named for John Noble, at one time Secretary of the 

Interior. 
Nobles; county in Minnesota, named for Col. William H. Nobles, a meml)er of the 

Minnesota Territorial legislature. 
Noblesboro; town in Lincoln County, Maine, named for James Noble, an early 

settler. 
Noblesyille; city in Noble County, Indiana, name<l for Noah Noble, an early 

governor. 
Nockamixon; township and village in Bucks County, Pennsylvania; a Delaware 

Indian word meaning " where tnere are three houses." 
Nodoway; county and river in Missouri. An Algonquian Indian word signifying 

" snakes," and, figuratiyely, "aliens" or "enemies." 

BiilL26a-05 16 



r 



I 



226 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 

NogBlea; town in Santa Craz County, New Mexit-o. Deriveil from thp BpatIl:^b 

word, -nogal, meaninit "«>minon walnut tne." 
Nokomia; city in Montgiwijery County, ItJinois. named for the mother of Weoonih 
Longfellnw'H " Hiawatha," theOjihwa Indian word meaning " ^ri^Ddmolber. ' 
Nolan; i-ounty in Texax. named for Philip Nolan, a trader and Indian fighter in thi^ 

earl}- davf of TexaH. 
Hordboff; town in Ventura County, California, named for Charity Nordhofl. 
Norfolk; county in Maexai'husettJi, eity in Madison County, Nebraska, aiki) <xmnic, 

anil town in rame iwiinty, in Virginia, named from the county in England. 
Normal; town in McLean f'onnty, IllinoiB, bo named because it is the eeat of lln> 

Slate Normal School. 
Norman; rouuty in Minnesota, namtnl for Norman W. Kittmn, a prominfiil 

Normans Kill; stream in New York, named for Albert Andrieesen Bradt de for- 

man, an early settU'r. 
Norridg'ewock; t'lwn in Bomerset County, Maine. An Indian wonl meaninK 

"place of deer," or, according to another authority, "smooth water betsnen 

falls." 
Norria; town within the corporate limits of Detroit, settled by and named ffir Col 

P. W. Norrii. 
Nonia; mountain in Yellowiitonci Park, named for PhiletUB W. Norris, the wmiul 

superintendent of the reserve. 
NorrifltowD; borougli in Montgomery County, Pennsylvania, naniwl for Isaac NV' 

ris, who purchased the land from William Penn. 
Nortb; town in Orangiebur^ County, Bouth Carolina, Damed for John F. North, iU 

North Adams; city in Berkshire County, Ma»mchnsetis, named from its relation tn 

Adanip, of which it was uri^nally a imu-I. 
Northampton; town in Hampshire County, Mast«chiisettH. and i^tintiM in Ft^nn- 

pylvRnm ami Vit^nia, named from the county In England. 
Northampton; county in North Carolina, name<l for the Earl of Northampton. 
Northampton; township in Summit County, Ohio, named by Simon Prior, an mlir 

w-tlliT frrmi Nfirthanipton, Masnachusetl^. 
North Anna ; river in Viririnia, nameil for Anne, tlueen of England. 
North Bend; city in Dodge County, Nebraska, so called because it is situated in 0» 

north bend of the Platte River. 
North Bend; village in Hamilton County, Ohio, name<l fmm the bend in the Obln 

River at that point. 
North Canaan; town in I.itchfielii County, Conne<'tieut, nanied from ite relation w 

Cumin n, iiF which it originally formed a part. 
North Carolina; State of the T^nlon, named for King Charles II cif Englanil. 
North Danaville; town in Livingston County, New York, named for Daniel 1'. 

Faulkner, an early settler. 
Northeast; town in DutclieHH Connty, New York, so named l>ecauBe of its Keograplii- 

cal position in the county. 
Northfleld; town in Franklin County, MsssachuBetta, BO called because of its nortli- 

eily titoation in the couuty. 
Northfleld; city in Rii« County, Minneeola, named for John W. North, who laid 

out the town. 
Northfleld; lownsliip in t^unimit County, Ohio, named for its location in tht 

county. 
XTorthford; viliaee in New Haven Cotmty, Connecticut. Tlie name is formed fiwi 

AbrtA Branford and Walting/tn-d, of which towuH the village was origiDallym 




GAWNKTT.l PLACE NAME8 IN THE UNITED STATES. 227 

Horth Hero; town in Grand Isle County, Vermont, named for one of the two 
islands which were called *'Two Heroes'' and jnimted to Ethan Allen, the 
intention being that they should be owned only by brave men warmly ^disposed 
toward the Revolution. 

Vorth Kanchester; town in Wabash County, Indiana, named from the city in 
England, with the prefix ''north," to distinguish it from another Manchester 
in the State. 

Vorthport; characteristic name given to several places in the United States. 

Vorthtunberland; towns in Coos County, New Hampshire, and Saratoga County, 
New York, county, and borough in same county in Pennsylvania, and county 
in Virginia, named from the county in England. 

North Vernon; township and town in Jennings County, Indiana, named from the 
town of Vernon in France. 

Vorthville; township and village in Wa3me County, Michigan, named for its loca- 
tion in the northerly part of the oldest county in the State. 

Vorth Webster; village in Kosciusko County, Indiana, named for Daniel Webster. 

Norton; county, and city in same county, in Kansas, named for Capt Orloff Norton, 
of the Fifteenth Kansas Cavalry. 

Norton; town in Bristol County, Massachusetts, named from the town in England. 

Norton; township in Summit County, Ohio, named for Birdsey Norton, a principal 
land proprietor. 

Norton Sound; an inlet of Bering Sea on thecoastof Alaska, named for Sir Fletcher 
Norton. 

Nortonville; city in Jefferson County, Kansas, named for L. Norton, jr., of the 
Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railroad Company. 

Norwalk; city in Fairfield County, Connecticut, said to have been so named because, 
when purchased from the Indians, the northern boundary was to extend north- 
ward from the sea one day's walk, according to the Indian marking of the dis- 
tance. According to another authority it is derived from nayang, ''point of 
land." 

Norwalk; .town in Warren County, Iowa, and city in Huron County, Ohio, named 
from Norwalk, Connecticut. 

Norway; township and city in Dickinson County, Michigan, so named by the early 
Norwegian settlers. 

Norway; towns in Herkimer County, New York, and Orangeburg County, South 
Carolina, named from the country in Europe. 

Norwich; city in New London County, Connecticut, and village in Chenango County, 
New York, named from the city in England. 

Norwich; village in Kingman County, Kansas, and town in Hampshire County, 
Massachusetts, named from Norwich, Connecticut. 

Norwood; town in Norfolk County, Massachusetts, and twenty-two other places, 
being generally named from the town in England. 

Nottoway; river and county in Virginia, named for the Indian tribe, the word 
meaning ''snake" — that is, an enemy. 

Novato; village and township in Marin County, California. A Spanish word 
meaning "new, * ''commencing in anything." 

Novo- Arkhangelsk; seaport of Alaska, named from the city in Russia. 

Noxubee; county in Mississippi. An Indian word meaning "stinking water." 

Nuckolls; county in Nebraska, named for an early settler.. 

Nueces; river and county in Texas. Derived from the Spanish word nt/^z, meaning 
"nnty" pecan. 

Nuevo; town in San Diego County, California. A Spanish word meaning "new" 
or "modem." 



13 THE miZD STATES. rBru.258. 



.1 X<'H-*ar-7 •^?fxiiC7. r.Iim»k jni mwn m LhrincscoD County. Nev 
T n_ >•"'—: r- ai "3i* Isisaa -wri ■w jh Awi . Bcanar "hilly,*" or. aocofding 

jftT* : i* •'v.iLz*: « Vnncy. 5<w Y'irk. ovicnallT ■riti g n AiodL An 

J|y» "I.:!-- .'. V — 'k'io. lift^ne*: 3'r Jsmes&W Xv^^chi^ tintforvmor of theTerritniy. 
0«ae ". j;r^ Ji r: 'jn*^ '^iiziry. Siacs. C^AtiCL An Inifwn woid "*<^»«»*g ** fooii- 

Oak. 1 T*^^ Till-", it-^i ^ r^'ni'cxacai:!! vith, fc > lB i. mmt. park, point. ri<lge, som- 
=_-- - c. - T-.. -i..*. i::»i .^jfy. aai c«cnll7 io crnen on accoont of the pre^ 

<^*^^*^ ' ir- ..1 'X':r?««GK' «r>:4xixST. Maia riwwrri naoMd from the town in 



^^'*''*^'^ - •!.- '7 * Xj-^ 'lar 4»: samieti frr>fiL the prevaiom of oak opening 
Oakland .*- - r*ir: '.• ii=*t. N-^raica. luneii ior the man vbo purchased tbe 

0ak:«7 ■*- r. L c:iz: < . •— Tjt. fLudWw osiMii for Hisl Elna Oiikknr Gardner. 

0&kl«7 - Li^ - ^*r-:i^-' •/. cztj Xic^Tgan naif d for an early pioneer. 

Oa:=ia2is YLmz r ^ tr .=. \r^> c^i^ ^' 2aa»e*i ^<>iimk it was the scene of the masBKre 

: ?, " -1.-:. a^ ah**! '-> iL=..i-T ry :rj»* Apadbea. 
0'c«»rlir> - r«-i :i: :* O *iz.'.j. Kaiusks. aaaied iroai. the city in Ohio. 

Oc^rlin -ki?^ .1 L* r:^.:: O.cnn-. tl^ciSx zaoed for Jean Ftedeiick Oherlin, a phi- 

O'z.czL :_':- i.' . -T^r .n T<erj:<iHiw«-. aazDRNi fx* Optiin Obion, vho was statioiKd 

OBr-.en • .1 »*. zA.-.r-: f r :be Irifh patriot, Wilham Smith O'Brien. 

0:alA r. Mi,- - •••ir.t>. F.< r.*ii. sam^ti tpom tke Indian Tillage, the word 

0:*?iii • ::.:> .:. N-t 'r>^v: 

O-.-^an City - 1 ij^ r. • j:* Miy i '. cnry. New Jciaey: 

Oc^anoi :. T7. ... '»^-. I--;> • '- .»•• O :r.:>. i'aUf«>mia. So named becaospof their 

. . :i*: r. T - r :.-<•- * -.- --var. - ^ ".•? iarze U>lv ol water. 
(V.<?aii«:de. .•-.- ;r. '•a-. l*ieeo « oizty. i^alixomia. Tbe name is deecriptive, sogr- 

.-■--■■; T v.- ; .-^"L n 
Oiean Spring: :• ^ r. ::. -■ i. "i.^ r. 0-ir.:y. M»rwippL So named becaose of the 

r. ::..• r. > - in- -i. -: -^r:^ in :hr vi. :n::y. 
(Xhejedan. • -*:. ::. • ^^x-^.a « '■ ur.ty. Iowa. An Indian word meaning **pljreof 

O'.hiltref: .:. T-xa-. r..i!:.r': : -r W. B. «>*hiltree, a prominent politician of 

(Khlockonee. r .• - :. '-e- rj:a dci F". r.ia. A Crvt^k Indian word meaning **yel- 

OcklAwaha. ■ r.ir.- :. •:.♦ ^:. J 'ir.\^ Kiver. FloridaL A Seminole Indian word 

rr.*ia.^.r.;f ::.:-\ iy -lav-r.'" 
Oconee, r -.-. ••■ ::/:. . ii:.i :• w r. in Wa.-hinir.on County, in Georgia, village in Shelby 

('y,.r,*y. I.-irj-i-. a:, i ••'■uriiy in S.uth CAP'lina. An Indian word, the name of 

2l:. an c** r. * ' " r»-»- k t < • w n . 
O'Connor: U/»n in «»r»-»-i»ry C«i:nty. Ntl«nL-ka. name«i for Bishop O'Connor. 
Oconomowoc: ^ ity in Waiikt-^ha County. WLs.\»n£in. An Indian word meaning 

*" r.orn»r '/f th«- ^M-Avt-r." 
Oconto; ^-i-y in ^*ij-t»-r ronnty. Nebraska, an«l o'linty. and city in samecoonty, in 

}S'i^oui»\u. An hiilian wrml meamng "re«i ^.»und,** or, in the Menominee 

fJiak'^.'t, *• place of the pickerel." 



OANNETT.l PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 229 

Ocopson; creek in Pennsylvania. An Indian name meaning ** brawling stream/* 

Ocou; river in Tennessee. An Indian word meaning "cow." 

October; mountain in the town of \Vashingtr)n, Berkshire County, Massachusetts, 

whose forests are especially brilliantly colored in the autumn. 
Odanah; town in Ashland County, Wisconsin. An Indian word meaning "town" 

or "village." 
Odebolt; town in Sac^ County, Iowa. Corrupted from Odebean, the name of a 

French trap))er, who lived alone on the banks of the creek flowing through the 

town. 
Odell; township and village in Livingston County, Illinois, named for W. C. Odell, 

a prominent land owner. 
Odessa; town in Newcastle County, Delaware, named from Odessa in Russia. 
Odin; village in Marion County, Illinois, and township in Watonwan County, 

Minnesota. The name is one given to the Supreme Being by the ancient 

northern nations. 
O'Falloxi; village in St. Clair County, Ilhnois, and town in St. Charles County, 

Missouri, named for Col. John O' Fallon, of St. Louis. 
OfENitt; village in Anderson County, Tennessee, named for the owner of the land 

upon which the post-office was built. 
Ogalalla; village in Keith County, Nebraska, named for a subtribe of the Sioux 

Indians. The word has some reference to "scattering." 
Osrdexi; township and village in Champaign County, Illinois, name<1 for an influen- 
tial resident family. 
Ogrden; city in Riley County, Kansas, named for Maj. E. A. Ogden, United States 

Army. 
Ogrden; town in Monroe County, New York, named for William Ogden, the son-in- 
law of the proprietor. 
Ogrden; city in Weber County, river, canyon, and valley in Utah, named for an old 

mountaineer of the Hudson Bay Company, Peter Skeen Ogden. 
Ogrdensbur^; city in St. Lawrence County, New York, named for its original pro- 
prietor. 
(Ogexna; town in Price County, Wisconsin; 
Ogemaw; county in Michigan. Derived from an Ojibwa Indian word meaning 
"great chief." 
O^le; county in Illinois, named for Capt. Joseph Ogle, an Indian fighter of the 

Ohio valley. 
O^lesby; town in Lasalle County, Illinois, named for Richard J. Oglesby, former 

governor of the State. 
Oglethorpe; county, and town in Macon County, in Georgia, named for Gen. James 

E. Oglethorpe, the founder of the colony of Georgia. 
O^letown; village in Newcastle County, Delaware, named for Thomas Ogle, the 

the former owner of the land. 
O^ontz; river in Michigan. Possibly a derivation of the Indian word ognasibi, 

meaning "little pickerel river." 
O^ontz; towns in Delta County, Michigan, Erie County, Ohio, and Montt;omery 

County, Pennsylvania, named for the Indian chief, Ogontz, who was a missionary 

among his own people. 
Ogreeta; village in Cherokee County, North Carolina. A manufailured word of no 

meaning. 
Ohio; State of the Union, river, and counties in Indiana, Kentucky, and West Vir- 
ginia. An Iroquois Indian word meaning "beautiful river." 
Ohio; township and village in Bureau CouUvy, Illinois; so nameil by settlers from 

the State of Ohio. 



230 PLACE XAXES IW THE TITITED STATES. rBrLL.25«. 

Ohiopyle: fall?- on th«' Yout;hio|rheiiy River, and town in Fayette Coonty. Pennfnrl- 

\ania. An Irnlian woni nir«niii|; "m-hite froth apc»n the wafer/' 
Oil Center; u*\\n in Keni Oiiinty, C^alifomia. Named from its location in the 

l»4'trnlciini-iir«Miii(*ing <li>trii't. 
Ojai; town in Vt^ntuni CVianty. and valley indoaed by monntainw^ in California. An 

Iri'liuh WMpi nicaiiint; '*nt^." 
Ojo Caliente: villas in Taof> (oonty. New Mezioo. ^vniah words meuiiiHr 

"^'l'^in^'" an<l *Miot/* andidventhipplaceoDaoooontof it8naiuenjiK>hatFftnii2s. 
Okabena; luk*- in Minnit^ota. An Indian wonl meaning ''heron rookery." 
Okahumka: town in I^ke Count v, Florida. Derived from the Seminole Indkn 

wonl, 'dihiimk*!', meaning; ''Ija^i water.'* 
Okanogan; county, riv<fr, and lake in Waahinaton. An Indian word and tribal 

naiii«% Hi^nifyin^ ''rendezvous/* and no applied first to the river on acttHmt i>f 

tli4' ass<'nil)lin^ of Indiana to lay in supplies of tiah and game. 
Okauchee: town in Waukesha County, Wisconsin. An Indian word meaning 

" vt-ry lontr." 
Okawvillee; township and village in Washington Coanty, Illinois. From an Imli&D 

v\npl, /'M///, Mioanin;; " |>4)rcnpine.** 
Okechobee; lak«' in southern Florida. A Seminole Indian word meaning "law 

walJT." 
Okeo; town in Colunihia County, AVisconsin. An Indian word meaning "evil 

spirit," or if fn)tn fntb\, "earth,** or ** place.** 
Oketo; «-it\ in Mar>-hall (Nninty, Kansas, named for an Indian chief, Arkatetah, the 

saiiM* iM'inir short^'iu-il l»v the settlers. 
Okldhoma: Ti-rritory of the Tnion, and coimty, and city in same cH>unty, in faid 

Trrritory. A ('hoj-taw Indian won! meaning ** red people.*' 
Oklokonee: riv«r in (Jeor^'ia. A Cri'ek Indian word meaning **yellow water." 
Okmulgee; river in (leor^ia. A CrcH^k Indian wonl meaning "b«>iling water." 
Okolona; tow n in Chickasiiw C(»unty, Mississippi. An Indian word meaning "much 

iMMlt." 

Okomi: riv«T in < Jeor^'ia. An Indian word meaning ''great water.*' 
Oktibbeha: county in Mississippi. An Indian word meaning "ice there in creek," 

or, a(«'onlinjr to another authority, **bloody water,** because of the battles 

foUL'ht there lu'tween Chickasaws and Cboctaws. 
Olathe; city in .lohnson County, Kansas. An Indian word of the Shawnee dialeit 

incaninj^' 'M^eautiful." 
Oldham; <ounty in Kentucky, named for Col. William Oldham, a Revolutionarj* 

(ttlicer w ho M'ttl(Nl in Kentucky in 1779. 
Oldham; coinity in Texas, nanuMl for Williamson S. Oldham, a prominent lawyer 

and ]>u]itician after the annexation. 
Old Orchard Beach; town and lK»iich in York County, Maine, so named l)ecauseof 

the extensive orchard set out hv its first settler. 
Old Point Comfort; town in KlizaU'th City County, Virginia, so named by Capt. 

< In ist.ipher .VewiMirt, hecausi^ lie found it a safe haven after a severe storm; the 
■Old*' ad<le<l t«» distinjruish it fnMu New Point Comfort, a few miles away. 
(ildtown; city in I'enohscot County, Maine, so named because it has been a town 

lie hoiii al»ori}zinal times. 
Mh.im. . iiv, (own, and creek in Cattaraugus County, New York; the name is given 

■ Mil M iriiiire to lhe<iil Springs in the r(.»gion. 
Ml. i.tiit . iii,i|Pi< in poller County, Pennsylvania, (M)lonize<l by the violinist Ole Bull 

'" t t'll iii|f ii,i njMiie from the tirst part of his. 
"""■»"• • In <denn ( 'ounty, California. A S[^nish tenn meaning *' heaven" 



OAXKBTT.l PLACE NAMES IN THK UNITED STATES. 231 

Oliver; county in North Dakota, name<l for Hon. II. S. Oliver. 

Oliveras, town in San Luis Obb>po County, California. A Spanish name meaning 

"ohve trees/* and applied descriptively. 
Olmstead; township in Cuyahoga County, Ohio, named for Charles H. Olmstead. 
Olmsted; county in Minnesota, named for Hon. David Olmstead, mayor of St. Paul 

in 1854. 
Olney; township and city in Richland County, Illinois, named for Nathan Olney of 

Lawrence ville. 
Olney; substation in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, named from the town in England. 
Olneyville; substation in Providence, Providence County, Rhode Island, named 

for Christopher Olney, a prominent citizen. 
Olokikana; lake in Florida. An Indian word meaning ''spotted lake,*' so named 

because dotted with green islands. 
Olyphant; borough in Lackawanna County, Pennylvania, named for Geoi^ Tal- 
bot Olyphant 
Olympia; city in Thurston County, Washington, named from the ancient mountain 

* of Greece. 
Omaha; township and village in Gallatin County, Illinois, named from Omaha, 

Nebraska. 
Omaha; city in Douglas County, Nebraska. An Indian word meaning "upstream,** 

also the name of a tribe designated as "upstream people.'* 
Omar; village in Jefferson County, New York, named for a character in one of 

Johnson *s allegories. 
Onancock; town and bay in Aocomac County, Virginia. An Indian name said to 

mean ''foggy place.*' 
Onar^a; township and village in Iroquois County, Illinois. Probably an Indian 

word meaning "place of rocky hills.** 
Onawa; township and town in Monona County, Iowa. An Indian word meaning 

" wide awake.*' 
O'Veala; village in Madera County, California, named for Charles 0*Neal, an early 

settler. . 
Oneco; village in Windham County, Connecticut, named for the son of Uncas, the 

Mohegan sachem. 
Oneida; county in Idaho, city in Knox County, Illinois, county and lake in New 

York, and county in Wisconsin; 
Oneida Castle; village in Oneida County, New York. Named for one of the tribes 

of the Six Nations, the word meaning "granite people** or "people of the 

stone.*' 
O'Veil; city in Holt County, Nebraska, named for Gen. John O'Neil,. an early 

settler. 
Onekama; village in Manistee County, Michigan. An Indian word meaning 

"portage." 
Oneonta; town in Otsego County, New York. An Indian word meaning " place of 

rest.*' 
On^; village in Burlington County, New Jersey, named for an early settler. 
Onida; town in Sully County, South Dakota. An Indian word meaning "hunte<l,** 

or "looked for.** 
Onion; creek in North Dakota, so named on account of the quantities of wild onions 

growing on its banks. 
Onondaga; county, and town in same county, and lake in New York, named from 

the Indian tribe, the word meaning " people of the hills.*' 
Onalow; county in North Carolina, named for Arthur Onslow, speaker in the British 

House of Commons. 



r633 PLACE NAMES IN THE t'NlTKI> ST^ATRS. 

Ostario; one o( the Great I^kes, county, and Uivti in Wayne Coimly, New YorlT 

village ill VemiHi County, Wimtinsin, and ten other towns aiii) vill^tw. An 

Indian word, Baid to nitian "lieantiful lake," or "lieautiful pnepect of rocks. 

hills, and water." Another authority gives "villa^iie ou themounlain." 

L Ontaora; villaiie in the CBlskilis in Ulster County, New York. An Indian woni 

V meaniDg "hille of theeky." 

^ Ontonagon; county, and river in Ntichigan. An Ojibwa Indian word naeaniii;.' 
" flNhing plai'e," or, atyonling to another authority, so nameii becausw an Indiun 
maiden loBt a dish in the xtreain and exclaimed " iiiadinuigan," which in lit-r 
dialect meant " away (roes my dish." 

Ooatanaula; river in Georgia, from a Cherokee Indian namesi^ifyinga ruck ledge 
acroea a stream . 

Opelika; eity in LeeCounty, AlaliamB. An Indi.ui word meaning "great swamp." 

Opelouaaa; town in St. Landry Parish, Louisiana, named from a tribe of Indians, 
the name wgnifying " black head," or "black moccaaiiia." 

Opequan; stream in Virginia. Derived from an Indian word meaning "froth- 
white stream," or perhu|>B from another, mesninjc " rain-worn stream." 

Oqnawka: village in Ilendermin County, Illinois, so named from the yellowish 
appearani'e of the river bankn. From an Indian word meaning " yellow." 

Orangre; counties in California and Florida, so named on account of the large orangi* 
groves. 

Oran^; town in New Haven Coimty, Connecticut, city in Essex County, New Jersey, 
counties in New York and North Carolina, and counties, and towns in same 
counties in Vermont and Virginia, named for William IV, Prince vt Orange. 

Orai^a; county in Indiana, named from the county in North Carolina, the home of 
it« settlers. 

Oian^l county, and city in same county, in Tesas, so named becanse of the luxi 
ant wild orange trees growing in the ewamp of the I^hiiie River. 

{Orangeburg; county, and Uyv-n in same munty in South Carolina; 
Oran^ City; town in Sioux County, Iowa, the center of a large settlement of Hol- 
landers. Named fur William IV, Prince of Orange. 

Orbiaonia; borough in Huntingdon County, Pennsylvania, named for William 
Orbison, an early Belller. 

Orchard; vill^e in Morgan Cijunty, Colorado; so named from Fremont's encamp- 
ment in an orchard of cottonwoods while reconnoitering. 

Orchard; village in Antelope County, Nebraska, so named because of the presence 
of a large orchanl of apple trees. 

Ord; dty in Valley County, Nebraska, named for Gen. E. 0. C. Ord. 

Ordway; town in Olero County, Colorado, named tor George N. Onlway, of Ute 
Denver board of supervisora. 

Oreana; village in HumboldtCounly, Nevada. A latin word meaning "town of gold." 

Oragon; Stat« of the I'nion, and county in Missouri. The iiaino said to have been 
derived from origanum, a Bpecies of wilil «age found along the coast in the State; 
but another authority States that it is derived from the Si>anish Ortgontt, whh-U 
name WbS given the Indian tribes inhabiting that region by a Jeetiit priest, tiui 
wonl meaning "big-eare<l men." 

Oregon; township and I'ity in Ogle County, Illinois, named from the Stale. 

Orejaa Del Oso; mountain in Utah. A Spanish plinii« meaning " bear's eara." 

Oi^an; mountains in New Mexicu, so calleit because of their resemblance tu tlw 
pipes of an organ. 

Orion; village in Oakland County. Michigan, named from the ci>iisiellation. 

iOriakany; creek, and village in Oneida Connty, in New York; 
Oriakany Falls; village in Oneida County, New York, An Indian word meaning 
"place of nettles." 



QAXSETT.l PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 233 

Orland; town in Glenn County, California, named from the town in Maine. 
Orland; town in Hancock County, Maine, said to have l)een so named by the first 

settler because of the finding of an oar upon the shore. 
Orlando; city in Orange County, Florida. A Spanish word meaning ''seat of 

justice." 
Orleans; parish in Louisiana, township, and city in Harlan County, Nebraska, and 

counties in New York and Virginia, named from the city in France. 
Orleans; town in Barnstable County, Massachusetts, named in 1797 for the Duke of 

OrleauH, alias Citizen Equality, popular for his democratic principles. 
Ormsby; county in Nevada, named for Major Ormsby. 
Omeville; town in Piscataquis County, New York, named for the Hon. Henry 

Ome, of Boston. 
Oro Chino; town in Mariposa County, California, so named because of the Chinese 

employed in the gold placer mines. From the Spanish oto^ meaning '*gold,'' 

and chino^ ** Chinese.'* 
Orofino; town in Siskiyou County, California, and town in Shoshone County, and 

creek in Idaho, so named by the Spanish because of their gold mines. 
Oroville; town in Butte County, California, so named by the early miners because 

of the gold mines. 
Orpliana Island; island in Penobscot County, Maine, so named because it was an 

orphan's share of an estate of the Waldo Patent. 
Orrick; town in Ray County, Missouri, named for John C. Orrick, of St. Louis. 
Orringrton; town in Penobscot County, Maine, the name being a misspelling of the 

original name of **Orangetown." 
Ortega; town in Santa Barbara County, California. A Spanish word meaning 

"grouse." 
Orville; town in Hamilton County, Nebraska, named for Orville Westcott, a resident. 
Orwigsbur^; borough in Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania, named for Peter Orwig, 

its founder. 
Osa^; township and city in Mitchell County, Iowa, named for Orrin Osage, bene- 
factor of the town. 
Osa^re; counties in Kansas and Missouri, Indian reservation in Oklahoma, and 

many towns, cities, and rivers in the United States. Named from the Wcimshi 

(French, Onamge) or Osage Indians. The meaning of the word is unknown. 
Osakis; village in Douglas County, Minnesota. An Indian word meaning "yellow 

earth." 
Osawatomie; city in Miami County, Kansas, a combination of the names of the two 

rivers at whose junction the town is situated — Osage and Pottawattomie. 
Osborne; county, and city in same county, in Kansas, named for Vincent B. Osborne, 

of the Second Kansas Cavalry. 
Osceola; town in Mississippi County, Arkansas; counties in Florida, Iowa, and 

Michigan; city in St. Clair County, Missouri; village in Polk County, Nebraska; 

mountain in New Hampshire; towns in Lewis County, New York, and Tioga 

County, Pennsylvania, and village in Polk County, Wisconsin; also many other 

cities and towns, named either directly or indirectly for the Seminole Indian 

chief. The name refers to a me<licine drink used by the tribe in certain cere- 
monies. 
Oscoda; county, and village in Iosco County, in Michigan. An Indian word, 8aid 

by some to mean "fire," by others, "strong prairie." 
Oshawa; village in Nicollet County, Minnesota. An Indian word meaning "ferry 

him over," or "across the river." 
Oskaloosa; cities in Mahaska County, Iowa, and Jefferson County, Kansas, named 

lor the wife of the Indian chief Mahaska. 



234 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [boll. 258. 

Oshkosh; city in Wirinel)ago County, WisconsiD, named for an Indian chief; the 
name i8 sai<l to mean **nail/' 'Viaw," or ''homy part of the foot of beasts." 

Oso; mountain in Colorado. A Biianish word meaning "bear." 

Ossineke; village in Al()ena County, Michigan. An Indian word meaning "stony 
land,'* or "place of a stone." 

Ossining; town in Westchester County, New York; the name is said to have been 
derived from that of the Indian tribe SirUgink or Singting, "stone upon stone/' 
or from omuting, "place of stones." 

Ossipee; river in Maine. An Indian word meaning "pine river," or "stony river." 

Oswegatchie; river in New York. An Indian word meaning "coming around a 
hill." 

Oswego; village in Kendall County, Illinois, city in Labette County, Kansas, and 
county, city, and town in same county, and river in New York. Derived from 
the Indian mi ti ahan toque, meaning "where the valley widens" or "flowing 
out." 

Osweya; creek in McKean County, Pennsylvania. An Indian word meaning 
"place of flies." 

Otay; town in San Diego County, California. Named from an Indian rancheria. 

Otero; county in Colorado, named for Miguel Otero, of a prominent Mexican feunily- 

Otero; county in New Mexico, named for governor M. A. Otero. 

Otis; town in IIan(x>ck County, Maine, named for James Otis, an early proprietor. 

Otis; town in I^rkshire County, Massachusetts, named for Harrison Gray Otis. 

Otisfield; town in Cuml>erland County, Maine, named for James Otis, an early pro- 
prietor. 

Otisville; village in Genesee County, Michigan, named for Byron Otis, an early 
settler. 

Otisville; village in Orange County, New York, named for Isaac Otis, its first settler. 

Otoe; county in Nebraska, named for the Indian tribe. 

Otsego; county, village, and townnhip in Allegan County, Michigan; county, town, 
and lake in Hame county in New York; village in Muskingum County, Ohio, and 
town in Columbia County, WilHionsin. An Indian word meaning "welcome 
water," or "place where meetings are held." 

Otselic; town in Chenango County, and creek in Madison County, New York. An 
Indian word meaning "plum creek." 

Otsquago; creek in Montgomery County, New York. An Indian word signifying 
"under the bridge." 

Ottawa; city in I^salle County, Illinois; reservation in Indian Territory; county, 
and city in Franklin County, Kansas; county in Michigan; village in Lesueor 
(/ounty, Minnesota; county in Ohio, and several other places, named for the 
Indian tribe. 

Otter; creek in Missouri. The present name is a translation of the original French 
name of "/oM^r^." 

Otter Lake; village in I>apeer County, Michigan, so named because of the abun- 
dance of otter in the adjacent lakes. 
Otter Tail; lake in Ottertail County, Minnesota; 

Ottertail; county, an<l town in same coimty in Minnesota. A translation of the 
Ojibwa name of the lake, referring to the form of a long and narrow sand liar 
whicli sej>arates the lake from the la«t mile of the inflowing Otter Tail River. 

Otto; town in Cattaraugus (/Ounty, New York, named for Jacob S. Otto, of the Hol- 
land l^nd Comimny. , ... 

Ottumwa; city in Wapello County, Iowa. An Indian word said to mean "place 
of the lone chief," but more probably meaning "rapids," or "tumbling 
water." 






OAX3firrr.l PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 235 

Ouachita; county and river in Arkansas and parish in Louisiana, named for a now 

extinct Indian tribe. 
Ouray; county, city in same county, and mountain in Ck>iorado, named for a friendly 

chief of the Ute Indians. The Cte Indian corruption of ** Willie.** 
Oatagamie; county in Wisconsin, named for the Outagamies, or '*Fox** Indians. 

By another authority said to mean *' those who live on the opposite side." 
Overton; county in Tennessee, named for Judge John Overton. 
Ovid; township and village in Clinton Ck)unty, Michigan, named from the town in 

New York. 
Ovid; town in Seneca County, New York, named for the Roman poet 

»; lake, town, and creek in Cayuga County, New York. An Indian word 

meaning ** bridge,** or *Make of the floating bridge.** 

r, town in Hardin County, Iowa, derived from ouxuse, the Indian word for 

"bear.** 
Owatonna; river, and city in Steele County, in Minnesota, An Indian word mean- 
ing ** straight river.** 
{Owen; counties in Indian and Kentucky; 
Oweneboro; city in Daviess County, Kentucky. Named for Col. Abraham Owen, 
of Kentucky, killed at Tippecanoe. 
Owensbur^; village in Greene County, Indiana, named for its founder. 
Owenyo; station in Inyo County, California. A compound of Owen and Inyo, from 

its situation near Owens Lake. 
Owingsville; city in Bath County, Kentucky, named for Col. T. D. Owings. 
Owobopta; tributary of the Minnesota river. An Indian word meaning "where 

they dig roots.** 
Owofiso; city in Shiawassee County, Michigan, named for the principal chief of the 

Chippewas in that country, the word meaning "he is afar off.** 
Owsley; county in Kentucky, named for Judge William Owsley, a former governor. 
Oxbow; village in Jefferson County, New York, on the Oswegatchie River, so named 

because of a bend in the river at this point in the form of an ox bow. 
Oxford; town in Calhoun County, Alabama, named from the city in England. 
Oxford; county, and town in same county, in Maine; town in Worcester County, 

Massachusetts; town in Chenango County, New York; township and village in 

Butler County, Ohio; and borough in Chester County, Pennsylvania; named 

from the university in England. 
Oxford; city in Lafayette County, Mississippi, so named from the university city in 

England because it is the location of the State University. 
Oxford Church; substation in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, named from the cathe- 
dral of Oxford, England. 
Oyster Bay; town in Nassau County, New York, so named because of the abundance 

of oysters found in the bay. 
Ozan; town and stream in Hempstead County, Arkansas. A corruption of the 

French, prcdrie dTdne, ** prairie of the donkey.** 
Osark; group of hills principally in Arkansas and Mississippi; village in Dale County, 

Alabama, county and city in Christian County, Missouri, and several other places. 

The aux arcs were said to refer to the bends in the White River, and applied to 

the Ozark Mountains, through which the river pursues a wandering course; in 

other words, the mountains at the bends of the river. 
Osankee; county in Wisconsin. An Indian word meaning "yellow clay.** The 

proper name of the Sauk Indians. 
Pacheco; town in Contra Costa County, California, named for an early Spanish 

settler. 
Pachuta; town in Clarke County, Mississippi. A Choctaw Indian word meaning 

"poonim creek." 



Pacific: ocesn. the lariat ilivieion of water nn the )!lcl>e, so named hy MafteHan, iu ■ 

itUcivertT, l)^^^!*.- of the fair weathereneounlereil there after ex perieucing heavy 

t^lee in the HtraitH. 
Pacific; eily in Franklin Connty, Missouri, ctiunty in Wasbin^o, uid creek in 

Yellowstone Park, Wyoiiiinj!, naineil from the ocean. 
Factolua: towD in PittCounty, North CaroliDa.DBiued from the ancient river in Asia . 

Minor, 
Paddock; village in Holt Connty. Nehnwka, iiiinieil for A. B. Paddock, UnitedjBtatm ■ 

Senator from that State. 
Paducah; city in McOrackenCnunty. Kentucky, namnl for a celebrate^l Indian chief " 

will) formerly lived in the vicinity and was buried on the lunks of Tenueewe ■ 

Kiver. now within the city limits. 
Page; county in Iowa, named for Colonel Page, of Palo Alto fame. 
Pitge; iciunty in Vinrinia, named for John Page, an early governor of the State. 
Pahaquany; townBhip in Warren County, New Jersey. An Indian word meaning " 

Pahcupo^; pond near Westerly, Connecticut. The name ie derived from the Indian 

word pnlike-jMiiij, meaning " pure water pond." 
PaineBville; village in Lake County, Ohio, named for Gen. E. Paine, an early 

Paiat; irt'ek in Oiiio. From the Indian words oloinon ti^iitg, "piunt Btream." 
Painted Post; village in S(eul>en County, New York, so named liecauiw of the «■■ 



a |iainted monument by the Indians over the grave of their chief, Cbptain 



> named because situated near a 
n hieroglyphic*. 
1 California. Named from the wild 



Paint Rock; town in Concho County, Texas, s 

li'rlge fit rock, profusely decomteil with India 
P^jaro; town in Monterey County and rive 

ilucktt that abound in the vicinity. A Spanish woril applied to birds in generaL I 
Pala; township in gan Diego County, California. A Spanish wor<l signifying m 

wooden shovel used for grain. 
Palarm; town and streani in Fiulkner County, Arkansas. A corruption of t 

French, jilnre da alarma. 
Palatine; township and village in Cook County, Illinois; village in Salem County, 

New Jersey; town in Montgomery County, New York, and village in Marion 

County, West Virginia. 
Palatine Brid^; village in Montgomery Connty, New York. The u 

fi-rrc(l from the division of Germany. 
Palatka; cily in Putnam County, Florida. A Seminole Indian word aaid by as 

to mean '' spillei)." and by others, '■ cow ford." 
Paleatine; town in 8t. Francis Connty, Arkansas, village in Crawford Count 

llliu'iis, and eleven othei towns and villages, the name being transferred (ro 

Palestine, in Syria. 
Palisadea; cliff of trap rock from 200 lo 500 feet high, forming the westerly bank of 

ihc Hudson River, New York, exlendin); from Fort Lee about Ufteen milee to 

the north. 
Palisades Park; borough in Bergen County, New Jersey, so named because of its 

liHmtion on the Palisades. 
Paliudale; town in Lox Angeles County, California, so named from the luxuriant 

t.'niwlh of palms. 
Palmer; town In Hampden County, Massachusetls. named for Chief Justice Thoma» 

Palmer. 
Palmer; village in Marquette County, Michigan, luuned for Waterman Palmer, ul 

Pittsburg, its founder. 



csAMNBTT.] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 237 



I«ake; town and creek in El Paso County, Colorado, named for General 
' Palmer, an official of the Denver and Rio Grande Railroad. 

i; creek in Chariton County, Missouri, named for Martin Palmer. 
i; town in Los Angeles County, California, so named from the large palmXrees 
in the neighborhood. ^ 

ra; towns in Marion County, Missouri, Wayne County, New Yorli:, and 
Portage County, Ohio, named from the ancient city in Syria. 
i; town in Linn County, Iowa, and village in Ionia County, Michigan. A Span- 
ish word meaning ** stick." 
IPalo Alto; town in Santa Clara County, California. A Spanish phrase meaning 
"high timber.** 

Alto; county in Iowa, and borough in Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania, 
named from the fomous battlefield in Texas. 

Blanco; town in Fresno County, California. A Spanish name descriptively 
applied, meaning "white timber.*' 

Gedro; town in Shasta County, California, so named from the abundant 
growths of cedars. A Spanish phrase meaning "cedar timber.*' 

k; villages in Calaveras County, California, and Adams County, Illinois. A 
Spanish word meaning " dove." 
f alo Pinto; county and river in Texas. A Spanish phrase meaning "stained 

timber." 
Yalo Verde; town in Los Angeles County, California. A Spanish name meaning 

"green timber," descriptive of the district. 
SPamelia; town in Jefferson County, New York, named for the wife of Gen. Jacob 

Brown. 
Pamlico; county, sound, and river in North Carolina, named from a former Indian 
tribe. 

»a; town in Kern County, California, so named from its location. A Spanish 
word meaning an "extensive plain." 

'; river, and town in Orange County, in Vii^nia. Said to have been 
derived from the Indian pihmungay meaning " where he sweat.** 
k; township and city in Christian County, Illinois. The corrupted form of 
Pftni, the name of a small tribe of Indians. 
Panasoilkee; town in Sumter County, Florida. From the Indian word, panaM>fkee, 

"deep valley." 
Panola; counties in Mississippi and Texas. An Indian wonl meaning "cotton." 
Panton; town in Addison County, Vermont, named for Lord Panton, a British 

nobleman. 
Paola; city in Miami County, Kansas, named for Baptiste Peoria, the town name 

being the Indian pronunciation. 
Papillion; village and creek in Sarpy County, Nebraska, given the French name 

because many butterflies were seen upon the banks of the stream. 
Papinairille; village in Bates County, Missouri, named for Herre Mellecourt Papin. 
Parag^oold; city in Greene County, Arkansas. A compound of the names of two 

railroad men, W. J. Paramore and Jay Gould. 
Paraiso Springs; post-office in Monterey County, California, descriptive of the 

beauty of the springs. The Spanish form of "paradise.*' 
Pardeeville; village in Columbia County, Wisconsin, named for John S. Pardee, 
the founder. 
i; township and city in Edgar County, Illinois, named from Paris, Kentucky. 
i; city in Bourbon County, Kentucky, town in Oxford County, Maine, city in 
Lamar County, Texas, and many other places, named from the city in France. 
Paris; a town in Oneida County, New York, named for Isaac Paris, a merchant of 
Fort Plain. 



238 PLACE 31 AMES IS THE CSITED STATED (h:li.£8. 

. Paruh. v.-s .-i ir. * ^v^:$er> O^mtj az^i liUa^ in Erie CoantT, Sew York: 

' ParishTille. Viwn in .M. LAvmce Coontj. Xcw York. Xaned for DtTid ¥mA, 

PaiitA: Tiiiasev in B^xar Oioiitv. Texat A Spanirii word mfnin|c ''gnpcTiiie." 
Park: ft^iTitv :r. rv^H'Ubir*. ^^o naaw«i Ijccame it inchidep a lanee arts ol Sooth Fuk. 
Park: ' ••'ir.ty ;r. M^^^taca. »ft Dam«d ftrxD its proxiiiutj to Yeik>v¥UMie Puk. 
Park City: o^vn in Yt^-Hovic^me Ojontj. Siootaaa: whcB phtteil a iMwtioo oL the 

lan'i vai- -tfrt a{«rt a^ a («rk. frocn vhieli the tovn took its name. 
Parke: < r^r; nty in Infiiana. narrnevi for BeDJaniin Fuke.a prominent State politJcian. 
Parker: <:itv in Linn Coantv. Kansas, named (or J. W. I^iker, the former owner 

of the l/»wn -it^. 
Parker: t/iwn-hip an«i <-ity in Tamer Coonty. Sooth Dakota, named for the vile 
ri»Vr I'arker of th<r <-hief engineer of the Chidfeo, Milwankee and Saint Paul 

liaWrfiegfi. 
Parker: '-r^finty in Texa^. named for the family of Buker'e Fort, who in 1836 were 

f:n\itnrt^\ an'l kille^i hy th^ Indian?. 
Parkeraburg; town in .Sam peon Coonty, North Carolina, named for a promiDent 

'itizen. 
Parkeraburg: city in Chesfter Coonty , Pennsiylvania, named lor I>r. Thomas Parker, 

ail *Miiinent phv.-iHan of Chester Coantv. 

mm m 

Parkersburg: <'ity in Worxi County, We^ Virginia, named for Alexander F^ker, 

of Ivnn-ylvania. 
Parkers Landing*: <'ity in Armstrong Coonty, Pennsylvania, named for the former 

Parkersville: viilaire in Lyon C<»unty, Kentocky, named for Thomas Parker, a 

w^-althy <itiz4'n. 
Parkerville; rity in M«^>rri- County, Kan8aj<, namerl for C. G. Parker, the former 

own«T of t\i*'. t/»wn «ite. 
Parkman; town in Ti'^f-atiujuiH County, Maine, named for its early proprietor, isun* 

•K-l rarkinan, of IVwton. 
Parkman: viiia^fr and townnhip of (ieauga County, Ohio, named for Robert P. 

f'arkrnan. 
Parkman; town in S}i<*rirlan C^Minty, Wyoming, named for Francis Parkman. 
Park Biver; citv in Wai^h County, North Dakota, named for the stream which 

llowH through th(? natural park. 
Parksville; t/iwn in P>l|?^*fi(?Ul County, hkmth Carolina, named for a prominent 

farjiily of th** <'onnty. 
Parkville; villavf** in Tlatt** County, MinKjuri, name<l for GreorgeS. P^k, its founder. 
Parmele; tov^n in Martin County, North Carolina, named for a prominent resident 
Parm«jr; rnu-k in Chariton County, Missouri, and county in Texas. Named for 

Martin Paniicr, who was a nieinl>er oi the first legislature of MisBOuri, and later 

wi'iit to T<'xas, wIm-h* hv engaged in an attemptetl revolution abont 1827. 
Parramore; )M'a(;h and island in Acroniac^ County, Virginia, named for the family 

who wen* its fr)nn('r owners. 
Parrott; town in \Ai Tlata (*ounty, Colorado, named for a California capitalist 
Parry; |K'ak in the Front Kange, Colorado, named for the lK)tanist. 
Parsons; city in I/alM'tt<* ('ounty, Kansas, named for Judge Levi Parsons, a promi- 
nent railroarl otli<'ial. 
Parsons; t*)wn in Tucker ('onnty, West Virginia, name<i for a former resident 
Parsonsfield; U)wn in York ('ounty, Maine, named for Thomas Parsons, an early 

projirietor. 
Pasadena; city in f^os Angeh^ ('ounty, California. An Indian word meaning 

"<Town of the valley." 
Piwicagoula; river, and t4)wn in Ja^'kson County, in Mississippi, named for an Indian 

trilH*, the name meaning "bread |MH>ple." 



.SNirrr.l PLACE NAME8 IN THE UNITED STATES. 239 



>; county in Florida, named for Senator Pasco. 

•; village in Providence County, Rhode Island. An Indian word meaning 
''dividing place,'* and so named because it is situated at the forks of the Black- 
stone River. 

Bobles; city in San Luis Obispo Ounty, California. A Spanish phrase mean- 
ing ''pass of the oak trees." 

Asquotank; county in North Carolina. An Indian word meaning "divided tidal 
river," and given this county because a river forms one of its boundaries. 
laconaway; mountain in New Hampshire, named for a sachem of the Merri- 
mack tribe of Indians. 

Lmnkeag; town in Penobscot County, Maine, situate at the mouth of a river 
of the same name, by reason of which it was given this Indian name, which 
means "falls running over a gravel bed." 

t; county, city in same county, and river in New Jersey; derived either from 
the Indian word, passaic or poimjeeky "valley," or from the Indian equivalent 
of "peace." 

isamaquoddy; bay on the coast of Maine. An Indian word meaning "pollock 
ground," or "pollock -plenty place." 

ChristiaiL; town in Harrison County, Mississippi. Received its name from 
Nicholas Christian, a Norwegian navigator, who discovered a channel or pass 
between Cat Island and the mainland. 

assumpsic; river and village in Caledonia County, Vermont. An Indian word 
meaning "much clear water." 

Bstoro; mountain in Arizona, so named because of its high mountain pastures. 

atasruxnkis; tributary of the Penobscot River in Maine. An Indian word meaning 
"sandy-ground cove." 

atapaco; river in Maryland. An Indian word meaning "black water." 

atata; town in Los Angeles County, California. A Spanish word meaning 
"potato." 

atchog^e; village in Suffolk County, New York. An Indian word meaning 
"turning place." 

aterson; city in Passaic County, New Jersey, named for William Paterson, an 
early governor. 

^atkaskaden; tributary of James River. An Indian word meaning "tortoise" 
or "turtle." 

^atoka; township and village in Marion County, Illinois, named for a local Indian 
chief. 

^trick; county in Virginia, named for the orator, Patrick Henry. 

^ttaquonk; hill in Middlesex County, Connecticut. An Indian name meaning 
"round place" or "round hill." 

^attarson; town in Putnam County, New York, named for a family of early settlers. 

^aulding; county in Georgia, town in Jasper County, Mississippi, and county, and 
town in same county, in Ohio, named for John Paulding, who assisted in the 
capture of Major Andr^. 

^auquepaug; brook in Litchfield County, Connecticut The name is derived from 
the Indian word papke-paug, meaning "pure- water pond." 

^autuck; river, and village in Suffolk County, New York. An Indian word mean- 
ing "fall." 

^awling; town in Dutchess County, New York. The name is derived from 
Panlding. 

*awnee; creek in Colorado, so named by the Indians because a party of 200 Paw- 
nee Indians were here surrounded by a greatly outnumbering force of Sioux, 
who, when they found they could not capture the Pawnees, proceeded to 
starve them out; but the Pawnees refused to surrender to escape even this 
death, and every man perished by starvation. 



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I'* ' '/•• y • • • '.'■■••<* 

' ' • ^* ^r I' ^^if. x'.r.i rritf^niinr "rrortked river." 

'"''"•**''• ' ' ' '" ' '-f' ./.-' ijr.'J T«-x;i- A >januh wonl meaniDg "flint. 

* ■ • ^ ' t ' ' it.* ■ 

'' ' **•.*.. Ji . .../. .,. v. . ..1/ t.i hs r r o'iiity. N4-W York, nanie*] for Jmn Peek, a Dutch 

''Ihttut I... ,,.. If, lliMi.|f:.),ir<- rounfy, .Maj»HrhiiM'tt>>, and llillsboro Ccmnty, New 

H.iMi|,.i.iM fiiiKM'l I'. I lli'MiiM- I'tWimti HolU-i-, f>iik<* of Newcastle. 
''.MiMMi. MiMj/i M, Wi.MM.ii.f County, N»w York, named for the original pat- 

« ('III , |.,|,M i'l II 

'»•!!« » H-. In Miiil'.n < '.Hinlv, l«»uii, roloni/.i..| |,y Dntrh nettlere, to whom the word 
nil (Mil ■ I H> III II tii|/i " 

••.MifiiliiMMiMilt. I.iIm- In ri"nit>i<|niH County, Maine. An Indian word meaning 
"liilti of llif ii|ii|ilnpf iiMMintiiin " 



OAKNRT.l PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 241 



id; point of land and village in Lincoln Coonty, Maine. An Indian word 
meaning *Mong point,'' or, according to another authority, "that rum? into the 
water.** 

i; county, and city in same county, in North Dakota, from the Ojibwa name 
for "cranberry.** 
Ptembroke; town in Plymouth County, Massachusetts, named from the town in 

England. 
Pembroke; town in Merrimack County, New Hampshire, probably named for the 

Earl of Pembroke. 
Pemi^ewasset; river in New Hampshire. The word is of Indian derivation, said 

to mean "crooked place of pines.** 
Pemiacot; county in Missouri, named from its principal bayou. An Indian word 
meaning "liquid mud.** 

:; substation in Concord, Merrimack County, New Hampshire. An Indian 
tribal name meaning "crooked.** 

'; county in North Carolina, named for Gen. William D. Pender, an officer 
of the Confederate Army. 
Pendleton; town in Madison Cbunty, Indiana, named for the former proprietor, 

Thomas M. Pendleton. 
Pendleton; counties in Kentucky and West Vii^nia, named for Edmund Pendle- 
ton, a prominent politician of Virginia. 
Pendleton; town in Niagara County, New York, named for Sylvester Pendleton 

Clarke, ex-governor of Grand Island. 
Pendleton; town in Northampton County, North Carolina, named for a prominent 

resident. 
Pendleton; town in Umatilla County, Oregon, named for George H. Pendleton. 
Pendleton; town in Anderson County, South Carolina, named for Judge Henry 

Pendleton, a Revolutionary jurist. 
Pend Oreille; lake in Idaho, named from a tribe of Indians who were given this 
name by the French because of their habit of wearing pendants in their ears, 
the phrase meaning " hanging ear.*' 
Penfield; town in Green County, Georgia, named for Josiah Penfield. 
Penfield; village in Champaign County, Illinois, named for a railroad builder. 
Penfield; town in Monroe County, New York, named for Daniel Penfield, an early 
settler. 

i; one of the Elizabeth islands in Buzzards Bay, Massachusetts. An Indian 
word meaning "sloping land.*' 

i; township in Stark County, Illinois, named from Pennsylvania, whence many 
of the early settlers came. 
l; the name of many townships, and the prefix to the name of many towns and 
villages in the United States, generally given in honor of William Penn. 
Pennington; borough in Mercer County, New Jersey, named for the Pennington 

feunily, two members of which were governors of the State. 
Pennington; county in South Dakota, named for John L. Pennington, a former 

governor. 
Pennsylvania; State of the Union, named for William Penn, to whom the land 
comprised within the limits of the State was granted, and gylraniaj from the 
Latin n/t», "forest.** 

l; village in Yates County, New York. The name is a compound of the 
namaEi of the two classes of settlers — Pennsvlvanians and Yankees. 

:; creek in Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania. An Indian word mean- 
ing "body of water with no current** 

B«ilL25»-05 16 



242 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [btll-^-s, 

Penobscot; county, town in Hancock County, bay, and river in Maine. Derived 

from the Indian wonl penofj^kenfff meaning ** rocky place," or ** river of mck?." 
Penryn; mining; town in Placer County, California, named by miners from the 

lK)nMijfh in Cornwall. 
Penaacola: Itay and city in Kflcambia County, Florida. Said to be derived from 

tin* Indian word jxtn-fha-oklOf meaning ** hair people." 
Pentwater; river and lake in Michigan, so named becaose of the soppoeition that 

the river had no outlet. 
Pentwater : township and village in Oceana County, Michigan, named from the river. 
Peosta: village in Dubutiue County, Iowa. An Indian word meaning *'goifre in 

the ro«'kH." 
Peotone: town in Will County, Illinois. Derived from the Indian word ptifme, 

nicaninjr *' hrinj:." " bring here," or ** bring to this place." 
Pepin; lake hetwi'en Wineonsin and Minnesota, and county in Wisconsin, named 

ti»r Pepin le Bref. 
Pepperell: town in Middlesex County, Massachusetts, named for Sir William IVp- 

ivn»ll. a nic!ul)er of the Massachusetts council. 
Pepperville; town.<hip in Butler County, Nebraska, named for Hubbel Pepper, u 

early st»ttler. 
Pe<iuabuck: river in Connecticut. An Indian word meaning "clear pond," or 

" .>ivn |H^ntl.*' 
Poquanac; villaj^' in Morri?* County, New Jersey. An Indian word meaning 

' » leart^l land.** 
IV^juannook; villain* in Hartford County, Connecticut An Indian word meaning 

and naturally eli»ar and open." 
iVx>r\rt *>^v.r.t\ . and eitv in same i-ountv, in Illinois, and nation in Indian Territory. 

V xNMre.pusi tonn of an Indian tribal name, signifying "carriers," or "packers" 

Ns^wert :, w'.^sV.i^* in I ^m^Hster County, Pennsylvania, from Piqua, the name of a 
'.Mi^d .M ; ' .e Sha>x v.iv Indian.^ who once inhabited the valley of the Pequea. The 
• -e'r v-j;u'.tu>s ' a^V,t\s '* and has a mx-thic reference. 

m 

Ns^notw t.^w V. -.r. i^\n\ Win»r County, Minnesota, named for a tribe of Indians, the 
^N .nJ N .r,< ^^^•v. '.or.i> r^^nden^l "destroyers," or "enemies." 

N^^ «< \ae ^ • \ , »v :. \ ..vKsr.ia and Florida, and bay into which these empty, so named 
'\ IN, v,s^:v,v' :V., Wv^M mean inc **lo8t/* because a Spanish ship was destroyed 

'.'^,- t^^^x^^^,Mto •.. \xv. ;r. Nl.H>*i>n County. Michigan, named for Father Marquette. 
•.»^^-*»^N , NX ^•^v^^^v^V v\n;niy. Maine, named for Hon. Sidney Perhani, i 

'. » »».\\H* ^^ . ^ ^ ., - .^ ^\^..,-.y Minnes^^tju named for Josiah Perbam, an oflBoial 

^^^\^\t. y- ^.^. ,... . , V% k r. l^s;r.t\, Maine^ named for TXxrtor Perkins, of Farm- 

♦ »«»»w „.,M >\,>-Avi,,ii nAr<M tor C. K. Perkins, an official of the Burlington 

■ »»»«.u*.^^ \ , ^,,, ^ ,.. .v,v v^ v..^ j^. >^.xT^Kr in Montgomery County, Pennsylvania- 

^ »^'^»M o, <M.^v' ^x,^■^■ ■v,^^v.;r<»: •• M bore thetv are cranberries." 
'»«»Mm»» , vv,, ,„ \« ». >v o, : :v.x \oxi York, named for Glover Perrin, the first 

♦ "* **'"'• *- \ ^Nx -, VVsnv^v. r.:;nois. liKiiana. Kentucky, MisBiaappi, 
'*' * ^*' '*'^ '■ '^'' ''' ^^ ^^->^ .\»: v>,,v.ty. Now York; and connties in Ohio, 
i ' »»»* » \\ >\u\.\ yu \ u n,,o.,.^^ n^:v.,N^ r.%r l\^:;,^ln^^ow Oliver Uaxard Pferry. 

I'uM '«n \sy »,,„, ..,,,^„,,„, K^,,^^^ ,^,,^,,^; Mr .lohn D. P^rry, a ndl road official 



GANNBTT.] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 243 

PezTysburg; town in Cattaraugus CJounty, New York, and village in Wood County, 

Ohio, named for Commodore Oliver Hazard Perry. 
Perrys Killa; village in Clinton County, New York, named for George Perry, a 

former proprietor. 
PerryviUe; city in Perry County, Missouri, named for Commodore Oliver Hazard 

Perrv. 
Person; county in North Carolina, named for Gen. Thomas Person, an officer of 

the Revolution. 
Perth; town in Fulton County, New York, named from the town in Scotland. 
Perth Amboy; city in Middlesex County, New Jersey; the name is a combination 

of the name of the Karl of Perth and a corruption of the original Indian name 

of the town, Ompage. 
Peru; township and city in Lasale County, Illinois, named from the town in New 

York. 
Peru; township and city in Miami County, Indiana, named for the South American 

State. 
Peru; towns in Berkshire County, Massachusetts, and Clinton County, New York, 

named from the country in South America. 
Peacadero; village in San Mateo County, California. A Spanish word meaning 

"fishmonger." 
Pescongamoc; lake in Maine near the Penobscot River. An Indian word meaning 

** divided lake." 
Peshtigo; river in Oconto County and town in Marinette County, Wisconsin. An 

Indian word meaning **wild goose river." 
Pesotum; village in Champaign County, Illinois, said to be named for an Indian 

who was active in the Chicago massacre in the war of 1812. 
Petaluma; township and city in Sonoma County, California. An Indian word 

meaning "duck pond." 
Peterboro; town in Hillsboro County, New Hampshire, named from the city in 

England. 
Peterboro; village in Madison County, New York, named for Peter Smith. 
Petersburg; town in Arapahoe County, Colorado, named for Peter Magnes, its 

founder. 
Petersburg; village in Kent County, Delaware, named for the descendants of Peter 

Fowler, who adopted his baptismal name as a surname. 
Petersburg; city in Menard County, Illinois, name<l for Peter Lukins, a founder. 
Petersburg; town in Pike County, Indiana, named for Peter Brenton, an early 

settler. 
Petersburg; town in Rensselaer County, New York, named for Peter Simmons, an 

early settler. 
Petersburg; borough in Huntingdon County, Pennsylvania, named for Peter Fleck, 

an early settler. 
Petersburg; city in Dinwiddle County, Virginia, foundetl by Col. William Byrd 

and Peter Jones, and named for the latter. 
Petersham; town in Worcester County, Massachusetts, name<i for William Stan- 
hope, Earl of Petersham. 
Petersville; village in Bartholomew ("ounty, Indiana, named for Peter T. Blessing, 

its founder. 
Petoskey; city in Emmett County, Michigan. Named from an Ojibwa Indian chief, 

the name being said to refer to some one of the heavenly bodies. 
Pettis; county in Missouri, name<i for Spencer Pettis, secretary of state of Missouri. 
Pettit; island off the Maine coast, named for the Pettit family. 
Pewabic; town in Ontonagon County, Michigan, named from the river which be 

the Indian name pewdbik npt, '' iron river." 



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I 

I 



PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 

Fewakpa; Iribiitury of the Dukola River; a Sinux Indian 

Pew&mo; village in Ionia County, Michigan, named (or the son of Hhacoe, a chief 

( IjibwB Indians. 
Fewftukee; ^-iIlnge in Waukeeiia County, Wisconsin, named irom the lake whirh 

bore the IndiHH name of jia^i'auket-tik't-jiiiis, "lake of ithellB." 
Feyioua; villa)(e in Boone County, West Virginia, named (or Williant M. Peyton, 
PbeaBant Branch; villapp in Dane County. WiBPonwn, named from the BtrMUii 

which I'lears tlie name of Peona, poeaibly a ecrruption of tbe French patnt, 

"lieaixx'k," or "pheasant." 
Fheba; village in Clay County, Mi«BisHippi, natned for Mrs. Pheba RobinBon. 
Fhelpe; county, and village in Atchieun C-ounty, in Missouri, named forGov.JobnK 

Phelpg. 
Phelpe; eonnly in Nebraska, named for William Phelpa, an early resident of tlie 

Fbelps; village in Onlariu C'Ounty, New York, named for Oliver Phelpn, iine of the 

original proprietors. 
Fhiladelphia; county, and city in same county, in Penneylvanio, so named by 

William Penn in order tliat the principle of the Quakers — brotherly love — might 

be identified with their city, the name being that of the city in Asia Minor. 

From the Greek, jihilitilclplioe, meaning "loving one'H brother." 
Philadelpliia; city in .Tefferson County, New York, name-l from the city in Peon- 

Hvlvania. 
Fhilippi: town in Parlxiiir County, We^ Virginia, both town and county bdng 

named tor Philip P. Harbour, an early governor of Virginia. 
Fhilipebur^; city in Granite County, Montana, named for the manager of the 

Fhilipsburg; horouB'" '» C^nterCounty, Pennsylvaiiia, named for its founders, Iwu 

Knulifihmeii. Henry ami James Philips. 
Philipatown; town in Putnam County, New York, named fi>r Adolph Pbilipee, llie 

orifmal patentee. 
FbUlipB; county in ArkauHaa, named for Sylvanus Phillips, a prominent residsut. 
Phillips; county in Colorado, named for R. 0. Phillipe, a prominent statesman. 
FhillipB; couutv, and city in same county, in Kansas, named for Col. William A. 

Phillips. 
FhiUips; lake in Maine, named for the man who ha« owned it for fifty yesrs. 
Phillip*; town in Franklin County, Maine, named tor a prominent resident family, 

by whom the hiwn site was formerly owned. 
Phillips; I'ily in Price County, Wisconsin, nameil for Elijah B. Phillips, a i^lroad 

Phillipsburg: town in Warren County, New Jersey, named for a resident family. 
Phillipston; town in Worcester County, Maesachusette. named for Lieut. Gov. 

William Phillips, 1814. 
PhillipsTille; village in Humboldt County, California, named for a settler. 
Fhilmoat; village in Columbia County, New York. Compound of Philip, theiwnu 

of a prominent family, and mottt, from its elevale<l location. 
Fhilo; township and village in Champaign County, Illinois, named for Philo Hale, 

who made the tirsit land entry in the vicinity. 
Phippsburg'; town in Sagadahoc County, Maine, naiueil for Sir William Fbw| 

governor of MaBsaehiisetts. 
Phoenix; city in Slarii'opa County, Arizona, named in prophecy ( 

growth," being situated in the midst of prehistoric ru 



William raw^J 



GANNETT.] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 245 

Phoenix; village in Oswego, County, New York, named for Alexander Phoenix. 
Phoenizville; borough in Chester County, Pennsylvania, named for the Phoenix 

Iron Works. 
Piasa; tow^n in Macoupin C^ounty, Illinois. The Indian name of a huge animal 

figure which they had chiselecl in an adjacent ledge of rock on tlie banks of the 

Mississippi River. Th<i word seems to refer to a panther. 
Piatt; county in Illinois, named for James Andrew Piatt, the first white settler 

within the limits of the county. 
Piccowaxen; creek in Maryland. An Indian word meaning *'tom shoes." 
Pickaway; county in Ohio. Another form of Piqua or Fequea^ the name of a sub- 

tril)e of the Shawnee Indians. 

\\ counties in Alabama and Georgia, and county, and town in same county, 

in South Carolina, named for Gen. Andrew Pickens, of the Revolutionary war. 
i; town in Holmes County, Mississippi, nameil for James Pickens a land- 
owner. 
Pickensville; town in Pickens County, Alal>ama, named for Gen. Andrew Pickens, 

an ofl&cer of the Revolution. 
Pickett; county in Tennessee, named for Col. George Edward C. A. Pickett, who 

led the famous charge at the battle of Gettysburg. 
Piedmont; town in Alameda County, California, at the foot of the Berkeley Hills; 

city in Wayne County, Missouri; and town in Mineral County, West Virginia, 

at the base of the Alleghenies. From the French pied^ meaning '*foot," and 

mcnt^ ** mountain.** 
Piedra; town in San Luis Obispo County, California. A Spanish name meaning 

** stone." 
Pieman; village in Chouteau County, Montana, named for a subtribe of the Blackfeet 

Indians, the original form being apihmiy meaning *' badly tanned robes." 
Pierce; mountain in Humboldt County, California, and counties in Georgia, Nebraska, 

Washington, and Wisconsin, named for President Franklin Pierce. 
Pierce; county in North Dakota, named for Hon. Gilbert A. Pierce, first United 

States Senator from North Dakota. 
Pierce; village in Wharton County, Texas, named for Thomas W. Pierce, an early 

railroad man. 
Pierce City; city in Lawrence County, Missouri, named for Andrew Pierce, of Bos- 
ton, Massachusetts. 
Pierceton; town in Kosciusko County, Indiana, nameti for President Franklin Pierce. 
Piermont; village in Rockland County, New York, so named because it is ba(;ked 

by high hills and facing the river, into which extends a long pier. 
Pierre; city in Hughes County, South Dakota. Derives its name from Pierre 

Choteau, who established a post for fur trading with the Indians. 
Pierrepont; town in St. lAw^rence County, New York, named for Hezekiah B. 

Pierrepont, one of the original proprietors. 
Pierrepont Manor; village in Jefferson County, New York, named for the Hon. 

William C. Pierrepont* s residence. 
Pierres Hole; valley in Idaho, named for an Iroquois chieftain in the employ of 

the Hudson Bay Company. 
Pierson; village in Montcalm County, Michigan, named for O. A. Pierson, the first 

white settler. 
Piffard; village in Livingston County, New York, named for David Piffanl, a prom- 
inent settler. 
Pig^eon; one of the Apostle Islands, in Lake Superior, Wisconsin. A translation of 

the Indian name. 



246 PLACK NAMER IN THE UNITED STATES, fBrLL.258. 

Pike; counties in Alabama and Arkansas, peak in Colorado, counties in Georgia, 
Illinoi.^i, Indiana, Kentucky, Missispippi, and MisHouri, town in Wyoming County, 
New York, and countie** in Ohio and Penn^ylvaniai named for Gen. Zebolon M. 
Pike, the explorer. 

Piketon; village in Pike County, Ohio, named from the county. 

Pikeville; town in Wayne County, North Carolina, named for a prominent reeident. 

Pillsbury ; villa|?e in To<ld County, Minnesota, named for an early governor. 

Pilot Grove; city in Cooj)er County, Missouri, so named becauae of the presence of 
a grove in a nearby prairie, which served as a landmark. 

Pilot Knob; town in Iron County, Missouri, named from the hill which is a promi- 
nent feature of the landia<'^pe. 

Pima; county and town in Graham County, Arizona, named for an Indian tribe. 

Pinal; c<^)unty in Arizona, named for a chief of the Apaches. 

Pinckney; town in I^wis County, New York, named for Charles C. Pinckney, a 

pn)minent ntatei^man of South Carolina. 
Pinckney; town in I'nion County, South Carolina; 

Pinckneyville; towns in Clay County, Alabama, and Wilkinson County, Missifl- 
Hippi. Narae<l for the Pinckney family of South Carolina. 

Pinckneyville; city in Perry County, Illinois, named for Charles C. Pinckney, of 
South ran»lina. 

Pinconning; village in Bay County, Michigan. An Indian word meaning **potato 
place." 

Pine; county in Minnesota, so named l)ecause of the extensive forests of red and 
white pines in the district. 

Pine Log; town in Tuolumne County, California, so named because the crossing of 
the StaninlauH River at this {)oint was originally by a large log. 

Pinkham; grant in Coos County, New Hampshire, named for Daniel Pinkham, the 
grantee. 

Pino Blanco; town in Mari{)osa County, California. A descriptive Spanish name, 
meaning "white pine." 

Pino Grande; town in Eldorado County, California, in a forest of laige pine trees. 
A Spanish phrase, meaning "big pine." 

Pinole; town in Contra Costa County, California. A Spanish word meaning 
''parched corn." 

Pinon Blanco; [3eak and ridge in California. A Spanish phrase meaning ''moun- 
tain of white rock." 

Pinos Altos; town in (irant County, New Mexico. A Spanish phrase meaning 
"higli pines." 

Pinteula; |H^ak of the San Juan Mountains, California. A Spanish word meaning 
''mottled" or "si>otted." 

Piper City; village in Ford County, Illinois, named for its founder, l>r. William 

Pipestone; county, and village in same county, in Minnesota, so named because of 

its (!elel)rate<l quarry of re<l pijK^stone. 
Piqua; city in Miami County, Ohio. From an Indian word signifying ** ashes," the 

name of one of the four divisions of the Shawnee Indians, formerly occupying 

that ri^gion. 
Pissacassick ; river in New Hampshire; 
Piscasset; stream in Maine. Deriveii from an Indian word meaning ** white 

stone." 
Piscataqua; river in New Hampshire, said to have been derived from the Indian 

y,'()rd pishgarhtigoky meaning "the confluence of two streams," or **greatdeer 



river." 



Piscataquis; county, and branch of the Penoljscot River in Maine. An Indian 
word meaning "divided tidal river." 



CANNBTT] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 247 

Pischelville; town in Knox County, Nebraska, named for the first postmaster, 
Anton Pischel. 

Pis^ah; mountain in Colorado, and town in Cooper County, Missouri, named indi- 
rectly from the mountain in Palestine. A Hebrew word meaning "peak." 

Piahtaka; lake in northern Illinois. An Indian word meaning '*fox." 

Pit; river in California, so named because the Indians dug pits upon its banks to 
catch men and animals. 

Pitcaim; island in the Pacific, named for its discoverer, Major Pitcaim. 

Pitcaim; town in St. Lawrence County, New York, named for Joseph Pitcaim, the 
original proprietor. 

Pitcher; creek in Humboldt County, California, named for an early setler. 

Pitcher; town in Chenango County, New York, named for Nathaniel Pitcher, lieu- 
tenant-governor of the State. 

Pithole City; village in Venango County, Pennsylvania, named from a creek which 
had a deep hole in the rocks upon its banks. 

Pitkin; county, and village in Gunnison County, in Colorado, named for F. W. Pitkin, 
an early governor of the State. 

Pitt; county in North Carolina, and mountain in Or^on, named for Sir William 
Pitt, Earl of Chatham. 

Pittsboro; town in Calhoun County, Mississippi, named for an early settler. 

iPittsboro; town in Chatham County, North Carolina; 
Pittsburg; city in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania. Named for Sir William Pitt, 
Earl of Chatham. 
Pittsburg; city in Crawford County, Kansas, named from the city in Pennsylvania. 
Pittsfield; township and city in Pike County, Illinois, named from the city in 

Massachusetts, the home of many of the settlers. 
Pittsfield; town in Somerset County, Maine, named for William Pitts, of Boston. 
Pittsfield; city in Berkshire County, Massachusetts; 
Pittston; town in Kennebec County, Maine; 
Pittsylvania; county in Virginia. Named for Sir William Pitt, Earl of Chatham, 

the celebrated English statesman. 
Piute; mountain in San Bernardino County, and town in Keni County, California, 
and county in Utah. Named for an Indian tribe. 
Placer; county in California; 

Placerville; city in Eldorado County, California. From the Spanish plaza; mean- 
ing '"place;" in mining district*, a place where surface deposition is washed for 
valuable minerals. 
Plainfield; city in Union County, New Jersey, so named because it is situated on a 

beautiful plain. 
Plankinton; township and city in Aurora County, South Dakota, named for John 

Plankinton, of Milwaukee. 
Piano; town in Tulare County, California. A Spanish word meaning "plan" or 

"dmft" 
Plant City; town in Hillsboro County, Florida, named for H. C. Plant, who organ- 
ized a railroad system in that State. 
Plaquemines; parish, and town in Iberville Parish, in Louisiana, so name<l by Bien- 
ville on account of the quantities of persimmons which grow in the vicinity. 
Plata; river in Colorado. A Spanish word meaning "silver." 
Platte; river in Nebraska, Colorado, and Wyoming. From the French plate^ 

meaning "dull,'* "shallow," a term singularly applicable to this stream. 
Platte; county, and city in same county, in Missouri, and county in Nebraska, named 

from the Platte River. 
Plattekill; town in Ulster County, New York. A Dutch word meaning "flat 
brook." 



-^"^ 



24S PLACE Names in the rsiXKD states. [btllss. 

Plmttsborg. \\..3jt' ::. iMl:*-:. i.'^riniy. N«-« York, named for Jodire Zephiniih 

r* ■••• ■ "• • •• • . *•-' 

Flmttflinouih . ■ iry ir. 4\i:^ r'^i:.:y. NVr'n^kjL ?>■• nanieil becaoAr of xxn location at 

thr • ■ :.:i :•-:.■>- ■■: ::;•- ria:t»- sm-l Mia*N.uri rivfis. 
Plmttville: \\..ax^ ::. {'••rtrr ('••'intj. Iniliana. namcil for Thomas Piatt, who bu*^ 

it '.^v 
Pleaaanton: • ::;. 1:. lin:. C'lnty. Kansas. nam«il for^ieo. Alfred PWaaanton. 
Fleaaant Plains: \:iLdur»- i:. >a£4«cixii< •& Omnty. Illinou, a descriptive name ^^' 

;ft^ti\>- .■: •*.»- "••■aii'-ri. 
Pleaaanta: « . in:;. :z. \\\r>: Vinntiia. namt^l f«>r Jamtt* Pleaaanttf, an early g^)verT^ ^*^' 
Pleaaia: .illa^ :r. J^-ffri^n ('••!:xi;\. Nrv York, nameii from the town in Fnnc*^- 
Plum: »tr»<i:i. i:. \r.:.:'Xr*-n^ r«<i.:nty. Penney 1%'ania. the name being a translation^ ^'^ 

thr In-iidii w.-T': •■» • ..•^-'.•i..-..'. 
Plumaa: ««':r.ty ::i < 'a:;i..rT-ui travfr^eil by the Feather Ri\*er. A Spanish w -^^^ 

iiit-ar.ir;.: "'VaTLt-r."' 
Plymouth: ti>w:i in Mur^n^Il r«>unTy. Indiana: n>an tie-in lom*aand Maaaachose ^^^' 

r<-wri« iri \Va.-ri:ii.:T"ii «"i:iitv. Nitrth C'aniHna, and Windsor Coantv, Vermt^ ^^" 

aii'i 'ity izi >hfr->yirari <.'>'Uii!y. Wi«^-oa»in: named from the town in Maisaac^^^^' 

•^tt.-. 
PlTmouth: t'>uii ii. f*!y!ii<>>ith (V«iinty. Masvachnsetts, the landing place of z:^^^ 

I'ilk'ri:i.-. riaiii»^l tr>'ii. l'!yxiii>uth in Enirland. wherv they were hospitably ent^^^^ 

tain»-«i pri"r t«< th»-:r eiiiikrnitii'n t«> Anirrii.'a. 
PlTmouth: T"\%nsh:p aii>i \iliajrf in Kii-hlanil County. Ohio, so uameil by pionee^^'^ 

fp»ni riviiMiuth. lVr.ii>\ Ivania. 
Plympton: t>>wii in I'lynfir.h County. Masesaohusetts. doubtless named for one 

thf IMynipti'ii- "I KnL'lanii. 
Pocahontas: villa^re in t^<n«l County. Illinois: coonty in Iowa; village in Ca] ^ 

* iininl»-a»i < *'"iinty. Mi^xMiri: an»l c»«unty in West Virginia; named for the India.-' — ^ 

priiuf*-. Tli»* i:aiiit- i- «aiil t*- ?ii;nity 'Stream between two hills." 
Pocantecs: ^tnam ninnini! tlirviikrh "Sleeity Hollow," near Tarrytown, Xew Yorl 

An Iri'lian wnni iitfaiiinii; "a nm Wtween two hills." 
Pocasset: villajt- in Barn<-taMe County. Ma<Ma^*ha<^tts. An Indian word nieanin^ 

■'at wlii'h a -Trait wi'ifn>." 
Pochaug: ^Trt-am in Ciiiin»-i-tii-iii. An Indian wurd meanini; ** where they divid'^^ 

in tw«.." 
Pockwocamus: iak*.* "U IVnitlir-ct't River. Maine. An Indian word meaning **mnc^^ 

.Pocomoke: riv«-r in Maryland: 

jPocomoke City: Immh in W.^nvster County. Maryland. An Indian word mean- 

' \u'^ "\tr(tk*'U hy kn«»llj-." 

Pocono: -tn-aiit in M<^nr"e County. Penunylvania. An Indian word meaning 

"ytn-aiii U'tw»t'n iiiountain>." 
Poconteco: riv»-r in W»*r.trh»->t«'r C<»untv. New York, said to have been dennelv 

•-had'*'! liv tn-e>. An Indian \vi»nl nieaniuju: **tlark river." 
Pocosen: riv^T in Viivinia. IVrivt^l frmn the an Indian won! signifying "graiV}' 

)fttXXinti." 
Poe: town«hif> in llannx-k County, West Virginia, nanieil for a family of pioneers 

and ln<iian tii;ht»Ts. 
Poestenkill: town in K«'n>*H.'laf'r Coiinty. New York, nanie<l from its principtl 

-tn-ajii. A Pntrh won! nieanin;; "iVianiinir rreek." 
Poge; rafH- at th«- nortli end nfCliapiiaquiiiirk Island, Ma.'-'MichusettS. Derivedfroin 

an Iiniian word \\hi<li mean*' *"liarlH.r'* or "iilace of shelter." 
Pogues; trtH-k in Indiana, nanietl for an earlv t<ettler. 



.'« 



GAN5ETT.1 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 249 

Pohopoco; stream in Pennsylvania. Derived from the Indian word poctikapockla, 
signifying **two mountains bearing down upon each other with a stream inter- 
vening.** 

Poinsett; county in Arkansas, named for Joel R. Poinsett, secretary of war during 
the administration of President Van Buren. 

Point a la Hache; town in Plaquemines Parish, Louisiana. A French name mean- 
ing ** hatchet point." 

Point Allerton; point near Boston, Massachusetts, named for a passenger on the 
Mayflower. 

Point Arena; town in Mendocino County, California, on the coast. From the 
Latin, harena^ meaning "sand,** and point. 

Point Bonita; southern extremity of Marin County, California. A Spanish phrase 
meaning *' beautiful point'* 

Point Caswell; village in Pender County, North Carolina, named for Richard Cas- 
well, a Revolutionary governor and general. 

Pointe Coui>ee; parish, and town in same parish, in Louisiana, so named because of 
an extensive cut-off formed by the change in the course of the river. A French 
name meaning ** cut-off point** 

Point Pleasant; town in Mason County, West Vii^nia, so named because it was 
once a place of great natural beauty. 

Point SemoTre; stream in Conway County, Arkansas. A corruption of the French 
word remouSy meaning "eddy.** 

Point Seyes; town in Marin County, California, named from the point on which a 
light-house is situated, called by the Spanish punta des reyes^ "point of the 
kings.** 

Point Roberts; cape on the coast of Washington, named for its discoverer. 

Point Saint Ignace; village in Mackinac County, Michigan, named for Saint 
Ignacius. 

Point Shirley; point and strait in Suffolk County, Massachusetts, named for 
William Shirley, an early governor. 

Point Sur; town in Monterey County, California. From the Spanish meaning 
"south point** 

Pokagon; village in Cass County, Michigan, named for a Pottawatomie chief, the 
name meaning "woman butcher.** 

Pokomoka; river in Maryland. An Indian name meaning "place of shellfish.** 

Poland; town in- Androscoggin County, Maine, said to have been named for a noted 
Indian chief. 

PolJEUid; village in Mahoning County, Ohio, named for George Poland, its original 
proprietor. 

Polk; counties in Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Iowa, Missouri, Tennessee, Texas, and 
Wisconsin, and probably the counties of the same name in Minnesota, Nebraska, 
and Oregon, named for President James K. Polk. 

Polk; county in North Carolina, named for Col. William Polk, of the North Caro- 
lina Continental Line. 

Polkton; town in Anson County, North Carolina, named for Leonidas Polk. 

Pollei»el; island on the Hudson River, New York. A Dutch word meaning "ladle.** 

PoUoksville; town in Jones County, North Carolina, named for a prominent citizen. 

Polo; city in O^le County, Illinois, named for the distinguished traveler, Marco Polo. 

Pomeroy; city in Meigs County, Ohio, named for its original proprietor, Samuel 
Wyllis Pomeroy. 

Pomfret; towns in Windham County, Connecticut, Charles County, Maryland, and 
Windham County, Vermont, named from the town in Yorkshire, England. 

Ponune de Terre; river of Missouri entering the Osage River. A French phrase, 
meaning "potato.** 



PLACE NAMEfl IN THE UNITED aTATES. ( 

town ill Mi^nilocino County, California, iianinl from ite localion in the hu 
i.'ri iM iriu n^nri. A Spanish wonl denoting trait in geuera], but applied parti 
Ittrly I'l llie apple. 

Pomona; citipB in 1*h Angelea County, C'alifoniia, and FYanklin County, Kaoi 
(laiiifd for the Kouian ^^oddesB of fruit. From the Latin /lomum, " fruit." 

Pomperaug; river in Connecticut, An Indian word prolubly meaning "place ql 



olft'l 



nut. 



Potnpsy; town in Onondaga C-ounty, New York, named for Pomiiey the Ureal. 
Fonca; townnhip, and city in Dixon CimnLy, in Nehnwka, and town in Kay County,'1 
Oklahoma, namtxl for the I'oiica tribe of Indiann. The word in eupponcd ti 

Ponf^hartrain ; lake in Louisiana, named for a French connt who waa » 

e\|iliirer of the Missia-ippi Valley. 
Ponkapo^; (own in Norfolk County, Massachusetts. An Indian word i 

Pontiac; uity in Oakland County, Michigan, named for a chief of the OumI 

Indian)). 
Pontiac; township and city in Livingaton County, Illinois, named from Pontii 

Michigan, whence many of the early settlen) came. 
PontooBUC; hill in Glastonliury, Connecticut, village in Hancock County, lllin<n%fl 

and village, and lake in Berkshire County, Maseachusettt^. An Indian i 

meaning "(allB on the brook." 
Pontotoc; town in Chickasaw Nation, Indian Territory, and county, and town Jj 

pamf county, in Minsieaippi, named for a Chickasaw Indian chief. The «« 

meaUB "weed prairie." 
Pope; i-onnty in Arkansas, named for John Pope, a former gover 
Pope; coimty in Illinois, named for Nathaniel Pope, a former Congresional deleg 
Pope; (-onnty in Minnesota, name<l for Gen. John Pope, who conducted the Min 

MJta exploring expedition to the Red River. 
Popbam; fori at the mouth of the Kennebec Kiver, Maine, named for Capt. Q 

I'dplLHin, its builder, when govemorof the firet English colony in New Englai 
Poplar Bluff; township and city in Butler County, Missouri, so named becanasifl 

the helt of poplar trees in that section, and the location of the city on a btuIlM 

the foot of the Ozark range of mountains. 
Poplarville; town in Pearl River County, Mixsissippi, named for "Popular" Jim 

Smith, owner of the store in which the first railroad ilejHit at this point wan located. 
Poponoming; lake in Monroe County, Pen nay Ivan in. A Delaware Indian name 

meaning "where we are gazing." 
Poquessing; stream in Pennsylvania. A Delaware Indian word meaning "when 

Poquetanuck; stream and town in New London County. Connecticut. An IndiaB 

Willi! tncaning "land open" or "broken up." 
Poquonoc; river and hill in Connecticut. An Indian word meaning " deared liad." 
Porcupine; inlands of Moimt l>e«ert, Maine, so called becau«i at a distance Hbef 

rc^inlile a i>on'upine. 
Portage: town in Uvingston County. New York, and counties in Ohio and Wiacoa- 

sill, »j named Ijecause of their location between water courvea. 
Portage; city in (Columbia County, Wisconsin. A French word meaniDK *' 

i I It;- i I lace," boata having l>e«n carried from the Fox to the Wisconsin ri 
Portag'e des Siouz; town in St. Charles Coimty, Missouri, so nai 

jHiiiil on the Mississippi Kiver the Indians carried their caiitH 

siila to the Missouri. 
Port Angeles; town in Clallam County. Washington, nameil by Don FiwidKa 

Klisu, a Mexican. 




GAXXETT.l PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 251 

Port Austin; village in Huron County, Michigan, named for the first man to estab- 
lish a business there. 
Port Chester; village in Westchester CJounty, New York, named from the city in 
England, ''port'' being prefixed to distinguish it from other towns of the same 
name. 
Port Clinton; village on the border of Lake Erie, Ottawa County, Ohio, named for 

ex-Governor Clinton of Northwest Territory. 
^ort Crane; village in Broome County, New York, named for one of the engineers 

of the Chenango Canal. 
^ort Deposit; town in Cecil County, Maryland, so named because it is one of the 
principal depots for the pine lumber rafted down the river. 
ort Dickinson; town in Broome County, New York, named in honor of Daniel S. 
Dickinson, United States Senator, lieutenant governor, and attorney-general of 
New York, 
ort Discovery; village in Jefferson County, Washington, named for a ship in the 

fleet of Vancouver, the explorer, 
orter; county in Indiana, name<l for Commodore David Porter, 
orter; town in Oxford County, Maine, named for Dr. Aaron Porter, an early 

proprietor, 
orter; town in Niagara County, New York, named for Judge Augustus Porter, 
ort Gamble; village in Kitsap County, Washington, named for a United States 
naval ofiScer. 
^^ort Oibson; town in Claiborne County, Mississippi, named for David Gibson, the 

former owner of the town site. 
'^ort Henry; village in Essex County, New York, named for the son of Maj. 
James Dalliba, United States Army, and from being a port on Lake Champlain. 
Tort Jervis; village in Orange County, New York, named for John B. Jervis, 

engineer of the Hudson and Delaware Canal. 
Portland; city in Jay County, Indiana, named by early settlers from Portland, Me. 
Portland; city in Cumberland County, Maine, and borough in Northampton 

County, Pennsylvania, named, indirectly, from the town in England. 
Portland; city in Multnomah County, Oregon. The name was decided by the toss 
of a copper by two settlers, one from Portland, Maine, and the other from Bos- 
ton, Massachusetts. 
Port Leyden; town in Lewis County, New York, named from Leyden, Netherlands. 
Port Korris; village in Westchester County, New York, named for Gouverneur 

Morris, an American statesman. 
Port Orchard; town and harbor in Kitsap County, Washington, named for its 

discoverer. 
Port Orford; cape and town in Curry County, Oregon, named for George, Earl of 

Orford. 
Port Penn; town in New Castle County, Delaware, named for William Penn. 
Port Royal; river, and town in Beaufort County, in South Carolina, so named 

** because of the fairness and bigness thereof.'* 
Portsmouth; city in Rockingham County, New Hampshire, first named Strawberry 
Banke, but later changed to its present name because situated at the river mouth 
and a good harbor. 
Portsmouth; city in Scioto County, Ohio, named from the city in Virginia. 
Portsmouth; city in Norfolk County, Vii^inia, named from Portsmouth in England. 
Port Tobacco; town in Charles County, Maryland, and an inlet on the Potomac 
River in the same State; the name has no connection with the plant, but is a 
corruption of the Indian word pauiapany, meaning a ** bulging out,** *'bay,** 
or **cove." 
Port Townsend; harbor and village in Jefferson County, Washington, named for 

Mawinia nf Tnivnannrl. 



r 



252 PLACE NAME3 IN TBE UNITED STATES. 

PortviUa; towu in Cattaraugus Cotinly, Kew York, so named becaoae it was, at an 
early dale, a prominent point for the shipment of lumber, shiogles, etc 

|FoBflyi county in Indiana; 

iPoMTTille; town in Posey County, Indiana. Named (or Gen. Thomas Poaey, an 

' early governor of the State. 

Foso; town in Kern County, Caiifomia. A Spanish wonl meaning "repose." 

Foaaeaaioa; sound in Washington, so named by VancoQver, bei»iise he lande<l and 
tooic poseeHfiion on the King's birthday. 

Foatboy: village in Tuscarawas County, Ohio, so named because a postboy was mur- 
dered in the neighborhood. 

Potaligo; village in MadiiKin County, Georgia. An Indian word meaning "plenty 
of fatilupks." 

Potaan; river in Arkanxae. A Freneb word meaning "poet," "stake," or "(Mllar." 

Fotanda; town in Ixe Angeles County, California. Thei^panish word for "power." 

FotoB; town in Washington Coanty, Missouri, a mining town, najned from the 
Peruvian mining town. 

Fotrero; town in San Diego County, Caiifomia, A Spanish word meaning "pae- 
tore ground." 

Potsdam; village in St, Lawren<'e County, New York, named from a town in 
I*rUHsia. 

iFottawattomie; rountieif in Kansas and Oklahoma; 
Pottawattamie; county in Iowa. Namwl for the Indian tribe. The word means 
" iii]iki'rH of tire," and was used to signify that this tribe assumed separate suv- 
■.■rt'ignty liy building a council fire for themselves. 
Potter; town in Yates County, New York, name<l for Arnold Potter, the original 

proprietor. 
Potter; county, and township in Center County, in Pennsylvania, named for Gen. 

James Potter, a Revolutionary officer. 
Potter; county in Kouth Dokota, named lor a prominent physician of the State- 
Potter; county in Tesaa, name<l fur Rotiert Potter, temporary secretary of the navy 

of Texas In 1B36. 
Potter Hollow; village in Albany County, New York, named for Samuel Potter. 
Pottervllle; \'illage in Eaton County, Michigan, named for Geoi^ N. Potter. 
Potts Camp; t'livn in Marshall County, Mimiseippi, named for Col. E. F. Potts. 
jPottatowTi; lifiroi^fh in Montgomery County, Pennsylvania; 

iPottsville; iHjrough In Schuylkill Omnty, Pennsylvania, Named for John Putts, i 
' \arne lariilowner, who founded the town, 
Foughkeepsie; city in Dutchess County, New York. Derived from the Delawin 

Indian word apuktepmngk, meaning "safe, pleasant harbor," or "shallow tnlel," 

"safe harljor for small boats." 
Powder; stream in Wyoming, so named because of the dark powder-colored (wnJ 

on its banks. 
Fcnrell; county in Kentucky, named for Lazerus W. Powell, a former governor. 
Fowall; mountain in Colorado and county in Mo utano, named forMaj. J, W. Powell, 

geologist and explorer, 
Powellarille: town in Bertie County, North Carolina, named for a prominent 

resident. 
Powellton; town in Fayette County, West Virginia, named for E. Powell, interested 

in a large coal aii<l coke company. 
Powell Valley; village in Multnomah County, Oregon, nameii for an old settler, 
Powelton; \ illage in Hancock County, Georgia, named for a former resident. 
Poweshiek; county in Iowa, name<l for an Indian cliiet. 
Powhatan; county in Virginia, and city in Brown Criunly„ Kai 

<-elebrated Inilion chief. The name ineaiiH "at the fails." 



las, named fo^h^^ 



PLACE KAMES IN THE UNITED STATEW. 



lebatio Coimty, WieconBin. An Indian word meaning 



Pownal; lowns ii 

nameil for (i 
Foygan; vill^^ i 

■ -pi !«■.'■ 

Poynette; villEi^ in Columbia Conniy, Wisconsin, named for Peter RtQuette; the 

preeeiit orthograpiiy is a clerical error 
Poyaippi; village in Waushara County, Wiefonain. Derived frem the Indian word 

pot/gamijipi, meaning "nuining into the laltc" 
Pozo; town in San Luia Obispo County, California, named from the wells in the 

ndghborhixid. A Spanish word meaning "well." 
Prairie: county in Arkannu, eo name<l on arrount of its treeless plains. 
PTuri«; stream in Wisconsin. Derived from the Indian word muek-kiMUiy ijihb 

te-hf, "prairie river." 
Prairie City; township anil villaae in MrDonough County, Illinois, named fiom ita 

location on a prairie. 

wford County, Wisconsin. A French phrase mean- 



Prairie du Chienj 

ing " prairie of the dog,' 
Prairie du Sochef; vill^ie 

Muf(. A French phrase 



n Randolph County, Illinois, behind which is a rocky 
iie^ning "meadow of the rock." 
Prairie du Sac; village in Sauk Connty, Wisconsin, originally in the territory of the 
Sauk Indians. A French phrase meaning " meadow of the tiauks." 

Prairie Home: village in Cooper County, Missouri, so name<l on account of the 
character of the land. 

Pratt: county, and city in same county, in Kansas, name<l for f'aleb Pratt, i>«cond 
lifuienant Company D, Second KanJW^. 

I^attaburgi town in Steuben County, New York, named for Capt. Joel Pratt, one 
of the first settleni. 

Pratta Hollow; village in Madison County, New York, named for John and Mat- 
thew Pratt, early settlers. 

frattaville; town in Greene County, New York, nanied for Za<lock Pratt, 

Preble; coonty in Ohio, and town in Cortland County, New York, nanied for Com- 
modore Edward Preble. 

Prendra: town in Riverside County. California. ASpanish name meaning "pledge." 

Prentice: villt^ie in Price County, Wisconsin, named for Alexander Prentice, tlie 
first postmaiit«r. 

Prentiaa; county in Mississippi, named for Sergt. Smith Prentiss, a gifted forensic 

Preacott; town in Yavapai County, Arizona, named for W. H. Prescott, the hiatorian. 
R'eacott; city in Linn County, Kansas, named for C. H. PreKOlt, a railroad official. 
Preacott; town in Hampshire County, MasBachusetts, named for Col. William Free- 

cott, commanding the Americans at the battle of Bunker Hill. 
Preacott; city in Pierce County, Wisconsin, named for P. Prescott 

{Presidio; station in San Francisco, California, Ihe head([iiarters of the United States 
garrison and military reservation; 
Preeidio; county in Texas. A Spanish word meaning "garrisfjn for soldiers." 
Preeque Isle; town in Aroostook County, Maine, and irounly in Michigan, A 

French phrase meaning "nearly an island." 
Preston; township in Wayne County, Pennsylvania, named for Judge Samuel Pres- 
ton, an early settler. 
I Preston: county in Wesi Virginia; 
Prestonburg': town In Floyd County, Kentucky. Named for James P. Preston, an 
early governor of Virginia. 
Preston Hollow; village in Albany County, New York, named for the fiist family 



: tamily ^^^ 



254 VLACK NAMES IN THK UNITED STATKa. Ih<xl.^H 

I' PreatoiiTille; town in Carroll County, Kentucky, naui«d (or Jamw 1*. Preston, an 

early governor of Virginia. 
[- Presumpscot; village in Cumberland County, Maine. An Indian word uiHining 

"rough plate in the river." 
[ Treuaa; mountain in Idaho, named for a topographer of the Fremont expluring 

part)-. 
] Pribilof; islands of Alaska, named for the Roeeian navigator who diacwvered tliem. 
' Price; I'reck in Hiinilmidt County, California, named fur an early settler. 
Price; coimty in Wii<con8in, named for Congreeaman WiUliun T. Price. 
Pnmgliar; town in O'Brien County, Iowa, named by i-ouibining the initials of the 

persona present at the laying of the i-omer Htoue. 
Prince Edward; iwunty in Virginia, named in 1702 for Edward, a son of Frederick, 

i'ritn-e of Wulea, 
Prince George; countiea in Maryland and Virginia, named for Prince George of 

Denniark, afUrwarda Kln^ of England. 
Pri&cea; stream In northern Illinoie, named for Daniel Prince, one of the fitBi set^ 

tiers of Peoria County. 
Princeaa Anne; county in Virginia, named for PrincesB, afterwards Queen, Anne of 

England; founded in 1B91. 
Princeton; mountain in Colorado, named from Princeton t'niversity. 
Frineeton; city iu Gibnon County, Indiana, named for Hon. William Prince, 
Frincetoa; town in Caldwell County, Kentucky, name<l for William Prince, the 

flnt senler. 
Princeton; town in Worceater County, MasBachnHplls, nauipd for ihe Hev. Thumas 

Prince, pastor of the Old South Church, Boston. 
Princeton; town in Merwr County, West Virginia, named for the battlefield np-m 

which Gen. Hugh Mercer fell. 
Princetown; town in Schenectady County, New York, named (or John Prince, a 

member of Alliany County's assembly. 
Princeville; township and village in Peoria County, llliiioiii, named for Daniel 

Prince, an early aettler in the county. 
Prince William; county in Virginia, named for Williatn, DukeotC^nilterland, 1730. 
Proctor; town in Lee County, Kentucky, named for the Kev. Joseph Pmclor. 
Proctor; town in Rutland County, \'ermont, named for Redfleld Proctor, Senator 

from that Slate. 
Proctor Knott; village in St. Louis County, Minnesota, named for Proctor Knott, 

of Kentucky. 
Proctoraville; village in Windsor County, Vermont, iiainwl (or Ihe father o( Sen- 
ator Redficld IVoctor. 
Promised Land; village in Suffolk County, New York, so named hecauae the land 

(or factories was promised but never given. 
Promontory; villaice in BoxeMer County, Utah, ^o named because it is Ihe higbeal 

point of the Pntmontury Kange. 
Frophetatown; village in ^Vhiteside County, Illinois, named tor the "Shawnev 

Prophet," the brother of the Indian chief, Tecumseh. 
Proapect; towns in New Haven County, Connecticut, and Waldo County, Mainr. 

and peak in Y'ellowstone Park, so named because of Ihe elevation. 
ProBperitjr; town in Newberry County, South Catolina, ao named by the optimiitic 

se I tiers, 
PrOTidence; village in Bureau County, Illinois, and county and river in Rhode 

Island, nameil from Providence. Rhode Island, 
Providence; city in Providence County, Rhode Island, »t cnlleil by Roger Williann 

"for God'e merciful providence to me in my distreaa." 



^AXKKTT.} PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 255 

^rovincetown; town in Barnstable Ck>unty, Massachusetts, incorporated as the 

Province Town, because the inhabitants were exempt from taxation. 
IPrcnro; river, and town in Utah County, Utah; a contraction of the name — Provost — 

of the man for whom they were named. 

i; county in Coloraiio, named for John W. Prowers, a prominent stockman 

and trader in early days. 

several lakes in Minnesota, with wild rice flawing on their banks. An 

Indian word, meaning ** wild rice." 
Ptansmta; peninsula on Lac Traverse and the Minnesota River. An Indian word 

meaning '* otter tail.'* 
Puckaway; lake in Green Lake County, Wisconsin. An Indian word meaning 

"catr tail flag.*' 
Packety; stream in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania. An Indian word meaning 

"throw it away." 
Paeblo; county, and city in same county, in Colorado. A Spanish word meaning 

"town" or "village." 
Paente; town, and range of hills in Los Angeles County, California. A Spanish 

word meaning "bridge." 
Paerco; river in New Mexico. A Spanish word meaning " hog." 
Paerto de Luna; village in San Miguel County, New Mexico. A Spanish phrase 

meaning "port of the moon." 
Paget; sound in Washington, named for Peter Puget, its discoverer. 
Polaaki; counties in Arkansas and Georgia; county, and town in same county, in 

Illinois; counties in Indiana, Kentucky, and Missouri; village in Oswego County, 

New York; town in Giles County, Tennessee; and county, and town in same 

county, in Virginia. Named for the Polish patriot. Count Casimir Pulaski, friend 

of the Americans in the Revolutionary war. 
Polteney; town in Steuben County, New York, named for Sir William Pulteney. 
Pongoteagne; stream, and town in Accomac County, Virginia, supposed to be so 

named on account of the extremely sandy character of the county; the name, 

an Indian one, means "place of dust." 
Ponta Gorda; town in De Soto County, Florida, so named on account of the point 

near by. A Spanish phrase meaning " lai^ point." 
Ponzsutawney; borough in Jefferson County, Pennsylvania. An Indian word 

meaning "sand-fly place." 
Purgatory; river in Colorado, tributary of the Arkansas. A translation of the 

French name ^^riiih'e Purgatoire.^^ 
Purvis; town in Marion County, Mississippi, named for the former owner of the 

railroad station site. 
Put in Bay; bay in Ottawa County, Ohio, Lake Erie, and village in same county; 

so named because Commodore Perry put in there with his fleet. 
Putnam; city in Windham County, Connecticut; counties in Florida, Georgia, 

Illinois, Indiana, and Missouri; county, pond, and creek in New York; and 

counties in Ohio, Tennessee, and West Virginia; named for Gen. Israel Putnam, 

distinguished in the Revolutionary W^ar. 
Pymatoning; tributary of the Chenango in Mercer County, Pennsylvania. A Dela- 
ware Indian word meaning "crooked mouthed man's dwelling place." 
Psrramid; canyon of the Colorado River, so named because of the monument-like 

pinnacle of porphyritic rock which crowns the left bank near the entrance. 
Psrramid; harbor in Alaska, so nameii because of the conical shape of one of its 

islands. 
Pyramid; lake in Nevada, so named on account of the shape of an island in the lake. 
Pjrrozene; peak in the same range as the Old Bald in Montana; another name for 

the mineral atigiUj found in the vicinity. 



I 



256 PLACE NAMES IN THE CNITED STATES. Inrw.. ans. 

PTiht; riwr in Waehin^n. The ClalUm Indiaa word for fleh 

ftuakake; stream in Carl>oQ County, P^Aiisylvanm. An liidiaii word tueaniHR 

"pine Unda." 
Qiuiutico; town in Wiromico County, Maryland. An Indian word poeeibly in«sii- 

iog "dandng," "place of daudng." 
Qiia.pK«; nation in Imlian Territory, named from the Indian tribe; the word muanH 

"down-«tream people." 
Quasqueton: town in Buchanan County, Iowa, derived from an Indian word mean- 
ing "rajml water." 
Quebec; villBge in I'nion Connly, Georgia. Said by Bome authorities to be derived 

from the Indian, meaning "being abut," "narrow," or "fearful rocky cliff;" 

otherx wy it is derived from the French phrase qiitlber, "what a beak!" 
Queen Anne; county in Maryland, nameit for Queen Anne of England, reigning at 

the time of itH organ ita I ion. 
Queen Uahon; stream in Indiana County, Penn)>ylvBniB. A corruption of the 

Delaware Indian word ruv!ei-iHiil"')ii, meaning "(line-tree lick." 
Queena; county in New York, named for Catherine of Braganza, wife of Charles U, 

of England. 
Quemahoning; Htream in Somen<et County, Penneylvania. The derivation ia the 

same oa Queen Mahon, 
Quenemo; village in llisage County, Kan.-*.-', named for an Ottawa Indian, who lived 

among thii Sacs and Foxes, near Melvern. 
Queponco; creek in Maryland. An Indian word meaning "Htihea of pine wood?.'' 
Quiccoane; branch of the MiHouri River. An Indian word meaning "running 

Q-oickailTer; town in Lake County, California, nained from the quickniver mtnei. 

Qoidnic; river and pon<l in Bhode Island and Connecticnt. An Indian word 
meaning "place at the end of the hill." 

Quien Babe; town in San Diego County, California. A colloquial Mexican cxpree- 
»ion meaning "who knows?" 

QuillaTute; river in Washington, named for the Indian tribe Kwillehiut; the river's 
name ia alao a corruption. 

Qnincy; city in Adama C-ounty, Illinois, and village in Branch County, Michigan, 
named for Preeideot Juhn Quincy Atlama. 

ftuincT'; city in Norfolk C^lunty, Maasachusetts, named for Col. John Qnincy. 

Quindaro; t'lwn in Wyandotte County, Kansas, named For the Indian woman, 
former owner of the land. An Indian word meaning "bundle of sticks." 

Qninebaug; village in Windham County, Connecticut, and river in Maesachusetts 
and Connecticut. An Indian word meaning "long pond." 

Quialan; village in Hunt County, Texas, named for G. A. Quinlan, former vice- 
president of the Houston and Texas Central Railroad. 

Quinneaec; village in Dickinson County, Michigan. An Indian word meaning 
"where the river forms smoke." and given this village on act^iunl of the bllv in 
the Menominee River at this point. 

Quinjiipiac; river in Connecticut. An Indian word meaning "long water pond," 
or, according to another authority, " the anrrounding country." 

Quinaigamond; lake in Worcester County, Maeeechusetts. An Indian word mean- 
ing "pickerel fishing place." 

Quintans; town in Brazoria County, Texas, naninl for Andre Quintana, prominenl 
in the early days of Texas. 

Quitman; county, and town in Jackson County, in Georgia; county, and town in 
ClarkeCounly, in Misrissippi; and vlllagein Nodaway County, Missouri; nan^ed 
for Gen. John A. Quitman, a former governor of Misgissippi and an officer i n tbe 
Mexican war. 




^NNBTT.] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 257 



topahilla; branch of the Great Swatara River in Lebanon Ck)anty, Pennsylvania. 
An Indian word meaning ''spring that flows from the ground among the pines.'' 
uoque; village in Suffolk County, New York. A (X)miption of the Indian word 
guaquananluck, meaning '* creek flowing through a shaking marsh/' describing 
the locality to which the name was originally applieil. 
l>l>it Bars; mountain of the Park Range, Colorado, so named on account of its 

resemblance to a rabbit ear. 
l>iin; county in Georgia, named for William Rabun, an early governor of the State. 
; creek in Beaver County, Pennsylvania. A corruption of the Indian arrcUh- 
kune or arathcone, the procyon lotor of the naturalist. 

; county, and city in same county, in Wisconsin, situated at the mouth of 
Boot River. A French word meaning ''root" 

ersburg; town in Broadwater County, Montana, named for William Rader, one 
of the early settlers. 

; village in Christian County, Illinois, named for George Radford, a land- 
holder. 

; city in Montgomery County, Virginia, named for William Radford, a 
prominent citizen. 

; village in Delaware County, Pennsylvania, named from the town in Wales. 
; village in Washington County, Illinois, named from the province of Russia 
in Poland. 

; mountain in Knox County, Maine, so named on account of its ragged 
appearance. 

; river in New Jersey. Said to be derived from the Indian word nawahm^ 
meaning "in the middle of the forest." 

; city in Union County, New Jersey, named for the Indian sachem, Rahwack. 
; town in Columbia County, Oregon, and mountain in Washington, named 
for Rear-Admiral Rainier, of the British navy. 

; county in Texas, named for Emory Rains, who was prominent in the poli- 
tics of the Republic and later in those of the State. 

e; town in Warren County, Indiana, named for the proprietor Isaac Rains. 
Sainy; lake in Minnesota. A translation of the original French name, lac de la 

pluie, "lake of the rain." 
"Kaiain; river in Michigan, so named on account of the abundance of grapes which 

formerly grew upon its banks. 
Saleigh; town in Smith County, Mississippi, city in Wake County, North Carolina, 
town in Shelby County, Tennessee, and county in West Virginia, named for Sir 
Walter Raleigh. 
Balls; county in Missouri, named for John Ralls, member of the State legislature, 

1820-1821. 
Ralston; village in Lycoming County, Pennsylvania, named for Matthew C. Ralston. 
Bamseur; town in Randolph County, North Carolina, named for Gen. Stephen 

Ramseur. 
Baxnsey; township and village in Fayette County, Illinois, and counties in Minne- 
sota and North Dakota, named for the war governor of Minnesota, Hon. Alex- 
ander Ramsey, afterwards United States Senator. 
Banchita; towns in Ix)s Angeles and Riverside counties, California. A Spanish 

term, meaning "little ranch." 
Randall; county in Texas, named for Horace Randall, a brigadier-general of the 

Confederacy. 
Randalls; island in New York, named for Jonathan Randall, who owns it. 
Bandleman; town in Randolph County, North Carolina, named for a prominent 
citizen. 

Boll. 258-06 17 



258 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 258. 

Randolph; counties in Alabama, Arkansas, Geoi^gia, and Missouri; towns in Coos 

County, New Hampshire, Cattaraugms County, New York, and Orange County, 

Vermont; named for John Randolph, of Roanoke, Virginia. 
Randolph; county in Illinois, named for Beverly Randolph, governor of Virginia, 

1788-1791. 
Randolph; township in McLean County, Illinois, named for Gardner Randolph, an 

early settler. 
Randolph; county in Indiana, named for Thomas Randolph, killed at Tippecanoe. 
Randolph; town in Norfolk Connty, Massachusetts, and county in North Carolina, 

named for Peyton Randolph, of Virginia. 
Randolph; village in Dakota County, Nebraska, named for the first mail carrier 

between Sioux City and Elkhom Valley — ^Jasper Randolph. 
Randolph; township in Portage County, Ohio, named for Henry Randolph Storrs, 

its original proprietor. 
Randolph; county in West Virginia, named for Edmund Randolph, an early 

governor. 
Randsburg; mining town in Kern County, California, named from the town in 

South Africa. 
Rangeley; town and plantation in Franklin County, and chain of lakes in Franklin 

and Oxford counties, Maine, named for an Englishman, an early settler and 

large landowner. 
Rankin; county in Mississippi, name<l for Christopher Rankin, congreesman from 

that State. 
Ransom; village in Lasalle County, Illinois, named for Gen. Thomas £. G. Ransom, 

an Illinois officer of the civil war. 
Ransom; village in Hillsdale County, Michigan, named for Epaphroditus Ransom, 

former governor of the State. 
Ransom; county in North Dakota, named for Fort Ransom. 
Ransomville; village in Niagara County, New York, named for Clark Ransom, one 

of the first settlers. 
Rantoul; township and village in Champaign County, Illinois, named for Robert 

Rantoul, a railroad incorporator. 
Rapho; township in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. A corruption of an Indian 

word, meaning **a fort of tents." 
Rapidan; river in Virginia, named for Anne, Queen of England, ** rapid Anne." 
Rapides; parish in Louisiana. A French word meaning ** rapids," and given thiB 

parish on account of the rapids or falls in the Red River. 
Rappahannock; river and county in Virginia. An Indian word meaning ''stream 

with an ebb and flow," or ''river of quick-rising water." 
Raquette; river in Hamilton County, New York, from the French word meaning 

"snowshoe." 
Raritan; stream and a town in Somerset County, New Jersey. An Indian word 

meaning "forketl river." 
Raspberry; island, one of the Apostles, in I>ake Superior. A translation of an 

Indian word, meaning ' * rasplxjrries are plentiful here." 
Rathbone; town in Steuben County, New York, named for Gen. Ransom Rath- 
bone, an early settler. 
Raton; village in Las Animas County, Colorado. A Spanish word meaning 

**mouse." 
Raiimaug; lake in Litchfield County, Connecticut. A corruption of the Indian 

word u^nkemaug, meaning ** crooked fishing place." 
Ravalli; county in Montana, named for the noted Jesuit missionary. 
Ravenna; village in Portage County, Ohio, named for the city in Italy. 



^HnnTT.1 PLACE NAMES IN THE ITNITKD STATES. 259 

Bavenswood; flubetntion in Long Ieliui<l City, New York, becBUse lA the thiiusanile 

iif I.TI •w!' wlio made iheir htitni: in the eurroundint; wtiode. 
Kavenswood; town in Jachson County. Wc*t Virginia, nanieii (or Die 

wortliH. a family of England, but misspelled by l\w on^raverB in making the 

first mapa and never corrected. 
Rawhide; creek in Nebraska, sai<l to be so named becauae u while man wr« flayed 

Qpon it8 banks by a party «l Pawnee Indians. 
Bawlins: county in Kansaa and city in Carbon County, Wyoming, n^iuiwl for Jolin 

A. Rawlina, necrelary of war under Pre«i<ieiit Grant. 
Rajr; creek in California, named for an early settler- 
Kay; county in Minouri, named for John Ray, a meml^er of the convention which 

formed the State constitution. 
Bajrmond; village in Madera County, California, named for Raymond Whitcomb, 

who iiFKHniKed a party of tourists to make the trip to the Yoaemite by Hta^ee 

from this jioint. 
Baymond; town in CHmiberland County, Maine, name"! tor Capt. William Raymond. 
Saymond; town in Rockingham County, New Hamjieliire, named for John Ray- 
mond, a grantee, 
Baymoudville; village in Bl. Lawrence County, New York, named for Bciijumin 

Raymond, lirsl agent. 
Baymore; town in CasH County, Missouri, :iamed for two railroa<l njen of St. l^uis, 

-Mosars. Kay and Moore. 
Baynham; town in Bristol County, Maaeachusetts, narneil from the parisfi of Rain- 
ham, Essex Connty, England. 
Bayaville; village in Henry County, Indiana, name<l for Governor Ray. 
Beading'; town in FairSeld County, Connecticut, named for Col. John Read, an 

early settler. 
Beading'; town in Middlesex County, MasaachuBetls, and city in Iterke County, 

Pennsylvania, named from the town In l^rkshire, England, 
Beadaboro; town in Bennington County. Vermont, named for Jolm Reml, one of 

the original patentees. 
Beadstown; village in Vernon Connty, Wisconsin, nameil for its founder. 
Beagan; county in Texae, named fur John l^L Reagaji, a member of the Confederate 

cabinet, 
B«ctor; town in Clay County, Arkansas, named for Wharton or Elias Rector, dis- 
tinguished in the early Imlian affairs of the State. 
Bod; range of mountains in Alabama, so called on account of its hematite ores. 
Bed; river in Arkansas, so named on accoant of the color o( the sediment with 

which it is freighted. 
Bed; lake in Beltrami County, Minnesota. The name is a Iranslalion of theOjibwHy 

name, referring to the uuniflle<l surface o( the lake reflecting the red sunset. 
Bed; group of mounlains in Wyoming, so named because formed of porphyry, 

which becomes dark red when exposed to the sun. 
Bed Bank; towns in Marshall Comity, Mlssiaiippi, and Monmouth County, New 

Jersey, so named on account of the reddish appearance of the river liankx. 
Bed Bluff; township and city in Tehama Connty, Califoruia. so nanied from the 

reddish color of o high bank of the Sacramento River, near which the city is 

locateil. 
Bedbud; villages in Walker Connty, Alabama, and Gordon County, Georgia, city 

in ttanilolph County, Illinois, and village in Cowley County, Kansas, so named 

bei^un- >if [he presence of the redbud, a small ornamental tree. 
Bed Gap; iTeck in California, named for a near-by n. 
Bed Cedar; river in towa. si:i named from the abundance o) cedar trees which 

formerly grew along its banks. 




I'LACK NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 



^V no 

^^^m Hed Cloud; i^ity in Webelcr (.'ounty, Neliraaka, iianitNl lor the LvlebratoJ ^ioux 
^^^P Indian t.'hief. 

^^^1 Redden; village in Siibscx County, De])iwa.re, named lor Col. William <>. Reilileii 
^^^B Redding; city in ^hastA County, California, n&med for Major KeddinK, ont> of tin; 
^^^1 eariieat Ameriuin pioneers. 

^^^B Hedfleld; town in Dallas County, Iowa, named Cor Colonel Beiifield. 
^^^1 Bedfleld; townnliip and city in Rpink Comity, South Dakota, named (or J. B. Reil- 
^^H Hell), a director of the Chicago and Northwcetem Railroad. 

^^^1 Bedford; village in Wayne County, Michigan, so nanied becanae it was a fonlinif 
^^^B place on the river Rouge. 

^^^1 R«d Hook; town in Dut^'heBs Connty, New York. A tmnalation of the original 
^^^H Dnt4:h natne, RtxxU Itoeck, which was given it on account of s near-by msrBli 

^^^P covered with cranberries. 

I Red Jacket; village in Erie County, New York, named tor a chief of the Senna 

Indians, who derived hia name from the brilliant red jacket which he wore, 
given him by a Britiah officer. 
Sed Lake; coanty in Minnesota, named from the lake in Beltrami County. 
Red Oak; city in Montgomery County, Iowa, bo named on account of s near-by 

grove iif Irte.i of this species. 
Redondo Beach; city in I^iie Angeles County, (.'atifomia, named from a Spanish 

word meaning "round." 
Red Biver; iwrish in Luuixioiia, and county in Tesas, named from the Red River, 

which twrders Teiaa on the north. 
Red BiTer of the North; rises in Elbow Lake, Minnesota, and enters lAke Winni- 
peg. Named from Reil Lake in Minneeota. 
Red Rock; town in Douglas County, Minnesota, so nameil on account of a near-by 

granite bowlder painted red by the Indians. 
Bed Rock; village in Columbia County, New York, nauied lor a red rock, hjt- 

monnted by a wooden column 10 feet high bearing the dale 1825. 
Redstone; branch of the Monongahela River in Pennsylvania, derived from the 

Indian word macliknchten. meaning "red stone creek." 
Redwillow; county in Nebraska, so named on account of the abundance of tree^ of 

this species. 
Bedwinff; city in (ioodhne County, Minnesota, nanioi (or an Indian chief. 
Bfldwood; city in San Mateo County, California, so named because of ibonbundtmre 

of redwood timber in the vicinity. 
Redwood; river in Indiana. Derived from t!ie Indian words mugqua mt tUj, mean- 
ing "redwood tree river." 
Redwood; river in Minneaota, draining into the Minnesota River. The name i:^ a 
translation of the Dakota (t^ionx) , name referring to the abundant growth along 
the river of come!, a bush with a retl bark. 
Bedwood; county in Minnesota, named from the river. 

Beed; township in Butler Coimty, Nebraska, named for David Reed, a pioneer. 
Re«d City; village in Osceola Countv, Michigan, named for its founder, Jamt» M. 

Reed. 
ReedabuTg; city in >Sauk County, Wisconsin, named for D. ('. Reed, an early settler. 
Beedjr; town in Roane County, West ^'irginia, nanieil for h creek where reeds grow 

abundantly. 
B«eae; valley and river in Nevada, named for a guide. 
Beeae; stream in Lander Comity, Nevada, named [or an early s 
Beeaerille; village in Dodge County, Wisconsin, named for S 

Beerei; county in Texas, named for (jeorge H. Reeves. 



early settler. ^^^H 

for Samuel Re«ee, 4!^^H 




PLACR NAMEfi IN THE TNITED ftTATES. 

^^ReevesviUe; towu in Dnn'h«eter Oniiily, Soiitli Carnliiia, iiamcil fur a promiueiit 

family of the vicinity. 
3leftt^o; town in Santa BarburaCouuty, Culifumiu. TbeS|iaiiiali furuiuf "reftige." 
!^£efagiO; county, and town in eaiiw county, in Texaa, named for a Mexican mjittifiii- 

ary t«tabliHiinient on the Misaioii Hiver. 
^^hoboth; town in Sumex County, Delaware, i^ven lliie scriptural name l)ecaiiKe it 

vjas first utablished rb a place for yearly camp meeting. A Hebrew won! 

meaning "room," or " enUrgementa." 
3t«bobotli; town in Bristol County, MoHsat'huBette; a Hebrew word meaning "ample 

»rDom." Said to have been founded by William Blai'ki^tone and sonaioal by him 
■a significant of hiaaim: "Room outside of tlie narrow L-onfineflof Piintan intol- 
OcanLf." Another authority BBcribes the name to Rev. Samuel Newman, who 
eetabliflhed a church there and gave llie town tliii^ name because " the I^rd liath 
made room for us." 
Seidoville; village in Knox County, Nebraska, nameii for Charles J. Reid, the first 

settler. 
3leid»Til]e; town in Rockingham County, North Carolina, nanieii for David S. Reid, 

a fonner governor. 
Aemsen; town in Oneida County, New York, named fur Henry Remaen, a patentee. 
Rennert; town in Robeaon County, North Carolina, uamed for a prominent retildenl. 
Boao; county in Kaneae, town in Waehoe County, Nevada, and village in Venango 

County, PennHylvania, named for lien. Jesse L. Reno. 
BenoTO; Iwrough in Clinton County. Pennsylvania. lierived from the Latin, re, 

"again," and noitu, "new." 
Rensselaer: «ty in Jasper Ck^untv, Indiana, named for.fohn Van RenHselaer, of Nfw 
York SUte. 

IKenseelaer; county in New York; 
Rensselaerville; town in Albany County, New York. Named tor Kilian von 
ReiiRselaer, who plaBle<l a colony on liin lands to \m known as Rensselnerwyck, 
now as aliove. 
BenviUe; county in Minnesota, named for Joeepli Renville, an Indian trader and 

jirominent ciUsen. 
Bepresa; town in Sacramento County, California. A Spanish woril meaning " mill- 

Bepablic; county in Kansas, named from the Pawnee Republic, a principal division 

of tiie Pawnee Indians formerly located in this county. 
Bepublic; township, and town in Marquette County, in Michigan, named from the 

iron ore mines in the Manjuette Range. 
Bepublican; village in Harlan County. Nebraska, namt^l from tlie Kepublimn 

River. 
Eevere; town in Sntfolk County. Massac husett*, named for Paul Revere. 
Revillaglgedo; group of inlands off tbe coo'^t of Alaska, name<l for Conde lievila 

ijijredo, viceroy of New 8|iain. 
Re^nolde; county in Missouri, named for Thomas Reynolds, a former governor. 
Bejmoldsburg; village in Fmnklin County, Ohio, prol«bly named for Jeremiah 

N, Reynolds. 
BeynoldsTille; borough in Jeftenion County, Pennsylvania, named for TliomaB 

Reynolds, an old citizen. 
Bhea; county in Tennessee, nameil tor John Rhea, congressnian-elecl at the time 

the comity was organized. 
Bhinebeck; town in Dutchess County, New York. A combination of the names of 

the umii wlio founded the town— William Beeknuui— and his native town— 
■1^ Bfaineland. ^^^^H^^^^^^^^^^H 



W2 PLACE NAMKS IN THE UNITED STATES. [BrLL. 25a 

RhineclifT; t<»wri in DiiUrhew Connty, New York, ho named by the early settlers 
wlio rariie from tin* lUiim* River in iterniany. 

Khinelander; city in Oneida County, Wiisiconain, named for F. W. Rhinelander, 
pn-Hident of the Milwaukee, Lake Shore and Western Railway. 

Rhode Island; one of the ori^nnal thirteen States, said to have received it8 name 
fromuHiiiall inland in Narragannett Bay named Roods Eylandt, ''red island;*' 
arrordiuK h> another authority, named for the island of Rhodes. 

Rib; river in WiHconnin. A trannlation of an Indian word. 

Rleti; rnnnty in KaiiHan, named for Brig. Gen. Samuel A. Rice. 

Rice; rntnity in Minn<>Mota, name<l for Scmator Henry M. Rice, a pioneer. 

Rlen Lake; rity in Barron (-onnty, Wisconsin, so called because situated on a lake 
wh<*r<« wild rice in abundant. 

Rlo(>vlllo: town in Mitrhell (-ounty, Iowa, named for three brothers. 

Rlrh; munty in Ttah. nanunl for Ai>08tle Charles C. Rich, a member of the Church 
nf ,\vH\\H Clirint of \\\r l^atter I>iiv Saints. 

RirhnrdMon: town in Monterey County, California, named by settlers from Richard- 
win (Ninnty, Nebnu*ka. 

Rlohnrdiiou: i^MUity in Nehnu^ka, named for William A. Richardson, former gov- 
ernor of the Terriiory. 

Hlohburir: town in AlUy^wiy County, New York, named in honor of Alvan Rich- 
uhlxon, the tirnt m»lller who went there from Otsego County in 1819. 

Hlehburir; town in Chentor i\>unty. Smith Carolina, named for a prominent family. 

Hlehtti^hi; eity in Morton i\mnty, Kansas, 9i> named because it was thought it 
>>onUI |vr»»\ert ''rioh Held/' 

Hiohtt^hi. town»hi)« in Sunuuit iVunty. Ohiix The name originated from a wee<l 
>\hv^ h ut^'xx rtlmndHUtly. known as riohweinl, corrupted to ridi6ekl, and appliecl 
l>^ the •^^nhMuout 

Mioht\0bi ii|%rt)V|S:«. ^iUt^^' in i^ts^^^ Cminty« New York, so named because of the 
e\«> (lent rh^^iiot^'r x^f th«' ta^Ml And the alnindanc^ of ^pringBL 

im'U UvU. N iu u\ IvAUyi i\Hnu\. Mi^f^^mn. :!^v nanieil l^ecanse of the fertile hill lands 

1lk\\A\\i^\\\\ x>Mnu \ u^ \ \ \\\\y\\^ \vk\\><\\ ^y ih«^ iirA j^Htkr? fiom RklilaDd Connty, Ohio. 
MM\\a^\«^ )v^hvU %«\ { s^\\\<:av^^ ^^>\ K\><xti\>^xvx N^Mth Hakoiau Ohio* Sooth Carolina, 

^)\>^ \\ ^v>>No.v.u. '^N^ ^vAr,u\*» N\'«;*[^^ xv; 5h<^ n^-h <-har»rter ol the wiL 
llu^l\\^\H\^\^^ v,N\\ ^\ \^\ \\v*,:'^ \\v** \\>;;r.:\. v>al:!k^rauL and ciliw in Wayne County. 

\.\,^^u<^ .^'..l M!^.i»^vx \\>i;x^^:\^ K<^)^x*^y. nanM^t frwn RkhoMNid, Vuginia. 
Ilwl\wsv>\^< >NS\vx\ u' ^-^\vv<v to>*r, IV, Hi'^-^w^.w v\>«nTT. MaflSKhoaettB, and coun- 

r.^^ .:\ \> x> N >v V A^":,; \.vr>. \>fc-\v rj^ ^ri*Rx\! jor Lm»t\x. Doke ol Rirhmonil. 
Il\^-Kw^s\\^< \- « ■' ^'^ » *v*- -x^,Mx \\>«;"^A> . K>>»v>r l^:ibOKl ^^i^eht tohaiv been nametl 

Hw^Wx^v^^^ >\^ ^\ *.N >-:x • ^^^-MA'^v^^iJST^'ir. VTffpxia. i^* ■■■Mdoo account of 

Hv,>^^^;V X i^N ' ^' .,** A"vv -^^^nr.^x \^* V/H;.. TWJn^3 iw^ilBfcDii Rich, an 
Hvi*' ^nsn^ n 'v\ ■ « ' v^' ,\n..'-,> \V.v\ ^' nitTnf^ 'St^'^mr <tf l^ie iurtllitT of the 

»\ \ ^ •- > *-, 1 ^wN \ \' \ ^ 'kV » ■»• ^Vk- 
^^^V-y^V, 'N\ '-•v N i^^N . •>,» V > »..! .^ ,^r[f^*T. A ^trrrtnCMta «l the French 



VLKCTK KAVIEft iN TRlB tTWlTKD STATES. 



nty, Illinob, named forCliarln' Kidgtily, oikmi( its 
uiit, nftiiied for John Jorab Ridgeway, 
med frnm tlie native 



Bidgel^i villaij^ in Satigamon Cout 

foiindem, 
Bidgvway; boroaf;!) in Elk County, Pennaylvi 

of Philarlelphia, a large lamlowner. 
Ridlej' Pork; borough in Delaware Coiinty. Pennsylvania, n 

place of its Peltiers In Cheshire, England. 
Bienzi; town in Alivorn County, Miatdseippi, named for the Roman tritmne. 
Biga; town in I.enawee County, Michigan, natneil from the city in Kuaflia. 
Riley; i?i>iinty in Kansas named for Maj. Geu. Bennet Hiley, Uuitwl States Anny. 
Rimeraburg'; borough in Clarion County, Peunaylvania, naineU for John Rimer, its 

lirat settler. 
Bimini : town in Lewis and Clark County, Montana. Named hy lAwrence Barrett 

for the rharscter in the tragedy of " FronceBca da Rimini." 
Bincon; tnwnii in Rivernde County, California, and Donna Ada County, New 

Mexico. A Spanish word meaning "comer," or "inside I'orner." 
Bindge: town in Cheshire County, New Hampshire, nameil for one of the original 

propriftors. 
Bing^old; rountv in Inwa, nainiHl for Maj. F^amuel Rin^Ko'd, an ofHcer of the 

Me-iican war." 
Bingivood; villages in Paeaaic County, New Jersey, and Halifax County, North 

Carolina, nameil from the town in England. , 

Bio Arriba; county in New Mexii'o inlerawiwi by the Rio Grande del Norte, "great 

river of the North." A SpanlBh name meaning "upper," or "high river." 
Bio Blanco; county in Colonulo, namml fivin tlie White River, of which the 

f lunty'ti name is the Spanish interpretation. 
Bio de laa Fiedras; stream in New Mexico. A Spanish phrase meaning "river of 

Rio de lOE AmericauoB; river in California. A il^panieh phra§e meaning "river of 

the -ViuericanMi" tlie favorite route of the early emigrantti. 
Eio de loB Hartires; river in California. A Spanish phrase meaning "river of the 

martyrs," no naiiie<l from the murder of Spanish priests by Indians. 
Bio de lOB Uimbiee; river in New Mexico. A Sjjanish pliraae meaning "river of 

the «-ilIi)»-H." 
Bio de Mercede; river in California. A Spanish phrase meaning "riverof mercy." 
Bio Frio; river in Texas. A Spanish word meaning " cold river." 
Rio Grande; county in Colorado, name*l from the river. 
Bio Grande; river rising in the Rocky Mountains and emptying into the Gulf of 

Mexico. A Spanish phrase meaning "great river." 
Bio Orande Pyrajnid; mountain of the 6im Juan Range, Colorailo, bo called because 

its fonii is that of a perfect pyramid. 
Rio Iilano; river in Texas. A Sfianii'li phrase meaning "river of the plain." 
Rio Saliuaa; river in Arizona, having alkaline deposits upon itslianks, which caused 

it to 1«! given this Sjanish name, meaning "salt river." 
Bio Seco: t-iwn in Butte County, California. A Spanish phrase meaning "dry 

Rio Verde; river in Arizona. A Spanish phrase meaning "green ri 

RioTiata; town in Solano County, California, at the mouth of the Socramenta 

River. A Spanish phrase meaning "river view." 
Bipley; counties in Indiana and Missouri and town in Chantauijua County, New 

York, named for Gen, Eleawr W. Ripley. 
Bipley; town in Brown (Viunty, Ohio, named for General Kipley, an officer In the 

war of 1812. 
Sipley; town in Payne County, Gklithoma. nameil fur a leading ollicJal i>I Die Santa 

Fe Rallroail. 




264 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. TBrLL. 258. 

Ripley; town in Jackson County, West Virginia, named for a resident. 

Ripen; city in Fond du Lac County, Wisconsin, named from the town in England. 

Rippey; town in Greene County, Iowa, named for Capt. C. M. Rippey, an old 

settler. 
Rising Oity ; village in Butler County, Nebraska, named for the owners of the town 

HiU», A. W. and 8. W. Rising. 
Rising Bun; village in Dearborn County, Indiana, so named by its founder, John 

JatnoH, when viewing the sunrise from that location. 
Ritchie ; (*ouiity in Went Vii^nia, named for Thomas Ritchie, editor of the Richmond 

Kntiuirer. 
Rivanna; river and township in Vii^nia, named for Queen Anne, of England. 
Rivera; town in lx)8 Angeles County, California. The Spanish form of '* river." 
River Falls; oity in Pierce County, Wisconsin, so named because of its situation 

iHHir the falls of the Kinnikinnic River. 
Riverhead; town in Suffolk County, New York, so named because of its location 

lUMir the luMid of tho Petx>nic River. 
Riverside; iH>iinty, and town in same county, in California, town in Washington 

County, Iowa, and forty other places, being usually so named on aoooont of 

thoir l(M'ation. 
Rivoli: town in Monvr County, Illinois, named from the town in Italy. 
Roach ; onn^k in nunil>oldt County, California, named for a pioneer who was drowned 

in it. 
Roan; plat^Hiu in Colorado, so named on account of the color of the diffs rising from 

tho i«rand Uiwr Valley. 
Roan; mo\mtain in North Carolina, so named on aoooont of the odor of the laurel 

gt>>>\ ii\g u|H>n it<> summit-. 
Roan«t: o^mty in Tonntw^etN named for Governor Archibald Roane. 
Roan«k; <>>unty in Wt>Q»t Vif^nnia, named for Spmcer Roane, judge of the sapreme 

^Murt *>( iho St«to in it*» eariv «lavs. 
Roanok«k; townn in Randolph CVmntT, Alabama, Howard Coontj, Miasoiiri, and 

tionrwv i\>unty« Now York, nanHM) from the home of John Randolph in Vir- 

Roanoke ; tow n!«hip and \ illa^ in Woodfoni Oonnty, Illinois, named from Roanoke, 

\'nvi^^i*» 'ho hon>o of its* fiMWK^w^ 
Roan^^k^. to^^n in llnntiiviton l\>unty, Indiana; roanty^ and chy in flsmeooanty, 

in \ iivi^^^*: a^«) rix'or in Virpnia and North CuoIiml An Indian wofd desig- 

nutiiv^ ^ kind of shoU \i«vi for n>t"*H*y. 
RoarSnit. tnonnt^in in VoDomNtAivio I'^u^. a> namcvl on a eoo— t of liie riirill sound 

nisi^o h\ tho MoAm 0!««^af»iT^r f^'m) a x'^mt in its snnmdt. 
R^vaWn^ VV^rk . h>^n<*h of tho i>7iind Rix^r in Colorado, w> named faon its steep 

And Yinpid dc^Y^nt 
lll^>v>v\vi»t^iii . toi^n in XVaatihiY^rt*^ Ot^4miy, MaiTie, named for ile cripnal owners, 

VM^nrsl 11 und Nuthnniol ,1 Kohhiwv 
ll^>w^H«. is>nn(> inN^nth 1^k^^rA. namo«i for ^<vi^ Rohnt (BoliarV, a for trader. 
VIvvWH* 4SMint> in T<AfiN imnHv^ tor < >nin M R^hertfs former fKAwnior of the State. 
Vlvv>»^H*<^vi «NM)nt\ in KontiTok^. namoii tor oK^TThieif «1n8tioe ijMit^ RobertEon, a 

H^Wvnxvvi <SMini\ in Tonm^;t!«i>o iMinuvi for ivotn ,lames HohntKm, a pioDeer. 
1l^»^i«fTp^«^ . ,\>«int> in T«'\«v. iinnuvl tor Stsorlinf! C RohratMsu who i«ccsi(«d a colo- 

»»i»MMoii v't>»l>l ffS^Iti Nt«»\l«V^ 

1II^^H«v»^v\ iSMintN in \oi*iYt «V«^>lina. nanxNi for Ool Thoma? Ro h eeoft, of tiie North 

^>!^^Oin^* K< volnfioiiNix Mih'fiw 
ll<vhi^«|^«l. t<«^t) in Nnmtnii 4\Mm(>. O^tloiada named for <^)«acg^ B. RobinsoD, 

foftmM mMiMwnt v«'*^*<***'^^^ <*> flx^Sl»t!i». 




PLACB NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 

RobinBdii, lijWQsbip anri city id CrawfonI County, lUiiioic, naiueil lor .lobn M, 

Robinmn, Unilel SUlM Senator from lllinriw. 1S30-1S41. 
Bobuuon: city in Browu County, Kansao, named for Govemur diaries Kubinsoii. 
Bobla; town in VeDtnra CoDDty, California. A Spanisli word meaning "bill of 

Roche a Oris; river in Adanifl County, Winroiisin. A Frcm-li phmxe iiii'flninK 

•*t;r.,yn,rk-- 
Rachelle; lity in Cgle County, Illinois, niuneil from Rocliclle, France. 
Roche Houtonnee; brunth of the Eagle Kiver in Colorado, bo nanietl on no-oiint of 

Ibe )cliU'ial rocks of its gorge. 
Eoche Perc^; river Jri Boone County, MietmurL A Prencb jibrase meanbig 

*'|)ierwcl roclc." 
Rochester; township and town in Fulton County, Indiana, iiaiiie<] from the dty in 

New York. 
RocheBter; towns in Plymouth County, MasaarhuiietU, and Beaver County, Penn- 

sylvaniu, named from tbe city in England. 
Rocheater; city in Monroe County, New York, named for tbe senior proprietor. 

Col. Nathaniel Rocheeter. 
Rochester; town in Ulster C^iunty, New York, nameil (or the Earl of Rochester. 
Rock; i'Ountie« in Minnesota and Nebraska, county anil river in Wirwonsln, and 

many othi^r places, so named on account of the rocky character of tile soil. 
Rockftway; river, and liorougli in Morris County, New Jersey. Supposed to lie 

derived from the Indian word Teckawacka, or nchmrrt, meaning "buBhy," or 

"ililliciiUtocroee." 
Rockbridge; county in Virginia, bo named on account of the natural bridge of rock 

over C'edar Creek. 
Rockcastle; cotuity and river in Kentucky, named for the nxik iMHtleB on the river 

Rockdale; county in Georgia, bo named from the ledges of rock running through it. 
Rock Falls: city in Whiteside County, Illinois, nainei! from its location at tbe falls 

in Ro.;b River. 
Rockford; city in Winneb^o County, lllinoEa, ho nameil iiecanse of iti> situation on 

both Hidfw of Rock River. 
Rockford; village in Wells Connty, Indiana, so named because it is locattxl at a 

ford on Rock Creek, 
Rockingham; connties in New Hampshire, North Carolina, and Virginia, named 

fur the Marquis of Rockingham, premier of England at the time of the repeal of 

the stump ai^t. 
Rock Island; county, and city in same county, in Illinois, named front an island in 

the Mississippi River which is fonned of limestone. 
Rockland; city in Knox County, Maine, so namei] tiecanne of its granite quarries. 
Rockland; town in Plymouth County, MaBBBchusettH, wt nami^il from the rbaracler 

of the soil. 
Rockland; county in New York, so named on aecoiiiit of its extensive ([UarricH of 

ref] sandstone. 
Rockport; town in Spencer County, Indiana, so nameil Iwoause of the hanging 

rock, '■ l.Ady Washington Rock," on the Ohio River. 
Bocfcport; town in Eseex County, Massachusetts, so named on account of the granite 

quarries near the sea. 
Bock Rapids; town in Lyon County, Iowa, named from its location on the falls o( 

Rock River. 
Bockton; township and \illage in Winnelwgo County, Illinois, named from ita loM- 
~ the Uoek River. 



I 




266 PLACE NAMES IN THE TNTTED flTATES. fBrM. 25S. 

Rockville; city in Tollaiul Couiity, Connecticut, ho named !)ecaiiHe of the rook for- 
mation of the hilltj u(M)n which the city is huilt. 
Rockville; city in Parke County, Indiana, so named because of lar;^ bowlders in 

the neigliborhood. 
Rockville; village in Allegany County, New York, so named on account of a quarry 

in the vicinity. 
Rockwall; county in Texas, so named on account of an undei^ground wall. 
Rodeo; town in Contra Costa County, California. A Spanish name signifying the 

market place when* homed cattle are exhibited for sale. 
Rodman; town in Jefferson County, New York, named for Daniel Rodman, of 

Hudson. 
Rodney; town in Jefferson County, Mississippi, named for Judge Rodney, of the 

State. 
Rogrer Mills; county in Oklahoma, named for Roger Q. Mills, senator from Texas. 
Rogrers; mountain in Tennessee, named for William B. Rogers, the geologist. 
Rogue; i-iver in Oregon, named for the Tototins, an Indian tribe of nefarious habits, 

who were temieil Coquins by the French and Rogues by the English. 
Rohnerville; town in Humltoldt County, California, named for Henry Rohner, an 

earlv settler. 

■r 

Rolesville; town in Wake County, North Carolina, named for a prominent resident 
Rolette; county in North Dakota, named for the Hon. Joseph Rolette, an early 

wittier of RihI River Valley. 
Rolfe; town in Poi^hontas County, Iowa, said by some authoritiee to be named for 

the young Englishman who married Pocahontas, but by others for the man 

who prt»viou8ly owned the town site. 
Rolls: township and city in Phelps County, Missouri. A corruption of Raleigh, 

Iw'ing uame<l from the city in North Carolina. 
Rollinsford; town in Straffonl County, New Hampshire, named for a resident 

family. 
RoUinsville; town in Gilpin County, Colorado, named for John Q. A. Rollins. 
Rome; cities in Floyd County, Geoi^gia, and Oneida County, New York, and twenty 

other places, the name l)eing transferred from the city in Italy. 
Romeo; village in Macomb County, Michigan, named for the character of Shake- 

spi'an^'s tragtnly. 
Romulus; towns in Wayne County, Michigan, and Seneca County, New York, 

named for the founder of Rome. 
Rondout; cn^ek in Ulster County, New York, the name being a corruption of 

"redoubt," a fortification built upon the stream by the early Dutch. 
Roodhouse; city in Greene County , Illinois, named for John Roodhonse, its founder. 
Rooks; county in Kansas, named for John C. Rooks, member of Company I, Elev- 
enth Kansas. 
Roosevelt: county in New Mexico, named for President Theodore Roosevelt. 
fU>ot; town in Montgomery County, New York, named for Erastus Root, of Dela- 

wim» County. 
XiOBCOo; town in Coshocton County, Ohio, named for William Roseoe, the English 

historian. 
Jlopcommon; countv in Michigan, nanuHi from the county in Ireland, 
jlonn; town ill Wayne C^>nnty, New York, named for Robert L. Rose, of Geneva. 
Honpriu; county. rivt»r. and lake in Minnesota, retaining the early French name, 

iniMiiiri^ a f-ced or rush, n»ferring to the abundance of a very coarse need grass. 
|tn«*d.ro(»m; town in ()tsep» CNmnty, New York, named for Abraham Rosebroom, 

Mill' of iho earliest settlers. , .,, 

H/fiiidMid. county ami river in Montana, so nameil because of the prof usion of wild 

• oiii'M hi llie vicinity. 



iSAxxETT.l PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 2fi7 

Boseburg'; town in Dcui^laH (\mnty, Orejb^n, nanKnl for Aamn KtKse, one of t)ie first 

settlers. 
Bosedale; city in Wyandotte County, Kansas, so name<l because when located the 

town site was a mass of wild rose bushes. 
Ho«ita; town in Custer County, Colorado, said to have been so nanunl by the e^rly 
miners because of the thickets of wild roses which surrounde<l the springs in the 
vi<'inity. 
; town in Kent County, Michigan, named for Daniel Roes. 
; county in Ohio, named for lion. James lioss, of Pennsylvania. 
ie; town in St. Lawrence Cotmty, New York, name<l for a sister of David 
I^arish, the proprietor. 

ille; village in Vennilion County, Illinois, name<l for its founder. 
ille; city in Shawnee County, Kansas, named for W. W. Ross, agent of the 
Pottawatomie In<iians. 

ille; village in Richmond County, New York, now a part of New York City, 
named for the proprietor of a large tract of land. 

ille; town in Fayette County, Tennessee, named for Jon Ross, a Cherokee 
chief. 

-well; town in El Paso County, Colorado, named for Roswell P. Flower, of New 
York. 

; town in Cobb County, Georgia, nameil for Roswell King, 
tliville; town in Chariton County, Missouri, named for John Roth, an early 
settler. 

; town in Schenwtady County, New York, nameil from the city in the 
Netherlands. 
mbedeau; river in Delta County, and pass in Scotts Bluff County, Nebraska, 

named for Antoine Rouliedeau, a French trader. 
ugh and Ready; town in Nevada County, California, so named by the miners 

of 1849. 
ixind Hill; town in Loudoun County, Virginia, so named l)ecause of its location 

near a round foothill of the Blue Ridge. 
use Poii^t; village in Clinton County, New York, named for a resident family. 
>utt; county in Colorado, named for John L. Routt, the last governor of the Ter- 
ritory. 

; county in Kentucky, named for John Rowan, a distinguished lawyer of the 
State. 

; county in North Carolina, named for Matthew Rowan, prominent in the 
early politics of the State. 
Boixreaville; town in Orangeburg County, South Carolina, named for Gen. William 

Rowe. 
iRowletts; town in Hart County, Kentucky, named for John P. Rowlett. 
Kowley; town in Essex County, Massachusetts, named from the town in England. 
!Royal; village in Antelope County, Nebraska, named for Royal Thayer. 
!Royal Oak; village in Talbot County, Maryland, so named l)ecause of a nearby oak 

into which the British shot a cannon ball in the war of 1812. 
iRoyalaton; town in Worcester County, Massachusetts, named for Col. Isaac Royal, 

one of its proprietors. 
iRoyersford; borough in Montgomery County, Pennsylvania, named for a family 

known as Roya, who live<l at a ford in the Schuylkill River in that vicinity. 
Kubicon; town in Eldorado County, California, and river in Wisconsin, named from 

the river in Italy. 
Kuby; peak in Colonulo, so namtnl on account of its color. 
Kulo; village in Richanlson County, Nebraska, named for Charles Rouleau. 



2r>8 PLArE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 258. 

Rutnford; town in Oxfonl County, Maine, said to have been named for Count 

kiifriford. 
Rumaey; town in Mcrlxian Cciunty, Kentucky, named for Edward Kumsey, a prom- 

lUf.iii n*Mid«»nt of the State. 
Runnels; county in Texu>4, named for Henry R. Runnels, fonner governor. 
Runnelaville; tiiwn in Ma^linon C/ounty, MisHiwippi, name<l for a prominent family 

of tli<> State. 
Rush; county in Indiana, named for Dr. Benjamin Rush, of Philadelphia. 
Rush; county in Kansas, name<l for Alexander Rush, captain Company H, Seofmd 

lO'KinM'nt KannaH ('olonnl V^ohinteers. 
Rush; town in Monroe (Vmnty, New York, named from large stretches of rushes 

((rowing in the vicinity. 
RushviUe; townHhip and city in Schuyler County, Illinois, named for Dr. Richard 

KumIi, candidate for vice-prt»Hidency in 1828. 
R\ishville; town in UuhIi County, Indiana, named for Dr. Benjamin Rush, of Phila- 

<UO|)hia. 
Rushvillf>; villa>rt' in Sheridan County, Nebraska, so named because of the exten- 

nive growth of runhex. 
R\iHk; niunty in Texa^, nanunl for Gen. Thomas J. Rusk, United States Senator from 

that State. 
RussoU; (H>unty in AlaUinm, named for Col. Gilbert Russell, of that State. 
RuMoU ; t otmty. and city in mme i^mnty, in Kansas, named forCapt Avra P. Ruasell, 

Com|»any K, StH»nd Kansas Regiment. 
Ruwif«U; county, and city in Ixigan County, in Kentucky, and oonnty in Viiyinia, 

imnusl (t\r Gen. William Hus*h»11. 
RuMif^ll; viUa^re in St. IjiwriMuv County, New York, named for Rnasell Atwater, itt^ 

on^hml im^prietor. 
RuMH^l), to\\ n^hip in G<^u^ County, Ohio, named for a family of early settlers. 
Hu»ii<rk))viU0; to\\n in )\>|v i\mnty. Arkansas named for Dr. Thomas Rossell, who 

liVH*t«sl thoi>» in IScU. 
Hu«««^UvO)i«; NiUj^ri' in lUmi^^hiro C^Mintv, Mafvachusetts, named for the RasBell 

irtnulx , pi>^nnnent in tho iHisim^s^ intorwrts of the vianity. 
llu»»\A)\ Rix^r, to>%nship in S\n*MiMi l\Minty, California, on a iiTer of the same 

n;«uie. M.^ n^^nusl K\^n!^' a K\)!«4an :<«i^ilonH>nt n-a^i earlv located there. 
J ll«1h«^v1>M>ir ,\in^ti«^ m N\^rth I'^n^lina ai>d T^nneawe; 

\ll«1h*kVt\M>i1x\u. to\%>t in UnthortV»nl OtM^nty, North Csrcttina. Named for Gen. 
I to\i^ih Knthevt.^tvi a n.^tol Int^win turblier. 
llMlh^xtxMM IvMNMwh u> lVrpf»r, i\M;nty. N<*m Jersry. named for John Rotherfonl, 

«n ^Alonvnv l^nt^^^xx nor 

H^G^^d N.lliw*^ >u l4^!*Ai)o O^-^cntx. l;jm«-*r<v aiHi t«>vn in Jeffermn Coonty, New 

N,vvK n.'^uusl f»\^n\ the »*;t\ in \'oT*n">t"*r)l.. 
^%«Gi%%Hd f,^^ n ;i; NX ,>iN>>~f*M \\^uv.tx , \lassarhQM<asv. ssid TO ha\Y been name*! from 

K»M»m?,j. niKj«^ U^^^*Jtor>J^.i:^^. K.ncl»n«v 
^^«Gi^>^i^ ,NMii.i\ «r.i .':tx ir. vRMN ,\^n>i> . m VrTm«*iinit. named trnm the town in 

MHv>>tH<'V. n>SHt> 

li>*i^^* ,"NV'k !•: G»M»Ov^Kii CNnni>. \Vi»\^^)iii. named fw Mti earhr w i diq, 

^>v^ t, ^ • .r K.v'V!Mv->»Nn .^^xn^^\^ \, m Hmni^)ii^'. named fiWD the bccoe of it.^i 

HwKN^t* >>»'.»! VNfpo i»«o»sN: ♦,»• ST. ^»>dwi. who arvvanpiBiied Arnold's expedition. 

IM^N^*^ ,s«,V ii. v\A*.«^j,x u'^ioA*. *<v tK ^ it« «v OnTax.Thrrhirt rtj the Fie Indians. 

^>SM>>4^ ,•.> 1- \oM»««K», *\x.Mv\\ KM»^>ivs. »»*,>)w)»!'^ li *v>rrni«iinin of the won! S*l»- 

?\M ^ M 1 ».o ^ »> ^s . »»♦»»*« »* *tv, ♦<'^nn\,-»f^-7\ v,»'^ ossahKj^ied cm iSkimday, fn^u 



GANNETT.] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 269 

Sabine; parish in Louisiana, county, town in Jefferson County, and lake in Texas. 

A French word, meaning "cypress." 
Sable; cape, the southernmost point of Uie mainland in Florida, and stream in 

Michigan. A French word meaning ** sandy.** 
Sabotawan; mountain in Maine, the most easterly of the Spencer Range. An Indian 

word meaning **the end of the pack,'* "where the strap is pulled together." 
fSac; (t)unty in Iowa; 

City; city in Sac County, Iowa, named for an Indian tril)e. The word refers 
to "yellow earth,*' the proper form l)eing Osaukee. 

,; tributary of Hudson River, so named lx?cause of a great marsh lying 
along its banks. An Indian word meaning "drowned lands.** 

i; town in Santa Barbara County, California. A Spanish word meaning 



**gra8s,** 

carappa; village in Cumberland County, Maine: An Indian wonl meaning 
"toward the rising sun.** 

em Head; watering place in New Haven County, Connecticut, so named 
because an Indian chief was once captured there. 

Harbor; village in Jefferson County, New York, named for Augustus 
Sacket, its first settler. 

o; river, and city in York County, in Maine. Derived from an Indian word, nohk 
or mukf "pouring out;** hence the outlet or dis(!harge of a river or lake. 
razn^nto; county, city in same county, and river in California, named by the 
Spaniards, the wonl meaning "sacrament.** 

amento; village in White County, Illinois, named from Sacramento, California, 
the home of many of the first settlers. 
adlersville; town in Robertson Comity, Tennessee, named for W. R. Sarller, an 
early settler. 

; township and village in Champaign County, Illinois, naminl for Henry 
Sadorus, the first settler. 
SalTord; village in Pima County, Arizona, named for A. P. K. Saffonl, governor of 

the Territory. 
Sas^adahoc; county in Maine l)ordering on the Atlantic Ocean. An Indian wonl 

meaning "land at the mouth,** or " mouth of the river.** 
Ba^eville; village in Hamilton County, New York, named for Hezekiah Sage. 
Sag: Harbor; village in Suffolk County, New York. Sagg is derive<l from the 

Indian word mgaporackf meaning "place where ground nuts grow.'* 
Sagru^aw; county, city in same county, river, and bay in Michigan, derived from an 
Ojibwa Indian word meaning "Sauk place," referring to the Sauk or Sac 
Indiana. 
^WLgO't town in Muskingum County, Ohio. An Indian word meaning "welcome." 
Sagruache; county, and town in same county, in Colorado. An Indian word mean- 
ing "water at the blue earth." 
^aliale; peak in Cascade Mountains, Okanogan County, Washington, named by the 
Mazamas, a mountaineering club of Portland, Oregon, from the Chinook word 
8ahale, "high," "above." 

Albans; city in Franklin County, Vermont, nameti for Allmn, a Roman 
Christian, and the first martyr in Britain. 

Anne; township and village in Kankakee County, Illinois, name<i from St. 
Anne, Quebec, the former home of nearly all the residents. 

Anthony; falls in the Mississippi River at Minneapolis. So nameil by a 
French missionary, becaiLse "of the many favors received through the interces- 
sion of that saint." 
Saint Anthony; town in Stearns County, Minnesota, named from the falls. 



270 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. rBrLL,25S. 

•aint Auffxistine; city in St. John County, Florida, so named l)ecao8e the first land- 
ing W1U4 niadi* on that day. 
Saint Bernard: i^arinh in Ix>ui8iana, named by the French for the aaint. 
Saint Oharlea; imrinh in IxiuiMana, named for the saint. 
Saint Oharles; inanity, and city in the same county, in Missouri, so named becaupe 

it WHJ* (ho pnr|Hiae of the vii-arof Pontoise to establish a seminary there in honor 

of that mint, when* the Indians should be educated. 
Saint Olair: i\>unty, city in same county, and lake in Michigan, said to have been 

m* UAnuHi Uhiiu«» the lake was discovered by the French upon that saint's day. 
Saint Olair: 4»unticc>in Alaliama, Illinois, and Missouri, town in Antelope Coonty, 

Nobmnkji, und UinMigh in Si»huylkill County, Pennsylvania; 
Saint OlairsYiUe: village in IWlnH>nt County, Ohio. Named for Gen. Arthur St. 

i^Uir, J^^w^lor of tho Nt>rthw^et Territory. 
Saint Cli^m^nt: to\^ n in l^ke County, Miasonri, named forthepation saint of Clem- 

ont tm>it\ an t^rlv i^^ttWr. 
Saint CK>ud; touivf&hip ami city in Steams Connty, 3kIinne0Ota. named by the 

on^\)wd i^n^pwtors frv^n iho town in France. 
Saint Crwix: riwr in Maino. pf\>hably £m named becanse of its reeemUance at Oak 

IU\ lo A ony^; ,^.H.i» iho Fivnoh woixl for "cn«5." 
Saint CriMx. riwr ^M* Minnttfv^ia an^i Ws<«x«kan. named for Moosieor St. Croix, who 

>*A:t ^\*^^n)H^i At *,1y «vM;th, 

Saint Ctwix. x>mx«u in Wi^xM^n. nazxw^i ffwi the rirer. 

Satal XVnv>n , \ iV^j^c^^ .r, N\x-.v*h* i\MBiiTy. N<4waska. naoicd for Joseph Dmon. an 

Satal KUa» v.>,>!;xv.u.n ^.r. A'^b^x nar.-j^i j.^ the jaint npiw whose <laT it was «li^ 
»[*a>^t FVajfc>N\» Ax;r.ix .r. \Bi«vcr. NjaMx.i ice ihe foa»ler of the Frasciscan 

Sta^^) 0*vc^ r,**T .: V^,^v i\*u:T^x Mjciw. TianKe trcoL 12* isbwl wbkJi is now 

;|iifc,^:-. ^^V*twK n. ...i»{^n .1 '* k^it.huT^ «i, uMtn«»f ijr l^irt Sane Htd(n&. BftixisAi 

I ' ^ ><•'■ ♦ .>v :»»«%> v:»,,.l. . u- x> >s ).♦ ^ri, Mt», .J«-i»» A** ill. 
;|li»;t*- ;t«.n<M«^ J. Ji V .,• VI %.^t , v,i,. ^hnufH..*:H iwtitfs fir ^ilf few 
;|i«,;«^ :i«»%v«K 1 v» :. 'u .i.> . xmx A'-<s.-.ii-. iwim*. s.»- » ^|^^ mxut *»wii«r in 

;||p«i«% W<Ul)*%, ■%».«*, il *\x'%.l^ 1|M%1XV. !♦ vu >,4n;. » vlilj. |^ c,*: 



^^pvrr.l PLACE NAMES IN THE I'NITED STATES. 271 

Saint John; village in Perry County, Illinois, iianie<1 [rem a celebration of Saint 

John's Day. June 24, held in the eeUlemiint in IftSK. 
Saint Jolin; city in Stafford Connty, Kansw. named for Governor John P.St, John. 
Saint Jolina; river in Florida, i-alleil by the Bpanidh discovered San Juau Baiitieta, 

liei^uKe upon this tnint'e day it was discovered. 
Saint Johns; villi^^ in Clinton County, Michigan, named tor John Sweglea. 
Saint Johnabuiy: town in Caledonia County, Vermont, named for St John de 

Creve-eoeor, French consul at New York, and a Iwneftu'tor of Vermont. 
Saint JohnBville; tow-n in Montgomery County, New York, named for an 

<'hun'h fslaliliahed there in early day». 
Saint John the Baptist; pari.sli in Louiaiana, named from Ibe Saint Jolins River. 
Saint Joseph; countyin Indiana, and county, and city in Berrien County, in Miehi- 

(tan, named from the river. 
Saint Joseph; river riHing in Hillsdale Coanty, Michigan, and entering Lake Michi- 
gan. Named by the early French Catholic esploretB for the husband of the 

Vinrin Mary. 
Saint Joseph; city in Buchanan County, Missouri, named for Joseph Robidoox, an 

early French Belller. 
Saint Landry: itarish in Lonisiana, named for Baint Landri, biahopof Paris in f)51. 
Saint Lawrence; gulf in New York, no named because discovered upon the feast 

day of thai saint. 
Saint Lawrence; county and river in New York, named from the gulf. 
Baint Louis; town in Bunoma County, California, and city in Gratiot Connty, 

Michigim, nanieil from thocity in Missouri. 
Saint Louis; river rising in Saint Louis County, Minnesota, and flowing into I«ke 

finperior, Proliably so namoi by t!n< explorer. Verendrye, in 1741', in honor ot 

the cross of Saint Louis conferred upon him shortly before his death by the 

King of France. 
Saint Louia; county in Minnesota, named from the river. 
Saint Lou ia; county, and city in Saint Louie City County, Missouri, named f.ir 

Lniiis XVot Frsnce. 
Saint Kartin; parish in Louisiana, named for Saint Martin, bishop uf Toure, aUmt 

Saint Haiy; [nrish in Louisiana, so niime<1 by Roman Catholic settlers. 

Saint Mary; county in Maryland, named tor Queen Henrietta Maria. 

Saint Marys; city in Pottawatomie County, Kansas, peak in Bitter Root MoiintAln 

ran^e, Ravalli County, Montana, and township and villt^ in Auf^laixe County, 

Chio, named from St. Mary's Mission in Bitter Root Valley, Montana. 
Saint Harye; town in Elk County, Pennsylvania, originally settled by Romim 

Catholics, and named for the saint. 
Baint Uatthewa; town in UrangebnrK County, South Carolina, named for the 

county, now i)efiini-l, in which it was fonnerly located. 
Baint Paul; city iji Ramsey County, Minnesota, named for a church which was 

built for M. Galticr, an early Catholic missionary. 
Saint Paul; city in Howard County, Nebraska, named for J. N. and N. J. Paul, its 

first settlers. 
Baint Peter; village in Cedar County, Nebraska, named for John Peler Abts, the 

first sellkT. 
Saint Petera; town in Saint Charles County, Mit«ouri, named for a Jesuit mission 

estabti shell there in early da/e. 
Saint Regis Falls; village in Franklin County, river and blls in New York, named 

fur a canonizeil Jesuit mi)«ionary. 
Saint Stephens; lown in Berkeley County. Soutli Carolina, named for the now 

defunct parish iji which it was formerly located. 



^V 272 
^^ Sain 

I 



272 PLACE XAM£S IN THE UNITED STATES. Iwnf^H 

Saint Taminaiir; luiritiii iu I»uiuana, named for a c^hief r>[ the DeUwure IniUtU, 

iiieanin^ "l>eaver leader." 
Saint Vrain: i-reok in (^ilorado, named (or Ceran St. Vraio, an early expli^ret. 
Salndo; biwn in Bell County, Texas. A Spanish wonl meaning "ealted," odt 

boing aliiinciant in the vicinity. 
Salamanca: village in CBttarauguB CoDnty, New York, named for Hefior HalamuKi. 

a t^poniah linancier, intercwted in the Atlantic and Great Weetrm RailrowL 
Salem; cities in Eeeex Coimty, Maaut^huBett^, and Marion Cuimty. Ortmn; ud 

city in Porayth Oonnty, North Carolina, aettled by Moraviaiis, aa named bj 

early settlers in the hope of peaceful eecurity. A Hebrew word meuuiil 

"peace." 
Balam; county, and city in same county, New Jersey, bo named by a ampmf 

of Enttliah Friends, from the peai-eful aspect of the country. 
Salem; town in Waahing^n County, New York, anil townabip and city in ColOB- 

hiona County, Ohio, named from the city in Mateachiiaette. 
Balero; hill in Arizona, aaid to have been bo named liecaiiae a ealtcellar, of ore Eran 

Ibe hill, was made by the padree of St. Joflepb fitr the table of llieir biehi^ 1 

Spaniah wonl meaning "saltcellar." 
Solida; town in Stanielaus County, California, and city in Chaffee County, Coiondii, 

at the junction of the Arkangas River with its large branch from the eoatb. i 

t^paniah word meaning "|>oint of departure." 

iSalioa; town in Ononda^ County, New York; 
Salinas; city in Monterrey County and river in California; 
Saline; rivereand coiuticsin Arkansas, Illinois, and Kaneas, anil counties in MLi- 
sduri and Npbraaka, and many other placee. 8o named from the preeenceiJ 
salt BpringH or Bait deposits within their limita. 
Salisbury; town in Litchfield County, Connecticut, nanieil for a cvBidenl. 
S&liabury; townB in Wicomico County, Maryland, and Essex County, Maafaihii- 

Betia, named front the city in Englsn<t. 
Salisbury; city in Chariton County, Misaouri, named for l.uciua Salisbury, ut Ibc 

county. 
Salisbury; town in Herkimer County, New York, named from Uie town in Oja- 

necticut. 
Ballis; town in Attala County, Mieaisippi, named for Dr. Jamea SalUs, the fortuK 

owner of the land. 
Salliaaw; etreani, and town in Cherokee Nation, Indian Territory. 8uppoeed tn 

have been deriveii from the French hayoii naiaiiKin, "ealtinR proviaions hayon." 
Sallys; town in Aiken County, South Carolina, named for the Salley family, pronu- 

nent residents of the l^late. 
Balmon; river in WHsfainglon, so named on account of the shoals of nlmon that 

ascend the river in the summer. 
Salmon Falls; river, and village in Strafford County, New Hampehire, named boco 

the falls in the river, where the salmon stop in their upwani course. 
Salt; creek in Colorado. HO named on account of the character of thenilneTal deponiti. 
Baltillo; borough in Huntingdon County, Pennsylvania, named from Ibe town in 

Mexico. A Spanish word meaning "leaping." 
Salt Iiake; county, and cily in Bame county in Utah, nanied from Cirnat tSatt l^tkf' 
Salton; town in San Diego Coimty, Califontia, situated on the border of the Sallon 

Sea, from which it receives its name. 
Salton Sea; dry lake in San Die^o County, California, 265 feet below sea level, tiM 

bottom of which is covered with salt. 
Saluda; town in Polk C-ounty, North Carolina, and river, county, and 

same county in South Carolina. An Indian word meaning 



c.™rt«,^l 



CASMBTT.J PLACE NAMK8 IN THE UNITED STATES. 273 

Salon^a; villaii^ in Lancaster County, Pennnylvania, derived from the Indian wonl 

chickimcaiun^f meaning *' place of crawfish/' 
Salyersrille; town in Magofiin County, Kentucky, named for Samuel Salyer, a 

member of the State l^slature. 
Samoa; village in Humboldt County, California, named for an Indian chief. 
Sampson; county in North Carolina, named for Col. John Sampson, ofiii*er of the 

Revolution. 
Somaonville; village in Ulster County, New York, named for Gen. Henry A. 

Sampson. 
Samuel Adama; mountain in New Hampshii)e, named for a Revolutionary patriot. 
Antonio; city in Bexar County, Texas, named for the Roman Catholio mission, 

San Antonio de Velero, otherwise the Alamo. 
Augnatine; county, and town in same county, in Texas, probably named for 

Saint Augustine, one of the early fathers of the Roman Catholic church. 

ito; county, and township in same county, in California. The Spanish 

form of Saint Benedict 
Bernardino; county, and city in same county, in California, nameil for an old 

Spanish mission. 
Banbom; town in O'Brien County, Iowa, and county in South Dakota, named for 

George W. Sanborn, division superintendent of the Chicago, Milwaukee and 

Saint Paul Railroad. 
Banbomton; town in Belknap County, New Hampshire, named for a family of 

early settlers. 
San Buenaventura; town in Ventura County, California. A Spanish phrase sig- 
nifying '* saint of good fortune.*' 
San Carloa; village in San Mateo County, California. The Spanish form of Saint 

Charles. 
Sanders; town in Carroll County, Kentucky, named for an old settler. 
SandersviUe; city in Washington County, Geoi^a, named for Benjamin Saunders, 

who once owned all the land upon which the city is built. 
San. Diego; county, and city in same county, in California. A corruption of Saint 

lago, the patron saint of Spain, for whom they were named. 
iSaadisfleld; town in Berkshire County, Massachusetts, named for Lord Sandys, 

first lord of trade and the plantations. 

t; town in Kent County, Michigan, so named because a sand bar extends 

acroes the center of a near-by lake. 

I; county, and town in same county, in New Mexico, named for a resident 

fomily. 

'; town in Alexander County, Illinois; county, city in Erie County, and 

river in Ohio. Derive<l from the Indian ouimndoukey ** there is pure water 

here,** or from Ba-imduntf, "large pools of water.** Another authority gives the 

meaning as '*cold spring.*' 

ich; township and city in Dekalb County, Illinoin, nameil fmm the town in 

Massachusetts. 
Sandwich; town in Barnstable County, Massachusetts, named from the town in 

England. 
Sandy Irfike; township, and l>orough in Mercer County, Pennsylvania, k) nameil 

because of the sandy charai^ter of the soil and the existence of a small lake in the 

neighbortiood. 
San Felipe; poflt-ofiii*e of Santa Clara County, California. The Siianish form (»f 

Saint Philip. 
San Fernando; town in 1^)6 Angeles County, California, named for an old S(>anish 

Catholic mission. 

Boll. 2&8— 05 18 



274 PLACK NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bill. -58. 

Banford; city in Orange County, Florida, named for Gen. H. S. Sanfonl, United 

States minister to Belgium. 
Banford; township, and town in York Ck)unty, Maine, named for Peleg Sanford, an 

early proprietor. 
Banford; town in Moore County, North Carolina, named for Colonel Sanford, a ci\ii 

engineer. 
Ban Francisco; l>ay, county, and city in same county, in California, said by some to 

have been named for the old Spanish mission of San Francisco de Aseisi, by 

others to have \yeen named for the founder of the order to which Father Juni- 

pero, the dinooverer of the bay, belonged. 
San Gabriel; town in Los Angeles County, California, named for an old Spanish 

mission. 
Sangamon; county and river in Illinois. A corruption of an Indian word mean- 
ing "good hunting ground." 
Sang^erfield; town and township in Oneida County, New York, named for Judge 

Jedediah Sanger. 
Sang^erville; town in Piscataquis County, Maine, named for Col. Cal\in Sanger, its 

proprietor. 
rSanilac; county in Michigan; 

ISanilac Center; town in Sanilac County, Michigan. Named for an Indian chief. 
San Jacinto; city in Riverside County, California, and county and river, in Texas. 

The Spanish form of ** Saint Hyacinth," whoee day is celebrated August 16th. 
San Joaquin; county and river in California. A Spanish phrase meaning '^whoni 

Jehovah has ap|)ointed.*' 
San Jose; city in Santa Clara County, California, named for the patron saint of 

Mexico. 
Ban Jose; village in Mason County, Illinois, named from the city in California. 
San Juan; counties in Colorado and New Mexico, and river in Utah. The name i^ 

the Spanish form of Saint John. 
San Juan; county in Ttah, name<i for the San Juan River, which traverses it. 
Ban Juan; iHiunty in Washington, named for the Greek navigator, Juan de Fuca. 
San Lucas; town in Monterey County, California. The Spanish form of Saint Luke. 
Ban Luis Obispo; county, and city in same county, in California, named for an old 

S]miiiHh inission. The name means Saint Louis, bishop. 
Ban Luis Bey; town in San Diego County, California, named for Louis IX, of 

Kmnco, meaning Saint lx)uis, king. 
Ban Marcos; town in San Diego County, California, named from the old Spanish 

grant Loh Vallecitos de San Marcixs "the little valleys of Saint Mark." 
Ban Mateo: county, and city in same county, in C^tfomia. The Spanish form for 

Saint Matthew. 
Ban Miguel; town in San Luis Obis|x> County, California, and counUes in Colorado 

and New Mexio). The Si>anish fonn of Saint Michael. 
Ban Patricio; <*onnty in Texas, wttletl by Irish colonists, and named by them for 

th(* imtn>n naint of Ireland, of which the present name is the Spanish form. 
Ban Pedro; city in ]a\h .\ngeU>s County, California, named for the Spanish saint 
Sanpete; county in Ttah, nanunl for an Indian chief. 
Ban Quentin; town in Marin County, C^alifomia, said to be named for a fonner 

rt***'u\v\\\ . 
San Rafaol; to\\hH)iip and city in Marin (^ounty, California, named for the Spanish 

Niint. 
Ban Saba: lomity and river in Texas, probably nameil for the old San Saba mission 

cNialilinhtMl in I7:U in what is nt>w Menaixl County. The Spanish form of **Holy 

SaMoi/' 



lUNxrrr.l PLACE NAMKS IN THK UNITKD 8TATKS. 275 



Tache; town in Fresno Connty, California, A French phnine meaning '*KiK>t- 

Santa Ana; township, and city in Orange County, California, nanieii for an old 

Spanish ndt«iion. 
Santa Barbara; (*ounty, and city in same county, in California, nanie<i for an old 

Spanish mission. 
Santa Olara; county, and town in same county, in California, nanuHl for an old 

Spanish mission. 
Santa Cruz; county in Arizona, and county, city in same county, and island of 

California. A Spanish phrane meaning '* holy cross." 
Santa Fe; city in Haskall County, Kansas, town in Monroe County, Missiouri, and 

county, and city in same county, in New Mexicrj. A Spanish phrase meaning 

*• holv faith." 

w 

Santa Monica; township, and city in Ix)s Angeles County, in California, named for 

the Spanish saint, the mother of Saint Augustine. 
Santa Hosa; county in Florida, name<l for a saint of^the Roman Catholic Church. 
Santa Tnez; town in Santa Barljara County, California, named for an old S)»ani^ih 

mission. The Spanish form of St. Agnes. 
Sapinero; town in Gunnison County, Coloratlo, named for a sulxihief of the Ute 

Indians. 
/'Saranac; river and lake in New York; 

I Qkaranac Lake; village in Franklin County, New York. An Indian word meaning 
^ ** river that flows under a riK-k." 

^^arato^; town in Santa Clara County, California, named from the town in New 

York. 
r ^Eteratoga; county, town in same county, and lake in New York; 
I Saratov Spring; town and village in Saratoga County, New York. An Indian 
^ word said to mean "place of the miraculous water in a rock.'* 

coxie; city in Jasper County, Missouri, nametl for a frien<lly Indian chief, 
dinia; town in Erie County, New York, named from the island in the Mediter- 
ranean Sea. 

is; town in Panola County, Mississippi, named from the ruined city in Asia 
Minor. 

it; county in North Dakota, name<l for a former general manager of the 
Northern Pacific Railroad. 
iarpy; county in Nebraska, named for Peter A. Sarpy. 

; stream in Maryland. The Knglish form of the Indian word tnnakhannr, 
ktartia; town in Yazoo County, Mississippi. Deriveil from an Indian word mean- 
ing "pumpkin place." 
kucon; tovmship and creek in Northampton County, Pennsylvania. An Indian 
word meaning *' outlet of a smaller stream." 
^Sau^tuck; river and village in Fairfield County, Connecticut, and village in Allegan 
County, Michigan. An Indian wonl meaning "outlet of the tidal river." 
Saugrerties; town in Ulster County, New York. One authority statics that it is an 
Indian word meaning "at the outlet;" another gives it as from the Dutch, 
zaeger^B hilly meaning "sawyer's creek," so given l^ecause a sawmill was erected 
on the town site. 
Saunas; town in Essex County, Massachusi'tts. The Indian name of Lynn, the 

word meaning "exten<UMl." 
Sauk; county, and city in .^^arne county, in Wisi'onsin; 
Sauk Center; city in Stearns Connty, Mintiesota; 

Sauk Kapids; village in Benton (*ounty, Minnesota. Name<l fmm the Sunk or 
Sac Indian tribe, the word meaning " ))eople living at a river mouth." 



276 PLACE NAMKS IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. l»r,8. 

Sault Sainte Marie; city in Chippewa Ck)uiity, Michigan, situated at the foot of 

the rapids of St. Marys River. A French phrase meaning "falls of St. Mary." 
Saunders; tributary of the Yellowstone River, Montana, named for a trapper who 

lived in the region. 
Saunders; county in Nebraska, named for Governor Alvin Saunders. 
Satiratown; town in Stokes County, North Carolina, named from the Sara Indian 

tribe. 
Sausalito; town in Marin County, California. A Spanish word meaning " little 

willow." 
Sauvie; island in the Columbia River, Oregon, named for Jean Baptiste Sauve, a 

French Canadian, who kept a dairy there. 
Savanna; city in Carroll County, Illinois; 
Savannah; city in Chatham County and river in Geoi^gia, and town in Wayne 

County, New York. The name is a Creek corruption of the name of the Shawnee 

Indians, who formerly lived upon the Savannah River. 
S^voy ; village in Champaign County, Illinois, named for Princeas Cothilda of Savoy, 

who visite<l Illinois in 1861. 
Savoy; town in Berkshire County, Massachusetts, named from the town in Switzer- 
land. 
Sawadabscook; branch of the Penobscot River in Maine. An Indian word mean- 
ing ** place of large, smooth rocks." 
Sawyer; county in Wisc*onsin, named for Philetus Sawyer, Senator from that State. 
Sazapahaw; town in Alamance County, North Carolina. A corruption of the 

name of an Indian tribe, Sissijxihaw. 
Saybrook; town in Middlesex County, Connecticut, named for Lords Say and Brook. 
Saybrook; village in McLean County, Illinois, named from Saybrook, Connecticut. 
Sayre; borough in Bradford County, Pennsylvania, probably named for R. S. Sayre, 

chief engineer of the Lehigh Valley Railroad. 
Scales Mound; township and village in Jo Daviess County, Illinois, named from the 

proximity of a large mound owned by Samuel Scales. 
Scammon; city in Cherokee County, Kansas, named for four brothers, early settlers 

from Illinois. 
Scandia; city in Republic County, Kansas, named for the Scandinavian agricultural 

society by which it was colonized. 
Scandinavia; village in Waupaca County, Wisconsin, named for the people by 

whom it was settled. 
Scantic; river, and village in Hartford County, Connecticut Derive<l from the 

Indian word res^katuk^ meaning "branch of the river." 
Scarboro; town in Cumberland County, Maine, named from the town in England. 
Scarsdale; town in Westchester County, New York, named from the town in Derby- 
shire, England. 
Scatacook; river in Connecticut. An Indian word meaning "confluence of two 

streams." 
Schaghticoke; town in Rensselaer County, New York, situated at the conflaence of 

the Hoosic and Hudson rivers. Derived from an Indian word pachgaiffoch, 

" place where a river branches." 
Schellsburgr; borough in Bedford County, Pennsylvania, named for the man who 

laid it out. 
Schenectady; county, and city in same county, in New York. Derived from the 

Indiun meaning "over beyond the plains," or "river valley l^eyond the pine 

trecH." 
Schererville; village in I^ke County, Indiana, named for Scherer Wright, its 

founder. 



.i.vvErr.l PLACE NAMRH IN THK t'NJTED STATES. 277 

Schleicher; cniint.V in Ti'Xa'=. nimicil (<ir liiir^Iav Sclilei.-licr, mi-iiiU'r oi Con^ri-XB 

from Iliat Stulf. 
BcbleiBingerrille; village in Wiixhinji^oii I'uuuty, \Vi»'o:iKiii, luiiiivl fur B. .Sclileiit- 

ingur Weil, ite founder. 
Schley; rouiity in Georgia, niuned (or Williftm Stvhley, a former tiovemor. 
fichodnck; town in Bensselaer Cnmity, New York. An Inilian wonl nteaninK 

"meadow or Jire plain," no called lx.'iiaiise it was in andent tiniea the seat of the 

ifiuneil fires of the Mohegans. 
Scboharia; cuuiity, town in mnie county, anil creek in New York. An Indian 

word iiieaRi)i^"floo<l wood,'' nr "driftwooil." Another untliorityRivcH "Irilni- 

tary that throws ita water« across the main stream." 
Schonbnum; town in Tuwara was County, Ohio, A German woril nii'aning"lit'an- 

t if 111 fountain." 
Schoodic; river, and chain of lakes, in Maine. An Indian word to wliich many 

meunintcH are credited, among them. ."trout plare," "burnt lands," "place 

where water niBhefi," and "where fish live all the year." 
Schoolcraft; county, and village in Kalainaxoo County, in Michigan, named for 

Henry K. Schoolcraft, diiHtin)fuinh«l for hin Indian researches. 
Bchroeppel; town in Oswepi County, New York, named for Henry W. Si'hrnepjH-l, 

an early resident. 
Bchroon; lake, river, nionn tain, and (own in Essex County, in New York. Upinions 

differ H8 tt> the derivation of thiH na:ne, eoine saying that it in derived from 

the Indian tluighnringhriimnhtira, meaning "largest lake," or from the Karaiioc 

Indian, "daoghter of the mountains;" another authority stating that it was 

named for the Duchese 8charon, of the court of Louis XIV. 
Bchulenburir; town in Fayetle Conntj, Texas, named for a nian prominent in the 

urfianiuilion of a corporation that built the town. 
Schajrier; cmunlies in Illinois, Missouri, and New York, named for Gen. Philip 

Schuyler, early mayor of Albany, New Yi>rk. 
Schujrler; city in Colfax County, Nebraska, naiiie<i (or Schuyler Odfax, Viiv- 

Preflident under President Grant. 
Schuylerville; village in Saratoga County, New York, named for (ien. Philip 

Schuyler, a prominent man, and early mayor of Allmny. 
Schuylkill; county and river in Pennsylvania; so named because the firat explorers 

[lassed Its mouth without seeing it, which caused them to give it this Dutch name, 

meaning "hidden stream." The Delaware Indiana called the river s^iwAowr- 

hdioie. "Having stream." 
Schuylkill Haveii; town in Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania, so named because of 

its location at the head of the Snhuylkill Canal. 
Bcio; town in Allegany County, New York, named from the island in the Mediter- 
ranean. 
Sciota; village in McDonougb County, Illinois, and river and county in Ohio. 

Derived from the Indian word itryolah, meaning "great legs," and applied to 

the river on account of its numerous and long branches. 
Bcipio; town in Cayuga County, New York, named for the Roman general. 
Seitico; village in Hartford County ,_ Connecticut. An Indian word meaning "at 

the branch." 
Bcituate; town in Plymouth County, Massachusetts, name<l for the stream running 

into thtf harbor, which derived its name from the Indian word mtuit, "cold 

Bcooha; tou'ii in Kemper County. Missiasipiii. An Indian word meaning "reed 

Scotland: coimtiea in Missouri and North Carolina, aud city in Boniiomme County, 
Boutli Dakota riamol for the ilivision of Great Brilaiu. 



278 PLA(^K NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bfll. 2r»R. 

Scott; connty in Arkanwu*, lumuMl for .Iiidjje Andrew Scott. 

Scott; county in liiinnis, naincMl from Scott County, Kentucky. 

Scott; <ounties in Indiana and Kentucky, name<l for (ilen. Ctiarlefl Scott^ governor 

of Kentucky, 1S()8-1S12. 
Scott; county in Iowa, county, and city in same county, in Kansas, and counties in 

MinneHota, Tennt^Hstn*, and Vii^inia, named for (ien. Winfield Scott. 
Scott; county in Mi^4Houri, nanu'il for John Scott 
Scottdale; borough in Wi'ntmoreland ('ounty, Pennsylvania, named for Thomas A. 

Scott, of the IVnnHvlvania Railroad. 
Scotts Bluff; county in Nel>nu<ka, naminl for the bluff where a man named S<*ott 

met death hv Hturvation. 
Scottsboro; town in Baldwin ('ounty, Geoi^a, named for Gen. John Scott. 
Scottsburg:; villa^^ in LivingHton County, New York, named for Matthew and 

William Scott, early Hcttlern. 
Scotta Creek; townnhip in JackHon County, North Carolina, named for John Scott, 

a trader anions the Cheroket^H. 
Scottsville; town in Allen County, Kentucky, named for Gen. Charles Scott, an 

early j^overnor of the State. 
Scottsville; village in Monnx* County, New York, named for Isaac Scott, the first 

wttlcr. 
Scran ton; town in Jackson ('ounty, Mississippi, name<l from the city in Pennsylvania. 
Scranton; city in I.4U*ka wanna County, Pennsylvania, named for Joseph H.8(*ranton, 

its founder. 
Scratch Gravel; hills in I^ewis and Clark County, Montana, 5 miles northwest of 

Helena, so named because jjold was picked up in the gravel after a heavy rain. 
Screven; county in (Jeorgia, named for (ien. James Screven, a Revolutionary officer. 
Scriba; town in Oswego C'ounty, New York, named for George Scriba, the resident 

j>roprietor. 
Scurry; county in Texas, nanunl for William B. Scurry, brigadier-general in the 

Army of the Confc<leracy. 
Seaboard; town in Northampt^m County, North Carolina, named from the Sea- 

l)oard Air Line. 
Seabright; lK>ronjxh in Monmouth County, New Jersey, named from the town in 

England. 
Sea Cliff; village in Na.»<Siiu County, New York, where camp meetings were formerly 

held u{)on a cliff by the salt water, from which circumstance the village was 

nameil. 
Sea Isle City; l)orough in Cape May County, New Jersey, so named because it is 

situated near the seashore. 
Searcy; county in Arkansas, named for Judge Richard Searcy. 
Searles; post-office in Kern County, California, named for J. W. Searles, who dis- 
covered l)orax in the Mohave Dest^rt in 1863. 
Searsmont; town in Waldo County, Maine; 
Searsport; town in Waldo County, Maine. Named for David Sears, of Boston, 

Massachusetts. 
Seattle; city in King County, Washington, named for the chief of the Duwamish 

tribe of Indians, Sir-an-thL 
Seba^o; lake in York County, and lake, pond, and town in Cumberland County, 

Maine. An Indian woixl meaning "stretch of water," or *' place of river lake." 
Sebamook; lake in Maine. An Indian word given two different meanings, *Marge 

bay lake" and "l)right water." 
Sebastian; county in .\rkans:is, nanieil for Senator William K. Sebastian. 
Sebethe; river in Coimecticut. Supp<K<*Hl to 1k» <leriveil from the Indian woni 

sepoent, "suiall river." 



oA.vxETT.l PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATEA. 279 

Sebewa; villas in Ionia County, Michigan. Derived from the Indian word gihiury 

"rivulet," or 'M)rook." 
Sebewaing; villas in Hun)n County, Michigan. Derived from the Indian woni 

fihiweng^ "at the creek." 
Seboeis; lake, stream, and plantation in Penobscot County, in Maine. Supposed to 

be derived from an Indian word meaning "little river." 
SBecaucnis; town in Hudson County, New York. Thought to be derived from the 
Indian word sekakeny used in reference to snakes. 

»; creek in Texas, and village in Boxelder County, Utah. A Spanish word 
meaning "dry." 
'; village in Wooilfonl County, Illinois, named for a railroad builder. 
Sedalia; city in Pettis County, Missouri. A modification of the original name 
Sadieville, having been named for the daughter of Gen. (t. R. Smith, who laid 
out the town. 
Sedan; city in Chautauqua County, Kansas, named from the town in France. 
Sedgrwick; county, and fort in same county, in Colorado, mountain in Idaho, and 

county, and city in Harvey County, Kansas, named for Gen. John Sedgwick. 
Sedgwick; town in Hancock County, Maine, named for Maj. Robert Sedgwick. 
Seekonk; town in Bristol County, Massachusetts. Said to be derived from an Indian 

word meaning "black goose," or "wild goose." 
Segruin; town in Gaudalupe County, Texas, named for Col. Juan Seguin, a Mexican 

who joined fortunes with the Texans in 1836. 
SeiglingviUe; town in Barnwell County, South Carolina, named for Gen. Randolph 

Seigling, a prominent capitalist of Charleston. 
Selixisgrove; borough in Snyder County, Pennsylvania, named for a family of early 

settlers. 
Sellersville; borough in Bucks County, Pennsylvania. The Anglicized form of the 

original name. Zoellers, a family of early residents for whom it waa named. 
Sellwood; town in Multnomah County, Oregon, named for Governor Sellwood. 
Selma; city in Dallas County, Alabama, name<l from the "Songs of Selma," in 

Ossian. 
Selxna; town in Fresno County, California, name<l from the city in Alabama. 
Bexninole; town in Hillsboro County, Florida, and nation in Indian Territory, 
named for the Indian tribe; the word proliably means "separatist," or 
''renegade." 
l^mpronius; town in Cayuga County, New York, named for the celebrated Roman 

tribune, father of the Gracchi. 
^enath; village in Dunklin County, Missouri, named for the wife of A. W. Doug- 
lass, an early settler. 
^enatpbia; creek and town in Tate County, Mississippi. A Choctaw Indian word 

meaning "white sycamore." 
Seneca; city in Nehama County, Kansas, named from Seneca County in Ohio, by 
the first settlers who emigrated from that county. 

1 Seneca; nation in Indian Territory, city in Newton County, Missouri, counties in 
New York and Ohio, town in Oconee County, South Carolina, and creek in 
Pendleton County, West Virginia; 
Seneca FaUa; village in Seneca County, New York, named from an Indian tribe. 
The word is a corruption of Sinnekaas^ a name given them by the Dutch. 
Benegar; creek in Maryland, named from the Seneca tribe of Indians. 
Sequoia; town in Tuolumne County, California, named from the trees. 
Severance; city in Doniphan County, Kansas, named for one of the three proprietors. 
Severy; city in Greenwood County, Kansas, nametl for L. Severy, of Km|>oria, a 

director of the Santa Fe Railroad. 
Sevier; county in Arkansas, namcnl for Ambrose H. Sevier, a Congressional deleg:ite. 



i 



l80 PLACK NAMEW IN THK dNITED STAT&l. 



'Memw, county in Tennessee, named for John Sevier, first governor "f il"' Stat*. 

:S«vier; cnnnty in Utali, jiroluihly namec) for Jolin Srvier, a pioneer. 

Seward; county in Ktuieas, county, and city in name county, in Nebraska, an ■*-i 

mountain and [own in Bchoharie County, New York, named for William IK — ■ 

Seward, the Anieritsu etateenian. 
Bewickley; Ixirougli in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania. An Indian won) lueai^^H- 

ing "sweet water." 
Bejrmour; city in JackHin County, Indiana, named for a civil engineer. 
Shnbbona; township and vill^te in Dekalb County, IllinoiH. Named for an India:^ -U 

chief who befriiandeil the whit4» settlerx at the time of the Black Hawk war. 
Bbackelford; county in Texa», named for a surgeon, captain of a band called th .^^» 

" Red Rovere," who hel^ied the Texaiis in their revolution. 
Shokopee; city in Scott County, Minnesota, named for a Sioux Indian chief wh^^^o 

formerly lived there; the name meaning "eix." 
Shateravills: township in Portage County, Ohio, nanied for an early settler. 
BbamoMn; Uirough in North um tier! and County, Pennsylvania, Derived from th^K— le 

Delaware Indian word nchahamoki, meaning "ptai.'e of eels." 
Bh&monf; town in Burlington County, New Jervey. An Indian word meanln^^c^ig 

"place of the big horn." 
Shandaken; town in I'lster County, New York. Ad Indian word meaning "rapi ^BA 

Bbfumock; river in Connecticut. An Indian won) meaning "place where t 

streams meet." 
Shannon; township and village in Carroll County, liiinoie. Nanied for Williat* 

Shannon, its founder. 
Bhannon; county in MisHouri. Named for George F. Shannon, of Marion CouDt;^ 
Shannon: county in South Dakota. Named for Peter 0. Sliannon, former chi^ 

jiiBtit^. 
Bhapleiffh; town in York County, Maine. Namcl for Nicholas Sliapleigh, onie &= 

the earliest proprietors. 
Bharkey; county in Mixsigaippi, named for Wllliaiii L Sharkey, provisional go^ 

ernor during Governor Clark's absence at Fort Pulaski in 1866-fHJ. 
Bharon; city in Barber County, Kansas, town in Schoharie County, New York, a 

twenty other places. The name is of biblical derivation, from the Hebre- 

meaning "a plain," 
Bkaron; town in Madison County, Misaiasippi, so named because the Sharon m 

nary for girls was situated there at an early day. 
Bharon Springs; city in Wallace County, Kansas, and village in Schoharie Counfty, 

New York. The name is of biblical derivation. 
Sharp; county in .4rkansaH. Named for Ephraim Sharp, representative from Iaw^ 

fence County. 
Bharpsburg'; town in Batli County, Kentucky. Nameil for Moses Sharp. 
Bharpaburg; tiorough in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania. Named for J 

Sharp, the original proprietor. 
GUiaata; county in C^alifornia. Named from the ln<tian tribe SiMe, or Sharlika. 
Shaume; river in Maseachusetta. An Indian wonl meaning "fountain" <tf 

"spring." 
Bhavano; peak of the Sawatch Range in Colorado, named for a Ute Indian. 
Shaw; town in Bolivar County, Misslseippi, named for the owner of tlie IuhIi 

through which the railroad pHt«es. 
Shairan; town in Baltimore County, Maryland. An Indian word meaning "mutk." 
Bhawangunk; river, town m L'leter County, and mountain in New York. Swd to 

be an Indian word meaning " white etone" or " white salt rocka." 



f 



eaxxCTT.l PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 281 

Sbmwano; county, and city in paine county, in Wiaconwn. I\»rivcHl from the 
Ojibwa Indian won! »hamiumuj, moaning **on thcHouth." 

JSliawnee; nation in Indian Territory and county in KauHan; 
Shawneetown; city in (iailatin County, Illinois. Named for the Indian tribe, the 
word probably meaning '^Bouthemers/* and given them because they emigrated 
northward from the Savannah River. 
Sheboygran; county, and city in same county, in Wisconsin. Two derivations are 
given, one from the Ojibwa Indian word jibaiyan^ meaning a perforated object, 
as a pipe stem, and the other from ghairb-wa-tixiy, expressing a tradition ** that a 
great noise coming unden?round from the region of Lake iSuperior was heani at 
this plape.'' 
Sheepeater; cliffs in the Yellowstone Park, named for a band of Indians, a sub- 
tribe of the Shoshoni. 
Sheepscot; river and bay in Maine. Derived from the Indian word ^ipsa-conta, 
meaning '* bird-flocking river " or " little bird place,** because the Indians resorted 
there for young ducks. 
Sheffield; cities in Colbert County, Alabama, and Warren County, Pennsylvania, 
and town in Berkshire County, Massachusetts, named from the city in England. 
Sheffield; village in Bureau County, Illinois, named for Joseph Sheffield, of New 

Haven, one of it founders. 
Sheffield; town in Franklin County, Iowa, named for James Sheflield, a railroad 

contractor. 
Shelbina; city in Shelby County, Missouri, naine<l by early settlers from Shelby 

County in Kentucky. 
Shelbume; towns in Franklin County, Massachusetts, and Chittenden County, Ver- 
mont, named for William Fitz Mauric*e, second Earl of Shelbume. 
Shelby; counties in Alabama, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, and Missouri; 
town in Orleans County, New York, and counties in Ohio, Tennessee, and Texas; 
Shelbyville; cities in Shelby crounties, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, and Missouri. 

Named for Gen. Isaac Shelby, former governor of Kentucky. 
Sheldon; city in 0*Brien County, Iowa, named for Israel Sheldon, a stockholder in 

the first railroad passing through the town. 
Sheldon; town in Franklin County, Vermont, named for a resident family. 
Shell Bock; town in Butler County, Iowa, so named on account of the rocks near 

the river. 
Shelter; island off Long Island, New York. Probably the translation of the original 
Indian word of manhanset-aha-cuBha-vxymmuck^ meaning *' island sheltered by 
islands." 
Shelton; town in Mason County, W^ashington, named for an early settler. 
Shenandoah; city in Page County, Iowa, borough in Schuylkill County, Pennsyl- 
vania, county, town in Page County, and river in Virginia. An Indian word 
said to mean " sprucy stream.** 
Qhepau^; river in Connecticut. Derived from the Indian word jnnshapaug, mean- 
ing "laiige pond.*' 
Shepherd; village in Isabella County, Michigan, named for I. N. Shepherd, its 

founder. 
Bhepherdstown; town in Jefferson County, West Virginia, named for Capt. Thomas 

Shepherd. 
Bherbom; town in Mid<llesex County, Massachusetts, named from the town of Sher- 
borne, England. 
Sherburne; county in Minnesota, nameil for Moses Sherburne, associate justice of 

the supreme court, 1853-1857. 
Sherburne; town in Chenango County, New York, named from the city in England. 



V .>!- >" THl ">:77I" -TaTE-. 



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-^: - ■^. - 'r.-r '.-xn iu Kn^lan.l. 
: ■ ■ " r - r.z -;.'-. ar. :a. Name* 1 for tivn. 

* ' ..-a::.-^ "T^ :ie "I the sj^riniT-." 

- ^:.— : : 7 an In iian •hief. 

- " - 1 ■: a:: trrV >:.'iTi:«ree. 

:-• ana. An In.iian woM ineaiiim; 



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An In<iian woi\l meanii]): 



"s. * ■**<■. 



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'. a;- : ri ■ ' *h.:»uiiler. 

> nai^ei because Ungate*! on the 



., . \l::.t-: ::r L». L. Shouj». Unite* I Stair?- 



v-* 



v^ ■■*■• 



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h« 



■'• a. ;ni:i:e«l for an early settler. 
;i a. *an->t :• r Henry M. ?*hri»ve. 
^Kt*«i- ■'.'->*•".*. nauKiI fur liet>r>»i* TaMmt, 

- ■ :. ai>i :*fveral otiier towns anil vil- 



■u. •« 



GASNKTT.l PLA(^E NAMES IN TH?: VNITED STATES. 283 

Shubrick; |H»ak in IIiiin)N»I<1t (^oimty, California, po nanx'il lH»<'au«» th«» pteainor 

Shnhrlck >vt»nt a;rr«min! in the vicinity. 
Shullsburg; city in l^fayctt*' County, \Vis<'onHin, nanieil for .Jt»«w^ W. Shuil, the 

tirst settler. 
Shurz; mountain in Wyoniinjr, nanie<i for Carl Shurz, Secretary of the Interior under 

Presiiient Have**. 
Shushan; villas in Washinjrton (V>unty, New York, named for the ruined city in 

Persia. 
Shutesburg; town in Franklin County, MaHHachusettfi, name<l for Gov. Samuel 

Shute, a relative <3f (iovernor Bernard. 
Sibley; county in Minnesota, namtnl for (ten. Henry H. Sibley, an early pioneer of 

the Territory, the first governor of the State, and ita military defender in the. 

Sioux war of 1862. 
Sibley; town in Jack8r)n County, Missouri, name<l for George C. Sibley, who was 

one of the eommisnioners to lay out a road in 1825 from Fort Osage to Santa Fe. 
Sidney; township and village in Champaign County, Illinois, named for Sydney 

Davis, a daughter of the foun<ler. 
Sidney; Kennebec County, Maine, and cities in Shelby County, Ohio, name<l for Sir 

Philip Sidney. 
Sidney; town in Delaware County, New York, named for Admiral Sir Sidney 

Smith. 
Sidon; town in Lefiort^ County, Mississippi, named for the ancient city of Syria. 
Siegrfiied; post-ofiice in Northampton County, Pennsylvania, named for Col. Jno. 

SiegfriwI, a Revolutionary soldier. 
Sierra; counties in California and New Mexico. Derive<l from the Spanish, Sierra 

MadrCj ** Mother Range,'* Rocky Mountains. 
Sierra La Sal; mountains in eastern Utah, so named from salt springs near their 

base. 
Sigel; village in Shelby County, Illinois, named for Gen. Franz Sigel, an officer of 

the rebellion. 
Sigoumey; city in Keokuk County, Iowa, named for the poetess, Mrs. Lydia H. 

Sigoumey. 
Sikeston; city in Scott County, Missouri, named for John Sikes. 
Siler City; town in Chatham County, North Carolina, named for a prominent 

family of the neighborhood. 
Silliman; mountains in California and Nevada, named for Benjamin Silliman, the 

chemist. 
Silverbow; county in Montana, so named because of its shape, and on account of the 

presence of this precious metal. 
Silver Gliff; town in Custer County, Colorado, so named because silver was found 

in a cliff near the present town site. 
Silver Lake; city in Shawnee County, Kansas, so nameil because the Kansas River 

forms a lake at this point. 
Simpson; county in Kentucky, nameil for Capt. John Simpson, member of Congress. 
Simpson; county in Mississippi, nameil for Judge Josiah Simpson. 
Simpsonville; village in Shelby County. Kentucky, named for Capt. John Simp- 
son, member of Congress from that State. 
Simpsonville; tcjwn in Greenville County, South Carolina, named for a prominent 

family of the State. 
Sincarte; town in Ma:?on County, Illinois, a corrupted name of the passage which was 

originally named by the French, chciml ecartt% '* remote channel.'* 
Sinclairville; village in Chautauqua County, New York, nametl for Maj. Samuel 

Sinclair, the first s<'ttler, who located tliere in ISIO. 
Singleys; town in lIumlK)ldt County, California, nameil for an early settler. 



2^4 VhACi: NAMKf* IN THE UNITKD ftTATEfl. f bpll. 2r»8. 

•iiiK Sitifir; <nM'k in ('JuMnuiij: Coiintv, New York. Indian wonla meaning ** place 

nf 11 Mtniir." Another ttiitJiority HtateH that it wafi name<l for John Sing Sing, a 

fri«MMllv Indian. 
•inkinic; <Tei«k in lireekinridgi* County, Kentucky, po named because it sinks 

iN'neath the Hurface of the ground for a diatance of 6 miles. 
0inn«inahonin{(; ntream in Pennwylvania. A Delaware Indian word meaning 

•*Htonv lick." 

■ 

•inainawa Mound; village in (irand County, Wisconsin. A combination of the 
Indian wonl Hinnunir, meaning "rattlesnake,*' and mounds because situated near 
a tnnicuttMl cone wveral hundre<l feet high. 

Sioux; cnuntii^H in Iowa and Nebranka, and eight other places, so named from the 
hukota or Sioux Indians of Dakota and Minnesota, the largest tribe in the Uniteil 
StatcH. TIh* wonl is an abbreviation of their Ojibwa name, signifying "little 
Hnaki»s,** i. c, "enemies." 

Sir Johua; small run in Morgan County, West Virginia, named for an officer of 
hruddiH'k's armv. 

Siakiyou; county in (\Uifornia and mountains in Oregon. By some aathorities it is 
t*i\\\\ to Umi otrruption of the original name given the district in California by 
the Kivncli aiv t^iittmu, meaning **six iM^wlders;'* others state that it is an 
Indian \m>i^1 utcaning ''UdMailiHl horst\** the mountains between California and 
Ori'gxtn having Uh'u so nanunl liei'Hib^^ a famous bob-tailed race horse was lost 
iU\ the tmil. 

ftiakowit; lake in Wisi^tnsin. .\n Indian word meaning a '*kind of fish resembling 
tixmt." 

BisUadobaia; lake in i>asitem Maine. An Indian wonl meaning '*rock lake.*' 

Siaa<>tou. to\\n in KoUTtsJ County. Snith l>akota. An Indian word meaning 
"sxNjuup v\Ua»^\" a subiriU* of the Siimx. 

Siaaou; \ illa^^ in Siskiyou i\mnty» I'^litomia, named for a former hotel keeper. 

Siaaowkiaaiuk. ci^vk \»n ilu* w^»st side of IVlaware River. Pennsylvmnia. Derived 
ti\»ui the lnvb;u\ wv^rvl s/{ih',i".tu^ '*pUiv of bla^^k dooksw" 

8Ul|frt»avt>a; jsiss in Aii^vuia. natu«\l tor i a^^in Sitgraave^. United States Army. 

flUlkum. \ dli^' m i\H*i Cvhiuin . Orx^v^u. A Chimn^k liKiian word meaning "half," 

VI '|SAtt " 

Bka^il, v\mnt> in Wjislxii^^uui. uatutsi K^ran Ini^iian tribe. 

Bkamauia. vvuuty iu Waslxiu^vm. Au ItKiian wv>ni meaning "swift watna.** and 

l>a\»lv^M\ aj*|Ui<\i K» it'.e irv^ibKxi mat^r^ ot ih<» Columbta RiTer. 
9kauawvxuv^W<Mhattc#, tntHitar> v^t Wuiw^tu^u Kitvr. An Indian word meaning 

Bkau<^li^iM. -sii.K'. loMkit, *v.n; \t:idt^ lit iHtvUKta^a Ooontr, in Xew York- An 

SLkil^^avUU. '.v*>*'.'. ^*-{ MuhVtttvtx vVuttcy. K^titt^-ky. ouiccMd tor Jam«e R. Skiles. 
Bkmui^ir. >!i»'fvi i^i l»itv M^ttivhreit'dw^y. V^rtiK^tit. aduti*?^ &>r Unttk Skinner, the 

S^^yV'dbs^k >f\\i»^ A^iv^ \r:a^» u \l'-'»^»m^fr> vVortty. fViuizj^lvaiui. r^riTed from 
9^aus\.vk ^^».K^ ^'i iK^ \ls*:'.?i^:A:/ri\*ajc fetter >tiixit*. Aa lodiui wwd meaiune 

■" .?cav*- >*,i'vf ^I'vvt.-* 

9(k^^k^NJtu«J)t ••\v? ri \\.i^^^ *»ji«-vi/. 'riitrKv. :«T jL'f Lud'uit tricv. the -Sko^^ioaisii: the 
9k>H?Xu.iu<bLU<k ^ ii^v ■ » t o % :> V Vii/ i : > . ^V vfcsh iii'^'tt. Art tmlian wi«f»i owuuiv 
9il*^^ htiriC«ua ''>^'4 :t v.'i<icrH.*c vViiac^. Mainv. A.-j Iruiian wi^ni :ml &> luran 



OANNBTT.l PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 285 

Skull; valleys in Utah and Yava|>ai County, Arizona; 

Skull Valley; village in Yavapai County, Arizona. So named on account of the 
many skulls of Indiann found there. 

Skunk; river in Iowa. A tranplation of the Indian name checauqua. 

Skunkacut; range of Hills in Hartford County, Connecticut. An Indian word 
meaning "at the high place." 

Slateford; village in Northamptfm County, Pennsylvania, so named l)ecause it i.s the 
(«nter of manufacture of school slates. 

Slater; city in Saline County, Missouri, named for W. A. Slater, of Norwich, C^)n- 
necticut. 

Slateraville; village in Providence County, Rhode Island, named for Samuel Slater, 
its founder. 

SlatJTigton; lx)rough in Lehigh County, Pennsylvania; so named on account of its 
extensive slate quarries. 

Slaughteraville; town in Webster County, Kentucky, named for G. G. Slaughter, 
an old settler. 

Sleepy Bye; lake and village in Brown County, Minnesota, name<l for the Indian 
chief Ishanumbakt **man whose eyes have the appearance of sleep." 

Slide; highest summit of the Catskill Mountains, Ulster County, New York, so 
named because an avalanche stripped a part of the mountain of earth and vege- 
tation. 

Slidell town in St. Tammany Parish, Louisiana, named for the celebrity of that 

name. 
Sligro; borough in Clarion County, Pennsylvania, and six other towns and villages, 

named from the town in Ireland. 
^lipi)eryrock; stream and borough in Butler County, Pennsylvania. Derived from 

the Indian word ufsrh-ach-ach-apochka, meaning "slippery rock.** 
^loansville; village in Schoharie County, New York, named for John R. Sloan, an 
early settler. 

locuxna; island in Michigan, named for its owner. 

; creek in Yellowstone Park, which was erroneously so described by its dis- 
coverer; it being, in fact, a swift running stream. 
mackover; stream in Union County, Arkansas. Corrupted from the French 

chemin couveri, "covered road.*' 
•xnethport; borough in McKean County, Pennsylvania, named for Theodore Smethe, 

a friend of the original proprietor. 
•mith; county in Kansas, named for J. Nelson Smith, of the Second Colorado Regi- 
ment. 

Smith; county in Mississippi, named for Maj. David Smith. 

Smith; river in Montana, named for Robert Smith, former Secretary of the Navy. 

Smith; river in Nevada, named for Lieut. Kirby Smith. 

Smith; county in Tennessee, name<l for Gen. Daniel Smith, a patriot and early set- 
tler of the State. 

Smith; county in Texas, named for John W. Smith, kille<l at the Alamo. 

Smith Center; city in center of Smith County, Kansas, named for J. Nelson Smith, 
of the Second Colorado Regiment. 

Smithfield; town in Dutchess County, New York, named for Peter Smith. 

Smithfield; town in Johnson County, North Carolina, named for John Smith, State 
senator. 

Smiths Perry; village in Beaver County, Pennsylvania, name<l for Jesse Smith, the 
man who establishefl the ferry. 

Smithtown; town in Suffolk County, New York, named for Richard Smith, an 
early proprietor. 



286 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. lBtix.2:>8. 

Smithville; village in Jeffer>rm County, New York, named for Jesse Smith, a 

lumber dealer. 
Smithville; village in Ritchie CV»ant\% West Virginia, named for the former owner 

of the land. 
Smithville; town in Clay County, Mi^wouri, name<l for Himiphrey Smith, the tim 

settler. 
Smokes; creek in Erie County, New York, named for an Indian who resided near 

its mouth. 
Smyrna; town in Cobb County, Georgia, and village in Chenango County, New 

York, and sixteen other places, the name being transferred from the ancient 

seaport of Asia Minor on the (iuU of Smyrna. 
Smyth; county in Virginia, named for Gen. Alexander Smyth, 3iember of Congress 

from that State. 
Snake; river in Idaho and Washington and Yellowstone Park, so named from the 

Snake or Shoshoni Indians. 
Snapeene; stream in Montana. An Indian word meaning "crooked mouth.*' 
Snelling; militar>' post in Hennepin County, Minnesota, named for Colonel Josiah 

Snelling, under wIhjsc direction it was built. 
Sniabar; t<jwnship and village in Lafayette County, Missouri. Corrupted from 

ffchuyte fjfjer^ from the circumstance of an early German hunter having lost his 

life there. 
Snohomiah; river, county, and town in same county, in Washington, named for an 

Inrlian tri^x*. 
Snoqualmie; river in Washington, named for an Indian tribe. 
Snowden; township in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, named for Judge Snowden, 

of Pittsburg. 
Snowmass; mountain in Colorado, so named because of the snow field near its 

summit. 
Snyder; county in Pennsylvania; 
Snydertown; borough in Northumberland County, Pennsylvania. Named for 

Governor Simon Snvder of the State. 
Socatean; stream in Maine, named for Standing Atean, a warrior of an Indian 

tribe, or from an Indian word, meaning '*half burned land, and half standing 

luml>er.'* 
Socorro; county, and city in same county, in New Mexico, and village in £1 Paso 

County, Texas. A Spanish word meaning '*succor'* or ** relief." 
Solano; county in California, named for a chief of the Suisun Indians. 
Soledad; town in Monterey County, California. A Spanish word meaning ** soli- 
tude" or "dessert." 
Solomon; city in Dickinson County and river in Kansas, originally known as the 

WiHkaiHjlla, from two Indian wonls, meaning **salt water." Name changed to 

Solonian as being more euphonic. 
Solon; towns in Somerset County, Maine, and Cortland County, New York, named 

for one of the seven wise men of Greece. 
Solon; townnhip in Cuyahoga County, Ohio, named for Lorenzo Solon Bull. 
Solution; creek in Yellowstone Park, so named because it is the outlet to Kiddle 

Lake. 
Solvay; village in Onon<laga County, New York, so named because the Sol\*ay 

l*r(>ceH.M works an? 8ituat<Hl there. 
Somers; town in Toliaii<l County, Connet'ticnt, named for I^ord Somers. 
Somers; town in Westcliester County, New York, nanunl for Capt. Kichanl Somers, 

naval odicer in the Tripolitan war. 
Somerset; comities in Maine, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania, named from the county 

in Kngland. 



GANNETT.) PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 287 

Somerset; (roanty in Maryland, named for Edward Somerset, ha8l>and of the 

daughter of Lord Baltimore. 
Somerset; village in Perry County, Ohio, named from the county in Pennsylvania. 
Somers Point; borough in Atlantic County, New Jersey, named for a family of 

residents. 
Somerton; station in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, named for Jacob Sommer, asso- 
ciate justice of the district court of Philadelphia. 
Somervell; county in Texas, named for Alexander Somerville, a brigadier-general 

of the Texas Militia. 
Somerville; city in Middlesex County, Massachusetts, named for Capt. Richard 

Somers, naval officer in the Tripoli tan war. 
Somerville; town in Somerset County, New Jersey, probably named for an English 

nobleman. 
Somoaauk; village in Dekalb County, Illinois, derived from the Indian word, 

essemiauky meaning '^pawpaw tree.'' 
Sonoma; county, and town in same county, in California, said to have been named 

for the chief of the Chocuyens, the word meaning ** valley of the moon.'* 
Sopris; peak of the Elk Mountains in western Colorado, named for Capt Dick 

Sopris, one of the early settlers of the State. 
Souderton; borough in Montgomery County, Pennsylvania, named for a family of 

early settlers. 
Souheg^an; river in New Hampshire. An Indian word meaning ** worn-out Iandii>." 
Souneunk; stream in Maine. An Indian word meaning 'Hhat runs between 

mountains." 
Southampton; towns in Hampshire County, Massachusetts, and Suffolk County, 

New York, and county in Virginia, named from the town in England. 
South Anna; river in Vixginia, said to have been named for Anne, Queen of 

England. 
South Berwick; town in York County, Maine, named from the city in England. 
Southboro; town in Worcester County, Massachusetts, so named because formed of 

the south part of Marlboro. 
Southbridge; town in Worcester County, Massachusetts, named with reference to 

the bridge over the Quinebaug River. 
South Carolina; one of the thirteen original States, first named for Charles IX of 

France, and later for Charles II of England. 
South Hero; town in Grand Isle County, Vermont, named for one of the two 

islands which were called Two Heroes, granted to Ethan Allen. It was intended 

that they should be owned only by brave men warmly disposed toward the 

Revolution. 
Southingrton; borough and town in Hartford County, Connecticut. A contraction 

of South Farmington, of which town it was originally a part. 
South Pittsburg; town in Marion County, Tennessee, named from the city in 

Pennsylvania. 
Southport; city in Brunswick County, North Carolina, so named because it is situ- 
ated in the southern part of the State. 
South River; borough in Middlesex County, New Jereey, so named to distinguish 

it from the North River district. 
Southwick; town in Hainp<len County, Massachusetti*, nanieil for its first settler. 
Spafford; town in Onondajm County, New York, named for Horatio Gates Spafford, 

author of the first gazettt'er of that State. 
Spalding; county in Georgia, named for the Hon. Thomas Spaulding. 
Sparland; village in Marshall County, Illinois, named for John Sparr, owner of 

the site. 
Sparta; city in Randolph County, Illinois, named from Sparta in Greece. 



288 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 258. 

Spartanburg:; county, and city in same county, in South Carolina, so called from 

the rigorous self-discipline practiced by the inhabitants during the Revolutionary 

war. 
Spearville; town in Ford County, Kansas, named for Alden Speare, of Boston. 
Spencer; township, and city in Clay County, in Iowa, named for Geoi^ E. Spencer, 

Unite<l States Senator from Alabama. 
Spencer; county in Kentucky, and county, and city in Owen County, in Indiana, 

named for Capt. Spier Spencer, kille<l at Tippecanoe. 
Spencer; town in Worcester County, Massachusetts, named for Spencer Phipps, 

lieutenant-governor 1732-1757; or, according to another authority, for Charles 

Spencer, second Duke of Marlborough. 
Spencerport; village in Monroe County, New York, named for William H. Spencer, 

a pioneer settler. 
Sphinx; mountain in Montana, so named on account of its resemblance in shape to 

the Sphinx in Egypt. 
Spink; county in South Dakota, named for S. L. Spink, a former Congressman. 
Spirit Lake; town in Dickinson County, Iowa, named from the lake which the 

Indians called "spirit water.*' 
Spivey; city in Kingman County, Kansas, named for R. M. Spivey, president of the 

Arkansas Valley Town and Land Company. 
Split Bock; village in P3ssex County, New York, so named because sitnated near a 

curiously formed rock. 
Spokane; county, city in same county, river, and falls in Washington, named for 

an Indian tribe, the name meaning ** children of the sun." 
Spoon; river in northern Illinois, so named by the first white settler because of the 

spoon-shaped course of the stream. The Indian name was Maquon, meaning 

'•feather.'* 
Spottsylvania; county in Virginia, named for Alexander Spotswood, early lieu- 
tenant-governor. 
Sprague; town in Lincoln County, Washington, named for Gen. John W. Sprague, 

interested in the Northern Pacific Railroad. 
Springrfield; city in Hampden County, Massachusetts, named from the town in 

Essex County, England. 
Spring^field; city in Greene County, Missouri; village in Sarpy County, Nebraska, 

and city in Clark County, Ohio, so named because of the numerous springs. 
Springrfield; village in Orangeburg County, South Carolina, so named by ita founder 

l)ecause he "expected to see a town spring up in the old fields." 
Spring^eld; town in Windsor County, Vermont, named from the city in Massa- 
chusetts. 
Spring Lake; borough in Monmouth County, New Jersey, named from a lake in 

the vicinity which is fed by springs. 
Spring Valley; township and village in Fillmore County, Minnesota, and village 

in Pierce County, Wisconsin, named from the springs which are notable features 

of the valleys. 
Springville; villages in I^porte County, Indiana, and Erie County, New York, so 

named because of the abundance of springs. 
Sproul; creek in Humboldt County, California, named for a settler. 
Squam; lake in New Hampshire. Derived from the Indian word, nesquamsauke^ 

meaning "pleasant water place." 
Squaw; mountain and township in Piscataquis County, Maine. An abridged ver- 
sion of the translation of its Indian name, meaning "the mountain which 

belongs to a woman." 
Stafford; town in Tolland Comity, Connecticut, and county in Virginia, named for 

the county in England. 



<2AM!(BTT.] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 289 

Sialfbrd; county, and town in same county, in Kansas?, named for Lewis Stafford, 

inptain Company E, First Kansas Regiment. 
Stafford; village in Fort Bend County, Texas, nanieil for a prominent citizen. 
Stafford; county in Virginia, named from the county in England. 
Stair; falls on the east branch of the Penobscot River, Maine. A translation of the 

Indian name. 
Stambau^h; village in Iron County, Michigan, named for the man who opened the 

Iron River mine. 
Stamping^ Groiuid; village in Scott County, Kentucky, so named because of the 

buffalo herds that coiigregate<l in the neighborhood. 
Stanberry; city in Gentry County, Missouri, named for J. J. Stanberry, former 

owner of the town site. 
Standish; town in Cumberland County, Maine, named for Miles Standish. 
Stanford; mountain in California, named for Governor Leland Stanford. 
Stanialaus; county in California, named for a resident family. 
Stanley; town in Gaston County, North Carolina, named for Elwood Stanley, mem- 
ber of Congress. 
Stanley; town in South Dakota, named for Henry M. Stanley, the explorer. 
Stanly; county in North Carolina, named for John Stanly, Meml)er of Congress. 
Stanton; county in Kansas, city in Montcalm County, Michigan, and county in 

Nebraska, named for Edwin M. Stanton, Secretary of War under President 

Lincoln. 
Stanton; town in Powell County, Kentucky, named for Hon. Richard H. Stanton, 

of Majrsville. 
Stanwix; village and fort in Oneida County, New York, named for Gen. John 

Stanwix, the builder of the fort in 1758. 
Stark; county in Illinois, towns in Coos County, New Hampshire, and Herkimer 

County, New York, and counties in North Dakota and Ohio; 
Starke; county in Indiana. Named for Hen. John Stark, of the Revolution. 
Starkey; town in Yates County, New York, named for John Starkey, one of the 

first settlers. 
Starks; town in Somerset County, Maine; 
Starksboro; town in Addison County, Vermont; 
Starkville; town in Oktibbeha County, Mississippi. Named for Gen. John Stark, 

of Revolutionary fame. 
Starr; county in Texas, named for James H. Starr, secretary of the treasury of the 

republic of Texas. 
Starr King; lake and mountains in California and New Hampshire, named for the 

Rev. Thomas Starr King. 
State Center; town in Marshall County, Iowa, so named because it is thought to be 

a geographical center. 
State College; borough in Center County, Pennsylvania, so named because it is the 

seat of the Pennsylvania State College of Agriculture. 
State lane; town in Wayne County, Mississippi, near the boundary line ))etween 

that State and Alabama. 
Staten; island, part of Richmond County, New York, named by. the Dutch for the 

Staaten general. 
Staunton; river, and city in Augusta County, in Virginia, named from the parish in 

England. 
Steamboat Rock; town in Hardin County, Iowa, so named becau^^e there is a large 

rock in the river near which resembles a steamboat in form. 
Steamboat Springs; town in Routt County, Colorado, so named because of the 

sound which issues from an opening in the rocks. 

BuU. 268—05 19 



290 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 258. 

Steams; county in Minnesota, named for Charles T. Steams, a member of the State 

legislature. 
Steel; mountain in Washington, named for William (4. Steel, of Portland, Oregon. 
Steele; counties in Minnesota and North Dakota, named for Franklin Steele, a res- 
ident of Minneapolis, a town-site promoter. 
Steele; village in Jefferson Ck)unty, Nebraska, named for D. M. Steele, a railroad 

man. 
Steeleville; village in Randolph County, Illinois, named for the man who built 

the first mill in the settlement 
Steelton; borough in Dauphin County, Pennsylvania, named from the steel works. 
Steelville; city in Crawford County, Missouri, named from the mines near by. 
Steen; mountain in Oregon, named for Col. Enoch Steen. 
Steilacoom; town in Pierce County, Washington, named for an Indian tribe. 
Stephens; county in Texas, name<l for Alexander H. Stephens, the American 

statesman. 
Stephenson; county in Illinois, named for Col. Benjamin Stephenson of the War 

of 1812. 
Stephenson; village in Menominee C^ounty, Michigan, named for Robert Stephenson. 
Scephentown; town in Rensselaer County, New York, named for Stephen van 

Rensselaer. 
Steptoe; town in Whitman County, Washington, named for Colonel Steptoe, United 

States Anuy. 
Sterling'; township and city in Whiteside County, Illinois, named for Colonel 

Sterling, of Pennsylvania. 
Sterlings; city in Rice County, Kansas, named for Sterling Rosan, father of C. W. 

and J. II. D. Rosan, early settlers. 
Sterling; town in Worcester County, Massachusetts, named for liDrd Sterhng, an 

American general. 
Sterling; county in Texas, named for a noted frontierBman. 
Sterlingburg; village in Jefferson County, New York, named for James Sterling, 

the builder of an iron furnace there. 
Stetson; town in Penobscot County, Maine, named for the original proprietor, 

Ama8a Stetson. 
Steuben; county in Indiana, town in Washington County, Maine, and county, and 

town in Oneida County, in New York; 
Steubenville; city in Jefferson County, Ohio. Named for Baron von Steuben, a 

Prussian soldier who fought in the American Revolution. 
Stevens; town in Kem County, California, and county in Kansas, named for Thad- 

deuH Stevens. 
Stevens; counties in Minnesota and Washington, named for Isaac I. Stevens, gov- 
ernor of Washington Territory in 1853. 
Stevens; Ktream in Caledonia County, Vermont, named for Capt. Phineas Stevens. 
Stevenson; mountain, and island in Yellowstone Lake, named for James Stevenson, 

of the United States Geological Survey. 
Stevens Point; city in Portage County, Wisconsin, named for the Rev. J. D. Stevens, 

misnionary to the Indians. 
Stevensville; village in Berrien County, Michigan, named for Thomas L. Stevens, 

who laid out the town. 
Stevensville; town in Ravalli County, Montana, named for Isaac I. Stevens, the 

first governor of Washington. 
Stewart; county in Georgia, named for Gen. Daniel Stewart. 
Stewart; county in Tennessee, name<l for Duncan Stewart. 
Stewartstown; town in Coos County, New Hampshire, named for John Stewart^ 

one of the original proprietors. 



GAKKBTT.l PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 291 



i; city in Dekalb County, Missouri, named for Rol)ert M. Stewart, a 
former governor. 

Stilesville; village in Hendricks County, Indiana, named for Jeremiah Stiles, the 
proprietor. 

StiHTnan Valley; village in Ogle County, Illinois, named for Gen. Joshua Stillman, 
an officer of the Black Hawk war. 

Stillwater; city in Washington County, MinneK)ta, nanuMl for a lumlxr com|)any 
which selected this site for its mill. 

Stillwater; town in Saratoga County, New York, so name<l because of the ** still 
water" in the Hudson River near the town. 

Stockbridge; town in Berkshire County, Massachusetts, named from Stockbridge 
in England. 

Stockbridge Bowl; lake in the town of Stockbridge, Berkshire County, Massachu- 
setts, situated in a depression in the surrounding hills and mountains. 

Stockport; town in Columbia County, New York, and W&yne County, Pennsyl- 
vania, named from the town in England. 

Stockton; cities in San Joaquin County, California, and Cedar County, Missouri, 
and town in Chautauqua County, New York, named for Commodore R. F. 
Stockton, who participated in the conquest of California. 

Stockton; city in Rooks County, Kansas, named from the city in California. 

Stockton; borough in Hunterdon County, New Jersey, named for a resident family. 

Stockville; village in Frontier County, Nebraska, so named because stock raising 
was an important industry. 

Stoddard; county in Missouri, named for Amos Stoddard, a military officer and 
author. 

Stoddard; town in Cheshire County, New Hampshire, named for Col. Samson Stod- 
dard, one of the original proprietors. 

Stokes; county in North Carolina, name<l for Col. John Stokes, a Revolutionary 
officer. 

Stone; county in Arkansas, name^l for Gen. T. J. (Stonewall) Jackson. 

I Stone; county in Missouri; 
Stonebam; town in Middlesex County, Massachusetts. So named because of the 
sterile soil. 
Stonefort; township in Saline County, Illinois, named from an old stone fort sup- 
posed to have been built for protection against Indians. 
Stonewall; county in Texas and town in Pamlico County, North Carolina, named 

for Gen. T. J. (Stonewall) Jackson. 
Storey; county in Nevada, named for Colonel Storey, killed in battle with the 

Pyramid I^ke Indians. 
Story; county in Iowa, named for Judge Joseph Stor}', of the Supreme Court. 
Stougbton; town in Norfolk County, Massachusetts, named for William Stoughton, 

lieutenant-governor and chief justice of the province. 
Stougbton; city in Dane County, Wisconsin, named for Luke Stoughton, who platted 

the village. 
Stoutsville; village in Monroe County, Missouri, named for Robert P. Stout, of 

Kentucky. 
Stow; town in Middlesex County, Massachusetts, named from the town in England. 
Stow; township in Summit County, Ohio, named for Judge Jonathan Stow. 
Stoystown; borough in Somerset County, Pennsylvania, named for an early settler 

and Revolutionary soldier, John Stoy. 
Strafford; county in New Hampshire, named from the town in England. 
Straaburg; town in Tuscarawas County, Ohio, and borough in Lancaster County, 

Pennsylvania, named from the city in Go f immy . X »/ o-a^ « \. 



292 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bcll. 258. 

Stratford; town in Faiiiield County, Connecticat, named by an early English settler 

from his native town Stratford-on-Avon. 
Stratton; town in Windham County, Vermont, named for Samuel Stratton, an early 

settler of Vernon. 
Strawberry Point; town in Clayton County, Iowa, so named bacanse of an abun- 
dance of these berries. 
Streator; city in Lasalle County, Illinois, named for Worthy S. Streator, of Cleve- 
land, Ohio. 
Streeter; creek in Nansemond County, Virginia, named for a resident family. 
Streetsboro; township in Portage County, Ohio, named for David Street, an early 

settler. 
Stromsburg^; city in Polk County, Nebraska, named by a Swedish colony from a 

suburb of Stockholm. 
Strong; creek in Humboldt County, California, named for an early settler. 
Strong; city in Chase County, Kansas, named for W. B. Strong, president, Atchison, 

Topeka and Santa Fe Railroad Company. 
Strong; town in Franklin County, Maine, named for Caleb Strong, United States 

Senator. 
Strongsville; townnhip in Cuyahoga County, Ohio, named for John S. Strong. 
Strother; town in Monroe County, Missouri, named for Prof. French Strother. 
Stroudsburg; borough in Monroe County, Pennsylvania, named for Col. Jacob 

Stroml, its first settler. 
Stuart; township and city in Guthrie County, Iowa, named for Capt Charles Stuart, 

of Vermont. 
Stuart; village in Holt County, Nebraska, named for Peter Stuart, an early settler. 
Sturbridge; town in Worcester County, Massachusetts, named from Stourbridge, 

England. 
Sturgeon; town in Boone County, Missouri, named for Isaac H. Sturgeon, of 

St. Louis. 
Sturgeon Bay; city in Door County, Wisconsin, named from the bay, which abounds 

with this fish. 
Sturgris; town in St. Joseph County, Michigan, named from the prairie which was 

name<l for Judge John Sturgis, first settler. 
Sturgia; city in Meade County, South Dakota, named for Col. Samuel Sturgis, of 

the Seventh U. S. Cavalrv. 
Stutsman; county in North Dakota, named for Hon. Enoch Stutzman, a pioneer 

settler prominent in the State's history. 
Stuyvesant; town in Columbia County, New York, named for Governor Peter 

Stuyvesant. 
Suamico; river in Wisconsin. An Indian word meaning "yellow sand." 
Subeet; town in Solano County, California. A combination of **sugar" and "beet," 

from its location in the sugar-beet raising district. 
Sublett; town in Cassia County, Idaho, named for Captain Sublette, a partner in the 

Ro<!ky Mountain Fur Comi>any. 
Sublette; Ujwnship and villas in Lee County, Illinois, so named because of the 

subletting of the contract for the grading on that part of the Illinois Central 

Railroad. 
Succaaunna; town in Morris County, New Jersey, in a locality famous for its iron 

ore. Derived from the Indian mkeUy "black,** and aclmiriy "stone;** hence 

"place where bla(^k stone is found.*' 
Sudbury; town in Midiliesex County, Massachusetts, named from the town in 

England. 
Suffern; town in Rockland County, New York, named from the Suffem family, 

which owned considerable property in the county. 



OANXETT.l PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 293 

Buf&eld; town in Hartford Coonty, Connecticut, originally calle<l Soiithfield, and 
mtuated in MaBsachiisetto; so named because ** being the southemmoet towne that 
either at present or is like to be in that county." 

Suffolk; counties in Massai'husetts and New York, and town in Nansemond County, 
Vin^nia, named from the county in England. 

Bu^ar; creek in North and South Carolina, named for the Indian tribe Sugaref. 

Bug^arpine; lumber town in Tuolumne County, California, so nameil for \ti^ hn^ium 
in the sugar-pine forest^i. 

Buiaun; town in Solano County, California, named from an Indian tribe. The 
wonl means **big expanse*." 

Bullivan; township and city in Moultrie County, Illinois, named by the county 
commissioners, who desired to associate the name with Moultrie, from Fort 
Moultrie on Sullivan Island, Charleston harbor, South Carolina. 

Bullivan; county and town in Indiana, named for Daniel Sullivan, killed by the 
Indians when bearing messages from Captain Clark, alter the capture of Vin- 
cennes. 

Bullivan; county, and town in Franklin County, in Missouri, named from the county 
in Tennessee. 

Bullivan; town in Hancock County, Maine, named for an original proprietor. 

Bullivan; county, and town in Cheshire County, in New Iiam|)flhire, county, and 
town in Madison County, in New York, and counties in Pennsylvania and Ten- 
nessee, named for Maj. Gen. John Sullivan, of the Revolutionary War. 

Bully; county in South Dakota, named for Alfred Sully, who commande<l a brigade 
in Dakota. 

Sulphur Springs; town in Hopkins County, Texas, so named because of its local 
features. 

Summer; lake in Oregon, so called because of the warm weather which was experi- 
enced there by the Fremont party. 

Summerfleld; city in Marshall County, Kansa^i, named for £. Summerfield, of Law- 
rence, Kansas. , 

Summers; county in West Virginia, named for George W. Summers, congressman 
from Virginia. 

Summerville; town in Dorchester County, South Carolina, so named because it is 
a summer resort for residents. 

Siunmit; county in Colorado, town in Pike County, Mississippi, city in Union 
County, New Jersey, and county in Ohio. So named l)e(»U8e of the elevated 
situation. 

Summit; village in Cook County, Illinois, nameil from its location on high land 
between two streams. 

Summit; county in Utah, so named because of its mountains. 

Summit Hill; lx)rough in Carbon County, Pennsylvania, so name<l l)ecause of the 
elevation. 

Sumner; county in Kansas, named for Charles Sumner, the American statesman. 

Sumner; town in Oxford County, Maine, named for Governor Increase Sumner. 

Sumner; county in Tennessee, named for Col. Jethro Sunnier. 

Sumter; counties in Alabama, Florida, and Georgia, and county, town in same 
county, and fort in Charleston Harbor, in South Carolina, named for Gen. Thomas 
Sumter, an officer of the Revolutionary war. 

Sunapee; lake in New Hampshire. From an Indian word, shehunk-nippe, ''wild 
goose pond." 

Sunapee; U)wn in Sullivan County, and mountain in New Hampshire, named from 
the lake. 

Sunbury ; borough in Northumberland County, Pennsylvania, named fnmi a village 
on the Thames. 



2^.)4 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 258. 

Suncook; river in New Hampshire. From an Indian word, srhunk-auke, meaning 

"jfoone place." 
Sunderland; town in Franklin County, Massachusette, named for Charles Spencer, 

Karl of Sunderland. 
Sunflower; river and county in Mississippi, no doubt descriptively named. 
Sun Prairie; town in Dane County, Wisconsin, so named bec^ause a party of pioneers, 

after a nine days' tramp over the prairies in the rain, came to this spot as the 

Hun C4inie out. 
Superior; lake in Michigan. Translation of the original French name, Uw mph-ieur, 

"up|K»r lake." 
Superior; city in Douglas County, Wisconsin, located on the border of Lake Supe- 

rii»r; hence the name. 
Surprise; criH»k in Yellowstone Park, so named because recent explorations find 

\\» ct»unk» diffenmt than was fonnerly 8up{)Osed. 
Surry; t\»unty in North Carolina, named for Lord Surry, an advocate of American 

inde|HMulemv. 
Surry; ti>wn in Chenhire County, New Hampshire, and county in Vii);inia, named 

ifxnw the (xmnty in Kngland. 
Survey; in^ak in the Yellowstone Park, Wyoming, so named because a signaling 

|M>int fi>r the Indiana. 
Susp4»cau|rh; stn^am in New Jersey. A Delaware Indian word meaning ''muddy 

water." 
SutquehAuna; river, ixmnty, and borough in same county, in Pennsylvania. From 

an Ihilian won!, suckahnnne^ ** water." 
SuM^x; (HtuutieH in I>elaware, New Jersey, and Vii^ginia, named from the county in 

Kngland. 
Suiro; villagt* in Lyon County, Nevada, named for Adolph Sutro. 
Sutt«»r; *H»unty, and town in same county, in California, named for Col. John Sutter, 

oh whtM' land the first gold wa8 discovered in California by John MarshalL 
Suttuu; town in Worcester County, Massachusetts, named from the town in England. 
Sutiou; city in (May County, Nebraska, and town in Merrimack County, New Hamp- 

tk\\\t\\ uhuuhI fn»m the town in Massachusetts. 
SuUon; tiumty in Texas, named for Lieutenant-Colonel Sutton, of the army of the 

(\»hliMlenu\v. 
SltWMUt»«>: iHumty, town in same county, and river in Florida, and creek and town 

lu 1»>\ innett County, Geoi^gia. Interpretations of this Indian word are various, 

JMit it m^MUM to 1h^ derived from sauxini, meaning **echo" or "echo river." 
SwmIu; «H»unty in North Carolina, named for David L. Swain, an early governor. 
MwMtuMboro; town in Kinanuel County, Geoi^gia, named for Col. Stephen Swain, of 

tlt«« MItilr legiHIatun^ 
MWHMipMt'oit; town in Kssex County, Massachusetts. Various derivations are given 

lhl» w«»mI from the Indiam word, Winmenquammukej ''pleasant water place;" 

liMHi tn'Htfin oiiifid'f "rtMl nwk," or **at the red rock;" or from another Indian 

HKfd i»w«iiln« "broken waU^rs." 
|IWH«HOiHM»», ntnmni and town in Huncoml)e County, North Carolina. A Cherokee 

Inill'iM Wiii'd nunuiing "Swali trail," the Swali or Sara being an ancient trail of 

MHhtMi N Ml til ('urolina. 
|IWH«««t***ro, Inwn In ( )nHlow County, North Carolina, probably so named on account 

hf llii> ttWHiiB friMiurntiiitf the neighborhood. 
|IWMO«»'«*j l»'^n» H» MnUA County, Massachusetts, named from the town in Wales. 
H4l«H«4M<ii> Ihwm ill ITiinklln (\mnty, Vermont, named for Capt William Swanton, 
tfi( mIMiii In thM HiitUh army l)efore the colonies gained their independence. 
HH*'HI»*i viMrtM*' !•» •''»'i«» C<>»i»ty, Pennsylvania, named for John L. Swan, its first 



GAXXKTT.l PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 295 

Swarthmore; borough in Delaware County, Pennsylvania, named from the dlHtrict 

in England. 
Sweathouae; creek in Ravalli Ciounty, Montana. A translation of ite Indian name 

(Flathead). The Indians built their sweathouses along the creek, believing its 

waters had medicinal qualities. 
Bwedeaboro; town in Gloucester County, New Jersey, so named because settleil by 

Swedes. 
Sweet Qraaa; county in Montana, name<l fn»m the sweet-grass hills. 
Sweet Bprixigs; city in Saline County, Missouri, so nameil l)ecause of its neighbor- 
ing springs. 
Sweetwater; town in Monroe County, Tennessee. Translation of an Indian word 

meaning ** crooked stream.'* 
Sweetwater; river in Wyoming, so naminl because its waters have a sweet taste. 
Sweetwater; county in Wyoming, named from the river. 
Sweiwonville; village in Alamance Coimty, North Carolina, named for Geoiye W. 

Swepson, a capitalist. 
Swift; county in Minnesota, named for Henry A. Swift, governor of the State in 

isas. 

Swisher; county in Texas, named for James G. Swisher, a signer of the Texas 

declaration of independencv. 
Switzerland; county in Indiana, named from the republic of Switzerland. 
Sycamore; township and city in Dekalb County, Illinois, nameil from the abun- 
dance of sycamore trees within its limits. 
Sylva; town in Jackson County, North Carolina, nameii for a prominent resident. 
Sylvan Grove; city in Lincoln County, Kansas, so named l)ecause situated near the 

Twin Groves, on the north bank of the Saline River. 
Synunes; town in Hamilton Omnty, Ohio, named for John Cleves Symmes, judge 

in the Northwest Territ4)ry. 
Syracuse; town in Hamilton County, Kansas. In 1873 a colony emigrated from 

Syracuse, New York, to Kansas, and gave their settlement the same name. 
Syracuse; village in OUie County, Nebraska, name<l from the city in New York. 
Syracuse; city in Onondaga County, New York, named from the ancient city of 

Sicily. 
Tabery ; village in Oneida County, New York, named from the iron-mining town in 

Sweden. 
Table Rock; village in Pawnee County, Nebraska, so named because situated near 

a large, fiat-top{)e<l rock. 
Tacoma; city in Pierce County, Washington. From the Indian name meaning 

** mountain.** 
Taconic; village in Fairfield County, Connecticut, and range of hills in Massachu- 
setts. An Indian word meaning "forest" or *' wilderness." 
Taghkanick; creek and village in Columbia C/Ounty, New York. An Indian word 

said to mean "there is water enough.** 
Tahoe; lake in California and Nevada. An Indian word meaning "big water.** 
Talbot; county in Georgia, named for Matthew Talbot, acting governor of the State 

in 1819. 
Talbot; county in Maryland, probably named for a son of Sir Rol)ert Talbot, of 

Ireland, who married Grace, the daughter of Sir George Calvert, the first Loni 

Baltimore, though same authorities state that it was named for the uncle of Lady 

Talbot. 
Talbott; village in Jefferson County, Tennessee, named for Col. John Talbott. 
Talhotton; town in Talbot County, Georgia, named for Matthew Talbot, acting 

governor of the State in 1819. 
Taliaferro; county in Georgia, nr med for Col. Benjamin Taliaferro. 



296 PLACE NAMES IN tHE UNltED 8TATE8. rBDLL.2r>8. 

Tallade^; county, and city in same county in Alabama. A Creek Indian name 
meaning **at the end,*' ** on the border," hence a town on the frontier. 

Tallahassee; city in Leon County, Florida. A Seminole Indian word meaning ''old 
town:*' so named because it is supposed to have been the site of Indian corn- 
fields in remote times. 

Tallahatchie; county in Mississippi, named from the principal branch of the Yazoo 
River in the same State. An Indian word meaning ** river of the rock/' 

Tallapoosa; county in Alabama and city in Haralson County, Georgia, named from 
the river. 

Tallapoosa; river in Georgia and Alabama. An Indian word meaning ''swift cur- 
rent/* or, according to other authorities, "stranger** or "newcomer.** 

Talleyville; village in Newcastle County, Delaware, named for the Talley family, 
earlv residentj*. 

Tallmadge; township in Summit County, Ohio, named for Col. Benjamin Tallmadge, 
an original land proprietor. 

Tama; county in Iowa. An Indian word meaning "beautiful,** "pleasant,** 
** lovely/* or the name of the wife of the Indian chief Poweshiek. Still another 
authority states that it is name<l for a chief whose name meant "bear whose 
voice makes the n-H'ks tremble.** 

Tamalpais; village and mountain in Marin County, California. A Spanish word 
meaning ''region of the Tamal Indians.** 

Tamanend; village in Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania, named for a celebrated 
lVlawan» Indian chief, better known as Tammany, the word meaning "beaver- 
like/* t»r 'amiable.** 

Tamaqua; U^rough in Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania. From an Indian word 
meaning **l»eaver stream.*' 

Tamaroa; village in Perry County, Illinois, named from a tribe of Illinois Indians. 

Tampa; city in lIiHsl>oro Ci>unty and bay on the west coast of Florida. From the 
Indian woni i/»m/>i. meaning "close to it,** or "near it.** 

Tampico: township and village in Wliiteside County, Illinois^ named from Tampico 
in Mexiiv. 

Tau^y; ivunty in Missouri, nameil for Roger B. Taney, chief justice of the United 
Static 

Tauyipahoa; river, i^arish, and town in same parish, in Louisiana, named for an 
Indian trilH\ the wonl meaning "those who gather maize stalks.** 

Taukhaiina, cret^k in IVunsyhimia. A Delaware Indian word meaning "smaller 
xlriHUu/* 

Ta\»pi; village' iu Mower County, Minnesota, said to be named for a Sioux Indian 
K'Uwi \s\\K> U^friendtni the whites in the Minnesota massacre, 1862, the word 
lutvimng ''woundtHl/* 
Ta|>|>au; town in Uarrisim County, Ohio; 

Tap>>autowu; villagt^ in Rockland County, New York. Said to be from an 
IhdlMu w\»r\l mwining "(H)ld stream.** 

Tav. **»tH»k in Ventura C^ounty, California, named from theasphaltum deposits. 

«^av. »»v**»' i"» North Cartel ina; 

Tl^rlHUV. town in Kdge<H>ml)e County, North Carolina. Named from the river, 
wUwU i^HHMvtnl its name on account of the tar made upon its banks by early 
«H»l\Miiiil «*»ttlorH. Whwler gives the origin of the name of the river as from 
\Uv liuhuu wonl 6iM, "river of health.** 

^VaiiMauiu. lHii>»ngh in Alliyheny county, Pennsylvania, named from the city of 

iSMmil^' iit Italy. 
Vh»IiI*» lo\>M««hlp. «'H,v. and river in Ati^hison County, in Missouri. Anindianword 
tm^hlHM "dimouli tofonl/* 



QAWncTT.l PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 297 



;; coanty in Texas, named for an early nettler pniininent in politics after the 

annexation. 
Tarrant; creek in Vii^ginia, named for the family who owned much land along ita 

Western border. 
Tarryall; peak and stream in Colorado, so named because of the rich placern found 

along the latter. 
Tarrytown; village in Westchester County, New York. A modification of its 

fonner name of terwen, *' wheat town," given on account of its large crops of 

that cereal. 
Tatamy; borough in Northampton County, Pennsylvania, named for u chief of the 

Delaware Indians who was prominent in the colonial history of the State. 
Tate; county in Mississippi, named for a prominent family, of which T. S. Tate was 

a member. 
Tatonka; village in £llsworth County, KansaM. A Sioux Indian word meaning 

"buffalo." 
Tattnall; county in Georgia, named for Josiah Tattnall, an early governor. 
Tatiun; town in Marll>oro County, South Carolina, named for a resiclent family. 
Taunton; river, and city in Bristol County, Mai<8iu*husett^, name<l from the t4)wn in 

England. 
Tawas; city in Iosco County, Michigan. A contraction of tnimvny "trader." 
Tawawa; town in Shelby County, Ohio. An Indian word meaning "trader." 
Taycheedah; villagt* in Fond du Lac County, Winctmsin, so name<l l)ecause of the 

Indian camp made upon I^ke Winnebago. An Indian wonl meaning "lake 

camp." 
Taylor; town in Shasta County, and peak in Humboldt C<^)unty, California, name<l 

for an earlv settler. 
Taylor; counties in Florida, CJeorgia, Iowa, and Kentucky, and towns in Cortland 

County, New York, and Williamson County, Texa.M, name<i for Gen. Zachary 

Taylor. 
Taylor; town in I^fayette County, Mississippi, nameii for an early settler. 
Taylor; county in Texas*, named for a family of early settlers. 
Taylor; county in West Virginia, name<l for John Taylor, of Caroline County, 

Virginia. 
Taylor; county in Wisconsin, named for David Taylor, justice of the supreme court. 
Taylor Center; villagt* in Wayne County, Michigan, named for Gen. Zachary Taylor. 
Taylor Ridge; mountains in Floyd County, Georgia, named for Richard Taylor, a 

Cherokee chief, who lived near their base. 
Taylors Falls; villajje in Chisago County, Minnesota, named for one of the first 

settlers, member of the Northwest Lumber Com|>any. 
Taylorsville; village in Bartholomew County, Indiana, named for Gen. Zachary 

Taylor. 
Taylorsville; town in Spencer County, Kentucky, named for Richard Taylor, the 

former proprietor of the land. 
Taylorsville; town in Alexander County, North Carolina, named for John L. Tay- 
lor, a former judge of the State. 
Taylorsville; village in Muskingum County, Ohio, named for James Taylor, who 

laid it out. 
Taylorville; township and city in Christian County. Illinois, nameil for John 

Taylor, one of the commissioners who locatetl the county seat. 
Tazewell; village in Marion County, Geoi^ia, and county, and town in same county, 

in Virginia, named for Senator Henry Tazewell of Virginia. 
Tazewell; county in Illinois, name<l for Governor LittleUm W. Tazewell, of Virginia, 

1834-1836. 



298 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 258. 

Tchemanahaut; stream in Hot Springs County, Arkansas. A corruption of the 

French chemin en hautf **high road.*' 
Tecumseh; village in Lenawee County, Michigan, cities in Johnson County, 

Nebraska, and Pottawatomie County, Oklahoma, and several other places named 

for the Shawnee chief. The name refers to a panther, and figuratively to a 

shooting star. 
Tehachapi; ti>wn and pass in Kern County, California, nameil for the Indian tribe 

Ta hi rha jnt han na. 
Tehama; countv in California. The name is derived from one of the Indian 

lan^uageH, and is said to mean ''high water.** The name was applied from the 

fact that at certain seasons the Sacramento River overflowed its banks at this 

}ioint, partially subn^erging the settlement. 
Tejon; {K^st-othtv, fort, and mountain pass in Kern County, California. A Spanish 

wonl meaning **ltfuiger.*' 
Tekonsha; village in Calhoun County, Michigan, named for the Indian chief of the 

tril)e who fonnerly occupie<l the town site. 
Telfair; iN^unty in (leorgia, named for Edward Telfair, one oif the early governors 

of the State. 
Tell City; city in IVrry County. Indiana, named by its Swiss colonists for William 

Tell. 
Teller; ixnintv, and town in Mineral Countv, in Colorado, named for Senator Teller of 

the State. 
Telluride; town in San Miguel County, Colorado, named from the ore found in ttie 

vicinitv. 
Temeacal; town in Riverside County, California. From a Spanish word meaning 

** sweat houj^',*' 
Temple; town in llillsUm^ County. New Hampshire, nameti for John Temple, a 

n»lative of Hiirl Temple, of Kngland. 
Temple; city in IVll i\nmiy. Texa:^ named for Major B. M. Temple. 
Templet on; town in Wt^nvt^ter County, MaAVi-husettii, said to have been named 

for Karl Temple. 
Tenafly; U»r^njgh in Benjen C^mnty, New Jerwy. A Dutch word meaning "at the 

Tenaaillihe^: island in ihe Columlna River. Oregon. .\n Indian word meaning 

*'liltle Innd." 
Teniuo; lo>in in Thurston County. Washington. name«l for an Indian tribe. 
Tenley; >«l^tation in W,^hingttm. IV i\ Nanie^l for two sisters, w«a\-eri% who 

livt\l ut^r the \»ld loU-cate^ 
T«»nne>as«M»; Siatc oi the rn:on, anvl a tribuiary oi the Ohio River. The wof>I is of 

l'hci\*k«v or,j:ui. Iviua: llie iuiuh^ of ?!^Vf ral iv^nuer s^tkmenti? of that tribe, bat 

hjis K^i i:> itit'ciniiii:. acetni^^^l int^-rprv^iations Iving pon^Iy laDcifol. 
Tenut^asMH^. loxi^tsitip and \tlUjee in MoIX^noufb C^^xonty, Illinots. named fiom the 

iwtixc State M rt5i jxHMuUrs^ 
Ten»aa; }v^rl>h ::x l.yv%;i>uAtkk s^asiwnI i^^mt a trilv «* Indtans now extincl. 
I^MkcalU; :r,v''/.ti:a:» ir^ i\«U'r*klv\ s*.^ :vA:iit\i Sx-auis^^ sha|^ like a Mexican pynunid. 
^NrT«K>nne. ttjir'>^;x :u l.^>t:\>ia:uu :uuiu>l :v>f- a p«M>^ in Oan^Ja. A French name 

Twr^i^ Haut^. x"a> iu V-,^^ i\»tir.:y. hKittna. btuJt up^^t a ^«&k ^ feel above the 

T#rfvll. »i\v.:'.i:\ lu xitv^rtfU. rju;:^i kht IV Wiluauu Tv^rjviL an ««rlT member of 

i\*it,*:?v>j^ :rvNVt ?iia! S«i:e. 
TVrt^IV o':> it Kav,t:vjk:i \\>tu^5>, re\*fv smuxi^vI >.r Caj^c. R»^<«nt A. Tem^L. the 

l^iR^ ll«ar. x-nw^ in AriiaaMfes^ A »vo<^ aattue summouiip ^^ bfaiick buid.'* 



CASTtm,} PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 299 

Terrill; mountain in Utah, named for the wife of J. II. Rt^nehuwo, of the Tnitecl 

States (Teologii-al Survey. 
Terry; town in Hinds CV>unty, MisHiwiippi, naine<l for Bill Terry, a resident. 
Terry; county in Texas, named for Frank Terry, commander of the Texas Ran^rs 

in the civil war. 
Terryville; village in Litchfield County, Connecticut, named for a manufacturer of 

wooden clocks in the village. 
Teton; town in Fremont C<»unty, I<laho, county, river, and mountain in Montana, 

and range of mountains in Wyoming, nanunl for a division of the Sioux trilie, 

whose name was variously written 7V/on, TV/on, or TitoiiiiUy and means *' prairie 

dwellers." 
Teutopolia; village in Effingham County, Illinois, originally settled by a colony of 

Germans from Cincinnati. From Teuton^ an ancient tril>e of Germans, and 

opolis. 
Tewksbury; town in Middlesex County, Massachusetts, probably named from the 

town in England. 

i; city in Miller County, Arkansas, near the lK)rder betw(»en Arkansas 

and Texas. The name i.M a combination of these two names. 
i; lan^t State of the Union. The generally a<'cepted version of the name is 

that it is an Indian word used as a token of friemlship. 
i; county in Missouri, named from the Ki^public of Texas. 
Thames; river in (Connecticut, named fnnn the river in England. 
Thatchers; island in Massachusetts, named for Anthony Thacher, who was ship- 
wrecked there in 1635. 
Thayer; city in Neosho County, Kansas, named for Nathaniel Thayer, of Boston. 
Thayer; county in Nebraska, nametl for Governor John M. Thayer. 
The Clips; ridge of hills extending from the Adirondack Mountains into Fulton 

County, New York. From the German il7i/>;>f, meaning ** high, steep rocks." 
The Dalles; city in Wasco County, Oregon, named for the rapids, or ** dalles" in 

the Columbia River, near which the citv is located. 
The Oeysers; town in Sonoma County, California, named from the hot springs. 
Theresa; town in Jefferson County, New York, name<l for the daughter of James 

Le Ray de Chaumont. 
Thermal; town in Riverside County, California, named from the hot springs. 
Thibodaux; town in Lafourche Parish, Ix)uisiana, nanuHl for H. 8. Thibodeaux. 
Thielsen; mountain in Oregon, named for Hans Thielsen, chief engineer of the 

Oregon and California Railroad. 
Thomas; county in Georgia, named for Gen. Jett Thomas. 
Thomas; county in Kansas, nanicnl for Maj. Gen. George H. Thomas. 
Thomas; mountains in Utah, nameil for Col. L. Thomas. 
Thomasboro; village in Cham()aign County, Illinois, named for John Thomas, an 

early settler. 
Thomaston; town in LitchGeld County, ConntHJticut, named for a family of 

inanufa(!turers. 
Thomaston; town in Upson County, Georgia, named for Gen. Jett Thomas. 
Thomaston; town in Knox County, Maine, named for Gen. John Thomas, of Mas- 
sachusetts. 
Thomasville; town in Thomas County, Georgia, named for Gen. Jett Thomas. 
Thomasville; town in Davidson County, North Carolina, nameil for State senator 

Thomas. 
Thompson; township in Geauga County, Ohio, named for Matthew Thompson, of 

Connecticut. 
Thomdike; town in Waldo Comity, Maine, named for Thomas Thorndike, one of 

the original proprietors. 



300 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 258. 

Thornton; town in Holmes County, Mississippi, named for Dr. C. C. Thornton, a 

large landowner. 
Thornton; town in Grafton County, New Hampshire. Probably named for three 

brothers, Thornton, early settlers, but by some credited to Hon. Mathew 

Thornton. 
Three Oaks; village in Berrien County, Michigan; so named on account of three 

large oaks near the village. 
Three Rivers; peak in Yellowstone Park, Wyoming; so named because the three 

rivers, Gallatin, Madison, and Gardiner, take their rise on its slopes. 
Three Rivers; city in St. Joseph County, Michigan; so named l)ecau8e situate<l at 

the junction of the St. Joseph, Portage, and Rocky rivers. 
Throckmorton; county in Texas, named for Dr. William E. Throckmorton, one 

of the first pioneers of northern Texas. 
Throgs Neck; cape in Westchester County, New York, named for John Throck- 

mortrjn, an original patentee. 
Throop; town in Cayuga County, New York, named for Hon. Enos T. Throop, 

governor. 
Thurman; town in Warren County, New York, named for John Thurman. 
Thurston; county in Nebraska, named for Senator John M. Thurston. 
Thurston; town in Steuben County, New York, named for William R. Thurston, 

a landholder. 
Thurston; county in Washington, named for Samuel R. Thurston, Delegate to 

Congress from Oregon Territory. 
Tia Juana; post-office in San Diego County, California. The Spanish form of **Aunt 

Jane." 
Tibbetts; creek in Westchester County, New York, named for the family who 

have owned the adjoining land for one hundred and thirty years. 
Tibee; creek in Mississippi. For derivation see Oktibbeha. 
Tiburon; inland in the Gulf of California. A Spanish word meaning '^ shark.'' 
Ticonderoga; town in Essex County, New York. Said to be a modification of the 

Indian word ddderogo, '* sounding waters;" other meanings given are ** brawl- 
ing water," or "noisy." 

Tidioute; borough in Warren County, Pennsylvania. An Indian word meaning, 

acconling to one authority, "see far," and according to others, "straight water" 

and "cluster of islands." 
Tiffin; city in Seneca County, Ohio, named for Edward Tiflin, the first governor of 

the State. 
Tillery; town in Halifax County, North Carolina, named for a prominent citizen. 
Tilton; town in Belknap County, New Hampshire, named for Charles £. Tilton, of 

New York. 
Tiltonsville; town in Jefferson County, Ohio, named for a family of early pro- 
prietors. 
Timmonsville; town in Florence County, South Carolina, named for the Timmona 

familv. 
Tin Cup; town in Gunnison County, Colorado, so named because in its early day^, 

when a mining camp, gold was so plentiful that it was measured in a tin cup. 
Tintah; town in Traverse County, Minnesota. From a Sioux Indian word meaning 

"prairie." 
Tinton Falls; town in Monmouth County, New Jersey. Corruption of Tintem, 

Monmouthshire, England, 
Tioga; county ir New York, county and l)orough in same county in Pennsylvania, 

and river traversing lK)th SUitcs. An Indian word given various interpretations, 

" at the forks," "swift current," and "gate." 



GAXSETTl PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 301 

Tioinati; tributarj- of tlie St. l^wrence River, in New York. An Indian woni, 

meaning ** Ijeyond the point*' 
Tiougrhnio^; river in central New York. An Indian word meaning '* meeting of 

the waters.** 
Tippah; county in Mississippi, named for the wife of Pontotoc, a Chickasaw Indian 

chief, the word meaning ** cut off.** 
Tippecanoe; river and county in Indiana, and village in Harrison County, Ohio. 

From an Indian word given the various meanings of **at the great clearing,** 

** long-lipped pike," and *M)uffalo fish.** 
Tipton; county, and city in same county, in Indiana, named for Gen. John Tipton, 

Senator from Indiana. 
Tipton; county in Tennessee, named for Capt. Jacob Tipton, father of Gen. Jacob 

Tipton. 
Tiflbury; town in Dukes County, Massachusetts, named from the town in England. 
Tishomingt); county in Mississippi, named for the king of the Chickasaw Indians, 

the name meaning "warrior chief.** 
Tiflhtang^; creek in Humboldt County, California, fancifully named to suggest the 

sound of the water. 
Tiskilwa; village in Bureau County, Illinois. Said to be derived from various 

Indian words with the meanings **plover,** **old boy,'* meaning a bachelor, and 

** beautiful valley.*' 
Titonka; village in Kossuth County, Iowa. A Sioux Indian word meaning ''big 

house.** 
Titus; county in Texas, named for James Titus, a prominent citizen. 
Titnsville; town in Brevard County, Florida, named for its founder, Colonel Titus, 

who was a leader in the Kansas crusade. 
TituBville; city in Crawford County, Pennsylvania, named for Jonathan Titus, the 

former owner of the town site. 
Tivoli; village in Duchess County, New York, named from the town in Italy. 
Tobesofka; creek in Georgia, so named because an Indian lost a dish of meal while 

crossing it. tSofkee, meaning "dish of meal,** and /o6«, **I have lost.** 
Tobyhanna; stream in Lehigh County, Pennsylvania, thickly banked with alder 

bushes. A Delaware Indian word meaning "alder stream.** 
Tocomo; river in Florida. A transposition of Tomoco, alias Timucus, a former 

tribe of that region. 
Todd; county in Kentucky, named for Col. John Todd. 
Todd; county in Minnesota, named for Gen. John B. To<id, of the Regular Army, 

commander at Fort Ripley, Maine, 1849-1856. 
Tohickon; stream in Bucks County, Pennsylvania. A Delaware Indian word mean- 
ing "driftwood stream,** or "stream with a driftwood bridge.** 
Toledo; town in Cumberland County, Illinois, named from the city in Ohio. 
Toledo; city in Lucas County, Ohio, named from the city in Sfxain. 
Tolland; county in Connecticut. The name is transferreil from England. 
Tolly; point at the junction of Severn River and Chesapeake Bay, Maryland, where 

Captain Tolly was wrecked. 
Tolono; township and village in Champaign County, Illinois; a name coined by the 

founders for individuality. 
Toluca; city in Marshall County, Illinois, named by the founders from Toluca in 

Mexico. 
Tomah; city and town in Monroe County, Wisconsin, named for a chief of the 

Menominee Indians. 
Tomahawk; town in Searcy County, Arkansas, and city in Lincoln County, 

Wisconsin. From tomaliuwk, or iotnakkan, the Indian hatchet. 



302 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. Ibcll. 258. 

Tomasaki; niountjiin in Utah, named for a Ute Indian. 

Tom Ball; iiiountain i?i the town of We8t Stockbridge, Berkshire County, Massa- 
chusetts, named for an early inhabitant living near the mountain. 

Tombicon; stream in Bucks County, Pennsylvania. A Delaware Indian word 
meaning '* place of crab apples." 

Tombigbee; river in Mississippi. Derived from the Indian Uumtn-hikjief *' coffin 
makers.*' 

Tombstone; town in Pima County, Arizona, so named by its founder, because 
when starting out on his prospei^ting tour he was assured he would '*find his 
tombstone." 

Tome; village in Valencia County, New Mexico. A contraction of Santo Tomis, 
Spanish for St. Thomas. 

Tom Green; county in Texas, name<l for Gen. Tom Green, distinguished in the early 
history of the State, and later in the civil war. 

Tomoka; river in Florida, named for an Indian tribe, the Tomoco or Timacos. 
Tompkins; county, and town in Delaware County, New York; 
Tompkinsville; villages in Monroe County, Kentucky, and Richmond County, 
New York. Named for Daniel D. Tompkins, governor of New York in 1807. 

Toms; river in Oirean County, New Jersey, 8ai<i to have been named for Capt 
William Tom, an early English settler. 

Tonawanda; stream, and town in Erie County, New York. An Indian word mean- 
ing '* swift water." 

Tonganoxie; town in I./eavenworth County, Kansas, named for a Delaware Indian 
who kept a stopping place near the present town site. 

Tonica; village in Lasalle County, Illinois, probably named from the Indian, the 
wonl said to mean ** place inhabited." 

Tonti; township and village in Marion County, Illinois, named for Tonti, the part- 
ner of I^ Salle. 

Tooele; county in Utah, so named on account of a species of rush which grows in 
the mountains. 

Topeka; village in Mason County, Illinois, and city in Shawnee County, Kansas. 
Said to be the Sioux or Omaha Indian name for the so-called '^Indian potato." 

Topsfield; town in Essex County, Massachusetts, named from the parish in England. 

Topsham; town in Sagadahoc County, Maine, named from the seaport in England. 

Toronto; township, and. city in \Voo<lson County, Kansas; village in Jefferson 
County, Ohio; and town in Deuel County, South Dakota. An Indian word 
meaning "oak tree rising from the lake." 

Torowcap; valley in Arizona. An Indian wonl meaning '* clayey locality." 

Torrey; jieak in Colorado, named for the botanist. 

Torrey; town in Yates County, New York, named for Henry Torrey. 

Torrington; town in Litchfield County, Connecticut, named from the town in 
England. 

Tortuga; town in San Diego County, California. A Spanish word meaning ** turtle." 

Totowa; Ix) rough in Passaic County, New Jersey. From the Indian word tomwd, 
moaning " to sink," **dive," or **go under water," as timbers do when carried 
over a waterfall. 

Totoganic; river in Wisconsin. An Indian word meaning "place of floating logs." 

Totoket; hill in New Be<iford, Massachusetts. Probably an Indian word meaning 
** on the great tidal river." 

Tottenville; village in Richmond County, New York, named for the Tottens, a 
family of early residents. 

Toulbah; mountain in Maine, in shape resembling a turtle. An Indian word mean- 
ing "turtle." 



OAKXirrr.l PLACE NAME8 IN THE UNITED STATES. 303 

Toulon; township and town in Stark OmniVf IllinoiH, nanie<l from a diP4X)ntinued 
poet-office in Tennesset*. 

Towali^; river in Georgia, so nanie<l, it is rlaimed, lH.H*anse the Indians roaste<l the 
scalps of the whites npon its lianks. From toirehggie^ meaning ** roaste<l 
scalps." 

Towanda; village in McLean County, Illinois, and borough in Bradford (^ounty, 
Pennsylvania. A Delaware Indian word meaning " where we Iniry the dead." 

Tower; city in Saint Louis County, Minnenota, name<l for the explorer of the Ver- 
million Iron Range. 

Tower City; town in C^ass County, North Dakota, and bonmgh in Schuylkill County, 
Pennsylvania, named for (^harlemagne Tower. 

Towner; county in North Dakota, named for O. M. Towner, a member of the Terri- 
torial council. 

Towns; county in Georgia, name<l for George W. B. Towns, former governor of the 
State. 

Townsend; town in Newcastle County, Delaware, named for Samuel Townsend, a 

laige land owner. 
Townsend; town in Middlesex County, Massachusetts; 

Townshend; town in Windham County, Vermont. Name<l for (.harles Townshend, 
a member of the ministry during (Tovernor Wentworth's term of office'. 

Townsend; town in Broadwater County, Montana, nanuMl for an official of the 

Northern Pacific Railroad. 
Towson; town in Baltimore County, Maryland, name<l for the family of which (ien. 

Nathan Towson was a meml)er. 
Tracy; city in San Joaquin County, California, and village in Piatt County, Missouri, 

named for an official of the Chicaj>o, Rock Island and Pacific Railroad. 
Traill; county in North Dakota, named for W. J. S. Trail, a representative of the 

Hudson Bay Company. 
Transylvania; county in North Carolina, so named on account of iis giH>graphical 

position — *' beyond the fon^st." 
Trappe; borough in i^Iontgoinery County, Pennsylvania, so name<l on aircount of 

the high Hteps which led up to one of the early taverns, designated by the Ger- 
man settlers as treppe. 
Travellers Rest; town in Gn»enville County, South Carolina, name<l for an inn 

situated there in early days. 
Traverse; county and lake in Minnesota; a translation of the Dakota (Sioux) name 

of the lake, referring to the transverse {wsition of this long lake across the course 

of the neighlx)ring long lakes — Big Stone and Lac qui Parle — and the Minni*8ota 

River. 
Traverse City; city in Grand Traverse County, Michigan. The name, meaning 

"lying across," was given by early French voyagers to an indentation of the 

coa^t line of Lake Michigan, which they were accu8tome<l to cross from headland 

to headland. 
Travis; county in Texas, named for Col. William B. Travis, one of Texas's most 

j>rominent men during its early days, who fell at the Alamo. 
Treadwell; bay in New York, named for Thomas Treadwell, an old resident. 
Treasury; mountain in Colorado, bo named on account of the mines which it 

contains. 
Trego; towns in Los Angeles and San Joaquin counties, California, in the wheat- 
growing districts. The Spanish form of "wheat." 
Trego; county in Kansas, named for Edward P. Tr^o, captain Company H, Eighth 

Kansas Regiment, killed during the civil war. 
Trempealeau; county, and village in same county, in Wisconsin, named from the 

island in the Mississippi River. 



304 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 258. 

Trempealeau; islaiul in the Mississippi River, designated by the French mant fiui 

trempe d, Venn meaning ** mountain which stands in the water." 
Trenton; township and city in Grundy County, Missouri, named from the city in 

New Jersey. 
Trenton; city in Mercer County, New Jersey, named for Col. William Trent, speaker 

of the assembly. 
Tres Pinos; town in San Benito County, California. A Spanish name meaning 

"three pines." 
Trexlertown; town in Lehigh County, Pennsylvania, named for John Trexler. 
Tribune; city in Greeley County, Kansas, named for the Tribune (New York), 

Greeley's newspaper. 
Trident; mesa in Colorado, so named because of the three spurs which rise from it. 
Tri^^; county in Kentucky, named for Col. Stephen Trigg, slain by the Indians at 

the battle of Blue Licks. 
Trimble; county in Kentucky, named for the Hon. Robert Trimble. 
Trinchera; creek in Colorado. A Spanish word meaning ** cut-bank river." 
Trinity; river in California, so named from the supposition of its first American 

explorers that it emptied into the Bay of Trinidad, which was entered by its 

Spanish discoverers on Trinity Sunday. 
Trinity; county in California, named from the river. 
Trinity; town in Randolph County, North Carolina, named from Trinity College, 

formerly located there. 
Trinity; river, and county, named for the river in Texas, named for the Triune GoiL 
Tripp; county in South Dakota, named for Bartlett Tripp, United States minister to 

Austria in 1893. 
Tropico; town in Los Angeles County, California. The Spanish form of * 'tropic." 
Troup; county in (ireorgia, named for Hon. George M. Troup, senator from that State. 
Trousdale; county in Tennessee, named for Governor William Trousdale. 
Troy; city in Pike County, Alabama, named for Alexander Troy, of Columbus 

County, North Carolina. 
Troy; cities in Doniphan County, Kansas; Pontotoc County, Mississippi; Rensselaer 

County, iVew York; Miami County, Ohio; and Bradford County, Pennsylvania, 

named from ancient Troy of Asia Minor. 
Troy; town in Montgomery County, North Carolina, named for Matthew Troy, a 

prominent lawyer. 
Truckee; river in California, named for the old Indian guide of General Fremont. 
Truesdale; town in Warren County, Missouri, named for Willitoi Truesdale, former 

owner of the town site. 
Trumansburg; village in Tompkins County, New York, named for the Tremaines, 

family of early settlers. 
Trumbull; county in Ohio, named for Jonathan Trumbull, first governor of Con- 
necticut, the land formerly being within Connecticut's Western Reserve. 
Truro; town in Barnstable County, Massachusetts, named from the town in England. 
Truxton; town in Cortland County, New York, named for Commodore Thomas 

Truxton. 
Tryon; town in Polk County, North Carolina, named for William Tryon, colonial 

governor. 
Tuckahoe; creek in New Jersey, probably named from the tuckahoe root. 
Tucker; village in Kankakee County, Illinois, named for J. T. Tucker, a railroad 

* ofKcial. 
Tucker; county in West Virginia, named for St. George Tucker, an eminent Vir- 
ginia jurist. 
Tucson; city in Pima County, Arizona, derived from an Indian word meaning 

" black creek." 



'iANsrrr.J PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 305 

Taftonboro; town in Carroll County, New HanipHhiro, name<l for J. Tuftun Mason, 

to whom the grant wan iiia<)e. 
Toknhnikavato; peak of the Sierra la Sal, in Utah, named for a Ute Indian. Tho 

word means '*dirt i«eer/* 
Tulare; ooanty, and city in name county, in California. An Indian word, *' place 

of tulea," or **plai*e of reeds." 
Tule; town in Tulare County, California, and lake lyin^;; in Modoi! and Siskiyou 

counties, California, and Klamath County, Oregon, named* from the willow 

jp-owths, a grass use<l by Indians for making mats and Itaskets. 
Tula; river in Kings and Tulare ci>untie>«, California. An Indian word meaning 

••reeds." 
Tnleya; creek in Humlx)ldt County, California, named for an early settler. 
Tullahoma; town in Coffee County, Tennestaei^ An Indian word meaning *' near- 
est town." 
Tully; town in Onondaga County, New York, named for Marcus Tullius Ciirero, the 

Koman orator. 
Talpehocken, stream in Pennsylvania. A l>elaware Indian wonl, ''land of 

turtles." 
Toznwater; town in Thurston County, Washington. An Indian word meaning 

"waterfall." 
Tiiiikhaiinock; township and l>orough in Wyoming County, and cn^ek in Su^iue- 

hanna County, Pennsylvania. From the Delaware Indian tank- hanne, meaning 

'•small stream." 
Taoltunne; county, city in same county, and river in California, name<l for an Indian 

tribe. Bancroft states the name to l)e a <H>rruption of talmainmnej meaning a 

•'group of stone huts" or "collection of wigwams." 
Tnppeckhanna; stream in Pennsylvania. A Delaware Indian word meaning "stream 

which flows from a lai?^ spring." 
Turbutville; borough in Northumberland County, Pennsylvania, named for a fam- 
ily who had large land holdings in the State. 
Turin; town in Lewis County, New York, named from the city in Italy. 
Turkey; river in Iowa, so namo<l l)eciause much frequented by wild turkeys. 
Tnrmana; creek in Sullivan County, Indiana, named for Benjamin Turman, first 

settler on the west side of the county. 
Turner; town in Androscoggin County, Maine, named for the Rev. Charles Turner, 

of Sdtoate, Massachusetts. 
Turner; comity in South Dakota, named for J. W. Turner, legislator. 
Turners Falls; falls on the Connecticut River and village in Franklin County, 

MasBachusetts, named for Captain Turner, who led in the masnacre of the Indians 

in King Philip's war. 
Tumersville; town in Robertson County, Tennessee, name<l for Major Turner. 
Tumwall; cieek in Clark County, Arkansas, corruption of the French terre noU't 

"black land." 
Turret; mountain in Yellowstone Park, so name<l from its shap4^ 
Tuscaloosa; county, and city in same county, in Alabama, named for an Indian chief, 

the name meaning *• black warrior." 
Tuscarawas; river, county, and village in same county, in Ohio. A Delaware 

Indian word, to which authorities give two meanings, "old town," because the 

oldest Indian town in that part of the State was }?ituate<l on the banks of the 

river; and ••open mouth." 
Tuscarora; village in Livingston County, New York, and river in Pennsylvania, 

named for the Tustairora, one of the confederated Iroquois tribes. The meaning 

of the name is uncertain. 

BuU. 268-05 ^20 



306 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATER. [bull. 258. 

Tuscola; city in Douglas County, Illinois, and county in Michigan. The woni is 

said to refer to ** level place." 
TuBcumbia; city in Colbert County, Alabama, and village in Miller County, Mis- 
souri, named for a Chickasaw Indian chief. 
Tusquitee; village in Clay County, North Carolina. From the Cherokee name sig- 
nifying ** rafters," or **roof poles." 
TuBten; town in Sullivan County, New York, named for Col. Benjamin Tusten. 
Tuttle; lake in Wisconsin, named for an early settler. 
Tuxedo; town in Orange County, New York. Probably from the Indian word 

p* taak'seet-toughf^^ meaning ** place of bears." 
Twiggs; county in Georgia, named for Gen. John Twiggs. 
Twin Rivers; two small streams, so named because entering Lake Michigan, from 

Wisconsin at the same point. 
Twinsburg; township in Summit County, Ohio, named for twin brothers, Moses 

and Aaron Wilcox, who were bom there. 
Two Hearted; river in Michigan. An erroneous translation of the Indian word 

nizftod^^bij **twin river." 
Two Licks; branch of the Conemaugh in Indiana County, Pennsylvania. A trans- 
lation of the Delaware Indian word nischahoni. 
Two Rivers; city and town in Manitowoc County, Wisconsin, named from Twin 

Rivers. 
Twowater; branch of the White River in Eastern Utah, so named because of having 

two main sources — Bitterwater and Sweetwater forks. 
Tygart; valley and river in West Virginia, named for David Tygart, an early settler. 
Tyler; county in Texas, named for John Tyler, President of the United States. 
Tyler; county in West Virginia, named for John Tyler, governor of Virginia. 
Tylerville; village in Jefferson County, New York, named for Joeiah and Frederick 

Tyler, early settlers. 
Tymochtee; stream, and town in Wyandot County, in Ohio, the former flowing 

around a large plain. An Indian word, meaning ** around the plain." 
Tyndall; mountain in California, named for the English physicist. 
Tyngsboro; town in Middlesex County, Massachusetts, named for Ebenezer Tyng, 

but, according to Mason, it received its name from Mrs. Sarah Tyng Winslow. 
Tyringham; town in Berkshire County, Massachusetts, named for the family of 

Tyringham, of which Governor Bernard was a descendant and representative. 
Tyrone; township and borough in Blair County, Pennsylvania, and eight other 

places bear the name of the county in Ireland. 
Tyrrel; county in North Carolina, named for Sir John Tyrrel, a lord proprietor. 
TJchee; village in Russell County, Alabama. The name of an ancient tribe of that 

region. 
TJdall; city in Cowley County, Kansas, named for Cornelius Udall. 
TJhrichsville; city in Tuscarawas County, Ohio, named for a family of early settlers. 
TJinkaret; plateau in group of volcanic mountains in Grand Canyon, Colorado, and 

Arizona. An Indian word meaning **pine mountain." 
TJinta; county and mountain range in Utah, and county in Wyoming, named for a 

branch of the Ute Indians, the word being said to mean ^*pine land." 
TJiukufki; stream in Indian Territory. An Indian word meaning ** muddy water." 
Ukiah; city in Mendocino County, California, and precinct in Umatilla County, 

Oregon. A corruption of Yokaia, the name of an Indian tribe. The word is 

said to mean "lower valley" or ** stranger." 
XJllin; village in Pulaski County, Illinois, named for a hero of the poet Ossian. 
Ulmers; town in Barnwell County, South Carolina, named for the Ulmer family. 
Ulster; county in New York, named from the province in Ireland. 



OAXXETT.l PLACE NAME8 IN THE UNITED STATES. 307 

Ulysses; city in Grant County, Kansan, and villa>?e in Butler (k)unty, Nebraska, 

named for Gen. Uivspes R. Grant. 
Umatilla; river and county in On»jron, named for a trilw of Indiann. 
Umbasrog:; lake, partly in New Hampphire and partly in Maine. An Indian won! 

««iid to mean ** doublet! up." Other authorities favor **ek«r lake," ** shallow," 

or ** great waters near another." 
Umcolcus; lake and stream in Maine. An Indian word meaning "whistling duck. ' ' 
Ummo; mountain in Mariposa County, California. An Indian woni meaning 'Most 

arrow." 
Umpachene; falls in a stream in the town of New Marlboro, Berkshire County, 

MaasachnsettH, named for an Indian chief. 
Unalaska; island in the Aleutian Archipelago. Indian word meaning *' land near 

Alayeska (or Alaknhak)." 
Unadilla; village in Dooly County, Georgia, and river, town, and village in Otsego 

County, New York. An Iroquois Indian word meaning "place of meeting." 
Unaweep; canyon in Colorado, so named l)ecause of the color of its sandstone. 

An Indian wonl meaning "nnl rot^k." 
Uncasville; village in New lx)ndon County, Connectticut, named for a war chief of 

the Mohegan Indians. 
Uncompahgre; river and mountain in Colorado. Derivinl from the Indian, Tinm, 

"hot;" /Ki/i, "water;" grvy "spring;" "hot water spring." 
Underbill; town in Chittenden County, Vermont, named for two brothers, share- 
holders under the original charter. 
Unicoi; county in Tennessee. A cornipte<l form of the name of the Ouika Indians. 
Unimo; mountain in Mariposa County, C'alifornia. An Indian word said to mean 

"lost arrow." 
Union; counties in Arkansas, Georgia, and Iowa, parish in Louisiana, and countii^ 

in Mississippi, New Mexico, North Carolina, Ohio, Oregon, Tennsylvania, South 

Dakota, and Tennessee; so named as an expression of the sentiment which actu- 
ates the American people. 
Union; county in Illinois, so named l)ecauw of a successful union meeting held in 

the vicinity al)out 1817 by two preachers of different denominations. 
Union; county in Indiana, formed by the union of parts of Wayne an<l Fayette 

counties. 
Union; mountain in Nevada, so named bi^cause it appears to \ye made up of many 

peaks. 
Union; county, and town in Siune county, in New Jersey, founde<l during the civil 

war, 80 named to expre-ss the patriotic sentiment of that 8ecti(m. 
Union; county in South Carolina, named from the Union Church on Brown Crtn^k. 
Union City; city in Randolph County, Indiana, and Darke County, Ohio, so namt^l 

b(H*ause of its location in two States. 
Union City; village in Branch County, Michigan, so named because of its location 

at the junction of the Saint Ja**eph and Coldwater rivers. 
Union City: town in Obion County, Tennessee, so named with the expectation that 

it would eventually l>e a large railroad center. 
Union Springs; town in Bulkwk County, Alabama, so name<l becaust^ of Methodists 

assembling at the springs for camp nu»etings. 
Union Springs; village in Cayuga County, New York, so named l>ecauHe several 

springs unite at this place. 
Uniontown; lK)rough in Fayette County, Pennsylvania, so named because of its 

l)eing built on two farms, the owners of which disputed as to whose name the 

town should l)ear. 
Unionville; city in Putnam County, Missouri, so named l)ecau8e of the union of 

Putnam and Dodge counties, of which that city is the county seat 



308 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. rB!JLL.l!58. 

TJnionville; town in Orange County, New York, named to eonuiiemorate the 
friendly adjustment of the matter of the questioned ownership of the locality of 
the present iovrn site. 

TJpotog; stream in Muscogee County, Alabama. An Indian word meaning ** cover- 
ing, " " sprea<l ing out. ' * 

TXpshur; counties in Texas and West Virginia, named for Abel P. Upshur, secretary 
of state under President Tvler. 

TJpson; county in Georgia, named for Stephen Upson, an eminent lawyer of the 8tat(». 

TJpton; county in Texas, named for John and W. F. Upton, prominent citizens of 
the State, the former an officer of the Civil war. 

TJrbana; city and tow^nship in Champaign County, Illinois, named from the city in 
Ohio. 

TJrbana; township and city in Champaign County, Ohio. The name is derived from 
urban, ** pertaining to a city." 

TJrsina; l)orough in Somerset County, Pennsylvania, named for Mr. Bear, one of ita 
founders. The Latin form of **l)ear." 

Utah; State of the Union, and county and lake in same State, named for the Ute 
Indians. The meaning is unknown. 

TJtica; township in I^iasalle County, Illinois, village in Macomb C/Ounty, Michigan, 
and towns in Hinds County, Mississippi, and Livingston County, Miasouri, 
named from tlie city in New York. 

TJtica; city in Oneida County, New York, named from the ancient city in Africa. 

TJtsayantha; mountain in Delaware County, and lake in Delaware and Schoharie 
counties, Ncjw York, named for the daughter of a legendary Indian chief. 

TJtuhu; lake in Michigan. An Indian word meaning ''oak.'' 

TJvalde; county, and town in same county, in Texas, named for Jose Uvalde. 

TJxbridge; town in Worcester County, Massachusetts, named for Henry Paget, Earl 
of Uxbridge. 

Vacaville; township and city in Solano County, California, so named liecttuse of the 
large number of cattle in the surrounding country, vaca being the Spanish word 
for "cow." 

Vaiden; town in Carroll County, Mississippi, said to be named for Doctor Vaiden, a 
resident planter. 

Vailsburg; borough in Essex County, New Jersey, named for the Vail family, resi- 
dents of tlie neighborhood. 

Valatie; village in Columbia County, New York, situated near a small falls. Derived 
from a Dutch word meaning *Mittle falls." 

Valdosta; city in Lowndes County, Georgia. From the Spanish, meaning '* vale of 
l)eauty." 

Valentia; county in New Mexico, named from the city in Spain. 

Valentine; village in Cherry County, Nebraska, named for Hon. E. K. Valentine, 
of the State. 

Vallejo; city in Solano County, California, named for Gen. Mariano G. Vallejo, a 
Mexican officer. 

Valley; counties in Montana and Nebraska, so named on account of the topography 
of the countv. 

Valley; town in Douglas County, Nebraska, so named l)ecaufle situated at the junc- 
tion of the Republican Valley branch and the L^nion Pacific Railroad. 

Valley Forg-e; village in Chester County, Pennsylvania, so named because situated 
at the mouth of Valley Creek, where a forge was erected by Isaac Potts pre- 
vious to the Revolution. 

Valley Junction; town in Polk County, Iowa; so named because situated at the 
junction of the Chicago, Rock Island and Pacific and Des Moines Valley nil' 
roads. 



OANNRTT.l PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 309 

Valley Sidg6; town in Dunklin County, MiBsouri, ho nanitMl )>oauise of Ww |>ec'uliiir 

formation of tlie land. 
Val Verde; town in Riverside County, California, and nmnty in Texat*. A deacrijH 

tive Spanish name meaning '* green valley." 
Van Buren; comitiee in Arkannas, Iowa, Michigan, and TennefVHv, nanie<l for 

Martin Van Buren, I*refiident of the Tnited States*. 
Vance; county in North Carolina; 
Vanceboro; town in Craven County, Nortli Carolina. Name<l for Z. B. Vanc<', 

governor and Senator. 
Vances; town in Orangeburg County, South Carolina, nanie<l for the Vance family, 

who formerly kept the ferry. 
Vancouver; town and military fort in Clarke County, \Vn.«hington, named for 

Capt. Geoi^ Vancouver, Royal Navy, who explored that pari of the country in 

1791. 
Vandalia; city in Audrain County, Miaiouri, and village in CasH County, Michigan, 

named from the city in Illinois. 
Vandemere; town in Pamlico County, North Carolina, named for a resident family. 
Vanderbilt; mining district in San l^manlino County, ('aliforniu, name<l for 

Cornelius Vanderbilt, of New York. 
Vanderburg; county in Indiana, name<l for Henry Vanderburgh, judge of the first 

court fonned in the State. 
Van Deusen; village in Berkshire County, Massachusetts, name<i for Isaac 1^. Van 

Deusen, an early manufacturer. 
Van Btten; village in Chemung County, New York, named for James B. Van Etten, 

member of the a}^semV>ly in 1852. 
Van Leuvens Comers; village in Albany County, New York, name<l for Isaac Van 

I-.euven. 
Van Orin; village in Bureau County, Illinois, name<l for Van Oriii (frc^esaj), an 

extensive landowner. 
Van Wert; county in Ohio, named for Isaa^; Van Wert, one of the militiamen who 

assisted in the capture of Major Andre. 
Van Zandt; <rounty in Texas, named for Isaac Van Zandt, member of the Texas 

congress. 
Varina^ove; town in Henrico County, Virginia, named from the town in Spain, 

because the same kind of tolmct^o is raiscKl in both places. 
Vama; village in Marshall County, Illinois, named by it.s founders from Varna in 

Bulgaria. 
Vamville; Uiwn in Hampton County, South Carolina, name<l for a resident family. 
Varysburg; vilUage in Wyoming County, New York, name<l for William Vary, one 

of the first settlers. 
Vashon; island in Washington, named for a captain in the British navy. 
Vassalboro; town in Kennebec County, Maine, named for Florentins Va^^sall, a 

proprietor of the Plymouth |)atent. 
Vaughns; creek in Simpson County, Mississippi, named for an early settler. 
Veazie; town in Penol)8cot County, Maine, named for Gen. Samuel Veazie, a large 

proi>erty owner. 
Vega; town in Monterey County, California. A Spanish name descriptively applied, 

meaning a ** tract of level, fruitful ground." 
Venable; creek in Fluvanna County, Virginia, name<i for T^wis Venable. 
Venango; county, and liorough in Crawford County, in Pennsylvania. From the 

Indian innungah^ in reference to a figure found on a tre<», <airve<l by the Fries. 
Ventura; river, county, ami township and city in same county, in California. A 

Spanish word meaning "luck,'* "fortune," "favorable chance." 
Vera; village in Fayette County, Illinois; from the lAtin veritoH^ meaning "truth." 



310 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 2r.s. 

Vera Cruz; town in WcHh County, Indiana, named from the city in Mexico. From 
the Spanish, nieaning **true croes." 

Veras; town in Santa Barbara County, Califoniia. The Spanish wonl for "truth.** 

Verde; river in Arizona with water of a greenish cast. A Spanish word meaning 
**green." 

Verdery ; town in Greenwood County, South Carolina, named for a resident family. 

Verdugo; town in Los Angeles County, California. A Spanish word meaning 
"young shoot of a tree" or **bud.'* 

Vergennes; city in Addison County, Vermont, named for Charles Granvier, Count 
de Vergennes. 

Vermilion; counties in Illinois and Indiana, parish in Louisiana, and village in 
Erie County, Ohio, named from the rivers. 

Vermilion; village in Edgar County, Illinois, named for Edward S. Vermilion, 
owner of the site. 

Vermilion; rivers in Illinois, Louisiana, Ohio, and South Dakota; said to have been 
so named because of the red earth produced by the burning of the shale over- 
lying the outcrop of coal. 

Vermont; State of the Union, so named because of the appearance of its mountains. 
Deri veil from the French vert vumt, "green mountain.'* 

Vermont ville; village in Eaton County, Michigan, named from the State. 

Vernal Fall; waterfall in Yosemite Valley, California, so named because of the 
beautiful greenish tints which it displays. 

Vernon; village in Marion County, Illinois, named for William Vernon, a railroad 
official. 

Vernon; parish in Louisiana and many other places, being generally named for the 
home of (Jen. George Washington — Mount Vernon. 

Vernon; county in Missouri, named for Miles Vernon, of Laclede County. 

Vernon; county in Wisconsin, given this name to suggest the greenery of the sur- 
rounding country. 

Verona; towns in Hancock County, Maine, and Oneida County, New York, and 
seventeen other towns and villages, name<i from V^erona in Italy. 

Verplanck; village in Westchester County, New York, named for Philip Verplanck. 

Versailles; town in Ripley County, Indiana, and eight other places bear the name 
of the palace in Paris. 

Vershire; town in Orange County, Vermont, name formed by a combination of the 
first syllable of the State name and "shire," the English suffix designating 
county. 

Vevay; city in Switzerland County, Indiana, named from the town in Switzerland. 

Vicksburg; city in Warren County, Mississippi, nanunl for Neivitt Vick, its founder. 

Victor; town in Kavalli County, Montana, nameil for Victor, a chief of the Flathea<l, 
Kootenai, and Pend'd Oreille tribes. 

Victor; village in Ontario County, New York, so named l)ecau8e the French com- 
mander in a battle fought there defeated the Iroquois Indians. 

Victoria; county in Texas, indirectly named for D. Felix Victoria, first president 
of Mexico, known as Guadalui)e Victoria. 

Vidalia; town in Concordia Parish, Louisiana, named for Vidal, the Spanish gov- 
ernor of the district in which the town is situated. 

Viejos; town in San Dit^o County, California. A Spanish word meaning "ancients." 

Vienna; township in Montgomery County, Michigan, and eighteen other places, 
bear the name of the capital city of Austria- Hungary. 

Vigo; county in Indiana, named for Col. Francis Vigo. 

Vigo; town in (\)ncho County, Texas, named from the seaport in Spain. 

Vilas; county in Wisconsin, named for Senator William F. VMlas. 

Villa Rica; town in Carroll County, Georgia, having gold mines. Spanish words 
meaning "rich city." 



nAXXBTT.] PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 311 

Villenora; town in Chautauqua County, New York. A Spanish name meaning 

**new town.** 
Vipalhaven; island and town in Knox County, Maine, named for John Vinal, of 

Boston. 
Vinceimea; city in Knox County, Indiana, named from the fort built by Sieur de 

Vincennes. 
Vineland; borough in Cumberland County, New Jersey, so nameil l)ecau8e it was 

the intention of its founder to raist* grapes on an extensive scale, which was 

realized to a considerable extent. 
Vineyard SLaven; town in Dukt'u County, Massachusetts, so name<l because of tlie 

quantity of vines found on the island at the time of discovery. Haven fmm the 

harbor or haven on which the village is situated. 
Vixiin^; dty in Clay County, Kansas, named for K. P. Vining, an officer of the 

Union Pacific Railroad. 
Vinton; township and city in Benton County, Iowa, named for Hon. Plynn Vinton. 
Vinton; county in Ohio, named for S. F. Vinton, member of Congress from that 

State. 
Viola; village in Richland County, Wisconsin, name<l for Viola Bu<>k. 
Virden; township and city in Macoupin County, Illinois, named for John Virden, 

founder. 
Vir^; town in Cortland County, New York, named for the jKiet, I*ublius Vergilius 

Maro. 
Virgin; river in Utah. Derived from the original S|>ani8h name, Rio Virgen, 

** river of the virgin.'* 
Virginia; one of the original thirteen States, named for Klizal)eth, Queen of Knghind. 
Virginia; cities in Cass County, Illinois, and Storey County, Nevada, named from 

the State. 
Virginia; cascade in Yellowstone Park, named for the wife of Hon. Charles Ciil)son, 

president of the Yellowstone Park Association. 
Virginia City; city in Storey County, Nevada, named for an early prospector known 

as "Old Vii^nia,** who is said to have been the finder of the largest gold nug- 
get in America. 
Viroqua; town in Vernon County, Wisconsin, nameii from a version of the title 

given to Columbus and his descendents, Duke of Veragua. 
Visalia; city in Tulare County, California, named for Vise, a hunter. 
Vista; town in San Diego County, California. A descriptive Spanish name, mean- 
ing **view.** 
Volney; villages in Allamakee County, Iowa, and Oswego County, New York, named 

for Count Volnev, the French writer. 
Voluntown; village in New Ix)ndon County, Connecticut, so named because the 

greater part of the town was granted to the voluntei»rs of the Narragansett war. 
Voliiaia; county in Florida, named for a town within its limits supp<jsed to have 

been named for Volus, an P^nglish settler. 
Voorheeaville; village in Allmny County, New York, named for Theodore Voor- 

hees, director of the Delaware and I^ckawanna Railroad. 
Waas; mountain in Utah, nameri for a Ute Indian chief. 
Wabash; county in Illinois, county, and city in .same county, in Indiana, and river 

traversing lx)th States. From the Indian won!, nmabachCf meaning ** cloud 

borne by an equinoctial wind,*' or, according to another authority, ** white 

water.*' 
Wabasha; county, and town in same county, in Minnesota, named for the Dakota 

(Sioux) chief Wapashaw, meaning '* red leaf," ** red caj)," or ** red flag,'* from 

a gift of a military uniform and flag of P^ngland to the first of three hereditary 

chiefs who bore the name. 



312 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. fBiLL. 258. 

Wabaunsee; county, and town in same county, in Kansas, named for a Pottawatomi 
Indian chief, the name signifying "dim daylight," or "caunerof paleness," given 
because he captured an enemy's camp just at the break of day. 

Wabeno; town in Forest County, Wisconsin. An Indian word meaning **menof 
the dawn," or ** eastern men." 

Wacasassee; river, and bay in Florida, so named because of the herds of cattle 
frequenting it. A Seminole word meaning *'cow range." 

Waccaxnaw; town in Georgetown County, Swith Carolina, and river, lake, and town- 
ship in Brunswick County, North Carolina, named for an Indian tril^e. 

Wachuaett; mountain in Massachusetts. An Indian word meaning " near the little 
mountain." 

Waco; town in Smith County, Mississippi, village in Cleveland County, North Caro- 
lina, and city in McLennan County, Texas, named for an Indian tribe. 

Waconia; village in Carver County, Minnesota. An Indian word meaning ** living 
spring." 

Waconda; village in Mitchell County, Kansas. An Indian word meaning "spirit." 

Wacouta; village in ( Jooilhue County, Minnesota. A Sioux Indian word meaning 
"shooter," the name of an Indian chief who lived at Red Wing. 

Waddams; township in Stephenson County, Illinois, named for William Waddams, 
one of the first settlers in the county. 

Waddington; town in Humboldt County, California, named for an early settler. 

Waddington; village in St. Lawrence County, New York, named for Joshua Wad- 
dington, proprietor. 

Wadena; county, and town in same county, in Minnesota, an archaic Ojibway word 
meaning "little round hill." 

Wadesboro; town in Anson County, North Carolina, named for Col. Thomas Wade. 

Wading River; village in Suffolk County, New York, named from the river, which 
was so called because the Indians waded into it for the shellfish. 

Wadflworth; township and village in Medina County, Ohio, namerl for Col. E. 
Wads worth. 

Wady Petra; village in Stark County, Illinois. From the Arabian, wadyy meaning 
"valley," and the Laitin petra ^ "rock." 

Waga; tributary to the Minnesota River. An Indian word meaning "cottonwood." 

Wagara; stream in New Jersey. Derived from the Indian woid vntakeu^ "crooked," 
or "bent," and akiy "a place." 

Wagener; town in Aiken County, South Carolina, name<i for F. W. Wagener, cap- 
italist, of Charleston. 

Wahkiakum; county in Washington, named for a tribe of Indians, said to have 
received their name from their (irst chief. 

Wahoo; village in Lumpkin County, Cieorj^ia, and precinct in Saunders County, 
Nebraska. An Indian word said to mean a species of elm. 

Wahpeton; city in Richland County, North Dakota. A Sioux Indian woiti mean- 
ing "leaf village." 

Waitsfleld; town in Washington County, Vermont, nameil for Gen. Benjamin 
Waite, the iirst settler. 

Wakatomika; village in Coshockton County, Ohio. An Indian word meaning 
"other side town." 

Wake; county in North Carolina, named for the wife of Governor Tryon. 

Wakeeney; city in Trego County, Kansas, nametl for its founders, A. E. Warren 
and J. K. Keenev. 

Wakefield; city in Clay County, Kansas, named for the Rev. Richard Wake, one 
of its founders. 

Wakefield; town in MiddK^cx County, Massatthusetts, name<l for Cynis Wakefield. 



GANNETT.J PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 313 

Wakefield; village in Wake County, North Carolina; 

Wake Forest; town in Wake County, North Carolina. Named for the wife of 
Governor Tryon. 

Wakenda; town in Carroll County, Missouri. An Indian word meaning "wor- 
shiped." 
Wakulla; county in Florida, named for the famous spring near the Gulf coast. 

An Indian word meaning ** mystery.'* 
Walden; town hi Grange (-ounty, New York, name<l for Jacob T. Walden, a promi- 
nent citizen. 
Walden; town in Caledonia County, Vermont, named for commanding officer of the 

militury forces i)rcsent during the building of a road in the vicinity. 
Waldo; county in Maine; 

Waldoboro; town in Lincoln County, Maine. Named for Brig. Gen. Samuel Waldo, 
of Ba*«ton. 

Waldron; island in Washington, named for W. T. Waldron, of the ship Porpoise. 
Wales; town in Hampden C-ounty, Massachusetts, named for James I^wrem^ 

Wales. 
Walesboro; village in Bartholomew County, Indiana, named for John P. Wales, its 

founder. 
Walheilla; town.s in Pembina C/Ounty, North Dakota, and Oconee C/Ounty, South 

Carolina. A Scandinavian name meaning ** palace of immortality." 
Walhonding; river in Ohio. An Indian won! meaning "white woman." 
Walke; point in North landing River, Virginia, named for the oldest resident family 

of Princess Anne County. 
Walker; county in Alabama, named for Senator J. W. Walker, of the State. 
Walker; j)ass in California, and lake and river in Esmeralda County, Neva<la, named 

for Joseph Reddeford W^alker, guide of Fremont's second exi)edition. 
Walker; county in CJeorgia, name<l for Freeman W^alker. 
Walker; village in Macon County, Illinois, named for J. W. Walker, one of the 

founders. 
Weilker; county in Texas, named for Robert J. Walker, Secretary of the Treasury 

during President Polk's Administration. 
Walkerville; city in Silverbow County, Montana, named for the owner of the 

"Alice" mine. 
Wallace; county, and town in same county, in Kansas, named for Gen. William II. L. 

Wallace, a vetc^ran of the Mexican war. 
Wallace; town in Duplin County, North Carolina, named for a prominent n^sident. 
Wallace; county in North Dakota, named for "Farmer" Wallace, a pioneer of the 

State in 1870. 
Wallawalla; county, and city in same county, in Washington. From a Nez Penv 

Indian wonl used to designate a rapid stream. 
Weillenpaupack; stream in Pennsylvania. An Indian word meaning " deep, dead 

water." 
Waller; county in Texas, named for Edwin Waller, formerly postmaster-general 

under the republic. 

Wallface; mountain on the west side of the Indian Pass in the Adirondack Moun- 

tiiins, so (railed l^ecause it terminates at this place in a precijMce hundreds of feet 

high. 
Wall Hill; town in Marshall County, Mississippi, name<l for WMlliam Wall. 
WeLllington; l>orough in Bergen County, New Jersey, name<l for Walling Van 

Winkle, the former owner. 
Walloostook; river in Maine. An Indian word meaning "stream when? you get 

boughs," or "tine, Ijeautiful river." 



314 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED 8TATE8. [bull. 25a 

Wallowa; county and river in Oregon. An Indian word meaning a tripod for hold- 
ing a fiBh trap in the water. 
Walnut; township and village in Bureau County, Illinoifi, so named from the large 

number of walnut trees within the limits. 
Walpack; township in Sussex County, New Jersey. An Indian word meaning **8ud- , 

den bend of a stream aromid the base of a rock.** 
Walpole; town in Norfolk County, Massachusetts, named for Sir Robert Walpole. 
Walpole; town in Cheshire County, New Hampshire, named from the town in 

England. 
Walsenburg; town in Huerfano County, Colorado, named for Fred Walsen, a 

banker and old settler. 
Walsh; County in North Dakota, named for George H. Walsh. 
Walterboro; town in Colleton County, South Carolina, named for the Walter fam- 
ily, prominent residents of the State. 
Walthall; town in Webster County, Mississippi, named for Gen. Edward Walthall. 
Waltham; city in Middlesex County, Massachusett«<, supposedly named from Wal- 

tham Abbey, England. 
Waltham; town in Addison County, Vermont, named from the city in Massachusetts. 
Walton; county in Florida, named for Colonel Walton, of Georgia. 
Walton; county in Georgia, named for George Walton, a signer of the Declaration 

of Indei)endence. 
Walton; city in Harvey County, Kansas, named for a stockholder of the Atchison, 

Topeka and Santa Fe Kail road. 
Walton; town in Delaware County, New York, named for William Walton, a large 

land proprietor. 
Walworth; town in Wayne County, New York, and county in Wisconsin, named 

for Chancellor Reuben H. Walworth. 
Walworth; county in South Dakota, named from the county in Wisconsin. 
Wameg-o; city in Pottawatomie County, Kansas, said to be so named because 

formerly there was no water in the village. An Indian word meaning *' clear of 

springs." Other authorities say that it was named for an Indian chief whose 

name meant "running waters." 
Wamesit; village in Middlesex County, Massachusetts. From the Indian word 

vKime, **all," or ** whole," and aitAre, ** place." 
Wampum; borough in l^wrence County, Pennsylvania. The name of the Indian 

shell money. 
Wanaque; river and valley in New Jersey. An Indian word meaning '* sassafras 

place. ' ' 
Wanatah; town in Laporte County, Indiana, nameil from an Indian chief, whose 

name signified *'he that charges on his enemies." 
Wangunbog; \)ond in Connec^ticut. An Indian word meaning "bent pond." 
Wapakoneta, village in Auglaize County, Ohio. An Indian word. meaning **clay 



river." 



Wapanucka; town in Choctaw Nation, Indian Territory. Derived from Wappa- 
nocra, the name given the Delawares by other Indians, it signifying "East- 
landers." 

Wapato; village in Washington County, Oregon. The Indian designation of a 
bulbous root resembling a potato. 

Wapella; village in Dewitt County, Illinois, named for a chief of the Fox tribe, the 
name meaning "he who is painted white." 

Wapiti; village in Summit County, Colorado. An Indian word meaning "elk." 
Wapping-er; creek and town in Dutchess County, New York; 
Wappingers Falls; village in Dutchess County, New York. Named for au Indian 
trilje. 



OANNirrT.l PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 815 

Wajwipincon; river in Iowa, ro naine<i l)ecaiu)e of the root wliioli in found in great 
abun<lamv u{>on its Imnks. An Indian won! meanin^r *' white |M>taUH^6.'' 

Wapwallopen; stream and village in Luzerne County, Pennsylvania. A Delaware 
Indian name said by some to mean "place where the mensengers were mur- 
dered;*' by others, ** where white hemp grows.** 

Waquapaug; stream in Khoile Island. An Indian wonl meaning "at the end of 
the pond.'* 

Ward; town in Boul<ler County, Colorado, named for the Ward lo<le, discovered in 
1860. 

Ward; village in Boone County, Indiana, named for Thomas Ward, Congressman 
from that State. 

Ward; peak in Montana, named for Artemus Ward. 

Ward; point on Staten Island, New York, named for the man who formerly owned 
that part of the island. 

Ward; county in North Dakota, named for Hon. Mark Ward, of South Dakota. 

Ward; county in Texas, nameil for Thomas W. Ward, the commissioner of the gen- 
eral land otfu^e under the first State governor of Texas. 

Wards; island in New York, named for Jasper and Bartholomew Ward, fonner 
proprietors. 

Wards; town in Saluda County, South Carolina, named for the Ward family, promi- 
nent residents of the State. 

Wardsboro; town in Windham County, Vermont, named for William Wartl, of 
New fane, the principal proprietor. 

Ware; county in Georgia named for Nicholas Ware, an early Senator from Georgia. 

Ware; town in Ilamjwhire County, Massachusetts, so named on account of the weirs, 
or weirers, formerly constructeil in the river to catch salmon. 

Warehaxn; town in Plymouth County, Massachusetts, named from the town in 
England. 

Waresboro; town in Ware County, Georgia, name<l for Nicholas Ware, an early 
Senator from that State. 

Warm Springes; tf)wn in Alameila County California, name<l from the hot springs. 

Warner; town in Merrimack County, New Hampshirt*, named for Col. Jonathan 
Warner, of Portsmouth. 

Wamerville; village in Schoharie County, New York, name<l for Capt. George 
Warner, the first settler. 

Warraxnaug; i>ond in Litt^h field County, Connecticut. An Indian word meaning 
"good fishing place.** 

Warren; oret»k in Humboldt County, California, name<l for a settler. 

Warren; town in Litchfield County, Connecticut, named for Sanniel Warren of 
Revolutionary fame. 

Warren; counties in Georgia, Illinois, Iowa, and Kentucky; town in Knox County, 
Maine; fortifi(!ation in Boston Ilarlwr, an<l town in Worcester County, Massa- 
chusetts; counties in Mississippi, Missouri, and New Jersey; county and town in 
Herkimer County, New York; crounties in North Carolina and Ohio; county, 
anil lH)rough in same county, in Pennsylvania; and counties in Tennessee and 
Virginia; named for J()st^i)h Warren, who fell in the battle of Bunker Hill. 

Warren; township and village in Jo Daviess County, Illinois, nam?d for the first 
white chiKl Ixjrn in the settlement. 

Warren; county in Indiana, named for Gen. Francis Warren. 

Warren; city in Trumbull County, Ohio, named for CJen. Moses Warren, of Lyme, 
Connecti(Mit. 

Warren; towns in (irafton County, New Hampshire, and Bristol County, Rhode 
Island, named for Admiral Sir Peter Warren, of the royal navy. 



31() PLACE NAMKS IN THE UNITED STATES. T bull. 258. 

WarrenBlmr^; town in Macon County, Illinois, named for a family prominent in 

the county. 
Warrensville; township in Cuyahoga County, Ohio, named for Moees Warren, an 

earlv wettler. 

m 

Warrenton; towns in Warren County, North Carolina, and Fauquier County, Vir- 
ginia, named for Gen. Joseph Warren, who fell in the battle of Bunker Hill. 

Warrick; county in Indiana, named for Capt Jacob Warrick, killed in the Iwittle 
of TipfHJcanoe. 

Warsaw; townnhip and town in Hancock County, Illinois, city in Kosciusko County, 
Indiana, and town in Benton County, Missouri, named from tlie capital city of 
Poland. 

Warwick; towns in Franklin County, Massachusetts; Orange County, New York, 
and Kent County, Rhode Island, and county in Virginia, named for the Earl 
of Warwick. 

Washburn; village in Woodford County, Illinois, named for the Washbume 
family. 

Washburn; town in Aroostook County, Maine, named for Israel Washburn, jr., 
governor of the State during the civil war. 

Washbiirn; mountain in Yellowstone Park, named for Gen. Henry Dane Washburn. 

Washburn; county, and town in Bayfield County, in Wisconsin, named for Cadwal- 
lader C Washburn, former governor. 

Wasco; county in Oregon, named for an Indian tribe, the name signifying '* grass.'' 

Washabaugh; county in South Dakota, named for Frank Washabaugh, a promi- 
nent State politician. 

Washington; State of the Union; counties in Arkansas, Georgia, Idaho, Illinois, 
Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, and Kentucky; parish in Louisiana; counties in Maine 
and Maryland; town in Berkshire County, Massachusetts; counties in Missis- 
sippi and Missouri; highest peak of the White Mountains in New Hampshire; 
coiintieH in New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, 
Tennessee, Vermont, Vii^nia, and VViwionsin; and probably the counties in 
Alabama, C^lora^lo, Florida, Minnc^sota, Nebraska, Oregon, Rhode Island, 
Texas, an<l Utah; and many cities, towns, and villages. Named for Gen. George 
Washington. 

Washington; city in the District of Columbia, the capital of the United States, 
named for George Wanhington, first President of the United States. 

Washining; Washinee; lakes in the t4>wn of Salisbury, Litchfield County, Con- 
necticut, connecte<l by a Hinall stream. The names are of Indian origin, express- 
ing beauty, vxishinwg indicating a higher degree of charm than ttxuthitiee, 

Washita; village in Montgomery County, Arkansas, and county in Oklahoma. 
Another form of ** Wichita." 

Washoe; county, and city in same county, in Nevada, namiHl for a tribe of Indians 
in that vicinitv. 

Washta; town in Cherokee County, Iowa. A Sioux Indian word meaning **good.*' 

Washtenaw; county in Michigan, named from the east branch of (irand River; the 
name is said to be derived from the Indian word watditenongy ** river that is 
far off." 

Wasioja; town in Dodge County, Minnesota, so named l)ec»use of the pine trees 
growing near. An Indian word meaning ** j)ine grove." 

Wassaic; village in Dutchess County, New York. An Indian word meaning '*diflS- 
cult," or "hard work." 

Wastedo; town in Goodhue County, Minnesota. An Indian wonl meaning** good." 

Watab; village in Benton County, Minnesota. .\n Indian word meaning ** root of 
pine," or ** to sew a ciino*».' 



cjANNBTT.l PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 317 

Wata^; village in Knox Coanty, IliinoiH. From the Pottawatonii Indian word 

meaning, " I heanl;** or, if derive<l inminhweatiiga, *'he has^meto ramble." 
Watch Hill; town in Washington County, Rhmle Inland. From this promontory 

the Narragansett Indians watched for their enemiep, the Montauks. 
Wateree; river, and town in Richland County, in South Carolina, named for an Indian 

tribe. 
Waterford; town in Marshall County, Mi.<^iH8ippi, so named on account of the great 

volume of water contained in Spring Creek at this point. 
Waterford; village in Saratoga County, New York, and town in Caledonia County, 

Vermont, named from the city in Ireland. 
Waterford; town in lyoudoun County, Virginia, named by an early settler from 

Waterford in Ireland, his native place. 
Waterloo; city in Monroe County, Illinois, village in Douglas County, Nebraska, 

and many other places; named from the battlefield in Belgium. 
Watertownf town in Middlesex County, Massachusetts, so called be(»nse it was a 

"well- watered place," and the first means of commnni(»tion between this plat« 

and Boston was by water. 
Watertown; town in Jefferson County, New York, so named on account of the 

extraordinary amount of water power. 
Water Valley; city in Yalobusha County, Mississippi, so named on account of the 

continuous flow of water in the vallev. 
WaterviUe; town in Marshall Coimty, Kansas, named from Waterville, New York, 

the home of Colonel Osborne, who was the contractor for the construction of the 

railroad. 
Waterville; city in Kennebec County, Maine, so named because of its situation at 

Ticonic Falls on the Kennebec River, which furnishes the motive power for the 

factories of the citv. 
Watervliet; city on the Hudson, in Albany County, New York. From the Dutch, 

meaning ** flowing stream." 
Wathena; city in Doniphan County, Kansas, name<l for a chief of the KickajHX) 

Indians. 
Watkins; village in Schuyler County, New York, named for Dr. Samuel Watkins, 

of I^)ndon, one of the first proprietors. 
Watkinsville; town in Oconee County, Georgia, named for Col. Robert Watkins, 

of Augusta, member of the State legislature. 
Watonwan; county and river in Minnesota. A Dakota (Sioux) name, meaning 

**fish bait," or ** where fish bait abounds." 
Watrous; town in Mora County, New Mexico, named for Sanmel B. Watrous, an 

early settler. 
Watseka; city in I rrniuois County, Illinois, named for a mythical Indian girl who 

save<l her tribe from disaster. Another authority gives it as a corruption of an 

Indian word, meaning '* pretty woman." 
Watson; township and \illage in Effingham County, Illinois, name<I for George 

Watson, a constmcting railroad engineer. 
Watson; town in Lewis County, New York, named for James Watson, a former 

proprietor. 
Watson; town in Hampshire County, West Virginia, named for Joseph Watson, the 

former owner of the land. 
Watsontown; borough in Northumberland County, Pennsylvania, named for John 

Watson, the original proprietor. 
Watsonville; city in Santa Cruz County, California, named for Col. James Watson, 

a first settler. 
Wattsburg; borough in Erie County, Pennsylvania, named for David Watts, an 

early settler. 



318 PLACE NAME8 IN THE UNITED STATES. [bull. 258. 

Waubay; villa>!e in Day County, South Dakota. An Indian wonl meaning ** place 

of hatching." 
Waubeek; towns in Linn County, Iowa, and Dunn County, Wisconsin. An Indian 

wonl meaning **metal,** or ** metal lie substance." 
Waubesa; lake in Wisconsin. An Indian word meaning "swan." 
Wauconda; village in Lake County, Illinois. A Sioux Indian wonl signifying 

**8acre*l," or "god." 
Waukarusa; stream in Kansas. An Indian wortl meaning "hip deep." 
Waukau; a town in Winnebago County, Wisconsin. An Indian word meaning 

** habitually," or "often." 
Waukegan; township an<l city in Lake County, Illinois, first calle<l Little Fort. 

In 1849 the name was changed to the present form, said to be the Indian trans- 
lation of the old name. 
Waukesha; county, and city in same county, in Wisconsin. From the Indian 

tmut-iAha, meaning "fox." 
Waukon: town in Allamakee County, Iowa. An Indian word meaning "moss on 

tn»ei« that is eatable." 
Waxinakee; village* in Dane County, Wisconsin. From the Indian won! innwkif 

" he lies," or "he lives in peac^." 
Wauneta; villagt* in Chase County, Nebraska. An Indian word meaning " winter 

t*amp." 
Waupaca; (X)unty in Wisc^onsin, named for the Menominee Indians, the meaning 

iHMUg "pale watvr." 
Wauponsee; town in Ctrundy County, Illinois. For derivation see WaJniunitee. 
Waupun; town in Fond du lac County, Wisconsin. An Indian word meaning 

"early," or "early day," or, according to another authority, from t/'ofta, meaning 

**wu«t." 
Waureflr^^: villagi^ in Windham County, Connecticut. An Indian word meaning 

**gt)(Hl thing." 
Wausau; city in Marathon County, Wisconsin. A corruption of uYism, meaning 

" farnwuy." 
Wausaukoe; river in Wisconsin. An Indian word meaning "distant land." 
Wausoon; villug<^ in Fulton County, Ohio, named for an Indian chief. The wonl 

UHMinH "fur off." 
Wauwatosa; «'ity in Milwaukee County, Wisconsin. A corruption of weivcUesfiy 

niiMinhig *Mln'-fly.*' 
Wau«if*ka; villagt* in Crawford County, W^isconsin, named for an Indian chief; the 

ninno in Hiiid to mean "pine." 
Wav«»rly ; <'lty in M<»rgan County, Illinois, and villages in Tioga County, New York, 

iMiil Plko (Niunty, Ohio, named from Scott's novels. 
WaMahm^hlti; town in Kllis County, Texas, so named l^ecause of the large number 

of t'uHio U\ the vicinity. An Indian word meaning "cow town," or "cow 

I'MM'k." 

WMNhi%Wi (*rtM«k in North Carolina and South Carolina, towns in Union County, 
North (•iirolina, and l^ncaster County, South Carolina, named for an Indian 

W»*y»'r«»M: lown in Wan^('Ounty, Gt^orgia, name<l from the crossing of two ways 

oi mmmIh. 
WHyUiut, (own In MitltlloHex (bounty, Massachusetts, named for Francis Wayland. 
WHyUlMli vlllu««» In SttMilnm C/Ounty, New York, named for Rev. Francis Wayland, 

mI Mliodn IhIiuuI. 
WHVffMiiiHVlUt*. villng«» in Hartholoniew County, Indiana, named for Charles L. 



GANNETT.l PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 319 

"Wsyne; coantiee in Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kentiurky, Michigan, Miseds- 
eippi, Miseonri, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, and 
West Virginia, and probably the counties In Nebraska an<l Ttah; 
Wajmesboro; towns in Burke County, Creorgia, and Wayne County, Mississippi, 

and borough in Franklin County, Pennsylvania; 
Waynesburg; town in Stark County, Ohio, and borough in CJreene County, Penn- 

svlvania; 
Waynesfleld; town in Auglaize County, Ohio; 

Waynesville; township and village in Dewitt County, Illinois, and towns in Hay- 
wood County, North Carolina, and Warren County, Ohio. Named for Gren. 
Anthony Wayne, hero of the Revolution. 

Wayzata; village in Hennepin County, Minnesota. An Indian wonl meaning ''at 
the mouth." 

Weakley; county in Tennessee, named for Robert Weakley, a member of the House 
of Reprchsentatives and the reviner of the constitution of Tennessee. 

Weare; town in Ilillsboro County, New Hampshire, named for Meshech Weare, 
chief justice of the province of New Hampshire. 

Weatherford; city in Parker County, Texas, said to be named for Jefferson Weath- 
erfonl, one of its early settlers. 

Weatogue; village in Hartfonl County, Connecticut. An Indian word meaning 
"wigwam place." 

Weauatucket; river in Connecticut. From the Indian, "land at the end of tide 
water." 

Weaverville; town in Trinity County, California, name<l for a pioneer. 

"Weaverville; town in Buncoml)e County, North Carolina, named for a family numer- 
ous in the State. 

Webb; county in Texas, named for Judge James Webb, politician in the early days 
of the State. 

Webb City; city in Jasper County, Missouri, so named because lea<l and zinc were 
first discovere<l in that locality on the farm of John C. Webb. 

Webberville; village in Ingham County, Michigan, named for Herbert Weblier, an 
early nettler. 

Weber; county and river in Utah, named dt a well-known trapper and guide. 
Webster; counties in (leorgia, Iowa, and Kentucky; parish in Louisiana; town in 
Worcester County, Massachusetts; counties in Mississippi and Missouri; town 
in Merrinmc County, and mountain in New Hampshire; county in West Mrginia; 
and many cities, towns, and villages; prolmbly, also, the county in Nebraska; 
Webster Groves; city in St. Louis County, Missouri. Named for Daniel Webster, 
the statesman. 

Wecuppemee; river in Connecticut. An Indian word meaning "linden" or 
"bass wood." 

Wedge; niountiiin in Montana, so named on account of its shape. 

Weedsport; village in Cayuga County, New York, named for Elisha and E<lward 
Weed, the first settlers. 

Weehawken; town in Hudson County, New Jersey. An Indian word meaning 
"maize land." 

Weeping Child; stream in Ravalli County, Montana, so named, according to tra- 
dition, from the circumstance of an Indian child being carried off by a mountain 
lion, causing insanity in the mother. 

Weeping Water; river in Nebraska. A translation of the Indian word nehaga. 

Weir; city in Chemkee County, Kansas, named for T. M. W^eir, its founder. 

Weisner; mountain in Llaho, named for a topographer with the Mullan exjxxlition. 

Weissport; lH>rouph in Carbon County, Pennsylvania, nameil for Col. Jacob Weiss, 
an officer of the Revolution, who early settled in the Lehigh Valley. 



-^20 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. [bill. 258. 



. '. ^•: -.n H^mV.iiitroonty. ralifornia, namefiforan In«lian towncallcnl 
Fr.;i/;#..#i.. '-.^ v-ni b- «ii*l u* mean "junction of rivere.*' 

•. <* :: ,r. Pirnamroanty. Flori«la. An Indian wonl meaning ** riverof iakw.'* 
Welcii. :.-w:i in >£•:£»•:• w*?ll Coonty. Wegt Virginia, named for Capt. J. A. Welch, of 

rha: ••' unry. 
Weld, -vuntv ji Colorado. Dame«i for Lewi** Ledyard Weld, first necretary of Colo- 

Weld: :• -Aa in Franklin Onrnty. Maine, name*! for Benjamin Weld, one of the 

Weldon. v^'Ijijt^ in IVwitt Coonty. IIlinoL*, name<i for Jadge Lawrence M. Weldon. 
Weldozi. :• vn in HjkliL&x Conntv. N»>rth Carolina, nameil for a resident family. 
WelMe^t: t. *n in Bliirr^'^tahle Coonty. MaasachasettB. The name is doubtless a 

>Tr':pdi?c .-r "whiiie rieet.*' 
Wellin^frton.: ••ty in Siiimer County. Kansas, and township and \nllage in Lorain 

i.'''iM:ry. *'*b.i*\ nan^teil for the Duke of Wellinjrton. 
Wells: -^ 'isry in Indiana, named for Capt William Wells, killed at the Fort Dear- 

WeII». : • >* :: in Y* *rk C'^anry. Maine. sup|M3eed to he named fn)m the town in England. 
WeII»; r-^u ia HAyiiiltoti County. New York, named for Joshua Wells, the first 

WeU». v.va:try u: North Uikota. named for the Hon. E. P. Wells, of Jamestown, an 

W^IUtero; bon.»uarf\ iu Ti«He» County, Pennsylvania, named for Mrs. Henry Wells 

M-»r*4?< an edriy rwi l^-ni. 
WelUbunr- ^**n tn Chemung County, New York, named fora 6imily who formerly 

.**rr*>{ I'v^ ot tht» tv^wn site. 
W^LUbur^: vity ia Br\><^ko County. West Virginia, named for Alexander Wells. 
W^IU KxY^r; <trvttm « hich rises in i'aleiionia County, Venuont, named for Cap- 

Ui:u W^-iK *ho was dn>wneil in it. 
W^IU KxYvri \ttUjse in i>rani!e County. Vermont, named from the river. 
W^lUUMi. to^tt^hip aiKl city in Jackson County, Ohio, named for Harvey Wells, 

I'.S *vHiv,dt*r 

W^IUyvU*. ^^^n i" AlUyaiiy County, New York, named for Gardiner Wells, a 

W^lUvxlW; vnty in V>anklin County, Kansas, named for D. L. Wells, a railroad 

W<4Wy\U*; to^n in Montgi>mory County, Missouri, named for Judjre Carly Wells. 
W^U»v\IWl cit> in Columbiana iVunty, Ohio, name<l for William Wells, who laid 

W«*^U\M\. u»^« iu Franklin County. Mastachusetts, named for Oliver Wendell, a 

|^v«l»»;'. lyinkcr. 
W«»nKA«««> town in K«»ex Ounty, Masssu'husetts, named from the town in Suffolk 

\\vuut\. Fnjk:l;uul. 
I W^w\*»i*%. *'itv ill Mawhall County. Illinois; 

Wi^uvMxiih; »Hm»»i>:h in iiUmi"t>»ter County, New Jersey. Derived from the Sioux 
I ti».h:*n, uuv^ninK '* tirst-lnmi daughter.'' 
W^M^twx^rih; town in t J ratton County. Now Hampshire, named for Benning Went- 

wx»nh. i^vituoi <o\cruortkftht» State. 
Wv^HUvilW. tx^^^»» »» ^»' ilmrU^ iVunty, Miswniri, named for the man who laid it 

Jill\^\^l^ iiumnti^i^ »i» i\u«itH*tUHU, An Indian word meaning " pUce at the nar- 

S\^W !*•* ** ^^* *(*H«« 

I^V^« H\^* M» y\m\\i \\mhty» liullium, naineil for an Indian chief. 



oixNETT.l PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED STATES. 321 

Wesley; township in WashingU^n County, Ohio, and town in \Vai«hington County, 
Maine, named for John Wesiley, the folinder of Methodii?m. 

Wesson; town in Copiah County, Michijjran, named for Col. J. M. Wesson, its 
founder. 

West; town in Mclx^an County, Illinois, named for Henry West. 

West Baton Rouge; |>arish in Louisiana. See Baton Rouge. 

West Bend; city in Washington County, Wisconsin, so named because of the bend 
in Milwaukee River at this point. 

Westboro; town in Worcester County, Massachusetts, formerly a i>art of Marlboro, 
hence its name. 

Westby; village in Vernon Coimty, Wisconsin, named for O. T. West by, an early 
settler. 

West Carroll; parish in Louisiana, named for Charles Carroll of Carrolltoh. 

Westchester; county in New York, name<l from the town in England. 

West Creek; town in O^ean County, New Jersey. Derived from an Indian word 
meaning "i)lace to get meat." 

Westerlo; town in Albany County, New York, name<i for Rev. Kilanlus Westerlo, 
of Albanv. 

Westerly; town in Washington County, Rhode Island, so named because of its loca- 
tion in the most westerly part of the State. 

West Feliciana; parish in Louisiana. See EaM Feliciana, 

Westfleld; town in Hampden County, Massachusetts, so named because situated on 
the wefrt boundrv of an earlv survev. 

• • • 

Westhampton; town in Hampshire County, Massachusetts, so named because, until 

its incor|)f>ration, it was the west parish of Northampton. 
West Haverstraw: town in Rockland County, New York, named from har€rfttrau\ 

a Dutch word, originally written hacerstroo^ and meaning **oat straw." Believed 

to have been suggested by wild oats growing there. 
West Jersey; township and village in Stark County, Illinois, named by the first 

settlers from the State of New Jersey. 
Westminster; town in Worcester County, Massachusetts, named from the borough 

of London. 
Westmoreland; town in Pottawatomie County, Kansas, named from the county in 

Pennsylvania. 
Westmoreland; counties in Pennsylvania and Virginia, named from the county in 

England. 
Weston; town in Middlesex County, Massachusetts, and city in Platte County,. 

Missouri, so named because situated at the western edge of their respective 

counties. 
Weston; county in Wyoming, named for a man prominent in the building of rail- 
roads in eastern and northern Wyoming. 
Westphalia; village in Clinton County, Michigan, named from the province in 

German V. 
West Plains; city in Howell County, Missouri, so named l)ecause the settlement 

was in a prairie in a westerly direction from the nearest town. 
West Point; city in Troup County, Georgia, probably named from its location at 

the most westerly point of the Chattahooche River. 
West Point; town in Clay County, Mississippi, so named because of its location in 

the extreme westerly part of the county. 
West Point; United States military academy in Orange County, New York. The 

promontory known as Gees Point was called West Point by the early settlers on 

the opposite bank of the river, as in their descriptions they designated it as ** the 

point to the west." 

Bull. 258—05 21 



322 PLACE NAMES IN THE UNITED 8TATES. [bull. 258. 

Westport; town in Clatsop County, Oregon, named for John West. 

West Salem; town in Edwards County, Illinois, named by Moravian settlers from 
Salem, North Carolina. 

West Station; town in Holmes County, Mississippi, named for A. M. West, a promi- 
nent citizen and president of the Mississippi Central Railroad. 

West Stockbridge; town in Berkshire County, Massachusetts, named from its rela- 
tion to Stockbridge, of which it was originally a part. 

Westville; town in Simpson County, Mississippi, named for Col. Cato West. 

Westville; town in Chariton County, Missouri, named for Dr. William S. West, the 
first postmaster. 

Westville; town in Kershaw County, South Carolina, named for a prominent family. 

Wet; mountains in Colorado, so named because of the heavy rains upon them in the 
^ summer season. 

Wetmore; city in Nemaha County, Kansas, named for W. T. Wetmore, vice- 
president of the Central Branch, Union Pacific Railroad. 

Wettunka; city in Elmore County, Alabama, near the falls of the Coosa River. An 
Indian word meaning "waterfall," ** tumbling water." 

Wetzel; county in West Virginia, named for Lewis Wetzel, a noted pioneer and 
Indian fighter. 

Wewoka; stream, and village in Seminole Nation, in Indian Territory. An Indian 
word meaning "barking water." 

Wexford; county, and town in same county, in Michigan, probably named from the 
countv in Ireland. 

Weyauwega; village in Waupaca County, Wisconsin. Probably a corruption of 
the Indian word (Miawikaiiy "he embodies it," but, according to an other author- 
ity, it is the name of a trusted Indian guide in the employ of Governor Doty, the 
name meaning "whirling wind." 

Weyers Cave; town and cavern in Augusta County, Virginia, named for Bernard 
Weyer. 

Weymouth; town in Norfolk County, Massachusetts, named from the town in 
England. 

Wharton; county, and town in same county, in Texas, named for William H. and 
John A. Wharton, of a family prominent in the State. 

What Cheer; township and city in Keokuk County, Iowa, so named by a Scotch 
miner when he discovered coal in the vicinity. 

Whatcom; county, and town in same county, in Washington. An Indian word, 
said to mean "noisy water." 

Whately; town in Franklin County, Massachusetts, named for Thomas Whately, 
member of the board of trade. 

Wheatfield; town in Niagara County, New York, named from the general character 
of the locality — wheat produ